Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
RT TT TE LI I IT I TIE

ESTABLISHED 1895



Thousands Found

Harvbados

Burnt To Death
In Jungle Trees

In New Guinea Volcano

: PCRT MORESBY, Jan. 24
"THE FIRST Government official back from the

Mount Lamington area, told today of dead
bodies of natives hanging grotesquely from jungle
trees at the foot of the volcano.

Claude Champion, Assistant Government Sec-
retary, collapsed sobbing to the cround after telling
of the horrors of the jungle, turned into a grave-

yard for at least 3,000 natives and 35 Europeans.
He had visited Higaturu near the four peak voleano
which erupted last Thursday.
Champion, brother of Ivan Champion, Director of Dis-
trict Services in New Guinea, said that the natives had
apparently climbed the trees when the ground became too

hot to stand on.

Then as the temperature rose and the shower of flam

ing lava and ash continued,

branches.

B.G. Does Not
Deserve
Responsibility

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Jan. 14

Carlos Gomes, solicitor and
prominent Social Welfare worker
giving evidence before the Con-!
stitution Commission on Tuesday’
made a very conservative propo-
Bal which painted a picture of
the colony's political future des-,
eribed by Sir John Waddington, |
Chairman, as “gloomy’’.

His recommendations although
retaining Legislative and Execu
tive Councils in more or less
present forms gave the Governor’
conside: able increased power:

particularly in the matter o|!
money bills,
Dr. Rita Hinden, suggested

that the proposals would put the
Constitution considerably further)
back from the responsibility that
it already has. |

Gomes rep.ied “I do not see the}
colony deserving any responsibility
for another 50 years”.

Gormesalso miade a strong ples
for schools to return to the de-
nominational system as there was
a “decided decrease in the morals
of the community.”

In the evening session the
Commission heard a delegation
from the B.G. Labour Union who
proposed a unicameral Legisla-
ture whol: Sper dan: AMET
leader of the majority party a
Prime Minister who would choos |
seven Ministers. ;

The Governor’s powers wouid
be confined t> defence and exter
nal matters,

The union also favour universa’
adult suffrage from the age of
eighteen with elections every
four years.



Dutch Government
Resigns Office

THE HAGUE, Jan, 24.
The Dutch Government head
ed by Labour Minister Willem

Drees resigned to-day. ‘
They took collective Cabine'
responsibility for policy on west-
ern New Guirca—which Holland
disputes with Indonesia—the issue
which caused Dutch Foreign
Minister Dr. Dirk Stikker to

resign earlier in the day,
—Reuter.

SCARECROW 1951

LONDON.
Thomas Davies, 0!
Hertfordshire, |:
1951 version of a



Farmer
South Mimms,
trying out his
scarecrow,

It has a piece of
smouicers for eight
every 20 minutes an
firecracker explodes.

With each explosion the seare-
crow’s alms spring out, wave in
the air and then clatter back.

—i.N.S.

rope that
hours, and
attachec



they burned to death in thc

Champion wept as he told how
he found his fri and colleague
District Commissicner C. S. Cow
ley.

“I found
culskirts



Cowley dead on the
of Higaturu,” he said,

“He was sitting alone in a jeep | foreign policy

half-covered by ash.

Iiis 15-year-old son, Earl, was
lying in front of their bungalow
a few yards away on top of a
meund of ashes. Their bungalow
vas the only undamaged building







iy, the area. They must have been
exught as ihey were trying to
nke a run fer it.”





s A. Lonergan, Government
Secretary for New Guinea
he names of the victims would
be released in Canberra when thei
next of kin had been notified



4 . His hands|arations at meetings her
| weve up trying to shield his eyes.

—SAYS GOMES |

‘From Our Own Correspondent) |

said |

It was by no means certain that}

ali the yiesing had

pe'shed

Europeans
added

radio fr Popendetta that
uld tr to penetrate to the

centre of Higatyers this mor:

end search for further victir

All rescue parties said their
efforts were made dangerous by
suffocating pumice dust which
stirred up as they walked over it
Fiercely hot ashes beneath
dust.were a deadly tran
added.

Latest reports today tended to
confirm fears that only 12 of 244
people survived at the village of
Tsavita. Most of the victims were
natives.

Emergency camps and hospitals
established at Popendetta air strin

ing

they

ty enre for ref
twee natives have a serious hv
giene problem. Natives are sus




eptible to dysentery and it is
feared that there might be an out-
break of this disease.—Reuter

Come Together
Says Nehru

NEW DELHI, Jan. 24.

India’s Prime Minister Nehru

said to-day that the time had
come for representatives of the
powers concerned to meet to-
gether and discuss Far Eastern
problems instead of talking at
each other across thousands of
niles,

He said in a broadcast there

was a great opportunity to-day for
turning the ide of events not
only away from war but in the
direction of enduring peace.

Nehru appealed to the great na-
tions of the west to “cross this
doorstep of opportunity in search
of peace” and to the Asian na-
tions he expressed the hope that
they would stand by methods of
peace whatever happened

The proposal in the United
Nations to name China as an ag
gressor could not lead to peace
but only to an intensification of
conflicts, he said.

The Chinese Government’s clar-
ification of its earler reply t
the United Nations Political
Committee’s resolution made it

even more clear, Nehru said, that

they were desirous of negotia-

tions for peace in the Far East
—Reuter,



|
|

the}





|
|

SCENE in yesterday's Tennis Tournament at the Belleville Tennis Giub, This is the Mixed Doubles
Match between Miss D. Wood and Dr. G, Manning and Miss Benjamin fot in picture) and Mr. V
‘bout to strike ball). Dr. Manning and Miss Wood won the ganic.



Huts

British Labour
Leaders Discuss
loreign Policy

LONDON,
British Labour

Jan

dise

'
leaaet
and defence prep



Prime Minister Attlee made a
statement to the National Execu
tive of the Labour Party on fe:





eign affai the latest moves
the Far stern crisis and hi
Government’s reactions
During the Christm, recoss on
important section of the Party

has consolidated its
against any

position |
move to let Norean|



issues pass out of the phase of
negotiation, To these members|
Attlee's statement yesterday

brought reflief

When the Parliamentary La}
Party meets next Wedns
some will want a full discussion



yur
day



grovid patrol reported by | Of foreign policy
they |

Teday also Aneurin Bevan wa
to meet industrial and Trace
Union leaders for the firs! time «
Minister cf Lebour



They were to examine the im-|
plications of Britain's new rear
mament programme.

Many complex problems of |
manpower must be settled, includ. |
ing conflicting claims of services, |
coal mines and armis factories. |
The committee is also "Several|

{
|



to discuss “Order 1205.” Several
Unions have complained about the
working of this regulation

Leaders of the Trades Union|
Ccngress met first to consider their
attitude at a meeting with the!
Minister

Among reports before them was
one on the proposed release from
the forces of 5.000 ex-miners

Britain’s coal crisis was also the
subject of a meeting today be-|
tween Attlee, Philip Noel Baker
Minister of Fuel and Power, and
Ministers of the Republic of Ire
land who want Britain to increase
exports to Fire.—Reuter



Middle East Thinks |



THURSDAY,

A SMASHER

Bevin Has “Patel (iiersceeces
Of Pneumonia”

Ernest Bevin, British Foreign Secretary has a “patch of
ia” a Foreign Office spokesman said to-day

p“eumonia’

JANUAR?
JAN ae



He retired to bed with in

vin who is 70, developed'a chill during the visit of the
Commonwealth Prime Ministers to London and h:
out only a few engagements sce.

ON THE
° SPOT

LONDON

Lord Harry Duncan Me-
Gowan, prominent Lritish
industrialist told this story

ata London meeting to illus-
rate his views on industrial
relations:

A manager of a factory in
ScoUland said to one of the
“Willie, you have
been 50 years with the com-



workers,

pany; yuu have been a won
derful servant no com-
plaints against you——but




the
company’s rules i
worker must
years service
Willie scratched his head
and said to the manager:
“Retire? Retire after 50
years? My God, if I'd known
this was a_ temporary job,

I'd never taken it.” s
—LN.S,

are tha

a
retire after 50







Chinese Note
Reassuring
SAYS DELEGATION

NEW YORK, Jan. 24
A further message clarifying
the attitude of the Chinese Com-
munist Government's plans fox
feuce moves in the Far East was
received by the Indian delegation
i from



here New Delhi this after
} noon
The Indian delegation spokes

War With Russia |
Inevitable

WELLINGTON, W.Z., Jun. 24

A New Zealand surgeon wi |
vias known as “Doc’’ wnhile sery
ing under Marshal Tito during |
V/orld War II said on a visit j
his home-town that most peopit |
the Middle East believed war with |



Russia was inevitable.
Doctor L, S. Rogers, now Pro- |
fessor of Surgery at the Royal |}

: ae , od
School of Medicine in Bagdad,

said that the Middle East was at}

ussia’s merey. j

There was nothing to
Russians swinging down to control
the Persian Gulf, Suez Canal
the Mediterranean.

He said the Soviets also had
string of airfields across th
E.ashmir border ready to strike
Tndia.

Doctor Rogers served with Yu
goslavian forces in the Balkan
curing the second world war

—Renuter

top the}



EAGER TO RECEIVE

OLD PEOPLE receiving clothes at the Children’s
being distributed »y Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Husbands of

Goodwill Le

agune

f
New York and Mr, John Beckles



ternoon

yesterday a

an said the message was fairly
ngthy and was still being de
ded

From a glance at it, he

said

; | appeared from the Indian point
cf view,

reassuring.”
rhe me arrived at

ndian deleg

the
tion office two hours




















order would be jifted immediaiely
—Feucer.



Far



iron a





25, 1951



United

142 Dead In
Avalanches

OGENEV.:, Janva '

Great svalanene . fC.
steep mountain tace with th‘
speod of an express train tore the
esque “usin rilarunage
Heiligc 26.0. inty Wwe piece
Three separate avalanches
«dad ihe village They

shat

carried away the debris leay
hg scarcely a trace.

Reuter reports fron, Milan that
igers crowded littie churches
he Italian Alps today to pray

tor salvation from avalanches
sich have so tar killed 34 people
ud injured at least 50

Yesterday brought warm winds
loosening thousands of tons of
snow and ice and threatening
(urther disasters

trom Genéva comes the

huge mass of snow



report
began
u the Austrian Italian and
Pavarian Alps today threatening
Villages with a fresh series of
uvalanches.

In Innsbruck, Austria, where
week-end falls cut off water sup
plies, houses in one suburb were

LONDON, Jan. 24

being evacuated because of the
fresh peril
Avalanches also began rolling

renza yesterday today in Allgau Alps on the Aus-
tr.an-German border as the
temperature rose, a Reuter cable
yveported from Augsburg

Weather stations in Bavaria
d that several avalanches had
ciashed from tbe steep siopes of
the Austrian end of the valley

carried

é 1¢ pasi year be ha
variety of

suffered
complaints

spi ais ni ak: i ceealltehetsnsereeecnniata ta ciatacecaiiti



belic ved largely due to over ‘
eee work. | near one village without causing
L...i May and June he under- |] 7 The lat ficial ¢
wen! operations. in @ London la Tage: ie Lad Py oe aN " "A ,
i ¥ ‘ al > “% é s
}@inic for heamorrhoids ‘and for it * cs eat ern
; we i 2 »
}aneal fistula When he left the |“ "5 Wash mpous people
\ i nissing.
al a ier more than a mont said c r
a St ae tees et Reports from Klagenfurt,
o mucn tainner that his A
mt aE : Austria said that British soldiers
S ippeared to b¢ LAN BIN’ j
folds. tard Austrian Gendarmes climb
But after convalescence he was |! ve deep eX ae
reported io be much fit‘e: yr ached 1e winter camps 0
jrower company workers near
He has long suifered from! Parstez glacier on the Gross
low blood pressure and though fa ockner
hig heart was regarded as organ- They took bandages
ic@Uy send, his physical bulls | supplies and radio transmitters!
has undoubtedly placed — strain | for 120 villagers marooned in |
upon it, ;eamp for tive davs Reuter

During the Commonwealth con-
Oo ncestt) Colombe. Hiet garredtry:
sevin's health condition

Estime Given

was 80

low that a special chair was used

to carry him up the steps of

«

the

Asylum By Busta

(From Our

onference hall,

The illness of Ernest Bevin will Own Correspondent)

renew agitation for his replace- a ah cee Senne r
ment by a younger man, political [Bat resident Dumarsais istime
quarters felt here to-dav of Haiti was granted one month
| asylum in Jamaica today as the
Prime Minister Attlee has ignor-| Hon. W. A. Bustamante moved
ed Such agitation in the past in Jon his behalf after emissaries of |
the hope that Bevin would recover} the Haitian Government had al
full health. | most succeeded in getting the
During his prolonged local Government to bar his entry

t is
taxe charge of the Foreign Office

State is its

(

U.S., U.K. Not
Aiding France |:



ACHESON HAS HIGH HOPES

into the Island. One man Lucien
Chauvet, Director of the Office of
A Foreign Office spokesmar | Sout and Development of the
to-d | ; Export Corporation of Haiti at

aid to-day that Bevin wa till! ice i
ehnieally in tie |present is in Jamaica ostensibly
n Office F 'to study commerce methods, but
Kennet! M ,{ actually there to keep an eye on
; pe nrater “OF was put into protective

, | Estime,
custody by C.I.D. men when he

usual for Attlee

absences
himself t |

charge of For-
Younger,

executive head

eputised for Bevin at yesterdays | visited S.S. Colombie, the ship on
abinet meeting. jwhich Estime and his family
—Kouter, travelled from France this morn-



ng. He was later released but
police suspect a plot here to
assassinate the ex-President, and
mm Bustamante'’s orders have in-
‘stituted plain clothes protection
Estime, his wife and two
| children.
| Estime hopes to be able to stay
in
|









I ; Pe] ‘
before 12 Asian and Arab nations , E h Jamaica, but if he cannot, he
were to meet to concert their | noug |} will go on to Cuba or the United
t lans to move their second refused States
resolution in the Political Com PARIS, Jan. 24 The Haitian Government told
mittee Minister for the Associated} the local Government that he in-
The Indian spokesman said it|5tates of Indo-China, Jean Lé-|tends to use this island as a
was likely that the new message |tourneau, complained here to-day) spring-board to regain power in
would be shown to the group. |that American and British Com-| Haiti and asked his deportation
The Indian delegation spoke: nwealth Governments were not| Bustamante says: “We will not be
man said copies of the message | giving France sufficient “strate dictated to by the Haitian Gov-
had apparently been received also) cic and ciplomati upport ir}ernment.” Three months before
| bv the Prime Ministers of Brit- | Indo-China Estime’s disposition in May 1949
in France and Canada He was talking to journalists} Bustamante _ visited Haiti as a
—Reuter. Mt 5 Preset Press neon -|guest of Estime and was warmly
aimee f & to think we could | welcomed by the ex-President on
lefend France on the Rhine if the! his embarkation, after being de-
Police Seize [ine a2rsseging us jriumphed | cained on board nip for six hours
4 . ; ; The fronts of freedom are inter
Paris Newspapers |sepensent. Cam sure our Bei) yyy ;
ish and American allies are get I wo Investigate
PARIS, Jan. 24. ting more aware every day of :
All copies of today’s Communist! the international aspect of this e
newspapers Humanite and Liber. | fight for freecom of the Asse- Jamaica Malady
aticn were seized by police “for | clated States of Indo-China (From Our Own Correspondent)
tieating ¢ ateu assemblage se serpy , o¢
$ gist oi ple ~— : on a | Strategic solidarity on a worl) The G KINGSTON, Jan 24.
f the p i in scale imposes duties «1 a 1e Government pathologist has
erior said. 30. gives us: right been joined by Dr. Kenneth Hill,
ice seized copies at printing! “pt ! Allstd. chic : 53 the University College of the
press fore they ere t ke , a, neryl De 1 bey De teeters West Indies in investigations start-
rough realer| fench Con 2 ander” ae eae ed in connection with the vomiting
area : z ae Pia P, “| sickness which has claimed nearly
h rd es soe then . id aa 200 lives in Jamaica in the past
f the i \ Te Proside*t 17 var oa three weeks, 40 in Montego Bay
t newsy i r Prime Minist Rer ‘| The investigation is being carried
for today, try | plays tt Vashinat rors poet | out at the island famed tourist re-
‘ lniterior 4 tid ary a8 af. wre ey mm Janu- om woes fhe penviont incigegs
» i oly c ic Zz is tak Z ace 8
Pr aries ae { al De Lattre placed Al'srd at Plev- HE ye eastriaatod - Chov arn
stair rom “inst MIChOUS | ¢ disposal to give up-to-minute! ment to send an appeal to the
mblag of the people th “iils of the military situation| World Health Organisation asking

needs
—Reuter,

i Indo-China’s for expert assistance to solve that

annual cold weather malady





Unity Of Free World







ticn in the Korea war ister Nehru in a broadcast to
Acheson seemed undisturbed day.
h weekly Press conference Acheson was asked if he was
widespread pr reports of confident that the United Na-
spit over the Far Eas- tions General Assembly would
tf mm policy Between the United accept* the United State reso
Stat anc other North Atlantic lution and declare Communist
io particularly Britain China as the aggressor
He said he expected actior
He epeatedly declined. to would be taken some tin thi
¢ tly howe ‘ week:in the United Nati He
reports or on the added he had high hope rr)
it r ade b British ‘re United States coulk re
ti \ttlee to the serve unity and that the '
c i yesterday Nations would go forward witi
and the Indian Prime Min- aetion taken Reuter



literally |
ind some cotiages to fragments |

medical{tion he occupied for so long as a












PRICE FIVE CENTS

Nations Move



Into Wonju Again

TOKYY, Jan. 24
UNIvs0 NATIONS battalion with reinforce
meuts today moved back into Wonju, the
communications centre in Southern Korea, which
has changed hands several times in the past week.
For the past few days United Nations troops
have moved into Wonju each day and withdrawn to
a more tenable situation by night. Fighting flared
up in the western central sector this morning as
two Chinese platoons occupied the hill north of

Kumyabgijinigini, 10 miles south of Seoul.
Another platoon dug in on a hill
ge south of the town,
. » A Chinese company attacked an
Mac Arthur W ill Be Allied patrol probing towards

~ ry | Kumyabgijinigini.
il To-morrow Strongly armoured United Na-
5 al “ tions patrols today continued
Kiekatt ie eae sweeping roads and tracks north
3 a as acé ‘i > acros ;
will celebrate his seventy-first os Se een rae
birthday on Friday against wide- =ones tear Ge ss tet f cane
spread discussion in the United |° Mor aa - oie “ee a :
States of his competence as United ore than , ore PECOHS
Nations Commander in Korea and hiding in the hills and valleys by
as top American Genera! in the|@®y and raiding isolated villages
Far East t night were reported operating
Since his armies have met set- | behind the central eastern sector
backs in Korea American maga-|in rugged, sparsely populated

country suited to guerilla opera-
tions. Aggressive United Nations
patrols throughout the western
sector to the north of Osan and

zines and newspapers have made
increasingly numerous critical re-
ferences to the General

There has been a severe drop in



his prestige and authority in]Ichon failed to make any contact
Washington, according to observ-] with Chinese troops.

ers here since his abortive “end

the war” offensive in November| An Army spokesman said today
was followed by two months of [that 1,500 North Koreans includ-

retreat by United Nations forces, }ing 500 women volunteers were
‘To-day” one source said, “Mac- | reported six miles south of Yong-
Arthur does not even exercise final |wol on Saturday. This force was
authority over military operations |said to contain elements of the
in his theatre. His war planning |Second, Third and Eleventh North
is under close supervision by the | Korean Divisions,
Joint Chiefs of Staff Two days later 30 North Ko-
“Also there is direct liaison be- |rean officers were reported in the
tween Joint Chiefs in Washing-|same area. Late yesterday after-
ton and General Ridgway at 8th} noon an estimated 75 to 100 Com-
Army headquarters, : S munists dug in on a hill about 2
The most important feature of miles north-east of Wonju and
this is that the Joint Chiefs of United Nations artillery opened
Staff now express their views five ay them 7 P
about plans for the Korean cam- ‘ ee Juni
paign more forcefully than they Allied forces pushed to the crest
of the hill and ten minutes later

ever felt free to do previously “*
“General MacArthur has all the | @stablished contact with Commu-
rists moving down the north-east

authority enjoyed by any military
Commander but the special posi- |e! the slope.

Today’s Eighth Army commu,
nique said that United Nations
patrols made aggressive patrols
and improved their defensive posi-
tions along the west front in the
lest 12 hours without contacting
\ the enemy.

Allied planés spotted many small
boats in Ansan Estuary, a few
miles south-west of Seoul yester-
day morning and in the afternoon

WASHINGTON, Jan, 24 patrols went in and destroyed 13

United States Secretary of| of them.

State Acheson to-day rejected as On the central front, United
‘brazen effrontery” what he call-| Netions patrols fought an estimat-
ed 100 Communists 2 miles north-

power in his own right has gone
with the legend of his military in-
vineibility.”

—KReuter, |



Acheson Rejects
Soviet Charges



‘ Specivus ad false Calg, . “| Pe :
made against Western Allies by] east of Yoju, Gomansnies ee
the Soviet Union in Soviet notes | U5!"8 — Stare automatic
to Britain and France on Janu weapons and mo ‘Ss, .
ary 20 pe ; : After a short fierce fight United
He said at his weekly press| Nations patrols disengaged and

withdrew to Yoju. American

conference that Soviet charges that} } vtaderjet fighters damaged three

Sesboned Soa was oe elton and probably destroyed one of a

tions which were completely un flight of 16 to 20 Communist
M1G 15 jet fiehters which at-

wue tacked ther to-day,.—Reuter,

tte said that the West had point
ed out many times that the founda-
ticn of the North Atlantic Pact
wa. one of collective self-defence
which was recognised in the
United Nations Charter
—RKeuter,

“And ’'ve smoked

them ever since!”





TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT













tI

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first du Maurier is quite

a revelation. They showed |

me quite a new standard

of enjoyment,”’ an
| |

“T've never found anything
else so cool and smooth —
and I expect you'll say I
smoke far too many.”

**You can’t have too many du Maurier
with this little filter tip to protect your
throat. Besides it adds enormously to
the flavour.”’

“And the result —given
the finest tobacco in the
first place—is superb.”



$1.00 for 50
There'll never be a better cigarette

du MAURIER

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PAGE TWO

aia



ARIB spent an _ interesting
twenty minutes yesterday

morning chatting with the “Wan-
dering Wainwrights” who have
been in Sarbados since November
1950. (

Thomas B. Wainwright, better
kniown to his friends as “Tibi” was
President of Canadian Bronze
Powder Works and _ Director
of International Bronze Pow-
der Works ‘in Montreal, when
he retired in April 1950. He
has been coming to Barbados
regularly for thirty years on
business visiting their agents here.

Soon after he retired, he bought
an English car and spent fourteen
weeks touring the Eastern US.
and Eastern Canada taking mov-
ing pictures as a souvenir of their
visit.

They returned to Montreal in
time to catch the Canadian Con-
structor on Novemebr 10th when
she sailed for Barbados. They
olan to remain here until May.

“Tibi” is a man of many hob-
bies. He collects stamps, old coins,
likes fishing, golf and most of all,
taking moving pictures. He has
recently started taking stil] photo-
graphs as well. His wife takes
a keen interest in all of his hobbies.
They are an ideal couple, They
have one son, twenty-six-year-old
Gordon Wainwright. Gordon is
six feet three inches tall. Among
other things he is a two handicap
golfer.

When I was shown into their
hotel room at the Enmore Hotel,
“Tibi” was pounding a typewriter.
“Every day I keep a diary uf the
day’s events and any interesting
happenings. Once a week, my
wife and I go on a picnic to one
of the out of the way spots on
the island. “Invariably we get
lost, but we get a lot of good pic-
tures,” he said

At present he is mating a mov-
ing picture study of the flowers
in Barbados which he will take
with him back to Canada, How-
ever, not knowing the names of the
flowers here he is finding it hard
to edft. He is trying to locate
someone here who has illustrations
of local flowers to help him out.

Mr. Wainwright has with aim
his own projector and sereen and
has given several shows since he
has been here. He has shown
his trip through Canada and a
reel of Barbados. ;

Before leaving the West Indies
Mr. and Mrs. Wainwright plan to
make the round trip to Jamaica
on the Colombie and re-visit
Tobago which they visited some
time ago:

Bronze Powder Works is repre-
sented in forty-five countries. Mr.
Wainwright has visited all of them
and likes the West Indies best.





E The wandering, Wein

CX 4 r.\/
, Sonal VP) )
4 4 “AS et



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Looking For Talent

_â„¢ GODDARD, after playing

in the Old Boys’ Cricket
match at Lodge School yesterday,
leaves this morning for St. Lucia
on a short visit, He is looking
for cricket talent on behalf of the
West Indies Cricket Board.

Here For Two Months

R. AND MRS. P. Ww

LAVERICK of London, Eng-
land, are now in Barbados for
two months’ holiday. They
travelled out to Trinidad on the
S.S. Brazil and arrived here on
Monday afternoon by B.W.I.A
It is their first visit to the island
and they are staying at the Ocean
View Hotel.

Mr. Laverick is Managing Di-
rector of Line Equipment Ltd.,
electrical manufacturers of Lon-
don.

Short Visit

M* BRIAN DUGGEN, repre-
sentative of MeNabb Rou-
gier & Co., of England, who spent
a few days in Barbados left iv
terday afternoon by B.W.1.A.
for Trinidad.

Leaving on the same plane were
Mrs. Dorothy Robinson and her
two children, Her husband Mr.
Jack Robinson, Managing Director
of H. E. Robinson & Co., in Port
of Spain, who was also.in Barba-
dos returned to Trinidad on Mon-
day.

Spent Honeymoon Here

M* AND MRS. George Carter
who were spending their
honeymoon in Barbados, returned
to Trinidad yeterday afternoon by
B.W.LA.

George who is the son of Mr.
and Mrs, W. H. Carter of “Ever-
ton” St. George, is with T.L.L.
stationed at Forest Reserve, South
Trinidad,

Old Boys

HARLIE TAYLOR made 94
runs yesterday afternoon,
the highest score in the Old Boys
versus the Schoo] match at the
Lodge. The old boys, two of
whom, John Goddard and Roy
Marshall, have represented the
West Indies. made 294 to the
School’s 143.

After the match John and Ro:
were presented with engraved sil-
ver cigarette boxes, and Mr. W. A.
Farmer, the Headmaster, express-
ed the school’s pride in their
achievements.

Chatting with the sportsmaster
Carib discussed the possibility of
the Lodge taking part in inter-
school swimming matches, The
difficulty is transportation, and it
is obvious that the school needs
a swimming pool—what about it
Old Boys?



BY THE WAY....

HARLIE SUET is at the mo-
ment dealing with a letter
from a Mrs. Wybrow, who says
that when she applied to the local
controller for a permit to turn on
the electric light to look for a
piece of coal, she was told to turn
on the gas for 30 seconds and light
a candle from it.

She said that she had no priority
licence to buy candles, so she was
told to look for the bit of coal by
the light of a match. The matter
was taken up by the Regional
Board, who told her to look for the
bit of coal by daylight. The Cen-
tral Office sent her a form to fill
in, asking where she got the bit of
coal, what was its size, weight and
texture, whether her grandmother
was alive, and, if not, what was
her religion. By the time Suet
himself took the affair in hand,
Mrs. Wybrow was being prosecut-
ed for reer. an electric torch
to look for the bit of coal.

Murder at Muckhurst (Ill)
“DERHAPS the horse could have

come down the chimney,”
suggested Sir Bartley. “Only if it
lived on the roof,” retorted Mal-
practice satirically. He then rap-
ped out, “Do you recognise the
horse?” “No,” said Sir Bartley.
“Tt don't come from round here,"
said Bucket. “Well, I presume it
wasn't dropped from a plane,” re-
torted the sleuth. The arrival of

the vet., Mr. Porter Bobster, put
an end to this nonsense. Having
examined the defunct gee-gee, Mr.
Bobster said gravely, “This poor
beast was killed by the most pow-
erful and unpleasant African poi-
son known to science. It is a poi-
son concocted from wuppa wuppa

berries.” “But nobody could have
entered the room,” rapped out
Malpractice. “Everything was

locked on the inside?

“Does it oceur to you,” said the
vet., “that someone must have got
in to lock the room on the inside?
A room doesn’t lock itself on the

inside.” It had not occurred to
anyone, “That’s a point,” said
Malpractice ungrudgingly. “We

must find out how the poison was
administered,” said the vet. “Per-
haps in this here,” said Bucket,
who had been oe on the floor.
He held up a chipped cup, The
vet. took one sniff. “This cup,”
he said, “contained enough wuppa-
yore poison to kill the entire

Take Your Choice,
Mr, Meat

MAN whose name is Meat is

so sick of being jeered at

that he wants to change his name
to “something unusual.” Allow
me to offer him a small selection
of possible names: Taddimath-
wind, Grefilbird, Elengener de





Due February 3rd
YOUNG ladies have

Gave

been asking me, when is
H.M.S. Devonshire arriving in
Barbados, Devonshire is due here
on Sunday, February 3.

On board are 245 cadets, in-
cluding two from the Royal Aus-
tralian Navy, seven from the
Royal New Zealand Navy, six
from the Ceylon Navy and eight
from the Burmese Navy.

With Singer Co.

RS. OLGA DOPSON and Miss
1 Eileen Luces who are with
the Singer Sewing Machine Co.,
in Trinidad returyed to Trinidad
yesterday afternoon by B.W.LA,
after a short visit. Mrs, Dopson
is with their San Fernando Branch
and Miss Luces ig attached to theiv
branch in Port of Spain.

While here they were staying at
the Aquatic Club’s Guest Rooms.
From Halifax

AYING THEIR FIRST visit to

the island are Mr. and Mrs.
A. J. Hustins and Mr, and Mrs.
Cc. G. Cleveland ‘of Halifax, Nova
Scotia, who arrived on the Lady
Nelson on its last trip here, They
have come out’ for five weeks’
holiday and are staying at the
Ocean View Hotel.

Mr, Hustins is President of
Arthur J. Hustins Enterprises,
while Mr, Cleveland is in the
Real Estate business.

Annual Reunion

a AND DAUGHTERS of the

Barbados Benevolent Society
ot America celebrated its 38th

annual reunion at a dance held
in Rockland Palace, New York,
last week. James Lashley as

Chairman and Clarence Lashley
vice-Chairman, headed the dance
committee responsible for the
success of the party.

This society was organised by
the Honourable James N. Car-
rington, on Sunday, Sept. 7th,
1913, He called together Evans
Willoughby, W. E. Best, James
Payne, Beresford Ward, Gerald
Whittingham, Samuel Hinds,
James Hall, Sylvasta Banfield,
Samuel Garner and Mrs. Edith
Willoughby, who became _ the
Lady Patron, They brought the
Society into being.

The specific purpose of the
Society is to aid the sick, and tu
help in burying the dead. As
Barbadians traverse the seven
seas, the founders made the laws
to include their offspring wherever
born.

Staying With Relatives

R. KEITH

MELVILLE,
son of the Rev.
and Mrs, Harold
Melville left yes-[)
terday afternoon] ¥
by B.W.LA. to
spend two weeks
holiday with re- Ff
latives in Trini-§&
dad. Mr. Melville
is studying Optics KEITH MELVILLE
in Dr, Harcourt Carter’s Optical
Laboratory where, in 1912, was
installed the first lens surface-
grinding plant in the B,W.1.

Dancing Unlimited

ISS JOAN RANSOM who is

due to arrive from England
on Sunday afternoon via Jamaica
will be taking over the Madame
Bromova Dancing School from
Molly Radcliffe who retires on her
arrival,

Miss Ransom holds the licen-
tiate of the Royal Academy of
Dancing of London and is a fully
qualified teacher. She not only
teaches ballet but ballroom, Greek
and other types of dancing. The
school hopes to extend its sylla-
bus with additional classes in
these types of dancing.

It is understood that the school
is being purchased from Madame
Bromova and will be turned into
a limited liability company,

Madame Bromova will still take
an interest in the school and she
will be one of the shareholders.



eece By Beachcombe:

Bowlgie, Gockliches, Tiffpin, Bur-
bulpipple, Quamhen, Sockticket,
Dilatatatoe, Smoil, Scrisangulsle,
Borthcork - Zizzlett, Keigaloop,
Frashaharoshson, Pudolkerough,
Mumph, Ifode, Crubhidden-Crub-
hidden.

Do You Lack Polish ?

N writing of a lady pianist that

she lacked polish, a music

critic was, perhaps inadvertently,
boosting Snibbo. There is no ex-
cuse for any woman to lack polish
when the small tube of Snibbo
will make her shine from head to
foot. Experiments have shown
that you can read a book by a face
properly smeared with Snibbo, Or
shave yourself in ii, vided the
owner of the face will stand still,

Top Floor

F OU,” said the white hunter’s





wife to the absent-minded
professor who hai , shot a very
short elephant (3ft. 6in.). “have

an elephant like & :nesory.” “And
you,” replied the professor, “ have
a back of a bus like a face.”

Oddly enough c's ‘oa
Attic
ND now I kiss my reader

goodnight, pack up my traps

(one mouse, four man—and a

small snare), ard make my final

bow (I'm going to make arrows
for it too),
Oh, well.

iiliaadiiinse-tilidinssedi Lisa hy 2 iit
BEEBE EER RB RP Ree eee 8 .



a FOBRALCO

A TOOTAL PABRIC

“NAMRIT” Tobralco and
LYSTAV newly opened at

Evans and Whitfields

' VISITORS &

DECORATIVE

are invited to call and Inspect our
fine Range of

ROYAL DOULTON CHINA FIGURES &

FLORAL CHINA BASKET

COLLECTORS

0) gee weceees em eemeewed

;
i
i
‘
:
i

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



(By HELEN BURKE)

Many housewives these 8,
besides bachelors and career p> ig
are faced with the problem of
cooking on ohe gas ring or an
electric hotplate. It takes bingen.
uity, but many delicious meals can
be prepared.

All the really interesting egg
dishes—serambled, omelettes and
steamed souffles — are “ring-
cooked.” So are steamed fish with
celicious sauces, mussels (done in
several ways), fried fish, fish frit-
ters and fish cakes of all kinds.
And there is no better way of
cooking herrings than gently
poaching them.

At the moment, the most néur-
ishing fried fish are sprats—an
excellent “buy” at 8d. a pound,

There are a dozen corned-beef
recipes and, provided he can get
finely ground steak, not even thi
best chefs need more than «@
cooking ring for hamburgers.

One _ of my favourite dishes,
Steak Diane, is cooked in a frying-
pan and so is liver, which is best
cooked this way: Cover the thir
Slices with boiling water. Leave
for a few minutes, then drain and
slowly fry them in a mere smear
of fat. Kidneys, too—devilled
curried or with rich mushroom or
Madere sauce—are ring-cooked,

Incidentally, the one-ring cook
would do well to invest in a pres-
sure pan—both to extend her
“repertoire” and to economise in
fuel, Further, with a pressure pan,
there is no difficulty in keeping
food hot,

Tea-breads
You can even bake scones or

»ther tea-breads on a ring or plates

First, heat slowly and thoroughly
whatever you are going to use—
a griddle (girdle), thick frying-
pan or the griller hotplate or you
full-sized electric cooker (this at
“medium,” turning it to “low’’)

B.B.C. Radio |
Programme

THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 1951

7.00 a.m, The News; 7.10 a.m, News
Analysis; 7.15 a.m, From The Editorials;
7.25 a.m. Programme Parade; 7.30 a.m,
Generally Speaking; 7.45 a.m. Listeners
Choice; 8.00 a.m. Land and Livestock;
8.30 am. Raymond Nilsson; 8.45 a.m,
Your Body and Its Enemies; 9.00 a.m.
The News; 9.10 am. Home News From
Britain; 9.15 a.m, Close Down; 11.15 a.m.
Programme Parade; 11,30 a.m, Songs of
Burns; 11.45 a.m. Special Dispatch; 12.00
noon The News; 12.10 p.m. News
Analysis; 12.15 p.m, Close Down; 4.15
p.m. Listeners Choice; 5.00 p.m. Com-
poser of the Week; 5.15 D.m. Seottish
Magazine; 5.45 ae: Spa_ Orchestra; 6.
p.m, How To Give A Party; 6. mn,
Musie From British Films; 6.45 p.m. Pro-
gramme Parade; 7.00 ne The News;
7,10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.15 p.m. We
See Britain; 7.45 p.m, Generally Speak-
ing; 8.00 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m.
Paul Temple And The Vandyke Affair;
8.45 p.m, Songs Of Burns; 9.00 p.m.
Special Dispatch; 9.15 p.m. Hallo Aus-
tralia; 9.45 p.m, Do You Remember:
10,00 p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m. From
The Editorials; 10.15 p.m. Take It From
Here; 10.45 p.m, Taxi-ing Around With
aoe Hodge; 11.00 p.m, Republic Day
-India,

CROSSWORD



Across








1. You may solve this Sy mete
chance. (9) a

6. Become aware. (7)

v. le to agitation of mind. (9:

435 by aceldeas or design? (4

1. re, $8)

14. Half seove Dy a Welsh seaside
resort it

lo. Should make it third hand. (6)

17. The one to commit 10 Down. (3)

19. IN take a bet for the second
letter. (4)

21. Give a cart room for this. (5-3)

22, Unpleasant sound, (4)

23. He's a pal, (4)

Down

1, Lean over, (4)

2. HSADproyvel of replaced potters.
(7) 3. Such folk are mine. (3)

4. To do this might be waste of
time, (5)

5. Pictorial parable, (6)

7. Stride from the pole. (4)

8 Dance. (5)

10, Rat nose. (anag., 7)

12. Ghostly. (6)

13. Two brothers of this name told
tales. (5) .

16. Overseas money. (4)

18. Makes an end of rabbits, (4)

20. To @ saint it’s a date. (3)
Solution of vesterday’s puzzle Across:

1, Vesver: 7, Elucidate: 9. Sound: 10.

Ente; 11, Queen: dirtt

cemie; 17, Unit

“1,.Even, 22. Need

2, Eloquent, fe

Stirring: 6,

14, Actor:
















i






It works fast
and tastes nice!






~—while you get on with the mix-
ing of the scones or cakes.

Here are some of my favourites,
most of which are best eaten hot:

‘Singin’ Hinnies’

These are so rich that they
“sing” about it as they bake. Rub
(but not too finely) 4o0z. lard or
ard and butter into 802. self-
raising flour and a pinch of salt.
Add, if you like, 40z. cleaned
currants and just enough milk to
make a stiff dough. Roll out to
quarter-inch thick and either cut
inte rounds or leave in one piece.

Rub a little saltless fat over the
well-heated frying—pan, griddle or
griller hotplate. Baie the ‘Hinnies’
on this until the undersides are
pale brown. Turn and cook the
other sides, then, for good
measure, give them another turn,
Split, butter and eat at once.

Scotch Pancakes

Rub a good walnut of margar-
ne into two teacups plain flour
sifted with a teaspoon cream of
tartar, half teaspoon bicarbonate
of soda and a pinch of salt. Add
a tablespoon of castor sugar. Stir
n one egg, beaten with a teaspoon
golaen syrup and less than quarter
pint milk. Add a few drops lemon
cssence,

Drop dessertspoons or table-
spoons on to the greased hot
surface, turn with a palette knife
as soon as the undersides are warm
brown, and do the other sides.
Pass butter with these.

Potato Scones
Sieve together 3o0z. self-raising
{lour and half teaspoon salt. Rub

Hat Trick

LONDON,
Suannequin Ann South appear-
ed before 40 fashion experts at
® London spring hat show wear-
ing a satin skull cap in the form
cf pink leaves, with two tea roses
at the front.

She had finished her parade
amid exclamations of “charming
. delightful style.”
Then the commentator, Gino
Davis, discovered the hat was on

back to front.

Following a hasty conference
Azn turned the hat round, with
the roses following the spring
trend at the back of the head.
—“Even more charming,” was tie
comment of the experts.

—LN.S.

Batonka Girls

LONDON.

A London “Daily Express” re-
port from Bulawayo tells of the
latest beauty treatment being tried
by the girls of the Batonka Tribe
near the Zambesi River f

The local witch doctor has
persuaded them that to have six
front upper teeth is zebra-like.

The girls are now queueing tc
have him knock their teeth otit.
He does it in one hit—with a
stone axe,

They pay the witch doctor in
beads and feathers.

eee,





—iLN.S.







Saying goodbye to Gaffer Jarge,
Rupert gets through the fence aud
presses on. “*Why on earth did
Rosalie run away from the con-
stable?" he murmurs. ‘* And why

is she going this way? It leads no-
where.’ Then he gives a. start.

"Yes, does. | quite forget

om

GOO

PLEASE BELIEVE

And

SECRET LAND



Opening To-morrow, 5.00 & 8.30 p.m.
Abbott & Costello in “THE FOREIGN LEGION”

‘ COS PEOES







POCESODPS PSPSPS SSSSS9 POPS SSSSS SOE

GLOBE

To-day, 5.00 & 8.30.

099556696S4490S8O%



Cooking on a ring?

Then try
Bisa gis “these ...

2oz. butter or margarine into them.
Rub half pound cooked mealy
potatoes through the sieve and
work the flour mixture into them.
Roll out quarter inch thick, cut
into rounds and bake both sider
on the greased surface (8—10
minutes in all). Split, spread with
butter and eat as soon as possible.

Syrup Sultana Scones

Rub an ounce of butter into
half pound self-raising flour,
sifted with quarter teaspoon salt.
Work in a_ tablespoon (golden
syrup, 207. cleaned sultanas and
enough milk (about half cup) to
make a soft dough. Roll out to
quarter inch thick, cut into rounds
and bake as above.

Crumpets

Mix half oz. bakers’ yeast with
a little tepid milk and water,
taken from a scalded pint. When
well mixed, add the remaining
liquid and stir in one pound plain
flour to which has been added a
teaspoon ealt and a pinch of bicar-
bonate of soda, Beat very wel
for 5—6 minutes, then put in a
warm enough place, covered, to
rise for just under an hour. Beat

Place greased crumpet rings on
a@ well-greased moderately heated

‘iddle or large frying-pan and

il them quarter inch deep with
the batter. Bake until the bubbles
which form are set, then remove
the rings, turn the crumpets,
bubbled sides down and finish off
the cooking,—L.E.S.

MARCH
PARTIES

LONDON.
King George VI and Queen
Elizabeth are jumping the gur
on London’s social season this
year by holding two presentation
parties at Buckingham Palace ir:
March,



The London season does not
begin until May and since the war
cebutantes have always been
presented at garden parties during
that month.

March presentations are not
however, without precedent. in
1935 and again in 1939 evening
courts were held in March,

The King and Queen have many
public engagements in May and
palace spokesmen imply
March
month for the parties this year.

Scottish debutantes are nei
affected by these arrangements

They will attend a presentation
party at the Palace of Holyrood-
house on June 25. The King and
Queen and Princess Margaret will
be in residence at the palace from

June 21, to 28.

English debutantes
mothers are already
dressmakers to choose outfits for
their presentation.

In past years most girls bought
a new garden party dress and hat
which
could be worn throughout the
summer. This year they have to
buy a different type of outfit for

for their presentation,

an indoor party in, March.
AÂ¥e. INS.





There's a short cut to Nutwood

Station through these fields!’ At
that moment he catches sight of
the tiny figure d.wn below making
straight for the station, and at his
best speed he gives chase so that
he gets near enough to see her run
on to the platform without a porter
hottie

Last Showing
ME (Deborah KERR

(Robert TAYLOR)



GARDENERS !

{Save Your Plants ftom Insect
Pests by the use of a - - -



THIS SPRAYER IS ALSO SUITABLE FOR USE



COTTON FACTORY LTD.




that
is the “most convenient’

and their
visiting

25,

THURSDAY, JANUARY 1951

ES
AQUATIC CLUB CUNEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT AT 8.30
ROSALIND RUSSEL!

in “THE VELVET TOUCH”

also Starring

Claire TREVOR :o: Sydnes

COMMENCING pinnag on Ens
Ceell B. de Mille’s “CLE I
COLBERT :o: Warren WILLIAM :o: Henry WILCOXON
A Paramount Picture



Leo GENN :o: GREENSTREET

Starring Claudette



>



=





PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

RKO RADIO'S Big Technicolor Adventure
Last 2 Shows TODAY 445 and 630 p.n
Douglas FAIRBANKS Jr. Maureen O'HARA = in
“SINBAD THE SAILOR” . ea é -
Also The Short Leon ERROL in “DON'T POOL zat ® WIFE



Th FRIDAY (Spécial Mat.) 4:45 p.m. (only)
“PREDDIE STEPS OUT" (By Request)
Freadie STEWART ond The TEENAGERS

+: and i-
Tom KEENE in “DYNAMITE CANYON’
———$———_

Mat, TODAY. 1.30 pin
“BELOW THE DEADLINE”
with Warren Dougias and

“RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL”
with Tom KEENE



Opening Friday “THE INSPECTOR GENERAL”

|
SSS SSS See ooo
;

PLAZA Theatre=OISTIN (DIAL 8404)

Last 2? Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. (Warner's Double)
& “WINGS FOR THE EAGLE”



“LARCENY INC.”



Ed. G. Robinson Dennis Morgan — Ann Sheridan
Jane Wyman
FRID: SAT: SUN: — 5 & 8.30 p.m MIDNITE SAT. 27th (RKO-Radio)
RKO.-Radio’s Double Thriller ! ! Tim Holt, (in Beth)
“ROSEANNA McCOY" and





DIAN AGENT” ana
George O'Brien in - - - :

Zane G
“MARSHAL OF MESA CITY" +

3
INDER MUOUNTAIN"









qQANET Y—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

Lact Show To-NITE 6.30 (RKO PADIO’S Double)
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY—8.30 P.M. ‘RKO-Radio Double Feature)

&







Tim Holt in - - -
“STAGECOACH

: Mat. -

“MARINE RAIDERS

Pat O'BRIEN & Ruth HUSSEY KID’



8.20 P.M

8



FRID, -- SAT. SUN,
Warner Bros, Big Special Double !

“UNDER CAPRICORN”
Color by Technicolor
Ingrid Bergman — Joseph Cotton

5 P.M.

Dick FORAN (The Singing
Cowboy) in
“GUNS OF THE PECOS"













GENERAL HILARITY Takes Over
FRIDAY 2.30 & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing
at 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.






DAILY








ector’






































snicolor Bass
a nr Se ee



DIRECTED BY
wore
BARBARA BATES

WALTER SLEZAK « wtsteratittte JERRY WALD HENRY KOSTER

Screen Play by Philip Rapp snd Harry Kurits + Suggouing ty 6 Pay te Mitite Gag
Lyrics ond Music oy The Associate Producer SULVIA FING + Myaseahlinrecson ond cstenta! Score by Jobrny Green

PLAZA — BRIDGETOWN (DIAL 2310)
WATCH FOR™= "THE STORY OF SEABISCUIT”

empresas
EMPIRE

Last Two Shows Today
4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

20th Century Fox presents

CHEAPER
BY
THE DOZEN

Color by Technicolor







ROYAL

Teday & Tomorrow
4.30 & 8.30 p.m.





Columbia Big Double

Richard DIX in

“SECRET OF
THE WHISTLER

AND
THUNDERHOOF’

with Robert PRESTON
and William BISHOP

OLYMPIC

Today & Tomorrow
430 & 8.15 p.m.

Starring Cilfton WEBB,
Jeanne CRAIN
and Myrna LOY





ROXY

Today & Tomorrow
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.



20th Century Fox Double
M-G-M Smashing Double
John PAYNE & Alice FAYE

in Van JOHNSON and
Phillis THAXTER in

“ THIRTY
SECONDS
OVER TOKYO”

AND

“THE ARNELO
AFFAIR”

Starring John HODIAK,
George MURPHY and
Francis GIFFORD |

“WEEK-END IN
HAVANA”

AND

“SOMEWHERE
IN THE
NIGHT”

with John HODIAK
and Nancy GUILD

Small Canteens of 6 Knives
orks and Spoons
Stainless Steel Carver Sets
Sets of Spoons
Cake Forks
Cake Baskets

also



THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 1951

Tweedsmuir

Says Western

World In Race Against Time

OTTAWA.

A BRITISH LORD who was wounded as a Canadian
soldier in Sicily said here that the democracies are in a
race against time and if they lose, it will be primarily

their own fault.



.
Air Squadron

Leaves Canada

7 . «
For Training

CHATHAM, New Brunswick.

The first airlift of the famous
No. 421 “Red Indian” squadron
of the Royal Canadian Air Force
deft this week to complete train-
ing in England.

It will be the first time for an
RC.A.F. squadron to train out-
side Canada in peacetime, and
when the airlift is completed No.
421 will have been the first
squadron to leave Canada since the
end of the Second World War.

Altogether 14 flights are sched-
uled this month to move the men
to England where they will train
alongside the Royal Air Force.

Addressing the squadron after
a formal inspection, Vice-Marshal
J. L. Plant, representing the chief
of air staff, remarked that it would
receive training with the R.A.F.
He reminded the men that some
phases of life in Britain were
different than in Canada, but he
asked them to remember that
“they do some things better than
we do.”

He urged the group to do all
they could to deserve the hospital-
ity they would receive overseas.

Groups gathered around those
about to depart. Wives and tod-
dling children exchanged one more
kiss with their blue-clad menfolk.
One pilot held a child in each arm
as he said farewell to his wife.

The squadron was presented
with q plaque recording the unit’s
record since it was formed over-
Seas in 1942. It was disbanded in
1945 and re-enlisted here in Sep-
tember, 1949. Eight Vampire jets
screamed overhead in formation
and music was provided by the
band of the New Brunswick North
Shore Regiment.

Verdi’s Tomb
Opened

MILAN, Jan, 24.

The body -of Giuseppe Verdi,
Italian composer who died here on
January 27, 1901, was found al-
most unchanged when his tomb
was opened yesterday shortly be-
fore the fiftieth anniversary cele-
brations of his death.

Verdi is buried in a garden of
the Milan “House of Rest” he’
founded for impoverished musi-
cians. His remains are to be re-
interred in a walnut coffin.

On Saturday there will be a
memorial service for Verdi in Mi-
lan Cathedral. On the same even-
ing, there will be a Verdi gala

formance at La Scala Opera
House.

Rome opera will present Verdi's

“La Forza Del Destino” the sare

~
nm New York Arturo Toscanini
will conduct Verdi's “requiem.”
Box office receipts from this per-
formance next Saturday estimated
at $25,000 will go to the upkeep
of Verdi’s “House of Rest’ in
Milan,

Tickets Weighed
To Count Traffic

WINNIPEG.

Winnipeg Electric Co. doesn’t
count its bus and street-car pas-
sengers—it weighs them,

However, it’s not the customer
that is weighed, but the ticket he
places in the fare box when he
travels by street-car, bus or trolley
coach.

Accurate scales make it possi-
ble for company officials to deter-
mine how many passengers travel
on each route daily.

But there are some complica-
tions. Damp tickets, for instance,

“We have found a. street-car
ticket doesn’t weigh the same
every day,” said F. S. Cook, assis-
tant treasurer of the company.
“The more moisture there is in the
air, the heavier the ticket.”

This difficulty is overcome by
counting, weighing and calculating
each day the number of tickets to
an ounce. The number varies from
185 to 195.













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Lord Tweedsmuir, 39-year-old
son of the former governor-
general of Canada, said in a
speech to the Canadian Club that
the west “must awake to its dan-
ger” and the democracies must
seek out as allies “any part of
the world that is ready to stand
by us.”

They must go forward posi-
tively, impressing Russia with
their will and their ability to
fight because “you can’t win
simply by defending your Own
goal.” The democracies, he said,
above all must be “absolutely
realistic” with themselves.

Lord Tweedsmuir left Canada
with the first overseas contin-
gent of the Canadian army 11
years ago and rose to command
the Hastings and Prince Edward
Regiment of Canadians in Sicily.

He had some humorous army
tales too. He told of one fight by
a Canadian unit against heavy
German odds. Eventually a cor-
poral was the senior remaining
Canadian, The Germans sent an
officer under a flag of truce, and
he warned “you English gentle-
men had better surrender or take
the consequences.”

The Canadian corporal replied:
“We ain’t English, we ain’t gen-
tlemen and we ain’t surrender-
ing.”

. Professional Puzzled

Lord Tweedsmuir also told of
another occasion on which the
Canadians captured a_ highly
professional, and highly enraged
German officer. The German
protested: “Your men advance
across open country under heavy
mortar fire.”

The Canadians replied: “Is that
wrong?”

The German snorted and said:
“If people are going to behave
like that you might as well not
have a war.”

Lord Tweedsmuir told of a sol-
dier he met in hospital shortly
after a political figure hed ap-
peared on the scene to speak a
few words.

“What did he have to say,”
asked his lordship by way of
cheerful conversation.

“Nothing,” came the retort
“And he came one helluva long
way to say it.”

Lord Tweedsmuir said that
three years of training in England
enabled the Canadian army _to go
into action in the Second World

War as “one of the most highly piec

professional armies the world has
seen,”
ever s aes

=]

ees

anne.

MY
ir



London Express Service.

Cancer Clinic
For Dogs Opened

NEW BRUNSWICK,

NEW JERSEY, Jan, 24.

The opening of a cancer clinic
for dogs only was announced on
Wednesday by Rutgers University.
The clinic is unique both in
canine medicine and in cancer re-
search.

Its sole aim is to treat and study
cancer in dogs which get the dis-
ease about as often as humans do.
Dog studies may turn up know-
ledge helpful against human
cancer.

This new deal for dogs is al-
ready underway at the Bureau o1
Biological Research at Rutgers.
New Jersey Veterinarians have
been asked to send their patients.

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BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Colonies Earned
$300 Million In 1950

(From Our London Correspondent)

LONDON, Jan. 16.

THE FAR-REACHING EFFECTS of the ten-year

development

‘ plans in the Colonies, approved costs of
which totalled £195 million at the end of November

reflected in a review of achievements last year published
at the week-end in an official report : “The British Colonial

Territories in 1950”.

While the prevailing high

world prices have had much to
do with the remarkable trade
figures of some of the Colonies,
the undoubted increased pros-
perity of the Colonies is shown
in this report to be based on
other and more stable factors.
_ Highlights of the year’s statis-
tical returns include the fact that
Colonial net dollar earnings were
over 300 million dollars, twice as
much again as in 1949. In spite
of continued Communist terror-
ism Malaya held her lead as the
greatest net dollar earner in the
Commonwealth.

Examples of the changed
revenue situation for many of the
Colonies are provided by Tangan-
yika in East Africa, whose
revenue in 1949 amounted to
£7,355,000 compared with £2,-
133,000 ten years earlier and her
expenditure to £6,905,000 com-
pared with £2,394,000.

In the British West Indian
Colonies the total true revenue
increased from 40.0 dollars in
1938 to 128.7 dollars in 1948, The
per capita income in Jamaica rose
from £17.8 in 1938 to £61.9 in
1949.

Record totals in trade returns
were registered in 1950 by Hong
Kong and Northern Rhodesia. In
the first nine months of 1950 alone
the value of Hong Kong’s imports
and exports amounted to £314
million compared with £317 mil-
lion for the whole of 1949. In
Northern Rhodesia total trade in
the first six months of 1950 was
worth over £34 million compared
with £27 in the same period of
1949.

Furtner interesting figures are
provided in regard to the trade
exchange between U.K. and the
Colonies. The Colonies, the Report
points out, cannot maintain and
expand their production without
the United Kingdom maintaining
a high rate of exports to them and
that this is done is shown by the
following facts: Exports of iron
and steel and manufactures thereof
from U.K. totalled 385,900 tons
in 1949 compared with 246,000
tons in 1948; cement supplies
667,000 tons compared with 493,000
tons.

The U.K. is also arranging in-
creasing exports of consumer
and in 1949 the Colonies imported
900 million square yards of cotton
e goods compared with 776
million square yards in 1948,

While British imports from the
Colonies totalled 5.3 per cent
twelve years ago, the 1949 figure
was 9.8 per cent,

Development Plans And
Finance

A summary of the extent to
which the U.K. is providing funds
under various schemes to help the
Colonies achieve stable economies
is given in the . To begin
with, it should be pointed out that
of the £195 million so far approved
under the ten-year plans, some
£130 million are to be found by the
Colonies themselves from their
own resources and from loans.

The heads under which these
ten-year plan m will be
spent show that 47.2 per cent will
go for development of social ser-
vices; 23.5 per cent on economic
development; 19.4 per cent on
communications and 9.9 per cent
on the development of miscellane-
ous services.

Financial gifts made or promised
by H.M.G. to British dependen-
cies since 1938 total £254,685,000
excluding the additional £20 mil-
lion to be provided under the 1950
Colonial Development and Welfare
Act. This has covered grants-in—
aid of administration, of recon—
struction and rehabilitation grants
for internal security; food subsi-
dies and claims waived in respect
of military administration and
defence. !

The Colonies are also benefiting
from ECA aid. For the year ending
June 30 last, some 20 million
dollars of the reserve fund were
allocated for overseas .develop-
ment for providing dollar equip-
ment and materials to help in

completing economic development

projects. The first use of this fund
was to buy generating equipment
in Jamaica and later allocations







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SSS SSO FPPC VS PFE ET ESSE EE LEE EPP PLE LEAP PPLLLPPADPPPPP SAP PLAAAS

4,

were made for road development

schemes in British Colonial terri-

une in Africa and South-East
sia.

Another £107 million—f£46 mil-
lion of whieh comes from the
territories’ own resources—is due
to be spent under the néw six-
year development plans _ for
Malaya, Singapore, North Borneo,
Sarawak and Brunei in connection
with the Colombo plan for Co-op—
erative Economic Development in
South and South-East Asia, H.M.G.
have announcéd that U.K. will
find the external “nance required:

Major Economic
Developments

Discussing some of the major
economic developments in the
Colonies, the Report says at the
outset that U.K.’s economic devel-
opment policy for the Colonies may
be summed up as “aiming to build
in every territory a stable economy
that is not dependent on a few
basic products.” Much of the
assistance U.K. makes available
to the Colonies is devoted to this
end. In terms of betterment in the
Colonies, says the Report, it means
improved communications; the
development of agricultural min-
eral and industrial resources and
improved methods of production;
safe rding natural wealth and
instilling “good husbandry” in all
economic activities; providing
stable markets and ensuring ade-
quate supplies of consumer and
capital goods.

Instances of how these aims are
being achieved are shown in, for
example, the sphere of communica-
tion where East Africa’s loans
raised for railway and harbour
improvements are part of the plans
for expanding and co-ordinating
communications throughout the
African continent. In the continu-
ous process of agricultural develop-
ment a feature was Malaya’s
record rice crop, the setting-up of
the Gezira Board in the Sudan,
cocoa research in West Africa to
combat swollen shoot, long-term
trade agreements between the U.K.
and the sugar-producing Colonies.

Regarding development of sec-
ondary industries in the Colonies
—an integral part of Colonial
policy—progress depends to a con-
siderable extent on the provision of
adequate and cheap power. The
Report shows how in each of the
main Colonial regions, efforts are
being made to develop hydro-
electric power potentialities. The
Volta Basin of the Gold Coast, the
Owen Falls scheme in Uganda
(due for completion in 1953) and
the Research on Power schemes in
Malaya and British Uganda are
examples of work in hand.

Social Progress

Improvements in the standards
of health and education are,
according to an official quotation
in the Report, “basie requirements
for effective self-government”.
The greatest achievement in Colo-
nial Health Services during 1950
is credited to the completion of
the three-year malaria eradication
campaign in Cyprus. Improved
Health Services are shown in vital
statistics as follows:

British Guiana: Birth-rate in-
creased by over 44 per cent in the
five years 1944-49; death-rate fell
by over 39 per cent and infant mor-
tality rate by over 43 per cent.

Singapore: In 1949 the death-
rate here was as low as in England
and Wales.

Cyprus: In seven years infant
preer rate decreased from 180

Jamaica, Trinidad: Average
length of life has increased by
more than 15 years since 1929.
This progress has also been
achieved in the case of British
Guiana,

In increased educational facili-
ties in the Colonies, first mention
is made of Uganda’s demonstration
terms for community education.
This work, the Report states, has
“attra>ted the attention of mass-
education workers in many coun-
tries”. The commercial production
of the “saucepan special” battery-
receiver and its success in North-
ern Rhodesia have opened up “a
significant possibility of educating
vast numbers of people by radio”.
Figures show too increasing attend-

> are.

