Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
arr

ESTABLISHED 1895





Free World Must
Stick Together

—Says FKisenhower

LONDON, Jan. 16.

GENERAL EISENHOWER, Conimandevr of the

Atlantic Pact Army, told
day that the “No 1 priority’’

“establishment of a res

reporters eve to-
of the West was the
vectabie, suitable and ade

quate military structure behind which we may ali

live in peace.’’

The General compared ihe condiiious of

to-day

with those of 1942 when he held his first Press con-

ference in London.

Then he was trying to orsanise

military forces

ane

to win a war already started.

Reds Prepare
For Battle
With Govt.

ROME, Jan. 16.
Italian Communists were to-
day feverishly preparing for what
may be a major trial of strengt!
against Government plans to
maintain order when Generali
Eisenhower arrives to-morrow.
“Shock police” of Interior Min-
ister Mario Scelba are the Gov-
ernment’s main weapon to dea:
with this type of situation.



Strong squads of these’¢rim
steel-helmeted police in the:
searlet jeeps are prowling nish

and day through the main Italiai
cities.

At the slightest sign of troub!
the jeeps will charge into
monstrators with sirens shriekin

Demonstrations and strike
have been planned by Commun-
ists.

Communist unions hope to uss
a printers’ strike to prevent Rowic
newspapers coming out with then
reports of Eisenhower's arrival

Communist protest strikes hav:
been peppering Italy for some
days, usually consisting of short
stoppages of work while the ‘‘or-
der of the day” is voted, There
was even a strike by players in
a football match near Pisa which!
held up the game for some min-
utes. ;

It was believed that the Cab-
inet discussed yesterday whethe:
to call out troops in- addition to
police, but no hint of the decision

has escaped.
re . —Reuter.





Flu Virus
Isolated

LONDON, Jan. 16.

The World Influenza Research
centre in London said today that
the virus causing Britain's influ-
enza epidemic had been isolated.

It was similar to the, virus—a
Prime which {caused the flu in
Seandinavia in 1949 and had prob-
ably been imported from Scandi-
navia, the Centre said. :

The Research Centre which is
working with Pasteur in Paris on
the flu problem, said that the epi-
demic in Britain is considered
mild.

A Ministry of Health spokesman
called it “very infectious, though
fairly mild.”

Commenting on the Italian re-
quest for vaccine from abroad to
avert the flu. epidemic, General
Sir John Taylor of the Medical
Research Council said today: “The
whole point is that there is no
vaccine in general use. Different
strains have been tried in America
and elsewhere, during the last five
or eight years, but their, positive
value is not yet known.”

The World |Health Organiza-
tion’s influenza centre here has
been seeking a protective vaccine
for general use but,'so far, no im-
munisation has been found.

—Reuter.



10 BELIEVED DEAD

SPOKANE, WASHINGTON,
Jan, 16.

Ten people were believed to be
aboard an airliner which showed
“no sign of life”, after it crashed

ard caught fire here to-day.
—Reuter.

“No it is



to preserve peace
ana p’event anyone from believ-
jing they ce destroy the Tree
world or that there is anything

to be gained for them in attacking
the free world” he said.

Eisenhower said he had keen
“cheered by the obvious readi-
ness of Governments and civil-
ians” to meet present tasks during
his tour of Europe

He believed the peoples of the
two sides of the Atlantic would be
bound together by a common ven-
eration of freedom and a common
jetermination to be united with
other free people.





“So far as I am concerned the
only criterion that should be

observed in measuring the con-
tribution of any country should
be expressed in these terms—
j. we intend to put into this effort
one more man-hour in terms of
our size than anybody else.










“If we can live up to that
simple little doctrine we need
have no fear.”

“You can be sure of one thing”
he added, “I thoroughly believe
|that the only way the free world
jcan defend itself successfully is
jfor the free world to stick to
gether”



Questioned about

; the gefem A
link between the Atlantic cn tbe
Pacific threat Eisenhower Sad

they could not possibly divorce |
any one area of the world from!
all others

Eisenhower said that as far as
his job as Supreme Commander
was concerned, he felt himself. to
be the representative of no single
country.

“T regard myself in this job as
one twelfth American and on
twelfth of each of the other na-
tions, and I shall attempt to con-
duct myself in just that way.”

Eisenhower met Field Marshal
Viscount Montgomery, Western
Union Defence chairman to-day
} continuing his European
“check up” tour.

afore

They dsscusseqd many problems
concerned with including Western
Union forces in an Atlantic Pact
force.

Afterwards Eisenhower went on
to a meeting of North Atlantic
deputies.

He was also to see Foreign Sec-
retary Ernest Bevin.—Reuter.



Urge Agreement On
Russian Proposals

By HAROLD KING

a PARIS, Jan. 16.
British and French Ambassa-
dors in Washington have been

instructed to urge United States
Secretary of State Acheson to
agree to Russia's request to hold
the proposed four power meeting
outside the United States it was
learned in usually well ‘nformea
quarters here to-day.

Henri Bonnet, French \mbassa-
dor and Sir Oliver Franks British
Ambassador were meeting Ache-
son to-day to work on the tex‘
of the Allied reply. Each country
has prepared a draft.

It was learned that the Ameri-
can draft differed somewhat in
form and style from the British
and French drafts.

The American draft apparently
deals at some length with polem-



ical matters dealt with in previ-|

our notes on both sides whereas
French diplvmatic quarters feel
there is no point in loading this
correspondence with ideology .
—Reuter.





AT THE HOTEL RAPHAEL, Paris, Col. Costa d

IKE AND MONTY

U.N. Must

Recognize

Red China
—NEHRU

_. LAONDON, Jari. 16,,
Jawaharlal Nehru, Prime Min-
ister of India, said in London
to-day that continued United
Nations’ support for Chiang Kai
Shek was unrealistic,

“While the nations have been
ciscussing the entry of the Peo-
ples’ Government of China into
the United Nations, something
much bigger has been recog-
nised—that New China is a great

power to be dealt with in terms
of equality by the other great
powers”,

Speaking to a crowded Press
Conference at the end of Com-
monwealth talks in London,
Nehru said settlement in the
Far East should not be on a local

but on a world-wide basis.

On the prospects of a peaceful |
settlement in Korea, the Indian
Prime Minister said that the im-
portant thing was that four pow-

ers specially concerned Britain,
the United States, Russia and
China should settle Far Eastern
problems

The basic factor is that a great
new power has arisen in the Far
East and thereby has upset pre-
j vious equilibrium, Not recogniz~
ing this fact does not make it)
any less a fact.—Reuter. |
|



| Bevin Talks Meat ,

LONDON, Jan. 16.

Carlos Hogan, Argentine Am-
bassador in London called on
Ernest Bevin, British Foreign
Secretary th®s afternoon at his
own request. It was believed he
discussed with Bevin the negoti-
ations opened to-day between the
British Ministry of Food and twu

|Argentine | representatives on
j|meat supplies to Brita’n.
A Food Ministry official said;

“The talks are on an official level,
en proposals which have been
}put forward. At present they are
exploratory and technical”
—Reuter.



uregard, Field



Marshal Viscount Montgomery,

eneral Eisenhower and Admiral Corney. Field Mar shal Montgomery met General Eisenhower, Supreme

Comma r of the

to mak

North Atlan
a three weeks tour of Western E

force +
rope.—Expr

tie defence e latter ar

rived in Paris from Wachington

Harbados



pel

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY, 17, 1951

MISS ARLENE CUMMINS newly





appointed Assistant Mistress at

Queen’s College is seen here chatting with some of her pupils when
the new school term began yesterday.



Scientist Wanted T

Investigate Sugar
Disease In’ B.G.

(From Our Own

The search begins to-day

Correspondent)
LONDON, Jan. 16,
in the U.K. for a plant scient-

ist able to fly at the earliest possible moment to British

Guiana to investigate the m

ysterious disease threatening

the colony’s main industry—sugar.



ON THE

° SPOT |

«ll

|
IPSWICH, England,

Harry J. Wright, area {
manager of the British Elec
tricity Authority, received
an electric shaver among |,
his Christmas gifts.

When he plugged it in the |
light socket it blew out the
fuses so he returned it to |
the makers for overhaul. |
It was then discovered |
that the shaver’s case had
been emptied of its mechan- |
ism and the space filled
with grey explosive powder.

Scotland Yard detectives
are now seeking the sender
of the explosive shaver
—-LNS



Norway Plans |

New Budget

OSLO, Jan. 16.

The Norwegian Government will {
soon propose a “new extraordin- |
ary budget” to be met by new
taxation, the Finance Minister de-
clared in his budget speech to
Parliament today.

This would be in addition to |
the budget for the year beginning
July 1, 1951, he declared.

Without loans or increases in
direct taxation the budget is bal-
anced at a total of £143,325,000
and includes nearly £25,000,000
for defence. |

The new budget proposes in-
creases in railway telegraph and
postal rates and a temporary tax
on electric power. .

He said that the Government |





would put forward proposals tc
pay for lengthening the period of |
military service and other ex-

penses for defence preparedness.
—Reuter.

PEKING MA

NEW DELHI, Jan. 16.

The Indian Home Minister
Chakravarty Rajagopalachari t
night expressed his belief that
Peking might not turn down th
latest peace plan to the resolution
on the Far East

He was speaking at a state ban-
quet given in honour of Afghan-
istan, Prime Minister, Marshal
Shah Mahmoud Khan who is
spending a few days here on hi
way to the United States

Rajagopalachari said that Indian
Prime Minister Nehru was absent
abroad “engaged in waging the
sacred battle for peace.”

“T have no news but I instinc-
tively feel that he (Nehru) will
win the difficult battle”
alachari continued
turned a critical corner

hard and long battle









| agreed
‘might

»- the extended hand

” in the

Reports suggest that the disease
which has descended suddenly is
leafseald, but according to a mes-
sage received last night by the
Colonial Office from B.G. author-
ities, this conclusion is unconfirm-
ed as yet.

Leafscald has been unknown in
the West Indies hitherto

In addition to pleas to Britain,
it is understood requests for as-
sistance to fight off the disease
have been sent by the sugar in-
terests of the colony to the United
States and Canada,

Alarming reports have eman-
ated from B.G., and some speak
of the prospect of the complete
annihilation of the sugar industry
which provides two-thirds of
B.G’s revenue. This is not in
aecordance with information
reaching the Colonial Office last
night. A spokesman at the Colo-
nial Office described such reports
as “rather exaggerated” He
that the unknown disease
become serious but it was
hoped measures could be taken
300n to vrevent any such disaster

The request of the B.G. Govern-
ment to the Colonial Office is for
a plant pathologist and it is pos-
sible he may be found at the Im
perial College of Tropical
culture,





Dutch Clairvoyant
Seeks Coronation Stone

AMSTERDAM, Jan. 16

Dutch clairvoyant, Peter Hur-
tkos aged 40, who claims to have
helpéd. Dutch and Belgian police

solve several cases left by air for
London to-day to look for the
Coronation Stone

Scotland Yard to-day denied he
was comng at their request
Hurkos’ real name is Peter Van
der Kurk

Several Dutch seers

said they

‘had been requested to help trace

the stone missing from West-
minster Abbey since Christmas
Day, but had refused following

the example of their counterpart

in Britain, who believed the case
‘had a political side

Reuter.

“I do not think Peking will max«

the disastrous mistake of refusin;
of friendsn



and co-operation.”

A State Department spokesm:r
said to-day that Chinese Com-
munists must stop fighting befoi
the United States would “sit dow,
at any conference dealing wit
Korea and the Far East in
eral.”

The — possibility that
would accept the United Natio
Ceasefire Plan in principle, bu
would demand sweeping and prob-
ably unacceptable reservations was
kept in mind, he said “In this
event the United States would
not be bound by its acceptan¢e of
the ceasefire resolution presented
Political last
poke

If Chinese Com te reje

goen-

Peking

Comr

eck,” the



ted



Agri- |





Vietminh
Launch New
All Out Drive

INDO-CHINA, Jan. 16.
Vietminh insurgents launching
anew all out drive to capture
Hanoi, chief town in north

Indo-China pushed to within 26
miles of the city to-day,

French forces were said to be
preparing aq powerfully fortified
perimeter on the coast around the

important port of Haiphong, in
case of necessity.

Thirty Vietminh battalions es
cimated to number nearly 40,006
men were being held in fierce
fighting along the 10-mile front

northwest of the city, it was said
to-night,

Two French
had recaptured
tions

American built dive bomber
ind other planes and curtain ar-
illery fire was giving “active and
‘fective support.” The Commu
iique said

The new attack followed
ill night lull in the
sloody battle.

Crack French

motorised
important

group:
posi

an
two-day

and North Afri-
can troops had fought bloody
bayonet battles with insurgents
in their efforts to hold the French
ront

Artillery pumped hundreds of
shells into stubbornly advanciny
rebel hordes as dive bombers

swept down. —Reuter.

4 STEAL 10m. FRANCS

PARIS, Jan, 16
A bank van with 10,000,006
{francs braked hard in a Pari
main street to-day when a cyclis:
swerved in its path and fell off



Three gangsters armed wit
ltummy guns, jumped out of
|car behind and seized the bank’

| brief cases all filled with notes

The cyclist waited for them ir
the getaway car parked with the
engine running in a side street
They left the bicycle and their
first car—stolen vehicles.—Reuter



U.S. STEEL GOES UP

NEW YORK, Jan. 16
America’s annua! steelmaking
capacity on January |, 1951, wag
the record of 104, 229, 650 tons,
more than 4,500,000 tons greater
than on January 1, 1950, the
American Lren and Steel Institute

has announced

The new capacity figures is an
increase of 22,600,000 tons or

of nearly 28 per cent since 1940

—Reuter



PEACE PLAN

the Peace Plan or demanded un-
acceptable reservations, it was
considered inevitable at the State
Department that the United States
would move in the United Nation

to brand China with aggresvion i

Korea,

State Department officials de-
“lined to comment on the speech
of the Indian Home Minister Raja-
fopalachari who expressed the be
lief that Chinese Communis.:
would not reject the Peace Plan

The speech aroused considerable

interest It followed earlier un-
confirmed reports that India be-
lieved Peking would accept the
proposal,

Officials said the State Depart-
ment had received “absolutely
nothing” from the Indian Gov
ernment to confirm these reports

-Reuter.





PRICE : FIVE CENTS

Suwon

TOKYO, Jan. 16.

UNITED NATIONS tanks smashed into Suwon

only 15 miles sou

th of Seoul to-day, shortly

| after their main forces had withdrawn to shorten-

ing north. up the west

| ed lines, south of Wonju in the centre. Tanks rac.

coast road through recap-

tured Osan brushed aside resistance to their 10-mile

Then they fought briefly in the

streets of Suwon itself in one of their first aggress-
ive actions since the retreat at the end of last year
—before Communists broke off and fled.

|
| drive to-day.

US. Bombers |
Fly 5,000 Miles
_ To England

FORT WORTH TEXAS, Jan, 16

Six ten-engined United States
B 36 superbombers landed it
'Lekenheath Airport in England
to-day after a flight of more than

| 5.000 miles from an American Air
| Force base it was announced here
| American Air Force authorities i
; England said the bombers were
on a “long range flight training
pro ramme initiated by the Unites
States Air Force several year:
ago.”

The bonbers, Diggest in the
world, had never when on previ-
ous training flights gone beyond
Hawaii in the west and the United

| States Atlantic coast in the east,

They roared into the air on
“Operation U, K.”

Each plane took qa different
course They carried the norma!
erew of 15 and the equal of full
combat armament

The flight is expected to leave
England after being serviced with-
.n four days. The planes will far
»ut on separate homeward mission
to Fort Worth taking from 35 to
40 hours

—Reuter.



Mussolini's Daughter
Sails To Buenos Aires

NAPLES, Jan. 16.

Ann Maria Mussolini, 21-year-
old daughter of the former Italian
dictator, left Naples last night in
the 8,000 tons liner Andrea Grita
»ound for Buenos Aires,

She is to visit her elder brother
Vittorio who has been living in
the Argentine capital for some |
time

~Reuter



Mass air attacks and a non-stop
artillery barrage accompanied the
United Nations withdrawal from
Wonju late yesterday, it was an-
nounced.

Troops after holding off 50,000
Chinese and North Koreans for 16
days pulled back from the thumb-
shaped bulge jutting north from
the main defence line to stricter
positions

Tonight, as they strengthened
their new posts, they stood ready
to meet any Communist drive for
two vital mountain passes about
70 miles north of Taeju, the Unit-

ed Nations Headquarters in the
southeast.
Command of these passes-—-the

only main road routes through the
1,000 yard high central. mountain
range—would enable Communists
to fan out south of the Naktong
River

Only occasional
from troops testing rifles and
machine-guns broke the silence
as the warming sun melted eight
inches of snow and frozen mud
along read tracks into a soggy
quagmire.

One Yak type Communist fight-
er was set afire in an attack on
two American bombers returning
from a raid on airfields in the
northwest. It disappeared behind
a hill,

bursts of fire

Reuter,



Persia May Retire
From World Bank

TEHERAN, Jan, 16,

Persia Ys contemplating” with-
crawal from membership of the
International Bank it was learned
here to-day from a usually reli-
able source

This follows the alleged refusal
by the Bank to grant her an
$8,000,000 loan to rehabilitate the
gulf ports of Buhre and Kioram-

The Government has cabled its
representatives at the Inter-
nat onal Bank to investigate
whether the loan has in fact been
refused

—Reuter.



India Turns Down Proposals
To Solve Kashmir Dispute

LIAQUAT ALI KHAN
said here to-day India had
to solve the Kashmir dispu
miers’ meetings last week.

LONDON, Jan. 16,

, Prime Minister of Pakistan,

turned down three proposals
te at the Commonwealth Pre-

Pakistan had accepted the proposals, he told a reporters

conference.
Suggestions were

1. Forces from other Common-

wealth nations such as Aus-
tralia and New Zealand
should be put into Kashmir
to protect the State while a
plebiscite took place

2. A Combined force of troop:
from India and Pakistar
should maintain joint securi-
ty in Kashmir, while prepa-
rations were made for the

Plebiscite

United Nations
Administrator,
Chester Nimitz, of the United
States), should have author
ity to raise a Jocal foree from
among the people of Kash-
mir itself, All other loca)
forces should be disbanded or
withdrawn

Plebiscite
(Admiral

“ASHMIR with borders on
China, India, Pakistan, Tibet
and Afghanistan — has beer

Hurricane Hits
British Columbia

VICTORIA, Jan. 16

A hurricane raked sea lanes and
he coastal terrain of the British
Columbia coast, on Monday wit!
the greatest fury unleashed in |
years, This city of 60,000 was
mack in the centre although the
wind hit from Southern Oregor
to the far up coast of Vancouve:
island,

A fisherman was drowned in
regon, but there were no storm
‘eaths in British Columbia. For
hree hours here the wind howled
outhwestward at more than 70
miles an hour (cP)



NEW RADAR FACTORY

OTTAWA, Jan. 16
A new $2,500,000 Government
factory may soon be built near
Toronto to produce $45,000,000
worth of radar equipment
West Europe’s defences, informed
quarters said here to-day. It

will form part of Canada’s



$300,000,000 programme to sup-

it Canadian made armament

| other defence equipment
—Reuter

| rity Council
, pute

for
|

a trouble area since the Indian
partition in 1947.

Both India and Pakistan claimed
Kashmir and fighting began
when tribesmen entered the
State in October, 1947.

India then flew in troops, Paki-
stan troops went im, but the war
did not spread,

And on New Year's Day, 1949,
fighting was stopped acd the
dispute taken before UNO,

The situation now is:



PAKISTAN wants the future of
Kashmir decided by plebiseite
under UNO control acl all
troops withdrawn,

INDIA is ready to hold the pic-
biscite, but is unwilling to with-
draw her troops.

“Nehru was not prepared to
accept any proposal which would
mean the withdrawal of the In-
dian army from Kashmir.” Liaquat
Ali Khan said. He added, “The
only hope now lies with the Secu-
So long as this dis-
lasts, neither Pakistan nor

India can make any contribution
}to the preservation of peace in
[A

porters “We are all agreed it is
for the people of Kashmir to de-
| cide their future.”

India’s intervention, he~ said,
come at the instance of the Gov-
ernment of Kashmir and the
largest political national party
there

eo told to (go away,
we would go away,” he said.

—Keuter.

Earlier to-day Nehru told re-

wr



PAGE TWO



IR EDWARD CUNARD’S

brother, Mr. Victor Cunard,
is expected to arrive from Eng-
land to-morrow morning by the
Colombie. He will be staying
with Sir Edward at Glitter Bay,
St. James.

Arriving by Colombie
R. and Mrs. H. F. Shearn
and Master John Shearn
are expected to arrive to-morrow
by the Colombie. For the past few
months they have been on holi-
day in England.
Mr. Shearn is Manager of the
Barbados Cooperage.

Expected Tomorrow

R. and Mrs. Aubrey Greaves

expect Mrs. Mabel Aiken
to arrive by the Colombie to--
morrow morning. Mrs. Aiken is
Mrs. Greaves’ sister,

“Going Tourist”’
RANK MORGAN tells me
that he has bought himself a
couple of brightly coloured sports
shirts and is “going tourist” as
from to-morrow, when he leaves
by the Colombie on her round trip
to Jamaica.

Other passengers leaving on the
round trip are Mr. and Mrs.
Austin Potter, Mr. G. G. Feld-
man, Mr. L. Spira, and Mr. and
Mrs. Ratcliffe.

Cable and Wireless

- Engineers
R. Ralph R. Head, Depuiy
Engineer of Cable and Wire-
less’ Station at Boarded Hall and
Mr. Geo. R. Hooper, Assistant
Engineer at the Cable Station,
leave to-morrow for England by
the Golfiteo, They are on long
leave. Mr. Hooper's wife is ac-
companying him,
First Visit
R. NEIL STEWART, T.C.A’s
Medical Officer in Vancouver
who spent two weeks’ holiday
here at Pa ae left for Canada

by T.C.A. on Saturday, This
was Dr. Stewart's first visit to
Barbados.

Leaving by Golfito
T. REV. BISHOP HUGHES
is due to leave by the Gelfite

for England to-morrow. Other
passengers leaving by the Golfite
are Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Hotch-
kiss. Mr. Hotchk'ss is Assistant
Adviser for Agricultural Educa-
tion, C.D. & W.

Back to Canada

R. JOHN GOODING, son of

Mr. and Mrs. Wyatt Good-
ina. Philip returned ” Canada

ery: UA 2.0, ~ ieee
sptaain a holiday in Barbadoy
with his family. John works in
Toronto.

BY THE

year, at this season,
ona Ot Wugwell uses all his
powers of persuasion to entice
Mrs. Wretch to make just one
appearance in the circus which
saw her earliest triumphs. But
he always fails,

As her husband, Colonel
Wretch, put it to Natacha the
Human Snake (Wugwell’s Envoy
Most Extraordinary): “You can-
not expect a lady with a political





CROSS cag








Across
{ Svidiers caps with a
t ( spike in

. )
Often ‘ost by the head of the



9°
1. When ‘to ‘dens 7
Â¥. Endpi a) ee
10. Conveyance, (6)
12 Sort of look to cause 14 per-
haps, (4) 14, See 12 Across.
1 Put'a' fain tne
a
ic ee 9g mn the fre. (3
20 Godiva once was. (8)
Down
4. Sort of drum. (6)
2 Different sort of wok to 12
Across, (4)
Â¥ opia this be be acess (5)
a small stree get
the easel. (5) ee ae
® This berry is a rasp. (@)
6 He was no cavalier, D}
i ting thi ‘or some
pepe jes. (5
8 zh make the A.A. cheer.
gives ll, Colour. (3)
13 At. (@
8 Pe SES SS Pwaen
are Ow
em lose 5 ‘Across. Oe lata -~
gun fr the
animal. (3) {
Sal nies of Saturd: ay's pu
bas! eri Se 14, ae ae te
19 20. Aga: 31, Lees: loste!
Down: 1. rein 2 ; oy
Rie sa intelli Bic Fe 6. Noon!
Pa in Kn TR kath “2e"out










Underwear

SLIPS—Plastic Back?,,....
Nylon Net VESTS ...
PANTIES

NIGHTIES
Rayon Mesh NIGHTIES ...




.. 1.18,





” ”








” ”






Evans and
Whitfields

Your Shoe Stores

~ the Wretches,

4.88

3.05, 3.68
4.10





POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

“night now, al i needa is one

of those rousing broadcasts to

the nation from Mr. Attlee

and my up of happiness will
be full.”



Left for the U.S.

RS. JOSIE WYRE left here

on Monday by air for the
U.S. Mrs. Wyre is the daughter

f Bishop Warner of Harlem, New
York City. She has gone to join
her father to assist him in the
church circuit and secretarial
work,

Mrs. Wyre came to Barbados
in November 1948 from St. Kitts
where she was born. While here
she had made many friends and
much of her time in Barbados
was spent with the Rev. and Mrs.
Winter

Here for the Winter
M* and MRS. W. P. “BILL”

WOODROFFE of Philadel-
phia are spending the winter in

Barbados staying at “Sandy-
wayes”, Rockley. Mr. Woodroffe
who was born in Barbados, is a
retired insurance businessman
He has been in the U.S. for
thirty-nine years and since 1948
has been coming to Barbados
every year fer a holiday. Staying

with them is Mrs. Florence Way
of Philadelphia. A good friend of
theirs, Mrs. Dorathy Smith is
also down for the winter stay-
ing at Cacrabank.

Executive Secretary

R. LOUIS LAW, Executive

Secretary of the Caribbean
Interim Tourist Committee ar-
rived from Trinidad by B.W.1,A,
on Monday afternoon, He _ is
here on a short visit and is staying
at the Marine Hotel,

Area Engineer

R. “BOB” GREENE, Inter-

national Aeradio Ltd.’s Area
Engineer returned to Trinidad on
Monday afternoon by B.W.1.A.

WAY —

career to consider, to appear in
public in spangles and tights.
riding two horses simultaneous-
ly.” Matters were not improved
when another envoy. Anselmo
the clown, reminded Mrs, Wretch
that she was once the girl who
had to answer the bell when
Booboo the African Ape rang for
his dinner.

Wugwell’s Rebuke
WUGWELL himself called on
When he was given
a glass of sherry he turned to
Mrs. Wretch and said sadly, “I
bet you can’t balance this glass
on the bridge of your nose as
you used to, my dear.” “I have
other things to do,” was the stiff
reply. “No, it’s not that,” said
Wugwell, “it’s just lack of prac-
tice, I must say, I never thought
a respectable circus performer
could sink as low as politics. It’s
never happened to Wugwell’s be-
fore, and it gets the circus a bad
name.” “I prefer not to talk of my
past,” replied Mrs. Wretch. “And
I prefer not to talk of your pre-

sent,” said Wugwell with mel-
ancholy dignity, as he took his
leave.
The Tin Outlook
THE recent failure of the Tix
Study Group to arrive at any

solution of the problem ot regula-

Rupert and the



Rosalie quickly explains

the lea
“You want to draw something ?
Well, you can make a picture of

me,"’ she smiles. “Just wa a
minute while | get ready." From

her little bag she takes a mirror and
der debbing
she pens her
uh AlaurTs

a
het nose.

1.37



SHOPPERS
GUIDE

MEN’S SWIM TRUNKS:
“JANTZEN” ...
“GANTNER”

“PEDIGREE” ...

NYLON GIRDLES .............., 7.06

COURT SHOES :
White from

Black, Brown, Blue Suede from 7.15
RRA TOS a be aawiececcues 3.06

BOOKS FOR YOUNGSTERS, CHIL-
DREN AND ADULTS, SUBSTAN-
TIALLY REDUCED TO CLEAR AT

EVANS « WHITFIELDS

Picturesque Sight
HE three-masted Swedish
Training vessel Sunbeam
made a picturesque sight as she
sailed into Carlisle Bay shortly
after 4 o'clock yesterday after-
noon,

She is rigged mainly with square
sails which is seldom seen these
days She is here on a short
visit.

Who Was Bassett ?
— people asked

yesterday, after ‘they
read about the Purple
who played the part of Alfred
Bassett in this one-Act play which
members of the Barbados Drama-
tc Club performed at Y.M.P.C.
on Saturday night.

Norman Wood played Alfred
Bassett, the Hon. Reg. Smith’s
(Michael Lynch) valet,

En Route To B.G.
R. J. NUNES, one of the wrong
Managing Directors of Messrs
William Fogarty Ltd. and Mr.
David B. Andrews, Manager of
Fogarty’s Brick Factory at Coo-
maka, a small town on the Dem-
erara River who" arrived here on
Friday on a short visit left yes-
terday afternoon for Trinidad by
B.W.1.A. intransit to B.G, They
were staying at the Marine Hotel.

New Appointment
M*: and Mrs. N. D,. Osborne
arrived by the Lady Nelson
from B.G. on Sunday morning
accompanied by their daughter.
Mr. Osborne has been appointed sim
to the office of Assistant Com-
missioner, Income Tax and Death

Duties Department.

He was with the Income Tax
Department here before he went

to British Guiana, and while ic sig

B.G. he was attached to the In

come Tax t.
T.L.L.
ISS SHEILA LEWIS, who hes

been spending a’ holiday
with her family at “Masryviic *
Rockley, returned to ‘Trinidad to
yesterday by B.W.1LA, She works
with T.L.L.’s office in Pointe a
Pierre.

Were

with Friends
RS. SHEILA NOTHNAGEL

and her daughter Madeline
who had been holidaying with
friends here for several weeks,
returned to Trinidad on Monday
afternoon by B.W.I.A.

Awarded 0.B.E.

R. ALAN STEWARD forme:

British Council Representa-
tive here who was suceeeded by

Mr. Risely Tucker, has been
awarded the O.B.E. in the King’s
New Year’s honours list. Mr.

Steward is now in England on
leave from Nigeria.



By Beachcomber

tion agreements qoincides with
the discovery of enormous de-
posits at Molonga. Mrs. Welsh-
man, the allotropist employed by
the Klumping Dredging Co., be.
lieves that these deposits, if
treated with stannous oxide (the
white kind), will make a crystal
tinfoil which could be ground io
strips and used for chimney
cowlings, tangerine covers, lime-
juice bottle caps, soldered loco-
motive couplings, and toothpick
cases, The effect of this on
American stockpiling is unpredict-
able. Of course, a world surplus
of tin would lead to widespread
attempts to shove the stuff bac






Fashion Designers.

but her appearance is elegant
perfect.





‘women in the
world have just been a for
1950 by the New York Institute of
Without ex-
ception, they are wealthy women
who spend a fortune on Their

clothes,
Apart from the Duchess of
who is der of fashicd

Windsor,
recognised as a leader of fashi
I could name several






she is far from ws

‘Under-playing’
Next as Mrs. Margaret
soernay. one vasepteys a beau-
instead over-playing
it. Whatever the -ogcasion, you
never see her w too much
wee too m
believes in

accessory
basically sienpie styles and
—— pentane , tailored. “She
a positive us for ““mad”

French hats. a g

On the British e I ld
place Vivien Leigh as Hest ray
fashion. he hock
glamorous without
self up to kill like the Baste

n the teen-age group there is
Petula Clark, who always appears
well groomed, but mever looks a
year older than she really is.
Among the older Mrs.

women
Winston” |\Churchill is noted for
many, and dignity in her

My Best Dress’

“The beautiful dress I
made in "1950" was described to
me by two of London's top de-
ners. Both, in dâ„¢ year of
straight, slim ‘lines, surprisingly
featured enormously full, skirts.

ani the

ch

Norman Hartnell

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
picks~
’s Best-Dressed Women













seater Triumph, or appearing ina tendency

court in her small court wig and
special feminine K.C’s gown cut
more slim-fitting and less billowy
than the masculine version.

Among her most notable recent
eases was the defence of George
Kelly at the Cameo cinema mur-
der trial.

Chief recreations from court and

black velvet crinoline he made for| domestic life are gardening and
Elizabeth to wear at the| olf, Her husband complains that
al Film Performance. It had|her advecate’s training gives her

be simple and black because
the court was in mo for
Sweden’s King Gustav. Tada
ted, the crinoline was made of 10
yards of 54in. black velvet over
large hooped petticoats.

fty yards of white chiffon
made the décolleté, full-skirted
evening gown chosen by Peter
Russell. It was for film star James
Stewart’s dark, attractive wife,
Gloria, was decorated with white
full-blown roses down one side,
and was created for a special
party.

Other Women’s Lives

One of England's only two
women K.Cs. 36-year-old brunette
Rose Heilbron, combines an inter-
esting legal career, which brings
her about £5,000 a year, with
domesticity as the wife of Liver-
pool surgeon Nathamiel Burstein:

Efficient, attractive and cheerful,
she brings the same clear intelli-
cor to whatever job she has on

and, whether it is preparing din-
ner in her Liverpool kitchen; doing
the family shopping in her five-

B.B.C. Radio Programme

> VERNERD AY, JANUARY 13,



1951



7.25 am, Programme Parade, 7.30 am
1 was there, 7.45 am. How to Listen
*.30 a.m. Light Orchestral Music, 4.43
a.m. People and Resources, 9 a.m. The
News, 9.10 a.m. Liome News from Britain,
eae aan, Clore Down, 11.15 a.m.’ ?ro
ramme Parade, 11.30 a.m, Listeners’
Choice, 11.45 a.m. Statement of Account,
12 (noon) The News, 12.10 p.m. News
Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Close Down, 4.15 p.m.
uvenirs of Music, 5 p.m. Composer of

the week, 5.15 p.m, Ulster Magazine, 5.45
p.m, Rhythm Rendezvous, 6 p.m. Ton.

in‘e the mines. ean Ey pm. From the Third
i e, p.m, Programme Parade
Temperameni 7 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m. News Analysis,
I READ of a soprano who Hip wee xe 5 oa Dm. T was
He ” . io Newsreel, 8.15 on
sobbed and gulped” as she sang, Books to Read, £30 pm Theatee Talk,
and who * ‘altered Verdi’s notes in 8.45 p.m. Composer of the week, 9 pn
an aria.” That is nothing. When cera of A> ing hes 15 p.m. Margerie
Rustiguzzi w. s 2 ‘ oa p.m. Tip Top Tune’, 10 p.m
g i as inging 4 duet The News, 10.10 p.m. From the Editorials,
with Broccoli in “Il Passero.” 10.15 p.m! Bric Barker, 1045 p.m. Mid
She silenced her confrére with a Week Talk, 11 pm, From the Third
look of thunder, and sang the ?'osTamme.

entire duet herself. Every’ time
Broccoli attempted to join in, she |}
dawled him down. “An example |
ef bad operatic manners, ” wrote

@ critic, “ which made the audi-
ence wince.” Wrong again, cully.
ft wasn’t the bad manners that

made them wince
oes Sayeed

It was that

‘Sketch Book—1 1



parasol, sits oer carefully and goes

on munching the candied fro,
"You can home inc aon
mind you make me look preity "
she calls. Revers sh

allright," ata.’ ‘ Gondanes
s hon * wall look like, but
fl try and then we relly must
start to go home.’

RESERVED



bi sibs ne 4.94 & 6.18
. 4.94 & 6.48
-5.00 & BOYS ..3.95













. 11,02





















Hours ;



ALFONSO B. de LIMA & CO.

NOTICE pinisian 4.30 and 8.15
eae hae Columbia Smashing Double
oak Richard Dix and Leslie
of Lower Broad Street CAUGHT Brooks in
desire to inform all their friends
end the public in — and — SECRET OF

and customers,

general, that they are in no way
financially or other-
with any other Jewelry
Establishment in Barbados,

connected,
wise,



Broad Street

rs
ee =




SS



CANE BILLS
CUTLASSES
SHOVELS

BASS BROOMS
WIRE BRUSHES
SEWING TWINE
STENCIL INK
OIL CANS

COTTON

Shactal

The Modern Dress Shoppe





@ SKIRTS
Seersucker and Prints $ 3.08
@ SHORTS & BLOUSES Sets
Pretty Patterns $ 8.75
@ SUN DRESSES
Pretty Colours with
BOOED Hiss seat, $12.00 1
@ BEACH DRESSES
With Bolero
All Tootal Fabries .. $15.0



FOR YOUR

CROP REQUIREMENTS

oat

2

WOVE WIRE--BRASS & GALVANISED

THE HARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY

LTD.






To-day and To-morrow 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
JUNGLE CAPTIVE
Vicky LANE — (The APE WOMAN)

THE FROZEN GHOST (Lon; Chaney)

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

{ Upstairs Over Newsam & Co., Lower Broad St.
AFTERNOON, COCKTAIL AND EVENING DRESSES
JACQMAR SQUARES AND SCARVES
8.30 to 3.30 Monday to Friday
8.30 to 11.30 Saturday



JANUARY

17

» 1951

WEDNESDAY,





SSS

AQUATIC CLUE : CINEMA (Members Only)

ATINEE : TO-DAY at 5 p.m
TOo- niGut & TO-MORROW NIGHT at 8.50

Dick POWELL—Marta TOREN—Vincent PRICE

+ ROGUES” REGIMENT: a t}

{
)
of The French Foreign Legion
A Universal-International Picture qt

)



FRIDAY TO 8U NDAY NIGHT at 8.50

MATINEES: FRIDAY & SATURDAY at 5 2.
CHILDREN’S MATINEE: SATURDAY MOR? 3
at 9 30 o'clock \

WALT DISNEY'S FUN & FANCY FREE in Techn‘ecolor

Featuring CHARLIE McCARTHY—MORTIMER SNERD—LUANA
PA TTEN.-DONALD DUCK—MICKEY MOUSE—JIMINY CRICKET

assess SSS SS
PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

TO-DAY and TO-MORROW joniy) 4.45 and 8.30 p.m

RIBBON will be

an important










fashion note in

the Paris spring

collections. WARNER'S BIG MUSICAL HIT Showing for Ist Time in Bridgetown

DEFORE—Dorothy MALONE
In

“ONE SUNDAY AFTERNOON”

Dennis MORGAN—Don
.. Advance renov-

ation ideas show

Color by Technicolor







|

red moire ribbon A Parti eet eileen
Special Mat. as usual. \

——————— |

used for a one- i ——————————— or =|
on

|

pibaigae. “a PLAZA Theatre — osTin |
FRIDAY, SAT. SUN, 5 and 8.30 p.m, (Warners Double) 1}

|

effect, on a strap- INGRID BERGMAN in Dick FORAN |
jean White "Seuina “UNDER CARRICORY” & (The Singing Cowboy) in |
mn Color by Technicolor “GUNS OF THE PEOOS” \
Midnite Matinee Saturday 20th (Two New Monogran Thrillers) 1
Warren Douglas—-Ramsey Ames & TOM KEENE in uy
“BELOW THE DEADLINE” “RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL |;
\|



ane ||
SSS

GAMETY—(rHE GARDEN) ST. JAMES |

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW 8.30 p.m
The BOWERY BOYS &

with LEO GORCEY in —
“BOWERY BOMBSHELL”
Friday—Saturday—Sunday—8.30 p.my.—MAT. Sunday —5
R.K.O, Radio Thrill-Packec -ACTION ADVENTURE !

“MIGHTY JOE YOUNG”
— with
Terry MOORE—Ben JOHNSON—Robert ARMSTRONG



(Monogram's double)

|
i|
TEX RITTER and his_ ||

4

“to argue a nage too
much jover the finer points of the

game.” MAN FROM TEXAS’

* *
Subjects nearest to her heart
are women’s welfare and the le; :
position of women, nem of w
she is always ready to ote
in her clear voice, with its hint

f North
WORD ORG It

WORLD CO
RESERVED.
—LES.







PM



ROYAL

Last Two Shows To-day

EMPIRE

To-day and Tomorrow

4.45 and 8.30 4.30 and 8.30

— AND —
M.G.M. Smashing Double
Esther Williams and Van

M-G-M Presents:

ANNIE GET

0 \ Johnson in

YOUR GUN “DUCHESS OF
Starring IDAHO ”

— and —

ASPHALT
JUNGLE

— with —
Stirling Hayden

Betty Hutton—Howard
Keel with
Louis Calhern and
J. Carrol Naish.

ROXY

To-day — Last Two Shows
4.30 and 8.15
M.G.M. Big Double
James Mason and Barbara









OLYMPIC

Last Two Shows To-day

A & C IN THE WHISTLER

HOLLYWOOD oe SOR eee
Starring THUNDERHOOF
Bud Abbott and Lou Cos- Starring
Preston Foster and William
ses nee a a

Se

ayes



















PHILIPS

THIS EMBLEM



1 9 5 I GUARDS THE
CHOICE OF
. MILLIONS
Radio P layers BACKED BY
BRING THE WORLD RIGHT HOME THE BEST
TO YOU. RADIO
DESIGNED FOR DELIGHTFUL ENTERTAIN. ee
ant : ORGANISATION

MANNING
& Co,, Lid.

°

AGENTS.

LPO

6,6, 66,66

¢

alr hh Nh ale a hs i Peat ae ie aoe r





WEDNESDAY, JANUARY

Will Solve

17,

1951

nae nt ene amen 2 nema

BARBADOS -EE





ADVOCATE tr, tind
ee)
whether it is the Alps, the Car- BLINDIN

The Wife Is | i:

the Caueasus or the

ms sIdi - B d _—. is why people im_ the HEADACHES
od . t B, 8 » > and some

Oo ler Ss e The Boss lena, seuaiiy. Geller trem guitan MADE HER HELPLESS





And the article concluded, tha
is why good yodelers usually are
mountain people, goiter being an
excellent sounding board fol
those gurgling noises

|
Problem |

PHILADELPHIA,

LONDON.
A woman psychologist protests
that the Englishman’s home is no

3 : : "i 4 . longer his castle—it'’s his wife's.
me = _ ar : Quartermaster The English father has been de- ins.
Sic uagtic on man for soldiers os Dr. Jean Macalister Brew, eeereerepempienne epics
ave a tough time passing 7, told the annual conference of
bed-making inspection, British Educational Associations. MAIL NOTICES



Dr. Brew said :














The QM is about to produce 2
“bed-Jama,”—an item designed
to increase a Garrison Soldier’s

Mails for Vineent, St. Lucia,
Grenada and Aruba by the Mâ„¢M.Y
Daerwood will be closed at the Geners|

St.
_ “That it is not really a
idea. The mother has been

oti



comfort as well as solve his bed- up too much. Mothers are try-] PSU Omics ts unger istered Mail
making problems. ing to be both mothers and fathers] at 1 p.m. and Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m
She ites. to-day with less time and less} TO-DAY, 17th January 1951. KRUSCHEN
he Bed-Jama is the invention space. The fact that the father : , People who
ef Master Sgt. W. F. Veit, who Mails for Dominica by the Sch. Melly

brought relief surfer from

severe head-
aches will be interested in
reading how this woman
ended her troubles :—

“I was subject to terrible
headaches. While they lasted, I
seemed to lose my sight and all

ower in my hands and was forced

o lie down for hours at a time.
My aunt, who has taken Kruschen
Salts for years, suggested my
trying them. I did so, and I’ve
not had a return of those terrible
headaches for months. In fact,
I feel quite cured.”’—M.W.

Headaches can nearly always
be traced to a disordered stomach

has a hand in the production of
children has been glossed over.”

Dr. Brew had several more pro-
tests to make about the present-
day family lfe.

Many people, she thought, had
lost the art of educating a family.
Said Dr. Brew:

__“We have got to get back to the
idea that if p> give children love
you can still do a lot of things to
them and they will survive. Peo-
ple have forgotten to be human,
“The old-fashioned ‘nanny’ who
knew nothing about psychology

N. Jones will be clowd at the General
Post Office as under

Parcel Mail at 9 a.m., Registered Maii
at 11 am. and Ordinary Mail at 12.15 p.m
TO-DAY, 17th January 1951

Eczema lich

Killed in 7 Minutes

Your skin has nearly 50 million tiny seams
and pores where germs hide and cause ter-

served in two World Wars and
Struggled every time he had to
muke a bed,

His invention consisis of two
pieces of sheeting sewed together
like an envelope, with another
envelope on the underneath half
for a pillow.



When the soldier climbs out of
it at Reveille, all he has to do is
smooth it over the bed—no miter-
ing of corners, no tucking under
the mattress.

s ee ‘line, | @nd to the unsuspected retention

Sgt. Veit first made the Bed- but a lot about children was a Burning, Aone, Ningworm, Baoriasts in the system of stagnating
J mich resembles tt i psychologist by intuition, lackheads, Pimples, Foot Itch and other | Waste material, which patsons
ama, which resembles the lining ” Ee ES N 3S. BOYS DO wE blemishes. Ordinary ‘treatments give only | the blood. Remove the polsonous
of a en bag, for his own TH Qu T10 J: ' ' Many parents have been over- one’, sober Becnuae they do mat ki goonmule tions idkin case “een
convenience. An officer noticed it BECOME ONE OF THEIR UNITED whelmed by too much ill-digested Me itin the ahontn ta © rakoubes mad to euaL cot oe, ee
£ ce” end cons fron og derm kills the germs in 7 minutes and is 3 p worr: more.
during an inspection tour and . . and outmoded psychology, Dr.|cuaranteed to give you & soft, clear, attrac: And Shak te i at how Rruschen

2 E aaldanahe ‘ ¢ na is ju
reported it to his superiors STATES OR DO THEY BECOME A Brew added, and mother has now en er oe in onp Week, oF money | brings swift and lasting relief—
. ; > . i . on return of empty package. by cleansing the system thor-
At their suggestion, Veit had MEMBER OF Our COMMONWEALTH 7" become the problem child of the]guarantes’ Nixoderm {-- :

it patented. He offered it to the family.

Army Royalty-Free, but he will

oughly of all harmful, pain-giving

waste

Get
your chemist
@& today and re-

receive any royalties from Com-
mercial use.

Veit, stationed at the Army
Chemical Center in Edgewood,
Md., visited the army QM Depot
in Philadelphia to-day to help
leunch the production of the
Bed-Jama.—LN.S

A Town’s
Good Name

HUNSTANTON, NORFOLK

The town councillors of this
Seaside resort believe they have
saved Hunstanton from “a fate
worse than death.”

While bitter cold winds deso-



lated the seashore, the council had
a sudden flood of applications to
rent beach huts—and all the pros-

pective renters were girls

Investigations revealed that
the girls wanted the huts to enter-
tain American airmen from
Sculthorpe airfield 16 miles away.

“If the town gets a bad name
the normal summer holiday trade
will be affected,” said ome coun-
cillor.

The council reportedly will ask
the commanding officer at Scul-
thorpe to put Hunstanton out of
bounds.—LN.S.



w’s Will
Tough Trade| Shaw’s Wi
e ——_*
Barriers Has Them
Negotiators at oo Na- en
tions Internationa ‘ar’ con-
ferenee were reported finding LONDON.
“tough sledding” to-day in their] George Bernard Shaw’s 8,000
efforts to knock down trade] Word will, still is confounding a

large part of the accountancy and
the legal personnel of the Public

Trustee’s Department more than

oo after the playwright’s
ea’

Ever since Shaw died Novem-
ber 2, the accountants of the
Public Trustee’s office have been
in a constant grapple with a maze
of figures.

Althou,
were rigidly and properly kept
wyian preci-

barriers,

Authoritative +eports from the
conference now being held in
Torquay, England, said that finai
results—in number of bilateral
agreements negotiated-—will most
likely fall far below expecta-
tions.

When the conference got under
way last October, U.N. experts
estimated that more than 400
bilateral agreements would be
concluded among the 40 nations
attending, including the United
States.

Now the target figure has been
unofficially lowered to about 200,
The conference is due to end in
March or April.

The tariff talks are secret and
results are not being announced,

with the usual Sha

sion, the computation of the
posth

demanding exhaustive and patient
researches.

As soon as an estimate of future
is made, the will
the bequests

his personal accounts | the























Still Selling

LONDON.

More of the once-fabulous
Harewood estates in Yorkshire
will be sold in the near future.

Last November music critic
Lord Harewood, nephew of King
George VI, announced that 6,000
acres of the Harewood estates in
West Yorkshire would be sold to
raise the outstanding balance of
death duties.

The previous June 8,600 acres
were sold by auction for $719,600
to meet “heavy death duties and
high taxation.”

By the end of 1950 the huge
Harewood estates had dwindled
to less than 10,000 acres and now
Earl’s Goldsborough estate
near Harrogate wil] come under
the hammer.

Tenants on the 1,000-acre es-
tate have received letters from
Lord Harewood’s agent, Nigel
Fitzroy, telling them with “great
regret” that the trustees of the
Goldsborough estate have decided
it witl be necessary to sel] the
estate in the near future.

Goldsborough was the boyhood
home of the present “ord Hare-

Harewood | Which Was

F e \
Right ?
SHEFFIELD, England.
A certain Sheffield druggist is

wearing an enigmatic smile these
days.

A customer recently handed
him a prescription for a talcum
powder. The customer had been
sent by the Sheffield Health Ser-
vice Executive because they want-
€d to test the accuracy of the
druggist's dispensing.

Three analysts—chosen by the
druggist, the National ealth
Service executive and a referee
appointed by Minister of Health
Aneurin Bevan—tested the pow-
der and turned in three different
reports.

The Executive’s expert reported
deficiencies of 3.5 per cent of
Salicylic acid and 19 per cent
boric acid.

The chemist’s expert said that
he found an excess of 4 per cent
salicylic acid and a deficit of 4
per cent borie acid.

Bevan'’s expert re
cess of 2.3 per cent salicylic acid

Dr. Brew condemned what she
termed “the emotional blackmail
of ‘if you don’t do that I will tell





Dad’, and ‘if you do that Mummy | ****#s383*532

will call a policeman.’
fetch a policeman.
better if they did.”

They don't
It would be

INS.

Have You
The Neck?

VIENNA.

To be a top-notch yodeler all
you need is a thick neck, say
about the size of a cider barrel,

This echo came to-day directly
from the land of the Tyrolean
sheep-herder, where yodeling is
almost as old as the hills.

The recipe for success actually
is the result of a “scientific study”

newspaper

According to an article in the
eltpresse only persons
have goiter—an enlargement of

the thyroid gland—can expect to] The improved All-

be tops in the yodeling game.

Yodeling and goiter,
is only a mild case, go together,

the paper said, and a good yodeler| ,

who removes the growth
find he’s unable to compete with
the bleat of a manny.

The paper gave this explana-

tion:

Nixoder: move the seal
* cause of skin
or Skin Troubles wouble. ©



appearance—all outstanding”
of the subject by a Viennese] —say Motorists and Tyre Suppliers alike.
The tread rubber is

sougsr, more shock-
than ever

Who} before.

even if it] Notehes for quicker,

PY)
for more traction, and Avi
wears more slow ly doll

an

%& Handsome buttressed >
Weather Tread— sidewalls provide pro- ]
with its new Stop- tection from kerb 2
safer stops — resists damage, and make f
every rection of cornering steadier J
id throughout the than you've ever
longer life. known,

will! byte

a
Ask your nearest Chemist or
| Stores for Kruschen.






THE

BY GOODYEAR

‘Stamina, strength and

~

%& Wider, flater creaa
area grips more road

INSIST ON GOODYEAR TUBES

You can trust




but reports from Torquay say the satisfied . who was christened in the} 4nd a deficiency of 8.8 per cent? Phe thyrgid gland, _ located 4 PAT
. trade delegations are acting much} ayes are ex to absorb | Vilage church at a ceremony at-} of boric acid, below the \aryn » produces a GoobD EAR f}] i
tougher now than at either of nearly pected of the tended by King George V and The Sheffield Health Service | Substance called Tyroxine, a I
wo similar conferences at Gen-l Pare. tn ix Metime “GB. So] Ween Mary. ive chai ig_|hormone which is a combination! rye LONG-LIFE HARDEST-WEARING TYRE
All his ia, Goce ert «| eva in 1947, and Annecy, France, 3 with all his wel Vines ee Farowecs, as yma pe airman, Bernard Sid-/ ie gour atoms of Iodine — GB,1-50-6
s rp. rris unt “Lucky” 5 s : t 3 iad tes es ee
Crownover, a 23-year-old First |!" 1949- known scorn and derision the faet{ the Princess Royal, then Princess| «ti, view ot the conflicting re~}« bit, that 1s, if there ty too ttle | SSSeSSeaesSasSesese:ets::ceeSsaammieSenie Se sSeiesies:ttecetei?
Army ;MP., has admired ten-| The delegates are reported ee ue wathy sakes Mary, lived at Goldsborough Hall; ports 1 cannot see we can do any-|lodine, the gland is. affected and THE CITY GA R A E
Ree pa he might, being a much less willing to make con-] iy, per cent. of earnings They moved to Hoseureed Moun thing more in the matter.” begins to grow—goiter,
De bee esa, ; B® 1 cessions. Income Tax near Leeds, after Viscount Las-| The words “No Action” closed| There is very little fodine TRAD G Co., LTD
But the young soldier recently The generally improved world] put the settlement of the mon- celles succeeded to the title. in the rocks of mountains. IN is iz

the case.
tangled with a top hat and came |
off $100 wiser.

—iIN.S.

the paper went on, regardless of

etary side of his estate will not
by any means finish off the Public
Trustee’s task.
















international

i NOW ! more than any other time we need to read
_ Crownover said he was walk-| are held responsible for the dim-] He has yet to find a way of
ing in midtown Manhattan when| jnished prospects at Torquay. implementing one of the condi- ; Y
a stranger, dressed in formal b tions of the will, which is to P GOOD ‘
clothes and wearing a_ top hat, The see also wee devote most of the money left 5 KE f R BOOK ] 951
called out “Hi, Soldier,” andj are reacting pressure : ha- |
shook hands with him. manufacturers in their own coun- oe creation af a new ap / Why not ask at the - - -

tries, against lowering of tariff

walls,

The Corporal said he felt the

This is a gargantuan task which
Trustee

a

man press something i a . . oe the Publie will have to § p ( K BOOK DEPARTMENT
palm and that when he looked In Britain, the infiuentialltackle. So far only tentetive , ‘ 2 oh eUrdde
he found it was a one-hundred! Beaverbrook press has been con-§ feelers have been to various The Advocate Co Ltd-, will publish a Year Book of Barbados

dollar bill. By the time he recov-
ered from his surprise, Crown-
over said the man had disappear-

ist FLOOR

Torquay conferences, Cc. F, HARRISON & CO., LTD.

that Britain retain the

in 1951.

ed into a crowd. preference” plan by which trade Their response has not been i F Below are a few suggestions for your Lenten Meditations :

He said it had never happened] flows freely within the Common-] encouraging, but the Public The Year Book will contain three parts:— FORTY LENT READINGS FOR BUSINESS PEOPLE (an
with a ten-gallon stranger back | wealth—to the detriment of other” Trustee is confident a solution invaluable Book of Readings for busy people who have a little
home in Texas.—LN.S. nations.—ILN.S. will be found. —LN.8. time for the observance of the lenten season) by the Rev. L. B.





(1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on
a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance,
industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, oom
art, literature and all the things we want to know about
Barbados but have until now not been able to find
under one cover.

Ash









iby.
THE LORD’S PRAYER FOR TO-DAY by Frederick Will-
cox

LENT (a manual for the Clergy)

GOOD FRIDAY (a manual for the Clergy).

THE CHURCHMAN’S PRAYER MANUAL (at no time
probably within recent years has there been a more widespread
desire than now among Church people to learn to pray more
and to learn to pray better. The present seems therefore, an
opportune time to offer some further assitance towards culti-
vating this divine faculty of man's being)

PRIVATE DEVOTIONS (for the young in spirit of all




CARE YOUR BUILDINGS!
REPLACEMENTS COST £'s

Corrosion costs you £ 2a year 3

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(2) Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar,
soap, butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels

etc. raw. 2M ee eee
(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about

others Hon. V. C. Gale
Vice

ag







*S MEDITATIONS FOR EVERY DAY by Father Andrew.
IN THE POWER OF THE tated by W. Wilson Cash.
anc
THE GLORY OF GOD by F. Donald Coggan.
We also have in stock a fine selection of - - -
VALENTINE CARDS
CALL AT THE S.P.C.K. BOOK DEPARTMENT at the earliest






A local committee comprising amon f
M.L.C., Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd.,





















int comnisie sven Waa 6 President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George pocalinle, panenenty oF Xiptmmmcrre S>
i ;: re is astonishingly isin pigh, ond Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate, Mr. Neville Se pray
| balance represents a heavy forfeit for Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale
| lack of taking proper precaations. Advertising Director of the Barbados Advocate will be respon-
|








sible for the publication.

The compilers of the Year Book want to make sure that the
Year Book ged «Abed of all aspects of life in Barbados
and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies.
Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations
of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisc-
tions at the earliest opportunity to the

Year Book,
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

Names and addresses of all those to be considered for
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed.

Advertisers are asked to get in touch with


















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Barbados Advocate, All at Reasonable Prices

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This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to
ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to be i
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(AN ADVOCATE PUBLICATION)




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Je

PAGE FOUR



ae ee fee

=< . .
Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown.
Wednesday, January 17, 1951

FRUSTRATION

IT is extremely regrettable that a
career of five years in this island as head
of the Anglican Diocese should have ended
with the note of frustration as that of
Bishop Hughes’. This was indicated in his
farewell sermon at Evensong at St.
Michael’s Cathedral on Sunday.

