Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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ae MY yy
> /, Vey



Sunday Advorate



ESTABLISHED 1895



Eisenhower Arrives

In London For Talks

ENERAL

EISENHOWER, North Atlantic

LONDON, Jan, 15.
Supreme

Commander arrived here tonight for talks*with Britis)
Cabinet Ministers and service chiefs. d
He had flown from Oslo on the sixth stage of a fact-finding

tour of West European cap

jitals.

Eisenhower will leave on Tuesday for Lisbon, Rome and
Frankfurt before returning to Washington to report to
President Truman on the state of West Europe and pre-

paredness.

Eisenhower was met by British Defence Minister Emanuel

Shinwell, British service ch

iefs and other personalities in-

cluding American Ambassador Walter Gifford. The General

declined to be interviewed.

: "Flu
Manchester

MANCHESTER, Eng. Jan. 13
About 12,000 of Manchester's
population of over 700,000 peopl
were to-day estimated to be
suffering from the influenza epi-
demic now sweeping North Eng-
land.

The epidemic, the worst since
1918, has thrown many of the
cotton city’s services into chaos.

More than 1,000 post office
engineers, telephonists, postmen,
and porters, with about 400 drivers
and conductors are off sick.

In North-west England
whole, claims at the
Ministry offices already
200,000 and many officers
working overtime to
flood of claims.

Most Manchester doctors are
working 15 and 16 hours a day.
Many have themselves fa'len
victims to the ‘flu.

as a
Insurance
total

are
handle a

At Liverpool and other parts
of Britain’s industrial Merseysid>
grave-diggers are working da»
and night shifts so that hundreds
of graves needed shall be ready
as quickly as possible.

On Monday, the
Insurance Company throughoui
Merseyside will begin paying ou!
nearly £100,000 in death benefits.

“To add to our difficulties there
has been an iftcrease in the num-
ber of cases of measles in the
area”, an official of the Liverpool
Health Department said.

Influenza is also being felt in
the north-eastern areas of Eng-
land. Deaths in Newcastle-on-
Tyne last week totalled 225, big-
gest weekly total since the 1918
epidemic of Spanish ‘flu.

Thirty-three of this total were
ettributed to influenza.

—Reuter.

B.W.I. Trade
Commissioner

Arrives

Mr. and Mrs. Rex Stollmeyer
arrived here yesterday by T.C.A.
from Trinidad. Mr. Stollmeyer
is Trade Commissioner for the
B.W.L, British Guiana and the
Bahamas in Canada and is sta-
tioned in Montreal.

Mr. Stollmeyer is here for two



weeks on an official visit and dur-/|

ing his stay he will confer with
exporters who send produce to
Canada, Government officials and
members of the Colonial Devel-

opment and Welfare Corporation. |

Mr. Stollmeyer has already
been to Grenada, Trinidad and
P.G. on this trip. From Barbados
he will return to Trinidad before
visiting the Leeward Islands, the
other Windward Islands, Jamaica,
the Bahamas and then back to

Montreal sometime in May. He|

left Canada November 24th, 1950.

Mr. Stollmeycr was in Barbados
for the Canada-West Indian Ship-
ping Conference in February 1949.
His last official visit was in Janu-

ary, 1947, when he arrived on the

ON OFFICIAL VISIT

10th.

Upsets

Industrial |

Eisenhower will start top level
talks in London on Monday. He
will study Britain’s new rearma-
ment programme.
| He will have his first formal
| meeting with the Atlantic Pact
Deputies on Tuesday. They will
review preparations for the estab-
lishment of an Atlantic army.
| Deputies will meet first on Mon-
| day to consider their reports for
|the Supreme Commander, They
are also expected to approve the
appointment of a “production Co
ordinator,” recommended by the





North Atlantic Defence Produc-
tion Board.
| An official British spokesman

would neither confirm nor deny re-
ports that the Co-ordinator would
be William R. Herod, Chairman
of the _ International General
Electric Company, but it was
known tkat the appointment
would go to a prominent Ameri-
ean industrialist

While in London, Fisenhower
will be given details of the debate
on the Micdle East by the Com-
|monwealth Prime Ministers this
| week

Summary
| Following is qa summary of the
results of Eisenhower's discussions

‘ith the Chiefs of some North
Atlantic Nations,

Paris: Eisenhower asked many
searching questions of French
service chiefs and Government
leaders during his visit from
; january 7 to 9.

Conversations centred on the
precise details of French rearma-
uyedt resources and on accelerated
and ircreased military aid to
France called for by tne French
Minister of Supply, reliable
quarters said here.

Government leaders were “very
satisfied”’ with the General’s visit,
these quarters added. Premier
Rene Pleven assured the Supreme
Commander of France's whole-
heartéd support and emphasised
the vitally important contribution
she would make to the new
Atlantic army, it was learned.

Defence Minister Jules Moch
pledged that France would have
at the disposal of Eisenhower 10

vicions by the end of 1951

Five divisions at battle readiness
would be stationed in Germany

The Hague: Holland will put a
military quota under Eisenhower's
command once material begins
pouring in, usually reliable quar-
ters said here today.

11,000 men conscripted in 1940
will probably spend their second
year training in Eisenhower's
army.

About 30,000 men to be called
up this year will be offered to re-
place the current year’s draft with
Fisenhower after serving cne year
‘under the Dutch Command. From
then on the annual call up will be
labout 45,000 men who will be
|made available for the Atlantic
larmy in their second year.
| Copenhagen: Denmark is be
lieved to have told Eisenhower
that no increase in call up would
be immediately possible. Den-



mark’s proposed contribution is
1,000 men now serving in Ger.
many.

It is planned however to call up
some men who have already com-
pleted their training for a short

@ on page 14



ME. AND MRS. REX STOLLMEYER arrived from Trinidad yester-
day. Mr. Stollmeyer, who is Trade Commissioner for the B.W.I.,
British Guiana and the Bahams; in Oamada is on am oMicial visit,









BARBADOS, JANUARY 14, 1951



POLO AT THE’ GARRISON





TORNADOES beat Cyclones 7—6 at the Garrison yesterday afternoon
ecwindbeciasoms 2 Loar Alege agin lens Fanon plaka gC at

? Italian Govt.

Wants Special |

Powers

|
ROME, Jan. 13. |

The Italian Government today
asked Parliament for special pow-
ers during the next two years,
authorising it to clamp severe con-
trols on practically any part of the
nation’s economy.

It also asked parliament to pro-|
vide for prison terms of up to 10
years and fines up to £12,000 for
anyone seeking to evade new con-
trols particularly if evasion was
intended to damage the national
defence.

2. Control of the prices of all
materials, wages, dividends, and
profits, rents, production, credit,
and investment.

_ 38. Authority to impose ration-
ing.

The preamble to the proposed
bill declared that the Government
did not propose to make use of the
delegated powers immediately nor
in all sectors in which they apply.

It was believed that one of the
principal aims of the Government
in demanding such large scale
special powers was to encourage
confidence in Italy amongst the
other Atlantic Pact nations.

Italy needs the guarantee of big
orders from other nations of West-
ern Europe to put into effect a
projected (£10,000,000) plan to
boost to full production great in-
dustries which must be geared to
war output and which are now in
a state of crisis.





—Reuter.

Koch Taken
To Hospital

AUGSBURG, Jan. 13,
Ilse Koch awaiting sentence ir
her murder trial which ended
here yesterday was to-day

in
Aichach prison hospital after
throwing a fit and breaking up



her cell furniture.
The head of Augsburg pr'son
said Koch did not injure her self
during the attack.
Koch was spending
hours before sentence

her last
in snow-

bound Aichach prison near here |REG., TYRRELL — the

On Monday afternoon three
judges and eight jurymen will
decide whether she was guilty of
the murders in Buchenwald hor-
ror camp, and if so what sentence
shou'd be inflicted.

The Prosecution has demanded
life imprisonment—-West German
law has abolished the death
sentence. Any sentence is expec-
ted to be served elsewhere than
in Aichach.

Koch has made it clear to those
attending her trial that she is
certain. she will receive life
imprisonment.

—Reuter.



Famous Animal
Lover Dies

LONDON, Jan. 13.

The death was announced here
to-day of the 72-year old Duchess
of Hamilton and Brandon, who
last year crowned her life’s work
for animals by opening a mater-
nity home for cats at her home
in Dorset.—Reuter.

STRIKE IN B.G. LIKELY

CEORGETOWN, B.G., Jan. 13.
Pelice action in making four
arrests of budget demonstrators
ovtside the Public Butldings las:
| week seems likely to lead to a
general strike, Executives of vari-
ous Trade and Employee Unions
and representatives of the Peo-
ple’s Progressive Party meeting
| behind close@ doors last night are



|said to have approved of it in
| principle, :
| This action follows the big

| Bourda Green meeting on Thurs-





day night when it was decided
to send a Resolution to the Secre-
| tary of State for the Colonies, pro-

testing “this encroachment upon
our liberty and freedom”. A rati-





fication by various Unions of last
night’s decision is now being
sought.

Three of the four demonstra-
tors arrested have been

with derly beh our and
the four ith assaulting a Police

' corporal,—O.P,

when play continued for the Warner Bolton Cup and the Advocate Cup.

U.N. Approve Far
East Settlement

The United Nations Political Committee tonight approved |

by 50 votes to seven with
“British Commonwealth Pla

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 13.

one abstention the five-point
n” for a Far Eastern settlement.

The U.N. Secretary General, Mr. Trygve Lie will send the
plan to Peking tonight with
pussible, an official spokesm




















suspect, has been on Pelican for one
month.
Barbados yesterday.

Small Pox
Suspect Leaves

REGINALD TYRRELL, seven-
teen-year-old Englishman fron
Dagenham, Essex left Barbados
yesterday afternoon by B.W.LA.,
for Trinidad. Tyrrell was the sus-
pected case of small pox who has
been on Pelican Island since

12, 1950

Tyrrell told the Advocate short-
‘y before he left Seawell yester-
day, that he will join the
Biographer in Trinidad. The
Biographer is due to leave there
today bound for the U.K.

Tyrrell who will be eighteen this
yeat was making his first sea
voyage as Engineer’s steward on

the Biographer. He hopes to make} stories which

the Biographer’s next trip here.

a request for a reply
an announced.

Before the Comm’ ttee was a plan
for four power talks on the Far
East to be held after a Korean
cease fire had been arranged. The
jplan, put forward by Israel and
| backed by Britain, embod es the
i principles prcposed by the United
; Nations Cease-fire Committee of
three for settling’ the Far East
crisis
The principles of the resolution
were proposed by Canada on
Thursday after the United States
“As Peported to have agreed to a
jacked by the London meeting
ommonwealth Prime Ministers
Itealls for a cease-fire in Korea
withdrawal of foreign troops and
the setting up of an appropriat®
body including Britain, the United
States, Russia and Communist
China to try to settle Far Eastern
problems.

The Dominican Republic, Cuba
‘and Panama supported the plan.
| Chinese Nationalist delegate Dr.
T. F. Tsiang moved an amendment
to substitute the term “Republic
of China” for that of ‘People's
_ Republic of China” in the resolu-
-tion, which would mean iny-ting
{the Chinese Government of Chiang
|Kai Shek to the talks
| Dr. Tsiang said that the proposed
‘plan was in fact a “total sell out by
{the United Nations of Korea and
jot China,”

The plan would inevitably land
Korea behind the “iron curtain.”

A Military Dunkirk

as $00N a&

tary Dunkirk”, Tsiang declared.
He scouted the idea that Formosa |
could simply be disposed of as no’
man’s land, “It is the home of Free
China, defended by an army of
500,000 men,” he said, |

The Chinese Nationalist delegate
went on; “I know nothing in the

small-pox | Charter which prevents my Gov-

ernment from exercising the in-

Now quite recovered he left |herent right of self defence both

on the island and on the mainland

‘Formosa represents the largest

single unit of power against Com-

munist aggression in the Far East
— Reuter.

U.S. AIR FORCE WILL
DO OWN CENSORSHIP

TOKYO, Jan. 13.

The American Air Force in
Korea and Japan today began its
own censorship. Correspondents
clearing stories with the Army
“press security division” were
told they must now submit all
Air Force stories to an Air officer
for eensorship.

An Air Force spokesman ex-
plained that Army censors were
often unaware of what the Air
Foree considered security matters
vot availablé for publication.

As the spokesman said, the
Army censor had passed Air Force
should have been
censored and held up others to





He wants to see a bit more Off which the Air Force would have

@ on page 9

» objection.—Reuter.



BRITISH

MEDICOS

LEAVE FOR BRAZIL
On Goodwill Tour

GEORGETOWN, BG., Jan. 13

The Chief Medical Officer to the
tritish Colonial Office, Dr. E. D.
Pridie, C.M.G., DS.O., O.B.E.,
accompanied by the Medical Ad-
viser to the Comptroller for De-
velopment and Welfare in the
West Indies, Dr. J. W. P. Harkness
will leave British Guiana tomor-
row for Brazil on a goodwill tour
of the neighbouring country. On
their four-month tour of the
Caribbean the two officials spent
16 days in British Guiana during

charged} which, accompanied by the British
Guiana Director of Medical Ser-

Dr. Leonard G. Eddey, they

1} vices,

made ap extensive survey of local

medical services visiting in par
ticular South Rupununi and also
tnking the opportunity to fly over
the famous Kaieteur Falls

Commenting on medical work
mong the Amerindian population
n Rupununi, Dr. Pridie observed
that under difficult conditions the
medical officer to Amerindians
Dr. Cenydd Jones had done a good
lot of work, but a lot yet re-
mained to be done. But already
the health of the Amerindian
population had _ benefited
their numbers are growing
had reason to be prot of the
results so far obtained.—C.P,

.

and



“We may have to suffer a mili- |

He,

}

| Big Three |
Will Reply To
' Moscow Soon

By SYLVAIN MANGEOT
LONDON, Jan. 13

Britain, France, and the United
States are expected to send to
Moscow without delay identica!
replies to the Soviet note on Four
; Power talks, though no date has
; yet been set, it was authoritative-
| ly learned today,
| They will not hold up replies
| pending the receipt of the Soviet
and Chinese reaction to the
latest United Nations’ resolution
on Korea.

It has been clear for some
time that negotiations for the
resumption of power talks were
separate from any move aimed
at a great powers discussion of
Far Eastern problems such as is
contained in the latest United
Nations move.

The two initiatives are regard-
ed here as parallel in their
genera} aim of bringing about a
negotiated settlement, of the
major causes of friction between
the great powers.

America’s insistence that a
ceasefire in Korea must precede
any joint talks on Far Eastern
problems is accepted here as also
representing British intention in
supporting the resolution in the
United Nations.

Will Not Relax

While the Commonwealth de
claration yesterday made it clear
that the Prime Ministers are
determined to do everything to
make negotiations for settlement
possible, there is no tendency
here either to assume Chinese or
Soviet consent or to relax the
efforts of the western powers to
make the non-Communist world
secure against aggression.

Ie F- eee
Students
Demonstrate

CAIRO, Jan. 13
Steel - helmeted police, armed

|
}
|







with tommy guns guarded ihe
approaches to the British and
American Embassies here to-day

as

2.000 hostile students demon-
strated outside the office of the
Egyptian Foreign Ministry. They
had gathered in defiance of the
government ban to demand
information on the results of th:
recent Anglo-Egyptian talks

The Foreign Minister Saleh El
Din Bey who has been conducting

talks with the British Foreign
Secretary Bevin, to'd students
from the Ministry balcony, that

foreign policy is not a matter of
argument with students,

Students demanded that the
Foreign Minister should join
them, “in denouncing colonialism
and supporting the World Peace
Movement,”

—Reuter.

Cardinal Dies
Shaving

VATICAN CITY, Jan. 13

The Dean of the Roman Catho-
lic Church College of Cardinals,
79 year old Cardinal Francesco,
Marchetti-Selvaggiani, died sud-
denly to-day while shaving in his
bathroom,

Hig death left 19 vacancies in
the College of Cardinals which
elects Popes and functions as
chief consultative organ of the
Catholic Church.

The Cardinal died shortly after
celebrating his usual morning
mass, it was learned, Friends of
the Cardinal reported he had of-
ten said: “I should like to die un-
expectedly after saying Mass.”

The death of Cardinal Marchet.
ti-Selvaggiani created the unique
situation for the College of Car-
\dinals of having a_ relatively
| young foreigner as its Dean

He is the 66-year-old French
Cardinal Eugene Tisserant, the
head of the Vatican’s congrega
jtion for Eastern churches
| Cardinal Marchetti-Selvag



; giani’s death reduced the
strength of the College of Car
dinals to the low level of 51

. —Reuter,



Prepare Joint
Offensive

TOKYO, Jan. 13.

UNITED NATIONS

forces held their ground

today against mass attacks by Communist

troops two miles seuch
the Korean peninsula.

of Wonju in the centre of

Communists Save hurled thousands of men to their deaths
in attempts to break through the Sobaek Mountain into

Southeast Korea.

U.S. Navy
Plan Big
Programme

WASHINGTON, Jan, 13
The United States Navy is
ready to launch a new naval re-

armament programme putting
|tundreds of fighting ships into the
nation’s defence lineup

Work on the construction of a
giant 4.700 ton aireraft carrier,
and 173 other ships was due to

start as soon as Congress approved
of the $2,000,000,000 Navai
gramme,

Half of the money
used to build new ships
jt@lf for conversion or moderni-
sation of 290 existing ships in-
cluding aireraft carriers, cruisers,
destroyers and submarine

pro-

would be
the other



This programme, endorsed by
{the President, comes before the
Houde off Representatives next

j week after receiving a quick and
unanimous approval by the House
Armed Services Committee

In addition to the super carrier
the programme provides for
building even Snorke] type (un-
der water breathing) submarines
152 minesweepers, 66 landing
ships, two rocket launching ships,
12 fleet tankers, two ocean escorts,
one icebreaker and 30 smaller
j assorted craft



—Reuter,



|
| Lava Destroys
“Garden Of Etna”

; CATANIA, Jan, 13,
Europe's biggest active voleano
| erupting for the 50th day poured
a 10-yard high stream of smould-
ering lava over the “Garden of
| Etna” today
| Thousands of
pmany acres Of rich garden
disappeared forever under
grey smoking rock
The Prefect of Catania province
ordered the opening of a special
office to try to find work for hun-
dreds of men unemployed by loss
of their orchards

and
land
the

apple trees

Scouts posted near erupting fis
sures on the volcano reported no
slackening in the merciless flow
of lava which has covered thous-
ands of acres of mountainside in
its six week eastward march to-
vards the sea .

Four empty villages, Milo, Rin-
azz0, Fornazzo, and Sciara, whose
inhabitants fled at the approach of
lava, today still stood miraculously
untouched.—Reuter,



———



—_—_—_—_—



—-

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD

Latest reports reaching Toky«
jsaic “heroes of Wonju” were stil!
clivgre tenaciously to their posi-
| tion

Huge transport planes dropped
hundreds of tons of supplies to
‘them while hundreds of fighters
and bombers hammered at the
Communists and tried to cut wit
forward troops from their supply

bases

But four Communist divisions
bypassing Wonju on the west
threatened to outflank troops
descending north. At least eight

more divisions were massed nortn
of the city, ready to be throw:
into an all out frontal assault

They are now menacing the key
junction of Tanyang 90 miles north
of Taegu, Communists attacks arc
now building up into one of the
biggest offensives since they
hurled back United Nations troop;
north of the 38th parallel.



Fresh troops in their thousands
are moving up along the 55-mile
line trom the west coast to a point
north of Tanyang. More thar
11.000 troops were reported con.
centrated in the Osan area 25 mile;
south of Seoul and United Nations
pilots reported another long
column of troops moving southeast
ilong the Han River northwest of
Wonju

Reds Withdraw

Eleven miles southwest of Inchon
directly west of Wonju, Commu-
nists withdrew early today after
a sharp clash,

In the Sobaek mountain ranges

the battle was increasing in in-
itensity and 350 Communists had
|been killed in the past three days.
} :

ed Nations planes roared
ae © battlefront at dawn today
att kine. Spimese . and. North

" i ing south © from

u.

Pilots reportéd four Communist
regiments moving south of the
city and thousands of troops mass-
ing a few miles north of the city.

An 8th Arm; pokcesman said
today that Chinese were also
continuing to build up large forces
in the Osan area to the southwest
of Wonju near the west coast
More than 11,000 Communists were
reported be massed there
earlier



to

Light bombers made 33 night
intruder sorties in close support of
rround troops and behind the
Communist lines,—Reuter

ee

TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113
DAY OR NIGHT



}



CO

=













STREET



|
CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. — Sole Distributors
— |









PAGE TWO

———————————————————

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)
'O-DAY 445 and 650 pw

amen Warne

SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 1951

HARRY G. DAIN, who









2 SEE YOURSELF AS OTHERS SEE YOU.
We Can Supply...

|
| MIRROR GLASS /

and continuing daily
r Bros. Pietures !
Sa Sat ey Bete










THE CENTRAL EMP®@. Ma



Training In Statistics

with Joel McCREA—Alexis SMITH Zachary SCOTT ‘Alan HALE—owers presided over the Caribbean MONG the passengers lea
Special Mat. Thurs. 1.30 p.n pecial Mat, Friday 1th : Medical Conference just held in by B.W.I.A. on Thursd
“PREDDIE STEPS OUI 443. ori. denis CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. — PROPRIETORS. Trinidad, and Mrs. Dain were in- for Jamaica via Trinidad wa
Freddie STEWART snd Teenaye: Tom KEENE. i r gi 5

Cnr. of Broad & Tuder Streets Angus M. Wilkie, Clerk, ;
to the Colonial Treasury

Wilkie has been seconded f

transit passengers through Barba-
dos yesterday from Trinidad for
St. Lucia.



and
‘I WOUIDNT BE IN YOUR SHOFS | Lx
Don CASTLE

RIDING THE SUNSET TRAL
GORCEY wi the Bowe Bey
“DOCKS OF NEW YORK













eae nenaeeney om ; , year to the Institute of Socia)
SS — —SSSSS——2— To-nite 8.30 to Tuesda . -m, They have gone over to St. a
| > ee enges om” Lucia for the week-eng and will Gen : is —
. ollege, where he Wi underg

PLAZA Theatre — o1/sTIN o THE STORY OF MOLLY X return to Trinidad in time to con- quacey of Guluing In: siation
LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 5 and 8.30 p gE June HAVOC — John RUSSELL to England. is expected that he will be allo

R.K.O. Radio's Mr. Leacock and Dr. Muir, he = aGenc my, Gopuasten rbd
“THE MIGHTY JOE YOUNG” E said, would be returning to Bar- methods of sampling in statist

Local Talent Audition TO-DAY, 9.30 a.m.

EMPIRE

enquiry which has been arrany:
by the Institute over the per;
15th to 27th January.
Educated at Harrison Colle;
Mr. Wilkie joined the Roya}
Force in 1944 and served
October, 1947 when he was i

bados today.

Electrical Engineer

R. and Mrs. Rupert Farmer

arrived by T.C.A. yester-
day to spend a month’s holiday in
Barbados. They are staying with



MONDAY and TUESDAY 5 and #30 p.m. (R.K.O. Double)

APRICA ABLAZE .

“SAVAGE SPLENDOR”
Color by Technicolor








“FOLLOW ME QUIETLY” &
with Arthur KENNEDY

NOW SHOWING
Mat. & Night Shows



MIDNITE SAT. January 2th 2 FEATURES |

—





ee — ee

EMPIRE

To-day 4.45 and 8.45 and

M-G-M Presents:

Howard KEEL
with
Louis CALHERN

and
J. Carrol NAISH



ROXY

To-day and To-morrow
4.30 and 8.15

M-G-M Smashing Double :
Ester WILLIAMS
and
Van JOHNSON

¢ in:
“DUCHESS OF
IDAHO”

June ALLYSON
Dick POWELL
and

Ricardo MONTALBAN





desi

q they

vewelry

= \



ROYAL

To-day and To-morrow
4.30 and 8,30

Harry CAREY &
The WILD. SAVAGE



OLYMPIC

To-day 4.30 and 8.30
Last Two Shows To-morrow
4.30 and 8.15

Columbia Smashing Double .

Margaret SULLAVAN &
Wendell COREY

“NO SAD SONGS
FOR ME”

AND

Starring

William EYTHE &
Marjorie REYNOLDS




NOTICE
Alfonso B. de Lima & Co.

of Lower Bread Street



Establishment in Barbados

























are IN NO WAY CONNECTED,






Financially or

Daily

THE BIGGEST MUSICAL UNDER THE SUN

Color by Technicolor

“Better Than The Stage Production”
Redbook Magazine



» to inform all their Friends and Customers, and the public in general, that

With any other

Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Gale at “The
Hope” St George.

Mr. Farmer is an Engineer with
“Hydro Quebec”. Mrs. Farmer is
the former Elsie Peterkin.

Leaving To-morrow

Massachusetts now live in Haiu.
‘They have been touring the West
Indies and yesterday they arrived
trom Trinidad by B.W.I.4. They

Mr. Miner is here until the mid-
dle of March and is staying at
Cacrabank.

14 Above!
ERE to spend a holiday with
relatives are Mr, and Mrs.
Lionel A. Pile who live in Cleve-
lund, Ohio, They were accom-
panied by their son Mr. Robert
Pile.

Mr. Lionel Pile is President of
Hough Bakeries Inc.

When he left Canada, Mr, Pile
told Carib the temperature was
“14 above.”

Road Contractor
R, AND MRS. CHARLES A
BIRGE arrived by T.C.A
yesterday to spend until January
29th in Barbados. They are staying

at the Ocean View Hotel.
Mr. Birge is a Road Contractor
and lives just outside of Toronto

in Oakville.

R. and Mrs. Francois Tur-

geon of Quebec City arrived
from Canada yesterday morning
by T.C.A. to spend a holiday in
Barbados. They are staying at
the Windsor Hotel.

Mr. Turgeon who is a paper
merchant, is partner of L. P.
‘Turgeon and Sons. This is their
first visit here.

Here Until February
ERE until February 12th when
they return to Canada by the
Lady Rodney are Mr. and Mrs.
Gerald O'Reilly.

They arrived yesterday by
T.C.A. and are staying at the
Ocean View Hotel. Mr. O'Reilly
is a retired business man,

Venezuelan Coney Island
RS. RITA GRAY and her
young son Peter, who for the

past three months have been holi-

daying in Barbados staying at the

Paradise Beach Club returned to

Venezuela yesterday morning by

6B.W.1.A. Mrs, Gray’s husband

is the Marager of Coney Island in

Caracas,

From Montreal
. AND MRS. PERCY
WRIGHT arrived yesterday
to spend a holiday with Mr. and



MR. AND MRS. LEAR WOOD, who had been holidaying in Barba-
dos, returned to Canada yesterday by T.C.A.

Teaches Modern Dancing
R. ALBERTO HOLGUIN who
spent a month’s holiday in
Barbados returned to. Venezuela
yesterday morning by B.W.1.A.
Mr. Holguin who works for the
Venezuelan Government is the
Director of a Sehool of Modern
Dancing im. Caracas. .He has
thirty students. Mr. Holguin
started dancing when he lived in
California at the age of Seventeen.
He also holds classes at some of
the Federal and Government
schools.
He was staying at the Aquatic

Vice President of the Canadian
Bank Note Co., in Ottawa. He is
staying with his brother and s‘ster-
in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wood
of “Culloden House”, Culloden
Road,

Thirty Years Ago

R. AND MRS. WILBERT E.

HUSBANDS are at present
holidaying in Barbados. Mr. Hus-
bands a“Barbadfan, is Manager of

Greene Travel Service in Boston,
Massachusetts. He used to be with
the Advocate Co., Ltd., thirty years
ago.

Mr. Husbands is a cousin of Mr.
K. N. R. Husbands, Speaker of
the House of Assembly.

They are here unt'] the end of
Tanuary when they will visit St
Lucia before returning here to
Jeave for the-U.S

Grenada Holiday

ISS CONSTANCE INNISS

who teaches at the Founda-
tion Girls’ Sehool, returned from
Grenada yesterday by B.W.1.A.
where she had been for the past
few weeks on holiday, staying
with friends.

Twice A Week
I SEE that B.G. Airways have
increased their number of



porarily released to study at Rk
kin College, Oxford, for the |
versity Diploma in Public
Secial Administration. He
awarded this Diploma on the c:
pletion of his course of stud
January, 1950

Continuing R. and Mrs, Arthur Blood Landy And The Bear
snes ood hea M-G-M_Big Double who are Originally from R. LANDY de MONTBRU
a '

who has been in Barbad
on a short visit left Seawell y«
terday with a huge Teddy Be
under his arm. This teddy b«

E have two friends in Barbados, is being vatied in ‘Tvinidad f
Dr. and Mrs. Greaves. . e Ne st Cases ;
“TRADER HORN” They leave tomorrow for Haiti. Stayi With Her Sisters
They are staying at Super Mare ying > rs
AND Guest House. RS. DOROTHY CLARK!
: Las arrived from Canada
Here Year T.C.A. yesterday to spend a ho!
" DIAL 1119 a R. WILLIAM MINER Wao day with relatives. She is sta
was in Barbados last winter ‘ng first with Mr. and Mrs. D
Starring arrived by T.C.A, yesterday oy Clarke in St. Lawrence. M
ing : ee gae morning. Mr. Miner is associ- Marke is her sister. Her oth
ee Marshall THOMPSON & ated with the Miner Rubber Co., fee sk tees) ghee’ Senpeon
Betty HUTTON Sam LAVINE and lives just outside Montreal. | farine’ Gardens.

Mrs, Clarke, who is a Bart
ian, now fives in Yarmout
Tova Scotia.

Arrived Yesterday

RS. JESSICA LEE, wife of
“ Gulf Oil’s Publicity Direct
a Venezuela, returned from Cara-
as yesterday afternoon
3.W.LA. Her children were
he airport to meet her.

Get Together
E Barbados Orchid Circle are
having a_ get-together
Sunday, January 21st at 5 p.m. at
Featherstone, Upper Collymore
Rock. There are quite a few
matters to be discussed and a good
attendance is expected,

Atlantic Region
R. and Mrs. F. M. McGregoi
arrived from Canada yester-













Back To Canada

R. AND MRS. LEAR WOOD

who had been in Barbados

for the past two months holiday-

ing with Lear’s family returned to)
Toronto yesterday by T.C.A.

Lear is an Old Harrisonian and

a former Barbados Scholar.
~~ e
























‘ . Club. day morning by T.C.A. to spend
: And : “CUSTOMS M-G-M’S After their holiday here. they Stavi ith Hi a week in Barbados. They are
“RIGHT CROSS 2 66 ANNIE E ee plan to visit! Jamaica. oe Wit His Brother staying at the Ocean View Hotel
to ‘spend a holiday in Mr. McGregor is Operations

Starring : AGENT # G T YOUR GUN Paper Merchant D Barbados is Mr. Perey Wood, Manager, T.C.A.,“Atlantic Region.

With P.A.A. Puerfo Rico
R. and Mrs, Charles Hitt and
their two children Roger
and Marylin arrived from Puerto
Rico via Trinidad yesterday morn-
ing by B.W.I.A. Mr. Hitt is
Flight Superintendent of Pan
American Airways in Puerto Rico.
Mrs, Hitt is the former Millicent
Hobson of Barbados.

Proof
7Q’HIRTY-THREE passengers
4 arrived by T.C.A. for Bar-
bados yesterday. Eight others
were destined for Trinidad and
six got off at Bermuda.

This is definite proof of Bar
bados’ rising popularity with
Canadian tourists.

Hotels and Department

Stores

R. and Mrs, J.. Harper Kent

from Bathurst N.B., ac-
companied by Miss Marion
Branch arrived from Canada
yesterday by T.C.A. to spend a
holiday in Barbados, They are
staying at the Windsor Hotel
Mr. Kent is associated with the
firm of W. J. Kent and Co.,
Ltd., and Miss Branch is Secre-
tary/Treasurer of the same Com-

MR, ALBERTO HOLGUIN returnea P®DY.



Mrs. Gordon Gale. They cdéme in flights to St, Vincent to twice a to Venezuela This company ms three

rs je yesterday by B.W.1A. pany owns _ threc
on the T.C.A. flight, Dr. and Mrs. week leaving’ Barbados on Mon- He teaches. Modern’ Dancing in Dotels and two department stores
Wright are from Montreal. days and Thursdays. Caracas. in New Brunswick.

59906660°

€
35 SSSS9 FOSS FO GOSS 9EF °PLPPOOOOC SOS ES SCOTS OSON







Appointed Manager
RANS Canada Air Lines an-

GAITETY—(rHe GARDEN) ST. JAMES ~ mounces that Mr. W. A. C.

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. “Bill Stuart, Station Manager ai

Seaweill Airport for the past year,

has been appointed Manager—

Barbados, This new title is con

sistent with Mr, Stuart’s opera

—" and traffic responsibilities
ere,

LADIES’
@
For Afternoon or Business - - -

SKIRTS, BLOUSES

Also BLACK PLEATED SKIRTS
HOUSECOATS and HOUSE/

DRESSES <

WARM HOUSECOATS for Trav-
elling

DRESSES










CAPTAIN FURY & CAPTAIN CAUTION







Monday & Tuesday 8.30 p.m. (Monogram Double)

“THE GUILTY” &

Johnny Mack Brown in Fo
Don Castle ur Branches

LAND OF THE LAWLESS ARRIVING by T.C.A,. yester-

———! day morning to spend a
holiday in Barbados are Mr. and
Mrs, John M. Sharpe who are
from Saskatchewan. Mr. Sharpe
is President of Electric Equip-
ment Co. Ltd., in Saskatoon. This
company has branches in Saska-









THIS EMBLEM
GUARDS Tiné



























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SUNDAY, JANUARY

How To Bring Up

14,

1951

=

Daughters

By ... THE HON. Mrs. ROBERT BOWER

MARIANA, one of my seven
daughters, was recently married
to Major Gilbert Monckton, son of
Sir Walter Monckton, K.C.

I have been asked to tell how I
brought up seven daughters, not
forgetting one son.

My large family was never
planned in advance. They are
Monica, aged six, Mary, 12,

Veronica, 13, Elizabeth, 17, Mari-
anna, 21, Mergaret, 24, Anne, 27,
and my son, Paul, who is 26.

No Easy Life

Early notions of an easy life as
a naval officer’s wife were swept
away by growing maternal in-
stinct backed by faith, though we
had little more than my husband's
Service pay with no marriage or
children’s allowances.

When my fourth baby was born
friends criticised. “How awful!”
they said, intending to be sym-
pathetic.

Our nurse was derided by shop
assistants for working in such a
large household when there were
so many jobs going looking after
a “one and only.”

But while friends wrote after
the birth of my seventh child:
“You surely cannot find this a
matter for congratulation,” I was
in fact extremely happy.

Until my fifth baby arrived we
had no real home, having to live
in a succession of rooms and fur-
nished houses at home and abroad.

Then we bought a house in
London. Of course, sacrifices had
to be made.

Expensive boarding school edu-
cation became out of the question.
Then, with experience accumulat-
ing, I found I could do without a
nurse.

When she went I decided that
my elder children had been waited
on far too much. I noticed how
much quicker my four-yead-old
was in learning to dress and un-
dress herself than the nurse-at-
tended older children.

Presently I found the four-year-
old bathing her younger sister as
a surprise help.

Beeame M.P.

ADDITIONAL household com-
plications arose when my husband
beeame Member of Parliament for
Cleveland in Yorkshire. For 14
years our expanding family shut-







MY RULES

DON’T spoil any one of
your children by giving in to
its every whim,

DON’T be too strict, While
@ spoiled child is wnfitted to
face life, an over ined
one is tempted to become
deceitful.

DON’T send your child to
church alone. Your own
example is essential,

DON’T overrate your
child's natural abilities.
That leads to disappoint-
ment. Watch and encourage.

DO take a real interest in
your children’s amusements.

be pai with the
endless questions of children.
When possible help them to
discover the answer for
themselves.
_ DO try to bring out initia-
tive. Implant the desire to
want to try things that are
new to them, whether it be
food, clothes, or amuse+
ments.

DO have the courage to
learn from your own tmis-
takes.

PARENTS never finish
learning how to be parents.





tled backwards and forwards be-
tween London and “Yorkshire
where one of my babies was born.

Clothing the children on a slen-
der family budget called for
ingenuity.

As one child grew out of her
clothes these were carefully put
away ready for the next.

At one time I had over 100 pairs
of children’s shoes in the house
and still had to buy more.

Sales bargains had to be pursued.
In those pre-war days I could buy
a £2 pair of shoes at a sales price
of 10s., a £5 coat for £1, and

IT bought in quantities.

One of my best bargains was
some white furnishing satin which
I made into cot pillowslips which
have been in use 13 years, and
cost only one shilling each.

Pandering to childish food fads
and fancies was impossible, but
some cof my children could not be

COOKERY CORNER

Fish plays an important part in
family cooking, and if carefully
chosen and cooked, it provides an
infinite variety of appetising
dishes that can easily be prepared.

You cannot be too careful
when buying fish, for if it is even
slightly stale or infe-
rior in quality, its poor
flavour can never real-
ly be disguised. Look
for these points when
you are choosing fish:

Flesh -that is firm,
and quite free from
any unpleasant smell.

Bright eyes.

Scales that adhere
closely to the skin.

Red gills,

_ Bright clear mark-

ings.

Flying fish is now
in season, so this week I am
going to give you a recipe for
that fish which I hope you will
enjoy.

Fillet six flying fish, an,
them with lime and salt
minutes, and then wash,

soak
or five



Stuffing. Three ounces of bread-
erumbs, an ounce of cooking but-
ter, half a teaspoonful of dried
herbs, grated rind of half a lime,
two teaspoonsful of chopped pars-
ley, two tablespoons of milk, salt

and pepper.
Mix ail the ingre-
dients together and

then spread some of
the stuffing on to each
fillet and roll up, place
in a greased
dish, add one of
white wine, one sliced
onion and a tomato,
then sprinkle with
breadcrumbs. Bake in
a moderately hot oven
for twenty minutes,

This dish can be
made to look very at-
tractive if garnished with green
peas and fried plantains.

ioe

- #OR THE BEST

cheaper still were remnants which

them s
It me to insure
operations and accidents. Opera-
tions five for

were numerous—
apeentnan alone and 11 for ton-
s wl

I never believe in dosing them
with medicines &$ a routine.

it wants to go to Here I
had to be careful. 35 per cent
of all ate to p
their children away from harmfui
films.

I er preview a film myself

me a Saberban
Church First

BUT on Sundays I al

low no
amusements until the family

has

I cr the greatest importance
to their os
prayers at earliest possi

“Gas of the most fascinating
things about a large family is
watching the development of
children’s talents and tastes.

Maty, aged 12, hag a gift for

odelling in clay. A local pottery

hes bees enthasioatic about hér
ornaments.

chosen.

Vv who is

eronic: 1

from the’ cudldren ‘of 40
London schools to be leading lady

in a children’s play presented re-

cently.

(Monica at six or. of age is
displaying an line and
colour. She spends hours painting.

Su say that

up,t
it is much easier to
large family than an only

eens

QUALITY & SHADES



INSIST ON

STORES

|



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

The Garden In
ary

Seedling Time, Flowering
Vines

As with all young living things,
it will make a tremendous
difference to seedlings if they get
a good start. Healthy seedlings
mean healthy, vigorous plants, s¢
it is well worth while to give
them just that little extra care
when they are tiny which will
repay such good dividends later on

. Planting

Always plant out the seedlings
in the late afternoon when the hot
Tays of the sun are going over.
This means that they have the
whole long, cool night in which to
recover from the shock of trans-
planting, and to settle themselves
in their new home before another
hot day comes round. When taking
them up see that you take up a
good hump of mould around each
so as to disturb the roots as little
as ible. Make a good hole for

one in the new bed, and pop
them down with the roots com-
fortably spread (never all bunch-
ed up together) and press them
firmly in. “This business of press-
ing the seedlings firmly in is very
important, for no plant can grip
ahd get the best out of the earth
if It is insecurely planted.

When all are planted, water
them with a fine watering pot,
and check up again to see that all
are firm, as often the water will
loosen some. Continue to use &
fine watering pot on them for a
few weeks, until it is seen that
they have made aq start, and are
sturdy enough to stand the gen-
eral watering.

Finally, after planting them put
up a few ‘umbrellas’ about the
bed, to give the seedlings a little
shade from the sun for a few
days. By ‘umbrellas’ is meant a
few small branches about a foot
high, of any tree or bush avail-
able, just stuck about the bed in
between the young plants. After
a few days when these umbrellas
wither they can be taken up and

discarded.
on lot of trouble? Yes, but such

Flowering Vines
Barbados is fortunate in having
a t variety of beautiful flow-

- ering vines which succeed well in

our climate, and nothing lends a
more Ii and gracious air to
a garden than an expanse of fence
or wall in the background cover-
ed by a flowering climber.

In deciding to plant a vine how-
ever care should be taken to
choose the vine suitable for the
place it is needed for, as it would

useless disappointing, to

be
for put a big heavy vine on to light
supports

, or in a confined space,
or to expect one of the lighter
‘ee to cover a large expanse of
wal

Double Pink Coraleta

One of our most beautiful vines
is the ‘Double Pink Coralita,’
which flowers around Christmas
time, and which may be termed
a ite vine as regards size
and weight. There are two typed
of this vime, one having a pald
flower with a crinkled edge,
and the other one having a rose-
pink flower with a plain edge.
Beth flowers are lovely and some-
what resemble an apple-blossom.
As the flowers fade, large
gréeny-pink seeds form, in appear-
ance almost as pretty as the flow-
ers, and these remain on the vine
for a couple of months while fresh

flowers continue to appear.

To Plant

This vine can be grown from
seed, but when planted from seed
there is no guarantee that it will
come ‘true.’ It may revert back
to the ordin single Coralita.
The best way refore of getting
a ‘true’ plant is to secure a root
from a well established plant, or
to layer a branch of an establish-



At The Cimema

Shoot Kid, You’re Loaded

Hy G.

ws.

When it comes to a fine, rousing, rowdy musical]

comedy, M.G.M.’s

Technicolor version

of ANNIE GET

YOUR GUN would be hard to beat as really first-class

entertainment.

In this instance, Hollywood has done a

bang-up job in its version of the Broadway musical that

ran for nearly four years.

Through the medium of the
camera, the show has been per-
mitted to travel further affield
than the narrow confines of the
Stage will allow, and this is a defi-
nite advantage. From what I
have read, the original story has
been followed closely and the
music and lyries by that master
of all song writers — Irving Ber-
lin—are intact.

Betty Hutton’s Annie Oakley—
the unlettered little hoyden Seen
the backwoods of Ohio, who joins
Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show tc
become the greatest marksman of
all time, is a combination of
brashness, aeerence and win-
ning appeal, There is no doubt
that she has almost more than her
fair share of energy and personali-
ty, and though, according to some
critics, she is not as competent as
Ethel she does alright in
he way. Her romance with
F Butler, another sharpshoot-
er, played by Howard Keel, is
accompanied by plenty of noise,
Indian war-whoops and all the
general confusion that attends a
Wild West Show, as well as by
three of the hit tunes, Mr, Keel
has a fine physique, an equally
fine baritone voice that he really
knows how to use, and a nice
flair for acting. All of which
adds up to a good performance on
his part. One of the best num-
bers is the tune “I Can Do Any-
thing Better Than You” that de-
velops out of a first class quarrel
and nearly into a first class fight
between the two. Another good
one is Annie’s solo at the opening
of the film—*You Can’t Get A
Man With A Gun" which ‘is
proved to be only too true by
our heroine,

Others in this topnotch cast in-
clude Louis Calhern as Buffalo
Bill, who wears some of the most
striking costumes seen in a long
time; J. Carol Naish as Big Chief
Sitting Bull, complete with george-
ous feather head-dtess which, on
occasion, is exchanged for a silk
opera hat: and Keenan Wynn as
a publicity agent—all of whom
are entertaining.

Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show
is spectacular, full of action and
excitement, and brilliantly
ourful, with all the atmosphere
of the sawdust ring. The whole

film sparkles with humour, galety | %

and wit and to the accompani-
ment of one of Irving Berlin’s
finest scores, ANNIE GET YOUR
GUN is one of the best musical
comedy films in years, You'll love
it—so don’t miss it.

The Story of Molly X

Showing at the Globe Theatre
is THE STORY OF MOLLY X

with June Havoe in the leading %

role, If is the story of the rehab-
ilitatign of a woman who is
indicated on a charge of grand
larceny and committed to the
California Institution for Women
at Tehachapi,

As Molly, the master-mind of
her murdered husband’s gang,
whose mission in life is to dis-
cover her husband’s murderer,
June Havoc gives a performance
that is flery, vicious at times—
eS
ed plant (more about layering
another time). Plant the vine in
a sunny but somewhat sheltered
spot (West is good) and give it a
feir size space or the roof of a
fernery to climb on, It will need
little help, but will cling and
climb tenaciously where it wants
to go.

Give it the usual garden care
in the way of water and manure.

Cut it back each year to within
a foot of the ground about
September, and it should be up

and flowering again by November

te January.



What-do

‘you know

about:ENO?











Eno’s

DO YOU KNOW tha: EMO
is cooling and refreshing, an un-
rivalled health drink foe young

pO YOU KNOW
thet ENO hes 8
gentle laxativeaction
and is a perfect cor-
rective for stomach
and liver disorders ?

Sold in bottles for lasting freshnese

‘Fruit Salt’

Bhs words " Eno" and “ Bruit Salt" ave registered wate martes



col- |

compelling—and of
dramatic feeling.

Most of the picture, which is
semi-documentary, is filmed in the
Institution at Tehachapi, and it
fs interesting to see the many
phases of work and the methods
employed to rehabilitate the
women who spend time behind its
walls, This is the first time this
institution has been permitted to
be used in a film,

Dorothy Hart and John Russell
are both very competent in the
other two leading roles—she as
the fiancee of the man who
kitted Molly's husband and he as
the husband's best friend. I found
enjoyable the performance of the
various women who play the
parts of prisoners and the Insti-
tution Staff. The atmosphere and
odd bits of humour are due to
them. From the sociological angle
THE STORY OF MOLLY X has
plenty of interest amd is well
acted and directed.

South of St. Louis

At the Plaza, we have a tale
of the Southwest, during the Civil
War, called SOUTH OF ST.
LOUIS. Starring Joel Macrae,
Alexis Smith and Zachary Scott,
it tells the story of three men
whoge ranch is plundered and
devastated but w are
mined to hold on to it and to take
their reve on their enemy.
SOUTH ST. LOUIS means
the no-man’s land of the Civil
War, comprising Texas and the
southwest where, although there
were army groups of both sides,
the war was fought on a guerilla
basis.

The story is too complicated
to go into detail, but there is
plenty of action and excitement
against a background of smug-
gling, war and intrigue.

The leading roles are well
played, and of the supporting
players, I would mention Victor
Jory as Cottrell and Alan Hale
as Jake Evarts, both of whom

with plenty

can be relied on to give a good}

aceount of themselves, and do.

The settings are realistic, cos-
tumes good and, as wé al] know,
the scenery in that part of the
world is magnificently shown in
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PAGE FOUR



B.A.F.A. MAY NOT SEND
DELEGATE TO P’TO RICO

Conflicting Cricket In First Trial
BY ©. S. COPPIN

HE Council of the B.A.F.A. at their meeting

last week decided that the financial position
of the Barbados Amateur Football Association was
such that they could not afford to accept an invi-
tation from the Executive Secretary of the Interim
Tourism Committee to send a delegate to a meet-
ing in Puerto Rico of the various Football Associa-
tions throughout the Caribbean.

They however agreed in principle a the idea

islands in the Caribbean area coming er for pur-

eee are willing to send a delegate if they receive any financial

assistance from the Caribbean Interim Tourism Committee under
whose auspices the meeting is being held.

A REASONABLE VIEW

HAT is quite a reasonable and logical view but I fail to follow
ae line of argument advanced in some sporting circles that this
conference would be in the nature of a spree or that such a confer-
ence for three days would mean nothing to Barbados. :

It is unfortunate that such ideas sili obtain. They are painfully
reminiscent of a disease from which I thought Barbados haa recov-
ered long ago, a sort of complacent isolationism that probably promp-
ied the now famous at the beginning of the tirst Worla War:
“Go on England, Barpados is behind you.”

NO SHOUTS

HERE is no use shouting ourselves hoarse that there should be

closer union t the West Indies, that there should be
a better understanding and that there shoulda be federation in the
not too distant future if we are inclined to stick up our noses and
suspect every move, that might or might not be genuine, that is
claimed to be aimed at these islands closer togetner. ;

I am glad that this was not the attitude adopted by the Council
since nothing could be lost if the finances could stand it and a dele-
gate were sent for the Barbados delegate to meet and exchange
information and views on football at the least with delegates from
‘Trinidad, Jamaica, British Guiana, Puerto Rico, Aruba, Haiti, Cura-
cao, the Leeward and Windward Islands, all of whom have been

invited. ,
INSURANCE FOR FOOTBALLERS

NOTHER interesting point about the meeting is the fact that a

A select committee has mepeted oe z — for the insurance of
layers dur the forthcoming 1951 foot season.

. “vThe coments is a copy of one that obtains between the Trinidad
Football League and the representatives of Lloyd's Underwriters in
‘Trink idad.

The Council will consider this at their next meeting. It allows
for compensation for death by accident, loss of one lin:b or one eye,
medical expenses and specialist fees in connection with injumes rece: -
ed during League games among other things. j

Although it has not yet been accepted yet it should be of some
satisfaction to the great of football fans who have been
clamouring for the introduction of some form of insurance for players
ever since the beginning of last season.

The Council, on which every club in the League is represented
is not bound to accept this scheme but something workab.e whi
have to be substituted for it and the Council is morally bound w
give some assurance that some form of insurance agaist injuries
will be put into operation before the 1951 season starts.

THE FIRST TRIAL GAME j

HE first Trial game in preparation for the Intercolonial matches

with Trinidad was played on Thursday and Saturday last wees.

i saw some conflicting cricket. At one time | was extremely
bored with the inefficacy of the bowling on the first day when Kelton
Walcott's XII were at the wicket but then I was thrided io some fine
batting chiefly by C. Hunte and Eric Atkinson who put on 137 runs
for the second wicket. ;

Hunte, who had scored a century in the annual Inter-League
fixture between the Criqxet League and the baroados
Cricket Association, established strong claims by his second gooa
patting display.

ATKINSON SCORES CENTURY

TKINSON went on to score 155 retired yesterday and then prove
A himself to be the only pace bowler to get some life out of .te
wicket that was certainly a batsman’s paradise.

Tne fielding on Thursday was colourless and dead. Only
“Brickie’ Lucas showed any life and initiative. Greenidge must have
been suffering from the nerves, he was the worst sinner. But in
the midst of all this, Clyde Walcott brought off a magnificent les
stump to dismiss Cave when he missed a slow spinner from

Mullins bowled t6 an extremely badly set field and seemed t»
be bowling without his usual spirit. He nad the most pace on that
side it is true but he did not seem to make up his mind to bow! to
the field set nor was the field changed to suit his bowling.

A BADLY SET FIELD

F he is bowling inswingers that begin almost on the baisman's
body there is no point setting two slips, a gully, a third man, a
mid-off and cover point with only a short fine leg and short anes
leg on the on-side of the wicket and at most times no midon, ! unde 5
stand that this was Mullins’ idea of the field but skipper Clyde Walcot(
with his admittedly sound knowledge of the game should have over-

1) cescunier bowled with great determination and direction, He
was really fast only in his opening overs but he made the batsmen
play and his bowling of Hunte at 85 was a great twibute to his
rae f slow left arm
McCollin has the potentialities of a very use ul 5 ett
alee but he spoils his chances by trying to bow! too fast as sorrs
as he has been punished and by bowling over and around the wicke

i himself. :
nel he Ort the ball. He proved, this ine be Sak a pares bet
ome forward to him, miss uw a

duck a eon ater in the day when Atkinson had completed a hard
earned 150 runs, beat him completely with a leg acienet. mili s
Keith Walcott’s oe were out for ae eS be | - _ —_
we ol aes See one that made it move and also got some life

wicket.
ee MOST IMPRESSIVE ,
turn in the most impressive bowling
He only bowled six overs but these
who gives any study to the game
on the spot and always com-



side
left

UT Errol Millington was to
B performance of the match,
were sufficient to convince —.
Snieen sepoct "ie al cae t for 11 runs in his six overs
ee B gh SF acek a ‘iseful 47 at number nine for oe
Walcott’s team ponte 2 ar 17 in four overs pad this inenatee Oy Se

, cket. eve
Wales vice Ravare “Pua ished be ested us

tournament at the conclusion of this ar tak and kept a good

Bowen got a c good
ing s team, led by Keith Wa
aoa Rieghen tr Sasa oneal ca that of Clyde Walcott’s XII.
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‘

E. Atkinson 155, K. Bowen 47

Smith 43, Performed Well
WALCOTT’S TEAM

Cc.
K.

C. WALCOTT’S § (for

AFTER treating the spectators ag
strokes all around the wicket,
at Kensington Oval yesterday.
of play of the first Trial game in
Intercolonial Tournament scheduled

It was the second day
preparation for the
tor next month.
Atkinson was undefeated at
time call for 112 on Thursday
last and he added an unblemished
42 to this score yesterday. His
entire innings included 15 fours.

From Thursday’s score of 248
for 7, K. E. Walcott’s Team piled
up 342 runs yesterday against
C. L. Walcott’ Team. Cc.
Walcott’s Team replied with 93
for 4 wickets by close of play.

The wicket was good and Atkin-
son and Bowen took advantage of
it. Bowen enjoyed a fine knock
for 47 rums. He was engaged in
an eighth wicket partnership with
Atkinson which yielded 72 runs.
Bowen took thimgs easy while
Atkinson was in a _ punishing
mood.

K. Branker, playing for C. L.
Walcott’s team, and Bowen of
K. E. Walcott’s team, were the
most successful bowlers of the
day. Branker took 2 wickets for
2! runs in 6 overs, one of which
was a maiden ang Bowen 2 for
17 in 4 overs.

Good fielding by both teams
saved many runs.

The Game

At about 1.35 a.m. Eric Atkin-
son, 113 not out and Keith
Bowen, 5 not out, went to the
middle to carry on from Thurs-
day's score.

C. Mullins sent down the first
over from the southern end, the
third ball of which Bowen glanced
to fine leg for a single. Pacer
Bradshaw took charge of the other
end and both batsmen Téok a
single off his first over. The 250
went up on the tins after 225
minutes of play.

Atkinson ang Bowen quickly
got their eye into the fast bowling
and were getting the ball ahead
of them and along the ground.

An early change was made by
skipper Clyde Walcott who
brought on Norman Marshall from
the southern end to replace
Bradshaw. Bradshaw had only
bowled two overs, conceding five
runs.

Marshall’s first over was a
maiden to Atkinson. Mullins was
kept on to bowl to Bowen and
= sent down his first maiden for

Bowen had a narrow escape
from a run out at seven in the next
over. Atkinson played g ball past
Greenidge at silly mid-on and
called for two, Greenidge quick-
ly retrieved the ball anq made a
2z00d throw to the bowler’s end.
Had not Marshall fumbled
Bowen would have been run out
by about two yards.

The second bowling change was
effected with K. A. Branker com-
ing on in place of Mullins who had
a four-over spell.

Atkinson got the first boundary
of the day when he cut an in-
swinger from Norman Marshall
past Proverbs at gully to make his
individual score 126 and the total
score 260 for 7.

Branker and Marshall followed
up with two consecutive maiden
overs, College’s right arm leg-
break bowler Smith was given his
first spell of the trials to bow] in
place of Branker.

His first two overs expensed him
17 runs and E. L. G. Hoad was
called to take over from him.
Smith’s second over was erratic.
Bowen drove his first ball, a full
toss, to the long off boundary for
4 and took a single off the second
to send down Atkinson, Atkinson
helped himself to 8 runs that same
over by two well-timed and
powerful cuts past gully off short
pitched balls,

Bradshaw was brought back \o
combine with spinner Hoad. A
cover drive for a single by Atkin-
son off Hoad’s second over for the
day sent 300 up in 285 minutes.
An over later, Atkinson played
Hoad off his back foot to cover for
a single to make his score 150.
Bowen was then 23 not out.

Squatty left-arm spinner
McCollin, B.C.L., player replaced
Hoad and immediately he got
Atkinson in difficulty. He forced

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Bright Cricket In Trial Game

4 whts)

again to a fine display of
Eric Atkinson retired at 155

Atkinson to make a rather
hurried stroke to his second bali
and completely beat him twice
ve, — over.

t e end of McCollin’s over
Atkinson was called in by his
skipper Keith Walcott. Atkinson
was undefeated for 155. The
scoreboard read 312 for 8, Bowen
27 not out,

ai Senta E. Millingio;,
partne: . Bowen, Branker wa,
brought back to bowl, this time
from the northern end,

Millington got off the mark
with a lovely drive the
covers for 4 off a full toss from
Branker’s last ball of that over.
He followed up with another
four to mid-on off the next over
bowled by MeCollin.

Mi n’s stay at the wicket
was short-lived. When he had
scored 9, he got into his wicket
to turn to leg a good length leg
break pitched on the leg stump
by Branker and was bowled off
his pads.

With the score at 342 for 9,
L. Barker joined Bowen. The
first ball to Barker from
Branker sent him back to the
pavilion for “duck”. Barker
pushed his bat carelessly to ar
off break pitched in line with his
pads to give Proverbs at short
Square leg a dolly catch. That
Was at the end of Branker’s over.

E. Brewster, the last man in
did not receive a ball, but saw
his partner Bowen well taken
Clyd Walcott, =o 2 von

yde next

McCollin

over from .
Bowen had ed down three
balls from ic Collin and in

attempting to cut the fourth—a
leg break on the. off stump—he
snicked it into Walcott’s gloves.
The innings was closed at 342.
The interval was then taken.

Mr. Keith Walcott’s team took
the field at 3.40 p.m. and Tony
Atkins with C. W. Smith went
to the middle.

L. Barker, who opened the pace
attack from the southern end,
sent down a maiden to Atkins.

Eric Atkinson supplied the fast
stuff from the other end. Smith
got off the mark the ball
Atkinson bowled with a rather
dangerous stroke to gully for a
single, and the fifth bal] of that
over Atkins pushed to cover for
a brace.

Barker sent down another
maiden to Smith, making a confi-
dent appeal for lbw at the last
ball. Atkinson’s second over cost
him 9 runs. Atkins got five of
them, including a beautiful lef
glance to the square leg boundary,
-_ Smith 4 with an edge through
slips.

Barker was taken off after he
bowled three maiden overs for
another pacer S. White.

White's first over was a maiden,
the first three balls of which
worried Atkins, Atkinson bowled
another maiden to Smith.

Barker was changed around to
bowl from the pavilion end while
White was keeping a steady length
from the screen end.

After a shaky start, the open-
ing pair settled down, but they
were getting runs slowly.

Spartan’s spinner B. K. Bowen
took over from White and imme-
diately disrupted what threatened
to be a good first wicket partner-
ship.

Bowen, in his second ball, en-
ticed Atkins to come down and
beat him through the air. The
ball turned away from Atkins’
bat for wicket-keeper Wood to
bring off a fine bit of stumping.

Atkins got 14 and the total score
was 31 with Smith 15 not out.

Clyde Walcott joined Smith. He
was off the mark by 2, the second
ball he received with a drive to
long-off off Bowen,

Bowen came back two overs
later and trapped him at 3. He
got Clyde to make one of his
full-blooded drives off a full toss.
Clyde drove through the air, giving
Eris Atkinson at mid-off a sitter.

With the score at 35 for 2, G.
Proverbs joined Smith. Smith’s
eye was in and he was batting





K. WALCOTT’S TEAM—Ist Innings



R. Marshall |.b.w. C. Mullins 8
¢. Hunte b C. Bradshaw 85
E. Atkinson retired 455
D. Atkinson b C. Bradshaw 4
F. Cave stpd. «wk. C. Walcott)

b C. Me Collin 0
K. Waleott run out 21
G, Wood c&b E, L. G. Hoad 1
S. White lbw C, Mullins 4
B. K. Bowen ¢ twk, C. Waicott)

b C. Me Collin . 47
&. Millington b K. Branker 3
Barker c Proverbs b Branker 0
F. Brewster not out 0

b6, Lb. 2 8
Total : fore. |

Fall of wkts: 1—13, 2-—-150, 3—166,
4—17], 5--214, 6-217, ‘7-240, 8-—312,
9—342, 10—342;-11-—242

BOWLING ANALYSIS
. oOo. M. BR. W
Cc. Bradshaw 22 0 a 2
Cc. Mullins i6 5 2
Ee. L, G. Hoad 12 0 35 1
soundly all the while, making

most of his runs on the off-side.

E. Millington, left-arm medium
pacer, who was brought on. to re-
place Barker did not allow Prov-
erbs a long stay at the wicket.
Proverbs had only scored a single
when he was towled neck and
crop playing forward to a good
length ball which kept straight
through. The score was then 36
for 3, Smith 16 not out, “Brickie”
Lucas was next in.

He was off to a good start with
a glide for 3 off Millington, Lucas
and Smith plodded on against
the steady bowling attack and
they sent 50 up on the tins in
about 80 minutes

The light started to fade and
Eric Atkinson was brought back
from the screen end while E.
Brewster, slow left-arm leg break
bowler, was brought on from the
northern end,

Atkinson bowled three overs
before giving place to Barker who
was taking his fourth spell for the
day.
Brewster struck the fourth blow
for his team. The second ball of
the third over, he got Lucas to
give wicket-keeper Wood a catch.

Lucas got the ball on the edge
of his bat in making a glide at a
leg break pitched outside the leg
stump and Wood made no mistake.
Lucas made 22. The scoreboard
read 76 for 4 with Smith 34 not
out,

With just about another 10
minutes left for play, skipper
Keith Walcott shuffled the bowl-
ing but to no avail. Smith and
Marshall were undefeated at time
call for 48 and _ respectively
and the total score was 93 for 4
wickets. The game continues on
Thursday.

Barbados Joins

Tennis Association

The Barbados Table Tennis
Association will be affiliated with
the Caribbean Table Tennis
Association, This was decided at
the Annual General Meeting of
the Barbados Association when
they discussed on Thursday at
the Y.M.C.A.,, a letter and Draft
Rules from the Trinidad body.

The Caribbean Table Tennis
Assogiation will be responsible
for controlling table tennis in
the West Indies principally be-
tween Jamaica, Barbados, British
Guiana and Trinidad.

It was decided that the Inter-
colonial Table Tennis Tourna-
ment will take place at Jamaica
in September this year.

The Association propose to
start the Inter-club Competition,
divisions I and Ii on February 8.

Mr. C. A. L. Gale was re-
appointed, President and Mr.
H. H. Williams first Vice Presi-
dent, Other officers appointed
are Col. R. T. Michelin, Second
Vice President, Mr. Harold Cor-
bin, Treasurer in place of Mr.
John Shannon resigned, Mr. C. A.
Smith Secretary and Mr. O.
Edgill, Assistant Secretary.

Tornadoes Beat
Cyclones 7-6

Tornadoes were victorious yes-
terday evening as play for the
Warner Bolton Cup and the Bar-
bados Advocate Cup was con-
tinued at the Garrison between
members of the Polo Club.
Tornadoes beat Cyclones 7—6.

Conditions were good and there





“was keen rivalry, Frequent flash-

es of excellent play brought bursts
of applause from the many spec-
tators.

Play continues next Saturday.



~ SCOREBOARD

Cc. Me Collin
W. C. Greenidge 5
K. A. Branker
N. Marshall
Cc. W. Smith

Cc. WALCOTT’S TEAM-
Cc. Atkins stpd. twk. Wood
b K. Bowen ........-
Cc. W. Smith not out
Cc. L. Walcott e¢ Atkinson b Bowen
G. Proverbs b Millington
N.S. Lucas ¢ (wk. Wood) b Brewster
N. Marshall not out .-
ib. 1, w. 1 4 Sted ,

Total (for 4 wkts.)

Fall of wkts 1—31, 2-35, 3—36, 4—1
BOWLING ne eee

cwnecs
SEARB
coon

st Innings
)

4
43
3

1

e

R. W.
L, Barker 9 3 17 0
E> Atkinson 7 1 20 0
S. White 5 1 18 0
B. K. Bowen 4 0 i7 2
E. Millington . 6 3 ul 1
E. Brewster 4 0 10 1

t

Dollery Gets 2
M.C.C. Wickets In
4 Maiden Overs

HOBART, TASMANIA, Jan. 13,

After dismissing Tasmania for
192, the M.C.C. lost two wickets
in scoring 18 runs by the close of
play on the first day of their
three-day match here.

The touring opening attack of
Alec Bedser and John Warr had
quick successes when the match
began in fine weather, two wick-
ets falling with only nine runs on
the board. A third wicket part-
nership of 55 by R. Thomas (39)
and E. Rodwell (25) helped to
pull the game around, J. Selton
‘was top scorer with 49. The MCC
were held up by C. Richardson,
who batting number ten made 23.
Warr took four for 47 and Alec
Bedser four for 56.

With about 45 minutes left for
play, the M.C.C. made a disas-
trous start losing John Dewes at
five and David Sheppard at 10
both falling to Dollery whose end
of the day’s figures were four
overs, four maidens, no runs, two
wickets.—Reuter.

C'WEALTH SCORE
319 FOR 8

MADRAS, Jan. 13.
The Commonwealth scored 319
for eight in their first innings on
the opening day of their match
against the Madras Government
Eleven here.—Reuter.





Charles Will Meet
Walcott On March7

NEW YORK, Jan. 13.

Ezzard Charles will defend his
World Heavyweight boxing title
(American version) for the sev-
enth time, meeting Jersey Joa
Walcott on March 7, it was an-
nounced here today.

Charles ‘defeated Walcott for
recognition as world champion in
Chieago on June 22, 1949.

The new match ‘was completed
teday by the International Box-
ing Club.
stopped Lee Oma in the tenth
round at Madison Square Garden.

—Reuter.



Tennis Results

Following are the results of
sets played at Belleville yesterday.

MEN’S SINGLES
P. K. Roach beat H. A. Cuke
Jr., 6—0, 6—3.
D. E. Worme beat W. Nurse,
6—3, 4—6, .
L. St. Hill beat H. L. Toppin,
4—6, 9—7, 6—4.

LADIES’ SINGLES
Miss E. Worme beat Miss P.
King 7—5, 9—7.
Miss J. Benjamin beat Miss M.
Ramsay 6—4, 6—2.

MONDAY’S FIXTURES
LADIES’ SINGLES
Miss E. Worme

v. Mrs, A. Gibbons.

W. S. Crichlow and W. H.
Allan. v. J. D. inson and
J. R. Hunte. | 7 £

MEN’S SINGLES

D. E. Worme v. P. Roach.
V. Hutson v. A. Jemmott.
S. Edghill v. D. Lawless.

Last night Charles jh,

SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 1951 ~

DISAPPOINTING CLASSICS
Why Da The Classic Races
Flop So Often?

BY BOOKIE

FTER returning from Trinidad and seeing a

horse like Footmark performing feats that few

three-year-olds are ever capable of, it may seem

that I am hard to please when I say that the Derby

was a most disappointing race. By this I do not

mean to imply that because Footmark made our

ereoles bred on this side of the Caribbean look very

inferior the race was disappointing, or that if he

had been removed we would have seen a better

race. I am not looking at it from such an insular point of view.

What annoys me is the fact that so many things were wrong with
the horses who might have been able to make him gallop.

In this respect one is immediately impressed with the regularity
with which the Trinidad Derbies of the past have been far below what
they promised, and on further reflection one cannot help coming to
the conclusion that it is as customary for all the classics, both here and
in Trinidad, to flop. Of course when these races were first formed
it was to be expected that with limited fields one or two horses would
stand out whiie the rest would always be also rans. In the War
years also there were excuses like intercommunication between the
islands. It woyld be useless therefore to recite all that past history.

UT just looking back at the results since the war we come upon
such years as 1948 when the Trinidad Trial Stakes and Derby
promised to be two of the most evenly contested events of the
season. Yet what did we see. in the first Ligan leaving his field
behind floundering in the mud while he never appeared to make
a false step. In the second Ali Baba’s sudden change to the outside
on the first turn taking nearly the whole field with him. The Gam-
bler off form, Brown Kocket off form, and finally Hall Mark’s sudden

ET us go back to 1947. We had every right to expect a tussle
between Brown Boy, Front Bell and Gun Hill in the ‘Trial
Stakes in which, if everything had gone according to plan, a new
mark for the race would probably have been set. Came the day;
Brown Boy a mere shadow of himself as he was as a two-year-old;
rront Beli and Gun Hill completely absent. Then on to the Derby
and, as if to compensate for the failure of Brown Boy, Atomic lI
was discovered in the interim. But on Derby day our hopes were
dashed to the ground. Atomic II won easily from Front Bell with
a half fit Gun Hill struggli for second place. Yet on the second
day of this same meeting and again on the third day, as if decreed
by some special fate, we saw what we should have seen in two D
class races,

N 1946 it was just the reverse with Whitsun Folly and Adventuress.
By all rights the Derby should have been the same push-over
that the Trial Stakes of the same year had proved to be for the
former, But just when everybody got ready to see a cut and dried
victory what must the heavens do but let down with a deluge and
thunderstorm the likes of which have seldom been seen in the month
of December. Result: a totally unexpected and uncommonly good
match race with Adventuress first, Whitsun Folly second and the
other three or four absolutely out of it.

yee FIFTY has been no exception, either in Trinidad or
Barbados, The first round began here with our Guineas, We
had Bow Bells, Perseverance, Cross Bow, Watercress and Bowman-
stan, all very promising when they were two-year-olds. But by
March this list had been reduced to Watercress only for the Guineas.
This race went as planned but the absence of the others certainly
took away a lot from it.

Meanwhile in Trinidad the feats of Wavecrest at Union Park
made the prospects for the Trial Stakes look rosy indeed. If
we could not expect all the big names to appear at least we would
see four speed merchants in the shape of Bow Bells, Wavecrest,
Bones and Bowmanston in a six furlong race that would prove i
a championship event if ever there was one. But by race day this
picture had fallen to pieces like a crumbling cake, First to be with-
drawn was Bowmanston, Then Lazy Bones, who could not keep
his condition. But worst of all Wavecrest although he eventually ran,
was discovered to be unwell. Result: Bow Bells first, the rest nowhere,

HE BARBADOS DERBY arrived on the scene. Would Cross Bow,

Colleton and Apollo, the three who had promised to be stayers
make a challenge to Bow Bells, and Watercress, and would Persever-
ance get over his leg trouble in time? These were the pertinent ques-
tions a few weeks before the event. Again the picture collapsed with
clockwork precision. Cross Bow proved unfit to be trained; Bow
was withdrawn after a rigorous meeting in Trinidad; Perseverance’s
leg never looked like improving and Colleton and Apollo just could
not make the grade, Result: Watercress first at the head of a pro-
cession.

Then tantalisingly mistimed came Mary Ann’s exploits on the
second and third day of the August meeting. Why couldn’t we have
seen Mary Ann give Watercress a proper race over nine furlongs in

the Derby even if, as most people agreed, she would not have beaten
er?

N to the Arima Derby Trial Stakes where only horses in the Trini-

dad sphere were expected to take part. Wagecrest and Lazy Bones
still on the resting list but Fair Profit, a likely stayer, in the offing.
Would he live up to the promise he had shown at two-years-old? It
is to be recorded that‘he did not but in spite of this the Arima Derby
Trial Stakes did not lack excitement even if it lacked class, Top
Flight won in a driving finish from Sun Glee, and to emphasise the
mediocrity of the field none of those who took part gained promotion
after the meeting although some of them were winners of other races.
This may not have meant much in the past but in this day of rapid
promotion of creoles it certainly demonstrates the poor view taken
of the classic candidates by the classifiers,

INALLY we come to the Trinidad Derby and as I have only re-
cently described the race and the preliminaries I will not go into
that here. But the sequence of circumstances which. caused the race
to turn out as it did, runs so true to form that one is tempted to con-
clude that there is some hand behind the scenes directing the show.

Why couldn't Wavecrest have recovered from his illness? Why
should Lazy Gones have hurt his hoof within a few days of the race?
Why did it have to rain so hard only in Port-of-Spain and its en-
virons and not particularly in any other part of Trinidad necessitating
the withdrawal of Cross Bow? Why was Blue Ribbon allowed to
start anywhere else but on the outside, when it was known that she
would probably bolt, which she promptly did, and in so doing, run
across Bow Bells (among others) who in turn had to be snatched up
se Eye piel A om Watercress run about 20 pounds below

er form and then come back on the third day to run a clo:
to Nan Tudor in the fastest 9% furlong or for the ‘epetiiat ond
that time, judging by past experience, Watercress should have been

“diay overboard, Instead she ran as if she was only then getting
ready.

Why does it happen? Your guess is as good as mine.

Ni
knows. It just does. roe





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SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 1951 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE











JANY. 13 — NO. 154

_ The Topic
This A Clean City? | ) ews Week

|

What About That New Year Resolution?
Do You

Call






Murder!

Miss Beckles murder!

Some boys’
The “cod-liver
Place Mottley

ambitions flop
ol! steel band
back on top.

What was new life to other
Was death-knell for “the rest

All was because the comrades
Were wallowing in a mes

Tears flowed like river water
Lou turned to Joe and said

Why boy) be still: do listen
Poor Judas is not dead

Open your ears; please listen
Things “coming out ou hear

Listen to true confessions?
For judgment day i here

If we had said the same words
A treason charge we'd face

But all the folks are saying
It's just a small disgrace

For Monday after midnight

A woman ‘elling souse

Said Joe your greatest enemy
Lives right inside your house

LATER IN THE DAY, the collection of stuff was stil) undisturbed—no one seemed to take any notice

of it.

* 10 O'CLOCK on Saturday this pile of stuff and and rubbish was still standing at the corner of a
ainess honse in Broad Street.

Start cleaning from the corner
Start mopping up the floor

Sea-water don't remove dirt
Try the stand-pipe next door
Ah boys we know the business
Joe is a comrade too

And what is done in secret
Comes right back home to Lou

Well Robert he loves business
And Joe philosophy

And Lou just like most womer
Vouch for integrit

So if you're doing busines
Do keep a proper check
Or some day soon or later
The business breaks its neck
When men start off back biting
And say things barsh and vile
Remember this old saying
Rogues cannot reconcile

And if you fool the people
You may get elear one year

But sure as the sun riseth s
Your dooms-dey must appear

The doetor in the Counc!!
And that bright busine s man
May they inject those patients
And clean both heart and hand

Yes talk of wrongs my brothers
Comrade open your eyes
Declare your own convictions
Then who dare to despise?
. * :
Be your own mater-builder
Draw from your “fountain nead”
You'll live as @ creator
A parasite will drop dead

VEGETABLES and other articles of food are here laid out on the
bare ground, next to an open gutter, on display for sale. This was
in Tudor Street, one of the main thoroughfares of the city.



Boys if to-day this topic

Is great philosophy
To understana it fully 4
Split a J & R in three
. ° °



Pictures such as shown
on this page san be tasen
any day in Bridgetown



AN OPEN GUTTER in the front of a big and up-to-date Jewellery
Store held this collection at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, in the very
heart of Bridgetown.

B. G. Produced
192,502 Tons
Sugar In 1950

sponsored by |
J&R BAKERIES er ee
makers of
ENRICHED BREAD
and the blenders of
J&R RUM
ARAL L ES SSDLL LESS SGI,



SPOT in McGregor Street just off Broad Street looked like this
4 o’clock on Monday.

»
A)
»
»







B.G.F.A. Delegate
Will Attend
Puerto Rico Talks

(From Our Own Correspoudent)

GEORGETOWN, B,G, Jan, 11





} woman
igh the stuff box outside one of

searches carefully

Gity stores. Her bag is filled
the still stirs through the rub-

Te pieicentinnats



MEN AND BOYS delve into the sweepings collecting bits of paper,
some of which might be used for wrapping articles of food.



JUST A HAND as it throws banana

skins on the roadway as others be-
fore it had done.

BG. Exported 29,022 22 Tons Rice In 1950

rom Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Jan. 9.
th one exception the British

e Rice Marketing Board
d all their export commit-
® for 1950 and as a result did
Jiggest trade since they start-
porting rice overseas. In
exports reached 29,022 tong
fainst 26,711 tons in 1949,

rd Manager, Mr. H. P,

(a
THE KEY TO

es

THE MOTORIST'S

Bayley sounded a note of optim-
the view that, barring unforeseen
happenings, this year’s exports
should exceed 30,000 tons.

As regards exports to Trinidad
it was explained that a balance
of 840 tons owed to that island at
the close of 1950, was already
blended. and ready for shipping.
The only problem at the moment
is lack of ships.

JONES & CO. LTD.
LL ee a ee

R. M.

Exports last year were as fol-
lows; Trinidad, 14,068 tons; Bar-

bados—8,783 tons; Antigua—1,228
tons; Montserrat—1,100 tons; St.
Kitts—940 tons; Grenada—995’
tons; St. Vincent—720 tons; St
Lucia—304 tons; Dominica—208
tons,

In addition to exports to these
colonies with whom the Board
kave contracts, British Guiana

OIL

— Agents

ESSO STANDARD

exported 1,678 tons to Antigua,
ism for 1951 when he expressed
some representing a gift after the
recent hurricane and some replac-
ing depleted stocks. Some ex-

porting was also done to Holland
and Martinique.

In 1950 a total of 30,507 tons
was consumed in British Guiana,
as against 30.653 tons in 1949.









(From Qur Own Correspondent) At an Executive Committee When the Question is
GEORGETOWN, Jan. 9. meeting of the British Guiana HAvE YOU GOT A
Official figures released by the Football Association held last
British Guiana Sugar Producers’ night it was decided to form a COLD or COUGH

Association disclosed that British
Guiana’s total production of sugat
from the various estates in 1950
was 192,502 tons. This exceeded
1949 production by 21,355 tons
Production came from a total of
61,612.45 acres of cane cut, Tota!
production’ in 1949 was 171,147
tons which was equivalent of a

Committee to consider ways and
means of sending a delegate to
the Conference which will be held
in Puerto Rico next month to dis-
cuss the formation of a Caribbean
Amateur Football Association, The
meeting formally accepted the in-
vitation to attend the Conference.

Bank of the

Demerara

‘River

IF SO TRY

BROWNE'S
CERTAIN COUGH






















SSO OY

PAIN

Z SACROOL |

Oot OP tA

oS


























yield per acre of 3.22 tons. The : io . CURE °
yield per acte in 1950 was 3.12 {oPPped the Mat with a total produc THE CERTAIN %
tons. omicoae a : , ‘ dy for Cougns x
Included in this grand total ie ee — nnn ee bore Se PAIN-KILLER %
of all the estates, is 113 tons pro- ard 7 Latins 18.301 un e Hoarseness, Bronchial As sth.
duced from Volunteer Canes. In Bilal : roger we tons), Whooping Cough, sainaete the %
1949 Volunteer Canes produced Hall (16408 lia pine ehaitiee SP Ai Pa x
246 tons. r Y "tal,
(15,850 tons); Skeldo 14,230
In addition, seven of the estates tons); Potts (14,387 ‘aaa C. CARLTON BROWNE On Sale At All
produced 3,147 tons of sugar from Ressouvenir (11,203 tons); Wales Wholesale & Retell Druggist Drug Stores
farmers’ canes, as’ against 3,089 (10,366 tons); Ogle (7,104 tons), Dia seit &
tons in 1949, Versailles (6,110 ‘tons), Ruim- 196 Roebuck St. —
Plantation Diamond seven miles veldt (1,866 tons), Houston (1,645
from Georgetown on. the East tons).
Bad colds and coughs are rampant all over the island just raya
: ¢ 3 S Co
now. Everywhere you go people are complaining of the Us Salt las)
particularly vicious coughs that are raging. They say . ff
they are terribly difficult to cure, but as long as 3
FERROL COMPOUND is available this is not alto- i
gether correct, because FERROL COMPOUND Nah 5
was specially made to combat just such coughs
as these. Most cough remedies fail in a case
like this because they only treat the ,
cough, but a system that is undermined ;
first by a bad cold needs rebuilding ‘
before it can help to throw off the cough ah *
that follows in its wake. Hence the bp |
success of FER ROL COMPOUND, Bis
because in FERROL COMPOUND is , a
combined a tonic to tone you up as rm
well as a treatment for your cough, thus .
aiding Nature to repair your strength so that you can defeat the cough PEED: ok eeenseen pees
that plagues you. : 4 DESCFIPTION
You are bound to notice a marked improvement from the ‘time you Be Fs pana wo: pia ne
start taking... of fresh cod livers, the nauseous fl
pisreate eltminated—with Iron Phe
| phorus contained
rSyrup of beta
| Quinine and Stry< ,
Malt and Flwid £ act vild
| Cherry B :
” + - » 399 NUTARITIVE—TON/C MUL }
“THE TONIC COUGH MIXTURE THAT BUILDS AS IT HEALS. hla tay te 4
Prepared under licsnee rom the
ferral Coe New You ’
FERROL COMPOUND is a combination of the active principles of Cod yntario, Canada, by R
Liver Oil, Vitamin A 1500 units and Vitamin D 500 units per dpse, to- eck s .
gether with other well known tonics, with the addition of Creosote and =e F
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STOKES & BYNOE LTD.~Asgents







==



f

PAGE SIX

- BARBADOS &4H ADVORATE

ee

(eens eueaer esas oaen”,

Aen ee ene

G55 = 2 SS SI
Printed by the Advocate Co. Ltd., Broad St., Bridgertewn.

January 14, 1951

MUST

NEARLY two years have passed since
Sir Douglas Ritchie signed his report on
April 25, 1949 on the proposed construc-
tion of a deep water wharf.

The passage of time has served one use-
ful purpose.

There is no one in Barbados who has not
admitted publicly and in private that a
deep water harbour is essential for Barba-
dos. There have been some who have been
doubtful as to the source from which the
money for its construction will come, there
have even been a few, a very few sceptics
who have pretended that the construction
of a deep water harbour was beyond the
resources of this island.

Today the sceptics have been put to rout
and everyone irrespective of political affili-
ation, whether employer or employee is
convinced that a deep water harbour must
be built at all costs, because unless it is
built, Barbados will be left behind the other
islands of the Caribbean and its natural
geographical position as a centre for Scuth
Caribbean shipping will be wasted.

Sir Douglas Ritchie, Vice Chairman of
the Port of London Authority said all that
needs to be said about a Deep Water Har-
bour in Barbados.

He said: “An urgent desire for the con-
struction of deep water berthage has been
expressed by all interested parties and
some improvement in port facilities is un-
doubtedly long overdue. The necessity for
such improvement can be in little doubt.
An inspection of port operations during
the loading or discharge of overseas ves-
sels in Carlisle Bay leads inevitably to the
conclusion that undue congestion in the
eareenage and double handling of cargoes
due to the necessity of lightering leads to
delays in the turn round of vessels. Apart
from the seriousness of such a situation in
the present world shortage of shipping,
delays of this nature can only result in in-
creased costs which must eventually be
paid for by the consumer or exporter.”