Farmers Buy
3 Cars Each

SOUTH AFRICAN FARMERS who for years have
lived in the dusty, semi-desert called the Karoo, their one
luxury a grimy wreck of a car to take them to the nearest
town, now own three or five cars each. The wool boom
has changed poverty into wealth.



Coal Cuts
Travel

ae LONDON
Britain’s serious coal shortage
has resulted in a drastic cut in the
main line and London suburban
train services.

_ The curtailed services now put
into effect by the British Rail-
roads will mean a saving of 12,000
tons of coal a week, but a further
cut is likely before winter ends.

_ Travellers on the eastern re~
gion railroads are the worse hit,

with the cancellation of 1,147
train services a week.
The southern region is with-

drawing 71 trains a week at the
present time, and the midland
region about 114.

About. 22 passengers’ will
now cram into cars built for 12
when the suburbanite rushes
home from his day’s work in the
city.

—LN.S.



Better Medical
Service Plauned
For West Indies

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan.

First step in organising a more
complete medical service for the
whole Caribbean area was taken
at the recent BMA Conference
held in Port-of-Spain.

Stating this on the eve of his
departure back for England, Dr.
H, Guy Dain, the Conference
Chairman, disclosed that it was

roposed in course of time to have

e British Medical Register as
the uniform standard throughout
the islands, but that for the time
being no change was to be made
in those islands which accepted
one not on the British Regis-
er,

_ The Conference has as one of
its major achievements the setting
up of a Medical Commission to
bring apout uniformity in We
service and to put its services
in an advisory capacity at the
disposal of the Colonial Office ana
the Governors in the different
islands. A Caribbean Council of
the BMA was also to be set up.



Butterflies To Give
Charm To Festival

Secrets of the Festival of
Britain’s Country Pavilion were
revealed today by Mr. L. Hugh
Newman, authority on butterflies
and moths.

Mr. Newman has been bound
to silence about the plans for
his exhibit since he signed his
contract last May, but he is now
free to describe the undertaking.

He has agreed to supply 300
moths and butterflies each week
for a woodland scene in whieh
plant life will flourish in a con-
trolled “climate” of 75 degrees,
and the winged insects will add
charm and movement.

Six thousand butterflies and
moths will appear in the pavilion
from May to September, and he
will collect them by touring the
Home Counties in his caravan
laboratory .

. Newman will also breed
exhibits on his butterfly farm at
Bexley, Kent.

—L.E.S.



ances of Colonial children at an
increasing number of schools and
reference is made to progress of
University colleges and colleges of
Arts, Science and Technology, such
as those planned in West Africa.

In its opening chapter on the
main achievements of the year, the
Report’s last section deals with
“Political and Constitutional
Advance”. It surveys briefly
advancements made during 1950,
both in the sphere of local and
central government.







This year South Africa wil?
almost certainly get £76 million
from wool sales— figure, which was itself a record.

Wool is bringing the Union
more than half as much overseas
currency as the gold from the
Rand—the world’s greatest mines,

But it has also brought a near-
famine in mutton



Few farmers will slaughter
sheep for meat these days. They
keep them alive as long as possible
for the wool on their backs.

Book for Festival

Britain may benefit indirectly
from wool fagtunes. Shipping
companies report considerable

bookings by woo] (growers for the
Festival of Britain.

The Karoo’s golden fleece has
brought something else new: far-
mers are forced to consult attor-
neys about their tax problems
Queues wait daily in front of the
village lawyer.

Some of them, too, are buying
meat from a shop for the first
time in their lives.

For How Long ?

But the wool farmers are not
only prosperous. They are wor-
ried, too. No one knows what will
happen to them in the future

Some have just put their money
in the bank. Others have ploughed
it back into their farms—as fenc-
ing. more land, tractors

Alt have paid off mortgages
which might have lasted their
whole lives.—L.E.8



36 Arrive From

Morocco
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 22
Thirty-six men, women and
children — indentured labourers
from Morocco, arrived aboard a
French freighter on Friday bound
for French Guiana where they

are going to settle.

They arrived at Martinique on
Tuesday January 16 from French
Morocco and were transferred to
the freighter for the south-
bound voyage.

During the three days spent be-
tween Martinique and Trinidad
the 36 huddled in the open deck-
space where they together shared
straw pallets for beds, They re-
ported that they went two days

without food or water, On ar-
rival here they walked the
streets of Port-of-Spain in tat-

tered and torn clothing in search
of food and drink.

News photographers were de-
nied the opportunity to take pic-

tures, being threatened by the
ship’s officers with being thrown
overboard,—-€?P),



Harbour Log

:
In Carlisle Bay
Sch. Phyllis Mark, Swedish Training
Ship “Sunbeam”, Seh Marion Belle
Wolfe, Sch. Mary M. Lewis, Sch. Zolleen,
Sch. Emanuel C, Gordon, Seh, Triumph
ant Star, Sch Burma D M.V
Sedgefield, Sch, Sunshine R, Seh, Bel
queen, Sch, Enterprise S., Seh, Molly N
Jones,
ARRIVALS

Schooner Lucille M, Smith, 74. tor
net, Capt. Hassell, from British Guiana,
Yacht Juanita, 85 tons net, Capt
Holmes, from Miami,

Schooner United Pilgrim S,, 47 tons net

Capt, Stewart, from St. Lucia

M.V. Willemstad, 2,855 fons net, Capt
Vermeulen, from Trinidad
DEPARTURES

M.V. Willemstad, 2,855 tons net, Capt

Vermeulen, for Madeira



In Touch With Barbados

Coastal Station
Cable and Wireless (West Indies; Ltd
advise that they ean now communicate

with the following ships through their
Barbados Coast Station

3.8. Bayano, s.s. Willemstad, s.s. Bon
aire, «s. Beech Hill, 5.8. Golfito, #
Gundine, «s. Jessie Stove, ss. Alcoa

.s, City of Oxford,



Polaris, 5.5. Cavina,

se. Florida, ston Heights,

#8.



Ff itamsea, §.5, ‘Belita, Tug Dragon, 8.5
Sun Jewel, ss. 8. Monica, 5.6. Empress
of Seotland, 4.5. Ferggen, 4.5, Myken,

s.s. Nieuw Amsterdam, s.s. Easo Roanoke,
s.s. S. Maria, ss, Spurt, 8.8. Mormackite,
s.s. Carolyn, ss. Amakura, 8.6 Reina
Del Pacifico, s.s. Lady Rodney, 84. §
Paula, ss. Mauretania, s,s, Gothic, #9
Port Townshend, 8.8. Colombie, #5. 5S.
Sofia, ss, Cape Cod, #8. Kansi, 5.8
Borinquen, s.8, Alcoa Roamer, 5.# Athel-
laird, s.s, Teetus, 9.8. Mormacsun, 6.8,
Pandt, #.s. Pathfinder, 5.5, Dunelimia,



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THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK

4

WITH A VIEW to assisting the Secretaries of Societies, Clubs,

and Associations to make the compilation of information in
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as eas
possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities;
religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports,
radio, agricultural, etc., are asked to have the form printed
below filled in and sent in as soon as possible to:

THE EDITOR,
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951,
C/o Advocate Co. Ltd., 34 Broad Street.

FORM

Title of Society, Club, Organisation, Etc. ..........:ccssccsesssssreeeeereseteens
President or Chaiirman..............:.cscccceseeereens Ms. cadevsliccticbcloal oe odak
Council or Committee Members..................
RI ricsrjeece.csselichcosne scans MORN lichicubnascs tiscssosstedesessoesstea fibrin

Short historical account of the origin, functions and current

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PAGE FOUR





AVOGATE

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetown,



Thursday, January 25, 1951



FIRE BRIGADE

THE decision by the Government to pur-
chase Club Willow as a suitable site for a
new Fire Brigade station will be welcomed
by the entire community. The House of
Assembly satisfied itself during the week
that the price was reasonable and the site
suitable, and there can be little doubt that
the Legislative Council will find no diffi-
culty in concurring in the resolution.

After this sanction by the Legislature, it
is hoped that the Government will not, as
in other instances in the past, allow the
spot to remain unused while fire hazards
continue to exist and threaten the safety
of life and property.

The purchase of Club Willow shows that
Barbados has at last accepted the advice
of an imported specialist.

Major Cox insisted that instead of hav-
ing one huge fire station in the middle of
the City with all the equipment concen-
trated in one spot, there should be several
stations at strategic points. The policy of
centralising fire brigade equipment, _re-
moved stations from Bay Street, Holetown,
and Speightstown many years ago in the
face of strong public objection.

Now that several residential districts
have been built up outside Bridgetown
and business houses are growing up outside
the immediate confines of the City, it is im-
perative that adequate fire protection be
afforded to these areas.

It is, however, regrettable that while
preparation is being made for the proper
distribution of fire stations, little is being
done to reduce the number of fire hazards
in the City itself.

. There can be no objection to the acquisi-
tion of the site for a new fire station
except by those who have failed to appre-
ciate the benefits to be derived. As soon
as the cost has been decided on as reason-
able, there can be little objection to a
scheme which brings the advantages of fire
protection, recreation facilities for mem-
bers of the brigade — who must be kept
physically fit if they are to be of any use—
and grounds for constant fire fighting
practices.

This purchase of a site between two
thickly populated residential districts
should be the precursor of a few others,



Blind, Deaf And Dumb

THE work of the Barbados Association
in aid of the Blind, Deaf and Dumb, is
being carried one step farther. It is pro-
posed among other things to establish a
local centre for training some of the
afflicted blind.

The work of the Association in the past,
limited through lack of funds, has been
confined to assistance of pupils at the
Training Institutes in Trinidad. There are
at present four deaf pupils whose training
has been financed by funds collected by
subscription, whilst another pupil has been
compelled to return home because of fail-
ing eyesight and her consequent failure to
learn to lip read,

If there was ever an association which
deserved public support, it is the Associa-
tion in aid of the Blind, Deaf and Dumb.
Few people in Barbados realise the num-
ber of young people and children suffering
from these afflictions, During the last week,
many of them have sought the help of
faith healers now operating in this island.
It is the duty of all of us, the majority
who can see and hear, to show our thank-
fulness by helping the less fortunate.

With the co-operation of the public, the
blind, deaf and dumb can be made useful

members of society and to be proud of that
usefulness,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

| NEW ZEALAND NOW |

Good-bye. PARIS...And
fiello. NEW YORK

PARIS

SO now it’s “Au revoir’ wo
Paris for a while. Next week I
shall clamber into a Transatlan
tie airliner and take off to New
York, almost exactly two years
after I left the U.S.A.

Glad or sorry? As usual a bit
of both. Emotions on leaving a
place you have lived in are never
entirely neat.

So many people and things I
look forward to seeing and doing
in Manhattan. But there are a
whole lot of people and things I’d
like to take over with me from
Paris,

One's daily life falls into two
broad parts—professional an
personal. How do the debits and
credits stack up?

Professionally, America wins
hands down, The U.S.A. is the
newspaperman’s paradise. When
the stuff isn’t being handed to
you on a platter, you can always
find it in the refrigerator.

So I look forward with huge
anticipation to Manhattan because
you can, within reason, ring up
nearly anybody, however import-
ant, and get a statement.

In France it takes anywhere
from hours to days to get a tele-
phone interview with someone to
whom you have not been form-
ally introduced.

I look forward to that crisp
telephone service, and I no longer
snigger at the slogan, “The voice
with a smile.”

Les Phone Girls .. .

THOSE American switchboard
girls, after two long years of
France’s mournful mademoi-
selles, now rate in my book as
more desirable than Marlene Die-
trich.

With lively expectation I look
forward to being able to call San
Francisco, 3,000 miles from New
York, in rather less time than it
now takes me to telephone my
office in Paris from my suburban
home ten miles away.

I look forward to air-condition-—
ing in the shops and cinemas (I
suppose I shall astonish the ush-
erettes at the first few films I go
to by trying to trip them, as one
does here, for showing me to my
place).

Le Wine...

NOW, what about the personal
side of things?

Well, if you are a wine drinker,
as I am, you cannot contemplate
a visit to the United States with
anything except a twinge of pre-
monitory sorrow.

For, although America produces
vast quantities of wine, and the
growers spend millions of dollars a

The Sort Of

Could Write About Her Boss

And for Blanche Patch (here pictured) the boss

I MEANT it to be a woman's
book,” said Miss Blanche Patch in
her Kensington hotel bed-sitting-
room, She was speaking of her
book, “Thirty Years with G.B.S,.""
which has just been published.

Perhaps it is not surprising that
it has been left to a woman to put
a little flesh and blood into
the legendary old man who once
described himself as “three-
quarters ghost”,

Of all the women round Bernard
Shaw, Miss Patch is the one to
paint the most accurate portrait.
For she was his secretary, a
shrewd independent person who
was one of the few women to re-
main “Shaw-proof,” immune to
the old man’s spell.

From her vantage point as a
woman with an outsider’s view-
pomt and an inside pitch. Blanche
Patch tells of Shaw’s early eccen-
tricities in dress. He had a collec-
tion of hats that rivalled Winston
Churchill’s, wore mittens knitted
by Blanche, had all his socks

“specially shaped” for each foot.

Infallible? No!

CONTRARY to his own belief
Shaw was not always right. “Few
people,” reports Miss Patch “can
have gained a reputation as a
prophet Qn more slender
ecmevement. He wrong
about both the wars.

“He assured me that the Ger-
mans would not bomb London and
he was equally in error over the
Jews in Palestine, Dempsey and
Winston Churchill (who was going
to die away when the party system
came back).”

Shaw’s industry was terrific.
“I have always thought,” says his
secretary “that he wrote too much,
He would be an uncommonly
devoted Shavian who today would
cheerfully set out again to read
through ‘The Intelligent Woman’s
Guide to Socialism, followed by

was



Don't Neglect Latin Americaan,

NEW YORK,
Harry F. Guggenheim, former

backward since World War Ii
Our policy,

By R. M. MacCOLL

year on advertising it (“It’s smart
to order wine” cry the hoardings,
a little desperately), the fact re-
mains that the great proportion
of the wine you get there is so
awful that tears spring, just to
think of it,

FLASHBACK No. 1: to a smart
Washington restaurant...a waiter
happily dollops a large lump of
ice into my Burgundy.

FLASHBACK No. 2: to one of
the best known of New York res-
taurants colleague Frank
Owen, intent on ordering cham-
pagne, and I having an acrimoni-
ous argument with the head

Purely
Personal

I LOOK forward to the
sheer tuxury of the working
conditions which American
reporters take for granted.

When I attended debates
at the French parliament, I
sat in hideous discomfert in
a wretched little gallery into
which the entire foreign
Press had to pack itseif like
a parcel of dehydrated pota-
toes. The heat was appal-
ling, ventilation non-exist-
ent, and it was next to im-
possible to hear what was
being said far below.

Compare the American
set-up: Reporters are given
the very best seats at Senate
committee hearings, with
plenty of tables and chairs
and supplies of writing
paper. Giving off from the
Press galleries in parliament
itself are air-conditioned
reading and writing rooms
for the Press.

en emer Se





waiter. Why, demands Frank,
won't they bring us the wine list?
It takes some time to convince us
that the place simply does not
possess one.

I don’t look forward to the tele-
vision. When I left America, things
had reached the pitch where you
could not have a quiet beer in a
saloon without being obliged to
see two all-in wrestlers on tha
screen.

Now the wrestlers, I hear, are
right there in the drawing-room
with you.

I look forward to seeing those
endless hosts of smartly dressed
women and girls. Contrary to the

Thing Only

Bernard Shaw



BLANCHE PATCH

‘Everybody's
What?’”

[Note that question mark (?).
Although “nobody dared disturb
a comma in Shaw's work.” Miss
Patch omits the ? in each of her
three references to the book.]

Shaw’s taciturnity (he would
turn on a radio programme he dis-
liked rather than have to talk at
mealtimes) may have been inherit-
ed from his mother who, when
asked whether she had any letters
from her distinguished son, replied
that they had always got on a post-
card all that they had to say to one
another,

Political What's

On Money

MISS PATCH turns the pages of
her 30-years diary on Shaw and
notes that: —

@ HE looked on money as an
irrelevance out of place in a civil-
ised community, He flatly refused
to face the fact that salaries earned
before the war were quite insuffi-
cient in peace. In his own mind,
Shaw priced everything at pre-
war standards and he really be-
lieved that we (his staff) were all
on velvet.

legend, well-dressed
rati> are searce,

Good clothes gost a great deal
Paris prices are right out of range
for the women and girls who make
up the”great army of French typ-
ists and secretaries.

shall wistfully yearn, of

course, for Paris food. It is not
only that the French know now
to cook. They care so passionately
about food. Every waiter, every
teen-age bus boy, treats the stuff
with such loving care.

Now what awajts me? Why thc
blue plate special at 75 cents.

Les Shops...

I SHALL miss the exquisit
taste of the French in such thing:
as window-dressing,

Yes, the big shops on Fifth
avenue can daze you with the
sheer weight of their opulence
but I don’t think you can beat a
Paris shopkeeper when he set:
out to performsbis own brand ol
magic with lighting, silks
salins; silverware and china.

I shall be nonplussed at first
when 1 am back in the land where
they like to do things fast—to
walk, for example, into a shop,

women in

ana

buy something and walk right oui! remaining forms of rationing.

again.
That is not the way they do it
here. You shake hands all round,

THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 1951
rrr ree
TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
at THE COLONNADE



D. V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.

REVERSES POLICY



: f ‘i ONTROL Usually Now
Oi STATE ( Tins BROOKS PEACHES .. 59 %
AUCKLAND. N.Z. Pkgs. QUAKER CORN FLAKES ........ 37 34 t
NEW ZEALAND is taking stock after a Bottles ALLSOPP’S BEER .......... 26 20



year under National Party Government.
Prime Minister Sidney Holland’s adminis-
tration took office a little more than a year
igo after 14 years of Labour rule,














$

Under the late Rt. Hon. Peter Fraser long |% We .
steps were taken toward state control and| e Have ose
che new government has a lot to do before : ‘ pei ae) weoeayeisee .
ts programme of free eterprise is fully % GALVANISE DO ES |
-ealizéd. g i. tee Fay ig

State controls and restrictions have been g ” SAREED WIRE
:mong the chief Labour measures to go by x : MESH WIRE
che board and government supporters claim |¥% 2”, We”, 144”, 1%”
there is far more freedom to-day than there Ee LASHING WIRE
ever was under Labour. On the other hand, 16, 14, 12 and 10 Gauge 8
Labour members maintain that many of i WOVE WIRE — 24” and 36

hese measures were wartime controls which
would have been removed with improved

CHAIN 1's”, 3-16", %4”, & 5-16”

conditions.

The new government has abolished all

wish all present a hearty good-{| most types of land, houses and buildings.

day, have a quiet appraisal of the
political situation.

Then you inquire
Madame’s bunions help her to
tot up the total of your purchases
with her piece of chalk on the

Until now, real estate prices have been

after} pegged to 1942 values, and properties sold,

brought in many cases, big under-the-table
payments in addition to the officially-

slate kept for the purpose, have] approved prices. Houses now are on the

a laugh when she gets it wrong
the first time, and then exit with
more good-days and another hand-
clasp.

What will happen when I try to
shake hands with the chap be-
hind the drug-store counter on
Lexington-avenue? “Say, listen,
mister, I ain’t got all day, Cut the
comedy, will ya?”

2
La Black Lady

AND I shall find myself, I know,
looking round for that majestic
figure of the Paris ¢cene—the lady
in black bombazine who sits be-
hind the cash register.

Even in the smartest bars of |
Paris she is apt to be there, keep- |
ing a doubting eye on the pro-
ceedings and a quick finger on the
takings.

However sophisticated the bar,
however immaculate the white
dress of the barmen, there is
Madame in the background.

She epitomises, in her solid way,
a great deal of the French way of
doing things. I shall find no
Madame in black at Al’s place... .

London Express Service.

A Seeretary



sas

@ ON the day after Shaw’s,ous terms.

98rd birthday Gene Tunney went
down to Ayot and told him round
by round of Mills’ fight against
Lesnevich. He was astonished that
the old gentleman knew as much
about them as he did.

@ SHAW worked in a shelter
. . » at the foot of the garden, He
liked it because he could get down
to his writing undisturbed .. .
and his housekeeper could honestly
aoe callers that Mr. Shaw was
“ou Big
@ALTHOUGH he carried a
watch the alarm clock was set
each day to remind
was time for lunch.
took any notice of it.
@SHAW sivod guard over
works like a nen with chicks.
It was because he would not have
a line of his precious dialogue cut
that he held out so long against
any play being filmed.

More Fun .

The woman who has written| or f

these memories into a book made
the first note nearly 30 years ago.
“And I always intended to call it
“Thirty Years with G.B.S.”
said last night.

_ Miss Patch lives in a “quiet hotel
in Kensington” where they are
used to celebrites.
where acid-bath murderer Haigh
met Mrs. Durand-Deacon. Ber-
nard Shaw’s secretary had observ-
ed Haigh pretty shrewdly, too:
“An insignificant little fellow...
bit of an_ exhibitionist... .for
menths I'd put him down as an
incipient lunatic’.

Shaw’s secretary a tall, spare
woman with a small grey head
and excessively penetrating and
wide-set grey eyes, said of her
job: “of course it was inter-
esting, but in many ways I
had more fun out of being a
dispenser—before I became
Shaw’s secretary”’.

—L.E.S,



at best, is one of wisely

American countries, But if we ac;

and promptly we can stop

Our whole foreign

Maleolm Johnson

policy, he

market at prices higher than the former
official levels, but not so greatly above the
black market rates.

HIGH WOOL PRICES

Largely as a result of high prices for wool
which have boosted overseas funds, the gov-
ernment has abolished import licensing on a
wide range of goods from soft currency coun-
tries. ‘his has brought into New Zealand
many items not seen since Labour imposed
import control in 1938. The Dominion now
has a surplus in trade with dollar countr‘es,
but its undertakings with the sterling area
have so far prevented relaxing of controls on
goods from dollar sources.

Some tax reductions have been made,
but further substantial cuts will be necessary
before the heavy tax burden built up during
the war is markedly eased.

In housing, the Government has pushed
ahead vigorously with its policy of “own
your own” in contrast to the Labour policy
of providing state houses for rental. It has
abolished many building restrictions, has
made loans available at favourable rates for
home builders, and has offered state houses
for sale to present tenants at very advantage-
At the same time it has raised
rentals on new tenancies of state houses.

—C.P.

Current Influenza
Outbreaks

GENEVA, Jan. 17.



Reporting on current outbreaks of influ-’
him when it] enza
He never Healt

appearing in several regions, the World
h Organization has indicated that

his| neither the spread nor the severity of the

illness can be compared with more serious
epidemics of influenza that occurred in the
first part of this century.

So far, said a WHO statement, complica-
tions have been rare and mortality remains

very low. Influenza may be fatal for the aged
or cardiac patients but, for the bulk of the

population, “the considerable progress in
chemotherapy of infectious diseases—espec-

she | cially sulfa and antibiotics—permits success-

ful vigorous action against the secondary in-
fections which caused the highest fatality in

It is the hotel | 1918”.

National Health Administrations are being
kept constantly advised regarding the out-
breaks by the World Health Organisation
through daily radio bulletins and weekly
summaries and WHO Regional Influenza
Centres and are thus enabled to take the
necessary action.

WHO has been notified of outbreaks in
Hawaii and Japan as well as in Europe, and
the disease has appeared in Canada and the
United States.

Research undertaken from the start of the
outbreak at the World Influenza Centre in
London and in several regional centres estab-
lished by WHO in Britain and on the conti-
nent indicates that the virus causing the out-
break belongs to type A-prime. Identification
of the isolated strains of the virus is continu-
ing. This process is necessary for the prep-

It has also
wiped out many price controls, among the
most important being control over sales of































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4



For Your

Afternoon
Zea Party

Ambassador to Cuba, warned to-
day that the Western Hemisphere
as “our last line of defense”, is
being “woefully neglected” while
United States foreign policy con-
centrates on Europe and Asia.

In an interview at his office in
lower Manhattan, Guggenhein:,
long a student of Latin American
affairs, said:

“Europe still may be our first
line of defense, but this hemis-
phere is our last line of defense,
and it must be made impregnable

“That is not a policy of isola-
tion,” he added firmly. “It is a
policy of prudence.”

Guggenheim, industrialist
pioneer in aeronautics and rocket
development and a naval aviator
in World Wars I and II, spoke
from his experience as the Gov-
ernment’s representative on many

diplomatic, economic and sero
nautical missions,

A progressive Republican,
Guggenheim was strongly critica}

of U.S., foreign policy as a whole,
asserting that it was “vague, con-

fusing and headed in three
directions at the same time.”

He said:

“In our relations with Lati

America we have gone steadil,

friendly apathy,

“In our haste to accept world
responsibility and assume world
leadership, we have neglected our
nearest neighbours |= in the
Americas,

-Isolationism has kept them from
us in the past, and ovr new
foreign policy, which plummets us
into Europe and Asia, keeps us
from them now.” 2

“In the present emergency,
Guggenheim continued, “the bes!
our government can do is to cali
a conference of Latin American
representatives,

“The solution, however, will no‘
come from conferences, but from
bi-lateral treaties. As in the past
we have waited for an emergency
beforetrying to do anything, wher
we should pursue a_ long-range
programme.

“It is five to ten years late,’ he
warned, “but not too late, if we
approach this problem with force
and wisdom.”

Of the danger to United States
security from Communist influ-
ence, he said:

“There is real infiltration of
Communism in Latin America. Ii
allowed to spread, Communism

can easily take over some Latin

Communism in its tracks.”

He cited Chile as an example of
growing danger in South America,
quoting sources as saying that the
Communists in the past have bee.
closer in Chile than anywhere else
in the Western Hemisphere t
controlling a national governmen!,

“Chile has approximately 30
per cent of the world’s copper
reserves and produces about ¥

per cent of the nitrogen consumed
by the world in the form of sodiun,
nitrate.” Guggenheim explained

But in spite of Chile’s impor-
tance to us a source of strategic
materials, the U.S. is again
following an indifferent course, he
contended.

“The Communists are relying or
economic distress and on Ameri-
can indifference to help them get
their way,” he declared.

If this should happen and the
Communists take over, he warned
Chile might then agree to supply
Russia with copper and nitrates

We must never allow ourselves
to be confronted with such
dilemma,” he said, We must bind
ourselves to Chile and all Latin
American countries so closely that
Communism will to be a
threat.” :

cease

continued, should be governed by
enlightened selt interest. It should
be based on two objectives— sur-
vival and our national ir,terests.

While recognizing the im-
portance of the North Atlantic
Pact to Stop Russian aggression
Guggenheim said it was regrettabk:
that its leadership wis not where
it traditionally ‘»elongs—with
England and France.

“We can only help Europe,” he
said, “We cannot save her fron
Russian ideology or | force, If
Europe no longer has the will '«
make desperate and _. supreme
efforts to preserve the essential
freedoms the democfatic world
has cherished, she will succum>
to the tyrants of Russia, no matter
what we try to do.”

He believes, he said, that 195!



will tell the story of whether
Europe is ‘willing and able to
make available the necessary
manpower.”

In the meantime, he urged a!!
possible speed ‘in strengthening
our diplomatic, economic ~ and
military relations with Latin
America, asserting that possibly
by 1970 the Latin American popu
lation “may well outgrow that of
Russia.”

—LN.S

aration of vaccines corresponding to the cur-
rent type of influenza.

The influenza epidemic now prevailing in
northern Europe probably originated from a
localized outbreak in Sweden last June, WHO

















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believes. The disease appeared in November Choyce Tips f Lonmin Cheese $1.21 o2.
in Denmark and later in Norway and north- oe RELISH & ;
ern Sweden. In December it covered the Pivkpnah oe
whole of Sweden, Tipton Pan Yan |

The disease was apparently imported into ornimans
the United Kingdom in the Neweastle area oe fay Ganee
from the Scandinavian focus, It first spread to
northern England and later to the whole read, Butter ‘
country. Almost simultaneously (early in
January), the Netherlands, Belgium and
northwest Germany became lightly infected Greens
and some cases, probably imported from Anchor Butter ;
Britain, appeared in Iceland. es eee CARROTS

A second focus of infection, more limited Meat & Fish Spreads
and to all appearances independent from the Carr's Assorted Biscuits CABBAGE
first, was discdvered late in December in the ven cee take
province of Guipuzcoa, northern Spain. Two Sliced Ham BEANS
toci now appear at the point of Joining across ‘

France.

(The World 4nfluenza Centre, mentioned in
the above release was established in London
in 1947 by the World Health Organisation, a
specialised agency of the U.N.)



and Jams.
J. & R. Bread

GODDARDS - pELivEer





THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 1951

Skeletons Hang From
The Apple Tree

ABOUT 50 yards down Goodland from Westbury Road
side, there is g small, queer, one roofed and shed roofed
house which the wind and age have blown out of shape
Strange writings are all over the boards of the house, and
On a sugar apple tree in the yard skeletons are hung up.







Sight Ret
eturned
HE ADVOCATE was informed

yesterday morning of an un-
ysual ‘neident that occurred in

St. Thomas on Tuesday.

irene’ Springer of -Hillaby was
blind for four years, After hearing
about the faith healing in the City
she decided to set out from her
home for Queen’s Park.

When she had completed half of
her journey, she changed her mind
and returned home, She felt that if
she had faith and prayed she
could cure herself,

At home she began to pray and
when she awoke on Tuesday mor-
ning she was able to see,

* AYBREAK IN UDI” is in-

; cluded in the British Coun.
cil’s film show which will take
place at Wakefield on Friday at
8.30 p.m. Those who are jnterest-
ed vill be admitted without
tickets.

The programme also includes
“British News” and “Green Gir-
dle.” For the usual Saturday
morning children’s show the pro-
gramme will be: “British News”
and “Children on Trial.”

NEW STANDPIPE is being
erected at Graham’s Gap, St
Andrew. Labourers have begun
to lay the foundation for this pipe.

The road in Corbin’s district
was recently dug up for pipe lines
to be put down. These lines are
now being repaired, Work is being
supervised by Mr. Coppin.

HE VISUAL EDUCATION |

Unit gave a show at St, An-
drew’s Church Boys’ School on
Tuesday. The subject “The House
Fly” was well demonstrated. The
boys took a keen interest in this
show.

NE OF THE largest cane fires
for

Dodd’s Plantation, St. Philip, on }

Tuesday night when 11% acres of



the year occurred at! thing but

The house and the things in and
about it are fraught with mystery
and people who pass there seem
to preter to walk on the opposite

side of the road

It is at the edge of the Good-
land water course and the firs
thing that strikes you when you
look at it is that the first high
wind which gets going would
blow it down. In the gully below
it sheep graze and boys play
cricket. Around it there are

many plantain trees,

Yesterday about 10.30 with lit-
tle wind blowing about the dis-
trict, with two windows opened
above half doors, old pieces of
Yags or paper hanging within and
with no one seemine to be stu
ring about it, the had
more curious look ever,

“Greet The XIV”
The first door of the house is
fairly whole, but another wire

house
than

door is nailed on it which appar-)

ently has no use. Near the door
is painted “Greet the XIV”, iW
white on a piece of green tin. You
may look at these uncanny words
as long as you like but you
would scarcely ever think what
they could mean, Although you
would not have seen the owner of
the house there yesterday, you
would have decided from the lovk
of his hat which could be seen
from above the half door, that
you had better not ask him any-
thing for he is not a talking man.

Neur ctnis writing is also writ-
ten “Private Otter Box,” and
“Believe in the Lord Jesus Christ
and thou shalt be saved.” Some
of these writings are done with

much precision and _ neatness
while others are written up in
chalk.

If you are passing up Goodland
you can look in the yard to this
house over some short rails,
Written up on the rails is “Some
of our race of people steal no-
at the end it cost
something.”

Blocking a pathway

into the

ripe canes were burnt. They are | Yards through the rails is an old

the property of the Governor-in-
Executive Committee and were
insured.

On Monday another
Lowthers Plantation, Christ
Church, destroyed six and a hal
acres of first crop ripe canes be-
longing to H. Watson of the same
plantation.

SALENE SARGEANT of Peter-

kins Land reported the loss of other

'
fire at | foot

rusty stove which must have
baked lots of bread in its time.

The stove is not more than a
away from the road and
contains plenty of other rusty

f things besides.

Women Peep Out

Within the yard are garden
beds with a scanty amount of
lettuce. In the yard too, with

old things is a heap of

$120 from her home between | Plaited twine for making mats.

December and January. It is the
property of Ivy Carter and herself.

A heifer calf valued $40 was}
stolen from an enclosed pen at
Dayrells Plantation this month, It
belongs to L. B. Hinds of the same
plantation,

Clemintina Dottin of Apes Hill,
reported that three dresses were
stolen from her home between 7.06
and 8.00 p.m. on Monday.

HE POLICE BAND will play

at the St. Lukes’ Church har-
vest, St. George, on Sunday, Jan-
uary 28. All Saints Church will
also be holding their harvest on
that Sunday.



YOUR GUESS

Where is this chimney, asked
the Advocate’s Guess Photo Com-
petition this week, It is at Congo
Road Plantation, guessed Mr.
Hugh Gittens of Mansion Road,
Bank Hall, and he became an-
other $5.00 winner in this com-
petition.

Thereafter the guesses ranged
far and wide, There was no
doubt that it was a chimney, The
guess question said so. But the
location was the headache. It is
in Bush Hall yard, said one guess-
er, It is at Mt. Gay Factory, St.
Lucy, said another, and another
guesser went to the Mental Hos-
pital.

A wild guess was “Needham’s
Point Lighthouse.” Another one

was “Arrow. Plantation,” St.
Philip. The guesser perhaps
meant “Harrow Plantation.”

Someone thought that Bay Street
was the location of the chimney,
and someone else thought it was
the chimney at the Cotton Factory.

Two other incorrect guesses
were, the Rum Refinery at Brigh-
ton, and Bowmanston Pumping
Station.



“WILLEMSTAD"

No passengers took the oppor-
tunity of sailing from Barbados
for England when the Dutch
passenger - freighter Willemstad
called from Trinidad yesterday.

The Willemstad brought two
passengers with her from Trini-
dad, They are from Curacao,

With 78 intransit passengers,
the Willemstad sailed yesterday
evening for Plymouth and
Madeira, She is consigned to
Messrs. S. P. Musson, Son & Co.,

Ltd.

CALLS \ tion

;, fined

After you read “Whatsoever a
man sow that shall he also reap”
and you begin to think, well here
is a bible of a man, you will come
upon a_ collection of skeletons
hanging from the sugar apple
tree. Included in them are a jaw
bone of some. big animal and the
skull of what seems to be a rab-
bit and one of a dog,

There are some plantain trees
near this apple tree and tied to
a piece of wire which is attached
to two of these trees are a small
vial and a three—gill bottle near-
ly filled with liquids. The three-
gill bottle still has the orange
erush label stuck upon it, but the
most daring little boy of the dis-
trict would not think of pulling
out the cork to ‘try the taste of
the drink. The vial has in an oily
sort of liquid with a thick brown
layer on the top.

If you want to get a look at
the funny house in Goodland, you
will have to make a quick job of
it, for you will see women peep-
ing at you from a window.



Fowl Thief Jailed |

After pleading guilty to a charge
of larceny brought by the Police,
Clyde Moore a labourer of Chap-
man Lane, St. Michael was
yesterday sentenced to one month’s
in.prisonment without hard labour)
by His Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod |
Police Magistrate of District “A”.|

Moore stole two fowls valued at
12/- belonging to Kathleen
Alleyne on January 23,

Police Constable Devonish told
the Court that on January 23 he
saw Moore with these two fowls
one of which he was carrying un-
der his arm,

He arrested Moore when he
could not give a satisfactory ex-
plantation as to how he came by

them. Later the same _ day
Alleyne identified the fowls as
her own.

Moore has one previous convic-
for stealing when he wag
40/- by His Worship Mr
H. A. Talma for the larceny of 4

sheep valued £1. lls. 2d.
Moore asked Mr. McLeod not
to.send him to prison but to

impose a fine. Mr. McLeod told
him that his hands are tied as
he (Moore) has a previous con-
viction for larceny and the law
says that anyone with a record
for larceny must go to prison if
found guilty.

Sgt. C. Murrell who prose-
cuted on behalf of the police
asked for imprisonment.

t

Le

A CLEANER CITY



ANOTHER VIEW of the new type of refuse collector.
order and are expected in early February

Two are on



THIS COVERED REFUSE COLLECTOR is expectea in eariy s'ebruary.

Commissioners’ contribution

Refuge Collectors
Coming

Two new types of refuse collec-
tors will be coming to the island
soon. These collectors keep the
refuse covered so that there is no
possibility
about the street. They ensure the
most up-to-date sanitary arrange-
ment for the removal of refuse.

These collectors were ordered
from England by the
Department of St. Mich
Messrs. McEnearney & Co., Ltd.
and will be used in the City and
suburbs, i

The Scavenging Department has

at present a fleet of nine refuse from 19 to 46.

lorries and 15 push carts.
The Advocate was told at the
Department yesterday that they

cover a mileage of approximately Richard

125 miles per day and remove
about 63 tons in the same period.



BARBADOS

of it being scattered }|

Scavenging | Wathen

Leslie Holmes, 44, is the skip- ,-—"--— - [jumped .17 per cent for each
per and he has with him Richard es iy of rey se wi
(Executive Officer) , ( t y , né one b oup which
ael through | George Hoehne (Navigator), Hen- e our proved to be fairly constant in Make that stew really tasty

ADVOCATE
SOON

PAGE FIVE

VICTORY GARDENS

WASHINGTON. other home garden campaign. He

The Department of Agriculture;added that if such ga program is

is thinking to-day about putting }launched again, “victory gardens”

hoes in the hands of city dwellers|would probably be called some-

{through the return of the victory |thing else, g name that still has
garden, to be drummed up.





COMING

“BLOOD |
By Robert N. Schwartz |

CHICAGO
Three scientists said to-da
study of blood contributed to ti













American * Red Cross showed | The department has already held If another home garden pro-

oe atgge nly the various = ¥ 1 the first of a series of conferences ,gramme is set up, officials say it

by oumerea on a geographices tq find out whether victory gar- | probably will not be an all-out
The study which lasted Yrom| “es should be encouraged this,campaign as it was in World

Jesuars 1948 through March |5Uâ„¢mer and if so, to what extent.|War IT. Chances are that efforts
1949, and included 141,784 men| The meeting was called at the] will be made to encourage serious

and women from 15 representa-|Pequest of Paul Stark, a nursery j city JOHNNY HAYSEEDS, and
ive cities turned up this fact man from Missouri and friend of }not the plant-in-the-spring-and-off
There are more “O” type per-| President Truman, who ran_ the }to-the-shore-all-summer variety,

sons in the South than in any/Victory garden campaign after

other region. World War IT to help provide food} The government wants to make
“B” type persons were in the|for Europe sure that full-time farmers who

majority in the North. produce the bulk of the nation’s
The scientists, Dr Louis K Agriculture Secretary Brannan|food and fiber get all the seed,

Diamond, George W. Hervey and ‘s called a meeting for January |fertilizer, insecticides and equip-

Virginia Watsen, all of Washing- and 23 of interested groups }|ment they need for all-out produc-

ton, D.C. report in the current]to discuss vietory gardens pro and } tion.

issue of the Journal of the Am-|con. The conference will include} Military and civil defense

erican Medical Association, j representatives of garden clubs, jofficials were said to favour ex-

ie ne they found a eee seed firms, horticultural depart-] pansion of home gardening as a

oor a en ae in j ree ments, truck garden journals, edu-|measure against sabotage, to aid

WE’ icenk , ind no Bast~! cators and others. nt ronservatio. of tin for cans, and
The tata) Keboentauk A Stark would not commit himsel’ [to make for more military space

; te percentage of per vhe abked shether. i vein t tati facilities

ons falling into each blood type} When asked whether he woulr ]on transportation facilities.

from all regions was as follows:|#¢cePt appointment to head an- —INS.
O—45.55 per cent; \—40.77

per cent; B—9.96 per cent; and|7~ £5 ic Ze

AB—-3.72 per cent.

© type is the so-called univer
sal type which can be used in all
transfusions regardless of the re-
cipient’s blood type.

Commenting on the value of
the study, the scientists declared

“In the event of an emergency
requiring large quantities of blood
(apparently a reference to atomic
attack) the Southern areas now
appear to be comparatively fav-
ourable sources of O and the
Northern areas of B ”

Results of the study indicated
that for each degree of latitude
moving from North to South, the
B group percentage increased an
average of .32 per cent. Moving
from South to North, on the oth-
er hand, the B group percentage

For that rich
savoury flavour?

It is part of the Sanitary
to a cleaner St, slichael.

AMERICANS CALL ON
RESEARCH CRUISE

NINE AMERICANS who are carrying out a biological
research cruise in the Atlantic, arrived at Barbados yes-
terday by the luxury yacht Juanita which they have
chartered to do their work.






with just a little Marmite !

ry E Whidden, Elmer Handy the various regions was the com- h
Paul Jos, Michie, Basil Symon Pencil And paratively rare AB, Make it better for you tog—
ette, Irving McLaughlin ano saan eae ae et! ex- Marmite contains the B2
Leslie Davis. Their ages range planation for their H somenad ;
=) ae Sees Yo P. “Probably the most acceptable Mn that build Up
They are working for _ the ur aper interpretation (for the prevalence ! and resistance to
Marine Biological Research In- of O type in the South) is that illness. That’s why it’s so
stitute, Inc. Baltimore, Maryland LONDON. in the South the hereditary lines good for everyone on bread Nit ;
Wathen is in charge o{{ The public relations department} of the early settlers, many * and butter or in tasty sand- '
the research work, of Britain’s General Post Office alan wee sae eee aes wiches. You can do so
Quite a good stock of glass jars}as issued an “important tip” elsh In origin, © '

much with Marmite in

jected to less admixture from the





are on board the yacht. They] for telephone users to every news- : : : ” : 5
: are kept clean for collecting rare| paper in Britain. outside than in the ee soupe, eahee a
C.D. C. Consider specimens of “life” to be found Under the heading “Telephon: .N.S. savoury ishes—an: armite
in oe ocean. Efficiency” the department use does so much for good cooking.
° . ese specimens will be taken] 142 words to tell the nation to keep
W oll. Shipping back to the States where they | pencil and paper next to the tele. Cows Do Fly
. , will be classified and may be], >

cocaine yP >. Mount, alused in other research work. ma is the advice in full kod valne hate pooner
fepresentative of Colonial Devel- one > crew is an expe aa 4 -* savy rains have s te ;
opment Corporation who is now bic Reetasieal seieet eh however Dnportant Tip tor Subsoribers,”| landslides from the “moving s
in Barbados on a short visit,] Skipper Holmes “Georse Hochne| Le efficiency of the telephone] mountain” which is erenventns = ; . ,
confirmed the report from Lon: and Richard Wathen ‘have done i” tele ao is of importance t oy little eo of Pantdu, The Vitamin B Yeast Food
don published in the Advocate ite a lot 3 so yiniect | ul telephone users, is under con-| Glamorganshire,
yesterday that the problem o ao a sss a poany 08) = subject ‘tant review by the Post Office, Boulders, rocks, and tree stumps geen dass aa

or p fland have reached an experimen-| > , to the village are
shipping in the West Indies is| tal stage. This is their first cruise| Pere is, however, a simple way hurling down hon ‘ . - se 1
one of which C.D.C. was aware of the sort They Nati not wet 1 which subscribers themselve: pearing the inhabitants continual-
from the start, and which has]. coh ene ae ae j can help, 7 ge Bhd e114 dial. taiata
been the subject of continuous RURIHOR “ON FORO RCH WOR “Tf every subscriber kept a pen- si ae nat rites geet The Naat H : . ; l ith t
puaer: aa Well Rigged cil and paper near his telephone | time the mountain moved a cow No oliday ts Comp ete winouw
h e cald that at. the moment The Juanita is certainly wel)| telephone lines and apparatus) was hurled down into her back

1 Sees es see a method that) rigged for the project. On her} would often be freed for other call: | garden, a Kodak Camera
would be both satisfactory and deck and astern is a sanding ma-] much sooner, there would be fewer ai

economically sound,

One of the most difficult prob- scraping the bottom of the vessel
lems had always seemed to him|@nd collecting the deposit which
to be the the provision of an|â„¢ay contain some of the objects

adequate inter-island service.
That problem resolved itself into

the question of inter-island trade] Stationary fishing rods and tubs
and it would be appreciated that] are nearby on the deck for re-
shipping economically |ceiving the
sound, freight as well as passen-| and

to make

gers were required.

Since most of the islands were|be found t ’
producing, broadly speaking, the| is roomy and will give good scope

same produce, the problem
building up an inter-island trade,

presented one of the major diffi-| for three or four months.

culties.

Local Company

Brigadier Mount said that the
development of the timber opera-
tions in British Guiana was going
ehead very well. Recently, this
undertaking was formed into ai
local company.

Work on the new and modern
mill began some months ago and

was going ahead well. When the Juanita’s
+ mill 4 5

is erected, the lumber pro-
duced from British Guiana will be
of a higher standard that it has

fever been before in the history

of the colony.

—LN.S.
chine, ‘line engaged’ signals, and both —_— -
caller and called would benefit
by the avoidance of unnecessary

waiting, This saving of time is

mechanical device for

a
é

Kodak (Cameras




Proud



a vor - Set particularly important in trunk of all
nm both sides of the yacht are ‘jong distance) calls, = : :
“Telephone calls now amount our 620 BROWNIE FOLDING hy rene seg Hera
¢ to over 3,000 million a year, of y 620 ” ” (Anaston ens)
catches. Nets, lines] wich 235 million are trunk call 620 fi BOX CAMERAS
a plankton collector are} For an appreciable percentage of 620 DUA-FLEX BOX CAMERAS
aboard while in the bridge willl these, and for the 3,000,000 tel 127 BROWNIE REFLEX CAMERAS
a fathomer, The deck grams i year delivered by tele ¢: ALBO : :
of| for fishing phone, the called subscriber re- CONWAY CAMERAS
The cruise is expected to last oT a pencil and paper. Count~ ULTRA-FEX CAMERAS
They | eas. hours would be saved’ if 16 mm. COLOUR & BLACK WHITE FILMS

these were readily at hand.”

The department said that more
“important tips” would be issuec
from time to time.

Some newspapers

started from Miami, Florida, and
sailed for Barbados via Cuba and
St. Thomas. They have called at
Barbados for the purpose of ef-
fecting repairs to their vessel.

8 mm. COLOUR & BLACK WHITE FILMS
16 mm, MAGAZINE COLOUR & BLACK a

Keep your lavatory spotlessly clean. It’s
mple. Shake some ‘ Harpic* into the bowl,

suggest EXPOSURE METERS












Richard Wathen told the Ad-{ 4merican Ambassador Walter| '’4ve overnight, then flush, ‘Harpic’ will
vocate yesterday that they me] Gifford, Board chairman of Ameri ean and deodorise the whole pan —even NIGHTS LTD
very rough weather throughout] can Telephone and a where no brush can reach, } | e
their 2,000-mile voyage from}|Company, might provide the de = A R Pp 1 Cc
Miami here. They had not in-bsortment with a few important
tended stopping at Barbados, but : to increase efficiency nao, PHOENIX & CITY PHARMACIES yi
were forced to after part of th INS. THE SPECIAL LAVATORY CLEANSER rif
rigging was snappec SS = ==
in a storm, J ee a eG)





After spending about five day
here, they will set sail again. The
next port of call is unknown. It

NO WAR=UNTIL

| You don't need







is their first visit to Barbados IT FLOODS

He said that negotiations _ — ES - RP sd — oxpoRD

yover i i ey nin arbados a ve . .
the comma factory in. ‘Trinidad place The sleepy little village of your car bright 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street
were still continuing, but in The white painted Juanita! Stoner, Oxfordshire is not worried
Dominica, the Corporation’s group|has a net tennage of 85 tons, is by war talk a
of products were progressing|/90 feet long, 25 feet wide and The villagers look at the Assen-
well. They included a_citrus|draws 10 feet of water, den stream that flows through the

plantation, a citrus packing grad-
ing plant,

the Roseau district.

Brigadier Mount leaves te-day
for St. Lucia by B.W.I.A. to

observe the progress of the re-| ace her engine is out of order

building of Castries.

Clothes Given
Away

Over 70 poor and old people] recently

were given clothes at the
Children's Goodwill League yes-
terday afternoon The clothes were
sent by Mrs. Violet Murray, a
social worker of Boston, Mass.
Also assisting Mrs. Murray were
Mr, C. Hilton Green and Mr, W.
E Husbands, two Shipping
Agents of Boston, Mass.

The clothes were distributed by
Mr. John Beckles and Mr. and
Mrs, W. E. Husbands who are in
the island on holiday.

A gramophone and records were
These
the entertainment of the

also sent by Mrs. Murray.
are for
small children at the League.

VERDICT ON PILGRIM’S
DEATH





An open verdict was returned
yesterday
cir-
cumstances surrounding the death
of Herman Pilgrim ended yester-

by a nine-man
when an inquiry

jury

into the

day at District “B” Police Court

Mr. A. W. Harper
Coroner Herman

was the

Pilgrim

at Seawell on Friday, January 19
when a two and a half ton

bucket fell on him about 9.25
a.m
| Pilgrim was a greaser employed
by Messr J. N. Harriman &
Cc T+A

ice and cold storage} Boothbay Boat Building Company
and a hydro electric scheme for| 12 years ago for Mr. George Bred

of
Hillbury Road. Brittons Hill, died

iron

She was built in Maine by the | tillage and predict: | “There will
be no war this year.
Ancient legend says that so long




you need only one





Shammy-Leather

2°, | CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LID. |
|

a businessman of the States.! 1s the stream does not flood there ‘ ,
Good weather and she will do| Will be no war. 1 ee Conk
10 knots. To-day while many of Britain's

‘ We have them in various
rivers are in winter flood the As- \ | i




The Juanita relies on sails ir senden is only a, trickle. Only ft we sizes and prices.
ba tuarmdne palel ay} twice in living memory has the
ae — ee. Wes stream welled up from its source

in full flood. The first time was in
the summer of 1914, and the sec-
ond in 1939,

Eli Shirford, 86, remembers the
legend from his boyhood,

trouble to keep it clean.

Beef Costs More

§) size 20" x 21"__ $3.63

oo. “I saw that stream flood just
People have been complaining before World War I. It filled the pa 16" X 7" J
that they have been|}eeljars of the pub and ran down ——
i

asked to pay a penny more for a
pound of beef which is scheduled

the road to the Thames River at

Henley.”















to sell at 36 cents a pound. A! Said 77-year-old Tom Collyer " " $1 63
check-up with the Control of eornetiniaa it does rise to a trickle ad 14 X 15 meena .
Prices Department yesterday re-|but we don’t get worried until it '
vealed that there has been no] floods.” ——————_- a
order authorising such an increase —LNS |
in the price of local beef. eerie

The price of imported beef A
fluctuates, Not only is it sold KITCHEN BURNT HOLIDA VING IN
according to the cut, but the price A fire which started in Ma



is also affected by landing cost

any Lane yesterday evening
One of the leading importers of

§,15 burnt part of a kitchen,





frozen meat however told the} property of Irene Griffith, Grif W’. kK. ?
Advocate yesterday that there] fith was cocking at the time of| e e
was no Official increase over 36|the fire and it is alleged to have



cents a pound, though he did not
| know

started from the fire with which

if local butchers were| she was cooking. The Fire Bri-|
charging more. gede turned out and quickly put} s > : :
The butchers on the other hand] out the fire. The kitchen is sep Deliveries can be arranged in.

say it must be the importers whc



arated from the remainder of the)
house |

ERR RRR Beene ee
FRESH SUPPLY OF 2

"PURINA HEN CHOW ©

|

a (SCRATCH GRAIN) s
oH JASON JONES & CO., LTD.--Distributors @
Mm eeERpERE RE RETR EER ES

are charting

A

more

the UK. for the popular - -

VAUXHALL CARS

Full details will be gladly given on application to - -

ROBERT THOM LTD.

GARAGE)



Dial 4616
acmnateammiaade

Whitepark (COURTESY

IL












PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 1951
«ssid italien ame ——_—_$

Cea pore.to a COLD
ee





















HENRY



Headache, that feverish “ache-
all-over” feeling—ease these Cold
discomforts with Alka - Seltzer.
Allka-Seltzer contains alkaline
ingredients to neutralize excess
gastric acidity plus an analgesic

for soothing headaches.

Have it handy —always!

DELICATE



WORK

For our people depends quite
a bit eon YOUR support of “Home
Industries.” APART from that,
compare

uMOLENE

(price and quality) against any

similar article and you will find

you get better value. Lim lene is

as refreshing as a breath of Spring
18 to 67c. at your dealer,

LESSEE SSSOCSSSSES

| FLAVOUR

| For Mellow Smoothness

and distinctive flavour,

Â¥ NONSENSE OLD MAN! JUST
STEP INTO THE OFFICE!



COOL BEAUTIFUL

“FERGUSON FABRICS”

FOR WEAR AT NIGHT.

STOCKED BY LEADING STORES. —














| in en grees Abit a
1 HATE MYSELF fen

WHEN 1 DO erw
LIKE THIS



There is no rum that com-











SOMEONE
a rte ae

CMH ee
INTERESTED )

THE HAPPY

HOUSE Je pares with .

Ses
f STUART & el
HL





IT COMES IN)» YOURE THRU WITH
= SIZES HIM, IT'S MY TURN





2 ;









LID.

Headquarters for Best Rum.







ananosmns ——

“ Te: June in Jonuarg It always is in Barbados and

that’s why Northerners enjoy our

climate, and their favourite foods.
SPECIAL— DOWNYFLAKE CAKE MIX — Ginger, Vanilla, Chocolate Flavours .......:.:.::ccsssenesesees 86c. per Pkg.

MEAT DEPARTMENT:



Pe












Extracts and Household

PRIME AUSTRALIAN BEEF seen a
Bovril ............ $1.60 .90 .70 Harpic ......... $ .80 $ .47
ae Bonox (Beet Extract) .70 .40 Shinio ooo .36
in STEAK, ROAST, Marmite ....... -97, 60, 32 SiIVO ...sssessnessennssese 36
: Oxo Cubes ........0..... .22 Min Cream 40 .20







Bisto (For Gravy)... .33 Windolene ................ 31





















6 ON THE I WONDER IF THE
TABLE <1 SAID- RUSTLERS WiLL Madras Curry ....... .76 Kilcrobe (D.D.T.) ...... .71
A uonieat= = Prepared Mustard... .17 Chemico Cleanser... .28

Heinz Browning for

Peanut Butter and







; Jams
Pickles and Sauces
Peanut Butter .......... - 85
Morton’s Mixed
Pickles ....cscssenn .56 err Jam .
ie ca gas =e j
KI PPERS Cheer ec sicausscs 53 een Jam «
hisctate chee MB memes y
peal “ 71 S.A. Fig Jam (2-Ib) 52
“Don T You ) WANT S oe eth WA Te eT] 7 Seek MONEY, 4] || TAMIL I (RIC ERS mma B] UR °
Tue euler sc, \ ora CANADIAN sisi: Wiasasinih S.A, Melon & Ginger
WILL RATTLE AeC: ed eee Tre : Geread oescsiuns. 51 Jam (2-1) 0.0... 0

‘ S.A, Peach Jam
S ALMON et ree. ee WOOT ietiscnse ces 60
Salad Cream .47

a Red Currant Jelly .. .34













a ene
























Hy re VM : » Stem Ginger 1.16
AN VA SALAMI
ag? \\\ ) Vt" Liqueurs, Wines
Oy 1 SAUSAGE
3 Qin Cereals Etc.
Li LA) Rs Per Wh._ $1.00 fF rarer essen 80 Drambule sccm $6.00 |
a ie od ————_ ] Breakfast Food ....... 86 | Grand Marnier ...... 7.50
EN Le ee bona \at nase’ | | Room to Man maar Allson’s White Oats 48 D.0.M 5.78
wr EXTRA TIME AT | YOU WANT. hk ‘ BE GIH My aisisicacnstvens :
LUNCH ? I HAVE Patent Barley ....83 .51 Gilbey’s Empire j
and Port fecsanninne ‘2652, 1.92

Dow's Sherry ........ 4.00

Quaker Puffed
H A M Wheat .........8 37 Gordon’s Gin ........ 2.50
‘ ‘ f 2.50

SLICED Per th.

APPLES |e ea

.73
; 70
1.07— .62














Per Ib 3O0c.

Per case $10.00















{CANT GO AWAY WITHOUT IT-~ ¥¥
MIGHT NEED IT- ANY gg d
MINUTE # THAT é

BLASTED DOG+~

BUTA FIGURE SUDDENLY
FLASHES BETWEEN HIM
AND THE DOG+ AN /RON
F/8T CONNECTSS













SWARLING DEVIL “GUARDS THE

GET AWAY FROM | FALLEN GUN ~

THATGUN, YOU~4/ 4 but m







#







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

| THE INDOMITABLE

PAGE SEVEN

Weakens







Britain,France U.S. Leadership





THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 1951
PUBLIC NOTICES

CLASSIFIED ADS.













NOTICE + . :
ee nf Se Se SN REJOINS FLEET U.S. Agree Influence Wiih West
DIED F@R RENT Marked on the envelope, Tender for




Church céiling—will be received by the

not late 27th January

Hy Ww. To Talks

LONDON, Jan, 24
Britain, France and the Unive

A. CRUMLEY

WORRELL—Yesterday at her residence
ieplaine, St. Andrew Catherine Jane.
(87) Interment took place the said eve-
ning at Saint Andrew's Parish Church.
Julian and Milton (U.S.A.)
Condeil, Clyde, Mrs. Rita Riley, Elliot

Restor

NEW YORK, Jan. 24.
The New York Times diplomatic correspondent James

—James

zt than



Plans and Specifications can be seen
at my Office on any Office day.