Bishop Hughes came to this island with
a reputation as a forceful preacher who
was not afraid to express his opinions on
matters which affected the general wel-
fare of the community. In fact it was this
outspoken and fearless attitude which won
for him in British Guiana the title of
“Dean Plain-talk.”

Barbadian society, however, is one in
which many things can be achieved if there
is tact and delicate handling. Its mem-
bers have been described as lovers of
snobbery in the sense that they believe in
the “orders” and in the maintenance of
conduct consistent with what they believe
to be the standard of one’s position or
public office.





Bishop Hughes had gone far towards
gaining a reputation which would satisfy
his admirers when he accepted the offer
of a seat on the Legislative Council. The
acceptance and subsequent performance
of the duties attached to membership in
the Council brought his utterances into
the realm of controversy and his actions
to the level of political consideration.

The Church in this island is still re-
garded as the one voice against the evils
existing in a society which having emerged
from slavery one hundred years ago
labours still under the influence of that
system. The head of the Church has a re-
sponsibility to the Church and to society
to see and to pronounce upon the order
of life in the community as a whole and
not merely on the conduct of one section.
The Bishop was well qualified to fill that
role. As a man of affairs he was without
compeer among the members of the Angli-
ean clergy. His handling of the funds of
the Synod showed that he would have
been a shining light in commerce.

Free from theological dogma and philo-
sophical content, his sermons were like
the last of them, vivid descriptions of the
hard facts of life. But it was also a con-
ception of Bishop Hughes that even in
Barbados where the Church was destined

to remain an integral part of the civil .

establishment that his word was to be “the
law.” His decisions have been challenged
and he has resigned from office.

Admittedly the Bishop of Barbados has
not the control of his clergy which one
would expect to be given to the head of a
department. Had Bishop Hughes not tired
so quickly he might have brought about
the necessary reform.

There have been other bishops who felt
as Bishop Hughes does, that the members
of local society are like the Bourbons “who
learnt nothing and forgot nothing.” But
there have been other bishops of the Dio-
cese who have continued to put their hands
to the plough and have not thrown in the
sponge and sought easier pastures. They
have continued to toil for reform, and.
even though they may have failed ulti-
mately, they were respected for their grit
and determination.

It is true that there will be no queue of
Bishops waiting to be appointed to the
See of Barbados but there are still Men
of the Cloth and among them eminent
divines of simple faith and deep devotion
who will be willing to labour in this field.

The Church in Barbados as part of a con-
tinually changing West Indian society,
has a unique mission and magnificent
opportunities. The head of. the Church
must realise that a collection of peoples
struggling up through the misty pathway

. to the light of nationhood needs the guid-
ance and assistance which only the Christ-
ian church can give. As an eminent divine,
Bishop Hughes has taken his hand from
the wheel and has threatened the benight-
ed labourers with the wrath of God. A
more gloomy picture could hardly have
been painted: a myopic government, de-
cadent clergy and a benighted people who
refuse to sanction the dissection of church
and state.

Our Readers Say:







| The Sun In Their [litsi Colonial Consul

The other evening a pessimistic
acquai.itance asked me what good
had England done for us

Now I live near the
green.

“My dear good Smith,” I told
him, “you must excuse me if !
speak somewhat bluntly, but 1 am
afraid that yours is a dolt’s ques-
tion. All evening you have sat
here with me and listened to the
sweetest sound on earth, the
scund of ball meeting bat, and
yet you ask what good has Eng-
land done for us, There it goes
again, the rich, resonant note. It
was on the playing-fields of
England, my dear man, that that
mellow sweetness—the sound of
seasoned English willow meeting
leather fair and true—was first
heard, What good has England
done for us? Why, she has given
us cricket.”

He poured himself out a last
telling draught of my punch, the
bit of ice included, quaffed it and
left, muttering something about
incongruities, which, when I
looked it up, I found meant bark-
ing up the wrong tree. The dic-
tionary didn’t say so, but I seemed
to sense an inference knocking
around that I hadn’t caught on to
the issue, or, in other words, that
I wasn’t so bright. But anyway
the long word had served its pur-
pose, for by the time I had dug
out its meaning Smith was far
away, and there was absolutely
no use in clenching my fist and
saying what and what I'd have
done if I’d suspected.

Then there was the lady who
asked me what was my idea of
contentment,

“My idea of contentment,” {
said, “is to sit on my little bencn
like a capital T of an afternoon,
under the tree to the western side
of the village green, with my pipe
in my mouth and a strong-lunged
fellow near by to applaud each
stroke made by the village bats-
men for himself and me.”

Now don’t run away with the
wrong impression, please. is
Ran.adin (is that spelt right?)
tickle out the Australians like he
did the Englishmen, so that they’ve
got to come up here to regain their
lost thunder, like many a poor
man I will weather an angry
Missus’ wrath and deduct a shil-
ling or two from the weesly
handover and go and see them at
Kensington too. But frankly |
prefer watching my cricket on mv
little T on the village green. The
great guns at Kensington so set
dom seem to realize the ball is
meant to be hit, but pat it and
pat it like a woman fondling her
baby. And you've got to wai
so long for somethiug to happen,
no wonder the scorers fall asleep
on their jobs. No, I prefer the
village green, where. either the
ball is hit or the wicket, and

village



wit Liaquat Ali Khan, Prime
nister of Pakistan, was a guest
of honour at the Canada Club
Dinner in London last week. He
received a wonderful welcome,

He rose to speak, said: “If there
is any dispute between any two
members of the Commonwealth
it is the duty of every other mem-
ber of the Commonwealth to re-
solve that dispute... ..Otherwise,
this great institution, with all its
splendid potentialities for peace
and good, will not survive.”

Thus, Liaquat Ali cast a bomb
amid that distinguished company.
He was right to do so, for mighty
issues, involving the tranquility
and prosperity of this entire earth,
are at stake,

Coaxed ...

Liaquat Ali hung back for sev-
eral days from coming to Britain
to join the Commonwealth Con-
ference. He had to be coaxed to
make the Empire Prime Minis-
ters’ party complete.

In the end he consented, came
here primarily to say to his fellow
Premiers what he repeated to the
Canada Club assembly: “What
are you going to do about Kash-
mir?”

This is a question which the
British Government, in particular,
has so far ducked, The buck was
passed to the United Nations, who
also have decided nothing about
it.

But now the people of Pakistan
want to know the answer.

In a word, the issue is: To
which Dominion, India or Pakis-
tan, shall the wild and lovely State
of Kashmir adhere?

You have only to be in Karachi,
the great and growing seaport
capital of Pakistan, as I was on
this New Year’s Eve, to realise the
near-war tension which exists.
Real trouble could happen here.

When the sub-continent of India
was partitioned in August 1947,
it was agreed that, broadly, where
large and contiguous areas of
population were Hindu or Moslem
in faith they should adhere either
to the new Dominion of India or
to that of Pakistan.

Kashmir’s ruler was Hindu, but
three-quarters of its 4,000,000
people were Moslems. Neverthe-
less, the ruler adhered to India.

Imagine the effect in Pakistan.

novel

music rendered by

and remarkable

BARBADOS

Faces

where the batsman tokes the ad-
vice of his friends on the boundary
(who always know best having
a wider view of the game) even
though he gets out in the process.
I prefer the village creen, where
even the man on ihe overhead
boundary does his part by jis
side when the ball beats bat and
raps the batsman’s pads, Nothing
half-hearted like Kensington,
where even the bowler is more
often than not too well-mannered
to ask, and when he does ask does
it like a polite hostess usking how
many lumps do you take.

So the other Thurscay afternoon
I took my little T and slipped
through my back gute on to the
village green. To my surprise, in-
stead of fielders in white drill
pants there were two men in
tweed suits with surveyor tapes
and a third in shirt and pants
driving stakes at their directions
in cur hallowed turt.

“What's the meaning of this?”
I asked Freddie, the old Cricke*
League umpire, who was looking
on.
“The village has swapped hancs
and the new owners're selling out
the green in lots for building,” he
told me.

“Oh Lord,” I
them, for
they do.”

“Sends my mind back to the
tyme I played my last match ’popv
this bit o’ playfield,” reminisce?
Freddie, after a time. “That’d be
nearly a lifetime back now, just
afore I left for the Boer War and
left my leg there.

said, “forgive
they know not what

“In them ‘days we didn’t have
no Cricket League nothing. If you
lived in a part you just played
for that part, that were all to it.
There were some six o’ us re-
cognized Clubs: Reliance, Lillipu-
tians, Rockblasters, Conquerors,
Fearless, and the Club what I used
to play for myself, Bedrock.

“We hadn't no Cup to compete
for like now, but at that time
there were a Colonel Willitt whu
was landlord, a real sport o’ #
gent and every year he used to
offer twenty-five dollars to the
side what beat all the others ur
come out best out and out.

“Well, this year in question the
tussle boil down ‘tween we Bed-
recks and Rockblasters.. The day
for the deciding match set now
a Bank-holiday, and there’s a big
crowd from all the villages round
looking on, both lasses and gents.
Well, we win the toss, and that
were a mighty great thing then,
for in them days the space weren t

and Why

By FRANK OWEN



The rivers--see how they run.

Promptly, trouble broke out,
Moslem irregulars poured down
from the passes upon the moun-
tain capital of Srinagar.

The maharajah fled, with a
baggage train of treasures.
Equally promptly, Indian regular
troops moved in, Regular Pakis-
tan Army forces advanced to
assert their own occupation claims.
It looked like full-scale war,

Probably two or three thousand
troops were killed on either side.
Add to these the half million help-
less, unarmed refugees butchered
by fanatic mobs of either faith in
the Punjab massacres at the time
of the 1947 Partition and you will
realise the river of blood that
already lay between Moslem and
Hindu when the Cease Fire was
terdily arranged.

That was just two years ago.
Ever since, the brave, battle-
trained troops of Indian and Pak-
istan, some of the finest fighting
men in Asia, have been glowering
aeross the wire at each other.

Ten divisions of veteran troops!

The feud had taken on a rather
personal strain because Pandit
Nehru, Prime Minister of India, is
himself a Kashmir-born Hindu.

Nehru may talk and_ think
sincerely in shining, lofty flights
of the ideals of world citizenship.

style of

the Juvenile parable



bination can produce music com-
with the best.

ADVOCATE



as it is now, it weren’t so large.
It were more o’ a narrower strip,
with the old slaughter-house wali
bordering ‘pon one side and the
road on the next so that the
onliest way to put the wicket were
east and west. So winning the
toss were, as I.said, a mighty im
portant thing, for it meant we'd
bat first and make our runs afoce
the sun swung west and gol
in our batsmen’s faces.

“Well we gone in to bat firs!
and score a hundred and two
though we’d hoped to stay a bi!
longer to get the sun just wher
we wanted, where it'd start i:
worry the batsman.

“Anyway, Rockblasters got ot
sheet anchor, a fellow by name «’
Murphy, who’d break your he»!
the way he lambasted your bow!-
ing, and we reckon that if w
can get him out quick we stan
to win hands down

“Anyway in they go to bat
round about half past two, wit»
this fellow Murphy and anothe
chap.

“We get one or two out, bu

they score pretty fast afore th
sun gets into their faces. The
cur captain toss the ball to ou

stock bowler, a fellow calle
Prince, who could whiz it throug!
like a lightning.

“We get two or three quic.
wickets, but they’re sixty odd i
five, and that Murphy stil! therc
battling like a monarch. No mat
ter how Prince bowl, no matte.
how fast, he keep the peak o’ 2
cap pulled down over his face arv
keep his eyes out the sun, and
won't let Prince get through how ~-
ever he try. ‘Nother thing ter
this Murphy using his head: h«
running only twos, and calling i«
sharp singles at the end o’ th»
overs, so that he collaring all th:
bowling and we can’t get at th:
rabbits. ‘

“Well suh, time pass and the
sun gone down behind soime tree;
mm the distance, Prince getting
weary and they’re ninety for seven
end this Murphy opening out his
shoulders. We recxon we lose anda
all the Rockblasters’ supporter:
getting cocky.

“But as Prince said after the |
match, there’s more than one way |
to hang a dog than ’round his neck |

“Now this Murphy is a danay |
He ain’t going in to bat save)
he all dressed up and got "boi |
a pound o’ whit’ning on his pads

“Prince comes through with ¥
fast one swinging away to the
leg. This Murphy takes a swing |
at it but misses and the ball sticx
on to his pads. Prince gets the
ball back quick, cuts his run by
half and afore the cloud o’ whit
ning clears has bowled him
through it.

‘The other two didn’t give us n¢
trouble whatever, so we won the
Colonel’s money by twelve runs.’



He would be less than a son of
Kashmir if hé did not desire his
romantic native land to be part
of his own responsibility.

But West Pakistan, the heart of
the Dominion, is in real truth The
Land of the Rivers. “Indus is to
Bind what Nile is to Egypt.”

The land is fair and fruitful,
simply and only because of the
bounty of its waters.

But look! Of the great Five
Rivers of the Punjab, Indus,
Jhelum, Chenab, Ravi and Sutlej,
the first three rise (or flow
through) Kashmir. Who controls
these head-waters holds the life of
°akistan in his fist,

Pakistan (given her
could “live of her own.”
grows almost all of what she eats,
in rice or wheat, and could even
epare some corn for India.

But without India as her neigh-
bouring customer, Pakistan would
live very poorly. She grows both
jute and cotton too, but it | is
India’s Calcutta) and Bombay
mills which process and fabricate
these products.

Deeper...

It is a kind of medieval mad-
ness which today makes Pakistan
impose an export duty on juta
and cotton—and makes India lay
a\reprisal tax upon the cotton
Shirts she sells back to Pakistan.

But the real reason for these
superficial follies lies deep. It is
the fear of Moslems—and there
are well-founded and historically
proven bases for it—that the
Hindus have not really accepted
Partition as final. That some-
how, some day, India intends a
re-absorb Pakistan into a new
Eindu Raj.

All this makes Moscow happy.
Any ill-will, suspicion and mis-
trust that ‘the’ Farmer in the!
Kremlin can sow in other =

rivers)

fields is harvest for him, For he
reckons that affer ruin even he
will be welcome.

In the mood of common sense
and comradeship in which the
leaders of the Commonwealth
met last week, good men _ will
hope that these two great sons of
India will both speak frankly and
deal fairly with each other, and
each other’s people.

There is no other way, and—let
us say it again—not a moment to
be lost.—L.E,S,



Ss

ee
Thougs Bus



| effort with the setting-up of the Commission

The Man Who Got Here Late



Sho| their governments au fait with what is going

Needed”

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1951



Se
D. V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.

TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
at THE COLONNADE

In West Africa

(From Our London Correspondent)

LONDON.

A NEW STEP has been taken by Britain
in fostering co-operation in Africa among
Colonial Governments. _ The post of British
Colonial Consul in French West Africa has
been created and the first oceupant will be
a Foreign Office man with experience of
the Colonial Service, Mr, Douglas Gordon
Pirie. He leaves for Dakar, his headquar-
ters, at the end of this month:

The. appointment can be regarded as a
logical sequel to increasing awareness of
Colonial Governments since the war of the
need for eliminating as far as possible arti-
ficial geographical barriers and co-operating
to the fullest extent in tackling commoa
problems in Africa. :

It is possible that the West African
appointment is just a beginning in the latest
approach adopted by Britain in this all-im-
portant matter of co-operation between Gov-
ernments in the Colonial field. The idea, it
is believed might well be extended to East
Africa. Officially, no definite step in this
direction is under consideration, but th: re
are those who believe that it is extrer 7
likely if the experiment now being unac.-
taken in West Africa should prove success-
ful.

The work of Mr. Pirie, it is understood,
will not be confined to Anglo-French rela-
tions. During the first tour of two years
which he expects to undertake in West
Africa he will be engaged in furthering co-
operation in every possible sphere, not only
in British and French territories but in Por-
tuguese Guinea.

Something of the co-operation drive has
already been evidenced in the various inter-

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three or four years — conferences on such

subjects as tsetse-control, land problems,
transport and communications, social and
educational progress, etc.

Ask for PARROT MATCHES from
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Britain, France, Belgium, Portugal, the } +
Union of South Africa, and Southern Rho-
desia are already linked in co-operative

for Technical Co-operation in Africa, South
of the Sahara, (C.T.C.A.) which had its first
meeting in Paris in January of last year
and met again in Brussels last June. A fur-
ther meeting of C.T.C.A. takes place this
month in Lisbon. Mr, Pirie has been Secre-
tary of this Organisation during its early
stages.

Though operating in a more limited
fashion, the French have recently shown
the way in the matter of contacts with
neighbouring Colonial Governments by
posting Colonial administrative officers to
‘their consulates throughout Africa. The
work of the French offices is chiefly to keep

DISPLAY

TRAVELLING
REQUISITES

on in the other Colonial territories.

Mr. Pirie has a good background to the
work he will be doing in Africa. Since his
return three years ago from East Africa,
where he was Private Secretary to Sir
Philip Mitchell, Governor of Kenya, for a
year, he has been engaged at the Colonial
Office in Colonial co-operation duties, in-

volving frequent contacts with» the other
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Wider training in co-operative activity in
the Colonies has been a feature in recent
years of courses for young Colonial Service
men, There have been exchanges of visits
of French, British and Belgian Colonial Ser-
vice students and young Portuguese Colonial
administrative officers have been spending
as much as six months in study in this
country.

The new Consul, who is 40 years of age,
is a native of Aberdeen, which his father
represented in Parliament, as a Liberal, for
many years. After education at Winchester
and taking his degree at Edinburgh Univer-

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sity, Mr. Pirie became Private Secretary to
the Governor of Mauritius before the war.
He served during the war as an officer in
the Coldstream Guards till 1946, when
appointed Private Secretary to the Governor
of Kenya.

TALKING - OF

; GODDARDS
TTR TAT TS





Recently the position was so

No Workman Promoted
To The Editor, The Advocate—

Sir,—I have noticed with deep
regret the inability of the Water
Works department to create any
new offices under the recent or-
ders, for the unestablished staff.

It seems quite strange that the
Public Works could create new
offices and promote workmen to
be foremen, the H. & T. Depart-
ment could also see fit to pro-
mote workmen to be overseers,
and yet with such a large staff
the Water Works could only keep
three inspectors, all of whom came
through the Civil or Clerical rank,

No workman can ever boast,
no matter how many years’ experi-
ence he has got of ever being
promoted beyond. the plumbers’
grade. After years of clerical
experience, down comes a clerk
to post of Inspector, and with all
power against technical know-
ledge.

The unestablished staff of this
department is over 250, with not
an overseer from the ranks, but

clerks who just number three and
a superintendent. Not the slight-
est ounce of promotion like other
departments of Government.
DISGUSTED.

Broadcast Station
To The Editor, The Advocate—

Sir—We recently determined
that the number of private radio
receiving sets entering Barbados
each year averages about 600. In
1948 there arrived here 640 sets
valued at nearly £17,000 and in
1949 there were 601 sets entering
here.

Despite this annual influx of
radios there appears to be no sign
of the formation of a local broad-
casting station, and it is felt that
the potential of such a station is
being overlooked.

R. D. STEWART,
Pye Ltd.
P.O, Box 260,
January 15, 1951.
Steel Band
To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR—Permit me to register the

high impression created by the

4

Steel band. Hearing of a Steel
Band, most people curl their lip
with ancient prejudice or scorn,
thinking of course of the old
steel noise to which they are ac-
customed, but hearing this Tr'i-
nidad Steel Band is something
different. The most critical must
look up, for this band is music, and
music at its best. The instru-
ments, all of steel, and born of
necessity to fill the irrepressible
urge of the West Indian to pro-
duce music” are finely tempered,
with a full compass of the music
scale—accidentals and all, highly
strung and truly tuned, and pro-
duce intriguing tones of a most
unique and stirring nature

The quality of tone is at once

peculiar and illusive, suggestive
in turn of the violin, the saw,
the piano and “yet distinctly
neither. The leading instrument
which produces the melody is
outstanding in solo work. Its
thrilling pulsations and vibrations
are marvellous. Still in. “ts ear

ly stage, impresses OMe as an
instrument of glorious untold po?
sibilities. The bass seems perfect

in itself and the five piece com



all renditions were good, one was
impressed that the band was at
its best in its classical numbers,
the lingering pulsations which
seem to go with the slightest
touch of the instruments seem
especially suited to such themes.

The youthful performers are
quite adept in their handling of
the instruments, giving the de-
sire to see their seniors and in-
spiring the confidence that within
a not distant space the Steel Band
Art will have gained recognition
and acceptance, and these now
novel instruments be regarded
equally with the most classical.

We in the West Indies shall be
duly proud of their creation:
already they are surely playing
an able — if not unobtrusive
part — in the cultural propula-
tion and creative upsurge of our

people, for they provide an
artistic outlet for a new art form
that may well fascinate and
adorn the world r
WASHINGTON PYLE
Fair View,
Christ Churcl

January 15, 1951

4



To The Editor, The Advocate
IR,—I write to suggest to The

General Motor Omnibus Co, Ltd.

that there is very great need for

8 645 p.m. Top Rock bus trip,

For some time now it has been
noticed that several persons take
the Oistins 6.45 p.m. bus to go
to Bay Street, Worthings, st.
Lawrence and Top Rock. This
practice, though quite justified in
one sense, deprives many persons,
the majority of whom are hard
working servants and other indi-
viduals, from obtaining seats for
the purpose of proceeding to
Oistins and Silver Sands for well
earned refreshment and rest.

Perhaps a 7.15 p.m. trip to
Top Rock is also a necessity, but
the one at 6.45 p.m loudly

shouts the necessity to have some
consideration for the persons for
whom the Silver Sands route is
provided.

I am sure that others of the
travelling public will confirm
these statements and I trust that,
early in the coming week, the
present unsatisfactory ind ij
tressing state of affair vill be
remedied.

acute that it caused the driver
of the 645 p.m, bus to Silver
Sands to remark on the existing
need and this was confirmed by

the conductor.
‘ AUXILIARY.

Altacks In Assembly

To The Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—There was an extremely
unfortunate misprint of my letter
published in the “Advocate” yes-
terday. In protesting against a
recent attack on Miss Arne in
the House of Assembly, I pointed
out that I was not in any way
influenced by the fact that this
lady happens to be an English-
woman. I said that T should have
felt equally strongly had the of-
ficial been a Barbadian of any
complexion. The ters how-
ever, managed to alter this into:
“my complexion”. Fortunately 1
think every Barbadian who
knows me and my work and my

intense antagonism te all forms
of colour discrimination aha pre-
judice, will have guessed’ imme-
diately that there had been a
m'sprint |
AUBREY DOUGLAS }
SMITH

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La: RS es iy seamen

a

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1951

House Pass
Registration Bill

THE House of Assembly yesterday passed with minor
amendments a Bill to make provision for the registration
of all persons entitled to vote at an election of a member
to the General Assembly. The Bill provides that Bridge-
town and the parishes of the island will be divided inte

registration districts, and lists of voters
for each registration district.

will be prepared

The Bill was supported by Mr. J. H. Wilkinson (E).

Mr. G. H. Adams (L) moving
the second reading quoted from
the Objects and Reasons which
said that the introduction of Adult
Suffrage and a residential qual-
ification by the Representation of
the People (Amendment) Act,
1950 entitled a great number of
persons to be registered as voters
at an election of a member to the
General Assembly and the present
method of registration under the
Representation of the People Act,
1901 appeared too cumbersome
and the present machinery inade-
quate to deal with the registration
of such persons so as to enable
them to vote at the next General
Election which wag due to take
place in 1951,

He did not think that they in
Barbados should speak at “any
length or at all when it came to
the question of representation as
they could rightfully boast of an
unbroken parliamentary record of
300 years.

If members of the Government
had for the last four years, an
Opportunity of introducing a Bill
of that sort and did not, it was
because they considered that there
were matters of greater import-
ance, matters which deserved
priority before they could attempt
to deal with the present Pill,

Adult Suffrage

When people make accusations
against the Labour Government
for not speeding up certain mat-
ters, they were entitled to say,
that they were other things which
should be taken care of first, It
was only right that at a conveni-
ent moment, they should put into
actual law, the principle of Adult
Suffrage.

It remained only for him to en-
deavour to explain to the House
all the provisions of the Bill
which was drafted afier long and
careful consideration.

He reminded honourable mem-
bers that it was proposed that
those people to be enfranchised
would be from next January.
They would put before the House,
a Bill which would see that be-
tween now and the next General
Elections that only those people
who at present had the vote would
be able to vote as they would be
no more registration between
now and the coming into being
of the new Bill.

The Bill provided that the
island should be divided into reg-
istration districts which would
be marked out in order to get as
near as_ possible, 450 persons
eligible for voting.

He said that assistant regis-
tering officers would be appointed
whose duty it would be to visit
each house in the registration
district or districts assigned to
them and leave a form of claim
for each person residing therein
and qualified to vote.

Preliminary List

Subsequently, the assistant
registering officer would collect
the forms or they might be sent
to him. A preliminary list would
be prepared by him and forward-
ed to the registering officer for

the parish.
The registering officer would
then prepare alphabetical lists

and cause them to be published
in the Official Gazette and posted
up at any Post Office or Police
Station in the parish and also at
three other buildings in the reg-
istration district.

Persons not on the lists might
make a claim and they might
obiect to others on the lists. Those
claims would. be posted up and
in due course the lists and the
claims would be revised by the
Revising Officer and the lists

Lie And Nehru
Will Confer

PARIS, Jan. 16.

Indian Prime Minister Nehru
and Trygve Lie, Secretary-Gen—
eral of the United Nations will
confer here on Thursday on the
International situation, a United
Nations spokesman told Reuter.
The meeting appears to have been
arranged within the last 24 hours
as the same spokesman said last
night that no mecting had been
fixed. French sources believed
that talks would concern princi-
pally India’s efforts to restore
peace in the Far East.

Trygve Lie arrived here from
Sw'tzerland last night to hear
French reaction to a proposal to
hold the United Nations Assem-
bly in Paris next September.
Geneva has already “made a
strong bid” for the Assembly, a
spokesman __ said. Lie to-night
conferred with Foreign Minister
leven to-morrow.
ue will meet Alexandre Parodi
Secretary General of the French
Foreign Office and Premier Rene
Pleve to-morrow.

The main purpose of Nehru’s
three-day visit which Embassy,
quarters describe as “private
is to confer with eee diplo-

ats in European cap'‘tals.

a Vijayalakhm Pandit, Am-
bassador to the United States and
Dr. Radhakrishnan, Ambassador
to Russia will also attend. Nehru
will call on President Vincent
Auriol and plans to hold a news
conference to-morrow . —Reuter.

IMPRISONED

Sentence of three months’ im-
prisonment with hard labour was
yesterday passed on Joseph Jor-
dan of Venture, St. John by His
Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith, Act-
ing Police Magistrate of Distric.
“or,

Jordan was found guilty of
wounding Gordon Crichlow of
Roebuck Street, St. John on Jan-
uary 4





when so revised and certified
would become the registers of
voters.

Mr. Adams said that they had
made enquiriés about the diffi-
culties in Trinidad and he was
prepared to say that no honour-
able member could show the
Government any snag that took
place in Trinidad against which
they had not made provision in
the present Bill.

He explained the various sec-
tions of the Bill and told honour-
able members that if they needed
any more information about them
he would be glad to give it,

He said that they proposed in
the Bill to make one or two
amendments and one was that if
a person moved out of his regis-
tration district after living in it
for three months, they proposed
to allow him, when election time
came along, to go and vote in his
old district.

Another one was that if a cane
cutter, say from St. Andrew moved
into a district temporarily for
Some weeks or months for that
matter he would be allowed to
vote where he permanently re-
sided, a‘

He said that if any honourable
members had any suggestions
they should let him know in
order that the necessary amend-
ments could be made. He then
moved that the Bill be read a
second time.

Bill Drafted

Mr. Wilkinson (E) said that he
thought the Honourable Senior!
Member for St. Joseph had given
a full explanation of the bill. As
the Hon, Member said, it was 4
big job.

He said that he appreciated the
fact that the Attorney General
and the Hon. Member had devoted
a lot of time drafting the bill,
and he hoped that everybody
would be satisfied,

He knew that the Government
was endeavouring to make it as
easy as possible for everybody.

The Hon. Member talked about
experience gained from Trinidad
showing that 450 people to the
polling stations were the right
number. He did not know, bul
the practica] experience gained ir:
Barbados would show whether
that was so or not. He said that
he had much pleasure in support.
ing the bill.

Clause 9 of the bill said “every
assistant registering officer who,
without reasonable excuse, omits
any name from the preliminary
list or enters in the preliminary
list any person not entitled to be
registered or fails to collect a
claim, shall be liable on convic-
tion by a Court of Summary
Jurisdiction to a fine of $500 or
to imprisonment for six months
and shall forfeit any claim to fees
under this Act.”

Mr. E. K, Walcott (E) said that
he was of the opinion that that
clause was too harsh. He felt
that for an offence of that nature,
the censure was too great.

Mr. Adams (L) said that he,
knew the Hon. Senior Member
for St. George could have borne
him out with the fact that in
Trinidad such an offence had al-
ready taken place, so he did not
want it to happen in Barbados.

People seeing that the penalty
for committing such an offence
was so great, would be scared to
commit any such action.’ It was
in his opinion a very good way
to get a clean system in register-
fng people.

Mr. Miller (L) rose to support
Mr. Adams. He said that in Trini-
dad, he had known many a per-
son to go to the polling booths
to exercise his or her rights only
to be turned back by the Sheriff
on the ground of not having a

vote. |

Pass Bill to Suspend
Registration Act

The House of Assembly yester-
day passed a Bill to suspend the
provisions of the Representation
of the People Act, 1901, requiring





[a Register of Voters to be pre-

pare: this year and for purposes
incidental thereto.

It is companion legislation to
the special gistration of Voters
(General Assembly) Act, 1950,
and suspends for the year 1951
the registration of voters in the
manner provided by the Repre-
sentation of the People Act, 1901.
It retains the 1950 register of
voters in case there is an elec-
tion before the new register of
voters prepared in accordance
with the provisions of the Special
Registration of Voters (General
Assembly) Act, 1950, becomes
effective.

Mr. G. H. Adams, who moved
the passing of the Bill, told tha
House that it was a fact that as
from the passing of that Act no-
body would be registered under
the old Aet. Hf a bye-election took
place then, only those persons
who were then registered would
have the right to vote, There
could not very well have two
methods of registration and two
bills existing at the same time.



“Colombie” Due

To-morrow

THE French passenger liner
S.S. Colombie which was sched-
uled to arrive at Barbados to-
day, will now be arriving to-mor-
row.

She will be landing passenge's
here from the United Kingdom
and will be sailing the same day

for Jamaica via Trinidad, La
Guaira, Curacao and Cartagena.
| The Colombie is consigned to

Messrs. R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd

Siollmeyer Is
Job—Adams

THE House of Assembly yester-
agreed to a Resolution for
,509 to be placed at the dis-
al of the Governor-in-Execu-
ve Committee to supplement the
Estimates 1950-51, 1, current.
The House also agreed to a
Resolution for $32,400 and to an-
other Resolution for $69,680 for
Raa? Estimates for
1 1.

Of the Resolution for $43,509,
under Commissioners of Currency,
expenses in connection with the
destruction of worn currency
notes, $2,434 was voted. For sub-
sidies and grants, Trade Commis-
sioner in Canada, $500 was voted.

Speaking of the Trade Commis-
sioner, Mr. Rex Stollmeyer, Mr.
Adams said that he thought there
was scarcely anyone more suitable
for doing the work than Mr.
Stollmeyer. He was an affable,
friendly man to everybody in
every walk of life and he really
did a good job for the West Indies.

Although he was a Trinidadian,
he did not give the impression
that he was pushing things for
iriniaad alone, but for the whole
West Indies.

They were pleased to see the
umount of work he did for the
West Indies. When they went on
the Fancy Molasses Enquiry, they
agreed that it would be their duty
when they returned home to tell
the public how useful he had been
to them. ’

Mr. F. Galdard (E) agreed with
ithe remarks of Mr. Aaams con-
cerning Mr, Stollmeyer and said
Yhat during tne war he had ex
pedited shipments of flour to the
West Indies and did many things
for trade which were beyond his
duties. He was in Barbados for
a few weeks on a refresher basis
te keep himself always in touch
With the situation and see how he
vould help.

Under Miscellaneous services,
Director of Petroleum and Natu-
ral Gas, $2,335 was passed, and
for Regisiration of voters, $16,000.

For the Department of High-
ways and Transport, plant, tools,

da

spares and equipment, $22,00U
was voted.
Mr. Lewis (L) said that in

1949-50 money had been voted
for plants, tools and spares for
the Department of Highways and
Transport, On the last occasion
that they had to vote, they voted
money for a similar item. They
voted so much that in making up
the estimate for 1950-51, the Gov-
ernment saw fit only to put in a
small amount.

He wanted a statement from a
member of the Government or the
particular minister in charge of
legislation for that department to
say whether he was satisfied that:
the plant of the Highways and
Transport Department was get-
ting the attention that Govern-
ment property deserved, that it
was getting fair handling.

That department had taken over
the Central Road Board and they
had about 50 units. It had in-
creased to 150 units.

There was talk of a Govern-
ment Workshop. He took it that
the scheme would have included
maintenance for a plant, and
equipment to the various depart-
ments. He could not say that it
was satisfactory for them to come
there meeting after meeting and
provide generously for replace-
ments if they were coming there
everytime for supplementary esti-
mates.

Two rollers had been lent te
the contractors to work at Sea-
well. He hoped they would be)
returned in order.

Something was radically wrong
with that department. He knew
that the members of the Govern-
ment were not responsible, but
yet they were responsible mem-
bers of the House. That was one
departments which would dry the
Treasury.

After further debate the Reso-
lutions were agreed to.



In The House
Yesterday

When the House of Assembly met yes-
terday Mr. Adams laid the Seawell Air-
port Regulations 1951.

The following notices were given :—

Dr. Cummins. Resolution making it
lawful for the Vestry of St. George to
lease a parce) of land situated at Eller- |
ton, containing by admeasurement hot
more than Six acres from the Governor: |
in-Executive Committee for period not
exceeding twenty-one years for the pur-
pose of a Playing Field.

Dr. Cummins. Resolution making 1!
lawful for the Vestry of St. Andrew to
lease @ parcel of land situated at Belle-
plaine and containing by admeasurement
not more than eight acres from the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee for 4
period not exceeding twenty-one years.

Dr. Cummins. Resolution making it
lawful for the Vestry of St. Michael to
lease any parcel of land from the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee — situated
within its administrative boundary and
for the purposes of Playing

period not exceediny
twenty-one years.

Dr. Cummins. Resolution making it
lawful for the Vestry of St. Philip to
lease from the Trustees (for the time
being) of the Garnes' Trust that parcel
of land known as King George Vth
Memoria! Park which land is to be used
for a Playing Field, for any period not
exceeding Thirty Years.

Dr. Cummins. Resolution making it
lawful for the Vestry of St. Joseph to
lease that parce! of land containing by
admeasurement not more than four
acres at the Old Railway Station, Bath-
sheba, from the Governor-in-Executive
Committee for any period not exceeding
twenty years for the purpose of a Play-
ing Field

Mr. Cox. Resolution to approve the
Book of Reference and Plan of the pro
posed extension of the Waterworks in
the parish of Saint Michael.

required
Fields for any

Mr. Cox. Bill to amend the Customs
Tariff Act 1921. This was later read o
first time.

The House agreed to:

A Resolution to place the sum of
$43,509 at the disposal of the Governor-
in-Executive Committee to supplement
the Estimates 1950-51, Part I, Current as
shown in the Supplementary Estimates
1950-51, No. 35, which form the Schedule
to this Resolution.

A Resolution to place the sum of
$32,400 at the disposal of the Governor-
in-Executive Committee to supplement
the Estimates 1950-51, Part II, Capital,
as shown in the Supplementary Esti-
mates 1950-51 No. 36, which form the
Schedule to this Resolution.
| A_ Resolution to place the sum of
$69.680 at the disposal of the Governor-
in-Executive Committee to supplement
the Estimates 1950-51, Part II, Capital,
as shown in the Supplementary Esti-
mates 1950-51, No.
Schedule to this Resolution.

The House passed

A Bill to provide for the winding ur
and dissolution of The Barbados Mutual
Aid and Assessment Assurance Society

A Bill to suspend the provisions of the

Representation of the People Act 1901
requiring a Register of Voters to be pre
pared in the year 1951 and for purposes |
incidental thereto

A Bill to authorise the Vestry of St
| Michael to

raise a loan to enable then
retrospective a
employees of the
e House adjo

to grant pay to all pa
aid parist

Jar



srned



37, which form the,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

'

£10,000 VOTED FOR
Doing A Good PAROCHIAL EMPLOYEES

THE House of Assembly yesterday passed a Bill}

| authorising the Vestry of St. Michael to raise a loan not
! exceeding £10,000 to give back pay to the parochial em-

| ployees.

{

many moxths

He had promised the hon. senior
member'_for St. Peter that he
would do his best to get the Bill
before the Legislature and he had
succeeded,

Some hon. members might raise
the point as to whether this mat-!
ter having been approved by the

that no precedent was being
created, During the present legis-
la session a similar Bill for the
Ve of St. Philip, and he
thought he was correct in saying,
another “for the Vestry of St.
James, haa been passed under
similar circumstances.

To make certain of his position,
however, he had raised the point
at the meeting of the Vestry on
Monday and he had then with
him a letter in which the present
Vestry had declared their approval
of the action taken by last year’s
Vestry. He had much pleasure in
moving the second reading of the
Bill

Mr. F. L. Walcott (L) seconded.
He said that the matter was a
zontroversial one between the Bar-
bados Workers’ Union and_ the
employers two years ago. Now
the House was seeing justice being
done.

He was glad to see that the hon.
senior member for the City had
persuaded others to agree to such
a Bill.

He had great pleasure in sec-
onding the Bill and hoped that the
Vestry would deal with the paying
out of the money as expeditiously
as the House was dealing with the
Bill.

Mr. A. E.,S. Lewis (L) said it
was regrettable that a long and
protracted discussion with threats
of strikes by a certain section of
the Vestry employees had preced-
ed the agreement to such a Bill.
but he was very pleased that the
matter had been settled that way

He knew that it was difficult for
a government or a vestry unlike a
private business, to give retro-
spective’ pay where there was a
dispute about wages. In this par-
ticular case, however, the Vestry |
employees of St. Michael had all
along maintained that they were
promised that whatever the gov-
ernment did the Vestry would also
do, That claim had been so per-
sistent that persons who were not
“in the know” must have come to
the conclusion unhesitatingly, that
such a promise had heen made no
matter how vague. He had no
doubt that the taxpayers of the
parish would welcome the settle-
ment reached.

He did not know if there were
some employees who did not agi-
tate for this back pay but would
still get the benefit of it. In this
country there was a sort of re-
spectable employee who did not
like to join with anybody to agi-
tate. They preferred the more
lowly employee to do so and then
when anything was to be given as
a result of this agitation, they often
got much more than those who
did the agitating.

He hoped that when the money
was to be paid, if by any chance
an employee had to be dismissed
between the time it was decide
on to pay it from. and the actual
paying of it, he would still get his
share, up to the time that he had
given satisfaction.

Mr. R. G. Mapp (L) said that
like the last speaker he welcomed
the fact that the matter had been
settled and that these deserving
Vestry employees would get their
back pay. While that was so, he
still found himself compelled to
draw to the attention of the House,
what was in his opinion, a very
serious lapse of sound methods by
the Vestry of St. Michael.

Mr. Mapp said that they oftea
heard the boast made by mem-
bers of the Vestry that they had
sound business methods and that
business men should always be
returned to the Vestries of Bar-
bados. Yet they were raising *
loan to pay wages to employees
for services already rendere?
Ratepayers of St, Michael would









Car Overturns |

|

HE MOTOR CAR O—171,

owned by Clarence Holder |

of Airy Hill, St. Joseph, ran off)

the road and overturned along

Easy Hal] on Monday evening. Up

to yesterday morning it was still

lying in a field of canes, The
front fenders were smashed.

The car was being driven by |
“Son” Yard of Sugar Hill, St.
Joseph.

RUCE VALE ROAD St. An-

drew which was being re-'
paired, is now completed. This}
road was damaged during the)
rainy season last year.

The damage done to the road
along Lower Parks has also been
repaired.

HE MOTORCYCLE M—619
owned and ridden by Darn-
ley Stuart of Black Rock, and the
motor car S—115, owned and
driven by Harold Clarke of Mad-
dock, St James, were involved in
an accident along Broad Street,
opposite Messrs, William Fogarty,
yesterday morning. Traffic was
held up for a short time while
the Police took statements.
HE GAS LAMP at the corner
of Syna¢ogue Lane and James
Street caught fire on Monday at
about 6.05 p.m. The gas was
soon efter turned off and the blaze
ceased

FIRE broke out under the
bonnet of a Central ‘Bus
while it was travelling along





Mr. E. D. Mottley (E) moved the passing of the Bill.
He said that the matter had been a controversial one for

have to pay for it in years to
come.

They should not borrow money
to pay back pay.

Mr, Cox (L) said that like other
members, he was glad to see that

at | ,
1950 Vestry was now in order. In fas long last Ge. Vestry. of St.

answer to that he would only say ; p

intended paying back
ay, He remembered when the
investigation of the Civil Service
was being made and there were
making recommendations with
regards salaries, wages and re-
organization, the St. Michael
Vestry made it clear that they
were prepared to follow the Gov-
ernment in whatever decisions
were arrived at by the Commis-
sioner Mr. Adams.

After Mr, Adams»°made his re-
commendations, Government had
made good with their employees,
but on the other hand the St
Michael Vestry went back on its
word and actually said that they
had made no promise and refused
to pay the workmen retrospective
pay. Although they realised that
they were in the same category as
Government employees and that
the cost of living had gone up for
them the same way as it had for
other employees, they refused to
pay the retrospective pay.

All those who would benefit as
a result of the passing of the Bill
should take off their hats to the
Sanitary workers who had _ the
courage to stand up against the
Vestry for their right It was
through the hardihood of those
workers that they had that bill.
He had to play his part in advis-
ing them and helping to instil
nerve in them,

It was regrettable that persons
who were responsible for the
spending of public fund should
treat their employees in a manner
in which they would not treat
their private employees.

Good Joh

Scavengers did a great service
to the island. They did work
many abhorred, and for that rea-
son consideration should be~given
to their claims.

The Vestry should debate sert-
ously the fact that they the tax-
payers of St. Michael who paid
the bills were willing to subscribe
anything at any time which they
considered reasonable and to the
interest of furthering and helping
the community and to the interest
of doing justice to the less for-
tunate. He hoped they would
never see a recurrence of the sit-
n which existed in St. Mich-
ael,

Mr. Allder (L) said that how-
ever long it had taken the Vestry
to do what was right by their
employees, one could not get
eway from the fact that the final
decisions showed that there was
always the open desire to treat
the employees! as they should
have been treated.

It was a question
members of the Vestry and the
Union to which the empioyees
were affiliated which caused the
delay. Nevertheless, the St, Mi-
chael Vestry were leading the way
for the other Vestries. He was
thinking in terms of the low wages
which were being paid to the
employees of the outside parishes,

He regretted that there was
nothing at their disposal which
would allow them to compel other
Vestries to act in a similar way
to their employees as the St.
Michael Vestry had acted. The
people of the other parishes had
t+ work under more trying cir-
cumstances than the workers of
65t. Michael, and he felt that all
the time they never got any con-
sideration because of the type ot
setup which was to be found in
those Vestries.

He regretted, too, that all of
the parochial employees were go-
ing to be considered in the Bill
He was not in favour of over-
burdening the taxpayers by in-
creasing the salaries of the al
ready well paid.













































between

Money Everywhere
... And Not A $

To Spend

WHEN the Advocate visited the
Currency Department of the Gov-
ernment yesterday there was
money, money everywhere, and
not a dollar of it could be spent
Four men, a temporary staff that
has been taken on by that depart-
ment, were busy sorting into ser-
ies and counting large quantities
of Barbados Government notes
prior to their disposal.

These notes which have been
cancelled, must be disposed of to
rake room for the new Unified
West Indies currency which may
go into circulation in April this
year. The Currency Department
does not have the accommodation
to house the large extra staff that
would be needed to do this work;
so these four men have been em-
ployed, and in addition members
of the regular Currency Staff and
such of the Treasury Staff as are
available are being called upon to
work overtime.

This extra staff is not used nor-
mally, and as a result there is
always an eight or
arrear in dealing with mutilated
notes that are returned to the De-
partment hy the island’s banks for
cancellation Such an arrear will
now have to be cleared up before
April.

The value of notes in circulation
—now over two million dollars—



Deacons Road at about 1.30 p.m
yesterday. The Fire Brigade was
summoned but when they arrived

on the scene the fire had already |

been extinguished by the
chauffeur, conductor and someone



else

The "bus is X-—373 and owned
by C. Ifill of the Central "Bus
Company.

HENZELL DIES AT 81
| From Our Own Correspondent
ANTIGUA, Jan. 16

Mr. L. T. Henzell died here
last night. He was 81. He was
}retired manager of the Antigua
Sugar Factory and served fo

nm the Executive and Leg-



ye Counc'ls

is usually constant, because the
Currency Department returns to
\the banks the amount that the

banks serid in to the department
for cancellation. But more notes
are becoming mutilated than
hitherto, proof of the increased
number of hands through which
they pass. It is a sign too of the
high cost of living and the result-
ant higher wages paid. The man
‘who w@uld normally be handing
faround a= shilling now
| around a dollar bill

The value of notes destroyed in
| 1950 was about $490,000. In 1949
was about $420,000. Note
cancellation from the banks come

t for

at the“average 1

twe eek



nine-month’



hands

39 Years

| Of Watch

Repairing

IN a room full of “time” in

Bolton Lane you will see a little
grey man, Alexander Yearwood, :
repairing a watch or maybe a|Eumicia brought a cargo of fruit,
It is

clock any time of the day.
the work that Yearwood has been
doing for the past 39 years and
the work which Yearwood likes.

When he bégan watch and clock
repairing at the age of 15 when
he had just left school, it. was be-
cause long before that he had been
dreaming of how he would some
day be fingering the intricate parts
of watches and touching gold
daily,

Between whiles of looking on a
piece of glass for small watci
parts as he sat with his back bent,
his spectacles resting low on his
nose and a piece of cloth thrown
over his braced pants, Yearwood
told the Advocate yesterday how
he had been working at the watch
business 27 years in McGregor
Street. He also worked for about
a year in Tudor Street and one in
Middle Street, but for him now
business is at its best.

It was the steady looking at
small watch parts which troubled
Yearwood's eyes and made him
begin to wear spectacles when he
was 35 He will tell you that
when you have been in the busi-
ness for a long spell as he has
been, you will come to hear
watches and clocks ticks only as
something in the distance. He
has got into such a groove that
unless you talk of the ticking of
a watch or clock, he would not
think of it.

Born Grey

You may begin to wonder
whether there are any peculiar
things about watch repairers, and
seeing Yearwood so grey at 54 you
may ask him if he thought that
had anything to do with his watch
repairing way of life, but he will
assure you that he had a sister
who was born grey :
_ Yearwood has done a lot for the
jewelry business in Barbados. He
has two sons and both of them
followed his footsteps. One,
however, left off after a while and
is now an optician in Trinidad.
Besides his two boys, he has train-
ed many young men in his time.

Maybe it is because he is al-
ways surrounded by clocks and
watches that he sticks for precise
times, but he has a flare for exact
dates and can tell you the date on
each occasion of a removal to an-

other street to carry on his busi-!

ness



Six Months For
Stealing Battery

Twenty-four-year-old labourer
Milton Millar of My Lord's Hill
was yesterday sentenced to six
months’ imprisonment with hard
labour by His Worship Mr. H. A.
Talma P@lice Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A”.

Millar was found guilty of the
larceny of a six-volt battery val-
ued at £5 and the property of
Evelyn Edwards. He gave notice
of appeal at the bar.

Edwards in his evidence said
that on November 8 he left his
motor jJorry outside the Plaza
Theatre at about 8.30 p.m. When
he returned later he noticed that
the battery was missing. He re-
perted the matter to the Police
who called him on January 14
to identify a battery which they
were holding.

At the first glance he saw that
the battery was the one that was
taken out of his lorry.

P.C. 336 Sargeant of the C.1.D.
said that Millar made a statement
to him in which he implicated
cne Colvin Moore who had helped
to take away the battery from
the lorry.

Garfield Jemmott said that
Moore and Millar came to him
offering to sel) him a battery. He
went to Moore’s home to see the
battery. Millar brought another
battery to him and this battery
was taken to Fort Royal Garage.

Seibert Waldron—keeper of the
crimina! records—told Mr, Talma
that Millar had one previous con-
viction for larceny. This was on
March 7, 1949 when he was con-
victed at the Court of Grand

Sessions and put on probation for
two years for stealing two
bicycles

Set E King who prosecuted for
the Police in addressing Mr.
Talma, stressed that Millar be
sent to prison due to the fact that
he was given a chance to amend
his ways and took no opportunity
ot that chance.



20’- For Assault

of Rock Gap, St.
Michael was yesterday fined ky
His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma
°0/. and 1/- costs for assaulting
and beating Cathalene Frederick
on May 6 1950.

The fine is to be paid in 14
days or in default he will under-
go one month's imprisonment with
hard labour.

gee

Seon Small

School

r J
or

CAVE

cot

ate of $40 000]

|



Bobby



A wide assortment
Blue & Brown

Prices From 4] ¢_ to 72¢







PAGE FIVE
SCHOONERS BRING COMPENSATION
| RICE AND FRUIT Compensation in the sum of

; A thousand bags of rice arriv-| £3 10/- was ordered to be paid
;ed in Barbados from British Gui-|to Clement Nightingale by 52-

jena yesterday by the 82-tor| year-old Ervin Thompson of
) Schooner Franklyn D. R. Spooners Hill yesterday after His
| The Franklyn D. Rs also} Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod Police
brought supplies of firewoou,| Magistrate of District “A” found
charcoal and sawn pieces of|Thompson guilty of maliciously
sreenheart. . damaging a motor cyele tryre be-

Another schooner, the W. L.|longing to Clement Nightingale on

January 15.

For the actual offence Thomp-
son was further ordered to pay a
fine of £4 in two months or in
default two months’ imprisonment
with hard labour.

‘opra, firewood and 1,000 loose

‘ocoanuts from Dominica,

Both schooners are consigned
to the Schooner Owners’ Associa-
tion,

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” PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1951
oo ES Le dates tte SSSR A
HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON











ae

Apply

at once



i INGIAN





on insect

stings

*‘DETTOL’

THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC

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\ [wart A MINUTEL HE SAID
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VENTURE
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THs



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3
“ZT Martyr ;
TO PAIN! 3















apply
SACROOL

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You know, too, when you look at the price
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is a Tan Oxford shoe for Boys and Youths.
Tied to every pair is the John White Guaran-
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Look for it in leading stores in Barbados.

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TO C?_CP#_ PMC FGF lle

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Ol, ELEANOR. 4
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pinto

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE
J / s c PAGE

CLASSIFIED ADS.|Miss Bevan /°4 Burglaries Hot Air Will Make!) tyro jnwires west ‘SHIPPING NOTI

ree TELEPHONE 2508 In 47 Nights Richer Milk OBSERVERS
MEMORIAM Is Always ol c ; aes | BEAIRADS,- Sen. - 18

EVEN

















ROYAL NETHERLANDS ee



























WHLLAR AT iviae cieuie ae ot FOR RENT Jack Townsend Payne, 33-year- More and richer mil! E “ a Marshal Tito has invited west STEAMSHIP co. The M.V. “Daerwcod” will ac-
Louise Miller whe died 17th January old workman, crammed a lifetime ted from 40 cows 2 eae Sotton ern military attaches to attend] satting trom Amsterdam and Dover— cept Cargo and Passengers for
1950. One year to-day. us of burglary raids into 47 nights Cogporetion’s. farm at Lostock.|°". his mountain units | M.S. “Bonaire” Sth. @th. January 195! St. Lucia, St. Vineent, Grenada
You ‘dea svat in nor theo HOUSES can nk was arrested during one Laneashire ‘ ae ane ‘somewhere in Yugoslavia" from | S$, Cotte and. Sed. February er ‘ey a ee
ou are ever in our oughts, 0! is “expeditions” s ¢ i a danuary 2 entatiincnas : Sailing from Antwerp and Amster- anuary
But God took you Home Si a a na a eS By CHARLES A SMITH 153 other ren soe and admitted The reason:— The cows enjoy January at +0 January 24 it W8S | dam—M.S, “Oranjestad” 6th. 19th
And it’s sweet to be with Jenus.© ASHTON — On-sea, Ma: |, Chrix H tw Oc ices—committed be- the het air sweeping from je: authoritatively learned here to-| January 1950 The M.V. “Caribbee” will ac-
Peroy Millar (Son U:S.A.), Mrs. Edith | Chureh. Fully lak sotesenen LuNDON ween October 21, just after he aircraft engines on test at-an|%®Y- This is the first time suci: | Salling to Trinidad. Paramaribo, and cept Cargo and Passengers for
Blenman (Daughter), and © Gran@-] Bedroon ly furnished, containing 4 O. . was released from jail, and De- adjoini : “est at aD) on invitation bee 4 Georgetown—-M.S. “Hersilia” 8th. Janu- romines Antigua, Montserrat
children 17.1.54-—In rooms, Verandah over looking the| A pretty 20-year-eld.girl with a cember 7, w Y ae idjoining factory . im ahion has been extended | ary 1951. S.S. “Cottica” 20th. February t : :
a an ae clk ot A cember 7, when he was arrested. i Resaiar” wheat nee the kel : ora aoe Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of de-
o, odern conveniences. Dil} peaches-and-cream complexion is In a stat oe R A_ National Farmers’ Union |*¢e Me wat Reuter. 951. parture to be notified.
: 13.1.51—5n. a ement Payne said: official admitted he “never heard . | Sailing to Trinidad La Guiere Corscac | :



aa mysterious “Woman in “I have committed so many
ows” . burglaries since I came out of



of such a thing” before but said 951

ee nee
FOR SALE ESPERANZA—Fully furnished, with

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Son tee ee . j lennifer Jane Bevan, prison that I am willi : + wanes ae certaaniy improves Sailing to Plymouth, Antwerp and ERS ASSOCIATION, Inc

A _-—— ne 91-33. 10.1.81-9n.| Whose job it is to steer Princess them all.” ling to admit mili yield.” —(1.N.° FURNITURE REMOVED WITH | \msterdam-- M.S. “Willemstad” 23rd lephone: 404 z
UTOMOTIVE | Margaret Rose through the ritual Police witnesses said Payne CARE. | cami dP A dation . “ow

CAR—Austin 10 h.p. perfect working Avene Rea Sizsisbed, and] of stuffy royal duties. She js total haul during the 47-day blit ; vatlabtels ee ne '
Pie fi A i , . Ring “inition | Princess Peg’s Lady-in-Waiting. on houses and stores totalled S. P, MUSSON, GON & CO. LTD. —="=5Es
Alleyne, Wakefield Plantation, St. John. |) —————_—_—_ . F $5,600. ; B ke Sh ; . = —_ ie

16.1.81—G. | | CUM - COURT—Britton'’s X Ra, from an Beheeeel she is the fun-loy- a lac irts aw - -~ a a

a anne 1 oe ruary. Gallery, Drawing and incess’ very good friend udge Harold Morri . a X ® 2

CAR—(1) Ford 10 hp. in perfest| Dining Rooms, tw Pansies ‘iend, \ rris sentenced = =— t , t
waking 8 tan apex Bae a Daning Boome, two Bestosms, Pantry connie, sharer of girlish Payne to seven years imprison- Protect Priests a Nationa eams ps

16.1.51—gn | Electric Light, ta es D secrets and participant in private Ment. —(I.N.S.) +e . oa

“GAR Ue Baan gy | CDMS: Britton: X Road. pranks. She helps with corre- LONDON = ste se ain. le aie, be ce
age MM aryl - Fy Suitable for 17.1.51—),] Spondence and counsels Margaret It is the cleric pte ’ —— Montreal Helifex weston Barbados Barbados
jal e ondition, C, Edwards, | —————_______ —_——___ | in her personal probl it is the ¢ erical collar and black CAN. CHALLENGER" os 3 Jai - % Jom. 15 Jan.

endship'’s Plantation, St. Andrew.| GIBRALTAR—Cattle Wash for the ; ; apa arsgpine ele Rail shirt front that gives clergymen ‘LADY RODNEY" 13 19 Jan. 28 Jan, 29 Jan
Phone Edwards 2635 or’ Walks 3216. months of February to June 1951, Apply |. Jemnifer is the girl who is al- waymen long life and protects them agains: : “LADY NELSON" as 1 Feb 3 Feb. 12 Feb. 13 Feb.

