Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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ESTABLISHED ee ee aoe

Ceasefire Group
Reports Failure

we LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 3
"THE THREE-MAN Cease Sre Group renorted to}

|

the United Nations Political Conzittee today |

that it had failed to negotiate a cease fire with the
Chinese Communist forces in Korea.

Sir Benegal Rau, Indian chief delegate and
member of the Group, gave the Committee what
he called a “plain and unvarnished account’’ of
what the Group had attem»te? to do since Decem-
ber 14 of last year.

lions hict

asonable”’



{the Group felt to be “re





Contraband Worth (00.072 feu ase oF Ronse
£150,000 Seized |

bo

Establishment of a demilitar.
Korea,









rea across about
20 miles in depth, with the
HONG KONG, Jan. 3 | ithern limit cf the 38tt

Revenue officers to-day seized} parallel
over £150,000 worth of gold, raw| °® All ground forces to rema
opium, Indian rupees and cigar-| in position be withdrawn
ettes aboard the 2,880-ton Nor | to the rear, Forces including
wegian steamer, Hai Hing. | guerillas, to be moved to the

The contraband was hidden in} rear of the demilitarised area.
the engine room of the ship,| 4 The cease fire to be super-
which was about to leave for| vised by a United Nations
Singapore | Commission which should

The greater part of the cus- have free access to the whole
toms haul was made up of gold of Korea.

Officers described it as possibly|5. No further reinforcements to
the largest in Hong Kong’s his-; be introduced by either side
tory. The cpiurm alone was! 6 Prisoners to be exchanged on
worth about £13,000 a > for cne basis.

No arrests were made. | Sir Benegal reported that the

—Reuter | [in Ag | Nations unified command

| hac ——— these terms as 2

| satisfactory basis for a cease fire

s The Group then hegan a series
King Of Nepal May | of attempts to discuss tne question
with the Chinese Peoples’ Repub-

Get Back Throne | lic representative in New York

; Mr Wu Shu Chuan,
NEW DELHI, Jan. 3 The first attempt was made on

The Nepal Parliament is ex-| Neeember 16 hy Mr. Ne Entzam
pected to agree to the return of) President of the General Assembly
King Tribhubana to the throne and Ch-irman of the Grono
according to authoritative Nepa-' —Reuter

lese sources here, ae ee

The Government of Nepal i: 7
understood to have agreed in Fix uch Agree On
principle to the King’s return . ‘
subject to the approval by Par- Note To Russia
liament which eight weeks ago
voted for his deposition and ths PAIRS, Jan. 2
succession of his three-year-old The French Government today
grandson Prince Gyanedra. agreed on the text of a note to

The restoration of King Trib-| be sent to the Soviet Government

hubana who is now guest here of] rejecting allegations made on

the Indian Government since No-| September 15, 1950, that France

vember, has been the crux of|had violated the Franco-Soviei
talks here between Indian and| Treaty of 1944,

Nepal Government representa- The Soviet note accused the

tives. French of systematic violation of

—Reuter the 1944 Pact binding the two

powers to take in common all

a Tae weasur t prevent German)

again becoming a_ threat an

Civilians Barred | 323)..ci05
From Night Train | pycess Profits Tax

nation,—Reuter,

SINGAPORE, Jan. 3
Civilian passengers will be Goes Up In U.S.
barred from travelling on the :
Singapore Kuala riage oes night ad eee coke eae
ai rai Malays railway au- a oda}
mail train, Malayan bday. {the new $30,000,000 Tax Bill,
The last night train for civil-| ‘mposing a 77 per cent super levy

) corporation excess profits.

ians between the two cities reach-|{ ~! rat .
sae es The Bill increases the country’s



ale r ic mninw

6 ent hanhone mer thie ax collections to the highest dollar

with a radio coach and an ar-] igure in history, but Mr, ‘Truman

moured car attached will take] sald “The tasks ahead of us will

the mail by night to Kuala Lum- fovea more and much heavier

Ee axes,

v deeatibeias attacks on trains He added in a statement: “T

have forced the authorities to} shall in due course submit to the

restrict civilians to day*’me}| Congress recommendations for

travel. substantial tax increases
—Reuter —Reuter,



LUCKY DOG



INTERNATIONAL TOY POODLES SHAMPION

owned by Count Alexis Pulaski of New York, grects his new mate
“Seahorses Brown Penny” when she arrived at New York Airport.
“Penny” is the first show specimen of the Toy Poodle to be imported
into the United States from England. Known as the world’s most

valuable dog, four year old “Masterpiece” is rep¢ rted to be the only
dog e arning a gross yearly income of $11,000 for his owner Valued
t 320,000 “Masterpiece” is the only dog in the w rid to be ham
pion of | preed as well as helder of the coveted Utility Dog Degree

Express

|

their

sentence,



arbudos @



WAITING |

THURSDAY,

JAI

SEOUL ABANDONE

“FOR FISH



JARY

4,

1951









"PRICE Ee

RIVE CENTS .

aoeeedltieennanenemeagragt +3

BY U.N. TROOPS:

SOUTH KOREANS LEAVE

Emergency
Declared In
Sugar Area

IN JAMAICA

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, January 4
The Acting Governor, Mr. Mac
a ilivray, to-day declared a state
of emergency in St. Catherine
Worthy Park Sugar Estate area
where trouble betw 1 pickets
‘cL would-be strike breakers and
lic broke out for the second

me to-day



rT





iT IS TIME for the fishermen to bring ashore their catch at Brown's beach and the many fish seekers

wait under the shade of the trees to make their

Breaks Jail Conflicting Doctrines
May Cause Trouble
In U.S. Congress

By PAUL SCOTT RANKINE

During Xmas
Concert

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 2
While convict inmates at Car-
rera prison settlement—Trinidad’s |
Aleatraz-—were taking part in |
annual Xmas_ concert on |
New Year’s eve night, Saywel!}
Gordon, 34, serving a ¢ ear |
made a drain:g jail- |

break during the intermission. t
Gordon was playing the part of |










a policeman in a slapstick comedy

crime,

about the triumph of the law over
When the alarm sounded

the concert broke up in disorder

as prison officials,

armed guards

and fellow convicts made a futile

search in every

nook and cranny

of the island prison.

a
the

the threat Gordon made

Police were to-day conducting
countrywide man-hunt while
irmed guards were posted outside
home of Attorney General J.
Matthieu Perez’s home in view of
at the

end of the trial when Perez, who

was. Trial Judge, passed sentence,
Police report no boats missing

since the jailbreak, but il is known

that
swimmer”

the

Gordon is an “excellent |
and is believed to have
swam the mile and a half between

island and the mainland

colony.

rs confederates took



off a fuel crisis by producing an

extna 3,000,000,000 tans of coal
by the end of April.

Prime Minister Attlee and
three of his Ministers held an
urgent conference with miners’
leaders.

Afterwards a_ statement was
issued that the miners represen-

tatives
operation,

over
in

} miners—hours of work, and



|
brough :
peace plan, he told repor:er V1 @



|
|
|

in May'
One of
part in ay
three-man escape from Carrera'

convicted
three others.

Gordon was
1949 with



six months ago but all three of |
them were recaptured after three
days at large.—(CP) |



Attlee Asks Miners
For Mere Coal

LONDON, Jan.
Government to-day oN
to coal miners to stave

The
pealed

had promised full co-
Such questions
European
the
posed

as bringing
workers to* work
mines—detern, nec'v op-
in the past by the coal-
ab-
also discussed,
—Reuter

MENZIES CALLS
ON ATTLEE

LONVUN, Ja’

The Australian Prime Minis‘er
Mr. J. Menzies, called on Prirne
Minister Clement Attlee at No, 10
Downing Street today

New Zealand’s Prime Ministes,
Mr. Sidney Holland, was exypec-
‘sd to make a call Jater,

Mr. Menzies was having
1ence

senteeisms were






aurd-
with the King at Bucking-

ham Palace this afternoon

—Keuier.

|
NEHRU IN LONDON |

LONDON, Jan. 3

Mr. J. Nehru Prime Minist |
of India arrived at Hura airport
near Bournemouth Dorset for the
Commonwealth Prime Ministers
conference today.

His plane had been divert
irom London airpert after a Pa
American stratosphere had cras \-
inded today.

Askeq if he had
=. I have no plan.”

fe was expected
Mi crane

to see Prime
Attlee tonight
—Reuter.

Clement





ere yeees

MORE FREQUENT and bitter criticism of the foreign
and military policies of western European countries is
heard in the new

likely
for

to be
many years.

ON THE
° SPOT

Mrs. Elizabeth
68, could not
lifelong fear of electricity,
Her house at Bridgend,
Wales, was equipped for
but she would only use sae
dlelight.

Neighbours





Nicholas,
conquer her

found her

burnt to death in bed—the
flames of the candles by the
bedside had apparently ig-
nited the bedclothing,

Six Give Skin To
Help Burnt Girl



NEW YORK, Jan. 3
A “tc Surgeon grafted skin
from six people on eight- -year-old
Susan ‘Late nick who lost 55 per

cent, of her skin when her cloi..-
ing caught fire from ao gas stove
ist November.
Seven men anid two women had
volunteered to give part of their
skin.

One of the men was a 33-year-

old legless war veteran Harold
Swan, but the surgeon, Dr
Nordstrom decided not to accept
his offer,

Dr. Nordstrom said 320 square
inches of skin were needed
Though the grafted skin would

not last, it would keep the child

alive until there were graft sites

available on her own body.
—Reuter.

_———

Ilse Koch Goes
On “Hunger” Strike

AUGSBURG, Jan. 3.
Ilse Koch, red haired widow of
Buchenwald concentration cump
commandant has begun a hunger



strike, Reuter learned to-day, |

Ilse came into court 20 minutes
late from her prison near here
with her corn-coloured hai:
streaming uncombed over her}
shoulders, her coat unbu'toned
and her complexion wan

She had eaten nothing since
Monday morning.

Yesterday she drank a little
coffee and told her warders she
was going on a hunger strike

—Reuter

LABOUR’S TWIN
BIRTHDAY

LONDON, Jan. 3

Prime Minister Attlee was 68)
today.

Today was also the birthday}
sf his deputy, Herbert Morrison

who is 63,—Reuter.

DEFENCE TALKS

LONDON, Jan, 3,
The
ed High Commission will
talks as scheduled on Monday
on Germany's contribution ic
western defence a spokesman of
the British Foreign Office

day



| strike



'

Bonn Government and the;
be-|

said to-'
-~Reuter. luxury



WASHINGTON, Jan. 3.

session of Congress than

This because te United
States’ relations with its Western
European Allies in the struggle
against Communism has become
. major factor in the isolationist-
interventionist debate now tak-
ing place in the press and in
political circles

Congressional consideration of
all foreign measures is expected
to be strongly influenced by two
conflicting political currents, One
is that thrown up by the deep
underlying struggle over the
Trum doctrine of continued
and Yeréasead economic and
military aid to the United States’
non-Communist allies.

The other is the Hoover doc-
trine of relianee upon consoli-
dating western hemisphere de-
fences advocated by the former
Republican President last month
Too Many Communists

Is



stoned

cM

red two shots from his revolver

Saetarnanae sent a telegram
mmediately to the Governor,
ealling for a recall of the whit
»clice officers who he said were
unable to handle the vandalism
ind hooliganism

To-day, following their appe
yesterday to the pay and
leaders Serene Sunda Janu

Last night the Hon W.A
Bustamante, head of the B.LT.U.,
ne of the opposing Union fac
tions, held a meeting in the area
.ecompanied by a strong police
bedyguard Union Supervision
Counille H. L. Shearer end
Mrs Rose Leon, M.H.R., were

and when the violent

t attacked Shearer's car, he



ary 7 a
Jamaica's
the Bishop
Vicar Apestolic
the Chairman
Circuit
crite al

day of prayer for
and the World's
of ,J
of
of

situa
tion, maica, whe
Jamaica and
the Methodist
another joint
directly — to
Chairman of
Asso-

K.C

issued

this time
M. Kirkwoed,
Sugar Manufacturers’
ciation, N, Ww.
stader of
Sustansarde
Bila xy
PL oat
Union's
industry

The three churchmen = said
“Unless this strike is settled in
the shortest possible time, it may
be the final spark which will set
fire to all the combustible material
we have mentioned and cause such
an explosion as will bring calamity
and disaster to our beautiful
island, shame and disgrace to all
who have failed to control it and
sct back the clock of progress for
ple for

ce
Manley,
P.N.P., W. A
leader of the
J.L.P. and Frank Hill,
executive «directing
campaign

the

this

in the sugar

cur pee years to

many




The line of argument of the; supporters of ex-President Her- Kirkwood and Frank Hill have
bert Hoover raises four points, already aecepted the invitation,
The first is that western Euro- | bt Bust ite and Manley were
pean countries are ther 109 | UNAavE ailable for a veply — this
weak or too divided ideologically j evening,
to be depended upon to give all- | —
out support to the United States

| . .

in a general struggle with inte ,
national Communism. The secoru| 1 Auriol Going
is that their rearmament indus- | 1 Oe he)
tries and armed forces are rid To Washington
dled with Communists . ‘ wae

Next is that they are cither| ,, WASHINGTON, Jan, 3.
too neutral, or too defeatist =| The President of France, M,
clined even to arm and. defena! Vincent Auriol is. expected in
themselves against Communism | Washington on March 28 for a

There is no doubt” that the | Visit of State as guest of Presi-|
Truman administration can com | Cent Truman . |
mand _ substantial majorities for} fficials said today that the
major foreign policy measures week of March 28 to April 3 had
in the new Congress, Althouvh, been agreed on for the visit. It
the Democratic party of Presi- will be the French President's
dent Truman has a majority of| {rst trip to the United States
only. two in the new Senate. the|He is to be accompanied by}
administration can rely on pickine| Madame Auriol

up Substantial voting sypn it
from the internationalist section)
| of the Republican Party whieh
supports the principles of the
North Aflantic treaty, and Unite:
nations,—Reuter.

Red Trade Union
Calls Strike

ROME, Jan, 3

ltaly’s Communist Trade Unicn
has called a 30-minute generai
in the capital tomorrow
asia proiest against a law author-
ising rent increases, Tramway
persennel, telephone an: tele-
graph workers will lay cff fox
only the first ten minutes
strike which

of the
am, local

begin 10
The

is to
time

law

at

new came into effect





Long in preparation the visit was
described by administration offi-

cials as primarily a courtesy and
goodwill affair like those made
recently by some other chiefs of
state

It will provide opportunity,
nevertheless for discussions with
Truman, Secretary of State

Acheson and Defence
Marshall on such issues
ern European Defenees
rearmament and Indo
future.—Reuter.

Secretar.

as West-
German
China’s



More Demonstrators
“Invade” Heligoland

CUXHAVEN, Jan, 3
demonstrators landed to-
Heligoland shortly after
a British patrol
a first party of
news agency

More
day on
German police in
boat had removed
24, a West*Germany







“WEST NEEDS TO KNOW MORE” |

WASHINGTON, Jan. 3
The United States Secretary
of State Dean Acheson said to-

day that’ the Western powers
must have further clarification
of the Soviet attitude before
assuming that the Soviet Union
is ready for four-power peace
tall
Mr. Acheson read to} weekly
“onference 1 tement
i x
peen gaing oO



on New Year’s Day. It allowed reported

landlords to raise rents blocked) “A spokesman for the Associa-
at low figures by Government) tion of Islanders seeking to wia
decree since the war back the derelict German ex-

Rents will go up by 20 pef| submarine base in the North Sea
ent, for tenants who are un- said the new group had set out
employed, living on low pensions,| from the island of Sylt, north-
nd in conditions of acute pov ng Pe of Heligoland, the agency
erty. j added.

Tenants of the middle @| The report had not yet been
group will have to pay Ot por coftirmed from any other source
ent. more and tenants of luxury-{it id. Demonstrators were pro-|
flats, shops and business premises| testing against the use of the is-
100, per cent. more, A 200 per cent.| land for bombing practice by the
inefease will hit tenants of super] R.A.F

houses.—Reuter, —Reuter
ference,
The snBject matter was not

ABOUT SOVIET ATTITUDE



months

regar¢ ng the possibili ty

of
Unie
Uni
He said that it was obviou
t the Seviet 1 ‘ t
f I pr f
talks







The State







Department an-
nounced today that Mr. Acheson
had ci d in the British and
French .smbassadors for discus-
sions at 9 o’clock tonight

The ouncement
Mr. Willer t t
Secretary i
Affairs, would he

discussed



In Moscow, newspapers pub-
lished today without comment
the text of the reply to France

|

and the French note to the Soviet}



Union on four-power talks,
eh vy indic ata that thesc |
w analogou ith the notes
exc hangec d wit he U -d States
Brit ter the proposal
—Reuter, |



— “BURNING INFERN¢

TOKYO, Jan 4.
bandoned by United Nations

Forces, it was announced here to-day. Leaving
the city in bu ruins, United Nations Forces
withdrew to the south as Communist troops fought
their way in from the north.

Reuter’s Correspondent, Alex Valentine, left
the city a burning inferno as he flew out to Tokyo.
President Syngman Rhee of South Korea and his
Government had already left the capital reaching
the chief United Nations seaport of Pusan yester
day (Wednesday). Throngs of miserable refugees
followed in the red glow-of the scorched city.

The martyrdom of Seoul start-
ed on June 28 last, the fourth da

GEOU Me a been



ning



S VT; Ik ‘ of the Korean War, when it first
ugar a Ss fell to the North Koreans
: After months of Communist
occupation, it was recaptured
Postponed jthe Americans on September 26,
following the Inchon landing. Oi:
|} December 24, the South Korean
Yrom Our Own Correspondent) President Dr Syngman Rhe
LONDON. Jan. 3 ordered the evacuation of all nou-
The International Sugar Counci] |combatants and men of non-mill-
Meeting postponed from autumn |tety age from the capital
ae ear Sinerete ern toe neck After the witndrawal began the
fob mts leant. -anothes. three | its of the great evacuation éon-~
nthe, it was. reliably learn stretched tor 80 miles south
e today. It is anticipated that |% rds from the city while anothe
meeting may be held in early | Une of lights moved northware:
but confirmation is stilt | tows ards the fallen capital ane
ing awaited from certsin dele.’ stward towards the port of
sates i hon
| Punishing air attacks and dog-
The reason for further post- ,8&¢ resistance failed to stem th
ponement of the Council Meeting | of Communisis in the three-
s that it is expected that the chief ;Prenged drive on Seoul,
opie for discussion has tempor-| A British Commonwealth Com-
ly been lost pany was reported to be fightiny
way out of encirclement b)
The Council was to have dis- Chinese troops
cussed the disposal of the expect
»1 world surpluses of sugar anti-| But a spokesman in Tokyo
ipated by the end of 1950 } and at Eighth Army headquar-









The advent of the Korean Wat ters said they had no knowledge
vhich brought Government pur of a report that the Communists
hases by the United States and had driven a wedge between the
hoarding by housewives caused an, British 29th Brigade and = an
anticipated surplus to disappear American Division,

That position still exists today Near smouldering Uijongbu
snd it is now thought there will on the central road 17 miles
be no world surplus until the end| north of Seoul, 300 Australian
of the present year at the earliest,| troops mounted guns on ?* tank

and raced headlong into... vova
om a ter-attack, killing hur ‘eds «Tt
Commurist#on either side of t

News Ban In | ‘0.
ft, 2 Fifth Air Force planes inflicted
Indo-china |more than 1,200 casualties when
ea they slashed back at- the advan-
SAIGON, Jan 3 cing Communist armies, Shootin

General be Lattre De Tassigny,| star jets killed or wounded about
French Com ( ww or a 1,000 Cominunis
High Commissioner in Tndo-¢ hina! northwest of Uijongbu
has ordered a ne ‘ crsntp, | 1 the road from the northwest

Until he returns to Si i | to Seoul, United Nations troop:
his. tour of Noi ina, | to-day abandoned Munsan, the
the French army in & Willi read town on the southern bank
release only official communt-! of the Imjin River,
ques. | four Chinese armies and two

; | North Korean Corps on this front

Tonight’s communique reported) and in the centre may try to cap-
an improvement in 1 military | ture the important communica-
stuation in the ‘T ector} tions centre of Wonju, 55 miles

of north Vietnam | southeast of Seoul, according to
General MacArthur’s Intelligence

Vietnam guerilla activies were | (United Nations air strikes were
still dispersed in the rs lnimed today to have damaged or
of the Red Ri rm troyed 719 Communist-held
French posts and a v ut >| towns, .
attacked, Reuter \ —Reuter,





“And ve smoked

them ever since!
er

9°?





“TI know
first du

» One’
i Mauricr is quite
a revelation. They showed #
me a new standard

enjoyment,”



“Tne never found anything
else so cool and smooth —
aud I expect you'll say I
smoke far too many.”

*You can’t have too many du Maurier
with this little filter tip to proteet your
Besides it adds enormously to

flavour.””

throat.
the

“And the result —given
the finest tobacco in the
Sirst place—is superb.”

MADE IN
ENGLAND

$1.00 for 50
There'll never be a better cigarette

du MA’ ele

THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER ?



fe i
CIGARETTE





2



PAGE TWO

Se emmeeetieokedl



tetera mmc Stearate

Canib Calling

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER
>

IR ALFRED BUTT is expect-

ed to arrive here on Satur-
day by the Golfito intransit to
Trinidad. Sir Alfred who was
created Knight in 1918 served in
the Ministry of Food from 191%
to 1918.

Four years after serving in the
Ministry of Food, he was for
twelve years a Unionist M.P. for
Balham and Tooting.

Reason for his trip to Trinidad
is unknown,

Brigadier General will
Be Intransit

bh geeed intransit passengers io
Trinidad on Saturday by
the Golfito are Brig. Gen. and
Mrs, Frank G. Willan.

Brig. Gen. Willan was born in
1878 and was educated at Eton.
He joined the 4th Oxfordshire
Light Infantry in 1896 and the
King’s’ Royal Rifle Corps in 1899.
He was made a Captain in 1906.
He served in South Africa from
1899 to 1900 and received the
Queen's medal. In the first World
War he was mentioned six times
in. despatches. He was awarded
the DS.O., in 1915 and the
C.M.G., in 1919. He retired from
the army in 1933.

Arrives Today

R. SYLVAN COX, Travei

Editor of the Miami Herald
arrives this afternoon on
B.WLA.’s flight from San Juan,
Puerto. Rico, and will spend a
few days in Barbados. He leaves
on Saturday for Grenada, During
his stay here he will be a guest
at the Marine Hotel,

Passages Cancelled

ARLY indications were that
the dollar cruises organised

by British steamship companies
for wealthy Americans, § and
which were to include the West
Indies and Bahamas, would not
suffer as a result of adverse In-
ternational news. Now, howeve.,
the situation in the Far East ap-
pears to be having some effect
on booking. Although the cruises
to the West Indies are unaffected,
it is reported from New York
that cancellations of bookings on
the £46-a-day round-the--world
eruise af the Caronia are coming

into the Cunard office. The can-
cellations are from people
frightened by the thought of

spreading war in the Pacific.

Back to Canada

ISS ANGIE CHALLENOK,
daughter of Mr, and Mrs
Lester Challenor of “Buckden”,
St. Joseph, who has been holi-
daying in Barbados, returned tc
Canada over the week-end by
air. Her Canadian home is in
London, Ontario,

With T. L. L.

ISS LENA SMITH, who ar-
rived from Trinidad on
Tuesday afternoon by B.W.1.A.
is spending a short holiday with
Mr. and Mrs. E. G. MacIntyre of
Worthing View House, Rockley.
Lena is with Trinidad Leaseholds
in Pointe a Pierre.





*

“You mark my words,
officer, this’ exhibitionist
pilfering invariably comes
as in waves.”



Sheriff Jones !

LTHOUGH Western costumes

aren't strictly required at
the Golf Club’s Wild West show
at the Crane Hotel on Jan. 20th,
those who wear formal attire
risk falling into the hands of “the
law,” The popular “Casey”
Jones has been appointed sheriff
for the evening and threatens to
throw anyone not “properly”
dressed ‘into the stockade. It may
cost him a dollar to get out on
bail for the evening, but it will
all be in a good cause as all the
proceeds will go to the Golf
Club’s Tournament Fund, which
will finance the Barbados team
on its trip to Trinidad to play
the St. Andrew’s Club represen-
tautives,

Back To Work
T WAS very gla@ to see Frank
Chandler, Overseer of Car-
rington’s Factory back out to
work after five weeks’ illness.






hi
ane -N
eo WL
Te h{ [9 cenrinicare
||| | No CHILOREN UNDER 6
- eee nc I
(






=



a

our
innocent young minds—
let’s go and bust open @
bank!”

Lonion Express Service.

Ie

“Might injure

Wedding

Ms ADALINE SEALY,
daughter of the late €apt
Sealy and Mrs, Sealy, was mar-
ried on Saturday afternooy to
Mr. T. L. Harris at Holy Trinity
Church St. Philip. The bride who
was given in marriage by her
brother wore a dress of off white
satin trimmed with silver beads.
The ceremony was performed
by Rev. O. E. Jones, Miss E.
Newton was the bridesmaid and
the bestman was Lt. L. Harris.

With National Geographic

Magazine

XPECTED to arrive in Bar-
bados this morning is My.
Charles Allmon, an American
photographer who is collectiny:
material and photographs for the
National Geographic Magazine,
A short time ago he completed «
sixty page article on ‘Trinidad
which will be nppearing in the
National Geographic fengerine
shortly. No doubt he is planning
en a similar article for Barbados

Turfites Return

OME of the Barbadian racing
turfites who were in Trini-
dad for the Trinidad Turf Club’s
Christmas meeting returned on
Tuesday by B.W.1.A. They
were Mr. Fred Bethell, M.C.P.,
his son Michael, and Dr, Herbert
Weaver.

Other arrivals on Tuesday who
spent the Christmas holidays 1n
‘Trinidad were Mr. Charlie
Peterkin, Mr. Fred Ferreira and
Mr. Winston Cozier.

W.I. Film Star

ARL CAMERON, the young
film star from Bermuda,
plans to visit the West Indies on
a short holiday after completing
his contract with Ealing Studios,
During the last few months, he
has been working on the film
“Pool of London,” which is to be
released next month. Earl ‘s
certainly enthusiastic about his
job. When asked in London if
he found the work tiring, his
reply was; “I can work on films
from January Ist. to December
3lst. without being tired of it.”

Back to Trinidad

KS. GEORGE cde NOBRIGA
who has been spending a
holiday in Barbados, returned to
Trinidad yesterday afternoon by
B.W.1.A. She was staying at
the Ocean View Hotel,

Christmas Dance

WORD of congratulation to
& the Colonial Office liaison
staff for the hard work they put
into arranging the Christmas
dance for all Colonial students in
England, which was held at
Seymour Hall, London, on
December 27th. The object of
these dances is to enable students
from various parts of the Colonial
Empire to meet together in a
friendly atmosphere and no effort
was spared on this occasion to
make sure that the atmosphere
was friendly.



BY THE WAY — By Beachcomber

‘HERE have been many ques-
tions asked about the part
Which the Saucy Mrs, Flovster,
still attached to Lots-road, is to
Play in the Festival.

The idea that Sir Ewart Hodg-
son’s ship should be a kind of
for foreign visitors is
absurd. At present the accom-
Modation zvoard comprises one
cabin with a hole in the floor, Even
the two hens aboard creep into
an old dog kennel amidships every
night, and the cat goes disdain-

fully ashore. My own opinion
is that this astonishing craft
Should remain moored to the

Embankment, and within call of
the Power House, Her. sailing
days were over when the port
side fell off in a gale. The re-
placement didn't fit, and to-day
she is lopsided, with half a must
stuck in upside down and a stern
made of old packing-cases.

For Your Christmas List

NE of Foulenough’s ideas
which has be¢n adopted by

the Malicious Press is to give the
books startling and attractive
wrappers which need have no
more to do with their contents
than the blurbs. This adds ex-
citement to the choice of a book
Thus Miriam Glapiron’s travel
book “Four Days in Turkey,” has
a wrapper with a view of the
valley of Aosta, and the blurb
says: “From the first moment
when Hugh Brascombe wresiles
with the elephant near Delhi, to
the pulse-tearing climax which
Babs Ormefield quells the mob by
showing them her father’s hat



there is not a dull page. Basilisk
Committee Choice.” Professot
Keigwin’s “Statistical Survey of
North Greenwich in the ‘Eighties’
has a wrapper showing the Upper
reaches of the Amazon as a back-
ground for Cleopatra. The blurb
says: “Even those who know
nothing of North Greenwich
statistics have thrilled to the story
of Cleopatra, Basilisk Commitiee
Choice.”
Smuggling News
In her handbag the Customs
officer found a pair of pytons.
us: (News item.)
S they must have been rataer
small pylons; and as she
was probably only trying to help
the electricity people at a wintry
moment, I hope the authorities
dealt lightly with her.

Another Secret Out

EVER, never shall I tire of
reading the reports of the

Gallup poll people about the cost
of living. I recorded last week
their discovery that when tne
cost of living goes up, everybody
finds things more expensive. A
later discovery is equally amaz-
ing. It is that lack of money is
forcing us to cut down expenses
on our pleasures, I suppose no-
body will believe such uncon-
ventional thinking until it is in-
corporated in a massive White
Paper. How little we shoul
ever know about our lives with-
out these polls.

There And Back

“Two first returns, please.”

“Where to?”

“Here, you fool!”




Floral Stripe
RIBBED MAROCAIN

HIRTS

New Flowered SPUNS 36"

SHIOZE




$1.12 yd.
$1.37 yd.
36" $1.24 yd.
36" $1.49 yd.





Assorted Shades
Grey
30/38" waist

4.09, 4.47, 4.86
4.97, 6.31, 6.53

EVANS « WHITFIELDS





Flannel Trousers

Naval Memories

“tT T’S the breezy Navy men 1

adore,” said the girl next to
Foulenough at dinner, “You're an
Army man, I suppose,” “Oh, no,”
said Foulenough, “Navy up to the
fetlocks. Six generations soaked
in brine, Great granddad was
Nelson’s bo’sun in the Victory.”
“What was your ship?” she asked
prettily, “H.M.S. Intolerable, ply-
ing between the Moluceas and Rio
with a cargo of wire-netting and
pianos, generally speaking.” “Were
you in any battles in the war?’
“Oh, yes,” said the captain, “One
in Davy’s Dive at Portsmouth, and
one in the Rialto Music Hall at
Wagbridge.” “But weren't they
land battles?” asked the silly lit-
tle rogue. “Partly”, said Foulen-
ough. “But the first ended up in
the water when Scug Rawlins fel}
into the harbour, and the second
was more an air battle, as I was
hanging by one hand to the front
of the dress circle with someone
pulling my legs from below.’
“You're making fun of me,” said
the girl sulkily. “You’re just talk-
ing rot.” “Mustn’t give away
naval secrets,” replied Foulen-
ough, toying with her hand under
cover of his napkin,

Hip-length Or-:ndie
Gaiters
ERY frequently pictures ap-

pear in various
women uphols?-ic. :



papers of |
> the horses |

{ BARBADOS ADVOCATE

NO SNAPS IN THE ALBUM SHOW
GRANDMA LOOKING LIKE THIS



skit on the last 100 years of fashion.








Left to right are Rita Diamond (1851 Bustle), Rosemary

Jacob (Naughty Nineties); Wendy Crosley (Bustle Girl), Ann Disbury and Esme Ketley (Suffragettes).



B.B.C. Radio Propramme |

THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 1951

7am, The News; 7.10 a.m. News Analy-
sis; 7.15 aan. From The Editorials; 7.25
am, Programme Parade; 7.30 a.m. Gen-
erally Speaking; 7.45 a.m. r
Choice; 8.00 a.m. Land and Livestock,
8.30 a.m. Halinka De Tarzynska; 845 a.m
Your Body and Its Enemies; 9.00 a.m
The News; 9.10 a.m. Home New. froin
Britain; 9.15 a.m. Close Down; 11,15 a.m,
Programme Parade; 11,30 a.m. Listeners
Choice; 11.45 a.m, Special Dispatch; 12.90
(noon) The News; 12.10 p.m. News Anal
sis; 12.15 p.m. Close Down;
Listeners’ Choice; 5.00 p.m, Compo-er ot
The Week; 5,15 p.m, Scottish Magazine;
545 p.m, Pipes and Drums; 6.00 p.in
Highlights of 1950; 6.45 p.m. Programme
Parade; 7.00 p.m. The News; 7.10 pin
News Analysis; 7.15 pm. We
See Britain; 7.45 p.m, Generally Speaking:
8.90 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 8.1 pm. Pau:
Temple and the Vandyke Affair; 8.45 p.m.
Composer of the Week; 9.00 p.m. Special
Dispeteh; 9.15 p.m. Have a Go; 945 p.in
Do You Remember; 10,00 pm. The News;
10.10 p.m, From the Editorials; 10.15 p.m,
Toke it From Here;

10.45 p.m. :

Avound with Herbert Hodge; 11,00 :
}

}





Our Mutual Friend.



CROSSWORD

ScTOSS

4. Quite a wrench having to adjust
it to one's needs, (7)

7. Stoat’s hesitant claim to cover-
ing ? (6)

11. It’s as ripe as tnis, (6)

12. Noise trom the line, (3)

13 Gentleman with a golden touch
(6) 16. Only half a Fabian, (3)

16. Babyish thanks to this provide a
great arterial trunk. (3)

17 Restore on proof sheets. (4)

19 Black watch? Anyway they're
fighters. (4)

42 Anyone with an eye to onion nas
a right to be, (7

24, Backward master in India. (5)

25. Made in a book or by the door
(5) 26. Movable habitation. (4)

Down

1, A tin cap may be more uselu
in war than @ brass nat. (7)

ut into practice. (6)
3. Wide open spaces. (8)
4. You'll find tt in the middie. (6)
. This us is an effort, (3)
6. A youth growing up may grow
Home, (4)

- t
9. Weird-sounding stretch of water
(4) 10, Everyday wear. 14)
14. Lost like a salver, (6)
18. Ratsed at golf and put pack
sixpence. ( 20. Silent
21. Operation in outline) (4)
22. Colour. (3)
23. Suitable for the end. (3)

Soiution of Saturday's Puzrie

to
(hh

Across:
red ,



1, Pieniiful, 7, Arrival t }

Arts: 15. Sailors: 15 Sniu Axe le
uan; J8 Amass, 19% A

Adept; 21. See 6 Down Down

2, Larvox. 3. Tiding Farol. 5
Paist; & and 2) Across. Versatility. »

Reason: 9 Valid: 19, Assessor: 14

Leant’ th Add

written beneath. On- one oc-

casion the clothes-horse had be-
side her a little gnat of a man-—
or about half of him. The photo-
grapher was so intent on getting
the whole clothes-horse into his
picture that poor gnattie was

at the Fair of the Stuzzi-cadenti | pretty well mutilated. Nor was

at Forli, with






Men’s

$5.81



Your
SHOE
Stores

not what}
balderdash about their costum*s,

his name given. He was about
as important to the great ognaaenty
as a sack of dirt.







NOW IS THE BEST TIME TO PAINT
YOUR HOUSE

A wide range of READY MIXED PAINTS
and MATERIAL supplied by the foremost

manufacturers to select from.
REMEMBER when you save the Surface
You Save $ $ $

Inspect these at our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT
Telephone No. 2039



THE BARHADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY LTD.

COTTON

————————

Figuring the size of the universe

like trying to find out “how
[high is up,” but the latest “star
' census”
two hundred billion galaxies, each
made up of hundreds of millions
of stars.

The new estimate was reported
y Dr, Harlow Shapley, director of
the Harvard Observatory, before
the American Astronomical So-
ciety at Haverford College.

Dr. Shapley said the appraisal
was made from a galaxy survey
conducted at Harvard during the
past 18 years.

He explained that there are

Listeners’ ' is

4.15 p.m b:



WARnerR BRos. PLAZA



L.E.S.

SEEING STARS

HAVERFORD, PA.

DRESS REHEARSAL 29 Chelsea Arts Ball by Croydon Art School students.. Their show will be a |

indicates there may be six trillion

miles,

entire universe.

Harvard “census,” he said.



THEATRE
BRIDGETOWN

TAKE DEEP PRIDE IN

ANNOUNCING

Starring as ROARK, a man who lived by no rules but his own

GARY COOPER

Co-starring as DOMINIQUE, the only woman for thet brand of men

| PATRICIA NEAL-E

PLAYING FROM FRIDAY JAN. ith

2.30 & 8.30

and Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30p.m.

S\N

Try this for
COUGHS

It works fast
and tastes nice!

oe

About a million galaxies have
been photographed so far in the









about a billion galaxies in the
visible half of the sky out to a dis-
tance of a billion light years—
each light year measuring about
(6,000,000,000,000)

There are probably another bil-
lion galaxies in the other half of
the sky, which is obscured by. the
milky way to which the earth be-
longs, he said, and these two bil-
lion galaxies probably represent
only one percent of those in the

S.











THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1951



Opening To-morrow —

BOBBY DRISCOLL :o:

COMMENCING FRIDAY STH - -

Walt Disney’s

GLOBE TO-DAY, LAST SHOWS 5.00 & 8.30

“THREE LITTLE WORDS’—Fred ASTAIRE
‘ “BAGDAD” and TALENT

AQUATIC CLUB CINE
TRUST, Mak

in “THE WINDOW”
An RKO RADIO PICTU



PLAZA Theatre—8RIDGETOWN

“CINDERELLA™

in rose—46
eed












cries to work m the autumn or
you'd be worried eee Mary was.”
Then, bidding farewell, he
cakes his pare home, and at last
he has time to tell the full take of
his adventure. “Well, that
Autumn Elf should be graseful mw
ou,” says Mrs, Bear.

THE END
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED








ARTHUR KENNEDY

CORNEL WILDE :o: MAUREEN O'HARA

in “HOMESTRETCH”
A 20TH CENTURY- FOX PICTURE

in Technicolor



Color by Technicolor

SPECIAL MATINEE TODAY — 1.30 p.m, (Monogram Pictures)

The Bowery, Boys with
Leo Gorcey in
“BOWERY BOMBSHELL”

Commencing Friday—®

Johnny Mack Brown
in
“LAND OF THE LAWLESS”

2.30 & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.50 pan,

Warner Bros. Towering Triumph - -

“POUNTAINHEAD” with Gary

‘Cooper : Patricia Neal: Raymond Massey |





a

PLAZA Theatre — OISTIN

LAST 2 SHOWS ponee=. 5 & ae
rson
: “THE WALKING DEAD"

Dennis Morgan,
a Boris Karloff in

MIDNITE SAT. JAN. 6TH

(Monogram)

Leo Gorcey & Bowery Boys in
“MR, HEX" and
“FALL GUY"

with Robert Armstrong

P.M, (W er’s Double)
“APRIL SHOWERS” and

(NOT SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN)

FRIDAY 5 & 4.30 p.m.
and Continuing :
Monegram’s Big Action Special !
Victor Mature — Alan Ladd in
“CAPTAIN CAUTION” and
“CAPTAIN FURY” with
Brian

Ahern — Victor McLaglen
——————————



GAMETY—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

LAST SHOW TONITE (8.30) (Warner's Double)

“KING’S ROW and

“CONFLICT”

FRIDAY—SATURDAY—SUN.—8.30 p.m. MAT. Sun. 5 p.m.

Monogram’s Bis Outdoor Special! ! !
“MASSACRE RIVER
with Guy MADISON — Rory CALHOUN — Cathy DOWNS



Monday and Tuesday — 8.30



mn, ee
“FREDDY STEPS our” @ “I WOULDN'T BE IN YOUR SHOES
i

EMPIRE

TODAY 4.45 and 8.30
TOMORROW 2.30 and 8.30

David O. Selznick’s

“DUEL IN THE
SUN”

Starring
Jennifer JONES
Gregory PECK
with

Joseph COTTON
Lionel Barrymoore

ROXY
Last Two Shows TODAY

4.30 and 8.15
M-G-M Double .

Clarke Gable ;
Hedy LAMARR





in
“COMRADE X”
AND
“TRADER HORN”
7 with



ROYAL

Last Two Shows TODAY

5 and 830
Republic Pictures presents :
David O. Selznick’s

“DUEL IN THE
SUN"

Starring

Jennifer JONES
Gregory PECK

Joseph COTTON
Lionel Barrymoore



OLYMPIC

last Two Shows TODAY
4.30 and 8.15

Columbia Double . . .
Larry PARKS
e Evelyn Keyes
in i

“THE
SWORDSMAN"

AND
“TO THE END
OF THE EARTH"

with
igne HASSO
_ Dick POWELL

—S—





FERNOXONE

The new Weedkiller for control of

“NUTGRASS”

It may be applied as a spray or
a dust and is harmless to persons

or animals.

For further particulars apply to - -

PLANTATIONS LTD.



ASR

= pommeomeesene



THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1951



Today, C’wealth Plans

Battle Against Reds

(By THOMAS C. WATSON)

LONDON, Jan. 4.

RENEWED EFFORTS to mobilize the British Com-
monwealth against world Communism and to localize the
Korean war dominate the agenda of the Commonwealth

Prime Ministers meeting ope





Royal College Of
Musie Appoints
Coloured Musician

(Prom Vur Longon Correspondent:
LUNVDUN,
A 52-year-old Airican, mpu-

faim Amu, Nas been appointea to
a@ new pust In we Nuya: COucge

ef iMusic — thai of examiner m
Atrican music. He 1s the mrs
ecoloursd musician to hoid an

appoiniment in this Coliege. M-.
Amu arrived recently in Lonaca

from his home in Accra, Gor

Coast, where he began as a

teacner in the Presbyterian
sner~ Training College.

- Mo Other Airican has
influeuceq African music to such
a degree as Mr. Amu in the past
20 years. With the aid of
Western technique, he has mod-
ernised many of the best known
songs in the African languages
and enhanced their popularity.
They are now being broadcast or
sung in Gold Coast schools and
churches,

A senior master at Achimota
Training College, Mr. Amu holds
the Associate diploma of the
Royal College of Music. He plays
with equal ease the piano and
all types of African musical in-
struments, many of which he has
made himself. At Achimota, he
opened an advanced course for
other teachers who wished to
pursue higher studies in music.

One of the latter has lately
followed Mr. Amu to London to
take his final examination for a
music degree at London Univer-
sity.

Mr. J. B. Craig, retired teacher,
who worked with Amu at the
Presbyterian Training College in
Accra, said to me recently; “Amu
is a genius. We could do with
thousands of his kind to j;romote
music throughout the Colonial
Empire.”



Obituary.
Hubert Thorpe

The Rev. Francis Godson

writes, .

On Friday night last 22na.
ultimo, there passed away a
noteworthy citizen in the person
of Hubert Thorpe, carpenter and
builder of Godson’s land, Chelsea
Road, whose life and achieve-
ments should not come to an end
without recognition and a meas-
ure of eulogy.

He started life as a carpenter,
but his skill and energy coupled
with the knowledge and exper-
ience and directing capacity
which he soon acquired, enabled
him to undertake repair and
constructive work on a consider-
able scale and thus assist in the

upkeep and improvement of
Bridgetown and its environs
which has been taking place

during a generation or more,

He was described in an obituary
announcement as “building ecn-
tractor to the Lynch Investment
Trust.” But the facts require a
much wider statement. He did
extensive work for quite a large
number of clients during many
years, and some of the jobs he
put through will long remain to
testify to his ability and con-
scientious service.

Two points are deserving of
further mention. First, he was a
tireless worker, and while he
proved able, as occasion requirect,
to direct the usual groups of
other people, he also kept up his
early habit of personal labour,
coupled with a smile, plain, way
of life. And although he had
reached the ripe age of 76 years
he was, until very recently, still
busy and eager. The idea of
retiring at 55 or 60 years would
have seemed to him irrational
and crippling: he was then in his
prime and full of business and
enjoyable activity. “The ruling
passion strong up to death.”

Secondly, he did not aim main-
ly at making money but was

rather animated i the noble
feeling of love, for his work and
pleasure in doing it efficiently.

And along with this trait, and
indeed as a part of it, was his
probility and loyalty in relaticn
to his employers; he was eager
to do the work entrusted to him
and to do it well at reasonable
cost. And his courteous and con-
siderate attitude rnade association
with him always easy and agree-
able.

There will be many to whoro
his passing will be not only a






|

am A
so cS

ning in London to-day.

The world situation gives the
meeting at No. 10 Downing St.,
expected to last about 10 days, a
far graver aspect than is usual
these “family consultations,”
Surveying the situation, the
Prime inisters will devote as
much attention to the Far Eas-
tern defence as to the develop-
ment. of the North Atlantic
Treaty.

Robert Menzies, the Australian
Prime Minister, comes to London
with the set purpose of having
the Korean war localized and an
out-and-out war with China
avoided.

The Australian Prime Minister,
in a speech just prior to his de-
parture referred to the magni-
tude and the delicacy of the
political implications. He said:

Korean Campaign

“Our best endeavours will be
made in the direction of isolating
the Korean campaign and mak-
ing it clear to the Chinese people
that the United Nations have no
desire to injure Chinese lives or
property,

Pandit Nehru, the Prime Min-

ister of India, is expected to fi-
gure prominently in discussions
on the Korean situation and on
the Chinese intervention. British
Prime Minister Clement Attlee,
who is to preside over the con-
sultations will be able to give
first hand information en_ his
talks with President Truman in
Washington,
The establishment of a_ secre-
tariat to co-ordinate dominion
defence as a whole reportedly
will be raised. This is a matter
in which Australia is vitally in-
terested, for the present Liberal
government in Australia has
been severely criticised in the
past by the Labour Opposition
for not being more forthright to
putting forward the views of Aus-
tralia both from the military and
the political angles,

Indian
The Indian domestic situation
is also to be raised. The rift be-
tween India and Pakistan is re-
garded as a setback to the hope
that the Dominicn Prime Minis-
ters would speak as one unified

cdy.

The Pakistan Prime Minister,
Liaquat Ali Khan, ‘has already
intimated that he would like the
problem of the future of Kash-
mir, the main cause of the fric-
tion, ‘solved by the full confer-
ence of Prime Ministers.
On the economic side the
principal discussions will be on
implementation of the six year
plan of co-operative economic
development at an estimated cost
of nearly six billion dollars,
Besides Menzies and Liaquat
Ali Khan, the Commonwealth
chiefs scheduled to attend t
meeting are:

Prime Minister Louis St. Laur-
ent, Canada; Prime Minister S.
C. Holland of New Zealand Dr.
T. BE, Donges, South African
Minister of Interior (Prime Min-
ister Daniel Malan is ill); Sir
Godfrey Huggins, Prime Minister
of Rhodesia and Prime Minister
D. S, Senanayake, Ceylon.



—I.N.S.

70 Million Phones
NEW YORK.

The telephone is in greater

demand than ever before—despite
the inroads made by radio, tele-
vision and other methods of high-
speed or instantaneous communi-
cation.

The number of telephones in
the world climbed to a_ record
70,300,000 at the beginning of
1950, The United States, with
40,709,398 instruments, had more
telephones than all other nations
combined, Great Britain ran a
signally poor second with 5,177,370
phones.

These are figures compiled by
the American Telephone and
Telegraph Company in its latest
issue of “Telephone Statistics of
the World.”

This is the list of the ATT re-
ort:

The U.S. had an average of 27.1
telephones for every hundred a
sons. Sweden continued to hold
its second place spot in telephone
development with 22.8 instru-
ments for every hundred persons.
Canada was in third place both
in respect to total number of tele-
phones and relative telephone
development, having 2,700,000 in-
struments or 19.6 per hundred

persons,
3 Per 100

The world as a whole had. three
telephones per hundred popula-
tion.

New York, with its 2,956,832
telephones at the start of 1950,
outranked all other cities of the
world in this respect, one
country, the United Kingdom, had
more telephones than the largest
city in the U.S, Greater London
was second in total telephones
with 1,526,548 instruments, and

loss from a business point. but a! Chicago was third with 1,495,800.
\ Washin;

personal sorrow.

YOU'LL BE DELIGHTED
with THE NEW
200 C.C.

LE.

gton D.C, had _moxce























BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Horse That ‘Could’nt Stay’

Went On

Running

By The Scout

THE RULE relating to doping—‘any drug or stimu-
lant administered to a horse for the purpose of affecting
its speed . . .”—is so vague as to be almost meaningless.
Trainers, therefore, are left in the dark as to what is or

is not legitimate.

Two noted South Countr
trainers have been giving their
horses a course of glandular in-
jections. The injections are given
over a period of several weeks.

Results, especially in the case
of old geldings, have been, on the
whole, markedly successful. Is
this “doping”? No one seems to
know,

It is generally conceded, how-
ever, that the stewards are abso-
lutely right in wording the rule
elastically.

One of the slickest cases of
indirect doping occurred a few
years before the war. The horse
involved was a useful old plater,
none too sound in his forelegs and
with a known dislike for hard
ground.

The confederates who bought
him chose a day to run when the
going was firm as a road,

The bookmakers fielded
against the horse. They did not
realise, though, that his forelegs
had been “frozen” by a local
anaesthetic. He won easily.
On first thoughts, you might

consider this action humane and
i The danger is that a
orse can break a leg without
realising it, go on galloping, and
crash heavily to the ground.

Salve that ‘Helped’ Bad-

legged Horses

A salve applied externally was
popular among certain trainers of
bad-legged horses in America a
few years ago. Its use, however,
was soon detected and forbidden.

Did we see a horse similarly
treated win a big race in 1950”
I am not alone in thinking so.
A which has rightly

been stamped out in this country
as that of tubing a horse on the
morning of a race.

The horse, in certain cases, was
given a strong “shot,” ostensibly
to deaden the pain of the opera-
tion (to improve breathing) but
primarily to act as a stimulant a
few hours later.

Racegoers will confirm how few
tubed horses are to be seen on
race-courses nowadays.

Not that these horses wera
necessarily always successful.
Dope, after all, is only used as a
despairing remedy, even by the
unscrupulous.

When cleverly administered,

though, it not only increases a

horse’s speed but also its stam-

ina,

A notable example of this oc-
curred in a race at a Royal Ascot
meeting. A trainer had bought
for new patrons a horse which he
feared, after purchase, was a
“dud.”

The enthusiastic owners insisted
on entering and running at Ascot.
The trainer engaged a well-known
jockey, and took him aside for a
quiet talk before the race.

“This horse is a so-and-so,” he

telephones in relation to its popu-
lation than any other large city
in the world, with 59 per hundred
persons. San Francisco ranked

ond with 55 instruments per
hundred people and Stockholm,
Sweden, third with 47.

Not only does the U.S. have
more telephones, but Americans
use them snore. There was an
average of 365.1 telephone con-
versations per person completed
in the U.S, auring 1949. This was
an increase of 13 conversations
per capita over the ing
year. —I.N.8.





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ysaid. He stays about six furlongs,
j The race, as you know, is 1} miles.
All I beg of you is not to show me
up for a fool by finishing last.”
It was decided that the jockey
should pull the horse right back
in the early stages, make no
move whatsoever until the last
furlong.

This was the Plan to
Avoid Last Place

He was then to ride him out
energetically to pass the tired
tail-enders. “Remember what f
told you—don't finish last,” was
the trainer's final reminder as he
lifted the jockey into the saddle.

Trainer and owners moved
away. The horse’s attendant led
horse and rider towards the open-
ing to the racecourse.

“Never mind what the guv’nor’
said,” the lad remarked to the
jockey. “You’re on a _ certainty.
He’s sure to win.”

The jockey, accustomed to these
last-minute “whispers” from stable
lads, smiled to himself.

After two furlongs in the race
the rider was not smiling, but
cussing, “I eouldn’t hold one side
of him, and I’m fighting him, lying
second,”

At the last bend the horse was
still full of fight. The jockey de-

him go.
He Won sco Easily—and
Kept on Going
He couldn’t pull him up for half
a mile after passing the winning
post, easy winner at very long
odds.

“Was the trainer pulling your
leg? Did he know all along what
might happen?” I asked.

el men enemy caret er

said the jockey.

I know the trainer, a much-
respected man in Newmarket.

He is just one of the many
whose licences could have been
forfeit under the strict application
of the Jockey Club's new ru!: on
doping.

ee

—LES

British Colony
Invites No-Colony
Italians

LUSAKA, (N. Rhodesia).

Under-developed Northern Rho-
desia, long naglected by British
emigrants, is to encourage Ital-
jans and Italian capital.

The colony's Legislative Assem-
bly has authorised immigration
from Italy. The Government is
now considering an assisted pas-
Sage plan for the new settlers.

First target is 2,500 “selective
quality Italians, including a high
percentage of engineers, agricul-
tural scientists, chemists, doctors,
mechanics, and skilled workmen.

A group of Italian capitalists,
working out development sehemes
with the Northern Rhodesian
Government, projects a £7,000,000
programme of farmland exploita-
tion, housing, and new light in-
dustries, including penicillin,

Said one of the group: “Italians
did a fine job in Africa before we
lost our own colonies. We are
not robbing anybody in Northern
Rhodesia because yery few Brit-
ons go there.”












eee rrr



cided to relax his grip and let capital



|
|

|

}

{million refinery





1, A :
Did The Trainer Know? "poe

Expansion
In 1951

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Dee. 22.
The New Year opens in truly
momentous times. In such chal-
leiging circumstances as those of
to-day, industrial productivity as-
sumes an entirely new -
cance. Particular interest at-
taches to the cessation on January

lst of Marshall Aid to Britain.
That it has been found possible
to end this aid—at any rate for
the time being—by mutual a -
ment between ourselves and the

U.S.A. is a marked tribute to the! turvy”

magnificent performance pe up
by British industry as a whole. It
does not imply, of course, the im-
mediate and aone ending of
all benefits such aid has hitherto
provided, Many U.K. industrial
development schemes, among the
most important of which is, per-
haps, the building of new refin-
eries in this country, will con-
tinue to receive the dollar grants
already allocated toward their ful-
filment under Marshall Aid ar-
rangement. This is most satisfac-
tory news,

Comparison

One single comparison of statis-
ics shows just how tremendous
has been Britain’s industrial ex-
pansion during the past fifty
years. In 1899, U.K. oil require-
ments were 725,000 tons of lamp
oil and 148,000 tons of lubricating
oil—under one million in all. In
1949. exclusive of bunkering oil,
we used 13,839,727 tons vari-
ous oil products. Oil is indeed
one of the most essential of all
modern industry's basic necessi-
ties. And current consumption is
bound to soar considerably higher
still as British industry’s present
investment programme
takes shape. . ,

Simultaneously with ‘this de-
velopment, Britain's home refining
expansion programme continues
to materialise in accordance with
carefully laid plans. By the end
of 1951, for example, the £374
now building at
Fawley—destined to be the largest
plant of its kind in Europe—
should have come into operation.

“Not unless he’s Dan Leno and|This plant alone will be able to
Laurence Olivier rolled into one—|handle 5
and the greatest actor of all time,” ! nually

million tons of oil an-
ouble the U.K.'s entire
refining capacity in 1947. With
similar large seale expansion pro-
grammes maturing at other UK.
refinery sites, we should—within
the next two or three years—suc-
ceed in raising our annual refinery
capacity to nearly 20 million tons,

Understandable

The importance of these pro-
jects is understandable when one
remembers just how many other
great enterprises rely upon oil
products in their battle to produce
more and sell more. Moreover,
these industries are all implement-
ing formidable expansion pro-
grammes of their own. That is
why results already achieved in
world oil production during recent
years are so invaluable, why the
agreement reached with U.S. oil
companies during recent months
over accepting payment in ster-
ling for their oil and this helping
free Britain from currency com-
plications over obtaining al) the
oil we need was so_ especially
beneficial. That is why plans laid
by the oil industry for stimulating
production yet further during the
coming twelve months are so vital
e international industry gener-
ally,

The Sooner The Better

LAGOS.
The Nigerian Eastern House of
Assembly listened in startled sur-
prise to a statement by Camer-
oons Chief Fon of Bali that but-
ter is used by the people in his
district as lamp oil. This was
during a debate when the Chiet
Pressed for the urgent extensior.
of electricity to Bamenda and
Manfe. ’

THE ADVOCATE
HAS THE BEST
BOOKS IN TOWN!:!

NEW PAN

OPENED THIS WEEK
HERE'S ONE OF THE
SPECIALS

“Strange Confiict”’

By Wheatley

ADVOCATE

| lower than ever.





PAGE THREE





By WALLACE 8S. HULLET
INDON

The year 1951 looms grimly for
Socialized Britain.

Burdened with a three-year re-
armament rogramme costing
$10,080,000,000, the bewildered
Briton is also “promised” less of
everything except taxes, work and
hardship and the prospect of

a

ee

| z Hygiene
rh

it}
Wail

It’s as easy as ABC to keep the

lavatory spotless. Just sprinkle some

compulsory vegetarian diet. ie

Most unkindest “cut” of all is ‘Harpic’ into the bowl and leave over-
the meat ration. ‘

Embroiled since last July in night — ten flush. ‘Harpic’s’ cleans

trade discussions with the Argen-
tine, which supplies a third of

Gethin’ Saoet ikininte of Doon, ing action disinfects and deodorises the S-bend where no

Maurice Webb is reported faced i
with a position in which the main- brush can reach.
tenance of even the limited 16-

cents worth of fresh meat weekly

ration may become impossible.

An official survey of all existing
stocks in storage in Britain is
reported to have revealed that
meat supplies have fallen below
even the meagre wartime stocks
and a drastic cut to 14 cents worth
weekly is envisaged for early in
the New Year,

Butchers

Butchers, already suffering
headaches trying to gauge a 16-
cent “roast” may ask for the
meat ration to be issued fort-
nightly if further rationing is
imposed,

Britain’s meat i rts from
Australia and New land are
also at a low ebb due to an
fronieal economic situation.