Successful Contractor must be prepared
to Complete this job to the satisfaction

HOUSES








Snes
— Cattlewash, Bathsheba,









States have agreed to “a Big Fou Reston that




' wrote to-day ‘events that have followed
inkson. 151—1e CULDUNE, of the Building Committee conference if Russia lifts the bu: Ameri eaders i * east ar i
Hinkson E10. TE ech Mae ns ee See Come, > duicietin Wall pepe: imerican leadership in the Far East and in the question
BOWMAN—MARY LILIAN BOWMAN a. Ber oe including Refrigerator Clerk to the Vestry, likely to threaten world peace of rearmanent of Western Germany have, it is generally
. J] conteining 4 rooms, running water St, Philip. . F : aT ee recogni are. ores , wed py y 4 ij i
loge Barbaus ae “an ise oa ewe ir each. Dial 8310. Mrs. Stuart Bynoe. 20.1.51--3n 1) was disclosed todgy. recognised here, gre atly © cake d United States influence
Channel Islands, 25.1.51—1n 23.1.51—3o | — — Russia hag so far stipulated that among the western nations.
1 ATS Cen laa SF Eis a ee een inn Gathcne cone NONCE the sole subjects of the conferen: ri ’ : 1s , :
THANKS ting of 3 bedrooms all with runnir¢ PICKWICK CRICKET CLUB should be German demilitaris. © fact of the matter is that 3 Red China.
— | water, ioeectine some and ait mode "Members are kindly asked to collect tion and other German probler ree ail. many Allies ri Resto: suid:
Oe alk tio ek eee, bee te conveniences, For appoi ntment, aie aS): | their gear ax the pavilion and groupds ——a move aimed against Wester: ‘¢ United States seriously anc

flowers, cards and letters and in any






























have been handed over io the Barbados
















Sincerely believe we rushed has







cam ; ; he be lathe not made it clear
ia 5 pians for raising German units *! , ; yp ne ie :
_ - " 7 | Cricket Association. The Club will not German rearmament question, | blie that sne is ready for
irene Soleo sympathy in ow sdnetae Wf Pepeine cee er ee : pe thanntaives responsible om 7s loss a of the: dn acted unilaterally ara they be- condemnation of Red
avement. P ’ | of gear not lect immediately iden > Sco © ” e aly . >» is aki i
Almaz and Nasmyth Crosby, Sue and}|3 Bedrooms all with running wate oe ee D KIDNEY. ference te include Mthe principal lieved, unwisely in defending Chir hat she is making dis-
/ida Williams. 25.1.51—1n | #0r further particulars phone 2824. Hon. Secretary ; Formosa, and pushed our.powe Cit between moral sanc-
25.1.51—3in 4 causes of the present international 5 aa . . , a Seki “
21.1.51—6n tension” Was one of the two con too far towards the Chinese tict against Peking and “eco-
IN MEM IAM “SWANSEA” | —_—_—- —_-—_- ——-——_——_ S fr or.” n Sanctions or “mili y
OR turniehen Bunualew at Worthing. & Bed ditions | laid down | in the three ae eels months difference a "The “pelations be.
BULLENs—In memory of our friend | 700ms, Frige, Telephone, Radio, Garage NOTICE powers’ replies yesterday (Tues- between the United States and. iween the two countrjes are being
Kenneth Ralph Bullen who was laid to | 29d available Ist February, Dial 347 or PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH day) to the latest Russian note. moet of the rest of the non- rampered by the failure of Brit
rest on 25th Jan. 1950, 2490. 23.1.51—3n. The replies were made public in ‘ tore: , ake is
Gone but not forgotten interne — Sealed Tenders, (marked on the Pr aPe : i ri P Communist nations, and particu im te make this distinction
See pence eee Micki aioe. TRINITY COTTAGE—St. James Coast. | envelope “Tender” for Loan”), will se] , Britain’s most powerful fighting Vietorious, is being rearranged London, Paris and Washington to- jarly between the ‘United States Fe: = fuentes seataining. 3 bedrooms, zeceived af sar office up to 3.00 p.m. on /Ship, the reconstructed 23,000-tol! so that at all times a reserve of “ay. h and Britain, have been played
BULLEN—In memor t friend a telephone. Ava’ le for months of | Monday anuary, 1951. for the loan | ajrers . i ili shi i » oon i a The othe -onditi was that > naming aa mh Am sertt,
dae Wee wa of oor Un eof Fearuaty 40 May aod Auaen te Deee Me LON Sa tay polite are eae aircraft carrier Indomitable, wil) ships in moth balls can be com th e — ee oe at down because they coincide with
Jan. 25th 1950, ber 1951, Phone 2959. 21.1.51—2 | interest not exceeding 4%, to be repaid|Teinforce the Home Fleet nex: missioned in emergency. e preliminary conference 1M the intensive drive by the Com ates XC ange
Wik aabike colen tepiead ane habe dcoaae ——— | in fifteen equal instalments of £1s»|month, First details of the 1951 pro- Paris should consider international jyunists to divide the Western
We never thought his death was near each gommencing in the month of She has been completely refitte! gramme, disclosed by the Admir- problems to decide which should coalition. January %, 1995
Qnty those who love can tell - PUBLIC SALES ee WOOD GODDARD. and her flight deck lengthened anJ alty last night, announced sailing be {included on the agenda of the in... however, private differ. oa 7/10} pp Shteqae*on
The Bullen deruye Emerald iia Clerk of the Vestry, strengthened for new types 9i of ships of the Home Fleet thi. “Big Four COMDSTSHGG “Ot POTMES | ce have given way to public Bankers 61 8/10% pr
Cheapeaa. th ada’ Christ Church.}naval jet planes, » Week for joint exercises with tiie Ministers and their order of pri- charges in Britain on American Demens . ;
‘pemeevrermamsnanicintindepeistintiliniataitieinmanamasrenane AUCTION 18.1 51—5n Mediterranean Fleet. ority. The preliminary conf erence recklessness” ‘in handling — tha wide Pee : iat a.
oe ae ee Ser eribe ae Return of the Indomitable is the Before the Home Fleet comes ae be attended by Ministers’ j,. Eastern crisis, while in 69 7/10% pt. Cable Ci
Bra wi : . ‘. ; } : teh fs m@ 210% pr Currency 60 3/104 pr
who departed this life on Jan. 25th 146. | UNDER HA R | Ni ‘ first stage of the rebuilding of home in March the Indomitable, deputies, Washington the British are now ‘ ee 508/106. or
Fred Duesbury, 25.1.51—In. | py eR THE IVORY. 1 IAMMER emova otice the Fleets, which, with two new an efficient fighting ship again. _ Under this head the Western being openly charged with “ap- o» pr saa mene
__ LOST BUT NOT FORGOTTEN | Thursday, January 25th at my Mart,| ROGERS BARRER SALOON Beg to}38,000-ton’ aircraft-carriers, new will replace the Vanguard as the Governments are asking - :
SEALE — In loving memories of my | Shepherd Street, the following: A set of | notify their Customers that they will{heavy destroyers, and fast. anti- flagship. preliminary conference should be
dear sons Ralph Seale and Donald Seale Settee Roane ak. ae ee jeoe 2 Building Next Daoedderds & /submarine frigates, is designed t» Another reserve aircraft-carrie; permitted with some discussion +
a ot ae Tae Jie Saw, Purse, Gath Sponges, “Biccie| tne'zth Suntary ian." ™ ™/bring the Navy to. effectiv> the 19,880-ton Warrior. Is boing substance on. the sues invelve
ords are very little things, Rims 28/7 x 1%" Bicycle Guards, Pots, : 24.1.51—Sn, | Strength in two to three years. ordered back to Korea with rein- aS well as simply a decision On | —_e_——_—eeemen
Things they cannot half in-part Kettles, Ch ae hich includes for, : ; yal What to include in the agenda ¥
The feelings that are deepest to a dear | K* et tein, ooters, Lamp_ The programme, which inclu es forcements of Navy men, Royal ‘eli i fare
Mother’s heart, tae pecmtise Matches etc. Sale NOTICE total reconstruction of the Flect Marines, and aircraft But the preliminary conference
Pete den a tee Pe aeery tL cae aaah partied Tenders for the erection of a| aircraft-carriers Implacable and —L.E.s, Would not attempt to arrive at
But many a Mother Kes. gtieved VINCENT GRIFFITH. ‘avilion and Community Hall at Ellerton





By instructions received from the In-





solutions of the problems “this



Britain could “in no cireumstan-

6a, | Playing field will be received by me up function being reserved for the
For. thei a ; 21.1.51—6n. ri ne '
But in God 1 trust ri beanie aed“ ipeciinatiens sik be “e e Ministers themselves.” But new treatment does more than
Mrs, E. Seale (Mother) der The Diam Men BEE ee ec ees A ; P, l rt: B t h S d The British note repeated that
Un i ond Hammer Messrs. Harrison & Con. Ltd... Broad st. ir l oO Ss u ec ers én ease these terrible agonies.

FOR SALE























surance Co,, I will sell on the spot at
Bank Hall x Road on Friday the 26th
of January, beginning at 1 o'clock, One







The person or firm whose Tender is
accepted will be required to give the
names of 2 persons as Sureties, and to












ces” accept the Prague proposals
on Germany as a limitation on, or

‘“‘Are Too Letter To

A new product, DOLCIN, has been created wh













i t 1 ich not only gives
enter into a formal contract with the as the basis for, discussions, prompt relief from the ins due to the symptoms of arthriiis and
A double-reofed shop. To be removed ‘frou | Vestry of St. George It said: “His Majesty's Govern- rheumatism, but also affects the metabolic processes which constitute
UTOMOTIVE spot. D'Arey. A. Scott, Auctioneer. Due allowance should be made for 99 ‘ ish hasi . »
23.1.51—4 ; ment wish to emphasise as was | @ rtant part of the rheumatic state’s background.
‘ ale #3.1.51—4n. | possible increased cost of materials and oor ee ‘ di thei t f ber Dol . edical i ituti

CAR—Citroen_16 P.11900 moacl in labous, stated in their note of December has n thoroughly tested in medical institutions,
qucclint. centicen eS os eS The Vestry does not bind itself to ac_ iba: 22, that the tension which exists | DOLCIN is being used now with vnpenpeeenses success, DOLCIN
island. Apply: B’dos Agencies Ltd REAL ESTATE cept the lowest or any eenaaes British Overseas Airways pilots LONDON, Jan, 24. _ in the world today does not arise 5 ee ee, d by doctors now. And many sufferers have already
Dial 4908, Evelyn, 21.1.51—7n Clerk, Vestry of St. George | re “far too poor to uphold their Leaders of 400 London butch- from the German problem, A dis- me aerinel yin mae et of taking f oN. i tu

Pha ualbntn ee fan en KA i ¢ i “ rs tir hast ~USssi imi the experience of fellow-victims of thease

CAR—Buick 8. 1939 Model, inspection The undersigned will offer for sale by 20.1.61 dignity and move .in the right ers tired of facing groups of cussion limited to the questions on’t jay. co) Ee ¢

invited. Willems, Rosamund: Worthing. | Public competition at their office, No. 17, circles.” grumbling .housewives to-day proposed by the Soviet Govern- | pains, Get DOLCIN today. A bottle of 100 precious tablets costs
#0.1-60—an- High, Street, Bridgetown, 2 Thureday NOTICE Captain H. L, Fry, 38-year-@l¢. demanded a statement of the ment would ah be inade- | 0 BY
wT (tA ’Taccohall ee rH 5 seni i i G t’ lans re quate and unreal.” :

CAR—Vauxhall Wyverns 12 h.p. saloons | dwellinghouse called Re ESTATE OF Ter. captain, who joined Government’s plans to get more 4 a ‘ OOKE

arrived. Dial 4616, COURTESY GARAGE. | . RICHELIEU SAMUEL HENRY HOWARD STREAT| Imperial Airways, forerunner ot meat. The British reply also pointed BOOKERS DRUG STORES— Bridgetown and Alpha
anno | tn “ith avert, “Belerie” wits’ 9495 | NOTICE is nersinsiven that ait per-| BOAC; in 1987, whites in the Log, “They sent a letter to Prime out that Britains earlier note of aeney.
je, Vv y Wi 85) Pre Pi ” i itie i i . ae ? 5

CAR — Morris 8 1946. Perfect condi- square feet of land. Drawing, dining | 5°MS having any debt or claim upon or ong re the British Airline Minister Attlee * accusing the Devens we o eee oa
tion. Phone 4255 between 9.30 a.m. and and breakfast rooms, 4 bedrooms, bath | !fecting the estate of Samuel Henry | Pilots Association: Government of failing to provide representatives o e ig Fou
3 pm. 25. n, and toilet and kitchen. Double garage Sn - Gr ta cation oo Bloomsbury) “The position of a captain in people with “adequate supplies.” should pnts en a
— —— — and servants rooms. lantativ: e parish of Sain ~ | Imperial Airways was, of course With only one shilling’s worth national problems “with a view to

CAR — Ford 1948 six cylinder pect: , al| Who died in this Island on the 9th day ab vo ms pvigded s ER a terrence eetisreemmees
Luxe Sedan, low mileage and in good ean rt oe of January 1951 are hereby required to totally different from the position of meat per week, butchers told re a eae ae bibs
Ther ant eat senaition. Chas. me ro | COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.. sead in perioulars ot ee Soe. Gate of 5 cr Pe a . oe that ee could not ant *. or Fi = mS suum Reacent AUSTRALIA sew | geet 0.

y, Me , ae actyors. | Siweree, & MENS 7 P “Present-day captains receive contrive more than two meats Ministers o P , aaa LINE
ncentenntieninein retin ena eatbrsbtiepeniiaanaacin tins, 51 Oswald Hamilton Harding, Oswald How- |], . ; ‘ ‘ - t * on if (MLA.N.Z,

LORRIES — One (1) 190 V—8 Ford | SSS | ard’ Streat and Milton Seale, the quai. | inferior transport, inferior hotel with meat, “She is at her wits srachenio’ Sonithtla Meena | Sek wren The MV, “DAERWOOD" will
Lorry, One (1) V—8 Ford Lorry without | FOR RENT, SALE OR LEASE fled executors of the will of the deceas- | accommodation, a salary which end to know how adequately she ernments a suitable agenda. wil Adolaide Jonuary 4th, Molbourne accept Cargo and Passengers for
Tyres and Engine. One (1) 1939 Chev-} BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-| ed in care of Cottie Catford & Co., No.| will buy far less, and they have, can feed her family for tne It added that these representa- January 18th, Brisbane January 27th, St. Luela, Grenada, and Aruba, and
Station Hill, st ’Alichsel ‘Dial soul" | Stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din- | 17 ish ST Or Mae eat, rte, Defer | of course, a much lower relative remainder of the week,” they tives would “need to give some | iyiney February Mth. Arriving ‘at Tri- Dena yimly for St. | Vincent,

Ren a Se eee. Biecin, | 2 7S eediata ee a ee GLIA Oe aRLIL DIGREE e eRe oe LMOnity added consideration to questions and) wig “Maret, Nal, Merch, 1984, Barbados ||] Sailing on Wednesday sist inst,

-*-)*—** | ette 8 bedrooms running water in each, ate we shi cee a Py vig “J . ‘ . ° : :
"anny er en =| Tollet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS Closod | assets of the said estate among the par- Ground Control And the butchers assured problems involved in order to non vessel has ample space for Hard The M.V. “Catibbee” will

MASSEY - i ities | Gallery, Living-room, Breakfast room| ties entitled thereto, having regard ‘| “There are other changes. such Attlee that they were “well determine their formulation for Cargo ee General Cargo, Accept Cargo and Passengers for
bh.p. also with steel wheels. ries | and Kitchenette, 2 Bedrooms Toilet and| the debts and claims only of which we . 15) vefded in + ini d griev- inclusion in the agenda as well argo accepted on through Billy of Dominic we svenueve. ie
gordially invited. COURTESY GARAGE. | natn, Electric ‘Light and Telephone.| then shall have had notice, and|as greatly increased ground con- vers he opinions and g as the order in which they would | /Aéné with transhipment at ‘Trinidad ||| Dominica, "Antigua, ene on
Dial 4616. 19.1.51—6n. | Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation, | that we shail not be liable for assets so| trol over flying operations and the ances of the housewife, as the order a . = ey — for British Guiana, Barbades, Wind- depart a tun Mle re

——————-—, | St. Thomas Dial 2221, 21.1,51.—6n, | distributed to any person of whose debt constant checking system (un- The letter was signed by appear so tha e mutually | ward and Leewnrd Island, | -

PICK-UP — One Second hand Ford —....| or claim we shall not have had notice . : > table basis referred to could Por further particulars oppiy:— |

known pre-war), which hé | Harold Daniels, President of the acceptable basis referred to ply
V-8 Pick-up in A. 1 condition. Just CAVE & ROACHES PLANTATIONS | at the time of such distribution Pp » Wh ave al belanedd s be established.” —Reuter FURNESS, WITHY & COMPANY, | BWI, SCHOONER OWN-
overhaul. (Past inspection) 3 days ago) ‘We will set up for sale by Public| And all persons indebted to the said | lowered our professional status,” London Retail Meat Traders Asso- be es pee ui ‘ LIMITED, \ ERS. ASSOCIATION, 1
New Tyres. 24.1-51—4n. | Competition at our Office James Street, estate are requested to settle thelr ac¢) Captain Fry suggests BALPA. ciation, — 3 . “ene, roe | 7 leph 4047 z m
“TRACTOR One (ID McCormick Deor.| 0n Friday 2nd February 1951, at 2 p.m.| counts without delay. should discuss with BOAC: The butchers added that most o } r WI. | elephone:

TRACTOR—One (1) McCormick Deer- CHES LANTATIONS Dated the 23rd day of January 1951. agen ; - ; » Ba & DA COSTA & Co. Ltd,
ing Farmall H. wheel tractor, complete ae mn a ton aid conraloiig by| Gordon Oswald Hamilton. Harding, |!.—A return to the pre-war systeni the meat now being supplied was Eva Peron Appeals A Sotaans ° |
with grass cutter. In excellent condi-} estimation 83 acres 3 roods 23 perches * Oswald Howard Streat, whereby an aircraft commander unsuitable for cutting up into u a BW. RMON cpmeeectetaeen, -
pen, very little used, ee take of which about 48 acres are arabie, Hilton Seale and his first officer were con- extremely small rations, and that For Strike Call-off

















The acreage is made up as follows:















Qualified executors of the will of Samuel






veyed between airport and hote!









dy f nny Howard Streat, deceased. V it could not be compared = in
VELOCETTE 500 c.c—Done under 1,000 we Ten a ee ye oun Pee tae 14.1.51—3n in a car; palatability with meat consumed BUENOS AIRES, Jan, 24.
Boieiae A inine Darga, gp 00.00. 14 acres young canes. itt cecaeenicenenmnte ———— |2—The provision of first-clasy before the war. Senora Eva Peron made : .
; 19,1,51—6n. Se Pe: preparation, | “£25 ~ 74: easily earned by obtaining || accommodation; Other organisations of butchers single handed effort during the ‘O.
roads, yards etc Seat Sears eee Tevihtd Oxtanh: 3A daily overseas allowance are expected to join this move “ night to put an end to Argentina’:
POULTRY Inspection on application to Mr. | from your friends, No previous experi} of roughly £2, put pressure on the Government third railway strike in the period —_
- —— ——-—. + | Ormond Knight on the premises. beautiful free sample Book to Britain's London Express Service. The failure of British and Ar- of » few months, Travelling by . Inc.
CHICKS — 12 White Wyandotte Chicks YEARWSOD & BOYCE, largest and foremost Publishers; highest gentine negotiators last week to car, accompanied by two high
hatched from imported Utility laying Solicitors. commission; marvellous money making agree on terms for the resump- fficials she went from. one station NEW YORK SERVICE
stocks 5 x 3 weeks old for $4.25. 7 x 2 EASE ON opportunity Jones, Williams & Co., D l h 2 FB e “ tit t shi nts o y > , 8/8 ©. G, Thulin sails 12th January arrives Barbadoa 23r¢ January
weeks old for $5.25 or the lot for $9.00 rey build.| Dept. 9 Victoria Works, Preston, oO /p in ‘urniture tion of Argentine meat shipme' > to another in the outskirts 01 8/8 Myfiord » 2nd February - is 4th February
Dial 3394. 34.1.51—2n.'| PROPERTY — One (1) 3 storey build-| pen ind, to Britain has ended any hop’ jjuenos Aires exhorting strikers t« | stesso andl Seetbiced- inhekciluhi teas ae pea
IMPROVE tock — 3 White Wy tral Sevpcay a pond % MG. Lewis sae Is Part Of Sart Lie SPaGaey SNEED, ESTER SENOS pment Woke: NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
your s' = ~ } > > day be. | Supe . . sina J ad
andette Cockerels 3 months old. Raised Jon premises. Inspection any day be 2 be increased. uf ave ,,okeleton services which hac 8/8 Liberville sails 21st December — arrives Barbados th y
d 4 pm LIQUOR LICENSE N 4 ters, there have vegterd , / acl hth Januar
from imported utility laying stock. $3.50} tween 8 a.m. an cerenee : tiated anlar - ot ° In some quarters, there have }ven n.aintained yesterday on twe A Steamer » 4th January * “ lath January
Soe) OF SRV ASORE, Aw Sen ee Lense At tet etbea. eneaan: Ge semnemavon Hw Festival Show been forecasts that it may be @ ;ygin lines serving Buenos Aires | A Steamer ‘) 8th January i "- 2nd ‘February
3304. oat WESTCLIFFE — Navy Gardens, stand- | fq. B*Town’ for. permission. to. sell {urther cut. had by this morning also been | == CANAD|AN SERVICE
ELECTRICAL ing on eet Maes ners a - Spirits, Malt Liquors, &e., at a beard The Dolphin furniture, mace —Reuter brought to a virtual halt and the
Jand, Built o! ne, ree bedroom

ee
ELECTRIC STOVE — Table Model, 2









and all modern conveniences. Also large





free light, water and taxes. Knowledge

and shingle and wall building at corner
Kensington New Rd, Baxters Rd. B’town,



j 0
in 1813 to commemorate Nelson's tOUTEBOUND



paralysis was almost total.













Queen, will also be on view. Korea,

aaiictbe yet . , victories, will be on show in e * —Reuter. Name of Ship Saily Sails Arrives
lay room 30 by 14 feet. For particu Dated this 23rd day of January 1951 ; a r 6 :
rings with small oven attached and Blec-| Jars and appointment, Phone Winston | po Nyy ST A Yoaa 5 Brighton's Royal Pavilion during Improving Brazil on. “hike dae? meer elites Barbados
trie Toaster. Apply Box A.A. C/o Ad-] Johnson at 4311. 26,1.51—6n Police Magistrate, aa weal a Regency Festival this summer 4 ‘BAMURALCOK PILGRIM” = tic deny, ei gare
vocate Co. 28.1.51—In. Signed GLADYS FARLEY. The Dolphin. suite—so called Comes First U.S. Extend aes os :
ary cut ft ‘teeuine with ak: WANTED ne Seat ae Ag hela at eee: a dope naaieetl O TN Them verweis have limited passenger accommodation.
cub, : : dered at a . s § Sist,
Apply D. 1. Emtage ¢/o K. R, Hunte Police Court, District “A” on Friday! of ten armchairs, three settees SAYS VARGAS verseas fours |
aves, Ltd. 4611. 20.1.51—t.f.n ra ie ite — | the and day of February 1951 at 11), window seat, ‘a boat-shaped RIO DE JANEIRO Jan. 23 WASHINGTON, Jan. 24 ; ROBERT THOM LTD.—New York and Gulf Service.
wa a p’clock, a.m oo ne ; ae; d . + ‘ : .
AA Cho a ee Re ee at ama one eer ee Te ee s press statements—real The American army is 0 extend Apply: DA OOSTA & CO, LTD.—Canadian Bervice.
Box A.A. C/o Advocate Co, HELP Police Magistrate, Dist. A'’| wood tops and brass inlay, a In mass press P : c > rae
25.1.51—In. 25.1.51—1n.| sofa table and a pedestal centre- or imaginary—it was claimed that overseas puts 6 REFRIGERATOR — One General Elec-] SECRETARY for ROCKLEY GOLF | ——-————... ___-—.-_-_ | piece. President-elect Getulio Vargas has men In ha Far East, a eae ;
tric American Refrigerator 5 cf. in| CLUB. Salary $100.00 per month to ee eee | Regency furniture from other expressed himself as much more OTe a ae meen extension | PASSAGES TO EUROPE
perfect order. A gift at the price. Call | gether with free quarters in fiat over I t t Notice 1| collections, including tho ‘% interested in correcting the finan- PB. f tive athena ot eee th
; it 4910 3601. , taining t edrooms, 7 > A anc < ch a eine >
renner e OF 9.1. B1-=20. living one domed veunaah te. nls0 mpor an | owned by the King and Gigi and moral state of Brazil than





















RADIO—One (1) Eddystone model 8.504









of Goif an advantage,

















THE Gas supply will be cut off













in the question of immediate party Contact Antilles Produets, Limited, Roseau, Dominias, for sail-

In July there will be a ball in The order applies to American |

!
|
|
|
|

































in districts from the Esplanade |j 5 olities. ‘00 i d Austria | ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
. = * di p- ; e y costum nd the world P Y i . troops in Germany an us’ :
ies Ee vite Seen, a | Same oe Soler oat Es, | || Bi, Re ation Mam ||| prices St a net lee of tig According 10 these claims in- ‘TOQPe In, Germany and Austria||| $960 Burope., The usual ports of sail are Dublin, London
Sette gelato Beans: eaevere rat ahta, weeping. See ar 1 “between 1.30. and Regency period, and an inter- flation must be stopped and the —Reuter }
Satins — . Vacancies exist in Design Department soproximately — aang national puppet festival. cost of living reduced ‘at the Ry ooo ol PPPOR OO POO, Rs
FURNITURE of a West Indian Petroleum — Refiner nde gene li rhe A cricket match in Regency earliest possible moment. : % 8 — a —
for Trained praumnismen, wanes te "THE BARBADOS GAS dress will be played on Bruns- —Reuter. You Might Walk : For Me. ‘
0 Sean eat — | design mn civil, ” “ rf , i : —_— ’ oe
FURNITURE—Ralph Beard offers the | G2). ee Ret ate aera projects COMPANY LTD wick Lawns, Hove, in August % BARBADOS : 10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH |
pe apg aed oo ub Chairs | Applicants must have the Britis! ||) Pageant *ROWDS WITNESS Thr ough A Wall 8 Me ye
a ees ee ue onus | Higher National Certificate or its U.S. or } — A Pageant of Brighton and 4 Cc Sy INVESTMENTS — 38] ovwpr 100 expensive Novels
$36.00 per pr.. Cocktail tables $10.00. Tea | Canadian equivalent and should be military display are planned DUCHESS’ FUNERAL NDON. |% SE seicg om mt
trolleys $15.00, Streamlined Morris chairs prepared to give proof of technical abil- + AL cys, ae Rotti LO ’ ° % elling ab Oe
SD cach! vention, $95.00 ee aT ity by interview or examination. i ORIENT : arenes eee ae st NAPLES, a a Dr. A. J. Glazewski, a well X Consult - - - x ae ks ie B1;00 ae
unpainti rush chairs; roc’ Applications, giving full details an yi a dean is to be o ’ Ries re Huge crowds of people to-day \nown British physicist, predicted xa Ll moe ih a ee aan
of good recond hand furniture. “Call at | exDePience, decompanied by, a | recent GOOoDs will de wvisits to warships, @ filed the Cathedral of Naples and \) lecture that the time is no.|% A. M. WEBB, 40 how ; ‘ é
Ralph Beard's furnishing showrooms, | PassPort photograph. snow) ea po. A regatta, firework displays, and spilted over into neighbouring ;o; distant when it will be pos-|2 gyjekhroker S| We have just opened SHEET
Hardwood Alley. Open 8 a.m, to 4 Box 103, Bridgetown. "23.1.51—6n. From INDIA, CHINA, an exhibition of Regency¥ streets to witness the funeral of sible to disintegra‘e a man in the}® °° 7°" BP) LLAasrve in astterent colours for |
aa, eae ae ro - ; EGYPT! books. Duchess Elena of Orleans Aosta (United States and integrate him ir | % 33 Broad St. (Over yo” vane AT |
8.1, SALESMAN — Tunes, - Salamon ane Silk, Curios, Brassware, Five concerts by the Southern who died on Saturday at the age pritain. 0 St. . utes
MISCELLANEOUS amy BF later to Brdshew & Co. Jewels, Linens, Ivory, Teak- Philharmonic Society, with inter~ of 79. He declared that this would bc|% Phoenix Pharmacy) | JOHNSON’S STATIO |
P. O, Box 228. wood, Sandals, French Per- national soloists and conductors, Thousands of others lined the possible by ineulstion from the | SF and ‘ i
GAMERA! A Assortment just fumes, Barbados Searves in are to be given at the Dome. highway to Naples as the hearse force of gravity t —: Phone 4796 :— x | HARDWARE |
ap ge eet MISCELLANEOUS ‘ i There will also be conducted ¢oljowed by five motor cars with - . i » ancl ‘ ¥ aaa cataracireeaasres
received — Also films all sizes Black Pure Silk, Etc., Ete., Ete. i ; Levitation would be simple anc | ¢ $
eee 2a Cont ae The Souvenir Headquarters tours, of Regency ane. Ss oe a ps eer wat of people would be able to wall ‘
Stores, \. * ae . slowly moved along e gulf o ” j
ones NT through walls,” he added, 4,
LADIES SPORT COATS — For cool FURNISHED. HOUSE, Buipituated be- THANI Kros. Naples. ' Dating thi lacture tea aaia tact § An Oil without Oiliness is not a Lubricant
evenings. Fawn, beige, wine and black | tween Maxwell's and Rockley. Sea KASHMERE GIRLISH FIGURES —Reuter. 5 Freddh sclentist hed turd the i
in assorted sizes. $28.50. Modern er Coast Levit ge ie less than Pr. Wm. Henry 8t.—Dial 5466 Holy Water feacted different! Use... i
NO a aN iene ee three months. one * 24.1.51—an. | LONDON SWIMMING CHAMPION from ordinary tap water and the { GERM ol Ss ;
PLASTIC Pe ee ee, — eres aaa Miss Mary Byatt, county LONDON a baptised infant differed electre ! mes - a Olli )
Aprons, Table Cloths, +3 TED . 7 £ j a! 2 ise imereas iliness {
ties.’ Modern’ Dress aaah GOAT—Young goat in ies Sates B b A t oom virnetitire eed iz Leonid Meshkov, the Russian statically from an unbaptise for increase i)
woh fm —— ar ados mateur b

—$—$—$———_——
MILK—Powdered Milk in 1 Ib Tins
Nutricia, Select & Daily Brands. Also
New Dutch Cheese 99 cts, Lat 2
Co., Ltd. 5
one 23.1,51—3n.
















WE BUY FOR CASH — Clocks, eer
and musical boxes in any condition.
Write, call or dial 4429.GORRINGES An-
tique shop, Upper Bay Street.

25.1.51—Tn







Boxing Association

t ~y *wimmer who hoids the official oe * * 1 , ‘ b
pita: be Ager hee bnly world and European record of | ‘ome eee is agg rhind CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD }
or 14 years old min,, 7.2 seconds for the 100 metres flingese "5 Palowing variation h

Miss Byatt said. breast stroke, has reduced his time asap RY B ;

S Gasolene Station — Trafalgar St.
; the wi hs.—LN/S
“We try to make school dinner» to 1 min., 6.6 seconds, according body wavelengths













| SS,
All amateur boxers are i is alates OE
q f ue tn : s ‘om 0 LELLONELESOE OLE) PCCP EP
ES SS an ~ 1, as n trit s a ssible. but th ‘ te ass gence y ep r ry > «

MAGAZINES — Second hand maga-| Wk BUY FOR CASH — Old Gold and asked to report to the Asso Se schoulen gets a isin’ Moscow, ’ 3
zines and comics in good condition. | silver jewellery, coins, dentures, etc. ciation’s Head-quarters . he h Rohan hed Subject to approval by the Rus- %
STANWAY STORE, Dial 4910, Lucas St. | write, call or Dial 4429. GORRINGES Modern High School on mania when she reaches ’ os *

25.1.51—2n. | Antique shop, adjoining Royal Yacht : oR ea aelal “teens.” sian All-Union Committee for $
Ay ntique 5 95.1817 Friday, 26th January at f . i ad 7 this id Wit be sbinlt $
Club. 25.1.51—T 5 m to arrange for “They start to think, serious, Sport, this record Ww submit-

FEEMANENT needles Sor you : : os : . arati about their figures far too ear!y ted to the International Swimming %
player, and needles of all Kinds. Price} GORRINGES undertake expert watch eliminations in preparation in li Th et the idea they Federation for consideration as a >
$1.08. Records of all kinds too. A.| ond clock repairs, cleaning and resto- for West Indian Champion- in life. ey ¢ Dae z :
BARNES & CO., LTD. 22, ration of oil paintings, valuations for in- ships to be held in Trinidad are going to get fat and we hav > world best. — x

RIBBONS, Feathers, Flowers, zipps, | Sumince, mgd Probate, eee al— in. |W 23rd, 24th, and 25th March, {\\| difficulty in malting them cit 2 s
: : , var : aes 7 a anything.”—LN,S, ip e
Buttons, Laces & Edges in a large vari- 1951. MAIL NOTICES %
ety at reasonable prices, Modern Dress fk f J . 7 %
acto. S| Spanish Tuition sara nner memes cone RED BASKETBALL sg, Mette foe Devnintos by the sen, w Sacg %

~ fo . c LONDON. {,. Eunieia will be closed ot the Gen- v

Seek Lined tha. hatha t Stew Mehulahs ‘ertadkie tawiiak’ Aosgiieb titles during the month of Communist Russia is apparent~ eral Post Office as undor:~ o %

Ankle Socks. 36 to 48 cents, Modern | and the “Advanced Gommercial Course” February or early March. ly teaching Communist China onion a Ln Registered and N
ft - * - ‘ 7 ¥v a bo n on ro)

Dress Shoppe. 23.1,51—6n. Seen t from the First of NB. — All professionals something new in aggressive taco Qrdinar sangary, tS rp bad 3
— ° a “< Maile for St. Vineent, Grenada, Trini-

SKIRTS, BLOUSEs, SHORTS. —Ina All those interested; please be good who have _ engage: nh no tics , tt c : ta. Trini © "
large variety. $3.98 to $4.80. Moderr | enough to contact Mrs. Maria Carlotta contest during the past three A Moscow radio commenta- pe i i ac gi oe. :
eee cored tn | Genesis, agen Sar, St awrenss | years may revert’ to their j}| tor’ reported that’ the “Russion Se,°Qny gill be cane

; ap, ewes Soe : ' il ama $ s ica- ’s bas g a ow tout ~ Parcel and Registered Mails ot 9 a.m

‘SAPPER SWALLOW” Collapsible Sail- | tration, — Phone: 8495. ; amateur ot deaiiastene so) men ee we n lates reet and Registered Malls at 9. a.m: age acids 3
ing Boat 11 st. 6 ins by 4 ft. New com- 25.1.51—6n | tion to this Association ; ing China has so I the 27th of January, 19) %
plete with sail, oars ete. Specially | investigation of their claims. every Chinese team it has met Malls tor Montelerat end Sk dé +] 1
Tod sateen tae — eee eee | L. A. LYNCH, Twenty “friendly matches” hav@ np. bs the |$.8 Canadian Challen CH iB ¢ p .
ee 241.5130. 1} Hon. Sec. B.A.BsA been played to date against See ee , a

BE WISE. - \ : 94.1.51-~3n. {\}| Chinese quintets in Peiping, Tient d Registered Mails at 2.40

Sar ee = Fos ee ee ISE } a2 4, BAe Kl en, Shanghai and Nanking ym 1d Ordinary Mail at 4 p.m. on oa ‘
bags. Small and very useful. ight’s ADVERT Ki 1 —INS tt ith of y ' 951
Phoenix 24.1,51—2n. sre w | 2

,

















PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS

ADVOCATE





Arsenal
Backed To
Win F.A. Cup

LONDON, Jan. 24.
Le idea's powerlul Arsenal team
has been installed as favourite to
win the Football Association Cup
fe the second straight year.
Gunners who meet Northampton,
Third Division club in the fourth
rou id this Saturday are quoted by
























ma BOARD, OF
|CO-ORDINAT LON

€ ONSOL IDA TION |

‘38 YEARS
A
TRADE
1$T

o) vesnampton Wanderers, winners
in 1948—49 are second choice at
}--6—1 odds

{ Arsenal wins. the cup at
Wembley Stadium next spring, it
w li be the first time in 60 years
it hes been taken by the same
club in successive years once-
famous Blackburn Rovers now in
the second division last did it in
1890 and 1891.

But cup honours go to Black-
burn Rovers who won the trophy
three consecutive years starting
in 1883—84.

In all Rovers have six cup tri-
umphs an honour shared by As-
ton Villa who meet Wolves in
tre next round.

Villa entered the competition
at the tempting odds of 33 to 1,
but they



“Stop nationalisation NOW? But that would rock the very foundutions of the Welfare State.”





GODDARD LOOKS FOR Stollmeyer Says W.L.
ee Highly Successful





Second Regatta
On Saturday

‘Yhe Second Regatta of the 1951
season takes place on Saturday off
tne Royal Barbados Yacht Club,

shots still in the cup. seramble.
Brighton ahd Newport .-are

MR. sleepers at odds “of 3,000 ‘to. 1,

JOHN GODDARD, West Indies Cricket Captain,



are put badly in the |
shade by some of the other long!

THURSDAY, carers 25, 1951

ee



WILL VISIT ENGLAND | : ; 3
pee THE BARBADOS POLO §
<" . . *
The Oporto Football Club,} Wh ?
prominent "Portuguese ‘tear, nes CLUB %
accepted an invitation t visit -ORPerNT y “ >
England this summer ene PRESENTATION MAT~.! >
| sin x

Oporto stipulated that three}

games must be played and
jast one must be against Arsenal, |
premier London club.

t

The Oporto team was the only GARRISON SAV4NNAA
ene to beat the Arsenal when the} at 4.15 pyn
London Club played several games.) ENTRANCE 50¢c.
im Portugal in 1947. A silver cup
was purchased to celebrate (Ne , \%-4-*+siGtt%4GS9SSeSss
event. —I.N.S SSS
T, ’
\ DANCE
ec
FIGHT IN MARCH r MEMBERS of the St. Lucy
LONDON. ‘ “Gals ya Stor thelr t She ati ch
Jack Gardner, British and Em- \\ comes off on Soturday night ord
pire heavyweight champion, has) Fey GE Sh SArleNy: ee St
been nominated by the Europea ai AER ok oe
Boxing Union as the official chal- |} aan * ent oh ‘Eiaas” 1
lenger to Joe Weiden of Austria, |’ under the patronage of Dr. A. C

)
retary of the union at the head, Wt
cvarters in Paris before February |

|



leaves Barbados for St. Lucia this morning. He has accept- Times and) handicaps are as wits nates, Nee aa,
ed the invitation of the West Indies Cricket Board io In 1950—S51 Cricketer’s Annual falas Leelee “* Tr Edna, eee vane
attend a Tournament in St. Lucia between the Windward — <== | petition at 40:to 1 with a strony
zara
and Leeward Islands as an observer. ‘ ' DE ps alae eeu Blackpool sauna: commanding, a
The tournament began Tuesday Hy 0. 8S. COPPIN D i) muswisibed 230 Red. —to—1 odds.cP)
(Te rr eee between St. Lucia and the Lee- D 10 Van Thorndyke r
ee c's Gutsiiin Bealk ‘wibilnlash “THE TOUR RECORD of the West indies in first class D Peter Pan 231 Yellow. ‘
Islunds versus the Leewards ‘on games of 31 games played, 17 won, 3 lost and 1i drawn, 13 Ranger 2.32 Red. What son Today
‘ » 92 OR OT ¢ 90: ¢ > ; i 2110) so Wi r j ————— - 7
January 25, 26, 27, end = Fe would be considered highly successful even by Australian = eer ee Mrs. Fela de Kuh’s Exhibi-
ee o wey A pencunré standards,” writes Jeffrey Stollmeyer in a review of the ~~~ elomees tion ef of paintings and
rds 1» Januaty 31, ebr y : : s . ,
Race Baia West Indies tour in the Cricketer’s Annual of 1950-51 (4/-) BP 8 Olive “Blosom Se pencil sketches at “The
wos { ; 2 ”
At the last. meeting of the on sale at the Stationery of the Barbados Advocate. tn m Pavilion”—9.00 a.m.
Board a sub-committee was ap- “and his follow-through with the © o Fin "i Advocate’s Photo Exhibition
vented to consider ways and , [1 an interesting and compre- },.+ was a perfect model to follow. @__‘*%!_Fantssy #4 | Yellow at Barbados Museum —
ea of 2 sisting the ‘Gevel- hensive review of the tour Jeffrey : : 10.06 a.m,
nyc went of ereket in. the Wind- Stollmeyer has been candid, has In Lancashire League R, J. MacLeod’s Exhibition
a and Leeward Islands, so 8!Ven praise where praise is due In the Lancasture letter in an- of Oil Paintings at the
. these islands can play a larger pHa see wh re ear eee otier part.of the Annual, West Barbados Museum—10.00
in West Indies Cricket. Sary to-do so - Indians can follow the career of p 2 Imp 2.39 Yellow. a.m, i
One of the recommendations For example he describes the Beuce Pairaudeau, George Head- 3 Rainbird Auction Sale of Toys and
culbmitted by the Sub-Committee patting of Weekes and Worrell in 1 oa on ae eer hing 2 7 Moyra Blair ace re —
t approved by the Board, is the Third Test as something which let za a eitans ti ee = ; a eke om a She Nera Street 1:00
th ee ; of wa eth made it difficult for anyone to wae ie dugieatan hes won _* 8 Skippy Z or e eet — 1.
teen combiner eams of b imagine two batsmen more pleas- . ¥, Geputising for ne ha ee as crs tere , 9-m.
reups ef Islands should be ar- iu ite watch at the wicket te. scored 747 runs, averaging 57.46°C_ © Pesay Nan 2.41 Yellow. Second Trial Cricket Game
uiged annually, and that the gether in contemporary cricket. !¢¢ Bacup : r,) ' 6 Engle continues at Kensington—
Hoard arrange to send, at its ex- “There are few, if any, who can 3ruce VPairaudeau, of British | 7 Mohawk 242 Red. 1.00 p.m.
j ense, a Selector or Observer, to truthfully say that the West In- Cuiana, now a student in England, | 12 Dawn . Belleville Tennis Tourna-
itness and report on the match- dies did not deserve to win the ved 562 runs for Burnley, C } Minbenave Rasta te ment continues—4.15 p.m.
es and subm’t recommendations series,” Stollmeyer writes, average 37.46 while Hazare, who , 2 Scamp Mobile Cinema gives Show
for any promising player or play- ; i: not a West Indian, but whose c 3 Madness 2.43 Yellow at Holder’s Pasture, St.
ers to be sent to one of the large: Not Afraid nm me is well known in West Indi- ! 9 Dauntless Jarmes—7.30 p.m.
Cclonies (preferably Barbados) On the other nand he is not a: cricket circies since the W.I. @ ~~ j) y oe Peis oe
: : : ; ; ‘ 1 Magw CINEMAS
f trials. afraid to say that one did get the tour of India, 1948—'49, gave the | 11 em 2.44 Red, AQUATIC CLUB: “The Velvet
impression that the team would best all-round performance in the Touch’? — 8.30 p.m.
relax and surrender rather too League, Playing for Roydon he & 1 Gipsy ‘ i PLAZA (Bridgetown): “Sinbad
M. Cc. C. Get 15. Run easily hard-won advantages scored 760 runs and took 89 © 5. epee 2.45 Yellow. Tet Soller Sah Dewe Nes
gained in the early stages of a wckets, average (10.02. a ah .
’ g ) p.m.
Lead Over mateh {t is interesting to find also in K Tornadoes PLAZA (Oistin): “Larceny Inc.”
° Refreshing frankness is reflect- the Annual that, as a result of | 2 nvaes 246 Red and Wines For The Eagle’ —
ve * ed in his observations on the much the ‘Test. matches in England ————— "8 EMPIRE: “Cheaper By The
S Australia discussed First Test at Manches- against the West Indies that the ° 18 Clytie 2.47 Yellow. Dozen” — 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
J. D. GODDARD (Capt) RENMARK, South Australia, jet, : He vee a. a counties on whose grounds fy 7q=n aa ea GATETE (84. lamest Marine
alee. peers Roy een Vo Jan, 24 nas been said ana written about matches were played will each . Kid” — 8.30 p.m.
‘ 7 f the Test wicket at Old Trafford. jeceive $21,321.60, the other first aon Se
The MCC with four first innin8s Without wishing to revive con- (ics counties $7 si C 40: Ganbet a Ab: ne
lee lk to fall led a South 3 4 cliss counties $7,166.40, each 50 Yellow
Ss L ° : wickets sti troversy on the subject, two strong jyinor count $1,233.60 and ‘abdlbiheienictilllipenie aman Liitaseny Weta ie niga taacd
t. ucta Hit 105 Australian Country Eleven here arguments against the preparation , teeta AP sha ate and the “N.B-=The following dates have been
by 75 runs at the end of the of such a wicket must surely be two Universities $7,166.40 be- ‘xed tor Regattas:—

Vs Leewards

i¥rom Our Own Corresvondent)

CASTRIES, Jan. 24

IN the match between the,
Leewards and St. Lucia which
started here today, St. Lucia
won the toss and scored 105. The
batsmen were subdued by steady
bowling ind accurate fielding

Griffith, St. Helen, Deterville
and Auguste batted doggedly
while Livingstone, slow-medium
ofi-break bowler, and Anthony-
son, medium-pacer were the most
successful trundlers for the Lee-
wards. By close of play Lee-
wards had replied with 24 runs








opening day's play to-day. The
match ends to-morrow,

Due mainly to splendid bowling
\y Bob Berry, Lancashire spin
Lowler, who claimed 6 wickets
for 36 runs the Country side were
all out for 84.

The MCC also had to struggle
for runs and lost their first five
wickets for 86 runs but a sixth

icket partnership between
Denis Compton (40) and Freddie
Brown (42 not out) enabled ne
touring team to regain the initia-
tive. Roy Tattersall and Brian
Statham playing in their firs’
match in Australia since flying
out to reinforce the injury-hit
MCC team, each tok two wickel*

(1) the danger of injury to bats-
men in the presence of high class
fast bowling (2) The incongruity
of producing such a wicket for a
5-day match.”

Every Member
Stollmeyer mentions every
member of the team by name and
gives an unbiassed appreciation of
their individual performances. Of
Clyde Walcott he writes that no

praise can be too high for his
deeds. The West Indies, opines
Stollmeyer, are lucky indeed to

possess such an outstanding wick-
et-keeper batsman.

The sound defensive methods of
Rae, the terrible persistence of





tween them.

Sir Home
MeCantliss,

Gordon K.
Edward Graysen have
all made contributions, The 1950
-51 Cricketer’s Annual will cer-
teinly be a “must” on the book-
shelves of the sport-loving public.

SAIDDLER

Bart.,



—_——_—_—





















‘rd Regatta Saturday 3rd February

10th February,

1951,
4th
1961
This
atura.
the

Regatta Saturday

is on account of the last two
tys in February being Cricket and
first two Saturdays in March being
Norse Races.

H. BLAIR BANNISTER,
Starter

READY TO

DEFEND HIS TITLE

(By GEORGE WHITING)
CHARLEY JOHNSTON, English-born manager

of
world feather-weight champion, negro Sandy Saddler,
tells me from New York that his publicity kilted warrior




The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 6.10 a.m.
Sun Sets: 5.55 p.m.
Moon (Last Quarter) Janu-
ary 30
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.

High Water: 6.05 am., 5.32
p.m.
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) .17 in.

‘lotal for Month to Yester-
day: 1.81 ins.

‘Temperature (Max.) 82.0°F

Temperature (Min.) 72.5°F

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E,
(3 p.m.) E.N.E.

Wind Velocity: 13 miles per



; A p i hour
for the loss of one wicket. Crick ii er, the left hander Valentine and the
bowled well taking one wicket ayy ak Reuter. subtle mysteries of Ramadhin, the a ner gg (9 a.m.) 29.943,
tor 8 runs, while Me Mahon ¥ openee example - the Skippey is “ready and willing” to defend his title in England this hee ee eae
batted confidently to score 19 not : Goddard on and off the field, the year against the w y
out. A one-minute silence was Belleville Tennis capable manner in which Mr fight, * Notti ham eine aoe Cet |}
observed Curing the interval for J. M, Kidney carried out the man- R ) : Pre January 29, between holder OPENING AT
Mr. McNamara, deceased vet- Tournament agerial duties are all chronicled onnie Clayton and challenger Al Phillips.
eran cricketer. Details are as here by, Mr. Stollmeyer to be Naturally enough, Johnston ap- ish promoter Reg King. Mr. King,
follows:— YESTERDAY'S RESULTS handed down to posterity. ae sums “3 message the two with a contract in his pocket, is E
i ake any . words that rule the boxirns wor aki > tri . Pi
ST. LUCIA 1ST INNINGS Men's Sigoe—Finsls tion of ane player and that was [9M Harringay’ to "Howolulus purpose of inviting the new enna aces j
C. Paul Lb.w, b. Davis a D. Trimingham beat D. Lawless jiimself. In a footnote to the “!!ow much?” champion to stake his _ title Friday 2.30 & 8.30
eo prath aes Snover if 8-2, 6-4, 62, article the Editor has filled this pans he does NOT mention is against the Clayton-Phillips win-
3. Auguste c. Davis Anthonyson f breach and he describes Stoll- ‘at a prior engagement at Madi- ner on a Nottingham football
Rage e Aatharpnon b Livingstone rf Mi Yo Pu ee Gib- Meyer as one of the most attrac- *°" Square Garden, New York, ground next summer
Phillip b. Edd 15 oiger-aht 0 eae r xe tive batsmen to watch that cricket ©! February 23, puts Saddler’s I have no means of knowing
Deterville c, whet b. Livingstone 8 bons 6—0, 6—0. has ever seen, crown in possible jeopardy against how much Mr. King is likely to
& ae BOT a rie Handicap Mixed Doubles He made the most of his height his dear old pal and former ofer for this title tilt, nor would
ike ast out. ’ ane champion Willie Pep—a fight I presume to ask. You may bet te
6. Ellick b. Livingstone 0 Mrs. Bancroft and P. Patterson i ‘5 th at could very well leave man- your boots, however, that there Treen
Extras k 4 40 beat Miss orme and Mr. ‘sreyhound Racing ag er Johnston In no position to will be no promise of a guaran- t
ea Worme —}15 7—5, 7—5. ask rote about guarantees, teed purse. WT
‘ota ; e percentages, or anything else. Those lucullia ays ar as
Miss Wood and Dr, Manning — Figures After all, it is Willies turn to If the Saddlers Pini og Roget SoU
Fail of wickets: 1-7, 2—7, 3-43, 445, 40 beat Miss Benjamin and V. LONDON win! He and Sandy have been the world want to flash their well aN Ta,
5-49, 6—60, 7—98, 8-105, 9-105. Hutson —415 6—0, 7—5, Totalinntae: tineser at grey - pee. nee ee _ rere fists in this country,
BOWLING s Ss hound tacks in the London area ..., arkable American phe- they must do so “on the gate”’—
TODAY'S MATCHE during 1980. oat 6.645, 360" fn nomenon known as the “return atthe recognised ratio of 374 per DENNIS
oe Qo. ¥ . r Men’s Doubles proximately $18.750.000) less thar licht aet"—in which the winner cent for the champion, 124 per
ne x 0 38 P, Patterson and G. Manning jp 1949. : ma per a championship bout has part cent for the challenger. The
Zz vs. N, Roach and P. Roach, The figures were: 1949:/40.711,- © his purse-money withheld un- more they draw the more they
LEEWARDS 1ST INNINGS j. St. Hill and J. D. Triming- 955° ere 1950:" 34056. © 1,ne fights the loser again, ge’
Thomas b. Crick » ham vs. V. Hunte and V. Hutson. oie (sie domenoy Pa IS AAEM oo ar fight customers Even so, Mr. King avows that
Claxton not out ‘ 3 ' hha timienen iG Totali _ Sood for this nonsense in 1948, a fight here for the feather-
pei Ba Rie dae 9 Ladies’ Doubles j ne Sanit ot me Lr ggasi when Saddler won; in 1949, when weight championship of the world
Extras 2 Miss G, Pilgrim and Mrs. A. 92 DO tout $11,500,000). °2,, Won; ang in 1950 when suitably boosted and bally-hooed,
Total (for 1. wieket) “9s O’Skinner vs, Miss E. Worme and <99U9,i3« (abou * Saddler won again. So why not could well net the American
otal (for 1. wiek he ee a Wome: rei pet gg OY oe) in 1951? holder of the title a tidy little
compar . -LN.S. ;







One Purpose













packet of up to £10,000. But there












ee ; would be no “return-fight” claus—

- a A Whatever nappens 'n New York es in tue contract! That is one

They'll il Do Ie — yee as dilich ie sheid aiee a a Hatlo lo on February 23, one of the first Americanism w+ can very well
Oe! * Dee enc a aon men to nip smartly into the





1 ) win-
ner’s dressing room will be Brit-

do without,
London Express Service.




Yj, OK.MR. CUFF «+ BUT

Y BOSS PUT THROUGH
ANEW RULE +++ ALL

_
\TeAL PAY FOR THEIR

| OWN MAILING ++

Sama
Cuey, KID IMPORTANT!
THESE HAVE TO GO OUT
AIR-MAIL SPECIAL

REGISTERED“iNSURE









gives you strength

OH, WELL +++JUST SEND
‘EM REGULAR -+-I GUESS
THEY'LL GET THERE
IN TIME sss

to fight your
way through life





J& R Bread is Baked in: the
most Modern Bakery in
Barbados.









a























SATURDAY, 27th J:
at

the;

GE Sf EP POPE PV OPE SO Oren

MM PLE FE EE OLE E EF OF EEE





he European title holder. :
, St. Luey

Gitten’s

Contracts must reach the sec
Musie by C

Admission 3
Refreshments

KiIRTON, P.M.O.
Barrows.
Orchestra
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4

on Sale

16. The fight is to take place {') _
before March 24.—-LN\S.





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Full Text

PAGE 1

PACK F.IGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE Tlll'KSDAY. JAWARV 25, It51 ill',' Plt i Welfare Slate." Arsenal Backed To Win F.A. Cup 1-ONDON. Jan. 2*. IdtAk'a p*..-T.'ul Aniuil team •it >eed iu.t..liod as favourite to .11 the Football A*ocii.on i"u, % % %  : praJgjri turners -.lanptott, n i d Mvlakm dub In ih the >-*-ond division last did It 1 1690 and 181)1 But cup honours go to M a ck — Hover* who won ihe trophy yean starting! W/U V/S/r ENGLAND LONDON. The Opoito Football Club, prominent Portuguese team, has accepted an invitation to visV. England this summer Oporto stipulated that three games must be played and the last one must be agaln-t Anstnal pinaster i*mdo*i club. The Oporto team ffnal one to beat the Arsenal when th y pts d Oll C lub played sev* Portugal in 194". A BvCff cup went.—I N S. FIGHT IN MARCH .---,*,'.'.;'.','.',::'>'• mi BARBADOS POH) (LIB pin GODDARD LOOKS FOR Stollmeyer Says W.I. CRICKET TALENT JJJSuccessf ul MR JOHN <.Ol>DAR[<. West Indies Cricket Captain. It ..w i ButMdOf for St. Lucifl this morning. He has m i (pi uiion "( Hat Weal Indie* Cricke' Board io nnamrnt in St i.ucia between the Winduanl %  i riser ver. The ti>uiniirnui|I |>eaati Tuesda' twe> n St Luna and the Lce' >th. r fix ; | 1 %  a, Windward l Ultlnll '"' 1 26. 21 god 29; and %  II the Wirwlw aidBad Leeaw on Jannaiv at Fabntarj i. %  A1 Ibf • i I the ird a sub-committee M v and aaatJni In ihe devei. icket in the Wtndi Interesting and romprchemive review of the tour Jeffrey Stollmeyer has been candid, ha* __ given praise where praise is due ran) Mands. so g^ hn *; nol |al|K| £ offw crlu '> "'"W csm where hr thought It necc*' '" w '"' m I" do so %  '• %  F'o. example he describes the b) the Rub-Cnmintllii: ilUl|lg o( y/eekeend Wot 1 by tlie Floarrl i^ ,,,,. Th rfl T( s as , m >thmg which tat , , of visits WniMk lt difficult for anyone te bow ini.iuiitr two bawmaa moro plan I,-. .( Islam). Oi>uld be ..r.,,„ u watf h ill the wicket to%  nnually, tad th.it the B ,>thcr in contemportii ,.ril errangt l> send, at Its ex-There are few. if anv, who can SatreUM Obaarvar, to truthfully gay that the West Inreporl on the match otniwand a t loni ant prornlrlni piavn or pla>t to i na of the large. h •! raft Barbadoa) Irlak J. I' I DMi MM. i .,.( St. Lucia Hit 105 Vs Leewards M.C.C.Get 75-Run l/t'ad Over S' Australia In 1950 — 51 Cricketer's Annual "THE TOUR RECORD of ihe West indies in (fa si i U names of 'il games played, 17 won, ii lost and U drawn, would be considered highly successful even by Australian .standards." writes Jeffrey Stollmeyer in a review I West Indies tOUX in the Cricketer's Annual ..( 1950 51 (4/-) on sale at tho Stationery of the Barbados Advocate ;ii l Ins follow-through with the h. t was a perfect model to follow In Lancashire L ayue In tinLancashire letter in anol i-r part of the Annual, West Ii.dians can follow the career of E uce Pairaudeau. George Haadli Jack Molt and others. In Rex Pogson's Lancashire ICttaf he writes th.it George iijiLitising fa Weekea, s-ored 74? runs, averaging 57 46 n li i Bruoa i'airaudeau. of British (iiana. now a student m England, to win the ed 562 run* for Burnley. %  rafo S7 4fl while Harare, who not .i West Indian, but whose me is well known In West IndiCrickat drCtai since the W.I ii of India. 1948—'49. gave the ild bent all-round performance in the too %  ;>aue. Playing foi Koydon he 69 SecontI Regatta On Saturday ... d Ragatta of the I9M >u lakat place on Saturday off ie itoyal Buib-dus Y-vht Club. Mid handicaps are a.; %  sari % %  W n.1,1 Bun-iinrrr Van Thomdyke R>d 1 I'l" I*. U| Vfllo1 BBhagai 111 DM n 1 Sbird |; Ol .. HI i; Hi" 1 : \>iii%  i p 1 Wr Cloud I 1 %  ; | ,,l. 1 %  II. i j ( t %  %  Imp Nnmbiid IX Velio* B 1 1 %  ..-., Bash Okapi Hk.p,. IV S>d C era-*. Haa t4l Vlln LOM.. \ Jack Gardner llr.tish and Emheavyweight champion, h ( ^^ nominated by the r Boxing Union as the official cballenger to Joe Weiden of Austria, tie European title holder Contracts must reach „.jUiry of the union at the haatL 1B83—84. .,i-ters in Paris before Fehniaiy In all Rovers have six cup tri-. ;t. The light is to t-'kc placa umpis an honour shared by As-j before March 24 INS ten Villa who meet Wolves in %  i ni-v round V;Ila entered the cornp UtiOd at the tempUng odds of 38 'o 1. but they are put badly In the shade by some of the other lonj hots sUII in the cup i-ramble Bi ighton and Newpor; rsleepcrs at odds of S.000 to 1 lule Exeter. Northampton and Bristol City are (|uoted at 2.000 to 1 Huddcrsneld entered the competition at 40 to 1 amfi l Rtaom Blackpool squad eomiaanding ii" t. %  I (Kids T>. Monday 1 Maaawa 24 •rinni Oui Own CibirrH-iii CABTUD, Jan IN tha matcn b at svaan QM and St. Lucia which st Ludu 105 The Datcmen were lubduad by steady accun u tieidi'it SI Helen, and A ugusta batted dogged I v while Livingstone, slow inedratn off-break howler, and Anthonyson, medium-pacer were the most successful trundlers for the Leelly close of play Ixv. wards had rapllad itb 24 runs for the loss .>f one '.vickel Crick bowled well taking one wicket .or 8 run-. ttrhUl Mr Mahoi %  nfldently t< tcata 19 not out A ona-mlnute sdenre sjaa %  ..An ing iluinterval for Mr McNamara deceased vatartm erlckatar net.m %  ST I.CC1A 1ST INNINGS C Pul lli b Davii 1 n b ,\nlhnv*>n 4 b. AutuMc c tMvi* b Anihonvson l to *.*riii > %  AnUMnfaDa b I ivinsalon* o ft | iKBM IS I akpi Ii IJvlnSi runs at the end of UV %  loning day'* play to-day. The : atoll end* to-moi"rt>w. Due mainly to splendid bowliitii fa>t Imwling (21 The Hi.I Barry, l-ancashire spin of producing Not Afraid On the other nand he Is not iv lhat one did get th %  mprearion that the team relax and surrender rath e a i i i v hard-wan idvantaiai irad 780 runs and took gained In the early stages <>f a A ckets, average 110.02.) mutch i t is Intereettag to find a'so in RerratMni franknai raBeetl| -\nnnal that, a* a result gf cd in his obeervatioci on the much th i Teat inauthat In Ena'ano 1 "K** T *** *' Ml**! — %  !">si the West mdM that the counties on whose grounds He write*:—"A great deal has been said and written about M( such a wicket must surely be ( I I the danger ol injury to batsthe presence of high class icongruilv ket for a i .wler. who claimed 6 wickeb: S.doy match for 36 runs the Country side were ... %  11 out for 84. *-very Mrmhei The MCC alsi hnd to etrug|l r Stollmeyei nientmnever y fi i i .ins and lost their ftrst five "i. mber of the team l... name and v ickets for 86 runs but a sixth gives an unbiassed appreciation of uket partnership between ih.o individual performances. Of l>eni< Crmpton (40) and Freddie iw.e Walcott he writes that no Brnern 42 „ot out) enabled JU praise can ba toa high for his :,.,.nng team tn ,. d,^ The West Indies., oplr" ., TaUereall and Brtsu s,n|lm > er r.tutham playing in their firs' itchea were played will each receive S21,321.60. the other first el IRS counties 87.166 40. eneh mmor county $1,233.60 and the two Universities . 166.40 beiharn. So HWna Gordon Bart, K. McCanhss. Edward Giaysin have all made contributions. The ihi.0 '1 Cricketer's Annual will cert inly be a "must" on the book%  helves of the sport-loving public. a .; Mii.hu ( roiiv 2 a V.lWiw i 3 itmeat Ol %  %  M i %  .. ?47 Yellow i 1 OssM Ml Urd c 1 HoRnr >H V.ilow *m lor iuif.it• i-.l .-C .11 4th Rr(.l(> S iWh rrtruny. a I M 0II BI ul lh> UK t i PHiruiiiy Iwlnn CrKhrl %  o S..liirdy. In March be It III AIM RA:JNISTER. match in Australia since flyioi! out to reinforce the Injury-nil Hi C taara, each ' k two wicket—Rruter. lietleville Tennis Tournanpent YESTERDAY'S II SILTS Men's King lea— FlnaU l) Trimlngham heM n lawless ti 2. —4. 6—2 SADDLER READY TO DEFEND HIS TITLE (By OKUKGK WHITING) CHARLEY JOHNSTON. English-born miniw.of world toathcr-wiiijht champion, negro Sandy Saddler, lella CM from New York that his publicity kilted warrior 11 -ready and willing lo defend his title in England this yeai against tha winner of our own private championship it Nottingham on January 29, between holder Kor.'iic Clayton and chaltonin Al Phillips. I. mouth, Johnatm Isfa promnirr Re KtiiK. Mr Kinf, Worme '.i't'\ IIOIIIKI Uacinii Ftgures IXJNDON r.tiali/atoi turnovai at payhoiind tmcks in Ihe I.ondnn ait' %  during 1950 was 6.64.^.m* (apinoximately 818.750 00111 less thin. in 1949. --•• football aquara uardan. New York, ground next summer i 23. put* Saddler'n I have no -nciis of knowing '" In possible jeopard* against h*.w much Mr King Iikeh if his height '' K "''I Pal and for.ner oler for this title til;, uu ".m|d — %  champion vrilUe Pap II II mill.' vary wall have man rour boots, however, that 'there uston In no position tn will be no promise of a guarnn%  %  Qjuealloiis alHiut Kuaranleet '. ed plat I "' %  % %  •>' any thing else Thoee lueulUan (lavs are past \fii-ii ail. II is Willie's inn, (-. if the Saddlers and the Pep. of Ha and Sandy have been the world want to Hash then we[| wonunjj. itnee October. IB4H pubUateed lists in this countr rtcan phethey must do so "on the gate"— %  manon Irjrtnwn UV el % %  %  racoflUaad ratio of t7| par I ni.er -id Un the champion, 121 cnamplonahlp bout has pan cent tor the chalk i'""' Ibey draw tha more the% •hi %  xi hoi-se races in 1B50 waa pen vvn „ B H n ICWII ...t,.m 2i.50.VI92 (abpul__S11.500,000_,__.. s, 1 ,,,,,., „;„ .^n, Ko u h. ,,nt IBS I? compn ad 368.877 H.35UJJO0I with 14. —I.N.I I Do It Evcrv Ttmc 3F~ a _.._. By Jimmy Hallo | ^....MP0RT4NT! yi T^BW W-^SSSM T.JESE HAVE TO SO OUT S \ A T,|w m,, f ... UA. .AIR-MAH. SPPCIAI... ) C> w tsvw C30Tlb" fr tS.frER£P^5URE7r\ S ^ 0 4 R \SOT a TO If ;rr 4.vi"'* ^ *V*s I aaftl UUIUUA-. ^ resbl Termites. W thick i 1 ^ll('^'ls 1 W Ihick in sheets 3' 1 First class quality Ideal (or Flush Dnois. Cupboards. and Pane!! if all I .in he niMill Varnished or Pa tiled. STANDARD HARDBOARD '" thick in shcels 4' • •'. 8', 10' H/IK" thick in -heels I' 8' WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Lid. VAWtCT OWn c w aaaiana miiiiii i ei i i