12.1.51—5n to Mrs. E. H. Farmer, Andrews or|W4YS slightly in the background a colds z in sient. aes. eare taken of Furniture | “CAN, CHALLENGER” . 18 Feo. _ 25 Feb. 25 Feb.
hat. ‘ ie » oo ” “ SeMar
Poo ne Daten eo Se masher —— Ou iebening 6 tei oe oaeee May Strike In Thé Rev, John St. Clair Gar- Personal Supervision “LADY NELSON” » Mar 2 Mar, Pry Mar n Ma..
. new Battery, Tyres in exeeilertl “HIGH WINDS” — Bathsheba, “ , attending a ringtor riting © i ig 4 Estimate freely given. Di “c ” ; r.
condition, M. C. M. Hunte — Room 311. | January, February, Mar “er! charity bazaar, attending th a < ng nh, Writing in his parish given. jal 3309 “c AN. CHALLENGER 2 Apr - 12 Apr 12 Apr.
Plantations Building. Phone 4349, 8478, | Dial 2650, HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD | tte or performing any on Buenos Aires MARgAROS, explained: | BARBADOS FURNITURE = AE edapeteenwiicninsinesnlocmemepsigeesaenmeecieerot-inaane
10.1.51—1n, 16.1,51—3n | royal chores that become Peg’s BUE 3 See aeons a hnah Coari REMOVER | “NonamnoUND Arrives tee Aves ve oe

— § 7 . ‘ y ay ct: x si a ' :

TRUCKS—Two Dodge Trucks 39 and “HEATHFIELD Ihe Grane fimnished ae ees duty as unmarried daughter of Th ENOS AIRES, Jan. 16 oy alecuen 1eay stand at funerals ‘odrington, Pritton'’s X Rd. Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifat
40 model in good working orde-.|from January 15th. Apply: Mrs. A. p | the King. the =Emergency Committee '" cold churchyards and in streel “LADY | NELSON" 14. Ja 8th HJan.. WS at
Apply: the Manager, Ridge Plantation. | Herbert. Phone a5." Mri" go which twice ‘called railwaymen *!!king to people “LADY RODNEY" 10 Fev. 12 Feb. 21 Feb. 22 rel _
Christ Chureh, or Phone 2605. ee Myriad details of protocol and cut on strike in the past two |, Credit must go to the stock LADY NELSON” 25 Feo, 2 Fet. 8 Mar -

131.5168, | ILFRACOMBE—On-sea, Maxwell Coast.| attendi : protocol ani months has given authorities (Plack shirt front) which is nor- LADY RODNEY" 21 Mar. 28 Mar. 6 Apr : --
excellent searbathing, ‘fully furnished. ing to split-second timing until January 20 to r vc. “tente mally made of silk, is lined am “LADY NELSON" 13 Avr. 3s Bes. 33 Apt : be aes
ELECTRICAL our bedrooms upstairs overlooking | at public appearances keep Jenni- j ee to restore “trace : aere ay Seeger ‘LADY RODNEY” 10 May. 12 May. 21 May. -- 22 May.
the sea. From the Ist February, Phone| fer on the go from early mornin union freedom” to the railway- 92d a wool and hair interlining to e é , P

WRIRIGMEA TON CY Scobie ine bens 8280. A. N. Chaderton, Maxwell Coast.| until late at night ” 8 men’s union. Otherwise the Com4 stiffen it. The stock covers the N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vesels fitted with cold storage cham.
in perfect condition, Wil accept nee 12.1,51—2n } mittee, “will take steps it con4 Most exposed parts of the body.”| ™ gour enew bers. Passenger Fares and freight :ates on application to :—-

Miss Bevan, with the laughing, Siders necessary to secure respect —LNS.
slanting eyes, would be a stand- for the sovereign will of ihe
out in any average company, but workers.”

gt in any average company, bu Without Operation GARDINER AUSTIN & CO, LTD. - Agents.

tates that she must subordinate ..RUmours of the resignation of In Touch With Barbados If you feel old before your time or suffer
toe has i ae ny Cast — ee conntet aria ee rite re! HARRISON LINE
he limelight beats i an : astro which wet first ‘a fi an American medical discovery which re-

g eats publicly. 7 A ae ree TSS Coastal Station * itores youthful vigour and vitatity ‘quicker

—_—_
reasonable offer. A. D. Worme, “KEN-ERME”, sea-sid 7
Winslow, Bank Hall Rd. Phone 2330 Bathsheba, to approved Senarite: dames
16.14 and ae optional, Available February

errno onward. For porticulars dial 2550 any
BEDSIDE PADIO G.E.C. Long &| day except Sunday, 10.1.51—t..n
short wave. Price $50.00. Telephone eee
8263. 16,1,51—2n “RESTAWILE” Gibb’s Beach, St

































































ST } Peter. Three bedrooms fuliy furnishe
sera: A shipment ot Petrol- Aor March, May, June, July, one me heard during the recent stril is |
C C hting an arging plants | December, Wesley Bayley, High Street 4 : 4 A ° ec strike: than giand operations, It is a simple home
14—32 Volts 9 amps. Price $250.00 3 et eieoe Jennifer is of mixed Irish and are again current Cabl 1 Wir t r
i . 51— . p a sless (We.z.) Lite dvie | treatment in tablet form, discovered by an
oe |e) Co.,Ltd, 13.1,51—fn. VEWAN =n hans parentage, the oldest eat" the, aap nee costae” with Amarone Doser, Annouce harmless and {
+ SEA"—A comfortable fully| daughter of Col. John Henry and _ La Prensa *.»orted that the the following ships rough their Bar- nay o, but the newest and most pow. | |
LIVESTOCK ogme, Helge teuetibe ener &Bec:| Lady Barbara Bingham. She is Minister yesterday was busy "Mg Coast Station. ey way aintcly ta our wanda: servers and |. OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
el . , * ie : : . - . 5s Wwesrtroo! 58 Lika, SE N any i
COW — 1% Holstein Heifer, by B. B., 224, available ist February. Dial 3578 well-educated, extensively tra- clearing ou his desk at the Min- s.s. Bs ©. Liverpool, SS. Seven Seae/ | works s8 tast Gea too teh bes aad Gal sae :
Bull Prince Albert, is 3 weeks oid. Diai| 2490. 12.1,81—3n. | Velled and has lived on the fringes istry. The Ministry has been run- Kvke, 8.S. Sport/Limoz, 8.5. Mormactern. | body power and vigour in 24 to 48 hours, } Due
3527, J. W. Smith, Radeot, Rouen Rd..| “UNFURNISHED FLAT — At “BRIAR of court life since childhood. ning railways since the former 5S. Lady Nelson. SS. Canadian Chat- eoneny oe oe eee on glands and Vessel From Leaves Barbados
7.1.51—t.f.0.} PIELD” with ane a . - British lines c ations lenwer, SS. Nieuw Amsterdam /Pagf. 5.5. | 2erves, your brain power, memory an
ge. Lower Collymore ' g ‘ Ss ines were nationalised in pergechief, $.S. Georgios, F. Andreadi syesight often improve amazingly. So 4
CAT—For Sale to good home only. | Rock, St. Michael, Dial 3472. H. Blair She first pecame friendly with 1947. oe andi So. Mabay Hrd, Ss. | And this amazing new gland and vigour |): LAURENTIAN FOREST” M/brough &
Imported Pedigree Siamese Male Cat. | D&nnister. 6.12.50—tfn |Margaret through her mother, a Reuter U.S. O Dimare, §.8. Loide 5a0 Domingos, | festorer, called Vi- Tabs, ie guarantee’. It | London 10th Jan. 26th Jan.
Aged 19 months. registered in England bridesmaid at the wedding of * $s Gavina, SS. Empress of Scotiand, | has, Deen Leelee sie eee val fousands | i.S, “PLANTER” -. .. London 18th Jan. Ist Feb.
champion strain, Tel, ova. Beautifai PUBLIC SALES Queen Elizabeth. She became the be ins S 5 a le whek 8.5. er Webw. chemists hore. Get Vets yy S. MULBERRY HILL” .. London 20th Jan. 4th Feb.
‘ 7.1.51—In ; A ” ee Ce : $ rgentina/Wme SS. Juvenal, S45 dhe: . t a Q « ”
ebullient princess’ Lady-in-Wait- : coe Pennant, $8. Olympic Game S sig improvament a it ts the tons, See the 3.5. “FACTOR os .. Glasgow &
MISCELLANEOUS ing on Novy, 27, 1948. 200,000 Live In Trailers ™ornecre: S. Venancio, $8. Trogas fu bottle, which lasts a pia te ‘S. “PRIBESMAN’ whe 20th Jan 31st Jan.
S.S. Helder/Pepq, S rivn, S.S. Coastal @ positive rf eS. wig .. M/brough &
— . ; ; nture: ; Bronnoy, &.S full of vitality, ‘
ANTIQUES — Of every description She is an enthusiastic skier, See ee Bronnoy, 8.8. | [06 ‘feel 10 te * ‘® younger oF London 27th Jan. 10th Feb.
Been wee Barer: ae, oor AUCTION keen bicyclist, but does not go in Denis Gurton argh of ae. hota jowne. 8 any on as. Seern womay Dede on of empty Dae 5.S.. “PROSPECTOR” London 27th Jan. 16th Feb.
+ Ear! 5 . Auto- ——~| for the strenuous type of Ck \- Ea “ ary O' S'S. Hersilia/Perk, $.S. Rochester Castle Special, Aon! .
graphs etc. at Gorringss Antique shop] UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER | ton-dancing that ee ae coasts ee Ri i sepcil, os. Soren ats ge Pee Fork: Vi-Tabs so the at wires | HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
3.9,50—t.f.n. ; i London at i : , , ritons hV@ Kvkw, SS. Fletero fe Protects you,
8 teem. | By instructions received from the | OucoD | A the moment. She jn trailers because they cannot get Restores Manhood and Vitality Vessel For Closes in Barbados
~ - - Insurance Company, I will mT prefers the more sedate sort of " +5 ,
AMM-I-DENT TOOTH POWDER—'This} Friday, January 19th’ ee oe of aouses, = | 35. “DEFENDER” ey .. London end Jany
esries control aid, supplies for many] Garage, next” to Fort ARovar yy ag te len ec sip those Gurton said trailers are being |

“or further information apply to - - -
DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents











uours the ammonium jon which has} St. Michael's Row. (1 is mixed with Welsh common- i

“ ) 1950 A—i0 : M g rg ¢ i > ”

becn found lacking in cevity-suscep-] Austin Car, only done 1,800 mile, |Sense, a combination that makes Wet bar contak er are cman “Just What | Wanted!
2 a

































































tible individuals. Caries Means TOOTH Patnaged. in accident. Sale at 2 p.m.}her an excellent foil for the irre- h .
‘Amm-l-dent is made wp of smail * YEVCENT RIpNITH pressible Peg. 88. ROMES. That is what nearly
particles tha! ere dissolved between the Auctioneer sous seer, Fe ee ee
Teeth hours: ieee peers Out Foe 14.1.51—4n.| As Lady-in-Waiting, she wields __ __ jet a HANDY. LITTLE
It can be obtained from any Drug Under The Di , considerable | influence over the ; | FLINT GAS LIGHTERS
gi fois. 7m | Under jamond Hammer Tae, taking a wee hand when cording to backstmre gossip, she at the Ges Ghowrcoms
T have. déen, instructed tar (hein argaret occasionally desires to joyously joins Margaret’s fun complete with Fitnts.... 44. each
CAPS Plastic Shower Caps. In] ance Company to neur-| kick over th annifer ” thtion . cytra Flints .... ... O4c. each
! sell by Public Auction r the traces when on Pub- Jennifer has many friends with- F noch Li
tio atterns, 2c. ch. 5 : 3 * : 4 AID) iE re ne
Mopere tees Mebpa 1atst ane aae Wht Meets! CEE Te now.) Be Scns Ge the Seve tn es Fncee cee, oe aren a | ¢ )
as ee eee o'clock, One Austin Car Santeged’ in an yrds enough to ask, “do vou ously denies any particular heart- | eee anes 27. |
Disinfectant ie, goutig te eee tea eet acer #96 One Morris 8 with the ao that’s wise ? whenever throb. : eae oR ee De } ia} | SS. COLOMBIE Sailing to Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao,
used in the sick-room, for spraying pur- ‘Terms ‘Cash, DYArcy A. Scott, Auc to thea tna leit - are My job tee c rai ee tim oe | | AUCTION SALE Gerageh 808 Comnyne. SP wend =_-
poes and also for cuts and bruises. | tioneer, : : 13.1.51.—4 F i ah at m : UP pola dbide <5. Ama 1951.
Price 40c. bot. KNIGHT'S LTD. Pee net ee : explains, brushing away questions " y B Sailing to Plymouth and Le Havre via Mar-
17:1.81-—n 4 Queen Blizabeth hand-picked about romance. [0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH WEDNERDAZ, JAMUBNY 9 ae ws and Guadeloupe on January 29th.
iereenreet ne ena aeeee REAL ESTATE ennifer for the job only after Jennifer’s whole life is centred | he 1951.11.20 a.m, 1951.
Whee shopee ee thee, Queen Mother Mary had looked around Margaret, which makes her ||| potest Motor Car Models” iit rigs Mtns 4 GS. GASCOGNE Sailing to Grenada, Trinidad, British Gui-
over the girl, then nodded her the woman of mystery. Young . : ana and French Guiana on February
oe amMANENT needles for your Tesora 2 seen pa Inevitably, she’s a great male friends and others intimate DINKEY TOYS—ali_ with LAS CAMPANAS 1951
er, and needles of all kinds. ice , St. James stickler for etiquette, but she’s no to court circles find a stone wall Rubber Tyres. ' > it
Sat. Rekaete (Of ail Minds “soa; TA; pafodem, Bungalow, 3 bedrooms, two| wet blanket behind Swany pevweeks Gin eae all | ; ber Ty NAVY GARDENS $.8S. GASCOGNE Sailing to Plymouth and Le Havre via St.
BARNES & CO., LTD 9? 12.50-tfn. Overlooking Bee, own private! of Buckingham Pete #2 alls em and Jennifer. 1} Sheet Plastic for Lamp I 8 Lucia, Martinique, Guadaloupe (Pointe a
~SUIT-LENGTHS—In Grey Pin Strips | Phone 91-50, see ten, te ane t Shades awenah aibay Satanic ke baht Foours th i981 en
$8.95 per length of 3% yards take a hint “ 3 AT by Auction the entire furniture , .
brother, you'll never get it at this price PROPERTY FOR SALE OR RENT j HNSON’S TIONERY end contents of “Las Campanas”
again, And what # more I'll furnish KENDAL HIld. — Christ Churen, , JOHNSON'S STATIONER | which is located 1 pul-de- po
seain. “And. what > emore Til fymniss | gRENDAL MILA: Christ Churen GOVERNMENT NOTICES | id whieh otatea avcudeae || RM. JONES & CO. LTD.—Agents.
0 :
menway Stare: 17.1.51—2n. | itchen ae ater Perea En BARD WARE Oak D Tabi ia Ch = a Se Sead
’ ‘ s | ak ining Table And 8 Chairs, =
SAFE—One Large Fire-Proof Safe in| House wire awaiting current. 3 Roods OLD AGE PENSION PAYING OFFICER, ST, MICHA | Oak China Cabinet, Oak Sideboard, | EES
perfect condition. Dimensions inside | 37 1/3 Perches of Land. Apply M. D. C. Applications are invited for < ; : CHAEL * : Setoitienes ! Oak Tip-top Table, ‘Small Glas* :
3 feet wide by 5 feet high. Apply] Tord, on premises. 16.1.51—6n : . Sa vited for appointment to the Post of Pension Tip-top Table, Upholstered Arm |
R. S. Nicholls & Co., ‘Teleplinge No.seas DeSIRABLE Dwelling house sat Paying Officer for the parish of St. Michael. | —— Chairs, Metal Standard Lamps, PASSAGES TO EUROPE |
1.50-t.£0. | «BREEZELEY" standing on approxi- 2. Appointment will be made subject to the selected candidate || Reacacares TAeashaiel areal) ee, Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominio. for sail (
hogany Occasional Tables, Re- | -ontac n s Products, mited, IOs ’ ’ - 1
Nylon Stockings. Lovely Shades, Ali | Maxwell Coast Road, Christ Church. 4 : ’ ; ade olving Mahog Bookease, jug , » usud rts ndon, or
sizes $2.14 per pair. Modern Dress Godan ey open Pownce. and will be on one year’s probation. The minimum educational stand- | GOopDs! enn’ Rriasmend my a F oe Loree _ ss" papal ag ge —_— i
Shoppe. 14,1.51—6n. | ee citchen. Three oe Se ucfast | ard which will be accepted is a pass in the Cambridge Local School | From INDIA, CHINA, PSOne, gions tools spatien otterdam, ngle fare > usu - |
“TABLECLOTHS Plastic Tare ‘Table: Greering sooty a running water, Certificate or similar examination of equivalent standard. App aeanes EGYPT! Desk with Book-case attached, ss Kieth ——
cloths—Pretty atterns x 6 24 4 m and) » x + , r 6 ss: enn ea il ¢ 5 oe | Table Lamps, 'T Indian
Bele ae reas, , vetene ae ee Eaihtaies Vubdenive Weis) cnuwaniances hould preferably be between the ages of twenty-one and forty years. Silk, Curios, Brassware, Table Lampe, wo. Tradl Garnet ;
14.1.51--6n, | downstairs, — Electricity throughout, 3. The salary attached to the post is at the rate of $1,200 per 6 ins x 10 ft. 6 ing), Patterned SLE YOURSELF AS OTHERS SEE YOU.
~_— | Three servants’ room and conveniences} gynum rising by annual incr s of ! Carpet (10 ft. 2 ins x 7 ft. 5 ins) { 2 Nh 7 p
YACHTO peter Pan’ 12 x 8 ft. Re. |in_yard, Garage for two cars. > increments of $72 to $1,632 per annum. Teakwood, Sandal, Rugs end Mats, Collection st We Can Supply .. .

clisditioned 3 scte of sails, Stone Meee The above property will be set up 4. Applhications~should be made on forms obtainable from the |

17.1.51—2n |for sale by Public competition at our

Office James Street on Friday 19tt Colonial Secretary’s Office and must be returned not later than the French Perfumes, Bar-

tray: Singer Electric ble

| Pssortingnt ot Flower WAR eae |B | MIRROR GLASS
.. . In All Sizes



bados Scarves in Pure
























Ne January 1951 at 2 p.m. 26th of January, 1951. { ; | Sewing Machine (As new 5
WANTE Inspection Py EALWOOD & BOYCE, | '61.51.—3n. il] Silk, Ete., Ete. Radio 7 ‘Tube and Mahogany ji | ie
aaa Dear e mathe, Souvenir Headquarters Roig ete, Satie Waioes Deer att THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
peed 7.1,81—lin, DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND AGRICULTURE HANI Hros. ble, Shaving Mirrot, Oak CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. — PROPRIETORS.
HELP MARSHVILLE Bank Hall main road OVERSEER, CODRINGTON STATION Wh ee et ees bien Medicine Cabinet, “Cane Onr, of Broad & Tudor Streets
Linen et, Electric Stove ‘



STOCKINGS—Kayser 51 gauge Denier | ™tely 1 rood 30 perches of land at} heing passed as medically fit for employment in the Public = ORIENTAL
|





Jewels, Linens, lvory,
|








SSS em creme Noe boats Miche ier _ Applications are invited for the post of Overseer, Codrington Sta- | Ss =e ‘ Refrigerator “Cold- = 2
and experience required, Write, stating pores Gravee perc ae rae tion, Department of Science and Agriculture. The post is pension- a eae | tric Irons, Lronang &
ao tees Oe stan and bath, Government water and elec- eble and Seer salary on the grade $480 x 48-—$1,200 (E.B.) 1,272 HAvE YOU GOT A | Toaster Lo} rie Cotes Pere on \
Ne onares pr caer se Buen meehipetttion x 72—1,440. It is desirable that the holder of the Office should reside vd Dinner, Salad, Soup
CHEF, WAITPR—First class chef’ {tOuy ofice James Street, on Friday,| Near the Station. Applications should be addressed to the Director COLD or COOUICSPT Bie) (23... Daset tines eee

experienced French and Creole cookiM&-\ 9nq February, 195: u : i ; :
also Head Waiter for New first class | "joy turtles “‘Mapticulane Bert ae Minne of Agriculture, Bridgetown, and should reach him not later than 26th

restaurant opening in Port-of-Spain. | of sale apply. to Hutchinson & Banfield,| January, 1951. Further details will be supplied on request. IF SO. TRY

" Meat Dishes, Wine, Cock-
tel nd Liqueur Glas-es, Assort-
t Glas Tumblers, Fruit
crvice. Relish Dishes; Tea Cups ° °






































March 1°t. Onky experienced men need | James Street

apply. Write giving particulars of ern een 17.1.5'—6n 15th January, 1951, 16.1.51.—3n. B OWNE'S ' ier Plates, China
experience P.O. Box 588, Port-of-Spain, sone ni Be ged Teo Pots, China Coffee Set, Salad
Trinidad, B.W.I. 16.1,51—6n. TWO ROODS OF LAND situate at ae: with servers, Pyrex Cas-

¢ Small Pyrex Moulds,
te » Utensils, Lawnmower, e
Gorden Tools, Collection of
Mooks and General Mi-cellaneous
including One Ladios

win, oun, ce | MOST OPENED - =~

Hothersal Turning, St. Michael, in the
possession of a Mr. Springer as tenant
thereof.

The above will be set up for ¢ale at
public competition at our office in
Lucas Street, Bridgetown, on Friday
the 19th January 1951, at 2 p.m.

CERTAIN COUGH
CURE 7

——
YOUNG LADY for Casablanca Ice
Cream Parlor (opposite St. Lawrence
Gap}. Apply by letter only The suc-
cessful Applicant will be notified.
17.1.51—2n







MISCELLANEOUS CARRINGTON & ‘SEALY, The Unique Remedy for Cougs j
———— Solicitors. Colds, Bronchitis,’ Sore Turost } r and many other articles
UNIVERSITY WOMEN— interested in 12.1,51—7n. Hoatsenew, Bronehiel Aathn « a Mttle over three months
forming local groups. Phone Mrs. JOHN" Whooping Ceush, Disease of the | |

Chest and Lungs, etc., ei Cosh on 9 of Hammer |



MARCH-PENNY 8330. 17.1,51—2n

wien iglpengilpeheneener pleco nine nenenataetcacangterlll>

CUSTOMERS TO SUPPLY with Pure
Fresh Milk. Enterprise Dairy Farm
Dial 4872. 16.1.51—6n

PUBLIC NOTICES
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

—$—$—$——
EMPTY BLUE MODEL SOAS) ‘he application of Lawrence Cox and
CARTONS — Delivered the Roberts] Gyrji Cox of Green Hill, St. Michael
Manufacturing Co, Ltd., in good order | taging as The Cox Brothers for per-
12c, each. 13.1.51-69 | Mnission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors,
HOUSE—Unfurnished house or flat &c., at a boarded and vhingled house

situated at Prout Village, St. Thomas.
from ist March. Five or six bedroorg rent | ,,Dated this 15th day ot January, 196:
Bus Toe xirton, ¢/o Belgownie Guest | Te:—J. R. EDWARDS. Esq

House, St. Mary’s Street, Antigua. Police Magistrate,
ee, ri 71 61—4n Dist. “D

LEONARD CUMBERBATCH,
for Applicant





Wholesale & Retail Druggist
136 Roebuck St. - Dial 2613





{
C. CARLTON BROWNE |

tone ste tae ||| THE GRANGE RUG
*| 100% MOHAIR PILE

In plain and rich-looking colours that are a
decorator’s joy!







PROG OO MOY AA PRPC LAL MALL ADL LPL OOOO

} SEE US FOR:—~

ot

—
oy
{
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Really good young goat in milk. Must







Pavilion Court, Hastings. 17,1,51—1n AGENTS x |
SSS SS LET US HAVE YOUR ORDER FOR

_ JOHN M. BLADON

PERSONAI,

The public are hereby warned egainst
giving credit to any person or persons
whomsoever in my name as I do not

be heavy milker ard healthy. Reasonable N.B.—This, application will be consid- % :
price, Tel. 8173. 17.1.61--In | ered at a Litensing Court to be held at %
enema | POLICE Court, District “D" on Monaay % -
SPANISH AND ENGLISH STUDENTS | the 29th day of January 1958 at Ji o'clock € i %
PRIVATELY COACHED by fully qualiiied | a.m. To : P
English Schoolteacher. Spanish “peaking J. R. EDWARDS, u EDINBURGH iiestohtint _ ’, < z ¢ .
aulecks taught English by quick and Police Magistrate, Dist. “"D” C SCOTLAND 3 2 Size 30 x 12 inches @ $3.46 each
eary method. veeersaee and prime 17.1.61—1n 3 4 % ‘ : és i dia ‘i
Certificate standard. ickward student n ., a : ;
a speciality, Commercial sooner. als, SSS a % = - Establishes ; H ; Py j incorporated ¢ if 8 x ” < ,
ineluding Commercial English, Spanis' bay ; ; is
and Commercial Geography. General TUITION” . % 1860 . 4 ; ° 1926 +1} 54 x 27 s @ $12.88 ”
office routine given. ‘Phone Mrs. Good- & 10 & 11 Roebuck Street. * |
revi iis | a we coms xs =<) MLANNING & CO., LTD. | ‘|
‘ 4A) ¢ é 5
turned. to resume private coaching °9 ° ry ‘ Dia ie «
‘ Sot AAM A AA AL AAG SELLE
(French, Spanish, English, Latin) at 104 OCHS SEA AYY Strsesitetaee eee ———
}



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hold myself responsible for anyone con-
" > 5 Ss y name Sc
Srecting any tes order sighed by me. BOUP — PILCHARDS — FPRY'S COCOA — MARIE BISCUITS-
Signed DAVID INNISS,
Bourne's Village CORNFLAKES — PINEAPPLE CUBES —SPLIT PEAS—JACK
boleh” AE ARNI APS. FV.A. cilia Get it now
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PAGE FIGHT

Perky Pass From
A Cheeky Chap

Presented by Desmond Hackett,
is on inside-forward play. The
tutors are EDDIE BAILY of ‘Spurs
and WILF MANNION of Middles-
brough.

Wing Pass
Makes Backs
Dizzy

EDDIE BAILY, of ‘Spurs, and
Wilf Mannion, of Middlesbrough,
those Soccer men of all work and
all arts, tackle the quiz question-
naire on a most important ques-
tion—What makes an inside for-
ward?

MANNION: We agree that the
inside forward must be about the
fastest and fittest player in the
EDDIE BAILY demonstrates a team, able to shoot accurately
back-heeler, the kick that takes with both feet, think quickly, pass
most defenders by surprise. smoothly, and know just about all
the stock-in-trade moves.

Question: What is your favour-
ite move, Eddie?

BAILY: The quick, short pass
to the wing, taking the return, and
the short flick back to the wing-
man. Backs tell me this kind of
thing leaves them dizzy. My wing
partner Les Medley and I concen-
trate on this act in our trairing.

Question: How can you master
accurate passing?

Use Inside of Foot

MANNION: The old story, prac-
lice, of course. Try it this way—
use the inside of the foot for short
passing, and the instep for long
passing.

That short pass must be accu-
rate to be effective, so follow
through smoothly. The long,
sweeping pass must be elevated,
but not too high, or your colleague
may have difficulty in bringing the
ball under control.

Question: What about those
Cheeky Chappie moves of yours,
Eddie?

BAILY: I picked up the idea
just fooling around kicking the
ball with alternate feet without
allowing the ball to bounce.
Suddenly I found I could baffle

defenders who were not used to
this kind of thing. While the back
is hesitating you can flick put the
pall to a forward who has had
time to move into position.





WILF MANNION shows the value
of the side flick, using the outside
of the instep, in getting the ball
quickly to an unmarked team-mate.



M.C.C. Beat
Tasmania By

Defence-Wrecker
MANNION: That flick is most
9 Wi k effective. A ball coming knee-

1¢ ets high can be moved towards your

forwards without it touching the

HOBART. Jan. 16 ground. This is one of the most

The MCC gained the third —- eS know.

: pees
wl Oh sate eS wien colleague throw the ball to you

wibkets Bret knee-high. The inside and out-

Tasmania were dismissed — for Slade aie bane fon haow a
229 in their second innings leav- tered this idea. .

ea a geae aeeues o sate eines: Is eg qvarheed kick

. > anag t at scores a goal a fluke?

half an hour to spare and for the BAILY: No sir, it is one more

loss of only one wicket. for the practice list and needs lots

Final scores: Tasmania 192 aiid of training. As the ball comes in,

229; M.C.C. 234 and 188 for one. aim to get it right on your instep

A fine bowling spell with the
new ball by Alec Bedser, who NET ela WERE
A FEW WORDS OW TACTICS

took four for 30, and John Wat:,
thfee for 39 gave the M.C.C. the
chance for victory.
















Tasmania were 209 for four
witkets when Bedser and Wart By M. Harrison-Gray
struck, The last six wickets fe'! HE difference between

requiring 90 for the first
meld and 120 is quite con-
siderable. The advantage of
being able to meld for the
lesser amount is grnerally
assessed as roughly the
equivalent of 400 points, or
more than the value of one
Canasta. en
side t 18 approachin)
e 3000 mark should there.

for the addition of 20 runs in 35
minutes.

Sheppard scored 67 and Como-
ton 77 in the,M,C.C, second ini-
ings, both not out.

TASMANIA—Ist Innings 192
M.C.C.-ist Innings ....... 234
TASMANIA 2nd INNINGS
Thomas c Berry b Warr 5

: th
Shelton c Evans b Compton 26
Robwell ¢ Alec Bedver b Bern ao {SFE EF 20 Orel ee, ee
Booth b Compton . 46 Starting the next hand with
Reid b Alec Bedser ... 43 ir score just below the
Schmidt c Warr b Alec Bedser mark rather than

8
Laver c Compton b Alec Bedser 0
Richardson c Dewes b Warr ..... 8
N
4
’

between 3000 and 3300
To take an le:

and your rtner have sored

fobs poe ree On oe next

Three, one ‘Canasta. an

Davidson b Warr
Diprove c Compton b Bedse
Dollery not out >

Extras S — ae Oe oath
Total Hew... 3 have me gon sand a wid

can
BOWLING ANALYSIS either form a second Canasta

oO. M R. w pF Fy out. 8 a wer
WwW ae : le 0 39 3 ow
Ales Bedear 963 9% 4 the going out bonus of 100,
Compton .... Cana k coke ae tp oo will bring your score up
Hollies 12 1 4 0 Gandara wilt aay wenn King | 8
Berry 0 3 3 1 3000 mark.
Erie Bedser . 5 1 14 0

Fall of wickets: 1 for 12, 2 for 54, 3 for
119; 4 for 160, 5 for 209, 6 for 209, 7 for
214, 8 for 217 9 for 217,

M.C.C, 2nd INNINGS
Simpson c Davidson b Richardson 43





Sheppard not out si .
Compton not out . heondon Express Servies.
Extra
Total. (for 1 wht.) .-. 045.665 188

Polo This Afternoon

This afternoon at 4.15 o'clock
at the Garrison the Mustangs wil!
engage the Criollos in a_ six
chukka match for the DeLime
Cup all forming part of the series
of cup matches of the Barbados

Reuter.





Fattest Man Dies

CARLTON, New Mexico

Jan. 15. Polo Club.

Bill Wether who claimed to be The teams are as follows: —
the world’s fattest man died here Mustangs :—Maynard, (Capt.),
aged 57, Skewes-Cox, Emtage and Mel-

Relatives said that the last \im_ ville.
he was weighed, about a year Criollos:— Hanschell, (Capt.),
igo, he tipped the scales at 660 Chandler, Johnson and Arthur.
pounds, Umpires will be Michelin and

His claim was based on his gir Weekes.
not his weight. He measured 7% Timekeeper :— Miss Maage
inches around the waist. Deane.

—Reuter. Scorer :-— Mrs. M. Parker.





It Every Time

Registered V. 6. Patent Ofte

They'll Do



I'VE SHOWN YOU EVERy-
THING ON MY LIST,
BUT I STILL THINK
THIS IS THE BEST
BUY FOR YOU:

COMES THE
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TIME =s+
THANX TO
FLOYO S. CARI. SON,
57i4 FAIRVIE. ' AVE.,
BOISE, LDAHO



Tee Be Te















“IF YOU CAN SELL OUR PLACE
FOR US IN TWO WEEKS, WE'LL
HAVE THE DOUGH TO MAKE
THE DOWN PAYMENT=:+

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



when it is about chin high.

Any lower than this may end
in your knocking yourself out, or
SKy-ing 1 over the bar.

‘This is a luxury shot and should
be, used only when that split sec-

und divides you from a strong
iackle.
Question; What about position-

‘ng yourselves?

MANNION: The soundest plan
is for one inside forward to lie
back, and the rest of the team
anow that he is the man to re-
ceive passes from defenders,

lake it in turn to play this wan-
dering forward aci, it can be
pretty exhausting.

Top Pace

BAILY: You are right there, be-
cause quite often you must be
ready to pull out your top pace
for those eight and nine-yard
runs-through that mean goals.

Have a place in your training you need to ve tt to give this
plan for that quick-take-of! Mannion-type on-the-run shot. Note
short sprint. Always end with a oth feet off the ground and the left
shot, using left and right feet in instep well turned, giving controlled

turn. nd dir: to the ball.
Question: Any ideas about ae ® ce

strengthening the shooting foot
that is not quite up to peak?

MANNION: The Middlesbrough
plan with young players is to send
them into training wearing a foot-
ball boot on the foot that needs
practice, and a plimsoll on the
good foot. This plan seems to work
wonderfully well.



Question: Any ideas on drib-
bling?
BAILY: We regard this as a

luxury. The quick, defence-veat-
ing pass is safer and speeds up the
attack,

MANNION: Normally we save
ihis dribbling act for the time
when we cannot pass the ball with
effect, then we take the risk of
trying to trick a way past the
challenger.

Remember: 1, keep thé body
Yorward over the ball; 2, keep the
bail under control; 3, keep the ball
at the inside of the foot; 4, swerve
right and left, keeping the defence
“uessing on your next move.

Question: Your teams are first
and second in the League. What is
the general team plan?

Team-Work

MANNION; . I think we both
agree on teamwork, every man
being in his correct position so
that the ball can be moved with-
out the man in possession having
w look up and commit Soccer sin
No. 1—taking his eye off the ball

Our training advice: Do not be HERE is Baily giving a measured
content to rely on the club sche- pass using the inside of the foot—
dule. the simplest way to control the speed

A brisk work-out with physi- and direction of the ball.
cal jerks on Sunday mornings,

followed by a brisk walk, takes —-— —

oe “ of your muscles, ST
supple fitness. ANDARD BRIDGE
The best team planning in the 5

world cannot make a star out of a

player who will not keep fit.
Mannion and Baily duet: Please

do not worry players for Cup THIS AS

tickets, particularly on the morn-
by M. Harrison-Gray

ing of the game. This sort of thing
can be really unsettling.
—L.E.S.

Belleville Tennis
Results

MEN'S SINGLES

D. I, Lawless beat S. P
hill; 6—3, 6—4.

LADIES’ DOUBLES

Mrs. I. D. Barnes and Miss M.
King beat Mrs. A. Warren and
Miss P. King: 6—3, 8—6.

Miss D. Wood and Mrs. R. S
Bancroft beat Miss I. Lenegar
and Miss, L. Branch: 6—3, 5—1.

Mrs. S. C. Lee and Mrs. C
Skinner beat Miss G. Benjamin
and Miss M. Ramsey: 6—2, 6—1!.

To-day’s Fixtures
MEN'S SINGLES

ANY valuable and
common-sense bids are
misused because of some
popular fallacy.a legacy from
the early days of Contract
The direct response of Three
No-Trumps to an opening suit
call is often treated as a “stop-
vd "—A Wwarcing to partner
against going bevond game level
In Standard Bridge this call is
a logical! extension ot the non-
forcing limit response of Two
No-Trumps 't is made on the
same type of nend but ‘the point
count range is 14-15—in other
words the hand 1s just short of
the strength for a forcing jump

Edg-

G. H. Manning vs. J. D. Trir take-out in a new suit Far
iaghar, 8 ure fro:: being discouraged the
: . opening bidder is in a fine
position for starting a slam

LADIES’ SINGLES
Miss G. Pilgrim vs, Mrs. S. C
Lee,

investigation or going straight to
a siam contract

abt peg however. should
be ‘ised only when it conforms
LADIES’ DOUBLES to th» follow.ne requirements

Mrs, J. Mahon and Mrs, C. i}. &par: ro vie stated pelt

iene % is 7 ‘ count RS istribution, with

mM ee Tees, woe. fee the four-card suit consisting ol
rs. R. S, Bancroft. §

; an unbiddable minor If this

Mrs. A. Gibbons and Mrs. J happens to be the suit bid by

Connell vs. Mrs. D. E.
and Mrs. %. Worme.

MEN’S DOUBLES
W. A. Crichlow anu W. H
Allan vs. J. D, Robinson and
J. R. Hunte.
P. K. Roach and V. N. Roaci
vs. C. A, Patterson and C. A

Bancroft.
One Spade. tn case South's hand

TANNER WINS is something like this:

@®jiIW76963 0K 9 3,
LONDON, Jan. 16, @AQ10. We
Tanner, coloured ligh With these two hands. Three

the opener -o much the better
Otherwise it is safer to make A
temporising take-out in a new
suit: the search for a fit in a
trump. suit is obviously more
difficult if the sidding is jumped
direct to the game level For
instance North holds

ts bedhead te @s 106
@KRI9

Worm:

lf South opens One Diamond
it costs nothing for North to
respond in the first place with



Allan

weight boxer from British Gu No-Trumps ts certa'n to fail
ana, gained a narrow esght rounc seeinst AD o ~ send

peint decision over Tommy Me- iron. Should South be unable

Govern, southern area light to port Spades, North can
weight champion in London to- Jump £ _—— No-Truinps on the
night. second over i. neutral

Me Govern’s crisp left har4 fee es Cte eee 7s
punching and solid right was d One No-Trump, North raises to
finitely no match for the We: , Three. Any slam venture in No-
Indian boxer who appeared as | ve 1 sould be based os Oe
as ever. The decision was popula at least 34 is necessary if Soe
—Reuter. hand contains a long suit.

Since responder limits his
hand with a direct Three No-
Trum: the slam suggestion
should normally come trom the
opener. After the sequence One
Spade—Three No-Trumps—Four

earts responder must pass or

opener has ‘not indicated add
onal strength , :
| WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
London Express Service

Z
m
ps
B
it
Zz



HAD PLENTY ee
MOOLA TO | Arthur Peall says:
CLINCH THE ee en ee

| THESE ‘GRAZE’ SHOTS
| __ GAN BE DECISIVE

Qregkr ces to cramp the
Very club snooker game. Wisely
e snooker game.
| handled, they can Be wisely
4 : See factor.

agram sho’
ee cae at n
contacts on jens:
range reds when
safety is de-

| signed.
ity ’ ’ Red at table
'



&

top needs a graze

\ ‘ contact — it can
( i { © i hardly be too

} ’ r fine,
i} ' i On dtagram
N tH) We ete
' ayed with left-
r—-+-9-8 9-4 hand “side” to
} pty ‘| Prevent white
| 110 stranding among

C ‘| tha shee ;
bt + a red behind

pi

gat 3,

ke overdone,

\

abcd sLould not

‘Golden Boy iaiatis |
Hiew To Shoot



|






SOCOLLLELOPPELLEOOOOOLOEOLPLEEE LLLP OOP ELLE AEM MOM MA KM LEP BIPIES FF,





What Makes The Tired

Businessman Tired Saat here exploded to-day fling-
And not Merely Businessmen Either
By Chapman Pincher

Why does a boring Sunday tire sponsibility
as much as a full day’s
story
start you yawning? Why do you
a

you out

work? Why .does a_ stale

ind ourself n-dding off at

dull speech?

Dectors have just put

a startlingly s mple. answer
these questions: boredom
ly reduces the amount of sugal

in your blood

This sugar is the main source
your brain and

ef energy for



forward habitually exhausts
to Led by Sidney Portis, the doc- ,,:osicns
rapid- (ors examined seeres of “worn

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1951

Tanker Explodes

VENICE, Jan. 17.
moored in Giudecca

—_—



tanker

ing 50 workers into the water
Four workers were rushed to

Hospital with multiple fractures

and contusions.

The force of the explosion

smashed the. bows of the 5,557-ton

to tanker Luisa. A huge sheet of
fatigue. flame shot skywards.

They eir finding of pr'me . Dense clouds of smoke imme-
medical ance because 1 diately enveloped the vessel mak-
shows that enforced retirement is ing it impossible at once to find
no remedy for the.over-ambitiou it whether there was anyone
cr over-conscientious- man why jn the hold.
himself, First reports said that the ex-
were caused by an
cetylene torch igniting petro-
out” business men during seve ¢@um vapours.
years of research at the Michaé! {ne tanker had arrived here
Reese Hospital, Chicago. oj January 10 from the Persian
culf and Was under repairs at














Here's a way to relief...

Do you know that a common
of backache lies in the
? When they are healtiiy
to filter impurities out
When they grow
these impurities ac-
cumulate and the resulting con-
games very often the cause of
Witt's Pills are

ed to invigorate
They act

on these vital organs, act
as a tonic, toning them = ond
speedily restoring them. to their
activity. Relief fro






are so subject

in

Hl



muscles. So, sitting “browned inp came el ance’ ak the dockyard after her cargo had backache or Seer

off? in an armehair can exhaust responsibility, impairs the glands been unloaded. 7 cin gitaeaiaee aa Witt's Pills have

you as much as hard physical Vion control the’ blood’s sugar . At = ae By eee been bringing relief to cuf-

*ffort. supply SON 8 Oe i- ferers from bacache and
- iscovered s pply. cl oo ee \

The doctors discovered this “rhe sugar, which builds up in flying over _ salon wt fe A ng oo we have received cvuntless
explanation accidentally ues the blood after a meal, is de- tude. Panic-s eat Sat 5 band letters of gratitude from 4
experiments to find out tives Pleted at an abnormally rapid ple 00 at #y by the plane. all over the riorld
high-level business . executives Pate in over-driven brain work- tad been dropped oy ttt de Geta supply from
and. others who carry heavy re- te Firemen brought the fire unc your chemist

“When an inadequate amount coatro! after a four howrs fi mt aa fay.

What’s on To-day

Advocate’s Photo Exhibition
at Barbados Museum 16—6

R. J, MacLeod’s Exhibition
of Oil Paintings at Bar-
bades Museum 10—6.

Polo at Garrison 4.30.

Police Band plays at St.
Peter's Almshouse 7.30

Mobile Cinema Show at
Westmoreland Planta-
tion Yard, St. James 7.30

Film Show at British Coun-
cil Headquarters, “Wake-
field” 8.00.

Empire Theatre “Annie Get
Your Gun” 4.45 & 8.30.
Roxy Theatre “Caught” &
“A” & “C” in Hollywood

4.30 & 8.15.

Globe Theatre “The Frozen
Ghost” & “Jungle Cap-
tive” 4.45 & 8.30.

Plaza Theatre (Bridgetown)
“South of St. Louis” 4.45
& 8.30,

Plaza Theatre (O%stin) —
“Marine Raiders” &

8.30.

Aquatic Club Cinema
“Rogues Regiment” 5.0
& 8.30.

Gaiety Theatre, (St. James)
“Bowery Bombshell” &
“Man From Texas” 8.30.



The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 6.12 a.m.
Sun Sets: 5.53 p.m.
Moon (Full) January 23.
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 11.18 p.m.

YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Codrington) .04 in.

Total fee month to yester-
day: 1.64 ins.

Temperature (Max.) 81.5 °F

‘Temperature (Min,) 74.5 °F

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.
(3 p.m.) E.N.E.

Wind Velocity: 15 miles per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.059,
(3 p.m.) 29.987,





















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—Reter.





of sugar circulates in the blood
the brain does not function pro-
perly and the patient . becomes
highly strung and easily fa-
tigued,” the doctors write in
their medical report.



—_—_—

COAL GUARD

COSELY, Worcestershire,
Jan. 16.

OuR
GUARANTEE
De Witt’s Pills are
manufactured under strictly hygienic
conditions and the ingredien\s con-
form to rigid stan dards of purity.




surements of the bloo? :
onan oF normal people delib- Police in this little town hit by
erately subjected to boredom. con-) -he nation-wide British coal
vineed the doctors that putting|shcrtage are mounting guard on
an exhausted, but still ambi-|the local football ground.
tious, business man on a dull They had earlier surpr sed
reutine of light reading and|about 50 people with picks and
country walks would probably shovels digging coal out of the
make him worse, football pitch laid out some years

So they offer a more praetica~}ago on an old slag dump.

ble remedy: ensure a more regu- —Reuter.

lar supply of blood sugar by more
food and less smoking.





— >

Kabe Crepe

In Pink, Blue, Gold,
Lemon, Lime, Green and

per Obg
Bilanjo Printed
| Hair Cord

In Nursery patterns

eure! 89¢
Diamond Crepe

In White only 36”



They believe that if the hard-
pressed brain worker had three
regular meals a day with plenty
of potatoes, bread, cereals, fruit
juices. and other ingredients
which generate blood sugar, plus
a half-pint of milk at bedtime,
likely to





he would be far less
suffer from fatigue.

An occasional cigarette helps
the tired man by stimulating: his
system to release. more ~ sugay
into the blood. But chain-smoking
has just the opposite effect.



Canadian Rates
Of Exchange

JANUARY 16. 1951

Cheques on !
63 9/10% vr. Bankers 61 $/10°% pr.
- Demand
- \ Drafts 61.75% pr.
Sight Drafts 61 6/10% pr

3 9/10% pr, Cable .

62 4/10% pr. Currency 60 4/10% pr
| Coupons $8 7/10% pr.
| Silver

OP LLCRL ODOC POSS PTFE,

§ BARBADOS POLO CLUB



wide
De LIMA CUP per'yd. ............ 99¢
Mustangs vs Cricllos Siieeei os



At Garrison Savannah
At 4.15 p.m.

TO-DAY

|
i
|
|
|
| Wednesday, 17th January.
|
|

CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET

—_

Entrance.to Enclosure
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Full Text

