Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

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Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
1930

y
r 10



U.N. Will Not

Unda

nn

WARSHIPS STAND BY OFF KOREA

Be Driven Out
Of Korea

Canadian Prime Minister

OTTAWA, Dec. 9.

‘THE CANADIAN Prime Minister, Mr. Louis St.

Laurent, said tonight after a conference with Mr.
Clement Attlee, the British Prime Minister: “the
information I have is that the United Nations are

not going to be driven out of Korea.’’

Mr. St. Laurent made his comment to correspondents
as he emerged from a full Canadian Cabinet meeting which
heard a report from the British Prime Minister on his
Washington talks with President Truman.

Britain, France, U.S.
Agree On Notes

To Russia

PARIS, Dec. 9.

Britain, France and the United
States agreed in talks here today
on “positive recommendations” in
reply to the Russian note propos-
ing a “Big Four” conference on
Germany, a communique issued
by the French Foreign Ministry
said. These recommendations have
been submitted to the three Gov-
ernments.

The British Ambassador, Sir
Oliver Harvey, the American Am-
bassador David Bruce, and the
Secretary General of the French
Foreign Ministry Alexandre Par-
odi are replying today. Experts
handled the final editing of the
reply late last night and the am-
bassadors decided that there was
no need for a full session today.

The reply is expected to reject
Moscow’s suggestion that the
resolutions drawn up by the East-
ern Foreign Ministers in Prague
should be used as the basis for
future talks on Germany,

—Reuter.



Electric Fishing

HAMBURG, Dec, 9.

Two German inventors will test
an “electric net” with which they
expect to revolutionise fishing in
the North Sea next year.

Devised by the engineer Herbert
Peglow and physiologist Conradin
Kreutzer, the apparatus consists
of a generator feeding two op-
posite poles attached to the mouth
of the net.

The inventors claim that the
current passing between the poles
will attract the fish into the net
and paralyse them long enough
for them to be hauled on board.
The system has already been suc-
cessfully tried in fresh water, but
salt water dissipates the current
much more.

Dr. Kreutzer thinks this can be
overcome by using regular short
shocks instead of a constant cur-
rent.—Reuter.



Saboteurs Damage
Transport Ship

SEATTLE, Dec. 9.

Saboteurs have damaged the
12,000-ton American Navy ship
A. W. Greely used to transport
troops and military supplies to
Korea, Naval Authorities an-
nounced last night.

The Greely is said to have been
damaged in five places,

Naval Intelligence and other
officials were investigating. The
Greely is now undergoing repairs.

—Reuter.

AUSSIES BUY, NEW
JET FIGHTERS

CANBERRA, Dec. 9.

Australia has bought 36 of
Britain’s latest Meteor Jet
fighters to re-equip the Austra—
lian 77 squadron now operating
in Korea with the American
Mustangs.

The Prime Minister, Robert
Menzies said that the Meteors with
spare engines and other equip-

Mr, St. Laurent said the Cabinet
has had a “very satisfactory in-
terview” with Mr. Attlee.

He added: “All of us feel quite
comforted by the _ information
which he and Field Marshal Slim
were able to give us as to their
talks with President Truman in
Washington. The information I
have is that the United Nations
are not going to be driven out of
Korea.”



i Main power lines
Factories and

cal refineries

& Coalfields

XX Iron fields

Hydro-electric:
a plants

Fort Arthur

—~

N

Yellow





Boy Performing



According to a London report.
the non-Communist world gave
general approval to the results of
the Truman-Attlee conference,
though in some places there was
apprehension about “‘unanswered
problems.”

Practical Work
ashington report states that
nited States
today started the practical
ih out the Truman-




me for the defence
of the free’ wprid against aggres-
sion within 24*hours of its publi-
cation.

} General George Marshall, the
Secretary of Defence, urged im-
mediate action by the Senate Ap-
propriations Committee on their
providing $18,000,000.000 for in-
creased arms productign here and
the enlargement of the armed

forces.
Some Senators. proposed that
declare a

the Government shoul
state of national emer, y for
an all-out economic mobilisation.
—Reuter.

Reds Charge U.S.
With Cruelty |

LONDON, Dec, 9.

The North Korean Government
has charged American forces i"
Korea with violating “the uni-
versally recognised standards of
international law on the conduct
of war,” according to a Tass (offi-
cial Soviet news agency) despatch
received in London to-day.

The statement charged that
American aircraft during the sec-
ond half of October had “virtually ;
completely destroyed” some 14



Government | d.

“Magic Cure”

CUTTACK, Orissa, N. E, India,
Dec. 9

Thousands of sick people are
pouring into Rantallai, a village
near here to avail themselves cf
the “magic cure” of a 12-year-old
shepherd boy Nepali Babu, accord-
ing to reports reaching here to-
ay.

Pressure on railways has been
so great that Orissa authorities
had to revoke an earlier decision
not to run special trains to Mer-
mandally, the nearest stetion, 26
miles from Rantallai until a com

mittee of experts had investigated
the “cures,”

Reports said over 200,000 people
had visited the shepherd boy tor
treatment.

A Dakota aircraft was reported
to have made three trips from
eo to — with “pa-
tien yesterday. 7

‘The boy has been doling ott
his “medicine” to thousands of
patients with chronic ailments
like leprosy and tubereulosis who
flock to his hut.

The “medicine” which he gives
without diagnosis consists of the
“divine bark” of a plant which
he claims was given him by 4
Hindu beggar.

—Reuter.



Peasants Anxious
To Return To Etna

CATANIA, Dec. 9,
Police were to-night turning
back peasants trying to return too
hastily to their homes on the
slopes of Mount Etna as the vol-
cano’s two week old eruption went

towns in Korea and wiped out gown for the second time.

about 9,000 villages and other
sociai communities.

—Reuter.

Tremors Shake

Messina

REGGIO CALABRIA, Dec. 9,
A series of strong earth tremors



to-day rocked both coasts of the }-

Straits of Messina between Italy
and Sicily. About 20 tremors
reaching a climax over a period
of four hours shook the city of
Messina on the Sicilian coast
where half a dozen people were
hurt in a panic scramble to get
out of a covered market.

The tremors were thought to be
reflections of the vast underground
explosions which have caused the
Etna volcano some 64 miles away
to erupt for the last two weeks.

—Reuter.

B.G. ELECTIONS

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Dec. 9.

Councillors George Francois
De Sebastiani and Edgar Wads-
worth Adams whose seats were
contested, returned as the George-
town Municipal General Election
ended after five days.

Nine were elected including



ment were expected to arrive in|four commercial men and a wo-
Australia early in the New Year. man secretary. Three Government | a member of the Caribbean Com-

—Reuter.



A T.C.A
new runway
.

{

nominees are not yet named.—CP) | mission.—Can. Press.

ON RUN AGAIN.

DC-4 plane after. an absence of seven weeks was able to land at Seawell yesterday on

The villagers had evacuated
their homes at Milo Rinazzo and
Fornazzo on the northeastern
slopes of Etna.

Lava slowed down to a halt last
night but the explosive activity of
the craters has not stopped, .

Black lava has formed 10-yard
high barricades north of the vil-
lage.—Reuter. ;

PLAN FOR SOIL
SAVING IN WI.

CURACAO, Dec. 9

The West Indian Conference
yesterday adopted a proposal to
establish a pilot plant for soil con-
servation in the British territories
of St Vincent and St. Lucia.

The proposal was submitted by
U.S. Allison, Director of the
Caribbean area of soil conserv-
ation service of Puerto Rico. Two
British islands were chosen be-
cause conditions there are sirnilar
to those in the surrounding terri-
tories of other nations.

The Conference also adopted the
suggestion that the Caribbean
Commission should seek outside
financial assistance and cabled
congratulations to Dr, Ralph
Bunche, Nobel Peace Prize Winner,
in appreciation of his services as



the

It is pictured bere on the parking apron and passengers are seen alighting

WHAT Irs ALL





Liat Ae "hae
“Sea of Japan—
0 Sheen



THIS “MAP shows” clearly what Communist China means to the war in Koi



12-Year-Old Indian| Byitish Emphasise F ailings
Of Atilee—Truman Talks

(From Our Own

THE COMMUNIQUE issued from Washington at the
conclusion of the Attlee-Truman *eonversations has not
been very enthusiastically received by informed diplomatic

quarters here.
It certainly represents

have already been emphasised, but its failings and omis-
sions are now being underlined here in the following

terms.



Over 3,000,000 |

Made Pilgrimage |
To Rome 1950 |

VATICAN CITY, Dec: 9. ;
Vatican officials have calculated}
that a_ _of between 3, \
and 4,000,000 pilgrims .came . to}

Reme this year, Western Ger-
many sent about 150,000, Spain
42,000, the countries of South
America 38,000, Holland 3,000,
Austria 30,000, and Scandinavian
countries 28,000.

About 15,000 came on foot, 9,000
of them Italians and the remaining
6,000 chiefly from France, Austria,
Holland, Britain, Western Ger-
many, Belgium and Spain. Others
used a total of 300,000 tourist
coaches, it was estimated, and hun-
dreds used special trains —Reuter





uestiog ©. calling a halt at the
Bit Gate, the United Nati,
-renwiF divided on the approatl





Correspondent)
LONDON, Dec. 9.

certain achievements which

These exchanges at the highest
level have not reached rny agree-
ment on the must urgent problem
which is the terms for negotia-
tions with the Chinese-Peking
Government, While hopeful re-
ports pour in, (particularly from
Indian rters), that the Chinese
are willing to negotiate on the

to two of the three issues likely
to be raised in any negotiation,
First the Communique admits
the Anglo-American difference
on the admission of China to the
Security Council; the second, the
Attlee-Truman Communique
avoids the issue of Formosa by
taking refuge in the formula:
“interests of the people of For-
mosa and the maintenance of
peace and security in the Pacific”.
Consulwation, A Farce
It is pointed out here that there
is no existing machinery for con-
sultation of the “people of For-

| mosa”, and that there won't be

Attlee Was Not |
“France’s Delegate

PARIS Dec. 9.