PAGE 1

THURSDAY. JAMJABY IS, I5 %  CLASSIFIED ADS. mH X9TUWS BAEBADOS ADVOCATE P \*.( M \; N TVLCPNONK MOB DO HUkRin VHMNU at her ^alenc. St A"*..i Ol.-l„. Jin. ST. I'^IPTJIII look plare the aid evening al Saint Aft JuK4.f1 and Mill'USA Conde.l. a*. Mr. Rita rtilev FII..I HMIton R-MARV LILIAN BOWMAN. Formerly NNd Ml.fr** o< Q "• H-rbado On 11th ut J. r .e> ( luei/iel llai>.lII I M —If. THANKS recent b*r* UBSM ss*. %  .-Ida Wniianv Ike uMeedgnrd i-g i. okind trler.4* *>ht, ten I. UKI i1l. and | n „; KpflMia, sympathy in on IN' MEMORIAM HOl'SKN NOTICE -t mnip CD1 I>IM ,,! %  .. For March Mav. ju, a Fully furm.hed canteining 4 nadiuuint. running u *h Dt.i asm M.. %  AS MI CHAUIN Mann* .;.. ting of ) bedroom, all arBI -r. rarepnon room* ind all no d. enumce. Fur appointment dial I* ftCilrom n1 in g of nravtir J Bedroom* .11 ii % Or further particular . %  1 niLlaT.N In memory ..( our fr .lear Will)* who departed tHli llf> Jas u. 1*90 The shock *,. RNI in* blow ssvere We never thought hn death -.. neai Only thoae artM love c.n toll The pain of parting without >ar..rlt The hull*). Ij.mil. Fjnerald Villa B>1S1~ In 'SwAKSRA" A comforiaI.iV full mimed Ring., to*, at Worthing. 4 Be. !" Frige. Telephone. Radio. Garag ivailable In Frtrruar. Dial m ..SB, -fll.SiMRATHWAtTK, I %  >f in> [M mothi ho departed thi. Fred Doesbuty i Bn.ih.rai*r n nth i*w S1 Sl-ln. l-OfTr RUT NOT FOROOTTBN I.EALS In loving memories of dear sons Ralph IMI| and Donald Bj that wa* loal at Sea. Word, or* very little thing. Things they rannot half in-part The rpriiimi that 1 Mother-, heart, mend* and k 11, laid will their ud but TRINITY COTTAGE-Si. J.me. Coae Fully fiirnunrd containing j badranmr. also a telephone Av.lUbla tar month, of February lo Mar and August to D**esnber 1P1 Phone MM II I SI 2 %  la* I. Plan* and £nee>*Vat.en. run be tfeo at my OfT.ce on an, OSVe n. Sucre*.. 1 i* prrpam n> c-omplrte HUI l<* l/i tbtcoTr Clai to to* v. NOTICE 11. moi (iihii 1 11 R ...., %  *"*tr |Wi aa lha pavilion and aruuDd. hai> ! %  hand*: M-M ... Ihr Darktadoi MtaUon Tha < I "*' %  *nn raw Mi Ml hM al I rolltrN II It I'l'Hl.ir s\lj;s AUCTION fVOTICE %  "i'H OF can miio Bdatod Trtwtort ,„„<, „ (n Trndrr lot LdMl"), Will •> racaivrd ai m,. ornc. u p to >a* p m o< Monday Kh j-nuar, IHI lo, th. loa, ^t Cl.vH tn lh F r.l-h. "I ., iato <4 intaraat no* aurradini f : to ba r*n m ft (tarn mual Inrtalmvnla of 1 rmmlt, October 1M1 wi>n cnnn.MiD. Clarfc f Ihr Vaalry. Chrtal Oiui THE INDOMITABLE REJOINS FLEET 1 ^!iS' m F,f mmm \ ^moval Notice • —"'rt>>ina raw Tniindav. January th -, Shepherd Slrarl the following A Ml Toy., eoniprlaed of Raldaatiip^ i Cnainai. Karin Cara. Slufled AnM JU1 Raw Puaalaa. Bath s, Rim. ja-' > IV BMyrle Guard.. V Kittle*. Choppar*. Scooter* Lai Htadaa. LagttMaMiaa Malcbe> etc | Term* ca*h VINUaWT CiRirriTM FOR SALE AUTOMOTIVE CAR-Citroen II II R im'maaWI~U axcelleiit eoodition Owner Maying Jaland. Apply B do* Aganclaa Lid D.al atdg. gvalyn. ^M.|j|Z t n CARBtikk I. 1*M HodaL IcMgaeUan HTViied Uillami. Roumund. Worthim — m ^_ m ___^_ m w 1 m *n CAR %  ':.. i-riii Wyvarn. II h p aal— H rrrlved. Dial t) COURTBBY OARAGE AUaWR, llDdv Tkf UupjuMf HiMm-.r %  inalrurlloi'n receive,) (mm tha In Bank II.II JC^* rr ai J \'"„*r', 1 'i o* Jimuii bealnnina .1 1 doubla-rwofed .hop. To be removed I... *poi. DA.ry. A -Jcott. Au Hall at Hiaiton Plavind field will he received by me up to Hat aaaWaM 1MI. Drawing, and Sperlfk-atloni ran be kfl Office il Alrfara. Harnami A c„ |Jd Broad St. The pcrton or flmt WIHM* TV-,1.1 ,. i.>f|.ir.i -ill 1* raajuarad to lvr lh' Ueorgr. Dug aihiiwanra HOII. ; uawibla Inciaaaed coat M EKAB ESTATE CAR K.1,.1 ]u all rMi.ider De Lwm Sedan, low mllaaaa and in paod inei-ivitiical condition. Cha*. Me Ctkaarnay A Co It.) Ml.II—4i I IJDRRIER Ooe III lt*0 V-g Ford lot'. One <|i V-g Ptord Lorry without TJ-ra* and Engina. Ona 1I1 |M> Ch.vI roi.t Lorry. Apply Cardinal Dowen. Station Mill Si. Michael Dial WOl Mill-an 1 MAJlREY-IIArlRlR-Dtaaal Ttactor7~ bh.p. alao with ateel wheel. EnquHrtoa cordially Invited. COURTBY GAHACK Dial *f.lfl. Iff 1.S1 n. I'ICK-Ul* One Second hand Ford V-g Plek-up In A. I caatdllton Juit overhaul. iPait Inapecllonl 1 dav* ago New Tyraa. M.l.l-4n. Tha undatiignad will oflar tor aala by P""'* *">V*UUtm at Ihelr ofllea. No. IT. Il'gli Rlreat. Uridgalown. on Tburad.iv lai Fabeuary at I pjn the freehold dwallirghouw called Mil III I II I in eacellant order and racently ranovaled. In Uth Avanua. Belleville, with • %  Kiuare foal of land. Drawing, dining and nraakfaxt raorni bedroom*, bath and toilet and kitchen Double aMrgaM and aarvanti ioon.. Inipertkin bv appointment onlv. pi.,i 2JI0 COTTtj:. CATFOflD t, CO. Rollnt.... U.IJH %  TltAtTMR—One Hi McCormleh DeerIrg Farmall H. ahael tractor, complete with graai culter In excellent condition, vary iiiti, uard. COIJC CO LTD. M 1.B1-TH VtXOCCTTB Mg < Dorr under 1. mile*, aa .aw. A real bargain at tatf rnt-HTtSV CARAGF Dtal gt Iff.l -il—i POl'LTRY CHK-KR II While Wvai.dotle Chk-a. hatched from Imporlad UttUly laying Mocka ft x J waeki old for M.SV 1 x ^eek old for U.IS or Ibp lot for M' Mini 3aM M.1.51—In. IMPROVE your .lock 3 White WyinaMlte Cockeiel. 3 month, old. Raierd Iron imporlrd utilil.laying nock glO •ach or equKalant value In Corn Dial ELECTBICAL aXatTTRIC STOVE — Table Model. J nnga with .mail oven alUrhed and neetill' Toii.ter AppW Boa A A C n Ad \OCate Cn M l ilIn 11 American rrllld mpleta wltb lock' 1 CO K R ML..-. Ml 51—1 f n I.MRE>-HI(iEHATOH One Oeneral tl trie American Rvfrtgciatm ft cf In peifart order A gift at tha price Oil C Pir.repnlnte -1 4I0 or MOI a I 91 -In RADKV-One Hi Eddyalone model R104 Radio In excellent condition. No reasonable offer lefuaad For further pa>tlrutei. phone gMl bafora ff.ffO a.m. and alter 4 00 p.m. I1.I.B1—4n. FURNITURE rURN ITU RE— Ralph Heard affar. in following-New Mahogany furniture Dining Chain (1S00 par pr Tub Chali IMfff par pr. Cocktail table. (10 00 Te ln.Ua>. ftlSOff. Mreamlined Morris ch.li •3900 each: Vantllea gMOO each alt iinpamted ruah chain; rocker, an .tooat not targeting a large aaaortmrr of aPod aacond hand furnllura. Call < Ralph Beard's fumlahlng ahowroom Hardwood Allay Open > •.!. to p.m. dart I y Close Baluiday nooi F-IIO* !" ara ig.i.n-g MISCELLANEOUS CAMERAS — A new Assortment recalved — Alao Alma all sMc* Black %  id White and Colour — Knlghf. Dm lADIF^ SPORT COATS For cool evenings Fawn, beige wine and black 111 assorted .I.e. gg* M Modern Dree* Shoppe. ni-ll-gn capa. Apron*. Table Cloth* Rable. PanIII SIAl MI1JC Powderad Milk 1 1 lb Tina Nulrkl*. Seiaat A Dally New Dutch Cheea rl* pelb R F. Cola Co.. Lid 31.1 at—m FOR R1NT. KAI* OR I.RASR BAOATTJIX HOUSE. St Tbomai L'o •lair* Closed tiallrry. Drawing and Din Irg room. Braakfaat room and KitchenelU I bedroom, running water in eacn. Toilet and Halh lyOWNSTADU CIo*d Onllarv. Living-room. Breakfast room %  i-.i Kitchenetle. 1 Bedroom* Toilet ami Both. Electrtc Light and Telephone Applv Maioger of Bagatelle Plant .th-. SI Thorn*. Dial 1331 SI.LSI -SB CAVB a) ROACHES rLANTATION" Wa will sat up far tale by Public CompelIIInn at our Office Jamea Sttn-I. on Friday and February IBM. at > p.m. CAVE ROACHES PLANTATION'S situate In St Lucy and gsaRBawJsaJ H eatlmallon gg acres 3 roods U peril.of which about 41 acreare arable The acreage Is made up a. follow. X)H orree in crop cane, nady to 14 1 MM) t acre* 13 parches In preparalioi.. road., yard, etc apertion on apQllcallon to Mr Ormond Kniglil on >ba prenu.e. YEARWDOD A, BOYCF Soll.llUK 1*111 Aii PtuiPFllTY — One) 111 1 stor. buildr.g illuated In Tudor St. Oppo-ite Cen ral roundry'a Apply to Mr. O Lewl> n premise. Inspection anv day beWBtTCUFTE — Navy 0a Ing on eleven thousand sgiuire real land Built of Stone. Three riedr* and all modern convenience* Also I play room 10 bI* feat For poriK WANTED SKCHETARY for ROCKI.XY OOI-F CLUB. SaUry glgogg par monlh 10 gethar with free quarter* In Sat 01 rr Cluh House, containing two bedrc.m.. Ilvsag room, eloaad verandah etc gam fra* light, wator and taie*. Knowledge of Golf an sdvanUg* Apply by latlar only, forwarding references, to—The Heeietarv. Golf Club. Rorfcle SB.LII-l.f V-anclaa exist in De*lgii Daportmen of a West Indian Petroleum Haflner for Trained Draughumen. capable c design and detail work on civil, marham ral. and chemical engineering pi..j.. %  Applicant* must have tha Brlllsl llighsr National CeiUAcate or it. U8 0 Canadian aqvitvalant and should I. prepared to give proof of technical aMI Ity by interview or examination Application*, giving full details m. ex pet ir lit. accompanied bv | Raag passport photograph, should be addrr.< ed to M>MI Da Coata • Co Ltd. Pi Box 103. Bridgetown. O 1 SI fl> MISCELLANEOUS WANTED TO RENT ruRh'isHrn HOUSE sttu.ted iwean Maxwell'* and Rocklev Coast w ata n a d iFori not saw* tl three month* Phone 3MI. Mill. %  Uv does n.tt bind Itaelf to a lowatt or any Tender K MAM IN Catrfc, V..t.i a* St Oeorg. MIJI NOTICE He P-ITATT or SAMUEL ROnrV HOWARD STREAT rjaay ... HOTtCo 1baanab) given thai all p*> %  ..fferltng Ihe ..late of Samuel Hem M.i-.rd Street late of Illnnrnabiu-> u the parish of Salnl Thoma. thl. Uland on Ihe ffth dav nf January iffSI are hetetiv rrauired lu %  end in particular* nl thrlt rlalm*. duly ataHUd. to the urtdarskgiird Gorftor Osavald H.mlMiin Harding. O.wald Howard Sirent and 11. I-L SealIhe quaillied r.ccutor* of the will of the oriMi I ..... IT High Street Bridgetown, mi as he for %  tha 10th dav of March 1961 date we .hall proceed lo tli | a*ael* of the *aid e.lale among ihe partie* entitled thereto, hiving regard t< the debt. I which *< than shall have had notice. am that wa shall not be lUbte for aaarU *> distributed to any prfmn >i# whose debt Britain. Franco L.S. Agree To Talks l.t >M. ^ tliltuh 1 % %  %  4 d iodA> hag ri.'i .ti--,, -nhhtctl ol th %  ci*rrn*wi dfi lion anu .-thrr Gorman problfr %  ..,:..(! : w. .1.1 PUIU for rauaWaafl '"'iinan unit-, tor Europfan CawflMatw. Widc-nuiR ;lt sCOpaj "t oM BMI • pCsTatlpa] . :,: inliTTIAlK.il,il WAS one of the iwo BOI .tlotis l.ud down in lb* thtre/ .S. Leadership Weaken? Influence With West — James Restor NEW YOUrv Jan. 24. %  S. v Yrk Timi.mn leadership in the Fai I %  •mjinent ol V .,-,-a., .1 lfc lil l '.aes lnAMnce nations %  switairly, m.u We> iuahe.ll Ihl 1 %  ff.mtioi Bntain'g mo |Mywerliil rlarHti >; snip. HIP reconstructed 23.000-ti.iairci-dft ..irrtci IndomlUblr. wil the Hooia r: ntiKiUi. She h. been romplrtelv refill^ and her fliajht dock IcnuUiencd BUJ MMd for new types a. n.iv'iil jet plane? Hrtiiin ut thr InalomlUMfIN ihr first *LIKC of the rebuildJnji 01 the Fleeb, which, with two new 38,000-ton ii ircraft-carriers, ndw tu-av v .iiv'.iiivns il of BBHTUI I.I il.naid Streat. deeeaaad. A4.1SI 3 £25. dai iqg Bvtvat* miMii; LICF.NSK NOTICF j. rarr-n of Kc Hd Htb-n ti.i perml lo e %  i -.. |.. ., „..d .hingle and will buldlng at Coynar Ken.iiigton Haw ltd. BWAlgra Rd Blown Dated this 33rd d.i. of tm h il \ TAJ ^:A. Eaq Pullie Maglel Dlil A" %  ig,...i OI.AI1VS HI I M Applicant N |l Th| bo considered at .. i ie "eld ..I PolKe Court. Distrirt -A" on Frlda, Ihe jnd star of Pabruary ll at l It A MM*. M.gi-i'TALAtA. I inn J i il Imporlanl Nfilirr TMI: .. % %  I.on. Ihe EaplanasVc Bay St.. Ihroiighout Hasting* St Lawrence area up lo Cr**rn< Kail Terrare. between 13* garf approalrnalely 1.30 pm Igdsffl WANTEO 1 GOAT Young goat gin MAGAZINES — Second hand maga•InM and comic* In gaod cnnditlan. STANWAY SJTOPaE. Dial 4010. UKAS It. la.ll~*n. naadle* for your record i of all kind*. Prle. .. all kind, too A. I CO, LTD. HUM tl" RIBBONS. Feather.. 1 Button*. Lace* at Edge* eiy at reaaanabM price* ShoRpe STOCKINGS II gauge Fine Myk>-> Stocking, ft it Iadl and children AnkJa Socks. H lo W cent* Modern Dreas Rhopna. DIM*' SWRTS, BLOOJaM.~iHrj.rrS. -In" larsW variety U M to MM Modrrr iye*a Shoppe. 1l-n SAPPER SWALLOW ColIasMble Sail Ing Boat II XI g Ins by 4 ft Naw r,,m pleta wtlh sail, oar* ate Spniallv treasad canvas to auit T.-pJca Alao Iwo fourteen foot oars Apply Yaung OdO Coy. M I fll-m TOITfCHLIGHTS baga Small and Phoenix For Ladle, hand*TV U-aful Kl.g-T. IT FOR CASH flocks, waf alral bones in any rondill all or dial **?v i.iiwiM.rI op Upper Bay Street St-l.SI HP BIT FOR t'ASB OM Gold on fUtver lawallory. cam. denture*, n wr.ie. call oi Dial 44Ji gyCyaUUNOI Antiajiw shop. BdJolnit-a Rg Club IS 141 T r.ORRrNGBS undertake rapart wal A clock repairs, cleaning and real tion of oil paintings, valuntlons for I ranra and probate. ..onsis.-i OIIIIXTAI. C*> S alS Kr.im ENDI I < H1N \ BrOTn I Hllk. CoHoa. BraaawA,-t Jrurl*. Llr.en*. Ivori leak Motxl Sandal*. Jreiteh Per famm, Barbados s< trwm >•• I'ure %  sss. r.tc Fie R| Ths Aeavealr llradaaarler. I HAM H...S. K\SIIMI:IU: *jjaawlaa T mlH mm New apaalsh Cl*sar* Regular Spain h and the Advanced On-mnei-i i i will be commencing from the First nt February. All Ibeee inter anted, pleas* be gnl enough to contact Mr. Maria Car lot IM Got,salve*. "Santa fTlara", St laamvt Bga BSfgM .e ..I-.-.•!.•JIM Rrp I',-.tillBK WISE. . . \IH I.HIIS1 Barbados Amateur Boxing Association I Association's I lead -quarters Modern Hlfjl ->< m Friday. 2th .lanu;.' 5 p.m to arrange for %  for Wcsl Iniiian Championgliil-g lo be he) lard, 24th. ,md 25th March. 1931. Local !tIe-holderb.prei titles during the month of rv or early March NB. All professional* who have engaged In no contest during the past three years may revert to Weir amateur status on applicathis Association and %  11 aims. L A Sec B A B A 24 1 51—3n. British Ovtasau f\la-w*i ptkjl LONDON Jan 'I dismal. t0 ^ poor ' Uph ?* Ql lh i Le-**>ni of 400 London butch%  i B>0T ... the right e,s Uml of fac.ng groups of ifi'tlbllng housewives to-dav Captain H. L Fry. 3R->eai-gae ilemanded a statement QC Uie nlor raptain. who Jolne.. Oovernmei-fi plan* i, ( Rt ., m ,„. Urwajra, forerunner of roSBl Journal of the British Airlin PIloU Associatn.n i isltlon of a captain u Imperial Airway*, was. of eours* totally different from the positim 1 'AC captain. ''Pregent^lay captains receiv Minister Attlee accusing Government of fulling to provide %  eople with "adequate mq.plies With only one shilling's worth ->f meat per week, butchers told Attlee. that housewives could noi %  nirive more than two meal Inferior transport, inferior hotel wlih meat She is al her wtf> "".;' 1"" : 1 '* ;' %  %  ,; '' • %  ; :l %  : "">* hoi. gdequanals £ will buy ^r less, and they have, ran feed her ramilv for tne ol course. %  much lower re|aii. rafluvlwlai ol the week thev seniority. added. (•round < nut ml And the tiulehers assure I "Then arc other changes, such Attlee lhat they were "well at greatly increased ground cor.versed in the opinion* and grlevtiol over flying operations and the .mccs of the housewife." constant checking system tun The letter was signed n known pre-war), which have all Harold Daniels, President of the liwered our professional .talus l-mdon Hetiul Meat THHM i \ Captain Fry suggests IIAI.I'A ciaUon. t inuld discuss with BOAC: _. The huU-hers added that mo*t x,l !. —A return to the pre-war systeni the meat now being supplied wa.. u in ii by an aircraft command" unsuitable fm eugUni up into and his first officer were eon* > xtremely small rations, and that veyed between airport and hotel n could not be compared ir ln a r; palatabilUy with ment consume i ..—The provision of ilnd ,|nlefore the war. accommodation; Other organl nations of butcherJ—A dally overseas BllOWanoa ..re exiiected lo join this move b Of roughly t^ london EXPH ^ut pressure On tinGovernniei.' The tallsBTa ..I Biilisli and Ain-i.inie negotiators last week b agree (i term* for Ihe resumption of Argentine meat ghlpment' to Rrltaln has ended any hopthat the midget IT. rat ration might %  In some quarters, ihei,BA1 raV List-, ihat 11 may be a .ithei 0U< —Renter Dolphin Furniture h Part Of Festival Show The Dolphin furiuiu:. tn 1813 to commemorate Nelnn. %  victories, will be on show if* n ., p, ".f' 1 :: Improving Brazil '' i* rR 1 .r v Pwilval this gummei O Comes First Under this head the Western Govern merits are asking that a preliminary conference should I-permitted with some discussion ol substance aa BBS I BUSi involved as well as simply a decision on what tojnclude in the agenda hut the iiicliminaiy conference would not attempt t.. .iu,ve .1 SOluUoni ol the problems "this Itanctkm being resereed for the Ministers themselves." The British note repeated that Baitain could "in DO eircumstanees" accept the Prague proposals on Germany as a limitation on. an as the bails for, discussions His Majesty's Government wish to emphasise as Wal stated in their note of Decsmbci 22. that the tension which exlits in the world today does not arise from the German problem A diCUasUon limited to the questions by the Soviet Govern ment srOUlfl theiefme b* Inadequate and unreal" The British reply also pointed out Ihat Britain's earlier note oi U had iu (.posed that representatives of the "Big Four" should meet and examine intet aatkM ll problems "with a view to %  hiding a mutually accaptabK basis for a meeting of Foreign %  if the four countries and to icegmmend to their Governments .1 suitable agenda. It added that these representaU*t aVOUsd "need to give some consideration to questions and problems involved in order tn delermine Iheu formulation fot inclusion in the ggenda as well as ihe order In which this amid appear so that the mutually %  CO) %  ptaiile basis referred to could i %  %  t.ii l.-hi'ii —Rewter. Eva P'rrtn Appeals P Strike Call-off BlitNl It AlliKS. Jan. 2*. Senora Eva Peron made single handed effort during th. %  .ight to pm an end to Argentina' (bird railway strike in the perlon a taw rnaattM Hovelling b i ..(..mpafiletl by two high officials ghe went from one station %  an..tin, in the outskirts oi BtPaVMM Anes rxhnrting strikers 1 resume work. BaVrMort ssrvleai which hm M ti naiintalnad yestarday on twi -nli UM Bfiot Airchad by this mi I.e. brought to a virtual halt and th. i ararvsli was %  Imoai total. —Heater. \ in hundllng K... i %  %  Brttw in i hNABA rUn*rr. NEW RELIEF FOR ARTHRITIC PAINS But new treatment does more than •ase these terrible agonies. A sow product. IKIU'IN, bol-rn cn .1 which n prompt relief from the pnuw due to Hm >vm. 4 rhanjmaliam. but A la.. nffiHia the nieUbotic priH-^asxH* wli a vary important part of the rheiimaiic State's backgrnurMl P. 0L .^. !" h *" '*'" redent*d gucceas. IXH.1IN Is bsing prpscrilmd by doet.irBMg And -anv sufferer. bsVS I raaunur.1 normal living na g rseull ol i .king IHI.CIN Ooo't dolsv Profit by thnx(NTef*IOS of fell., paing. Gel OOLOW today. Abut only SOtb IV: B'MKFTtS DRUG STOHU— Brlduer. PhmrmMcu. of 100 j.t only gK ihri.is m i eoraSita %  t linenBS 1 't><'Uc*MU id Alpha SHIPPING NOTICES "' • AND "JN" II Ml 1*1. MANX. UNli !• elilule,i to *0i. Melbnurae I MS lOMjAPIIWe* .11 AdnUMe Jri.nery January lath. Brisbane" Ml,! salt. Bar bad"* I %  0*a for Hard II* .c ..I .... „.,,„ •ft aiMl Oeneral ua? griZAEn fflsua ."..".•ir.^rujs-"-"* roe further parti. „iai. (1 ,, nt njRNTS'v IITIIV A I iMI'ANV n.r.r. i. -Tr*tiload. DA COSTA Vm Lid BegtjgSgi. B W 1 Again. r'e <4 V DABBWOOO gftf ..-, Telephonr: 404? \&EA McOO; SisamAhipCo. r= • 9at NKW VIHIK SFHVK I _n_ rv.U.-"" 1 "' a inrv %  "— %  m UXBSm NKW ORLRANS XERVIfF S S I .b, .,,11. -ail-. .M.I neremppi .iMvri lUHuadi.* Clli — %  %  „an IBII. I., m Mi 1 Ml---. M. Mas*. .1 sale CANAI'.AN vr.uvii t. The Dolphin suite -so cal|e< because it is decorated with cervtsaSj of dolphins — consist. -1 ten %  nmsaalra, three setteea window scat, a bOBt-ghapetl sola, two card tables with rosewood lops and brass inlay, u %  %  ;%  SAYS VARGAS lilO DE JANEIRO Jan 23 % %  %  press .utemsMi IS*I sofa table and n prdpst.-il oMtrai>r imaginary—It waa claiml thai P'^"^ I'M'S.,1,,,., rl.fi (;.'!ullc. Varfaa ha. nsjncj rurauura I .|„„.,,, bbnMU ......... non %  nt, .ncluding H-< „„ cr | M m ,orre,ting the BnanI, "Tulir Th.r. Sll^ a ball ,„ '" ,'"f *>" %  <'" < "n>.nIUI. p...y Hegcncy costume and the wild P"'Bles. liriiineiiof a new play of t'te According to these claims inperiod, and an Inter* flatten must be Mopped and the ational put pet fc.tiv-1 cost of living reduced al thc A niikci match in Ragsnci garUcst possible moment U.S. Extend Overseas Tours WASHINGTON. Jan. 24. The American army is to extend oveiseas tours as duty except foi Hie K.ir East, for another six menth* it was UIIIIIILIII..-.| aafll Thlr is the second rxtensioi %  met the outbreak of war u l. ..ii-.. The order applies to Ameriiai. tioops in Germany and Austn. and a mall group In Trieste -Hester H-lll.. Ka.had... 12tl. Jam B*1H Jan. ail. Fehy ROBERT TIIOM LTD N-w York and Onlf Bervlca. Apply DA CO-IT A O CO. LTD Osnadlan BMTTICS. PASSAGES TO EUROPE Cunt.ict Antilleg Products. Uniili-d. Hoscau. DumlnlSa. fur lalling to Europe. The usual port, .,t ,,|| .,,,. Dublin, Ixindon. or Itotler.iam. single fare £70; usual reductions for children. ID be played oil BrUl Wlch Lawn-. Hove. In August Pageaal A Pageant of Brighton and g i.aplay are plannet' Kipling*! house at Rottlng:lcan is to be open, and the Renter CROWDS WITNESS DUCHESS" FUNERAL NAPLES. Jan 24 Hugr crowd) of iieople to-day tf'l.^w.'u?' 1 d i"V'"J ..plilM .,.„ into i^Cbbourlng Ducheas Elena o( Orleans A.Ma UtsBOal lOaOlsU and cotiduetorBJ JbOU .n.ls al Ol i others lined the 'p tZ'l£ ^J SsAlrHeH h ' hWJ "> N P' M th ""* ll aLso be conduite. f( ,i lowrd D „ ,i vr mfltnr Cif] | w i th members of the Ducal nunll) %  lowly moved along the gulf i Naples —Jleuter f Hegencv Brighton —LE.H GIRLISH FIGURES DIMMING CHAMPION I-ON DON aV \laiv Byatt. com. schools meals organizer fur , ., ,_. IXJNDON North Hampshire reported tnal Leonid Methfcov. thl '. %  l..:Rirls now liegin to B/oi / wimm.-i who holds the official about their figures when onk t *"'!<' '< Europ.-aii n-cord of l nr.in.. 1 ^ ••>< onds for the 100 metre, i east stroke, hareduced his linnt. I mm. rj fl seconds, according to Taas Agency reports from atOBOBW. You Might Walk Through A Wall 1.DNDON J Ulazewski. a well H ItLsh physicist, predictI Ixtiiic tb.it the time Is no Dl when it will be pm. i-mlegra'" a man In thi Cnlled Stales and integrate him ll i He declared that this would Bl i .K.ible by insulation from uV i raa ol pavttj LaTPlteUoa would be Mir.pl.• u. &f (.pic would ii. Bl %  to through walls," In. H During the lecturs he gold tha i >. had found tfu 'A.I'.-I rtaetod OiiTaranl imary tap water and thi. a baptised infant differ* statically from an unBBfglai or 14 yeai Miss Byatt said. Witry to make school din a< nttirltious as possible, but modem -choolgirl get* a lUmii lg tin of an indicator which diagnc Illnesses by showing variation* i Ihe body wavelengths —IN S ( ,V-e, %  '. ,-,'/,V,*,V/,V/,VeV/, :J roi S KAKBAIIOS ; : l-WKSl'MKNTS ;; MA A. M. BESS, I •-'• : :>:i r.i....i si. nivcr v Piinenix I'll i M %  ....' —: I'll.....IT'ii, : — I .; c.. 10-DAY'S NEWS FUSH JOIINStlN'H SIATIONtlRV aasj UAiintVAKh An Oil Mithoul Ollinesa is nvl A t uhrlra I.I'IIM OILS Im n. n iv, ,1 Odler.. M \TII\I I Ol MHO I.TII. Staln.n — Trafali hen she reaches I 1 Subject lo approval by DM Boi "teens." • ian All-l'nion Committee fo They start to think, gaiio %  -t thl rtt rd II < %  *• •ubmlt about then figure far tO0 OarH lad to the International fl in llts They Bet the idea I are going to get fat and we havl w mld boat I N I (iifflfiiltv in nsiKsTlg them — %  — anything -IJ^ MA|L RED BASKETBALL IX>NDON Communist Russia Is apparently teaching Communist China something new in aggi— %  A Moscow radio < i-rtsd that the Rus*>*n ^%JT^S o-C 2 ,,'X* 'Tien'' basketball team now lour. parre* and RrgMtere-.! Mail* .a S ., m Ha has JO far defeated "-* Ordinary Mail •• 10 IS a m an %  .mese team it ha. n ^SSSStmrnt st Joa... ly 'friendly matches nava N n t>. it** ss ranadian ct>aiierig-.i. -ved to date a gains* •_ be etaaed M Chinese quintc. 'H-g,.t,-.i uaii* at i .* sen. Shanghai and Nankina v „ m an —tW D> -" %  /anuar, ISSl Malh far Darnir.Ka by | -III lie rloaed If I rral Po*l Offlee a. Mall at 1 ,, m Brgi.trr.-I ordlnars' Kail, at I Jo a Ji'h •>! J.i -. ..la Tn Hh ->l January. IMi. ',',*.-.-,',-,'. .% %  .;'*';•,**;•.•*'>'. %  .'.*.',-••''•'**•*•">-•'*'*'>*'+"'''''•'' I CaO r > * oo a 'u 0 CHARLES McENEARNEY & CO. LTD. E 1



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llaxtafo ESTABLISHED 1895 Thousands Found Burnt To Death In Jungle Trees In New Guinea Volcano FOB* MORESBY, Jan. 21 ^'HE FIRST Government official back from the Mount Lamington area, told today of dead bodies of natives hanging srotwquely from iungle trees at thi foot of the volcano Claude Champion, Assistant Government Sec retary. i ollapsed sobbinv. to the r round after telling of the horrors of the junle, turned into a grave yard for at least 3,000 natives and 35 Europeans. He hurl visited Higatuiu new the foul peak volcano which fruptad IMM Thundujr, Champion. brother of I".m Chamolon, Director >f District 8ervteM in New Gmnen. said that ll:. apparently climbed the trees when the ground became t !" > hot to stand on. Then as the temperature rose and the shower of flaming lava and ash continued, thev burned to I branches THURSDAY. JANU S>l Will 1! United Nations Move Into Wonju Again B.G. Does Not Deserve Responsibility -SAYS GOMfS he found hi f Di l"ii l O i-wniiontl c S f\ A ley %  1 found Cowley dead on the U IIwm Sttthl ; BlOTM MI n jeep ii il|*oventd by ..-h Kb hands m %  up iivin. to inlaid I I ii.a IV).JI ild -on. Karl, wao :i; in front of their bungalow 14 !' ; %  %  '*>' on top of a and n-curiii of BSIU Thenbungalow the only kindamaged building ,t PI %  i _,'""' %  our Own l 0 „r.t..i.(lr GEORGETOWN. B.C. Jon. Carlos Come.-, solicitor prominent Social Welfare worke Hying evidence before the Constitution Commissin on TueedJ> made g very conservative proje-c l,. .. i I aal which painted a picture of ^ A LOTM n^n. QovOrni itnl the colony's political future 4gg Bocretarj f... Mew Gull* orlbed by Sir John Waddingtmi. %  > nUM of the vlctln Chairnmn, as "gloomy". %  rOMO* I hi Canberra what %  i His reciminciidations although next of kill bud bran notified retaining Legislative and Exe?u I' * %  by no means certain that tive Council* in more or leu* "II present forms pave the Governor oonside able increased power particularly in the matter o money bill*. Dr RIUi Jin en. suggested that the proposubt would put tin Constitution considerably furthei back from the responsibility thai %  I. ha< Gomes rep led "I do not see thr, colony deserving any responslbiitti for miotber 50 yean" Gomee-ri!?Ti made -i strong pie. for schools to return to the deniiial system as there WM a "decided decrease in the moral* of the community In the evening session the Commission heard a dclegnliu. from the B.G Labour Union who proposed a imlcamernl Legislature who 1 leader of the majority parts s Prime Mn lifter who would chnnfc seven Minister*. The Qovarnor'g powtra would be confined t defence and exter nol matters The union ilao favour univeisa adult auffiar from the age of eighteen wd'i election-, every four years %  lie I %  i idtkftd ,i patrol re|Mtrted by pop, I .' uld '( to DO Mtiak %  ad for rurtl %  i i All rescue parties said their efforts were made dangerous, by •suffocating pumice di; i U •ttrrcd up us they walked over It, Fiercely hoi ashes beneath th< dual were a ilsull. trap they jdded Latest reports today tended to confirm fears thai only 12 of 244 people survived at the village of Isavita. Host of the vlctlfM WtP %  ..-.,. %  Emergency lamw and nOOpttall n <•( cnduiinu peace >'ehru appealed to the tions of the Waal to "cross this doorstep of opporlunil> in search and to the Asian tlons he expressed the hope lha' they would stand by methods ol peace whatever happened. The proposal in Uw Nations to name China as an ag gressor could not lend to peace but only to an tntensideation conflict*, he said The Chinese Ooventfl • k0eatlon of III earl %  UM United Natioiu PoMttceJ ( onunlttae'i raaoluUon made It %  Mar N'ehni -ild. UM MgU HU "f negotiations for peace n the Far East. —Reuter. SCENE in y-t. nl.v T Hatch between Hiss D. Wood and Hi %  ISJOl to strike ball) Di llrilhh l.tihour iA'aders Discuss foreign I'oiiey Biituh Lab I I Pi mi mi icj -... ttetaaaaM t. th N |vo of ana L iboui Part %  ;. %  (he Far Beaten During Ui Chi Important %  ootloB ,,i u„. parts has consolidated IU against any mow I issues pasv oul ol UM phase of i llOfl To Hies,, members statement brought refllef When the Pai lian i Party maeti next We nine Will want a full f foreign policy, ilao Aneurin B< 0 niicl udlMtl I I %  the Ai i %  i rt They won to ntamlpa ihe Im pUoaUoni of BriuHn'i l ri.:in .omplex problems of nuibpower must be settled, imluo ..uiia tuunw oi coal mine and arms The committee la also I .. DM Onh'i HIM Sever..I I • inns have n.I* reiula" ol UM Trad ngress met first to consider their attitude at a meeting with the lot Among reports bol ie (in the propiM %  • .,. i J DOfJ %  llritain\ coal ere subject of a meeting today been Attlee. Philip Noel BsUM Minister of Fuel and I' s Mmlaton Of the Republic of Inland who want Britain b 1 Btil -Reuler Middle East Thinks \\ ur With ItuBSiu lneviUibltWBLUNOTOM I A New taalu 1 %  big under .Min.-iuil Tito 9 his home-towii ih >t moat ptopie Ihe Middle East oellevod hu.M.i a> ineA ital le Doctor L. S. Itogers. now PP [ Singer, g| the Itoyal School of Metln-itie said that the Middle Ban rnatxy. thing i" lop % %  Russians swinging down I the ]>ersian Gulf. Sue/ Canal and %  He said the SOVMOI also had a s'ring of airfields across the Kashmir border n I "Ha. DootOT Rowan Mtva d with Vu goslavian foreeg fiirlng the seeon.i WOrM —Rr nfer maniit at th.Bii vi lo Tanni. c Dr. O. Manning nd htlsa Baujaaiiii f Mannins tag vi >' %  won tl .MM Kixod D^ihU. i %  M. \ Bevin Has Palch Of Pneumonia" I.OM" IN. Jin. 24. HIAH. Initial. K.ncn.11 Serivl.n i Pon !'!"., ui iid io-da\ III i.ui.,l In brd with mn.,.iu., ycsli levin who is 70 chill durin< liie vu n of .Inmonwcallh Prim* Minnley 10 I..i %  few engagenwnli <.*ncr OX llll • SPOT LONDON. Lord Hoi i" Duncan Mc. %  . at a London rneetini to lUi ins vlewi on Tndu Factorj in %  I '! e 1 Ilia, rou ban been 50 years with the com%  i bow no complaints puna! you bu UM %  %  -i i ih.it .i %  i.u..' reUre :ifter so ervlce IttfJ scrau-hed hU %  %  %  i to UM mgnoajM RetllC? Ketue after 50 kf y God, If I'd Known U rnporary Job, linn U • %  Id never taken jt "' —I.N.S. Chinese Note Reassuring SAYS DELEGATION NEW YORK. Jajl J* %  %  u;l "" n i %  rual %¡ overnmi %  %  \ be ra i the 1 del< here Irom New Delhi th! fen I i The Indian delegation ipokoi man said Ihe nv %  i -lill being de i glance at it. he said i appeared from the Indian point %  urlng Tin u.t i i.i ..i i ivod ..[ UM |W0 I. 'Ill I A lai god An t ii'ld e.| In the Political Com Ittet The Indiai pokei man said ii '",, hkely that the new message • i uld bo ihown to the groui The Indian dt %  irwntly bean re. %  i.v the Pi M Fran. —Heater '< %  I ... %  i overwork %  e underoperutmas In u London %  flsllllM When ,i, ..I -i IT i %  %  s .ipenred to be lUigMll Ida. %  . ted xo be much l|e ha> long H I thoug.i hi rt wee regardai UM %  n During the Commonwealth COJI! id i lion 142 Drat I III Avalanches i tore th" %  lietUg ib v n %  id the % iilaiit Tsw > HMeall) rragmnt ried awi t -airr raporU front Milan that igen crowded little churches he Italian Alps, todaj K.I salvation from av.d.mihe • -vch have s< i..i killed M peopl i i injured at least .V) 1 i agtofday biraugjhi \ Ii I Mning thouaanda of t %  now .nd ice and ihn %  liri ui: astei I nun (>m'\ ,i comes thu %  %  i Uljlg down IM the Austrian. Italian aim I'avarian Alptoday thieatenma villages nii iriah valinehea In Innsbruck. AHMTM I lallr. cut off M ;IN u, houses HI one " url wan i im evacuated because of the i, peril u.ilancha also beg,i Ulg>u .Mi'* on .ii mm bordci (. r-.|H-i .itnl.root, Reuter CabM %  ported from AugsborK ffaalht i Mat ora in Bevaru i ii.,l nv.ilali.hes ti. I.* i isin'u from the itoap pe %  ..; ihiuiigh deep -now have 'he winter lamps of wot company worm b laeier on tin l. ocgner i look bandage* MO tun for I2tl villager* O M aSw w rd i i tii|i lor live rt\s BUMWM A i wni.li %  %  repori began i parti lolling Austhe OP •dual i liter TOKYO, Jan. 24 [JlframJ UA'l'iONS oattahon with reinforce nieiiis iouny moved back into Wonju, thu communications centre in Southern Korea, which has changed hands several times in the past week. Fo.the past few nays United Nations troops have movdd into Wonju each day and withdrawn to A more tenable situation by nignt. Fighting flared up in the western central sector this morning as two Chinese platoons occupied the hill noith of Kumyabgijinigini. 10 miles south of Seoul Mac Arthur W ill Be 71 To-morrov* eaith llcvln'g low that i" carTj him ui the Mai (onraognea hall. The Illness of ErncM I'evm will renew agitation ior in* replacement by a younger man, i">liliial Quartan felt here to-day llll e MIIUMCI AUlM %  Kitation in |hl thai Bevm wou I lull baalth. During abotno \ %  %  testa charge of the F0n A Fi.iciui, ni'm pokagmai uld lo-dav that Bavin , OfBce Kenneth Younger. Mini 1 .!• i % %  i ... ui %  .. r Be' _K iil.i WASHINGTON. Jan 2 General llnughe M.u \i lluu ill easahrata hu Mvanty-flrtl birthday on Ittdl Spread OMCUMaon in Uv It ttes ol United Nations r..' td I av top An n .'.MI the Tar Cast Since t'i mot setbacks in Korea American magazines and tiewspapcK have made in. rcasingU numerous ei ilual refi'i i'in-etn the General liu ie I %  l-eeii .i e\ ei i c I %  op in his prestige and authoriH in WaahlngjtMB, gsxoVdlng to obatrvers here since his .lUirtixe "end the war" offensive m November followed by two ii-..retreat by UBHod Nationforces "To-day" one source s.n H Ailhui d(es nol even men ise tin..1 authortb over mlUtar) i in Ins in is under close supervision b) Ihe lilefl of Staff Ai-o UM n lalson beiwooo -hunt Chiefs in Washington .uid General KldgWBl ll Ith Army headquarters. The most Important i thig n that Ihe Joint Chhafl of SlalT now express then | > ..tniit plans for Ihe Kore.ui mpaign more forcefull> than thev .1 fall fr* h do General MacAitbm h thority enjoyed by inj military l". uniiandei but Ihe speel .1 pottlion he occupied for so long as a power In his own right ha* gone with the legend of hli military InVIM, ibllllV %  — K> nl.i i;\.m TO HWiivi FfoBce Seize Psrki NfHftpu|M'rs I i..u M All copies of today'* (ommanit. Ilumanite and Liber i oltce "ti rh pic" ll %  printing : I e . II . %  I vocativ .! 1 %  % %  | %  %  U.S., U.K. Not Aiding France Enough I'AHis. Ju %  •+ i "i the Associated States of Indo-China Jen I*' %  i nimi. cocnplatnad here in rtaj that An* c I . %  | ., ,,,. ipuort |p i i hma, Ht vs tallttng to j at a French Prgaa hmdioon I lefeptd Fume on the RhllK il Ibt d: near threatening us ti in the rest of Ihe world I am sore on, \\, ,i aw ire evei ... fight for h %  i the As." ; [ndo-Chlna Strale t •• il hi* a %  on Jmu:tv g I p|ei of the mini 11 I Ind.. ( %  isjjir. l>-limr Given Asylum \\\ Biisla JAMAICA, Ju. M. I idenl Dumarsais Kslime Haiti SHU granted one month r JasMdca today as ihe lion w A BuatamonM moved on his behalf after emissaries of i Haitian G< vernmet t had a in getting the I... .,1 Government to bai his enlry Into the Island Hie m • %  I ... n i Dlleetnl of the Ofllcc nf Control and I>evcl.ipiiiriit of the Export Corporation off Main at m I.iin.ii. | !• I, Ml. I %  to siuilv lommerce melhoils, but SCtuall) (here (o RaM an eye on Bstlme, was p U t into | i .'ndy by C I I) men WIKH he VI I'.ed" S S Cibimbie I,. r.-time and his family trMn Franee this mornHe wsj l;de f released bul in.In e -uspr. t ,i plot here MMMlngla the Ml rrMMlBBt, and in Hustamante's orders have inStltUtod (ilain clothes pioteetion I in e his wife and two hddron P.flune hopes lo lie able to stay in Jamaica, but if he cannot, he will go on to Cuha or II < Ira '< I 1 HaitlfOl (oA-einnieiit told the local Government thai he Intends In use this island as a tpririg-board to regain power in Haiti and asked hideportation. ftuslarnante says: "We will not be dictated to to Ihe Haitian OovsrnmOBl Three months before £itime'F. dlbposillon in May 1049, Buslamante visited Haiti as s gueet of Kstirne and was warmly welcomed by the ex-Presidenl on his embarkation, after being dei oard *lnp for six hours 1 eheson Rejects Soviet Charges WASHINGTON, Jan 24 United state* Iterator! ol St.de Aeheson to-day ie,i %  fffton la ry" what 11 %  that Western Allies by the Soviet Union m BOVttt ItOMl lo llrllain ^,iut FronOI sry 20. e said at hi thai Soviet ohoi North Atlantl B alms were old slHsjalions which were comph true H MU thai 'lie weal had polnl n • tunes Hint the foundoto Norlh Atlai i ,-.. one i %  .ii,. live uhieh was reoogniaed in Ih" United Nal H.ulrr plaloon dug in on a hill south of thi A Chinese company alt." Kt I % %  Allied patrol probing towards siiinyabgljlniginl I armoured United Na| Rtrob today continued iweepmg nuns sad Itaekg north of Ihe Allied line across the Ko lean Peninsula. There • I .i no sign of Communist forcsa. More than 600 North Korean. hi.ii.ig in the hOls ind vaUon bj i ) uid raiding itolateil villages i night were ieu rled operating oesiind the central eastern seelor in rugged, sparsely populated country suited to guerilla opera AgajrOSSlva United Nations patrols ihroiigboiit th,western sector to the north of Osan and Ichon failed to make" any contact '! rTlllIMM Iroops \ Amir spohesnuin said today thai 1.500 North Koreans mclud II. g 500 women volunteeri were i ported stx miles south of Yong Wol on Saturday. This force was said to contain BMSDMU of ue Sei-.iid. Third and Mevenlti North Koie.ui DIVISION. Two daylaler In N, 1 in Ko reun officers wen' icpurttd In the same area. IjUe yesterday after noon an estimalcul 75 lo IO0 Comnuiimts dug in on g hill about 2 i I %  ..iiju and Unlied Nations s-tilliTy opened Bio on IhODi Allied forces pushed to ihe crest Of IhO hill and ten minute* later i contact with Cummu%  fag down ihe north-eet i I the slope Tod.iv's Kighth Army communniue said lhat United Nations in.intls made aggressive patrols ,M it Improved iheir oa^ffooalva post, tions along the west front in the list 12 hours without contacting | ll"' enemy. Allied planes spotted many small boats In Annan Estuary, a few I mlleg south-west of Seoul yaatsjrBMrniMg and In the afternoon plrola went in nnd destroyed IS : of them. On the central front. United \ 'iions patrols fought an esllmat. ed 100 Communists 2 mill < > east of Yoju Communist wan mall arms, automatlc md mortars. After a nhoit fierce fight United 1 i Unengaged and iThdrea In Yoju. AmMlean idertet ilghU-.s damaged three raid probebV 1 d troyod one of t fliHhi of 16 to 20 Communist \; i ( || • %  : < "ters which ati. daj steuler. Tt'LL '11IK AIVCATF. THI NKWS KING 111S llAV OK MGHT "And I've smoked r the m ever since: ieU. Two Invt'Klijiutt' Jumaica Mulaily From Our (hvn Co m awondsnti KINGSTON. Jan 24 The Government pathol been Joined to ir Kenneth rUU if the l.'mversiU ColMgl Of UM West Indies in Investigations start* i .i in connection with the vomiting sieknes which has claimed nearlj I'lW livi-. in Jamaica in the past three weeks. 4(1 || i •lie inioallgaHoii u bain out at Ihe island famed lo list I .orl Where tfie be nn | •if vomiting is lakiug plsV Governmen! lO stud an :ipj.-'jl lo ihe World Health Org lUUtlo for expert assUUn %  annual cold we M .,-. ACHESOy HAS HIGH HOPES Far Lnity Of ffoe World WAS %  • %  %  OLD PEOPL*: ie<4*;ng 'lathes St the Children* Ooodwl'.l L-sga yrsterd | baUig distributed to Mr. and Mrs W E Husband* of New York and Mr. John Heckle* Itl : mod undisturbed I %  %  %  la of Far Eas% %  .i o! thi i North Atlantl .main. He • iirl CYl to Ie %  Brltlab giessor ua*—se wX its l&larvanand by the Indian Prime .MinU ifler Nehru in I day. Achaeon was risked if he eonlldent that the United; tlons General A*sembl> \s '!• %  United suite-, j lution and declare Con China as the aggressor. He said he exiie.led • taken some tin iwee* m the Unit* added he had high hopes •ie United States could serve unity and that the '' N'liUona would gp forwim ..juon taken ...gteat Naou hi 1 7M "I know. One's ^.aw *" In -i du Maurier in 0jSaMF~M I a m elation. The y showed si I V nte ijinii' a new atandard 1 %  >l • iijotiiiriil." "Taw nrptr found mnylhimx rl.r so tool and smooth — -"../ / r.x/ttit yom'U say I smohifmr fee many." "Yen ean'l hae luo many du Maurier wilb tinlillle tiller lip lo proleel yuv ihrval. ll. -oh', il old, m.ri -I> lo the flee And ihi result — gh*n the finest tobaeto in th* first plan — is superb." $1.00 (or 50 There II never be m belief cigarette du MAURIER THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE *"" ""tMraa 1 "'' 1 -r'l t ls c "-'_ a %  "^a*" CO., ita giuri.niowi