PAGE 1

WEDNESDAY, JAM ARY IT, 151 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE FIVE House Pass Registration Bill THE House of Assembly yesterday passed with minor amendments H Bill to make provision for the registration of all persons entitled to vote al an election of a member to the Gctwral Assembly The Bill provides that Budgetown .md the parishes of the island will be divided into ree.1. tration districts, and lists of voters will be prepared for each registration district. The Bill was supported by Mr J. H. Wilkinson of wnen would voters Mr. Adams said that Ihey had made enquiries about the difficulties in Truudad and he was prepared to say that no honourable member could show the Government any snag that took place in Trinidad against which they had not made provision in the present Bill He explained the various sections of the BUI and told honourable members that if they needed any more information about them would be glad lo give It, He said that they proposed in e Bill to make one or two amendments and one was that if person moved out of his registration district after living in It for three months, they proposed to allow him, when election time came along, to go and vote in his old district Another one was that if a cane itter. say from St. Andrew moved Into a district temporarily for some weeks or months for that tter he would be allowed to vole where he permanently resided. He said that If any honourable members had any suggestions they should let him know in rder that the necessary amendments could be made. He then n.oved that the Bill be read a second time. Bill Drafted Mr Wllklntsa said that he thought die Honourable Senior Member for St Joseph had given a full explanation of the bill. As the Hon. Member said, it was big job. He said that he appreciated the fact thai the Attorney General and the Hon. Member had devoteu a lot of time drafting the bill, and he hoped that everybody would be satisfied. He knew that the Government was endeavouring to make It as aasa M possjfblg nt rrirybodar The Hon. Member talked about experience gained from Trinidad showing that 450 people to the pclling stations were the right number. He did not know, but the practical experience gamed ir Barbados would show whether that was so or not He said that he had much pleasure in support • ing the bill. Clause 9 of the bill said "every assistant registering officer who, without reasonable excuse, omit" any name from the preliminary list or enters in the preliminary list any person not entitled to be registered or falls to collect a claim, shall be liable on conviction by a Court of Summary Jurisdiction to a fine of S500 or to imprisonment for six months and shall forfeit any claim to fees under this Act. !" Mr. E K. Wales*! (E) said that he was of the opinion that that clause was too hnrsh. He felt that for an offence of that nature the censure was too great Mr Adams said that he knew the Hon Senior Member tor St George could have borne him out with die fact that In Trinidad such an offence had already taken place, no he did not want It to happen In Barbados. People seeing that the penalty for committing such an offence was so great, would be scared to commit any such action. It was in his opinion a very good way to get a clean system in registering people Mr. Miller (Li rose to support Mr Adams He said that In Trinidad, he had known many a person to go to the polling booth" to exercise his or her rights only to be turned back by the Sheriff on the ground of not having a vote Stollmeyer Is £10.000 VOTED FOR Doing A Good PAROCHIAL EMPLOYEES Job—Adams TUT. House of Assembly yesterdav passed a Bill authorising the Vestry of St Michael to raise a loan not exceeding JC 10.000 to give back pay to the parochial employees. Mr. E. D. Mutt ley |E) moved trie passing of the Bill He said that the matter nud been a controversial OM fm many mo.'ths He bad promised the hon senior %  have to pay for it in years to __ member for St Peter that he | come, other Resolution for $69,680 for would do his best to get the Bill i They should not borrow money supplementary Estimates for before the Legislature and he had to pay back nay 1950-31. succeeded. Of the Resolution for 143,509. Some hon. members might ralsej sjr Cos said that like other under Commissioners of Current>., the point as to whether this mat-' members, he was alad to see that expenses in connection with the | ler having been approved by the | Hl long i Mt g^ Vestry of St THE House of Assembly yesterJ day agreed to a Resolution foi I $43,509 to be placed at the dis-' posal of the Governor-in-Execu' Uve Committee to supplement the Estimates 1950-51, part I, current. The House also agreed m Resolution for $32,400 and to dsfeabTueUo of worn currenc> 1950 V. notes. $2,434 was voted For sub""" •idles and grants. Trade Commissioner In Canada, $500 was voted. Speaking of the Trade Commissioner. Mr. Rex Stollmeyer, Mr. Adams said that he thought there! thought he was ily anyone more suitable [ anolhci *fn the for doing the work than Mr Stollmeyer. He was an affable. friendly man to everybody in every walk of life and he really did a good job for the West Indies Although he was a Trinidadian, he did not give the impression that he was pushing things for uad alone, but lor the v. hole West Indies. They were pleased to see the amount of work he did lor the West Indies When they went on the Fancy Molasses Enquiry, they agreed that it would be their duly when ihey returnee homo to tell the public how useful be had been to them. Mr. F Gialdard agreed with the rvmaiks o! Mr. Aoams concerning Mr Stollmeyer and said that during tnc war he nad ex j leaned stiiuincnts of flour to the West Indies and did many things for trade which were beyond his duties. He was in Barbados fur a few weeks on a refresher basis to keep ninutelf always >" touch with uie situation unu see how he nulli help Under Miscellaneous services. Director of Petroleum and Natulal Gas, $2,335 .... i ., i n,i RssjftslraUaa of voters, gie.ouo For the Department of HighMays and Transport, plant, tools, spares and equipment. $22,0OU v.i. voted. Mr Lewis (L> said that 1949-50 money hud BC4R9 VOMd for plants, tools and spares for the Department of Highways and Transport. On the last occasion ihat they had to vote, they voted money for a similar item. They voted so much that in making up tbt estimate for 1950-51. the Government saw lit only to put in a small amount. ted a statement from tfsj In answer to that he would only sa> that no precedent was being created. During the present legislatfM session a similar Bill tor the Vessrf of St Philip, and he %  orrcct in saying. Vestry of St James, hao been passed under similar circumstances To make certain of his position. hewevcr. he had raided the point at the meeting of the Vestry iin Mondav and he had then with him ;t letter in whieh the present Vestry had declared their approval of the action taken by last year's Vestry He had much pleasure In moving the second rending of the Bill Mr. F X. WaleeSt (L) seconded He said that the mattn %  i -nnlroversial one between the Barbados Workers* Union and the employers two years ago. Now the House was seeing Justice heina done lie was glad to see that the hon senior member for the City had persuaded others to agree to surh a Bill. He had great pleasure in seconding the Bill and hoped Ihat the Vestry would deal with the paying out of the money as expedition-^ as the House was dealing with the Rill Mr V E. Ji. Lewis (L) said II was regrettable Ihat n long and protracted discussion with threats bj %  cartatn MM lion nf UM vestry amptoyaai had preceded the agreement to men Ril but hi %  natter had bSM II,. knew that it was difflcult fi g K ci\rninent or a vestry unlike private business, to give retrospective pay where there was .i dispute about wages In this particular case, however, the Vestry employees of St. Michael had all along maintained that they were promised that whatever the government did the Vestry would also do. That claim had been so persistent that persons win. were not "in the know" must have come to nember of the Government or the| the conclusion unhesitatingly, thai particular minister in charge of such a promise had been made no legislation for that department to matter how vague He had no say whether he was satisfied that, doubt that the taxpayers of the the plant of the Highways and] parish would welcome the settleTr an snort DeDartmcnt was setment reached in,The aS,on !" mat W GovemHe did no, know J,'here were ^JfSS^tmShSOim over twig net b X fl ? sort % rS Ih. Central Hoad Board and the.> ^bV^mpIo^ Vho*d3 nti had about 50 un.s l| had In\j>£ 1O Joln ^, lh Bnvl)0( v Io 1Kl . %  •oased to 150 units. ,ie Thev preferred the more Tre was talk of a Govern.; |o v|v ,. m pj ov ec to do so and thep ment Workshop He took it thai. ^raM anything was lo l>e gives as the echeme would have included B rcs „it 0 f this agitation, the) often maintenance for a plaut, andi go i ,,,,,1, more than those who equipment to the various depart-1 md h „ ngltatlng. ,ents. He could not say that it. \\ 0 hoped that when the mon y Michael intended pay pay. He remembered when thi BvasttsjaRIOn of the Crrfl Service was being made and there were 'r.ikmi rW "iiiiii.n.:-:.. jfcj g i'h regards salaries, wages and reorganization, the Si Vssjtf) made it clear Ihat they ( %  ared to follow the Government tn whiitevet were arrived at hy the CommissioiMI Mi Adams Altai Mi Adams made bis recommendations. Government had made good with their employees. but on the other hand the St Michael Vestry went back on Its word and actually said that they had made no promise and refused to pay the workmen retrospective pay Although they realised Ihat they were in the same category as Government employees and thai the cost of living had gone up for them the same way as it had for other employees, they refused to pa\ the retrospective pay All those who would benefit reaull of the passing of thr Hill should take off their hats to the workers who had the courage to stand up againM the for their right It ra through the hardihood or those workers that tb.v had that bill. He had to play his pai: in advtsing them and helping to Instil nerve in them It was regrettable that persons who were responsible for the spending of public fund should treat tli.'i. mplovesi ir I manner %  v"pleased that'th.-i ,' n "hlch they would not treat n veutod that_wa> | lnclr Private amp* Good Job Sriiveni;ei dt.< lo the Island Thai did work man> abhorred, and for that rei%  00 consideration should lie "given to their claims The Vestry should debata Mrtously Ihe fact that the? U Uu payers of St. Michael who paid the bills were willing to subscribe anything at any tun. which thev considered reasonable and to the interest of furthering and helping t'n 'immunity and to the interest of doing justice to the less forI mate. He Imped they would never see a neurrennof (he %  atwhieh existed In ffl Mich39 Years Of Watch Repairing IN a room full at tmie" Bolton Lane you will sec a little Alexander Year/wood. lepairuig a watch or maybe a elect any time of the day It u the work thai Year wood has been doing for the past 39 years and Ihe work which Yearwood likes When he began watch and clock repairing at the age Of 15 when he had just left school, it was because long before ih*t ha had been dreaming of how he would some BSD i>e lingering the intricate parts of watches and touching gold dajlj B etween whiles >f leofcaa| aa %  m.ill w.ito parts as he sal with his hack bent, his spectacles i rating low on his i piece of cloth thrown over his braced pants, Yearwood told the Advocate yesterday how he had been working at the watch business 27 years in McGraajBI Street Me also worked for about I year In Tudor Street and one in Middle Street, but for him now business is at its best It was the steady looking at small watch parts which troubled Yen ".nod's eyes and made him begin to wear spectacles when he was S3 Hi*il] Ml you that have been in the busi ness for a long spell as he has been, you will come to hi watches and clocks ticks only aa >oiM.thing in the distance. He has not into such a groove that unless you talk of the ticking of a watch or clock, he would not think of it. Bnrn Grey You may begin to wondei their .in.my poctiU.ii minus about watch repairers, and %  aetn| Yearwood so grey at 54 you may ask him if he thought that had anything to do with his watch repalrnaf way of life, but he will assure you Ihat he had a sister iv ho was born grey Yearwood has done a lot for the krwatt] business In Barbados. He hs two son, and both of them followed his footsteps One, agf .-ft.i .i while and IS now an .iptician in Trinidad Besides his two boys, he has trained man) young men in his time. Maybe it is because he Is alraj <. anil Mi-pend* for the year IVM Ibi regi [ration <>r voters in Uie manner provided by Ihe HeprelOsrtatton of the People Act. lttbl It retains the IBS0 register voters in case there is an election before the new register of voter* prepared in accordance With the provisions of the Special 41 of Voters (General A"emblyi Act. 1930. becomes s^Netrv* Lie And Nehru Will Confer PARIS. Jan. 16. Indian Prime Minister Nehru and Trygve IJe, Secretary-General of the United Nations will confer here on Thursday on the International situation, a United Nations spokesman told Reater. The meeting appears to have been arranged within the last 24 hours as the same spokesman said last night that no meeting hnd been fixed. French sources believed that talks would concern principally India's efforts to restore peace in ihe Far East Trygve Lie arrived here from Sw tierland inst night to hear French reaction to a pwspoeal to hold the United Nations Assembly in Paris next September Geneva has already "made strong hid" for ihe Assembly I gpokesman laid Me '-"'' conferred will. Foreign Ministe, Pieven to-morrow. Lk will meet Alexandre Parodi Secretary General of the French Foreign Office and Premier Rene Pleve to-morrow. g The main purpose of Nehru s three-day visit which Embassy quarters describe as "private is to confer with Indian diplomats in European cnp'tals Mrs Vijayalakhm Pandit. Ambassador to the United Stales and Di Radhakrishnan. Ambassador to Russia will also -TK1 Nehru will rail on President \ln.entj Auriol and plans to hoMla news conference to-morrow -Reoier. _„.*,. THE French passenger liner IMPRISONED S.S. Ce4eaabie which was schedScntence of three months' imuled to arrive at Barbados toprltonment with hard labour was day. will now be arriving to-moryesterday passed on Joseph JOT[row dan of Venture, St. John by His I %  Worship Mr G B Griffith. Act-I She will be landing passengers in? Police Magistrate of Distric. (here from the United Kingdom %  c [and will be sailing the same day Jordan was found guilty of] for Jamaica via Trinidad. La wounding Gordon Crichlow of iGuairo, Curacao and Cartagena. Roebuck Street, St John on JanThe CetamMe It coni'sned uary 4. I Messrs R M Jones ft C In The House Yesterday Whti tlw House ot AwmWi m % %  Hi**' M'. Adami Uid Ihr seawel .,.1 tUgulationi 1SSI The foliowtns nolle** wrr sivei Hraoluuon ..as to be paid, if by nnv chiuv an employee had lo be disirjissii' between the time il was decided on lo pay it from, and the actual paying of it, he srould still pet his share, un to the lime that he had given satisfaction. Mr R. G. Mspp (I.) said that like the last speaker he welcomed the fact that the matter had been settled and that these deserving Vestry employees would get their back pay. While that was so. he still found himself compelled to draw to the attention of ihe House. what was In his opinion, a very t _i serious lapse of sound methods by Id dry the. |h(1 Ve Iry of Sl Michael Mr. Mapp said lht they ofle.i heard the boast marie by members of the Vestry that they had sound business methods and that business men should always be returned to the Vestries of Barbados Yet they were raising loan to pay wages to employees. Car services already rcnderC Ratepayers of St Michael would Pass Bill to Suspend L'^:' 1 aVsIO iu u ^lT wV" %  ,.„ contain"* by Hmmmon *** *f Registration Act [ ael. Mr Allgrr fL) said that however long It hail taken Ihe Vestry lo f •he parochial employees Wgajsj going to be oonsiricrcfl in Ihe BUI He was tm' I" favour cf over burdening the tanwyen bv in|ba .-^ibiries of 'he g] i. ids well paM SCHOONERS BRING RICE AND FRUIT A thousand bags of rice arriV' %  NI in Barbados from Bn 1 %  vi yesterda\ by th. %  hooner Franklyn l> K The Frufclyn D R .d"> 'of tirewooU. .'harcoal and sawn pieces ul %  Another schooner. tsM V* I. FssnieU biMoghl a cargi. of li upra. firewood and 1.000 loose ..i ;is from Dominica. Both schooner* are consigned '.. the Schooner OS I :in COMPENSATION in the sum of £3 10 %  "be paid lo Clement Nightingale by 52year-old Ervm Thompson of Spoonera Hill yeslerday jfter HIS Worship Mr E A McLeod Pollc? Magistrate 4 Di Uiet Thompson guilty of maliciousw damaging a motor cycle i 'lenient Nightingnle on January 15 %  rfenca Thomi son was further ordered to pay a Hue of £4 in two months or in delimit two months' imprisonment. with hard laboui. FRESH SUPPLY Of :PURINA HEN CHOW : (SCRATCH GRAIN) %  H. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.-Di.tHbu to r. %  -*•* %  **•*'**-*-'. Cjplowt frit III I us I rul in SEEDS SI'IITI Your FAVOtTBMTES Emrlm 12 kinds 2 ,. Otgfalttea 2 Alyssum, Snap Dragon. Petunia, Asters. Chrysan•h.nnims, Candytuft. Phlos. Cosmos, Verbena. Calliopals. also a supply of | | I.I PABLI SEEDS Tomato. Cabbage, Leltu etc ri. KNIGHTS DRUG STORES ;; \ ..i rwurm row ( % %  > %  • I %  • llr>l on. Dr. %  mm"" Hr*iini.tm m lawful for ilw V-tiy l Sl MirhMmmm •->* P-f-l ol Und Imm th* Oov rrnor-ln-S*c"Uv Commnir* .ituli "ilhlr il•dmumtiallve bomnlary and irquirr-f lw Uw pnriKM of F\v nld> for l an mint. Renlull •scwd *ini 11 Pbilip I.. Imm ih Trut*> 'lr th tln> ..I ilw GB.nr.' TH..I thai pf*> ._d >>n •• Kim Oasrai v of Meno'l> •*••* which land iilu bi l %  PUylril F1*M. o snr p*o4 i*> Mdim Thirty V—.. It (aBiniln. Sa-nlullon mfcins II riul for !• V^try of SI J*Bh 1 M Ihat patc-rl of land ronUinmS b iilllill %  aillll not nwrr Ihan four M at Uir OM Railway Station. BaU< 4M, from Uw Oovno-ln-:-iin. rt.miitcfor any prlod nol ei*dins Mr (.. H Adams, who moved the passing <>i the BILL, tid um House that it was a fact that as from the passing of that Act nobody would be registered under the old Act If a bye-election took place ihen. only those persons who were then registered would have tho right to vote. There could not very well have methods of registration and two bills existing at the same tlm "Colombif To-morrow Du<* •M flea. Hrtciui "I SVfrri poavd MIUII TssM %  Th I IS11 ThU of I I.-ua> .J u. A Bolul->n lo pUK tha .um i Ml.SOS at th dxpoaal ot lh Ootrrnn in rJi.ro.ivr CannilHN Id mpplun* UM EalimalM ISM-SI. Part I. Cuirmt a%  ttoWP In Uui Suppu-m*nta-> Utiu.a' <•• SS. whlth form Ihr fKh^l>jlr p Ihl. Rat Car Overturns Mon, y Eresywhew .. And Nol A T IIF MOTOR CAR O— 111. C S3? "n ld 'ft! To Spend c roea pnu w*rlurned ul'n.K WHV'N thn Advaralr visittHl th" WHKN the Advaeale visited Ih. miHiciuy rvi-iiuiK up to yesterday morning it was still !„__, %  nd W Yd""o"r SSLTm-g IT— mn. %  Hnpcn. Jowph '"" *"" '"'"•" "" h> """ dcl '" — RWE VAI.E ROAD Sl B" drew which being re completed Thai .,,_ ment, were busy sorting into sei —"nj large IHIrict "A-" Millar was found guilty of the larceny of a six-volt batter] raJ tied ;if l '• and 'he |iroperty .if Kvelyn KaMsaS>saasas)gjari i n ww>w>v^v>w^// l v/-y^' Mty,v Want Something Nice ? Al K1CAN PRINTS M e.. Site, per Yd. I Mitiioiiu KI i) ANOLAJM In White. Tink, Lemon nnd Aqua at $.1.05 per Yd. t'KKPK OK MIINK S l. per Yd. ( III l'l HOMAINK in lovely tnlouro $2.4(1 per Yd. PLAIN & PRINTED SPVNS More read.v-lo-weur BEACH WKAK IlKtSSKS SLACKS. SKIRTS & lll.OI'SKS ^She Jiroadway ZDress Shoppe )..'s,;',**'sss No. 1 BROAb STREET ,', ;',::'. '•','.';'.', •? paired road alnv season last year. The damage done lo the roan long I^-wer Parks has also been cpalred %  pUF MOTORCYCLR M—619 X owned and ridden by Darnley Stuart of Black Rock, and the motor car S—115. owned and driven by Harold Clarke of Maddock, St Jame. were Involved In an accident along Broad Street. Megan William Fognrty. yesterday morning Traffic was held un for a short lime while IV police took statements. T HR GAS LAMP at the corner f Svii; % %  ;: I.-' .nd fan"" %  treat .n-ght Ire on Monday ai about 6 05 p.m. The gas was soon ffter turned off and the blaze B .-i.'-h '.... isnl i. ,i,.,-.-i I Ihi 1 Onvanw* SSMW • ,-. r--i" in* C*tiina ISSO-il Psrl II. Capital, ai iho in >hr Suppannvnlary Sallajktte* ItSf-SI No M. whlrh lorm tru Srltadula to IMR*.I..IK>II A M—alutlon lo piac* in* *um ot •SSaW ai th dlMcoal erf ih. 0-.v*rr-in-Eiprotlv* CommilW* to •upoleinf>' th* EallmalH ISSS-SI. Part tl. Capital a> >hown in th* ftuppln>*nlarv * mat*> ltW-91. No 17 which form Ih* bV C thi* Kmolutlon Tha H..„ rassss A Bill to provid* for th* -if.dini .1 •nd dU*lullnn r.l Th* narbal" Hstual AMI and Aummtnl Auiinnc *<*it. • prnit th* nrovi. R*pr***Ution of th* Proplr Art ISO) rvqiiiiina a 1 to b* pr* Ih* rwr lssi its I ih*r*to %  iplo>**< mi th* h T n at 1 pm tancelied, must be disposer! of to make room for the new Unified West Indies currency which ma go into • irrigation in April th year The Currency Department does not have the accommodation to house the large extra staff that would be needed to do this work. %  *> these (our men have baag) in ployed, and in addition member'. of ihe regular Currency staff gnd BUCn "f the Treasury Staff at are available are being culled upon to work overtime. This extra staff is not used normally, and as a result there U alavays an eight or nine-month dealing with mutilated notes thai are returned to the Department by the island'* hanks for cancellation Surh n si | nmv have to be cleared up before April The valu~ Of note* m circulation now over two million orJIaTB ~ i> usually constant. I^eause the Currencv Department returns to the banks the amount that the banks send in to the depailment for cancellation But more notes •niitilnte.l than hitherto, proof of th. number of hand? through whirh they pass. It is a sign too of the high cost of living and the resultant higher wages paid The man who would normally be handing .p !" .1 -tondant I around a shilling now hands %  jmOl % %  dollai bill died here The value of notes destro' He was R; He snut] 1M0 was about S4SO.000. It was abnul $420,000 Not "" (Sugar Factorv and *erved for! eaneellation from the hanks come „. Wears a. t* ,l,x '' o( $40 0(Hi lislative Counc'ls. / A ITJtR broke .nit under the bonnet of a Central *Bus while It was travelling along I. eon Hoad at about 1.30 pm The Fire Brigade was summoned but when they arrived •iM tltg the fire hurl alreidy been extinguished bv the chauffeur, conductor and someone el




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<1 SiuTbdau ESTABLISHED 1893 Free World Must Stick Together — Says I isrii/iiiiici __i_ LONDON, Jan 16. GENERAL EISENHOW^K. Oommandei of the Atlantic Pact Army, told riparian tar* to day that the "No 1 priority" of the West was the establishment of a respectable, suitable and ade quate military strucfjre behind h!ch w; may ali live in peace." The General compared \'„c condition* nf to day with those of 1942 when he held his flrst. Press con ference in London. Then he was trying to organise military forces to win a war already started. NKW Tt"HFH Reds Prepare For Battle With Govt. ROME. Jan. 16. Italian Communist* Ram V day feverishly prepariro may be .! major trial of stren (til ngi.in.il C vetnin.-nt plan* 1o maintain order when Gcnei. anMiUaawer arrives, to-n "Shork police*' of Interior Mia. ister Mario Scelbn *r<%  mnwnt'i main weapo., |o dea: with th.s type nf situation Strom; squads "I thee' arm steel-hclmeled police in tlr i: scarlet jeeps an prowling nl;dr and dav thniugh IM in I .iti.At the slightest sign %  the jeeps will charge brio • itfl l*>ul the link ii waan the Atlnntic RacinV threat Elsenhowei Hi.. uld no! possibly divorce %  ny one area of the world from ..II otherEisenhower said that as far as his job as Supreme Commander waa concerned, he felt himself to be thr rassflaaantaUva <>f no single country "I regard myself in this )ob as one twelfth American and odot twelfth of each of the other nations, and I shall attempt to conduct myself in just that way." Eisenhower met Field Marshal Viscount Montgomery. Western Union Defence chairman to-day ontlnulni his Europe, check up" low They drscussed many problems concerned with including Western Union forces in an Atlantic Pact force. Afterwards Eisenhower went on to a meeting of North Atlantic deputies He wag also to see Foreign SecKmest Bevin — Renter U.Nrtroops Fight Way Into Suwon TOKYO, Jan 18 (JNITED NATIONS tanks smashed into Suwon only 16 miles south of Seoul to day, shortly alter their main forces had withdrawn to shorten ed lines, south of Wonju in the centre Tanks rac tag north up the west coast road through, recap tured Osan brushed aside resistance to their 10 mile driveto day. Then they fought briefly in the streets of Suwon itself in one of their first aggress ive actions since the retreat at the end of last year before Communists broke off and fled Mm air attack* and | .•romp.tnii-tt Ih.' U.N, Must Recognize Red China MISS AKLF.NE CUMMINS newly spujiniwi Assistant Ml-tress at Queen's College n> -Jen here chatting wttb -iime of her pupil* when the new school term began yesterday. -NtHkU 10 BELIEVED DEAD SPOKANE. WASHINGTON. Jan in Tan i" ,iii span balttvad to b,aboard an airliner which showej "no sign of life", after it crashed ard caught fire here to-dav —Reuter. Urge Agreement On Russian Proposals By HAROLD KIM, PARIS. Jan. 16. BslUgfa pnd froocb Ambassadors In Washington have been -strutted io urge United Statei Stti.l.iiy of Slate Acheson agree 10 Russia's request to holu the proposed foui powei meeting i uiUfda the Unites I States it was learned in usually well :nforme>> quarters here to-day. Henri Bonnet. French .mbasaedor and Sir Oliver Frank Britisl Ambassador were meeting Acheson to-day tn work on I e tev of the Alli.-d reply Each count r> has prepared B It waa learned that the American draft differed somewhat IB fcrm and style from the rlritnl and French drafts. draft apparently deals at some length with polemical mailers dealt with in previon both sides whereas French dipl' mutic quarters feel point In loading ihb convjpondrn' e with .dcology Reuter LONDON, Jan. in. Jawaharlal Nehru. Prune tilDutter or India, said In London to-day that continued Unftad Nations' support for Chiang Kal Shek was unrealistic. Wtnle the njiiiuis have been {.iscusamg the? entry ol the Peoplea' Government of China into the United Nail i. icfl bigiier bi raeo| niaad -that New Orini Is a great power to be dealt with in termc.|uallty by the oUMV nreul powers". Speaking to ., crowdej Press Conference at the end of Commonwealth talks In London. Nehru said setllcmvni in the Par K-ast should not be on local but on a world-wide basis f>n the proepecU "f I rettlement In Korea, the Indian Prune Minister said that the importnnt thing was that four powers specially concerned Britain, the United States. Russia and China shruld settle Far Eastern problems The baak Bnetoi is that a great new ppwer has arisen In the Far East and thereby has upset preVII -is aaulllbrium Not icognizing this fact does not make It I... t — Reuter lievin Talks Meat LONDON, Jan 16 Carlos Hog.in, Argentine Ambassador in London called on %  rnaat Bavin. Ilntiih roreign Secretary th'a %  rternnon at his own reyueat It waa believ*! lt diseuased with Bevin the negotliUons opened to-IW between th<-* drlUah Ministry of F-od and tw, Argentine rapresentatlves in. meal stippli'^ lo HriU'n A Food Mini-s'ry offlcial said: "The talks are on an official level, i n proposals which have been put forward. At present they are explorntorv and technical** —Reuter Scientist Wanted To Investigate Sugar Disease In B.G. (From Our Own Correspondent) LONDON. Jan. 16. The search begins to-day in Ihe U.K. for a plant scientist able to My at the earliest possible moment to British Guiana to investigate the mysterious disease threatening s I L.I I Itcpom auggest that the disease Which bM descended suddenly is leatseald, but according lo u message received last night by the Colonial Office from DC author.lie-., this conclusion is unconfirmed as yet. Leaf scald has been unknown in the West Indies hitherto In addition to pleas to Britain. ll b underst.HMi respiesLs l1.T %  \ ie Im'mli Launch New ill Out Drive INI", ( HINA .1.1 |( VHHnunh uanuganu launch ii oew nil out drive to cap! Hanoi chip.* town in ii' Indo China pushed lo arl inn miles of the eltv to-day. PraneJl forces were said to be preparing n powerfully fortified perimeter on the coast around Ihe important |>ort of Haiphong, In MSC of necessity Thlrts Vletnunh baPallons es Unab i '<• numba. naarl • 40JXV man were IK*UIK helil i lighting aloiiK the 10-mile fion* northwest of the dt) it was said l.-night Two French moUwlaed groupi .i raeanturad Irnportant Hive bombtt ig "active und The Cnmmu >< h.ll'i In the IKK \MF MONTY 111 AT Tin, HOTEL RAPHAEL. Fsrls. Col Cost* J B "uregard. nenersl Elsenhower and Admiral Oornry. Fisld Mar-hal Mon';on mmr of the ntorth Atlsa. .<• def.-ncu foi to aukr s Uirea weeks tour of WgataTa Eirope i Viscount Montgoaiary. %  Sal EisonJiower. Supreme Psri-: from Ws'hinfton Norway Plans New Budget OSLO. Jan. 16. The Norwegian Oorarnment will soon propose a "new extraordinary budget" to be met by new taxation, the Finance Minister declared in his budget speech lo Parliament today. This would be In adrldiun to the budget for the year l>eginiiini: July 1. 1931. hdeclared rather exaggerated' Mel .i the unknown disease might I e%  i ii it was hoped measures could '*• taken >oon to Dievent any such disaster. The request of the H(; Oovori .nrnt to the Colonial Ofll hold the French U.S. Bombers Fly 5,000 Milra To England %  OpT WORTH TF.XAS. Jan 10 Six lan-englnad Uhlb M 31 sitnacQanbagi landnd %  •' 1. knheath AJrnorl in i 'o-day alter .i Tiiulit of mof* IhBD .('') milas prom an American Ai' IIit was announced her* in Air Force utillno It lei ll uld the >.,mlieiwen' an I hng ranie flight tratnmr i ro ranunc Inltlatad %  > thd Unlta< Slates Air For..aval ui ihe b nbera, tineas* In *ht Ai.id, hmi in vi i wnan an pvavt* ous training tlight> iir i Hawaii in the west ami tinUnited S'ales Atlantic const 'n the east %  no the .or or %  Operation U K %  nan ptana t<-K .. duWaranl i urse Tin \ oUrtad the no* rew of 15 Mud Ihe equal nf i.nib.it .n I.I The thriii iexpat led lo la England alter being sen > 'our days. The planej will i nl n •••pur.ilii mi< !<• Fmt Worth taking fiom 35 In Mussolini's Daughter Sods To Buenos Aires NAPLES. Jan. I Ann Mai I.I Mussolini, 21-vestId (laughter of the former Italian dictator, left Naples last night ,< aiKiJ toi I ill. i And" Ci. i Kind lm llueniMv Aires. She is to visit hai 'Her brothti Vlltoilu WnO has l-i-eti living Ul ha Araontlnt eapltal IM lauons withdrawal from Wonju late yesterdsy. It was announced Troops after holding off f>0.000 Chinese ami North Koreans for 16 itavi pulle.1 back fr-rni tin shaped bulge lulling north from he main defence Una i oalttoni Tonight, as they strengthened their new posts, they stood read.. to meet any Communist drive (pt two vital mountain passes about 70 miles north of Taeju. II ed Nations Headquarters in thr southeast. Command of these DM Olllv main I I nm'. thrOUgh thf t.wMi surd high central mountain range would enable rnmrmint-din r.in "it south ol 'he Vikiong HlMI Only occnsional bunta of fire from troop landing rlAat *m* machine-gunbroke the silence as Ihe warming sun melted eight Inches of snow and rrOBafl mud i | into n sofiso' qtiagoilra One Yah tyoe Communist flght.1 -.' IIMi .III .itt.i k nil i -,Fi i m bombers raturnhaj from a raid mi airfields In the northwest ii disappeared hehlnd a hill. Reiner. Reuter From Worm Bank TEHERAN, Jan. t. <• c<>nTenipi..iing wlthL'rawml from membership of tlulot. iri.iim,,.,! Bank It was learned here to-day from a usually rclinble source in toUowi the allege. I refusal l>> the Hank to grant her an $8.0110,000 loan torehabilitate ttv Kulf porta of Ituhre and Kiioraml i iic OovarnnaaM baa > iblid Hi representatives at the Interrial on,.I Hank I., investigate %  iiiiiu-i ih.loan has In fad baan raft ..i -Jteuter Dutch Clairvoyant Seeks Coronation Stone Without loans nr increases In direct taxation the budget is balanced at a total of till.325.000 and includes nearl. tZ5.000.000 for defence The new budget creases in raUwai Uvlagrapn postal rates and a temporary tax mi aha 'ric power. AMSTERDAM. Jan. 18 Dutch • i, pi lei 'lm m s aged *0. who claims to have helped Dutch and Belgian police ft by air foi Ixmloii laad for Ihi Coronation BtOfM Scotland Yard to-day dented Mwas eom'ng at ItMn proposes in t e U r rk JJ ulk r il1 n me "** V r Si viral Hub I. BSshrl ';aid lh<-> had been recjuested to help traoo 'Ha said thit the Government I the stone missing frorn Westwould put forward proposals tc lm,n ••' %  •' A'^hey sir !" Chrletm* pav for lengthening ihe period of Da>. but had icfuseil following. mililary service nnd other exthe examplr e-f their muntcrnart penses for defetu-e preparedness. HI Britain, who believed the caa 1 Renter hgd a pal Renter 4 STEAL 10m. FRANCS I'AltlS. JHII. IS A bank van with in.noo.oo* irancg bralMd hard in a Purl mam slreet to-day when a cyclis. swerved In its path and fell off naad nit) lununj ^uns. lunspi I i i banlnd and seized the bank' brief cases all filled with notes The cyclist waited for them it the getaway car parked with HM sngini fanning in a akli They left the hlcvile and (hen first car—stolen vehicles Reuu-r U.S. STEEL GOES UP NKW YOHK. Ian II America's annus 1 steelmaklm ...,. |ta mi 'anuan i msi. wnI of 104. 229, U50 bms. toen than 4,500.00(1 tons greater Hua on JatMatrj I, 1050, the %  •.ii si d w '-1 Inatltuti 1 Tin naw capacity iigures is an increase of 22,600,1100 of nenrU 2H pi-r cent since 10|tl -Renter PEKING MAY ACCEPT PEACE PLAN demanded Ihe Peace I acceptable considered inevitable at llM RaU D'l.arlment that the Hinted State would move in the United rfatloi %  % %  K-.re • NIW DELHI, Jan 16. I do not think Peking will makl The Indian Home UlniteSl he disastrous mistake of lelusirn Ctekravarty Raiagopulachan 1 %  the extended hand nf frierulsn night axpreaaad hi l"-l*f that and co-operation." Pea night not turn down tnlatest peace plan to the resolution A State Department BpORaaWaa on the Far Esst. said to-day that Chinese Com He was speaking at a slate banmiimsts must atop fighting boftx quet given in honour of Afghanthe United Statewould "sit do* istsn. Prime Minister, Marshal at nny conference dealing Shnh Mahmoud Khan who If Korea spending a few days hat ba Coiled States Thfi pojaiwiMy th l pefc,,^ K.ii H;->p,'dachari said truit Indian would acept the United Prime Minister Nehru was absent Ceasefire Plan in prineii abroad "engaged in waging the would demand sweeping and prob. sacred battle for peace." ably unacceptable reservations was no news but I Instinekept In mind, he said "In lhi> lively feel that he (Nehru) will event the United Slates wotil.i win the difficult battle" Rajagopnot be bound by tt. aceepfanee ot Officials said the State Depsrlalachari continued. "We hav--. 1 ihe ceasefire resolution presented me-it had -olutely ISSUave. turned a critical cornet" in the Pnlitlcal Committee last nothing" frorn HM battle i> week." the spokesman said. eminent to confirm these report* It Chinese Comn.m i.u rejected Depiirtmenl officials de• rommi nt on l "tlu Far "East Tn gon"' *"* Indian Home Minister Raloessed the belief that Chinese Communls.f emild oot reject the Peace Plnn The siieech aroused consideribie ll followed earhej unconfirmed reports that India l-clieved Peking would uccept the ptppMat India Turns Down Proposals To Solve Kashmir Dispute LONDON, Jan 16, I.IAQUAT Al.I KHAN. Prime Minister of Pakistan. %  nit lii ir tfi-fliiy Imli.i had turned down thiee proposals to solve the Kashmir disputiat the Commonweal!)! I'n nii.-i.s mgjgllnffg last week. Pakistan li.id accepted the proposals, he told a rei>orters con ference. a trouble are* since Ihe tmli.ti I..U.I,.,!, III I'll. Kolh India and I'aklsUn claimed Kaahmir and llfhllns beian whe-.i Irlbesmen enured the HUU In Oelober. 1947. India then flew in i. % %  •! %  I'o • In Iraops went In inn Ihe SSSU did not spread And on Ne Veal v .) > IMS. ftlh ting; was stopped a. it Uie .i.-i la he ii tvfore I'NU. The .lluallun now %  : Suggestlm. i Forces (rom othei Commonwealth nations such us Au Italia und New should be put into Kashmir io protect the State while ., plebiscite tool I A Combined fores <>r troop. from India and Id maintain Joint Sfleurh ly In Kashmir WflLV rations were mtdfl Plabi 3 Umlen NatlOM Pl Administrator. 'Admiral Chester Nimii/ ej ihe United States*, should hnve uuthur ity i< r ilas .i local I among the people nf K-uriv %  mr HeeU All nil. i forces should he rllaltanded 0 •ithdrawn WsllMIK willhorslers %  Chkea. India. pahUIan Tlhe -.1 Afghanistan h* her Hurrioailf Hits British Columbia VICTOIMA Jar. If A hurro ..! %  %  nskl he coastal terrain oi th, Britisl Columbia c ,i-t. on MOT. die itrealest Iur> unleashed in I years. This city of 00.000 sra mack In the centre although ih' r/lnd hit from Southern Oregoi tj the far up coast of Vancouver-lend. A fisherman was drowned i: iii'uon. bul thi I'AKIHTAN wants the i-.i ,,,nt Kashmir decided b> ;iiebrW.I.under ISO control | .J : .|| troops w thdrawn. INDIA IH ready to hull tee pi< In-..ie. bel Is unwilling I saasdraw ker i< %  •; %  I Nehru was not pn'i accept any proposal which would were nJ m the withdrawal of the Ineaths In Hritish Columbia For ,iian irmv fnm Kashmir Uanuar nree hours hen' b) ed All Khan said. He addtvi, "The oulhwestwar.l nt more thn-i 70 only hope now lies with the Secumlles an hour e J ri v council So long as this dlsiasta. neither Pakistan nor but! on to th> A-1.1" make ; re I'-, it. HI "f -.. %  %  %  BI NEW RADAR FACTORY OTTAWA. Jan. 16 A new $2,500,000 (..factory may noon be built ne.n Toronto to produce W5.OOO.00 %  worth of radar equipment for West Europe'* defences, informed c*rM at the Instance of UM C.OVquarters said here to-dy. Iliernment of Ka-'hmlr and the will form part of Canada's! largeit political national partv 1300,000.000 programme tn sup-I there t.Iv C'imdisii made nrniamsnt| "if are wen* lold '• igo awo>. and other defen. %  <• aoulpfneol l we would go away." be aaM. Earlier to-day Nehru lold reporters "We are all agreed It is for the people of Kashmir to der !de their future." India's intervention, he said. 3SSST'


arr

ESTABLISHED 1895





Free World Must
Stick Together

—Says FKisenhower

LONDON, Jan. 16.

GENERAL EISENHOWER, Conimandevr of the

Atlantic Pact Army, told
day that the “No 1 priority’’

“establishment of a res

reporters eve to-
of the West was the
vectabie, suitable and ade

quate military structure behind which we may ali

live in peace.’’

The General compared ihe condiiious of

to-day

with those of 1942 when he held his first Press con-

ference in London.

Then he was trying to orsanise

military forces

ane

to win a war already started.

Reds Prepare
For Battle
With Govt.

ROME, Jan. 16.
Italian Communists were to-
day feverishly preparing for what
may be a major trial of strengt!
against Government plans to
maintain order when Generali
Eisenhower arrives to-morrow.
“Shock police” of Interior Min-
ister Mario Scelba are the Gov-
ernment’s main weapon to dea:
with this type of situation.



Strong squads of these’¢rim
steel-helmeted police in the:
searlet jeeps are prowling nish

and day through the main Italiai
cities.

At the slightest sign of troub!
the jeeps will charge into
monstrators with sirens shriekin

Demonstrations and strike
have been planned by Commun-
ists.

Communist unions hope to uss
a printers’ strike to prevent Rowic
newspapers coming out with then
reports of Eisenhower's arrival

Communist protest strikes hav:
been peppering Italy for some
days, usually consisting of short
stoppages of work while the ‘‘or-
der of the day” is voted, There
was even a strike by players in
a football match near Pisa which!
held up the game for some min-
utes. ;

It was believed that the Cab-
inet discussed yesterday whethe:
to call out troops in- addition to
police, but no hint of the decision

has escaped.
re . —Reuter.





Flu Virus
Isolated

LONDON, Jan. 16.

The World Influenza Research
centre in London said today that
the virus causing Britain's influ-
enza epidemic had been isolated.

It was similar to the, virus—a
Prime which {caused the flu in
Seandinavia in 1949 and had prob-
ably been imported from Scandi-
navia, the Centre said. :

The Research Centre which is
working with Pasteur in Paris on
the flu problem, said that the epi-
demic in Britain is considered
mild.

A Ministry of Health spokesman
called it “very infectious, though
fairly mild.”

Commenting on the Italian re-
quest for vaccine from abroad to
avert the flu. epidemic, General
Sir John Taylor of the Medical
Research Council said today: “The
whole point is that there is no
vaccine in general use. Different
strains have been tried in America
and elsewhere, during the last five
or eight years, but their, positive
value is not yet known.”

The World |Health Organiza-
tion’s influenza centre here has
been seeking a protective vaccine
for general use but,'so far, no im-
munisation has been found.

—Reuter.



10 BELIEVED DEAD

SPOKANE, WASHINGTON,
Jan, 16.

Ten people were believed to be
aboard an airliner which showed
“no sign of life”, after it crashed

ard caught fire here to-day.
—Reuter.

“No it is



to preserve peace
ana p’event anyone from believ-
jing they ce destroy the Tree
world or that there is anything

to be gained for them in attacking
the free world” he said.

Eisenhower said he had keen
“cheered by the obvious readi-
ness of Governments and civil-
ians” to meet present tasks during
his tour of Europe

He believed the peoples of the
two sides of the Atlantic would be
bound together by a common ven-
eration of freedom and a common
jetermination to be united with
other free people.





“So far as I am concerned the
only criterion that should be

observed in measuring the con-
tribution of any country should
be expressed in these terms—
j. we intend to put into this effort
one more man-hour in terms of
our size than anybody else.










“If we can live up to that
simple little doctrine we need
have no fear.”

“You can be sure of one thing”
he added, “I thoroughly believe
|that the only way the free world
jcan defend itself successfully is
jfor the free world to stick to
gether”



Questioned about

; the gefem A
link between the Atlantic cn tbe
Pacific threat Eisenhower Sad

they could not possibly divorce |
any one area of the world from!
all others

Eisenhower said that as far as
his job as Supreme Commander
was concerned, he felt himself. to
be the representative of no single
country.

“T regard myself in this job as
one twelfth American and on
twelfth of each of the other na-
tions, and I shall attempt to con-
duct myself in just that way.”

Eisenhower met Field Marshal
Viscount Montgomery, Western
Union Defence chairman to-day
} continuing his European
“check up” tour.

afore

They dsscusseqd many problems
concerned with including Western
Union forces in an Atlantic Pact
force.

Afterwards Eisenhower went on
to a meeting of North Atlantic
deputies.

He was also to see Foreign Sec-
retary Ernest Bevin.—Reuter.



Urge Agreement On
Russian Proposals

By HAROLD KING

a PARIS, Jan. 16.
British and French Ambassa-
dors in Washington have been

instructed to urge United States
Secretary of State Acheson to
agree to Russia's request to hold
the proposed four power meeting
outside the United States it was
learned in usually well ‘nformea
quarters here to-day.

Henri Bonnet, French \mbassa-
dor and Sir Oliver Franks British
Ambassador were meeting Ache-
son to-day to work on the tex‘
of the Allied reply. Each country
has prepared a draft.

It was learned that the Ameri-
can draft differed somewhat in
form and style from the British
and French drafts.

The American draft apparently
deals at some length with polem-



ical matters dealt with in previ-|

our notes on both sides whereas
French diplvmatic quarters feel
there is no point in loading this
correspondence with ideology .
—Reuter.





AT THE HOTEL RAPHAEL, Paris, Col. Costa d

IKE AND MONTY

U.N. Must

Recognize

Red China
—NEHRU

_. LAONDON, Jari. 16,,
Jawaharlal Nehru, Prime Min-
ister of India, said in London
to-day that continued United
Nations’ support for Chiang Kai
Shek was unrealistic,

“While the nations have been
ciscussing the entry of the Peo-
ples’ Government of China into
the United Nations, something
much bigger has been recog-
nised—that New China is a great

power to be dealt with in terms
of equality by the other great
powers”,

Speaking to a crowded Press
Conference at the end of Com-
monwealth talks in London,
Nehru said settlement in the
Far East should not be on a local

but on a world-wide basis.

On the prospects of a peaceful |
settlement in Korea, the Indian
Prime Minister said that the im-
portant thing was that four pow-

ers specially concerned Britain,
the United States, Russia and
China should settle Far Eastern
problems

The basic factor is that a great
new power has arisen in the Far
East and thereby has upset pre-
j vious equilibrium, Not recogniz~
ing this fact does not make it)
any less a fact.—Reuter. |
|



| Bevin Talks Meat ,

LONDON, Jan. 16.

Carlos Hogan, Argentine Am-
bassador in London called on
Ernest Bevin, British Foreign
Secretary th®s afternoon at his
own request. It was believed he
discussed with Bevin the negoti-
ations opened to-day between the
British Ministry of Food and twu

|Argentine | representatives on
j|meat supplies to Brita’n.
A Food Ministry official said;

“The talks are on an official level,
en proposals which have been
}put forward. At present they are
exploratory and technical”
—Reuter.



uregard, Field



Marshal Viscount Montgomery,

eneral Eisenhower and Admiral Corney. Field Mar shal Montgomery met General Eisenhower, Supreme

Comma r of the

to mak

North Atlan
a three weeks tour of Western E

force +
rope.—Expr

tie defence e latter ar

rived in Paris from Wachington

Harbados



pel

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY, 17, 1951

MISS ARLENE CUMMINS newly





appointed Assistant Mistress at

Queen’s College is seen here chatting with some of her pupils when
the new school term began yesterday.



Scientist Wanted T

Investigate Sugar
Disease In’ B.G.

(From Our Own

The search begins to-day

Correspondent)
LONDON, Jan. 16,
in the U.K. for a plant scient-

ist able to fly at the earliest possible moment to British

Guiana to investigate the m

ysterious disease threatening

the colony’s main industry—sugar.



ON THE

° SPOT |

«ll

|
IPSWICH, England,

Harry J. Wright, area {
manager of the British Elec
tricity Authority, received
an electric shaver among |,
his Christmas gifts.

When he plugged it in the |
light socket it blew out the
fuses so he returned it to |
the makers for overhaul. |
It was then discovered |
that the shaver’s case had
been emptied of its mechan- |
ism and the space filled
with grey explosive powder.

Scotland Yard detectives
are now seeking the sender
of the explosive shaver
—-LNS



Norway Plans |

New Budget

OSLO, Jan. 16.

The Norwegian Government will {
soon propose a “new extraordin- |
ary budget” to be met by new
taxation, the Finance Minister de-
clared in his budget speech to
Parliament today.

This would be in addition to |
the budget for the year beginning
July 1, 1951, he declared.

Without loans or increases in
direct taxation the budget is bal-
anced at a total of £143,325,000
and includes nearly £25,000,000
for defence. |

The new budget proposes in-
creases in railway telegraph and
postal rates and a temporary tax
on electric power. .

He said that the Government |





would put forward proposals tc
pay for lengthening the period of |
military service and other ex-

penses for defence preparedness.
—Reuter.

PEKING MA

NEW DELHI, Jan. 16.

The Indian Home Minister
Chakravarty Rajagopalachari t
night expressed his belief that
Peking might not turn down th
latest peace plan to the resolution
on the Far East

He was speaking at a state ban-
quet given in honour of Afghan-
istan, Prime Minister, Marshal
Shah Mahmoud Khan who is
spending a few days here on hi
way to the United States

Rajagopalachari said that Indian
Prime Minister Nehru was absent
abroad “engaged in waging the
sacred battle for peace.”

“T have no news but I instinc-
tively feel that he (Nehru) will
win the difficult battle”
alachari continued
turned a critical corner

hard and long battle









| agreed
‘might

»- the extended hand

” in the

Reports suggest that the disease
which has descended suddenly is
leafseald, but according to a mes-
sage received last night by the
Colonial Office from B.G. author-
ities, this conclusion is unconfirm-
ed as yet.

Leafscald has been unknown in
the West Indies hitherto

In addition to pleas to Britain,
it is understood requests for as-
sistance to fight off the disease
have been sent by the sugar in-
terests of the colony to the United
States and Canada,

Alarming reports have eman-
ated from B.G., and some speak
of the prospect of the complete
annihilation of the sugar industry
which provides two-thirds of
B.G’s revenue. This is not in
aecordance with information
reaching the Colonial Office last
night. A spokesman at the Colo-
nial Office described such reports
as “rather exaggerated” He
that the unknown disease
become serious but it was
hoped measures could be taken
300n to vrevent any such disaster

The request of the B.G. Govern-
ment to the Colonial Office is for
a plant pathologist and it is pos-
sible he may be found at the Im
perial College of Tropical
culture,





Dutch Clairvoyant
Seeks Coronation Stone

AMSTERDAM, Jan. 16

Dutch clairvoyant, Peter Hur-
tkos aged 40, who claims to have
helpéd. Dutch and Belgian police

solve several cases left by air for
London to-day to look for the
Coronation Stone

Scotland Yard to-day denied he
was comng at their request
Hurkos’ real name is Peter Van
der Kurk

Several Dutch seers

said they

‘had been requested to help trace

the stone missing from West-
minster Abbey since Christmas
Day, but had refused following

the example of their counterpart

in Britain, who believed the case
‘had a political side

Reuter.

“I do not think Peking will max«

the disastrous mistake of refusin;
of friendsn



and co-operation.”

A State Department spokesm:r
said to-day that Chinese Com-
munists must stop fighting befoi
the United States would “sit dow,
at any conference dealing wit
Korea and the Far East in
eral.”

The — possibility that
would accept the United Natio
Ceasefire Plan in principle, bu
would demand sweeping and prob-
ably unacceptable reservations was
kept in mind, he said “In this
event the United States would
not be bound by its acceptan¢e of
the ceasefire resolution presented
Political last
poke

If Chinese Com te reje

goen-

Peking

Comr

eck,” the



ted



Agri- |





Vietminh
Launch New
All Out Drive

INDO-CHINA, Jan. 16.
Vietminh insurgents launching
anew all out drive to capture
Hanoi, chief town in north

Indo-China pushed to within 26
miles of the city to-day,

French forces were said to be
preparing aq powerfully fortified
perimeter on the coast around the

important port of Haiphong, in
case of necessity.

Thirty Vietminh battalions es
cimated to number nearly 40,006
men were being held in fierce
fighting along the 10-mile front

northwest of the city, it was said
to-night,

Two French
had recaptured
tions

American built dive bomber
ind other planes and curtain ar-
illery fire was giving “active and
‘fective support.” The Commu
iique said

The new attack followed
ill night lull in the
sloody battle.

Crack French

motorised
important

group:
posi

an
two-day

and North Afri-
can troops had fought bloody
bayonet battles with insurgents
in their efforts to hold the French
ront

Artillery pumped hundreds of
shells into stubbornly advanciny
rebel hordes as dive bombers

swept down. —Reuter.

4 STEAL 10m. FRANCS

PARIS, Jan, 16
A bank van with 10,000,006
{francs braked hard in a Pari
main street to-day when a cyclis:
swerved in its path and fell off



Three gangsters armed wit
ltummy guns, jumped out of
|car behind and seized the bank’

| brief cases all filled with notes

The cyclist waited for them ir
the getaway car parked with the
engine running in a side street
They left the bicycle and their
first car—stolen vehicles.—Reuter



U.S. STEEL GOES UP

NEW YORK, Jan. 16
America’s annua! steelmaking
capacity on January |, 1951, wag
the record of 104, 229, 650 tons,
more than 4,500,000 tons greater
than on January 1, 1950, the
American Lren and Steel Institute

has announced

The new capacity figures is an
increase of 22,600,000 tons or

of nearly 28 per cent since 1940

—Reuter



PEACE PLAN

the Peace Plan or demanded un-
acceptable reservations, it was
considered inevitable at the State
Department that the United States
would move in the United Nation

to brand China with aggresvion i

Korea,

State Department officials de-
“lined to comment on the speech
of the Indian Home Minister Raja-
fopalachari who expressed the be
lief that Chinese Communis.:
would not reject the Peace Plan

The speech aroused considerable

interest It followed earlier un-
confirmed reports that India be-
lieved Peking would accept the
proposal,

Officials said the State Depart-
ment had received “absolutely
nothing” from the Indian Gov
ernment to confirm these reports

-Reuter.





PRICE : FIVE CENTS

Suwon

TOKYO, Jan. 16.

UNITED NATIONS tanks smashed into Suwon

only 15 miles sou

th of Seoul to-day, shortly

| after their main forces had withdrawn to shorten-

ing north. up the west

| ed lines, south of Wonju in the centre. Tanks rac.

coast road through recap-

tured Osan brushed aside resistance to their 10-mile

Then they fought briefly in the

streets of Suwon itself in one of their first aggress-
ive actions since the retreat at the end of last year
—before Communists broke off and fled.

|
| drive to-day.

US. Bombers |
Fly 5,000 Miles
_ To England

FORT WORTH TEXAS, Jan, 16

Six ten-engined United States
B 36 superbombers landed it
'Lekenheath Airport in England
to-day after a flight of more than

| 5.000 miles from an American Air
| Force base it was announced here
| American Air Force authorities i
; England said the bombers were
on a “long range flight training
pro ramme initiated by the Unites
States Air Force several year:
ago.”

The bonbers, Diggest in the
world, had never when on previ-
ous training flights gone beyond
Hawaii in the west and the United

| States Atlantic coast in the east,

They roared into the air on
“Operation U, K.”

Each plane took qa different
course They carried the norma!
erew of 15 and the equal of full
combat armament

The flight is expected to leave
England after being serviced with-
.n four days. The planes will far
»ut on separate homeward mission
to Fort Worth taking from 35 to
40 hours

—Reuter.



Mussolini's Daughter
Sails To Buenos Aires

NAPLES, Jan. 16.

Ann Maria Mussolini, 21-year-
old daughter of the former Italian
dictator, left Naples last night in
the 8,000 tons liner Andrea Grita
»ound for Buenos Aires,

She is to visit her elder brother
Vittorio who has been living in
the Argentine capital for some |
time

~Reuter



Mass air attacks and a non-stop
artillery barrage accompanied the
United Nations withdrawal from
Wonju late yesterday, it was an-
nounced.

Troops after holding off 50,000
Chinese and North Koreans for 16
days pulled back from the thumb-
shaped bulge jutting north from
the main defence line to stricter
positions

Tonight, as they strengthened
their new posts, they stood ready
to meet any Communist drive for
two vital mountain passes about
70 miles north of Taeju, the Unit-

ed Nations Headquarters in the
southeast.
Command of these passes-—-the

only main road routes through the
1,000 yard high central. mountain
range—would enable Communists
to fan out south of the Naktong
River

Only occasional
from troops testing rifles and
machine-guns broke the silence
as the warming sun melted eight
inches of snow and frozen mud
along read tracks into a soggy
quagmire.

One Yak type Communist fight-
er was set afire in an attack on
two American bombers returning
from a raid on airfields in the
northwest. It disappeared behind
a hill,

bursts of fire

Reuter,



Persia May Retire
From World Bank

TEHERAN, Jan, 16,

Persia Ys contemplating” with-
crawal from membership of the
International Bank it was learned
here to-day from a usually reli-
able source

This follows the alleged refusal
by the Bank to grant her an
$8,000,000 loan to rehabilitate the
gulf ports of Buhre and Kioram-

The Government has cabled its
representatives at the Inter-
nat onal Bank to investigate
whether the loan has in fact been
refused

—Reuter.



India Turns Down Proposals
To Solve Kashmir Dispute

LIAQUAT ALI KHAN
said here to-day India had
to solve the Kashmir dispu
miers’ meetings last week.

LONDON, Jan. 16,

, Prime Minister of Pakistan,

turned down three proposals
te at the Commonwealth Pre-

Pakistan had accepted the proposals, he told a reporters

conference.
Suggestions were

1. Forces from other Common-

wealth nations such as Aus-
tralia and New Zealand
should be put into Kashmir
to protect the State while a
plebiscite took place

2. A Combined force of troop:
from India and Pakistar
should maintain joint securi-
ty in Kashmir, while prepa-
rations were made for the

Plebiscite

United Nations
Administrator,
Chester Nimitz, of the United
States), should have author
ity to raise a Jocal foree from
among the people of Kash-
mir itself, All other loca)
forces should be disbanded or
withdrawn

Plebiscite
(Admiral

“ASHMIR with borders on
China, India, Pakistan, Tibet
and Afghanistan — has beer

Hurricane Hits
British Columbia

VICTORIA, Jan. 16

A hurricane raked sea lanes and
he coastal terrain of the British
Columbia coast, on Monday wit!
the greatest fury unleashed in |
years, This city of 60,000 was
mack in the centre although the
wind hit from Southern Oregor
to the far up coast of Vancouve:
island,

A fisherman was drowned in
regon, but there were no storm
‘eaths in British Columbia. For
hree hours here the wind howled
outhwestward at more than 70
miles an hour (cP)



NEW RADAR FACTORY

OTTAWA, Jan. 16
A new $2,500,000 Government
factory may soon be built near
Toronto to produce $45,000,000
worth of radar equipment
West Europe’s defences, informed
quarters said here to-day. It

will form part of Canada’s



$300,000,000 programme to sup-

it Canadian made armament

| other defence equipment
—Reuter

| rity Council
, pute

for
|

a trouble area since the Indian
partition in 1947.

Both India and Pakistan claimed
Kashmir and fighting began
when tribesmen entered the
State in October, 1947.

India then flew in troops, Paki-
stan troops went im, but the war
did not spread,

And on New Year's Day, 1949,
fighting was stopped acd the
dispute taken before UNO,

The situation now is:



PAKISTAN wants the future of
Kashmir decided by plebiseite
under UNO control acl all
troops withdrawn,

INDIA is ready to hold the pic-
biscite, but is unwilling to with-
draw her troops.

“Nehru was not prepared to
accept any proposal which would
mean the withdrawal of the In-
dian army from Kashmir.” Liaquat
Ali Khan said. He added, “The
only hope now lies with the Secu-
So long as this dis-
lasts, neither Pakistan nor

India can make any contribution
}to the preservation of peace in
[A

porters “We are all agreed it is
for the people of Kashmir to de-
| cide their future.”

India’s intervention, he~ said,
come at the instance of the Gov-
ernment of Kashmir and the
largest political national party
there

eo told to (go away,
we would go away,” he said.

—Keuter.

Earlier to-day Nehru told re-

wr
PAGE TWO



IR EDWARD CUNARD’S

brother, Mr. Victor Cunard,
is expected to arrive from Eng-
land to-morrow morning by the
Colombie. He will be staying
with Sir Edward at Glitter Bay,
St. James.

Arriving by Colombie
R. and Mrs. H. F. Shearn
and Master John Shearn
are expected to arrive to-morrow
by the Colombie. For the past few
months they have been on holi-
day in England.
Mr. Shearn is Manager of the
Barbados Cooperage.

Expected Tomorrow

R. and Mrs. Aubrey Greaves

expect Mrs. Mabel Aiken
to arrive by the Colombie to--
morrow morning. Mrs. Aiken is
Mrs. Greaves’ sister,

“Going Tourist”’
RANK MORGAN tells me
that he has bought himself a
couple of brightly coloured sports
shirts and is “going tourist” as
from to-morrow, when he leaves
by the Colombie on her round trip
to Jamaica.

Other passengers leaving on the
round trip are Mr. and Mrs.
Austin Potter, Mr. G. G. Feld-
man, Mr. L. Spira, and Mr. and
Mrs. Ratcliffe.

Cable and Wireless

- Engineers
R. Ralph R. Head, Depuiy
Engineer of Cable and Wire-
less’ Station at Boarded Hall and
Mr. Geo. R. Hooper, Assistant
Engineer at the Cable Station,
leave to-morrow for England by
the Golfiteo, They are on long
leave. Mr. Hooper's wife is ac-
companying him,
First Visit
R. NEIL STEWART, T.C.A’s
Medical Officer in Vancouver
who spent two weeks’ holiday
here at Pa ae left for Canada

by T.C.A. on Saturday, This
was Dr. Stewart's first visit to
Barbados.

Leaving by Golfito
T. REV. BISHOP HUGHES
is due to leave by the Gelfite

for England to-morrow. Other
passengers leaving by the Golfite
are Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Hotch-
kiss. Mr. Hotchk'ss is Assistant
Adviser for Agricultural Educa-
tion, C.D. & W.

Back to Canada

R. JOHN GOODING, son of

Mr. and Mrs. Wyatt Good-
ina. Philip returned ” Canada

ery: UA 2.0, ~ ieee
sptaain a holiday in Barbadoy
with his family. John works in
Toronto.

BY THE

year, at this season,
ona Ot Wugwell uses all his
powers of persuasion to entice
Mrs. Wretch to make just one
appearance in the circus which
saw her earliest triumphs. But
he always fails,

As her husband, Colonel
Wretch, put it to Natacha the
Human Snake (Wugwell’s Envoy
Most Extraordinary): “You can-
not expect a lady with a political





CROSS cag








Across
{ Svidiers caps with a
t ( spike in

. )
Often ‘ost by the head of the



9°
1. When ‘to ‘dens 7
Â¥. Endpi a) ee
10. Conveyance, (6)
12 Sort of look to cause 14 per-
haps, (4) 14, See 12 Across.
1 Put'a' fain tne
a
ic ee 9g mn the fre. (3
20 Godiva once was. (8)
Down
4. Sort of drum. (6)
2 Different sort of wok to 12
Across, (4)
Â¥ opia this be be acess (5)
a small stree get
the easel. (5) ee ae
® This berry is a rasp. (@)
6 He was no cavalier, D}
i ting thi ‘or some
pepe jes. (5
8 zh make the A.A. cheer.
gives ll, Colour. (3)
13 At. (@
8 Pe SES SS Pwaen
are Ow
em lose 5 ‘Across. Oe lata -~
gun fr the
animal. (3) {
Sal nies of Saturd: ay's pu
bas! eri Se 14, ae ae te
19 20. Aga: 31, Lees: loste!
Down: 1. rein 2 ; oy
Rie sa intelli Bic Fe 6. Noon!
Pa in Kn TR kath “2e"out










Underwear

SLIPS—Plastic Back?,,....
Nylon Net VESTS ...
PANTIES

NIGHTIES
Rayon Mesh NIGHTIES ...




.. 1.18,





” ”








” ”






Evans and
Whitfields

Your Shoe Stores

~ the Wretches,

4.88

3.05, 3.68
4.10





POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

“night now, al i needa is one

of those rousing broadcasts to

the nation from Mr. Attlee

and my up of happiness will
be full.”



Left for the U.S.

RS. JOSIE WYRE left here

on Monday by air for the
U.S. Mrs. Wyre is the daughter

f Bishop Warner of Harlem, New
York City. She has gone to join
her father to assist him in the
church circuit and secretarial
work,

Mrs. Wyre came to Barbados
in November 1948 from St. Kitts
where she was born. While here
she had made many friends and
much of her time in Barbados
was spent with the Rev. and Mrs.
Winter

Here for the Winter
M* and MRS. W. P. “BILL”

WOODROFFE of Philadel-
phia are spending the winter in

Barbados staying at “Sandy-
wayes”, Rockley. Mr. Woodroffe
who was born in Barbados, is a
retired insurance businessman
He has been in the U.S. for
thirty-nine years and since 1948
has been coming to Barbados
every year fer a holiday. Staying

with them is Mrs. Florence Way
of Philadelphia. A good friend of
theirs, Mrs. Dorathy Smith is
also down for the winter stay-
ing at Cacrabank.

Executive Secretary

R. LOUIS LAW, Executive

Secretary of the Caribbean
Interim Tourist Committee ar-
rived from Trinidad by B.W.1,A,
on Monday afternoon, He _ is
here on a short visit and is staying
at the Marine Hotel,

Area Engineer

R. “BOB” GREENE, Inter-

national Aeradio Ltd.’s Area
Engineer returned to Trinidad on
Monday afternoon by B.W.1.A.

WAY —

career to consider, to appear in
public in spangles and tights.
riding two horses simultaneous-
ly.” Matters were not improved
when another envoy. Anselmo
the clown, reminded Mrs, Wretch
that she was once the girl who
had to answer the bell when
Booboo the African Ape rang for
his dinner.

Wugwell’s Rebuke
WUGWELL himself called on
When he was given
a glass of sherry he turned to
Mrs. Wretch and said sadly, “I
bet you can’t balance this glass
on the bridge of your nose as
you used to, my dear.” “I have
other things to do,” was the stiff
reply. “No, it’s not that,” said
Wugwell, “it’s just lack of prac-
tice, I must say, I never thought
a respectable circus performer
could sink as low as politics. It’s
never happened to Wugwell’s be-
fore, and it gets the circus a bad
name.” “I prefer not to talk of my
past,” replied Mrs. Wretch. “And
I prefer not to talk of your pre-

sent,” said Wugwell with mel-
ancholy dignity, as he took his
leave.
The Tin Outlook
THE recent failure of the Tix
Study Group to arrive at any

solution of the problem ot regula-

Rupert and the



Rosalie quickly explains

the lea
“You want to draw something ?
Well, you can make a picture of

me,"’ she smiles. “Just wa a
minute while | get ready." From

her little bag she takes a mirror and
der debbing
she pens her
uh AlaurTs

a
het nose.

1.37



SHOPPERS
GUIDE

MEN’S SWIM TRUNKS:
“JANTZEN” ...
“GANTNER”

“PEDIGREE” ...

NYLON GIRDLES .............., 7.06

COURT SHOES :
White from

Black, Brown, Blue Suede from 7.15
RRA TOS a be aawiececcues 3.06

BOOKS FOR YOUNGSTERS, CHIL-
DREN AND ADULTS, SUBSTAN-
TIALLY REDUCED TO CLEAR AT

EVANS « WHITFIELDS

Picturesque Sight
HE three-masted Swedish
Training vessel Sunbeam
made a picturesque sight as she
sailed into Carlisle Bay shortly
after 4 o'clock yesterday after-
noon,

She is rigged mainly with square
sails which is seldom seen these
days She is here on a short
visit.

