Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
ESTABLISHED 1895





Khan Boycotts

Empire Talks

‘THE CONFERENCE

LONDON, Jan. 4
of Commonwealth Prime

Ministers opened here today at 10 Downing

Street, official residence
Clement Attiee.
For the first time

of British Prime Minister

in history, the Common

wealth chain was broken—Pakistan, one of the

new Dominions, was not present.
Khan, her Prime Minister, has declined to attend!
unless the Kashmir dispute between his country!

and India is put on the



s
Appointed Dutch
s .-. *
Minister To Spain
THE HAGUE, Jan, 4.

Holland’s Minister in Egypt,
Count Van Rechteren Limpurg,
has been appointed Minister in
Spain, it was reliably learned
to-day.

This is the first appointment of
a Dutch Minister to Spain since
the United Nations last Novem-
ber rescinded their decision to
break off diplomatic relations
with Spain.

It is not yet known who will
replace the Count in Cairo.

—Reuter

New Chinese Atlas

HONG KONG, Jan. 4.

Copies of a new Chinese Com-
munist Atlas reaching Hong
Kong from Shanghai contained a
map covering Malaya and parts
of Siam and Indo-China as cap-
tured “southeast China penin-
sula,”

Several Chinese in Hong Kong
have received seasonal greeting
cards from China, wishing them
a “happy New Year and happy
liberation.”



—Reuter

ARGENTINA TO BARTER
. MEAT FOR STEEL

BUENOS AIRES, Jan. 4
Argentina will this year bar-
ter $8,000,000 worth of meat for
steel icing from West Germany,
according to a local announce-
ment. The State Trade Institute
put through the deal on behalf

of State oilfields,
—Reuter



80 WORKERS KILLED
IN EXPLOSION
|
|

LIMA, Jan. 4

An explosion of dynamite
charges was reparted to have
killed 80 workers and _ injured |

almost an equal number in north
Peru.

The accident occurred in the
valley of the Santa River where
an avalanche of rock last Oc-
tober had blocked communica-
tions.

—Reuter

75 ESCAPE FROM
BURNING HOTEL

VANCOUVER, Jan, 4.

Seventy-five guests fled blindly
when the four-storey Parks Ho-
tel was destroyed here to-day by
a fire.

None of the guests was in-
jured but 10 of the firemen who
brought the blaze under contro!
in three hours were overcome
by smoke.



—Reuter

Liaquat Ali

agenda,

Eight nations of the British
Commonwealth — ineluding the
United Kingdom and sev eii

autonomous countries—are repre-
sented in the conference,

Present at the talks were: Mr.
Attlee (United Kingdom), Presi-
dent; Mr. Robert Menzies (Aus
tralia); Mr. S. G, Holland (New
Zealand); Mr. Louis St. Laurent
(Canada); Mr, Nehru (India);
Mr. Senanayake (Ceylon); Sir
Godfrey Huggins (Southern Rho-
desia); and Dr. T. E, Donges
(South Africa), All are Prime
Ministers except Dr. Donges who
is deputising for Mr. Malan,
South African Premier,

Empty Seat

The chair reserved for Pakistan
in the cream-washed cabinet room
of 10 Downing Street remained
vacant as the Prime Ministers
took their places around the great
green-topped table.

The conference, due to last 10
days—-has been called to discus9
the world crisis—and today the
statesmen began almost immedi-
ately to study the growing threat
to peace,

Mr. Attlee opened the confer-
ence, the third of its kind since
the war, with an address of wel-
come.

Foreign Secretary Bevin, De-
fence Minister Shinwell and Brit-
ish Service chiefs were due to
attend some of the sessions.

The Prime Ministers later de-
cided to send a telegram to Pak-
istan Prime Minister Liaquat Ali
Khan urging him to attend,

Quarters close to the Govern-
ment here thought it doubtful
whether Liaquat would eventually
agree to come.

First business before them was
to settle the agenda and to hear
a wide review of the world situa-
tion from Mr. Attlee.

The statesmen had these rough
heads 9n which to plan their pro-
eramme:

1. The situation in Korea, its
implications for the Common-
wealth and policies to be
advanced
tions.

2. Commonwealth _ policy
wards Communist China.

3. The Communist world threat.|
4. Rearmament of Germany and}
the possibility of new high|

level talks with Russia, i
5. Britain’s commitments as a}

member of the North Atlantic| ROME, Jan, 4
Treaty organisation and their; Many Roman bus and tram
implications in terms of man-| drivers stopped their vehicles

power, money and rearma-

ment, |

* A Japanese Peace Treaty and
the American suggestion that

in the United Na-| $100,000,000

to-|






|



WHAT ELSE would a crowd like this be watching on a cool Thurs
game between B.C.L. and B.C.A. teams at Kensington yesterday

| 6 Cruisers

WASHINGTON Jan, 4.

The United States today offer-
ed to sell two light cruisers to
each of three South American
nations — Argentina, Brazil and
Chile — for hemisphere defence.

The State Department said if
the offer were accepted, arrange-!
ments would be made for rehab-
ilitating the ships and for
training crews of the three
countries.

The six cruisers would be sold
under the Mutual Defence Act of
1949 which allows
material to be sold for 10 per
cent of the gross cost plus
cost of rehabilitation. |

Officials said the United States/
had offered the Phoenix and the
Boise to Argentina, the Brooklyn
and the Nahi to Chile, and the
St. Louis and the Philadelphia to
Brazil. !

The State Department said
they were in excess of mobilisa-
tion reserve requirements

Representatives of Argentina, |
Brazil and Chile, said _ their
Governments had agreed to the
United States offer. i

The terms were not disclosed
for the disposal of the vessels
which cost a total of more than
shortly before the;
second world war, —Reuter.

surplus war

the





Romans Protest
Rent Increases



wherever they happened to be at
precisely 10 a.m, local time today
land politely informed their pas-
sengers of a Communist called 10



Japan might be rearmed. | minutes strike in protest against

—Reuter.



FORTY-FIVE ESCAPE

CHICAGO, Jan, 4.
An airliner carrying 45 pas-
sengers crashed and burned at
Midway airport here carly to-
day but all aboard escaped with-
out injury police repored.
—Reuter

SEOUL BURNING

By WARREN WHITE
ON A PLANE FROM SEOUL, Jan. 4,

Seoul was burning under

dense layers of smoke today

as Communist troops swarmed into the northern suburbs.
As we flew over the doomed city shells lobbed spasmod-

ically flashing brightly against the smoke.

conld be seen 50 miles away
pall of gloom.



U.S. Planes Made
328 Air Attacks

HONGKONG, Jan, 4.
Peking Radio alleged to-n'ght
that American aircraft had made
328 raids over Chinese territory

from August 27 to the end of
last year.
The Radio said 1,406 aircraft

took part in these bombing and
strafing raids in which it claimed
16 Chinese were killed and 715
wounded.

—Reuter

SMUGGLERS ON
THE RUN

ROME, Jan. 4.
Italian frontier patrols last
night surprised a band of about
20 smugglers who dropped cases

containing over 300,000 black
market cigarettes and fled back
on to Swiss soil.

—Reuter



SLIGHT EARTHQUAKE

BOMBAY, Jan. 4.
An earthquake shock of slight
intensity with its origin in North
Assam was recorded here early
to-day.
—Reuter

One fire which
threw an orange glow on the

—— Southward for 80 miles stretch-

ad a thin, almost unbroken line of
light, made up by the headlights,
of the great evacuation convoy,
Here and there the line swelled
and split — presumably where
troops were depioying for new
defence lines. ., °

To the northeast a line of lights
was moving towards Seoul—to the
west lights moved westward to-
wards the port of Inchon and
south to Suwon. 25 miles away.

The Communists weré reported

pressing hard on this road trying | contribute five and ten cent pieces| June 24,
to drive a wedge between Seoul |t<, a special fund throughout Lent.! Manager and later as Managing

and Inchon 20 miles away.

As we took off, a passing soldier
said: “They have cut the road. Our
convoys will have to come back
and try to find another way ouf.”

Solemn March
Shells were pounding on the Kim-
po airfield as we roared into the
darkness and beaded for Japan.
The Communists were then re-
ported three miles away.
American jeeps had been cross-
ing the river on the ice all yester-
day.

rent increases authorised by the
| Government.

After a quiet smoke, the crews
| drove off again at exactly 10,10.
Buses and trams with Christian
Democrat crews did not stop.



The transport strike was part of
a 30 minutes “gendral strike”
called in the Capital by the Com-
munist Trade Union headquarters
but there was less evidence of its
effect among other workers. In
the small Via Veneto quarter, most
waiters went on serving as usual
and clerks went on typing.

A check on Rome's telephone
exchange which was also supposed
to be paralysed for 10 minutes,
revealed that a cable or trunk
call would still go through during}
the “lay off” period,

—Reuter.|



$5,000,000 Wanted
From Catholics

NEW YORK, Jan. 5.
American Roman Catholics will!
be asked to raise $5,000,000 in aj
ar collection on March 4 for'|
relief of war ravaged countries.
The appeal for funds was outlined
by Monsignor Edward Swanstrom
Executive Director of the War
Relief Services National Catholic
Welfare Conference.
Two million children in Cath-|
olie countries will be asked to

—Reuter.



(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Jan. 4.
A guarded warning to the West
Indies not to prejudice Canadian
goodwill in future trade agree-
ments appears in a leading ar-

The main road south from Seoul |ticle in the current issue of the

was choked with a_ turbulent
stream of vehicles and refugees,
men, women and children walked
solemnly by the roadside.

| Dead women and children and

West India Committee Circular’
published here to-day.

Throughout the article empha-
sis is placed on Canada’s previous

j sometimes a man lay forgottén be- | generosity to the West Indies and

side the roac
starvation and exposure, but hur-



They had died of}on the fact that in any agreement,

“it takes two to make any bar-



rying relatives had not time to/gain”. The leader recalls that
tbury them. after the Commonwealth sugar
| The refugees’ were heading j negotiations in Tondo the dan-
} @ On Page 7 ger was pointed out that ith





FRIDAY, JA

Under

. afternoon, but the first trial

NUARY 5,

1951

U.N. TROOPS EVAC

CRICKET OF COURSE

U.S. Selling Nevis Carries On

FOR ALMOST A WEEK the people of St. Kitts, Nevis
and to a lesser degree Antigua. have been subjected to one

of the worst earthquakes to
many years.

—ON THE —
°sPoTr |.

YT
A BATHER at Browne's | |
Beach dived into the sea |
yesterday morning for his
| early dip. The sun was just |
coming up and up he came
as well gasping: “Shark !
Shark !" This was very
near in and a few people
waded in to investigate.

There was the terrible
looking head of a large shark
all right, but there was no
“body to it. It was just one
of the sharks butchered by
the fishermen at Browne’s
Beach the previous afternoon
and the head and other
unwanted parts thrown into
the surf.

The bather took a little
time to recover his equilib-
rium, but he was so shaken
that he did not continue his
dip.

ee Ce

Essex Coming Back



Into Service

NEW YORK, Jan. 4

The 27,000-ton American air-—
craft carrier Essex will be recom-
missioned on January 15. An-
other large carrier the Bon Homme
Richard would rejoin the Pacific
Fleet at the same time, the Navy
announced today,

The Essex has been undergoing
modernisation for two years. The
flight deck can now handle Jarger
and heavier planes. A_ heavy
cruiser, the Los Angeles, will be
recommissioned on January 27.

—Reuter.



King Paul Summons

Greek War Council

LONDON, Jan. 5. |
King Paul of Greece has called
a meeting of the Greek War
Council for today (Friday) a
communique quoted by Athens
radio announced. Besides Prime
Minister Sophocles Venizelos and
the Ministers for War and Foreign
Affairs, the Urfited States Ambas-
sador and the heads of the British
and American Military Missions
in Greece have been invited
attend.

to

—Reuvter.



MURRAY GOES

{From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN Jan. 2.

Lt. Commander A, D. S. Mur-
ray, Managing Director of the
British West Indian Airways, will
soon be transferred from his
present post.

Commander Murray has been
in the service of B.W.1.A. since
the new Company was formed on
1948, first as General

Director.

full preferences West Indian pro-
ducers might find it impossible to
sell sugar in either the United
Kingdom or Canada at world
prices, in competition with the
Cuban “dump.” Removal or di-
minution of that preference
would convert that fear into cer-
tainty.

Yet even though the “size of the
stake in sugar alone is so fright-
ening, we must not overlook the
fact,” says the Cireular, “that the
Caribbean colonies enjoy many
other extremely valuable prefer-
ences in the Canadian market.”

Reference ic t xtreme-

|
|
have struck these islands for
Nevis perhaps has been hit the
hardest. Mr, R. K. Samthani, a
merchant from India who has)
been holidaying in Antigua and
St. Kitts told the Advocate yes-|
terday afternoon shortly after he
arvived at Seawell from Antigua,
that many people from Nevis have
evacuated their homes and gone
over to St, Kitts. Mr. Samthani
left St. Kitts four days ago from
Antigua. Severest shocks, he said
were felt in Nevis and St. Kitts
either early in the morning or
late at night when people were
asleep. Some people have been
sleeping in their cars and others
walked up and down the beaches;
#. tight. Peaple in Nevis were,
very panicky and more were ex-

steve t> arrive daily in St. Kitts

The Red Cross in Trinidad are
sending supplies of tents to the
two islands for sleeping purposes.

Slight Shocks in Antigua

Shocks in Antigua
very slight, he said. On Wednes-
day Mr, Samthani made a radio
telephone call to a friend in St
Kitts and he said that they had
shocks on Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday in that island

In Nevis the water supply has
heen cut off by landslides and
business is at a standstill, Every
stone building in the island has
been badly damaged. The Charles-
town’ Court-house has collapsed
and the hospital and Government
House have been evacuated

Damage to the Royal Bank and
Barclays Bank has been reported
in St. Kitts and the Roman Cath-
olic, Anglican, Methodist and Mo-
ravian churches in Basseterre have
also been damaged.

have been





f s
No Panic
se
In Nevis
(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, Jan. 4,
Major Martin Hicks, Private
Secretary to His Excellency Mr
K. W. Blackburne has informed
me that Nevis news published in
certain sections of the West Indian
Press is utterly without founda-
tion, Through the kind offer of
Mr. Ogden Reid, Major Hicks and
Bishop .athaaic! Davis few to St.
Kitts to-day. There is no ques-
tion of evacuation, no panic, no
terrifying situation, Tremors con-

tinue spasmodically but are de-
creasing,”





A correspondent from Antigua
siates that Administrator Hugh
Burrowes visited Nevis on New
Year’s Day . 1d reported serious
damage to the Hospital, the
Court-house, the Police Station
buildings at Cades Bay, the Health
Buildings at Cotton Ground, the
Matrons’ quarters, St. Thomas
Church, Gingerland School and
two business premises

There was moderate damage to
one bridge and the Treasury,

Water Supply Hard Hit

The water supply was seriously
damaged at its source, causing
alarming anxiety as to whether
the trouble Lies in the reservoir

@ On Page 7

A WARNING FOR W. INDIES

ly warm “and for the most part
mutually profitable” relationships
which have existed between Can-
ada and the West Indies during
the last 50 years, and special men-
tion is made of the fact that, even
though the dollar crisis meant
heavy restriction on the volume of
exports from Canada to the West
Indies, the Dominion did not de-
nounce the trade agreement as she

,could have done

Even now when steps had been
taken to remove some of the dis-
abilities which Canadian exporters
had been suffering, Canada might
well feel something more might
have been done,

“I do not know whether
wants World War III,

UATE INCH

Red Army Drive

Further

IKE GOING
TO PARIS

PARIS, Jan, 4

General Dwight Eisenhower
Supreme Commanaer of the nev
Atlantic army will arrive here oi |
Sunday, a member of the Head |
juarters staff cf S.H.A.P.E. (Su
ereme Headquarters Allied Pow- |
rs in Europe) said here today

The American army authoritie
1ave clamped tight security
peasures on the hotel Eisenhowe
“ill oceupy temporarily

A photographer who called a
he 200-room hotel, guarded by
American military policemen wa
ot allowed upstairs to take pic
tures of the Genera!’ t fl
uite

American officers sereene
French civilian presonnel sop!yin
for employment at the headquar
ters.

Fivenhower will be accompanie
by his Chief of Staff, General
Grunther on his iovr of Wester
Europe after their arrival on Sun-
day, it was learned here today

So far no new French civiliar
have been engaged for Eisenhow
er’s temporary headquarters in th:
Hotel Astoria.

—Reuter,

Europe Must
Sacrifice Too

—Eisenhower

WASHINGTON, Jan. 4.

General Dwight D, Eisenhower
the North Atlantic Supreme Com-
mander in Europe said to-day
that the North Atlantic defence
system would not be successfui
unless wester;, European nations
matched American sacrifices anc
efforts,

General Eisenhower made a
vigorous appeal for all the north
Atlantic nations to build up their
defences,

He spoke at a Press Conference
prior to his departure on Saturday
on a tour of the capitals of west-
ern European members of the
— Atlantic Treaty Organisa-
tion,

Eisenhower spoke emphatically
to the crowded Press Conference
frequently pounding the table.

Eisenhower was asked about
American press reports that he
was confident the Western De
fence Organisation could be built
up within two years to a strength
which would deter Russia from
starting a third world war, He
replied that he had not talked to
anyone 0» that subject. He added:
Russi‘



Montgomery

Answering questions, he said he
lid not now believe there had
been any special discussions on
the position of Field Marshal Lord
Montgomery in the Western De-
fence Organisation,

He added: “I would like to say
that Field Marshal Montgomery
has several times very enthusias~
tically placed himself at my dis-
posal for any purpose he can
serve. We have been friends for
a long time.” —Reuter,

U.S. Will Not Bomb

China Says Truman

WASHINGTON, Jan, 4

President Truman said to-day
that United States forces would
not bomb China without United
Nations sanction,

The President told reporter
that the United States Govern
ment did not have under con
sideration a request to the Unite





Nations to bomb Communis
China. He added that the Unitec
States would not contemplat
such a_ step withcut United

Nations authority.—Reuter.

IMPORT PERMITS

MONTEVIDEO, Jan., 4

Al] imports from the sterlin:
area into Uruguay will in future
be subject to a system of prio:
permits. The Government decrec
ordering this refers to the neec
to adopt temporary measure
aimed at adjusting purchases i:
the sterling area to the country
sterling balances,



—Reuter

“In these circumstances we have |
viewed with some concern certai:
recent happenings in those terri

tories,’ says the Circular. But al
though it is fully realised hov
much the authorities in the col

onies need do everything possib!«
to raise the standard of living, “a
the same time it is most importan
and necessary to appreciate a’
their true worth, such long-triec
benefits as those that derive from
preferences enjoyed in the Cana
dian market and make sure be-
yond question that whatever i
done nothing should be allowed tc
damage the solid foundations or
which all future
rest.”

building must

{9999994064444 tpt plete et et et

South

TOKYO, Jan. 4.
UNITED NATIONS FORCES defending the
port of Inchon began to evacuate by sea to-
night, according to front line reports
The great Allied withdrawal from the blazing
capital—-which has now changed hands three times
in six months—-was completed almost without a
hitch
The American, British and South Korean troops
took up positions on a new secret defence line to the
south.
Small forces of Communists were reported to
be moving through Seoul late to-night in pursuit
of the retreating United Nations troops









Rear Admiral lL. A. Thackery,

| ike ae . Senior American Naval Com-

'mander on the west coast an-

pb? ’ nounced earlier today that a giant

Third Test | armada of Navy transports and

{chartered merchant ships was

In the Third Test Maten {standing by off Inchon “in case it
between England and Aus-— ‘is needed for evacuation.”

tralia which began at : The transports were protected

Sydney to-day England won by American, Canadian British,

the toss and are batting. The Duteh, and Australian cruisers

and destroyers,
Elsewhere the advancing Com-
their

Weather was described as
fine but there is a threat of

d aie by : munists continued south-
py ete ie on u Eng- ward drive plunging down among

i a oes with utton |/the mountains in the centre of
anc Vashbrook and the | Korea and threatening to split the
pair batted confidently,

United Nations Army in two.

Washbrook scoring twice as One army of about 200,000
fast as Hutton, At $4 Wash Communist troops was reported
brook was caught by Miller thrusting deep below the 38th
off the bowling of lun John- parallel towards the key road

son; he had scored 18 junction of Wonju, gateway to the
south .

| The move would leave United
| Nations forces isolated on the east

and west coasts,

Latest score
133 for 3. Hutton 62 Comp-
ton 0; Simpse) and Park-
house not out

is England

The capture of this strategic
town would enable them to com-

|
| mang the highway to Pusan, main’



supply port in the southeast.

Wants More Time
For U.S. Conscripts

WASHINGTON,‘ Jan. 4
Congress will soon be asked to
add six months to the present 21
months served by conscripts Carl
Vinson, Chairman of the House
Armed Services Committee gaid
today. He told reporters he expec-

The other mein Communist
‘oree, swiftly following up the
| Righth Army's retreat from blaz-
ing Seoul, the southern capital,
and its airfields of Kimpo, was
trying to outflank the United Na-
tions forees falling back through
streams of refugees towards In-
chon, the west coast port.

Thousands of refugees tried to
board shore transports as the big

ted the Defence Department to una, of the marethes, zn *
— to Congress an overall mili- ie lind edie MOURA tame
ary eslimate in the next few the smoke-covered inferno of

days. The Defence Department is
still debating whether to ask
Congress to lower the call-up age
to 18, he said

abandoned Seoul,

United Nations warplanes roar-
ed overhead covering the retreat
ind hitting the Communists with
bombs adn guns,

Of burning Seoul itself now
totally evacuated by all United
Nations forces, one pilot said: “It
was like watching an anthill on
Refugees were streaming in
ery direction, even er.
The British 29th Brigade, last
troops to leave the eity, fought

Under present draft regulations,
men aged
called up

or more may be

-—Reuter.



——-——— fire

ARMY CONFERENCE

: PARIS, Jan. 4
france will invite representa
tives of Western Germany, Italy

@ On pase o



and the Benelux countries to take TELL THE ADVOCATE
part in talks here on a Buropean THE NEWS
army within 24 hours of the sign
RING 3113
ing of the Schuman Plan, a French ;
Foreign Ojfice spokesman an- DAY OF, REGIE

pounced today.—-Reuter,



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PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1951
ES LE A ST
Fo

© + ‘
spn Turfites, Retain ! ae. é and the Sketch Book-] Sade tei seekers: ics. weak aes
4 tising Manager of the Advo-| HIG * 5 eS
cate Company Limited, and his| _ i ; | Ae iC L i i i
brother Dr. Tony Gale who were cj PLA? 4 or ae Wi
|














MAKE THEIR FIRST APPEARANCE AT
in Trinidad for the Trinidad Turf CASUARINA CLUB
IR ¢ act 1 ad for ri ‘ur
er IR ARTHUR and Lady Morrell, Gav's Christ Maetin

who have been in Trinidad for TO-MORROW NIGHT. ADMISSION 60c.

five weeks arrived here yesterday
by B.W.LA, to spend a couple of
menths’ holiday in Barbados and
are staying at the Crane Hote!
Sir Arthur joined the West

re-
turned on Wednesday etnoon
by B.W.1.A. During his stay in
Trinidad Mr. Gale was the guest
of Mr. Justice Kenfieth Vincent
Hrowne, Acting Chief Justice of
Trinidad. Incidentally Mr. Browne






PLAZA





agers Pee nS will be leavi inidad for Eng-
in ahd was in command fr¢ lohd by the in the middl é
1906 t6 1922, retiring on election ef January. Dr. ‘Gale wee a Guest WARNER BROS. ant
to Active 1 Eldér Brother of Trinity at the Queen’s Park Hotel. ane has Walked to the vila he meets fig pal Wilke. * Hille, TAKE DEEP PRIDE IN THEATRE

oy = He Was Deputy Master Heré for Two Weeks 10 get a paper for his Daddy. ust Saprt. éties thé little mouse. BRIDGE? /
of Trinity House from 1935 to 1948 eré to ee Before he arrivés a small figure ‘I've just eine paét_your editage on TOWN
when he retired from active Me. AUDREY DE LIMA and walks olf of th€ shop: ‘*Surély, thy _ {airy-eyele. Pherd was 4 ANNOUNCING

three children arrivedcfrom that’s Podgy’s tittle cousin Rosalie,” whacking big motor-car standing “NO MAN TAKES








e.

Sir Arthur is fond of golf and
bridge. His wife is the forme:
Auarey bouise Alston.

Trittidad’s New K.Cs.

WO TRINIDADIANS have
been made K.C.s. They are
Honourable J. Mathieu-Perez,
Trinidad’s Attorney General and
Mr. John Basil Hobson, son of
Mr. J. B. Hobson; K.C. of San
Fernando, at present Solicitor
General of Kenya. The name of
Hobson has for almost a century
been linked with the Bar in
Trinidad
Very Pleased
A NOTHER BARBADIAN turf-
ite returning from Trinidad
on Wednesday afternoon was Mr.
Lisle Ward, M.C.P. He was very
pleased to see two horses that he

Trinidad on Wednesday afternoon pg e. other why Pod; oe bey was it?” “Vve pe
by B.W.I.A. to spend a couple ing care of he ought es " says ft, in surptise. “* It
ef weeks’ holiday, staying uit fot 16 be alone. ide the hen | started out
Leaton-on-Sea, Her husband, M:

Alfonso B, de Litha is to
SoS StE BRC. RADIO PROGRAMME
two children from Trinidad.
To Take U A ent FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, i981
i, arrived} 7.00 am, The News; 17, New:
from Efiglanid via Trinidad] Pye" YS em. ch
“pnt nent wiht to ee an} eth a.m.
dames en Fitens: 8. im ale A
home e in i fla i qualities we I oe ee ro Bis ide
years ago and
at Various Lon hospitals prt prior evs ee, Hs es ne #28
té this appointment. ig Cote Bo 4 rites

wast’ t there











isiting Her



se

bred, Atomic II and Crossroads,
do so well at the Christmas méet-
ing.
To celebrate the victories, Mr
Aiex Chin, who now owns then atid a half months’ holiday Ph the

U.S. She came down via Puert
Rico and Antigua by B.W.LA.

ing Up The Curtain

Was V Brother

APT FRANK PARRIS mem-

bers of his helt ano

several friends were at Sawell

yesterday aftetrioon to meet Mrs.

Patris who retutned from five

EAT NT BARLAY
Mrs. Parris had been visiting : {
het brother in Brooklyn.

Seth Assia , za gn pe

held a party in Trinidad on Tues-
— s

Weaver who returned
from Trinidad on Tuesday was a
guest of Sit Hubert and Lady
Rance at Government House,





during his stay. DR. AND MRS. OSCAR KLEVAN—left for the U.S. yesterday after 1SS MOLLY LOURENCO whe
Life in India spending a holiday with their two children. was in, Barbados in early Serving os ROARK, © man who leet by no rules but his own

IR HENRY CRAIK arrived from 4 “er ae te inne ev ee recent
KF Englund yesterday via the Heliday Visit Over . + a me dt naan at ean bs
Dutch W.I. and Trinidad. He j ; . 4 On Carib Tour B. A. Wak ier SE A
has come over to spend six weeks Dp" AND MRS. OSCAR ve ; : B.W.1.A. with her mother Mrs
oe Rarkades and io stave ct thé RLEVAN who have beeh A’ the invitation of B.O.A.C.- Kathleen Lourenco. They are JANETT

ying B.W.1.A. office in Miami, Staying at Accra, Rockley and wili A DRESS OE

Ocean View Hotel. Sir Henry, Spending a holiday in Barbados
‘who wears a monocle, has spent with their son, Dr, Dean Klevan Mr. Sylvan Cox, Travel Editor ° Melly wi about that ‘bioria
most of his life in India. He and their daughter Mrs, Lisle 0f the Miami Herala is toutin, lly tells me thab Gloria is
joined the Indian Civil Service in Smith left yesterday morning by Several of the Caribbean islands batk in Canada whefe she works
1919. He was Chief Secretary of B.W.1.A. for Puerto Rico on to. gather material for his with T.C.A. in Montreal.



Co-starring as DOMINIQUE, the only woman for that brand of man

PATRICIA NEAL &

Upstairs Newsam & Co., Lower Broad Street

Lovely AFTERNOON, COCKTAIL and EVENING DRESSES
Also








the Punjab from 1922 to 1927. In their way to the U.S. Dr. and Column. He arrived yesterduy os

192, he was made Commissioner. Mrs. Klevan’s home is in West &fternoon in Barbados, Mr. Cox Back from Trinidad ne r-MADE DRE mae

He was a member of the Punjab Chester, Pennsylvania has already visited the Virgin D*: AND MRS. W. H. E. aueTic SATIN SWIM SUITS

Executive Council from 1930 to To See Damage Islands and from here he will JOHNSON and their son who 7, , ry , ,
1934 and Home Member of th , & visit Grenada, Trinidad, Tobago were in Trinidad over the Christ- : a Also :: NOW PLAYING TOsDAY JAN. Stis



~ ELASTIC COTTON SWIM SUITS
For LADIES and CHILDREN
Hours—Mondays to Fridays 8.30 to 3.30, Saturdays 8.30 to 11.30



ObeiuL * Cdhdval’s Pxecitive M* and Mrs. Ogden Reed of and Jamaica in that order before Mas season returned from Trini-
Ceuncil from 1934 to 1938. He waa } 1" soe _" pee — returning home. This is his first oT ete afternoon by
made Governor of the Punjab in OY" arriveo’ i ave visit to Barbados. Mr, Cox is a A r. Johnson is P.M.O.

2.30 & 8.30




"i 50 betas .. Wednesday night by private plane St. Joseph. Inui i
a. sadaada Tan. Pelilines and flew to St. Kitts and Nevis guest at the Marine Hotel y * and Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
RAviser to the Wiceray dom Anat yesterday to view the damages ahd R. Ant MRS. WiLdPRED ————
to 1943. ‘ eae Reef where they ALSTON arrived from Trin-

idad yesterday motning by
B.W.1.A. after a few weeks’

AQUATICC CLUE CINEMA iombiste Sal EMPIRE ROYAL











Another Photographer

RRIVING trom the U.S, visit, MATINEES: TODAY & TOMORROW AT 5 P.M. :

yesterday morning was Mr. With Barclays Bank TONIGHT TO SUNDAY NIGHT AT 8.30 P.M. Last Two Shows To-day Today Only 4.30 and 8.30
4 ae ee a taaoharcier as pay R. NORMAN “ROBBIE” CORNEL WILDE :o: MAUREEN O'HARA | 2.30 and 8.30 Republic Big Double
eed via Or : er a Robinson who has been. in : " i i Selanick’s
SMa Aiken ils octet Grenada for three months, with in THE HOMESTRETCH” in technicotor | on George Brent and
eka aE “ya 4 arclays Bank arriv ester: é 1
Barbados as a guest of the 5 ow. ge ae eS with GidiMIN LANGAN :o: HELEN wALseth té DUEL IN THE
Barbados Publicity Committee, YL ane in

" weeks’ holiday with his family in} 20th Century-Fox Picture

and while here will gather George Street, Belleville,





material for an article about cantata SUN ” 6 ANGEL ON TH
Barbados, for the National Geo- ; Visi L E
graphic Magazine, which will be Short at MOND Oven: ea ke se A oe
illustrated with colour photo- WDRIG. E. K. PAGE, G.O.C. Starring AMAZON rr)
graphs, He will also take Caribbean Area left yester- CLIFTON WEBB in
photographs for the Barbados day by B.W.1.A., on a two-day “ ad Jennifer Jones
Publicity Committee. visit to St. Lucia. MR. BELVEDERE GOES TO COLLEGE Gregory Peck and

At Seawell to meet him yes- y
terday was Mr. Aubrey Boyce, Not Returning ee with “ MURDE
Hon. Treasurer of the Barbados SIDNEY SPIRA, Opto- — name R IN THE
Publicity Committee. metrist, who has been WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY NIGHT AT 8.90 Joseph Cotton and {

Mr. Allmon was born in East holidaying with his parents in she idaho Sarai ee MUSIC HALL r
Liverpool, Ohio, and has spent Barbados since he completed his JOHN PAYNE :o; MAUREEN O'HARA lla Al



studies at Colombia University
in New York, has decided to re-
main here and will shortly be

opening an office hete. = “MIRACLE ON 34th STREET”

20th Century-Féx Picture

about seven years as a free lance
journalist and photographer,
During that time he has visited
fifty countries and has written
articles on West Africa, Trinidad
and Tobago and two articles on
the South Seas which were pub-
lished in the National Geographic
Magazine. He also writes articles
and takes pictures for Life,
Holiday and the Saturday
Evening Post, magazines. He is
a motion picture producer. One
of his adventure films — Of
Shores and Sails in the South
Seas,—took ten months, 100,000
miles and 10,000 feet of film to
make.
|
}
'
'

ROXY sci

Vera Ralston and
Today 4.45 and 8.15 and Willi I
Cantinting jam Marshall

Columpictires Presents OLYMPIC

Today Only 4.30 and 8.15

Columbia Smashing Double








CROSSWORD





PLAZA Theatre—sri0GErowN

ONE OF THE GREATEST OF ALL BEST-SELLERS !

- ERE FOUNTAINHEAD”

THE Pe ote BY AYN RAND
One of a f it of all Warner ares 4 TaN !
Starring — Gary COOPER : Patricia NEAL mond MASSEY
NOW PLAYING—2.30 & 8.30 p.m. and Gontindiag: ar 445 & 8.30 p.m.
MATINEE: Sat. 9.30 A.M. & 1.90 P.M. (RKO Radio Double)

GEORGE O'BRIEN in - -
“MARSHAL OF MESSA CITY” and

TIM BOL in “INDIAN AGENT”

\. Badg © of offen you’ find is in PLAZA Theatre — OISTIN




Glenn Ford and Terry More
in

“THE RETURN OF
OCTOBER ”

and

“OUTCAST OF THE





Mr. Allmon expects to be in MR. CHARLES ALLMON
SIR HENRY CRAIK Barbados for six weeks and is
—arrived from England yesterday staying at the Ocean View Hotel. —arrived from U.S. yesterday.
a Here

BY THE WAY — By Beachcomber




























: < 8 Down. Let pace tell rinc TODAY—5 & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing (Monogram Double)
O boxers fell out of the ring the catalogue., H-O-L-B-E-I-N.” I will wager that already the ° onde (8; 6) VENT
the other day, and ‘were “Holborn,” said the official, “is a phrase is more widely known than / }} ie ee, oa go, ba oY 6). - ee Se BLACK MESSA nm
both counted out. A dull ending. place, That's w here, you'll fina spy omar cine a persenes, Ue. eo village,” (5) ae “CAPTAIN FURY” & “CAPTAIN CAUTION” Me Ps
7 che 1e jaduct.” “Wh t : js é is 4 Tear ; 4 sce jarig Kal i -
Saaers? have bouts-betWeen three: Gone” said the fool. cole" T have just seen it as the caption | ‘4 chit sore ot i, dite. (4) Braih Aherné — Victot McLaglen : Victor (Samson) Mature — Alan Ladd in toni Fe with
se* So . J i " ® An old wom bie)
It w ‘ Prodnose: And is that all you to his photograph. It might amuse} ,7 She ‘can be MIDNITE SATURDAY, JAN. 6TH (Monosram Dou ‘ i .
that ree ouee Contd kant he re to say about a wonderful ex- 7. ees a atl one Aj oe isan ; iniltenge Ons) yo Leo Garcey £2" Bowery Boys in & “FALL GUY" came tenet
ibition of art? “T am rather fond of salmon,” an 18. luck up |! (5) “MR. =i ,
oe torn on tha ompt of any Myself: It’s all I can. think of then watch the phrase becoming | %? Sad men's alteration, (7) emits armumeny —- Suisess Eee = 4
think this would liven up boxing 1 the moment, as the man re- famous, L Novtirie ente here. 18) — 1 . TO ee
plied to the woman who said “Is N , radio-beam 2 Just trifi ’

contests,” The ‘danger iE hate plied to the woman who said “is No Sunday et GLOBE OPENING To-DAY TO TUESDAY
eunning fighter might simply bide red ot URELY there can be no debate + Get a tt amy THE GAR E ) ST. JA
his time, letting the other two go De. — ‘and told her her house ) on who should be the first} » They bring firm feet wih ong?
proach other. Then, Mehend man to talk to the moon from the} 4 Mckle , 49). erub,. TODAY TO SUN, 8.30 p.m. — MATINEE: Sun. 5 p.m.

us, he cou step in and i‘ : top of the Shot ‘Tower ..«t year Dante ate before true time (8) Spectacular Action-Packed Special ! ! ! ’
deal with the pair of them. But _erginal note The honour should fall by right to] ;7, Marble group in the Vatican. (7) r N — Rory CALHOUN — Cathy DOWNS in THE SIN CITY'S .
T don’t care. OU never know nowadays Dr. Strabismus (Whom God Pre=| ' St eStart it Wisdominates: the Guy MADISON — Rory . 4 i

Holbein’s ‘Viaduct’ what casual phrase will be serve), of Utrecht. As there will b Sct sek “MASSACRE RIVER” WILDEST pays/ é 3 ‘=
FOOL who went to the Royal hailed as though it were a brilliant be no reply, he can say anything “eee of yesterday's Duzezie. - Across = ‘he
‘Aasdeny. - tt one * Oye Carer. and repeated, all over the he likes. But, spec “1g os an ine Met idaar th ane ge oe 3 Monday and Tuesday — 8.30 p.m 4
y » 8 olbein's weorlc ver since r. Somerset former, whose earnings should be imo 92. Tearful 94 M " 4 s
et searched in vain. An Maugham said that he was a very tax-free. let me catch someone Pranics Bown yi ES “FREDDIE STEPS OUT” “I WOULDN'T BE IN YOUR ie? |
cial said, “Don’t you mean Hol- old person, the words have been talking to the moo. on a sunday! i Wet Ran te ad MM Freddy STEWART SHOES” vn ’ :
res T certainly, do not, said pepestest every day in interviews, Saperlipopette! Is this the Place; +2 Tan: as Beet 2 Mute, 21.” Piaty MAUREEN VI NCENT j
| 2In here on artic eS, essa) . -

and | _paragraphs. Pigalle?









geen nts O'HARA - CHRISTIAN. - PRICE
NOW IS THE BEST TIME TO PAINT | GOODS! ; lr Ap

YOUR HOUSE Tinie
:
.

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Evans & Whitfields

MATTRESSES (Fibre-filled)
YOUR he ene

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A wide range of READY MIXED PAINTS oo Quality Pan ray Sk TECHMICOLOR .
AY ae ,

and MATERIAL supplied by the foremost Washable Prints
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méafitifacturers to seléct from. Ginghams—59¢, a yd. :
. Printed Spuns—$1.02 up
Plain Spuns—87c., 91c., § ; ‘ : :
98c., $1.16¢e., a yd. Scnempley by ROBERT HARDY ANDREWS « Directed by CHARLES LAMONT ¢



REMEMBER when you save the Sarface

SHOE STORES te
Oa 8 You Save $ $ $ tui tk on Bla - Pendeced by ROBERT ARTHUR + A Universalnternational Picture cau

Taffetas, Crepes. Georg: $ EXTRA TONITE LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE i

Inspect these at our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT . ettes, Satins, Anglaise, NAT DUNNAH - if You Stub Your Toe on the
Telephone No. 2039 x vee ee : Tho

SHEETS

GERALD HAREWOOD .. If I Love You

80"x100” each_ _ _ _ $7.08
x _ FRANCIS HYPOLITE Where Are You

PIT 16 — HOUSE 30 — BAL. 40 — BOX

BOY KIS i Set % MAL. WILLIAMS .. Maybe You'll Be 1
70” x 100” $6.17 7 & TH ANTS WINFIELD RUDDER Magic in the Moonlight”
x 4 on a 90, THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE x FOR VALUES Y AA Seen, «, Sercende of the Belly
“ ” r S $ z '
Oo X100) 24): hee ee COTTON FACTORY LTD. | Pr. Wm. Henry Street 3 NO INCREASE IN PRICES |
!



nme PILLOW CASES 940. & 97e.





a

U.N. Still

FRIDAY, JANUARY



1951

Hope To

Settle Korea Fighting

(By MICHAEL FRY)

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan, 4.

THE UNITED NATIONS has not given up all hope

of a negotiated settlement

Chinese Communists, though most delegates realise that



Reception Held
For Diplomats To

W. Germany

BONN, Jan. 4

The Allied High Commissioners
to-day held a New Year's recep
tion for foreign diplomatic mis-
sions in West Germany at which
19 countries were represented,

Sir Ivone Kirkpatrick of Britain,
this month’s chairman of the
High Commissioi. replied to greet-
ings from Minister Albert Wehrer
of Luxemburg.

Sir Ivone, referring to the im-
pending revision of the Occupa-
tion Statute giving the west Ger-
mans a foreign office, said: “This
may be the last occasion on which
the Allied High Commission will
meet the heads of diplomatic
missions on the basis of the pres-
ent relationship.”

Only east European representa-
tive present was Dr, Stan Pavlie,
Minister and head of the Yugoslav
Economic delegation.

Other countries were, Holland,
Denmark, Belgium, Brazil, Aus-
tralia, Italy, Switzerland, Turkey,
Sweden,
Spain, Greece,
and South Africa.

In view of the reception, the
High Commissioners postponed
their usual weekly iil
next Thursday.

onaeo, Norway, Canada,
India, Uruguay

meeting

—Reuter.

Mout Etna
Still Spouting

CATANIA, Sicily, Jan. 4.
Europe's tallest volcano to-day
went into its 40th day of violent
eruption amid inereasing fears
that worse may be yet to come.
The Government of Catania, 20
miles south of the half-mile wide
lava stream spouting from the
snow-crested eastern slopes of
Mount Etna said in a special an-
nouncement that serious concern
is begun to be felt because of the
continued violence of the erup-

tion. —(C.P.)

Not British Enough

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 2

Supersad, owner of the Princess
Theatre, Arima, was fined $50,
or three months’ hard labour, for
failing to exhibit the prescribed
quota of British films during Sep-
tember, 1950. Supersad exhibited
3,690 feet instead of the prescrib-
ed 8,000 feet.

Committee several delegations felt
that the United Nations should
not be committed at once to
drastic action against the Peking
Government including the use of
collective sanctions.

After the three man United
Nations Cease-fire Group had
reported its failure to negotiate a
oease-fire with the Chinese Com-
munists’ the Committee adjourn-
ed until to-morrow (Friday) to
enable delegates te consider what
to do next,

Since the Chinese opened their
new year offensive across the 38th
parallel, the Ameriean delegation
has tended to press for strenge
and more urgent measures against
the Peking Government,

After consultation with various
Governments, this tendency has
been softened to some _ extent.
Several delegations it was under-
stood, urged the United States not
to slam the door irrevocably.

Judging by the statement of Mr.
Warren Austin the chief American
delegate to the Political Commit-
tee yesterday, these counsels ap-
parently prevailed. The Commit-
tee allowed itself another 48
hours of reflection. The delay it
was generally thought, would
also allow the British Common-
wealth Prime Ministers at their
conference opening in London
to-day to concert their Roliey. og
Korea and Communist China.

—Reuter

SRS


of the Korean war with the

much depends on the course of the fighting.
Following yesterday’s meeting
of the General Assembly's Political

| E. Berlin Actors
Boycott Play

BERLIN, Jan. 3

To-day’s celebrations of East
German President J. Pieck’s
75th birthday were marred by
ithree East Berlin actors refusing
ito participate in a Russian play
“The Transformation of Golo-
vin”.

The play, designed as a climax
to the birthday ceremonies in a
mass rally in a huge Soviet sec-
tor hall, describes how a Russian
Musician is being converted into
ja “good Communist”.

A spokesman for the theatre
to-day declined to reveal the
names of the three actors but
eonfirmed that they haye can-
celled their econtraets for
reason. —Reuter



FRENCH GET BOMBERS

SAIGON Jan. 4.
Seven American light bombers
arrived here yesterday as Ameri-
can supplies to the French Union
forces fighting Vietnam —Reuter.



Poppy Collection 1950

ST. MICHAEL'S











Upper Broad Street Mrs, L. MeKinstry 8 30
Lower Broad Street Miss D. C. Hutson 44
Cathedral District Miss Mandeville $128.96

Church Collection Cathedral . 80.27 209.23
Fontabelle ‘

one Miss K. Warren 33.19
Bank Hall & White Park Mrs. O. Symmonds 47.23
St. Leonard's ++ Mrs, Foster 18.92
Stratholyde : Mrs. G. Clarke 48.59
Upper Black Rock Mrs. C. Manning 82
Lower Black Rock Mrs. E. G. Wilkie 60
Belle Ville ; Miss Hollinsed f 190.30
Upper Collymore Rotk Mrs. J. H, Roberts 12.73
Dalkeith & Culloden Miss Hollinsed 15.32
Brittons Hill Mrs. T. Gittens 59.11

arrison . Mrs. L. Bowen 80.09
Two Mile Hill Mrs. F. C, Hutson 17.62
Flint Hall Mrs, R. Stokes *% 18.12
Ivy Land Mrs. C. W. Cumberbatch .. 2.58
St, Matthew's Mrs. W. M. Worrell 20.97
Bay Street Miss G. Williams 90.15
Glendairy ‘ Mrs. Foster 3.52
Milk Market ete. . Salvation Army 37.04 1,443.45
w whing geet M W. A, Gi t $287.67

orthing & es rs. . A, Gran A

Church Collection St. Matthias 69.20 346.87
St. Lawrence Mrs. Bob Edgehill 33

Chureh Collection Seis 75.46
Rest of Parish Miss S. Arthur 228.35
Christ Church Miss S. Arthur 650.68
St. Philip i Miss F. G, Cameron 228.
St. George Mrs. W. B. Carrington 221,52
St. Joseph -» Mrs, G. R. Hutson 182.00
St. John . Mrs, Farmer 61.70
St. Thomas Mrs. J. A, Mahon 43.
St. James Mrs. S. Nurse bs
St ter Mrs. R. Packer 31
St. Lucy Mrs, Clarke-Holman 35.00
St. Andrew Mrs. E. Gill 25.98 1,840.01

DONATIONS

Officers Association 24.00
Barbados Turf Club 84.06
parece eae Gio - 40.00

ereantile Community ¥
Sale of Wreaths 738
Sale of Plates — W.V.W.W. ae

anee, Marine Hotel 762.45 2,330.23

SPECIAL EFFORTS
St. Philip—Dance, Crane Miss F. G, Cameron e 3-28
St. John vs . Mrs, W. Chandler .00
St. George—Book Sale &
file . Mrs, W, B. Carrington 254.80

Christ Church—Boek Sale Miss S. Arthur : 240.00
St. Foter—Prive ae" .. Mrs. R, Packer Re
St. Joseph—Collec .. Mrs. G. R, Hutson .00 1,367.13

TOTAL | CORLROTION TO DATE

ess Expenses

Balance in hand
EXPENSES
Danee, Marine Hotel
Park Constables
Posting Bills
Printing Application Forms



Sincere Appreciation to al

drawing to a close.
May Your Holidays be

UCU SEES wees Sy

c

AGE TN TR TS TR DEN RAK

Ex

in aiding us to meet the Problems of the Year

may the Year to come bring you in full measure the
satisfaction that makes life and work worth while.

a
The Barbados Foundry Ltd.

WHITE PARK ROAD

-

our friends and Customers

filled with Happiness and

ST. MICHAEL

FAFA DED AAAS



1M, THE BOY







Indian Embassy at Katmandu.

Doping

of these have been doped.





Scare About A New Dru

NORMAL TESTS MAY NOT
DETECT IT

By THE SCOUT
The French have produced some magnificent horses in the
last dozen years. It would be churlish to allege that many

RARBADOS :
KING OF NEPAL | Robert J. MacLeod



A new and unpublished picture of H.M. the GYNENDRA BIR
BIKRAM SHAH BAHADUR NEPAL, the young King of Nepal, who
was enthroned in November when his grandfather took asylum in the

The boy king wears his ceremonial
head-dress and is seen taking the salute.

Express.



&

There ig na doypt, however, ——-

that some French trainers do dope
their horses, and very efficiently,

too,

The French authorities are not
so severe in their sentences, In
fact, they apparently see nothing
jineongruous about warning off a

that) trainer for doping and still allow-

ing him to supervise the training
of “his” horses-—under a different
name.

There is not the same money-
motive as in this country. Except
on big-race days a French owner
has no chance of bringing off a
gamble of any magnitude.

etting is confined to the tote,
and normally individual race-
pools are so small that a £200 bet
makes a substantial difference to
the final odds.
On the other hand, the “bad
type” of French racing man is

about the meanest creature

breathing.

Anything Over Three Is
Suspect

Many of our trainers have had
experience of French horses who
have been “treated.” That is why,
now, they prefer to buy only young
horses in France. Anything over
the age of three is suspect.

The job is done well. There are
certain experts, both in France and
Belgium. The best of them is a
man connected with trotting-
racers. It is. not unusual for a
horse-box, on its way to one of the
Paris meetings, to draw up at his
“consulting room.”

The authorities in this country
have been notably courteous in
their attitude towards the dope-
testing of French-trained horses,
The only instance which I can

recall of a French horse being
swabbed in England was at New-
market in 1946, The horse was the
sprinter Boree. Tests proved
negative.

would, however, be intoler-
able to subject the horses of lead-
ing Freneh owners and trainers
to tests while their opposite num-
bers in this country enjoy immu-
nity,

French Trainers Have
More 1

There is a scare now that the
French have a new dope which
cannot be detected. We will hear
more of this later.

Doping by outside agents is far
less common across the Channel.
French trainers are more fortunate
than ours in that they have ample
time te devote to the supervision
of their horses. Travelling is con-
fined within easy limits.

Our trainers, on the other
hand, spend a large proportion
of their working time in train or
ear, This doubles their difficul-

ties.

And yet, under this inflexible
new rule, they are to be accounted
responsible and guilty, even when
personally innocent,

U.N. Troops

@ From Page 1

doggedly through a Chinese am-
bush in the northwestern suburbs
suffering casualties,

The last pontoon bridge across
the frozen Han river running
through the city, was blown up by
a British Army Engineer Sergeant
William Robson,

The Eighth Army officially an-
nounced tonight: “The city of
Seoul has been successfully evaeu-
ated by all United Nations troops
who have withdrawn as planned
to their next defensive positions,”

The new defence plan remained
a closely guarded secret but Tokyo
observers speculateti on the pos-
sibility of a line through Susju, 20
miles below Seoul, or Osan an-
other 10 miles to the south,

United Nations troops were con-
Ainuing to fall back al] along the
150 miles battlefront,

In the central sector, along the
Chunchon-Kapyong road northeast
of Seoul, the situation was de-
scribed as “vague”.

—Revier,



Released From Jail

BUENOS AIRES, Jan. 3,
The Argentine Government in a
surprise move on Tuesday ordered
the release from jail of Ricardo
Balbin, chief opposition critic of
President Juan D, Peron.

Balbin, 46, was sentenced to five
years’ imprisonment on November
22 for calling Peron a dictator and
a No. 1 criminal, He had been
most widely mentioned by the
Radical Party candidate for Presi-
dent in the 1952 elections.—(CP)



A few weeks ago a_ trainer
friend of mine was walking one
evening from an outlying stable-
yard back to his house,

He noticed a big limousine
parked in the lane. A glance at
the tough-looking characters in-
side reminded him, he says, of the
“spivs” in some of Giles’s car-
toons.

His head man was waiting.
“There’s a lad come to apply for
that vacancy. His references are
good and he seems all right,” he
sald,

The interview was_ short:
“You came by car—that car
down the lane?” “Yes.” ‘Well,
go away in it!”

There’s no end to supposing

what might have happened if luck
had not been on that trainer’s side
that evening.
Problem For The Stewards
TOMORROW The Scout will
deal with the Stewards’ problem:
“Someone must be held responsi-
ble, who—if not the oeeed
—-L.E.S.

ADVOCATE



Robert J. Mac Leod, whose
exhibition of paintings opens at
the Museum today, (Friday)
, although net bern in Barbados
‘considers himself a Barbadian,
for his mother was a Barbadian

although his father was a Scot.
He was born in Greenwich
| village, New York, which is now
as famous as an art centre in
}New York as Chelsea is in Lon-
don, or Montparnasse in Paris,
At the early age of one year he
was brought to Barbados, where
| he learned his A.B.C, on Has-
tings Rocks:

Mac Leod spent many years of
his life in the United §tates,
where he reegived his art educa-
tion, He studied as a student at
the New York School of Fine
Arts, The Art Students’ League,
The Metropolitan School of Art
and the Pratt Institute. He was
most fortunate in later becoming
the protege of one of America’s
outstanding landscape painters
Frank Bicknell, At the home of
this artist in Qld Lyme, Con-
neticut, Mac Leod came inte
contact with many of America’s
first rank painters. He also owes
much to the well known painter
Bertha Metzler Peyton, the ex-
quisite, jewel-like colouring of
whose landscapes has always in-
Spired him in his work.



He spent fifteen years as a
commercial aptist with the well
known irm of Mec Graw-Hill

Publishing Co, of New York,
During those years he found time
to hold exhibitions of his work
both in oils and water colours;
he also had the honour of having
his water colours hung in the
Vanderbilt Gallery during the
shows of the American Water

Yolour Society,

Since his return to Barbados
Mac Leod has devoted all his
time to painting the West Indian
scene, which holds an unlimited
attraction for him.

Thirty one of his paintings —
chiefly of Barbados and St, Lucia
—are now on view at the
Museum.



Protest New
Rum Tax

(From Our Own Correspondent)
_ GEORGETOWN, Jan. 4.
Sponsored by

various
Unions, a

demonstration

Trade

was
staged today outside the Public
Buildings during a debate on the
budget, protesting against the
proposal to increase the prices of
aerated drinks and rum. The
Council Chamber was crowded
and the publie had to be warned
twice by the Governor against
any attempt to interrupt the
debate by shouts and hisses.
When the Council adjourned the
crowd booed Governor Sir Charles
Woolley and the Financial Sec-
retary Hon, BE. S. McDavid as they
left the Buildings, The Demon-
stration was arranged at the end
of a Town Hall meeting Wednes-
day night attended by more than

3,000 who jammed the Hall and
the compound, The meeting deel-
ded that should the tax proposals

pass the Legislature, to call for a
colony wide boyeott of aerated
drinks. As a further protest act
small
tacay.

factories closed busines:



a

Abolition Of Dutch

Indonesian Union Urged

DJAKARTA, Jan, 4,

The powerful nationalist (Op-
position) party submitted to the
Indonesian Parliament to-day a
motion yrging the abolition of the
Netherlands Indonesian union
and the revision within three
months of the Hague round table
conference agreement,

Other main party groups were
expected to submit similar reso-
lutions during to-day’s debate on
the failure of the Dutch Indone-
sian talks on West New Guinea,

—Reuter.

Spain Not Included

In Mutual Defence Plan

WASHINGTON, Jan, 4.

President Truman told hig press
conference to-day that the ap-
pointment of an ambassador to
Spain did not contemplate the
inclusion of Spain in the Mutual
Detence programme. It had not
been under consideration, at least
by him, he said.



—Reuter.



U.S. High Commissioner
In Pacific Appoint

WASHINGTON, Jan, 4
President Truman has appointe
farmer Senator Albert Thomas o
Utah, High Commissioner of the
United States trust territory of
the Pacific islands,
He was a missionary and lived
there for several years, He is 67.
The islands in the Pacific—fot
which he will be the United
States High Commissioner—are
the former Japanese mandated
islands which United States forees
occupied during the last war,
—Reuter.

AVAILABLE IN ALL SIZES

USE THE TYRES CHAMPIONS USE

Charles Mc Enear

ney & Co,, Lt

d.



Britain Prepares
For War

(B
BRITAIN’S C

uipment.

This effort to bring the coun-
try’s defences to more complete
preparedness is the direct result
of the Brussels North Atlantic
Treaty Organization ec
and the appointment of General
Dwight Eisenhower # Supreme
Commander of the estern Eu-
repean forces.

Plans are being made to speed
up voluntary recruiting to the
services and defence estimates
for the coming year are ex-
meshed to be inereased consider-
ably.

The services haye already car-
tied out an intensive check-up of
he present whereabouts of men
2elonging ta the Class Z reserve.
This class consists of war veter-
ins who are skilled tradsemen and
yther key men,

At the moment Britain is plan-
iing to spend an average of
$3,360 million annually on re-
armaments in the next three
years. But as a direct result of
Prime Minister Clement Attlee's
talks with ident Truman and
the Brussels Conference this fi
gure is expected to be greatly
exceeded,

According to the latest avail-
able figures Britain has an army
of 184,000 regular soldiers plus
211,000 conscripts.

In addition to these 395,000
men there is a Territorial Army
(National Guard) whose volun-
tary element is now about 90,000,
This figure will be increased
monthly as men who finish their
National Seryice with the regu-
lar army automatically enlist in
the Territorials.

63 Diyisions Uutside U.K.

The latest official records show
that there are about six and ane-
half British divisions serving
outside the United Ki ;

Two and one-half divisions
stationed in Western Germany—
but these are not up to full ar-
meured eombat strength, ‘he
War Office has annoyneed that
this foree will be increased ear-
ly in the New Year to three di-
visions, This may be increased
to five divisions during the year

There is approximately a bri-
gade of troops in Austria and
another in Trieste. Scattered
over the Eastern Mediterranean
and the Middle East there is
another divisian.

In the Far East theatre ine te
ing Korea and Malay
sangre amount to two ava ons,
nder the present plans there
is going to be a strategic reserve
based in Britain of one armoured
division, one infantry division
with parachute brigade and one
infantry byigade. It is believed
this total force will amount to

Minister Emanuel
Shinwell has said in the eyen
‘of some emergency” the
ernment might “require to

pro-

‘\wide even more adequate forces.”
3)That depended, he said, largely

on whether the Government could
provide adequate equipment for

them,

The Government has _ also
promised to provide in an emer-
gency 12 Territorial divisions,
which could be mobilized withig

“M ay commen Tons tate that
r sta a
to maintain the figure, of 184,000

men in the regular or ‘‘volunteer”

army, as it is call 30,000 en-
istments are required each year,
In 1948 the Army obtained ‘only

24,400 recruits, in 1949 only 18,-
400, But according-to the latest
official returns numbers of re-
cruits have increased as a result
of the increase of pay granted
to all services,

Defence Minister Shinwell has
also promised that if an emer-
gency arises a Home Guard will

be enrolled. This will be re-
quired primari for home de-
‘nee and dealin, with para-

chutists or fifth column operators.

It is reported that plans are in
hand for arming 2,000,000 men
under this scheme and this group
could be formed into an efficient
Gotence force within a few weeks
of war,

Build Up Of Navy

During the next three years it
is also planned to increase con-
struction for the Navy. Attlee
has announced “a substantial
programme of construction, mod-
ernization and conversion,”

The Admiralty has said that 89
warships of Britain’s mothball
Reserve Fleet are to be refitted
2, private shipyards throughout

in.

inesweeping shares top-pri-
ority with anti-submarine ships.
The minesweepers will ovetoct|
Britain's key river estuaries!
against new types of mines
known to have been developed
since the war.

Their equipment is secret, but
they reportedly will be capable of
handling pa uted magnetic-
acoustie mines and the new Rus-
sian floating mines of the type
released in Korean waters,

By





Laon CAMSELL)

IEFS OF STAFF are urgently review-
ing all passible measures, short of total mobilization, to
strengthen the armed services and improve their fighting

a

PAGE THREE















state. The small force availabie
is highly trained but urgently re-
quires more men ‘o maintain the
mew jet-machines as they are
delivered,

R.A.F. Strength

When the European war ended
it was planned that the R.A.F.
should be maintained at a strength
of 300,000 officers and men.

Air Minister Arthur Henderson
has revealed that the uniformed
strength on April, 1950, was
202,400. This number was expect-
ed to fall by April 1, 1951, to
198,000 made up of 118,000 regu-
lars, 71,000 National Service men
and 9,000 women,

The total number of airmen
recruited or re-cnlisted for the
regular Air Fo.ce quarterly fel)
from 4,026 in the first quarter of
1949 to 2,807 in the last quarter
of that year.

Recruiting has improved in this
service following the Govern-
ment's decision to increase pay,
but the Royal Auxiliary Air Force
and R.A.P. Volunteer Reserve are
still very short of men.-—I.N.8.