Those words were said in Barbados two
years ago, just before Sir Douglas re-
turned to London to finish his report. The
consumer and the exporter have been pay-
ing those increased costs ever since.

Barbados’ capacity to pay for a deep
water harbour depends primarily on the
maintenance and full utilisation of its
sugar industry. After decades of uncer-
tainty and years of violent fluctuation in
prices the United Kingdom has finally de-
cided to treat the British West Indian
Sugar Industry as of vital importance and
to give long-term guarantees as to its
purchase. As a result West Indian sugar
producers are going all out to increase
their output in an effort to meet the hither-
to unsatisfied demands of 900,000 tons re-
quired annually up to 1951 by the British
Ministry of Food.

This general incentive to sugar produc-
tion gives Barbados a clear green light to
go ahead with the construction of a deep
water harbour.

Not only does a healthy sugar industry
made possible by the United Kingdom
long-term guarantee permit greater local
investment in the proposed deep water
harbour, but the greater volume of sugar
required for export demands that Barba-
dos modernise to keep in line with other
West Indian territories whose deep water
harbour facilities will make bulk shipment
of sugar general, and unprogressive
islands will find that there is less demand
for sugar in bags than sugar in bulk.

Bulk shipment of sugar is bound to come
within a few years if only because the
high price of sugar bags adds to the in-
creased costs to exporters and consumers
of sugar.

The scarcity of sugar bags has led to an
increase in their price to such an extent
that it has been estimated that no less
than £180,000 would be saved on the ship-
ment from Barbados of 120,000 tons of
sugar, if sugar were shipped in bulk from
the docks of a deep water harbour.

The old bogey that modernisation
throws people out of employment is as old
as Watt’s steam engine or Hargreaces’ spin-
ning jenny. Modernisation increases not
decreases employment.

Sir Douglas Ritchie who was a con-
vineed believer in the necessity for Bar-
bados having a deep water harbour listed
some of the advantages which would
accrue to Barbados from the construction
of a deep water harbour.

One of them was an increase in trade
and particularly transhipment traffic. Two
were a reduction of congestion in the town
and an improvement in the amenities of
the town.

Another was a. lessening
troubles and disputes.

Three important methods of meeting
charges on capital necessary for the con-
struction ‘of the harbour were outlined
by Sir Douglas. They were by a reduction
of present costs of handling charges, by a
reduction in freight rates and by an im-
provement in tonnages passing through
the port.

By adopting the North Scheme, consist-
ing of a deep water wharf, sheltered by
breakwaters, constructed on reclaimed

Sunday,



in labour



'
land and about one mile to the North of

Bridgetown, between Pelican Island and
Spring Garden Anchorage, a large area of
valuable land, in excess of the port's re- |
quirements would be reclaimed and made
available for development.

|
Various schemes for port improvement }, ;

have been under consideration for some
60 to 70 years, Let 1951 be the year that
work on the deep water harbour begins,
is the hope of all those who have Barbados’
true interests at heart.

Loeal Government

Elections for the several Vestries of the
island took place during the week. The
future of local government was not an
issue in the elections and indeed it
appeared that candidates for election did
not foresee any change in the present
arrangements in the near future.

Nearly two years ago, Sir John Maude
presented his Report on Local Government
in Barbados. Sir John’s task was to re-
view the system of local government in
Barbados and to feport what, if any,
changcc snould be made in the system. Sir
John begins his report by examining the
h.story of Vestries in Barbados and des-
cribing the officers and functions of the

:

Aiter having examined the work which
has been and is being done by the Vestries
Sir John forms the opinion shared by
every commentator, that change is neces-
sary. The public health administration
is the most glaring example of the neces-
sity for change. “Certain health measures
require to be planned for the island as a
whole, and it is most unsatisfactory that
the loyal co-operation of one parish with
the central authority may be rendered
completely nugatory by inaction on the
part of its neighbour,” writes Sir John.

The main defect found in the present
system is the division of the island into
too large a number of separately governed
units. Among the other defects commented
upon are the combination of civil and
ecclesiastical affairs and the assumption
that the Rector of the parish should neces-
sarily be the spokesman and leader of the
parish in civil affairs.

The Report rejects the view that local
government should be abolished altogeth-
er and recommends that the present Ves-
tries should be abolished and that the
island should be divided into three areas.
These areas would comprise the City of
Bridgetown, the Northern area and the
southern area. The Report also expresses
the view that the City of Bridgetown
should be granted municipal status.

Sir John recommends that the qualifica-
tion for voting be extended to all persons
above the age of twenty-one, of British
nationality and with a residential qualifi-
cation, Whether the island is yet ripe for
adult suffrage is a matter which has been
debated recently in respect of members of
the House of Assembly and the same argu-
ments would be applicable to voting for
the Vestries or new Councils. Qualifica-
tions for membership of the new Councils
are recommended to be a British subject
of full age who is a local government elec-
tor for the area or the owner of freehold
or leasehold land in the area or a person
who has resided in the area during the
whole of twelve months preceding the
election.

The Report recommends that certain
functions now carried out by the Vestries
should be taken over by the central gov-
ernment. This move has already been
begun by the transfer of most of the roads
in the island to the care of the Department
of Highways and Transport and the
recommendation of the Report will merely
carry it to its logical conclusion. Public
health would also be controlled to a great-
er extent by the central government but
Poor Relief would remain as the especial
province of the new Councils.

The greatest dispute is likely to take
place in respect of the financial implica-
tions of the reeommendations. There is no
reason to believe that as a result of the
Report being implemented that the cost of
local government will decrease and a
change is recommended in the system of
local government taxation which has been
in operation for very many years, The abol-
ition of Occupancy Tax, recommended by
the Report, has already been achieved and
there is no reason why some satisfactory
basis of taxation should not be worked out.

Recommendation is also made for the

severing of the civil and ecclesiastical
functions carried out by the Vestries but
as the Commission on the Civil Service of
Barbados recommended that a Commis-
sion be appointed to inquire into the
whole position of the Anglican Church in
«the island, Sir John Maude does not.make
as detailed recommendations as in other
matters and merely lays down the general
lines on which it could be arranged.

Few persons maintain that no change is
necessary in the system of local govern-
ment and it is time that the public was in-
formed what the Legislature intends to do
about the Maude Report. Two years have
passed and yet candidates for the Vestries
do not regard their future as an issue in
the elections. The central government
should have the matter debated by the
Legislature and decide what action it is
proposed to take.




















SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Sitting Om The Fence



Nursery Rhyme By NATHANIEL GUBBINS sciousness in the merry month of
“People must learn to love MAY, with no money left to
ne”.—Presidemt Peron things were coming down almost Spend at the Festival of Britain.
ove little Peron, his beef is sq »on-stop. Russia will begin spring man-
nice, But I sent down medicines. oeuvres at several places at once.
And if I don't hurt him he'll sell Medicines, unless prescribed by Molotov will repeat All we want
me a slice competent authority, only cause + _— ‘ s waahdiiee

I won't pull his leg, or call hima a further chaos. zast winds are always probat
YS Whether you like it or not, I im flaming at NE. If they hit ~~

Then rations from butchers will refuse to change my way of life in your weak and impoverts

a > di le of condition, you are likely to get

ho le gg eh a rat ee dose of flu. Maybe

Then you must be prepared for something worse.

i start naval manoeuvres. St

LIKE the miners (and who can internal troubles during 1951. Molotov. and Vishinsky will say
ae i & wate Happy Days “All we want is peace.”

If a general election has not

getting back to work after the
; OLD Moore Gubbins, the world alréady occurred, JULY is a likely

Thru was trouble with Tum famous astrologer, offers his month for this peculiar form of
and Liver. After working ovef- (ous) unreliable prophecies for misery. Still tottering from your
time for three days they were re- the New Year. two attacks of flu and with the
luctant to snap back into form. If the weather experts say eggs giving out, you will be in-

Dr. Gubbins, their chief medical JANUARY will be cold, it is volved in bitter arguments with
adviser, sent down dose after likely to be mild. If they say it friends and possibly cracked on
dose of soothers and. stimulants wj]i be mild, look out for snow, the nose by some of them. The
alternately, with the result that hail, sleet, frost. During this entire chorus at The Kremlin will
both were in a state of revolt by month Stalin will say “All I want shout “All we want is peace.”
Thursday. is peace.” ‘ Most people think about holi-

. FEBRUARY, the influenza days in AUGUST. This time you

Dialling TUM month, will live up to its reputa- can think again. With most of

eee i my stomach? tion. Russian activities will fill your money ma on axmaments,
our stomach speaking. the newspapers with abnorm: you can stay at home an en
Had a good Christmas? depressing news which you yd to the bad news of the interna+
wer and I tried to make read in bed with a high tempera- tional situation, which usually
your Christmas as merry as pos- ture during savage fuel cuts. gets worse when the harvests are
sible. During this month Molotov will in. Mr. Wu, the Chinese Com-

And so you did. Now we must say “All I want is peace.” munist, will say “All I wlant is
get back to work. ec If a meat agreement is not pleace.”

Not before we have discu. the. Argentine by
working conditions for the co MARCH, there Will be hardly no eggs at all.
year. anything to eat but eggs. As meat agreement, you'll have to

Are you holding a pistol at my moc. of the eggs will have trav- live on oysters a roast pea-
lgad? elled a long way before you get cocks. In OCTOB! the oysters

I would if I had one. them, they are likely to make and peacocks will give out, so

Suppose I have breakfast at 8 you very ill, particularly after you'll have to live on caviar and
a.m. Can't I send anything down your severe attack of influenza. boiled swans. In NOVEMBER
after 4 p.m.? During this month Vishinsky will we ‘shall be croaking at each

You can stagger your hours. say “All I want is peace.” other in the fog about the price

So I can still have three meals In APRIL, when people of the of turkeys we may never get.
a day?, northern hemisphere are usually Mr. Ho, the Hindonesian Com-

Of course.

Then what's the difference? bird song and the sight of blos- his pleace.”

I think you are aware we are som, the defenc Budget will For DECEMBER Old Moore
not striking against the intake of knock most taxpayers out for the Gubbins can only wish you an-
too much food. count. Stalin will say again “All other merry Christmas and say

I want is ? “Peace is hall I want, too.”

The taxpayers will recover con- —L.E.S.

be twice as big.
Back To Work

signed with

I see.
During part of the holidays

J





« e AND WHEN AE MOVES INTO
ACTION, DOING HIS DUTY AS HE
SEES JT, THEY THINK HE 19. SOME-
THING THAT CRAWLS




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We Are All Imports=—And
Children Of Imports

OR $76.80 I can travel first :
class from London to Rome Says GEORGE HUNTE

by rail and sea. The distance in-
volved is 950 miles. The time taken The Chinese community
taxis and light refreshments from
3500 ome need not exceed

Barbados to Georgetown I must
. in Georgetown

YY a basic fare which varies ;
tween $120 and $130. the overall impression). Of the

(at least this is forests of Turner Hall.

The time taken is betweer four

for tips, refreshments and visits sonal wanderings I cannot remem- years ago.
ashore at ports of call will never ber seeing a Chinaman who was here.
come to less than $75 and will not driving a motor car.
possibly be twice as much if I
have no friends to entertain me old cliche that
in port.

It is against British

this background can that it comes as a surprise to greatest imports into

that closer association of the West find what little trace of Africa Guiana, the East Indians and the
Indies ought to be but is seldom there is to be found in these Negro peoples there are at this

considered. ~ isl In London I had moment clamouring for greater
Many people glibly tell us that West African friends and acquaint. political cights in that country
the British West Indian posses- ances but the only ones who hardly a voice except my own is

sions ought to be centralised, that J I f Afri- raised to point out that no one in
the interests of the people are.the rene Peles paere from. British Guiana has rights
Same and that political federation °®" — aga Siigtoves Sodie

e ities. friend Mr. Fowell there than the indigenous Indians
West ae Sink, Seren Buxton, ‘Editor of a Freetown whose _ forefathers preceded
lands. - et ee newspaper is not unlike Mr, Columbus in time. The British
Unfortunately we are told littfe Grantley Adams and anyone less cant aes . - — —
more than that and we are in- like an African than Mr. Grantley an today are offered an oppor-
clined to interpret federation Adams I have never met. tunity which they have never
according to our own particular The real African way of life is been offered since the fabulous
indulgences in wishful thinking. still predominantly based on the days of the 18th century when
To the European in the West tribe with its ceremonial ritual West Indian heiresses in London
Indies’ federation provides sub- and respect for the feudal chief. Were as plentiful as Indian nabobs
stantial Qpportunities, since it Nowhere in the West Indies have as au Law Golthuen "s of
Provides the only form of recog- I come across any vestige of an oe
nition which appears to African way of life although Y@luable than all the unta _—
bg in the modern world, everywhere there are obvious one —, > en
‘British Gui loon ee ggallis signs of African influences. _ were regarded in the 18th century
than 25,000 Europeans and Trini- Yet it is chieily among this as mines of wealth.
dad and Barbados probably have *¢ction of West Indians of African Today a similar opportunity
50,000 between them. It is not ieseent that the idea of federa> arises which the West Indian
easy to arrive at figure on has n mostly entertained. islands and mainlands can grasp
Europeans in the West Indies vet The reason is obvious. West in the interests of all its inhabi-
ae is no racial segrega- paatnte iy African descent are tants,
on area. But no on numerically greatest in the West The sad state of world in
tour the West Indies witha Indies but they have nowhere in almost oudnaes
being visibly impressed by the the area been able to compete South America has brought the
le number of ans who with East Indians, Chinese or Caribbean into the it.
live in the South Caribbean Europeans in commerce and trade. The resources of British Guiana
to-day. It is therefore logical for them alone are a challenge and an in-
are Trinidad a a “aes to hope that by political domina- oor ga | can only oa eee by
East ns make i road an communications on
presence felt by sheer profusion thay an run. the West Indies as & vast
ane Toad from San Fernando to if by birthright, “dad has synonymous with
wie ae a, Mined on both Actually the only peoples in the Oi, asphalt and Angostura Bit-
East In ahi tee ouses in which British Caribbean who can claim fet. evpeinie res - = he
In British Guiana East Indiang {)\% {Deciel rights in the area are because of its high standards of
form the bulk of the workers on British Gelee tina sam onetered 2 and
the sugar plantations and in the 4 rs most desired of all settlement
rice fields. housands of Caribs in St. Vincent eres in tish
and Dominica.
nousen which fy Tags'fra bam, Ai historiane re beginning to hg
boo poles and water buffalos trans. ‘ the 33 Grenadines have no
form Trinidad into an Oriental the Caribs wrested possession peers,

country. from the Arawaks in the islands. is knocking Let

There is an Indian Commissioner _ Unlike Africa or Asia therefore us go forward like men and
in Trinidad and Indian Universi- there is no moral right of women, content with the -
ties are offering scholarships to possession on original grounds. tation and the pattern in

Indians in. the West Indies, The There has been no exploitation which the Creator of the world
Indian ways of life are very deep here by ewcomers of innocent has fashioned our “dust and
rooted in Trinidad and in British indigenous peoples ashes.”

}Guiana, East Indians are not all Even the practice of slavery Let us play our part as men and
poor, One of the greatest palaces (foul thing that it is and never women and let us not be ashamed
facing Queen’s Park Savannah it more prevalent in the world than. of our part. ‘There is no more
Trinidad is owned by an Indian. it is in Soviet Russia today) was essential profession than the grave
Throughout Trinidad and _ in not confined to one race. I have digger and which of us can claim
Georgetown Indians are building no evidence to disprove that at to be more important to the c
lavish and expensive houses, one stage my own ancestors were munity than he?





Tins CORNED BEEF with CEREAL 31



In SEPTEMBER there will be}
If there’s still *o|

Phones — 4472, 4687,



made cheerful by the sound of munist, will say “Hall Hi wlant

Buy ...





























not of servile status in the West
Indies

To hear some people talk in
7 in Barbados and of Barbados today
is within 36 hours. Extras, tips, Georgetown is considerable and in one might with justice assume
Trinidad it is also growing, The that the peoples of this island
ee 7 their own aoe spines locally almost as if Sie
A she? i elu and associations an ey had evolved from Manchinee
To travel first class by sea from own almost every provision shop berries or from the primeval

The oa ’ nana ae ws are ail oe and
distance involve inese it is said that they know children of imports and it does not

Ce how to look after themselves im matter whether we arrived in the
and four and a half days. Extras the Caribbean and from my per- island yesterday or three hundred
None of us originated
The only exception to this
West Indian family tree are the
One gets so accustomed to the aboriginal Indians and it is a sad
-the inhabitants of commentary on the morals of the
the West Indies are mostly Afti- present day that while the two

scale, The name of Trini-|

14, 1951

SUNDAY, JANUARY

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SUNDAY, . JANUARY - 14, - 1951



: SUNDAY ADVOCATE TAGE SEVEN

Bridgetown Never Sleeps—I. SRR RRR ERR ee eee

Newspapers Are Born In The tains un cuow!

=PURINA HEN CHOW ©
Early. Hours







(SCRATCH GRAIN)

at JASON JONES & CO., LTD.--Distributors

\, OPP SSPSIS SOS SDPO POO GRO AL OF ISSO P CE ABCROPS




a




















*
.
WORK never really’ ceases in were being copied on metal }lock R NG US YOUR

the Advocate building in Broad Hy IAN GALE tor inpertion tn the pease x BRING
Street.“ and for the newspaper : \ ‘oS vy
staff night is the busiest time.doing a crossword puzzle — and From the sub’s desk the “copy In the Stone Room the paper % PRESCRIE I IONS
Tt-is then that the paper is print- try to make the “stories” clear goes down to the Linotype de- began to take shape. The met s
ed, and it must be printed late and interesting. He usually gets partment. There it is copied on Stories and the metal photogra| :

endugh to catch the late news Fome about 3.30 a.m In the metal, and the “slugs”,
and early enough to reach your same
breakfast table in time.

as they Were being put together in

department were Tony are called, are chen assembled and soqansies called formes, to m oe

Vanterpool, a reporter, waiting weeneed: The proofs are sent up te eeiees “ee
sr Laie .«, to the proofreaders who correct P forme is Ugntened and carrie

I visited the Editorial depart. by. the ’phone in case any late the ; ) Corres’ to the press’ for printing.

nien€ first. 'There’l foimd. twenty news should come in, and the them, and then the linotypists

rine-year-old .Everest McComie. Wireless operator, Alfred Taylor make their corrections, At about two

,

the night sub-editor, busy ar- Taylor was taking the Keuter’s A’nother department which was

ranging the front page. e has news at about forty words a busy was the

to write’ the headlines so that minute. Both of these

they fit in neatly—it is rather like news for McComie’s pages

: WE DISPENSE CAREFULLY
and ACCURATELY



in the morning
all the formes were ready, the big
Cossar press. began to: turn, and

Photo-Engraving the first Advocate for the day was
Supply department. There photographs porn.

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THE LINOTYPE is one of the world’s most complicated machines. Otho Waithe, at right, is one

IT ROASTS, BOILS, STEWS, AND FRIES
of the shift-leaders. He has been at the “Advocate” for 23 years. |

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PAGE EIGHT



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE





The Achievement Of Cinderella—Of The Beach—

Is Transformed

Osear Wilde

By

In scar Wiide’s most outrage-
ous savings there was usually an
e'emen. of truth, and it is a sad
reflection for those who never saw
him striding along Piccadilly in
London, regal in fur collar and
top hat, or heard his magical con-
versation, that he may not have
been exaggerating when he made
the remark recorded by André
Gide: “I haye put my genius into
my life; I have put. only my talent
into my beoks.” His works, how-
ever. constitute a solid and dur-
able achievement, big enough to
ensure his fture fame, and though
they may be Only a pale reflection
of his genius they do at least re-
present it im-Nearly all its aspects
Fifty years @fter his death we can
be grateful-that he wrote so much.

Of what does the canon consist?
There is the early collection of
poems, published when he was 27,
and there is The Ballad of Read-
ing Gaol, which appeared two
years before his death. There is
De Profundis, written from prison
to a friend and only recently pub-
lished in full. In between, the fruit
of concentrated literary activity
within a period of little more than
seven years, there are two collec-
tions of fairy tales, a book of
stories, a novel (The Picture of
Dorian Gray), a collection of es-
says reprinted from periodicals
(Intentions), several miscellane-
ous pieces, a tragedy written in
French (Salome), three comedy-
dramas, and a comedy-farce (The
Importance of Being Earnest).

Tie fairy tales, though not par-
ticularly well known, except per-
haps in Germany, where they have
always been highly appreciated,
contain much that is characteristic
and revealing. They are closer to
the Grimm Brothers and Hans
Andersen than to Perrault; that is
to say, they have an underlying
seriousness and express a vision of
life which is at times sad and
bitter. There could be no greater
mistake than to imagine that
Wilde was essentially a frivolous
jester. It would be nearer the
mark to say that he was funda-
mentally a moralist, and these
stories support that view. The
Christian idea of sacrifice for
others finds e ion in two
heart-breaking tales, The Happy
Prince and The Nightingale and
the Rose. His sympathy with the
poor and oppressed, an element in
his character which some have
found surprising and paradoxical,
comes out in The Young King, a
story that shows him preoccupied
with the application of Christian-
ity to life. It makes an attack on
the materialism of so-called
Christian society which neither
the Victorian child nor his parents
ean have been expected to appre-
ciate, and in depth of humani-
tarian feeling it anticipates both
The Soul of Man under Socialism
(written three years later) and
The Ballad of Reading Gaol,

From the stylistie point of view
some of the fairy tales, especially
those in the second collection, A
House of Pomegranates, are inter-
esting because they reveal Wilde's
growing delight in gorgeous, en-
crusted language. nder the in-
fluence of his two great masters,
Walter Pater and John Ruskin, he
fabricated passages of prose with
the deliberate intention of making
words produce the same effect as
a piece of music or a painting
Unfortunately the descriptions of
jewels and ‘ppedzige in, for in-
stance, The Birthday of the In-
fanta, now strike us as artificial
and silly.

Wilde wrote his fairy tales at a
time when he was experimenting
with various forms of literary ex-
pression. Simultaneously he tried
the Platonic dialogue or duologue,
and the results were entirely
happy. The volleying of ideas
between two speakers, one ex-

CAMPHELL NAIRNE

pounding, the other interpolating,
exactly suited him, for it allowed
him to talk with his own voice and

comes almost word for word from
Dorian Gray.

With the shadow of the im -

reproduce his own conversation. ing tragedy already wu he
In these duologues (reprinted in suddenly took a from
Intentions) Wilde, the talker was serio-comic writing and in three

heard on paper for the first time. weeks at Wort
Importance of ne Earnest,
which is sheer gaiety from begin-

The Decay of f
Lying and The ning to end, a romp with only one
Critic as Artist design—to please and entertain.

are briliiant ex-
positions of his
theories about
life and art. They
deal with difficult
and abstruse sub-
jects, and the
thought is tightly
packed, yet they
are continuously
entertaining. Part
of the firm lies in
seeing how he
commits himself
to paradox after
paradox, some of

The Importance is Congreve with
an added lightness of heart, Wy-
cherley without his grossness. It
conquered London in 1895 and im-
mediately took its place among the
masterpieces of English light com-
edy. Throughout, the cumulative
effect of the laughter set off by
the continuous word-play is over-
whelming, and the wit lies as
much in the situations as ‘n the
lines.

Three years iater came one of
his most outstanding works, The
Ballad of Reading Gaol. In the



} poe interval the butterfly had been
wae ae — broken on the wheel, and the
suavely and Oscar Wilde ‘#l¢ of the man doomed to be

hanged because he had “killed
more than extricate himself from the thing he loved” is unrelieved
seemingly untenable positions; he ‘"@gedy. Many readers, while
carries conviction with his sophis- recognising its force and sincerity,
try, though some of the pronounce- have thought it the product of a
ments he makes are at best half- transient emotion. In fact it was
truths. Sometimes, indeed, he goes net uncharacteristic. The hell of
a little too far, as when, illustrat- Wandsworth and Reading had
ing the theory that Life imitates heightened a sympathy with the
Art, he says that “Hamlet invent- underdog that had already found
ed the pessimism that character- expression in The Nappy Prince
ises modern thought” and “the and in the essay on Socialism.
world has become sad because a
puppet was once melancholy”—
which is plain nonsense.

calmly explains them. He does

Oscar Wilde’s countrymen have
never claimed that he was .
writer of the first rank; nor di
Much of the thought does not }. over make such a claim him-

appear to us as really original. .,); ;

For instance, today it is almost a On the Continent, yeaah

commonplace to say that Art [iS writings are very highly

should not copy life. Yet even his ©Steemed. It has been said that

platitudes are madg to seem pew ° writer of English since Shake-
“ speare, with the single exception

and fresh, so arresting is the 1

method of Seeaanaton so en- ¢f Bernard Shaw (another Irish-
chanting the verbal arabesques â„¢a2n!) is to-day so widely known
that are hung upon them, Of #nd appreciated in Europe. It is
course there are affectations and possible that he is overvalued
extravagances, but they can be outside his own country because
forgiven because Wilde was so ob- his plagiarisms and borrowings

viously enjoying himself—toss- pass undetected, and accordingly |

ing thoughts like roses. and play- to the overseas reader he seems
ing with them in happiness of more original than he really was.
heart,” as one of his biographers That was the explanation sug-
has put it. gested by Shaw to account for
the success in Germany of his

There is the same sparkle of
early poems.

epigram in The Picture of Dorian
Gray, but oe debonair galety is
missing. “Give a man a mask,” ;
Wilde had written, “and he will ® master of epigram. He pro-
tell you the truth.” Dorian Gray Pagated ideas as well as mots
bears this out. The character of. The doctrine of art for art’s sake,
Lord Henry Wotton is Wilde’s “iseredited to-day in his own
mask, and he leaves little unsaid. country, never had a_ more
The book has been described as Cloquent exponent. His principle
his spiritual autobiography. When of creative criticism was &n im-
he wrote it he had not met Lord portant contribution to aesthetic
te Dou ae ~~ sypeanent theory and has had its influence
events provided a rrible con- in every coun where literary
firmation of his belief that “Life ar iitane is castes as an art,

imitates Art far more than Art
imitates Life.” The writings of Oscar Wilde
They spread

But Wilde was much more than

The histrionic element in Wilde’s have a triple value.

nature drew him early towards the laughter (the civilised world is
theatre, and having succeeded in the gayer for his passage through
other fields of literature he again it); they have a tonic effect on

began to write for the stage. When mind: 3
Salome was refused a licence in me 1 AS Sone soneeeeee

ion for beauty in all its
England he turned (with his Rests
tongue contemptuously in his a ri ae Pater’s des-
cheek) to the composition of CtPtion of the Gioconda to a crate

comedy-dramas that followed the ° oses at Covent Garden.
stage conventions of the time.
They all pointed a heavy moral—
yet they were in essence immoral,
and a negation of his own artistic
creeds, lmost their sole merit is
that they provided a setting for
his epigrams. Wilde was prodigal
with the coin of his wit, and he
could afford to be, for he scat-
tered it from a seemingly inex-
haustible treasury; yet he was not
above stooping to pick it up and
recoin it. He reintroduced in these
plays many of the epigrams he be
had previously let fall in his books gi
and conversation. “Children be-

saxscisacnchineigiaainen
COMMUNISM TAUGHT
IN CHINESE CHURCH

LONDON, Jan. 13.

Chinese churches are often used
for “indoctrination” classes by
Communist officials, though they
remain available for Sunday ser-
vices, the Church of England says.

“In some places the clergy are
ing required to obtain permis-
on from the authorities to hold

services *
gin by loving their parents; after church’s olattel oo k —
a time they judge them; rarely, if clared.
ever, do they forgive them”; that —Reuter.



LONDON

Cotton beachwear, and eau-dc-
cologne, sun hats and sunglasses
are the rule for any beach, any
year, The iced drink beneath the
palms by a sunbaked beach is an
unbroken tradition. But on the
subject of fashions ior the L-acb,
there is no hard and fast rule

carried on from year to year.
Although the emphasis is always







—BEACH SUIT

on providing comfort and coolness
in the heat, different designs and
colours come with each summer

The most attractive feature of
this year’s beachwear is_ its
adaptability. Sunsuits, topless o:
shoulderstrapped dresses can

easily be transformed into a dress:
for off the beach wear by the
addition of a stole or bolero.

Dorville have a neat white bolero
cuffed all the way round, which





How To Make Tea

Tea is a drink to which ihe
English are more than partial ani
about which they disagree violen!
ly. Arguments of great heat cin
start on the subject of the wa:
in which the pot should be warned
how much tea should be used per
person, how long it should b>
allowed to draw, whether ml:
should be put in first, last or ac
all, and so on and so forth, Patric
Sargent threw himse'f into this
controversy when he spoke about
tea in a BBC programme calle:
“English Magazine.” Next Apr {
the London tea auctions vill b»
re-opened and Sargent said tha
this would be an important thin
in London’s commercial life. Sinc
the war all tea has been bough
and distributed by the Governmer. -
and the City’s traditional buyin::
skill has been in abeyance. Nov
that tea supplies are improviny



The LOADSTAR works harder...

ee « because the driver’s work is easier !



By Dorothy Barkley

they sell separately for wear ove:
Summer dresses in general,

Inset sleeves are still little seen.
The majority of dresses have but
a@ mere suggestion of a sleeve,
usually cut in one with the
shoulder. The neckline is casual
often without collar, Dorvilic
showed one dress which buttoned
onto the shoulders, tunic fashion,
and was completely sleeveless.

Illustrated here are two en-
sembles designed by Horrockses.
The first comprises a one-piece
beach suit, shirt and skirt. The
c are bright and ,
Note especially the casual set of
the collar and cuffs which are
cut in one with the shoulders. The
skirt, which can be worn with
it, is full.

The second outfit is a sundress
with white picque bolero to match
the facing on the bodice. This
comes in a wide range of colours:
zon. ee pees, rue Bese and

ue, al a
design.

Cotton, understandably, is the
chief material. This material, for
so long considered the Cinderella
vf Fabrics, without prestige
because it was cheap, has now
earned for itself a place of con-
siderable dignity, With new pro-
cesses, new finishes, skilful cut
and design, it appears in a
variety of expensive guises, It is

. ese
developments, combined with the
basic advantages of price, hard
wear and ease of laundering
make it the most popular materia}
fot town and office wear as wel)
as the beach, Other popular
fabrics, are quickdrying seersuck-
er, and rayon shantung with its
practical quality of crease resist-
ance. 4

Colours this year are rich and
deep, The African and jungle
prints so popular last year, have
been replaced by hothouse prints,
checks, and designs in which red
or tan are the principal colours.
These are frequently combined
with black to make a very strik-
ing ensemble. Noticeable in this
connection was the beach outfit
in a red and black design which
consisted of a one-piece sunsuit,
button-through dress and_ stole
which was reversed with black.

Swim Wear, 1951

This year the smartest swim.
suits are strapless one-piece
affairs, the bras so cut and boned
that they are no problem to the
wearer. However, for diving and
active swimming, there are de-
tachable straps or halter fasten-
ings. But there are always many

sellers will have to come to Brit-
ain, the largest buyer of tea in
the world, and expert private buy-
ers should be able to secure better
quality teas for us.

All tea buyers, Mr. Sargent said,
are men, although women do more
tea drinking. Before the auction
the buyers taste samples of all teas
to be sold and they, as an example
to warring housewives, agree
almost unanimously on how to
make a pot of tea. First of a’l they
weigh the tea carefully. The
weight of a shilling should give
enough tea for a half pint pot.
This pot should be warmed slightly
on the outside, the tea put in and
freshly boiling water added. It is
important, tea tasters maintain, to
use freshly boiling water; other-
wise the leaves will not come to
the top and draw in the right



women who prefer the absolutely
plain classic swimsuit—tailored
and becoming, it never goes out of
fashion. A variation of this styie
is the use of contrast in eithe:
fabric or colour.

Fabrics
nylon

popular this year ate
and rayon-wool-lastex.

Black and white are still the firm
favourites; a new colour is the
deep “midnight sapphire” which



—SUN DRESS

looks well whether you are pale
honey-coloured or darkly tanned
Navy and garnet-red are good
dark colours for the beach.

Beach coats are an essential for
the bathing holiday; terry towell-
ing is the most practical material
for these. For casual wear, a cot-
ton jacket may be lined with terry
towelling in a_ striking colour
contrast,

way. The tea must be left to draw
for six minutes and then drunk
with milk but no sugar. Milk
apparently enables tea to hold its
taste longer. Another fact that
Sargent disclosed is that smell is
more important than taste in
appreciating tea. The palate regis-
ters the tea’s tang but it is the
delicate aroma creeping up the
nostrils from the back of the
throat that gives most pleasure.
When the tasters have sampled
the teas they go to the auction and
bid for those they consider best
suited to the blend they have
planned. Sargent found it difficult
to predict exactly what will happen
when the auctions begin again but
he thought that as competition
usually leads to cheaper goods and
better services it was reasonable
to hope that an era of better tea
drinking in Britain was at hand.



|

GOODNESS

DRINK

Vi-eSTOUT

SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 1951

a



No more after-forty fatigue!

If you feel ‘too tired’ to enjoy life as you should,
too listless to take a keen and happy interest in
all that goes on around you, this advertisement
has good news for you.
During the last twenty years, countless numbers of
people all over the world have proved that, if you
take Phyllosan tablets regularly, your steady
gain in vitality, energy and cheérfulness will
delight both you and your friends. To regain
your joie de vivre, to feel young, gay, and
full of energy again, start taking ME
Phyllosan tablets to-day ! re

PHYLLOSA

fortifies the over-forties

| GEE ciecrric




















The refrigerating unit of the G.B.C.
refrigerator is so finely made that it
is hermetically sealed after manu-
facture and never needs servicing,
This refrigerator will stand up ‘o
any extreme of climate -- it’s
lovely to look at, too |

>

Solid chromium-plated

handle a

GEC—I6AP

THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD.

BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS
“REPRESENTING THE GENERAL ELECTRIC CO, LTD., OF ENGLAND





ee







tells“us
about pinking

.
.
é

YOU CAN EASILY

SAKE

'
.
°
'
'
‘
‘
’
.
»
‘

FGA

Our scieniists protest that this is a slanderous misrepresentation
of a serious test to safeguard the Anti-Knock qualities of
REGENT. What really happens is that regular tests are made
ina special engine, the compression of which can be progress-
ively increased until the fuel is made to knock. A “Bouncing
Pin”’ resting on a diaphragm in the cylinder head measures
| the intensity of Knock electrically, thereby enabling us to



THE NEW AUSTIN 2

A truck can be as powerful and strong as you Sike

AND $-TON TRUCKS

WERE ARE SOME CAB FEATURES ... Full

a & | determine and control the Anti iti
: y ra three-seater’’ (:djustable driving seat); lockable doors ; the o Anti-Knock qualities of ie sam)
—but it can only work es hard as the driver. The | dust and draught proof; : ject venene windows; door orally stow This is only one-of many tests which chgunsa iin “e4
; new Austin Loadstar is built to take care of that, | Widow ventilaung panels. viraminb En eT PRL a
The cab makes the driver’s work e.sier, sater + ‘}) Controlled ventilation ; single or °
< esung as.) demisting; sliding rear 3




ut more comfortable, and all the strength and power boat and sound insulation and radio,



\j you look for in an Austin is there in the chassis |



Austin Service covers the

PLATS ANG SERVICE
wi, 7 tustin ocomers everywhere can depend on it for

PETROL
Sterling Quality /

and engine. | parts, ser ei (EGEN

» and repairs.

AJ 5 T E W -you can depend on it?

sem





VieStout

THE VITAMIN STOUT
OSTAINABLE FROM:

ALL LEADING

Simeon Hunte & Son,






Get fuli details now from : y
GROCERS

Ltd.—Agents.

i JAMES A. LYNCH AND
| DA COSTA & CO., LTD. - Accents



|
| DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO. LTD.

(ECKSTEIN BROS.) 1372-1376 BAY ST. - BRIDGETOWN

MOTOA t



KPORT CORPORAT

BIRMINGHAM -¢«

SuNGLAND ee a





SUNDAY, JANUARY

Duck Lays
Big Eggs



ILTON CLARKE, of King

Edward Road, Bank Hall,
eame into the Advoecate’s
yesterday morning with a duck
egg that weighed three and a
half ounces.

Duck eggs usually weigh about
two and a half ounces. Clarke
said that it was the third
that his duck had laid large eggs.
This one was bigger than the
others.

TRINIDADIAN, Edmore

Jackbir. was awarded first
prize at the Local Talent Show at

the Globe Theatre on Friday
night.
Jackbir, who sang the Irish

song “Mother MaCrae” delighted
the large and enthusiastic crowd
that attended the show. It was his
first public performance in the
island.

The second prize went to Gerald
Daisley who sang “Day By Day.”
Other good performances were
given by Austin Evelyn
“My Love Loves Me”,
Rudder with “Our Very

The Judges at the Talent Show
were Mr. Everton Weekes, Miss
Murray and Miss Cheeseman.

in an accident along Black Rock
Road on Friday. She was treated
at the General Hospital and dis-
charged.

Mrs. Newton is Postmistress of
Black Rock Sub-Post Office.

Also involved in the accident
was motor car M. 166, owned by
Lepert Downes of Black Rock,
and driven by Arlington Savoury
of Peterkins Road.

CANE FIRE which broke out

at Society Plantation, St,
John, on Friday burnt 252 holes
of first crop ripe canes, They are
the property of Mr. C. N. Reece
of the same plantation.

Sixty holes of first crop ripe
canes were burnt when a fire
broke out in a field of canes at
Villa Road, Brittons Hill, on
Friday. The canes belong to
Charles Ruck of the same address.
They were not insured.

ILE LABOURERS from
the Waterworks Depart-
ment were putting down pipe
lines at Pine Hill around mid-day
yesterday they came across a
skeleton. It was found about
three and a half feet down'in the
earth.
The lines were being laid be-
tween the lands of, Messrs. Hut-
son and Goddard.





Basket Selling
Is Slow Work

If one walked a few yards up
Milk Market he would see dozens
of baskets on the pavement on
the right side of the road, Some
are plain and others have a blend
of various colours that inevitably
attract the passerby.

One of the basket makers is
Sealy Watson of St.. Andrew.
The business is not a thriving
one, he told the Advocate yester-
day, and as a matter of fact, he
said, he is often on the verge of
despondency .

Watson entered the basket busi-
ness about four years ago, but the
material is so expensive, he said,
that he has never been quite able
to make a livelihood out of it. He
has often to turn to something
else. For him there are no bright
selling periods. Some days the
sales are fair but on others he
does not sell a single basket.

B. Lowe of Eagle Hall, St. Mi-
chael, had a somewhat similar
tele to tell, but for him around
Christmas time is the bright sell-
ing period. After that sales go
back to normal, Lowe said that
he can never cover expenses,



oh ° y
_ 2 Ships Come

“zt.

io-day
‘two C.N.S. steamships, R.M.S5.
Lady Nelson and we Canadian
Chaitienger will be calling at
Briagetown to-day.
‘ine Lady Neison will be
Tivigg ifvin brilisn Guiana via
Trinidad, Grenada and St, Vin-
cent. She will be taking cargo
here and sailing to-morrow nignt
for Bermuda, Boston and St. Jonna
via the British Northern Islands.
The Canadian Chailienger will
be bringing cargo trom.Canada
for Barbados. Sne is also expect-
ed to sail to-morrow night for
British Guiana via St. Vincent,
Grenada and Trinidad.
Both ships are consigned to
Messrs. Gardiner Austin & Co.,

Ltd. a el ls













ar-

14, 1951

On Tuesday

Tuesday will begin a new term

for Harrison College, Combermere

office Queen’s College and St. Michael’s

Girls’ School. After the Christ
mas vacation with many holidays,
pupils will begin a

will be the game of the season

time This term, too, is athletic sports

for all the schools.



Small Pox Suspect
Leaves

@ from page 1
Barbados than Pelican.

but after
better, it became rather tiring to

wards the end of my stay. When

I was able to get up and around

I could walk anywhere on the
I used to wave at
° fishing boats as they
with passed. There were plenty of books
and Sylbert to read and over Christmas the
Own." Royal and Merchant Navy Welfare
over seyera!

island and
yachts and

League sent me
Christmas packages.”

While here he heard from home,
ae NEWTON, of Mortimer Both of his parents are alive and
Hall, St. Peter, was injured were glad to know how well he

had been treated.

Tyrrell has fair hair and grey-
green eyes, He is
inches tall, well built and a
friendly likeable fellow,



Guide Notes:
Visit Of The Chief

Sie
Guide

Lady Baden-Powell, Chief
Guide .of the World, left England
on SS. Colombie to visit the
Guides in the Caribbean. Owing
to the Carnival in Trinidad and
Grenada Lady Baden-Powell will
visit these Islands before coming
here for her official visit.

The S.S. Colombie is due in
Barbados on or about Wednesday
January 17th, and while the ship
is in t she will spend the
time e. A Guard of Honour



of 2 uts and 24 Guides will
welet her at the Baggage
Ware e.

In ter from the Ghief Guide
writte. a day or two before she
sailed from England she said she
was Lusy packing and looking
forward to her tour.

The SS. Colombie calls at
Guadeloupe and Martinique en
route to Barbados which is a
wonderful opportunity fer Lady
Baden-Powell to see the Guides
in the French Islands. On this
tour she will visit British Guiana,
the British West Indies, Ber-
muda, the Bahamas, Puerto Rico,
Haiti and Jamaica. In Puerto
Rico at the end of March she will
attend the meeting of the Sub-
Committee of the Western Hemis-
phere Council. From Jamaica
the Chief Guide will return to
England by ship, arriving there
towards the end of April.

Executive
Committee

There will be a meeting .of the
Executive Committee on Satur-
day January 20th, and after this

meeting details of the programme

for the Chief Guide's visit to
Barbados will be published.



GAS AND ICES
AT “EBENEZER”

Motorists who stop at “Ebene-
zer House”, Four Roads, St. John,
can now fill up in more than one
way. Formerly, since Mr. T. L.
Clarke opened a gasolene station
there, they could fill up the tanks
of their cars. Now, he has gone
one further and opened an ice
cream and light refreshment par-
lour.

Not oniy motorists and motor-

ing parties, but villagers as well

can make use of Ebenezer which
is now .a combination of liv-
ing house, gasolene station and
parlour.

The opening function was held
last Thursday. Among those pre-
sent were: Mr. and Mrs. A. P.
Cox, Mr. and Mrs. M, H, Alleyne,
Dr, E. B. Carter, Mrs. F, D. G.
Simpson, Mrs,
Miss M. Clarke, Miss L. Brad-

shaw, Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Tudor, terested in British goods in toucn
Mrs. C, Redman, Mr. with possible sources of supply in

Mr. and
and Mrs. H. N. Farmer, Miss
Margaret Taylor, Mrs. S. W.
Howell.



new year,
For the boys’ schools football

“I was
very comfortable and well treated,
I was feeling much

five feet ten

CivilAviation

For Bahamas

(From Our London Correspondent)

LONDON

GROUP-Captain Edward Mole,
British
duration gliding record, will ar-
25th
to take up his duties as Director

ene-time holder of the
rive in Nassau on January

of Civil Aviation, Bahamas.
This 44-year-old officer,

CAPTAIN EDWARD MOLE
cause to remember January
1951. For in cac iicn to taking

up his new appoui.ment, he got
married this month. His wife is
vxtremely interested in light
aircraft flying.

They were married at Caxton
Hall, London, on January 9th and

Mrs. Mole will accompany her
husband to Nassau.
Group-Captain Mole has 20

years’ service in the R.A.F. and is
widely experienced in most
branches of eivil and military
aviation. From 1940-42 he was
Assistant Director of repairs and
servicing at the Air Ministry.
He was then promoted head of
the "branch at the Ministry of Air-
eraft Production controlling the
technical devélopments of military
gliders and their towing aircraft.

His experience of civil aviation
was increased when in 1945-46 he
was seconded from the R.A.F. as
Manager of B.O.A.C. Develop-
ment Flight. In this capacity he
supervised flight trials of new
vee of aircraft.

rom 1946-48 he was Chief En-
gineer Officer of Transport Com-
mand and responsible for main-
tenance and efficiency along
Empire routes.

Group-Captain Mole also has
considerable experience of jet
aircraft .as a result of one year
spent as R.A.F. representative of
the National Gas Turbine estab-
lishment, where he was employed
on the development of this latest
aspect of aviation.

It is with a wry smile that he
recalls that year spent working
on jets and then remembers ear-
lier days when he was one of the
pioneers of another type of flying
~—this time without engines.

Apart from once holding the

British duration record for glidin,
—eight hours, 20 minutes—he sti
holds the Egyptian altitude record
at 5,200 feet. Another record he
retains, and one which is never
likely to be beaten is that of 147
successive loops in a glider. “It
was done for a bet” explains
Group-Captain Mole.
_ His other interest outside glid-
ing has been in the promotion and
sponsoring of light aircraft flying.
He has a civilian licence and is
chairman of the Ultra Light Air-
craft Association, which has been
instrumental in forming 11 groups
of light aircraft enthusiasts
throughout the coyntry.

In 1939, and again in 1947, he
was third in the Isle of Man light
aeroplane race and in 1949 he fin-
ished second in the Royal Aero
Club Grosvenor Trophy.

REQUIREMENTS WILL BE
MADE KNOWN IN U.K.

(From Our Own Corresponaent)

‘ PORT-OF-SPAIN. Jan. 11.
Trinidad importers, unable to
get any particular British goods
from the United Kingdom,
now have their requirements pub-
licised in the United Kingdom
through the Statistics and En-
quiries Department of the London

Chamber of Commerce (Inc.)
Mr, H. C. Squire, Principal of
the Department said that through
the medium of the “Openings for
Trade” columns of the “Chamber
of Commerce Journal,” the Cham-



Howard Smith, ber has been able for a number

of years, to put many buyers in-

the United Kingdom.”



—-——

May Save $76,000

who
retired from the R.A.F. exactly
twelve months ago, will long have



can

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Schools Open Director Of Bad Season

Faces J’ca
Citrus

From Cur Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jan, 9.
Reports trom Britain indicate

that this season —the first since
tne bulk purchase of citrus by the
Ministry of Food has ceased —
will be the worst in many years
from the point of view of the
Jamaica citrus grower, in that
Jamaican citrus is having a bad
time on the United Kingdom
market,

Earlier in the season, grepe-
fruit was reported to be earning
fcirly good prices but the price
for grapefruit has dropped con-
siderably, With the current prices
the Jamaica Citrus Growers As-
sociation is taking a loss of 5/-
on every box of fruit shipped,
and according to cabled advice
from London this week the grape-
fruit market is likely to be fur-
ther depressed toward mid-Jan-
uary and onwards when Pales-
tine is expected to release large
supplies of grapefruit on the Bn.
tish market.

The Association's plan to ship
scme 25,000 boxes of grapefruit
to the U.K. has been halted in
view of the new situation. To
meet it, the Association is ai.
ranging to sell the remainder of
the crop as processing fruit so to
maintain the present advance price
of 2/- per box to the grower.

Sweet oranges are in a slightly
better position but because of the
very low prices for these which
prevailed during the earlier part
of the season, present prices are
bardly enough to offset the lass-
es on earlier shipments.

250,000 More
Schools Needed For
In Jamaica

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, J’ca., Jan. 7.
An estimate that there were now
250,000 children of school age it
Jamaica unable to attend schcol
because of insufficient accommoda-
tion facilities was made last week
by Mr. G. T. Saunders, retirin::





" sank
SARE WORDS

.2 ew maddening puzzle

Cooearcs epnspeladarar

Here is the latest thing . in
quizzes—A CROSSWORD WITH-
OUT CLUES.

You have to arrange the maze
ot words so that they lead
logically from HEREWARD to
ALBATROSS. All you have to
remember are the seven rules
which govern the relationship
between any word and the word
that precedes it. Here they are:—
1. A word may be an anagram
of the word that precedes it.
IT may be a synonym of the
word that precedes it.

3 IT may be achieved by adding
one letter to, subtracting
one letter from, or changing
one letter in the preceding
word.

IT may be associated with the
previous word ina_ saying,



READING ON THEIR,
BACKS

HALF a dozer, big hospitals in |

president of the Jamaica Union of England are using a new divice

Teachers, at
annual meeting.
Mr. Saunders said there was
need for small, inexpensive
schools in the country districts to
provide accommodation for these
children now denied education.
“Laudable as are the efforts
to construct school buildings,” Mr.
Saunders said, “there are now
nearly a quarter of a million of
our children without accommoda-
tion in our schools — there are
actually 137,000 places for 369,000
children of school age. Addition-
ally it is estimated that over 43
per cent. of our children leave
scheol without attaining fourth
standard efficiency.”

the Association's



Guianese On
Cambridge Exams
Committee

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN. B.G. Jan. 11
Guianese-born Rawle Farley,

B.A., B.Sc., (Hons.), Dip. Ed.,
(Lond.), has been appointed a
member of the Cambridge Uni-
versity Overseas Committee for
Overseas Examinations,

Mr. Farley who is in London
doing research in Economics un-
der a Geddes Grant Studentship
awarded him by the University
College of the West Indies, is First
Vice President of the West Indian
Students’ Union in England. About
mid-December last he headed a
West Indian panel of nine to Cam-
bridge University on the invita-
tion of the University Examina-
tions Syndicate to discuss the pro-
posed changes in the Syllabus for
the Overseas School Certificate
Examinatior .

Tourist Board Asks.
Govt. For $10,000

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN. Jan. 11.
The Trinidad and Tobago Tour-
istist Board has asked Govern-
ment to provide $10,000 in the
1951 estimates for a survey of
sites suitable for hotel, cabana

and beach development in the
Colony.
Tentative arrangements have

already been made by the Board
for outstanding U.S.A., experts to
conduct a survey if funds are pro-
vided.

This proposal was submitted to
Government immediately after
the meeting of the Caribbean In-
terim Tourism Committee in San
Juan, Puerto Rico in December,
when C. I, T. C. passed a resolu-
tion strongly urging its member
governments to embark on the
establishment of “pilot plant’
hotel and resort development in
their territories, financed, if neces-
Govern-

designed by Helen Craig-Davies, |
grey-haired professional mventor.
Jd: enables patients who are flat



INVENTION

The patient reads
» around her
on their backs to read, write and
see what is going on around them
It is an arrangement of chro-
mium ~ plated tube, fastened to
the back of the bed and over the
patient’s head. To it is fastened

and sees

s reading desk which can be ad-'!

justed to any angle.

There is a separate mirror, nine
inches by seven, also adjustabl:
to any angle, so that the patien'
can see all round the room

—L.E.S.



Rupe: oh! the



Walking down the hill, Rupert
s reaches the clump of bushes, and,
$2 sure enough, he finds Rosalie sitting
sticky.
* Hullo, I've come to look after you
nd to take you back to Mrs, Pig's

ind munching something

Rosalie starts

nttage,”” he says.
‘ Then she

violently as he appears



City Council Will Buy
Sewer Disposal Plant

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 9
Government has granted the
Port-of-Spain City Council a loan
of $48,000 to enable them to pur-
chase the sewer disposal plant at
Waller Field Air Force Base
The Council wil! hand over a
cheque for $36,000 to the Garcia






PAGE NINE





invitation f
Z

to enchantment é ;

Ze

tog tham ever
simile, metaphor, or
tion of ideas.

5. IT may form with the pre-
ceding word the name of a
well-known person or plac«
in fact or fiction.

6. IT may be associated
the preceding word in
title or action of a book,
or other composition
» ST? re .

associa-

=

By BOURJOIS

POWDER -

with
the
play
PAGE

ROUGE +» PERFUME +

VANISHING CREAM .-

LIPSTICK -
BRILLIANTINE -

TALG « COLD Cx I

pe

may be used more than twice | HAIR GREAM F







consecutively, and only one! aiinasaseadslsht f eee ie ae
ai — to govern one 9

ations : P
enone you wont.

A typical succession of words |
might be: MUTUAL-FRIEND- |
FOE-FLOE-SLOE-SOLE-HOLE. |
CORNER-HORNER-JACK.JILL-
HILL—CONSTITUTION,

hear

yourselt walk

in Clartes
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| 7. Preceded the fai! of Row 1)
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| 10, Initially shes Tra Lingalre “
(L Fit out our severity 6)

leaf-ee0!—aud
12. He resists authinrit »)
ji4. Bish (4)
1b. Pair this to get a ut ap. if
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sound of the ‘ast

4. Idea rate (anag.) 18)

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German song (3)

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you'd get 4

EXPERIENCE ©

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LOCAL AGENTS; ALEC RUSSELL & CO. BARBADOS

|
usaie Across
Wager Li “lite

Lint. 15 Gyot te

JoiuLION of yesterday

4, Sitter; 5 Nap; ¥
13. Pelt; 14
17 = Any Le.
Mandarin 25
28 Hades
‘atter, 4







Sketch Book—-9 |
vo ¥ t) : .




gets up with a sigh of relief. ‘* My,
you gave me a fright!" she
quavers. ‘' Thank goodness it's only
you. We needn't go home yet,
need we? Stop here for a bit and
have some of this candied fruis.
It's topping.”” “*Whew, what a
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First Of The Line sary, completely from Commerciale Company for the 9 London, |
Shooting Results ("28n%"o8"SeXIN7FMNY, [ment funds or under government purchase of the plant. Work on” “M*S™EGtANDC emer | :
The first of the Saguenay Ter- The Department of’ the Con-| guarantee of the payment of long the removal of the plant — will ap arr
minals steamships, for which The usual Saturday afternoon troller of *apaete and Exports | term loans.
| Messrs. Plantations Limited are practice at the Small Bore rifle may clip about $76,000 off its m Don't miss Andrews
the local agents, arrives to-day range took place yesterday, when expenditure this year on cargo- “pour Deuces” Pro

a stay of four days at this yy 7, A. L. Roberts scored a handling on the wharf. amine every Thes

over

begin next week.
|
|



ae ssible. The eight best scores is expected that this saving
The London Mariner brings to At as —— a ae Se oibectars as a result of a Radio Distribution,
Barbados a cargo of whisky, bis- scheme under which the General
cuits, asbestos, machinery and 48 T. A. L. Roberts, 100; M. G. Manager of the Port Services
mctor cars, besides other mer- Tucker, 99; G. May, 98; P. Chase, Department will undertake to OUNGSTERS, as well as grown-
chandise, t@@ 98; H. B. G. Marshall, 97; M.A. deliver goods to merchants on : , ;
She has two intransit passen- Tucker, 97; G. Pilgrim, 97; S. the order of the Controller of ups, must make sure of Inner Clean-
gers for’ British Gulans, Tempro, 96, Imports and Exports. | £ liness in order to keep fit. Playtime, and
‘ & ; school-time, demand good health, and
ee a this young lady has found the way to
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As a refreshing drink at any time of the
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For white teeth, use

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FLIT Is



See wees ee ee



,4 the time in Korea, thank good- pe Ran Mag was = a at Worthing, told mé the same my diary: “It has just occurred ‘ ;
| } ness. oprers baven prisoner Ketore Wey thing. to me that I’ve never seen a cat }
4f You may get a week on end could get out of their blankets. The cries of the women and the in Korea. Must ask if they have
He when it isn’t much worse than at of Cates pad Pat x Sma Ptr. two children were $6 pitifal as them.” — - ;
a) home. Then, without any warn- last few dave would bg b Faken they were led to a new tfench I did ask. I asked an inter i
TO BRIDGE 9 ie. seet, comes ehiene ince two weeks ae wnat bur lads started threatening preter who said: “Oh ves ell TLLUSTRATED CATALOGUE
hy Pye woe and every & the little black-coated magistrate eee ar Py their skin: t
reezes § . ‘Black Friday’ with a brief-case who was super— for furs. me Koreans grow so
, Temperatures drop to 30 and 40 3 Aethbs . ; 3 cea °
THOSE TWO below freezing point in the lati- Down at my local there’s a fel- V'S!NS the ‘executions. fond of their cats that the;

PAGE TEN



LAST night the Keens dropped
in. They live in the next flat to

mine in Hampstead, and Alan, t . Friday for the Fusiliers. Execution After each shooting the graves you through to a sound position in any ey
ids ge Beckson oc Renetied bee emeay's Aypives back from KOREA "' At ca eee yu trough en sound pein nm) ee
war, said: “What is going on in ®ll. Everything went according to That note was to remind me of and then the earth filled in. dre individual. There's a friendly,
Korea? How can the capital city Plan. : * ose ® a story so ya Set oem Se normal... personal touch that encour-
of a nation fall with hardly a _ If it hadn't been for the censor- {9} }} he 1s writin stra t repeated it in that ge t of .. Fifty yards from the graves ages quick progress and
Chinese in sight and scarcely a ship I could have cabled you a i. ee. oe ie Wri out there was a small hut where a makes for early
e the life our boys « Korean woman lived with her
‘ . ciency
Z to the heart eeee we two small children. Apparently effi ,



World Trip
Will Cost
£13,000

. aaah ne in September 1949 was ted
the fixed undercarriage on air- B its bookmakers t ate in ;> execu i

y CHAPMAN PINCHER perm: okmakers to o) L . ing for more than a month to
ace aft je moe suitenous liners? ; PARIS. opposition to the Totalisator, is ne cecum x time bomb, on build the stem and forepart of a,
eo agg 7 i Soa hate Experts in the design shops A huge electronic “brain,” be- the best. 4,000-ton passenger-cargo vess¢l. |

It will be round the world via
the’ South and North Poles in five
stages. The airplane—a Constel-
lation air liner.

The longest stage, from Christ-
church, New Zealand, to Cape
Town, over the South Pole will
be 7,210 miles.

In the airplane will be mem-
bers of the Adventurers’ Chib,
Chicago.

The ‘club has bought the Con-
Stellation for a series of flights.

Record breaking will not be
attempted although. during the
25,000 mile flight records will!
certainly fall.

The route will be from Chicago

to Honolulu, Christchurch, Cape- der earriages make so +h differ- has to be blown through to keep and Steward of ~the Auteuil ? ; of paints and everything from
Mm tn het ease it COOL, sie ® ‘Steeplechase Commictee. Loosened First Day he Ee Le gets bade fish-hooks to counter-scales.
via the North Pole. The Government financed the The intention is to have betting « Don't tet ing, sneezing, chok- “nd cause WAS Itching, Cracking, ’ 9° f 4t!!
Undoubtedly they would knock project because the “brain” will be Offices, as in Ireland, in addition | tng attacks ronchitis or Asthma Eczema, . oUt oO eminence! Can't get it? Try us for it!!

Special Compass a few miles an hour off speed. of great value for working out de- to facilities for racecourse betting, | Gay Jour algep and en Re Pimples, Foot Itch atid other blem-

De Havillands, builders of the be of ercral) Gone and other ‘ a | DAC Jed reat ‘medic! + not. a ighes, Ordinary trap tma ts ee de nok

irple illo , jet-engined Comet, the worlds defence research problems. ne ob ar but wor! “n : discov-

nel, et cars Sere" Stnneecatty reseed "Ake a glentetng nee LEARN FROM COMICS Teauib'MG Md: Menritiaans I iain Ah He ea

for Polar navigation, radio sets the fixed undercarriage when they hailed the Manchester “brain” as PITTSBURGH. | dose t minutes and fs guaranteed to give you

for long-range reception tests ant
weather-recording devices.

One Instrument will keep a
record of every word uttered on
board and every message over



shot being fired?”
Well, I told him

and I can tell

you that so far as the fall of Seoul

talking with the
man in the flat

WORLDS

~

Fixed Wheel
Planes?

JAMES STUART
SHALL we ever see a return of

may throw up their hands af the
Suggestion, and get on with their
pians for even more sléek air-
vianes.

But must air travellers be held
up by “undercart’” failures?

Often an airplane has _ to
circle because one of its wheels
has stuck.

At best—delay

Mostly undercarriages
no trouble, but when they do,
emergency organisations have to
be alerted in case of a crash Jand-
ing. At best there is delay

A London Airport incident a
few days ago prompted a pilot to
ask me: “With the speed of the
modern airliners, would fixed un-

cause

produced the Hern, a
ger ‘‘feeder-liner.”

14-passen-



TRUMAN'S DAUGHTER

THIS DIARY ig
OF MINE Is |#

BERNARD

They recovered .. .

the war.

Don’t know how right we were,
out we reckoned the Chinese
didn’t attack us at Christmas be-
cause the weather wasn’t cold
enough. The weather isn’t bad all

and very much
When it

tude of Seoul,
lower further north



is this

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

It WASN’T Fun Finding Out

WICKSTEED

we can’t? It must be
they are used to it.

entry in my diary for December
15 that says, cryptically: “Black

On the Thursday night some of

because see eight of the prisoners marched
It’s their kind to a trench and shot through the

of country and climate. They*ve back of the head as they knelt in

themselves before the attack, but
they couldn’t conceive that any-

The boy of eight
He swore that one of the boys

body would be about in the open was no more than eight years old

oh such a bitter night and so
did_nothing about it.

ey and the other only [3. Young

Lieutenant Gordon McEwan, who

They soon learned their mis- used to be a newspaper réporter

low with a brothét in Koréa,
brother

nd
has

been writing interference,

He protested in Korean at the
and while he was

as cold ag that, you give most of home saying the South Koreans talking the prisoners were shot.

your attention to the problem of
keeping alive.

Up round the Chosin reservoir

there were several cases of Amer-

death while on guard.

New Brain
Needs A
Cold Tonic .

lieved to be the most advanced of
its kind in the world, has just been
built for the Government by a
team of Manchester engineers.

This was disclosed today by
Professor F, C. Williams, the Man-
chester University scientist who
designed it. at an international
conference on robot machines in
Paris.

The “brain” is 50, feet long,
seven feet high, and contains 3,500
radio valves. It thinks so fast that
it can obey 3,000,000 orders in one
hour.

Britain Leads

It can add up a column of 500
numbers in the time you take to
say the word “addition”.

When full out the “brain” gets
so hot that a continuous air blast

a great achievement, since it puts
Britain ahead of America in the
race to market these robots com-
nercially.

QUAKE SHAKE TERCEIRA



are as bad as the North Koreans.
He's seen them shooting wormen
and children himself. t

One of the children raised his
head as he knelt in the trench
and a uniformed policeman bent

No one in the pub believed it, down and slapped his face. After

was probably right. I have



cried out something in



Koréan that our lads

couldn’t |
understand. |

’ - the Northumberland _ Fusiliers the whole thing was so a i
couple of Weeks ago from Seoul It’s not so bad if you can stay moved into a new position on the her that she went on nonchalan y
A FEW days age itself. saying @xaetly what would in your sleeping-bag all night. If outskirts of Seoul and set up sweeping the snow off her door-
happen. I could have filled in you've nothing else to do but look their tents in a_ valley. They step while the executions took
and this is what I every detail except the date. after yourself you can keep pretty didn’t know it, but in the dark place. 2 CHOOSE
It was quite an odd experience snug even in a hole in the ground. they had pitched camp on one 0. Also close by was the niagis-
to sit by my own fire with the But you are in no state to leap the South Korean mass execution trate’s car, in which a woman,sct YOUR C “ER
was looking like Christmas cards still on the man- up and fight at 3 o’clock in the grounds.. ; : in full view througtiout. ARL
tel and read all about it. morning, and that’s the time these Early next morning 29 prisoner Our lads wére so furious they | he incy Exams. £0 ene th Quaneiey siievayinit
Here’s a note in my diary that heathen Chinese and Koreans arrived in a truck for execution. wrote ott a full ré and the | Aviation (Engineering and Coferedeciat em Sa Se ahainebrion
13,000 mifles away says: “The big attack is expected choose for their attacks. Quartermaster-Sergeant Brown, following day ré ate aves of Wireless) ightsmanship, Radio (Shore Ware)
to-night. If it comes, bang goes Not fair, is it? But it’s their who’s a decent, ordinary English- UNO came out a d dug up th ing, Architecture G-F.0.. Eng. Dent. , Speretecial coe
from Britain our turkey dinner, for we’ll all be answer to air power, and a good man, was shaving when the first Mik Gee eee toe late ‘and of Works institute ipa a —
a Sat on the move again and there won't one too. fusillade of shots rang out. He staves. y hci regs 8 em teathareatios Teachers of Handicrafts
be an Allied soldier in Seoul 48 Used to it looked out of his tent and saw a In the night someone had 1] grams CT tis © : lation. ea
Yesterday | was hours from now.” : crowd of British soldiers running there before them. They foun’! Gite. Eula Aa jects ioe &
The date’ of that entry is How do thty do it without towards a nearby hillock. He the women but the bodies of th>| Engingerine. Bronce Path Wireless Telegraphy and
Christmas Eve. freezing to death themselves, if joined them and was in time to children had gone. , | ens Police. Special Course Telephony

I saw Brown and McEwan ‘4
few hours after they had wit :
nessed these events. They showe' |



Gentlemen, please” and my ow
children tucked up safely in bed
I began to wonder if it was true
myself,

Cats? Why, yes

Here’s a more cheerful entry in



actually keep them as pets. They
eat mice, you know.”

A comment like that, made in
all sincerity, makes you realis>
what a long way from home you
are.

Next: What sort of a man is
—L.E.S.

ican sentries actually freezing to but I had to tell him his brother he’d been shot be raised oné arm Syngman Rhee?
an and







“Bookies” Again Time Bontb Killer 20 Men Build Ship;

In France?

BOOKMAKERS and _starting-
price betting may return to France.

Racehorse owners and breeders jewell

there have come to the conclusion
that the British system, which

Bookmakers were put out of
business many years ago in France
and all legal betting has since been
conducte throug the Pari-
Mutuel Conferences have been
held recently with a view to urg-
ing the Government to change the
Act and permit bookmakers once
more.

Executed

MONTREAL, Jan. 12.
J. Albert Guay, 33, Quebec
er convicted of timé bomb
murder in a Canadian air liner

board an airliner in a plot to get
rich quickly by killing his wife
to collect her insurance. The
plane blew up in m killing
Guay’s pretty 28 year old wife
and 22 other .

A friend of Guay’s, Generux
Rust, has been convicted of par-
ticipating in the same murder

Most of those intimately con- and has been sentenced to die.
nected with racing are in favour Another friend. Mrs. Pitre, will

of the new move.

It is under- go on trial for murder in Feb-

stood that M. Marcel Boussac ruary.

is one of the few big owners

who would prefer to retain the turing

present arrangement.

Rust was convicted of manufac-
the bomk which was
placed aboard the plane on Sep-

On a recent visit to France the tember 9, 1949. —Reuter.

head of an Australian bookmaking
concern was asked to explain the
business of bookmaking as con-
ducted in Australia, Among those
present was a well-known owner



Comie books and scheol teach- |
ers usually work at cross-purposes |
but Westinghouse Electric Co
poration, home of many scientific
miracles, thinks it can make them |
as compatible as strawberries arid |

the radio. ee Ses ) . ahs hess |
»The Corporation's .school service
It is hoped to obtain new MAY GO ON RADIO LISBON, Jan. 13. department announced that it has

information about the weather

reached a_ tentative

A severe earthquake shock on

published a comic-typé book





ASTHMA MUCUS

im Go Ta Tea are

move thick strangl: mucus, 2, fae

promot er ng der,
end Riga
ing, Ww , if.
cuarataage Oot MENBAUD foe
shemist Sy. rye



It Will Never Sail |

A ship which will never we |
completed and never sail is being
built at Southampton for the Fes-
tival of Britain.

Twenty men have been work-

The bow, 30ft. high, 20ft, long,
is to be placed in the shipbuild-
ing section of the Festival on)
the Thames South Bank,

The outline of the ship will be
framed by scaffolding to give)
the impression of a vessel under |
consttuction. — |

At night it will be floodlit. fT
has taken about 15 tons of mild
steel, the type normally used in |
shipbuilding to build a “skeleton”
ship. —LES. |

{





ited in 7 Minutes

~ soft, clear, attractive, smooth skin

fy one week, or money back on return
of empty package. Get guaranteed
Nixoderm from your chemist todayand
Ni od j remove the
e of skin

For Skin Troubles trouble.

real cause |

14, 1951

SUNDAY, JANUARY







THE STEPPING STONES
TO SUCCESS

Don't hesitate about your future !_ Go forward,
confident that The Bennett College will see























If your requirements are not listed above, write us for free advice

Direct Mail to DEPT. 188





/ r § at particu- lived in it all their lives and it. ' me the aves, then merciful! : ‘ie NETT
tet aoneeak was an ‘the ition of learned how to get on with it. We The firing party returned to the covered oth snow, and demon THE BEN ; COLLEGE LTD.
next te ours in two British newspaper coneagies haven't. , truck, where the remaining pris- strated just .who stood where $s D. E AND
who'd been languishing in their There was one night whem a oners were kneeling on the Short of seeing it myself |! if
Hampstead bedrolls for two days with flu or British guardpost was overrun by yround.. They marched off © gouldn’'t have been better in ;
Mou some kind of fever guerrillas in the small hours’ of further eight which Brown told formed, = ade
1 Luckily the Chinese allowed us the morning. Our boys, who'd me included two young women yet kn hen I told th:
; i been in the country only a couple et, you Know when I told t
our Christmas dinner fn peace, al y ple aged between 20 and 25 and two story in the pub with the gooc a i
and the two sick men had time to Of weeks, actually heard the |”... old Tandlord shouting “Time Cl L NOTICE TO ;
recover and get on with reporting guerrillas whispering among "~ g ime. |

TRADERS & SHOPKEEPERS

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over the South Pole, which has jyjcx ities Toca i Terceira island, in the Azores wench explains for stagents such Ss d Uj P i ti
: never before been visited by , 0°. 4 : rene - caused panic among the local pop- !Mvolved matters as atomic energy dua
big aircraft. Prepideore daughter, is reported ulation yesterday according to re- jet propulsion, television an m pee P ro etton
e e

f

aot
oie sata

The exact cost is unknown, but
flying a Constellation usuall)
costs about £130 per hour. Ther«

agreement with the National
Broadcasting Company to appear
vn a dozen radio and television

ports reaching here to-day.
Many houses were damaged,
according to Press accounts but,

other new scientific developments,
The book is intended as a teach-

ing aid for science classes in

junior and senior high schools.



. : , casualties were mentioned. d “HOW DOES IT e 7” re d
will be more than 100 hours flying shows at a salary between $2,000 ma a i aed at Entitled, : | @
so it is likely to be £13,000. and $3,000 for each performance, yg hon mente © Population of WORK?" the books contain 16 c

—L.E.S.

iStitiisisdeiseaseeis

SSTStSTSSSSSsSSSe se

THE

“Stamina, strength and



—Reuter.









brightly-coloured pages. —INS

““ Beauty, you lifted

up my sleeping eyes, 4

And filled my heart

with longing with a look.”’
JOHN MASEFIELD

Like a happy memory, the haunting











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1S THAT THE ADVOCATES Sats
D ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT ?, ,
THIS IS MISTER BIFF BONG
SPEAKING. LOOKS
‘DO ME A FAVOUR, WIL
yuu 2






—- .
YEs, THis is Tre
ADVERTISING 4

YW DEPARTMENT, 4
ADVOCATE





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LK

IS THERE ANY CHANCE FOR A GUY
LIKE ME 10 SECORE ADVERTISING

LS
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|









gest RECEIVED ....

TABLE & BEDSIDE LAMPS

PRE-WAR QUALITY and PRE-WAR PRICES

Colours:

OLD IVORY, RESIDA GREEN, CHAMPAGNE,
TURQUOISE, PIGEON BLUE, SUBDUED ROSE,
PALE MAUVE, MOTHER-OF-PEARL

| AT OUR SHOWROOMS IN TWEEDSIDE ROAD

HEY 77 ..weer

MLL BE Ace a












WAY YOU GDYS
HANDLED THAT
AD FOR MISTER
BIFF BONG
GIMME A
JOB LIKE



————$—<—=


















WHAT 1S THISP ISITA
DOGGONE INVASION,OR
ar? ,




















s 2 IS THAT THE
ADVERTISING
DEPARTMENT ? .)#







oes ()








WHEN YOU ADVERTISE 7 |








INTHE ADVOCATE ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LIMITED
ee MISTER *BING BANG AR Tweedside Road St. Michael





OUR NEWSPAPER HAS A

ny)




say F wat DID YOU
GUYS POT INTO THAT
ADVERTISEMENT ABOUT ME ?
THAT ) HAD DISCOVERED A
SECRET WEAPON OR SOMETHING
WY, TOE PLACE 15 LOUSY wit
JAPS, CBINKS, /AEXICANS, AND

MAY GE- A KOREAN OR TWO ToaRown
WW §

Phone 4629 & 4371
























Cani— (
ANDERDON —

Shell is proud to have played a leading part for fifty years in the
progress and development of internal combustion engines on land, on
sea and in the air. Shell research has had much to do with the
perfecting of the modern jet engine. For the Comet today, for the

horseless carriage of yesterday, it has been true to say ....

you can be sure of

a



BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

HELLO*HELLO «LILY «WHO IS THIS?
WHO? WELL # THIS 1S UNCLE
DAVE«1'M AT THE coe











;
:



PAGE TWELVE



CLASSIFIED ADS.|

—

*

TELEPHONE 2508



THANKS
BECKLES.We the undersigned beg
through this medium to thank all those
who . ent us wreaths, cards, letters or
in any other way expressed theit sym-

in our recent bereave-
the death of Winston

twife', John Beckles
(brother), Winston, Irvine, Orrie Beckles
(chfidren), Clancy Banfield, Meene Luke
and 116 grand-chiiarenr 14.1.51—in

pathy with us.

ment, caused bs

Beckles
Jeme Beckles





HAYNES—We beg io thank those who
attended the funeral and expressed
their rympathy in the sad bereave-
ment of our dear mother Mrs. Albertha
Haynes who was called to rest on
December 29th 1950, may she rest in
peace ever to be remembered by her

Sincere Children and Grand-children.

14,1,51—In.

iN MEMORIAM

WELLIE—In loving memory of Willie
who died the 13th of January 1947,
Four years have rolled away
Some may see a smile
But memories never fade
She will alwaye be remembered by
Hilda Archer, Brittons Hill,

14,1.51—I1n,
a
REFRVFS—In loving
dearly beloved mother Mrs. Patier
Reeves, who died on the 15th Janus
1950, age & ye of St. Stephen
Black Rock, former!y of near Cocoanut
Hall, St. Lucey.
Tis sweet to think we'll meet again
When partings are no more;
Ana that the one, we loved so well,
Has onk/ gone before
By her loving on Fred A. Bowen of
Station Hill, St, Micheel, and family.
14,1,51—1r

FOR SALE









memory of our











CAR Humber 21
hire, Exce condition. C
Friendship's Plantation, St. Amdrew.
Phone Edwards 2635 or Walks 3876.

12.1,61—Bn.

H.P. Suitable for
Edwards,



CARS.--One Morris Oxford 1949 (0.6)
done 15,500 miles. One Standard Vanguard
(0.22) cone 130060 miles. Both cars in
good condition. Can be seen at St
Joseph Rectory or in Bri
appointment Apply: Rew Ly,
Mallslieu, St. Joseph Rectory.

12.1,51—-3n

CAR 17 V-# Ford Sedan, Owner
Driven, and in exeellent condition, FORT
ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Phone 4504,

7.1.51—6n.

CAR Renault Sedan in good working
order, new Battery, Tyre) in — excellent
condition. M. C, M. Hunte — Room 311.
Plantations Building. Phone oF: aut

51—Iin.








CAR—AUSTIN A.40. Offers in writing
ill be received up to Monday 15th
at 4 p.m. for the above damaged car
which can be seen at Dear's Garage,
Roebuck Street. James A. Lynch & Co.,
Lid. P.0.B. 140, Bridgetown,

11,1,51—4n.

TRUCKS—Two Dodge Trucks 39 and
40 model in good — workin, order.
Apply: the Manager, Ridge Plantation,
Christ Church, or Phone 2605.

13.1,51—6n.

TRUCK— One (1) Ford V-8 truck in
good order. Apply the Manager St.
Nicholas Plantation, St. Peter.

13.1,51—2n



ELECTRICAL

RECEIVED: A
Plectric Lighting
1432 Volts 9
Cole & Co., Lid,

~ Te ee
-— Two (2) Mahogany

FURNITURE
Morris Chairs with cushions practically
new. Phone—2320, 13,1,51,—2n,

RALPH BEARD offers Large Painted
Preeses $50.00 each. Strong Painted
Chairs §5.00 each. Painted Dressing
Tables $25.00 each. 3 ft. 6 ins, Vono
Springs complete with bed-ends $35.00.

Unpainted Kitchen Tables $8.00 each,
Unpainted Rush Chairs $4.50 each, Wash-
stands from $8.00 upwards. Also a large
“satiety of New Mahogany Furniture view-
ing without obligation at Ralph Beard’s
Furnishing Show Room, Hardwood Alley.
Dial 4683. 9,1.51—5n.

LIVES'TOCK

COW-—Guernsey and Ayshire Cow, to
Calf within a week. Last Calf gave
30 =opints. Apply: Miss M. Prince,
Satinders Dairy, Upper Collymore Rock,
St. Michael. 13.1,51—2n.

MISCELLANEOUS

shipment of Petrol-
and Charging plants
amps. Price $250.00

13,1,51—6n.













ANTIQUES — Of every 4d
Glass, China, old Jewels, fine
Watercolours. Early books, Maps. Auto-
graphs etc. at Gorringes Antique Shop
adjoining Royal Yacht HP

tion
liver

50—t.f.n.



a
PED ointment for foot in-

f 8, especially ATHLETES FOOT.
It's good. Try it. Knight's ae pie
1.51—2n

he ieee setcnentcirecnienenmanenainnmnaseannis

AMM-I-DENT TOOTH POWDER—This
eaties control aid, supplies for many
sours the ammonium ion which has
been found lacking in cavity-suscep-
tible individuals. Caries Means TOOTH
DECAY.

Amm-i-dent is made up of small
particles that are dissolved between the
teeth hours after just washing out the
mouth with this solution after meals.

Tt can be obtained from any Drug
Store. 10,1.51—7n,

BLANKETS—Cold Proof Blankets in
colours. From 245 upwards, Get one
for to-morrow nite and enjoy its warmth.
Stanway Store, Lucas Street. Dial 4910.

14.1,51—2n.





CAPS Plastic
Vvaatidus patterns,
Modern Dress Shoppe.

“FUR COAT—Hailf length modern
at Nutria Coat in new condition,
4885" 12.1.51—3n.

KROPP LONG HANDLE RAZORS-—
Always give a sharp, smooth shave,
no drag or pull, makes shaving
pleasure instead of a bore. Knight’
Drug Stores. 13.1.61-—

— _______. fe

MOTOR LAUNCH-—22 ft. long, with
e “Brite Marine Engine. Named “Res”
Apply K. Corbin c/o B’dos Turf Club,
_

PLASTIC APRONS—96c. each, Modern
Dres: Shoppe. 14,1,51—6n,

enn nce
PERMANENT needles for your record
player, and needles of all kinds. Price
$108. Records of all kinds too. A.
& CO., LTD. 22.12.50—t.f.n.

POLAROID SHADES are quite dif
ferent from ordinary sun glasses. They
are a scientific optical product. They
imvprove vision and colour. They con-
tol reflected glare. They are expensive
but good. Get a pair to-day. Knight's
Drug Stores. 13.1,51—2n,

POTATOES—100 Ib, bags at 7%e.
50 lb. bags at 8c. 25 Ib, bags at 9c.
13,1,51—2n,

Shower
72a,

Caps, In
each, The
14.1,51—6n

















SHIRTS—Shark Skin



and Gabardine

Shirts in white long sleeves. Only «
limited number in medium sizes, Stan-
way Store, Lucas Street, Dial 4910.

14,1.51—2n

SAFE—One Lérge Fire-Proof Safe in
perfect condition. Dimensions inside
3 feet wide by 5 feet high. Apply
R. 8. Nicholls & Co., Telephone No.3925.

4,1,50—t.f.n.





SUIT-LENGTHS—In Grey Pin Stripe
$8.95 per length of 3% yards take a hint
brother, you'll never get it at this price

again, And what t more Ill furnis
a pair of pants for little over a &
14.1,51
ee eed
STOCKINGS—Kayser 51 gauge Denier
Nvlon | Stockings. Lovely Shades. Ali
sizes $2.14 per pair. Modern Dress
Shoppe. 14,1,51—6n.
an ESSE
TABLECLOTHS—Plastic Large Table-
olothe-—Pretty Patterns 60 x 60 $3.24
each, The Modern Dress Shoppe
14,1.51—6n



Herbert. Phone 8385. 12.1.51—6n
| “HILLSIDE —Bathsheba, fully _furn-
ished, water and lights. From March
$50 per month. Apply: Rev. L. C






















































































HOUSES
ASHTON -— On-sea, Maxwell, Christ
Church. Fully furnished, containing 4

Bedrooms, Verandah over looking the
ea and all modern conveniences. Dial
3607 13.1,51—5n.



DIAMONDVILLE — On-sen. Pully
furnished, 3 bedrooms, drawing Py
dining room. For dial :

13.1,51—2n.

—_ KK
ESPERANZA-—Fully furnished, with
modern conveniences. On St, James

Sea Coast. Phone 91-33.
10.1.51-—9n.

FLAT — At Sea View, Upper Bay St.
opposite Bay Mansion, From Ist January,







apply on
8.12.50—t.f.n.
FARAWAY—St. Philip, on
Bay, 3 bedrooms, W: mill
supply,



g plant, Car’ port,
vant fooms. Dial 4476.
17.9.50—t.f.n

HEATHFIELD—The Crane, furnished
from January 15th. Apply: Mrs. A. D







Mallalieu, St. Joseph Rectory.
12.1.51—3n

ILFRACOMBE—On-sea, Maxwell Coast,
e.cellent sem-bathing, fully furnished,
‘our bedrooms upstairs overlooking
the sea, From the Ist February. Phone
8286, A. N, Chaderton, Maxwell Coast.

12,1,51—2n,

ed

LARGE COOL ROOM—Running water,
furnished or unfw . Apply Trela-
why, annex third house from St. Matthias
Gap, on the iand side. 14.1.51-—-1n

NEWHAVEN—Crane Coast,

tient “Boube criae 3











rooms.

Dial 4476 17.9.50—t.f.n,
OFFICE — Medium size Office with
breakfast room. airy with seven
windows. Top Floor of Slinger & Co.
Ltd. Bolton Lane and Swan Strect.
Dial 4582 or 3637. 13.1.51—2n.

-_——

oadienpaisinaninteantnntanenttinstsinaiaiititie

ROOM — Unfurnished and Garage.
Residential area, A little over 3 miles
from town. Apply: X.%. ¢/o Advocate
Sa, 10.1,51-—%n.

Alene

SMALL ROOM-—On the ground floor
of the Mayfair Gift Shop, Aquatic Club.
Apply to the Secretary, Mayfair Gift
Shop. 11,1,61—3n.





RAYLSTONE—Brownes Gap. Hastings
Lounge, Dining and Drawing Rooms.
4 Bedrooms etc. Double’ Garage, 2
Servants’ Room, Tennis Court, Tele-
phone 4258 or 95-213, 13,1,51—2n.





WINSLOW—Cattlewash, for the months
of February to July. Appiy to. Mrs. W. 7.
Gooding, Strong Hope, St. Thomas.

7.1.51,—3n.