A French War Ministry spokes-
man said here today that he did
not think the Truman-Attlee
decision to “increase the military
capacities of the U.S. and U.K.,”
would mean the neglect of other
‘Atlantic Pact countries defence
requirements,

The “United States undoubt-
edly realises that French defence
must rely to a considerable ex-
tent on American aid”, he said

He pointed out that at the
meeting of Premier Attlee and
President Truman, only the in-
terests of Great Britain and
America were represented,

“French Premier, Rene Pleven

has made it quite clear in the
last few days that Attlee was
not acting as a delegate foi

France,” he said. —Reuter.

Peking Wants Peace

LAKE SUCCESS, Dec, 9.



Sir Benqgal Rau, leader of the|

Indian delegation to the United)
Nations, said today talks with
Communist China indicated that
she was giving “careful considera- |
tion” to the 13-nations appeal to!
halt her forces at the 38th paral-
lel.

The Peking Gevernment was
“desirous uf bringing fighting to
an end as early as possible,” he



told reporters after an 80-minute
talk with Wu Chan, leader of the |

delegation It was their third |
meeting to discuss Korea,
—Reuter.



|U.K. WILL APPEAL FOR

until Chiang’s Government supei -
seded—moreover the security of
the Pacific begs the whole ques-
tion, On the other hand, Attlee
and Truman have reached an
agreement on the third important
issue that would arise in nego-
tiations with Chinese authorities
—they have agreed to grant as-
surances that the United Nations
would not regroup in South
Korea for re-entry into North:
Korea, once a_ cease-fire was
achieved on an agreed line

These are the limitations seen
in the understanding reached
between ‘Attlee and Truman

There are also some glaring
omissions. Nothing ts said about
the re-armament of Germany on
which all Europe is now agitated.
Up to recently it was presumed
that the United States made an
agreement that German re-arma-
ment was a pre-condition of the
appointment of General Eisenhow-
er as Supreme Commander of the
Atlantic Pact

Vague Wording
Wording is vague in the Com-
munique but according to the
most likely reading, the Ameri-
cans are agreed to go ahead with
@ O nPage 16

Big Four Meeting

PARIS, Dec. 9,
The Big Three western powers
are to tell Russia they are willing
to join in a Four-Power Meeting
in an effort to settle outstanding
difficulties, it was reliably learned
here to-night, but they will pro-—
pose that a suitable agenda for
the meeting should be worked out
beforehand through diplomatic

channels, it was understood.
—Reuter




















Reds Demand.
| Withdrawal |
\Of U.N. Troops

LAKE SUCCESS, Dec, 9
Russia submitted to the United!
Nations today. a resolution call-
ing for the immediate withdrawal
of all foreign troops fron Korea
and recommending that the solu-

|

tion of the Korea question be |
vested in the Korean people it- |
self.

Presenting the resolution to the
Political Committee of the Gen-
eral Assembly, the Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei Vyshinsky said
it was the only way which could



MacArthur Orders

News Blackout

TOKYO, Dec. 9.

FLEET transports and warships stood by tonight

off Hungnam, the Korean east coast port just
above the peninsula, waiting for “the possible
evacuation of 15,000 American marines and British
Commandos whose forward elements had linked up
with relief forces from the port after battling their

way out of the Chinese

encirclement.

The American Third and Seventh Divisions—
brought back from Port Chongjin, only 50 miles
from the Siberian border — had established a
beach-head around Hamhung and Sungram.



bring about peace.

Vyshinsky moved the resolution

afier describing as “nonsense”,
the estimates by the United
States and the United Nations
Commission in Korea of the
strength of the Chinese Com-j;
mun st Forces there. j
The Commission report yes-
terday that the Chinese forces,
definitely identified in Korea,
totalled 231,000 and that one
“responsible” estimate placed the

total at 400,000.

Vyshinsky referred to these
figures and to the statement by
Warren Austin, the United States

delegate, that there were no
fewer than 3) Chinese divisions
in Korea.

—Reuter.

f

30 Year's
In Gaol

PHILADELPHIA, Dec. 8.
Harry Gold, a research ehem-
3. Was today sentenced to 30



years in prison as the self-con-
fessed courier of the Rusy.an
atomic spy ring.

Gold had pleaded guilty ww
serving as the go-between for
Doctor Fuchs, the convicted Brit-
ish atom scientist, and Soviet
agents

He was sentenced by the Dis-

trict Judge James P, McGranery
to two terms of 30 years to run
concurrently. He was charged with
espionage in wartime which car-

ries the maximum penalty olf
death
The Federal Government had

recommended 25 years in prison.
Gold received sentence calmly.
After a brief statement before the
bar, he said:

“Nothing has served more
since my arrest to prove to me
what a terrible m'stake I have

made than the manner in which
my court-appointed Counsel have
worked hard on my behalf despite
personal criticism and invective

It could not have happened in
Russia.”
—Reuter.



AIRLINER CRASHES
IN CONGO

PARIS, Dec. 9
The French air liner taking 5f
Senegalese troops from Bangui ir
the French Congo to Madagasca)

crashed in the Belgian Congo
few minutes after taking off las
night, it was learned here to-day
The Intercontinental Air Trans-
port Company announced that
there were 18 survivors, three
crew and 15 Senegalese soldiers,
three survivors of the crew, pilot
co-pilot, and the mechanic, were

injured and are in hospital at
Bangui.

The Air Transport Company
stated that of the Senegalese

survivors 13 were injured; some
of them very slightly,-Reuter,

SCRAP IRON

21,000 Unemployed In Liverpool

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Dec, 9.
Two signs of the times appear
in today’s morning newspapers
One is the Manchester Guardian's
strong leader, advocating that the
21,063 unemployed. on Liverpool’s |
Merseyside—just revealed in the
Ministry of Labour analysis—be |
absorbed by the rearmamenit |
programme. The other is the re-|
port that there shortly is to be!
an urgent appeal for scrap meta:
in Britain, to meet the deficiency
of 1,000,000 tons a year which

has arisen since the Korean cam



> GUardian points out that it
was not until the secc ear f
the war that Britain made f

ise of its 1,500,000 unemployed
vorkers, This mistake should |
not be made again, It draws at-

tention to the wisdom of utilising
such unused labour, before

ae

The “ Advocate Co, Ltd
takes pleasure
ing with to-day’s ‘‘ Sunday
Advocate’’ our FREE
Xmas Supplement to sub

in present

seribers and thanks then
for their loyalty, support
and vterest through f
the year

‘

’

| diverting valuable workers from
{trades most needed for rearm-
ament
| On the scrap metal problem of
, equal importance to rearmment,
| the Daily Telegraph comments on
| the fact that it is America’s heavy
| purchases of scrap metal in Ger-
many that have reduced supplies
| available to the British steel
| market, and sees an urgent neces-
| sity for a widely planned serap-
| drive in Britain and on the con-
tinent, and for a higher ie
f
}
j
|
\

tion of pig iron

Stra

al
ilso

Minister U
warned the ntry f
hortage Pxy fer

etals

WITHDRAWAL —





MEK Par

“We intend to operate offensively from this line of sup-
ply”, Major General Edward Almond, Tenth Corps Com-

mander said to-day.
Admiral Charles Joy,

Commander-in-Chief of the

United States Far Eastern Fleet, was asked at a Press Con-
ference to-day whether a naval force were gathering off
Hungnam to evacuate the 10th Corps.

“The navy is standing by for any }area

eventuality,” he replied. The
Tenth Corps officers here did not
minimise the seriousness of the
situation now facing the United
Nations commanders, but they ex-
pressed confidence that greater
Amertean fire power would be
decisive

Marines and Commandos linked
up with the American rescue
column in the “hell fire valley”.
The “break out” force had been
cut off in the Chosin reservoir





- CSE aR a =.
MANCHURA ea REA [gies g
Suibe es o % oO Con as. ee)

;
/ =| US. TROOPS AND
( BRITISH COMMANDOS
TRY 10 FIGHT
Our





British Tug
In Korea

HONG KONG, Dec. 9.

The Gritisn tug Allegiance, hit
twice today by gunfire from the
Ladroncs Islands southwest of
Hong Mong reached port here
tonight

Captain C. Thomas of Mel-

bourne and the two Ch'nese crew
were safe,

Also aboard and unhurt were
23 survivors from a Philippines
freighter which foundered off the
South-China coast yesterday.

Captain Thomas said tonight
that the Communists fired about
five small shells without warning
when the tug was two miles off
the shore,-Reuter,



of northeast Korea, soon
after the Chinese Communists
launched their big offensive in
Korea on November 27,
Withdrawal

United Nations forces in North-
west Korea withdrew towards the
38th parallel today General
MacArthur clamped down a
blackout on official news of the
retreat

Military observers here said to-
day that the logical line for Allied
forees to defend it they go below
the 38th parallel was on the Im-
jin river 25 miles north of Seoul,
the South Korean capital

The Truman-Attlee announce-
ment was seen here as an indica-
tion that the western powers were
willing to negotiate on a basis of
the division of Korea on the 38th
parallel, Observers expected that
British, American and South
Korean forces will go below the
parallel to see what the Chinese

as

will do,
The British Admiralty an-
nounced in London today the

successful withdrawal by sea of
7,000 wounded and civilian re-
fugees from the Pyongyang
area-—one of the most hazard-
ous naval operations of the
Korean war.
Through darkness and
through the swept channel of a,
minefield, destroyers nave® (ed
30 unlit miles of been vaiers
to cover the withdra VAT of
civilian and non-essential mili-
tary personnel and wounded
from the Pyongyang area to
more advantageous points
Front line reports said that the
maximum withdvawal by Unite
Nations forces in the past 24 hours
was 40 miles

15,000 American marines, 200
British Commandos and a body of
South Koreans were trying to
fight thelr way to the sea to the

twin Korean towns of Hambhung
and Hungnam where the Ameri
ean Seventh and Thi Divisions
have taken up positions around

the beachhead,Reuter.
TE,



TELL
THE NEWS

Ring 3113 Day or Night.

oe THE ADVOCATE

*
THE ADVOCATE
PAYS FOR NEWS.