PAGE 1

PAGE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE TitrusDM i\vr\RY :;, f5i BARBA^jMAOVDGfrE Prtaud b, ih. A*.i t B** II* '.* •'.. •!•.UW. Thursday. January 25, 1951 I llll IIKM. \ll THE decision by the Government to purchase Club Willow as a suitable site for a new Fire Brigade station will be welcomed by the entire community. The House of Assembly satisfied itself during the week thai the price was reasonable and the site suitable, and there can oe little doubt thai the Legislative Councl will find no difficulty MI concurring in the resolution. After this sanction by the Legislature, ii is hoped that the Government will not. as in other instances in the past, allow the spot to remain unused while tire hazards continue to exist and threaten the safety of life and property. The purchase of Club Willow shows that Barbados has at last accepted the advice of an imported specialist Major Cox insisted that instead of having one huge tire station in the middle of the City with all the equipment concentrated in one spot, there should be several stations at strategic points. The policy of centralising tire brigade equipment, removed stations from Bay Street, Holetown, and Speightstown many years ago in the face of strong public objection. Now that several residential districts have been built up outside Bridgetown and business houses are growing up outside the immediate confines of the City, it is imperative that adequate tire protection be afforded to these areas. It is, however, regrettable that while preparation is being made for the proper distribution of lire stations, little is being done to reduce the number of tire hazards in the City itself. There can be no objection to the acquisition of the site for a new fire station except by those who have failed to appreciate the benefits to be derived. As soon as the cost has been decided on as reasonable, there can be little objection to a scheme which brings the advantages of fire protection, recreation facilities for members of the brigade — who must be kept physically tit if they are to be of any use— and grounds for constant fire fighting practices. This purchase of a site between two thickly populated residential districts should be the precursor of a few others. Blind, Deaf And Dumb THE work of the Barbados Association in aid of the Blind, Deaf and Dumb, is being carried one step farther. It is proposed among other things to establish a local centre for training some of the afflicted blind. The work of the Association in the past, limited through lack of funds, has been confined to assistance of pupils at the Training Institutes in Trinidad. There are at present four deaf pupils whose training has been financed by funds collected by subscription, whilst another pupil has been compelled to return home because of failing eyesight and her consequent failure to learn to lip read. If there was ever an association which deserved public support, it is the Association in aid of the Blind, Deaf and Dumb. Few people in Barbados realise the number of young people and children suffering from these afflictions. During the last week, many of them have sought the help of faith healers now operating in this island. It is the duty of all of us, the majority who can see and hear, to show our thankfulness by helping the less fortunate. With the co-operation of the public, the blind, deaf and dumb can be made useful members of society and to be proud of that usefulness. Good-bye, PARIS... And Hello. NEW YORK PARIS BO nm r A .1". Heal wees I iliitII clumber Into a Transattan tic airliner and taJ*" ofl York, alm j.ple and things 1 look forward u. MMU and doinn in Manhattan But then ... | Of people and Ihfnjs. I'd like to take ow with m* from PanOne* daily Ufa fall Into two broad parts pro! personal. How do |1 t •Tflits .'.t.'icl; Up? tonally, Amelia wuu hands down. The USA iu., m Mpapttnaft'i pararilaa. v.'t. i the stuff isn't being hantlwi tu you on a platter, you rnn always find it in the reft % % % %  So 1 took tcrv.ard with huge ii to Manhattan because you cn, within reason, ring up nearl* anybody, however important, and get a statement In .'i..-.. %  • from boun to da) i to p %  a U phone interview with sumeone l whom you have not l i %  11) introduced. I look forward to ihni eriap tSflaphona service, and I no longer snigger at the slogan. "The voles with a smile." Les. Phone Girl* . THOSE American switchboard girls, after two long yean of France's mournful inadcmoiwiles, now rale in my book as more desirable than Marlenr Dietrich With lively expectation I look forward lo being able to call San Fran, -,., ., MOO mJaM 'i m *>'<• %  York, in rather less time than it v take* me U telephone my re in Parts from my suburban home ten miles .iway. I look forwaru to aIr-conditinning in the shops and cinema* (I suppose I shall astonish the ushMOM at the lirsi few UBM I BO to by trying lo trip ihem, si one does here, for showing me to my place) Le Wine ... NOW. what about the personal side of things? Well, if you are a wine drinker, as I am, you cannot contemplate visit to the United States wllh ivthlng except a twinge of premonitory sorrow. For, although America produceast quantities of wine, and the growers spend millions of dollars a The Sort Of Thing Only 1 Secretai Could Write About Her Buss !*/ /or Hlmncho 1'alrh (hi,,picturt>*lf *#*<• / *.* tttt rutiitl Shut, M M*cCCU .idvei Using it ("II*! i v the hoardings. .. lattlo deaprialy), the fact ret the great proportion 0l lh< artM you set there Is so awful That tears spring, just to lotah of a. raaAaaaVraOB N Ii lo I smart w.ihington restaurant, a waiter h a p pilj dollops a large lump of Ice Into my Burgumh FLASHBACK No. I. to one of the best known of New York restaurants . colleague Ki-nk i-nt on ordering champagne, and 1 having an acrimonious argument with liircl; IV %  MMI.li I LOOK forward to the -In luxury Hi the working i %  imhin us whirh American rrporter* ..-. lor -i.ii-<: When I .ii. i.,t. ,i dehaU> %  I the f renrli parliament. I sal In liideouH dHiomfivi in a wretched htllr >ll< i Into whirl, the eiillrr foreign I'ress had lo pack ItaaU HLr a parcel of dehydrated potatoes. The heal waa appalUna, ventilation non-rxUlvut, and It waa next lo impossible lo hear what waa being said far beltm. Compare the American set-up: Reporters are given the very beat seats al Senate committee hearings, with plenty of tables and chain and ouppues of writing paper Giving off from the Tress cilleries In parllamenl Itself are air-conditioned reading and wrltlm room* for Ike Pre !" waiter. Why. demands Frank. gfOnt they bring us ihe wine list? It lakes some time to convince us that the place simply does not pone.-, one. 1 don't look forward lo Ihe television When 1 left America, things had reached the pilch where you could not hove a quiet beer In a saloon without being obliged to see two all-in wrestlers on tha screen. Now the wrestlers, I hear, are right there in the drawing-room with you. I look forward to seeing those endless hosts of smartly dressed women and girls. Contrary lo the i *rb *rw scarce. Good clothes nat a gn as* are riKTii ul of range for the women and girls who make up llu hTeat army of r i mis and secretui n I shall wistfully .i.ni course, for Paris food. It i -he Freii. h know to cook. The . r.about forxi. Kve, waller, % %  . %  Now what await-; me! Why in. Hue plate special at TB cents Les Sbopa . I SHALL mil.the i i ai wiiidow-dreasinK. ". %  the hi,*. .* avenue can dale you sheer weigni of their out 1 don't think 1 pkeepai out to uei: magic with ItantiriK. %  I shall be nonplus-. %  rhen I am back In the land where they like to do tilings fas 1 walk, for example, into a shop, buy something ai d walk again. not the waa bars, You shake hands all rounu wish all present a hearty goodday, hav. ,val of the political situation Then you inquire aftei Madame* bunion.help her tot up the total of your purrh. with her piece ol chalk otl llata kep: for the purpose, h a laugh when she fats it wioiik the first time, and (ben sal I aritl more good-days and another hand clasp. What will happen when I try h shake hands with the chap behind Ihe drug-afire counter Lexington-avenue? "Say. listen, mister, I ain'l got all da) comedy, will ya?" La Blaek Lady AND I shall find myself. 1 know, looking round for that majestic, figure oi the Paris s^ene-the lady in black bombazuie who sits behind the cash regi tar Even in the smartest ban of Paris she is apt to be UM I ing a doubling eye on the proe'-edings and a quick linger on tha takings. However sophisticated inc bar. i immaculate the while dress of the barmen, there is Madame in the background She epitomise*, in her solid way. a great deal of the French way of •hung things. 1 shall find m> Mad. me in hlack it Al's place . London Express Service NEW ZEALAND NOW REVERSES POLICY I MEANT il to be a woman'.. Look." uid Miss Blanche paten in her Kensington hotel bcd-alttingroom. She was speaking of her book, "Thirty Years with G.B.S"' which has iust been published. Perhaps it is not surprising thai H has been left to a woman lo put a little flesh and blood into the legendary old man who once described himself as "threequarters ghost". Of all the women round Bernard Shaw. Miss Patch is the one to paint the most accurate portrait. For she was his secretory, a shrewd independent person who was one of Ihe few women lo remain "Shaw-proof," immune to the old man's spell. From her vantage point as a um wllh an outsider': HI.ANCIH PATCH pomt and an Inside pilch. Itlandio Kverybodv'i Patch tells of Shaw's early eccentricities in diets. He had a collection i| hats that rivalled Winston Churchill's, wore mittens knitted by Blanche, had all his necks spcvi.-lh shaped" for each foot. Infallible? No! PoUl What'. What IffoU thai question mark (?) AltUimati "nobody dared disturb a comma la Shunt's loork." Miss I'aicli omits the f in each of her (Meet rejervneaa t MM book.) Shaw's taciturnity turn • ON ihe day idler Shaw's Sard birthday Gene Tunney went down to Ayot and told him round by round of Mills' fliiht against 1 men. He was siannlaliail thai the old sjanUaouui knaw as mud. BDOUl Ihem as he did. S> SHAW avrkad la a shelter . at the foot of the garden, hkod It because he could get d< lo his writing undisturbed and his housekeeper could honestly Inrorm callers thai Mr Sha M vrai "out." • ALTHOUGH he carried ~ watch the alarm clock was set each day to remind him when (r wns lime for lunch He never v notice of it. tSHAW stood ajua:d Ovai hi works h'i,. | ,„.„ Wllh .-hicks. It was because he would not have a line of his precious dialogue cut Ihat he held out so long aga a: I play bemR Aimed. laaara l-'un . liked rather than have ty llk at (.ONTRAKY to his own belief mealtimes) may have been uihentShaw was not always right. "Few ed from his mother who, when people.' reports Miss Patch "can asked whether aha had any letters have gained a reputation as a from her distinguished son. replied prophet ini more .slender that they hud always got on a postechievement. He was wron^ card all that they had lo say tn one Ixiul both the wars. another. "He assured me that the Ger^ __ mans would not bomb London ami <>' .>Ine\ he was equally hi error over the MISS PATCH turns ihe pages ot The woman who has written these memories into a book made a taciturnity (he would !.. Ill 1 no "" nPi,rl y 30 years ago. a radio programme he d.s-ftS#J sfcS? .!!!!^. cd .. ?"" 'Thirty Years with G.B S said last night Miss Patch lives in a "quiet note in Kensington" where they an used to cclebljtes. It is the hotel where acid-bath murderer Hair, met Mrs Duraml-Deacon. Bernard Shaw's secretary had observ ed Haigh pretty •-hi.v.dlv |0fl "AT Insigniilcanl little fellow Im of an exhibitionist...for mi nths I'd put him down as Shaw and incipient lunatic". Jews in PalesUne, Dempsey and her 30-yeara diarv Winston Churchill (who was going notes that: — to die awny when ihe party system # HE looked on money as an Shaw'a secretary a tall spare cme Uieki. irrelevance out of place in a civilwoman wilh u .small grer head Shaw s industry was terrific. i.ed conununil^ He llatly refused and excessively pneti-ting ami I have always thought.' says his to face the fact that salaries eai n-\l wide-set grey eye*, salrf of her ISC rotary "thai he wrote too much. Iieiore the Wat were quite msutV|0Oj of course it w,is inleille would lx' an uncoinnioidj cicnt in peace In bli Own mind, esting. but in man>"wavs dcvoled Shavian who today would Shaw price,! evei>thm ( at prehad more fun cut of being cheerfully set out again to read war standards and he reallv bedispenser—before I becai through The Intelligent Woman's lieved that we this staff) were all Shaw's secietai, Guide lo Socialism, followed by on velvet. -I.I: s Doirl Xc*glec1 Latin Am^rira-K? inairim JI. NEW YORK. Harry F. Guggenheim, former Ambassador lo Cuba, warned today that the Western Hemisphere as "our last line of defense", i* being "woefully neglected" while United States foreign policy con %  centrates on Europe and Asia. In an interview at his office In lower Manhattan. Guggenheim long a student of IjUin American affairs, said: "Europe still may be our first line of defense, but this hemis phere is our last line of riefen.se and ll must be made impregnable "That i not a policy of isolation," he added firmly "It Is o policy of prudence." Guggenheim, industrialist pioneer in aeronautics and roekr* development and a naval avuit % %  In World Wan I and II. poke from his experience as the Government's representative on many diplomatic, economic and aeronautical missions. A proa-resslve Republican. Guggenheim was atroni[)> critical of U.S.. foreign policy awhole, asserting that it waa "vague, confusing and headed in three directions at the same time He said: "In our relations with America wa have gone staau.i.. backward since World War Ii Our policy, at beat. U one o: friendly apathy. "In our haste to accept ararld roaponsibUlty and assume worM leadership, we have neglected our nearest nelnhbours in the Americas. Isolationism has kept them from us in She past, and o>ir new foreign policy, which plumnv I into Iturope and Asia, keeps u* from them now." 'In the present erne i gene y Guggenheim continued, "the bes' our government can do is to call a conference of Latin Ansftsi representatives. "The solution, however, will not come from conferences, hut from bt-lateral treaties. As in tha we have waited for an anwcffanOJ beforatrying to do anything we should pursue a long-rang" programme. "It is five to ten years late,' warned, "but not too bate, II Wt approach this problem arlui force and wisdom." Of the danger to United I security front Con muni ence, ha "Tliei,. is real intliTi Communism in Latin America [I allowed to spread. Camnu can easily take over some Latin American countries. Dul if we oc. wisely nnd promptly we can Stop Communism in Its tracks." He cited Chile as an example o| growinu danger la South America. quoting sources as saying that the Communists in the past have beo.i closer in Chile than anywhara tl in the Western Hemisphere i conlrolling a national governmen' "Chile has approximatelv 30 par cant of the world's coppei %  ltd produces about v. i 11 earn ol the nitrogen consume I by the world in the form of s xliun, !• (ii I'lihrim explained Hut in spile of Chile's imporlance to us n BOUrOB Of strategumatertals. the US. is ai'ain following an Indifferent course, he %  tended The (nmmunisls are relying ot dklareaa and on Amen can Indifference to help them pi %  ie declare.!. If this ahOUld happen and th. vat. he warned Crdk might ""•'i agree to lupply Russia with eoppsq and nUrata allow ourselvi i to be confronted with such %  Wa must bind %  %  lountrles so C m will .ease to be a threat" BIStMl Our whole foreign nalley, h, continued, should be Koverneri b) enlightened sell m!ere-t. It siiould DO based on two objectives^— survival and our national lrlerests. While recognizing the Intpottanca of the Nort'i At) Pact |0 Stop Itiis.i.u, afgp Guggenheim said ii wt Hglatlshli that Its leadership win nag when it tradilionall>' "jewngEngland and France "We can only he'.p Eai •Bid, "We cannot save hfli Russian ideohigy or (our 11 Buropa oo lonsjat hns late %  *& [e rnaka dasperata and stip/en* efTorts to preserve the essential freedoms Uie domncritic word 1 has charlshad, ihe wiM succum' to the tyrants fd Russli no mattei what we try t. do" lie betlavas, he said, that iosi will tell the storv ..f whethc* Europe is "wUUn| available the pnea nuiit|>o\ver in the rnenntlaw, he possible speed in %  Ijtln America, usiv ,il>U by 1970 the Latin Ameiican population "may well oul Russia" —IN' AUCKLAND, N.Z. /.KALAND is takins; stock after a year under National Party Governmenl. Prim* Minister Sidney Holland's adminis.ratmn took otlice a little more ihan a year 14 years of Labour rule. the late Hi Hun. Peter Fruser long %  r taken toward state control and %  'iment has a lot lo do before ts projjramme ol free e-iterpiise iv fully rob Uad restrtotaOH have been the chief Uibour measures to go by Uad government supporters claim than 1-. l.ir more freedom to-day than ihere iinder Labour. On the other hand Labour members maintain thai many of hane measures were wartime controls which Rrould have been removed wllh improved %  ms. The new government has abolished all remaining forms of rationing. Il has also wiped out many price controls, among the mott important being control over sales of moat types of land, houses and buildings. Until now, real estate prices have been pegged to 1942 values, and properties sold.i brought in many cases, big under-the-table payments in addition to the ofliciallyapproved prices. Houses now are on the market at prices higher than the former official levels, but not so greatly above the black market rates. HIGH WOOL PRICES Largely as a result of high prices for wool which have boosted overseas funds, the government has abolished import licensing on a wide range of goods from soft currency couniries. This has brought into New Zealand many items not seen since Labour imposed import control in 1938. The Dominion now has a surplus in trade wilh dollar countres, ijut ii-, undertakings with the sterling area have so far prevented relaxing of controls on qoods from dollar sources. Some tax reductions have been made, but further substantial cuts will be necessary before the heavy tax burden built up during Ihe war is markedly eased. In housing, the Government has pushed ahead vigorously with its policy of "own your own" in contrast to the Labour policy of providing state houses for rental. It has .iholished many building restrictions, has made loans available at favourable rates for home builders, and has offered slate houses for sale to present tenants at very advantageous terms. At ihe same time it has raised rentals on now tenancies of state houses. —C.P. Current Influenza Outbreaks GENEVA. Jan. 17. Reporting on current outbreaks of inlluania appearing in several regions, the World Health Organization has indicated that neither the spread nor Ihe severity o( Ihe illness can be compared with more serious I'pidemies of influenza that occurred in the first part of this century. So far, said a WHO statement, complications hove been rare and mortality remains very low. Influenza may be fatal for the aged or for cardiac patients but, for the bulk of the population, "the considerable progress ir chemotherapy of infectious diseases—espec cially sulfa and antibiotics—permits successful vigorous action against the secondary infections which caused the highest fatality 1918". National Health Administrations are being kept constantly advised regarding the outbreaks by the World Health Organisation through daily radio bulletins and weekly .summaries and WHO Regional Influenza Centres and are thus enabled to take the necessary action. WHO has been notified of outbreaks in Hawaii and Japan as well as in Europe, and ihe disease has appeared in Canada and the United Stales. Research undertaken from the start of the outbreak at the World Influenza Centre in London and in several regional centres established by WHO in Britain and on the continent indicates that the virus causing the outbreak belongs to type A-prime. Identification of the isolated strains of the virus is continuing. This process is necessary for the preparation of vaccines corresponding to the curvent type of influenza. The influenza epidemic now prevailing northern Europe probably originated from a localized outbreak in Sweden last June, WHO believes. The disease appeared in November in Denmark and later in Norway and northern Sweden. In December it covered th whole of Sweden. The disease was apparently imported Into the United Kingdom in ihe Newcastle area from the Scandinavian focus. It first spread to northern England and later to the whole country. Almost simultaneouslv (carlv in January), the Netherlands, Belgium and northwest Germany became lightly infected and some cases, probably imported trow Britain, appeared in Iceland A second focus Of infection, more limited and to all appearnci independent from the Bret, was discovered lut.in Decent! northern Spain. Two loci now appear at the point of joining across (Th Woi Id (nfluei u Ct ntro, rnenUoMd in tlie above release was established in London n 1947 by the World Health Orgar specialised agency of the UJ>*) D. V. SCOTT i; CO., LTD. TO-DAY'S SPECIALS at THE COLONNADE Tins BKOOKS PBaVI HI B PW*. QUAKER CORN FLAKES Bottles ALLSOPPS BEER Pkgs. CORN KLAKES Usually Now 39 :>5 %  M 26 2. 2* ,',-,-,-,'.-,-,',',V,V,*.'.'.'-'-'. •V'-'.'.'.'-V-V..'''-'-'-'. '•''-.' We Have ... %  GALVANISE DOWN PIPES WATER HEADS KIIXiE CAPS BARBED WIRE MESH WIRE r, w, i'. LASHING WIRE 16. 14, 12 and 10 Uaucc WOVE WIRE — 24' and 36" CHAIN '". 3-U". '4", & 5-16" IV WIUUNSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd. Successors To C. S. PITCHER & CO. Phono — 4472, 4687, SCOTLAND'S BEST ts SCOTTISH CREAM III.I \in it sum II WHISKY /*£?V'*R'*^ A Favourite at all if^i rr*>T The Leading Clubs v sYfY^jffi Ask l r scomsH \&V>;HCi CREAM WHISKY at % Your Grocer LADIES ... When Ihe Evenings are Chilly you will need a Coat Slop in To-day at DACOSTA'S Where you will find all Wool Materials in Ihe following colours:— BLUE, TAN, MUSTARD AND GBEV ALSO IMITATION CAMEL'S HAIR Suitable lor TRAVELLING COATS. DACOSTA&CO.LTD DRY GOODS DEPT. For Your Afternoon Tea Party < Imosr Tour f*ourilt? brand P.-d ROM Chovee Tip* Mynba Nectar Ksrdonsh Upton Homlaun" Blue X Tas HY--i.il. Butter ..ml .I.i ms .1. a R. Brtsd Anchor Butter South wall's JSJDS Rslsuic Hest Fish Spread* Carr'K AsaorUd Biscuit* Carr't (linger Nut Paa Oake Syrup Sliced Ram SPECIALS MYN'AH TEA—36c. par 1 Idn* Kola Tonic— 1.00 per Bottle Luncheon Cheese 11.81 ea. RKLI8H a PICKLES Cucumber Salad A I Sauce Pan Tan Brans ton HP Sauce Kep Careen*. CARROTS CABBAGE BEANS 1



PAGE 1

PAC.I TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE Mil BSDAY, JAW \K\ M, MM CaJtib galling t' The uianJertng (UaimungMs // C ARIB spent an Inierestini! twenty minute* | %  mom in* chattln* with U* ''Wandering Wsinw, rights" who have been in net Vovembcr 1950 Thomas R Wannvnifht, belief known I., hiIH.-IHIH Tibi" %  i I .III Hll.ll/C Powder Work* Md Director of In trr national Bronze Pow oattifa the Canadhui (onalraeior on Novcmcbr 10th when she sailed for Barbados. They ewriter. "Every day I keep u diary of the day's events and any UitOfagllng happenings. Once a wck. my wife and I go on a picnic to 000 of the out of (he way spots on the Island Invariably we get lost, but we get n lot of good pictures.'* he said At present he la maMng a moving picture study of the flowers m Barbados which b* will laha with him back lo Canada. However, not knowing the names of the flowers here he Is finding it hard to edit. He Is trying to locate .• %  omeoije hero who has Illustration* of local flower* lo help him out. Mr. Wainwrighl bai with aim his own projector and screen and has given several shows since he has been here He has shown his trip through Canada, and n reel of Barbados Before sMVaU the West Indies Mr. and Mrs Wainwright plan to make the round trip lo Jamaica on the CoUmbie and re-visit Tobago which they visited some time ago. Bronze Powder Works is represented In forty-live COUlltrtM Mr Wainwright has visited all of them and likes the West Indies best Looking For Talent J OHN OODTMBD, ..fun playing In the Old Boys' match MI I^odge School yesterday. leaves this morning for St. Lucia on a short visit. He is looking r tneket talent on behalf of the Boon. Here For Two Months M H AND MRS P W l.AVKKK K of London. Eng' now m Barbados for two months' holiday Thev travelled out to Trinidad on the ss. Br*u and %  rrtvad here on % % %  w i \ %  'K' Island and they are staying at the Ocean View Hot. I Mr I^everiek is Managing T)i! I %  dun Short Vi.it M R BRIAN DUOGEN. representative of MrNabh Itongier & Co.. of England, who spent I few days in Barbados left %  %  terday afternoon by B.W 1 A for Trinidao. Leaving on the same plane were Mrs Dnrotrn Robinson and her i en Her IUIM.HHI Mr Jack Robinson. Managing Dire* toi 04 H. F. Robinson & Co., in Port Of Spam. wtlO was also In Barbados returned to Tl da>. Spent Honeymoon Here M R AND MRS Geri... who were spending their honeymoon in Barbados, returne 1 lo Trinidad yeterday afternoon by B.W.I A. George who is the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Carter of Evcrton" St Qoorsja, IN with T.L.L. stationed nt Forest Reserve. South Trinidad Old Boy* C HARLIE TAYLOR made W %  mis yesterday aAarnoon, the highest score in "the lon Navy and eight from the Burmese Navy. With Singer Co. M RS OLGA DOPSON and Miss Eileen Lucas who are with the Singer Sewing Machine Co., -i Trinidad returned to Trinidad • esterday afternoon by B.W.I.A. %  ftcr a short visit Mrs. Dopson %  ii San Fernando Branch 1 -'ices Is attached to thciV FOrl of Spain While here thev were staying at lbs Aquatic Club's Guest Rooms From Halifax P AYING THEIR FIRST visit to the island are Mr and Mrs. A J. Hustlns and Mr. and Mrs C. G Cleveland of Halifax. Nova Scotia, who arrived on the Last) NrlwMt on its last trip here They ma out for live weeks' holiday and are staying at the Ocean View H0tl Mi Muslins is President of Arthur J. Huslins Enterprises, while Mr. Cleveland is in the 1 I Iota business. Annual Reunion S i 118 AND DAuXUfTSM of tfto BaillSjdOl Benevolent Society d America ctlebralad iu Mtn icuniun al a dance held mil Palace. New York <'. -whilr ,ou > on wllh th. m. Syrup Sultana Scone. ,i. IM T? flT. !" !T, r """ "•>"' "•• • %  " %  <* """• Bub •" • unc •" bu, r ""•,' ...vin. iL, -K. ""*m o' Hr-tc arr im ot my lavountw. holt pound ull.iauuit flour, %  ui iharV-u .,——.. "f^* 9 * rkh uu,t Ul€v "'can milk (about half cupi to ,. *CL %  > *f u y. ">Teang asu .mg about it as they bake Rub make a soft dough. Roll out lo XaB*s^d^.m~ om,kl,H J ,nd 4 l Urd or lu-rt" inch thick, cut into roundi '"'mod soufflea are ringgrd ,.nd buttgff into Boz self and bake as above .552 ~ ,r * tnm *? ""h with raising flour and a pinch of salt. ^Is (done in Aod. if you like. 4os. cleaned Crumpet*. MirranU and just enough milk to ., ,, make a stiff dough. Roll oul to "•*, "*" %  * k n >•" %  luarterinch thick and either eul • U,U J w P |d %  "'" %  %  nd \„ b rounds or leave in one piece. ,alum froro fc '" ld * P |nl Wnen Rub little saltless fat over tha **H mixed, add the remainm, w.all-lwate.1 frying-pan, griddle 0> l ** uW * *"•" ' on l***""*' P-* ln Her notplate n-k* ih> Hinnles' Bour to which ha* been added .. a.potti li -ml %  pinch of blearnnale of soda. Beat very well for 8—• minutes, then put in J warm enough place, covered, to use for lust under an hour. Beat again. Scotch Paincakoa Plaee greased crumpet ri Rub m good walnut of margara well-greased moderately heated ie utio two teacups plain flour griddle or large frying-pan anc fled with a teaspoon cream of "H them quarter Inch deep witr which is bed tartar, half taaspoon bicarbonate the barter. Bake until the bubble. f soda and a pinch of salt Add which form are set. then remov i tablespoon of castor sugar Stir 'he rings, turn the crumpets %  i one egg bcatan with a teaspoon lubbled sides down and finish ofi k olaen syrup and less than quarter the cooking.—L-E.8. :tnt milk Add a few drops lemon %  ssence. ^ !" "^^^^~~ Drop dessertspoons or tablepoc-ns on to the greased hot urfaee. turn with a palette knife im a II tin LinOssnhu an warm give them another tu Spin butter and eat at once. • v.-rai ways., rrled fish, fish frit lew and flsh cakes of all kinds And there Is no hotter way ot i coking herrings than genii pi n-hing them. At the moment, the most now SiaUSSsVKS* ssegr^-gs Thara are a dozen corned-beef ,b r Kiw thtn w rtxipaa and. provided he can get titiely ground steak, not even tin beat chefs need more than • lo'iKlng ring for hamburgers One of my favourite dishes Steak Diane, is cooked in a frying pan and so is liv cooked this way: Cover the tin slices with boiling water. Leav< for a few minutes, then drain ami slowly fry them m „ mere smeai of fat. Kidneys, too—dcvlllcvi curried or with rich mushroom or %  ice—arc ring-cooked Incidentally, the one-ring cook would do .\cll hi Invaal In a pressure pan—both to extend s--5 SCTUS %X£T "*' fuel r UVtlM r. with a pi'-s\urc pan. I| no difficulty In Keeping rood hot SHI Tea-breads You can even . T'.. i bag breads on a ring or plate" rirst, heat slowly and thoroughly whatever you are going to use— griddle (girdle), thick rrvinp BOB IT tfaa grUler ttotplata M vour/ full-sized electric cooker (this gt %  medliiin. turning it t. 1,,^' I'oi un Scnnes a together 3o^. self naVBI nd half teaspoon salt Rub Hat Trick B.B.C. Radio Programme MARCH PARTIES LONDON. King George VI and Queen Elizabeth are Jumping the gur on London's social season the .vcar by holding two presentation parties at Buckingham Polace It March. The London season does not begin until May and since the wa: ebutantes have always been [ %  resented at garden parties duriitc that month. Ill l-IPAV, J ,s ut IS, IKI ... Tlir • %  ... N*w> „ y* %  In %  11 1.1'i.rul. UvMtoak; I'roilrammp l'#i-lr Hpraklna. T W Ml urn Land Itsyn-tiMl NltaL_ r and Ii. Brmi.. t-m am. ; SIS an. Horn* -.. From t IS am cb.r Down, II 1% a m. iiitw r'aiadiv 1IM am. 8n. ol II 4S am Sprcial Dlipatdi. 1100 Th Nvw*. 1110 p.m. Nrw. Analy.t.. ISIS pm. Clone Down. 4.11 n in LMlsmsn CIMII !" sou pro Compowr ol in>.• %  Sift p.m Hn.lU-h Haarassaai r !" sa otvi.u, sat '"To Ol** A Party: M p in Mittk rrnn. H.m.h film-. pm pro %  ramrn* Parade 7*0 p.m. Tl^ Sp— 7 10 p.m. Nrw. Anal)*!., Tit p.m. Wa %  Rrllaln; T.4S p.m <;rn*i.lly 8pMik> '.yf. sno p... Ii-ii,. K'n*l: SIS p m. Paul Taniplr And Ttva Van.lfk* Altair: %  U p.m. Alma. Of Bum.; *M p m. HPKI-I niipaicn: BIS pm Hallo A...Irnlia: SB pm Do You R.mamlKi 10OS pm. Th* Hawi; lg.lo pm m-i TIM gdllnrlaU: ISIS p.m Takr ll rn>m H t .r*. 10 S pm. Tasl-ins Around Wllh llrrlvrl llortar. 1100 it m nVpuhll.pi' I. illi IIONVIVOI.H LONDON. .iianneq'iin Ann Sou'h appcari I before 40 fashion experts Bl London spring hat show -Marital skull cap in the form i f pink leaves, with two ten roses .a the front She had finished her parade March presentations are not %  .i lamntions of "charmin-: however, without precedent [c delightful style., M5 yTI(l :iKtllri ln i 939 ovenlnj Then the eommeutator. Gint< eourts were held in March. Davta, discovered the hut was on • iront. The King and Queen have manFollowing a hasty conferenc: Public engagements In May am Ar.n turned the hat round, with palace spokesmen Imply tha 1 Ihe roses following the spring March is the "most convenient month for the parties this year. it the bark of the head. —"Even more charming," was th comment of the experts, —LN.8. Scottish debutantes are affected by these arranscmeulf They will attend n presenlnt party at the Palace of Holyroi house on June 25. The King i Queen and Princess Marguret wtU be in residence at the palace irorr June 21. to 28. English dcbubirUCA and thcu BY THE WAY By Beachcombei C HARLIE SUET is at the moment dealing with | latter from a Mrs Wybrow. who savs that when she applied to the local controller for a permit to turn on the electric light to look for a piece of coal, she was told to turn on lb* gas for 30 seconds and light a candle DODO it She said that she had no priority licence to buy candles, so she was told to look for the bit of coal by tha light of a match. The matter was taken up by the Regional Board, who told her to look for Ihe bit of coal by daviight. The Central Office sent her a form to nil in, asking where she got the bit of coal, what was 11s size, weight and texture, whether her grandmother was alive, and, if not, what was her religion. By the time Suat himself took the atTuir in hand. Mrs. Wybrow was being prosecuted for borrowing an electric torch lo look for the bit of coal. Hurder at Muckhurni (UI) P ERHAPS the horse could have come down the chimney." suggested Sir Hartley. "Only If it lived on the roof." retorted Malpractice satirically. He then rapped out, "Do you recognise the horse?" "No." said Sir Bartlev. "It don't come from round here.' said Bucket. "Well, J presume it wasn't dropped from a plane." retorted the sleuth. The arriv.il of Mi Porter bnbster. put this nonsense rUVtng examined the defunct gee-gee, Mr Mobster said gravely, "This poor beast was killed by the most powcrlul and unpleasant African poison known to icianca it is a inson concocted from wupps aruppa Hot DObOdy could have %  Bland the room." nipped out Malpractice KVCT ) (hing was ii the inside? "Does It occur to you, said the VOL, Lnsri someone must have got in to lock the room on Ihc Inside" A room doesn't lock itself on the Inside." It had not occurred to anyone. That's a point," said Malpractice ungrudgingly "We must hud out how the poison was administered." said the vet. "Perhaps in this, here," said llucket. who had born moping on the floor He held up %  chipped cup. The vet. took one sniff. "This cup," he said, "contained enough wupp..wuppa poison to kill the entire Zoo. fhfcf )ifiir Choirf. Mr. M,ut A MAN whose name i< Meat Is •o steal .if being tsaaasl al that he wants lo change his name to "something unusual." Allow ma lo offr him a small selection 1 %  anno, Onfilbird, Danaonar tie Howlgle, C.ockliches, Ttffpin. BurQuamhen, Socktlrke:. Dilulatatoc. Smoil, Scrisangulsle. Borthcork /.//Ml. Kcigaloop. Fl ashaharnshson, Pudolkeroiigh. Mumph, Ifodc, C-rtihhtdden-t'rubDm )..,, Lark Polith f p anting of a lady pianist th^t %  iba lacked poli*h. a music | m a.i L ponvaps ni..d\rii.i.:i' Ixiosting Snibho. There is no exi use for any woman to lack polish when the small tube of Snlbbo Mill make her shine from head to root. Experiments have shown tlisl you can read a book by a fare ] iot-'ih iroa*rod amfa Snibbo. Or shava yourself %  vided the .vner ,.1 the f ice will Y < A3," said the while huntei's wife to the nh*r>r>t-minded professor Srlw .t ., m short elephant )3fi ami "have an elephant iik. . • "AI.I you." replied the professor. have a back of a bus like a face." Oddiv anousjk I Utir A NO now i kiss my reader goodnight, pack up nay trgpi (one mouse, four man—and a my iinai DW Im going to make arrows for it lot Oh. well. liutonhi Girls LONDON A London "Dally Express'' report from Buluwnyo tells of tlic Jateat beauty treatment being tried mothers are already visiting by the gtrta of the Baionka TriUdressmakers to choose outfit' near the Zambesi River the 1 Tlie local witch doctor has persuaded them that to have six i„ past year, mwn ^ r]s bou -i 1 froiit upper teeth is zebra-like. a new garden party dresi and h. 1 now queueing : f or their presentation, whil could be worn tjiroughout ti summer. This year they have to %  ** % %  „ „ buy a diflerent type of outfit foi pay the wiich doctor Ln an indoor party i n March, 1*4 —I.N.8. presentation. The girls have him knik their teeth M it in one hit—with mt —I.N.S Rupert and the Sketch Book-18 ... .J at it* i • aeUasAt or tia-eci i * II ^^ %  % %  • I MlilKf 11 tliliU I, ma ...ir u commit IO t> I. I'll take m ti tor u,. ... %  ) loiter. <4> Ol** a carl room (or thH. (ft-Oi I. UnplMnnt aouno. (4 i i. n a M l Dasni • a i t. Lnuppi.tval ,i| rrplacril polUi(7i 3. sun, lolk are n I. TO do tlil miBlit be anal* <* pnmblp. igi •i' m ih pots. %  Rat n. !" O'lmtly. || Two bn-ilim of thU i Ulfl.. ,j. pyari \ -V^v 1 %  %  --tC-^x ml Saying goodbyr to Gittti \tigt Rupctt get* through the frncc sad presst* on. "Why on esnh d:d Rosilic 'un iwjy tram the con•iibk ?" h. murmurs. "And why i*h* jtoint thi* way ? Ii Irjdi no*heit. Thrn he fcive ggn "Vt I There'i %  ihort cut to Nuivvond Station through thest field'!" Ai 'hat atoment ht catches tight of :ha tiny figure d *n below nuk •>* xrsight for the rianon. ind jt h • he "peed he give* chaie to th*' h gen neir enough to a*r het ui" aa > he p!.fo.m wilhoui pert." GLOBE Til SJ. 5.00 & 8J0. 1..IM ShoHlne PI.KASK BKL1EVK ME (Deborah KERH •NAMRIT" Tobralco and LYSTAV neuh opened M Evans and Whitfields I VISITORS & COLLECTORS are invited to call and Inspect our \ fine Range of TOBRALCO PABRK B0VAL D0ULT0N CHINA FIGURES DECOHATIVI FLORAL CHINA BASKET AVIATK I.I II < IXK.MA (Mamber.Only] in THt VELVET TOUCH" V. %  I 11 IIH.IM IM. Itl.l I'M f ...I I' .1. MillI < I IUI-AIBV m.rrlna -...n WILLIAM o l l..\/..\ TUemtrr-Biidgttown (DIAL 23W) Ufveatwn taMt t I DwiaoSrAIRA*JKa J. Ma.ii".. <-HARA %  "Mi"' iai -\ii-oii Also Ta* Sh..i i.ns i in..i niiii MIII HinAV 1 Mat.) Ma). TODAY I pi" „ _. %  ""WS .-• % % %  oVSaiin. c>M„s IM A/.A Thralrt— 0ISTIN (DIAL 8404) . (.. M.lHi, I ; MI.,., TO I > W l\< rasas mrmm FKIi) SAT SiN It ISp goal UCH4 Sfrt'OT" -...I lilt MinNITE SAT Hih nKO-Ra ran M-n Ha Bsiai ptaftail \i.*.i ... r OirVi i in >i>. K .101 MAIN 4. AIKTY— (THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES i PM HKO :ij, & Mill! Ml fafass nrv> nu laaaW aaabat I MM M'MK o*.\ a ,.ia IW.fun I..IM tllan l^ie A.nsinc i ....i... .l NOl 'III I'M (I, tXJVBMAL llll. Mil I IWkss Orvr FRIDAY 2.30 & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing DAILY al 4 45 and 8.30 p m I Never such aingin' dancin' Danny Kaye-pers/J DANNY WALTER SUZAK • J II D HENRY K0STER l LAXA KllMaK'l'OW.\ (DIAL 1310, WATCH FOR — "THE STORY OF SEABISCUIT" EMPIRE l.s*t Tu shows TIMIJY i 44 at 8.30 p m 20!h COBt U tT f' 1 presents CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN Color by Technicolor Starring Cllftoi Wl-l'.r Jeanne CRAIN and Myrnn LOY now l'ol:.\ A TmorroM30 S.I5 p m 20th Century Fox Double John PAYNE A Alice FAYF In "WEEK-END IN HAVANA" SOMEWHERE IN THE NIGHT' ROYAL Tnlaj a. TomomiM 4.S0 A K.:IQ r m Columhlu Big Double Rlrhord DIX in "SECRET OF THE WHISTLER AND THUNDERHOOF villi Poh.it I'RKSTON and William MISHOI* OLYMPIC TiKljt \ Tomorrow 13a 4. R.I3 p m. M Smashln,; Double Van JOHNSON and mini, THAXTEIt 111 THIRTY SECONDS OVER TOKYO" AND •THE ARNELO AFFAIR" Slanioa John IIODIAK .ItHPHY and Prancii (;IFFOHD 1 I



PAGE 1

TIllKMiAi. JANUARY 2i, MH BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACl Tweedsmuir Says Western World In Race Against Time OTTAWA A BRITISH LORD who was wounded us a Q soldier in Sicily said here that the democracies are in a race against time arid if they lose, it will be primarily their own fault. Lord TwitxUmuu*. 39-year-old on of The former governor Kcnrral of Canada, laid in .1 speech lo the Canadian Club that Ihe west "must awake to its danStr" ;ind Ihe democracies must •ek out as allies "any part of Air Squadron Leaves Canada For Training Colonies Earned $300 Million In 1950 (Prom Our Ltmwon Correspondent, LONDON. Jan. 16. THE FAR-RE ACHING EFFECTS of the fc development plans in the Colonies, approved costs of which totalled £195 million at the end of November. are B reflected in a review of achievements last year published at the week-end in an official report "The British Colonial Territories in l50". Farmers Buy 3 Cars Each CHATHAM, New Brunswick. The llrsi airlift i the famous No. 421 "Red Indian" squadron of the Royal Canadian Air Fun left this week lo complete training in England. It will be the first time lot an R.CA.F. squadron to tram outrealist side Canada in peucellme, and when the jirllft b voniuloteii No. 421 will have boon ihe Bat squadron to leave Canada since the end of the Second World W SOUTH AFRICAN FARMERS who for vears haw lived in the dusty, semi-desert called the Karoo, their one luxury a grimy wreck of a car lo take iiu-m to the nearest town, now own three or five cars each. The wool boom has changed poverty into wealth. • This v.-ar Soulh Af lately get £76 million i %  sales—double last year's ilgurr h-h > %  < itself a record k< bringing t> more than half as much overseas %  gold from the Hand—the world's greate** mines. Bui it has also brought a near* faminein mutUui Coal Cuts Travel LOOT* m UbU While the prevailing high were made for road development world Price* have had much to schemes in British Colonial terrljha world that ,. ready to stand j*^ ^^Tlhf&SK HI* ***" "* So h ^* 7 "* ,h undoubted Increased prosAnother C107 million—£46 milThey must go forward pOiiiP" !" * ,h Colonies is shown i,on of which comes from th."pressing Russu. with '"tins report to be based on territories 1 own resources— IK due Britain's *> %  .. muium Ml will and their ability to "trier "nd more stable factors, to be spent under the new sixhas resulted m a drastic cut In the Fc 'anners will .laughter fight because "you cant win Highlights of the year's stausy*ar development plans for main line and l^ndon suburban twmv ,or "5* 1 l ,uy *"?*, y umplv by defending your own "cat return* include the fact that Malaya, Singapore. North Borneo, .tain services. k >' ,l " **•*? %  > a* pc—'• %  goal." The democracies, he said. CoIoiu.il net dollar earnings weirSarawak and Brunei In connection '"* "' "•*| '" ,h, ir bark*. above all must be absolutely over WO million dollar*, twice as with the Colombo plan for Co-op. Th curtailed service* now put Rwak Is* ruMival with themselves much again as In 1940. in %l> ,ue r*Uve Economic Development In In, nect by the British RailBritain ssft) bttaffAl indirectly _* ^..^j. !" ....... _•,.,.., "J 1 ;"^ CommunW terrorSouth and South-East Asia. H MO roads will mean a saving of 12.000 i„, in „,„| flXttU** Shipping .if^.K 7 ^^!? "Uf" C J^?1 ,Sm M la > ra &f he Id ">• have announced thai U K will !" of coul a week, but a further „,..,.. .... .„.|, it net dollar earner in the nn( the external Inance required. * l "* p y before winter ends bookings by wootignmn ( Main* Fro-nmu TraveUars on the eastern reF *£i£"',," f 1 l ,,,a ,'! l ,_ ,^, „ „ %  V i< railroad! are ihe won..hit. The Kar.H. golden fleece ho. Developinenls wtfn lhm t-lw ,. Uil tm of ,, 7 '' !" 8^ ^c.hmg else new: fartrain services a week mer ""' '"'"" >ul1 ttor Discuising some of the major a.mi.i their i;iv >.r.'hU-m< ly sn front of the -h the first overseas cont gent of the Canadian army 11 Commonwealth" yeari ago and rose to command the Hastings and Prince Edward Example* of the changed Altogether 14 flight* are scbedRegiment of Canadian* In Sicily, revenue situation for many of thuled this month to move the men to England where they will train alongside the Royal Air Force Addressing the squadron after Colonies are provided by Tangan He had some humorous army yika in East Africa, whose tales too. He told of one light by revenue in 194* amounted to economic developments In the The southern region is with(Jueue* wail I nndian unit against heavy £7,353,000 compared with £2Colonies, the Report says at the drawing 71 train* week at the village lawy a formal inspection. Vice-Marshal German odds Eventually a corm.ooo ten year* earlier and her outset that U.K. "s ecwranic devel££* ">* %  %  " ">• midland •"•<* •**£•j"" J. L. Plant representing the cruel P rul w *J. C ** n,or remaining expenditure to £6,905,000 comupment policy for the Colonies may region about 114. of air %  laff rejii-,rknri that would Canadian. The Germans sent an pared with £2,394,000 be summed up a* "a.min K lo build .. ,, -Mnnn ... „,,,i reilve trkS^ ">British' West Indian >n every territor> a stable economy *•" g* ,^,^7, * iTr„,? .L ^ ,5 Vw .. Zl he warned you English gentlecolonies the total true revenu*. thai is not dependent on a few n ? w cr m "* i !" built for IS KJL t w ,h u lhJt Mmi men had better surrender or take increased from 40 0 oVUarTin bw.c produeta" Much of uv, when the suburban,:. SSSrt^nt th n liffguSf W ,Vti >e consequences 1938 g ,., doHnVin 1948 The assistance U.K. makes availabW horn"<" hu day's work in the different than in Canada^but he TJ^ cariadian corporal replied; per capita income In Jamaica ros* lo the Colonie* is devoted to thi* cl & ashed them lo remember trial ..a/,, a n t English, we ain't genfro,,, £ 17 a. („ 1933 to ctJ 9 m end. In term* of b-" enraged million compared with £317 mileconomic activities; providing kiss with their bhie-.l., %  •" u, ' jjs • n. — ^ ^^xt^^zzz^ tion where East raised for rail' —LN.8. Better Medical Service Planned For West Indies Ihei For How l-ong ? But the wool farmers are not onlv peo an ero u i They an srof lied, ton No one kjSUsfl what will happen ft ' fulure Some have ju-t put their gsOasef in BD bank Others have ploughed ir back hitn then farol inr more lnnd '1 AH have t-ti.l 08 morlgages which might ha* laded their h I>VM-LEII 1 r 1 • >n 1 Our 1 i"m* 1 36 Arrive From Morocco formed ovei %  disbanded In : M9. Elahl Vampire KU l.kc tha. you mi,ht a. well no, „ rh „ u .„ Mul>n VK nd lho |or P rxpaMmt ,„% 0 „ icd overhead in formation nave a war. __ pninninB ni. rniimiin IK.. Rnnrt ...... %  .>i. n i.>niinnc i>mii record sine sea* in 1942 It 1045 and t ember. screamed overhead in format and music was provided In theared on the eene to speak lew wora. tha| tnte ^ gone is shown by the the Gezira Board in the Sudan, the uniform standard througmmi ,a following fact* Exports of iron cocoa research 111 West Africa to th. islands, but that for ihe Umo £• 'relRhter of and steei and manufactures thereof combat swollen shoot, long-term bring no change was to be made •'' those Islands PORT-OF SPAIN. Jan 3 TssmTty gfci ni.n. VfOIDaD BS*d children — iniii-iiinr.d labOUfl U aboard French ir< 1 daj bound t,i Prs*ch <;iit.in.. arhirt UK$ n| to *etlle. They arrived ut Man "What i*kcd did he have lordship by from U K totalled 385,tOO tons trade agreements between the U.K. ir. those Islands which accepted 'hiring the three days •P e t>J fc b *1 WSSHSF^E*the Ntorl ir. 1949 compare,! with 246,000 and the sugar-producing Cronies. d.tor. not on the British Regis££ FT^\&.J^IX!£"AndIhe %  canie one heUuVa U>ng tons In 1948: cement supplies Regarding development of secter. *•* *!*!*&]* J**3?£El w.v ;i*av it"" M7.fMJ0 tons compared with 493.000 ondarv industries in the Colonies _. Pre where they >gelhei Kh-rwl wav ,0 By %  tons. -an inlegial part of Colonial Ths Conference ha* as one of straw pallets for bas thVJJ> Lord Tweedsmuir said that The U.K. is also nrrnnglnK inp.licy-progress depends to a con' L m fJr achievement, the setting ported t hai they went iwo_days three vears of training, in England creasing export, of consumer goods sld erable extent on the provision of u * Medle.tommua.on to without fd or < DsSaad the Canadian army to go and in 1949 the Colonies Imported adequate and cheap power. The '"'"f *" uniformity in u. — into action in Ihe Second World 900 million square yards of cotton Report shows how In each of the IVI "" %  "> to put its services m of the most highly piece goods compared with 778 ma ln Colonial regions, effort* are '' n advisory capacity at Ihe professional armies the world has rnilllon square yards in 1948. iK>ing made to develop hydroH >< pt ^ a j*_ thc c ?'""! al r'l e *"" _rale decreased from 1HU Home Counties In hi* caravan excluding the additional £20 mil^ -JQ lsboratOTV lion to be provided under %  ihe IBM Jamaica, Trinidad. Average Mr Newman will nl*o btsjad <-olonial Development and Welfare Iw|fln of Hfe has increased by exhibits on hi* butterfly farm at Bexley, Kent MirMin IUIU> %  AnHrnrlrl 1. Bl a*** % %  M Ba* prs* 1 BM AlllllVAl S Haas N aWton-wi 1..1.1II.. M *n.d. .1 .. net. <-i>i lit-—11. < — nun.. Y-rhl J> i( ...lh.. %  -. "•' *%  !>' 1 mud i*iiK %  %  %  %  .1 lifi'A -• %  M v WasSssataB, Jia% tans rt. C|H %  In Touch With Barbados Coastal Station Ad This has covorcd ranU-Uimo ^. „„„ „ ytBn -1K C lMl j aM ut admlnlstraUOD, of reconThis utoarrsa han nisn laxm Accurate scales make it possifor dog. on y wa* announced on alructInn nd rehabilitation grants 3 ^veTTTThc ctse of Brlulh ble for company tsnssall to deterWednesday by Rutgers University. f | nt emal security; food subsi(£££? mine how many passengers travel The clinic is unique both in ^ { ^^ Oi I. i: s on each route daily. But there are some complications. Damp tickets, for instance. "We have found a street-car ticket doesn't weigh the as me every day." said F. S. Cook, assistant treasurer of the company. "The more moisture there is in the air, the heavier the ticket This difficulty counting, weighing In increased educational focilim^ „f Colonial children 1 are al.i ties in the Colonies, first menti is made of Uganda'* demonstration 1 benefiting terms for rommumty eduratl Increasing number of schools and reference is made to progress of University colleges and colleges of "ajfjh medlcme and in canccr re of" military administration "and 1U sole aim is to treat and study d*'* !" *cancer in dogs which get the d,isThe Coloni ease about as often as hur Uog studies may turn up •* %  ledge helpful against human dollars of the reserve fund wer. ^" c /.' u 2".*^f !" J.V.I n^.^f?^ l ? ^.openini chapter on tho canc er. allocated for overseas developtries The commercial production main achievements of the year, th Thi new deal for dogs is alment for providing dollar equip<***>* saucepan special baiu-ryReport'a last section deals wit reads underway a the Bureau 01 ment and materials to help in reot, ^f r ?"' 1 l ^ ^^cewm North-Polltlcnl and Constitutional fssla. overcome by 5S^calRf*leaich at Rutger*. completing eeonomie development *". i Rhudesia have opened up "a Advance' 1 It survey. briefly £j a ndC.lcul.t,ng^^SS^SSSMAS Z£ pro.ecU. The flrst tise of this fund SKSSLSfS^Ll! ^^ advanccnienU made during M. $*&„£. 2ft£T~ ns do. from ECA aid. r.r the vear ending Th j* work, the Report stales, has Arts. Science and Technology, mrh knowj ur .e SO last, some 20 million %  '"•J* 1 tha_ aSSs yjaW at saassa* these planned in Wert Africa each day the number of tickets to f^^.,, g,^^ to send their patients, an ounce. The number varies from —a;p) IBS to 19S. 1 ... W generating equipment vaat number* of people by radio' both In the sprier' of local and i..,',.i Jamaica and later allocations Figures show too Increasing attendcentral government fsr-it. TaM* ar> Whelm iWl H *H S I rust in* (oiur-ina %  <"!>• *. %  • I art-.do. I'.M.I W.l.,11 I S n-...-". •Wllloi < ,ir • IWrrh Mill. • OatBlla. OunaStw. M JM- a*"-. !" (s.i.ri. .. C*vln, • fit* u* Oilord. .. raw***. •• Q.eaaw>ti unshi. ... !• IU.H-M. %  %  lSrlit... Ton !>.•*•. •%  „ j.,.1 -v % % %  ... • rwi Di Shoilana. •• f>rs*" %  • M*n u -^.ai., %  %  EM•• %  Spurl. M Mi*aawkii Ainafciit>. • IVmi IJMIV M. %  a...rfUi.n. • %  I Ti.-ii.Mnd. ... C-Jna-W*. • %  ^a A>h 'i sessi puaata % %  C-roly.. THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK \yiTH A VIEW lo anUtinq the Secrelari.w ol Socioli. Clubs. and Associations to make the compilation oi inlormatlon in THE BARBADOS YEAH BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities: religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports, radio, agricultural, etc., are asked to have the form printed below filled In and sent in as soon as possible lo : THE EDITOR. THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951. Co Advocate Co. Ltd.. 34 Broad Street. FORM Title of Society, Club. Organisation. Etc STOP THAT COUGH yv Sun lakmg VI.MI-* UHi.ll MUniE at once, and x how quickly vour couch will .top That world f-unoui cough remedy tootbc* sway ncn nd loicnctt, ea.es trcat-hing, M,J pnaectt the • !u-t and lurigi YENQS COUGH MIXTURE BOVRIL introduces Maralyn **3£L EVERYONE ENJOYS, Pure. vTeamy. .ounrry milk M<.uircd . and already sugared — thai"* Maralyn Milk Fto, I It tsa ^ti-ivini;. rnlung milk S^tst and live kiddtc Un* H.SW1 MARALYN • lOVRIL OUJLITV M % % Whiter whites, briglitcr coloured* — that's what you get with Rinso! Its rich lather soaks out dirt so thoroughly and quickly so gently too! For easier, quicker washing use Kin-o yonll be thrnU.t with the wondrrlul results it gives RINSO for all your wash! Gr



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RT TT TE LI I IT I TIE

ESTABLISHED 1895



Thousands Found

Harvbados

Burnt To Death
In Jungle Trees

In New Guinea Volcano

: PCRT MORESBY, Jan. 24
"THE FIRST Government official back from the

Mount Lamington area, told today of dead
bodies of natives hanging grotesquely from jungle
trees at the foot of the volcano.

Claude Champion, Assistant Government Sec-
retary, collapsed sobbing to the cround after telling
of the horrors of the jungle, turned into a grave-

yard for at least 3,000 natives and 35 Europeans.
He had visited Higaturu near the four peak voleano
which erupted last Thursday.
Champion, brother of Ivan Champion, Director of Dis-
trict Services in New Guinea, said that the natives had
apparently climbed the trees when the ground became too

hot to stand on.

Then as the temperature rose and the shower of flam

ing lava and ash continued,

branches.

B.G. Does Not
Deserve
Responsibility

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Jan. 14

Carlos Gomes, solicitor and
prominent Social Welfare worker
giving evidence before the Con-!
stitution Commission on Tuesday’
made a very conservative propo-
Bal which painted a picture of
the colony's political future des-,
eribed by Sir John Waddington, |
Chairman, as “gloomy’’.

His recommendations although
retaining Legislative and Execu
tive Councils in more or less
present forms gave the Governor’
conside: able increased power:

particularly in the matter o|!
money bills,
Dr. Rita Hinden, suggested

that the proposals would put the
Constitution considerably further)
back from the responsibility that
it already has. |

Gomes rep.ied “I do not see the}
colony deserving any responsibility
for another 50 years”.

Gormesalso miade a strong ples
for schools to return to the de-
nominational system as there was
a “decided decrease in the morals
of the community.”

In the evening session the
Commission heard a delegation
from the B.G. Labour Union who
proposed a unicameral Legisla-
ture whol: Sper dan: AMET
leader of the majority party a
Prime Minister who would choos |
seven Ministers. ;

The Governor’s powers wouid
be confined t> defence and exter
nal matters,

The union also favour universa’
adult suffrage from the age of
eighteen with elections every
four years.



Dutch Government
Resigns Office

THE HAGUE, Jan, 24.
The Dutch Government head
ed by Labour Minister Willem

Drees resigned to-day. ‘
They took collective Cabine'
responsibility for policy on west-
ern New Guirca—which Holland
disputes with Indonesia—the issue
which caused Dutch Foreign
Minister Dr. Dirk Stikker to

resign earlier in the day,
—Reuter.

SCARECROW 1951

LONDON.
Thomas Davies, 0!
Hertfordshire, |:
1951 version of a



Farmer
South Mimms,
trying out his
scarecrow,

It has a piece of
smouicers for eight
every 20 minutes an
firecracker explodes.

With each explosion the seare-
crow’s alms spring out, wave in
the air and then clatter back.

—i.N.S.

rope that
hours, and
attachec



they burned to death in thc

Champion wept as he told how
he found his fri and colleague
District Commissicner C. S. Cow
ley.

“I found
culskirts



Cowley dead on the
of Higaturu,” he said,

“He was sitting alone in a jeep | foreign policy

half-covered by ash.

Iiis 15-year-old son, Earl, was
lying in front of their bungalow
a few yards away on top of a
meund of ashes. Their bungalow
vas the only undamaged building







iy, the area. They must have been
exught as ihey were trying to
nke a run fer it.”





s A. Lonergan, Government
Secretary for New Guinea
he names of the victims would
be released in Canberra when thei
next of kin had been notified



4 . His hands|arations at meetings her
| weve up trying to shield his eyes.

—SAYS GOMES |

‘From Our Own Correspondent) |

said |

It was by no means certain that}

ali the yiesing had

pe'shed

Europeans
added

radio fr Popendetta that
uld tr to penetrate to the

centre of Higatyers this mor:

end search for further victir

All rescue parties said their
efforts were made dangerous by
suffocating pumice dust which
stirred up as they walked over it
Fiercely hot ashes beneath
dust.were a deadly tran
added.

Latest reports today tended to
confirm fears that only 12 of 244
people survived at the village of
Tsavita. Most of the victims were
natives.

Emergency camps and hospitals
established at Popendetta air strin

ing

they

ty enre for ref
twee natives have a serious hv
giene problem. Natives are sus




eptible to dysentery and it is
feared that there might be an out-
break of this disease.—Reuter

Come Together
Says Nehru

NEW DELHI, Jan. 24.

India’s Prime Minister Nehru

said to-day that the time had
come for representatives of the
powers concerned to meet to-
gether and discuss Far Eastern
problems instead of talking at
each other across thousands of
niles,

He said in a broadcast there

was a great opportunity to-day for
turning the ide of events not
only away from war but in the
direction of enduring peace.

Nehru appealed to the great na-
tions of the west to “cross this
doorstep of opportunity in search
of peace” and to the Asian na-
tions he expressed the hope that
they would stand by methods of
peace whatever happened

The proposal in the United
Nations to name China as an ag
gressor could not lead to peace
but only to an intensification of
conflicts, he said.

The Chinese Government’s clar-
ification of its earler reply t
the United Nations Political
Committee’s resolution made it

even more clear, Nehru said, that

they were desirous of negotia-

tions for peace in the Far East
—Reuter,



|
|

the}





|
|

SCENE in yesterday's Tennis Tournament at the Belleville Tennis Giub, This is the Mixed Doubles
Match between Miss D. Wood and Dr. G, Manning and Miss Benjamin fot in picture) and Mr. V
‘bout to strike ball). Dr. Manning and Miss Wood won the ganic.



Huts

British Labour
Leaders Discuss
loreign Policy

LONDON,
British Labour

Jan

dise

'
leaaet
and defence prep



Prime Minister Attlee made a
statement to the National Execu
tive of the Labour Party on fe:





eign affai the latest moves
the Far stern crisis and hi
Government’s reactions
During the Christm, recoss on
important section of the Party

has consolidated its
against any

position |
move to let Norean|



issues pass out of the phase of
negotiation, To these members|
Attlee's statement yesterday

brought reflief

When the Parliamentary La}
Party meets next Wedns
some will want a full discussion



yur
day



grovid patrol reported by | Of foreign policy
they |

Teday also Aneurin Bevan wa
to meet industrial and Trace
Union leaders for the firs! time «
Minister cf Lebour



They were to examine the im-|
plications of Britain's new rear
mament programme.

Many complex problems of |
manpower must be settled, includ. |
ing conflicting claims of services, |
coal mines and armis factories. |
The committee is also "Several|

{
|



to discuss “Order 1205.” Several
Unions have complained about the
working of this regulation

Leaders of the Trades Union|
Ccngress met first to consider their
attitude at a meeting with the!
Minister

Among reports before them was
one on the proposed release from
the forces of 5.000 ex-miners

Britain’s coal crisis was also the
subject of a meeting today be-|
tween Attlee, Philip Noel Baker
Minister of Fuel and Power, and
Ministers of the Republic of Ire
land who want Britain to increase
exports to Fire.—Reuter



Middle East Thinks |



THURSDAY,

A SMASHER

Bevin Has “Patel (iiersceeces
Of Pneumonia”

Ernest Bevin, British Foreign Secretary has a “patch of
ia” a Foreign Office spokesman said to-day

p“eumonia’

JANUAR?
JAN ae



He retired to bed with in

vin who is 70, developed'a chill during the visit of the
Commonwealth Prime Ministers to London and h:
out only a few engagements sce.

ON THE
° SPOT

LONDON

Lord Harry Duncan Me-
Gowan, prominent Lritish
industrialist told this story

ata London meeting to illus-
rate his views on industrial
relations:

A manager of a factory in
ScoUland said to one of the
“Willie, you have
been 50 years with the com-



workers,

pany; yuu have been a won
derful servant no com-
plaints against you——but




the
company’s rules i
worker must
years service
Willie scratched his head
and said to the manager:
“Retire? Retire after 50
years? My God, if I'd known
this was a_ temporary job,

I'd never taken it.” s
—LN.S,

are tha

a
retire after 50







Chinese Note
Reassuring
SAYS DELEGATION

NEW YORK, Jan. 24
A further message clarifying
the attitude of the Chinese Com-
munist Government's plans fox
feuce moves in the Far East was
received by the Indian delegation
i from



here New Delhi this after
} noon
The Indian delegation spokes

War With Russia |
Inevitable

WELLINGTON, W.Z., Jun. 24

A New Zealand surgeon wi |
vias known as “Doc’’ wnhile sery
ing under Marshal Tito during |
V/orld War II said on a visit j
his home-town that most peopit |
the Middle East believed war with |



Russia was inevitable.
Doctor L, S. Rogers, now Pro- |
fessor of Surgery at the Royal |}

: ae , od
School of Medicine in Bagdad,

said that the Middle East was at}

ussia’s merey. j

There was nothing to
Russians swinging down to control
the Persian Gulf, Suez Canal
the Mediterranean.

He said the Soviets also had
string of airfields across th
E.ashmir border ready to strike
Tndia.

Doctor Rogers served with Yu
goslavian forces in the Balkan
curing the second world war

—Renuter

top the}



EAGER TO RECEIVE

OLD PEOPLE receiving clothes at the Children’s
being distributed »y Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Husbands of

Goodwill Le

agune

f
New York and Mr, John Beckles



ternoon

yesterday a

an said the message was fairly
ngthy and was still being de
ded

From a glance at it, he

said

; | appeared from the Indian point
cf view,

reassuring.”
rhe me arrived at

ndian deleg

the
tion office two hours




















order would be jifted immediaiely
—Feucer.



Far



iron a





25, 1951



United

142 Dead In
Avalanches

OGENEV.:, Janva '

Great svalanene . fC.
steep mountain tace with th‘
speod of an express train tore the
esque “usin rilarunage
Heiligc 26.0. inty Wwe piece
Three separate avalanches
«dad ihe village They

shat

carried away the debris leay
hg scarcely a trace.

Reuter reports fron, Milan that
igers crowded littie churches
he Italian Alps today to pray

tor salvation from avalanches
sich have so tar killed 34 people
ud injured at least 50

Yesterday brought warm winds
loosening thousands of tons of
snow and ice and threatening
(urther disasters

trom Genéva comes the

huge mass of snow



report
began
u the Austrian Italian and
Pavarian Alps today threatening
Villages with a fresh series of
uvalanches.