PURLIC SALES
AUCTION a
Onder The Diamond Rammer

I have be®n instructed by the Insur-
ance Company to sell by Public Auction
at the B'dos Taxi Co., on Wednesday
next the 17th January beginning at |
o'elock, One Austin Cur damaged in an
accident; and One Morris 8 with the
upholstery burnt.

Terms Cash. D'Arcy A. Scott,
tloneer,









Auc-
13,1,61,—4n,



UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions recetved from the
Insurance Company, will sell on

Friday, January 19th at Alleyne Arthur’s
Garage, next to Fort Royal Garage,
St. Michael’s Row (1) 1950 A—40
Austin Car, done 1,600 miles,
Damaged in a lent. Sale at 2 p.m,
Terms Cash.

VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer.
14, ),51—4n,

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON TUESDAY 16th by order of Mrs.
M. Roach we will sell the stock in
Trade and Fittings of the General Store

112 Roebuck Street o

omprising
Glass Cases and Show Cases, Shelving,



Counters, Desk, Tables, Scales and
Weights; Carrier Bicycle, Glas; Ware,
Saucepans, Combs, Books
Rubber Balls, Lamps, Kite Paper,
Jams, Marmalades, Toilet , Potted
eat, Sweets, Paper Bags, Hot Plate;
Bicycle Tyres, Saddles, Rims, Lamps,

&c., &c., all parts for a Bicycle and
many other items,

Sales 12 o'clock. Terms strictly cash.
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers,
12.1.51—2n,

lee
BUILDING SITE—Navy Gardens, 14000
square feet. Only spot obtainable in
this area. Ideally situated, facing the
East. Enclosed on three sides. Going
at a reasonable price, Dial 4582 or 8493.
13,1,51—2n.

C THEM — THEN C ME AND U
WILL SEE BARGAINS AT YOUR
BECK! Imagine a Bungalow Type in
Belleville, 3 Spacious Bedrooms with
Basins, Excellent Condition, Well Laid
Out, Going for Under £1,900; A 3
Bedroom (2 Large, one with Basin)
at Thornbury Hill, Very Good Condi-
tion, Modern Conveniences, cious
Yard enclosed with Stone, ant,
Going for under £900; A 3 Bedroom
Cottage by Lower Bank Hall Main Rd.,
Modern ‘onveniences, Spacious Yard,
Going for Under £1,200; A New 2 Bed-
room Stonewall Bungalow not far from
Rockley, Modern Conveniences, Going
for Under £1,700; A Two-Storey (Part
Stonewall) Near City, Good Location
and Condition, Suitable afso as a
Guest House, Large Yard, Going for
Under £4900; Three City Business &
ann bg Very Busy Area,
oing for er 3,000.
Is IT YOUR es A
CINCH? — A Furnished Unique and
ee eapee De Pree snnece Stone-
wal ngalow, most lew, Wide
San Beach, Fine

Exclusive Area at St. James, over
‘4 Acre, Going Indeed Reasonable
Building Sites — Seaside and Elsewhere.
Re-Sale Values Assured. jes
Arranged Tt am He! — A ‘Trained
Auctioneer and Yes How Wise it is tc
let Me Sell Your Household, Furniture,
Bte., at Auction, Pi
de Abreu for Nearly
Estate. If I CAN'T,
Kindly Call at Olive



a WILL?
Bough, Hahtings?





DeSIRABLE Dwelling house called

“BREEZELEY" standing on approxi-
perches of land at

mately 1 rood 30
Maxwell Coast

house contains open Verandah,
Draw: room, Dining room, Breakfa:
room, hen, Three bedrooms wi

dressing room: and running water,
downstairs.

downstairs. Electricity throughout.

Three servants’ room and conveniences

in yard. Garage for two cars,

The above property will be set up

for sale by Public competition at our

Office James Street on Friday 19?
January 1951 at 2 p.m.

Inspection by appointment, Dial 8229.

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitor
7.1.51—lin,

__
THE undersigned will set up for sale
by public Competition at their office
Roebuck Street, Bridgetown, on Fri-
day the 19th instant at 2 p.m.
EVANTON
With the land thereto belonging
taining 19,312 square feet,
Top Rock, Christ Church.
The dwellinghouse comprises three
bedrooms with large built-in cupboards,
spacious lounge, dining room, and mod-

con-
situate at

ern kitchen, together with two tiled
toilets and baths. Servant rooms and
Sarage. The property commands a mag.

rifleent view
For further particulars, inspection
and Conditions of Sale, Apply to R. 8
Nicholis & Co., Telephone 3925.
6.1.51—0n.
4

GcsM
Swedish

your home by spect.
Wiggins and Nurse Forde, associates.

wantep | SHIPPING NOTICES _"vcationat _

ee —
A STENOGRAPHER AND TYPIST—



Avety by letter to Cottle, Catford & Co.
0. .

High Street, Bridgetown.

12.1.51—2n.
L—Apply to Mrs. Lisle

COOK GENERA:
Batley D. Pavillion, Hastings.

13,.1.51.—3n.



Salary $100.00 per month to-

with free quarters in flat over

Club House, containing two bedrooms,

living room, closed verandah ete. also

free light, water and taxes. Knowledge
of Golf > advantage,

Apply only, forwarding re-

ferences, to — ‘The Secretary, Golf Club,

Rockley. ‘9.1.51—t-t.n-

WANTED AT ONCE
At the Barbados Dye and Laungry
Works, Pressers for Hoffman machines
only those who can press need apply.
14.1.61——2n.

MISCELLANEOUS

WANTED TO BUY
HOUSE—3 bedroom house in residential
area. Write Box D.D. c/o Apes .

HOUSE,—Unfurnished house or fiat
from Ist March, Five or six bedrooms. On
Bus route near City. Write stating rent
to J. R. Kirton, c/o Belgownie Guest
House, St. Mary's Street, Antigua.

7.1 51—4n.

OLD GOLD of every description.
Highest price paid. ALFONSO B. DE
LIMA & CO., Me Gregor and Broad
Street. 9.1.51—én.

ameitatinsentinimattetnnmsnsinins
PUPIL ASSISTANT wanted by the
Cathedral Organist. Must be C of &
communicant, Apply by letter to G.
Hudson, “Pendle”, Pine Hill,
10.1.51—2n.

URGENT—Up to 6 Evenflo Baby
Bottles plain or Pyrex. Phone 2654,
Between the hours of @~-12 a.m. ana













3—6 p.m. 13.1.51—2n.
WANTED TO
BUNG. ‘—2 or 3
bedrooms in resi area. Rent
reasonable. Phone of P.O. Box 52.
13.1.51—3n.
LOST



From a Jeweller Shop in Broad Strect
where they were left to be cleaned
2 old Silver Necklaces and one Locket
of sentimental value to the owner.
Anyone giving information or returning
same will be suitably rewarded, Phone
6329, Mrs. Mahon-Greer.





13.1.51—2n,
WATCH—Gold Elgin Watch (lady's)
on gold bow-shaped brooch. Rewarded
on return to Advocate Advertising
Department. 14.1,51—1n.
——_—_—_—

PUBLIC NOTIC

TO THE ELECTORS OF THE

PARISH OF ST. JAMES
We the undersigned, desire through
this medium to express our warmeit
thanks, and highest appreciation to the
Electors of St. James for the loyal sup
port given us in the recent Vestry Elec-
tion, We shall endeavour to do all in
our power to merit the confidence re-
posed in us, and to conserve to the
best interest of the Parish and its people
We desire to remain,
Yours faithfully,
JAMES M, CRICK
J. G. JOHNSON
E. S. A, HOLDER
C. B. SEARLES.
14,1,51.—1n





NOTICE
1 HEREBY beg to thank all the
Vestry’s Electors for the Parish of St.
Andrew who have so_ kindly voted for
me, and have returned me at the head
of the polls on election day, Monday

8th inst.
Mrs, E, V. ROCK,
Belleplaine,
St, Andrew.
14.1,61-—1tn.
_

CARLTON CLUB
NOTICE

are reminded that notice
of any motions for the Annual General
Meeting of the above Club must be
handed in to the Seeretary before the

" oa StC, HUTCHINSON,
Hony. Secretary.
11,1,51—2n.
—_———
PROFESSIONAL NOTICE OF
REMOVAL





BETTER SERVICE TO
PATIENTS.
This will serve to inform my patients

and patrons of my recent removal from

18 Roebuck St. to Pine Rd., near Ist

Aven,'e, Belleville, where I now reside
and practise.
dence and

commodation ia
coming from

bination of resi-

e country by the early

bus. I take this geporuunity to wish all
a ig healthy 1951.
D ‘M. H. WIGGINS, Ph.T. -H.,

M
(USA) GSI." (England)
HyStotempy Bletiethcraps” Diste
'y» TAapy etetics
and Botanicals for the treatment of dis-
eases of the nerves, lungs and joints,

Blood and Liver Sacer
Optic Atrophy ete. Rxternal and internsl
baths, (medicated a d mineral). Hours
8 a.m. to 12 noon, 2r.m_ to 6 pm. daily

except Saturday. Diul 4615. Treatment in
lal consideration. .t

7.1.51.—2n

PUBLIC SALES

REAL ESTATE
ON THE SEA







Sea, own private
bething beach. Good Yacht Anchorage.
Phone 91-50, 16.11.80-—-t.t"n,

_—_—

HOUSE—Tobago, Old Colonial House
renovated. Beautiful grounds, 3 acres
Central and secluded. One wing con-
verted, self contained flat. Freehold,
Good investment, $24,000.00. For photor
and further particulars apply: Wil:on
Welbeck, Tobago. 14.1,51—-1n,

TWO ROODS OF LAND situate at



Hothersal St, Michael, in

the
Een of a Mr. Springer as tenant

The above will be set up for fale at
iblic competition at our office in
Tisces Street, Bridgetown, on Friday
the 19th January 1951, at 2 p.m.
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Solicitors,
12,1,51—7n.
————$
PROPERTY-—One small property at
Road, It consists of 6,000 sq.
ft. of lund and a house which has
Gallery, Drawing and Dining rooms, 2
Bedrooms, Water-toilet and Shower,
Kitchen with water. Electricity
Apply to
Lane.



PROPERTY—One small property at
Hall's Road. It consist: of house with
water and light, shop and the land on
which it stands. Price Five hundred and
fifty pounds.

One small property at King’s Street.
It is a good house with Verandah, draw-
ing and dining rooms, 2 bedrooms, water
and light, together with the land, Price
$3,600.00

Apply to D’Arcy A. Scott. Magazine
Lane, Dial—3743. 13.1,51—2n.







Enterprise, Christ Church, suitable for
building one or more institutions because
of its immediate approach to the sea,
Also a fine area to be transformed into
@ residential colony by the introduction
of modern and up-to-date buildings.
Apply to C. F. Hackett c/o James A.
Tudor, Roebuck Street. arene, a
.1.51—3n.



PROPERTY—One property called Harts |Commissioner of Income Tax

Dale at White Park opposite the B'dos
Foundry, It consists of a stone and
wooden house which has Gallery, Draw-
ing and Dining rooms, three bedrooms
water-toilet and shower bath, together
with 5,567 sq, ft. of land.

Apply to D'Arcy A. Scott, Magazine

Lane. 13,1.51,—2n.
WOODEN BUILDING—Complete with
passage 20x7 and Kitchen 20x6, House

20x10, Situated at Four Square St. Philip
Apply to Milton Greenidge on premises
13.1, 51.—3n.






INCOME TAX NOTICE

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO,

Sailing from Amsterdam and Dover—

}
—— _—____—_—__-



The M.V. “Daerwcod” will ac-
\

|
M.S. “Bonaire” Sth. @th. January 1951. cept Cargo and Passengers for |
S.S. “Cottica” Ind. Srd. February 1951. St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenade

Sailing from Antwerp and Amseter- and Aruba Sailing on the 16%
dam—M.8. “Oranjestad” 6th. 19th. January 1961.

Jaruary 1950.

Sailing to Trinidad, Paramaribo and The M.V. “Caribbee” will ac- I
Georgetown—M.S. “Hersilia’’ 8th. Janu- cept Cargo and Passengers for 1
ary 1951. S.S. “Cottica” 20th. February Dominica, Antigua,

1961. Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of de-

Sailing to Trinidad La Guisra Curacao parture to be notified.












































Montserrat,
Etc —M.S. “Oranjestad” 2nd February an Gs
1951. R OWN-
Salling to Plymouth, Antwerp and B.W.I, SCHOO
M.S, “Willemstad” 23rd. ERS ASSOCIATION, Inc.
J 1951.
‘ Passenger Accommodation Telephone: 4047 |
available
S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.,.
Agents. = ————
Canadian National Steamships
TF Sails Sails _ Sails Arrives — Sails
Montreal Halifax Boston Barb» .os Larbados
“CAN, GER" — 3 Jan. _ 14 Jan. 15 Jan.
“LADY 4 -- 17 Jan. 19 Jan. 28 Jan. 29 Jan.
LADY La - 1Feb. 3 Feb. 12 Feb. 13 Feb
“CAN. CHALLENGER” _ 15 Pew. = 25 Feb. 25 Feb
“LADY ‘DNEY"" ~ 3 Mar. 5 Mar. 14 Mar. 15 Mar
. ¥ IN” _ 19 Mar. 21 Mar. 30 Mar. 31 Mar
“CAN. CHALLENGER” -~ 2 Apr. —, 12 Apr. 12 Apr
“LADY RODNEY” -_ 16 Apr. 18 Apr 27 Apr 27 Apr
NORTHBOUND Arri Bails Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax
“LADY IN" 14, Jan, 15th 25 Jan. 26 Jan —
“LADY RopNEY 10 Feb. 12 Feb. 21 Feb. 22 Feb. _
“LADY NELSON” 25 Feb. 27 Feb, & Mar. 9 Mar _
“LADY RODNEY" 27 Mar. 28 Mar. 6 Apr. 7 Apr _
“LADY NELSON” 12 Apr. 14 Apr. 23 Apr. -- 24 Apr
“LADY RODNEY” 10 May, 12 May. 21 May. _ 22 May

N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vesnels fitted with cold storage cham.
bers, Passenger Fares and freight iates on application to :—-

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.
GOVERNMENT NOTICES

(AMENDED)
PUBLIC LIBRARY

Applications are invited from persons, between the ages of 21
and 40 years, for training overseas in the work of a Librarian. Ap-
plicants should hold the minimum qualification of a recognised School
Certificate with credit in English and one other language. Preference
will be given to University Graduates.

2. The selected applicant will probably be required to take the
correspondence course offered by the Regional Library (British Coun-
cil from January to June 1951 leading to the Entrance Examination
of the Library Association, and may subsequently be required to
attend a recognised Library School in the United Kingdom for a
period of one year commencing September, 1951 in order to qualify
as a Chartered Librarian,

3. It is intended that the selected candidate should be attached
to the staff of the Library in the first instance and be appointed sub-
stantive Librarian when the Office becomes vacant in April, 1953,
provided the course in Library training is satisfactorily completed.

4. Applications should be submitted to the Colonial Secretary
not later than the 24th of January. Further information will be sup-
plied on application to the Secretariat.
13th January, 1951.



LTD. — Agents






14.1.51—3n.



APPOINTMENT OF STOREROOM CLERK (FEMALE), MAIN
KITCHEN, GENERAL HOSPITAL
Applications are invited for the non-pensionable post of Store-
room Clerk (Female), Main Kitchen, General Hospital, at a salary
of $480, rising by annual increments of $48, to $1,200 per annum,
Applicants should not be over 40 years of age. should have at-
tained a satisfactory standard of education, and should have had
some experience in house-keepiiig duties on a large scale.
Applications on forms obtainable from the Secretary, General Hos-

pital, should be forwarded to him fot later than 24th January, 1951.
llth January, 1951,







14,1,.51—3n,
By
Lieut,-Col. J. Connell, O.B.E., E.D.,
* weno Tea
Issue No. 2. ee eee 12 Jan. 51

eae
ranks will parade at Regiments! Headquarters at 1700 hours on Thursday,
ear 51. Gompanies will be at tie aapoeal of Coy Commanders, â„¢

sate Practice parades will be held on Monday 15, Wednesday 17, and Thursday
SPRrEts OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING

Orderly Officer . Lieut. E, R. Goddard
384 L/S Laurie, C, K.

Orderly Serjeant
Next ee eee
erly cer Lieut, 8S. G, Lashley
Orderly Serjeant 278 L/S Wintame, Ss. D.
L. A. CHASE, Major,
Adjutant, (Ag.),
The Barbados Regiment.

SERIAL NO. 2
SHEET 1.

2

PART ii ORDERS
T BARBADOS REGIMENT
itn JANUARY, 1951

1. STRENGTH INCREASE
582 Pte Taylor, J. Bn HQ

STRENGTH DECREASE—Resigna‘
383 Pte Richardson, J, oa





” Coy
393. ,, Bushelle, W. D. “A” Coy
305 ,, Worrell, K. N. eS
Dismissals

262 Morris, T.

2. PROMOTIONS
206 cans Ishmael, A, F.
326 L/C Proute, A. O

$12 Pte Chase, V. { a
= i Roach, I. A.
§ ” ‘aylor, J.
Signal Instructor on the Permanent
Staff wef 1 Jan 51.
L. A. CHASE, Major,
Adjutant, (Ag.),
The Barbados Regiment.







————








BE WISE... . ADVERTISE 10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Latest Motor Car Models in
DINKEY TOYS—ali
Rubber Tyres.

Sheet Plastic for Lamp
Shades



|



with



|

Notice is hereby given that)

Income Tax returns are required!
from every married man whose;
income is $1,200.00 per annum ov}
over, from every other person |
whose income is
annum or over and from com-/%
Panies whether incorporated or x
unincorporgted, societies, persons
engaged in any trade or pro.
fession, and owners of land of |§
property whether a taxable jin
come has accrued during the past!
year or not. |

|
Forms of Return may be o 1%
tained from the Income Tax Dee |
partment AFTER THE 1ST DAY! %
OF JANUARY, 1951, and the
forms duly filled in must be
delivered to me on or before the
ere respective dates:
. eturns of persons whose
books were closed on the
3Ist day of December, 1950
on or before the 31st day
of: March, 1951.
Returns of persons whose
principal place of business
is not situate in the island
on or before the 30th of
June, 1951.
3. Returns of all other persons,
on or before the 31st Jan-
uary 1951.

F. A. C. CLAIRMONTE,

AT
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and
HARDWARE

$720.00 per |~

NOTICE

1. Tenders are invited for
the exclusive right to sell
liquors, lunches and teas at
Kensington Oval during the
Barbados - Trinidad Tour
(approximately from Feb-
Tuary 12th to 27th).

Tenders are required to
submit price lists for drinks
and lunches as well as pro-
posed menus of the lunches.
Should prices for the Asso-
ciation differ from those for
the general public these
must also be submitted.

2. Tenders are also in-
vited for the transportation
of the Trinidad players from
the Hotel to the Oval and
back during the Tourna-
ment,

3. Tenders must reach the
Honorary Secretary at C. F.
Harrison’s Office not later

LAPS



cw 4 p.m. on Monday,

: anuary 22nd.

and Death Duties.

' 4. The Association does

Note:—Any person failing to not bind itself to accept
make his return within the lowest or any Tender. %}
the due date will be liable x
to a fine not exceeding emer ee %
£100 and not less than £2 W. F. HOYOS oe
and will be prosecuted Honorary Secretary, ©
unless a satisfactory rea- mig * 1.51 ce x
son is given a se cap &

*
s
oS or * POSSESS OSSSSSSSSS =

6.1.51—8n



will begin on Tuesdey the 16th January.
1961,
be in

SUNDAY,

HARRISON COLLEGE

The

MODERN HIGH
SCHOOL

next term ut Harrison College
at 930 a.m., and the school will
session for the entire day.
S.C. CORBIN,
Acting Secretary, Governing Body,
Harrison College.

Department of Education, 2



begin on Tuesday the 16th January, 1951,

$th Januery, 1851

(Registered, approved
and recommended to the
O. & C. Examinations
Board by the Dept. of
Education).

11.1.51—2n.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE

The next term at Queen’s College will



and the School will be in session fron

DeGfartment of Education,



Our building pro-
gramme has now been
dompleted and we are
prepared to accept a
few more new pupils on
Monday, 15th January,
at %30 a.m. School re-

5 CORBIN,
Acting Secretary, Governing Body,
Queen’s College.

Sth January, 1951.

11.1.51—2n.
MALVERN ACADEMY
EDENVILLE, CHEAPSIDE

This school will re-open on Tuesday

16th January at 930 a.m. New pupils opens next day.
a be interviewed on Monday 15th at acetate
9. a.m,
i ee. Entrance Fee $1.50
10.1.51—2n.

—————— L. A. LYNCH
LYNCH’S SECONDARY Principal.
SCHOOL
SPRY STREET PLCC IOCCOO DOO.



Next Term begins om Monday, 15th
January, 1951
A. MeD. Lae ner
Headina: A Ld
cera. ( Just What I Wanted!

THE HOYTE’S PREPARATORY

That is what nearly

SCHOOL. every Housewife says
sory bie gua, Led 5
Next Term be J 15.
aecommodation for 9%-year-old children PZ, fa nateste
and over. yop and mathematics
tional, Apply Mrs. Ruby. “Gwen- complete with Flints.... 44c. each
ville”, Black Rock, St. Mi . cytra Flints ............ Ode. each
7.1.51,—3n. GET ONE TO.DAY .

Attested and taken on strength wef
1 Jan 51.
Permitted to resign from the Regi-
) ment wef 30 Dec 50,
* Dismissed from the Regiment for non-
attendance at parades.
Promoted to CSM wef 12 Jan 51.
; Promoted to Cpl. wef 12 Jan 51,
we Promoted to L/C wef 12 Jan 51,
Bn ‘HQ Promoted to L/Sit and appointed



Wanted to Purchase
COMFORTABLE HOME

That you pay nothing to
% join; that there are no






Osmand’s Schoal

PRITTONS HILL LAYNE’S GAP
The School will re-open on

Wednesday 17th January. New

pupils will be accepted on

16th When parents can interview

the Principal. .% ,
Principal.



BAND CONCERT





vs.
By kind permission of TRINIDAD

Colonel . Michelin, . Capt At
Raison and the Police Band KENSINGTON OVAL
will give a an oa :
Hastings Rocks on Monday, FIRST MATCH
22nd January, at 8 p.m.

eae February 15, 16, 17,

ADMISSION 1/- 19 & 20

unas oe
omnes In

Plans of seating accom-
modation will be opened
at Harrison’s Office on
Monday, January 15th to
members of the Associa-
tion who may also pur-
chase two additional
season tickets. The plans
will be opened to the
General Public on Mon-
day, January 22nd_for



Proceeds in Aid of
St. Matthias’ Church Funds,



with three bedrooms, living
and dining rooms, good
kitchen and bathroom, ser-
vant’s quarters, garage, elcc-
tricity water and phone, on
about half acre of garden,
Please give full particulars



and price. the sale of SEASON
S.K,, TICKETS.
C/o, Barbados Advocate.
Prices of Admission :
6:$9$99096605099909 CHALLENOR STAND
$1.20 pee dag or $10.00
Season Ticket

IT IS TRUE

Levies nor assessments, to
pay; that you get Bigger
Bonus & Better Benefits and
that anybody is paid sixty
cents (60) c. for every mem-
ber mace any day at

The “SELF-HELP &

THRIFT” Friendly Society,
47 Swan Street, (over Bata

240. per day or Half-price
after Tea

Car-Park Available at 1/-
per day
N.B.—No PASSES will be

Â¥ THE BARBADOS CRICKET
2 ny Sherer ASSOCIATION INC.
Open every day, ask for Ww. F. HOYOS
o hand bills Honorary Secretary.

WHEN YOU REQUIRE GOOD RUM
SEE THAT YOU GET...

TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM
(

; With The “—— Flavour)
gw It is a favourite among the Best Brands.
e

Blender:

JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.









































JANUARY H, 1951



ORIENTAL
GOoOonpDs!
From INDIA, CHINA,
EGYPT!

Silk, Curios, Brassware,
Jewels, Linens, Ivory,
Teakwoed, Sandal,
French Perfumes, Bar-





bados Scarves in Pure
Silk, Ete., Etc.

The Souvenir Headquarters

THAN! KEros.

Pr: Wm, Henry 8t.—Dial 2406































































DIGNIFIED
SERVICE !!
e

For over thirty years the firm
of J. A, CORBIN & SONS, has
rendered you efficient and con-
scientious service, and if the re-
sults we achieve are any criterion,
we succeed. We are experienced
in taking care of all requirements
for. a funeral, no matter how
imple or elaborate. We ap-
vreciate the severe strain every
member of the family is under in
times of death and sorrow, and
realise that a funeral director
should relieve them of all the
burdens ible.

With the arrival of A NEW
MOTOR COACH, and with our
return to the old business site in
Belmont Road, we are fully pre-
pared to render you the services of
our long experience.

“ Silent Service”

J. A. CORBIN & SONS

FUNERAL DIRECTORS
BELMONT ROAD PHONE 3848


























|

SS ee



REAL ESTATE
JOHN |

M4.
BLABON

AF.S., F.V.A.
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE

“ROCK DUNDO"'—Cave Hill. A
well maintained and productive
Estate of some 32 acres in a very
lovely position 2 miles from City.
The house is worthy of speciai
notice and posiesses great charm.
Tts general condition is excellent
end there is spacious accommo-
dation.

“SUNSET HOUSE” — Prospect,
St. James. Bungalow with wide
gea frontage and good boat an- |
chorage. 3 bedrooms, lounge, |
separate dining com, verandah
3 sides, garage and paved court-
yard and pleasant garden. Sound |
buy at £3,150. |







“CRANE VILLA" — Modern |
stone-built 2-storey property with
approx. 3% acres bounded by
Crane Hotel driveway. Converted
into 2 large self contained apart- |
ments. lent investment
property with good sea bathing. |
Offers invited. '

“KINGSLEY"—Top Rock. Very
attractively designed bungalow
with L-shaped dining room and
lounge, 3 bedrooms, modern
kitchen and garage. Well recom-
mended.

“BON ACCUIL” — Pine Hill.
Large well built residence in the
higher part of this select area.
Accommodation comprises large
reception rooms and veranda’ .
study, 3 large bedrooms, 2 gar-
ages and outbuildings; Pleasant
lawns and gardens with tennis
court. Grounds approx. 4% acres.
Offered at attractive figure.

“CASABLANCA” — Maxwell's
Coast. A beautiful property em-
bodying the finest pre-war work-
manship and well planned with 2
reception, 5 large bedrooms, ver-
andah, kitchen, pantry, garage,



rooms etc. The land is
®pprox. 2 acres with flower and
vegetable gardens, productive

erehard and coconut grove. 1
acre walled garden may be sold
separately as building site.

“VILLA ROSA" — Passage
Road, City. Attractive and cen-
trally located stone bungalow

with double car! leway. Approx
14,000 sq. ft. This well built
property contains a front gallery,
jarge lounge, separate dining
room, 3 large bedrooms, toilet,
pantry and kitchen. Good court-
yard at rear.

“DEANE HOLLOW” — St, Lucy.
Pleasant country home of stone
with shingle roof containing ?
bedrooms, living and = dining
rooms, kitchen, servants’. quarters,
2 garage and storerooms, 2)
fertile acres, option further 2% |
acres. Offers considered. |

COASTLAND, St, James — %
acres of excellent building land
with sea frontage which may be
sold in half acre lots if required

REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

PLANTATIONS BUILDING
Phone 4640

AUCTION SALE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY %,
1951, 11,30 a.m.

at

LAS CAMPANAS

We have been instructed by the
owner, Mrs. James Smith, to sell
ty Auction the entire furniture
and contents of “Las Campanas”
which is located in a cul-de-sac
off road opposite the Hotel Reval.

Oak Dining Table and 8 Chairs,
Oak China Cabinet, Oak Sideboard,
Oak Tip-top Table, Small Glass
Tip-top Table, Upholstered Arm
Chairs, Metal Standard Lamps,
Suite of Wicker Furniture (Sofa,
Rockers, Armchairs,) Small Ma-
hogany Occasional Tables, Re-
volving Mahogany Bookcase, Piano
{John Brinsmead & Son) 2
Mahogany Plant Stools, Indian
Brass Tray & Table, Oak Writing |
Desk with Book-case attached,
Table Lamps, Two Indian Carpets
5 ft, x 10 ft. 6 ins.) and (10 ft
6 in x 10 ft. 6 ins.), Patterned
Carpet (10 ft, 2 ins x 7 ft. 5 ins.), |
Rugs and Mats, Collection 97
Pictures, Glass Candle Holders,
Assortment of Flower Vases, Ash-
trays, Singer Electric Portable
Sewing Machine (As new) G.E.C,
Radio 7 Tube and Mahogany ;
Radio Table, Single Wooden Bed»
end Mattresses, Mahogany Bedside
Tables, Shaving Mirror, Oak
Dressing Chests, Oak Dressing
Medicine Cabinet, Cane
Linen Basket, Electric Stove
“Jackson”, Refrigerator ‘“Cold-
rator”’, Electric Irons, lronimg
Board, Electric. Clock, Electric
Toaster, Electric Coffee Percolator,
Assorted Dinner, Salad, Soup
and Desert Plates, Vegetable
Dishes, Meat Dishes, Wine, Cock-
tail and Liqueur Glasies, Assort-
ment Glas; Tumblers, Fruit

, Relish Dishes, Tea Cups
and Saucers, Tea Plates, China |
Tea Pots, China Coffee Set, Salad
Bowl with servers, Pyrex Cas-
seroles, Small Pyrex Moulds,
Kitchen Utensils, Lawnmower,
Hose, Garden Tools, Collection of |
Books and General Miscellaneous |
Items including One Ladies
Bicycle.





The Radio, Fridge, Electric |
Cooker and many other article: |
are a little over three months
old.
Cash on fe of Hammer

AUCTIONEER }

John 14. Sladon

AFS., F.V.A.
Phone 4640, Plantations Building.









Spot



SUNDAY,



Programme

SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 1951
7 a.m. The



News, 7.10 a.m. News
Analy is, 7.15 a.m. From The Editorials,
7.25 am. Programme Parade, 7.30 am
English Magazir 8 am, Calling All
Forces, $ am. The News, 9.10 a.m. Home
News Prom Britain, 915 am. Close
Down 1.15 a.m Programme Parade.
11.30 a.m, Interlude, 11.30 a.m. Sunday

Service, 12 noon The News, 12.10 pm.
News Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Close Down,
4.15 p.m. Murie Magazine, 4.30 p.m. Sun-
day Half Hour, 5 p.m. Composer Of The
Week, 5.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, 6 p.m
From The Winter Proms, 645 p.m. Pro-
gramme Parade, 7 p.m. The News, 7.10
p.m. News Analysis. 7.15 p.m. Caribbean
Voices, 7.45 p.m. The Body of Christ, 8
p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m. Sunday
Service, 8.45 p.m. Composer of the week,
9 p.m. The Half Century, 10 p.m. The
News, 10.10 p.m. From the Editorials,
10.15 p.m. The Cathedral Organs, 10,30
pe London Forum, 11 p.m. Jan Smeter-
in
MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 1951

7 am, The News. 7.10 am. News Ana-
lysis. 7.15 am From the Editorials, 7.25
a.m. Programme Parade. 7.30 a.m. The
Seychelles, 7.45 a.m. Singing is so good
a thing 8 a.m. Let’s Make Music 8 45
a.m. The Debate Continues. 9 p.m. The
News, 9.10 a.m. Home News From Britain
9.15 a.m, Close Down 11.15 a.m. Pro-
gramme Parade. 11.30 a.m. Listeners’
Choice 11.45 a.m. Commonwealth Sur-
vey, 12 Noon The News. 12.10 p.m. News
Analysis 12.15 p.m, Close Down 4.15
p.m, Ray Martin and his Orchestra. 5
p.m. Composer of the Week. 5.15 p.m
The Storyteller. 5.35 p.m. Interlude. 5.45
p.m, Ivor Moreton and Dave Kaye. 6
p.m. Nights at the Opera. 6.45 p.m, Pro-
sramme Parade. 7 p.m. The News, 7 10
Pm. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m. Our
Mutual Friend. 7.45 p.m. The Seychelles.
8 pm Radio Newsreel. 8.15 p.m. Com-
monwealth Survey. 8.30 p.m. Singing {-
S0 good a thing. 8.45 p.m. Composer of
the Week; 9 p.m: BBC Concert Halli; 10
D.m, Phe New’; 16.10 p.ny, From the
Editorials; 10.15 p.m. Ray's a Laugh:
10.45 p.m. Science Review; 11 p.m. How
to Listen

i BOSTON
WRUL 15.29, Mc WRUW 11 75; Mec WRUX
17.75 Me

3 p.m. Lecture on Christian Science;
4.30 p.m. Christian Science Programme



HERITAGE OF BRITAIN

New| Monthly BBC Series

Beginning on Tuesday next the
BBC will broadcast a monthly
Series of programmes devised to
tell of Britain’s heritage. These
have been planned because the
coming Festival of Britain pro-
vides for many British people a
moment and an occasion to look
back and gather strength from
the past and to look forward to
the future. Some of Britain’s most
experienced producers and writers
have been given a free hand to
tackle the tremendous subject of
Britain’s great heritage in the way
that suits them best. The first pro-
gramme will be introduced by the
well-known farmer-broadcaste?
Ralph Wightman and is entitled
‘The Land—the Material Inheri-
tance.’ It will be broadcast on
Tuesday 16th. inst. at 10.15 p.m.

The Winter Proms

The Winter Promenade Concert
Season is now on in London—
from Jan, 8th. to 20th—and
listeners to the BBC’s G. O, S,
will hear broadcasts from some
of these performances including
a direct broadcast of the last night
of the ‘Proms’ from the Royal
Albert Hall. The BBC Symphony
Orchestra, with its conductor, Sir
Malcolm Sargent, will be heard in
all the broadcasts, and will have
Amy Shuard (soprano) as their
soloist for the last night. The ‘live’
broadcast on Saturday at 5.15 p.m,
will include the aria ‘Ritorna
Vincitor? from Verdi's ‘Aida
Strauss’s ‘Tales from the Vienna
Woods’ and, a tradition for the
last night of the ‘Proms,’
march, ‘Pomp and Circumstance.’
Recordings of the ‘Proms’ can be
heard on Sunday, 14th, inst., at
6.00 p.m., and on Friday, 19th.,
inst., at 4.15 p.m.

The First World War

The coming week's ‘Half-Cen-
tury’ programme, No, 2 in the
series of which we told you last
week will tel] of the fateful vears
from 1914 to 1918, The producer
is Francis Dillon, the only BBC
Features producer who actually
fought in the first World War.

Like all the programmes in this
series broadcast will be at 9.00
p.m., on Sunday, No. 2 being on
the 14th., inst.
Can We Do It?
We remind our readers that the









PRINTED

GET YOURS

. 6664
SOOO FOSS errr

PSPSPS ISOS

JANUARY 14,

S PERCALES and
‘ SEERSUCKER

These Washable Materials are suitable for .

DRESSES, HOUSE-COATS, GOWNS, PLAYSUITS
BATHING SUITS, BED SPREADS, Eic., Etc.,
At prices Ranging from 54c. to $1.44 per yard

Now

N. E. WILSON & Co.

he house, with the Big Hit of the Year

LOCO OO OOOO OFOOOOSOOON OS?

1951

HARVERT FEST:VAL TO-DAY

All Souls Church, Bank Hall will cele-
brate their Harvest Festival today. Cele-
bration begins at 6.00 a.m. with Matins
and Holy Eucharist (plain) followed b}
Solemn Eucharist and Sermon. At 3 p.m.
there will be Cantata in which loca:
artistes will take part Section B of thy
Police Band will also contrbute to yhe
programme. Th
The festival ends with Solemn Evensong
and Sermon preached by Fr. Cobhan
of St, Phillip's Church, New York City

METHODIST NOTICES

BETHEL; 11 am. Rev. E. J. Griffin
7 pm. Rev. B. Crosby,
DALKEITH: 11 am. Mr. G. Jones:

+ p.m. Mr. D. F. Griffith.
BELMONT: Harve't Festival Services;
ll am. Mr. P. Bruce; 3 p.m, Harves.
Cantata; 7 p.m. Rev. H. C. Payne.
SOUTH DISTRICT: 9 am. Mr. T
Callender; 7 p.m. Mr. L Blackman.
PROVIDENCE: 11 am. Covenant
Service; 7 p.m. Supply.
VAUXHALL: 9 a.m. Rev. B. Crosby

Holy Communion; 7 p.m. Mr. A, B

Curwen.

ST. CATHERINE EPISCOPAL CHURCB
DASH ROAD

11 am. Divine Worship, 3 p.m. Sun
day School, 7 p.m, Evensong and Sermon;

Preacher: — Evangelist A, Young

Celebrant;— Rev. C. Ishmael.

ST. PAUL'S

7.30 a.m. Holy Communion, 9.30 am
Solemn Mass and Sermon. Subject
“The object of Worship’ 3 pm
Sunday Senool and Children’s Service;
7 p.m. Solemn Evensong Sermon and
Procession. Subject: “The witness o:
the Church.”

JAMES STREET CHURCH NOTICES

JAMES STREET: 11 a.m. Rev. H. C
Payne; 7 p.m. Rev. R. Mc. Cullough.

PAYNES BAY: 9.30 a.m. Mrs. Phillips;
7 p.m. Mr. G. Sinchler

WHITE HALL; 9.30 a.m. Mr. G. Harper
Harvet Festival; 3 p.m. Chidren’s Ser-
vice; 7 p.m, Rev. E. Griffin Harvest

HOLETOWN: 8.30 a.m, Mr. G. Marville
7 p.m. Mr. F. Roach.
BANK HALL; 9.30 am. Rev. R. Me.
Cullough, 7 p.m. Mr. J. T. Oxley.
SPEIGHTSTOWN: 11 am. Rev. F
Lawrence, 7 p.m. Rey, F. Lawrence.
MORAVIAN CHURCH SERVICES
ROEBUCK STREET: 11 a.m. Rey. A. C.
Pilgrim M.A., 7 p.m. Rev. D. C. Moore
GRACE HILL: 11 a.m. Mr. C. Greene,
12.30 p.m. Holy Communion Rey. A, C.
Pilgrim, M.A. 7 p.m, Mr. T. Barker.
FULNECK:

11 am. Mr, W. Haynes,
7 p.m. Mr. S. Weekes,
MONTGOMERY: 3.30 p.m. Sunday
School Anniversary
THE SALVATION ARMY CHURCH
NOTICES
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL
11 am, Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m.
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Meeting. Conducted by Major A, 8,
Moffett (Divisional Commander).
WELLINGTON STREET
11 am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m.
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Meeting; Preacher: Sr. Major Gibbs.
SPEIGHTSTOWN
il am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m.
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Meeting; Preacher Sr. Captain Bishop.
DIAMOND
11 am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Saivotion
Meeting; Preacher: Lieutenant Moore,
CHECKER HALL
il am. Holiness Meeting, 3 pm
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Meeting; Preacher: Lieutenant Reid,
LONG BAY
11 am. Holiness Mé€eting, 3 p.m
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Meeting; Tempe. Lieutenant Etienne.
1l am. Holiness Méeting, 3 p.m.
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation

Winter and A. R. Brome,

10.30 a.m. Quarterly Service, at
Queen's Park Steelshed under the aus-
pices of Rev. J. B. Winter,
Distingui-hed Rev. J. B,
Guest Speaker,

2.30 p.m. Faith Healing Service, to
which the sick are invited,
7.15 p.m. Evangelistic
Bank Hall, Speaker, Rev.

Stoppe, Supt. of West Indies.

7.15 p.m. Evangelistic Meeting at
River Road, Speaker Rev. J. B. Reesor.
known to be vested with the Gift of
Healing through Faith.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST.

PRIDGETOWN, UPPER BAY STREET

Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.

Wednesdays 8 p.m. A Service which
includes Testimonies of Christian Science
healing. «

SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 1951

Subject
MENT.

Golden Text: John 6:33, The bread
of God is He which cometh down from
heaven, and giveth life unto the world.

with the
Reesor, as

Meeting at
Henry C.

of Levson-Sermon; SACRA-



being broadcast on Wednesdays at
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17th, inst, In this series John
Figueroa and Howard Spencer of
Jamaica, Rawle Farley of British

Guiana and Charles Wilmot,

can do today to remedy the
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GILL MEMORIAL: 9,30 a.m. Rev. E.
Griffin, 7 p.m. Mr, P. Deane.

Meeting; Preacher: Sr, Major Holling -
worth.
THE NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH OF
GoD
8 a.m. Baptismal Service, at Bran-
dons Beach, Baptizers, Reverends, J. B.

Director of Information of the
British Council are discussing
what ordinary men and womet

SUNDAY

B.B.C. Radio CHURCH SERVICES |arexavprs scHooL, SPEIGHTSTOWN-BARBADOS. BW.





The Governors of



Alexandra School invite APPLICATIONS for the post of

HEADMISTRESS, which will become vacant in Aurust 1951 The new Head- |
mistress will be required to take up the appointment on Ist September, 1951. Alex- |
andra School is a day secondary school with 150 girls on the roll and is aided

oy Government funds
which the General Certificate of Education will be taken in 1951
Girl Guide Cempany attached te the school

There is a Preparatory Department and a Main Seco! in}
There is a

The Headmistress who should possess a Degree of a British University and a

Teacher's Diplom:
school and promofe out-of-class activities
chool grounds which is provided for the use of the Headmistress
nistress is not a Civil Servant, but service is pensionable under the Teachers
2ension Act
en years
ish Teachers’ Superannyation Act

Passage expenses to Barbados not exceeding £200 will be paid against appro-
oriate vouchers A term's long leave is granted every five years on request, but
ap to the present no passage money is available for leave.

Applicants should forward a statement giving the following particulars :—
Date and place of birth
Schools and Universities attended
Degree, giving subjects and class obtained
Post-graduate study, including Teacher’s Diploma or Certificate ‘if any
Teaching experience with dates and positions held
War Service (if any)
Participation in out-of-class activities

8. Games record

9 Administrative experieuce (if any)

10. Medical Certificate of fitness

11. Copies of three recent testimonials

12. The names and addresses of two referees

The statement together with Ceftificate of Birth
covering letter of application

MOD mwter

should be

or Certificate will be required to devote her whole time to the |
The salary offered is £600 per annum,
} per cent of which is deducted as rent for the partially furnished resfa@ence in the
The Head- |



No contributions are payable, but the minimum qualifying period is |
Service at Alexandra Schoo! is counted as qualifying under the Eneg- |





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Candidates living in the Caribbean Aréa should send their applications to

‘he Honorary Secretary, Alexandra School,

G.P.O. Box 243, Bridgetown, Barba
dos, B WI, by 3ist March, 1951

14.1 51—2n

ALEXANDRA SCHOOL, BARBADOS, B.W.I.

A Graduate to teach Mathematics up to School Certificate standard is required
in May 1951
roll and is aided by Government funds

Salary :

Both are termite proofed and obtainable in various

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Alexandra School is a day secondary school with 150 girls on the

For First or Second Class Honours Degrees; $1,584, rising by $72, to}

$2,304, and then by $120 to $2,784, plus ‘$216 per annum for a recognised |

Teacher's Diploma or Certificate

plus $216 per annum for a recognised Teacher's Diploma or Certificate.
($480— £100.)
The position on the Salary Seale would
cluding an allowance for War Service
The post is pensionable under the Teacher's Pension Act No contributions
are payable but the minimum qualifying period is ten years Service at Alexandra
School is counted as qualifying under the English Teacher's Superannuation Act
Passage expenses to Barbados not exceeding £200 will be paid against appro-
priate vouchers
up to the present no passage money is available for leave,
Application together with three recent testimonials, the names of two Referees,
should be sent by airmail to The Headmistress, Alexandra School, Speightstown,
Barbados, B WI. to arrive not later than 15th February, 1951

be decided by teaching experience in-



14.1 51.—3n
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PAGE FOURTEEN

How Ezzard Charles



Beat Lee Oma

NEW YORK, Jan. 13

EZZARD CHARLES peat Lee Oma on a technical knockout
in the 10th round of their fifteen rounds contest here tonigh:
to retain his world heavyweight title as recognised in

America.
The referee stopped the fight
before the halfway mark of the

10th round to save Oma from fur-
ther punishment although he had
nore than held his own in the
arlier stages ;

it was a dramatic end for the
blow to the chin appeared to stun
Oma who became the chopping
block for Charles’ blows until the
referee intervened

For nine rounds, Oma had given
as good as he received and Charles
n fact, had two rounds taken from
him for alleged low blows for
which he had been booed and
warned

Oma did not flinch from any
blows landed by the champion
who had his left eye damaged in
the seventh round after the bruise
had shown earlier, but he became
stronger as the fight progressed.

Not At Best
Charles was not on his best form
and as the referee raised his hand
in victory, the crowd booed loudly.
The champion started six to one
on favourite. >
Neither boxer did much in the
opening round and Charles was
cumbersome. Oma had little diffi-
culty in tying



Charles had a bruise under his left
eye. ’
The bout warmed up towards
round five. Both men speeded up
and Oma did most of the forcing.
Charles’ left eye began to bleed
and he was warned for a
which appeared to be low.
With the crowd roaring. Oma
maintained “pressure thre ughout
the sixth round. Charles landed
often but did not appear to hurt
Oma who kept pegging away at
the damaged eye.
Charles began
tance in the next round and pun-
ished Oma severely about the a
ow

blow

to find his dis-

He was again warned for a
blow in the eighth round, but he
was improving all the time and
carried the fight to Oma.

The referee took this round and
the fifth round from the champion
because of his alleged low blows.

Charles was doing most of the
leading in the ninth round but
Oma took his punishment without
flinching. ,

A heavy right to Oma’s
ended the fight in the 10th round
It rocked the challenger who stood

chin

almost still taking a succession of
left hooks to the chin. He seemed
stupefied and offered no defence
Then he the
stepped in,

In his dressing room afterwards
Oma said he was not hurt but only
befuddied. “I don't know what
happened. All of a sudden T lost
strength and could not get my
hands up. I knew he was hitting
me but I could not do anything
about it. I just ran out of gas.”

Charles’ weight was 185 Tbs. as
against Oma’s 193 lbs. It was the
champion’s 22nd consecutive win

bent and referee

The Fight

They manoeuvered carefully in Charles drove a right to Oma's pected
Charles shot a light left

mid ring.

the champion up;
and at the end of the second is eff as

left to the body Charles again
drove a hard right to Oma’s head
and a stiff left to the body. Charles
was very wild with a left but Oma
did not try to take advantage of
his opening. Charles smacked a
right to Oma’s head. Charles was
pressing the attack more vigorous-
ly now and he sent over two hard
smacks to the body

Round 4. Charles stalked Oma
who started sidestepping. Charle:
shot a light left to the body and a
hard right to the kidney. Oma’s
body was getting red from Charles
body blows. Charles belted to the
body and Oma retaliated with a
left to head. Charles dug a right
to Oma's body and the challenger
grunted. Charles pressed Oma
again and Oma backed away
Charlies got in a long right to jaw.
Charles belted a left and right to
Oma’s body as Oma backed away.
Oma stabbed a left to head and a
long right to Charles’ jaw just be-
fore the bell

Round 5. Oma got in two light
lefts to head and they went into
a clinch. They traded lefts and
then Oma crossed a right to Ezz-
ard’s jaw Oma got in a left and
a right to head as the crowd let
dogse with a roar. They exchanged
and rights in a sizzling ex-

hange. and fans yelled again

hook to the body and a right to The crowd yelled as Charles left

Oma’s head

a sweeping left hook to head and stepped into Oma with a left and in
The crowd
cheered when Oma got in nee
ead,

a hard right to body
shot, a light left jab to
Charles banged a right to the body
and

the body and missed a right

The champ was wide open but
Oma did not make a move as the
Oma stabbed two

crowd groaned.
lefts to the head
Charles.

head, all light blows.

Oma grabbed hold of him.
Ezzard drove another left hook to

and pressed
Charles came back with
a flurry of rights and lefts to the
Oma moved
Charles with two left jabs Charles

low blow with a left, and Goldstein
warned Charles to keep them up.
connected with two

in on
to head. They traded lefts at the lefts to the bedy and Oma
bell. landed a left to head. Char'es

Round 2. They traded lefts as
Oma stayed with Charles in the
Oma discarding his usual
style moved in on Charles again the challenger too's the

middle,

and scored with a left and right out wincing. Charles sent over two West Indian boxers. They have
to the body. The challenger was more lefts to the head and ducke'l the same surname but as far as
holding his hands higher than away from an Oma left. Charles [ know, are unrelated. On Mon-
usual. Charles swept in with a beat Oma with tefts two to one. day evening Cliff Anderson from
left and right to the body, and Again the champ slammed in and British Guiana outpointed Selwy?

Oma backed away

then danced away. Charles got wear Oma down with his body derson (Jamaica) scored a K.O
in a left to the jaw and then barrage. Goldstein took the roun| win over Harry MeMurdie (Edg-
a right to the body. Oma away from Chares again for low ware) over the same distance

again took the lead, landed a left
and right to the body and moved
fighters
and boxed care- a
hard
Oma
There was a
smatter of blood and a lump under

right Both

took

out again
their time
fully. Charlés
right to Oma's
scored with a right

pumped a
body and

Charles’ left eye,
Round 3

a right to Oma’s body.
yelled as Charles missed a
maker right
self open Again Oma
make a move. Oma
hard right to Charles’

did
smashed



to the
with a

body Charles
hard right to head












CHEDDAR,
| WHO IS THAT
| NICE-LOOKING
| BOY? DO You
| KNOW HIM 2

I « f |



g YS AIT

Oma chopped
a short right to Charles’ jaw and

Charles stabbed two
lefts to Oma'’s head and smashed
The crowd
hay-
and again left him-
not

head but the
champion came back with a left
connected
ind ;

| They'll Do It Every Time

Asp ivesTRA WENT TO HER BROTHER'S |

COLLEGE PROM HOPING TO MEET SOME |
NICE, ELIGIBLE YOUNG MEN=*>s |

A iM? I'VE SEEN
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I FORGET HIS NAME=+
BUT I'LL HAVE You
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VEATURES SYMOICATE, Inc. WORLD RIGHTS RASEAVRD

stalked Oma, drove two lefts and
rights to his head. Charlies be'ted
Oma with a solid right to jaw but
tlow with-

scored with a series of body blow
Charles was apparently try ng to



blows.
Round 9,
with two
short
with a

Charles
lefts
right

stepped , in
and missed
Oma_ connected
left and a shor
right chop to the jaw. Charle:
landed a sweeping left to Oma’s
right eve and followed with two
lefts to body, Oma got in a short
chop to Charles, adosing hs left
eye, The crowd let go with another
roar as Oma scored with a hard
right hand lead to head. Char'e;
banged away with both hands to
the body as Oma retreated. Charle
dug another left to the body which
seemed low and the crowd booed
igain, Charles banged Oma to the
head at close quarters. Fans booed
once more when the bell rang





Registered US Patent Oftee










STAYED HOME

















7]






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STILL FIGHTI

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



G



beadquarters in West Germany
in Frankfurt, Heidelberg, Stutt-
gart or somewhere in the British

Zone.—Reuter.



that he will establish his advance |

Boxers’ Successes

Good news this week of two

Evans (Wales) over eight rounds
and the following day Bob An-

Both victories were scored in th«

London area; Cliff's at Leyton

Baths and Bob’s at Watford.
—LNS

Canadian Rates
Of Exchange

JANUARY 13,

CANADA
Cheques on

Bankers
Demand

Drafts
Sight Drafts
Cable
Currency
Coupons
Silver

The above Rates are subject to ohan*
without notice.



1951
642/10 pr
62 2/10 Pp
62.05% pr
61 9/10% pr
64 2/10% pr
62 7/10% * 60 7/10% pr
60" pr

By Jimmy Hatlo

AND READ FRANKENSTEIN”

PLEASTA
MEETCHA!



i 2 .
[FRAN Re PRS Le RATHINS, RTA ARM 215 A! STH FIELO, TERAS







You can't keep dandruif

a secret

‘Foothall
Results

LONDON, Jan 13
LEAGUE 1.
Middlesbrough 1
Huddersfield Town 1

Arsenal 3
Burnley 0;

Chariton Athletic 2; Sheffield Wednes-

day 1.
Chelsea 3; Newcastle United |

The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 6.12 a.m
Sun Sets: 5.53 p.m.
Moon (First Quarter) Janu-
ary 15.
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 8.56 a.m., *20

Derby County 1; Liverpool 2 P.m,
Everton 0; Stoke 3% ie
Manchester United 2; Tottenham Hot YESTERDAY
spur 1 %,
Portsmouth 2; West Bromwich Albion Rainfall (Codrington) .05 in.

Sunderland 1 Bolton Wanderers 2
Wolvershemton Wanderers 1 Black
pool 1, ind

LEAGUE 2
Bury 1; Cardiff City 2.
Chesterfield 1; Manchester City 2
Doneaster Rovers 2. Hull City 4
Leeds United 5, Southampton 3.
Luton Town |, Barnsley 1
Notts County 3, Grimsby Town 2
Preston North End 1, Birmingham City

Queens Park Rangers °, Coventry City



4 Meld United 2, Leicester City 1

Swansea Town 2, Brentford 1

West Ham United 2, Blackburn Rov-
ers 3

LEAGUE 3 Southern

Bournemouth 3, Walsall !

Brighton & Hove 3, Colchester United 1

Bristol City 2, Millwall 1.

Crystal Palace 1, Bristol Rovers 0

Exeter City 0, Leyton Orient 0.

Gilingham 3, Watford 1.

Newport County 2, Swindon Town !
Northampton Town 1, Torquay United ©

Norwich City 2, Aldeshot 2

ort Vale 1, Notts Forest 1

Reading 4, Plymouth Argyle 0

Southend United 1, Ipswich Town 6

LEAGUE 3 Northern:

Bradford 3, Accrington Stanley 0.

Crewe Alexandra 2, New Brighton 0

Darlington &, Lincoln City 1

Gateshead 2, Bradford City 0

Halifax Town 3, Chester 1

Hartlepools United 0, Rochdale 0
Mansfield Town 1, Rotherham United 1

Cidham Athletic 4, Carlisle United 1.

Scunthorpe United 1, Barrow 0
Stockport County 2, Shrewsbury Town 0

Tranmere Rovers 4, Southport 0
Wrexham 4, York City 3












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—_—__ _

MOTOR REPAIRS

Bee

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BARBADOS GARAGE
130 Rueouck St. ::: Dial 3671

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CONSTIPATION
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"Top Scorers in Tailoring”

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ed

‘harles outpunched Oma two to SCOTTISH LEAGUE “A” INDIAN
one in another exchange. Oma Celtic 3, Aberdeen 4. ROOT
pumped lefts to Charles’ head sibecmian 5, ae gh ee were all
Charles sent a left hook to Oma’s ~ * . scion ovine $0 unt grounds
law -and followed with a right. BX-WORLD HEAVYWEIGHT BOXING CHAMPION JOE Louis ' SCOTTISH LEAGUE “B” 1 @ Banish hendoche, backache, Eiteweneve
Charles speared Oma with left (left) hits Freddie Beshore’s face with a left in the third round of Dumbarton 2,,Ayr United 0 ' — ms :
$ Ps ; @ Dr. Morse’s Pills contain six active
jabs and drove a smashing right their fight in Detroit, Michigan. The referee stopped the fight in the _Kilmarnock 3, Queens cing i ; wepeicble ingredients.
to QOma's jaw. Oma_came back ‘fourth round—awarding the victory to the Brown Brmber on a tech- Pha eeomnee: Ae watches were. at | © Gentle, effective 9-hour action will not
full of fight and hit Charles with nical knockout.—Express. postponed owing to unfit grounds. 1 disturb your rest. oi
a right Referee ; stej —Reuter @ Special TONIC ingredient ps restore
wa < chatter th awe ods ence hi he A s 7 ° Ne di mee on we hemorrhoid
es up.. Oma connected with two tsennower Arrives French Motorists 1 e : ee
good rights to Charles’ head at arbour 0. | A TRUSTED REMEDY
the end of the round. Goldstein v F
took the round away from Charles In London Break Record a FOR OVER 50 YEARS
for a low blow. Charles had been 7 i : i \x
cuutioned in the early rounds For Talks FE } i aerate a 12 In Carlisle Bay | a ee ee oe ow Ow oe ae me me
Round 6. They traded a left rench drivers, Andre ercier 1
ind right at the start and then . @ from page 1 and Charles De Corianze in their Sch. Emeline; M.V. Blue Star; Sch ! BEWAREorworms!
vent into a series of clinches, 'efresher course in te spring Peubot 203 car have covered the Marion Belle Wolfe; Sch. Philip_H. |! worms threaten old and young alike. Be
Charles pummelled Oma with a But Eisenhower presumably distance from Capetown to Algiers eayceon: anh ey x. Lena) ao 4 eure your family is protected with Com-
, 2 av . 8 : een; Sec ommanue nm; % a »
ieft and right to the body, and a found the Danish contmibution Mm 16 cays, 10 hours, 6 minutes. go, “Triumphant Star; Sch. Burma D i aE eee pilin BWI-349,
vicious right to the jaw. Charles satisfactory for he commentca cay natebiiened in 1937 MV. Sedgefield; Sch. Adalina; Sch. t J
macked Oma with another right yesterday: “In Denmark I have by British driver Gleisner is 16 Sunshine R.; Sch. Mary E. Caroline; | ma)
+ urs i : : de s Sch Belqueen; Sch _ Enterprise S; Sch
3 the jaw. and Oma held on, met nothing that has not upraised taj ’ MI hours. se Lavdaiphs, Sh. Molly N. Jones.
Charles stabbed Oma with two my heart” The two arrived in Paris in DEPARTURES
lefts and Oma hit the champ with Oslo: Norwegian authorities their car from Marseilles today. en ; SEL tons net, Capt.
a rin! ee he eee away. Charles were saiq to be considering placing They left Capetown on Decem- *!"#. for Bt: a
smashed a right and a left to 4) -¢ Py ete, Bilton tkhowe er 26 .
head, and took a left from Oma ah of Norway's Military Force. ai With the Algiers-Capetow. In Touch With Barbados
and came back with another right Eisenhower's disposal Bub aN ly i P Ss a oe eed Co : ] Stati
to head. There was a. slight Official communique said that the Shed ge. DEomeNas the two men asta ion
bruise under Oma's right eye, Norwegian contribution would be enbanee nee So eee see he ute ‘and Wireless’ (Westeanidioa) Sad Mu
Blood trickled from a cut under “!scussed later. < Brist i niresadt: fie hs advise that they can now communicate
Charles’ left eye. They traded Rome: Though Communists po, ‘Alt ore a See them A urns Se thrpush ‘thet:
1eft hands and then Oma got in have been threatening demonstra yort Hier Mz raeill SY ean they 5.8. Rezent Hawk, 8.8, Regent Leopold
a left to head, There seemed to tions and strikes during LEiser } arseiles where they §.s. Wagon Box, 8.8. Indian Reefer, S.S.
be a sligbt'cut over ‘Charlies’ le? 3 o) : > *-,. took the road again yesterday. leman Hills, S Ss.
a sug i s eft nower’s visit here next week Their official speed fr Cc: Ss
eye too. The crowd cheered at Premier ride » Gi ri d ert” OFIw1es Speee IrCm ape
\ d at Premier Alcide De Gasperi c: ie rd 9 aa re
the bell t , town, to Algiers was 25 miles y _ 4 N
. * clared in Parliament today that he Ȣ hour Ppt yeks + oo
Round 7 Charles connected 5 Pia aa at ib : ES f per hour, S.S. Argentina, S.S, Canadian Challenger,
with a sweeping right to head would be a “welcome guest f The expenses of the journey, ¥ § W ested a2 slepe Papnent, yee
and a long left to body. Charles See Fie a ai ha about £2,000, wer®met by Mer- fanturet, 88, Asia, SS. Alcoa Cavalier,
pressed the attack ‘and. Oma The Premier made this state- cier exporter of Peubot cars. S.S. Polyvlory, S.S. Colonial, 8.8, Fran- Gi G
started backing and sidestepping Ment while Communist cries of) Their official Capetown-Paris fine Glore, M/V_ Good Sarin eo TAI Ne ri | -, “NE
. ‘ a Matte .? ‘“ Ht ae _ | 43 a eaten mien on razil, S Samana, S.S. Ha reek, S.S.
Oma pumped three fast left jabs shame , out with foreigners’ | time was 17 days, 9 hours. Metoli, S.S. Withelm Bornhofen, S S
to Charles’ head, Charles got in a @2d “down with Eisenhower | —Reuter. —Meline, S.S. Lady Nelson, 8.8. Thelma, .
left to body and Oma speared at filled the Senate Chamber. | iNeed
Charles’ wounded eye with a lefi Frankfurt: — Eisenhower is ex-|
in Frankfurt within 10
jaw and two lefts to the body, days. |. |
J ; He will hear from top Altec | e
Charles landed with hit Oma on the beltline. Charles Officials of the latest developments ad}
military talks between the | i When late h h i
right to body. Oma took the lead Allies and West Germans oi} i] eS a ee
for a moment and then backed ¢reating a West German force e wading oe Soames, Felt yous
away, Charles socked two lefis to He will also cast a sharp eyc e morning with headache, fatigue
Oma’s jaw but Oma retaliated with hoe the ee tein and aa y, and upset stomach... don’t let
two lefts to head. Charles oved Dat readiness 0 re three princi- i i
in again with two lefts to head, Pal occupation armies, American on dare ven ay my be spotted, And
The crowd booed at the bell British and French : qnick celiet with Alka “Bel oy!
Round 8. They traded ‘efts in , He is expected to see Allied % Take it on arising, again —if
midring and moved carefully, High Commissioners and to confer not ignore it! needed — later in the day.
Charles dug a left to body and with Chancellor Adenauer. an
clinched. Again Charles drove a There is much speculation here By combining several medicines











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Mango Chutney

Large Bottles. Each __12¢

Medium size Bottles _ _ 60 g

Small Bottles = ___ 487

HOME PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT

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CAVE SHEPHERD & Co.,Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET

* erty









FOR YOUR ENJOYMENT

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FRESH APPLES

FRESH GRAPES
CAMEMBERT DANISH CHEESE pk. 45¢

30¢ lb.
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RUNM1 \l>\"< \i i H SI)\V, JANTABV a 1K1 BARBAfX)Sfi# ADVfrffE I I. Utt \d. Sunday, January 14. 1*51 MUST NKAK1.V two years have passed since L-.rt on April 25 Iy4i OB tfw propoeed tlon of a (kep water wharf. The passage of tun has served one useful purpose. There u. no I i.Ich<.'r u'lll be twice at Mo. Local Go?ernmenl Elections for the several Vestries of the island took place during the week. The future of local government was not an issue m the elections and indeed it appeared that candidates for election did not foresee any change in the present arrangements in the near future. Nearly two years ago. Sir John Maude presented his Report on Local Government :. % % %  !. i-.Sal Joferfl -,a 3 K VM u. lem of local government in Barbados and to report what, if any. I be made in the system. Sn j.ihn begins nis report by examining the f Vestries in Barbados and desLbe officers and functions of the Alter having examined the work which i as beer, and is being done by the Vestries Sir John forms the opinion shared by •vary commentator, that change is necessary. The public health administration La the most glaring example of the necessity for change. "Certain health measures require to be planned for the island as a whole, and it is most unsatisfactory that the loyal co-operation of one parish with the central authority may be rendered v-'.mpletely nugatory by inaction on the ;.urt of its neighbour." writes Sir John. The main defect found in the present system is the division of the island into too large a number of separately governed units Among the other defects commented upon are the combination of civil and ecclesiastical affairs and the assumption that the Rector of the parish should neces -..niy be the spokesman and leader of the parish in civil affairs. The Report rejects the view that local government should be abolished altogether and recommends that the present Vestries should be abolished and that the island should be divided into three areas These areas would comprise the City of Bridgetown, the Northern area and the southern area. The Report also expresses the view that the City of Bridgetown should be granted municipal status. Sir John recommends that the qualification for voting be extended to all persons above the age of twenty-one. of British nationality and with a residential qualification. Whether the island is yet ripe for adult suffrage is a matter which has been debated recently in respect of members of the House of Assembly and the same arguments would be applicable to voting for the Vestries or new Councils. Qualifications for membership of the new Councils are recommended to be a British subject of full age who is a local government elector for the area or the owner of freehold or leasehold land in the area or a person who has resided in the area during the whole of twelve months preceding the election. The Report recommends that certain functions now carried out by the Vestries should be taken over by the central government. This move has already been begun by the transfer of most of the roads in the island to the care of the Department of Highways and Transport and the recommendation of the Report will merely carry it to its logical conclusion. Public health would also be controlled to a greater extent by the central government but Poor Relief would remain as the especial province of the new Councils. The greatest dispute is likely to take place in respect of the financial implications of the recommendations. There is no reason to believe that as a result of the Report being implemented that the cost of local government will decrease and a change is recommended in the system of local government taxation which has been in operation for very many years. The abolition of Occupancy Tax, recommended by the Report, has already been achieved and there is no reason why some satisfactory basis of taxation should not be worked out. Recommendation is also made for the severing of the civil and ecclesiastical functions carried out by the Vestries but as the Commission on the Civil Service of Barbados recommended that a Commission be appointed to inquire into the whole position of the Anglican Church in 'the island, Sir John Maude does not.make as detailed recommendations as in other matters and merely lays down the general lines on which it could be arranged. Few persons maintain that no change is necessary in the system of local government and it is time that the public was informed what the Legislature intends to do about the Maude Report. Two years have passed and yet candidates for the Vestries do not regard their future as an issue in the elections. The central government should have the matter debated by the Legislature and decide what action it is proposed to take. Back To Work LIKE the miners (and who c*n blame ihem?) 1 was slow in getting back In work after th-Chrutnuu holidays. Thru wu trouble with Tun! and Liver After working overtime for three cays they were reluctant to snap back into form. Dr. Gubbtn*, !heir chief medical JANI/ART will adviser, writ down dose after dose of soothers and stimulant* alternately, with the result that both were in a state of revolt by 1 hursday. Dullinf TIM HULLO Is that my stomach'' Your if omasa speaking. Had a good Christmas? Your Liver and I fried to xvak-;cur Chrotmaj as merry as posMa. And so you did. Now we must -< %  '. back to work Not be*%  'iiicuaard M \ left to myi u-erg coming dove almost JP* !" 1 * lh festival of Britain. <-<>! -' J *"'" bein spring rnan-ent down medicines oeuvres at several places at ooce Medicines, unless prescribed by Molotov will repeal Alt we wmmt r.i.1 nrlM*nr., only oaase u peace. trffcer fteaa F~i-t li M %  %  .. rut vou refuse ithan* at the dictation of a couple of condition, you are likvl> lu get i aric another dose of flu M-iyUe Then yon must be prepared for something worse Ru*** "A" .nrernol r^Me. din*, N S2J?\UVBES J*m Haeev Ihtv* "*" %  """"' u P earf rr If a general election has not OLD Moore Guni ins. ihe world already occurred. JCL fs a likely famous astrologer, offers his month for this peculiar form of ..meltable i rophecles for mlserv Still tottering from your the New Yaar. ..-.tacks of flu and with the I! the weather experts say eggs giving out, you will be lne cold, it is volvcd in hitter arguments with 'ikel> to be mild If they say it friends and possibly cracked on will be mild, look out for snow, the nose by some of It* i had. sleet, fro-t During this entire chorus at The Kremlin will month Stalm WJII 'All I iranl shoul -All we want U peace." it peace" Most people think about holitiRRt ARY. the influenza dayi m AUGUST. This time you month, will Uve up to Its reputacan ihink again. With most of tion. Russian art: itles will All >our money spent on armaments. the newspaper* VM abnormally you can stay at home and listen depressing new* %  nich you can to the bad news of the Intcrnaragd in bed with a high tempersiUiaoon, which usually during savage fuel cuts. Beta ^orae when the harvests are D. V. SCOTT & CO., LTD. TO-DAY'S SPECIALS at THE COLONNADE Usually Now Tins CORNED BEEF with CEBEAL 31 28 .. BIRDS BLANC MANGE POWDER ,. BACHELOR PEAS Buttles McEWAVS BEEK 38 M n 26 20 y///ry^/^/////w*w/''''''' During this monti. Molotov will III 1 trerii if peace." If a n.eat agrtement la not the, Argentine by irorfcinff conditions for the coming M \ROI there w 11 be hardly %  ar %  %  ut eggs. As Uw Chinese Com munut, will say "All / icianf u i>Icflrc In SEPTEMBER there will be no eggs at all. If there's still no meat agreement, you'll have to' Are you holding a pistol at my moof the eggs .111 have travlive on oysters and roast pealad? / u'outd if I had one. Suppose I have breakfast at 8 i m Cant 1 send anything flown tflcr 1 BJB.1 You rax stapger your hours. So I can still have three meal* • day. Of course. Then what's the difference? i rhinfc you are curare ice are aon of strtlrtiMj apainsl the intake of knock most taxpa loo much food. I see. During part of the holiday elled a long wiv 1eace." other in the fog about the price In APRIL, when people of the of turkeys wc may never get. northern Iwmasphnra arc usually Mr. Ho. the Hindoneslan Cornmade cheerful by the sound of munisi. will say -flail Hi iWa>.f bird ong and tin sight of bioshis pleore." Budget will For DECEMBER Old Moore out for the Gubbins can only wish you an1 CARPET and UPHOLSTERY CLEANER ;: I Easy to Use,—Will not hurt hands No rinsing required. 1 Plat Bottle 50 Ceata at WILKINSON A HAVNES Co.. Ltd. Successors To C.S. PITCHER & CO. Pboiws — 4471, 4*87, count Stalin wtll isy again "All othrr merry Christmas and say f want is p*sc." "Peace it hall / u'ant. loo." The taxpayers v.ill recover con—L.F.S. WHIN ft COP IS LENIENY, SOME PHOPLE IHlKllt. HE'S DUMI5, N01 RE AUZ INCs-flWl HE I". tVOMAN, AMI> snBJEcr io Mooi>r, THE SAME rV, OTHERS. IKfip rtvu/w of risoH.OK vein owiwt nt uwi MI uni K 'w, -,nt, uHuw.f . AMD VVHfcM HE MOVES WfO ACTION, DOING HIS DOFV AS HE SEES IT, 1HE> THINK HE IS SOME THING THAT CRAWLS We Are All Imports—And Children III Imports F OR $76,80 I can travel first class from London to Rome by rail and sea. The distance Involved la 85(1 miles. The time taken is within 36 liours. Extras, tips. taxis and light refreshments from London to Rome need not exceed 5 00. T.> trawl first class by sea from Barbados to Georgetown 1 must pay a basic fare which varies between $120 and $130. The distance involved is 631 in Has The Ume taken Is between fo*pr and four and %  half dayc Extra* for tips, refreshments and visits ashore at ports of call will never come to less than $75 and will possibly lie twice as much if I have no friends to entertain me in port. It is against this background that closer association of the Wgt Indies ought to be but i$ seldom Bgatfjii M Many people glibly tell us that the British West Indian possessions ought to be centralised, that the interests of the people are. the same and that political federation is the only way to develop the West Indian islands and malalands Unfortunately we are told Ittffc more than that and we are Inclined to Interpret federation tccordlng to our own particular indulgences in wishful thinking To the European In the West Indies' federation provides substantial opportunities, since It provides the only form of recognition which appears to flaw favour in the modern world, that is numerical recognition. British Guiana alone has more than 25.000 Europeans and Trinidad and Barbados probably have 50.000 between them Hi, not easy to arrive at figures f Europeans In the West Indies because there is no racial segregation In the area But no one can tour the West Indies without being visibly impressed by the large number of Europeans who Iree In the South Caribbean to-day In Trinidad .ind British Guiana he East Indiana make their presence felt by sheer profusion The road from San Fernando to <*n-of-Spain Is lined on both M.ies with mud houses m which East Indiana live. In British Guiana East Indiana >nn the bulk of the workers on •lie sugar plantations and in tho .ce fields. Mosquea and Hindu Tampisa. "uses which fly raes frnm bam%  %  poles ;tnd water buffalos trans. %  orm Trinidad Into an Oriental country There la an Indian Commissioner m Trinidad and Indian Universities are offerins scholarships to Indian* In the West Indiea. Thy Indian ways of life are very deep outed In Trinidad and in British Guiana East Indiana are not all poor. On* of the greatest palaces -aeing Queens Park Savannah in Trinidad Is owned by an Indian. Throughout Trinidad and In Georgetown Indiana are building laviah and expansive houses Says GEORGE HUNTE The Chinese community in Georgetown la considerable and In Trinidad it is a'so growing. The Chinese have their own Chlneca dubs and associations and they % %  wn almost every provision shop in Georgetown (at least this Is l"c overall impression). Of the Chinese It is said that they know how to look after themselves lit the Caribbean and from my per*onal wanderings I cannot remember seeing a Chinaman who waa not driving a motor ear. One gets so accustomed to the ,.! clicna that the Inhabitants or the West Indies are mostly African that It comes as a surprise to tind what little trace of Africa there la to be found In thaee islands. In London I had many West African friends and acquaint— ances but tne only ones who resembled West Indians of African descent ware the ones from Cities. My friend Mr Fowell Uuxton, Editor i If by birthright Actually the only peoples in the British Caribbean who can claim any special rights In the area are'.he ten thousand Amerindians of British Guiana and the scattered thousands of Cartbs In St. Vincent and Dominica And historians are beginning to produce evidence to prove that the Car.bs wrested possession from the Arawaks In the islands. Unlike Africa or Asia therefore there Is no moral right of possession on original grounds There has been no exploitation here by ewromer* of innocent Indigenous peoples Even the practice of -l.ivry (foul thing that it is and never more prevalent in the world than It Is in Soviet Russia today) was not confined to one race. I have no evidence to dlsprovi one stage my own ancestors were not of servile status in the Wes' Indies. To hear some people talk >n Barbados and of Barbados today one might with Justice assume that the peoples of this island originated locally almost as If they had evolved from Manchineel berries or from the primeval forests of Turner Hall Actually we are all imports anil children of Imports and it does not matter whether we arrived in the island yesterday or three hundri years ago. None of us originate. here. The only exception to thi* West Indian family tree are the aboriginal Indians and it is a sad eommentury on the morals of the present day that while the two greatest impoits into British Guiana, the East Indians and Hi Negro peoples there are at thi* moment clamouring for greater political rights in that country hardly a voice except my own is raised to point out that no one in British Guyana ba* greater rights there than the indigenous Indians whose forefathers preceded Columbus in time. The British Territories of the South Caribbean today are offered an opportunity which they have never been offered since the fabulous days of the 18th century whet. West Indian heiresses in London were as plentiful as Indian nabobs and when the sugar crop of Guadeloupe was considered more valuable than all the untapped resources of Canada. The West Indies, savs Prof A. P. Newton, were regarded in the 18th century as mines of wealth. Today a similar opportunity arises which the Wast Indian islands and mainlands can grasp in the interests of all its inhabitants. The sad state of the world in almost every continent except South America has brought the Caribbean into the limelight The resources of British Guiana alone are a challenge and an incentive which can only be met by road and rail communications or a vast scale. The name of Tr. :. dad has become aynonyino with oil. asphalt and Angostura Bitters. Barbados because of Its nontropical vegetation and climate an : because of its high standards of Civilization and education la the moat desired of all settlement areas in the British Commonwealth today. Grenada la one of the world's loveliest IriaMf. while the 81 Grenadines hare no Opportunity la knocking. Let us go forward Ilka man and women, content with the plg*mcn• i. and the pattern of life in which the Creator of the world has fashioned our "dust and %  glag Ut us play our pert as men and women and let us not be athatned of *ir part There la no more essential profession than the grave digger and which of us can claim to be mure Important to the community than he? MY... PARROT SAFETY MATCHES &f SWEDEJVTS BEST MATCH &f Ask for PARROT MATCHES from your Grocer. &f DA COSTA & CO.' LTD Agents ;**? NOW ON DM SPLAY TRAVELLING REQUISITES THAT GO H.Wlt MM MLIXII mm FASHMOJV litre is Liifgsge Exquisitely Bcsutiful In . QUALITY—APPEARANCE— AND DESIGN,— Expcrlly Fashioned by . MASTEB CRAFTSMEN See thai yon Select Your LUGGAGE, lhat gives yon Iho Chick "NEW LOOK" of lb. Snasrl Traveller s DACOSTA&CO.,LTD. DRY GOODS DEPT. ft** "QOLD BRAID" WITH A Th KUM l/ial's SfSr /or COCKTAILS i



PAGE 1

SUXDAY. JANUARY 14. 151 SUNDAY ADS OCA Tl. r\c.r. SEVEN llriHgrlnnn WaMK Slee Newspapers Are Born Early Hours FRESH SUPPLY Of :PURINA HEN CHOW ; %  (SCRATCH GRAIN) %  fin JASON JONES & CO., LTD.ntmn m il %  ,W.'/A'AW, .•.'.'.-.'. -.'•/Vr't'e'.'t'St'SZ, ii\ IVN c,%i.fr: WORK neve, really the Advocate bulldtntt i n Broad Street, and for the newspaper staff night ta the bu*ie*i Ume.rimng a crossword puzzle ~ and From the aub's desk tinNpy It la then that the paper la printtry to make the "stories' denr goes down to the Lino*rd. and it inuat be printed late and Interesting He uMMUp |eti uwblianl lawra It bj p jaad pn enough to oatch the late newa home about 3.30 ,i n In baa irei.il. and th "slugs", and early enouah to reach your ;iimt department were Tony are called, aitthen wemble.1 and breakfast table in time Vanterpool. a reporter, waiting proofed. The proofs are sent up I vWted the Editorial dcoart. ^ * 'l**"* '" " W ••* ^ "* pfoofread r wno * ni^nS? "Sere" found twenty! — >"" me £ and .he "£ jl then th, linotyp.au rlne-year-old Everest McComta. wrtam operator. Alfred Taylor "* " eorree.'ona. the night sub-editor, busy arTaylor was taking tha keater* Another department which wa< ranging the front page He haa news at about forty words busy was the Photo-Engraving to write the headlines ao that minute. Both of the** suppl.v department There photographs they fit in neatly—It la rather like news for McComle's page*. Itlll\t. is YtHK PRESCRIPTIONS is'#: IH.SPEX.SI-: tuiEEii.LY and AttEHATELY The Cosmopolitan Pharmacy ANIMATED OPINIONS Toffee MADE IN U.K. The Perfection of Confection '.'.*,*, W.'.-.',*.V > K >00—060 IIAIHIIMIVS BROAD ST. THE VITA-SAVOUR WATERLESS COOKER EMPLOYS ALL Till: NATTOML FOOD JUICES AS A COOKING MBDION THIS (1REATI.Y •IHIMOTINIi HEALTH. FLAVOUR. AND ECONOMY IT BOASTS, IIOH.S. STEWS, AND I KIDS || HAKES CAKES, IIKEAD. PASTRY ETC. ] AND DOES AM, THIS I KKHTKNTI.Y AT ONEQJUABTBB Ob Till; I I II. GOBI HEQUIBED BY ANY OTHER FOBM Off t'OOKINfi. USE A "VITA-SAVOUR ITS EASIERITS A SHORT CUT TO TASTIER FOOD, BETTER HEALTH, AND MORE LEISURE. PRICE $21.24 EACH. BE SURE TO SEND YOUR NEXT PRESCRIPTION, !" KNIGHTS DRUG STORES Prescription Specialists W^^^WC'-COC*, '.'. '. V I l. WONH Ur a\ Sir riVIII Nil Xltl-rMKS rafti 27r I I \ril HOXI *•>.. Me.. •> fl 20 rVUNI BOXt:st 20. SI 44. Sac 42c 48e. MI. IIIMV ROOK8 Me. tit* A f 1 44 Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, 11, 12 13 BROAD STREET IIAIIIIIMIVK-BROAD ST. | I The Finest Food HKIN/. SANDWICH SPREAD— vn bottle 47c. ROSES LIU MARMALADE p boMk Ml PI r,„. 11.M 33c PS—pi 1:11 SI.10 %  N K I'AII c,\I< INS %  ?9c IBLE RAISINS p pkl Jc • i pki 30c m Hi 35.' COCK1 AIL CHERRII I Sm.ll 51, : r.i ,, 60c i IUVI i -it. i II ill 11 in '-. si.sa OOROONZOLA CHEESE pa lb.. S1.I0 (iulliA CHEESE ir Id 11.05 Bl SLICED BACON pa lb 11.11 sFsaALt DUTCH TABLE APPLES, per lb. 30c. S si i.tsff r SCOTT A to.. Ltd. I •• s