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PAGE TWO

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Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m, (Warner's Thriller)
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Renee enn enn ee eee eee re eee
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SPECIALIST

GLOBE ||

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

the Gov-|

erner and Mrs, Savage will |
attend a Christmas Celebration
entitled “Carols Come to Life’
at Queen's College on Saturday
afternoon, December 16, This

ente t will also be per-








and

“OVERLAND TRAULS”

« ” « . formed on Thursday at 8 p.m.

ED GALAHAD" _& _ “FIND THE BLACKMAILER: LAST SHOW "tl dole se in ein Door childpen have been
MID-NITE MATINEE SATUR DAY 16TH Also Feature Film nvited to attend, but a limited

“ONE THRILLING NIGHT” & “THE KNOCKOUT” RED SKELTON | oe the ‘ona —

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AS PROVED UNSATISFACTORY. WE WILL NOW RESUME OUR
*REAKFAST HOUR BETWEEN 11 A.M. AND 12 NOON (EXCEPT SAT.

URDAYS) BEGINNING FROM MONDAY, DECEMBER



MANNING'S



his FIGHTIN’EST MOOD in
WARNER BROS.

MR. HEX” and
Gilbert ROLAND ns Cisce Kid in
“GAY CAVALAER

z=
L GODDARD, son of
cayuely Geddar,
. ALG

Mrs.
and the late
dard, has been



YANKEE




Major

Republic, :
Lt. Comdr. Goddard is at pres-
ent living in Trinidad.
Hotel Manager Returns
R. NORMAN MITCHELL,
Manager of the Ocean View
Hotel returned from a five

Alexis SMIT—S. Z. SAKALL
—Now Playing—
445 and 8.30 pm. and

Continuing

mes

J & 6.30 p.m.
Dick POWELL
and
June ALLYSON










(real yesterday morning by T.C.A.



“KIDNAPPED”



in
THE REFORMER

and

THE RED HEAD

Talent Audition To-day
9.30 A.M.
——





>








WONDERFUL . . .

CHRISTMAS PARTY

Proceeds for THE OLD LADIES' HOME,
Constitution Road
SATURDAY, 23RD DECEMBER 19,20
Floor Show 9.380 p.m. o Dancing 10.
THE POLICE BAND :
Directed by Capt. RAISON, M.B.E., A R.cC.M.



ROYAL
THE CROSS OF LORRAINE
— WITH — 4
Jean Pierre Aument an .
Gene Kelly. GREAT
Tuesday and Wednesday

FLOOR SHOW

Staged at 9.30 p.m. by Norman Wood
GRAND FINALE





BRITTANY
and
M-G-M Double . ; Our CHEF has a certain
Kathryn Grayson and

flair with food that makes






Jose Tturbi in

appointed honorary Vice-Consu! !
———— MONTA NA of the Dominican Republic by
T0-MoRROW ri ee General Trujillo, President of the i

week visit to New York and Mon- |

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1950
ee

Caub Calling

SIR GEORGE RELAXES



HIS EXCELLENCY Dr. L. A. H. Peters and Mrs. Peters, on the right, gave a cocktail party in Cura-

Sn" . i aribbean Com-
cao recently. In this picture, l. to r. are Mr. Ward Canaday, U.S. Co-Chairman of the Garibbe

| mission, behind Dr. Peters; Mr. Nicholas Debrot, a member of Curacao’s Executive Council; Sir George

Seel, British Co-Chairman; Mrs. Peters; and, behind her, Baron Edmond Petit de Beauverger, French Co-

PRIZE PORTRAIT

| Chairman.
Not Since 1926
AJ. and Mrs, R. M

terday
spend

morning by
a couple

TC.A.
of months holi-

Watson F
arrived from Montreal yes- —

; day in Barbados. They are Staying —°-

| With their son-in-law and daugh-

| ter, Mr. and Mrs. Lionel Williams = *

' of “Canbar”, St. Joseph.

| Maj. Watson opened the Cana-
dian Bank of Commerce Branch
here in 1920 and left Barbados
in 1926. He has net visited
here since then.

| Back From Canada—U.S.
} Visit
Mé« and Mrs. Ian Niblock wi'o

have been away for about
}two and aie hal months re-
turned from Canada sterday
morning by T.C.A. Mrs. Niblock

| spent most of the time in Windsor,
while Mr. Niblock was in New
York and other parts of the U.S.

With T.C.A. In Toronto

every item on the Menu | : ; - sleigh R. and Mrs, David E. Moore
: ee | Entrance of Santa Claus in winter sleig eee Pia ie
THAT MIDNIGHT KISS really special, Enjoy our | with sack of Christmas Presents ame es oe + Canada. —
P hrilli | ay by é
and palate—t ng dishes Admission : $1.00 | week they are staying at the
, ; Ocean View Hotel. Mr. Moore 1s
SHADOW A aad WALE TO-DAY with T.C.A. in Toronto.





Ann Sothern and “Zachary
Scott



~ ALY MPIC
TO-DAY 4.30 and 8.30

Monday: Last Two Shows
; 4.30 and 8.15
Randolph Scott and George

("Gabby")

TO-DAÂ¥Y & TOMORROW
4.30 and 8.30
M.G.M. Big Double . .
Jean Pierre Aumont and
Signe Hasso in —
ASSIGNMENT IN
4.30 and 8.30
Hayes in—



With National Film Board

| A RRIVING by T.C.A, yesterday
| morning was Mr. Geoffrey
| T, Taylor who is hereon a month's
tholiday staying at the Windsor
| Hotel, Mr. Taylor is with the
(avetontel Film Board in Ottawa

Fourth Winter

OMDR. G. J. KING-LANDALE
arrived from England yes-
terday via Curacao and Trinidad





| by B.W.IA. and is staying with
with . |Sir Edwar Cunard at “Glitter
Betty Grable and Victor Bay”, St. es. Here for five

Mature Make a date with YOU jmonths, this will be the fourth

(Not suitable for children) FRIENDS at = in succession that he has



Tuesday and Wednesday
4.30 and 8.15
20th Century Fox Double . .
Dick Haymes and Vera
Ellen in

CARNIVAL IN COSTA
RICA

=_‘zOw ee SSS

GLOBE

REPEAT PERFORMANCE

THE GREEN
DRAGON

FOR BETTER MEALS





THE CARIBOO TRAIL
AND
WABASH AVENUE




AND and By
THE es BETTER SERVICE "
— Ww :
Cornel Wilde and Maureen For Reservation Dial 3896 | NUMEROUS REQUESTS \
O'Hara R |
JUDY GRAHAM'S

YOUR “CARIBBEAN REVELRY ”






Starring :
CEDRIC PHILLIPS and MAY RAMDIN
CONGOLEUM on |
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 20TH, 830 P.M.
’ e
Now For Xmas! ioe i
CAPT. RAISON AND THE POLICE BAND
we offer e
PRICES : Orchestra Seats oa es ss $1.00 ;
CONGOLEUM SQUARES ma eee
2 yds. x 3 yds. °
. ‘ : : BF Keep the 20th DECEMBER Clear






For This GRAND MUSICALE !

——



x4





Select some of these
CHRISTMAS GIFTS, |





Tea Blectric Teasters
Peon ‘> Carving Sets ” Kettles
- 2rns . se F ruit ” Boiling Rings
Over 20 Patterns To Choose From. Nickel Plated Ash Trays Irons




Cigarette Cases

Imme
Cigarette Lighters “ona”

Pyrex Gift Sets
Pyrex Ovenware

ALSO
Christmas Tree Decorations and

Bubble Lights.

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
AND — COTTON FACTORY LTD.

ELECTRICAL WORKSHOP I HARDWARE DEPARTMENT — Telephone No. 2039

SS =| === === | asses
=





LiTH








THE CORNER STORE
Trafalgar Street

SALES DEPARTMENT















; winter
| spent in Barbados.



THIS PORTRA!T won first

ing.



It was drawn by Osc

T. C. A. OFFICIALS

PICTURED here are some of the passengers who arrived by T.C.A.

Seen coming down the steps are Mrs. R )
Watson and Mrs. Charles Whitney. At the bottom
to T.C.A. officials is Mr. Norman Mitchell, Man.

yesterday from Canada.

View Hotel.

for

TOYS



of the steps talking
ager of the Occen



Owen) Cie

Dyeerwesgera

prize at the exhibition for pencil draw-
ar DaC. Walkes.

Chief Reason
RS. CHARLES WHITNEY ar-
tived from Montreal yesterday
by T.C.A. and plans to remain
here for a holiday until the first
week in January, 1951. Mrs.
Whitney is the former Joan God-
dard, daughter of Dr. and Mrs.
A. L. Goddard of “Heathfield”,
Pine Hill, She expects her husband
down next Saturday by T.C.A.
accompanied by his parents.
Chief reason of Mrs. Whitney’s
visit is to be Matron of Honour at
Rosemarie Robinson's wedding
later this month
Her last visit to Barbados was
in August last year.