Who Was Bassett ?
— people asked

yesterday, after ‘they
read about the Purple
who played the part of Alfred
Bassett in this one-Act play which
members of the Barbados Drama-
tc Club performed at Y.M.P.C.
on Saturday night.

Norman Wood played Alfred
Bassett, the Hon. Reg. Smith’s
(Michael Lynch) valet,

En Route To B.G.
R. J. NUNES, one of the wrong
Managing Directors of Messrs
William Fogarty Ltd. and Mr.
David B. Andrews, Manager of
Fogarty’s Brick Factory at Coo-
maka, a small town on the Dem-
erara River who" arrived here on
Friday on a short visit left yes-
terday afternoon for Trinidad by
B.W.1.A. intransit to B.G, They
were staying at the Marine Hotel.

New Appointment
M*: and Mrs. N. D,. Osborne
arrived by the Lady Nelson
from B.G. on Sunday morning
accompanied by their daughter.
Mr. Osborne has been appointed sim
to the office of Assistant Com-
missioner, Income Tax and Death

Duties Department.

He was with the Income Tax
Department here before he went

to British Guiana, and while ic sig

B.G. he was attached to the In

come Tax t.
T.L.L.
ISS SHEILA LEWIS, who hes

been spending a’ holiday
with her family at “Masryviic *
Rockley, returned to ‘Trinidad to
yesterday by B.W.1LA, She works
with T.L.L.’s office in Pointe a
Pierre.

Were

with Friends
RS. SHEILA NOTHNAGEL

and her daughter Madeline
who had been holidaying with
friends here for several weeks,
returned to Trinidad on Monday
afternoon by B.W.I.A.

Awarded 0.B.E.

R. ALAN STEWARD forme:

British Council Representa-
tive here who was suceeeded by

Mr. Risely Tucker, has been
awarded the O.B.E. in the King’s
New Year’s honours list. Mr.

Steward is now in England on
leave from Nigeria.



By Beachcomber

tion agreements qoincides with
the discovery of enormous de-
posits at Molonga. Mrs. Welsh-
man, the allotropist employed by
the Klumping Dredging Co., be.
lieves that these deposits, if
treated with stannous oxide (the
white kind), will make a crystal
tinfoil which could be ground io
strips and used for chimney
cowlings, tangerine covers, lime-
juice bottle caps, soldered loco-
motive couplings, and toothpick
cases, The effect of this on
American stockpiling is unpredict-
able. Of course, a world surplus
of tin would lead to widespread
attempts to shove the stuff bac






Fashion Designers.

but her appearance is elegant
perfect.





‘women in the
world have just been a for
1950 by the New York Institute of
Without ex-
ception, they are wealthy women
who spend a fortune on Their

clothes,
Apart from the Duchess of
who is der of fashicd

Windsor,
recognised as a leader of fashi
I could name several






she is far from ws

‘Under-playing’
Next as Mrs. Margaret
soernay. one vasepteys a beau-
instead over-playing
it. Whatever the -ogcasion, you
never see her w too much
wee too m
believes in

accessory
basically sienpie styles and
—— pentane , tailored. “She
a positive us for ““mad”

French hats. a g

On the British e I ld
place Vivien Leigh as Hest ray
fashion. he hock
glamorous without
self up to kill like the Baste

n the teen-age group there is
Petula Clark, who always appears
well groomed, but mever looks a
year older than she really is.
Among the older Mrs.

women
Winston” |\Churchill is noted for
many, and dignity in her

My Best Dress’

“The beautiful dress I
made in "1950" was described to
me by two of London's top de-
ners. Both, in dâ„¢ year of
straight, slim ‘lines, surprisingly
featured enormously full, skirts.

ani the

ch

Norman Hartnell

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
picks~
’s Best-Dressed Women













seater Triumph, or appearing ina tendency

court in her small court wig and
special feminine K.C’s gown cut
more slim-fitting and less billowy
than the masculine version.

Among her most notable recent
eases was the defence of George
Kelly at the Cameo cinema mur-
der trial.

Chief recreations from court and

black velvet crinoline he made for| domestic life are gardening and
Elizabeth to wear at the| olf, Her husband complains that
al Film Performance. It had|her advecate’s training gives her

be simple and black because
the court was in mo for
Sweden’s King Gustav. Tada
ted, the crinoline was made of 10
yards of 54in. black velvet over
large hooped petticoats.

fty yards of white chiffon
made the décolleté, full-skirted
evening gown chosen by Peter
Russell. It was for film star James
Stewart’s dark, attractive wife,
Gloria, was decorated with white
full-blown roses down one side,
and was created for a special
party.

Other Women’s Lives

One of England's only two
women K.Cs. 36-year-old brunette
Rose Heilbron, combines an inter-
esting legal career, which brings
her about £5,000 a year, with
domesticity as the wife of Liver-
pool surgeon Nathamiel Burstein:

Efficient, attractive and cheerful,
she brings the same clear intelli-
cor to whatever job she has on

and, whether it is preparing din-
ner in her Liverpool kitchen; doing
the family shopping in her five-

B.B.C. Radio Programme

> VERNERD AY, JANUARY 13,



1951



7.25 am, Programme Parade, 7.30 am
1 was there, 7.45 am. How to Listen
*.30 a.m. Light Orchestral Music, 4.43
a.m. People and Resources, 9 a.m. The
News, 9.10 a.m. Liome News from Britain,
eae aan, Clore Down, 11.15 a.m.’ ?ro
ramme Parade, 11.30 a.m, Listeners’
Choice, 11.45 a.m. Statement of Account,
12 (noon) The News, 12.10 p.m. News
Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Close Down, 4.15 p.m.
uvenirs of Music, 5 p.m. Composer of

the week, 5.15 p.m, Ulster Magazine, 5.45
p.m, Rhythm Rendezvous, 6 p.m. Ton.

in‘e the mines. ean Ey pm. From the Third
i e, p.m, Programme Parade
Temperameni 7 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m. News Analysis,
I READ of a soprano who Hip wee xe 5 oa Dm. T was
He ” . io Newsreel, 8.15 on
sobbed and gulped” as she sang, Books to Read, £30 pm Theatee Talk,
and who * ‘altered Verdi’s notes in 8.45 p.m. Composer of the week, 9 pn
an aria.” That is nothing. When cera of A> ing hes 15 p.m. Margerie
Rustiguzzi w. s 2 ‘ oa p.m. Tip Top Tune’, 10 p.m
g i as inging 4 duet The News, 10.10 p.m. From the Editorials,
with Broccoli in “Il Passero.” 10.15 p.m! Bric Barker, 1045 p.m. Mid
She silenced her confrére with a Week Talk, 11 pm, From the Third
look of thunder, and sang the ?'osTamme.

entire duet herself. Every’ time
Broccoli attempted to join in, she |}
dawled him down. “An example |
ef bad operatic manners, ” wrote

@ critic, “ which made the audi-
ence wince.” Wrong again, cully.
ft wasn’t the bad manners that

made them wince
oes Sayeed

It was that

‘Sketch Book—1 1



parasol, sits oer carefully and goes

on munching the candied fro,
"You can home inc aon
mind you make me look preity "
she calls. Revers sh

allright," ata.’ ‘ Gondanes
s hon * wall look like, but
fl try and then we relly must
start to go home.’

RESERVED



bi sibs ne 4.94 & 6.18
. 4.94 & 6.48
-5.00 & BOYS ..3.95













. 11,02





















Hours ;



ALFONSO B. de LIMA & CO.

NOTICE pinisian 4.30 and 8.15
eae hae Columbia Smashing Double
oak Richard Dix and Leslie
of Lower Broad Street CAUGHT Brooks in
desire to inform all their friends
end the public in — and — SECRET OF

and customers,

general, that they are in no way
financially or other-
with any other Jewelry
Establishment in Barbados,

connected,
wise,



Broad Street

rs
ee =




SS



CANE BILLS
CUTLASSES
SHOVELS

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WIRE BRUSHES
SEWING TWINE
STENCIL INK
OIL CANS

COTTON

Shactal

The Modern Dress Shoppe





@ SKIRTS
Seersucker and Prints $ 3.08
@ SHORTS & BLOUSES Sets
Pretty Patterns $ 8.75
@ SUN DRESSES
Pretty Colours with
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@ BEACH DRESSES
With Bolero
All Tootal Fabries .. $15.0



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To-day and To-morrow 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
JUNGLE CAPTIVE
Vicky LANE — (The APE WOMAN)

THE FROZEN GHOST (Lon; Chaney)

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

{ Upstairs Over Newsam & Co., Lower Broad St.
AFTERNOON, COCKTAIL AND EVENING DRESSES
JACQMAR SQUARES AND SCARVES
8.30 to 3.30 Monday to Friday
8.30 to 11.30 Saturday



JANUARY

17

» 1951

WEDNESDAY,





SSS

AQUATIC CLUE : CINEMA (Members Only)

ATINEE : TO-DAY at 5 p.m
TOo- niGut & TO-MORROW NIGHT at 8.50

Dick POWELL—Marta TOREN—Vincent PRICE

+ ROGUES” REGIMENT: a t}

{
)
of The French Foreign Legion
A Universal-International Picture qt

)



FRIDAY TO 8U NDAY NIGHT at 8.50

MATINEES: FRIDAY & SATURDAY at 5 2.
CHILDREN’S MATINEE: SATURDAY MOR? 3
at 9 30 o'clock \

WALT DISNEY'S FUN & FANCY FREE in Techn‘ecolor

Featuring CHARLIE McCARTHY—MORTIMER SNERD—LUANA
PA TTEN.-DONALD DUCK—MICKEY MOUSE—JIMINY CRICKET

assess SSS SS
PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

TO-DAY and TO-MORROW joniy) 4.45 and 8.30 p.m

RIBBON will be

an important










fashion note in

the Paris spring

collections. WARNER'S BIG MUSICAL HIT Showing for Ist Time in Bridgetown

DEFORE—Dorothy MALONE
In

“ONE SUNDAY AFTERNOON”

Dennis MORGAN—Don
.. Advance renov-

ation ideas show

Color by Technicolor







|

red moire ribbon A Parti eet eileen
Special Mat. as usual. \

——————— |

used for a one- i ——————————— or =|
on

|

pibaigae. “a PLAZA Theatre — osTin |
FRIDAY, SAT. SUN, 5 and 8.30 p.m, (Warners Double) 1}

|

effect, on a strap- INGRID BERGMAN in Dick FORAN |
jean White "Seuina “UNDER CARRICORY” & (The Singing Cowboy) in |
mn Color by Technicolor “GUNS OF THE PEOOS” \
Midnite Matinee Saturday 20th (Two New Monogran Thrillers) 1
Warren Douglas—-Ramsey Ames & TOM KEENE in uy
“BELOW THE DEADLINE” “RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL |;
\|



ane ||
SSS

GAMETY—(rHE GARDEN) ST. JAMES |

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW 8.30 p.m
The BOWERY BOYS &

with LEO GORCEY in —
“BOWERY BOMBSHELL”
Friday—Saturday—Sunday—8.30 p.my.—MAT. Sunday —5
R.K.O, Radio Thrill-Packec -ACTION ADVENTURE !

“MIGHTY JOE YOUNG”
— with
Terry MOORE—Ben JOHNSON—Robert ARMSTRONG



(Monogram's double)

|
i|
TEX RITTER and his_ ||

4

“to argue a nage too
much jover the finer points of the

game.” MAN FROM TEXAS’

* *
Subjects nearest to her heart
are women’s welfare and the le; :
position of women, nem of w
she is always ready to ote
in her clear voice, with its hint

f North
WORD ORG It

WORLD CO
RESERVED.
—LES.







PM



ROYAL

Last Two Shows To-day

EMPIRE

To-day and Tomorrow

4.45 and 8.30 4.30 and 8.30

— AND —
M.G.M. Smashing Double
Esther Williams and Van

M-G-M Presents:

ANNIE GET

0 \ Johnson in

YOUR GUN “DUCHESS OF
Starring IDAHO ”

— and —

ASPHALT
JUNGLE

— with —
Stirling Hayden

Betty Hutton—Howard
Keel with
Louis Calhern and
J. Carrol Naish.

ROXY

To-day — Last Two Shows
4.30 and 8.15
M.G.M. Big Double
James Mason and Barbara









OLYMPIC

Last Two Shows To-day

A & C IN THE WHISTLER

HOLLYWOOD oe SOR eee
Starring THUNDERHOOF
Bud Abbott and Lou Cos- Starring
Preston Foster and William
ses nee a a

Se

ayes



















PHILIPS

THIS EMBLEM



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alr hh Nh ale a hs i Peat ae ie aoe r


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY

Will Solve

17,

1951

nae nt ene amen 2 nema

BARBADOS -EE





ADVOCATE tr, tind
ee)
whether it is the Alps, the Car- BLINDIN

The Wife Is | i:

the Caueasus or the

ms sIdi - B d _—. is why people im_ the HEADACHES
od . t B, 8 » > and some

Oo ler Ss e The Boss lena, seuaiiy. Geller trem guitan MADE HER HELPLESS





And the article concluded, tha
is why good yodelers usually are
mountain people, goiter being an
excellent sounding board fol
those gurgling noises

|
Problem |

PHILADELPHIA,

LONDON.
A woman psychologist protests
that the Englishman’s home is no

3 : : "i 4 . longer his castle—it'’s his wife's.
me = _ ar : Quartermaster The English father has been de- ins.
Sic uagtic on man for soldiers os Dr. Jean Macalister Brew, eeereerepempienne epics
ave a tough time passing 7, told the annual conference of
bed-making inspection, British Educational Associations. MAIL NOTICES



Dr. Brew said :














The QM is about to produce 2
“bed-Jama,”—an item designed
to increase a Garrison Soldier’s

Mails for Vineent, St. Lucia,
Grenada and Aruba by the Mâ„¢M.Y
Daerwood will be closed at the Geners|

St.
_ “That it is not really a
idea. The mother has been

oti



comfort as well as solve his bed- up too much. Mothers are try-] PSU Omics ts unger istered Mail
making problems. ing to be both mothers and fathers] at 1 p.m. and Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m
She ites. to-day with less time and less} TO-DAY, 17th January 1951. KRUSCHEN
he Bed-Jama is the invention space. The fact that the father : , People who
ef Master Sgt. W. F. Veit, who Mails for Dominica by the Sch. Melly

brought relief surfer from

severe head-
aches will be interested in
reading how this woman
ended her troubles :—

“I was subject to terrible
headaches. While they lasted, I
seemed to lose my sight and all

ower in my hands and was forced

o lie down for hours at a time.
My aunt, who has taken Kruschen
Salts for years, suggested my
trying them. I did so, and I’ve
not had a return of those terrible
headaches for months. In fact,
I feel quite cured.”’—M.W.

Headaches can nearly always
be traced to a disordered stomach

has a hand in the production of
children has been glossed over.”

Dr. Brew had several more pro-
tests to make about the present-
day family lfe.

Many people, she thought, had
lost the art of educating a family.
Said Dr. Brew:

__“We have got to get back to the
idea that if p> give children love
you can still do a lot of things to
them and they will survive. Peo-
ple have forgotten to be human,
“The old-fashioned ‘nanny’ who
knew nothing about psychology

N. Jones will be clowd at the General
Post Office as under

Parcel Mail at 9 a.m., Registered Maii
at 11 am. and Ordinary Mail at 12.15 p.m
TO-DAY, 17th January 1951

Eczema lich

Killed in 7 Minutes

Your skin has nearly 50 million tiny seams
and pores where germs hide and cause ter-

served in two World Wars and
Struggled every time he had to
muke a bed,

His invention consisis of two
pieces of sheeting sewed together
like an envelope, with another
envelope on the underneath half
for a pillow.



When the soldier climbs out of
it at Reveille, all he has to do is
smooth it over the bed—no miter-
ing of corners, no tucking under
the mattress.

s ee ‘line, | @nd to the unsuspected retention

Sgt. Veit first made the Bed- but a lot about children was a Burning, Aone, Ningworm, Baoriasts in the system of stagnating
J mich resembles tt i psychologist by intuition, lackheads, Pimples, Foot Itch and other | Waste material, which patsons
ama, which resembles the lining ” Ee ES N 3S. BOYS DO wE blemishes. Ordinary ‘treatments give only | the blood. Remove the polsonous
of a en bag, for his own TH Qu T10 J: ' ' Many parents have been over- one’, sober Becnuae they do mat ki goonmule tions idkin case “een
convenience. An officer noticed it BECOME ONE OF THEIR UNITED whelmed by too much ill-digested Me itin the ahontn ta © rakoubes mad to euaL cot oe, ee
£ ce” end cons fron og derm kills the germs in 7 minutes and is 3 p worr: more.
during an inspection tour and . . and outmoded psychology, Dr.|cuaranteed to give you & soft, clear, attrac: And Shak te i at how Rruschen

2 E aaldanahe ‘ ¢ na is ju
reported it to his superiors STATES OR DO THEY BECOME A Brew added, and mother has now en er oe in onp Week, oF money | brings swift and lasting relief—
. ; > . i . on return of empty package. by cleansing the system thor-
At their suggestion, Veit had MEMBER OF Our COMMONWEALTH 7" become the problem child of the]guarantes’ Nixoderm {-- :

it patented. He offered it to the family.

Army Royalty-Free, but he will

oughly of all harmful, pain-giving

waste

Get
your chemist
@& today and re-

receive any royalties from Com-
mercial use.

Veit, stationed at the Army
Chemical Center in Edgewood,
Md., visited the army QM Depot
in Philadelphia to-day to help
leunch the production of the
Bed-Jama.—LN.S

A Town’s
Good Name

HUNSTANTON, NORFOLK

The town councillors of this
Seaside resort believe they have
saved Hunstanton from “a fate
worse than death.”

While bitter cold winds deso-



lated the seashore, the council had
a sudden flood of applications to
rent beach huts—and all the pros-

pective renters were girls

Investigations revealed that
the girls wanted the huts to enter-
tain American airmen from
Sculthorpe airfield 16 miles away.

“If the town gets a bad name
the normal summer holiday trade
will be affected,” said ome coun-
cillor.

The council reportedly will ask
the commanding officer at Scul-
thorpe to put Hunstanton out of
bounds.—LN.S.



w’s Will
Tough Trade| Shaw’s Wi
e ——_*
Barriers Has Them
Negotiators at oo Na- en
tions Internationa ‘ar’ con-
ferenee were reported finding LONDON.
“tough sledding” to-day in their] George Bernard Shaw’s 8,000
efforts to knock down trade] Word will, still is confounding a

large part of the accountancy and
the legal personnel of the Public

Trustee’s Department more than

oo after the playwright’s
ea’

Ever since Shaw died Novem-
ber 2, the accountants of the
Public Trustee’s office have been
in a constant grapple with a maze
of figures.

Althou,
were rigidly and properly kept
wyian preci-

barriers,

Authoritative +eports from the
conference now being held in
Torquay, England, said that finai
results—in number of bilateral
agreements negotiated-—will most
likely fall far below expecta-
tions.

When the conference got under
way last October, U.N. experts
estimated that more than 400
bilateral agreements would be
concluded among the 40 nations
attending, including the United
States.

Now the target figure has been
unofficially lowered to about 200,
The conference is due to end in
March or April.

The tariff talks are secret and
results are not being announced,

with the usual Sha

sion, the computation of the
posth

demanding exhaustive and patient
researches.

As soon as an estimate of future
is made, the will
the bequests

his personal accounts | the























Still Selling

LONDON.

More of the once-fabulous
Harewood estates in Yorkshire
will be sold in the near future.

Last November music critic
Lord Harewood, nephew of King
George VI, announced that 6,000
acres of the Harewood estates in
West Yorkshire would be sold to
raise the outstanding balance of
death duties.

The previous June 8,600 acres
were sold by auction for $719,600
to meet “heavy death duties and
high taxation.”

By the end of 1950 the huge
Harewood estates had dwindled
to less than 10,000 acres and now
Earl’s Goldsborough estate
near Harrogate wil] come under
the hammer.

Tenants on the 1,000-acre es-
tate have received letters from
Lord Harewood’s agent, Nigel
Fitzroy, telling them with “great
regret” that the trustees of the
Goldsborough estate have decided
it witl be necessary to sel] the
estate in the near future.

Goldsborough was the boyhood
home of the present “ord Hare-

Harewood | Which Was

F e \
Right ?
SHEFFIELD, England.
A certain Sheffield druggist is

wearing an enigmatic smile these
days.

A customer recently handed
him a prescription for a talcum
powder. The customer had been
sent by the Sheffield Health Ser-
vice Executive because they want-
€d to test the accuracy of the
druggist's dispensing.

Three analysts—chosen by the
druggist, the National ealth
Service executive and a referee
appointed by Minister of Health
Aneurin Bevan—tested the pow-
der and turned in three different
reports.

The Executive’s expert reported
deficiencies of 3.5 per cent of
Salicylic acid and 19 per cent
boric acid.

The chemist’s expert said that
he found an excess of 4 per cent
salicylic acid and a deficit of 4
per cent borie acid.

Bevan'’s expert re
cess of 2.3 per cent salicylic acid

Dr. Brew condemned what she
termed “the emotional blackmail
of ‘if you don’t do that I will tell





Dad’, and ‘if you do that Mummy | ****#s383*532

will call a policeman.’
fetch a policeman.
better if they did.”

They don't
It would be

INS.

Have You
The Neck?

VIENNA.

To be a top-notch yodeler all
you need is a thick neck, say
about the size of a cider barrel,

This echo came to-day directly
from the land of the Tyrolean
sheep-herder, where yodeling is
almost as old as the hills.

The recipe for success actually
is the result of a “scientific study”

newspaper

According to an article in the
eltpresse only persons
have goiter—an enlargement of

the thyroid gland—can expect to] The improved All-

be tops in the yodeling game.

Yodeling and goiter,
is only a mild case, go together,

the paper said, and a good yodeler| ,

who removes the growth
find he’s unable to compete with
the bleat of a manny.

The paper gave this explana-

tion:

Nixoder: move the seal
* cause of skin
or Skin Troubles wouble. ©



appearance—all outstanding”
of the subject by a Viennese] —say Motorists and Tyre Suppliers alike.
The tread rubber is

sougsr, more shock-
than ever

Who} before.

even if it] Notehes for quicker,

PY)
for more traction, and Avi
wears more slow ly doll

an

%& Handsome buttressed >
Weather Tread— sidewalls provide pro- ]
with its new Stop- tection from kerb 2
safer stops — resists damage, and make f
every rection of cornering steadier J
id throughout the than you've ever
longer life. known,

will! byte

a
Ask your nearest Chemist or
| Stores for Kruschen.






THE

BY GOODYEAR

‘Stamina, strength and

~

%& Wider, flater creaa
area grips more road

INSIST ON GOODYEAR TUBES

You can trust




but reports from Torquay say the satisfied . who was christened in the} 4nd a deficiency of 8.8 per cent? Phe thyrgid gland, _ located 4 PAT
. trade delegations are acting much} ayes are ex to absorb | Vilage church at a ceremony at-} of boric acid, below the \aryn » produces a GoobD EAR f}] i
tougher now than at either of nearly pected of the tended by King George V and The Sheffield Health Service | Substance called Tyroxine, a I
wo similar conferences at Gen-l Pare. tn ix Metime “GB. So] Ween Mary. ive chai ig_|hormone which is a combination! rye LONG-LIFE HARDEST-WEARING TYRE
All his ia, Goce ert «| eva in 1947, and Annecy, France, 3 with all his wel Vines ee Farowecs, as yma pe airman, Bernard Sid-/ ie gour atoms of Iodine — GB,1-50-6
s rp. rris unt “Lucky” 5 s : t 3 iad tes es ee
Crownover, a 23-year-old First |!" 1949- known scorn and derision the faet{ the Princess Royal, then Princess| «ti, view ot the conflicting re~}« bit, that 1s, if there ty too ttle | SSSeSSeaesSasSesese:ets::ceeSsaammieSenie Se sSeiesies:ttecetei?
Army ;MP., has admired ten-| The delegates are reported ee ue wathy sakes Mary, lived at Goldsborough Hall; ports 1 cannot see we can do any-|lodine, the gland is. affected and THE CITY GA R A E
Ree pa he might, being a much less willing to make con-] iy, per cent. of earnings They moved to Hoseureed Moun thing more in the matter.” begins to grow—goiter,
De bee esa, ; B® 1 cessions. Income Tax near Leeds, after Viscount Las-| The words “No Action” closed| There is very little fodine TRAD G Co., LTD
But the young soldier recently The generally improved world] put the settlement of the mon- celles succeeded to the title. in the rocks of mountains. IN is iz

the case.
tangled with a top hat and came |
off $100 wiser.

—iIN.S.

the paper went on, regardless of

etary side of his estate will not
by any means finish off the Public
Trustee’s task.
















international

i NOW ! more than any other time we need to read
_ Crownover said he was walk-| are held responsible for the dim-] He has yet to find a way of
ing in midtown Manhattan when| jnished prospects at Torquay. implementing one of the condi- ; Y
a stranger, dressed in formal b tions of the will, which is to P GOOD ‘
clothes and wearing a_ top hat, The see also wee devote most of the money left 5 KE f R BOOK ] 951
called out “Hi, Soldier,” andj are reacting pressure : ha- |
shook hands with him. manufacturers in their own coun- oe creation af a new ap / Why not ask at the - - -

tries, against lowering of tariff

walls,

The Corporal said he felt the

This is a gargantuan task which
Trustee

a

man press something i a . . oe the Publie will have to § p ( K BOOK DEPARTMENT
palm and that when he looked In Britain, the infiuentialltackle. So far only tentetive , ‘ 2 oh eUrdde
he found it was a one-hundred! Beaverbrook press has been con-§ feelers have been to various The Advocate Co Ltd-, will publish a Year Book of Barbados

dollar bill. By the time he recov-
ered from his surprise, Crown-
over said the man had disappear-

ist FLOOR

Torquay conferences, Cc. F, HARRISON & CO., LTD.

that Britain retain the

in 1951.

ed into a crowd. preference” plan by which trade Their response has not been i F Below are a few suggestions for your Lenten Meditations :

He said it had never happened] flows freely within the Common-] encouraging, but the Public The Year Book will contain three parts:— FORTY LENT READINGS FOR BUSINESS PEOPLE (an
with a ten-gallon stranger back | wealth—to the detriment of other” Trustee is confident a solution invaluable Book of Readings for busy people who have a little
home in Texas.—LN.S. nations.—ILN.S. will be found. —LN.8. time for the observance of the lenten season) by the Rev. L. B.





(1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on
a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance,
industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, oom
art, literature and all the things we want to know about
Barbados but have until now not been able to find
under one cover.

Ash









iby.
THE LORD’S PRAYER FOR TO-DAY by Frederick Will-
cox

LENT (a manual for the Clergy)

GOOD FRIDAY (a manual for the Clergy).

THE CHURCHMAN’S PRAYER MANUAL (at no time
probably within recent years has there been a more widespread
desire than now among Church people to learn to pray more
and to learn to pray better. The present seems therefore, an
opportune time to offer some further assitance towards culti-
vating this divine faculty of man's being)

PRIVATE DEVOTIONS (for the young in spirit of all




CARE YOUR BUILDINGS!
REPLACEMENTS COST £'s

Corrosion costs you £ 2a year 3

W Dieser






(2) Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar,
soap, butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels

etc. raw. 2M ee eee
(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about

others Hon. V. C. Gale
Vice

ag







*S MEDITATIONS FOR EVERY DAY by Father Andrew.
IN THE POWER OF THE tated by W. Wilson Cash.
anc
THE GLORY OF GOD by F. Donald Coggan.
We also have in stock a fine selection of - - -
VALENTINE CARDS
CALL AT THE S.P.C.K. BOOK DEPARTMENT at the earliest






A local committee comprising amon f
M.L.C., Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd.,





















int comnisie sven Waa 6 President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George pocalinle, panenenty oF Xiptmmmcrre S>
i ;: re is astonishingly isin pigh, ond Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate, Mr. Neville Se pray
| balance represents a heavy forfeit for Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale
| lack of taking proper precaations. Advertising Director of the Barbados Advocate will be respon-
|








sible for the publication.

The compilers of the Year Book want to make sure that the
Year Book ged «Abed of all aspects of life in Barbados
and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies.
Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations
of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisc-
tions at the earliest opportunity to the

Year Book,
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

Names and addresses of all those to be considered for
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed.

Advertisers are asked to get in touch with


















Anti-Corrosive Paint
for every INCH of metal.

t desig or clings
Srectnaa des della forming







“Se- al

Housewirces ’

to BRIGHTEN



UP THE
HOME

We can supply you with - - -
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Manufacturers: BURRELL’S P.
(Props.: R. J. ee SONS



Also makers of - -
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‘O” Oil Bound Washable



RUGS in various sizes and attractive designs



Mr. Trevor Gale, _ — Also —
Advertising Director, LEATHER CLOTH in assorted colours
Barbados Advocate, All at Reasonable Prices

34 Broad Street.

This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to
ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to be i
without the Year Book of Barbados 1951.

(AN ADVOCATE PUBLICATION)




S a
—

Try us before making your purchase elsewhere

BARBADOS HARDWARE (0. LTD.

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
No. 16 Swan Street ¢ ’Phone 2109, 4406













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———







A.%. BRYDEN & SONSe>os)


Je

PAGE FOUR



ae ee fee

=< . .
Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown.
Wednesday, January 17, 1951

FRUSTRATION

IT is extremely regrettable that a
career of five years in this island as head
of the Anglican Diocese should have ended
with the note of frustration as that of
Bishop Hughes’. This was indicated in his
farewell sermon at Evensong at St.
Michael’s Cathedral on Sunday.

Bishop Hughes came to this island with
a reputation as a forceful preacher who
was not afraid to express his opinions on
matters which affected the general wel-
fare of the community. In fact it was this
outspoken and fearless attitude which won
for him in British Guiana the title of
“Dean Plain-talk.”

Barbadian society, however, is one in
which many things can be achieved if there
is tact and delicate handling. Its mem-
bers have been described as lovers of
snobbery in the sense that they believe in
the “orders” and in the maintenance of
conduct consistent with what they believe
to be the standard of one’s position or
public office.





Bishop Hughes had gone far towards
gaining a reputation which would satisfy
his admirers when he accepted the offer
of a seat on the Legislative Council. The
acceptance and subsequent performance
of the duties attached to membership in
the Council brought his utterances into
the realm of controversy and his actions
to the level of political consideration.

The Church in this island is still re-
garded as the one voice against the evils
existing in a society which having emerged
from slavery one hundred years ago
labours still under the influence of that
system. The head of the Church has a re-
sponsibility to the Church and to society
to see and to pronounce upon the order
of life in the community as a whole and
not merely on the conduct of one section.
The Bishop was well qualified to fill that
role. As a man of affairs he was without
compeer among the members of the Angli-
ean clergy. His handling of the funds of
the Synod showed that he would have
been a shining light in commerce.

Free from theological dogma and philo-
sophical content, his sermons were like
the last of them, vivid descriptions of the
hard facts of life. But it was also a con-
ception of Bishop Hughes that even in
Barbados where the Church was destined

to remain an integral part of the civil .

establishment that his word was to be “the
law.” His decisions have been challenged
and he has resigned from office.

Admittedly the Bishop of Barbados has
not the control of his clergy which one
would expect to be given to the head of a
department. Had Bishop Hughes not tired
so quickly he might have brought about
the necessary reform.

There have been other bishops who felt
as Bishop Hughes does, that the members
of local society are like the Bourbons “who
learnt nothing and forgot nothing.” But
there have been other bishops of the Dio-
cese who have continued to put their hands
to the plough and have not thrown in the
sponge and sought easier pastures. They
have continued to toil for reform, and.
even though they may have failed ulti-
mately, they were respected for their grit
and determination.

It is true that there will be no queue of
Bishops waiting to be appointed to the
See of Barbados but there are still Men
of the Cloth and among them eminent
divines of simple faith and deep devotion
who will be willing to labour in this field.

The Church in Barbados as part of a con-
tinually changing West Indian society,
has a unique mission and magnificent
opportunities. The head of. the Church
must realise that a collection of peoples
struggling up through the misty pathway

. to the light of nationhood needs the guid-
ance and assistance which only the Christ-
ian church can give. As an eminent divine,
Bishop Hughes has taken his hand from
the wheel and has threatened the benight-
ed labourers with the wrath of God. A
more gloomy picture could hardly have
been painted: a myopic government, de-
cadent clergy and a benighted people who
refuse to sanction the dissection of church
and state.

Our Readers Say:







| The Sun In Their [litsi Colonial Consul

The other evening a pessimistic
acquai.itance asked me what good
had England done for us

Now I live near the
green.

“My dear good Smith,” I told
him, “you must excuse me if !
speak somewhat bluntly, but 1 am
afraid that yours is a dolt’s ques-
tion. All evening you have sat
here with me and listened to the
sweetest sound on earth, the
scund of ball meeting bat, and
yet you ask what good has Eng-
land done for us, There it goes
again, the rich, resonant note. It
was on the playing-fields of
England, my dear man, that that
mellow sweetness—the sound of
seasoned English willow meeting
leather fair and true—was first
heard, What good has England
done for us? Why, she has given
us cricket.”

He poured himself out a last
telling draught of my punch, the
bit of ice included, quaffed it and
left, muttering something about
incongruities, which, when I
looked it up, I found meant bark-
ing up the wrong tree. The dic-
tionary didn’t say so, but I seemed
to sense an inference knocking
around that I hadn’t caught on to
the issue, or, in other words, that
I wasn’t so bright. But anyway
the long word had served its pur-
pose, for by the time I had dug
out its meaning Smith was far
away, and there was absolutely
no use in clenching my fist and
saying what and what I'd have
done if I’d suspected.

Then there was the lady who
asked me what was my idea of
contentment,

“My idea of contentment,” {
said, “is to sit on my little bencn
like a capital T of an afternoon,
under the tree to the western side
of the village green, with my pipe
in my mouth and a strong-lunged
fellow near by to applaud each
stroke made by the village bats-
men for himself and me.”

Now don’t run away with the
wrong impression, please. is
Ran.adin (is that spelt right?)
tickle out the Australians like he
did the Englishmen, so that they’ve
got to come up here to regain their
lost thunder, like many a poor
man I will weather an angry
Missus’ wrath and deduct a shil-
ling or two from the weesly
handover and go and see them at
Kensington too. But frankly |
prefer watching my cricket on mv
little T on the village green. The
great guns at Kensington so set
dom seem to realize the ball is
meant to be hit, but pat it and
pat it like a woman fondling her
baby. And you've got to wai
so long for somethiug to happen,
no wonder the scorers fall asleep
on their jobs. No, I prefer the
village green, where. either the
ball is hit or the wicket, and

village



wit Liaquat Ali Khan, Prime
nister of Pakistan, was a guest
of honour at the Canada Club
Dinner in London last week. He
received a wonderful welcome,

He rose to speak, said: “If there
is any dispute between any two
members of the Commonwealth
it is the duty of every other mem-
ber of the Commonwealth to re-
solve that dispute... ..Otherwise,
this great institution, with all its
splendid potentialities for peace
and good, will not survive.”

Thus, Liaquat Ali cast a bomb
amid that distinguished company.
He was right to do so, for mighty
issues, involving the tranquility
and prosperity of this entire earth,
are at stake,

Coaxed ...

Liaquat Ali hung back for sev-
eral days from coming to Britain
to join the Commonwealth Con-
ference. He had to be coaxed to
make the Empire Prime Minis-
ters’ party complete.

In the end he consented, came
here primarily to say to his fellow
Premiers what he repeated to the
Canada Club assembly: “What
are you going to do about Kash-
mir?”

This is a question which the
British Government, in particular,
has so far ducked, The buck was
passed to the United Nations, who
also have decided nothing about
it.

But now the people of Pakistan
want to know the answer.

In a word, the issue is: To
which Dominion, India or Pakis-
tan, shall the wild and lovely State
of Kashmir adhere?

You have only to be in Karachi,
the great and growing seaport
capital of Pakistan, as I was on
this New Year’s Eve, to realise the
near-war tension which exists.
Real trouble could happen here.

When the sub-continent of India
was partitioned in August 1947,
it was agreed that, broadly, where
large and contiguous areas of
population were Hindu or Moslem
in faith they should adhere either
to the new Dominion of India or
to that of Pakistan.

Kashmir’s ruler was Hindu, but
three-quarters of its 4,000,000
people were Moslems. Neverthe-
less, the ruler adhered to India.

Imagine the effect in Pakistan.

novel

music rendered by

and remarkable

BARBADOS

Faces

where the batsman tokes the ad-
vice of his friends on the boundary
(who always know best having
a wider view of the game) even
though he gets out in the process.
I prefer the village creen, where
even the man on ihe overhead
boundary does his part by jis
side when the ball beats bat and
raps the batsman’s pads, Nothing
half-hearted like Kensington,
where even the bowler is more
often than not too well-mannered
to ask, and when he does ask does
it like a polite hostess usking how
many lumps do you take.

So the other Thurscay afternoon
I took my little T and slipped
through my back gute on to the
village green. To my surprise, in-
stead of fielders in white drill
pants there were two men in
tweed suits with surveyor tapes
and a third in shirt and pants
driving stakes at their directions
in cur hallowed turt.

“What's the meaning of this?”
I asked Freddie, the old Cricke*
League umpire, who was looking
on.
“The village has swapped hancs
and the new owners're selling out
the green in lots for building,” he
told me.

“Oh Lord,” I
them, for
they do.”

“Sends my mind back to the
tyme I played my last match ’popv
this bit o’ playfield,” reminisce?
Freddie, after a time. “That’d be
nearly a lifetime back now, just
afore I left for the Boer War and
left my leg there.

said, “forgive
they know not what

“In them ‘days we didn’t have
no Cricket League nothing. If you
lived in a part you just played
for that part, that were all to it.
There were some six o’ us re-
cognized Clubs: Reliance, Lillipu-
tians, Rockblasters, Conquerors,
Fearless, and the Club what I used
to play for myself, Bedrock.

“We hadn't no Cup to compete
for like now, but at that time
there were a Colonel Willitt whu
was landlord, a real sport o’ #
gent and every year he used to
offer twenty-five dollars to the
side what beat all the others ur
come out best out and out.

“Well, this year in question the
tussle boil down ‘tween we Bed-
recks and Rockblasters.. The day
for the deciding match set now
a Bank-holiday, and there’s a big
crowd from all the villages round
looking on, both lasses and gents.
Well, we win the toss, and that
were a mighty great thing then,
for in them days the space weren t

and Why

By FRANK OWEN



The rivers--see how they run.

Promptly, trouble broke out,
Moslem irregulars poured down
from the passes upon the moun-
tain capital of Srinagar.

The maharajah fled, with a
baggage train of treasures.
Equally promptly, Indian regular
troops moved in, Regular Pakis-
tan Army forces advanced to
assert their own occupation claims.
It looked like full-scale war,

Probably two or three thousand
troops were killed on either side.
Add to these the half million help-
less, unarmed refugees butchered
by fanatic mobs of either faith in
the Punjab massacres at the time
of the 1947 Partition and you will
realise the river of blood that
already lay between Moslem and
Hindu when the Cease Fire was
terdily arranged.

That was just two years ago.
Ever since, the brave, battle-
trained troops of Indian and Pak-
istan, some of the finest fighting
men in Asia, have been glowering
aeross the wire at each other.

Ten divisions of veteran troops!

The feud had taken on a rather
personal strain because Pandit
Nehru, Prime Minister of India, is
himself a Kashmir-born Hindu.

Nehru may talk and_ think
sincerely in shining, lofty flights
of the ideals of world citizenship.

style of

the Juvenile parable



bination can produce music com-
with the best.

ADVOCATE



as it is now, it weren’t so large.
It were more o’ a narrower strip,
with the old slaughter-house wali
bordering ‘pon one side and the
road on the next so that the
onliest way to put the wicket were
east and west. So winning the
toss were, as I.said, a mighty im
portant thing, for it meant we'd
bat first and make our runs afoce
the sun swung west and gol
in our batsmen’s faces.

“Well we gone in to bat firs!
and score a hundred and two
though we’d hoped to stay a bi!
longer to get the sun just wher
we wanted, where it'd start i:
worry the batsman.

“Anyway, Rockblasters got ot
sheet anchor, a fellow by name «’
Murphy, who’d break your he»!
the way he lambasted your bow!-
ing, and we reckon that if w
can get him out quick we stan
to win hands down

“Anyway in they go to bat
round about half past two, wit»
this fellow Murphy and anothe
chap.

“We get one or two out, bu

they score pretty fast afore th
sun gets into their faces. The
cur captain toss the ball to ou

stock bowler, a fellow calle
Prince, who could whiz it throug!
like a lightning.

“We get two or three quic.
wickets, but they’re sixty odd i
five, and that Murphy stil! therc
battling like a monarch. No mat
ter how Prince bowl, no matte.
how fast, he keep the peak o’ 2
cap pulled down over his face arv
keep his eyes out the sun, and
won't let Prince get through how ~-
ever he try. ‘Nother thing ter
this Murphy using his head: h«
running only twos, and calling i«
sharp singles at the end o’ th»
overs, so that he collaring all th:
bowling and we can’t get at th:
rabbits. ‘

“Well suh, time pass and the
sun gone down behind soime tree;
mm the distance, Prince getting
weary and they’re ninety for seven
end this Murphy opening out his
shoulders. We recxon we lose anda
all the Rockblasters’ supporter:
getting cocky.

“But as Prince said after the |
match, there’s more than one way |
to hang a dog than ’round his neck |

“Now this Murphy is a danay |
He ain’t going in to bat save)
he all dressed up and got "boi |
a pound o’ whit’ning on his pads

“Prince comes through with ¥
fast one swinging away to the
leg. This Murphy takes a swing |
at it but misses and the ball sticx
on to his pads. Prince gets the
ball back quick, cuts his run by
half and afore the cloud o’ whit
ning clears has bowled him
through it.

‘The other two didn’t give us n¢
trouble whatever, so we won the
Colonel’s money by twelve runs.’



He would be less than a son of
Kashmir if hé did not desire his
romantic native land to be part
of his own responsibility.

But West Pakistan, the heart of
the Dominion, is in real truth The
Land of the Rivers. “Indus is to
Bind what Nile is to Egypt.”

The land is fair and fruitful,
simply and only because of the
bounty of its waters.

But look! Of the great Five
Rivers of the Punjab, Indus,
Jhelum, Chenab, Ravi and Sutlej,
the first three rise (or flow
through) Kashmir. Who controls
these head-waters holds the life of
°akistan in his fist,

Pakistan (given her
could “live of her own.”
grows almost all of what she eats,
in rice or wheat, and could even
epare some corn for India.

But without India as her neigh-
bouring customer, Pakistan would
live very poorly. She grows both
jute and cotton too, but it | is
India’s Calcutta) and Bombay
mills which process and fabricate
these products.

Deeper...

It is a kind of medieval mad-
ness which today makes Pakistan
impose an export duty on juta
and cotton—and makes India lay
a\reprisal tax upon the cotton
Shirts she sells back to Pakistan.

But the real reason for these
superficial follies lies deep. It is
the fear of Moslems—and there
are well-founded and historically
proven bases for it—that the
Hindus have not really accepted
Partition as final. That some-
how, some day, India intends a
re-absorb Pakistan into a new
Eindu Raj.

All this makes Moscow happy.
Any ill-will, suspicion and mis-
trust that ‘the’ Farmer in the!
Kremlin can sow in other =

rivers)

fields is harvest for him, For he
reckons that affer ruin even he
will be welcome.

In the mood of common sense
and comradeship in which the
leaders of the Commonwealth
met last week, good men _ will
hope that these two great sons of
India will both speak frankly and
deal fairly with each other, and
each other’s people.

There is no other way, and—let
us say it again—not a moment to
be lost.—L.E,S,



Ss

ee
Thougs Bus



| effort with the setting-up of the Commission

The Man Who Got Here Late



Sho| their governments au fait with what is going

Needed”

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1951



Se
D. V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.

TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
at THE COLONNADE

In West Africa

(From Our London Correspondent)

LONDON.

A NEW STEP has been taken by Britain
in fostering co-operation in Africa among
Colonial Governments. _ The post of British
Colonial Consul in French West Africa has
been created and the first oceupant will be
a Foreign Office man with experience of
the Colonial Service, Mr, Douglas Gordon
Pirie. He leaves for Dakar, his headquar-
ters, at the end of this month:

The. appointment can be regarded as a
logical sequel to increasing awareness of
Colonial Governments since the war of the
need for eliminating as far as possible arti-
ficial geographical barriers and co-operating
to the fullest extent in tackling commoa
problems in Africa. :

It is possible that the West African
appointment is just a beginning in the latest
approach adopted by Britain in this all-im-
portant matter of co-operation between Gov-
ernments in the Colonial field. The idea, it
is believed might well be extended to East
Africa. Officially, no definite step in this
direction is under consideration, but th: re
are those who believe that it is extrer 7
likely if the experiment now being unac.-
taken in West Africa should prove success-
ful.

The work of Mr. Pirie, it is understood,
will not be confined to Anglo-French rela-
tions. During the first tour of two years
which he expects to undertake in West
Africa he will be engaged in furthering co-
operation in every possible sphere, not only
in British and French territories but in Por-
tuguese Guinea.

Something of the co-operation drive has
already been evidenced in the various inter-

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governmental and _ international SWEDEN'S BEST MATCH
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subjects as tsetse-control, land problems,
transport and communications, social and
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Ask for PARROT MATCHES from
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Britain, France, Belgium, Portugal, the } +
Union of South Africa, and Southern Rho-
desia are already linked in co-operative

for Technical Co-operation in Africa, South
of the Sahara, (C.T.C.A.) which had its first
meeting in Paris in January of last year
and met again in Brussels last June. A fur-
ther meeting of C.T.C.A. takes place this
month in Lisbon. Mr, Pirie has been Secre-
tary of this Organisation during its early
stages.

Though operating in a more limited
fashion, the French have recently shown
the way in the matter of contacts with
neighbouring Colonial Governments by
posting Colonial administrative officers to
‘their consulates throughout Africa. The
work of the French offices is chiefly to keep

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on in the other Colonial territories.

Mr. Pirie has a good background to the
work he will be doing in Africa. Since his
return three years ago from East Africa,
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Philip Mitchell, Governor of Kenya, for a
year, he has been engaged at the Colonial
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Wider training in co-operative activity in
the Colonies has been a feature in recent
years of courses for young Colonial Service
men, There have been exchanges of visits
of French, British and Belgian Colonial Ser-
vice students and young Portuguese Colonial
administrative officers have been spending
as much as six months in study in this
country.

The new Consul, who is 40 years of age,
is a native of Aberdeen, which his father
represented in Parliament, as a Liberal, for
many years. After education at Winchester
and taking his degree at Edinburgh Univer-

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sity, Mr. Pirie became Private Secretary to
the Governor of Mauritius before the war.
He served during the war as an officer in
the Coldstream Guards till 1946, when
appointed Private Secretary to the Governor
of Kenya.

TALKING - OF

; GODDARDS
TTR TAT TS





Recently the position was so

No Workman Promoted
To The Editor, The Advocate—

Sir,—I have noticed with deep
regret the inability of the Water
Works department to create any
new offices under the recent or-
ders, for the unestablished staff.

It seems quite strange that the
Public Works could create new
offices and promote workmen to
be foremen, the H. & T. Depart-
ment could also see fit to pro-
mote workmen to be overseers,
and yet with such a large staff
the Water Works could only keep
three inspectors, all of whom came
through the Civil or Clerical rank,

No workman can ever boast,
no matter how many years’ experi-
ence he has got of ever being
promoted beyond. the plumbers’
grade. After years of clerical
experience, down comes a clerk
to post of Inspector, and with all
power against technical know-
ledge.

The unestablished staff of this
department is over 250, with not
an overseer from the ranks, but

clerks who just number three and
a superintendent. Not the slight-
est ounce of promotion like other
departments of Government.
DISGUSTED.

Broadcast Station
To The Editor, The Advocate—

Sir—We recently determined
that the number of private radio
receiving sets entering Barbados
each year averages about 600. In
1948 there arrived here 640 sets
valued at nearly £17,000 and in
1949 there were 601 sets entering
here.

Despite this annual influx of
radios there appears to be no sign
of the formation of a local broad-
casting station, and it is felt that
the potential of such a station is
being overlooked.

R. D. STEWART,
Pye Ltd.
P.O, Box 260,
January 15, 1951.
Steel Band
To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR—Permit me to register the

high impression created by the

4

Steel band. Hearing of a Steel
Band, most people curl their lip
with ancient prejudice or scorn,
thinking of course of the old
steel noise to which they are ac-
customed, but hearing this Tr'i-
nidad Steel Band is something
different. The most critical must
look up, for this band is music, and
music at its best. The instru-
ments, all of steel, and born of
necessity to fill the irrepressible
urge of the West Indian to pro-
duce music” are finely tempered,
with a full compass of the music
scale—accidentals and all, highly
strung and truly tuned, and pro-
duce intriguing tones of a most
unique and stirring nature

The quality of tone is at once

peculiar and illusive, suggestive
in turn of the violin, the saw,
the piano and “yet distinctly
neither. The leading instrument
which produces the melody is
outstanding in solo work. Its
thrilling pulsations and vibrations
are marvellous. Still in. “ts ear

ly stage, impresses OMe as an
instrument of glorious untold po?
sibilities. The bass seems perfect

in itself and the five piece com



all renditions were good, one was
impressed that the band was at
its best in its classical numbers,
the lingering pulsations which
seem to go with the slightest
touch of the instruments seem
especially suited to such themes.

The youthful performers are
quite adept in their handling of
the instruments, giving the de-
sire to see their seniors and in-
spiring the confidence that within
a not distant space the Steel Band
Art will have gained recognition
and acceptance, and these now
novel instruments be regarded
equally with the most classical.

We in the West Indies shall be
duly proud of their creation:
already they are surely playing
an able — if not unobtrusive
part — in the cultural propula-
tion and creative upsurge of our

people, for they provide an
artistic outlet for a new art form
that may well fascinate and
adorn the world r
WASHINGTON PYLE
Fair View,
Christ Churcl

January 15, 1951

4



To The Editor, The Advocate
IR,—I write to suggest to The

General Motor Omnibus Co, Ltd.

that there is very great need for

8 645 p.m. Top Rock bus trip,

For some time now it has been
noticed that several persons take
the Oistins 6.45 p.m. bus to go
to Bay Street, Worthings, st.
Lawrence and Top Rock. This
practice, though quite justified in
one sense, deprives many persons,
the majority of whom are hard
working servants and other indi-
viduals, from obtaining seats for
the purpose of proceeding to
Oistins and Silver Sands for well
earned refreshment and rest.

Perhaps a 7.15 p.m. trip to
Top Rock is also a necessity, but
the one at 6.45 p.m loudly

shouts the necessity to have some
consideration for the persons for
whom the Silver Sands route is
provided.

I am sure that others of the
travelling public will confirm
these statements and I trust that,
early in the coming week, the
present unsatisfactory ind ij
tressing state of affair vill be
remedied.

acute that it caused the driver
of the 645 p.m, bus to Silver
Sands to remark on the existing
need and this was confirmed by

the conductor.
‘ AUXILIARY.

Altacks In Assembly

To The Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—There was an extremely
unfortunate misprint of my letter
published in the “Advocate” yes-
terday. In protesting against a
recent attack on Miss Arne in
the House of Assembly, I pointed
out that I was not in any way
influenced by the fact that this
lady happens to be an English-
woman. I said that T should have
felt equally strongly had the of-
ficial been a Barbadian of any
complexion. The ters how-
ever, managed to alter this into:
“my complexion”. Fortunately 1
think every Barbadian who
knows me and my work and my

intense antagonism te all forms
of colour discrimination aha pre-
judice, will have guessed’ imme-
diately that there had been a
m'sprint |
AUBREY DOUGLAS }
SMITH

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1951

House Pass
Registration Bill

THE House of Assembly yesterday passed with minor
amendments a Bill to make provision for the registration
of all persons entitled to vote at an election of a member
to the General Assembly. The Bill provides that Bridge-
town and the parishes of the island will be divided inte

registration districts, and lists of voters
for each registration district.

will be prepared

The Bill was supported by Mr. J. H. Wilkinson (E).

Mr. G. H. Adams (L) moving
the second reading quoted from
the Objects and Reasons which
said that the introduction of Adult
Suffrage and a residential qual-
ification by the Representation of
the People (Amendment) Act,
1950 entitled a great number of
persons to be registered as voters
at an election of a member to the
General Assembly and the present
method of registration under the
Representation of the People Act,
1901 appeared too cumbersome
and the present machinery inade-
quate to deal with the registration
of such persons so as to enable
them to vote at the next General
Election which wag due to take
place in 1951,

He did not think that they in
Barbados should speak at “any
length or at all when it came to
the question of representation as
they could rightfully boast of an
unbroken parliamentary record of
300 years.

If members of the Government
had for the last four years, an
Opportunity of introducing a Bill
of that sort and did not, it was
because they considered that there
were matters of greater import-
ance, matters which deserved
priority before they could attempt
to deal with the present Pill,

Adult Suffrage

When people make accusations
against the Labour Government
for not speeding up certain mat-
ters, they were entitled to say,
that they were other things which
should be taken care of first, It
was only right that at a conveni-
ent moment, they should put into
actual law, the principle of Adult
Suffrage.

It remained only for him to en-
deavour to explain to the House
all the provisions of the Bill
which was drafted afier long and
careful consideration.

He reminded honourable mem-
bers that it was proposed that
those people to be enfranchised
would be from next January.
They would put before the House,
a Bill which would see that be-
tween now and the next General
Elections that only those people
who at present had the vote would
be able to vote as they would be
no more registration between
now and the coming into being
of the new Bill.

The Bill provided that the
island should be divided into reg-
istration districts which would
be marked out in order to get as
near as_ possible, 450 persons
eligible for voting.

He said that assistant regis-
tering officers would be appointed
whose duty it would be to visit
each house in the registration
district or districts assigned to
them and leave a form of claim
for each person residing therein
and qualified to vote.

Preliminary List

Subsequently, the assistant
registering officer would collect
the forms or they might be sent
to him. A preliminary list would
be prepared by him and forward-
ed to the registering officer for

the parish.
The registering officer would
then prepare alphabetical lists

and cause them to be published
in the Official Gazette and posted
up at any Post Office or Police
Station in the parish and also at
three other buildings in the reg-
istration district.

Persons not on the lists might
make a claim and they might
obiect to others on the lists. Those
claims would. be posted up and
in due course the lists and the
claims would be revised by the
Revising Officer and the lists

Lie And Nehru
Will Confer

PARIS, Jan. 16.

Indian Prime Minister Nehru
and Trygve Lie, Secretary-Gen—
eral of the United Nations will
confer here on Thursday on the
International situation, a United
Nations spokesman told Reuter.
The meeting appears to have been
arranged within the last 24 hours
as the same spokesman said last
night that no mecting had been
fixed. French sources believed
that talks would concern princi-
pally India’s efforts to restore
peace in the Far East.

Trygve Lie arrived here from
Sw'tzerland last night to hear
French reaction to a proposal to
hold the United Nations Assem-
bly in Paris next September.
Geneva has already “made a
strong bid” for the Assembly, a
spokesman __ said. Lie to-night
conferred with Foreign Minister
leven to-morrow.
ue will meet Alexandre Parodi
Secretary General of the French
Foreign Office and Premier Rene
Pleve to-morrow.

The main purpose of Nehru’s
three-day visit which Embassy,
quarters describe as “private
is to confer with eee diplo-

ats in European cap'‘tals.

a Vijayalakhm Pandit, Am-
bassador to the United States and
Dr. Radhakrishnan, Ambassador
to Russia will also attend. Nehru
will call on President Vincent
Auriol and plans to hold a news
conference to-morrow . —Reuter.

IMPRISONED

Sentence of three months’ im-
prisonment with hard labour was
yesterday passed on Joseph Jor-
dan of Venture, St. John by His
Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith, Act-
ing Police Magistrate of Distric.
“or,

Jordan was found guilty of
wounding Gordon Crichlow of
Roebuck Street, St. John on Jan-
uary 4





when so revised and certified
would become the registers of
voters.

Mr. Adams said that they had
made enquiriés about the diffi-
culties in Trinidad and he was
prepared to say that no honour-
able member could show the
Government any snag that took
place in Trinidad against which
they had not made provision in
the present Bill.

He explained the various sec-
tions of the Bill and told honour-
able members that if they needed
any more information about them
he would be glad to give it,

He said that they proposed in
the Bill to make one or two
amendments and one was that if
a person moved out of his regis-
tration district after living in it
for three months, they proposed
to allow him, when election time
came along, to go and vote in his
old district.

Another one was that if a cane
cutter, say from St. Andrew moved
into a district temporarily for
Some weeks or months for that
matter he would be allowed to
vote where he permanently re-
sided, a‘

He said that if any honourable
members had any suggestions
they should let him know in
order that the necessary amend-
ments could be made. He then
moved that the Bill be read a
second time.