PAGE 1

M M)AY. JANCARY 14, UM SUNDAY ADVOCATE PACE VINE Duck Lays Schools Open Director Of Bad Season Big Eggs On Tuesday CivilAviation Faces J'ca H"; !nN ' W,KI '^ Tu ~ d '> wiU **• "* tenr *• Edward JUU. /„r Ham-.*. College. Combetmere came into the Ad vacat e s office Queen'* College and St Michael's yesterday monui, with ... dlMk ,; 1 *" School After the Cnml egg that weighed three and a ma* vacation w m, > holiday-, half ounces i upUi will begm .1 new year. Duck eggs usually weigh about **ar the boys' schools football two and a half ounces Clarke w| Dr ,he same of the season % %  id that it was the third time J hl ,ctm too. is athletic sports that his duck had laid large eggs tor %  *"* schools. This one was bigger than the BfJ %  : %  A, TRIMDADIAN, Edinorc Small Pox Su-pr. t Leaves fro than n page I Pi . i prize at the Local Talent Show it the Globe Theatre on Friday oigfat Jackbir, who sang the Irian psri*Hr85! SS E~^~ DaUley who *am. "!)..> |t> n..s tiind imrt ^ ^ Other ood performance* were yacfatl inn rising boats as (her given by Austin Evelyn wttfa passed. There were pl-nty of bookMy ^ nd Svlbcrt to read and over Christmas the Rudder with -Our V.-rv Own." Royal and Merchant Navy Welfar.The Judges at the Talent Show League sent me over sever.ii were Mr Everton Weekes. Miss Christmas packages" Murray and Mis* Cheeseman. J *•.< %  .. ...-.._. %  .. Willie here he heard (rom home AMC | NEWTON, el Mortimer Both of big parents aie aUve and Hall. St Peter, was injured were glad to know how well he In an accident along Black Hock had been treated. Road on Friday. She was treated at the General Hospital and disTyrrell has fair hatr and gre>charged green eyes. He is five feat ten Mrs. Newton is Postmistress of ""* tell, well built and a Black Hock Sub-Post Office. Irlendiy likeable fellow. Also involved in the accident was motor car M. 166. owned by Lepert Downes of Black Rock. -, __ and driven by Arlington Savoury faII idr I%*lf-N : of Peterkins Road. % %  — % % % %  i n — For Bahamas Citrus LOTIKW Jan. t. OROUP-CapUui Bdward Hole Report* Dram buunu indicate "f the British that thu season the in duration gliding record, will ..iUst bulk purchase of citrus by thu rive in Nassau on January -5th Ministry of Food has ceased — ;> his duties as Director will be the worst in many years of Civil Aviation, Bahamas from the point of view of the This 44-year old officer, who Jamaica citrus grower, in that retired from the R.A.F. exactly Jamaican citrus is having a bad twelve months ago. will long have lime on the United Kingdom market. %  CAPTAIN lim\i:n MOLE ause to . i. mba A CANE FIRE which broke at Society Plantation, OMl up lu new appui.ineut, he got married this month. HLS wile |l %  xtremely interested in light the season, grr-pcfiuit was reported to be earning fairly good prices but the plica for grapefruit has dropped conuderably. With the current price* n.e Jamaica Citrus Growers Association is taking a loss of 5 iv.i> box of fruit shipped. Oi nmTTlk sgj to cabled advice fioni London this week the grapei utt market is likely to be fur•r.et depressed toward mid-January and onwards when Pa lea%  sjvetc.i lo ii lc.ee large HOpUag of grapefruit on the Bnt.sh Ba rm, The Association s plan lo ship si me 21.000 boxes of grapefruit K has been halted in Mn the new situation To meet it. ihe Association is oito sell the remainder b* %  They were married at Cgxti John, on Friday burnt 252 holes of first crop ripe canes. They are the property of Mr. C N Reecc _, __ ,. „, , of the same nlnntatinn lMdy Madcn-Powell, Chief S^tvTouir of ti crop rip,£**,? £• World left England canes were burnt when a Ore " ./S. Colaaible to visu the .,, broke out in a Held of canes at Guides in the Caribbean Owing brands of gcvfl VUla Road. Brittons HlU. on J?J he C n J va '" Tr nida ,d •"• aviation From 1940-42 he wag 25O.0OO children of school age .. Prtday. The canes belong to SETS ^ "teden-Powell wUl A M ..„ lt DlI x or „ f reta ,r s a" J"' !" unable to attend school Charles Ruck of the same address visit these Islands before cmnin,: ^.^^ a| ^ A|r ^ bcauof msufttcient accommodaThty were not Insured. here tw hor neis| visit. Hl W(|> lhll|1 ( „, 1|ni)U d h ead of '"> 11 facilities was made last Weak the "branch at the Ministry of AirW %  "• O T. Sounders, relin craft Production controlling the president of the Jamaica Un KINGSTON, J'ca. Jan 7. An estimate that there were now A word may be an anagram of the word that precedeil IT may be a synonym of the word that precede il IT may be achieved by adding one letter to, subtracting one letter from, or changing one letter in the preceding word IT may be associated with Ihe previous word in a saying. IIIIIL; |Mi//lt' •1 lliiiai ••!• simile IT may form with Uie preceding word UM IUIIH ,,I %  well-known pgeaon IN plB) in fiict or OettOB IT may be aasociated with the preceding wind In the title or action of %  book, play Of other com) may he used more than twice consecutivelv. and only oi may he UM d | relntinnship. A typical succession of words might b.' MUTUAL-FRIEND mE-FI,OF SLOE SOLE lit >I E i ORNEH H< IRNER JAi'K JILLHILL CONSTITUTION, I I v Solution on Monday By BOURJOIS lAlf I'litt.lhl K Kill.,I I.H1IMI IIIMKk IM. VANISHINO CRHAM %  mill I IVdTINI • IIA1U you wont, hear yourself walk \7'UXE LABOIRERH W the Waterworks Department were putting down pipe ( lines at Pine Hill around mid-day tim £' yesterday they came ticross a of ^ skeleton It was found about we \Q, three and a half feet down'tn the Wan earth The lines were being laid between the Innd* of Messrs. Hutson and Goddard from The SS Celceabic is de ii Barbados on or about Wedncsda Janum wntti 17th, and while the ibJp 1 she will spend Ihe t. A Guard of Honour uts and 24 Guides will her at the Baggage Association') Basket Selling Is Slow Work technical developments of military Teachei gliders and their towing aircraft, annual meeting. His experience of civil aviation Mr. Saundeis said there w;. : was increased when in 1945-46 he need for small. inexpen-iv. was seconded from the R.A.F. as schools i n the country district!' lo Manaue. of B.O.A.C. Developprovide accommodation for these merit Might In this capacity he children now denied education. ICC from the Ohief Guide ? upen "f et "'tf 11 truU ^ new "Laudable as are the efforts day or two before she "EL? SEE h. /'*,.. -IO construct school buildings,Mr. •CfVod Ton, England she said she Bl1 f !" Vm"; 4 of h T W "i!V r.fm' was LJW packing „nd looking *; r ^ ^SnrtbffS? forward to hor lour. u narift and % tti< iency "droiip'-Captain Mole also has uUy 131.000 places for 3(19,OOC considerable txnenerue Of jet h ''ren of whoot age AddiUon aircraft as n result of one year Hll >' u '• estimated that over 3; spent as R A.F. representative of P" cent, of our children leav. tlie National Gas Turbine ostabM'hool without attaimng fi lishment. where he was employed standard on the development of this latest aspect of aviation. READING ON THEIR BACKS HALF a dnzei. big liokpilals in Kualaud are using I new divno downed by Helen Cralg-Davioa, %  . i -ued prulesPionnl hiveutoi J eiiatile; pahetits who a blunders said, "there nearly a quarter of a mill. aln our children without accom tloji in our schools — the along The s s Ceiomble calls at Guadeloupe and Martinique en route to Barbados which is a wonderful opportunity far I-ady i* ii J t .. „.j ..„ Baden-Powell to *oe the Guides Ju ?S W U l t d S? >W i U P i', the French Is'ands. On this Milk Market he would see downs fhQ m ^^ Br|t 8n Gultllul Cd DO k. %  .OB he pavcmenl on ,,,. lMu%h w ,.. ,„.,.. „, Ihe right side of the road. Some mudn lno Bahamas. Puerto Rico, are plan, and others have a blond HalU and Jnrtialca i n Puerto It is with a wry smile that he of various colours that inevitably Blco at u^ cnti ^ March she will recalls that year spent working attract the passerby. attend the meeting of the Subon jets and then remembers aarOnc of the basket makers is Committee of the Western HemisHer days when he WBS one of the Scaly Watson of St. Andrew, phere Council. From Jamaica pioneers of another typo of dying The business is not a thriving the Chief Guide will return to —this time without engines. one, he told the Advocate yesterEngland by ship, arriving there Apart from once holding the day, and as a matter of fact, he towards the end of April. Uritish durauon record for gliding said, he is often on the verge of —eight hours, 20 minutes—he still desuondencv I' vi>f>llt l Vi' holds the Egyptian altitude record ., uesponoenc, I.XI < imt* a( ^^ { ^ % Another record he "' d ) has been appointed Watson entered the basket busi-* %  aj^ , retains, and one which is never '"""her of the Cambridge Uninesa about lour years ago, but the %  _OasaBBMaa5c likely to be beaten is that of 147 V*"y Overseas Committee loi material Is so expensive, he said. -,__ .. ^ m —, lnil o( t hc succe ive lo P %  "<* %  ""> ^ %  "S f*""*""""", that hi* bus never been autte able ~ lne !" wili be a meeting xl me w d ^ ^r, ^nWtu Mr Farley who is in London In make a livelihoodTout of it He S?? C V ,t !" Conumttee on Salui Uroiip-Caplaln Mole. P doing research In Economics un?.a often i turn to somethiSi dw M 7 f 1 M *' ^ aflCr lma "" ol er interest outside glid C .'SP; r .,oa, k " < %  "" Unlver,,!. ExaminaihSf'.n ,1 S ,JS",\ tf "ona Syndicate to dl.cuaa thc prothird in the isle o Man light 1Hlsod c han|W ,„ „,. syllabus fo. the Overaeas School Certiflcaic aeroplane race and 1 Ished second In the 1949 he iinRoyal Aero Examlna n ^a SS^Jui MQUIREMCNTS WILL BE MADE KNOWN IN U.K.. %  Klum Our Own Corirtfturulri'ti PORT-OF-SPAIN. Jan. II. The Trinidad and Tobago Tourthere, they could till up the tank of their cars. Now, he has gono one further and opened an Ico ,. C..\ U| B M a. cream and light refreshment par^o^r woatii '' %  i i Lau> NeUun ai.u int.LaViuduu lour * i OKI-OF-&PAIN. Jan. II. Ih.uciuVi-si ui calhtuTTl Innniad importers, unable to istist Board has asked Governa Bra Yi I,M. ^—*-^i - Nu( on(y moloriJl5 gjnj molor get any particular British gooas nient to provide $10,000 in the _->uig parties, but villagers as well from thc United Kingdom, can 1951 estimates for a survey ol ' can make use of tbeneier which ow have their requirement* pub-itcs suitable for hotel, cabaiia is now .a combination of livBcised in thc United Kingdom and beach development in UW „„ .ng house, gasolene station and "rough the Statistics and EnColony. i^.g c-igu u-rlour qulrles Department of the London Tentative arrangements have l ..'. i %  Si i -ill, be ar. Trinidad. QfSslada and Si. Vui| lOWm nun Chamber of Commerce (Inc.) already been made by the Board for Beiinuua, Boston ana bl. Juno The opening function was held Mr. H. C. Squire, Principal of for outstanding USA. I via the British Northern islands ; ail t Thursday Among those pre the Department said that through , n duct a survey if funds are pro. Ihe ( aiuui-n lb.ulriM.er wni „. Ml Wl r ,. : Mr. and Mrs A. P. ihe medium of the Openings for vlded. be (winging DSrsjO nom Canada (_((X( M r u „d Mrs M. H. Alleyne, Trade'' columns of the "Chamber This proposal was submitted b %  IS also expectDr. E. M Carter, Mrs F. D. G of Commerce Journal.' thc ChamGovernment Immediately aflc ed to a aii u>-iiioiiow riigni for Simpson, Mrs. Howard Smith, ber has been able for a number the meeting of the Caribbean InBnlisn Guiana via St. Vincent. Miss M. Clarke, Mis* L Bradof years, to put many bayera int.nm Tourism Committee in Ban I i and Trinidad. Both ships are con Kiessrs. Gardiner Austi Ltd. i St Co., shaw. Mr. and Mrs. H. A Tudor, tercsted in British goods In toucn .l.ian. Puerto Rico in Decembe Mr. and Mrs. C. Redman, Mr. with possible sources of supply in hen C. I. T. C. passed a resolunnd Mrs II. N. Farmer, Miss the United Kingdom." Margaret Tavlor. Mrs. S. W. Howeil /ir*rf Of Jhe Line %  -'. oi the Saguenay Terminals .-tegrnships. for which Messrs. Plantations. Limited are Shooting Results May Save 876,000 I lui-iiif i. nitooiaii i"i the local agnU, ..invc. ;..-,uj ,„,„ look acc ,„,„,,„> ... ,.f four days at this M T A L R obcrls K ""r'he Land.,, Marlr-e brm* ,., ^e". Barbados a cargo of whisky, biscuits, asbestos, machinery and 48 T. A. L. Roberts. 100; M. G rr.'tor can, besides other merTucker, 99; G May. 98; P. Ch. I id is*. Saturday afl< i the Small Bore rifle hei scored a The eight best scores follows:— k r.tn 1.1.. ..... i-. H.nli l*ORT-OF SPAIN, Jan. 9. S Department of the Controller of Imports and Export* may clip about $7ti,000 off iis expenditure this year on cargohandling on the wharf. It Is expected that this saving will be effected as a result of a scneme under which the | ; %  tm I Manager of tinPort Services Department will undertake 1 Sjd 98; H. B. G Marshall, 97; M A deliver goods to merchants on She has two intranslt passenTucker. 97; G. Pilgrim. 97; S the order of the Controller for British Guiana. pro, 98. Imports and Exports. MACLEANS ymomm vwrop wm^is healthy TOOTH PASTE Fot r hue teeth, DM thc TI-ROXIDE tooth f Tourist Board Asks. Govb For $10,000 ... Jtrongly urging Its IBMnbtt (.• %  vernments u. embark on lbs ., establishment of "pilot plant u/aller Field Air IVr.. h-.tel and resort development m Th ,. Council wilt hand their territories, financed, ir nece*r hr| U r for 830.000 lo UM wry. completely I rom Governr limm erciale Company lot liu •MM funds or under government ,, u ichase of the plant Worlj on guarantee of the payment of long „„. Kmovgi „f o,e pig) term loans. a next week. FLIi tW Pitt contains D.O.T. FLIT IS AN <|M^ PRODUCT Y<>l'N(.STi:RS, ts well as grownups, must make inn of Inntr CUanlineis in order lo keep tit 1'i.ivume, and 'itnc, dcmjnd good health, and this youn^ IJJV has found ihl way lo enjoy boili' Andfawi if in ckciting "h7/y" drink which brings Inner Cleanhntu by cloning ihe mouth, •cttling the stomach, and toning up the liver. Finally, il gently dsggg ihe bowels. A* a rcfrc\hing drink .it in* time of thc day, take one teaspoonim od AnJrcws in a glass of water More imporum .still, don't forget your Andrews wtsn you wake in thc morning ANDREWS LIVERSMT THE IDEAL FORM OF LAXATIVE




ae MY yy
> /, Vey



Sunday Advorate



ESTABLISHED 1895



Eisenhower Arrives

In London For Talks

ENERAL

EISENHOWER, North Atlantic

LONDON, Jan, 15.
Supreme

Commander arrived here tonight for talks*with Britis)
Cabinet Ministers and service chiefs. d
He had flown from Oslo on the sixth stage of a fact-finding

tour of West European cap

jitals.

Eisenhower will leave on Tuesday for Lisbon, Rome and
Frankfurt before returning to Washington to report to
President Truman on the state of West Europe and pre-

paredness.

Eisenhower was met by British Defence Minister Emanuel

Shinwell, British service ch

iefs and other personalities in-

cluding American Ambassador Walter Gifford. The General

declined to be interviewed.

: "Flu
Manchester

MANCHESTER, Eng. Jan. 13
About 12,000 of Manchester's
population of over 700,000 peopl
were to-day estimated to be
suffering from the influenza epi-
demic now sweeping North Eng-
land.

The epidemic, the worst since
1918, has thrown many of the
cotton city’s services into chaos.

More than 1,000 post office
engineers, telephonists, postmen,
and porters, with about 400 drivers
and conductors are off sick.

In North-west England
whole, claims at the
Ministry offices already
200,000 and many officers
working overtime to
flood of claims.

Most Manchester doctors are
working 15 and 16 hours a day.
Many have themselves fa'len
victims to the ‘flu.

as a
Insurance
total

are
handle a

At Liverpool and other parts
of Britain’s industrial Merseysid>
grave-diggers are working da»
and night shifts so that hundreds
of graves needed shall be ready
as quickly as possible.

On Monday, the
Insurance Company throughoui
Merseyside will begin paying ou!
nearly £100,000 in death benefits.

“To add to our difficulties there
has been an iftcrease in the num-
ber of cases of measles in the
area”, an official of the Liverpool
Health Department said.

Influenza is also being felt in
the north-eastern areas of Eng-
land. Deaths in Newcastle-on-
Tyne last week totalled 225, big-
gest weekly total since the 1918
epidemic of Spanish ‘flu.

Thirty-three of this total were
ettributed to influenza.

—Reuter.

B.W.I. Trade
Commissioner

Arrives

Mr. and Mrs. Rex Stollmeyer
arrived here yesterday by T.C.A.
from Trinidad. Mr. Stollmeyer
is Trade Commissioner for the
B.W.L, British Guiana and the
Bahamas in Canada and is sta-
tioned in Montreal.

Mr. Stollmeyer is here for two



weeks on an official visit and dur-/|

ing his stay he will confer with
exporters who send produce to
Canada, Government officials and
members of the Colonial Devel-

opment and Welfare Corporation. |

Mr. Stollmeyer has already
been to Grenada, Trinidad and
P.G. on this trip. From Barbados
he will return to Trinidad before
visiting the Leeward Islands, the
other Windward Islands, Jamaica,
the Bahamas and then back to

Montreal sometime in May. He|

left Canada November 24th, 1950.

Mr. Stollmeycr was in Barbados
for the Canada-West Indian Ship-
ping Conference in February 1949.
His last official visit was in Janu-

ary, 1947, when he arrived on the

ON OFFICIAL VISIT

10th.

Upsets

Industrial |

Eisenhower will start top level
talks in London on Monday. He
will study Britain’s new rearma-
ment programme.
| He will have his first formal
| meeting with the Atlantic Pact
Deputies on Tuesday. They will
review preparations for the estab-
lishment of an Atlantic army.
| Deputies will meet first on Mon-
| day to consider their reports for
|the Supreme Commander, They
are also expected to approve the
appointment of a “production Co
ordinator,” recommended by the





North Atlantic Defence Produc-
tion Board.
| An official British spokesman

would neither confirm nor deny re-
ports that the Co-ordinator would
be William R. Herod, Chairman
of the _ International General
Electric Company, but it was
known tkat the appointment
would go to a prominent Ameri-
ean industrialist

While in London, Fisenhower
will be given details of the debate
on the Micdle East by the Com-
|monwealth Prime Ministers this
| week

Summary
| Following is qa summary of the
results of Eisenhower's discussions

‘ith the Chiefs of some North
Atlantic Nations,

Paris: Eisenhower asked many
searching questions of French
service chiefs and Government
leaders during his visit from
; january 7 to 9.

Conversations centred on the
precise details of French rearma-
uyedt resources and on accelerated
and ircreased military aid to
France called for by tne French
Minister of Supply, reliable
quarters said here.

Government leaders were “very
satisfied”’ with the General’s visit,
these quarters added. Premier
Rene Pleven assured the Supreme
Commander of France's whole-
heartéd support and emphasised
the vitally important contribution
she would make to the new
Atlantic army, it was learned.

Defence Minister Jules Moch
pledged that France would have
at the disposal of Eisenhower 10

vicions by the end of 1951

Five divisions at battle readiness
would be stationed in Germany

The Hague: Holland will put a
military quota under Eisenhower's
command once material begins
pouring in, usually reliable quar-
ters said here today.

11,000 men conscripted in 1940
will probably spend their second
year training in Eisenhower's
army.

About 30,000 men to be called
up this year will be offered to re-
place the current year’s draft with
Fisenhower after serving cne year
‘under the Dutch Command. From
then on the annual call up will be
labout 45,000 men who will be
|made available for the Atlantic
larmy in their second year.
| Copenhagen: Denmark is be
lieved to have told Eisenhower
that no increase in call up would
be immediately possible. Den-



mark’s proposed contribution is
1,000 men now serving in Ger.
many.

It is planned however to call up
some men who have already com-
pleted their training for a short

@ on page 14



ME. AND MRS. REX STOLLMEYER arrived from Trinidad yester-
day. Mr. Stollmeyer, who is Trade Commissioner for the B.W.I.,
British Guiana and the Bahams; in Oamada is on am oMicial visit,









BARBADOS, JANUARY 14, 1951



POLO AT THE’ GARRISON





TORNADOES beat Cyclones 7—6 at the Garrison yesterday afternoon
ecwindbeciasoms 2 Loar Alege agin lens Fanon plaka gC at

? Italian Govt.

Wants Special |

Powers

|
ROME, Jan. 13. |

The Italian Government today
asked Parliament for special pow-
ers during the next two years,
authorising it to clamp severe con-
trols on practically any part of the
nation’s economy.

It also asked parliament to pro-|
vide for prison terms of up to 10
years and fines up to £12,000 for
anyone seeking to evade new con-
trols particularly if evasion was
intended to damage the national
defence.

2. Control of the prices of all
materials, wages, dividends, and
profits, rents, production, credit,
and investment.

_ 38. Authority to impose ration-
ing.

The preamble to the proposed
bill declared that the Government
did not propose to make use of the
delegated powers immediately nor
in all sectors in which they apply.

It was believed that one of the
principal aims of the Government
in demanding such large scale
special powers was to encourage
confidence in Italy amongst the
other Atlantic Pact nations.

Italy needs the guarantee of big
orders from other nations of West-
ern Europe to put into effect a
projected (£10,000,000) plan to
boost to full production great in-
dustries which must be geared to
war output and which are now in
a state of crisis.





—Reuter.

Koch Taken
To Hospital

AUGSBURG, Jan. 13,
Ilse Koch awaiting sentence ir
her murder trial which ended
here yesterday was to-day

in
Aichach prison hospital after
throwing a fit and breaking up



her cell furniture.
The head of Augsburg pr'son
said Koch did not injure her self
during the attack.
Koch was spending
hours before sentence

her last
in snow-

bound Aichach prison near here |REG., TYRRELL — the

On Monday afternoon three
judges and eight jurymen will
decide whether she was guilty of
the murders in Buchenwald hor-
ror camp, and if so what sentence
shou'd be inflicted.

The Prosecution has demanded
life imprisonment—-West German
law has abolished the death
sentence. Any sentence is expec-
ted to be served elsewhere than
in Aichach.

Koch has made it clear to those
attending her trial that she is
certain. she will receive life
imprisonment.

—Reuter.



Famous Animal
Lover Dies

LONDON, Jan. 13.

The death was announced here
to-day of the 72-year old Duchess
of Hamilton and Brandon, who
last year crowned her life’s work
for animals by opening a mater-
nity home for cats at her home
in Dorset.—Reuter.

STRIKE IN B.G. LIKELY

CEORGETOWN, B.G., Jan. 13.
Pelice action in making four
arrests of budget demonstrators
ovtside the Public Butldings las:
| week seems likely to lead to a
general strike, Executives of vari-
ous Trade and Employee Unions
and representatives of the Peo-
ple’s Progressive Party meeting
| behind close@ doors last night are



|said to have approved of it in
| principle, :
| This action follows the big

| Bourda Green meeting on Thurs-





day night when it was decided
to send a Resolution to the Secre-
| tary of State for the Colonies, pro-

testing “this encroachment upon
our liberty and freedom”. A rati-





fication by various Unions of last
night’s decision is now being
sought.

Three of the four demonstra-
tors arrested have been

with derly beh our and
the four ith assaulting a Police

' corporal,—O.P,

when play continued for the Warner Bolton Cup and the Advocate Cup.

U.N. Approve Far
East Settlement

The United Nations Political Committee tonight approved |

by 50 votes to seven with
“British Commonwealth Pla

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 13.

one abstention the five-point
n” for a Far Eastern settlement.

The U.N. Secretary General, Mr. Trygve Lie will send the
plan to Peking tonight with
pussible, an official spokesm




















suspect, has been on Pelican for one
month.
Barbados yesterday.

Small Pox
Suspect Leaves

REGINALD TYRRELL, seven-
teen-year-old Englishman fron
Dagenham, Essex left Barbados
yesterday afternoon by B.W.LA.,
for Trinidad. Tyrrell was the sus-
pected case of small pox who has
been on Pelican Island since

12, 1950

Tyrrell told the Advocate short-
‘y before he left Seawell yester-
day, that he will join the
Biographer in Trinidad. The
Biographer is due to leave there
today bound for the U.K.

Tyrrell who will be eighteen this
yeat was making his first sea
voyage as Engineer’s steward on

the Biographer. He hopes to make} stories which

the Biographer’s next trip here.

a request for a reply
an announced.

Before the Comm’ ttee was a plan
for four power talks on the Far
East to be held after a Korean
cease fire had been arranged. The
jplan, put forward by Israel and
| backed by Britain, embod es the
i principles prcposed by the United
; Nations Cease-fire Committee of
three for settling’ the Far East
crisis
The principles of the resolution
were proposed by Canada on
Thursday after the United States
“As Peported to have agreed to a
jacked by the London meeting
ommonwealth Prime Ministers
Itealls for a cease-fire in Korea
withdrawal of foreign troops and
the setting up of an appropriat®
body including Britain, the United
States, Russia and Communist
China to try to settle Far Eastern
problems.

The Dominican Republic, Cuba
‘and Panama supported the plan.
| Chinese Nationalist delegate Dr.
T. F. Tsiang moved an amendment
to substitute the term “Republic
of China” for that of ‘People's
_ Republic of China” in the resolu-
-tion, which would mean iny-ting
{the Chinese Government of Chiang
|Kai Shek to the talks
| Dr. Tsiang said that the proposed
‘plan was in fact a “total sell out by
{the United Nations of Korea and
jot China,”

The plan would inevitably land
Korea behind the “iron curtain.”

A Military Dunkirk

as $00N a&

tary Dunkirk”, Tsiang declared.
He scouted the idea that Formosa |
could simply be disposed of as no’
man’s land, “It is the home of Free
China, defended by an army of
500,000 men,” he said, |

The Chinese Nationalist delegate
went on; “I know nothing in the

small-pox | Charter which prevents my Gov-

ernment from exercising the in-

Now quite recovered he left |herent right of self defence both

on the island and on the mainland

‘Formosa represents the largest

single unit of power against Com-

munist aggression in the Far East
— Reuter.

U.S. AIR FORCE WILL
DO OWN CENSORSHIP

TOKYO, Jan. 13.

The American Air Force in
Korea and Japan today began its
own censorship. Correspondents
clearing stories with the Army
“press security division” were
told they must now submit all
Air Force stories to an Air officer
for eensorship.

An Air Force spokesman ex-
plained that Army censors were
often unaware of what the Air
Foree considered security matters
vot availablé for publication.

As the spokesman said, the
Army censor had passed Air Force
should have been
censored and held up others to





He wants to see a bit more Off which the Air Force would have

@ on page 9

» objection.—Reuter.



BRITISH

MEDICOS

LEAVE FOR BRAZIL
On Goodwill Tour

GEORGETOWN, BG., Jan. 13

The Chief Medical Officer to the
tritish Colonial Office, Dr. E. D.
Pridie, C.M.G., DS.O., O.B.E.,
accompanied by the Medical Ad-
viser to the Comptroller for De-
velopment and Welfare in the
West Indies, Dr. J. W. P. Harkness
will leave British Guiana tomor-
row for Brazil on a goodwill tour
of the neighbouring country. On
their four-month tour of the
Caribbean the two officials spent
16 days in British Guiana during

charged} which, accompanied by the British
Guiana Director of Medical Ser-

Dr. Leonard G. Eddey, they

1} vices,

made ap extensive survey of local

medical services visiting in par
ticular South Rupununi and also
tnking the opportunity to fly over
the famous Kaieteur Falls

Commenting on medical work
mong the Amerindian population
n Rupununi, Dr. Pridie observed
that under difficult conditions the
medical officer to Amerindians
Dr. Cenydd Jones had done a good
lot of work, but a lot yet re-
mained to be done. But already
the health of the Amerindian
population had _ benefited
their numbers are growing
had reason to be prot of the
results so far obtained.—C.P,

.

and



“We may have to suffer a mili- |

He,

}

| Big Three |
Will Reply To
' Moscow Soon

By SYLVAIN MANGEOT
LONDON, Jan. 13

Britain, France, and the United
States are expected to send to
Moscow without delay identica!
replies to the Soviet note on Four
; Power talks, though no date has
; yet been set, it was authoritative-
| ly learned today,
| They will not hold up replies
| pending the receipt of the Soviet
and Chinese reaction to the
latest United Nations’ resolution
on Korea.

It has been clear for some
time that negotiations for the
resumption of power talks were
separate from any move aimed
at a great powers discussion of
Far Eastern problems such as is
contained in the latest United
Nations move.

The two initiatives are regard-
ed here as parallel in their
genera} aim of bringing about a
negotiated settlement, of the
major causes of friction between
the great powers.

America’s insistence that a
ceasefire in Korea must precede
any joint talks on Far Eastern
problems is accepted here as also
representing British intention in
supporting the resolution in the
United Nations.

Will Not Relax

While the Commonwealth de
claration yesterday made it clear
that the Prime Ministers are
determined to do everything to
make negotiations for settlement
possible, there is no tendency
here either to assume Chinese or
Soviet consent or to relax the
efforts of the western powers to
make the non-Communist world
secure against aggression.

Ie F- eee
Students
Demonstrate

CAIRO, Jan. 13
Steel - helmeted police, armed

|
}
|







with tommy guns guarded ihe
approaches to the British and
American Embassies here to-day

as

2.000 hostile students demon-
strated outside the office of the
Egyptian Foreign Ministry. They
had gathered in defiance of the
government ban to demand
information on the results of th:
recent Anglo-Egyptian talks

The Foreign Minister Saleh El
Din Bey who has been conducting

talks with the British Foreign
Secretary Bevin, to'd students
from the Ministry balcony, that

foreign policy is not a matter of
argument with students,

Students demanded that the
Foreign Minister should join
them, “in denouncing colonialism
and supporting the World Peace
Movement,”

—Reuter.

Cardinal Dies
Shaving

VATICAN CITY, Jan. 13

The Dean of the Roman Catho-
lic Church College of Cardinals,
79 year old Cardinal Francesco,
Marchetti-Selvaggiani, died sud-
denly to-day while shaving in his
bathroom,

Hig death left 19 vacancies in
the College of Cardinals which
elects Popes and functions as
chief consultative organ of the
Catholic Church.

The Cardinal died shortly after
celebrating his usual morning
mass, it was learned, Friends of
the Cardinal reported he had of-
ten said: “I should like to die un-
expectedly after saying Mass.”

The death of Cardinal Marchet.
ti-Selvaggiani created the unique
situation for the College of Car-
\dinals of having a_ relatively
| young foreigner as its Dean

He is the 66-year-old French
Cardinal Eugene Tisserant, the
head of the Vatican’s congrega
jtion for Eastern churches
| Cardinal Marchetti-Selvag



; giani’s death reduced the
strength of the College of Car
dinals to the low level of 51

. —Reuter,



Prepare Joint
Offensive

TOKYO, Jan. 13.

UNITED NATIONS

forces held their ground

today against mass attacks by Communist

troops two miles seuch
the Korean peninsula.

of Wonju in the centre of

Communists Save hurled thousands of men to their deaths
in attempts to break through the Sobaek Mountain into

Southeast Korea.

U.S. Navy
Plan Big
Programme

WASHINGTON, Jan, 13
The United States Navy is
ready to launch a new naval re-

armament programme putting
|tundreds of fighting ships into the
nation’s defence lineup

Work on the construction of a
giant 4.700 ton aireraft carrier,
and 173 other ships was due to

start as soon as Congress approved
of the $2,000,000,000 Navai
gramme,

Half of the money
used to build new ships
jt@lf for conversion or moderni-
sation of 290 existing ships in-
cluding aireraft carriers, cruisers,
destroyers and submarine

pro-

would be
the other



This programme, endorsed by
{the President, comes before the
Houde off Representatives next

j week after receiving a quick and
unanimous approval by the House
Armed Services Committee

In addition to the super carrier
the programme provides for
building even Snorke] type (un-
der water breathing) submarines
152 minesweepers, 66 landing
ships, two rocket launching ships,
12 fleet tankers, two ocean escorts,
one icebreaker and 30 smaller
j assorted craft



—Reuter,



|
| Lava Destroys
“Garden Of Etna”

; CATANIA, Jan, 13,
Europe's biggest active voleano
| erupting for the 50th day poured
a 10-yard high stream of smould-
ering lava over the “Garden of
| Etna” today
| Thousands of
pmany acres Of rich garden
disappeared forever under
grey smoking rock
The Prefect of Catania province
ordered the opening of a special
office to try to find work for hun-
dreds of men unemployed by loss
of their orchards

and
land
the

apple trees

Scouts posted near erupting fis
sures on the volcano reported no
slackening in the merciless flow
of lava which has covered thous-
ands of acres of mountainside in
its six week eastward march to-
vards the sea .

Four empty villages, Milo, Rin-
azz0, Fornazzo, and Sciara, whose
inhabitants fled at the approach of
lava, today still stood miraculously
untouched.—Reuter,



———



—_—_—_—_—



—-

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD

Latest reports reaching Toky«
jsaic “heroes of Wonju” were stil!
clivgre tenaciously to their posi-
| tion

Huge transport planes dropped
hundreds of tons of supplies to
‘them while hundreds of fighters
and bombers hammered at the
Communists and tried to cut wit
forward troops from their supply

bases

But four Communist divisions
bypassing Wonju on the west
threatened to outflank troops
descending north. At least eight

more divisions were massed nortn
of the city, ready to be throw:
into an all out frontal assault

They are now menacing the key
junction of Tanyang 90 miles north
of Taegu, Communists attacks arc
now building up into one of the
biggest offensives since they
hurled back United Nations troop;
north of the 38th parallel.



Fresh troops in their thousands
are moving up along the 55-mile
line trom the west coast to a point
north of Tanyang. More thar
11.000 troops were reported con.
centrated in the Osan area 25 mile;
south of Seoul and United Nations
pilots reported another long
column of troops moving southeast
ilong the Han River northwest of
Wonju

Reds Withdraw

Eleven miles southwest of Inchon
directly west of Wonju, Commu-
nists withdrew early today after
a sharp clash,

In the Sobaek mountain ranges

the battle was increasing in in-
itensity and 350 Communists had
|been killed in the past three days.
} :

ed Nations planes roared
ae © battlefront at dawn today
att kine. Spimese . and. North

" i ing south © from

u.

Pilots reportéd four Communist
regiments moving south of the
city and thousands of troops mass-
ing a few miles north of the city.

An 8th Arm; pokcesman said
today that Chinese were also
continuing to build up large forces
in the Osan area to the southwest
of Wonju near the west coast
More than 11,000 Communists were
reported be massed there
earlier



to

Light bombers made 33 night
intruder sorties in close support of
rround troops and behind the
Communist lines,—Reuter

ee

TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113
DAY OR NIGHT



}



CO

=













STREET



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PAGE TWO

———————————————————

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)
'O-DAY 445 and 650 pw

amen Warne

SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 1951

HARRY G. DAIN, who









2 SEE YOURSELF AS OTHERS SEE YOU.
We Can Supply...

|
| MIRROR GLASS /

and continuing daily
r Bros. Pietures !
Sa Sat ey Bete










THE CENTRAL EMP®@. Ma



Training In Statistics

with Joel McCREA—Alexis SMITH Zachary SCOTT ‘Alan HALE—owers presided over the Caribbean MONG the passengers lea
Special Mat. Thurs. 1.30 p.n pecial Mat, Friday 1th : Medical Conference just held in by B.W.I.A. on Thursd
“PREDDIE STEPS OUI 443. ori. denis CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. — PROPRIETORS. Trinidad, and Mrs. Dain were in- for Jamaica via Trinidad wa
Freddie STEWART snd Teenaye: Tom KEENE. i r gi 5

Cnr. of Broad & Tuder Streets Angus M. Wilkie, Clerk, ;
to the Colonial Treasury

Wilkie has been seconded f

transit passengers through Barba-
dos yesterday from Trinidad for
St. Lucia.



and
‘I WOUIDNT BE IN YOUR SHOFS | Lx
Don CASTLE

RIDING THE SUNSET TRAL
GORCEY wi the Bowe Bey
“DOCKS OF NEW YORK













eae nenaeeney om ; , year to the Institute of Socia)
SS — —SSSSS——2— To-nite 8.30 to Tuesda . -m, They have gone over to St. a
| > ee enges om” Lucia for the week-eng and will Gen : is —
. ollege, where he Wi underg

PLAZA Theatre — o1/sTIN o THE STORY OF MOLLY X return to Trinidad in time to con- quacey of Guluing In: siation
LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 5 and 8.30 p gE June HAVOC — John RUSSELL to England. is expected that he will be allo

R.K.O. Radio's Mr. Leacock and Dr. Muir, he = aGenc my, Gopuasten rbd
“THE MIGHTY JOE YOUNG” E said, would be returning to Bar- methods of sampling in statist

Local Talent Audition TO-DAY, 9.30 a.m.

EMPIRE

enquiry which has been arrany:
by the Institute over the per;
15th to 27th January.
Educated at Harrison Colle;
Mr. Wilkie joined the Roya}
Force in 1944 and served
October, 1947 when he was i

bados today.

Electrical Engineer

R. and Mrs. Rupert Farmer

arrived by T.C.A. yester-
day to spend a month’s holiday in
Barbados. They are staying with



MONDAY and TUESDAY 5 and #30 p.m. (R.K.O. Double)

APRICA ABLAZE .

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Color by Technicolor








“FOLLOW ME QUIETLY” &
with Arthur KENNEDY

NOW SHOWING
Mat. & Night Shows



MIDNITE SAT. January 2th 2 FEATURES |

—





ee — ee

EMPIRE

To-day 4.45 and 8.45 and

M-G-M Presents:

Howard KEEL
with
Louis CALHERN

and
J. Carrol NAISH



ROXY

To-day and To-morrow
4.30 and 8.15

M-G-M Smashing Double :
Ester WILLIAMS
and
Van JOHNSON

¢ in:
“DUCHESS OF
IDAHO”

June ALLYSON
Dick POWELL
and

Ricardo MONTALBAN





desi

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vewelry

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ROYAL

To-day and To-morrow
4.30 and 8,30

Harry CAREY &
The WILD. SAVAGE



OLYMPIC

To-day 4.30 and 8.30
Last Two Shows To-morrow
4.30 and 8.15

Columbia Smashing Double .

Margaret SULLAVAN &
Wendell COREY

“NO SAD SONGS
FOR ME”

AND

Starring

William EYTHE &
Marjorie REYNOLDS




NOTICE
Alfonso B. de Lima & Co.

of Lower Bread Street



Establishment in Barbados

























are IN NO WAY CONNECTED,






Financially or

Daily

THE BIGGEST MUSICAL UNDER THE SUN

Color by Technicolor

“Better Than The Stage Production”
Redbook Magazine



» to inform all their Friends and Customers, and the public in general, that

With any other

Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Gale at “The
Hope” St George.

Mr. Farmer is an Engineer with
“Hydro Quebec”. Mrs. Farmer is
the former Elsie Peterkin.

Leaving To-morrow

Massachusetts now live in Haiu.
‘They have been touring the West
Indies and yesterday they arrived
trom Trinidad by B.W.I.4. They

Mr. Miner is here until the mid-
dle of March and is staying at
Cacrabank.

14 Above!
ERE to spend a holiday with
relatives are Mr, and Mrs.
Lionel A. Pile who live in Cleve-
lund, Ohio, They were accom-
panied by their son Mr. Robert
Pile.

Mr. Lionel Pile is President of
Hough Bakeries Inc.

When he left Canada, Mr, Pile
told Carib the temperature was
“14 above.”

Road Contractor
R, AND MRS. CHARLES A
BIRGE arrived by T.C.A
yesterday to spend until January
29th in Barbados. They are staying

at the Ocean View Hotel.
Mr. Birge is a Road Contractor
and lives just outside of Toronto

in Oakville.

R. and Mrs. Francois Tur-

geon of Quebec City arrived
from Canada yesterday morning
by T.C.A. to spend a holiday in
Barbados. They are staying at
the Windsor Hotel.

Mr. Turgeon who is a paper
merchant, is partner of L. P.
‘Turgeon and Sons. This is their
first visit here.

Here Until February
ERE until February 12th when
they return to Canada by the
Lady Rodney are Mr. and Mrs.
Gerald O'Reilly.

They arrived yesterday by
T.C.A. and are staying at the
Ocean View Hotel. Mr. O'Reilly
is a retired business man,

Venezuelan Coney Island
RS. RITA GRAY and her
young son Peter, who for the

past three months have been holi-

daying in Barbados staying at the

Paradise Beach Club returned to

Venezuela yesterday morning by

6B.W.1.A. Mrs, Gray’s husband

is the Marager of Coney Island in

Caracas,

From Montreal
. AND MRS. PERCY
WRIGHT arrived yesterday
to spend a holiday with Mr. and



MR. AND MRS. LEAR WOOD, who had been holidaying in Barba-
dos, returned to Canada yesterday by T.C.A.

Teaches Modern Dancing
R. ALBERTO HOLGUIN who
spent a month’s holiday in
Barbados returned to. Venezuela
yesterday morning by B.W.1.A.
Mr. Holguin who works for the
Venezuelan Government is the
Director of a Sehool of Modern
Dancing im. Caracas. .He has
thirty students. Mr. Holguin
started dancing when he lived in
California at the age of Seventeen.
He also holds classes at some of
the Federal and Government
schools.
He was staying at the Aquatic

Vice President of the Canadian
Bank Note Co., in Ottawa. He is
staying with his brother and s‘ster-
in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wood
of “Culloden House”, Culloden
Road,

Thirty Years Ago

R. AND MRS. WILBERT E.

HUSBANDS are at present
holidaying in Barbados. Mr. Hus-
bands a“Barbadfan, is Manager of

Greene Travel Service in Boston,
Massachusetts. He used to be with
the Advocate Co., Ltd., thirty years
ago.

Mr. Husbands is a cousin of Mr.
K. N. R. Husbands, Speaker of
the House of Assembly.

They are here unt'] the end of
Tanuary when they will visit St
Lucia before returning here to
Jeave for the-U.S

Grenada Holiday

ISS CONSTANCE INNISS

who teaches at the Founda-
tion Girls’ Sehool, returned from
Grenada yesterday by B.W.1.A.
where she had been for the past
few weeks on holiday, staying
with friends.

Twice A Week
I SEE that B.G. Airways have
increased their number of



porarily released to study at Rk
kin College, Oxford, for the |
versity Diploma in Public
Secial Administration. He
awarded this Diploma on the c:
pletion of his course of stud
January, 1950

Continuing R. and Mrs, Arthur Blood Landy And The Bear
snes ood hea M-G-M_Big Double who are Originally from R. LANDY de MONTBRU
a '

who has been in Barbad
on a short visit left Seawell y«
terday with a huge Teddy Be
under his arm. This teddy b«

E have two friends in Barbados, is being vatied in ‘Tvinidad f
Dr. and Mrs. Greaves. . e Ne st Cases ;
“TRADER HORN” They leave tomorrow for Haiti. Stayi With Her Sisters
They are staying at Super Mare ying > rs
AND Guest House. RS. DOROTHY CLARK!
: Las arrived from Canada
Here Year T.C.A. yesterday to spend a ho!
" DIAL 1119 a R. WILLIAM MINER Wao day with relatives. She is sta
was in Barbados last winter ‘ng first with Mr. and Mrs. D
Starring arrived by T.C.A, yesterday oy Clarke in St. Lawrence. M
ing : ee gae morning. Mr. Miner is associ- Marke is her sister. Her oth
ee Marshall THOMPSON & ated with the Miner Rubber Co., fee sk tees) ghee’ Senpeon
Betty HUTTON Sam LAVINE and lives just outside Montreal. | farine’ Gardens.

Mrs, Clarke, who is a Bart
ian, now fives in Yarmout
Tova Scotia.

Arrived Yesterday

RS. JESSICA LEE, wife of
“ Gulf Oil’s Publicity Direct
a Venezuela, returned from Cara-
as yesterday afternoon
3.W.LA. Her children were
he airport to meet her.

Get Together
E Barbados Orchid Circle are
having a_ get-together
Sunday, January 21st at 5 p.m. at
Featherstone, Upper Collymore
Rock. There are quite a few
matters to be discussed and a good
attendance is expected,

Atlantic Region
R. and Mrs. F. M. McGregoi
arrived from Canada yester-













Back To Canada

R. AND MRS. LEAR WOOD

who had been in Barbados

for the past two months holiday-

ing with Lear’s family returned to)
Toronto yesterday by T.C.A.

Lear is an Old Harrisonian and

a former Barbados Scholar.
~~ e
























‘ . Club. day morning by T.C.A. to spend
: And : “CUSTOMS M-G-M’S After their holiday here. they Stavi ith Hi a week in Barbados. They are
“RIGHT CROSS 2 66 ANNIE E ee plan to visit! Jamaica. oe Wit His Brother staying at the Ocean View Hotel
to ‘spend a holiday in Mr. McGregor is Operations

Starring : AGENT # G T YOUR GUN Paper Merchant D Barbados is Mr. Perey Wood, Manager, T.C.A.,“Atlantic Region.

With P.A.A. Puerfo Rico
R. and Mrs, Charles Hitt and
their two children Roger
and Marylin arrived from Puerto
Rico via Trinidad yesterday morn-
ing by B.W.I.A. Mr. Hitt is
Flight Superintendent of Pan
American Airways in Puerto Rico.
Mrs, Hitt is the former Millicent
Hobson of Barbados.

Proof
7Q’HIRTY-THREE passengers
4 arrived by T.C.A. for Bar-
bados yesterday. Eight others
were destined for Trinidad and
six got off at Bermuda.

This is definite proof of Bar
bados’ rising popularity with
Canadian tourists.

Hotels and Department

Stores

R. and Mrs, J.. Harper Kent

from Bathurst N.B., ac-
companied by Miss Marion
Branch arrived from Canada
yesterday by T.C.A. to spend a
holiday in Barbados, They are
staying at the Windsor Hotel
Mr. Kent is associated with the
firm of W. J. Kent and Co.,
Ltd., and Miss Branch is Secre-
tary/Treasurer of the same Com-

MR, ALBERTO HOLGUIN returnea P®DY.



Mrs. Gordon Gale. They cdéme in flights to St, Vincent to twice a to Venezuela This company ms three

rs je yesterday by B.W.1A. pany owns _ threc
on the T.C.A. flight, Dr. and Mrs. week leaving’ Barbados on Mon- He teaches. Modern’ Dancing in Dotels and two department stores
Wright are from Montreal. days and Thursdays. Caracas. in New Brunswick.

59906660°

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GAITETY—(rHe GARDEN) ST. JAMES ~ mounces that Mr. W. A. C.

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. “Bill Stuart, Station Manager ai

Seaweill Airport for the past year,

has been appointed Manager—

Barbados, This new title is con

sistent with Mr, Stuart’s opera

—" and traffic responsibilities
ere,

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LAND OF THE LAWLESS ARRIVING by T.C.A,. yester-

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from Saskatchewan. Mr. Sharpe
is President of Electric Equip-
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company has branches in Saska-









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SUNDAY, JANUARY

How To Bring Up

14,

1951

=

Daughters

By ... THE HON. Mrs. ROBERT BOWER

MARIANA, one of my seven
daughters, was recently married
to Major Gilbert Monckton, son of
Sir Walter Monckton, K.C.

I have been asked to tell how I
brought up seven daughters, not
forgetting one son.

My large family was never
planned in advance. They are
Monica, aged six, Mary, 12,

Veronica, 13, Elizabeth, 17, Mari-
anna, 21, Mergaret, 24, Anne, 27,
and my son, Paul, who is 26.

No Easy Life

Early notions of an easy life as
a naval officer’s wife were swept
away by growing maternal in-
stinct backed by faith, though we
had little more than my husband's
Service pay with no marriage or
children’s allowances.

When my fourth baby was born
friends criticised. “How awful!”
they said, intending to be sym-
pathetic.

Our nurse was derided by shop
assistants for working in such a
large household when there were
so many jobs going looking after
a “one and only.”

But while friends wrote after
the birth of my seventh child:
“You surely cannot find this a
matter for congratulation,” I was
in fact extremely happy.

Until my fifth baby arrived we
had no real home, having to live
in a succession of rooms and fur-
nished houses at home and abroad.

Then we bought a house in
London. Of course, sacrifices had
to be made.

Expensive boarding school edu-
cation became out of the question.
Then, with experience accumulat-
ing, I found I could do without a
nurse.

When she went I decided that
my elder children had been waited
on far too much. I noticed how
much quicker my four-yead-old
was in learning to dress and un-
dress herself than the nurse-at-
tended older children.

Presently I found the four-year-
old bathing her younger sister as
a surprise help.

Beeame M.P.

ADDITIONAL household com-
plications arose when my husband
beeame Member of Parliament for
Cleveland in Yorkshire. For 14
years our expanding family shut-







MY RULES

DON’T spoil any one of
your children by giving in to
its every whim,

DON’T be too strict, While
@ spoiled child is wnfitted to
face life, an over ined
one is tempted to become
deceitful.

DON’T send your child to
church alone. Your own
example is essential,

DON’T overrate your
child's natural abilities.
That leads to disappoint-
ment. Watch and encourage.

DO take a real interest in
your children’s amusements.

be pai with the
endless questions of children.
When possible help them to
discover the answer for
themselves.
_ DO try to bring out initia-
tive. Implant the desire to
want to try things that are
new to them, whether it be
food, clothes, or amuse+
ments.

DO have the courage to
learn from your own tmis-
takes.

PARENTS never finish
learning how to be parents.





tled backwards and forwards be-
tween London and “Yorkshire
where one of my babies was born.

Clothing the children on a slen-
der family budget called for
ingenuity.

As one child grew out of her
clothes these were carefully put
away ready for the next.

At one time I had over 100 pairs
of children’s shoes in the house
and still had to buy more.

Sales bargains had to be pursued.
In those pre-war days I could buy
a £2 pair of shoes at a sales price
of 10s., a £5 coat for £1, and

IT bought in quantities.

One of my best bargains was
some white furnishing satin which
I made into cot pillowslips which
have been in use 13 years, and
cost only one shilling each.

Pandering to childish food fads
and fancies was impossible, but
some cof my children could not be

COOKERY CORNER

Fish plays an important part in
family cooking, and if carefully
chosen and cooked, it provides an
infinite variety of appetising
dishes that can easily be prepared.

You cannot be too careful
when buying fish, for if it is even
slightly stale or infe-
rior in quality, its poor
flavour can never real-
ly be disguised. Look
for these points when
you are choosing fish:

Flesh -that is firm,
and quite free from
any unpleasant smell.

Bright eyes.

Scales that adhere
closely to the skin.

Red gills,

_ Bright clear mark-

ings.

Flying fish is now
in season, so this week I am
going to give you a recipe for
that fish which I hope you will
enjoy.

Fillet six flying fish, an,
them with lime and salt
minutes, and then wash,

soak
or five



Stuffing. Three ounces of bread-
erumbs, an ounce of cooking but-
ter, half a teaspoonful of dried
herbs, grated rind of half a lime,
two teaspoonsful of chopped pars-
ley, two tablespoons of milk, salt

and pepper.
Mix ail the ingre-
dients together and

then spread some of
the stuffing on to each
fillet and roll up, place
in a greased
dish, add one of
white wine, one sliced
onion and a tomato,
then sprinkle with
breadcrumbs. Bake in
a moderately hot oven
for twenty minutes,

This dish can be
made to look very at-
tractive if garnished with green
peas and fried plantains.

ioe

- #OR THE BEST

cheaper still were remnants which

them s
It me to insure
operations and accidents. Opera-
tions five for

were numerous—
apeentnan alone and 11 for ton-
s wl

I never believe in dosing them
with medicines &$ a routine.

it wants to go to Here I
had to be careful. 35 per cent
of all ate to p
their children away from harmfui
films.

I er preview a film myself

me a Saberban
Church First

BUT on Sundays I al

low no
amusements until the family

has

I cr the greatest importance
to their os
prayers at earliest possi

“Gas of the most fascinating
things about a large family is
watching the development of
children’s talents and tastes.

Maty, aged 12, hag a gift for

odelling in clay. A local pottery

hes bees enthasioatic about hér
ornaments.

chosen.

Vv who is

eronic: 1

from the’ cudldren ‘of 40
London schools to be leading lady

in a children’s play presented re-

cently.

(Monica at six or. of age is
displaying an line and
colour. She spends hours painting.

Su say that

up,t
it is much easier to
large family than an only

eens

QUALITY & SHADES



INSIST ON

STORES

|



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

The Garden In
ary

Seedling Time, Flowering
Vines

As with all young living things,
it will make a tremendous
difference to seedlings if they get
a good start. Healthy seedlings
mean healthy, vigorous plants, s¢
it is well worth while to give
them just that little extra care
when they are tiny which will
repay such good dividends later on

. Planting

Always plant out the seedlings
in the late afternoon when the hot
Tays of the sun are going over.
This means that they have the
whole long, cool night in which to
recover from the shock of trans-
planting, and to settle themselves
in their new home before another
hot day comes round. When taking
them up see that you take up a
good hump of mould around each
so as to disturb the roots as little
as ible. Make a good hole for

one in the new bed, and pop
them down with the roots com-
fortably spread (never all bunch-
ed up together) and press them
firmly in. “This business of press-
ing the seedlings firmly in is very
important, for no plant can grip
ahd get the best out of the earth
if It is insecurely planted.

When all are planted, water
them with a fine watering pot,
and check up again to see that all
are firm, as often the water will
loosen some. Continue to use &
fine watering pot on them for a
few weeks, until it is seen that
they have made aq start, and are
sturdy enough to stand the gen-
eral watering.

Finally, after planting them put
up a few ‘umbrellas’ about the
bed, to give the seedlings a little
shade from the sun for a few
days. By ‘umbrellas’ is meant a
few small branches about a foot
high, of any tree or bush avail-
able, just stuck about the bed in
between the young plants. After
a few days when these umbrellas
wither they can be taken up and

discarded.
on lot of trouble? Yes, but such

Flowering Vines
Barbados is fortunate in having
a t variety of beautiful flow-

- ering vines which succeed well in

our climate, and nothing lends a
more Ii and gracious air to
a garden than an expanse of fence
or wall in the background cover-
ed by a flowering climber.

In deciding to plant a vine how-
ever care should be taken to
choose the vine suitable for the
place it is needed for, as it would

useless disappointing, to

be
for put a big heavy vine on to light
supports

, or in a confined space,
or to expect one of the lighter
‘ee to cover a large expanse of
wal

Double Pink Coraleta

One of our most beautiful vines
is the ‘Double Pink Coralita,’
which flowers around Christmas
time, and which may be termed
a ite vine as regards size
and weight. There are two typed
of this vime, one having a pald
flower with a crinkled edge,
and the other one having a rose-
pink flower with a plain edge.
Beth flowers are lovely and some-
what resemble an apple-blossom.
As the flowers fade, large
gréeny-pink seeds form, in appear-
ance almost as pretty as the flow-
ers, and these remain on the vine
for a couple of months while fresh

flowers continue to appear.

To Plant

This vine can be grown from
seed, but when planted from seed
there is no guarantee that it will
come ‘true.’ It may revert back
to the ordin single Coralita.
The best way refore of getting
a ‘true’ plant is to secure a root
from a well established plant, or
to layer a branch of an establish-



At The Cimema

Shoot Kid, You’re Loaded

Hy G.

ws.

When it comes to a fine, rousing, rowdy musical]

comedy, M.G.M.’s

Technicolor version

of ANNIE GET

YOUR GUN would be hard to beat as really first-class

entertainment.

In this instance, Hollywood has done a

bang-up job in its version of the Broadway musical that

ran for nearly four years.

Through the medium of the
camera, the show has been per-
mitted to travel further affield
than the narrow confines of the
Stage will allow, and this is a defi-
nite advantage. From what I
have read, the original story has
been followed closely and the
music and lyries by that master
of all song writers — Irving Ber-
lin—are intact.

Betty Hutton’s Annie Oakley—
the unlettered little hoyden Seen
the backwoods of Ohio, who joins
Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show tc
become the greatest marksman of
all time, is a combination of
brashness, aeerence and win-
ning appeal, There is no doubt
that she has almost more than her
fair share of energy and personali-
ty, and though, according to some
critics, she is not as competent as
Ethel she does alright in
he way. Her romance with
F Butler, another sharpshoot-
er, played by Howard Keel, is
accompanied by plenty of noise,
Indian war-whoops and all the
general confusion that attends a
Wild West Show, as well as by
three of the hit tunes, Mr, Keel
has a fine physique, an equally
fine baritone voice that he really
knows how to use, and a nice
flair for acting. All of which
adds up to a good performance on
his part. One of the best num-
bers is the tune “I Can Do Any-
thing Better Than You” that de-
velops out of a first class quarrel
and nearly into a first class fight
between the two. Another good
one is Annie’s solo at the opening
of the film—*You Can’t Get A
Man With A Gun" which ‘is
proved to be only too true by
our heroine,

Others in this topnotch cast in-
clude Louis Calhern as Buffalo
Bill, who wears some of the most
striking costumes seen in a long
time; J. Carol Naish as Big Chief
Sitting Bull, complete with george-
ous feather head-dtess which, on
occasion, is exchanged for a silk
opera hat: and Keenan Wynn as
a publicity agent—all of whom
are entertaining.

Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show
is spectacular, full of action and
excitement, and brilliantly
ourful, with all the atmosphere
of the sawdust ring. The whole

film sparkles with humour, galety | %

and wit and to the accompani-
ment of one of Irving Berlin’s
finest scores, ANNIE GET YOUR
GUN is one of the best musical
comedy films in years, You'll love
it—so don’t miss it.

The Story of Molly X

Showing at the Globe Theatre
is THE STORY OF MOLLY X

with June Havoe in the leading %

role, If is the story of the rehab-
ilitatign of a woman who is
indicated on a charge of grand
larceny and committed to the
California Institution for Women
at Tehachapi,

As Molly, the master-mind of
her murdered husband’s gang,
whose mission in life is to dis-
cover her husband’s murderer,
June Havoc gives a performance
that is flery, vicious at times—
eS
ed plant (more about layering
another time). Plant the vine in
a sunny but somewhat sheltered
spot (West is good) and give it a
feir size space or the roof of a
fernery to climb on, It will need
little help, but will cling and
climb tenaciously where it wants
to go.

Give it the usual garden care
in the way of water and manure.

Cut it back each year to within
a foot of the ground about
September, and it should be up

and flowering again by November

te January.



What-do

‘you know

about:ENO?











Eno’s

DO YOU KNOW tha: EMO
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‘Fruit Salt’

Bhs words " Eno" and “ Bruit Salt" ave registered wate martes



col- |

compelling—and of
dramatic feeling.

Most of the picture, which is
semi-documentary, is filmed in the
Institution at Tehachapi, and it
fs interesting to see the many
phases of work and the methods
employed to rehabilitate the
women who spend time behind its
walls, This is the first time this
institution has been permitted to
be used in a film,

Dorothy Hart and John Russell
are both very competent in the
other two leading roles—she as
the fiancee of the man who
kitted Molly's husband and he as
the husband's best friend. I found
enjoyable the performance of the
various women who play the
parts of prisoners and the Insti-
tution Staff. The atmosphere and
odd bits of humour are due to
them. From the sociological angle
THE STORY OF MOLLY X has
plenty of interest amd is well
acted and directed.

South of St. Louis

At the Plaza, we have a tale
of the Southwest, during the Civil
War, called SOUTH OF ST.
LOUIS. Starring Joel Macrae,
Alexis Smith and Zachary Scott,
it tells the story of three men
whoge ranch is plundered and
devastated but w are
mined to hold on to it and to take
their reve on their enemy.
SOUTH ST. LOUIS means
the no-man’s land of the Civil
War, comprising Texas and the
southwest where, although there
were army groups of both sides,
the war was fought on a guerilla
basis.

The story is too complicated
to go into detail, but there is
plenty of action and excitement
against a background of smug-
gling, war and intrigue.

The leading roles are well
played, and of the supporting
players, I would mention Victor
Jory as Cottrell and Alan Hale
as Jake Evarts, both of whom

with plenty

can be relied on to give a good}

aceount of themselves, and do.

The settings are realistic, cos-
tumes good and, as wé al] know,
the scenery in that part of the
world is magnificently shown in
Technicolor,














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e


PAGE FOUR



B.A.F.A. MAY NOT SEND
DELEGATE TO P’TO RICO

Conflicting Cricket In First Trial
BY ©. S. COPPIN

HE Council of the B.A.F.A. at their meeting

last week decided that the financial position
of the Barbados Amateur Football Association was
such that they could not afford to accept an invi-
tation from the Executive Secretary of the Interim
Tourism Committee to send a delegate to a meet-
ing in Puerto Rico of the various Football Associa-
tions throughout the Caribbean.

They however agreed in principle a the idea

islands in the Caribbean area coming er for pur-

eee are willing to send a delegate if they receive any financial

assistance from the Caribbean Interim Tourism Committee under
whose auspices the meeting is being held.

A REASONABLE VIEW

HAT is quite a reasonable and logical view but I fail to follow
ae line of argument advanced in some sporting circles that this
conference would be in the nature of a spree or that such a confer-
ence for three days would mean nothing to Barbados. :

It is unfortunate that such ideas sili obtain. They are painfully
reminiscent of a disease from which I thought Barbados haa recov-
ered long ago, a sort of complacent isolationism that probably promp-
ied the now famous at the beginning of the tirst Worla War:
“Go on England, Barpados is behind you.”

NO SHOUTS

HERE is no use shouting ourselves hoarse that there should be

closer union t the West Indies, that there should be
a better understanding and that there shoulda be federation in the
not too distant future if we are inclined to stick up our noses and
suspect every move, that might or might not be genuine, that is
claimed to be aimed at these islands closer togetner. ;

I am glad that this was not the attitude adopted by the Council
since nothing could be lost if the finances could stand it and a dele-
gate were sent for the Barbados delegate to meet and exchange
information and views on football at the least with delegates from
‘Trinidad, Jamaica, British Guiana, Puerto Rico, Aruba, Haiti, Cura-
cao, the Leeward and Windward Islands, all of whom have been

invited. ,
INSURANCE FOR FOOTBALLERS

NOTHER interesting point about the meeting is the fact that a

A select committee has mepeted oe z — for the insurance of
layers dur the forthcoming 1951 foot season.

. “vThe coments is a copy of one that obtains between the Trinidad
Football League and the representatives of Lloyd's Underwriters in
‘Trink idad.

The Council will consider this at their next meeting. It allows
for compensation for death by accident, loss of one lin:b or one eye,
medical expenses and specialist fees in connection with injumes rece: -
ed during League games among other things. j

Although it has not yet been accepted yet it should be of some
satisfaction to the great of football fans who have been
clamouring for the introduction of some form of insurance for players
ever since the beginning of last season.

The Council, on which every club in the League is represented
is not bound to accept this scheme but something workab.e whi
have to be substituted for it and the Council is morally bound w
give some assurance that some form of insurance agaist injuries
will be put into operation before the 1951 season starts.

THE FIRST TRIAL GAME j

HE first Trial game in preparation for the Intercolonial matches

with Trinidad was played on Thursday and Saturday last wees.

i saw some conflicting cricket. At one time | was extremely
bored with the inefficacy of the bowling on the first day when Kelton
Walcott's XII were at the wicket but then I was thrided io some fine
batting chiefly by C. Hunte and Eric Atkinson who put on 137 runs
for the second wicket. ;

Hunte, who had scored a century in the annual Inter-League
fixture between the Criqxet League and the baroados
Cricket Association, established strong claims by his second gooa
patting display.

ATKINSON SCORES CENTURY

TKINSON went on to score 155 retired yesterday and then prove
A himself to be the only pace bowler to get some life out of .te
wicket that was certainly a batsman’s paradise.

Tne fielding on Thursday was colourless and dead. Only
“Brickie’ Lucas showed any life and initiative. Greenidge must have
been suffering from the nerves, he was the worst sinner. But in
the midst of all this, Clyde Walcott brought off a magnificent les
stump to dismiss Cave when he missed a slow spinner from

Mullins bowled t6 an extremely badly set field and seemed t»
be bowling without his usual spirit. He nad the most pace on that
side it is true but he did not seem to make up his mind to bow! to
the field set nor was the field changed to suit his bowling.

A BADLY SET FIELD

F he is bowling inswingers that begin almost on the baisman's
body there is no point setting two slips, a gully, a third man, a
mid-off and cover point with only a short fine leg and short anes
leg on the on-side of the wicket and at most times no midon, ! unde 5
stand that this was Mullins’ idea of the field but skipper Clyde Walcot(
with his admittedly sound knowledge of the game should have over-

1) cescunier bowled with great determination and direction, He
was really fast only in his opening overs but he made the batsmen
play and his bowling of Hunte at 85 was a great twibute to his
rae f slow left arm
McCollin has the potentialities of a very use ul 5 ett
alee but he spoils his chances by trying to bow! too fast as sorrs
as he has been punished and by bowling over and around the wicke

i himself. :
nel he Ort the ball. He proved, this ine be Sak a pares bet
ome forward to him, miss uw a

duck a eon ater in the day when Atkinson had completed a hard
earned 150 runs, beat him completely with a leg acienet. mili s
Keith Walcott’s oe were out for ae eS be | - _ —_
we ol aes See one that made it move and also got some life

wicket.
ee MOST IMPRESSIVE ,
turn in the most impressive bowling
He only bowled six overs but these
who gives any study to the game
on the spot and always com-



side
left

UT Errol Millington was to
B performance of the match,
were sufficient to convince —.
Snieen sepoct "ie al cae t for 11 runs in his six overs
ee B gh SF acek a ‘iseful 47 at number nine for oe
Walcott’s team ponte 2 ar 17 in four overs pad this inenatee Oy Se

, cket. eve
Wales vice Ravare “Pua ished be ested us

tournament at the conclusion of this ar tak and kept a good

Bowen got a c good
ing s team, led by Keith Wa
aoa Rieghen tr Sasa oneal ca that of Clyde Walcott’s XII.
aâ„¢








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Veceset







‘

E. Atkinson 155, K. Bowen 47

Smith 43, Performed Well
WALCOTT’S TEAM

Cc.
K.

C. WALCOTT’S § (for

AFTER treating the spectators ag
strokes all around the wicket,
at Kensington Oval yesterday.
of play of the first Trial game in
Intercolonial Tournament scheduled

It was the second day
preparation for the
tor next month.
Atkinson was undefeated at
time call for 112 on Thursday
last and he added an unblemished
42 to this score yesterday. His
entire innings included 15 fours.

From Thursday’s score of 248
for 7, K. E. Walcott’s Team piled
up 342 runs yesterday against
C. L. Walcott’ Team. Cc.
Walcott’s Team replied with 93
for 4 wickets by close of play.

The wicket was good and Atkin-
son and Bowen took advantage of
it. Bowen enjoyed a fine knock
for 47 rums. He was engaged in
an eighth wicket partnership with
Atkinson which yielded 72 runs.
Bowen took thimgs easy while
Atkinson was in a _ punishing
mood.

K. Branker, playing for C. L.
Walcott’s team, and Bowen of
K. E. Walcott’s team, were the
most successful bowlers of the
day. Branker took 2 wickets for
2! runs in 6 overs, one of which
was a maiden ang Bowen 2 for
17 in 4 overs.

Good fielding by both teams
saved many runs.

The Game

At about 1.35 a.m. Eric Atkin-
son, 113 not out and Keith
Bowen, 5 not out, went to the
middle to carry on from Thurs-
day's score.

C. Mullins sent down the first
over from the southern end, the
third ball of which Bowen glanced
to fine leg for a single. Pacer
Bradshaw took charge of the other
end and both batsmen Téok a
single off his first over. The 250
went up on the tins after 225
minutes of play.

Atkinson ang Bowen quickly
got their eye into the fast bowling
and were getting the ball ahead
of them and along the ground.

An early change was made by
skipper Clyde Walcott who
brought on Norman Marshall from
the southern end to replace
Bradshaw. Bradshaw had only
bowled two overs, conceding five
runs.

Marshall’s first over was a
maiden to Atkinson. Mullins was
kept on to bowl to Bowen and
= sent down his first maiden for

Bowen had a narrow escape
from a run out at seven in the next
over. Atkinson played g ball past
Greenidge at silly mid-on and
called for two, Greenidge quick-
ly retrieved the ball anq made a
2z00d throw to the bowler’s end.
Had not Marshall fumbled
Bowen would have been run out
by about two yards.

The second bowling change was
effected with K. A. Branker com-
ing on in place of Mullins who had
a four-over spell.

Atkinson got the first boundary
of the day when he cut an in-
swinger from Norman Marshall
past Proverbs at gully to make his
individual score 126 and the total
score 260 for 7.

Branker and Marshall followed
up with two consecutive maiden
overs, College’s right arm leg-
break bowler Smith was given his
first spell of the trials to bow] in
place of Branker.

His first two overs expensed him
17 runs and E. L. G. Hoad was
called to take over from him.
Smith’s second over was erratic.
Bowen drove his first ball, a full
toss, to the long off boundary for
4 and took a single off the second
to send down Atkinson, Atkinson
helped himself to 8 runs that same
over by two well-timed and
powerful cuts past gully off short
pitched balls,

Bradshaw was brought back \o
combine with spinner Hoad. A
cover drive for a single by Atkin-
son off Hoad’s second over for the
day sent 300 up in 285 minutes.
An over later, Atkinson played
Hoad off his back foot to cover for
a single to make his score 150.
Bowen was then 23 not out.

Squatty left-arm spinner
McCollin, B.C.L., player replaced
Hoad and immediately he got
Atkinson in difficulty. He forced

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Bright Cricket In Trial Game

4 whts)

again to a fine display of
Eric Atkinson retired at 155

Atkinson to make a rather
hurried stroke to his second bali
and completely beat him twice
ve, — over.

t e end of McCollin’s over
Atkinson was called in by his
skipper Keith Walcott. Atkinson
was undefeated for 155. The
scoreboard read 312 for 8, Bowen
27 not out,

ai Senta E. Millingio;,
partne: . Bowen, Branker wa,
brought back to bowl, this time
from the northern end,

Millington got off the mark
with a lovely drive the
covers for 4 off a full toss from
Branker’s last ball of that over.
He followed up with another
four to mid-on off the next over
bowled by MeCollin.

Mi n’s stay at the wicket
was short-lived. When he had
scored 9, he got into his wicket
to turn to leg a good length leg
break pitched on the leg stump
by Branker and was bowled off
his pads.

With the score at 342 for 9,
L. Barker joined Bowen. The
first ball to Barker from
Branker sent him back to the
pavilion for “duck”. Barker
pushed his bat carelessly to ar
off break pitched in line with his
pads to give Proverbs at short
Square leg a dolly catch. That
Was at the end of Branker’s over.

E. Brewster, the last man in
did not receive a ball, but saw
his partner Bowen well taken
Clyd Walcott, =o 2 von

yde next

McCollin

over from .
Bowen had ed down three
balls from ic Collin and in

attempting to cut the fourth—a
leg break on the. off stump—he
snicked it into Walcott’s gloves.
The innings was closed at 342.
The interval was then taken.

Mr. Keith Walcott’s team took
the field at 3.40 p.m. and Tony
Atkins with C. W. Smith went
to the middle.

L. Barker, who opened the pace
attack from the southern end,
sent down a maiden to Atkins.

Eric Atkinson supplied the fast
stuff from the other end. Smith
got off the mark the ball
Atkinson bowled with a rather
dangerous stroke to gully for a
single, and the fifth bal] of that
over Atkins pushed to cover for
a brace.

Barker sent down another
maiden to Smith, making a confi-
dent appeal for lbw at the last
ball. Atkinson’s second over cost
him 9 runs. Atkins got five of
them, including a beautiful lef
glance to the square leg boundary,
-_ Smith 4 with an edge through
slips.

Barker was taken off after he
bowled three maiden overs for
another pacer S. White.

White's first over was a maiden,
the first three balls of which
worried Atkins, Atkinson bowled
another maiden to Smith.

Barker was changed around to
bowl from the pavilion end while
White was keeping a steady length
from the screen end.

After a shaky start, the open-
ing pair settled down, but they
were getting runs slowly.

Spartan’s spinner B. K. Bowen
took over from White and imme-
diately disrupted what threatened
to be a good first wicket partner-
ship.

Bowen, in his second ball, en-
ticed Atkins to come down and
beat him through the air. The
ball turned away from Atkins’
bat for wicket-keeper Wood to
bring off a fine bit of stumping.

Atkins got 14 and the total score
was 31 with Smith 15 not out.

Clyde Walcott joined Smith. He
was off the mark by 2, the second
ball he received with a drive to
long-off off Bowen,

Bowen came back two overs
later and trapped him at 3. He
got Clyde to make one of his
full-blooded drives off a full toss.
Clyde drove through the air, giving
Eris Atkinson at mid-off a sitter.

With the score at 35 for 2, G.
Proverbs joined Smith. Smith’s
eye was in and he was batting





K. WALCOTT’S TEAM—Ist Innings



R. Marshall |.b.w. C. Mullins 8
¢. Hunte b C. Bradshaw 85
E. Atkinson retired 455
D. Atkinson b C. Bradshaw 4
F. Cave stpd. «wk. C. Walcott)

b C. Me Collin 0
K. Waleott run out 21
G, Wood c&b E, L. G. Hoad 1
S. White lbw C, Mullins 4
B. K. Bowen ¢ twk, C. Waicott)

b C. Me Collin . 47
&. Millington b K. Branker 3
Barker c Proverbs b Branker 0
F. Brewster not out 0

b6, Lb. 2 8
Total : fore. |

Fall of wkts: 1—13, 2-—-150, 3—166,
4—17], 5--214, 6-217, ‘7-240, 8-—312,
9—342, 10—342;-11-—242

BOWLING ANALYSIS
. oOo. M. BR. W
Cc. Bradshaw 22 0 a 2
Cc. Mullins i6 5 2
Ee. L, G. Hoad 12 0 35 1
soundly all the while, making

most of his runs on the off-side.

E. Millington, left-arm medium
pacer, who was brought on. to re-
place Barker did not allow Prov-
erbs a long stay at the wicket.
Proverbs had only scored a single
when he was towled neck and
crop playing forward to a good
length ball which kept straight
through. The score was then 36
for 3, Smith 16 not out, “Brickie”
Lucas was next in.

He was off to a good start with
a glide for 3 off Millington, Lucas
and Smith plodded on against
the steady bowling attack and
they sent 50 up on the tins in
about 80 minutes

The light started to fade and
Eric Atkinson was brought back
from the screen end while E.
Brewster, slow left-arm leg break
bowler, was brought on from the
northern end,

Atkinson bowled three overs
before giving place to Barker who
was taking his fourth spell for the
day.
Brewster struck the fourth blow
for his team. The second ball of
the third over, he got Lucas to
give wicket-keeper Wood a catch.

Lucas got the ball on the edge
of his bat in making a glide at a
leg break pitched outside the leg
stump and Wood made no mistake.
Lucas made 22. The scoreboard
read 76 for 4 with Smith 34 not
out,

With just about another 10
minutes left for play, skipper
Keith Walcott shuffled the bowl-
ing but to no avail. Smith and
Marshall were undefeated at time
call for 48 and _ respectively
and the total score was 93 for 4
wickets. The game continues on
Thursday.

Barbados Joins

Tennis Association

The Barbados Table Tennis
Association will be affiliated with
the Caribbean Table Tennis
Association, This was decided at
the Annual General Meeting of
the Barbados Association when
they discussed on Thursday at
the Y.M.C.A.,, a letter and Draft
Rules from the Trinidad body.

The Caribbean Table Tennis
Assogiation will be responsible
for controlling table tennis in
the West Indies principally be-
tween Jamaica, Barbados, British
Guiana and Trinidad.

It was decided that the Inter-
colonial Table Tennis Tourna-
ment will take place at Jamaica
in September this year.

The Association propose to
start the Inter-club Competition,
divisions I and Ii on February 8.

Mr. C. A. L. Gale was re-
appointed, President and Mr.
H. H. Williams first Vice Presi-
dent, Other officers appointed
are Col. R. T. Michelin, Second
Vice President, Mr. Harold Cor-
bin, Treasurer in place of Mr.
John Shannon resigned, Mr. C. A.
Smith Secretary and Mr. O.
Edgill, Assistant Secretary.

Tornadoes Beat
Cyclones 7-6

Tornadoes were victorious yes-
terday evening as play for the
Warner Bolton Cup and the Bar-
bados Advocate Cup was con-
tinued at the Garrison between
members of the Polo Club.
Tornadoes beat Cyclones 7—6.

Conditions were good and there





“was keen rivalry, Frequent flash-

es of excellent play brought bursts
of applause from the many spec-
tators.

Play continues next Saturday.



~ SCOREBOARD

Cc. Me Collin
W. C. Greenidge 5
K. A. Branker
N. Marshall
Cc. W. Smith

Cc. WALCOTT’S TEAM-
Cc. Atkins stpd. twk. Wood
b K. Bowen ........-
Cc. W. Smith not out
Cc. L. Walcott e¢ Atkinson b Bowen
G. Proverbs b Millington
N.S. Lucas ¢ (wk. Wood) b Brewster
N. Marshall not out .-
ib. 1, w. 1 4 Sted ,

Total (for 4 wkts.)

Fall of wkts 1—31, 2-35, 3—36, 4—1
BOWLING ne eee

cwnecs
SEARB
coon

st Innings
)

4
43
3

1

e

R. W.
L, Barker 9 3 17 0
E> Atkinson 7 1 20 0
S. White 5 1 18 0
B. K. Bowen 4 0 i7 2
E. Millington . 6 3 ul 1
E. Brewster 4 0 10 1

t

Dollery Gets 2
M.C.C. Wickets In
4 Maiden Overs

HOBART, TASMANIA, Jan. 13,

After dismissing Tasmania for
192, the M.C.C. lost two wickets
in scoring 18 runs by the close of
play on the first day of their
three-day match here.

The touring opening attack of
Alec Bedser and John Warr had
quick successes when the match
began in fine weather, two wick-
ets falling with only nine runs on
the board. A third wicket part-
nership of 55 by R. Thomas (39)
and E. Rodwell (25) helped to
pull the game around, J. Selton
‘was top scorer with 49. The MCC
were held up by C. Richardson,
who batting number ten made 23.
Warr took four for 47 and Alec
Bedser four for 56.

With about 45 minutes left for
play, the M.C.C. made a disas-
trous start losing John Dewes at
five and David Sheppard at 10
both falling to Dollery whose end
of the day’s figures were four
overs, four maidens, no runs, two
wickets.—Reuter.

C'WEALTH SCORE
319 FOR 8

MADRAS, Jan. 13.
The Commonwealth scored 319
for eight in their first innings on
the opening day of their match
against the Madras Government
Eleven here.—Reuter.





Charles Will Meet
Walcott On March7

NEW YORK, Jan. 13.

Ezzard Charles will defend his
World Heavyweight boxing title
(American version) for the sev-
enth time, meeting Jersey Joa
Walcott on March 7, it was an-
nounced here today.

Charles ‘defeated Walcott for
recognition as world champion in
Chieago on June 22, 1949.

The new match ‘was completed
teday by the International Box-
ing Club.
stopped Lee Oma in the tenth
round at Madison Square Garden.

—Reuter.



Tennis Results

Following are the results of
sets played at Belleville yesterday.

MEN’S SINGLES
P. K. Roach beat H. A. Cuke
Jr., 6—0, 6—3.
D. E. Worme beat W. Nurse,
6—3, 4—6, .
L. St. Hill beat H. L. Toppin,
4—6, 9—7, 6—4.

LADIES’ SINGLES
Miss E. Worme beat Miss P.
King 7—5, 9—7.
Miss J. Benjamin beat Miss M.
Ramsay 6—4, 6—2.

MONDAY’S FIXTURES
LADIES’ SINGLES
Miss E. Worme

v. Mrs, A. Gibbons.

W. S. Crichlow and W. H.
Allan. v. J. D. inson and
J. R. Hunte. | 7 £

MEN’S SINGLES

D. E. Worme v. P. Roach.
V. Hutson v. A. Jemmott.
S. Edghill v. D. Lawless.

Last night Charles jh,

SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 1951 ~

DISAPPOINTING CLASSICS
Why Da The Classic Races
Flop So Often?

BY BOOKIE

FTER returning from Trinidad and seeing a

horse like Footmark performing feats that few

three-year-olds are ever capable of, it may seem

that I am hard to please when I say that the Derby

was a most disappointing race. By this I do not

mean to imply that because Footmark made our

ereoles bred on this side of the Caribbean look very

inferior the race was disappointing, or that if he

had been removed we would have seen a better

race. I am not looking at it from such an insular point of view.

What annoys me is the fact that so many things were wrong with
the horses who might have been able to make him gallop.

In this respect one is immediately impressed with the regularity
with which the Trinidad Derbies of the past have been far below what
they promised, and on further reflection one cannot help coming to
the conclusion that it is as customary for all the classics, both here and
in Trinidad, to flop. Of course when these races were first formed
it was to be expected that with limited fields one or two horses would
stand out whiie the rest would always be also rans. In the War
years also there were excuses like intercommunication between the
islands. It woyld be useless therefore to recite all that past history.

UT just looking back at the results since the war we come upon
such years as 1948 when the Trinidad Trial Stakes and Derby
promised to be two of the most evenly contested events of the
season. Yet what did we see. in the first Ligan leaving his field
behind floundering in the mud while he never appeared to make
a false step. In the second Ali Baba’s sudden change to the outside
on the first turn taking nearly the whole field with him. The Gam-
bler off form, Brown Kocket off form, and finally Hall Mark’s sudden

ET us go back to 1947. We had every right to expect a tussle
between Brown Boy, Front Bell and Gun Hill in the ‘Trial
Stakes in which, if everything had gone according to plan, a new
mark for the race would probably have been set. Came the day;
Brown Boy a mere shadow of himself as he was as a two-year-old;
rront Beli and Gun Hill completely absent. Then on to the Derby
and, as if to compensate for the failure of Brown Boy, Atomic lI
was discovered in the interim. But on Derby day our hopes were
dashed to the ground. Atomic II won easily from Front Bell with
a half fit Gun Hill struggli for second place. Yet on the second
day of this same meeting and again on the third day, as if decreed
by some special fate, we saw what we should have seen in two D
class races,

N 1946 it was just the reverse with Whitsun Folly and Adventuress.
By all rights the Derby should have been the same push-over
that the Trial Stakes of the same year had proved to be for the
former, But just when everybody got ready to see a cut and dried
victory what must the heavens do but let down with a deluge and
thunderstorm the likes of which have seldom been seen in the month
of December. Result: a totally unexpected and uncommonly good
match race with Adventuress first, Whitsun Folly second and the
other three or four absolutely out of it.

yee FIFTY has been no exception, either in Trinidad or
Barbados, The first round began here with our Guineas, We
had Bow Bells, Perseverance, Cross Bow, Watercress and Bowman-
stan, all very promising when they were two-year-olds. But by
March this list had been reduced to Watercress only for the Guineas.
This race went as planned but the absence of the others certainly
took away a lot from it.

Meanwhile in Trinidad the feats of Wavecrest at Union Park
made the prospects for the Trial Stakes look rosy indeed. If
we could not expect all the big names to appear at least we would
see four speed merchants in the shape of Bow Bells, Wavecrest,
Bones and Bowmanston in a six furlong race that would prove i
a championship event if ever there was one. But by race day this
picture had fallen to pieces like a crumbling cake, First to be with-
drawn was Bowmanston, Then Lazy Bones, who could not keep
his condition. But worst of all Wavecrest although he eventually ran,
was discovered to be unwell. Result: Bow Bells first, the rest nowhere,

HE BARBADOS DERBY arrived on the scene. Would Cross Bow,

Colleton and Apollo, the three who had promised to be stayers
make a challenge to Bow Bells, and Watercress, and would Persever-
ance get over his leg trouble in time? These were the pertinent ques-
tions a few weeks before the event. Again the picture collapsed with
clockwork precision. Cross Bow proved unfit to be trained; Bow
was withdrawn after a rigorous meeting in Trinidad; Perseverance’s
leg never looked like improving and Colleton and Apollo just could
not make the grade, Result: Watercress first at the head of a pro-
cession.

Then tantalisingly mistimed came Mary Ann’s exploits on the
second and third day of the August meeting. Why couldn’t we have
seen Mary Ann give Watercress a proper race over nine furlongs in

the Derby even if, as most people agreed, she would not have beaten
er?