With wool bringing such a high
price, sheep farmers are reluctant
to kill off their “golden fleece”,
and meat exports to Britain are

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MINERALS.--->*
Cuts in power during peak hours PROTEINS
by overloaded aging power station

equipment, and the failure of the
nationalised coal mines to cope)
with the increasing consumption is y
also adding to the discomfort of
the harassed housewife,

Conservative newspapers con-
stantly and bitterly assail what
they term the Government “topsy-
handling of the national-
ised industries,

More Acute
And as the cuts and shortages
ecome more acute so does the
ordinary Briton become more
confused.

The electricity boards urge him
to use less electricity and at the
same time offer him new électrical
gadgets which add to consump-
tion,

He is told the miners are break-
ing records each week with out-
put but coal is imported from
abroad because too much is being
used.

And with creaking rolling-
stock running constantly behind

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>. to country and seaside

resorts,

Devoting a whole editorial to
Government handling of national-
ised industries, the London “Daily
Mail” bitterly concluded:

“There may be worse ways of
celebrating a New Year than sit-
ting with a piece of corned beef
in front of a dead electric fire—
but not many.”--L.N,S,

than

INFLUENZA

——




















—

Blood From
Seaweed

LONDON.

Millions of tons of wasted sea-
weed that litter the rugged Scot-
tish coasts may be used in mak-
ing a substitute for blood plasma.

ExperimentS are being carried
out in London to use laminarin
— a chemical derived from sea-
weed — to solve the increasing
medical need for blood.

The new Gullang Laboratory
at the Institute of Seaweed Re:
search, at Musselburgh, Midlot-
hian, Scotland, is believed to
possess the only sample ¢
lan.inarin in the world,

About 100 tons of wet seaweed
are needed to produce one ton of
the chemical, but at present about
four million tons of seaweed
could be obtained each year
around the Scottish nt .

Glamour
Gaols

LONDON,

Glamour will go into Britisn
jails for women this year.

Prison reform regulations just
angounced provide that the
women inmates be allowed to use
lipstick and cosmetics and also
tone their dress with cell cur-
tains.

A range of colours for dresses
will be issued and the prisoners
illowed their own choice.

New patterns for outer cloth-
ing are also in preparation as
yell as new underciothing and
shoes.

The new regulations are aimed
at —, the prisoners take 4
ride i eir appearance.
™ . 7 —LN.S.



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PAGE FOUR



Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St:

Bridgetown.



Thursday, January 4, 1951



SEWERS

THE campaign for a cleaner Bridgetown
waged by the “Advocate” has met with
some measure of successin so far as it has
been noticed by the Commissioners of
Health. The staff of Sanitary Inspectors
and the members of the Scavenging De-
partment have contributed too, to such
success as has been achieved; but it is far
from satisfactory to find that individuals
in whose interest this campaign has been
waged have given little co-operation.

Despite the efforts of the Sanitary De-
partment to keep the dangerous gutters
clean and to provide bins into which people
can throw refuse, the condition of the gut-
ters shows that people deliberately dump
refuse into them.

The question is therefore whether the
gutters such as are found in the City are
suitable to the needs of Bridgetown. They
are deep and it must be admitted, offer
temptation to people to throw refuse in
them. In fact they are converted into
sewers by this process. In nearby St. Lucia,
a modern sewerage system has been de-
signed for Castries. Why not benefit from
this close source of knowledge? Why not

have a proper sewerage system in Bridge-
town?

But if Broad Street has responded to the
call for a cleaner Bridgetown, the call has
fallen on deaf ears in Bay Street.

It was suggested that the members of
the Boys’ Club might with advantage to
themselves and benefit to the community
transform the Bay Street windows into
beauty spots. This has not been done.

Surely the presence of the excellent Bay
Street Esplanade which is always scrupu-
lously clean and well tended, should act as
an incentive to the residents and owners of

that part of Bay Street where lie the two
windows.



WOMEN

THE election of one woman and the
nomination of three others in the 1951 Ves-
try Elections indicate an increasing and
welcome interest in public affairs by the
women of this island.

The appointment of one member of that
sex to membership in the Legislative
Council and the election of one to the
Christ Church Vestry has, it would seem,
given an incentive to them.

In this island there are many sides of
community life in which women can render
more effective service than men. It is
especially so in the administration of paro-
chial affairs, The sympathetic outlook
needed in investigating cases of poverty
which come before the Poor Law Guar-
dians in each parish gives women a
natural outlet for their maternal instinct.
The executive who must decide what por-
tion of his quota must be bought with the
dollars at his disposal or what portion of
his stock must be left in bond instead of
being distributed to his retailers, ought not
to be making decisions as to the difference
between the grant of five shillings for a
mother and a child and the necessity for
two doses of cod liver oil or two suits of
clothing for the same child.

Women have their natural place in
society and can make a worth while con-
tribution to the smooth and efficient work-
ing of local government.



SCOTTISH HOME RULE

NEW YORK
Theft of the famous old Scone
of Scone from its place of honour

And Russia

Truman came
Stalin as “goog old Joe.”

The General’s first invitation to
i



NEW YORK

General Ike Eisenhower, in-
spirational force behind the I
Western European armour being
assembled to frustrate any Russian
designs on countries reaching trom
Scandinavia to Gibraltar,
was cheered in Red Square
It was in August 1945, at a time
when Eisenhower shared the
widespread hope that the West
could do business with Stalin. At
Potsdam, just before Eisenhower
trips to Moscow, there was such
an aura of good feeling that Mr
home referring to



S

once

Moscow, as he explained in his
“CRUSADE IN EUROPE,”
(DOUBLEDAY) came in July,
1945, but he had been forced to
send his regrets because he had
to fly to Washington from Berlin
for a report. His second invita-
tion, and the one he accepted at
War Department urging, was de-
livered to him on the day the
A-Bomb fell on Hiroshima. His
friend, Marshal Gregori Zhukov,
since “broken” because of his ad-
miration for Eisenhower, the
General believes, flew with him
from Berlin to Moscow.

| Eisenhower took along with
‘him Maj. Gen. Lucius Clay, Brig.
Gen. T. J. Davis, his freshly-
graduated son, Lt. John Eisen-
hower and Master Sergeant |
Leonard Dry. They arrived in
the Russian capital August 11,

1945, by which time the second
bomb had fallen on Nagasal:i.
was in the war
against Japan, Averell Harrimn
put them up at the U.S. Embassy



On the following day, after ex-
changing military informaticn
with Red Army Chief of Staff
yen, Antonov, Ike’s party and
Ambassador Harriman’s group

took their places in a special
section of the stand erected in
Red Square for a_ vast sports

parade. But shortly after their
arrival, Gen. Antonoy appeared
with an invitation to Ike froin
Stalin to join him in the extra-
special reviewing stand atop
Lenin’s Tomb.

The invitation, first ever offered
to a foreigner, did not at first
include any other member of the
American party. Eisenhower at-
tempted to decline it as‘ tactfully
as possible because Harriman had
not been included. But Antonov
said:

“The Generalissimo says tho* if
you would like to come he also
invites two of your associates.”
Ike took along Harriman and Maj






By BOB CONSIDINE

Gen. John R. Deane, head of tie
U.S. Military Mission to Moscow
The parade consumed five
hours during which time Ike talk-
ed intermittently to Stalin through
an interpreter

Stalin queried Ike at length on
the industrial, scientific, educa-
tional and social achievements of
the U.S. .

The dictator, who by then had
told Polish democratic leaders that
he not only planned to dominate
that country but would ignore the
“paper protest” of the U.S., told
Ike in effect:

port

G NER/ s NHOWER

ing at a ceremony at the Waldorf
Astoria at which he received a Sal-
vation Army citation for ‘“Distin-
guished Services to Humanity.”
Express;

we need American help. It is our
great task to raise the standards
of living of the Russian people
which have been seriously
damaged by the war. We must
learn all about your scientific
achievements in agriculture. Like-
wise, here we must get your
technicians to help us in our
engineering and _ constructicn
problems, and we want to know
more about mass_ production
methods in factories, We know
that we are behind in those things
and we know that you can help
us.”






BARBADOS ADVOCATE —

Looking down on the thousands
cf Russian men and women in the
sports festival, Stalin also said

“This develops the war spirit.
Your country ought to do more
of this.” Then he added: “We will
never ullow Germany to do this.”

During his trip to Russia Eisen
hower was permitted to see the
Stormovik fighter plane factory.
where the work-week was 84
hours, and was granted leave to
visil Stalingrad. At one point
during the stay Stalin asked him
to express his apologies to Gen:
George Marshall for a sharp note
Stalin had sent to the American
chief of staff for supplying him
with certain information which
had turned out badly and resulted
in what Stalin called “some em
barrassment” to the Red Army.

At the big farewell dinner
countless toasts were offered but
one by young John Eisenhower
drew the biggest ovation. It was
dedicated to “the common soldier
of the great Red Army.”

Eisenhower's Moscow trip was
hailed as such a great success that
the United States War Depart
ment immediately invited Mar
shal Zhukov to visit America
Ike set aside his C54 for the
trip and assigned Gen. Clay and
John to accompany him. But
Zhukov fell ill. U.S.-Russian rela—
tions fell even more ill, By the
time Zhukov was able to travel
he was not permitted to do so.

In retrospect, Eisenhower says
that the Russian heirarchy came
to fear chiefly the fruits of libera-
tion—freedom of the individual.
He says there is no need for alarm
in this country over the growing
Russian menace provided we stick
together:

“If the men and women of
America face this (Communist,
issue as squarely and bravely as
their soldiers faced the terrors of
battle in World War II, we would
have no fear of the outcome. If
they will unite themselves as
firmly as they did when they
provided, with their allies in
Europe, the mightiest fighting
force of all time, there is no tem
poral power that can dare chal
lenge them.

“If they can retain
integrity, the clarity
hension, and the
sacrifice that finally crushed the
Axis, then the Free World will
live and prosper and all the peoples
will eventually reach a level of
culture, contentment and security
that has never before been
achieved,”—INS.

the moraf
of compre
readiness to



‘The Red Threat In Latin

(This ts the last of a series of articles
disclosing the extent of Communist
activities in Latin America aimed at
weakening the security of the western
oernere and specifically the United

ates.)

WASHINGTON
Department realizes
wise leadership is

The State
that positive,

required to combat the rising
menace of Communism in Latin
America,

It is necessary, the Depart-
ment’s spokesmen emphasize, io
keep Latin American opinion

marshalled solidly on the side cf
the free world.

It is important to keep the
Latin American people convinced
that their welfare is linked to the
welfare of the United States.

The purpose of the Communists,
as agents of the Kremlin, is plain.
It is to neutralize Latin America
in the event of war between the
U.S. and the Soviet Union and
deprive us of such vitally needed
supplies as wool, zine, oil, tin cop-
per, rubber and foodstuffs.

In a recent speech, Assistant
Secretary of State Edward G.
Miller Jr. in charge of Inter-
American affairs, warned that
there has been too much friction
and misunderstanding in the past
in U.S. relations with Latin
America.

“For some of this,” he said, “we
can justly blame those among
ourselves who fail to understand
the hopes and aspirations of the
Latin American countries,”

“But part of the blame,” Miller
added, “must be laid at the door
of those in Latin America who,
with or without malice afore-
thought, misinterpret and distort
the motives, policies and ob-
jectives of the United States”

“While much of this mis-
interpretation and distortion







By J. C. OESTREICHER

America’

BY MALCOLM JOHNSON

stems from our enemies, whose
purpose is to divide and con-
fuse inter-American opinion, a
disappointingly large share of it
comes from people who are any
thing but sympathetic to Com-
munism, but who either are
obsessed with outmoded con-
cepts of economic policy or who
enjoy using this country as a

Scapegoat for their economic
ills.”

The “good

! neighbour” policy
inaugurated

in the early 30’s is
vited as having done much to
cement friendly relations with
Latin America.

Just how important this is to
the United States was proved
during World War II. Ivan
White, Economic Adviser to
Assistant Secretary Miller, says
that Latin, America was able to
supply the U.S. war economy
with $1.5 billions of essential
Zoods.

With regard to future possibil-
ities, White says;

“With two-thirds of the world’s
population and three-fourths of its
productive capacity in non-Com-
munist areas, the Soviet Union
is confronted with a formidable

barrier to the attainment of its
ultimate goals.
“The Kremlin, therefore, has

another clear objective, namely,
to obtain a progressive shift in
the balance of productive power
in the world.”

Other observers emphasize that
this is one of the primary reasons



there is no
along the Tweed.

“impassable” border

why the Communists now are
concentrating feverishly on Latin
America.

Secretary of Stete Dean Acheson
has pointed out that to counteract

this activity our own approach to!

the problem must be

one.” As a step toward action

of the Foreign Munisters

American Republics.
White says:

“Economic conditions for free-! ;

dom through the creation of new
workshops, new crops, new wealth
must be developed in places where
they have not been before

“It means that for
millions of people living in a
state of poverty in unde-

developed regions, every reason- | because

able effort must be made for
the economic development and

of goods necessary if they are 1861 w

to believe that the free world

a “dynamic |

|
|

THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1951



SIKKIM |

WASHINGTON.

INDIA has forged a new link in the
defenses of its vast northern frontier by
assuming the role of protector for the little
semi-independent state of Sikkim, a moun-
tain-girt land of tropic flowers and eternal
nows in the heart of the eastern Himalayas.

By a recent treaty the Maharajah of Sik-
kim has given India full authority to utilize
his country for military purposes. Although
not much larger than the State of Delaware,
Sikkim occupies a highly strategic buffer
position against the Chinese Communists
now invading Tibet, writes the National
yeographic Society.

The Maharajah’s relatively tiny domain
vhares frontiers with Nepal, Tibet, India,
ind the state of Bhutan, which is also an
indian protectorate. For centuries the Hima-
layan mountain passes of Sikkim have been
e gateway to Tibet; caravans from the
Tibetan highlands have worn an ancient
trade route across Sikkimese territory to
Salimpong and Darjeeling in India.

——— ee

Nature presents a variety of moods in
Sikkim. The country is a jumbled mass of
gorges and precipitous slopes. In the narrow
valleys the climate is tropical with a pro- |

fusion of ferns and flowering plants. Climb- Q

ing the towering, forested mountains, one
enters a temperate zone. Farther up, above
timberline, are barren wastes capped by the
glacial peaks of the world’s mightiest moun-
tains.

Altitudes in Sikkim range from a low of
some 400 feet above sea level to the 28,146-
foot eminence of Kanchenjunga, third high-
est mountain in the world, which is located
on the Nepal border, The extreme differences
in rainfall are remarkable for so small a
country; annual precipitation in the south
is over 130 inches, while some of the more
sheltered northern valleys get less than 20
inches.

In this land of abrupt contrasts live about
123,000 people, most of whom eke out a
living growing maize and millet on the
‘nountain sides and rice crops on the ter-
raced slopes at lower elevations. Their capi-
tal is Gangtok, a collection of tiered wooden
houses clinging to a mountain shoulder
4.000 feet high.



Sikkim legend credits a Buddhist Lama
from Tibet as the founder of the country.

Acheson has called for a meeting| Most of the present inhabitants are Nepal-
of 21) ese; others belong to the Bhutia and Lepcha

hill tribes, and a variety of Tibetan dialects

are spoken. Puddhism is the state religion.

In setting up a protectorate over Sikkim,
india is re-affirming a precedent established

the| by the British nearly a century ago, English

forees entered the little country in 1860
it had persisted in kidnapping

| British subjects, who were sold into slavery.
the increase in the interchange) The maharajah was forced to sign a treaty in

hich made Sikkim a protectorate of

offers a workable system for| {he Crown.

the improvement of their living
Standards and the achievement
of their aspirations.”

United States aid
of public healtn, sanitation and
education in impoverished Latin
American countries is one of the
concrete, friendly acts which are
helping to improve relations,

By such acts the American
people are trying tc prove their
lasting friendship for Latin
America and their interest in the
welfare of its people.

in problerns

This form of assistance might
be greatly expanded under exist-
ing legislation.

The United States’ best weapon
against Communist agitation in
Latin America again is seen as the
weapon of truth—truth buttressed
by positive aid and acts of friend-
ship,—LN.S,

i
'





Even Stamps Tell

The British promptly honoured this treaty
when Tibet invaded Sikkim in 1888, “Tom-
mies” and Indian troops soon drove the
Tibetans back behind the encircling moun-
tains. Two years later the Chinese, who pro-
fessed an ancient claim to Sikkim, agreed to
recognise it as a British protectorate.

For many years Great Britain maintained
a “dewan,” or political officer, in Sikkim,
who had considerable power over the affairs
of the state. A similar representative was
sent to Gangtok by India in 1949, and the
recent treaty merely formalizes a relation-
ship that has been in effect for some time.

—INS.





in London’s Westminster Abbey
Served today to point up that curi-
ous factor in Britain’s national
life known as Scottish home rule.

It is curious because the mere
expression home rule indicates at
least a desire for secession, while
that word implies that Scotland is
being held by force and duress by
the British Crown.

Such is hardly the case. The
people of Scotland presumably
could vote themselves out of their
proud position in the British
Commonwealth if they wanted to.
But the “home rulers” or nation-
alists are not more than a small if
somewhat noisy minority. There
seems to be no general desire to
eliminate Scotland from the
United Kingdom.

Much of the wind was taken out
of nationalist sails when King
George VI ascended the throne 13
years ago.

For his Queen is a Scotswoman
to the core, Princess Elizabeth,
who will succeed to the throne, is
therefore half Scotch, with some
of the proudest blood of the High-
lands in her veins and as long as
the line prevails, the chain of
genedlogicai links to Scotland will
not be broken,

Theft of the famous stone
concern in London, however, lest
the daring if foolhardy theft of
Britain’s most famous relic arouse
national fanatics to something
more than an occasional bagpipe



THE STONE—INTRINSIC

led parade of tartans, kilts and
sporrans,

It is undoubtedly true that the
Scottish Nationalists have used
every breakup in the British Em-
pire to make effective propaganda
for their cause,

This was the case when the
British Mandate in Palestine was
surrendered, and applied also to
the separation of Burma, India
and other portions of the Com-
monwealth that have dropped
away.

Establishment of the Republic
of Ireland, provided fuel for the
nationalist flames, But until the
present, these have all been
pot tempests

Whether there ever could be

tea-

a

VALUE; 2s. 6¢.

separation of Scotland from the
United Kingdom is problematical
at best.

The two countries have such
close economic and financial ties
that the union seems unbreakable.
England depends heavily on the
shipbuilding yards of the Clyde;
Scotland well represent
ed in the London marts of com-
merce, It is a saying that in every
large Britisi mereantile establish-
ment, Britain supplies the work-

is

ers and Scotland sends down the
directors to work for handsome
salaries

And the numerous resort pro-
prieto! of Scotland, to say
nothi f the n gements of
world famous golf clubs, have
every reason to he happy that

For many months out of the
year, Britons are the principal
paying guests, And in better
times, the wealthy Englishman
who did not have a hunting lodge
or the lease of a grouse-shooting
moor in Scotland was not deemed
worthy of the name,

The more moderate element of
the home rule faction, numbering
about 2 million Scotsmeén, signed a
covenant last year,

While this was entirely an all-
Scottish affair, it is noteworthy
that the signers pledged full loyal-
ty to King George and his heirs
and merely asked His Majesty's
government to consider a larger
degree of self-government for
Scotland.

Thus there is obviously a great
deal of difference between this
movement and the politics of Eire,
which not only broke all ties with

the British throne but ardently
desires to annex the Northern
Counties.

That is a matter that day in and
day out is one for violent agita-
tion, The Southern Irelanders
are always ready with vast bun-
dles _of pamphlets and charts
designed to prove that a mere
handful of “King’s Men” are keep-
ing millions of Irishmen in servi-
tude to the Crown.

Fanatics who do not hesitate to
steal Britain’s most l
relic from their most sacred s
must indeed be a resolute
termined people—LN.S.

ven



ind de

Lies For Russia

NEW YORK.
The recent Russian propaganda
line * the western world is re-
flected” in postage stamps issued
by Russia and its satellites.

Recent stamp issues of Eastern
Germany follow the pattern used
for many years by the Soviet
Union, One stamp on peace shows
a hand of the West covering the
eyes of the dove of peace from
rows of crosses, the atomic bomb
burst, and other symbols of war.

A series of Russian stamps de-
picts Uncle Sam in the pose of
the Statue-cf Liberty but carry-
ing a firebrand instead of a torch.

Before the recent propaganda
barrage, Russian stamps generally
showed pros s made under the
various five-year plans



One informed yhilatelic source
in New York, the Scott Stamp
and Coin Company, says these are

effective in transit through the
imails, But that is about their
only outlet
Sale of Russian and Satellite
rountric Ss is very difficult
n European countr
i States
i Wh tish and French

issues of sets of three and four
stamps sell for a total of up to
$109,000 for each set, the grand
total of Eastern European stamp
sales is not more than $50,000 a
year.

The popularity of a country is
well reflected in the sale of un-
used stamps to collectors in the
United States. Certain countries
have issued stamps which have
never been well received’ in
America,

Stamps from Germany, Austria,
Hungary and Japan seldom are
listed for sale above the minimum
amount considered reasonable to
cover the cost of dealer handling.
A similar fate is befalling Russian
stamps.

Stamps from China fell in
value at the closing stages of the
Second World War, while British
Stamps fell then, only to rise
again.

Britain and France realize sev
eral millions a year in vValuuble
American dollars. These are im
portant assets and a high return
f ry small investment





id

-LN.S. ’ |! i
SSE



D. V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.

eee”



TO-DAY’S SPECIALS

at THE COLONNADE



Pkgs. QUAKER OATS .

{
Tins LETONA PEACHES ..

Bottles McEWAN’S BEER



Usually NOW

$ .24 $ .22

5 ial pita habits Rey | 4
‘sesh tpdilbatiadelae’ 26 20





KITCHEN WARE

ALUMINIUM FRY PANS & SAUCEPANS
COCKTAIL SHAKERS

THERMOS FLASKS,

PUDDING & DRIPPING PANS
BREAD BOARDS and KNIVES

SANI-CANS
GARBAGE CANS

ENAMEL PLATES and CUPS

Ete., Ete., Ete.

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

Phones — 4472, 4687,







PARROT

SAFETY

SWEDEN'S

MATCHES

+

BEST MATCH

+

Ask for PARROT MATCHES from

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LINGERIE DEPT.

HERE’S YOUR
TO BUY ALL

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OPPORTUNITY
RRR 5 ae ete

LINGERIE

WANTED

In this Department you will find a full range

of LADIES INTIMATE-WEAR, by all the +

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Knowing that QUALITY & SERVICE

are Yours!

DACOSTA

here with Confidence

om:

& CO., LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPT.




FISH

Turtle

Salmon
Haddock

Cod Fillets
Sole Anchovies
Kippers

MEATS
Hams in tins
Bacon—Sliced
Turkeys |
Chickens j
Ducks |
Ox Tongues
Liver
Tripe i
Brains |
Sweet Breads |
Rabbits

APPLES

GODDARD



TO-DAY

FOR THESE
ENERGY.
BUILDING

FOODS

VEGETABLES
in tins
Cucumbers Spinach
String Beans Kale
Cauliflower Asparagus

Carrots & Peas
Brussel Sprouts

SPECIALS
Cook's Paste—6c, per tin
Dried Prunes—50c, per Ib.
Sling in tins—36c.
Sultana Puddings—48c.
Steak & Kidney Puddings
—44c.
CHEESE
Empire Coffee
3 & R BREAD & CAKES
CROWN SWEET DRINKS
Fruit Cakes
Chocolates
After Dinner Mints
Marshmellows

S DELIVER







THURSDAY, JANUARY 4,

Car Damaged
In Collision
7 RIGHT FRONT bumper

of the motor car X—870,
cwned and driven by Mr. E. S.
Burrowes, Labour Commissioner,
Was damaged in an accident ut
the junction of Prince
Henry
8 o'clock yesterday morning.

Also involved in the accident
was a mo-tor lorry owned by
Springhall Company Limited, and



driven by Clarendon Greenidge pany Limited, Chairman of the
Negotiating Committee of the Sea
Association in
were stolen from a car be-,Sngland and a Member of the

of Mile and Quarter, St, Peter.
WO CAR SEATS valued $20

longing to Reginald Robinson of
Dash Gap, Bank Hall, The car
Was on an open spot at the side

of the house. The seats were re- nual General Meeting of the B.W.1.

moved between 10 a.m. and

z 12.30
p.m. on Tuesday.

OLVIN MOORE, a labourer of Since then, he visited the cotton

My Lord's Hill, yesterday
appeared before His Worship Mr.

Police.
He was first charged with the
larceny of clothes valued at £12

7/9 om December 22, from the evening bv B.W.1.A. for Trinidad

home of Sydney Skinner of Bax-
ters Road.

The second charge was larceny
of clothing from Charles Brown
of Nelson Street. The clothes are
valued at £14 12/8 and the offence
was alleged to have been commit-
ted sometime on November 23.
Qn this charge he was remanded
until January 10.

The preliminary hearing on both
charges was started yesterday.
Moore is not represented by

unsel.

QUIRY into the circumstances

surrounding the death of 22-
yedr-old’ Edward Blackman was
yesterday postponed by Mr. A. W.
Harper at the District “B’ Court
until Wednesday next.

The body of Blackman was
found at Silver Sands on Friday
morning by Lionel Ross of Tweed-
side Road. It was removed to the
Christ Church Almshouse and
Beatrice Blackman identified it to
Dr.. Charles Manning.

AJOR ROAD studs and signs

were placed at the junction
of James Street and Lucas Street
yesterday morning.

Formerly there were many
minor accidents at these corners,
but motorists and cyclists who
approach Lucas Street from these
directions will now realise that
they are going towards a major
road.

R. A. W. HARPER is acting as

Police Magistrate of District
“B” in place of Mr. C. L. Walwyn
who is on sick leave,

Central Station Is New

Vaccination Centre

Colonel R. T, Michelin was first
of 155 people to be vaccinated
against small pox at the newly
opened centre at Central Station
yesterday.

Eight vaccination centres were
open in St. Michael, but only 220
people took advantage of them.

Returns at the Chief Medical
Officer's Office. yesterday showed
that an approximate total of 4,531
people had received vaccinations
against the disease since the cam-
paign started some weeks ago.

Of these, 3,120 people were
vaccinated at the St. Michael cen-
tres and 1,411 at the centres in
the out-parishes.





eases

1951

Cotton Prices
Satisfactory
To W.I. Growers

The prices being paid to grow-
, the
P William West Indies by the Raw Cotton
and Parry Streets at about Comunission in England are satis-

factory, Mr. T. A. Twyman told

ers of sea island cotton in

the Advocate yesterday

Mr. Twyman is Managing Di-

rector of the Montserrat Com-

Island Cotton

Advisory Committee.

He came out to the West Indies

in November to attend that An-

Sea Island Cotton Association
which was held in Barbados.

growing islands in the area.

He said that the cotton \jgrowers
A. J. H. Hanschell, Senior Police in Montserrat are getting ready to
Magistrate of District “A” om two plant their crop next’ month and
charges of larceny brought by the are hoping for a better season than

the previous one when the crop
;was destroyed by pink boll worm.
Mr. Twyman left yesterday

and will visit New York and Mon-
treal before returning to England
later in the month,

While in Barbados he was stay-
ing at the Marine Hotel.



Ex-Stoker Goes
Job Hunting

When the Advocate saw 39-
year-old Alwin Higgins yesterday
morning hé was on a ‘bus going
to Boarded Hall. From Boarded
Hall he walked three and a half
miles to Woodburn to see some-
— who had promised him a
job.

Higgins lives at Holders Hill,

St. James, so in all he travelled j

over 16 miles in search of a job,
He has three children and they
are all ill. His wife is suffering
from an injured leg.

He served for five years in the
Trinidad Royal Navy as a leading
stoker and would be glad to do
the same job on any vessel that
visits Carlisle Bay.

Higgins said that he spent a
rough Christmas and a worse New
Year. On Tuesday, the second
day of 1951, he was at home rest-
ing when he heard a knock at the
door. When he looked out of the
window, he was surprised to see
a postman who was holding a few
bundles of letters,

“TI thought someone had remem-
bered me and sent a money order.
1 was feeling very happy, but
instead I was handed a small card
box.”

When he opened it, to his dis-
may he saw a 1939—45 Medal sent
to him from the Navy Headquar-
ters. He looked at the Mecal and
then at his sick children and wife.

He said yesterday that if the
box had contained a $5 note he
would have appreciated it more
as he had already been given the
1939-45 Medal at the Drill Hall.
He left his larder at home empty—

not even containing tea or sugar.



NINE I.D’s
The following infectious dis-
were notified during the
month of December: Diphtheria 2;

Enteric Fever 4; Tuberculosis 3.



Fishing 25

Years Ago

TO LOOK at Herbert Carter’s face on the Reef Beach
yesterday as he mended the fishing boat sails which will
take him fishing for red fish to-morrow, you would not

have thought that 25 years

fishing sank about 15 miles

swim for five hours.
Carter is a short, little

ago, a boat in which he was
off the shore and he had to

man of 58. He has a rugged

weather-beaten face over which he wears about an inch

jof bristled grey hair.

From the time he was a_ boy,
Carter used to fish. Now he goes
about 23 miles off the island and
where the water is over 300
yards deep he fishes for red fish
Carter says that to the south of
the island you will find the best
red fish fishing grounds.

He will tell you that when
flying fish are plentiful, fisher-
men have to rest in between
whiles. As soon as the sails are
lowered, flying fish will cluster
on the boat and will go on the
sides and spawn, Fishermen lean
over the sides of the boats with
their nets and scoop up about 40
at a time

He has sailed around the island

many times. Two of them go
out fishing in the Monkey, the
boat Carter thinks of as his

home away from home,

When Carter is telling you of
the time, 25 years ago when the
bowsprit of the boat in which he
was fishing 15 iniles off shore
broke and the boat sank, he
speaks in a hurried way as though
he wants to get over the memory
of those five hours of swimming
for his life. Fi

Boat Sank

He wiis with another fisherman

whom he calls ‘Phonsa, about
midday when the boat sank.

He was young then, but he did
not feel he could reach the shore

and the only hope he had was
that a boat might pass by, Many
boats were with sight, but

they were going in dilferent ai-



Chenery.
tenced Wesley Thorne of Howells
Cross Road to three months’ im-



Three Months For A Cock

A decision of Police Magistrate,
Mr. E. A, McLeod was confirmed
by the Judges of the Assistant
Court of Appeal yesterday, Mr.
G. L. Taylor and Mr. J. ae ae
Mr. McLecd had sen-

prisonment with hard labour when
he found him guilty of the larceny

of a cock.

The cock was stolen on No-

vember 23 and was the property

of Richard Jordan of Haggatt
Hall. . «et

Jordan said that he was home
when he saw Thorne between
some canes near his home. People
tid not generally pass there and
he asked him what he wanted.
He had a paper bag and ran when
he went towards him, dropping
the bag as he did so. The bag
contained the cock.



C. P. BETHEL MADE
COL. SEC. BAHAMAS

Mr. C. P. Bethel, Deputy
Coloniai Secretary, Bahamas, has
been appointed Colonial Secr
tary of the Bahamas ii succession
to Mr. F, A. Evans.





BARBADOS





ADVOCATE

GRASS GROWS FAST



PRINCESS ALICE playing field is a grazing ground. The grass is tall and the sheep which graze there
are fat. There is too much bush for cricket and other games and the playing field is still incomplete.



Trade With Canada
Will Increase In °51

As a result of talks between
Canada and the British West
Indies, trade between the two
places will increase during 1951,

Honourable Lionel Chevrier, Min-
ister of Transport in the Canadian

Government told the Advocate
yesterday.

He said that

cc ae or later













=? sooner
y would find

of negotiating a
‘new trade agree-

f m7 ment between
Canada and the
y West Indies
ae Which would be

" icial to both

in Can-
MR. L. CHEVRIER ada, had a great
deal that they could purchase
from the West Indies and he be-
lieved that there were many
things that were required in the
island that could be more econo-
mically purchased in Canada,

He said that he believed that
Canada was one of the best, if
not the best, purchasers of
molasses from Barbados,

Mr. Chevrier is particularly in-
terested in airways and was happy
to see that Barbados had an excel-

lent runway which was in all
respects, capable of taking the
newest and heaviest aircraft.

When this strip is completed, it
should be in a position to take
the strato cruisers, the biggest
commercial aircraft in the world
and the Comet, the new commer-
cial airliner.

Mary Lewis, Oldest
Schooner onthe Run



With the schooners Frederick
P. Elkin and Minnie Mosher
fading out of colonial shipping,

the Mary M. Lewis can boast
of being the oldest schooner now
visiting Barbados.

The Mary M, Lewis is 33
years old. The next to her in

age is the Marion Belle Wolfe
whose captain Every said some
weeks ago was about 32 years
old.

Barbadian bern Captain Mar-
shall, the Mary M. Lewis’

skipper, said yesterday that there
was very little difference in age
between the two schooners.

The Mary M. Lewis has
had only two owners during her
eareer. Her first owner was Cap-
tain Lewis of St. Lucia, after
whose wife she was named.
Captain Lewis ran her through-
out the West Indies trading with

general cargo. Occasional rips
were made to Curacao, Aruba
and Surinam.

In 1924, Captain Marshall’s

father bought her over. In re-
cent years she has been running
steadily between British Guiana
and Barbados trading with rice
and general cargo,

The Mary M. Lewis is now
in port making ready for sailing

back to British Gu’ana

With her grey painted hull
which really shows age, she
measures 98.83 feet from stem

to stern post, 23.53 feet in width
und has a draft—when empty—
of 10 feet. Her net tonnage is 69
and she draws 11 feet when well
loaded. Nine men man her.

Captain Marshall told the Ad-
vocaie that he could remember
the Mary M, Lewis being in-
volved in one serious accident,
Captain Marshall’s brother was
then skipper.

Sometime in 1936, the ship
lost its mast during a long spell
vf bad weather encountered be-
tween Barbados and British Gui-
anu. Many a gale and rough sea

he has sailed her through, and
occasionally minor damages re-
sulted



NEW PS.

The Secretary of State for the
Colonies, Mr. James Griffith, has
appointed Mr. A. M MacKintosh
to be his Private Secretary

SEEOOLVESSOOSOS SSS SSCPOO LOE SCPE SEO SPP POPS,



“Don’t Play Ball”’
On Playing Fields

. THE GOVERNMENT and the Vestry of

St. Michael

seem to have reached deadlock where playing fields are
rar ry Dy j ; i : »
concerned. The Princess Alice Playing Field at the Reef

is incomplete, and a

been bought.

five-acre
selected by the Playing Fields Committee,

site at Mt. Friendship,

has not yet

nquiry
Adjourned

The inquiry int) the circum-
stances surroundiny the death of
Evans Spooner of Edgecliffe, St.
John, which is being held by M
A. J. H. Hanschell, Coroner of
District “A”, was adjourned uniil
Thursday, January 11 yesterday

Evans Spooner, a 58-year-old
wheelwright of St. John = was
found lying in a trench along

Guinea Road, St. John, about 8,30
p.m. on December 31. Spooner
was taken to the General Hos-
pital the same night but died on
the morning of January 2

_ Evidence was taken yesterday
from Dr. G. S, Emtage and Evelyn
Edghill of St. George. In his
evidence Dr. G. S. Emtage said
that he performed a post mortem
on the body of a man whose
name was Charles Evans Spoone:v
at the General Hospital Mortuary
on January 2 at about

2.30 p.m
The body was identified by
Jeseph Spooner of St John
who told him that the deceased
was his brother
The apparent age of the man
was about 60—-65 years and he
was dead for about eigkt to

twelve hours. There was a wound
under the right eye and a
haematoma on the right

large
ear,

In his opinion death was due
to sub-dural cerebral haemor-
rhage from injuries received.

The injuries received to the
right side of the head are con-
sistent with some considerable
blow received in that region

Evelyn Edghill of St. George
told the court that on December

31 at about 8.10 pm. he was
driving the motor car G-——282 ,
along Guinea Poad, St. John

He saw a man in the trench
on the right side of the road
apparently unconscious He re-

versed and focussed the headlights
of the car on the man, He exam-
ined him and noticed that the
man’s right jaw was swollen. A
bieyele was on the ground about
five feet from where the man was
lying with the front wheel

ex-
tensively damaged The hack
wheel was in the road and _ the

rest of the bicycle in the gutter,

He took up the bicycle and
placed it against some canes grow-
ing on the trench and then £04
into the car and reported the mat-
ter to ‘Four Roacs Sub-Station

The man that was in the trench
was of medium builia and slightly
bald with a dark Frown complex-
ion. He looked about 50 years of
age.





All Fer A Piece Of Sugar
GENEVA

Wishing to suck up a piece of
sugar at the bottom of his liqueur
glass, Mr, Placide Vieux in a cafe
at Val d’Illieu, Switzerland, suck-
ed up the glass as well that
it got wedged in his throat. Blue
in the face and unconscious, hi
life was saved by another custom;
er who forced his street door key
down Placide’s throat, breke
glass and pulled out the pieces
Placide was then taken to hospital

so





OUR

1951 STYLINGS

the

The Government is asking fot

detailed estimate of the Mt
Friendship Scheme, and the Ve
try ate saying they submitted such
on estimate a long time ago, when
they put up to Government seve
sites as being suitable for playis
fields,

The seven sites were put up t
Government in June, 1949, The
site at the Reef was the first to be
acquired and converted into what
is now the Princess Alice Playing
Field. But it is still incomplete
It has not been enclosed, and
srass and weeds have got out of
control. Moreover, it has not yet
been officially handed over to the
Vestry by the Governor-in
Executive Committee, and the
Vestry therefore have no contro:
over it.



A lot of controversy was stirred
up late last year by charges that
all was not well with expenditure
on the Princess Alice Fieid.
Government in a letter signed by
Miss Betty Arne, Social Welfare
Officer, asked the Vestry to submit
” detailed account of the expend-
iture, including particulars of
incidentals

Special Meetings
The Vestry held special meet
ings, threshed the matter out, acd
ubmitted a report to the Gov
ernment. Since then, the Vestry
received four tenders for enclos
ing the field, which tenders wer
submitted to the Government
Government has not yet replied
4
Friendship was
original seven
Playing Fields
price had hee
arranged at that stage, but lic
cstimated cost of the buildings
which would be required and Wwe
cst of preparing the grounds was
“8160. Subsequently the ownet
of the land quoted a price, which
cffer was submitted to the Gw-
crnment,



Mt

the
the
No

The site ai
also one of
e ected by
Committee

The Government replied that
they would not be in a position t
make any decision with regard to
the purchase of the site until a
cetailed scheme for the field has
teen ,submitted and further
cxomined by the Governor-1in-
Executive Committee, The letter
also stated that the Executive
must be advised by its legal ad-
visers to the price at which
the land was being offered, A
econd letter from the Govern~
ment asked if the Vestry were
yet in a position to submit the
detailed seheme asked for

as

Now the Vestry have replied
telling the Government tha -
estimates for the establishment ot

seven sites including Mt. Friend-
hip have already been submitted,
and that moreover, the Playing
Ficlds Committee feels a sense of
frustration at Government’s atti-
tude. The Committee has also
recommended that the Govern-
ment be told that they are willing
to undertake the supervision of
euch fields as may be established
in St, Michael but sugeest that
the Government take over the
responsibility of acquiring an

converting the sites



Banana Proposals

Approved

(Frem Our Own

KINGSTON

Correspondent)
J’ca, Dee. 27

The Jamaica Government ha
approved the recommendation of
the Island Banana Committee
cting on the advice of the Jamai
ca banana delegation which
recently discussed the immediate
future of the industry with the

\iinistry of Food in England,

the Government has approved
of the maintenance of the present
price of £32 per ton F.O.B. for
all shipments during 1951 and the
extension of the present contract
for a further two years until the

end of 1954

The price for 1952 and subse-
quent years will continue to be
subject to negotiation



Miami University
Students Visit Jamaica

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, J'ca, Dec. 27.

_A group of students from the
University of Miami paid a visit
to Jamaica last week-end and this
week to look over the agricultural
and industrial development of the
island. They were accompanied
by Dr, Luella Dambaugh, profess-
or of Geography at the Unive

The visit, which lasted 10 days,
included tours of agricultural
centres in St, Thomas, St. Andrew,
Manchester, Montego Bay, St. Ann
and St. Catherine.

The group was welcomed to the
island by the Hon, |. W., A. Bar-
rant, Minister for Agriculture,
Lands and Commerce, Mr. Ru-
dolph Burke, President of the
Jamaica Agricultural Society, Mr.
Vivian Durham, Secretary to the
Minister, and Mr. D, A. Jones,
Acting Secretary of the J.A.S.

The party, consisting of the pro-
fessor and four students, was
assisted in its study tour by the
Jamaica Agricultural Society

ahd ,
light Naked Food
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec. 30.
Dr, Roderick Marcano, Medical
Officer of Health for Port-of-
Spain, has indicated that the ex-
posal of foodstuffs in the City
might involve enactment of leg-
islation for their wrapping in
some form of inexpensive cello-
phane paper
Serious criticisms
the way food is prepared for sale
in the City, and on the health
standards of the people who offer
these foodstuffs for sale.






are made on



Refused Pioneer Aid

(from Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec. 29.
The Bermudez Biscuit Com-
pany of Trinidad have been re-
fused Pioneer Aid when the
Executive Council turned down
their application: It is understood
that the application was consid-
ered by the Economic Advisory
Board which did not recommend
its acceptance,

"Who's Who” Dedicated
To Princess

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, J’ca, Dec, 27





Princess Alice, Countess of
Athlone, Chancellor of the Uni-
versity College of the West In-

dies, has aliowed the forthcoming
edition of “Who’s Who, Jamaica,”
now on the Press, to be dedicated
lo her

Princess Aiice has furnished the
editor with an autographed photo-
graph and a short biography



Cement Talks
(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dee, 30.

Mr. A. A. Shenfield, Govern-
ment Economic Adviser in Trini-
dad, has gone to Jamaica to take

purt in talks concerning the pro-
posed establishment of a cement
factory in Trinidad,

CASE STRUCK OUT

A ease against Horrace Burnett
was yesterday struck out because
C. Ifill of the Central Motor "Bus
Co. who charged him with negli-
vent driving was not present at
the court

The case was heard in the Court
of Original Jurisdiction before Mr.
G,. L. Taylor

Mr. G. B. Niles
half of Burnett

Ifill was claiming that on June
2? last year, Burnett who was then
employed by him, drove the 'bus
X-582 on Trafalgar Street in such



appeared on be- |

PAGE FIVE



Whopping Big Lies

A FANTASTIC STORY

BURLINGTON, Wis.
of death in the North Dakota

cold to-day won the 1950 World Liars’ Championship for

1 man in Sunny California.
Officials of the Burlington, Wi Liars’ Club, which

sponsors the annual competition said the cold facts

lescribed by Frank J. Coulette of .(3233 Portola Ave

Los Angeles made the world’s bes*—if not most heart

warming-—tall story.

Excluded, however, were many While fishing in the Cisco chain
entries dealing with the recent in Villas County this summer I

national election or nominating
leading political figures in certain
countries, because the judges de-
cided “ours is strictly an amateur
contest.’

Goulettes emus

“One winter while I was work-
ing on a pile-driver in North Da
kota it got so cold that one night
a member of our crew froze to
death in bed. The ground was
frozen so hard that it was im-
possible to dig a grave; in fact,
we never did find out how far

down it was frozen
>

“But this 1 do know, Seeing we
couldn't dig a grave, we stood the
fellow on his head under the pile-
driver—and we had to drive on
him seven days and seven nights
before we got him down far

* enough for a decent burial!”

Other entries in contrast, made

hot for the judges. They gave
honourable mention to one from
Paul Dorsett of Gravette, Ark.

It went like this:

Sun Came Down

“Out where I worked last sum-
mer it got so hot that the sun came
down out of the sky and crawled
under a tree to get in the shade!”

Another honourable mention

winner came from Don Brewer
of Terre Haute Ind. He spun this
yarn:

“Last spring our neighbour
planted tomatoes on the hillside
back of his house, put some pa-
tented fertilizer on the hills,

watered them good and how they
zrew! A couple of weeks later one
tomato was so big that it broke
loose from the vine rolled down
the hill into the valley and broke
open, It was tough. The neigh-
bour’s little boy, playing out there,
was drowned in the juice before
they could get boats out to rescue
him.”

And from among dime-a—dozen

fish stories the judges picked a
sad economic commentary from
Claude Eames of Elkhorn, Wis.,

who wrote

caught a fish with scales the size
of quarters but the current de-
valuation of the dollar reduced
them to the size of dimes and
that made the fish so small I had
to throw it back.

Another vast wave won honour-
able mention for Marcus Lerch of
Moline, Ill. His story:

“It got so hot down here last
summer that the ground got just
like concrete. In fact, the earth
was baked so hard that people
working in their gardens had to
give the weeds a shot of oil down
along the reots before they could
pull them.”

—LNS.



“Lffects Of Rain

CAPETOWN.
Houses are cracking in half on
Free State goldfields because

‘the
f: 200 ft. subsoil layer of clay and

lime is “breathing” after the rains
People living in the boom towns
of Odenaalsrus, Weldom, and St
Helena are tervified by the sponge-
like behaviour of the earth's
crust. Extensive damage has been
caused to mine and business pro-
perties and while experts experi-

ment with new foundations, bed-
rooms and bathrooms crack wide
open



SHOCKED LOVE

SOUTHAMPTON,

Courting touples in the village
of Durley, near Southampton, pro-
tested loudly when farmer Norman
Clark electrifled a fence sur-
rounding his herd of prize cattle.

The fence runs alongside the
local Lovers’ Lane, with its tradi-
tional kissing gate at each end, and
more than one idyll was broken by
unpleasant shocks

Two council surveyors investi-
gated and received shocks.
Clark was ordered to arrange safe-
guards, —(1I.N.S.) f

also

z Season's Greetings from
Bu. JASON JONES & CO. LTD.- Distributors

OF

= PURINA

CHOWS



els!

LINOLEUM

WwoOD FLOORS



AND FURNITURE

PD

HYGIENIC WAX

POLIS

FOR BRIGHT AND

ce]






HEALTHY HOMES

|
|
|

|

a negligent way that it collided
with a bicycle and damaged the
bus and the bieycle. On that
ground he wa claiming £ 25 |
damages

/

TOO

FABRICS











SIMPLY ADORABLE
NEW LOVELY

TAL

———————————_—_——_





.







rections. ie felt. somethin Ne rs B eaut y x Usher In The |
ne me he fe so! 2
touch his foot and he thought VW * EAR |
tie all ‘was over with hn, ot NE “LOMBIA” in lovely coloured Plaids and Plain Shades
it was only moss. Then, about | | d
5 o'clock when he was tired, and For ] he of Green, Blue, Beige. 36 in. wide at
the other fisherman had cramp, |
they saw two boats. They had to
do much yelling before they a. ob: |
Sites one e te otin ous! Ne Ww y Cd r > We have THE LATEST in: i
anybody o
aie “ate, ot aes Ve “LYSTAV” in Floral Designs. Also Plain Shades of
sh now and because of} sol ee a) ee rh |
tiet ewitn, together, his tone was} FOR YOUR MAKE-UP USE:— g eee eee Green, Beige, Cream, Pink, Grey, Maroon, Light 4
sad when he said that soon after, ARDENS CLEANSING CREAM é rae we
r CREA g CHILDREN’S SHOES ! fee ice Galt Ok sae |
a So Bi ja tp ot AGUS g Navy, Dark Navy, Black, Ete. 36 ins. wide .
; ” SKIN TONIC 8 With a wide choice in SANDALS and PUMPS . |
« 8 a |
59 ATTEND NEW CLINIC ) ANTI-WRINKLE CREAM x : oe ae , jase
Fifty-nine patients have already 4 i NOSHINE $ Also Beach Balls, Wolter Biags and Water Wing s
been attended to at the St. Michael | % ‘ HAND LOTION $ :
fas tt ee ant ts Gea, % SPECIAL EYE CREAM : | A great Variety of CLEANSERS and POLISHES San .
one of the Parochial Medical Off- | % ULTRA AMORETTA CREAM % | |
cers told the Advocate yesterday. | & ‘ BLUE GRASS & NIGHT & DAY BRILLIANTINE | r t
This, he said, keeps to the aver-/% RIMMEL NIGHT & DAY LIP-PENCIL | x 4
age of 200 patients per week at- | % LIPSTICK | |
tended to, formerly by both of the 1x ” aAIPSTIC % | ’
Bishouse and at their homes. |® S| i 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET |
almshouse and at their es 1% "NEQUITO . > fi84,, si % |
7 _ de Oe See z KNIGHTS Ltd.—Phoenix & City Pharmac les % i The British Bata Shoe Co, Ltd ae ’
on alterr i ek al * ~ \
ro t Ww ; hours each '_LCSSCO9S SS SSF 96S S59 SSO 09 G69 OOOO LO OOOOH MSD WU. = = ——— Se —=— - a rs













PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1951 ~
a |







oot a
— MORNING
MISERY fi
become all-day misery!
When headache, fatigue and upset
REGO stomach ruin your morning, you cen

THE WONDERFUL BRITISH | Take it on arising, again—if needed
DISCOVERY

—later in the day. Keep a supply of
A Supreme Germicide and Antiseptic



HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON










TM HUNTIN’
FOR LIONS -
AN’ TIGERS -
AN’ BEARS ! /|

quick acting Alka-Seltzer
handy — always!

Alka-Seltzer

=a
FF






























’
Season’s
daa ee BY WALT DISNEY * FOR PERSONAL HYGIENE Greetings
PS - Ce | gt LAD! ) ‘UNDERWATER CAVERN WHAT?) TFUSTHERMORE..-THE WHALE WADPENS eh beeeriise CUTS AND e
priewes? Yoao nee Bite Ne OY | SEAS’) eS BS + 10 STERILIZE CUTS
REAL 8 Aa ids Tus suamagne J Pa Whale > pee Y || pe SN” gn CAED | GRAZES Stuart & Sampson Ltd.
od eT OF TE NRW ATER Nand pms ee , \ Ges 20 - Extend to all the Com-
BB Oe ie STENSLED_) } ig (177 Y \ te S ye ‘| | &« TO DESTROY DISEASE GERMS plimeteite of the Besse
ms ie as | ; a ~ Cy 2 a
OS ee . ee WH SL AS &% SAFETY AND RELIEF FOR BITES ei a
\Le= ea? Se WZ | Cork | AND STINGS ant enna eee eee
| NM » PS (7 Ss r i i
gee. wr T\ ae = va This wonderful new “ Lifeguard” used in tens of STUART & SAMPSON
UNS ee (< UP» va thousands of homes is the most powerful protection LD
a ¢ £ ini you can use. At the same time it is quite safe for 5 |



all to handle and pleasantly fragrant and non-staining. |=
S No home with small children dare be without it.



USE
RAZOL

POMADE as your HAIR dress+
ing. It straightens tne hair, and
rids the scalp of dandruff. USE
RAZOL Pomade as directed, and

GN IN | 4.8. BRYDEN & SONS (Barbados) LTD.—agas —[re-omome memo




















a WHITEFISH WITH LEMON,
BLONDIE, WHAT BROWN POTATOES.

DID 1 HAVE .

_ ( pacwoon, |
— WAKE | |





iy WAS_IN
i
~

distressing your pocket.
Distributors :
THE BORNN BAY RUM CO.



THE OLD GALOOT HAS MORE

MARSHAL AND DAUGHTER
\ MONEY THAN BRAINS!

40D IMITATION 0;
© SOM WHO STRUCK }



PRIME AUST: BEEF
aa Steak - Roast - Stew
ae 4 DP waa Legs - Chops - Stew
CANADIAN SALMON
BACON: Sliced
HAM: Sliced
Apples 30¢ pe
$12.00 Per case
Grapes ve b. $1.08

i

a

yb














BY ev ovosimeR! YOU GOT A BUSINESS To SELL OUT? \) (mR. PECK. THE JEWELER, MAY HAVE THE
'M IN THE MARKET FOR ONE ! VERY THING YOU WANT!

CHOCOLATES
and
CONFECTIONERY

Boxes MELTIS FAVOURITE CANDIES $1.85 $1.02








és » NEWBERRY FRUITS ...... 1.67.96
” " COFFEE CHOCOLATE SENSES
o INO RON etree niéciaies 1.32
GLAMOUR SHOCOLATES . 90 BISCUITS |
aie ee Tins JACOB'S AFTERNOON TEA BISCUITS $1.45
Tins FRY'S CHOC: HAZEL NUTS (1-Ib) ......... 2.02 » °» CARNIVAL ASS: BISCUITS ...... 1.56
PASCALL FRUIT BARLEY SUGAR ........ 98 “ « ASSORTED CREAM BISCUITS 1.51



EORGE MC. MANUS

















_. GEORGE MC. MANUS. « _» CREAM CRACKERS ................ 1.52
CANNED FRUIT » ROMARY'S WATER BISCUITS ......... 1.06
a Tae PROM RALAD oe » CARR'S CELERY BISCUITS .................... 1,57
29 xu rT DOBENT WAKE A PEARS (23) 0 a8 2 ae Pkgs. JACOB'S CREAM CRACKERS ................ 41
beap TO te PERS AUAIB) sscssisessctvgsovidecesvvncesaonsnssinvesnes 37 OTN
_ME HERE? » PEACHES. ........ 59 87

ea APRICOTS orn 2 LIQUEURS & WINES

; Bottles COCKTAIL CHERRIES... 140.59 Bottles COINTREAU ......-ccsose $6.00 $3.60
» BOLS CREME DE MENTHE










CANNED MEATS » LIQUEUR BRANDY oo cccccccccce 12.00
% we BS . MARTINI VERMOUTH .................. 968
Tins SWIFT'S OX TONGUES 0.00... ae $8.20
» ae a «DRY FLY SHERRY | ccs 4.00
we MEI RID ses sesesctc crdsstvvnscesec 3.36 « GONZALEZ GOLDEN SHERRY ....... 4.00
, CORNED BEEF WITH CERSAL ......... 31 » BUCKFAST TONIC WINE... 2.58 1.45
ww MEAT PASTE oooocccccscccccsssccsssseons 23, .19
BAWE DE FOR ico bosch csc 20

BY ALEX RAYMOND

i THE OLD BOYS BUT.ER \ fF





PHONE HIM AND TELL
S I WISH TO SIGN THEM
~ THIS EVENING!
ASQ
>

bs

| E+] WANTS TO SPEAK TO YOu, je
~\ DEBORAH,.., SAYS IT'S = T
VERY IMPORTANT... ay.
{ yf
ay,

CUSTARDS & DESSERTS JUICES
my || /
Gay — Summer SQUASHES ee
The OTH FOOD oi
Tins SILVER LEAF PINEAPPLE JUICE ............ 39







//,









: ‘ » LETONA TOMATO JUICE 0. 84
Tins BIRD'S CUSTARD POWDER 0.0.0... 28

CHIVERS CUSTARD POWDER .......... .30 » TRINIDAD ORANGE JUICE ................. 33
om ‘4 7 a MANGE POWDER ....... 38 e » ORANGE & G. F. JUICE ...... 28
=) a oR ee peed LE iy AAO sess Nl shacesscciindy asi er i“ 3 RAPEFRUIT JUICE ......... 23
Pkgs, HARTLEY'S JELLY CRYSTALS ........... .20 Seles COR aug ‘ce i 5

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES CHIVERS JELLY-CREAMSG ......... sesso. 20 ae BR boesteesyesrbgict ‘
MONK & GLASS BLANC MANGE... 16 . ORANGE BARLEY WATER ................ $1.28
FULLY CRYSTALS o.c.cssssiectstssosslocecs 12 » ROSE'S LIME JUICE «uses 1.06






« FIFTY-SIX+ FIFTY -SEVEN+~ Sa | BQQTH. FT FIFTV-NINE*: 5 THE PROJECTOR, BUT IT. BE
FIFTV-EIGHT << a ee |x: é SITY? yee FIXED INA MOMENT =

| —= ||

THE PROJECTION + [OH= GOMETHING HAPPENED YO
=>}







. }
FAST I ONLY HAD TIME
ONE SHOT?