Bill Drafted

Mr. Wilkinson (E) said that he
thought the Honourable Senior!
Member for St. Joseph had given
a full explanation of the bill. As
the Hon, Member said, it was 4
big job.

He said that he appreciated the
fact that the Attorney General
and the Hon. Member had devoted
a lot of time drafting the bill,
and he hoped that everybody
would be satisfied,

He knew that the Government
was endeavouring to make it as
easy as possible for everybody.

The Hon. Member talked about
experience gained from Trinidad
showing that 450 people to the
polling stations were the right
number. He did not know, bul
the practica] experience gained ir:
Barbados would show whether
that was so or not. He said that
he had much pleasure in support.
ing the bill.

Clause 9 of the bill said “every
assistant registering officer who,
without reasonable excuse, omits
any name from the preliminary
list or enters in the preliminary
list any person not entitled to be
registered or fails to collect a
claim, shall be liable on convic-
tion by a Court of Summary
Jurisdiction to a fine of $500 or
to imprisonment for six months
and shall forfeit any claim to fees
under this Act.”

Mr. E. K, Walcott (E) said that
he was of the opinion that that
clause was too harsh. He felt
that for an offence of that nature,
the censure was too great.

Mr. Adams (L) said that he,
knew the Hon. Senior Member
for St. George could have borne
him out with the fact that in
Trinidad such an offence had al-
ready taken place, so he did not
want it to happen in Barbados.

People seeing that the penalty
for committing such an offence
was so great, would be scared to
commit any such action.’ It was
in his opinion a very good way
to get a clean system in register-
fng people.

Mr. Miller (L) rose to support
Mr. Adams. He said that in Trini-
dad, he had known many a per-
son to go to the polling booths
to exercise his or her rights only
to be turned back by the Sheriff
on the ground of not having a

vote. |

Pass Bill to Suspend
Registration Act

The House of Assembly yester-
day passed a Bill to suspend the
provisions of the Representation
of the People Act, 1901, requiring





[a Register of Voters to be pre-

pare: this year and for purposes
incidental thereto.

It is companion legislation to
the special gistration of Voters
(General Assembly) Act, 1950,
and suspends for the year 1951
the registration of voters in the
manner provided by the Repre-
sentation of the People Act, 1901.
It retains the 1950 register of
voters in case there is an elec-
tion before the new register of
voters prepared in accordance
with the provisions of the Special
Registration of Voters (General
Assembly) Act, 1950, becomes
effective.

Mr. G. H. Adams, who moved
the passing of the Bill, told tha
House that it was a fact that as
from the passing of that Act no-
body would be registered under
the old Aet. Hf a bye-election took
place then, only those persons
who were then registered would
have the right to vote, There
could not very well have two
methods of registration and two
bills existing at the same time.



“Colombie” Due

To-morrow

THE French passenger liner
S.S. Colombie which was sched-
uled to arrive at Barbados to-
day, will now be arriving to-mor-
row.

She will be landing passenge's
here from the United Kingdom
and will be sailing the same day

for Jamaica via Trinidad, La
Guaira, Curacao and Cartagena.
| The Colombie is consigned to

Messrs. R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd

Siollmeyer Is
Job—Adams

THE House of Assembly yester-
agreed to a Resolution for
,509 to be placed at the dis-
al of the Governor-in-Execu-
ve Committee to supplement the
Estimates 1950-51, 1, current.
The House also agreed to a
Resolution for $32,400 and to an-
other Resolution for $69,680 for
Raa? Estimates for
1 1.

Of the Resolution for $43,509,
under Commissioners of Currency,
expenses in connection with the
destruction of worn currency
notes, $2,434 was voted. For sub-
sidies and grants, Trade Commis-
sioner in Canada, $500 was voted.

Speaking of the Trade Commis-
sioner, Mr. Rex Stollmeyer, Mr.
Adams said that he thought there
was scarcely anyone more suitable
for doing the work than Mr.
Stollmeyer. He was an affable,
friendly man to everybody in
every walk of life and he really
did a good job for the West Indies.

Although he was a Trinidadian,
he did not give the impression
that he was pushing things for
iriniaad alone, but for the whole
West Indies.

They were pleased to see the
umount of work he did for the
West Indies. When they went on
the Fancy Molasses Enquiry, they
agreed that it would be their duty
when they returned home to tell
the public how useful he had been
to them. ’

Mr. F. Galdard (E) agreed with
ithe remarks of Mr. Aaams con-
cerning Mr, Stollmeyer and said
Yhat during tne war he had ex
pedited shipments of flour to the
West Indies and did many things
for trade which were beyond his
duties. He was in Barbados for
a few weeks on a refresher basis
te keep himself always in touch
With the situation and see how he
vould help.

Under Miscellaneous services,
Director of Petroleum and Natu-
ral Gas, $2,335 was passed, and
for Regisiration of voters, $16,000.

For the Department of High-
ways and Transport, plant, tools,

da

spares and equipment, $22,00U
was voted.
Mr. Lewis (L) said that in

1949-50 money had been voted
for plants, tools and spares for
the Department of Highways and
Transport, On the last occasion
that they had to vote, they voted
money for a similar item. They
voted so much that in making up
the estimate for 1950-51, the Gov-
ernment saw fit only to put in a
small amount.

He wanted a statement from a
member of the Government or the
particular minister in charge of
legislation for that department to
say whether he was satisfied that:
the plant of the Highways and
Transport Department was get-
ting the attention that Govern-
ment property deserved, that it
was getting fair handling.

That department had taken over
the Central Road Board and they
had about 50 units. It had in-
creased to 150 units.

There was talk of a Govern-
ment Workshop. He took it that
the scheme would have included
maintenance for a plant, and
equipment to the various depart-
ments. He could not say that it
was satisfactory for them to come
there meeting after meeting and
provide generously for replace-
ments if they were coming there
everytime for supplementary esti-
mates.

Two rollers had been lent te
the contractors to work at Sea-
well. He hoped they would be)
returned in order.

Something was radically wrong
with that department. He knew
that the members of the Govern-
ment were not responsible, but
yet they were responsible mem-
bers of the House. That was one
departments which would dry the
Treasury.

After further debate the Reso-
lutions were agreed to.



In The House
Yesterday

When the House of Assembly met yes-
terday Mr. Adams laid the Seawell Air-
port Regulations 1951.

The following notices were given :—

Dr. Cummins. Resolution making it
lawful for the Vestry of St. George to
lease a parce) of land situated at Eller- |
ton, containing by admeasurement hot
more than Six acres from the Governor: |
in-Executive Committee for period not
exceeding twenty-one years for the pur-
pose of a Playing Field.

Dr. Cummins. Resolution making 1!
lawful for the Vestry of St. Andrew to
lease @ parcel of land situated at Belle-
plaine and containing by admeasurement
not more than eight acres from the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee for 4
period not exceeding twenty-one years.

Dr. Cummins. Resolution making it
lawful for the Vestry of St. Michael to
lease any parcel of land from the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee — situated
within its administrative boundary and
for the purposes of Playing

period not exceediny
twenty-one years.

Dr. Cummins. Resolution making it
lawful for the Vestry of St. Philip to
lease from the Trustees (for the time
being) of the Garnes' Trust that parcel
of land known as King George Vth
Memoria! Park which land is to be used
for a Playing Field, for any period not
exceeding Thirty Years.

Dr. Cummins. Resolution making it
lawful for the Vestry of St. Joseph to
lease that parce! of land containing by
admeasurement not more than four
acres at the Old Railway Station, Bath-
sheba, from the Governor-in-Executive
Committee for any period not exceeding
twenty years for the purpose of a Play-
ing Field

Mr. Cox. Resolution to approve the
Book of Reference and Plan of the pro
posed extension of the Waterworks in
the parish of Saint Michael.

required
Fields for any

Mr. Cox. Bill to amend the Customs
Tariff Act 1921. This was later read o
first time.

The House agreed to:

A Resolution to place the sum of
$43,509 at the disposal of the Governor-
in-Executive Committee to supplement
the Estimates 1950-51, Part I, Current as
shown in the Supplementary Estimates
1950-51, No. 35, which form the Schedule
to this Resolution.

A Resolution to place the sum of
$32,400 at the disposal of the Governor-
in-Executive Committee to supplement
the Estimates 1950-51, Part II, Capital,
as shown in the Supplementary Esti-
mates 1950-51 No. 36, which form the
Schedule to this Resolution.
| A_ Resolution to place the sum of
$69.680 at the disposal of the Governor-
in-Executive Committee to supplement
the Estimates 1950-51, Part II, Capital,
as shown in the Supplementary Esti-
mates 1950-51, No.
Schedule to this Resolution.

The House passed

A Bill to provide for the winding ur
and dissolution of The Barbados Mutual
Aid and Assessment Assurance Society

A Bill to suspend the provisions of the

Representation of the People Act 1901
requiring a Register of Voters to be pre
pared in the year 1951 and for purposes |
incidental thereto

A Bill to authorise the Vestry of St
| Michael to

raise a loan to enable then
retrospective a
employees of the
e House adjo

to grant pay to all pa
aid parist

Jar



srned



37, which form the,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

'

£10,000 VOTED FOR
Doing A Good PAROCHIAL EMPLOYEES

THE House of Assembly yesterday passed a Bill}

| authorising the Vestry of St. Michael to raise a loan not
! exceeding £10,000 to give back pay to the parochial em-

| ployees.

{

many moxths

He had promised the hon. senior
member'_for St. Peter that he
would do his best to get the Bill
before the Legislature and he had
succeeded,

Some hon. members might raise
the point as to whether this mat-!
ter having been approved by the

that no precedent was being
created, During the present legis-
la session a similar Bill for the
Ve of St. Philip, and he
thought he was correct in saying,
another “for the Vestry of St.
James, haa been passed under
similar circumstances.

To make certain of his position,
however, he had raised the point
at the meeting of the Vestry on
Monday and he had then with
him a letter in which the present
Vestry had declared their approval
of the action taken by last year’s
Vestry. He had much pleasure in
moving the second reading of the
Bill

Mr. F. L. Walcott (L) seconded.
He said that the matter was a
zontroversial one between the Bar-
bados Workers’ Union and_ the
employers two years ago. Now
the House was seeing justice being
done.

He was glad to see that the hon.
senior member for the City had
persuaded others to agree to such
a Bill.

He had great pleasure in sec-
onding the Bill and hoped that the
Vestry would deal with the paying
out of the money as expeditiously
as the House was dealing with the
Bill.

Mr. A. E.,S. Lewis (L) said it
was regrettable that a long and
protracted discussion with threats
of strikes by a certain section of
the Vestry employees had preced-
ed the agreement to such a Bill.
but he was very pleased that the
matter had been settled that way

He knew that it was difficult for
a government or a vestry unlike a
private business, to give retro-
spective’ pay where there was a
dispute about wages. In this par-
ticular case, however, the Vestry |
employees of St. Michael had all
along maintained that they were
promised that whatever the gov-
ernment did the Vestry would also
do, That claim had been so per-
sistent that persons who were not
“in the know” must have come to
the conclusion unhesitatingly, that
such a promise had heen made no
matter how vague. He had no
doubt that the taxpayers of the
parish would welcome the settle-
ment reached.

He did not know if there were
some employees who did not agi-
tate for this back pay but would
still get the benefit of it. In this
country there was a sort of re-
spectable employee who did not
like to join with anybody to agi-
tate. They preferred the more
lowly employee to do so and then
when anything was to be given as
a result of this agitation, they often
got much more than those who
did the agitating.

He hoped that when the money
was to be paid, if by any chance
an employee had to be dismissed
between the time it was decide
on to pay it from. and the actual
paying of it, he would still get his
share, up to the time that he had
given satisfaction.

Mr. R. G. Mapp (L) said that
like the last speaker he welcomed
the fact that the matter had been
settled and that these deserving
Vestry employees would get their
back pay. While that was so, he
still found himself compelled to
draw to the attention of the House,
what was in his opinion, a very
serious lapse of sound methods by
the Vestry of St. Michael.

Mr. Mapp said that they oftea
heard the boast made by mem-
bers of the Vestry that they had
sound business methods and that
business men should always be
returned to the Vestries of Bar-
bados. Yet they were raising *
loan to pay wages to employees
for services already rendere?
Ratepayers of St, Michael would









Car Overturns |

|

HE MOTOR CAR O—171,

owned by Clarence Holder |

of Airy Hill, St. Joseph, ran off)

the road and overturned along

Easy Hal] on Monday evening. Up

to yesterday morning it was still

lying in a field of canes, The
front fenders were smashed.

The car was being driven by |
“Son” Yard of Sugar Hill, St.
Joseph.

RUCE VALE ROAD St. An-

drew which was being re-'
paired, is now completed. This}
road was damaged during the)
rainy season last year.

The damage done to the road
along Lower Parks has also been
repaired.

HE MOTORCYCLE M—619
owned and ridden by Darn-
ley Stuart of Black Rock, and the
motor car S—115, owned and
driven by Harold Clarke of Mad-
dock, St James, were involved in
an accident along Broad Street,
opposite Messrs, William Fogarty,
yesterday morning. Traffic was
held up for a short time while
the Police took statements.
HE GAS LAMP at the corner
of Syna¢ogue Lane and James
Street caught fire on Monday at
about 6.05 p.m. The gas was
soon efter turned off and the blaze
ceased

FIRE broke out under the
bonnet of a Central ‘Bus
while it was travelling along





Mr. E. D. Mottley (E) moved the passing of the Bill.
He said that the matter had been a controversial one for

have to pay for it in years to
come.

They should not borrow money
to pay back pay.

Mr, Cox (L) said that like other
members, he was glad to see that

at | ,
1950 Vestry was now in order. In fas long last Ge. Vestry. of St.

answer to that he would only say ; p

intended paying back
ay, He remembered when the
investigation of the Civil Service
was being made and there were
making recommendations with
regards salaries, wages and re-
organization, the St. Michael
Vestry made it clear that they
were prepared to follow the Gov-
ernment in whatever decisions
were arrived at by the Commis-
sioner Mr. Adams.

After Mr, Adams»°made his re-
commendations, Government had
made good with their employees,
but on the other hand the St
Michael Vestry went back on its
word and actually said that they
had made no promise and refused
to pay the workmen retrospective
pay. Although they realised that
they were in the same category as
Government employees and that
the cost of living had gone up for
them the same way as it had for
other employees, they refused to
pay the retrospective pay.

All those who would benefit as
a result of the passing of the Bill
should take off their hats to the
Sanitary workers who had _ the
courage to stand up against the
Vestry for their right It was
through the hardihood of those
workers that they had that bill.
He had to play his part in advis-
ing them and helping to instil
nerve in them,

It was regrettable that persons
who were responsible for the
spending of public fund should
treat their employees in a manner
in which they would not treat
their private employees.

Good Joh

Scavengers did a great service
to the island. They did work
many abhorred, and for that rea-
son consideration should be~given
to their claims.

The Vestry should debate sert-
ously the fact that they the tax-
payers of St. Michael who paid
the bills were willing to subscribe
anything at any time which they
considered reasonable and to the
interest of furthering and helping
the community and to the interest
of doing justice to the less for-
tunate. He hoped they would
never see a recurrence of the sit-
n which existed in St. Mich-
ael,

Mr. Allder (L) said that how-
ever long it had taken the Vestry
to do what was right by their
employees, one could not get
eway from the fact that the final
decisions showed that there was
always the open desire to treat
the employees! as they should
have been treated.

It was a question
members of the Vestry and the
Union to which the empioyees
were affiliated which caused the
delay. Nevertheless, the St, Mi-
chael Vestry were leading the way
for the other Vestries. He was
thinking in terms of the low wages
which were being paid to the
employees of the outside parishes,

He regretted that there was
nothing at their disposal which
would allow them to compel other
Vestries to act in a similar way
to their employees as the St.
Michael Vestry had acted. The
people of the other parishes had
t+ work under more trying cir-
cumstances than the workers of
65t. Michael, and he felt that all
the time they never got any con-
sideration because of the type ot
setup which was to be found in
those Vestries.

He regretted, too, that all of
the parochial employees were go-
ing to be considered in the Bill
He was not in favour of over-
burdening the taxpayers by in-
creasing the salaries of the al
ready well paid.













































between

Money Everywhere
... And Not A $

To Spend

WHEN the Advocate visited the
Currency Department of the Gov-
ernment yesterday there was
money, money everywhere, and
not a dollar of it could be spent
Four men, a temporary staff that
has been taken on by that depart-
ment, were busy sorting into ser-
ies and counting large quantities
of Barbados Government notes
prior to their disposal.

These notes which have been
cancelled, must be disposed of to
rake room for the new Unified
West Indies currency which may
go into circulation in April this
year. The Currency Department
does not have the accommodation
to house the large extra staff that
would be needed to do this work;
so these four men have been em-
ployed, and in addition members
of the regular Currency Staff and
such of the Treasury Staff as are
available are being called upon to
work overtime.

This extra staff is not used nor-
mally, and as a result there is
always an eight or
arrear in dealing with mutilated
notes that are returned to the De-
partment hy the island’s banks for
cancellation Such an arrear will
now have to be cleared up before
April.

The value of notes in circulation
—now over two million dollars—



Deacons Road at about 1.30 p.m
yesterday. The Fire Brigade was
summoned but when they arrived

on the scene the fire had already |

been extinguished by the
chauffeur, conductor and someone



else

The "bus is X-—373 and owned
by C. Ifill of the Central "Bus
Company.

HENZELL DIES AT 81
| From Our Own Correspondent
ANTIGUA, Jan. 16

Mr. L. T. Henzell died here
last night. He was 81. He was
}retired manager of the Antigua
Sugar Factory and served fo

nm the Executive and Leg-



ye Counc'ls

is usually constant, because the
Currency Department returns to
\the banks the amount that the

banks serid in to the department
for cancellation. But more notes
are becoming mutilated than
hitherto, proof of the increased
number of hands through which
they pass. It is a sign too of the
high cost of living and the result-
ant higher wages paid. The man
‘who w@uld normally be handing
faround a= shilling now
| around a dollar bill

The value of notes destroyed in
| 1950 was about $490,000. In 1949
was about $420,000. Note
cancellation from the banks come

t for

at the“average 1

twe eek



nine-month’



hands

39 Years

| Of Watch

Repairing

IN a room full of “time” in

Bolton Lane you will see a little
grey man, Alexander Yearwood, :
repairing a watch or maybe a|Eumicia brought a cargo of fruit,
It is

clock any time of the day.
the work that Yearwood has been
doing for the past 39 years and
the work which Yearwood likes.

When he bégan watch and clock
repairing at the age of 15 when
he had just left school, it. was be-
cause long before that he had been
dreaming of how he would some
day be fingering the intricate parts
of watches and touching gold
daily,

Between whiles of looking on a
piece of glass for small watci
parts as he sat with his back bent,
his spectacles resting low on his
nose and a piece of cloth thrown
over his braced pants, Yearwood
told the Advocate yesterday how
he had been working at the watch
business 27 years in McGregor
Street. He also worked for about
a year in Tudor Street and one in
Middle Street, but for him now
business is at its best.

It was the steady looking at
small watch parts which troubled
Yearwood's eyes and made him
begin to wear spectacles when he
was 35 He will tell you that
when you have been in the busi-
ness for a long spell as he has
been, you will come to hear
watches and clocks ticks only as
something in the distance. He
has got into such a groove that
unless you talk of the ticking of
a watch or clock, he would not
think of it.

Born Grey

You may begin to wonder
whether there are any peculiar
things about watch repairers, and
seeing Yearwood so grey at 54 you
may ask him if he thought that
had anything to do with his watch
repairing way of life, but he will
assure you that he had a sister
who was born grey :
_ Yearwood has done a lot for the
jewelry business in Barbados. He
has two sons and both of them
followed his footsteps. One,
however, left off after a while and
is now an optician in Trinidad.
Besides his two boys, he has train-
ed many young men in his time.

Maybe it is because he is al-
ways surrounded by clocks and
watches that he sticks for precise
times, but he has a flare for exact
dates and can tell you the date on
each occasion of a removal to an-

other street to carry on his busi-!

ness



Six Months For
Stealing Battery

Twenty-four-year-old labourer
Milton Millar of My Lord's Hill
was yesterday sentenced to six
months’ imprisonment with hard
labour by His Worship Mr. H. A.
Talma P@lice Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A”.

Millar was found guilty of the
larceny of a six-volt battery val-
ued at £5 and the property of
Evelyn Edwards. He gave notice
of appeal at the bar.

Edwards in his evidence said
that on November 8 he left his
motor jJorry outside the Plaza
Theatre at about 8.30 p.m. When
he returned later he noticed that
the battery was missing. He re-
perted the matter to the Police
who called him on January 14
to identify a battery which they
were holding.

At the first glance he saw that
the battery was the one that was
taken out of his lorry.

P.C. 336 Sargeant of the C.1.D.
said that Millar made a statement
to him in which he implicated
cne Colvin Moore who had helped
to take away the battery from
the lorry.

Garfield Jemmott said that
Moore and Millar came to him
offering to sel) him a battery. He
went to Moore’s home to see the
battery. Millar brought another
battery to him and this battery
was taken to Fort Royal Garage.

Seibert Waldron—keeper of the
crimina! records—told Mr, Talma
that Millar had one previous con-
viction for larceny. This was on
March 7, 1949 when he was con-
victed at the Court of Grand

Sessions and put on probation for
two years for stealing two
bicycles

Set E King who prosecuted for
the Police in addressing Mr.
Talma, stressed that Millar be
sent to prison due to the fact that
he was given a chance to amend
his ways and took no opportunity
ot that chance.



20’- For Assault

of Rock Gap, St.
Michael was yesterday fined ky
His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma
°0/. and 1/- costs for assaulting
and beating Cathalene Frederick
on May 6 1950.

The fine is to be paid in 14
days or in default he will under-
go one month's imprisonment with
hard labour.

gee

Seon Small

School

r J
or

CAVE

cot

ate of $40 000]

|



Bobby



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Blue & Brown

Prices From 4] ¢_ to 72¢







PAGE FIVE
SCHOONERS BRING COMPENSATION
| RICE AND FRUIT Compensation in the sum of

; A thousand bags of rice arriv-| £3 10/- was ordered to be paid
;ed in Barbados from British Gui-|to Clement Nightingale by 52-

jena yesterday by the 82-tor| year-old Ervin Thompson of
) Schooner Franklyn D. R. Spooners Hill yesterday after His
| The Franklyn D. Rs also} Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod Police
brought supplies of firewoou,| Magistrate of District “A” found
charcoal and sawn pieces of|Thompson guilty of maliciously
sreenheart. . damaging a motor cyele tryre be-

Another schooner, the W. L.|longing to Clement Nightingale on

January 15.

For the actual offence Thomp-
son was further ordered to pay a
fine of £4 in two months or in
default two months’ imprisonment
with hard labour.

‘opra, firewood and 1,000 loose

‘ocoanuts from Dominica,

Both schooners are consigned
to the Schooner Owners’ Associa-
tion,

Scenes e esses
FRESH SUPPLY OF 2

SPURINA HEN CHOW §

(SCRATCH GRAIN)
at JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributore
SESS EES BEE Eee eee
Select Your
FAVOURITES

Early

Large Variety

Zinnias 12 kinds
Dianthus 2
Carnations 2

Alyssum, Snap Dragon,

Petunia, Asters, Chrysan-
themums, Candytuft, Phlox,

Cosmos, Verbena, Calliopsis,

s

3

also q supply of %
VEGETABLE SEEDS :
.

Â¥



iteni Avviratia

SEEDS
KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

Lettuce, Tomato,

etc., ete.

Cabbage,





Want Something
Nice ?

AFRICAN PRINTS .......0.6.665 05065

EMBROIDERED ANGLAISE
in White, Pink, Lemon and Aqua at $3.05 per Yd.

CREPE DE CHINE $1.29 per Yd,

CREPE ROMAINE in lovely colours .... $2.40 per ¥d.
PLAIN & PRINTED SPUNS
More ready-to-wear BEACH WEAR

DRESSES, SLACKS, SKIRTS & BLOUSES

84c., 93e. per Yd.

5
Che roadway Dress Shoppe

No, 1 BROAL

bt



SEPP OSSSSOOOTOA

You can enjoy Britain’s
favourite tobaccos. Six

blends to choose from—
every one a balanced
blend of vintage leat



SOLE AGENTS:
MESSRS. A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS), LTD.,
P.O, BOX 403, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

Socks

Girls and Boys
in White,









Navy °

SHEPHERD & CO., LID.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street





Sa ce Tae UN i aa ea a










” PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1951
oo ES Le dates tte SSSR A
HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON











ae

Apply

at once



i INGIAN





on insect

stings

*‘DETTOL’

THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC

Non-poisanous. Pleasant smell,
Deossw’t Pain. Doesn't Stain.





\ [wart A MINUTEL HE SAID
A HUNDRED AND HOW MANY
DEGREES ?




VENTURE
TIME OF













THs



x
%
3
“ZT Martyr ;
TO PAIN! 3















apply
SACROOL

R to the affected parts and

‘(Hem good looks tell you they*re fust right.
You know, too, when you look at the price
tag, that you can’t get finer value. Tllustrated
is a Tan Oxford shoe for Boys and Youths.
Tied to every pair is the John White Guaran-
tee Shield—the sign which means ‘ just right *?
Look for it in leading stores in Barbados.

WHITE

means made just right

TO C?_CP#_ PMC FGF lle

-

® you'll be amazed at the

w quick reiier.

>t



OF

- § n.050000006




% Ask for Sacrool
x AT

— Hy Stores

Ol, ELEANOR. 4
1 JUST ADORE )- THANK

: { ADORE rT)
YOUR NEW ~“( I ene
} a

soe



r
|
lL SIMPLY |
\



FLY CARGO

BIG OR SMALL



THE LONE RANGER

MM GST niece ey
Sion HES WE FOLLOWED. 5



JEN THOSE HORSES BELONG TO THE —~
“EN WHO WERE TRAILING THE MARSHAL |
- TANG | HIS DAUGHTEF ars


















BAGGAGE AND

HOUSEHOLD

EFFECTS NOW 50%
OHEAPER

BWIA

AIR-CARGO

Service

FOR PARTICULARS
SEE






EXERCISE BOOKS

SINGLE LINE 8c. |
STEPHENS INK=5c. & 10c. bot. )
QUINK (Washable) Blue & Black :

i
















24c: bot.
WATERMANS INK=Blue at 16c.

RULERS - RUBBERS - PENCILS






(BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS.

Lower Broad Street
etown




Phone 4585

Advocate Stationery |













pinto

| TELL aacoie
TO COME IN
HERE

HUH IF A LITTLE
POTATO LIKE THAT
KIN GIT QUT BY

TALKIN’ LIKE THAT-
|] I'M GONNA TRY IT-

SORRY - SIR- SHE'S
OUT-SHE Sa10 Sic FAM



a

[Pee T-DARLING 5-) 3-\( Bur: YOU MIGHT-
he DIDN'T SAy SHUT UP--GO |
CNS HOME -T WON'T
BE HOME FO?

INNER =
a DIN ee
eh ay tees oe?

ots) ¥ 4 ny Fs

U o














WON'T BE HOME

FOR DINNER-AND

FOR YOU TO EAT
OQUT-TOO-



A protection against ill-health, a st:

children . . , there’s goodness in ‘Kepler’ for all the
family, ‘Kepler’ contains vitamins A and D and gives
extra energy, extra nourishment. Its sweet, malty flavour
is so palatable too.





RIP KIRBY

SORRY SIR. NI MAVENT THE = a a tt
. ae ‘ J.c.WE" Baa “ { You'Re 4 ~ R , aon
DES NOT WISH TO 7 f \¢ } S y i x anne
SEE ANYONE THIS cafor mie ie eS COD LIVER OIL WITH
EVENING. } ‘ \ q y aaa! || ae | . , f ‘
| eS
~
=




















MALT EXTRACT
ie A BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO, proouer



Sole Agents for Barbados : COLLINS’ LTD. 28 Sread- Se.

ATTENTION !!
FACTORY MANAGERS
Take this opportunity of obtaining your requirements in :—

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE
Ranging from 14 in. upwards
MILD STEEL
Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes

BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes

FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill
At PRICES that cannot be repeated.






Aallity has made Ovaltine

The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltd. the most widely used Food Beverage
oe

WHITE PARK ROAD, ST, MICHAEL -~
DIAL 4528 re

=








WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE
J / s c PAGE

CLASSIFIED ADS.|Miss Bevan /°4 Burglaries Hot Air Will Make!) tyro jnwires west ‘SHIPPING NOTI

ree TELEPHONE 2508 In 47 Nights Richer Milk OBSERVERS
MEMORIAM Is Always ol c ; aes | BEAIRADS,- Sen. - 18

EVEN

















ROYAL NETHERLANDS ee



























WHLLAR AT iviae cieuie ae ot FOR RENT Jack Townsend Payne, 33-year- More and richer mil! E “ a Marshal Tito has invited west STEAMSHIP co. The M.V. “Daerwcod” will ac-
Louise Miller whe died 17th January old workman, crammed a lifetime ted from 40 cows 2 eae Sotton ern military attaches to attend] satting trom Amsterdam and Dover— cept Cargo and Passengers for
1950. One year to-day. us of burglary raids into 47 nights Cogporetion’s. farm at Lostock.|°". his mountain units | M.S. “Bonaire” Sth. @th. January 195! St. Lucia, St. Vineent, Grenada
You ‘dea svat in nor theo HOUSES can nk was arrested during one Laneashire ‘ ae ane ‘somewhere in Yugoslavia" from | S$, Cotte and. Sed. February er ‘ey a ee
ou are ever in our oughts, 0! is “expeditions” s ¢ i a danuary 2 entatiincnas : Sailing from Antwerp and Amster- anuary
But God took you Home Si a a na a eS By CHARLES A SMITH 153 other ren soe and admitted The reason:— The cows enjoy January at +0 January 24 it W8S | dam—M.S, “Oranjestad” 6th. 19th
And it’s sweet to be with Jenus.© ASHTON — On-sea, Ma: |, Chrix H tw Oc ices—committed be- the het air sweeping from je: authoritatively learned here to-| January 1950 The M.V. “Caribbee” will ac-
Peroy Millar (Son U:S.A.), Mrs. Edith | Chureh. Fully lak sotesenen LuNDON ween October 21, just after he aircraft engines on test at-an|%®Y- This is the first time suci: | Salling to Trinidad. Paramaribo, and cept Cargo and Passengers for
Blenman (Daughter), and © Gran@-] Bedroon ly furnished, containing 4 O. . was released from jail, and De- adjoini : “est at aD) on invitation bee 4 Georgetown—-M.S. “Hersilia” 8th. Janu- romines Antigua, Montserrat
children 17.1.54-—In rooms, Verandah over looking the| A pretty 20-year-eld.girl with a cember 7, w Y ae idjoining factory . im ahion has been extended | ary 1951. S.S. “Cottica” 20th. February t : :
a an ae clk ot A cember 7, when he was arrested. i Resaiar” wheat nee the kel : ora aoe Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of de-
o, odern conveniences. Dil} peaches-and-cream complexion is In a stat oe R A_ National Farmers’ Union |*¢e Me wat Reuter. 951. parture to be notified.
: 13.1.51—5n. a ement Payne said: official admitted he “never heard . | Sailing to Trinidad La Guiere Corscac | :



aa mysterious “Woman in “I have committed so many
ows” . burglaries since I came out of



of such a thing” before but said 951

ee nee
FOR SALE ESPERANZA—Fully furnished, with

ie-M.S, "Oranjestad" 2nd ea BWA SCHOONER OWN-



































modern conveniences. Qn St, Jamos She is J if ; that “warmth certain! , ;,

Son tee ee . j lennifer Jane Bevan, prison that I am willi : + wanes ae certaaniy improves Sailing to Plymouth, Antwerp and ERS ASSOCIATION, Inc

A _-—— ne 91-33. 10.1.81-9n.| Whose job it is to steer Princess them all.” ling to admit mili yield.” —(1.N.° FURNITURE REMOVED WITH | \msterdam-- M.S. “Willemstad” 23rd lephone: 404 z
UTOMOTIVE | Margaret Rose through the ritual Police witnesses said Payne CARE. | cami dP A dation . “ow

CAR—Austin 10 h.p. perfect working Avene Rea Sizsisbed, and] of stuffy royal duties. She js total haul during the 47-day blit ; vatlabtels ee ne '
Pie fi A i , . Ring “inition | Princess Peg’s Lady-in-Waiting. on houses and stores totalled S. P, MUSSON, GON & CO. LTD. —="=5Es
Alleyne, Wakefield Plantation, St. John. |) —————_—_—_ . F $5,600. ; B ke Sh ; . = —_ ie

16.1.81—G. | | CUM - COURT—Britton'’s X Ra, from an Beheeeel she is the fun-loy- a lac irts aw - -~ a a

a anne 1 oe ruary. Gallery, Drawing and incess’ very good friend udge Harold Morri . a X ® 2

CAR—(1) Ford 10 hp. in perfest| Dining Rooms, tw Pansies ‘iend, \ rris sentenced = =— t , t
waking 8 tan apex Bae a Daning Boome, two Bestosms, Pantry connie, sharer of girlish Payne to seven years imprison- Protect Priests a Nationa eams ps

16.1.51—gn | Electric Light, ta es D secrets and participant in private Ment. —(I.N.S.) +e . oa

“GAR Ue Baan gy | CDMS: Britton: X Road. pranks. She helps with corre- LONDON = ste se ain. le aie, be ce
age MM aryl - Fy Suitable for 17.1.51—),] Spondence and counsels Margaret It is the cleric pte ’ —— Montreal Helifex weston Barbados Barbados
jal e ondition, C, Edwards, | —————_______ —_——___ | in her personal probl it is the ¢ erical collar and black CAN. CHALLENGER" os 3 Jai - % Jom. 15 Jan.

endship'’s Plantation, St. Andrew.| GIBRALTAR—Cattle Wash for the ; ; apa arsgpine ele Rail shirt front that gives clergymen ‘LADY RODNEY" 13 19 Jan. 28 Jan, 29 Jan
Phone Edwards 2635 or’ Walks 3216. months of February to June 1951, Apply |. Jemnifer is the girl who is al- waymen long life and protects them agains: : “LADY NELSON" as 1 Feb 3 Feb. 12 Feb. 13 Feb.

12.1.51—5n to Mrs. E. H. Farmer, Andrews or|W4YS slightly in the background a colds z in sient. aes. eare taken of Furniture | “CAN, CHALLENGER” . 18 Feo. _ 25 Feb. 25 Feb.
hat. ‘ ie » oo ” “ SeMar
Poo ne Daten eo Se masher —— Ou iebening 6 tei oe oaeee May Strike In Thé Rev, John St. Clair Gar- Personal Supervision “LADY NELSON” » Mar 2 Mar, Pry Mar n Ma..
. new Battery, Tyres in exeeilertl “HIGH WINDS” — Bathsheba, “ , attending a ringtor riting © i ig 4 Estimate freely given. Di “c ” ; r.
condition, M. C. M. Hunte — Room 311. | January, February, Mar “er! charity bazaar, attending th a < ng nh, Writing in his parish given. jal 3309 “c AN. CHALLENGER 2 Apr - 12 Apr 12 Apr.
Plantations Building. Phone 4349, 8478, | Dial 2650, HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD | tte or performing any on Buenos Aires MARgAROS, explained: | BARBADOS FURNITURE = AE edapeteenwiicninsinesnlocmemepsigeesaenmeecieerot-inaane
10.1.51—1n, 16.1,51—3n | royal chores that become Peg’s BUE 3 See aeons a hnah Coari REMOVER | “NonamnoUND Arrives tee Aves ve oe

— § 7 . ‘ y ay ct: x si a ' :

TRUCKS—Two Dodge Trucks 39 and “HEATHFIELD Ihe Grane fimnished ae ees duty as unmarried daughter of Th ENOS AIRES, Jan. 16 oy alecuen 1eay stand at funerals ‘odrington, Pritton'’s X Rd. Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifat
40 model in good working orde-.|from January 15th. Apply: Mrs. A. p | the King. the =Emergency Committee '" cold churchyards and in streel “LADY | NELSON" 14. Ja 8th HJan.. WS at
Apply: the Manager, Ridge Plantation. | Herbert. Phone a5." Mri" go which twice ‘called railwaymen *!!king to people “LADY RODNEY" 10 Fev. 12 Feb. 21 Feb. 22 rel _
Christ Chureh, or Phone 2605. ee Myriad details of protocol and cut on strike in the past two |, Credit must go to the stock LADY NELSON” 25 Feo, 2 Fet. 8 Mar -

131.5168, | ILFRACOMBE—On-sea, Maxwell Coast.| attendi : protocol ani months has given authorities (Plack shirt front) which is nor- LADY RODNEY" 21 Mar. 28 Mar. 6 Apr : --
excellent searbathing, ‘fully furnished. ing to split-second timing until January 20 to r vc. “tente mally made of silk, is lined am “LADY NELSON" 13 Avr. 3s Bes. 33 Apt : be aes
ELECTRICAL our bedrooms upstairs overlooking | at public appearances keep Jenni- j ee to restore “trace : aere ay Seeger ‘LADY RODNEY” 10 May. 12 May. 21 May. -- 22 May.
the sea. From the Ist February, Phone| fer on the go from early mornin union freedom” to the railway- 92d a wool and hair interlining to e é , P

WRIRIGMEA TON CY Scobie ine bens 8280. A. N. Chaderton, Maxwell Coast.| until late at night ” 8 men’s union. Otherwise the Com4 stiffen it. The stock covers the N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vesels fitted with cold storage cham.
in perfect condition, Wil accept nee 12.1,51—2n } mittee, “will take steps it con4 Most exposed parts of the body.”| ™ gour enew bers. Passenger Fares and freight :ates on application to :—-

Miss Bevan, with the laughing, Siders necessary to secure respect —LNS.
slanting eyes, would be a stand- for the sovereign will of ihe
out in any average company, but workers.”

gt in any average company, bu Without Operation GARDINER AUSTIN & CO, LTD. - Agents.

tates that she must subordinate ..RUmours of the resignation of In Touch With Barbados If you feel old before your time or suffer
toe has i ae ny Cast — ee conntet aria ee rite re! HARRISON LINE
he limelight beats i an : astro which wet first ‘a fi an American medical discovery which re-

g eats publicly. 7 A ae ree TSS Coastal Station * itores youthful vigour and vitatity ‘quicker

—_—_
reasonable offer. A. D. Worme, “KEN-ERME”, sea-sid 7
Winslow, Bank Hall Rd. Phone 2330 Bathsheba, to approved Senarite: dames
16.14 and ae optional, Available February

errno onward. For porticulars dial 2550 any
BEDSIDE PADIO G.E.C. Long &| day except Sunday, 10.1.51—t..n
short wave. Price $50.00. Telephone eee
8263. 16,1,51—2n “RESTAWILE” Gibb’s Beach, St

































































ST } Peter. Three bedrooms fuliy furnishe
sera: A shipment ot Petrol- Aor March, May, June, July, one me heard during the recent stril is |
C C hting an arging plants | December, Wesley Bayley, High Street 4 : 4 A ° ec strike: than giand operations, It is a simple home
14—32 Volts 9 amps. Price $250.00 3 et eieoe Jennifer is of mixed Irish and are again current Cabl 1 Wir t r
i . 51— . p a sless (We.z.) Lite dvie | treatment in tablet form, discovered by an
oe |e) Co.,Ltd, 13.1,51—fn. VEWAN =n hans parentage, the oldest eat" the, aap nee costae” with Amarone Doser, Annouce harmless and {
+ SEA"—A comfortable fully| daughter of Col. John Henry and _ La Prensa *.»orted that the the following ships rough their Bar- nay o, but the newest and most pow. | |
LIVESTOCK ogme, Helge teuetibe ener &Bec:| Lady Barbara Bingham. She is Minister yesterday was busy "Mg Coast Station. ey way aintcly ta our wanda: servers and |. OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
el . , * ie : : . - . 5s Wwesrtroo! 58 Lika, SE N any i
COW — 1% Holstein Heifer, by B. B., 224, available ist February. Dial 3578 well-educated, extensively tra- clearing ou his desk at the Min- s.s. Bs ©. Liverpool, SS. Seven Seae/ | works s8 tast Gea too teh bes aad Gal sae :
Bull Prince Albert, is 3 weeks oid. Diai| 2490. 12.1,81—3n. | Velled and has lived on the fringes istry. The Ministry has been run- Kvke, 8.S. Sport/Limoz, 8.5. Mormactern. | body power and vigour in 24 to 48 hours, } Due
3527, J. W. Smith, Radeot, Rouen Rd..| “UNFURNISHED FLAT — At “BRIAR of court life since childhood. ning railways since the former 5S. Lady Nelson. SS. Canadian Chat- eoneny oe oe eee on glands and Vessel From Leaves Barbados
7.1.51—t.f.0.} PIELD” with ane a . - British lines c ations lenwer, SS. Nieuw Amsterdam /Pagf. 5.5. | 2erves, your brain power, memory an
ge. Lower Collymore ' g ‘ Ss ines were nationalised in pergechief, $.S. Georgios, F. Andreadi syesight often improve amazingly. So 4
CAT—For Sale to good home only. | Rock, St. Michael, Dial 3472. H. Blair She first pecame friendly with 1947. oe andi So. Mabay Hrd, Ss. | And this amazing new gland and vigour |): LAURENTIAN FOREST” M/brough &
Imported Pedigree Siamese Male Cat. | D&nnister. 6.12.50—tfn |Margaret through her mother, a Reuter U.S. O Dimare, §.8. Loide 5a0 Domingos, | festorer, called Vi- Tabs, ie guarantee’. It | London 10th Jan. 26th Jan.
Aged 19 months. registered in England bridesmaid at the wedding of * $s Gavina, SS. Empress of Scotiand, | has, Deen Leelee sie eee val fousands | i.S, “PLANTER” -. .. London 18th Jan. Ist Feb.
champion strain, Tel, ova. Beautifai PUBLIC SALES Queen Elizabeth. She became the be ins S 5 a le whek 8.5. er Webw. chemists hore. Get Vets yy S. MULBERRY HILL” .. London 20th Jan. 4th Feb.
‘ 7.1.51—In ; A ” ee Ce : $ rgentina/Wme SS. Juvenal, S45 dhe: . t a Q « ”
ebullient princess’ Lady-in-Wait- : coe Pennant, $8. Olympic Game S sig improvament a it ts the tons, See the 3.5. “FACTOR os .. Glasgow &
MISCELLANEOUS ing on Novy, 27, 1948. 200,000 Live In Trailers ™ornecre: S. Venancio, $8. Trogas fu bottle, which lasts a pia te ‘S. “PRIBESMAN’ whe 20th Jan 31st Jan.
S.S. Helder/Pepq, S rivn, S.S. Coastal @ positive rf eS. wig .. M/brough &
— . ; ; nture: ; Bronnoy, &.S full of vitality, ‘
ANTIQUES — Of every description She is an enthusiastic skier, See ee Bronnoy, 8.8. | [06 ‘feel 10 te * ‘® younger oF London 27th Jan. 10th Feb.
Been wee Barer: ae, oor AUCTION keen bicyclist, but does not go in Denis Gurton argh of ae. hota jowne. 8 any on as. Seern womay Dede on of empty Dae 5.S.. “PROSPECTOR” London 27th Jan. 16th Feb.
+ Ear! 5 . Auto- ——~| for the strenuous type of Ck \- Ea “ ary O' S'S. Hersilia/Perk, $.S. Rochester Castle Special, Aon! .
graphs etc. at Gorringss Antique shop] UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER | ton-dancing that ee ae coasts ee Ri i sepcil, os. Soren ats ge Pee Fork: Vi-Tabs so the at wires | HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
3.9,50—t.f.n. ; i London at i : , , ritons hV@ Kvkw, SS. Fletero fe Protects you,
8 teem. | By instructions received from the | OucoD | A the moment. She jn trailers because they cannot get Restores Manhood and Vitality Vessel For Closes in Barbados
~ - - Insurance Company, I will mT prefers the more sedate sort of " +5 ,
AMM-I-DENT TOOTH POWDER—'This} Friday, January 19th’ ee oe of aouses, = | 35. “DEFENDER” ey .. London end Jany
esries control aid, supplies for many] Garage, next” to Fort ARovar yy ag te len ec sip those Gurton said trailers are being |

“or further information apply to - - -
DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents











uours the ammonium jon which has} St. Michael's Row. (1 is mixed with Welsh common- i

“ ) 1950 A—i0 : M g rg ¢ i > ”

becn found lacking in cevity-suscep-] Austin Car, only done 1,800 mile, |Sense, a combination that makes Wet bar contak er are cman “Just What | Wanted!
2 a

































































tible individuals. Caries Means TOOTH Patnaged. in accident. Sale at 2 p.m.}her an excellent foil for the irre- h .
‘Amm-l-dent is made wp of smail * YEVCENT RIpNITH pressible Peg. 88. ROMES. That is what nearly
particles tha! ere dissolved between the Auctioneer sous seer, Fe ee ee
Teeth hours: ieee peers Out Foe 14.1.51—4n.| As Lady-in-Waiting, she wields __ __ jet a HANDY. LITTLE
It can be obtained from any Drug Under The Di , considerable | influence over the ; | FLINT GAS LIGHTERS
gi fois. 7m | Under jamond Hammer Tae, taking a wee hand when cording to backstmre gossip, she at the Ges Ghowrcoms
T have. déen, instructed tar (hein argaret occasionally desires to joyously joins Margaret’s fun complete with Fitnts.... 44. each
CAPS Plastic Shower Caps. In] ance Company to neur-| kick over th annifer ” thtion . cytra Flints .... ... O4c. each
! sell by Public Auction r the traces when on Pub- Jennifer has many friends with- F noch Li
tio atterns, 2c. ch. 5 : 3 * : 4 AID) iE re ne
Mopere tees Mebpa 1atst ane aae Wht Meets! CEE Te now.) Be Scns Ge the Seve tn es Fncee cee, oe aren a | ¢ )
as ee eee o'clock, One Austin Car Santeged’ in an yrds enough to ask, “do vou ously denies any particular heart- | eee anes 27. |
Disinfectant ie, goutig te eee tea eet acer #96 One Morris 8 with the ao that’s wise ? whenever throb. : eae oR ee De } ia} | SS. COLOMBIE Sailing to Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao,
used in the sick-room, for spraying pur- ‘Terms ‘Cash, DYArcy A. Scott, Auc to thea tna leit - are My job tee c rai ee tim oe | | AUCTION SALE Gerageh 808 Comnyne. SP wend =_-
poes and also for cuts and bruises. | tioneer, : : 13.1.51.—4 F i ah at m : UP pola dbide <5. Ama 1951.
Price 40c. bot. KNIGHT'S LTD. Pee net ee : explains, brushing away questions " y B Sailing to Plymouth and Le Havre via Mar-
17:1.81-—n 4 Queen Blizabeth hand-picked about romance. [0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH WEDNERDAZ, JAMUBNY 9 ae ws and Guadeloupe on January 29th.
iereenreet ne ena aeeee REAL ESTATE ennifer for the job only after Jennifer’s whole life is centred | he 1951.11.20 a.m, 1951.
Whee shopee ee thee, Queen Mother Mary had looked around Margaret, which makes her ||| potest Motor Car Models” iit rigs Mtns 4 GS. GASCOGNE Sailing to Grenada, Trinidad, British Gui-
over the girl, then nodded her the woman of mystery. Young . : ana and French Guiana on February
oe amMANENT needles for your Tesora 2 seen pa Inevitably, she’s a great male friends and others intimate DINKEY TOYS—ali_ with LAS CAMPANAS 1951
er, and needles of all kinds. ice , St. James stickler for etiquette, but she’s no to court circles find a stone wall Rubber Tyres. ' > it
Sat. Rekaete (Of ail Minds “soa; TA; pafodem, Bungalow, 3 bedrooms, two| wet blanket behind Swany pevweeks Gin eae all | ; ber Ty NAVY GARDENS $.8S. GASCOGNE Sailing to Plymouth and Le Havre via St.
BARNES & CO., LTD 9? 12.50-tfn. Overlooking Bee, own private! of Buckingham Pete #2 alls em and Jennifer. 1} Sheet Plastic for Lamp I 8 Lucia, Martinique, Guadaloupe (Pointe a
~SUIT-LENGTHS—In Grey Pin Strips | Phone 91-50, see ten, te ane t Shades awenah aibay Satanic ke baht Foours th i981 en
$8.95 per length of 3% yards take a hint “ 3 AT by Auction the entire furniture , .
brother, you'll never get it at this price PROPERTY FOR SALE OR RENT j HNSON’S TIONERY end contents of “Las Campanas”
again, And what # more I'll furnish KENDAL HIld. — Christ Churen, , JOHNSON'S STATIONER | which is located 1 pul-de- po
seain. “And. what > emore Til fymniss | gRENDAL MILA: Christ Churen GOVERNMENT NOTICES | id whieh otatea avcudeae || RM. JONES & CO. LTD.—Agents.
0 :
menway Stare: 17.1.51—2n. | itchen ae ater Perea En BARD WARE Oak D Tabi ia Ch = a Se Sead
’ ‘ s | ak ining Table And 8 Chairs, =
SAFE—One Large Fire-Proof Safe in| House wire awaiting current. 3 Roods OLD AGE PENSION PAYING OFFICER, ST, MICHA | Oak China Cabinet, Oak Sideboard, | EES
perfect condition. Dimensions inside | 37 1/3 Perches of Land. Apply M. D. C. Applications are invited for < ; : CHAEL * : Setoitienes ! Oak Tip-top Table, ‘Small Glas* :
3 feet wide by 5 feet high. Apply] Tord, on premises. 16.1.51—6n : . Sa vited for appointment to the Post of Pension Tip-top Table, Upholstered Arm |
R. S. Nicholls & Co., ‘Teleplinge No.seas DeSIRABLE Dwelling house sat Paying Officer for the parish of St. Michael. | —— Chairs, Metal Standard Lamps, PASSAGES TO EUROPE |
1.50-t.£0. | «BREEZELEY" standing on approxi- 2. Appointment will be made subject to the selected candidate || Reacacares TAeashaiel areal) ee, Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominio. for sail (
hogany Occasional Tables, Re- | -ontac n s Products, mited, IOs ’ ’ - 1
Nylon Stockings. Lovely Shades, Ali | Maxwell Coast Road, Christ Church. 4 : ’ ; ade olving Mahog Bookease, jug , » usud rts ndon, or
sizes $2.14 per pair. Modern Dress Godan ey open Pownce. and will be on one year’s probation. The minimum educational stand- | GOopDs! enn’ Rriasmend my a F oe Loree _ ss" papal ag ge —_— i
Shoppe. 14,1.51—6n. | ee citchen. Three oe Se ucfast | ard which will be accepted is a pass in the Cambridge Local School | From INDIA, CHINA, PSOne, gions tools spatien otterdam, ngle fare > usu - |
“TABLECLOTHS Plastic Tare ‘Table: Greering sooty a running water, Certificate or similar examination of equivalent standard. App aeanes EGYPT! Desk with Book-case attached, ss Kieth ——
cloths—Pretty atterns x 6 24 4 m and) » x + , r 6 ss: enn ea il ¢ 5 oe | Table Lamps, 'T Indian
Bele ae reas, , vetene ae ee Eaihtaies Vubdenive Weis) cnuwaniances hould preferably be between the ages of twenty-one and forty years. Silk, Curios, Brassware, Table Lampe, wo. Tradl Garnet ;
14.1.51--6n, | downstairs, — Electricity throughout, 3. The salary attached to the post is at the rate of $1,200 per 6 ins x 10 ft. 6 ing), Patterned SLE YOURSELF AS OTHERS SEE YOU.
~_— | Three servants’ room and conveniences} gynum rising by annual incr s of ! Carpet (10 ft. 2 ins x 7 ft. 5 ins) { 2 Nh 7 p
YACHTO peter Pan’ 12 x 8 ft. Re. |in_yard, Garage for two cars. > increments of $72 to $1,632 per annum. Teakwood, Sandal, Rugs end Mats, Collection st We Can Supply .. .

clisditioned 3 scte of sails, Stone Meee The above property will be set up 4. Applhications~should be made on forms obtainable from the |

17.1.51—2n |for sale by Public competition at our

Office James Street on Friday 19tt Colonial Secretary’s Office and must be returned not later than the French Perfumes, Bar-

tray: Singer Electric ble

| Pssortingnt ot Flower WAR eae |B | MIRROR GLASS
.. . In All Sizes



bados Scarves in Pure
























Ne January 1951 at 2 p.m. 26th of January, 1951. { ; | Sewing Machine (As new 5
WANTE Inspection Py EALWOOD & BOYCE, | '61.51.—3n. il] Silk, Ete., Ete. Radio 7 ‘Tube and Mahogany ji | ie
aaa Dear e mathe, Souvenir Headquarters Roig ete, Satie Waioes Deer att THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
peed 7.1,81—lin, DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND AGRICULTURE HANI Hros. ble, Shaving Mirrot, Oak CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. — PROPRIETORS.
HELP MARSHVILLE Bank Hall main road OVERSEER, CODRINGTON STATION Wh ee et ees bien Medicine Cabinet, “Cane Onr, of Broad & Tudor Streets
Linen et, Electric Stove ‘



STOCKINGS—Kayser 51 gauge Denier | ™tely 1 rood 30 perches of land at} heing passed as medically fit for employment in the Public = ORIENTAL
|





Jewels, Linens, lvory,
|








SSS em creme Noe boats Miche ier _ Applications are invited for the post of Overseer, Codrington Sta- | Ss =e ‘ Refrigerator “Cold- = 2
and experience required, Write, stating pores Gravee perc ae rae tion, Department of Science and Agriculture. The post is pension- a eae | tric Irons, Lronang &
ao tees Oe stan and bath, Government water and elec- eble and Seer salary on the grade $480 x 48-—$1,200 (E.B.) 1,272 HAvE YOU GOT A | Toaster Lo} rie Cotes Pere on \
Ne onares pr caer se Buen meehipetttion x 72—1,440. It is desirable that the holder of the Office should reside vd Dinner, Salad, Soup
CHEF, WAITPR—First class chef’ {tOuy ofice James Street, on Friday,| Near the Station. Applications should be addressed to the Director COLD or COOUICSPT Bie) (23... Daset tines eee

experienced French and Creole cookiM&-\ 9nq February, 195: u : i ; :
also Head Waiter for New first class | "joy turtles “‘Mapticulane Bert ae Minne of Agriculture, Bridgetown, and should reach him not later than 26th

restaurant opening in Port-of-Spain. | of sale apply. to Hutchinson & Banfield,| January, 1951. Further details will be supplied on request. IF SO. TRY

" Meat Dishes, Wine, Cock-
tel nd Liqueur Glas-es, Assort-
t Glas Tumblers, Fruit
crvice. Relish Dishes; Tea Cups ° °






































March 1°t. Onky experienced men need | James Street

apply. Write giving particulars of ern een 17.1.5'—6n 15th January, 1951, 16.1.51.—3n. B OWNE'S ' ier Plates, China
experience P.O. Box 588, Port-of-Spain, sone ni Be ged Teo Pots, China Coffee Set, Salad
Trinidad, B.W.I. 16.1,51—6n. TWO ROODS OF LAND situate at ae: with servers, Pyrex Cas-

¢ Small Pyrex Moulds,
te » Utensils, Lawnmower, e
Gorden Tools, Collection of
Mooks and General Mi-cellaneous
including One Ladios

win, oun, ce | MOST OPENED - =~

Hothersal Turning, St. Michael, in the
possession of a Mr. Springer as tenant
thereof.

The above will be set up for ¢ale at
public competition at our office in
Lucas Street, Bridgetown, on Friday
the 19th January 1951, at 2 p.m.

CERTAIN COUGH
CURE 7

——
YOUNG LADY for Casablanca Ice
Cream Parlor (opposite St. Lawrence
Gap}. Apply by letter only The suc-
cessful Applicant will be notified.
17.1.51—2n







MISCELLANEOUS CARRINGTON & ‘SEALY, The Unique Remedy for Cougs j
———— Solicitors. Colds, Bronchitis,’ Sore Turost } r and many other articles
UNIVERSITY WOMEN— interested in 12.1,51—7n. Hoatsenew, Bronehiel Aathn « a Mttle over three months
forming local groups. Phone Mrs. JOHN" Whooping Ceush, Disease of the | |

Chest and Lungs, etc., ei Cosh on 9 of Hammer |



MARCH-PENNY 8330. 17.1,51—2n

wien iglpengilpeheneener pleco nine nenenataetcacangterlll>

CUSTOMERS TO SUPPLY with Pure
Fresh Milk. Enterprise Dairy Farm
Dial 4872. 16.1.51—6n

PUBLIC NOTICES
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

—$—$—$——
EMPTY BLUE MODEL SOAS) ‘he application of Lawrence Cox and
CARTONS — Delivered the Roberts] Gyrji Cox of Green Hill, St. Michael
Manufacturing Co, Ltd., in good order | taging as The Cox Brothers for per-
12c, each. 13.1.51-69 | Mnission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors,
HOUSE—Unfurnished house or flat &c., at a boarded and vhingled house

situated at Prout Village, St. Thomas.
from ist March. Five or six bedroorg rent | ,,Dated this 15th day ot January, 196:
Bus Toe xirton, ¢/o Belgownie Guest | Te:—J. R. EDWARDS. Esq

House, St. Mary’s Street, Antigua. Police Magistrate,
ee, ri 71 61—4n Dist. “D

LEONARD CUMBERBATCH,
for Applicant





Wholesale & Retail Druggist
136 Roebuck St. - Dial 2613





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PAGE FIGHT

Perky Pass From
A Cheeky Chap

Presented by Desmond Hackett,
is on inside-forward play. The
tutors are EDDIE BAILY of ‘Spurs
and WILF MANNION of Middles-
brough.