N to the Arima Derby Trial Stakes where only horses in the Trini-

dad sphere were expected to take part. Wagecrest and Lazy Bones
still on the resting list but Fair Profit, a likely stayer, in the offing.
Would he live up to the promise he had shown at two-years-old? It
is to be recorded that‘he did not but in spite of this the Arima Derby
Trial Stakes did not lack excitement even if it lacked class, Top
Flight won in a driving finish from Sun Glee, and to emphasise the
mediocrity of the field none of those who took part gained promotion
after the meeting although some of them were winners of other races.
This may not have meant much in the past but in this day of rapid
promotion of creoles it certainly demonstrates the poor view taken
of the classic candidates by the classifiers,

INALLY we come to the Trinidad Derby and as I have only re-
cently described the race and the preliminaries I will not go into
that here. But the sequence of circumstances which. caused the race
to turn out as it did, runs so true to form that one is tempted to con-
clude that there is some hand behind the scenes directing the show.

Why couldn't Wavecrest have recovered from his illness? Why
should Lazy Gones have hurt his hoof within a few days of the race?
Why did it have to rain so hard only in Port-of-Spain and its en-
virons and not particularly in any other part of Trinidad necessitating
the withdrawal of Cross Bow? Why was Blue Ribbon allowed to
start anywhere else but on the outside, when it was known that she
would probably bolt, which she promptly did, and in so doing, run
across Bow Bells (among others) who in turn had to be snatched up
se Eye piel A om Watercress run about 20 pounds below

er form and then come back on the third day to run a clo:
to Nan Tudor in the fastest 9% furlong or for the ‘epetiiat ond
that time, judging by past experience, Watercress should have been

“diay overboard, Instead she ran as if she was only then getting
ready.

Why does it happen? Your guess is as good as mine.

Ni
knows. It just does. roe





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SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 1951 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE











JANY. 13 — NO. 154

_ The Topic
This A Clean City? | ) ews Week

|

What About That New Year Resolution?
Do You

Call






Murder!

Miss Beckles murder!

Some boys’
The “cod-liver
Place Mottley

ambitions flop
ol! steel band
back on top.

What was new life to other
Was death-knell for “the rest

All was because the comrades
Were wallowing in a mes

Tears flowed like river water
Lou turned to Joe and said

Why boy) be still: do listen
Poor Judas is not dead

Open your ears; please listen
Things “coming out ou hear

Listen to true confessions?
For judgment day i here

If we had said the same words
A treason charge we'd face

But all the folks are saying
It's just a small disgrace

For Monday after midnight

A woman ‘elling souse

Said Joe your greatest enemy
Lives right inside your house

LATER IN THE DAY, the collection of stuff was stil) undisturbed—no one seemed to take any notice

of it.

* 10 O'CLOCK on Saturday this pile of stuff and and rubbish was still standing at the corner of a
ainess honse in Broad Street.

Start cleaning from the corner
Start mopping up the floor

Sea-water don't remove dirt
Try the stand-pipe next door
Ah boys we know the business
Joe is a comrade too

And what is done in secret
Comes right back home to Lou

Well Robert he loves business
And Joe philosophy

And Lou just like most womer
Vouch for integrit

So if you're doing busines
Do keep a proper check
Or some day soon or later
The business breaks its neck
When men start off back biting
And say things barsh and vile
Remember this old saying
Rogues cannot reconcile

And if you fool the people
You may get elear one year

But sure as the sun riseth s
Your dooms-dey must appear

The doetor in the Counc!!
And that bright busine s man
May they inject those patients
And clean both heart and hand

Yes talk of wrongs my brothers
Comrade open your eyes
Declare your own convictions
Then who dare to despise?
. * :
Be your own mater-builder
Draw from your “fountain nead”
You'll live as @ creator
A parasite will drop dead

VEGETABLES and other articles of food are here laid out on the
bare ground, next to an open gutter, on display for sale. This was
in Tudor Street, one of the main thoroughfares of the city.



Boys if to-day this topic

Is great philosophy
To understana it fully 4
Split a J & R in three
. ° °



Pictures such as shown
on this page san be tasen
any day in Bridgetown



AN OPEN GUTTER in the front of a big and up-to-date Jewellery
Store held this collection at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, in the very
heart of Bridgetown.

B. G. Produced
192,502 Tons
Sugar In 1950

sponsored by |
J&R BAKERIES er ee
makers of
ENRICHED BREAD
and the blenders of
J&R RUM
ARAL L ES SSDLL LESS SGI,



SPOT in McGregor Street just off Broad Street looked like this
4 o’clock on Monday.

»
A)
»
»







B.G.F.A. Delegate
Will Attend
Puerto Rico Talks

(From Our Own Correspoudent)

GEORGETOWN, B,G, Jan, 11





} woman
igh the stuff box outside one of

searches carefully

Gity stores. Her bag is filled
the still stirs through the rub-

Te pieicentinnats



MEN AND BOYS delve into the sweepings collecting bits of paper,
some of which might be used for wrapping articles of food.



JUST A HAND as it throws banana

skins on the roadway as others be-
fore it had done.

BG. Exported 29,022 22 Tons Rice In 1950

rom Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Jan. 9.
th one exception the British

e Rice Marketing Board
d all their export commit-
® for 1950 and as a result did
Jiggest trade since they start-
porting rice overseas. In
exports reached 29,022 tong
fainst 26,711 tons in 1949,

rd Manager, Mr. H. P,

(a
THE KEY TO

es

THE MOTORIST'S

Bayley sounded a note of optim-
the view that, barring unforeseen
happenings, this year’s exports
should exceed 30,000 tons.

As regards exports to Trinidad
it was explained that a balance
of 840 tons owed to that island at
the close of 1950, was already
blended. and ready for shipping.
The only problem at the moment
is lack of ships.

JONES & CO. LTD.
LL ee a ee

R. M.

Exports last year were as fol-
lows; Trinidad, 14,068 tons; Bar-

bados—8,783 tons; Antigua—1,228
tons; Montserrat—1,100 tons; St.
Kitts—940 tons; Grenada—995’
tons; St. Vincent—720 tons; St
Lucia—304 tons; Dominica—208
tons,

In addition to exports to these
colonies with whom the Board
kave contracts, British Guiana

OIL

— Agents

ESSO STANDARD

exported 1,678 tons to Antigua,
ism for 1951 when he expressed
some representing a gift after the
recent hurricane and some replac-
ing depleted stocks. Some ex-

porting was also done to Holland
and Martinique.

In 1950 a total of 30,507 tons
was consumed in British Guiana,
as against 30.653 tons in 1949.









(From Qur Own Correspondent) At an Executive Committee When the Question is
GEORGETOWN, Jan. 9. meeting of the British Guiana HAvE YOU GOT A
Official figures released by the Football Association held last
British Guiana Sugar Producers’ night it was decided to form a COLD or COUGH

Association disclosed that British
Guiana’s total production of sugat
from the various estates in 1950
was 192,502 tons. This exceeded
1949 production by 21,355 tons
Production came from a total of
61,612.45 acres of cane cut, Tota!
production’ in 1949 was 171,147
tons which was equivalent of a

Committee to consider ways and
means of sending a delegate to
the Conference which will be held
in Puerto Rico next month to dis-
cuss the formation of a Caribbean
Amateur Football Association, The
meeting formally accepted the in-
vitation to attend the Conference.

Bank of the

Demerara

‘River

IF SO TRY

BROWNE'S
CERTAIN COUGH






















SSO OY

PAIN

Z SACROOL |

Oot OP tA

oS


























yield per acre of 3.22 tons. The : io . CURE °
yield per acte in 1950 was 3.12 {oPPped the Mat with a total produc THE CERTAIN %
tons. omicoae a : , ‘ dy for Cougns x
Included in this grand total ie ee — nnn ee bore Se PAIN-KILLER %
of all the estates, is 113 tons pro- ard 7 Latins 18.301 un e Hoarseness, Bronchial As sth.
duced from Volunteer Canes. In Bilal : roger we tons), Whooping Cough, sainaete the %
1949 Volunteer Canes produced Hall (16408 lia pine ehaitiee SP Ai Pa x
246 tons. r Y "tal,
(15,850 tons); Skeldo 14,230
In addition, seven of the estates tons); Potts (14,387 ‘aaa C. CARLTON BROWNE On Sale At All
produced 3,147 tons of sugar from Ressouvenir (11,203 tons); Wales Wholesale & Retell Druggist Drug Stores
farmers’ canes, as’ against 3,089 (10,366 tons); Ogle (7,104 tons), Dia seit &
tons in 1949, Versailles (6,110 ‘tons), Ruim- 196 Roebuck St. —
Plantation Diamond seven miles veldt (1,866 tons), Houston (1,645
from Georgetown on. the East tons).
Bad colds and coughs are rampant all over the island just raya
: ¢ 3 S Co
now. Everywhere you go people are complaining of the Us Salt las)
particularly vicious coughs that are raging. They say . ff
they are terribly difficult to cure, but as long as 3
FERROL COMPOUND is available this is not alto- i
gether correct, because FERROL COMPOUND Nah 5
was specially made to combat just such coughs
as these. Most cough remedies fail in a case
like this because they only treat the ,
cough, but a system that is undermined ;
first by a bad cold needs rebuilding ‘
before it can help to throw off the cough ah *
that follows in its wake. Hence the bp |
success of FER ROL COMPOUND, Bis
because in FERROL COMPOUND is , a
combined a tonic to tone you up as rm
well as a treatment for your cough, thus .
aiding Nature to repair your strength so that you can defeat the cough PEED: ok eeenseen pees
that plagues you. : 4 DESCFIPTION
You are bound to notice a marked improvement from the ‘time you Be Fs pana wo: pia ne
start taking... of fresh cod livers, the nauseous fl
pisreate eltminated—with Iron Phe
| phorus contained
rSyrup of beta
| Quinine and Stry< ,
Malt and Flwid £ act vild
| Cherry B :
” + - » 399 NUTARITIVE—TON/C MUL }
“THE TONIC COUGH MIXTURE THAT BUILDS AS IT HEALS. hla tay te 4
Prepared under licsnee rom the
ferral Coe New You ’
FERROL COMPOUND is a combination of the active principles of Cod yntario, Canada, by R
Liver Oil, Vitamin A 1500 units and Vitamin D 500 units per dpse, to- eck s .
gether with other well known tonics, with the addition of Creosote and =e F
Guiaicol SOO !



STOKES & BYNOE LTD.~Asgents







==
f

PAGE SIX

- BARBADOS &4H ADVORATE

ee

(eens eueaer esas oaen”,

Aen ee ene

G55 = 2 SS SI
Printed by the Advocate Co. Ltd., Broad St., Bridgertewn.

January 14, 1951

MUST

NEARLY two years have passed since
Sir Douglas Ritchie signed his report on
April 25, 1949 on the proposed construc-
tion of a deep water wharf.

The passage of time has served one use-
ful purpose.

There is no one in Barbados who has not
admitted publicly and in private that a
deep water harbour is essential for Barba-
dos. There have been some who have been
doubtful as to the source from which the
money for its construction will come, there
have even been a few, a very few sceptics
who have pretended that the construction
of a deep water harbour was beyond the
resources of this island.

Today the sceptics have been put to rout
and everyone irrespective of political affili-
ation, whether employer or employee is
convinced that a deep water harbour must
be built at all costs, because unless it is
built, Barbados will be left behind the other
islands of the Caribbean and its natural
geographical position as a centre for Scuth
Caribbean shipping will be wasted.

Sir Douglas Ritchie, Vice Chairman of
the Port of London Authority said all that
needs to be said about a Deep Water Har-
bour in Barbados.

He said: “An urgent desire for the con-
struction of deep water berthage has been
expressed by all interested parties and
some improvement in port facilities is un-
doubtedly long overdue. The necessity for
such improvement can be in little doubt.
An inspection of port operations during
the loading or discharge of overseas ves-
sels in Carlisle Bay leads inevitably to the
conclusion that undue congestion in the
eareenage and double handling of cargoes
due to the necessity of lightering leads to
delays in the turn round of vessels. Apart
from the seriousness of such a situation in
the present world shortage of shipping,
delays of this nature can only result in in-
creased costs which must eventually be
paid for by the consumer or exporter.”

Those words were said in Barbados two
years ago, just before Sir Douglas re-
turned to London to finish his report. The
consumer and the exporter have been pay-
ing those increased costs ever since.

Barbados’ capacity to pay for a deep
water harbour depends primarily on the
maintenance and full utilisation of its
sugar industry. After decades of uncer-
tainty and years of violent fluctuation in
prices the United Kingdom has finally de-
cided to treat the British West Indian
Sugar Industry as of vital importance and
to give long-term guarantees as to its
purchase. As a result West Indian sugar
producers are going all out to increase
their output in an effort to meet the hither-
to unsatisfied demands of 900,000 tons re-
quired annually up to 1951 by the British
Ministry of Food.

This general incentive to sugar produc-
tion gives Barbados a clear green light to
go ahead with the construction of a deep
water harbour.

Not only does a healthy sugar industry
made possible by the United Kingdom
long-term guarantee permit greater local
investment in the proposed deep water
harbour, but the greater volume of sugar
required for export demands that Barba-
dos modernise to keep in line with other
West Indian territories whose deep water
harbour facilities will make bulk shipment
of sugar general, and unprogressive
islands will find that there is less demand
for sugar in bags than sugar in bulk.

Bulk shipment of sugar is bound to come
within a few years if only because the
high price of sugar bags adds to the in-
creased costs to exporters and consumers
of sugar.

The scarcity of sugar bags has led to an
increase in their price to such an extent
that it has been estimated that no less
than £180,000 would be saved on the ship-
ment from Barbados of 120,000 tons of
sugar, if sugar were shipped in bulk from
the docks of a deep water harbour.

The old bogey that modernisation
throws people out of employment is as old
as Watt’s steam engine or Hargreaces’ spin-
ning jenny. Modernisation increases not
decreases employment.

Sir Douglas Ritchie who was a con-
vineed believer in the necessity for Bar-
bados having a deep water harbour listed
some of the advantages which would
accrue to Barbados from the construction
of a deep water harbour.

One of them was an increase in trade
and particularly transhipment traffic. Two
were a reduction of congestion in the town
and an improvement in the amenities of
the town.

Another was a. lessening
troubles and disputes.

Three important methods of meeting
charges on capital necessary for the con-
struction ‘of the harbour were outlined
by Sir Douglas. They were by a reduction
of present costs of handling charges, by a
reduction in freight rates and by an im-
provement in tonnages passing through
the port.

By adopting the North Scheme, consist-
ing of a deep water wharf, sheltered by
breakwaters, constructed on reclaimed

Sunday,



in labour



'
land and about one mile to the North of

Bridgetown, between Pelican Island and
Spring Garden Anchorage, a large area of
valuable land, in excess of the port's re- |
quirements would be reclaimed and made
available for development.

|
Various schemes for port improvement }, ;

have been under consideration for some
60 to 70 years, Let 1951 be the year that
work on the deep water harbour begins,
is the hope of all those who have Barbados’
true interests at heart.

Loeal Government

Elections for the several Vestries of the
island took place during the week. The
future of local government was not an
issue in the elections and indeed it
appeared that candidates for election did
not foresee any change in the present
arrangements in the near future.

Nearly two years ago, Sir John Maude
presented his Report on Local Government
in Barbados. Sir John’s task was to re-
view the system of local government in
Barbados and to feport what, if any,
changcc snould be made in the system. Sir
John begins his report by examining the
h.story of Vestries in Barbados and des-
cribing the officers and functions of the

:

Aiter having examined the work which
has been and is being done by the Vestries
Sir John forms the opinion shared by
every commentator, that change is neces-
sary. The public health administration
is the most glaring example of the neces-
sity for change. “Certain health measures
require to be planned for the island as a
whole, and it is most unsatisfactory that
the loyal co-operation of one parish with
the central authority may be rendered
completely nugatory by inaction on the
part of its neighbour,” writes Sir John.

The main defect found in the present
system is the division of the island into
too large a number of separately governed
units. Among the other defects commented
upon are the combination of civil and
ecclesiastical affairs and the assumption
that the Rector of the parish should neces-
sarily be the spokesman and leader of the
parish in civil affairs.

The Report rejects the view that local
government should be abolished altogeth-
er and recommends that the present Ves-
tries should be abolished and that the
island should be divided into three areas.
These areas would comprise the City of
Bridgetown, the Northern area and the
southern area. The Report also expresses
the view that the City of Bridgetown
should be granted municipal status.

Sir John recommends that the qualifica-
tion for voting be extended to all persons
above the age of twenty-one, of British
nationality and with a residential qualifi-
cation, Whether the island is yet ripe for
adult suffrage is a matter which has been
debated recently in respect of members of
the House of Assembly and the same argu-
ments would be applicable to voting for
the Vestries or new Councils. Qualifica-
tions for membership of the new Councils
are recommended to be a British subject
of full age who is a local government elec-
tor for the area or the owner of freehold
or leasehold land in the area or a person
who has resided in the area during the
whole of twelve months preceding the
election.

The Report recommends that certain
functions now carried out by the Vestries
should be taken over by the central gov-
ernment. This move has already been
begun by the transfer of most of the roads
in the island to the care of the Department
of Highways and Transport and the
recommendation of the Report will merely
carry it to its logical conclusion. Public
health would also be controlled to a great-
er extent by the central government but
Poor Relief would remain as the especial
province of the new Councils.

The greatest dispute is likely to take
place in respect of the financial implica-
tions of the reeommendations. There is no
reason to believe that as a result of the
Report being implemented that the cost of
local government will decrease and a
change is recommended in the system of
local government taxation which has been
in operation for very many years, The abol-
ition of Occupancy Tax, recommended by
the Report, has already been achieved and
there is no reason why some satisfactory
basis of taxation should not be worked out.

Recommendation is also made for the

severing of the civil and ecclesiastical
functions carried out by the Vestries but
as the Commission on the Civil Service of
Barbados recommended that a Commis-
sion be appointed to inquire into the
whole position of the Anglican Church in
«the island, Sir John Maude does not.make
as detailed recommendations as in other
matters and merely lays down the general
lines on which it could be arranged.

Few persons maintain that no change is
necessary in the system of local govern-
ment and it is time that the public was in-
formed what the Legislature intends to do
about the Maude Report. Two years have
passed and yet candidates for the Vestries
do not regard their future as an issue in
the elections. The central government
should have the matter debated by the
Legislature and decide what action it is
proposed to take.




















SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Sitting Om The Fence



Nursery Rhyme By NATHANIEL GUBBINS sciousness in the merry month of
“People must learn to love MAY, with no money left to
ne”.—Presidemt Peron things were coming down almost Spend at the Festival of Britain.
ove little Peron, his beef is sq »on-stop. Russia will begin spring man-
nice, But I sent down medicines. oeuvres at several places at once.
And if I don't hurt him he'll sell Medicines, unless prescribed by Molotov will repeat All we want
me a slice competent authority, only cause + _— ‘ s waahdiiee

I won't pull his leg, or call hima a further chaos. zast winds are always probat
YS Whether you like it or not, I im flaming at NE. If they hit ~~

Then rations from butchers will refuse to change my way of life in your weak and impoverts

a > di le of condition, you are likely to get

ho le gg eh a rat ee dose of flu. Maybe

Then you must be prepared for something worse.

i start naval manoeuvres. St

LIKE the miners (and who can internal troubles during 1951. Molotov. and Vishinsky will say
ae i & wate Happy Days “All we want is peace.”

If a general election has not

getting back to work after the
; OLD Moore Gubbins, the world alréady occurred, JULY is a likely

Thru was trouble with Tum famous astrologer, offers his month for this peculiar form of
and Liver. After working ovef- (ous) unreliable prophecies for misery. Still tottering from your
time for three days they were re- the New Year. two attacks of flu and with the
luctant to snap back into form. If the weather experts say eggs giving out, you will be in-

Dr. Gubbins, their chief medical JANUARY will be cold, it is volved in bitter arguments with
adviser, sent down dose after likely to be mild. If they say it friends and possibly cracked on
dose of soothers and. stimulants wj]i be mild, look out for snow, the nose by some of them. The
alternately, with the result that hail, sleet, frost. During this entire chorus at The Kremlin will
both were in a state of revolt by month Stalin will say “All I want shout “All we want is peace.”
Thursday. is peace.” ‘ Most people think about holi-

. FEBRUARY, the influenza days in AUGUST. This time you

Dialling TUM month, will live up to its reputa- can think again. With most of

eee i my stomach? tion. Russian activities will fill your money ma on axmaments,
our stomach speaking. the newspapers with abnorm: you can stay at home an en
Had a good Christmas? depressing news which you yd to the bad news of the interna+
wer and I tried to make read in bed with a high tempera- tional situation, which usually
your Christmas as merry as pos- ture during savage fuel cuts. gets worse when the harvests are
sible. During this month Molotov will in. Mr. Wu, the Chinese Com-

And so you did. Now we must say “All I want is peace.” munist, will say “All I wlant is
get back to work. ec If a meat agreement is not pleace.”

Not before we have discu. the. Argentine by
working conditions for the co MARCH, there Will be hardly no eggs at all.
year. anything to eat but eggs. As meat agreement, you'll have to

Are you holding a pistol at my moc. of the eggs will have trav- live on oysters a roast pea-
lgad? elled a long way before you get cocks. In OCTOB! the oysters

I would if I had one. them, they are likely to make and peacocks will give out, so

Suppose I have breakfast at 8 you very ill, particularly after you'll have to live on caviar and
a.m. Can't I send anything down your severe attack of influenza. boiled swans. In NOVEMBER
after 4 p.m.? During this month Vishinsky will we ‘shall be croaking at each

You can stagger your hours. say “All I want is peace.” other in the fog about the price

So I can still have three meals In APRIL, when people of the of turkeys we may never get.
a day?, northern hemisphere are usually Mr. Ho, the Hindonesian Com-

Of course.

Then what's the difference? bird song and the sight of blos- his pleace.”

I think you are aware we are som, the defenc Budget will For DECEMBER Old Moore
not striking against the intake of knock most taxpayers out for the Gubbins can only wish you an-
too much food. count. Stalin will say again “All other merry Christmas and say

I want is ? “Peace is hall I want, too.”

The taxpayers will recover con- —L.E.S.

be twice as big.
Back To Work

signed with

I see.
During part of the holidays

J





« e AND WHEN AE MOVES INTO
ACTION, DOING HIS DUTY AS HE
SEES JT, THEY THINK HE 19. SOME-
THING THAT CRAWLS




Wren A COP 15 LENIENT, SOME
PEOPLE THINK HE'S DUMB, NOT >
REALIZING THAT HE 16 HUMAN}
AND SOBJECT TO MOODS THE
SAME AS OTHERS « «

OK BOYS BREAK Vf BEFORE
IWE SARGE GETS DERE J


















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DEM POLICE 1S BEASTS

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HE GOT DAH-MAN, LOOK £
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/





We Are All Imports=—And
Children Of Imports

OR $76.80 I can travel first :
class from London to Rome Says GEORGE HUNTE

by rail and sea. The distance in-
volved is 950 miles. The time taken The Chinese community
taxis and light refreshments from
3500 ome need not exceed

Barbados to Georgetown I must
. in Georgetown

YY a basic fare which varies ;
tween $120 and $130. the overall impression). Of the

(at least this is forests of Turner Hall.

The time taken is betweer four

for tips, refreshments and visits sonal wanderings I cannot remem- years ago.
ashore at ports of call will never ber seeing a Chinaman who was here.
come to less than $75 and will not driving a motor car.
possibly be twice as much if I
have no friends to entertain me old cliche that
in port.

It is against British

this background can that it comes as a surprise to greatest imports into

that closer association of the West find what little trace of Africa Guiana, the East Indians and the
Indies ought to be but is seldom there is to be found in these Negro peoples there are at this

considered. ~ isl In London I had moment clamouring for greater
Many people glibly tell us that West African friends and acquaint. political cights in that country
the British West Indian posses- ances but the only ones who hardly a voice except my own is

sions ought to be centralised, that J I f Afri- raised to point out that no one in
the interests of the people are.the rene Peles paere from. British Guiana has rights
Same and that political federation °®" — aga Siigtoves Sodie

e ities. friend Mr. Fowell there than the indigenous Indians
West ae Sink, Seren Buxton, ‘Editor of a Freetown whose _ forefathers preceded
lands. - et ee newspaper is not unlike Mr, Columbus in time. The British
Unfortunately we are told littfe Grantley Adams and anyone less cant aes . - — —
more than that and we are in- like an African than Mr. Grantley an today are offered an oppor-
clined to interpret federation Adams I have never met. tunity which they have never
according to our own particular The real African way of life is been offered since the fabulous
indulgences in wishful thinking. still predominantly based on the days of the 18th century when
To the European in the West tribe with its ceremonial ritual West Indian heiresses in London
Indies’ federation provides sub- and respect for the feudal chief. Were as plentiful as Indian nabobs
stantial Qpportunities, since it Nowhere in the West Indies have as au Law Golthuen "s of
Provides the only form of recog- I come across any vestige of an oe
nition which appears to African way of life although Y@luable than all the unta _—
bg in the modern world, everywhere there are obvious one —, > en
‘British Gui loon ee ggallis signs of African influences. _ were regarded in the 18th century
than 25,000 Europeans and Trini- Yet it is chieily among this as mines of wealth.
dad and Barbados probably have *¢ction of West Indians of African Today a similar opportunity
50,000 between them. It is not ieseent that the idea of federa> arises which the West Indian
easy to arrive at figure on has n mostly entertained. islands and mainlands can grasp
Europeans in the West Indies vet The reason is obvious. West in the interests of all its inhabi-
ae is no racial segrega- paatnte iy African descent are tants,
on area. But no on numerically greatest in the West The sad state of world in
tour the West Indies witha Indies but they have nowhere in almost oudnaes
being visibly impressed by the the area been able to compete South America has brought the
le number of ans who with East Indians, Chinese or Caribbean into the it.
live in the South Caribbean Europeans in commerce and trade. The resources of British Guiana
to-day. It is therefore logical for them alone are a challenge and an in-
are Trinidad a a “aes to hope that by political domina- oor ga | can only oa eee by
East ns make i road an communications on
presence felt by sheer profusion thay an run. the West Indies as & vast
ane Toad from San Fernando to if by birthright, “dad has synonymous with
wie ae a, Mined on both Actually the only peoples in the Oi, asphalt and Angostura Bit-
East In ahi tee ouses in which British Caribbean who can claim fet. evpeinie res - = he
In British Guiana East Indiang {)\% {Deciel rights in the area are because of its high standards of
form the bulk of the workers on British Gelee tina sam onetered 2 and
the sugar plantations and in the 4 rs most desired of all settlement
rice fields. housands of Caribs in St. Vincent eres in tish
and Dominica.
nousen which fy Tags'fra bam, Ai historiane re beginning to hg
boo poles and water buffalos trans. ‘ the 33 Grenadines have no
form Trinidad into an Oriental the Caribs wrested possession peers,

country. from the Arawaks in the islands. is knocking Let

There is an Indian Commissioner _ Unlike Africa or Asia therefore us go forward like men and
in Trinidad and Indian Universi- there is no moral right of women, content with the -
ties are offering scholarships to possession on original grounds. tation and the pattern in

Indians in. the West Indies, The There has been no exploitation which the Creator of the world
Indian ways of life are very deep here by ewcomers of innocent has fashioned our “dust and
rooted in Trinidad and in British indigenous peoples ashes.”

}Guiana, East Indians are not all Even the practice of slavery Let us play our part as men and
poor, One of the greatest palaces (foul thing that it is and never women and let us not be ashamed
facing Queen’s Park Savannah it more prevalent in the world than. of our part. ‘There is no more
Trinidad is owned by an Indian. it is in Soviet Russia today) was essential profession than the grave
Throughout Trinidad and _ in not confined to one race. I have digger and which of us can claim
Georgetown Indians are building no evidence to disprove that at to be more important to the c
lavish and expensive houses, one stage my own ancestors were munity than he?





Tins CORNED BEEF with CEREAL 31



In SEPTEMBER there will be}
If there’s still *o|

Phones — 4472, 4687,



made cheerful by the sound of munist, will say “Hall Hi wlant

Buy ...





























not of servile status in the West
Indies

To hear some people talk in
7 in Barbados and of Barbados today
is within 36 hours. Extras, tips, Georgetown is considerable and in one might with justice assume
Trinidad it is also growing, The that the peoples of this island
ee 7 their own aoe spines locally almost as if Sie
A she? i elu and associations an ey had evolved from Manchinee
To travel first class by sea from own almost every provision shop berries or from the primeval

The oa ’ nana ae ws are ail oe and
distance involve inese it is said that they know children of imports and it does not

Ce how to look after themselves im matter whether we arrived in the
and four and a half days. Extras the Caribbean and from my per- island yesterday or three hundred
None of us originated
The only exception to this
West Indian family tree are the
One gets so accustomed to the aboriginal Indians and it is a sad
-the inhabitants of commentary on the morals of the
the West Indies are mostly Afti- present day that while the two

scale, The name of Trini-|

14, 1951

SUNDAY, JANUARY

D. V. SCOTT TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
& CO., LTD. at THE COLONNADE
Sanniitiilianingbaiiee

Usually Now

» BIRDS BLANC 7.

WDER 38 30

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SUNDAY, . JANUARY - 14, - 1951



: SUNDAY ADVOCATE TAGE SEVEN

Bridgetown Never Sleeps—I. SRR RRR ERR ee eee

Newspapers Are Born In The tains un cuow!

=PURINA HEN CHOW ©
Early. Hours







(SCRATCH GRAIN)

at JASON JONES & CO., LTD.--Distributors

\, OPP SSPSIS SOS SDPO POO GRO AL OF ISSO P CE ABCROPS




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*
.
WORK never really’ ceases in were being copied on metal }lock R NG US YOUR

the Advocate building in Broad Hy IAN GALE tor inpertion tn the pease x BRING
Street.“ and for the newspaper : \ ‘oS vy
staff night is the busiest time.doing a crossword puzzle — and From the sub’s desk the “copy In the Stone Room the paper % PRESCRIE I IONS
Tt-is then that the paper is print- try to make the “stories” clear goes down to the Linotype de- began to take shape. The met s
ed, and it must be printed late and interesting. He usually gets partment. There it is copied on Stories and the metal photogra| :

endugh to catch the late news Fome about 3.30 a.m In the metal, and the “slugs”,
and early enough to reach your same
breakfast table in time.

as they Were being put together in

department were Tony are called, are chen assembled and soqansies called formes, to m oe

Vanterpool, a reporter, waiting weeneed: The proofs are sent up te eeiees “ee
sr Laie .«, to the proofreaders who correct P forme is Ugntened and carrie

I visited the Editorial depart. by. the ’phone in case any late the ; ) Corres’ to the press’ for printing.

nien€ first. 'There’l foimd. twenty news should come in, and the them, and then the linotypists

rine-year-old .Everest McComie. Wireless operator, Alfred Taylor make their corrections, At about two

,

the night sub-editor, busy ar- Taylor was taking the Keuter’s A’nother department which was

ranging the front page. e has news at about forty words a busy was the

to write’ the headlines so that minute. Both of these

they fit in neatly—it is rather like news for McComie’s pages

: WE DISPENSE CAREFULLY
and ACCURATELY



in the morning
all the formes were ready, the big
Cossar press. began to: turn, and

Photo-Engraving the first Advocate for the day was
Supply department. There photographs porn.

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THE STONE ROOM was a hive of activity. E. F. McLeod, Newspaper Superintendent, is standing in ¢ 3
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HEINZ SANDWICH SPREAD—per bottle 47c.
ROSES LIME MARMALADE-~per bottle S4c
WHEN B® ASPARAGUS SPEARS—Large Tit $1.56
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fi RULERS Ac., Ge & 12 B® CARR'S CHEESE CRISPS—per ti $1.10
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PAGE EIGHT



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE





The Achievement Of Cinderella—Of The Beach—

Is Transformed

Osear Wilde

By

In scar Wiide’s most outrage-
ous savings there was usually an
e'emen. of truth, and it is a sad
reflection for those who never saw
him striding along Piccadilly in
London, regal in fur collar and
top hat, or heard his magical con-
versation, that he may not have
been exaggerating when he made
the remark recorded by André
Gide: “I haye put my genius into
my life; I have put. only my talent
into my beoks.” His works, how-
ever. constitute a solid and dur-
able achievement, big enough to
ensure his fture fame, and though
they may be Only a pale reflection
of his genius they do at least re-
present it im-Nearly all its aspects
Fifty years @fter his death we can
be grateful-that he wrote so much.

Of what does the canon consist?
There is the early collection of
poems, published when he was 27,
and there is The Ballad of Read-
ing Gaol, which appeared two
years before his death. There is
De Profundis, written from prison
to a friend and only recently pub-
lished in full. In between, the fruit
of concentrated literary activity
within a period of little more than
seven years, there are two collec-
tions of fairy tales, a book of
stories, a novel (The Picture of
Dorian Gray), a collection of es-
says reprinted from periodicals
(Intentions), several miscellane-
ous pieces, a tragedy written in
French (Salome), three comedy-
dramas, and a comedy-farce (The
Importance of Being Earnest).

Tie fairy tales, though not par-
ticularly well known, except per-
haps in Germany, where they have
always been highly appreciated,
contain much that is characteristic
and revealing. They are closer to
the Grimm Brothers and Hans
Andersen than to Perrault; that is
to say, they have an underlying
seriousness and express a vision of
life which is at times sad and
bitter. There could be no greater
mistake than to imagine that
Wilde was essentially a frivolous
jester. It would be nearer the
mark to say that he was funda-
mentally a moralist, and these
stories support that view. The
Christian idea of sacrifice for
others finds e ion in two
heart-breaking tales, The Happy
Prince and The Nightingale and
the Rose. His sympathy with the
poor and oppressed, an element in
his character which some have
found surprising and paradoxical,
comes out in The Young King, a
story that shows him preoccupied
with the application of Christian-
ity to life. It makes an attack on
the materialism of so-called
Christian society which neither
the Victorian child nor his parents
ean have been expected to appre-
ciate, and in depth of humani-
tarian feeling it anticipates both
The Soul of Man under Socialism
(written three years later) and
The Ballad of Reading Gaol,

From the stylistie point of view
some of the fairy tales, especially
those in the second collection, A
House of Pomegranates, are inter-
esting because they reveal Wilde's
growing delight in gorgeous, en-
crusted language. nder the in-
fluence of his two great masters,
Walter Pater and John Ruskin, he
fabricated passages of prose with
the deliberate intention of making
words produce the same effect as
a piece of music or a painting
Unfortunately the descriptions of
jewels and ‘ppedzige in, for in-
stance, The Birthday of the In-
fanta, now strike us as artificial
and silly.

Wilde wrote his fairy tales at a
time when he was experimenting
with various forms of literary ex-
pression. Simultaneously he tried
the Platonic dialogue or duologue,
and the results were entirely
happy. The volleying of ideas
between two speakers, one ex-

CAMPHELL NAIRNE

pounding, the other interpolating,
exactly suited him, for it allowed
him to talk with his own voice and

comes almost word for word from
Dorian Gray.

With the shadow of the im -

reproduce his own conversation. ing tragedy already wu he
In these duologues (reprinted in suddenly took a from
Intentions) Wilde, the talker was serio-comic writing and in three

heard on paper for the first time. weeks at Wort
Importance of ne Earnest,
which is sheer gaiety from begin-

The Decay of f
Lying and The ning to end, a romp with only one
Critic as Artist design—to please and entertain.

are briliiant ex-
positions of his
theories about
life and art. They
deal with difficult
and abstruse sub-
jects, and the
thought is tightly
packed, yet they
are continuously
entertaining. Part
of the firm lies in
seeing how he
commits himself
to paradox after
paradox, some of

The Importance is Congreve with
an added lightness of heart, Wy-
cherley without his grossness. It
conquered London in 1895 and im-
mediately took its place among the
masterpieces of English light com-
edy. Throughout, the cumulative
effect of the laughter set off by
the continuous word-play is over-
whelming, and the wit lies as
much in the situations as ‘n the
lines.

Three years iater came one of
his most outstanding works, The
Ballad of Reading Gaol. In the



} poe interval the butterfly had been
wae ae — broken on the wheel, and the
suavely and Oscar Wilde ‘#l¢ of the man doomed to be

hanged because he had “killed
more than extricate himself from the thing he loved” is unrelieved
seemingly untenable positions; he ‘"@gedy. Many readers, while
carries conviction with his sophis- recognising its force and sincerity,
try, though some of the pronounce- have thought it the product of a
ments he makes are at best half- transient emotion. In fact it was
truths. Sometimes, indeed, he goes net uncharacteristic. The hell of
a little too far, as when, illustrat- Wandsworth and Reading had
ing the theory that Life imitates heightened a sympathy with the
Art, he says that “Hamlet invent- underdog that had already found
ed the pessimism that character- expression in The Nappy Prince
ises modern thought” and “the and in the essay on Socialism.
world has become sad because a
puppet was once melancholy”—
which is plain nonsense.

calmly explains them. He does

Oscar Wilde’s countrymen have
never claimed that he was .
writer of the first rank; nor di
Much of the thought does not }. over make such a claim him-

appear to us as really original. .,); ;

For instance, today it is almost a On the Continent, yeaah

commonplace to say that Art [iS writings are very highly

should not copy life. Yet even his ©Steemed. It has been said that

platitudes are madg to seem pew ° writer of English since Shake-
“ speare, with the single exception

and fresh, so arresting is the 1

method of Seeaanaton so en- ¢f Bernard Shaw (another Irish-
chanting the verbal arabesques â„¢a2n!) is to-day so widely known
that are hung upon them, Of #nd appreciated in Europe. It is
course there are affectations and possible that he is overvalued
extravagances, but they can be outside his own country because
forgiven because Wilde was so ob- his plagiarisms and borrowings

viously enjoying himself—toss- pass undetected, and accordingly |

ing thoughts like roses. and play- to the overseas reader he seems
ing with them in happiness of more original than he really was.
heart,” as one of his biographers That was the explanation sug-
has put it. gested by Shaw to account for
the success in Germany of his

There is the same sparkle of
early poems.

epigram in The Picture of Dorian
Gray, but oe debonair galety is
missing. “Give a man a mask,” ;
Wilde had written, “and he will ® master of epigram. He pro-
tell you the truth.” Dorian Gray Pagated ideas as well as mots
bears this out. The character of. The doctrine of art for art’s sake,
Lord Henry Wotton is Wilde’s “iseredited to-day in his own
mask, and he leaves little unsaid. country, never had a_ more
The book has been described as Cloquent exponent. His principle
his spiritual autobiography. When of creative criticism was &n im-
he wrote it he had not met Lord portant contribution to aesthetic
te Dou ae ~~ sypeanent theory and has had its influence
events provided a rrible con- in every coun where literary
firmation of his belief that “Life ar iitane is castes as an art,

imitates Art far more than Art
imitates Life.” The writings of Oscar Wilde
They spread

But Wilde was much more than

The histrionic element in Wilde’s have a triple value.

nature drew him early towards the laughter (the civilised world is
theatre, and having succeeded in the gayer for his passage through
other fields of literature he again it); they have a tonic effect on

began to write for the stage. When mind: 3
Salome was refused a licence in me 1 AS Sone soneeeeee

ion for beauty in all its
England he turned (with his Rests
tongue contemptuously in his a ri ae Pater’s des-
cheek) to the composition of CtPtion of the Gioconda to a crate

comedy-dramas that followed the ° oses at Covent Garden.
stage conventions of the time.
They all pointed a heavy moral—
yet they were in essence immoral,
and a negation of his own artistic
creeds, lmost their sole merit is
that they provided a setting for
his epigrams. Wilde was prodigal
with the coin of his wit, and he
could afford to be, for he scat-
tered it from a seemingly inex-
haustible treasury; yet he was not
above stooping to pick it up and
recoin it. He reintroduced in these
plays many of the epigrams he be
had previously let fall in his books gi
and conversation. “Children be-

saxscisacnchineigiaainen
COMMUNISM TAUGHT
IN CHINESE CHURCH

LONDON, Jan. 13.

Chinese churches are often used
for “indoctrination” classes by
Communist officials, though they
remain available for Sunday ser-
vices, the Church of England says.

“In some places the clergy are
ing required to obtain permis-
on from the authorities to hold

services *
gin by loving their parents; after church’s olattel oo k —
a time they judge them; rarely, if clared.
ever, do they forgive them”; that —Reuter.



LONDON

Cotton beachwear, and eau-dc-
cologne, sun hats and sunglasses
are the rule for any beach, any
year, The iced drink beneath the
palms by a sunbaked beach is an
unbroken tradition. But on the
subject of fashions ior the L-acb,
there is no hard and fast rule

carried on from year to year.
Although the emphasis is always







—BEACH SUIT

on providing comfort and coolness
in the heat, different designs and
colours come with each summer

The most attractive feature of
this year’s beachwear is_ its
adaptability. Sunsuits, topless o:
shoulderstrapped dresses can

easily be transformed into a dress:
for off the beach wear by the
addition of a stole or bolero.

Dorville have a neat white bolero
cuffed all the way round, which





How To Make Tea

Tea is a drink to which ihe
English are more than partial ani
about which they disagree violen!
ly. Arguments of great heat cin
start on the subject of the wa:
in which the pot should be warned
how much tea should be used per
person, how long it should b>
allowed to draw, whether ml:
should be put in first, last or ac
all, and so on and so forth, Patric
Sargent threw himse'f into this
controversy when he spoke about
tea in a BBC programme calle:
“English Magazine.” Next Apr {
the London tea auctions vill b»
re-opened and Sargent said tha
this would be an important thin
in London’s commercial life. Sinc
the war all tea has been bough
and distributed by the Governmer. -
and the City’s traditional buyin::
skill has been in abeyance. Nov
that tea supplies are improviny



The LOADSTAR works harder...

ee « because the driver’s work is easier !



By Dorothy Barkley

they sell separately for wear ove:
Summer dresses in general,

Inset sleeves are still little seen.
The majority of dresses have but
a@ mere suggestion of a sleeve,
usually cut in one with the
shoulder. The neckline is casual
often without collar, Dorvilic
showed one dress which buttoned
onto the shoulders, tunic fashion,
and was completely sleeveless.

Illustrated here are two en-
sembles designed by Horrockses.
The first comprises a one-piece
beach suit, shirt and skirt. The
c are bright and ,
Note especially the casual set of
the collar and cuffs which are
cut in one with the shoulders. The
skirt, which can be worn with
it, is full.

The second outfit is a sundress
with white picque bolero to match
the facing on the bodice. This
comes in a wide range of colours:
zon. ee pees, rue Bese and

ue, al a
design.

Cotton, understandably, is the
chief material. This material, for
so long considered the Cinderella
vf Fabrics, without prestige
because it was cheap, has now
earned for itself a place of con-
siderable dignity, With new pro-
cesses, new finishes, skilful cut
and design, it appears in a
variety of expensive guises, It is

. ese
developments, combined with the
basic advantages of price, hard
wear and ease of laundering
make it the most popular materia}
fot town and office wear as wel)
as the beach, Other popular
fabrics, are quickdrying seersuck-
er, and rayon shantung with its
practical quality of crease resist-
ance. 4

Colours this year are rich and
deep, The African and jungle
prints so popular last year, have
been replaced by hothouse prints,
checks, and designs in which red
or tan are the principal colours.
These are frequently combined
with black to make a very strik-
ing ensemble. Noticeable in this
connection was the beach outfit
in a red and black design which
consisted of a one-piece sunsuit,
button-through dress and_ stole
which was reversed with black.

Swim Wear, 1951

This year the smartest swim.
suits are strapless one-piece
affairs, the bras so cut and boned
that they are no problem to the
wearer. However, for diving and
active swimming, there are de-
tachable straps or halter fasten-
ings. But there are always many

sellers will have to come to Brit-
ain, the largest buyer of tea in
the world, and expert private buy-
ers should be able to secure better
quality teas for us.

All tea buyers, Mr. Sargent said,
are men, although women do more
tea drinking. Before the auction
the buyers taste samples of all teas
to be sold and they, as an example
to warring housewives, agree
almost unanimously on how to
make a pot of tea. First of a’l they
weigh the tea carefully. The
weight of a shilling should give
enough tea for a half pint pot.
This pot should be warmed slightly
on the outside, the tea put in and
freshly boiling water added. It is
important, tea tasters maintain, to
use freshly boiling water; other-
wise the leaves will not come to
the top and draw in the right



women who prefer the absolutely
plain classic swimsuit—tailored
and becoming, it never goes out of
fashion. A variation of this styie
is the use of contrast in eithe:
fabric or colour.

Fabrics
nylon

popular this year ate
and rayon-wool-lastex.

Black and white are still the firm
favourites; a new colour is the
deep “midnight sapphire” which



—SUN DRESS

looks well whether you are pale
honey-coloured or darkly tanned
Navy and garnet-red are good
dark colours for the beach.

Beach coats are an essential for
the bathing holiday; terry towell-
ing is the most practical material
for these. For casual wear, a cot-
ton jacket may be lined with terry
towelling in a_ striking colour
contrast,

way. The tea must be left to draw
for six minutes and then drunk
with milk but no sugar. Milk
apparently enables tea to hold its
taste longer. Another fact that
Sargent disclosed is that smell is
more important than taste in
appreciating tea. The palate regis-
ters the tea’s tang but it is the
delicate aroma creeping up the
nostrils from the back of the
throat that gives most pleasure.
When the tasters have sampled
the teas they go to the auction and
bid for those they consider best
suited to the blend they have
planned. Sargent found it difficult
to predict exactly what will happen
when the auctions begin again but
he thought that as competition
usually leads to cheaper goods and
better services it was reasonable
to hope that an era of better tea
drinking in Britain was at hand.



|

GOODNESS

DRINK

Vi-eSTOUT

SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 1951

a



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FGA

Our scieniists protest that this is a slanderous misrepresentation
of a serious test to safeguard the Anti-Knock qualities of
REGENT. What really happens is that regular tests are made
ina special engine, the compression of which can be progress-
ively increased until the fuel is made to knock. A “Bouncing
Pin”’ resting on a diaphragm in the cylinder head measures
| the intensity of Knock electrically, thereby enabling us to



THE NEW AUSTIN 2

A truck can be as powerful and strong as you Sike

AND $-TON TRUCKS

WERE ARE SOME CAB FEATURES ... Full

a & | determine and control the Anti iti
: y ra three-seater’’ (:djustable driving seat); lockable doors ; the o Anti-Knock qualities of ie sam)
—but it can only work es hard as the driver. The | dust and draught proof; : ject venene windows; door orally stow This is only one-of many tests which chgunsa iin “e4
; new Austin Loadstar is built to take care of that, | Widow ventilaung panels. viraminb En eT PRL a
The cab makes the driver’s work e.sier, sater + ‘}) Controlled ventilation ; single or °
< esung as.) demisting; sliding rear 3




ut more comfortable, and all the strength and power boat and sound insulation and radio,



\j you look for in an Austin is there in the chassis |



Austin Service covers the

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ALL LEADING

Simeon Hunte & Son,






Get fuli details now from : y
GROCERS

Ltd.—Agents.

i JAMES A. LYNCH AND
| DA COSTA & CO., LTD. - Accents



|
| DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO. LTD.

(ECKSTEIN BROS.) 1372-1376 BAY ST. - BRIDGETOWN

MOTOA t



KPORT CORPORAT

BIRMINGHAM -¢«

SuNGLAND ee a


SUNDAY, JANUARY

Duck Lays
Big Eggs



ILTON CLARKE, of King

Edward Road, Bank Hall,
eame into the Advoecate’s
yesterday morning with a duck
egg that weighed three and a
half ounces.

Duck eggs usually weigh about
two and a half ounces. Clarke
said that it was the third
that his duck had laid large eggs.
This one was bigger than the
others.

TRINIDADIAN, Edmore

Jackbir. was awarded first
prize at the Local Talent Show at

the Globe Theatre on Friday
night.
Jackbir, who sang the Irish

song “Mother MaCrae” delighted
the large and enthusiastic crowd
that attended the show. It was his
first public performance in the
island.

The second prize went to Gerald
Daisley who sang “Day By Day.”
Other good performances were
given by Austin Evelyn
“My Love Loves Me”,
Rudder with “Our Very

The Judges at the Talent Show
were Mr. Everton Weekes, Miss
Murray and Miss Cheeseman.

in an accident along Black Rock
Road on Friday. She was treated
at the General Hospital and dis-
charged.

Mrs. Newton is Postmistress of
Black Rock Sub-Post Office.

Also involved in the accident
was motor car M. 166, owned by
Lepert Downes of Black Rock,
and driven by Arlington Savoury
of Peterkins Road.

CANE FIRE which broke out

at Society Plantation, St,
John, on Friday burnt 252 holes
of first crop ripe canes, They are
the property of Mr. C. N. Reece
of the same plantation.

Sixty holes of first crop ripe
canes were burnt when a fire
broke out in a field of canes at
Villa Road, Brittons Hill, on
Friday. The canes belong to
Charles Ruck of the same address.
They were not insured.

ILE LABOURERS from
the Waterworks Depart-
ment were putting down pipe
lines at Pine Hill around mid-day
yesterday they came across a
skeleton. It was found about
three and a half feet down'in the
earth.
The lines were being laid be-
tween the lands of, Messrs. Hut-
son and Goddard.





Basket Selling
Is Slow Work

If one walked a few yards up
Milk Market he would see dozens
of baskets on the pavement on
the right side of the road, Some
are plain and others have a blend
of various colours that inevitably
attract the passerby.

One of the basket makers is
Sealy Watson of St.. Andrew.
The business is not a thriving
one, he told the Advocate yester-
day, and as a matter of fact, he
said, he is often on the verge of
despondency .

Watson entered the basket busi-
ness about four years ago, but the
material is so expensive, he said,
that he has never been quite able
to make a livelihood out of it. He
has often to turn to something
else. For him there are no bright
selling periods. Some days the
sales are fair but on others he
does not sell a single basket.

B. Lowe of Eagle Hall, St. Mi-
chael, had a somewhat similar
tele to tell, but for him around
Christmas time is the bright sell-
ing period. After that sales go
back to normal, Lowe said that
he can never cover expenses,



oh ° y
_ 2 Ships Come

“zt.

io-day
‘two C.N.S. steamships, R.M.S5.
Lady Nelson and we Canadian
Chaitienger will be calling at
Briagetown to-day.
‘ine Lady Neison will be
Tivigg ifvin brilisn Guiana via
Trinidad, Grenada and St, Vin-
cent. She will be taking cargo
here and sailing to-morrow nignt
for Bermuda, Boston and St. Jonna
via the British Northern Islands.
The Canadian Chailienger will
be bringing cargo trom.Canada
for Barbados. Sne is also expect-
ed to sail to-morrow night for
British Guiana via St. Vincent,
Grenada and Trinidad.
Both ships are consigned to
Messrs. Gardiner Austin & Co.,

Ltd. a el ls













ar-

14, 1951

On Tuesday

Tuesday will begin a new term

for Harrison College, Combermere

office Queen’s College and St. Michael’s

Girls’ School. After the Christ
mas vacation with many holidays,
pupils will begin a

will be the game of the season

time This term, too, is athletic sports

for all the schools.



Small Pox Suspect
Leaves

@ from page 1
Barbados than Pelican.

but after
better, it became rather tiring to

wards the end of my stay. When

I was able to get up and around

I could walk anywhere on the
I used to wave at
° fishing boats as they
with passed. There were plenty of books
and Sylbert to read and over Christmas the
Own." Royal and Merchant Navy Welfare
over seyera!

island and
yachts and

League sent me
Christmas packages.”

While here he heard from home,
ae NEWTON, of Mortimer Both of his parents are alive and
Hall, St. Peter, was injured were glad to know how well he

had been treated.

Tyrrell has fair hair and grey-
green eyes, He is
inches tall, well built and a
friendly likeable fellow,



Guide Notes:
Visit Of The Chief

Sie
Guide

Lady Baden-Powell, Chief
Guide .of the World, left England
on SS. Colombie to visit the
Guides in the Caribbean. Owing
to the Carnival in Trinidad and
Grenada Lady Baden-Powell will
visit these Islands before coming
here for her official visit.

The S.S. Colombie is due in
Barbados on or about Wednesday
January 17th, and while the ship
is in t she will spend the
time e. A Guard of Honour



of 2 uts and 24 Guides will
welet her at the Baggage
Ware e.

In ter from the Ghief Guide
writte. a day or two before she
sailed from England she said she
was Lusy packing and looking
forward to her tour.

The SS. Colombie calls at
Guadeloupe and Martinique en
route to Barbados which is a
wonderful opportunity fer Lady
Baden-Powell to see the Guides
in the French Islands. On this
tour she will visit British Guiana,
the British West Indies, Ber-
muda, the Bahamas, Puerto Rico,
Haiti and Jamaica. In Puerto
Rico at the end of March she will
attend the meeting of the Sub-
Committee of the Western Hemis-
phere Council. From Jamaica
the Chief Guide will return to
England by ship, arriving there
towards the end of April.

Executive
Committee

There will be a meeting .of the
Executive Committee on Satur-
day January 20th, and after this

meeting details of the programme

for the Chief Guide's visit to
Barbados will be published.



GAS AND ICES
AT “EBENEZER”

Motorists who stop at “Ebene-
zer House”, Four Roads, St. John,
can now fill up in more than one
way. Formerly, since Mr. T. L.
Clarke opened a gasolene station
there, they could fill up the tanks
of their cars. Now, he has gone
one further and opened an ice
cream and light refreshment par-
lour.

Not oniy motorists and motor-

ing parties, but villagers as well

can make use of Ebenezer which
is now .a combination of liv-
ing house, gasolene station and
parlour.

The opening function was held
last Thursday. Among those pre-
sent were: Mr. and Mrs. A. P.
Cox, Mr. and Mrs. M, H, Alleyne,
Dr, E. B. Carter, Mrs. F, D. G.
Simpson, Mrs,
Miss M. Clarke, Miss L. Brad-

shaw, Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Tudor, terested in British goods in toucn
Mrs. C, Redman, Mr. with possible sources of supply in

Mr. and
and Mrs. H. N. Farmer, Miss
Margaret Taylor, Mrs. S. W.
Howell.



new year,
For the boys’ schools football

“I was
very comfortable and well treated,
I was feeling much

five feet ten

CivilAviation

For Bahamas

(From Our London Correspondent)

LONDON

GROUP-Captain Edward Mole,
British
duration gliding record, will ar-
25th
to take up his duties as Director

ene-time holder of the
rive in Nassau on January

of Civil Aviation, Bahamas.
This 44-year-old officer,

CAPTAIN EDWARD MOLE
cause to remember January
1951. For in cac iicn to taking

up his new appoui.ment, he got
married this month. His wife is
vxtremely interested in light
aircraft flying.

They were married at Caxton
Hall, London, on January 9th and

Mrs. Mole will accompany her
husband to Nassau.
Group-Captain Mole has 20

years’ service in the R.A.F. and is
widely experienced in most
branches of eivil and military
aviation. From 1940-42 he was
Assistant Director of repairs and
servicing at the Air Ministry.
He was then promoted head of
the "branch at the Ministry of Air-
eraft Production controlling the
technical devélopments of military
gliders and their towing aircraft.

His experience of civil aviation
was increased when in 1945-46 he
was seconded from the R.A.F. as
Manager of B.O.A.C. Develop-
ment Flight. In this capacity he
supervised flight trials of new
vee of aircraft.

rom 1946-48 he was Chief En-
gineer Officer of Transport Com-
mand and responsible for main-
tenance and efficiency along
Empire routes.

Group-Captain Mole also has
considerable experience of jet
aircraft .as a result of one year
spent as R.A.F. representative of
the National Gas Turbine estab-
lishment, where he was employed
on the development of this latest
aspect of aviation.

It is with a wry smile that he
recalls that year spent working
on jets and then remembers ear-
lier days when he was one of the
pioneers of another type of flying
~—this time without engines.

Apart from once holding the

British duration record for glidin,
—eight hours, 20 minutes—he sti
holds the Egyptian altitude record
at 5,200 feet. Another record he
retains, and one which is never
likely to be beaten is that of 147
successive loops in a glider. “It
was done for a bet” explains
Group-Captain Mole.
_ His other interest outside glid-
ing has been in the promotion and
sponsoring of light aircraft flying.
He has a civilian licence and is
chairman of the Ultra Light Air-
craft Association, which has been
instrumental in forming 11 groups
of light aircraft enthusiasts
throughout the coyntry.

In 1939, and again in 1947, he
was third in the Isle of Man light
aeroplane race and in 1949 he fin-
ished second in the Royal Aero
Club Grosvenor Trophy.

REQUIREMENTS WILL BE
MADE KNOWN IN U.K.

(From Our Own Corresponaent)

‘ PORT-OF-SPAIN. Jan. 11.
Trinidad importers, unable to
get any particular British goods
from the United Kingdom,
now have their requirements pub-
licised in the United Kingdom
through the Statistics and En-
quiries Department of the London

Chamber of Commerce (Inc.)
Mr, H. C. Squire, Principal of
the Department said that through
the medium of the “Openings for
Trade” columns of the “Chamber
of Commerce Journal,” the Cham-



Howard Smith, ber has been able for a number

of years, to put many buyers in-

the United Kingdom.”



—-——

May Save $76,000

who
retired from the R.A.F. exactly
twelve months ago, will long have



can

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Schools Open Director Of Bad Season

Faces J’ca
Citrus

From Cur Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jan, 9.
Reports trom Britain indicate

that this season —the first since
tne bulk purchase of citrus by the
Ministry of Food has ceased —
will be the worst in many years
from the point of view of the
Jamaica citrus grower, in that
Jamaican citrus is having a bad
time on the United Kingdom
market,

Earlier in the season, grepe-
fruit was reported to be earning
fcirly good prices but the price
for grapefruit has dropped con-
siderably, With the current prices
the Jamaica Citrus Growers As-
sociation is taking a loss of 5/-
on every box of fruit shipped,
and according to cabled advice
from London this week the grape-
fruit market is likely to be fur-
ther depressed toward mid-Jan-
uary and onwards when Pales-
tine is expected to release large
supplies of grapefruit on the Bn.
tish market.

The Association's plan to ship
scme 25,000 boxes of grapefruit
to the U.K. has been halted in
view of the new situation. To
meet it, the Association is ai.
ranging to sell the remainder of
the crop as processing fruit so to
maintain the present advance price
of 2/- per box to the grower.

Sweet oranges are in a slightly
better position but because of the
very low prices for these which
prevailed during the earlier part
of the season, present prices are
bardly enough to offset the lass-
es on earlier shipments.

250,000 More
Schools Needed For
In Jamaica

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, J’ca., Jan. 7.
An estimate that there were now
250,000 children of school age it
Jamaica unable to attend schcol
because of insufficient accommoda-
tion facilities was made last week
by Mr. G. T. Saunders, retirin::





" sank
SARE WORDS

.2 ew maddening puzzle

Cooearcs epnspeladarar

Here is the latest thing . in
quizzes—A CROSSWORD WITH-
OUT CLUES.

You have to arrange the maze
ot words so that they lead
logically from HEREWARD to
ALBATROSS. All you have to
remember are the seven rules
which govern the relationship
between any word and the word
that precedes it. Here they are:—
1. A word may be an anagram
of the word that precedes it.
IT may be a synonym of the
word that precedes it.

3 IT may be achieved by adding
one letter to, subtracting
one letter from, or changing
one letter in the preceding
word.

IT may be associated with the
previous word ina_ saying,



READING ON THEIR,
BACKS

HALF a dozer, big hospitals in |

president of the Jamaica Union of England are using a new divice

Teachers, at
annual meeting.
Mr. Saunders said there was
need for small, inexpensive
schools in the country districts to
provide accommodation for these
children now denied education.
“Laudable as are the efforts
to construct school buildings,” Mr.
Saunders said, “there are now
nearly a quarter of a million of
our children without accommoda-
tion in our schools — there are
actually 137,000 places for 369,000
children of school age. Addition-
ally it is estimated that over 43
per cent. of our children leave
scheol without attaining fourth
standard efficiency.”

the Association's



Guianese On
Cambridge Exams
Committee

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN. B.G. Jan. 11
Guianese-born Rawle Farley,

B.A., B.Sc., (Hons.), Dip. Ed.,
(Lond.), has been appointed a
member of the Cambridge Uni-
versity Overseas Committee for
Overseas Examinations,

Mr. Farley who is in London
doing research in Economics un-
der a Geddes Grant Studentship
awarded him by the University
College of the West Indies, is First
Vice President of the West Indian
Students’ Union in England. About
mid-December last he headed a
West Indian panel of nine to Cam-
bridge University on the invita-
tion of the University Examina-
tions Syndicate to discuss the pro-
posed changes in the Syllabus for
the Overseas School Certificate
Examinatior .

Tourist Board Asks.
Govt. For $10,000

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN. Jan. 11.
The Trinidad and Tobago Tour-
istist Board has asked Govern-
ment to provide $10,000 in the
1951 estimates for a survey of
sites suitable for hotel, cabana

and beach development in the
Colony.
Tentative arrangements have

already been made by the Board
for outstanding U.S.A., experts to
conduct a survey if funds are pro-
vided.

This proposal was submitted to
Government immediately after
the meeting of the Caribbean In-
terim Tourism Committee in San
Juan, Puerto Rico in December,
when C. I, T. C. passed a resolu-
tion strongly urging its member
governments to embark on the
establishment of “pilot plant’
hotel and resort development in
their territories, financed, if neces-
Govern-

designed by Helen Craig-Davies, |
grey-haired professional mventor.
Jd: enables patients who are flat



INVENTION

The patient reads
» around her
on their backs to read, write and
see what is going on around them
It is an arrangement of chro-
mium ~ plated tube, fastened to
the back of the bed and over the
patient’s head. To it is fastened

and sees

s reading desk which can be ad-'!

justed to any angle.

There is a separate mirror, nine
inches by seven, also adjustabl:
to any angle, so that the patien'
can see all round the room

—L.E.S.



Rupe: oh! the



Walking down the hill, Rupert
s reaches the clump of bushes, and,
$2 sure enough, he finds Rosalie sitting
sticky.
* Hullo, I've come to look after you
nd to take you back to Mrs, Pig's

ind munching something

Rosalie starts

nttage,”” he says.
‘ Then she

violently as he appears



City Council Will Buy
Sewer Disposal Plant

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 9
Government has granted the
Port-of-Spain City Council a loan
of $48,000 to enable them to pur-
chase the sewer disposal plant at
Waller Field Air Force Base
The Council wil! hand over a
cheque for $36,000 to the Garcia






PAGE NINE





invitation f
Z

to enchantment é ;

Ze

tog tham ever
simile, metaphor, or
tion of ideas.

5. IT may form with the pre-
ceding word the name of a
well-known person or plac«
in fact or fiction.

6. IT may be associated
the preceding word in
title or action of a book,
or other composition
» ST? re .

associa-

=

By BOURJOIS

POWDER -

with
the
play
PAGE

ROUGE +» PERFUME +

VANISHING CREAM .-

LIPSTICK -
BRILLIANTINE -

TALG « COLD Cx I

pe

may be used more than twice | HAIR GREAM F







consecutively, and only one! aiinasaseadslsht f eee ie ae
ai — to govern one 9

ations : P
enone you wont.

A typical succession of words |
might be: MUTUAL-FRIEND- |
FOE-FLOE-SLOE-SOLE-HOLE. |
CORNER-HORNER-JACK.JILL-
HILL—CONSTITUTION,

hear

yourselt walk

in Clartes
“MINNESOTA”
“GROUNO-GRiP" PUSSYSETE 9044)
| Im gpest demand in many ports of the world, “Minnesm”
| pleases both for ite samptly casual design and for its amaning
new soling material.
nom-ekid, cushion - comfort -
able, rubber-light,

— LES
Solution on Monday



| (Wem WATERPROOF, NON-SKID,







| AerUss

Nationa: Gil, (9)
| ¥. Might earn if it didn't dream. iy)
| 7. Preceded the fai! of Row 1)
} & The mevriate’s prop
| 10, Initially shes Tra Lingalre “
(L Fit out our severity 6)

leaf-ee0!—aud
12. He resists authinrit »)
ji4. Bish (4)
1b. Pair this to get a ut ap. if
16 Mist net when struct (7)
(7 His succession is oniy a mat
Down
|
|
|

tough as you
could pos-
sibby meed |

maes by

Clans _ OF ENGLAND

THE QUALITY SHOE FIRM WITH 125 YEARS’

new elamt heel-shape

of time ‘
14% Occurrence 1B) ae aan
rear
\. Back Ww the
horse. (7)

The rules Of pulite suciery cup

sound of the ‘ast

4. Idea rate (anag.) 18)

4. Shining to make Reg thuent (By)

6. Ethereal. (6)

8 Ancient galley with two
of oars. (6)

Â¥ You must deprive somepody else
to do this (3)

4. Por a penny more
German song (3)

Oe atte

you'd get 4

EXPERIENCE ©

Cc. & J. Clark Ltd. (Wholesale only), Street, Somerset, England
LOCAL AGENTS; ALEC RUSSELL & CO. BARBADOS

|
usaie Across
Wager Li “lite

Lint. 15 Gyot te

JoiuLION of yesterday

4, Sitter; 5 Nap; ¥
13. Pelt; 14
17 = Any Le.
Mandarin 25
28 Hades
‘atter, 4







Sketch Book—-9 |
vo ¥ t) : .




gets up with a sigh of relief. ‘* My,
you gave me a fright!" she
quavers. ‘' Thank goodness it's only
you. We needn't go home yet,
need we? Stop here for a bit and
have some of this candied fruis.
It's topping.”” “*Whew, what a
lovely oxful,” cries Rupert.'

‘Wherever did you get it ?"”



Keep it DARK with

SHADEINE

| Permanent, washable

| and oem aes. All |
natural tints, 50 years

| reputation. Ask your chemist to ob

| tain some for you from his Wholesaler,

nufactured
THE SHADEINE COMPANY








©






First Of The Line sary, completely from Commerciale Company for the 9 London, |
Shooting Results ("28n%"o8"SeXIN7FMNY, [ment funds or under government purchase of the plant. Work on” “M*S™EGtANDC emer | :
The first of the Saguenay Ter- The Department of’ the Con-| guarantee of the payment of long the removal of the plant — will ap arr
minals steamships, for which The usual Saturday afternoon troller of *apaete and Exports | term loans.
| Messrs. Plantations Limited are practice at the Small Bore rifle may clip about $76,000 off its m Don't miss Andrews
the local agents, arrives to-day range took place yesterday, when expenditure this year on cargo- “pour Deuces” Pro

a stay of four days at this yy 7, A. L. Roberts scored a handling on the wharf. amine every Thes

over

begin next week.
|
|



ae ssible. The eight best scores is expected that this saving
The London Mariner brings to At as —— a ae Se oibectars as a result of a Radio Distribution,
Barbados a cargo of whisky, bis- scheme under which the General
cuits, asbestos, machinery and 48 T. A. L. Roberts, 100; M. G. Manager of the Port Services
mctor cars, besides other mer- Tucker, 99; G. May, 98; P. Chase, Department will undertake to OUNGSTERS, as well as grown-
chandise, t@@ 98; H. B. G. Marshall, 97; M.A. deliver goods to merchants on : , ;
She has two intransit passen- Tucker, 97; G. Pilgrim, 97; S. the order of the Controller of ups, must make sure of Inner Clean-
gers for’ British Gulans, Tempro, 96, Imports and Exports. | £ liness in order to keep fit. Playtime, and
‘ & ; school-time, demand good health, and
ee a this young lady has found the way to
CLEANS PEROXIDE TooTH PASTE | tale bite haiews i on ening
“fizzy” drink which brings Jnner
Cleanliness by cleaning the mouth,
settling the stomach, and toning up the
liver. Finally, it gently clears the
bowels.

As a refreshing drink at any time of the
day, take one teaspoonful of Andrews
in a glass of water. More important
still, don’t forget your Andrews when
you wake in the morning !

ANDREWS uvver sair

AM Fli. l
¢ contains D.DX. “THE IDEAL FORM OF LAXATIVE

AN PRODUCT | 3










For white teeth, use

tooth raste-——use Maclear



FLIT Is



See wees ee ee
,4 the time in Korea, thank good- pe Ran Mag was = a at Worthing, told mé the same my diary: “It has just occurred ‘ ;
| } ness. oprers baven prisoner Ketore Wey thing. to me that I’ve never seen a cat }
4f You may get a week on end could get out of their blankets. The cries of the women and the in Korea. Must ask if they have
He when it isn’t much worse than at of Cates pad Pat x Sma Ptr. two children were $6 pitifal as them.” — - ;
a) home. Then, without any warn- last few dave would bg b Faken they were led to a new tfench I did ask. I asked an inter i
TO BRIDGE 9 ie. seet, comes ehiene ince two weeks ae wnat bur lads started threatening preter who said: “Oh ves ell TLLUSTRATED CATALOGUE
hy Pye woe and every & the little black-coated magistrate eee ar Py their skin: t
reezes § . ‘Black Friday’ with a brief-case who was super— for furs. me Koreans grow so
, Temperatures drop to 30 and 40 3 Aethbs . ; 3 cea °
THOSE TWO below freezing point in the lati- Down at my local there’s a fel- V'S!NS the ‘executions. fond of their cats that the;

PAGE TEN



LAST night the Keens dropped
in. They live in the next flat to

mine in Hampstead, and Alan, t . Friday for the Fusiliers. Execution After each shooting the graves you through to a sound position in any ey
ids ge Beckson oc Renetied bee emeay's Aypives back from KOREA "' At ca eee yu trough en sound pein nm) ee
war, said: “What is going on in ®ll. Everything went according to That note was to remind me of and then the earth filled in. dre individual. There's a friendly,
Korea? How can the capital city Plan. : * ose ® a story so ya Set oem Se normal... personal touch that encour-
of a nation fall with hardly a _ If it hadn't been for the censor- {9} }} he 1s writin stra t repeated it in that ge t of .. Fifty yards from the graves ages quick progress and
Chinese in sight and scarcely a ship I could have cabled you a i. ee. oe ie Wri out there was a small hut where a makes for early
e the life our boys « Korean woman lived with her
‘ . ciency
Z to the heart eeee we two small children. Apparently effi ,



World Trip
Will Cost
£13,000

. aaah ne in September 1949 was ted
the fixed undercarriage on air- B its bookmakers t ate in ;> execu i

y CHAPMAN PINCHER perm: okmakers to o) L . ing for more than a month to
ace aft je moe suitenous liners? ; PARIS. opposition to the Totalisator, is ne cecum x time bomb, on build the stem and forepart of a,
eo agg 7 i Soa hate Experts in the design shops A huge electronic “brain,” be- the best. 4,000-ton passenger-cargo vess¢l. |

It will be round the world via
the’ South and North Poles in five
stages. The airplane—a Constel-
lation air liner.

The longest stage, from Christ-
church, New Zealand, to Cape
Town, over the South Pole will
be 7,210 miles.

In the airplane will be mem-
bers of the Adventurers’ Chib,
Chicago.

The ‘club has bought the Con-
Stellation for a series of flights.

Record breaking will not be
attempted although. during the
25,000 mile flight records will!
certainly fall.

The route will be from Chicago

to Honolulu, Christchurch, Cape- der earriages make so +h differ- has to be blown through to keep and Steward of ~the Auteuil ? ; of paints and everything from
Mm tn het ease it COOL, sie ® ‘Steeplechase Commictee. Loosened First Day he Ee Le gets bade fish-hooks to counter-scales.
via the North Pole. The Government financed the The intention is to have betting « Don't tet ing, sneezing, chok- “nd cause WAS Itching, Cracking, ’ 9° f 4t!!
Undoubtedly they would knock project because the “brain” will be Offices, as in Ireland, in addition | tng attacks ronchitis or Asthma Eczema, . oUt oO eminence! Can't get it? Try us for it!!

Special Compass a few miles an hour off speed. of great value for working out de- to facilities for racecourse betting, | Gay Jour algep and en Re Pimples, Foot Itch atid other blem-

De Havillands, builders of the be of ercral) Gone and other ‘ a | DAC Jed reat ‘medic! + not. a ighes, Ordinary trap tma ts ee de nok

irple illo , jet-engined Comet, the worlds defence research problems. ne ob ar but wor! “n : discov-

nel, et cars Sere" Stnneecatty reseed "Ake a glentetng nee LEARN FROM COMICS Teauib'MG Md: Menritiaans I iain Ah He ea

for Polar navigation, radio sets the fixed undercarriage when they hailed the Manchester “brain” as PITTSBURGH. | dose t minutes and fs guaranteed to give you

for long-range reception tests ant
weather-recording devices.

One Instrument will keep a
record of every word uttered on
board and every message over



shot being fired?”
Well, I told him

and I can tell

you that so far as the fall of Seoul

talking with the
man in the flat

WORLDS

~

Fixed Wheel
Planes?

JAMES STUART
SHALL we ever see a return of

may throw up their hands af the
Suggestion, and get on with their
pians for even more sléek air-
vianes.

But must air travellers be held
up by “undercart’” failures?

Often an airplane has _ to
circle because one of its wheels
has stuck.

At best—delay

Mostly undercarriages
no trouble, but when they do,
emergency organisations have to
be alerted in case of a crash Jand-
ing. At best there is delay

A London Airport incident a
few days ago prompted a pilot to
ask me: “With the speed of the
modern airliners, would fixed un-

cause

produced the Hern, a
ger ‘‘feeder-liner.”

14-passen-



TRUMAN'S DAUGHTER

THIS DIARY ig
OF MINE Is |#

BERNARD

They recovered .. .

the war.

Don’t know how right we were,
out we reckoned the Chinese
didn’t attack us at Christmas be-
cause the weather wasn’t cold
enough. The weather isn’t bad all

and very much
When it

tude of Seoul,
lower further north



is this

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

It WASN’T Fun Finding Out

WICKSTEED

we can’t? It must be
they are used to it.

entry in my diary for December
15 that says, cryptically: “Black

On the Thursday night some of

because see eight of the prisoners marched
It’s their kind to a trench and shot through the

of country and climate. They*ve back of the head as they knelt in

themselves before the attack, but
they couldn’t conceive that any-

The boy of eight
He swore that one of the boys

body would be about in the open was no more than eight years old

oh such a bitter night and so
did_nothing about it.

ey and the other only [3. Young

Lieutenant Gordon McEwan, who

They soon learned their mis- used to be a newspaper réporter

low with a brothét in Koréa,
brother

nd
has

been writing interference,

He protested in Korean at the
and while he was

as cold ag that, you give most of home saying the South Koreans talking the prisoners were shot.

your attention to the problem of
keeping alive.

Up round the Chosin reservoir

there were several cases of Amer-

death while on guard.

New Brain
Needs A
Cold Tonic .

lieved to be the most advanced of
its kind in the world, has just been
built for the Government by a
team of Manchester engineers.

This was disclosed today by
Professor F, C. Williams, the Man-
chester University scientist who
designed it. at an international
conference on robot machines in
Paris.

The “brain” is 50, feet long,
seven feet high, and contains 3,500
radio valves. It thinks so fast that
it can obey 3,000,000 orders in one
hour.

Britain Leads

It can add up a column of 500
numbers in the time you take to
say the word “addition”.

When full out the “brain” gets
so hot that a continuous air blast

a great achievement, since it puts
Britain ahead of America in the
race to market these robots com-
nercially.

QUAKE SHAKE TERCEIRA



are as bad as the North Koreans.
He's seen them shooting wormen
and children himself. t

One of the children raised his
head as he knelt in the trench
and a uniformed policeman bent

No one in the pub believed it, down and slapped his face. After

was probably right. I have



cried out something in



Koréan that our lads

couldn’t |
understand. |

’ - the Northumberland _ Fusiliers the whole thing was so a i
couple of Weeks ago from Seoul It’s not so bad if you can stay moved into a new position on the her that she went on nonchalan y
A FEW days age itself. saying @xaetly what would in your sleeping-bag all night. If outskirts of Seoul and set up sweeping the snow off her door-
happen. I could have filled in you've nothing else to do but look their tents in a_ valley. They step while the executions took
and this is what I every detail except the date. after yourself you can keep pretty didn’t know it, but in the dark place. 2 CHOOSE
It was quite an odd experience snug even in a hole in the ground. they had pitched camp on one 0. Also close by was the niagis-
to sit by my own fire with the But you are in no state to leap the South Korean mass execution trate’s car, in which a woman,sct YOUR C “ER
was looking like Christmas cards still on the man- up and fight at 3 o’clock in the grounds.. ; : in full view througtiout. ARL
tel and read all about it. morning, and that’s the time these Early next morning 29 prisoner Our lads wére so furious they | he incy Exams. £0 ene th Quaneiey siievayinit
Here’s a note in my diary that heathen Chinese and Koreans arrived in a truck for execution. wrote ott a full ré and the | Aviation (Engineering and Coferedeciat em Sa Se ahainebrion
13,000 mifles away says: “The big attack is expected choose for their attacks. Quartermaster-Sergeant Brown, following day ré ate aves of Wireless) ightsmanship, Radio (Shore Ware)
to-night. If it comes, bang goes Not fair, is it? But it’s their who’s a decent, ordinary English- UNO came out a d dug up th ing, Architecture G-F.0.. Eng. Dent. , Speretecial coe
from Britain our turkey dinner, for we’ll all be answer to air power, and a good man, was shaving when the first Mik Gee eee toe late ‘and of Works institute ipa a —
a Sat on the move again and there won't one too. fusillade of shots rang out. He staves. y hci regs 8 em teathareatios Teachers of Handicrafts
be an Allied soldier in Seoul 48 Used to it looked out of his tent and saw a In the night someone had 1] grams CT tis © : lation. ea
Yesterday | was hours from now.” : crowd of British soldiers running there before them. They foun’! Gite. Eula Aa jects ioe &
The date’ of that entry is How do thty do it without towards a nearby hillock. He the women but the bodies of th>| Engingerine. Bronce Path Wireless Telegraphy and
Christmas Eve. freezing to death themselves, if joined them and was in time to children had gone. , | ens Police. Special Course Telephony

I saw Brown and McEwan ‘4
few hours after they had wit :
nessed these events. They showe' |



Gentlemen, please” and my ow
children tucked up safely in bed
I began to wonder if it was true
myself,

Cats? Why, yes

Here’s a more cheerful entry in



actually keep them as pets. They
eat mice, you know.”

A comment like that, made in
all sincerity, makes you realis>
what a long way from home you
are.

Next: What sort of a man is
—L.E.S.

ican sentries actually freezing to but I had to tell him his brother he’d been shot be raised oné arm Syngman Rhee?
an and







“Bookies” Again Time Bontb Killer 20 Men Build Ship;

In France?

BOOKMAKERS and _starting-
price betting may return to France.

Racehorse owners and breeders jewell

there have come to the conclusion
that the British system, which

Bookmakers were put out of
business many years ago in France
and all legal betting has since been
conducte throug the Pari-
Mutuel Conferences have been
held recently with a view to urg-
ing the Government to change the
Act and permit bookmakers once
more.

Executed

MONTREAL, Jan. 12.
J. Albert Guay, 33, Quebec
er convicted of timé bomb
murder in a Canadian air liner

board an airliner in a plot to get
rich quickly by killing his wife
to collect her insurance. The
plane blew up in m killing
Guay’s pretty 28 year old wife
and 22 other .

A friend of Guay’s, Generux
Rust, has been convicted of par-
ticipating in the same murder

Most of those intimately con- and has been sentenced to die.
nected with racing are in favour Another friend. Mrs. Pitre, will

of the new move.

It is under- go on trial for murder in Feb-

stood that M. Marcel Boussac ruary.

is one of the few big owners

who would prefer to retain the turing

present arrangement.

Rust was convicted of manufac-
the bomk which was
placed aboard the plane on Sep-

On a recent visit to France the tember 9, 1949. —Reuter.

head of an Australian bookmaking
concern was asked to explain the
business of bookmaking as con-
ducted in Australia, Among those
present was a well-known owner



Comie books and scheol teach- |
ers usually work at cross-purposes |
but Westinghouse Electric Co
poration, home of many scientific
miracles, thinks it can make them |
as compatible as strawberries arid |

the radio. ee Ses ) . ahs hess |
»The Corporation's .school service
It is hoped to obtain new MAY GO ON RADIO LISBON, Jan. 13. department announced that it has

information about the weather

reached a_ tentative

A severe earthquake shock on

published a comic-typé book





ASTHMA MUCUS

im Go Ta Tea are

move thick strangl: mucus, 2, fae

promot er ng der,
end Riga
ing, Ww , if.
cuarataage Oot MENBAUD foe
shemist Sy. rye



It Will Never Sail |

A ship which will never we |
completed and never sail is being
built at Southampton for the Fes-
tival of Britain.

Twenty men have been work-

The bow, 30ft. high, 20ft, long,
is to be placed in the shipbuild-
ing section of the Festival on)
the Thames South Bank,

The outline of the ship will be
framed by scaffolding to give)
the impression of a vessel under |
consttuction. — |

At night it will be floodlit. fT
has taken about 15 tons of mild
steel, the type normally used in |
shipbuilding to build a “skeleton”
ship. —LES. |

{





ited in 7 Minutes

~ soft, clear, attractive, smooth skin

fy one week, or money back on return
of empty package. Get guaranteed
Nixoderm from your chemist todayand
Ni od j remove the
e of skin

For Skin Troubles trouble.

real cause |

14, 1951

SUNDAY, JANUARY







THE STEPPING STONES
TO SUCCESS

Don't hesitate about your future !_ Go forward,
confident that The Bennett College will see























If your requirements are not listed above, write us for free advice

Direct Mail to DEPT. 188





/ r § at particu- lived in it all their lives and it. ' me the aves, then merciful! : ‘ie NETT
tet aoneeak was an ‘the ition of learned how to get on with it. We The firing party returned to the covered oth snow, and demon THE BEN ; COLLEGE LTD.
next te ours in two British newspaper coneagies haven't. , truck, where the remaining pris- strated just .who stood where $s D. E AND
who'd been languishing in their There was one night whem a oners were kneeling on the Short of seeing it myself |! if
Hampstead bedrolls for two days with flu or British guardpost was overrun by yround.. They marched off © gouldn’'t have been better in ;
Mou some kind of fever guerrillas in the small hours’ of further eight which Brown told formed, = ade
1 Luckily the Chinese allowed us the morning. Our boys, who'd me included two young women yet kn hen I told th:
; i been in the country only a couple et, you Know when I told t
our Christmas dinner fn peace, al y ple aged between 20 and 25 and two story in the pub with the gooc a i
and the two sick men had time to Of weeks, actually heard the |”... old Tandlord shouting “Time Cl L NOTICE TO ;
recover and get on with reporting guerrillas whispering among "~ g ime. |

TRADERS & SHOPKEEPERS

QUALITY MERCHANDISE
WILL BE SENT FREE
ON REQUEST

LENNARDS LIMITED,

HOUSEHOLDERS AND BUILDERS ALL

We now have a complete range

A BARNES & LTD.



co.,



over the South Pole, which has jyjcx ities Toca i Terceira island, in the Azores wench explains for stagents such Ss d Uj P i ti
: never before been visited by , 0°. 4 : rene - caused panic among the local pop- !Mvolved matters as atomic energy dua
big aircraft. Prepideore daughter, is reported ulation yesterday according to re- jet propulsion, television an m pee P ro etton
e e

f

aot
oie sata

The exact cost is unknown, but
flying a Constellation usuall)
costs about £130 per hour. Ther«

agreement with the National
Broadcasting Company to appear
vn a dozen radio and television

ports reaching here to-day.
Many houses were damaged,
according to Press accounts but,

other new scientific developments,
The book is intended as a teach-

ing aid for science classes in

junior and senior high schools.