= (4 AF,







THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

PAGE SEVEN







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

sucar ration) §HIXPPING NOTICES





WANTED




















































| ‘
} ‘ BUDAPEST, Jan. 2. | == .
TELEPHONE 2508 HELP Hungary has again rationed} MQNTBEAL AUSTRALIA “NEW | <= | ou u j or es ore
fees So See care ty Soares Raat te it Se xe coe ara 1
DIED . _ 3 2 t ng was lifted! Ms, “TONGARIRO” - cup < Caran. enh Paneesasts te | eee sy :
PUBLIC SALES CANE WEIGHER — Past experience |in 1948, the first country in post-| ‘all Adelaide January ‘aan M@duled to ||] TPP Carte ee menmers fee Hi Ce t.e ,
HALLIDAY 29th Dec., at a London essentail and possibility of permanent Jan + Melbourne . . : >
Nursing. Home, FRANCIS WATSON employment to suitable. applicant. | W@F Europe to do so, but heavy | siyusry path. Brisbane January g7th,|j/ Sevis & St. Kitts, Sailing Frida | > ae YY
‘Aust Pan) Daughter of the Late 2. [———— Apply in writing to Lower Estate Ofice |€Xport to buy industrial machinery | nidad frst belt we Arriving at Tri | ah .
ee a eee Midow 0 AUCTION St. Michael 23 — Attention Mr. H. A./for drought storing for “anj| Mid. March, 1951. re eee TT v : . | wa
ana Jamaica ee 4 tsi in. ” ances | ESOS 31.516 eventual national emergency” nae versel has ample space for Hard | i eeent Fh sl aeeewes * | G la nN ds F or t 7 f 17é d
On Friday Sth at 2 + REDMAN| COMPETENT CHILDREN’s NURSE— |™ade rationing necessary again. Carae anne Cage. Hi} st. Lucia Vineent, Gr
REVERA—JOHN BERESFORD. Yerter-| & TAYLOR'S GARAGE. Church V1 Only experienced need apply. Fridman, —Reuter, |uscee wie wee ge tereuan Bills of | snd Aruba, Date of departur | b N D 35 overy
“a i ae poeldenee ee ‘Street. 1 CONTINENTAL PICK UP Siedaeat Le Chateau Blanc, Post Office Gap, for British Guiana, ubeten, Wen | ~The y ew ’ ¢ J
oe teieeh tae aa ae ne fre. R. Archer Mc Kenzie, Auctioneer. | Worthing. 4.1.51—In se “ ward and Leeward Island. — j | Do you feel old before your time? Are you tired,
Patrick’s R.C. Church, Jemmotts 2947. 3.1.51-8n Excelien Canadian Rates ror further particulars apply:— B.W.I, SCHOONER OWN- j run-down, worn out, and unable to keep up with the
Lane and thencey to the Westbury ~~ REALE ESTATE caine ee eee, ee FURNESS, WITHY a COMPANY, ERS ASSOCIATION. Inc speed and pleasures of modern life? Bo ou suiler
EST. — * LIMITED. " , . m joss of m » nervy: ss, weal y,, -
sae Friends ere asked to ‘ATE CLUB. 3.1.51—2n JANUARY 3, 1951 Trinidad, Te . pure biood? Are you worried? Do you suffer trom
i Roc! Phyli B.W.1. lephon : ear or have an inferiority complex? you enjoy Vigourous
Citomine (danatcer Orville IMMEDIATE SALE CANADA & DA amen & Co. Ltd . je: 4047 the sosteyy. of women or do beautiful women pess
Leo Revers (eens en GIS. ee Gracme Hall Terrace, Christi} PQGT & FOUND Cheques 2 Barbados, ~~ ~ | You, Py without @ second glance? If you suffer from
Lady Nelson), Mrs. Doris Revera, | — ~~ V. Taylor. 4.1,51—2n. 633/10% pr. Bankers 614/10% pr B.W.I, Agents. | tt glands, spd, unless: voir glands ste fortified and
Melawie # Revera, (daughters- | BUNGALOW — “New Bungalow™, | === | HOE 125% p | stimulated, you can not hope to regain youthful
- Kensington New Road. Containing two Sight aioe o vigour and animation.
> 1/10% pr
WILLIAMS—James, Age 93. His funeral | Bedrooms, Drawing and Dining rooms, LOST 632/10% pr. Cable ° Vitalize Your Glands
will leave his late residence Black ton aace’ toilet and bath etc. For par. 61 8/10% pr. Currency 599/10 pr Fortunately for those who suffer from run-down
Rock for St. Stephen's Church at 4.30 2506 ‘Ss apply to F. A. Marshall. Phone Coupons 592/10" pr land action, a physician with 30 years’ experience
o'clock this afternoon. Friends are J 4.1,51.—6n. ‘ Silver nas perfected a simple, safe, and positive preserip-
asked to attend, FILM—A Reel of 16 millimetre film of Zi tion to stimulate gland activity and thus beng
Are iar i eamann | SoRanae Sean, | Sig Sti he ates eee our ect en Vise ann
Rusisee, e, me Ow New substantial wall! rive show at the British Council LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE WARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM tablet form. All you need to do |
eal Welches Road, St. Michael, house con-| Finder rewarded. 3.1.54-2n. two little tablets three times

The application of ANELLE TAYLOR This prescription starts work

IN MEMORIAM Tas



7 open verandah, drawing, dining;

































let Complete with platform licensed to





of Chancery Lane, St. Michael for per-





4 Steamer saiis 4th January—arrives Barbados 17th January.














‘ THE CENTRAL EMpPoRTUM

ee
1 Ebenezer, h pern 01 as » immedi stimulating the glan in-
IN loving memory of our Beloved hae Seti SA Seg water, ents he ee ee $ sell Sens itcle timc sagen = Vessel From Leaves yeas vigourating tio blood, and enlivening your
Mother and Grand = Mother Mrs. | cupboards, WC & Bath, spetvente veaey return to the Advocate Advtg Dept |oard and shingle shop with shedroof | 5-S. “LAURENTIAN M/brough and saan strong er, Fou 8 will feel and eco yourself bes | fect Pett So MIEG, eresnee Se Bee
SOSEE EE ASHLEY who fell asleep | garage, entirely wall encl . Immedi-| Reward offered. attached at Ebenezer Village, St. Philip FOREST” oe ; Tiemeion aed’ — 1 oe 4 neta aabenhea, aaa not | and to build new blood and vigour, there is
Leng Seek. N6ikb ulate ‘ahs bleaches 2” gen Possession, "Dial ait 3.1.51—mn | Dated this, tnd day of January, 1951. $$. “MULBERRY HILL” || London Oth Jan. Seth Jan | only, abto to Regp up ‘with our War Ot ie ea ee arena within
pain : er McKensie, Victoria Street. | “Tea cine Ko ~| Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist, “C" SS. “PLANTER” .. .. London 3th Jan. “27th Je more frequently than ever betcse. © | 24 hours ‘and that they feel ten
She waited for cure but all in vain nh aah sta tween ton cee aistn sien Sed. ANELLE TAYLOR S.S “FACTOR” Glasgow and saa a = : eyes hate be oo valteted co aiae
Until God himself knew what was FOR SALE OR RENT Reward. Armstrong, Da Costa & Co. ts ; Applicant: : Liverpool 20th J Rist J Doctor Praises Vi-Tabs in Thousands of cesee, some ot which hed
est. RESIDENCE 4 al N.B.—This application will be ¢ i-|1S.S. “TRI rs 1 Jan 3ist Jan. ~ almos'
So he took her home with him to] Buiidi in Hi Sacoe ae Wome a dered at a Licensing Court to be held |" ” BESMAN M/brough and | nysicia eereatis ctaety Chane oie well ‘aud vigorous ‘again. = 7
rest.” . Stone nt very wees ao i ‘are GOLD BROOCH with a_ safety catch | at Police Court, District “C" on Mon- SS. “PROS ee London 27th Jan. 10th Fet lists are ot the opinion that the true secret ’
gk Saiaren. i Gronds and 2 oe a D. Williams, Baxters Road, om pee aut 54. Finder reture Say Se ty day of January 1951 at 11/ 9%. SPECTOR London 27th Jan. 16th Feb lands, fae Sucla heen our wands ti be] Results Guaranteed ~
. 1,51—1n, ni, 3.1.51—6n s. W. Daniel, Ban, a a ae os ~ | Honing, properly, we would feel and loo!
es ee Reward offered. 4.1,51—In. G. B. GRIFFITII , . outstanding hag een the ot
FOR SALE Ag. Police Maxistrate, ‘Dist, “C" HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM tn and pears of experisoes, in study ana | Vicrere. im thousands ang theessads of
4.1.$1—1n
: practice, Jt 1s my opinion that the medi-| ofered wu a ive tee to
F ia known as bree 2
AUTOMOTIVE PUBLIC NOTICES | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE —— ss. “speciaitsr — Closes in. Barbados Vi-vebs represents the | Qorung, unless Sntirely papiafactory. Une
CAR. & 17 ARNE DUS Ee in eas The application of VERNON MASON ; as London 8th Jan most modern and scien-| chemist today. Put it to the test and see
Brice Shee, Bemsunke holder of Liquor License No, 390 of 1951 Parish Of Christ Church tifle internal method of | for you: w new blood ti t h
See ey ‘ THE ALLEYNE SCHOOL granted to Wilmer Yarde in respect of a For further information apply to-.- stimulating and invik- | your veins, how ~~ T on S pew
erin abe ein = ° 4.1.51-—3n, The Examination for a vacant Founda | »oard and shingle shop with shedroof 4 ourating the glands, and kle, your Stoo a spring, and
CAR 1 ae : tion Scholarship (available from Janu | 2t Ivy, St. Michael for permission to _ she, roe - — you y can enjoy life as frequently
tn ‘pete t : ps iP. 6 Cyl, Vauxhall | ary 195") will be held on Friday, Jam | USe said Liquor License at said premi- DA COSTA & co LTD —A ts alit, to the body." rr oes in Ry Ay RS
and battery Mune order. Good tyres} ary 12th at 9 a.m. Por all particular: | 5% at Ivy, St, Michael. “ . gen | , y . pri we. tase 8 or n op erm
“te pion te pply to T. S. Birkett, | contact the Headmaster, Dated this 3rd day of January 1951, NOTICE TO DAIRY 24-Hour Results the empty pack: ‘Pail purchase
e ad, St. “Michael. $.1,51—8n | Te:—E. A. MeLEOD, Esq. vit Because Vi-Tebs are | price will’ He refunded, Get Vi-Tabs from
iu a 4.1.51—4n ale Sth Seghualh y tek Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”, i Nae SY scientifically Seslgnee que chemist today. The guarantee pro-
i a rh % vo sie. Small Mileage. THE PA NOTICE ANDREW mene ae esp a KEEPERS Etc o & eee ee =o f To Restore” ww
Standard Ten Reasonable prices Dial— RIS} * . N.B.—This application will be consi- ° ” Vi T b
$1800.) sted an Candidates for the Vespa or be | ar euee “ease nae Court, to Tbe held VieLabs ¢ Guaranteed J manhood. Vitality
— - y oO »} at Police Court, District "A" on Mon- IG -regis-
mat cacao 10. H.P, 1947 very nee 2 peer seas my intentions] day the 15th day of January 1951 at mee at cee a i Ine. SS SSS SSS SATE SSS
very good condition Poca Peaheot sen the Almshouse "oh Madea te tance tf One ney aucved os a peodation of Miix NEW YORK SERVICE
vo . ‘ i ’ ’ BE. A. McLEOD, iin] s \ s T ALL
arg ak yt: wis New Batteny. | 1951, beginning between the hours of 8 Police Magistrate, Dist. “A” tor sale, and persons producing 3/8 Syed wie ne pe Soper aarteee Bethados 13th December. | eee Se ere ae ee
Sedan 1938. Bareain en vie te 208 PBR, io Verne at 4/p.m. for the 41.51—1n. T surplus milk for sale: uuaec| ———————————— ae ree TSO) ; for your splendid support during the year.
1935. Very good Condition. FORT ROYAL Signed W. W. W Dairies Regulations, 1948, mauve NEW ORLEANS SERVICE : r {
GARAGE Ltd. Telephone 4504 Bherlft and tces eee: . NS") S/S Basi salled 28rd N WE WISH YOU
* ind Presiding Officer, LI UOR LICENSE NOTICE by the General Board of Healt: | 4's; lovember—arrives Barbados 7th December.
‘ teamer .
ee eee eh Stren. Doted Jan, 2nd, 1961,” Q under Dairies Act 1941 (1941-17) | "A Steomer sails 31st Deoseabon ne year pades 21st December, | A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TRUCK — One 4.wheel drive Chevro- re eo The application of SAMUEL THOMAS] will take place DAILY at the wed }




































































































































































’ Office, Oistu. ~
May 1951 (8 tons) A 1 order, Ideal { NOTICE niission to sell Spirits, Malt Li | Sanitary Inspectors’ Office, CANADIAN § |
carting cane from fiela. $4,000, “Abby Attention is drawn to all owners of | &¢., at ground ‘enor of “EL Paso” Club, Christ Church; from TUESDAY COUTHBOUND pu ae i (CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)
A. S. Atwell, Fortescue Pr. St. Philip. | 408s that they should be licensed during | Nelson Street, St. Michael, January 2nd, 1951, between the ) Corner of Broad & Tudor Streets.
4.1.51—3n. ony the to teen in accordance | | Dated this 2nd day of January 1951.) hours of 9.00 a.m. and 3.00 p.m., Name of Ship Sails Sails Arrives |}
‘Als, all Cexee duet ees ii ae Dist. “AN except on Saturdays; when Regis-|.. . Montreal Halifax Barbados = |!
ELECTRICAL i » a ‘axes due to this Parish Police Magistrate, “Dist. “A’ trati ete. will take place be-! sa’ « ‘OA PENNANT” : i - 29th Deer ath Jany
GIBSON FRIDGE (American) a ar thes ans Paste ares xen ae rene winger t : nth he rs of 9 00 a m, and £6, Ok PILARE" : vie 26th Jany Sth Febry
‘ F = y Wi e collected through the for Applicant. ween the hours 0: . -m. — ?
Sane $e ae Steen Seer reete. Gree | Cour, ih coaaell Karn, wpecieemen, wil De cenit: 19.00 noon, a
Ralp' an * . & PRASER, dered at a Licensing Court to te held . ; Arrives
Geet pr Beard, Hardwood o a Parochial Treasurer, at Police Court, District “A" on Friday ee eee aon Barbados JEFFREY’S COMPETITION
. er u St. John. the 12th day of January, 1951, at 11] 0) . :
icekeie? be 3.1.51—3n | o'clock a.m. ** “Alcoa Polaris” Arrives Barbados 13th December. Sails f£
Radio it “yole workioe eae eee ¥ H. A. TALMA, | ($gd), CHAS S, MacKENZIE, St Jonn, "NB. and Halifax, N.S.
information Dial 4306. ms order. For Ne Police Magistrate, Dist. “A” , Chairman Them vesseia have Mmited passenger accommodation. e
4.1.51—-1n. : —
4.1.51—2n.| I hereby notify my Friends, Custo- 17.12.50—6n S.W. RO
mers and the Public in general that fh BERT THOM LTD.—Now York and Gulf Service. We ie winaebat that the d
my place of business will be closed Apply: DA COSTA & OO., LTD.—Canadian Service. ; Dd ed to announce at the drawing of the num-
Good, and aed Foi | Wainy Ain se eh Ot GOVE NT NOTICES "a ae a “g||| bizce on Thursday, 26tn December, 1980, the complete lista
e 3 4 igh St. RNME place on ursda cem i
bes ee poe Ee wiatande &. alae WERE’S HOPING 1% oR S Al E which is as fallawes e r, 1950, the complete list of
a Dresting Tables Ba Mahogans Tenders for Cane Crops, Pine Plantation, 1951 chad 1951 F we 4 No, 5456 Col.a Marshall, Dayrells Road, Christ Church
: A . No. 10894 Norr!s Brathwaite, Martindales Road, St. Michael
Chairs $18 pair. Birch $16. Also lots of PARISH OF 8T. LUCY i i in Gives the opportunity of , ad, o
other Furniture, in excellent condition Fifteen persons naving been momina- OFFERS are invited for the purchase of cane be ranged. ~4 an Getting ali issues settled for PROPERTY situated at No. 8979 Angus Griffith, Lightsfoot Lane, St. Michael
at RALPH BEARD'S Showrooms, Hard-| '€¢ as Candidates for the Vestry of st.| 1951 from 119 acres of Government land at the Pine Plantation, ‘ ; a a ae Hp # achaist No, 11328 Horace Hinds, Oxley Street, Nr. Wellington
wood Alley. Phone 4683 Lucy. I hereby declare my intention ‘ ‘ * ; ; be i G iving our Customer j Prespect, St. James, consis 4 ” '
S * 94.12.50—6n | to take a poll at the Vestry Room near Michael. It is estimated that the yield from this acreage should be in An even better % ing of Open Verandan, ‘ Street, St. Michael
thi osn — | she Rarish Chureh on Monday January | the vicinity of 3,500 tons cane. § ervice than 1950 | Drawing and Dining Rooms, No. #945 Conrad Best, Bank Hall, St. Michael
MECHANICAL B and $ Stlock ie’ the nr tine tk 2. Tenders should be submitted to the Director of Agriculture, aivi:. aioe 7 Wane two Bedrooms, Toilet and ord Hazel Nelson, Fitz Village, St James
BICYCLE—1 Boy's Bicycle, second] closing at 4 p.m. for the election ot] P.O. Box 505, not later than Monday, 15th January, 1951. and should Ch; A, Sabie Bath and Electricity, Apply & _ Lavernie Forde, Dayrells Road, St. Michael
mend tn, pot aandies. Alo, young ten Vestrymen. state terms aud conditions of pfice. delivery, etc : Y on premises or to ERIC No. 7418 J H. Waterman, Bank Hall X Road, St. Michael
bury Road. Dial 3232. 3.1.51—3n G. ONE 7 4 7 4.1.51 on ee! AMORY, Treasury or ‘Phone me oan aaa ee, See Road, St Michael
; : ee ae : 306: ave p rmo: urse, Westbury Road, St. Michael
4.1.51—An. —- LOOPS DOCG OPO GOOG SOGS (Retarevg) » Bb.
MISCELLANEOUS TICE 3 % % 4.1.51.3n, Now 5326 Dorothy Stanton, Nurse’s Land, Tweedside Road,
Fibre just received. ‘This Fibre is clean, piamee 8T. PHILIP HOUSEC CENTRE, BAY STREET. $ CIR L AR Feoccossoseceosooenses~"” No, 7486 adel nents Si Hill,
soft Ane. ere ae 14 cents per I hereby. give Notice that as 12 Can- The following programme of Day and Evening classes will opea x PROROPPOOOPP PSP IOV OS ‘ No. 12084 CA Mustor Sihens hota
pound, 4222. G. W. Hutchinson & | didates have been nominated as ft and] at the Housecraft Centre, Bay Street, from Monday, 15th January to |X * ) arn. co , ,
Co., Ltd. 15.12.50—t.f.x. | proper persons to represent the Vestry , , $ . % e s NOTICE » No. 6017 M. Lewis, Tudor St., City.
for the Parish of St. Philip for the year| Thursday 22nd March, 1951, & 4 : & No. 10387 Lilewlyn Fitzpatrick, King Willi St, 8
; wired % ‘ , : rder to obtain resi ¥ . ’ am St. t,
eine ae ~ Rr tree ee ae sed ne only Ee Spr Monday F % Voters for the Vestry of g ace rate and physica: % N Michael,
now. We supply 1 peiate Glass for Church Boys’ School next Monday the 10.00 p.m.—12.00 noon Cake and pastry making. » St. Michael R strain I have decided to No, 3797 K. Austin, Westbury Rd., St. Michael,
ays es ae a elke extra lerke_penge ® B Sanuiary, et hetween the hours of Simple Dress Cutting and Sewing. Ns % resign from my professiona . hd a ne. Chapel Lane, City,
Hutchinson & Co. Ltd. —19.12.50—t.f.n THOMAS A. CATLIN, 2.00 p.m.— 4.00 p.m. Simple Dressmaking. Vote For % activities indefinitely, Any 9 No. 5493 Harold esdnae” Aootieal Fat tien
LADIES! Embroidered Anglaise’ in a 4.30 p.m.— 6.30 p.m. Tasty dishes and table laying. y one oe ee i) nec ate S]]| No. 5750 Arthur Parris, Welehman. Hall, St. Thomas
beautiful designs and colours just open- wae x i) x criptions which mig De a foe 5 ° e .
ed again for you. Yes! It’s at THANI'S NOTICE Rug-making. ° Ud holding, may call for then s No. 5408 ae C, L. Carter, ‘Linden’, Watts Village, St.
Pr. Wm. Henry St, Dial $496 and Swan Tosi ad pei eo Sond t 3 % any day between 8 and 9 ‘ No. 3914 Merinin Pagna Nurse's Land, Tweedsid
tee mi AT a meeting of the electors of the . a.m.—12. noon Cockta nacks. on Monday next, 6 a.m. % a.m..except Thursdays. No, of , irse's nd, Tweedside Rd.,
LADIES SPORT COATS — In assort-| Parish of St. Thomas held in. the St. Elementary Dressmaking. % to 5 p.m. at Parochial bh. CLARKE, St. Michael,
ed sizes and shades, special for the cool| Temas Boys’ School on 2nd Jan. 1951 2.00 4.00 Assorted dishes x ae . : 7 . Druggist No. 6447 M. Lewis, Tudor St., City.
weather $28.50. Modern Dress Shoppe] 0Mly 10 members were nominated, I : p.m.-— 4. p.m, ssorte shes, % Buildings. Bast No. 4437 Neville Griffith, N Ort
(Broad Street). 4.1.51—4n, | therefore declare the following duly 4.30 p.m.— 6.30 p.m. Cake and Pastry Making. 1% Th » New Orleans, St. Michael,
Site baliay tes ae elected Vestrymen for the Parish of aia Sen Theadtin & Fearless he above are requested to come to our Office, Broad St.
Mule, part and harness in working St, Thomas foe whe veer 1951, Advanced pattern Drafting. % a SS LA SEOOCSS + bringing their tickets a few minutes before 1,00 o'clock on
order. | Dia . Sherbi b i ve, d s arti i OS . wary :
Hil, 'St, Michael. oe 9.1.50—4n Gil. Lushingtons tascan® aa 12.00 noon Girls’ First Cookery Course % cma one bl | Sommething ta ere ices te ee eee fe wee rrr N.
NE wo . ‘m.—12. § a Be. ‘ Serviceable ‘ B e t » PETITION,
PERMANENT needles for your record| (jovding,, Utilian Theadore Home Nursing. R 4.151.411 T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
player, and needles of all kinds. Price] ann Vilian Aubrey Ao ac i : S. P. MUSSON
Rot Records of at Kinds too,” A.} Beene Distant aetth, 2.00 p.m.— 4.00 p.m. Preserves and sweet making. ¥ . . SON & CO. LTD.
ARNES Ke. , 12.0—tf.n. | phorne, John Henry Clifford ‘octet Advanced Dressmaking. TABLE TENNIS. SETS IT]
SAFE—One Lorde Fire-Proot Safe in as al ee anes 4.30 p.m.— 6.30 p.m. Caribbean Cookery. ‘i iy] Agents.
> condition. i si uteon, : . i inn A
i'eet wide by rb face ~high Apps | Qu elected Venirymen for the Parish] ay Sir nba arinetmnceni :
. S, Nicholls & Co,, Telephone No.3925. 4 s ¥ . ursday JOUNSON'S STATIONERY . | pO Oe OE PL Pe phe aatate seat sae
3.1,50—t.f.n. B. H. te 10,00 a.m.—12.00 noon Advanced Cookery and table laying . ; ee ——— CON DN DNDN IN ON NON ON IN GN ON DNDN ON OOM SHON ON CK OG is
pAEGETABLE GARDEN EQUIPMENT. 4.1.51—2n. 2.00 p.m.— 4.00 p.m. Cake and Pastry Making. vhoOwe oe ge ian & ¢
‘an mill, pump an anks. Also gal- icr: : ey G R E E ] I N a4
Condition Dist anes Gherbourns, “os ‘iain TICE 4.30 p.m.— 6.30 p.m Se pr nig | AT & -
dition. . . F ST. JOSEPH. : m.— 6. mM. , | : Psy
Mile Hill, St. Michael. 30.12.50—4n. aan Tehy, ive Metlee that as 12 Candi: Simple Handicrafts. j JOHNSON’S HARDWARE bo
a nomina’ as an ‘ “ ‘ NS a
FeR RENT proper ‘persons jo, represent the Vestry Friday & R and 3
mes ‘or ‘ar’ of St. Joseph for the year ‘ .m.—12. 4 oo = ee
HOUSES 1961, ate MS tabs Mae ave Soauired ty 10.00 a.m.—12.00 noon Simple Handicrafts §PPOVODDIO9OP9OOSOVVOO. 5 & BEST WISHES Pid
A STONE BUILDING-id0 st x 40.| l2¥ T will hold 2 Poli at the Vestry 2.00 p.m.— 4.00 p.m. Butlering. ATICTION CATE | . E is SHE: S
Suitable for a Warehouse. Situated in oom over the Dispensary nex onday, han’ ! iv a
uae Bast oaks Ap, Dror ee O.| the ath day of January 1961, between 4.30 p.m.— 6.30 p.m. Salads and Deserts. | E | ‘ Y » :
Alleyne, Dial 3072. 29.12.50—6n, | the hours of 8 + and 4 p.m. Simple Dressmaking. WEDNFSMAv J ort t ar Vv ear For bo
oe S. A. DURANT, J.P. Registration for all classes must be made in persen, and will take 11.30 » E
CANAAN, Bathsheba—Fully furnished. Sheriff ss . . ® Furniture and Household effect rx) a
From January 15th, Feb. March, and 4.1.51—3n, | Place at the Housecraft Centre, between 10.00 a.m. and 12 noon, and | §! = } ? A HAPPY
July. “Apply Mrs, A. Alleyne Gibbons. between 2.00 p.m. and 5.00 p.m. from Wednesday 10th January to » T ;
Phone 2617, 3.1,51—3n Z ‘ nar eee ate f “ mS) »
cans nC ce Friday 12th January, 1951. inclusive. | BLACKMAN’S * & And bi
se ech nae meta aa eee a hereby give Notice that as 13 Can- Fees must be paid in advance for the term, at the time of regis- |) St. Joseph At x I s
Family — Furnished or Unfurnished. Ona ekue ce get ine veuty tering. | WE are favoured with jase % PROSPEROUS ¥
for: particulars Dial 4789. 4.1.81—1; | 228 the Pariah ot St, James for’ the 5/- for each course in Sewing, Pattern Drafting, Home Nursing, Hous srom the, onnens. to sit By M Savi Prices - bid
eae an Sa onby ten are reaulved | Rug Making and Handicrafts. |B} and Eftects, oney - saving Ss a N NEW YEAR S
2 maines’ OS: Bedeey orARB'y | Room’ neat the Pariah church’ “ext! 10/-for each course in Girls’ First Cookery Course. IB axOfteszaimaz, aise, be, submitted, Vlas teed talkee o
Office. 7h Sob BTaoA, | eae Gut gee ge, SO NUREY, Ls 12/6d for each course in Cake and Pastry, Cake Icing, Assorted |B) for ‘the entire freehold provert. % up Chests-of-Drawers, Bed | Mi TO OUR CUSTOMERS, 8
PERSONAL GEORGE EGERTON TAYLOR, | and Tasty Dishes, Caribbean Cookery, Salads and Deserts, Butlering, BG eae Ngaeity woudl Se ek eet eink aeidee.. ee & G
Fe SRA we hea fi a1ni a | Advanced Cookery, Preserves and Sweets making, and Cocktail ed grounds pas Oehs Damn ae eR » & FRIENDS AND THE
e public are hereby warned against | _ = “| Snacks I » Dining Table Dinine iD. Go-Car 7 » 4 * -
giving credit to my wife DORIS EILEEN ie _ | _ Larse ning Tables i ‘
BAYLEY (nee Mayers) as I do not hold NOTICE 2/- will be refunded at the end of the term to all students who Chairs SEO ciasy iat ine DRAWING ROOM Suites andy, | ei GENERAL PUBLIC! &
myself responsible for her or anyone PARISH OF ST. ANDREW ; . . ‘ ‘abinets Linen separate pieces in orris, u a SEINE 4 ‘ a .
else contracting any debt or Sabie is uripplications wil be Teceived by, the aoeuuiaae s eee Cee ye airy, Talley “Hat Kush and other Kinds — Couches. ), iz a
miy name unless by a written order ersigned up ursday, Jan. . ic maa A hr Mahogany) erbice yergere Chairs
vigned We fgirt) enable ae tne ey Se Ue | 80th December, 1950. Beck: cmennirs, and Rocket ape ; penersiate &
Sed. KENNETH R. BAILEY, tgirl) tenable at the Alleyne School. ’ c be Settee Eas} TABLES tor Dinner, Luneh, ¢ t
Be ccors aan Straitened SGarakenoe wei 3.1.51,—4n, ees aint Side Table. Up Kitchen, Sewing, Radio fe Fanes 2 . i&
2 . ¥ : ‘hi - rine chen e r.
RuSieen, between the age of 11 and 12 years. holstered ay sane. ieee Med bedroom Cabinet And Many %j BARBADOS HARDWARE C0. LTD. thi
yt ee ae a ea ES Bearing aettrass Painted Other Things * i%
The public are hereby warned against | ?* licants mus: POLICE NOTIC . : ture, Simmonds Spring for ss
giving credit to my wife, LUELLA | Present themselves to the headmaster v7) “a Furniture ts " Tray > ty
AGUSTUS BROWN (nee Waldron) as I/ #1ine Alleyne School to be examined on Single sulen, Book Racks, Gramo % (THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS) ok
oo done else conteetine any acct cr|: | | MMNDG G.. A, SKINNER, RENEWAL OF PETROLEUM LICENCES phone and Record Cabines, Good +>) & i
é . - Vestry Clerk, ‘ assortment o ecards (Classi : e e 4 a ae , t
debts in my name unless by a written St. Andrew. Persons licensed to sell, store and keep Volatile Petroleum are a ee a hecled ere cade tices ca & No. 16 Swan Street tt Phone 2109, 4406 & 3534.
Sed. EDWARD me. hereby reminded that under paragraphs 5 and 7 of the Regulation: a "Chairs, (as new) Piatad ¥ , ; SENS NSNS ISN IS NI 0
> : i y . , 7 poire glass Can ~ ‘ ‘et
Ch, Ch NOTICE made under the Petroleum Act, 1882—2, licences are renewable b) Candelab a ee coe, are POPOL ALO te FUNG RONG iw Oe poe aoe as
ae, 4 eC TON Fon sun, Vemmey oF ne) the 16th: Januaty, 1991: HB) fines nandeut Barrel Shade, Lamp SOs tp ee MCI . SPLPEVELLV EEE VELEBELELOVVPPLELKPELPLEPSCOCOSSES
e a s fable Lamps Stange
The public are hereby warned against| NINTEEN persens having been nomi- (Sgd.) R. T, MICHELIN, | ey 1 Eumnboo, Pletures, Paint
giving credit to any person or persons} ated for the Vestry of the parish of Commissioner of Police. | ings, and Engraving Pr
whomsoever in my name as I do not} St. Michael, a Poll for the election of s | Service (38 pieces), Wine, Liqueur
hold myself responsible for anyone con- | Sixteen will be taken at the Parochial | Police Headquarters, and Champagne Glasses, Glass
tracting any debt or debts in my name | Puildings, Cumberland Street, Bridge- Bridgetown, Barbados, Secansers Canteen Deseert
unless by a written order signed by me.| town, on Monday next the 8th. instant r | Knives and Forks, Antique China
DEIGHTON WEEPKES, beginning between the hours of 8 and Dated 3rd January, 1951. Ornaments, large Mason stone
Beckles Road, § o'clock in the morning and closing at 4.1.61.--8n ware, Cider General Elec |
St. Michael. | 4 D.m. | trie refrigerator | 2
2.1.5°—2n . The following yey tee STATIONS box Electric 10-7 |
—_—_— — —_ ave been provi under the provis- i Lad Roadste
The public are hereby warned against | ions of the Ballot Act, 191:— IMPORTA NT Bete act ‘ : .

R ving credit to any person or persons
whomsoever in my name as I do not
hold myself re-ponsible for anyone con.
tracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me

Signed KENNETH McCLEAN.









Spa Hill,
St. Joseph

3,1.51—2n
The public are hereby warned against
siving credit to my wife, EDNA SMALL
ine Marshall) as I do not hold mwyseif
> for er anyone else con.
t debt or debts in my name
a written order signed by me

Signed APN .D SMALL

Dur





riliz
$1—~2r

Ne. 1 POLIANG STATION:

The first floor of the Parochial Build-
ings i; allotted to Voters whose sur.
nemes begin with the letters “A" to
“1” (both inclusive) and the entrance
thereto will be by way of the door of
the Churchwarden's Office
No. 2 POLLING STATION:

The ground floor of the Parochial
Buildings is allotted to Voters whose
surmpames begin with the letters “J" to
“Z" (both inclusive: and the entrance
thereto will through the Gateway
situate at Southern End of
building.

be
the

R. MAURICE CAVE
Sheriff and Returning Officer
3.1.51-—-6n

|

the}

RENEWAL OF FIREARM LICENCES

Owners of Firearms are hereby remindied that under Section 5
of the Firearms Act, 1896—4, licenses are renewable by the 1

January, 1951.

{

All expiring licenses must be produced at the time of renewal
for cancellation by the Police.

Police Headquarters,

Bridgetown, Barbados,

Dated 3rd Jar

iuary,

(Sgd.) R. T. MICHELIN,
Commissioner of Polic«

1951

|
5th
|

|



Sto



Radio, Burner
New) Hommock
room Frrniture

Lengths Coconut Matting
mometer® Electric Razo

Bath
Telephone Stoo

lron Safe



Ther

Old



Map Barbados, Electric
Lavatory Cistern Tank

Cate and a Large
of

tery
4 ment



Cos on 9 tH f

AUCTIONEER
John M. Biadon

Phone 4640, I



‘Five-Star

%
-
$
Â¥.
e
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CHARLES MeENEARNEY & 00. ifD.

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69OFO99S00O50650605665:





{ PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1951

_—————































MCC § core D903 For $ | ; OFF TO HUNT Ships In Touch With Neecanacemaaenannsndeed
| ae . # mahedon Coast Station INTERCOLONIAL } ST. STEPHEN’S CHURCH
me : oh *, * m E A ease
i) A) â„¢ eee et a ' : WIRELESS (West Indies) 1 x sese
P ee that they ca now commu- ae Y
In Draw n ame | Foe ca 1 the following. ships through CRICKET x RECITAL
their rbados Coast Station: — of
S5. Ageroen, S.S. Mormacland, 8.8. | ‘
Simpson Bats Brilliantly | [Se Aeede: 68 eee Se XMAS MUSIC
Gascogne, S.S. Kratos, S.S. Seabreeze se .
SYDNEY, January 3. | [SS Phizabeth A Flanigan, SS. Wiltred. BARBADOS Sunday, January 7th,
; THE MATCH between the M.C.C. and New South | [$5. Carimare, BS. tne Butele, 5.5: vs. 4.30 p.m.
/“Wales ended here to-day in a draw with the State side ta, SS. Mormae Port. 8.8 Castile TRINIDAD _ Rg
{. Still 90 runs in arrears with only 4 second innings wickets (ee Sr ae nenenbee AE At Visiting Soloists :
__ standing a John, 88, John Osiris, BS: KENSINGTON OVAL CEDRIC PHILLIPS
. Fredcie > ac} | Brittany, S.S, Specialist, 8.8. Mormacsea, c .
sedcic Brown decturcd ine jas. Samana, SS. Dolores, SS, Chung: 3533 HAROLD STRAKER
M,.C.C. first innings c.osed at | #, S.S. Neritopsis, S.S. S. Virgilio, S.S
553 for 8 wickets, the highes } Eliceo SS. Neuve Andalucia, SS. FIRST MATCH ¢ BORO GOSS
* & | * - PPPLPCSOOOSS oS
total for the tour, thanks to | skoop, 5.8 Laternaster, $5 Preece February 15, 16, 17, .
comma double century by Reg ine "i racheua, rr Teieusy ‘Amaterdarn, 19 & 20
Simpson i Sundial, 3.S. Rufina, SS, Sheridan, >
New South Wales then lost S Atlantic Princess, SS. Cottica, SS. SECOND MATCH
} wickets for 31 but a sixth w icket | S. Silverstre, S.S. Broad, §.S, Graslin, February 22, 23, 24,
| stand of 90 by B ke (40) not rt et Say oan Se 2 ~- 26 & 27
} out) — Moroney (51 not ov ; 38 Byford, 38 Thelma Iv, 88. Plans of seating accom-
| Tes ei ‘ulded arucaibo, an ana. *
* Simpem: suka 259 includin; cr modation will be opened

Harrison's Offi
NV TGAINST BCL. |i Monday, January 19th to

“members of the Associa~





at the wicket. His score y tbe
| highest individual innings ‘
|M.C.C., player in Australia since



|
23 fours in just under 9 hours |









eae ahi: , 4 | J, WILLIAMS of Harrison Col- tion who may also pur-
With Parkhouse who was out \ ee ; ay lecuut the Bee : play a chase t wo additional

® short of his century he put on ; : ’ Oval. ; et season tickets. The plans

| 228. for the fouth —s F ‘ Fee it % : ei). Be opened to the
Tre > row took i n i aE Qe Raa pie , i

eae oe Rr ies eich pean ON BOXING DAY, BANK HOLIDAY—the day after Christmas, hounay meet im v.aages & p if ; General Public on Mon-

Warr 2 for 25 in the State’s sice England. This typical hunt scene was taken in Worcestershire at a meet of the Crocombe Hunt BARBADOS TURF CLUB day, January 22nd for

second innings. as the pack moved off among a herd of cattle. Repres, the sale of SEASON

SCOREBOARD raining pps “
NEW SOUTH WALES—Ist Innings 333 TICKETS.



ist INNINGS

amber Jonni... Fastest Man \{kin Hits 1 ‘As India| NOTICE prices of sitbabnaiets




Hutt«
Washb





























| Sheppard ¢. Moroney b. Lindwall 2 ND
REG _SEMPSON eae eee Sune me | On Earth — ie Tata a tet
| Parknouse b. Madden 92 | :
ene gar tan. | Draws 3rd “Test Sieiiee Soins
ictoriis eat es Johnston a1 | LONDON TENDERS are invited for KENSINGTON STAND
righ no’ ow ’ ane 4 : 2 : " be
Txtras 13 b.. 6 1b, 3.n.b,) 22 John Cobb, fastest man on CALCUTTA, Jan. 3. aieier Rabroainas Pays ay $1.00 per day ox $8.00
S Australia | fetal ‘for & wickets declared) ssa }¢@tth with his 394.19 m.p.h. auto at the Garrison Svaceien Season Ticket
© ol a wg ._. [record established in Utah ir Ri iiacrsialas a . : eee anns 3 S
MELBOURNE, Jan. 3, |,.P%,0(, wickets: 1 for 8, 2 for 17, 311947, is planning a try to regainy CENTURIES by John Ikin and Bruce Dooland helped Race Days during i951, UNCOVERED petal :
Victoria beat South’ Australia | (7.2 Zi‘, et, tty § for 481, © for 4% Ithe world water speed record for} the Commonwealth to make a grand recovery and force edule: taste ibe dadioaien 480, Ber Gey pr SAE Brle
by nine wickets in the Sheffield BOWLING ANALYSIS Britain. a draw with india in the third “Test” here today. ed in sealed envelopes mark- afier ‘Tes
Shield match here to-day abies o. M R. w C obb, at 51, is working out The Commonwealth began with ed “TENDER FOR LIQUOK GROUNDS
South Australia’s — remaining | Waker 2) ae Md feta aed at ae ona only five second innings wickets AND REFRESHMENTS” and 24e, per day or Walf—price
thi wickets fell to-day for the | Mille 23 4 62 © {Snatch the record at pres intaet, while India had still te bat addressed to the Secretary after Tea
addition of 60 runs to the over- | Johnston 3 3 165? |by American Stanley Sayres, who 1 second time not later than noon on at
. 79 “olin | Madden 7 : 7 ) “ached 160,23 miles an hour last : ; § a on Sa te
“ore O 79 ( _ ; reached 2 n ; ns . ails ' a }
Bivee ee cusabexted' with ue. ne 6.5 o 32 1 |June. | The last five wickets added 217 urday, 18th January, 1951. Car-Park hp mg at 1/ ‘
Victoria knocked off the 6? NEW SOUTH WALFS—2nd Innings The previous record of 141,74 runs and lasted out until after tea, | . e per day
rans for victory with the loss of re Si aere Bt RP '{ |miles an hour had been held by Jeaving India time to score only | The Committee does not N.B.—No PASSES will be ;
one wicket. ; iden ¢ Evans b. Wart 1 |Britain’s Sir Malcolm Campbell 39 runs for the loss of one wicket. bind itself to accept the issued.
Final scores: Victor’a 271 an Courey b. Brown 1 lfor eleven years. Lancashire left hander John ||] highest or any other Tender. THE BARBADOS CRICKET
, . + Aneiralia ag}. wes b. Warr ; ‘4 f present plans work out Cobb {kin required only three to com- y
82° fer one. South Australia 93 te ¢. Sheppard b. Wright 40 If present fF
and 259 eitealer.| maroney. not out “ st Twill go for the record = on plete his century when the Com- G. A. LEWIS ASSOCIATION INC.
| Lindwall not out : ® Coniston Water, Lancashire, where} ] mon ph cae rou ~— arenes Sécretary | W. F. HOYOS
; . | Fxtras (5 no balls) As 5 é - se ; of with the total 2 or § e too! 4 pit dala eit
young Donald Campbell, son ¢ . 4.1.51,—4n, ' Honora Secretary.
6 Irish Thoroughbreds Total (for six wickets) 130 | Sir Aiateottn, tried in vain to his score to 111 before being | RY eretary
-Leave For Argentina | ee \break it last summer and tine bowled. He batted four and a —
: ' of wickets: } for 7,2 for ‘\ aoe: before half hours and hit 12 fours, giving | 7 ==
LUNDON, Jan. 3 1: 4 92: 5 for M1; 6 for 121 year before. aot i Ppp ity Agr age . :
Pive thoroughbred mares in BOWLING AN ALzas . & } Cc ibb is working with bepers a chance when four.
a jand to-day -for Argentina, ; 1 Psat iate a8 | builders —who ae een ill nd| tralia continued to bat steadily in i . "
The stallion is Kasiro, a SIX | a; ot BeBe ee ee des'en ie ‘prillianit, spite of an attacking field» He
yerr=ola by Dastur out of Clove- } Brie ee > 0 | with Reid Cane ae a scearct s veaciied his second hundred in the
ly-and the five in foul maies ar: | —Reuter British designer who a seer | “Test” series in just over four and
Florida Calling, Farford June Sawin American cat mé a half hours, hitting eleven fours,
Puel«Flash, Ujiji Fleet and Owe since the war Y 4 ; After Ikin had left, Dooland was
Nothing 1 1 Railton designed ‘Cobb's Napier ; ; ; joined by Géerae Tribe in a sev- ,
ve , —Reuter. Herb Feels Sure Special auto which eevaliiigted ‘ ty ae enth wicket stand of 87 and then
. the won Tend y 0) Aen Sir , “ par.nered H, Stephenson, the BUY EARL
Utah, He also redes . : Scmerse ris “ . 2 i d y
SEL TEI ELEC Of Himself Malcolm's Bluebird aia ar JOHN TKIN ers een eae m* oe .
—LN.S.
(From Our Own Correspondent) ee tr tend eter eee en ee ee . errtaees.
KINGSTON J’ca, Dec, 27 2s Once the 400 mark haa beer
nset abo Herb McKenley, Jamaicen PRICES “NATIONALISM HAS _ | P2ssec, the Commonwealth bats Thats Why
solder of five ‘track — athletic IRISH Oat ten. 3 men. yhit out aid Stephensen
scihteihitia “re a. : DUB Ja . opened his shoulders to every-
pre ee aa en r Gniees The Republic of Ireland's Gov- CAUSED DEADLOCK’”’ thing short of a length, He com-
e LE 9 prt sicgaterd 30, se me yen ernment on Wednesday ordered pleted his fifty in 76 minutes, . . :
| es tikinys at nde writttenin ‘patents that prices be solied hear oe LONDON, Jan. 3. 4 Dooland left at 442 and the next GORGONZOLA inde DUTCH GOUDA it is enjoyed
veh a ays © 7 _ 2 levels on a lor Ss Lord ‘hair i i

* , cember i Luke, Chairman of the,two wickets fell within 20 min-
in New York, Herb will begin] (ommodities and services. Action ne,

weliminary training sessions lor] was taken to combat the rising Bovril meat extract company, | utes after the tea interval, to end DUTCH EDAM _— DUTCH CAMEM-

called today for a retreat by “one!the innings with the Common-

vhat he terms “an arduous} cost of living. : country or the other” to end th: | wealth leading by 217 runs. BERT rT DUTCH SMALL LUNCHEON

by M. HARRISON-CRAY
ANASTA is still in its















experimental stage. eason from April to September. Affected were food, clothing, . ¥ s eo aati. | 7 7 = ‘i :
There are several diver. Sefore he left he said that ke} fuel, light, power, | household nae eee between Britain alee eee left for play, CHEESE
@meles in the rules applied | ill be going all out during th>| goods, industrial raw materials, | and Argentin: : a’s batsmen began to attack,
Various schools of players, ‘951 ota to better hi rene building materials, agricultural Lord Luke, who went to Argen-|; ihe bowling consisting of Em-
One of the main bones of con- ne Lae sabatts biles and accessories | tina in 1945 for meat negotiations,| mett, Ikin, Ames and Gimblett;
tention is the “4ccaba” rule. !00 metres and 440 yards records, See, Oana (CP) said that the present situation|—players who, except for Ikin, ALLEYNE ARTHUR & Co.. Ltd.
Su Bee ake tole nate which stand at 45.8 and (46), had been brought about by in-/rarely take a turn with the ball. “Your Grocers”
ticularly bad position. to: call seconds, = tense nationalism -—Reuter, | —Reuter. ¢
“ Accaba This it do at Confessing that early in 1950 W I .
any (ime during the hand, where- xe had doubts as to how long he The eather
upon pinv ceases, a new i ‘ remai mk i ep, 137
sags era geome. sere | veserved for world top quartes" | a pgm TODAY , y q : 3
‘Titers. ‘The side online milers, Herb said that he was Bun Bes 3 , i

Sun Sets : 5.49 p.m
Moon (New) January 7
Lighting : 6.30 p.m.

“Aecaba’ naturally scores zero.
At first glance this appears the
equivalent of some mystic sij uel

ure of himself now and would
face the coming season with con-

DANCE

sea srt pe manele i aided

which takes some two or three
minutes to play. the painless
extraction at Canasta may last
for 20 minutes during which
tempers are apt Lo be sorely tried
ane opponents of this rule
est it is unfair that a hand

wh ch is about to yield them

py a Bridge player who is about ae aes ‘ne * 1 YESTERDAY
incur a penalty of wi inh seconds runs over the metres ’, Yodrington) : Nil
Genie omer ind wats in and 440 yards during the recent ee ae IN
‘ 5 i : .
A aight one ORY continental tour. 805° F, AN
Many players are prejudiced Looking ahead to the Helsinki Temperaiure (Min.) :
against spate peneae oe the World Olympic Games in 1952 67.5° F
Casional bouts of boredom in orb sai amaic: as ever a .
wading solemnly through a hand > on soe mane a Bees ty |] Wind, Digection (9 a.m:)
where one side has all the valu. , *€@Son to view their chances 4 N.E. (3 p.m.) N.
able cards and the other no ; the 1,600 metres relay with much Wind Velocity : 4 miles per
possible chance | hope if a fit team of Arthur Wint, hour
* * * |George Rhoden and himself is Barometer (9 a.m.) ; 29.936
Unlike a grand slam at Bridge, lavailable to form the backbone (3 p.m.) ; 29.860

of the quartet



Jcan Footballer



BLACK PATENT
GIBSON

What’s on Today



|
say.. 090 points should be com. | @uickly establishing himself as Civil Service Examinations
nromised for u mere 1500. As }one of the best outside-rights in| at Combermere School
against this. Canasta is essen- }¥nglish first Divisian soccer 1s! 8.00 — 9.30 a.m
ee eg weer | Lindy Delaphena, Middlesbrough's | Advocate’s Photo Exhi-
Certainiv in my opinion, this jYoung Jamaican, whom they] bition at Barbados
rife,is worth trying out. to be | secured on a transfer from Ports- | Museum .. 10 a.m.—6 p.m.
rst, Serearaed ne gis mouth during the summer. Dela-'| Court of Ordinary a oe
Moe ci , vere : , ) 1 Annual B.C.L, vs. B.C
~ her rule. th sUNes phena, whom Portsmouth
d ee . cae rete Se | Manager Bob Jackson cescribed — opens at Kensington,
esed with the function of Red 1s potentially one of the greatest} p.m.
iuateny ae eS, anon ni" | one players he had ever seen, | Aquatic Club Cinema
RAERe ace dows thet tia ao ; was originally an inside-forward. “The Window". . 8.30 p.m

< Injuries ¢ idlesbrough cause Globe Theatre “Three :
, ; lag ket cake Rama's } nan be cous ri ee eee Little Words’ 5 & §30 p.m e FOR DISCRIMINATING MEN.

ngse_up a Canasta The sup- ight siti ‘ las Seale he Empire and Royal Theatres p ae 5 .

1 facet fan nddiheunt toniave te hat Fe catenin ar coeice “Duel in the Sun” | @ This British Shoe is of the highest quality,
adds an a 10 ae aoe 5 : 8. i i 5

rie game: its antagonists say me of Middlesbrough's goals in 4.45 & 8.30 p.m _ affording the maximum of Comfort and Style.

that it detracts from the skill [their 3-1 victory over Ports- Plaza Theatre (Bridge- : '\* Supplied also in Tan, Suede, Monks, Tan

rsquired to make the best. use of Le t a victory whict 1 town) “Cinderella” 4 y hi i

rhe. partnership's wild cards. mouth —- a victory which put 445 & 830 p.m and White combination.

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED Middlesbrough at the top of the , . re

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

















How happy they are —Mother and Child! Yes, 10, 11, t2 & 13 Broad Street.
= THANKS, JUNIOR:: I'M ( 4 ‘
OP IS ALWAYS FRESH OUT--I'D BETTER } |: doubts and difficulties have gone—baby is on
Bess CIGARETTES, Ree EE me Cow & Gate! ed
IT SEEMS TO |
Strong, sturdy limbs, sound bones, the happiness | FYFFES LINE
of abounding health— these are some of the gifts .
bestowed by this famous food. —__i
Buy a tin of Health and Happiness for your T.$.S. GOLFITO is due to arrive here from Southamp-
. ton at 2.00 p.m. on 6th January and will leave
little one too. at 8.00 p.m. for Trinidad.

TA NOPE! HERE~-YOU CAN HAVE
my SOME OF MY TOBACCO=*+

2
7 ms HAVE YOU ore PIPE ¢ ,










First Class accommodation is available for
intending passengers.





POP-GOTA
HAT 1S+> OGARETTE 2
UNTIL YOU TRY ~~.

TO MOOCH ONE \¢
FROM HIM=*

T.S.S. GOLFITO is due to sail from this port to South-
ampton on 18th January. Some First Class
accommodation is available by this sailing.




For further information ‘phone 4230.