Rainstorms
Sweep
Central Italy

ROME, Jan. 4
A village near Spezia was
flooded five feet deep when vio-
lent rain storms swept central and
southern Italy to-day

LONDON

A number of destroyers will be
converted next year into fast U-
beat killers, Five are being con-
verted at present, with radar-
controlled multiple barrel depth-

threwers and other new
weapons, Many older destroyers
are to be gonverted into frigates,

It is reported that these super
U-boat destroyers will be led by
frigates of revolutionary design,
A few are being built in Canada
as well as in Britain.

Six new aircraft carriers join
the Fleet in the next four years,

The 23,000-ton Indomitable and
Vietorious are being modernized so
that they can fly new and heavier
types of jet fAghters and U-boat
killing planes.

The Eagle, 36,000-ton jet-plane
carrier, delayed by development
in aircraft design, will be deliyer-
ed in 1951,

The other four are modifications
of 18,000-ton ships ordered during
the war.

It has also been disclosed that
the scientists at the Admiralty
have developed a “homing” tor-



pedo which noses out a submarine, Rivers overflowed their banks
sets its own course, and then sticks|and landslides dislocated traffic
to its target. It is dropped from]|and communications zi
aircraft and travels in narrowing Snow covered large areas ol

northern Italy and was reported
10 feet deep in some areas neat
the Austrian border.

An army of sweepers was clear-
ing the streets of Milan where

circles,

New Types o Aireraft
The Society o. —«citish Aircraft



Constructors have announced that} eight inches of snow had fallen
the Navy is planning to bring four]in the past two days. —Reuter,
types of turbine-engined aireraft
into squadron narra eas

These planes include attac in
fighters, all weather and night CLARIFICATION.

WASHINGTON, Jan, 4,
The United States, France and
Britain will send Russia a new
note in a few days asking clari-

fighters, heavily armed strike air-
eraft, and anti-submarine search
and strike machines,

The last official naval estimates

available showed that the Navy} fication of Moscow’s latest pro-
will be reduced in strength from] posal for a Big Four meeting,
140,000 to 127,000 during the years] generally reliable sources said

195) 1. The main reason is the] here
smaller intake of National service
men,

Howeyer, in July, nearly 1,000
officers and men were affeeted by
an emergency call up of Selected
Naval and Royal Marine reserves,
and the retention of others sched~-
uled for release. This was a direct
result of the worsening of the
a ilitary situation in Korea,

Naval Strength
Estimated strength of the Royal
Nayal Reserve and Royal Naval
Volunteer Reserve is 41,300 men,
e@ last published table show-
ing the ae strength of the Royal
abu

to-day, —Reuter
TI

FIRE COS1S $10m,
EVANSVILLE, Indiana, Jan, 4,
Fire swept by a stiff wind roar-
ed through eight buildings in the
business district early to-day,
cuusing damage estimated at more
than $10,000,000,—Reuter.

DO YOU KNOW?





Nayy is tabulated below;
_ Training and ; 4
i © Reperimental * 5
& a , ;
0 waa) RY)
tileghips 0 1 4 !
Picet eS ars 1 2 3 2
ight Fleet
ers 4 1 i 7
rt Carriers o 0 1 0
Crulsers 1 2 10 3
estroyers 34 18 61 8
rigates 27 16 = 123 0
Win ss f ff
i eeper: 5
Fas ‘Minseweppers 0 0 ; 0

Like its sister services the Royal
Air Force is also in a very weak

AIVER SALT

ae



ee
THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING ABOUT

HOUSEHOLD CLEANSER
‘PENNY TEST”

TRY IT TODAY— Here's a quick, way to
prove how easily and efficiently
CHEMICO cleans metal, Dab a little
CHEMICO ona dull penny, rub brisk-
ly, and see how brilliantly the coin

ms. S-M-O-O-T-H paste CHEMI-

cleans porcelain, tiles, glass, lino,
paintwork, etc., with equal ease

EVELYN ROACH & |CO., UTn,
Bridgetown, — Barbados








THERE'S PAIN RELIEF
AND TONIC BENEFIT

Yeo! —- Yeast -

THE ADVOCATE
HAS THE BEST

IN TO

HERE’S ONE OF
THE NEW NOVELS

v?
ee

“AN TRISHMAN’S DIARY’

PATRICK CAMPBELL
ADVOCATE STATIONERY.









PAGE FOUR

ARBADOS fb

bias SSS =

PSS SSP sce a

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd|, Broad St., Bridgetown.
ceatbiniiiadesseatnierntpikegieanbelchedienetieniencatapeunancinsinmeetnmanentpmmastesant

Friday, January 5, 1951

APATHY

THE fact that the Report of Sir John
Maude on local government in this island
was not made an issue at the 1951 Vestry
Elections is further evidence of the seem-
ing apathy which follows recommendations
for changes in this island. Time and again
specialists are imported into this island to
investigate conditions of and report on and
make recommendations on certain phases
of life, then follows a long silence until
some compelling circumstance leads to
cursory and inadequate consideration of
the matter.

It has been contended for many years
now that the Vestry system has outlived
its usefulness in Barbados and in 1946 the
Acting Governor in his address to the
Legislature pointed out that the support-
ers of that system would have to be con-
tent with its modernisation or to witness
its abolition.

This view was accepted and as a result
Sir John. Maude was invited to come to
Barbados to examine local government and
to make recommendations thereon. He
arrived in Barbados in November 1948 and
his report was submitted to the local Gov-
ernment in March 1949. The year 1950
passed without any attempt being made to
discuss it and only the barest mention was
made of it at the 1951 Vestry Elections.

In a manifesto issued during the week
the candidates sponsored by the Barbados
Electors’ Association say that they under-
stand “that the Central Government
intends implementing the Maude Report
either wholly or in part shortly.”

With this-knowledge at their disposal it
was the duty of those candidates to have
brought the question of the Maude Report
before the ratepayers. It is true that the
Legislature will have to say whether the
report should be implemented or not, but
it is hardly likely that that decision will be
taken without consideration being given to
the views of those who now work under
that system. The only method for obtain-
ing the views of the ratepayers on this
important change is to discuss it with them.
And the views of the ratepayers who must
eventually foot the bill and whose interests
and well being are to be affected by the
change would seem to be the most import-
ant of all.

It is not now necessary to examine the
details of the recommendations made by
Sir Johii. He points out the relative value
of the présent vestry system and that of
District Councils which would be substi-
tuted for the country vestries and a Corpo-
ration which would displace that in the
Metropolitan parish.

Whether the ratepayers will have their
affairs conducted by the Vestry, limited in
its functions and governed by an act of the
legislature or by a Mayoralty with wider
powers is their right to say. Whether the
complexity of problems which now arise
in parochial affairs do not demand a more
modern system of administration is a mat-
ter to be decided by those responsible for
the government of the island. Whichever
decision is taken it is clear that the same
personnel will be at work in the conduct
of affairs.

It is regrettable that the matter was not
raised as an election issue and candidates
offering themselves for election should,
during their campaigning this week
attempt to explain the difference to the
people whose support they seek and also be
in a position, when they take their seats as
vestrymen to express the views of the
people.

The criticism that inadequate consider-

ation has too often been given to important
questions is sound and in a matter which
is as fundamental as the change of our sys-
tem of local government, every effort
should be made to correct what is obvious-
ly a mistake.





ADVOGATE |

PROFESSOR ST:

ALDERSCOPE FOR A
OESCENT .





‘Five Years oft Socialism

British Conservatives oppose as
“A Wanton Act of Sabotage, the
Labourite government's plan to na-
tionalize the steel and iron indus-
tries early this year at a time of
iiternational crisis. Britain has had
five years of “cradle to grave’ so-
cialism. This is the firt in a series
of articles analyzing the “Great Ex-
periment’ in the former home of

capitalist and free enterprise,
By FRED DOERFLINGER
LONDON.

The state is the “big boss” in
Socialist Britain today and is
growing bigger all the time,

In five years Prime Minister
Attlee’s administration has turned
the home of capitalist free enter-
prise into the leading socialist
state of the non-communist world.

Early this year the government
intends to take over the three-
billion-dollar steel industry. Then
half of Britain’s capital invest,
meut and practically all basic in-
dustries will be in state hands.

The Conservatives call this step
“foolhardy” and a “Wanton Act
of Sabotage” at a time of danger-
ous world tension and the threat
of a possible Russian attack on
Western Europe,

Under the Labourite plan 92
iron and steel companies employ-
ing 300,005 of the industry’s 460,-
000 workers will go under state
ownership. Smaller firms which
help produce more than 16 million
tons of steel yearly will operate
under government license.

Already the coal, gas, electric-
ity, railroad, other inland trans-
port, civil aviation, the Bank of
England and big cable and wire-
less industries have been nation-
alized.

The state now employs nearly
one in five of the 23-million
working population.

With steel nationalized — and
when and if cement, sugar-refin-
ing and meat wholesaling are
taken over—another 600,000 will
be on the state payroll.

The Socialist pledge to assume

Dr, J. A. Fraser Roberts, who
has carried out many researches
in medical genetics, spoke re-
cently in the BBC’S “Science
Survey” programme about blood
groups and their significance. He
reminded listeners ‘who were
blood donors of the letters, O, A
or B on their cards; these stand
for chemical substances that
occur naturally on the surface of
the red blood cells and show the
group to which the donor belongs.
Cards marked AB show that their
owners possess both A and B;
people of group O have neither A
nor B. It is immaterial to which
group a person belongs except in
the case of blood transfusions,
when the patient must receive
blood of the same group. What in-
terested Dr. Roberts was the
number of people possessing each
type of blood. In Great Britain
47% of people belong to group
O and 42% to A; 8% are in B and
3% in AB. These figures are true
for the whole country with im-
portant !ocal variations,

Blood groups are. detecniined
by heredity and differing pro-
portions of blood groups in differ-
ent places give information on the
history of mankind. Many English

people now live on the North
Welsh coast., and so two popula~
tions, largely separated by

tradition, are side by side. Their
difference is faithfully mirrored
in their blood groups. Further

THE LAST OF THE



MICHAELSK I
VESTRYOVITCH ENTERS = HIS

sikh sinamsdcspeesicatomcahes



FURTHER

“production, distribution and ex-
change means” has been fulfilled.
By acquiring key industries and
other devices the state indirectly
controls remaining industries,

Are the people better off under
socialism?

Some small industrial rofits
have occurred, such as the electric
industry’s $11 million in its first
year. But the nationalized indus-
tries as a whole have gone more
than $200 million into the red.

The government considers
nationalization still in an experi-
mental stage.” By no means was
financial stability expected imme-
diately. Some industries like the
railways and coal mines were in
bad shape when the Labourites
took over. Others like electricity
were prospering.

By Socialist standards the object
is not big profits but producing
goods and services more cheaply
and efficiently.

Since’ nationalization, the
price of coal, gas and electricity
and transport fares and cable
rates have risen sharply while
in most instances the industries
still showed heavy losses.

The average charge for electric-
ity during the first year of nation-
alization was 4.7 per cent higher
than the previous year; the aver-
age annual increase the previous
decade had been under 0.8 per
cent.

The coal price has increased
each year. To-day it is about 20
per cent more than before nation-
alfation. Coaluprice jumps main-
ly have been responsible for
hikes in gas, electricity, railway
passenger fares, and _ freight
charges.

These facts give ammunition to
the Conservative critics.

Nationalization also has altered
worker - management relations
without, in general, bettering
them. There are strikes against
nationalized industries like the
recent unofficial gas strikes, the
unofficial stoppages by railway-

back in history Vikings came to
live in South Pembrokeshire and
in that area of Wales the A
figure was higher than anywhere
else in Britain, about the same as
it is’‘in Southern Norway which
has the highest proportion of A’s
in Europe.

Dr. Roberts then looked at the
world picture, taking group B
first. China, parts of India, Java
and Central Africa had up to 40%
of B. Radiating from these areas
the proportion of B fell steadily
to the British figure of 8%, about
the lowest in Europe. It seemed
likely that B originated in Asia
and Africa and spread outwards
with the peoples who carried it.
Before the coming of Columbus
America had no B at all; nor
had Australia before the Euro-
peans arrived. But while this
radiation possibly accounted for
the bulk of B found in human
beings the story was not quite so
simpie. In the Celtic fringe of
the British Isles B rose instead of
continuing to fall. In certain
remote parts of Wales, the kind
of terrain to which people might
be driven by invaders, there was
evidence of the survival of a
palaeolithic physical type and
here were “islands” of very oo
B, from 18% to 24%, giving indi-
cations of people so ancient that
they had been almost but not
uite submerged, Thé peoples of
the old Stone Age were probably
high in B long before the more

BARBADOS ADVOCATE —

VESTRIES





men, miners, dockers, and others

Grave danger still exists, judg-
ing by outstanding wage claims of
millions, that any increased effi-
ciency which is obtained will
have to go more into paying
higher wages than into yielding
lower fuel and transport prices.

Economic and administrative
problems equally are unsolyed,
stemming mainly from inability
to get top-flight industrial men to
serve under nationalization.

A consumer can complain about
nationalized products and _ser-
vices, but cannot command.
Under free enterprise he can re-
fuse to buy a product or can get
it from a competitor—but
state product is bad he can do
little effectively about it.

Despite rank and file socialist
demands it has become evident
Parliament practically has no
voice in running state enterprises.
Parliament legislated the private-

to-public transfer of industries— |

at the same time legislating itself
out of any real control of them

Annually Parliament may de-
bate the yearly report on a state
industrial operation, but it can do
little else.

The state industry—a deliber-
ately created monopoly — makes
its own law, and it is not, like
any private monopoly, answerable
to the existing monopolies com-
mission.

The Socialist programme has
gone so far that even the conser-
vatives do not propose: a sharp
turn-back, Most nationalized
industries will remain that way as
far ahead as one can see.

But the labourite plan _ to
nationalize basic iron and _ steel

industries has divided the nation |

like no other socialization project.

It is the biggest political issue
to-day. And if and when the
conservatives return to
they have pledged to keep iron
and steel in private hands.

—LNS
(TOMORROW:
rearmament on British Socialism.)

modern spread of high B_ from
Asia and Africa. The world wide
distribution of A is more compli-
cated but the patterns were in-
formative there tno, There were
also other groups, such as the well
known Rhesus or Rh system, dis-
covered some ten years ago. Most
people had this substance on their
red cells and were positive but
some were negative, In North
Western Europe only eighty-five
per cent of people were Rh posi-
tive, but all Pacific Islanders were
and all but one per cent of Chin-
ese, Japanese and American In-
dians, The most remarkable
story came a year or so after the
substance was discovered, when
Professor Haldane pointed out
that amongst the ancestors of
modern Europeans there should
be some peoples in whom the Rh
negative hereditary factor was
commoner than the positive. For
years nosuch race was found
until it was discovered that the
Basques of France and Spain
were largely Rh negative.

Eight blood groups are now
known, With many sub-divisions.
The newest, named Duffy after
the donor through whom it was
found, shows particularly wide
variations. “Knowledge about
blood groups and their distribu-
tion is growing very rapidly in-
deed,” concluded Dr. Roberts.
“and it is safe to prophesy that
within quite a short while a whole
flood of new light will be thrown
on the history of mankind, both
recent and more remote.”



f al e :
SEAS |dence, since I had not been confronted with

FUCHS WANTS TO |

|

STAY BRITISH

By JOSEPH THOMAS

| LONDON.
{

Dr. Klaus Fuchs, the atom scientist now
serving 14 years in prison for giving A-bomb

lseerets to Russia, is fighting to retain his

British citizenship.

He has written a letter to the “Deprivation
of Citizenship Committee” pleading with
hem not to revoke his British nationality.

Fuchs was born in Germany in 1911 and

‘admitted he joined the Communist Party

after Hitler came to power. He came to Eng-
iand before World War II and after a careful
check was given British citizenship because
of the important work he was doing.

The history of the Fuchs case was given

‘to the committee by Attorney-General Sir

|Hartley Shaweross.

The Committee will
advise Home Secretary Chuter Ede on

'whether Fuchs’ citizenship should be re-
| voked.

Sir Hartley revealed that Fuchs had made
representations to the Home Office why he
should not be deprived of British nationality.
He had previously been notified that the
Home Secretary was considering revoking
his British citizenship.

Fuchs wrote that if the Home Secretary’s
action was intended as punishment for his
actions there would be little that he could
cay, except that he had already received t! >
maximum sentence permitted by law.

Fuchs said he assumed, however, that the
question under consideration was his present
ind future loyalty. .”

He declared his disloyal actions ceased
early in 1949, before any suspicion had been

voiced against him.

|

| Communist party seem to go through.”







|

Blood Groups And Origins

power ; Was unable to repair the tremendous damage
| he had done.”

The effect of |2NY argument on the Committee, pointing

The Attorney-General said that Fuchs set
out the fact that he had made a full state-
ment and that it was on that statement that
he was prosecuted.

“T was not forced to confess by any evi-

iny evidence against me,” said Fuchs’ letter,
adding; “I think the facts mentioned would
have been of great value in a plea in miti-
gation.”

Fuchs added that in making his confession
and in his subsequent actions he was guided
by his convictions and loyalties, and that he
showed clearly what his loyalties were.

“The whole story,” said Sir Hartley, “is
really an object lesson in the meaning of
modern Communism. The fact that Fuchs
made a free and full confession is a curious
characteristic of these queer psychological
processes which some of the adherents of the

Sir Hartley told the Committee that Fuchs
had a kind of mental schizophrenia—the
dominant part of his mind accepted Com-
munist doctrine unquestionably, but the
other part realized that it was wrong.

“After his confession”, the Attorney-
General concluded, “Fuchs appeared to have
done his best to help the authorities, but he

The Home Secretary decided not to press

out that it was a matter for the committee
to decide in their great experience.—INS.

Year And A Hali

OTTAWA.

CANADA in 1950 embarked on the great-
est peacetime military programme in her
history, an effort sparked by the crisis in
Korea.

It all happened in a short six months, In
June, North Korean Communists invaded
South Korea and the United Nations inter-
vened. By December, acting in conjunction
with her U.N. partners, Canada had sent
three destroyers, a squadron of transport
planes and a battalion of troops to the far
Pacific.

At home she raised a special army brigade
of 10,000 men to meet international obliga-
tions in Korea or elsewhere and set a pre-
cedent by labelling it as an international
peace-enforcement force.

Canadians were told in effect that the
peacetime economy of the last five years
was over. Higher taxes were forecast to meet
the staggering $1,000,000,000 defence budget



necessary to pay for these military moves y

and for boosted production of jet fighters,
naval ships and other weapons of war.

In mid-December the government an-
nounced that Canada’s 63,000 servicemen
would get pay increases retroactive to Dec.
1, ranging from $14 a month upward and
averaging $19 for other ranks and $33 for
officers,





Vestry Grants
To the Editor, The Advocate,—

SIR,—The writer “$50 Tax Bill”
raises some interesting points, one
of which concerns grants to repair
and maintain churches in St.
Michael. The total vote is in the
region of $14,000, out of which
some $10,000 is applied directly
to the Cathedral, The Cathedral
is wholly maintained from the
rates, but the district churches
are not. The latter receiving
small grants for repairs only, and
even these are very unevenly dis-
tributed.

This means that the inhabitants
of a district have to contribute
towards maintaining their district
church, and in addition must pay
all the expenses of the Cathedral;
a classic instance of the poor
helping out the rich,

It is only in St. Michael’s parish
where this wholly inequitable
arrangement is persisted in, for in
the country parishes, the church
rate is at least more reasonably
divided amongst the churches
concerned. I am not defending
the principle of church rate,
though since the churches are
public buildings something may
be said for it no doubt, but whilst
it remains, there should be even
distribution according to the rate-
able value of each district. No
deubt, in Christian charity, the
Cathedral authorities themselves

will hasten forward to initiate a
much needed reform?... ?
EQUITY.

Poppy Collection

To the Editor, The Advocate,—

SIR,—I would like to thank the
following for help with the Poppy
Collection.

Mr. J. C. Hammond for his
broadcast on the eve of Poppy
Day.

Lady Collymore and her helpers
who counted the town collection
on Poppy Day.

All Organizers and Sellers.

The Directors and Management
of the Marine and Crane Hotels
for the loan of their premises for
dances.

Mr. Skinner for running the
Roulette at the Marine.

The Organisers of the “Special
Efforts.”

Messrs. Fitzpatrick Graham &
Co. for auditing the accounts free
of charge.

The Manager and Staff of the
Canadian Bank of Commerce for
their help and courtesy through-
out the year.

The Advocate for their gift of
free space to the Cause.

DOROTHY C. HUTSON,

Joint Hon: Secretary,

B’dos Branch Poppy Leagu
“Leighley’”’,
Belleville,

ist. January, 1951

Cut Spending

LONDON.

The powerful Federation of
British Industries has called on
the Labour Government to “sub-
stantially cut spending” in a
statement emphasizing that the
shorte’> of key raw materials is
“serio «ly threatening” Britain's
economic recovery.

The statement, “The Economic
Background in December, . 1950,”
also warned that the load of taxa-
ation which Britain already carries
is one which no country could for
long support,

Britain’s success in reducing the
dollar gap and in increasing pro-
duction are “substantial achieve-
ments,” but the statement pointed
cut that it “would be unwise to
allow them to blind our eyes to





some very real difficulties that
have appeared in recent months.
“We are faced with a scarcity
of certain key raw materials
:mounting in some cases to an
al famine) as serious as io
threaten the maintenance of both
production and productivity,
“In addition, the fuel and power

situation is most grave-—even

FBI

industrial production were to
remain no higher than today.

“The whole basis of industrial
effort is thus being undermined;
until adequate supplies of fuel
and power and raw materials can
be assured there can be no security
in our industrial outlook.”

The statement said that despit:
this, physically anc financially,
room must be made for whatever
was necessary for defence.

It insisted that taxation was
already too high and industry was
faced with an actual or prospec-
tive shortage of capital.

“We cannot escape the conclu-
sion that substantial cuts must be
made in national and local govern-
ment expenditure (apart from
rearmament), which from its very

size is, with the consequent high
taxation, the strongest among the
forces maintaining inflationary

pressure.

The stftement dec!
alternative
in peace
aggravate”

red tl the
of yet higher taxation
time would “merely
the situation and “in-

disince ves to effort,’

—INS




| would be expected to make sacrifices for



|
|

Cabinet Ministers told the people they

some time to come. They were necessary if
world Communism was to be stemmed in
Korea and wherever else it might try to ad-
vance. They were necessary if a third world
war was to be averted.

Cabinet sessions in Ottawa were frequent
and long as the Korean war ran hot, then
cold, then hot again as Chinese Communists
entered the fray near the close of the year.

Within a few weeks of the Korean out-
break the government announced the dis-
patching of the destroyers Cayuga, Atha-
baskan and Sioux from the west coast to
join U.N. naval forees in Korean waters.

A short time later—in July—Canada sent
No. 426 Transport Squadron of vhe RL.A.F.
from Montreal to join the Korean airlift
flying supplies from McChord Field at
Tacoma, Wash., to Tokyo.

External Affairs Minister Pearson, between
hops to critical U.N. sessions in New York,
said that in setting up the special brigade as
an international peace-enforcement force,
Canada had “started something important.”

S . the year and a half ahead is the
dangerous period,” he told the Commons. “If
we can get through that period, we may
then have time to settle our problems even
with those people behind the Iron Curtain.”

—C.P.



FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1951



D. V. SCOTT TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
& CO., LTD. at THE COLONNADE
*



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) Pigs. QUAKER OATS 00.000 $24. 9.22
‘Tins LETONA PEACHES ................--. 37 34
Bottles McEWAN’S BEER ....... ba tabbaie hae 26 .20







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COCKTAIL SHAKERS
THERMOS FLASKS
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BREAD BOARDS and KNIVES
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GARBAGE CANS
ENAMEL PLATES and CUPS
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Successors To

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Phones — 4472, 4687,

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DRY GOODS DEPT.










FOR THESE
ENERGY:
BUILDING
FOODS

FISH VEGETABLES pe
ttl Cucumbers Spinach
Haddock String Beans Kale
Cod Fillets f Cauliflower Asparagus
Sole Anchovies eet see
Kippers russel Sprouts

* SPECIALS
MEATS Cook’s Paste—6c. per tin
Hams in tins Dried Prunes—50c, per Ib.
Bacon—Sliced Sling in tins—36c.
Turkeys Sultana Puddings—48c.
Chickens Steak & Kidney Puddings

{ ge 8 CHEESE —
Bice pues Empire Coffee
Tripe i J & R BREAD & CAKES
Brains i CROWN SWEET DRINKS
Sweet Breads | — =
Rabbits c hocolates

inetae After Dinner Mints

Marshmellows

i GODDARDS DELIVER

FSSA EE

&



FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1951

T.C.A. Can Carry
More U.K. Mail

T.C.A. are at present taking mails from Barbados to
the United Kingdom every Saturday morning and these
should arrive in London at 1.45 p.m. on Mondays, Mr.
H. N. Armstrong, Colonial Postmaster, told the Advocate
yesterday.



He said that when T.C.A. start to make their two
flights a week from Canada to Barbados, there will be a
possibility of more mails going to the United Kingdom
from Barbados.

Prince Charlie



In addition to carrying mails
to the U.K. on Saturdays, T.C.A.
also take mails to Bermuda for
. onward conveyance to New York.
/ q These are scheduled to arrive
W as Wrong there at 8 o’clock the same night.

Little Ian McLeod, grandson of , Prior to December 16, 1950,
the Hon. D. G. Leacock was the *W° weekly mails-—one on Mon-
subject of the Advocate’s “Your day and the other on Friday—

suess” competition this week and Were carried to the U.K. from
this was won by Charles Ray of Barbados to Jamaica by B.W.LA.
“Whitehall Flats”. Hastings. ind then forwarded by B.O.A.C

Few people got it right, but Now, there is only one mail from
they hazarded their guess never- Barbados to the U.K. by
theless. Some thought it was B.O.A.C. and that is on Tues-
“Bonnie Prince Charlie” and other days.
guesses that placed it as “Charles Mr. John Baldwin, Chairman
Philip, Duke of Edinburgh,” were of the Canadian Air Transport
indicative of the same line of Board said that as far as T,C.A
thought. were concerned, they would be

A most noncommittal one was always most happy to assist in
“A Spanish Visitor’, and some the carriage of mail between
more definite but still wrong ones Barbados and the United King-
=e eee ee — tom and vice versa, but that was

olonia| retary”, “The a matter for th ste i-
Son of the Hon. and Mrs. Black- ‘jes. Semel seine
man”. “Master’ Embiricos”, “Son
of George Camacho.”

Some single tries in the dark
placed it as “Joseph Rudder” and
“Paul De Freitas.”

41 CHOSEN FOR
“DEFENDER”

A crew of 41 West Indian sca-
men were picked at the Harbour
and Shipping Department yester-
day for the Harrison liner Defend-

To Probate

The will of John Henry Hall
who died in Barbados on Octo-
ber 10, 1947, was admitted to
Probate in Solemn Form by His
Honour the Chief Judge, Sir
Allan Collymore, in the Court

T.C.A. Willing

If _ the postal authorities wish-
ed TCA to supplement the pres-
ent mail service between Bar- of Ordinary yesterday.
bados and the United Kingdom, his will which was lodged in
he was sure TCA would be very the Registry 10 days after Hall’s
anxious to assist, and certainly death, was presented to the Court
would be in a position to carry for Probate in Common Form or

the mail as_ there is adequate Feb
ta ruary 24, 1949. Probate was
capacity on TCA planes to move refused on that occasion because

1 aoe | mail up to the United Kingdom " '
“a now lies in Carlisle Bay. by way of Montreal. ee oa A oh ae
these, 13 were chosen as ‘The Sesh atte ON eed rete

service to Barbados by Court that when
s been provided to serve will
é ,

deck hands, 7 for the steward TCA ha

he signed the
department and 21 for the engine both th

the other witness Lauriston

1e needs of Canada and , are-

room, The Defender may leave Barbados, and anything that pe died anne ee tee

port around the end of the week. TCA could do to move traffic to was given by him : 7
A room of the Harbour and and from Barbados in accordance , ‘

Shipping Department was crowded with the wishes of the people Represented by Mr. D. H. L.

for many hours during the day here, will
with seamen seeking jobs.

"HELDER” DUE TODAY

The Royal Netherlands steam-
ship Helde: is expected to call

ll if possible, be done Ward, instructed by Messrs
whether it is mail, cargo or pas: Hutchinson & Banfield, Ethel'ne
sengers to any point served by Hall, widow of the deceased, and
TCA. beneficiary under the will and Ber-
U.K. Reluctant esford Hoider, another beneficiary,
He said that there has been presented a petition to the Court
here to-day from Trinidad wigh some slight difficulty in that the yesterday asking that the will be
general cargo. Her agents afte United Kingdom has shown some admitted to Probate in Solemn
Messrs. S, P. Musson, Son & Co,, reluctance to have TCA move Form. Six other people were
Ltd. traffic between Canada and the cited_to appear—Abraham_ Hol-
On Monday, the Harrison liner United Kingdom by way of Mon- der, Erwin Sealey, Laurie Sealey,
Specialist is expected to arrive treal, but they are hopeful that Beatrice Harewood, Hestella
with general cargo from London the difficulty can be solved be- Meritt and Mary Belgrave.
and on Tuesday the Aleoa Pennant cause, if it cannot, it will limit
Single Beneficiary



agents of both ships. to give to the people of Barbados.
Sealey were the only ones who
ers are merely next of kin tu
of the “Canadian Exporter” in connection with the high ‘on to the will.
for it is that the costs of operation of C

will be calling from Halifax, the ability of TCA to provide a
Messrs. Da Costa & Co, Ltd., are service which they are anxious
Of these, Abraham _ Holder,
ae ae Beatrice Harewood and Laurie
/ e e
Canad Sh y Hi 7 attended the Court. Abraham
tan u s ope Oo Holder is the only beneficiary
Quote Lo F, _@ ht R t out of the seven cited. The oth-
oe. r reig a es the deceased. The three who
came to Court told the Chief
COMMENTING on an article in the October issue Judge that they had no objec-
i ‘ ’ The other witness of the will,
o pen between Canada and the West Indies, Hon ble Lauriston Holder, told the Court
one evrier, Minister of Transport in the Canadian that both he and James Hare-
Government, told the Advocate yesterday that the c I
jl : ¢ anadian ships are Will was signed.
the ‘highest in the world with the exception of those in Elsie Browne, step-daughter of
America. the deceased, said she had gone
He said that it costs 50% more to cali Harewood . reek
9 : to operate a Canadian ship than will, and that she had seen the
B’dos Polo Club

it does a British ship, and it costs tWo Witnesses and the deceased
25% more to build a Canadian in the house together. She knew



ae iene i : : thing of the actual execution
l ship. However, they were begin- "0 4
May Visit Jamaica ning to obviate and get over that Of the will.
THIS YEAR difficulty by two policies, first,

Court Satisfied

The Chief Justice giving his
decision, said the Court was sat-
isfied as to the genuineness of
the will, which on the face of it
was a reasonable document, such
as from the surrounding circum-
stances the testator would have
been likely to make in favour of
his wife and others.

“IT am satisfied”, said the Chief
been to have a favourable effect Judge, “that for some reason or

There are 36 playing members ©" freight rates. Before that or an eres ia ovtdanes
at the club, 27 men'‘and 9 women, Policy came into existence be- oa eben teeth) sell. be
The club has been in being now Céuse of high freight rates brought aumnitted in Bolte Baer, and
about 12 years and was formed tye at high fost Of Opera ucm, Letters Testamentary will ‘issue
by an old member of the Savan- Canadian ships were in difficulty, “There is no. Death’ Duty ‘Gare
nah Polo Club who dropped out but at the end of December 1950, Hicdn Sttinhed. “bit to widens
of the polo world soon after the the position was again normal, stand that one was filed before.
1914—18 war. and it is to be hoped that export- Tr it has been misplaced and

In the matches that will begin ers to the West Indies will be in Canton be found... snother | can
to-morrow, the teams will play @ position to quote lower rates. probably be got ‘
six chukkas. Some members own f "
only one horse and will have to _ It must never be forgotten that “Until then, what I have said
plav on strange horses. Canadian ships are not subsidized will be subject to the finding of

Tne players are practising hard like American ships which are the original certificate, or produc-
because this is the first. time highly subsidized; neither are tion of a duplicate. ,
that the teams have played for they assisted to the extent that The costs of the. case will come
challenge cups. Two horses have British ships are, They have to out of the estate.
been injured since practice began. operate competitively, and that
One horse, Mr. W. Bradshaw's, brings up again the Canada West
was injured when a player swung Irdies Trade Agreement which
his stick to hit the ball under he believed should be negotiated,
the horse's neck. first with reference to trade,
second, with reference to curren-
ey and third, with reference to
freight rates,

the replacement plan, and second
the transfer of a _ flag policy
which permits Canadian ships to
transfer to the United Kingdom

Members of the Barbados Polo
Club hope to visit Jamaica after

the crop this year to play a series ;
of polo games. In October, 1949 Registry and to operate under the

: > U.K. Registry still retaining their
when Jamaican Polo players came ; ; ‘

to Barbados the honours were ©#Padian Flag Registry.
divided. When the polo cup
matches begin at the Garrison
Savannah to-morrow, players will
play at their best in the hope of
catching the selectors’ eyes.

Freight Rates
The result of that policy has



"LADY” BOATS
DUE THIS MONTH

Two calls from the C.N.S. pas-
senger liners Lady Nelson and
Lady Rodney are scheduled for
this month,



More Houses For

Bay HousingScheme Boost The first of them will be the

‘anadian Goods

Some of the houses from the * Cs ; Lady Nelson on Saturday, Janu-

congested area of Beckles Hill Mr. Frank Lewis, a retired tex- ary 13, from the British Southern

may be removed to the Govern- tile manufacturer of Truro, Nova Islands. From here she will be

ment Housing scheme on the Bay Scotia, told the Advocate yester- sailing home via the British North-

Land, the Advocate was told yes- day that while in Barbados last ern Islands, 7

terday. year, he noticed that some buyergy The S.S. Lady Rodney is expect-
In that case the houses will be preferred Canadian goods to ed to eall on Sunday, January 28

taken to the area on the north side English. ‘ She will be arriving from Canada

of Beckles Road which is being He said that America and via the British Northern Islands

developed, Cenada used to supply a great and leaving the same night for
This will be done to remodel deal of their goods to the B.W.I., British Guiana via St. Vincent,

the Beckles Hill site and bringing but now they were prohibited on Grenada and Trinidad.

it up to the standard of other account of the exchange difficul-





developed areas, Pe, ties.
"i t e area pe
am sree of Beckles Road As soon as these restrictions FISHING BOATS

de- were removed, the W.I. markets
velopment of the area on the should go back to Canada and the BLOCK CAREENAGE
north side is progressing well, it U.S.A., particularly Canada, as :

was said, Work on the roads in they had built up a big business Over 20 fishing boats blocked
this area was interrupted by the with the B.W.I., and because their the entrance of the Careenage for

is almost complete and the



avy rains d shortage of goods were suitable to the W.1I. some hours yesterday . i
ee “put it nae going ahead market With the current pulling hard
£ idl f . Mr. Lewis arrived in Barbados to the South and the wind a bit
ee thi —x on Saturday by the Lady Nelson-high, Carlisle Bay began to get

to spend his second winter. He rough and so the skippers of the
pag crn tear 2 + by his wife and fishing boats brought them into
they are staying at the Marine the Careenage’s mouth for shelter,

1 ee Some of the fishing boats were
Hotel, from Bridgetown and St. Peter
but the most of them were from
St. James, Few of them had re-
turned from the fishing banks
with little fish while the others had
not gone fishing for the day.

ESCAPED CONVICT
RECAPTURED

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan, 3
Convict Gordon was recaptured
on the mainland on Tuesday eve-

ning about 19 hours after he had FIRE DESTROYS CANES
escaped from Carrera prison

island. A fire of unknown origin broke The fishing boats were a men-

He was caught wearing only out at Pleasant Hall Plantation ace te shipping in the harbour
short pants in which he had swum about 2.00 p.m. yesterday. It de- Lighters and launches could not
the natrow stretch of sea to the stroyed 8} acres of first crop canes move freely out and in of the
mainlang he had _ hidden in end 5 acres of second crop canes. Careenage. Luckily, there was no
nearby forests where police found The damage was covered by in- motor vessel or schooner leaving
bim.—€P) surance yw going into the Care





PELICAN

reason wood had been present when the ;



BARBADOS ADVOCATE
HOLIDAY



ON BARBADOS’ only island a British Sailor, Regi nald Tyrroll, spent Xmas and New Year as a Small-
pox suspect. The scare is now over.

Will Admitted Small Pox Scare Over

THE BRITISH SAILOR, Reginald Tyrrell, who

has been quarantined

at Pelican Island since

December 11, is expected to return to the United

Kingdom next week.

The Director of Medical Services told the
Advocate yesterday that “the risk of extension of

small pox to Barbados

Ex B.M.A. Chairman

Here To-morrow

Dr. H. G. Dain and Mrs. Dain
are among the passengers due to
arrive here by the T.S.S, Golfito
to-morrow. Dr. Dain will be in-
transit for Trinidad where he will
preside over a meeting of the
Caribbean Medical Conference of
the British Medical Association
from January 8 to Juiuuary 13.

Dr. Dain who is now eighty
years old, is a past chairman of
the Council of the British Medi-
cal Association,

Dr. Hyacinth B. Morgan who
was intransit here last week will
attend the conference as an ob-
server, He is a member of the
Council representing the West In-
dian branches.

The Barbados delegates will be
Mr. A .G. Leacock and Dr. A P
Muir, Secretary of the Barbados
Branch. They leave by air on
Sunday for Trinidad.



Music At
The Rocks”
TONIGHT:

Old English Dances by Edward Ger
man will enliven the Police Band Con
cert at Hastings Rocks tonight at
o'clock, The programme will be:

Operatic March The Damnation of
Faust — Berlioz

Overture Hungariana
Lotter.

Old English Dances

Edward German.
Rustic Dance; Jig.)

Selection The Great Walts—Strauss

Two Pasidobles — Amparita Roca and
Aguero — Texidor

Two Tangos
Jacob Gade

8

Brahms-

Merrie England
(Hornpipe; Minuet;

Jalousie and Selita —

Song Selection Gracie Fields Hit
Parade — Duthoit
Film Music Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo and
The Work Song (From the Walt Disney

Film Cinderella)

Modern Dance Medley In Old Brazil
—Murrell,

Finale Himno Nacional De Vene-
zuela,

God Save The King

"DON'T WANT IT”

A seaman yesterday strolled
into the Harbour and Shipping
Department to have a correction
made on his discharge certificate
He had just got off a ship which
came down from England.

After hearing the purpose of his
visit to the office, a clerk took hi:
red ink pen and made the correc-
tion,

“Don’t want 1%”, the seaman
said aloud when he saw the red
ink on the paper.

The clerk asked his reason and
he said, “When I Was at school
and the school teacher crossed the
sums with red ink, he meant tha‘
they were wrong — no good; so
that means that the discharge cer-
tificate is wrong.” The clerk tried
to explain but he continued, “Don't
want it.’





is over.”

J ohnny’s Tale

If you went through Da Costa
Alley, a little back alley which
runs from the Lower Wharf and
along which donkey carts and cars
are parked, you would see Thomas
Johnson, a watchman of over
seventy, who can tell you of the
days when bakeries and provision
dealers had businesses in Broad
Street.

Johnson, or Johnny to his ac-
quaintances, says that in 1890
eight biscuits used to be sold for
i cent and a tin of condensed milk
for five cents.

Johnson was born in St. Lucey
and worked as a cooper in St.
Peter for many years, but only
because he could not find a bet-
ter job, He is seared of being in-
Jured and that was why he left
the cooper’s trade, because he
said, he used to be cut often.

When the Panama Canal was
being built, Johnson went to
Panama, He stayed there for only
thirteen months. He said there
used to be accidents daily such as
scaffolds breaking down, and fear-
ing that he might be one of the
unlucky ones. he returned to Bar-
bados.

When Johnson returned, nearly
30 years ago, he took a job as a
messenger and now that he is old,
he watches bicycles during the
day in Da Costa’s Alley.

A short small man who carries
a stick in one hand and his white-
fvamed shades in the other, John-
son likes to tell of the strictness
of parents in the old days and is
disgusted with youngsters “who
work for a lot of money and don’t
know what to do with it.”

Blackguard Fined

Olga Thomas of Roebuck Street
St. Michael, was yesterday found
guilty by His Worship Mr
A. J. H. Hanschell of assaulting
a Writ Server and blackguarding
near Coleridge Street, a public
highway on December 13

For the assault she was ordered
to pay a fine of £1, and for black-
guarding £2. in 14 days or one
month's imprisonment, Mr. E. W
Barrow appeared on behalf of
‘homas while the case was prose-
cuted by Sgt. Murrell,







Wonder Drug

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan, 2.
Is a drug known as Conteben
being used extensively in Vene-
zuela and other progressive
countries in the treatment of T.B.?
If so, the Hon, Raymond Quevedo,
member for Laventille, wants the

Minister of Health and Local
Government, the Hon. Norman
Tang, to state what steps were
being taken to introduce this

“wonder drug’ into Trinidad for
the treatment of this disease,



= Season's Greetings from

Mil, JASON JONES & CO. LTD.- Distibutors

= PURINA

————













“COCKADE” FINE RUM
App! per Ib 40 \
Purple Grapes per lb 1.08
Gouda Cheese per Ib 1.05
Gorgenzola per Ib t 1.10
3acon (Sliced) per Ib, Sie B39
Cake Mx (Assorted Flavours) per pkt 40
Cocktai] Cherries per bottle + 1,21
French ¢ rs per bottle ie $5 i}
Heinz Cocktail Onions per bottle. J }
Jan ne Marmalade (7lb. tins)... 2.48 & 2.59
Marshmallows 4lb_ tins 3,50 }{f

STANSFELD SCOTT & Co.. Ltd.

,



CHOWS

pment





a=
Soe

APPLES
GRAPES
CHEESE
BACON
JAMS



PAGE FIVE

SCECCPEVOOPSOOOOSPPESIS FC PEPLESEPOSESESOSVTE POG

ENJOY -«

TO0-DAY’S
DOUBLE
Attraction





Tree Trunks
Dynamited

WV ANY OF THE tree trunks at

Wakefield, the new Y.M.C.A’
Headquarters, are so big that the
owners have had to use dynamite
to reduce the size. After these
trees were cut down, it was found
impossible to saw the trunks into
pieces suitable for transportation.
Nearly all the area which will
used for the playing field at
the new Y.M.C.A, has been cleared
cf the trees, grass and wild vines.

When the Y.M.CyA. took over
Wakefield a bee hive was found
in the gallery roof of the house.
This was removed, but soon after







x ines
COFFEE CREAMS

inother hive found its way into AND
the same spot.

When asked about this, Roy MS
Went, the bee-man told the PINEAPPLE CREA

Advocate that before a swarm of
tees decide to pick a spot to make
their hive they always send out
eouts. The scouts found the roof
Wakefield, where bees had al-
ready been, a good spot. They
went back to notify the swarm

N ACCIDEN'’ occurred on

Passage Road on Wednesday
between the motor car M—556,
owned and driven by Mohamed
Patel of Wellington Street and a
bicycle owned and ridden by Wil-
fred Deane of Barbarees Hill.
Deane was injured

URING the holiday season
there was a lull in the sales
of the (B.T.c. 3 Sweepstake
tickets for the coming Spring
Meeting. When the Advocate
visited the Turf Club office yester-
day Series L was being sold. The
(rst prize money has now reached
9,976 but there is still over two
months before the races begin.
One vender told the Advocate
that he had to decide to stop
selling on Christmas Eve, Christ-
mas Day and the Bank-Holiday,
but he sold a record amount on
the Saturday night before Christ-
mas Eve, He also had to put up
his books on Old Year's and New
Year’s Days. *

Another vendor mixed business
with pleasure He went to an
Excursion to Bathsheba on New
Year's Day but carried along three
books with him, He waited for a
while and then caught the crowd
in a good mood. The majority
were eating and singing. When
he offered to sell his tickets they
bourht them with a smile,

He said that every Spring Meet-
ing he makes it a habit to dispose
of some of his tickets at the
various excursions, pienics and
‘ther festivities at the Christmas
and New Year seasons.

CHARGE = against James
Eastmond of Drax Hall Hope,

AT
KNIGHT'S=PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN

Â¥ 5 SSSOGOCEBSSSOE DS SFOS PO SEDO SSIS GOSS FESSSS "



——

HARRISON'S | 2x
SUPREME VALUES IN







POCKET WATCHES
Snap Back: Silver | $4.00

Chromium Plated Case; Hinged Back; and
Silver Dial,

Nickel Plated Case;

Dial; Luminous Hands

| $4.50
| so

$7.

CONFIDENT
FOUR BEST

Chromium Plated Case; Hinged Back;

Luminous Figures, Levee Movement with

4 Jewels,

Chromium Plated Case; Hinged Back with.
Inside Dust-Proof Cover; Luminous Fig-

ures, Lever Movement with 6 Jewels

WE OFFER THE ABOVE,
THAT THEY REPRESENT THE
WATCH VALUES AVAILABLE.

St. George, brought by Colonel ag ge dag am a gp eee ia ee
R. T. Michelin, Commissioner of HARRISON'S BROAD ST,
Police, for driving the motor 'bus DIAL 2464

J—129 along Bulkeley Road on
October 26 in a manner dangerous
to the public, was dismissed with-
out prejudice by Mr, A. W, Har-
per, Acting Police Magistrate of
District “B” ‘on Wednesday mor-
ning.

Eastmond was represented by
Mr, J, E. T. Brancker, Sgt, K
inniss prosecuted for the Police
from information received.

Evidence for the Prosecution was
that the driver of the 'bus J,-129
was driving abreast of another
‘bus. A man, who was on the
road with a bicycle, had to run
into the gutter, :

Writserver Yarde, the main
witness for the Prosecution, said
that he recognised the driver of
he other ’bus, but not the driver
of J--129, Passengers were in both
‘buses,

Mr. Brancker submitted that
there was no evidence as to the
identity of the driver of the ’bus
J—129 y

When asked by Mr, Harper if
he had anything to say, Set.
Inniss replied: “That's a good one

N ACCIDENT occurred on
A Cheapside Road at about
a.m yesterday between
motor car M-2258 and _ bicycle
M5805. The front wheel of the
cycle and the rear part of the car
vere damaged





| Someone's



8.40



DIES AFTER FALL

Gladstone Browne of Workman,
St. George, died at the General
Hospital at 2.30 o’clock yesterday

evening after falling from the
motor lorry G-72 earlier in the
fay

It was about 10.40 a.m. when

CPALOING

lorry G-72 was travelling
along Constant Road, St. George OVER 70 YEARS OF SPORT
4rowne was on the platform.
@-72 is owned by Bulkeley
Ltd., and was being driven by
Charles Powlett of Haggatt Hall, A. GCG. EPA DING -& BROS. LED
St. Michael ee ne J

the







—
—_—_——













—<——

Enjoy Music from

ON THE NEW

1951 BUSH RADIO

TWO IMPROVED MODELS
NOW AVAILABLE

E.B.8.-15-6 Tube E.B.8.1. 5 Tube
$118.00 $90.00

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LID.

11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.









SSS =



PAGE SIX * BARBADOS ADVOCATE PRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1951
A =



















HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON |

upsets
When y h is upset
asa resu hy acidity, a
dose of De Wis tacid
Powder will disperse the pain
and distress right away.
Flatulence, heartburn and in-
digestion are some of the
symptoms that this excess of
acid in the stomach can bring
in its train. De Witt's Antacid
Powder soon neutralises the
acid and at the same time
other ingredients in the well-
formula soothe and
tect the delicate stomach
into: ing. Get a supply right











BY WALT DISNEY

| (Sceetees WILL GO WITH YAND THe) (WHAT KEPT WOU? YoU HAD M
YOu! REMEMBER, LAD... | END OF | | woRRieD sick! a
ONE FALSE MOVE, AND IT’S) ME -.-. SF COO S

5 ~~ HO, O=—%
Sate Apy-O:
6° 700,00 |

ANTACID
POWDER

Neutralises Acid "i
Soothes Stomach Relieves Pain

rw)

@ For use away from home—
Carry a few
@ Nowaterneeded De WITT’S

@ Prompt relief
@ Easily cariead ANTACID

@ Cell-sealed TABLETS



Soap It combines
emollient ana medicinal
which keep his ~



|
|
HERRINGS

FRESH or in TOMATO SAUCE

2



A } Ss

DP iieinclpnaeserateesenieecne ee

Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose
Teeth mean that zou have Pyorrhea,
Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gum
bleed ne the firat ends sore recut
and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad

‘Latee. Amosan must make your
mouth well and save your teeth or
money back on return of empty pack-
age. Get Amosan from sO ees

jay

today. e guar-
Amoran antee protects
you, ’

for fyerebawe Toone Newt?

A.S. BRYDEN & SONS evo LTD. le op
Baar ae Gums Bleed!





|
|



ma
|
129 |

Cx

SOSSOSSSSSS





Betas SP PSSOSOS OS SOOO OPPO POOF
THE LONE RANGER f






~~ SOOTHING
SAND COMFORTING NZ










LEPOCPLELOSSPSSSPSSS SSO



t gH YOU WANT TO Ley NOT MUCH WITH ME, BUT A !
BUY A BUSINESS? HOW Muct® th
CASH HAVE YOLION HAND > — ARS

AM
FA)














en PA
REALLY
STRIKE Re

\F YOU CAN GETA THOUSAND DOLLARS 4 | GET AS MANY BOYS AS YOU CAN AND
IN GOLD BEFORE TOMORROW, YOU FOLLOW THE OLD DESERT RAT! SEE rj
oe BUY THE BEST-PAYING BUSINESS! | WHERE HIS GOLD CLAIM Is!











May 1951 unlock the door Gr eetings |
We Heartily Thank All
of Our Customers and
Friends for Their Un-
failing Patronage During
1950, and hope to Satisfy
Them in the same Un-
faltering Manner during

to happiness and prosperity







for you... this is the deep

and sincere wish of .... .... ....



eo gee

9OF
GOS SOS GOOG POOS POOF

LX Oe

BY GEORGE MC, MANUS

__BY GEORGE : THE CORNER STORE

ne x and
NORA=JUST WHISPER =} jy yygic %
HOW 90 YOU SPELL. (PMMA %
“CONSEQUENTLY'? ao ,
Tr,
; 2-8

r
‘Sea

BRINGING UP FATHER

ail BT Ah

the Coming Year

We Wish You All a
Very HAPPY and
PROSPEROUS
NEW YEAR



POSSE FSSDSP SOF SPP PFE F PPPS EO OPSPS FFE LEN PAP LPP PPPS IF

»
<| WOW-T CES TAINLY | MAGGIE - HOW fen tae
a9?) HATE TO WRITE | DO You | LISTEN -vou! HOw
\ LETTERS-BUT THiS |} |, SPELL MANY TIMES HAVE
@ ONE HAS TO BE | CONSEQUENTLY”? || I TOLD YOU NOT
ANSWERED “% _) TO DISTURB ME
Be J WHILE I STUDY ??



>?













~ ee

. MANNING & CO., LTD.
PIERHEAD.

Seg



INCE & Co., Ltd.

8 and 9 Roebuck Street
Dial 2236

PROSE EL OCOD
4



Se SO SSSSOSS

O° SSOOCOSSPO SOS SOOO SOOO

POEL EOS COCPS PEED CCPL I LEFSELLL ESSE ED SLES SSL SLE LLCS SESS SASSO
FRENCH LINE OFFERS...
BARBADOS / JAMAICA CRUISE
ON EVERY SOUTHBOUND SAILING OF THE LUXURY LINER
S.S. *COLOMIBIE”’’

TEN DAYS OF UNFORGETTABLE ENJOYMENT

iat ot ak ferme =



ot a aaa



I MAD TO PHONE MR.
‘A New CK, MISS DEBORAU.|
A) Twas AR. VAN DORPE’S
DERS! I GUESS YOU

WHAT

HIS WILLE TLL {
BE RIGHT OVER
WATKING... TRY 8
TO KEEP
THAT LAWYER

AWAY FROM



LLIONS, YOU'LL
KEEP YOUR NOSE
OUT OF My
APFAIRS! 4
nt



THOSE




















g
%
| a pi + om” x
PS re LLL ‘ f x
hata | |f Minimum Rate ERK SENG: |’ | satnr oun}
m ~ | ar ares foe: ~ = ry he
“ea FIRST CLASS \ oF e , January 17
afl ee Pak acm $208.00 2 :
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES February 28 :
VITAE LIGHTS ARE SUDDENLY ) MEN= WHAT) | (YOU KNOW WHAT 2. (DON'T ANYBODY TRY CABIN CLASS §
DOES THIS IT MEANS,WARDEN.) STO STOPUS + “QR y. April I $
$163.00 §

4

eg

June 30
July i

TOURIST CLASS
$111.00

= TURNED ON + ~
|W THE PRIGON AUDITORILIM, AS MEAN? THiS ISA BREAKS —7/~ “THIS DAME IS
DIANA GIVES A TRAVEL FILM TALKs= { 5 a i oe er F ‘oe Ai A. ea] So





Shore Excursions arranged in advance for Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao,
Cartagena and Kingston, Jamaica.
For Further Particulars, Apply to: 8. M. Jones & Co. td.
Agents: Compagnie Generale Transatlantique, Tel. 3814

SOLE LCL ELLE CCE LPO LPL LPP ELL ELPA PEEL A AAPA



POLLAN LAE



SIOSOISSS SS SPOS FF SGPGO PSO SOS FSFE SS OSGI POSSESS PSF POSS FOSSS SOS SOO OPO SO OS OO SS SN GF PIS GSS SOSEOR,

f ( i

y





FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508











aE ou
+ te ec PUBLIC SALES
1N loving memory of our beloved ‘3
MARCUS JORDAN, who fell aleep on
sunmary 5, 1950.
“The radiant star shines o'er the gravé, AUCTION
Of one we loved but coe not save,
Someday, somewhere. we hope to see, On Friday 5: .
The face of one we keep in memory jay Sth at 2 p.m.“at MAN
The JORDAN Family. & TAYLOR'S GARAGE, Church Village,

1 CONTINENTAL PICK UP damaged by
fire. R. Archer Mc Kenzie, Auctioncer.
Dial 2947. 3.1.51—3n

—_oo
Under The Diamond Hammer
BY instructions receiyed from Miss
Maude Philips, T will sell at her houre,
Rendevous, Worthing on Wednesday
next the 10th beginning at 12.30 o’clock
ot ae ee ar tabs which includes:
oR. ‘= Tal with 4 Chairs,
5.1.51—In |} Mahog. Couch, 1 large Carpet, 3

i Mahog. Wardrobe, 1 Vanity, 1 Mahog.
Chet of Drawers, 1 Painted double
Bedstead, spring and mattress, 2 hair

5.181-—-1n
—

In loving memory of our dear mothers
an' wife LILLIAN LYNTON whe fell
uctleep on January Sth 1946.

Not dead to us who loved her

Not lost but gone before

She lives with us in memory

And will for ever more,

Rest in Peace
Lynton and Mope family.







—~—eew= | Mahog Rockers, 2 Mahog. Rail Chairs,
F Ss E 2 Breakfast Tables with 4 painted Chairs,
—— ---— Mattresses, 2 Mirrors, 1 Kitchen Cabi-
Al net, Larder, Collection of Pictures,
Kitchen Utensils and many other items

CAR — Singer nine Roadster, one | Of interest.
owner, 16,000 miles. Telephone Hooper Terms Cash. D.Arey. A. Scott, Auc-

4666 between 5.30 p.m. and 6.30 p.m. for | tioneer.

furtber information.

§.1.51—4n.

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER .

On Tuesday 9th by order of Mrs.
Tric E. Tryhane we will seil her House
appointments at Bagatelle, St. Thomas.

which includes
Very good Dinng
Sereen to seat 18,





5.1.51—3n

CAR — 1 Aurtin Ten H.P, Apply to
Bruce Skeete, Edgecumbe.



4.1,51—3n.





“CAR — 1 — 14 HP. 6 Cyl. Vauxhall
in perfect working order, Good tyres
and battery. Apply to T. S. Birkett,

7p with Patent
Pine Road, St. Michael.

ight and Arm





4.1,51—4n, | Chairs; Large Mir'd China Cabinet;

é wea ese Seeeaes Tables; Ber-

CARS—1 A. 70 Austin. Small Mileage. | Dic® airs, ckers, Corner Chairs,
1 Standard Ten Reasonable prices Dial— Couch; Settee; Mir'd Hatstand; Dining
2037 3.1.50—6n, | Table (Seat 8) all in Mahogany; Car-
pets and Congoleum; Piano — Meister

LORRY — 1937 Federal Lorry with | Sizger in perfect condition; Paintings
good tyres. Can be seen at Fort Royal | Beaded Blinds; 365 Day Clock; Glass
Garage. 5.1.51—5n. | 2d China, Tea, Coffee and Dinner Sets



Pit'd Ware in Vases, Sweet Dishes ete
Fish Knives and Forks, and Cake Forks
in Cases; Silver Prize Cup won by Moor
Bird; Barometer, Jardineers Pine Liquor
and Waggon;
Mir’d Presses; tead, Duech-
esse Dressing Table; Shaving Mirrors,
Bureau, 3 Fol’d Screen all in Mahogany;
fangle and Double Iron Bedteads and
Springs, White Painted Press, GE. Re.
fvigerator (working order) Larders,
Kitchen Cabinet, Flotéhce 3 Burner Gil
Stove and Oven, Milk Cans; Churns ane



TRUCK — One 4.wheel drive Chevro-
let Complete with platform licensed to
May 1951 (8 tons) A 1 order, Ideal for
carting cane from field». $4,000, Apply
A. S. Atwell, Fortescue Pr, St. Philip.

4.1.51—3n,

Tres Wing and Double

ELECTRICAL
GIBSON FRIDGE (American) 8
cubic ft. with interior deep Freeze, three

















years guarantee -- Also other Fridges.| Measures, Domo Cream Separator in
Ralph A. Beard, Hardwood Alley. fect diti
Srna ahead ada ; oa condition, Books and other
£ale 1), ¥ . s y
RADIO. — ” 1880, Dutch, Phil pe ed 30 o’elock, Terms Striethy
adio p working order. BRANKER TROTMA
information Dial 4306 MF ation dle
4.1.51—2n. 5.1.51—2h.
MECHANICAL REAL ESTATE
BICYOLES — Phillips Carrier Bicy. IMMEDIATE SALE
cles. THE GENERAL AGENCY | -CO.! DEVAN — Graeme Hall Terrace, Christ
td, High St. aa “| Church. H. V. Taylor. 4.1.51—2h.
MISCELLANEOUS BUNGALOW — ‘New Bungalow”,





Kensington New Road. Containing two
bedrooms, Drawing and Dining room,
kitchen, toilet. and bath ete, For par.
ticulars apply to F. A. Marshall. Phone
2596. 4.1.51.—6n.

FOR SALE OR RENT
RESIDENCE—A two Storey Wooden
Building in Hindsbury Road, near 1-mile
Stone, Very Roomy on its own land.
See Me. D. Williams, Baxters Road,
Bridgetown 1, 3.1.51—6n

PUHLIC NOTICES

THE ALLEYNE SCHOOL
The Examination for a vacant Founda
tion Scholarship (available from Janu
ary 195%) will be held on Friday, Janu

CEYLON FIBRFE—Fine quality Cavion
Fibre just received. This Fibre is clean,
soft and springy. Price 14 cents per
pound, Dial 4222. G. W. Hutchinson &
Co., Ltd 15.12.50—t.t.r.

GLASS—Sparkle Glass and regular
window glass to fill ali needs, available
now. We supply %” Plate Glass for
show caves and also extra latge panes
up to % inch thick. Dial 4222. G. W.
Hutehinson & Co. Ltd. 19.12.50—t.f£.n

LADIES! Embroidered Anglaise in
beautiful designs and colours just open-
ed again for vou. Yes! It’s at THANT'S
Pr. Wm. Henry St. Dial 3466 and Swan
st 14.12.50—t.f.n.