In Innsbruck, Austria, where
week-end falls cut off water sup
plies, houses in one suburb were

LONDON, Jan. 24

being evacuated because of the
fresh peril
Avalanches also began rolling

renza yesterday today in Allgau Alps on the Aus-
tr.an-German border as the
temperature rose, a Reuter cable
yveported from Augsburg

Weather stations in Bavaria
d that several avalanches had
ciashed from tbe steep siopes of
the Austrian end of the valley

carried

é 1¢ pasi year be ha
variety of

suffered
complaints

spi ais ni ak: i ceealltehetsnsereeecnniata ta ciatacecaiiti



belic ved largely due to over ‘
eee work. | near one village without causing
L...i May and June he under- |] 7 The lat ficial ¢
wen! operations. in @ London la Tage: ie Lad Py oe aN " "A ,
i ¥ ‘ al > “% é s
}@inic for heamorrhoids ‘and for it * cs eat ern
; we i 2 »
}aneal fistula When he left the |“ "5 Wash mpous people
\ i nissing.
al a ier more than a mont said c r
a St ae tees et Reports from Klagenfurt,
o mucn tainner that his A
mt aE : Austria said that British soldiers
S ippeared to b¢ LAN BIN’ j
folds. tard Austrian Gendarmes climb
But after convalescence he was |! ve deep eX ae
reported io be much fit‘e: yr ached 1e winter camps 0
jrower company workers near
He has long suifered from! Parstez glacier on the Gross
low blood pressure and though fa ockner
hig heart was regarded as organ- They took bandages
ic@Uy send, his physical bulls | supplies and radio transmitters!
has undoubtedly placed — strain | for 120 villagers marooned in |
upon it, ;eamp for tive davs Reuter

During the Commonwealth con-
Oo ncestt) Colombe. Hiet garredtry:
sevin's health condition

Estime Given

was 80

low that a special chair was used

to carry him up the steps of

«

the

Asylum By Busta

(From Our

onference hall,

The illness of Ernest Bevin will Own Correspondent)

renew agitation for his replace- a ah cee Senne r
ment by a younger man, political [Bat resident Dumarsais istime
quarters felt here to-dav of Haiti was granted one month
| asylum in Jamaica today as the
Prime Minister Attlee has ignor-| Hon. W. A. Bustamante moved
ed Such agitation in the past in Jon his behalf after emissaries of |
the hope that Bevin would recover} the Haitian Government had al
full health. | most succeeded in getting the
During his prolonged local Government to bar his entry

t is
taxe charge of the Foreign Office

State is its

(

U.S., U.K. Not
Aiding France |:



ACHESON HAS HIGH HOPES

into the Island. One man Lucien
Chauvet, Director of the Office of
A Foreign Office spokesmar | Sout and Development of the
to-d | ; Export Corporation of Haiti at

aid to-day that Bevin wa till! ice i
ehnieally in tie |present is in Jamaica ostensibly
n Office F 'to study commerce methods, but
Kennet! M ,{ actually there to keep an eye on
; pe nrater “OF was put into protective

, | Estime,
custody by C.I.D. men when he

usual for Attlee

absences
himself t |

charge of For-
Younger,

executive head

eputised for Bevin at yesterdays | visited S.S. Colombie, the ship on
abinet meeting. jwhich Estime and his family
—Kouter, travelled from France this morn-



ng. He was later released but
police suspect a plot here to
assassinate the ex-President, and
mm Bustamante'’s orders have in-
‘stituted plain clothes protection
Estime, his wife and two
| children.
| Estime hopes to be able to stay
in
|









I ; Pe] ‘
before 12 Asian and Arab nations , E h Jamaica, but if he cannot, he
were to meet to concert their | noug |} will go on to Cuba or the United
t lans to move their second refused States
resolution in the Political Com PARIS, Jan. 24 The Haitian Government told
mittee Minister for the Associated} the local Government that he in-
The Indian spokesman said it|5tates of Indo-China, Jean Lé-|tends to use this island as a
was likely that the new message |tourneau, complained here to-day) spring-board to regain power in
would be shown to the group. |that American and British Com-| Haiti and asked his deportation
The Indian delegation spoke: nwealth Governments were not| Bustamante says: “We will not be
man said copies of the message | giving France sufficient “strate dictated to by the Haitian Gov-
had apparently been received also) cic and ciplomati upport ir}ernment.” Three months before
| bv the Prime Ministers of Brit- | Indo-China Estime’s disposition in May 1949
in France and Canada He was talking to journalists} Bustamante _ visited Haiti as a
—Reuter. Mt 5 Preset Press neon -|guest of Estime and was warmly
aimee f & to think we could | welcomed by the ex-President on
lefend France on the Rhine if the! his embarkation, after being de-
Police Seize [ine a2rsseging us jriumphed | cained on board nip for six hours
4 . ; ; The fronts of freedom are inter
Paris Newspapers |sepensent. Cam sure our Bei) yyy ;
ish and American allies are get I wo Investigate
PARIS, Jan. 24. ting more aware every day of :
All copies of today’s Communist! the international aspect of this e
newspapers Humanite and Liber. | fight for freecom of the Asse- Jamaica Malady
aticn were seized by police “for | clated States of Indo-China (From Our Own Correspondent)
tieating ¢ ateu assemblage se serpy , o¢
$ gist oi ple ~— : on a | Strategic solidarity on a worl) The G KINGSTON, Jan 24.
f the p i in scale imposes duties «1 a 1e Government pathologist has
erior said. 30. gives us: right been joined by Dr. Kenneth Hill,
ice seized copies at printing! “pt ! Allstd. chic : 53 the University College of the
press fore they ere t ke , a, neryl De 1 bey De teeters West Indies in investigations start-
rough realer| fench Con 2 ander” ae eae ed in connection with the vomiting
area : z ae Pia P, “| sickness which has claimed nearly
h rd es soe then . id aa 200 lives in Jamaica in the past
f the i \ Te Proside*t 17 var oa three weeks, 40 in Montego Bay
t newsy i r Prime Minist Rer ‘| The investigation is being carried
for today, try | plays tt Vashinat rors poet | out at the island famed tourist re-
‘ lniterior 4 tid ary a8 af. wre ey mm Janu- om woes fhe penviont incigegs
» i oly c ic Zz is tak Z ace 8
Pr aries ae { al De Lattre placed Al'srd at Plev- HE ye eastriaatod - Chov arn
stair rom “inst MIChOUS | ¢ disposal to give up-to-minute! ment to send an appeal to the
mblag of the people th “iils of the military situation| World Health Organisation asking

needs
—Reuter,

i Indo-China’s for expert assistance to solve that

annual cold weather malady





Unity Of Free World







ticn in the Korea war ister Nehru in a broadcast to
Acheson seemed undisturbed day.
h weekly Press conference Acheson was asked if he was
widespread pr reports of confident that the United Na-
spit over the Far Eas- tions General Assembly would
tf mm policy Between the United accept* the United State reso
Stat anc other North Atlantic lution and declare Communist
io particularly Britain China as the aggressor
He said he expected actior
He epeatedly declined. to would be taken some tin thi
¢ tly howe ‘ week:in the United Nati He
reports or on the added he had high hope rr)
it r ade b British ‘re United States coulk re
ti \ttlee to the serve unity and that the '
c i yesterday Nations would go forward witi
and the Indian Prime Min- aetion taken Reuter



literally |
ind some cotiages to fragments |

medical{tion he occupied for so long as a












PRICE FIVE CENTS

Nations Move



Into Wonju Again

TOKYY, Jan. 24
UNIvs0 NATIONS battalion with reinforce
meuts today moved back into Wonju, the
communications centre in Southern Korea, which
has changed hands several times in the past week.
For the past few days United Nations troops
have moved into Wonju each day and withdrawn to
a more tenable situation by night. Fighting flared
up in the western central sector this morning as
two Chinese platoons occupied the hill north of

Kumyabgijinigini, 10 miles south of Seoul.
Another platoon dug in on a hill
ge south of the town,
. » A Chinese company attacked an
Mac Arthur W ill Be Allied patrol probing towards

~ ry | Kumyabgijinigini.
il To-morrow Strongly armoured United Na-
5 al “ tions patrols today continued
Kiekatt ie eae sweeping roads and tracks north
3 a as acé ‘i > acros ;
will celebrate his seventy-first os Se een rae
birthday on Friday against wide- =ones tear Ge ss tet f cane
spread discussion in the United |° Mor aa - oie “ee a :
States of his competence as United ore than , ore PECOHS
Nations Commander in Korea and hiding in the hills and valleys by
as top American Genera! in the|@®y and raiding isolated villages
Far East t night were reported operating
Since his armies have met set- | behind the central eastern sector
backs in Korea American maga-|in rugged, sparsely populated

country suited to guerilla opera-
tions. Aggressive United Nations
patrols throughout the western
sector to the north of Osan and

zines and newspapers have made
increasingly numerous critical re-
ferences to the General

There has been a severe drop in



his prestige and authority in]Ichon failed to make any contact
Washington, according to observ-] with Chinese troops.

ers here since his abortive “end

the war” offensive in November| An Army spokesman said today
was followed by two months of [that 1,500 North Koreans includ-

retreat by United Nations forces, }ing 500 women volunteers were
‘To-day” one source said, “Mac- | reported six miles south of Yong-
Arthur does not even exercise final |wol on Saturday. This force was
authority over military operations |said to contain elements of the
in his theatre. His war planning |Second, Third and Eleventh North
is under close supervision by the | Korean Divisions,
Joint Chiefs of Staff Two days later 30 North Ko-
“Also there is direct liaison be- |rean officers were reported in the
tween Joint Chiefs in Washing-|same area. Late yesterday after-
ton and General Ridgway at 8th} noon an estimated 75 to 100 Com-
Army headquarters, : S munists dug in on a hill about 2
The most important feature of miles north-east of Wonju and
this is that the Joint Chiefs of United Nations artillery opened
Staff now express their views five ay them 7 P
about plans for the Korean cam- ‘ ee Juni
paign more forcefully than they Allied forces pushed to the crest
of the hill and ten minutes later

ever felt free to do previously “*
“General MacArthur has all the | @stablished contact with Commu-
rists moving down the north-east

authority enjoyed by any military
Commander but the special posi- |e! the slope.

Today’s Eighth Army commu,
nique said that United Nations
patrols made aggressive patrols
and improved their defensive posi-
tions along the west front in the
lest 12 hours without contacting
\ the enemy.

Allied planés spotted many small
boats in Ansan Estuary, a few
miles south-west of Seoul yester-
day morning and in the afternoon

WASHINGTON, Jan, 24 patrols went in and destroyed 13

United States Secretary of| of them.

State Acheson to-day rejected as On the central front, United
‘brazen effrontery” what he call-| Netions patrols fought an estimat-
ed 100 Communists 2 miles north-

power in his own right has gone
with the legend of his military in-
vineibility.”

—KReuter, |



Acheson Rejects
Soviet Charges



‘ Specivus ad false Calg, . “| Pe :
made against Western Allies by] east of Yoju, Gomansnies ee
the Soviet Union in Soviet notes | U5!"8 — Stare automatic
to Britain and France on Janu weapons and mo ‘Ss, .
ary 20 pe ; : After a short fierce fight United
He said at his weekly press| Nations patrols disengaged and

withdrew to Yoju. American

conference that Soviet charges that} } vtaderjet fighters damaged three

Sesboned Soa was oe elton and probably destroyed one of a

tions which were completely un flight of 16 to 20 Communist
M1G 15 jet fiehters which at-

wue tacked ther to-day,.—Reuter,

tte said that the West had point
ed out many times that the founda-
ticn of the North Atlantic Pact
wa. one of collective self-defence
which was recognised in the
United Nations Charter
—RKeuter,

“And ’'ve smoked

them ever since!”





TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT













tI

“fT know. One’s

first du Maurier is quite

a revelation. They showed |

me quite a new standard

of enjoyment,”’ an
| |

“T've never found anything
else so cool and smooth —
and I expect you'll say I
smoke far too many.”

**You can’t have too many du Maurier
with this little filter tip to protect your
throat. Besides it adds enormously to
the flavour.”’

“And the result —given
the finest tobacco in the
first place—is superb.”



$1.00 for 50
There'll never be a better cigarette

du MAURIER

|THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE

SOLE DIST VELKINSON & H BRIDGETOWN




\ \\






























PAGE TWO

aia



ARIB spent an _ interesting
twenty minutes yesterday

morning chatting with the “Wan-
dering Wainwrights” who have
been in Sarbados since November
1950. (

Thomas B. Wainwright, better
kniown to his friends as “Tibi” was
President of Canadian Bronze
Powder Works and _ Director
of International Bronze Pow-
der Works ‘in Montreal, when
he retired in April 1950. He
has been coming to Barbados
regularly for thirty years on
business visiting their agents here.

Soon after he retired, he bought
an English car and spent fourteen
weeks touring the Eastern US.
and Eastern Canada taking mov-
ing pictures as a souvenir of their
visit.

They returned to Montreal in
time to catch the Canadian Con-
structor on Novemebr 10th when
she sailed for Barbados. They
olan to remain here until May.

“Tibi” is a man of many hob-
bies. He collects stamps, old coins,
likes fishing, golf and most of all,
taking moving pictures. He has
recently started taking stil] photo-
graphs as well. His wife takes
a keen interest in all of his hobbies.
They are an ideal couple, They
have one son, twenty-six-year-old
Gordon Wainwright. Gordon is
six feet three inches tall. Among
other things he is a two handicap
golfer.

When I was shown into their
hotel room at the Enmore Hotel,
“Tibi” was pounding a typewriter.
“Every day I keep a diary uf the
day’s events and any interesting
happenings. Once a week, my
wife and I go on a picnic to one
of the out of the way spots on
the island. “Invariably we get
lost, but we get a lot of good pic-
tures,” he said

At present he is mating a mov-
ing picture study of the flowers
in Barbados which he will take
with him back to Canada, How-
ever, not knowing the names of the
flowers here he is finding it hard
to edft. He is trying to locate
someone here who has illustrations
of local flowers to help him out.

Mr. Wainwright has with aim
his own projector and sereen and
has given several shows since he
has been here. He has shown
his trip through Canada and a
reel of Barbados. ;

Before leaving the West Indies
Mr. and Mrs. Wainwright plan to
make the round trip to Jamaica
on the Colombie and re-visit
Tobago which they visited some
time ago:

Bronze Powder Works is repre-
sented in forty-five countries. Mr.
Wainwright has visited all of them
and likes the West Indies best.





E The wandering, Wein

CX 4 r.\/
, Sonal VP) )
4 4 “AS et



tp

24
f
a

aii acowinetiin

a
vg
i
t/
4
7

i

Looking For Talent

_â„¢ GODDARD, after playing

in the Old Boys’ Cricket
match at Lodge School yesterday,
leaves this morning for St. Lucia
on a short visit, He is looking
for cricket talent on behalf of the
West Indies Cricket Board.

Here For Two Months

R. AND MRS. P. Ww

LAVERICK of London, Eng-
land, are now in Barbados for
two months’ holiday. They
travelled out to Trinidad on the
S.S. Brazil and arrived here on
Monday afternoon by B.W.I.A
It is their first visit to the island
and they are staying at the Ocean
View Hotel.

Mr. Laverick is Managing Di-
rector of Line Equipment Ltd.,
electrical manufacturers of Lon-
don.

Short Visit

M* BRIAN DUGGEN, repre-
sentative of MeNabb Rou-
gier & Co., of England, who spent
a few days in Barbados left iv
terday afternoon by B.W.1.A.
for Trinidad.

Leaving on the same plane were
Mrs. Dorothy Robinson and her
two children, Her husband Mr.
Jack Robinson, Managing Director
of H. E. Robinson & Co., in Port
of Spain, who was also.in Barba-
dos returned to Trinidad on Mon-
day.

Spent Honeymoon Here

M* AND MRS. George Carter
who were spending their
honeymoon in Barbados, returned
to Trinidad yeterday afternoon by
B.W.LA.

George who is the son of Mr.
and Mrs, W. H. Carter of “Ever-
ton” St. George, is with T.L.L.
stationed at Forest Reserve, South
Trinidad,

Old Boys

HARLIE TAYLOR made 94
runs yesterday afternoon,
the highest score in the Old Boys
versus the Schoo] match at the
Lodge. The old boys, two of
whom, John Goddard and Roy
Marshall, have represented the
West Indies. made 294 to the
School’s 143.

After the match John and Ro:
were presented with engraved sil-
ver cigarette boxes, and Mr. W. A.
Farmer, the Headmaster, express-
ed the school’s pride in their
achievements.

Chatting with the sportsmaster
Carib discussed the possibility of
the Lodge taking part in inter-
school swimming matches, The
difficulty is transportation, and it
is obvious that the school needs
a swimming pool—what about it
Old Boys?



BY THE WAY....

HARLIE SUET is at the mo-
ment dealing with a letter
from a Mrs. Wybrow, who says
that when she applied to the local
controller for a permit to turn on
the electric light to look for a
piece of coal, she was told to turn
on the gas for 30 seconds and light
a candle from it.

She said that she had no priority
licence to buy candles, so she was
told to look for the bit of coal by
the light of a match. The matter
was taken up by the Regional
Board, who told her to look for the
bit of coal by daylight. The Cen-
tral Office sent her a form to fill
in, asking where she got the bit of
coal, what was its size, weight and
texture, whether her grandmother
was alive, and, if not, what was
her religion. By the time Suet
himself took the affair in hand,
Mrs. Wybrow was being prosecut-
ed for reer. an electric torch
to look for the bit of coal.

Murder at Muckhurst (Ill)
“DERHAPS the horse could have

come down the chimney,”
suggested Sir Bartley. “Only if it
lived on the roof,” retorted Mal-
practice satirically. He then rap-
ped out, “Do you recognise the
horse?” “No,” said Sir Bartley.
“Tt don't come from round here,"
said Bucket. “Well, I presume it
wasn't dropped from a plane,” re-
torted the sleuth. The arrival of

the vet., Mr. Porter Bobster, put
an end to this nonsense. Having
examined the defunct gee-gee, Mr.
Bobster said gravely, “This poor
beast was killed by the most pow-
erful and unpleasant African poi-
son known to science. It is a poi-
son concocted from wuppa wuppa

berries.” “But nobody could have
entered the room,” rapped out
Malpractice. “Everything was

locked on the inside?

“Does it oceur to you,” said the
vet., “that someone must have got
in to lock the room on the inside?
A room doesn’t lock itself on the

inside.” It had not occurred to
anyone, “That’s a point,” said
Malpractice ungrudgingly. “We

must find out how the poison was
administered,” said the vet. “Per-
haps in this here,” said Bucket,
who had been oe on the floor.
He held up a chipped cup, The
vet. took one sniff. “This cup,”
he said, “contained enough wuppa-
yore poison to kill the entire

Take Your Choice,
Mr, Meat

MAN whose name is Meat is

so sick of being jeered at

that he wants to change his name
to “something unusual.” Allow
me to offer him a small selection
of possible names: Taddimath-
wind, Grefilbird, Elengener de





Due February 3rd
YOUNG ladies have

Gave

been asking me, when is
H.M.S. Devonshire arriving in
Barbados, Devonshire is due here
on Sunday, February 3.

On board are 245 cadets, in-
cluding two from the Royal Aus-
tralian Navy, seven from the
Royal New Zealand Navy, six
from the Ceylon Navy and eight
from the Burmese Navy.

With Singer Co.

RS. OLGA DOPSON and Miss
1 Eileen Luces who are with
the Singer Sewing Machine Co.,
in Trinidad returyed to Trinidad
yesterday afternoon by B.W.LA,
after a short visit. Mrs, Dopson
is with their San Fernando Branch
and Miss Luces ig attached to theiv
branch in Port of Spain.

While here they were staying at
the Aquatic Club’s Guest Rooms.
From Halifax

AYING THEIR FIRST visit to

the island are Mr. and Mrs.
A. J. Hustins and Mr, and Mrs.
Cc. G. Cleveland ‘of Halifax, Nova
Scotia, who arrived on the Lady
Nelson on its last trip here, They
have come out’ for five weeks’
holiday and are staying at the
Ocean View Hotel.

Mr, Hustins is President of
Arthur J. Hustins Enterprises,
while Mr, Cleveland is in the
Real Estate business.

Annual Reunion

a AND DAUGHTERS of the

Barbados Benevolent Society
ot America celebrated its 38th

annual reunion at a dance held
in Rockland Palace, New York,
last week. James Lashley as

Chairman and Clarence Lashley
vice-Chairman, headed the dance
committee responsible for the
success of the party.

This society was organised by
the Honourable James N. Car-
rington, on Sunday, Sept. 7th,
1913, He called together Evans
Willoughby, W. E. Best, James
Payne, Beresford Ward, Gerald
Whittingham, Samuel Hinds,
James Hall, Sylvasta Banfield,
Samuel Garner and Mrs. Edith
Willoughby, who became _ the
Lady Patron, They brought the
Society into being.

The specific purpose of the
Society is to aid the sick, and tu
help in burying the dead. As
Barbadians traverse the seven
seas, the founders made the laws
to include their offspring wherever
born.

Staying With Relatives

R. KEITH

MELVILLE,
son of the Rev.
and Mrs, Harold
Melville left yes-[)
terday afternoon] ¥
by B.W.LA. to
spend two weeks
holiday with re- Ff
latives in Trini-§&
dad. Mr. Melville
is studying Optics KEITH MELVILLE
in Dr, Harcourt Carter’s Optical
Laboratory where, in 1912, was
installed the first lens surface-
grinding plant in the B,W.1.

Dancing Unlimited

ISS JOAN RANSOM who is

due to arrive from England
on Sunday afternoon via Jamaica
will be taking over the Madame
Bromova Dancing School from
Molly Radcliffe who retires on her
arrival,

Miss Ransom holds the licen-
tiate of the Royal Academy of
Dancing of London and is a fully
qualified teacher. She not only
teaches ballet but ballroom, Greek
and other types of dancing. The
school hopes to extend its sylla-
bus with additional classes in
these types of dancing.

It is understood that the school
is being purchased from Madame
Bromova and will be turned into
a limited liability company,

Madame Bromova will still take
an interest in the school and she
will be one of the shareholders.



eece By Beachcombe:

Bowlgie, Gockliches, Tiffpin, Bur-
bulpipple, Quamhen, Sockticket,
Dilatatatoe, Smoil, Scrisangulsle,
Borthcork - Zizzlett, Keigaloop,
Frashaharoshson, Pudolkerough,
Mumph, Ifode, Crubhidden-Crub-
hidden.

Do You Lack Polish ?

N writing of a lady pianist that

she lacked polish, a music

critic was, perhaps inadvertently,
boosting Snibbo. There is no ex-
cuse for any woman to lack polish
when the small tube of Snibbo
will make her shine from head to
foot. Experiments have shown
that you can read a book by a face
properly smeared with Snibbo, Or
shave yourself in ii, vided the
owner of the face will stand still,

Top Floor

F OU,” said the white hunter’s





wife to the absent-minded
professor who hai , shot a very
short elephant (3ft. 6in.). “have

an elephant like & :nesory.” “And
you,” replied the professor, “ have
a back of a bus like a face.”

Oddly enough c's ‘oa
Attic
ND now I kiss my reader

goodnight, pack up my traps

(one mouse, four man—and a

small snare), ard make my final

bow (I'm going to make arrows
for it too),
Oh, well.

iiliaadiiinse-tilidinssedi Lisa hy 2 iit
BEEBE EER RB RP Ree eee 8 .



a FOBRALCO

A TOOTAL PABRIC

“NAMRIT” Tobralco and
LYSTAV newly opened at

Evans and Whitfields

' VISITORS &

DECORATIVE

are invited to call and Inspect our
fine Range of

ROYAL DOULTON CHINA FIGURES &

FLORAL CHINA BASKET

COLLECTORS

0) gee weceees em eemeewed

;
i
i
‘
:
i

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



(By HELEN BURKE)

Many housewives these 8,
besides bachelors and career p> ig
are faced with the problem of
cooking on ohe gas ring or an
electric hotplate. It takes bingen.
uity, but many delicious meals can
be prepared.

All the really interesting egg
dishes—serambled, omelettes and
steamed souffles — are “ring-
cooked.” So are steamed fish with
celicious sauces, mussels (done in
several ways), fried fish, fish frit-
ters and fish cakes of all kinds.
And there is no better way of
cooking herrings than gently
poaching them.

At the moment, the most néur-
ishing fried fish are sprats—an
excellent “buy” at 8d. a pound,

There are a dozen corned-beef
recipes and, provided he can get
finely ground steak, not even thi
best chefs need more than «@
cooking ring for hamburgers.

One _ of my favourite dishes,
Steak Diane, is cooked in a frying-
pan and so is liver, which is best
cooked this way: Cover the thir
Slices with boiling water. Leave
for a few minutes, then drain and
slowly fry them in a mere smear
of fat. Kidneys, too—devilled
curried or with rich mushroom or
Madere sauce—are ring-cooked,

Incidentally, the one-ring cook
would do well to invest in a pres-
sure pan—both to extend her
“repertoire” and to economise in
fuel, Further, with a pressure pan,
there is no difficulty in keeping
food hot,

Tea-breads
You can even bake scones or

»ther tea-breads on a ring or plates

First, heat slowly and thoroughly
whatever you are going to use—
a griddle (girdle), thick frying-
pan or the griller hotplate or you
full-sized electric cooker (this at
“medium,” turning it to “low’’)

B.B.C. Radio |
Programme

THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 1951

7.00 a.m, The News; 7.10 a.m, News
Analysis; 7.15 a.m, From The Editorials;
7.25 a.m. Programme Parade; 7.30 a.m,
Generally Speaking; 7.45 a.m. Listeners
Choice; 8.00 a.m. Land and Livestock;
8.30 am. Raymond Nilsson; 8.45 a.m,
Your Body and Its Enemies; 9.00 a.m.
The News; 9.10 am. Home News From
Britain; 9.15 a.m, Close Down; 11.15 a.m.
Programme Parade; 11,30 a.m, Songs of
Burns; 11.45 a.m. Special Dispatch; 12.00
noon The News; 12.10 p.m. News
Analysis; 12.15 p.m, Close Down; 4.15
p.m. Listeners Choice; 5.00 p.m. Com-
poser of the Week; 5.15 D.m. Seottish
Magazine; 5.45 ae: Spa_ Orchestra; 6.
p.m, How To Give A Party; 6. mn,
Musie From British Films; 6.45 p.m. Pro-
gramme Parade; 7.00 ne The News;
7,10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.15 p.m. We
See Britain; 7.45 p.m, Generally Speak-
ing; 8.00 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m.
Paul Temple And The Vandyke Affair;
8.45 p.m, Songs Of Burns; 9.00 p.m.
Special Dispatch; 9.15 p.m. Hallo Aus-
tralia; 9.45 p.m, Do You Remember:
10,00 p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m. From
The Editorials; 10.15 p.m. Take It From
Here; 10.45 p.m, Taxi-ing Around With
aoe Hodge; 11.00 p.m, Republic Day
-India,

CROSSWORD



Across








1. You may solve this Sy mete
chance. (9) a

6. Become aware. (7)

v. le to agitation of mind. (9:

435 by aceldeas or design? (4

1. re, $8)

14. Half seove Dy a Welsh seaside
resort it

lo. Should make it third hand. (6)

17. The one to commit 10 Down. (3)

19. IN take a bet for the second
letter. (4)

21. Give a cart room for this. (5-3)

22, Unpleasant sound, (4)

23. He's a pal, (4)

Down

1, Lean over, (4)

2. HSADproyvel of replaced potters.
(7) 3. Such folk are mine. (3)

4. To do this might be waste of
time, (5)

5. Pictorial parable, (6)

7. Stride from the pole. (4)

8 Dance. (5)

10, Rat nose. (anag., 7)

12. Ghostly. (6)

13. Two brothers of this name told
tales. (5) .

16. Overseas money. (4)

18. Makes an end of rabbits, (4)

20. To @ saint it’s a date. (3)
Solution of vesterday’s puzzle Across:

1, Vesver: 7, Elucidate: 9. Sound: 10.

Ente; 11, Queen: dirtt

cemie; 17, Unit

“1,.Even, 22. Need

2, Eloquent, fe

Stirring: 6,

14, Actor:
















i






It works fast
and tastes nice!






~—while you get on with the mix-
ing of the scones or cakes.

Here are some of my favourites,
most of which are best eaten hot:

‘Singin’ Hinnies’

These are so rich that they
“sing” about it as they bake. Rub
(but not too finely) 4o0z. lard or
ard and butter into 802. self-
raising flour and a pinch of salt.
Add, if you like, 40z. cleaned
currants and just enough milk to
make a stiff dough. Roll out to
quarter-inch thick and either cut
inte rounds or leave in one piece.

Rub a little saltless fat over the
well-heated frying—pan, griddle or
griller hotplate. Baie the ‘Hinnies’
on this until the undersides are
pale brown. Turn and cook the
other sides, then, for good
measure, give them another turn,
Split, butter and eat at once.

Scotch Pancakes

Rub a good walnut of margar-
ne into two teacups plain flour
sifted with a teaspoon cream of
tartar, half teaspoon bicarbonate
of soda and a pinch of salt. Add
a tablespoon of castor sugar. Stir
n one egg, beaten with a teaspoon
golaen syrup and less than quarter
pint milk. Add a few drops lemon
cssence,

Drop dessertspoons or table-
spoons on to the greased hot
surface, turn with a palette knife
as soon as the undersides are warm
brown, and do the other sides.
Pass butter with these.

Potato Scones
Sieve together 3o0z. self-raising
{lour and half teaspoon salt. Rub

Hat Trick

LONDON,
Suannequin Ann South appear-
ed before 40 fashion experts at
® London spring hat show wear-
ing a satin skull cap in the form
cf pink leaves, with two tea roses
at the front.

She had finished her parade
amid exclamations of “charming
. delightful style.”
Then the commentator, Gino
Davis, discovered the hat was on

back to front.

Following a hasty conference
Azn turned the hat round, with
the roses following the spring
trend at the back of the head.
—“Even more charming,” was tie
comment of the experts.

—LN.S.

Batonka Girls

LONDON.

A London “Daily Express” re-
port from Bulawayo tells of the
latest beauty treatment being tried
by the girls of the Batonka Tribe
near the Zambesi River f

The local witch doctor has
persuaded them that to have six
front upper teeth is zebra-like.

The girls are now queueing tc
have him knock their teeth otit.
He does it in one hit—with a
stone axe,

They pay the witch doctor in
beads and feathers.

eee,





—iLN.S.







Saying goodbye to Gaffer Jarge,
Rupert gets through the fence aud
presses on. “*Why on earth did
Rosalie run away from the con-
stable?" he murmurs. ‘* And why

is she going this way? It leads no-
where.’ Then he gives a. start.

"Yes, does. | quite forget

om

GOO

PLEASE BELIEVE

And

SECRET LAND



Opening To-morrow, 5.00 & 8.30 p.m.
Abbott & Costello in “THE FOREIGN LEGION”

‘ COS PEOES







POCESODPS PSPSPS SSSSS9 POPS SSSSS SOE

GLOBE

To-day, 5.00 & 8.30.

099556696S4490S8O%



Cooking on a ring?

Then try
Bisa gis “these ...

2oz. butter or margarine into them.
Rub half pound cooked mealy
potatoes through the sieve and
work the flour mixture into them.
Roll out quarter inch thick, cut
into rounds and bake both sider
on the greased surface (8—10
minutes in all). Split, spread with
butter and eat as soon as possible.

Syrup Sultana Scones

Rub an ounce of butter into
half pound self-raising flour,
sifted with quarter teaspoon salt.
Work in a_ tablespoon (golden
syrup, 207. cleaned sultanas and
enough milk (about half cup) to
make a soft dough. Roll out to
quarter inch thick, cut into rounds
and bake as above.

Crumpets

Mix half oz. bakers’ yeast with
a little tepid milk and water,
taken from a scalded pint. When
well mixed, add the remaining
liquid and stir in one pound plain
flour to which has been added a
teaspoon ealt and a pinch of bicar-
bonate of soda, Beat very wel
for 5—6 minutes, then put in a
warm enough place, covered, to
rise for just under an hour. Beat

Place greased crumpet rings on
a@ well-greased moderately heated

‘iddle or large frying-pan and

il them quarter inch deep with
the batter. Bake until the bubbles
which form are set, then remove
the rings, turn the crumpets,
bubbled sides down and finish off
the cooking,—L.E.S.

MARCH
PARTIES

LONDON.
King George VI and Queen
Elizabeth are jumping the gur
on London’s social season this
year by holding two presentation
parties at Buckingham Palace ir:
March,



The London season does not
begin until May and since the war
cebutantes have always been
presented at garden parties during
that month.

March presentations are not
however, without precedent. in
1935 and again in 1939 evening
courts were held in March,

The King and Queen have many
public engagements in May and
palace spokesmen imply
March
month for the parties this year.

Scottish debutantes are nei
affected by these arrangements

They will attend a presentation
party at the Palace of Holyrood-
house on June 25. The King and
Queen and Princess Margaret will
be in residence at the palace from

June 21, to 28.

English debutantes
mothers are already
dressmakers to choose outfits for
their presentation.

In past years most girls bought
a new garden party dress and hat
which
could be worn throughout the
summer. This year they have to
buy a different type of outfit for

for their presentation,

an indoor party in, March.
AÂ¥e. INS.





There's a short cut to Nutwood

Station through these fields!’ At
that moment he catches sight of
the tiny figure d.wn below making
straight for the station, and at his
best speed he gives chase so that
he gets near enough to see her run
on to the platform without a porter
hottie

Last Showing
ME (Deborah KERR

(Robert TAYLOR)



GARDENERS !

{Save Your Plants ftom Insect
Pests by the use of a - - -



THIS SPRAYER IS ALSO SUITABLE FOR USE



COTTON FACTORY LTD.




that
is the “most convenient’

and their
visiting

25,

THURSDAY, JANUARY 1951

ES
AQUATIC CLUB CUNEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT AT 8.30
ROSALIND RUSSEL!

in “THE VELVET TOUCH”

also Starring

Claire TREVOR :o: Sydnes

COMMENCING pinnag on Ens
Ceell B. de Mille’s “CLE I
COLBERT :o: Warren WILLIAM :o: Henry WILCOXON
A Paramount Picture



Leo GENN :o: GREENSTREET

Starring Claudette



>



=





PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

RKO RADIO'S Big Technicolor Adventure
Last 2 Shows TODAY 445 and 630 p.n
Douglas FAIRBANKS Jr. Maureen O'HARA = in
“SINBAD THE SAILOR” . ea é -
Also The Short Leon ERROL in “DON'T POOL zat ® WIFE



Th FRIDAY (Spécial Mat.) 4:45 p.m. (only)
“PREDDIE STEPS OUT" (By Request)
Freadie STEWART ond The TEENAGERS

+: and i-
Tom KEENE in “DYNAMITE CANYON’
———$———_

Mat, TODAY. 1.30 pin
“BELOW THE DEADLINE”
with Warren Dougias and

“RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL”
with Tom KEENE



Opening Friday “THE INSPECTOR GENERAL”

|
SSS SSS See ooo
;

PLAZA Theatre=OISTIN (DIAL 8404)

Last 2? Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. (Warner's Double)
& “WINGS FOR THE EAGLE”



“LARCENY INC.”



Ed. G. Robinson Dennis Morgan — Ann Sheridan
Jane Wyman
FRID: SAT: SUN: — 5 & 8.30 p.m MIDNITE SAT. 27th (RKO-Radio)
RKO.-Radio’s Double Thriller ! ! Tim Holt, (in Beth)
“ROSEANNA McCOY" and





DIAN AGENT” ana
George O'Brien in - - - :

Zane G
“MARSHAL OF MESA CITY" +

3
INDER MUOUNTAIN"









qQANET Y—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

Lact Show To-NITE 6.30 (RKO PADIO’S Double)
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY—8.30 P.M. ‘RKO-Radio Double Feature)

&







Tim Holt in - - -
“STAGECOACH

: Mat. -

“MARINE RAIDERS

Pat O'BRIEN & Ruth HUSSEY KID’



8.20 P.M

8



FRID, -- SAT. SUN,
Warner Bros, Big Special Double !

“UNDER CAPRICORN”
Color by Technicolor
Ingrid Bergman — Joseph Cotton

5 P.M.

Dick FORAN (The Singing
Cowboy) in
“GUNS OF THE PECOS"













GENERAL HILARITY Takes Over
FRIDAY 2.30 & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing
at 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.






DAILY








ector’






































snicolor Bass
a nr Se ee



DIRECTED BY
wore
BARBARA BATES

WALTER SLEZAK « wtsteratittte JERRY WALD HENRY KOSTER

Screen Play by Philip Rapp snd Harry Kurits + Suggouing ty 6 Pay te Mitite Gag
Lyrics ond Music oy The Associate Producer SULVIA FING + Myaseahlinrecson ond cstenta! Score by Jobrny Green

PLAZA — BRIDGETOWN (DIAL 2310)
WATCH FOR™= "THE STORY OF SEABISCUIT”

empresas
EMPIRE

Last Two Shows Today
4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

20th Century Fox presents

CHEAPER
BY
THE DOZEN

Color by Technicolor







ROYAL

Teday & Tomorrow
4.30 & 8.30 p.m.





Columbia Big Double

Richard DIX in

“SECRET OF
THE WHISTLER

AND
THUNDERHOOF’

with Robert PRESTON
and William BISHOP

OLYMPIC

Today & Tomorrow
430 & 8.15 p.m.

Starring Cilfton WEBB,
Jeanne CRAIN
and Myrna LOY





ROXY

Today & Tomorrow
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.



20th Century Fox Double
M-G-M Smashing Double
John PAYNE & Alice FAYE

in Van JOHNSON and
Phillis THAXTER in

“ THIRTY
SECONDS
OVER TOKYO”

AND

“THE ARNELO
AFFAIR”

Starring John HODIAK,
George MURPHY and
Francis GIFFORD |

“WEEK-END IN
HAVANA”

AND

“SOMEWHERE
IN THE
NIGHT”

with John HODIAK
and Nancy GUILD

Small Canteens of 6 Knives
orks and Spoons
Stainless Steel Carver Sets
Sets of Spoons
Cake Forks
Cake Baskets

also
THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 1951

Tweedsmuir

Says Western

World In Race Against Time

OTTAWA.

A BRITISH LORD who was wounded as a Canadian
soldier in Sicily said here that the democracies are in a
race against time and if they lose, it will be primarily

their own fault.



.
Air Squadron

Leaves Canada

7 . «
For Training

CHATHAM, New Brunswick.

The first airlift of the famous
No. 421 “Red Indian” squadron
of the Royal Canadian Air Force
deft this week to complete train-
ing in England.

It will be the first time for an
RC.A.F. squadron to train out-
side Canada in peacetime, and
when the airlift is completed No.
421 will have been the first
squadron to leave Canada since the
end of the Second World War.

Altogether 14 flights are sched-
uled this month to move the men
to England where they will train
alongside the Royal Air Force.

Addressing the squadron after
a formal inspection, Vice-Marshal
J. L. Plant, representing the chief
of air staff, remarked that it would
receive training with the R.A.F.
He reminded the men that some
phases of life in Britain were
different than in Canada, but he
asked them to remember that
“they do some things better than
we do.”

He urged the group to do all
they could to deserve the hospital-
ity they would receive overseas.

Groups gathered around those
about to depart. Wives and tod-
dling children exchanged one more
kiss with their blue-clad menfolk.
One pilot held a child in each arm
as he said farewell to his wife.

The squadron was presented
with q plaque recording the unit’s
record since it was formed over-
Seas in 1942. It was disbanded in
1945 and re-enlisted here in Sep-
tember, 1949. Eight Vampire jets
screamed overhead in formation
and music was provided by the
band of the New Brunswick North
Shore Regiment.

Verdi’s Tomb
Opened

MILAN, Jan, 24.

The body -of Giuseppe Verdi,
Italian composer who died here on
January 27, 1901, was found al-
most unchanged when his tomb
was opened yesterday shortly be-
fore the fiftieth anniversary cele-
brations of his death.

Verdi is buried in a garden of
the Milan “House of Rest” he’
founded for impoverished musi-
cians. His remains are to be re-
interred in a walnut coffin.

On Saturday there will be a
memorial service for Verdi in Mi-
lan Cathedral. On the same even-
ing, there will be a Verdi gala

formance at La Scala Opera
House.

Rome opera will present Verdi's

“La Forza Del Destino” the sare

~
nm New York Arturo Toscanini
will conduct Verdi's “requiem.”
Box office receipts from this per-
formance next Saturday estimated
at $25,000 will go to the upkeep
of Verdi’s “House of Rest’ in
Milan,

Tickets Weighed
To Count Traffic

WINNIPEG.

Winnipeg Electric Co. doesn’t
count its bus and street-car pas-
sengers—it weighs them,

However, it’s not the customer
that is weighed, but the ticket he
places in the fare box when he
travels by street-car, bus or trolley
coach.

Accurate scales make it possi-
ble for company officials to deter-
mine how many passengers travel
on each route daily.

But there are some complica-
tions. Damp tickets, for instance,

“We have found a. street-car
ticket doesn’t weigh the same
every day,” said F. S. Cook, assis-
tant treasurer of the company.
“The more moisture there is in the
air, the heavier the ticket.”

This difficulty is overcome by
counting, weighing and calculating
each day the number of tickets to
an ounce. The number varies from
185 to 195.













luse LIFEBUOY
Stay fresh all day long —use Lifebuoy Toilet Soap
in your daily bath or shower and whenever you
wash. Lifebuoy’s deep-cleansing lather really
frees you of weariness, keeps you looking fresh |
so much longer. Buy a tablet today and discover |*
for yourself the difference it makes !

Lord Tweedsmuir, 39-year-old
son of the former governor-
general of Canada, said in a
speech to the Canadian Club that
the west “must awake to its dan-
ger” and the democracies must
seek out as allies “any part of
the world that is ready to stand
by us.”

They must go forward posi-
tively, impressing Russia with
their will and their ability to
fight because “you can’t win
simply by defending your Own
goal.” The democracies, he said,
above all must be “absolutely
realistic” with themselves.

Lord Tweedsmuir left Canada
with the first overseas contin-
gent of the Canadian army 11
years ago and rose to command
the Hastings and Prince Edward
Regiment of Canadians in Sicily.

He had some humorous army
tales too. He told of one fight by
a Canadian unit against heavy
German odds. Eventually a cor-
poral was the senior remaining
Canadian, The Germans sent an
officer under a flag of truce, and
he warned “you English gentle-
men had better surrender or take
the consequences.”

The Canadian corporal replied:
“We ain’t English, we ain’t gen-
tlemen and we ain’t surrender-
ing.”

. Professional Puzzled

Lord Tweedsmuir also told of
another occasion on which the
Canadians captured a_ highly
professional, and highly enraged
German officer. The German
protested: “Your men advance
across open country under heavy
mortar fire.”

The Canadians replied: “Is that
wrong?”

The German snorted and said:
“If people are going to behave
like that you might as well not
have a war.”

Lord Tweedsmuir told of a sol-
dier he met in hospital shortly
after a political figure hed ap-
peared on the scene to speak a
few words.

“What did he have to say,”
asked his lordship by way of
cheerful conversation.

“Nothing,” came the retort
“And he came one helluva long
way to say it.”

Lord Tweedsmuir said that
three years of training in England
enabled the Canadian army _to go
into action in the Second World

War as “one of the most highly piec

professional armies the world has
seen,”
ever s aes

=]

ees

anne.

MY
ir



London Express Service.

Cancer Clinic
For Dogs Opened

NEW BRUNSWICK,

NEW JERSEY, Jan, 24.

The opening of a cancer clinic
for dogs only was announced on
Wednesday by Rutgers University.
The clinic is unique both in
canine medicine and in cancer re-
search.

Its sole aim is to treat and study
cancer in dogs which get the dis-
ease about as often as humans do.
Dog studies may turn up know-
ledge helpful against human
cancer.

This new deal for dogs is al-
ready underway at the Bureau o1
Biological Research at Rutgers.
New Jersey Veterinarians have
been asked to send their patients.

| keep fresh all day...!





\

~

wresuey |




FOR PERSONAL FRESHNESS ALWAYS

NAST G6B-1 1 1OonS



TOILET

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Colonies Earned
$300 Million In 1950

(From Our London Correspondent)

LONDON, Jan. 16.

THE FAR-REACHING EFFECTS of the ten-year

development

‘ plans in the Colonies, approved costs of
which totalled £195 million at the end of November

reflected in a review of achievements last year published
at the week-end in an official report : “The British Colonial

Territories in 1950”.

While the prevailing high

world prices have had much to
do with the remarkable trade
figures of some of the Colonies,
the undoubted increased pros-
perity of the Colonies is shown
in this report to be based on
other and more stable factors.
_ Highlights of the year’s statis-
tical returns include the fact that
Colonial net dollar earnings were
over 300 million dollars, twice as
much again as in 1949. In spite
of continued Communist terror-
ism Malaya held her lead as the
greatest net dollar earner in the
Commonwealth.

Examples of the changed
revenue situation for many of the
Colonies are provided by Tangan-
yika in East Africa, whose
revenue in 1949 amounted to
£7,355,000 compared with £2,-
133,000 ten years earlier and her
expenditure to £6,905,000 com-
pared with £2,394,000.

In the British West Indian
Colonies the total true revenue
increased from 40.0 dollars in
1938 to 128.7 dollars in 1948, The
per capita income in Jamaica rose
from £17.8 in 1938 to £61.9 in
1949.

Record totals in trade returns
were registered in 1950 by Hong
Kong and Northern Rhodesia. In
the first nine months of 1950 alone
the value of Hong Kong’s imports
and exports amounted to £314
million compared with £317 mil-
lion for the whole of 1949. In
Northern Rhodesia total trade in
the first six months of 1950 was
worth over £34 million compared
with £27 in the same period of
1949.

Furtner interesting figures are
provided in regard to the trade
exchange between U.K. and the
Colonies. The Colonies, the Report
points out, cannot maintain and
expand their production without
the United Kingdom maintaining
a high rate of exports to them and
that this is done is shown by the
following facts: Exports of iron
and steel and manufactures thereof
from U.K. totalled 385,900 tons
in 1949 compared with 246,000
tons in 1948; cement supplies
667,000 tons compared with 493,000
tons.

The U.K. is also arranging in-
creasing exports of consumer
and in 1949 the Colonies imported
900 million square yards of cotton
e goods compared with 776
million square yards in 1948,

While British imports from the
Colonies totalled 5.3 per cent
twelve years ago, the 1949 figure
was 9.8 per cent,

Development Plans And
Finance

A summary of the extent to
which the U.K. is providing funds
under various schemes to help the
Colonies achieve stable economies
is given in the . To begin
with, it should be pointed out that
of the £195 million so far approved
under the ten-year plans, some
£130 million are to be found by the
Colonies themselves from their
own resources and from loans.

The heads under which these
ten-year plan m will be
spent show that 47.2 per cent will
go for development of social ser-
vices; 23.5 per cent on economic
development; 19.4 per cent on
communications and 9.9 per cent
on the development of miscellane-
ous services.

Financial gifts made or promised
by H.M.G. to British dependen-
cies since 1938 total £254,685,000
excluding the additional £20 mil-
lion to be provided under the 1950
Colonial Development and Welfare
Act. This has covered grants-in—
aid of administration, of recon—
struction and rehabilitation grants
for internal security; food subsi-
dies and claims waived in respect
of military administration and
defence. !

The Colonies are also benefiting
from ECA aid. For the year ending
June 30 last, some 20 million
dollars of the reserve fund were
allocated for overseas .develop-
ment for providing dollar equip-
ment and materials to help in

completing economic development

projects. The first use of this fund
was to buy generating equipment
in Jamaica and later allocations







de
nee

$0.




a LEVER prove



SSS SSO FPPC VS PFE ET ESSE EE LEE EPP PLE LEAP PPLLLPPADPPPPP SAP PLAAAS

4,

were made for road development

schemes in British Colonial terri-

une in Africa and South-East
sia.

Another £107 million—f£46 mil-
lion of whieh comes from the
territories’ own resources—is due
to be spent under the néw six-
year development plans _ for
Malaya, Singapore, North Borneo,
Sarawak and Brunei in connection
with the Colombo plan for Co-op—
erative Economic Development in
South and South-East Asia, H.M.G.
have announcéd that U.K. will
find the external “nance required:

Major Economic
Developments

Discussing some of the major
economic developments in the
Colonies, the Report says at the
outset that U.K.’s economic devel-
opment policy for the Colonies may
be summed up as “aiming to build
in every territory a stable economy
that is not dependent on a few
basic products.” Much of the
assistance U.K. makes available
to the Colonies is devoted to this
end. In terms of betterment in the
Colonies, says the Report, it means
improved communications; the
development of agricultural min-
eral and industrial resources and
improved methods of production;
safe rding natural wealth and
instilling “good husbandry” in all
economic activities; providing
stable markets and ensuring ade-
quate supplies of consumer and
capital goods.

Instances of how these aims are
being achieved are shown in, for
example, the sphere of communica-
tion where East Africa’s loans
raised for railway and harbour
improvements are part of the plans
for expanding and co-ordinating
communications throughout the
African continent. In the continu-
ous process of agricultural develop-
ment a feature was Malaya’s
record rice crop, the setting-up of
the Gezira Board in the Sudan,
cocoa research in West Africa to
combat swollen shoot, long-term
trade agreements between the U.K.
and the sugar-producing Colonies.

Regarding development of sec-
ondary industries in the Colonies
—an integral part of Colonial
policy—progress depends to a con-
siderable extent on the provision of
adequate and cheap power. The
Report shows how in each of the
main Colonial regions, efforts are
being made to develop hydro-
electric power potentialities. The
Volta Basin of the Gold Coast, the
Owen Falls scheme in Uganda
(due for completion in 1953) and
the Research on Power schemes in
Malaya and British Uganda are
examples of work in hand.

Social Progress

Improvements in the standards
of health and education are,
according to an official quotation
in the Report, “basie requirements
for effective self-government”.
The greatest achievement in Colo-
nial Health Services during 1950
is credited to the completion of
the three-year malaria eradication
campaign in Cyprus. Improved
Health Services are shown in vital
statistics as follows:

British Guiana: Birth-rate in-
creased by over 44 per cent in the
five years 1944-49; death-rate fell
by over 39 per cent and infant mor-
tality rate by over 43 per cent.

Singapore: In 1949 the death-
rate here was as low as in England
and Wales.

Cyprus: In seven years infant
preer rate decreased from 180

Jamaica, Trinidad: Average
length of life has increased by
more than 15 years since 1929.
This progress has also been
achieved in the case of British
Guiana,

In increased educational facili-
ties in the Colonies, first mention
is made of Uganda’s demonstration
terms for community education.
This work, the Report states, has
“attra>ted the attention of mass-
education workers in many coun-
tries”. The commercial production
of the “saucepan special” battery-
receiver and its success in North-
ern Rhodesia have opened up “a
significant possibility of educating
vast numbers of people by radio”.
Figures show too increasing attend-

> are.

Farmers Buy
3 Cars Each

SOUTH AFRICAN FARMERS who for years have
lived in the dusty, semi-desert called the Karoo, their one
luxury a grimy wreck of a car to take them to the nearest
town, now own three or five cars each. The wool boom
has changed poverty into wealth.



Coal Cuts
Travel

ae LONDON
Britain’s serious coal shortage
has resulted in a drastic cut in the
main line and London suburban
train services.

_ The curtailed services now put
into effect by the British Rail-
roads will mean a saving of 12,000
tons of coal a week, but a further
cut is likely before winter ends.

_ Travellers on the eastern re~
gion railroads are the worse hit,

with the cancellation of 1,147
train services a week.
The southern region is with-

drawing 71 trains a week at the
present time, and the midland
region about 114.

About. 22 passengers’ will
now cram into cars built for 12
when the suburbanite rushes
home from his day’s work in the
city.

—LN.S.



Better Medical
Service Plauned
For West Indies

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan.

First step in organising a more
complete medical service for the
whole Caribbean area was taken
at the recent BMA Conference
held in Port-of-Spain.

Stating this on the eve of his
departure back for England, Dr.
H, Guy Dain, the Conference
Chairman, disclosed that it was

roposed in course of time to have

e British Medical Register as
the uniform standard throughout
the islands, but that for the time
being no change was to be made
in those islands which accepted
one not on the British Regis-
er,

_ The Conference has as one of
its major achievements the setting
up of a Medical Commission to
bring apout uniformity in We
service and to put its services
in an advisory capacity at the
disposal of the Colonial Office ana
the Governors in the different
islands. A Caribbean Council of
the BMA was also to be set up.



Butterflies To Give
Charm To Festival

Secrets of the Festival of
Britain’s Country Pavilion were
revealed today by Mr. L. Hugh
Newman, authority on butterflies
and moths.

Mr. Newman has been bound
to silence about the plans for
his exhibit since he signed his
contract last May, but he is now
free to describe the undertaking.

He has agreed to supply 300
moths and butterflies each week
for a woodland scene in whieh
plant life will flourish in a con-
trolled “climate” of 75 degrees,
and the winged insects will add
charm and movement.

Six thousand butterflies and
moths will appear in the pavilion
from May to September, and he
will collect them by touring the
Home Counties in his caravan
laboratory .

. Newman will also breed
exhibits on his butterfly farm at
Bexley, Kent.

—L.E.S.



ances of Colonial children at an
increasing number of schools and
reference is made to progress of
University colleges and colleges of
Arts, Science and Technology, such
as those planned in West Africa.

In its opening chapter on the
main achievements of the year, the
Report’s last section deals with
“Political and Constitutional
Advance”. It surveys briefly
advancements made during 1950,
both in the sphere of local and
central government.







This year South Africa wil?
almost certainly get £76 million
from wool sales— figure, which was itself a record.

Wool is bringing the Union
more than half as much overseas
currency as the gold from the
Rand—the world’s greatest mines,

But it has also brought a near-
famine in mutton



Few farmers will slaughter
sheep for meat these days. They
keep them alive as long as possible
for the wool on their backs.

Book for Festival

Britain may benefit indirectly
from wool fagtunes. Shipping
companies report considerable

bookings by woo] (growers for the
Festival of Britain.

The Karoo’s golden fleece has
brought something else new: far-
mers are forced to consult attor-
neys about their tax problems
Queues wait daily in front of the
village lawyer.

Some of them, too, are buying
meat from a shop for the first
time in their lives.

For How Long ?

But the wool farmers are not
only prosperous. They are wor-
ried, too. No one knows what will
happen to them in the future

Some have just put their money
in the bank. Others have ploughed
it back into their farms—as fenc-
ing. more land, tractors

Alt have paid off mortgages
which might have lasted their
whole lives.—L.E.8



36 Arrive From

Morocco
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 22
Thirty-six men, women and
children — indentured labourers
from Morocco, arrived aboard a
French freighter on Friday bound
for French Guiana where they

are going to settle.

They arrived at Martinique on
Tuesday January 16 from French
Morocco and were transferred to
the freighter for the south-
bound voyage.

During the three days spent be-
tween Martinique and Trinidad
the 36 huddled in the open deck-
space where they together shared
straw pallets for beds, They re-
ported that they went two days

without food or water, On ar-
rival here they walked the
streets of Port-of-Spain in tat-

tered and torn clothing in search
of food and drink.

News photographers were de-
nied the opportunity to take pic-

tures, being threatened by the
ship’s officers with being thrown
overboard,—-€?P),



Harbour Log

:
In Carlisle Bay
Sch. Phyllis Mark, Swedish Training
Ship “Sunbeam”, Seh Marion Belle
Wolfe, Sch. Mary M. Lewis, Sch. Zolleen,
Sch. Emanuel C, Gordon, Seh, Triumph
ant Star, Sch Burma D M.V
Sedgefield, Sch, Sunshine R, Seh, Bel
queen, Sch, Enterprise S., Seh, Molly N
Jones,
ARRIVALS

Schooner Lucille M, Smith, 74. tor
net, Capt. Hassell, from British Guiana,
Yacht Juanita, 85 tons net, Capt
Holmes, from Miami,

Schooner United Pilgrim S,, 47 tons net

Capt, Stewart, from St. Lucia

M.V. Willemstad, 2,855 fons net, Capt
Vermeulen, from Trinidad
DEPARTURES

M.V. Willemstad, 2,855 tons net, Capt

Vermeulen, for Madeira



In Touch With Barbados

Coastal Station
Cable and Wireless (West Indies; Ltd
advise that they ean now communicate

with the following ships through their
Barbados Coast Station

3.8. Bayano, s.s. Willemstad, s.s. Bon
aire, «s. Beech Hill, 5.8. Golfito, #
Gundine, «s. Jessie Stove, ss. Alcoa

.s, City of Oxford,



Polaris, 5.5. Cavina,

se. Florida, ston Heights,

#8.



Ff itamsea, §.5, ‘Belita, Tug Dragon, 8.5
Sun Jewel, ss. 8. Monica, 5.6. Empress
of Seotland, 4.5. Ferggen, 4.5, Myken,

s.s. Nieuw Amsterdam, s.s. Easo Roanoke,
s.s. S. Maria, ss, Spurt, 8.8. Mormackite,
s.s. Carolyn, ss. Amakura, 8.6 Reina
Del Pacifico, s.s. Lady Rodney, 84. §
Paula, ss. Mauretania, s,s, Gothic, #9
Port Townshend, 8.8. Colombie, #5. 5S.
Sofia, ss, Cape Cod, #8. Kansi, 5.8
Borinquen, s.8, Alcoa Roamer, 5.# Athel-
laird, s.s, Teetus, 9.8. Mormacsun, 6.8,
Pandt, #.s. Pathfinder, 5.5, Dunelimia,



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THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK

4

WITH A VIEW to assisting the Secretaries of Societies, Clubs,

and Associations to make the compilation of information in
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as eas
possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities;
religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports,
radio, agricultural, etc., are asked to have the form printed
below filled in and sent in as soon as possible to:

THE EDITOR,
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951,
C/o Advocate Co. Ltd., 34 Broad Street.

FORM

Title of Society, Club, Organisation, Etc. ..........:ccssccsesssssreeeeereseteens
President or Chaiirman..............:.cscccceseeereens Ms. cadevsliccticbcloal oe odak
Council or Committee Members..................
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PAGE FOUR





AVOGATE

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetown,



Thursday, January 25, 1951



FIRE BRIGADE

THE decision by the Government to pur-
chase Club Willow as a suitable site for a
new Fire Brigade station will be welcomed
by the entire community. The House of
Assembly satisfied itself during the week
that the price was reasonable and the site
suitable, and there can be little doubt that
the Legislative Council will find no diffi-
culty in concurring in the resolution.

After this sanction by the Legislature, it
is hoped that the Government will not, as
in other instances in the past, allow the
spot to remain unused while fire hazards
continue to exist and threaten the safety
of life and property.

The purchase of Club Willow shows that
Barbados has at last accepted the advice
of an imported specialist.

Major Cox insisted that instead of hav-
ing one huge fire station in the middle of
the City with all the equipment concen-
trated in one spot, there should be several
stations at strategic points. The policy of
centralising fire brigade equipment, _re-
moved stations from Bay Street, Holetown,
and Speightstown many years ago in the
face of strong public objection.

Now that several residential districts
have been built up outside Bridgetown
and business houses are growing up outside
the immediate confines of the City, it is im-
perative that adequate fire protection be
afforded to these areas.

It is, however, regrettable that while
preparation is being made for the proper
distribution of fire stations, little is being
done to reduce the number of fire hazards
in the City itself.

. There can be no objection to the acquisi-
tion of the site for a new fire station
except by those who have failed to appre-
ciate the benefits to be derived. As soon
as the cost has been decided on as reason-
able, there can be little objection to a
scheme which brings the advantages of fire
protection, recreation facilities for mem-
bers of the brigade — who must be kept
physically fit if they are to be of any use—
and grounds for constant fire fighting
practices.

This purchase of a site between two
thickly populated residential districts
should be the precursor of a few others,



Blind, Deaf And Dumb

THE work of the Barbados Association
in aid of the Blind, Deaf and Dumb, is
being carried one step farther. It is pro-
posed among other things to establish a
local centre for training some of the
afflicted blind.

The work of the Association in the past,
limited through lack of funds, has been
confined to assistance of pupils at the
Training Institutes in Trinidad. There are
at present four deaf pupils whose training
has been financed by funds collected by
subscription, whilst another pupil has been
compelled to return home because of fail-
ing eyesight and her consequent failure to
learn to lip read,

If there was ever an association which
deserved public support, it is the Associa-
tion in aid of the Blind, Deaf and Dumb.
Few people in Barbados realise the num-
ber of young people and children suffering
from these afflictions, During the last week,
many of them have sought the help of
faith healers now operating in this island.
It is the duty of all of us, the majority
who can see and hear, to show our thank-
fulness by helping the less fortunate.

With the co-operation of the public, the
blind, deaf and dumb can be made useful

members of society and to be proud of that
usefulness,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

| NEW ZEALAND NOW |

Good-bye. PARIS...And
fiello. NEW YORK

PARIS

SO now it’s “Au revoir’ wo
Paris for a while. Next week I
shall clamber into a Transatlan
tie airliner and take off to New
York, almost exactly two years
after I left the U.S.A.

Glad or sorry? As usual a bit
of both. Emotions on leaving a
place you have lived in are never
entirely neat.

So many people and things I
look forward to seeing and doing
in Manhattan. But there are a
whole lot of people and things I’d
like to take over with me from
Paris,

One's daily life falls into two
broad parts—professional an
personal. How do the debits and
credits stack up?

Professionally, America wins
hands down, The U.S.A. is the
newspaperman’s paradise. When
the stuff isn’t being handed to
you on a platter, you can always
find it in the refrigerator.

So I look forward with huge
anticipation to Manhattan because
you can, within reason, ring up
nearly anybody, however import-
ant, and get a statement.

In France it takes anywhere
from hours to days to get a tele-
phone interview with someone to
whom you have not been form-
ally introduced.

I look forward to that crisp
telephone service, and I no longer
snigger at the slogan, “The voice
with a smile.”

Les Phone Girls .. .

THOSE American switchboard
girls, after two long years of
France’s mournful mademoi-
selles, now rate in my book as
more desirable than Marlene Die-
trich.

With lively expectation I look
forward to being able to call San
Francisco, 3,000 miles from New
York, in rather less time than it
now takes me to telephone my
office in Paris from my suburban
home ten miles away.