Wing Pass
Makes Backs
Dizzy

EDDIE BAILY, of ‘Spurs, and
Wilf Mannion, of Middlesbrough,
those Soccer men of all work and
all arts, tackle the quiz question-
naire on a most important ques-
tion—What makes an inside for-
ward?

MANNION: We agree that the
inside forward must be about the
fastest and fittest player in the
EDDIE BAILY demonstrates a team, able to shoot accurately
back-heeler, the kick that takes with both feet, think quickly, pass
most defenders by surprise. smoothly, and know just about all
the stock-in-trade moves.

Question: What is your favour-
ite move, Eddie?

BAILY: The quick, short pass
to the wing, taking the return, and
the short flick back to the wing-
man. Backs tell me this kind of
thing leaves them dizzy. My wing
partner Les Medley and I concen-
trate on this act in our trairing.

Question: How can you master
accurate passing?

Use Inside of Foot

MANNION: The old story, prac-
lice, of course. Try it this way—
use the inside of the foot for short
passing, and the instep for long
passing.

That short pass must be accu-
rate to be effective, so follow
through smoothly. The long,
sweeping pass must be elevated,
but not too high, or your colleague
may have difficulty in bringing the
ball under control.

Question: What about those
Cheeky Chappie moves of yours,
Eddie?

BAILY: I picked up the idea
just fooling around kicking the
ball with alternate feet without
allowing the ball to bounce.
Suddenly I found I could baffle

defenders who were not used to
this kind of thing. While the back
is hesitating you can flick put the
pall to a forward who has had
time to move into position.





WILF MANNION shows the value
of the side flick, using the outside
of the instep, in getting the ball
quickly to an unmarked team-mate.



M.C.C. Beat
Tasmania By

Defence-Wrecker
MANNION: That flick is most
9 Wi k effective. A ball coming knee-

1¢ ets high can be moved towards your

forwards without it touching the

HOBART. Jan. 16 ground. This is one of the most

The MCC gained the third —- eS know.

: pees
wl Oh sate eS wien colleague throw the ball to you

wibkets Bret knee-high. The inside and out-

Tasmania were dismissed — for Slade aie bane fon haow a
229 in their second innings leav- tered this idea. .

ea a geae aeeues o sate eines: Is eg qvarheed kick

. > anag t at scores a goal a fluke?

half an hour to spare and for the BAILY: No sir, it is one more

loss of only one wicket. for the practice list and needs lots

Final scores: Tasmania 192 aiid of training. As the ball comes in,

229; M.C.C. 234 and 188 for one. aim to get it right on your instep

A fine bowling spell with the
new ball by Alec Bedser, who NET ela WERE
A FEW WORDS OW TACTICS

took four for 30, and John Wat:,
thfee for 39 gave the M.C.C. the
chance for victory.
















Tasmania were 209 for four
witkets when Bedser and Wart By M. Harrison-Gray
struck, The last six wickets fe'! HE difference between

requiring 90 for the first
meld and 120 is quite con-
siderable. The advantage of
being able to meld for the
lesser amount is grnerally
assessed as roughly the
equivalent of 400 points, or
more than the value of one
Canasta. en
side t 18 approachin)
e 3000 mark should there.

for the addition of 20 runs in 35
minutes.

Sheppard scored 67 and Como-
ton 77 in the,M,C.C, second ini-
ings, both not out.

TASMANIA—Ist Innings 192
M.C.C.-ist Innings ....... 234
TASMANIA 2nd INNINGS
Thomas c Berry b Warr 5

: th
Shelton c Evans b Compton 26
Robwell ¢ Alec Bedver b Bern ao {SFE EF 20 Orel ee, ee
Booth b Compton . 46 Starting the next hand with
Reid b Alec Bedser ... 43 ir score just below the
Schmidt c Warr b Alec Bedser mark rather than

8
Laver c Compton b Alec Bedser 0
Richardson c Dewes b Warr ..... 8
N
4
’

between 3000 and 3300
To take an le:

and your rtner have sored

fobs poe ree On oe next

Three, one ‘Canasta. an

Davidson b Warr
Diprove c Compton b Bedse
Dollery not out >

Extras S — ae Oe oath
Total Hew... 3 have me gon sand a wid

can
BOWLING ANALYSIS either form a second Canasta

oO. M R. w pF Fy out. 8 a wer
WwW ae : le 0 39 3 ow
Ales Bedear 963 9% 4 the going out bonus of 100,
Compton .... Cana k coke ae tp oo will bring your score up
Hollies 12 1 4 0 Gandara wilt aay wenn King | 8
Berry 0 3 3 1 3000 mark.
Erie Bedser . 5 1 14 0

Fall of wickets: 1 for 12, 2 for 54, 3 for
119; 4 for 160, 5 for 209, 6 for 209, 7 for
214, 8 for 217 9 for 217,

M.C.C, 2nd INNINGS
Simpson c Davidson b Richardson 43





Sheppard not out si .
Compton not out . heondon Express Servies.
Extra
Total. (for 1 wht.) .-. 045.665 188

Polo This Afternoon

This afternoon at 4.15 o'clock
at the Garrison the Mustangs wil!
engage the Criollos in a_ six
chukka match for the DeLime
Cup all forming part of the series
of cup matches of the Barbados

Reuter.





Fattest Man Dies

CARLTON, New Mexico

Jan. 15. Polo Club.

Bill Wether who claimed to be The teams are as follows: —
the world’s fattest man died here Mustangs :—Maynard, (Capt.),
aged 57, Skewes-Cox, Emtage and Mel-

Relatives said that the last \im_ ville.
he was weighed, about a year Criollos:— Hanschell, (Capt.),
igo, he tipped the scales at 660 Chandler, Johnson and Arthur.
pounds, Umpires will be Michelin and

His claim was based on his gir Weekes.
not his weight. He measured 7% Timekeeper :— Miss Maage
inches around the waist. Deane.

—Reuter. Scorer :-— Mrs. M. Parker.





It Every Time

Registered V. 6. Patent Ofte

They'll Do



I'VE SHOWN YOU EVERy-
THING ON MY LIST,
BUT I STILL THINK
THIS IS THE BEST
BUY FOR YOU:

COMES THE
GATCH++ THEY'LL
JO IT EVERY
TIME =s+
THANX TO
FLOYO S. CARI. SON,
57i4 FAIRVIE. ' AVE.,
BOISE, LDAHO



Tee Be Te















“IF YOU CAN SELL OUR PLACE
FOR US IN TWO WEEKS, WE'LL
HAVE THE DOUGH TO MAKE
THE DOWN PAYMENT=:+

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



when it is about chin high.

Any lower than this may end
in your knocking yourself out, or
SKy-ing 1 over the bar.

‘This is a luxury shot and should
be, used only when that split sec-

und divides you from a strong
iackle.
Question; What about position-

‘ng yourselves?

MANNION: The soundest plan
is for one inside forward to lie
back, and the rest of the team
anow that he is the man to re-
ceive passes from defenders,

lake it in turn to play this wan-
dering forward aci, it can be
pretty exhausting.

Top Pace

BAILY: You are right there, be-
cause quite often you must be
ready to pull out your top pace
for those eight and nine-yard
runs-through that mean goals.

Have a place in your training you need to ve tt to give this
plan for that quick-take-of! Mannion-type on-the-run shot. Note
short sprint. Always end with a oth feet off the ground and the left
shot, using left and right feet in instep well turned, giving controlled

turn. nd dir: to the ball.
Question: Any ideas about ae ® ce

strengthening the shooting foot
that is not quite up to peak?

MANNION: The Middlesbrough
plan with young players is to send
them into training wearing a foot-
ball boot on the foot that needs
practice, and a plimsoll on the
good foot. This plan seems to work
wonderfully well.



Question: Any ideas on drib-
bling?
BAILY: We regard this as a

luxury. The quick, defence-veat-
ing pass is safer and speeds up the
attack,

MANNION: Normally we save
ihis dribbling act for the time
when we cannot pass the ball with
effect, then we take the risk of
trying to trick a way past the
challenger.

Remember: 1, keep thé body
Yorward over the ball; 2, keep the
bail under control; 3, keep the ball
at the inside of the foot; 4, swerve
right and left, keeping the defence
“uessing on your next move.

Question: Your teams are first
and second in the League. What is
the general team plan?

Team-Work

MANNION; . I think we both
agree on teamwork, every man
being in his correct position so
that the ball can be moved with-
out the man in possession having
w look up and commit Soccer sin
No. 1—taking his eye off the ball

Our training advice: Do not be HERE is Baily giving a measured
content to rely on the club sche- pass using the inside of the foot—
dule. the simplest way to control the speed

A brisk work-out with physi- and direction of the ball.
cal jerks on Sunday mornings,

followed by a brisk walk, takes —-— —

oe “ of your muscles, ST
supple fitness. ANDARD BRIDGE
The best team planning in the 5

world cannot make a star out of a

player who will not keep fit.
Mannion and Baily duet: Please

do not worry players for Cup THIS AS

tickets, particularly on the morn-
by M. Harrison-Gray

ing of the game. This sort of thing
can be really unsettling.
—L.E.S.

Belleville Tennis
Results

MEN'S SINGLES

D. I, Lawless beat S. P
hill; 6—3, 6—4.

LADIES’ DOUBLES

Mrs. I. D. Barnes and Miss M.
King beat Mrs. A. Warren and
Miss P. King: 6—3, 8—6.

Miss D. Wood and Mrs. R. S
Bancroft beat Miss I. Lenegar
and Miss, L. Branch: 6—3, 5—1.

Mrs. S. C. Lee and Mrs. C
Skinner beat Miss G. Benjamin
and Miss M. Ramsey: 6—2, 6—1!.

To-day’s Fixtures
MEN'S SINGLES

ANY valuable and
common-sense bids are
misused because of some
popular fallacy.a legacy from
the early days of Contract
The direct response of Three
No-Trumps to an opening suit
call is often treated as a “stop-
vd "—A Wwarcing to partner
against going bevond game level
In Standard Bridge this call is
a logical! extension ot the non-
forcing limit response of Two
No-Trumps 't is made on the
same type of nend but ‘the point
count range is 14-15—in other
words the hand 1s just short of
the strength for a forcing jump

Edg-

G. H. Manning vs. J. D. Trir take-out in a new suit Far
iaghar, 8 ure fro:: being discouraged the
: . opening bidder is in a fine
position for starting a slam

LADIES’ SINGLES
Miss G. Pilgrim vs, Mrs. S. C
Lee,

investigation or going straight to
a siam contract

abt peg however. should
be ‘ised only when it conforms
LADIES’ DOUBLES to th» follow.ne requirements

Mrs, J. Mahon and Mrs, C. i}. &par: ro vie stated pelt

iene % is 7 ‘ count RS istribution, with

mM ee Tees, woe. fee the four-card suit consisting ol
rs. R. S, Bancroft. §

; an unbiddable minor If this

Mrs. A. Gibbons and Mrs. J happens to be the suit bid by

Connell vs. Mrs. D. E.
and Mrs. %. Worme.

MEN’S DOUBLES
W. A. Crichlow anu W. H
Allan vs. J. D, Robinson and
J. R. Hunte.
P. K. Roach and V. N. Roaci
vs. C. A, Patterson and C. A

Bancroft.
One Spade. tn case South's hand

TANNER WINS is something like this:

@®jiIW76963 0K 9 3,
LONDON, Jan. 16, @AQ10. We
Tanner, coloured ligh With these two hands. Three

the opener -o much the better
Otherwise it is safer to make A
temporising take-out in a new
suit: the search for a fit in a
trump. suit is obviously more
difficult if the sidding is jumped
direct to the game level For
instance North holds

ts bedhead te @s 106
@KRI9

Worm:

lf South opens One Diamond
it costs nothing for North to
respond in the first place with



Allan

weight boxer from British Gu No-Trumps ts certa'n to fail
ana, gained a narrow esght rounc seeinst AD o ~ send

peint decision over Tommy Me- iron. Should South be unable

Govern, southern area light to port Spades, North can
weight champion in London to- Jump £ _—— No-Truinps on the
night. second over i. neutral

Me Govern’s crisp left har4 fee es Cte eee 7s
punching and solid right was d One No-Trump, North raises to
finitely no match for the We: , Three. Any slam venture in No-
Indian boxer who appeared as | ve 1 sould be based os Oe
as ever. The decision was popula at least 34 is necessary if Soe
—Reuter. hand contains a long suit.

Since responder limits his
hand with a direct Three No-
Trum: the slam suggestion
should normally come trom the
opener. After the sequence One
Spade—Three No-Trumps—Four

earts responder must pass or

opener has ‘not indicated add
onal strength , :
| WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
London Express Service

Z
m
ps
B
it
Zz



HAD PLENTY ee
MOOLA TO | Arthur Peall says:
CLINCH THE ee en ee

| THESE ‘GRAZE’ SHOTS
| __ GAN BE DECISIVE

Qregkr ces to cramp the
Very club snooker game. Wisely
e snooker game.
| handled, they can Be wisely
4 : See factor.

agram sho’
ee cae at n
contacts on jens:
range reds when
safety is de-

| signed.
ity ’ ’ Red at table
'



&

top needs a graze

\ ‘ contact — it can
( i { © i hardly be too

} ’ r fine,
i} ' i On dtagram
N tH) We ete
' ayed with left-
r—-+-9-8 9-4 hand “side” to
} pty ‘| Prevent white
| 110 stranding among

C ‘| tha shee ;
bt + a red behind

pi

gat 3,

ke overdone,

\

abcd sLould not

‘Golden Boy iaiatis |
Hiew To Shoot



|






SOCOLLLELOPPELLEOOOOOLOEOLPLEEE LLLP OOP ELLE AEM MOM MA KM LEP BIPIES FF,





What Makes The Tired

Businessman Tired Saat here exploded to-day fling-
And not Merely Businessmen Either
By Chapman Pincher

Why does a boring Sunday tire sponsibility
as much as a full day’s
story
start you yawning? Why do you
a

you out

work? Why .does a_ stale

ind ourself n-dding off at

dull speech?

Dectors have just put

a startlingly s mple. answer
these questions: boredom
ly reduces the amount of sugal

in your blood

This sugar is the main source
your brain and

ef energy for



forward habitually exhausts
to Led by Sidney Portis, the doc- ,,:osicns
rapid- (ors examined seeres of “worn

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1951

Tanker Explodes

VENICE, Jan. 17.
moored in Giudecca

—_—



tanker

ing 50 workers into the water
Four workers were rushed to

Hospital with multiple fractures

and contusions.

The force of the explosion

smashed the. bows of the 5,557-ton

to tanker Luisa. A huge sheet of
fatigue. flame shot skywards.

They eir finding of pr'me . Dense clouds of smoke imme-
medical ance because 1 diately enveloped the vessel mak-
shows that enforced retirement is ing it impossible at once to find
no remedy for the.over-ambitiou it whether there was anyone
cr over-conscientious- man why jn the hold.
himself, First reports said that the ex-
were caused by an
cetylene torch igniting petro-
out” business men during seve ¢@um vapours.
years of research at the Michaé! {ne tanker had arrived here
Reese Hospital, Chicago. oj January 10 from the Persian
culf and Was under repairs at














Here's a way to relief...

Do you know that a common
of backache lies in the
? When they are healtiiy
to filter impurities out
When they grow
these impurities ac-
cumulate and the resulting con-
games very often the cause of
Witt's Pills are

ed to invigorate
They act

on these vital organs, act
as a tonic, toning them = ond
speedily restoring them. to their
activity. Relief fro






are so subject

in

Hl



muscles. So, sitting “browned inp came el ance’ ak the dockyard after her cargo had backache or Seer

off? in an armehair can exhaust responsibility, impairs the glands been unloaded. 7 cin gitaeaiaee aa Witt's Pills have

you as much as hard physical Vion control the’ blood’s sugar . At = ae By eee been bringing relief to cuf-

*ffort. supply SON 8 Oe i- ferers from bacache and
- iscovered s pply. cl oo ee \

The doctors discovered this “rhe sugar, which builds up in flying over _ salon wt fe A ng oo we have received cvuntless
explanation accidentally ues the blood after a meal, is de- tude. Panic-s eat Sat 5 band letters of gratitude from 4
experiments to find out tives Pleted at an abnormally rapid ple 00 at #y by the plane. all over the riorld
high-level business . executives Pate in over-driven brain work- tad been dropped oy ttt de Geta supply from
and. others who carry heavy re- te Firemen brought the fire unc your chemist

“When an inadequate amount coatro! after a four howrs fi mt aa fay.

What’s on To-day

Advocate’s Photo Exhibition
at Barbados Museum 16—6

R. J, MacLeod’s Exhibition
of Oil Paintings at Bar-
bades Museum 10—6.

Polo at Garrison 4.30.

Police Band plays at St.
Peter's Almshouse 7.30

Mobile Cinema Show at
Westmoreland Planta-
tion Yard, St. James 7.30

Film Show at British Coun-
cil Headquarters, “Wake-
field” 8.00.

Empire Theatre “Annie Get
Your Gun” 4.45 & 8.30.
Roxy Theatre “Caught” &
“A” & “C” in Hollywood

4.30 & 8.15.

Globe Theatre “The Frozen
Ghost” & “Jungle Cap-
tive” 4.45 & 8.30.

Plaza Theatre (Bridgetown)
“South of St. Louis” 4.45
& 8.30,

Plaza Theatre (O%stin) —
“Marine Raiders” &

8.30.

Aquatic Club Cinema
“Rogues Regiment” 5.0
& 8.30.

Gaiety Theatre, (St. James)
“Bowery Bombshell” &
“Man From Texas” 8.30.



The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 6.12 a.m.
Sun Sets: 5.53 p.m.
Moon (Full) January 23.
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 11.18 p.m.

YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Codrington) .04 in.

Total fee month to yester-
day: 1.64 ins.

Temperature (Max.) 81.5 °F

‘Temperature (Min,) 74.5 °F

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.
(3 p.m.) E.N.E.

Wind Velocity: 15 miles per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.059,
(3 p.m.) 29.987,





















PLL PELE ALLL LCL LEE LE ECE CLEPEP COO CPS COCO

“Stagecoach Kid” 5.00 &°



LUSCIOUS PURPLE GRAPES
OXO in 8-o0z. and 4-0z. bots.
SYMINGTON’S PEA FLOUR in 1-l) Tins
Bots. HEINZ STEM GINGER

» PEANUT BUTTER
Tins GUAVAS — 2\'s
» PEACHES & PEARS in 1's & 21's



GET READY

FOR THE CRICKET

TROPICAL SUIT.

FLANNEL

P.C.S. MARFEL & C0. LTD.

—Reter.





of sugar circulates in the blood
the brain does not function pro-
perly and the patient . becomes
highly strung and easily fa-
tigued,” the doctors write in
their medical report.



—_—_—

COAL GUARD

COSELY, Worcestershire,
Jan. 16.

OuR
GUARANTEE
De Witt’s Pills are
manufactured under strictly hygienic
conditions and the ingredien\s con-
form to rigid stan dards of purity.




surements of the bloo? :
onan oF normal people delib- Police in this little town hit by
erately subjected to boredom. con-) -he nation-wide British coal
vineed the doctors that putting|shcrtage are mounting guard on
an exhausted, but still ambi-|the local football ground.
tious, business man on a dull They had earlier surpr sed
reutine of light reading and|about 50 people with picks and
country walks would probably shovels digging coal out of the
make him worse, football pitch laid out some years

So they offer a more praetica~}ago on an old slag dump.

ble remedy: ensure a more regu- —Reuter.

lar supply of blood sugar by more
food and less smoking.





— >

Kabe Crepe

In Pink, Blue, Gold,
Lemon, Lime, Green and

per Obg
Bilanjo Printed
| Hair Cord

In Nursery patterns

eure! 89¢
Diamond Crepe

In White only 36”



They believe that if the hard-
pressed brain worker had three
regular meals a day with plenty
of potatoes, bread, cereals, fruit
juices. and other ingredients
which generate blood sugar, plus
a half-pint of milk at bedtime,
likely to





he would be far less
suffer from fatigue.

An occasional cigarette helps
the tired man by stimulating: his
system to release. more ~ sugay
into the blood. But chain-smoking
has just the opposite effect.



Canadian Rates
Of Exchange

JANUARY 16. 1951

Cheques on !
63 9/10% vr. Bankers 61 $/10°% pr.
- Demand
- \ Drafts 61.75% pr.
Sight Drafts 61 6/10% pr

3 9/10% pr, Cable .

62 4/10% pr. Currency 60 4/10% pr
| Coupons $8 7/10% pr.
| Silver

OP LLCRL ODOC POSS PTFE,

§ BARBADOS POLO CLUB



wide
De LIMA CUP per'yd. ............ 99¢
Mustangs vs Cricllos Siieeei os



At Garrison Savannah
At 4.15 p.m.

TO-DAY

|
i
|
|
|
| Wednesday, 17th January.
|
|

CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET

—_

Entrance.to Enclosure
1/











‘ ¢ SC OPESEO SSE SSSSSOSOO OPO
An Economical Decoration for Walls and Ceilings

SISCOLIN DISTEMPER

Easy to use, supplied in Powder and made ready for
use by mixing 2} pints water with 5 lbs, Powder.

WHITE, BUFF, CREAM, GREEN,
SUNSHINE and BLUE

5-Ib Packages at 95 cents: each. 8

»

SSOSESSSSOSSF

S99



in 1b. & 24lb
7 — 10\]b. tins

HAM

SLICED TO ORDER



Supplied in:



For Concrete Floors we offer - - -

RED HAND CONCRETE FLOOR
: PAINT

FULL LINE OF ASSORTED SWEET AND BRIGHT, RED end MID GREEN %

COCKTAIL BISCUITS in 4 Gln. and } Gln. Tins. x

ALLEYNE ARTHUR & Co., Ltd. }% phone 4456. ,
“Your Grocers” WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd. -§

Ped

oR COSOSSSIOOS 5 ete,
Â¥

COMFORT.

STYLE.
DURABILITY.

, THESE ARE WHAT YOU
SHOULD DEMAND OF
GOOD CLOTHES.
THESE ARE WHAT YOU
GET IN CLOTHES MADE BY

C. B. RICE & CO.

BOLTON LANE
LCCSeueoueses CVOOSOSOOUSS OUTLET

{ i

with a

FINE

AND



PANTS

“Top Scorers in Tailoring”



LLLAPPPPOOP EPEC OOS PCSFD

‘

ee a

ia: ainaasetbemmaieiril




PAGE 1

\HI>MM>\Y. IVM ARY 17. pi:,i BARBADOS KB4MC iff I'M.' seVRM CLASSIFIED ADS. TELEPHONE 2501 IN .11 MOKIAM Mil I \K iii lotmi mnwi at I Foti 10 hp In MftoM • orbing. J • T; re Dial 5t Mlll—fr CAR [lumber II HP Boa-lab, Sa. Mr*. Excellent condltlen C. En Friend-hip'* Plantation, StAirhole r-i* ird. ana or Wai*. HM 1 M J* M. • AH Romaull Seda-. In good workln, T>reIn eseeilet %  c.mditlun. M C M Hunt* ROOM 311 plantation. Building Phone 4W, MTt 10.1*1—!• TRUCKS—Two U.i.r Truck. aj*l •c model in *r,*i working oeeUApply Ihe M.m.i.-i lodge Plantalio" ELECTUCAL RETRIGERATOH i rasac n Reese In pcrl.-ct c<-ndilioi. Will MCHI JMK reasonable -fie. A D. Worm*. Wlnalow. Bank Hall Rd Prior* MM 16 141 S BEDSIDE P-AlH'l DEC Lou A -hart wave. Price SM.M. Tal.md.pai on i>i)i • RECEIVED A ihlamnil of patratElectric Ushting and Charging plant* l—M VotU B amp* Price MMM Cole */ Co. LW. HIS', n LIVESTOCK AMI IN I Os-es*. Ma-w.ll. Chew Church. Fully IdraiahM. contain*** i Bedrao m a, Verandah ever i^nn t, •as and all modarn con yen** nee. Di i SSFT i j i M I J4EA PutWlumilaM, .i mo die it conveniences Oft ft. Jam lea Coaat. Phone 1-M. Ct-M twin -Brmaa'a X Kd Iror l February Qallerj. Drawing an Dining ROOD* two Bedroom*, Panti and kitchen. Toilet and Bath. Walr Electric IMW Apply Mla> I: Cummin.. Britten X Road rl.ruajy to Jun< II fanner. Mli.n WINDS" Rathnncbe 'u. „ '"•": %  Eatoruart-. March and May IM: BM MM HUTCH INSON A BANTUXD UlSt—3-| HEATH FIEUt—Th,, Crane. furnt.lied %  January IMh Apply. Mr, A. D Herbert Phone MBS II I 91 t IIJ-RACOMUX (.tn-ara. Maxwell Coa.l .-Client %  ee.balliin*;. fully turmahad. mar bedroom* upatalr* overlook ma. he aea. From the lal FCtoruar* Phone MS. A N Chadertoii. Maxwell Coar. 11 I SI In KEN-ERMX-, lea-ide Bathaheba. to approved ten* >d cutlery optional Avall.bJ iward Tor particular, dla day except Sunday in i %  RF.siAWiLr. %  Gibba Beach. 8t etc. Three bedioom* fully furnl.hed KiKh Slreel IT I tl—Jn COW I ', llolaleln Helle I Ml AiiM>n. i> 3 % %  I i SSJT J W Smith. Rjflcii If % i %  H.le to good home only Imrone.) pediBree Kia*new Male Ca Afad II months reaiatered in KuBUjnd rhamplon train Tel. 1173 Beautifu eve colour H I M I. MISCELLANEOUS ANT1UL2B %  Of ever* dracrtirtMn niaaa. China, old Jewel*, fine Silver Watercolour*. Early book*. MapAutograph* etc at Gorrlr-Bi Antique Shop adlolnlnfl Royal Yacht Club s.t.M—i La. AUM-I-DKNT TOOTII POWDIJl Inli ri-rici control aHl. auppllea tor many .•"tirt the ammonium Ion which ha> been found larklna; In caviiv>.i TOtFlli DECAY. Amm-l-denl I* made up of amali par IK In thai are dwaolvcd between the teeth ho. %  liter JtHt waxhl-if out the mouth —ili Ihi* anlutUan after meala It r.n, be obtained from ar rod Royal tarifc %  •It Michael-. Mow ill IMd A Aunin Car. only done 1,600 mile liumaim in nnrident Rale a | ] p.m. Termi Caih VINCENT GRirFTTH. Avictloner-I 14 LSIi. , -rn^ rao. ac*i The Mode n Draaa Shoppe 14 1 M-n m %  PiwaKtJva (-. %  • %  Dl.n el.nl L deadly 1" Ut n*. and l< %  ,...,., |,. L .! %  • IVM „ u ,, U; .,i. id brubat* Price lac. hot KM'iliTS LTD IT.I9I Sn PI^STIC APRONS—Mc eft %  M.Klcr, nre Sl„ pp. 1(1.31 -Ai t'EHMANENT needlee for 'our record player, and needle, of all kind* Price •I M Record, of all Unda too. A. UAIW*J A CO. LTD VI U V 1 1 rt. StlrT-LBNOTHS— In Grey Pi" Strip' MM p.-r lenlh of 3'. yard, take a fetal brother, you'll never Bel It at thla price %  ffaln. And a hat I more I'll lUMwl 'n (lit Lars* Fire-Proof Sale in ••erfeet condition. Dtmenalorui Inaldc 3 faet wide by > f*at huh Appl R. S. Nieholla A Co. Telephone No MS3 Tl It ffa STOCKINGS—Kaytcr 51 sauaV Deni %  klni. lAvelv Slkade. AH •Ire* ir 14 per pair. Mod"Pre** %  ; r>i -[ 1-— 14.1.SI TAHl I'l.t.TILS Pla.lK Latg* TM "ici, Prett* Paiiem* $* narh Tht Modi rn Drew Shoppe 14 I SI -*. i YACIIT-'PeHer Pan" 11 S fl * rondllioned 1 atta of aaua. Phone MM. IT | 31—;. WANTED HELP I HAVrFFUH Gardener Refer* ,ind eiperlence requirad. Will* -latiwl parucular. In Bo "A-' Co Adyncat.. Co ITISI C1IET. WAITER—Fliat clnai chef eaperlenced French and Creole -"*ln Blao Head Waller for New rlr-t cUa reataurant opanlnB In Port-oI-Bp*ln, March I I Onl cuperlencad man n*eO .i.ply. Writa Blvlnf particular* ol .• PO BOB 5M. Port-of-Spain. Trinidad. B.W.I. la.i )i—an TODlM IADY far Caaablanca Ice Cr..im Parlor .oppo.ite St Lawrenca i; .,, Apply by l*tcr onlv The itfcaaafUl Applicant will he notified %  flWAN'SEA-—A comfonable fully lurnlUMd BuriB.low at WnrthliiB. 4 Be.1a. Price. Teh-phone. Radio Oar*v available lit February IMaj .(ST m. i:iM--n. UNFUnOMfED FLAT At "BRIAR• IKi.i.ith Garage. Low** Cnllymnrc II-tea,. St. Michael. Dial 3T1. II Blair P.nniitcr g.n ^o t i „ IM Hill SAIIS AUCTION I wicr The Diimoad Hammnr — n in.truclcd t..the Inmr"*e Company to tall by Public Aiattun al the Bdox Ta. Co. on Wedn^U> leat th* llth January betliiinUn al I'dork. One Aii-tm r ilm .eed In an cciderii. and One Mom. %  -nh Hi. iphl.tiy burnt Tnnvi Cath. D'An-) A Scott. A'—lloneer. IAIREAC ESTATE ON THE SEA al Garden. M. Jama* Modem Buna-alow, %  brdr........ balba Overtook!';,! Sea. own PTtvale I-thlriB beach Good Yacht Anchora, Phono fl-aO. icrage FROPF.lt T FOR BALF. OR RFNT KENDAI. HtlJ> Chriat Churen Owner laavlng liland aoon Two Bed%  nig Room. Drawing P.mm Kitchen. Shop attached, encloeed Yard Hou*e wit* awaiting current. J Roodi 37 I 3 Perchea of Land Apply M. D. C rord. on pranuaea. is i u <. llaatlHAllLE Dwelling hou.'* called %  BREXZELEY" aUnding on approkim.ilely 1 rood 30 perch** of land at Maawfll Coaat Road. Chrlrt Church. The houae contain* open Verandah Drawing room. DMauin rooan. BroaHlini tooht. KMrhati Three he-i-oom* -~lth ai**aing loon., and running water, ctownatalf*. One large bedrvom and bathroom upilaln llaual ionii-iilnci d o w n *ta I r f FJectr I r it v throughout. Three aarvanla* room and convnnlencvl In yard. Garage for two car*. Th* above prnn-rty will be a*t up for *al* by Public competition al oui Office Jam** Street on Friday ltU January 1MI at 1 pJn. In.pectlon by appolnlnient Dial UHI YEAKWOOD A BOYCE. MARbllVlLLE Bank Hall main ro-d %  landing on 5 44* aquafe feet of I,... Dwellma hou e compel*** cloard > %  'rnd.-h. drawing and dining room*. Iruee bedroom*, break fart room mi let and bnth. Government water and electricity Inalalled Thl* i-ropeity -ill lie offered for *a1* to pubic com pet n ion -I our offlca Junn Street, on Friday Ind Pehruary. ItSI a 1 p m For further particular, and co>.dtti<.>>. ol aale apply to Hutchlneon aV llanll-M. MISCELLANEOUS I'NIVHISITY W'lMFN forming local group* Pho MAHCH-PEWNY ETJO iti-te,l*d I %  .Iff IN t: i M TWO HOODS OF LAND altuala :olh*r*l TuiiilnB. St Michael. In U poaaeaaion of a Mr, SpringhM %  tenant thereof. a above will be a**, up for -ale a public competition at our office it Li.ca* Street. Bridgetown, on Friday the Ifth January IS*l. at S p.m. CAKR1NGTON a. 5IEAI.Y, Solicitor. 1EI.W-'" CI-STOMERS TO SUPPLY with PurFreah Milk. EnlarprlDal.. Fa-m DUI 4*71 ' *•" FMITV BUI MODEI. SOA? CARTONS Dellverad the Roberta Manufacturing Co. Ud.. In % %  * "•* lc. *h II 1*1 on ItOL'KE l'nfurnlh*d hou*e or Sat from lit March Five or ilk badroom*. On Bui rout* near City. Writ* .UtlnB rent to i. B Klrton. to BelBOtml* Oue*t -• "*"' %  • %  ""' A yrs -<. prira Tel IIB | HOI 1SH STl'DfJKT"BTVATn v i-i-*rtirn t. I Englhh Vhooltrwcb-r SpanUh r*al rfudenti U'.ieht Eiuili'h by quick 1 Preparatory and Rcnnui Certinrate •tundard. Backward etudenta eperiallt''. CommereM eoiir-*a afen including Commercial Enailah. Bpanlan ,1 ,-.,.. nfflre routine given -Phon* Mra. Good„„ „. .,.„ ... % %  Miss Bevan is Always Busy By <11\RLIS A SMITH LuNDON A prvily ^0->i'di-4M|| JErL with a peawnes-ania-cretim complexion is England's mysterious "Woman in %  he Shadow*" She is Jennifer Jane Bevan, whose job it is to steer Prince* Margaret Rose through the ritual of stuffy royal duties. She is Princess Pegs Lady-in-Waiting. UnofTlcially. she is the fun-loving Princess' very good friend. conildante. sharer of girlish secrets and participant in private pranks She helps with correspondence and counsels Margaret in her personal problems. Jennifer is the girl who is always slightly In the background in photographs showing Margaret launching a ship, attending a charity bazaar, attendmi: the theatre or performing any number o( royal chores that become Pen''. duty os unmarried daughter of the King. Myriad details of protocol aiv.t Sttstidlfifl to split-see >tuj limn at public appearances keep Jennifer on the go from early morrnnK until late ut night Miss Bevan. wiih the laughing, slanting tyts, would be a standout in iiny average company, but her job as Ladyin -Waiting dictates that she must subordinate herself to her mistress whcrevei the limelight beats publicly. Jcniufci is of mixed lush and Welsh parentage, the oldest daughter of Col. John Henry and Lady Barbara Binghum She is well-educated, extensively traveled ..ml has lived on the fringes of court life since childhood She first Became friendly with Margaret through her mother, u bridesmaid al the wedding of Queen Elizabeth She became the ebullient princess' Ludy-in-Wailng on Nov. 27. 1948 She i an enthusiastic skier, keen bicyclist, but does nof go in fot the strenuous tvpr „t Charleston-dunclng that is the rage of London nt the moment. She pi.ni.N ihe more sedate sort or Her fine sense of humour nixed with Welsh commone. a combination that makM an excellent foil for the Irrepressible Peg. As Lady-in-Waittng, she wields considerable influence over the Princess, taking u firm hand when Margaret occasionally desires to kick over the traces when on Public show She is one of the lew II.IMenough to ask. "do you think that's wise"" whenever M.iigiuet shows signs of wanting 154 fturgiaries In 47 Nights IA0NDON Jack Townscnd Payne. BS-mr. old workman, .lammrd a lifetime of burglary raids into 47 nights Payne was arrested during one of hi* "expedifaons and admitted iit'iices—committed kV 1 trsMsT 21, just after he MBd from jail, .ind Oe.• arreeted. In a statemetii PtMM said: "I have committed so iianv burglaHes -nice 1 came out of prison that 1 an willing to M <\mil them all." Police witnesses said Payne total haul duniiK the 47-day bl|| on houses and stores totalici $5,800 Jttdjfel Harold Morris >-. Payne to seven vc-at? i ment —(| N S ) Hot Air Will Mak, l.irh. r Milk tod fnm The rsaasoii — Tlw mj enjoy tha? hot an sweeping Iron ].' at .tt factor*'. %  %  I rid. — 11 s K Railway men May Strike In Buenos Aires BUENOS A1HKS. j 1'he Emergeiu rj l which twice cstUad nllvaj/i out on strike in Ihe | months has given aulhorilitl until January 20 to restore "tra.:* %  < Unn'' to ihe railwayiiienV union Otherwise the COOai mittee. "will take steps It con-* siders nceesimry t„ .ecure resn-. t for the sovereign will of ihtj i k>rirjan' Him.i ,is or the lesiknatioii of Minister for Transport. Jan F. CastflO which VCM I heard during the recent are again .unei.i l.a Prensa '.worteil that the Minister yesterday was busy daak at the Min%  ning railways since the former British lines weie nationalised in 1117 —Iteulei /Hack Shirts Protect Priests LONDON. It || the clerical collar and UaCS ... • long life and pi. v h Tie ft.v John St Clair Gartliunon. uritiug in I, magazine, explained iie uBdai 'in although they •t.uul at funeralin cold chui talking to 1 rt front) i %  ilk. ilined BDu had ,i ""•'! and ha tUra it The stock I s ^ TITO INVITES WEST OBSERVERS cm milit I'UHinlain UIUU %  _'-i Lt was %  %  %  Neuter SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. Sailing to Trinidad. Paramaribo and raorarlawn-MI "Herallla Hh January IHI. 11 "CvtUra" MU). Februarv -DaerwcodfUMITURt MMOVCD WIT" CAKt. r ASTr Kstra caic laker, of FUrnltW RemBval -.1 Superviiion Fatunat* f-eely Bltrit Dial JJPv 6ARBADCS FURNITUR6 REMOVtR M. Lwela. Bt Tk* M.V f .naaar. will *c**aS Cargo and Poaa*s*r lor ii.. AniUtia. Uonlaerrut. Mast* and St. Kits*. Date of deU* null fir d %m I dCHOONEK OffN%  BB ASSOCIATION Ine IrlefMMtse: 4*47 (Canadian Natioiuil Sleamships \W\ r.> li LADY NELSON" -CAN I'llAl.l-ENtJlJt" "IAUY lt.>l>N'\ IAUV NELSON .'AN rilAMJCNCil.ll LADY RODNgTt -... At-:*a Ball* .. i U t. Daibadoa atarOadda ;* Jan is Jan l Jan IB Jan M J4P. j r*> ia r*t> u FS-. u y*b rfb a Mar 14 Ma la*AU. II Mar 3D Ma. St Ma IS Apr li AT 14 Apr 2T ApEl Ap. 200,000 Live In Trailers lX>NDON tOenis (Jurton. Secretary ol (lie National Caravan Council, estimated that 200,0011 Btit HI trailers bei-ausc they cannot H'l %  n Touch With Barbados Coastal Station 1. Ufi Nra" IJ l •garhirt. S I" i %  S O Dlinar* i S lotdr * %  • DoiOlngiH %  S. r*l"la *. %  P4 .....I%  Hi '%  ( %  <• %  '< %  %  Ifldei IV|-| US ii. rvllUi %  %  %  Gurlon said trailers are being bull: Bl the rate of 25.0IKI g >... and 90 per cent ol "icm are bought huiiu -INkg i aiet sin cat. nm id 1 ulej Queen Elizabeth hand-picked Jennifer for the job onlv %  fttd gucen Mother Mary had looked over Ihe girl, then nodded her approval. Inevitably, she's a great stickler ror etiquette, but sha's no wet blanket Itehind the grey walls of Buckingham Palace where, according to i>acKs:aiir gossip, she Joyously joins Margaret's fun. Jenmfi i lim muny friends within the P Tt n caaa' i In ' bo b i •usly denies any parlicular heniillnol. l'\c no lime for that, you know My )ob takes ur all my tin t explains, brushing away OjtMssUoru about rORUUMM Jennifer's whole life [i *a and health In in Amrnran madlcaJ dlacovarr which r. %  loraa >ouihfut vtanur and vitality nuirkr. han gland operation* It la a ilnion hem* r.'atni.ni In lablrl form. i1larnverl ^y an • ui-n-.n Inn-tnc Ab—liitaly harml^a and ia*v to laH", but th* nrwaat and aMM pow %  %  rful InvIgouratrx %  " to aclenc*. It u-la directly on your *lim^. aeryea. and %  Hal rna. build* new. pure blad. and aarba *n (aat that yu can *e* aad leal a*a Mdr powar aad vlB"ur in It to 4t hour* liecaua..f Itnatural aclloo on Blaada and larvaa. >nur brain pow-c. mamarv ana •yaalBhl oltra Improve amaalncly And thla araaalna naw gtamt ami ylaam -*at"rer. .ailed VI Taba, la narantaad It *sa baaa laaled aad proved by taouaaada a Anxrba. and U now a.allahU al all b'ani*ta hre *lt VI lab* rrom your -hamlal t.-lay. Put It tn I ha teat Ha* th. •la Improvatnaot In rt fxmra Tak* th* uil holt I. which asata elgkt days, under h* r—mi(tuaraatae that It muil mak. %  ti full r iia-our. *aaag r and vltallly. tad f"l l l7 Id y*ar* youa|*r or '"!*•> in> nn raluin nf mp>y paihau YA'Tmbm HSlS^ir fM>% soiLIMROI HO AU1 H.iltNK^ L AHV M1SUN 0*\ ROONEft IAUV Nl IAUY HOOMIV I Fe.. II Fab a an - I E M Ma, 'A. 14 Ap! | M,.. II W. Ii„ %  -.. M Jan II tel. • Mai a Apr J i Apt II Mai. A..K GARDINER AUSTIN a CO. LTD. 4a*aK HARRISON LINE OUTWARD FROM THS nSITBD KIM0D0M COVKH >y||>T X OTMES <>lii \< .1 PENSION PAVINti OFFICER. ST. MICHAEL Applications are Invited for appointment to the Post of PenMon Paying Officer for Ihe parish or St. Michael. 2. Appointment will be made subject to the selected candidate being passed ns medieslly fit for employment in the Public Service, and will be on one year's probation. The minimum educational standard which will be accepted Is a pass In the Cambridge Local School Certificate or similar examination of squivaleni standard. Applicants >ftould preferably lie between the ages of twenty-one and forty years. 3 The salary attached to Ihe post is ut the nta of $1,200 pal rising by annual increments of $72 to $1,032 par annum. Applications should be made on forms obtainable from the Colonial Secretary's Office and must be relumed not later than the :'6th of January, 1951. 18.1.51.—3n. DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND AGRICt'I.TUKE OVERSEER, CODRINGTON STATION Applications are invited for the post of Overseer, Codnngton Station. Department of Science and Agriculture. The po-t ipen* n nbie and carries salary on the grade $480 x 48— $1,200 tE.B.I 1.272 x 72—1,440. It is desirable that the holder of the Office should reaide near the Station. Applications should be addressed to the Dlrcloi %  >t Agriculture. Bridgetown, and should reach him not later than 26th January. 1951. Further details wilt be supplied on request :5th January, 1951. 16 I 51— 3n. IHBIH WtMTirBS UQUOK LICENSE NOTICE Maaktn to a*il SpUiu. Mali lao. >i<. K al a boaided and hlngled BttUM ituated at Prnut Village. St Thotna* Dated IM* ItHh day ol January. IM" P J H EDWARDS. Enq Itehce ULigMtralc. D laSONARO a.M*STTaiATCH. for Applicant N II Thu.applKatlon will be con.irl rred at a I (ren.i. K Court to be held i r>SM Court l>i li*'. D ?fn n • nt Janoae MM at Jl a/Claei J R EDWARDS I URRAYS .. MILK STOUT L !" EDINBURGH 5C0TIAMD PERSON Al. Tl.e puhlic tractlnai a %  glii fe) a,., tl.i.t or drl,tIn 1-1. "•>"• ts FOR TOIW D*BORA-4-R •4EEDS — CONSl'LT ANDREW D SIIF-PPARD Represent! nn ranfedrraUaa !"• A — *MM*> Co F. B. ARMSTROMQ LTD.. .'RrDTiETOWT' tAHBADOS BIGGER A IIETTFR 1951 CARNIVAL VANCE by the MEMBERS OF THE RIVERSIDE (LIB TI'ESDAV. FFBV. 6th MANNING & CO., LTD. AGENTS JOHN M. BLADON AFS. FVA. FOIt Vessel rro-ti f eat'.-' Due Barhado* -. l.AI'RENTIAN FOKEST M bdCMaagh 10th Jan 26th Jan. S P1ANTERLondon 18th Jan 1st Feb Ml'LBERRY HILL" London 20th Jim 4th Feb y 'FACTOR" Glasgow K L/pool 20th Jan 31st Jsn i -TRIBESMAN" lull.: 27lh Jan 10th Feb s I'ROtVBCTOIt" London HO, Jan Li ii Feb. HOMEWARD TOR THE OWITBD sUWODOll Vemel For CIOMI In HorbOffO' ni.KKNOEH" Umdon end Jany fir further informntion applv to DA COSTA A CO.. LTD.—Atta III GleE. rKA^SATrA^TIMI F vFrench Line) COIeOUaUl Suiiing io TrtnidasL L*a Gualro, Curauia, t .ii l.in i.' ind Jamaica on Januar> lain. 1951 Sh (Ol'iMBIE Sailing I. P n nth and L. Ilavn w. M-itlnitiue and Guadeloupe on January 2th. 1951. bl UAaaC Clrcnuda. Trinidad. UtiUsli CJUIana ami French Ouiana on February 8th, 1951. Sfi CiASCOCJNE Sailing to Plymouth and I-e Havre via St. I.nna, Miuliiii'iii'-. Ouadaloupe (Polnte a Pitre It Basse-Terre) and Antigua on Febnii.i> 17th. 1951 R M. JONES & CO.. LTD.-Agents. PASSAGES TO EUROPE ('. nt act AnUllen Products, Umllad, Itoacau. Domlnla.. for saUiU| Kurope. The usual i>oit .f call are Dublin, London, or Kulfrdam Rtngle fair Al 70: USU-tl icductions for children. REAL ESTATE RZAL ESTATE AGENT AUCTIONEER SURVEYOR 'Phone 4640 — Plantations' Building. 11 aoal.|||;|;|!|!!l i|(). •*ss*"I ID 01 li R4St H ' %  LET US HA VIC ) Ol li ORDER FOR %  %  fim TOMATO .. ; i -IflKTABLr. and PEA %  OUP PILCHARDS FRY8 COCOA MARIR BIBCUITiV CORNri,AKF..S PJNEARrU: rnrBaU HPLIT PEAH JACK aVTRAWH ORAPEFKUIT JlHfl BOVaUL HARTLEYS MAR MALADi: KUTRI'TA I'OWfHIli II • WOM ROYAL BAKING POWDER PUFFED WHEAT ftl PRUNES JOHX n. rwiMit \ S0JVS i/riK SI.E YOURStLI AVOTHK.BS SKK YOU. We Wn Hupvly . minion <;i*i%m . In All Htses OB CENTRAL mMWHUJM CENTRAL FOINDRY LTD PROPRIETORS Car. of atraad A Tudor KfareeU Wm. F06ARTY Ltd. JI'ST OPKXEI* THE GRANGE RUG 100"/u MOHAIR PILE In plain