Staying With His Brother

R. O’KILL MILLER, whose
brother Douglas lives‘in Bar-
bados, arrived from Canada yes-
terday by T.C.A. to spend about a
month’s holiday here.
Mr. Miller is with a newsprint
manufacturing company in Keno-
gami. Quebec.

Back From Montreal

FTER two and a half months
4 in Montreal, Miss May Hart
of “Callendars”, Christ Church,

returned from Canada yesterday
by T.C.A,

To, Be Married Shortly
MSs ELAINE JEMMOTT leit
yesterday by B.W.LA. for
Puerto Rico, She is shortly to be
married in San Juan to Mr, Allen
K. Payne of the Distrust Engii-

eer’s Office in San Juan. Mr.
Payne was at one time stationed
in Barbados.



FOR GIRLS; Dolls, Prams,

Push Chairs,
Cooking Sets,

Embroidery &
Teddy Bears.

BOYS: Lorries, Cars, Cranes

trains, barrows,

mouth-organs, pen-knives,

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EVANS “ WHIT FIELDS — vour shoe stores



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| SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10,

CARIB

EVERAL T.C.A. Staff mem-

bers arrived from Canada
yesterday on the T.C.A. flight-
They were Miss E. Bishop Boucher
who is an Air Stewardess on the
Caribbean run. She is here for a
week staying at the Ocean View
Hotel.

Mr. Brian Ramage whose broth-
er Glenn was here a month ago
with his wife also arrived yester-
day. He is with T.C.A. in Montreal
and is here for two weeks, stay-
ing at “Cacrabank.”

Mr. William Benson who is a
T.C.A. pilot on the Toronto-Mon -
treal and Toronto-Windsor flights,
accompanied by his wife arrived
yesterday to spend two weeks at
the Ocean View Hotel.

Other arrival was Mr. Frank
Coughlin who is a navigator. He
is here for a week and is also
staying at the Ocean View Hotel.

Back From Curacao Talks

R. LISLE WARD. M.C.P. who
attended the W.I. Conference
in Curacao, returned yesterday
via Trinidad by B.W.LA.
Arriving on the same ‘plane
with him was Mr. Michael Hans-
chell, Superintendent of Agricul-
ture in St. Vincent, who attended
the same conference as Adviser to
the Windward Islands delegation.
He is here for a few days, stay-
ing with his mother in Eagle Hall,
before returning to St. Vincent by
the Lady Rodney.

Labour Commissioner

R, E. S. S. BURROWES, Lab-
our Commissioner and Mr.
Darnley Lewis of the Labour
Office here left for Jamaica yes-
terday by B.W.LA.
They expect to be away a week.

Here For a Few Days
R. AND MRS. Jose de Mont-
brun arrived from Trinidad
yesterday morning by B.W.1.A.. to
spend a few days in Barbados.
They are staying at the Hotel
Hastings and plan to return to
Trinidad on Thursday.
Mr. de Montburn is a Director
of Grell and Co., in Trinidad.

Former Intercolonial

Cricketer

R. CYRIL MERRY, who is

‘ with Gordon Grant Ltd., in

Port-of-Spain arrived from Trini-

dad yesterday by B.W.I.A. on a
short visit,

Mr Merry will be remembered

by local cricket fans as a Trini-

dad and Intercolonial cricketer.

B.W.I1. Station Offtcer
RRIVING from Jamaica via
Trinidad yesterday by
B.W.1.A. was Mr. Walter Girling.
Here for two weeks’ holiday, he
is staying with his brother and
sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs, Ken-

neth Girling.

Walter is B.W.1.A.’s Station Offi-



cer at Palisadoes Airport in
Jamaica.
Library Course
ISS NANCY WENT of the

Barbados Public Library whx
was in Trinidad for six weeks on
a library course, returned from
Trinidad yesterday by B.W.I.A.

Adventist Convention
EV. VERNON BERRY, Educa-
tional and Young Peoples
Secretary of the Inter-American
Division of the Seventh Day
Adventists arrived from Trinidad
yesterday by B.W.I.A.

He is here for a Seventh Day
Adventist Convention which be-
gins this morning. He leaves Bar-
bados on Tuesday.

Representatives from Antigua,
St. Kitts, Dominica, St. Lucia,
Montserrat and the Virgin Islands
are already here for the Conven-
tion.

To Take Up Appoinrment
EV. Walter Fairweather who
came to Barbados in Octo-
ber, 1947 to study for the Anglican
Ministry at Codriigton College,
left yesterday for his home, Brit-
ish Honduras via Jamaica by
B.W.LA.

He is returning to take up an

appointment at St. John’s Cathe-
dral in Belize.



| “A nast

1950

(ardening Hints
Kor Amateurs

GROUND ORCHIDS

Ground Orchids are growing in
popularity throughout the island,
for gardqn lovers are quickly
finding out how lovely and hard
working these useful plants are.

They deserve the term hard
working, for the low growing
variety flower continuously
through the year, and once well
established they need no pamper-
ing or special care, but can be
left practically to their owh
devices .

Be sure however, if you are
starting a bed of Groung Orchids
to sea that you get the ever
bearing kind, and not the tall

variety which flowers only at
times.

Description
In appearance the Ground

Orchids have slender ribbon-like
leaves, growing in clumps, which
terminate in a bulbous growth
with a bunch of roots underneath.
In some of these the flowers ure
a deep purple, and in others, a
rarer variety, a lovely pink which
varies in shade. Both varieties
are hardy and easy to grow and
can be left undisturbed for three
or four years.

To Plant
Plant the bulbs in a sunny open
bed, thoroughly prepared with
plenty of well rotted pen manure.
The roots of the plants should be
well spread out and pressed firmly

y. stuck- u ,
ten-shilling-a-lb. bird,



London Express Service. _

in the bed, sinking the bulbous
part to three quarters of its depth.
Do not bury the bulb entirely.
Give the bed periodic applications
of manure, and water the plants
well, Ground Orchids are slow
starters and they will take a
little time to get established before
they begin to flower, but once
started they make up for their
slowness by flowering profusely
all the time.

It is said that they flower best
when they become close packed
in the bed



Treatment
As has been said, these plants
can be left undisturbed for many
years, but after a time they become
so overcrowded that the plants

begin to suffer, and then they
must be dug up, divided, and
replanted again in a freshly

made up bed.

When the plants are taken up
it will be found that the bulbs
have greatly increased, and after
their division it will probably be
possible to pass on a number of
plants to friends.

There is no special time of the
year for taking up the Orchids,
the time being entirely governed
by the condition of the bed.

The pink Ground Orchids are
rarer than the purple ones, their
bulbs often selling for as much
as one to two dollars each. They
| grow however just as easily as
the purple, and are so beautiful
that they amply repay the expen-
diture of a few dollars to get them
established in the garden,







MR. MOT

OIL
+

DETERGEN TS

TIN
+

CHROMIUM |

KS A A A a A A ee et a fal A ie





ORIST !!

THE IDEAL XMAS PRESENT FOR YOUR CAR

CASTROL HAS SOMETHING

YOU CAN'T GET ELSEWHERE !

At the Cinema

CRISIS

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



POGOe

By CG. B. |
DICTATOR versus revolutionaries is the theme of |
“CRISIS” now playing at the Empire Theatre, with an

American doctor thrown in

on the democratic side. maa. |

napped, with his wife by the government forces, while on
holiday in a South American republic, he is conducted to
the President’s Palace, where he is firmly persuaded to
operate on him for brain tumor.

It appeats that the dictator is
none too popular and therefore
there is some doubt that the oper-
ation would be if per-
formed by any of the various local
surgeons, Whi

to make
sure there is no slip of a scalpel,
and with the revolutionaries, who
are equally determined that the
president will not leave the table
alive. To ensure this, they

the doctor’s wife when she is
leaving the country and send him
a message to the effect that she is
safe with them and will remain
so—unless—, What might have
happened had the fe ever
reached its destination is any-
body’s guess, but it never does
and the operation is performed—
successfully. Events however,
take a sharp turn in favour of the
revolutionaries, and with his wife
safely restofed to him, the doctor
finds his services in demand by
the victorious group.

There is plenty of drama and
shooting, with tanks and soldierg
milling about and you will notice
the extracrdinary likeness of both
conflicting groups in their lust for
gopet and Siete paliees use of 3.
Cary Grant and Jose Ferrar
are

excellent performances.
doctor, Cary Grant is smooth an
sardonic in his first serious role
for many a long day, and Jose
Ferrar as the fanatical dictator is
thorough convincing and dia-
oneaiey are a couple of
Teasonal amusing scenes, par-
ticularly one where Mr. Grant,
scalpel in demonstra’
a rubber model, the opening steps
of the operation to be

This seems to be a year for the
real old-timers and in “Ortsis’’,
Ramon Novarro, Antonio Moreno
and Gilbert Roland all take part,
though their roles are a far cry
from the romantic ones of twenty-
five years ago. Personally, T think
ne more interes: now, but
perhaps that’s because I'm getting
on too! The background music is
played almost entirely on the
guitar by Vincente Gomez and it
is astonishing how many different
types of atmosphere can be and
are created by the skilful play-
ing of this instrument.