I look forward to air-condition-—
ing in the shops and cinemas (I
suppose I shall astonish the ush-
erettes at the first few films I go
to by trying to trip them, as one
does here, for showing me to my
place).

Le Wine...

NOW, what about the personal
side of things?

Well, if you are a wine drinker,
as I am, you cannot contemplate
a visit to the United States with
anything except a twinge of pre-
monitory sorrow.

For, although America produces
vast quantities of wine, and the
growers spend millions of dollars a

The Sort Of

Could Write About Her Boss

And for Blanche Patch (here pictured) the boss

I MEANT it to be a woman's
book,” said Miss Blanche Patch in
her Kensington hotel bed-sitting-
room, She was speaking of her
book, “Thirty Years with G.B.S,.""
which has just been published.

Perhaps it is not surprising that
it has been left to a woman to put
a little flesh and blood into
the legendary old man who once
described himself as “three-
quarters ghost”,

Of all the women round Bernard
Shaw, Miss Patch is the one to
paint the most accurate portrait.
For she was his secretary, a
shrewd independent person who
was one of the few women to re-
main “Shaw-proof,” immune to
the old man’s spell.

From her vantage point as a
woman with an outsider’s view-
pomt and an inside pitch. Blanche
Patch tells of Shaw’s early eccen-
tricities in dress. He had a collec-
tion of hats that rivalled Winston
Churchill’s, wore mittens knitted
by Blanche, had all his socks

“specially shaped” for each foot.

Infallible? No!

CONTRARY to his own belief
Shaw was not always right. “Few
people,” reports Miss Patch “can
have gained a reputation as a
prophet Qn more slender
ecmevement. He wrong
about both the wars.

“He assured me that the Ger-
mans would not bomb London and
he was equally in error over the
Jews in Palestine, Dempsey and
Winston Churchill (who was going
to die away when the party system
came back).”

Shaw’s industry was terrific.
“I have always thought,” says his
secretary “that he wrote too much,
He would be an uncommonly
devoted Shavian who today would
cheerfully set out again to read
through ‘The Intelligent Woman’s
Guide to Socialism, followed by

was



Don't Neglect Latin Americaan,

NEW YORK,
Harry F. Guggenheim, former

backward since World War Ii
Our policy,

By R. M. MacCOLL

year on advertising it (“It’s smart
to order wine” cry the hoardings,
a little desperately), the fact re-
mains that the great proportion
of the wine you get there is so
awful that tears spring, just to
think of it,

FLASHBACK No. 1: to a smart
Washington restaurant...a waiter
happily dollops a large lump of
ice into my Burgundy.

FLASHBACK No. 2: to one of
the best known of New York res-
taurants colleague Frank
Owen, intent on ordering cham-
pagne, and I having an acrimoni-
ous argument with the head

Purely
Personal

I LOOK forward to the
sheer tuxury of the working
conditions which American
reporters take for granted.

When I attended debates
at the French parliament, I
sat in hideous discomfert in
a wretched little gallery into
which the entire foreign
Press had to pack itseif like
a parcel of dehydrated pota-
toes. The heat was appal-
ling, ventilation non-exist-
ent, and it was next to im-
possible to hear what was
being said far below.

Compare the American
set-up: Reporters are given
the very best seats at Senate
committee hearings, with
plenty of tables and chairs
and supplies of writing
paper. Giving off from the
Press galleries in parliament
itself are air-conditioned
reading and writing rooms
for the Press.

en emer Se





waiter. Why, demands Frank,
won't they bring us the wine list?
It takes some time to convince us
that the place simply does not
possess one.

I don’t look forward to the tele-
vision. When I left America, things
had reached the pitch where you
could not have a quiet beer in a
saloon without being obliged to
see two all-in wrestlers on tha
screen.

Now the wrestlers, I hear, are
right there in the drawing-room
with you.

I look forward to seeing those
endless hosts of smartly dressed
women and girls. Contrary to the

Thing Only

Bernard Shaw



BLANCHE PATCH

‘Everybody's
What?’”

[Note that question mark (?).
Although “nobody dared disturb
a comma in Shaw's work.” Miss
Patch omits the ? in each of her
three references to the book.]

Shaw’s taciturnity (he would
turn on a radio programme he dis-
liked rather than have to talk at
mealtimes) may have been inherit-
ed from his mother who, when
asked whether she had any letters
from her distinguished son, replied
that they had always got on a post-
card all that they had to say to one
another,

Political What's

On Money

MISS PATCH turns the pages of
her 30-years diary on Shaw and
notes that: —

@ HE looked on money as an
irrelevance out of place in a civil-
ised community, He flatly refused
to face the fact that salaries earned
before the war were quite insuffi-
cient in peace. In his own mind,
Shaw priced everything at pre-
war standards and he really be-
lieved that we (his staff) were all
on velvet.

legend, well-dressed
rati> are searce,

Good clothes gost a great deal
Paris prices are right out of range
for the women and girls who make
up the”great army of French typ-
ists and secretaries.

shall wistfully yearn, of

course, for Paris food. It is not
only that the French know now
to cook. They care so passionately
about food. Every waiter, every
teen-age bus boy, treats the stuff
with such loving care.

Now what awajts me? Why thc
blue plate special at 75 cents.

Les Shops...

I SHALL miss the exquisit
taste of the French in such thing:
as window-dressing,

Yes, the big shops on Fifth
avenue can daze you with the
sheer weight of their opulence
but I don’t think you can beat a
Paris shopkeeper when he set:
out to performsbis own brand ol
magic with lighting, silks
salins; silverware and china.

I shall be nonplussed at first
when 1 am back in the land where
they like to do things fast—to
walk, for example, into a shop,

women in

ana

buy something and walk right oui! remaining forms of rationing.

again.
That is not the way they do it
here. You shake hands all round,

THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 1951
rrr ree
TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
at THE COLONNADE



D. V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.

REVERSES POLICY



: f ‘i ONTROL Usually Now
Oi STATE ( Tins BROOKS PEACHES .. 59 %
AUCKLAND. N.Z. Pkgs. QUAKER CORN FLAKES ........ 37 34 t
NEW ZEALAND is taking stock after a Bottles ALLSOPP’S BEER .......... 26 20



year under National Party Government.
Prime Minister Sidney Holland’s adminis-
tration took office a little more than a year
igo after 14 years of Labour rule,














$

Under the late Rt. Hon. Peter Fraser long |% We .
steps were taken toward state control and| e Have ose
che new government has a lot to do before : ‘ pei ae) weoeayeisee .
ts programme of free eterprise is fully % GALVANISE DO ES |
-ealizéd. g i. tee Fay ig

State controls and restrictions have been g ” SAREED WIRE
:mong the chief Labour measures to go by x : MESH WIRE
che board and government supporters claim |¥% 2”, We”, 144”, 1%”
there is far more freedom to-day than there Ee LASHING WIRE
ever was under Labour. On the other hand, 16, 14, 12 and 10 Gauge 8
Labour members maintain that many of i WOVE WIRE — 24” and 36

hese measures were wartime controls which
would have been removed with improved

CHAIN 1's”, 3-16", %4”, & 5-16”

conditions.

The new government has abolished all

wish all present a hearty good-{| most types of land, houses and buildings.

day, have a quiet appraisal of the
political situation.

Then you inquire
Madame’s bunions help her to
tot up the total of your purchases
with her piece of chalk on the

Until now, real estate prices have been

after} pegged to 1942 values, and properties sold,

brought in many cases, big under-the-table
payments in addition to the officially-

slate kept for the purpose, have] approved prices. Houses now are on the

a laugh when she gets it wrong
the first time, and then exit with
more good-days and another hand-
clasp.

What will happen when I try to
shake hands with the chap be-
hind the drug-store counter on
Lexington-avenue? “Say, listen,
mister, I ain’t got all day, Cut the
comedy, will ya?”

2
La Black Lady

AND I shall find myself, I know,
looking round for that majestic
figure of the Paris ¢cene—the lady
in black bombazine who sits be-
hind the cash register.

Even in the smartest bars of |
Paris she is apt to be there, keep- |
ing a doubting eye on the pro-
ceedings and a quick finger on the
takings.

However sophisticated the bar,
however immaculate the white
dress of the barmen, there is
Madame in the background.

She epitomises, in her solid way,
a great deal of the French way of
doing things. I shall find no
Madame in black at Al’s place... .

London Express Service.

A Seeretary



sas

@ ON the day after Shaw’s,ous terms.

98rd birthday Gene Tunney went
down to Ayot and told him round
by round of Mills’ fight against
Lesnevich. He was astonished that
the old gentleman knew as much
about them as he did.

@ SHAW worked in a shelter
. . » at the foot of the garden, He
liked it because he could get down
to his writing undisturbed .. .
and his housekeeper could honestly
aoe callers that Mr. Shaw was
“ou Big
@ALTHOUGH he carried a
watch the alarm clock was set
each day to remind
was time for lunch.
took any notice of it.
@SHAW sivod guard over
works like a nen with chicks.
It was because he would not have
a line of his precious dialogue cut
that he held out so long against
any play being filmed.

More Fun .

The woman who has written| or f

these memories into a book made
the first note nearly 30 years ago.
“And I always intended to call it
“Thirty Years with G.B.S.”
said last night.

_ Miss Patch lives in a “quiet hotel
in Kensington” where they are
used to celebrites.
where acid-bath murderer Haigh
met Mrs. Durand-Deacon. Ber-
nard Shaw’s secretary had observ-
ed Haigh pretty shrewdly, too:
“An insignificant little fellow...
bit of an_ exhibitionist... .for
menths I'd put him down as an
incipient lunatic’.

Shaw’s secretary a tall, spare
woman with a small grey head
and excessively penetrating and
wide-set grey eyes, said of her
job: “of course it was inter-
esting, but in many ways I
had more fun out of being a
dispenser—before I became
Shaw’s secretary”’.

—L.E.S,



at best, is one of wisely

American countries, But if we ac;

and promptly we can stop

Our whole foreign

Maleolm Johnson

policy, he

market at prices higher than the former
official levels, but not so greatly above the
black market rates.

HIGH WOOL PRICES

Largely as a result of high prices for wool
which have boosted overseas funds, the gov-
ernment has abolished import licensing on a
wide range of goods from soft currency coun-
tries. ‘his has brought into New Zealand
many items not seen since Labour imposed
import control in 1938. The Dominion now
has a surplus in trade with dollar countr‘es,
but its undertakings with the sterling area
have so far prevented relaxing of controls on
goods from dollar sources.

Some tax reductions have been made,
but further substantial cuts will be necessary
before the heavy tax burden built up during
the war is markedly eased.

In housing, the Government has pushed
ahead vigorously with its policy of “own
your own” in contrast to the Labour policy
of providing state houses for rental. It has
abolished many building restrictions, has
made loans available at favourable rates for
home builders, and has offered state houses
for sale to present tenants at very advantage-
At the same time it has raised
rentals on new tenancies of state houses.

—C.P.

Current Influenza
Outbreaks

GENEVA, Jan. 17.



Reporting on current outbreaks of influ-’
him when it] enza
He never Healt

appearing in several regions, the World
h Organization has indicated that

his| neither the spread nor the severity of the

illness can be compared with more serious
epidemics of influenza that occurred in the
first part of this century.

So far, said a WHO statement, complica-
tions have been rare and mortality remains

very low. Influenza may be fatal for the aged
or cardiac patients but, for the bulk of the

population, “the considerable progress in
chemotherapy of infectious diseases—espec-

she | cially sulfa and antibiotics—permits success-

ful vigorous action against the secondary in-
fections which caused the highest fatality in

It is the hotel | 1918”.

National Health Administrations are being
kept constantly advised regarding the out-
breaks by the World Health Organisation
through daily radio bulletins and weekly
summaries and WHO Regional Influenza
Centres and are thus enabled to take the
necessary action.

WHO has been notified of outbreaks in
Hawaii and Japan as well as in Europe, and
the disease has appeared in Canada and the
United States.

Research undertaken from the start of the
outbreak at the World Influenza Centre in
London and in several regional centres estab-
lished by WHO in Britain and on the conti-
nent indicates that the virus causing the out-
break belongs to type A-prime. Identification
of the isolated strains of the virus is continu-
ing. This process is necessary for the prep-

It has also
wiped out many price controls, among the
most important being control over sales of































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—S—S—S—SS=—_=
4



For Your

Afternoon
Zea Party

Ambassador to Cuba, warned to-
day that the Western Hemisphere
as “our last line of defense”, is
being “woefully neglected” while
United States foreign policy con-
centrates on Europe and Asia.

In an interview at his office in
lower Manhattan, Guggenhein:,
long a student of Latin American
affairs, said:

“Europe still may be our first
line of defense, but this hemis-
phere is our last line of defense,
and it must be made impregnable

“That is not a policy of isola-
tion,” he added firmly. “It is a
policy of prudence.”

Guggenheim, industrialist
pioneer in aeronautics and rocket
development and a naval aviator
in World Wars I and II, spoke
from his experience as the Gov-
ernment’s representative on many

diplomatic, economic and sero
nautical missions,

A progressive Republican,
Guggenheim was strongly critica}

of U.S., foreign policy as a whole,
asserting that it was “vague, con-

fusing and headed in three
directions at the same time.”

He said:

“In our relations with Lati

America we have gone steadil,

friendly apathy,

“In our haste to accept world
responsibility and assume world
leadership, we have neglected our
nearest neighbours |= in the
Americas,

-Isolationism has kept them from
us in the past, and ovr new
foreign policy, which plummets us
into Europe and Asia, keeps us
from them now.” 2

“In the present emergency,
Guggenheim continued, “the bes!
our government can do is to cali
a conference of Latin American
representatives,

“The solution, however, will no‘
come from conferences, but from
bi-lateral treaties. As in the past
we have waited for an emergency
beforetrying to do anything, wher
we should pursue a_ long-range
programme.

“It is five to ten years late,’ he
warned, “but not too late, if we
approach this problem with force
and wisdom.”

Of the danger to United States
security from Communist influ-
ence, he said:

“There is real infiltration of
Communism in Latin America. Ii
allowed to spread, Communism

can easily take over some Latin

Communism in its tracks.”

He cited Chile as an example of
growing danger in South America,
quoting sources as saying that the
Communists in the past have bee.
closer in Chile than anywhere else
in the Western Hemisphere t
controlling a national governmen!,

“Chile has approximately 30
per cent of the world’s copper
reserves and produces about ¥

per cent of the nitrogen consumed
by the world in the form of sodiun,
nitrate.” Guggenheim explained

But in spite of Chile’s impor-
tance to us a source of strategic
materials, the U.S. is again
following an indifferent course, he
contended.

“The Communists are relying or
economic distress and on Ameri-
can indifference to help them get
their way,” he declared.

If this should happen and the
Communists take over, he warned
Chile might then agree to supply
Russia with copper and nitrates

We must never allow ourselves
to be confronted with such
dilemma,” he said, We must bind
ourselves to Chile and all Latin
American countries so closely that
Communism will to be a
threat.” :

cease

continued, should be governed by
enlightened selt interest. It should
be based on two objectives— sur-
vival and our national ir,terests.

While recognizing the im-
portance of the North Atlantic
Pact to Stop Russian aggression
Guggenheim said it was regrettabk:
that its leadership wis not where
it traditionally ‘»elongs—with
England and France.

“We can only help Europe,” he
said, “We cannot save her fron
Russian ideology or | force, If
Europe no longer has the will '«
make desperate and _. supreme
efforts to preserve the essential
freedoms the democfatic world
has cherished, she will succum>
to the tyrants of Russia, no matter
what we try to do.”

He believes, he said, that 195!



will tell the story of whether
Europe is ‘willing and able to
make available the necessary
manpower.”

In the meantime, he urged a!!
possible speed ‘in strengthening
our diplomatic, economic ~ and
military relations with Latin
America, asserting that possibly
by 1970 the Latin American popu
lation “may well outgrow that of
Russia.”

—LN.S

aration of vaccines corresponding to the cur-
rent type of influenza.

The influenza epidemic now prevailing in
northern Europe probably originated from a
localized outbreak in Sweden last June, WHO

















Choose your
favourite brand



Idris Kola Tonic—





1.00 per

believes. The disease appeared in November Choyce Tips f Lonmin Cheese $1.21 o2.
in Denmark and later in Norway and north- oe RELISH & ;
ern Sweden. In December it covered the Pivkpnah oe
whole of Sweden, Tipton Pan Yan |

The disease was apparently imported into ornimans
the United Kingdom in the Neweastle area oe fay Ganee
from the Scandinavian focus, It first spread to
northern England and later to the whole read, Butter ‘
country. Almost simultaneously (early in
January), the Netherlands, Belgium and
northwest Germany became lightly infected Greens
and some cases, probably imported from Anchor Butter ;
Britain, appeared in Iceland. es eee CARROTS

A second focus of infection, more limited Meat & Fish Spreads
and to all appearances independent from the Carr's Assorted Biscuits CABBAGE
first, was discdvered late in December in the ven cee take
province of Guipuzcoa, northern Spain. Two Sliced Ham BEANS
toci now appear at the point of Joining across ‘

France.

(The World 4nfluenza Centre, mentioned in
the above release was established in London
in 1947 by the World Health Organisation, a
specialised agency of the U.N.)



and Jams.
J. & R. Bread

GODDARDS - pELivEer


THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 1951

Skeletons Hang From
The Apple Tree

ABOUT 50 yards down Goodland from Westbury Road
side, there is g small, queer, one roofed and shed roofed
house which the wind and age have blown out of shape
Strange writings are all over the boards of the house, and
On a sugar apple tree in the yard skeletons are hung up.







Sight Ret
eturned
HE ADVOCATE was informed

yesterday morning of an un-
ysual ‘neident that occurred in

St. Thomas on Tuesday.

irene’ Springer of -Hillaby was
blind for four years, After hearing
about the faith healing in the City
she decided to set out from her
home for Queen’s Park.

When she had completed half of
her journey, she changed her mind
and returned home, She felt that if
she had faith and prayed she
could cure herself,

At home she began to pray and
when she awoke on Tuesday mor-
ning she was able to see,

* AYBREAK IN UDI” is in-

; cluded in the British Coun.
cil’s film show which will take
place at Wakefield on Friday at
8.30 p.m. Those who are jnterest-
ed vill be admitted without
tickets.

The programme also includes
“British News” and “Green Gir-
dle.” For the usual Saturday
morning children’s show the pro-
gramme will be: “British News”
and “Children on Trial.”

NEW STANDPIPE is being
erected at Graham’s Gap, St
Andrew. Labourers have begun
to lay the foundation for this pipe.

The road in Corbin’s district
was recently dug up for pipe lines
to be put down. These lines are
now being repaired, Work is being
supervised by Mr. Coppin.

HE VISUAL EDUCATION |

Unit gave a show at St, An-
drew’s Church Boys’ School on
Tuesday. The subject “The House
Fly” was well demonstrated. The
boys took a keen interest in this
show.

NE OF THE largest cane fires
for

Dodd’s Plantation, St. Philip, on }

Tuesday night when 11% acres of



the year occurred at! thing but

The house and the things in and
about it are fraught with mystery
and people who pass there seem
to preter to walk on the opposite

side of the road

It is at the edge of the Good-
land water course and the firs
thing that strikes you when you
look at it is that the first high
wind which gets going would
blow it down. In the gully below
it sheep graze and boys play
cricket. Around it there are

many plantain trees,

Yesterday about 10.30 with lit-
tle wind blowing about the dis-
trict, with two windows opened
above half doors, old pieces of
Yags or paper hanging within and
with no one seemine to be stu
ring about it, the had
more curious look ever,

“Greet The XIV”
The first door of the house is
fairly whole, but another wire

house
than

door is nailed on it which appar-)

ently has no use. Near the door
is painted “Greet the XIV”, iW
white on a piece of green tin. You
may look at these uncanny words
as long as you like but you
would scarcely ever think what
they could mean, Although you
would not have seen the owner of
the house there yesterday, you
would have decided from the lovk
of his hat which could be seen
from above the half door, that
you had better not ask him any-
thing for he is not a talking man.

Neur ctnis writing is also writ-
ten “Private Otter Box,” and
“Believe in the Lord Jesus Christ
and thou shalt be saved.” Some
of these writings are done with

much precision and _ neatness
while others are written up in
chalk.

If you are passing up Goodland
you can look in the yard to this
house over some short rails,
Written up on the rails is “Some
of our race of people steal no-
at the end it cost
something.”

Blocking a pathway

into the

ripe canes were burnt. They are | Yards through the rails is an old

the property of the Governor-in-
Executive Committee and were
insured.

On Monday another
Lowthers Plantation, Christ
Church, destroyed six and a hal
acres of first crop ripe canes be-
longing to H. Watson of the same
plantation.

SALENE SARGEANT of Peter-

kins Land reported the loss of other

'
fire at | foot

rusty stove which must have
baked lots of bread in its time.

The stove is not more than a
away from the road and
contains plenty of other rusty

f things besides.

Women Peep Out

Within the yard are garden
beds with a scanty amount of
lettuce. In the yard too, with

old things is a heap of

$120 from her home between | Plaited twine for making mats.

December and January. It is the
property of Ivy Carter and herself.

A heifer calf valued $40 was}
stolen from an enclosed pen at
Dayrells Plantation this month, It
belongs to L. B. Hinds of the same
plantation,

Clemintina Dottin of Apes Hill,
reported that three dresses were
stolen from her home between 7.06
and 8.00 p.m. on Monday.

HE POLICE BAND will play

at the St. Lukes’ Church har-
vest, St. George, on Sunday, Jan-
uary 28. All Saints Church will
also be holding their harvest on
that Sunday.



YOUR GUESS

Where is this chimney, asked
the Advocate’s Guess Photo Com-
petition this week, It is at Congo
Road Plantation, guessed Mr.
Hugh Gittens of Mansion Road,
Bank Hall, and he became an-
other $5.00 winner in this com-
petition.

Thereafter the guesses ranged
far and wide, There was no
doubt that it was a chimney, The
guess question said so. But the
location was the headache. It is
in Bush Hall yard, said one guess-
er, It is at Mt. Gay Factory, St.
Lucy, said another, and another
guesser went to the Mental Hos-
pital.

A wild guess was “Needham’s
Point Lighthouse.” Another one

was “Arrow. Plantation,” St.
Philip. The guesser perhaps
meant “Harrow Plantation.”

Someone thought that Bay Street
was the location of the chimney,
and someone else thought it was
the chimney at the Cotton Factory.

Two other incorrect guesses
were, the Rum Refinery at Brigh-
ton, and Bowmanston Pumping
Station.



“WILLEMSTAD"

No passengers took the oppor-
tunity of sailing from Barbados
for England when the Dutch
passenger - freighter Willemstad
called from Trinidad yesterday.

The Willemstad brought two
passengers with her from Trini-
dad, They are from Curacao,

With 78 intransit passengers,
the Willemstad sailed yesterday
evening for Plymouth and
Madeira, She is consigned to
Messrs. S. P. Musson, Son & Co.,

Ltd.

CALLS \ tion

;, fined

After you read “Whatsoever a
man sow that shall he also reap”
and you begin to think, well here
is a bible of a man, you will come
upon a_ collection of skeletons
hanging from the sugar apple
tree. Included in them are a jaw
bone of some. big animal and the
skull of what seems to be a rab-
bit and one of a dog,

There are some plantain trees
near this apple tree and tied to
a piece of wire which is attached
to two of these trees are a small
vial and a three—gill bottle near-
ly filled with liquids. The three-
gill bottle still has the orange
erush label stuck upon it, but the
most daring little boy of the dis-
trict would not think of pulling
out the cork to ‘try the taste of
the drink. The vial has in an oily
sort of liquid with a thick brown
layer on the top.

If you want to get a look at
the funny house in Goodland, you
will have to make a quick job of
it, for you will see women peep-
ing at you from a window.



Fowl Thief Jailed |

After pleading guilty to a charge
of larceny brought by the Police,
Clyde Moore a labourer of Chap-
man Lane, St. Michael was
yesterday sentenced to one month’s
in.prisonment without hard labour)
by His Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod |
Police Magistrate of District “A”.|

Moore stole two fowls valued at
12/- belonging to Kathleen
Alleyne on January 23,

Police Constable Devonish told
the Court that on January 23 he
saw Moore with these two fowls
one of which he was carrying un-
der his arm,

He arrested Moore when he
could not give a satisfactory ex-
plantation as to how he came by

them. Later the same _ day
Alleyne identified the fowls as
her own.

Moore has one previous convic-
for stealing when he wag
40/- by His Worship Mr
H. A. Talma for the larceny of 4

sheep valued £1. lls. 2d.
Moore asked Mr. McLeod not
to.send him to prison but to

impose a fine. Mr. McLeod told
him that his hands are tied as
he (Moore) has a previous con-
viction for larceny and the law
says that anyone with a record
for larceny must go to prison if
found guilty.

Sgt. C. Murrell who prose-
cuted on behalf of the police
asked for imprisonment.

t

Le

A CLEANER CITY



ANOTHER VIEW of the new type of refuse collector.
order and are expected in early February

Two are on



THIS COVERED REFUSE COLLECTOR is expectea in eariy s'ebruary.

Commissioners’ contribution

Refuge Collectors
Coming

Two new types of refuse collec-
tors will be coming to the island
soon. These collectors keep the
refuse covered so that there is no
possibility
about the street. They ensure the
most up-to-date sanitary arrange-
ment for the removal of refuse.

These collectors were ordered
from England by the
Department of St. Mich
Messrs. McEnearney & Co., Ltd.
and will be used in the City and
suburbs, i

The Scavenging Department has

at present a fleet of nine refuse from 19 to 46.

lorries and 15 push carts.
The Advocate was told at the
Department yesterday that they

cover a mileage of approximately Richard

125 miles per day and remove
about 63 tons in the same period.



BARBADOS

of it being scattered }|

Scavenging | Wathen

Leslie Holmes, 44, is the skip- ,-—"--— - [jumped .17 per cent for each
per and he has with him Richard es iy of rey se wi
(Executive Officer) , ( t y , né one b oup which
ael through | George Hoehne (Navigator), Hen- e our proved to be fairly constant in Make that stew really tasty

ADVOCATE
SOON

PAGE FIVE

VICTORY GARDENS

WASHINGTON. other home garden campaign. He

The Department of Agriculture;added that if such ga program is

is thinking to-day about putting }launched again, “victory gardens”

hoes in the hands of city dwellers|would probably be called some-

{through the return of the victory |thing else, g name that still has
garden, to be drummed up.





COMING

“BLOOD |
By Robert N. Schwartz |

CHICAGO
Three scientists said to-da
study of blood contributed to ti













American * Red Cross showed | The department has already held If another home garden pro-

oe atgge nly the various = ¥ 1 the first of a series of conferences ,gramme is set up, officials say it

by oumerea on a geographices tq find out whether victory gar- | probably will not be an all-out
The study which lasted Yrom| “es should be encouraged this,campaign as it was in World

Jesuars 1948 through March |5Uâ„¢mer and if so, to what extent.|War IT. Chances are that efforts
1949, and included 141,784 men| The meeting was called at the] will be made to encourage serious

and women from 15 representa-|Pequest of Paul Stark, a nursery j city JOHNNY HAYSEEDS, and
ive cities turned up this fact man from Missouri and friend of }not the plant-in-the-spring-and-off
There are more “O” type per-| President Truman, who ran_ the }to-the-shore-all-summer variety,

sons in the South than in any/Victory garden campaign after

other region. World War IT to help provide food} The government wants to make
“B” type persons were in the|for Europe sure that full-time farmers who

majority in the North. produce the bulk of the nation’s
The scientists, Dr Louis K Agriculture Secretary Brannan|food and fiber get all the seed,

Diamond, George W. Hervey and ‘s called a meeting for January |fertilizer, insecticides and equip-

Virginia Watsen, all of Washing- and 23 of interested groups }|ment they need for all-out produc-

ton, D.C. report in the current]to discuss vietory gardens pro and } tion.

issue of the Journal of the Am-|con. The conference will include} Military and civil defense

erican Medical Association, j representatives of garden clubs, jofficials were said to favour ex-

ie ne they found a eee seed firms, horticultural depart-] pansion of home gardening as a

oor a en ae in j ree ments, truck garden journals, edu-|measure against sabotage, to aid

WE’ icenk , ind no Bast~! cators and others. nt ronservatio. of tin for cans, and
The tata) Keboentauk A Stark would not commit himsel’ [to make for more military space

; te percentage of per vhe abked shether. i vein t tati facilities

ons falling into each blood type} When asked whether he woulr ]on transportation facilities.

from all regions was as follows:|#¢cePt appointment to head an- —INS.
O—45.55 per cent; \—40.77

per cent; B—9.96 per cent; and|7~ £5 ic Ze

AB—-3.72 per cent.

© type is the so-called univer
sal type which can be used in all
transfusions regardless of the re-
cipient’s blood type.

Commenting on the value of
the study, the scientists declared

“In the event of an emergency
requiring large quantities of blood
(apparently a reference to atomic
attack) the Southern areas now
appear to be comparatively fav-
ourable sources of O and the
Northern areas of B ”

Results of the study indicated
that for each degree of latitude
moving from North to South, the
B group percentage increased an
average of .32 per cent. Moving
from South to North, on the oth-
er hand, the B group percentage

For that rich
savoury flavour?

It is part of the Sanitary
to a cleaner St, slichael.

AMERICANS CALL ON
RESEARCH CRUISE

NINE AMERICANS who are carrying out a biological
research cruise in the Atlantic, arrived at Barbados yes-
terday by the luxury yacht Juanita which they have
chartered to do their work.






with just a little Marmite !

ry E Whidden, Elmer Handy the various regions was the com- h
Paul Jos, Michie, Basil Symon Pencil And paratively rare AB, Make it better for you tog—
ette, Irving McLaughlin ano saan eae ae et! ex- Marmite contains the B2
Leslie Davis. Their ages range planation for their H somenad ;
=) ae Sees Yo P. “Probably the most acceptable Mn that build Up
They are working for _ the ur aper interpretation (for the prevalence ! and resistance to
Marine Biological Research In- of O type in the South) is that illness. That’s why it’s so
stitute, Inc. Baltimore, Maryland LONDON. in the South the hereditary lines good for everyone on bread Nit ;
Wathen is in charge o{{ The public relations department} of the early settlers, many * and butter or in tasty sand- '
the research work, of Britain’s General Post Office alan wee sae eee aes wiches. You can do so
Quite a good stock of glass jars}as issued an “important tip” elsh In origin, © '

much with Marmite in

jected to less admixture from the





are on board the yacht. They] for telephone users to every news- : : : ” : 5
: are kept clean for collecting rare| paper in Britain. outside than in the ee soupe, eahee a
C.D. C. Consider specimens of “life” to be found Under the heading “Telephon: .N.S. savoury ishes—an: armite
in oe ocean. Efficiency” the department use does so much for good cooking.
° . ese specimens will be taken] 142 words to tell the nation to keep
W oll. Shipping back to the States where they | pencil and paper next to the tele. Cows Do Fly
. , will be classified and may be], >

cocaine yP >. Mount, alused in other research work. ma is the advice in full kod valne hate pooner
fepresentative of Colonial Devel- one > crew is an expe aa 4 -* savy rains have s te ;
opment Corporation who is now bic Reetasieal seieet eh however Dnportant Tip tor Subsoribers,”| landslides from the “moving s
in Barbados on a short visit,] Skipper Holmes “Georse Hochne| Le efficiency of the telephone] mountain” which is erenventns = ; . ,
confirmed the report from Lon: and Richard Wathen ‘have done i” tele ao is of importance t oy little eo of Pantdu, The Vitamin B Yeast Food
don published in the Advocate ite a lot 3 so yiniect | ul telephone users, is under con-| Glamorganshire,
yesterday that the problem o ao a sss a poany 08) = subject ‘tant review by the Post Office, Boulders, rocks, and tree stumps geen dass aa

or p fland have reached an experimen-| > , to the village are
shipping in the West Indies is| tal stage. This is their first cruise| Pere is, however, a simple way hurling down hon ‘ . - se 1
one of which C.D.C. was aware of the sort They Nati not wet 1 which subscribers themselve: pearing the inhabitants continual-
from the start, and which has]. coh ene ae ae j can help, 7 ge Bhd e114 dial. taiata
been the subject of continuous RURIHOR “ON FORO RCH WOR “Tf every subscriber kept a pen- si ae nat rites geet The Naat H : . ; l ith t
puaer: aa Well Rigged cil and paper near his telephone | time the mountain moved a cow No oliday ts Comp ete winouw
h e cald that at. the moment The Juanita is certainly wel)| telephone lines and apparatus) was hurled down into her back

1 Sees es see a method that) rigged for the project. On her} would often be freed for other call: | garden, a Kodak Camera
would be both satisfactory and deck and astern is a sanding ma-] much sooner, there would be fewer ai

economically sound,

One of the most difficult prob- scraping the bottom of the vessel
lems had always seemed to him|@nd collecting the deposit which
to be the the provision of an|â„¢ay contain some of the objects

adequate inter-island service.
That problem resolved itself into

the question of inter-island trade] Stationary fishing rods and tubs
and it would be appreciated that] are nearby on the deck for re-
shipping economically |ceiving the
sound, freight as well as passen-| and

to make

gers were required.

Since most of the islands were|be found t ’
producing, broadly speaking, the| is roomy and will give good scope

same produce, the problem
building up an inter-island trade,

presented one of the major diffi-| for three or four months.

culties.

Local Company

Brigadier Mount said that the
development of the timber opera-
tions in British Guiana was going
ehead very well. Recently, this
undertaking was formed into ai
local company.

Work on the new and modern
mill began some months ago and

was going ahead well. When the Juanita’s
+ mill 4 5

is erected, the lumber pro-
duced from British Guiana will be
of a higher standard that it has

fever been before in the history

of the colony.

—LN.S.
chine, ‘line engaged’ signals, and both —_— -
caller and called would benefit
by the avoidance of unnecessary

waiting, This saving of time is

mechanical device for

a
é

Kodak (Cameras




Proud



a vor - Set particularly important in trunk of all
nm both sides of the yacht are ‘jong distance) calls, = : :
“Telephone calls now amount our 620 BROWNIE FOLDING hy rene seg Hera
¢ to over 3,000 million a year, of y 620 ” ” (Anaston ens)
catches. Nets, lines] wich 235 million are trunk call 620 fi BOX CAMERAS
a plankton collector are} For an appreciable percentage of 620 DUA-FLEX BOX CAMERAS
aboard while in the bridge willl these, and for the 3,000,000 tel 127 BROWNIE REFLEX CAMERAS
a fathomer, The deck grams i year delivered by tele ¢: ALBO : :
of| for fishing phone, the called subscriber re- CONWAY CAMERAS
The cruise is expected to last oT a pencil and paper. Count~ ULTRA-FEX CAMERAS
They | eas. hours would be saved’ if 16 mm. COLOUR & BLACK WHITE FILMS

these were readily at hand.”

The department said that more
“important tips” would be issuec
from time to time.

Some newspapers

started from Miami, Florida, and
sailed for Barbados via Cuba and
St. Thomas. They have called at
Barbados for the purpose of ef-
fecting repairs to their vessel.

8 mm. COLOUR & BLACK WHITE FILMS
16 mm, MAGAZINE COLOUR & BLACK a

Keep your lavatory spotlessly clean. It’s
mple. Shake some ‘ Harpic* into the bowl,

suggest EXPOSURE METERS












Richard Wathen told the Ad-{ 4merican Ambassador Walter| '’4ve overnight, then flush, ‘Harpic’ will
vocate yesterday that they me] Gifford, Board chairman of Ameri ean and deodorise the whole pan —even NIGHTS LTD
very rough weather throughout] can Telephone and a where no brush can reach, } | e
their 2,000-mile voyage from}|Company, might provide the de = A R Pp 1 Cc
Miami here. They had not in-bsortment with a few important
tended stopping at Barbados, but : to increase efficiency nao, PHOENIX & CITY PHARMACIES yi
were forced to after part of th INS. THE SPECIAL LAVATORY CLEANSER rif
rigging was snappec SS = ==
in a storm, J ee a eG)





After spending about five day
here, they will set sail again. The
next port of call is unknown. It

NO WAR=UNTIL

| You don't need







is their first visit to Barbados IT FLOODS

He said that negotiations _ — ES - RP sd — oxpoRD

yover i i ey nin arbados a ve . .
the comma factory in. ‘Trinidad place The sleepy little village of your car bright 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street
were still continuing, but in The white painted Juanita! Stoner, Oxfordshire is not worried
Dominica, the Corporation’s group|has a net tennage of 85 tons, is by war talk a
of products were progressing|/90 feet long, 25 feet wide and The villagers look at the Assen-
well. They included a_citrus|draws 10 feet of water, den stream that flows through the

plantation, a citrus packing grad-
ing plant,

the Roseau district.

Brigadier Mount leaves te-day
for St. Lucia by B.W.I.A. to

observe the progress of the re-| ace her engine is out of order

building of Castries.

Clothes Given
Away

Over 70 poor and old people] recently

were given clothes at the
Children's Goodwill League yes-
terday afternoon The clothes were
sent by Mrs. Violet Murray, a
social worker of Boston, Mass.
Also assisting Mrs. Murray were
Mr, C. Hilton Green and Mr, W.
E Husbands, two Shipping
Agents of Boston, Mass.

The clothes were distributed by
Mr. John Beckles and Mr. and
Mrs, W. E. Husbands who are in
the island on holiday.

A gramophone and records were
These
the entertainment of the

also sent by Mrs. Murray.
are for
small children at the League.

VERDICT ON PILGRIM’S
DEATH





An open verdict was returned
yesterday
cir-
cumstances surrounding the death
of Herman Pilgrim ended yester-

by a nine-man
when an inquiry

jury

into the

day at District “B” Police Court

Mr. A. W. Harper
Coroner Herman

was the

Pilgrim

at Seawell on Friday, January 19
when a two and a half ton

bucket fell on him about 9.25
a.m
| Pilgrim was a greaser employed
by Messr J. N. Harriman &
Cc T+A

ice and cold storage} Boothbay Boat Building Company
and a hydro electric scheme for| 12 years ago for Mr. George Bred

of
Hillbury Road. Brittons Hill, died

iron

She was built in Maine by the | tillage and predict: | “There will
be no war this year.
Ancient legend says that so long




you need only one





Shammy-Leather

2°, | CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LID. |
|

a businessman of the States.! 1s the stream does not flood there ‘ ,
Good weather and she will do| Will be no war. 1 ee Conk
10 knots. To-day while many of Britain's

‘ We have them in various
rivers are in winter flood the As- \ | i




The Juanita relies on sails ir senden is only a, trickle. Only ft we sizes and prices.
ba tuarmdne palel ay} twice in living memory has the
ae — ee. Wes stream welled up from its source

in full flood. The first time was in
the summer of 1914, and the sec-
ond in 1939,

Eli Shirford, 86, remembers the
legend from his boyhood,

trouble to keep it clean.

Beef Costs More

§) size 20" x 21"__ $3.63

oo. “I saw that stream flood just
People have been complaining before World War I. It filled the pa 16" X 7" J
that they have been|}eeljars of the pub and ran down ——
i

asked to pay a penny more for a
pound of beef which is scheduled

the road to the Thames River at

Henley.”















to sell at 36 cents a pound. A! Said 77-year-old Tom Collyer " " $1 63
check-up with the Control of eornetiniaa it does rise to a trickle ad 14 X 15 meena .
Prices Department yesterday re-|but we don’t get worried until it '
vealed that there has been no] floods.” ——————_- a
order authorising such an increase —LNS |
in the price of local beef. eerie

The price of imported beef A
fluctuates, Not only is it sold KITCHEN BURNT HOLIDA VING IN
according to the cut, but the price A fire which started in Ma



is also affected by landing cost

any Lane yesterday evening
One of the leading importers of

§,15 burnt part of a kitchen,





frozen meat however told the} property of Irene Griffith, Grif W’. kK. ?
Advocate yesterday that there] fith was cocking at the time of| e e
was no Official increase over 36|the fire and it is alleged to have



cents a pound, though he did not
| know

started from the fire with which

if local butchers were| she was cooking. The Fire Bri-|
charging more. gede turned out and quickly put} s > : :
The butchers on the other hand] out the fire. The kitchen is sep Deliveries can be arranged in.

say it must be the importers whc



arated from the remainder of the)
house |

ERR RRR Beene ee
FRESH SUPPLY OF 2

"PURINA HEN CHOW ©

|

a (SCRATCH GRAIN) s
oH JASON JONES & CO., LTD.--Distributors @
Mm eeERpERE RE RETR EER ES

are charting

A

more

the UK. for the popular - -

VAUXHALL CARS

Full details will be gladly given on application to - -

ROBERT THOM LTD.

GARAGE)



Dial 4616
acmnateammiaade

Whitepark (COURTESY

IL









PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 1951
«ssid italien ame ——_—_$

Cea pore.to a COLD
ee





















HENRY



Headache, that feverish “ache-
all-over” feeling—ease these Cold
discomforts with Alka - Seltzer.
Allka-Seltzer contains alkaline
ingredients to neutralize excess
gastric acidity plus an analgesic

for soothing headaches.

Have it handy —always!

DELICATE



WORK

For our people depends quite
a bit eon YOUR support of “Home
Industries.” APART from that,
compare

uMOLENE

(price and quality) against any

similar article and you will find

you get better value. Lim lene is

as refreshing as a breath of Spring
18 to 67c. at your dealer,

LESSEE SSSOCSSSSES

| FLAVOUR

| For Mellow Smoothness

and distinctive flavour,

Â¥ NONSENSE OLD MAN! JUST
STEP INTO THE OFFICE!



COOL BEAUTIFUL

“FERGUSON FABRICS”

FOR WEAR AT NIGHT.

STOCKED BY LEADING STORES. —














| in en grees Abit a
1 HATE MYSELF fen

WHEN 1 DO erw
LIKE THIS



There is no rum that com-











SOMEONE
a rte ae

CMH ee
INTERESTED )

THE HAPPY

HOUSE Je pares with .

Ses
f STUART & el
HL





IT COMES IN)» YOURE THRU WITH
= SIZES HIM, IT'S MY TURN





2 ;









LID.

Headquarters for Best Rum.







ananosmns ——

“ Te: June in Jonuarg It always is in Barbados and

that’s why Northerners enjoy our

climate, and their favourite foods.
SPECIAL— DOWNYFLAKE CAKE MIX — Ginger, Vanilla, Chocolate Flavours .......:.:.::ccsssenesesees 86c. per Pkg.

MEAT DEPARTMENT:



Pe












Extracts and Household

PRIME AUSTRALIAN BEEF seen a
Bovril ............ $1.60 .90 .70 Harpic ......... $ .80 $ .47
ae Bonox (Beet Extract) .70 .40 Shinio ooo .36
in STEAK, ROAST, Marmite ....... -97, 60, 32 SiIVO ...sssessnessennssese 36
: Oxo Cubes ........0..... .22 Min Cream 40 .20







Bisto (For Gravy)... .33 Windolene ................ 31





















6 ON THE I WONDER IF THE
TABLE <1 SAID- RUSTLERS WiLL Madras Curry ....... .76 Kilcrobe (D.D.T.) ...... .71
A uonieat= = Prepared Mustard... .17 Chemico Cleanser... .28

Heinz Browning for

Peanut Butter and







; Jams
Pickles and Sauces
Peanut Butter .......... - 85
Morton’s Mixed
Pickles ....cscssenn .56 err Jam .
ie ca gas =e j
KI PPERS Cheer ec sicausscs 53 een Jam «
hisctate chee MB memes y
peal “ 71 S.A. Fig Jam (2-Ib) 52
“Don T You ) WANT S oe eth WA Te eT] 7 Seek MONEY, 4] || TAMIL I (RIC ERS mma B] UR °
Tue euler sc, \ ora CANADIAN sisi: Wiasasinih S.A, Melon & Ginger
WILL RATTLE AeC: ed eee Tre : Geread oescsiuns. 51 Jam (2-1) 0.0... 0

‘ S.A, Peach Jam
S ALMON et ree. ee WOOT ietiscnse ces 60
Salad Cream .47

a Red Currant Jelly .. .34













a ene
























Hy re VM : » Stem Ginger 1.16
AN VA SALAMI
ag? \\\ ) Vt" Liqueurs, Wines
Oy 1 SAUSAGE
3 Qin Cereals Etc.
Li LA) Rs Per Wh._ $1.00 fF rarer essen 80 Drambule sccm $6.00 |
a ie od ————_ ] Breakfast Food ....... 86 | Grand Marnier ...... 7.50
EN Le ee bona \at nase’ | | Room to Man maar Allson’s White Oats 48 D.0.M 5.78
wr EXTRA TIME AT | YOU WANT. hk ‘ BE GIH My aisisicacnstvens :
LUNCH ? I HAVE Patent Barley ....83 .51 Gilbey’s Empire j
and Port fecsanninne ‘2652, 1.92

Dow's Sherry ........ 4.00

Quaker Puffed
H A M Wheat .........8 37 Gordon’s Gin ........ 2.50
‘ ‘ f 2.50

SLICED Per th.

APPLES |e ea

.73
; 70
1.07— .62














Per Ib 3O0c.

Per case $10.00















{CANT GO AWAY WITHOUT IT-~ ¥¥
MIGHT NEED IT- ANY gg d
MINUTE # THAT é

BLASTED DOG+~

BUTA FIGURE SUDDENLY
FLASHES BETWEEN HIM
AND THE DOG+ AN /RON
F/8T CONNECTSS













SWARLING DEVIL “GUARDS THE

GET AWAY FROM | FALLEN GUN ~

THATGUN, YOU~4/ 4 but m







#




BARBADOS ADVOCATE

| THE INDOMITABLE

PAGE SEVEN

Weakens







Britain,France U.S. Leadership





THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 1951
PUBLIC NOTICES

CLASSIFIED ADS.













NOTICE + . :
ee nf Se Se SN REJOINS FLEET U.S. Agree Influence Wiih West
DIED F@R RENT Marked on the envelope, Tender for




Church céiling—will be received by the

not late 27th January

Hy Ww. To Talks

LONDON, Jan, 24
Britain, France and the Unive

A. CRUMLEY

WORRELL—Yesterday at her residence
ieplaine, St. Andrew Catherine Jane.
(87) Interment took place the said eve-
ning at Saint Andrew's Parish Church.
Julian and Milton (U.S.A.)
Condeil, Clyde, Mrs. Rita Riley, Elliot

Restor

NEW YORK, Jan. 24.
The New York Times diplomatic correspondent James

—James

zt than



Plans and Specifications can be seen
at my Office on any Office day.

Successful Contractor must be prepared
to Complete this job to the satisfaction

HOUSES








Snes
— Cattlewash, Bathsheba,









States have agreed to “a Big Fou Reston that




' wrote to-day ‘events that have followed
inkson. 151—1e CULDUNE, of the Building Committee conference if Russia lifts the bu: Ameri eaders i * east ar i
Hinkson E10. TE ech Mae ns ee See Come, > duicietin Wall pepe: imerican leadership in the Far East and in the question
BOWMAN—MARY LILIAN BOWMAN a. Ber oe including Refrigerator Clerk to the Vestry, likely to threaten world peace of rearmanent of Western Germany have, it is generally
. J] conteining 4 rooms, running water St, Philip. . F : aT ee recogni are. ores , wed py y 4 ij i
loge Barbaus ae “an ise oa ewe ir each. Dial 8310. Mrs. Stuart Bynoe. 20.1.51--3n 1) was disclosed todgy. recognised here, gre atly © cake d United States influence
Channel Islands, 25.1.51—1n 23.1.51—3o | — — Russia hag so far stipulated that among the western nations.
1 ATS Cen laa SF Eis a ee een inn Gathcne cone NONCE the sole subjects of the conferen: ri ’ : 1s , :
THANKS ting of 3 bedrooms all with runnir¢ PICKWICK CRICKET CLUB should be German demilitaris. © fact of the matter is that 3 Red China.
— | water, ioeectine some and ait mode "Members are kindly asked to collect tion and other German probler ree ail. many Allies ri Resto: suid:
Oe alk tio ek eee, bee te conveniences, For appoi ntment, aie aS): | their gear ax the pavilion and groupds ——a move aimed against Wester: ‘¢ United States seriously anc

flowers, cards and letters and in any






























have been handed over io the Barbados
















Sincerely believe we rushed has







cam ; ; he be lathe not made it clear
ia 5 pians for raising German units *! , ; yp ne ie :
_ - " 7 | Cricket Association. The Club will not German rearmament question, | blie that sne is ready for
irene Soleo sympathy in ow sdnetae Wf Pepeine cee er ee : pe thanntaives responsible om 7s loss a of the: dn acted unilaterally ara they be- condemnation of Red
avement. P ’ | of gear not lect immediately iden > Sco © ” e aly . >» is aki i
Almaz and Nasmyth Crosby, Sue and}|3 Bedrooms all with running wate oe ee D KIDNEY. ference te include Mthe principal lieved, unwisely in defending Chir hat she is making dis-
/ida Williams. 25.1.51—1n | #0r further particulars phone 2824. Hon. Secretary ; Formosa, and pushed our.powe Cit between moral sanc-
25.1.51—3in 4 causes of the present international 5 aa . . , a Seki “
21.1.51—6n tension” Was one of the two con too far towards the Chinese tict against Peking and “eco-
IN MEM IAM “SWANSEA” | —_—_—- —_-—_- ——-——_——_ S fr or.” n Sanctions or “mili y
OR turniehen Bunualew at Worthing. & Bed ditions | laid down | in the three ae eels months difference a "The “pelations be.
BULLENs—In memory of our friend | 700ms, Frige, Telephone, Radio, Garage NOTICE powers’ replies yesterday (Tues- between the United States and. iween the two countrjes are being
Kenneth Ralph Bullen who was laid to | 29d available Ist February, Dial 347 or PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH day) to the latest Russian note. moet of the rest of the non- rampered by the failure of Brit
rest on 25th Jan. 1950, 2490. 23.1.51—3n. The replies were made public in ‘ tore: , ake is
Gone but not forgotten interne — Sealed Tenders, (marked on the Pr aPe : i ri P Communist nations, and particu im te make this distinction
See pence eee Micki aioe. TRINITY COTTAGE—St. James Coast. | envelope “Tender” for Loan”), will se] , Britain’s most powerful fighting Vietorious, is being rearranged London, Paris and Washington to- jarly between the ‘United States Fe: = fuentes seataining. 3 bedrooms, zeceived af sar office up to 3.00 p.m. on /Ship, the reconstructed 23,000-tol! so that at all times a reserve of “ay. h and Britain, have been played
BULLEN—In memor t friend a telephone. Ava’ le for months of | Monday anuary, 1951. for the loan | ajrers . i ili shi i » oon i a The othe -onditi was that > naming aa mh Am sertt,
dae Wee wa of oor Un eof Fearuaty 40 May aod Auaen te Deee Me LON Sa tay polite are eae aircraft carrier Indomitable, wil) ships in moth balls can be com th e — ee oe at down because they coincide with
Jan. 25th 1950, ber 1951, Phone 2959. 21.1.51—2 | interest not exceeding 4%, to be repaid|Teinforce the Home Fleet nex: missioned in emergency. e preliminary conference 1M the intensive drive by the Com ates XC ange
Wik aabike colen tepiead ane habe dcoaae ——— | in fifteen equal instalments of £1s»|month, First details of the 1951 pro- Paris should consider international jyunists to divide the Western
We never thought his death was near each gommencing in the month of She has been completely refitte! gramme, disclosed by the Admir- problems to decide which should coalition. January %, 1995
Qnty those who love can tell - PUBLIC SALES ee WOOD GODDARD. and her flight deck lengthened anJ alty last night, announced sailing be {included on the agenda of the in... however, private differ. oa 7/10} pp Shteqae*on
The Bullen deruye Emerald iia Clerk of the Vestry, strengthened for new types 9i of ships of the Home Fleet thi. “Big Four COMDSTSHGG “Ot POTMES | ce have given way to public Bankers 61 8/10% pr
Cheapeaa. th ada’ Christ Church.}naval jet planes, » Week for joint exercises with tiie Ministers and their order of pri- charges in Britain on American Demens . ;
‘pemeevrermamsnanicintindepeistintiliniataitieinmanamasrenane AUCTION 18.1 51—5n Mediterranean Fleet. ority. The preliminary conf erence recklessness” ‘in handling — tha wide Pee : iat a.
oe ae ee Ser eribe ae Return of the Indomitable is the Before the Home Fleet comes ae be attended by Ministers’ j,. Eastern crisis, while in 69 7/10% pt. Cable Ci
Bra wi : . ‘. ; } : teh fs m@ 210% pr Currency 60 3/104 pr
who departed this life on Jan. 25th 146. | UNDER HA R | Ni ‘ first stage of the rebuilding of home in March the Indomitable, deputies, Washington the British are now ‘ ee 508/106. or
Fred Duesbury, 25.1.51—In. | py eR THE IVORY. 1 IAMMER emova otice the Fleets, which, with two new an efficient fighting ship again. _ Under this head the Western being openly charged with “ap- o» pr saa mene
__ LOST BUT NOT FORGOTTEN | Thursday, January 25th at my Mart,| ROGERS BARRER SALOON Beg to}38,000-ton’ aircraft-carriers, new will replace the Vanguard as the Governments are asking - :
SEALE — In loving memories of my | Shepherd Street, the following: A set of | notify their Customers that they will{heavy destroyers, and fast. anti- flagship. preliminary conference should be
dear sons Ralph Seale and Donald Seale Settee Roane ak. ae ee jeoe 2 Building Next Daoedderds & /submarine frigates, is designed t» Another reserve aircraft-carrie; permitted with some discussion +
a ot ae Tae Jie Saw, Purse, Gath Sponges, “Biccie| tne'zth Suntary ian." ™ ™/bring the Navy to. effectiv> the 19,880-ton Warrior. Is boing substance on. the sues invelve
ords are very little things, Rims 28/7 x 1%" Bicycle Guards, Pots, : 24.1.51—Sn, | Strength in two to three years. ordered back to Korea with rein- aS well as simply a decision On | —_e_——_—eeemen
Things they cannot half in-part Kettles, Ch ae hich includes for, : ; yal What to include in the agenda ¥
The feelings that are deepest to a dear | K* et tein, ooters, Lamp_ The programme, which inclu es forcements of Navy men, Royal ‘eli i fare
Mother’s heart, tae pecmtise Matches etc. Sale NOTICE total reconstruction of the Flect Marines, and aircraft But the preliminary conference
Pete den a tee Pe aeery tL cae aaah partied Tenders for the erection of a| aircraft-carriers Implacable and —L.E.s, Would not attempt to arrive at
But many a Mother Kes. gtieved VINCENT GRIFFITH. ‘avilion and Community Hall at Ellerton





By instructions received from the In-





solutions of the problems “this



Britain could “in no cireumstan-

6a, | Playing field will be received by me up function being reserved for the
For. thei a ; 21.1.51—6n. ri ne '
But in God 1 trust ri beanie aed“ ipeciinatiens sik be “e e Ministers themselves.” But new treatment does more than
Mrs, E. Seale (Mother) der The Diam Men BEE ee ec ees A ; P, l rt: B t h S d The British note repeated that
Un i ond Hammer Messrs. Harrison & Con. Ltd... Broad st. ir l oO Ss u ec ers én ease these terrible agonies.