Cann OP
LADIES SPORT COATS — In assort-
ed sizes and shades, special for the cool









weather $28.50, Modern Dress Shoppe] aty 12th at 9 a.m, For all particular:
(Broad Street). 4,1,51—4n, | contact the Headmaster.

ned 3.1,51-86n
OPEL KADET PARTS — Timing gear, = —

diferential, front assembly etc. Apply NOTICE

E L. Archer, 3185, 51—2n THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW



PERMANENT needles for your record
piaver, and needles of all kinds. Price



Fourteen persons having been nomin-
eted as Cand‘dates for the Vestry of St.
Andrew I hereby declare my intentions







$1.08. Records of all kinds too. A.| to take a Poll at the Vestry Room near
BARNES & CO., LTD, 22.12.50—t.f.n-| the Almshouse on Monday 8th January
1951, beginning between the hours of 8%
SCALES — Platform Scales (500 t%
Cupe.) THE GENERAL AGENCY CO., and 9 a.m. and closing at 4 p,m, for the
Bdos Ltd. Phone 4517. election of 10 Vestrymen.
5.1.51—6n, Signed W. W. WORRELL,

Sheriff and Presiding Officer.
Dated Jan, 2nd, 1951.
3.1.51—6n

————

SAFE—One Larte Fire-Proof Safe in
perfect condition. Dimensions inside
3 feet wide by 3 feet high. Apply
R. S. Nicholls & Co., Telephone No.3925.



NOTICE





3.1.50—t.f.n. I hereby notify my Friends, Custo-
mers and the Public in general that
TRAXLER — Locally built, capacity) my place of business will be closed
4 tons. At Woodland Plantation St | from Mon, 8th until Sist. Jan. 1951. A.
George. 5.1.51—5n | L. WAITHE, 16 High St.
a Pn URES Berm —_— 4.1.51—2n.
YACHT — 18 ft. ity ee ae ——
worries that go with it. ia ran
Morgan 4000, §.1.51—3n NOTICE
PARISH OF 8ST. LUCY
— Fifteén persons having been nomina-
FeR RENT ted as Candidates for the Vestry of St.
Lucy. I hereby declare my intention

to take a poll at the Vestry Room near

the Parish Church on Monday Januaty

HOUSES 8th, 1951, beginning between the hours of

. NE BUILDIN 100 ft x 40 ey ne 9 ogee Pe ea aoe eo

STO! G— *| closing at p.m. for e election ©
Suitable for a Warehouse, Situated in| fon. Vestrymen’
Push Hall Yard. Apply: Dr, F, M. O. G. SLOCOMBE,

Alleyne. Dial 3072. 29.12.50—6n, Sheriff.

;
CANAAN, Bathsheba—Fully furnished. 4,1.51—4n

From January 15th, Feb. March, and
July. Apply Mrs. A. Alleyne Gibbons.
Phone 2617. 3.1.51—3n

einai inna ac grantee
FLAT — Fully furnished, all modern
conveniences (2) Bedrooms, Linen and

Cutlery, 10 minutes walk from Club and
city, Phone 4103. 5.1.51—1n.

PERSONAL



NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. PHILIP.

1 hereby give Notice that as 12 Can-
didates have been nominated as fit and
proper persons to represent the Vestry
for the Parish of St, Philip for the year
1951 and as only ten are required by
law I will hold a poll at_the Parish
Chureh Boys’ Sehool next Monday
8th January 1951 between the hours of
8 a.m, and 4 p.m.

THOMAS A. CATLIN,
Sheriff.
4.1.51—3n.





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, EDNA SMALL
(nee Marshall) as I do not hold myself
responsible for her or anyone else con.
tracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me.

Signed ARNOLD SMALL,
Duncan Village,





NOTICE

AT a meeting of the electors of the
Parish of St. Thomas held in the St.

St. Philip, | Thomas Boys’ Sehool on 2nd Jan. 1961
4.1,51—2n, | Only 10 members were nominated. Tf
“rd therefore declare the following duly
——
The public are hereby warned against or ee sls Nae of
giving credit to my wife, VIOLA Cave, Arnold eerton

SKEETE (nee Lucas of Orange Hill,
St. James) as I do not hold myself re-
spon-ible for her or anyone els€ con-
traeting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me.

Collins, Cyril Mandeville
Gill, Lushington Denzil
Gooding, Uellian Theadore
Mahon, Julian Aubrey
Reeves, Vernon Euley

Sed. BRANDFORD SKEETE, Tailor. ved, Vermont, Kaley
ee ames rne, John Henry Clifford Cooper
St. James | Walcott, Stephen, Alleyne

Watson, David Adolphus
duly elected Vestrymen for the Parish
of St. Thomas for the year 1951.





The public are hereby warned against



giving credit to any person or persons * B, H. MOORE,
whomsoever in my name as I do not Sheriff.
hoid myself responsible for anyone con- 4.1.51—3n.
tracting any debt or debts in my name

unless by a written order signed by me. NOTICE

Signed VAL McCOMIE,
Bay Street,
St. Michael.
5.1.51—2n

PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH.

I hereby give Notice that as 12 Candt-
dates have been nominated as fit and
proper persons to represent the Vestry
for the Parish of St. Joseph for the year
1951, and as onhky ten are required by
law I will hold oa Poll at the»Vestty
Room over the Dispensary next Monday,
the 8th day of January 1951, between
the hours of 8 a.m, and 4 p.m.



WANTED
HELP





S. A. DURANT, J.P.
- Sheriff
4.1.51-—Sh
CANE WEIGHER Past OXPel eC
essentail and possibility of permanent NOTICE

employment to suitable applicant.
Apply in writing to Lower Estate Office
St. Michael 23 — Attention Mr. H. A.
Dowding. 3.1,51—6n

CVBRSEER -—— At Whodland Plan-
tation, St. George. Apply in person with
recommendations, 5.1.51—5n.

PARISH OF 8T. JAMES

I hereby give Notice that as 13 Can-
didates have been nominated as fit and
proper persons to represent the Vestry
for the Parish of St. James for the
year 1951, and as only ten are required
by law I will hold a Poll at the Vestr¥
Room near the Parish Church next
Monday, the 8th day of January 1951,
betwee, the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.nt.

GEORGE EGERTON TAYLOR,







HARDWARE SALESMAN Requires
® Position, having had 54 years’ experi-







ence. N. R. CARRINGTON, Telephone
8277 5.1.51—~1n % ieee
~ 1,510,
MISCELLANEOUS Tans
FOWLS FOR EATING — ==. | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
tity, Apply Teddy Jones, Green Dra- The application of James E. Marshall
fon Restaurant, Broad St. } of Passage Rd, St, Michael for permis-
F $.1.51-—tfn. | 10m to Sell Spitite, Malt Liquors, &e,
at a Woatd and shingle shep at Baxters
WANTED IMMEDIATELY B -| Rd. City r
diay or Rls Tors Genta. Woeatene "Dated this 4th day of January 1951
ed, Tel. 2459. 5.1.61-—1n. | TO:—H. A. TALMA, Esq.
| Police Magistratd, Dist. “A”.
Sed. JAMES FE. MARSHALL,



Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consi.

dered at a Licensing Court to be held

at Police Court, District “A" on Mon-

tod the 15th day of January 1951 at
11 o'clock, a.m.



BE WISE...
-- - ADVERTISE





H. A. TALMA,
Poice Magistrate, Dist. “A”
5.1,51—I1n











































Upper Collymore Rock,
St. Michael.
Dear Sir/Madam,

On Tuesday, January 2nd, 1951,
was again nominated as a candidate for
the parish of St. Michael.

My knowledge gained as a Vestryman
for the past 4 years and my achieve.
ments won on behalf of the parishioner:
wil again be of service to you in con-
ducting the affairs of the parish.

In view of the contested election
which takes place on Monday, January
8th, at the Parochial Buildings, Cum-
berland Street, between the hours of
8 am, and 4 p.m. 1 am again soliciting
your support, trusting you will record
ene of your votes in my favour.

Thanking wou in anticipation.

I am,
Yours for Sevice,
THOMAS W. MILLER,
6.1.51—3n





NOTICE
ELECTION FOR THE VESTRY OF THE
PARISH OF ST. MICHAEL

NINTEEN persons having been nomi-
nated for the Vestry of the parish of
St. Michael, a Poll for the election of
Sixteen will be taken at the Parochial
Buildings, Cumberland Street, Bridge-
town, on Monday next the 8th. instant
beginning between the hours of 8 ana
9 o'clock in the morning and closing at
4 pm

The following POLLING STATIONS
have been provided under the provis-
ions of the Ballot Act, 191:—

No. 1 POLIANG STATION:

The first floor of the Parochial Build-
ings is allotted to Voters whose sur.
names begin with the letters “A” to
“I” (both inclusive) and the entrance
thereto will be by way of the door of
the Churchwarden's Office.

No. 2 POLLING STATION:

The ground floor of the Parochial
Buildings is allotted to Voters whose
surnames begin with the letters “J" to
“Z" (both inclusive) and the entrance
thereto will be through the Gateway
situate at the Southern End of the

bullding.
R. MAURICE CAVE,
Sheriff and Returning Officer.
3.1,61—6n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Lawrenee Edgar
Miller of Orange Hill, St, James for
permission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors,
&c., at a stone wall and galvaniz
building situated at Orange Hill, St.
James, >
Dated this 2nd day of January 1991.
Tu;—S. H. NURSE, Esq.
Police Magistrate Dist. “E"', H'town.
Sad. ABRAHAM MILLER,
for Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be consi-
dered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “EB H’town on
Tuesday the 16th day of January 1951

at 11 9’elock, a.m.
S. H,. NURSE,
Foiice Magistrate Dist. “E" H'town.
5.1.51—1n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Colvin Worrell o:
Jackson, St. Michael for permission tc
sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at bot-
tom floor of a 2 storey wall building
in Tweedside Rd., St. Michael,

Dated this 4th day of January
To:—E. A. McLBOD,

Police Magistrate, ‘A”.

Sed COLVIN WORRELL,
Applicant

N.B.—Thi> application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “A” on Mon-
day, the 15th day of Jan 1951, at
11 o'clock, a.m,











1951,



E. A. MeLEOD,
Magistrate, Dist. “A’
5.1.51.-In

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Olga Herbert of
Roebuck Street, City, for permission te
sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at bot
tom floor of a two storey wooder
building at Upper Roebuck Street, City

Dated this 4th day of January, 195)
To;—H. A, TALMA, Esq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”.

Signed PRINCE CALLENDER,
for Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “A on Mon-
day, the 15th day of January, 1951, at
11 o'clock, a.m,

Police

H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “A.
§.1.51—In

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Edward Catwell of
Jackson, St. Michael, for permission to
sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &e., at a
galvanized chop attached to residence at
Jackson, St. Michael.

Dated this 4th day of January, 1951.
To:—E. A. McLEOD, Esq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist. "A",

Sed. EDWARD CATWELL,
Applicant.

N.B,—This application will be con.
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “A” on Mon-
day, the 15th day of January, 1951 at

11 o'clock, a.m,
E. A, McLEDD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “
5.1.51—In

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Jarvis Drayton of
Macon Hall Street, St. Michael, for per-
mission to vell Spirits, Mait Liquors,
&c,, at bottom floor of a 2 storey
wooden building at cr, Mason Hall &
Emmerton, City.
Dated this 4th day of January, 1951.
To:—H. A. TALMA Esq.,
Pole Mafisttate, Dist. A".
Signed JESSAMY,
‘or Applicant.
N.B.=This application will be eén-
fiaéred at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “A’’ on Mon-
gay, the 15th day of January, 1951 at
11 o'clock, a.m,











H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
5.1.51—In.





LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Violet De Castro
6f Mohogany Lane, St. Michael, for
kermission to sell Spirite, Malt Liquors,
&>., ut bottom floor of Blue Lagoon
buiding, known @&s “Hosaty’, Neison
St. City.

Dated this 4th day of January, 1961.
To:-H, A, TALMA Baq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.

Signed VIOLET De CASTRO,

Applicant
N.B.—This application will be con
fitered at a Licensing Court to be helc
al Police Coutl, District A", on Mon-
. the 15th day of January,
i! o'clock, a.m,





1951 at

H. A, TALMA,

Police Magi-trate, Dist.





LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of tanthe dordah of
Beckles Road, St. Michael, for permis-
Sion to seli Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c.,
at bottom fleot af a 2 storey wall
Bialding at corner of Beckles Road and
Bay Street, St, Michael,
Dated this 3rd day of January,
To:—E. A. McLEOD Baq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A’
Signed G. L. MURRELL,
fot Applicant.
N.B.—This ippleation whl be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
ct Police Court, District “A on Mon-
day, the 15th day of January, 1951 at
33 o'clock, a.m.

1951,

E, A. McLEOD,
Polite Magistrate, Dist. “A’’.
§.1.51—1n



————





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Seoul Burning | Major Battle |
dn Indo-china

From Page 1
away from Seoul. They had no
particular goal.
hosé Who could afferd it could
be evacuated by the Korean army.
It had been én open seeret around
Seoul for the last few days that
the army would evacuate a family
south for £90.
On the road
Eorean

SAIGON, Indo China, Jan. 4.

A French military spokesman
said tonight that a major battle
is being fought in North Indo«
China, but no details will be an-
nouneéd until the completion of
the eurrent phase of operations.

Meanwhile for the fifth consecu-
tive day the French army head-
quarters here issued a commu-
nique whith shed little light on
events on embaitied northern

to-day, rickety
f army trucks passed by
jammed tight with refugees and
their belongings. :

At the Han River main bridge,
many refugees had to dump some
of .the few possessions they had
sa.- aged.

They found they could not man-
age to cross the frozen river car-
rying loads and there was noe room
for them on the heavily laden
railway bridge being used by the

fi i

"The communique said Com-
munist-led Vietminh forces are
still attacking a _ line of
French forees guarding Hanoi.
There was no change in the situa-

tion whatever it was reported
wre ies Pahioh had been in the Tienyen-Monca sector on
pianked to take army trucks was|‘h€ northeast of the ‘Indo-China
to be blown up soon after dawn. | frontier.

For 50 yards on either side, am-
phibious tanks smashed across the
ice, breaking it into small pieces
to thwart any Communist attempt
to blow up the bridge premature-
ly. It was fear Communist
saboteurs might sneak over the
ice under cover of darkness and
dynamite it.—Reuter.

The spokesman who revealed
a major battle was a personal rep-
resentative of the new Com-
mander-in-Chief and High Com-
missioner Gen. Jean De Lattre De
Tassigny.

He said the restriction is part
of the new Press policy, but as-
sured correspondents that other-

: all facilities will be given
for comprehensive coverage



eT tA eee acamseenctiei aT

LOST & FOUND

of the Indo-China situation, —CP



LOST

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET Series I
2283. Finder please return to J ph
Lynch, School Road, Upper Bridge Ra
St. Michael, §.1.51—1n





Nevis Carries On

From Page 1
or nearby mains. Hence, Mr. J.
D. Wilson, Clerk of Works, flew
fiom St. Kitts to-day to retder
assistance to the damaged Nevis
water supply.

Tents which arrived from
Puerto Rico on the U.S. Oppor-
tune, are being used for the shel-
ter of Police and as
Government buildings



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Carlisle Atwell of
Halls Road, St, Michael, for permission
to sell Spirits, Mait Liquors, &e,, at a
beard and shingle shop at Gov't Hill.
St, Michael.

Dated this 3rd day. of January,
To'—B. A. MeLZoD_ Exq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A".

Signed W. SEALY,
for Applicant

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Poliee Court, District “A"’ on Mon
day, the 158th day of January, 1961 at

It o'clock, a.m.
BE. A. MeLEOD,

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
$.1.51—In

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of THE WORKERS’
CANTEEN



1951
temporary

His Excellency accompanied by
the Federal Engineer, John Knox,
are leaving on January 7th for a
two-day visit to Nevis

A report from our St. Kitts
correspondent states that a .char-
tered plane from Trinidad arriv-
ed in that colony bringing repre-
sentatives of the Banks, the Presa





a eee Dudley D. Holder andj and Rex Stollmeyer They re-
cDonal Brathwaite (Trustees) of ini i
Fairchild Street, St. Michael, for per- turned to Trinidad later in the
mission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, | (4Y-

&c., at bottom floor of a 2 storey wall
building in Fairchild Street, City.
Dated this 4th day of January,
To—H. A. TALMA Esq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
Signed D. D. HOLDER,

1991

CANADIAN RATES

JANUARY 4, 151

seem eneneeeente eeceonaaeetaenenctt tA TCs acsccencttie teat

for Applicants. | 644/10% pr. Cheques on

N.B.—This application will be con- . Dahkers 625/10% pr
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held Demand
et Police Court, District “A’’ on Mon- Draits 62.35% pr
day, the 15th day of January, 1951 mt Sight Drafts 62 2/10% pr
il o’elock, a.m, 644/10% pr. Cable

H. A. TALMA, 629/10% pr, Curtehey 61 pr
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A” Coupons 60 3/10% pry
5.1.51—1h

Ae ete me e e



cae animism oad omnes ene on

GOVERNMENT NOTICES



Liability For Recall of Reservists of His Majesty’s Forces in
The United Kingdom Who Are Resident in Barbados.

Reservists of all three services should be in no doubt of their
individual liability, and the documents issued to personnel on ‘heir
release make it clear that any changes of address should be notitied
to the Service Department congerned.” If the intention of reservists
living in the United Kingdom to proceed overseas is notified, the
reserve liability is then confirmed or cancelled and the individual
cencerned is notified accordingly. Any officers or men who are in
doubt, therefore, should communicate direct with the Service Depar' -
ment concerned,

Colonial Secretary’s Office,

3rd January, 1951.

2

5 1.51—2n



UNIVERSITY OF LONDON



Matriculation Examination — June 1951



All persons desirous of entering for the June 1951 Matricula-
tion Examination of the University of London should forward (he

B.G. India
Responsible Govt.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Jan. 4

A three-man delegation from
the B.G. East Ifidian Association
in eVidence before the Constitu-
tion Commission made strong
claims for responsible Govern-
ment for British Guiana con-
trolled by a Cabinet of ten Min-
isters. It was their desire, the
delegation told the Waddington
Commission, to see Imperial re-
presentatives “shorn of powers
which would negative whatever
Was done by the Cabinet.” The
East Indians pleaded for univer-
Sal adult suffrage for all over the
age of 18 yéars. A Legislative
euncil comprising 24 élected
members who shall elect a Speak-
er from their number and an
Executive Council of ten mem-
bers, charged with departmental
responsibilities,

The Governor to preside over
Couneil meetings, but powers to
be exercised only in regard to
external affairs and defence.

The Colonial Secretary, Attor-
ney General, and Financial Secre-

tary were to be his principal
advisers

Dr. J. P. Lachhmalisingh, Pres-
ident, with the Hon. D. B. Deb-
idin and Mr, C. R, Jacob, com-
prise the delegation. Questioned
whether they thought there was
possibility of an organised party
system in British Guiana with a
fully developed political pro-
gramme to make self government
possible, they assured the Com-
mission that there was already
established a Labour Party with
others now in the making and that
it would take two years to have
the system fully organised,

The Commission adjourned the
session in Georgetown and pro-
ceeded to-day to the Essequibo
district to take evidence at Bar-
tica, Fort Island, Scampa Island
and the C.D.C. timber concession
at Manaka, Later they will visit
MacKenzie Bauxite Mines

Ilse Koch Ends
Hunger Strike

AUGSBURG, Germany, Jan. 4.
Ilse Koch, accused Red witch of
Buchenwald, to-day gave up her
two-day—old hunger strike. After
a hearty breakfast, she munched
an apple during pauses in her
trial on charges of inciting mur-
ders and tortures of Buchenwald
Concentration Camp inmates,
One of the witnesses against
her to-day, was Mrs. Rosa Roedeél,

whose husband preceded Mfrs,
Koch's husband as Buchenwald
Camp Commandant and thén

served as his deputy.

Previous witnesses have praiséd
Mrs. Roedel for her kindness to
inmates and contrasted her con-
duct with the alleged cruelty of
Mrs, Koch,

Mrs, Roedel said Mrs. Koch .was
feared and hated by eamp pris-
oners, and that she exercised fear-
ful influence over her Command-
ant husband,—(CP) ¥

in Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

CABLE & WIRELESS (West Indies!







Lid. advise that they can now commu-
nicate with the following ships taroudh
their Barbados Coast Station

8.8. Captain John, 8.8, Seabreeze, H+
Samuna, 8.8, Presidente Dutra, 8,
Anistal, SS. John Chandris, $8. Brier
$8, Arania, $8, Soya Christiana, 8,
Sundale, S.S. Red ¢ yon, S.S. He Dratt
8.8, Fort Amherst, Mormac Sea, 8.8
toskoop. S&S, Ardentina, WMDS,
Puerto Caballo, $.8. America, WDI,
Skotaa S.S, Salem Maritime, §.8 -
con, 8S. Aleda Patriot, 5.5. Parita, 5.



Veragua, SS, Del Norte, 8.5, Parita 5un,
S.S. Uruguay, WMCM, 8,8. Alcoa Cof-
salt, $.S. Brockley Hill, 5.8, Lady Nelsow,

oat to Eee ee of Education not later than Monday,]%.>, tawie s Cinmnnkine ss Mow
« anuary, — mac Port, 8.8. shins « BS a,
(i) A letter setting out the subjects to be taken, name in full, Ha wethano: SP aN: iMon at
date of birth and address. Tug Dragon, 858. Golfito, 8.8. Quilmes
Gi) A Baptismal Certificate. SS
(iii) A receipt from Barclays Bank (D.C. & O.) showing -hat
vie oon "REAL ESTATE
(a) £2.12.6—for can@idates taking full examination |
(b) £1. 10—,, ; - one (1) stibject to
complete matr.cula- JOHN
tion qualification
(ec) £111.6—,, , is one part to complete
Matriculation quali- 4.
fication,
has been forwarded by mail transfer to the External

Registrar, University of London.
SPECIAL NOTICE :—The attention of all candidates is particularly
drawn to the fact that the Matriculation Exam-
ination will not be held after June 1951.
Department of Education,

27th December, 1950.
onimmremensiong

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Applications are invited from teachers and other suitably qualified

pefsons for the following vacanciés:-- ,
St. Lucy’s Girls’ School
St. Matthias’ Boys’ School (men and women)
Grace Hill Girls’ School
Holy Trinity Boys’ School (men and women)
St. Saviour’s Boys’ School (men and women)
St. Catherine’s Mixed Scliool (men and women)

2. The minimum qualification for entry to the teaching service
is a School Certificate.

3. Applicatisns must be submitted on the appropriate forms
(E. 35 (b) for men and E. 35 (c) for women) which may be obtained
from the Department of Education, but candidates who have already
submitted one of these forms in respect of previous vacancies (now
filled) may apply by letter accompanied by a recent testimonial.

4. Any teacher who applies for « vacancy on the staff of apotber
school must inform his or her present Chairman of Managers and
the Head Teacher of any application for such a transfer.

5. All applications must be enclosed in envelopes marked
“Appointments Board” in the top jeft hand corner and must reach
the Department of Education by Saturday, 6th January, 1951.

23rd December, 1950. 30.12.50—3n.



DEPARTMENT 0! EDUCATION
Wesley Hall Girls’ Scool—St. Michael.

Applications are invited for the Heudship of the Wesley Hall |
Girls’ School from teachers (women) with at least 10 years’ teaching |
experience. The minimum professional qualification required is the |
Certificate A of the Department or extanption therefrom.

Salary will be in accordance with the Government Scale for Head |
Teachers in Grade II Elementary Schools. |

}
|



Candidates who have already submitted application forms in re-
spect of previous vacancies (now filled) may apply by letter, accom-
panied by a recent testimonial. All other candidates should make
application on the appropriate form which may be obtained from
the Department of Education. All applications must be enclosed in
envelopes marked “Appointments Board” in the top left hand corner
and must reach the Department of Education by Saturday. 6th Janu-
ary, 1951.

23rd December, 1950. 30.12.50—3n.

BLABDON
|
|

| AF,S., F.V.A.
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE

| “ROCK DUNDO” Cave Hill.
A well maintained and productive
42 4



Eetate of sor
love
The house





rs in a very
position 2 miles from C
is worthy of ©
notice and possesses great ¢
Its general condition is excellent
and there |s spacious accommoda.




tion

| “GRENADA” B.W.1, A beautt-
| ful and well found ecovlptry home
containing 3 reception, 5 Bedroom,

4 verandahs, 2 bathrooma, 3 toil-





ety 2 Bara ete. The land con-
wists of 14 ‘scres, 12 acres under
coconuts and nutmem, the re-
| mainder pasture and gardens
Income about’ £200, ser annitn
Price 28,000, Full pertieutars on
application
‘BAPTIST VICARAGE’—Paynes
Bay 2 storey house with 3 bed.
roome mpateir lounge; galleries,
dining — roots kitehen Usual
offices, Beautiful sandy beach and
exe@itent bathing. Available May
rm
“TOWER GARAGE" St. Mat-
thha Gap. Near Marine Hotel.
Hecently built property in central
position, Ideal for store, ware-
house, garage, small theatre ete,
Offers considered
UNSET HOUSE” Prospect.
t, Jame Bungalow with wide
va frantaye snd good beat anchor-
“« + bedrooma, lounge, separate
| dining room, verandah 3 sides,
| @ and paved courtyard and
vt garden Sound Yuy at



AUCTION SALE
BLACKMANS

Wednesday, Jan. 10th

REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

PLANTATIONS BUILDING |
Phone 4640





us Ask | Liverpool Has

PAGE SEVEN

‘flu. so far are confined to. the
Lancashire area arownd Liverpoo!
and to the Nort coast. It
noted that the ailment is spread-
FI E . . ing through the Midlands ane
u pl C@MIE Seuthern England, but had not

| Teac! epidemic tions

| there, e Ministry said -

dethie cases are mild ones. toy



LIVERPOOL, Eng., Jan. 4



An epidemic of influenza dis-|
rupted Liverpool fiipping today | Ne ae: Tee
cringing on the Hafbour condi- + . >
tions that haven't been seen here Ship Sinking
‘inee wartime convoys flocked
into port. BRISBANE, Queensland, Jan. 4.

S he
An estimated 30 per cent. of The 11065 ton F. and 0. sang

| liner, Palana, was slowly sinking
i bea | the Central Queensland coast
” | to-day after striking a rock in the
Great Barrier Reef last night.

Her captain, 59-year-old Francis

verpool’s working people inclu-
ling 3,000 dockers were
vith the flu

The harbour was jammed with |
hips awaiting for berths. About |



(.u00 nurses were away from | Russell Spurr, i ie Sepdic
heir jobs, Hospital authorities ia the ol
wwpealed for retired nurses to taken off si
ome back temporarily, Nearty | ew of te enly
00 bus drivers and conductors | Woman on a. Mi "
md 25 to 30 per cent. of the field, wife of Chief ;
telephone operators were ill Half of the erew ate fromm ee

Captain § appea for
Meanwhile in London the Min-| tugs to tow his ship to shallow
istry of Health said epidemics of waters for beaching.

ROYAL NETHERLANDS.
STEAMSHIP CO.









7 ‘ ‘ =

NOTI












an” Galas — will ae-
Sailing from Amsterdam and Dover £ ae elaine :
M.S, “Bonaire” Sth. eth, January 1952, hee & ites inne day
S.S. “Cottica” 2nd. 3rd, February 1951 Maro ae ee
Sailing from Antwerp and Amster- .
ane-M.S “Oranjestad” 6th, 19th.
January 1980 The MV ‘Daerwood" will
Sailing to Trinidad, Paramaribo and uecept Cargo and reatnaee for
Georgetown—M.S, “Hersilin” 8th, Janu- St, Lucia, St. Vineent, Grenada
ary 1981, S.S. “Cottica” 20th. February and Aruba, Date of departure
151 to be notified.

Sailing to Trinidad La Guiara Curacao

Ete.—-M:S hs ad" F
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TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

TABLE TENNIS’ SETS
os At i

profession of desithing
tntest American stylet
making

the
in drese-

6.5L

Siation Hill, St, Michael, who left
here on a vacation in July 147
to join her husband in Florida,
USA, tle paid a viKit to New
York City and hie roedntly re-
turned after 3% years absence

dn.









POPE PF Fe POS JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
NOTICE MORE DESIGNS IN
In order to obtain rest FRONT DOOR GLASS
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St. Michael
Vote For

OWEN T. ALLDER

on Monday next, 8 a.m.

Tenders must be forwsra—
ed in sealed envelopes mark—
ed “TENDER FOR LIQUOK
AND REFRESHMENTS" and
addressed to the Secretary
not later than noon on Sat-
urday, 13th January, 1951,

to 4 p.m. at Parochial
Buildings. The Committee does not
bind itself to accept the
Fearless highest or any other Tender. {
Impartial G. A. LEWIS |
Serviceable Secretary. ||

4,1.61.—4n.



4.1.51.—4n,



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PAGE EIGHT

MUST



SAM FOGG

BEFORE MARCH

THE NATIONAL BC

warned lightweight champion
heavyweight champ Joey Maxim to defend their titles
before March | or be uncrowned.



cab ch
Ike Williams

eS

Louis Beats
Beshore
Fight Stopped In 4th Round

DETROIT, Jan. 4
Former world heavyweight
champion Joe Louis showed a
flash of his old form in batter-
ime Freddie Beshore of MHar-
urg to defeat in the 4th round
Of their 10-rounds bout here last
it

«The referee stopped the fight
two minutes 48 secs of the
round with Beshore bleeding

a broken nose and a badly

cut left eye. Supporters of Louis
immediately hailed the victory as
a significant step on the road to a
return title match with Ezzard
Charles, holder of the American
on of the world heavyweight

ionship.

7 Beshore’s

‘kout.
nching with something ap-
aching the viciousness of for-
a days, Louis now 36, had all
best of the exchanges after the
rst round.
~-Meshore carried the fight to
Louis from the first bell but the
former champion had little diffi-
in scoring with powerful
its and lefts which brought
blood from Beshore’s nose.

From the second round on Be-
shore, a plodding type of fighter,
be merely a punching bag. Louis
hit him at will and in the third
round a crashing right broke
his» nose and another split his
left" eye. The doctor allowed
Beshore to come out for the
fourth round. He ran into more
sledge hammer blows from
Louis who used his right more
frequently than he did in his last
fight against Cesar Brion. Louis’
left was as potent as of old.

A big home town crowd of
138,096 gave Louis a tremendous
ovation at the finish,

“Two of the three ring officials
called the opening round even but
from then on they agreed it was
“Louis’ fight all the way. Louis
had obviously twained hard for
this fight. He weighed 210} pounds
—the lightest he has been since
his bout in June 1946 with Billy
Conn—and seemed more spirited

e

courage pre-




than when he met Charles last
September. Beshore scaled 191}
pounds.

Louis did not have much to say
about this fight.

When asked how it compared
with the last fight—-Brion—he said
simply: “No comparison”.

Louis said his best fighting
weight was about 210 Ibs.
—Reuter.
I

$4,688 Forecast Goes
To South Trinidad

{From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN Jan. 2

South Trinidad turfites held
both tickets sold in the Baby

Bird-Clipper forecast which paid
$4,688 at Monday’s§ T.T.C.
races. They are Haidar Ali, gas
station proprietor of Point Fortin,
who had one ticket, and Cliffor
Sooknanan, who shared the othe:
with another Southern man.



They'll Do It E







YEARS COURTMORE

AND THE ENTERTAINMENT
WAS EL DULLO-ER-
x3 gk

ss



IT THE NIGUT
WE INCLUDED
HER MAMA IN
THE PARTY
THE PLACE
HAD JUST -
CHANGED
POLICY =++
©

Louis winning by a clean |

very Time

= SSS

HEIRESSA TO EL DULLO-—

FIGHT

|
|

WASHINGTON
YXING ASSOCIATION ha:
Ike Williams and light

The ultimatum was delivered
by Fred J. Saddy, Chairman of
the N.B.A. championship com-
mittee, as the assoc ation announ-
ced its final rati of the year

‘Lhe NWG.A, official also dociured
ihat if Jake Lamotta fails to go
threugh with his scheduled battle
with Sugar Ray. Robinson on Feb-

ruary 14, Robinson should te ce-
clarea middleweight champion
Major surprise in the N.B.A

1950 ratings was that Joe Louis is
longer considered a “logical
contender” for the heavyweight
championship he once held. Louis
was relegated to the role of ‘“out-
standing boxer” by N.B.A. along
with Lee Savold.
For Title

Saddy ssid Maxim should meet
Bob Murphy of California for his
title as soon as possible. He ex-
pressed doubt that Williams can
make the 135-pound lightweight
class weight limit any longer

Saddy announced

“Unless Williams and Maxim
defend their championships by
March 1, 1951, I will make strong
recommendations to the National
Boxing Association Executive
,Committee that their titles be
declared vacant and that an elim-
ination be conducted between
John LL, Davis of California and
Fred Dawson cf Illinois for the
lightweight crown and also be-
tween Bob Satterfield, Archie
Moore and Bob Murphy for the
light heavyweight crown.”

He added that if Lamotta for-
feits his title to Robinson, «
elimination contest should ke
staged between Kid Gavilan, Billy
Graham, Charlie Fusari and Edd‘e
'Thomas of England to select a
new welterweight king to succeed
Robinson,

Saddy, commenting on the
fact that there are no logical con-
tenders for heavyweight, champ
Ezzard Charles to fight, said:

“In the case of Ezzard Charles.
the undisputed heavyweight
champion of the world, he has
made every effort to prove that
he is a champion worthy of that
title and ready at all times to
meet all comers. He has proved
{to be a fighting champion,”

\ Other Ratings

Other NBA ratings by

| were:

| Light heavyweight:
Joey Maxim; logical contenders,

ne



en

class

Champion,

BARBADOS ADV



MIGHT WIN CuLONY CAP



CARL MULLINS, the fastest bowl er in Barbados to-day is tipped to
win his Intercolonial Cap againstTrinidad next month. He took ma-
jor honours in yesterday's B.C.L.--B.C.A. fixture when he captured
five of the seven B.C.L. wicketsfor 33 runs.

“I AM IN DEBT”
—Says Charles

EZZARD CHARLES may be America’s idea of a world
heavy-weight champion, but, so far, the Cincinnati negro
has failed to get his hands on much of that big money
that reputedly accrues to the big men of international
boxing.

“T am about the poorest heavy-
weight champion, tinancially, the;

|
fats chore" Aingland Has
n my way up, never made} ~~
Good Chance
In Third Test

much. There was that sports|
(From Our Own Correspondent)

arena I owned. While I was away!
England’s team for the



on service, they piled up £3,00.|
worth of unpaid amusement taxé

on me, and on my return I had to}
start paying that off. I sold the}
arena, but the debt remained. [|
still owe £1,000.

Archie Moore. Bob Murphy and] “Being a champion is suainiaih third Test commencing at
Bob Satterfield. sive. Tips here, tips there—folks| Sydney to-day is Brown,
| Middleweight: Champion, Jake [expect you to live up to the title,” Compton, Washbrook, Simp-
Lamotta; logical contender, Ray ‘Hard Way’ He Hutwon, Parkhouse,
gg yo ey ae . mr “I have come up the hard way, rena fg ae aH
R reine rc! A a “YTI appreciate the value of a dollar O’Reill ay ; tata W. J.

perenne a onten der None] WAY 80 around tossing dough pet iggniny £ ustralia’'s | great-
Williams: logical a cnteniets down the drain in the big cities? Buartiuauey sah cpemiaie

ams; B B % ai ; ; eS 2 Ss

John L. Davis and Freddie Daw- { don’t aim to make an impression in the match

that way,” adds Charles.

son, Ws ae ee ree : ‘
Featherweight; Champion, San- iia i Rag maintains an rt SYDNEY, Friday.
dy Saddler; logical contenders, al os igri 9 tw ° grand- Good judges give England an
Willie Pep and Ray Famechon. nothers, two aunts and four/excellent chance of winning







Bantamweight: Champion, Vic cocker spaniels—is “owned,” like|the Third Test which begins here
Toweel; logical contenders,’ Luis} ‘© ™@ny top-rank American fight-| to-day. The belated return to
Romero of Spain and Manuel “"*; by a business syndicate. run-getting form of Simpson and
Ortiz. At least 50 per cent of his] Parkhouse has strengthened Eng-

Flyweight: Champion, Dado earnings goes in managerial ex-J|land’s batting tremendously.
Marino; logical contenders, Jean J PEMses. : { Compton returned to the team
Sneyers of Belgium and Terry Joe Louis earned £1,500,000- ; with his mind set on effacing, the
Allen of England. ind still has to fight to meet in- memory of his Brisbane blob and

—I.N.S8,] ©ome-—tax demands, Jack Dempsey,: giving the lie direct to much
on the other hand, put the savings; nonsense that has bean written

7 r P rH from £ 2,000,000 fight earnings! eid spoken about him since he

Klee anasta nto a restaurant, oil and other; became unavailable for the Mel-
yusiness interests—and is now aj bourne Test.
vealthy man. So is Gene Tunney} Washbrook while not in top
















case. Eg.,
2s ont a thant teat
Two Red Threes A

A
Canasta of Kings 4




a an unfrozen
aiscard pile which be ie
melded with his Joker. is
left with about 14 cards in



rr

-~he married money. year is likely to bfeak his drought
Few of our British boxers can|cf runs at any time

match the Dempsey—Tunney kind| These five batsmen compared

of affluence, But Bruce Woodcock Australia’s first five, Mor-

igi

ind Freddie Mills are two who!is, Archer, Harvey, Miller and
will never have to worry about| Hassett stand out favourably |
‘next week's wages,” when one considers the patchy
Women in Sport urreat form of the Australians.
he will be D tak: If women cricketers had aj} En-land having dropped Close
ing” subsequent ‘anking list, No. 1 would be un-j| 4nd Dewes has Johnny Warr mak-
canting safe you suming Molly Hide, of Gunners- !ng his Test debut as extra speed
con) BaD, Sree e ury Club, Surrey and England, bowler. He'll be needed. The
culties yourself,” You iB _ As batsman she is stylish, avreey pitch will be as usual,
orcefu and free-scoring; as] blatant in its ,avcuritism towards

cards end, Meceian Gf tee owier of off-breaks, she is accu-| batsmen

Each captain will need to give
much thought to the arrangement

cate, experimental and invariably
langerous

It is likely that she will have] vf the batting order.
the honour of leading England Hutton has played Australian
again next summer in the three] {3st bowlers so confidently each
Tests to be played against’ the|time (hat it would be foolish to
Australian women touring team | Persist with the dreadful risk of
Cricket for Miss Hide began at|‘S¢"ding him in to bat again at
home; she understood the swing]! umber five.

his hand You hold ; . oo , ;
A. 0-0. 8.7.7, 6. 6. 2 of the bat before the ‘strokes of The Yorkshire opener has been
ety oof ogurse, meld he pen. But at school and collegt 7 arrogant in his confidence
i xCe e she advance rial dal tap i a ‘ ; i ate
nebo end. the Rinne a, " he advanced rapidly in both. a ‘ling with Lindwall and
Canasta of Nines ang leave The one brought her a diploma] * ‘Sim t
rself w one ca is r agrie ” eg Simpson faced = darra of
Coe aeby ah t Boeke. tie et ic ulture, the other, at the Rie nee re a Site ‘i one of
You should meld your Ninconly ige of 19, a place in the England pers in le recen yaney
Qbg, Sincard either a six oF 8 eam v. The Rest. game and came through on top.
cards and aniess the Like all the greater batsmen,|!le played the fast bowling much
ppuarels ts are ip a josttlon Miss Hide does more than play] etter than the slows. He should
Sie Haas io ven ie a inter zood strokes, she commands them. | P@rtner Hutton in opening the
liscard pile that you or your To do that requires a quick wit | 'â„¢OIngs.
partner will be able to take and a stout heart as well as soun’| With Washbrook at number
- technique, Poise in fact three and Compton to follow,
Loudon Bxpress Service. & —L.E.S | Australia’s bowling seems likely
to face sterner opposition than














it has met for many years.

Hassett’s problem is Harvey.
At first drop he is too vulnerable
to the swinging ball.

In Melbourne’s Test he might
have been out from any one of
the first three balls bowled to him
by Bedser.

His method of lifting the bat
high and blazing away at off side
shots surely makes him an enter-
taining player but entertainment
value does not cut much ice in
a Test Match
number five.

the early stages of
position

His

41S













The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises : 6.15 a.m.
Sun Sets : 5.50 p.m.
Moon (New) January 7
Lighting : 6.30 p.m.
High Water : 129 am, 1.13
p.m

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington)
Temperature (Max.) :

82.0° F.
Temperature (Min.)
63.0° F.

Wind Direction (9.00 am.) :
NN.E. (3.00 p.m.) E
Wind Velocity : 4 miles per

hour
Barometer
(3 p.m.) :

: Nil



(9 am.) : 29.944

29.861







OCATE

Hunte Hits 101;
Mullins 5 For 33

A SPARKLING 101 NOT OUT by 18-year-old Conrad

Hunte of Belleplaine, St. A

vesterday’s cricket match between B.C.L. and B.C.A. at
stumps were drawn,

Kensington Oval. When
after batting the entire day,

loss of seven wickets in their first innings. Sree, oe eee ree age

. . 72 no .
Hunte hit seven fours and f2 runs in his first over. hes ema wis: Wood b. Mullins. . 0
twos in his century. He thrillea When the score had reached 5), ° , Carrington c. wk. Wood b. Mullins 39

the. crowd with his well-timed and Hunte and Codrington were sti!
drives and together with Hunte 22 and Cod

1ul'-bleoede4 cover







FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1951

|
make the runs. Hunte then started |

to go for his century and Horact;
King came in for some rough;
treatment when he punched him}
twice to the boundary in his 13th
over.





He completed his century by
hitting Williams for a_ brace
through the covers and whet

stumps were drawn he was un-
defeated with 101 and L. Barker
was five not out.

The scores:—

ndrew, was the highlight in

B.C.L.

had scored 188 runs for the} B.C.L. — FIRST INNINGS

| H. Mc. Carthy Lb.w, b. Mullins
©. Symmonds b Mullins

2
8
Dy Crawford run out 4









India Picks Team
For Fourth Test

BOMBAY, Jan. 4.

India’s team for the fourth
unofficial “Test” against the Com-
monwealth beginning at Madras
on January 19 shows four changes
from the side which drew in the
third “Test”.

Syd Mustaq Ali, G. Kishen-
chand, B. C. Alva, and P. G.
Joshi replace M. R. Rege, H. R
Adhikari, R. S. Modi and Rajen-

dra Nath.
Adhikari informed the Cricket
Control Board that he was

suffering from a strained shoul-



gave a good display: of aggressive) rington 27. After King’s sevent.1! K. Goddard stpd. w.k. Wood der.

bdtting. Opening with Sealy he!cver Denis A‘’kinson of Wander-]_ * >. Greenidge a Joshi the wicketkeeper, an-
showed from the outset that he|ers was brought on in his place. | © Barker not out 1 |nounced that he was fully
wus out for big things and gave Atkinson bowling at medium M -— lrecovered after pulling a thigh
7 cneae Sets ~*~ —_ at 68) pace did_not get much out of the Total (for 7 wickets) 183 | uscle during the first “Test” at
t the y ins io) . rong | ‘

In hi Dowling «ten cast! te aaa ae an aap Fall of wickets: 1 for 12, 2 for 12, 3] New Delhi. a:
Mullins the gix=taot Police wnseel me e Lb “= apy b 73, 4 for 77, 5 for 89, © for 95, 7 for The team: V. sermes. (Cap.
MULE § a wa ins s brou or ai azé . sta j
captured five of the B.C.L, wickels| again and at 73 Mullins had{} : BOWLING gies ae ve oar eae Mouked D. G.
for 33 runs after sending dow!) Codrington caught behind the} y,-witiams Sy 0 |phadkar, CG. Kishenchad, P.
e seca oie which four were! wicket by Wood. Codringto.}t eens oy ‘ Umriger, N, Chowdhury, P.

aiden overs. |made 39. t ing ae 3

Mullins bowled extremely mel H. McCarthy followed and h2}p/ ateineon “ad 0 Ne cma aan M Pege, H.
developing much pace and in the| opened his account with a single,}K Branker St tig bes d efid Rajendra Nath are
first two overs made good use Of after Hunte had pushed a balif¢ Greenidee 8°! 1 | Gaekward, & eer
the new ball. At lunch time his! tr¢ “Mullins. t6 coke foe C. Smith ce 0 'standbyes.—Renter.
figures wereO10 M3 _ R17 W 4.! single McCarthy was given nae ————————— x

Winning the toss B.C.L, cpened! leg before to Mullins in his last 4

with C, Hunte and H. Sealy to;
the bowling of schoolboy J. Wil-!
jiams and Carl Mullins. Sealy haa
a chance off Williams’ third ball
«f his first over when he snicked
through to Denis Atkinson = at
second slip who dropped the ball

Mullins bowled the second over
cf the day to Hunte who pulled
the ba’l to the leg side sending
cown Sealy to take strike, The
fourth ball rose chest high and
Sealy watched it go through to
Gerald Wood,

Hunte in Williams’ second over
began to get well over the ball
and drove the fourth ball nicely
for a brace. Mullins in his third
over began to bowl with venom
and broke Sealy’s defen¢e
many times.

In Mullins’ fourth over—a maid-
en—Sealy gave Gerald Wood an
easy catch off a rising ball when
his score was five. Jones, who fol-
lowed was out in the next ball
when he cocked another rising
ball from Mullins into the air to
give wicket-keeper Wood another
cateh. The score was now 12.
L. Codrington who was next in
never seemed comfortable against
Mullins. He was _ occasionally
beaten by the pace of the ball and
was dropped by Wood off Mul-
lins.

After bowling five overs Wil-
liams was replaced by the Empire
spinner Horace King. King’s first
over was a maiden sent down
to Codrington who had not yet
scored, Codrington opened his
scoring with a boundary off
King in his second over. Hunte at
the other end was batting patient-
ly against Mullins. After sending
down seven overs for nine runt
and taking two wickets, Mullins
was relieved by K. Bowen of
Spartan. Bowen conceded five

TS

Hassett himself should take first
arop.

Warr seems to be the man who
will supplement England’s bowl-
ing strength, His virile bowling
in Sydney clinched his position.

That means that Brown can
maintain a fast-medium attack
indefinitely from one end, Aus-
tralians have not shown up well
ugainst that type of attack, ,

Lindwall was over-bowled_ in
the New South Waies—M.C.C.
match just finished. He looked
muscle bound and weary when
the match concluded on Wednes-
‘ay, It will surprise if he can
ittain his top speed to-day

_ What's on Today

Civil Service Examin
| ations, Combermer> |
| School 8.00 a.m.—9.20 a.m.

Advocate’s Phote Fxhib
| ition at B bados

Museum .... 10.00 a.m.
R. J. MacLeod’s Exhib-

ition of Oil Paintings

at Barbados Museum

Vb ew eee eae Tae hg: ne eres
Court of Ordinary 10 30 a.m.
Auction Sale — Redman

& Taylor's Garage 2
Police Band, Hastings

Rocks . 8.00 pan.
Empire Theatre — “Duel

In The Sun”, 2.30 & 8.30
Plaza Theatre (Bridge—
town) “The Fountain-
head”. ... 2.30 & 8.30 p.m.
Aquatic Club Cinema
‘Homestretch,” 8.30 p.m.
Globe Theatre “Bagdad”
and “Talent” 5 & 8.30 p.in,

{
|
}
|
|

pm,

| |
|
|

eens

|
|

OPPOSES PPP SSP PD SP SSSS FOSS

GET READY

%

FOR

SRSCSOO SFOS PEEPS LPL OPEL LLC A LLL

4
POSE

P.

<



$9984
“

THE CRICKET

TOURNAMENT

Let us fit you now

TROPICAL SUIT

FLANNEL

POSPOS SOS SPOS SPOS POOF SSS PSPS FOSS SP SPS POSES

ball of the tenth over. At this

stage luich was taken. Hunte wa’ ‘IC Y-CO. ”9
jnot out 31 and the score was 77
| for the loss of four wickets.
After lunch C. Symmonds joint xIVE
ed Hunte and was off the mark WARMEST

with a single off Branker’s bowl-
ing. Hunte continued to bat fault-
lessly and showed signs of becorn-
ing aggressive. Whe, the score
was 89 another wicket fell, when
Symmonds was completely beaten
and bowled by Mullins in the first
ball of his 13th over.

Crawford went in and was off
with a single. The scoreboard now
read 90/5/6. The running between
the wickets by Hunte and Craw-
ford was faulty and a run out
came when Crawford ran dowu
on Hunte and finding that it was
impossible to make the run tried
to get back but Wood had tic
bails off. Crawford had scored 4.

Skipper Kenneth Goddard fol-
lowed, Hunte was then 38. Both
of the batsmen settled down and
Hunte now in an aggressive mood
reached his fifty with a beautiful
late cut through the slips for four
runs off the College pace bowler
Williams. He was now at the
wicket for about two hours and
fifty minutes. When 66 Hunte
gave his first chance, when he
glided a ball on the leg side from
Mullins which Weod dropped.

Goddard after scoring 23 ended
his stay at the wicket when he
attempted to lift a ball from
Greenidge overhead and was
stumped by Wood

L. Barker followed Goddard and
was just content to stay with
Hunte so that he (Hunte) coula





in Pink, Blue, Gre

60 « 80...
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PAGE 1

I Kill XV l\M MtV '. 151 nAIIIIMM)UIVOCATI I-\I.I TIIKH ILN. Still Hope To Settle Korea Fighting (By MICHAEL FRY) LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 4. THE UNITED NATIONS has not given up all hope of a negotiated settlement of the Kore*n war with the Crvnrte Cbmmumsts, though most delegates realise that much dependi r. Stan Pavlie, Minister and head of the Yugoslav Economic delegation. Other countries were, Holland, Denmark. Helgium. Brazil, Australia. Italy. Switzerland, Turkey. Sweden, Monaco, Norwny, Canada. Spain, Greece. India. Uruguay and South Africa In view of Uie reception, the High Commissioners postponed their usual weekly meeting ill next Thursday. Moukit Etna Still Spouting CATANIA. Sicily. J.m. 4 Europe's tallest volcano tu-uay went into its 40th day of violent eruption amid incre-sing fears lh.it worse may be yet to come. The Government of Catania. 20 miles south of the half-mile whta lava stre..m spouting from the gnow-cwati Mount Etna said in a special announcement that serious concern Is begun to IKfelt because of the continued violence of the eruption. —1CP1 After consultation with various Qovaroinanta, this tendency n us been softened to some extentSeveral delegations It was understood, urged the United States not to slam the door irrevocably. Judging by the statement of M Warren Austin the chief American delegate to the Political Committee yesterday, these counsels apparently prevailed. The Committee allowed Itself another 48 hours of reflection. The delay it was generally thought, would also allow the British Commonwealth Prime Ministers at their conference opening in London to-day to concert their policy og Kore;i and Communist China. —MM* E. Berlin Actors Boycott Play BERLIN. Jan. 3 To-day's celebrations of East German President J. Pteck'a 75th birthday were marred by 'tin.. East Berlin actor* refusing to participate in a Russian play "The Transformation of GoloThe play, designed as a climax to the birthday ceremonies In a mass rally in a huge Soviet sector ban, describes how a Russian Musician Is being converted into ii "good Communist". A spokesman for the theatre to-day declined to reveal the names of the three actors but continued that they have canrelied their .--i*i.-i. i for that reason. —Renter A new and unpublished picture of HM tl.o OYNENDRA BI* BIKKAM 8IIAH BAHADUR NEPAL, taa young King of Nopal, who WM enthroned in November when Bin grandfather took asylum in the Indian Embassy at Katmandu. Tli boy king wear* his ceremonial asad dress and is seen taking the salute. Express. n-ei-K Robert tggg Leod, whose exhibition of painting* open* at Mujn today, i Friday) '•MII 111 ltiirbados himself a Bar b adia n for his mother .va.\ a Barbadian although his f^lher was a ScotHe was born in Greenwich .. which i. r as famous as an art i %  as CheUea is in Lon>iiii. of Montp.t. ii.itM.' in Paris. At the early age of one year he was brought to Barbados, where he learned hi ABC on Ilast n IBS Rocks. Laos] spent many years of |Us life In the United Slates. i hit art adu>" lion He studied ai a sUideatt a> the New York School ,f Tinr Arts. The Art Students' Leagu i MatrotajUtau School of Art and the Pratt Institute He mm kastHDalc m later becomlni u %  protege) ot one of Amerlca'i ou islanding landscape pa in ten PTanlc. Bicknell. At the home o this artist In Old Lyme, Con netieul, Mac Leod came lnt< contact with many of America'! liHl raaJl painters. He also owe* much to the well known palntei %  McUlei INjU.n. U x-•wel-like colourtmr whose landscapes, has alway> T' ad htm In his work. He spent fifteen years as a artist with the well toetaVn Irm of Mc Uruw-Hil! Publishing Co. of New York During those year* he found time to hold exhibitions of his work both in oils and water colours: ha also had the honour of having his water colours hung In the Vanderbilt Gallery during the (Slows of the American Water Colour Society Since his return to Barbados Mac Leod has devoted all hh tim,. to painting the West Indian scene, which holds an unlimited altr.utlon for him Thirty one of his paintings — ehlufly of Barlwdos nnri SI. I.i —annow on view at the Museum Britain Prepares For War LONDON (By JOHN i WIM i i BRITAIN'S CHIEFS Or" STAFF are jrgcntK n t inn all possible measures, short of total inol.ili/.aliun U) strengthen the armed services and impnAf thrulighting ttiuipment. ri#>nl %  PORT-OF-SPAIN. Jan. 2 Supersad, owner of tho Princess -_--,--c !" DAUOrDC Theatre, Arlma. was fined 550, rKhNLH tjfc. I DUMlU.K£> or three months' hard labour, for failing to exhibit the prescribed, BAIQON J quota ol British Dims during SciSeven American light bombers tcmbei. 1050. Supersad exhibited arrived here yesterday as Amerl3.690 teet Instead of the prescribcan supplies to the French Union ed (.000 feet. forces lighting Vietnam —Reuter. Scare About A New Drug NORMAL TESTS MAY NOT DETECT IT Poppy Collection 1950 ST. Mil II Ml Mn I M.K.-..I. 1 iMsn m.*t Mita D. C llutaon uihfdt.i ni.iii.-i kluManSevllla %  mas < b.rrli r-ll-.Uaoaaaalial %  on ass as FanUS'll' Mi K. Warren U1S Ktnh ll.ii a WhlU Park Mr-. O. Symmund* 47 a SI. 1-.....J Mi>. Poater use M,,U,rlW" Mn. a. Clarke •AM 1 pp.r PI.ik Bark i "-" nia** aas i M.in.maMr-. E O Wllkle B 1'. 11. Villa i iin.nl ISO so %  t*r c.n.i.iir lUri Mi J 11 Hubert 11T3 ISM H.lk.llH i .II.J-Mit* KelHrwed HrllUn. Mill T (linen.•' i: narrlaan Mr 1. Howan as os f MIL mil Mn r C Hut !" it.a* Mr*. R. Stoke* %  sis %m M MallhiB'i Mr. W. M. Worrell 30 fl Bar ••"" Ml. O. William. sets Mr. Fo.ier ssa Mllb Mark*! eta. Salvation Army • 1.443 43 OIHIR pAai-mWorihtni A HaMlae* Hn w A arani ttsrrr Ckerab Call-'Uan SI Mallhlaa HM S4SS7 St Laarraeaa Mr. Rob tdeehlll H (herah rallarllan ?> %  %  as] r ra.ua Miaa 8 Arlliur ! % %  Mla> 8. Arthur aao.ai it ramp Mlaa P U. Camemn nut HI. Ova re* Mr. W B Carrlnflon Ml -7 SI. Jaaaf* Mn Q H lluiwi 1SI00 SI Jaka. HI Kseata Mra. PSriner laiM Mr. J. A. ktakon Mr. s Nunat Mr. R Parker m >< i >'• Mr. Ctarbe-Holman SflOO Si. AaSraw r OKI ISS* 1S4S01 %  OVATION* HM ii. aadoa T..'f Ctub MM ll.-M-ln. Aquallc Club M> •nlll ru>ninuiil(y S*'o of Wraalh. &f nao %  H S %  „f Flaw. w V W.W , %  D.iwe. Marine Hotel l.S3tI3 SPECIAL rrroiiT* %  1 Phllla— Bnr#. erenr Mia* 1' O Cernai in M vr n.. in si s. l.hn its as Si Qaoiea—Caah Sal* a BaM* MI W n CarHaeton SM.BS (kiiu ii.,i,s-n.,i -,i. *• P*t#r—RrlS*. Drive Mi" S. Arthur aw to Mi. R Paeker %  so as M0S "1 !• %  * %  —iline Aopllratlon Torn ts siasai %.'.'* .^MKMWHUWHn***** By THE The French havo produced I last dozen years. It would b* of these have been doped. There i no doubt, however,, that some French trainers do dopvj their horses, and very efficiently, j too. The French authorities are not I so severe in their sentencea. In fact, they apparently see nothing incongruous about warning off a 1 trainer for doping and still allowing him to supervise Ihe training of "his"' *-nnjea— under a different There is not the same moneymotive as In this country Batcopt on big-race dava a French owner has no chance of bringing u(T u gamble of any magnitude Betting is %  •aiiine.t to the tote, mid normally Individual racepools arc so small that a £200 bet makes a substantial difference t<> tha final odds. On the other hand, the "bad type" of French racing man is about the meanest creature breathing. Anything Over Three Is Suspect Many of our trainers have had experience of French horses who have been "treated." That is why, now, they prefer to buy only youna horses in France Anything ovoi Ihe age of three Is suspect. The job is done well. There an certain experts, both in France anil Belgium. The best of them la %  man connected with irottingracers. It ii not unusual for horse-box. on its way to one of the Paris meet:ngs, to draw up at his "consulting room" Tho authorities In this country have been notably courteous in their attitude towards the do|>eteatinu of French-trained horses The only instance which 1 can reeall of a French bursu being swabbed in England was at Newmarket in I46. The horse was the sprinter Boree. Tests proved negative. II would, however, be Intolerable to subject the horses of leading French owners and trainer*, lo testa while their opposite bora In this country enlov immunlty. French Trainers Have More Time There is a scare now that the French have a new dope which cannot be detected. We will hear more of this later Doping by outside agents is fai less common across the Channel French trainers are more fortunate than ours in that they have ampl a to devote to the supervision of their horses. Travelling ia contliied within easy limits. Our trainers, on the other hand, spend a large proporti of their working lime In train car. This doubles their difficulties. And yet. under this infloxlblt new rule, they are to be accounte. responsible and guilty, even when sonally innocent. SCOUT me magnificent honat Ln the churlish to silage th*i many U.N. Troops a> Fr*m Pace 1 douecU} ihrough a Chinese ambush in Ihe northwestern -nbtirba differing casualties. The last pontoon luidge across the frozen Hnn river running through the city, was blown up Dy a British Aimy Engineer Sergeant William Robson. The Eighth Army officially announced tonight: "The city of Seoul has been successfully evacu,iU.i U> .... l'i .u-ii N..H..U, tmopa who have withdrawn as planned to tiii-n next min.Mu lyiMtioin." The new .t.fi-nopl.iu r.'in..lned a closely guarded ateret hut Tokyo ipecialated on the possibility of a tine Uirough susju, 2U mil.irelow Seoul, or Usan another lu rrilk to Ifaa south. United Nation* troops were eonUnublf to fall li.'k H1| .IIOUK tho biatlefront. In tluivnii.il sector, along too .'huiifhoii-Kapyoiig road northeast of Seoul, the situation was described as "vague". -Re uter. Released From Jail BUENOS AIltES. Jan. 9, The Argentine Government in a surprise move on Tuesday ordered tinrelease from j:nl of Ricardo Balbln. chief opposition critic of President Juan 1>. 1'eron. Balbin, 40, was sentenced lo live years' InaprisOMnant on November 22 ior calling 1'eroli .i dutatoi and a No. I criminal, lie had Uen most widely mentioned by the Radical Party candidate for President in the 1952 elections.—(Cft A |iw week> ago %  friend of mine was walking one front .in outlying stable>.uii bach (o his house II. noticed g big limousine parked in the lane. A glance at ihe tousjh-iooklni chaWftOtei u> ~iiir rssnlndt'il i.m. ... %  : 'he "spivs" in some of Giles's cartoons. His head man was w.nting. "There's a lad come to apply for I'nl v.n "i M > : %  i good and he seems all right," he n i m.that evening. Problem For The Stewards TOMORROW The .Seoul trill deal uilh the Stewards' problem 'Someone must be held retponeitile. Who—1/ not lh' irolncr?" — L.ES. Protest New Rum Tax r'rt.n, Out nn rnrraapondenl GEORGKTOWN. Jan 4. Siwmsored by various Trade Unions, i demonstration was stuved today outside the Public Buildings during a debate on the it protesting against th> proposal to increase the price* of :nnk and rum The Council Chamber was crowded and Hie pubhe had to IKwarned twice bj tinGovernor against an/ attempt to interrupt the debate by shouts and hisses. Whin the Council adjourned tho crowd booed Governor Sir Char W.-.lh'v and Ihe Financial Si iet..iy Hon. F S Mi-David ns they left the Buildings. The Demonstration wat, arranged at the i-nd of a Town Hall meeting Wednesday night attended by more than 3.000 who jammed the Hall and the compound The meelinK decided that •hould the lax proposal peag tan t^gtuUture. to call for a Ion) wide boycott of aerated 1 nis effort to bring the eounn'• defences to more complete uie|.iredneji is the direct result rf the Brussels North Atlantic Treaty OrKanii^Uun coiifeaviue and the appointment of Ueneral Dwight Eisenhower as Supreme Commander of the western Europeae, forces. Plans are being made to .ipeed jp voluntary recruiting to the lervicea and defence e-limates for the coming year ire ex* nil-reeled cuiisuletibjy Tiicsi'i vices have already carried out an intensive check-up of he present whereabout* of men elim:liig to the Claoa /. ruaerve I'hi' cl.i.s ruiisist of war vetei UIH who are skilled tradsemrn and gher key matt, At the iiKHiteitt Britain ia planling to spend an average of 8.M0 mtltlon annually on lent* in the next three But as a direct result of Prime Minister Clement Attire', elks wh Preaidanl Truman and the Brussels Cenferenee this firm e i* expected to be greatly xceeded. According to the latest available figures Britain has au ami) of 184.000 regular soldiers plui 211.000 conscript* In addition to these 393,000 en there Is a Territorial Army I National Guard) whose voluntary element is now about ao.000. This figure will be increased monthly as men who fiiuah their National Service with the regular army automatical!v enlist ui ihe Territorial*. v Division* oiiisid,IK The laleM ufflclal reeorda show ih-t there are about six and onehalf British divisions serving ulsidiihe United Kingdom Two and one-half divisions stationed in Western Germany — but these are not up to full armoured combat strength. The War Office has announced that this force will be increased early hi the New Year to three divisions. This may be increased to I-.I* divisions during in-year There Is approximately a brigade of troops in Austria and mother in Trieste Scattered i.ver Ihe Eastern Mediterranean and Ihe Middle East there U another division. inverted neat year Into last IIboat killers. Five ere b) vtrted at arssjssM, with radervvnirolled aiultiphl earrt) depthdiarge thio* PI and ••Um new weapons. Mar., pldei de str oy in e to be gonverU-d Utsj ftigaU-s It is reported that It.. C-lxuil destroyers will he led frigates o( rrVOaHUonani ileMan A few are neing built in Canadg well M in Britain, >ix new aini.il. the Fleet In the peat foul The 23,000-Um IndamiUhlr Vietorietas an bclsg % %  • %  dar n L td >HJ th,.t they can fly new and 1 types of jet lighter* killing planes. rha Kaele. S8.000-ton jel pb eiirier. delayed l>> daeeioptni In aircraft design, wnl lie dvlivered in 1951. The other four are modifications of I8.ooo-ton shipottleres] during the war. It bas also been disclosed that the scientists at the Admit Hj have developed a "homina" lorpe.lo which noses oul a submarine sets its own course, and li to Its target. It i* dropped from aircraft and travels in narntwlng ciicW New Typen M \ircra(l The S-Kiet. ,. ...HINII An. raft Constructors have aiinouiicori that the Navy Is planmug to bring KNU types of turbine-engitied aircraft ii to squadron service. These planes include attack flghUsn>. all weather and night flithtera, heavily armed .irike aucraft, and gnti-aubmarmc search and strike machine The last oflteial naval ekUmauea available showed that the N* vlll be reduced In Miength fron 140,000 to U'7.IMK) during Ihe years 1950—-ol. The main reason is tho smaller intake o! National servica However, In July, nearly 1.00Q officers and men were ^riecled Iw -i, emergency call up of S-'levted N.ival and Boyal Mm reserves ai d the rctantion of others scheduled for release This war .< direj I mull of the worsrning of tho I iUUry situation iu Korea. itate. The aeaail force avadablo J hlgtily Iramed bui urgently requires more men lo maintain the 1 lotimarhinn as III BAF. Strength When the European war ended iied that the K.A.F. hould be maintained at a strength aoo.uuu officers and men. Air Minister Arthur Henderson .-. the uniformed strength on April. 1950, waa 302.400. Ttns number m expectBd to fall uy April 1. IMI. to 1S8.0UO ntede up of ilB.ooo regulars. 71.000 National Service men mi 9,0in> *omen lei number of airmen lor the regular An ft 0* quarterly fell fiom t.u.'b in Ihe ilrs* nuarter of (Hg 507 In the last quarter .1 that >ear Recruiting ho,, impiovvd in this service foflowlng the OovernINM pay. I,it tinRoyal Auxiliary Air Force and R A F Volm.teer Reserve are < n-on -I N.I KaiiiHtorms Sweep Central llaly ROMX, Jan. 4 MB when vioP! tciitral and ,iin In Ihe Far East theatre including Korea and Malaya British f.'tccs amount to two divisions, Under the i.going to be a strategic reserve based In Britain of one armoured divialon, one infantry division with parachute brigade and one infantry brigade It is believed Ihls total force will amount tt 100.000 men. Defence Minister Emanucl .Shlnwall has said in the event '"of some emergency" Ihe Govcii.ii .-ui might "reuuire to proA. a further protest erf. ltfi. „,„ „ %  „ ,,,,,,0^ forces.' That depended, he said, largely on whether tho Government could provide adequate equipment for them. TluGovernment has also promised to provide in an %  Batricy 12 Terrilorkal divisions 11 Ii could I-in 'd within llattUrr "1 inonUis. Naval Strength Kstlmated strength of the Royal ival Reserve and Royal Naval .lUinirer Reserve o. 41,300 me iHene^atetnl The last published table shov 1 11 g the ships strength >* the Royal Navy Is tabulated below: all factories closed DualneS) Abolition Of Dutch Indonesian Union Urged DJAKARTA, J.m. 4. I % %  ii natlonallat (Op part) submitled to the 11 Intieaioii PaVtlaeMni to-.i.i> a 'notion U'K-XK the abolition .if tne Netherlands liuiimci,ni .mioii .nid the revision within three months of the Hague round table 1 .inference agreement. • nht-r main party groups were expected to submit iiinibjir resolutions during to-day'debate on the failure of the Dutch Indonesian .talks on West Now Guinea -BeuUr Spain Not Included In Mutual Defence Plan WASHINGTON, Jan. 4. I'result 1,1 Truman told ins pu %  conference Ui-day that the appoiitnneni of an aowassadoi iSpain did not contemplate the illusion of Spain in the Mulu... Defence programme. It had not lieen under iimahlamlaisn. at least b> hun, he aald. liar. U.S. High Commissioner In Pacific Appointed WASHINGTON. Jan. 4 President Truman has appointed fnrmer Senator Albert Thomas of Utah. High Commissioner of the United Sullen trust territory ol the Pacific Islands. He was a missionary and lived II.1 re for several years. He is 61 The islands In the Pacific—f01 which he will be the United States High Commissioner -are thu former Japanese mandated islaskfjg which Unltad Stales force. during the last war —Keuter. Military commentators state tha| i< maintain the figureof 184.000 nen in the regular or "volunteer" army, as it u called 30.000 enlistments are required each year. In 1948 the Army obtained only 24.400 recruits, in 1040 only 18.400. But according to the latest official returns numbers of reluits have increased as a result of the Increase of pay granted all services. Defence Minister Shinwell has also promised that If an emer%  I-., arisen a Home Guard will j enrolled. This will be reS Hired primarily for home deIttce and dealing with parahutisls or fifth column operators It is reported that plans ara In hand for arming 2.000.000 men under this scheme and this group ould be formed into an efnclen* defence force within a few weeks of war. Build Up Of Navy During ihe next three years it U also planned to increase construction for the Navy Attica has announced "a substantial programme of construction, moduriiiation and conversion." The Admiralty has said that 88 warships of Britain's mothball Reserve Fleet are to be refitted 111 private shipyards throughout Britain. Mlnesweeping share* top-pri Uy with anU-submanne ships The minesweepers will protect Britain's key river estuaries against new types of mines known to have been developed since the war Their equipment Is secret, but they reportedly will be capable of l;.ndling paraohuled magnetlc"ualia mines and the new Rus•n floating mines of tho type leased in Korean waters. I A vfUagl flooded live feet t leal ratfl id ran 1 %  outhern [tab to-oaj Rivers owrflowad their banks and l.itm-l 1 :1 tulli. id coiiiiiuinicatkons Snow covered large areas of noitlitui Hal) and e/gg re pur tad 10 feet deep in aODM areas near the Austrian border. An -iiny ..i apsea l was clear. t ti„. .'i. %  %  Milan whirv alght inches of snow had fallen in '.he I-.I-' %  CLAMFICATIOH aVAaUlNGTON, Jan. 4. Th.United states, Franee and Britain will -.'nil Hussia a new oete m pm day* asking clarili.atii.ii -.1 II.-J.I for a Bin Four meeting. generally tellable sources said r>t-r FIRE CUSlb e>10m. FVANSVll.i.F. Indiana, Jan. 4. pin iwepi by %  > Btlfl wind roarcighl i>ulldiiig-> in the 1 usinesi district early to-day. cuusing damage estimated at more than HU.OUO.ulMl lleulei DO YOU KNOW? 1 m, ^ 1 r 11 .H.M).. l>. P1.-.1 C air i.i. 1 11 n.-i %  ....-. a>4.url 'mn.Ciulwri l>ilrwyrrPriaalaa Mult 1 tula MtiHiweepao Pit Mln*>wM|H-r Like Its sialei Air Force is a seei a • baejatsj • t J 1 i 1 1 j i! i it in • a a j 1 : 'vices the Hi" '1 n a very weak y %  IS a se Ml ANDREWS LIVER SALT TNI WHOLE TOWNS TALKING ABOUT ^QIEMICO^ ^BB> HOUSEHOLD CLEANSER "PENNY TEST" Tiff II Tews. — HCK'I a tiuuik wsy to prove how csulv ami enVhaHp/ < HIMIiiItlcsmmeial n,. % % % %  < HI MI(()on•d^lllt.. u in fall meaaau-e Use sattsfartleo that makes life sod work worth while The Barbados Foundry Ltd. WHITE PARK ROAl> :—: ST. MICHAEL. SlIffBlffffllfltRBffftfiMBHBslBiarJIfrft! Preston* TYRES and TUBES II III Mill l\ ALL stxes USE THE TYRES t H.VtlPIO.VS USE Charles Mc Eneamey & Co., Ltd. THE ADVOCATE HAS THE BEST BOOKS IN TOWN!! HERE'S ONE OF THE NEW NOVELS "AN IRISHMAN S DIAHY By PATRICK CAMPBELL ADVOCATE STATIONERY. i