' CowgGate |
Mii oo8 i

'§ WILKINSON & HAYNES CoO,, LTD.



rT}
YNDICATE, Ine, WORLD RIGHTS RESERVED



8-26 corn Mi, KING FEATURE







; SRST

Me eS

LESLIE & C LTD Agent

siesta tac



Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE TWO BARtlADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1951 Cahib patting S IR ALFRED BUTT is expec. rd to arrive here on Satinda> by the Cointo i Tnnidiul Sir Alfred aninl Knight in 19IS served la the Ministry of Food from 181'. to tlft. Four years after serving in the Ministry of Food, he was foi twelve years a l_'nioniii M.P. foi Balham and Tooling Reason for his trip !-> Trinid-d Is unknown Brigadier General will Be Intransit O THER intransit pasieii.<-, Trinidad on Saturd;.% b] the Oolfllo ire Bug Gen. ami Mrs Frank C. WiUan Bng Gen. WUlan was born *l 1878 and was, educated at Hon. He joined the 4th Oxfordshire Light Infantry in 1896 and the King's Royal I title Corps in IfiHH He was made I Captain in IBOtl He served in South Africa from 1899 IO 1BO0 and received the Queen** medal. In th* first WorUI war he was mentioned six times in despatches He was awarded the D.S.O. in 1915 and th %  CM G.. In 1919 He retired from the army in 1933. Arrives Today POCKET CARTOON by OSBERT LANCASTER a* Wedd.n, • .... mark my word., otilctt, rhli rxhfbiiiomit h.lf.rinx lavariaMy eoNMS Id M R. SYLVAN COX. Trav Editor of the AfMir.,1 Hera arrive. this anernoon S.W.I.A s flight from San Juan, l"ueno Rico, and will spend a few dnyn In Barbados Me leave-, on Saturday for Grenada. Durini; his stay here he will be a guest at the Marine Hotel Passages Cancelled E ARLY indications were thai the dollar cruises organised by British steamship companies tor wealthy Americans. and which were to include ihr West Indies and Bahamas, would not suffer aa a result of adverse International news. Now, howew., the situation in the Far Last appears to be having some effect on booking Although the cruises to the West Indies are un.ifTe-ie.l It is reported from New Yoik that cancellations of bookings „., the r46-a-day round -the -wc rid cruise af the Caranla are coming into the Cunard office. The cancellations arc from people frightened by the thought ol spreading war In the Pacific Back to Canada M ISS ANGIE CHALLENO.i daughter of Mr and Mi. Lester Challeiior of BuikHen". St Joseph, who has been holtdaylng in Barbados, returned l. Canada over the week-end by air. Her Canadian horn* is In London. Ontario With T. L. L. M ISS LENA SMITH, who arrived from Trinidad %  Q Tuesday afternoon by BW.l.A is spending a short holiday with Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Maclntyre of Worthing View House. Rocklev Lena is with Trinidad leaseholds in Pointe a Pierre. Sheriff Jones \ I,THOL*GI. Western aren't lricllv required at th Q I Otlb'l Wild W< at the Crane Hotel on Jan 20th, thOFC who WeaT formul allliti risk falling into the han't of i %  law %  The popular "Casey"* Jones has been appointed shenlT for the eveiunn and Urn tail throw anyone not "proiietly" dressed Into the stockade II mav cost him a dollar to get out on hail foi liltevening, but it will all be In a good cause us nil the proceeds will go to the Golf Club's Tournament Fund, which will finance lhe Barbados team OB Its it p to Trinidad to plav the Si Andrew'* Club representatives. Back To Work f WAS very glad lo see Frank Chandler, overseer ol Cuirington'g Factory back out to work after five weeks' illness U "MtoTif nuure OUT Innocent young minds— let'* go ami bust open a barkf M ISS ADAUNE S E A L Y. daughter of the lair Cent Sealy and Mrs. Sealy. was marrted on Saturday aftemooii tc Mr. T 1.. Harris at Holy Trinity Church St. Philip. The bride who was given in marriage by har brother wore a dress off off white "iitin Trimmed with silver beads The ceremony was performed by Rev. O. E Jooaa. Miss E. Newton was the bridesmaid and the bestman was Lt L Harris With National Geographic Magwirar E XPECTED to arrive .r, Barbados this morning Is M.Charles Allmon. an Americ*i photographer who is collect in, material and photographs for the National Geographic Maganne. A short time ago he completed *. i"tv page article on Trinidad which will be rppearlng In the National Geographic Maga/ --.•• shortly No doubt he is plannlnR • ti a similar article for Barbados Turfilei Return S OME of the Barbadian rating turfites who were in Trtnidotl for the Trinidad Turf Club Christmas meeting returned on Tuesday by B.W.I. A. Th. y were Mr Fred Bethell. M.C P hU son Michael, and Dr. Herbert Wciver Other arrivals on Tuesday whj spent the Christmas holidays 10 Trinidad were Mr. Charlie Peterkln. Mr. Fred Ferreira an I Mr Winston Coxier W.I. Film Star E ARL CAMERON, the yoti.ig film star from Bermuda, plans to visit the West Indies on a short holiday after completing his contract with Baling Studios. During the last few months, hd has been working on the film Pool of London.'' which is to be released next month. Earl s certainly enthusiastic about I is |QB When asked in London if he found the work tiring, his reply was; "I can work on fill .9 from January 1st. to Decemb-r 31st. without being tired of %  '." Back to Trinidad M hi. OEORUU. 00 NOBRIGA who has been upending holiday in Barbados, returned to Trinidad yesterday afternoon B W.I.A. She was staying the Ocean View Hotel. Christmas Dance A WORD of congratulation to the Colonial Offlre liaison staff for the hard work they put into arranging the Christmas dance for all Colonial students 'n England, which was held ut Seymour Hall. London, cm December 27th. The object -if ihese dances u to enable students liom various parts of the Colonial Empire to meal together in a friendly atmosphere and no effort waa spared on this occasion to make sure that the atmosphere was friendly. NO SNAPS IN THE ALBUM SHOW GRANDMA LOOKING LIKE THIS Rupert's Autumn Primrose—46 BY THE WAY By Beachcomber 'TWERE have been many ques•1 tlont asked about the pan which the %  Met' Mrs. Flobrter, "till attached to Lots-roud, is to play In the Festival. The idea that Sir Ewart Hod* Jon's ship should be a kind o( hostel for foreign visitors is absurd. At present the accommodation x'joard comprises one cabin with a hole in the floor. Even the two hens aboard creep into an old dug kennel amidships every night, and the eat goes disdainfully ashore. My own opinion la that this astonishing cralt should remain moored to the Embankment, and within call of the Power House. Her sailing days were over when ItM pM t tide fell off In a gale. The replacement didn't fit, and to-day she Is lopsided, with half n mast stuck in upside down und a ster.i made of old packing-ruses for Your Christum* List f~\^' 1 f Foulenough's ideas VJ which has been adopted L the Malicious Press is to give the books startling and attractive wrappers which need have no mort to do with their QDanssBU than the blurbs. This adds excitement to the choice of a book Thus Miriam Glnpiron's travel book "Four Days in Turkey," ha. a wrapper with a view of the valley of Aosta, and the blurb says: "From the first moment when Hugh BrssMOOalM vnatttl with the elephant near Delhi, t-. the pulse-tearing climax whicli Babs Onneficld quells the mob u> showing them her father's hat there Is not a dull pnge. BasllisK Committee Choice." Professot Keigwir\ "Stiitisliral Survey ,1 North Oraonwlcfa in the -Eightiw' has n wrapper showing the Upiv nothing of North Greenwich llallrtliU have thrilled to the stor v of Cleopatiii. Basilisk Commltuc Choice." Smugxlhifi Vie* In Psfff fiatidhau 'he Customs office r 'mind a /ir of pylons %  TV (News item) A S they must have been r.d.ier small pylons, and as she was probably only trying to bglfl the electricity people ..t ,i ivintr> iiiomeiit, 1 hope the authorities dealt tightly with her Xnulhfr Svcrft Out N BVBR, nevoi shall I Ure of ratdtng tni reports of the QaUup i'ii people about the cost of living. I recorded last week their dJecovorj thai when too i 11 o| living gaes up. everybody finds things more onygMtvo A later discovery is equally ainaring. It is that lack ol money la forcing us to cut down extiensc. on our pleasures. I juppoae nobody will believe at li uiH.mventional thinking until it Is incorporated in a massive Whi..* Paper. How little we should ever know about OUT Uvefl Irtthi gat polls. ThtTf XIIII AJI-SV "Two iirsl returns, please" 'Where to— %  H.ie yon foolt" Mavnl Memories I TS the breezy Navy men 1 adore." said the girl not (0 Foiilenough at dinner. "You're an Army man. 1 suppose.*' "Oh. no,'' said Fuulcnuugh. "Navy up to Inc fetlocks. Six generations soaked in brine. Great granddad M Nelson's bosun in the Victtn > "What was your ship?" she asked prettily. "H.M.S Intolerable, plying between the Moluccas and Ki ttsat uungs I'vt ': burst of, R epsw." bs >. 1 Tht lmp of Spring den'c oasac ic oi fsidm." Oh. y. l'at tu %  , do." laugh* tht listls bur "ealy you nevsr sat i h tss. k'l IIKJIT lor yen tht* aoot of (htir -*, t Mary waa." !jptwt!l, he and a mm it :iaw io tell tht lull uv* of idvtnruit. "W.ll. thai %  n EU •hoaU U itaaaaal a. .... MM. Star. THE END HI BJOMTS SftSYtO IflLODt r< ( DAT, LAS! SHOWS :> uu A B 3d "THREE LITTLE WORDS"—Fred ASTA1RE Openins Tomorrow — "BAGDAD" and TALENT \i}\ ATII I I.I II CINEMA (MembersOnlyl AKTHt'ii Krs-Nrnv DREM REHXARBAL W Ohehts ArtBall by Croydon Art School studentTheir show will bs a skit on the last 100 year, of fashion. Lett to right are Rita Diamond (1861 Buatlt). ftOMBnary Jacob (Naughty Nineties). Wendy CroOey (Biutlt Oirli Ann Dl-btiry and E*m.Kttlry (Suffragettes) LI r I.LC. Radio Pr^raiw THURSDAY, Jan *. |M| 1am. ThtN.wt. T.IQ...H N...A. *>•; 111 SJPV frown Ta rlIt SUn Pruaratnm* ."..rxli ; '. V n m Ot •rail* Sorakma. TH | %  i ,% %  Cliotc*. SOU am Ijrul und LivrMiKH SW am HallnKOt TarijTi,!... u „ Your Body % %  ! lu aWnne.. t ,n Th* Ntwo 6 1. am tU-^r hrw (earn Britain. • I* ai>i CIM lw>n. ill n. rToaTainmr I'arad* USS am UMm<.i, tholra; II ft a'n Spatial Dnpttth lf inomii Th* Ni 17 IU p ii N.-.A %  U. III! BUB. Clo-* DOOM 4 It pin Llatrnan Chour BOO pin Ci-wp.. ..< T>>r Vaehl ll> l-m V.HH.h --.,., 9 pin. Pipe, and Dfiim.. 00 pji HitniisM* oi ISM-. aa p.m ftmimnms ^arade 7 DO p in Tha Nw; fit pm Ntwa A n a I V > I .. TIB pin r *fli Minn. (,-r.M.ll. Kp-.-i t.:\ t> ... Radio N...,r*i SIS aar p.u T--i-iit >d Uw v d udK ANaii: S.U p m ~ ipw*l ol Ihr Ward. (SO p.m. Sprtial SEEING STARS IS -vta-h: S.ll INi Ynu Rrmmbtr; !•• pin Prom Ilia Han The : r Mutual llimd CROSSWORD 1 I 4 M f %¡ "TTTFI II T k-l 11 V L B I 1 %  t I' y p r r HAVKtFORD, PA. Figuring the size of the universe is like trying to find out "how high is up." but the latest "star .'ii-ii." III ii.\,v. there may IT two hundred billion galaxies, each made up of hundreds of millions of stars The new estimate was reported by I>r. Harlow Shapley. directoi of the Harvard Observatory, baton the American Astronomical Society at Haverford College. Dr. Shapley said the appraisal was made from a galaxy survey conducted at Harvard during the past 18 years. He explained that there .ire about a billion galaxies in the visible half of the skv out to a distance of a billion light years each light vear measuring about ?lx trillion <6.lK)(i,0no.00O.OOil| n-iilt-v There are probably another billion galaxies in the other half of lhsky. which is obscured by the milky way to which Iht earth belongs, ho said, and these two billion galaxies probably represent only one percent nt tiiose in the entire universe. About a million galaxies have been photographed so far In the HarvAiri "census," he said. —LN.S. a", •suit* a 1. Stoat... ma r itii It r aa rip* ss tn.. |S> 12 Nulw Imin ine lint. 13) 13 OenUemati wun a gulden toucn t&i Ik utm Hall a Falilau. cj. 16 Bartyiari tnauaa tu 'in* provide < B. u I nihiers. ii Q Anton* sritn tn ore ui on Km DSM t\. OacSrU uiaater m India. i9i 2&. Made In a CooK or Di tna flu.r i ahiDlanabltailiMi. it WIIBI a preaenrr la axprclm 1 § inustar net ii > %  utvi -pactx*. Ill li nnd it in the middle to u* la an efioTt Mli a a a WARNER BROS. "** A A TAKE DEEP PfMOE IN / ###t. I t HMJ ANNOUNCING *" !" ^ "MM THC PRESENTATION t s.*w IS. UMI use i II Raised i tlipeitca. r.T*Wl*iP i _L is Itpl. 31 %  *• Itoan Larvni A r.*ni* 2. i >.. i fwra'.! •A,.... || Uoan irrtaa yen beneath On OM DO* c clothes-horse hid beside her a little gnat of a manor about half of him. The photographer was so intent on gelling the whole clothes-horse into his picture that poor gnattie w.s pretty well mutilated. Nor was his name given He was jbout as important to the great occasion as a sack of dirt Stenina at tOAgg, o-i-",l, ( |h^, u l, 1 Wb 1 ^ GARYCOOPER (MMafel 0OMW0W. Ik. oaly mm to M tari mm PATRICIA NEAL I'l I 111*. I HHM I iim\ 1 JAN. 3th 3.30 fit B.30 and Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. I III M HI • ORNKI. WII.Ui: %  MAITP.FFN D'HAKA "HOMESTRETCH" in Technicolor CKNTt'RVFOX l-ICTLHE PLAZA Theatre— BRIDGETOWN l ..I : sjttswS Wall Disney's ~CMNBBMBM.LA '* Color by Technlrolor araciAL MATiNn fas Bawarr a wfc I • %  •,<••<• i la aoHtav nonaaiit.il *V — us %  PLAZA Theatre — OISTIN L*mki lEnST J-A cVraoB V "APRIL SHOWERS" and "" % %  .is TtortTkarlorT In "THE WALKING DEAH Boris Kanoir in .. ^^ sl ., TAULX FOK cilll.tJHFNi L Gorcwv Si Bnaur Bmi "Ml in' aae -raix ot'T-with Raharl An I Hill M %  m a eaat --.... irmlrlin-i Bit Action Spw->al 'tar MaH>rr \u.. LaSt < AI-TA1N I 1 IIONa>t %  <'ArTAiN' PvMr WHS (iAIETY — [THB GARDEN) ST. JAMES I A*T SHOW TONITC < %  10' .Wnn'. Hoi** "KI NO'S HOW nil "CONrLWrT' FMDAY—BATOTDAY—BUN—.S0 P.m. MAT n 5 p.m HMMtajn*. B*r O..idoo. ii>rr..l -MA88ACE *rVER" with Oliy MADISON Ho.v CXLHOITJ C-.hy DOWNS I WOl LDN'T BE IN TOrK SNOrv New Flowered SPUNS 36" $1.12 yd. $1.37 yd. Floral Stripe SHIOZE 16" $1.24 yd. RIBBED MAROCAIN %  $1.49 yd. Aisorlod Shade! Grey Flannel 30/38' wdM Men's Trousers $5-81 HIRTS 4.09. 4.47, 4.86 4.97. 6.31, 6.53 EVANS 'WHITFIELDS, Your SHOE Stores NOW IS THE BEST TIME TO PAINT YOIK HOUSE A wide rinse of READY MIXED PAINTS and MATERIAL supplied by the foremost manufacturers to select from. REMEMBER win you ||fC the Sonstf TM Save $ $ $ Inspecl these at our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT Telephone No. 203* THE ii vim Aims O-OPI ii v 11% i roTTOK inroin ITD. EMPIRE TODAY 4.4 and 8.S* TOMORROW Ml and 8M David O ScUnick's "DUEL IN THE SUN Starring Jennifer JONES Gregory PECK Joseph COTTON Lionel Barrymoore ROW I '•! Two ^hows TODAY I ui and 11> M i; v Double . Clarke Cable Hedy LAMARR "COMRADE X" AND TRADER HORN with Harry CAREY ROYAL lit Two Shows TOI>Ai 5 and 8.30 Republic Pictures presenC David O. Sclznkk'5 "DUEL IN THE SUN" J.nnll-r JONES Grenory PECK Juseph COTTON Lionel narr>'moore OLYMPIC East Tsva Shows TODAY 4.30 and l %  Columbia Double . Larry PARKS Evelyn Keyc^ "THE SWORDSMAN" AND "TO THE END OF THE EARTH" SI1MHASSO Dick POWELI. FEIIWOXOXI; The now Weedkiller for control of "NUTGRASS" It may be applied as a spray or a dust and is harmless to persons or animals. For further particulars apply to PLANTATIONS LTD. % % %  I I



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p\r.r nt.HT BARBADOS ADVOCATE rillRSDW, JASTARY 4, ittl MCC Score 553 For 8 In Drawn NSW Game Simpson Hats iirilliffntiy SYDNEY. January J THE MATCH between I Wale? ended here to-day in a draw with the Stale aidi i still >*' rut 'y ^ second innings wicketi standing. OFT TO mnrr ... M (" I I Slmpso Brat Inningji a wickr %  (lOllhle Victoria Beat S. Australia VicUtii.i %  SOU A11--I1.1I1.i i>y nine wickets la the SheJReld Simla m itch hen today South Au&li u ilng %  it to-day (or the .nklti' f Co run.to ihv overright K-oro -r 179 (01 Colin Pinch •.-.. undefeated with 14*. Victoria knocked oil the I! I lot y with DM OJH [i }.< Float SCI %  V*Ml a 271 .tit Ml I r Sov'nnd 2aP —Renter. 6 Irish Thoroughbreds Leave For Argentina i.um>N. Jan s. l. In IMMJ tc-cbr. fin Argentina. I iTlion i% KM Lro. %  sii wr i-i %  of C"tov lv MI livt In fool males oi I FtpOflB I's linn i" i %  ford June Rawl Fl.i i -'Hi Owe Sothl'v —Renter. % %  •o h) Burin o w and %  orooay (ti MM on :lem IS ten m ju*i under I at the *.' ki %  M C i plays* in *n tra v. th Park! I bin century hi :hc COUUJ %  Freddie Brown look ihree .nil John Warr 2 for 25 In the Stab second innings -. ..I:I r.. n %  NOW SOUTH w M j l-i INNINGS II % %  i ... I* WMlibnx* lb> b W.l*.-! 4 'i — M I %  • -nrl-n -"• %  h M'Mni %  ..,. I I.mi* .11 h MMCn. fan u j-k.-Mi" "i %  in l< l %  >. I n b i. a In • iMH wiari. OH i Walker W.llri ji.nnn. %  M t.i. II Wflglil ..,.( But I ii'iltaall '• % %  ""' balhJ Ships In Touch With Barbados Coast Station -Uiki-l-v. w..t [n*.> ... .... t -liipihrnugl lurbado* ca* auum S M^rmxlMMl KB ... S Aranu US Norfntk B( tlanufn 0.0, Wilfred SS IM Buffalo. 1 l*>—i.i. il Saya Ckru"* Pen. s Caeni* Hill U V. %  .*•. SS I S S DrMHr, B-S. Mi i Htna. as %  %  '. M 'nimmri S*. italofo II Chung s S VlrCIllo. SS M MfWM Aixlalucu. as U JT SB W IBU -AalllpL>ka 15. Uru|uj Alftnllna. H Niauw Anialxrt. LuHna. S.S ShvrkdM. u-i.ti, i>iii. *> CallMa, U SraUn. OS Oraalln. SB. Laia Ami. OS. San i I M Dana. SS nxioi'l SS Thalma IV. INVITED TO PRACTISE AGAINST B.CL .! wn.i.iAMS of Harrison Colleiff ha* been Invited to play today against Iho B.C L at the DAY EagUu* Thin IfVsMl BSBM ncoiir w>. t*ki aa Iba pack moved oR imoni a hard of cattle. Fastest Man Ikin Hits 111 As India %  %  '.SI S far 121 NVM yen itandard Canasta Upset about the RULES? a. M. HAftBISOM-CllAY C ANASTA In ,iui in IU ex pt may do at Siu 'luring thr nand when' uooti pln( '-ea.se*. a new drai •tarts .i:ni :lie opooneoU score lioo Dim 'lie value ol any ml Tnrees Tlir side rnllme ".4rcaf*n na'uraPv acores wro At flrsi Klant e line appeara The KtimaieriT ol sump mystic Msnai i>v a Bridge player who f abou' 10 trn-ur a pmuil-.v ol 1*00 which itlaWOO* redtucd rriud.'C.l ngatnnt Cunastu necmihe ol the occasional b-miot boredom m -AB'imii BOletnnii inrongn u hand %  .ham. * CnliKc a gi'and slam al Bridge ituct: Ml. ni. io • thrc. mtou:i i be oroUi :IH.I 11 >i)ponenu> ol this rule that a hand which is about u> view them potato vUouW be com•wonnar.! lur u nicre 1500 A'^ egstn.i MCna-ia u> assan %  i. '. . Iteer tli. BKC ii,:tniorinre-tsmv m mv opinion thti '1 %  ins "lit to be c*UUIV0 -.f (linearded i,t Ihr d^ %  inv wri.u'i ol nlaver* rule Hint mimr u 'ii is con fincupn ol Rl HOrmalu thev anarda. bin one set •an ilu 1 thev CBI. i in olace ol n wild card %  the naeh but no! Ifl up i canasta The sup %  i>l tli uii iiiHintain ttui' Sdn> an addltlonsl feature W t;# game us aniagoi Herb I'eels Sure Of Himself KINGSTON JV,i H.v /.: Hub IteKoiuay, J s .older of live track Mtilef %  ifonbi, loft the Island, B Jfcetnber 30. lor IM UnKc iMes alter spending Ciiriatmatolidays ut home with his parent. ,n New York. Herb will bean ,ieliniin.iry training sessions lor terms "an arduous m April ho Bepti oibo BktforO he left he suirl thai hi vill be going all out during t-> 951 season to better his present 100 metres and 440 yard* record'. ,. Herb said thjt M #a ure of himself now and Sfoull faeo the ennuna loaooa s/MI idenet rememberin K hi4ti I oennd* runs over Ihe 400 metris ..nd 440 yards during IIM reeartl i ontinental lour Louking ghead to the Helsinki In 195^ Herb sakl that Jamaica eason to view Their ehnnces in the 1.600 BMtrei roU) with nueh hone if -i lit team of Arthur Wltil. • rcuige Rhutten god hlnudl available to form Iho backbone r the nuarte' On Earth LONDON John i nun on garth lth his 394 lit m.pJ) suto record • stabUshs 194". ii plan %  lo regaun the aToeld %  %  M I I i Britain rkbig out details Un ;i boat which CBfl %  eo *nt held by Amw kean BtanV layr reached I0OJI miles ,. u hour laal June The previous record of 141 ~>'< houl had been held by Britain's Sir Malcolm I un g lev en ir preeenl plan* work iii Cool will go for the rOCOrd Ol gf %  Lancashire, whuri oung Don %  *•>•> *•' s.i Malcobri tried wUn w break n i-ist summe. year brfi.i. C bh is wiirking Wlul ,,t i'. rtam ilh, thi ship and j %  hrnenuni hull .••> % %  i RaUton, the I>IMM..III Britlsl :• %  who has i>eC' \mt %  mnhawi %  the wot Id %  ' " or<1 Utah Male He also ledeolgnert n* Bluebird rae ruj nuto I s IRISH PRICES DUBLIN .l.n 3 Tng Republic of Ireland i Oovernment on Wednesday ordered that prices M rolled beefc to December 2 leveleommoiiities and SSTVle. was Uucen lo eornbel the rising cost of living. Affected clothing; fuel light, power hon-cho o K „od>. Industrial rev building materials, agricultural KoiKis. automobiles and nccesw.ries nnd enlertnlnii'cnl *CP> JVan FootbasBer Quickly setabltshhig himself j, DSaB m the beet outside-rlghbj m tngti-sii iirst Division loccer n l.indy IJelaphen.i. Middle brough'a young Jamali on, % % %  bom the) eeured on .i tranafei from Portsmoulh duiiiii; the Mimmi'i Dold phena, whorn Poi tan oul h afanagoi Bob Joekoon deaeribad as potctiiuillv ong o| the greatest young players he bad Mm sen .1HI Ul'l.tlll .,! %  lll-|ll< -! %  >! \..ll 1 injuries ol lUddlesbrough cauat-l Mm lo be mowed to the oubddo* nght position and loai bag) the satisfaction %  : %  HM lo bi • gjoaki lo vi'ti.i' over Ports inOuth -_ | vi.t.UN wh.eii put Mlilillsabioiigli .it tit.lop ol UW rsi Wvurtofi he lop ol i i | The Wgthef ffODAI Sun Rises | g.|g am Sun Sf, ; 5 49 pm Moon (New) Januarj "• I i, hi in. : b30 pm. YESTERDAY ltaiiilall K'odrlnsloiti : Nil Temp*r*turr am i \ i .. i> in \ Wind \>li>.ll> I mile* per hour Karometer • !l a m > : t9 938 IS p.m.) !9RfiO W hat's on Today tlvll Service ateaaataaUgeal at Combermerr Srhool 8 00 — Una in 1945 for meat negot said thai the present situation had been brought about bj intense nationalism —Rrutei. India's batsmen began to attack, .be bowling consisting of Ei men. ikin. Ames and (Jtmblett who, except (or Ikin. I win < li\KHAIH>>> TtTtl l.t It >ont i; TENDERS are invtled I-JI the exclusive right to sell IJqaor. RrtreBhments, He at ihe Gsrrison Savannah or. !la*e r>-iys during 1951. Tenders must be forward.• %  1 in sealed envelopes mark ed -TENDEH FOR I.IQCCic AND REFRESHMENTS" and addressed to the Secretary not later than noon en Sat urttay. 13th January. 1951 The Committee docn not bind itself to accept thhighest or any other Tender INTERCOLONIAL CRICkEl BARBADOS fa. TRINIDAD At KtNSlNGTON OVAL FIRST MATCH Krbruary 13. lb. IT 19 & 20 SECOND MATCH rehrunry 22, II. 24. 2G & 27 Plans of soatim; accimmodat'on will be opened at Harrison's Office on Monday. January 15th tn members ol the Association who may also purchase t w o additional •season tickets. The plROI will be opened to the Itcnerai Public %  • Mondav, .Tanu.irv 22nd for the sale oj SEASON TICKETS. Prices of Admit IIIUIIMII; STAND U 0 per d*y or 110 *>n Heaaun Ticket KENSINGTON STAND SI.00 per day or $8 00 Season Ticket t'NCOVEREO SEAT* 18c per da* or Half price after Tea <;ttoi NI>S Me per day Of II**' Price alter Tea • ""T Ml fill Kfg l Hl'Rt 11 :::: EBCITAL XMAS MISIC Suaeas. January 7lh. 4 30 pan. \'isitmg Sol' CKORK I'tiii.Mrs II Mrill.l s| i; \KI rant) take turn with the ball —Reuler. LOVELY FRESH APPLES BUY EARLY CHEESES GORGONZOLA — DUTCH GOUDA DUTCH EDAM — DUTCH CAMEMBERT — DUTCH SMALL LUNCHEON CHEESE ii.i.i-v.xt: IHIUIH A "Your Greet/ 1 *'o.. Ltd. J&R BREAD i is THE BEST BAKED BREAD That's Why it is enjoyed by Everybody. appiness How happy they are Mother and Child! Yes. doubts and difficulties have gone — baby Is on Cow & Gate! Strong, sturdy limbs, sound bones, the happiness of abounding health—these are some of the gifts bestowed by this famous food. Buy a tin of Health and Happiness for your little one too. DANCE IN AN ASCOT BLACK PATENT SHOE THE DELUXE FOOTWEAR FOR DISCRIMINATING MEN. • This British Shoe is of the highest finality. nfforriitiK the maximum of Comfort anil Style. Supplied also in Tan. Suede. MogVko. Tan mid White combination. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street. LTD. K.VM">l'V>OC' COW&GATESo^J, Oh*. FOOD oP ROYAI. BABIES FYFFES LINE T.S.S GOLFITO is duo to arrive here from Southampton at 2.00 p.m. on 6th January and will leave ;it 8.00 p.m. for Trinidad. First Class accommodation is ;iva.lable for intending passengers. T.S.S. GOLFITO is due to sail from this port to Southampton on 18th January. Some First Class accommodation is available by this sailing. For further information 'phone 4230. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.. LTD. LSSUS a CO LTD -A(uu



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PM.F. KOl'R BARBADOS ADVOCATE THLRSDAr. JAM ABV I, ISS1 BARBADOS.j^j^ADVDCffTE lid Hi..* -I MiiJt.l ThurMliiy. January 4. 1951 SIWIIIS THE campaign for a cleaner Bridgetown waged by the "Advocate" has met with some measure of success in so far as it has been noticed by the Commissioners cil Health. The staff of Sanitary Inspectors and the members of the Scavenging Department have contributed too, to such success as has been achieved; but it is far from satisfactory to find that individuals in whose interest this campaign has been waged have given little co-operation Despite the efforts of the Sanitary Department to keep the dangerous gutters clean and to provide bins into which people can throw refuse, the condition of the gutters shows that people deliberately dump refuse into them. The question is therefore whether the gutters such as are found in the City are suitable to the needs of Bridgetown. They are deep and it must be admitted, offer temptation to people to throw refuse in them. In fact they are converted into sewers by this process. In nearby St. Lucia. a modern sewerage system has been designed for Castries. Why not benefit from this close source of knowledge? Why not have a proper sewerage system in Bridgetown? But if Broad Street has responded to the call for a cleaner Bridgetown, the call has fallen on deaf ears in Bay Street. It was suggested that the members of the Boys' Club might with advantage to themselves and benefit to the community transform the Boy Street windows into beauty spots. This has not been done. Surely the presence of the excellent BayStreet Esplanade which is always scrupulously clean and well tended, should act as an incentive to the residents and owners of that part of Bay Street where 'ie the two windows. \vo>n:\ Ike Was Cliwrctl In >Sts,^ %  : %  Western Europvai. Mm assembled to frnsti b designs on run n trie res SeandlnavU to Gibraltar, once was cheered in IUo Squ-inIt was 1" AuKUit LM6, when Eu.enhi.wer BM widespread hoi>e thai could do I Potsdam. efotl Rjeanhonar trips to Hwo*, there w- "H" an aura of good feeling IhM Mr Truman cams taon* n Stalin M "ssaod olu Joe' The General's tint im.: Moscow, as ho explain*-, i ,a bit "CRUSADE IN ED B 'DOUBI-EDAY) time in July, IMS. but lie had BMB I •end his regrets because be had to fly to Washington from Berlin for A report His second invention, and the one lie a ine A-Homh foil on Hiroshima. His friend, Marshal Oregon EhUROV, *ince "broken" because of his .'idmiration fui %  bentmwer. the General believe*, ffcrM With him from Berlin to Moscow Elsenhower took along wttil %  i -.;., Qea T J CM Ktsduated son. I.t. John Elsenhower and Mast* Leonard Dry They nrrived m the Russian capital August II, INC bt which time thl bomb had fallen on N And Russia was in against Japan. Avcrell Ran i ui ttsan up at tha VS. 1 On the following day, <<''< • rlianglng m 11 I t t flral % %  > %  other HH-IILUT ol Ihc American party Etaanhoerar atli-mpted to deeluie It us tactful:. as possible hacauee Hal not neen Included Hut Antmiov .id. The Oeaemussimo says th i II you would ulu) to coma ha all invites two of your ai Ike took along Hnrrimnn and Ha] By BOB CONSIDINe aad of t la Moscow %  i %  %  %  ed intermittently to Stutu %  th* industrial, tional and social achie\, the U.S. The dictator, who t P a dMaocraUt leaders that he not only planned to dominate thai country out would ignore the papa* protest" of the US. lold Ike in effect There are many ways in whi' 'i !R *pak lag at s ceremony at the Waldorf Astoria nt which ha received s Ssl VAUOII Army citation for "DisUn%  puntied Beivlces to Hunaiiity." Express: we need American help It is out great task to raise the standards f living of the Russian people which have been seriously damaged by the war. We must laarn ..II about your RBSi %  Ma i" aajTseuhun Likewise, here we must gel your technicians to help us In our engineering and eons4rtKtlcti problems, and we want to know more about man production methods In factories We know m behind in those thhc". und we know that you can help Looking down on en m tha "Thai deve l ops parti VOUI country i.ugdi % %  I tin' Then he id U rever -How Germ.. During his trip i>< hower was perrnWeeei t g| u i ine factory ad was granted leave t"> during the stay Stollr. to oxprass hu apolog,< George Marshall for a sharp note StHlui hud sent to tinAmerican rhlel "t staff for euppl • i tain mfoi inir. i had turned out itadly .md re-ul in what Stalin cakei d barrassment" to the Red Arm' At the big farewell dinner countless toasts were offered I ul one by young John Eisenhow.r iirew the biggest ovation. It era dedicated to "the common M-M i of the great Red Army." Etssnhowafs Moscow tup waj h*.lled as i m H %  great Ihe United Stuie? WI.I Depart men! immedlaU'ly ln% shal /.hukov to visit \meri %  [hi d rm C 54 for the trip and nsngiictl Gen. Clsy and John to acrompunv him. But Zhukov fell ill. l'.S -Hustian relations fell even more III. Bv the time Zhukov was able r.. t pa milled I In rob %  %  %  %  I I %  %  i i that the Russian helrard to fear duct!, tha 'mils of liber..tion—freedom of the b He says thenl| no naad for alarrr in this country over tba Russian menace provided we stick togetherif the men and woman or (Boa ti,i (Gommunbri issue as Mjuarely and bravely a their soldiers faced the terrors of buttle in Woild W,.i II. . wbava no fear of the OUtHMM, II they will unite their i i i flrmlv as they did when they provided, with th.-u tlltai Europe, the mightiest flghMnx fcree of all time, thenI poral power tlml can dare ehal nn#a them. %  If they can pNabl UH morisj Integrity, ihe clarity ol comp hension, and tin ra %  > i %  terihe,. that finally nj Ask, than the Praa World w! live and prosper ami all I will eventually reach %  level i culture, contentment and security that has never bafore I Mhtavad" iv*THE election of one woman and tha nomination of three others in the 1951 Vestry Elections indicate on increasing and welcome interest in public affairs by the women of this island. The appointment of one member of that aex to membership in the Legislative Council and the election of one to the Christ Church Vestry has, it would seem, given an incentive lo them. In this island there are many sides of community life in which women can render more effective service than men. It is especially so in the administration of parochial affairs. The sympathetic outlook needed in investigating cases of poverty which come before the Poor Law Guardians in each parish gives women a natural outlet for their maternal instinct The executive who must decide what portion of his quota must be bought with the dollars at his disposal or what portion of his stock must be reft in bond instead of being distributed to his retailers, ought not to be making decisions as to the difference between the grant of five shillings for a mother and a child and the necessity for two doses of cod liver oil or two suits of clothing for the same child. Women have their natural place in society and can make a worth while contribution to Ihe smooth and efficient working of local government. 'The Red Threat In Latin America' Bhly %  Ull Ibi vu.:t nortbtfn topaUw by Uw nilc ui protector for the little ;-mi-independent sU'.e of Sikkim. %  noun I tropic (lowers and etertml the heart of the eastern Himalayas. By a rec.nt treaty the Maharajah of Sikkim has given India full authority to utilize his country for military purposes. Although not much larger than the State of Delaware. Sfkklm occupies a highly strategic buffer poaltioo against the Chinese Communists now invading Tibel. writes the National Geographic Society. The Maharajah's relatively tiny domain •hares frontiers with Nepal, Tibet. India, nd the stut NO\\ $ .24 $ M .37 .34 .2b .20 KITCHEN WARE Al.I MINIUM FKV I'ANS & SAl'CKI'.WS IOCKTAIL SIIAKKKS THFKMOS FLASKS PUDDING & DRIPPING PANS IIKF.AD BOARDS und KNIVES SANI-CANS GARBAGE CANS ENAMEL PLATES und CUPS Kir.. Etc.. Elr. WILKINSON & IIAYNES Co.. Lid. Successors To C. S. PITCHER & CO. Phones — 4472, 4687. WASHINGTON The steta DaBeftmenl (hat pmiltvt', WM !< jilcrship is required to coinbnt tha rwng menaee ol Comann I m In LaUn America. It U necessary, the Department's spokesmen erapK I keep I-atin American opinion marshalle-l solidly mi the side cf the free world. It ts important lo keep Itaa L-.iu> American people convlncnJ lhal their welfare Is linkad to ine welfare of me United Slates. The purpose of the Cominuiiu>:.s, a* agent* of ine Kremlin. pi It Is to neutralise l-atm America the event of w..c between tie U.S and the Soviet Union and deprive u* of such vitally needed Mi|iplie*JI: wool. Tine, nil. tin COB per. rubber ,uid fi-Kibtull BV MAICOLM JOHNSON BUY... PARROT SAFETY MATCHES &f smnatars BEST MATCH &f Ask lor PARROT MATCHES from your Grocer. Just how important thl. Is to M 1 I i'. SMICN ng provr.i during World War II Ivoiv In n recwil %  DMCb, A*BRnl SSi"! £222!f Ad, ,er too**, o, su* K da, d SS*Sn?SiSlS Mipnly the U S. %  with |1.| billions and misunderstanding in the pji'l tn U.S. relations with Latin With regard to fuiu America White says why the Conaa %  ting tev '• %  Secretary .if Si. u< Dean Ache-.m has pointed out thot to ed tail activity inn owl ..piiroach : %  %  %  i i >lrmji Iruru our enenilrs. ulimr "i"'" A. .< -tcp t. • %  purpose to lo divide jiid conAches.m h.K callei for a meeting ru*c inler-Aineriijn opinion, a '' ,(l F""'lKn IfUliStan of '21 disappointingly larga t>lure of II American Kepublics lomes from people who 4re any* White says: thine but *>mp*thet.c to Com'Economic conditions f„ r tr-e;iro spoken. Ruddhism is the state rel.Rion inuiu-m. bul who ellhrr are !<-•"> through the creation of new obsr>e served today to point up that carious factor in Britain's national life known as Scottish home rule. It Is curious because the mere • %  -1 : toon home rule indicates at least a desira fur secession, while that word impliei that Scotland is being held by force and duress by Ihe British Crown. Such is hardly the case. The people of Scotland piesumably eould vote themselves out of their proud position in the British Commonwealth If they wanted to. But the "home lulers" or nationalists are not more than a small If somewhat noisy minority There seams to be no general desire to eliminate Scotland from the United Kingdom. Much of the wind was taken out of nationalist sails when King Gaorge VI ascended the throne 13 years ago. For his Queen is a Scotswoman to the core. Princess Elirabeth, who will succeed to the throne, Is therefore half Scotch, with some of the proudest blood of the Highlands in her veinand as long as the line prevails, the chain of geneological links to Scotland will not be broken. Theft of the famous stone concern in London, however, lest .F,* if foolhardy theft of Britain's most famous relic arouaa national fanatics to something aiora than an occasional bagpipe By J C OESTREICHtR TE STONE—IMKINSIC VAI t'E : U led parade of tartuns. kilts and sporrans. It is undoubtedly true that the Scottish Nationalists have used every breakup in the British Empire to make effective propaganda for their cause. This was the case whin the British Mandate In Pal surrendered, and applied also '.o the separation of Burma. India and other portions of the Commonwealth that have dropped %  way Establishment of the KepuMic of IrclPi.;!. provided fuel for the rationalist fames But until the Whether there ever could be a ol Scotland from the t'uited Kingdom is problematical ; %  I. %  I The tbava such close economic and ilnmicial ties that the union seen..unbreakable. England depends heavily mi the shipbuilding yards of tbe Clyde; %  i I III the London mart: of commerce II i ? a saying thai in cveiy large British mercantile establish%  %  handaoBH Ami the Dtunaraug resort proi %  ottand, 11 say notiiiiik' i 'nents of ;;Jf clubs, have ovary leasoo to ba happy that there is M "ImiaaeaMe' border alonsj the Tweed K. i may months out uf the %  < > Unions are the principal lueata. Ami and Coin C these err rough ihe mails l not more than $50,000 a The popularity of a country Id well reflected In the sale of un used slumps to collectors in the United States. Certain countries have Issued stamps which have n.'v. i bean well received in America. from German>. Austria. Hungary and Japan seldom are OV tbe minimum amount considered reasonable to cover the COSl Of dealer handling. • %  Vf, tiling Russian stamp*. BtSJRpl from China fell in tbe closing stages of thi R %  ffl irhue British .•lamp* fell then, only to rise again Britain and France r* ; eral millions %  year in valuable These are im peartanl assarts and a high return %  rill investment DA COSTA & CO.* LTD Agents LINGERIE DEPT. HKKK'S YOl'R OIM'OKTUNITV TO BUY ALL IHK LOVELY LINGERIE YOUVK WANTED In (his Deparlmpnl you will find a full range of LADIES INTIMATE-WEAR, by all the Leading Makers wW You will buy here vvilh Confidence Knowing Ihul QUALITY & SERVICE are Yours' DACOSTA&CO.,LTD. DRY GOODS DEPT. Ql&nfi TO-DAY FOR THESE ENERGY* BUILDING FOODS FISH TurUe S* I mini Hsrieech Tad i .ii-iseir aaaabsvtes Km-. MEATS Hsnu in tins B-roii—Sliced Twkr.. Chicken* Ducks Ol Toncueo Liver Tripe Itraln. SUTFl r.r'.idRabblU APPLES VI (.1 lAllLIS In Uns %  ale \-[rroU A Teu Rrujwel Sproubi m miCook's 1'asle—fie. per Un Dried Prunes— Mk\ per lb. Sllnc in tins—36e Saltana Pudduurs—ite. Steak & Kidney Puddlncs —44e. nr i s ( Empire Coffee i .. i: BREAD & CAKES i i;i>\\\ SWF;M IPRLNKS Fruit ( itc ChocnUten Ml-. Dinner Mint* M. r*. tun-Mow*


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THURSDAY, JANUARY I, lH\ BARBADOS ADVOCATF PAOI FIVE Car Damaged Cotton Prices In Collision Satisfactory .ll \\s I. IIOUS IASI ipn To W.I. Growers T ill: RIGHT FRONT bu of the motor car X \.w\ ;.n.l ilriven by Mr E. S. burrow.--. Labour Commissioner. The prices, being paid *•' damaged in an arvldoni m PI ,., „., ^l.,,,,] ^ rtlou ,„ Ulr ttie toneUon ..r MOM WUUafn Wet indie* by Ike it. lleniy and l'nn> Street* ..t about COO ...%  .. B pdocl .. rdv moni.im factory. Mr. T. A Twyman. told AT-o irvt.lvod in the uc-eident the Advseale >esterda\ was a m^ior lorry owned by Mr. Twyman is Manajina I)iSprmKhKll Company Limited, and rector of the Monucrrat Com driven by Clarendon Creemdtte pany Limited, Chairman of the of Mile uud Quarter. SI Peter. Negotiating Comtrittre of the Bea T WO CAR SEAT* valued MO '-land Cotton Association In astro stolen from a car b'Kruiiand and a Mfmber nf the JoORinjt to Reginald Robinson of Advisory Commit lee Dash Gap. bank Hall The oar He came out to the West Indies was un mi open spot at the side, in November 'o attend thr.t Angl DM rhe seat.' wore rsnual General Meeliiiir of the B.W.I, moved between 10 am ind 1230 Sea Island Cotton Association p.m on Tuesday. -vhich was held in Barbados. C 0LV1N MOORE, a labourer of Since then, ho visited the cotton M> Lord's Hill, yesterday tfnwinji islands in the area. appeared before His Worship Mr. He said that the cotton growers A J H. Hanschell. Senior Polite in Montserrat are setting ready to Maji'straU* of District ''A" on two plant their crop next month and charges of laiceny brought by the are hoping for a better season than Police the previous one when the crop He was hrsi charged with the was destroyed by pink boll worm larceny of i-lothe*. valued at 112 Mr Twyman left pesterdaj 7/9 on December 22, from iho evening bv B.W.I A for Trinidad home of Sydney Skinner of Baxnd will visit New York and Monlers Road. treal before returning to England The second charge was larceny later In the month. Iluiiiinu PropOBah \|>|>rov<*d Whopping Big Lies BURLINGTON, v \ rANTASTIC STORA ol death in the North Dakota ...i. the IMS World hip for %  Sunnj C iltloi nil tit ol the Bui I I pnntoi %  Lhi n r Harcui Lift ii "' 111. His story. "It got so hot down here last KINGS %  iiniiulatiou oi tin Island I I tg euan amah "M'HIU .IIMUMM-II the inu future <>f the industry, with lhi rood III England. M ni hat .ipprovtd of the maintenance of the preset.: i of I | o.B. Ibe pi i' i i %  %  UssS> to be Miami University Students Visit Jamaica iiaaen PRINCES* ALICE playing Held at a graslng ground Toe grass hi tall and tbe h*p which erase there arc fat. There too much bush for cricket and other name* .HI* the playing field is atill incomplete .. Dee _. U from the Ow paid a \ aad end tin.. %  agrieultui ii %  aintei whih i wai In ri ., p|la dritfi lo North n kola it got M i COM thai MM night %  tnernbar ol ou ;i r that the ground got just ate In tact, the earth %  O hard that people of clothing from Charles Brown Whili of Nelson Street. The clothes are Inn at the valued at £ H I2'8 and the offence was alleged to liave been committed sometime on November 23. On this charge he was remanded until Jamiaiy 10. The preliminary hearing on both charges was started yesterday. Moore is nut represented by Bofrbedoi he i Marine Hotel I stay Trade With Canudu Vt'IIl Increase In '51 .A* suit Ex-Stoker Goes Job Hunting OJTL: %  1 tur Advocate suv^ ll'.tu Higgins yeeterdgj morning he WHS on a 'bus goint u Boariled null fVoin Boarded Hall he walked three and a half 'iles to Woodburn to see totnehad promised him a iii been boi '.ii;ht When tr ear -old A NQCIRY into Hie eircumslances nioniing he %  urrounding the death of 22yedr-old Edward Blackman was yesterday postponed by Mr. A. W. Harper gt tint District "B" Court one win until Wednesday next. Job. Tlie body of Blackmail was Higgins liven at Holder* Hill, found at Silver Sand?; on Friday St. Jamc*. so in .ill he travelled morning by Lionel Huss of Tweedpva i 10 miles in HMI.II of .1 lob, aide Hoaii. it was removed t<. ttM lie inthree i-hildren and they Christ Chureli Almshowte and are all ill His wife kg suffering Beatri.o Btackmao idenliiled it to flom an injured leg. Dr. Charles Manning. Hr -ervt.i for live vears in the M AJOR ROAD studs and signs Trinidad Royal Navy as a leading <*el that they could were placed at the junction stoker and would be glad to do Jrm the Weat Indies a of James Street and Lucas Street the same job on any vessel that l-eved that there were many yesterday morning visiU Carlisle Bay. } n in ** Xnltt *"*f p ns i uir t " "" Formerly there were many Higgins said that he spent -1 isl.>id that eould be more econominor accidents at these corners, rough Christmas and a worse New m-cally purchased in Canada. Evans Bpofl but motorisU and cyclists who Year. On Tuesday, the second He said that he be u-ved thai ,i,wlwrighl of approach t.u 1 i\ to both parties. They in CanMa. L. c n> vana ada. had a great purchase id he beDon't Play Ball" On Playing Fields THE COYKKNMKNT RI i uuVMn ol Sv. Michael .... seem to have reached deadlock where ptaylntl Belda era J' 1 "" 1 1 Agricultural Society. Mi K1NOSTI IN, A group of stude I vrr-it. I last week %  i.tok over th 1 mdoMii.il deeelepwisBi of Ihe nd They were aciximpamed 1 lr 1 .uella namb.iugh, professor Of Ceograpby ni |he t'i The visit, which l.-ted 10 day;. • t tours of agricultural -But tins 1 do know couldnl dm ,i grave, we ilooa the %  drtvei and %  bad lo avea Dlffhti hilB down far hot f"i the (udgei They g*av give the weeds a shot of oil down I could poll then IN S Effect* Of Ruin • >WN. king in half on I 81 1 ithei 11 The group was welcomed to the the Hen 1 w A BarT -.fit. Minister for Agriculture. : mdi and Commarca. Mi R11 dalph Uuike. IT arenl like tin. Ark. .nceined The Princess Alice Phiyi] |.„ ,( .,, ,(„. j i. ronetltlng of the proof lene Maule Intl. faCBM aiul four students, was yarn: assisted In its study tour bv the Jamaica Agricultural Socket) 200 ft subsoil layer of clay ant! (lime IN i.ieihnig" after the rains Peopla living in the boom town* Of Odenaalsmv W. Idnni. ami St Helena arc tei 1 Ifled bj the .spongelike behaviour f the earth's M has been mess pro%  %  %  %  iii. 1 gperta esMeiine.it with new fouiMlatlOCtt, Udni and %  aek wide open The Governntanl u '' % %  • %  the Mi. Fight NaJd food iUmat< .1 long Ume > %  %  .>. iu the) put i < ;-s ;is iK'lug suitahh t.,i j.i. t .. SHOCKED LOVE elds, rfM an an itaei w n put up ti J I HI^'IVV. '" M '. l "V^mmont ,., June. i W T*. triei *A, """ l "' 1 f s "'-"' ^e Reef was the ii>-i t„ .. si., t'.r ,, '" u w <* m,;i1 .i..|inred and convened ,,.:.. orsday. January ll yesterd..> „ow the Princes, Allca i Evans Sow.net :. Ul..„ E -„ IH **** Bl '' :cel1 thought someniie had reOsMDl,,| l 'nhwav whlcfa was in all bered me and sent a money order reapeotS, capable of taking tbe I wat. feeling ven* happy, but rajweal and heaviest aircraft I was handed a small card When this strip is completed, ii \tm ''lould be in a position to tak< When he opened it. tO his disIhe slrato eruisera. tlie n.nv he saw a 1939 -45 Medal sent commercial aircraft in lb" •" to him fn>m the Navy Hcadiuarand the Comet, the new eommert.rs He looked at the Medal and eial airliner at his sick children ^r.d wife. terday that if Me al.l had •J ;; ,u ';; Vlurv Lewis, OMeal Central Station Is New Vaccination Centre Colonel R. T Mirhehn was flrsl of 155 people to be vaccinated against small pox at the newly opened centre at Cclral Station yesterday. Eight vaccination centres were open in St. Michael, but only 220 would he Wf* !" "J-a-Tj %  ^.r k ;.i'";C"^^i!^c„> SaS ffiffM Sehooiierontheltun Offlcer's Ofnce vesterday showed He left hi* larder at home empty— W|Jh (ft that an approximate total of 4,531 not even containing tea or sugar. p MkM people had received vaccination fading out against the disease since the camMIMF I D'a '"<• Mar M %  >* %  • can "boast riawnato. palgn started some wean ago rtuvss* •• %  • ,,_.,.„ „ ..ideit sebuoi P Of these. 3,120 people were The following infecUous ft KJVWS vaccinated at the St. Michael ceneases were n-difled during th. rt tres and 1,411 at the centres in month of December: iJiphtherm £ the out-parishes. Enteric Fever 4; Tuberculosis 3. SB—year-old — -. si Ma wai found lying in ., trcneh along Qulnea Road. St. John, about 8.3t' P.m. on December 31. S|H>oncr was taken to the (ieneral Hospital the tame night hut du the morning <>i Anuarj :• Kvidence was taken v. -.t.iu.n from Dr. G S. Emtage and KVIIM Edglull 01 St George In his evidence Dr Q s RmU w:. m 'hat he performed %  peat mortem Pbu Mill in ot beet M .mil weed have K"t out ol troi. Moreover, n Offlcialll h.niiled i.vci to III' try by iln .nine Cornmlttee, trj iiii'M .1 have, r it. I't H(T-OF-SPA!N. Dee 30 Dl Roderick Marcano, Medical of Health for Port-ofI. is Ind i cated Ihat the exposa! of foodstuffs in ttM C1I1 u^ coufd get boat might involve enactment Of legnln %  islalion for their wiapping m •0CM form of inexpensive olioipai Serious criticism' IN made OB prepared for sale in the City, and on the health t.uuliilds of tile people who offei I '..1 planted lomatoeg on tha niUalde 1 ack % %  Mi nou a, put rertiUzei on the iiis. htm the) sdi'iiiwirroN. DIM Courting fcouptM la the vUtngu toroato "as so big thai It broke o( f> '.n, pro11 the vine lolled d.iwn UMed loucUj when fanner Norman the hill Into the vallej and brahf Clark eleeti gee suropen n wai U>ugh The neigh1 iduu M laa cattle bour'fl little boy, fdaytngj out there, The Banea runa alongaldi the as drowned in the jul Lgrrera' Lane, with its tradi' I foodstulh I Refu-^d Pioneer Aid ii— oi OWB pan .j-, tha i"-iv ,,r 1 man whi name was Charlea Evans Spoone, .it tinOanerai Hospital Mortuarj on Januai \ -' at al 1 a\ Tite bodj was 1 Red Jisepb Spooner of SI John a ii" lol %  nun that thbrothel Tin .,i 1 I the man .,v .dn.ni ti.i 89 yean and he schooners Frederick wan dead foi id Minnie Masher twelve In.in There 1 n wound loin.11 shipping, lindei the riflll eye ami a larg" the right The Mary M. Lewla is 33 years old. The next to her in age j the Maries Belle Walle whose captain Ever) said some weeks ago was about 32 vears old Baibadian born Captain Marshall, the Mary M. Leuls' skipper, said yesterday that there 31 at was very little diffcrci A lot I>I controversy HUN year by 01UU nil was not well wilh expenditure Prune.Alice Ki nad bj Executive v Butt] v %  So sTel .1 letaUad account ol tin itnre. Including pertic %  Sp-titil Meelincs rhe Vastri bald ipei la threehed ihe mattei out. and 1 omitted .1 rejpori lo it* • 1 1 merd Since Ihen, U < %  V*e %  %  elVi'd linn b-i.ilei lni > 1 %  Ing the held, which lew bmltted to the Oovununenl llOl >el • %  nil %  l'i)l(T-OF-SPAIN, Dec 29 The Bermudez hiwi.n fom1 in* of Trinidad hove been ie HaN Aid when th. Council turned dowr %  1 .1 ..if i< idinii It 1 %  %  1 . .,1 eied by the K..mnnnc Advinor.v Rotrd which "lid not reiommeiK 1 r.mii' Who's Who" Dedicated To Princess Fishing 25 Years Ago TO LOOK at Herbert Carter's face on the Reef Beetch yesterday as he mended the fishing boat sails which will take him fishinR for red lish to-morrow, you would nol l*w |* lwo ch ""' have thought that years ago. a boat in which he was J^"^ JJUaX* fishing sank about li miles off the shore and he had lo v niM r Her Aral owner v, swim for five hours. tain I-ewi of St. Luc Carter is a short, little man of T>8. He has a rui;l whose > weather-beaten face over which he wears about an incli |of bristled grey hair. From the time he wss a boy. —^ Carter used to fish. Now he goes %  %  r__ t CnrL about 23 miles off the inland and Three Months POT A LOCk where the water is over 300 yards deep he fishes for red llsh Carter says thn' to the south ol the island you will find the best red fish fishing grounds He will tell you that when fly Inn tlsh men n.ive to rest in between whiles As soon as the sails are bus %  IK he i is C';ip. aflei named Captain Lewis ran her throuKhr.ut the West Indli i trading w)tl Konend eargo Occasion were madl tO Curacao, .ind Surinam. 1624. Captain Mnrshull': In his opinion death WU due ublin .1! eirl r.il I K-inin |, ,,.,,.,,;,.. • .. rhage from injuries received. The Injurksi received to the : i. t rite at Mt irkindehip wa rlnht side of ihe he;-rl are con0 QUI .,f the original BVOI %  wtent with 1 kderaUe cted ba Ihe Playui %  I %  • hved n. th.it region 1 mmlttee Nn price h Evelyn BdghUI of St. Oeor) ti |1 Md told the court tht on December ,, n .>t<<<-• %  ol the buUdlngi about 8.10 pm he wu which would irequired and •• %  • %  mt the in UM 1 O—281 %  .,( r, paring the gTOUBdl w.i long Guillen Road, SI J gfj Subsequent:, ihe OWBsH He saw a man in the U nd %  1. ruotsd .1 price, whicn on the riitht sm. ; u;t lubmtUed fa Ihe G iv1 mnent. KINGSTON. .It.i. De> Alt COUI %  I IkN Of the I'm%  gfeal 1, allowed lhi rorthcom rdltton ol Who' Whi the Pre l-rmcess Alice has furnished the adiioi Aith ,ui iiutoarnphed photn1 a •hi.ii btegraphs Cement Talks A decision of Police MnRistrate, Mr. E. A. McLeod was connrmed fey the Judges of the Assistant Court of Appenl vesterday, Mr. G. L. Tavlor and Mr. J. W. B. Cheneiy Mr. McLeod had scnplentiful IlKhcrlcnccd 'wnley Thorne of Howell: Itoad lo three months' imbach father bouKht cent years she has been runninR steadily between British C.uiina and Barbados tradlnK with rice ;md general cargo. The Mar* M Usrfa hi now irt rnukiui* reudy (off nlttng apparently um onadoui 11 %  -f UM the 1 He exai toed him and noticed that tin %  i'i right 1 1 .. ,. Aruha |IV1 f,.,t from where the ma lying With the fniit .'heel ex( ,. Ian rhi Ol veinniont rap UOd lhi) would i>i irt' in .1 poattl %  Hen A „,,,!,,. „ I1V deebttdn with %  and about i|„. purchase of lhi alte until %  ik 1 :e* .' : lowered, flying llsh will cluster h( rounn ), prisonmenl with hard labour when hull With her itrey painted tguiity of the larceny which Willy im •• bj boat and will go on the of cock oiaaauree !' HT feet from riem sideo jnd spawn. Fishermen lean The ^gtk was stolen on Noto stern post, 23.53 fee: in width over the aide* of the boats with VPm bcr 23 and was the property and has a draft—when empty— their nets and scoop up about 40 or Kiehnid Jordan of Hasgntl of 10 feet Her net tonnage is 8.< at a tune Hall. %  pfj SUd "he draws 11 feet when well He has sailed aiound the Island loa-tcd. Nine men man her many times Two of them w Jordan said thai he was home Captain Marshall told the Adout fishing in the Mankey. the "hen he saw Thorne between (WJ( ,. ln(| hr ,. ollM rof ncmler boat Carter thinks of as hi' some canes near his home People 1||t Maf M i^wi, being inhome away from home 'id not generally paait tlwie and v0|vC(l ln mil w n0U5 accident. Captan Marshall's brother was iklppei I id and Uu f the Lieyele In the gUUsT, 1 up the 1 [cycle •< % %  d placed it against some can* | ing on the trench and then g<, into the car and i.-porti-d the mut 1.1 la Poui Roacw Bub Btatlon The man ttuil wa in the trench was of me*lium ouii.i and lllghth held %  ; dsa* rrown complexIon He looked about BO aga home foi ttM %  ami further nlned pi the OoesBBor-lni,r utive Committee 1 %  thai kho ExeouUve ( advised bs ha %  s*do.. vlaem as lo the price M wnloti PORT-Or-SPAJN, Mi A. A BhenOeld, Qo %  assonomk Adviser in 1 ,. j 1 ha gone to Jamai* %  la I Ii uill com amlng the %  1 1 Uehmenl 4 1 %  1 m Tunulad %  Ami from amoi llsh storii' eeoiMJini. romn • iii.n. from Claude Bamei of Blkhorn, Wla., wrote I kisMiia li'ite ,.t e.ieh end, an<| i' than ime idyll wax broken by aaulensanl shobiu Two louniii survey ore inveatintt 1 I 1 shocks rderod i" %  rremga safeguarda —| INSI !H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD.Distributors' PURINA CHOWS FOR LINOLEUM WOOD FLOORS AND FURNITURE Now riling When Carter is telling you of he asked' him what he warned lie had a paper bag and ran when he went towards him, dropping the bag as he did so.. The bag contained the cock. the time. 25 years ago when the bowsprit of the boot in which h was nshiria 18 miles off shore broke and the boat sank, he spe.ifcin n hurried way BJ thougt he wants to net over the memory of iaosa free hour* ol iwurunlnji for hut life R.at Sank Hi \>;i wttti anoUier ntlienuan who; 1 Incull!" Thna. about midday %  hen the boat stank ^ He 1 r*-'Ung the-., but he did bci not feel • I rsei ct l Ihe shonljrv and the only hope he had a> l>( \\ that .1 boal might pass t.y. Msnv boa'were with n light, bul the}' were golnii in ilnbient 01 rsctlonOne time he felt 'ometlih.t touch his foot and he thought that all WH ove* w-ith him. but it was onlv moss. Then, about 5 o'clock when he was lired. and the other fisherman had cramp. thev saw two boats. They had to do" much yelling before they could attract the attention of anybody onme boat which came near them. II friend 'Phonsa is in the Almshouse now and liecauae of that swim toicther. his tone was sad when he said that soon after. 'Phonsa took a down turn C. P. BETHEL MADE COL SEC. BAHAMAS Mi C. P. Bethel. DtpU Coioniin s< creta B appointed Colo.iinl Seer, f the Bahamain aucceasll f A F.van> Sornctlme in 183fl. the ghlp BUUN during 1 long %  peu .if bod weather encountetsd between barbad'H and llritlsh fiui.111.. Many a ale and rou*h he has sailed her Ihrouih. and .H I tsl Stilted All For A Piece Of Suiiar 01 M:VA Wishing to suck up %  1 sugar at the bottom nf his liqueur glass. Mr Pb.nde V eux in a eaf" ; ,i val ^iwx a Bwlteerland. sucked Up the Rla** i.^ well so that it got wedged In bli Ihroal Bhi 1 in face and unconscious, hi .1 er who forced his street door ke\ down Plnrlde'* throat, bn k. til Kiss* and prlled out the piece. Plat ub> then tken 1 CASE STRUCK OUT \ 1., umlrj • Hon H a Burnett truck out because C Hill Of the Central Motor llus hill With nenhda iv ing it not present at th* 11111 %  Mn Court "i Origin ii Jurisdiction bel Q 1. 1 i . 1, Ol of Burnett inn ws 1 lalmlo it on June Burnett who was then ,11 i... ihe 'IMI* ..JlTol'inT Ml Friend% lM •" %  i''-'.falaai Sire, lC eady 'SS-niulantte-l. UJ COOldad 1 1 .. On that %  Ing y.2'* damage*. me land was bring offered. A •cond lettei rregp Ihe aoearnirM t ,1'kcd if the Vseti 1 *er % %  m .. |. aWon lo submit the -,euie .iske-i for MANSION HYGIENIC WAX POLISH ^ FOR BRIGHT AND HEALTHY HOMES , \. U. i I'' i"|lie ii,,' Oovarnn* 1 . bment ol NEW P S. The SecreUry of State lor I Colonies. Mr. Jame-. Griffltli appointed Mr A. M MncK to bhb Pi %  V/V////#V/////////W/-'-V'V,'/'/V'* < 59 ATTEND NEW CLINIC Fifty-nine patients have -dream been .mended to at the Si aUebsel PaHsh Medical Llinir for the two days it was opened to tlie public. <*w of the Parochial Medical Ofticers told the Advocatf This, he aaid. keens age of 200 patients per ten.liv. t". farmer!v by l-ith of the parish Medical Officer" at the ulrughouse and at lhi 1 The de> 'ne Clink on illernale day* of UM for two hour* aa> per week at; J, ////////.'////#' New Beauty For The New Year OUR 1951 STYUNGS Usher In The NEW YEAR FOR YOUR MAKE-UP USE — ARDENS CLEANSING CREAM VELV'A CREAM MASQUE SKIN TONIC ANTI-WRINKLE CREAM NOSHINE HAND LOTION SPECIAL EYE CREAM ULTRA AMORETTA CREAM BLUE GRASS 4 NIGHT & DAY BR1IJ.IANTINE F1IMMEI. NIGHT & DAY LIP-PENCIL LIPSTICK ;: KNIGHTS Ltd.-Pbwiix & lily rsinudM ,n,l Ihat moi.vcT, Iho PlwIM %  ."' HultnUon al GovPnmil tu•,,,''• Th* CorniniKiih "W* i... Mimendcd ll.m '• „o-.l l>c MM "•' Uiw i maka "i" .upervl taldj > In si Miftiuri but -ugicn triji •lie Government like over rwponnibimy ul ara.ulrin i ung ll**M''• ,, THE I-\TEST Mills POOTWUI Hriii.h IUU sfc. SIMPLY ADORABLE NEW LOVELY TOOTAL FABRICS %  I.OMIHA" In lovely eotoun I Plaidi and Plata ol Gra B '' %  B in wide .ii $1.69 per yd. CBDLOM %  In SANDALS and W'jler Rlns* \nd ..nri ttjter Hinr Itti ti rLKANSOM and POUHIII.^ l.vsi'W .. v. il Di 1 fjreei %  I I "'"' Black, Etc, "' $1.63 y d Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. I 10, tl, 12 4 13 BROAD STRUT





PAGE 1

PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, JAMABY 4, 1951 I j HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON ? HLT^i J <^vj — %  T E \^!a*jl(/\ 0 5 LIFEGUARD THE WONDERFUL BRITISH DISCOVERY A Supreme Germicide and Antiseptic FOR PERSONAL HYCIENE TO STERILIZE CUTS AND a R.I IBS | TO DESTROY DISEASE GERMS SAFETY ASD RELIEF FOR BITES AND STINQS This wonderful new Lifeguard used tn tens of thousands of homo is the most powerful protection you can use. At the same time it is quite safe for jl! to handle and pleasantly fragrant and non-staining. No home with small children due h: without it 33S rw I l MORNING MISERY v ull-Juv haadarha. 1-t.sua nd up • t h ruin your motmrig. you cm _,. ih. day" with AlkaSalUat. Taka it on •mini, asam-il naadad -latof In tha day Kaap a tupply of qui.k acting Alka SalUar handy a/wayf.' m u Alka Seltzer Season's Qree tings • Slur! & Saapsun Ltd. Extend to all the ComplimmU of tinSeason and Beat WUm for 1151. SHAM I SAMPSON LTD. A.S. BRYDEN & SONS (Barbados) LTD.-** USE RAZOL POMADE a* your HAIR drctaing. It ftraigntens inc nair. and rids the scalp of dandruff. USE RAZOL Pomade as directed, and you get iUrtling results, without distressing your pocket. Distributors: THE BORNN BAY BUM CO. RESOLVE IN < HOI Ol.All:s ;<••

i

es





ESTABLISHED ee ee aoe

Ceasefire Group
Reports Failure

we LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 3
"THE THREE-MAN Cease Sre Group renorted to}

|

the United Nations Political Conzittee today |

that it had failed to negotiate a cease fire with the
Chinese Communist forces in Korea.