. : , casualties were mentioned. d “HOW DOES IT e 7” re d
will be more than 100 hours flying shows at a salary between $2,000 ma a i aed at Entitled, : | @
so it is likely to be £13,000. and $3,000 for each performance, yg hon mente © Population of WORK?" the books contain 16 c

—L.E.S.

iStitiisisdeiseaseeis

SSTStSTSSSSSsSSSe se

THE

“Stamina, strength and



—Reuter.









brightly-coloured pages. —INS

““ Beauty, you lifted

up my sleeping eyes, 4

And filled my heart

with longing with a look.”’
JOHN MASEFIELD

Like a happy memory, the haunting











Sizes 13 to 3

at 66c. per pair

FOLDER PRAMS

At prices ranging

PUSH CHAIRS

Suitable for children or Ladies with small feet

Of interest to young mothers is the arrival of :

Special Bargain Offer }Â¥
LADIES’ SUEDETTE SANDALS’ ;

from $27.52 to $72.00 each. §

Beduce Wear

swith

“FLEXO”

OF 80 PAGES OF FIRST

BRISTOL, ENGLAND.



ae PR AC EG LS CECT











At $14.59 and $11.30 each. 4 t Treatment
appearance—all outstanding” aq ; tt gee eee t tme
: 7 the English countryside to dos |
—— say Motorists and Tyre Suppliers alike. :
, ‘ PP | N Originally made by Potter & Moore NIBS CHARIOTS
¢ tread rubber is ye Wider, flatter treat |
tougher, more shock- area grips more road At $10.55 each.
Teefaclag than ever ip sare seca and | dred years ago Mitcham Lavender Ne sn° Shi wee t
; . years more slowly } A i§ e "
. Maket Tecan % Handsome buttressed has ever since been dedicated to e g »

with its new Stop. *idewalls provide pro- Beauty the World over.

than you've ever}

skid throughout the i

t tyre’s longer life.
INSIST ON GOODYEAR TUBES

You cam twat q
| _GOOD“YEAR

i" THE LONG*LIRE HARDEST.

>
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; 1g

Notches for quicker, ‘ction from kerb Housewives, Housekeepers and Hoteliers |

: caer srope—S'resss damage, and make | f : r Recently Received
every direction of cornering steadier } ce Please note the arrival of:

known,



ovegtr tite
din tak, val ws # va?
WORCH AM LAVENDER
oe ese

LAVENDER WATER
TALCUM POWDER
TOILET SOAP
SHAVING SOAP
BRILLIANTINE
FROZEN BRILLIANTINE
AFTER-SHAVE LOTION



“FEATHER PILLOWS” |}

At $2.90 and $3.58 each



CENTRAL FOUNDRY Ltd.

Phone 4302

|
in their Mitcham Distillery two hun-
}
|

WEARING TYRE



THE CITY
TRADING CO.



GARAGE
LTD.





%5$006$606066006056644

30OKER’S DRUG STORES SSOSSOOOSSSSOSTSD

‘



Ss)







SOOOCOOOL LEE LLLP
























369
a Se % : 3
%
Â¥ SURVEYING AND LEVELLING FOR BUILDERS >
‘ *. or . A . ~ os
WELL 4 BE A TADPOE'S Upstairs Over Newsam & Co., Lower Broad St. 1X peated keeminimebaras po git nage x
GRANNYS: hs LOOMS. Ge r AFTERNOON, COCKTAIL AND EVENI ES 1S Design and Construction of FORMWORK ‘for Concrete Struc- z
, YOON, C ND EVENING ISSES {}\|} tures
CROWD POORING INTO BIFF BONGS. . De \ CONCRETE PRODUCTS AND CAST STONE. .
JACQMAR SQUARES AND SCARVES | CONCRETE (SURFACE FINISHES, RENDERINGS AND
- ie = 8 SRRAZZ cone
Hours: 8.30 to 3.30 Monday to Friday % We con alee accept any orders for any technical books
require
8.30 to 11.30 Saturday *
i ROBERTS & Co. ae Dial 3301 3
re _ 7”













1S THAT THE ADVOCATES Sats
D ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT ?, ,
THIS IS MISTER BIFF BONG
SPEAKING. LOOKS
‘DO ME A FAVOUR, WIL
yuu 2






—- .
YEs, THis is Tre
ADVERTISING 4

YW DEPARTMENT, 4
ADVOCATE





a)

\

wAN
LK

IS THERE ANY CHANCE FOR A GUY
LIKE ME 10 SECORE ADVERTISING

LS
a



x
‘S




a





|
|









gest RECEIVED ....

TABLE & BEDSIDE LAMPS

PRE-WAR QUALITY and PRE-WAR PRICES

Colours:

OLD IVORY, RESIDA GREEN, CHAMPAGNE,
TURQUOISE, PIGEON BLUE, SUBDUED ROSE,
PALE MAUVE, MOTHER-OF-PEARL

| AT OUR SHOWROOMS IN TWEEDSIDE ROAD

HEY 77 ..weer

MLL BE Ace a












WAY YOU GDYS
HANDLED THAT
AD FOR MISTER
BIFF BONG
GIMME A
JOB LIKE



————$—<—=


















WHAT 1S THISP ISITA
DOGGONE INVASION,OR
ar? ,




















s 2 IS THAT THE
ADVERTISING
DEPARTMENT ? .)#







oes ()








WHEN YOU ADVERTISE 7 |








INTHE ADVOCATE ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LIMITED
ee MISTER *BING BANG AR Tweedside Road St. Michael





OUR NEWSPAPER HAS A

ny)




say F wat DID YOU
GUYS POT INTO THAT
ADVERTISEMENT ABOUT ME ?
THAT ) HAD DISCOVERED A
SECRET WEAPON OR SOMETHING
WY, TOE PLACE 15 LOUSY wit
JAPS, CBINKS, /AEXICANS, AND

MAY GE- A KOREAN OR TWO ToaRown
WW §

Phone 4629 & 4371
























Cani— (
ANDERDON —

Shell is proud to have played a leading part for fifty years in the
progress and development of internal combustion engines on land, on
sea and in the air. Shell research has had much to do with the
perfecting of the modern jet engine. For the Comet today, for the

horseless carriage of yesterday, it has been true to say ....

you can be sure of

a



BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

HELLO*HELLO «LILY «WHO IS THIS?
WHO? WELL # THIS 1S UNCLE
DAVE«1'M AT THE coe








;
:



PAGE TWELVE



CLASSIFIED ADS.|

—

*

TELEPHONE 2508



THANKS
BECKLES.We the undersigned beg
through this medium to thank all those
who . ent us wreaths, cards, letters or
in any other way expressed theit sym-

in our recent bereave-
the death of Winston

twife', John Beckles
(brother), Winston, Irvine, Orrie Beckles
(chfidren), Clancy Banfield, Meene Luke
and 116 grand-chiiarenr 14.1.51—in

pathy with us.

ment, caused bs

Beckles
Jeme Beckles





HAYNES—We beg io thank those who
attended the funeral and expressed
their rympathy in the sad bereave-
ment of our dear mother Mrs. Albertha
Haynes who was called to rest on
December 29th 1950, may she rest in
peace ever to be remembered by her

Sincere Children and Grand-children.

14,1,51—In.

iN MEMORIAM

WELLIE—In loving memory of Willie
who died the 13th of January 1947,
Four years have rolled away
Some may see a smile
But memories never fade
She will alwaye be remembered by
Hilda Archer, Brittons Hill,

14,1.51—I1n,
a
REFRVFS—In loving
dearly beloved mother Mrs. Patier
Reeves, who died on the 15th Janus
1950, age & ye of St. Stephen
Black Rock, former!y of near Cocoanut
Hall, St. Lucey.
Tis sweet to think we'll meet again
When partings are no more;
Ana that the one, we loved so well,
Has onk/ gone before
By her loving on Fred A. Bowen of
Station Hill, St, Micheel, and family.
14,1,51—1r

FOR SALE









memory of our











CAR Humber 21
hire, Exce condition. C
Friendship's Plantation, St. Amdrew.
Phone Edwards 2635 or Walks 3876.

12.1,61—Bn.

H.P. Suitable for
Edwards,



CARS.--One Morris Oxford 1949 (0.6)
done 15,500 miles. One Standard Vanguard
(0.22) cone 130060 miles. Both cars in
good condition. Can be seen at St
Joseph Rectory or in Bri
appointment Apply: Rew Ly,
Mallslieu, St. Joseph Rectory.

12.1,51—-3n

CAR 17 V-# Ford Sedan, Owner
Driven, and in exeellent condition, FORT
ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Phone 4504,

7.1.51—6n.

CAR Renault Sedan in good working
order, new Battery, Tyre) in — excellent
condition. M. C, M. Hunte — Room 311.
Plantations Building. Phone oF: aut

51—Iin.








CAR—AUSTIN A.40. Offers in writing
ill be received up to Monday 15th
at 4 p.m. for the above damaged car
which can be seen at Dear's Garage,
Roebuck Street. James A. Lynch & Co.,
Lid. P.0.B. 140, Bridgetown,

11,1,51—4n.

TRUCKS—Two Dodge Trucks 39 and
40 model in good — workin, order.
Apply: the Manager, Ridge Plantation,
Christ Church, or Phone 2605.

13.1,51—6n.

TRUCK— One (1) Ford V-8 truck in
good order. Apply the Manager St.
Nicholas Plantation, St. Peter.

13.1,51—2n



ELECTRICAL

RECEIVED: A
Plectric Lighting
1432 Volts 9
Cole & Co., Lid,

~ Te ee
-— Two (2) Mahogany

FURNITURE
Morris Chairs with cushions practically
new. Phone—2320, 13,1,51,—2n,

RALPH BEARD offers Large Painted
Preeses $50.00 each. Strong Painted
Chairs §5.00 each. Painted Dressing
Tables $25.00 each. 3 ft. 6 ins, Vono
Springs complete with bed-ends $35.00.

Unpainted Kitchen Tables $8.00 each,
Unpainted Rush Chairs $4.50 each, Wash-
stands from $8.00 upwards. Also a large
“satiety of New Mahogany Furniture view-
ing without obligation at Ralph Beard’s
Furnishing Show Room, Hardwood Alley.
Dial 4683. 9,1.51—5n.

LIVES'TOCK

COW-—Guernsey and Ayshire Cow, to
Calf within a week. Last Calf gave
30 =opints. Apply: Miss M. Prince,
Satinders Dairy, Upper Collymore Rock,
St. Michael. 13.1,51—2n.

MISCELLANEOUS

shipment of Petrol-
and Charging plants
amps. Price $250.00

13,1,51—6n.













ANTIQUES — Of every 4d
Glass, China, old Jewels, fine
Watercolours. Early books, Maps. Auto-
graphs etc. at Gorringes Antique Shop
adjoining Royal Yacht HP

tion
liver

50—t.f.n.



a
PED ointment for foot in-

f 8, especially ATHLETES FOOT.
It's good. Try it. Knight's ae pie
1.51—2n

he ieee setcnentcirecnienenmanenainnmnaseannis

AMM-I-DENT TOOTH POWDER—This
eaties control aid, supplies for many
sours the ammonium ion which has
been found lacking in cavity-suscep-
tible individuals. Caries Means TOOTH
DECAY.

Amm-i-dent is made up of small
particles that are dissolved between the
teeth hours after just washing out the
mouth with this solution after meals.

Tt can be obtained from any Drug
Store. 10,1.51—7n,

BLANKETS—Cold Proof Blankets in
colours. From 245 upwards, Get one
for to-morrow nite and enjoy its warmth.
Stanway Store, Lucas Street. Dial 4910.

14.1,51—2n.





CAPS Plastic
Vvaatidus patterns,
Modern Dress Shoppe.

“FUR COAT—Hailf length modern
at Nutria Coat in new condition,
4885" 12.1.51—3n.

KROPP LONG HANDLE RAZORS-—
Always give a sharp, smooth shave,
no drag or pull, makes shaving
pleasure instead of a bore. Knight’
Drug Stores. 13.1.61-—

— _______. fe

MOTOR LAUNCH-—22 ft. long, with
e “Brite Marine Engine. Named “Res”
Apply K. Corbin c/o B’dos Turf Club,
_

PLASTIC APRONS—96c. each, Modern
Dres: Shoppe. 14,1,51—6n,

enn nce
PERMANENT needles for your record
player, and needles of all kinds. Price
$108. Records of all kinds too. A.
& CO., LTD. 22.12.50—t.f.n.

POLAROID SHADES are quite dif
ferent from ordinary sun glasses. They
are a scientific optical product. They
imvprove vision and colour. They con-
tol reflected glare. They are expensive
but good. Get a pair to-day. Knight's
Drug Stores. 13.1,51—2n,

POTATOES—100 Ib, bags at 7%e.
50 lb. bags at 8c. 25 Ib, bags at 9c.
13,1,51—2n,

Shower
72a,

Caps, In
each, The
14.1,51—6n

















SHIRTS—Shark Skin



and Gabardine

Shirts in white long sleeves. Only «
limited number in medium sizes, Stan-
way Store, Lucas Street, Dial 4910.

14,1.51—2n

SAFE—One Lérge Fire-Proof Safe in
perfect condition. Dimensions inside
3 feet wide by 5 feet high. Apply
R. 8. Nicholls & Co., Telephone No.3925.

4,1,50—t.f.n.





SUIT-LENGTHS—In Grey Pin Stripe
$8.95 per length of 3% yards take a hint
brother, you'll never get it at this price

again, And what t more Ill furnis
a pair of pants for little over a &
14.1,51
ee eed
STOCKINGS—Kayser 51 gauge Denier
Nvlon | Stockings. Lovely Shades. Ali
sizes $2.14 per pair. Modern Dress
Shoppe. 14,1,51—6n.
an ESSE
TABLECLOTHS—Plastic Large Table-
olothe-—Pretty Patterns 60 x 60 $3.24
each, The Modern Dress Shoppe
14,1.51—6n



Herbert. Phone 8385. 12.1.51—6n
| “HILLSIDE —Bathsheba, fully _furn-
ished, water and lights. From March
$50 per month. Apply: Rev. L. C






















































































HOUSES
ASHTON -— On-sea, Maxwell, Christ
Church. Fully furnished, containing 4

Bedrooms, Verandah over looking the
ea and all modern conveniences. Dial
3607 13.1,51—5n.



DIAMONDVILLE — On-sen. Pully
furnished, 3 bedrooms, drawing Py
dining room. For dial :

13.1,51—2n.

—_ KK
ESPERANZA-—Fully furnished, with
modern conveniences. On St, James

Sea Coast. Phone 91-33.
10.1.51-—9n.

FLAT — At Sea View, Upper Bay St.
opposite Bay Mansion, From Ist January,







apply on
8.12.50—t.f.n.
FARAWAY—St. Philip, on
Bay, 3 bedrooms, W: mill
supply,



g plant, Car’ port,
vant fooms. Dial 4476.
17.9.50—t.f.n

HEATHFIELD—The Crane, furnished
from January 15th. Apply: Mrs. A. D







Mallalieu, St. Joseph Rectory.
12.1.51—3n

ILFRACOMBE—On-sea, Maxwell Coast,
e.cellent sem-bathing, fully furnished,
‘our bedrooms upstairs overlooking
the sea, From the Ist February. Phone
8286, A. N, Chaderton, Maxwell Coast.

12,1,51—2n,

ed

LARGE COOL ROOM—Running water,
furnished or unfw . Apply Trela-
why, annex third house from St. Matthias
Gap, on the iand side. 14.1.51-—-1n

NEWHAVEN—Crane Coast,

tient “Boube criae 3











rooms.

Dial 4476 17.9.50—t.f.n,
OFFICE — Medium size Office with
breakfast room. airy with seven
windows. Top Floor of Slinger & Co.
Ltd. Bolton Lane and Swan Strect.
Dial 4582 or 3637. 13.1.51—2n.

-_——

oadienpaisinaninteantnntanenttinstsinaiaiititie

ROOM — Unfurnished and Garage.
Residential area, A little over 3 miles
from town. Apply: X.%. ¢/o Advocate
Sa, 10.1,51-—%n.

Alene

SMALL ROOM-—On the ground floor
of the Mayfair Gift Shop, Aquatic Club.
Apply to the Secretary, Mayfair Gift
Shop. 11,1,61—3n.





RAYLSTONE—Brownes Gap. Hastings
Lounge, Dining and Drawing Rooms.
4 Bedrooms etc. Double’ Garage, 2
Servants’ Room, Tennis Court, Tele-
phone 4258 or 95-213, 13,1,51—2n.





WINSLOW—Cattlewash, for the months
of February to July. Appiy to. Mrs. W. 7.
Gooding, Strong Hope, St. Thomas.

7.1.51,—3n.



PURLIC SALES
AUCTION a
Onder The Diamond Rammer

I have be®n instructed by the Insur-
ance Company to sell by Public Auction
at the B'dos Taxi Co., on Wednesday
next the 17th January beginning at |
o'elock, One Austin Cur damaged in an
accident; and One Morris 8 with the
upholstery burnt.

Terms Cash. D'Arcy A. Scott,
tloneer,









Auc-
13,1,61,—4n,



UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions recetved from the
Insurance Company, will sell on

Friday, January 19th at Alleyne Arthur’s
Garage, next to Fort Royal Garage,
St. Michael’s Row (1) 1950 A—40
Austin Car, done 1,600 miles,
Damaged in a lent. Sale at 2 p.m,
Terms Cash.

VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer.
14, ),51—4n,

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON TUESDAY 16th by order of Mrs.
M. Roach we will sell the stock in
Trade and Fittings of the General Store

112 Roebuck Street o

omprising
Glass Cases and Show Cases, Shelving,



Counters, Desk, Tables, Scales and
Weights; Carrier Bicycle, Glas; Ware,
Saucepans, Combs, Books
Rubber Balls, Lamps, Kite Paper,
Jams, Marmalades, Toilet , Potted
eat, Sweets, Paper Bags, Hot Plate;
Bicycle Tyres, Saddles, Rims, Lamps,

&c., &c., all parts for a Bicycle and
many other items,

Sales 12 o'clock. Terms strictly cash.
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers,
12.1.51—2n,

lee
BUILDING SITE—Navy Gardens, 14000
square feet. Only spot obtainable in
this area. Ideally situated, facing the
East. Enclosed on three sides. Going
at a reasonable price, Dial 4582 or 8493.
13,1,51—2n.

C THEM — THEN C ME AND U
WILL SEE BARGAINS AT YOUR
BECK! Imagine a Bungalow Type in
Belleville, 3 Spacious Bedrooms with
Basins, Excellent Condition, Well Laid
Out, Going for Under £1,900; A 3
Bedroom (2 Large, one with Basin)
at Thornbury Hill, Very Good Condi-
tion, Modern Conveniences, cious
Yard enclosed with Stone, ant,
Going for under £900; A 3 Bedroom
Cottage by Lower Bank Hall Main Rd.,
Modern ‘onveniences, Spacious Yard,
Going for Under £1,200; A New 2 Bed-
room Stonewall Bungalow not far from
Rockley, Modern Conveniences, Going
for Under £1,700; A Two-Storey (Part
Stonewall) Near City, Good Location
and Condition, Suitable afso as a
Guest House, Large Yard, Going for
Under £4900; Three City Business &
ann bg Very Busy Area,
oing for er 3,000.
Is IT YOUR es A
CINCH? — A Furnished Unique and
ee eapee De Pree snnece Stone-
wal ngalow, most lew, Wide
San Beach, Fine

Exclusive Area at St. James, over
‘4 Acre, Going Indeed Reasonable
Building Sites — Seaside and Elsewhere.
Re-Sale Values Assured. jes
Arranged Tt am He! — A ‘Trained
Auctioneer and Yes How Wise it is tc
let Me Sell Your Household, Furniture,
Bte., at Auction, Pi
de Abreu for Nearly
Estate. If I CAN'T,
Kindly Call at Olive



a WILL?
Bough, Hahtings?





DeSIRABLE Dwelling house called

“BREEZELEY" standing on approxi-
perches of land at

mately 1 rood 30
Maxwell Coast

house contains open Verandah,
Draw: room, Dining room, Breakfa:
room, hen, Three bedrooms wi

dressing room: and running water,
downstairs.

downstairs. Electricity throughout.

Three servants’ room and conveniences

in yard. Garage for two cars,

The above property will be set up

for sale by Public competition at our

Office James Street on Friday 19?
January 1951 at 2 p.m.

Inspection by appointment, Dial 8229.

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitor
7.1.51—lin,

__
THE undersigned will set up for sale
by public Competition at their office
Roebuck Street, Bridgetown, on Fri-
day the 19th instant at 2 p.m.
EVANTON
With the land thereto belonging
taining 19,312 square feet,
Top Rock, Christ Church.
The dwellinghouse comprises three
bedrooms with large built-in cupboards,
spacious lounge, dining room, and mod-

con-
situate at

ern kitchen, together with two tiled
toilets and baths. Servant rooms and
Sarage. The property commands a mag.

rifleent view
For further particulars, inspection
and Conditions of Sale, Apply to R. 8
Nicholis & Co., Telephone 3925.
6.1.51—0n.
4

GcsM
Swedish

your home by spect.
Wiggins and Nurse Forde, associates.

wantep | SHIPPING NOTICES _"vcationat _

ee —
A STENOGRAPHER AND TYPIST—



Avety by letter to Cottle, Catford & Co.
0. .

High Street, Bridgetown.

12.1.51—2n.
L—Apply to Mrs. Lisle

COOK GENERA:
Batley D. Pavillion, Hastings.

13,.1.51.—3n.



Salary $100.00 per month to-

with free quarters in flat over

Club House, containing two bedrooms,

living room, closed verandah ete. also

free light, water and taxes. Knowledge
of Golf > advantage,

Apply only, forwarding re-

ferences, to — ‘The Secretary, Golf Club,

Rockley. ‘9.1.51—t-t.n-

WANTED AT ONCE
At the Barbados Dye and Laungry
Works, Pressers for Hoffman machines
only those who can press need apply.
14.1.61——2n.

MISCELLANEOUS

WANTED TO BUY
HOUSE—3 bedroom house in residential
area. Write Box D.D. c/o Apes .

HOUSE,—Unfurnished house or fiat
from Ist March, Five or six bedrooms. On
Bus route near City. Write stating rent
to J. R. Kirton, c/o Belgownie Guest
House, St. Mary's Street, Antigua.

7.1 51—4n.

OLD GOLD of every description.
Highest price paid. ALFONSO B. DE
LIMA & CO., Me Gregor and Broad
Street. 9.1.51—én.

ameitatinsentinimattetnnmsnsinins
PUPIL ASSISTANT wanted by the
Cathedral Organist. Must be C of &
communicant, Apply by letter to G.
Hudson, “Pendle”, Pine Hill,
10.1.51—2n.

URGENT—Up to 6 Evenflo Baby
Bottles plain or Pyrex. Phone 2654,
Between the hours of @~-12 a.m. ana













3—6 p.m. 13.1.51—2n.
WANTED TO
BUNG. ‘—2 or 3
bedrooms in resi area. Rent
reasonable. Phone of P.O. Box 52.
13.1.51—3n.
LOST



From a Jeweller Shop in Broad Strect
where they were left to be cleaned
2 old Silver Necklaces and one Locket
of sentimental value to the owner.
Anyone giving information or returning
same will be suitably rewarded, Phone
6329, Mrs. Mahon-Greer.





13.1.51—2n,
WATCH—Gold Elgin Watch (lady's)
on gold bow-shaped brooch. Rewarded
on return to Advocate Advertising
Department. 14.1,51—1n.
——_—_—_—

PUBLIC NOTIC

TO THE ELECTORS OF THE

PARISH OF ST. JAMES
We the undersigned, desire through
this medium to express our warmeit
thanks, and highest appreciation to the
Electors of St. James for the loyal sup
port given us in the recent Vestry Elec-
tion, We shall endeavour to do all in
our power to merit the confidence re-
posed in us, and to conserve to the
best interest of the Parish and its people
We desire to remain,
Yours faithfully,
JAMES M, CRICK
J. G. JOHNSON
E. S. A, HOLDER
C. B. SEARLES.
14,1,51.—1n





NOTICE
1 HEREBY beg to thank all the
Vestry’s Electors for the Parish of St.
Andrew who have so_ kindly voted for
me, and have returned me at the head
of the polls on election day, Monday

8th inst.
Mrs, E, V. ROCK,
Belleplaine,
St, Andrew.
14.1,61-—1tn.
_

CARLTON CLUB
NOTICE

are reminded that notice
of any motions for the Annual General
Meeting of the above Club must be
handed in to the Seeretary before the

" oa StC, HUTCHINSON,
Hony. Secretary.
11,1,51—2n.
—_———
PROFESSIONAL NOTICE OF
REMOVAL





BETTER SERVICE TO
PATIENTS.
This will serve to inform my patients

and patrons of my recent removal from

18 Roebuck St. to Pine Rd., near Ist

Aven,'e, Belleville, where I now reside
and practise.
dence and

commodation ia
coming from

bination of resi-

e country by the early

bus. I take this geporuunity to wish all
a ig healthy 1951.
D ‘M. H. WIGGINS, Ph.T. -H.,

M
(USA) GSI." (England)
HyStotempy Bletiethcraps” Diste
'y» TAapy etetics
and Botanicals for the treatment of dis-
eases of the nerves, lungs and joints,

Blood and Liver Sacer
Optic Atrophy ete. Rxternal and internsl
baths, (medicated a d mineral). Hours
8 a.m. to 12 noon, 2r.m_ to 6 pm. daily

except Saturday. Diul 4615. Treatment in
lal consideration. .t

7.1.51.—2n

PUBLIC SALES

REAL ESTATE
ON THE SEA







Sea, own private
bething beach. Good Yacht Anchorage.
Phone 91-50, 16.11.80-—-t.t"n,

_—_—

HOUSE—Tobago, Old Colonial House
renovated. Beautiful grounds, 3 acres
Central and secluded. One wing con-
verted, self contained flat. Freehold,
Good investment, $24,000.00. For photor
and further particulars apply: Wil:on
Welbeck, Tobago. 14.1,51—-1n,

TWO ROODS OF LAND situate at



Hothersal St, Michael, in

the
Een of a Mr. Springer as tenant

The above will be set up for fale at
iblic competition at our office in
Tisces Street, Bridgetown, on Friday
the 19th January 1951, at 2 p.m.
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Solicitors,
12,1,51—7n.
————$
PROPERTY-—One small property at
Road, It consists of 6,000 sq.
ft. of lund and a house which has
Gallery, Drawing and Dining rooms, 2
Bedrooms, Water-toilet and Shower,
Kitchen with water. Electricity
Apply to
Lane.



PROPERTY—One small property at
Hall's Road. It consist: of house with
water and light, shop and the land on
which it stands. Price Five hundred and
fifty pounds.

One small property at King’s Street.
It is a good house with Verandah, draw-
ing and dining rooms, 2 bedrooms, water
and light, together with the land, Price
$3,600.00

Apply to D’Arcy A. Scott. Magazine
Lane, Dial—3743. 13.1,51—2n.







Enterprise, Christ Church, suitable for
building one or more institutions because
of its immediate approach to the sea,
Also a fine area to be transformed into
@ residential colony by the introduction
of modern and up-to-date buildings.
Apply to C. F. Hackett c/o James A.
Tudor, Roebuck Street. arene, a
.1.51—3n.



PROPERTY—One property called Harts |Commissioner of Income Tax

Dale at White Park opposite the B'dos
Foundry, It consists of a stone and
wooden house which has Gallery, Draw-
ing and Dining rooms, three bedrooms
water-toilet and shower bath, together
with 5,567 sq, ft. of land.

Apply to D'Arcy A. Scott, Magazine

Lane. 13,1.51,—2n.
WOODEN BUILDING—Complete with
passage 20x7 and Kitchen 20x6, House

20x10, Situated at Four Square St. Philip
Apply to Milton Greenidge on premises
13.1, 51.—3n.






INCOME TAX NOTICE

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO,

Sailing from Amsterdam and Dover—

}
—— _—____—_—__-



The M.V. “Daerwcod” will ac-
\

|
M.S. “Bonaire” Sth. @th. January 1951. cept Cargo and Passengers for |
S.S. “Cottica” Ind. Srd. February 1951. St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenade

Sailing from Antwerp and Amseter- and Aruba Sailing on the 16%
dam—M.8. “Oranjestad” 6th. 19th. January 1961.

Jaruary 1950.

Sailing to Trinidad, Paramaribo and The M.V. “Caribbee” will ac- I
Georgetown—M.S. “Hersilia’’ 8th. Janu- cept Cargo and Passengers for 1
ary 1951. S.S. “Cottica” 20th. February Dominica, Antigua,

1961. Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of de-

Sailing to Trinidad La Guisra Curacao parture to be notified.












































Montserrat,
Etc —M.S. “Oranjestad” 2nd February an Gs
1951. R OWN-
Salling to Plymouth, Antwerp and B.W.I, SCHOO
M.S, “Willemstad” 23rd. ERS ASSOCIATION, Inc.
J 1951.
‘ Passenger Accommodation Telephone: 4047 |
available
S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.,.
Agents. = ————
Canadian National Steamships
TF Sails Sails _ Sails Arrives — Sails
Montreal Halifax Boston Barb» .os Larbados
“CAN, GER" — 3 Jan. _ 14 Jan. 15 Jan.
“LADY 4 -- 17 Jan. 19 Jan. 28 Jan. 29 Jan.
LADY La - 1Feb. 3 Feb. 12 Feb. 13 Feb
“CAN. CHALLENGER” _ 15 Pew. = 25 Feb. 25 Feb
“LADY ‘DNEY"" ~ 3 Mar. 5 Mar. 14 Mar. 15 Mar
. ¥ IN” _ 19 Mar. 21 Mar. 30 Mar. 31 Mar
“CAN. CHALLENGER” -~ 2 Apr. —, 12 Apr. 12 Apr
“LADY RODNEY” -_ 16 Apr. 18 Apr 27 Apr 27 Apr
NORTHBOUND Arri Bails Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax
“LADY IN" 14, Jan, 15th 25 Jan. 26 Jan —
“LADY RopNEY 10 Feb. 12 Feb. 21 Feb. 22 Feb. _
“LADY NELSON” 25 Feb. 27 Feb, & Mar. 9 Mar _
“LADY RODNEY" 27 Mar. 28 Mar. 6 Apr. 7 Apr _
“LADY NELSON” 12 Apr. 14 Apr. 23 Apr. -- 24 Apr
“LADY RODNEY” 10 May, 12 May. 21 May. _ 22 May

N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vesnels fitted with cold storage cham.
bers, Passenger Fares and freight iates on application to :—-

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.
GOVERNMENT NOTICES

(AMENDED)
PUBLIC LIBRARY

Applications are invited from persons, between the ages of 21
and 40 years, for training overseas in the work of a Librarian. Ap-
plicants should hold the minimum qualification of a recognised School
Certificate with credit in English and one other language. Preference
will be given to University Graduates.

2. The selected applicant will probably be required to take the
correspondence course offered by the Regional Library (British Coun-
cil from January to June 1951 leading to the Entrance Examination
of the Library Association, and may subsequently be required to
attend a recognised Library School in the United Kingdom for a
period of one year commencing September, 1951 in order to qualify
as a Chartered Librarian,

3. It is intended that the selected candidate should be attached
to the staff of the Library in the first instance and be appointed sub-
stantive Librarian when the Office becomes vacant in April, 1953,
provided the course in Library training is satisfactorily completed.

4. Applications should be submitted to the Colonial Secretary
not later than the 24th of January. Further information will be sup-
plied on application to the Secretariat.
13th January, 1951.



LTD. — Agents






14.1.51—3n.



APPOINTMENT OF STOREROOM CLERK (FEMALE), MAIN
KITCHEN, GENERAL HOSPITAL
Applications are invited for the non-pensionable post of Store-
room Clerk (Female), Main Kitchen, General Hospital, at a salary
of $480, rising by annual increments of $48, to $1,200 per annum,
Applicants should not be over 40 years of age. should have at-
tained a satisfactory standard of education, and should have had
some experience in house-keepiiig duties on a large scale.
Applications on forms obtainable from the Secretary, General Hos-

pital, should be forwarded to him fot later than 24th January, 1951.
llth January, 1951,







14,1,.51—3n,
By
Lieut,-Col. J. Connell, O.B.E., E.D.,
* weno Tea
Issue No. 2. ee eee 12 Jan. 51

eae
ranks will parade at Regiments! Headquarters at 1700 hours on Thursday,
ear 51. Gompanies will be at tie aapoeal of Coy Commanders, â„¢

sate Practice parades will be held on Monday 15, Wednesday 17, and Thursday
SPRrEts OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING

Orderly Officer . Lieut. E, R. Goddard
384 L/S Laurie, C, K.

Orderly Serjeant
Next ee eee
erly cer Lieut, 8S. G, Lashley
Orderly Serjeant 278 L/S Wintame, Ss. D.
L. A. CHASE, Major,
Adjutant, (Ag.),
The Barbados Regiment.

SERIAL NO. 2
SHEET 1.

2

PART ii ORDERS
T BARBADOS REGIMENT
itn JANUARY, 1951

1. STRENGTH INCREASE
582 Pte Taylor, J. Bn HQ

STRENGTH DECREASE—Resigna‘
383 Pte Richardson, J, oa





” Coy
393. ,, Bushelle, W. D. “A” Coy
305 ,, Worrell, K. N. eS
Dismissals

262 Morris, T.

2. PROMOTIONS
206 cans Ishmael, A, F.
326 L/C Proute, A. O

$12 Pte Chase, V. { a
= i Roach, I. A.
§ ” ‘aylor, J.
Signal Instructor on the Permanent
Staff wef 1 Jan 51.
L. A. CHASE, Major,
Adjutant, (Ag.),
The Barbados Regiment.







————








BE WISE... . ADVERTISE 10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Latest Motor Car Models in
DINKEY TOYS—ali
Rubber Tyres.

Sheet Plastic for Lamp
Shades



|



with



|

Notice is hereby given that)

Income Tax returns are required!
from every married man whose;
income is $1,200.00 per annum ov}
over, from every other person |
whose income is
annum or over and from com-/%
Panies whether incorporated or x
unincorporgted, societies, persons
engaged in any trade or pro.
fession, and owners of land of |§
property whether a taxable jin
come has accrued during the past!
year or not. |

|
Forms of Return may be o 1%
tained from the Income Tax Dee |
partment AFTER THE 1ST DAY! %
OF JANUARY, 1951, and the
forms duly filled in must be
delivered to me on or before the
ere respective dates:
. eturns of persons whose
books were closed on the
3Ist day of December, 1950
on or before the 31st day
of: March, 1951.
Returns of persons whose
principal place of business
is not situate in the island
on or before the 30th of
June, 1951.
3. Returns of all other persons,
on or before the 31st Jan-
uary 1951.

F. A. C. CLAIRMONTE,

AT
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and
HARDWARE

$720.00 per |~

NOTICE

1. Tenders are invited for
the exclusive right to sell
liquors, lunches and teas at
Kensington Oval during the
Barbados - Trinidad Tour
(approximately from Feb-
Tuary 12th to 27th).

Tenders are required to
submit price lists for drinks
and lunches as well as pro-
posed menus of the lunches.
Should prices for the Asso-
ciation differ from those for
the general public these
must also be submitted.

2. Tenders are also in-
vited for the transportation
of the Trinidad players from
the Hotel to the Oval and
back during the Tourna-
ment,

3. Tenders must reach the
Honorary Secretary at C. F.
Harrison’s Office not later

LAPS



cw 4 p.m. on Monday,

: anuary 22nd.

and Death Duties.

' 4. The Association does

Note:—Any person failing to not bind itself to accept
make his return within the lowest or any Tender. %}
the due date will be liable x
to a fine not exceeding emer ee %
£100 and not less than £2 W. F. HOYOS oe
and will be prosecuted Honorary Secretary, ©
unless a satisfactory rea- mig * 1.51 ce x
son is given a se cap &

*
s
oS or * POSSESS OSSSSSSSSS =

6.1.51—8n



will begin on Tuesdey the 16th January.
1961,
be in

SUNDAY,

HARRISON COLLEGE

The

MODERN HIGH
SCHOOL

next term ut Harrison College
at 930 a.m., and the school will
session for the entire day.
S.C. CORBIN,
Acting Secretary, Governing Body,
Harrison College.

Department of Education, 2



begin on Tuesday the 16th January, 1951,

$th Januery, 1851

(Registered, approved
and recommended to the
O. & C. Examinations
Board by the Dept. of
Education).

11.1.51—2n.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE

The next term at Queen’s College will



and the School will be in session fron

DeGfartment of Education,



Our building pro-
gramme has now been
dompleted and we are
prepared to accept a
few more new pupils on
Monday, 15th January,
at %30 a.m. School re-

5 CORBIN,
Acting Secretary, Governing Body,
Queen’s College.

Sth January, 1951.

11.1.51—2n.
MALVERN ACADEMY
EDENVILLE, CHEAPSIDE

This school will re-open on Tuesday

16th January at 930 a.m. New pupils opens next day.
a be interviewed on Monday 15th at acetate
9. a.m,
i ee. Entrance Fee $1.50
10.1.51—2n.

—————— L. A. LYNCH
LYNCH’S SECONDARY Principal.
SCHOOL
SPRY STREET PLCC IOCCOO DOO.



Next Term begins om Monday, 15th
January, 1951
A. MeD. Lae ner
Headina: A Ld
cera. ( Just What I Wanted!

THE HOYTE’S PREPARATORY

That is what nearly

SCHOOL. every Housewife says
sory bie gua, Led 5
Next Term be J 15.
aecommodation for 9%-year-old children PZ, fa nateste
and over. yop and mathematics
tional, Apply Mrs. Ruby. “Gwen- complete with Flints.... 44c. each
ville”, Black Rock, St. Mi . cytra Flints ............ Ode. each
7.1.51,—3n. GET ONE TO.DAY .

Attested and taken on strength wef
1 Jan 51.
Permitted to resign from the Regi-
) ment wef 30 Dec 50,
* Dismissed from the Regiment for non-
attendance at parades.
Promoted to CSM wef 12 Jan 51.
; Promoted to Cpl. wef 12 Jan 51,
we Promoted to L/C wef 12 Jan 51,
Bn ‘HQ Promoted to L/Sit and appointed



Wanted to Purchase
COMFORTABLE HOME

That you pay nothing to
% join; that there are no






Osmand’s Schoal

PRITTONS HILL LAYNE’S GAP
The School will re-open on

Wednesday 17th January. New

pupils will be accepted on

16th When parents can interview

the Principal. .% ,
Principal.



BAND CONCERT





vs.
By kind permission of TRINIDAD

Colonel . Michelin, . Capt At
Raison and the Police Band KENSINGTON OVAL
will give a an oa :
Hastings Rocks on Monday, FIRST MATCH
22nd January, at 8 p.m.

eae February 15, 16, 17,

ADMISSION 1/- 19 & 20

unas oe
omnes In

Plans of seating accom-
modation will be opened
at Harrison’s Office on
Monday, January 15th to
members of the Associa-
tion who may also pur-
chase two additional
season tickets. The plans
will be opened to the
General Public on Mon-
day, January 22nd_for



Proceeds in Aid of
St. Matthias’ Church Funds,



with three bedrooms, living
and dining rooms, good
kitchen and bathroom, ser-
vant’s quarters, garage, elcc-
tricity water and phone, on
about half acre of garden,
Please give full particulars



and price. the sale of SEASON
S.K,, TICKETS.
C/o, Barbados Advocate.
Prices of Admission :
6:$9$99096605099909 CHALLENOR STAND
$1.20 pee dag or $10.00
Season Ticket

IT IS TRUE

Levies nor assessments, to
pay; that you get Bigger
Bonus & Better Benefits and
that anybody is paid sixty
cents (60) c. for every mem-
ber mace any day at

The “SELF-HELP &

THRIFT” Friendly Society,
47 Swan Street, (over Bata

240. per day or Half-price
after Tea

Car-Park Available at 1/-
per day
N.B.—No PASSES will be

Â¥ THE BARBADOS CRICKET
2 ny Sherer ASSOCIATION INC.
Open every day, ask for Ww. F. HOYOS
o hand bills Honorary Secretary.

WHEN YOU REQUIRE GOOD RUM
SEE THAT YOU GET...

TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM
(

; With The “—— Flavour)
gw It is a favourite among the Best Brands.
e

Blender:

JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.









































JANUARY H, 1951



ORIENTAL
GOoOonpDs!
From INDIA, CHINA,
EGYPT!

Silk, Curios, Brassware,
Jewels, Linens, Ivory,
Teakwoed, Sandal,
French Perfumes, Bar-





bados Scarves in Pure
Silk, Ete., Etc.

The Souvenir Headquarters

THAN! KEros.

Pr: Wm, Henry 8t.—Dial 2406































































DIGNIFIED
SERVICE !!
e

For over thirty years the firm
of J. A, CORBIN & SONS, has
rendered you efficient and con-
scientious service, and if the re-
sults we achieve are any criterion,
we succeed. We are experienced
in taking care of all requirements
for. a funeral, no matter how
imple or elaborate. We ap-
vreciate the severe strain every
member of the family is under in
times of death and sorrow, and
realise that a funeral director
should relieve them of all the
burdens ible.

With the arrival of A NEW
MOTOR COACH, and with our
return to the old business site in
Belmont Road, we are fully pre-
pared to render you the services of
our long experience.

“ Silent Service”

J. A. CORBIN & SONS

FUNERAL DIRECTORS
BELMONT ROAD PHONE 3848


























|

SS ee



REAL ESTATE
JOHN |

M4.
BLABON

AF.S., F.V.A.
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE

“ROCK DUNDO"'—Cave Hill. A
well maintained and productive
Estate of some 32 acres in a very
lovely position 2 miles from City.
The house is worthy of speciai
notice and posiesses great charm.
Tts general condition is excellent
end there is spacious accommo-
dation.

“SUNSET HOUSE” — Prospect,
St. James. Bungalow with wide
gea frontage and good boat an- |
chorage. 3 bedrooms, lounge, |
separate dining com, verandah
3 sides, garage and paved court-
yard and pleasant garden. Sound |
buy at £3,150. |







“CRANE VILLA" — Modern |
stone-built 2-storey property with
approx. 3% acres bounded by
Crane Hotel driveway. Converted
into 2 large self contained apart- |
ments. lent investment
property with good sea bathing. |
Offers invited. '

“KINGSLEY"—Top Rock. Very
attractively designed bungalow
with L-shaped dining room and
lounge, 3 bedrooms, modern
kitchen and garage. Well recom-
mended.

“BON ACCUIL” — Pine Hill.
Large well built residence in the
higher part of this select area.
Accommodation comprises large
reception rooms and veranda’ .
study, 3 large bedrooms, 2 gar-
ages and outbuildings; Pleasant
lawns and gardens with tennis
court. Grounds approx. 4% acres.
Offered at attractive figure.

“CASABLANCA” — Maxwell's
Coast. A beautiful property em-
bodying the finest pre-war work-
manship and well planned with 2
reception, 5 large bedrooms, ver-
andah, kitchen, pantry, garage,



rooms etc. The land is
®pprox. 2 acres with flower and
vegetable gardens, productive

erehard and coconut grove. 1
acre walled garden may be sold
separately as building site.

“VILLA ROSA" — Passage
Road, City. Attractive and cen-
trally located stone bungalow

with double car! leway. Approx
14,000 sq. ft. This well built
property contains a front gallery,
jarge lounge, separate dining
room, 3 large bedrooms, toilet,
pantry and kitchen. Good court-
yard at rear.

“DEANE HOLLOW” — St, Lucy.
Pleasant country home of stone
with shingle roof containing ?
bedrooms, living and = dining
rooms, kitchen, servants’. quarters,
2 garage and storerooms, 2)
fertile acres, option further 2% |
acres. Offers considered. |

COASTLAND, St, James — %
acres of excellent building land
with sea frontage which may be
sold in half acre lots if required

REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

PLANTATIONS BUILDING
Phone 4640

AUCTION SALE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY %,
1951, 11,30 a.m.

at

LAS CAMPANAS

We have been instructed by the
owner, Mrs. James Smith, to sell
ty Auction the entire furniture
and contents of “Las Campanas”
which is located in a cul-de-sac
off road opposite the Hotel Reval.

Oak Dining Table and 8 Chairs,
Oak China Cabinet, Oak Sideboard,
Oak Tip-top Table, Small Glass
Tip-top Table, Upholstered Arm
Chairs, Metal Standard Lamps,
Suite of Wicker Furniture (Sofa,
Rockers, Armchairs,) Small Ma-
hogany Occasional Tables, Re-
volving Mahogany Bookcase, Piano
{John Brinsmead & Son) 2
Mahogany Plant Stools, Indian
Brass Tray & Table, Oak Writing |
Desk with Book-case attached,
Table Lamps, Two Indian Carpets
5 ft, x 10 ft. 6 ins.) and (10 ft
6 in x 10 ft. 6 ins.), Patterned
Carpet (10 ft, 2 ins x 7 ft. 5 ins.), |
Rugs and Mats, Collection 97
Pictures, Glass Candle Holders,
Assortment of Flower Vases, Ash-
trays, Singer Electric Portable
Sewing Machine (As new) G.E.C,
Radio 7 Tube and Mahogany ;
Radio Table, Single Wooden Bed»
end Mattresses, Mahogany Bedside
Tables, Shaving Mirror, Oak
Dressing Chests, Oak Dressing
Medicine Cabinet, Cane
Linen Basket, Electric Stove
“Jackson”, Refrigerator ‘“Cold-
rator”’, Electric Irons, lronimg
Board, Electric. Clock, Electric
Toaster, Electric Coffee Percolator,
Assorted Dinner, Salad, Soup
and Desert Plates, Vegetable
Dishes, Meat Dishes, Wine, Cock-
tail and Liqueur Glasies, Assort-
ment Glas; Tumblers, Fruit

, Relish Dishes, Tea Cups
and Saucers, Tea Plates, China |
Tea Pots, China Coffee Set, Salad
Bowl with servers, Pyrex Cas-
seroles, Small Pyrex Moulds,
Kitchen Utensils, Lawnmower,
Hose, Garden Tools, Collection of |
Books and General Miscellaneous |
Items including One Ladies
Bicycle.





The Radio, Fridge, Electric |
Cooker and many other article: |
are a little over three months
old.
Cash on fe of Hammer

AUCTIONEER }

John 14. Sladon

AFS., F.V.A.
Phone 4640, Plantations Building.






Spot



SUNDAY,



Programme

SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 1951
7 a.m. The



News, 7.10 a.m. News
Analy is, 7.15 a.m. From The Editorials,
7.25 am. Programme Parade, 7.30 am
English Magazir 8 am, Calling All
Forces, $ am. The News, 9.10 a.m. Home
News Prom Britain, 915 am. Close
Down 1.15 a.m Programme Parade.
11.30 a.m, Interlude, 11.30 a.m. Sunday

Service, 12 noon The News, 12.10 pm.
News Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Close Down,
4.15 p.m. Murie Magazine, 4.30 p.m. Sun-
day Half Hour, 5 p.m. Composer Of The
Week, 5.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, 6 p.m
From The Winter Proms, 645 p.m. Pro-
gramme Parade, 7 p.m. The News, 7.10
p.m. News Analysis. 7.15 p.m. Caribbean
Voices, 7.45 p.m. The Body of Christ, 8
p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m. Sunday
Service, 8.45 p.m. Composer of the week,
9 p.m. The Half Century, 10 p.m. The
News, 10.10 p.m. From the Editorials,
10.15 p.m. The Cathedral Organs, 10,30
pe London Forum, 11 p.m. Jan Smeter-
in
MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 1951

7 am, The News. 7.10 am. News Ana-
lysis. 7.15 am From the Editorials, 7.25
a.m. Programme Parade. 7.30 a.m. The
Seychelles, 7.45 a.m. Singing is so good
a thing 8 a.m. Let’s Make Music 8 45
a.m. The Debate Continues. 9 p.m. The
News, 9.10 a.m. Home News From Britain
9.15 a.m, Close Down 11.15 a.m. Pro-
gramme Parade. 11.30 a.m. Listeners’
Choice 11.45 a.m. Commonwealth Sur-
vey, 12 Noon The News. 12.10 p.m. News
Analysis 12.15 p.m, Close Down 4.15
p.m, Ray Martin and his Orchestra. 5
p.m. Composer of the Week. 5.15 p.m
The Storyteller. 5.35 p.m. Interlude. 5.45
p.m, Ivor Moreton and Dave Kaye. 6
p.m. Nights at the Opera. 6.45 p.m, Pro-
sramme Parade. 7 p.m. The News, 7 10
Pm. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m. Our
Mutual Friend. 7.45 p.m. The Seychelles.
8 pm Radio Newsreel. 8.15 p.m. Com-
monwealth Survey. 8.30 p.m. Singing {-
S0 good a thing. 8.45 p.m. Composer of
the Week; 9 p.m: BBC Concert Halli; 10
D.m, Phe New’; 16.10 p.ny, From the
Editorials; 10.15 p.m. Ray's a Laugh:
10.45 p.m. Science Review; 11 p.m. How
to Listen

i BOSTON
WRUL 15.29, Mc WRUW 11 75; Mec WRUX
17.75 Me

3 p.m. Lecture on Christian Science;
4.30 p.m. Christian Science Programme



HERITAGE OF BRITAIN

New| Monthly BBC Series

Beginning on Tuesday next the
BBC will broadcast a monthly
Series of programmes devised to
tell of Britain’s heritage. These
have been planned because the
coming Festival of Britain pro-
vides for many British people a
moment and an occasion to look
back and gather strength from
the past and to look forward to
the future. Some of Britain’s most
experienced producers and writers
have been given a free hand to
tackle the tremendous subject of
Britain’s great heritage in the way
that suits them best. The first pro-
gramme will be introduced by the
well-known farmer-broadcaste?
Ralph Wightman and is entitled
‘The Land—the Material Inheri-
tance.’ It will be broadcast on
Tuesday 16th. inst. at 10.15 p.m.

The Winter Proms

The Winter Promenade Concert
Season is now on in London—
from Jan, 8th. to 20th—and
listeners to the BBC’s G. O, S,
will hear broadcasts from some
of these performances including
a direct broadcast of the last night
of the ‘Proms’ from the Royal
Albert Hall. The BBC Symphony
Orchestra, with its conductor, Sir
Malcolm Sargent, will be heard in
all the broadcasts, and will have
Amy Shuard (soprano) as their
soloist for the last night. The ‘live’
broadcast on Saturday at 5.15 p.m,
will include the aria ‘Ritorna
Vincitor? from Verdi's ‘Aida
Strauss’s ‘Tales from the Vienna
Woods’ and, a tradition for the
last night of the ‘Proms,’
march, ‘Pomp and Circumstance.’
Recordings of the ‘Proms’ can be
heard on Sunday, 14th, inst., at
6.00 p.m., and on Friday, 19th.,
inst., at 4.15 p.m.

The First World War

The coming week's ‘Half-Cen-
tury’ programme, No, 2 in the
series of which we told you last
week will tel] of the fateful vears
from 1914 to 1918, The producer
is Francis Dillon, the only BBC
Features producer who actually
fought in the first World War.

Like all the programmes in this
series broadcast will be at 9.00
p.m., on Sunday, No. 2 being on
the 14th., inst.
Can We Do It?
We remind our readers that the









PRINTED

GET YOURS

. 6664
SOOO FOSS errr

PSPSPS ISOS

JANUARY 14,

S PERCALES and
‘ SEERSUCKER

These Washable Materials are suitable for .

DRESSES, HOUSE-COATS, GOWNS, PLAYSUITS
BATHING SUITS, BED SPREADS, Eic., Etc.,
At prices Ranging from 54c. to $1.44 per yard

Now

N. E. WILSON & Co.

he house, with the Big Hit of the Year

LOCO OO OOOO OFOOOOSOOON OS?

1951

HARVERT FEST:VAL TO-DAY

All Souls Church, Bank Hall will cele-
brate their Harvest Festival today. Cele-
bration begins at 6.00 a.m. with Matins
and Holy Eucharist (plain) followed b}
Solemn Eucharist and Sermon. At 3 p.m.
there will be Cantata in which loca:
artistes will take part Section B of thy
Police Band will also contrbute to yhe
programme. Th
The festival ends with Solemn Evensong
and Sermon preached by Fr. Cobhan
of St, Phillip's Church, New York City

METHODIST NOTICES

BETHEL; 11 am. Rev. E. J. Griffin
7 pm. Rev. B. Crosby,
DALKEITH: 11 am. Mr. G. Jones:

+ p.m. Mr. D. F. Griffith.
BELMONT: Harve't Festival Services;
ll am. Mr. P. Bruce; 3 p.m, Harves.
Cantata; 7 p.m. Rev. H. C. Payne.
SOUTH DISTRICT: 9 am. Mr. T
Callender; 7 p.m. Mr. L Blackman.
PROVIDENCE: 11 am. Covenant
Service; 7 p.m. Supply.
VAUXHALL: 9 a.m. Rev. B. Crosby

Holy Communion; 7 p.m. Mr. A, B

Curwen.

ST. CATHERINE EPISCOPAL CHURCB
DASH ROAD

11 am. Divine Worship, 3 p.m. Sun
day School, 7 p.m, Evensong and Sermon;

Preacher: — Evangelist A, Young

Celebrant;— Rev. C. Ishmael.

ST. PAUL'S

7.30 a.m. Holy Communion, 9.30 am
Solemn Mass and Sermon. Subject
“The object of Worship’ 3 pm
Sunday Senool and Children’s Service;
7 p.m. Solemn Evensong Sermon and
Procession. Subject: “The witness o:
the Church.”

JAMES STREET CHURCH NOTICES

JAMES STREET: 11 a.m. Rev. H. C
Payne; 7 p.m. Rev. R. Mc. Cullough.

PAYNES BAY: 9.30 a.m. Mrs. Phillips;
7 p.m. Mr. G. Sinchler

WHITE HALL; 9.30 a.m. Mr. G. Harper
Harvet Festival; 3 p.m. Chidren’s Ser-
vice; 7 p.m, Rev. E. Griffin Harvest

HOLETOWN: 8.30 a.m, Mr. G. Marville
7 p.m. Mr. F. Roach.
BANK HALL; 9.30 am. Rev. R. Me.
Cullough, 7 p.m. Mr. J. T. Oxley.
SPEIGHTSTOWN: 11 am. Rev. F
Lawrence, 7 p.m. Rey, F. Lawrence.
MORAVIAN CHURCH SERVICES
ROEBUCK STREET: 11 a.m. Rey. A. C.
Pilgrim M.A., 7 p.m. Rev. D. C. Moore
GRACE HILL: 11 a.m. Mr. C. Greene,
12.30 p.m. Holy Communion Rey. A, C.
Pilgrim, M.A. 7 p.m, Mr. T. Barker.
FULNECK:

11 am. Mr, W. Haynes,
7 p.m. Mr. S. Weekes,
MONTGOMERY: 3.30 p.m. Sunday
School Anniversary
THE SALVATION ARMY CHURCH
NOTICES
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL
11 am, Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m.
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Meeting. Conducted by Major A, 8,
Moffett (Divisional Commander).
WELLINGTON STREET
11 am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m.
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Meeting; Preacher: Sr. Major Gibbs.
SPEIGHTSTOWN
il am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m.
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Meeting; Preacher Sr. Captain Bishop.
DIAMOND
11 am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Saivotion
Meeting; Preacher: Lieutenant Moore,
CHECKER HALL
il am. Holiness Meeting, 3 pm
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Meeting; Preacher: Lieutenant Reid,
LONG BAY
11 am. Holiness Mé€eting, 3 p.m
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Meeting; Tempe. Lieutenant Etienne.
1l am. Holiness Méeting, 3 p.m.
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation

Winter and A. R. Brome,

10.30 a.m. Quarterly Service, at
Queen's Park Steelshed under the aus-
pices of Rev. J. B. Winter,
Distingui-hed Rev. J. B,
Guest Speaker,

2.30 p.m. Faith Healing Service, to
which the sick are invited,
7.15 p.m. Evangelistic
Bank Hall, Speaker, Rev.

Stoppe, Supt. of West Indies.

7.15 p.m. Evangelistic Meeting at
River Road, Speaker Rev. J. B. Reesor.
known to be vested with the Gift of
Healing through Faith.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST.

PRIDGETOWN, UPPER BAY STREET

Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.

Wednesdays 8 p.m. A Service which
includes Testimonies of Christian Science
healing. «

SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 1951

Subject
MENT.

Golden Text: John 6:33, The bread
of God is He which cometh down from
heaven, and giveth life unto the world.

with the
Reesor, as

Meeting at
Henry C.

of Levson-Sermon; SACRA-



being broadcast on Wednesdays at
7.15 p.m. will be on the air on the
17th, inst, In this series John
Figueroa and Howard Spencer of
Jamaica, Rawle Farley of British

Guiana and Charles Wilmot,

can do today to remedy the
world-wide problems such as
illiteracy, disease, malnutrition
and poverty which face the world.

THRIFTY
WOMEN

SHOULD

READ

We now offer you the
Biggest and Prettiest

Assortment of .. .

COTTONS



AT -~ =

LL APPS

645636

4
POSSESSES OPO

FIISS

Â¥

Festival.
GILL MEMORIAL: 9,30 a.m. Rev. E.
Griffin, 7 p.m. Mr, P. Deane.

Meeting; Preacher: Sr, Major Holling -
worth.
THE NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH OF
GoD
8 a.m. Baptismal Service, at Bran-
dons Beach, Baptizers, Reverends, J. B.

Director of Information of the
British Council are discussing
what ordinary men and womet

SUNDAY

B.B.C. Radio CHURCH SERVICES |arexavprs scHooL, SPEIGHTSTOWN-BARBADOS. BW.





The Governors of



Alexandra School invite APPLICATIONS for the post of

HEADMISTRESS, which will become vacant in Aurust 1951 The new Head- |
mistress will be required to take up the appointment on Ist September, 1951. Alex- |
andra School is a day secondary school with 150 girls on the roll and is aided

oy Government funds
which the General Certificate of Education will be taken in 1951
Girl Guide Cempany attached te the school

There is a Preparatory Department and a Main Seco! in}
There is a

The Headmistress who should possess a Degree of a British University and a

Teacher's Diplom:
school and promofe out-of-class activities
chool grounds which is provided for the use of the Headmistress
nistress is not a Civil Servant, but service is pensionable under the Teachers
2ension Act
en years
ish Teachers’ Superannyation Act

Passage expenses to Barbados not exceeding £200 will be paid against appro-
oriate vouchers A term's long leave is granted every five years on request, but
ap to the present no passage money is available for leave.

Applicants should forward a statement giving the following particulars :—
Date and place of birth
Schools and Universities attended
Degree, giving subjects and class obtained
Post-graduate study, including Teacher’s Diploma or Certificate ‘if any
Teaching experience with dates and positions held
War Service (if any)
Participation in out-of-class activities

8. Games record

9 Administrative experieuce (if any)

10. Medical Certificate of fitness

11. Copies of three recent testimonials

12. The names and addresses of two referees

The statement together with Ceftificate of Birth
covering letter of application

MOD mwter

should be

or Certificate will be required to devote her whole time to the |
The salary offered is £600 per annum,
} per cent of which is deducted as rent for the partially furnished resfa@ence in the
The Head- |



No contributions are payable, but the minimum qualifying period is |
Service at Alexandra Schoo! is counted as qualifying under the Eneg- |





ADVOCATE

“HI
HE WISE!
ADVERTISE
in the
‘ADVOCATE’ |



% WE CLOSE FOR

LUNCH

11 to 12

A. BARNES & CO., LTD.



To Economise on Ceilings and Partitions use . . .

attached to a

Candidates living in the Caribbean Aréa should send their applications to

‘he Honorary Secretary, Alexandra School,

G.P.O. Box 243, Bridgetown, Barba
dos, B WI, by 3ist March, 1951

14.1 51—2n

ALEXANDRA SCHOOL, BARBADOS, B.W.I.

A Graduate to teach Mathematics up to School Certificate standard is required
in May 1951
roll and is aided by Government funds

Salary :

Both are termite proofed and obtainable in various

UNITEX INSULATING

3" OR

BROWN HARD-BOARD

1/8" at 14 cents per sq. ft.

lengths .....

Alexandra School is a day secondary school with 150 girls on the

For First or Second Class Honours Degrees; $1,584, rising by $72, to}

$2,304, and then by $120 to $2,784, plus ‘$216 per annum for a recognised |

Teacher's Diploma or Certificate

plus $216 per annum for a recognised Teacher's Diploma or Certificate.
($480— £100.)
The position on the Salary Seale would
cluding an allowance for War Service
The post is pensionable under the Teacher's Pension Act No contributions
are payable but the minimum qualifying period is ten years Service at Alexandra
School is counted as qualifying under the English Teacher's Superannuation Act
Passage expenses to Barbados not exceeding £200 will be paid against appro-
priate vouchers
up to the present no passage money is available for leave,
Application together with three recent testimonials, the names of two Referees,
should be sent by airmail to The Headmistress, Alexandra School, Speightstown,
Barbados, B WI. to arrive not later than 15th February, 1951

be decided by teaching experience in-



14.1 51.—3n
F_—aO=—= = =>=029"”9”""9—omO0D0>-> | -tdaOo=Qoo—O=
cal i HAPPY NEW YEAR

1 is the firm wish to ow
STANWAY STORE i FRIENDS, PATRONS
) and all Barbados
from RAYMOND JORDAN’S
Laundry, Bay Street

For further particulars—
Dial 4910

SSS



IMPORTANT TO PLANTERS
AND HUSINESSMEN

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For Graduates; $1,416, rising by $60, to $1,776, and_then by $72 to $2,352,

A term's long leave is granted every five years on request but |

i
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|

BRITISH

FIRE,

MONEY, GLASS,
AND GOLFERS’.

For information and rates, apply to the Agents :—

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—aAGENTS

APPLES Ib
GRAPES Ib
BACON
HAMS
CHICKEN HADDIES
APPLES SAUCE tins
PEARS tins
PEACHES tins

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HOWELL

Lumber and Hardware

MOTOR,







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JAMS
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All classes of Insurance transacted, including :—

WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION,
PERSONAL ACCIDENT, TRAVELLERS’ BAGGAGE,
LOSS OF PROFITS, MARINE,



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SODA BISCUITS tins
SWEET BISCUITS (assort-
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CHEESE Ib
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Following new Schedule by B.G. Airways beginning

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For Particulars apply - - -

BW.LA.

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Are your trucks equipped for the coming crop?

are getting difficult, so

BUY NOW
PLANTATIONS



TRINIDAD—ST. VINCENT .. . Tuesdays—Fridays
BARBADOS8—ST. VINCENT... Mondays—Thursdays
BARBADOS—DOMINICA Mondays.

.W LA.

Bridgetown

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PAGE THIRTEEN
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PAGE FOURTEEN

How Ezzard Charles



Beat Lee Oma

NEW YORK, Jan. 13

EZZARD CHARLES peat Lee Oma on a technical knockout
in the 10th round of their fifteen rounds contest here tonigh:
to retain his world heavyweight title as recognised in

America.
The referee stopped the fight
before the halfway mark of the

10th round to save Oma from fur-
ther punishment although he had
nore than held his own in the
arlier stages ;

it was a dramatic end for the
blow to the chin appeared to stun
Oma who became the chopping
block for Charles’ blows until the
referee intervened

For nine rounds, Oma had given
as good as he received and Charles
n fact, had two rounds taken from
him for alleged low blows for
which he had been booed and
warned

Oma did not flinch from any
blows landed by the champion
who had his left eye damaged in
the seventh round after the bruise
had shown earlier, but he became
stronger as the fight progressed.

Not At Best
Charles was not on his best form
and as the referee raised his hand
in victory, the crowd booed loudly.
The champion started six to one
on favourite. >
Neither boxer did much in the
opening round and Charles was
cumbersome. Oma had little diffi-
culty in tying



Charles had a bruise under his left
eye. ’
The bout warmed up towards
round five. Both men speeded up
and Oma did most of the forcing.
Charles’ left eye began to bleed
and he was warned for a
which appeared to be low.
With the crowd roaring. Oma
maintained “pressure thre ughout
the sixth round. Charles landed
often but did not appear to hurt
Oma who kept pegging away at
the damaged eye.
Charles began
tance in the next round and pun-
ished Oma severely about the a
ow

blow

to find his dis-

He was again warned for a
blow in the eighth round, but he
was improving all the time and
carried the fight to Oma.

The referee took this round and
the fifth round from the champion
because of his alleged low blows.

Charles was doing most of the
leading in the ninth round but
Oma took his punishment without
flinching. ,

A heavy right to Oma’s
ended the fight in the 10th round
It rocked the challenger who stood

chin

almost still taking a succession of
left hooks to the chin. He seemed
stupefied and offered no defence
Then he the
stepped in,

In his dressing room afterwards
Oma said he was not hurt but only
befuddied. “I don't know what
happened. All of a sudden T lost
strength and could not get my
hands up. I knew he was hitting
me but I could not do anything
about it. I just ran out of gas.”

Charles’ weight was 185 Tbs. as
against Oma’s 193 lbs. It was the
champion’s 22nd consecutive win

bent and referee

The Fight

They manoeuvered carefully in Charles drove a right to Oma's pected
Charles shot a light left

mid ring.

the champion up;
and at the end of the second is eff as

left to the body Charles again
drove a hard right to Oma’s head
and a stiff left to the body. Charles
was very wild with a left but Oma
did not try to take advantage of
his opening. Charles smacked a
right to Oma’s head. Charles was
pressing the attack more vigorous-
ly now and he sent over two hard
smacks to the body

Round 4. Charles stalked Oma
who started sidestepping. Charle:
shot a light left to the body and a
hard right to the kidney. Oma’s
body was getting red from Charles
body blows. Charles belted to the
body and Oma retaliated with a
left to head. Charles dug a right
to Oma's body and the challenger
grunted. Charles pressed Oma
again and Oma backed away
Charlies got in a long right to jaw.
Charles belted a left and right to
Oma’s body as Oma backed away.
Oma stabbed a left to head and a
long right to Charles’ jaw just be-
fore the bell

Round 5. Oma got in two light
lefts to head and they went into
a clinch. They traded lefts and
then Oma crossed a right to Ezz-
ard’s jaw Oma got in a left and
a right to head as the crowd let
dogse with a roar. They exchanged
and rights in a sizzling ex-

hange. and fans yelled again

hook to the body and a right to The crowd yelled as Charles left

Oma’s head

a sweeping left hook to head and stepped into Oma with a left and in
The crowd
cheered when Oma got in nee
ead,

a hard right to body
shot, a light left jab to
Charles banged a right to the body
and

the body and missed a right

The champ was wide open but
Oma did not make a move as the
Oma stabbed two

crowd groaned.
lefts to the head
Charles.

head, all light blows.

Oma grabbed hold of him.
Ezzard drove another left hook to

and pressed
Charles came back with
a flurry of rights and lefts to the
Oma moved
Charles with two left jabs Charles

low blow with a left, and Goldstein
warned Charles to keep them up.
connected with two

in on
to head. They traded lefts at the lefts to the bedy and Oma
bell. landed a left to head. Char'es

Round 2. They traded lefts as
Oma stayed with Charles in the
Oma discarding his usual
style moved in on Charles again the challenger too's the

middle,

and scored with a left and right out wincing. Charles sent over two West Indian boxers. They have
to the body. The challenger was more lefts to the head and ducke'l the same surname but as far as
holding his hands higher than away from an Oma left. Charles [ know, are unrelated. On Mon-
usual. Charles swept in with a beat Oma with tefts two to one. day evening Cliff Anderson from
left and right to the body, and Again the champ slammed in and British Guiana outpointed Selwy?

Oma backed away

then danced away. Charles got wear Oma down with his body derson (Jamaica) scored a K.O
in a left to the jaw and then barrage. Goldstein took the roun| win over Harry MeMurdie (Edg-
a right to the body. Oma away from Chares again for low ware) over the same distance

again took the lead, landed a left
and right to the body and moved
fighters
and boxed care- a
hard
Oma
There was a
smatter of blood and a lump under

right Both

took

out again
their time
fully. Charlés
right to Oma's
scored with a right

pumped a
body and

Charles’ left eye,
Round 3

a right to Oma’s body.
yelled as Charles missed a
maker right
self open Again Oma
make a move. Oma
hard right to Charles’

did
smashed



to the
with a

body Charles
hard right to head












CHEDDAR,
| WHO IS THAT
| NICE-LOOKING
| BOY? DO You
| KNOW HIM 2

I « f |



g YS AIT

Oma chopped
a short right to Charles’ jaw and

Charles stabbed two
lefts to Oma'’s head and smashed
The crowd
hay-
and again left him-
not

head but the
champion came back with a left
connected
ind ;

| They'll Do It Every Time

Asp ivesTRA WENT TO HER BROTHER'S |

COLLEGE PROM HOPING TO MEET SOME |
NICE, ELIGIBLE YOUNG MEN=*>s |

A iM? I'VE SEEN
HIM AROUND ++sNAWs
I DON'T KNOW HIM =>
I FORGET HIS NAME=+
BUT I'LL HAVE You
_ MEET SOME REAL
Mn GUYS Up)

VEATURES SYMOICATE, Inc. WORLD RIGHTS RASEAVRD

stalked Oma, drove two lefts and
rights to his head. Charlies be'ted
Oma with a solid right to jaw but
tlow with-

scored with a series of body blow
Charles was apparently try ng to



blows.
Round 9,
with two
short
with a

Charles
lefts
right

stepped , in
and missed
Oma_ connected
left and a shor
right chop to the jaw. Charle:
landed a sweeping left to Oma’s
right eve and followed with two
lefts to body, Oma got in a short
chop to Charles, adosing hs left
eye, The crowd let go with another
roar as Oma scored with a hard
right hand lead to head. Char'e;
banged away with both hands to
the body as Oma retreated. Charle
dug another left to the body which
seemed low and the crowd booed
igain, Charles banged Oma to the
head at close quarters. Fans booed
once more when the bell rang





Registered US Patent Oftee










STAYED HOME

















7]






Avo DID SHE MEET THEM $ WE QUOTE
FROM HER DIARY: “I SHOULD HAVE

My BEST FRIENDS~THIS iS RED,
LEFTY:AND THAT'S OX y—

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«



STILL FIGHTI

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



G



beadquarters in West Germany
in Frankfurt, Heidelberg, Stutt-
gart or somewhere in the British

Zone.—Reuter.



that he will establish his advance |

Boxers’ Successes

Good news this week of two

Evans (Wales) over eight rounds
and the following day Bob An-

Both victories were scored in th«

London area; Cliff's at Leyton

Baths and Bob’s at Watford.
—LNS

Canadian Rates
Of Exchange

JANUARY 13,

CANADA
Cheques on

Bankers
Demand

Drafts
Sight Drafts
Cable
Currency
Coupons
Silver

The above Rates are subject to ohan*
without notice.



1951
642/10 pr
62 2/10 Pp
62.05% pr
61 9/10% pr
64 2/10% pr
62 7/10% * 60 7/10% pr
60" pr

By Jimmy Hatlo

AND READ FRANKENSTEIN”

PLEASTA
MEETCHA!



i 2 .
[FRAN Re PRS Le RATHINS, RTA ARM 215 A! STH FIELO, TERAS







You can't keep dandruif

a secret

‘Foothall
Results

LONDON, Jan 13
LEAGUE 1.
Middlesbrough 1
Huddersfield Town 1

Arsenal 3
Burnley 0;

Chariton Athletic 2; Sheffield Wednes-

day 1.
Chelsea 3; Newcastle United |

The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 6.12 a.m
Sun Sets: 5.53 p.m.
Moon (First Quarter) Janu-
ary 15.
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 8.56 a.m., *20

Derby County 1; Liverpool 2 P.m,
Everton 0; Stoke 3% ie
Manchester United 2; Tottenham Hot YESTERDAY
spur 1 %,
Portsmouth 2; West Bromwich Albion Rainfall (Codrington) .05 in.

Sunderland 1 Bolton Wanderers 2
Wolvershemton Wanderers 1 Black
pool 1, ind

LEAGUE 2
Bury 1; Cardiff City 2.
Chesterfield 1; Manchester City 2
Doneaster Rovers 2. Hull City 4
Leeds United 5, Southampton 3.
Luton Town |, Barnsley 1
Notts County 3, Grimsby Town 2
Preston North End 1, Birmingham City

Queens Park Rangers °, Coventry City



4 Meld United 2, Leicester City 1

Swansea Town 2, Brentford 1

West Ham United 2, Blackburn Rov-
ers 3

LEAGUE 3 Southern

Bournemouth 3, Walsall !

Brighton & Hove 3, Colchester United 1

Bristol City 2, Millwall 1.

Crystal Palace 1, Bristol Rovers 0

Exeter City 0, Leyton Orient 0.

Gilingham 3, Watford 1.

Newport County 2, Swindon Town !
Northampton Town 1, Torquay United ©

Norwich City 2, Aldeshot 2

ort Vale 1, Notts Forest 1

Reading 4, Plymouth Argyle 0

Southend United 1, Ipswich Town 6

LEAGUE 3 Northern:

Bradford 3, Accrington Stanley 0.

Crewe Alexandra 2, New Brighton 0

Darlington &, Lincoln City 1

Gateshead 2, Bradford City 0

Halifax Town 3, Chester 1

Hartlepools United 0, Rochdale 0
Mansfield Town 1, Rotherham United 1

Cidham Athletic 4, Carlisle United 1.