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PACE FOPS BARBAIMV; ADVOCATE FR1DAV, JAMJAR? 5, 1K1 BARBADOS Irvw 1 AOVOOTE THE LAST OF I III' \ is Mill s I Friday. January 5. I9S1 APATHY THE Cad that the IU'ixrl oi Sir John Maude on local government in this island was not made an issue &t the 1951 Vestry Elections is further evidence of the seeming apathy which follows recommendations for changes in this island. Time and again specialists are imported into this island to investigate conditions of and report on and make recommendations on certain phases of life, then follows a long silence until some compelling circumstance leads to cursory and inadequate consideration of the matter. It has been contended for many years now that the Vestry system has outlived its usefulness in Barbados and in 1946 the Acting Governor in his address to the Legislature pointed out lhal the supporters of that system would have to be content with its modernisation or to witness its abolition. This view was accepted and as a result Sir John Maude was invited to come to Barbados to examine local government and to make recommendations thereon. He arrived in Barbados in November 1948 and his report was submitted to the local Government in March 1949 The year 1950 passed without any attempt being made to discuss it and only the barest mention was made of it at the 1951 Vestry Elections. In a manifesto issued during the week the candidates sponsored by the Barbados Electors' Association say that they understand "that the Central Government intends implementing the Maude Report either wholly or in part shortly." With this knowledge at their disposal it was the duty of those candidates to have brought the question of the Maude Report before the ratepayers. It is true that the legislature will have to say whether the report should be implemented or not, but it is hardly likely that that decision will be taken without consideration being given to the views of those who now work under that system. The only method for obtaining the views of the ratepayers on this important change is to discuss it with them. And the views of the ratepayers who must eventually foot the bill and whose interests and well being are to be affected by the change would seem to be the most important of all. It is not now necessary to examine the details of the recommendations made by Sir John. He points out the relative value of the present vestry system and that of District Councils which would be substituted for the country vestries and a Corporation which would displace that in the Metropolitan parish. Whether the ratepayers will have their affairs conducted by the Vestry, limited in its functions and governed by an act of the legislature or by a Mayoralty with wider powers is their right to say. Whether the complexity of problems which now arise in parochial affairs do not demand a more modern system of administration is a matter to be decided by those responsible for the government of the island. Whichever decision is taken it is clear that the same personnel will be at work in the conduct of affairs. It is regrettable that the matter was not raised as an election issue and candidates offering themselves for election should, during their campaigning this week attempt to explain the difference to the people whose support they seek and also be In a position, when they take their seats as vestrymen to express the views of the people. The criticism that inadequate consideration has loo often been given to important questions is sound and in a matter which is as fundamental as the change of our system of local government, every effort should be made to correct what is obviouslv a mistake. PR0FE550R ST: MICHAeuSK I veSTlKYOVITCH fNTglW! Hi* ALD£KSCOP£ FOR A FOftTHttt DESCENT 'Five Years of Socialism' x-i %  Mas am ft A Ww.lon AM v,l ,1... u %  wnl> pi— 1 iKtiuilur tl.. Ii In r.rly .11 • IIH-lu 1 %  rmlMm Ttili ic Hi 1 In a ..( *rllrl. <• ( Ill* OlT • •rrlnirnl 1 Conner ho" By FRED DOERFLINGER LONDON The state is the "bl* bow" in Socialist Britain today and is growing bigger alt the time. In live yearn Prime Minister Alike s administration has turned the home of capitalist free enterprise into the loading socialist state of the non-communist world. Early this year the government kntaocfi to tuke over the threebillion-dollar steel Industry. Then half ot Britain's capful Investmc.it and practically nil baste industries will be in stale hands. The Conservatives call this step •foolhardy" and n "Wanton Act Of Sabotage" at a time of dangerous world tension and the threat of • possible Russian attaek on Western Europe Under the labourite plan 92 iron and steel companies employing MC.2C9 <>f the industry's 460.000 won t tTg win no IK.ULT stale ownership Smallrr firms which help produce more than 18 million tons of steel yearly will operate under government license. Already the coal, gas, electricity, railroad, other inland transport, civil aviation, the Bank of England and big cable and wire! %  -.mtiiistri< li.tvo t>een nationnlized. The slate now employs nearly one In live of the 23-milllon wmkiiiu population. With steel nationalized and when and if cemont. sugar-refining and meat wholesaling are taken over -another 800.000 will l>e on the state payroll. The Socialist pledge to assume production, distribution and exchange means" has been fulfilled By acquiring key industries and -t her devices the state Indirectly controls remaining Industries Are the people belter off under Some small industrial pronts have occurred, such as Ihe electric industry's III million in its first year Hut the nationalized industries as a whole have gone more than $200 million into the red. The government considers nationalizeUon still In an experimental stage." By no means was financial stability expected immediately. Some Industries like the railways and coal mines were in bad shape when the labourites took over. Others like electricity were prospering. By Socialist standards the object Is not big pronts but producing goods and service! more cheaply and efficiently. Since naUooalLxaUoa. the prkr of '".I gas and rleetrkllv and ii in .(Hiri (are* and cable rates have risen sharply while In moat instances the Industrie* *1UI showed heavy losses. The average charge for electricity during the tlrst year of nationuli/atmii was 4 7 per cent higher than the previous year; the average annual increase the previous decade had been under 0 8 per cent. The coal price has Increased each year. To-day it is about 20 per cent more than before nationalisation. Coal-price lumps mainly have been responsible fur hikes in gas. elcetricit. railway passenger fares, and freight charges. These fact* give ammunlUon lo the Conservative critics. Nationalization also has altered worker management relations without, In general, bettering them. There arc strikes against nationalized industries like the recent unofficial gas strikes, the unofficial stoppages by railwayi, dockers, and others Orm danger still exists, judging by outstanding wage claims of millions. Ihat any increased efficiency which is obtained will have to go more into paying higher wages than into yielding lower fuel and transport Economic and administrative problems equally are unsolved, stemming malnll to get top-flight Industrial men to serve under nation a lizaUon. A consumer can complain about nationalized products and services, but cannot eomman i. Under free enterprise he can refuse to buy a product or can gel it from .> but if a state product is had he can do little < tle.tlvciy about It. Despite rank and file socialist demands It has become evident Parliament practically has no voice In running state enterprise) Parliament leglsl ite.l the prlvatet.. -public transfer of industries— at the San l vmg ItaeU out of nnv real control of them Annually Parliament mny debate tlM yearly rep. at .,r .i >'..* %  Industrial operation, but it can do little else The state industry a deliberately created monopoly — make* its own law. and it is not. like any private monopoly, answerable lo the existing monopolies com> 111. :. > i n The Socialist programme bai gone so far that even the conservatives do nol propose n sharp turn-back. Most nationalized industries will remain thai way as fsil ..head as one enn see. But the labourite plan to nationalize basic iron and steel industries has divided the nation like no other socialization prajatf It Is the btggeat political Issue to-day. And if and l conservatives return to power they have pledged to keep iron :tiu: '.. %  el 111 pllVStfl hands —I.N.S (TOMORROW: The effect 0. rearmament on British Socialism.) FUCHS WANTS TO STAY BRITISH By JOSKPH THOMAS LONDON. Ui KJttU r'liths. the UUJIII scientist now erving 14 years in prison for giving A-bomb Ku-Ma. i" fighting to retain his ritsMMhlp. He has written a letter to the "Deprivation of Citizenship Committee" pleading with rot to revoke his British nationality. J Fuchs was born in Germany in 1911 and j idmitted he joined the Communist Party i I it ler came to power. He came to England before World War II and after a careful ] check was given British citizenship becausej rrf the important work he was doing. The history of the Fuchs case was given >• the committee by Attorney-General Sir Hartley Shawcross. The Committee will 8 Home Secretary Chuler Ede on whether Fuchs' citizenship, should be revoked Sir Hartley revealed that Fuchs had madei -presentations to the Home Office why he should nol be deprived of British nationality. le had previously been nolilied lhal the Home Secretary was considering revoking "irs British citizenship. Fuchs wrote that if the Home Secretary's i was intended as punishment for his HI there would be little that he could l xcept that he had already received tl maximum sentence permitted by law. Fuchs said he assumed, however, that tl. I'.iestion under consideration was his present ind future loyalty. II. declared his disloyal actions ceased ,irly in 1949, oefore any suspicion had been voiced against him. The Attorney-General said lhat Fuchs set out the fact that he had made a full statement and that it was on that statement that [he was prosecuted. "I was not forced to confess by any eviMtCfj, since I had not been confronted with evidence against me," said Fuchs' letter, %  :; "I think the facts mentioned would (have been ol great value in a plea in miti.aiion." Fuchs added that in making his confession ,iiid in his subsequent actions he was guided by his convictions and loyalties, and thai he showed clearly what his loyalties were. "The whole tory," said Sir Hartley, "is /eally an object lesson in the meaning of modern Communism. The fact that Fuchs made a free and full confession is a curious %  iistic of these queer psychological tf*M which some of the adherents of Ihe Communist party seem lo go through." Sir Hartley told the Committee that Fuchs [had a kind of mental schizophrenia—the [eminent part of his mind accepted Comuunist doctrine unquestionably, but the ither part realized that it was wrong. "Alter his confession", the AttorneyGeneral concluded, "Fuchs appeared to have done his belt to help the authorities, but he v nil ible to repair the tremendous damage he had done." The Hume Secretary decided nol to press any argument on the Committee. pointinR out that it was a matter for the committee *o decide in their great experience.—-INS. D. V. SCOTT 5. CO., LTD. TO-DAYS SPECIALS M THE COLONNADE Wkm WOmWmM OATS Tins iimw KACHKfl Bottles McEWANS BErJt l.nully NOW 9 .24 XL .:i7 H .26 .20 KITCHEN WARE ALUMINIUM FRY PANS i SAI'C'KPANS COCKTAIL SIIAKKKS TREUKM II.ASKS PUDDING & DSIFFTNG PANS BKKAD BOARDS mil KNIVES SAM-CANS GARBAGE CANS ENAMEL PLATES and CUPS Etc.. Etc.. Etc. WILKINSON & HAYNES Co.. Ltd. Successors To C. S. PITCHER & CO Blood Groups And Origin* Dr. J. A Frascr Roberts, who has carried oul many ro.-archi-s in medical genetics, spoke re conlly in the BBC S "Science Survey" programme about blood groups and their significance H reminded listeners who were blood donors of the letters. O. A or B on their cards; these stand for chemical substances that occur naturally on the surface of the led blood cells and snow the group to which tho donor bafaQSja. Cards marked All show that their owners possess l>oth A and B; people of group O have neither A nor It It is immaterial to which group a person belongs except In the case r blood transfunion-, when the patient musl receive blood of the same group What interested Dr. Roberts was the nu.nber of people possessing each type of blood. In Great Britain 47% of people belong to group O ami M : tn A. %  :' an in I) mid 3% In AB. These ttgurcs are true for the whole country with bn portant local variation! Blood grOlipi arc detenu,ned by heredity uric I differing proportion., of blood tioups in dtfrar ent places give information on the history of mankind. Manv Bngllan people now live on the North Welsh coast, and so two populations, largely separated by tradition, are ilda by side. Their difference it faithfully mirrored In their blood groups. Further back In history Vikings came t" live in South Pembroke-runami in that area of Wales the A figure was higher thnn anywhere else in Britain, aboul the same as it is'In Southern Norway which has the highest proportion of A'* in Europe. Dr. Roberts then looked at the world picture, taking group It first. China, parts of India, Java and Central Africa had up to 40% of B. Radiating from these areas the proportion of It fell steadily to the British Ilgure of 8%. aboul the lowest in Europe It seemed likely that B originated In Asia and Africa and spread outwards with the peoples who carried it. Before the coming of Columbus America had no B at all: nor had Australia before the Europeans arrived But while this radiation possibly accounted for the bulk of B found In human lielnia's Ihe story was not quite so simple In the Celtic fringe of the British Isles 11 rose instead of continuing to fall. In certain %  mate parts of Wales, the kind of terrain to which people might be driven by Invaders, there was evidence of the survival of a f ialacollthic physical type and ere were "Islands" of very high B. from 18% to %, giving indications of people so ancient that they had been almost but not quite submerged. The peoples of the old Stone Age were probably high in B long before the more modern spread of high B from Asia and Africa. The world wide distribution of A is more complicated but the patterns mr formative there tno. There were also other groups, such as the well known Rhesus or Bh system, dls""'ird some ten years ago. Host people had this substance on their rod eallf and artw psMltlva bed some were negative. In North Western Europ>only eighty-five per cent of people were Rh positive, bul all Pacific Islanders were and nil but ootJ per cent of Chinese, Japanese and Anieiicm Indians. The most remarkable %  lory came a year or so after the substance was discovered, whei; Pi. NokBM Hall IM pointed oul thai amongst the ancestors of modern Europe.ins there should bo ">me pOOPIM in whom the Rh hereditary factor was commoner than the positive For years no Mich n until it was discovered ihat ^hc Basques of K i %  1} Rh negative. Eight blood groups are now known, with m The newesi. mined Duffy after the donor through whom II wat found, slv nly wide van.itions. -(.' %  blood groups and their distribution Is growing very rapidly indeed." concluded Pi "and it is safe i thrown on the history i>f mankind, both n-.ml in*) mon remote." Veatry Crania To ihe Editor. The Advocate,— SIR,—The writer "*50 Tax BUI" raises some Interesting points, one of which concerns grants to repair and maintain churches in St. Michael. The total vote is In the region of $14,000, out of which some $10,000 is applied directly lo the Cathedral. The Cathedral is wholly maintained from the rales, but the district churches are not. The latter receiving small grants for repairs only, and fven these are very unevenly distributed. This means lhat the inhabitants of a district have to contribute towards maintaining thair district church, and in addition must pay all the cxtK_-n.sc-, of the Cathedral; a classic Instance of the poor helping out the rich. It Is only in St. Michael's parish where this wholly inequitable arrangement is persisted in. for in the country parishes, the church rate Is at least more reasonably divided amongst the churches concerned. I am not defending the principle of church rate. though since the churches are public buildings something may be said for it no doubt, but whilst it remains, there should be even distribution according to the rateable value of each district. No doubt. In Christian charity, the Cathedral authorities themselves will hasten forward to initiate a much needed reform?.. EQUITY. Poppy Collection To the Editor, The Advocate.— SIR,—I would like to thank the following for help with the foppv Colleclion Mr J C Hammond for hl broadcast on the eve of Poppy Day. I*dy Colly more and her helpers who counted the town coUactlon on Poppy Day All Organizers and Sellers The Directors and Management of Ihe Marine and Crane Hotels for the loan of their premises for asssKtl Mr Skinner for runrtng the Roulette at the Marine The Organivers of the "Special Efforts." Messrs Fltspatrick Graham & Co. for auditing the accounts free of charge. The Manager and Staff of the Canadian Bank of Commcr.v for their help and courtesy throughout the year. The Advoeaie for their gift of /ree space to the CaaM DOROTHY C HtfTSON. Joint HonSiBVIos Branch Poppy •'Lelghley**. Belleville, 1st January. 1951 Cut Spending Says FBI I-ONDON The powerful Federation o' British Industries has called on Ihe Labour Goveriimenl lo "subtuitlallv ml spending" in a .'..foment omphBsi/ing that the %  0i gSQ raw ni;it<1 i.i l> threatening" Britain's economic recovery. The statement, "The Economic Background in D-v.-mber. 1950." also warned that the load of taxation which Britain already cart M is one which no country could for upporl Britain'! success in reducing the dollar pap and In increasing pmduction axe 'substantial achievement*." bul the "tptctnent pointed out that It "would be unwise tallow them to blind our eyes to %  ami very real difficulties that b.ive appeared in recent months. -We anraced with a totxetty ml'ng in some cases to an i .i.iam to ten ih. -f both urn and orrtdii *iti addition, the fuel and power ituatioQ Is most grave-—van If Industrial preducUon war* to remain no higher U HI "The whole basis of industrial effort i% thus be in it undermined; until ade q uate supplies of fuel and power and raw materi ..! %  be assured there ran bsj no securitv in our Industrial outlook" The st.it. rum that despit this, physically an.< financially room must be made lor whatcin was necessary for del It insisted that taxation was already too nigh and industry was faced with an actual or prospective %  tsMtaaaj ol "We cannot escape the COSKM' akn thai ml rtantl): cuts must be made in national and local p I •; dturo (apart i which from Ih with the conssjQuent hig'i taxation, the Itronge I %  %  Item i n ;.ition In pat Id %  —INS Year And A Half OTTAWA. CANADA in 1950 embarked on the greatest peacetime military programme in her history, an effort sparked by Ihe crisis in Korea. It all happened in a short six months. In June. North Korean Communists invaded Squth Korea and the United Nations intervened. By December, acting in conjunction with her U.N. partners, Canada had sent three destroyers, a squadron of transport planes and a battalion of troops to the far Pacific At home ahe raised a special army brigade of 10,000 men to meet international obligations in Korea or elsewhere and set a precedent by labelling it as an international %  to -enforcement force. Canadians were told in effect that the peacetime economy of the last five years was over. Higher taxes were forecast to meet the staggering $1,000,000,000 defence budget necessary to pay for these military moves and for boosted production of jet fighters. n.iviil ships and other weapons of war. In mid-December the government announced that Canada's 63,000 servicemen would get pay increases retroactive to Dec. 1, ranging from $14 a month upward and averaging $19 for other ranks and $33 for officers. Cabinet Ministers told the people they would bo expected to make sacrifices for some time to come. They were necessary if world Communism was to be stemmed In Korea and wherever else it might try to advance. They were necessary if a third world •Vfd was to be averted. Cabinet sessions in Ottawa were frequent and long as the Korean war ran hot, then cold, then hot again as Chinese Communists entered the fray near the close of the year. Within a few weeks of the Korean outinrak the government announced the dispatching of the destroyers Cayuga, Athabaakan and Sioux from the west coast to join U.N. naval forces in Korean waters. A short time later—in July—Canada sent j No. 426 Transport Squadron of .he R*?.A.F. from Montreal to join the Korean airlift 1 Hying supplies from McChord Field at Tacoma. Wash., to Tokyo. External Affairs Minister Pearson, between hops to critical U.N sessions in New York. said that in setting up the special brigade as %  n international peace-enforcement force. Canada had "started something important." "... the year and a half ahead is Ihe %  V he told the Commons "If through that period, we mav then hv tie our problems even with those people behind the Iron Curtain." —CJP. BUY ... PARROT SAFETY MATCHES &f SWMCBW&rS BEST MATCH &f Ask for PARROT MATCHES from your Grocer. &f DA COSTA & CO.' LTD Agents LINGERIE DEPT. HKKK'S YOIIH OPPORTUNITY TO BUY ALL THE LOVELY LINGERIE YOU'Vt; WANTED In this Department you will find a full range of LADIES INTIMATE-WEAR, by all the Leading Makers FISH Turtlr Halmnn Haddock Cod Fillet* Sole Anchovies Kippers MEATS Hinu In tins Barm.—Sliced Tarkejs ChlrkCIl* Ducks Ox Tonsurs Liver Tripe Brain* SM-eet Breads RsbhIU AITt I | Cucumbers String Bean Cauliflower Carrots Peas Brusael Sprouts SIM II M.S (....!.. Paste—8c. per Ua Dried Prunes— 50c. prr lb. Sllnr, in tins—36c -nit inj Puddinxs—4He. Steak & Kldne? Puddlno —44c. i HI I -I Umpire ColTee J & R BRFAI. & CAKFS I SOWN MVIIT DRINKS Fruit Cakes rtitiiihi \fler Dinner Mints M i r*h me I Inws GODDARDS DELIVER



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ESTABLISHED 1895 Aoporatc FRIDAY. JANUARY \ 1961 U.N. TROOPS EVACUATE INCHO Khan Boycotts Empire Talks LONDON, Jan. 4 THE CONFERENCE of Commonwealth Prime Ministers openeii fan today at 10 Downing Street, official residence of British Prime Minister Clement Attlee. For the first time in history, the Common wealth chain was broken—Pakistan, one of the new Dominions, was not ( resent. Liaquat Alt Khan, her Prime Minister, has declined to attend unless the Kashmir dispute between his country and India is put on the agenda. HIKKII OF (IM IISI-Appointed Dutch Minister To Spain THE HAGUE. Jan 4. Holland''Minister in Egypt, Count Van Heehteren Umpurg, hits been appointed Minuter in Spain, tt win reliably learned to*du This is the first appointment of a Dutch Min'sler to Spain since the United Nations last Novcmbar r.-.imted their (aa cJa tol Id break oil diplomatic relation? with Spain. It is not VjM known who will replace the Count in Cairo. -Reuter New Chinese Atlas HONG KONG. Jan 4. Copies of %  new Chinese Communist Atlas reaching Hong Kung from Shanghai contained .1 map covering Malaya and parts of Siain and Indo-China as captured "southeast China peninsula." Several Chinese in Hong Kong have received seasonal greeting cards from China, wishing them a "happy New Year and happy liberation." —Reuter ARGENTINA TO BARTER MEAT fOk $mi BUENOS AIRES, Jan. 4 Argentina will this year barter $8,000,000 worth of meat for steel piping from West Germany, according to a local announcement. The State Trade Institutu put through the deal on behalf of State oilfielda. —Heater 80 WORKERS KILLED IN EXPLOSION LIMA. Jan. 4 An explosion of dynamite Wiau*.Wat] "t'JHITU'd to haw killed B0 workers and injured almost an equal number in north Peru. The accident occurred in the valley of the Santa River where an avalanche of rock last October had blocked communication I, —Renter .( ibi Brttfa wealth — Including Uw Unlit 1 Klocdon and 1 1 1 utonom i m repre%  ntad n UM coriference l %  T at the talks | Aitu* (United Kingdom). President: Ml 1CN (AllS tralial; Mr. S. G. Holland (New Zealand); Mr IAHIIS Si LasW D (Canada); Mr. Nehru (India), Mr. Senanayake (Ceylon); Sir Godfrey Muggins (Southern Hhodealu); and Dr. T. E DoBfl (South Africa) All are Prime evcept Di DonfM who Is deputising for Mr Mnlan. South At" u l'i limply Seat The 1 hair reserved for Pakistan LII UM I 1 cam-washed cabinet room of 10 Downing Street raflsBlMd vacant as the Prune Minister* took their places around the great green-topped table. The conference, due to last 10 days—has been called to discus* the world crisis—and today the statesmen began almost immediately to study the growing ihre,it li, pea e Mr. Attlee opened the conference, the third of it* kind since the war, with an address of welcome Foreign Secretary Bavin, Defence Minister Shinwell and British S-rvlce chiefs were due to attend some of the sessions The I-rime Ministers later decided to send a telegram to Pakistan Prime Minister Liaquat All Khan urging him to attend. Quarters close to Ihc Government here thought it doubtful whether Liaquat would eventually ngrec to come Fir.it business before tin to settle the agenda and to hear a wide review of the world situation from Mr. Attlee. The statesmen had these rough heads >n which to plan their prosTamtna: ,,., lueti 1 in Korea Ittj implication: for the C %  iltli ,md policies Red Army Drive Further South WHAT ELSE W gams between B C L and U.S. Selling 6 Cruisers WASHINGTON Jan. A. The United States today offered to sell two light cruisers to each of three South American nation* -Argentina, llmzil and Chile — for hemisphere defence The State Depart met.the offer were accepted, arrangements would be made foj Hit a ting the ships and for training crews of the three countries The six illlliaii would be sold under the Mutual Defence Act of IMS which allows surplus war material to be sold for 10 per cent of the gross cost plus the cost of rehabilitation Official* said the Unltad States had offered the Phoenix and the Beta* to Argent,na. the RrookHn nnd the Nahl U Chile, and the St. Louis Ud She Philadelphia tel Brazil The State Department saidl lhe> were In sOtcaM of mobilisation reserve requlrernen'-. Representatives of Argentina.) Brazil and Chile, snld their Government* had agreed to the I'nlted Slates offer Tho tern.:watt 004 disclosed .! lor the disposal of the vessels] which cost a total of RWrB tha crowd like U11bo watching OD a cool Thursday afternoon, but the rir-t In.I A teams at Kenington yesterday. Nevis Carries On Under Tents FOR ALMOST A WEEK I to popl of St Kttt>. Nevifl and to a lesser degree Antigua.,have been subjected to 0M of the worst earthquakes In have struck these islands for many yenrs. Hevl perhaps has iieen hit tho lest Mr. K K SainUi.uu. .. rfjftrchanl from India who hasj leei. holidaying in Antigua and. SI. Kltts told the Advocate yes1 iitemoon shortly after ho [arrived .it Baa w el l from Antigua. jhat mana people (ran \cvis have e 1 theli homes and gone St. Km*. Mr BamttBtni i*ft St Kitt* four day„,... man Antigua Severest shocks, he said IKE GOING TO PARIS PARIS Dwtgjhi 1 la ui .. me Comma %  %  '..t! I S II U I 11 .me H aadqua r b 1 uropo • *;* 111 ht-i The Am -'i h an I) .1 \ e i I.illii I .1 !.-> 1 I rartlj S %  %  11 hotel, guai 1 mai > %  .HI military polTet men a %  1 lii f the ulle 1 in offiivi 1 Pram h civilian pra*onn< I ror MBplaymanl \ the neaoquai ters. Of A ui hi .i>"inp4nie, by his Chief of Stall Orunther on bbt u m -1 W Kurop) altar thnta urlval 11 Bui .,. it -...is leaiinil tieiSo far DO new Prench clvlllai i.Mve IH-.II tngBtted foi I npOfsVy headiiu.ii*' 1 Hotel A 1 Reutrr 75 ESCAPE FROM BURNING HOTEL VANCOUVER, Jan A Seventy-five guests fled blindly when the four-itorey Parks Hotel was destroyed here to-day b> %  fire. None of the guests was Injured but 10 of the Ilremen who advanced in the United Na-M00,000.000 shortly before the tions. n! world war —Reutrr. Cominot 1 wealth policy to-| wards Communist China. The Communist world threat Rearmament of Oenaanj Ud the possibility of new high level talks with Russia, llrltain's commitments as n* member of the North AtlamV Treaty organisation nnd their implications in terms of manpower, money and rearmament. A Japanese Peace Treaty ami the American suggestion that Jgpan might be rearmed. Rruter IM THE • SPOT A r. \ mi 1 at Brounr.s Beach ditrd Into the sea "NirnUy morninii tor hb> i nl* dip. The sun w.s lust • Minn up and up he came aa well 1 I>M. "Shark ShAtk '.' This WM very •te.ir in 4iiri lew pcoptr waded in to inveallgale. There was the trrnhlr lookliit lie.nl of 4 large shark 1 all right, but there WAS no I *hiHl> to it It was Just one of the shark* butrhrred b> I the frthermrn .1 Browne's Beach the previous afternoon I and the head and oiher ,n n ini.-d pjrU thrown Into the surf The iMffcar took j, htlh > line to recover his eqallib-ilum. hut he wa %o shaken Unit he did pi.it eanUnee his dip St Kill• Hot e.irly in the morn insor Lite .it nigh 1 when people ware Some people have been sleeping m their cars and othei. .ip and down the beaches ai.iklit People In Nevis were lerj i'.iucky and more were M>! Atlantic nations to build up thci arrive dully in St. KitU1 dfences, : 1 Bed Croat in trlnldad ar %  He spoke at a Press Conference sending supplies of tents to th prlOl t" his departure on Saturday pn a lour of the capitals of west ern Euro[>e,iii members of th FORTY-FIVE ESCAPE CHICAGO, Jan A. An airliner carrying 45 passengers crashed and burned it brought the blaze under eonurol Midway airport hare irij to in three hours were overcom* day but all uboard escai td vrtsBby smoke. out injurj' pol.ee repor.ed. —Renter Renter Romans Protest Rent Increases HOME. Jan. 4 Many Roman bus and tram -topped their vehicles wherever they happened to be at precisely 10 a.m. local time today ar.d politely informed their passengers of a Communist called 10 minutes strike in prote I lent increases authorised t>y the < km rnment. After u quiet smoke, the crews drove off again al exactly 10.10. Ruses and trams with Cnrift Ksmocrat crews did not stop. SEOUL BURNING By WARKEN WHITE ON A PLANE FROM SEOUL, Jan. 4, Seoul was burning under dense layen if smoke today its Communist troops swarmed Into the northern suburbs. As we flew over the doomed city shells lobbed spasmodically flashing brightly against the smoke. One fire which could be seen 50 miles away threw an orange glow on Use pall of gloom. — %  ———Southward for 80 miles stretch__. „.. _ ...:t.Lii 1 and strafing raids in which it claimed 10 Chinese were killed ind 713 wounded —Reoter SMUGGLERS ON THE RUN ROME. Jan Italian fiontier patrols hisi night .surprised a band of about 20 smuggler* who dropped ei containing over 300.000 black market cigarettes and fled back on to Swiss soil. —Reuter %  part of strike" The transport strike wa M nirnules "general ailed in the Capital by the d munist Trade Union baadQuartan but there wai less evidence of Its %  fleet among other workers the small Via Veneto quarter, most tan Irani on serving as usual and clerks went on typing 1 check on Rome's telephone exchange which was also supposed to be paralysed for 10 minutes. evealed that n cable or trunk :J11 would still go through during he "lav off" period. —Reater 1 K-M-\ Coming I tack Into Service NEW YORK, Jan. 4 The 27.000-ton American air daft carrier Essex will be recommiasioncd on January la. Another large carrier the Bon llommr Richard would ie)oln the Pacific Fleet al tho same time, the Navy announced 'oday. Tl c Essex has been undergoing modernisation for two years. The I'.ight deck Can now handle larger ami BMvier planea. A heavy cruiser, the Los Angelea, will bo oned on January 27. Reuter $5,000,000 Wanted ••"< From Catholics Kii.g Fuul Summons Greek War Council LONDON, Jan 5. King Paul i,1 rini-ee li;.culled A meet nn of Uw ('.-<• W.e council foi ladaj (Friday) 1 communiquf ojuolcd i>v Athem radio aniiouiiced. Besides Prime Minister Sophocles Venuelos and the Ministers for War nd |]prelgri Affairs, the United States Ambassador nnd the heads of the British and American lUUtar? MISM : in Greece have been invited tu —ReaUr SLIGHT EARTHQUAKE light, made up by the headlights, of the great evacuation convoy Here and there the line swelled and split presumably where troon* were deploying for new defence lines. • To the northeast a line of light* was moving towards Seoul to the west light* moved westward towards the port of Inchon and south to Suwon 25 mile* The Communists were reported pressing hard on this road trying 10 drive I wedge between Seoul and Inchon JO miles ftwaj As we took off, a passing soldie ;aid: "They have cut the road. Ou ronvoys will have to come back and try to find another way ouf Solemn March Shells were poundinp on the Kimpo airfield as we roared Into the darkness and beaded for Japan The Communists ware then reported three miles away. American jeeps had been crossing the river on the i.e ill yesterday The main road south from Seour ked with a turbulent stream of vehicles and refugees. men, women and children walked solemnly by the roadside. Dead women and children and sometimes a man lay forgotten beside the road Thev had died of NEW YORK. Jnn American Roman Catholici Le asked to rah* $5,000,000 special collection on March 4 for relief of war ravaged countries. ppeal for funds was outlined by Moi.slgnor Edward S I Director of BM War Relief Services National Cat holt' Welfare Conference. Two million children in CalhoILff countries will be asked contribute five and ten cent pieces 1.. n special fund throughout I^nt MURRAY GOES PORT-Or-8e>AIN Jan. I*t Commander A. I S Murray. Managing Director of lh British West Indian Airways, wil soon be transferred from hli present post Commander Murray ha* bee', in the -ervlce of |) W I A sine* the new Company w.iTormed on June 24. 1W8. Iirt ,>General Manager nnd later as Managing Europe Musi Sacrifice Too — Eisenhower WASHINGTON, Jan. 4. General Dwlghi D. Eisenhowe M N I'II Atlantic Supreme Coin uiaiuier in Europe said to-tb. HUM the North Atlantic defen.system would not IHsucceasfn unless wester,, European nation: matched Ainericmi sacrifices am efforts. General Eicnhuwcr mai'o 1 igorous appcl for all the norti standt for sleeping purpose* Sfiuhi Murhi in tallfW North Atlantic Treaty Organlaa Sliocks in Anllgun havt varj ^Usiiit. he laid. On Wadnai ,, day Mr. Samtham mad> %  radio %  call lo i trittl % %  lie smd thai they had I. ski on Monday. Tt* we.tin ida) in thai In Nevis the watc siipplv has .,i cut on b] business is nt a sfnndslill tverj rtond building in the island fun been badly damaged. Tin I n' Court-house ha* coUapasd %  nd the hospital and een damaged Eisenhower ipoko empiiaticalU Conference hrajquantiy poundlnd the table Kise'iimvM 1 ,as asked about American pram rapofftl tint be %  lent the Western D* lence Osfanl—tion could ,M bui'up within two yenrs lit a strength which would deter Russia frnn. starting %  third world war He replied that he had not talked I" gnyOM 0 that subject. He added: "I do not know whether Knssi 1 wantWorld War III. No Panic In Nevis %  lain SflMlSM %  ( Ik* iS Bki St.M 1. iill>il> Kllhasl IOHI.4. ii--. 11.' ..1. Ih* kind >fl" ml Mr ".-.. R'ld. M.i„, lli.fc< .., HUk-li "V* I !•..(. '!• In -I Kill. ta-S>> "Tkfr la M flJSSf l*rrll>lna allaallnn Tifmai. > % %  llnor .p..m.ri*.al|. I.ai .,, ,. Reuter Director \ correspondent from Antlgu slutes that Administrator ll.igh • %  Ne\ .,,, N--.. Year's Day id reported serloux ddmage to the mMpttal, tin Court-house, the Police Station 1 uOdlngi %  ) Cades Bej the He llukldings at Cotton Ground, the Matron*.' nb ommunl China. Ha ssldad thai UM Unite Stateei would not rontemplnl .-..,. .1 -nit >} h. daj 1 ii.iiiiii in. 11 the In %  ind are battlNI I he 1 .i~ geaartaad a* (HI, 1 'it ih. re h 1 Ihre ii .> a tlMindervle.-m later Klljijnd %  gtanadj arils. Batten mil .Va-dilirok 4 nd tin pair lulled • .mint ml, t\sr about 200.00" •vaj reported baloai the Mth towarda the bay mad Wiinju. gateway to the v* would leavt Ui Itad Lited on the eat 11 nd west coasts. The rapture of this strategic lid enable them to command th>limlium to Pusan, main i'i UN -n'l'lie.!-' ARMY CONFERENCE PARIS, Jnn 4 ri.iii.. lives of W< 1 ..1 • •lid the llenelux countl • part in 1 .. may nil mgof the Behuman Puu 1 rorelgn ii Dunned u othet tain Conununlal lltt] (tilUiwiiig up the Blghtn Arrajri ratraal frum bluing Seoul, ihe southern capital. iiifU-ldt. of Kiuipo. wan Irving lo outflank the United Natercaa falling hark through refugees towards In1 coast port. Thousands of refugee* tried t*i 1 1 • rf the big ii, M.iihhips, 30 miles iway, i-oured salvoes Info the frontline dodging, forward from the ^moke-covered inferno of ibai ned Seoul. Uultad Nut Ions warplanes roar. %  %  triOR the retreat nnd httUnf the I ommui %  p-iii ."In guns. %  '< 1 uriiiiig Seoul itself now I 11 dad I I "II Unite" %  aid "P WAS like widening nn anthill on Refuata ware -.tiearning In VI.I northwnrdi British ttHh llngade. las' ti . i'\. fought gj On pas* •> L THt ADVOCATE %  III. M.\\> UNO ma DAV >K NICillT |p"fTTniiiiiMiinuuMinimi nn 111 111 '""I I fmtl-0' I'offtT f-Vf/'fff/f/ i*im Oar on i .r.f .a. n . n i i f u u preferences West Indian proI> warm "and for the most part "In the** ti rtu mil nines w lnv. I-ONDON. Jan. 4. dueermight find it impossible to n ,ll1 "v profitable** relationships vie A guardee tvajnlnj lo the West „ . ..,._ ,^„ i, n ,,j which I rtween ranrecent happenings in those terrl Indies not to prejudice Canadian IT} 1 "** T ? riJS. ,, J 'u, ul Bmt lhe Wc,T lndi durln '" t'keulsr II,,' al goodwill In future trade agreeK">oom or tanadi at worm v.e last 50 years, and spetidl menthough it 1fullv realised ho-. msmU appears in a leading arDntes. In competition wiih in l0n f mgidt l)t lh(V fap( lhat even much the authoritip. i n the eol tide in Ihe current issue of Ihe Cuban -dumo. Kemoval or dithough the dollai • nsis meant onles need do ew West India Committee Circular' mir.utiori of that preference heavy restriction on the volume of to raise the standard of living, 'V published here to-dny would convert that f.-,.r into cerexports fawn Canada to the West the same time it la moat Import an tainty Indies, the Dominion did not deand neeesaary Through'^,' the article empharounee the trade agreement a> she their true worth, nui-h long--riot sis is placed on Canada's previous Yet even though the site of the could have d bfJDefltl M thus* that derive from generosity to the West Indies and "take in sugar alone is so fright' 1 pre' 1 In the Canaon the fact that In anv agreement, ening. w must not overlook the Evan now when steps had been d'-" n %  rfcet "it takes two to make any barfact." saya the Circular, "that the taken to remove some of the dlsyond quaswsn that whatever i: gain". The leader recalls that Caribbean colonle* enjoy many abilities which Canadian exporters done nothing* gt ..-:'•allowed I' after tha Commonwealth sugar other cxtremelv valuable preferhad been suffering. Canada might damage the solid foundations 01 heading p-gotiation* in IJH in the Canadlnn market" well feel aomethrng more might which nU future building mu^t ger was pointed out that even with .>ebcendone. %  • fo I Ink, II.. MM A Supply of B I C O I Brsl Iff Crna Hblainablr ITS RICH IN QUALITY DELIGHTFUL IN FLAVOUR CONVENIENT TO SERVE On sale Day or Night at Soda Fountains. Parlours and Restaurants or direct from Barbados Ice Co., Ltd.—Bay Strttt. %  ^MCIV.WMIWWW. "I — t.



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PAfiF. SIX • BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, JANI'ARY 5. 1*51 MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY t' S^-'l VOJ MEAN ... A WKALB \ >-AS SV.A1—Ov*6D TV. s S-S^ARlNB? HOW GA WE SET OuTTj •--.-,-.-,-.-..,.....,..-,.,-..,.,,.,.,._._._._. STOMACH 1 upsets Wb UM atom** u eVps*t _j a result of hyperaadrtT, a dote of De Witt'Am-i.J Powder will disperse the pun and distress ngbt away. Maluhrnte. heartburn and iudigeatMMi nrc BOON ol tha lymptom* thai IBM excess of acid in UM stomach can brine in iu train. De Witt's Antacid Powder aoon neutralises the and and at tht same time Other uiKtadieiiti in ihe wellbalanced formula soothe and protect the delicate stomach J limns;. Get a supply right away. HERRINGS FRESH oi IK TOMATO SAUCE BRYDEN & SONS mm LTD. AGENTS ANTACID POWDER N.ufj' i. i 1 J Soother Siamacfi • Foe uis • *•) from home > Carry a fr* ( •,.. %  .,,..:.; D,WITT'S S i...<, ..i..i ssraws %  •oa-twiid TABLETS • 'AV/,V,V/,V.V/,V///-VV//AV/-*.V-VV,V.V/-V,V,V.-.' HEALIJIX • Bat*; rerebtaithe J^ ** delMhiful creamUse lethe. of J r „> Csacurs Soar %  comhii assallieat raa mednii properties which Keep hu tender ii(i hcsltbT sad v tree from blerniihet, am\VH _* f aaaateel T icAsadalwi^>; money bark i rf *m|ki> Par's 'today. Ta* ismAmotan r, fyeTr U e IWsSl Meat* THE CORNER STORE and MANNING 6c CO., LTD. ;. Greetings We Heartily Thank All oi Our Customer* and Friends for Their Unfailing Patronage During 1950, and hope to Satisfy Them in the same Unfaltering Manner during the Coming Year We Wish You All a Very HAPPY and PROSPEROUS fVfW YIAR L\CE&Co.,Ltd. B and 0 Roebuck Street Dial 223fl PIERHEAD. VVeV'>Ve*e-,Vl-V e'eVC*90C t*S r <**,'SSS r ',',',','SSS *+C* 'stA^'S, W-V>'AV,V.'-y-'/-V/--/--: 1 FRENCH LINE OFFERS . BARBADOS/JAMAICA CRUISE ON EVERY SOUTHBOUND SAILING OF THE LUXURY LINER S.S. -