Sir Benegal Rau, Indian chief delegate and
member of the Group, gave the Committee what
he called a “plain and unvarnished account’’ of
what the Group had attem»te? to do since Decem-
ber 14 of last year.

lions hict

asonable”’



{the Group felt to be “re





Contraband Worth (00.072 feu ase oF Ronse
£150,000 Seized |

bo

Establishment of a demilitar.
Korea,









rea across about
20 miles in depth, with the
HONG KONG, Jan. 3 | ithern limit cf the 38tt

Revenue officers to-day seized} parallel
over £150,000 worth of gold, raw| °® All ground forces to rema
opium, Indian rupees and cigar-| in position be withdrawn
ettes aboard the 2,880-ton Nor | to the rear, Forces including
wegian steamer, Hai Hing. | guerillas, to be moved to the

The contraband was hidden in} rear of the demilitarised area.
the engine room of the ship,| 4 The cease fire to be super-
which was about to leave for| vised by a United Nations
Singapore | Commission which should

The greater part of the cus- have free access to the whole
toms haul was made up of gold of Korea.

Officers described it as possibly|5. No further reinforcements to
the largest in Hong Kong’s his-; be introduced by either side
tory. The cpiurm alone was! 6 Prisoners to be exchanged on
worth about £13,000 a > for cne basis.

No arrests were made. | Sir Benegal reported that the

—Reuter | [in Ag | Nations unified command

| hac ——— these terms as 2

| satisfactory basis for a cease fire

s The Group then hegan a series
King Of Nepal May | of attempts to discuss tne question
with the Chinese Peoples’ Repub-

Get Back Throne | lic representative in New York

; Mr Wu Shu Chuan,
NEW DELHI, Jan. 3 The first attempt was made on

The Nepal Parliament is ex-| Neeember 16 hy Mr. Ne Entzam
pected to agree to the return of) President of the General Assembly
King Tribhubana to the throne and Ch-irman of the Grono
according to authoritative Nepa-' —Reuter

lese sources here, ae ee

The Government of Nepal i: 7
understood to have agreed in Fix uch Agree On
principle to the King’s return . ‘
subject to the approval by Par- Note To Russia
liament which eight weeks ago
voted for his deposition and ths PAIRS, Jan. 2
succession of his three-year-old The French Government today
grandson Prince Gyanedra. agreed on the text of a note to

The restoration of King Trib-| be sent to the Soviet Government

hubana who is now guest here of] rejecting allegations made on

the Indian Government since No-| September 15, 1950, that France

vember, has been the crux of|had violated the Franco-Soviei
talks here between Indian and| Treaty of 1944,

Nepal Government representa- The Soviet note accused the

tives. French of systematic violation of

—Reuter the 1944 Pact binding the two

powers to take in common all

a Tae weasur t prevent German)

again becoming a_ threat an

Civilians Barred | 323)..ci05
From Night Train | pycess Profits Tax

nation,—Reuter,

SINGAPORE, Jan. 3
Civilian passengers will be Goes Up In U.S.
barred from travelling on the :
Singapore Kuala riage oes night ad eee coke eae
ai rai Malays railway au- a oda}
mail train, Malayan bday. {the new $30,000,000 Tax Bill,
The last night train for civil-| ‘mposing a 77 per cent super levy

) corporation excess profits.

ians between the two cities reach-|{ ~! rat .
sae es The Bill increases the country’s



ale r ic mninw

6 ent hanhone mer thie ax collections to the highest dollar

with a radio coach and an ar-] igure in history, but Mr, ‘Truman

moured car attached will take] sald “The tasks ahead of us will

the mail by night to Kuala Lum- fovea more and much heavier

Ee axes,

v deeatibeias attacks on trains He added in a statement: “T

have forced the authorities to} shall in due course submit to the

restrict civilians to day*’me}| Congress recommendations for

travel. substantial tax increases
—Reuter —Reuter,



LUCKY DOG



INTERNATIONAL TOY POODLES SHAMPION

owned by Count Alexis Pulaski of New York, grects his new mate
“Seahorses Brown Penny” when she arrived at New York Airport.
“Penny” is the first show specimen of the Toy Poodle to be imported
into the United States from England. Known as the world’s most

valuable dog, four year old “Masterpiece” is rep¢ rted to be the only
dog e arning a gross yearly income of $11,000 for his owner Valued
t 320,000 “Masterpiece” is the only dog in the w rid to be ham
pion of | preed as well as helder of the coveted Utility Dog Degree

Express

|

their

sentence,



arbudos @



WAITING |

THURSDAY,

JAI

SEOUL ABANDONE

“FOR FISH



JARY

4,

1951









"PRICE Ee

RIVE CENTS .

aoeeedltieennanenemeagragt +3

BY U.N. TROOPS:

SOUTH KOREANS LEAVE

Emergency
Declared In
Sugar Area

IN JAMAICA

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, January 4
The Acting Governor, Mr. Mac
a ilivray, to-day declared a state
of emergency in St. Catherine
Worthy Park Sugar Estate area
where trouble betw 1 pickets
‘cL would-be strike breakers and
lic broke out for the second

me to-day



rT





iT IS TIME for the fishermen to bring ashore their catch at Brown's beach and the many fish seekers

wait under the shade of the trees to make their

Breaks Jail Conflicting Doctrines
May Cause Trouble
In U.S. Congress

By PAUL SCOTT RANKINE

During Xmas
Concert

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 2
While convict inmates at Car-
rera prison settlement—Trinidad’s |
Aleatraz-—were taking part in |
annual Xmas_ concert on |
New Year’s eve night, Saywel!}
Gordon, 34, serving a ¢ ear |
made a drain:g jail- |

break during the intermission. t
Gordon was playing the part of |










a policeman in a slapstick comedy

crime,

about the triumph of the law over
When the alarm sounded

the concert broke up in disorder

as prison officials,

armed guards

and fellow convicts made a futile

search in every

nook and cranny

of the island prison.

a
the

the threat Gordon made

Police were to-day conducting
countrywide man-hunt while
irmed guards were posted outside
home of Attorney General J.
Matthieu Perez’s home in view of
at the

end of the trial when Perez, who

was. Trial Judge, passed sentence,
Police report no boats missing

since the jailbreak, but il is known

that
swimmer”

the

Gordon is an “excellent |
and is believed to have
swam the mile and a half between

island and the mainland

colony.

rs confederates took



off a fuel crisis by producing an

extna 3,000,000,000 tans of coal
by the end of April.

Prime Minister Attlee and
three of his Ministers held an
urgent conference with miners’
leaders.

Afterwards a_ statement was
issued that the miners represen-

tatives
operation,

over
in

} miners—hours of work, and



|
brough :
peace plan, he told repor:er V1 @



|
|
|

in May'
One of
part in ay
three-man escape from Carrera'

convicted
three others.

Gordon was
1949 with



six months ago but all three of |
them were recaptured after three
days at large.—(CP) |



Attlee Asks Miners
For Mere Coal

LONDON, Jan.
Government to-day oN
to coal miners to stave

The
pealed

had promised full co-
Such questions
European
the
posed

as bringing
workers to* work
mines—detern, nec'v op-
in the past by the coal-
ab-
also discussed,
—Reuter

MENZIES CALLS
ON ATTLEE

LONVUN, Ja’

The Australian Prime Minis‘er
Mr. J. Menzies, called on Prirne
Minister Clement Attlee at No, 10
Downing Street today

New Zealand’s Prime Ministes,
Mr. Sidney Holland, was exypec-
‘sd to make a call Jater,

Mr. Menzies was having
1ence

senteeisms were






aurd-
with the King at Bucking-

ham Palace this afternoon

—Keuier.

|
NEHRU IN LONDON |

LONDON, Jan. 3

Mr. J. Nehru Prime Minist |
of India arrived at Hura airport
near Bournemouth Dorset for the
Commonwealth Prime Ministers
conference today.

His plane had been divert
irom London airpert after a Pa
American stratosphere had cras \-
inded today.

Askeq if he had
=. I have no plan.”

fe was expected
Mi crane

to see Prime
Attlee tonight
—Reuter.

Clement





ere yeees

MORE FREQUENT and bitter criticism of the foreign
and military policies of western European countries is
heard in the new

likely
for

to be
many years.

ON THE
° SPOT

Mrs. Elizabeth
68, could not
lifelong fear of electricity,
Her house at Bridgend,
Wales, was equipped for
but she would only use sae
dlelight.

Neighbours





Nicholas,
conquer her

found her

burnt to death in bed—the
flames of the candles by the
bedside had apparently ig-
nited the bedclothing,

Six Give Skin To
Help Burnt Girl



NEW YORK, Jan. 3
A “tc Surgeon grafted skin
from six people on eight- -year-old
Susan ‘Late nick who lost 55 per

cent, of her skin when her cloi..-
ing caught fire from ao gas stove
ist November.
Seven men anid two women had
volunteered to give part of their
skin.

One of the men was a 33-year-

old legless war veteran Harold
Swan, but the surgeon, Dr
Nordstrom decided not to accept
his offer,

Dr. Nordstrom said 320 square
inches of skin were needed
Though the grafted skin would

not last, it would keep the child

alive until there were graft sites

available on her own body.
—Reuter.

_———

Ilse Koch Goes
On “Hunger” Strike

AUGSBURG, Jan. 3.
Ilse Koch, red haired widow of
Buchenwald concentration cump
commandant has begun a hunger



strike, Reuter learned to-day, |

Ilse came into court 20 minutes
late from her prison near here
with her corn-coloured hai:
streaming uncombed over her}
shoulders, her coat unbu'toned
and her complexion wan

She had eaten nothing since
Monday morning.

Yesterday she drank a little
coffee and told her warders she
was going on a hunger strike

—Reuter

LABOUR’S TWIN
BIRTHDAY

LONDON, Jan. 3

Prime Minister Attlee was 68)
today.

Today was also the birthday}
sf his deputy, Herbert Morrison

who is 63,—Reuter.

DEFENCE TALKS

LONDON, Jan, 3,
The
ed High Commission will
talks as scheduled on Monday
on Germany's contribution ic
western defence a spokesman of
the British Foreign Office

day



| strike



'

Bonn Government and the;
be-|

said to-'
-~Reuter. luxury



WASHINGTON, Jan. 3.

session of Congress than

This because te United
States’ relations with its Western
European Allies in the struggle
against Communism has become
. major factor in the isolationist-
interventionist debate now tak-
ing place in the press and in
political circles

Congressional consideration of
all foreign measures is expected
to be strongly influenced by two
conflicting political currents, One
is that thrown up by the deep
underlying struggle over the
Trum doctrine of continued
and Yeréasead economic and
military aid to the United States’
non-Communist allies.

The other is the Hoover doc-
trine of relianee upon consoli-
dating western hemisphere de-
fences advocated by the former
Republican President last month
Too Many Communists

Is



stoned

cM

red two shots from his revolver

Saetarnanae sent a telegram
mmediately to the Governor,
ealling for a recall of the whit
»clice officers who he said were
unable to handle the vandalism
ind hooliganism

To-day, following their appe
yesterday to the pay and
leaders Serene Sunda Janu

Last night the Hon W.A
Bustamante, head of the B.LT.U.,
ne of the opposing Union fac
tions, held a meeting in the area
.ecompanied by a strong police
bedyguard Union Supervision
Counille H. L. Shearer end
Mrs Rose Leon, M.H.R., were

and when the violent

t attacked Shearer's car, he



ary 7 a
Jamaica's
the Bishop
Vicar Apestolic
the Chairman
Circuit
crite al

day of prayer for
and the World's
of ,J
of
of

situa
tion, maica, whe
Jamaica and
the Methodist
another joint
directly — to
Chairman of
Asso-

K.C

issued

this time
M. Kirkwoed,
Sugar Manufacturers’
ciation, N, Ww.
stader of
Sustansarde
Bila xy
PL oat
Union's
industry

The three churchmen = said
“Unless this strike is settled in
the shortest possible time, it may
be the final spark which will set
fire to all the combustible material
we have mentioned and cause such
an explosion as will bring calamity
and disaster to our beautiful
island, shame and disgrace to all
who have failed to control it and
sct back the clock of progress for
ple for

ce
Manley,
P.N.P., W. A
leader of the
J.L.P. and Frank Hill,
executive «directing
campaign

the

this

in the sugar

cur pee years to

many




The line of argument of the; supporters of ex-President Her- Kirkwood and Frank Hill have
bert Hoover raises four points, already aecepted the invitation,
The first is that western Euro- | bt Bust ite and Manley were
pean countries are ther 109 | UNAavE ailable for a veply — this
weak or too divided ideologically j evening,
to be depended upon to give all- | —
out support to the United States

| . .

in a general struggle with inte ,
national Communism. The secoru| 1 Auriol Going
is that their rearmament indus- | 1 Oe he)
tries and armed forces are rid To Washington
dled with Communists . ‘ wae

Next is that they are cither| ,, WASHINGTON, Jan, 3.
too neutral, or too defeatist =| The President of France, M,
clined even to arm and. defena! Vincent Auriol is. expected in
themselves against Communism | Washington on March 28 for a

There is no doubt” that the | Visit of State as guest of Presi-|
Truman administration can com | Cent Truman . |
mand _ substantial majorities for} fficials said today that the
major foreign policy measures week of March 28 to April 3 had
in the new Congress, Althouvh, been agreed on for the visit. It
the Democratic party of Presi- will be the French President's
dent Truman has a majority of| {rst trip to the United States
only. two in the new Senate. the|He is to be accompanied by}
administration can rely on pickine| Madame Auriol

up Substantial voting sypn it
from the internationalist section)
| of the Republican Party whieh
supports the principles of the
North Aflantic treaty, and Unite:
nations,—Reuter.

Red Trade Union
Calls Strike

ROME, Jan, 3

ltaly’s Communist Trade Unicn
has called a 30-minute generai
in the capital tomorrow
asia proiest against a law author-
ising rent increases, Tramway
persennel, telephone an: tele-
graph workers will lay cff fox
only the first ten minutes
strike which

of the
am, local

begin 10
The

is to
time

law

at

new came into effect





Long in preparation the visit was
described by administration offi-

cials as primarily a courtesy and
goodwill affair like those made
recently by some other chiefs of
state

It will provide opportunity,
nevertheless for discussions with
Truman, Secretary of State

Acheson and Defence
Marshall on such issues
ern European Defenees
rearmament and Indo
future.—Reuter.

Secretar.

as West-
German
China’s



More Demonstrators
“Invade” Heligoland

CUXHAVEN, Jan, 3
demonstrators landed to-
Heligoland shortly after
a British patrol
a first party of
news agency

More
day on
German police in
boat had removed
24, a West*Germany







“WEST NEEDS TO KNOW MORE” |

WASHINGTON, Jan. 3
The United States Secretary
of State Dean Acheson said to-

day that’ the Western powers
must have further clarification
of the Soviet attitude before
assuming that the Soviet Union
is ready for four-power peace
tall
Mr. Acheson read to} weekly
“onference 1 tement
i x
peen gaing oO



on New Year’s Day. It allowed reported

landlords to raise rents blocked) “A spokesman for the Associa-
at low figures by Government) tion of Islanders seeking to wia
decree since the war back the derelict German ex-

Rents will go up by 20 pef| submarine base in the North Sea
ent, for tenants who are un- said the new group had set out
employed, living on low pensions,| from the island of Sylt, north-
nd in conditions of acute pov ng Pe of Heligoland, the agency
erty. j added.

Tenants of the middle @| The report had not yet been
group will have to pay Ot por coftirmed from any other source
ent. more and tenants of luxury-{it id. Demonstrators were pro-|
flats, shops and business premises| testing against the use of the is-
100, per cent. more, A 200 per cent.| land for bombing practice by the
inefease will hit tenants of super] R.A.F

houses.—Reuter, —Reuter
ference,
The snBject matter was not

ABOUT SOVIET ATTITUDE



months

regar¢ ng the possibili ty

of
Unie
Uni
He said that it was obviou
t the Seviet 1 ‘ t
f I pr f
talks







The State







Department an-
nounced today that Mr. Acheson
had ci d in the British and
French .smbassadors for discus-
sions at 9 o’clock tonight

The ouncement
Mr. Willer t t
Secretary i
Affairs, would he

discussed



In Moscow, newspapers pub-
lished today without comment
the text of the reply to France

|

and the French note to the Soviet}



Union on four-power talks,
eh vy indic ata that thesc |
w analogou ith the notes
exc hangec d wit he U -d States
Brit ter the proposal
—Reuter, |



— “BURNING INFERN¢

TOKYO, Jan 4.
bandoned by United Nations

Forces, it was announced here to-day. Leaving
the city in bu ruins, United Nations Forces
withdrew to the south as Communist troops fought
their way in from the north.

Reuter’s Correspondent, Alex Valentine, left
the city a burning inferno as he flew out to Tokyo.
President Syngman Rhee of South Korea and his
Government had already left the capital reaching
the chief United Nations seaport of Pusan yester
day (Wednesday). Throngs of miserable refugees
followed in the red glow-of the scorched city.

The martyrdom of Seoul start-
ed on June 28 last, the fourth da

GEOU Me a been



ning



S VT; Ik ‘ of the Korean War, when it first
ugar a Ss fell to the North Koreans
: After months of Communist
occupation, it was recaptured
Postponed jthe Americans on September 26,
following the Inchon landing. Oi:
|} December 24, the South Korean
Yrom Our Own Correspondent) President Dr Syngman Rhe
LONDON. Jan. 3 ordered the evacuation of all nou-
The International Sugar Counci] |combatants and men of non-mill-
Meeting postponed from autumn |tety age from the capital
ae ear Sinerete ern toe neck After the witndrawal began the
fob mts leant. -anothes. three | its of the great evacuation éon-~
nthe, it was. reliably learn stretched tor 80 miles south
e today. It is anticipated that |% rds from the city while anothe
meeting may be held in early | Une of lights moved northware:
but confirmation is stilt | tows ards the fallen capital ane
ing awaited from certsin dele.’ stward towards the port of
sates i hon
| Punishing air attacks and dog-
The reason for further post- ,8&¢ resistance failed to stem th
ponement of the Council Meeting | of Communisis in the three-
s that it is expected that the chief ;Prenged drive on Seoul,
opie for discussion has tempor-| A British Commonwealth Com-
ly been lost pany was reported to be fightiny
way out of encirclement b)
The Council was to have dis- Chinese troops
cussed the disposal of the expect
»1 world surpluses of sugar anti-| But a spokesman in Tokyo
ipated by the end of 1950 } and at Eighth Army headquar-









The advent of the Korean Wat ters said they had no knowledge
vhich brought Government pur of a report that the Communists
hases by the United States and had driven a wedge between the
hoarding by housewives caused an, British 29th Brigade and = an
anticipated surplus to disappear American Division,

That position still exists today Near smouldering Uijongbu
snd it is now thought there will on the central road 17 miles
be no world surplus until the end| north of Seoul, 300 Australian
of the present year at the earliest,| troops mounted guns on ?* tank

and raced headlong into... vova
om a ter-attack, killing hur ‘eds «Tt
Commurist#on either side of t

News Ban In | ‘0.
ft, 2 Fifth Air Force planes inflicted
Indo-china |more than 1,200 casualties when
ea they slashed back at- the advan-
SAIGON, Jan 3 cing Communist armies, Shootin

General be Lattre De Tassigny,| star jets killed or wounded about
French Com ( ww or a 1,000 Cominunis
High Commissioner in Tndo-¢ hina! northwest of Uijongbu
has ordered a ne ‘ crsntp, | 1 the road from the northwest

Until he returns to Si i | to Seoul, United Nations troop:
his. tour of Noi ina, | to-day abandoned Munsan, the
the French army in & Willi read town on the southern bank
release only official communt-! of the Imjin River,
ques. | four Chinese armies and two

; | North Korean Corps on this front

Tonight’s communique reported) and in the centre may try to cap-
an improvement in 1 military | ture the important communica-
stuation in the ‘T ector} tions centre of Wonju, 55 miles

of north Vietnam | southeast of Seoul, according to
General MacArthur’s Intelligence

Vietnam guerilla activies were | (United Nations air strikes were
still dispersed in the rs lnimed today to have damaged or
of the Red Ri rm troyed 719 Communist-held
French posts and a v ut >| towns, .
attacked, Reuter \ —Reuter,





“And ve smoked

them ever since!
er

9°?





“TI know
first du

» One’
i Mauricr is quite
a revelation. They showed #
me a new standard

enjoyment,”



“Tne never found anything
else so cool and smooth —
aud I expect you'll say I
smoke far too many.”

*You can’t have too many du Maurier
with this little filter tip to proteet your
Besides it adds enormously to

flavour.””

throat.
the

“And the result —given
the finest tobacco in the
Sirst place—is superb.”

MADE IN
ENGLAND

$1.00 for 50
There'll never be a better cigarette

du MA’ ele

THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER ?



fe i
CIGARETTE





2
PAGE TWO

Se emmeeetieokedl



tetera mmc Stearate

Canib Calling

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER
>

IR ALFRED BUTT is expect-

ed to arrive here on Satur-
day by the Golfito intransit to
Trinidad. Sir Alfred who was
created Knight in 1918 served in
the Ministry of Food from 191%
to 1918.

Four years after serving in the
Ministry of Food, he was for
twelve years a Unionist M.P. for
Balham and Tooting.

Reason for his trip to Trinidad
is unknown,

Brigadier General will
Be Intransit

bh geeed intransit passengers io
Trinidad on Saturday by
the Golfito are Brig. Gen. and
Mrs, Frank G. Willan.

Brig. Gen. Willan was born in
1878 and was educated at Eton.
He joined the 4th Oxfordshire
Light Infantry in 1896 and the
King’s’ Royal Rifle Corps in 1899.
He was made a Captain in 1906.
He served in South Africa from
1899 to 1900 and received the
Queen's medal. In the first World
War he was mentioned six times
in. despatches. He was awarded
the DS.O., in 1915 and the
C.M.G., in 1919. He retired from
the army in 1933.

Arrives Today

R. SYLVAN COX, Travei

Editor of the Miami Herald
arrives this afternoon on
B.WLA.’s flight from San Juan,
Puerto. Rico, and will spend a
few days in Barbados. He leaves
on Saturday for Grenada, During
his stay here he will be a guest
at the Marine Hotel,

Passages Cancelled

ARLY indications were that
the dollar cruises organised

by British steamship companies
for wealthy Americans, § and
which were to include the West
Indies and Bahamas, would not
suffer as a result of adverse In-
ternational news. Now, howeve.,
the situation in the Far East ap-
pears to be having some effect
on booking. Although the cruises
to the West Indies are unaffected,
it is reported from New York
that cancellations of bookings on
the £46-a-day round-the--world
eruise af the Caronia are coming

into the Cunard office. The can-
cellations are from people
frightened by the thought of

spreading war in the Pacific.

Back to Canada

ISS ANGIE CHALLENOK,
daughter of Mr, and Mrs
Lester Challenor of “Buckden”,
St. Joseph, who has been holi-
daying in Barbados, returned tc
Canada over the week-end by
air. Her Canadian home is in
London, Ontario,

With T. L. L.

ISS LENA SMITH, who ar-
rived from Trinidad on
Tuesday afternoon by B.W.1.A.
is spending a short holiday with
Mr. and Mrs. E. G. MacIntyre of
Worthing View House, Rockley.
Lena is with Trinidad Leaseholds
in Pointe a Pierre.





*

“You mark my words,
officer, this’ exhibitionist
pilfering invariably comes
as in waves.”



Sheriff Jones !

LTHOUGH Western costumes

aren't strictly required at
the Golf Club’s Wild West show
at the Crane Hotel on Jan. 20th,
those who wear formal attire
risk falling into the hands of “the
law,” The popular “Casey”
Jones has been appointed sheriff
for the evening and threatens to
throw anyone not “properly”
dressed ‘into the stockade. It may
cost him a dollar to get out on
bail for the evening, but it will
all be in a good cause as all the
proceeds will go to the Golf
Club’s Tournament Fund, which
will finance the Barbados team
on its trip to Trinidad to play
the St. Andrew’s Club represen-
tautives,

Back To Work
T WAS very gla@ to see Frank
Chandler, Overseer of Car-
rington’s Factory back out to
work after five weeks’ illness.






hi
ane -N
eo WL
Te h{ [9 cenrinicare
||| | No CHILOREN UNDER 6
- eee nc I
(






=



a

our
innocent young minds—
let’s go and bust open @
bank!”

Lonion Express Service.

Ie

“Might injure

Wedding

Ms ADALINE SEALY,
daughter of the late €apt
Sealy and Mrs, Sealy, was mar-
ried on Saturday afternooy to
Mr. T. L. Harris at Holy Trinity
Church St. Philip. The bride who
was given in marriage by her
brother wore a dress of off white
satin trimmed with silver beads.
The ceremony was performed
by Rev. O. E. Jones, Miss E.
Newton was the bridesmaid and
the bestman was Lt. L. Harris.

With National Geographic

Magazine

XPECTED to arrive in Bar-
bados this morning is My.
Charles Allmon, an American
photographer who is collectiny:
material and photographs for the
National Geographic Magazine,
A short time ago he completed «
sixty page article on ‘Trinidad
which will be nppearing in the
National Geographic fengerine
shortly. No doubt he is planning
en a similar article for Barbados

Turfites Return

OME of the Barbadian racing
turfites who were in Trini-
dad for the Trinidad Turf Club’s
Christmas meeting returned on
Tuesday by B.W.1.A. They
were Mr. Fred Bethell, M.C.P.,
his son Michael, and Dr, Herbert
Weaver.

Other arrivals on Tuesday who
spent the Christmas holidays 1n
‘Trinidad were Mr. Charlie
Peterkin, Mr. Fred Ferreira and
Mr. Winston Cozier.

W.I. Film Star

ARL CAMERON, the young
film star from Bermuda,
plans to visit the West Indies on
a short holiday after completing
his contract with Ealing Studios,
During the last few months, he
has been working on the film
“Pool of London,” which is to be
released next month. Earl ‘s
certainly enthusiastic about his
job. When asked in London if
he found the work tiring, his
reply was; “I can work on films
from January Ist. to December
3lst. without being tired of it.”

Back to Trinidad

KS. GEORGE cde NOBRIGA
who has been spending a
holiday in Barbados, returned to
Trinidad yesterday afternoon by
B.W.1.A. She was staying at
the Ocean View Hotel,

Christmas Dance

WORD of congratulation to
& the Colonial Office liaison
staff for the hard work they put
into arranging the Christmas
dance for all Colonial students in
England, which was held at
Seymour Hall, London, on
December 27th. The object of
these dances is to enable students
from various parts of the Colonial
Empire to meet together in a
friendly atmosphere and no effort
was spared on this occasion to
make sure that the atmosphere
was friendly.



BY THE WAY — By Beachcomber

‘HERE have been many ques-
tions asked about the part
Which the Saucy Mrs, Flovster,
still attached to Lots-road, is to
Play in the Festival.

The idea that Sir Ewart Hodg-
son’s ship should be a kind of
for foreign visitors is
absurd. At present the accom-
Modation zvoard comprises one
cabin with a hole in the floor, Even
the two hens aboard creep into
an old dog kennel amidships every
night, and the cat goes disdain-

fully ashore. My own opinion
is that this astonishing craft
Should remain moored to the

Embankment, and within call of
the Power House, Her. sailing
days were over when the port
side fell off in a gale. The re-
placement didn't fit, and to-day
she is lopsided, with half a must
stuck in upside down and a stern
made of old packing-cases.

For Your Christmas List

NE of Foulenough’s ideas
which has be¢n adopted by

the Malicious Press is to give the
books startling and attractive
wrappers which need have no
more to do with their contents
than the blurbs. This adds ex-
citement to the choice of a book
Thus Miriam Glapiron’s travel
book “Four Days in Turkey,” has
a wrapper with a view of the
valley of Aosta, and the blurb
says: “From the first moment
when Hugh Brascombe wresiles
with the elephant near Delhi, to
the pulse-tearing climax which
Babs Ormefield quells the mob by
showing them her father’s hat



there is not a dull page. Basilisk
Committee Choice.” Professot
Keigwin’s “Statistical Survey of
North Greenwich in the ‘Eighties’
has a wrapper showing the Upper
reaches of the Amazon as a back-
ground for Cleopatra. The blurb
says: “Even those who know
nothing of North Greenwich
statistics have thrilled to the story
of Cleopatra, Basilisk Commitiee
Choice.”
Smuggling News
In her handbag the Customs
officer found a pair of pytons.
us: (News item.)
S they must have been rataer
small pylons; and as she
was probably only trying to help
the electricity people at a wintry
moment, I hope the authorities
dealt lightly with her.

Another Secret Out

EVER, never shall I tire of
reading the reports of the

Gallup poll people about the cost
of living. I recorded last week
their discovery that when tne
cost of living goes up, everybody
finds things more expensive. A
later discovery is equally amaz-
ing. It is that lack of money is
forcing us to cut down expenses
on our pleasures, I suppose no-
body will believe such uncon-
ventional thinking until it is in-
corporated in a massive White
Paper. How little we shoul
ever know about our lives with-
out these polls.

There And Back

“Two first returns, please.”

“Where to?”

“Here, you fool!”




Floral Stripe
RIBBED MAROCAIN

HIRTS

New Flowered SPUNS 36"

SHIOZE




$1.12 yd.
$1.37 yd.
36" $1.24 yd.
36" $1.49 yd.





Assorted Shades
Grey
30/38" waist

4.09, 4.47, 4.86
4.97, 6.31, 6.53

EVANS « WHITFIELDS





Flannel Trousers

Naval Memories

“tT T’S the breezy Navy men 1

adore,” said the girl next to
Foulenough at dinner, “You're an
Army man, I suppose,” “Oh, no,”
said Foulenough, “Navy up to the
fetlocks. Six generations soaked
in brine, Great granddad was
Nelson’s bo’sun in the Victory.”
“What was your ship?” she asked
prettily, “H.M.S. Intolerable, ply-
ing between the Moluceas and Rio
with a cargo of wire-netting and
pianos, generally speaking.” “Were
you in any battles in the war?’
“Oh, yes,” said the captain, “One
in Davy’s Dive at Portsmouth, and
one in the Rialto Music Hall at
Wagbridge.” “But weren't they
land battles?” asked the silly lit-
tle rogue. “Partly”, said Foulen-
ough. “But the first ended up in
the water when Scug Rawlins fel}
into the harbour, and the second
was more an air battle, as I was
hanging by one hand to the front
of the dress circle with someone
pulling my legs from below.’
“You're making fun of me,” said
the girl sulkily. “You’re just talk-
ing rot.” “Mustn’t give away
naval secrets,” replied Foulen-
ough, toying with her hand under
cover of his napkin,

Hip-length Or-:ndie
Gaiters
ERY frequently pictures ap-

pear in various
women uphols?-ic. :



papers of |
> the horses |

{ BARBADOS ADVOCATE

NO SNAPS IN THE ALBUM SHOW
GRANDMA LOOKING LIKE THIS



skit on the last 100 years of fashion.








Left to right are Rita Diamond (1851 Bustle), Rosemary

Jacob (Naughty Nineties); Wendy Crosley (Bustle Girl), Ann Disbury and Esme Ketley (Suffragettes).



B.B.C. Radio Propramme |

THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 1951

7am, The News; 7.10 a.m. News Analy-
sis; 7.15 aan. From The Editorials; 7.25
am, Programme Parade; 7.30 a.m. Gen-
erally Speaking; 7.45 a.m. r
Choice; 8.00 a.m. Land and Livestock,
8.30 a.m. Halinka De Tarzynska; 845 a.m
Your Body and Its Enemies; 9.00 a.m
The News; 9.10 a.m. Home New. froin
Britain; 9.15 a.m. Close Down; 11,15 a.m,
Programme Parade; 11,30 a.m. Listeners
Choice; 11.45 a.m, Special Dispatch; 12.90
(noon) The News; 12.10 p.m. News Anal
sis; 12.15 p.m. Close Down;
Listeners’ Choice; 5.00 p.m, Compo-er ot
The Week; 5,15 p.m, Scottish Magazine;
545 p.m, Pipes and Drums; 6.00 p.in
Highlights of 1950; 6.45 p.m. Programme
Parade; 7.00 p.m. The News; 7.10 pin
News Analysis; 7.15 pm. We
See Britain; 7.45 p.m, Generally Speaking:
8.90 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 8.1 pm. Pau:
Temple and the Vandyke Affair; 8.45 p.m.
Composer of the Week; 9.00 p.m. Special
Dispeteh; 9.15 p.m. Have a Go; 945 p.in
Do You Remember; 10,00 pm. The News;
10.10 p.m, From the Editorials; 10.15 p.m,
Toke it From Here;

10.45 p.m. :

Avound with Herbert Hodge; 11,00 :
}

}





Our Mutual Friend.



CROSSWORD

ScTOSS

4. Quite a wrench having to adjust
it to one's needs, (7)

7. Stoat’s hesitant claim to cover-
ing ? (6)

11. It’s as ripe as tnis, (6)

12. Noise trom the line, (3)

13 Gentleman with a golden touch
(6) 16. Only half a Fabian, (3)

16. Babyish thanks to this provide a
great arterial trunk. (3)

17 Restore on proof sheets. (4)

19 Black watch? Anyway they're
fighters. (4)

42 Anyone with an eye to onion nas
a right to be, (7

24, Backward master in India. (5)

25. Made in a book or by the door
(5) 26. Movable habitation. (4)

Down

1, A tin cap may be more uselu
in war than @ brass nat. (7)

ut into practice. (6)
3. Wide open spaces. (8)
4. You'll find tt in the middie. (6)
. This us is an effort, (3)
6. A youth growing up may grow
Home, (4)

- t
9. Weird-sounding stretch of water
(4) 10, Everyday wear. 14)
14. Lost like a salver, (6)
18. Ratsed at golf and put pack
sixpence. ( 20. Silent
21. Operation in outline) (4)
22. Colour. (3)
23. Suitable for the end. (3)

Soiution of Saturday's Puzrie

to
(hh

Across:
red ,



1, Pieniiful, 7, Arrival t }

Arts: 15. Sailors: 15 Sniu Axe le
uan; J8 Amass, 19% A

Adept; 21. See 6 Down Down

2, Larvox. 3. Tiding Farol. 5
Paist; & and 2) Across. Versatility. »

Reason: 9 Valid: 19, Assessor: 14

Leant’ th Add

written beneath. On- one oc-

casion the clothes-horse had be-
side her a little gnat of a man-—
or about half of him. The photo-
grapher was so intent on getting
the whole clothes-horse into his
picture that poor gnattie was

at the Fair of the Stuzzi-cadenti | pretty well mutilated. Nor was

at Forli, with






Men’s

$5.81



Your
SHOE
Stores

not what}
balderdash about their costum*s,

his name given. He was about
as important to the great ognaaenty
as a sack of dirt.







NOW IS THE BEST TIME TO PAINT
YOUR HOUSE

A wide range of READY MIXED PAINTS
and MATERIAL supplied by the foremost

manufacturers to select from.
REMEMBER when you save the Surface
You Save $ $ $

Inspect these at our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT
Telephone No. 2039



THE BARHADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY LTD.

COTTON

————————

Figuring the size of the universe

like trying to find out “how
[high is up,” but the latest “star
' census”
two hundred billion galaxies, each
made up of hundreds of millions
of stars.

The new estimate was reported
y Dr, Harlow Shapley, director of
the Harvard Observatory, before
the American Astronomical So-
ciety at Haverford College.

Dr. Shapley said the appraisal
was made from a galaxy survey
conducted at Harvard during the
past 18 years.

He explained that there are

Listeners’ ' is

4.15 p.m b:



WARnerR BRos. PLAZA



L.E.S.

SEEING STARS

HAVERFORD, PA.

DRESS REHEARSAL 29 Chelsea Arts Ball by Croydon Art School students.. Their show will be a |

indicates there may be six trillion

miles,

entire universe.

Harvard “census,” he said.



THEATRE
BRIDGETOWN

TAKE DEEP PRIDE IN

ANNOUNCING

Starring as ROARK, a man who lived by no rules but his own

GARY COOPER

Co-starring as DOMINIQUE, the only woman for thet brand of men

| PATRICIA NEAL-E

PLAYING FROM FRIDAY JAN. ith

2.30 & 8.30

and Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30p.m.

S\N

Try this for
COUGHS

It works fast
and tastes nice!

oe

About a million galaxies have
been photographed so far in the









about a billion galaxies in the
visible half of the sky out to a dis-
tance of a billion light years—
each light year measuring about
(6,000,000,000,000)

There are probably another bil-
lion galaxies in the other half of
the sky, which is obscured by. the
milky way to which the earth be-
longs, he said, and these two bil-
lion galaxies probably represent
only one percent of those in the

S.











THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1951



Opening To-morrow —

BOBBY DRISCOLL :o:

COMMENCING FRIDAY STH - -

Walt Disney’s

GLOBE TO-DAY, LAST SHOWS 5.00 & 8.30

“THREE LITTLE WORDS’—Fred ASTAIRE
‘ “BAGDAD” and TALENT

AQUATIC CLUB CINE
TRUST, Mak

in “THE WINDOW”
An RKO RADIO PICTU



PLAZA Theatre—8RIDGETOWN

“CINDERELLA™

in rose—46
eed












cries to work m the autumn or
you'd be worried eee Mary was.”
Then, bidding farewell, he
cakes his pare home, and at last
he has time to tell the full take of
his adventure. “Well, that
Autumn Elf should be graseful mw
ou,” says Mrs, Bear.

THE END
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED








ARTHUR KENNEDY

CORNEL WILDE :o: MAUREEN O'HARA

in “HOMESTRETCH”
A 20TH CENTURY- FOX PICTURE

in Technicolor



Color by Technicolor

SPECIAL MATINEE TODAY — 1.30 p.m, (Monogram Pictures)

The Bowery, Boys with
Leo Gorcey in
“BOWERY BOMBSHELL”

Commencing Friday—®

Johnny Mack Brown
in
“LAND OF THE LAWLESS”

2.30 & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.50 pan,

Warner Bros. Towering Triumph - -

“POUNTAINHEAD” with Gary

‘Cooper : Patricia Neal: Raymond Massey |





a

PLAZA Theatre — OISTIN

LAST 2 SHOWS ponee=. 5 & ae
rson
: “THE WALKING DEAD"

Dennis Morgan,
a Boris Karloff in

MIDNITE SAT. JAN. 6TH

(Monogram)

Leo Gorcey & Bowery Boys in
“MR, HEX" and
“FALL GUY"

with Robert Armstrong

P.M, (W er’s Double)
“APRIL SHOWERS” and

(NOT SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN)

FRIDAY 5 & 4.30 p.m.
and Continuing :
Monegram’s Big Action Special !
Victor Mature — Alan Ladd in
“CAPTAIN CAUTION” and
“CAPTAIN FURY” with
Brian

Ahern — Victor McLaglen
——————————



GAMETY—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

LAST SHOW TONITE (8.30) (Warner's Double)

“KING’S ROW and

“CONFLICT”

FRIDAY—SATURDAY—SUN.—8.30 p.m. MAT. Sun. 5 p.m.

Monogram’s Bis Outdoor Special! ! !
“MASSACRE RIVER
with Guy MADISON — Rory CALHOUN — Cathy DOWNS



Monday and Tuesday — 8.30



mn, ee
“FREDDY STEPS our” @ “I WOULDN'T BE IN YOUR SHOES
i

EMPIRE

TODAY 4.45 and 8.30
TOMORROW 2.30 and 8.30

David O. Selznick’s

“DUEL IN THE
SUN”

Starring
Jennifer JONES
Gregory PECK
with

Joseph COTTON
Lionel Barrymoore

ROXY
Last Two Shows TODAY

4.30 and 8.15
M-G-M Double .

Clarke Gable ;
Hedy LAMARR





in
“COMRADE X”
AND
“TRADER HORN”
7 with



ROYAL

Last Two Shows TODAY

5 and 830
Republic Pictures presents :
David O. Selznick’s

“DUEL IN THE
SUN"

Starring

Jennifer JONES
Gregory PECK

Joseph COTTON
Lionel Barrymoore



OLYMPIC

last Two Shows TODAY
4.30 and 8.15

Columbia Double . . .
Larry PARKS
e Evelyn Keyes
in i

“THE
SWORDSMAN"

AND
“TO THE END
OF THE EARTH"

with
igne HASSO
_ Dick POWELL

—S—





FERNOXONE

The new Weedkiller for control of

“NUTGRASS”

It may be applied as a spray or
a dust and is harmless to persons

or animals.

For further particulars apply to - -

PLANTATIONS LTD.



ASR

= pommeomeesene
THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1951



Today, C’wealth Plans

Battle Against Reds

(By THOMAS C. WATSON)

LONDON, Jan. 4.

RENEWED EFFORTS to mobilize the British Com-
monwealth against world Communism and to localize the
Korean war dominate the agenda of the Commonwealth

Prime Ministers meeting ope





Royal College Of
Musie Appoints
Coloured Musician

(Prom Vur Longon Correspondent:
LUNVDUN,
A 52-year-old Airican, mpu-

faim Amu, Nas been appointea to
a@ new pust In we Nuya: COucge

ef iMusic — thai of examiner m
Atrican music. He 1s the mrs
ecoloursd musician to hoid an

appoiniment in this Coliege. M-.
Amu arrived recently in Lonaca

from his home in Accra, Gor

Coast, where he began as a

teacner in the Presbyterian
sner~ Training College.

- Mo Other Airican has
influeuceq African music to such
a degree as Mr. Amu in the past
20 years. With the aid of
Western technique, he has mod-
ernised many of the best known
songs in the African languages
and enhanced their popularity.
They are now being broadcast or
sung in Gold Coast schools and
churches,

A senior master at Achimota
Training College, Mr. Amu holds
the Associate diploma of the
Royal College of Music. He plays
with equal ease the piano and
all types of African musical in-
struments, many of which he has
made himself. At Achimota, he
opened an advanced course for
other teachers who wished to
pursue higher studies in music.

One of the latter has lately
followed Mr. Amu to London to
take his final examination for a
music degree at London Univer-
sity.

Mr. J. B. Craig, retired teacher,
who worked with Amu at the
Presbyterian Training College in
Accra, said to me recently; “Amu
is a genius. We could do with
thousands of his kind to j;romote
music throughout the Colonial
Empire.”



Obituary.
Hubert Thorpe

The Rev. Francis Godson

writes, .

On Friday night last 22na.
ultimo, there passed away a
noteworthy citizen in the person
of Hubert Thorpe, carpenter and
builder of Godson’s land, Chelsea
Road, whose life and achieve-
ments should not come to an end
without recognition and a meas-
ure of eulogy.

He started life as a carpenter,
but his skill and energy coupled
with the knowledge and exper-
ience and directing capacity
which he soon acquired, enabled
him to undertake repair and
constructive work on a consider-
able scale and thus assist in the

upkeep and improvement of
Bridgetown and its environs
which has been taking place

during a generation or more,

He was described in an obituary
announcement as “building ecn-
tractor to the Lynch Investment
Trust.” But the facts require a
much wider statement. He did
extensive work for quite a large
number of clients during many
years, and some of the jobs he
put through will long remain to
testify to his ability and con-
scientious service.

Two points are deserving of
further mention. First, he was a
tireless worker, and while he
proved able, as occasion requirect,
to direct the usual groups of
other people, he also kept up his
early habit of personal labour,
coupled with a smile, plain, way
of life. And although he had
reached the ripe age of 76 years
he was, until very recently, still
busy and eager. The idea of
retiring at 55 or 60 years would
have seemed to him irrational
and crippling: he was then in his
prime and full of business and
enjoyable activity. “The ruling
passion strong up to death.”

Secondly, he did not aim main-
ly at making money but was

rather animated i the noble
feeling of love, for his work and
pleasure in doing it efficiently.

And along with this trait, and
indeed as a part of it, was his
probility and loyalty in relaticn
to his employers; he was eager
to do the work entrusted to him
and to do it well at reasonable
cost. And his courteous and con-
siderate attitude rnade association
with him always easy and agree-
able.

There will be many to whoro
his passing will be not only a






|

am A
so cS

ning in London to-day.

The world situation gives the
meeting at No. 10 Downing St.,
expected to last about 10 days, a
far graver aspect than is usual
these “family consultations,”
Surveying the situation, the
Prime inisters will devote as
much attention to the Far Eas-
tern defence as to the develop-
ment. of the North Atlantic
Treaty.

Robert Menzies, the Australian
Prime Minister, comes to London
with the set purpose of having
the Korean war localized and an
out-and-out war with China
avoided.

The Australian Prime Minister,
in a speech just prior to his de-
parture referred to the magni-
tude and the delicacy of the
political implications. He said:

Korean Campaign

“Our best endeavours will be
made in the direction of isolating
the Korean campaign and mak-
ing it clear to the Chinese people
that the United Nations have no
desire to injure Chinese lives or
property,

Pandit Nehru, the Prime Min-

ister of India, is expected to fi-
gure prominently in discussions
on the Korean situation and on
the Chinese intervention. British
Prime Minister Clement Attlee,
who is to preside over the con-
sultations will be able to give
first hand information en_ his
talks with President Truman in
Washington,
The establishment of a_ secre-
tariat to co-ordinate dominion
defence as a whole reportedly
will be raised. This is a matter
in which Australia is vitally in-
terested, for the present Liberal
government in Australia has
been severely criticised in the
past by the Labour Opposition
for not being more forthright to
putting forward the views of Aus-
tralia both from the military and
the political angles,

Indian
The Indian domestic situation
is also to be raised. The rift be-
tween India and Pakistan is re-
garded as a setback to the hope
that the Dominicn Prime Minis-
ters would speak as one unified

cdy.

The Pakistan Prime Minister,
Liaquat Ali Khan, ‘has already
intimated that he would like the
problem of the future of Kash-
mir, the main cause of the fric-
tion, ‘solved by the full confer-
ence of Prime Ministers.
On the economic side the
principal discussions will be on
implementation of the six year
plan of co-operative economic
development at an estimated cost
of nearly six billion dollars,
Besides Menzies and Liaquat
Ali Khan, the Commonwealth
chiefs scheduled to attend t
meeting are:

Prime Minister Louis St. Laur-
ent, Canada; Prime Minister S.
C. Holland of New Zealand Dr.
T. BE, Donges, South African
Minister of Interior (Prime Min-
ister Daniel Malan is ill); Sir
Godfrey Huggins, Prime Minister
of Rhodesia and Prime Minister
D. S, Senanayake, Ceylon.



—I.N.S.

70 Million Phones
NEW YORK.

The telephone is in greater

demand than ever before—despite
the inroads made by radio, tele-
vision and other methods of high-
speed or instantaneous communi-
cation.

The number of telephones in
the world climbed to a_ record
70,300,000 at the beginning of
1950, The United States, with
40,709,398 instruments, had more
telephones than all other nations
combined, Great Britain ran a
signally poor second with 5,177,370
phones.

These are figures compiled by
the American Telephone and
Telegraph Company in its latest
issue of “Telephone Statistics of
the World.”

This is the list of the ATT re-
ort:

The U.S. had an average of 27.1
telephones for every hundred a
sons. Sweden continued to hold
its second place spot in telephone
development with 22.8 instru-
ments for every hundred persons.
Canada was in third place both
in respect to total number of tele-
phones and relative telephone
development, having 2,700,000 in-
struments or 19.6 per hundred

persons,
3 Per 100

The world as a whole had. three
telephones per hundred popula-
tion.

New York, with its 2,956,832
telephones at the start of 1950,
outranked all other cities of the
world in this respect, one
country, the United Kingdom, had
more telephones than the largest
city in the U.S, Greater London
was second in total telephones
with 1,526,548 instruments, and

loss from a business point. but a! Chicago was third with 1,495,800.
\ Washin;

personal sorrow.

YOU'LL BE DELIGHTED
with THE NEW
200 C.C.

LE.

gton D.C, had _moxce























BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Horse That ‘Could’nt Stay’

Went On

Running

By The Scout

THE RULE relating to doping—‘any drug or stimu-
lant administered to a horse for the purpose of affecting
its speed . . .”—is so vague as to be almost meaningless.
Trainers, therefore, are left in the dark as to what is or

is not legitimate.

Two noted South Countr
trainers have been giving their
horses a course of glandular in-
jections. The injections are given
over a period of several weeks.

Results, especially in the case
of old geldings, have been, on the
whole, markedly successful. Is
this “doping”? No one seems to
know,

It is generally conceded, how-
ever, that the stewards are abso-
lutely right in wording the rule
elastically.

One of the slickest cases of
indirect doping occurred a few
years before the war. The horse
involved was a useful old plater,
none too sound in his forelegs and
with a known dislike for hard
ground.

The confederates who bought
him chose a day to run when the
going was firm as a road,

The bookmakers fielded
against the horse. They did not
realise, though, that his forelegs
had been “frozen” by a local
anaesthetic. He won easily.
On first thoughts, you might

consider this action humane and
i The danger is that a
orse can break a leg without
realising it, go on galloping, and
crash heavily to the ground.

Salve that ‘Helped’ Bad-

legged Horses

A salve applied externally was
popular among certain trainers of
bad-legged horses in America a
few years ago. Its use, however,
was soon detected and forbidden.

Did we see a horse similarly
treated win a big race in 1950”
I am not alone in thinking so.
A which has rightly

been stamped out in this country
as that of tubing a horse on the
morning of a race.

The horse, in certain cases, was
given a strong “shot,” ostensibly
to deaden the pain of the opera-
tion (to improve breathing) but
primarily to act as a stimulant a
few hours later.

Racegoers will confirm how few
tubed horses are to be seen on
race-courses nowadays.

Not that these horses wera
necessarily always successful.
Dope, after all, is only used as a
despairing remedy, even by the
unscrupulous.

When cleverly administered,

though, it not only increases a

horse’s speed but also its stam-

ina,

A notable example of this oc-
curred in a race at a Royal Ascot
meeting. A trainer had bought
for new patrons a horse which he
feared, after purchase, was a
“dud.”

The enthusiastic owners insisted
on entering and running at Ascot.
The trainer engaged a well-known
jockey, and took him aside for a
quiet talk before the race.

“This horse is a so-and-so,” he

telephones in relation to its popu-
lation than any other large city
in the world, with 59 per hundred
persons. San Francisco ranked

ond with 55 instruments per
hundred people and Stockholm,
Sweden, third with 47.

Not only does the U.S. have
more telephones, but Americans
use them snore. There was an
average of 365.1 telephone con-
versations per person completed
in the U.S, auring 1949. This was
an increase of 13 conversations
per capita over the ing
year. —I.N.8.





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ROBERT THOM LTD.,

White Park Rd.

ysaid. He stays about six furlongs,
j The race, as you know, is 1} miles.
All I beg of you is not to show me
up for a fool by finishing last.”
It was decided that the jockey
should pull the horse right back
in the early stages, make no
move whatsoever until the last
furlong.

This was the Plan to
Avoid Last Place

He was then to ride him out
energetically to pass the tired
tail-enders. “Remember what f
told you—don't finish last,” was
the trainer's final reminder as he
lifted the jockey into the saddle.

Trainer and owners moved
away. The horse’s attendant led
horse and rider towards the open-
ing to the racecourse.

“Never mind what the guv’nor’
said,” the lad remarked to the
jockey. “You’re on a _ certainty.
He’s sure to win.”

The jockey, accustomed to these
last-minute “whispers” from stable
lads, smiled to himself.

After two furlongs in the race
the rider was not smiling, but
cussing, “I eouldn’t hold one side
of him, and I’m fighting him, lying
second,”

At the last bend the horse was
still full of fight. The jockey de-

him go.
He Won sco Easily—and
Kept on Going
He couldn’t pull him up for half
a mile after passing the winning
post, easy winner at very long
odds.

“Was the trainer pulling your
leg? Did he know all along what
might happen?” I asked.

el men enemy caret er

said the jockey.

I know the trainer, a much-
respected man in Newmarket.

He is just one of the many
whose licences could have been
forfeit under the strict application
of the Jockey Club's new ru!: on
doping.

ee

—LES

British Colony
Invites No-Colony
Italians

LUSAKA, (N. Rhodesia).

Under-developed Northern Rho-
desia, long naglected by British
emigrants, is to encourage Ital-
jans and Italian capital.

The colony's Legislative Assem-
bly has authorised immigration
from Italy. The Government is
now considering an assisted pas-
Sage plan for the new settlers.

First target is 2,500 “selective
quality Italians, including a high
percentage of engineers, agricul-
tural scientists, chemists, doctors,
mechanics, and skilled workmen.

A group of Italian capitalists,
working out development sehemes
with the Northern Rhodesian
Government, projects a £7,000,000
programme of farmland exploita-
tion, housing, and new light in-
dustries, including penicillin,

Said one of the group: “Italians
did a fine job in Africa before we
lost our own colonies. We are
not robbing anybody in Northern
Rhodesia because yery few Brit-
ons go there.”












eee rrr



cided to relax his grip and let capital



|
|

|

}

{million refinery





1, A :
Did The Trainer Know? "poe

Expansion
In 1951

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Dee. 22.
The New Year opens in truly
momentous times. In such chal-
leiging circumstances as those of
to-day, industrial productivity as-
sumes an entirely new -
cance. Particular interest at-
taches to the cessation on January

lst of Marshall Aid to Britain.
That it has been found possible
to end this aid—at any rate for
the time being—by mutual a -
ment between ourselves and the

U.S.A. is a marked tribute to the! turvy”

magnificent performance pe up
by British industry as a whole. It
does not imply, of course, the im-
mediate and aone ending of
all benefits such aid has hitherto
provided, Many U.K. industrial
development schemes, among the
most important of which is, per-
haps, the building of new refin-
eries in this country, will con-
tinue to receive the dollar grants
already allocated toward their ful-
filment under Marshall Aid ar-
rangement. This is most satisfac-
tory news,

Comparison

One single comparison of statis-
ics shows just how tremendous
has been Britain’s industrial ex-
pansion during the past fifty
years. In 1899, U.K. oil require-
ments were 725,000 tons of lamp
oil and 148,000 tons of lubricating
oil—under one million in all. In
1949. exclusive of bunkering oil,
we used 13,839,727 tons vari-
ous oil products. Oil is indeed
one of the most essential of all
modern industry's basic necessi-
ties. And current consumption is
bound to soar considerably higher
still as British industry’s present
investment programme
takes shape. . ,

Simultaneously with ‘this de-
velopment, Britain's home refining
expansion programme continues
to materialise in accordance with
carefully laid plans. By the end
of 1951, for example, the £374
now building at
Fawley—destined to be the largest
plant of its kind in Europe—
should have come into operation.

“Not unless he’s Dan Leno and|This plant alone will be able to
Laurence Olivier rolled into one—|handle 5
and the greatest actor of all time,” ! nually

million tons of oil an-
ouble the U.K.'s entire
refining capacity in 1947. With
similar large seale expansion pro-
grammes maturing at other UK.
refinery sites, we should—within
the next two or three years—suc-
ceed in raising our annual refinery
capacity to nearly 20 million tons,

Understandable

The importance of these pro-
jects is understandable when one
remembers just how many other
great enterprises rely upon oil
products in their battle to produce
more and sell more. Moreover,
these industries are all implement-
ing formidable expansion pro-
grammes of their own. That is
why results already achieved in
world oil production during recent
years are so invaluable, why the
agreement reached with U.S. oil
companies during recent months
over accepting payment in ster-
ling for their oil and this helping
free Britain from currency com-
plications over obtaining al) the
oil we need was so_ especially
beneficial. That is why plans laid
by the oil industry for stimulating
production yet further during the
coming twelve months are so vital
e international industry gener-
ally,

The Sooner The Better

LAGOS.
The Nigerian Eastern House of
Assembly listened in startled sur-
prise to a statement by Camer-
oons Chief Fon of Bali that but-
ter is used by the people in his
district as lamp oil. This was
during a debate when the Chiet
Pressed for the urgent extensior.
of electricity to Bamenda and
Manfe. ’

THE ADVOCATE
HAS THE BEST
BOOKS IN TOWN!:!

NEW PAN

OPENED THIS WEEK
HERE'S ONE OF THE
SPECIALS

“Strange Confiict”’

By Wheatley

ADVOCATE

| lower than ever.





PAGE THREE





By WALLACE 8S. HULLET
INDON

The year 1951 looms grimly for
Socialized Britain.