MONTANA

MONTANA how ing at the
Plaza, Bridgetown, is a colourful
Western film with plenty of action
and direction. Westerns in

color always excel in
magnificent scenery and this one is
no exception, but in addition, the
validity of its subject matter is an
improvement on the usual run-of-
the-mill plot. It is the story of the
war that existed, toward the latter
part of the nineteenth century, be-
tween the cattle barons of the

tory. In those days, there was
a belief that no cattle could graze

rsuades them to march their cat-
le, along wii

qu






, depicts a





some pretty tough fighting and a
thunderous cattle stampede before
peace is restored and cattle and
sheep graze together,

I am not an ardent admirer of
Errol Flynn, but 1 enjoyed his per-
formance in this film, where his
acting is far more realistic than 1}
have seen hitherto, and in the role
of the hero—he has to use his
brains as well as his brawn. He
exchanges rapiers for pistols, and
seems to be equally proficient with
the latter, and of course, his horse.
manship is superb. Alexis Smith,
as the fiery haireq young woman
involved, whose _ disposition
matches her crowning glory is

adequately bitchy, and S.K. (Cud-
dles) f
comedy as a pedlar and perennial

Sakall supplies delightful

tenderfoot.

Incidentally, there are no Indi-
ans in this film, and I must admit

there is plenty of excitement, even

without the air being full of

whizzing arrows.
THE LISBON STORY

THE LISBON STORY showing
at the Aquatic Club was accord-
ing to all accounts, an exciting
play, but something seems to have
gone very much amiss where the
film is coneerned. To begin with,
it has been chopped up like a
piece of hamburger before ever
reaching these shores, and in
consequence, the abrupt transitions
from” one scene to another are
confusing and annoying. Apart
from this, the story is so compli-
cated that I have a feeling that
even the director got lost in its
maze, and how the main char-
acter ever remembered who he
was 5 ed to be—and at the
right me—is a mystery! The
story has to do with a British In-
telligence agent during the last
war, who seems to have difficulty
in persuading the French that
he’s on their side, and yet is re-
ceived with open arms by the
Germans when he informs them
he is, one of their secrets agents.
Fortunately for him, he remem-
bers who he is at the end, and
emerges with a whole skin, As
you can guess, the locale of thie
confusion is Lisbon.

David Farrar is a good actor,
but even he, ably assisted by the
glorious voice of the late Richard
Tauber, couldn’t save this film.
Pat Burke, who also sings, has a
charming voice, but her acting is
not up to the same standard.

Epstein Model
Gets A Haircut

A man whose statue will stand
outside the Dome of Discovery,
cn the South Bank Festival site,
has just been to the barber fox
the first time in months.

Shoulder-length hair was
needed for his job as a model for
Epstein’s new sculpture for the
Festival.

As yet the statue
man = striding

unnamed,
young
forward,

The model, Aubrey Grandon,
831, of Hyde Vale, Blackheath,
says: “It was Epstein’s wish that
I should grow my hair long.

“Passers-by stared at it in the
streets and friends nick-named
me the Red Indian.”

Mr. Grandon had to pose more
than 30 times.

London Express Service,



any extreme of climate —— and
lovely to look at, too |

GEC—I6AP



—

o

THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD.
BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

REPRESENTING THE GENERAL ELECTRIC CO, LTD

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE










’ PAGE FOUR ~

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TOO FEW CRICKETERS
ASKED TO PRACTISE

Why Is Mullins Left Out?
BY O. S. COPPIN

EST INDIES captain John Goddard has been

included in the twenty-eight players invited
by the Selection Committee of the Barbados Cricket
Association to practise for the forthcoming Inter-
colonial tournament that takes place here in Jan-
Â¥ uary-February next year.
Vie It is obvious that as long as John Goddard has
- participated in the selection of the twenty-eight
invitees and has himself stated his willingness to play in the tourna-
ment, that he will be the Barbados captain.

That follows as the night the day. But I am afraid that the
decisions of the Selection Committee do not follow however.
— I have never offered an apology for any criticism I

have ever made in these notes and hope never to be forced to do
so, yet I must make this observation that must not be taken in the
light of an apologia.

1 am a member of the Selection Committee of the Barbados
Amateur Football Association and so I am not unmindful of the
| meres and thankless job of a committee as such.



seismsesvennieasinassiniesitsiueintayserneusmennpnish-nsnisineaeialtisceetiaiiianasin



‘Clyde Walcott Hits;
Fine N.O.



Century

BOWLERS HAD GOOD DAY

FINE WEATHER favoured cricketers yesterday for the
first time in this series of First Division games, and a good

day’s play resulted.

Clyde Walcott, skipper of Spartan turned in the best
performance of the day by scoring a century against Lodge.
His team’s 214 for 7 wickets declared was the highest re-

corded in any game.

The four games opened yester-
day as the first day’s play was
completely washed out by rain.
In each game both sides batted,
and bowlers had quite a good day.
J. Williams of College and Edghill
of Carlton took six wickets each.

The games will be concluded on

Theretore if I criticise the Selection Committee of the Barbados | 5@turday next.

| Cricket Association on this particular issue, and I feel that I must,
Fr intend to be purely academic.

eight players.
tween Trinidad and Barbados, on the one harfid and Jamaica and Brit-
ish Guiana on the other hand will constitute Trial games for the 1951
West Indies tour to Australia.

That being the case it is intriguing that Barbados who have been
acclaimed as one of the leading sources of West Indies cricket
talent, should have found themselves in a position in which they have
invited only twenty-eight players to practise as against thirty-four





HE Selection Committee have invited, in the first place, twenty | Spartan (for 7 wits. dee.) ..
It is no secret that these intercolonial games be- | Lodse (for 1 wkt.)

SPARTAN vs. LODGE
218
3
s brillant i!+ mot out by the
rnational piajer Clyde Wal-
t of Spartan, \vas the highlight

inte

cot

of yesterday's piay in the match
between Lodge and Spartan at
College.

Spartan won the toss and bat-

in Trinidad, forty in British Guiana and as many or more in Jamaica. |ted on an easy-puced wicket, Most

NO INVITATION FOR MULLINS
HAT is most perplexing is the fact wat Carl Mullins, admitted-

ly, a force to be reckoned with in local pace bowling circles,
has not been invited. ,

of their batsmen, however, found
runs difficult to inake due to some
accurate and steady bowling by
the school boys. They lost their

The point that strikes me most forcibly about this is, that Carl |first four wickets with only 39
Mullins, when he was only an up-and-down rough ground pace bowler}runs on the board, but at this

in the Barbados Cricket League, was invited to practise, but since he |stage

has had the opportunity to play senior division cricket this season in

Walcott cume prominently
into the picture and stopped the

the Barbados Cricket Association competition with the Police First Di- | rot

vision team, it seems as if the members of the Barbados Cricket Selec-
tion Committee have failed to realise the benefit of the experience
which Mullins will have gained by playing first class. cricket on gr-
thodox wickets under conditions which have already been approved
by the Barbados cricket authorities as suitable for the staging of West

Indies cricket.
NOT SO RICH

O one could hope to convince me that the pace bowling depart-

ment in any proposed Barbados Eleven could be so rich as to
dispense, at least on paper, with the services of Car] Mullins.

It is true that he has not been eminently successful in the senior
division games in which he took part this season, But I feel that the
Barbados cricket authorities, if they could invite him in a series o!
trial games prior to the visit of the 1948-49 M.C.C, team to the West
Indies, then, all the more so should they have included him in this
list of invitees.

Mullins, who in my opinion, is one of the most promising young
iast bowlers in the West Indies to-day, should have been given a
chance to show nis wares,

FAIL to see too how L. F. “Shell” Harris of Spartan, and R. St, C.

Hutchinson of, Carlton and L. St. Hill of Wanderers were also
omitted, But I must commend the Selection Committee for including
young players like K. Bowen, Spartan’s slow right arm spin bowler,
A, Cave, Lodge and Empire's batting “find”, J. Williams and C. Smith
of College and K. A. Branker of Y.M.P.C.

A further criticism 1 must make is with regard to the inclusion of
B. Me Collin of the Barbados Cricket League. In a chat yesterday
with Mr, J. M. Hewitt I could learn nothing, nor did Mr. Hewitt know
at once of Mr. McCollin. He shared my view that the Selection Com-
mittee of the Barbados Cricket Association would have been better
served if they had in turn asked the Selection Committee of the Bar-
bados Cricket League to nominate whom they considered the best

possible candidace.
WHY NOT GODDARD?

CAN see ne reason why Kenneth Goddard of Telephone Club

should nui have been invited again.

Goddard bowled, fielded and batted comparatively well in his
first Intercolonial outing against Trinidad a year ago and on the
| strength of this he should have been invited to practise,
| If Trinidad can invite thirty-four players to practise, tish
| Guiana forty and Jamaica not less tMan forty, then why shou ar~
| bados limit themselves to twenty-eight players, when the Colony
justifiably claims that it holds a commanding position in West Indies

cricket to-day?
SO MUCH BOWLING TALENT?
ae in my opinion would be laying claim to an excellence
| in bowling talent which they do not really possess if they decide
that they can dispense with the services of Carl Mullins even if he
has not been shining on some atrocious wickets which he has met by
accident or design this season.
WILLIAMS IGNORED TOO

NOTICE that E. A. V. Williams has not been asked to practise.

I do not know whether he had been approached and has refused
but that is hardly likely seeing that he is still taking a most active
part with the Empire First Division team in their competition in the
senior division this season.

ihe memories of Barbados Cricket Selectors are notoriously
short and unfortunately they suffer from a disease that has confused
the terms “experienced” with aged.

i. A, V,. Williams, in my opinion, and this is shared by people
n the colony who are more competent to judge than I am, should
not only walk into a Barbados team today”as an all-rounder but he
should be able, on his merit, to demand his place in a West Indies
veam as well.

Trinidad and British Guiana have not made this mistake since
British Guiana have invited John Trim, Berkeley Gaskin and A. B.
Rollox, all older men than E. A. V. Williams to practise.

I am sure that Williams could well replace some of the nincom-
poops invited to practise for this forthcoming tournament.