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FRIDAY. JANUARY 5, IK1 HUlMUHiADVOtATK PAOE SEVEN CLASSIFIED ADS. TELEPHONE IHI |\ Ml •l-lKI \M %  r hop* < The face ml on* *-e ***B M "" mm-. r*n>n ,r dear n* pi !le LIU.:'1 LY7.TON %  !*. IMI Not deed to u> who lo*ed P-f Hot WMI But *oi* boiafc LM Hva* -Il" ui In memor oi Beat II' 1 Dillon and HPH (•mile FOR SALE AUTOMOTIVE r\F Slneer m %  **. bflwtM SM p.n CAB — 1 Au tin Ten II P. Apply lo Pi me Skee(e. Bdsecuinb* 4 i si—m CAR I it M P C*i VaunhaU In perfect *tw*dna or*Good ly and battery Applv to T B. BtrBelt. P.ne Buad. SI W 4 i si n CAH* I A TO Au. i Mai .1 %  : T-i,'. MJ7 LORRY ll Gor.fr S 1 SIMl, ram i. Our %  irlr *ti plaUo n licet, ted l.i \t. MM der. Idr-I ft •trtna .. 1. .... AMfa A 1 Alt • II. Fi> i r< IT St Philip *isi :nELECffttCAL IM III M SALES AUCTION I CONTINENTAL PICK l-F I 1 fjre H Archer Mr KSagga, limWr TRC DUHHI Haaroer BY M.ud* Philip*. I will Mil at KM hex* Beniaivou*. Worthing on Wedneadav •em ihe loin besinning *t UJO o'clock l..r hnuMhold furnltjre which include*: 1 Mah.a Dinlna T.blc with 4 Chair*. %  Manor couch. 1 l*r|f Carpet. S M-hof Rockon. I Mahoa: Hall Chain, l Hir.-la.t Table. -Mb painted Chalra I M*hof Wardrobe I Vanity. 1 Mahof Cl.e I of Dr*.. I pm.ted doublo fc.a'1ead. -prln and mattrra. hair %  %  W*W > Mirror*. 1 Kitchen CabiMf, l.arder. Collection of picturaa. Kitchen l'ten*ll* and many other Item* 1 Ca*h. ) Arc* A UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER Tucda. fin b* <—dei E Trvhane M will >*,] Intmenta al H.*.t.|l,-. which inrlude* Sood Dinrm T*bk 91 Thoi PoSrii CabllH nt TWOS' I'RinOK .American! ruble fl wnn li.t**ir dcp Free**. Ihrec in"** Abo other pildae. Hardwood All* v. 4 I SI m RADIO On* ISM Dutch Phillip* Radio M *od worklni md*< For [Hal irxwi I SI Ml MECHANICAL I ; "hm, pit*. THE GCNCKAL n at %  ACFNCV CO S I M—n MISCELLANEOUS rv "v rrrmT— Fino'loiit* c !" fcj> Flbr> hi-t *rtT-d Thl* Flhra %  elar. anfl and •nlrr Prica 14 ranla p-r io.ind Tl*l 4!f! O. W. Hulchlnwn A Co Hd li.ifl.sa-t.f.r Ola*and rMfiilar II all n*d*. arallahla now flFa rupT-lv.Plata 01M* for %  bow *'** and ato tr larn pana* lOU* Inch i-i'V nlal 4Wfl O w PluSrhlnann m Co Lid IB U SOt f n I-AT>ir-F~'.-~ld*'ad AnfUlaa In beautiful d*rt-and mini in )n*l opnad **aln tt vo.. Vi If* al TTtANIf P* Wm Hmrv St Dial *** and *w*n tR l4US-tfn LAOIT-S SPORT COAT* — In ataort*d *! %  *> and .had.-prrial for the cool v-~iIhn SW Modern Dr**< Shnpp* (Ilroad Ktr**ti 41.51-4n OPEI. KADCT PAnTS TImloi f*r. <'.r*r*iillal. (ronl a**pmMy tic Applv F. I Arrhn1ISS !1 1 SI—*i< PERMANENT ravdla* fnr vour raenrd plY*r. aid r*-ll of all kind* Prtr* • I oa Record, of all kind* too. A. UARNEfll ft CO. LTD. O 11 .Jt—t.l n SCAI.FJ4 Pl.Korm Scilr. iSOO R r... nir 'iNrriAi. ACFKCV rlmen*Wn* iniide feel wide hi:i fe*1 hWh. AnpV S NlcholU t, Co Tel*p..nr No 38 mlt. capaclt. lanlitMn %  %  l-9n FR HKVr HOUSES A STONE nuiuuNn—1 ft %  Suitable for a Warehounv Sllu*led In r-jh Hall Yard Apply Dr F M. O Allevne Dial Mil. It.M-arl. CANAAN. Hath.ln From January I it I July. Apply Mr. M— -Fully furnlthed Feb Maich. and 1 Allayno Olhbo.11 liv himMaMMl. all moderw Hi Bedroom*. Unen and ^u* walk from Club and 101 S.IA1—* lIIISO>AI The publM are herebr warned afalnat -,vlnacredit to mv wife. EDNA SMALL i n ee Mnrahalli a. I do not hold nv.arlf rerponaibl* for her or anyone el con. factlne any debt or debt* in me r*wia unit'* bV a written order alaned hv me *-IJI.I ARNOLD SMALL. n m %  Villa** SI. Philip 1 M In Th* puhllr air %  MM eredli SKTrTTT. mefnrd iflinil \ M l -\ >ian|* Mill Ir-cMna any debt or debt. In rjw nam. urhM by a written orde r *P*d by RM -,H BltANDMiHO KKEETF.. Talk* Otanfe IU1I. St Jam** s 191-tn 1 1 li ud mvvll lopoiiuhle for anvone con Ir tt.na Bay dbl or debli in my nam. l,iil*? tt I wr.tlen nr.l.i -lined by me Suned VAI. M.I'uMI*. Hav Sl-eet. v. y nwarl sill—tn .. fable -1 Screen to —t la I'lietabt Ch.lr.: 1*rr Mini China Kidney and Ornament Tabti M*M Chan Rinkin. Cornel Cluir*. Couch: Settee. Mud IL.trt.iW. Dinlnp Tible iSaat I* all in Mahocany. CarP*and Cona-tcu—; piano HMfHi I -ei In perfecl (ondlUon. I >ti.lln|i Headed bMinda. .us Day Clock: Ola*.• d China Tea. ('..rrer and Dinner Bats Pit d War* in V—• M-MI DUhe. etc *i o Knl'.—i and Fnik-. and Cake ForkIn Caaaa; Sllv*. I'n.e Cup won bv Moor Bird; Barometer. J.idlneer* Pine l-qi.ot and Wao—.. Th..-. Win* ,md Double Mlrd Pre****. rHnala Mfrdatrad. Duwb->*e Dr**dna Table 9iaviiik vt ...,,. L'unau. 1 Fold Rc-.ei, all In Manofany. ; inl. and Do.ible llun Bed Mad 1 J.KI —'fur*. While Painted Pre*.. OF Re_ f Wrrator waTkUU order • Lantern Kitchen Cabinet. Flj#re 3 Burner Oil Stove and Oven. Milk Can*. Chum, ana Me-tnr*. Doino Cieam Beparalor In p-ifert .-o.idltlon. Rook* and uthei le I'M o'clock. Term. Ml "• I. nnANKFB 1 POTMAN & CO. REAL ESTATE IMMBDIATf 11 .. J OiaemHall Terrac H V Tayloi. 4 li.Blon New Road %  'N* ll^nialow" kltchan. loifcH and bath *t ulan appk Ui F. A Mai Upper Collymore Rock. M. Michael Dear Sir Madam. On Tuatday. January And. Ifldl. WM asaln nominated aa a candidate lithe partih of 81. Michael M knowledB* B* inert a* a Vertrvmai for the paM >* %  — ^nd my achUn* meal* won on brlulf n( the parlahtona* -ill -lain be of avmrr to aaaj in .on oiclhur the .(Tall, ai the pariah In vl*w of the ...nle.te.l alnMal %  huh take, place on Monday. Januai' I'h. al th* Parncnial 4iiv l.-i..i'i<1 Sti*.t lM-'eei' Ihe hoi I m. and p m. I am a**in iota aupport. tniilini ion -ill ThankliiB nu in annrloatlnn Dlieitli: i 1 SI -3n NOTICE n.r< TION so* Ttir VFBTBY or Tint PARI1R OF BT. MK'BAKL N1NTREN i-T'.ir. I..\ii* lieen nnmluitcd fnr Ih* Vewtrv of Ihe earlda*ctown. on Monday next the tlh In.laht beBiiiiliiB between the hour* of %  ana o'clock in the morn In r .md cUMln** al 4 pm. The followlns POIJ.fNC. TATiriMi ha^-e been pmvlded under the per Ion. of the Ballot Act. Ill: Ma. I POI.IaTfG STAtrON. The ... c.,. InK* Iallotted 1. % %  I MMJ %  V 'both incluif tha I .rmlnal II Jl to Voter* wh—*• *dr h the letter* "A" t< vi and Ih. FOR Mli OR BBNT RKSII1RNCE—A two Slorev Wooden 111 dine in ll.nd.bury Road, near 1-mil,on. Very Roomy on It* own land Hoe Me D Will.* !" Bavin* Road. Driddetown I. 1 LSI~4t> I'lHIJI NOTirES THF. Al .1.1VM SCHOOL The Examination for a vacant Found* >n Scnolar*hip .available fiom Jan-i -y It*'., will be held on Friday. Jam. ary lllh at a m Fur all paiticular' cm tan the HeadmaMri. NOTICE 1 III i-M-iMt Or BT. ANDREW Fourtaen Demon* harlna been noinln. brd a* Cand lata* for the Veir> of St Andrew I hereby darlaie ml mieiitwni lo take a Poll al the Vestry Room near ItM Alm.hoii*o on Monday Bth JamriM-v IUI, liejilntilnB between (he hour, at II electini m and clo.ln* at 4 |. m for Of 10 Vealrimrn SiBned W W WORRELl %  herlfl ,11.rt ITe.ldli'f llflkei Dated Jan. and. itBl. J1SINOTICE nolify mv Fri my place of hu*i I mm Mon tth Ur I.. WAJTHF. 10 H NOTICE 1 M-I-II OF BT. H'CY Flfieen p*r*ona havioB ben 1 the Panih dutch on Monday January %  th. ItSI. beamnln-' between Ihe hour* of B and n'rlnck m the inornnul und cloalnl at 4 MR. for Ihe eleclton nt ten Veattymen 0 RLOOOMliF. Sherlfr NOTICE IM-.I-H or *r I-.MI IT I hereby Blve Notlre that •* It Candidate* have been nominated a* nt and proper penon* to iepr**ciit the Ve*t.v for the Porlrti of Si Philip for the yawr 1H| a nd a. only ten are requited bv law I will hold a poll al Ihe Parian Church •>>'-' School n*t Mondath* Bth January IHI **iwe*n the hour* nf T1D-AA CATTJN. Sherlfl. 4.1 ai—i Bl I* of the held In the Bl. on flnd Jan IMI Pariah of Bl Thorn*. Thotna. Beya* Brhool only 10 iieiiibeiweir nominateo %  therefore 4-tUi* the following duly elected Vestryman for tha Prt*h il %  t. Thoma. for tha year IMI Cave. Arnold F.-*i*.m C0U111*. Cyril Mandevllle Gill. Luahliucton Denill Ciondir.j. L'elllan Theadore Mahon. Jttllan AM-. E ra, Vemon EuM. If.ird Kennrlh Smith ne. John Henrv Cllffafd Cooper • Icott llephan Alleyne Tha araaad Bear of the Parochla Bulldim* la ntlotied h. Voter, who-* %  Bimame* bcBln with ih* letler. "J" It "Z" (both inclii .1*1 and the entrant. Ihartio will be Ihroufh Ihe Oatewa* altuata at Ihe BoiitVrn End of Ih* bulldinff B. MAURK'fc CAV1 *lhrrl" and Betitrnina OrBcer 9.1J1—-So LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE •h npplKallon of l.iwrence Edfai Miller of OranaHill. St Jame* fo* permuaion to -all Bpltit*. Malt Liquor. *c. at a .tone wall and gal> aimed bulldim *ltuat(d at Orafif* mil. 9t Dated thl* Ind ri.iv of January T 11 NURSE. Eq Police M.n.natr Diu -r', III. SBd ARJIAHAM M1IJXM for ApplH NH Thi. ipplM-aMen will be c oied al u Ucenalni Court to be held at Police Court. Dt-trlrl F." H'lowi Tir-dav the Inn, da of Januarv |M1 al II 9'clock. am % H NURSE. I BaM Mnliilmtr IXd IV II town MSI In Seoul Burning Major Hat tic In Imlo-t hi 11 a % r rum Pair I %  Siu) TheY hail mi i'-ulifiilar 1:0.11 Tho-ar who eoultl aijofd H could (*• evacuated by thn Korean army. It had been sn open socret around Seoul for the lasl fru, day* That the army would evacuate a fanuli toulh fur CM On the road tu-dav. iuk.iv EarMUl .irmy lrucks patstii l,v jammed tijht with iWuiMhl .mil Iheit belonRinxs At the Han River rtUtln balMa, any refugeea had to dump onr of the few possessions they had St.-aged They found they could not roar.age to cross the frozen river carrying loads and there was no room for them on the heavily Uckfl railway bridge being u*ed by the withdrawing armv Trbridge which had been planked to take army truck* iu to be blown up soon after dawn For SO yards on either side, amphibious tanks smashed across the ice. breaking it Into small piece* to thwart any Communist attempt to blow up the bridge prematurely. It was feared Communist saboteurs might sneak over Tine ice under cover of darkness and dynamite it.—RruU-r LOST FOIMI LOST Mich. AKI TiCKFrr mder pleaae rrtum ti School Ho.id. I'uprr RrnlBe In l.HJI OK LICENSE NOTICE The npplirati..i of C-.li-le Aiw-ll of 11.11. R.iad. Rt MM'iiati. f*n perml10 |n • %  It Haunta. Malt Idqunr-v *.-, ai 'rd ind -hniBle .hop at Qav\ }t|l|, Si Mhrhael Datad thi. 3rd d-y of Januai v BJOI Tn I A. MeLMOD ak*|, Police M-Bl'tr.le. Dl.t "A". Sirurd W SXALY for Apalleai NO Tin* application Will be eoi •Idered .il a I.irrnaini Cinirt to he h... I Police four!. Ul.lnct \ ,lav. Ihe ISIh da M J.nuar' IMI II o'clock, am. t A. MclJUD. Palice MBBi'irate. Ih.l A J 111 —In 1.101 (ii: LICENSE NOTICE The aphelion ol TUB! WuRKtlls (.ANTXS.N per Dudley D Holder a*>d MeDonald Brathwaite .Tru*te*-I of Faurhikl St.eei. si Ml.hael I01 perinlndoii lo aell Spun. Malt Uq.ro'a •c al bottom Root of a Morey w aL bolidim In Fairrhiid Stre-i c %  Dated thl* 4th dai of January Ifdjl To H A TAIJdA Baq.. Police Ma*|l*lrate, DUt A SiBned D. D. HOUH;iI for ApplKlint' N B — Thi. .ippln alinn will be cor .idned al ,1 Ucenu^B COUft to be halo .1 Police Court. Dtitrlrt "A" on Moi. day the 1Mb da of January. IMI %  II o'clock, am. It A TALMA. Police Majrlctrate. Dl.t A %  IV. 1. SAIGON. Indo China. Jan. 4. A rrench military *poke*i-iin said tonlgh' Tha" u major l.attle l< beinf foughl in Soilh Indochina, but no details will be anrnnimed unlit the 1 ompU tn.n .1 the eutrtni p*-. Meanwhihfor Hv nttti %  > %  i> rMrttd''err muct .. COfmUniqu* 1 which shed little light on events on embattled northern tnm 1 rh*. .(•nimunique a'd Comnunisl-led Vietminh forces are till attaeklng g Hi french fflTMi guarding Hanoi There was no ch-nee m the BIIUBlon whatever n wm reported ,ii the Ticnyeti-Moncar sector en %  he nottheasi -f IrhT h frontier The spokevinan Who 1 major battle was a pri %  resentmlve of ihe new Commander-In-Chief and High Coftinissioner Oen Jenn l>e l.iiti.I • %  Tasslgny. He said the restriction I* part n( the new Prasi pOUc*. but asi ured lorrespoiidcnU that other'wiso ai: fucllitm will Ua^vtffl hem for eonipreheiifiive coverage f the Indo-Chiiii. frflU ittOfl <" Nevis Carries On f> rratn rage I ur nearby main* Hence, Mr J P Wilson. Clerk of Works, flew fion si Kilt, i, -iiu> to iwndf ,i".iiued b; lth Federal Kngitufr. J .ire leaving on J;inu.n iwo-day \ %  A rcpcrl from our Si Kill:; (-orrospondcnl *tntes UW 'ercil plii:ie fnnii Trlnlitad arrival in th-t HMony bringli %  enlatives of the Banks, |M rTBMi and Rex Stollmeyci Ttiev turtird lo Trinidad I.'iler In < A \ All I \\ IIA I IS IANI 4BV I M (.4 4 10 p. fheq^ien on Banker* A 10-. Drali. a 36 I pi Smlit Drafti J ic: 5S ible • renn <.VIH\rIIM AOI II IS LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The application nf Colvin Worrell n. J.icamn. St. Micti.irl (or iniii'0n U M-II Spllll*. Malt l.(o,i.oi. ftp. .,t boll..m dnnr of a MSB*] wall hmliloR ..1 Tweedaide Hd St M-harl. l>-(*d thl< *th U.V M lo.: ,, 1BSI > \ M.LSXH*. K.| foJIce MaBI'trala, Dill. "A" S.^ COLVTM WORRELL ApplH ant N.B Thi application will be conaldeied at a LMan.lna Court to he Held al Ponce Court. Dlrfnrt "A" SB Monday, the ISth day ol January. IMI. al II o'rlock, am E. A. MrlXOD. Police \1-Bimal* Dial. "A' LIQUOR UCKNSE NOTICE The He 1 Roebuck Btieel *ell Spi-i.. Malt Uquoi. A loo 1 ilo-ir ol .. 1 wo itnrev woodri blilldnul al Upper Roebuck S*I.*I. Cttj o*i*d thi* 4lh 1I-1 ai I T01-M. A. TALMA. E^| Police MaBl'IraU'. Dial. "A '. SiBned PRINCE CALIXNDFJI. lor Appll '.' I Thli BPBUB be H. A TALMA. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The applwatlnn ol Edward Catwell %  aril Spirit.. Malt I..,. \ .1 Balvanlied .hop attached '. '(—usance 1 Jar**on. Al Michael I>ai*d Hit. h day ol JTn —E A. McLBOD. Ban Police Madurate. Dial "A", Had EDWARD CATWEiX. N tl Thiippllcatlon leered al a UcenunB Cm I Police Couil. Dlat'Kt ... ih* iMn day of Jat A Milk V* AMI -II HELP AM. UI I,.11 ,' 0 (uilable appilraaii rig lo Lowe* Ettate OflVv 1 AlfenllOi. Mr II A • ".plovmei **pply In 1 M M:,,.., Dowdtng. a 1.01—an < \ BfBtEEJt At Woodland Plantation. Bt. Oeorf* Apply Hi p*ru>n with % %  l.illorc. Stlt—*n MAhDWARE lAlatJ havUlf had M ve.i I CtAJMNOTOrl MISCELLANEOUS roWtJi FOR EATING Any m>. Applv Teddi J tl.tt Re*laurant. BroaU SI alphua Parlih •r IMI MOORE. HherlR 41.51-in NOTICE I-VI.I-K or T "i-Hii I hereby flea NoUc* that a* 11 Candl datei proper penona li for the Paruh of IMI. and a* onl law I will hold Room over the D th* Mh day of the hour* nil* 1 At lepreaent the Veatry II Joaeph tor the >aar a poll at the Vetey ( %  I Mondy. lanu.n IMI. between 1. and 4 p m. A ni'HANT J P •-hertB 4 1 SI -M NOTICE PARISH OF *T JAMIH t heraby give Notice mat a* 13 Candidate* hav* been nominated a* Bt anproper per on* to raptcent the Vrairy for the Parlh of St James for the l*nr IMI, and a* onl/ ten are require*! by law I will hold a Poll al the Ve*t Room near the Pari.h Church net! Mondav the ath day of January IMI. BetCFoRflL FtirHTON TAYLOR Sheriff H M BE WISE. . . ADVERTISE MOTOR LICENSE NOTICE The application of ), vei T. Marshall n( Paaaaa* Pd *• ". "aal for perml*• 1011 Id ell Spirit* Man I-q.-it*>* Pollr* Mal'lrald. D*t A s*rd JASSTS r MARSIIAIJ. Applicant. N a Thu appUcaUi'i will be ronal. Oered at a Ucenalni Court u> be hall at PolSre Court. Diatrtct "A" on Mon. Cm the ISth day of January IMI a 1 LIQUOR UCENSC NOTICE The application of Jam* Dr.yim, a' Ma on Hall Slieet. St Ml. 'vael. f"i fnUaMn to • Spirit*, kl.it laqi botvom rlooi of a *Urrey Va-m Hall .onto 11 building '.miMTlun. CttT Dated d... %  1 J... TAI-MA y.q 'Wke MMI.lf.re Di-t \ Slfh*d ARTHUR JBrtHA for Appili .'. g-Thl. apbiieailon will 1m. rred J Pol"" 1 I* Co 1. Liability For Recall of Rrserxeds of HiM-ji'vly's Korrcs in The Cnited Kin>doin Who Are Resident in Hnrhnilo'.. ResorvisU of all three scrvic< should IHin no doubT ol lluir ndividual liability, and the docUim-nts Issued lo per^oum I 01 lelease make il clear that any changes of address should b*. nott lajfl to tlu SIIVKC U-piiitmcii* vonctnu'd. If the UMMntlOV Ol f ITItgll living in the United Kingdom to proceed overseas is millllcd. tha reserve liability Is then confirmed er canecllcl Md the UadrVrdUBl .n^iiiieil Is iiotifled accordingly. Any ofllceis Of mttl aVho BN I* loulit, therefoie. should communicate direct with the llrViCl DtfWI inent concerned. Colonial Secretary's Office, 3rd January, 1S!S1. .11. IM*. IllltlMH Uk Ucs|MUisihlf Govt Qa> A tl-ree-nuii delegation from In nan AssorUlion In evlw-nte before The Constitution Commission made nroflbj ilaiim for raap. rn*nT lor Rutlsh Cuiana toaUffd by H Cabinet of ten Mm iBlers. 11 wai their desire UM th* E district to take evidence a* Hartim. Fort Inland. Srampa Island iimi tiip CJXC. ttonbat i .{.i later thev will visit MorKcnrie BJiixite Mines fba Koch Ends Hunger Strike Al GSBUIia. li.unany, Jan. 4. ,!. IsjCUBBfJ Red vviUii ol Itn.liiiiw.iht. to-day gave up her two-day-old imnio'i sink.Allei I hi .1 iv I P akJEl IB* munchad an apple dui ing pan-' inal on charges ol inciting mur1 1 tortures of Ruehenwald Concentration Camp Inmates On* nf the witnesses agalnM her to-day. was Mrs. Rosa Itoedal. whose hulband preceded Mrs Ko.linusband H Buchenwald iBip I'orntnandain and th* n-eei h< 1 1 i I ant n-i-ii'iwi L y, 1 .(,„ i AII ep. I gajua disthlpping today bringmg n lb* nafbotii %  % %  %  H^e W..: %  An estimated SO pat eaaj, <•'< '-ixerpool's working peoplo incluIfi.g S.OCfi di-keiv-erc in b*d %  The harbour was lammed with hips awaiting for berths About I "i>0 nurses were awav from hen „.bs. Hospital authorities for retired nurses to VIM hack temporarily Nearly (rivers and conductors md 2.1 lo SO K r cent of the ich ptam operator I were ill u*> in I.on>l.'ti the Minim v o| Health said epidemU* 0! "flu so fa ". 10 th.Usneaahire area around Uvarpool • V'-rth B..SI caast 1; ni.led thai .nf through The' Midlands .md Southern England, but bati fatraacned •pldemlc pToportior. 1 her* The Ministry aaid fiia *wsrRld cases are mild otias _•*• Ship Sinking UHISHANR. Cfueemland. Jan 4 The 11,1ml too p and 0. cargo BOM ral*aa. was Blowly sinkmi off (h* Central Queensland coast to-day alVr striking, a rock in the Great Barrier Reef last night. Her captain. 50-year-old Fraacis Rusaali IMIII, .aid m a radie message that the fhiteri freight. BiBSakef had takan off most ox thraw of 09, including Ih* onl. \"WTi3'> rm hoard. Mrs M. A, Tfen f.eld. vfr of Th* Chief OfTW< %  : nil! rl the crew ate from fAid.n Captain Spurr appealed for tugs to tow his ship to .hall, .v v tier* for beaching SHIPPING NOTICES UNIVERSITY OF LONDON M.U 1 i< 11I.1I inn I \. iniir.it — Jlllir 'TIM All persons desirous of entering for the June IBM Ma Ion Kxamlnntlon of th* University of London slu. 'ollowing to the Department of Education not Ian r ihMl N ^8th January, 1951: — (i) (11) (ill) A letter selling out the •>uuieets to '>' IBdUB date of birth and address. A Baptismal Certificate. A receipt from Barclay Bank (IXC. 4.0.) ii.un.> in lull -how 11 a fee of; — (a) (bl 12 12 6— for £1. 1.0— .. iiiiintioo %  £1.11.1 quail* ntlidntes taking full ex, one 111 complete inal tlon quBliileiit; on* part tc Malriculat Heat Ion. has been forwarded by mail transfer |fj Ihfj Bxtan Registrar. University of l^ndon SPECIAL NOTICE:—The altentlnn of all candidate la partit ulailt drawn to the % %  i that the Malrirulatl'in K**mInaUon will Rut be held aft*-r June ll Department ol Education, 27lh December, 1B50. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION %  %  .,,!!,. ilInMv vomen) vlaa IQUOR LICKNSK NOTtCI Ihe appllcat-.n of Vml.t I>* OMtB I HohoBanv UlM, St Michael, for eimlulori lo I'll BUawna, Malt Ijquora. lUfn ft*x-r of Blue lagoon kSm Knr,,n S* "Bn.arv Nelon I Cll. llaird thl* *,h 4ar of January. IMI II A. TALMA aWi I--.;.,. Sfa, 1'i.ir l>. U M *a-i-— A* at b-ttoen "*. .t nf |U si... i n-ted II T I \ PolM-e II II..-a MrLEOD Ban M U swaB s, n %  •if.eii '. u MI'HRFI H A TM.VA N M .III "be eon. .Id.red %  t a Ur* .1 Pol: a Court. DMwMI A on Monlata a of Jl iuar*. IMI al E ^ M. rtsfsn PWIut candidates who have already submitted one of these forms In ftalpac. of pnvfttMM vaeasetM [no* filled) may apply by letu-r a-'".in .ed i>> l 4 Any teacher who appln f.i i vuraniy on Ihe lad of aj>< ti %  School must Inform his or h*i lrrnt Chairman < %  ( Managvrs ar.d the Head Teacher Of any applliall'm 'or BUch a uansfer. 5. All applications must \t • %  nclosed in BBmtoMl "Appoinfmenls Board" In the top left hand corner and the Department of Education b\ 23rd December. I9S0. ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. i. Trinidad. Painmarlkn and -.. MS Heiuli. Sin Jar.uII "Cdttlca" BHh Februarr P MB. snusn iMi. i JSuBMlU .!>. S P MUBBON. .ih .....1 Mr -l-.l V.IMl Arenmniodal ion B CO LTD ABei > %  The M V i .'>hr*e %  II) at and F'.H-.iaei* lo Ilnn.ti.ua A"tlua. Mantaerrwt ,1 •nd I'aea. naer* loVincent fliened "ate r.1 n >aa*t*ir i aXW.I SCIIOONKR OWNERS AHflOCIATTON, lae. 1 -aiiiic I in ii National Steamships Mil'" Ml vN I'll \: ) '. .i >M> IIIHIMI ADY M -\ CIIAI IJ/MOCT • \i> mniNsrv: \i>\ Rl i S.IN \N 1*11 \l i Aor IT AB> I! I II II.. I M, I \OV NBtJMN' Al> RUUNSrV > APV NklJSON m ininvBTi' %  in. ltl1|l^K^• TI Jan II PM. II P*l> B Mat it Mai .. Apr a Apt GARDINER Al 3TIN A CO.. LTD. Agents. nf: WISE ADVERTISE MAIL NOTCE In Touch With Barbadoi Coagtal Sution vi" r I BmBJJLBjBJ iWaai ta*Ml td adv .-.o iha i..n...in*i -i.il>. mi.iudr. ., M.I. .Ii I -I .!...( %  ,| ),„, USVnbieei* Hi -niann. R.B ....... Dutra, SS HrlarS . %  -I II* lit aid s -. i,. ( t Ami l Araenl i WMIBI. HB. gmj al Pal | •,.: %  .M. I C**S, mil. Kfl Lad) Mataod n N...I..I.-.SH |i. ,...,., -. Mo* i i ( imaienn H.S la-al.lai-a *s (,.,n,1.,. SS U .lime* nr-flr a aoriM. hat i-i.-.i he oepor1un.lv of QsltaSB all i--...-— wtlled for 41 rvtai ., i IMfM*! A •' %  • n bellrr -. U-an IMS WITH nPST BlailJv 11 A Rr.vlce och Mlay. 61h Januar\. 1851 30.12.50—31). EDUCATION -.ui S: Michael DEPARTMENT 0 Wesley Hall Girls' a Applications are InviKd I ''V Hall QM*School from teachers (wotstl Itl least 10 yeirs' tearhing experience The minimum prof*Hioiuil qualification required is th* Certificate A of the Department or ex*sT.ption therefrom. Salary will be in accordance with the Government Scale for Head Teachers in Grade II Elemental:. Schools. Candidates who have already submitted application forma in respect of previous vacancies (now filled) may apply by letter, accompanied by i. recent testimonial Al! other candidates should make application on the appropriate form which may be obtained from the Department of Education. AH applications must be enclosed in envelopes marked %  1 Ap-poiilmcnf Board'' In the top left hand corner and must reach the Department of Education by Saturday. 6th January. IMI. 2rd DecpmbrT. 1950 30.12 50—3n REAL ESTATE JOHN Ki. Bl iHOS A.V.B., r.T.A. Formerly Dlaon ftladoo FOR SALE ITNAIIA II W BAPTBtT v,M'AHA<;r I'aVnr|l... t afa.iev BBSM Bailer le*. r. -i I liearh and %  SI Matleai Manna Motel %  I MI,, Ideal fix More. aiea. S"as* %  %  laanri Ban J dam a>Rh ..i* a *imd h.,at ni.rhorAUCTION SALE BLACKMANS %  EAf, KBTATE AGENT A I IIONRKR FaVtSTTATlOBffl nillJUMi Phone 4640 In order to obtain leal from menial and physical 'tiain I have decided to re*ign from my professional N imlennhVly. Ally one desiring hi* or her pic m -iiuonwhich I might bholding, may call fur Ihem MIV .inv between 8 ami a Hi ettept Thuisdays. J. li fl.MtKF ; CIRCULAR a ;I Voter* (oc ih* Vntrj M SI. Micharl Volr lor | OWEN T. ALLDER I ui Monday next. A a.m. .; i" s p.m. al Parochiol ;. B4illdiQg>. Vav yvvvxeVa*; § Wfst Indian Painlin^ by I Mill I! I I V Ml MAC IrOI) FXHIBITItlN at the HtRHAIHIri Ml SUM Garrbusi, JAN. Mil TO JAN. S1T. II All. V AU, W<>HKS POD SAI.K rO-DAYS NEWS FLASH TABLI: IBHBIB XETS — AT KIIINSON'H HTATIONCRT Moar nKMGNs !\ rONT DOOR OLA88 — AT — JOHXONS IIMII.n Mil Faarl IIAKHADOS TI'RF CLUB NOTICE TENIJKKS an invited rot MotiatJv* rigtai to sell i i.|.i... Kefreohment*. etc. ..i lhi QaiTUoR Savannah w: durtai issi %  i %  li-'l i %  ( IKNDKH Kill Uvjt'Ult AND ItEPRENHMENTS" and addressed to the Secretary not lata* Ulan noon on Sat iirttay. 13th January. 1M*I1. Tin( ..ninillte*. does not bind Itself t .i.ten Uw highest or any other Tetider Q A LEWIS IIIWKS TO IlSr AMI \I.L for your plrndiil gBBUBBB] dnrin* the year. WE WISH YOU A 1IAPPV AMI PKOSHEROI'S NEW YEAR THE rEJVntAL EMPORIUM (CENTRA.. EOI NDR1 I.TII —IToprietorsi ( rner .f Itr i ', ,1, r S-icevv//*y^Av/^x/rtv>V!rt-,', ^ SEE US FOR:— LUMBER & HARDWARE rji.bii.i.i-, IM0 T.IIFr 10 •% 11 Rotbuck Street Incorporataid I9M



PAGE 1

PACE EIGHT BARBADOS .ADVOCATE FBIDAY, JANUARY S, 1*51 MUST FIGHT BEFORE MARCH H* SAM XM.I. WASHlM.To'. THE NATBONA1 BOXING ASSOCIATE warned lightweight champion Ike William.* and light heavyweight champ Joey Maxim u< defend Iheii litlea before March 1 or be uncrowned. The ultimatum ^va^ b> rred J Saddy I 3 Ire NBA chumi the aaiHK' alien red 115 tu. %  %  i i ti1\ M ixim vtinuld meet Bob Mmphv of California for nil title as soon si poaslbta He expgl %  dOuM that William* can make tin lao-pound Indiiweiaht • lass welfbl limn BTQ longei Sad.i annou "tlnl. M tH III II and Mi defend that) nanylonshipa Kareh i. msi. I will mi roeom r nen %  MI.*.' A ation BaeniUi Lteo thai their Hues I %  III and that Ike William*. Louis Beats Beshore Fight Stopped In 4th Round DETROIT. Jan. 4 Former world lieavywelght eharnpiun Jue Louii Nhowed a flash of his old form in battering Freddie Beshore <>f H nriibura to defeat In the 4th round of their 10-rounds bout here lasl %  topped the fluid after two minutes 48 sees, of Ihe 4th round with Ik-shore bleeding. £fOm u broken nose and a badly cut left eye Supporters of Louts Immediately hailed the victor) a significant step on the road to a return title match with Ezinrd j Charles, holder of the America" version of the world heavyweight i chant pi unship. Only Reshore's courage vented Louis winning hy a > ktwekout Punching with something pToachlnj; the nciousness of for mef days L-ouis now :i. had all I La best of the exchanges ufter 'hrtrsl round. Beshore carried the fight lo Louts from ihe first bell but the former champion had little difficulty '" scoring with powerful right* and lefts which brought blood from Beshore'i nose. Prom the second round OB B*> shore. %  plodding type of lighter, was merely a punching bag. Louis hit him at will and In the thirl i bund .i crashing right broke hi nose and %  notber *plh hli leTI i'v The doctor allowed Beshore In come out for the fourth round. He ran into mOM sledge hammer blows uTQAl l>ouls who used his right mon frequently than he did in his UUM light %  gainst Cesar Brlon. Louis' left was. us potent as of old. A big home town crowd I 13,096 gave Louis a tremendous ovation at the finish Two of the three ring officials called the opening round even but from then on they %  freed it was "Leukl light all the way Louis had ohvlouslv trained hard foi this light Me weighed 210| pound! the lightest he has been since his bout in June 1946 with Hi IK Conn and seined more spirited than when he met Charles last September lleshore scaled 1911 pounds Loins did not have much to lay about this fight When asked how it compared with the last light— Brlon—he said simply "No comparison". Louis said his U-st flghtinj weight was about 210 lbs. —Reuier tit ion !• %  l MlUCtOd between i. U %  %  i I : i lii'hiweifht crown and also between Dob Batt a rflold, Arch' Moore and Bob Murphy for the weutbt crown He addtd thai if Lumolta forfeits his title to Hobinson. Ion contest should fce %  .... i, Kui Oavttan, Billy Graham. Charlie Fusari and Idd Thomas of England to %  % %  naw weltei 'eiuhi king to succeed Hobinson. Baddj %  i oiu.entini' an lb 'act that there are no logic.d con tenders for heavyweight champ %  anrd Charles to fight, said In the ease of Erzard Charles, the undisputed hoatrywelghl champion of the world, he ha eVOry effort to prove thai he is a champmi worthy nf thu" lllle and ready at :>ll limes l %  II omen Ho has proved 10 be %  Bghttag ehampi* Other Rating* Other NBA ratings hy class iron Light heavyweight Champ*, pn Jo**y Maxim, logical conlendr lean (Archie Moore. Bob Murphy and 'Bob Sallci Field. -I Middleweight: Champion. Jak LamotUt; logical contender. Ray Robtngon Welterweight Champion. Robinson, logical coatasiaer, N lae.htwe.ghts' Chiimpioii. Williams. logical contenders John L Davis and Freddie Di Featherweight Champion. S.tndy Saddler; topical eontenden WHIM Pap and Raj Fag i Bantamweight: Champion, t rowoeJ; logical contenders. Luis Romero Of Spain nml Manuel Ortiz. riywaight! Champ* anno; logical emiten Bnayors of Belgium and Terr. Alien ol Kngland —I N.8, $4,688 Forecast Goes To South Trinidad nTtwn Our Own LUtivpudrnl • PORl'-OF-SI'Al.N Jan 2 South Trinidad lurflb ioth tickets sold in tinBaby Btrd-CUppei fore...i which paid h4,gBfi at Monday's T.T.C. races. They are Haid-r All, g.is station proprietor of Point Fortln, who hod one tlckel and Cllffoi Sooknanan. who with another Southern man Standard Canasta 8 M. MARRISON-GRAT W' sliould uol TOUT c*rdi rn.nl* lille jo i nnarui m IM 111 r *ND usually j"_wr. jp_ooo MQ.as U> iui>na — lubwqusnt imiKlim u(( tusosr •onunusiiT Bimpir __. L'UMi.rrship r>> hrli la fllfflculim vourssll Tou wUl to nwt force htm lo mpld all nin csrda and tuvai so out %oopar i n*n wouid otbsrwiea M UM "s*e %  .. rou IISM In mot Ol rou the rollowina spraid: Tws • ThrtM A Oanasta •! glnas r L>: n.i'i Iflin lunt taaan c-p.ni iroro an unTrOBM) i % % %  -m pile wmcO D* bia ii.i-.nwi wtth Hi. Joker >nd l %  •fl with Rboul Is cards ID ins i"iiii You nold *. o • i. T. T. a s a. Tou could ul course oield all ruvir crd< except the jueeii mm ih. unlit mUr %  Cnii| ii Nine, ana !**• • ourwlT ltli one erd T*blB S iHi'Vrl -m. I \ *a BowajaeM 9)1 or ilr dt p. i-1 Hull Illi-t Will iin. II i un I.HOMI l.ti' Hunte Hits 101; Mullins 5 For 33 A SPARKI.INCJ 101 NOT OUT by 18-year-old Conruu Hunts) *>! Heili-pl.n.rSt. Andrew, was the huihlight in cri c fc a>l match between B.C.!-. and B.C.A. ut h^nalnflsQii Oval VVhcn .stumps were irawn. B.C.L. after batttng the entire day. had scored 188 runs fnr the even wickets in their first innings Runt hit save i four* and T2 runs in his Aral over, two in hi* century. He thrlllen When the score had reached .. : u well-timed and Hunte and CoJrmgton were atil' i ll ..nil together with Hunte 22 and Coil i aggressive: ungton 27 After King's seveni i MMing Opening with Sealy h< ..i Uards /.'kinson of Wander, %  roat Ihe outs*t that he. ttn. was brought on in his place things and gave: Atkinson bowling at medlm i u'e ihai.c whan he was at ii>> puce did not get much out of in* %  ff t.ie bowling o( Mullins. wicket. The scoreboard now department Carl read 58/2/0. When the SCOTO Mullins the six-foot Police pucer'vas 87 Mulling was Lrought (ll raptured live of the BCL wicke. kaln and M 73 Mullins had Codrtogttn caught behind lh? make the runs Hunte then started j !o go for hn century and Horse. King came In for some rough treatment when he punched him twice to the boundary in his 13th over He completed his century b> hitting William* for a brace through • %  cl when •lump* were dmwn he was undefeated with 101 .ind L Burke. was five not out The scores:— 33 rung after sending dowi. Of whtefa four wan msiden overs Mullins. bowled extremely wci! developing much pace and in the nm iwo oVg I made good use ol ihe now (tail. At lunch lime hi. n.ur.swercO 10 M 3 H 17 W 4. lnf ,, Wood Codrlngto Winning the to* mi, 1 -CT.. I with C Hunte und H. Sealy to IBS bowling of schoolboy J Wi',i i:.and Carl Mulnnn. Sealy h-u third bull f his first over when he sgdehad rlcket by nude 3B ll McCgr**ly followed and h opened his account with a slngli After Hunte had pushed a bal Mullins lo cover for McCarthy was given CARI. MULLINH. Uis fs-tov how .-r In Barbadoa today Is tipped to win bis Intercolonial Cap .igain" Trinidad first month He took ma )or honours In yoatcrdsy'a D.CL BOA future when be captured flve of the -even B C L wKk*l-for :a rnns. "1 AM IN DEBT" — Soys Charles BZZABO CHARLES ma) bo An i Id i Idea of a world heavy-weight champion, but, sc. far. the Cincinnati negro baa failed to get his hands on much of thai bij< money thai reputedly accrual to the I international boxing, tha i -t heavyweight champion, linuncially. the gpme has neen In yearti %  ulrh.,n,"On my WE) up M VOl BHsdl much Then wag thai spun* .i ,i\\... on service, they piled I | worth of unpaid an on me. and on my raturn i had lo stan paying that off. I sold th.arena, bui the debt rag %  mi owe K l.ooo. "Being H champion i* expensive. Tips here, tips there : %  II expect you to live up to the title Hard Way" "I have come up the hard way 1 appreciate the value of a dollar Why go around tossing dough down {he drain in the big eiiuI don't aim to make an Impression that way," adds Charles. who maintains go siahlishmenl of two grandnotnorgi two aunts and four ; .inlels—Is "owned," like .. many top-rank American lighters, by a business syndicate. At least 50 per cent of hbl earnings goes in managerial exEngland Has Good Chance In Thin! Teat •Tiotn Our o'i Coi reapaident > %  i i-.mi fer the third Test onin in; at Sydor, to-day l Hremii. Complon. \\>slihre>k. Slmpaoa> lluiiun. lUrkhoUM'. BoMai i i. iiHed-er, WATI. VVtighl Here J O'Reilly. Australia'* areatet spin bowler dr-cutacs ii'ii, %  ii % %  .mil proopeeli In the nul.li sVDNK.Y. Friday Good JUdgOi give Kngland an exoallonl ebanes ol winning the Third Test which begins here tn-d,iy. The belated return run-getting form of Simpson and I'.trkhousc hn.t trengthei.. i land's balUnj iremei i ' i Oompton returned to the loam % %  i 1,000,000 with inmind at on eflaetni the md still has lo flghl to meel ItJ-f i n i> of hi: Brlaboae blob and s demands .lack Dempsc->. living Ihe lie direci t„ much on the other hand, put the savou' wrllter. from 1:2.000 0011 light turanl ol i othw now i realthy man. So Is Qona runnoi i lad hi.mey %  in iintish boaata can natdl the Dcmpsev—-Tunnev kind f affluence. But Bruce WO.K1CO.K •nri Freddie Mills are two wh nil] novas have to worry abou' %  loxl week's wages." Women in Spnrl If women cricketers had .nking list. No 1 would be un Molly Hide, of Qunnoi urv ciui>. Surra) and asigland As a batsman she Is -t.'l' orceful %  ii d free-scoring; ai oa i off-broaaa, she is accu%  ti i Mi lag ni d and mvuriabiv langeroui II Is Ukal) ih.it she Will have .he honour of leading Knglaml igain next summer in the tbrc • ba played agalnsf the Australian women louring team Cricket for MKs Hide begin, ,.* h i uudarstood ,lha awing if the hat before the %  .troke* n 1 ne pen But ,it aehool and eollegi %  Kadvanoad rapidly In bottt. Tha one bronchi bar i dlatocni i sgrlculiaro, tha othar, at the tag of If. it place In the England ciiin v Tin Id-t Like .til the greater batamen. Mil lime dOsa more than |!. H .i Itrokos, she commands theie thai requires a quick wi\ stout hear! >. wel que I'rrtse in fact spoken about hi %  i .ime unavailable foi lha Meiurna Test. ook whlla not in top i roan his drought rf runs at any lime T iflva in Igroon ounpared gVl Mn ha, IrchOBi Harvey, MlUat and Hand out favourabty lha p-iti ii M i loin, oi ihe Australians -'iu'd Close W.in mak1 He'll ba n eeded Tha Ba II I | pitch will be as usual. m towards batsmen. Each eaptatn will nee ? I i Mm. i i. HI li m lli.li U.'rr iltlim.l t 11 BTODAY IWi .1 LI' %  >driiii;l.ni l.inp.tlurr <\lax ) 8t0 F. Tr inner* Hi re iMin ) : U 9 \m.i Dsrastlan i.na \ \ l il M n m ) Wtod Vela" hy t mile Imur It-r.-ii.-t-i i •'.'< 'til il pm i U 'i l I Ml net :n Denis Atkinson Up wh i dropped Ihe ball Mulliiibowled the second over %  f the day to Hunte who pulled the ba'l to tne leg side sending down Sealy to take strike. Tho fourth bull rose chest high and Sealy watched it go through to %  .. %  !..id Wood. Hunte in Williams" second over began to get well over the ball and drove the fourth ball nicely for a brace. Mullins In his third _. began to bowl with venoti. and broke through SooJy's defenae many times. In Mullins' fourth ovcr--a maid n—Sealy gave Gerald Wood an any catch off a rising ball when us score was five. Jones, who followed was oul in the next ball hen he cocked another rising ball from Mullins inU, the air to Icket-keeper Wood another catch. The score A.IS now 12. ('odnnglon who was next never seemed comfortable against Mullins. He was occasionally beaten bv the pace of the ball and was dropped by Wood off MulAftor bowling live overs Williams was replaced hy the Empire spinner Horace King. King's first over was a maiden sent down to CodTinglon who had not yet stored. Codnngton opened his scaring with a boundaryKing In his second over. Hunte ire other end was batting patient| Mullins. After sending down seven overs for nine rum md lakfcnsj two wickets, Mullins laved by K Bow Spartan Bowen conceded Ii K before to Mullins in his la ball Ol the tenth over At irn state lui*.ch was taken. Hunte era i at out 31 und Ihe score was T i i tan loss of four wnkitAfter lunch C Symmonds jo.u ncL rraav anrrsna II. an %  i %  „JoPMCK Waod b M^llln. . Woud b Mull (. air Carlhi lb. b M.Uln%  %  %  1 h kMbM Hi k W.--I 1. HiTiildlr lUikrr TVOI •Ul aaarsi ToUl 'for Fall of wM> Ma 1 for 11 1 1 rerovered after pulling .i ihnl. muscle during the first • Tesi" gl New Delhi The team V Mo r cna n t (Canlain) V. Ha/are. S Mn*taq Ah C S Navudu. V Mankad. I) MI Police Band. Misting* Rock* 8 00 „>.i Kinplre Theatre — "Ihiel In The Kan" 3.3b H in n ,.., Theslre (Bridar town! 'The r"r>nnl*ln head* 2 10 * 30 ? m Aquatic Club Cinema 11 .in.--i: .Mi 8 30 p.m. Globe Theatre "Bagdad and •Talent' UK 31 p in at the UNITED SOCIA1. CLUB M ... h lu-Id. St. Philip On SATURDAY NIGHT, JANUARY 6, 1851 Kindly Lent by the Management Music by the Mi\H K \ i /i vi W1M1 i; STEEL BAND (Part of the Ptocee THE QUEENS PARK I STEEL -HI M S Special Programme of y £ Classical and Calypso N I Numbers *J ^ Admission ?4 eenis v Your Last Chance to Hear One of Trinidad s Best .Steel Orcheetraa. GET READY .•.• r ;;t r r *,*.'*'**s'r*r** ,*.*,'**,'r* t ***,'.'>'.'*'S r 't'-' THE I nil hi I TOURNAMENT Let us fit you with a FINE TROPICAL SUIT BLAZER AND FLANNEL PANTS a F.C.S. MAFrEI & CO. LTD. W* Now Ofl>r: WOOLLEN BLANKETS in PinK. Blue. Green and Bullercup BO 80 S10.50 COTTON BLANKETS — Coloured 75 S2.3H H6 3.13 COTTON BLANKETS While wilh Coloured Borders M X H6 $3.62 H CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, 11. 12, 13. Illtd M) STREET HWM4MI1 FYFFES LINE T.S.S (;OLF1TO is due (o arrive here from Southampton at 2.00 p.m. on 6th January and will leave at 8.00 p.m. for Trinidad. First Class accommodation is available for intending passengers. T.S.S. GOi.FITO is due to sail from this port to Southampton on 18th January. Some First Class accommodation is available by this sailing. Fnr further information 'phone 4230. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.. LTD. '•'''•'.'••.'s t t 'ss f t *s r *,* e *M& f f *&iV*'*'s*'s>•.'.''•> %  %  %  .'.::•,:•* MA TERIALS AT .'/-'/A'.WAM '' Top SfOrsi Tailor"c" S THEIR BEST AT C.B. RICE & CO. OF BOLTON LANE. **.'***S.' t SS*4'*+***0WjW-* w+wsjwss,:*.;; ;;;:'.', •ai



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FKIMT, MNUAXT 5, TB1 BARBADOS ADVOCATF. p'.\cr rTVF T.C.A. Can Carry More U.K. Mail TC.A. are at present taking rrunls from Barbados lo lite United Kingdom cveiy S.itm.Kiv morning and these %  houM uriivv in 1-ondon at 1.45 p.m. on Mondays, Mr. H. N Armstrong, Colonial Postmaster, told tha \d\nrate yeaterday. He said that when T.CA. start to make iheir two flights a week from Canada to Barbados, there will be a possibility of more mails going to the United Kingdom from Barbados. 1 In addition lo carrying mails to the U K on Saturday* T.C-A. also take mails to Bermuda for onward conveyance to New York. These are scheduled to am\ < there at 8 o'clock the same night Prior to December 16. 1950. as "the ,wo wee lv mail*—one on Monday and the other on Friday— were carried to the U K fn % %  Barbados to Jamaica by B.W I /• MM then forwarded by B.O.A t Now. there Is onlv one mall from Barbados to the U.K. b. B.O A C and that Is on TuesIMiM W HOLIDAY Prince Charlie Was Wrong little Ian McLsod, grandson of the Hon. D. G. Leacock subject of the Advocate's "Y* Guess" competitioD this week and this wai won by Charles Ray of "Whitehall Flats". Hastings. Few people got it right, but they ha/arded their guess nevertheless Some thought it was "Bonnie Prince Charlie" and other days guesses thiil placed it as "Charles Mr John Baldwin. Chairman Philip, Duke of Edinburgh." were of the Canadian Air Transpoii indicative of the same line of Board said That as far as T C.A thought. were concerned, they would be A most noncommittal one was always most happy to assist in ,4 A Spanish Visitor", and some the carriage of mail between more definite but still wrong ones Barbados ano the United Kingwere John Turner "Child of the lorn and rice versa but that wu new Colonial SOUSJigj". jTlsl a matter for the postal authoriSon of the Hon. and Mrs. Blacku >s man". "Master Emblncos "Son Tree Trunks Dynamited M IN OP nit: in. Lniasa %  ra have had I Y M C A iV/MWAW .-,-,<.'.'.',•,'.*,',-,•,','.'.-,'.*.•' M ujiLiinito kt Afiei these %  %  to saw the trunks into pieces suitable for transportation il I'lr .IT.., uhlCh Wll uj field ai Lht ra V M i .\ baj bt 11 the trees grass and \MM vine* Ihe Y M t .A took over %  v a.s found in the galler) roof of tha house OUl '.-'ii .ifter inothcf h way 1 %  .iK.M A .nt thi. I told. %dvB(4lr that baton ;> -.warm of %  %  %  i lac not • Id. where bees had al. .i n baan ., good spot They l i .in ON BARBADOS pox nu>pct. The A N \<(ll)INi OCC e,| Will Admitted To Probate of George Camacbo." Some single tries in the dark placed it as "Joseph Itudder" and "Pnul De Freitai. T.C.A. Willing The will of John Henry Hall who died in Barbados on October 10, 1M7, was admitted to Probate In Solemn Form by His J'-i"? vo,M authorities wishHonour the Chief Judge. Sn ed TCA to supplement the pre.Allan Collvmore. in the Court cm mall acrvice between Barof Ormnarv vratenlav an.tau. "835 2 "}" iLT." "" R 10 day, after Haiti '..ib i J .„ ?^.I!" 1 ''"""" %  death, was presented to the Court lit? mla 1. k po on " c,rr> "" %  """"ate ... Co......... form on Tfi ^ ** ,, w February 21. IKIl Probate WM TCA, planes Jo move refu.,,1 „, b „ ocr.sinn bsrauae James lia.cwood. one of 41 CHOSEN FOR "DEFENDER" A crew of 41 West Indian seamen were picked at the Harbour lir and Shipping Dvp..rtment vastercapacity *2 SSS. ? f^he^waK J^ffi ^JOTJi Small Pox Scare Over THE BRITISH SAlLOft! Reginald Tynell. who has been quarantined at Pelican Island allies. December II, is expected to return to the United Kingdom next week. The Director of Medical Services told tin Advocate yesterday thai "the risk of extension of small pox t Barbados is over." E\B.M..\.Chairniaii Johnny's Tale Here To-morrow i w agi R I on w aoM das ctween the motor cai v. tag driven )>v Mohanu-d Ms*, oi Welling! H i. !. % %  b) Wili.-.i Daam 4 B I..U HMTI sags] 1 1 th.ii r c I h %  Moating Wh,, lull in the salaa %  COBatng Spring the Ad 1 or* U Di 11. (. Daln 11 .ire among the pasM If you went through I> I lltUt hack alley which runs train th* Lovar Wharf ami T3fS (•olflto ahu.K whieh donkey carta and cars of the will, told tht to-morrow Dr Dam will be intry parked, you would see Thofn.ii. hen he siKiied tietransit for Tnnid.irf n here he will Johnson, a watchman of over 11, the other arttMM l.i.urtston preiide over a meeting of the > v enty. who can tell you of the HareCaribbean Medical Conference of a-'J" when bakeries and provision :he British Medical Asuoclatlor OjsalSJfi had businesses m Broad ghnta by him. from January 8 to J....uary IS. ,.. .,. department and 21 for the engine both the needs" of Cnnadn' oiui .*.".'! M room. The Defeoaer mo, leave BarbadS. ST anvth,na Z " M J r ^ ? 0t "Tf" 1 port around thend o( the week TCA could do to move t?a(ne l d,ed """ hl r A T 001 of ie Harbour and nn d from Barbados in accordanc Sl.lpping Department wa* crowded with the wishes of the peoplRepresented by Mi D II 1.. Dr. Dain WM II m abjht] for many hour* during the day here. >iU if possible, be done Ward, Instructed by Messrs >" old. Is a paht chairman of A itfunan laitrlni Jobs whether it is mail, cargo or pas Hutchinson 4. Bamield. Uwllftt ,, ' Council of the British Medi-al ASSori .'..tin Ryactnth It Morgan wb "H£LDEr DUE TODAY ^T" St •• %  • Johnson, 01 JoBnoy to his arqu.untances says that in 18U0 elKht biauits used to be sold for 1 1 ant and a tin of condensed milk any point served" by Hall, widow of the deceased, and cal Association. beneficiary under the will and BerDr Hyacinth II Morgan who Johnson was bom in St Lucv The Roy.,1 .Netherlands steamU.K. Reluctant esford Holder, another beneficiary, *' ,s ''"t;"" 1 "fc lag! week will ;m ,i worked at. a COOCSH lo S .ship Heldn ls expected to call He said that there hat, been presented a petition to the Court %  %  n v inference ns an obPolar for many years, but only here to-oay from Trinidad wiih some slight dimculty in thai the yesterday asking that the will tie ;: lvor c l %  ., mt,n ? Ue f,, of n '' lnvause he eould not lliul a betgeneral cargo. Her agents afe United Kingdom has Oiown some admitted lo Probate In Solemn V ounc l !L t *P r '* e ""' S *he West In%  „ job. He Is scared of being mMessrs. S. P Musson. S.m 4 Co.. reluctance to have TCA movt Form. Six other people *cre mfl 4\,? ran 5 h 55„ . „ J""'<1 and that was wh\ h. left Ltd. mfflB betwivn Canada and uS cik-d to appear—Abraham HoiuJVr^lLWh Wl1 'S lh '' cooper's trade, because he On Monday, the Harrison liner United Kmgdon. by wav „? Mond. E^ln Ctey. Laurie Seal-y. r \,? cr ^ ^ " d £LAI "&* "£ ' "• <" 1 *: SpeetatW to expecteci to arrive treal, t they are hooeful thai Beatrice I ^!!. r ;. 1 !.^. v ZL-.."'^rZ Jff\jjl J"Kn "Jnt *to Panama. He staved there for onh Single BeneArinry 1 liner United Kiugdf Barbados tltad QM 'fin r Club oOoi 1 %  1 L was being sold. The 1 1 pit/BMOa) has now reached ;'i*i6 hut there u ittll ovca Issa nonths boforo tha raeaa bsgan, -1.' thi Advsrase Ut in bad to uciidi 1 oUini 1 Bva, 1 iiiistCosta "IM !>-•> and the Itank-Holiday, but ba bold a reciil BIDOUDl on Las BIBOI banra 1 lirtasn .1 Eve ii*also had \put ui: 1 and New N ear's Days. \ ttaar vondoi mixed bti Inaisl % %  in. iii want lo 1 i it ii'imi bo Bath .' t>. on M I 1 ,Un,s thn I %  ilted (01 1 then oaughi tha orawd -I RMiad Tha malority 0J Wl ttieni with a MIIII. 1, Bprinsj MoaiI %  .. %  >. Edwmrd Ufinwi .H.r-plpf Mlai ii-.iu ii..-.,' I14 Ik* Ore.. Wall!—Ht. r.. euiiloblrB>|iariia Saia i Afsrra TaiHlm TWO Tm.s.ilalaaalr ,.n.| -allla J.-al. OaSr H..HH SriOrarlr >lrl. I... day in Da Costa's Allej 0mA short small man who carries a stick In one hand and his white ai fianied shades In the Othar, Johnson likes to tell of Ihe ii of parents in the . With roungsti 1 a ho *irk for a lot nf monev nnd don't know what lo do with it." Illl'klall ship. However, they were beginnothing of the actual ning to obviate and get over that ol ,hc wlu difficulty by two policies. Bnt, Ihe replatcment plan, and second the transfer of a flag policy which pei.i.its Canadian ships to >nc crop ,„,, year . pia, a eri,s KltSSS '"<• "' ' "" ^nulncnc or SOLA'S* a WESBSSF* a**--^ "'%  XCCUtion MtuWrn Dane* M*dl -Mm Finak rli Va.lo.al II. V.i Members of the Barbados Polo Club hope to visit Jamaica after the crop this year to play 1 Court Satisfied chief Justinglvlni hli decision, said the Court was satPONT WANT IT" Barbados the honours were divided. When the polo cup matches begin at the Garrison Savannah to-morrow, players will play at their best in the hope of catching the selectors' eyes. reasonable document, such %  Freight Rates cd ink ren and made tl • MTC tion. t itroUad Shipping from the surrounding clreumn.partment to havi 1 stances the testator would havi mild( on hll diM been likely to make in favour of He na(| Juflt off „ sh mMA his wife and Other, l<|t l( .,.„ { nm PjlKl „ nri rhe result of that policy has J am at 0*d said the Chier AJiar IrasjgMlg tha purpose of hi been to have a favourable effect J""**' J haI ; or some t "V 00 OI visit to the office, a clerk took hi There are 30 playing member, freight rates. Before that gh.r ,£&$£"cy ;ome into existence beJead dsaWH ... B WMW The ehih has IHHH. bi 1s*in now ei use of high freight rates brought a rt .„ I c 1 L s. about 12 years and wasTorSSd -bout by h.gh SS of operation. fj^-JSJgSg, wTl 'teue by an old member of the SavC-r.ad,..,, ship, were in difficulty. "" <,| J > nah Polo Club who dropped out hul aI ,hc cnrt of I>eccmbcr 1950. of the polo world soon after the the position was again normal. I9H-W war. !" d l •* to 1* hoped uiat export„ tl h „ „„,, mUp | ac „, 1(nd In the matches that will beg.n o the Wc.t Indies will be in ( a|)not b( H I and teuiirding i.2. in 14 days 'nonth's imprisonment Mr ..11 row %  ppaarad on behalf ot homas while the case .. %  ted liv Sgt Murrell. \\ oiulr 1 Drug 1 ond was repre.ienle.1 b; Mr .1 B. T. Brancker. Sgt K ,1 11, |ii*ceutcd for the PUo r nnalion received. y.\ uien.-e r.*i tha Proaartitioa sn drivor <>( the Tsui J IS .., ilium; abreast of anolhe 'bus. A man, who was on 11* rand wlOi a '"'8" It. had irui into ttM gutter wi ervtr Varda, uc muit for th" l*ioseeution. M"I :,. ..n.i-i-.i Ihe driver of that 'I'll-', bul not the drlver %  I "."< I'. -1 wi re 11 I ..tli 1 Ml Itr. linker submitted tiiut as to the f the driver of the 'bus J—129 Mi Harpsr ir „. he had anything lo say. Sgt. ',]"" bud refjUad T-.af a good one A N ACCIDrNT iMCiirred 011 Ch> ipssda load ' about H40 am yestenluy between motor car M-2258 ami bicycle me front whaal M Ina v, 1.. and UM n ai part "f On car %  rnagad itt>>a.a>">> the seamen Letters Testam. ntary will issue ^j,, u | olK | w | u .,. h "There i no Dealh Duly Carlllk ,,.,. ,,.,.,, tiflcate attached, but I underTll( u fk .^ kv ,, hla reason and stand that one was filed before. he „,„ %  v/hen I was ai 1 misplaced and fl „ d hfl rth0fl | tVil tm , nnnol be found, another oan mmut u ilh r ,.a )ltk t, r Ml good: [| DIES AFTER FALL MJItV %  probably be got he be forgotten that Until then, what I have Hid j rang? 1 *^ : 1 bul he want it the horse More Houses For Bay HdusingScheme first with reference to trudi M".-.ii.-1, with reference to curre>i Nelsan.hlgh. Carlisle Bay began to He rough ami so the skip," FISHING BOATS BLOCK CAREENAGE PURINA CHOWS heavy rains cement, but rapidly ESCAPED CONVICT RECAPTURED to spend his second winter He rough and so the skhpper* of the was accompanied bv his wife and Miing ^U brought ttnltfo PORT-OT-SPAIN. Jan 3 Convict Gordon was recaptured nland on Tuesday evestaving 'at the Marine Ihe Careenage's rtwth for shelter Some of the fishing boats were and St Peter •hey Hotel from Bndget. hut the most of them were fi St. James. Few of them hud nstvrwL-sjsr v& F ,RE DES !" 0YS CANES **£&&&$* island \ f\ n 0 f unknown origin broke -f^g, n^h 1 ^1 menRa was caught wearing only oul al Pleasant Hall Plantation sxe to shipping in the harbour short pants In which he had swum about 2 00 p m. yesterday It deLighters and launches could no' the narrow stretch of %  ; %  to the stroyed 8J acres of first crop cane* move freely out and In of Ihr mainland he had hidden in r -nd 5 acres of second crop canes. Careenage Luckily, there was no nearbv forests where police found The damage wa* covered by inmotor vessel or schooner leaving* I im -^