Burdened with a three-year re-
armament rogramme costing
$10,080,000,000, the bewildered
Briton is also “promised” less of
everything except taxes, work and
hardship and the prospect of

a

ee

| z Hygiene
rh

it}
Wail

It’s as easy as ABC to keep the

lavatory spotless. Just sprinkle some

compulsory vegetarian diet. ie

Most unkindest “cut” of all is ‘Harpic’ into the bowl and leave over-
the meat ration. ‘

Embroiled since last July in night — ten flush. ‘Harpic’s’ cleans

trade discussions with the Argen-
tine, which supplies a third of

Gethin’ Saoet ikininte of Doon, ing action disinfects and deodorises the S-bend where no

Maurice Webb is reported faced i
with a position in which the main- brush can reach.
tenance of even the limited 16-

cents worth of fresh meat weekly

ration may become impossible.

An official survey of all existing
stocks in storage in Britain is
reported to have revealed that
meat supplies have fallen below
even the meagre wartime stocks
and a drastic cut to 14 cents worth
weekly is envisaged for early in
the New Year,

Butchers

Butchers, already suffering
headaches trying to gauge a 16-
cent “roast” may ask for the
meat ration to be issued fort-
nightly if further rationing is
imposed,

Britain’s meat i rts from
Australia and New land are
also at a low ebb due to an
fronieal economic situation.

With wool bringing such a high
price, sheep farmers are reluctant
to kill off their “golden fleece”,
and meat exports to Britain are

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MINERALS.--->*
Cuts in power during peak hours PROTEINS
by overloaded aging power station

equipment, and the failure of the
nationalised coal mines to cope)
with the increasing consumption is y
also adding to the discomfort of
the harassed housewife,

Conservative newspapers con-
stantly and bitterly assail what
they term the Government “topsy-
handling of the national-
ised industries,

More Acute
And as the cuts and shortages
ecome more acute so does the
ordinary Briton become more
confused.

The electricity boards urge him
to use less electricity and at the
same time offer him new électrical
gadgets which add to consump-
tion,

He is told the miners are break-
ing records each week with out-
put but coal is imported from
abroad because too much is being
used.

And with creaking rolling-
stock running constantly behind

CARBOHYDRATES. -

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Boil 2 cups of water. Add
sale. When boiling, add |
cup of Quaker Oats.
Cook it, stirring, for 2%
minutes. That's all.

BOVEIL



schedule the traveller is swamped 4

with offers of cheap exctrsion Costs Less
>. to country and seaside

resorts,

Devoting a whole editorial to
Government handling of national-
ised industries, the London “Daily
Mail” bitterly concluded:

“There may be worse ways of
celebrating a New Year than sit-
ting with a piece of corned beef
in front of a dead electric fire—
but not many.”--L.N,S,

than

INFLUENZA

——




















—

Blood From
Seaweed

LONDON.

Millions of tons of wasted sea-
weed that litter the rugged Scot-
tish coasts may be used in mak-
ing a substitute for blood plasma.

ExperimentS are being carried
out in London to use laminarin
— a chemical derived from sea-
weed — to solve the increasing
medical need for blood.

The new Gullang Laboratory
at the Institute of Seaweed Re:
search, at Musselburgh, Midlot-
hian, Scotland, is believed to
possess the only sample ¢
lan.inarin in the world,

About 100 tons of wet seaweed
are needed to produce one ton of
the chemical, but at present about
four million tons of seaweed
could be obtained each year
around the Scottish nt .

Glamour
Gaols

LONDON,

Glamour will go into Britisn
jails for women this year.

Prison reform regulations just
angounced provide that the
women inmates be allowed to use
lipstick and cosmetics and also
tone their dress with cell cur-
tains.

A range of colours for dresses
will be issued and the prisoners
illowed their own choice.

New patterns for outer cloth-
ing are also in preparation as
yell as new underciothing and
shoes.

The new regulations are aimed
at —, the prisoners take 4
ride i eir appearance.
™ . 7 —LN.S.



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LOCOCVOO~ SOUGGOOTOS G08 1 56 COCUSTSOSS 9S


PAGE FOUR



Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St:

Bridgetown.



Thursday, January 4, 1951



SEWERS

THE campaign for a cleaner Bridgetown
waged by the “Advocate” has met with
some measure of successin so far as it has
been noticed by the Commissioners of
Health. The staff of Sanitary Inspectors
and the members of the Scavenging De-
partment have contributed too, to such
success as has been achieved; but it is far
from satisfactory to find that individuals
in whose interest this campaign has been
waged have given little co-operation.

Despite the efforts of the Sanitary De-
partment to keep the dangerous gutters
clean and to provide bins into which people
can throw refuse, the condition of the gut-
ters shows that people deliberately dump
refuse into them.

The question is therefore whether the
gutters such as are found in the City are
suitable to the needs of Bridgetown. They
are deep and it must be admitted, offer
temptation to people to throw refuse in
them. In fact they are converted into
sewers by this process. In nearby St. Lucia,
a modern sewerage system has been de-
signed for Castries. Why not benefit from
this close source of knowledge? Why not

have a proper sewerage system in Bridge-
town?

But if Broad Street has responded to the
call for a cleaner Bridgetown, the call has
fallen on deaf ears in Bay Street.

It was suggested that the members of
the Boys’ Club might with advantage to
themselves and benefit to the community
transform the Bay Street windows into
beauty spots. This has not been done.

Surely the presence of the excellent Bay
Street Esplanade which is always scrupu-
lously clean and well tended, should act as
an incentive to the residents and owners of

that part of Bay Street where lie the two
windows.



WOMEN

THE election of one woman and the
nomination of three others in the 1951 Ves-
try Elections indicate an increasing and
welcome interest in public affairs by the
women of this island.

The appointment of one member of that
sex to membership in the Legislative
Council and the election of one to the
Christ Church Vestry has, it would seem,
given an incentive to them.

In this island there are many sides of
community life in which women can render
more effective service than men. It is
especially so in the administration of paro-
chial affairs, The sympathetic outlook
needed in investigating cases of poverty
which come before the Poor Law Guar-
dians in each parish gives women a
natural outlet for their maternal instinct.
The executive who must decide what por-
tion of his quota must be bought with the
dollars at his disposal or what portion of
his stock must be left in bond instead of
being distributed to his retailers, ought not
to be making decisions as to the difference
between the grant of five shillings for a
mother and a child and the necessity for
two doses of cod liver oil or two suits of
clothing for the same child.

Women have their natural place in
society and can make a worth while con-
tribution to the smooth and efficient work-
ing of local government.



SCOTTISH HOME RULE

NEW YORK
Theft of the famous old Scone
of Scone from its place of honour

And Russia

Truman came
Stalin as “goog old Joe.”

The General’s first invitation to
i



NEW YORK

General Ike Eisenhower, in-
spirational force behind the I
Western European armour being
assembled to frustrate any Russian
designs on countries reaching trom
Scandinavia to Gibraltar,
was cheered in Red Square
It was in August 1945, at a time
when Eisenhower shared the
widespread hope that the West
could do business with Stalin. At
Potsdam, just before Eisenhower
trips to Moscow, there was such
an aura of good feeling that Mr
home referring to



S

once

Moscow, as he explained in his
“CRUSADE IN EUROPE,”
(DOUBLEDAY) came in July,
1945, but he had been forced to
send his regrets because he had
to fly to Washington from Berlin
for a report. His second invita-
tion, and the one he accepted at
War Department urging, was de-
livered to him on the day the
A-Bomb fell on Hiroshima. His
friend, Marshal Gregori Zhukov,
since “broken” because of his ad-
miration for Eisenhower, the
General believes, flew with him
from Berlin to Moscow.

| Eisenhower took along with
‘him Maj. Gen. Lucius Clay, Brig.
Gen. T. J. Davis, his freshly-
graduated son, Lt. John Eisen-
hower and Master Sergeant |
Leonard Dry. They arrived in
the Russian capital August 11,

1945, by which time the second
bomb had fallen on Nagasal:i.
was in the war
against Japan, Averell Harrimn
put them up at the U.S. Embassy



On the following day, after ex-
changing military informaticn
with Red Army Chief of Staff
yen, Antonov, Ike’s party and
Ambassador Harriman’s group

took their places in a special
section of the stand erected in
Red Square for a_ vast sports

parade. But shortly after their
arrival, Gen. Antonoy appeared
with an invitation to Ike froin
Stalin to join him in the extra-
special reviewing stand atop
Lenin’s Tomb.

The invitation, first ever offered
to a foreigner, did not at first
include any other member of the
American party. Eisenhower at-
tempted to decline it as‘ tactfully
as possible because Harriman had
not been included. But Antonov
said:

“The Generalissimo says tho* if
you would like to come he also
invites two of your associates.”
Ike took along Harriman and Maj






By BOB CONSIDINE

Gen. John R. Deane, head of tie
U.S. Military Mission to Moscow
The parade consumed five
hours during which time Ike talk-
ed intermittently to Stalin through
an interpreter

Stalin queried Ike at length on
the industrial, scientific, educa-
tional and social achievements of
the U.S. .

The dictator, who by then had
told Polish democratic leaders that
he not only planned to dominate
that country but would ignore the
“paper protest” of the U.S., told
Ike in effect:

port

G NER/ s NHOWER

ing at a ceremony at the Waldorf
Astoria at which he received a Sal-
vation Army citation for ‘“Distin-
guished Services to Humanity.”
Express;

we need American help. It is our
great task to raise the standards
of living of the Russian people
which have been seriously
damaged by the war. We must
learn all about your scientific
achievements in agriculture. Like-
wise, here we must get your
technicians to help us in our
engineering and _ constructicn
problems, and we want to know
more about mass_ production
methods in factories, We know
that we are behind in those things
and we know that you can help
us.”






BARBADOS ADVOCATE —

Looking down on the thousands
cf Russian men and women in the
sports festival, Stalin also said

“This develops the war spirit.
Your country ought to do more
of this.” Then he added: “We will
never ullow Germany to do this.”

During his trip to Russia Eisen
hower was permitted to see the
Stormovik fighter plane factory.
where the work-week was 84
hours, and was granted leave to
visil Stalingrad. At one point
during the stay Stalin asked him
to express his apologies to Gen:
George Marshall for a sharp note
Stalin had sent to the American
chief of staff for supplying him
with certain information which
had turned out badly and resulted
in what Stalin called “some em
barrassment” to the Red Army.

At the big farewell dinner
countless toasts were offered but
one by young John Eisenhower
drew the biggest ovation. It was
dedicated to “the common soldier
of the great Red Army.”

Eisenhower's Moscow trip was
hailed as such a great success that
the United States War Depart
ment immediately invited Mar
shal Zhukov to visit America
Ike set aside his C54 for the
trip and assigned Gen. Clay and
John to accompany him. But
Zhukov fell ill. U.S.-Russian rela—
tions fell even more ill, By the
time Zhukov was able to travel
he was not permitted to do so.

In retrospect, Eisenhower says
that the Russian heirarchy came
to fear chiefly the fruits of libera-
tion—freedom of the individual.
He says there is no need for alarm
in this country over the growing
Russian menace provided we stick
together:

“If the men and women of
America face this (Communist,
issue as squarely and bravely as
their soldiers faced the terrors of
battle in World War II, we would
have no fear of the outcome. If
they will unite themselves as
firmly as they did when they
provided, with their allies in
Europe, the mightiest fighting
force of all time, there is no tem
poral power that can dare chal
lenge them.

“If they can retain
integrity, the clarity
hension, and the
sacrifice that finally crushed the
Axis, then the Free World will
live and prosper and all the peoples
will eventually reach a level of
culture, contentment and security
that has never before been
achieved,”—INS.

the moraf
of compre
readiness to



‘The Red Threat In Latin

(This ts the last of a series of articles
disclosing the extent of Communist
activities in Latin America aimed at
weakening the security of the western
oernere and specifically the United

ates.)

WASHINGTON
Department realizes
wise leadership is

The State
that positive,

required to combat the rising
menace of Communism in Latin
America,

It is necessary, the Depart-
ment’s spokesmen emphasize, io
keep Latin American opinion

marshalled solidly on the side cf
the free world.

It is important to keep the
Latin American people convinced
that their welfare is linked to the
welfare of the United States.

The purpose of the Communists,
as agents of the Kremlin, is plain.
It is to neutralize Latin America
in the event of war between the
U.S. and the Soviet Union and
deprive us of such vitally needed
supplies as wool, zine, oil, tin cop-
per, rubber and foodstuffs.

In a recent speech, Assistant
Secretary of State Edward G.
Miller Jr. in charge of Inter-
American affairs, warned that
there has been too much friction
and misunderstanding in the past
in U.S. relations with Latin
America.

“For some of this,” he said, “we
can justly blame those among
ourselves who fail to understand
the hopes and aspirations of the
Latin American countries,”

“But part of the blame,” Miller
added, “must be laid at the door
of those in Latin America who,
with or without malice afore-
thought, misinterpret and distort
the motives, policies and ob-
jectives of the United States”

“While much of this mis-
interpretation and distortion







By J. C. OESTREICHER

America’

BY MALCOLM JOHNSON

stems from our enemies, whose
purpose is to divide and con-
fuse inter-American opinion, a
disappointingly large share of it
comes from people who are any
thing but sympathetic to Com-
munism, but who either are
obsessed with outmoded con-
cepts of economic policy or who
enjoy using this country as a

Scapegoat for their economic
ills.”

The “good

! neighbour” policy
inaugurated

in the early 30’s is
vited as having done much to
cement friendly relations with
Latin America.

Just how important this is to
the United States was proved
during World War II. Ivan
White, Economic Adviser to
Assistant Secretary Miller, says
that Latin, America was able to
supply the U.S. war economy
with $1.5 billions of essential
Zoods.

With regard to future possibil-
ities, White says;

“With two-thirds of the world’s
population and three-fourths of its
productive capacity in non-Com-
munist areas, the Soviet Union
is confronted with a formidable

barrier to the attainment of its
ultimate goals.
“The Kremlin, therefore, has

another clear objective, namely,
to obtain a progressive shift in
the balance of productive power
in the world.”

Other observers emphasize that
this is one of the primary reasons



there is no
along the Tweed.

“impassable” border

why the Communists now are
concentrating feverishly on Latin
America.

Secretary of Stete Dean Acheson
has pointed out that to counteract

this activity our own approach to!

the problem must be

one.” As a step toward action

of the Foreign Munisters

American Republics.
White says:

“Economic conditions for free-! ;

dom through the creation of new
workshops, new crops, new wealth
must be developed in places where
they have not been before

“It means that for
millions of people living in a
state of poverty in unde-

developed regions, every reason- | because

able effort must be made for
the economic development and

of goods necessary if they are 1861 w

to believe that the free world

a “dynamic |

|
|

THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1951



SIKKIM |

WASHINGTON.

INDIA has forged a new link in the
defenses of its vast northern frontier by
assuming the role of protector for the little
semi-independent state of Sikkim, a moun-
tain-girt land of tropic flowers and eternal
nows in the heart of the eastern Himalayas.

By a recent treaty the Maharajah of Sik-
kim has given India full authority to utilize
his country for military purposes. Although
not much larger than the State of Delaware,
Sikkim occupies a highly strategic buffer
position against the Chinese Communists
now invading Tibet, writes the National
yeographic Society.

The Maharajah’s relatively tiny domain
vhares frontiers with Nepal, Tibet, India,
ind the state of Bhutan, which is also an
indian protectorate. For centuries the Hima-
layan mountain passes of Sikkim have been
e gateway to Tibet; caravans from the
Tibetan highlands have worn an ancient
trade route across Sikkimese territory to
Salimpong and Darjeeling in India.

——— ee

Nature presents a variety of moods in
Sikkim. The country is a jumbled mass of
gorges and precipitous slopes. In the narrow
valleys the climate is tropical with a pro- |

fusion of ferns and flowering plants. Climb- Q

ing the towering, forested mountains, one
enters a temperate zone. Farther up, above
timberline, are barren wastes capped by the
glacial peaks of the world’s mightiest moun-
tains.

Altitudes in Sikkim range from a low of
some 400 feet above sea level to the 28,146-
foot eminence of Kanchenjunga, third high-
est mountain in the world, which is located
on the Nepal border, The extreme differences
in rainfall are remarkable for so small a
country; annual precipitation in the south
is over 130 inches, while some of the more
sheltered northern valleys get less than 20
inches.

In this land of abrupt contrasts live about
123,000 people, most of whom eke out a
living growing maize and millet on the
‘nountain sides and rice crops on the ter-
raced slopes at lower elevations. Their capi-
tal is Gangtok, a collection of tiered wooden
houses clinging to a mountain shoulder
4.000 feet high.



Sikkim legend credits a Buddhist Lama
from Tibet as the founder of the country.

Acheson has called for a meeting| Most of the present inhabitants are Nepal-
of 21) ese; others belong to the Bhutia and Lepcha

hill tribes, and a variety of Tibetan dialects

are spoken. Puddhism is the state religion.

In setting up a protectorate over Sikkim,
india is re-affirming a precedent established

the| by the British nearly a century ago, English

forees entered the little country in 1860
it had persisted in kidnapping

| British subjects, who were sold into slavery.
the increase in the interchange) The maharajah was forced to sign a treaty in

hich made Sikkim a protectorate of

offers a workable system for| {he Crown.

the improvement of their living
Standards and the achievement
of their aspirations.”

United States aid
of public healtn, sanitation and
education in impoverished Latin
American countries is one of the
concrete, friendly acts which are
helping to improve relations,

By such acts the American
people are trying tc prove their
lasting friendship for Latin
America and their interest in the
welfare of its people.

in problerns

This form of assistance might
be greatly expanded under exist-
ing legislation.

The United States’ best weapon
against Communist agitation in
Latin America again is seen as the
weapon of truth—truth buttressed
by positive aid and acts of friend-
ship,—LN.S,

i
'





Even Stamps Tell

The British promptly honoured this treaty
when Tibet invaded Sikkim in 1888, “Tom-
mies” and Indian troops soon drove the
Tibetans back behind the encircling moun-
tains. Two years later the Chinese, who pro-
fessed an ancient claim to Sikkim, agreed to
recognise it as a British protectorate.

For many years Great Britain maintained
a “dewan,” or political officer, in Sikkim,
who had considerable power over the affairs
of the state. A similar representative was
sent to Gangtok by India in 1949, and the
recent treaty merely formalizes a relation-
ship that has been in effect for some time.

—INS.





in London’s Westminster Abbey
Served today to point up that curi-
ous factor in Britain’s national
life known as Scottish home rule.

It is curious because the mere
expression home rule indicates at
least a desire for secession, while
that word implies that Scotland is
being held by force and duress by
the British Crown.

Such is hardly the case. The
people of Scotland presumably
could vote themselves out of their
proud position in the British
Commonwealth if they wanted to.
But the “home rulers” or nation-
alists are not more than a small if
somewhat noisy minority. There
seems to be no general desire to
eliminate Scotland from the
United Kingdom.

Much of the wind was taken out
of nationalist sails when King
George VI ascended the throne 13
years ago.

For his Queen is a Scotswoman
to the core, Princess Elizabeth,
who will succeed to the throne, is
therefore half Scotch, with some
of the proudest blood of the High-
lands in her veins and as long as
the line prevails, the chain of
genedlogicai links to Scotland will
not be broken,

Theft of the famous stone
concern in London, however, lest
the daring if foolhardy theft of
Britain’s most famous relic arouse
national fanatics to something
more than an occasional bagpipe



THE STONE—INTRINSIC

led parade of tartans, kilts and
sporrans,

It is undoubtedly true that the
Scottish Nationalists have used
every breakup in the British Em-
pire to make effective propaganda
for their cause,

This was the case when the
British Mandate in Palestine was
surrendered, and applied also to
the separation of Burma, India
and other portions of the Com-
monwealth that have dropped
away.

Establishment of the Republic
of Ireland, provided fuel for the
nationalist flames, But until the
present, these have all been
pot tempests

Whether there ever could be

tea-

a

VALUE; 2s. 6¢.

separation of Scotland from the
United Kingdom is problematical
at best.

The two countries have such
close economic and financial ties
that the union seems unbreakable.
England depends heavily on the
shipbuilding yards of the Clyde;
Scotland well represent
ed in the London marts of com-
merce, It is a saying that in every
large Britisi mereantile establish-
ment, Britain supplies the work-

is

ers and Scotland sends down the
directors to work for handsome
salaries

And the numerous resort pro-
prieto! of Scotland, to say
nothi f the n gements of
world famous golf clubs, have
every reason to he happy that

For many months out of the
year, Britons are the principal
paying guests, And in better
times, the wealthy Englishman
who did not have a hunting lodge
or the lease of a grouse-shooting
moor in Scotland was not deemed
worthy of the name,

The more moderate element of
the home rule faction, numbering
about 2 million Scotsmeén, signed a
covenant last year,

While this was entirely an all-
Scottish affair, it is noteworthy
that the signers pledged full loyal-
ty to King George and his heirs
and merely asked His Majesty's
government to consider a larger
degree of self-government for
Scotland.

Thus there is obviously a great
deal of difference between this
movement and the politics of Eire,
which not only broke all ties with

the British throne but ardently
desires to annex the Northern
Counties.

That is a matter that day in and
day out is one for violent agita-
tion, The Southern Irelanders
are always ready with vast bun-
dles _of pamphlets and charts
designed to prove that a mere
handful of “King’s Men” are keep-
ing millions of Irishmen in servi-
tude to the Crown.

Fanatics who do not hesitate to
steal Britain’s most l
relic from their most sacred s
must indeed be a resolute
termined people—LN.S.

ven



ind de

Lies For Russia

NEW YORK.
The recent Russian propaganda
line * the western world is re-
flected” in postage stamps issued
by Russia and its satellites.

Recent stamp issues of Eastern
Germany follow the pattern used
for many years by the Soviet
Union, One stamp on peace shows
a hand of the West covering the
eyes of the dove of peace from
rows of crosses, the atomic bomb
burst, and other symbols of war.

A series of Russian stamps de-
picts Uncle Sam in the pose of
the Statue-cf Liberty but carry-
ing a firebrand instead of a torch.

Before the recent propaganda
barrage, Russian stamps generally
showed pros s made under the
various five-year plans



One informed yhilatelic source
in New York, the Scott Stamp
and Coin Company, says these are

effective in transit through the
imails, But that is about their
only outlet
Sale of Russian and Satellite
rountric Ss is very difficult
n European countr
i States
i Wh tish and French

issues of sets of three and four
stamps sell for a total of up to
$109,000 for each set, the grand
total of Eastern European stamp
sales is not more than $50,000 a
year.

The popularity of a country is
well reflected in the sale of un-
used stamps to collectors in the
United States. Certain countries
have issued stamps which have
never been well received’ in
America,

Stamps from Germany, Austria,
Hungary and Japan seldom are
listed for sale above the minimum
amount considered reasonable to
cover the cost of dealer handling.
A similar fate is befalling Russian
stamps.

Stamps from China fell in
value at the closing stages of the
Second World War, while British
Stamps fell then, only to rise
again.

Britain and France realize sev
eral millions a year in vValuuble
American dollars. These are im
portant assets and a high return
f ry small investment





id

-LN.S. ’ |! i
SSE



D. V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.

eee”



TO-DAY’S SPECIALS

at THE COLONNADE



Pkgs. QUAKER OATS .

{
Tins LETONA PEACHES ..

Bottles McEWAN’S BEER



Usually NOW

$ .24 $ .22

5 ial pita habits Rey | 4
‘sesh tpdilbatiadelae’ 26 20





KITCHEN WARE

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COCKTAIL SHAKERS

THERMOS FLASKS,

PUDDING & DRIPPING PANS
BREAD BOARDS and KNIVES

SANI-CANS
GARBAGE CANS

ENAMEL PLATES and CUPS

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WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.
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Phones — 4472, 4687,







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DRY GOODS DEPT.




FISH

Turtle

Salmon
Haddock

Cod Fillets
Sole Anchovies
Kippers

MEATS
Hams in tins
Bacon—Sliced
Turkeys |
Chickens j
Ducks |
Ox Tongues
Liver
Tripe i
Brains |
Sweet Breads |
Rabbits

APPLES

GODDARD



TO-DAY

FOR THESE
ENERGY.
BUILDING

FOODS

VEGETABLES
in tins
Cucumbers Spinach
String Beans Kale
Cauliflower Asparagus

Carrots & Peas
Brussel Sprouts

SPECIALS
Cook's Paste—6c, per tin
Dried Prunes—50c, per Ib.
Sling in tins—36c.
Sultana Puddings—48c.
Steak & Kidney Puddings
—44c.
CHEESE
Empire Coffee
3 & R BREAD & CAKES
CROWN SWEET DRINKS
Fruit Cakes
Chocolates
After Dinner Mints
Marshmellows

S DELIVER




THURSDAY, JANUARY 4,

Car Damaged
In Collision
7 RIGHT FRONT bumper

of the motor car X—870,
cwned and driven by Mr. E. S.
Burrowes, Labour Commissioner,
Was damaged in an accident ut
the junction of Prince
Henry
8 o'clock yesterday morning.

Also involved in the accident
was a mo-tor lorry owned by
Springhall Company Limited, and



driven by Clarendon Greenidge pany Limited, Chairman of the
Negotiating Committee of the Sea
Association in
were stolen from a car be-,Sngland and a Member of the

of Mile and Quarter, St, Peter.
WO CAR SEATS valued $20

longing to Reginald Robinson of
Dash Gap, Bank Hall, The car
Was on an open spot at the side

of the house. The seats were re- nual General Meeting of the B.W.1.

moved between 10 a.m. and

z 12.30
p.m. on Tuesday.

OLVIN MOORE, a labourer of Since then, he visited the cotton

My Lord's Hill, yesterday
appeared before His Worship Mr.

Police.
He was first charged with the
larceny of clothes valued at £12

7/9 om December 22, from the evening bv B.W.1.A. for Trinidad

home of Sydney Skinner of Bax-
ters Road.

The second charge was larceny
of clothing from Charles Brown
of Nelson Street. The clothes are
valued at £14 12/8 and the offence
was alleged to have been commit-
ted sometime on November 23.
Qn this charge he was remanded
until January 10.

The preliminary hearing on both
charges was started yesterday.
Moore is not represented by

unsel.

QUIRY into the circumstances

surrounding the death of 22-
yedr-old’ Edward Blackman was
yesterday postponed by Mr. A. W.
Harper at the District “B’ Court
until Wednesday next.

The body of Blackman was
found at Silver Sands on Friday
morning by Lionel Ross of Tweed-
side Road. It was removed to the
Christ Church Almshouse and
Beatrice Blackman identified it to
Dr.. Charles Manning.

AJOR ROAD studs and signs

were placed at the junction
of James Street and Lucas Street
yesterday morning.

Formerly there were many
minor accidents at these corners,
but motorists and cyclists who
approach Lucas Street from these
directions will now realise that
they are going towards a major
road.

R. A. W. HARPER is acting as

Police Magistrate of District
“B” in place of Mr. C. L. Walwyn
who is on sick leave,

Central Station Is New

Vaccination Centre

Colonel R. T, Michelin was first
of 155 people to be vaccinated
against small pox at the newly
opened centre at Central Station
yesterday.

Eight vaccination centres were
open in St. Michael, but only 220
people took advantage of them.

Returns at the Chief Medical
Officer's Office. yesterday showed
that an approximate total of 4,531
people had received vaccinations
against the disease since the cam-
paign started some weeks ago.

Of these, 3,120 people were
vaccinated at the St. Michael cen-
tres and 1,411 at the centres in
the out-parishes.





eases

1951

Cotton Prices
Satisfactory
To W.I. Growers

The prices being paid to grow-
, the
P William West Indies by the Raw Cotton
and Parry Streets at about Comunission in England are satis-

factory, Mr. T. A. Twyman told

ers of sea island cotton in

the Advocate yesterday

Mr. Twyman is Managing Di-

rector of the Montserrat Com-

Island Cotton

Advisory Committee.

He came out to the West Indies

in November to attend that An-

Sea Island Cotton Association
which was held in Barbados.

growing islands in the area.

He said that the cotton \jgrowers
A. J. H. Hanschell, Senior Police in Montserrat are getting ready to
Magistrate of District “A” om two plant their crop next’ month and
charges of larceny brought by the are hoping for a better season than

the previous one when the crop
;was destroyed by pink boll worm.
Mr. Twyman left yesterday

and will visit New York and Mon-
treal before returning to England
later in the month,

While in Barbados he was stay-
ing at the Marine Hotel.



Ex-Stoker Goes
Job Hunting

When the Advocate saw 39-
year-old Alwin Higgins yesterday
morning hé was on a ‘bus going
to Boarded Hall. From Boarded
Hall he walked three and a half
miles to Woodburn to see some-
— who had promised him a
job.

Higgins lives at Holders Hill,

St. James, so in all he travelled j

over 16 miles in search of a job,
He has three children and they
are all ill. His wife is suffering
from an injured leg.

He served for five years in the
Trinidad Royal Navy as a leading
stoker and would be glad to do
the same job on any vessel that
visits Carlisle Bay.

Higgins said that he spent a
rough Christmas and a worse New
Year. On Tuesday, the second
day of 1951, he was at home rest-
ing when he heard a knock at the
door. When he looked out of the
window, he was surprised to see
a postman who was holding a few
bundles of letters,

“TI thought someone had remem-
bered me and sent a money order.
1 was feeling very happy, but
instead I was handed a small card
box.”

When he opened it, to his dis-
may he saw a 1939—45 Medal sent
to him from the Navy Headquar-
ters. He looked at the Mecal and
then at his sick children and wife.

He said yesterday that if the
box had contained a $5 note he
would have appreciated it more
as he had already been given the
1939-45 Medal at the Drill Hall.
He left his larder at home empty—

not even containing tea or sugar.



NINE I.D’s
The following infectious dis-
were notified during the
month of December: Diphtheria 2;

Enteric Fever 4; Tuberculosis 3.



Fishing 25

Years Ago

TO LOOK at Herbert Carter’s face on the Reef Beach
yesterday as he mended the fishing boat sails which will
take him fishing for red fish to-morrow, you would not

have thought that 25 years

fishing sank about 15 miles

swim for five hours.
Carter is a short, little

ago, a boat in which he was
off the shore and he had to

man of 58. He has a rugged

weather-beaten face over which he wears about an inch

jof bristled grey hair.

From the time he was a_ boy,
Carter used to fish. Now he goes
about 23 miles off the island and
where the water is over 300
yards deep he fishes for red fish
Carter says that to the south of
the island you will find the best
red fish fishing grounds.

He will tell you that when
flying fish are plentiful, fisher-
men have to rest in between
whiles. As soon as the sails are
lowered, flying fish will cluster
on the boat and will go on the
sides and spawn, Fishermen lean
over the sides of the boats with
their nets and scoop up about 40
at a time

He has sailed around the island

many times. Two of them go
out fishing in the Monkey, the
boat Carter thinks of as his

home away from home,

When Carter is telling you of
the time, 25 years ago when the
bowsprit of the boat in which he
was fishing 15 iniles off shore
broke and the boat sank, he
speaks in a hurried way as though
he wants to get over the memory
of those five hours of swimming
for his life. Fi

Boat Sank

He wiis with another fisherman

whom he calls ‘Phonsa, about
midday when the boat sank.

He was young then, but he did
not feel he could reach the shore

and the only hope he had was
that a boat might pass by, Many
boats were with sight, but

they were going in dilferent ai-



Chenery.
tenced Wesley Thorne of Howells
Cross Road to three months’ im-



Three Months For A Cock

A decision of Police Magistrate,
Mr. E. A, McLeod was confirmed
by the Judges of the Assistant
Court of Appeal yesterday, Mr.
G. L. Taylor and Mr. J. ae ae
Mr. McLecd had sen-

prisonment with hard labour when
he found him guilty of the larceny

of a cock.

The cock was stolen on No-

vember 23 and was the property

of Richard Jordan of Haggatt
Hall. . «et

Jordan said that he was home
when he saw Thorne between
some canes near his home. People
tid not generally pass there and
he asked him what he wanted.
He had a paper bag and ran when
he went towards him, dropping
the bag as he did so. The bag
contained the cock.



C. P. BETHEL MADE
COL. SEC. BAHAMAS

Mr. C. P. Bethel, Deputy
Coloniai Secretary, Bahamas, has
been appointed Colonial Secr
tary of the Bahamas ii succession
to Mr. F, A. Evans.





BARBADOS





ADVOCATE

GRASS GROWS FAST



PRINCESS ALICE playing field is a grazing ground. The grass is tall and the sheep which graze there
are fat. There is too much bush for cricket and other games and the playing field is still incomplete.



Trade With Canada
Will Increase In °51

As a result of talks between
Canada and the British West
Indies, trade between the two
places will increase during 1951,

Honourable Lionel Chevrier, Min-
ister of Transport in the Canadian

Government told the Advocate
yesterday.

He said that

cc ae or later













=? sooner
y would find

of negotiating a
‘new trade agree-

f m7 ment between
Canada and the
y West Indies
ae Which would be

" icial to both

in Can-
MR. L. CHEVRIER ada, had a great
deal that they could purchase
from the West Indies and he be-
lieved that there were many
things that were required in the
island that could be more econo-
mically purchased in Canada,

He said that he believed that
Canada was one of the best, if
not the best, purchasers of
molasses from Barbados,

Mr. Chevrier is particularly in-
terested in airways and was happy
to see that Barbados had an excel-

lent runway which was in all
respects, capable of taking the
newest and heaviest aircraft.

When this strip is completed, it
should be in a position to take
the strato cruisers, the biggest
commercial aircraft in the world
and the Comet, the new commer-
cial airliner.

Mary Lewis, Oldest
Schooner onthe Run



With the schooners Frederick
P. Elkin and Minnie Mosher
fading out of colonial shipping,

the Mary M. Lewis can boast
of being the oldest schooner now
visiting Barbados.

The Mary M, Lewis is 33
years old. The next to her in

age is the Marion Belle Wolfe
whose captain Every said some
weeks ago was about 32 years
old.

Barbadian bern Captain Mar-
shall, the Mary M. Lewis’

skipper, said yesterday that there
was very little difference in age
between the two schooners.

The Mary M. Lewis has
had only two owners during her
eareer. Her first owner was Cap-
tain Lewis of St. Lucia, after
whose wife she was named.
Captain Lewis ran her through-
out the West Indies trading with

general cargo. Occasional rips
were made to Curacao, Aruba
and Surinam.

In 1924, Captain Marshall’s

father bought her over. In re-
cent years she has been running
steadily between British Guiana
and Barbados trading with rice
and general cargo,

The Mary M. Lewis is now
in port making ready for sailing

back to British Gu’ana

With her grey painted hull
which really shows age, she
measures 98.83 feet from stem

to stern post, 23.53 feet in width
und has a draft—when empty—
of 10 feet. Her net tonnage is 69
and she draws 11 feet when well
loaded. Nine men man her.

Captain Marshall told the Ad-
vocaie that he could remember
the Mary M, Lewis being in-
volved in one serious accident,
Captain Marshall’s brother was
then skipper.

Sometime in 1936, the ship
lost its mast during a long spell
vf bad weather encountered be-
tween Barbados and British Gui-
anu. Many a gale and rough sea

he has sailed her through, and
occasionally minor damages re-
sulted



NEW PS.

The Secretary of State for the
Colonies, Mr. James Griffith, has
appointed Mr. A. M MacKintosh
to be his Private Secretary

SEEOOLVESSOOSOS SSS SSCPOO LOE SCPE SEO SPP POPS,



“Don’t Play Ball”’
On Playing Fields

. THE GOVERNMENT and the Vestry of

St. Michael

seem to have reached deadlock where playing fields are
rar ry Dy j ; i : »
concerned. The Princess Alice Playing Field at the Reef

is incomplete, and a

been bought.

five-acre
selected by the Playing Fields Committee,

site at Mt. Friendship,

has not yet

nquiry
Adjourned

The inquiry int) the circum-
stances surroundiny the death of
Evans Spooner of Edgecliffe, St.
John, which is being held by M
A. J. H. Hanschell, Coroner of
District “A”, was adjourned uniil
Thursday, January 11 yesterday

Evans Spooner, a 58-year-old
wheelwright of St. John = was
found lying in a trench along

Guinea Road, St. John, about 8,30
p.m. on December 31. Spooner
was taken to the General Hos-
pital the same night but died on
the morning of January 2

_ Evidence was taken yesterday
from Dr. G. S, Emtage and Evelyn
Edghill of St. George. In his
evidence Dr. G. S. Emtage said
that he performed a post mortem
on the body of a man whose
name was Charles Evans Spoone:v
at the General Hospital Mortuary
on January 2 at about

2.30 p.m
The body was identified by
Jeseph Spooner of St John
who told him that the deceased
was his brother
The apparent age of the man
was about 60—-65 years and he
was dead for about eigkt to

twelve hours. There was a wound
under the right eye and a
haematoma on the right

large
ear,

In his opinion death was due
to sub-dural cerebral haemor-
rhage from injuries received.

The injuries received to the
right side of the head are con-
sistent with some considerable
blow received in that region

Evelyn Edghill of St. George
told the court that on December

31 at about 8.10 pm. he was
driving the motor car G-——282 ,
along Guinea Poad, St. John

He saw a man in the trench
on the right side of the road
apparently unconscious He re-

versed and focussed the headlights
of the car on the man, He exam-
ined him and noticed that the
man’s right jaw was swollen. A
bieyele was on the ground about
five feet from where the man was
lying with the front wheel

ex-
tensively damaged The hack
wheel was in the road and _ the

rest of the bicycle in the gutter,

He took up the bicycle and
placed it against some canes grow-
ing on the trench and then £04
into the car and reported the mat-
ter to ‘Four Roacs Sub-Station

The man that was in the trench
was of medium builia and slightly
bald with a dark Frown complex-
ion. He looked about 50 years of
age.





All Fer A Piece Of Sugar
GENEVA

Wishing to suck up a piece of
sugar at the bottom of his liqueur
glass, Mr, Placide Vieux in a cafe
at Val d’Illieu, Switzerland, suck-
ed up the glass as well that
it got wedged in his throat. Blue
in the face and unconscious, hi
life was saved by another custom;
er who forced his street door key
down Placide’s throat, breke
glass and pulled out the pieces
Placide was then taken to hospital

so





OUR

1951 STYLINGS

the

The Government is asking fot

detailed estimate of the Mt
Friendship Scheme, and the Ve
try ate saying they submitted such
on estimate a long time ago, when
they put up to Government seve
sites as being suitable for playis
fields,

The seven sites were put up t
Government in June, 1949, The
site at the Reef was the first to be
acquired and converted into what
is now the Princess Alice Playing
Field. But it is still incomplete
It has not been enclosed, and
srass and weeds have got out of
control. Moreover, it has not yet
been officially handed over to the
Vestry by the Governor-in
Executive Committee, and the
Vestry therefore have no contro:
over it.



A lot of controversy was stirred
up late last year by charges that
all was not well with expenditure
on the Princess Alice Fieid.
Government in a letter signed by
Miss Betty Arne, Social Welfare
Officer, asked the Vestry to submit
” detailed account of the expend-
iture, including particulars of
incidentals

Special Meetings
The Vestry held special meet
ings, threshed the matter out, acd
ubmitted a report to the Gov
ernment. Since then, the Vestry
received four tenders for enclos
ing the field, which tenders wer
submitted to the Government
Government has not yet replied
4
Friendship was
original seven
Playing Fields
price had hee
arranged at that stage, but lic
cstimated cost of the buildings
which would be required and Wwe
cst of preparing the grounds was
“8160. Subsequently the ownet
of the land quoted a price, which
cffer was submitted to the Gw-
crnment,



Mt

the
the
No

The site ai
also one of
e ected by
Committee

The Government replied that
they would not be in a position t
make any decision with regard to
the purchase of the site until a
cetailed scheme for the field has
teen ,submitted and further
cxomined by the Governor-1in-
Executive Committee, The letter
also stated that the Executive
must be advised by its legal ad-
visers to the price at which
the land was being offered, A
econd letter from the Govern~
ment asked if the Vestry were
yet in a position to submit the
detailed seheme asked for

as

Now the Vestry have replied
telling the Government tha -
estimates for the establishment ot

seven sites including Mt. Friend-
hip have already been submitted,
and that moreover, the Playing
Ficlds Committee feels a sense of
frustration at Government’s atti-
tude. The Committee has also
recommended that the Govern-
ment be told that they are willing
to undertake the supervision of
euch fields as may be established
in St, Michael but sugeest that
the Government take over the
responsibility of acquiring an

converting the sites



Banana Proposals

Approved

(Frem Our Own

KINGSTON

Correspondent)
J’ca, Dee. 27

The Jamaica Government ha
approved the recommendation of
the Island Banana Committee
cting on the advice of the Jamai
ca banana delegation which
recently discussed the immediate
future of the industry with the

\iinistry of Food in England,

the Government has approved
of the maintenance of the present
price of £32 per ton F.O.B. for
all shipments during 1951 and the
extension of the present contract
for a further two years until the

end of 1954

The price for 1952 and subse-
quent years will continue to be
subject to negotiation



Miami University
Students Visit Jamaica

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, J'ca, Dec. 27.

_A group of students from the
University of Miami paid a visit
to Jamaica last week-end and this
week to look over the agricultural
and industrial development of the
island. They were accompanied
by Dr, Luella Dambaugh, profess-
or of Geography at the Unive

The visit, which lasted 10 days,
included tours of agricultural
centres in St, Thomas, St. Andrew,
Manchester, Montego Bay, St. Ann
and St. Catherine.

The group was welcomed to the
island by the Hon, |. W., A. Bar-
rant, Minister for Agriculture,
Lands and Commerce, Mr. Ru-
dolph Burke, President of the
Jamaica Agricultural Society, Mr.
Vivian Durham, Secretary to the
Minister, and Mr. D, A. Jones,
Acting Secretary of the J.A.S.

The party, consisting of the pro-
fessor and four students, was
assisted in its study tour by the
Jamaica Agricultural Society

ahd ,
light Naked Food
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec. 30.
Dr, Roderick Marcano, Medical
Officer of Health for Port-of-
Spain, has indicated that the ex-
posal of foodstuffs in the City
might involve enactment of leg-
islation for their wrapping in
some form of inexpensive cello-
phane paper
Serious criticisms
the way food is prepared for sale
in the City, and on the health
standards of the people who offer
these foodstuffs for sale.






are made on



Refused Pioneer Aid

(from Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec. 29.
The Bermudez Biscuit Com-
pany of Trinidad have been re-
fused Pioneer Aid when the
Executive Council turned down
their application: It is understood
that the application was consid-
ered by the Economic Advisory
Board which did not recommend
its acceptance,

"Who's Who” Dedicated
To Princess

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, J’ca, Dec, 27





Princess Alice, Countess of
Athlone, Chancellor of the Uni-
versity College of the West In-

dies, has aliowed the forthcoming
edition of “Who’s Who, Jamaica,”
now on the Press, to be dedicated
lo her

Princess Aiice has furnished the
editor with an autographed photo-
graph and a short biography



Cement Talks
(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dee, 30.

Mr. A. A. Shenfield, Govern-
ment Economic Adviser in Trini-
dad, has gone to Jamaica to take

purt in talks concerning the pro-
posed establishment of a cement
factory in Trinidad,

CASE STRUCK OUT

A ease against Horrace Burnett
was yesterday struck out because
C. Ifill of the Central Motor "Bus
Co. who charged him with negli-
vent driving was not present at
the court

The case was heard in the Court
of Original Jurisdiction before Mr.
G,. L. Taylor

Mr. G. B. Niles
half of Burnett

Ifill was claiming that on June
2? last year, Burnett who was then
employed by him, drove the 'bus
X-582 on Trafalgar Street in such



appeared on be- |

PAGE FIVE



Whopping Big Lies

A FANTASTIC STORY

BURLINGTON, Wis.
of death in the North Dakota

cold to-day won the 1950 World Liars’ Championship for

1 man in Sunny California.
Officials of the Burlington, Wi Liars’ Club, which

sponsors the annual competition said the cold facts

lescribed by Frank J. Coulette of .(3233 Portola Ave

Los Angeles made the world’s bes*—if not most heart

warming-—tall story.

Excluded, however, were many While fishing in the Cisco chain
entries dealing with the recent in Villas County this summer I

national election or nominating
leading political figures in certain
countries, because the judges de-
cided “ours is strictly an amateur
contest.’

Goulettes emus

“One winter while I was work-
ing on a pile-driver in North Da
kota it got so cold that one night
a member of our crew froze to
death in bed. The ground was
frozen so hard that it was im-
possible to dig a grave; in fact,
we never did find out how far

down it was frozen
>

“But this 1 do know, Seeing we
couldn't dig a grave, we stood the
fellow on his head under the pile-
driver—and we had to drive on
him seven days and seven nights
before we got him down far

* enough for a decent burial!”

Other entries in contrast, made

hot for the judges. They gave
honourable mention to one from
Paul Dorsett of Gravette, Ark.

It went like this:

Sun Came Down

“Out where I worked last sum-
mer it got so hot that the sun came
down out of the sky and crawled
under a tree to get in the shade!”

Another honourable mention

winner came from Don Brewer
of Terre Haute Ind. He spun this
yarn:

“Last spring our neighbour
planted tomatoes on the hillside
back of his house, put some pa-
tented fertilizer on the hills,

watered them good and how they
zrew! A couple of weeks later one
tomato was so big that it broke
loose from the vine rolled down
the hill into the valley and broke
open, It was tough. The neigh-
bour’s little boy, playing out there,
was drowned in the juice before
they could get boats out to rescue
him.”

And from among dime-a—dozen

fish stories the judges picked a
sad economic commentary from
Claude Eames of Elkhorn, Wis.,

who wrote

caught a fish with scales the size
of quarters but the current de-
valuation of the dollar reduced
them to the size of dimes and
that made the fish so small I had
to throw it back.

Another vast wave won honour-
able mention for Marcus Lerch of
Moline, Ill. His story:

“It got so hot down here last
summer that the ground got just
like concrete. In fact, the earth
was baked so hard that people
working in their gardens had to
give the weeds a shot of oil down
along the reots before they could
pull them.”

—LNS.



“Lffects Of Rain

CAPETOWN.
Houses are cracking in half on
Free State goldfields because

‘the
f: 200 ft. subsoil layer of clay and

lime is “breathing” after the rains
People living in the boom towns
of Odenaalsrus, Weldom, and St
Helena are tervified by the sponge-
like behaviour of the earth's
crust. Extensive damage has been
caused to mine and business pro-
perties and while experts experi-

ment with new foundations, bed-
rooms and bathrooms crack wide
open



SHOCKED LOVE

SOUTHAMPTON,

Courting touples in the village
of Durley, near Southampton, pro-
tested loudly when farmer Norman
Clark electrifled a fence sur-
rounding his herd of prize cattle.

The fence runs alongside the
local Lovers’ Lane, with its tradi-
tional kissing gate at each end, and
more than one idyll was broken by
unpleasant shocks

Two council surveyors investi-
gated and received shocks.
Clark was ordered to arrange safe-
guards, —(1I.N.S.) f

also

z Season's Greetings from
Bu. JASON JONES & CO. LTD.- Distributors

OF

= PURINA

CHOWS



els!

LINOLEUM

WwoOD FLOORS



AND FURNITURE

PD

HYGIENIC WAX

POLIS

FOR BRIGHT AND

ce]






HEALTHY HOMES

|
|
|

|

a negligent way that it collided
with a bicycle and damaged the
bus and the bieycle. On that
ground he wa claiming £ 25 |
damages

/

TOO

FABRICS











SIMPLY ADORABLE
NEW LOVELY

TAL

———————————_—_——_





.







rections. ie felt. somethin Ne rs B eaut y x Usher In The |
ne me he fe so! 2
touch his foot and he thought VW * EAR |
tie all ‘was over with hn, ot NE “LOMBIA” in lovely coloured Plaids and Plain Shades
it was only moss. Then, about | | d
5 o'clock when he was tired, and For ] he of Green, Blue, Beige. 36 in. wide at
the other fisherman had cramp, |
they saw two boats. They had to
do much yelling before they a. ob: |
Sites one e te otin ous! Ne Ww y Cd r > We have THE LATEST in: i
anybody o
aie “ate, ot aes Ve “LYSTAV” in Floral Designs. Also Plain Shades of
sh now and because of} sol ee a) ee rh |
tiet ewitn, together, his tone was} FOR YOUR MAKE-UP USE:— g eee eee Green, Beige, Cream, Pink, Grey, Maroon, Light 4
sad when he said that soon after, ARDENS CLEANSING CREAM é rae we
r CREA g CHILDREN’S SHOES ! fee ice Galt Ok sae |
a So Bi ja tp ot AGUS g Navy, Dark Navy, Black, Ete. 36 ins. wide .
; ” SKIN TONIC 8 With a wide choice in SANDALS and PUMPS . |
« 8 a |
59 ATTEND NEW CLINIC ) ANTI-WRINKLE CREAM x : oe ae , jase
Fifty-nine patients have already 4 i NOSHINE $ Also Beach Balls, Wolter Biags and Water Wing s
been attended to at the St. Michael | % ‘ HAND LOTION $ :
fas tt ee ant ts Gea, % SPECIAL EYE CREAM : | A great Variety of CLEANSERS and POLISHES San .
one of the Parochial Medical Off- | % ULTRA AMORETTA CREAM % | |
cers told the Advocate yesterday. | & ‘ BLUE GRASS & NIGHT & DAY BRILLIANTINE | r t
This, he said, keeps to the aver-/% RIMMEL NIGHT & DAY LIP-PENCIL | x 4
age of 200 patients per week at- | % LIPSTICK | |
tended to, formerly by both of the 1x ” aAIPSTIC % | ’
Bishouse and at their homes. |® S| i 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET |
almshouse and at their es 1% "NEQUITO . > fi84,, si % |
7 _ de Oe See z KNIGHTS Ltd.—Phoenix & City Pharmac les % i The British Bata Shoe Co, Ltd ae ’
on alterr i ek al * ~ \
ro t Ww ; hours each '_LCSSCO9S SS SSF 96S S59 SSO 09 G69 OOOO LO OOOOH MSD WU. = = ——— Se —=— - a rs










PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1951 ~
a |







oot a
— MORNING
MISERY fi
become all-day misery!
When headache, fatigue and upset
REGO stomach ruin your morning, you cen

THE WONDERFUL BRITISH | Take it on arising, again—if needed
DISCOVERY

—later in the day. Keep a supply of
A Supreme Germicide and Antiseptic



HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON










TM HUNTIN’
FOR LIONS -
AN’ TIGERS -
AN’ BEARS ! /|

quick acting Alka-Seltzer
handy — always!

Alka-Seltzer

=a
FF






























’
Season’s
daa ee BY WALT DISNEY * FOR PERSONAL HYGIENE Greetings
PS - Ce | gt LAD! ) ‘UNDERWATER CAVERN WHAT?) TFUSTHERMORE..-THE WHALE WADPENS eh beeeriise CUTS AND e
priewes? Yoao nee Bite Ne OY | SEAS’) eS BS + 10 STERILIZE CUTS
REAL 8 Aa ids Tus suamagne J Pa Whale > pee Y || pe SN” gn CAED | GRAZES Stuart & Sampson Ltd.
od eT OF TE NRW ATER Nand pms ee , \ Ges 20 - Extend to all the Com-
BB Oe ie STENSLED_) } ig (177 Y \ te S ye ‘| | &« TO DESTROY DISEASE GERMS plimeteite of the Besse
ms ie as | ; a ~ Cy 2 a
OS ee . ee WH SL AS &% SAFETY AND RELIEF FOR BITES ei a
\Le= ea? Se WZ | Cork | AND STINGS ant enna eee eee
| NM » PS (7 Ss r i i
gee. wr T\ ae = va This wonderful new “ Lifeguard” used in tens of STUART & SAMPSON
UNS ee (< UP» va thousands of homes is the most powerful protection LD
a ¢ £ ini you can use. At the same time it is quite safe for 5 |



all to handle and pleasantly fragrant and non-staining. |=
S No home with small children dare be without it.



USE
RAZOL

POMADE as your HAIR dress+
ing. It straightens tne hair, and
rids the scalp of dandruff. USE
RAZOL Pomade as directed, and

GN IN | 4.8. BRYDEN & SONS (Barbados) LTD.—agas —[re-omome memo




















a WHITEFISH WITH LEMON,
BLONDIE, WHAT BROWN POTATOES.

DID 1 HAVE .

_ ( pacwoon, |
— WAKE | |





iy WAS_IN
i
~

distressing your pocket.
Distributors :
THE BORNN BAY RUM CO.



THE OLD GALOOT HAS MORE

MARSHAL AND DAUGHTER
\ MONEY THAN BRAINS!

40D IMITATION 0;
© SOM WHO STRUCK }



PRIME AUST: BEEF
aa Steak - Roast - Stew
ae 4 DP waa Legs - Chops - Stew
CANADIAN SALMON
BACON: Sliced
HAM: Sliced
Apples 30¢ pe
$12.00 Per case
Grapes ve b. $1.08

i

a

yb














BY ev ovosimeR! YOU GOT A BUSINESS To SELL OUT? \) (mR. PECK. THE JEWELER, MAY HAVE THE
'M IN THE MARKET FOR ONE ! VERY THING YOU WANT!

CHOCOLATES
and
CONFECTIONERY

Boxes MELTIS FAVOURITE CANDIES $1.85 $1.02








és » NEWBERRY FRUITS ...... 1.67.96
” " COFFEE CHOCOLATE SENSES
o INO RON etree niéciaies 1.32
GLAMOUR SHOCOLATES . 90 BISCUITS |
aie ee Tins JACOB'S AFTERNOON TEA BISCUITS $1.45
Tins FRY'S CHOC: HAZEL NUTS (1-Ib) ......... 2.02 » °» CARNIVAL ASS: BISCUITS ...... 1.56
PASCALL FRUIT BARLEY SUGAR ........ 98 “ « ASSORTED CREAM BISCUITS 1.51



EORGE MC. MANUS

















_. GEORGE MC. MANUS. « _» CREAM CRACKERS ................ 1.52
CANNED FRUIT » ROMARY'S WATER BISCUITS ......... 1.06
a Tae PROM RALAD oe » CARR'S CELERY BISCUITS .................... 1,57
29 xu rT DOBENT WAKE A PEARS (23) 0 a8 2 ae Pkgs. JACOB'S CREAM CRACKERS ................ 41
beap TO te PERS AUAIB) sscssisessctvgsovidecesvvncesaonsnssinvesnes 37 OTN
_ME HERE? » PEACHES. ........ 59 87

ea APRICOTS orn 2 LIQUEURS & WINES

; Bottles COCKTAIL CHERRIES... 140.59 Bottles COINTREAU ......-ccsose $6.00 $3.60
» BOLS CREME DE MENTHE










CANNED MEATS » LIQUEUR BRANDY oo cccccccccce 12.00
% we BS . MARTINI VERMOUTH .................. 968
Tins SWIFT'S OX TONGUES 0.00... ae $8.20
» ae a «DRY FLY SHERRY | ccs 4.00
we MEI RID ses sesesctc crdsstvvnscesec 3.36 « GONZALEZ GOLDEN SHERRY ....... 4.00
, CORNED BEEF WITH CERSAL ......... 31 » BUCKFAST TONIC WINE... 2.58 1.45
ww MEAT PASTE oooocccccscccccsssccsssseons 23, .19
BAWE DE FOR ico bosch csc 20

BY ALEX RAYMOND

i THE OLD BOYS BUT.ER \ fF





PHONE HIM AND TELL
S I WISH TO SIGN THEM
~ THIS EVENING!
ASQ
>

bs

| E+] WANTS TO SPEAK TO YOu, je
~\ DEBORAH,.., SAYS IT'S = T
VERY IMPORTANT... ay.
{ yf
ay,

CUSTARDS & DESSERTS JUICES
my || /
Gay — Summer SQUASHES ee
The OTH FOOD oi
Tins SILVER LEAF PINEAPPLE JUICE ............ 39







//,









: ‘ » LETONA TOMATO JUICE 0. 84
Tins BIRD'S CUSTARD POWDER 0.0.0... 28

CHIVERS CUSTARD POWDER .......... .30 » TRINIDAD ORANGE JUICE ................. 33
om ‘4 7 a MANGE POWDER ....... 38 e » ORANGE & G. F. JUICE ...... 28
=) a oR ee peed LE iy AAO sess Nl shacesscciindy asi er i“ 3 RAPEFRUIT JUICE ......... 23
Pkgs, HARTLEY'S JELLY CRYSTALS ........... .20 Seles COR aug ‘ce i 5

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES CHIVERS JELLY-CREAMSG ......... sesso. 20 ae BR boesteesyesrbgict ‘
MONK & GLASS BLANC MANGE... 16 . ORANGE BARLEY WATER ................ $1.28
FULLY CRYSTALS o.c.cssssiectstssosslocecs 12 » ROSE'S LIME JUICE «uses 1.06






« FIFTY-SIX+ FIFTY -SEVEN+~ Sa | BQQTH. FT FIFTV-NINE*: 5 THE PROJECTOR, BUT IT. BE
FIFTV-EIGHT << a ee |x: é SITY? yee FIXED INA MOMENT =

| —= ||

THE PROJECTION + [OH= GOMETHING HAPPENED YO
=>}







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FAST I ONLY HAD TIME
ONE SHOT?