Scunthorpe United 1, Barrow 0
Stockport County 2, Shrewsbury Town 0

Tranmere Rovers 4, Southport 0
Wrexham 4, York City 3












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‘harles outpunched Oma two to SCOTTISH LEAGUE “A” INDIAN
one in another exchange. Oma Celtic 3, Aberdeen 4. ROOT
pumped lefts to Charles’ head sibecmian 5, ae gh ee were all
Charles sent a left hook to Oma’s ~ * . scion ovine $0 unt grounds
law -and followed with a right. BX-WORLD HEAVYWEIGHT BOXING CHAMPION JOE Louis ' SCOTTISH LEAGUE “B” 1 @ Banish hendoche, backache, Eiteweneve
Charles speared Oma with left (left) hits Freddie Beshore’s face with a left in the third round of Dumbarton 2,,Ayr United 0 ' — ms :
$ Ps ; @ Dr. Morse’s Pills contain six active
jabs and drove a smashing right their fight in Detroit, Michigan. The referee stopped the fight in the _Kilmarnock 3, Queens cing i ; wepeicble ingredients.
to QOma's jaw. Oma_came back ‘fourth round—awarding the victory to the Brown Brmber on a tech- Pha eeomnee: Ae watches were. at | © Gentle, effective 9-hour action will not
full of fight and hit Charles with nical knockout.—Express. postponed owing to unfit grounds. 1 disturb your rest. oi
a right Referee ; stej —Reuter @ Special TONIC ingredient ps restore
wa < chatter th awe ods ence hi he A s 7 ° Ne di mee on we hemorrhoid
es up.. Oma connected with two tsennower Arrives French Motorists 1 e : ee
good rights to Charles’ head at arbour 0. | A TRUSTED REMEDY
the end of the round. Goldstein v F
took the round away from Charles In London Break Record a FOR OVER 50 YEARS
for a low blow. Charles had been 7 i : i \x
cuutioned in the early rounds For Talks FE } i aerate a 12 In Carlisle Bay | a ee ee oe ow Ow oe ae me me
Round 6. They traded a left rench drivers, Andre ercier 1
ind right at the start and then . @ from page 1 and Charles De Corianze in their Sch. Emeline; M.V. Blue Star; Sch ! BEWAREorworms!
vent into a series of clinches, 'efresher course in te spring Peubot 203 car have covered the Marion Belle Wolfe; Sch. Philip_H. |! worms threaten old and young alike. Be
Charles pummelled Oma with a But Eisenhower presumably distance from Capetown to Algiers eayceon: anh ey x. Lena) ao 4 eure your family is protected with Com-
, 2 av . 8 : een; Sec ommanue nm; % a »
ieft and right to the body, and a found the Danish contmibution Mm 16 cays, 10 hours, 6 minutes. go, “Triumphant Star; Sch. Burma D i aE eee pilin BWI-349,
vicious right to the jaw. Charles satisfactory for he commentca cay natebiiened in 1937 MV. Sedgefield; Sch. Adalina; Sch. t J
macked Oma with another right yesterday: “In Denmark I have by British driver Gleisner is 16 Sunshine R.; Sch. Mary E. Caroline; | ma)
+ urs i : : de s Sch Belqueen; Sch _ Enterprise S; Sch
3 the jaw. and Oma held on, met nothing that has not upraised taj ’ MI hours. se Lavdaiphs, Sh. Molly N. Jones.
Charles stabbed Oma with two my heart” The two arrived in Paris in DEPARTURES
lefts and Oma hit the champ with Oslo: Norwegian authorities their car from Marseilles today. en ; SEL tons net, Capt.
a rin! ee he eee away. Charles were saiq to be considering placing They left Capetown on Decem- *!"#. for Bt: a
smashed a right and a left to 4) -¢ Py ete, Bilton tkhowe er 26 .
head, and took a left from Oma ah of Norway's Military Force. ai With the Algiers-Capetow. In Touch With Barbados
and came back with another right Eisenhower's disposal Bub aN ly i P Ss a oe eed Co : ] Stati
to head. There was a. slight Official communique said that the Shed ge. DEomeNas the two men asta ion
bruise under Oma's right eye, Norwegian contribution would be enbanee nee So eee see he ute ‘and Wireless’ (Westeanidioa) Sad Mu
Blood trickled from a cut under “!scussed later. < Brist i niresadt: fie hs advise that they can now communicate
Charles’ left eye. They traded Rome: Though Communists po, ‘Alt ore a See them A urns Se thrpush ‘thet:
1eft hands and then Oma got in have been threatening demonstra yort Hier Mz raeill SY ean they 5.8. Rezent Hawk, 8.8, Regent Leopold
a left to head, There seemed to tions and strikes during LEiser } arseiles where they §.s. Wagon Box, 8.8. Indian Reefer, S.S.
be a sligbt'cut over ‘Charlies’ le? 3 o) : > *-,. took the road again yesterday. leman Hills, S Ss.
a sug i s eft nower’s visit here next week Their official speed fr Cc: Ss
eye too. The crowd cheered at Premier ride » Gi ri d ert” OFIw1es Speee IrCm ape
\ d at Premier Alcide De Gasperi c: ie rd 9 aa re
the bell t , town, to Algiers was 25 miles y _ 4 N
. * clared in Parliament today that he Ȣ hour Ppt yeks + oo
Round 7 Charles connected 5 Pia aa at ib : ES f per hour, S.S. Argentina, S.S, Canadian Challenger,
with a sweeping right to head would be a “welcome guest f The expenses of the journey, ¥ § W ested a2 slepe Papnent, yee
and a long left to body. Charles See Fie a ai ha about £2,000, wer®met by Mer- fanturet, 88, Asia, SS. Alcoa Cavalier,
pressed the attack ‘and. Oma The Premier made this state- cier exporter of Peubot cars. S.S. Polyvlory, S.S. Colonial, 8.8, Fran- Gi G
started backing and sidestepping Ment while Communist cries of) Their official Capetown-Paris fine Glore, M/V_ Good Sarin eo TAI Ne ri | -, “NE
. ‘ a Matte .? ‘“ Ht ae _ | 43 a eaten mien on razil, S Samana, S.S. Ha reek, S.S.
Oma pumped three fast left jabs shame , out with foreigners’ | time was 17 days, 9 hours. Metoli, S.S. Withelm Bornhofen, S S
to Charles’ head, Charles got in a @2d “down with Eisenhower | —Reuter. —Meline, S.S. Lady Nelson, 8.8. Thelma, .
left to body and Oma speared at filled the Senate Chamber. | iNeed
Charles’ wounded eye with a lefi Frankfurt: — Eisenhower is ex-|
in Frankfurt within 10
jaw and two lefts to the body, days. |. |
J ; He will hear from top Altec | e
Charles landed with hit Oma on the beltline. Charles Officials of the latest developments ad}
military talks between the | i When late h h i
right to body. Oma took the lead Allies and West Germans oi} i] eS a ee
for a moment and then backed ¢reating a West German force e wading oe Soames, Felt yous
away, Charles socked two lefis to He will also cast a sharp eyc e morning with headache, fatigue
Oma’s jaw but Oma retaliated with hoe the ee tein and aa y, and upset stomach... don’t let
two lefts to head. Charles oved Dat readiness 0 re three princi- i i
in again with two lefts to head, Pal occupation armies, American on dare ven ay my be spotted, And
The crowd booed at the bell British and French : qnick celiet with Alka “Bel oy!
Round 8. They traded ‘efts in , He is expected to see Allied % Take it on arising, again —if
midring and moved carefully, High Commissioners and to confer not ignore it! needed — later in the day.
Charles dug a left to body and with Chancellor Adenauer. an
clinched. Again Charles drove a There is much speculation here By combining several medicines











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THESE ARE WHAT YOU
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GOOD CLOTHES.
THESE ARE WHAT YOU
GET IN CLOTHES MADE BY

C. B. RICE & CO.

OF
BOLTON LANE

58GC%D



PPS IOD

EE RA NE

EOCOOS6eS




PAGE 1

I'M.I KM 111! rS -I M)AY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. JANUASV 14, 1M1 How Ezzard Charles Beat Lee Oma NEW YOKK. Jan. 13 K/./ARO CilAKLEt> Deat Lee Oma on a technical k ir. tin a iheir fifteen rounds Contest hi-ie innii'h |a I.-.,i %  .arorM heavyweight title as raeogntwd m %  rtea i. j i nc halfwaj mark ..ui to aavc Omi fr utfatunent allhouBh he had nan than held hi* own in the [• %  i .1 Uramatu end for the hj .Inn appeared to stun i>ma hopping blows until the :,ed I had giver. %  I i:ir! Charle* %  i.t lateen froin SMI I IM.IMIM. Ill Iht .!!• %  I fUT.intl rf *ti(T left l<> the iM-. %  "•:> dd irltB ,i lrf( hut Oma -ke advantage of Ml iip-i.mg. Charles B9 light to Oni'l head Charles VM itrewina; Ihe attack more vigorou* iy no* and he BMt D*MI macks to the body. Round 4 chiiilea stalked Oma who started 1 Hdattep] shut %  light kfl to the body and ,. hard -i l-n. blows for l*o> wa> grtting red fr..p I whieh he hu leen booed and body DtOWB, Charles IK-IT. body and Oma retaliaied with a lid not ilmeh from anv lofl is u right %  nfWaJ b) the champion lo O tod the coallengei 1 ayi 'UmnMd iii shunted, Charlei pro — OBI .' %  < Uw bruiae again and Onin backed had show nut He became the light progressed. Sol A< Bcrvl %  • as not on his best tori referee .. rowd booed l'nidl The (hai'.pi'.u t-tartad six to or did much in lb tpeninii round and Charl* %  dlfilculty In tying thtchampion the end of ihe second round) ..ng right to jaw, CharleI od right l Otna'b bo M Oma lucked .twii> QBM ...lied a left to head and long rtgbl to Cnarl ised his hand f 0r( the i ondei hii left eye. The bout warmod "V towards round five Uoth men speeded up .nd Oma dW moat of 'he forcing I to bleed ;md b< mod 10? which apiiearet! I i Round :> Oma not in two light lefts to head and they vent into a clinch Tin-, traded then Onu aroosad •• nght lo Eax....t n> it iefi and a right to head . the crowd tot • tli a IIMI !//.llIU Football Results l^NTXHf. JauU IX4GUI 1. A. .anal J HiadlMCiBu-jn I B rnlf, 0 ItiMMaiaflrUl Town I Cfaitloo Athletic 1. StieineM Wadi--. EX WORLD HEAVYWEIGHT BO'XINO CHAMPION JOE LUuia Uafti hit" Freddie BevhoreX fan with a left In the third round of tlwlr light In Detroit, Michigan T!;rafaraa -topped the tight in the fourth loimd Awarding the victoty to tlir Bra-f tech Oloal knockout. Espreti". and (aag yelled again outpuni hod Oma two i" Ul .iiKith.i <'Xehange. Oma left la Charles' head. %  i i f Irnok to Oma's i -and followed with a right. Chjrlcf Bpeare. Ot I with left i ,i and iii % % %  .. mi 'itng right With the crowd touring. Oma to Omn s )..v< dni.t .ante hack mamtaiTie.1 prm ire '*"' "ihout tull f OgAl and mi Charles with the slxlh round Charles landed .1 rmhi Referee Rub) Ooldstcln often but did not appear to hurl *dCb punch fci Ht >„h nUH r 4#-#-II'PK Oma Who kepi i-egging away at up Ovna connoetod with two *J*9*'iHl*t**sm rtf f §t fn (he damaged eye rljh*J >'. CharW head at Charkf began in nd his dlSihe end ot the round Coldstcln nd and punlooh the round iway from Cnoiioa ... •rverab aboul the rib* u a loo Mow Chorlea He was again nioned In the early raunda, Blow ii. the eighth round, i-tii iRond •> Thej troded %  i-ft all it* urn. and ind nghi at ihe itarl and then curried the tight !• %  < m .i < "' wtO B MrlCa "f elinehea 'rhe referee took thi* round an pummelled Oma with a Bul Eiaeonowei the fitlh round from Hie ihiimplm' iefi and rliiht lo UM body, and a found the DOfl iM*-.au<'i hii aUeind tow bhyi ght to the jaw. Charles >uti5f.ietoi> '..i i. commtnteo CharV at moat ot the tnaefced Oma with anotiu-i rich' yesturd^y in iw-ni-.u.. i :,. %  .. leading in the ninth round but to the Jaw. and Orna held on met nothing thai h it* Vraim Dw-a-c Couiu* l| Livat y l I %  .. i :. TtxinU •ur 1 r-wtamoi-h I: wi atat-ie It \>.t K 1 hur I. c-iatfl Citj I. t -iMWtiWM I ManclMtaCll> 1 I.-O. Unltwt b, Suuinampton 1 1 .-ton rw., • Ruii-i-j I N.-HCoonljr 3 tli.mtb, fo. %  anHBaM I'mlrrt 1. Inc-Mler C I -..ui-** Town 1. Bientloftl 1 ..l Mum Urutra 1. Bl*. H %  J LKAVIK 1 a^itinr-n BMirnamoulh ). Waball Bp.jhlori Hiint. Cok-hrrifr Vnllnl llrlMol CUV 1. HlllwWl I Crnaal Palaaa i B'toi Rooen o b n. Lu Oriani 0 -. ii..^in 1. Waatate 1. N-lrt Cuf.i> *. Bwlndon Taw 1 .•iMmpto>i Tu-n 1. T>rQU"t\ V-ulU Nurwlrll Clt 1 AUMahol 1 1'iTI Vale 1 Nftim raml I Baadina 4. FlymouUi Aigyl* • s,-ah--nd Unllad I. Ip-wKh Town LEAGUE 1. Jforfk-mt. Itanlrv • Crw Alend. a. Nw Brt a Mo 0 n.rluiflon I Uneoln CUj I '. %  tnm.-d I, rflfpfd Clt 0 ii.ula. T.— 1. Cheal* 1 Herllepoel* t'niled 0. RoclidaW 0 4. -i-KI Town I. Brtheih-m Unltl | i ..n.nn AIMMK . C-'U-Je UBIIed I • Uiul1 I. Barro0 -,..i„ft O-aUatr 1 swubury town ri.iinHclt Pnvera 4. BOulhpml D i rihani 4 York City 1 worm ir u-u-i %  -A' CaOat a. Ab-4.-" 4 H.OMiu.u a. aloii'i*-"'! i _, Tfiw remaining BIK tnavcliee were ai i-iipone-1 owing lo unfU aroundi SCOTTISH UCAfVE •* %  '• IHimbarton . A>i Unlll 0 KiUnarnoca . Queer.. Fa* %  aaataa B. CowdenbeaUi 4 The W-atlui TODAY Sun Kktea: *.12 am Sun Seta: 5.53 p m Muaw lUr-t (luarter) Janu ary Iff. Lighllna: 30 p m High Water: S.H am *rZW pan VtSTtKDAV Rainfall i < odrlngtoii > tS hi I 1..1 lei month lo yealer da>: It In. Temperatu.-e 77* F Wind Dlreellon: <0 a.m.) K N t. ill am. I E by N. Wind Velocity; ". mile, per hour Haronirter „• charter i-ndcd the fight in the 10th i-.nmi %  naBShOd %  light and I left to |t locked the ctuiUongei who stood hood and tool % %  left from Oma .... loo % %  ma bnek aith ..nmher right left hook ' "' ; 1 rii,, < "' w I'AKIS. J.m. 12 French drivorg, Andre latarcioi ..ml Chail.-: I), < \„ .,„. m their I'eubot 203 car have covered the distance i ("Algiers n J*^' d • on • "f" in 10 days. 10 ho,.is. minutes ^ w ;*„ in '..hhshed in 1937 w v sMarfeid h driver Gleisner Is 16 Bw.hiiie a a •rti Bil q uata u t.>u"alpha Srh Mol la Carlisle Bay Emelu..M V Bell* WoH.-. S 'i N.ai, S> I, Burma 1 > Ad-Una. Set. iry E Carolina atupctlcd and olTeied leli-me Then he benl and Ihe reforee stepped in. In hii dJ ..Merwarcis Oma said he was not hurl but only I don't know whiU happened. -\u ol a Hidden T Ion strength and could not get m> hands up I knew he was hiltln-. tne bid 1 could not do any thine about It I iusl ran out of *%> %  <' Charles' weight was IM lb. as against Oma's 193 lbs. It was thnaei utive win bruiae undOr Oma'i tight lllood trickled fioin a cut iimV i harlei left eye They traded Oslo. Norwegian aufhoettM srosi s,ii,i to be %  .1 %  %  %  all ot Norway'. DaUlltar) POTCO Eisenhoweis Uiaposal Hut ai iilhii.il eominunique said thai Ull Norwogtan oontj I % %  would "* llMUOBOd iBttM Rome: T h 0 U g h tou.muiirt M.aiy N IirPAItTIIIES llKLQUCEaV 44 tOi i. lot 91 Vincent IN Touch With Bnrbados Coastal Station ipi Bm ieft hands and %  Utranteaiinff dei .. left to h" body and Oma speared at Charles' %  rounded eye with a lef. They inanoeuvered carefully in Charle* di r u, in.,., l"''' mid rinCharhM shot a light Iefi law iim t two left* to the bodj "C hook to the body and n right (< %  The crowd yelled a> Charles li-.'s Oma's head Charles landed with Mlt oma on the l>eltliiie Chnrli log left hook t> • "i W •. nped into Oma with a left a bard light to body The crowd |(i;L (| |>ou (|MU( 1 ,„„„„.,„ i(hlt n „„ ,,.„ k ,„ : .in. Tiie Premier made this stale mom "idle Communist %  i 101 %  siiami %  ". nut witii [oraigneri and "down with Eisenhower filled the Semite Chamber. I'rankfarl: Baaonhowor i< es Frankfurt within ill heai horn !<>p Allien officials of the latest developmeiii The site direction. A Bristol Blfcnfl Hew them from Algiers to Marignane air— ,K,n „cr Mntlllai >hn ih.-y d w!^a5rSi^SrSS*rSS look the road again yesterday. Their official speed from Capetown, to Algiers was 25 mllea per hour The expenses of the journey, about £2,000. were*mct by Mereier exporter of I'eubot cars. Their official Capetown-Paris 1 time wus 17 days. B hours. —RevU-r TRUSTED HfUfO. T^nn^y roi ovta M IIAW !BEWitJ0MK>wr J Wocta* threalen old and youaa alike Be I ... r Im.iW a) teowelaU w>Ui I'w | .toek. *...o. MM fKs. 'v II-| luakanot 1>r Mon*> IMIa. Hl HL— % %  iii tli! ldwa> 4S fer. s r ^., HHI-. SH Kl Alel'i. 88. Bwi lln II B, Clara. S.S Maul. 48 BowRatKfllOto. S.S Seicniu. SB IS. Nieow Amilerdam. Araenuna, SS. Canadian riullrnari. -' s , ,,. i..I s s A.I...I "~r~' I v IS Colombte, S* C.a-tal Ali*"tiirer. SS Alia. SJI Afccoa Cavallei. • lor) U Cataaial. SS FionI'II..' ..I..r> M V (i.-ri Gulf. SS. Eeao I | Bagaana. M Mat ai>ek, s s Metoll. 8.8 Wilhclrn Bornhufen. B S beta light left "jab to head i .figed a right lo the bcH and Oma grabbed hold of him. Ezzard drove another left hook t> the bodv and miw?d n right The champ was wide opon bul Oma did not make a move as the .i I. OCR" d Oma's Jaw but Oma retaUated with two lefts i" bead Charles ovod in .main with lWO lOftl 10 bead The crowd booed .>t the bt II Round H The) Uradi aft oved < ..i 1'iiK lug ii left to bod) and elhieheil Again Chat l< low blow with .i left and Ootdatelri r __ warned Cbarioj u> keep them up, in on Charles with tWO lOfl ial J "" '" UhOOd They traded lefts at the lefts t„ %  (,. iKaU laniieil a It-It In head < hai'es (tOatsid 2 They traded lefts as Malk.wl Oma. drove two lefts and Oma staved with Charles In the rights to his la ad Charl* middle. Oma ducairiing his usual Onu. with a aolnl right t. |.. % %  hu style moved m on Charles again loo cJuUlengei and scored with a left ami right out winein over i-" to the bod' The ehnllengei . BgDfO lofts lo the h> Bd In I ducki holding his hands higher than away from an Oi usual Chariot iwopt in wiih i beat Oma i right lo Ihe hwiy, and Again ihe a,tti IIIUV* tin dgroaiMd Omaatabbofltwo '''''V^ lefts to the he-ad and pressed u ( bnrilCharles came back with a flurry of lights and left", to the head, nil light blows. Oma moved military talk Allies and Woal creating a West Oerman (area He ill also cast a sh.i. i i Do the stale .>f mining and I hat readiness of the three principal occupation arnncs. Anieti.-.n. p.. itch and Froneh He is e.X)H-.-te.l I.. % % %  Allied High Coinmis.si'ir fis and to eonfet With Chancellor Adenauer Tnore is much ipecula>tton hen that he will establish his advance t CNdtpinners in West Qormanj in Frankfurt, lleidellx-rg, Slnttgnrt or son owhoTl 'he British Zone Renter Boxers Successes Oi %  kod awoj oma chopped woivd with %  sarloe ot body hi a short right to Charles' jaw and Charles wag apparent!) U\ ng i sncod awnj Charlei got weot <„ n<1 oown with %  m a left ro the (aw and th*'ii bOATOgO; Qoldstein look tlio roun ,i right to the ixKiy Omi awB) from Chai for a again took the )>',K\ landed I lelt blows and rigid to the >--!> -ml moved Hound B Charles Hepped, i right head. Chare.. mgkei right and again left himbongad owsu with i-oth hands le %  eU open Uln Oma did not the body as Oma retreated. Charle make a move Oma smashed .. dttf aimtbec lift to the bOd) which hsod right to Charles* head but i <* and tho crowd booed champion came back srlth %  left %  is-n Chsurle banged O.no to tin to the \u~>\ Charles connecb nuartoi Fana booed with .... ea1 -r when the bell rat Oood news this week of two West Indian boxers. They have the same surname but as far Bl Charle 1 know, are unrelated. On Monto on day evening cliff Anderson froi hamp -lammed in and llr'itlsh Guiana outpointed Selwy Kvans (Wales >vei eight round and the following day Bob Anderson (Jamaica) scored a K O .in nvi-i Harry McMurdie (Edg•varc) over the same distance. Both victories were scored in the Ixnidon area: ClilT's at Levtun ,n.l Hob*at Watford —ENS Ymican'i keep dandruff Canadian Halts Of EXCaaaUage 0 secret—but you can get rid of it. Dandi'itl means that your hair is undcr-nounshed and thai DOdtt) lopplkwofnabsral vital hair f.HHlsarc running low. Rcplcmsh the lupphf with Silvikrui and dandruff In! by its natural foods, the hair regains its 11 your head not in your comb. r *rMS>'.fiiMia>,fa'aVraeaii<. •an w.art-M.r raas i*Sw*waa0B h.uitlmim uml tlifrl lONDON NWI0 %  INCitND uihfui vigour and aj Silvikrin DOtS CROW HAIR Don t let MORNING MISERY^ become all-day misery When late hours, too much good eating and drinking, ruin >our morning with headsihe. Uligue and upiet sioraach .. don't lei >our entire day he spoiled, and quick relief with Alka-Saltier. Take .1 on arising, againif needed — laicr in the day. By combining wvcral medicine* etfceiue againvl these divomfoeii, Alka Selirer SCO) two ways ...relieving headache and neuiraliiing eicew gssiric scidiiy. Not a laxative —you can take AlkaVh/r. —yl.me. IJroji one or two fahletv inio a stlast ol water. Watch ii .Darkle into a rrlrevhing. pleatani>UMing solution then drink n. Quick acting Alka-Seltier will "vt the day' for you. Keep a •upply on hand-alw.<*< Lock tail time it always so pleasant and what could bo be tier with your cocktails lhan en spies served w,lh Mango Chutney Large Bottles. Each Medium size Bottles. Small Bottles lc' 18^ HOME PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd. SrWS FOR r 101 it 1 v.iorui xr • FBESH APPLES — 30? lb. FBESH GRAPES — $1.08 lb. CAMEMBERT DANISH CHEESE pk. 45c LUNCHEON CHEESE (in blocks; $1.11 each ti.i.r.r.w; llll III it A Co.. I.ul. "Your Gfocers" An r.... H. iiii...I Derontlion for Walls and Ceilinus .; SISC0LIN DISTEMPER ;: Easy to use. supplied in Powder and made ready lor ^ use by mixing 2! pints water with 5 lbs. Powder. ;* Supplied in: WHITE, BUFF, CREAM. GREEN, ; SUNSHINE and BLUE v; 5-lb Packagea at 95 cents each. For Concrete Floors taller ABORATOILilt UD Alka-Settzer helps millions Oily Alka-Selizer >->fct Dr..' CM. Curr.nc> ..hrrrl %  • .... They'll Do It Every lime JLsniXSTHA WENT TO HER BROTHER'S COLLEGE PROM HOPING TO MEET SOME NICE. ELIG.BLE yOUNG MEN"" ——••—— By Jim my Hado I AND OD SHE MEET TWEM ? WE QUOTE j FROM HER CJURy: *I SHOULD HAVE 'STAVED HOME AUO READ FRANKENSTEIN-' IT.CHINC INFLAMED SKIN HckAiltMK.hiiii-%autfjbitriauiijfi 'he akin, ireedilf deetkipt uHO irntanrif pieaplei and upeo MM imleaa cbeckol .' human it ot akin lutTrirti have p:o*e living vou pem and dint KC/HMA. PSORIASIS. BOILS. r-'KUITIONS, I'lUKLY HBAT. MAI-\BIA SOR^.Sor HINviWORM mat %  few tpplkaitnai e-1 aroodertul ODD PreerripiKin -l"l giea inaiani irh-f Perwvcre, and Che gooJ renili* -u: be kuuni 1 ODD PreKiiption n "Mainable (totn thci •varfwaan ///.VAV//// GET READY FOR THE (llll hi I TOURNAMENT you now RED HAND CONCRETE FLOOR PAINT BRK.HT KID ..ml MID l. III I \ in %  Gin. and 1 Gin. Tins. Phone 4456. | WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Lid. ^ t^^^^V^VyvVhOrVV>O40^ COMFORT. STYLEj DURABILITY. I THESE ARE WHAT YOU SHOULD DEMAND OF GOOD CLOTHES. THESE ARE WHAT YOU GET IN CLOTHES MADE BY C. B. RICE & CO. OF BOLTON LANE aaaeaaaaaeaaaaaaaaaaaao-.-.-,•.-.-.•-•-'.vc-.-.w.-..,-.-...-,..-,-^ £t<.-.*.w-'.^eaaeaaaaeeeeeeeeaeeeeeeeeiiaau K a I I Let us fit with FINE TROPICAL SUIT BLAZER AND FLANNEL PANTS o P.I.S. MAFFF.I 4 (0, ITO. Top Scorar. tn Tailoring"



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^B" SUNDAY. JANUARY 14. 1H1 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PACE El.EVEN WELL ILL BE A TADPOE'S GRANNY.'/. LOOClT tUt CROWDFOORINO INTO BIF> BONGS .| tMMf HOW DOES HE DO I*. WITH WITCHCRAFT ? y^ JUS.T LEAVE M 'TO ME, BOSS, itix. FINO j>1 oof. %  ','u IS THAT THE AOVOCAtC'S } ADVBRTlSINCr DEP*\f?TMENr p. |TH1S IS MISTER BIFFBONCr SPEAKING. LOOK/ DO ME A FAVOUR, VMIUL^ VOH?_SON THAT AD kANOTHER 7 WEEK ITS .PAYING nc I OFF, IKJ S .A BK> IS THERE ANY CHANCE TOR A GOy LIKE ME TO SECURE ADVERTISING SPACE IN YOOR DAILY PAPER ? THE I LIKE THE WAV VOO OOYS HANDLED THAT AD FOR MISTER BIFF BONGGIMME A JOELIKE HIS, ONLY v*BETT6R. GIVE IT THE WORKS.' BOSS, BIFF DONG. Is ADVERTISING, IN THE ADVOCAfF S C j. NrwS-L-jl— PAPER!) cS~f JosT fOONOj oot. YES, THIS IS it**; ADVERTISING Kf DEPARTMENT, '\ '* ADvocmt j< COMPANY 7 LIMITED -v:i • IS THAI THE ADVERTISING .DEPARTMENT ? iny ^3 // >V SAY WHAT DID YOO ty^ GOYS PoT INTO THAT 'ADVERTISEMENT ABOOT ML ? '•THAT I HAD DISCOVERED A StCRtT We AWN OK SO*AElHINC.£ \ WHY THt PI.AC I* LOOSV WITH JAPS, CHINKS, MEXICANS, ANI> ArtA-ftJi A KORFAN OR TWO THKOWM I IN/ """ %  '•" ;• 0X/. THAT •!>*'***• RING BANS.'. ,€, JL)S f THE FIRST, •OF THE AN y RESOLTS YOU'LL GET WHEN VOO ADVERTISE IN THE ADVOCATE NEWSPPlPER **OU SEE, MISTER BINO BANG OOK NEWsPAPl-R H* fcUBSCRlBERS. IN MANY OONTKltS, AND THAT* •' -j SAYIlT FAYS TO ADVEBTlSf f HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES iGOOMYB.MKPMWEtfvVI :*||g!Jj| I WP com *P"" i^Cj 11. "?| JANETTA DRESS SHOP l/pklair* Over \e.nm & Co. bfr Broad Si. AFTERNOON. miKnii AM) ftVHUNU NBM JACQMAK SQl'AKKS AND SCARVKS Hoyi .ii in :i.:ill Monday |o Friday K.:iO to II :l Suturduy '/.V/.V/,'/.V,V,V-'-V#V*V.*,V.','/.V-'-',V,V.-/,-, MOILS IMtbr BUILDERS mi IOMKAI TOILS j 4 SURVEYING AND LEVELLING FOR BUILDERS > 1 MOW TO MAKK G(X>I> CONCRETE I tNCRBTB CONSTRUCTION MADE F.ASY %  of FORMWORK for Concrete Struc^ I A lures d CONCRETE I'HOIlli IS AND CAST STONE S CONCRRTt HOUSES AND NMAl.I. CARAGES X CONCRETE SURFACE FINISHES. RENDERINGS AND > rrmiAZZo X We can alsoarcH K %  Bhell In proud to have playsd • l-aJln ueit for nfly years In 111* pnflfiflaa and development or Internal uomlnnitlon en*-luN ou laud, ua %  ea and ID toe air. Shell re*earch ban bad mucb to do wltb the perfecting of the moderD Jet englae. For the Comet today, for taa horaelene carnage of yeeterday. It bae been true to ear .... you can bo sure of SHELL) .'..



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SUNDAY, JAMAKY It. 1ISI SINDAY ADVOCATE PACE THIRTFI \ B.B.C. Radio Programme *i RM1 JAM u> it. H*| HH Mm 1 1mm Haw. rom Thr Editorial.. '"| Prngrjinm. Paradr T am ( roir.. %  an. ri>o ,-*r. ie j m Ha>.<. • %  OuHii II IS t in (TOT'lllPjTBU. i Anah-M. 1/1.. pm. (Inv tin,, My Half HM %  p.m. CompuMt C W.rk. & IS p.m : I'T'I. it Thr Wl t. %  .1 111 IJ p in Carlbbaan .— %  aa 7.40 pm TnRodv of Chnat. %  pm RM Nrw i-rl. Ill p.,, Sunday Ihr wrrfc fc in T>.a Hall Onljrv. M Nawi. 10 10 p i.i. Proa) io IS pn> Tha CaiKniii pm. London Fo* I in -I 0.a.,.. 10 J m Jan 1n*Ki*OVAV JAM t.t IS IMI 7 in TM N.% %  .-. T1H am Nawa Arts-. m tiMi tha Editorial*. TJ3 a.M Pi.rflarun.r Paiada 1*) am. T* I.4S >m. s.nsm. ,. ... Booa it thins 8 •'ii Lr. U.t* M„M, B ... 1 W5MI ConLnua*. p m. Tha i*t,"" ,0 J!,'" "2"* N *"" rrum Brltali. MJ am cio* rw n HIS am p,^. MM t'aiadr. 11 .JO a.m. IHitUa.1' in..lr II.4S am Commonwrallh SurHM N. i IJ io pm. Maw* AnalyM. ilj p m ckBW ^^ „ P.m IU* Martin and Ma Otfhr.tr, | pni tompoaar of Hi. W nl s IS pm Thr Siorytallrr i.a* pm Intrrluda a s "m; i&^trtbToS:. "•• pSr^ a Patada Tom Tha Nrw. t lo B Nan An. lal Frirnd 7u pn. Radio Nnvl illh Survaj H JII Boos a thing s s ., %  w ? ...„: K r ... Our n.f So chalk*. Compoaar butariahi n> li IM %  n %  %  MMffON **s Mr S Mr WBl w :v %  W""'X 3 pm. Urlurr on Chriatlun Vlmr,. p.m Chrl.ua n Rrianr, %  HERITAGE OF BRITAIN New Monthly BBC Scries u *Jt* lnn,n S on Tuesday nexi ilia BBC will broadcast a month!) series of programmes devised lo HI of Britain's heriuge. These nave been planned because the corning Festival of Britain provides fur many British people I moment and an occasion to looh* back and gather strength from the past and to look forward to the future. Some of Britain's mau experienced producers and writer. nave been given a free hand to tackle the tremendous subject of Britain's great heritage in the wa that suits them best. The first programme will be introduced by the well-known faumer-broaulcSBTteRalph Wightman and Is entitled •The Land—the Material Inheritance' It will be broadcast on Tuesday |0th. inst jt 10.15 p.m. The Winter Proms The Winter Promenade Concert Season is now on in Londonfrom Jan 8th. to 20th—and listeners to the BBC's G. O. S. will hear broadcasts from some of these performances Including a direct broadcast of the last nigi'.l of the "Proms' from the Royal Albert Hall. The BBC Symphony Orchestra, with its conductor. Sir Malcolm Sargent, will be heard in all the broadcast,., and will have Amy Shuard (soprano) as their -oloist for the but night. The 'live' broadcast on Saturday at B.15 p.m will include the aria Ritorn:. Vinrltor" from Verdi's 'Aida Strauas'a Tale* from the Vienna Woods' and, a tradition for tne last night of the •Proms.' Ebrar-a march. 'Pomp and Circumstanco.' Recordings of the 'Proms* can be heard on Sunday, Hth. Inst., at 6.00 p m.. and on Friday. 19th Inst., at 4.15 p.m. The First World War The coming; weeks 'Half-Century' programme. No. 2 In tlie series of which we told you last weak will tell <>f the fateful wars from 1914 to 1918. The producer is Francis Dillon, the only BBC Features producer who actually fought in the llrst World W-ir Like nil the programmes in thU series broadcast will be at 9.00 pin on Sunday. No. 2 being on the Hth.. inst. Can We I*i It? We remind our readers that thu second programme in the West Indies series 'Can Wa Do It?' now CHURCH SERVICES HAKVtai rjIK.AL TO IIAT *i — ml. criurtli. Bank Hpn mil M4I t' %  IL"t! r %  ""-' I I.IJI-T. brcu • -t aim ^ a. d Hol> Bucharin .pUln. %i?" ^F^i.— *•" %  > %  — -nan a ill br Cantala in aMrk ascav U.la .til UU pn ^ llon „"*„, SZ'JK* "" %  "* " %  ** * Thr i-.t.wi ,n. M h .!,„ rr.naaa, tt a.^??," 0 '?* *<• "" r. CoMtait s- Voth CH* .,—. %  •? NOTH'CS limiFJ. II am. R* J pm. R*\. 0 Ooabt. DAUCSJTH 11 an, Mb Q t9tmv m Ur Dr. Grimm BSXHONT Harvtt FWtKal Rarvkaa. II am M, p a,,,,,. B m „. H C. Payne SOLTH DISTRICT • am M L'allanda>. 1 p.m. Mr. 1 HlacBman PSOflDWci! II Sarvk. : (JR Siapi> H VAUmjAlJ.: .. mr. 8. C.o*> mm *i ''..."'IM rriMorAi tMiaca DASH ROAD 11 am. II,, a-urui. 3 pm Suit .l-.v Sthool. T n, Bvrnaons d nd Senoan. iirachn £..>.-, HM A Vouns. Calabrai.t — Bav C l.h r.at-i St. PAl I 7.M am Holy Conununu.ii. t ajn %  MB and Satmon SuDtaCt The obiffri ,,l Wr.ln|> I p.m Snnda. %nuol and Chlldran a Srr. ica J p.m. SoMnin B\naonf Jn. rrara a R o n. Subiact: Tha wltnaat U-* CRUTSS i\^i-lariT "*. 1 P m. Kcv. H. Mc. Culanigk. PAVNE1 RAY SO am. Mia PMIUv*. 1 p m Mi G Smrhlai WHITE HAU. 110 a.m. M> C Haipn I'arvol raadval. 1 pm. ChMvan %  Bff> wea: I pm. Re. K. Gnflln Harvaat OD-iMKMOR1AL Giimn. ^ p.... Mt. P. Dean*. HutJn-OWN: I*J am Mt. < T pm Mr T Roat-h. HANK HAIA DM a.m. H '"'"."'' T p m Mr. j. T SPElGHT-ITOWN. || a.m. I.iwrenca. 7 pjn. Rav r 1 MOSAVIAN I Ml am XlMVIilIIOFJIircK STHRTT II am Rav. A. c I'tlsriRi M.A.. 7 pm. Rav. D C GRACK HILL II am Mi. C OnW. 1130 pm Hol> C Itlcnm. MA 7 pm Mr. T Daikar rtljiTBCK 11 am Mr W Ha^r. '•MJatY: 3 30 pm Sunda I Hi KA1.VATIOJ* ABI NOT1CKS UHI1XHBTOWN CBNTHAI II a.m. Hollnaaa M'-atu-n. Company Maatlns. 7 p.m I Marlins. Canduclad I>> Mafoi M..fTall .Dlvlatonal Cnnunandar WH.I.1M1T..S II 0-m. Hollnaaa Mcaun|. 3 pm Company MaaUns. 7 p.m. HalvaUoi Martins. Plaachet Rr Major Gtbba. hl'EItiHTHTdWN II a m Hollnaaa Martins. 3 p ir CaanpanT Mrrtmi. 7 urn s^i.itu.i Marlins. Piaachcr Hi Cap) I DIAMOND CORNER 11 am Hollnru M*rtln. 3 pr Company Marlins. 7 p.m. Ralvatlm Mrrllnf Ptaacliri Umtaiiaiil Mn..i nirx'KBH HAU il am. H oa maaa Martins 3 p m ////>V//^//V/.y^Vr*<^///^///^//V///^^^ I PRINTED COTTONS PERCALES and SEERSUCKER I ,. TIICM Washable Materials arc suitable lor . DSS8SBB, HOl'SKCOATS, GOWNS, PLAYSUITS J BATHINC. SUITS. BED SPREADS. Etr.. Etc.. £ Al prices K:.n::nifrom 54c. lo 11.44 per yard I I ;: I I UET vmns .vow AT N. E. WILSON tSt Co. I ,s,. Hi'h 'i iBig Hil >f tlie Year A'*W//^//^W/////////eWA '''V.W-V/eW//W. Compaiiv MaaUns. T pi Martins. Praath't Uautanai.i EtuMl CORNESt II m Hollnaaa Martin* 3 i I oinpanv Maatins. 7 P %  Maalliuf Plaar-irr Si Major Holln *orth Mil Wintar and 1030 a m li iai tii> tjuaan". Park staaianad ur-Wi tn ptcaa of Rav J R Wintar. wH Dmtiurul had Ri|C trlrouSh Paltli CHRISTIAN !M IT.Nt I I MIST CHURCH UK CJIHIST SCI l'KIIX.rTTWN. UPPKH HAY -I H1.IT SUNDAY. JANUARY M lil -- %  !-i ..r i ,.„„ ..-.„,.,„ KACRAMRNT Lialdaa Tail: Jaha • i3 Tbr brrad o( God i> Ha which comaAh down lro-i l-eing broadcust on Wednesdays at 7 15 p.m. will be on the air on thf nth., inst. In this eerloa Joan FiKueroa and Howard Spencer ot Jamaica, Kawle Farley of BritLfth Giiiana and Charles Wllmot. Director of Information of th British Council are dlscussink what ordinary men and women can do today to remedy the world-wide problems such as illiteracy, disease, malnutrition and poverty which face the world We now offer you the Biggest and Prettiest Assortment of . We can supply you with %  • CONC.OLEUM in various sires and ultrurCive design* Kl'C.S in various sites and attractive designs All at Reasonable Prices Try us before makinj,' your purchase elsewhere BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LTD. (THE HOUSE FOB BARGAINS) No. U Sou SUM Phone 2!0S. 44M & MM.



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PACE TEN Sl'NDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. JANUARY It. Il_ It WASN'T Fun Finding Out LAST night the KlM ,.I Tdfv live in the nexl flat to V, I and I CM 1. II I and Alan, you 1 • fall of Seoul "I !" 1 IhetVa no mystarjr at • lhln *'•"' ordllii 1., •v plan I unD) a If liadnl been fiir the ifTaorI .mi --ar.-el a ship I could have cabled you a A FEW toys ar.0 and this is what I was Intel** like 1 3,000 uriitjs away Own Britain . Yesterday I was talklig with tke mm it tke flat next te turs In Hampstead . IMIIN nut niiksiini Arrives back from KOREA —and he is writing straight to the heart.... ..N|,lc of vvee* ..<> from Seoul It's not m bail if you itself savin i; cicvu-ii. what would in your sleeping-bag all night. If happen I -mild havetilled In jou've nothing else to do but look pt the dote. aflol pounolf JOU eafl keep pretl. It was quit* "i DM experience snug even in a hole In the ground to sit by my own tire with the Hut you are in no stole to loop Christmas rard* still on the manup and fight at 3 o'clock in third and rend all About It morning, and that's the time thes* nod in my diary that heathen Chinese and Korean fU '>iu attack li expected choose foi their attacks, io.ntuhr 11 If comet, bang goes Not fair, is If Hut its then ••u dinner, for we'll oil be answer to air power, and a gor-i i the mope aoai" awl there-won't one too. Uses. In it Allied soldier in Mm) ** hoora f" The date of that miry U %  %  ttam do they do it without freezing U> death themselves, if wo cant'' It mutt be bc.au M Thev recovered %  . th "> !" u >*** to ll I 1 '* "">' %  kind of country and climate. They've H( that particuvcd in it all their live* and the condition of >*" !" "** '<• get on with it. W. Ann'.hcr .. %  i ocnonl i British lwo Hritish newspaper crmrasu.' who'd l>ecii 1 annul shin* In their <.r two days with flu or kind of fever Lucidly Iho Chinese allowed ui j our Christmas dirmer In peace. THIS DIARY ^j f I World Trip Will Cost £13,000 ONE of the most ambition', (lights in history will 1-e mode towards the end rf thismonth It will be round the world via the South and North Polos in five stages. The airplane*—a Constellation air liner The longest stage, from Christchurch. New Zealand, to Cape Town, over the SwUh !*-* will be 7,310 miles In the airplane will be mom* bora of the AdvonturerV Club, Chicago The flub tins bought the Constellation for a arncof Mi*Ms Record breaking will not Inattempted although durllUJ th' 25.000 mile flight n certainly fall The route will be fnmi Chicago to Honolulu, Chrlstchurch, Capetown. London, boek to Chicago via the North Pole. Special Compass The airplane will .-any special instruments including compasses for Polar navigation, radio sets for long-range reception torts and weal her-recording devices One Instrument will keep %  record of every word uttered on board and every message over the radio. It Is hoped to obtain new information about the wrath*" over the South Pole, which hai never before been visited h\ big aircraft. The exact cost is unknown, Im flying a Constellation usunlh costs about £130 per hour Thenwill be more than 100 hours flylni: so It is likely to be £13.000 —L.E.S. OF MINE IS AN ATTEMPT TO BRIDGE THOSE TWO WORLDS Fixed Wheel Planes? JAMES STIAKT SHALL we ever see ., ratlin, ol the trgrd undercarriage on airliners'' Expert* in the design shops may throw up their hand m*e*ti..i. .vith then plans for even more sleek airplane*. Hut must air traveller* he hehi up by "undercut" failures? Oftan an airplane has to circle because one ol its wheels has stuck At he-1—delay undercai i lagoa cause .' trouble, but when thev emergency organisaUom bave to he alerted m case of a .rash landing. At best thenIs delay A London Airport |n< ident %  lew days ago prompted a pilot to ash ma: '•wltfi the speed of thi rnodern iflrttoeTi, would nxed ui der eai rli %  m ch din.i Undoubtedly Ihcy wOuM knock few miles ;.n hour De Havllrands. hullee.. of the %  I COtnat, the woilo | 1 i h %  Inlnar, recently revived the dxed undercarriage when they produced the Hern. .. ger fccder-lmcr." men had time ti dad get on with repnrtluv % %  Don't know how right wo were, it wc reckoned the Chine: [didn't attack us at Christmas be haven't Than was one night when i Hritmh gu.u (,>• guerrillas in the small hours' of the morning. Our boys, who d bran In ihcounCn tiraw n coupin of weeks, actually heard UILguerrillas whispering nmon. themselves before the attack, but trtei couTdnl conceive that anybody would be about in the opt-n I thv on such a hitter night and so t the weather wasn't cold did nothing about ft. enough The .feather isn't bad all l J^£ t ? !" X !" £^iJ r &%  -he time in Korea, thnnk goodJr The sentry was shot and the •f. JIL others taken prisoner before th. v "-• -nav art B week on end could get out of their blanket* Isn't much worse than at there had been a cold sru You ivhen n_ at Christmas .ill the events of tin have taki: home Then, without any ---. "r? K lh.wind comn whlttllnl l">' '"* d ."' .„..„d40 •Bl.ckFrid J> btlow free/mg pobtf m the laliDown at my local then .>. .i fi I tudc of Seoul, and very much low with a brother in Korea. krwor further north When it is as cold n' %  %  most of i, and brother has been writing home saying the South KunN.tr nre as bad as the North Koreans He's seen them shooting women and children himself. No one In the pub believed t. sentries actually freeitng to but I had to tell him his brother Math while on guard. was probably right. I hare an attention to the problem keeping altVO Up iound toe Chosin reservoi there were several cases of Amer~ %  l,..ll,i IHMKHII 1l> entry in my diary for December 15 that says. crypUcalb Sloe Friday for the FuaiHrri Erecufion ices>e." That note was to remind me of a story so horrid I wouldn't have repeated it in that Hampstead pub if it hadn't l>een .i real part of the life our boys are living on' i here On the Thursdav night some ol the NorlhumbcrlaiKi Fusiliers moved Into a new position on th( outskirts of Seoul and set up their tents in a valley Tbsa didst know it. but in the dark they had pitched ramp on one <> the South Korean mass executioi uruunds. Early next morning 29 prisoner arrived in a truck for execution Quartermaster-Sergeant Drown. decant, ordinary English man, was shaving when the firs fusillade of shots rang out. He looked out of bis tent and saw i i rOWd Of Hrltish soldiers runtum towards a nearby hillock. Hi ( iined them and was In time to Ma eight of the prisoners mareheo to a trench and shot through th( hack of the head as they knelt in It. The firing party returned to the truck where the remaining pris oners weic kneeling on tiv ( %  round They marched off .• lurthei eight which Brown told me im-hided two young women .een 20 and 2* and two The h.iy of eight He wore that one of the boys was no more than eight year* old and the ther only T3 Young Lieutenant Gordon McEwan, wh'> used to be a newtpaaer reporter at Worthing, told me the same thipg. The ofM of the WOmen tnd 5V two children were so pitifol BS they were ted Off to a new tfatM h th.,: our lads started threatenuiK the little black-coated maglstratr with a briel-case who wa* supervising ihe executions He protested in Korean at the interference, and while he was talking the prisoners were shot One of the children raised hihead as he knelt in the trench and a uniformed policeman bent down ,*nd slapped his face. After he'd been shot be raised one arm und cried out something in ean that our lad* couldn't understand. Alter each shooting the gravewere sprayed with tommy-Run'and then the earth filled in So normal . Fiftv yards from the graves there was a small hut where a Korean woman lived with nor two small children Apparently the whole thing was so normal to her that she went on nonchalnntlv .-weeping the snow off her djoo' >tep while the executions to k place. Also close by was the magi trate's car, in which a woman t ui full view throughout Our lads were so furious th< wrote out a full report and n following day representatives i t l'NO came out and dug up th graves. But they were too iat> In the night someone had bee there before them. They four tlie women but the bod* i hildTen had gone. I saw Brown and McEwan %  few hour* after they had wr nessed these events. They showe me the graves, then merciful I covered with snow, and demor strated lust who stood when Short of seeing it myself couldn't have been batter itformed Yet. you know when I told th %  tar? in loo pub with the goo. old landlord shouting "Trmt QatiUeman, please'' and my ow children tucked up safely in be. 1 began to wonder if it was true myself Cats? Why, yes Here's a more cheerful entry it my diary: "ll has just occurred to me that I've never teen a ca' In Korea. Mutt atk if they northern I did ask. I asked mi intci prefer who said: "Oh .bave cats. Wc use their skin for furs. Some Koreaiis grow m fond of their cats that the. artually keep them as pets;. Thev eat mice, you know." A comment like that, made lv all sincerity, makes you realis' what a long way from home yoi serf. What sort l a man I syngrnan Rhee? —L.E.8. Write Direct w Airmail lor Fathe rly Ad>me_Jre€ THE STEPPING STONES TO SUCCESS Don'! hKale bout your fulurt Go (or-jrd. co.fid.t thai The B.rni Collt|e will i *oo throuth to a sound portion m any car*.' Coo choow Th. Bnnt Coll^. method. are Individual. There', a Irlendl. personal iou>*S'if. bi!>•*'• .-. < — V %  > Wrt. lotMT •*< I*— AN (*-—.-! %  "!.. UnMnWin BS CPO l-i Bwi-...i_i. i *-• < — %  "•IO-.IIO M_t,...'..... Hh.~ ( sa fc.-ii H.e.1 W>ll-| eiaMln -Direct Mail to DEPT. 188 THE BENNETT COLLEGE LTD. SHEFHHD, ENGLAND l\ew Brain Needs A Cold Tonic llv ( li \I'M \s I'INtllKK PARIS A huge electronic "brain," ba> lievad to ba the most advanced of i;s kind in the world, has just been built for the Government by :i team of Manchester engineers. This was disclosed today by Professor F. C. Williams, the Manchester University scientist whn designed it. at an international 'onfeieiue on robot machines in Paris. The "brain" Is 50. feet long. M-vcn feet high, and contains 3,50n i .'IM > .Ives. It thinks so fast that it can obey 3.000.000 orders in one hour. Britain Lends It < ,ui add up a column or ftOO numbers in the time you lake to ... tin word "addition". When full out the "brain" get. so hot that a continuous air blast i %  blown through to keep 11 COD) 'I in (.nvernment financed the I .HIM the "brdin" will be of great value for working out details of aircraft design and other dorence research problems The 2S0 scientists meeting hero hailed ihe Manchester "brain" us .i greal .ichievement, since It puts Britain ..head of America in the raca tu market these roltntit comncrcuilly. TRUMAN'S DAUGHTER MAY GO ON RADIO NEW YORK. Jun |3. Mis* Margaret Truman, the President's daughter is reported to have reached .. tentative :il!reement with the National Broadcast Inn Company I JD a dozen radio and laiaTtnOO %  'linwB at u salary between $2.00(i and $3,000 for each pcrformancc —it rater QUAKE SHAKE TERCEIRA LISBON, Jan 13 A evafg earthquake shock on rareaira Island. In the Aasarag male among the local population yesterday according to rri ii-hing here to-day. Many homes ware damaged, according to Press accounts but, IIBM were menti..ned has a population of la.noo —neuter. "Bookies" Again In France ? BOOKMAKERS and startingprice betting may return to France Hnechorsc owners and breeder' there have come to the conclusion, that the British system, which permits bookmakers to operate In opposition to the Totalfsator. is %  .he uest Bookmakers were put out of business many years ago in France and all legal betting has since been -onducted through the PariMutuet Conferences have been held recently with a view to urging the Government to change the Act and permit bookmakers once Most of those intimately connected with racing are in favour of the new move. It is understood that M. Marcel Uoussgi is one of the few big owners who would prefer to retain the present arrangement. On a recent visit to France tbe head of an Australian bookmaklng concern was asked lu explain the business of buokmaklng as conducted In Australia. Among those praaanl was a well-known owner and Steward of the Autcull Steeplechase Comm'itee. The intention Is to have betting offices, as in Ireland, in addition to facilities for racecourse betting — LEI LEARN FROM COMICS PITTSBUROH books and fccheol teachtra usually work at cross-purpose* hut Wcstinghousc Baetrk Cof poratinn, home of nlrailes. thinks it table %  % %  cream. Tin ( HI i"iration' .• %  .•• 'lepariment announced that It has I published a comic-type lx-ik %  vhi.lt explains for students rod involved matters as atomhet;rrg; .••' prupulslon. television an %¡ thai nau idanUAe developnients. The lmk is intended as a teaching aid for science classes Ir Junior and seuior high schooU Entitled, "HOW DOES IT WORK*" the books contain It hrlghtly-ioloured pages. —INS Time Bomb Killer Executed .MONTREAL, Jan. 1Z. J. Albert Guay. 33. Quebec jeweller convicted of time bomb murder in a Canadian afar liner in September 1049 was executed here early today. He "planted" a time bomb on board an airliner in a plot to get rich quickly by killing his wife to collect her insurance. The plane blew up in midair kltlh„ Guay's pretty 28 year old wife and 23 other passengers A friend or Guay's, Generux Rust, has been convicted of participating in the same murder and has been sentenced to die. Another friend Mrs. Pftre. will go on trial for murder in February. Rust wa.s convicted of manufacluring the bomb which was placed aboard the plane on September 9, 1949. —rtesrser. 20 Men Build Ship; It Will Never Sail A ship which will never oe completed and never sail is beiii„ built al Southampton for the Festival of Britain. Twenty men have been work Ing Tor more than a month ti build the stem and forepart of a 4,000-ton passenger-cargo vessel. The bow, 3011. high, 20ft. long, is to be placed in the shipbuilding section of the Festival on the Thames South Bank. The outline of the ship will oe framed by scaffolding to give the impression of a vessel undci construction. At night it will be floodlit. It has taken about 15 tons of mild %  teal the type normally used in shipbuilding to build n "skeleton ship. —I^E.8. SPECIAL NOTECE TO TRADERS A SHOPKEEPERS • A NEW BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE OF 80 PAGES OF F^l QUALITY MERCHArWSE WILL BE SENT FREE ON REQUEST LENNARDS LIMITED, BRISTOL, ENGLAND it Eczema Itch ASTHMA MUCUS KIUK. in 7 Minutes loosened Flrsl Day Unn'l lot coughl r %  Harks of aWni-httls or As thin-. i iitn your ilM and -nirfy snotti'i a*"l". titter irr*o Hta unp. m>-, load Kn -.,-. nri. ae* Stop. Notchi for qiutferr. i*li nop. — pni t{J^ Like a happy memory, the haunting fragrance Of Mitcham Lavender brings the Enghih countrynde to Barbxidos Originally made by Potter & Moore in their Mitcham Diitlllery two hundred years ago. Mitcham Lavender has ever tince been dedicated to Beauty the World over. WITCH A M IAV E N O C H IAV£ND£K. WATW TALCUM eowof a TOtLET SOAr SHAVING SOAf BRItliANTINl SOZ(N BHUHAtsfriNr AFTta-SMAVE IOTION BOOKSR*8 nnt-'r, STonFs Wm. F0GARTY Ltd Spveiul Bargain Offer LADIES SUEDETTE SANDALS Slim 13 to 3 Suitable for children or Ladies with small leet M Mc. rer pair Of interest to youn mothers is the arrivnl nf: FOLDER PRAMS At prices rani^ing from $27.52 in $72,110 earh. PUSH CHAIRS At 14.59 and SI 1.311 each. NIBS CHARIOTS Al SIMS each. Housewives, Housekeepers and Hoteliers Please note the arrival of: "FEATHER PILLOWS At S2.M and S3.58 each Wm. F0GARTY Ltd. Speed Up Production and Heduee Wear with I "FLEXO" | Belt Treatment .Xetr Shipment Kt>rfi%llti Reeoired CENTRAL FOUNDRY Ltd. ri...... i:oi ^



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'AGE FOUB SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. JANUARY 14, 1SI B.A.F.A. MAY NOT SEND DELEGATE TO PTO RICO Conflicting Cricket In First Trial y o. s. COPPIH Bright Cricket In Trial Game E. Atkinson 155, K. Bowen 47 C. Smith 43, Performed Well SCOREBOARD T HE Coi 1 U of the BAfA al their uweuag tiul week decided that the financial position or the Barbados Amateur Football Associ-tum wss •uch thiil they could not afford to accept an invitation from the Executive Secretary of tinInterim Tourism Committee to send a delegate to a meeting in Puerto Rico of the various Football Associations throughout the Caribbean. G ^ALLOHb HALCOTT'S TEAM — — They however agreed In principle with the idaa slands in the Caribbean area coming together for this pur(/or -I nil; ., 3 AFTn tnUtmt *J pUUini again to a One dlpiav i.l %  trokaa aU around the wicket. Eric Atkmson rcHredat ISO at Kensington Oval yesterday. It wu the second day oi play of the first Trial same m !"_ c| i dr ."." on '? *• Intercolonial Tournament schedul.!! K fAli od rai< E i. o n—i %  C Wafcoll b C M %  K 1IO* -it •> • lb I DISAPPOINTING CLASSICS Why Do The Classic Races Flop So Often? BOOKIE (' WAICOTTK TlAM-lil l..in AiKiuntpd iwfc. WDOHI I. K Buw.li Smith J I. Walroll r AtkliiMMi l> Do*" r. Mil.niailui. K Lucw C t*tall nM OUt /aS <_,-.< | of the iaianda in the canDDeani area ecming rogeiner lor uua purAtkinson was undeleted at Atkinson t POK and are willing to send a delegate if they receive any financial ttaucall for 1 ia assistance from the Caribbean Interim Tourism Committr— whose auspices the meeting is being held. Thursday hurried stroke —t and he added an unblemished and complete!. UUt thu score yesterday. His that sam.• „w, -itir e inning* uiciuded 15 fours. Al the f£ 4a?" WaIco " Team piled skipper Keith Walcott. Atkini,, UP U2 runs yeausrday against was undefeated for IMTM rail %  ** KU nciWMNC; ANALYSIS %  end of MiCoiii: Hia-1-lwU ll.li. T r; ii. .i i I-...-: I! AIMm-on •i Wmte B K S*n r Millinstun %  Dollery Gets 2 M.C.C. 4 Maiden Overs lor next month. Alkmson was UIMH -Take hia second ball beal him iw.,. A Kl VMIWUI.I VIEW r-puAi is quite a reasonable and logical view Uul I fail to fodow JL the line of argument advanced in some sporting circles Itufet this COOfarsaca would uc m lh<_ nature of a spree or that such a conference lor three days would mesn nothing to Barbados. L. L .Walcoti' Team. Mr. C, L. scoreboard read 312 for 8 Bows** -.Mindly aU the while, making It is uidorlunate that such ideas .uu obtain, ihey are painfully Walcott a Team replied with 93 27 not out. mast rf hit run on the ofT-stde. Dl of s disease from which 1 thought Barbados bau isxovfor* wickeU by close of play. Left-hander E. MUllngtOu E Millingt..n. left arm mod l nd ksng ago, a son of complacent isolationism1 that probably proii.pThe wicket was good and Atkmpartnered K. Bowen. Branker we oarer who was i.rought on to Vru the now lamous phrase al the beginning of We lirst Worlu tt ... son and Bowen took advantage of oroughl back to bowl, this time t'lace Barker did not allow Prov'(io on fcnglaiid, baruadoa is behind TO it. Bowen enjoyed a nne knock 'rom the northern end. fro ' %  •:'•:<' NU I.MI'i^ SUOLTS for 47 runs. He was engaged in Millington got off the mark Pr^crbs had only scored a aingl T ILKE is no use shouting ourselves hoarse that there should be an eighth wicket partnership with "itii a lovely drive through Int.when ho was 1 owlrd neck and HOBART TASMANIA. Jan. 13, closer union Uu-oujhout the West indies, that there should be Atkinson which yielded 71 run* covers for 4 off a full toss from crop plsylng f01 ward to a good After dismissing Tasmania for a better understanding ana that there shoulo be federation in the Bowen took things easy whilv Blanker* last ball of that over, length ball which kept straight IOJ, me M.C.C. lost two wickets not loo distant future ii we are inclined to sties up our noses slid Atkinson was in s punishing He followed up with another through. The H >re was then 36 n scoring 16 runs by the close ol •uspect every move, that might or might not be genuine, that is mood four to mid-on off the next over for 3, Smith 16 not out "Brickie" pu .y on the first day of thssr ...i 10 1* aimed at bringing these islands clour to*< K Branker, playing for C L. bowled by McCoUin. Lucas was next *n three-day match here. I am glad that thu was not the attitude adopted by the Council u/alcoit team and Bowen o, htiUington's stay at the wicket H-: was off U> since nothing could be lost if the finances could stand il and adeleK E walcott s team, were the %  hort-hved. When he had n glide for 3 on Millington Lucas Alec Bedser and" John Warr ha! most successful bowlers of the eored 9, be got into his wicket and Smith plodded on against quick successes day. Branker took 2 wickets for * tu 5 n to leg a good length log the fteadj bo\ lin attack and began in fine weather, two wick2( run< in 6 overs, one of which br !" P ,lched on the leg stump ihey lent 5U 1 a on Hie 'in* 11ets falling with only nine ngH ot. was a maiden and Bowen 2 for by B !" ntt Pr and was bowled off about 80 1, the board. A third wicket partII in 4 overs. hli iiP?,?*' Tne shl '''' u d lo fad Bnii nershlp of 56 by R. Thomas (39i Good fielding by both teams "i" 1 l l e KO B l M2 or 9 *>"• Atkinion as brought back and E. RodweU f|S) hclu.-d to A *t SmniSl^ ^ ved """y !" flrst^nS T* HS?" fEl""" fift 5; p ul1 lhe am 52*4 J ^ ll " The i nut V. u to Bather fom nrewster, slow Mt-arm leg break was top scorer with 49. The MC( At about 1.35 a.ra_ Eric AtklnZ^S IS "T,rJ? )Lr?£ bow,cr WM br< v ht " from *" *• held U P by C hardson son. 113 not out and Keith t^e? hi hat careU^W^-^ r,, th OTn ^ who batting number ten made 23 Bowen. 5 not out/went to the lyttkfttcied Atk,naon ^ d ?*"* ""^ Warr Xook ,0ur ,or "^ A P niddle to carry on from Thurspads to give Proverbs at short ^i!'* ?TT? equare leg a dolly catch. That C Mullins sent down the first was at the end of Branker 1 s over. over from the •outhern end. the E. Brewster, the last man U> third ball of which Bowen glanced did not receive a ball, but saw to fine leg for a single Pacer his partner Bowen well taken Bradahaw took charge of ihe other behind at 47 by wicket-keeper end and both batsmen Took a Clyde Walcott, during the next single off his first over. The 250 vrr rom alcColun went up on the tins after 225 i delegate were sent for the Barbados delegate to meet and exchange nilormaUon and views on football at the least uilli delegates from t ruiidad, Jamaica, British ttuians, Puerto Kico, Aruba, HaiU. Curacao, the Leeward and Windward Islands, all of whom have been I.W K.\M I. rOt FOOTBAJXtKS i NOTHER mieresung point about the meeting || the fact that a select committee has reported on a scheme lor the insurance of players during the forthcoming 1W51 football season. The scheme is a copy of one that obtains between the Trinidad Football League anu the representatives of Lloyds Underwriters i i Council will consider this at their next meeting. It allows for compensation for death by accident, loss of one lin.b or one eye. n.vuical expenses and T— •* %  %  fees in connection wito injuries recei\ ed during League games among other things. Aitnough it has not yet been accepton yet it should be of soou latlsfaotion to tne great number of football fans who have ueen clamouring for the m(reduction of some form of Insurance for player. ever since the begin n i n g of last %  issson. The Council, on which every club in the League re, is not bound to accept this sehesns but something w*^v ss*u have to be substituted lor it and the Council is morally uuuna give some assurance that some form of insurance aga,i,will be put into operation before the 1*51 season starts. THE FUUST TRIAL I.AMI T HE ilrst Trial game in preparaUon for the Intercolonial matches* with Trinidad was played on Thursday and Ssturtiay IMI Mttf 1 saw some conflicting cricket. At one time 1 was exire. BY A FTEH returning from Trinidad and seeing a horse like Footmark performing feats that few three-year-olds are ever capable of. It may seem tlut I am hjrd to pie• that the Derby most disappointing race. By this I do not mean to Imply that i""'Mii*e F<-itmark made our , Creole* bred on thU side of tlic Caribbean look very J3 M l SIii"ilS k 'Ji %  "*•*" % (I (l infcrn.r the race was disappointing, or that If he iC !" w i > %  %  %  %  *"^had been removed wc would have seen a better race. I am not looking at it from such an insular point of view. What annoys me is the fact thai H many things were wrong with the lioises who might have been able to make him gallop. In this respect one is immediately impressed with Ihe regularity with which the Truudad Derbies of the past have been far below what m.'> (uornised. and i>n further NAtctton DM MlUsOt help coming to ihe conclusion ih.it it is as customaiy loi all the clasiicv, both here and in Tnmdad. to (lop. Of course when these races were lirst formed it was lo be expected that with (halted Ik Id ona or two horses would stand MM ntM lbs i--i would always be also rans. ID the War years also there were excuses like intercommunication between the islands. It would be useless therefore to recilc all that past history. f-f/-* a %  /^ R lJT Jusl 0 k '"K l>acl1 l 'he i ... w-r wc come upon W tCfCetS in U auch years as iw*8 when the Truudad Ma] stakes and Derby promised lo be two of tne most evemy contested events of the season. Yet wnat did we see. in tne msi Mgan leaving Ills field behind floundering in the mud while he never appeared lo make a fids* step, in ;nc second An Il-b u %  sudden change lo the outside on the Hrsi turn taking nearly the wliole held with mm. The Gamit i nil lorm, Brown hocket oil form, and llnally Hall Mark's sudden I ET us go back to 1M7. We bad every right to expect a tussle good start with The tburing opening attack of ^^^t^f n ^ y 'T n ^ ^ "* Gu n IU li "? lhc TrU1 i^_ U^J —*-%  tnhn Wsrr hn-i t u,ke '" which, it everything had gone according to plan, a new hi IK i h llu rK or ,ne race wuuld probably have been set. Came ihe nay; c Brown Boy a mere shadow of himself as he was as a two-year-oiu; front Bell and Gun Hill completely absent. Then on to the Derby and. as if to compensate for the failure of Brown Boy, Atomic 11 was discovered in the interim. But on Derby day our hopes were dashed to the ground. Atomic 11 won easily from Front Bell wrtth a half IL Gun Hill struggling for second place. Yet on the second :ia> of this same meeting and again on the third day, as if decreed oy some special fate, we saw what we should have seen in two D .lass races. mutes of play. Atkinson and Bowen quickly „ tot their eye into the fast bowline lv *. £" "". **£. oD s tum ? and were getting the ball ahead £**!*. mto V *"*K* & of them and along the ground. An early change was made by skipper Clyde Walcott wh brought bored with the inefflcacy of the bowling on the lirst day wnen fcauu !" tvalcott s XII were at the wicket but then I was thrided to some nn. "e southern end to replace to the middle. of his bat In nuKing a glide Bowen had played down three lc brcal1 P ltc, "' ,, ouUide the ICR baDs from Mc Collin and in ^tump and Wood made no mistake. attempting to cut the fourth—a Lucas made 22 The scoreboard leg break on the off stump—he ****** 78 or llh Smith 34 net > Walcott's gloves, out The Innings was closed at 142. With just about another IU The interval was then taken. minutes left for play, lltippei Mr. Keith Walcott's team took Keith Walcott shuffled thg bowl the field at.3 .40 p.m. and Tony ing but to no i vail. Smith and N 1946 it was just the n i UtgUO lolly and Auventurees. B) M righu the Derby should have been the same push-over .:...: M ii'i.ti stakes of the same year had proved to be for the But just when everybody got ready to see a cut and dried victor) what must the heavens do but let down with a deluge and lhuii.i.rstonn Ihe likes of which have seldom been seen m the month third over, lie got Lucas to Byei and Uavid hheppard at 10 uf December. Result: u totally unexpected and uncommonly good eket-keeper Wood a catch, both falling to Dollery whose end m^tcj, racc w i lh Adventuress lirst, Whitsun Folly second and the ither tnree or four absolutely out of it l \^t ***• giving place to Barker who Bedser four for 56 was taking his fourth spell for the day. With about 45 minutes left for lorm ei r struck the fourth blow play, the M.C.C. made a disaster his team The second ball of trous start losing John Dewes as got the i>all on the edge of tSe day's figures were four ra, four maidens, no runs, two kets—Heater. CWEALTH SCORE 3/9 FOR 8 MADRAS, Jan. 13 The Commonwealth scored 31 l J batung chiefly by C. Hunte and Eric Atkinson who put on 137 runs lor the second wicket Hunte, who had scored a century m the annual inter-League ;.xiurc between the Barbados Cricket League and lbs Cricket Association, established strong claims by his sevond gooo nutting display. ATKINSON SCORES CENTURY A TKINSON went on to score 156 rotired yesterday and HMD pro* himself to be the only pace bowler to get some ufe out wicket that was certainly a batsman's paradise. 'f>e fielding on Thursday was cotourlew and doud. oni> Brl IUa H Lucas showed any life and Initiative. Greetudge must have ueen sutlering from the nerves, he was the worst sinner, tiul in the midst of all this, Clyde Walcott brought off a magnniceni lei u> -o disuusa Cave when he missed a slow spin MuUhtt i>owlfd t* an extremely badly set field and be bowling without his usual spirit He nad the mufl pace on thai wdc it is true but he did not seem lo make up his mum io i-owi .%  the held set nor was the Held changed lo suit his bowJuiff. wiL.. -^. ii w ^ eW at 3*0 p.m. and Tony ">g but to no i vail. Smith and i'i "mmonwcaim swrea am Norman Marshall from Atkins with C. W Smith went Marshall ware undefeated ot time /or ***** ^ ***" " innings on I end to replace to the middle. call for 43 f .nd respectively th opening day of their natdl Hradshaw had only L Barker, who opened the pace and the total %  eon was 93 for 4 gpei me il'.r\ IMMMlMa il... -".1 #. -i M^^. L-i *** %  ... linn,-! ,.lil*t Kin.**. II., Bradshaw bowled two overs, conceding fire attack from the "southern end. *""• ... sent down a maiden to Atkins. Marshall. i-rM mr was a Eric Atkinson supplied the fast maiden to Atkinson. Mullins win stuff from the other end. Smith kept on to bowl to Bowen and got off the mark the second ball he sent down his first maiden for Atkinson bowled with a rather ; %  !.< % %  %  > The Thursday. game continues on E'^v*'" here—Beater. the day. Bo wen had a narrow escape from a run out at seven In the next over. Atkinson played a lall past Greenidge at silly mld-on mid railed for two Greenldirc quick., ly retrieved the ball and made de "' "P^f> fo f lbw * last dangerous stroke to gully for single, ami the fifth ball of thai over Atkins pushed to cover for brace. Barbadtis Joins Charles Will Meet Tennis Association Walcott On March 7 The BarbaricTable Tennis Barker sent down another ft n g l n M be „ a !" a,c l_ wlth maiden to Smith, making a conflNEW YORK, Jan. 13 Ez/ard Charles will defend In* Id lie N INETEEN FIFTY has been no cxcepUon. mtlicr in Trinidad or Barbados. The first round began here with our Guineas. We had Bow Bells, Perseverance. Cross Bow, WetarcNH and Bowmanstan. all very promising when they were two-year-olds. But by M.ui b this Ugt had been reduced to Watercress only for the Guineas This race went as planned but the absence of the others certainly' look away a lot from It Meanwhile in Trinidad the feats of Wavecrcst at Union 1'ark made the pruspecls for the Trial Stakes look rosy indeed. If could not expect all the big names to appear at least we would merchants in Ihe shape of Bow Bells. Wavecrest, Lazy Hones and Bowinanstou in a MX fuiluig iace that would prove itself a championship event if ever there was one. But by race day this picture had fallen to pieces like a crumbling cake. First to be withdrawn was Bowmanston. Then LatV Bones, who could not keep his condition. But worst of all Wavecrest although he eventually ran, was discovered to be unwell Result: Bow Bells first, the rest nowhere. :cne. Would Cross Bow, OoUataO and Apollo, the three who had promised to be slayers make a challenge to Bow Bells, and Watercress, and would Perseverget over his leg trouble in time? These were the pertinent quesT I1E BARBADOS DERBY I C four-over spell. he Caribbean Table Tennis w orlu Heavyweight boxing till,. Uona a few weeks before the .v.-nt Again the picture collapsed i Association. Tin* was decided al (American version) for the sevclockwork precision. Cross Bow oroved uiult to be trained; Bow Bells ball. Atkinson's second over cost ""' A" 1 ""' 1 General Meeting of ">th time, meeting Jersey Joo was withdrawn after a rigorous meeting in Trinidad; Perseverance^ him B runs. Atkins got five of hu Barbados Association when walcott on March 7. it was anleg never looked like improving and Colletnn und Apollo just could them. Including a beautiful lr they discussed on Thursday at nounce.1 hero today. not make the grade. Result: Watercress first -t the head of a proglance to the square leg boundary ,np M-C.A.. :. letter and Draft Charles defeated Walcott for cession, and Smith 4 with an edge through lf ,cs from **** Trinidad body. recognition as world champion in Kps, The Caribbean Table Tennis Chicago on June 22. 1940. Then tantalising))' mistimed came Mary Anns exploits on the second and third day of the August meeting. Why couldn't we have pleted 5en Mary Ann ((hr* W.iUni.. p op| raea over nine furlongs in vood throw to the bowler's end Had not Marshall fumbled Bowen would have been run out by about two yards. The second lx>wling change win h£*^* W |. 1 J C A, B .7' nkc r T"" "'&'rker was taken off after he Association will be responsibl place of Mullins who had bowled three maiden overs for for controlling table tennis match *was > Atkinso of the dl I (II.II score 260 for 7. another pacer S. White. Jai ritish .,. „, Itarbailos, Bi i:..t ihe first boundary White's first over was a maiden. Guiana and Trinidad whan he cut an inthe find three halls of which It was decided that the InterNorman Marshall worried Atkins. Atkinson bowled colonial Table Tennis Tournauverbs at gully to make his another maiden to Smith. ment will take place at Jamaica 126 and the total Barker was changed around to m September this year. %  bowl from the pavilion end while The Association propose :cr and Marshall followed White was keeping a steady length start the Inli ing Club. Last night Charles her? -topped Lee Om:i In the tenth uuiul at Madison iai c Gai %  —Renter Tennis Results Following are tho results ot „.. has the potentialities of a very useful slow left bowler but he spoils Ins chances by trying to bowl too fast aoon as he has been punished und by bowling over and around the WI.K until he befuddles himself. li.on spin the balL Ho proved this A BADLY SET FIELD I F ha bl howling inswingers that begin almost on the bu< body there is no point setting two slips a gully, ;. third inid-off'and cover paint with only a abort fine leg and tfWN leg on the on-side of the wicket and al most times B0 RUdOO I under auiid that this waj MuUins'idea of the Held but skipper Cl>.i. tfakW wilh lus admittedly sound knowledge of tlie game should have ovorimuvidual ruled this nonsense. Bradshaw bowled With greul determinatiou and dueclion. am manner ana Marsnall followed White was keeping a steady length atari the Inler-cluh Competition was rtaliy fast only in his opening overs but ho made the batsmen up with two comocutive maiden from the screen end. divisions I and II on February H ulav and his bowling of Hunte at 85 was a great tribute io hlj overs. College's right arm legAfter a shaky start, the openMr. C A. L Gale was relenacity. ... ... .... n!S bowler Smith was given hi., Ing pair settled down, but they appointed, President and Mr sets played ot Belleville yesterday McCollin has the polenUablies of a very useful slow i*u ann nm spell of the trials to bowl in were getting runs slowly H H Williams tint Vice Presiplace of Branker Spartan's Bplnner B. K. Bowen dent. Other ofltotfi appointed His first two overs expensed him took over from White and immeare Col. R. T. Mlchclin. Second 17 runs and E. L. G. Hoad was dlalely disrupted what threatened Vice President. Mr Harold Corarhen he had a good oatsraUed to Illkc over frtm h m to be a good flmt wicket partnerbin. Treasurer in place of Mr. man like Cave, come forward lo him, miss and be slumped lor i. smith's second over was erratic ship. John Shannon resigned. Mr C A duck and then later in Ihe day when Atkinson had completed .. ham Bowen drove his first ball, a full Bowen. in his second ball. en. Smith Secretary and Mr O. earned 150 runs, beat him completely with a leg •PJ"'* 1 t1 toas, to the long off boundary for tired Atkins to come down and Edglll. Assistant Secretary KAIUI Walcott's team were out for 342 runs and Clyde WalcOtvs 4 and look u sLngle off thp wecond b,. ol him through the uir. The Xll entered upon their first innings. For the pace bowlers MK ^ fCnd wn Atkinson. Atkinson ball turned away from Atkins' Atkinson was the only ono that made it move and also gut some %  helped himself to 8 runs that same bat for wicket keeper Wood tn out of the wicket ,, over by two well-timed and bring off a line bit of stumping. MILLINGTON MOST IMPRESSIVE powerful cuts past gully off thorl Atkins got 14 and the total score B IT Eirol Millington was to lum in the most impressive bowlmn pitched halls. was 31 with Smith 15 not nut nerformance of the match. Ho only bowled six overs uul these Bradshaw was brought hack lo Clyde Walcoti joined Smith, lie Tornadoai nn vut.ii w.utlicienl to convince anyone who gives any study to the game combine with spinner Hoad. A was off the mark by 2, the second tiday evening as play for the n i then, was B bowler full of guile, on the spot and always comcover drive for u single by Atklnball he received with a drive to Warner Uolion t up and the Itarraiding ropect He got one wicket for 11 runs in hU six overs mn off Hoad's second over for the long-off off Bowen. bados Advaeale Cup was coniirt h* had no rival in this dopartment. „ dsy sent 300 up in 285 minutes Bowen came back two overs tlnued at the Garrison between H K Bowen who scored a useful 47 at number nine f" Keith a^ over i ateFi Atkinson played later and trapped him at 3. He members of the Polo Club. w im'i's tcim took 2 for 17 in four overs and tWf included Civile HOOd ofl Ml back tool toM tol fM Cl*da to HI 0M of III Tnin.,does bejt Cyclone* -G WascdU'l wicket 1 believe this big, good natured '•''"* } ,r J" a single to make his score 150. full-blooded drives off a full toss li.! he will not teU anyone. I think he should be rested until tha ^owm was then 23 not out. Clyde drov Ornament at the conclusion of this game. Squatty left-arm spinner Eris Atkinson at mid-off a sitU-r "BJJJ got a considerable amount of turn uljpt a good McComili B .C.L. player replaced With the score at 35 for 2. G length The holding of Keith WalcOtfs team, led by Kel h Wulcott Hofld >nd lrnmedtato |y h. g „ t Proverba loined Smith Smith's h^mseli was a refreshing improvement on that of Clyde Wal.im s XII Atkinson In difficulty. He forced eye was in and he ws* batting West Indies principally be' y -, y K thc f n ( 'rnational Box the Derby even if. as most people agreed, she would not have beaten O N lo the Arima Derby Trial Stake* w dad sphere were expected lo take pal t, Wskeci -till on the resting list hot fair 1'ini.t. i likelyslaye; Tornadoes Heat Cyclones 7~6 Conditions were good and there r through the air. giving wai keen rivalry, Frequent tia.shes of excellent play brought bursts of applause from the many spectators. Play continues next Saturday. MEN'S SINGLES P. K Roach beat H. A. Cuko Jr.. a—0, 6—3. P. E. Worme beat W Nurse. 6—3. 4—6 6—4. L. St.Hillbeat H. L. Toppin, that "hi LADIES' SINGLES Miss E. Worme beat Miss P King 7—5. ft—7. Miss J Benjamin beat Miss M. ttamsay 6—4, 6—2. MONDAY'S FIXTURES LADIES' SINGLES Mis.> E Worme v. Mrs. A. Gibbon? MEN'S DOUBLES W. S Crtchlow and W H. Allan v. J. D. Robinson J. R. Hunte. ily horses in the Trlnlicraal and Lacy Bones —. sluyer. in the oiling. Would he live up to the promise he had shown at two-years-old? It is to be recorded that*4ie did not but In spite of this the Arima Derby Trial Stakes did not lack excitement even if it lacked class Top Flight won in a driving llnish from Sun Glee, and to emphasise the mediocrity of the held none of those who look part gained promotion t.ftor the meeting although some of them uciv winners of other races not have meant much tn the p.i.i hut in Inis day of rapid promotion of Creoles it certainly demonstrates the poor view taken of the classic candidates by the classifiers F INALLY we come to the Trinidad Derby and as I have only recently described the race and tlu pralfanlluttka I will not go into But the sequence of circumstances which, caused the race o tum out as it did, runs so true to form that one is tempted to con•Inde that there is some hand l>eMnd the scenes directing the show. fid MEN'S SINGLES E. Worme v. P. Roach. Hutson v. A. Jemmolt EdghlU v. D. Lawless. Why couldn't Wavecrcsl h.ivc recovered from his illness? Whv hould Lasy '.ones have hurt his hoof within a few days of the race? Why did il have to rain so haid only in Iorl-of-Spain and its en%  irons and not particularly in any other part of Trinidad necessitating the withdrawal of Cross Bow? Why was Blue Ribbon allowed to .tart anywhere else but on the outside, when it was known that she would iw<'bably bolt, which he promptly did. and in so doing, run ..cross Bow Bells (among others) who in turn had to be snatched up -nd sttuck herself? Why did Watercress run about 20 pounds below her forni and ihtn tmc back on the third day to run a close second <-4" ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAT STUIT %  DIAL l PHOSFERINE for youthful vigour! Lack of vitality is s familiar symptom today. Nothing really wrong, people feel, but simply (hat th.-y haveloM their normal happy tenor of life. Their reserves are low. Their resilience hai vanished. 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PACE r.lGHT SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JANUARY U, HB1 The Achievement Of Cinderella—Of The Beach Oscar Wilde Transformed If* < \>ll'. I I \ HUM' Cc** be.ehwc<,r. SS!*2S!ieB Y Dorothy Barkley %  olugnc. su> hat* and '"-'"I !" lh, ,,,, %  epor.trl, for wear ove. arr ih.rule lot Jiiy b*.nh. jny "*! outragepouruling. ihc other interptjUH;.. st word for word from palm, by a sunbaked bea*h is aft The nu;cirll\ of drcMci have bat f,.l rut aav H |.< u.ere al usually an exa.tly s,.ited him. for It allowed Danan C.ro k unhrolWTl tradition But 01 We a m*^ .uawMrtiA MP -u-Sl "" ulh m;II .. a -ad Mrnjo Ulh with hi. own voice and Wlttattj Aatowo. the Imo-nd^/eS ol -££ lor 55. Ui-Z u. !" ly SW^OD? wilhTE %  ** notion lor those who never taw reproduce his own conversetlon mg.tragedy already upon him he thm B no ^4 und tmtl rule .ho^dai. The "-k^L ^^--S WlOO earned on from year to y*r. often women who prefer the absolutely plain classic swiinsult—talloreo -. '...1'. 11 goes out %  >i.tahiori. A VafffaUflaj ,tf this at> H: DM UN (1 f ...ntrsst in elthei colour. All ho Hal dv htmhe *"***•** oI '•* ok *MI ior *"• l'-**". usually cut -tnoing U)ng Piccadilly In in'these duologue* (reprinted In suddenly took a holiday 'from ,here no ta ^"'<>a,. Th, legal In fur collar and intentions) Wilde, the talker was lerio-comic writing and in three or heard his magical conheard on paper for the first time weeks at Worthing threw off The Importance of Being £mrst which is sheer gaiety from beginning to end. a romp with only one iiemgn— -to please and entertain, fluImport a net* is Cnngreve with .HI ..(i.ied lightness of heart. Wyi.i 1 ley without his grossness. II usscd London in 1895 and imitelj ti-ik il* place among the '1 rplsccs of English light com1 Throughout, the cumulative tffael Of the laughter set off by the 1 utitlmuiii-, word-play Is overwhelming, and the wit lie* as nturn In the situations as 'n the n, :hal he may not have been cxaggeraiing when he made Tae Decstv of the remark, recorded hy Andre i^na mu6 Tht (llde I iiaya put my genius Into crttti I*J Artist my 11:I haw put only my talao< lM buinant exHi* works, howpgfjUoni of his Ot .< Milld and dur-theories about erement, bin enough to i,f c ami art Thcv ulur rme, and though dtsd with dinVull they may Oc only a pale reflection i)jl( j jbslruse subol hi-. eiuut they do at least reirci* -•* %  l .: m nearly all it* aspects his death we can M! that he wrote so much popular this year ate _. The neckline bj casual nylon "" rayon-wool-lastcx. year 10 y*r. often without collar DorviLk Blac and white are still the Arm phasis is always flowed one dreat which buttoned favourites; a new colour is the onto the shoulders, tunic fashion d **P "midnight sapphire" and was completely ilae v a lf i Of h:it dor* the uanoii consist" Tbars li ih tarty collection of poeni^. imblishrd when he was 27. and there is The Ballad of Readir •" within n |M*nod of little more thnn seven years, there are two colic.tales, ook of JJ"g Oacar Wilde them. He does %  extricale himself from seemingly untenable positions: hi Three years later came one of nis most outstanding works. The Ballad of Heading Gaol. In the mu-rval the butterfly had been Vrukrti OB the wheel, and the tale of the man doomed to be hanged because he had "killed the thing he loved" is unrelieved n..Kedy. Many readers, while ngjllglltg its force and sincerity, ~.victit.n with his sophis. rii# picture ot 'ry^hough some of the pronounce, havo thought It the product of a •' ments he makes are at best halftronsienemotion. In fact It w. :10ns Of f. %  MglOB, ;i l... .. P. n "renHMea\i?n? r nertnaBr^ tnillw. Soinai7rnCoiL ha tJgg n'>' ""l u <* Imitates heightened a sympathy with the Frcnih ^alMtrt three comodvArt ne v ,hi "Hamlet Inventunderdog that had already found dramas, and %  romedy-faxce (The •* ,tu l^wlmisn. that characterexpression In The ffappy Prince fmporfancr of Being Earnest). ises modern tliought and "the „nd in the essay on Socialism, world has become sad because a %  r, -nousth not oarP U PP*'> w ofee melnncholy"— Oscar Wilde's countrymen have which is plain nonsense Ucularly well known, except perhaps In Germany, where they have always l>een highly appreciated. contain much that is charaeterlttlc and revaaOlng. They arc closer to !" !" %£l the Grimm Brothers and Hans C £ !" !S*atVLx>* 1 Andersen than to rVrrnult; thit is *Jf{} \* £ to say. they have an underlying *:. '*'"• .—,......... -*^ii ni %  '" •"" never claimed that he was a ..--. „. writer cf the llrst rank; nor did Much of the thought doai1 not hl ,. V(r make rwtx a cltm mm ppear to ug m really orudn.1 M ., f C n the Continent, however. For instance, today It Is lnwt a „„ WIllin(l are VfTy U ghiy Ye! even lus ""- %  < %  h ** n id tiiat arresting is the >PH* with the single exceptl ecause Wilde was so obhis plagiarisms and borrowing* maty enjoying himself—"tosspav* undetected, and accordingly to the overseas reader he seem xKi m thoughts like roses, and playin ing with them m happiness of heart." as one of his biographers seriousness and express a vision of life which 1* at times sad and bitter There mistake than to Imagine that Wilde wus essentially a frivolous jester It would be nearer the mark to say that he was fundamentally %  moralist, and stories support that Christian Idea of sacrifice tor other* Und* expression In two heart-breaking lales. The Happv Prince and The Niuhtlnoolc and 'he Rose. His sympathy with the poor and oppressed, an element his character which some havi found surprising -nd paradoxical ^, ,„ comes out in Tht Young King a le |i you the truth." Dorian Grau PJ.'* !" lde *" eU ^, story that shows him preoccupied bears this out The character of nc doctrine or art for in s saki with the application of ChristianLord Henry Wntton Is Wildea discredited to-day ir ity to life It makes an attack on mjjg|r_ and he leaves little unsaid. i'>untrv. never had the materialism of so-called The book has been described as elwiueni exponent. His principle f or on lt Christian society which neither his spiritual autobiography When of creative criticism was hn im ..dditlon There it th< sparkle Gray, but the debonair gaiety Is missing "Give a man a mask," de had wi original than he really was. That was the explanation suggested by Shaw to account for Hie success in Germany of his irly poems Wilde written rrQl But Wilde was much moi naster of epigram. Hi \ than pro n*ArH si'iT on providing comfort and coolnes In the heal, different design* am colours come with each summer Illustrated here are two ensmble~ designed by HorrockeeThe lirst comprises a one-piece beach suit, shirt and skirt The -c>lourings are bright and gay note especially the casual set of the collar and cuffs which are out In one with the shnulderv Th skirt, which can be worn with It, is full. The second "Utflt is a aundresG with white pieoue bolero to match the facing on the bodies Thcomas In a wide range of colour*; red, bottle green, rust. UVl and blue, all with a matching stripe design Cotton, understandably, is the Ohtaf material. This malarial, for ra long considered the Cinderella ~>l Fabrics. without prasUga because It was cheap, hag now which was reversed with black. No more after-forty fatigue! If you feel 'too tired' to enjoy life aa you ftwMld, too listless to take a keen and happy Interost in all that goes on around you. tlna advertiwment nan good newa for you. During the last twenty years, countless numbers of people ail over the world have proved that. If you take Phylloaan tablets rrguIaWjf. your Bteady gain in vitality, energy and cheflrf/ulneas will delight both you and your friends. To regain nr ioie de fit re. to feel young;, gay. and full of energy again, start taiefno hi Phullotan tablets to-day f PHYU0SAN fortifies the over'forties $?S.<£ ELECTRIC The most attractive feature 01 :hls year's beach wear is IU adaptability. Sunsuits. topless 01 li-ik-well whether you are pale honey-coloured or darkly lanneJ Navy and garnet-red are good dark colours for the beach. Swim Wear. 1MI This year the -martest swimsuits are strapless one-plcce Beach coats are an essential for his own Bhoulder-atrapped dresses cm. affairs, the bras o cut and bone.i the bathing holiday; terry towellmore easily be transformed Into a dre that they are no problem to the ing is the most practical material beach wear by thi wearer. However, for diving and kw these. For casual wear, a ceding, there are deton jacket may be lined with terry the Victorian child nor his parents he wrote It he had not met Lord portant contribution to aesthetic borvllle have a neat white bolero lachablc straps "or halter fasten, towelling in" a striking coloui ubsequent theorv and has had its Influence cun e( all the wov round, which Inga. But there are always many contrast, every country where literary criticism is accepted as an art can have been expected to appreAlfred Douglas-, and elate, and in depth of humanlevents provider! a terrible contartan reeling It anticipates both Armatlon of his belief that "Life The Soul of Man under Socialism imitates Art far more than Art (written three years later) and imitates Life" The writings of Oscar Wlldi The Ballad of Readtna Gaol. The histrionic element In Wilde's have a triple value They spread ^ ^ ,,-u .. nature drew him early towards the laughter (the civilised world IF From the stylistic point ot view theatre, and having aucceeded In the gayer for his passage through *"* £?'" ll) ; lM y h vt %  ,on,c cn *^t <"> "" the mind; and they communlcat* 1 his passion for beauty In all its manifestations, from Pater's des COMMUNISM TAUGHT IN CHINESE CHURCH , %  lib 11.1-111, Bl of the fairy tales, especially other fields of Utcratu those In the second collection. A began to write for the stag House of Pomegranates, are InterSalome was refused a licence In estlng because they reveal Wilde's England he turned (with his growing delight In gorgeous, entongue contemptuously In his crusted language Under the Incheek) to the composition of fluenre of his two great masters, comedy-dramas that followed the Walter Pater and John Ruskln, he stage conventions of the time fabricated passages of prose with They all pointed a heavy moral the deliberate Intention of making yet they were In essence' immoral, words produce the same effect as and a negation of his own artistic n piece of music or a painting creeds. Almost their sole merit Is Vnfortunateiv the descriptions of that they provided a setting for Jem-els and tapestries in. for Inhis epigrams. Wilde was prodigal LONDON Jan 13 stance. The Birthday 0/ the towith the coin of his wit. and he Chinese churches are'often used controversy when he spoke fan to now strike us as artificial could afford to be. for he sentfor "indoctrination" classes by tea In a BBC programme (.%  11* and silly. ered Ji frnm n s w |n ily 'nexCommunist officials, though they "English Msgarlw" M _,„. ., , haustible treasury; yet he was not remain available for Sunday scrthe lx>ndon ie auctions >ill h ^Jt'l^t ^'JVILl^L^Ll abt T f, t ?P' nB 1 t ?£i ck !*£* %  £! vlce ,hc Chure ' England says re-opc.wd and Sargent s, time when he was experimenting recoin it. He ^Introduced In these tn „,„,,. p i acM the clergy are this would be sn In with various forms of literary explays many of the epigrams he being required to obtain permlsin London's commerchVl ITc Sine pression. Simultaneously he tried had previouMy let fall In his books si 0 „ f tom ihe authnrtliea to hnlrt th P wae >n 1*. h M ^*, iwwiak two spenx How To Make Tea Tea Is a drink to which th English are more than partial u bout which they disagree vlolen start on the subject of the wain which the pot should be uan %  how much tea should be used pe. person, how long it should b allowed to draw, whether n I. should be put In Ann, last or .1 all, and so on and so forth. Fain *. Sargent threw hlmsef into ml ever, do they forgive them": thai skill has been in abe, that tea supplies are imp f uvi 11 sellers will have to come to Britway. The tea must be left to di ain. the largest buyer of tea in for six minutes and then drunk the workl. and expert private buywith milk but no sugar Milk 1 rs should be able to secure better npi.arently enables tea to hold it u,ualltv teas for us. taste longer. Another fact that Sargent disclosed is that smell is All tea buyers. Mr. Sargent said, rnore important than lasts in are men. although women do more ai-pieciating tea. The palate reglstea drinking. Before the auction tfn the teas tang but it is ttuthe buyers taste samples of all teas del cat* aroma creeping up the U be sold and they, as an example nostrils ; from the hark of the to warring housewives, agree throat that gives most pleasure, almost unanimously on how to When the tasters have sampled make a pot of tee. First of a I they the teas they go to the auction and weigh the tea carefully. The bid for those they consider best weight of a shilling should give suited to the blend they have enough tea for a half pint pot. planntd. Sargent found It difficult This pot should he warmed slightly to predict exactly what will happen on tin outside, tintea put in and when the auctions begin again but freshly boiling wster added. It IS he thought that as competition important, tea tasters maintain, to usually leads to cheaper goods and use freshly boiling water; otherbetter services it was reasonable wise the leaves will not come to to hope that an era of better tea th* top and draw In the right drinking in Britain was at hand. The rcirigerating unit of the G.B.C ssJUssjeaaaf is EO finely made that it is hermetically sealccf after manufacture and never needs servicing. Thii refrigerator will stand up *o any extreme of climate — and it's I vt!) to look at, too I SolM chromiwnvpUtsd THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD. BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS REftUS£NriNC IHZ GfNEAAl CIEC7MC CO. LTD-, Of fJiGUNO The CC^PS^HK works hardsr... . because the driver's work is easier! THE NEW AUSTIN 2 AND 5-TON TRUCKS A truck can be as powerful and urong M —but it can only wort • hard ts the driver. The new Austin I. %  dassj is built to take care of that. The cab make die driver* #01 1 .•:. more t-omfurtat-Ic. and i| i y ...: vou look lor ID an Austin is there in ti.i sod engine. HIRg ARI SOMg CAB riSTURII . Full "three-tcaicr" %  ItuKibir driving seal); lockablc doori; dust and dr-.nrni proof; resfl comer windows [ door window vesnastsng paaels. .i lulled ventilauon; iingk or diiling rear windowi ; ukesse Jiuf radio. •AATl AND lisvici Aumn Ssrvtts tovsn tin %  r+.-r, 1: %  -whirs can as sess 1 m Ufpr I -spstn. AUSTIN • yon cr.n deptnd on itl <:. 1 lull .hi-ll. DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO, LTD. (ECKSTEIN BROS.) I J71-I J7* BAY ST. • BRIDGETOWN 0"T Cbl'U %  AMINt, H AH IHSkAMS FOR ... GOODNESS SAKE DRINK Vi-STOfJT YOU CAN EASILY *wf? HEALTH/ i/otft STRENCTH/ UOWI VITALITY*/ 1Y MINKINC r rnijT4iuiiir CONTAlHINe >Vw\E7} VITAMIHB ZpodfteoW THE VITAMIN STOUT fm 0TAINABLI [ROM AIX LEADING GROCERS '• % % %  ft Sor Ud-Agenl! BOUHC'HG A PIN tells us about pinking Our tdeniisu prouu Uul ihii u a aluderout misrcprueauiioa of a Mrious letl 10 safeguard ihe Anli-Knock qualities of REGENT. Whal really happens is that regular tests arc made in a special engine, the compression of which can be progressively increased until the fuel is made to knock. A %  Bouncing Pin" resting on a diaphragm in the cylinder head measures lie intensity of Knock electrically, thereby enabling us to determine and control the Anti-Knock qualities of the sample. This is only one of many tests which safeguard the quality and performance of RECENT petrol. REGENT PE !" OL S %  fc ^ 11SIT ^ %  Sterling Quality 0 JAMES A. LYNCH AND DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. ***