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FILES



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P\GE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. JANUARY Qahib galling Turfites R*tu rttirn A 1.1. i S ill AltTMUK and Lady Morrcil, who have been in Trinidad (Or nvtj wcek< arrived hen vmrterday by B W I A to spend a NU| manias' holiday in Bar ban:. art? staying at th* Crane Hotel Sir Arthur joined India and Panam TV in lMt and waa In command from lt(M t* 1622. ret inn* on election to Aettve F-ld*r ltu.thei ,.f Hoy*.He Wan Defutv itrtaaan of Trinity Houae from 1831* to IMS when be retin acuva sarvicc. Sir Arthui is form uf fOCl bride*. His wife IS the I Aucury I--nie Alston Trinidau > New K.Cs. T WO TRINIDADIANS have been made K C 1 Honourable J. Mathicu-Hcrcz. Trinidad's Attorney General and Mr. John Basil HotaMM, Mr. J. B Hobaun. K C of San Fernando, at prvaanl Solicitor General of Kenya. The nai Hobaoit baa foi almost .. been linkea with the Bar in Trinidad Very Pleased A NOTHEK BARBADIAN turfite returning from 1 on Wednesday afternoon am Ml LUle Ward. Ml P (leased to see two horses I bred. Atomic I 1 do so well at the Chi In. To celebrate UK A.fx Chin, wrta held a parly In TIM day night Dr. II. wai i from Trinidad on Tw itue-st of Sir HMbtrH Ha nee at Oovcrnm'ii' during K Lifr in India S IRllENl'YCl.AIK ..i EHKIUIKI Dutch wi and mi has come ov i l Wti DR AND MRS OSCAR KLEVAN left lor the U.l Ltafl .i holiday witli their two child !" .]. yp'tsrday aftar M R. TREVOR GALl, Adeettimg Manager of the Aaa posa 1-iinited. and Ma I'TDther l)i Tony (J*> who wre i i Trinidad for the I nnidad Turf Club's ClirWma* Meetan. >edrned on Wedne*rlT afleTmVm by B W I A. During his stay Trinidad Mr. Gale was the guest i Mr. Justice Kenneth Vincent V ting Chief Juxtiro of Trinidad. Incidentally Mr. Browne will be teavtne; Trinidad for England by the GvtfiM In the middle f January Dr Gale was a guest %  • the Queen* Park Hotel. Her* for Two Week. Al'DRHY DE LIMA and arrived from nidad on Wednesday afternoon I v B W. I A to spend a couafe %  f weeks' holiday, staying at I.eaton-on-Sea. Her husband. Mr. Alfonso B d> mn Is pxpeeted to • %  In her today with their other wo chlMren from Tftnldad. To Take Up Appwinlment p%R OT.IVER JAMM arrived *J from England Via Trinidad -esterday momlng to take up an ppolntment with the Genera Hospital here Dr Jamea who** iome is in Sheffield qualified twr %  ears ago and hat been stationer' t various London hospitals prioetterday ..rtfrii.-mt to meet sgrj. Parr.*. wh. returned from (Ivi .nd I hitlf months' holiday in the IIS She came down vi;i Puert •tico and Antigua by B VT.I.A. M#s. Parrla had been vlslllnt her brother in Brooklyn Back Again |V|ISS MOLLY LOUhENCU C APT THANK beri of dad Holiday Vi.it Over II OSCAR /~V II.W 1 A oflke In Mb. Mr. Sylvan Cox. Travel Editor bt .]'*ff *5 aboul lw W* >f the Mi.-iml Herald is touting Cf uncil from 1934 to I03R H. ifafl nade Governor ral UH Punjab in 1138 and his last appointment reforo retirement WH Politic;.! Adviser to the Viceroy from 1941 to 1943 already visited Islands and from here he wll visit Grenada. Trinidad, Tdbago nnd Jamaica in that order before returning home. This Is his firs: visit to Barbados. Mr Cox is a guest at the Marine Hotel AMI i In Barbados ami i %  %  Kl.KVAN Ocean Vie,, fatal g | I tMUda* ID Ilaruadoa •who wears a monocle, has spent "•' ll > ,n r soli, most of his liftMI Instts H i.iuKhter Mrs. Lisle joined Ihe Indian Civil Serv'ee in Smith h. unlng by eeveral of the Caribbean islands Itltf Be was CkM Secretan of B W I A for I m " Kalher material for hi the Pun|ab from 1922 to 1927. In their w;..v to M.. nd Hnnn He arrived yesterd„> 192' hr wo. made i Klaean'i horns la In WM ifternoon m Barbados. Mr. C He wss it metnl>er of the Punjab Chi Executive Council from 1930 to T See Damaae IM.'OSJR LSJZ M", ^vr7 rw i u.. .. MI iT "' r NF f Yurk Herald Trii in Antigua on Wednesday rught by private plan* '.. %  and RVTIS estertlay to view the damages and to Mill ihff where they Hi' Imlm • Another Photographer A RJUVINQ Hum ine U.S. ra U rdaj mini was Mr i narkai Allmon, adventurer, ,LII'KI, .in.i EAotoB asfk H.i] B.W.LA. Mr Allmon haii COBM t" BarbadoK as ,. guest of the Barbsdoa Publicity Commit top. %  nd while bNWS will gather gaalsrla] for nn article about Barbados, for the National GeonpMa M.IJ.I/IIHwhich will l>e Qlustratad with tolour photographs. He will also take photographs (91 tbS Barbados Publicity Committee ,'••11 to meet him yesterday was Mr. Aubrey Boyre, Hon. Treasurer of the Ilarbndos Publicity Committee Mr Allmon was born in F-ist Liverpool, Ohio, and has spent ihout tsvM yaai . %  .i IMT imuf raphsv. During that time ha bas visited .'iirlcs ond has written i n Wsart Africa. Trinidad and Tobago and two ait i' UM South Seas which were published in the Nntionnl Geographic I Me alao writes articles pletursa foj Ufa, Holiday and the Saturday %  VMSSt l'o. mSgSfl"f He is .i motion picture prtxiucer One of his adventure UnM Of Ad Sails in the South Seas—took ten months. 1110,000 md 10.000 feet of Him to was in Barbados in earl) November with her s|sler Gloria, is back in Barbauos. She arrivci on Wednesday afternoon by B W.l A. wiUi her mother Mrs T the invitation of B.O.A.C.Kathleen Lourenco. They On Cnrib Tour slaying at Accra. Buckley and Molly tells me that Gloria is aek in Canada Where she work" nth TC.A. in Montreal. Back from Trinidud the"Virii'n IV AND >(RS w "• re he will *•* JOHNSON and their son,who were In Trinidad over the Christmas season returned from Trinidad on Wednesday afternoon by I: W i A Dr. Johnson is P M O. St. Joseph. SI* HENRY CRAIX -arrit'ed from Eriolond yciferdaw miles make. lb Allmon expects to be in Barbados for six weeks and l staying at Ihe Ocean View Hotel. BY THE WAY By Beachcomber M B. AND MRS. WILFRED ALSTON arrived from Trinfew weekM" %  dad yesterday B W.I A after With Barclays Bank R NORMAN "ROBBIE" Robinson who has been in Grenada for three months with Barclays Bank arrived yesterday by B.W.I. A., to spend two weeks' holiday with his family fieorge Street. Belleville. Short VUlt ORIG K K PAGE, O O.C Caribbean Area left yestetlav by B.W 1.A., on a fwo-d viit to St Lucia Not Returning SIDNEY SPIRA. Optometrist, who has been holidaying with his parents Barbados nince he completed his studies at Colombia University in New York, has decided to main here and will shortly opening an office here D"„ CROSSWOBD 1 1 1 1 f 1 ' v~ u IS T* [a '" — i H'.l.;.' ','„' jar TWO boxer:, fell out of the ring X the other day. and werV C counted out A dull Hiding. not have bouts h.tween thr.p •oxers? It would have to he understood that each man would fight for himself, with no attempt of unv two to turn on the odd man. I think this would liven up boxing contests The danjpaT Is that a tunning DghtCf rmgM -Imply bide his time, letting the other two go for each other. Then, fresh and Ylgorou-c. he r, md lap in and deal with the pair of them But I don't care. Hulln-iii's •VimlucV A FOOL who went to the Royal Academy to see H "Viaduct" searched in vain. An official said, "Don't you mean Holaorn?" "I certainly do not." nU the fool. "It says Holbein here on the catalogue. H-o-i. B I I N "Holborn." snid the official. "Is a rl.,., ii..' %  I'll hud thS Viaduct' "WhQl .i iniiu-i: a, said the fool. Prodstose: And is that all you have to say about a wonderful exhibition of art? Mgjelf: It's all I can think of for the moment, us the man re— S tha woman who • % %  I u hat all?" when he thin I I oft her door and told her h. i house %  Miiifiinal not* Y OU never know Dos ftdaj what casunl phrase will l>e hailed as though it WSM I nd repeated all over the wand. Ever sluie Mr. Somerset %  aid that be was a very m. the words have been I .vei> dn> :n in! articles, essays, and pa I will vagcr that already Ihe phrase Is more widely known than any other single sentence Mr. Maugham hns written or spoken. I have just seen it as the caption to his photograph. It might amuse Mr. Maugham to say one day. "I am rather fund of salmon," and than Witch the phrase becoming famous. V durrf/fi)' rt$ilio-bpam S URELY there can be no debate on who should be the first man to talk to the mnrm from the lop of the Shot Towel -. t year The tun -uishould fall bv right to Dr. Strabismus (Whom (Jod I*ressr**), of Utrecht. As there will !* %  BO rtpfar, he can sav anything hs USMM But, spai I an informer, whose earnings should be tax-free, let me r;i .h roroaa n a taUdna to tba m %  %  %  oa ^unday! p< tie' Is this the Place Pi RB lie? mm a l>twn. l*t oaoa tell •oisr. is, Si u> An IKIUMII can do Uil IS. An Alrlean would call the Tillage' <&> i %  Tear u> rlo. (PI ; Ulillli —it of die*. 141 < An ola wuman. (Si • th .wi be loouM upon laalrBlnlng Influence Cl IH Kiteiid. (Xi \J Hues up ^ M.i men' alierstlon. (7j asani i Nutnim *ai* nar*. it) Cirl Pn "•Il1l"r cfll unr %  .:.form (el r, JJ, ta isrk;* Jh.n(m befor* true time Mirtilr group tn th* Vatlrnn PV>r • Wi It predominates i %  iiiiin.il labv (g) 'i Taa sa. Vlt 1 M Mt Rupert and the Sketch Book-1 Ruptn hfs aslknl to it* viaMr ht man. JM pal Will*. "Hulls. W art piper iar h.. Djddy. (an Ruptn." m*i ih kttU movw a:or h irrfrn mull figure I vr ,ur M*n p4 your Mtic on *ilki oat oi 'ha .Sop. "Sunfrr. Riy .jav-ryMr Tkaaf tr*i I • h *'" P*SV' ..irta coutin RoMli*." .hjdung a> K mor-car itanding n# aamaaM. 1 -ondr why Podgy ouiadt. Wheat wu M ? " l'*t ao i'i tlking ef< ol b*r ? Sha oughi JM." u Rueen. in lurpr.w. ll net i b rtene." lard* ilW ihoa wun'i rhsai whan I Manrd out f" B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME raia*r. JAXIAST S. MI rtaund. I IS m l*r Make .vi..-,.fl as p.m Mffckaoi May NfWuI'Mr! a im Tbr Maw.; 'IS >,m. New< Sin p m Ttw lUiih Lertvm; 149 p .t, I-.I. || %  ... From Thf Editorial* Pro#r<.,m Para rftlN.tlADS HOT KIIOTS ALL STAR HAND MAKE THEIR I1RKT APPEARAN* t U I ASI AIII.V. M.I Ml MMH.IV, NIGHT. ADMISSION 60c. | WARNER BROS. P L Z A — mm saw, i 11' A - ** HRIIH.I ion \ ANNOUNCING "Mo ausi raitffa wsurs aassMf i ejaa.Bmftn' Parade, S am iM> uh I-tur^. IM am IJ'Wieri Indian Dlaf* I U"-t rum. And Bad Thin*. • so •> i lew* fr. ada. TOO ajn. Tn I THbna On TheM%  Nawieacl. a |l tat am. com. The New*, lit < nrltain; III m CVaw pnaer ol the Wfrt n ll n am Pi-|rinrg. Paiadr. Afratn: f It p m Lef. Stake MUJI am Australia v tnaThirMf U l am The Haw*. IS |0 am Frn Worltf Aaaira ISO) noot* The t-"norlaVi 10 i^ pm commupi Ill" n", Ne*. Anal;. I.: ll 15 Prartree. ISM p m Tn June' CVn* On. n. ID pm BBC Se*>1I" tl am The If r hate I a m Auatralla • p m Rma Up The Curl^ ROBINSONS 'PATENT' BAHUnr GARY COOPER O-xrrn, at D0MMKUI, 1* •!> -WO" ( mi ol i~>n MRICIA NEAL voii' PLAri.w ro.ii.-tr JA.v. .ui. BEDDING ,i Evans & Whiff ields YOUR SHOE STORES MATTRESSES (lihn--(illfd) 3 fool. $13.17 3' 6" $16.28 4' 6" $19.^"' SHEETS 80"x100" each $7 08 80" x 99" „ $6.61 70" x 100" „ $617 63" x 100" $5.38 PILLOW CASES 94c. & 97c.l NOW IS THE BEST TIME TO PAINT YOUR HOUSE A wide rangr ol READY MIXED PAINTS •nd MATERIAL nupplied by ihiforemost manufacturer* to telecl from. REMEMBER wan yt* sivr thr Surfarr YM Savr $ $ $ lrn.nl lhre -it our H/VRDWABE DEPARTMENT T.lephow Nu. 20SS THE IIAHHAIMIS t IWII'lll.l S IVI rOTTON III llllll LTD. Washable Prints —43.. S5e.. *nd 7Je. liinihams—59. a yd. Printed Sjmns—S1.02 up Plain Sinin—XT. nil *Se.. ll.lCe.. a yd. Jersey* (Plain and Striped)—8c. up Taffetas. Crepes. GeoreHtea, Satins, Aniflai.e. Ete.. Ete. THAM'S FOR VALUES S Pr. Wm. Henry Street Dial 3IM -•"ML MAUREEN PAUL VINCENT O'HARACHRISTIAN PRICE %  y—COioe BY J&HMCOLOe I0M S4ITI0U JEFT CUTf by ROBfBT HARDY WIDREWS • D-KW by CHARUS LMHOMT by ROBERT ARTHUR • A Lni^rsarlnternitsml PUuft EXTRA TOMTF l.CH'AI. TALENT ON P\K\ll NAT DI'NNAH GERALD HAREWOOIt IHANCIS HVPOLITK KAL. WILLIAMS "IMIII l KtDDER CLEM BRHK.EMAN if Vou Sluh ^ tun Tor nn lhe> MO.II ll 1 l.ovr \..u Whrrr ArtYou Maibf You'll Br Ttirrr Matlr In Ihr Moonllshi Srr*a.de ol lha Hell. Ml IN( KEASF IS I'Rli I <' PIT 16 — HOl'SE 30 — RAL. 40 — BOX 54.




ESTABLISHED 1895





Khan Boycotts

Empire Talks

‘THE CONFERENCE

LONDON, Jan. 4
of Commonwealth Prime

Ministers opened here today at 10 Downing

Street, official residence
Clement Attiee.
For the first time

of British Prime Minister

in history, the Common

wealth chain was broken—Pakistan, one of the

new Dominions, was not present.
Khan, her Prime Minister, has declined to attend!
unless the Kashmir dispute between his country!

and India is put on the



s
Appointed Dutch
s .-. *
Minister To Spain
THE HAGUE, Jan, 4.

Holland’s Minister in Egypt,
Count Van Rechteren Limpurg,
has been appointed Minister in
Spain, it was reliably learned
to-day.

This is the first appointment of
a Dutch Minister to Spain since
the United Nations last Novem-
ber rescinded their decision to
break off diplomatic relations
with Spain.

It is not yet known who will
replace the Count in Cairo.

—Reuter

New Chinese Atlas

HONG KONG, Jan. 4.

Copies of a new Chinese Com-
munist Atlas reaching Hong
Kong from Shanghai contained a
map covering Malaya and parts
of Siam and Indo-China as cap-
tured “southeast China penin-
sula,”

Several Chinese in Hong Kong
have received seasonal greeting
cards from China, wishing them
a “happy New Year and happy
liberation.”



—Reuter

ARGENTINA TO BARTER
. MEAT FOR STEEL

BUENOS AIRES, Jan. 4
Argentina will this year bar-
ter $8,000,000 worth of meat for
steel icing from West Germany,
according to a local announce-
ment. The State Trade Institute
put through the deal on behalf

of State oilfields,
—Reuter



80 WORKERS KILLED
IN EXPLOSION
|
|

LIMA, Jan. 4

An explosion of dynamite
charges was reparted to have
killed 80 workers and _ injured |

almost an equal number in north
Peru.

The accident occurred in the
valley of the Santa River where
an avalanche of rock last Oc-
tober had blocked communica-
tions.

—Reuter

75 ESCAPE FROM
BURNING HOTEL

VANCOUVER, Jan, 4.

Seventy-five guests fled blindly
when the four-storey Parks Ho-
tel was destroyed here to-day by
a fire.

None of the guests was in-
jured but 10 of the firemen who
brought the blaze under contro!
in three hours were overcome
by smoke.



—Reuter

Liaquat Ali

agenda,

Eight nations of the British
Commonwealth — ineluding the
United Kingdom and sev eii

autonomous countries—are repre-
sented in the conference,

Present at the talks were: Mr.
Attlee (United Kingdom), Presi-
dent; Mr. Robert Menzies (Aus
tralia); Mr. S. G, Holland (New
Zealand); Mr. Louis St. Laurent
(Canada); Mr, Nehru (India);
Mr. Senanayake (Ceylon); Sir
Godfrey Huggins (Southern Rho-
desia); and Dr. T. E, Donges
(South Africa), All are Prime
Ministers except Dr. Donges who
is deputising for Mr. Malan,
South African Premier,

Empty Seat

The chair reserved for Pakistan
in the cream-washed cabinet room
of 10 Downing Street remained
vacant as the Prime Ministers
took their places around the great
green-topped table.

The conference, due to last 10
days—-has been called to discus9
the world crisis—and today the
statesmen began almost immedi-
ately to study the growing threat
to peace,

Mr. Attlee opened the confer-
ence, the third of its kind since
the war, with an address of wel-
come.

Foreign Secretary Bevin, De-
fence Minister Shinwell and Brit-
ish Service chiefs were due to
attend some of the sessions.

The Prime Ministers later de-
cided to send a telegram to Pak-
istan Prime Minister Liaquat Ali
Khan urging him to attend,

Quarters close to the Govern-
ment here thought it doubtful
whether Liaquat would eventually
agree to come.

First business before them was
to settle the agenda and to hear
a wide review of the world situa-
tion from Mr. Attlee.

The statesmen had these rough
heads 9n which to plan their pro-
eramme:

1. The situation in Korea, its
implications for the Common-
wealth and policies to be
advanced
tions.

2. Commonwealth _ policy
wards Communist China.

3. The Communist world threat.|
4. Rearmament of Germany and}
the possibility of new high|

level talks with Russia, i
5. Britain’s commitments as a}

member of the North Atlantic| ROME, Jan, 4
Treaty organisation and their; Many Roman bus and tram
implications in terms of man-| drivers stopped their vehicles

power, money and rearma-

ment, |

* A Japanese Peace Treaty and
the American suggestion that

in the United Na-| $100,000,000

to-|






|



WHAT ELSE would a crowd like this be watching on a cool Thurs
game between B.C.L. and B.C.A. teams at Kensington yesterday

| 6 Cruisers

WASHINGTON Jan, 4.

The United States today offer-
ed to sell two light cruisers to
each of three South American
nations — Argentina, Brazil and
Chile — for hemisphere defence.

The State Department said if
the offer were accepted, arrange-!
ments would be made for rehab-
ilitating the ships and for
training crews of the three
countries.

The six cruisers would be sold
under the Mutual Defence Act of
1949 which allows
material to be sold for 10 per
cent of the gross cost plus
cost of rehabilitation. |

Officials said the United States/
had offered the Phoenix and the
Boise to Argentina, the Brooklyn
and the Nahi to Chile, and the
St. Louis and the Philadelphia to
Brazil. !

The State Department said
they were in excess of mobilisa-
tion reserve requirements

Representatives of Argentina, |
Brazil and Chile, said _ their
Governments had agreed to the
United States offer. i

The terms were not disclosed
for the disposal of the vessels
which cost a total of more than
shortly before the;
second world war, —Reuter.

surplus war

the





Romans Protest
Rent Increases



wherever they happened to be at
precisely 10 a.m, local time today
land politely informed their pas-
sengers of a Communist called 10



Japan might be rearmed. | minutes strike in protest against

—Reuter.



FORTY-FIVE ESCAPE

CHICAGO, Jan, 4.
An airliner carrying 45 pas-
sengers crashed and burned at
Midway airport here carly to-
day but all aboard escaped with-
out injury police repored.
—Reuter

SEOUL BURNING

By WARREN WHITE
ON A PLANE FROM SEOUL, Jan. 4,

Seoul was burning under

dense layers of smoke today

as Communist troops swarmed into the northern suburbs.
As we flew over the doomed city shells lobbed spasmod-

ically flashing brightly against the smoke.

conld be seen 50 miles away
pall of gloom.



U.S. Planes Made
328 Air Attacks

HONGKONG, Jan, 4.
Peking Radio alleged to-n'ght
that American aircraft had made
328 raids over Chinese territory

from August 27 to the end of
last year.
The Radio said 1,406 aircraft

took part in these bombing and
strafing raids in which it claimed
16 Chinese were killed and 715
wounded.

—Reuter

SMUGGLERS ON
THE RUN

ROME, Jan. 4.
Italian frontier patrols last
night surprised a band of about
20 smugglers who dropped cases

containing over 300,000 black
market cigarettes and fled back
on to Swiss soil.

—Reuter



SLIGHT EARTHQUAKE

BOMBAY, Jan. 4.
An earthquake shock of slight
intensity with its origin in North
Assam was recorded here early
to-day.
—Reuter

One fire which
threw an orange glow on the

—— Southward for 80 miles stretch-

ad a thin, almost unbroken line of
light, made up by the headlights,
of the great evacuation convoy,
Here and there the line swelled
and split — presumably where
troops were depioying for new
defence lines. ., °

To the northeast a line of lights
was moving towards Seoul—to the
west lights moved westward to-
wards the port of Inchon and
south to Suwon. 25 miles away.

The Communists weré reported

pressing hard on this road trying | contribute five and ten cent pieces| June 24,
to drive a wedge between Seoul |t<, a special fund throughout Lent.! Manager and later as Managing

and Inchon 20 miles away.

As we took off, a passing soldier
said: “They have cut the road. Our
convoys will have to come back
and try to find another way ouf.”

Solemn March
Shells were pounding on the Kim-
po airfield as we roared into the
darkness and beaded for Japan.
The Communists were then re-
ported three miles away.
American jeeps had been cross-
ing the river on the ice all yester-
day.

rent increases authorised by the
| Government.

After a quiet smoke, the crews
| drove off again at exactly 10,10.
Buses and trams with Christian
Democrat crews did not stop.



The transport strike was part of
a 30 minutes “gendral strike”
called in the Capital by the Com-
munist Trade Union headquarters
but there was less evidence of its
effect among other workers. In
the small Via Veneto quarter, most
waiters went on serving as usual
and clerks went on typing.

A check on Rome's telephone
exchange which was also supposed
to be paralysed for 10 minutes,
revealed that a cable or trunk
call would still go through during}
the “lay off” period,

—Reuter.|



$5,000,000 Wanted
From Catholics

NEW YORK, Jan. 5.
American Roman Catholics will!
be asked to raise $5,000,000 in aj
ar collection on March 4 for'|
relief of war ravaged countries.
The appeal for funds was outlined
by Monsignor Edward Swanstrom
Executive Director of the War
Relief Services National Catholic
Welfare Conference.
Two million children in Cath-|
olie countries will be asked to

—Reuter.



(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Jan. 4.
A guarded warning to the West
Indies not to prejudice Canadian
goodwill in future trade agree-
ments appears in a leading ar-

The main road south from Seoul |ticle in the current issue of the

was choked with a_ turbulent
stream of vehicles and refugees,
men, women and children walked
solemnly by the roadside.

| Dead women and children and

West India Committee Circular’
published here to-day.

Throughout the article empha-
sis is placed on Canada’s previous

j sometimes a man lay forgottén be- | generosity to the West Indies and

side the roac
starvation and exposure, but hur-



They had died of}on the fact that in any agreement,

“it takes two to make any bar-



rying relatives had not time to/gain”. The leader recalls that
tbury them. after the Commonwealth sugar
| The refugees’ were heading j negotiations in Tondo the dan-
} @ On Page 7 ger was pointed out that ith





FRIDAY, JA

Under

. afternoon, but the first trial

NUARY 5,

1951

U.N. TROOPS EVAC

CRICKET OF COURSE

U.S. Selling Nevis Carries On

FOR ALMOST A WEEK the people of St. Kitts, Nevis
and to a lesser degree Antigua. have been subjected to one

of the worst earthquakes to
many years.

—ON THE —
°sPoTr |.

YT
A BATHER at Browne's | |
Beach dived into the sea |
yesterday morning for his
| early dip. The sun was just |
coming up and up he came
as well gasping: “Shark !
Shark !" This was very
near in and a few people
waded in to investigate.

There was the terrible
looking head of a large shark
all right, but there was no
“body to it. It was just one
of the sharks butchered by
the fishermen at Browne’s
Beach the previous afternoon
and the head and other
unwanted parts thrown into
the surf.

The bather took a little
time to recover his equilib-
rium, but he was so shaken
that he did not continue his
dip.

ee Ce

Essex Coming Back



Into Service

NEW YORK, Jan. 4

The 27,000-ton American air-—
craft carrier Essex will be recom-
missioned on January 15. An-
other large carrier the Bon Homme
Richard would rejoin the Pacific
Fleet at the same time, the Navy
announced today,

The Essex has been undergoing
modernisation for two years. The
flight deck can now handle Jarger
and heavier planes. A_ heavy
cruiser, the Los Angeles, will be
recommissioned on January 27.

—Reuter.



King Paul Summons

Greek War Council

LONDON, Jan. 5. |
King Paul of Greece has called
a meeting of the Greek War
Council for today (Friday) a
communique quoted by Athens
radio announced. Besides Prime
Minister Sophocles Venizelos and
the Ministers for War and Foreign
Affairs, the Urfited States Ambas-
sador and the heads of the British
and American Military Missions
in Greece have been invited
attend.

to

—Reuvter.



MURRAY GOES

{From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN Jan. 2.

Lt. Commander A, D. S. Mur-
ray, Managing Director of the
British West Indian Airways, will
soon be transferred from his
present post.

Commander Murray has been
in the service of B.W.1.A. since
the new Company was formed on
1948, first as General

Director.

full preferences West Indian pro-
ducers might find it impossible to
sell sugar in either the United
Kingdom or Canada at world
prices, in competition with the
Cuban “dump.” Removal or di-
minution of that preference
would convert that fear into cer-
tainty.

Yet even though the “size of the
stake in sugar alone is so fright-
ening, we must not overlook the
fact,” says the Cireular, “that the
Caribbean colonies enjoy many
other extremely valuable prefer-
ences in the Canadian market.”

Reference ic t xtreme-

|
|
have struck these islands for
Nevis perhaps has been hit the
hardest. Mr, R. K. Samthani, a
merchant from India who has)
been holidaying in Antigua and
St. Kitts told the Advocate yes-|
terday afternoon shortly after he
arvived at Seawell from Antigua,
that many people from Nevis have
evacuated their homes and gone
over to St, Kitts. Mr. Samthani
left St. Kitts four days ago from
Antigua. Severest shocks, he said
were felt in Nevis and St. Kitts
either early in the morning or
late at night when people were
asleep. Some people have been
sleeping in their cars and others
walked up and down the beaches;
#. tight. Peaple in Nevis were,
very panicky and more were ex-

steve t> arrive daily in St. Kitts

The Red Cross in Trinidad are
sending supplies of tents to the
two islands for sleeping purposes.

Slight Shocks in Antigua

Shocks in Antigua
very slight, he said. On Wednes-
day Mr, Samthani made a radio
telephone call to a friend in St
Kitts and he said that they had
shocks on Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday in that island

In Nevis the water supply has
heen cut off by landslides and
business is at a standstill, Every
stone building in the island has
been badly damaged. The Charles-
town’ Court-house has collapsed
and the hospital and Government
House have been evacuated

Damage to the Royal Bank and
Barclays Bank has been reported
in St. Kitts and the Roman Cath-
olic, Anglican, Methodist and Mo-
ravian churches in Basseterre have
also been damaged.

have been





f s
No Panic
se
In Nevis
(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, Jan. 4,
Major Martin Hicks, Private
Secretary to His Excellency Mr
K. W. Blackburne has informed
me that Nevis news published in
certain sections of the West Indian
Press is utterly without founda-
tion, Through the kind offer of
Mr. Ogden Reid, Major Hicks and
Bishop .athaaic! Davis few to St.
Kitts to-day. There is no ques-
tion of evacuation, no panic, no
terrifying situation, Tremors con-

tinue spasmodically but are de-
creasing,”





A correspondent from Antigua
siates that Administrator Hugh
Burrowes visited Nevis on New
Year’s Day . 1d reported serious
damage to the Hospital, the
Court-house, the Police Station
buildings at Cades Bay, the Health
Buildings at Cotton Ground, the
Matrons’ quarters, St. Thomas
Church, Gingerland School and
two business premises

There was moderate damage to
one bridge and the Treasury,

Water Supply Hard Hit

The water supply was seriously
damaged at its source, causing
alarming anxiety as to whether
the trouble Lies in the reservoir

@ On Page 7

A WARNING FOR W. INDIES

ly warm “and for the most part
mutually profitable” relationships
which have existed between Can-
ada and the West Indies during
the last 50 years, and special men-
tion is made of the fact that, even
though the dollar crisis meant
heavy restriction on the volume of
exports from Canada to the West
Indies, the Dominion did not de-
nounce the trade agreement as she

,could have done

Even now when steps had been
taken to remove some of the dis-
abilities which Canadian exporters
had been suffering, Canada might
well feel something more might
have been done,

“I do not know whether
wants World War III,

UATE INCH

Red Army Drive

Further

IKE GOING
TO PARIS

PARIS, Jan, 4

General Dwight Eisenhower
Supreme Commanaer of the nev
Atlantic army will arrive here oi |
Sunday, a member of the Head |
juarters staff cf S.H.A.P.E. (Su
ereme Headquarters Allied Pow- |
rs in Europe) said here today

The American army authoritie
1ave clamped tight security
peasures on the hotel Eisenhowe
“ill oceupy temporarily

A photographer who called a
he 200-room hotel, guarded by
American military policemen wa
ot allowed upstairs to take pic
tures of the Genera!’ t fl
uite

American officers sereene
French civilian presonnel sop!yin
for employment at the headquar
ters.

Fivenhower will be accompanie
by his Chief of Staff, General
Grunther on his iovr of Wester
Europe after their arrival on Sun-
day, it was learned here today

So far no new French civiliar
have been engaged for Eisenhow
er’s temporary headquarters in th:
Hotel Astoria.

—Reuter,

Europe Must
Sacrifice Too

—Eisenhower

WASHINGTON, Jan. 4.

General Dwight D, Eisenhower
the North Atlantic Supreme Com-
mander in Europe said to-day
that the North Atlantic defence
system would not be successfui
unless wester;, European nations
matched American sacrifices anc
efforts,

General Eisenhower made a
vigorous appeal for all the north
Atlantic nations to build up their
defences,

He spoke at a Press Conference
prior to his departure on Saturday
on a tour of the capitals of west-
ern European members of the
— Atlantic Treaty Organisa-
tion,

Eisenhower spoke emphatically
to the crowded Press Conference
frequently pounding the table.

Eisenhower was asked about
American press reports that he
was confident the Western De
fence Organisation could be built
up within two years to a strength
which would deter Russia from
starting a third world war, He
replied that he had not talked to
anyone 0» that subject. He added:
Russi‘



Montgomery

Answering questions, he said he
lid not now believe there had
been any special discussions on
the position of Field Marshal Lord
Montgomery in the Western De-
fence Organisation,

He added: “I would like to say
that Field Marshal Montgomery
has several times very enthusias~
tically placed himself at my dis-
posal for any purpose he can
serve. We have been friends for
a long time.” —Reuter,

U.S. Will Not Bomb

China Says Truman

WASHINGTON, Jan, 4

President Truman said to-day
that United States forces would
not bomb China without United
Nations sanction,

The President told reporter
that the United States Govern
ment did not have under con
sideration a request to the Unite





Nations to bomb Communis
China. He added that the Unitec
States would not contemplat
such a_ step withcut United

Nations authority.—Reuter.

IMPORT PERMITS

MONTEVIDEO, Jan., 4

Al] imports from the sterlin:
area into Uruguay will in future
be subject to a system of prio:
permits. The Government decrec
ordering this refers to the neec
to adopt temporary measure
aimed at adjusting purchases i:
the sterling area to the country
sterling balances,



—Reuter

“In these circumstances we have |
viewed with some concern certai:
recent happenings in those terri

tories,’ says the Circular. But al
though it is fully realised hov
much the authorities in the col

onies need do everything possib!«
to raise the standard of living, “a
the same time it is most importan
and necessary to appreciate a’
their true worth, such long-triec
benefits as those that derive from
preferences enjoyed in the Cana
dian market and make sure be-
yond question that whatever i
done nothing should be allowed tc
damage the solid foundations or
which all future
rest.”

building must

{9999994064444 tpt plete et et et

South

TOKYO, Jan. 4.
UNITED NATIONS FORCES defending the
port of Inchon began to evacuate by sea to-
night, according to front line reports
The great Allied withdrawal from the blazing
capital—-which has now changed hands three times
in six months—-was completed almost without a
hitch
The American, British and South Korean troops
took up positions on a new secret defence line to the
south.
Small forces of Communists were reported to
be moving through Seoul late to-night in pursuit
of the retreating United Nations troops









Rear Admiral lL. A. Thackery,

| ike ae . Senior American Naval Com-

'mander on the west coast an-

pb? ’ nounced earlier today that a giant

Third Test | armada of Navy transports and

{chartered merchant ships was

In the Third Test Maten {standing by off Inchon “in case it
between England and Aus-— ‘is needed for evacuation.”

tralia which began at : The transports were protected

Sydney to-day England won by American, Canadian British,

the toss and are batting. The Duteh, and Australian cruisers

and destroyers,
Elsewhere the advancing Com-
their

Weather was described as
fine but there is a threat of

d aie by : munists continued south-
py ete ie on u Eng- ward drive plunging down among

i a oes with utton |/the mountains in the centre of
anc Vashbrook and the | Korea and threatening to split the
pair batted confidently,

United Nations Army in two.

Washbrook scoring twice as One army of about 200,000
fast as Hutton, At $4 Wash Communist troops was reported
brook was caught by Miller thrusting deep below the 38th
off the bowling of lun John- parallel towards the key road

son; he had scored 18 junction of Wonju, gateway to the
south .

| The move would leave United
| Nations forces isolated on the east

and west coasts,

Latest score
133 for 3. Hutton 62 Comp-
ton 0; Simpse) and Park-
house not out

is England

The capture of this strategic
town would enable them to com-

|
| mang the highway to Pusan, main’



supply port in the southeast.

Wants More Time
For U.S. Conscripts

WASHINGTON,‘ Jan. 4
Congress will soon be asked to
add six months to the present 21
months served by conscripts Carl
Vinson, Chairman of the House
Armed Services Committee gaid
today. He told reporters he expec-

The other mein Communist
‘oree, swiftly following up the
| Righth Army's retreat from blaz-
ing Seoul, the southern capital,
and its airfields of Kimpo, was
trying to outflank the United Na-
tions forees falling back through
streams of refugees towards In-
chon, the west coast port.

Thousands of refugees tried to
board shore transports as the big

ted the Defence Department to una, of the marethes, zn *
— to Congress an overall mili- ie lind edie MOURA tame
ary eslimate in the next few the smoke-covered inferno of

days. The Defence Department is
still debating whether to ask
Congress to lower the call-up age
to 18, he said

abandoned Seoul,

United Nations warplanes roar-
ed overhead covering the retreat
ind hitting the Communists with
bombs adn guns,

Of burning Seoul itself now
totally evacuated by all United
Nations forces, one pilot said: “It
was like watching an anthill on
Refugees were streaming in
ery direction, even er.
The British 29th Brigade, last
troops to leave the eity, fought

Under present draft regulations,
men aged
called up

or more may be

-—Reuter.



——-——— fire

ARMY CONFERENCE

: PARIS, Jan. 4
france will invite representa
tives of Western Germany, Italy

@ On pase o



and the Benelux countries to take TELL THE ADVOCATE
part in talks here on a Buropean THE NEWS
army within 24 hours of the sign
RING 3113
ing of the Schuman Plan, a French ;
Foreign Ojfice spokesman an- DAY OF, REGIE

pounced today.—-Reuter,



44)
PPLE
%,
>
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>
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y

+

44% pple",

PLLA AA ALAA PEE

Give Your Family
a Daily Treat!!

APPLES SPOOFS OSSLO,

-



A Supply of

C O

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46
OC PLS OF

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rn IT’S RICH IN QUALITY
DELIGHTFUL IN FLAVOUR
CONVENIENT TO SERVE



On sale Day or Night at Soda Fountains,
Parlours and Restaurants or direct from
Barbados Ice Co., Ltd.—Bay Street.

PK CP COOP CIOOO PODS SOG PPO OOO

%
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Vos
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Se v

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°
PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1951
ES LE A ST
Fo

© + ‘
spn Turfites, Retain ! ae. é and the Sketch Book-] Sade tei seekers: ics. weak aes
4 tising Manager of the Advo-| HIG * 5 eS
cate Company Limited, and his| _ i ; | Ae iC L i i i
brother Dr. Tony Gale who were cj PLA? 4 or ae Wi
|














MAKE THEIR FIRST APPEARANCE AT
in Trinidad for the Trinidad Turf CASUARINA CLUB
IR ¢ act 1 ad for ri ‘ur
er IR ARTHUR and Lady Morrell, Gav's Christ Maetin

who have been in Trinidad for TO-MORROW NIGHT. ADMISSION 60c.

five weeks arrived here yesterday
by B.W.LA, to spend a couple of
menths’ holiday in Barbados and
are staying at the Crane Hote!
Sir Arthur joined the West

re-
turned on Wednesday etnoon
by B.W.1.A. During his stay in
Trinidad Mr. Gale was the guest
of Mr. Justice Kenfieth Vincent
Hrowne, Acting Chief Justice of
Trinidad. Incidentally Mr. Browne






PLAZA





agers Pee nS will be leavi inidad for Eng-
in ahd was in command fr¢ lohd by the in the middl é
1906 t6 1922, retiring on election ef January. Dr. ‘Gale wee a Guest WARNER BROS. ant
to Active 1 Eldér Brother of Trinity at the Queen’s Park Hotel. ane has Walked to the vila he meets fig pal Wilke. * Hille, TAKE DEEP PRIDE IN THEATRE

oy = He Was Deputy Master Heré for Two Weeks 10 get a paper for his Daddy. ust Saprt. éties thé little mouse. BRIDGE? /
of Trinity House from 1935 to 1948 eré to ee Before he arrivés a small figure ‘I've just eine paét_your editage on TOWN
when he retired from active Me. AUDREY DE LIMA and walks olf of th€ shop: ‘*Surély, thy _ {airy-eyele. Pherd was 4 ANNOUNCING

three children arrivedcfrom that’s Podgy’s tittle cousin Rosalie,” whacking big motor-car standing “NO MAN TAKES








e.

Sir Arthur is fond of golf and
bridge. His wife is the forme:
Auarey bouise Alston.

Trittidad’s New K.Cs.

WO TRINIDADIANS have
been made K.C.s. They are
Honourable J. Mathieu-Perez,
Trinidad’s Attorney General and
Mr. John Basil Hobson, son of
Mr. J. B. Hobson; K.C. of San
Fernando, at present Solicitor
General of Kenya. The name of
Hobson has for almost a century
been linked with the Bar in
Trinidad
Very Pleased
A NOTHER BARBADIAN turf-
ite returning from Trinidad
on Wednesday afternoon was Mr.
Lisle Ward, M.C.P. He was very
pleased to see two horses that he

Trinidad on Wednesday afternoon pg e. other why Pod; oe bey was it?” “Vve pe
by B.W.I.A. to spend a couple ing care of he ought es " says ft, in surptise. “* It
ef weeks’ holiday, staying uit fot 16 be alone. ide the hen | started out
Leaton-on-Sea, Her husband, M:

Alfonso B, de Litha is to
SoS StE BRC. RADIO PROGRAMME
two children from Trinidad.
To Take U A ent FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, i981
i, arrived} 7.00 am, The News; 17, New:
from Efiglanid via Trinidad] Pye" YS em. ch
“pnt nent wiht to ee an} eth a.m.
dames en Fitens: 8. im ale A
home e in i fla i qualities we I oe ee ro Bis ide
years ago and
at Various Lon hospitals prt prior evs ee, Hs es ne #28
té this appointment. ig Cote Bo 4 rites

wast’ t there











isiting Her



se

bred, Atomic II and Crossroads,
do so well at the Christmas méet-
ing.
To celebrate the victories, Mr
Aiex Chin, who now owns then atid a half months’ holiday Ph the

U.S. She came down via Puert
Rico and Antigua by B.W.LA.

ing Up The Curtain

Was V Brother

APT FRANK PARRIS mem-

bers of his helt ano

several friends were at Sawell

yesterday aftetrioon to meet Mrs.

Patris who retutned from five

EAT NT BARLAY
Mrs. Parris had been visiting : {
het brother in Brooklyn.

Seth Assia , za gn pe

held a party in Trinidad on Tues-
— s

Weaver who returned
from Trinidad on Tuesday was a
guest of Sit Hubert and Lady
Rance at Government House,





during his stay. DR. AND MRS. OSCAR KLEVAN—left for the U.S. yesterday after 1SS MOLLY LOURENCO whe
Life in India spending a holiday with their two children. was in, Barbados in early Serving os ROARK, © man who leet by no rules but his own

IR HENRY CRAIK arrived from 4 “er ae te inne ev ee recent
KF Englund yesterday via the Heliday Visit Over . + a me dt naan at ean bs
Dutch W.I. and Trinidad. He j ; . 4 On Carib Tour B. A. Wak ier SE A
has come over to spend six weeks Dp" AND MRS. OSCAR ve ; : B.W.1.A. with her mother Mrs
oe Rarkades and io stave ct thé RLEVAN who have beeh A’ the invitation of B.O.A.C.- Kathleen Lourenco. They are JANETT

ying B.W.1.A. office in Miami, Staying at Accra, Rockley and wili A DRESS OE

Ocean View Hotel. Sir Henry, Spending a holiday in Barbados
‘who wears a monocle, has spent with their son, Dr, Dean Klevan Mr. Sylvan Cox, Travel Editor ° Melly wi about that ‘bioria
most of his life in India. He and their daughter Mrs, Lisle 0f the Miami Herala is toutin, lly tells me thab Gloria is
joined the Indian Civil Service in Smith left yesterday morning by Several of the Caribbean islands batk in Canada whefe she works
1919. He was Chief Secretary of B.W.1.A. for Puerto Rico on to. gather material for his with T.C.A. in Montreal.



Co-starring as DOMINIQUE, the only woman for that brand of man

PATRICIA NEAL &

Upstairs Newsam & Co., Lower Broad Street

Lovely AFTERNOON, COCKTAIL and EVENING DRESSES
Also








the Punjab from 1922 to 1927. In their way to the U.S. Dr. and Column. He arrived yesterduy os

192, he was made Commissioner. Mrs. Klevan’s home is in West &fternoon in Barbados, Mr. Cox Back from Trinidad ne r-MADE DRE mae

He was a member of the Punjab Chester, Pennsylvania has already visited the Virgin D*: AND MRS. W. H. E. aueTic SATIN SWIM SUITS

Executive Council from 1930 to To See Damage Islands and from here he will JOHNSON and their son who 7, , ry , ,
1934 and Home Member of th , & visit Grenada, Trinidad, Tobago were in Trinidad over the Christ- : a Also :: NOW PLAYING TOsDAY JAN. Stis



~ ELASTIC COTTON SWIM SUITS
For LADIES and CHILDREN
Hours—Mondays to Fridays 8.30 to 3.30, Saturdays 8.30 to 11.30



ObeiuL * Cdhdval’s Pxecitive M* and Mrs. Ogden Reed of and Jamaica in that order before Mas season returned from Trini-
Ceuncil from 1934 to 1938. He waa } 1" soe _" pee — returning home. This is his first oT ete afternoon by
made Governor of the Punjab in OY" arriveo’ i ave visit to Barbados. Mr, Cox is a A r. Johnson is P.M.O.

2.30 & 8.30




"i 50 betas .. Wednesday night by private plane St. Joseph. Inui i
a. sadaada Tan. Pelilines and flew to St. Kitts and Nevis guest at the Marine Hotel y * and Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
RAviser to the Wiceray dom Anat yesterday to view the damages ahd R. Ant MRS. WiLdPRED ————
to 1943. ‘ eae Reef where they ALSTON arrived from Trin-

idad yesterday motning by
B.W.1.A. after a few weeks’

AQUATICC CLUE CINEMA iombiste Sal EMPIRE ROYAL











Another Photographer

RRIVING trom the U.S, visit, MATINEES: TODAY & TOMORROW AT 5 P.M. :

yesterday morning was Mr. With Barclays Bank TONIGHT TO SUNDAY NIGHT AT 8.30 P.M. Last Two Shows To-day Today Only 4.30 and 8.30
4 ae ee a taaoharcier as pay R. NORMAN “ROBBIE” CORNEL WILDE :o: MAUREEN O'HARA | 2.30 and 8.30 Republic Big Double
eed via Or : er a Robinson who has been. in : " i i Selanick’s
SMa Aiken ils octet Grenada for three months, with in THE HOMESTRETCH” in technicotor | on George Brent and
eka aE “ya 4 arclays Bank arriv ester: é 1
Barbados as a guest of the 5 ow. ge ae eS with GidiMIN LANGAN :o: HELEN wALseth té DUEL IN THE
Barbados Publicity Committee, YL ane in

" weeks’ holiday with his family in} 20th Century-Fox Picture

and while here will gather George Street, Belleville,





material for an article about cantata SUN ” 6 ANGEL ON TH
Barbados, for the National Geo- ; Visi L E
graphic Magazine, which will be Short at MOND Oven: ea ke se A oe
illustrated with colour photo- WDRIG. E. K. PAGE, G.O.C. Starring AMAZON rr)
graphs, He will also take Caribbean Area left yester- CLIFTON WEBB in
photographs for the Barbados day by B.W.1.A., on a two-day “ ad Jennifer Jones
Publicity Committee. visit to St. Lucia. MR. BELVEDERE GOES TO COLLEGE Gregory Peck and

At Seawell to meet him yes- y
terday was Mr. Aubrey Boyce, Not Returning ee with “ MURDE
Hon. Treasurer of the Barbados SIDNEY SPIRA, Opto- — name R IN THE
Publicity Committee. metrist, who has been WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY NIGHT AT 8.90 Joseph Cotton and {

Mr. Allmon was born in East holidaying with his parents in she idaho Sarai ee MUSIC HALL r
Liverpool, Ohio, and has spent Barbados since he completed his JOHN PAYNE :o; MAUREEN O'HARA lla Al



studies at Colombia University
in New York, has decided to re-
main here and will shortly be

opening an office hete. = “MIRACLE ON 34th STREET”

20th Century-Féx Picture

about seven years as a free lance
journalist and photographer,
During that time he has visited
fifty countries and has written
articles on West Africa, Trinidad
and Tobago and two articles on
the South Seas which were pub-
lished in the National Geographic
Magazine. He also writes articles
and takes pictures for Life,
Holiday and the Saturday
Evening Post, magazines. He is
a motion picture producer. One
of his adventure films — Of
Shores and Sails in the South
Seas,—took ten months, 100,000
miles and 10,000 feet of film to
make.
|
}
'
'

ROXY sci

Vera Ralston and
Today 4.45 and 8.15 and Willi I
Cantinting jam Marshall

Columpictires Presents OLYMPIC

Today Only 4.30 and 8.15

Columbia Smashing Double








CROSSWORD





PLAZA Theatre—sri0GErowN

ONE OF THE GREATEST OF ALL BEST-SELLERS !

- ERE FOUNTAINHEAD”

THE Pe ote BY AYN RAND
One of a f it of all Warner ares 4 TaN !
Starring — Gary COOPER : Patricia NEAL mond MASSEY
NOW PLAYING—2.30 & 8.30 p.m. and Gontindiag: ar 445 & 8.30 p.m.
MATINEE: Sat. 9.30 A.M. & 1.90 P.M. (RKO Radio Double)

GEORGE O'BRIEN in - -
“MARSHAL OF MESSA CITY” and

TIM BOL in “INDIAN AGENT”

\. Badg © of offen you’ find is in PLAZA Theatre — OISTIN




Glenn Ford and Terry More
in

“THE RETURN OF
OCTOBER ”

and

“OUTCAST OF THE





Mr. Allmon expects to be in MR. CHARLES ALLMON
SIR HENRY CRAIK Barbados for six weeks and is
—arrived from England yesterday staying at the Ocean View Hotel. —arrived from U.S. yesterday.
a Here

BY THE WAY — By Beachcomber




























: < 8 Down. Let pace tell rinc TODAY—5 & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing (Monogram Double)
O boxers fell out of the ring the catalogue., H-O-L-B-E-I-N.” I will wager that already the ° onde (8; 6) VENT
the other day, and ‘were “Holborn,” said the official, “is a phrase is more widely known than / }} ie ee, oa go, ba oY 6). - ee Se BLACK MESSA nm
both counted out. A dull ending. place, That's w here, you'll fina spy omar cine a persenes, Ue. eo village,” (5) ae “CAPTAIN FURY” & “CAPTAIN CAUTION” Me Ps
7 che 1e jaduct.” “Wh t : js é is 4 Tear ; 4 sce jarig Kal i -
Saaers? have bouts-betWeen three: Gone” said the fool. cole" T have just seen it as the caption | ‘4 chit sore ot i, dite. (4) Braih Aherné — Victot McLaglen : Victor (Samson) Mature — Alan Ladd in toni Fe with
se* So . J i " ® An old wom bie)
It w ‘ Prodnose: And is that all you to his photograph. It might amuse} ,7 She ‘can be MIDNITE SATURDAY, JAN. 6TH (Monosram Dou ‘ i .
that ree ouee Contd kant he re to say about a wonderful ex- 7. ees a atl one Aj oe isan ; iniltenge Ons) yo Leo Garcey £2" Bowery Boys in & “FALL GUY" came tenet
ibition of art? “T am rather fond of salmon,” an 18. luck up |! (5) “MR. =i ,
oe torn on tha ompt of any Myself: It’s all I can. think of then watch the phrase becoming | %? Sad men's alteration, (7) emits armumeny —- Suisess Eee = 4
think this would liven up boxing 1 the moment, as the man re- famous, L Novtirie ente here. 18) — 1 . TO ee
plied to the woman who said “Is N , radio-beam 2 Just trifi ’

contests,” The ‘danger iE hate plied to the woman who said “is No Sunday et GLOBE OPENING To-DAY TO TUESDAY
eunning fighter might simply bide red ot URELY there can be no debate + Get a tt amy THE GAR E ) ST. JA
his time, letting the other two go De. — ‘and told her her house ) on who should be the first} » They bring firm feet wih ong?
proach other. Then, Mehend man to talk to the moon from the} 4 Mckle , 49). erub,. TODAY TO SUN, 8.30 p.m. — MATINEE: Sun. 5 p.m.

us, he cou step in and i‘ : top of the Shot ‘Tower ..«t year Dante ate before true time (8) Spectacular Action-Packed Special ! ! ! ’
deal with the pair of them. But _erginal note The honour should fall by right to] ;7, Marble group in the Vatican. (7) r N — Rory CALHOUN — Cathy DOWNS in THE SIN CITY'S .
T don’t care. OU never know nowadays Dr. Strabismus (Whom God Pre=| ' St eStart it Wisdominates: the Guy MADISON — Rory . 4 i

Holbein’s ‘Viaduct’ what casual phrase will be serve), of Utrecht. As there will b Sct sek “MASSACRE RIVER” WILDEST pays/ é 3 ‘=
FOOL who went to the Royal hailed as though it were a brilliant be no reply, he can say anything “eee of yesterday's Duzezie. - Across = ‘he
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a

U.N. Still

FRIDAY, JANUARY



1951

Hope To

Settle Korea Fighting

(By MICHAEL FRY)

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan, 4.

THE UNITED NATIONS has not given up all hope

of a negotiated settlement

Chinese Communists, though most delegates realise that



Reception Held
For Diplomats To

W. Germany

BONN, Jan. 4

The Allied High Commissioners
to-day held a New Year's recep
tion for foreign diplomatic mis-
sions in West Germany at which
19 countries were represented,

Sir Ivone Kirkpatrick of Britain,
this month’s chairman of the
High Commissioi. replied to greet-
ings from Minister Albert Wehrer
of Luxemburg.

Sir Ivone, referring to the im-
pending revision of the Occupa-
tion Statute giving the west Ger-
mans a foreign office, said: “This
may be the last occasion on which
the Allied High Commission will
meet the heads of diplomatic
missions on the basis of the pres-
ent relationship.”

Only east European representa-
tive present was Dr, Stan Pavlie,
Minister and head of the Yugoslav
Economic delegation.

Other countries were, Holland,
Denmark, Belgium, Brazil, Aus-
tralia, Italy, Switzerland, Turkey,
Sweden,
Spain, Greece,
and South Africa.

In view of the reception, the
High Commissioners postponed
their usual weekly iil
next Thursday.

onaeo, Norway, Canada,
India, Uruguay

meeting

—Reuter.

Mout Etna
Still Spouting

CATANIA, Sicily, Jan. 4.
Europe's tallest volcano to-day
went into its 40th day of violent
eruption amid inereasing fears
that worse may be yet to come.
The Government of Catania, 20
miles south of the half-mile wide
lava stream spouting from the
snow-crested eastern slopes of
Mount Etna said in a special an-
nouncement that serious concern
is begun to be felt because of the
continued violence of the erup-

tion. —(C.P.)

Not British Enough

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 2

Supersad, owner of the Princess
Theatre, Arima, was fined $50,
or three months’ hard labour, for
failing to exhibit the prescribed
quota of British films during Sep-
tember, 1950. Supersad exhibited
3,690 feet instead of the prescrib-
ed 8,000 feet.

Committee several delegations felt
that the United Nations should
not be committed at once to
drastic action against the Peking
Government including the use of
collective sanctions.

After the three man United
Nations Cease-fire Group had
reported its failure to negotiate a
oease-fire with the Chinese Com-
munists’ the Committee adjourn-
ed until to-morrow (Friday) to
enable delegates te consider what
to do next,

Since the Chinese opened their
new year offensive across the 38th
parallel, the Ameriean delegation
has tended to press for strenge
and more urgent measures against
the Peking Government,

After consultation with various
Governments, this tendency has
been softened to some _ extent.
Several delegations it was under-
stood, urged the United States not
to slam the door irrevocably.

Judging by the statement of Mr.
Warren Austin the chief American
delegate to the Political Commit-
tee yesterday, these counsels ap-
parently prevailed. The Commit-
tee allowed itself another 48
hours of reflection. The delay it
was generally thought, would
also allow the British Common-
wealth Prime Ministers at their
conference opening in London
to-day to concert their Roliey. og
Korea and Communist China.

—Reuter

SRS


of the Korean war with the

much depends on the course of the fighting.
Following yesterday’s meeting
of the General Assembly's Political

| E. Berlin Actors
Boycott Play

BERLIN, Jan. 3

To-day’s celebrations of East
German President J. Pieck’s
75th birthday were marred by
ithree East Berlin actors refusing
ito participate in a Russian play
“The Transformation of Golo-
vin”.

The play, designed as a climax
to the birthday ceremonies in a
mass rally in a huge Soviet sec-
tor hall, describes how a Russian
Musician is being converted into
ja “good Communist”.

A spokesman for the theatre
to-day declined to reveal the
names of the three actors but
eonfirmed that they haye can-
celled their econtraets for
reason. —Reuter



FRENCH GET BOMBERS

SAIGON Jan. 4.
Seven American light bombers
arrived here yesterday as Ameri-
can supplies to the French Union
forces fighting Vietnam —Reuter.



Poppy Collection 1950

ST. MICHAEL'S











Upper Broad Street Mrs, L. MeKinstry 8 30
Lower Broad Street Miss D. C. Hutson 44
Cathedral District Miss Mandeville $128.96

Church Collection Cathedral . 80.27 209.23
Fontabelle ‘

one Miss K. Warren 33.19
Bank Hall & White Park Mrs. O. Symmonds 47.23
St. Leonard's ++ Mrs, Foster 18.92
Stratholyde : Mrs. G. Clarke 48.59
Upper Black Rock Mrs. C. Manning 82
Lower Black Rock Mrs. E. G. Wilkie 60
Belle Ville ; Miss Hollinsed f 190.30
Upper Collymore Rotk Mrs. J. H, Roberts 12.73
Dalkeith & Culloden Miss Hollinsed 15.32
Brittons Hill Mrs. T. Gittens 59.11

arrison . Mrs. L. Bowen 80.09
Two Mile Hill Mrs. F. C, Hutson 17.62
Flint Hall Mrs, R. Stokes *% 18.12
Ivy Land Mrs. C. W. Cumberbatch .. 2.58
St, Matthew's Mrs. W. M. Worrell 20.97
Bay Street Miss G. Williams 90.15
Glendairy ‘ Mrs. Foster 3.52
Milk Market ete. . Salvation Army 37.04 1,443.45
w whing geet M W. A, Gi t $287.67

orthing & es rs. . A, Gran A

Church Collection St. Matthias 69.20 346.87
St. Lawrence Mrs. Bob Edgehill 33

Chureh Collection Seis 75.46
Rest of Parish Miss S. Arthur 228.35
Christ Church Miss S. Arthur 650.68
St. Philip i Miss F. G, Cameron 228.
St. George Mrs. W. B. Carrington 221,52
St. Joseph -» Mrs, G. R. Hutson 182.00
St. John . Mrs, Farmer 61.70
St. Thomas Mrs. J. A, Mahon 43.
St. James Mrs. S. Nurse bs
St ter Mrs. R. Packer 31
St. Lucy Mrs, Clarke-Holman 35.00
St. Andrew Mrs. E. Gill 25.98 1,840.01

DONATIONS

Officers Association 24.00
Barbados Turf Club 84.06
parece eae Gio - 40.00

ereantile Community ¥
Sale of Wreaths 738
Sale of Plates — W.V.W.W. ae

anee, Marine Hotel 762.45 2,330.23

SPECIAL EFFORTS
St. Philip—Dance, Crane Miss F. G, Cameron e 3-28
St. John vs . Mrs, W. Chandler .00
St. George—Book Sale &
file . Mrs, W, B. Carrington 254.80

Christ Church—Boek Sale Miss S. Arthur : 240.00
St. Foter—Prive ae" .. Mrs. R, Packer Re
St. Joseph—Collec .. Mrs. G. R, Hutson .00 1,367.13

TOTAL | CORLROTION TO DATE

ess Expenses

Balance in hand
EXPENSES
Danee, Marine Hotel
Park Constables
Posting Bills
Printing Application Forms



Sincere Appreciation to al

drawing to a close.
May Your Holidays be

UCU SEES wees Sy

c

AGE TN TR TS TR DEN RAK

Ex

in aiding us to meet the Problems of the Year

may the Year to come bring you in full measure the
satisfaction that makes life and work worth while.

a
The Barbados Foundry Ltd.

WHITE PARK ROAD

-

our friends and Customers

filled with Happiness and

ST. MICHAEL

FAFA DED AAAS



1M, THE BOY







Indian Embassy at Katmandu.

Doping

of these have been doped.





Scare About A New Dru

NORMAL TESTS MAY NOT
DETECT IT

By THE SCOUT
The French have produced some magnificent horses in the
last dozen years. It would be churlish to allege that many

RARBADOS :
KING OF NEPAL | Robert J. MacLeod



A new and unpublished picture of H.M. the GYNENDRA BIR
BIKRAM SHAH BAHADUR NEPAL, the young King of Nepal, who
was enthroned in November when his grandfather took asylum in the

The boy king wears his ceremonial
head-dress and is seen taking the salute.

Express.



&

There ig na doypt, however, ——-

that some French trainers do dope
their horses, and very efficiently,

too,

The French authorities are not
so severe in their sentences, In
fact, they apparently see nothing
jineongruous about warning off a

that) trainer for doping and still allow-

ing him to supervise the training
of “his” horses-—under a different
name.

There is not the same money-
motive as in this country. Except
on big-race days a French owner
has no chance of bringing off a
gamble of any magnitude.

etting is confined to the tote,
and normally individual race-
pools are so small that a £200 bet
makes a substantial difference to
the final odds.
On the other hand, the “bad
type” of French racing man is

about the meanest creature

breathing.

Anything Over Three Is
Suspect

Many of our trainers have had
experience of French horses who
have been “treated.” That is why,
now, they prefer to buy only young
horses in France. Anything over
the age of three is suspect.

The job is done well. There are
certain experts, both in France and
Belgium. The best of them is a
man connected with trotting-
racers. It is. not unusual for a
horse-box, on its way to one of the
Paris meetings, to draw up at his
“consulting room.”

The authorities in this country
have been notably courteous in
their attitude towards the dope-
testing of French-trained horses,
The only instance which I can

recall of a French horse being
swabbed in England was at New-
market in 1946, The horse was the
sprinter Boree. Tests proved
negative.

would, however, be intoler-
able to subject the horses of lead-
ing Freneh owners and trainers
to tests while their opposite num-
bers in this country enjoy immu-
nity,

French Trainers Have
More 1

There is a scare now that the
French have a new dope which
cannot be detected. We will hear
more of this later.

Doping by outside agents is far
less common across the Channel.
French trainers are more fortunate
than ours in that they have ample
time te devote to the supervision
of their horses. Travelling is con-
fined within easy limits.

Our trainers, on the other
hand, spend a large proportion
of their working time in train or
ear, This doubles their difficul-

ties.

And yet, under this inflexible
new rule, they are to be accounted
responsible and guilty, even when
personally innocent,

U.N. Troops

@ From Page 1

doggedly through a Chinese am-
bush in the northwestern suburbs
suffering casualties,

The last pontoon bridge across
the frozen Han river running
through the city, was blown up by
a British Army Engineer Sergeant
William Robson,

The Eighth Army officially an-
nounced tonight: “The city of
Seoul has been successfully evaeu-
ated by all United Nations troops
who have withdrawn as planned
to their next defensive positions,”

The new defence plan remained
a closely guarded secret but Tokyo
observers speculateti on the pos-
sibility of a line through Susju, 20
miles below Seoul, or Osan an-
other 10 miles to the south,

United Nations troops were con-
Ainuing to fall back al] along the
150 miles battlefront,

In the central sector, along the
Chunchon-Kapyong road northeast
of Seoul, the situation was de-
scribed as “vague”.

—Revier,



Released From Jail

BUENOS AIRES, Jan. 3,
The Argentine Government in a
surprise move on Tuesday ordered
the release from jail of Ricardo
Balbin, chief opposition critic of
President Juan D, Peron.

Balbin, 46, was sentenced to five
years’ imprisonment on November
22 for calling Peron a dictator and
a No. 1 criminal, He had been
most widely mentioned by the
Radical Party candidate for Presi-
dent in the 1952 elections.—(CP)



A few weeks ago a_ trainer
friend of mine was walking one
evening from an outlying stable-
yard back to his house,

He noticed a big limousine
parked in the lane. A glance at
the tough-looking characters in-
side reminded him, he says, of the
“spivs” in some of Giles’s car-
toons.

His head man was waiting.
“There’s a lad come to apply for
that vacancy. His references are
good and he seems all right,” he
sald,

The interview was_ short:
“You came by car—that car
down the lane?” “Yes.” ‘Well,
go away in it!”

There’s no end to supposing

what might have happened if luck
had not been on that trainer’s side
that evening.
Problem For The Stewards
TOMORROW The Scout will
deal with the Stewards’ problem:
“Someone must be held responsi-
ble, who—if not the oeeed
—-L.E.S.

ADVOCATE



Robert J. Mac Leod, whose
exhibition of paintings opens at
the Museum today, (Friday)
, although net bern in Barbados
‘considers himself a Barbadian,
for his mother was a Barbadian

although his father was a Scot.
He was born in Greenwich
| village, New York, which is now
as famous as an art centre in
}New York as Chelsea is in Lon-
don, or Montparnasse in Paris,
At the early age of one year he
was brought to Barbados, where
| he learned his A.B.C, on Has-
tings Rocks:

Mac Leod spent many years of
his life in the United §tates,
where he reegived his art educa-
tion, He studied as a student at
the New York School of Fine
Arts, The Art Students’ League,
The Metropolitan School of Art
and the Pratt Institute. He was
most fortunate in later becoming
the protege of one of America’s
outstanding landscape painters
Frank Bicknell, At the home of
this artist in Qld Lyme, Con-
neticut, Mac Leod came inte
contact with many of America’s
first rank painters. He also owes
much to the well known painter
Bertha Metzler Peyton, the ex-
quisite, jewel-like colouring of
whose landscapes has always in-
Spired him in his work.