FOR SALE























surance Co,, I will sell on the spot at
Bank Hall x Road on Friday the 26th
of January, beginning at 1 o'clock, One







The person or firm whose Tender is
accepted will be required to give the
names of 2 persons as Sureties, and to












ces” accept the Prague proposals
on Germany as a limitation on, or

‘“‘Are Too Letter To

A new product, DOLCIN, has been created wh













i t 1 ich not only gives
enter into a formal contract with the as the basis for, discussions, prompt relief from the ins due to the symptoms of arthriiis and
A double-reofed shop. To be removed ‘frou | Vestry of St. George It said: “His Majesty's Govern- rheumatism, but also affects the metabolic processes which constitute
UTOMOTIVE spot. D'Arey. A. Scott, Auctioneer. Due allowance should be made for 99 ‘ ish hasi . »
23.1.51—4 ; ment wish to emphasise as was | @ rtant part of the rheumatic state’s background.
‘ ale #3.1.51—4n. | possible increased cost of materials and oor ee ‘ di thei t f ber Dol . edical i ituti

CAR—Citroen_16 P.11900 moacl in labous, stated in their note of December has n thoroughly tested in medical institutions,
qucclint. centicen eS os eS The Vestry does not bind itself to ac_ iba: 22, that the tension which exists | DOLCIN is being used now with vnpenpeeenses success, DOLCIN
island. Apply: B’dos Agencies Ltd REAL ESTATE cept the lowest or any eenaaes British Overseas Airways pilots LONDON, Jan, 24. _ in the world today does not arise 5 ee ee, d by doctors now. And many sufferers have already
Dial 4908, Evelyn, 21.1.51—7n Clerk, Vestry of St. George | re “far too poor to uphold their Leaders of 400 London butch- from the German problem, A dis- me aerinel yin mae et of taking f oN. i tu

Pha ualbntn ee fan en KA i ¢ i “ rs tir hast ~USssi imi the experience of fellow-victims of thease

CAR—Buick 8. 1939 Model, inspection The undersigned will offer for sale by 20.1.61 dignity and move .in the right ers tired of facing groups of cussion limited to the questions on’t jay. co) Ee ¢

invited. Willems, Rosamund: Worthing. | Public competition at their office, No. 17, circles.” grumbling .housewives to-day proposed by the Soviet Govern- | pains, Get DOLCIN today. A bottle of 100 precious tablets costs
#0.1-60—an- High, Street, Bridgetown, 2 Thureday NOTICE Captain H. L, Fry, 38-year-@l¢. demanded a statement of the ment would ah be inade- | 0 BY
wT (tA ’Taccohall ee rH 5 seni i i G t’ lans re quate and unreal.” :

CAR—Vauxhall Wyverns 12 h.p. saloons | dwellinghouse called Re ESTATE OF Ter. captain, who joined Government’s plans to get more 4 a ‘ OOKE

arrived. Dial 4616, COURTESY GARAGE. | . RICHELIEU SAMUEL HENRY HOWARD STREAT| Imperial Airways, forerunner ot meat. The British reply also pointed BOOKERS DRUG STORES— Bridgetown and Alpha
anno | tn “ith avert, “Belerie” wits’ 9495 | NOTICE is nersinsiven that ait per-| BOAC; in 1987, whites in the Log, “They sent a letter to Prime out that Britains earlier note of aeney.
je, Vv y Wi 85) Pre Pi ” i itie i i . ae ? 5

CAR — Morris 8 1946. Perfect condi- square feet of land. Drawing, dining | 5°MS having any debt or claim upon or ong re the British Airline Minister Attlee * accusing the Devens we o eee oa
tion. Phone 4255 between 9.30 a.m. and and breakfast rooms, 4 bedrooms, bath | !fecting the estate of Samuel Henry | Pilots Association: Government of failing to provide representatives o e ig Fou
3 pm. 25. n, and toilet and kitchen. Double garage Sn - Gr ta cation oo Bloomsbury) “The position of a captain in people with “adequate supplies.” should pnts en a
— —— — and servants rooms. lantativ: e parish of Sain ~ | Imperial Airways was, of course With only one shilling’s worth national problems “with a view to

CAR — Ford 1948 six cylinder pect: , al| Who died in this Island on the 9th day ab vo ms pvigded s ER a terrence eetisreemmees
Luxe Sedan, low mileage and in good ean rt oe of January 1951 are hereby required to totally different from the position of meat per week, butchers told re a eae ae bibs
Ther ant eat senaition. Chas. me ro | COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.. sead in perioulars ot ee Soe. Gate of 5 cr Pe a . oe that ee could not ant *. or Fi = mS suum Reacent AUSTRALIA sew | geet 0.

y, Me , ae actyors. | Siweree, & MENS 7 P “Present-day captains receive contrive more than two meats Ministers o P , aaa LINE
ncentenntieninein retin ena eatbrsbtiepeniiaanaacin tins, 51 Oswald Hamilton Harding, Oswald How- |], . ; ‘ ‘ - t * on if (MLA.N.Z,

LORRIES — One (1) 190 V—8 Ford | SSS | ard’ Streat and Milton Seale, the quai. | inferior transport, inferior hotel with meat, “She is at her wits srachenio’ Sonithtla Meena | Sek wren The MV, “DAERWOOD" will
Lorry, One (1) V—8 Ford Lorry without | FOR RENT, SALE OR LEASE fled executors of the will of the deceas- | accommodation, a salary which end to know how adequately she ernments a suitable agenda. wil Adolaide Jonuary 4th, Molbourne accept Cargo and Passengers for
Tyres and Engine. One (1) 1939 Chev-} BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-| ed in care of Cottie Catford & Co., No.| will buy far less, and they have, can feed her family for tne It added that these representa- January 18th, Brisbane January 27th, St. Luela, Grenada, and Aruba, and
Station Hill, st ’Alichsel ‘Dial soul" | Stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din- | 17 ish ST Or Mae eat, rte, Defer | of course, a much lower relative remainder of the week,” they tives would “need to give some | iyiney February Mth. Arriving ‘at Tri- Dena yimly for St. | Vincent,

Ren a Se eee. Biecin, | 2 7S eediata ee a ee GLIA Oe aRLIL DIGREE e eRe oe LMOnity added consideration to questions and) wig “Maret, Nal, Merch, 1984, Barbados ||] Sailing on Wednesday sist inst,

-*-)*—** | ette 8 bedrooms running water in each, ate we shi cee a Py vig “J . ‘ . ° : :
"anny er en =| Tollet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS Closod | assets of the said estate among the par- Ground Control And the butchers assured problems involved in order to non vessel has ample space for Hard The M.V. “Catibbee” will

MASSEY - i ities | Gallery, Living-room, Breakfast room| ties entitled thereto, having regard ‘| “There are other changes. such Attlee that they were “well determine their formulation for Cargo ee General Cargo, Accept Cargo and Passengers for
bh.p. also with steel wheels. ries | and Kitchenette, 2 Bedrooms Toilet and| the debts and claims only of which we . 15) vefded in + ini d griev- inclusion in the agenda as well argo accepted on through Billy of Dominic we svenueve. ie
gordially invited. COURTESY GARAGE. | natn, Electric ‘Light and Telephone.| then shall have had notice, and|as greatly increased ground con- vers he opinions and g as the order in which they would | /Aéné with transhipment at ‘Trinidad ||| Dominica, "Antigua, ene on
Dial 4616. 19.1.51—6n. | Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation, | that we shail not be liable for assets so| trol over flying operations and the ances of the housewife, as the order a . = ey — for British Guiana, Barbades, Wind- depart a tun Mle re

——————-—, | St. Thomas Dial 2221, 21.1,51.—6n, | distributed to any person of whose debt constant checking system (un- The letter was signed by appear so tha e mutually | ward and Leewnrd Island, | -

PICK-UP — One Second hand Ford —....| or claim we shall not have had notice . : > table basis referred to could Por further particulars oppiy:— |

known pre-war), which hé | Harold Daniels, President of the acceptable basis referred to ply
V-8 Pick-up in A. 1 condition. Just CAVE & ROACHES PLANTATIONS | at the time of such distribution Pp » Wh ave al belanedd s be established.” —Reuter FURNESS, WITHY & COMPANY, | BWI, SCHOONER OWN-
overhaul. (Past inspection) 3 days ago) ‘We will set up for sale by Public| And all persons indebted to the said | lowered our professional status,” London Retail Meat Traders Asso- be es pee ui ‘ LIMITED, \ ERS. ASSOCIATION, 1
New Tyres. 24.1-51—4n. | Competition at our Office James Street, estate are requested to settle thelr ac¢) Captain Fry suggests BALPA. ciation, — 3 . “ene, roe | 7 leph 4047 z m
“TRACTOR One (ID McCormick Deor.| 0n Friday 2nd February 1951, at 2 p.m.| counts without delay. should discuss with BOAC: The butchers added that most o } r WI. | elephone:

TRACTOR—One (1) McCormick Deer- CHES LANTATIONS Dated the 23rd day of January 1951. agen ; - ; » Ba & DA COSTA & Co. Ltd,
ing Farmall H. wheel tractor, complete ae mn a ton aid conraloiig by| Gordon Oswald Hamilton. Harding, |!.—A return to the pre-war systeni the meat now being supplied was Eva Peron Appeals A Sotaans ° |
with grass cutter. In excellent condi-} estimation 83 acres 3 roods 23 perches * Oswald Howard Streat, whereby an aircraft commander unsuitable for cutting up into u a BW. RMON cpmeeectetaeen, -
pen, very little used, ee take of which about 48 acres are arabie, Hilton Seale and his first officer were con- extremely small rations, and that For Strike Call-off

















The acreage is made up as follows:















Qualified executors of the will of Samuel






veyed between airport and hote!









dy f nny Howard Streat, deceased. V it could not be compared = in
VELOCETTE 500 c.c—Done under 1,000 we Ten a ee ye oun Pee tae 14.1.51—3n in a car; palatability with meat consumed BUENOS AIRES, Jan, 24.
Boieiae A inine Darga, gp 00.00. 14 acres young canes. itt cecaeenicenenmnte ———— |2—The provision of first-clasy before the war. Senora Eva Peron made : .
; 19,1,51—6n. Se Pe: preparation, | “£25 ~ 74: easily earned by obtaining || accommodation; Other organisations of butchers single handed effort during the ‘O.
roads, yards etc Seat Sears eee Tevihtd Oxtanh: 3A daily overseas allowance are expected to join this move “ night to put an end to Argentina’:
POULTRY Inspection on application to Mr. | from your friends, No previous experi} of roughly £2, put pressure on the Government third railway strike in the period —_
- —— ——-—. + | Ormond Knight on the premises. beautiful free sample Book to Britain's London Express Service. The failure of British and Ar- of » few months, Travelling by . Inc.
CHICKS — 12 White Wyandotte Chicks YEARWSOD & BOYCE, largest and foremost Publishers; highest gentine negotiators last week to car, accompanied by two high
hatched from imported Utility laying Solicitors. commission; marvellous money making agree on terms for the resump- fficials she went from. one station NEW YORK SERVICE
stocks 5 x 3 weeks old for $4.25. 7 x 2 EASE ON opportunity Jones, Williams & Co., D l h 2 FB e “ tit t shi nts o y > , 8/8 ©. G, Thulin sails 12th January arrives Barbadoa 23r¢ January
weeks old for $5.25 or the lot for $9.00 rey build.| Dept. 9 Victoria Works, Preston, oO /p in ‘urniture tion of Argentine meat shipme' > to another in the outskirts 01 8/8 Myfiord » 2nd February - is 4th February
Dial 3394. 34.1.51—2n.'| PROPERTY — One (1) 3 storey build-| pen ind, to Britain has ended any hop’ jjuenos Aires exhorting strikers t« | stesso andl Seetbiced- inhekciluhi teas ae pea
IMPROVE tock — 3 White Wy tral Sevpcay a pond % MG. Lewis sae Is Part Of Sart Lie SPaGaey SNEED, ESTER SENOS pment Woke: NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
your s' = ~ } > > day be. | Supe . . sina J ad
andette Cockerels 3 months old. Raised Jon premises. Inspection any day be 2 be increased. uf ave ,,okeleton services which hac 8/8 Liberville sails 21st December — arrives Barbados th y
d 4 pm LIQUOR LICENSE N 4 ters, there have vegterd , / acl hth Januar
from imported utility laying stock. $3.50} tween 8 a.m. an cerenee : tiated anlar - ot ° In some quarters, there have }ven n.aintained yesterday on twe A Steamer » 4th January * “ lath January
Soe) OF SRV ASORE, Aw Sen ee Lense At tet etbea. eneaan: Ge semnemavon Hw Festival Show been forecasts that it may be @ ;ygin lines serving Buenos Aires | A Steamer ‘) 8th January i "- 2nd ‘February
3304. oat WESTCLIFFE — Navy Gardens, stand- | fq. B*Town’ for. permission. to. sell {urther cut. had by this morning also been | == CANAD|AN SERVICE
ELECTRICAL ing on eet Maes ners a - Spirits, Malt Liquors, &e., at a beard The Dolphin furniture, mace —Reuter brought to a virtual halt and the
Jand, Built o! ne, ree bedroom

ee
ELECTRIC STOVE — Table Model, 2









and all modern conveniences. Also large





free light, water and taxes. Knowledge

and shingle and wall building at corner
Kensington New Rd, Baxters Rd. B’town,



j 0
in 1813 to commemorate Nelson's tOUTEBOUND



paralysis was almost total.













Queen, will also be on view. Korea,

aaiictbe yet . , victories, will be on show in e * —Reuter. Name of Ship Saily Sails Arrives
lay room 30 by 14 feet. For particu Dated this 23rd day of January 1951 ; a r 6 :
rings with small oven attached and Blec-| Jars and appointment, Phone Winston | po Nyy ST A Yoaa 5 Brighton's Royal Pavilion during Improving Brazil on. “hike dae? meer elites Barbados
trie Toaster. Apply Box A.A. C/o Ad-] Johnson at 4311. 26,1.51—6n Police Magistrate, aa weal a Regency Festival this summer 4 ‘BAMURALCOK PILGRIM” = tic deny, ei gare
vocate Co. 28.1.51—In. Signed GLADYS FARLEY. The Dolphin. suite—so called Comes First U.S. Extend aes os :
ary cut ft ‘teeuine with ak: WANTED ne Seat ae Ag hela at eee: a dope naaieetl O TN Them verweis have limited passenger accommodation.
cub, : : dered at a . s § Sist,
Apply D. 1. Emtage ¢/o K. R, Hunte Police Court, District “A” on Friday! of ten armchairs, three settees SAYS VARGAS verseas fours |
aves, Ltd. 4611. 20.1.51—t.f.n ra ie ite — | the and day of February 1951 at 11), window seat, ‘a boat-shaped RIO DE JANEIRO Jan. 23 WASHINGTON, Jan. 24 ; ROBERT THOM LTD.—New York and Gulf Service.
wa a p’clock, a.m oo ne ; ae; d . + ‘ : .
AA Cho a ee Re ee at ama one eer ee Te ee s press statements—real The American army is 0 extend Apply: DA OOSTA & CO, LTD.—Canadian Bervice.
Box A.A. C/o Advocate Co, HELP Police Magistrate, Dist. A'’| wood tops and brass inlay, a In mass press P : c > rae
25.1.51—In. 25.1.51—1n.| sofa table and a pedestal centre- or imaginary—it was claimed that overseas puts 6 REFRIGERATOR — One General Elec-] SECRETARY for ROCKLEY GOLF | ——-————... ___-—.-_-_ | piece. President-elect Getulio Vargas has men In ha Far East, a eae ;
tric American Refrigerator 5 cf. in| CLUB. Salary $100.00 per month to ee eee | Regency furniture from other expressed himself as much more OTe a ae meen extension | PASSAGES TO EUROPE
perfect order. A gift at the price. Call | gether with free quarters in fiat over I t t Notice 1| collections, including tho ‘% interested in correcting the finan- PB. f tive athena ot eee th
; it 4910 3601. , taining t edrooms, 7 > A anc < ch a eine >
renner e OF 9.1. B1-=20. living one domed veunaah te. nls0 mpor an | owned by the King and Gigi and moral state of Brazil than





















RADIO—One (1) Eddystone model 8.504









of Goif an advantage,

















THE Gas supply will be cut off













in the question of immediate party Contact Antilles Produets, Limited, Roseau, Dominias, for sail-

In July there will be a ball in The order applies to American |

!
|
|
|
|

































in districts from the Esplanade |j 5 olities. ‘00 i d Austria | ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
. = * di p- ; e y costum nd the world P Y i . troops in Germany an us’ :
ies Ee vite Seen, a | Same oe Soler oat Es, | || Bi, Re ation Mam ||| prices St a net lee of tig According 10 these claims in- ‘TOQPe In, Germany and Austria||| $960 Burope., The usual ports of sail are Dublin, London
Sette gelato Beans: eaevere rat ahta, weeping. See ar 1 “between 1.30. and Regency period, and an inter- flation must be stopped and the —Reuter }
Satins — . Vacancies exist in Design Department soproximately — aang national puppet festival. cost of living reduced ‘at the Ry ooo ol PPPOR OO POO, Rs
FURNITURE of a West Indian Petroleum — Refiner nde gene li rhe A cricket match in Regency earliest possible moment. : % 8 — a —
for Trained praumnismen, wanes te "THE BARBADOS GAS dress will be played on Bruns- —Reuter. You Might Walk : For Me. ‘
0 Sean eat — | design mn civil, ” “ rf , i : —_— ’ oe
FURNITURE—Ralph Beard offers the | G2). ee Ret ate aera projects COMPANY LTD wick Lawns, Hove, in August % BARBADOS : 10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH |
pe apg aed oo ub Chairs | Applicants must have the Britis! ||) Pageant *ROWDS WITNESS Thr ough A Wall 8 Me ye
a ees ee ue onus | Higher National Certificate or its U.S. or } — A Pageant of Brighton and 4 Cc Sy INVESTMENTS — 38] ovwpr 100 expensive Novels
$36.00 per pr.. Cocktail tables $10.00. Tea | Canadian equivalent and should be military display are planned DUCHESS’ FUNERAL NDON. |% SE seicg om mt
trolleys $15.00, Streamlined Morris chairs prepared to give proof of technical abil- + AL cys, ae Rotti LO ’ ° % elling ab Oe
SD cach! vention, $95.00 ee aT ity by interview or examination. i ORIENT : arenes eee ae st NAPLES, a a Dr. A. J. Glazewski, a well X Consult - - - x ae ks ie B1;00 ae
unpainti rush chairs; roc’ Applications, giving full details an yi a dean is to be o ’ Ries re Huge crowds of people to-day \nown British physicist, predicted xa Ll moe ih a ee aan
of good recond hand furniture. “Call at | exDePience, decompanied by, a | recent GOOoDs will de wvisits to warships, @ filed the Cathedral of Naples and \) lecture that the time is no.|% A. M. WEBB, 40 how ; ‘ é
Ralph Beard's furnishing showrooms, | PassPort photograph. snow) ea po. A regatta, firework displays, and spilted over into neighbouring ;o; distant when it will be pos-|2 gyjekhroker S| We have just opened SHEET
Hardwood Alley. Open 8 a.m, to 4 Box 103, Bridgetown. "23.1.51—6n. From INDIA, CHINA, an exhibition of Regency¥ streets to witness the funeral of sible to disintegra‘e a man in the}® °° 7°" BP) LLAasrve in astterent colours for |
aa, eae ae ro - ; EGYPT! books. Duchess Elena of Orleans Aosta (United States and integrate him ir | % 33 Broad St. (Over yo” vane AT |
8.1, SALESMAN — Tunes, - Salamon ane Silk, Curios, Brassware, Five concerts by the Southern who died on Saturday at the age pritain. 0 St. . utes
MISCELLANEOUS amy BF later to Brdshew & Co. Jewels, Linens, Ivory, Teak- Philharmonic Society, with inter~ of 79. He declared that this would bc|% Phoenix Pharmacy) | JOHNSON’S STATIO |
P. O, Box 228. wood, Sandals, French Per- national soloists and conductors, Thousands of others lined the possible by ineulstion from the | SF and ‘ i
GAMERA! A Assortment just fumes, Barbados Searves in are to be given at the Dome. highway to Naples as the hearse force of gravity t —: Phone 4796 :— x | HARDWARE |
ap ge eet MISCELLANEOUS ‘ i There will also be conducted ¢oljowed by five motor cars with - . i » ancl ‘ ¥ aaa cataracireeaasres
received — Also films all sizes Black Pure Silk, Etc., Ete., Ete. i ; Levitation would be simple anc | ¢ $
eee 2a Cont ae The Souvenir Headquarters tours, of Regency ane. Ss oe a ps eer wat of people would be able to wall ‘
Stores, \. * ae . slowly moved along e gulf o ” j
ones NT through walls,” he added, 4,
LADIES SPORT COATS — For cool FURNISHED. HOUSE, Buipituated be- THANI Kros. Naples. ' Dating thi lacture tea aaia tact § An Oil without Oiliness is not a Lubricant
evenings. Fawn, beige, wine and black | tween Maxwell's and Rockley. Sea KASHMERE GIRLISH FIGURES —Reuter. 5 Freddh sclentist hed turd the i
in assorted sizes. $28.50. Modern er Coast Levit ge ie less than Pr. Wm. Henry 8t.—Dial 5466 Holy Water feacted different! Use... i
NO a aN iene ee three months. one * 24.1.51—an. | LONDON SWIMMING CHAMPION from ordinary tap water and the { GERM ol Ss ;
PLASTIC Pe ee ee, — eres aaa Miss Mary Byatt, county LONDON a baptised infant differed electre ! mes - a Olli )
Aprons, Table Cloths, +3 TED . 7 £ j a! 2 ise imereas iliness {
ties.’ Modern’ Dress aaah GOAT—Young goat in ies Sates B b A t oom virnetitire eed iz Leonid Meshkov, the Russian statically from an unbaptise for increase i)
woh fm —— ar ados mateur b

—$—$—$———_——
MILK—Powdered Milk in 1 Ib Tins
Nutricia, Select & Daily Brands. Also
New Dutch Cheese 99 cts, Lat 2
Co., Ltd. 5
one 23.1,51—3n.
















WE BUY FOR CASH — Clocks, eer
and musical boxes in any condition.
Write, call or dial 4429.GORRINGES An-
tique shop, Upper Bay Street.

25.1.51—Tn







Boxing Association

t ~y *wimmer who hoids the official oe * * 1 , ‘ b
pita: be Ager hee bnly world and European record of | ‘ome eee is agg rhind CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD }
or 14 years old min,, 7.2 seconds for the 100 metres flingese "5 Palowing variation h

Miss Byatt said. breast stroke, has reduced his time asap RY B ;

S Gasolene Station — Trafalgar St.
; the wi hs.—LN/S
“We try to make school dinner» to 1 min., 6.6 seconds, according body wavelengths













| SS,
All amateur boxers are i is alates OE
q f ue tn : s ‘om 0 LELLONELESOE OLE) PCCP EP
ES SS an ~ 1, as n trit s a ssible. but th ‘ te ass gence y ep r ry > «

MAGAZINES — Second hand maga-| Wk BUY FOR CASH — Old Gold and asked to report to the Asso Se schoulen gets a isin’ Moscow, ’ 3
zines and comics in good condition. | silver jewellery, coins, dentures, etc. ciation’s Head-quarters . he h Rohan hed Subject to approval by the Rus- %
STANWAY STORE, Dial 4910, Lucas St. | write, call or Dial 4429. GORRINGES Modern High School on mania when she reaches ’ os *

25.1.51—2n. | Antique shop, adjoining Royal Yacht : oR ea aelal “teens.” sian All-Union Committee for $
Ay ntique 5 95.1817 Friday, 26th January at f . i ad 7 this id Wit be sbinlt $
Club. 25.1.51—T 5 m to arrange for “They start to think, serious, Sport, this record Ww submit-

FEEMANENT needles Sor you : : os : . arati about their figures far too ear!y ted to the International Swimming %
player, and needles of all Kinds. Price} GORRINGES undertake expert watch eliminations in preparation in li Th et the idea they Federation for consideration as a >
$1.08. Records of all kinds too. A.| ond clock repairs, cleaning and resto- for West Indian Champion- in life. ey ¢ Dae z :
BARNES & CO., LTD. 22, ration of oil paintings, valuations for in- ships to be held in Trinidad are going to get fat and we hav > world best. — x

RIBBONS, Feathers, Flowers, zipps, | Sumince, mgd Probate, eee al— in. |W 23rd, 24th, and 25th March, {\\| difficulty in malting them cit 2 s
: : , var : aes 7 a anything.”—LN,S, ip e
Buttons, Laces & Edges in a large vari- 1951. MAIL NOTICES %
ety at reasonable prices, Modern Dress fk f J . 7 %
acto. S| Spanish Tuition sara nner memes cone RED BASKETBALL sg, Mette foe Devnintos by the sen, w Sacg %

~ fo . c LONDON. {,. Eunieia will be closed ot the Gen- v

Seek Lined tha. hatha t Stew Mehulahs ‘ertadkie tawiiak’ Aosgiieb titles during the month of Communist Russia is apparent~ eral Post Office as undor:~ o %

Ankle Socks. 36 to 48 cents, Modern | and the “Advanced Gommercial Course” February or early March. ly teaching Communist China onion a Ln Registered and N
ft - * - ‘ 7 ¥v a bo n on ro)

Dress Shoppe. 23.1,51—6n. Seen t from the First of NB. — All professionals something new in aggressive taco Qrdinar sangary, tS rp bad 3
— ° a “< Maile for St. Vineent, Grenada, Trini-

SKIRTS, BLOUSEs, SHORTS. —Ina All those interested; please be good who have _ engage: nh no tics , tt c : ta. Trini © "
large variety. $3.98 to $4.80. Moderr | enough to contact Mrs. Maria Carlotta contest during the past three A Moscow radio commenta- pe i i ac gi oe. :
eee cored tn | Genesis, agen Sar, St awrenss | years may revert’ to their j}| tor’ reported that’ the “Russion Se,°Qny gill be cane

; ap, ewes Soe : ' il ama $ s ica- ’s bas g a ow tout ~ Parcel and Registered Mails ot 9 a.m

‘SAPPER SWALLOW” Collapsible Sail- | tration, — Phone: 8495. ; amateur ot deaiiastene so) men ee we n lates reet and Registered Malls at 9. a.m: age acids 3
ing Boat 11 st. 6 ins by 4 ft. New com- 25.1.51—6n | tion to this Association ; ing China has so I the 27th of January, 19) %
plete with sail, oars ete. Specially | investigation of their claims. every Chinese team it has met Malls tor Montelerat end Sk dé +] 1
Tod sateen tae — eee eee | L. A. LYNCH, Twenty “friendly matches” hav@ np. bs the |$.8 Canadian Challen CH iB ¢ p .
ee 241.5130. 1} Hon. Sec. B.A.BsA been played to date against See ee , a

BE WISE. - \ : 94.1.51-~3n. {\}| Chinese quintets in Peiping, Tient d Registered Mails at 2.40

Sar ee = Fos ee ee ISE } a2 4, BAe Kl en, Shanghai and Nanking ym 1d Ordinary Mail at 4 p.m. on oa ‘
bags. Small and very useful. ight’s ADVERT Ki 1 —INS tt ith of y ' 951
Phoenix 24.1,51—2n. sre w | 2

,














PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS

ADVOCATE





Arsenal
Backed To
Win F.A. Cup

LONDON, Jan. 24.
Le idea's powerlul Arsenal team
has been installed as favourite to
win the Football Association Cup
fe the second straight year.
Gunners who meet Northampton,
Third Division club in the fourth
rou id this Saturday are quoted by
























ma BOARD, OF
|CO-ORDINAT LON

€ ONSOL IDA TION |

‘38 YEARS
A
TRADE
1$T

o) vesnampton Wanderers, winners
in 1948—49 are second choice at
}--6—1 odds

{ Arsenal wins. the cup at
Wembley Stadium next spring, it
w li be the first time in 60 years
it hes been taken by the same
club in successive years once-
famous Blackburn Rovers now in
the second division last did it in
1890 and 1891.

But cup honours go to Black-
burn Rovers who won the trophy
three consecutive years starting
in 1883—84.

In all Rovers have six cup tri-
umphs an honour shared by As-
ton Villa who meet Wolves in
tre next round.

Villa entered the competition
at the tempting odds of 33 to 1,
but they



“Stop nationalisation NOW? But that would rock the very foundutions of the Welfare State.”





GODDARD LOOKS FOR Stollmeyer Says W.L.
ee Highly Successful





Second Regatta
On Saturday

‘Yhe Second Regatta of the 1951
season takes place on Saturday off
tne Royal Barbados Yacht Club,

shots still in the cup. seramble.
Brighton ahd Newport .-are

MR. sleepers at odds “of 3,000 ‘to. 1,

JOHN GODDARD, West Indies Cricket Captain,



are put badly in the |
shade by some of the other long!

THURSDAY, carers 25, 1951

ee



WILL VISIT ENGLAND | : ; 3
pee THE BARBADOS POLO §
<" . . *
The Oporto Football Club,} Wh ?
prominent "Portuguese ‘tear, nes CLUB %
accepted an invitation t visit -ORPerNT y “ >
England this summer ene PRESENTATION MAT~.! >
| sin x

Oporto stipulated that three}

games must be played and
jast one must be against Arsenal, |
premier London club.

t

The Oporto team was the only GARRISON SAV4NNAA
ene to beat the Arsenal when the} at 4.15 pyn
London Club played several games.) ENTRANCE 50¢c.
im Portugal in 1947. A silver cup
was purchased to celebrate (Ne , \%-4-*+siGtt%4GS9SSeSss
event. —I.N.S SSS
T, ’
\ DANCE
ec
FIGHT IN MARCH r MEMBERS of the St. Lucy
LONDON. ‘ “Gals ya Stor thelr t She ati ch
Jack Gardner, British and Em- \\ comes off on Soturday night ord
pire heavyweight champion, has) Fey GE Sh SArleNy: ee St
been nominated by the Europea ai AER ok oe
Boxing Union as the official chal- |} aan * ent oh ‘Eiaas” 1
lenger to Joe Weiden of Austria, |’ under the patronage of Dr. A. C

)
retary of the union at the head, Wt
cvarters in Paris before February |

|



leaves Barbados for St. Lucia this morning. He has accept- Times and) handicaps are as wits nates, Nee aa,
ed the invitation of the West Indies Cricket Board io In 1950—S51 Cricketer’s Annual falas Leelee “* Tr Edna, eee vane
attend a Tournament in St. Lucia between the Windward — <== | petition at 40:to 1 with a strony
zara
and Leeward Islands as an observer. ‘ ' DE ps alae eeu Blackpool sauna: commanding, a
The tournament began Tuesday Hy 0. 8S. COPPIN D i) muswisibed 230 Red. —to—1 odds.cP)
(Te rr eee between St. Lucia and the Lee- D 10 Van Thorndyke r
ee c's Gutsiiin Bealk ‘wibilnlash “THE TOUR RECORD of the West indies in first class D Peter Pan 231 Yellow. ‘
Islunds versus the Leewards ‘on games of 31 games played, 17 won, 3 lost and 1i drawn, 13 Ranger 2.32 Red. What son Today
‘ » 92 OR OT ¢ 90: ¢ > ; i 2110) so Wi r j ————— - 7
January 25, 26, 27, end = Fe would be considered highly successful even by Australian = eer ee Mrs. Fela de Kuh’s Exhibi-
ee o wey A pencunré standards,” writes Jeffrey Stollmeyer in a review of the ~~~ elomees tion ef of paintings and
rds 1» Januaty 31, ebr y : : s . ,
Race Baia West Indies tour in the Cricketer’s Annual of 1950-51 (4/-) BP 8 Olive “Blosom Se pencil sketches at “The
wos { ; 2 ”
At the last. meeting of the on sale at the Stationery of the Barbados Advocate. tn m Pavilion”—9.00 a.m.
Board a sub-committee was ap- “and his follow-through with the © o Fin "i Advocate’s Photo Exhibition
vented to consider ways and , [1 an interesting and compre- },.+ was a perfect model to follow. @__‘*%!_Fantssy #4 | Yellow at Barbados Museum —
ea of 2 sisting the ‘Gevel- hensive review of the tour Jeffrey : : 10.06 a.m,
nyc went of ereket in. the Wind- Stollmeyer has been candid, has In Lancashire League R, J. MacLeod’s Exhibition
a and Leeward Islands, so 8!Ven praise where praise is due In the Lancasture letter in an- of Oil Paintings at the
. these islands can play a larger pHa see wh re ear eee otier part.of the Annual, West Barbados Museum—10.00
in West Indies Cricket. Sary to-do so - Indians can follow the career of p 2 Imp 2.39 Yellow. a.m, i
One of the recommendations For example he describes the Beuce Pairaudeau, George Head- 3 Rainbird Auction Sale of Toys and
culbmitted by the Sub-Committee patting of Weekes and Worrell in 1 oa on ae eer hing 2 7 Moyra Blair ace re —
t approved by the Board, is the Third Test as something which let za a eitans ti ee = ; a eke om a She Nera Street 1:00
th ee ; of wa eth made it difficult for anyone to wae ie dugieatan hes won _* 8 Skippy Z or e eet — 1.
teen combiner eams of b imagine two batsmen more pleas- . ¥, Geputising for ne ha ee as crs tere , 9-m.
reups ef Islands should be ar- iu ite watch at the wicket te. scored 747 runs, averaging 57.46°C_ © Pesay Nan 2.41 Yellow. Second Trial Cricket Game
uiged annually, and that the gether in contemporary cricket. !¢¢ Bacup : r,) ' 6 Engle continues at Kensington—
Hoard arrange to send, at its ex- “There are few, if any, who can 3ruce VPairaudeau, of British | 7 Mohawk 242 Red. 1.00 p.m.
j ense, a Selector or Observer, to truthfully say that the West In- Cuiana, now a student in England, | 12 Dawn . Belleville Tennis Tourna-
itness and report on the match- dies did not deserve to win the ved 562 runs for Burnley, C } Minbenave Rasta te ment continues—4.15 p.m.
es and subm’t recommendations series,” Stollmeyer writes, average 37.46 while Hazare, who , 2 Scamp Mobile Cinema gives Show
for any promising player or play- ; i: not a West Indian, but whose c 3 Madness 2.43 Yellow at Holder’s Pasture, St.
ers to be sent to one of the large: Not Afraid nm me is well known in West Indi- ! 9 Dauntless Jarmes—7.30 p.m.
Cclonies (preferably Barbados) On the other nand he is not a: cricket circies since the W.I. @ ~~ j) y oe Peis oe
: : : ; ; ‘ 1 Magw CINEMAS
f trials. afraid to say that one did get the tour of India, 1948—'49, gave the | 11 em 2.44 Red, AQUATIC CLUB: “The Velvet
impression that the team would best all-round performance in the Touch’? — 8.30 p.m.
relax and surrender rather too League, Playing for Roydon he & 1 Gipsy ‘ i PLAZA (Bridgetown): “Sinbad
M. Cc. C. Get 15. Run easily hard-won advantages scored 760 runs and took 89 © 5. epee 2.45 Yellow. Tet Soller Sah Dewe Nes
gained in the early stages of a wckets, average (10.02. a ah .
’ g ) p.m.
Lead Over mateh {t is interesting to find also in K Tornadoes PLAZA (Oistin): “Larceny Inc.”
° Refreshing frankness is reflect- the Annual that, as a result of | 2 nvaes 246 Red and Wines For The Eagle’ —
ve * ed in his observations on the much the ‘Test. matches in England ————— "8 EMPIRE: “Cheaper By The
S Australia discussed First Test at Manches- against the West Indies that the ° 18 Clytie 2.47 Yellow. Dozen” — 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
J. D. GODDARD (Capt) RENMARK, South Australia, jet, : He vee a. a counties on whose grounds fy 7q=n aa ea GATETE (84. lamest Marine
alee. peers Roy een Vo Jan, 24 nas been said ana written about matches were played will each . Kid” — 8.30 p.m.
‘ 7 f the Test wicket at Old Trafford. jeceive $21,321.60, the other first aon Se
The MCC with four first innin8s Without wishing to revive con- (ics counties $7 si C 40: Ganbet a Ab: ne
lee lk to fall led a South 3 4 cliss counties $7,166.40, each 50 Yellow
Ss L ° : wickets sti troversy on the subject, two strong jyinor count $1,233.60 and ‘abdlbiheienictilllipenie aman Liitaseny Weta ie niga taacd
t. ucta Hit 105 Australian Country Eleven here arguments against the preparation , teeta AP sha ate and the “N.B-=The following dates have been
by 75 runs at the end of the of such a wicket must surely be two Universities $7,166.40 be- ‘xed tor Regattas:—

Vs Leewards

i¥rom Our Own Corresvondent)

CASTRIES, Jan. 24

IN the match between the,
Leewards and St. Lucia which
started here today, St. Lucia
won the toss and scored 105. The
batsmen were subdued by steady
bowling ind accurate fielding

Griffith, St. Helen, Deterville
and Auguste batted doggedly
while Livingstone, slow-medium
ofi-break bowler, and Anthony-
son, medium-pacer were the most
successful trundlers for the Lee-
wards. By close of play Lee-
wards had replied with 24 runs








opening day's play to-day. The
match ends to-morrow,

Due mainly to splendid bowling
\y Bob Berry, Lancashire spin
Lowler, who claimed 6 wickets
for 36 runs the Country side were
all out for 84.

The MCC also had to struggle
for runs and lost their first five
wickets for 86 runs but a sixth

icket partnership between
Denis Compton (40) and Freddie
Brown (42 not out) enabled ne
touring team to regain the initia-
tive. Roy Tattersall and Brian
Statham playing in their firs’
match in Australia since flying
out to reinforce the injury-hit
MCC team, each tok two wickel*

(1) the danger of injury to bats-
men in the presence of high class
fast bowling (2) The incongruity
of producing such a wicket for a
5-day match.”

Every Member
Stollmeyer mentions every
member of the team by name and
gives an unbiassed appreciation of
their individual performances. Of
Clyde Walcott he writes that no

praise can be too high for his
deeds. The West Indies, opines
Stollmeyer, are lucky indeed to

possess such an outstanding wick-
et-keeper batsman.

The sound defensive methods of
Rae, the terrible persistence of





tween them.

Sir Home
MeCantliss,

Gordon K.
Edward Graysen have
all made contributions, The 1950
-51 Cricketer’s Annual will cer-
teinly be a “must” on the book-
shelves of the sport-loving public.

SAIDDLER

Bart.,



—_——_—_—





















‘rd Regatta Saturday 3rd February

10th February,

1951,
4th
1961
This
atura.
the

Regatta Saturday

is on account of the last two
tys in February being Cricket and
first two Saturdays in March being
Norse Races.

H. BLAIR BANNISTER,
Starter

READY TO

DEFEND HIS TITLE

(By GEORGE WHITING)
CHARLEY JOHNSTON, English-born manager

of
world feather-weight champion, negro Sandy Saddler,
tells me from New York that his publicity kilted warrior




The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 6.10 a.m.
Sun Sets: 5.55 p.m.
Moon (Last Quarter) Janu-
ary 30
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.

High Water: 6.05 am., 5.32
p.m.
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) .17 in.

‘lotal for Month to Yester-
day: 1.81 ins.

‘Temperature (Max.) 82.0°F

Temperature (Min.) 72.5°F

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E,
(3 p.m.) E.N.E.

Wind Velocity: 13 miles per



; A p i hour
for the loss of one wicket. Crick ii er, the left hander Valentine and the
bowled well taking one wicket ayy ak Reuter. subtle mysteries of Ramadhin, the a ner gg (9 a.m.) 29.943,
tor 8 runs, while Me Mahon ¥ openee example - the Skippey is “ready and willing” to defend his title in England this hee ee eae
batted confidently to score 19 not : Goddard on and off the field, the year against the w y
out. A one-minute silence was Belleville Tennis capable manner in which Mr fight, * Notti ham eine aoe Cet |}
observed Curing the interval for J. M, Kidney carried out the man- R ) : Pre January 29, between holder OPENING AT
Mr. McNamara, deceased vet- Tournament agerial duties are all chronicled onnie Clayton and challenger Al Phillips.
eran cricketer. Details are as here by, Mr. Stollmeyer to be Naturally enough, Johnston ap- ish promoter Reg King. Mr. King,
follows:— YESTERDAY'S RESULTS handed down to posterity. ae sums “3 message the two with a contract in his pocket, is E
i ake any . words that rule the boxirns wor aki > tri . Pi
ST. LUCIA 1ST INNINGS Men's Sigoe—Finsls tion of ane player and that was [9M Harringay’ to "Howolulus purpose of inviting the new enna aces j
C. Paul Lb.w, b. Davis a D. Trimingham beat D. Lawless jiimself. In a footnote to the “!!ow much?” champion to stake his _ title Friday 2.30 & 8.30
eo prath aes Snover if 8-2, 6-4, 62, article the Editor has filled this pans he does NOT mention is against the Clayton-Phillips win-
3. Auguste c. Davis Anthonyson f breach and he describes Stoll- ‘at a prior engagement at Madi- ner on a Nottingham football
Rage e Aatharpnon b Livingstone rf Mi Yo Pu ee Gib- Meyer as one of the most attrac- *°" Square Garden, New York, ground next summer
Phillip b. Edd 15 oiger-aht 0 eae r xe tive batsmen to watch that cricket ©! February 23, puts Saddler’s I have no means of knowing
Deterville c, whet b. Livingstone 8 bons 6—0, 6—0. has ever seen, crown in possible jeopardy against how much Mr. King is likely to
& ae BOT a rie Handicap Mixed Doubles He made the most of his height his dear old pal and former ofer for this title tilt, nor would
ike ast out. ’ ane champion Willie Pep—a fight I presume to ask. You may bet te
6. Ellick b. Livingstone 0 Mrs. Bancroft and P. Patterson i ‘5 th at could very well leave man- your boots, however, that there Treen
Extras k 4 40 beat Miss orme and Mr. ‘sreyhound Racing ag er Johnston In no position to will be no promise of a guaran- t
ea Worme —}15 7—5, 7—5. ask rote about guarantees, teed purse. WT
‘ota ; e percentages, or anything else. Those lucullia ays ar as
Miss Wood and Dr, Manning — Figures After all, it is Willies turn to If the Saddlers Pini og Roget SoU
Fail of wickets: 1-7, 2—7, 3-43, 445, 40 beat Miss Benjamin and V. LONDON win! He and Sandy have been the world want to flash their well aN Ta,
5-49, 6—60, 7—98, 8-105, 9-105. Hutson —415 6—0, 7—5, Totalinntae: tineser at grey - pee. nee ee _ rere fists in this country,
BOWLING s Ss hound tacks in the London area ..., arkable American phe- they must do so “on the gate”’—
TODAY'S MATCHE during 1980. oat 6.645, 360" fn nomenon known as the “return atthe recognised ratio of 374 per DENNIS
oe Qo. ¥ . r Men’s Doubles proximately $18.750.000) less thar licht aet"—in which the winner cent for the champion, 124 per
ne x 0 38 P, Patterson and G. Manning jp 1949. : ma per a championship bout has part cent for the challenger. The
Zz vs. N, Roach and P. Roach, The figures were: 1949:/40.711,- © his purse-money withheld un- more they draw the more they
LEEWARDS 1ST INNINGS j. St. Hill and J. D. Triming- 955° ere 1950:" 34056. © 1,ne fights the loser again, ge’
Thomas b. Crick » ham vs. V. Hunte and V. Hutson. oie (sie domenoy Pa IS AAEM oo ar fight customers Even so, Mr. King avows that
Claxton not out ‘ 3 ' hha timienen iG Totali _ Sood for this nonsense in 1948, a fight here for the feather-
pei Ba Rie dae 9 Ladies’ Doubles j ne Sanit ot me Lr ggasi when Saddler won; in 1949, when weight championship of the world
Extras 2 Miss G, Pilgrim and Mrs. A. 92 DO tout $11,500,000). °2,, Won; ang in 1950 when suitably boosted and bally-hooed,
Total (for 1. wieket) “9s O’Skinner vs, Miss E. Worme and <99U9,i3« (abou * Saddler won again. So why not could well net the American
otal (for 1. wiek he ee a Wome: rei pet gg OY oe) in 1951? holder of the title a tidy little
compar . -LN.S. ;







One Purpose













packet of up to £10,000. But there












ee ; would be no “return-fight” claus—

- a A Whatever nappens 'n New York es in tue contract! That is one

They'll il Do Ie — yee as dilich ie sheid aiee a a Hatlo lo on February 23, one of the first Americanism w+ can very well
Oe! * Dee enc a aon men to nip smartly into the





1 ) win-
ner’s dressing room will be Brit-

do without,
London Express Service.




Yj, OK.MR. CUFF «+ BUT

Y BOSS PUT THROUGH
ANEW RULE +++ ALL

_
\TeAL PAY FOR THEIR

| OWN MAILING ++

Sama
Cuey, KID IMPORTANT!
THESE HAVE TO GO OUT
AIR-MAIL SPECIAL

REGISTERED“iNSURE









gives you strength

OH, WELL +++JUST SEND
‘EM REGULAR -+-I GUESS
THEY'LL GET THERE
IN TIME sss

to fight your
way through life





J& R Bread is Baked in: the
most Modern Bakery in
Barbados.









a























SATURDAY, 27th J:
at

the;

GE Sf EP POPE PV OPE SO Oren

MM PLE FE EE OLE E EF OF EEE





he European title holder. :
, St. Luey

Gitten’s

Contracts must reach the sec
Musie by C

Admission 3
Refreshments

KiIRTON, P.M.O.
Barrows.
Orchestra
)
)
4

on Sale

16. The fight is to take place {') _
before March 24.—-LN\S.





SS



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PAGE 1

THURSDAY. JANTARV 25. 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PXOE FIVE Skeletons Hang From The Apple Tree ABOUTWyudidownGoodknd h We tbury Read side. there is it small, queer, m hou'iwhich thrwind and age Slrani>e writings are all over the boards of il K house and n s "Rr apple tree in the yai T he houae and IBM |hj ^9 %  %  - aboil H are Iri.uirht wn hight Returned "g "I ; T HE AIIVOCATE •h..t ... -St. Thomas on Tuesday ••pnnger of Hubby Wiu blind f.-r lour years Af|l ••bout the failh healing In ihe Olv •he decide^ to set out from her home for Queen's Park When she had completed hulf of i ney. >hc changed her mind rnd returned home Snafattthal I it* had faith tod pr.i-ci aba iould rtUTC h'rself. AI tonic .-he began to pray and when -he awoke on Tuesday morning die W9M able to see I > IYBKI u, IN VMi5 |„. '-'eluded in the Ilritikh Council's dim sliow which will MM place at Waketield on Friday at • p.m. Those who are interested *^ill be admitted without tickets. The programme also includes %  British News" and "Green Girdle." For the usual Saturday morning children's show the programme will be "British News" and 'Children on Trial A NEW STANDMPK is bein* erected at Graham's Gap. St Andrew. Labourer* have begun to l:iv tin foundation for this pipe. The road in Corbin'* district was recently nug up for pipe line* l'i he put down. These lines ore nc.\lso be holding their harve-t on that Sunday. YOUR GUESS Where is this chimney, asked the Advocate's Guess Photo Com* petition this week. It li at Congo Hoed Plantation, guessed Mr. Hugh Gitlens of Mansion Road. Bank Hall, and he became another $5.00 winner in this competition Thereafter the guesses ranged far and wide. There was no doubt that n was a chimney. The guess question said so. But the location was the headache. It Is in Bush Hall yard, said one guessar, It Is at Ml. Gay Factory, St. Lucy, said another, and another guesser went to the Mental Hospital. A wild guess was "Needham's Point Lighthouse." Another one was "Arrow Plantation." St. Philip. The guesser perhaps meant "Harrow Plantation Someone thought that Bay Street was the location of the chimney. and someone else thought it was the chimney at the Cotton Factory Two other Incorrect guesses were, the Rum Refinery at Brighton, and Bow mansion Pumping Station. and people who pas, to walk .m Ihl gkH -.1 ii%  %  I 1 .. our* took ai M is t: 1 •rind arnjeh gets going would blow it down. %  graze and hoys play OraBDri Around it t many planUiii, lr"-:> at.ut 10.30 with little wind blowing about too district, with two above I1.1 1 don t, old 1 rags or paptr hanglO| within UN %  mlti' 1 • be stirring about it. thai t %  1 "Greet Trie XIV" The lli-t dooi of the house is fairly whole, hut another wire latd on it which appargsttl) haa no use Near the do., is pointed "Greet tinXIV". n white on a plOCO of sn>' | .n 1 may look at these uncanny ward as long as you like but you would scarcely ever ihink wlu.t they could mean. Although you would not have seen the owner ol the house there yesterday, you would have decided from the lc*-k of hi* hat which could be see from above the half door, that you had better not ask him anything for he is not a talking man. i OtIIM. \oo\ Ne ..!-. 1.:tn %  wrlung ten I'nvati 1 utter flox." and Believe in Hie I and thou shall bo s-ved." Some of these writings are done with much precision and neatness while others ;irc written up In .-halk. If you are passing up Goodlnn I you can look in the yard to ttlu, house over some short rails Written up on the rolls Is "Some of our race of people steal nothing but at the end it cost something" Blocking a pathwny into the yards through the rails is an old rusty stove which must have baked lots of bread in its Unit, The stove is not more than 1 foot away from the road and contains plenty of other rust;. things besides. Women Peep Out WlUdll the yard are garden beds with a scanty amount of lettuce. In the yen! too. with other old things hi .1 heap o; plaited twine for inuking mats. After you read "Whatsoever a an sow tha* shall he also reap" and you begin to think, well here bible of u man, you will come %  POD %  COUoetlon Of skeletons hotiKiiiK 0t0IH the sugar apple Ineluded in them are a Jaw bone of somr. big animal and the skull of what seems to be a rabt and one of a dog. There an aoma plantain irees %  ar this apple tree and tied Id piece of w.re which is attached to two of these trees are a small I and n three-gill boric MOT* ly tilled with liquids. The threegill bottle still has the orange sh label sluck upon it. but the most daring little boy of the district would not think of .mll'n. out the cork to try the taste oi the drink. The viol has in an oily sort of liquid with a thick brown layer on the top. want to get a look at the funny house In Goodland. you II have to moke a quick job of It, for you will see women peeping at you from a window. BLOOD VICTORY GARDENS WASHINGTON By Robert N. Schwartz | ThP Department of Agriculture .itxt.il pulling CHH H noes in the hands of eM risjh :• %  retui 1 % %  uted to tl Stssal 2 The department has ifcn .,,1 whether which lasted fror, %  "" %  hould be aneou trnmer and if so. to what extent. 1 and included Ml 784 mOfl nc ""* lln *** l; THM OOVBRED REFUSE COLLECTOR la expectea in Miiy I'ebroary. It Is part of the Saoitu, Commissioner*' contribotton to a cleaner St. ClcaasL Refuge Collectors Coming Two new types of refuse collectors will be coning to tha lahu d •owi These collectors keep the ictu.se covered so that there Is no possibility of it being %  onttllu' about the itraot They ensure the most up-to-date sanitary arrangement for the removal of refuse. These collectors were ordered Dram hngland by the Scavenging rhmnrhnont of St Michael through McKnearnej t, Co., Ltd and will be used in the City and Ml ui liThe Scavenging Department has at present a Meet of nine refuse lorries and 15 push carts. The Adracate was told at Hit Department yesterday that thev cover a mileage of approximately 125 miles per day and remove about 63 tons in the same period. Fowl Thief Jailed After pleading guilty to a charge of larceny brought by the Police. Clyde Moore a labourer of Chapman Lane. St. Michael was yesterday sentenced to one monlb'-in.prisonmcnt without hard labour by His Worship Iff K A Mcl,c*l Police Magistrate of District "A". Moore stole two fowls valued at 12 belonging to Kathleen Alleyne on January 23. Police c.ai.siable Devonish teld the Court that on January 23 he s.,w Moore with these two fowk DM ol which he, w> ..uryind un h r tUa arm. lie anested Moore when In; could not give a satisfactory explantation as to how he came by them. Later the same day Alleyne identified the fowls as her own. s. A 1 AM i sea ^. %  i. Moore has one previous convlc"WtUEMSTAD CALLS |oon for %  ttauuu when he wa* Ined 40 by His Worship Mr No passengers look the opportunity of sailing ;rom Barbados for England when the Dutch passenger freighter Wlllemstad called from Trinidad yesterday. The WUIemsUd brought two passengers with her from Trinidad They are from Curacao. With 18 intransit passengers, the WlUemalad sailed yesterday evening for Plymouth and Madeira. She is consigned to Messrs. S P Musson. Son & Co.. Ltd. Talma for the larceny of sheep valued £1. 11s. 2d. Moore asked Mr. McLeod nol to aand him to prison but to Impose a tine. Mr. Mcl-cod told him that his hands anno (Moore) has a previous eon viction for larceny and the law %  anyone with a record I i.v must go to prison if found utility Sgt. 0. Murrell who prose cuted on behalf of the police %  ifcod I* r imprisonment C D. C, Consider W.L Shipping Brigadier B. B. Mount. a representative of Colonial l>evel i.pm.ni Corporation who is now in Kaibodo-. nil ., slim i v ... .1 I the report (rum Lon don published in Uie Adveeate that the problem of %  hipping in the West Indies is one i.f which CDC. was aware from the start, and which has been the subject of continuous study. He said that at the moment he could not see a method that would be both satisfactory and economically sound. One tif the most difficult prob. lenis had always seemed to him to be the the provision of an Bdoquot* inler-l-land service That problem resolved Itself Into the) auottton of inter-island tradu and It would be appreciated that to make shipping economically sound, height as well as passengers were required Since most of the Islands were li" due inn. broadly speaking, the same produce, the problem of Du ilrlln j up an inter-island trwfc presented one of ihe major difficulties I "oil Computi) Brigadier Mount said that the development of the limber operalions m British Guiana was going .. 11 w*U Rocentlj thl undertaking was formed Into a local company. Work on the new and modern mill began some months ago ami was going ahead well. When the mill is erected, the lumber produccd from British Guiana w:ll 0-1 of a higher standard that it has ever been before In the history of the colony. He said that negotiations with Government In connection with the cement factory in Trinidad wen* still continuing, but Ih'iiiinjca. the Corporation's group of product.' were progressing 11. They included a citrus plantation, a citrus packing grading plant. Ice and cold storage and a hydro electric scheme for the Roseau district. Brigadier Mount leaves to-day for St. Lucia by B W.I.A. to observe the progress of the rebuilding of Castries. AMERICANS CALL ON RESEARCH CRUISE NINE AMERICANS who are carrying out ;i Wolofltci reohnr ch crtiaM In the AtatnUc, irrivnd %\ Biffbndoi v< lerday by the luxury yar.it Jtianiu which they h.iv chartered to do their work. Clothes Given Away Over 70 poor and old people veil clothes at the Children's Goodwill League fOg%  11 noon The clothes were ...HI bj Mr*. Violet Murrat. a social worker of Boston. Mass \. 1 rn lira, Murray were Mr. C. Hilton Green and Mr W E Husbands. two Shippini: Agents of Boston. Mass. The clothes were distributed b] Mr. John Beckles and Mr. and Mrs. W E. Husbands who are in the island on holiday. A gianiophone and records were also sent by Mrs. Murray. These are for the entertainment of the small children at the league. V£kDlCT ON PILGRIM'S DEATH An open verdict was returned by a nine-man Jury ycsicrdwhen an Inquiry into the cires urroundln^. %  t! of Herman Pilgrim and) I day at DhrMcl "P." Pol %  Mr A W Harper wa UN Herman PUgTti I ihllburv Road. Bl l on Friday. Jgl when a two and a half bucket fell on him about 9 25 Leslie Holmes, 44. is the skip DOT and he b.i.s srttt) hil Wathen (Executive Ofllcer Gcirge Hoehno (Navisjatoe), Henry E Whiddcu, Elmei %  ...1 s> non ettc. Irving McLaughlin ano Leslie Davis. Theii aoei nnn from 19 to 46. Thrv are working for tin Marine Biological Resear. h Instilute. too. Baltimore. Maryland Richard wothon b In charsa •> the research work Quite a good stock of glass Jars are on board the yacht They are kept clean for collecting rare specimens of "life" to be foun the ocean. These specimens will be taker back to the States where thaj be classlfled_ and may b< r 'rfher research work. None of the crew is an expert biological research. However. Skipper Holmes. QBOffSJ HOOUM nd Rirhani Wathen have dona Quit* ., lot of study oUf the subucl nnd have reachet) ai 1 tal stage. This Is their fit of the sort. They have %  Urtad on %  Well IC .%  The Joanlta is certainly wel igeed for the projert On her deck and astern Is a sandnc machine, a mechanhal devno (or ping the bottom of the vessel and colleelini: the dopoatl Whlcn may contain some of tin %  int for t liissifi" atim: On both sides of the yacht are stationary fishing rods and tubs ne.oln on the deck for receiving the eatchai Nats, Una and a plankton coUoctoi aaa iboard while in the bridg* will l>e found a r rimini 1 roomy and will give good scope for tl shine The cruise is expected to Uksl for three or four months That started from Miami. Florida, and iled for Barbados via Cuba and St Thomas They have railed at Barbados for the purpose of efto their vessel. BlcTinrd Wathen told the Ad eeate yesterday thai the) tin en raUMh weather UtrouttkOUt their 2.000-mihvoyage from Miami here. Tl>ey had tsnd* topptl at RartiadoK. bU* forceil to afiei panl "f UX Joanlta's riyginu was snappct In a stoiin pondlni about hen*, thev will set sail again. The next port of call is unknown r is their tirM visit to Barbados and Ihe llrst call of the J-.nil.. Thev think Barhado;, loveh Place The white painted Jaanita baa a net tonnage of 85 tons, li 90 feet long. 21 feet %  %  root i I a it* She avaa buill in Maine by the Boothbaj Boat Biiildim: • % %  .. rot %  :. DTge "i"" 1 a businessman of the State-. Good weather and she will d' 10 knots The Juanlta relies on sails lr easher engine is out Water is always breaking OVOt the (U-rk. glvlnft hei i keep It clean Beef Costs More People have been complaining that they have been usked to pav a penny more for a pound of boot which is scheduled to sell at 3S cents a pound. A check-up with the Control id l i %  Department yeatOt ted lhal their hat been no in lei auUMrtgtnfl au h an increase in the price of local hot The price of imported beef Not only is It sold according to the cut. I ul the price is also affected by landing cost One of ihe leading importers of frozen meat however told th< Advorste yesterday lhat there %  %  %  cents a pound, though N know if local butchel %  charging more ''hers on the ny it miisi be the importers who Get Your Pencil And Your Paper LONDON The public ratal* : Britain's Genet.,! P.. %  oil,. hM issued an "impoitani Up 1 i telephone users U. aOOT ) new papor in Britain Under the heading Tele^tu | the donorUnant uaa< i42 words to tell the nation to kOOp pencJJ gad paper next to the telephone. This is the advice m full ImporUnt Tip for Subscriber*. The i-nicioncv of tha %  I i %  lea, whiih i> nf iioixii! % %  %  II telephone pat I lanl rovktw bji tha Pot I OfAn however, ., ilmi n which subscribers themselvc help If rvi.v suli-i rilier kepi | ptn< MI and puper near his I) kskanhono lines and appnratur would often be freed for Othei all much sooner, there would iw fowOi 1 iited' signals, and both aller and called would benefit -y the avoidance of uni waitinir This Mvtng Of lime e particuiuriv hn| an In trunk lonaj million are mink can I rcm 'hrse. and for Ih. I '"'noon •, %  ntntd %  VIM, delivered by tele phone, the called auhact milres a pencil and papal I is would be saved If hce were readily at hand The department said that own "important tips" would be asMOt' time to time. Some newspapers suggest Ambassador Wait** Glflord, Board chairman M Amerl ran Telephone and Tola Cotnpar v. mliilit provide Iho d bnporta f| | i.'OCV — I.N.S. rVO V/AR-UNTIL IT FLOODS OXFORD The sleepy btlle w Btonar, l laJofdahlra ta nol talk The rtuagjera look at the Asseni that flows tbnnmb the lUUga gnd pRMlei 1'here will i c i. M ai thla vi n Ancient legend sayj that so long la tha stmam does not Hood there will be no war. To-day while many of Britain rivers are in winter flood ihe AslA'lideti i> onl] g, tinkle lln:\ twice In living mai nt Trunvi' VKtori garden campaign aitei World War If In help pVOVkM Mod turned up thl te moH-r "O" tvpe [*r South ihan in any %  lon. "B" : % %  \orth lii l'-ni K n 11, i t ti ii. D.C rapt it n tha t urroni huu i.i ih • .' %  • Mmal of the AmaUon .'i they found a NorthaV mil d fferenUatloi In bloc rand. The total percentage i*f |-ei tons (alln \ to r it .96 per cant; and cant < i I-, the so-called %  hb h i an bo u ad In transfusions i'*r.ardless of tha rO'. |*e i i riling on the value of the atudy, ihe aclenuata daclarod In ihe evonl of un emergeno requiring lnrge ipinntitles of blood i apporantl.i .i n-fen-nee (o alon attack) Ihe Southern .1 %  %  lw comparati> i ourabltsources of O and thi Northorn araaa of B Ri ul* -.t tha Mudj Indicate) tli.d fog each degree of latitude lor from N.a'.b U) South. Ihe ii group pareantaga Inaraaaad an i :f.' I--I can) Moving fioni BOUth to North. OB the olh hand, the ii gjroun paaoantoga jumpe aft up. ofneiabi say It probably will not be an all-out campaign as it was In World W,.r II Chances are that efforts will he made to encOUPBfJt serious city JOHNNY HAYSEEDS, and not th,. plant-in-thc-pring-and-on* to-1 he-shoreall -summer variety. The government wants to make sure that fall-time farmer*, who produce the bulk of the nation's food and fiber get u ll the seed. fertilizer. Insecticides and equipment they need for all-out pro-l.iiMilitary and civil defense officials were said to favour expansion of home gardening as a measure aialnst sabotage, to aid -onservatlo i of tin for cans, and make for more military spec on transportation facilr — I.N •. For that rich savoury flavour! Cam Do Fly IX>NDON ii. . tains have started new from the "moving mountain" whk ii n threatanln ihe little village of Pauldo nahlre Bouldi n rocks, ami tn hurlUll down Into tha village are keaplna the Inhabitants continualMi Winnie Williams is particularly OH the WOtah The Uug time the mountain moviHt a cow was hurled down into her back HARPIC Make that stew really tasty with just a little Marmltc Make it better for you too Marmitc .ont.nnv the B2 vitamins that build up health and rcM-dance to illness. That'* why it's so good for everyone oo bread and butter or in tasty sandu iches. You can do MI much with M.irmitr in soups, gravies, sauces and •iavoury dhhes and Marroite docs so much for good cooking. MAR MITE The Vitamin 8 Yeast Food Had* in f nglalMf No Holiday in Complete without a Kodak Camera me RltllWN z tOMHNO i Meniscus Lens) tAnaaton l.enal BSw U.K. ? Deliveries can be arranged in the U.K. for the popular VAUXHALL CARS Full detail* u ill he gladly 8>ven on application (n %  ROBERT TIIOM LTD. Whilrpark (COURTESY GARAGE) Dial 4U16



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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, JANIZARY , 1*51 HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON % %  r— 11 TKVOUB SCBATCH RBMOVSR &UUHHID MICKCY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY CvEs : Y NONKNM ^>_MW CO I ^-" VJ --.' I • %  1 mi i w-9 V\A*-. __ BLONDIE _____ -,:v; HI BY CHtC YOUNG DO •vr mi •; DELICATE as a moonbeam the* fswwrtsh "mehm•n-m*r iMltng MMthossCold dfeeoaaferM with Al--SaltierAlka Sttluor contain* alkaline Hur a il f to ontrallM %  %  > %  (•Hik acidity ohn aa aoalgoaic lot aoothini heada ch e*, llivr it handy-always' Alka-Seltzer COOL BEAUTIFUL "FERGUSON FABRICS" FOR WEAR AT NIGHT. STOCKED BY LEADING STORES. *,VAV.V////>W. WOHK For cur people depends quit bit on YOUR Industrie^, compel • ,rt or Hoi from thai LlM QLENE (price and quality) against any similar article and you will find you get better value. Lim lene la as refreshing as a breath of Sprm* 18 to 67c. at your dealer. FLAVOUR For Mellow Smoothness md distinctive tlaTemr, There Is no rum that compares with mSB & SAMPSON LTD. %  •!,,:. m H i-i • for Brrt Rom It always is in Barbados and that's why Northerners enjoy our climate, and their favourite foods. DOWNYFL/VCE CAKE MIX Jlnqsr. Vanilla. Chocolal. Flarours 36c. per Pkg. Extracts and Household Condiments Requisites BOYTII S1.60 .90 .70 Harplc S .80 $ .47 Bonox (BMI Exliacl) .70 .40 Shlolo 36 Mnrmitc .97. .80, .32 SUvo .36 Oxo Cubss .22 Mln Cream .40 .20 Bisto (Foe Gravy) .... .33 Wuidolan* 31 Madras Curry ... .. .7G KUcrobe ID.D.T.) .71 Prepared Mustard .17 Chsmico Clsanssr .26 Peanut Butter and Jams Poanul Bultsr 55 SJL Plnsappls Jam (2-ib) S.A. ApricM |am 12-lb) S.A. Fig lam 12-lb) S.A. Malon 4 Ginasr Jam (Jib) .60 .62 Jm