Fortunately, the Selection Committee can go outside this pre-
scribed list and select players whom they consider up to Intercolonial
standard. 1 sincerely hope that they would make every use of this
fortunate safeguard.

LIGHT-HEAVYWEIGHT BOUT
ID FRANCIS and Kid Ralph, two well-known names in local
boxing circles, are billed to meet in the main event of a

programme to be staged at the Yankee Stadium on Tuesday night,
December 12,



Kid Ralph has been more in the public eye of late and has in|

four years disposed of all opposition both local and intercolonial in
the Welterweight and Middleweight division.

Now Kid Francis, who took the Middleweight Championship from |

Jack Montelle as far back as 1941 and who scored victory over such
with Kid Ralph,



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Most successful bowlers for the
school were Mr. McComie who
took 3 for 49 and Brookes 2 for 41.

C. Atkins ana N. Wood opened
Spartan's innings against the
bowling of pace bowlers Welch
and Brookes, These two bowlers
struck an early blow for their
side by dismissing two batsmen
before ten runs were hoisted. The
batsmen were Harris and Wood
who made 7 and “duck”, respec-
tively. Clyde Walcott then joined
Atkins, and the former, got three
successive boundaries to send the
total into double figures, A bowl-
ing change brought Lodge further
success, when Mr. MeComie, who
replaced Welch, cleaned bowled
Atkins, after sending down a mai-
den.

The score was then 29--3—12.
Pilgrim joined Walcott, but he
was quickly returned to the pavil-
ion. The half century mark was
reached, when Haynes, who had
joined Walcott, snicked one of
Mr. McComie’s deliveries through
slips for a couple, Play at this
stage became dull, as the batsmen
were contented to play some ac-
curate bowling, Walcott who was
now settled, delighted the crowd
with some. fine stroke play.

Half the side was out, when,
with the total at 84, Haynes
who had collected a _ patient
20, was bowled, while play-
ing back to a_ delivery from
Brookes. Four runs later, B. K.
Bowen, who was_sent.to the
wicket, was caught behind the
wicket, before scoring. Skipper
Glasgow brought back Mr. Mc-
Comie, as Morris came in to
partner Clyde Walcott, who was
well set and he reached his half
century, with a glide to leg for
a couple. Lunch was taken with-
out any further addition. On the
resumption the rate of scoring
increased as the batsmen began
to dominate the bowling and
soon 12 runs were passed. Skip-
per Glasgow, a spinner replaced
fast bowler Brookes, but he
received rough treatment especi-
ally by Clyde Walcott, who was
now having things his own way.

Walcott, scoring all around the
wicket moved quickly from 50 to
100 in spite of frequent bowling
changes. It was his first century
for the season. Morris his part-
ner then had a “go” and 12 runs

|



were added at the expense of
Hutchinson. He was bowled soon
after by Mr. McComie, his con-

tribution being 45. Seven wickets
had now fallen for 192. With the
score at 218 for 7, L. F. Harris,
deputy skipper in the absence of
K. Walcott, declared the innings
clased.

Going to the wicket Lodge
suffered an early loss, Hutchin-
son and Stoute played until time
call with the score at 8 for 1.

CARLTON vs. PICKWICK
Pickwick 81
Carlton (for 3 wkts.) .... 76
j G, Edghill, Carlton's number
one pacer, ran through the Pick-
wick team yesterday, taking 6 of
their wickets for 23 runs in 10
overs,

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Edghill was always accurate
and was getting a lot of pace out
of the well-surfaced wicket.

Pickwick, winning the toss de-
cided. to bat and were all out
shortly after lunch for 81 runs.
At the time of call, Carlton were
76 for 3 wickets. .

Best batting performance for
Pickwick was turned in by Har-
old Kidney who defied Carlton’s
attack for quite a while to score
24 runs. The only other Pick-
wick batsman to reach double
figures was B. Inniss, 10.

The day’s brightest batting
came from K. Greenidge and R
Hutchinson who scored 32 not
out and 28 not out respectively.

Pickwick sent their opening
pair G. Wood and Eric Edwards
to the wicket. Carlton’s attack
was led by pacers G, Edghill and
K, B. Warren.

The first two overs yielded 14
runs and it was at this stage that
Pickwick lost their first wicket.
Edghill, in the fourth ball of ) 3
second over, deceived and c!: |
bowled Wood for 8, T. S. Bi) ¢
joined Edwards.

Edwards Out

Three runs later, Edwards fol-
lowed Wood to the pavilion and
Edghill had struck the second
blow for Carlton. Edwards had
only got three when he was snap-
ped up by Marshall fielding at
silly mid-on, The score was 17
runs for two wickets.

Wickets then started to tumble
Without further addition to the
score, Taylor who came two down,
lost his hand to Edghill for
“duck.’”’ Taylor pushed his bat at
one wide outside the off-stump
and gave a good catch to C, Green-
idge at third slip.

Edghill had now taken three
quick wickets for 7 runs in 2
overs, 2 balls.

Birkett, who was not yet set-
tled, was joined by Harold Kid-
ney. His was the next wicket to
fall. He played forward to a fast-
ish one from Edghill and was ad-
judged lb.w. for 2, The score-
board read 28 runs for four wick-
ets.

H. A. King, the next man in,
was immediately returned by
Edghill. King flashed at an out-
swinger outside the off — stump,
did not connect properly and skied
the ball for K. Hutchinson at
cover to take a simple catch, Five
of Pickwick’s wicket were taken
for 23 runs and Edghill had done
all the damage.

Kidney, in the meanwhile, was
playing in his hand and punishing
the few loose balls,

Good Partnership

With Kidney and B. Inniss at
the wicket things looked better for
Pickwick. This partnership yield-
ed 32 runs. Z

They improved the rate of scor-
ing and 55 runs reached the tins
before Pickwick lost their sixtn
wicket,

K. Greenidge came into action.
He got Inniss to cut a slowish ball
into the safe hands of “Brickie”’
Lucas at gully. Inniss made i?
and Kidney was then 17 not out.

Skipper John Goddard anil
Kidney came together. John was
soon back in the pavilion for...
He played back to a good lengt”
ball from Edghill and played the
ball on to his stumps, Kidney
was run out a few balls later in
attempting to take a couple, He
was the team’s topscorer with 24.

The score was now 62 for 8,
with Jordan and Clarke holding
stubbornly for Pickwick.

They took the score on to 75
when the interval was taken.

After Lunch

On resumption, Warren clean-
bowled Jordan in his first over
after lunch for 7, Warren came
back the next over to dismiss
Clarke. for 7. Clarke cut ata
rising ball to give Lucas a catch
at gulley.

With E. L. G. Hoad, not out,
the Pickwick team was all out for
81. Carlton made use of only four

@ On page 5.

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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1950 ~

PLENTY OF PADDING
Many New Names On Entry List

For Christntas Meeting
BY BOOKIE



ONE thing that impresses immediately about the
entries for the Trinidad Christmas meeting is the
large number of horses that need not have been
entered. One is even tempted to say “should not
have been entered.”

Some years ago when 130 horses took a

i i i t a
this annual fixture it was evident tha’

South Caribbean had made considerable pe gry tol
that the number was considerably padded was — io A coo
later when entries for iehowins ae eee eet 2 a

-day the situation is similar wi he e2 °
* mais up the padding are er arcivals from Bog eed enna
; is expected that in the near Tu ’
7 this Ag one that nearly all will be entrants with some semblance

of a chance

However for the present it is unlikely that horses aces
rived from England only a few weeks ago will be wor - ones
and apart from noting the new — on the programme Ww y

iss without much comment. f
ve Time to the Governor's Cup once again we now bere ie en-
tries before us and to my surprise there are ee vas Pw
surprising is the absence of Orly. News from Trini . - gel
has leg trouble. This, I hope, will not be the en a oS st
have already said, he is a magnificent specimen and I am s = we
are due to see a great horse if and when he ever gets going in

best form.
i y there i f seven or eight
Nevertheless without Orly there is a hard core 0}
ie tr nineteet who will 4 — of eee 2 —
ace ittle uncertain abou ea .
gg Fa Caracas among the a ht cae er eee
would not have been sent over unless 1t D
aes good, This is Delhi and I know nothing of his (or her) on
it is clear ‘that 1 do not even know what the — is. ee
> likely winners until we .
must be counted among the like eet 7 rear ike
The other seven with the best chances si :
Streak, Elizabethan, Atomic 11, Gun Site, Ocean Pearl. Silver Bullet
and Rebate. I gave my reasons last week why I thought them the
best so we may leave them at this juncture. Perhaps when the exer-
cise gallops get warmer there might be some changes of opinion to be
made.

There is also no change in the situation about the Derby but what
interests me about it, now that the final entries have closed is the fact
that it will probably break the record for prize money set up last year
when Ocean Pearl won. This means that it will be worth well over
$4.500 to the winner, and if bred in ‘Trinidad the owner~-breeder will
receive over $5,000. Thus if Wavecrest is the eventual winner his own-
er can count on $500 more than the Jamaicans or Vincentians if they
win, Nevertheless it is possible that for the first time in the history of
racing in these parts a £1,000 stake will be paid out to the winner.
We will know definitely in a few weeks.

Something which has not failed to attract my attention is the
number of times that Bow Bells and Footmark have been mentioned
as respective winners of the Trinidad Breeders’ Stakes and the Jamai-
cen Derby. This is quite incorrect, of course. Bow Bells was beaten
in the Breeders’ last year, finishing unplaced, and Footmark was
beaten in the Jamaican Derby by Mark Twain et al. In fact Footmark
has not won one classic in his home country. I hope that by the
time the forecasting for the races comes to be written the poor public
will not be served up with large headlines, that the Jamaican and
Barbados Derby winners are about to clash in the Trinidad classic.