He spent fifteen years as a
commercial aptist with the well
known irm of Mec Graw-Hill

Publishing Co, of New York,
During those years he found time
to hold exhibitions of his work
both in oils and water colours;
he also had the honour of having
his water colours hung in the
Vanderbilt Gallery during the
shows of the American Water

Yolour Society,

Since his return to Barbados
Mac Leod has devoted all his
time to painting the West Indian
scene, which holds an unlimited
attraction for him.

Thirty one of his paintings —
chiefly of Barbados and St, Lucia
—are now on view at the
Museum.



Protest New
Rum Tax

(From Our Own Correspondent)
_ GEORGETOWN, Jan. 4.
Sponsored by

various
Unions, a

demonstration

Trade

was
staged today outside the Public
Buildings during a debate on the
budget, protesting against the
proposal to increase the prices of
aerated drinks and rum. The
Council Chamber was crowded
and the publie had to be warned
twice by the Governor against
any attempt to interrupt the
debate by shouts and hisses.
When the Council adjourned the
crowd booed Governor Sir Charles
Woolley and the Financial Sec-
retary Hon, BE. S. McDavid as they
left the Buildings, The Demon-
stration was arranged at the end
of a Town Hall meeting Wednes-
day night attended by more than

3,000 who jammed the Hall and
the compound, The meeting deel-
ded that should the tax proposals

pass the Legislature, to call for a
colony wide boyeott of aerated
drinks. As a further protest act
small
tacay.

factories closed busines:



a

Abolition Of Dutch

Indonesian Union Urged

DJAKARTA, Jan, 4,

The powerful nationalist (Op-
position) party submitted to the
Indonesian Parliament to-day a
motion yrging the abolition of the
Netherlands Indonesian union
and the revision within three
months of the Hague round table
conference agreement,

Other main party groups were
expected to submit similar reso-
lutions during to-day’s debate on
the failure of the Dutch Indone-
sian talks on West New Guinea,

—Reuter.

Spain Not Included

In Mutual Defence Plan

WASHINGTON, Jan, 4.

President Truman told hig press
conference to-day that the ap-
pointment of an ambassador to
Spain did not contemplate the
inclusion of Spain in the Mutual
Detence programme. It had not
been under consideration, at least
by him, he said.



—Reuter.



U.S. High Commissioner
In Pacific Appoint

WASHINGTON, Jan, 4
President Truman has appointe
farmer Senator Albert Thomas o
Utah, High Commissioner of the
United States trust territory of
the Pacific islands,
He was a missionary and lived
there for several years, He is 67.
The islands in the Pacific—fot
which he will be the United
States High Commissioner—are
the former Japanese mandated
islands which United States forees
occupied during the last war,
—Reuter.

AVAILABLE IN ALL SIZES

USE THE TYRES CHAMPIONS USE

Charles Mc Enear

ney & Co,, Lt

d.



Britain Prepares
For War

(B
BRITAIN’S C

uipment.

This effort to bring the coun-
try’s defences to more complete
preparedness is the direct result
of the Brussels North Atlantic
Treaty Organization ec
and the appointment of General
Dwight Eisenhower # Supreme
Commander of the estern Eu-
repean forces.

Plans are being made to speed
up voluntary recruiting to the
services and defence estimates
for the coming year are ex-
meshed to be inereased consider-
ably.

The services haye already car-
tied out an intensive check-up of
he present whereabouts of men
2elonging ta the Class Z reserve.
This class consists of war veter-
ins who are skilled tradsemen and
yther key men,

At the moment Britain is plan-
iing to spend an average of
$3,360 million annually on re-
armaments in the next three
years. But as a direct result of
Prime Minister Clement Attlee's
talks with ident Truman and
the Brussels Conference this fi
gure is expected to be greatly
exceeded,

According to the latest avail-
able figures Britain has an army
of 184,000 regular soldiers plus
211,000 conscripts.

In addition to these 395,000
men there is a Territorial Army
(National Guard) whose volun-
tary element is now about 90,000,
This figure will be increased
monthly as men who finish their
National Seryice with the regu-
lar army automatically enlist in
the Territorials.

63 Diyisions Uutside U.K.

The latest official records show
that there are about six and ane-
half British divisions serving
outside the United Ki ;

Two and one-half divisions
stationed in Western Germany—
but these are not up to full ar-
meured eombat strength, ‘he
War Office has annoyneed that
this foree will be increased ear-
ly in the New Year to three di-
visions, This may be increased
to five divisions during the year

There is approximately a bri-
gade of troops in Austria and
another in Trieste. Scattered
over the Eastern Mediterranean
and the Middle East there is
another divisian.

In the Far East theatre ine te
ing Korea and Malay
sangre amount to two ava ons,
nder the present plans there
is going to be a strategic reserve
based in Britain of one armoured
division, one infantry division
with parachute brigade and one
infantry byigade. It is believed
this total force will amount to

Minister Emanuel
Shinwell has said in the eyen
‘of some emergency” the
ernment might “require to

pro-

‘\wide even more adequate forces.”
3)That depended, he said, largely

on whether the Government could
provide adequate equipment for

them,

The Government has _ also
promised to provide in an emer-
gency 12 Territorial divisions,
which could be mobilized withig

“M ay commen Tons tate that
r sta a
to maintain the figure, of 184,000

men in the regular or ‘‘volunteer”

army, as it is call 30,000 en-
istments are required each year,
In 1948 the Army obtained ‘only

24,400 recruits, in 1949 only 18,-
400, But according-to the latest
official returns numbers of re-
cruits have increased as a result
of the increase of pay granted
to all services,

Defence Minister Shinwell has
also promised that if an emer-
gency arises a Home Guard will

be enrolled. This will be re-
quired primari for home de-
‘nee and dealin, with para-

chutists or fifth column operators.

It is reported that plans are in
hand for arming 2,000,000 men
under this scheme and this group
could be formed into an efficient
Gotence force within a few weeks
of war,

Build Up Of Navy

During the next three years it
is also planned to increase con-
struction for the Navy. Attlee
has announced “a substantial
programme of construction, mod-
ernization and conversion,”

The Admiralty has said that 89
warships of Britain’s mothball
Reserve Fleet are to be refitted
2, private shipyards throughout

in.

inesweeping shares top-pri-
ority with anti-submarine ships.
The minesweepers will ovetoct|
Britain's key river estuaries!
against new types of mines
known to have been developed
since the war.

Their equipment is secret, but
they reportedly will be capable of
handling pa uted magnetic-
acoustie mines and the new Rus-
sian floating mines of the type
released in Korean waters,

By





Laon CAMSELL)

IEFS OF STAFF are urgently review-
ing all passible measures, short of total mobilization, to
strengthen the armed services and improve their fighting

a

PAGE THREE















state. The small force availabie
is highly trained but urgently re-
quires more men ‘o maintain the
mew jet-machines as they are
delivered,

R.A.F. Strength

When the European war ended
it was planned that the R.A.F.
should be maintained at a strength
of 300,000 officers and men.

Air Minister Arthur Henderson
has revealed that the uniformed
strength on April, 1950, was
202,400. This number was expect-
ed to fall by April 1, 1951, to
198,000 made up of 118,000 regu-
lars, 71,000 National Service men
and 9,000 women,

The total number of airmen
recruited or re-cnlisted for the
regular Air Fo.ce quarterly fel)
from 4,026 in the first quarter of
1949 to 2,807 in the last quarter
of that year.

Recruiting has improved in this
service following the Govern-
ment's decision to increase pay,
but the Royal Auxiliary Air Force
and R.A.P. Volunteer Reserve are
still very short of men.-—I.N.8.

Rainstorms
Sweep
Central Italy

ROME, Jan. 4
A village near Spezia was
flooded five feet deep when vio-
lent rain storms swept central and
southern Italy to-day

LONDON

A number of destroyers will be
converted next year into fast U-
beat killers, Five are being con-
verted at present, with radar-
controlled multiple barrel depth-

threwers and other new
weapons, Many older destroyers
are to be gonverted into frigates,

It is reported that these super
U-boat destroyers will be led by
frigates of revolutionary design,
A few are being built in Canada
as well as in Britain.

Six new aircraft carriers join
the Fleet in the next four years,

The 23,000-ton Indomitable and
Vietorious are being modernized so
that they can fly new and heavier
types of jet fAghters and U-boat
killing planes.

The Eagle, 36,000-ton jet-plane
carrier, delayed by development
in aircraft design, will be deliyer-
ed in 1951,

The other four are modifications
of 18,000-ton ships ordered during
the war.

It has also been disclosed that
the scientists at the Admiralty
have developed a “homing” tor-



pedo which noses out a submarine, Rivers overflowed their banks
sets its own course, and then sticks|and landslides dislocated traffic
to its target. It is dropped from]|and communications zi
aircraft and travels in narrowing Snow covered large areas ol

northern Italy and was reported
10 feet deep in some areas neat
the Austrian border.

An army of sweepers was clear-
ing the streets of Milan where

circles,

New Types o Aireraft
The Society o. —«citish Aircraft



Constructors have announced that} eight inches of snow had fallen
the Navy is planning to bring four]in the past two days. —Reuter,
types of turbine-engined aireraft
into squadron narra eas

These planes include attac in
fighters, all weather and night CLARIFICATION.

WASHINGTON, Jan, 4,
The United States, France and
Britain will send Russia a new
note in a few days asking clari-

fighters, heavily armed strike air-
eraft, and anti-submarine search
and strike machines,

The last official naval estimates

available showed that the Navy} fication of Moscow’s latest pro-
will be reduced in strength from] posal for a Big Four meeting,
140,000 to 127,000 during the years] generally reliable sources said

195) 1. The main reason is the] here
smaller intake of National service
men,

Howeyer, in July, nearly 1,000
officers and men were affeeted by
an emergency call up of Selected
Naval and Royal Marine reserves,
and the retention of others sched~-
uled for release. This was a direct
result of the worsening of the
a ilitary situation in Korea,

Naval Strength
Estimated strength of the Royal
Nayal Reserve and Royal Naval
Volunteer Reserve is 41,300 men,
e@ last published table show-
ing the ae strength of the Royal
abu

to-day, —Reuter
TI

FIRE COS1S $10m,
EVANSVILLE, Indiana, Jan, 4,
Fire swept by a stiff wind roar-
ed through eight buildings in the
business district early to-day,
cuusing damage estimated at more
than $10,000,000,—Reuter.

DO YOU KNOW?





Nayy is tabulated below;
_ Training and ; 4
i © Reperimental * 5
& a , ;
0 waa) RY)
tileghips 0 1 4 !
Picet eS ars 1 2 3 2
ight Fleet
ers 4 1 i 7
rt Carriers o 0 1 0
Crulsers 1 2 10 3
estroyers 34 18 61 8
rigates 27 16 = 123 0
Win ss f ff
i eeper: 5
Fas ‘Minseweppers 0 0 ; 0

Like its sister services the Royal
Air Force is also in a very weak

AIVER SALT

ae



ee
THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING ABOUT

HOUSEHOLD CLEANSER
‘PENNY TEST”

TRY IT TODAY— Here's a quick, way to
prove how easily and efficiently
CHEMICO cleans metal, Dab a little
CHEMICO ona dull penny, rub brisk-
ly, and see how brilliantly the coin

ms. S-M-O-O-T-H paste CHEMI-

cleans porcelain, tiles, glass, lino,
paintwork, etc., with equal ease

EVELYN ROACH & |CO., UTn,
Bridgetown, — Barbados








THERE'S PAIN RELIEF
AND TONIC BENEFIT

Yeo! —- Yeast -

THE ADVOCATE
HAS THE BEST

IN TO

HERE’S ONE OF
THE NEW NOVELS

v?
ee

“AN TRISHMAN’S DIARY’

PATRICK CAMPBELL
ADVOCATE STATIONERY.






PAGE FOUR

ARBADOS fb

bias SSS =

PSS SSP sce a

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd|, Broad St., Bridgetown.
ceatbiniiiadesseatnierntpikegieanbelchedienetieniencatapeunancinsinmeetnmanentpmmastesant

Friday, January 5, 1951

APATHY

THE fact that the Report of Sir John
Maude on local government in this island
was not made an issue at the 1951 Vestry
Elections is further evidence of the seem-
ing apathy which follows recommendations
for changes in this island. Time and again
specialists are imported into this island to
investigate conditions of and report on and
make recommendations on certain phases
of life, then follows a long silence until
some compelling circumstance leads to
cursory and inadequate consideration of
the matter.

It has been contended for many years
now that the Vestry system has outlived
its usefulness in Barbados and in 1946 the
Acting Governor in his address to the
Legislature pointed out that the support-
ers of that system would have to be con-
tent with its modernisation or to witness
its abolition.

This view was accepted and as a result
Sir John. Maude was invited to come to
Barbados to examine local government and
to make recommendations thereon. He
arrived in Barbados in November 1948 and
his report was submitted to the local Gov-
ernment in March 1949. The year 1950
passed without any attempt being made to
discuss it and only the barest mention was
made of it at the 1951 Vestry Elections.

In a manifesto issued during the week
the candidates sponsored by the Barbados
Electors’ Association say that they under-
stand “that the Central Government
intends implementing the Maude Report
either wholly or in part shortly.”

With this-knowledge at their disposal it
was the duty of those candidates to have
brought the question of the Maude Report
before the ratepayers. It is true that the
Legislature will have to say whether the
report should be implemented or not, but
it is hardly likely that that decision will be
taken without consideration being given to
the views of those who now work under
that system. The only method for obtain-
ing the views of the ratepayers on this
important change is to discuss it with them.
And the views of the ratepayers who must
eventually foot the bill and whose interests
and well being are to be affected by the
change would seem to be the most import-
ant of all.

It is not now necessary to examine the
details of the recommendations made by
Sir Johii. He points out the relative value
of the présent vestry system and that of
District Councils which would be substi-
tuted for the country vestries and a Corpo-
ration which would displace that in the
Metropolitan parish.

Whether the ratepayers will have their
affairs conducted by the Vestry, limited in
its functions and governed by an act of the
legislature or by a Mayoralty with wider
powers is their right to say. Whether the
complexity of problems which now arise
in parochial affairs do not demand a more
modern system of administration is a mat-
ter to be decided by those responsible for
the government of the island. Whichever
decision is taken it is clear that the same
personnel will be at work in the conduct
of affairs.

It is regrettable that the matter was not
raised as an election issue and candidates
offering themselves for election should,
during their campaigning this week
attempt to explain the difference to the
people whose support they seek and also be
in a position, when they take their seats as
vestrymen to express the views of the
people.

The criticism that inadequate consider-

ation has too often been given to important
questions is sound and in a matter which
is as fundamental as the change of our sys-
tem of local government, every effort
should be made to correct what is obvious-
ly a mistake.





ADVOGATE |

PROFESSOR ST:

ALDERSCOPE FOR A
OESCENT .





‘Five Years oft Socialism

British Conservatives oppose as
“A Wanton Act of Sabotage, the
Labourite government's plan to na-
tionalize the steel and iron indus-
tries early this year at a time of
iiternational crisis. Britain has had
five years of “cradle to grave’ so-
cialism. This is the firt in a series
of articles analyzing the “Great Ex-
periment’ in the former home of

capitalist and free enterprise,
By FRED DOERFLINGER
LONDON.

The state is the “big boss” in
Socialist Britain today and is
growing bigger all the time,

In five years Prime Minister
Attlee’s administration has turned
the home of capitalist free enter-
prise into the leading socialist
state of the non-communist world.

Early this year the government
intends to take over the three-
billion-dollar steel industry. Then
half of Britain’s capital invest,
meut and practically all basic in-
dustries will be in state hands.

The Conservatives call this step
“foolhardy” and a “Wanton Act
of Sabotage” at a time of danger-
ous world tension and the threat
of a possible Russian attack on
Western Europe,

Under the Labourite plan 92
iron and steel companies employ-
ing 300,005 of the industry’s 460,-
000 workers will go under state
ownership. Smaller firms which
help produce more than 16 million
tons of steel yearly will operate
under government license.

Already the coal, gas, electric-
ity, railroad, other inland trans-
port, civil aviation, the Bank of
England and big cable and wire-
less industries have been nation-
alized.

The state now employs nearly
one in five of the 23-million
working population.

With steel nationalized — and
when and if cement, sugar-refin-
ing and meat wholesaling are
taken over—another 600,000 will
be on the state payroll.

The Socialist pledge to assume

Dr, J. A. Fraser Roberts, who
has carried out many researches
in medical genetics, spoke re-
cently in the BBC’S “Science
Survey” programme about blood
groups and their significance. He
reminded listeners ‘who were
blood donors of the letters, O, A
or B on their cards; these stand
for chemical substances that
occur naturally on the surface of
the red blood cells and show the
group to which the donor belongs.
Cards marked AB show that their
owners possess both A and B;
people of group O have neither A
nor B. It is immaterial to which
group a person belongs except in
the case of blood transfusions,
when the patient must receive
blood of the same group. What in-
terested Dr. Roberts was the
number of people possessing each
type of blood. In Great Britain
47% of people belong to group
O and 42% to A; 8% are in B and
3% in AB. These figures are true
for the whole country with im-
portant !ocal variations,

Blood groups are. detecniined
by heredity and differing pro-
portions of blood groups in differ-
ent places give information on the
history of mankind. Many English

people now live on the North
Welsh coast., and so two popula~
tions, largely separated by

tradition, are side by side. Their
difference is faithfully mirrored
in their blood groups. Further

THE LAST OF THE



MICHAELSK I
VESTRYOVITCH ENTERS = HIS

sikh sinamsdcspeesicatomcahes



FURTHER

“production, distribution and ex-
change means” has been fulfilled.
By acquiring key industries and
other devices the state indirectly
controls remaining industries,

Are the people better off under
socialism?

Some small industrial rofits
have occurred, such as the electric
industry’s $11 million in its first
year. But the nationalized indus-
tries as a whole have gone more
than $200 million into the red.

The government considers
nationalization still in an experi-
mental stage.” By no means was
financial stability expected imme-
diately. Some industries like the
railways and coal mines were in
bad shape when the Labourites
took over. Others like electricity
were prospering.

By Socialist standards the object
is not big profits but producing
goods and services more cheaply
and efficiently.

Since’ nationalization, the
price of coal, gas and electricity
and transport fares and cable
rates have risen sharply while
in most instances the industries
still showed heavy losses.

The average charge for electric-
ity during the first year of nation-
alization was 4.7 per cent higher
than the previous year; the aver-
age annual increase the previous
decade had been under 0.8 per
cent.

The coal price has increased
each year. To-day it is about 20
per cent more than before nation-
alfation. Coaluprice jumps main-
ly have been responsible for
hikes in gas, electricity, railway
passenger fares, and _ freight
charges.

These facts give ammunition to
the Conservative critics.

Nationalization also has altered
worker - management relations
without, in general, bettering
them. There are strikes against
nationalized industries like the
recent unofficial gas strikes, the
unofficial stoppages by railway-

back in history Vikings came to
live in South Pembrokeshire and
in that area of Wales the A
figure was higher than anywhere
else in Britain, about the same as
it is’‘in Southern Norway which
has the highest proportion of A’s
in Europe.

Dr. Roberts then looked at the
world picture, taking group B
first. China, parts of India, Java
and Central Africa had up to 40%
of B. Radiating from these areas
the proportion of B fell steadily
to the British figure of 8%, about
the lowest in Europe. It seemed
likely that B originated in Asia
and Africa and spread outwards
with the peoples who carried it.
Before the coming of Columbus
America had no B at all; nor
had Australia before the Euro-
peans arrived. But while this
radiation possibly accounted for
the bulk of B found in human
beings the story was not quite so
simpie. In the Celtic fringe of
the British Isles B rose instead of
continuing to fall. In certain
remote parts of Wales, the kind
of terrain to which people might
be driven by invaders, there was
evidence of the survival of a
palaeolithic physical type and
here were “islands” of very oo
B, from 18% to 24%, giving indi-
cations of people so ancient that
they had been almost but not
uite submerged, Thé peoples of
the old Stone Age were probably
high in B long before the more

BARBADOS ADVOCATE —

VESTRIES





men, miners, dockers, and others

Grave danger still exists, judg-
ing by outstanding wage claims of
millions, that any increased effi-
ciency which is obtained will
have to go more into paying
higher wages than into yielding
lower fuel and transport prices.

Economic and administrative
problems equally are unsolyed,
stemming mainly from inability
to get top-flight industrial men to
serve under nationalization.

A consumer can complain about
nationalized products and _ser-
vices, but cannot command.
Under free enterprise he can re-
fuse to buy a product or can get
it from a competitor—but
state product is bad he can do
little effectively about it.

Despite rank and file socialist
demands it has become evident
Parliament practically has no
voice in running state enterprises.
Parliament legislated the private-

to-public transfer of industries— |

at the same time legislating itself
out of any real control of them

Annually Parliament may de-
bate the yearly report on a state
industrial operation, but it can do
little else.

The state industry—a deliber-
ately created monopoly — makes
its own law, and it is not, like
any private monopoly, answerable
to the existing monopolies com-
mission.

The Socialist programme has
gone so far that even the conser-
vatives do not propose: a sharp
turn-back, Most nationalized
industries will remain that way as
far ahead as one can see.

But the labourite plan _ to
nationalize basic iron and _ steel

industries has divided the nation |

like no other socialization project.

It is the biggest political issue
to-day. And if and when the
conservatives return to
they have pledged to keep iron
and steel in private hands.

—LNS
(TOMORROW:
rearmament on British Socialism.)

modern spread of high B_ from
Asia and Africa. The world wide
distribution of A is more compli-
cated but the patterns were in-
formative there tno, There were
also other groups, such as the well
known Rhesus or Rh system, dis-
covered some ten years ago. Most
people had this substance on their
red cells and were positive but
some were negative, In North
Western Europe only eighty-five
per cent of people were Rh posi-
tive, but all Pacific Islanders were
and all but one per cent of Chin-
ese, Japanese and American In-
dians, The most remarkable
story came a year or so after the
substance was discovered, when
Professor Haldane pointed out
that amongst the ancestors of
modern Europeans there should
be some peoples in whom the Rh
negative hereditary factor was
commoner than the positive. For
years nosuch race was found
until it was discovered that the
Basques of France and Spain
were largely Rh negative.

Eight blood groups are now
known, With many sub-divisions.
The newest, named Duffy after
the donor through whom it was
found, shows particularly wide
variations. “Knowledge about
blood groups and their distribu-
tion is growing very rapidly in-
deed,” concluded Dr. Roberts.
“and it is safe to prophesy that
within quite a short while a whole
flood of new light will be thrown
on the history of mankind, both
recent and more remote.”



f al e :
SEAS |dence, since I had not been confronted with

FUCHS WANTS TO |

|

STAY BRITISH

By JOSEPH THOMAS

| LONDON.
{

Dr. Klaus Fuchs, the atom scientist now
serving 14 years in prison for giving A-bomb

lseerets to Russia, is fighting to retain his

British citizenship.

He has written a letter to the “Deprivation
of Citizenship Committee” pleading with
hem not to revoke his British nationality.

Fuchs was born in Germany in 1911 and

‘admitted he joined the Communist Party

after Hitler came to power. He came to Eng-
iand before World War II and after a careful
check was given British citizenship because
of the important work he was doing.

The history of the Fuchs case was given

‘to the committee by Attorney-General Sir

|Hartley Shaweross.

The Committee will
advise Home Secretary Chuter Ede on

'whether Fuchs’ citizenship should be re-
| voked.

Sir Hartley revealed that Fuchs had made
representations to the Home Office why he
should not be deprived of British nationality.
He had previously been notified that the
Home Secretary was considering revoking
his British citizenship.

Fuchs wrote that if the Home Secretary’s
action was intended as punishment for his
actions there would be little that he could
cay, except that he had already received t! >
maximum sentence permitted by law.

Fuchs said he assumed, however, that the
question under consideration was his present
ind future loyalty. .”

He declared his disloyal actions ceased
early in 1949, before any suspicion had been

voiced against him.

|

| Communist party seem to go through.”







|

Blood Groups And Origins

power ; Was unable to repair the tremendous damage
| he had done.”

The effect of |2NY argument on the Committee, pointing

The Attorney-General said that Fuchs set
out the fact that he had made a full state-
ment and that it was on that statement that
he was prosecuted.

“T was not forced to confess by any evi-

iny evidence against me,” said Fuchs’ letter,
adding; “I think the facts mentioned would
have been of great value in a plea in miti-
gation.”

Fuchs added that in making his confession
and in his subsequent actions he was guided
by his convictions and loyalties, and that he
showed clearly what his loyalties were.

“The whole story,” said Sir Hartley, “is
really an object lesson in the meaning of
modern Communism. The fact that Fuchs
made a free and full confession is a curious
characteristic of these queer psychological
processes which some of the adherents of the

Sir Hartley told the Committee that Fuchs
had a kind of mental schizophrenia—the
dominant part of his mind accepted Com-
munist doctrine unquestionably, but the
other part realized that it was wrong.

“After his confession”, the Attorney-
General concluded, “Fuchs appeared to have
done his best to help the authorities, but he

The Home Secretary decided not to press

out that it was a matter for the committee
to decide in their great experience.—INS.

Year And A Hali

OTTAWA.

CANADA in 1950 embarked on the great-
est peacetime military programme in her
history, an effort sparked by the crisis in
Korea.

It all happened in a short six months, In
June, North Korean Communists invaded
South Korea and the United Nations inter-
vened. By December, acting in conjunction
with her U.N. partners, Canada had sent
three destroyers, a squadron of transport
planes and a battalion of troops to the far
Pacific.

At home she raised a special army brigade
of 10,000 men to meet international obliga-
tions in Korea or elsewhere and set a pre-
cedent by labelling it as an international
peace-enforcement force.

Canadians were told in effect that the
peacetime economy of the last five years
was over. Higher taxes were forecast to meet
the staggering $1,000,000,000 defence budget



necessary to pay for these military moves y

and for boosted production of jet fighters,
naval ships and other weapons of war.

In mid-December the government an-
nounced that Canada’s 63,000 servicemen
would get pay increases retroactive to Dec.
1, ranging from $14 a month upward and
averaging $19 for other ranks and $33 for
officers,





Vestry Grants
To the Editor, The Advocate,—

SIR,—The writer “$50 Tax Bill”
raises some interesting points, one
of which concerns grants to repair
and maintain churches in St.
Michael. The total vote is in the
region of $14,000, out of which
some $10,000 is applied directly
to the Cathedral, The Cathedral
is wholly maintained from the
rates, but the district churches
are not. The latter receiving
small grants for repairs only, and
even these are very unevenly dis-
tributed.

This means that the inhabitants
of a district have to contribute
towards maintaining their district
church, and in addition must pay
all the expenses of the Cathedral;
a classic instance of the poor
helping out the rich,

It is only in St. Michael’s parish
where this wholly inequitable
arrangement is persisted in, for in
the country parishes, the church
rate is at least more reasonably
divided amongst the churches
concerned. I am not defending
the principle of church rate,
though since the churches are
public buildings something may
be said for it no doubt, but whilst
it remains, there should be even
distribution according to the rate-
able value of each district. No
deubt, in Christian charity, the
Cathedral authorities themselves

will hasten forward to initiate a
much needed reform?... ?
EQUITY.

Poppy Collection

To the Editor, The Advocate,—

SIR,—I would like to thank the
following for help with the Poppy
Collection.

Mr. J. C. Hammond for his
broadcast on the eve of Poppy
Day.

Lady Collymore and her helpers
who counted the town collection
on Poppy Day.

All Organizers and Sellers.

The Directors and Management
of the Marine and Crane Hotels
for the loan of their premises for
dances.

Mr. Skinner for running the
Roulette at the Marine.

The Organisers of the “Special
Efforts.”

Messrs. Fitzpatrick Graham &
Co. for auditing the accounts free
of charge.

The Manager and Staff of the
Canadian Bank of Commerce for
their help and courtesy through-
out the year.

The Advocate for their gift of
free space to the Cause.

DOROTHY C. HUTSON,

Joint Hon: Secretary,

B’dos Branch Poppy Leagu
“Leighley’”’,
Belleville,

ist. January, 1951

Cut Spending

LONDON.

The powerful Federation of
British Industries has called on
the Labour Government to “sub-
stantially cut spending” in a
statement emphasizing that the
shorte’> of key raw materials is
“serio «ly threatening” Britain's
economic recovery.

The statement, “The Economic
Background in December, . 1950,”
also warned that the load of taxa-
ation which Britain already carries
is one which no country could for
long support,

Britain’s success in reducing the
dollar gap and in increasing pro-
duction are “substantial achieve-
ments,” but the statement pointed
cut that it “would be unwise to
allow them to blind our eyes to





some very real difficulties that
have appeared in recent months.
“We are faced with a scarcity
of certain key raw materials
:mounting in some cases to an
al famine) as serious as io
threaten the maintenance of both
production and productivity,
“In addition, the fuel and power

situation is most grave-—even

FBI

industrial production were to
remain no higher than today.

“The whole basis of industrial
effort is thus being undermined;
until adequate supplies of fuel
and power and raw materials can
be assured there can be no security
in our industrial outlook.”

The statement said that despit:
this, physically anc financially,
room must be made for whatever
was necessary for defence.

It insisted that taxation was
already too high and industry was
faced with an actual or prospec-
tive shortage of capital.

“We cannot escape the conclu-
sion that substantial cuts must be
made in national and local govern-
ment expenditure (apart from
rearmament), which from its very

size is, with the consequent high
taxation, the strongest among the
forces maintaining inflationary

pressure.

The stftement dec!
alternative
in peace
aggravate”

red tl the
of yet higher taxation
time would “merely
the situation and “in-

disince ves to effort,’

—INS




| would be expected to make sacrifices for



|
|

Cabinet Ministers told the people they

some time to come. They were necessary if
world Communism was to be stemmed in
Korea and wherever else it might try to ad-
vance. They were necessary if a third world
war was to be averted.

Cabinet sessions in Ottawa were frequent
and long as the Korean war ran hot, then
cold, then hot again as Chinese Communists
entered the fray near the close of the year.

Within a few weeks of the Korean out-
break the government announced the dis-
patching of the destroyers Cayuga, Atha-
baskan and Sioux from the west coast to
join U.N. naval forees in Korean waters.

A short time later—in July—Canada sent
No. 426 Transport Squadron of vhe RL.A.F.
from Montreal to join the Korean airlift
flying supplies from McChord Field at
Tacoma, Wash., to Tokyo.

External Affairs Minister Pearson, between
hops to critical U.N. sessions in New York,
said that in setting up the special brigade as
an international peace-enforcement force,
Canada had “started something important.”

S . the year and a half ahead is the
dangerous period,” he told the Commons. “If
we can get through that period, we may
then have time to settle our problems even
with those people behind the Iron Curtain.”

—C.P.



FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1951



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FISH VEGETABLES pe
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Haddock String Beans Kale
Cod Fillets f Cauliflower Asparagus
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MEATS Cook’s Paste—6c. per tin
Hams in tins Dried Prunes—50c, per Ib.
Bacon—Sliced Sling in tins—36c.
Turkeys Sultana Puddings—48c.
Chickens Steak & Kidney Puddings

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FSSA EE

&
FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1951

T.C.A. Can Carry
More U.K. Mail

T.C.A. are at present taking mails from Barbados to
the United Kingdom every Saturday morning and these
should arrive in London at 1.45 p.m. on Mondays, Mr.
H. N. Armstrong, Colonial Postmaster, told the Advocate
yesterday.



He said that when T.C.A. start to make their two
flights a week from Canada to Barbados, there will be a
possibility of more mails going to the United Kingdom
from Barbados.

Prince Charlie



In addition to carrying mails
to the U.K. on Saturdays, T.C.A.
also take mails to Bermuda for
. onward conveyance to New York.
/ q These are scheduled to arrive
W as Wrong there at 8 o’clock the same night.

Little Ian McLeod, grandson of , Prior to December 16, 1950,
the Hon. D. G. Leacock was the *W° weekly mails-—one on Mon-
subject of the Advocate’s “Your day and the other on Friday—

suess” competition this week and Were carried to the U.K. from
this was won by Charles Ray of Barbados to Jamaica by B.W.LA.
“Whitehall Flats”. Hastings. ind then forwarded by B.O.A.C

Few people got it right, but Now, there is only one mail from
they hazarded their guess never- Barbados to the U.K. by
theless. Some thought it was B.O.A.C. and that is on Tues-
“Bonnie Prince Charlie” and other days.
guesses that placed it as “Charles Mr. John Baldwin, Chairman
Philip, Duke of Edinburgh,” were of the Canadian Air Transport
indicative of the same line of Board said that as far as T,C.A
thought. were concerned, they would be

A most noncommittal one was always most happy to assist in
“A Spanish Visitor’, and some the carriage of mail between
more definite but still wrong ones Barbados and the United King-
=e eee ee — tom and vice versa, but that was

olonia| retary”, “The a matter for th ste i-
Son of the Hon. and Mrs. Black- ‘jes. Semel seine
man”. “Master’ Embiricos”, “Son
of George Camacho.”

Some single tries in the dark
placed it as “Joseph Rudder” and
“Paul De Freitas.”

41 CHOSEN FOR
“DEFENDER”

A crew of 41 West Indian sca-
men were picked at the Harbour
and Shipping Department yester-
day for the Harrison liner Defend-

To Probate

The will of John Henry Hall
who died in Barbados on Octo-
ber 10, 1947, was admitted to
Probate in Solemn Form by His
Honour the Chief Judge, Sir
Allan Collymore, in the Court

T.C.A. Willing

If _ the postal authorities wish-
ed TCA to supplement the pres-
ent mail service between Bar- of Ordinary yesterday.
bados and the United Kingdom, his will which was lodged in
he was sure TCA would be very the Registry 10 days after Hall’s
anxious to assist, and certainly death, was presented to the Court
would be in a position to carry for Probate in Common Form or

the mail as_ there is adequate Feb
ta ruary 24, 1949. Probate was
capacity on TCA planes to move refused on that occasion because

1 aoe | mail up to the United Kingdom " '
“a now lies in Carlisle Bay. by way of Montreal. ee oa A oh ae
these, 13 were chosen as ‘The Sesh atte ON eed rete

service to Barbados by Court that when
s been provided to serve will
é ,

deck hands, 7 for the steward TCA ha

he signed the
department and 21 for the engine both th

the other witness Lauriston

1e needs of Canada and , are-

room, The Defender may leave Barbados, and anything that pe died anne ee tee

port around the end of the week. TCA could do to move traffic to was given by him : 7
A room of the Harbour and and from Barbados in accordance , ‘

Shipping Department was crowded with the wishes of the people Represented by Mr. D. H. L.

for many hours during the day here, will
with seamen seeking jobs.

"HELDER” DUE TODAY

The Royal Netherlands steam-
ship Helde: is expected to call

ll if possible, be done Ward, instructed by Messrs
whether it is mail, cargo or pas: Hutchinson & Banfield, Ethel'ne
sengers to any point served by Hall, widow of the deceased, and
TCA. beneficiary under the will and Ber-
U.K. Reluctant esford Hoider, another beneficiary,
He said that there has been presented a petition to the Court
here to-day from Trinidad wigh some slight difficulty in that the yesterday asking that the will be
general cargo. Her agents afte United Kingdom has shown some admitted to Probate in Solemn
Messrs. S, P. Musson, Son & Co,, reluctance to have TCA move Form. Six other people were
Ltd. traffic between Canada and the cited_to appear—Abraham_ Hol-
On Monday, the Harrison liner United Kingdom by way of Mon- der, Erwin Sealey, Laurie Sealey,
Specialist is expected to arrive treal, but they are hopeful that Beatrice Harewood, Hestella
with general cargo from London the difficulty can be solved be- Meritt and Mary Belgrave.
and on Tuesday the Aleoa Pennant cause, if it cannot, it will limit
Single Beneficiary



agents of both ships. to give to the people of Barbados.
Sealey were the only ones who
ers are merely next of kin tu
of the “Canadian Exporter” in connection with the high ‘on to the will.
for it is that the costs of operation of C

will be calling from Halifax, the ability of TCA to provide a
Messrs. Da Costa & Co, Ltd., are service which they are anxious
Of these, Abraham _ Holder,
ae ae Beatrice Harewood and Laurie
/ e e
Canad Sh y Hi 7 attended the Court. Abraham
tan u s ope Oo Holder is the only beneficiary
Quote Lo F, _@ ht R t out of the seven cited. The oth-
oe. r reig a es the deceased. The three who
came to Court told the Chief
COMMENTING on an article in the October issue Judge that they had no objec-
i ‘ ’ The other witness of the will,
o pen between Canada and the West Indies, Hon ble Lauriston Holder, told the Court
one evrier, Minister of Transport in the Canadian that both he and James Hare-
Government, told the Advocate yesterday that the c I
jl : ¢ anadian ships are Will was signed.
the ‘highest in the world with the exception of those in Elsie Browne, step-daughter of
America. the deceased, said she had gone
He said that it costs 50% more to cali Harewood . reek
9 : to operate a Canadian ship than will, and that she had seen the
B’dos Polo Club

it does a British ship, and it costs tWo Witnesses and the deceased
25% more to build a Canadian in the house together. She knew



ae iene i : : thing of the actual execution
l ship. However, they were begin- "0 4
May Visit Jamaica ning to obviate and get over that Of the will.
THIS YEAR difficulty by two policies, first,

Court Satisfied

The Chief Justice giving his
decision, said the Court was sat-
isfied as to the genuineness of
the will, which on the face of it
was a reasonable document, such
as from the surrounding circum-
stances the testator would have
been likely to make in favour of
his wife and others.

“IT am satisfied”, said the Chief
been to have a favourable effect Judge, “that for some reason or

There are 36 playing members ©" freight rates. Before that or an eres ia ovtdanes
at the club, 27 men'‘and 9 women, Policy came into existence be- oa eben teeth) sell. be
The club has been in being now Céuse of high freight rates brought aumnitted in Bolte Baer, and
about 12 years and was formed tye at high fost Of Opera ucm, Letters Testamentary will ‘issue
by an old member of the Savan- Canadian ships were in difficulty, “There is no. Death’ Duty ‘Gare
nah Polo Club who dropped out but at the end of December 1950, Hicdn Sttinhed. “bit to widens
of the polo world soon after the the position was again normal, stand that one was filed before.
1914—18 war. and it is to be hoped that export- Tr it has been misplaced and

In the matches that will begin ers to the West Indies will be in Canton be found... snother | can
to-morrow, the teams will play @ position to quote lower rates. probably be got ‘
six chukkas. Some members own f "
only one horse and will have to _ It must never be forgotten that “Until then, what I have said
plav on strange horses. Canadian ships are not subsidized will be subject to the finding of

Tne players are practising hard like American ships which are the original certificate, or produc-
because this is the first. time highly subsidized; neither are tion of a duplicate. ,
that the teams have played for they assisted to the extent that The costs of the. case will come
challenge cups. Two horses have British ships are, They have to out of the estate.
been injured since practice began. operate competitively, and that
One horse, Mr. W. Bradshaw's, brings up again the Canada West
was injured when a player swung Irdies Trade Agreement which
his stick to hit the ball under he believed should be negotiated,
the horse's neck. first with reference to trade,
second, with reference to curren-
ey and third, with reference to
freight rates,

the replacement plan, and second
the transfer of a _ flag policy
which permits Canadian ships to
transfer to the United Kingdom

Members of the Barbados Polo
Club hope to visit Jamaica after

the crop this year to play a series ;
of polo games. In October, 1949 Registry and to operate under the

: > U.K. Registry still retaining their
when Jamaican Polo players came ; ; ‘

to Barbados the honours were ©#Padian Flag Registry.
divided. When the polo cup
matches begin at the Garrison
Savannah to-morrow, players will
play at their best in the hope of
catching the selectors’ eyes.

Freight Rates
The result of that policy has



"LADY” BOATS
DUE THIS MONTH

Two calls from the C.N.S. pas-
senger liners Lady Nelson and
Lady Rodney are scheduled for
this month,



More Houses For

Bay HousingScheme Boost The first of them will be the

‘anadian Goods

Some of the houses from the * Cs ; Lady Nelson on Saturday, Janu-

congested area of Beckles Hill Mr. Frank Lewis, a retired tex- ary 13, from the British Southern

may be removed to the Govern- tile manufacturer of Truro, Nova Islands. From here she will be

ment Housing scheme on the Bay Scotia, told the Advocate yester- sailing home via the British North-

Land, the Advocate was told yes- day that while in Barbados last ern Islands, 7

terday. year, he noticed that some buyergy The S.S. Lady Rodney is expect-
In that case the houses will be preferred Canadian goods to ed to eall on Sunday, January 28

taken to the area on the north side English. ‘ She will be arriving from Canada

of Beckles Road which is being He said that America and via the British Northern Islands

developed, Cenada used to supply a great and leaving the same night for
This will be done to remodel deal of their goods to the B.W.I., British Guiana via St. Vincent,

the Beckles Hill site and bringing but now they were prohibited on Grenada and Trinidad.

it up to the standard of other account of the exchange difficul-





developed areas, Pe, ties.
"i t e area pe
am sree of Beckles Road As soon as these restrictions FISHING BOATS

de- were removed, the W.I. markets
velopment of the area on the should go back to Canada and the BLOCK CAREENAGE
north side is progressing well, it U.S.A., particularly Canada, as :

was said, Work on the roads in they had built up a big business Over 20 fishing boats blocked
this area was interrupted by the with the B.W.I., and because their the entrance of the Careenage for

is almost complete and the



avy rains d shortage of goods were suitable to the W.1I. some hours yesterday . i
ee “put it nae going ahead market With the current pulling hard
£ idl f . Mr. Lewis arrived in Barbados to the South and the wind a bit
ee thi —x on Saturday by the Lady Nelson-high, Carlisle Bay began to get

to spend his second winter. He rough and so the skippers of the
pag crn tear 2 + by his wife and fishing boats brought them into
they are staying at the Marine the Careenage’s mouth for shelter,

1 ee Some of the fishing boats were
Hotel, from Bridgetown and St. Peter
but the most of them were from
St. James, Few of them had re-
turned from the fishing banks
with little fish while the others had
not gone fishing for the day.

ESCAPED CONVICT
RECAPTURED

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan, 3
Convict Gordon was recaptured
on the mainland on Tuesday eve-

ning about 19 hours after he had FIRE DESTROYS CANES
escaped from Carrera prison

island. A fire of unknown origin broke The fishing boats were a men-

He was caught wearing only out at Pleasant Hall Plantation ace te shipping in the harbour
short pants in which he had swum about 2.00 p.m. yesterday. It de- Lighters and launches could not
the natrow stretch of sea to the stroyed 8} acres of first crop canes move freely out and in of the
mainlang he had _ hidden in end 5 acres of second crop canes. Careenage. Luckily, there was no
nearby forests where police found The damage was covered by in- motor vessel or schooner leaving
bim.—€P) surance yw going into the Care





PELICAN

reason wood had been present when the ;



BARBADOS ADVOCATE
HOLIDAY



ON BARBADOS’ only island a British Sailor, Regi nald Tyrroll, spent Xmas and New Year as a Small-
pox suspect. The scare is now over.

Will Admitted Small Pox Scare Over

THE BRITISH SAILOR, Reginald Tyrrell, who

has been quarantined

at Pelican Island since

December 11, is expected to return to the United

Kingdom next week.

The Director of Medical Services told the
Advocate yesterday that “the risk of extension of

small pox to Barbados

Ex B.M.A. Chairman

Here To-morrow

Dr. H. G. Dain and Mrs. Dain
are among the passengers due to
arrive here by the T.S.S, Golfito
to-morrow. Dr. Dain will be in-
transit for Trinidad where he will
preside over a meeting of the
Caribbean Medical Conference of
the British Medical Association
from January 8 to Juiuuary 13.

Dr. Dain who is now eighty
years old, is a past chairman of
the Council of the British Medi-
cal Association,

Dr. Hyacinth B. Morgan who
was intransit here last week will
attend the conference as an ob-
server, He is a member of the
Council representing the West In-
dian branches.

The Barbados delegates will be
Mr. A .G. Leacock and Dr. A P
Muir, Secretary of the Barbados
Branch. They leave by air on
Sunday for Trinidad.



Music At
The Rocks”
TONIGHT:

Old English Dances by Edward Ger
man will enliven the Police Band Con
cert at Hastings Rocks tonight at
o'clock, The programme will be:

Operatic March The Damnation of
Faust — Berlioz

Overture Hungariana
Lotter.

Old English Dances

Edward German.
Rustic Dance; Jig.)

Selection The Great Walts—Strauss

Two Pasidobles — Amparita Roca and
Aguero — Texidor

Two Tangos
Jacob Gade

8

Brahms-

Merrie England
(Hornpipe; Minuet;

Jalousie and Selita —

Song Selection Gracie Fields Hit
Parade — Duthoit
Film Music Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo and
The Work Song (From the Walt Disney

Film Cinderella)

Modern Dance Medley In Old Brazil
—Murrell,

Finale Himno Nacional De Vene-
zuela,

God Save The King

"DON'T WANT IT”

A seaman yesterday strolled
into the Harbour and Shipping
Department to have a correction
made on his discharge certificate
He had just got off a ship which
came down from England.

After hearing the purpose of his
visit to the office, a clerk took hi:
red ink pen and made the correc-
tion,

“Don’t want 1%”, the seaman
said aloud when he saw the red
ink on the paper.

The clerk asked his reason and
he said, “When I Was at school
and the school teacher crossed the
sums with red ink, he meant tha‘
they were wrong — no good; so
that means that the discharge cer-
tificate is wrong.” The clerk tried
to explain but he continued, “Don't
want it.’





is over.”

J ohnny’s Tale

If you went through Da Costa
Alley, a little back alley which
runs from the Lower Wharf and
along which donkey carts and cars
are parked, you would see Thomas
Johnson, a watchman of over
seventy, who can tell you of the
days when bakeries and provision
dealers had businesses in Broad
Street.

Johnson, or Johnny to his ac-
quaintances, says that in 1890
eight biscuits used to be sold for
i cent and a tin of condensed milk
for five cents.

Johnson was born in St. Lucey
and worked as a cooper in St.
Peter for many years, but only
because he could not find a bet-
ter job, He is seared of being in-
Jured and that was why he left
the cooper’s trade, because he
said, he used to be cut often.

When the Panama Canal was
being built, Johnson went to
Panama, He stayed there for only
thirteen months. He said there
used to be accidents daily such as
scaffolds breaking down, and fear-
ing that he might be one of the
unlucky ones. he returned to Bar-
bados.

When Johnson returned, nearly
30 years ago, he took a job as a
messenger and now that he is old,
he watches bicycles during the
day in Da Costa’s Alley.

A short small man who carries
a stick in one hand and his white-
fvamed shades in the other, John-
son likes to tell of the strictness
of parents in the old days and is
disgusted with youngsters “who
work for a lot of money and don’t
know what to do with it.”

Blackguard Fined

Olga Thomas of Roebuck Street
St. Michael, was yesterday found
guilty by His Worship Mr
A. J. H. Hanschell of assaulting
a Writ Server and blackguarding
near Coleridge Street, a public
highway on December 13

For the assault she was ordered
to pay a fine of £1, and for black-
guarding £2. in 14 days or one
month's imprisonment, Mr. E. W
Barrow appeared on behalf of
‘homas while the case was prose-
cuted by Sgt. Murrell,







Wonder Drug

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan, 2.
Is a drug known as Conteben
being used extensively in Vene-
zuela and other progressive
countries in the treatment of T.B.?
If so, the Hon, Raymond Quevedo,
member for Laventille, wants the

Minister of Health and Local
Government, the Hon. Norman
Tang, to state what steps were
being taken to introduce this

“wonder drug’ into Trinidad for
the treatment of this disease,



= Season's Greetings from

Mil, JASON JONES & CO. LTD.- Distibutors

= PURINA

————













“COCKADE” FINE RUM
App! per Ib 40 \
Purple Grapes per lb 1.08
Gouda Cheese per Ib 1.05
Gorgenzola per Ib t 1.10
3acon (Sliced) per Ib, Sie B39
Cake Mx (Assorted Flavours) per pkt 40
Cocktai] Cherries per bottle + 1,21
French ¢ rs per bottle ie $5 i}
Heinz Cocktail Onions per bottle. J }
Jan ne Marmalade (7lb. tins)... 2.48 & 2.59
Marshmallows 4lb_ tins 3,50 }{f

STANSFELD SCOTT & Co.. Ltd.

,



CHOWS

pment





a=
Soe

APPLES
GRAPES
CHEESE
BACON
JAMS



PAGE FIVE

SCECCPEVOOPSOOOOSPPESIS FC PEPLESEPOSESESOSVTE POG

ENJOY -«

TO0-DAY’S
DOUBLE
Attraction





Tree Trunks
Dynamited

WV ANY OF THE tree trunks at

Wakefield, the new Y.M.C.A’
Headquarters, are so big that the
owners have had to use dynamite
to reduce the size. After these
trees were cut down, it was found
impossible to saw the trunks into
pieces suitable for transportation.
Nearly all the area which will
used for the playing field at
the new Y.M.C.A, has been cleared
cf the trees, grass and wild vines.

When the Y.M.CyA. took over
Wakefield a bee hive was found
in the gallery roof of the house.
This was removed, but soon after







x ines
COFFEE CREAMS

inother hive found its way into AND
the same spot.

When asked about this, Roy MS
Went, the bee-man told the PINEAPPLE CREA

Advocate that before a swarm of
tees decide to pick a spot to make
their hive they always send out
eouts. The scouts found the roof
Wakefield, where bees had al-
ready been, a good spot. They
went back to notify the swarm

N ACCIDEN'’ occurred on

Passage Road on Wednesday
between the motor car M—556,
owned and driven by Mohamed
Patel of Wellington Street and a
bicycle owned and ridden by Wil-
fred Deane of Barbarees Hill.
Deane was injured

URING the holiday season
there was a lull in the sales
of the (B.T.c. 3 Sweepstake
tickets for the coming Spring
Meeting. When the Advocate
visited the Turf Club office yester-
day Series L was being sold. The
(rst prize money has now reached
9,976 but there is still over two
months before the races begin.
One vender told the Advocate
that he had to decide to stop
selling on Christmas Eve, Christ-
mas Day and the Bank-Holiday,
but he sold a record amount on
the Saturday night before Christ-
mas Eve, He also had to put up
his books on Old Year's and New
Year’s Days. *

Another vendor mixed business
with pleasure He went to an
Excursion to Bathsheba on New
Year's Day but carried along three
books with him, He waited for a
while and then caught the crowd
in a good mood. The majority
were eating and singing. When
he offered to sell his tickets they
bourht them with a smile,

He said that every Spring Meet-
ing he makes it a habit to dispose
of some of his tickets at the
various excursions, pienics and
‘ther festivities at the Christmas
and New Year seasons.

CHARGE = against James
Eastmond of Drax Hall Hope,

AT
KNIGHT'S=PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN

Â¥ 5 SSSOGOCEBSSSOE DS SFOS PO SEDO SSIS GOSS FESSSS "



——

HARRISON'S | 2x
SUPREME VALUES IN







POCKET WATCHES
Snap Back: Silver | $4.00

Chromium Plated Case; Hinged Back; and
Silver Dial,

Nickel Plated Case;

Dial; Luminous Hands

| $4.50
| so

$7.

CONFIDENT
FOUR BEST

Chromium Plated Case; Hinged Back;

Luminous Figures, Levee Movement with

4 Jewels,

Chromium Plated Case; Hinged Back with.
Inside Dust-Proof Cover; Luminous Fig-

ures, Lever Movement with 6 Jewels

WE OFFER THE ABOVE,
THAT THEY REPRESENT THE
WATCH VALUES AVAILABLE.

St. George, brought by Colonel ag ge dag am a gp eee ia ee
R. T. Michelin, Commissioner of HARRISON'S BROAD ST,
Police, for driving the motor 'bus DIAL 2464

J—129 along Bulkeley Road on
October 26 in a manner dangerous
to the public, was dismissed with-
out prejudice by Mr, A. W, Har-
per, Acting Police Magistrate of
District “B” ‘on Wednesday mor-
ning.

Eastmond was represented by
Mr, J, E. T. Brancker, Sgt, K
inniss prosecuted for the Police
from information received.

Evidence for the Prosecution was
that the driver of the 'bus J,-129
was driving abreast of another
‘bus. A man, who was on the
road with a bicycle, had to run
into the gutter, :

Writserver Yarde, the main
witness for the Prosecution, said
that he recognised the driver of
he other ’bus, but not the driver
of J--129, Passengers were in both
‘buses,

Mr. Brancker submitted that
there was no evidence as to the
identity of the driver of the ’bus
J—129 y

When asked by Mr, Harper if
he had anything to say, Set.
Inniss replied: “That's a good one

N ACCIDENT occurred on
A Cheapside Road at about
a.m yesterday between
motor car M-2258 and _ bicycle
M5805. The front wheel of the
cycle and the rear part of the car
vere damaged





| Someone's



8.40



DIES AFTER FALL

Gladstone Browne of Workman,
St. George, died at the General
Hospital at 2.30 o’clock yesterday

evening after falling from the
motor lorry G-72 earlier in the
fay

It was about 10.40 a.m. when

CPALOING

lorry G-72 was travelling
along Constant Road, St. George OVER 70 YEARS OF SPORT
4rowne was on the platform.
@-72 is owned by Bulkeley
Ltd., and was being driven by
Charles Powlett of Haggatt Hall, A. GCG. EPA DING -& BROS. LED
St. Michael ee ne J

the







—
—_—_——













—<——

Enjoy Music from

ON THE NEW

1951 BUSH RADIO

TWO IMPROVED MODELS
NOW AVAILABLE

E.B.8.-15-6 Tube E.B.8.1. 5 Tube
$118.00 $90.00

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LID.

11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.









SSS =
PAGE SIX * BARBADOS ADVOCATE PRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1951
A =



















HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON |

upsets
When y h is upset
asa resu hy acidity, a
dose of De Wis tacid
Powder will disperse the pain
and distress right away.
Flatulence, heartburn and in-
digestion are some of the
symptoms that this excess of
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in its train. De Witt's Antacid
Powder soon neutralises the
acid and at the same time
other ingredients in the well-
formula soothe and
tect the delicate stomach
into: ing. Get a supply right











BY WALT DISNEY

| (Sceetees WILL GO WITH YAND THe) (WHAT KEPT WOU? YoU HAD M
YOu! REMEMBER, LAD... | END OF | | woRRieD sick! a
ONE FALSE MOVE, AND IT’S) ME -.-. SF COO S

5 ~~ HO, O=—%
Sate Apy-O:
6° 700,00 |

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Neutralises Acid "i
Soothes Stomach Relieves Pain

rw)

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Carry a few
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@ Easily cariead ANTACID

@ Cell-sealed TABLETS



Soap It combines
emollient ana medicinal
which keep his ~



|
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HERRINGS

FRESH or in TOMATO SAUCE

2



A } Ss

DP iieinclpnaeserateesenieecne ee

Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose
Teeth mean that zou have Pyorrhea,
Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gum
bleed ne the firat ends sore recut
and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad

‘Latee. Amosan must make your
mouth well and save your teeth or
money back on return of empty pack-
age. Get Amosan from sO ees

jay

today. e guar-
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for fyerebawe Toone Newt?

A.S. BRYDEN & SONS evo LTD. le op
Baar ae Gums Bleed!





|
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ma
|
129 |

Cx

SOSSOSSSSSS





Betas SP PSSOSOS OS SOOO OPPO POOF
THE LONE RANGER f






~~ SOOTHING
SAND COMFORTING NZ










LEPOCPLELOSSPSSSPSSS SSO



t gH YOU WANT TO Ley NOT MUCH WITH ME, BUT A !
BUY A BUSINESS? HOW Muct® th
CASH HAVE YOLION HAND > — ARS

AM
FA)














en PA
REALLY
STRIKE Re

\F YOU CAN GETA THOUSAND DOLLARS 4 | GET AS MANY BOYS AS YOU CAN AND
IN GOLD BEFORE TOMORROW, YOU FOLLOW THE OLD DESERT RAT! SEE rj
oe BUY THE BEST-PAYING BUSINESS! | WHERE HIS GOLD CLAIM Is!











May 1951 unlock the door Gr eetings |
We Heartily Thank All
of Our Customers and
Friends for Their Un-
failing Patronage During
1950, and hope to Satisfy
Them in the same Un-
faltering Manner during

to happiness and prosperity







for you... this is the deep

and sincere wish of .... .... ....



eo gee

9OF
GOS SOS GOOG POOS POOF

LX Oe

BY GEORGE MC, MANUS

__BY GEORGE : THE CORNER STORE

ne x and
NORA=JUST WHISPER =} jy yygic %
HOW 90 YOU SPELL. (PMMA %
“CONSEQUENTLY'? ao ,
Tr,
; 2-8

r
‘Sea

BRINGING UP FATHER

ail BT Ah

the Coming Year

We Wish You All a
Very HAPPY and
PROSPEROUS
NEW YEAR



POSSE FSSDSP SOF SPP PFE F PPPS EO OPSPS FFE LEN PAP LPP PPPS IF

»
<| WOW-T CES TAINLY | MAGGIE - HOW fen tae
a9?) HATE TO WRITE | DO You | LISTEN -vou! HOw
\ LETTERS-BUT THiS |} |, SPELL MANY TIMES HAVE
@ ONE HAS TO BE | CONSEQUENTLY”? || I TOLD YOU NOT
ANSWERED “% _) TO DISTURB ME
Be J WHILE I STUDY ??



>?













~ ee

. MANNING & CO., LTD.
PIERHEAD.

Seg



INCE & Co., Ltd.

8 and 9 Roebuck Street
Dial 2236

PROSE EL OCOD
4



Se SO SSSSOSS

O° SSOOCOSSPO SOS SOOO SOOO

POEL EOS COCPS PEED CCPL I LEFSELLL ESSE ED SLES SSL SLE LLCS SESS SASSO
FRENCH LINE OFFERS...
BARBADOS / JAMAICA CRUISE
ON EVERY SOUTHBOUND SAILING OF THE LUXURY LINER
S.S. *COLOMIBIE”’’

TEN DAYS OF UNFORGETTABLE ENJOYMENT

iat ot ak ferme =



ot a aaa



I MAD TO PHONE MR.
‘A New CK, MISS DEBORAU.|
A) Twas AR. VAN DORPE’S
DERS! I GUESS YOU

WHAT

HIS WILLE TLL {
BE RIGHT OVER
WATKING... TRY 8
TO KEEP
THAT LAWYER

AWAY FROM



LLIONS, YOU'LL
KEEP YOUR NOSE
OUT OF My
APFAIRS! 4
nt



THOSE




















g
%
| a pi + om” x
PS re LLL ‘ f x
hata | |f Minimum Rate ERK SENG: |’ | satnr oun}
m ~ | ar ares foe: ~ = ry he
“ea FIRST CLASS \ oF e , January 17
afl ee Pak acm $208.00 2 :
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES February 28 :
VITAE LIGHTS ARE SUDDENLY ) MEN= WHAT) | (YOU KNOW WHAT 2. (DON'T ANYBODY TRY CABIN CLASS §
DOES THIS IT MEANS,WARDEN.) STO STOPUS + “QR y. April I $
$163.00 §

4

eg

June 30
July i

TOURIST CLASS
$111.00

= TURNED ON + ~
|W THE PRIGON AUDITORILIM, AS MEAN? THiS ISA BREAKS —7/~ “THIS DAME IS
DIANA GIVES A TRAVEL FILM TALKs= { 5 a i oe er F ‘oe Ai A. ea] So





Shore Excursions arranged in advance for Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao,
Cartagena and Kingston, Jamaica.
For Further Particulars, Apply to: 8. M. Jones & Co. td.
Agents: Compagnie Generale Transatlantique, Tel. 3814

SOLE LCL ELLE CCE LPO LPL LPP ELL ELPA PEEL A AAPA



POLLAN LAE



SIOSOISSS SS SPOS FF SGPGO PSO SOS FSFE SS OSGI POSSESS PSF POSS FOSSS SOS SOO OPO SO OS OO SS SN GF PIS GSS SOSEOR,

f ( i

y


FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508











aE ou
+ te ec PUBLIC SALES
1N loving memory of our beloved ‘3
MARCUS JORDAN, who fell aleep on
sunmary 5, 1950.
“The radiant star shines o'er the gravé, AUCTION
Of one we loved but coe not save,
Someday, somewhere. we hope to see, On Friday 5: .
The face of one we keep in memory jay Sth at 2 p.m.“at MAN
The JORDAN Family. & TAYLOR'S GARAGE, Church Village,

1 CONTINENTAL PICK UP damaged by
fire. R. Archer Mc Kenzie, Auctioncer.
Dial 2947. 3.1.51—3n

—_oo
Under The Diamond Hammer
BY instructions receiyed from Miss
Maude Philips, T will sell at her houre,
Rendevous, Worthing on Wednesday
next the 10th beginning at 12.30 o’clock
ot ae ee ar tabs which includes:
oR. ‘= Tal with 4 Chairs,
5.1.51—In |} Mahog. Couch, 1 large Carpet, 3

i Mahog. Wardrobe, 1 Vanity, 1 Mahog.
Chet of Drawers, 1 Painted double
Bedstead, spring and mattress, 2 hair

5.181-—-1n
—

In loving memory of our dear mothers
an' wife LILLIAN LYNTON whe fell
uctleep on January Sth 1946.