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PARE TWO SUNDAY ADVOCATE SI M.W. JAM \K> II. |i,i PLAZA i h • %  re-— Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) PLAZA Theatre — OISTIN -THY. MH.HTV JOK VOING" uohttAv VMI TXI>DA\ i ...i : "III \ \HI /| "FOLLOW MF 111 Illl. & SAVAGE SPLENDOR" with Arthur KENNFDY i aim by Terhnlcala I HI I YOURSELF AS OTHERS SI• E YOU. W. ( .ill Supply H1HROR I.IASS %  In All *t NOTICE B. l* I iiai.a If (o. %  I I ....... Haoaail M.e-el to inform :i'l their Friend* anil Curtomrr*. cimi tile puhlh%  i\ NO w.w comncran nianil.11.1 ... mmiam, %  i I,I III Bar! n '.iiri.il. ;II... %  in any otliai •&S*****S*SS*y*"'*'"**^^*&S**iW*iV.V,lW*i*v*WWH*IIA QaJtib C*Uw4 LVa, H K 1951 llatlio IMavers BRING THE WORLD RIGHT HOME TO YOU DESIGNED FOK DELIGHTFUL ENTERTAIN MENT THIS EMBLEM GUARDS ii,: CHOICE OF MILLIC": BACKED :. THE BEST RADIO SERVICE ORGANISATION MANNING & Co., Ltd. AGENTS. Dial 4284 HARRY G DAIX who presided over the Caribbean Medical Conference just held in Trinidad, sad Mr* Dain were intransit passengers Uu-ough BarbaM yesterday from Trinhl:t ft t Luria They have gone over to St Lucia for the week-end and will to Trinidad In lime to connect with the Galflto on her wav to England. Mr. Leacock and Dr Muir. he Bid. would be returning to Barbados today. Electrical Engineer M R and Mrs Rupert Farmer arrived by T.C A. vestrrday to 'pend a month's holiday in Barbados They are staving with Mr. and Mr* A O Gale at "The Hope*' St George Mr Farmer is nn Engineer with •Hydro Quebec" Mrs. Farmer is he former Elsie pelrrkin Leaving To-morrow M K. and Mrs. Arthur Blood who arc origi*Uiv from Massachusetts now live in Ham They have been touring the West indict and yesterday they arrived Trinidad by B.W.I.A. They have two friends in Barbados. r. and Mrs. Greaves. They leave tomorrow lor Haiti They are staying at Super Mure Guest House. Here Last Year M R WILLIAM MINER who v.as in Barbados last winter rriveu by T.CA. yesterday .oming. Mi Miner is assorted with the Miner Rubber Co.. nd lives just outside Montreal. Mr. Miner is here until the middle of March and is staying at Cacrabank 14 Abov.-: ERE lo spend a holiday with relatives are Mr. and Mrs Lionel A Pile who live in CleveI. Ohio. They were accompanied by their ton Mr Robert Pile. Mr. Lionel Pile is President of Hough llakenes Inc. When he left Canada, Mr. Pile told Canb the temperature was ".U ahove." Road Contractor M R. AND MRS. CHARLES A BIRGE arrived by T.C A yesterday to spend until January 2flth In Barbados Thev are stay me at the Ocean View Hotel. Mr. Birge is a Road Contractor and lives just outside of Toronto In Oakville. After their holiday here the. plan to visit Jamaica Paper Merchant M R and Mrs. Francois Turgeon of Quebec City arrived from Canada yesterday moniin* by T.C.A. to spend a holiday hi Barbados. They are staying ai the Windsor Hotel. Mr. Tiirgeon who is a paper merchant, is partner of L. P Turgeon and Sons. This Is their first visit here. Hare Until February H ERE until February 12th when they return to Canada by the Lady Redney are Mr. and Mr Gerald O'Reilly. They arrived yesterday by T.C.A. and are staying at the Ocean View Hotel Mr. O'Reilly Is a retired business man. Venezuelan Coney Island M RS RITA GRAY and her young son Peter, who for the past three months hove been holtdiivmg in Barbados staying at the Paradise Beach Club returned tn Venezuela yesterday morning bo B.W.l.A. Mrs. Gray's huabuito i* the Marager of Coney Island in Caracas. From Montreal D R. AND MRS. PERCY WRIGHT arrived yesterday .pend a holiday with Mr. and Gordon Gale. They came in on the T.C. A. flight. Dr. and M Wright are from Mi MK AND MRS LEAR WOOD, who bad been holidaying In Barbs do", returned to Canada yesterday by T.C.A. Teaches Modern Dancing AM H ALBERTO HOLGUIN Bark To Canada M R AND MRS. LEAR WOOD who had been in Barbados for the past two month* hohdayBmbados Scholar — TP .pent a months holiday ii Barbados returned to Venetue) yesterday morning by B.WJ.A. '"B with Lear's family returned t Mr. Hulgu.il who works for the Toronto yesterday by T C A. Venemelan Governrnent lg the Ler %  Director of a School of Modem Dancing in Caracas. He has thirty students. Mr Holguhi started dancing when he lived ir California at the age of seventeei He also holds classes at some Of the Federal and Government schools. He was staying at the Aquatu Club Staying With His Brother D OWN to spend a holiday u Barbados is Mr. Percy Wood Vice President of the Canadian K..i.k Note Co.. in Ottawa. He is gtaj ing with his brother and s'sterin-low. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wool of "Culloden House", Cullodti. Road. Thirty Years Ago M R. AND MRS WIIJ3ERT E HUSBANDS are at presen* holidaying in Barbados Mr. Husbands; a -Ritrhadtan. is Manager of Greene Travel Service ID Bosto.:. Massachusetts. He used to be with the Advocate Co., Ltd., thirty year* ago Mr. Husbands Is a cousin of Mr K. N. R Husbands, Speaker of the House of Assembly. They are here unt 1 the end ot lanuary when they will visit St Lucia before returning here to leave for the US Grenada Holiday M ISS CONSTANCE I N N I S S who teaches at the FoundaUOn Girls 1 School, returned from Grenada yesterday by B.W.I A where she had been for the past low weeks on holiday, staying with friends. Twice A Week | SEE that it t. Airways have 7, ln e rea s<* TrcSKWe4<,, A L'nlversal-International Release COMMENCim. TUESDAY ISTH at IIS DICK POWELL MARTA TOR EN VINCENT PRICt in RtK.UI > RK.IMFM A Universal-International Picture *TMIE Barbados Orchid Cir A having a get-loner %  Sunday, January 21st at 5 p.m at Featherstone, Upper Collymon Rock. There are quite n few natters to be discussed and a goon ittendance is expected Atlantic Region M R. and Mrs. F. M. IgWregoi arrived from Canada yesterday morning by T C A to sperm a week in Barbados They are •laying at the Ocean View Hotel Mr McGregor is Operations Manager, T C A.'Atlantic Region With P.A.A. Puerto Rico M R. and Mr* Charles Hitt and their two children Roger and Marylin arrived from Puerto Rico via Trinidad yesterday morr.mg by B.W I A. Mr. Hitt Is Flight Superintendent of Pan American Airways in Puerto Rico. Mrs. Hitt ia the former Milllceni Hnhtton of Barbados. Proof T HRTY-THREE pSMengari arrived by T.C A. for Bar bados yesterday. Elghi were destined for Trinidad and six got off at Bermuda. This Is definite proof of Bar nados' rising populant. Canadian tourist*. Hotels and Department Stores M R. and Mr*. J Harper Ker • from BnthurM N.B.. oc rompanied by Miss Marion Branch arrived from i yesterday by T.C.A. to neuday In Barbi Thev arc ttayinu at the VtadSot Ih lei Mr Kent is associated with tin firm of W. J Kent and Co Ltd and Miss Branch is SecrrtaryTTeasurer of the same Company. This company owns three hotels and two department gtori in New Brunswick. Appointed Manager "'-pHANS Canada An Lines an A nounccs that Mr W. A. i. ''Bill" Stuart. Station Manager a Seawell Airport for the past year. hah been appointed Manajwi Barbados. This new title |s con sistcm with Mr. Stuart's opero tional and traffic rcapons-bilihehere Four Branches A RA1VING by T.C. A. yestei ^ %  day morning to spend %  holiday in Barbados are Mr. ami Mrs. John M. Sharp** who aic from Saskatchewan. Mr. Sharp* La President of Electric Equipment Co.. Ltd., in Saskatoon Thi company ha*, branches in Sank. toon, Rogina. Calgary and Edmonton They are staying at the Paracli.-t* Beach Club. -->y.^-v>>aiaas 6c ooocoocioiieit v FOR YOUR CROP REQUIREMENTS CANE BILLS CUTLASSES SHOVELS WOVE WIRE—BRASS & GALVANISED BASS BROOMS WIRE BRUSHES SEWING TWINE STENCIL INK OIL CANS THE IIARBADOS < O-OI'I IIA III I COTTOIV FAHTOBY LTD. Travel Agent HEMINi Trav.-I M B CHARLES W Of Hrmlns I Agents of Hamilli HamioR anivad by T.C.A. yea* terdav lo spend a ho'iday henTbev ari. gloving it the Hotrl Royal. SHOPPERS GUIDE A good, strong Blue Denim at onlv 74e. ? yd. Excellent Khaki Shirting at 96c., and t*V. Khaki Trousering ol hardwenring quality at SI.37. A good, strong Striped Cotton Drill, 54" wide at no more than $2.26 yd 36" School Uniform Linen K:.c. 94k.. and Mr. New storks of School Girls* nnd Nurses' Shoes. BOOKS FOR YOUNGSTERS, CHILDREN AND ADULTS. SI BSTAN TIALLY REDUCED TO CLEAR AT EVANS WHITFIELDS I



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PACE TWELVE SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 1M1 CLASSIFIED ADS. WANTED TtLEPHONt 2 SOS nit I, 11. iindftumM. b#* throuah lln medium t" Hunk all inu-r Me--el •• %  *> l**ll.v e/ltk ... ia*M rorer.l taw%  rd In the death of WMeaan >ltll*l JaM Berks** iwnV J.aV, ^. .brother.. rrl* Heckle. .-nd '.* ••*-'" KM* -" %  %  %  in* i...***! and .h. i da iW bereave • rir-f r.i..ih.r Mri Alberlh. IL.yne. *. • • tailed to reel on. ~ih I MP, yq %  %  '•> %  > t bf r**nger**ecea by her Children end Grand-ehlldrei. i*ii] la .:; MEMO-UAH nUIIn twine mrmor. of Will* nn died tto IMA ( J.nrj 1MT Pour tear* have rolled .1— *V Some m*v are a smile I ,i H %  .,.. %  < ..tr D PavUrkon, nailing*! I11H -* MCrUCTAKY lor ROCKLXY OOLaT CUTB Salary I tee.Op par. Rieed* *gaMwrr with Iraa quarter* In Bat ever quarter* me*, containing twa cloeed S5KT-' Too Secretary. Golf Cluk, BBBPRRANZAFully lutnuhM. modern convenience*. On M J CM CO*** Ftxjtia SI-S3 *"TID AT OWE I who ran praaa Huffman riwhun Ml M • .1,. .1 < I Ml, i o. ...... %  Black Mo K. %  1 %  Tie .weet to tmnk well meet again. Wkei. O-TI.II> are no mere. Ana that Ihe on*, we loved ao well. MOB a>. I"" *>(•**• •a bee loving on Fred A Bawan >l StalmKill St Mlch-el. % %  i!T\THFin.I> Th. Ci-ae. rumiaho* f-om January ISlh Apply. Mr* A. %  Herbert Phona MB* ill M-dbt — % %  %  HUJJ MU aa Re*aM>ieba full* lum Met -alar anal RaTh' i on s AM AL-TOMOTIVI CAB Uw > rrllrnl rondll ii Pia-.tntn HH M ,-., %  .-.:Mi %  CAOne Morrl O.fard IS** 'OSi don* IVMO miJi i Ono standard Va.ifuarl %  iwo miiai Bdih rara %  • lallau. inonUt Avpi HI..I. U 1 M 3r MI9CELLANBOUB wairr TO in BOUT 1 kodrocoB huaoa lo n %  a-. Writ, Bao D.D .VO A**, ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. ooiUna hum Anu M *. -Bonairo" Slh %  J T,n. ,.i %  kl Paw Mh January Ird Fioroi p MSI. warp and Amotaroom—MS -Oianiaatadh IMh Jtmwy law Sallln to TrlnKlad. Paramaribo and ~\ ~HwMllA" ilh Janu"CoUiro" Hth February Anlwrrp and Plfriowa i Hal. B %  nuary taI Until** Paaaenier vaiUbla. I P MVBBOM, KM AnommodaUon TW M V. -Doarwco d will ropt Caro and •* I.UIUI. % %  Tlnrani. laaa-waj and Aruba Kailn.d an Uta mi January IMI The M.V -Carlbbaa-.11 -'repl Carco and Paaarfiden in. Doantnlra. Antl*u* Mo^taarrel. Nrrla and StKTl. Dato a* departure to *a notirled B.WJ SCHOONEE OWNCBS ASSOCIATION, [M Telephone: 4M7 HARRISON COLLEGE %  m M Harrlaon Colbkje i on r-o*dny tha lk Januaif. %  V, and rfc* athool wBJ QUEENS COLLEGE Ton nest term at Quoen'i Colloda bearh* on Twaada* tha lih January 1 and the drhaol will DO in aaoato B : fro em -ISM pm S. C. COMB1LN. Ac tine amatory, Uoramind Bad>. Canadian National Steamships n opal ment of Mur •*, aoaaanffP, IMt. 11 MALVERN %  DaVn B-U IIOlRtE -Unfutnlabad houao or Rat from lit March Flye or %  !• bedroom, on B.i route near City Wrlto alatlna rent to J R Klrton. co llelaownle 'lueet It...'.. HI. Mary't Btreol. Anlllua T 1 SI 4a OLD •„,n> of Hlfhrit price paid LIMA A CO. Me %  troet verv dew-lptie" H-TONIOtl B Ul rodM and Broot HM %  ouTBBOtrara -CAM. CRAI.IXNOFJI -LADY RODNEY -LADY NEIaWN" -CAM CBAIJJ-N'iF* -LADY tmimtn"LADY ffBLAOM" • %  CAR. CIIAIJ*N;LH LADY RODNEY %  I Fab Ii fa.,. 1 Mir It Mar 1 Apr. M Jan. 11 Feo M Fab 14 M. IS Jan n Jan II Pah ACADEMY ciiKAmiinle-opan n Tueaoay %  o.aaWow puptt OR Mondo-r lth a BMadanBdMi ny^ArrTMroT; Oo-ioa. Maawrll Cooot. r-llent n o batnlad. luklv turntahed OUT bedrootni upuaari overlnoklnK the aea From the let Fenn.ar Phone 4BMV A. N Chadarton, Maawell Coal I It I SI l'< MWHAVLN Crane C aait. F uT Pi kRl ^ Plant Doubt* GarmBf. 9 eetvant reooM. dnwa. Top • "... limtm. Lot* i I 4M9. i 3BT) JMIYAI (• IBAOI 11 I 11 In n ..T,I S.~daJI. Ownor ll.l.l FOIldllrfMI XRT I.TD Phone 4S0* II tlCAR Rrnaull Sedan In rial worklrif n..ile... Tyre in oeailor.| condition M C. M. Hunte Room 111 PUi.Utu.iii ilnildiT.i p*i,.i.r 4MB. MTU I* 1.11-in CAR—AUBTM AM OBora In writing -in bo rerdyed n at Deor'a Oarage faaebuck Blreet. J-n.e A. Lynch %  Co Ltd P.OB Iff. Bridgetown. H tl—%n tRI" K' r Dodge Trueka M and good working otde' M*, Ridge Planlatkir TIIUCK One 'l .O..I order Apply Ntri...... l'l.,,itati..i. KLECTKICAI. rURNITUBE FUIINITIHI: Marro Chair. I prartWali iSlSI. Ii RAIJ-H HEARD aaaeri Larde Paini.d iTWaea PM each ittrond Painted CRaln U.M each Iwlnted Dra-a; Tkhle. Ill 00 ech. 3 ft t Im Ve Sprn.g. rt.mplete wllh hed-enda k. Urpamted Kllrhen Tablee MOO aw Ilmp-lnled lliiii Chair. M So each Wa • bknda Itom MM upward*. Alan a lai %  Tlely of New Miboianr Puinlture vie iitf wllbo.il obllgalion al Ralph %  led u %  FumUhing Hr>w Room. Rardwoxd Alley Dial 4M3 •.IJI-dn. ROOM Unl mkhd and eof I--.Men!ial area A luthf aver 1 mil** •n.m town ABTIT" X R C. Advocate -o. 10 I SI an •klAlX HO of Rai Mayfaer ttft RRayp, AO—tir Cnrk Apply to the aWreftT. Maylalr Otlt RKYI wTONTf Rrownea Oap MahBh Dining and Drawing Bed room a ale. Cwublo G rrvanta' RoomTaeinlr Con phone 42M or Pa-Ill I] AIN1U1W — -aih for tha month* M rebnuiry to Jfy. Appay a* km W. t. Goading. Sln.ng Hop*, St Thoma* f 1 SL—Sn. I'iniir SAI is AUCTION InaVr The Lflamind namnnr Kied l the In* -nee Company to **ll it Ihe R'doa Tail Co, on Wednrula' twxX tha 17th Januaiv beginning ^1 n'ehwk. Omo Au>ln Oar damaged In n rfeldent; and On* Monl. %  tahh thi i III bo utar y burnt Trim, Cdah. DAnv A. SCOII. A.ICIll.SI UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Itv .niinictioni lecarvod from UM Inauraiw* Company, I wTO. a*ll on Friday. January Itth M Alleyha Arthur-| (;arago. nt to Fort Royal Oarad*. St Mlrhaal-a Row Hi IMO A-44 A-., .inCar, anjy dan* ',**• mllr. liMnaned In amdnll Sal* at I an*. Term. C**n VINCENT (JltlFFITH. AdMMfMM IS SI—dn UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER LIVESTOCK COW nuernaev and A'.hlre Cow. to Call within a week. Lot Calf |av: %  piiui Appl> MH* M. Prime Saiii.der. Dll, Vpurr CU)BMli* Boc". SI. Michael 1? I M %  MISCELLANEOUS (lu.. China. eU Watarcolour*. Barly booka. Map* graph* nr at Ofrrrlnge. Antique adjoining Hoyal Yacht n..i. i ointment far aM Mat Infeaaoni. npeclally ATHIaTTaas FOOT. Ill ftood Try It Knlghll Drug Utori-v AMM-I.IJCNT TOOTH POWDEHI hi, 'i.ff*a eonliol aid. aupplle. for many ..nap, the .mmonlum ton which hM bag!, found lacking In cvl|y-.u*eepIndlvldaaU. Carle. Mean* TOtrni\ CM T1TIWT)AY M try ordar of Mra .i it,-,, i, *,. HI **1l Ik* Hork |n Trade and rittln I Al the General Store ill 1'... 1. .. 111 •I cornprtatnd llaaa Caaaa and SI,. C'aaea, Shelving, Vrlghu, Carrtai Ill rcl*. Ola*. Ware, B**ctae Booka H unbar IL.ili. LM P*. Kit* Pa*r. PUPIL ABBLBTAHT ward* 4 by M. Cathedra Organlit MuM M C %  ai.t Apple Hr irttar to o. Hodann. IVnd I-". Pin* Hill. 10 1 SI EvenAo Hay A s lp.li TO BIHT I'VU'HMJSHB) BirNaAlAW—I ar I bedroom* in raatdaaiual are*. Rerd reaaonabir Phan* MM of PO. Ban VI LOST FOIMI LOST Prom a Jrwll-r Shop I whara thay war* Wt I oM Sliver Natklaiei %  enlimenUI value t. Anyone pvlng InSarmalio a will be i.iliahly re. Mr. M.i..ii. (ireer Braad Street I be .leaned 1 one Locket WATCH Gold ri*n, I gold kaw-ahaped U*. i ratorn to Advnca Drpartmenl llr-.nl I 14 I 1 In PI HI ir M>rn is TO THE ELECTORS OF THE PAmim OF ST. JAMES W* th* underalgnad dealre through Ihla medium to • %  pra-a our warmt lhank*. and hlghaat apprectallori to th* Hartora of Rt J.im-i for th* layal *IIP port gl**n ua In lh* recant V**try Elet We dial I i-iul rathe mIMn %  M >iirl*R aid it* paopt* to iiauun. lallhfuUy. MMM M CJUCK 0 JOtlNBON S A HOIJRCR B BBMMLXB. M i si In NOTICE I HRHKiiv tod lo thank all th. Ve.tr>i Elector, for lh* Pariah of St Aiulrew who have. *i kindly voted lor %  i.' and bav* rrlurnad me at tha head Of tha poll, on el-Clio. day. Manila) Mh Inat Mr* B V. ROCK. Relleplaln*. HI. Andrew bMdnV-BR. CARLTON aUB Meet Hid < haadad In !** Joi-o. NOTICE ar* rataindad mat not*" ria for Uu Jam*. Marmaladaa. Tollat Pa| s...i-. It o*clock. Tarma mlricily caah. BRANKER. TROTMAN 4k OOAtwllonreni. ucarj ESTATE ni'IIJ>INO RITT-Navy Oardani. 14000 Quare feat. Only .pot obtainable n nn nrr.i. Idraii, ntuated. faring the RBI ll.-i., M-,1 Dn thraa aide*, uomt it A i*.onablr pile* Dial 45*1 or Mfll I1.IJ1—In DBCAY Amm particle it I* made up of *m*n I ar* dlaaolvrd brtwaan tl. fter Ju.t aarhPit out th* Ibll *olutlor> Ml** meal. obtained from *n. IHu 10.1 SI7n %  ANKI.T. Cold I'll-)! Bla-.keU IroaPur* From 14* to ward*. Oaf on* lop to morrow "He and enjoy It* walmtli 4kM>wav ttor* t i... Mraat Dial Mio I4.i si a.v CA'"S Plait ic St van-ak., patte-rli.. i Dreaa Shoppe Cap* In "355 COAT Hail lengRi modem b-la Coat in new condition II I M 'o RROPP LONG HANDtafJ RAEOHS Ah.> give a sharp, unaoth aha* % %  • drag or pull. mak*. .having plaa.oi* in*lead of a hnr* Knlgi.t* l*m "tor1S.L91 MOTOR LAUNCH H "BHt* Mailnr Faiglne AmuK 1 arkra 1 B I arttk iied Ban PKIIMANENT needl*. lor 1 C THEM THBM C MR AND U WILL snBARGAINS AT YOUR PJBCK1 Imagine Bungalow Typ* In Belleville. 1 Rpartau Bedroom, with Hi. ii.• Eai-rllent Condlikan, W*ll Laid out. aohm lor Under ci.kw. A J %  om II Large, on* with BaMm Horn bury Hill. Veiy Good CondliVodarn Crntyaniancaa, Rpacioua Yard encloaed wllh Stone, Vacant. (loin* tor under CPM A 3 Bedroom Collage by L*>w*r Bank Hall Main Rd Modern CoiitriuriHn. Spaclout vrf Going lor Under C1.W0. A New 1 m Stonewall Bungalow not fi_ kley. Modern Convenlenca*. Going Under CI TO; A Two-Storay iParl new alt i Near City. Good Location I Condition. Suitalile atpo •• %  r.i Hnu.r. Larg* Yard. Going for ler CSaMO; Thr-o City Builnaw. %  Hence < Stonewall i. Vary Ru> Area, ng for Under <1JOO and C 1,000. IB TT YOUR DDUHSt YTR A clNCTC — A Furnlahad Unique and Artutic Super Da Lux* Saoald* w-ll Burui-low. Almo.1 N*w Randy Bawak. Ftna Bathing. F'-liialvc Area at St Jam*., over >* A ire Oolruf Indeed Keaaonable li.iii'i.ng Slira Saaalde and Elaewneic He '.lr V.-lue. Aaaarad Mortgage. Arrang*d 1 am H*l A Trained Auctioneer and Ye* How Wi.r it U \< U. M* 8*11 Your !l.>L.iei,ni %  ThH aomMnaUon of %  < %  d*no* and udlt* will arToid feaflar -. %  % % % %  ' %  .-! %  '.. %  n **paclally to thoae prnom oomUhf from tha country by tha earl) I taka thla opportunity to wlah al Lppp and health.1WL t WM H WIOOINS. PhT. Mil IN tU B A t O S I lEngland swodUh Muiair Medical O. Hydt u fnara p y. %  Metro therapy, DlaUtlc. eaaei of th* nBlood and Llvar dl*ord*n, Spain, ami Atonic Constipation and Non-operatlvc Optic Atrophy etc Entornal and Inktrwar bath*. imedKated MOaYfaUODMD LADY H EJ -SOSLADY RODNltl' LADY NtUKW' %  LADY RODrOTY LADY NTLBON "LADY BODMF.Y MB Bublect to (hi 10 Pen n r*o TI Mar iMh 13 Feb. IT Feb. 9* Mar. 14 Apr. II May. It Jan 11 Fab I Mar. Apr M Jan B Feb • M. I Apr 5 £. : GARDINER AUSTIN 4k CO„ I.TO. A#nrB <.VIH \MIM V OIMrS (AMENDED) PUBLIC LDJRAR1 Application* :nc inviled from perBonn, between Hie ages of 21 and 40 ysaUB, for ti.unlng overseas in the work of a Libraruui. Applicants should hold the minimum qualification of a recognised School Certificate with credit in English and one other language. Preference will be given to Umvusity Graduates. 2. The selected applicant will probably be required to take the correspondence course offered by the Regional Library (British Coun-II from January to June 1951 leading to the Entrance Examination of Ihe Library Association, and may subsequently be required to attend a recognised Library School in the United Kingdom for a period of one year commencing September, 1951 in order to qualify as a Chartered Librarian. 3 It is intended that the selected candidate should be attached to the auff of the Library in the A'st instance and be appointed substantive Librarian when the Office becomes vacant in April, 1963, provided the course in Library training is satisfactorily completed. 4. Application* should be submitted to the Colonial Secretary not later than the 24th of January. Further infryrmauon will be supplied on application to the Secretan;u, IStli January, 1951. la. 1.51l-YNCHS SECONDARY SCHOOL M'ltY STTBRaCT fa.l Ter... lard.** on Monday. IM January t*}a*4Ma*tt"*M>*j MODERN HIGH SCHOOL (R*rfjert-i, approved and lYcomafjended to the O. Hi C. Examinations Board by the Dept. of Education). Our building programme has now been completed and we are prepared to accept a few more new pupils on Monday. 15th January, at fc2*3 a.m. School re opeip. next Jay. A McD Foflnr. Hi .Oi -.ITHE HOTTM PREPARATORY M lit Mil. IMI BUrk B**k 1SS1 Nnl Term begin. January IS. UmJMd .•rommodauon for year-oW children %  nd over Frapeh and rnatnaraotlca aptldgud, Apply Mra Ruby Hoyta. Owan villa". Black Rock. St. Michael KntraactL. $1.50 A, LYNCH Principal. OIIIIM VI GOODS! From INDIA. CHINA EOYPT: Silk. Currt>s, BraftkWBre. Jewels Linens, lvor>. TciikwirtKl S II II t* B I. French Perfume*. Barbados Scarves in Pure Silk, Etc.. Etc. Th* Baavratr %  cada.aarur. I IIAM llroki__Js Hiah SditHri rRlTTON* uni l-AYN-aTB OAP Th* Bekoal will reopaa on Wadneadamh Januar> Kev/ pnptU will ba.ieptedon T u ip j ay .Bth when parentcan inRRtt**) the Principal R. V. UrTTOef. Principal -jBJtWhltlR'Mlffl!" %  ABT 1-ITTli PLRWT OAS LlOBTERS at tha Oa* ahowroonM APPOINTMENT Or STOREROOM CLERK (FEMALE). MAIN KITCHEN. .1 I I; \i HOSPITAL Applications are invited for the non-peniionable post of Storeroom Clerk (Female), Main Kitchen, General Hospital, at a salary tf $480. rising by annual increment., of $48. to f 1,200 per annum. Applicants should not lie over 40 years of age. should have attained a satisfactory standard <>f education, and should have had some experience In house-keepli jr, duties on a large scale. ApBllcatiOfls oil forms obtainable from the Secretary. General Hospital, should be rorwarded to him not later than 24th January. 1951. 11th January, 1951. 14.1.51 3n. BAND CONCERT llv kind permission of Culonel Mil iii-lin. Cast Halson and the f*olice Band will give a CONCERT at the Hastings Rocks on Monday, 22nd January, st 8 p.m. ADMISSION 1/. Proceed* In Aid of ;St. Maltlllas (hut. Il > UIKM Wanted U Pirckue COMFORTABLE HOME with three bedrooms, living and dining rooms, good kitchen and bathroom, servant's quarters, garage, electricity water and phone, on about half acre of garden. Please give full particulars and price. S.K., C/o. Barbados Advocate. INTERCOLONIAL CRICKET BARBADOS TRINIDAD At KENSINGTON OVAL FIRST MATCH February IS, 14, 17, 19 20 SECOND MATCH February 22, 23. 21, 26 27 Plan* of seating accommodation will be opened at Harrison's Office on Monday, January 15th to members of the Association who may also purchase two additional season tickets. The plans will be opened to the General Public on Monday, January 22nd for the sale of SEASON TICKETS. PrkM of Admission: CHALLXSOa STAND II Jl KlU 110 M REAL ESTATE Jt)HN ft*. KltHOS A.F.*.. r.v.a. Forairlr Dtswi a BU*m FOR SALE -ROCK DUMIKJ Cut Hill A well maintained and prodnrtKRotate of aomr SB acre* in a trrr tavaay poaltlon S mile* from Cllv a nauae al wodhy of awiUse and pcarMH great cairn. general i ondiUon % %  -.ell %  d Ihara I. oparlon. Mcornn-n. •UNSBT IIOCBaT l*roapacl •M Jasna* Bungalow -nil atld* •*• (rtrntage and good kaat nn(hor*ge 2 badroom*. Ipunge. •ayparat* dining .. vartuid*:. atdea. garaaa and paad couTtyard and plewni.it garden. Sonnl buy al £3,110. %  CRAVF. VUJ A — Modcrr4ton*-bullt S-itorev property with appro* 3*k aeaa* bounded by Crana Hotel drlvaway Con varied Into 1 large aalf contained apart nrenU. Excel li-i.t lnva*tniar>1 pawparty wllh good *ea bathing Offer. Invited K1NOSI.TY %  —Top Rock Verl .iltractKi't deaigned bungalow '. %  I. I .i |.ed dining mom and HMtnge 4 badroom*. moaVm kitchen mid gamp* Well %  BOW ACXIUIL." Pina Hill Large well built le.idcnc* in Ihe higher part of Ihl* ealact areAcconunodallon coaiprMa* Use recaption roni-i and varwnda' %  ludy. 3 large kadroa*n*. S faiasjaa and nutbulMkif*: Plaavii l..*m ..nd garden* with lea.ii | caxirt Ground!) appmi. 4*. artei 1 .'ffprod it aiiractive Agurc. cASAni-urCA" — uanweir. Coaat. A baauUlul property anbodying the ib.e.i pre-war work, manahlp and wdl planned with 1 reception. S large badroom*, verandah, kitchen, pantry, gar**:-. •tor* room. cU Th* land i, appnn. 9 acre* with flower and v< getable gard*n*. producltv orchard and .-inut grove. I acre walled garden may be anil tarately a. building die. "VILLA it.-s.\ Pa eeag* Rjoad. Ciiy. Attridtlve and i^n ttalty located .lone buim.a..v. with dnuble carriageway. Appro* MJ900 *a. It Thla wall built property contain* a front gellaiv large lounge. *cp*ri>Ie dlnlnk badrimm*. lotlet. pantey yard %  "DKANK HOLLOW St. L*K> Pleaaant country hnmd O* atone wRh ahlngle root containing bedraaen*. living and dlainn Quarter.. 1 garage lertlle acre., option further ?', >i.dered IM III II REAL KSTATF OM THE RCA Moden. Bungalow, bath*. Overlooking Baa, awn private Good Yacht Anehoi bething beech. i Bl-i TWO ROODS OF LAND si Mtoka. rkprtnger i Pnl At'litli SIIAIH.S irei renectrd gla* i-ut good. Oat la...iMft PiyTATOBB—100 lb beg* M THC Sf lb bag. al Be SS lh bag* al Sr 11 LSI—to SAFE One Urge i-edett rondttion 1 feet wide by S H. 8 N--hr.Ha Co Ptie-Proof Sal* In DI inrtiSoui i iu i d %  fe*4 hbjh AppVv Telephone No MSS. 'IR t f '. mm i iimn •EM per length ol krulher. yo ill %  • M %  n tlrey PH. onTtPt 1. > Hid* I mot* 1 i*et B 14 1 SI to rtTOTRIM. 1 Kai Stocking* %  lie* MI4 per at 11" KM M **"•* DeM-r aively Shade* A. ial' Modern Drr.. It 1 M---H. rnssuiABL BREEFRtr II Dwelling hoia wjlad taately 1 rood SO perchea o( land Maawell Coaat Road. Chrl* Church. Tha hau** rontalna open VeraeM rhawlng room. Dining room. Breakfast Mom Kitchen. Three bedroom* with or earing room, and running water downstair*. On* large badroor n ana 1 bathroom upat ar re "nil eonvenlencei duwniUIr*Elactrlcity throu ghoul Three •ervatila' room and convenience) in yard. Oarage for too ran The above property Will be set up for *ale bry Public competition at our Office Jane. Stiee! on Friday ISO January 1PBI al 1 p m Inipeclmn by appointment Dial SMS YEAIiWOOD BOYCE. rtoikitor' T ist—lln. • —h The M si nn B THE under*.gn-d will tat up for **l* l.y public Competition at their <>fnce l-iebuok Street. BeUgetoerp. on day th* IPth InMant at S pn, IVANTON With lh* land thereto belonging inning IP 111 .quare feet, altuate Tup Rock. Chrttl Church The dwelllnghoua* comptlar* I hedrooma wllh large built-in cuptm %  % %  *iM iWuad*. dining room, and modern kitchen, toaelher with (wo Ur*d t iirti and bath* Servant roei.u and i"-ge Tha properly eommand* a mag. RWar parUrular*. InapecUen land ( .inditioim o( Sale. Apply to R, •SaPhoiii m Co. Telephone au f i si—art. n %  ,.(,..... n January IMI. i CARtUHOTON LANDS Ei.trrprlK. bulMIng on HOUSE Tobago Old Colonial Rod** renovated. Beautiful ground*. 3 acre. Central and aecluded On* wing converted, eatl contained Sal. Freehold Good Inveetmenl. SM.eOOPD. For pholoand (uriher particular. nppl<: Wll or. Welback. Tobago 14.1.51 In MEALY. •Jotii-Ror* ISI9I— Ti proper ty PI40PTRTY t'l Country Road n of land and a hou** whu Oallerv. Drawing and Dining Bedroom.. Water toll.t and Show. Kitchen with throughout Apply to Darcy A. Scott Maguun* Lane. 1S.I.SL—Sn. PROP*RTY-Ohe email property Roll. Road. It cotuiic of houae t • ter and light, .hop and Ihe land which II stands Pine Five hundred r.fi pound*. On* --...il propnt\ at Klng'i II i. a good ho...* with Verandal mg and dining room*, I nedrnorrui, water and light, together with Ihe land Prh" Heoooo acvee o( arable land Christ Church, suitable for lutiona bee. Immedial* Al*o a fine area to be tranalormad • i e. idem Ial colony by the Introduction of modern and up-tD-d*l Apply tn C F. Hackelt c a 3 Tidor. Roebuck Rtrcet Phon. 13 1M 3n PHOPEJITYOne property called RartJ Dal* at White Park *pgf n fte the B'doi Foundry It conatita of a atone and wood*r. houae which haa Gallery. Drawing and Dining roerna, three bedroom. water-toilet and ahower bath, together with S.SST a*, ft. of land Apply to D'Arcy A Scott. Magailne Lane. WOODCN BUILDa*n CompVele with pa wage Br*7 and Kitchen BhtS. Ilouw Mi 10. BMtuaied at Four Square St. Philip Apply lo Milton areetildge on pternlee. Notice is hereby Incomv Tux return* | irom every rnurried income is JI,2OUIHI pe r annum I over, from every other ihsrsta, |L hoae income u 1720.00 per; annum or over mid from com-; panicwhether * %  forms duly filled In must M delivered to me on or before the following respective dates: 1. Returns of persons whoss books were closed on the 31st day of December. 1950 on or before the 31st dsj of March, 1951. Returns of persons whose principal place of business Is not situate In the islanvj on or before the 30th of June. 1951 3 Returns of all other persona, on or before the 31 • I pf> nary 1951. F. A, C. CLAIRMONTE. Commissioner of Income Tax and Death Duties Nnte:—Any person failing to make his return ui'hln the due date will be 1U.B*O to a fine not exccoi mg CKI0 and not leu thai |J and will be prosed unless a satisfactory roa1s given. 8.1.51—an 1. Tenders ore invited for the exclusive right to sell liquors, lunches and teas at i Ken.siTijrton Oval during the Barbados Trinidad Tour %  (approximately from February 12th to 27th). Tenders are required to submit price list* for drinks and lunches us well as propoaed menus of the lunches. Should prices for the Association differ from those for :he general public these. %  nuit also be submitted. 2. Tenders are also invited for the transportation of the Trinidad players from the Hotel to the Oval and back during the Tournament 3 Tenders must reach the Honorary Secretary at C. F. Harrison's Office not later than 4 p m on Monday. January 22nd. S 4 The Association does v not bind itself to accept ; S the lowest or any Tender. N ilARBADOS CRICKET S ASSOCIATION. INC \ IW F HOVOS. \ Honorarv Secretary | 7 1.51.—n i >e*e*-'-*-*-*---*e--'.--'-------*-----*-^-. For over thirty ye:n Liking care of all requirements for a funeral, no matter how •impl* or elaborate We apDreclate the severe .train every member of the family iunder in tunes of death ind NT OA





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,'^miii/////. ESTABLISHED 1895 BARBADOS JAM A".Y 14. mM Eisenhower Arrives In London For Talks LONDON, Jan. i:i. ( F.NKKAI. KISCNHOWKK. N.irlh Atliuitic Supreme ('nninuindcr Arrived here tonight for Uaaul w itli RrilivV (aSiiii'l Ministers and service chiefs. He had flown from Oslo on the sixth Mage f a fact-finding! •our of West Kuropean capitals. Eisenhower will leave on Tuesday for UgbeH, Koine ami | Frankfurt lief ore returning to Washington In report to j President Truman on the state of Weal hiirope anil pre-; pared MM Btenbowv was met by British Defence Mini In Kmamtel Shinwell. British service chiefs and othei pt i tilth I including American Ambassadnv Waiter G Iti rd Thi Gcntnl declined to be interviewed. KoMihourt will start top level talk! in t-ondon on Mom | M tudy Brit ment pro) I He will have his llrst formal meeting with the Atlantic Pact Deputies on Tuesday. They will raVla a preparations for II liahmint of an Atlantic army. Deputies will meet first Q0 Monthe Supreme Commander. The; %  appointment of n 'production Co ordlnator." recommended by the North Atlantic Defence Production Board. An official Hriilsh spokesman would neitiiot cuniirni noi denj reports that the Co-orriinator would ba William it Hi rod, of the international General Electric Company, but it was known thai lha appotntrnanl it Ameri%  While i" Lond I taUi of (he debate OH the MirMlp East by the C"m%  'i Pi me nunlateri thiI'OI.O AT I III UHHISIIN 9 Flu Upsets Manchester MANCHESTER. Enp Jan 13 About 12.000 i f Mi popu atlon ol i v., 7004 weie to- i ted to ix* %  ufferhni frooi lha liulia den innow sweeping North England. The epidemic. Ihe v..-' -iru1018, has thrown many of the cotton ni I ito chaos. More HUD 1.000 post offlce engineers, telephonists, postmen, and porters, wit* about 400 driver* and conductors are off MI k. In North-west England aft n whole, claims at the Insurance Mliiistn officer already toll. I 200.000 and mi.ny officers are %  vorUng overl ma to handle %  BOod "f claim.-. Mnjrl Manchester dOCtOfl are working IS aivl 16 hours a dav. Many have themselves flee victims to the 'flu i ... pr |< At Liverpool and other part-1 Summary of Britain's industrial Merseysid p„|| OW n g „ a summarv of the Brave-diggers are wonting da ;. Muhj| of Fls e nnnwer 5 dlscunioo. ami night shifts so that hundred:of graves needed shall l>e rea<.> AtUnllr Nallon( 1th the Chiefs of North as qulcklv as possible. On Monday, the Industrial I Insurance Company throughout. Mersoyside will begin paying ou' i nearlv flOO.OQO in death benefit*. "To add to our difficulties there i has l>eeii an increase In the numI ber of cases of mensles In tho I area", an official of the Liverpool i Health Department said Influenza is also being felt In the north-eastern Paris: Eisenhower asked %  carehlng questions of French 'erviee chiefs and (iovcrnment leaders during his visit from anuary 1 to 9 on the precise details of French rearmarces and on .uccierated and I creaaad military aid to called for by liie French land Death! In Newcastli t weak totalled 225, Wg : of Eng, Minister of Supply. quarters said here. Government leaders were eliauli goal weekly total since the 191U satufled" with the Gcner.il* epidemic of Spanish 'flu. Thirty-three of this total ptlributed to I nfl ua nt a ran these quarters added. Premii KentPleven assured the Supren commander of France's wholehearted support and emphasised the vitally Important contribute she would make to the new Atlantic army, it was learned Defence Minister Jules Modi pledged that France would ha at the disposal of Eisenhower of i AM FWa dlvkDOU .it battle readiness would be stationed in Germany < The lluue: Holland will put i military quota under Beanhowar'l and once material bcgl: B.W.I. Trade Commissioner Arrives d Mrs. Rex Stollmeyer arrived hare yesterday by T.C.A. him Trinidad. Mr. Stollmeyer pouring in. usually reliable quarts Trade Commissioner for the tirs said here today. B V I., British Guiana and the 11,000 men conscripted in 1940 Bahamas In Canada and i-s stawill probably spend their second lioned in Montreal. year training in Eisenhowers Mr. Stollmeyer is here for two army. weeks en nn official visit and durAbout 30,000 men to be called lug his stay he will confer with up this year will be offered to exporters who send produce to place the current year's draft \ Canada. Government officials and Fisenhower after serving < no year members of the Colonial Develunder U.e Dutch Command From ojinieni end Welfare Corporation, then on the annual cnll up will be about 45.000 men who will be Mr Stollmcye has already I' i;ide vailable for the Allanti been to panada Trinidad and d B G. on th.s trip. JESJJ2S5! Copenhagen: Denmark is be he will return to Trin dad before U)U) Eiwnhowci Vlattuu the Leeward Islands, he lncrc;iw m . al i up would ary. 1947, 10th. when he arrived on the OX OFFICIAL VISIT 1 • A v %  1 l^fl ^^ H Br^* VI 5S ^K^^HK.' _^B 'W 4. ^ . if". . TORNADOKB bnat Cytl %  at the Onmson yosterday afl*rnoon iiliiiiird loi tae W..t n I Cup sad the Adv w^s^-j tttt Approve Farf^ To Powers East Settlement Moscow Soon ROME, Jan. 13 The Italian Government todayasked Parliament for special powers during the next two years, authorising It to clamp severe controls on practically any part of the nation's economy. It also asked parliament to pro:•fi prison terms of up to 10 years and lines up to £ 12.000 for anyone seeking to evade new contiols particularly if evasion was intended to damage Ihe national defence. Control of the prices of all material*, wages, dividends, and profits, rents, production, credit, Lind investment Authority tn impose rationhe preamble to the proposed bill declared that the Government not propose to make use of the delegated powers immediately nor .ii all sectors In which they apply. It was believed that one of the principal alms of the Government demanding such large scale special powers was to encourage "onfldence in ftnlv amongst Ihe other Atlantic Pact nations. Italy eeedl tlM guarantee of big irders from other nations of Western Europe to put in'o effect a projected 4 £ 10,000.000) plan to boost to full production great industries which must he geared to ar output and which are now state of crisis. —Rentei LAKE SUCCESS. Jen. 13 The United Nations Political Committee tonight approved | by 50 votes to seven with one abstention the five-point •'British Commonwealth Plan" for a Far Eastern nttletnei The U.N. Secretary General, Mi Trygve Lie will tend ihe plan to Peking tonight with a request for a reply g. possible, an official spokesman announced. Before the Comm tte> was a plan |for four power tullo. on the F.o "~ ist to he held after .i Korean in had been arranged. The .II. put i< ; iranl i>> ireel and ibacKi-d by Britain, emlmd es lha I I MM pit posed by the Uniteo Nallonf Ceare-llre Committee of three for settling tho V-n ( %  % %  arlali in. principles ol the resolution *• !< %  !'M'|..".| II. I .,ll.,l| 1 Thursday after the tnilcd States I reported to have ugteed to Koch Taken To Hospital AUGSBURG. Jan. 13. Use Koch uwalting sentence i iier murder trial which ended here yesterday was to-day Alchach prison hospital afti throwing a fit and breaking up hi I ceil furniture. The head of Augsl:ur pr said Koch did not injure her self during the attack. Koch was spending her last hours before sentence m saoar* bound Alchach prison neur here ()n Monday afternoon three judges and eight jurymen will daelae whether she was guilty of the murders in Buchenwald horror camp, ana if so what sentence shou'd be inflicted. The Prosecution has demanded life imprisonment—West German la\> has abolished the death sentence. Any sentence i< expected to be served elsewhere than in Alchach. Koch bai made it dear to those attending hei trial tl certain she will reee.ve life imprisonment —Reuler. Famous Animal Lover Dies LONDON. Jan l3 The dealt) was annoui i. day of tba Tl-yeai old Ducbeai of Hamilton and Brandon. I rowned her life's w fot animals by openinc rity home for cats at her home Renter STRIKE IN B.G. LIKELY II REO. TYRRELL the mall pox suspect, has bean on PMlcan for one month Now quit* recovered he left Barbado* yesterday. Small Pox Suspect Leaves fiEGINALD TYKREIJ*. seventn-T'-year-oi'i Englishman fr >i Diixenham, Essex left BarUido yesterday afternoon t>v B.W.I.A toi ntnldad Tyrrel] wa %  d> p cted case of small |M>x who bai been on Pelican Island sine D^OBDOT 1*. 1M Tyrrell told the Advoeale hort v before he left SeaweU yeatariiay. that he will Joth tba Biurrapher In Trinidad. The Hioiraphf-r is due to UMVO there today bound for the U.K. Tyrrell who will be eighteen this year was making his flrat sea voyage as Engineer's steward nn lha Biographer He hopes to mak tl.i Biographer'* next trip here He wants to see a bit more of • on pate It •.ills for a cease-lire m Korea witl.di.iWMl of foreign troops and tlie selling up of an appropriate body including Britain, the United Suites. HUMI.I mil Coninuinis-* China to try to atttsa Far Eastern p utileitis i inDominican Republic, Cuba and Panama support! d thi plan Chinese Nationalist delegate Dr. T F. Tslang moved an umeiidment to subilitute the term Republic of China" for that of "People*! B'-pilblic of China" in Ihe .-solo ttOD, which would mean on-ting lha Chinese Government of Chiang Kal Shek to the talks Dr. Tuaim said that the proposed pi m Was iii fuel a 'total sell out by lh. UniNil Nations of Korea and Of China lie plan would inevitably land Korea l>ehind the "iron curtain." A Military Dunkirk -We may hiive to suffer a mllt%  hiv Dunkirk". Tsiang declaredHe scouted the idee that Formoaa ;uin simply be disposed of as no I.. .'* land "It is the home of Free Ii ria. defended by an army of % %  "Mm men," he said. The Chine*? Nationalist delegate) • nt on: "I know nothing in the i:uter which prevents H> 8YLVAIN MANC.KOT LONDON, Jan. 13 Britain. France, and the United State* are expected to send to Moscow without delay IdontUa' replies to the Soviet note on Four Power talks, though no date has ral i" an Mi II ami authoritatively leumed today They will not hold up replug pending the receipt of tinSoviel and Chinese reaction to the lataM United Nations' resolution on Korea. It has been i tune that uegolialloiis tm a*l resumption of power talks wer* separate from any move aimed at a great powers discussion of Fur Eauteni problems USB ai > contained In the uitest Unlte-l Nations move Thei two Initiatives are regard • od here aa parallel In then general aim of bringing about a negotiated settlement, of tin major cause* of friction between the great powers America's insistence that a ceasefire in Korea must precede any Joint talks on Fat Raauri problems is uccepteii hen Hi ll representing British intention in Mipporting the resolution in the United Nations Will N'ol Relax While the Commonwndth da claratioil yesterduy made it dent that the Prime Ministers are determined to do everything to make negotiations for aattletnenl possible, there is no tendency here either to assume Chinese oi Soviet consent or to relax lha efTorl* of the western power* to OUka the iiori-Communiid world secure against aggression. IIM f -euter Students Demonstrate CAIRO, Jan. 13 SU.-I helmeted police, armed nth tommy guns guarded ihfl nmein frm exercising the In-'aiiproachei* l. the Itntish ent right of self defence both the inland and on tl' mionlaiid Formosa represents the larger*. H) ngin unit i.f powei .m HI.-* ('"H miiniit aggression in the For East Rcutcr. US. AIR FORCE WILL DO OWN CENSORSHIP TOKYO, Jan. 13. The American Air Force ii Korea and Japan today began lti Own ieie.!rshlp Correspondent! (louring stories with the Arm* ,II ecunty division' ..cio ii'ld they must now nuhmit all Air Force stone* lo an An officer fot censorship An Air Force spokesman explained that Army censors wen Men unaware of what the AI Farce considered security matter ot available for publication. As the spokesman said, th fcrray eaneor had passed Air For.-, %  ones which gMUld have Ix-en i-nsored and held up othen which the Air Forc in Keuli-r y %  I... .II I,I i. % % % % %  ., 21100 hostile students demon* Straterl OUtSlde the olllie of the Egyptian Fweign Mln'stry. They had gathered in defiance of tli, gtiveniinent ban to datnand Information on the results of |h< cent Angli>-Egypti.in talks The Foreign Minister Baleh El In Bey who has bean conductln tniks with the BriUah Foreign Secretary Bevin. to'd Btiident.-. the Ministry balcony, thi.: foreign policy Is not a mattei of argument with students Student! 'd that th Foreign Minister should Mr them, "in denouncing udonialism nd supporting the Woild Peace Movement —Reuter MR. AMD MRS REX gTOLLMEYEE unved from Truudud yesterd*yMr. atollmever. wto is Trade Oo— d aat nur r for the R.W I. Uaah gaiaoa and ue lslsi;-. la Oaeaaa u ea aa afacial Malt CEOIIGETOWN. B G.. J l'uiue action in nuki i.rrests of budget demonstrators UM Public Buildings la; week seems likely to lead to genera) strike. Executiveof var ous Trade and Employee Unioi and representatives of the Peo pie's ITogressivc Party meeti>"d doors last night aro said to have approved ' their poatHuge transport planes dioppc i hundreds of tons of supplier to them while hundreds of fighters and b mbcr* hammered at the romrounaata and Mod to cut .1 .nd troops ii""' their repp)) 47.5. Navy Plan Big Programme WASHINGTON I u Ii The United Btafa I launch a new oava] amuunont programrna putting tiundr Kb of i ihtlng shl| ii fence lineup Woik ||on o glaal 4.7t'o t n iirerafl earrlai .ou ITI other rhlpa a i i.nt i I the s %  B %  % %  %  rararna Hall of ih. monaa e ijld ba used to build nes I half for convention or %  atloj of %  -'*> 'tliiins.-itid'c.f ipplc %  %  ;, amoking rock rhe Pre f ect < I la gn inre red ( : .i special offlci lo ti. (l find work for hundreds of men unemployed by leai • tl then on i oated aeai .i.iti. ...... Four empty villages. Milo. Itinso. Fornauo. and Bclara, whoa* inhabitants DM .t' tinipproaeh Of i.iv.,. i...ia> gUll itood r in ulouth • inlnoeli-d ReMler I .; % %  Bui foui PnmaiiinW dhrtaV • bypassing Wonju on tea •real i to outflank noiiti At Ii .1 ond vision-, wrie RUM Od DOTt.1 the i II reaahj i i ba aaroan into an -'ll out frontal assault They are now mengi ii Junction "I T.oiy.mg m ml of Taegu Commiuusts %  ttaeki n mm building up into one of t Jv era report 1 KBmikfft aouth "f Seoul and United Hattona nllots reported anotln-i long 1 olumn of noop* moving klong (he Han Hiv.r uorthweit of w nju Hals Withdraw Beven aiUaa aoutharaei of Inahon %  a sh.irp cl.i-ii. h> tii. Sobaek mountain ranges the battle was incrce-mg in intensity and 3 wi Cemrnunlatg had been killed in the pa-t three days. Nations planes roared i.iUlefn.in • l.Jm.1.' .out NoHO K ore .ins nynvlng •outh frv;n Wonju Pilots reported four Commume reglmenU moving south of the city and thousands or troops massing a few miles north of the cltj. An Btl> \ today Uiat Chinese were als-, inflnidng to build up large force the Osan nreu to the aoutfaweat Wonju Dear the we*t coast lore than 11,000 Communists were %  port.-I tO be massed there .11 lier Light l-miU-rmade IS night 1 close support of 'round iroopa and behind the Convnunun llm Renter <5 L Tlir. tliVOCATi: THE NEWS RINQ 3111 l.\V t>R Mi.lli Cardinal Dies Shaving VATICAN CITV. Jan 13 The Dean of the Itoman Cathu lie Church College of Cardinal 79 year old Cardinal t •. Marchetti-Selvaggiani. died sudoenly today While batbrooro His death left If vacat th* College of Cardinals which elects Popes and fu nct ion! chief consultative organ of the Catholic Church. The Cardinal died shortly after I'lebrating his usual morning mass. It was learned r*ri#nd< of the Cardinal reported he had often said: "I should like to die unexpectedly after saying Mass." The death of Cardinal Marchetti-Selvaggiani created the unhnj KM, Dr J W. p Harkneu 'i Rupununi. Dr. Pridle observed will leave British C.uiana tomor'-iat under diftlcult goncUl row for Brazil on a goodwill tour medical ofnotl lo Amerindians, i.f the neighbouring COUgdn I I k >ad done a good >t month tour of the lot of work, but a lot ret M a the two officials s| %  • % %  b done Rut already In days In British Guiana during the health of the Amerindian which, accompanied by tho British population had Director of Medical %  ortheir number dirals of having a rclativel, .oung foreigner as its Dean II 'he gg-yrar-.l Cardinal Eugene Ti-^erant, the head of the Vatican*, congregation for Eastern churches Cardinal Mnrrhctti S, II. 1? & 13 BRCAD STREET



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SUNDAY, JASIARY 14, 1M1 SWBM. ADVOCATE 11> KI r How To Bring Up 7 ** l lints wTw ^ %  For Amateurs Haugliters You're Loaded By. THE HON. Mrs ROBERT BOWER The (.aril.-n It J—u-r. MY III IKS DO"fT spoil any oae of your childrrn by giving in to Us e very whim. IH>VT be too strict. While a spoiled child is unfitted M iii.' Hfe. an ov*r-di$ctpHned <.'!. %  is tempted to become d.-crtlfiO. DONT "d wour cMM ta crsureh atone. Your own fiani!'?*' ij ratenrial. DONT onerrefe your rhild-s •lain rat abilities. That lead* to disappointiumt. Watrh and encaurmge. DO !"' %  a real mure* fn i/Miir < iiildring atfsaanajaajfk, DO bf parimf lett* ihe eiidlrs* ijii*srionj of fMldrefl. IVtifn tmsnbtV help ihrm fa •liseoeer IN* answer far ihemtelotB. DO •'!, f ( bring out initiative. Implant the desire to u>Bi to try China* that or* nev to I Firm, urfVrher it be food, etittkew. or arausvmenls. DO hare (he rotiraoe to lean, from yovr men witsllfaajL nerer fhruti ID M pdrrntl. PAHN'TS Ipirninfl hati* made to enjoy trip* and onions or calves' h—d J dlahaa which were cheap and Dourlahlnc. At ona time I aconotniaad by buying fish direct from Grirnsby Seedling Time, Flower in t Vine. As with all young livti.3 thing*. it will make a tremendous difference to seedlings if they get a good start Healthy seedling* mean healthy, vigorous plants. by the none. I els saved by t ta wU worth whlll 111 Wh.it n comes to fine, rou.Mng, rowdy musical M.G.V.'g Technicolor Version of ANNIK GET YOUR GUM would be hard to beat as really Ri cimrtainment. In Ihia instance, Hollywood has done a bang-up job in its version of the Broadway musical tha: ran for nearly four years. Through the medium of iftr compelling—and with plenty oi arriera, the show has been pei dramatic feeling. mi ted to travel further affleld %  *** es* the picture, which U than the narrow comities of the senu-dtwunienUry, is aimed ui thr st-.kwill niiow. .md this ts a detlfaaftrutton at Tehachapi. and II rule advantage From what 1 %  Interesting to see the manv haw read, the original -.toi-v ha>. phases of work and the method* bu'ii fl| uw ,.j ,-kwcly and the '''• %  l>..yed '• rehaluhtale eM %  In that inasur WUD^ w^ho s(H'nd lirne l^elimd It,•11 MMIM wnu-iv irv, it waiis. This is the tlrst Ume this lln-^HK5 ii-Utuliun has been ***** to .-, u^ MM -. -.—a. .... h ^,|: w T ^ n A,, '" ,e y w 5 y ~~ Dorothy Hart and John Husswll This mean, that they have me f !" 1 un J" f d J"^\ ho vd , n !* Mn both very corapetenl in tha I could not have cooed with my whole long, cool night in which to ^, ^*„ 1 0 !" who **""* other two leading mlrt tee as large family If T had not made it recover from the shock of trans£~5 !" ^ Jl llj Wt,rt Sho the fiancee of the man who my .policy to snake the children planting, and to settle themselves D ; oni H greatest marksman rf kllfrxl Mollys husband and he as self-eehaat ad lnd t p j asleaa of m.in their new home before anothoi J" n ''' %  %  eombinatson of the husband's best friend. I found at the earliest possible moment, hot day comes round. When takuu: "" Wllw s exubvnince and winenjovabte the performance of the I began to emt the apron strings them up see that you take up a ". ** eppeal. There u> iio donbf various women who play :> %  after the fourth birthday. good bump of mould around each J* 1 %  has almost nwire than her parts of prisoner" and the ln-ttt .-. ,_ __ 1W so as to disturb the roots as litUe '-" r "hara of anerny and personali tuUon Staff The atmospti.-rr and •a* waveiBM m Bossible. Make a good hole for 'y. and though, according to somv odd h*u of humour are due ic one in the new bed. an,| pon ';!.^^*vJ* | e M not at. competent * themk*£om the soelologh^l angli buying grocery in bulk, such a; jam In 7m tins. Quarrels wore usually over possession of toys or whese turn it was to hetp rae with homely tasks. I had a rota system U>laying tables and clearing, for example. them Just that little extra '!'' %  tfW 'umbrellas* about the Qnr js AimH a SQln Ht the ollf .., m j---^ rs -*-,a £3y-fi8Paa-s . r* && & \ '^ s^arA*S I rriKenuii}. day By umbrellas' is meant a 1irnwiM i .„ H „U .- ^.. Epon,lr bor.li„, -hool I U ,_. . w !" M .tdlihj-d MM ,.i m ,f| brmchc „ho„l tool pr ! *• "'' '"" ,alion bcanu.ml at Ihquestion * " '""" I !" "' "M ned Uirnln M aist. but Witt lllgh of a „, trc or bl „„ avllU Thon. with ntNttanc* :.....nmlat"" '~ -Inf, 1 found I could do w.Ihout nuts*. Al Qnj. ume i na ,j ovpr loo ptirs (.oeraiioi,. ^.d accidents OocraWhen she Wat I decided that "' ""'"" %  "^."<• In * hou e uSi were numerou-nve to, "^I^ 7 nn b '**'" '"' ,nd !" V : / J3l re ] N *i*. h ".5 1 Cnl >•[•"*• f"" "L SfL.f5'lnl£! my elder chl'dren hod been wailed '"•> " hod lo buy more. appendlclUi alone and 11 tor tond "f*J !" :, ta.,,,,.. v., k „t .„%  S "'"' B ""' ""IP'S'' ""*• seoravpbqrm. ImJI menlion Vigor on for too much I noticed how ^_ _.__ aUU/ %> A lot of trouble? Te.. bul such „ u father heod-ctrcos which, on Jarj •* CottreU .rj AUin Hole much quicker my four.yeod-old S hnrpnm hod lo be pursued. „„„ keiurw tn Un Ihem fun. _, ... nc.,<• %  "<* P'T'T^L a "V C ? M J*V wilh medicines n o routine Flowwinc Vmes opera hat: and Keenon Wynn u ran be railed on u IKIV. od : dress herself than the nurse-at0^2^ pair of shoes at a sales priee As soon as a child saes lo.school Barbados is fortunate In haying o publicity asent—all of whorr. n.-count of themselves, and a 7/e FAM/LYFoodDr/nk StomacCe by CADBURYS tnvelafd and I hare not always been able to n trtth thalrK. „„„, 'artafcly spread (never oil bunch/JiSrfi*? "?*' Her "oraance with IIUllBlll 9t WWaJassag IB the rd up together) and press Ihem ymM Ow'rer.'"lolher shorpshoot KuaraTs .in on. of them at ts fu-ar In. Thla business of preaoJJ;„K*" d b """"rd Keel, is ae of tour. ln the seedlings (Irmly In Is very """ntparued by plenty of noise. AU my ilaanhlii. are taught to Importont, for no plant eon grip ,IM "*n war-whoops ond all ffn> eook, sew, dam aaa) knit, seonssa and gel the best out of the earth £,1*/,, r r n fuak>n thai attends .i could sew buttesH, on when she if It a. anseeurely planted 7" ,n WMt Snow, as well as by •Ml •• When all are planted, waler l" !" * "" hit tunes Mr Keel When (he time tun, for one ot ages, wlln .„ ,.,,,,rln not ''"* ""* Physique, on etiuallr V9 U S, Su r, "a J>l M cr 'my girl, to attend srhod 1 luj oVw check uo iigi". lot that all !""' '-'"<'• •*• •" %  he^really Alexis Smith and Zachjr, Scoll. my own system of teachutg (hem are Brm a" often ihe wateTwll 5""" ""' ' "" %  "•"' nice '' %  ••"" the story ol three men truffle safely JlTiaSt ront.iuie to use ""' '" •""* *" <* which *• r~* plundered and ** usk, , acj *m g^ga. S'Tt-i IS r. %  *• -p -.— -*—-e „., eft-tft*.* S *!&for the first week or two then few weeks, until il Is seen thni 1 would follow the redid wtthror! Ihey have made THE STORY OF MOLLY X has lUmly ot tntereet and Is well acted and directed. S.anlh **f Si. I ..II.H At the Pbtxa, we hava a talc •( the Southwest, during the Civil Keel War. called soi'Tii OP his part One of 'the best nurfflm,ned to ho,d on to 'I Bnd to uk bars is tlu? tune "I Tan IJo Anvtheir revenge on their enemy TSZ d .Z: ''. %  *,Te,' Th.„ Y C ca 1 ".'S,, A drSW OF** S T LOU IS As one i hllrt grew out of her s eea id alarming at lurst, but with i.i-h „. ^_ r Iri ... i., h availA.\T ..., w.... clothes these were carefully put experience I canv. be able to Sfj ,1, lvu c k Ii^ut the bed ,,, *?"*?' '" "U* .L 00 01 "' "" '"" £5 away rendv for the next. dleesvwe thaan ossadsW. Eii^ii, ihZ i„,,nl V, ,n,5 n ^ l,Hl •" ui r lh'rn as llufhlu agouu It^Sdme iTbinir. against W l"*^i "" C"! p '""* .j" 1 r "ill. who weora wme of the moat e. At one time 1 had over 100 pair. £ nd aeddenu. <5STtSS. 2*?J?212???2 : r i '" ? %  "!?• !" >" 1"'' T stand Ihe gen^ , ., ".TJI^UVTV. £ -man", land; of .he Civil. and neony ,„,. ., „„, ei.s. *, ZShZXVSSi. MZ^SH\ were army groups of both sides. the war was fought on a uui-nll.. V ***> %  Q T The story is too compiicateti I ar hernlne 10 go %  deUll, but there i*' Others In this .opnotcl. cast Inl>*sny of action and excitssanl gainst a backgnnind of smugwar and intrigue leading roU..nwell tended older children. Became M.P. some white furnishing aattn which 1 made into cot pillowslips which i either preview a tUm my have been in use 18 years, and before allowing the children lo see ADDITIONAL household coinrost only one shilling each. it or take •ir'n.TI from mothers plications arose when my husband ^n|tMM m views about Ihe became Member of Parliament for Pandering to childish food fade dfJ1£trs ^ luC c i n ema to children. Cleveland In Yorkshire. For 14 and fancies was impossible, but |Z, .| IM H|hagfi ug ikeai lag and Dl1 years our expanding family shutsome of my children could not C* y ( on me Idea of COOKERY CORNER Fish plays an important part in family cooking, and if carefully chosen and cooked, it provides an lKt infinite variety of appetising herbs, crated rind of half a lime. dishes that can easily be prepared. t wu u-aspoonsful of chopped parsYou cannot be too careful w, two tablespoons of milk, salt when buying rlsh, for If it is even pnd pepper. slightly slale ur inferior in quality, its poor flavour can never really be disguised. Look for these points when you are choosing fish: Flesh that is tlrm, and quite free from any unpleasant smell. Bright eyes. Scales that adhere closely to the skin. Red gills. Bright clear mark£2 pair of of 10s.. a £5 coat for f.1, and u'wants tcTftV to cJaasn^Here I %  great variety~of beautiful flow" Bre'entertiiinlne the settings are realistic, cos-' cheaper still were remnant* which n(jd ^ ^ car afulOnly 35 per cent, erlng vines which succeed well in P.ufTalo Bill's Wild West Show tumes good and. as we all know. Presently I lound the four-yearI bought in quantities. ^ jji parents are careful to keep car climate, and nothing lends a I* </^//^rV#yV<'.Vi ^ or wall In the background coverof the sawdust ring The whole |JOO*0vV>V^//^//'V//V//^'.'W. *" ^-"" !" ed by a flowering climber. Aim sparkles with humour, gaiety | 5 In deciding to plant a vine howand wit and to the aceompanf*w care should be taken to men! of one of '"'.rig Berlinj choose the vine suitable for the One.) ^eores. ANNIK OPT YOUR .. nlnre 11 Is needed for as It Would (; N %  ""^ ot ltt h** 1 "lusleal ftgag S^mm^^m!m\SmZ, *J*5 >~" vo„-,i love wlS'tShS-T^dSceffor put. bl heavy vine o,^lo light - dont miss ,1 hSmS ?Kr Prt ""' STWaftA TWiSSThe Story l Molly X It coat ortly a sblUlni or two t > cover large expanse of Sn(m ni( „, ,„,. olobt Theatre more than a tlmfle* dance In My •" %  is THE STORY or MOLLY X good class suburban ball. Ikmble Pink Curaleta dh June Havoc in ihe leading Church llnt OnVoTol moat o-.uulul vine, ^*, "•*••""" man^who"^. been to church. LTi,, Vk.., !" Z ,,-.ls •" Tehachapi I attach the greatest importance and weight, men are two type. A Moll\. Ihe masler-nilnd of HSSJ children thelT dally t S* vine, one h..U, a paUi mur(U) red huaband's gang. prayers at the earBert poaUbhl-rd' •*''•"* "crinkled edge. wnoM „,,„,„„ ,,,„ „ w „,,. Mix all Ihe ingre%£ end the other one having a rose. iwtf „,.,. huabaids murderer. dienU together and r^g ^ ^j,, mof t fascinating pmk dower with a plain edge. Jun( Havoc gives a performance then spread some of Ihi „„ gfcom a large family is Both atowcra are lovely anil somelh0 „, ncrVi the stuffing on to each w ,i c hlng the development of what resemble an apple-blossom. —. llllel and roll up. place cm M r e„s talents and tanes As the dowera fade, large d „,„„, m0 re about layering in a greased (Ire-proof gioeny-plnk seeds form. In appear., no thei llmei Plan! the vine In dish, add one gfU of Mary, agaal U, baa a tut for unet almo as pretty as the flow, TOnn fa,, uimewhat sheltered white wine, one slload modelling &1 cUy. A local pottery erI| lnd a„ remain on ihe vine ,*_, ,, 00< „ truS ,, w onion and o tomato. ,,„ tassn smtkeliieasac about aver for c olsple of month, while fresh ,. lr „„. ., a r „ r tBc ,oof of a CSJOJEC n.k.£ Brusr-M eaagassa. dowers eontlnue lo appear. ,,.„„,, v ,„ cll „ „ it will need ToiafeSelv' hs."oven Veronica, why i. Ik. was chosen To .„,, :„ U c help. bi:l will clin^ and m ! r „l!f l lea. ^ n < !" ^j**" ^SSh 1 ."i^ Thl. vine can be grown Iron, .limb %  cna.i.iusl, wtgtM it want, London schools to HMMM ^^ bu wMl pl nuM f rom ^ „. gn. i..ns play preaented rethw# u no guarantee that il will Oive II ihe usual garaen care come 'true.' It may revert back in Ihe v.a> of walcr and manure. to the ordinary single Coralita. Cut It back each year lo wilhli rcfore of getting a fool of Ihe ground about secure a root September, und it should be up llet six living dsh, and soak /TTVsAlljS e* Sc- -^WhssTaaiTa ,r "l • *"" cstobllshcd plain. „r „,„l (lowering .gain by November %  hen. wilh lime and soil (or llv. (.[/Af' V '^ i'.JL 51?S!v TSzJfSffJS. ••*" %  "-* %  %  "UbllshI. Janu.ry Flying dsh Is now In season, so this week I am tractive .. icotng to give you a recipe for peas and fried plagrtssam thai llsh which I hope you will for twenty minutes. This dish can be in made to look very atte ntly. garnished with green "Monioa al six years of .age is displaying an eye tor Una and minutes, and then wash. ed-pUnteU. *,VV&in 9mZdlS%Ji colour. Sbe spends hours palming. J %  J"f' "* !" '' W lakr pleasure in unnouncinE the opening of a Branch Store at No, 46 Roebuck Strccl on MONDAY. 1.1TH JANUARY. We lake this opportunity of assuring mir Friends ami CeWbNMn that It is constantly our ami In otter better Merchandise at competitive prices and at all time to i;ive prompt and oOUTtCWB service EASY PARKING MAKES SHOPPING A PLEASURE, G.W. HUTCHINSON & CO., LTD. ST. FOR THE BEST QUALITY & SHADES INSIST ON BRANCH STORF. — No. 46 ROEBUCK I V.V.VAV^AV.W.V.V.V.'.V.V,V,V.V,V/,V.W,^^V,W.'.V.V/'.V. What'do you know about ENO? strike STOCKED BY ALL LEADING STORES DO YOU KJI0W da BIO is joollng and rrfreahing, an uav rivillod health dglnk St ; r I Old? DO YOU KS0W •hat ENO ha %  sxMklmaTcecnasi Md is a perfect corrective for itrjtnacb and liver venusmhev Phensic! Wise at the nt snili from headache or nerve pain who keeps a "apply of Phensic I In a mntttr of minutes the wont of pains give way lo Phensic — and is the pain ksaens, you feel fit and cheerful, ready again for work or play. It is good to know that you can always have the certain relief ot Phensic. Be prepared for headaches keep a ••upply of Phensic handy. \Justtake* 2 tablets. Sent" a tntttei fee tajrnsf fr n lmtm Eno's Fruit Salt 5 Phensic for quick, safe relief FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS, NEURALGIA, FLU, COLDS & CHILLS



PAGE 1

Sl'NDAV, MMARY II. 1S31 ~;l \li\V WIYOCATE PAOI FIVE What About That New Year Resolution? ^ e TODIC E of iik^*^^ Last Week lplaU^ m Do You Call This A Clean City? •POT in McGregor Street Jtut ofl Broad Btreat looked IUM thli 4 o'clock on Holiday Wrlure* nHi H shown OB this par M to U**n an] %  ay ID Bridirtowa 1 woman Marches carefully igh the naff box outside one of atty stores. Hex bag Is filled fie still stirs through U< rubHEN AND BOYS delve Into the sweepings collecting bits of paper, MOM Of which might be used for wrapping article* of food. JOBT A HAND as It throws banana skins on the roadway u otters before It had done. B.G. Exported 29,022 Tons Rice In 1950 AN OPEN GUTTER In the froat of a big and up to date Jewellery %  tore held tin., collection at 3 o'clock In the afternoon. In tbe yery hoart of Br.'iMtown B.G. Produced 192,502 Tons Sugar In 1950 rnOROaTfOWlf, Jan. Ofliclal figures released by the Hut -ii Guiana Sugar Producers' Association disclosed that Hritlah Guiana's total production of sugai fn IN the various estates in t9Wl was 192,302 tons This eXCawdtd 1049 production In 21.355 Ions Production came from a total of 61,612.45 am;* of CUM rut. Tola' production in 1949 was 171,147 tons which WM equivalent of a yield pr aero of 322 tons. Too yield psa MM in 1950 was 3-12 tons. Included in this grand total of all the estates, la 113 Ions pro1949 Volunteer Cane* produced 248 lODK. In uddlUon, MVtn Oj Ihe estates prodm ad 3,147 tons, of sugar from farm'rt' canes, ar against 3.0M tons in 1949 Plantation Diamond seven mile? from Georgetown on the Fas' B.G.F.A. Dfllegtte W ill \ 11 r M.I Puerto Rico Talks GEORGETOWN. BG. Jan. II At an Executive Committee nosjtlaj of the British Guiana Football Association held last night It was decided to form a Committee to consider ways and means of sending a delegate to the Content, which a ill be held In Puerto Rleo next month to CDs> cuss Ihe formation of a Caribbean Amateur Football Association The meeting formally accapttd 'he mvit.iium t.i gWaod tlie Conference Bunk of the DtssksflaWa Hivei topped the list with a total pioduc ttoti of 23.211 tons Plantation Albion eras next with 19,783 tons, followed by K,,m..uand Lusignan (18.301 tons). Hlairimmte (17.411 tons) Ruse Hnll (16,408 tons): Port Mourant (15.650 tons): Sheldon II43M tons); Loonora (14,337 tons); Reaaouvenlr (11,203 tons): Wales (10,366 tons): Ogle (7,104 tons). VeraalllM (6,110 tons), Huirn.-.-Idt (1.866 tons). Houston (1,645 tons). %  |Msata< .'reator aslte will *•••>• %  *-t e nadarsuM •' '* %  < %  •ponsored bv JAR BAKERIES maker* of ENRICHED BREAD and the blender* of j & R RUM HAvl YOU GOT A COLD or COUGH IF SO TRY BROWNE'S CERTAIN COUGH 1 HuSIHn**-, r..i ..•!.... I wiioopais Otosti. Deasa CI...I Slid l.ir.S %  !• C CARLTON BROWNE W..II. a a**ui i M Roebuck f*. the Arwwrr hi SACROOL I THE CERTAIN PAIN KII.LF.H On Hale At All Orus Storm mi Our Own Correspondent GEORGETOWN. Jan. 9 h one exception the British Rice Marketing Board 'd all their export commttfor 1950 and as a result did ggest trade since they start porting rice overseas In exports reached 29.022 tons foun 26.711 tons In 1949 •rd Manager. Mr H P. Baylev sounded a note of optlmthe view that, barring unforeseen happenings this year's exports should exceed 30.000 tons. As regards exports to Trinidad it was explained that a balance of 840 tons owed to that island at the close of 1950, was already blended and ready for shipping. The only problem at the moment Is lack of ships Exports last year were as folexported 1.678 tons to Antigua, lows; Trinidad, 14,068 tons: Bar1Bm for 1951 when he expressed Kitts—940 tons Grenada—995' r *n l hurricane and some replao tons; St. Vincent—720 tons; St " depleted stocks Some exLucia—304 tons; Dominica—208 porting was also done to Holland ton*. and Martinique. In addition In exports to these In 1950 a total of 30,507 tons colonies with whom the Board was consumed In British Guiana, have contract*. British Guiana as against 30.653 tons In 1949. THE KEY TO THE MOTORISTS HEART. R. M. JONES ft CO. LTD. *••*• ESS0 STANDARD OIL DISCOURAGED ABOUT YOUR COUGH? Ii.nl colds find coughs are rampant all over the island just now. Everywhere you go people are complaining of the particularly vicious coughs lhat are raging. They say rhcy are terribly difficult to cure, but as long as I I ItKOI. COMPOUND is available this is not altogether correct, because FF.RROI. COMPOUND was specially made to combat just such coughs as these. Most cough remedies fail in a case like this because they onl> treat Ihe cough, but a system that is undermined first by a bad cold needs rebuilding it can help to throw off the cough that follows in its wake. Hence the success of FERROL COMPOUND, because in FKRROI. COMPOUND is combined a tonic to tone you up as well as a treatment for your cough, thus aiding Nature to repair your strength so that you can defeat the cough dial plague* you. You are bound to notice a marked improvement from the time you start takini FERR0L COMPOUND 'THE TONIC COUGH MIXTURE THAT BUII.IXS AS IT HEALS." FF.RROI. COMPOUND is a combination of the active principles of Cod Uver Oil Vitamin A 1500 units and Vitamin D 500 units per dpse. toirrtlain with other well known tonics, with the addition of Creosote and a^rtrs^r I'M** ti.iuiM !" — "• lr* *Soi E m ii Ma atli'r C*..j 6rt %  n %  o-w-> t— m jr.STOKES a BYNOE LTD.-*••"• =•