_In the entries for B class races I see two old stagers have been
revived after a long absence. First of these is War Lord and for the
first time he will be racing as a whole Trinidadian. Previously he was
owned in Trinidad and trained in Barbados and we therefore num-
bered him among our contingent. But he is now owned and trained
in Trinidad. Incidentally he will be Mr, Trestrail’s leading candidate
now that Orly has been withdrawn. Nine years old and still going
strong. Very good going indeed for the old son of O.T.C. and Pique.

The other staging a come back is Devon Market.
ported to"be going well but this has happened before so we must be
careful how we view him. Nevertheless his trainer, Johnny Marcel,
has brought back some good ones like Just Fair and Sherwood Archer
in his time so we might see Devon Market recapture his form of two
years ago. If so we shall be in for some good sprint races both in
B class and A class during the course of the meeting.

He is also re-

in fact there seems to be such a number of good sprinters on the
programme that the six furlong races will turn out to be more evenly
coniested than the distances. There Lady Pink. Jolly Friar, White
Company, Foot Mark, Vindima, Ocean Pearl, Balandra, Devon Market
and War Lord, all in A or B. In addition there is also Tuffley Bell
who is a winner of sprint races in England although being one of
the recent arrivals, she might be one of those whom we have to count
out of the picture.

NEW STALLION BOUGHT

The Barbados Turf Club has again earned the plaudits of all
West Indian breeders by purchasing last week the horse Star Witness
for stud duties here. By Fair Trial out of Speckle, by Solario out of
Post Mark, by Friar Marcus, Star Witness won five races in good
company in England in the last four years among which was the
Wilburton Handicap at Newmarket worth some £900. In this race.
as a three year old, he carried the heavy weight of 133 lbs.

The rest of his form and particulars about his breeding will come
later but on what I can see from the above he has some very strong
lines on his dam’s side. His dam and grand dam it should be noted
are by Solario and Friar Marcus respectively and the latter in particu-
lar was noted as a sire of good brood mares. When I have gone into
the family history thoroughly I shall deal with them again.

Meanwhile now that it is clear that we are set for big things in
the breeding of thoroughbred race horses in Barbados, and with as
many as seven stallions standing here it would be wise if we paid
some attention to the husbanding of more brood mares. In this con-
nection I must once again reiterate the suggestion that the B.T.C.
should do something about importing mares as well as the horses
which they now purchase to offer as consolation prizes.




Every time I speak to some planter who keeps horses on his
lantation I am again assured that there is a demand for thorough-
red mares at reasonable prices. But the prices which are asked for

mares (most of them former consolation prize horses) when they are
finished racing out here is out of all proportion to what they would
have fetched if they had retired from racing in England. In the end
a number of them are sold out of the island because no one here is
willing to pay the price. Why not therefore buy a few mares at the
sales in England and sell them at cost price to purchasers who the
B.T.C. could have ready listed as persons willing to take them? I can
see nothing in this plan to be afraid of. It is well to remember that
many a dam of classic winners has been sold for £50 or less and more
urgent still to consider that we cannot keep a lot of stallions and
have only a few mares to send to each.



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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1950



SUNDAY



Ist XI Cricket

SCOREBOARD



ADVOCATE

M.C.C. Drew Game



DEC. 10

NO. 149

PAGE FIVE



wie es SPARTAN vs. LODGE L. Harris 8 ~ :
now ers. SPARTAN—Ist Lonings M. Murrell ¢ Millington b King 0 ;
Carlton was to the wicket by A- Atkins b Mr. McComie 12 Extras 10 4 e Opic
4.10 pam. E, W. Marshall and F. ( Harris b Brookes." 7 i
BS a i: ae ie arris b Brookes 7 Total 1s
Hutchinson were sent to receive C. Walcott not out Be ONO ac a Re a ueens anc ”
the new ball from pacers H. King Cc. Pilgrim c Glasgow b Mr. McComie 4 Fall of wickets 1 fop 1, 2 for 1. 3 of

A. Haynes b Brookes 21

and R. Clarke. They lost three x:

Bowen c (wkpr. b Welch

. 0 122, 8 f a ‘or
quick wickets. > a b Mr. McComie a5 " aarti ANAL YSsIs
Carliton’s first wicket fell at 7 oe v mM FR Ww I
L i E. Smith and Qiinaior : ec
Hutchinson moved into his wicke. K Wolcott did not bat reg 7 . = is LAIADON, Dec. 4
t _King. ai not get a touch and xtras 5 King eee 8 8 RAIN which played such an important part in the first | ast Week
was giv , r 8 Alleyne 5 - ‘ . ,
= Gove oat Mw, See Total (for T wkts.) decid.) .. 218 Que’ 2s Test match on this ground serkaey interfered with the
ios wan eee ae _ Fall of wickets: 1—3, cae nobin ee TERE, Lt INNINGS ‘ M.C.C.’s match against Queensland although the State side
: s . . s 39; 5—78; 7 * © Robinsor ou : ‘
given out Lb.w to Clarke. MY 8 BOWLING ANALYsis ©. Grant b Murrell ¢ _ attained the better of @ draw. Alka-Seltzer brings pleasant relief
With the score at10 for 2 o mm rn w. V- Babb } Sealy 8 Se i ee ee This match, the match of the .
7 yf + Welch ; W- © Cave not out 17 Sean ; : ‘
Skipper Hutchinson went to part- Brookes site S — ° rr wee notable for four fine in- When you need First Aid fast for the ,
ner Marshall. Five runs later Wilkie i 0m 8 “* M 88 D oe eee by Bedser, pains of a headache, take Alka-Seltzer Tubes of
Marshall was nicely caught in the Sacomle 16 2 “8 a Total (for 2 wkts.) _” ° ie ra per Washbrook and Dew es Its bubbling, effervescent action helps 12 & 30 tablets.
slips by Inniss off King, Hutchinson 3 9. M8 sFan of wickets: 1 for 9, 2 for 37 aa =e magnificently on the first Alka-Seltzer’s pain-relieving agent to
Tem 15 for 3, R. Hutchinson LODGE—Ist Insines BOWLING ANALYSIS “Va atc y. otter Guesnsland had won go to work fast. Not a laxative—y
: F. Cheeseman b C. Walcott 0 M R Wz the toss and elected to bat, Bed te Pees S Hane ye ypu er
and K. Greenidge took the score Stoute not out .. 2 smith ‘- 8 = and Warr had all the bats = take Alka-Seltzer at ANY time. Drop
on to 76 without further loss. F. Hutchinson not out 1 Murrell t's (a 2 ° Mr eee ee , .
The t : Beaty :. aoe QUEENSLAND, Dec. trouble and eight wickets were une or two tablets in a glass of water
ae = ae ae a ye ve Total (for 1 wkt.) 8 Collins g a oe The Marylebone Cricket Club down for 216. Of these Carrigan Watch it fizz and dissolve into a spa
2, st for the day. After z tourists drew their two days who was dropped when only 13. | Kling, pleasant-tasting
. ; ses ) 3) . , & drink. |
they had got their eyes in, they BOWLING ANALYSIS Cone BGE Vs. WANDERERS | match with the Queensland Coun- made exactly 100 | x4 t
were going for the ball and runs Walcott eg By OF WANOEREMG (fer 3 wai oo 6 try = XI. to-day when after dis 4 eee
were coming easily. Falls m, 2 $8 COLLEGE ist INNINGS missing the local side for 220 iv Unfortunately, the M.C.C. cou } f Y
: d
Both 7 P ‘all of wickets: 1—4 cw.s ; | ‘ a.
th Hutchinson and Greenidge PICKWICK vs. CARLTON ply, Smith ¢ (wk! Skinner b reply to their own score of 426 not press home this advantage We went to Queen's Park T ey
were undefeated at close of play PICKWICK'S Ist INNINGS Mr. Gittens ¢ Peirce b WN. iMarshali ig $0, 6 wickets declared, they And after one day's play had been Twas Exhibition Yay a ¥. Sa ee ) ae
for 28 and 32 respectively. a wood b Edghill : a C. Bisckman bw, D. Atkingon .. —— again gna scored 204 fo: lost through rain, Queensland re- Ana ail the people turned out 0 be E
; is ¢ Marshall b Edghill Mr. S, Headley run outy....... 7 wickets declared, suming on the Monday , ooking quite smart and ga MILES LABORATORIES INC! Sv s
T. S$ Bitket " 3 . . r ¢ x ' 8 e Monday morning - . . 5 Ladin. eee
EMPIRE vs. COMBERMERE a x. Taylor ¢ Creetin. 6 Baghili 4 “te eben ccReer is ; The follow-on was not enforced added 89 runs for the last two Some wore those sweeping dress: -
Combermere ............ 139 «i Kidney run out ,D mdgnil | MM. Mayers B Petes clint. ¢ im deference to the home captain wickets, That take a mile of voile
Empire (for 2 wkts.) 69 ge td ce R. Hutchinson, ¢ E. Hope 1.b.w. D. Atkinson 4 who wanted the local spectators Tic Wee % needie workers
After winning the toss Com- ™-_Iniss ¢ N.S. “Luicas, b K oo ene eae) Spee > to have another look at the tour- , ae addition of runs by the © went through all ‘the toil. |
bermere sco 3 ot C Gites... ee aoe 4 ists batting. Douglas Wright hai Willenders was another blow to the — The scallops and the trimming
runs in their 10 C. Thorpe b D. Atkinson 4 M.¢ ’
first innings, on a perfect wicket 1. @“sard,? Ail SS ae or cro. 2. the exbelient fguren of 5 wickets — --\. Prestige ahd certainly: took Worn by a certain girl
against Empire at Bank Hall = >" oo 2 arren 7 N. Simmons not out s . -@ for 52 runs in 16.4 overs during * 8 much of the glory of their Waseaie wheat the long dress {
». : “ : a . bys al te el ‘ ¢ Joe's hair curl j
yesterday, the second day of © l.G.Hoad not out Ass oe # the Country team’s first innings. °°"!!! performances re etn. ® e
their first division cricket match Extras; 11 b.,2.b.4w..2nb. 19 Total 5 A feature of the Marylebone's Ww But boys, it_was a tetas
" . , ob. Banat i a or 4 mor
Rain prevented any play on the Total | » —— second innings batting was a orse With four firsts to their credit
first day. When stumps were UU 1 Fall of wickets; 1 for 26, 2 for 43, hectic unbroken 8th wicket stand

were

for 1, 4 for 60, 5 for yi, 5 for Fe, 7 tor
2, 10 for 133



3
for 44, 4 for 69, 5 for 80, 6 for 80. 7 for

(From Our London Correspondent)

But worse was to follow. Before



Now place them miles ahead
‘ . -

Ps























drawn Empire in reply had Pall of wickets; > | as 3 of 66 between Trevor Bailey and
scored ets; 1 for Id, 2 for 17, 85, 8 for 88, 9 for 95 : : > clos ay - ; ; .