Not dead to us who loved her

Not lost but gone before

She lives with us in memory

And will for ever more,

Rest in Peace
Lynton and Mope family.







—~—eew= | Mahog Rockers, 2 Mahog. Rail Chairs,
F Ss E 2 Breakfast Tables with 4 painted Chairs,
—— ---— Mattresses, 2 Mirrors, 1 Kitchen Cabi-
Al net, Larder, Collection of Pictures,
Kitchen Utensils and many other items

CAR — Singer nine Roadster, one | Of interest.
owner, 16,000 miles. Telephone Hooper Terms Cash. D.Arey. A. Scott, Auc-

4666 between 5.30 p.m. and 6.30 p.m. for | tioneer.

furtber information.

§.1.51—4n.

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER .

On Tuesday 9th by order of Mrs.
Tric E. Tryhane we will seil her House
appointments at Bagatelle, St. Thomas.

which includes
Very good Dinng
Sereen to seat 18,





5.1.51—3n

CAR — 1 Aurtin Ten H.P, Apply to
Bruce Skeete, Edgecumbe.



4.1,51—3n.





“CAR — 1 — 14 HP. 6 Cyl. Vauxhall
in perfect working order, Good tyres
and battery. Apply to T. S. Birkett,

7p with Patent
Pine Road, St. Michael.

ight and Arm





4.1,51—4n, | Chairs; Large Mir'd China Cabinet;

é wea ese Seeeaes Tables; Ber-

CARS—1 A. 70 Austin. Small Mileage. | Dic® airs, ckers, Corner Chairs,
1 Standard Ten Reasonable prices Dial— Couch; Settee; Mir'd Hatstand; Dining
2037 3.1.50—6n, | Table (Seat 8) all in Mahogany; Car-
pets and Congoleum; Piano — Meister

LORRY — 1937 Federal Lorry with | Sizger in perfect condition; Paintings
good tyres. Can be seen at Fort Royal | Beaded Blinds; 365 Day Clock; Glass
Garage. 5.1.51—5n. | 2d China, Tea, Coffee and Dinner Sets



Pit'd Ware in Vases, Sweet Dishes ete
Fish Knives and Forks, and Cake Forks
in Cases; Silver Prize Cup won by Moor
Bird; Barometer, Jardineers Pine Liquor
and Waggon;
Mir’d Presses; tead, Duech-
esse Dressing Table; Shaving Mirrors,
Bureau, 3 Fol’d Screen all in Mahogany;
fangle and Double Iron Bedteads and
Springs, White Painted Press, GE. Re.
fvigerator (working order) Larders,
Kitchen Cabinet, Flotéhce 3 Burner Gil
Stove and Oven, Milk Cans; Churns ane



TRUCK — One 4.wheel drive Chevro-
let Complete with platform licensed to
May 1951 (8 tons) A 1 order, Ideal for
carting cane from field». $4,000, Apply
A. S. Atwell, Fortescue Pr, St. Philip.

4.1.51—3n,

Tres Wing and Double

ELECTRICAL
GIBSON FRIDGE (American) 8
cubic ft. with interior deep Freeze, three

















years guarantee -- Also other Fridges.| Measures, Domo Cream Separator in
Ralph A. Beard, Hardwood Alley. fect diti
Srna ahead ada ; oa condition, Books and other
£ale 1), ¥ . s y
RADIO. — ” 1880, Dutch, Phil pe ed 30 o’elock, Terms Striethy
adio p working order. BRANKER TROTMA
information Dial 4306 MF ation dle
4.1.51—2n. 5.1.51—2h.
MECHANICAL REAL ESTATE
BICYOLES — Phillips Carrier Bicy. IMMEDIATE SALE
cles. THE GENERAL AGENCY | -CO.! DEVAN — Graeme Hall Terrace, Christ
td, High St. aa “| Church. H. V. Taylor. 4.1.51—2h.
MISCELLANEOUS BUNGALOW — ‘New Bungalow”,





Kensington New Road. Containing two
bedrooms, Drawing and Dining room,
kitchen, toilet. and bath ete, For par.
ticulars apply to F. A. Marshall. Phone
2596. 4.1.51.—6n.

FOR SALE OR RENT
RESIDENCE—A two Storey Wooden
Building in Hindsbury Road, near 1-mile
Stone, Very Roomy on its own land.
See Me. D. Williams, Baxters Road,
Bridgetown 1, 3.1.51—6n

PUHLIC NOTICES

THE ALLEYNE SCHOOL
The Examination for a vacant Founda
tion Scholarship (available from Janu
ary 195%) will be held on Friday, Janu

CEYLON FIBRFE—Fine quality Cavion
Fibre just received. This Fibre is clean,
soft and springy. Price 14 cents per
pound, Dial 4222. G. W. Hutchinson &
Co., Ltd 15.12.50—t.t.r.

GLASS—Sparkle Glass and regular
window glass to fill ali needs, available
now. We supply %” Plate Glass for
show caves and also extra latge panes
up to % inch thick. Dial 4222. G. W.
Hutehinson & Co. Ltd. 19.12.50—t.f£.n

LADIES! Embroidered Anglaise in
beautiful designs and colours just open-
ed again for vou. Yes! It’s at THANT'S
Pr. Wm. Henry St. Dial 3466 and Swan
st 14.12.50—t.f.n.











Cann OP
LADIES SPORT COATS — In assort-
ed sizes and shades, special for the cool









weather $28.50, Modern Dress Shoppe] aty 12th at 9 a.m, For all particular:
(Broad Street). 4,1,51—4n, | contact the Headmaster.

ned 3.1,51-86n
OPEL KADET PARTS — Timing gear, = —

diferential, front assembly etc. Apply NOTICE

E L. Archer, 3185, 51—2n THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW



PERMANENT needles for your record
piaver, and needles of all kinds. Price



Fourteen persons having been nomin-
eted as Cand‘dates for the Vestry of St.
Andrew I hereby declare my intentions







$1.08. Records of all kinds too. A.| to take a Poll at the Vestry Room near
BARNES & CO., LTD, 22.12.50—t.f.n-| the Almshouse on Monday 8th January
1951, beginning between the hours of 8%
SCALES — Platform Scales (500 t%
Cupe.) THE GENERAL AGENCY CO., and 9 a.m. and closing at 4 p,m, for the
Bdos Ltd. Phone 4517. election of 10 Vestrymen.
5.1.51—6n, Signed W. W. WORRELL,

Sheriff and Presiding Officer.
Dated Jan, 2nd, 1951.
3.1.51—6n

————

SAFE—One Larte Fire-Proof Safe in
perfect condition. Dimensions inside
3 feet wide by 3 feet high. Apply
R. S. Nicholls & Co., Telephone No.3925.



NOTICE





3.1.50—t.f.n. I hereby notify my Friends, Custo-
mers and the Public in general that
TRAXLER — Locally built, capacity) my place of business will be closed
4 tons. At Woodland Plantation St | from Mon, 8th until Sist. Jan. 1951. A.
George. 5.1.51—5n | L. WAITHE, 16 High St.
a Pn URES Berm —_— 4.1.51—2n.
YACHT — 18 ft. ity ee ae ——
worries that go with it. ia ran
Morgan 4000, §.1.51—3n NOTICE
PARISH OF 8ST. LUCY
— Fifteén persons having been nomina-
FeR RENT ted as Candidates for the Vestry of St.
Lucy. I hereby declare my intention

to take a poll at the Vestry Room near

the Parish Church on Monday Januaty

HOUSES 8th, 1951, beginning between the hours of

. NE BUILDIN 100 ft x 40 ey ne 9 ogee Pe ea aoe eo

STO! G— *| closing at p.m. for e election ©
Suitable for a Warehouse, Situated in| fon. Vestrymen’
Push Hall Yard. Apply: Dr, F, M. O. G. SLOCOMBE,

Alleyne. Dial 3072. 29.12.50—6n, Sheriff.

;
CANAAN, Bathsheba—Fully furnished. 4,1.51—4n

From January 15th, Feb. March, and
July. Apply Mrs. A. Alleyne Gibbons.
Phone 2617. 3.1.51—3n

einai inna ac grantee
FLAT — Fully furnished, all modern
conveniences (2) Bedrooms, Linen and

Cutlery, 10 minutes walk from Club and
city, Phone 4103. 5.1.51—1n.

PERSONAL



NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. PHILIP.

1 hereby give Notice that as 12 Can-
didates have been nominated as fit and
proper persons to represent the Vestry
for the Parish of St, Philip for the year
1951 and as only ten are required by
law I will hold a poll at_the Parish
Chureh Boys’ Sehool next Monday
8th January 1951 between the hours of
8 a.m, and 4 p.m.

THOMAS A. CATLIN,
Sheriff.
4.1.51—3n.





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, EDNA SMALL
(nee Marshall) as I do not hold myself
responsible for her or anyone else con.
tracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me.

Signed ARNOLD SMALL,
Duncan Village,





NOTICE

AT a meeting of the electors of the
Parish of St. Thomas held in the St.

St. Philip, | Thomas Boys’ Sehool on 2nd Jan. 1961
4.1,51—2n, | Only 10 members were nominated. Tf
“rd therefore declare the following duly
——
The public are hereby warned against or ee sls Nae of
giving credit to my wife, VIOLA Cave, Arnold eerton

SKEETE (nee Lucas of Orange Hill,
St. James) as I do not hold myself re-
spon-ible for her or anyone els€ con-
traeting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me.

Collins, Cyril Mandeville
Gill, Lushington Denzil
Gooding, Uellian Theadore
Mahon, Julian Aubrey
Reeves, Vernon Euley

Sed. BRANDFORD SKEETE, Tailor. ved, Vermont, Kaley
ee ames rne, John Henry Clifford Cooper
St. James | Walcott, Stephen, Alleyne

Watson, David Adolphus
duly elected Vestrymen for the Parish
of St. Thomas for the year 1951.





The public are hereby warned against



giving credit to any person or persons * B, H. MOORE,
whomsoever in my name as I do not Sheriff.
hoid myself responsible for anyone con- 4.1.51—3n.
tracting any debt or debts in my name

unless by a written order signed by me. NOTICE

Signed VAL McCOMIE,
Bay Street,
St. Michael.
5.1.51—2n

PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH.

I hereby give Notice that as 12 Candt-
dates have been nominated as fit and
proper persons to represent the Vestry
for the Parish of St. Joseph for the year
1951, and as onhky ten are required by
law I will hold oa Poll at the»Vestty
Room over the Dispensary next Monday,
the 8th day of January 1951, between
the hours of 8 a.m, and 4 p.m.



WANTED
HELP





S. A. DURANT, J.P.
- Sheriff
4.1.51-—Sh
CANE WEIGHER Past OXPel eC
essentail and possibility of permanent NOTICE

employment to suitable applicant.
Apply in writing to Lower Estate Office
St. Michael 23 — Attention Mr. H. A.
Dowding. 3.1,51—6n

CVBRSEER -—— At Whodland Plan-
tation, St. George. Apply in person with
recommendations, 5.1.51—5n.

PARISH OF 8T. JAMES

I hereby give Notice that as 13 Can-
didates have been nominated as fit and
proper persons to represent the Vestry
for the Parish of St. James for the
year 1951, and as only ten are required
by law I will hold a Poll at the Vestr¥
Room near the Parish Church next
Monday, the 8th day of January 1951,
betwee, the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.nt.

GEORGE EGERTON TAYLOR,







HARDWARE SALESMAN Requires
® Position, having had 54 years’ experi-







ence. N. R. CARRINGTON, Telephone
8277 5.1.51—~1n % ieee
~ 1,510,
MISCELLANEOUS Tans
FOWLS FOR EATING — ==. | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
tity, Apply Teddy Jones, Green Dra- The application of James E. Marshall
fon Restaurant, Broad St. } of Passage Rd, St, Michael for permis-
F $.1.51-—tfn. | 10m to Sell Spitite, Malt Liquors, &e,
at a Woatd and shingle shep at Baxters
WANTED IMMEDIATELY B -| Rd. City r
diay or Rls Tors Genta. Woeatene "Dated this 4th day of January 1951
ed, Tel. 2459. 5.1.61-—1n. | TO:—H. A. TALMA, Esq.
| Police Magistratd, Dist. “A”.
Sed. JAMES FE. MARSHALL,



Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consi.

dered at a Licensing Court to be held

at Police Court, District “A" on Mon-

tod the 15th day of January 1951 at
11 o'clock, a.m.



BE WISE...
-- - ADVERTISE





H. A. TALMA,
Poice Magistrate, Dist. “A”
5.1,51—I1n











































Upper Collymore Rock,
St. Michael.
Dear Sir/Madam,

On Tuesday, January 2nd, 1951,
was again nominated as a candidate for
the parish of St. Michael.

My knowledge gained as a Vestryman
for the past 4 years and my achieve.
ments won on behalf of the parishioner:
wil again be of service to you in con-
ducting the affairs of the parish.

In view of the contested election
which takes place on Monday, January
8th, at the Parochial Buildings, Cum-
berland Street, between the hours of
8 am, and 4 p.m. 1 am again soliciting
your support, trusting you will record
ene of your votes in my favour.

Thanking wou in anticipation.

I am,
Yours for Sevice,
THOMAS W. MILLER,
6.1.51—3n





NOTICE
ELECTION FOR THE VESTRY OF THE
PARISH OF ST. MICHAEL

NINTEEN persons having been nomi-
nated for the Vestry of the parish of
St. Michael, a Poll for the election of
Sixteen will be taken at the Parochial
Buildings, Cumberland Street, Bridge-
town, on Monday next the 8th. instant
beginning between the hours of 8 ana
9 o'clock in the morning and closing at
4 pm

The following POLLING STATIONS
have been provided under the provis-
ions of the Ballot Act, 191:—

No. 1 POLIANG STATION:

The first floor of the Parochial Build-
ings is allotted to Voters whose sur.
names begin with the letters “A” to
“I” (both inclusive) and the entrance
thereto will be by way of the door of
the Churchwarden's Office.

No. 2 POLLING STATION:

The ground floor of the Parochial
Buildings is allotted to Voters whose
surnames begin with the letters “J" to
“Z" (both inclusive) and the entrance
thereto will be through the Gateway
situate at the Southern End of the

bullding.
R. MAURICE CAVE,
Sheriff and Returning Officer.
3.1,61—6n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Lawrenee Edgar
Miller of Orange Hill, St, James for
permission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors,
&c., at a stone wall and galvaniz
building situated at Orange Hill, St.
James, >
Dated this 2nd day of January 1991.
Tu;—S. H. NURSE, Esq.
Police Magistrate Dist. “E"', H'town.
Sad. ABRAHAM MILLER,
for Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be consi-
dered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “EB H’town on
Tuesday the 16th day of January 1951

at 11 9’elock, a.m.
S. H,. NURSE,
Foiice Magistrate Dist. “E" H'town.
5.1.51—1n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Colvin Worrell o:
Jackson, St. Michael for permission tc
sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at bot-
tom floor of a 2 storey wall building
in Tweedside Rd., St. Michael,

Dated this 4th day of January
To:—E. A. McLBOD,

Police Magistrate, ‘A”.

Sed COLVIN WORRELL,
Applicant

N.B.—Thi> application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “A” on Mon-
day, the 15th day of Jan 1951, at
11 o'clock, a.m,











1951,



E. A. MeLEOD,
Magistrate, Dist. “A’
5.1.51.-In

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Olga Herbert of
Roebuck Street, City, for permission te
sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at bot
tom floor of a two storey wooder
building at Upper Roebuck Street, City

Dated this 4th day of January, 195)
To;—H. A, TALMA, Esq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”.

Signed PRINCE CALLENDER,
for Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “A on Mon-
day, the 15th day of January, 1951, at
11 o'clock, a.m,

Police

H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “A.
§.1.51—In

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Edward Catwell of
Jackson, St. Michael, for permission to
sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &e., at a
galvanized chop attached to residence at
Jackson, St. Michael.

Dated this 4th day of January, 1951.
To:—E. A. McLEOD, Esq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist. "A",

Sed. EDWARD CATWELL,
Applicant.

N.B,—This application will be con.
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “A” on Mon-
day, the 15th day of January, 1951 at

11 o'clock, a.m,
E. A, McLEDD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “
5.1.51—In

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Jarvis Drayton of
Macon Hall Street, St. Michael, for per-
mission to vell Spirits, Mait Liquors,
&c,, at bottom floor of a 2 storey
wooden building at cr, Mason Hall &
Emmerton, City.
Dated this 4th day of January, 1951.
To:—H. A. TALMA Esq.,
Pole Mafisttate, Dist. A".
Signed JESSAMY,
‘or Applicant.
N.B.=This application will be eén-
fiaéred at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “A’’ on Mon-
gay, the 15th day of January, 1951 at
11 o'clock, a.m,











H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
5.1.51—In.





LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Violet De Castro
6f Mohogany Lane, St. Michael, for
kermission to sell Spirite, Malt Liquors,
&>., ut bottom floor of Blue Lagoon
buiding, known @&s “Hosaty’, Neison
St. City.

Dated this 4th day of January, 1961.
To:-H, A, TALMA Baq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.

Signed VIOLET De CASTRO,

Applicant
N.B.—This application will be con
fitered at a Licensing Court to be helc
al Police Coutl, District A", on Mon-
. the 15th day of January,
i! o'clock, a.m,





1951 at

H. A, TALMA,

Police Magi-trate, Dist.





LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of tanthe dordah of
Beckles Road, St. Michael, for permis-
Sion to seli Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c.,
at bottom fleot af a 2 storey wall
Bialding at corner of Beckles Road and
Bay Street, St, Michael,
Dated this 3rd day of January,
To:—E. A. McLEOD Baq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A’
Signed G. L. MURRELL,
fot Applicant.
N.B.—This ippleation whl be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
ct Police Court, District “A on Mon-
day, the 15th day of January, 1951 at
33 o'clock, a.m.

1951,

E, A. McLEOD,
Polite Magistrate, Dist. “A’’.
§.1.51—1n



————





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Seoul Burning | Major Battle |
dn Indo-china

From Page 1
away from Seoul. They had no
particular goal.
hosé Who could afferd it could
be evacuated by the Korean army.
It had been én open seeret around
Seoul for the last few days that
the army would evacuate a family
south for £90.
On the road
Eorean

SAIGON, Indo China, Jan. 4.

A French military spokesman
said tonight that a major battle
is being fought in North Indo«
China, but no details will be an-
nouneéd until the completion of
the eurrent phase of operations.

Meanwhile for the fifth consecu-
tive day the French army head-
quarters here issued a commu-
nique whith shed little light on
events on embaitied northern

to-day, rickety
f army trucks passed by
jammed tight with refugees and
their belongings. :

At the Han River main bridge,
many refugees had to dump some
of .the few possessions they had
sa.- aged.

They found they could not man-
age to cross the frozen river car-
rying loads and there was noe room
for them on the heavily laden
railway bridge being used by the

fi i

"The communique said Com-
munist-led Vietminh forces are
still attacking a _ line of
French forees guarding Hanoi.
There was no change in the situa-

tion whatever it was reported
wre ies Pahioh had been in the Tienyen-Monca sector on
pianked to take army trucks was|‘h€ northeast of the ‘Indo-China
to be blown up soon after dawn. | frontier.

For 50 yards on either side, am-
phibious tanks smashed across the
ice, breaking it into small pieces
to thwart any Communist attempt
to blow up the bridge premature-
ly. It was fear Communist
saboteurs might sneak over the
ice under cover of darkness and
dynamite it.—Reuter.

The spokesman who revealed
a major battle was a personal rep-
resentative of the new Com-
mander-in-Chief and High Com-
missioner Gen. Jean De Lattre De
Tassigny.

He said the restriction is part
of the new Press policy, but as-
sured correspondents that other-

: all facilities will be given
for comprehensive coverage



eT tA eee acamseenctiei aT

LOST & FOUND

of the Indo-China situation, —CP



LOST

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET Series I
2283. Finder please return to J ph
Lynch, School Road, Upper Bridge Ra
St. Michael, §.1.51—1n





Nevis Carries On

From Page 1
or nearby mains. Hence, Mr. J.
D. Wilson, Clerk of Works, flew
fiom St. Kitts to-day to retder
assistance to the damaged Nevis
water supply.

Tents which arrived from
Puerto Rico on the U.S. Oppor-
tune, are being used for the shel-
ter of Police and as
Government buildings



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Carlisle Atwell of
Halls Road, St, Michael, for permission
to sell Spirits, Mait Liquors, &e,, at a
beard and shingle shop at Gov't Hill.
St, Michael.

Dated this 3rd day. of January,
To'—B. A. MeLZoD_ Exq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A".

Signed W. SEALY,
for Applicant

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Poliee Court, District “A"’ on Mon
day, the 158th day of January, 1961 at

It o'clock, a.m.
BE. A. MeLEOD,

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
$.1.51—In

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of THE WORKERS’
CANTEEN



1951
temporary

His Excellency accompanied by
the Federal Engineer, John Knox,
are leaving on January 7th for a
two-day visit to Nevis

A report from our St. Kitts
correspondent states that a .char-
tered plane from Trinidad arriv-
ed in that colony bringing repre-
sentatives of the Banks, the Presa





a eee Dudley D. Holder andj and Rex Stollmeyer They re-
cDonal Brathwaite (Trustees) of ini i
Fairchild Street, St. Michael, for per- turned to Trinidad later in the
mission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, | (4Y-

&c., at bottom floor of a 2 storey wall
building in Fairchild Street, City.
Dated this 4th day of January,
To—H. A. TALMA Esq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
Signed D. D. HOLDER,

1991

CANADIAN RATES

JANUARY 4, 151

seem eneneeeente eeceonaaeetaenenctt tA TCs acsccencttie teat

for Applicants. | 644/10% pr. Cheques on

N.B.—This application will be con- . Dahkers 625/10% pr
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held Demand
et Police Court, District “A’’ on Mon- Draits 62.35% pr
day, the 15th day of January, 1951 mt Sight Drafts 62 2/10% pr
il o’elock, a.m, 644/10% pr. Cable

H. A. TALMA, 629/10% pr, Curtehey 61 pr
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A” Coupons 60 3/10% pry
5.1.51—1h

Ae ete me e e



cae animism oad omnes ene on

GOVERNMENT NOTICES



Liability For Recall of Reservists of His Majesty’s Forces in
The United Kingdom Who Are Resident in Barbados.

Reservists of all three services should be in no doubt of their
individual liability, and the documents issued to personnel on ‘heir
release make it clear that any changes of address should be notitied
to the Service Department congerned.” If the intention of reservists
living in the United Kingdom to proceed overseas is notified, the
reserve liability is then confirmed or cancelled and the individual
cencerned is notified accordingly. Any officers or men who are in
doubt, therefore, should communicate direct with the Service Depar' -
ment concerned,

Colonial Secretary’s Office,

3rd January, 1951.

2

5 1.51—2n



UNIVERSITY OF LONDON



Matriculation Examination — June 1951



All persons desirous of entering for the June 1951 Matricula-
tion Examination of the University of London should forward (he

B.G. India
Responsible Govt.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Jan. 4

A three-man delegation from
the B.G. East Ifidian Association
in eVidence before the Constitu-
tion Commission made strong
claims for responsible Govern-
ment for British Guiana con-
trolled by a Cabinet of ten Min-
isters. It was their desire, the
delegation told the Waddington
Commission, to see Imperial re-
presentatives “shorn of powers
which would negative whatever
Was done by the Cabinet.” The
East Indians pleaded for univer-
Sal adult suffrage for all over the
age of 18 yéars. A Legislative
euncil comprising 24 élected
members who shall elect a Speak-
er from their number and an
Executive Council of ten mem-
bers, charged with departmental
responsibilities,

The Governor to preside over
Couneil meetings, but powers to
be exercised only in regard to
external affairs and defence.

The Colonial Secretary, Attor-
ney General, and Financial Secre-

tary were to be his principal
advisers

Dr. J. P. Lachhmalisingh, Pres-
ident, with the Hon. D. B. Deb-
idin and Mr, C. R, Jacob, com-
prise the delegation. Questioned
whether they thought there was
possibility of an organised party
system in British Guiana with a
fully developed political pro-
gramme to make self government
possible, they assured the Com-
mission that there was already
established a Labour Party with
others now in the making and that
it would take two years to have
the system fully organised,

The Commission adjourned the
session in Georgetown and pro-
ceeded to-day to the Essequibo
district to take evidence at Bar-
tica, Fort Island, Scampa Island
and the C.D.C. timber concession
at Manaka, Later they will visit
MacKenzie Bauxite Mines

Ilse Koch Ends
Hunger Strike

AUGSBURG, Germany, Jan. 4.
Ilse Koch, accused Red witch of
Buchenwald, to-day gave up her
two-day—old hunger strike. After
a hearty breakfast, she munched
an apple during pauses in her
trial on charges of inciting mur-
ders and tortures of Buchenwald
Concentration Camp inmates,
One of the witnesses against
her to-day, was Mrs. Rosa Roedeél,

whose husband preceded Mfrs,
Koch's husband as Buchenwald
Camp Commandant and thén

served as his deputy.

Previous witnesses have praiséd
Mrs. Roedel for her kindness to
inmates and contrasted her con-
duct with the alleged cruelty of
Mrs, Koch,

Mrs, Roedel said Mrs. Koch .was
feared and hated by eamp pris-
oners, and that she exercised fear-
ful influence over her Command-
ant husband,—(CP) ¥

in Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

CABLE & WIRELESS (West Indies!







Lid. advise that they can now commu-
nicate with the following ships taroudh
their Barbados Coast Station

8.8. Captain John, 8.8, Seabreeze, H+
Samuna, 8.8, Presidente Dutra, 8,
Anistal, SS. John Chandris, $8. Brier
$8, Arania, $8, Soya Christiana, 8,
Sundale, S.S. Red ¢ yon, S.S. He Dratt
8.8, Fort Amherst, Mormac Sea, 8.8
toskoop. S&S, Ardentina, WMDS,
Puerto Caballo, $.8. America, WDI,
Skotaa S.S, Salem Maritime, §.8 -
con, 8S. Aleda Patriot, 5.5. Parita, 5.



Veragua, SS, Del Norte, 8.5, Parita 5un,
S.S. Uruguay, WMCM, 8,8. Alcoa Cof-
salt, $.S. Brockley Hill, 5.8, Lady Nelsow,

oat to Eee ee of Education not later than Monday,]%.>, tawie s Cinmnnkine ss Mow
« anuary, — mac Port, 8.8. shins « BS a,
(i) A letter setting out the subjects to be taken, name in full, Ha wethano: SP aN: iMon at
date of birth and address. Tug Dragon, 858. Golfito, 8.8. Quilmes
Gi) A Baptismal Certificate. SS
(iii) A receipt from Barclays Bank (D.C. & O.) showing -hat
vie oon "REAL ESTATE
(a) £2.12.6—for can@idates taking full examination |
(b) £1. 10—,, ; - one (1) stibject to
complete matr.cula- JOHN
tion qualification
(ec) £111.6—,, , is one part to complete
Matriculation quali- 4.
fication,
has been forwarded by mail transfer to the External

Registrar, University of London.
SPECIAL NOTICE :—The attention of all candidates is particularly
drawn to the fact that the Matriculation Exam-
ination will not be held after June 1951.
Department of Education,

27th December, 1950.
onimmremensiong

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Applications are invited from teachers and other suitably qualified

pefsons for the following vacanciés:-- ,
St. Lucy’s Girls’ School
St. Matthias’ Boys’ School (men and women)
Grace Hill Girls’ School
Holy Trinity Boys’ School (men and women)
St. Saviour’s Boys’ School (men and women)
St. Catherine’s Mixed Scliool (men and women)

2. The minimum qualification for entry to the teaching service
is a School Certificate.

3. Applicatisns must be submitted on the appropriate forms
(E. 35 (b) for men and E. 35 (c) for women) which may be obtained
from the Department of Education, but candidates who have already
submitted one of these forms in respect of previous vacancies (now
filled) may apply by letter accompanied by a recent testimonial.

4. Any teacher who applies for « vacancy on the staff of apotber
school must inform his or her present Chairman of Managers and
the Head Teacher of any application for such a transfer.

5. All applications must be enclosed in envelopes marked
“Appointments Board” in the top jeft hand corner and must reach
the Department of Education by Saturday, 6th January, 1951.

23rd December, 1950. 30.12.50—3n.



DEPARTMENT 0! EDUCATION
Wesley Hall Girls’ Scool—St. Michael.

Applications are invited for the Heudship of the Wesley Hall |
Girls’ School from teachers (women) with at least 10 years’ teaching |
experience. The minimum professional qualification required is the |
Certificate A of the Department or extanption therefrom.

Salary will be in accordance with the Government Scale for Head |
Teachers in Grade II Elementary Schools. |

}
|



Candidates who have already submitted application forms in re-
spect of previous vacancies (now filled) may apply by letter, accom-
panied by a recent testimonial. All other candidates should make
application on the appropriate form which may be obtained from
the Department of Education. All applications must be enclosed in
envelopes marked “Appointments Board” in the top left hand corner
and must reach the Department of Education by Saturday. 6th Janu-
ary, 1951.

23rd December, 1950. 30.12.50—3n.

BLABDON
|
|

| AF,S., F.V.A.
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE

| “ROCK DUNDO” Cave Hill.
A well maintained and productive
42 4



Eetate of sor
love
The house





rs in a very
position 2 miles from C
is worthy of ©
notice and possesses great ¢
Its general condition is excellent
and there |s spacious accommoda.




tion

| “GRENADA” B.W.1, A beautt-
| ful and well found ecovlptry home
containing 3 reception, 5 Bedroom,

4 verandahs, 2 bathrooma, 3 toil-





ety 2 Bara ete. The land con-
wists of 14 ‘scres, 12 acres under
coconuts and nutmem, the re-
| mainder pasture and gardens
Income about’ £200, ser annitn
Price 28,000, Full pertieutars on
application
‘BAPTIST VICARAGE’—Paynes
Bay 2 storey house with 3 bed.
roome mpateir lounge; galleries,
dining — roots kitehen Usual
offices, Beautiful sandy beach and
exe@itent bathing. Available May
rm
“TOWER GARAGE" St. Mat-
thha Gap. Near Marine Hotel.
Hecently built property in central
position, Ideal for store, ware-
house, garage, small theatre ete,
Offers considered
UNSET HOUSE” Prospect.
t, Jame Bungalow with wide
va frantaye snd good beat anchor-
“« + bedrooma, lounge, separate
| dining room, verandah 3 sides,
| @ and paved courtyard and
vt garden Sound Yuy at



AUCTION SALE
BLACKMANS

Wednesday, Jan. 10th

REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

PLANTATIONS BUILDING |
Phone 4640





us Ask | Liverpool Has

PAGE SEVEN

‘flu. so far are confined to. the
Lancashire area arownd Liverpoo!
and to the Nort coast. It
noted that the ailment is spread-
FI E . . ing through the Midlands ane
u pl C@MIE Seuthern England, but had not

| Teac! epidemic tions

| there, e Ministry said -

dethie cases are mild ones. toy



LIVERPOOL, Eng., Jan. 4



An epidemic of influenza dis-|
rupted Liverpool fiipping today | Ne ae: Tee
cringing on the Hafbour condi- + . >
tions that haven't been seen here Ship Sinking
‘inee wartime convoys flocked
into port. BRISBANE, Queensland, Jan. 4.

S he
An estimated 30 per cent. of The 11065 ton F. and 0. sang

| liner, Palana, was slowly sinking
i bea | the Central Queensland coast
” | to-day after striking a rock in the
Great Barrier Reef last night.

Her captain, 59-year-old Francis

verpool’s working people inclu-
ling 3,000 dockers were
vith the flu

The harbour was jammed with |
hips awaiting for berths. About |



(.u00 nurses were away from | Russell Spurr, i ie Sepdic
heir jobs, Hospital authorities ia the ol
wwpealed for retired nurses to taken off si
ome back temporarily, Nearty | ew of te enly
00 bus drivers and conductors | Woman on a. Mi "
md 25 to 30 per cent. of the field, wife of Chief ;
telephone operators were ill Half of the erew ate fromm ee

Captain § appea for
Meanwhile in London the Min-| tugs to tow his ship to shallow
istry of Health said epidemics of waters for beaching.

ROYAL NETHERLANDS.
STEAMSHIP CO.









7 ‘ ‘ =

NOTI












an” Galas — will ae-
Sailing from Amsterdam and Dover £ ae elaine :
M.S, “Bonaire” Sth. eth, January 1952, hee & ites inne day
S.S. “Cottica” 2nd. 3rd, February 1951 Maro ae ee
Sailing from Antwerp and Amster- .
ane-M.S “Oranjestad” 6th, 19th.
January 1980 The MV ‘Daerwood" will
Sailing to Trinidad, Paramaribo and uecept Cargo and reatnaee for
Georgetown—M.S, “Hersilin” 8th, Janu- St, Lucia, St. Vineent, Grenada
ary 1981, S.S. “Cottica” 20th. February and Aruba, Date of departure
151 to be notified.

Sailing to Trinidad La Guiara Curacao

Ete.—-M:S hs ad" F
, M.S. “Oranjetad" 2nd February B.W.I| SCHOONER OWN-
Sailing to Plymouth, Antwerp and ERS ASSOCIATION, Inc.
Amsterdam— M.S. “Willemstad” 28rd .
Tanwary 1951 ff

(Limited Passenger Accommodation Telephone: 4647

vailable\s.

S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.,

Agents

Canadian National Steamships

“SOUTHBOUND

Sails Sails Sails Arr 2
Montreal Holifax Bosto: Barbe 2 Barbados
CAN, CHALLENGER" 3 Jan - 13. Jan, 3 Jan
LADY RODNBY” 17 Jar 19 Jan 28 Jan. 2 Jan
LADY NELSON” 1 Feb 3 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb
CAN, CHALLENGER” 15 Feb % Feb. % Fed
LADY RODNEY" 3 Mar 5 Mar 14 Ma. 15 Mar.
LADY NELSON” 19 Mar 21 Mar 30 Mar 31 Mav
CAN. CHALLENGER" 2 Apr - 12 Apr 12 Apr,
ADY RODNEY" 16 Apr. 18 Apr 27 Apr 27 Apr.
sORTHBDOUND Arrives Bails = Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston St. John Aalifax
LADY NELSON” 1) Jay 8 Jan 22 Jan 23 Jan =
LADY RODNEY" 10 Feb 12 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb
LADY NELSON” 25 Feb. 2 Fev & Mar 9 Mar
LADY RODNTFYâ„¢ 27 Ma 28 Mar 6 Apr 7 Apr _
ADY NELSON" 12 Apr 14 Apr, 23 Apr - 4% Apr
tADY RODNEY" 10 May, 12 May. 21 May 22 May.

h.—Subjeet to change without notice

All ves els fitted with cold sto
bers, Passenger Fares and freight ee

rates On application ta





GARDINER ALSTIN &

RE WISE... . ADVERTISE

CO., LTD. — Agents.



MAIL NOTCE











Mails for Trinidad by the Sch, Cyelo-
SSS | ame O will be closed at the ral
| Post Office as under:
HERE'S HOPING anaiee! dial! pod, Hpeleters , Mail at
hy
that 1951 the ath January. 1951, oo
| Gives the opportunity of VN OBOS.
Getting all issues settled for-
| G iving our Customers
| Ay inne 8 West Indian Paintings
Service than 1950 by +
Witt BEST WISHES ROBERT JAMES %
' G, A, Service . MAC LEOD ‘
0 ee! | oo :
— ai = x EXHIBITION >
at the 3
BARBADOS MUSEUM
NOTICE Se ge’
JAN. 5TH TO JAN. 31ST.
MRS. META PETERKIN of DAILY
% ALL WORKS FOR SALE

0 CCSD ODVCCSSS





She has inipragved extensively tm
her

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

TABLE TENNIS’ SETS
os At i

profession of desithing
tntest American stylet
making

the
in drese-

6.5L

Siation Hill, St, Michael, who left
here on a vacation in July 147
to join her husband in Florida,
USA, tle paid a viKit to New
York City and hie roedntly re-
turned after 3% years absence

dn.









POPE PF Fe POS JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
NOTICE MORE DESIGNS IN
In order to obtain rest FRONT DOOR GLASS
from mental and physical
etrain é have jee to a an oe
resign from my professional § my
~ activities indefinitely, Any Sn ee
* one desiring his or her pre SSS
scriptions which [ might be
holding, may call for them
ss any day between 8 and 9 BARBADOS TURF CLUB
\ ath. except Thursdays,
< J. B. CLARKE,
ne biSiind Drugeist
+ 4.1,.61,—6n.,
. y
ELSES PESOS VV
\ Gerbtmneers
CIRCULAR ; TENDERS are invited for
s the exclusive right to sell
e Liquor, Kefreshments, ete..

at the Garrisor. Savannah om

Voters for the Vestry of Rece Days during i951.

St. Michael
Vote For

OWEN T. ALLDER

on Monday next, 8 a.m.

Tenders must be forwsra—
ed in sealed envelopes mark—
ed “TENDER FOR LIQUOK
AND REFRESHMENTS" and
addressed to the Secretary
not later than noon on Sat-
urday, 13th January, 1951,

to 4 p.m. at Parochial
Buildings. The Committee does not
bind itself to accept the
Fearless highest or any other Tender. {
Impartial G. A. LEWIS |
Serviceable Secretary. ||

4,1.61.—4n.



4.1.51.—4n,



; for your splendid support during the year.

WE WISH YOU
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR

!
| WME CENTRAL EMPoRTOM |

(CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors) h
Corner of Broa.i é

‘Tudor Streets,




7 PESTS c
iss »
x SEE US FOR:— %
iy ‘.
: LUMBER & HARDWARE :
3 2 pie :
a Incorporated ‘
s wae r. HERBERT Ltd. a 1926 y
its 10 & 11 Roebuck Street. *
* S
3 8565555050015504545565S 5469 009969005659SS5950585
PAGE EIGHT

MUST



SAM FOGG

BEFORE MARCH

THE NATIONAL BC

warned lightweight champion
heavyweight champ Joey Maxim to defend their titles
before March | or be uncrowned.



cab ch
Ike Williams

eS

Louis Beats
Beshore
Fight Stopped In 4th Round

DETROIT, Jan. 4
Former world heavyweight
champion Joe Louis showed a
flash of his old form in batter-
ime Freddie Beshore of MHar-
urg to defeat in the 4th round
Of their 10-rounds bout here last
it

«The referee stopped the fight
two minutes 48 secs of the
round with Beshore bleeding

a broken nose and a badly

cut left eye. Supporters of Louis
immediately hailed the victory as
a significant step on the road to a
return title match with Ezzard
Charles, holder of the American
on of the world heavyweight

ionship.

7 Beshore’s

‘kout.
nching with something ap-
aching the viciousness of for-
a days, Louis now 36, had all
best of the exchanges after the
rst round.
~-Meshore carried the fight to
Louis from the first bell but the
former champion had little diffi-
in scoring with powerful
its and lefts which brought
blood from Beshore’s nose.

From the second round on Be-
shore, a plodding type of fighter,
be merely a punching bag. Louis
hit him at will and in the third
round a crashing right broke
his» nose and another split his
left" eye. The doctor allowed
Beshore to come out for the
fourth round. He ran into more
sledge hammer blows from
Louis who used his right more
frequently than he did in his last
fight against Cesar Brion. Louis’
left was as potent as of old.

A big home town crowd of
138,096 gave Louis a tremendous
ovation at the finish,

“Two of the three ring officials
called the opening round even but
from then on they agreed it was
“Louis’ fight all the way. Louis
had obviously twained hard for
this fight. He weighed 210} pounds
—the lightest he has been since
his bout in June 1946 with Billy
Conn—and seemed more spirited

e

courage pre-




than when he met Charles last
September. Beshore scaled 191}
pounds.

Louis did not have much to say
about this fight.

When asked how it compared
with the last fight—-Brion—he said
simply: “No comparison”.

Louis said his best fighting
weight was about 210 Ibs.
—Reuter.
I

$4,688 Forecast Goes
To South Trinidad

{From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN Jan. 2

South Trinidad turfites held
both tickets sold in the Baby

Bird-Clipper forecast which paid
$4,688 at Monday’s§ T.T.C.
races. They are Haidar Ali, gas
station proprietor of Point Fortin,
who had one ticket, and Cliffor
Sooknanan, who shared the othe:
with another Southern man.



They'll Do It E







YEARS COURTMORE

AND THE ENTERTAINMENT
WAS EL DULLO-ER-
x3 gk

ss



IT THE NIGUT
WE INCLUDED
HER MAMA IN
THE PARTY
THE PLACE
HAD JUST -
CHANGED
POLICY =++
©

Louis winning by a clean |

very Time

= SSS

HEIRESSA TO EL DULLO-—

FIGHT

|
|

WASHINGTON
YXING ASSOCIATION ha:
Ike Williams and light

The ultimatum was delivered
by Fred J. Saddy, Chairman of
the N.B.A. championship com-
mittee, as the assoc ation announ-
ced its final rati of the year

‘Lhe NWG.A, official also dociured
ihat if Jake Lamotta fails to go
threugh with his scheduled battle
with Sugar Ray. Robinson on Feb-

ruary 14, Robinson should te ce-
clarea middleweight champion
Major surprise in the N.B.A

1950 ratings was that Joe Louis is
longer considered a “logical
contender” for the heavyweight
championship he once held. Louis
was relegated to the role of ‘“out-
standing boxer” by N.B.A. along
with Lee Savold.
For Title

Saddy ssid Maxim should meet
Bob Murphy of California for his
title as soon as possible. He ex-
pressed doubt that Williams can
make the 135-pound lightweight
class weight limit any longer

Saddy announced

“Unless Williams and Maxim
defend their championships by
March 1, 1951, I will make strong
recommendations to the National
Boxing Association Executive
,Committee that their titles be
declared vacant and that an elim-
ination be conducted between
John LL, Davis of California and
Fred Dawson cf Illinois for the
lightweight crown and also be-
tween Bob Satterfield, Archie
Moore and Bob Murphy for the
light heavyweight crown.”

He added that if Lamotta for-
feits his title to Robinson, «
elimination contest should ke
staged between Kid Gavilan, Billy
Graham, Charlie Fusari and Edd‘e
'Thomas of England to select a
new welterweight king to succeed
Robinson,

Saddy, commenting on the
fact that there are no logical con-
tenders for heavyweight, champ
Ezzard Charles to fight, said:

“In the case of Ezzard Charles.
the undisputed heavyweight
champion of the world, he has
made every effort to prove that
he is a champion worthy of that
title and ready at all times to
meet all comers. He has proved
{to be a fighting champion,”

\ Other Ratings

Other NBA ratings by

| were:

| Light heavyweight:
Joey Maxim; logical contenders,

ne



en

class

Champion,

BARBADOS ADV



MIGHT WIN CuLONY CAP



CARL MULLINS, the fastest bowl er in Barbados to-day is tipped to
win his Intercolonial Cap againstTrinidad next month. He took ma-
jor honours in yesterday's B.C.L.--B.C.A. fixture when he captured
five of the seven B.C.L. wicketsfor 33 runs.

“I AM IN DEBT”
—Says Charles

EZZARD CHARLES may be America’s idea of a world
heavy-weight champion, but, so far, the Cincinnati negro
has failed to get his hands on much of that big money
that reputedly accrues to the big men of international
boxing.

“T am about the poorest heavy-
weight champion, tinancially, the;

|
fats chore" Aingland Has
n my way up, never made} ~~
Good Chance
In Third Test

much. There was that sports|
(From Our Own Correspondent)

arena I owned. While I was away!
England’s team for the



on service, they piled up £3,00.|
worth of unpaid amusement taxé

on me, and on my return I had to}
start paying that off. I sold the}
arena, but the debt remained. [|
still owe £1,000.

Archie Moore. Bob Murphy and] “Being a champion is suainiaih third Test commencing at
Bob Satterfield. sive. Tips here, tips there—folks| Sydney to-day is Brown,
| Middleweight: Champion, Jake [expect you to live up to the title,” Compton, Washbrook, Simp-
Lamotta; logical contender, Ray ‘Hard Way’ He Hutwon, Parkhouse,
gg yo ey ae . mr “I have come up the hard way, rena fg ae aH
R reine rc! A a “YTI appreciate the value of a dollar O’Reill ay ; tata W. J.

perenne a onten der None] WAY 80 around tossing dough pet iggniny £ ustralia’'s | great-
Williams: logical a cnteniets down the drain in the big cities? Buartiuauey sah cpemiaie

ams; B B % ai ; ; eS 2 Ss

John L. Davis and Freddie Daw- { don’t aim to make an impression in the match

that way,” adds Charles.

son, Ws ae ee ree : ‘
Featherweight; Champion, San- iia i Rag maintains an rt SYDNEY, Friday.
dy Saddler; logical contenders, al os igri 9 tw ° grand- Good judges give England an
Willie Pep and Ray Famechon. nothers, two aunts and four/excellent chance of winning







Bantamweight: Champion, Vic cocker spaniels—is “owned,” like|the Third Test which begins here
Toweel; logical contenders,’ Luis} ‘© ™@ny top-rank American fight-| to-day. The belated return to
Romero of Spain and Manuel “"*; by a business syndicate. run-getting form of Simpson and
Ortiz. At least 50 per cent of his] Parkhouse has strengthened Eng-

Flyweight: Champion, Dado earnings goes in managerial ex-J|land’s batting tremendously.
Marino; logical contenders, Jean J PEMses. : { Compton returned to the team
Sneyers of Belgium and Terry Joe Louis earned £1,500,000- ; with his mind set on effacing, the
Allen of England. ind still has to fight to meet in- memory of his Brisbane blob and

—I.N.S8,] ©ome-—tax demands, Jack Dempsey,: giving the lie direct to much
on the other hand, put the savings; nonsense that has bean written

7 r P rH from £ 2,000,000 fight earnings! eid spoken about him since he

Klee anasta nto a restaurant, oil and other; became unavailable for the Mel-
yusiness interests—and is now aj bourne Test.
vealthy man. So is Gene Tunney} Washbrook while not in top
















case. Eg.,
2s ont a thant teat
Two Red Threes A

A
Canasta of Kings 4




a an unfrozen
aiscard pile which be ie
melded with his Joker. is
left with about 14 cards in



rr

-~he married money. year is likely to bfeak his drought
Few of our British boxers can|cf runs at any time

match the Dempsey—Tunney kind| These five batsmen compared

of affluence, But Bruce Woodcock Australia’s first five, Mor-

igi

ind Freddie Mills are two who!is, Archer, Harvey, Miller and
will never have to worry about| Hassett stand out favourably |
‘next week's wages,” when one considers the patchy
Women in Sport urreat form of the Australians.
he will be D tak: If women cricketers had aj} En-land having dropped Close
ing” subsequent ‘anking list, No. 1 would be un-j| 4nd Dewes has Johnny Warr mak-
canting safe you suming Molly Hide, of Gunners- !ng his Test debut as extra speed
con) BaD, Sree e ury Club, Surrey and England, bowler. He'll be needed. The
culties yourself,” You iB _ As batsman she is stylish, avreey pitch will be as usual,
orcefu and free-scoring; as] blatant in its ,avcuritism towards

cards end, Meceian Gf tee owier of off-breaks, she is accu-| batsmen

Each captain will need to give
much thought to the arrangement

cate, experimental and invariably
langerous

It is likely that she will have] vf the batting order.
the honour of leading England Hutton has played Australian
again next summer in the three] {3st bowlers so confidently each
Tests to be played against’ the|time (hat it would be foolish to
Australian women touring team | Persist with the dreadful risk of
Cricket for Miss Hide began at|‘S¢"ding him in to bat again at
home; she understood the swing]! umber five.

his hand You hold ; . oo , ;
A. 0-0. 8.7.7, 6. 6. 2 of the bat before the ‘strokes of The Yorkshire opener has been
ety oof ogurse, meld he pen. But at school and collegt 7 arrogant in his confidence
i xCe e she advance rial dal tap i a ‘ ; i ate
nebo end. the Rinne a, " he advanced rapidly in both. a ‘ling with Lindwall and
Canasta of Nines ang leave The one brought her a diploma] * ‘Sim t
rself w one ca is r agrie ” eg Simpson faced = darra of
Coe aeby ah t Boeke. tie et ic ulture, the other, at the Rie nee re a Site ‘i one of
You should meld your Ninconly ige of 19, a place in the England pers in le recen yaney
Qbg, Sincard either a six oF 8 eam v. The Rest. game and came through on top.
cards and aniess the Like all the greater batsmen,|!le played the fast bowling much
ppuarels ts are ip a josttlon Miss Hide does more than play] etter than the slows. He should
Sie Haas io ven ie a inter zood strokes, she commands them. | P@rtner Hutton in opening the
liscard pile that you or your To do that requires a quick wit | 'â„¢OIngs.
partner will be able to take and a stout heart as well as soun’| With Washbrook at number
- technique, Poise in fact three and Compton to follow,
Loudon Bxpress Service. & —L.E.S | Australia’s bowling seems likely
to face sterner opposition than














it has met for many years.

Hassett’s problem is Harvey.
At first drop he is too vulnerable
to the swinging ball.

In Melbourne’s Test he might
have been out from any one of
the first three balls bowled to him
by Bedser.

His method of lifting the bat
high and blazing away at off side
shots surely makes him an enter-
taining player but entertainment
value does not cut much ice in
a Test Match
number five.

the early stages of
position

His

41S













The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises : 6.15 a.m.
Sun Sets : 5.50 p.m.
Moon (New) January 7
Lighting : 6.30 p.m.
High Water : 129 am, 1.13
p.m

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington)
Temperature (Max.) :

82.0° F.
Temperature (Min.)
63.0° F.

Wind Direction (9.00 am.) :
NN.E. (3.00 p.m.) E
Wind Velocity : 4 miles per

hour
Barometer
(3 p.m.) :

: Nil



(9 am.) : 29.944

29.861







OCATE

Hunte Hits 101;
Mullins 5 For 33

A SPARKLING 101 NOT OUT by 18-year-old Conrad

Hunte of Belleplaine, St. A

vesterday’s cricket match between B.C.L. and B.C.A. at
stumps were drawn,

Kensington Oval. When
after batting the entire day,

loss of seven wickets in their first innings. Sree, oe eee ree age

. . 72 no .
Hunte hit seven fours and f2 runs in his first over. hes ema wis: Wood b. Mullins. . 0
twos in his century. He thrillea When the score had reached 5), ° , Carrington c. wk. Wood b. Mullins 39

the. crowd with his well-timed and Hunte and Codrington were sti!
drives and together with Hunte 22 and Cod

1ul'-bleoede4 cover







FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1951

|
make the runs. Hunte then started |

to go for his century and Horact;
King came in for some rough;
treatment when he punched him}
twice to the boundary in his 13th
over.





He completed his century by
hitting Williams for a_ brace
through the covers and whet

stumps were drawn he was un-
defeated with 101 and L. Barker
was five not out.

The scores:—

ndrew, was the highlight in

B.C.L.

had scored 188 runs for the} B.C.L. — FIRST INNINGS

| H. Mc. Carthy Lb.w, b. Mullins
©. Symmonds b Mullins

2
8
Dy Crawford run out 4









India Picks Team
For Fourth Test

BOMBAY, Jan. 4.

India’s team for the fourth
unofficial “Test” against the Com-
monwealth beginning at Madras
on January 19 shows four changes
from the side which drew in the
third “Test”.

Syd Mustaq Ali, G. Kishen-
chand, B. C. Alva, and P. G.
Joshi replace M. R. Rege, H. R
Adhikari, R. S. Modi and Rajen-

dra Nath.
Adhikari informed the Cricket
Control Board that he was

suffering from a strained shoul-



gave a good display: of aggressive) rington 27. After King’s sevent.1! K. Goddard stpd. w.k. Wood der.

bdtting. Opening with Sealy he!cver Denis A‘’kinson of Wander-]_ * >. Greenidge a Joshi the wicketkeeper, an-
showed from the outset that he|ers was brought on in his place. | © Barker not out 1 |nounced that he was fully
wus out for big things and gave Atkinson bowling at medium M -— lrecovered after pulling a thigh
7 cneae Sets ~*~ —_ at 68) pace did_not get much out of the Total (for 7 wickets) 183 | uscle during the first “Test” at
t the y ins io) . rong | ‘

In hi Dowling «ten cast! te aaa ae an aap Fall of wickets: 1 for 12, 2 for 12, 3] New Delhi. a:
Mullins the gix=taot Police wnseel me e Lb “= apy b 73, 4 for 77, 5 for 89, © for 95, 7 for The team: V. sermes. (Cap.
MULE § a wa ins s brou or ai azé . sta j
captured five of the B.C.L, wickels| again and at 73 Mullins had{} : BOWLING gies ae ve oar eae Mouked D. G.
for 33 runs after sending dow!) Codrington caught behind the} y,-witiams Sy 0 |phadkar, CG. Kishenchad, P.
e seca oie which four were! wicket by Wood. Codringto.}t eens oy ‘ Umriger, N, Chowdhury, P.

aiden overs. |made 39. t ing ae 3

Mullins bowled extremely mel H. McCarthy followed and h2}p/ ateineon “ad 0 Ne cma aan M Pege, H.
developing much pace and in the| opened his account with a single,}K Branker St tig bes d efid Rajendra Nath are
first two overs made good use Of after Hunte had pushed a balif¢ Greenidee 8°! 1 | Gaekward, & eer
the new ball. At lunch time his! tr¢ “Mullins. t6 coke foe C. Smith ce 0 'standbyes.—Renter.
figures wereO10 M3 _ R17 W 4.! single McCarthy was given nae ————————— x

Winning the toss B.C.L, cpened! leg before to Mullins in his last 4

with C, Hunte and H. Sealy to;
the bowling of schoolboy J. Wil-!
jiams and Carl Mullins. Sealy haa
a chance off Williams’ third ball
«f his first over when he snicked
through to Denis Atkinson = at
second slip who dropped the ball

Mullins bowled the second over
cf the day to Hunte who pulled
the ba’l to the leg side sending
cown Sealy to take strike, The
fourth ball rose chest high and
Sealy watched it go through to
Gerald Wood,

Hunte in Williams’ second over
began to get well over the ball
and drove the fourth ball nicely
for a brace. Mullins in his third
over began to bowl with venom
and broke Sealy’s defen¢e
many times.

In Mullins’ fourth over—a maid-
en—Sealy gave Gerald Wood an
easy catch off a rising ball when
his score was five. Jones, who fol-
lowed was out in the next ball
when he cocked another rising
ball from Mullins into the air to
give wicket-keeper Wood another
cateh. The score was now 12.
L. Codrington who was next in
never seemed comfortable against
Mullins. He was _ occasionally
beaten by the pace of the ball and
was dropped by Wood off Mul-
lins.

After bowling five overs Wil-
liams was replaced by the Empire
spinner Horace King. King’s first
over was a maiden sent down
to Codrington who had not yet
scored, Codrington opened his
scoring with a boundary off
King in his second over. Hunte at
the other end was batting patient-
ly against Mullins. After sending
down seven overs for nine runt
and taking two wickets, Mullins
was relieved by K. Bowen of
Spartan. Bowen conceded five

TS

Hassett himself should take first
arop.

Warr seems to be the man who
will supplement England’s bowl-
ing strength, His virile bowling
in Sydney clinched his position.

That means that Brown can
maintain a fast-medium attack
indefinitely from one end, Aus-
tralians have not shown up well
ugainst that type of attack, ,

Lindwall was over-bowled_ in
the New South Waies—M.C.C.
match just finished. He looked
muscle bound and weary when
the match concluded on Wednes-
‘ay, It will surprise if he can
ittain his top speed to-day

_ What's on Today

Civil Service Examin
| ations, Combermer> |
| School 8.00 a.m.—9.20 a.m.

Advocate’s Phote Fxhib
| ition at B bados

Museum .... 10.00 a.m.
R. J. MacLeod’s Exhib-

ition of Oil Paintings

at Barbados Museum

Vb ew eee eae Tae hg: ne eres
Court of Ordinary 10 30 a.m.
Auction Sale — Redman

& Taylor's Garage 2
Police Band, Hastings

Rocks . 8.00 pan.
Empire Theatre — “Duel

In The Sun”, 2.30 & 8.30
Plaza Theatre (Bridge—
town) “The Fountain-
head”. ... 2.30 & 8.30 p.m.
Aquatic Club Cinema
‘Homestretch,” 8.30 p.m.
Globe Theatre “Bagdad”
and “Talent” 5 & 8.30 p.in,

{
|
}
|
|

pm,

| |
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eens

|
|

OPPOSES PPP SSP PD SP SSSS FOSS

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ball of the tenth over. At this

stage luich was taken. Hunte wa’ ‘IC Y-CO. ”9
jnot out 31 and the score was 77
| for the loss of four wickets.
After lunch C. Symmonds joint xIVE
ed Hunte and was off the mark WARMEST

with a single off Branker’s bowl-
ing. Hunte continued to bat fault-
lessly and showed signs of becorn-
ing aggressive. Whe, the score
was 89 another wicket fell, when
Symmonds was completely beaten
and bowled by Mullins in the first
ball of his 13th over.

Crawford went in and was off
with a single. The scoreboard now
read 90/5/6. The running between
the wickets by Hunte and Craw-
ford was faulty and a run out
came when Crawford ran dowu
on Hunte and finding that it was
impossible to make the run tried
to get back but Wood had tic
bails off. Crawford had scored 4.

Skipper Kenneth Goddard fol-
lowed, Hunte was then 38. Both
of the batsmen settled down and
Hunte now in an aggressive mood
reached his fifty with a beautiful
late cut through the slips for four
runs off the College pace bowler
Williams. He was now at the
wicket for about two hours and
fifty minutes. When 66 Hunte
gave his first chance, when he
glided a ball on the leg side from
Mullins which Weod dropped.

Goddard after scoring 23 ended
his stay at the wicket when he
attempted to lift a ball from
Greenidge overhead and was
stumped by Wood

L. Barker followed Goddard and
was just content to stay with
Hunte so that he (Hunte) coula





in Pink, Blue, Gre

60 « 80...
COTTON
DANCE
at the "a 55 RP nisin
UNITED SOCIAL CLU eye ae:

Marchfield, St, Philip

NIGHT,
1951

On SATURDAY
JANUARY 6,

Kindly Lent by the
Management

Music by the
T’DAD KATZENJAMMER

White with Colou
66 & 86...

STEEL BAND

(Part of the Proceeds of this

Dance will be used to send

some of the Elementary

School Children of the

Parish to the Seaside during
the Holidays)

Gents 2/~ — Ladies 1/6-
Refreshments on Sale
This is the last Opportunity
to Hear the Steel Band in
St. Philip



YWPOSSGG GSTS S9DOIGPISOISS,,

x Tonight at 8.30 :
s :
s Farewell Performance : T.S.S. GOLFITO is due to
%
% by % at 8.00 p.m. for Trinidad.
% THE KATZENJAMMER 3
: STEEL
5 ORCHESTRA ; i
: og aelalana intending passengers.
” ie ee

¢ 3!% T.S.S. GOLFITO is due to
x THE QUEEN’S PARK SI
: STEEL SHED % accommodation is

Special Programme of x
% Classical and Calypso} For further information ‘phone 4230.
s Numbers x
$ Your Last Chance to Hear X
x One of Trinidad’s Best Steel :
. Orchestras,
. “J
: er at ot cems $1$ WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, LTD.
365650959O065066605S065"
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We Now Offer:
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ton at 2.00 p.m. on 6th January and will leave

First Class accommodation is available for

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