= (4 AF,




THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

PAGE SEVEN







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

sucar ration) §HIXPPING NOTICES





WANTED




















































| ‘
} ‘ BUDAPEST, Jan. 2. | == .
TELEPHONE 2508 HELP Hungary has again rationed} MQNTBEAL AUSTRALIA “NEW | <= | ou u j or es ore
fees So See care ty Soares Raat te it Se xe coe ara 1
DIED . _ 3 2 t ng was lifted! Ms, “TONGARIRO” - cup < Caran. enh Paneesasts te | eee sy :
PUBLIC SALES CANE WEIGHER — Past experience |in 1948, the first country in post-| ‘all Adelaide January ‘aan M@duled to ||] TPP Carte ee menmers fee Hi Ce t.e ,
HALLIDAY 29th Dec., at a London essentail and possibility of permanent Jan + Melbourne . . : >
Nursing. Home, FRANCIS WATSON employment to suitable. applicant. | W@F Europe to do so, but heavy | siyusry path. Brisbane January g7th,|j/ Sevis & St. Kitts, Sailing Frida | > ae YY
‘Aust Pan) Daughter of the Late 2. [———— Apply in writing to Lower Estate Ofice |€Xport to buy industrial machinery | nidad frst belt we Arriving at Tri | ah .
ee a eee Midow 0 AUCTION St. Michael 23 — Attention Mr. H. A./for drought storing for “anj| Mid. March, 1951. re eee TT v : . | wa
ana Jamaica ee 4 tsi in. ” ances | ESOS 31.516 eventual national emergency” nae versel has ample space for Hard | i eeent Fh sl aeeewes * | G la nN ds F or t 7 f 17é d
On Friday Sth at 2 + REDMAN| COMPETENT CHILDREN’s NURSE— |™ade rationing necessary again. Carae anne Cage. Hi} st. Lucia Vineent, Gr
REVERA—JOHN BERESFORD. Yerter-| & TAYLOR'S GARAGE. Church V1 Only experienced need apply. Fridman, —Reuter, |uscee wie wee ge tereuan Bills of | snd Aruba, Date of departur | b N D 35 overy
“a i ae poeldenee ee ‘Street. 1 CONTINENTAL PICK UP Siedaeat Le Chateau Blanc, Post Office Gap, for British Guiana, ubeten, Wen | ~The y ew ’ ¢ J
oe teieeh tae aa ae ne fre. R. Archer Mc Kenzie, Auctioneer. | Worthing. 4.1.51—In se “ ward and Leeward Island. — j | Do you feel old before your time? Are you tired,
Patrick’s R.C. Church, Jemmotts 2947. 3.1.51-8n Excelien Canadian Rates ror further particulars apply:— B.W.I, SCHOONER OWN- j run-down, worn out, and unable to keep up with the
Lane and thencey to the Westbury ~~ REALE ESTATE caine ee eee, ee FURNESS, WITHY a COMPANY, ERS ASSOCIATION. Inc speed and pleasures of modern life? Bo ou suiler
EST. — * LIMITED. " , . m joss of m » nervy: ss, weal y,, -
sae Friends ere asked to ‘ATE CLUB. 3.1.51—2n JANUARY 3, 1951 Trinidad, Te . pure biood? Are you worried? Do you suffer trom
i Roc! Phyli B.W.1. lephon : ear or have an inferiority complex? you enjoy Vigourous
Citomine (danatcer Orville IMMEDIATE SALE CANADA & DA amen & Co. Ltd . je: 4047 the sosteyy. of women or do beautiful women pess
Leo Revers (eens en GIS. ee Gracme Hall Terrace, Christi} PQGT & FOUND Cheques 2 Barbados, ~~ ~ | You, Py without @ second glance? If you suffer from
Lady Nelson), Mrs. Doris Revera, | — ~~ V. Taylor. 4.1,51—2n. 633/10% pr. Bankers 614/10% pr B.W.I, Agents. | tt glands, spd, unless: voir glands ste fortified and
Melawie # Revera, (daughters- | BUNGALOW — “New Bungalow™, | === | HOE 125% p | stimulated, you can not hope to regain youthful
- Kensington New Road. Containing two Sight aioe o vigour and animation.
> 1/10% pr
WILLIAMS—James, Age 93. His funeral | Bedrooms, Drawing and Dining rooms, LOST 632/10% pr. Cable ° Vitalize Your Glands
will leave his late residence Black ton aace’ toilet and bath etc. For par. 61 8/10% pr. Currency 599/10 pr Fortunately for those who suffer from run-down
Rock for St. Stephen's Church at 4.30 2506 ‘Ss apply to F. A. Marshall. Phone Coupons 592/10" pr land action, a physician with 30 years’ experience
o'clock this afternoon. Friends are J 4.1,51.—6n. ‘ Silver nas perfected a simple, safe, and positive preserip-
asked to attend, FILM—A Reel of 16 millimetre film of Zi tion to stimulate gland activity and thus beng
Are iar i eamann | SoRanae Sean, | Sig Sti he ates eee our ect en Vise ann
Rusisee, e, me Ow New substantial wall! rive show at the British Council LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE WARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM tablet form. All you need to do |
eal Welches Road, St. Michael, house con-| Finder rewarded. 3.1.54-2n. two little tablets three times

The application of ANELLE TAYLOR This prescription starts work

IN MEMORIAM Tas



7 open verandah, drawing, dining;

































let Complete with platform licensed to





of Chancery Lane, St. Michael for per-





4 Steamer saiis 4th January—arrives Barbados 17th January.














‘ THE CENTRAL EMpPoRTUM

ee
1 Ebenezer, h pern 01 as » immedi stimulating the glan in-
IN loving memory of our Beloved hae Seti SA Seg water, ents he ee ee $ sell Sens itcle timc sagen = Vessel From Leaves yeas vigourating tio blood, and enlivening your
Mother and Grand = Mother Mrs. | cupboards, WC & Bath, spetvente veaey return to the Advocate Advtg Dept |oard and shingle shop with shedroof | 5-S. “LAURENTIAN M/brough and saan strong er, Fou 8 will feel and eco yourself bes | fect Pett So MIEG, eresnee Se Bee
SOSEE EE ASHLEY who fell asleep | garage, entirely wall encl . Immedi-| Reward offered. attached at Ebenezer Village, St. Philip FOREST” oe ; Tiemeion aed’ — 1 oe 4 neta aabenhea, aaa not | and to build new blood and vigour, there is
Leng Seek. N6ikb ulate ‘ahs bleaches 2” gen Possession, "Dial ait 3.1.51—mn | Dated this, tnd day of January, 1951. $$. “MULBERRY HILL” || London Oth Jan. Seth Jan | only, abto to Regp up ‘with our War Ot ie ea ee arena within
pain : er McKensie, Victoria Street. | “Tea cine Ko ~| Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist, “C" SS. “PLANTER” .. .. London 3th Jan. “27th Je more frequently than ever betcse. © | 24 hours ‘and that they feel ten
She waited for cure but all in vain nh aah sta tween ton cee aistn sien Sed. ANELLE TAYLOR S.S “FACTOR” Glasgow and saa a = : eyes hate be oo valteted co aiae
Until God himself knew what was FOR SALE OR RENT Reward. Armstrong, Da Costa & Co. ts ; Applicant: : Liverpool 20th J Rist J Doctor Praises Vi-Tabs in Thousands of cesee, some ot which hed
est. RESIDENCE 4 al N.B.—This application will be ¢ i-|1S.S. “TRI rs 1 Jan 3ist Jan. ~ almos'
So he took her home with him to] Buiidi in Hi Sacoe ae Wome a dered at a Licensing Court to be held |" ” BESMAN M/brough and | nysicia eereatis ctaety Chane oie well ‘aud vigorous ‘again. = 7
rest.” . Stone nt very wees ao i ‘are GOLD BROOCH with a_ safety catch | at Police Court, District “C" on Mon- SS. “PROS ee London 27th Jan. 10th Fet lists are ot the opinion that the true secret ’
gk Saiaren. i Gronds and 2 oe a D. Williams, Baxters Road, om pee aut 54. Finder reture Say Se ty day of January 1951 at 11/ 9%. SPECTOR London 27th Jan. 16th Feb lands, fae Sucla heen our wands ti be] Results Guaranteed ~
. 1,51—1n, ni, 3.1.51—6n s. W. Daniel, Ban, a a ae os ~ | Honing, properly, we would feel and loo!
es ee Reward offered. 4.1,51—In. G. B. GRIFFITII , . outstanding hag een the ot
FOR SALE Ag. Police Maxistrate, ‘Dist, “C" HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM tn and pears of experisoes, in study ana | Vicrere. im thousands ang theessads of
4.1.$1—1n
: practice, Jt 1s my opinion that the medi-| ofered wu a ive tee to
F ia known as bree 2
AUTOMOTIVE PUBLIC NOTICES | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE —— ss. “speciaitsr — Closes in. Barbados Vi-vebs represents the | Qorung, unless Sntirely papiafactory. Une
CAR. & 17 ARNE DUS Ee in eas The application of VERNON MASON ; as London 8th Jan most modern and scien-| chemist today. Put it to the test and see
Brice Shee, Bemsunke holder of Liquor License No, 390 of 1951 Parish Of Christ Church tifle internal method of | for you: w new blood ti t h
See ey ‘ THE ALLEYNE SCHOOL granted to Wilmer Yarde in respect of a For further information apply to-.- stimulating and invik- | your veins, how ~~ T on S pew
erin abe ein = ° 4.1.51-—3n, The Examination for a vacant Founda | »oard and shingle shop with shedroof 4 ourating the glands, and kle, your Stoo a spring, and
CAR 1 ae : tion Scholarship (available from Janu | 2t Ivy, St. Michael for permission to _ she, roe - — you y can enjoy life as frequently
tn ‘pete t : ps iP. 6 Cyl, Vauxhall | ary 195") will be held on Friday, Jam | USe said Liquor License at said premi- DA COSTA & co LTD —A ts alit, to the body." rr oes in Ry Ay RS
and battery Mune order. Good tyres} ary 12th at 9 a.m. Por all particular: | 5% at Ivy, St, Michael. “ . gen | , y . pri we. tase 8 or n op erm
“te pion te pply to T. S. Birkett, | contact the Headmaster, Dated this 3rd day of January 1951, NOTICE TO DAIRY 24-Hour Results the empty pack: ‘Pail purchase
e ad, St. “Michael. $.1,51—8n | Te:—E. A. MeLEOD, Esq. vit Because Vi-Tebs are | price will’ He refunded, Get Vi-Tabs from
iu a 4.1.51—4n ale Sth Seghualh y tek Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”, i Nae SY scientifically Seslgnee que chemist today. The guarantee pro-
i a rh % vo sie. Small Mileage. THE PA NOTICE ANDREW mene ae esp a KEEPERS Etc o & eee ee =o f To Restore” ww
Standard Ten Reasonable prices Dial— RIS} * . N.B.—This application will be consi- ° ” Vi T b
$1800.) sted an Candidates for the Vespa or be | ar euee “ease nae Court, to Tbe held VieLabs ¢ Guaranteed J manhood. Vitality
— - y oO »} at Police Court, District "A" on Mon- IG -regis-
mat cacao 10. H.P, 1947 very nee 2 peer seas my intentions] day the 15th day of January 1951 at mee at cee a i Ine. SS SSS SSS SATE SSS
very good condition Poca Peaheot sen the Almshouse "oh Madea te tance tf One ney aucved os a peodation of Miix NEW YORK SERVICE
vo . ‘ i ’ ’ BE. A. McLEOD, iin] s \ s T ALL
arg ak yt: wis New Batteny. | 1951, beginning between the hours of 8 Police Magistrate, Dist. “A” tor sale, and persons producing 3/8 Syed wie ne pe Soper aarteee Bethados 13th December. | eee Se ere ae ee
Sedan 1938. Bareain en vie te 208 PBR, io Verne at 4/p.m. for the 41.51—1n. T surplus milk for sale: uuaec| ———————————— ae ree TSO) ; for your splendid support during the year.
1935. Very good Condition. FORT ROYAL Signed W. W. W Dairies Regulations, 1948, mauve NEW ORLEANS SERVICE : r {
GARAGE Ltd. Telephone 4504 Bherlft and tces eee: . NS") S/S Basi salled 28rd N WE WISH YOU
* ind Presiding Officer, LI UOR LICENSE NOTICE by the General Board of Healt: | 4's; lovember—arrives Barbados 7th December.
‘ teamer .
ee eee eh Stren. Doted Jan, 2nd, 1961,” Q under Dairies Act 1941 (1941-17) | "A Steomer sails 31st Deoseabon ne year pades 21st December, | A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TRUCK — One 4.wheel drive Chevro- re eo The application of SAMUEL THOMAS] will take place DAILY at the wed }




































































































































































’ Office, Oistu. ~
May 1951 (8 tons) A 1 order, Ideal { NOTICE niission to sell Spirits, Malt Li | Sanitary Inspectors’ Office, CANADIAN § |
carting cane from fiela. $4,000, “Abby Attention is drawn to all owners of | &¢., at ground ‘enor of “EL Paso” Club, Christ Church; from TUESDAY COUTHBOUND pu ae i (CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)
A. S. Atwell, Fortescue Pr. St. Philip. | 408s that they should be licensed during | Nelson Street, St. Michael, January 2nd, 1951, between the ) Corner of Broad & Tudor Streets.
4.1.51—3n. ony the to teen in accordance | | Dated this 2nd day of January 1951.) hours of 9.00 a.m. and 3.00 p.m., Name of Ship Sails Sails Arrives |}
‘Als, all Cexee duet ees ii ae Dist. “AN except on Saturdays; when Regis-|.. . Montreal Halifax Barbados = |!
ELECTRICAL i » a ‘axes due to this Parish Police Magistrate, “Dist. “A’ trati ete. will take place be-! sa’ « ‘OA PENNANT” : i - 29th Deer ath Jany
GIBSON FRIDGE (American) a ar thes ans Paste ares xen ae rene winger t : nth he rs of 9 00 a m, and £6, Ok PILARE" : vie 26th Jany Sth Febry
‘ F = y Wi e collected through the for Applicant. ween the hours 0: . -m. — ?
Sane $e ae Steen Seer reete. Gree | Cour, ih coaaell Karn, wpecieemen, wil De cenit: 19.00 noon, a
Ralp' an * . & PRASER, dered at a Licensing Court to te held . ; Arrives
Geet pr Beard, Hardwood o a Parochial Treasurer, at Police Court, District “A" on Friday ee eee aon Barbados JEFFREY’S COMPETITION
. er u St. John. the 12th day of January, 1951, at 11] 0) . :
icekeie? be 3.1.51—3n | o'clock a.m. ** “Alcoa Polaris” Arrives Barbados 13th December. Sails f£
Radio it “yole workioe eae eee ¥ H. A. TALMA, | ($gd), CHAS S, MacKENZIE, St Jonn, "NB. and Halifax, N.S.
information Dial 4306. ms order. For Ne Police Magistrate, Dist. “A” , Chairman Them vesseia have Mmited passenger accommodation. e
4.1.51—-1n. : —
4.1.51—2n.| I hereby notify my Friends, Custo- 17.12.50—6n S.W. RO
mers and the Public in general that fh BERT THOM LTD.—Now York and Gulf Service. We ie winaebat that the d
my place of business will be closed Apply: DA COSTA & OO., LTD.—Canadian Service. ; Dd ed to announce at the drawing of the num-
Good, and aed Foi | Wainy Ain se eh Ot GOVE NT NOTICES "a ae a “g||| bizce on Thursday, 26tn December, 1980, the complete lista
e 3 4 igh St. RNME place on ursda cem i
bes ee poe Ee wiatande &. alae WERE’S HOPING 1% oR S Al E which is as fallawes e r, 1950, the complete list of
a Dresting Tables Ba Mahogans Tenders for Cane Crops, Pine Plantation, 1951 chad 1951 F we 4 No, 5456 Col.a Marshall, Dayrells Road, Christ Church
: A . No. 10894 Norr!s Brathwaite, Martindales Road, St. Michael
Chairs $18 pair. Birch $16. Also lots of PARISH OF 8T. LUCY i i in Gives the opportunity of , ad, o
other Furniture, in excellent condition Fifteen persons naving been momina- OFFERS are invited for the purchase of cane be ranged. ~4 an Getting ali issues settled for PROPERTY situated at No. 8979 Angus Griffith, Lightsfoot Lane, St. Michael
at RALPH BEARD'S Showrooms, Hard-| '€¢ as Candidates for the Vestry of st.| 1951 from 119 acres of Government land at the Pine Plantation, ‘ ; a a ae Hp # achaist No, 11328 Horace Hinds, Oxley Street, Nr. Wellington
wood Alley. Phone 4683 Lucy. I hereby declare my intention ‘ ‘ * ; ; be i G iving our Customer j Prespect, St. James, consis 4 ” '
S * 94.12.50—6n | to take a poll at the Vestry Room near Michael. It is estimated that the yield from this acreage should be in An even better % ing of Open Verandan, ‘ Street, St. Michael
thi osn — | she Rarish Chureh on Monday January | the vicinity of 3,500 tons cane. § ervice than 1950 | Drawing and Dining Rooms, No. #945 Conrad Best, Bank Hall, St. Michael
MECHANICAL B and $ Stlock ie’ the nr tine tk 2. Tenders should be submitted to the Director of Agriculture, aivi:. aioe 7 Wane two Bedrooms, Toilet and ord Hazel Nelson, Fitz Village, St James
BICYCLE—1 Boy's Bicycle, second] closing at 4 p.m. for the election ot] P.O. Box 505, not later than Monday, 15th January, 1951. and should Ch; A, Sabie Bath and Electricity, Apply & _ Lavernie Forde, Dayrells Road, St. Michael
mend tn, pot aandies. Alo, young ten Vestrymen. state terms aud conditions of pfice. delivery, etc : Y on premises or to ERIC No. 7418 J H. Waterman, Bank Hall X Road, St. Michael
bury Road. Dial 3232. 3.1.51—3n G. ONE 7 4 7 4.1.51 on ee! AMORY, Treasury or ‘Phone me oan aaa ee, See Road, St Michael
; : ee ae : 306: ave p rmo: urse, Westbury Road, St. Michael
4.1.51—An. —- LOOPS DOCG OPO GOOG SOGS (Retarevg) » Bb.
MISCELLANEOUS TICE 3 % % 4.1.51.3n, Now 5326 Dorothy Stanton, Nurse’s Land, Tweedside Road,
Fibre just received. ‘This Fibre is clean, piamee 8T. PHILIP HOUSEC CENTRE, BAY STREET. $ CIR L AR Feoccossoseceosooenses~"” No, 7486 adel nents Si Hill,
soft Ane. ere ae 14 cents per I hereby. give Notice that as 12 Can- The following programme of Day and Evening classes will opea x PROROPPOOOPP PSP IOV OS ‘ No. 12084 CA Mustor Sihens hota
pound, 4222. G. W. Hutchinson & | didates have been nominated as ft and] at the Housecraft Centre, Bay Street, from Monday, 15th January to |X * ) arn. co , ,
Co., Ltd. 15.12.50—t.f.x. | proper persons to represent the Vestry , , $ . % e s NOTICE » No. 6017 M. Lewis, Tudor St., City.
for the Parish of St. Philip for the year| Thursday 22nd March, 1951, & 4 : & No. 10387 Lilewlyn Fitzpatrick, King Willi St, 8
; wired % ‘ , : rder to obtain resi ¥ . ’ am St. t,
eine ae ~ Rr tree ee ae sed ne only Ee Spr Monday F % Voters for the Vestry of g ace rate and physica: % N Michael,
now. We supply 1 peiate Glass for Church Boys’ School next Monday the 10.00 p.m.—12.00 noon Cake and pastry making. » St. Michael R strain I have decided to No, 3797 K. Austin, Westbury Rd., St. Michael,
ays es ae a elke extra lerke_penge ® B Sanuiary, et hetween the hours of Simple Dress Cutting and Sewing. Ns % resign from my professiona . hd a ne. Chapel Lane, City,
Hutchinson & Co. Ltd. —19.12.50—t.f.n THOMAS A. CATLIN, 2.00 p.m.— 4.00 p.m. Simple Dressmaking. Vote For % activities indefinitely, Any 9 No. 5493 Harold esdnae” Aootieal Fat tien
LADIES! Embroidered Anglaise’ in a 4.30 p.m.— 6.30 p.m. Tasty dishes and table laying. y one oe ee i) nec ate S]]| No. 5750 Arthur Parris, Welehman. Hall, St. Thomas
beautiful designs and colours just open- wae x i) x criptions which mig De a foe 5 ° e .
ed again for you. Yes! It’s at THANI'S NOTICE Rug-making. ° Ud holding, may call for then s No. 5408 ae C, L. Carter, ‘Linden’, Watts Village, St.
Pr. Wm. Henry St, Dial $496 and Swan Tosi ad pei eo Sond t 3 % any day between 8 and 9 ‘ No. 3914 Merinin Pagna Nurse's Land, Tweedsid
tee mi AT a meeting of the electors of the . a.m.—12. noon Cockta nacks. on Monday next, 6 a.m. % a.m..except Thursdays. No, of , irse's nd, Tweedside Rd.,
LADIES SPORT COATS — In assort-| Parish of St. Thomas held in. the St. Elementary Dressmaking. % to 5 p.m. at Parochial bh. CLARKE, St. Michael,
ed sizes and shades, special for the cool| Temas Boys’ School on 2nd Jan. 1951 2.00 4.00 Assorted dishes x ae . : 7 . Druggist No. 6447 M. Lewis, Tudor St., City.
weather $28.50. Modern Dress Shoppe] 0Mly 10 members were nominated, I : p.m.-— 4. p.m, ssorte shes, % Buildings. Bast No. 4437 Neville Griffith, N Ort
(Broad Street). 4.1.51—4n, | therefore declare the following duly 4.30 p.m.— 6.30 p.m. Cake and Pastry Making. 1% Th » New Orleans, St. Michael,
Site baliay tes ae elected Vestrymen for the Parish of aia Sen Theadtin & Fearless he above are requested to come to our Office, Broad St.
Mule, part and harness in working St, Thomas foe whe veer 1951, Advanced pattern Drafting. % a SS LA SEOOCSS + bringing their tickets a few minutes before 1,00 o'clock on
order. | Dia . Sherbi b i ve, d s arti i OS . wary :
Hil, 'St, Michael. oe 9.1.50—4n Gil. Lushingtons tascan® aa 12.00 noon Girls’ First Cookery Course % cma one bl | Sommething ta ere ices te ee eee fe wee rrr N.
NE wo . ‘m.—12. § a Be. ‘ Serviceable ‘ B e t » PETITION,
PERMANENT needles for your record| (jovding,, Utilian Theadore Home Nursing. R 4.151.411 T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
player, and needles of all kinds. Price] ann Vilian Aubrey Ao ac i : S. P. MUSSON
Rot Records of at Kinds too,” A.} Beene Distant aetth, 2.00 p.m.— 4.00 p.m. Preserves and sweet making. ¥ . . SON & CO. LTD.
ARNES Ke. , 12.0—tf.n. | phorne, John Henry Clifford ‘octet Advanced Dressmaking. TABLE TENNIS. SETS IT]
SAFE—One Lorde Fire-Proot Safe in as al ee anes 4.30 p.m.— 6.30 p.m. Caribbean Cookery. ‘i iy] Agents.
> condition. i si uteon, : . i inn A
i'eet wide by rb face ~high Apps | Qu elected Venirymen for the Parish] ay Sir nba arinetmnceni :
. S, Nicholls & Co,, Telephone No.3925. 4 s ¥ . ursday JOUNSON'S STATIONERY . | pO Oe OE PL Pe phe aatate seat sae
3.1,50—t.f.n. B. H. te 10,00 a.m.—12.00 noon Advanced Cookery and table laying . ; ee ——— CON DN DNDN IN ON NON ON IN GN ON DNDN ON OOM SHON ON CK OG is
pAEGETABLE GARDEN EQUIPMENT. 4.1.51—2n. 2.00 p.m.— 4.00 p.m. Cake and Pastry Making. vhoOwe oe ge ian & ¢
‘an mill, pump an anks. Also gal- icr: : ey G R E E ] I N a4
Condition Dist anes Gherbourns, “os ‘iain TICE 4.30 p.m.— 6.30 p.m Se pr nig | AT & -
dition. . . F ST. JOSEPH. : m.— 6. mM. , | : Psy
Mile Hill, St. Michael. 30.12.50—4n. aan Tehy, ive Metlee that as 12 Candi: Simple Handicrafts. j JOHNSON’S HARDWARE bo
a nomina’ as an ‘ “ ‘ NS a
FeR RENT proper ‘persons jo, represent the Vestry Friday & R and 3
mes ‘or ‘ar’ of St. Joseph for the year ‘ .m.—12. 4 oo = ee
HOUSES 1961, ate MS tabs Mae ave Soauired ty 10.00 a.m.—12.00 noon Simple Handicrafts §PPOVODDIO9OP9OOSOVVOO. 5 & BEST WISHES Pid
A STONE BUILDING-id0 st x 40.| l2¥ T will hold 2 Poli at the Vestry 2.00 p.m.— 4.00 p.m. Butlering. ATICTION CATE | . E is SHE: S
Suitable for a Warehouse. Situated in oom over the Dispensary nex onday, han’ ! iv a
uae Bast oaks Ap, Dror ee O.| the ath day of January 1961, between 4.30 p.m.— 6.30 p.m. Salads and Deserts. | E | ‘ Y » :
Alleyne, Dial 3072. 29.12.50—6n, | the hours of 8 + and 4 p.m. Simple Dressmaking. WEDNFSMAv J ort t ar Vv ear For bo
oe S. A. DURANT, J.P. Registration for all classes must be made in persen, and will take 11.30 » E
CANAAN, Bathsheba—Fully furnished. Sheriff ss . . ® Furniture and Household effect rx) a
From January 15th, Feb. March, and 4.1.51—3n, | Place at the Housecraft Centre, between 10.00 a.m. and 12 noon, and | §! = } ? A HAPPY
July. “Apply Mrs, A. Alleyne Gibbons. between 2.00 p.m. and 5.00 p.m. from Wednesday 10th January to » T ;
Phone 2617, 3.1,51—3n Z ‘ nar eee ate f “ mS) »
cans nC ce Friday 12th January, 1951. inclusive. | BLACKMAN’S * & And bi
se ech nae meta aa eee a hereby give Notice that as 13 Can- Fees must be paid in advance for the term, at the time of regis- |) St. Joseph At x I s
Family — Furnished or Unfurnished. Ona ekue ce get ine veuty tering. | WE are favoured with jase % PROSPEROUS ¥
for: particulars Dial 4789. 4.1.81—1; | 228 the Pariah ot St, James for’ the 5/- for each course in Sewing, Pattern Drafting, Home Nursing, Hous srom the, onnens. to sit By M Savi Prices - bid
eae an Sa onby ten are reaulved | Rug Making and Handicrafts. |B} and Eftects, oney - saving Ss a N NEW YEAR S
2 maines’ OS: Bedeey orARB'y | Room’ neat the Pariah church’ “ext! 10/-for each course in Girls’ First Cookery Course. IB axOfteszaimaz, aise, be, submitted, Vlas teed talkee o
Office. 7h Sob BTaoA, | eae Gut gee ge, SO NUREY, Ls 12/6d for each course in Cake and Pastry, Cake Icing, Assorted |B) for ‘the entire freehold provert. % up Chests-of-Drawers, Bed | Mi TO OUR CUSTOMERS, 8
PERSONAL GEORGE EGERTON TAYLOR, | and Tasty Dishes, Caribbean Cookery, Salads and Deserts, Butlering, BG eae Ngaeity woudl Se ek eet eink aeidee.. ee & G
Fe SRA we hea fi a1ni a | Advanced Cookery, Preserves and Sweets making, and Cocktail ed grounds pas Oehs Damn ae eR » & FRIENDS AND THE
e public are hereby warned against | _ = “| Snacks I » Dining Table Dinine iD. Go-Car 7 » 4 * -
giving credit to my wife DORIS EILEEN ie _ | _ Larse ning Tables i ‘
BAYLEY (nee Mayers) as I do not hold NOTICE 2/- will be refunded at the end of the term to all students who Chairs SEO ciasy iat ine DRAWING ROOM Suites andy, | ei GENERAL PUBLIC! &
myself responsible for her or anyone PARISH OF ST. ANDREW ; . . ‘ ‘abinets Linen separate pieces in orris, u a SEINE 4 ‘ a .
else contracting any debt or Sabie is uripplications wil be Teceived by, the aoeuuiaae s eee Cee ye airy, Talley “Hat Kush and other Kinds — Couches. ), iz a
miy name unless by a written order ersigned up ursday, Jan. . ic maa A hr Mahogany) erbice yergere Chairs
vigned We fgirt) enable ae tne ey Se Ue | 80th December, 1950. Beck: cmennirs, and Rocket ape ; penersiate &
Sed. KENNETH R. BAILEY, tgirl) tenable at the Alleyne School. ’ c be Settee Eas} TABLES tor Dinner, Luneh, ¢ t
Be ccors aan Straitened SGarakenoe wei 3.1.51,—4n, ees aint Side Table. Up Kitchen, Sewing, Radio fe Fanes 2 . i&
2 . ¥ : ‘hi - rine chen e r.
RuSieen, between the age of 11 and 12 years. holstered ay sane. ieee Med bedroom Cabinet And Many %j BARBADOS HARDWARE C0. LTD. thi
yt ee ae a ea ES Bearing aettrass Painted Other Things * i%
The public are hereby warned against | ?* licants mus: POLICE NOTIC . : ture, Simmonds Spring for ss
giving credit to my wife, LUELLA | Present themselves to the headmaster v7) “a Furniture ts " Tray > ty
AGUSTUS BROWN (nee Waldron) as I/ #1ine Alleyne School to be examined on Single sulen, Book Racks, Gramo % (THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS) ok
oo done else conteetine any acct cr|: | | MMNDG G.. A, SKINNER, RENEWAL OF PETROLEUM LICENCES phone and Record Cabines, Good +>) & i
é . - Vestry Clerk, ‘ assortment o ecards (Classi : e e 4 a ae , t
debts in my name unless by a written St. Andrew. Persons licensed to sell, store and keep Volatile Petroleum are a ee a hecled ere cade tices ca & No. 16 Swan Street tt Phone 2109, 4406 & 3534.
Sed. EDWARD me. hereby reminded that under paragraphs 5 and 7 of the Regulation: a "Chairs, (as new) Piatad ¥ , ; SENS NSNS ISN IS NI 0
> : i y . , 7 poire glass Can ~ ‘ ‘et
Ch, Ch NOTICE made under the Petroleum Act, 1882—2, licences are renewable b) Candelab a ee coe, are POPOL ALO te FUNG RONG iw Oe poe aoe as
ae, 4 eC TON Fon sun, Vemmey oF ne) the 16th: Januaty, 1991: HB) fines nandeut Barrel Shade, Lamp SOs tp ee MCI . SPLPEVELLV EEE VELEBELELOVVPPLELKPELPLEPSCOCOSSES
e a s fable Lamps Stange
The public are hereby warned against| NINTEEN persens having been nomi- (Sgd.) R. T, MICHELIN, | ey 1 Eumnboo, Pletures, Paint
giving credit to any person or persons} ated for the Vestry of the parish of Commissioner of Police. | ings, and Engraving Pr
whomsoever in my name as I do not} St. Michael, a Poll for the election of s | Service (38 pieces), Wine, Liqueur
hold myself responsible for anyone con- | Sixteen will be taken at the Parochial | Police Headquarters, and Champagne Glasses, Glass
tracting any debt or debts in my name | Puildings, Cumberland Street, Bridge- Bridgetown, Barbados, Secansers Canteen Deseert
unless by a written order signed by me.| town, on Monday next the 8th. instant r | Knives and Forks, Antique China
DEIGHTON WEEPKES, beginning between the hours of 8 and Dated 3rd January, 1951. Ornaments, large Mason stone
Beckles Road, § o'clock in the morning and closing at 4.1.61.--8n ware, Cider General Elec |
St. Michael. | 4 D.m. | trie refrigerator | 2
2.1.5°—2n . The following yey tee STATIONS box Electric 10-7 |
—_—_— — —_ ave been provi under the provis- i Lad Roadste
The public are hereby warned against | ions of the Ballot Act, 191:— IMPORTA NT Bete act ‘ : .

R ving credit to any person or persons
whomsoever in my name as I do not
hold myself re-ponsible for anyone con.
tracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me

Signed KENNETH McCLEAN.









Spa Hill,
St. Joseph

3,1.51—2n
The public are hereby warned against
siving credit to my wife, EDNA SMALL
ine Marshall) as I do not hold mwyseif
> for er anyone else con.
t debt or debts in my name
a written order signed by me

Signed APN .D SMALL

Dur





riliz
$1—~2r

Ne. 1 POLIANG STATION:

The first floor of the Parochial Build-
ings i; allotted to Voters whose sur.
nemes begin with the letters “A" to
“1” (both inclusive) and the entrance
thereto will be by way of the door of
the Churchwarden's Office
No. 2 POLLING STATION:

The ground floor of the Parochial
Buildings is allotted to Voters whose
surmpames begin with the letters “J" to
“Z" (both inclusive: and the entrance
thereto will through the Gateway
situate at Southern End of
building.

be
the

R. MAURICE CAVE
Sheriff and Returning Officer
3.1.51-—-6n

|

the}

RENEWAL OF FIREARM LICENCES

Owners of Firearms are hereby remindied that under Section 5
of the Firearms Act, 1896—4, licenses are renewable by the 1

January, 1951.

{

All expiring licenses must be produced at the time of renewal
for cancellation by the Police.

Police Headquarters,

Bridgetown, Barbados,

Dated 3rd Jar

iuary,

(Sgd.) R. T. MICHELIN,
Commissioner of Polic«

1951

|
5th
|

|



Sto



Radio, Burner
New) Hommock
room Frrniture

Lengths Coconut Matting
mometer® Electric Razo

Bath
Telephone Stoo

lron Safe



Ther

Old



Map Barbados, Electric
Lavatory Cistern Tank

Cate and a Large
of

tery
4 ment



Cos on 9 tH f

AUCTIONEER
John M. Biadon

Phone 4640, I



‘Five-Star

%
-
$
Â¥.
e
°
%

‘ “pOOOTMCOSEOUSCOSSOSSSL O SOGS"

oe

ro
3
z

CHARLES MeENEARNEY & 00. ifD.

ooo

&

69OFO99S00O50650605665:


{ PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1951

_—————































MCC § core D903 For $ | ; OFF TO HUNT Ships In Touch With Neecanacemaaenannsndeed
| ae . # mahedon Coast Station INTERCOLONIAL } ST. STEPHEN’S CHURCH
me : oh *, * m E A ease
i) A) â„¢ eee et a ' : WIRELESS (West Indies) 1 x sese
P ee that they ca now commu- ae Y
In Draw n ame | Foe ca 1 the following. ships through CRICKET x RECITAL
their rbados Coast Station: — of
S5. Ageroen, S.S. Mormacland, 8.8. | ‘
Simpson Bats Brilliantly | [Se Aeede: 68 eee Se XMAS MUSIC
Gascogne, S.S. Kratos, S.S. Seabreeze se .
SYDNEY, January 3. | [SS Phizabeth A Flanigan, SS. Wiltred. BARBADOS Sunday, January 7th,
; THE MATCH between the M.C.C. and New South | [$5. Carimare, BS. tne Butele, 5.5: vs. 4.30 p.m.
/“Wales ended here to-day in a draw with the State side ta, SS. Mormae Port. 8.8 Castile TRINIDAD _ Rg
{. Still 90 runs in arrears with only 4 second innings wickets (ee Sr ae nenenbee AE At Visiting Soloists :
__ standing a John, 88, John Osiris, BS: KENSINGTON OVAL CEDRIC PHILLIPS
. Fredcie > ac} | Brittany, S.S, Specialist, 8.8. Mormacsea, c .
sedcic Brown decturcd ine jas. Samana, SS. Dolores, SS, Chung: 3533 HAROLD STRAKER
M,.C.C. first innings c.osed at | #, S.S. Neritopsis, S.S. S. Virgilio, S.S
553 for 8 wickets, the highes } Eliceo SS. Neuve Andalucia, SS. FIRST MATCH ¢ BORO GOSS
* & | * - PPPLPCSOOOSS oS
total for the tour, thanks to | skoop, 5.8 Laternaster, $5 Preece February 15, 16, 17, .
comma double century by Reg ine "i racheua, rr Teieusy ‘Amaterdarn, 19 & 20
Simpson i Sundial, 3.S. Rufina, SS, Sheridan, >
New South Wales then lost S Atlantic Princess, SS. Cottica, SS. SECOND MATCH
} wickets for 31 but a sixth w icket | S. Silverstre, S.S. Broad, §.S, Graslin, February 22, 23, 24,
| stand of 90 by B ke (40) not rt et Say oan Se 2 ~- 26 & 27
} out) — Moroney (51 not ov ; 38 Byford, 38 Thelma Iv, 88. Plans of seating accom-
| Tes ei ‘ulded arucaibo, an ana. *
* Simpem: suka 259 includin; cr modation will be opened

Harrison's Offi
NV TGAINST BCL. |i Monday, January 19th to

“members of the Associa~





at the wicket. His score y tbe
| highest individual innings ‘
|M.C.C., player in Australia since



|
23 fours in just under 9 hours |









eae ahi: , 4 | J, WILLIAMS of Harrison Col- tion who may also pur-
With Parkhouse who was out \ ee ; ay lecuut the Bee : play a chase t wo additional

® short of his century he put on ; : ’ Oval. ; et season tickets. The plans

| 228. for the fouth —s F ‘ Fee it % : ei). Be opened to the
Tre > row took i n i aE Qe Raa pie , i

eae oe Rr ies eich pean ON BOXING DAY, BANK HOLIDAY—the day after Christmas, hounay meet im v.aages & p if ; General Public on Mon-

Warr 2 for 25 in the State’s sice England. This typical hunt scene was taken in Worcestershire at a meet of the Crocombe Hunt BARBADOS TURF CLUB day, January 22nd for

second innings. as the pack moved off among a herd of cattle. Repres, the sale of SEASON

SCOREBOARD raining pps “
NEW SOUTH WALES—Ist Innings 333 TICKETS.



ist INNINGS

amber Jonni... Fastest Man \{kin Hits 1 ‘As India| NOTICE prices of sitbabnaiets




Hutt«
Washb





























| Sheppard ¢. Moroney b. Lindwall 2 ND
REG _SEMPSON eae eee Sune me | On Earth — ie Tata a tet
| Parknouse b. Madden 92 | :
ene gar tan. | Draws 3rd “Test Sieiiee Soins
ictoriis eat es Johnston a1 | LONDON TENDERS are invited for KENSINGTON STAND
righ no’ ow ’ ane 4 : 2 : " be
Txtras 13 b.. 6 1b, 3.n.b,) 22 John Cobb, fastest man on CALCUTTA, Jan. 3. aieier Rabroainas Pays ay $1.00 per day ox $8.00
S Australia | fetal ‘for & wickets declared) ssa }¢@tth with his 394.19 m.p.h. auto at the Garrison Svaceien Season Ticket
© ol a wg ._. [record established in Utah ir Ri iiacrsialas a . : eee anns 3 S
MELBOURNE, Jan. 3, |,.P%,0(, wickets: 1 for 8, 2 for 17, 311947, is planning a try to regainy CENTURIES by John Ikin and Bruce Dooland helped Race Days during i951, UNCOVERED petal :
Victoria beat South’ Australia | (7.2 Zi‘, et, tty § for 481, © for 4% Ithe world water speed record for} the Commonwealth to make a grand recovery and force edule: taste ibe dadioaien 480, Ber Gey pr SAE Brle
by nine wickets in the Sheffield BOWLING ANALYSIS Britain. a draw with india in the third “Test” here today. ed in sealed envelopes mark- afier ‘Tes
Shield match here to-day abies o. M R. w C obb, at 51, is working out The Commonwealth began with ed “TENDER FOR LIQUOK GROUNDS
South Australia’s — remaining | Waker 2) ae Md feta aed at ae ona only five second innings wickets AND REFRESHMENTS” and 24e, per day or Walf—price
thi wickets fell to-day for the | Mille 23 4 62 © {Snatch the record at pres intaet, while India had still te bat addressed to the Secretary after Tea
addition of 60 runs to the over- | Johnston 3 3 165? |by American Stanley Sayres, who 1 second time not later than noon on at
. 79 “olin | Madden 7 : 7 ) “ached 160,23 miles an hour last : ; § a on Sa te
“ore O 79 ( _ ; reached 2 n ; ns . ails ' a }
Bivee ee cusabexted' with ue. ne 6.5 o 32 1 |June. | The last five wickets added 217 urday, 18th January, 1951. Car-Park hp mg at 1/ ‘
Victoria knocked off the 6? NEW SOUTH WALFS—2nd Innings The previous record of 141,74 runs and lasted out until after tea, | . e per day
rans for victory with the loss of re Si aere Bt RP '{ |miles an hour had been held by Jeaving India time to score only | The Committee does not N.B.—No PASSES will be ;
one wicket. ; iden ¢ Evans b. Wart 1 |Britain’s Sir Malcolm Campbell 39 runs for the loss of one wicket. bind itself to accept the issued.
Final scores: Victor’a 271 an Courey b. Brown 1 lfor eleven years. Lancashire left hander John ||] highest or any other Tender. THE BARBADOS CRICKET
, . + Aneiralia ag}. wes b. Warr ; ‘4 f present plans work out Cobb {kin required only three to com- y
82° fer one. South Australia 93 te ¢. Sheppard b. Wright 40 If present fF
and 259 eitealer.| maroney. not out “ st Twill go for the record = on plete his century when the Com- G. A. LEWIS ASSOCIATION INC.
| Lindwall not out : ® Coniston Water, Lancashire, where} ] mon ph cae rou ~— arenes Sécretary | W. F. HOYOS
; . | Fxtras (5 no balls) As 5 é - se ; of with the total 2 or § e too! 4 pit dala eit
young Donald Campbell, son ¢ . 4.1.51,—4n, ' Honora Secretary.
6 Irish Thoroughbreds Total (for six wickets) 130 | Sir Aiateottn, tried in vain to his score to 111 before being | RY eretary
-Leave For Argentina | ee \break it last summer and tine bowled. He batted four and a —
: ' of wickets: } for 7,2 for ‘\ aoe: before half hours and hit 12 fours, giving | 7 ==
LUNDON, Jan. 3 1: 4 92: 5 for M1; 6 for 121 year before. aot i Ppp ity Agr age . :
Pive thoroughbred mares in BOWLING AN ALzas . & } Cc ibb is working with bepers a chance when four.
a jand to-day -for Argentina, ; 1 Psat iate a8 | builders —who ae een ill nd| tralia continued to bat steadily in i . "
The stallion is Kasiro, a SIX | a; ot BeBe ee ee des'en ie ‘prillianit, spite of an attacking field» He
yerr=ola by Dastur out of Clove- } Brie ee > 0 | with Reid Cane ae a scearct s veaciied his second hundred in the
ly-and the five in foul maies ar: | —Reuter British designer who a seer | “Test” series in just over four and
Florida Calling, Farford June Sawin American cat mé a half hours, hitting eleven fours,
Puel«Flash, Ujiji Fleet and Owe since the war Y 4 ; After Ikin had left, Dooland was
Nothing 1 1 Railton designed ‘Cobb's Napier ; ; ; joined by Géerae Tribe in a sev- ,
ve , —Reuter. Herb Feels Sure Special auto which eevaliiigted ‘ ty ae enth wicket stand of 87 and then
. the won Tend y 0) Aen Sir , “ par.nered H, Stephenson, the BUY EARL
Utah, He also redes . : Scmerse ris “ . 2 i d y
SEL TEI ELEC Of Himself Malcolm's Bluebird aia ar JOHN TKIN ers een eae m* oe .
—LN.S.
(From Our Own Correspondent) ee tr tend eter eee en ee ee . errtaees.
KINGSTON J’ca, Dec, 27 2s Once the 400 mark haa beer
nset abo Herb McKenley, Jamaicen PRICES “NATIONALISM HAS _ | P2ssec, the Commonwealth bats Thats Why
solder of five ‘track — athletic IRISH Oat ten. 3 men. yhit out aid Stephensen
scihteihitia “re a. : DUB Ja . opened his shoulders to every-
pre ee aa en r Gniees The Republic of Ireland's Gov- CAUSED DEADLOCK’”’ thing short of a length, He com-
e LE 9 prt sicgaterd 30, se me yen ernment on Wednesday ordered pleted his fifty in 76 minutes, . . :
| es tikinys at nde writttenin ‘patents that prices be solied hear oe LONDON, Jan. 3. 4 Dooland left at 442 and the next GORGONZOLA inde DUTCH GOUDA it is enjoyed
veh a ays © 7 _ 2 levels on a lor Ss Lord ‘hair i i

* , cember i Luke, Chairman of the,two wickets fell within 20 min-
in New York, Herb will begin] (ommodities and services. Action ne,

weliminary training sessions lor] was taken to combat the rising Bovril meat extract company, | utes after the tea interval, to end DUTCH EDAM _— DUTCH CAMEM-

called today for a retreat by “one!the innings with the Common-

vhat he terms “an arduous} cost of living. : country or the other” to end th: | wealth leading by 217 runs. BERT rT DUTCH SMALL LUNCHEON

by M. HARRISON-CRAY
ANASTA is still in its















experimental stage. eason from April to September. Affected were food, clothing, . ¥ s eo aati. | 7 7 = ‘i :
There are several diver. Sefore he left he said that ke} fuel, light, power, | household nae eee between Britain alee eee left for play, CHEESE
@meles in the rules applied | ill be going all out during th>| goods, industrial raw materials, | and Argentin: : a’s batsmen began to attack,
Various schools of players, ‘951 ota to better hi rene building materials, agricultural Lord Luke, who went to Argen-|; ihe bowling consisting of Em-
One of the main bones of con- ne Lae sabatts biles and accessories | tina in 1945 for meat negotiations,| mett, Ikin, Ames and Gimblett;
tention is the “4ccaba” rule. !00 metres and 440 yards records, See, Oana (CP) said that the present situation|—players who, except for Ikin, ALLEYNE ARTHUR & Co.. Ltd.
Su Bee ake tole nate which stand at 45.8 and (46), had been brought about by in-/rarely take a turn with the ball. “Your Grocers”
ticularly bad position. to: call seconds, = tense nationalism -—Reuter, | —Reuter. ¢
“ Accaba This it do at Confessing that early in 1950 W I .
any (ime during the hand, where- xe had doubts as to how long he The eather
upon pinv ceases, a new i ‘ remai mk i ep, 137
sags era geome. sere | veserved for world top quartes" | a pgm TODAY , y q : 3
‘Titers. ‘The side online milers, Herb said that he was Bun Bes 3 , i

Sun Sets : 5.49 p.m
Moon (New) January 7
Lighting : 6.30 p.m.

“Aecaba’ naturally scores zero.
At first glance this appears the
equivalent of some mystic sij uel

ure of himself now and would
face the coming season with con-

DANCE

sea srt pe manele i aided

which takes some two or three
minutes to play. the painless
extraction at Canasta may last
for 20 minutes during which
tempers are apt Lo be sorely tried
ane opponents of this rule
est it is unfair that a hand

wh ch is about to yield them

py a Bridge player who is about ae aes ‘ne * 1 YESTERDAY
incur a penalty of wi inh seconds runs over the metres ’, Yodrington) : Nil
Genie omer ind wats in and 440 yards during the recent ee ae IN
‘ 5 i : .
A aight one ORY continental tour. 805° F, AN
Many players are prejudiced Looking ahead to the Helsinki Temperaiure (Min.) :
against spate peneae oe the World Olympic Games in 1952 67.5° F
Casional bouts of boredom in orb sai amaic: as ever a .
wading solemnly through a hand > on soe mane a Bees ty |] Wind, Digection (9 a.m:)
where one side has all the valu. , *€@Son to view their chances 4 N.E. (3 p.m.) N.
able cards and the other no ; the 1,600 metres relay with much Wind Velocity : 4 miles per
possible chance | hope if a fit team of Arthur Wint, hour
* * * |George Rhoden and himself is Barometer (9 a.m.) ; 29.936
Unlike a grand slam at Bridge, lavailable to form the backbone (3 p.m.) ; 29.860

of the quartet



Jcan Footballer



BLACK PATENT
GIBSON

What’s on Today



|
say.. 090 points should be com. | @uickly establishing himself as Civil Service Examinations
nromised for u mere 1500. As }one of the best outside-rights in| at Combermere School
against this. Canasta is essen- }¥nglish first Divisian soccer 1s! 8.00 — 9.30 a.m
ee eg weer | Lindy Delaphena, Middlesbrough's | Advocate’s Photo Exhi-
Certainiv in my opinion, this jYoung Jamaican, whom they] bition at Barbados
rife,is worth trying out. to be | secured on a transfer from Ports- | Museum .. 10 a.m.—6 p.m.
rst, Serearaed ne gis mouth during the summer. Dela-'| Court of Ordinary a oe
Moe ci , vere : , ) 1 Annual B.C.L, vs. B.C
~ her rule. th sUNes phena, whom Portsmouth
d ee . cae rete Se | Manager Bob Jackson cescribed — opens at Kensington,
esed with the function of Red 1s potentially one of the greatest} p.m.
iuateny ae eS, anon ni" | one players he had ever seen, | Aquatic Club Cinema
RAERe ace dows thet tia ao ; was originally an inside-forward. “The Window". . 8.30 p.m

< Injuries ¢ idlesbrough cause Globe Theatre “Three :
, ; lag ket cake Rama's } nan be cous ri ee eee Little Words’ 5 & §30 p.m e FOR DISCRIMINATING MEN.

ngse_up a Canasta The sup- ight siti ‘ las Seale he Empire and Royal Theatres p ae 5 .

1 facet fan nddiheunt toniave te hat Fe catenin ar coeice “Duel in the Sun” | @ This British Shoe is of the highest quality,
adds an a 10 ae aoe 5 : 8. i i 5

rie game: its antagonists say me of Middlesbrough's goals in 4.45 & 8.30 p.m _ affording the maximum of Comfort and Style.

that it detracts from the skill [their 3-1 victory over Ports- Plaza Theatre (Bridge- : '\* Supplied also in Tan, Suede, Monks, Tan

rsquired to make the best. use of Le t a victory whict 1 town) “Cinderella” 4 y hi i

rhe. partnership's wild cards. mouth —- a victory which put 445 & 830 p.m and White combination.

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED Middlesbrough at the top of the , . re

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

















How happy they are —Mother and Child! Yes, 10, 11, t2 & 13 Broad Street.
= THANKS, JUNIOR:: I'M ( 4 ‘
OP IS ALWAYS FRESH OUT--I'D BETTER } |: doubts and difficulties have gone—baby is on
Bess CIGARETTES, Ree EE me Cow & Gate! ed
IT SEEMS TO |
Strong, sturdy limbs, sound bones, the happiness | FYFFES LINE
of abounding health— these are some of the gifts .
bestowed by this famous food. —__i
Buy a tin of Health and Happiness for your T.$.S. GOLFITO is due to arrive here from Southamp-
. ton at 2.00 p.m. on 6th January and will leave
little one too. at 8.00 p.m. for Trinidad.

TA NOPE! HERE~-YOU CAN HAVE
my SOME OF MY TOBACCO=*+

2
7 ms HAVE YOU ore PIPE ¢ ,










First Class accommodation is available for
intending passengers.





POP-GOTA
HAT 1S+> OGARETTE 2
UNTIL YOU TRY ~~.

TO MOOCH ONE \¢
FROM HIM=*

T.S.S. GOLFITO is due to sail from this port to South-
ampton on 18th January. Some First Class
accommodation is available by this sailing.




For further information ‘phone 4230.