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PACE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, JAM ARY 17, 1951 BARBADOSfillLADVtKtCTE %  lMM January 17. 1951 IIUMII VIION IT is extremely regrettable that a career of five years in this island as head of the Anglican Diocese should have ended with the note of frustration as that of Bishop Hughes'. This was indicated in his farewell sermon at Evensong at St. Michael's Cathedral on Sunday. Bishop Hughes came to this island with a reputation as a forceful preacher who was not afraid to express his opinions on matters which affected the general welfare of the community. In fact it was this outspoken and fearless attitude which won for him in British Guiana the title of "Dean Plain-talk" Barbadian society, however, is one in which many things can be achieved if there is tact and delicate handling. Its members have been described as lovers of snobbery in the sense that they believe in the "orders" and in the maintenance of conduct consistent with what they believe to be the standard of one's position or public office Bishop Hughes had gone far towards gaining a reputation which would satisfy his admirers when he accepted the offer of a seat on the Legislative Council. The acceptance and subsequent performance of the duties attached to membership in the Council brought his utterances into the realm of controversy and his actions to the level of political consideration. The Church in this island is still regarded as the one voice against the evils existing in a society which having emerged from slavery one hundred years ago labours still under the influence of that system. The head of the Church has a responsibility to the Church and to society to see and to pronounce upon the order of life in the community as a whole and not merely on the conduct of one section. The Bishop was well qualified to All that role. As a man of affairs he was without compeer among the members of the Anglican clergy. His handling of the funds of the Synod showed that he would have been a shining light in commerce. Free from theological dogma and philosophical content, his sermons were like the last of them, vivid descriptions of the hard facts of life. But it was also a conception of Bishop Hughes that even in Barbados where the Church was destined to remain an integral: part of the civil establishment that his word was to be "the law." His decisions have been challenged and he has resigned from office. Admittedly the Bishop of Barbados has not the control of his clergy which one would expect to be given to the head of a department. Had Bishop Hughes not tired so quickly he might have brought about the necessary reform. There have been other bishops who felt as Bishop Hughes does, that the members of local society are like the Bourbons "who learnt nothing and forgot nothing." But there have been other bishops of the Diocese who have continued to put their hands to the plough and have not thrown in the sponge and sought easier pastures. They have continued to toil for reform, and even though they may have failed ultimately, they were respected for their grit and determination. It is true that there will be no queue of Bishops waiting to be appointed to the See of Barbados but there are still Men of the Cloth and among them eminent divines of simple faith and deep devotion who will be willing to labour in this Held. The Church in Barbados as part of a continually changing West Indian society, has a unique mission and magnificent opportunities. The head of the Church must realise that a collection of peoples struggling up through the misty pathway to the light of nationhood needs the guidance and assistance which only the Christian church can give. As an eminent divine. Bishop Hughes has taken his hand from the wheel and has threatened the benighted labourers with the wrath of God. A more gloomy picture could hardly have been painted: a myopic government, decadent clergy and a benighted people who refuse to sanction the dissection of church and state. The Sun In Faces rqua. uancr asked me w\ igUnd d< M lot us Now 1 live neat tin l.lI. "M\ dear good Smith." I told him, "you must excuse me if speak somewhat bluntly, but 1 am afraid thai yours Is a doll's question All evening you fel DM and bwaaoad lo Mas sweetest sound on earth, the Min-d of ball meeting bat. and yet you ask what good has Ens1. ml done for w. There it gi*s aSSdBa tht rich, resonant note It wan on the playing-fields of England, my dear man. that that maUow iwfajtncai the found of %  tSSSBNd sftltfftsl) willow meeting leather fair and true—was first heard What rood has England done for us? Why. she has given irickct Ho poured himself out a last ulling draught of my punch, the Lit of ice included, quaffed it and eft. muttering something about inooryp-uiiies. which, when I looked it up. I f-und meant bark,ing up the wro uj tree. The dictionary didn't sav so. but I seemed !< %  sense an inference kn.-rkins around that I hadn't caught on to the issue, or. in other words, that I wasn't so brirht TV.' the long word had s.ved its pjrnosc. for by the lime 1 had dun cut its meaning Sn Ith WM far away, and there wag absolutely no use m clenching my list an" saying what and what I'd have done If I'd suspected. Then there was tl* lady who asked me what WM tn*. contentment "My idea of contentment," gaJd, ll to sit on m> lit'!. bsOCB like a capital T of an afternoon, under the tree U) tfejg western sid" of the village green, with my pippin my mouth .mil a irung-iunge. 1 fellow near by to nppi: stroke made by the village betsmen for himself nod rrv Now don't run away with th wrong impression, please. 1/ Ran.odin (is that pelt right") lickle ml the AustralianUsM he did the Englishmen, so thm they've got U) a me up here te regain thci. losi thunder, like many a poor man 1 will weather an snigr) Missus' wrath and deduct %  shilling or two from the weedyhandover and go and see then ;i. Kiii.muion too. B'Jt frankly I prefer watching my cricket on mv little T on the village gnaa Tbi great guns at Kensington so se' dem seem to realize the ball is meant lo be hit. but pat it and pat it like a woman fondling he: baby. And you've got to wai: so long (or something to happen, no wonder the scorers fall asleep on their jobs No. I prefer ihc village green, when either tit. ball Is hit or the wicket, rod By KAPL &ALY \ here the batsman t..kcs the advice of his friends on the boundary (who always know beat having a wider view of the game) even Iht-ugh he gets out in the proee s I prefer the village jreen. where even the man on uSe overhe*"! boundary does his part by nij fide when the ball Rents bat -nd ; itsman's pads. Not hi: is half-hearted like Kensington. where even the bowler la monoften than not too well-mannereJ to "k. and when he aoes ask dtx-b it like a polite hestei hgfclns; bow many lumps do y. u talk) So the other Thur> ay allarm-M. I took my little T and slip'. '.nrough my back g..'.e on to the village green To mj surprise, in stead of fielders In wh'te dull pants there were two •weed suits with surveyor tauov and a ihirJ in shin and panls drying %  takes %  %  alowed tori tht m I I the "id Crtdte* league umpire, who w.i%  The village has swapped haniN and the now owners're sellnit: Wit the green in lots for buildim:." be told me. "Oh Lord." I said, "forgive ihem. for they know not what they do "Send* my mino bark to the t'me I ployed my last match 'poo thla bit o' playAcld." reminisce-! Freddie, after a time. "That'd bo nearly a lifetime baek now. just nfore I left for the Boer War a-id left my leg there. •In them days we didn't have >-o Cricket league nothing Jf y.*u lived in a part you Just played for that part, that were all to it. There were some six o' us recognized Clubs' Beh.uiee. LjlUputtans, RockblaMer*. Conqueror*, .and the Club h n I sWd i i-i'fur myself. Bedrock. "We hadn't no Cup lo COtnpet* lor like now. but at that time there were n Colonel Willltt who Was landlord, a real sport o' i mat and •very pear lie used to offer twenty-live dollars lo ih" side what beat all the others in come out best out and out "Well, this year in question the lussle boll down 'tween we Bedrocks and Rockblosters. The d ly for the deciding match set now .i Hank -holiday, and there's a big crowd from all the villages Voui:d looking on. both lasses and gent* Well, we win Ihe loss, and thai were a mighty great thing then, for in them days the spa%  nt It is new, il weien %  • %  With Ihe Old slaughtcr-l H *t so that lilt %  JF to put the Wtd cast and west. So Winning tin toas were, as I said, %  mighty im portant thing, lor It meant we'd bat first and m.ike our runs BIOM the sun swung west and go) in our batamaaVs face*. Weil e none HI to ual HIM and score a hunvred and two though we'd hoped to stay a by longer to •; H the sun Just whei we wanted, where It'd start t worry the batsman. "Anyway. Rockblasters got oi.sheet anchor, a fellow by name Murphy, who'd break your he •*, the way he lambasted yom bo*'ing. and we re. kon that if w cm get him out QjSsCk iwra hands' down "Anyway in they KO to b: I i out hail past 'his fellow Mui pin gad anothe chap. W' gag one i>r two out. bn %  :ifore to sun gets into their laces. The rur captain toss the ball to Mi rlook bow!. ., MtOW ealle Prince, who cotiU win/ ii throug like a lightning 'We gel tWi 01 three Wild •y odd Sill til' I haltling like a %  ter how Prince bowl, no matte how fast, he keep the peak o' .i Cap polled down tfel his 1 keep his eyes out Ihe sun, an %  >< ift let Tniice net through hoj ey he try. "Nether thing tec this Murphy using his head' V running i |. %  %  i tiling ft iharp singles at the end o' th %  nig all In. bowling and we eani get at lit l.ibbltS "Well suit, tune pass and thi< sun gone down behind m the distance, Prince gettn u %  veary and they'r* ninety for sev< n rnd this Murphy opening oul his rhouldcrs. We reciton we lose an* all the Rovkblatters' support) %  • t-.iiiK cooky. 'But as Prince said liter Uw match, there's moic than one WJ> to hang a dog than 'round his n % %  "Now this Murphy is a danoy He .iin'i polng in to >,ii lav he all dressed up and gol 'bo"i a pound o' whit'ning on his pad: "Prince comes utrough th fast one swlngini! away to the leg This Murph> take* .i awtnf at K but misses and the ball stlvs on to his pads. Prince gels thv 1 all back quick, •nd prosperity of this entire earth, are at stake Coaxed . Liaquat Ah hung back for several days from coming to Britain 10 Join the Commonwealth Conference He had to he coaxed to make the Empire Prime Ministers' parly complete. In the end he consented, came here primarily to say to his fellow Premiers what he repeated lo the Canada Club assembly: "What are you going to do about Kashmir?" This is a question which the British Government, in particular, has so far ducked. The bucl was pussed to the United Nations, who also have decided nothing about it. But now the people of Pakistan want to know Ihe answer In I word, the Issue is: To which Dominion. India or Pakistan, shall the wild and lovely State of Kashmir i.dhere? You have only to be In Karachi. the great and growing seaport capital of Pakistan, as I was on this New Year's Eve. to realise the near-war tension which exists. Real trouble could happen here. When the sub-conlincm of India was partitioned In August 1947, 11 was agreed that, broadly, where large and contiguous areas of population were Hindu or Moslem In faith they should adhere either to the new Dominion of India or to that of Pakistan. Kashmir's ruler was Hindu, but three-quarters of it* 4.000.000 people were Moslems. Noverthe. less, the ruler adhered to India Imagine the effect In Pakistan. and Why 8/ FRANK OWEN 1 sw / CrIINA iaV* -3 .'.' -< %  "*'! flMMI mM ^jmm jfl f J 'i.'\ 'III' ^E 1 *^' N D 1 N *r/[ M'rohS 1 II HttilUt %  ; ~ \j0\onm Promptly, trouble broke oul. Moslem irregulars poured down (rum the passes upon the mountain capital of Srlnagar. The maharajah lied, with a baggage train of treasures. Equally promptly, Indian regular troops moved In. Regular Pakistan Army forces advanced to assert their own occupation claims. It looked like full-scale war. Probably two or three thousand troops were killed on either side. Add to these the half million helpless, unarmed tefugees butchered by fanatic mobs of either faith In the Punjab iitassa.ii-> .it ihe lime of the 1947 Partition and you will realise the river of Wood that already lay between Moslem and Hindu when ihe Cease Fire was i ranged. That was just two years ago. Ever since, the brave, battletr.iined Iroops of Indian and Pakistan, some of the finest fighting men in Asm. have been glowering Ihe wire ut each other. Ten divisions of veteran iroops! The feud bad taken on a rather personal strain because Pandit Nehru, Prime Minister of India, is himself a Kashmir-born Hindu. Nehru may talk and think sincerely In shining, lofty flights of the Ideals of world eittgssflgAlp He would be less than a son of Kashmir if he did not dealre hl>. romantic native land to be part of his own respons.l.iiitv I'.ut W.! Pakistan. Ihe heart of the Dominion, is in real truth The I-and of the Rivers Indus If to hind what Nile is to Egypt The land Is fair and fruitful, simply and only because of the bounty Of Its waters But look! Of the seal Plw EUven of tin Punjab. [odllS, Jhelum. Chenab, Ravi and Sutlej. three rise (or flow through i Kashmir. Who controls these head-waters hold i the lift Of •'akistan In his fist. Pakistan (given her ilversi could "live of her own Shi grows almost nil nf what she eals. In rice or wheat, and could even rpare some corn for India. Bui without India as her neighbouring customer. Pakistan would live very poorly. She grows both lute and cotton too. but it Is India's Calcutta and Rombav mills which process and fabricate these products. Deeper . It la a kind of medieval mad ness which today makes Pakistan Impose an export duty on Juto and cotton—and makes India lav a reprisal tax upon the cotton shirt* she sells back to Pakistan. llul the real reason for these superficial follies lies deep. It i. the fear of Moslems—and thoiu are well-founded and hi Woven bases for il—that the Hindu* have not really accepteo larlition ;t s hnal. That some how. some day. India intends i-> ic-nbsorb Pakistan Into a new l:indu Raj. All this makes Moscow happy. Any ill-will, suspicion and mistrust thai Die Farmer ut the Kremlin can sow in other men's fields is harvest for him. For ho reckons that after ruin even ho v-il| be welcome In the mood of common sense and comradeship in which the Of th. Common wool th net l.,>t week, good men will hope that these two great sons of India will both speak franklv and deal fairly with each other, gnd each other's people. There is no other way. and—let us say it again—not a moment to be lost.— L.K.8 respondent) LONDON. A NEW STEP has been taken by Britain in fostering co-operation in Africa among Colonial Governments. The post uf British Colonial Consul in French West Africa has uit'ii rivaled and the first occupant will be Foreign Office man with asjpgjgleocc i ihe Colonial Service, Mr. Douglas Gordon • He haves for Dakar, his headquarthe end of tins month. The aiipt'mtment can be regarded as a logical sequel to increasing awareness of I lovernmentg since the war of the eliminating as far as possible arliiicial geographical barriers and cu-operating to the fullest I'xtent in tackling commo i piublems in Africa. Ii is possible that the West African appointment is just a beginning in the latest a looted by Britain in this all-important matter of co-operation between Governments in the Colonial field. The idea, ' is believed might well be extended to Ea:t Africa. Officially, no definite step in this direction is under consideration, but th i* are those who believe that it Is extrer likely it the experiment now being untu. laktn in West Africa should prove successful. The work of Mr. Pirie, it is understood. will not be confined to Anglo-French rela-l lions. During the first tour of two Jean width he expects to undertake in West Africa he will be engaged in furthering cooperation in every possible sphere, not only in British and French territories but in Portuguese Guinea. Something of the co-operation drive has ;'liv;idy been evidenced in the various inlcrgovernmental and international conferences which have taken place in various parts of Africa during the past three or four years — conferences on such subjects as tsetse-control, land problems, transport and communications, social jnci educational progress, etc. Britain. France. Belgium, Portugal, the Union of South Africa, and Southern Rhodesia are already linked in co-operative %  effort with the setting-up of the Commission for Technical Co-operation in Africa. South of the Sahara. (C.T.C.A.) which had its lirsi meeting in Paris in January of last year and met again in Brussels last June. A further meeting of C.T.C.A. takes place this month in Lisbon. Mr. Pirie has been Secretary of this Organisation during its early stages. Though operating in a more limited fashion, the French have recently shown the way in the matter of contacts with neighbouring Colonial Governments by posting Colonial administrative officers to their consulates throughout Africa. The work of the French offices ir; chiefly to keep thru :: Tht Ediior, The AdpoetUe— Sir,—I have noticed with deep regret the Inability of the Water Works department to create any new offices under the recent orders, for the unestabllshed staff. It seems quite strange that the Public Works could create new offices and promote workmen to be foremen, the H. T. Department could also see fit to promote workmen to be overseers, and yet with such a large staff the Water Works could only keep three inspectors, all of whom came through the Civil or Clerical rank. No workman can ever boast, no matter how many years' experience he has got of ever being promoted beyond the plumbergrade. After years of clerical experience down comes a clerk to post of Inspector, and with all power against technical knowEedga Tne unestabllshed staff o< thin department Is over 250. with not an overseer from the ranks, uai clerks who Just number three and a superintendent. Not the slightest ounce of promotion like other departments of Government. DISGUSTED Broatleart Slalion To The Editor. The Advoeale— Sir—We recently determined that thr number of private radio receiving sets entering Barbados each year averages about 600. In 1M8 there arrived here 640 sets valued at nearly £17.000 and In 1949 there were 001 set* entering here Despite this annual influx of radios there appears to be no sign of the formation of a local broadcasting station, and it felt that the potential of such a station Is being overlooked R D STEWART, Pye Ltd P.O. Box 260 January 13. 1951 Sir./ Band To The Editor. The AdvoeaU— SIR—Permit me to register the high impression created by ihe novel and remarkable Hytj .[ mu*lc rendered by the Juvenile Steel bond. Hearing of n Stew Band, most people curl their lip with undent prejudice or scorn, thinkingof course of the old steel noise to which they are accmtomed. hut homing this Tr'nidad Steel Band is something different The most critical must look up. for this band is music, ami music at Its best. The Instruments, all of steel, and born of necessity to fill the irrepressible urge of the West Indian to produe* music" are finely tempered, with a full compass of the mask scale—accidentals and all. highly strung and truly tuned, and produce intriaulntt tones of a most unique and stirring nature The quality of tone Is at once peculiar and illusive, suggestive in turn uf the violin, the saw, the piano and yet distinctly neither The lending instrument whtctl produces the melody 1* tig in solo thrilling r"lsation ;md vibrations -' I I Mtold Of" sibllitles The bass seems perfect in Itself and the five piece combmaUon con produce music comparable with the best. Though ill lendiiions were good, one was Impressed that the band rgg ;it its best In its classical numbers. the lingering pulsations which seem to go with the shghtc; touch of the instruments seem especially suited to such themes. The youthful performers arc quite adept in their handling ol the instruments, giving the desire to see their seniors and Inspiring the contldcnie that within a not distant space the Steel Band Art will have galm-d recognition and acceptance, and these now novel instrument! be reskntwd •Wallf with the most classical We in the West Indit duly proud of their creation already they ure surely playing an able — if not unobtrusive part — in the cultural population and creative upsurge of our people, for they provide an that may well '.iscinate and adorn the world WAS' Fair View. Christ Church. January 15, ISJI "BUM VMSW" T "L hv Edi,or Th ' Advocate SIR.—I write to suggest to The General Motor Omnibus Co. Ltd. that there is very great need for a B4S p.m, Top Rock bus trip. For some time now It has been noticed that several persons take The OUtbM 6 45 p.m. bus to SO to Bay Street. Worthing*. sT Uiwrence and Top Rock. Thla pracUce. though quite Justified in one sense, deprives many persons. the niiij, nty of whom are hard woik.n* servants and other individuals, from obtaining seats for th purpose of proceeding lo Olstin* and Silver Sands for well corned refreshment and res:. Perhaps a 7 15 p.m trip tfl Top Ruck I* also a necessity, but at 6.45 p.m loudly shouts the nseesatty m have some consideration for the persons for whom the BUvet Band provided. ire that others of the Iravc Ming put.lir will confirm ti earlv 111 the coming I %  %  %  tressing stale of affair rvmauied. Recently the position was so acute that it caused the driver of the 6 45 p.m. bus to Silver Sands to remark on the existing need and this was confirmed b\ the conductor. m AUXILIARY. AltarltH In Anm'mkly To The Editor. The Advocate SIR.—There was an extremel unforlunntc misprint of my letter published in the "Advocate" yesterday. In protesting against a recent ottack on Miss Arne 11. the House of Assembly, I polnteo out that I was not In any wav Influenced by the fact that thl' lady happens to be an Englishwoman I said that I should have felt equally strongly had the official been a Barbadian of ln> complexion The printers however, managed to alter this Intoplexion" Fortunately | % %  ry Barbadian who and my work and my intense antagonism to all form of colour dlscrhr.i-i.ilion and preII have ifU.'<> Hat there had been a AUBREY DO I SMITH 1 D. V. SCOTT it CO., LTD. TO-DAYS SPECIALS at THL COLONNADE Usually Now Bots. 1 A It SALAD 1 1; I '. 43 38 Tins MV LADY TOMATO SOUP 29 26 BotsMY LADY TOMATO KETCHUP 42 37 W,'-W,V-V.V*/. '.'------,-.'..'.'-'-'-','-'-'-'V,*,*#< CARPET and UPHOLSTERY CLEANER Easy to Use,—Will not hurt hands No rinsing required %  Pint Ifoltle 50 i < ills at WILKINSON & HAYNES Co, Lid. Successors To C. S. PITCHER & CO. Phones — 4472, 4W7, BUY... 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Ml DM >1> VI .1 \M UN IT, IsSl BAUIIADOs ADVOCATE f %  Will Solve Soldier's Bed Problem Pltll.AliEI.PHIA, The Army Quanannatter Corps has goo.i i who have a tough time paiung bed-making inspection. The QM W about lo produce "bed-Jama."—an [tan to increase a Garnton Soldier's o-mforl as well n>akin< problem-. The Bed-Jiim. ef Ma.ter SRI W F eerved in two World v. tlruinl-d every time he harl to I oed Hit invention coruuis of two pieces of Kheetn.k mn i hjgMhat like an envelope, with another •nvelope on the underm-ath h;ill for a pillow. When ihe oldier climb* out ol it al Reveille Bj] be I. %  month i: 10 inhering of corners, no tucking under the mattress. Sgt. Veit rum mads which resembles aha Unu | kMBSRsl bas. for his own convenience An cmM noticed it during an inspection low tad n ported it to his superiors. At their suggestion. \ %  htJ It patented. He offered it to the Army Royalty-Free, but he will receive any royalties from Commercial use. Veit. .tatioticd %  ) the Army Chrmira' Cental Md.. visited the army QM Depot In Philadelphia tr.-day to help h-unch the production of le Bed-Jan-... —I.N.S A Town's Good Name HUNSTANTON. NORFOLK The town councillors of Iti seaside resort bcllev.. th.-v have saved Hunstanton from I fata verge, than tattfe" While bitter coi.i wlndi afltofc.tcd the seashore. the council had %  sudden flood of IppuV rant biach buta—aj | iii the prospective renters ami tniaoetigations revealed that the girls wanted Ihe huts to ester* tain American aim Sculthorpe airfield ifl miles away. "If the town gets a bud name the normal summer holiday trade will be affected." aid one to cillor. The council reportedly will ask the commanding officer at Sculthorpe to put Hunstanton out of bounds—I.N.S HATS NEW YORK All his life Corp Horritc Crownover, a 23-ycHr--.liadon and the return to something more like pre-war liil.rnntional trade competlt! are held responsible for the di inished prospects at Torquay. The delegations alto reportedly tgi rejttttnf to pressure from manufacturers in their own eou tries againsl lowering of taritf walla. In Britain. the influential Beaverbrook press has been i ducting a campaign against rOrquay conferences, insisting that Britain retain the "empi preference" plan by which trade Hows freely within the Common' wealth—to the detriment ul uthci nations.—4 N.8. Shaw's Will Has Them Beaten LONDON. George Bernard Shaw's l.aOO vord will, still Is confounding large part of the accountancy and the legal personnel of the Public Trustee's Department more than two months after the playwright's death. Ever since Shaw died November 2. the accountants of the Public Trustee's office have been in a constant grapple with a maze of figures. Although his personal accounts were rigidly and properly kept with the usual Shawvlaa precision, the computation of the posthumous earnings of his plays and books from royalties la demanding exhaustive and patient researches. As toon as an estimate of future Shaw earnings Is made, the will will be probate, the beqaest* honoured aad the terrifying demands of the Treasury In death duties wMl be satisned. Taxes are expected to absorb nearly sixty per cent of the estate. In his lifetime "G. B. S. used to assert with til hit wril known scorn and derision the fact that the Chancellor of the Exchequer took extctly ninetyfive par cant, of earnings In Income Tax. But the settlement of the monetary side of his estate will not by any m aa ni finish off the Public Trustee's task. He has yet to find a way of implementing one of the conditions of the will, which is to devote most of the money left to the creation ol a .urw alphabet. Tills Is a gargantuan task which the Public Trustee will have to tackle. So far only tentative feelers have been put to various etvinological professors and others learned In the use of English and its meaning and history. Their response has not beei encouraging, but the Public Trustee Is confident a solution will be found. —IJf.9. Hafewood Still Selling LONDON More of the once-fabulous Harewood estates in Yorkshire will be sold in the near future Last November music critic Lord Harewood. nephew of King George VI. announced that 6,000 acres of the Harewood estates in West Yorkshire would be sold to raise Ihe outstanding balance ol death duties. The previous June 8.690 acre* were sold by auction for S7190t to meet "heavy death duties and high taxation." By the end of 1950 the huge Harewood estates had dwindled less than 10,000 acres and now the Earl's Got dsbo rough estate near Harrogate wilj come under the hammer The Executive's expert reported Tenjiils on the 1.000-iicre esdcnciencws of 3.S per eeni ot tale have received letters from salicylic acid and 19 per cenf vitttttftW/ CARE YOUR BUILDINGS!! REPLACEMENTS COST £'s Corrosion costs you IL r ueaF D O you know the amount ol Corrugated Iron imported into tropical countries every yw t ihe figure is istonithiajly high, and alter si lowing for new Works the balance repreaentt a heavy forfeit to* lack of taking proper prccaotiotu. Protection is eaiy with fiBRKOGEFTg AnH-Corroiivm Pminl tot every INCH of metaJ. I LKROGENE it ao anti-cocroairc. taint designed for th* uoeica. It elk*, closely tc the surface of inetaVarork, forming a %  'amp.proof, air-proof akin vkid) p — I I JHli'tilnioalinriVfinllrlT. InOastMMHtri Which Was Right? SHEFFIELD. England. A certain Sheffield druggist is wearing an enigmatic smile these days A c us tamer recently handed him a proscription for a talcum powder. The customer had been HOI by ihe Sheffield Health Service Executive because they wanted to ti-i the accuracy of the diungist's dispensing. Three analysts—chosen by the itttjMltl the National Health Service executive and a referee appointed by Minister of Hearth Aneurin Bevan—.tested the powder ami turned in three different reports. The Wifeh The Boss LONDON. A woman psychologist protests that the Englishman's home is no longer bis eaaaat—It's hi* wife's. The Rnglish father has been deponed. Ur. Jean Macalister Brew. •?. told the annual conference of British Educational Associations Dr Brew said "That it is not really a good idea. The mother has been built up too much. Mothers are trying to be both mothers and fathers to-day with less time and less space The fact thai the lathe* has a hand in the production of children has been glossed over." Dr Brew had several more protests to make about the presentdav family lie. Many people, she thought, had lost the art of educating a fomilv. Said Dr Brew : "We have got to get back to the idea that if you give children lovt you can still do a lot of things to them and they will survive. People have forgotten to be human. "The old-fashioned 'nanny' who knew nothing about psychology l>u, | lot about children was a psychologist by intuition. Many parents have been overwhelmed by too much ill-digested and outmoded psychology. Dr. Brew added, and mother haa now become the problem child of the family Dr Brew condemned what she termed "the emotional blackmail of 'u* you don't do that I will tell Dad*, and 'if you do thai Mummy will rail a policeman They don't fetch a policeman. It would be better if they did." IN8. t is the Alps, the Carthe Caucasus or th< ah) paapli w nether MtMlBU %  Wkie. Taa* mounted leas, usually sunVi fro. And the article concluded, tl is why good yodeler* u mountain people, goiter being excellent sounding board I those gurgling m -MMM MAIL NOTICES •*.>•! Oflr* 4' under p*f*i aun at i> %  m aasssta M I .m arvt Ordinals Ml al TO-DAY. ITU, Matin litl. Haiti (' (h N. ..... -Ill MrHMMtH l-V.I 0#W 4. undf" Parcfl Mall al B a M K. %  !r•I II am and Otdi. BT) HM M I lO-DAY, lllh Janu-i. inl BLINDING HEADACHES MADE HER HELPLESS Eczema Itch Killed in 7 Minutes headache*. While the; d to lone my ugh id w Your.kli. ,r1v ni la lieaiaa, Cm kina, I ... I Kii aa i a' ta na^rMl i". n a^a MaZr blni.ii.iH-. OtdTnen i *nta %  %  l-r'lal h.,..ii— itiry do aol kill %  ana* Tli* I..-W .Ii"\r.r<. Nlicd#-m killihrd Harewood. who was christened in the village church at a ceremony attended by King George V and Queen Mary. The late Lord Harewood, a< Viscount "Lucky" Laucelles and the Princess Royal, then Princess Mary, lived at Goldsborough Hull until shortly before the last war They moved to Harewood House war Leeds, after Viscount Lasrelies succeeded to the title. —INS boric acid. The. licmist'n expert said that he found an excess of 4 per cent ralicylic j.cid tnd a defied of A per cent boric add %  evan's expert reported aa ea> eess of 2 3 per cent salicylic acid and a deficiency of 8 8 per oanl of boric acid. The Sheffield Health Service executive chairman. Bernard Siddons, naid; "In view of ihe conflicting reports I cannot tee we can do anything more in the matter.'' The word* "No Action' 1 closed i':ii.... —IN 8 e hteaacbet will be interested la reading how this woman ended her troablte :— abject to ttrrlble .h.-v lasted, 1 _.. sight and all hands sn.fwrV forced lo lie down faff hours at a time. My aunt, wbo has taken Kroaobea year*, tugvested my irviiiri thorn. I did to. and I've not had a return of thott terrible beadachea for months. In fact. I feel quite cured "=lt".W7 Headaches .an nearly always be traced to a disordered atoiaach i-tanllon In the pv-lem of staitneUng <*>eki inatril*!, *Iitch uotsons tTit blood Hemove the poisonous itlont prevent them from formula/ again and you BTon'i have to worry any more. And that igust how Kriiftcflen hi in*swift snd lent In* relief bv cleanalnii 'he h\.-lem thoroughly of all harmful, paln-gtvlag wast.Ask %  ur I Mtorea for klruacbta. t. 1'h-mlst or Have Vau The Neck? VIENNA To be a lop-notch yodeler all you need is a thick neck, nay about the si/e of a cider barrel. hit echo came to-day directly from the land of the Tyrol) invi>-herder, where youeling idmost as old an the lulls The recipe for tiicreMi actually the result of a "scientific study of the subject by | Vieiuvcse ewtpaper. According to an article in the Vetepreaee only pertoni who have goiter—an enlargement of Ihe thyroid gland—can expect lo be tops in the yodellng game. Yodeiiiig and goiter, even if it only a mild case, go tokellivr. e paper tald, and a good yodeler who removea Ihe growth will find he't unable to compete with the bleat of a aanny. The paper etjve this eaulaiiatlon.am ,]„i, 1 h* iHprarrd All* Hindu*** buumu .. I,..,. i life m n*w Siof:.,,, f„ r ouicfcr,, ili Mop. — mm. .idrwsll. p.. • HI • COOD.f AR IUNI Houcatduat GOODYEAR THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO., LTD. GOOD BOOHS Why not aik al the S.F.C.K. BOOK DEPARTMENT lot FMIOK r, IIARRIHIIN Ac CO., 11> lielow nif . few suggeIi.ns f..i >.nii l.e.i'rn M<-l.t..ut.n-. FOHTY LENT READINGS TOR BUSINESS I'KOfl.E riedcnck W.llI.ENT m miiiiuul foi ttM Clergy) COOD FKIDAV < %  > manual fir Ihe Clergy) THE CHURCHMAN'S PRAYER MANUAL (at no time probably within rrenl year* has there been ;i more wnlt-apread detlre l*iun now tmong Chinch paoptl and to learn to prty lietter I'luopportune time to oflii MOM hllihet ttMtaa c e li-wnrdi cultivating thin divine faculty ol man I tn^ni?) PRIVATE DEVt/riONS (for the young in splrtt of all MM] MEDITATIONS FOR EVERY DAY h. Either Andrew. IN THE POWER OF THE SPIRIT by W Wilson Cash. and THE GLORY OF GOD by F Donald Coggan. We alM) have in stock a fine wla c UOB Cat • VALENTINE CAKD* CALL AT THE HP ( R IMMIK DEPAK1 MEM al • tt %  earlleal tlblr opaortunll> ur TELEPHONE 4127. f7J TBK U03ME V. can auaaiy yea "tt • ( < .M.< >l .1.1 M I" vsrioua nUea and attractive drsigna RUGS In varloui. aia and utlractive deaigna — Also — LEATHER CLOTH in avuirlcd colours All at Reasonable Prices Try us before making your purchase elsewhar. BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LTD.



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PAf.F. EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE WT.nvESDAY. JASTARV H, 1951 IVrk I'll-.". I roin A Cfc—fcy hap SOCCER 5CH001 f'rrw-ifpd by Dei'mmd Harfcrfl. "Iitrii || is atwn.il chin high ..jidV-Juruwd play Tt.r An> lowci than this : iiiori anEDDIE RAH.Y o( '.Spun in >om knockin> vourself out. i d WILF MANSION of Middles-Kj-ing II over tne bar. <.<• %  • H ItoV Slums llM I II SIMMII Wing Pass Makes Backs Dizzy EDDIE MAll.V I Wilt Munition, of MiadlosbrouKli. those Soccer men of all Work and nil arts, tackle the quii questionnaire on a nion iinpciiant queUonWhat makes an Inside forward? MANNION We agree that the inside forward mint be about Ihi fastest and Attest player in the team, able to shoot accurately lack-timer the kick that tasaa with both feet, think quickly. pans most d< fender* by auracua. smoothly, and know )ust about all the stock-in-trade moves Qui-itlon What is your favour%  .'< % % %  „ Eddie" EDDIE BAILY dcmoiuuataa s I In*, is .1 luxury ,hul and should be used only when that split sec* •nd divides you from a ulrunu .—kle Vi'cificin What about position%  i PCC IIAII.V: You are right ... iauMquite often you must be icady lo pull out your lop pact lor (hose eight and nine-yard luns-through that mean goals. Have a place In your training Y0U n##d to &. m to iaa Ihls plan for that quick-take-on Mannlon typa on tha-rnn shot. Not* short sprint Always end with %  h^u, twt oB thf gr0 uiid and tho left shot. turn V mi! Ion Any siren gt he ning the ng left and right feet i shooting instep well turned, giving controlled flight and direction to tot bail. BA11.Y The quick, short pass that is not quite up to peak to the wing, taking the return, and MANNION. The Middlesbrough the short flu k back to Ibt Win*i""" with young players is lo send man Backs tell me this kind of them into training wearing a footUuiig leavethem dlnj Mv wing hall booi on the f<->t th.il MSSM partner I.** Medley and I eoncenpractice, and a plnusoll on the trate on the act in OUT trali'iig *d foot. This plan seems to work Question How can you master wonderfully well. accurate passingyneifion Any id. I'se Inside of Foot btl $£„ v MANNION: The old story, pracWhat Makes The Tired Businessman Tired And not Merely Businessmen Either Uk 4 h. % %  . % %  MI linr.|.i Tanker Explode* an.so ubieel fa i Hill apw rl1 VENICE, Jan 17 A tanker moored In Gludecea canal here exploded lo-da> flinginn 50 workers into the water Kour workers were rushed U Hospital with multiple f raclui e-> and contusions The force of the BXBSOtasSI smashed the bows of the .',S57-ton tanker laftaa. A huge sheet Of flame shot skywards. Dense clouds of smoke immediately enveloped the vessel maki drilng off at a shows that enforced retirement hi .ng it impossible at once lo fl no remedy for the over-ambitiou ,yt whether there was anyone uvci-conscientious man srraj m the hold. ar.i habitually exhausts himself. First reports said that the Led by Sidney Parti*, the doc,.: 0 siins were caused by tors examined sc o res of "worn cetylene torch igniting iietro>iul" business men during asvssj e im vapours, .ears of research at the Michael 'ine unker had urrtved he Reese Hospital. Chicago. ^ January 10 from the PeM ult and was under repairs ,e.T n ^aS\r^ong n npeli.' n e; £ -JMgj g & <***<> "*" responsibility impair. ^ gUnd, Oee" ""-^ml o( lhe cxpl „. Whv don u boring Sunday lira sponslbility much as a full da) fatigue nV Whv does a stale story They rateU£eir finding of pr start yen yawning? Why do vou medical Tm|krtance I-ft -I US'' lust PW l mtwm u H rapid ... %  startilnelv i these %  | in your blood This sugar fa the main source brain ano So. Mttinn I if in .in uwaohalr Cl you as much as hard physical "tTort The debtors d"scm-i. I lht< -xplanalion accid-nlnlly during experiments to find oul why high-level business execulives %  rra Hho cany heavy rem h in control the blood's sugar British military plane dribTry It this way inside of the foot for short and the Instep for long The We regard this as %  k. defcncc-ucatind speeds up the WILT MANNION show* Hie value of the ide flick. u*lng the outside of the inttep. in getting toe ball •illicitly to sn unmarked teaai mata paastng, passing That shor pass must tie acru%  ate to lie effective, so follow through smoothl> The long. sweeping pass mu-t be elevated, but not loo high, or your colleague may have difucultv in bringing the ball under control Question What about Cheeky Chappie moves of youi Eddie? BA1LY: I picked up the Idea lust fooling around kicking the ball with alternate feet without allowing the ball to boUIWe Suddenly I found 1 could baffle defenders who were n,ot used 1 luxury in' pass is safei attack. MANNION Normally we save nils dribbling act for the urn" when we cannot pass the ball with effect, then we take the risk of Hying to trick a way past the challenger. Kemember' 1, keep lh# bod> •niward over the ball; 2. keep the thne •""' under control. 3. keep the ball at the inside of the foot; 4. swerve right and left, keeping the defence guessing on your next move OMffMM Your teams are first and second In the League. What ta the general team plan" Team-Work MANNION: I think, we both M.C.C. Beat Tasmania Bv 9 Wickets HOBAHT, Jan. 16 Tin hf.CC gained the lh.nl %  in of their tour here to-day when they beat Tasmania by nine atfpVatfl Tasmaniu were dismissed (or 229 in thrir MCoad Innings lei.>'Ing the M.C.C lo get 188 in 1.1 They mananed it win half an hour to npure and (or tic loss <>( only one wicket Final scores: Tasmania 192 a', t 229: M('l 234 nnd 188 for on A nne bowling spell with lie new ball by Alec Bedser. who took four for 30. and John Wu'i. three lor 39 gave the M< r i chance for victory. nla were 209 fur rod* WflaWti Wfban Bedser and W.n struck The last six wickets !e i for the addition of 20 runs in 3" minutes SIIC|>|MM scored GT and Cdfl I fl the. M.C.C secind in.jiiig-. both not out. iNtA l* ln|p|< ixiiiui. .* ihis kind of thing WhUe the hack i>K" "" bBamwork, every man It hesitating you eon flick glut lh bemn In his correct position so ..ill I') %  forward who has had (bat the ball Can be moved with. move into position out the man In possession having to look up and commit Soccer sin Defenre-Wrecker No I—taking his eye olf the ball MANNION That flick Is most Our training advice Do not Da effective. A ball coming kneecontent to rely on the -lub fencing!) can be moved towards your dule forwarON without it touching the %  round This is one of the most effective defence-wreckers I know Practise this move by having a colleague throw the ball to you knee-high The Inside and outMdc of the boot can be used with equal effect one wrad this idea HERE iBally giving measured pass using the Inside of the foot til* simplest way to control the speed A brisK work-out with phystand direction of tho ball, ral (erks on Sunday mornings. followed by a brisk walk, takes lhe stiffness out of your muscles, and gives Ihem that vital, supple fitness The best team planning In the hnve masworld cannot make a star out of a plavcr who will not keep It. Queit.ou Is that overhead kick Mnnnion and Daily duet: Please that score. to>.ii ,i fluke do not worry players for Cup ItAII.Y: No sir. tt Is one more tickets, particularly on lhe mornfor the practice list and needs lots lnH if lhe game. This sort of thing Of training. As the bull comes in. can be really unsettling aim lo get il right on your Instep —L.E.8. ASMANIA bid MNUIGB n i 1 ivm t. *. SHllnn F Evaiti b Coi ipto.. %  Air* lira%  > Bvrr. Poolh 1 1 -14 b :mp(i li Al DSBM %  • W*rr i) rid* i b Wsrr rt-rtne. IMII.I. %  %  Standard Canasta A FEN WORDS OR TACTICS fly M. Hirriton-Gray 'I'm. difference between %  roQUiring tto for the Oral meld and 120 is quite conniderable The advantage Of being able to meld for the leaser amount is generally aaseased as roughly the %  QUlvaleni of 400 point* or more than the raluc of one Canaita .? as BthsJaTca fore try to orgaDUe their Se-wjrareS loal Below tM tnao nOWIINCl ANAI.VSW O M Warr Ik 0 Alee BeOMr .. t • ) lampion II I II..Hi,11 I Bern 10 3 I II-..S 1 r>ll nf HH-Krl. 1 lor II. 1 tor I 119' 4 to* ISO. S lor San. 8 lir tl. (of 111 s toi in M CC tun 1NNINOS AIDIPMHI t |)V*-.II b HI.'hurrtHir. CUOIMCHI HOI al ToUl Id" I t • &%% J5J nest HeO To lane ina rout -'iOO pol in.na vou na** one Three. nn Cantata •otoa iao pomu in *aIUM-a total ul MBO riava In rour band a wiin cart with which rau osn elUier lorni • second Oanatts nr go %  ,< Tou %  houkl normalls elect . HI nut Wltn 'he going oul bonua nf 100. tiila win bring rour -core up to 2900: but making a ESS**' wl11 DUl T 0 ' t* 1 1000 mark "These tactics ara not advisable, however, if vou naea raaaoa to believe that by roora Conasfs. Belleville Tennis Results MM 1 SINGLKS D I. Lawless beat S, P E6a> hill: 6—3. 6—4. Hints iMitnus Mrs I 1) Bamw %  nd Ml King beat Mis. A. Waj Miss p King: 6—3. 8—6. Mis> D Wood and MiI: ilancmft l--at M.s. I i. and MlfS L Branch, (i I. 0 Mis S C I** 1 and Mrs C Skinm-i Ir'at Miss O Beniann i nd Mltl M Ramsey < %  t, I To-da.v\ Fixtures MKN'S SIN(l|>s ulng v J. 1) Tril Hl.nillalULLU DON'T TAKE THIS AS A WARNING by '/• lltirriton-dray M ANY valuable and common--ninii %  in 1* inghai LAD1IS (1 PUfrfi aexeo* fewrii* Sereias. Fattest Man Dios CARI.TUN, New Mexico Jan. 13 Hill Wetliei who claimed to b< the world's fattest man died he.aged 37. Relative* naid Ihlit tho lo't \w he was weighed, about igo, he tipped the pounds. Polo This AI term H >II Thla afternoon al 4 13 OCICKK at the Garrison the Mustangs win engage the Crloltos in a six chukka match for the DMJn Cup all forming part of the seri-v of cup matches of the Hnrbauo.. Polo Club. The teams are as follows: Mustangi —Maynard Mi. Lee LADIE8* inn ni Mrs J Mahon and Mr. C Sii'u-tt vs Miss D. Wood Mrs H S Bancroft. Mrs. A Gibbons and Mrs Connell vs. Mrs. D. K Wot and Mrs fj Worme MtNS DUllBLr'.S W A Crlchlow and W Allan vs. J. D. Hobm-on J. K Hunte P. K Koach and V. N vs. C. A. Patterson and t Bancroft :r Rtl TANNER WINS LONDON, Jan. Allan Tanner, coloured I fight boxer from British a, gained a narrow iMlM r. (Capt.), print decision over Tommy His claim was based on his gin 1 %  eight Me measured 7* i.iehe*. around die waist, Rruter Skewes-Cox. Emtngr and MelGovern, southern area ligh \ die. weinht champion in London 1 CHolioa Mansehcll. (Cap..!, night, ales at *>>iChandler, Jnhno u and Arth.ir Me Govern's crisp lef! hm Umpires will be Michelin and punching and solid right Weekes. Timekeeper I — Deane. Scorer : Mrs Anilely no match for the Wi Miss Mange Indian boxer who appe.i as ever. The decision was popui. M Parkei R cuter The y' 11 Po I[ Every Time By Jimmy Katlo rvE SHOWN >OJ EVERyTHIN6 ON My LIST L BUT I STILL THINK ( THIS IS WE BEST SO DO t' MOOLA TD CLINCH TWE DEAL*** i'en • %  -alJ a* a "Stop%  Id "—a *%• mi to nartner aasm-t tiotns i "innd same level III s-anlura Bnise ihiiall l a louua 1 ex'ention ol Uie non forcing iin.'i re-ifHare o| Two It w made on the -unic nue ol e>->i run inr noint '•ouii' range m I* 13 -in othei words Hie hand > lusi -hort ol •he KIWMlh toi a Inrrinc lumii tateout In a ne suit far fro i being ni^ouraaed the bradti m a fine •at ion lot J i %  %  %  K U %  1 • 4 U It With these two hands. Tliree No-TTiioios is certa'n lo fall again'an opening dean lead rut Four Spades |a vi tuallv cast iron Should South oe unable to 6upport Spades North can lump to Three No-Trui IDon the *econd round over i neutral reoid such as Two llianonds or Two Clubs If South' rebld is One No-Trump. North raises to Three *nv slam venttu'e in No Trumps should be based on the theory lhat a combined count of at leasl 34 Is neeessarv il neither hand contain'' a lonir •nil Since rr*-nondrr limits n hand with a direct Three NoTruaiDS, the shun suggestion should normally come from the opener Arter the sequence One Spade— Three No-Trumrss— Pour cleans rmponder must psss or returr. o Pour Spades The ier has not indicated sddi strength WORLD COPTRIUH'I KaagRVfcjJ Arthur PiaU uyn THESE GRAZE* SHOTS CAN BE DECISIVE • %  vary cluli KnuoUr gal nandlad. ihei ran ba %  Imosi Winly BsaWN What's on To-day Advocated Photo Kxolbltltni at Barbados Mm cum Is— K J. MacLeod s FxhibitMn si Oil Paintings at Barbados, Mv.iim h • %  I'ol.. al Garrb>on 4.30. Pollee Band plays at SL Peter'a AlmsbosM l Mobile Cinema Show at VYodmorrland PlanU imn Yard. SI. James 7 3v Film Show al British Caun %  ii 11> .i.i.j u ir i.. "Wake. Held*' SOU. I niplre Theatre "Annie Get Sour Gun" 4 43 S.. Rosy Theatre "Caught'' & "A" T' In M.^iivu i 1M A 8 15 Clobe Theatre "The Frosen Ghost' A "Junglr Captive" 4 45 A 8 30 i : .. Thettre irVldgetown) -""Hi of St l'iih 4.45 A. S 30. Plasa lli-.in. (Ol'dlni — "Marine lUiderV "SUreeojch Kid .'> Of J> Aqualle Club Cinema "Rosues Keeimenr* j Wl A 830 fialety Theatre. (St I ,..,,-. "BoHery Bombahell' A "Man From Tesas" 8.30. Ttsurt s-^ KS3Si-?aS nu^WatraA^H&H&c inadequate amuun-. eoatfOl aaer a fou: rirculates in the blood When ,.f sugar the brain does not function pro (.trly and the pat enl become, highly strung and enslly fatigued." the doctors write in iheir medical report Measurements of the blco.' strength of normal people deliberately subjected to boredotii con-i vinccd the doctors that putting an exhausted, but still ambil.ous. business man on a dull r u'lne of light reading and country walks would probably make him worse. So they offer a more practicable remedy: ensure a more regular supply of blood sugsr by more food nnd less smoking. They believe that if the hardpressed brsln worker had three irualar meals a day with plenty of potatoes, bread, cereals, fruit juices and other ingred cnU which generate blood sugar, plui u half-pint of rn'lk at bedtime he would be far less likely K suffer from fatlfue An occasional cigirette helpOn tired man by stimulating h'' system to release more suga into the blood. But chain-smoking has lint the npiwitite effect. —I..E 3 PAINS 1 THE BAG Hmrm't • way to rof'ef Do you snow tha cans* al Dacaachi lies is Uie hiaSHia? Whentl w *fr I,.-. they help to fih-i tmpnriuea oat of the system. When they gran alafgiah, these unpun'jci ac" and the lesulnng coe De Wrtis Pills ^tr s aa ri a l rff prcpaied to invigorate a l fgisn kidneys. They set au-ectly on these sital organs, act aa a tonic, lotung Mi%  %  op aid aswiadily restoring then, to then Natural activity. Reliel fin. backache follows as s natuaconaeaueace. For o'-r J' a u reoiury De Witt's PUL h*.< I been bnhgirig r-nef to gaf< V farcrs from baCuchc and A *vs have received i/,.*itkss letter* of graU'ude (r COAL GUARD COSILY, Worcestershire. Jan Id. Police in this little town hit by he nation-wide British GOM .Krtage are mounting guard or he local football ground Thy had earlier surpr sed %  bout 50 people with ph kl I nd hovels digging coal out of the football pitch laid out some yenrt ago on an old slag dump Re u ler Canadian Rates Of Exchange r The Weather TO-DAY Sun lie.es g. am. Sun Sela: 5.53 pm Mnn i i;i January f3 Lishllns: i, ,:n i> in Mi .. Water: 11 IK p m VE8TFRDAV Rainfall (Codrlngton) 04 in. Total Uf month to yesterday: I 84 Ins. Temperature


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PAG1 TWO CoUiib Caliinq S IR F D \V A it II LUNARI>S brother. Mils expected to .ri\ %  lr '.and to-morrow momng I>v t>M latomhle llr will bo itaying with Sir Edward si Glitter Bat, St. Jamn Arrivinj by Colon bie M R. and Mrs H : and Matter John are expected to arrive by the ColaeaMe For the past lew months Ihcy ha\c been on holiday In England Mr Shcarn Is Manager of the Barbados Cooperage. Expected Tomorrow D R. and Mn. Aubrey Greaves expect Mrs. Mabel Alton to arrive hy the Calnmble |DmOITOW morning MrAiken is tors. Greaves' sister. "Going TourUt" F RANK MORGAN that he has bought himself a couple ol brightly coloured sport* shirts and Is "going tourist" a* from to-morrow, when he leaves by the Ceteaabtr on her round trip to Jamaica. Other passenger* leaving on the round trip are Mr and Mrs Austin Potter. M> G G Foldman. Mr. L. Splrs. and Mr and Mrs. RatclifTe Cable and Wireless Engineer* M R Ralph R Bead, Doputs Engineer of Cable ami Wire less' Station at Boarded Hall and Mr. Geo. R Hooper. Assistant Engineer at the Cable Station, leave to-morrow for England by the Gatrlta They arc on Ions; leave Mr Hooper's wife is OCromparving him. First Visit D R NTH. STEWART. T.C.A's Med'ral Officer in Vancouver who spent two weeks' holiday here at Cacrabnnk. left for Canada by T.c A on Saturday Tim was Dr Stewart's Ant otaH to Barbados Leaving by Golfito R T. REV. BISHOP HU0H1 > Is due to leave by the Ciatlita for England to morrow* Othe i passengers leaving by the (iolHfu are Mr. and Mrs J C kias. Mr. Hotchk 'st is Assistant Adviser for Agricultural Education. C D AW Back to Canada M R JOHN GOOD1NG. son ! Mr. and Mm. Wyatt Goodlog St. Philip retiimill on Saturday by T C A. after %  pending a holiday in Barbados with his family. John works in Toronio POCKET CARTOON h> asm in LANCASTER My/it mm. oil i urea on' oi r'l'tae roattno btoaaiitti It Hit natloi from Mr Allle, isd it eap of .'lappMeaf KIH he lull* BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, Best-Dressed Women Picturesque Sight T HE three-masted Swedisi' Training vessel HUMW made a picturesque sight as she sailed into Carlisle Bay shortly after 4 o'clock yesterday afterth square The ban Left for the U.S. M RS. JOS1E WYKE Ml BHWa on Monday by air for the U 8 M'. Wyre is the daughter .1 Blihop Warner of Harlem. New York City She has gone to joi.i her father to assist him in the chuivli CSrniR and secretarial as. |fe Wyre came to Barbados in November 194S (mm St Kttts %  in While henshe had made many friends ann iruch of her time In Barbadrx WSS \HI.\ with the Hiv and Mr.-. I here for the Winter M lt Bad MRS W P. "BILL" WoniHtOFFE of Philadelphia are spending the winter in Barbados staying at "Sandy..,..RocMO) Mr Woodrofle who was born In Barbados. Is a retired insurance buslness.nan i .-en in the US for tliii n-Mine poors and ulnee 19411 haj baaB eoiniaf to Barbados .i |. i .. holiday Sla.vuii; with '!. %  i ol Philadelphia A swirl Mood 0) Mis Dorothy Smith is o in tns winter stay. Executive Secretary M R. LOUIS LAW, gamut m Secretary of the Caribbean Intartffl Tourist Committee arrived from Trinidad by H.W.I.A MI Monday %  f lar n oon. fts li here on a short visit and is vtaying ,:t ttW Marine Hotel. Area Engineer M lt "BOB" GREENE, InterDal Aeradio Ltd.'s Area %  tuiiu li U) Tl MIKI.IM on %  •liTiu-in by n W 1 A. She is rigged mainly v.uU which i seldom (i-:vr She h here on a short Who Was tiassett ? S iAKKAl. people aafced me yesterday, after Uie> bad read about the Purple Bedroom. who played Uu part of Alfred Uusacit in this one-Act piay wbn.i i-.era bets of the Barbados Dramatic Club performed at Y M P C <.. Satuiday night. Norman Wood played Alfred li..>aett. the Hon. Rag. Smith's i.Michael Lynch) valet. En Route To B.C. M R. J NUNES, one of th? Managing Directors of Messrs William F^garty Ltd.. and Mr David B Andrews, Manager of Fcgarty's Brick Factory at Coomake, a small town on th* Deni trara River who" arrived here on Fi i'i.i. on a short visit left yesterday afternoon for Trinidad by U W.I A mtranstt to B.G They wt rv staying at the Marine Hotel New Appointment M R and Mrs. N. D. Ostoorn.* arrived by the Lady NssMii irnm B G on Sunday morning ... omounied by their daughter Mr Osborne has been afpoiniecl to the office of Assistant Commissioner, Income Tax and Death i 'i miDepartment lie was with the Income Tax Department here before he went lo British Guiana, and while w H G ho was attached to die In come Tax Department. WhCTXA. M ISS SHEILA LEWIS,, who hi* t-tn spending a hoJida. with her family at "lgsBrryville" Kocfcley, returned to Trinidad y, Hcday by B.W.I.A She wori i I: T.L. L B Office m I'.nni a Pierre. Were Holidaying with Friends M RS SHEILA NOTHNAGEL and her daughter Madeline who had bean holidaying witn friend* here for several week", returned to Trinidad on Monti..) .ifternoon by B.W I A Awarded O.B.E. M R. ALAN STEWARD form* i British Council KrpreeenUiUvsj henwho was succeeded by Mr. Steely Tucker, h" I-ii awarded the O B. E In the King*> New Year's honours list, Mr. St.wjiit is now in England on |sav liom Nigeria —•§•** *umrn in the world have lust Len named for I WO by the New York Irmitute of fashion I>esigners WJhout excepUon, they are wealthy omen who spend a fortune on ti*t r clothes. Apart from the Daeaeaa of* Windsor, who i.* internatlnnallv. loogmsed as a leader of faahionr I eould name several Londoner*. who. for elegance and taste, would snake some of their American ounlcrpar'.s look like over* dressed ChiKtmat trees The Durhru of Keel would be my first choice Although a Royal ducheaa. she is far from wealthy, but her appearance •elegant and perfect 'ludt i-play Hi-" Nest eaaaes Mrs. Maoar.-t .Sweeney, who .inderpU> a beaunfui efTecl insCcad o/over-playinc it. Whatever the occasion, you never see her wearing too much jewellery, too many colours or the wrong accessory She believes ir. basically simple styles and good materials beautifully tailored. She has s positive genius for "mad' French hat*. I would u decking herverage On the British stage place Vivien Leigh as nnt laO: fashion. She managei glamorous without self up to kill like the English star. In the teen-age group there if f'efuUi Clark, who always appears well groomed, but never looks n year older than she really la. Among the older women Mr. Winston Churchill Is noted foi simplicity and dignity In her clothes. 'My Beat Dress' 'The moat beautiful dress I made In IBM" was described to me by two of London's top de-} than the masculine version. signer* Both, In s~ year of i Among her most noublc recei straight, slim lines. surprlsingl> RIBBON will ba stion Ideas al • m .!•< T msNsv^ FlJN A FANCY CHARI.ir. HcCAJtTIIV MUKTI.MIK SNKHD-UJANA UfCK MICKEY MOCSF. JIMINY taiCKfT FREE rag PLAZA Theatre— Bridgetown (DIAL 1310) TODAY Mid TO-MOMBOW ....(>. *S *n. AB.vra n BUI SiSjBSJOal BIT Showing for In Tl"e in BrMert* DeiuiU MOBCAN-n-i.x HrORE~Or.rolh MAJ ONE In "ONE SUNDAY AFTCRNOON' Color by Teehnatolor Vl.A'EA Theatre — OlSTiN & IWWV. SAT mvt INGKin I.EKGMAN St IMIH %  %  < i.iM. • Dick FODAN Tlw Stiia'i'V OBWCM I .l S* Ol 1HI Mlii. featured iously full skirts BY THE WAY B, Beachcomber %  VERY ri-i. at thin %  eaaon, good old Wugwell uses in his powers of pemuaskm to entice Mrs. Wretch to make just one appearance in th r CirCUS winch saw her earliest triumphs. But he always falls. As her husband, Colonel Wretch, put I' to Natacha the Human Snake (Wugwe-H's Envoy Most Extraordinary): "You can B< t SOtpact a lady with a political CROSSWORD Ml 1 \i I) 1 1 %  • Pi \]U\ n H In I 0 i l/j| l/V 0 ~ I Wbfo w debit sat ( 7 fcndpiree. |3I s ooBveiaoea. ISI 12 aort ol loos in HUH 14 uer,.I***"*1 *' I*. Bee 12 lew li A 'umtir lass (Ol IS raVin' it" th a m (1i JO Oodivs lrt ,cs -a. uil..k Tin: ran I the Tw 'lip to gtrivsj at ant Solution of th. pi i lags Ol regultion agreementa ooinctdcwan the discovery of enormous de posits at Molonga. Mrs. Welsnm.in. the allotropiat employed by the Klumping Dredging Co.. •* lievea that these deposits, if treated with stannous oxide (the white kind), will make a crystal tinfoil which could be ground .o strips and used for chimne> cowlings, tangerine covers, limelute* Bottlg caps, soldered locomotive couplings, and toothpick ..1-.1 The effect of tr-ls uu American stockpiling is unpreditt. able. Of course, a world rurplu* of tin would lead to wideeprcn.l a'tempts to shove the stufl I ft In f the mines. remperument I HEAD of a soprano wl.n •'sobhed and gulped" as she sann. and svlio "altered Verdi's notes m n aria" That is nothing When Rustlauui was singing a due*. with Hrucroh in "II Pasaero" "ti hei confrere with .1 look df thunder, and sang the dual herself. Every time Broccoli attempted to join in. she bawled him down "An example 9l bod operatic manners." am which made the audt' Wrung again. ull> I the bad manners ihamade them winctIt was th montruu> voice. Norman Hartnrll named UM black velvet crinoline he made for Vueen £Iizabeth to wear at tin K..J-„J Pii m Performance. It had to be simple and black because the court was in mourning foi Sweden's King Ouetuv Undcreor.ited, the crinoline was made of 10 yards of 64in. black velvet over large hooped petticoats Fifty yards of white chlffor made the decollete, full -ak irtcd eveni.a gown cboaen by Peter Russell. It was for Aim star Jam** Stewarts dark, attractive wife. Gloria, was decorated with while full-blown roaen down one side. and was created for a special party. Other Women's Lives One of England's only two women K.O. 38-yenr-old brunette Rose f/eilbroii. combine! an interesting legal career, which bring* her about £a,000 a year, with domesticity as the wife of UverPOO) surgeon Vaftuasilel Burst T. hltlcient, attractive and cheerful, she brings the same clear IntelliE tnce to whatever job she has on iind, whether It Is preparing dinner in her Liverpool kitchen; doinr the family shopping In har fiveB.B.I Ra4i* Prelaw WIDNMDAT I'M 111 I", lui an. IW Newa, t It a.m. Nr Aal.. t.U ..n r*r, iha Id.ipn-i J* •" Pror.imm I'aiade. 7.JP jm I -a. Mase. . ,,. no. to IJ, W „ ran am Liahi OttiViii.i Uuaar. Jl' a-m. Paoolr md IteaourCa. t a n Ttc H*m*. li" am l.oai. New. *, B,i Ulr e.is a 1. cid i>m..,. H.iB a.n> 'i,. Brsnune Parade, lisp an. l.u-i,,i J* Si• m SUIeme^l ol Ac* n Z< II "W.' The Nm. It 10 N.*. Analyti. inipTO cio Down. 4 It pnih* WMk, SIS p.m ItlM-, Ma*... H ni Rhlhni Randriv T Jonea Trto. a ; %  D m Ptom lhTh -.. \.A 7 IS pm Can .• do 11. '*i pm ihsre. S pm Radio Ne. Booh* i„ H,.fl IK p .„ TMaln T. S.U r. ... Campowr of i rtaiaman! m A vnunl. S B pat h £ %  S pm TwTaa T.J10 It pm K*\< Marker. %  pn Week TaU. II p. | sealer Triumph, or appearing in a tendency "to argue a little ton %  ourt in her small court wig and much over the finer points of the •pecial feminine K.C's gown cut game." wre tlim-fltting and less bilJowy • • • Subjects nearest to her heart e women's welfare and the legal cases was the defence of Oeorge position of women, both of which Kelly at the Cameo cinema murshe is always ready to advocate u-r trial ln n r c, '* r voice, with lit hint Chief recreations from court and of North Country.accent. domesUc life are gardening and WORLD COPYRIGHT jotf. Her husband complains that SERVEI> her advocate's training gives her GAIETY — [THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES The BOWERY BOYS with LEO GORCEY In — "BOWEKY BOMBSHELL" TEX RITTEK U •While flMh' III MAX rum TI:.\ i. /fiinci ( U^L1^ Sketc h Book-11 :r Kou OMJddf 'Diin 4M .'*• You tsga io d'i. MnaiAm, I WU. you can mik. a pKtuie o' me." ahe amikaa. lutt vsa a minute while I *• tcady.*' r'faai her liule bag aha lake* a %  trm* aitd j powdat pu* ad bwiaa e*bb"i* •>— TVaaT shr aas Mr H VOMT* HIMMViu patatoi, am down try and thin n> raalf -.,, go honw yN IIM.l I 1M I .11 HI' SIHil s NMS frgm ||.t III., k llr. MII Blur Siirdr ttmm 7.1ft NVI.ON HRAR z tit HOOKS FOR YOUNGSTERS, CHII.DBBU AND ADULTS. SUBSTANTIALLY KIIH(H) TO ( I.IAK AT EVANS WHITFIELDS i SKIRTS Seruckcr and Prims $ J.eu SHORTS A BLOUSES itf Pretty Pattemi. $ 8.7S SUN DRESSES Pretty Co\oun with Bolero BEACH DRESSES With Bolero All Tontal r'lbric* $IS.(.|> The Modern Dress Shoppe Ji ) Broad Street (] FOR YOUR CROP REQUIREMENTS CANE BTLLS CUTLASSES SHOVELS WOVE WIRE-BRASS & GALVANISED BASS BROOMS WIRE BRUSHES SEWING TWINE STENCIL INK OIL CANS THE HAHHAUO.S 4 0-4IHI H VI IVI l'TTa.\ FACTORS I.T.


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1-AGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1?, 15I HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY CO NO *" vew*6 Ou~ *• "-' -~\ *~ "-* T'\*£ OF PAN T.-I -.'^:rA-ja£ T4^PS AT WIA-MSB ANiP ... WATT A M N^l I Hfi 9A 7 MuNOaeo vr> now MANV n* : I p — %  M BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG IT DC*S SO I SO SMAPT •/ ; OB ^V-v THE LONE RANGER rap.? Tswl Mi - -v % %  -i < i ,cE ILL LOOK OVfcR Irtt" j WILT***' — BY FRANK STRIKER CYOU/ BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC MANUS C t-LW'-CA LfTTUt r, %  '%  11 '.rn*rr KIN err CUT v TALK*.' IMS T-ukTrvaOwNATBvrr•V % %  -<**?v--s-r* l CXIT-5*A'C>'-i MOM'''' KKMI R -vOJ TO **" RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND THE PHANTOM WEAINrWIViN VVWEKEAKE EAP THEVUHAVE , imt .M. couawi* LTD, m %  FACTORY MANAGERS Tnkn Inls •prartmnHr l obUinln; your raqulrraMMi In :— GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE RmnclBC from >. In. upwmrdi MILD STEEL FUU. Rounds. Sqanres In nil ShM BOLTS & NUTS—Ail Sires FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill At PRICKS Uinl cannM be miilnt ***• BARBADOS I Ol XIUIY I.id. WHITE PAR! ROAD. ST. WCHAtl DIAL 4UI •0.1 fc-i*. i "••• %  IT. J.lidoui •O^IUB.' U1 %  !• %  T*U tW HM IO "* chMtftiUr ~1 .fliamil 'Ovnldna' proviAM Uint .. tan rlunio.. at IJH binkMC Mil ~J~ 4-n.rf horn N.i, Annas. Tfa. fc snsssj 'Ov.lds* •nrs illi H I I i I an M in. nkshnf m I < l at aaarr Ant ds. snsk. %  %  ^ % % %  i of In. wu i r .nni sn nmtiUv. qusnost 'OvdHw' Is nAnsI for nvnsf %  % %  h si of tbo fsssUr. nt snr time of iR. cU t As • I %  fins, i knrrinK. •no, k is siminhss. nnfcnnwlsd|l ss s n nslli nisi to u nni l osiursl. Ka ^S:,: SWssss.Kssinois.su Quality has made OvJlltlUe *•• mtrlds me at widaly used Food Beverage