' CowgGate |
Mii oo8 i

'§ WILKINSON & HAYNES CoO,, LTD.



rT}
YNDICATE, Ine, WORLD RIGHTS RESERVED



8-26 corn Mi, KING FEATURE







; SRST

Me eS

LESLIE & C LTD Agent

siesta tac




PAGE 1

%  %  %  THURSDAY, JA1.JAKY 4. 151 II T. fc^V B i I SEOUL ABANDONED BY U.N. TBOOPS Ceasefire Group Reports Failure LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 3 THE THREE MAN Cea < %  Sw Qtoup reported to] the United Nations Politioal ConuaittM today | that it had failed to nogotaic a CMM bra with the Chine.;e Communist foroea in Korea. Sir Benegal Rau, Indian chiof ck'eeate and member of the 'iroup, gave the Committee what he called a "plain and unvarnished account" of what the Group had att nnstt to do since Decem ber 2! of last year HMIIM, ron FISH • Contraband W urlh £150.tMM> Seized KOMO. !-.n i Revet.,.. m tO %  "ith of gold, raw opium. Indian rupee*, ana clear efte* aboard the juao-nm Not weaken rtMmar, lUi sting. The eonl l %  hidden In %  I nf the snip, uhnh mi about to V tva • %  i l The greater part %  •< Use CUI lonis haul was made un of gold 11 i • %  11 ,iv pocsthb the larvcst in Hong K' |0M v.ns' %  bOUl £13.000 No ancst* were made. Biahsg %  ... .,.> of annar whole of Koree %  K %  K I---I ..1 1 .n with trn % %  III lit 1 1 the 38 tr d %  1 r i' i Ithdnwi Includmj to the rear. King Of Nepal May Get Back Throne NEW DM.III Jaa -i The Nepal Parliament ll expected to agree to the return of King Tribhubana to the throne according to authoritative Nepa%  ( urces here. The Government of Nepal i, understood in have agreed In principle to tinKing's return %  ubjaet to the approval by Parliament which eight weeks ago voted for his deposition and 'tlv of ins Ihroe jaanr niil Ki:iiids'in Prince Gyanvdru The restoration of Kinif Trlbhubanu who is now guest here at the Indian Government since November, has been the crux of talks here between Indian and Nepal Government representatives. —Reuter < i\ Hi.inBurred From Nigh! Train SINGAPORE, Jan. 3 Civilian passengers will barred fioin traveling on Singapore Kuala Lumpur i mail train. Malayan rallwa thoritire announced to-dny. The last night train for civilians between the two cities reached Kuala Lumpur this morning without incident. A smaller Irain with a radio coach and an armoured car attached will t..kthe mail by night to Kualu Lumpur. PcigWCnl attacks on trains have forced the authorities to restrict civilians to day" "me Ir.ivel —Reute guerillas, ty l>e mi red to the rear of ihe demilitarised area. 4. The cease lire to I I Unit) N..turns h should of tO '• No fill be Intn It "her side •u) Attlce Asks Miners For MoreGoal lX)NDON. Jan. 3 The Government to-day ap|,.1.. coal miner '.. -Ta\c olf .i fuel crisis bv pr %  it but she would onlv use candMfjpit Nelghbouri round her burnt to death in bed the flames rrf the candles bv Ihe bedaide had apparently tnited the l>edclothing. Six Gin> Skin To Help Burnt Girt NEW VQBK. | | %  i .-. In-yi i-..i LVuaan Lali nick who lo I cant, of her skin when hi ing caught fire from n , list November. Seven men and two vrom a had volunteered to yive pail of their skin %  Of the men waa oi.i lefpjeea .ir veteran Harold Swan, but the lurffaon, i> Nor.lstron decldod iml lo aOMpi hb iir.-i Dr. Nordstrom said t20 inche of -kin *Wc Though the grafted aUn not last, it would keep the child alive until there were nr.di rite available on her own body —Rruler | MLNZ1ES CALLS ON ATTLEE :.< rMiXin, J-<".. 3. The Australian Prime Mints ci Air. J IfeoglM, called on Print .viiru -;ei element Att lee at No. Ii Downing Street today. Mr Sidney ItWtand, wa exuee..~M1 to make a call later, Mr. Men/lcs waa having an' 1 %  nee with the King at Huiknm,.,111 Palace this afternoon —Keuier NEHRU IN LONDON LONDOX. Jan. 3. kb J Nehru Prirre Mtallflt i Bl Hum airpoit .ir Bournemouth Dorset tor thi -minonnealih i nfereuce today. hme had bee, diverte irum Londc-n .in perl American stratosphere ha today. Asked if he had bl : m, he told repoi expected to %  M.nistcr Clement Attic.—Renter Use Kurd Goe8 On"Hunger" Strike AUGSBUBO, Jnn. 3. Use Koch, red haired widow of l luehenwa id concenuration cam,-. coouTiandarit has be g un .i hunffael strike, Reuter learned %  Ihe came into court '20 minutes | late Proro her prison ni w-th her corn-coloui. BtreanUrig uncombed 01 her coat unbu tomM ;IIKI her complexion wan She hail ealtu nothing since Alonday morning. Yesterday she drank a little rid t"id ban wai was itoing on a buna> —Reuter This is beci states' reletlone with Iti ffeati Buropi ,m Allies In the i Jin l Communism has become mainfactor in the isolationistliiteiventitniisi debate un. t.ik" and In Cofigressiiimti conelderatlevi i f .ll foreign measures is expectfd trengly influenoad b) two conflii ling politlenl currentl <' %  <• thi' tnrowQ ui> bj the dean tni i %  %  : thi loctrlne of timtlnued ft military aid to the United States' non-Communist allies The othof is the Hoover docii.rr of relland" upon Mini western hemi*)-renees advocated by the former Itii'iiblicaii President |..st month Too Mam f'niinmniMs The Una nt tho ortei %  j |oni Heri< nd o day. l.,.-t iiishl the Hon. W. A ad of the it i TV i i i the opiMMfcuj Ui fat lions, held a mceling in the area Irani pollea ii: dvKunrd Union SupCCVMon C 'i !li ii L Ihe. i. %  Loot at.H R were Ron -i and when tinvlokwi %  rcwd atiack.ii Bhearer 1 ca III tl tWO tnOtl 'torn hi Buatamanta -em .. nun.dintelv to thi I calling for ,i recall ..I the hi' %  10 h.iiiilh tfU nd '"">i | %  %  i (tiling tut; I hi ppoinUi Bt %  I i day of i" .; in,..;.. s ..nd the vv. i B shop Df V ear Ap i I tinChairrnan of the Methodiel Circuit isRucd aawthei Mnt ippeal tins tune direct H 1. M Kirkwoed. Ctsturman ol ti > %  Bugai vi.on : "-tut. i \ a elation, N W atanley, K.c, L adM i "f the I'M' w A Itusl.im-iFite. I -i ..I B.I.T.U. J L P and Frank Mill. T u I executive tdlreetlni thi I'mon's campaign In the sugar : %  (hi 'l | The three chun | "Unless this strike is gettted In the i %  it<-sl possible time, it may be uv Boa) apark whieh will set Hie to all the combustible material a have mentioned and cauae such an aatploa aa will bring calamity and daaaater to aw beautiful Inland, shame and dlrgrace to all who have railed to C fltrol it and the l i ck of progresi for f i m.in. roan I lUrfcwood md rrai h Mill have %  i % % %  I the InviUUon and Manley wen' ti i ill itaV rot % %  |iiv thu i venin^. LABOURS 1 WIN BIRTHDAY MINIKIN. Jan. 3 PPlme M nmtoi Attic, was S8 today. Today i birthday %  f Ids depu'y. [ft v ho is fW.-Renter. DEFENCE TALKS LONDON, Jan 3. Thi Bonn Government and the Red Trade Liiion Cullrf Strike ROM! ttaly*i Comnunilal 'I raov I rnk has called .. 30-mir. b tftlca .i the capita) tomoii' %  < A againai a law author, i ,nn reni kncraaaeK l peraonnel, telephone anti tele.: ,ph .. ik.M will lay tl i',v only the In bt ten mil., i %  iike Which IS t( I" .i ii. local time. n,.i -. law an %  Into off. 11 New Veer's Day It landlords to raise rent ..t low figure-, bj I %  %  knee tiie war Hems WI H go up v i nt, for tenan %  ipaayed, llvmi %  TOKYO, Jan 4 CEOTTJ ndonod by United Nation:, i QBOUnced here to day Leavin>. Mi" cttS D mtafl, United Nations Forces witbdriw bo the south its Communist troops fought tit. LI w.t. ti i tho north Rriii < %  <•'.. OorrtaspoBdCfllt, Alex Valentine, left the city o bt.ming inferno as he flew out to Tokyo President Syngman Rhee of South Korea and his Goveriiiiont had already left the capital reaching the chiof United Nations seaport of Pusan yester day (Wednesday) Th rungs of miserable refugees followed in the red glow of the scorched city The n...it>ril.nn of Seoul stall .ni June 28 last, the touTtl of the Korean War. WM> l>U to the N.irth Koreans. M"I i montl %  of Cornmunlai • iptured %  the Amei || ..n s. i •,. the Inenon landing, o. \n the South K in Byn un %  I .it II. and %  "i pltal, Sugar Talks FostpoiHMl LONDON Jan .* i ii,hi. %  ir C um il %  %  t yaai %  i foj February, will i a i II %  |i u ..ni" l| %  tting a %  %  .. .i %  i in dele n tu, %  iii.i Duncll Ueethu \:'.-i the withdrawal began "•' !-tv of the (real ei acuatlon (0*1 %  .... tn the city while anottw line of lightmoved northw lee %  ( %  f ;t :i, n aplta In.-lion .. I .ini i\,.._ lance (mile I to at ,r Communi u m thi i he •Linemen. %  'hat it iexpet '.M ih..t M net ;iu.-nged drive on Seoul. .,„. fot tompOl ^ lliiti-b Comm iiw.-iillh Com, repi .re I i be tightin, vva> mil .it ii %  %  r .. %  I %  ua D wa M have die ,C1 .1 .1 the rxpei rid : %  %  paled tis the end ol ax ih. i iv..ii of the K %  %  in pui %  turplua tn That i i Iheri .nil be no wo itl the end News Han In Intlo-chinti %  Until h. but lour the Fieri. release qties Auriol Going 1 o \\ ashington '.VASIIIN<;T()N. Jnn. 3 i President of Ki.uiee. \ Vincent Aunol is eMpected I Wellington on Mnrrh 2fl for v r :l i.f SI it< i I .if Pre.i %  i" i Tiiiinaii said today that lb weak Of March 28 to Aprd 3 had men agreed on for the visit It v. ill inUie FMnCh I*reiident's it i tup |o the Unttajd Stales II. |g to be annmpanled brj M I''.. 1 Ami' I i^ing in prepar a tion the visit was lb) admuktlratloa oftin:iU pr imar ily .1 eourtaaf* and goi dv/lll iffnir like thoaa made recently by some other chiefs of stale It will prov i de opportunity. novertheleei foi oUaeuamaaai with Bacretarj of Siaie 11.1 DeferuN M u Weal Oennan "nt and Indo Oilm's futbra -Rruler. |l .' .1 north Vii loam %  1 1 % %  Vietn.im %  •iii .11 pet "I the R,,, French i> • attartod But .1 apofcearnaai In Tokyo nul .it lighth Atin\ lii>a.ii|uai1 thoj had uu knowMdga %  1h.1t .• CummunuilN .1.1 driven %  /edge tietween l '"' BlitUh tPUl llng.ide and un American Division Ne.ir smouldering Uijonghu %  ni the central road 17 mile. north of Seoul. 300 Australian iroops mounted guns 011 •* tank mid raced IwadJit.g Into -.XJVJ ter.attack, killing hur "en. r i.m.mi-m w eilhw woe of t u roe 1 Fifth Air Force planes inflicte-i 11. 11. than 1,200 casualties when they slashed booh ;d thi .ing Communist unmc BhOOtlni siar lets killed or wounded about .,i ..''hi I Hi, .11,1. ilii..ilhwat of U.j.ngbu 1 the road flora the northwi 1 United N.it...I I mdoi 1 %  U outharn bats tho iinnn Rivei Foui Chin* sc armies and t*.. lot 111 Km. in Coi ps oil this front md m the centre ma) try to cap,i 1 the 1 nportanl 1 ..mmunicaiir of w..n)ii. 55 miles Bee iL m 1 ordlnl to General MacArthura Intelligence ui strikes wer.have d imaged 01 1 1 '.-iiiiiirtt-held 1 —Renter. "And I Ve smoked them ever since!" Tene Ati of the Ttmiuion will be-'xioup Kfttl havt I I %  in talks as scheduled on Mwuiw.. • at more and p n I on Qermany*l contribution (C ftata, shops and business premises western defence a spokesman of l afle; B dish patrol lat had removed .1 mat party ci awl agency reported A spokesman foi the Associa• on -J Island* ing to win .leieh.t (ii-rman exlne base in th. North Baa -;ud 'he Raw grout, had set out rU, northind 'he> agency I vet been .'ier source It ag 1 %  teailng eg a of the li land fi.r 'itc by th' R A I —Reuter +X%. 'T f* %  l kasnr. %  >• %  gear. %  rat an M ,„M roeeaatlaat. 1 %  4 ti <• quite ;i u. ,1 -1 ,,.,....! 1 jiiienl." i'y, ggeyr fmtd antpfAAaj ehf 10 tfKil nnil iH'uolh and I rx[u,r yitu'll - %  m,iin a WEST NEEDS TO KNOW MORE 99 miA "Y i.tl.'l have Ion Mi.11 with ll..I.lllr Ifen lip 1.1 liii'.ii. It' I. il .1,1.1e lb. 1 .in Rfa i" % %  "Amt the mull — giiru th. lim 1/ Imbatio hi thr Jiril /il.itf— .J SMfiirb." IN i ,;:.N 1 %  I % %  Seshor.r. Br l n J 'Tenny is the arst into th rpecln '.•*• y %  Airport of the Toy Poodle to be imports*' United Stats* from England Known • %  the wov:J> most valuabU dog. foor year old • -alaaterpl-ee" is reported to be the only dog earning a gross yearly income of Si 1.000 f at *2*VO0 '•at.\terp' plon of lii- breed owner. Valued •].; only nog In the -*-ir''l tr 1>e eham%  r 11 aa holder of the coveted Utility Peg Degree. Erprcu. WASHINGTON Jan 3 The United State* Secretarv of State Dean Acheson said today thnt the Western power* must have further clarification of the Soviet, attitude before assuming th it the Soviet Union is ready for four-power peso Mr. Acheson read to his veekly nave been gUng on I ABOUT SOVIET ATTITUDE months regarding the possibility of talks between the Soviet France 'ind the ni that it was obvloui ine talks. The State Department an:oday that Mr ha>l r, d %  • g Bl %  French .0 1.ght %  Mr. Wir • Aff-u. -.voul-1 ., : the conThe *oh)e. %  matter was not di 'i ad In Moscow, newspapers pubcomment of the reply to FTanc and the FreneJi note to the Soviet •;ilka. They indicated th;it the*. exchanged with the UnitCHl Slater •1.00' 50 Iheicll never ia a bollci cigarette du PlAURIER THf IXCLUSIVE fl'LTER TIP CIO*ETTE



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THLPSDAV. JANUARY I. 1*31 BARBADOS AOVOCATF I'M.I -l\l\ CLASSIFIED ADS.i_^ A jm SUGAR RATIONED TELEPHONE 2SOI DIM) HMllbw MU DM *• a London % % %  -. WATSON M of am i-*i* B II King ..< niidgatow., and Widow at MMIIDAY f Bat i bad*-. 4:S,-| KRBH BERESPORD Ye-letua> ai In. re.nk.ncr N*Uon IWt • afternoon for 81. Pirk.k* M C Church. JtmnUM Lane and 'haw*, la Ih* K'nlWry Cenj*t*r\ friend* are nktd lo at lend %  in. H— Bora. Un Phvn. • daughter*!. Orvlu* e L*o Rovora ,**** an C.N s f Seltaai. Mr.. Don. Barer* MM I I ., HOV.ID. daughter! in-laa' i*m#. Age aui haan "1 Hicphen* .. ciock ..had I.' Amelia William Bog) child r. a ltd Gr raid i> i*. IN MFMORIAM IN loving memory of our Brlovac? Molhat and Orand Mather Mr* JOSEPHINE LA4HLIY who (all aaia-n Loi day. long nl|u ahr bora hat 0 br-t So he looH -e with Una and i or*. I Oil S All AUTOMOTIVE CAB — I A.i ttn T. M p %  rat, %  djterumbe In perfect mid U.IIFIA :i iir e & .irking valor, Aoplv to T I A. TO Auatin tniaii MUMgr *r.t Ta Roa*MULIr price. |>ui_ a I so-*i CARS Morn. 10 H.P 1*7 fan (loud Coi.'. ;i. ... HotraJ i HP (fan m.i rr.fMi.iion. rrd Prefect lions mil*. Uke New with Now Bailor Fold Prefect Low Mileage Find V-* ftedar. ISM Remain Ford Vl Tourer •? %  • Yorv oood Condllion. FORT ROYAI. (1APACI: Lad ralrohonf 430* Tni'fK — Ono (.who* let Complete with plaid M lirv.i*d to May IHI %  HMi A 1 rdor. Ideal (or carting ran* from flelrt •4 000 Appl. Pi SI Philip 1.M—3u ELECTRICAL nrnsor. FBiixjr .Argnrtcan> — %  nil interior dorp Preeie. three Man run ran tee Abo outer Fridge* v IL-.irt. Hardwood AI|*v 'V 4 I M-Jn RADIO One ltd* Radio in rood workl I .! .... Dutch Phillip. % % %  -j, FURNITURE Oood Naw and Socond hard Furniture, lardac* Iron. SIS. Waihatand* (10 Praaaa" SJn. Mahogany Vaniu** BU. Painted rdfMinf T.l.'.c. f30, MnhQggii-. I'lPirn Table* from MV Mahogan* Chain 111 pair. Birch SIS. Alao lola oi Other Furnlluro. in •.Calient cmidlUon %  t RALPH BEARD'S thxwroomt, Itar.1 wood Alloy. Phono MS). MECHANICAL BICYCLEI Boy'. Bicycle, aecond hand In food condition Alao young pigeon, for eating. C A Fwld Watt bury Rood Dial 3132 31.91—3n MISCELLANEOUS CEYI/IN FIBRE—Finquality Car let Fibre MM raeflvod Thla Flbro It cie*.. •oft and n-rlngy Price 14 ccnla p.i •und Dial 41 O W Hulehlnaon a. Co.. Lid. 19.11 If.-. PI HLlr SALES AUCTION Mb at 1 urn al REDMAN A TAVIOH-S QARAOK. n.urvh Villaaw I NTINDNTAL pmr, UP darnaiidX £*, i Are,m M Ke^j* Au.t^aw REAC ESTATE IMMrDIATIj BALE BCNOALOW N ^ Bun-atowr* ? "— 0 lt J i w • Contalrl-n two J !" "* Dfowing and Dmlni tooaai. IKh-n. to.iet and both etc For par. FOR HALE — LEAH — OR RSNT HPNOALOW: Naw lubatantlal WR|| unalow railed -Win,.%  Ituated 5 Wofchoo Road. St. Iftch.,1. hoaoo con. MBSJOROn votandah. drawln*. dlnlnR. % %  diouuia with running water 11 hoi ouiii-in preaai Kitchen with built-in cupboard.. *f C h Bath, aerv.nt, roon,,farag* entlroly wall erwloood Immodlato Vacant Poaaaaaton Dial JUT H Archer McKenne. Victoria aiee< 31 13 50 -3i' FOE HALS OR ESNT REMDENcrA two Storey W*n luidina in Hindabury Road, poor I ntir J&JfL. P Wlll-m.. B.,e. *,** IM IIIH AOTII 'ES THE AUXYNE SCIIOOI The I...mi,.tion for • vacant Found* '*" %  chciarohip available from Imu ar> itsv win i>e held n Prldy. J*in aty 13th ai R a.m. Par all particular the lleaaanaatar. 3 Ml a NOTICE F.T"* '*""" OF T AJ "*" %  tod ii Candidate) for Ihe W>ti '.T Andrew I hereby declare my inlmlUm* In lake o Poll al the Vealrv Ro *..r lie Atmalumae on Monday nth J u i,inr< IMt. beRlnnlni between the hour, .rf A and cla f 10 Ye %  ki i the Mm Signed W W WORRn.I Sheriff and Pre.idiiif QEoWl Doted JIM Jnd. 1RA1 ^ MJI %  %  NOTICE all doga lhal Ihey nhonld br lloeni the month of February. In I with the Dog Larenre Art. Alao. all T). duo tn thli Poi •houkl be paid without further del TS collected Ihrouth Court II B FHASJ* SI NOTICE notify my Prlendi. CualO' o P,*Uc In general that boMnoaa will be rloard th until 31.t Jan Iffl) A I* Hl|h St NOTICE i-ii OF ST. LPCY tra an Candidate l.i> I lierel.to take a poll at DM Pkaisfe < koRBj "I, 1I5I. beg-.ru> B and • o( cloaing at I Vealrymon V*alr> nDoin iu>ai Ml Monday Januan I betwern the hour* ol k |n BW rwrtdnc I 11 -4n OLASE-•parti* OIao> and regular window glaoa lo All all nooda. available now Wo oupply >.Plate Olaoa f. •how < %  ••. and alao eatro largo paM vp to •. Inch thick Dial tai O W Hutchlnaon gt Co. Ltd. 11.1110 -l.fai IADIES1 BmbroldoTod Anglalae In beautiful deilgna and colour" |u*t op*nad again for you YeaT Ifa at THANl'S PP. Wni Henry SI DU1 SIM and Swan ITWTT IIB Mul*. earl and ham* ordoc. Dial 403S. Sherboi HlL. SI. Michael PFttMAMENT needle* lor voti* repunl piayrr, and noodloa of all klnda Pr.,-e %  I SS. Record, of all hlndi loo. A. r.ARNEB CO., LTD. SS.13S* I f SAFE One I :fect rondlt 1 feel wide b R. S. Nlcholh 1 I feet high %  > Telephom -If i VEC.nTABLE GARDEK FQt'IPMI^T Pan mill, pump and lank*. Alao gat. %  niuted piping and me*h wire In good ent-dlllon Dial 403S Sherbourne, Two Mile Hill. St. Michael NIIH In HH HUNT HOUSES A STONE HllUlINC .,.. %  It X 4 fUiitable for a Warehoua*. Sllualod i l-,.h Hall Yard. Apply: Dr. F M ( Alle.ne Dial 30T3. B 11 SO ,i CANAAN. PMthshebii Fullv lurnl>hed From January ISth. Fob. March. ad July. Applv Mr A Alleyne Otbbon. Phoii*. JS1T. 3 1 SI P" • • %  • %  % %  r'ar to town Suitable 1 Familv — Pumlahad or for particular* Dial 4TR9 U Sn laega lahod 1 in %  ao* At PIHSOWI The public are h*r*b/ warned acatnat cuing credit lo my ife ixirtis FIJJ:N I'AVI F.Y n** Mjyt-ra) aa I do not bold no Mil rtaparulble for h*r or anyon* llH contracting an* debt or debt* in my namo unl**a by a willien ord*i .igncd By me Slid KFNHTTH R BAI1XY Eton Hill St Ccors* 3I.M—n The pub I* nr* hereby warned again*! giving credit to n,. wife. LUEIJuA AOPSTl'S BROWN >n** Waldron. do not hold mvaeif raaporuuble lor or anyone el** contracting: anv debi u!it In my name tai'ea* by a wri m* FTrWABD BROWN St Patrick. Ch C %  %  I Thr public /ir fivms credit to whnmw>*v*r in my natn* a* I do not hold m-'elf tecponiibk* for anyone conli.ictlng anv debt odelit> In mv name ned by m* DTKiHTON WTTKF-S Becklea Road. "I Michael j I 9*—Jn prrann hold mvelf rpon-iblr f-.r nnyon* eon. i "ding R*y det.' or debtin n.y name unl** by .n winter: Signed KENNETH ICCCIXAN. %  pg Hw NOTICE rvmi-M OF BT inn ii*by give Niitice that n. 13 Canhave been nominated a> At and pinper perwn* to represent the Veelry for Ih* Pariah o( SI Philip for lha >ear IRSI and aa only ton are reojutrad bp law I w>U hold a poll at th* Part.h Church BoV School ne.l Monda> lb" md 4 | 1SS1 i Ihe THOMAS A CATUN. I" NOTICE ling of Ih* etecuw* of Ihe Thornaa bald la Iho St. i % %  .1 Jan IHI ^1 IHIKI-I. —— ihnsl i 1-letle.l Vi "n mrn lor th* Pan.h of Si Thomaa for Ihe year mi Cave. Arnold Evert on Cplllm '>ril Mandevllle c;m. l.unhiiigloii Danill Ooodlng. Dell Ian Thoadore Mahon. Julian Aubrai Maaver. Vornon Eulnv s.i„i for.i Kenrwlh Sonllh Thorn*. John llonry CHITard Coope. Wak-ott. Stenhori Alleyne Walton. David Adolphu* duly elected Vestrymen for DM In-" Thomai for the year IP51 B II MOOIU. Sherlfl 4 1 SI, NOTICE PARBUI OF ST JOSEPH. I hct'bv rive NoUrr lhal a* II Candidate* hnvo boon nominated a* fit and proper pervoii* lo leprrnent the Veilrv for th* Pariah of S| Javph for the vear IWI. and aa n> tea are required b< law I nil hoM a Pail al th* V*itr> Poom o*er the I)i pcnaaiv ngii Monday the ath dav of January rial, between the hour* oil im. and I p m S A DURANT. J.P Sh*nR 4 I SI ^. NOTICE paaitH op BT. JAM*t> -r*by j %  thai i repr*a*nl th* V*alfi dldaUi ha' proper p*r*>na for Ih* Pariah oi n. Jamaa for th* tear InSI. and a* onl' l*n are rrouli.-d by law I will fold a Poll at th* V**tr> Boom noar th* Pariah Church ueit Mondar. Ihe th day of January ISS|. between th* hour* of %  am and 4 p m OEORGE EOEBTON TAVIR. Sheriff 4 191—In. NOTICE PARISH OF T. AMDBEW Application, will be received bv U> imoenumed up to Thuraday. Jan 11th, for on* vacant Vo*lry fcholaflntR %  girl' tenable -t Ihe All*vn* School Applicant! mutt b* rhildr*n of Pari-h lonar* In HUaileued circumatance. and I* I ween the age of II and It yean Applkratlona mud b* accnmpaniil b* C*niflcale> and applicanf mmi |....... ...... ... ., ... .. at the Aileyne School to be examined on Prldav January 11th at • JO .. %  %  agn*d C A tKINNER Voatrv Clerk St Andrea -'-' waataBU Pan! (.part**** raamtail and poMiblui, of pcrmaneit e.' akwia.,1 to aulUble applicant Appl) V *mUng u Li—. Fate l*d^Rt Michael El AlWntion Mr H A Cwwdmg j| 91—On COWfrTENT CIIILXtREKS NURSE' Oaly *kp*rlenced need IPMI Flldman L* Chaaraa Blanc Poet Uanc* Uap. Worthing %  BSaaK I %  ••ek. CLUB paaitktn offered lo food -i nmedUlte FOUR WnTDB 3191—Sn LOVF 4V FOUND ii.llio.eli FILM—A Reel of IS Tfafalgai ua> Parado ung aftor th* Saturday mon droni how at th* BnUah Find*r i*aardrd J I i OOLD irWnTTITKATlON BRACELET With th* name Marlon Finder pleaae return lo Iho Advocate Advtg D*pt Reward oRciod 11.91-Sn CAAIUIA Cine Kodak Camel. twoon Yacht Club and Marine Reward. Armttronw. Da Coota gt C GOIJ) BROOCH wnn a all*!* calcli in Bank Hall Mam Kd Flivd*r rein in lo Mr*. W. Dnmei. B-nk Hall Main Kd 4eward offered 4 1 91—la LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Th* applicauon of VEJtNON I.., 1 14*1 granted Uaird and vhuujl* ihop with -lnitr..f %  l Bf. St Michael f..i pat u* and LeQucr Licrnar .il aald prrnn •-. al It,-. St MKhael. Dated thh aid day of J.tnuarj ISSI T. I A MrLEOD. Eaq Police UaiKllKlr. Dl.l A' S.gn Lane. St Michael for parn.*alon lo -ell Spirit* Mall Uqoora •c at ground floor of "El Paao" Club Nelaon Street. St Michael Doled lhn Ind day at January IS31 To II. A. TALMA. Eaq. Police Magl'tiatr. DIM 'A" Sgd MAY PHEBCOTT lor Applicant N B —Tim BpplkraU.m will lie COBSl lined al a I icen.iug Court a> •* hold at Polkra Caun. Dirtnct "A" on Fr.da> MM Hlh dat of January. Itol. al II H A TAIJgA Police Marti'*!*. Did "A" 4 I 91In BUDAPEST. Jan 2 Hungary has REBln iaiiinws.1 -Bar. noiir and stairri by dtcreg ISRUCXI totUy lUttoninwas lifl.\l in IMS, th* tlrt country In poetSHIPPING NOTICES Al'gTBL|A MS #**. 4.M. ,,! LugrraD a*. ,_ ^}* AMZ UHlli r*4.^,T" -**" •• -. -___, _. ^__. i" Adeiaid* January h Malbaurn* wr Buropg to do so. but heavv ; £"?"*' ."f" %  "•s-ne janttTTimk export lo buy industrial ma.time-v Jujii aZm^STJ 9 A "" "g " Tritor dTOUETit Rtorin* for Jn Mia March, 'il %  rt **rvgntuat national MlBlgllatj" Th" %  taatl ha. an.pi* %  ** %  . Hard made rationinf npcessaxy asm'. ,''" • M o*n**i Oatan I T***f ..I 1 ** jTRnafctprnani „ Trinamad ' aBSB Qhaaaal I gtj .IL R-Wg and laawang UlS. M I Far lurt'ier panhfular* aoatt — I ItRNEBB. WITHY A COaWAgTY aaaaVEaaa K'lMlfc It I DA COSTA A Co Ltd tuubodaa, W 1 Agaaita. Canadian Rates JAJfl ART 1. IR-M CANADA Choaiuaa c> S3 3 IS-, pr Banker. gl 4 ISpr %  ••MDaaa1D*rnar... Draft-1 RJ aagnt Draft* SI I IS* pi 13 1 ion pr Cable SIB 18-. pr. Carroacy SS S IS w < Coutuni M:il ,. SI rear UQLOR UCENSE NOllCE The •ppluatK'r. of AfELLE TA\1>'S of EMnearc. SI Philip lor : U. aell Samta. Malt Ltquora, *' I I board and ahingtr ahop with .in .1 %  ItachM al EbeneKi Vlllaga. 81 < Ho Dated thla and day of January '0*1 To-G B. GMFPTTH. E*q Ag Kobe* Magiiuat* Hi" i Rgd ANTJ1J' TAY1<" MB-Thl* appliral.un .111 I-' dared at a Llcerunng Cn"ti to h>• %  :d at Police Court. DMtrKI "C" on MotSay ihe iWh n. -.1 fai %  *] ISSI o clock an, O. B GRtFPlTH Ag Polar* M.:Ktr..t* Diit -C' 4 1*1 IR Parish 6f Chrlsl Church %  Moni**r>at %  ..ml Pa — Dale ol I B.W.I. SCHOONI.lt OWN HIS ASSOCIATION In* Trlpphon*: 4*47 Youthful • Vigor Restored In 24 Hours \ Glands Fortified \*4 by New Discovery if' DOT rr*.r.,:,r... .r.l I f**l old briar* eoor I ran-ooon. >om oot. and un %  P-ed an* pie*. 'Tam lot* Of m*B*rr, aai • unarm*. %  %  %  'i.a K ro blood* Are you aarrktd* Do you I-I frooi ir or hat* aa Interloritr coatplai* Da TOO apjoy Ih* BDrlety of voawn or do Wautitvl aoaieii p>* 'on br ailhoui %  ffcoad glance* If y.... OR, %  1^ HARRISON LINE OtTTWABD FROM THE UN1TID KtNODOM Vkffel SS 1.AUHINTIANmi; is-! SS "MI'LKERKY Mil.I ss limn SS FACTOR"IIIHSMANSS l'H..S|.|., i,,i M l.touRh anp. Ion lo itimulate gland a'UIHT and tr.ubivug a I lerling of incrraied enrriv. vitality, and IwaTlli i Th ;'n-.-riDUan. (aR.d ViTaa.. U In ^Uaaaac. i taiteleaa. laMft form. All you need to do i U to ink* l*o llttl* tabl'li three lUwei •arh day. Thla prrariiptlou alart* voik IRI— gliorty, aUaiuIating in* gland*, toiigeuiatingtht blood, and rnli*enln poof anal* bad, Aa your aland* rapidly baoaraa i • trsoger. you all! [eel ai.d ae* youratlf be' 20th Jan 31.t Jan ITUi lu tOUi EM JTUi Jan mm FPI. HOMEWARD FOR THE UHITBD KntODOBt IVIIC. 'SI'ECIAI.ISIIf in Rvbatif. sth Jan NOTICE TO DAIRY KEEPERS. Etc. HfcOlSTKATlON and Ite-rt'g.iratlon of Dairies, iicisuns i ployed in the production ot M..a lor sale, and penons wodun: lurplus milk for sate: Ubowi OairlVH Kegulatioiu. 1W4B. n...... by the General Board of lltalli under Dairies Act 1041 (1-41-i'i wiU take place DAILY .it U< Ispattan Inspectors' OtUc*. U^:i. Christ Church; from TUESDAY January 2nd. lt5I. between the hours of WOO a.m. and 3.00 p in esccpt on Saturdays; when RI-|1Ktration. etc.. will take place between the hours of 9.00 a.m. and 12 00 noon. By order of Ihe Commisslonii'. of Health. Parish of Christ Church A COSTA & COllTlpll AjaatM ,e.li,..u, Ih* .joy. and ple.M>-e. of |U. ITUar.'ffiTh'f TZSTZSgR t ing't altnln on* aril Tiwa* raoaB* .%• tj-an aaoompliabod tun* after Ipae in Ihooaanda of •aato, MM of ahkna aad alaaaat glron up 'op* el on Wlag Mioag. aril, aud vlgoi<".* aga.i, rtesulti Guarantetd S ooiatanding hai o**n th* auoccao of %  b* In Ihoniaiida and thou.and* ol catr* Ihroughoul ll.' aorld that it IB Boa .'!• %  r'd under a aaaaie* gaoraiiie* to nit Killing unleaa %  tirrly -atiffactory. L'nfl-r IMI. guaranw gel Vl-Tab* frool FSOr lod*< I'm II lo lite leil aoafie* uiily than .v.i kafGio. Doctor pFfaiMft Vi-Tobs Dr 1 Raitelll. %  utel.-knowa Kurapeaa iniiitiin, (rcenlly ilated 'Many a*Mi • tilt arc of tin opl.uenlbal ih* iru* arct.t •J >ouinfHl ..*our angrualiti lie* to tl %  lanoa If ae luuld k**p om glaidt fur Uoalag properly, r aould f*rl and loel ti-ai. joani't and lite t .*(. long.. Baari oa ny raara of fgptrlrno* In aludp and aaaajSaaa, iilaiini and tnrirGOVERNMENT NOTICES Tenders for Csne Cropa. Pine PlantBtion, l n 51 OFFERS .ire Invited for the purchase of cane to bo reaped during 1951 from 119 ncres of Government land at the Pine Plantation, si Michael It is estimated ihat the yield from this acreaEe should l>e In thvicinity of 3,500 tons cane. 2. Tenders should be submitted lo the Director of Agriculluiv, P.O. Box 505, not later than Monday, lit*. January. INI. and shoul'i state terms and renditions of prtre. dellverv. etc. 4 1 51 la -a, rr —-. %  i-ur */ laaaa *a a ar. I Ih. gland, aid aparkle. year ii*v a frata* aprlag, aad nd* to r**u.'. til i ,„„ leallr .*n fnh>r Df* a* fWgaraUr NEST I "i K -IHI 11 I aaniBoi pjliugg Barbaooi am..IUIU.IM Uih Il.een.ber | Staatnrr Mil* tint D*tn*aabet MEW OBI UN* maVICB >b*r—arrlvo* llarbad.a 1th D*cmb*i tlarltado. Il.t Decemb*. 24-Hour R.H.III K %£?&£&& KPfeSlS Becau** Vl-Toa* ai* pr"* •HI b* i*funo.d Got VI-Tata ffotn *>lentiflc-aUv aciigwd TOUT ch.nual, today. Tba faaiame* pre"" and Rftparag la a( d.-1 laota jeu. Vi-Tab^Ciiarard..di^^"V^ I IIANKs far y III (INK AMI AM. iir >|ii> n-iiii iBBkfWrl during thr year. iv** Hiri.a.1... iTih January oi iiia.ii N. Maaa* or aaip I I ALCOA PENNANT S R AU'UA PILQRIM m WISH torn A HAPPY ANI PHOSPKROl'S NEH YEAH VtttR n \ut \t i tii'Oitit # illMKAL Ull NIlKY Ln.—PronrtetaHB) Corner of HUM I & Tudor Streets. -IIUIlll-.CM M. IIOU-SKCRAFT CENTRE. BAY STREET. The following programme of Day and Evening classes will op< ..' the l(ou nrder tlgaed ay ave Sun.-d ,1'NOir. SVAI 1 Dunrai *H Philip NOTICE llfCTION TOR TBP VCRTBT Or TBI PARI4H OF *T MICHAEL NINTF.E.N perari having bean no*nlnaied for lb* V*alry of ihe pariih of St MMfaarl a poll lor the election of sixteen will be taken at Ihe Parochnl Puildlngt. Cumberland Rlreet. Bridgetown. On Monday neat th* Sth Inalarrt b*ginning ueiween ih* hour* of > and ft o'clock in Ih* morning and cloflng at 4 p m Th* followl-g POUJNa STATIONS have boot pr-tided undar the pro\i*mn. of the Ballot Art. HI MB 1 POIUNt1TSTION: Th* ar*l S**r ol th* Parochial fluid. .% %  1 allotted lo Voter* who** 1..1. i.**n** begin wrtl' Ihe letteri "A la 1"* i both UtrtuHvK and the eniranco inereto will bo b. wav of the door of the Caiirrhwardan • Office N* POII.IVC. >TSTIO> Tne creaad Bear of \| Building* a ullotled to Voterwho .'roam** begin with the let•' • (late— .t Ih* a^ulkarn D.g of R. MAURICE r*,VF 't-eriff Jim Re' ,r. ., r i*r Jr %  JJB-Bi Cocktail Snacks. Elementary Dress 4.00 pm. Assorted dishes. — 6.30 p.m. Cake and Pnsiry Makini: Advanced pattern Drafting Wednesday 10.00 .t.m.—12.00 noon Girls' First Cookery Course. Hmnr Nursing 2.00 pm— 4 00 p.m. Preserves and sweet making. Advanced Dressmaking 4.30 pinfl 30 pm. Caribbean CofJ**aVl Advanced Dressmaking Thursday 10.00 am—12.00 noon Advanced Cookery and table laying 2.00 p.m. 4.00 p.m. Cake and Pastry Making. Advanced Handicrafts. 4.30 pmfl 30 pm. Advanced cake Icing Simple Handicrafts. Friday 10 00 a.m.—12.00 noon Simple Handicrafts 2.00 p.m.— 4 00 pm Butlcrlng. 4.30 p.m.— 6.30 p.m. Salnds and Deserts Simple Dressmaking. Registration for all classes must be made In patSBN, and will i:ikr place at the Housecraft Centre, between 10 00 a.m. and 12 noon, ami between 2.00 p.m. and 5.00 p.m from Weonesday 10th January lo Friday 12th January, 1951. inclusive Fees must be paid In adrancr for the term, at thr time of registering. B/for each course in Sewing. Pattern Drafting. Home Nursing. Rug Making and Handicrafts. 10/-for each courie in Girls' First Cookery Course 12/6d for each course in Cake and Pastry. Cake Icing, Assorted and Tasty Dishes, Caribbean Cookery, Salads and Deserts. Itullerliik. Advanced Cookery. Preserves and Sweets making, and CocfeBBll Snacks. 2'will be refund-d at the end of the term to nil %  tudBfttl who attend 75'; of Iheir rtasses. Department of Education, 30th December. 1950. 3.1 51 —4n. 'e'e'e*eV*e'-.'e'eV-*-'.*-*.*---0-.','. CIRCULAR • Vot*l* loi |h* Vrstrv <*l SI. Mi. h.. Vol. for OWEN T. ALLDFII on Mm !. % %  .1 .i.m. to ."> |).ni .u farochiaJ Illllllll! Eeiirles^ linpuriiiil Nirvict'.'iblp 4.1 51 —4n. MOIIM Nmn RENEWAL OF PETROLEUM LICENCES Persons licensed to sell, store and keep Volatile Petroleim are hereby reminded that under paragraphs 5 and 7 of the Regulation: made under the Petroleum Act. 1B82—2. licences are rtraaWablg trj the 15th January, lt>51 (Sgd.J R T. MICIICL1N. Commissioner of Police Police HeadquaitT Bridgetown. Marl-ado' Dated 3rd January, 1951 4 1 B IMPORTANT RENEWAL OF FIREARM LICENCES Owners of Firearms are hereby remlndk-d that under Section 6 of the Firearms Act. 1896—4. licenses are i%ncwab.e by U January. HMI. All expiring licenses musi be produced at the time of renewal for cancellation by the Police (Sgd ) R. T MTCHEUN. Commfctsiooar of Polici I. adquarters, Bridgetown, Barbados. Dated 3rd January, 1951 4 1 51 -3n AITfTION SAII BLACKMAN'S" %  %  i lone I I-nlian! CVrcln TH I %  • %  i Booh. I Can* Armchair*. Igtrvj II-I '-%  > BrtiRj %  ; ChaW* Bamboo Hid* TWIB. Wj T^el %  %  %  i %  phone and Record I %  .,-1 Jam Tlgei %  '" Bag. M-' Bug*. I Beriming Wh*ked ••.1 l-amMO, pain s. .... %  Shade lamp 1'< B %  I. 1 %  %  Map B-ba*. " >",r."i~ I.a. kd. UI-J~ i Kill SALE Di .mt i>.< I Rot ;• %  Itt-drot. ll.i'l ,. maj call (a IBRV. %  ..in aa] be) I u*cJ 1 %  %  1 J 1 rl.AllKF 4 -.1 in •.*.*.c.*,*.*,*,*.*.*^^^ J *.* **>Cfg>e>*e*ro-DAVs NEWS mm TXRI.i: TKNNIS SI I-AT JOHNhON'N HTATIONtRl Mllltl III Slf.\s IN I RUNT HOOK f.IASH AT tOM\ IIAKOWARi: Earlv Year JEFFREYS COMPETITION t*r .trr plea-rd to aiiiioiMir that the drawn*, of the nuiuher* for the Jl.l 1 HKVS tllKIsr.MAH COMPITITION look place on Ihutad^j. zfth Oerrmber. 1950. Ihe rniu|ete |i. Mali ('0I..1 Marshall. ItatrelU Road. GalM 4'hurrh No IflRSI Rarrll Brathwalle. >Ni m>ditli-. Kojd. SI. Mirharl No. 8971' Angiia (.rlfllth. I.lihUfoot Lane, St Michael Nn ill'" II in, Hind*, lulu .sin.1 Nr UeMiiiEton .Street. S|. Mlrharl No 9913 Conrad Heat. lUnh Hall. SI. Michael N... 401! Hasel Nelaon. Kit* Vlllaa*. St Jaaaas No SIU I % % %  1 nn r'ordr lla.rrlla KiNtd. 81. Muh-rl No. 7411 J. II. Waterman. Hunk llaJI X Road. St. Mi.hi.l No 11101 1 I,.,,1, HandlliNd. lUxtera Road. St Michael N. s..l llrmond Nurar W.-lhu,, Hmi4i ^, Mtehael Ni>. aX4M IhrrtMhy HUnlm. Ntirar'a Land, TwrrffRldr R. I. SI. Mi, I. ..I II >'-l Sealr. Sugaii Hill, S| Joseph C. A. Mualor. Harbour Bar. Wharf M. I**W*B* Tudor SI. (*M>. IJewIrn titapairlrk, Km. William --( Bs, Michael. K Auatin Wr.lhuii Kd SI Michael, •lerlin Oanwrnr, f lupel l^inr. I'll> l.tlr OOmx Ml.ik Bork. SI. Mlrharl. Harold llardini, l.oadland St. Mlrharl. Arthur Parrla. WrlrBMan Hall. St. 11,..,,,.. V. V. I., f'arlrr. 'Undea'. Walla VilUgr. St liearge '*. Norman Payne. Nurae a I-and Ttvred*,lde RJ HI. Michael. M. 1 < % % %  .Tudor si.. 1 ity Neville (.rlHilh \,a Orleans, si Michael nie above are rrtjueilrd l -unir lo our Mflnr. Broad SI '" %  '' their lukrU a frw minute* 1| Oil rt'clock on Prldav ilh January IBM. lo use their .kill n. gueanlng .,1 %  BaffJaEaBEf lu ronnrcliou with llir 11 I I I! 1 < OMI'I-TITHIS S. P. MUSSON SON & CO.. LTD. AgenU No 7486 Nn I'OR4 Nn. oil! 7 No IMt. No 3197 No :1116a Va. .,1.11 No. 5483 Nn. .1711) No ,MBX X. 2914 Nn. C447 4437 4v5iftftrtWt\WWfttf*ftfft W },;, j GREETINGS ] R RF-ST B1SRR8 For A IIAI'I'V And PKIISPI Kill s NKW VK.AII TO IH'K Cl STIIMI.IIS IKII MiAMI TIIK GKNKRAI. P0RUCI %  X 1" I I I I J? %  I I I %  I BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LTD. B (TIIK HOUSK FOR BARGAINS) • , lli Swan Slrrrl Thi.ni21119. IIIK & a.-|3l.iS ^tKMta*3.t....-tr,ss*t,4t.j,iiflkj.'' u Cw 4- CsO I • ad Us ^f ^ CHARM'S MrFNEARNEY & CO. LTD. PA0E*aM*SE0( 4



PAGE 1

THURSDAY. JAM'ARV 4. 1M1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE Today, C'wealth Plans Bailie Against Reds (Bv THOMAS C. WATSON) LONDON, Jan. 4. RENEWED EFFORTS lo mobilize the Brilish Commonwealth against world Communism and to localize the Korean war dominate the agenda of the Commonwealth Prime Ministers meeting opening in London to-day. ^— T hc world situation sives ihr „ -~. __ meeting at No. 10 Downing St.. Royal College Of Music Appoints Coloured Musician LUMIU**, A 52-year-old Ammo, r,u..Mim /\Miu, n.t.N own .iptru.iiitM in a new ,isi m tu* iu>.><" i-ni'.. of MUKtC tiu. oi ix-numr i. Airu^n musii\ He is inc %  *i cuiuui.-u muaician to nokl an apiJuiiuiiicnt in in--(. % %  Amu arrived recently m inuo„ front nis nurne in Accra, <.ot„ Coast, wnere hi UK-U as a teaciivr in the ttesuyteriun %  ***• training College. no oUicr Air lean n..* iiuiue.iciti Airicun music 10 sum a aegrce as Mr. Amu in Ine peat 20 vc.ii-With tne aid of Western lecKniguv. he has modernised many of me best known SOURS in tnc African languages and enhanced their popularity. They are now being broadcast or sung in Gold Coast schools and churches. A senior master at Achlmoia Training College, Mr. Ami bsssaa the Associate diploma of the Royal College of Music. Ho plays with equal ease the piano and all types of African musical instruments, many of which he 1ms made himself. At Aehtmota, he opened an advanced OOssTM fo> other teachers who wished to pursue higher studies in music. One of the latter hat lately followed Mr. Amu to London to take his final examination for a music degree at London Univerally. Mr. J. B. Craig. retired teacher, who worked with Amu at Lie Presbyterian Training College m Accra, said to me recently "Amu is a genius. We could do wi'h thousands of his kind to iTomote music throughout the Colonial Empire." Oliiiiiiiry Hubert Thorpe The Rev. Francis QMBMI writ**. On Friday night la^t SOBd. ultimo, there passed away j noteworthy citizen In the person oi Hubert Thorpe, carpenter and builder of Godson's land, Chelsea Road, whose life and achievements should not come lo an end. without recognition and a measure of eulogy. Ho started life as a carpenter, but his skill and energy coupled with the knowledge and experience ami directing capacity which he soon acquired, enable! him to undertake repair and constructive work on a considerable scale and thus assist m |IM upkeep and Improvement of Bridgetown and its environs which has been taking place during a generation or more. He was described in an obituary announcement .is "building ctntrector to the Lynch Investment Trust." But the facts require n much wider statement. He did extensive work for quite a large number of clients during many years, and some of the job* heput through will long remain to testify to his ability and conscientious service Two points arc deserving of further mention. First, he was r. tireless worker, and while be proved able, as occasion required. to direct the usual groups of other people, he al'o kept up his early habit of personal labour, coupled with o smile, plain, way of life. And although he had reached the ripe age of 76 years he was. until Vary recently, still busv and eager The idea of retiring at 53 or 60 years would have seemed to him IrrationM and crippling: he was then in his prime and full of business and enjoyable activity. "The rulin ; t passion strong up to daaHl Secondly, he did not aim mainly at making money but was rather animated by the noble feeling of love, for his work an-1 pleasure In doing it efficiently. And along with this trail, and indeed as a part of It. was hir. urobility and loyalty in relati-r to his employers; he was **' to do the work entrusted to wn and to do it well *J reasonable east. And his courteous nnd considerate attitude made with him always easy an, agreeable There will be many tO whoi.i his passing will be not only loss from a business ooi'" hut :\ personal sorrow ^_ | pected to last about 10 days. far graver aspect than is usual on these "family consultations." Surveying the situation, the Prime Ministers will devote as much attention to the Far Baste, n defence as to the development of the North AtlanUc Treaty. Robert Menzics, the Australian Prime Minister, comes to London with the set purpose of having the Korean war localized and an out-and-oul war with China avoided The Australian Prime Minister, in a speech just prior to his departure referred to the magnitude and the delicacy of the political Implications. He said: Korean CamBuign "Our best endeavours will be made in the direction of isolating the Korean campaign and making It clear to the Chinese people that the Uiuted Nations have no desire to injure Chinese lives or |HU|ieil> Pandit Nehru, the Prime Minister of India, is expected to figure prominently in discussions en the Korean situation and on the Chinese intervention. British Prime Minister Clement Alllee. who is to preside over the consultations will be able to give first hand information on his talks with President Truman in Washington. The establishment of a secretariat to co-ordinate dominion defence as whole reportedly will be raised. This is a matter in winch Australia is vitally interested, for the present Liberal government hi Australia has been severely criticised in th past by the Labour Opposition for not being more forthright lo putting forward the views of Australia both from the military and the political angles Indian The Indian domestic situation is also to be raised. The rift between India and Pakistan is regarded as a setback to the hope thai the Doimuicn Prirre IffanaMCT would speak at opv unified bedy. The Pakistan Prime Minister. Llnquat All Khan, has already intimated that he would like the problem of the future of Kashmir, the main cause of the friction, -solved by the full conference of Prime Mlnlstera. On the economic side tho principal discussions will be on Implementation of the six year plan of co-operative economic development at an estimated cost of nearly six billion dollars. Besides Mr ivies and Llaquat All Khan, the Commonwealth chiefs scheduled to attend thai meeting are: Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent. Canada; Prime Minister S. C. Holland of New Zealand Dr. T. E Dongea. South African Minister of Interior (Prime Minister Daniel Malan is ill): Sir Godfrcv Hugglns. Prime Minister of Rhodesia and Prime Minister D S Senanayake. Ceylon -INS WAIT A BIT. DEAR. WE BUSY WtMNIMCWTMC WAf Itopi-g Did The Trainer Know? Horse That 'CouWnt Stay' Went On Running % Tke Seoul THE RULE relating to doping—-"any druc or stimulant administered to a horse for the purpose of nfltOtinfl its speed . ."—is so vague as to be almost meaningless. Trainers, therefore, are left in the dark as to whut is or is not legitimate. Two noted South Countrysaid. Ho stays about six furlongs. trainers have been giving their. The race, as you know, is If mile*. norses a course of glandular in-'All I beg of you is not to show mo 70 Million Phones NEW YORK. The telephone Is in greater demand than ever before—despite the inroads made by radio, television and other methods of highspeed or instantaneous communication. The number of telephones in the world climbed to a record ; 0.300,000 at the beginning of 1950. The United States, with 40.70W.398 instruments, had more telephones than all other nations combined. Great Britain ran a signally poor second with 5,177470 phones. These arc figures compiled by the American Telephone and Telegraph Company in Its latest auue of "Telephone Statistics of the World" This Is the list of the ATT report: The U.S. had an average of 17 1 telephones for every hundred persons Sweden continued to hold its second place spot in telephone development with 22 8 instruments for every hundred persons. Canada was in third place both in respect to total number of telephone* and relative telephone development, having 2,700.000 instruments or 19. • per hundred persons. 3 Per 1H The world as %  whole had thi telephones pr hundred population. New York, with its 2,956.B32 telephone* at the start of 1850, outranked all othei cltle* of the world in this respect Only one country, the United Kii.edom, had more telephones than the large*! city in the II*. Greater T ^>ndon was second in total telephones with 1.820.548 instruments, and Chicago was third with 1.485.W0 V'ashlngton D.C. had mo.- jccllons. The injection* ire given %  •er a period of. several week*. Results, especially in the ca of old geldings, have been, on the whole, markedly successful. Is this "doping"? No one seems to know. It is generally conceded, however, that the stewards are absolutely right in wording the rule elastlcally. One of the slickest cases of indirect doping occurred a few years before the war. The horsu Involved was a useful old plater. none too sound In his forelegs and with a known dislike for hard ground. The confederates who bought him chose a day to run when th going was firm as u road. The bookmakers fielded against the horse. They did not realise, though, that his foreleg* up for a fool by finishing last It was decided that the Jockey should pull the horse right back m the eurl> singe*, make move whatsoever until the la>t furlong. This was Ine Flan to Avoid Last Place He Mas then to rule him ouB energetically to pass the taT*sj tail-enders "Remember whal I told you—don i mush List." w*jfl the Iiaiiur'.s luui] leiiuiider a.he lined the jockey Into the Middle Trainer and OWMM MRMd away. The horse's attendant led horse and rider towards the opening to the racecourse "Never mind whal lb* guv'imr *ald." Iho lad lemnrked to the jockey. "You're on a certainly He's sure to win." The Jockey, accustomed lo these Oil Industry Expansion In 1951 M had been "froaen" by local iat-minute-whispers" from st-ble anaesthetic. He won easily. On first thoughts, you might consider this action humane HIKI kindly. The danger is that u horse can break a leg without realising 1 it, go on galloping, and crash heavily to the ground. Salve that 'Helped' Badlegged Hones A salve applied externally was popular unonc certain trainers of bud-lugged horses in America a few years ago. Its use, however, was soon detected and forbidden Did we ace a horse similarly treated win a btg race in 1950V 1 am not alone in thinking so. A practice which has rightly bean stamped out In this country is that of tubing %  horse on the morning of a race. The horse, In certain cases, wns given a strong "*hot." ostensibly to deaden the pain of th* operation (to improve breathing) but primarily to act as a stimulant a few hours later. Karcgocrs will confirm how few tubed horse* are to be seen <>n race-courses nowadays. Not that these horses wera necessarily always successful Dope, after all, Is only used as a despairing remedy, even by the uri scrupulous. When cl<-verlv admlnistere. 1. though, it not only increases a horse's speed but also its stemA notable example of this occurred in a race at a Royal Ascot meeting. A trainer had boughl for new patrona hone which he reared, after purchase, was a •Mud." The enthusiastic owners insisted an entering ond running at Ascot The trainer engaged a well-know n Jockey, and took mm aside for a quiet talk before the race. This horse is a so-and-so," he B telephones In relation to its population M-an any other large city In the world, with 89 per hundred persons. San Francisco ranked second with 55 Instruments i%  hundred people and Stockholm. Sweden, third with 47. Not only does the U.S. have more telephones, but Americans use ihem more. There was an average of 36S.1 telephone conversations per person completd in the US auring 1949. This was an Increase of 18 conversations per capita over the pracadin-t year —s.wT.g 1 ^ ItfU BE OEUGBTED WITH THE Vf-Tir gjg. 200 €.C. VELOC ETTE THE MOTOR CYCLE MARVEL • WATER COOLED • HAND STARTED • SHAFT DRIVEN • NOISELESS FOR SIMPLICITY. ECONOMY. COMFORT \\l> I'OWF.R Chooie -VKLm'ETTE COURTESY GARAGE lads, smiled In himself After two furlongs in the race) the rider win not smiling, but cussinit '1 couldn't hold one side Of htm. and I'm fighting him, lying second." At the last bend the horse wns still full of light. Thr Jockey decided lo relax his grip and lei him go. He Won so Lasily—and Kept on <. %  i • i He couldn't pull him up for half a mile afler passing the wlnnlni post, easy winner at van V n odds. "W;is the trainer pulling your leg'.' Did he know all along what might bappmf* 1 I asked. "Not anlsssl be*i Dan beno and Laurenre Olivier rolled into one— and the greatest .^ctur of all time," said the jockey. 1 know the trainer, a muchresoected man In Newmarket He is just one of the many whose licences could have been forfeit under ihe strict BpfjUeatlon of Ihe Jockey Club's new ru' IMI doping. —L.FS British Colony Invites No-Colony Italian** LUSAKA. (N Rhodesia). Under-developed Northern Rhoe-ia. long noglccted hy BrtUarl migrant.-.. || to encourage Iial•":• and Italian capital The coloi I tlva Assembly has authorised immigration from Italy. The Government i* now connldering an Baaiatad pa go plan for the new i Fir*t target is 2.50i quality Italians, including .. high percentage of engineeis afllcultural scientists, chemists, doctors, met h, ii. us, and It* 11 lad wmfciimi A group of Italian worlttnfout development atfliim* with thiging circumstances as those of in-day, industrial productivity •*Mimes an entirch new signlflrassM Particular Interest attaches to the cessation, on January 1*1 of Murshall Aid to Britain. That It has u-eo found possible to end this akl—at any rate for th* tune being—by mutual agreement between ourselves and Hull.S.A. is a marked tribute lo the n jgiiiticeui performance put up by British industry as a whole. Il does not Imply, of course, the Immediate and absolute ending of all benefits such aid has hitherto provided Many U.K industrial development schemes, among the most important of which Is, perhaps, the building of new refineries in this country, will continue to receive Ihe dollar grants already allocated toward their fulfi! nent under Marshall Aid arrangement This is most tlsfac. tury news. lomperiMin One single comparison of stall-tu inirts just how tremendous; i. been Britain's Industrial expansion during Ihe past fifty years. In iH. U K oil requirements were 733,000 tons of lamp o., and 148.0OO tons of lubricating oil—under one million in all. In t exclusive of hunktrlng oil. W* used 13.839.727 Ions various oil products. Oil is indeed oa* • i ihe moat essential of all modern industry'* Iwsle necessities. And current consumption Is bound to ko.tr considerably higher still as Brtttah industry's present capital investment programme takes shape. .Simujltancoinly with this development. Britain's home refining expansion programme continues (o inBtcrinhM' in accordance with carefully I < %  MI |i v the end of 1951. for example, the £37| inillnin i.llnciv IL.* building at Fawtey destined to be Ihe largest plant of Its kind in Europe •hould have tome into operation. Thip plant alone will be able to handle M million tons of oil annually—double th* u K.'s entire lellning capacity in 1947 With i > %  paali I.M>. union programmes maturing at other 1* K. refinery sites, we should—within the next two or ihree years succeed in talslng our annual retinery capacity to nearly 20 million Ions, I Ullrr %  l.llllhll.l. The importance of these pro-i i understandable when one remember* just how many other great enterprises icly upon oil productin liteir battle to produce Ml .iiKi sell more Moreover. these industries are all Implementing formidable expansion programmes of their own. Th.il is '-; already achieved In world oil production during recent years are so Invaluable, why the agreement reached with U S. oil during recent months over accepting payment in sterling for their oil and this helping talll (nun current c ggfta pllralions over obtaining all the oil we need was so especially That Is why plans laid b> the oil industry for stimulating i i M Hen yet further during the i-uiiuiig iwoke month* are so vital rnatlonal industry generally GLOOMY BRITAIN B> WALLACE M. IU1LLET | LONDON The year 1951 looms grimly foe S**ialized Britain. Burdened with a three-year rearmament programme costing 110.oao.000.000. the bewlldri Briton Is also "promised'* less of cvrt v'.hfrujt except taxes, work hardsmp and the prospect compulsory vegetarian diet. Most unkindest "cut" of all is the meat ration embroiled since last July trade discussions with the Argentine, which supplies a third of Britain's meat. Minister of Pood. Maurice Webb Is reported faced with position In which the maintenance of even the limited 16 cents worth of fn-sh meat weekly ration may become impossible An official survey of all existing stocks in storage in Britau reported lo have revealed that meat supplies have fallen below even the m—gn wartime stockt and a drastic cut to 14 cent* worth weekly is envisaged fie earl] the New Year. Butchers Butchers, already suffering I esdarhes trying to gouge a cent "roast" may ask for the Meat ration to bo issued fortnightly If further rationing imposed. Britain's meat imports from Australia and New Zealand also at a low ebb due to Ironical economic situation. With wool bringing; such a high price, sheep farmers ar( reluctant to kill oh* their "nolden fleece", ar.d meat exports to Britain re lower than ever. Cuts In power during peak hours n overloaded aging power station equipment, and the failure of the nationalised coal miites tu copo with the Increasing consumption I* also adding to the discomfort of the harassed housewife Conservative newspapers constantly and bitterly assail what they lenn the Government -topsyturvy" handling of the nationalised industries. More Acute And ss the cuts nnd shortage; become more acute so does the ordinary Briton become more confused. The electricity board* urge him lo use less electricity and at the same lime offer him new elvetncsl gadgets which add to consumption. He is told the miners are break ing records each week with output but coal l> imported from abroad because too much is being used. And with creaking rolllngtock running constantly behind hedule the traveller Is swamped .Hi offers of cheap excuraioi trip* to country and **esldi resort*. Devoting a whole editorial t ivernment handling of nstionalised Industrie*, the London "Daih Mali" bitterly concluded "There may be worse ways o elebratlng a New Year lhan sitting with a piece of corned beef front of dead electric Arebut not many" -I.N.8 Dial: :—: IlilC ROBEBT THOM LTD White Park RH The Sooner The better LAGOS. The Nigerian Eastern House o* Assembly listened In startled surprise to a statement by Cameroons Chief Ton of Ball thai butter is used hy the people In hi.district as lamp oil. This we during ., djjtjgjlg v.h.-t, Ujg rim-pressed for the urgent extenslor of elect licit) to Bamenda and Msnfe Blood From Seaweed LONIXiN Millions of tons of wasted aeaeed that Utter th* rugged So;tlsh coasts may be used In making a substitute lor blood pissms Experiments are being carrlet out in London to use lamlnanr — a chemical derived from •eed to solve the Increasing medical need for blood The new Gulland laboratory at the Institute of Seaweed Re search, at Musselburgh, Midlothian. Scotland, Is believed h* possess the only simple HUB* mnw'H'"' |\S5 vlt•^• l, •* ,, ,."• •w1 *vA *? wi "Tessuasiil ,,u 1 Jtupiol water. Add (vWvUnV vali. V.hco! M iilina.a.Ul I ^ WL cupof Qmkrr Osia. 1 -Ufa ^..•::VC"."^' i BOVRIL Costs Less than INFLUENZA BROWNE'S NAUTICAL ALMANAC FOR 1951 Hohorti A Oa. IH,.I :I:IOI fllM*llfR*IHt1RHlil*l*illBiBl*1IIM CTffuvnk S Wa thank you for your Patronage during I9S0 ;.' S and with you at thit season ^ A PROSPEHOUS 19.11 BOOKER'S DRUG STORED mog) LTD. | THE ADVOCATE HAS THE BEST BOOKS IN TOWN!! NEW PAN SERIES OPENED THIS WEEK HERE'S ONE OF THE SPECIALS tfj Strange Conflict" By Wheatley ADVOCATE STATIONERY. ATTENTION/ PLANTATION MANAGERS SHOULD THE HEAVY RAINS CONTINUE DUBINC; THE CROP SEASON, ARE YOUR TRUCKS EQUIPPED WITH NON-SKID CHAIN."; TO TACKLE THE JOB? WE AHE NOW BOOKING ORDERS FOR Parsons Non-skid Chains PLEASE INFORM US OF YOUR REQUIREMENTS EARLY Writ* in or DUI UM. ECKSTEIN BROTHERS n\r STBCR %  *IIAL *z* 1m**090 909t+6+O0QOOO'''S'0OO*f+*O*+0—*******