@ suas a the he of two %,!9%,1% 4 for 23, 8 tor 23, 6 iH, ©, $ for 2 eS soe Wright, Bailey being not out 63 aaa pjose of play Hutton, Simpson 42. #R famous Sait bread oO e sure .
wickets. OF BOWEN ‘Sivakysad GM. Rw. when the dectaration came and Davition with only 106 rane on the Tyee, and Low and Robe de

For Combermere Mr. S. Smith eal ai Gage Sey ed n 3 18 1 4there was not sufficient time to poard— this again 6 runs on the Twas not a great surpris«
who went at number four in the &: Bdghill ® 3 2 6 OD. Atkinson 124 3 19 4 Mallow the home side to bat ayein 45), i ee ee Deere SOM ’ I Salt |
batti ; K. B. Warren 9 3 15 2 R. Marshall cs 4 . Reuter. aining not one bowler good For if vor eat this Salt bread
an ie | oy aes — an K. Greenidge ........ 5 2 7 1. T. Peirce ee a. enough to get into the first Aus- er suniply good and grand
a cuve Jy . uarless 31, N. S. Lucas ..... oy G. Toppi 5 amt, aie PT ee : traliar - 4 ou'll want no other Salt bread
while opening batsman Mr. G. , CARLTON’S ‘Ist INNINGS” WANDERERS Ist INNINGS Ba bad S ndin h Test team Nowhere throughout thie land )
Sealy scored a patient 26. Bowl- - Boel ¢ Tomes b King 1 =O aie ¥ J we tt rr Os e. t 8 A fighting innings by Cyril Next first prize was plain Sweet bre |
ing honours went to H. “King the N. S. Lucas 1.b.w. Clarke ER ane ER pl Washbrook who was undefeated —p,The ,breed vou must enjo |
a oe tae Empire spinner 2+ Hutchinson not out 28D. Atkinson c Hope b H. Simmonds 1 16 Horses To ime 44 at the close saved the Pik cry ts “onore bend bo
who took five wickets for 47 reenidge not out 32 §E. Atkinson b J, Williams 0 M.C.C, from worse collapse t . e a ee

. : 7 Extras 2 5 s Pse but :
runs a , , a ‘ 2 A. Skinner not out 4 Denis . 4 . Next first . an i heat: tae
Tall Tene ane over 16 overs, 2. Atkinson b J. Williams 3 T. ole Meet . t ; iL eee had, for him, the And this’ you ought to x ow

a rro illington bowled a Total (for 3 wkts.) 76 Wilkes b J. Williams ‘ isual experience of being barrack- 11 is the loaf that strength«
ee length to take four for 39 EMPIRE ys. COMBERMERE Extra 1 (abla Gur Gen Coreeonteit ~ tor slow play His 28 runs All children while they grow

ever anticipation was shown COMBERMERE Ist INNINGS PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec. 7 which included one six straight E
. : Mr. G. Sealy c rn : Total (for 7 wkts.) 69 “VE— ‘ c.f. = ‘ & igh Next first soe st

By M. Jones who kept wicket for 4" Wilkin-on tow. b Millington * eee ee - sci Among the 16 Barbados horses “'!ven off McCool occupied 101 ‘That lovely wedding Cak

mpire when he stumped Smith, G. Grant b Millington 0 Fall of wickets: ' for 22, 2 for 28, that have entered for the T.T.C minutes, with one other boundary It was something quite similar
Algeria, ond nena, ain Mr. 8. Smith stpd. (w.k. Jones) b 3 for 39. 4 for 46, 9 for 61, 6 for 65. Christmas meeting which opens thrown i as his only worthwhile That tled Joe to the stake

be . ealy an ilkinson 5 to hee tune : ‘ 36 7 for at the Queen's Bk Savannat scoring stroke,
; R. Quarless 1.b.w. b Milli 1 4 BC + ANALYS z _ 4 in Lou stood up with amazement

opened the batting for Comber- 6) Beckles b Millington . SOWLING ANALYSIS | w,. on December 26; is “Bow Bells”, And this she calmly said i
mere against the pace bowling of i. Licorish stpd. (w.k. Jones) b King 4 J. Williams 14 4 «38 «66 «6.1949 Breeders’ Stakes winner. No It was left to Washbrook and Even. the judges own that
oa and Barker. Wilkinson €: Sotkise sted. w.k. dongs) biking © ‘C. Wi 'Bmitn 8 + 1% 1 fewer than 193 animals have Dewes, the overnight not-out 3:0 Fe OREM ie Peg bread

= a grace | of the first aoa oae ee ns ny \ = been entered altogether. The batsmen, to save the MCC from Yes boys you ean believe \
over from Millington and in his resistance to the steady bowling Williams hit the wickets of all Previous highest was 130. further disgrace on the fourth and =, We _-say_ it very plain t
second ball Wilkinson was given of Millingto ; last day. Together they put on 2xtime you judge J. & KR. Bread
out leg before to Millington. G. up, and C a on King was put six batsmen whom he got out. 106 batdre Tiwoles died. me Twill win first prize aga

. . , a ombermere ended their The only batsman who played his . » Mewes had to retire ;

Grant followed and with the first
ball he took—the third in Milling-

Tennis Results

Those bakers got the sec

a sae at 133. bowling with any show of ease, with an attack of cramp They don't bake “witt burst



ton’s first over—he w ) e ; an hour's play left and that not convincingly, was TWO games of tennis were Washbrook took his score to 81 9 They tke the time and trouble

beaten Sg bowled etere te with cpanes their first innings Wanderers’ opening bat, Norman played at the Barbados Yacht before being yorked iy dehkeean aR Rees

had a chance to score. force taking: dee ay _ Marshall who , made more than Club yesterday. They were: and then Dewes, returning, play So when you eat J. & R Bread
Mr. . Smith then came in ana {rmer taking the first ball from half his team’s total. Marshall Men's Singles (Finals) ed his way into the Test tearm by rat's why in every housthold

he played out the remainder of pressively was Salen wit his made 41 which included a six E. P, Taylor defeated D, E. Scoring a valiant 117 before being J. & R. Bread's not enough

the over. Sealy and Smith then score was four by Murrell after boundary. It was off Williams’ Worme 6—4, 6—0, 2—6, 6—3. last out when trying to gein first . °

Pratt 3 ps i x - i . nnings leac The daddy and the mum
began to play cautiously taking he played over a yorker.’ Babo bowling that Marshall took his Ladies’ Doubles innings jeac ee ontianan. aril ‘cones

short runs between the wicket. pa vi Six. He followed up that stroke Mrs. D. E. Worme, and Miss E 4 J. & R. Bread ty the best bread
nF Wee bbs tonre nad reeset by Sealy ee ae eee with a two, but was bowled, by the Worme defeated Mrs. C. Skinner van ee wae oo ie rs st To enjoy. with morning tear
‘the first ball. ieee Allaveve in his en ee Babb scored 8. gt Ag was given a .s Mrs. C. 6. Lae, Sek, Ft. this year "dae be toasted "4 sai Wrapnne for ver! rotegtion ® ser
% it 7< r r —2. . _ . - , t's freshness it will keep
first over for the day missed the tthe tea Ghee po age Mie “life” at 4 when he went through MONDAY’S TENNIS learn that when the last man Ho! And when the Kiddie ce. it makes a tidy dif erence to your hair
ball and was nicely stumped vy joined Robinson and they doth Sipe ih the eekly pees ef Wee Mixed Doubles they be hae eee ee eM es
aurice Jones, arless follow- i derers’ batting and was dropped ; g + pat- an he has taken wickets, cam 30 Chris: 8 two wee ° leree ‘ rh ’
ed _and soon Sealy fell a victim jenock. mak the Nid ut pike by Thorpe. He then went on in mig = Mise 'B. Benjamin aa in, Dewes was still 18 short of hi Sot co ote in abu ee Let Brylereem look afiex your hair and you're bound

to King when he gave Millington
who was fielding at second slip
a fine catch. He scored 26. Beck-

Send in your orders early

century It seemed the is
1 nat his For J. & R. first prize bread

chances of reaching it were slight
but Hollies, in what for him ranks

to benefit—for Brylcreem gives your hair this double benefit.
(1) Day-long smartress.

a fair manner until he failed to
play the ball from Williams.
Out of College’s 95, C. Black-

they were undefeated with

Robinson 31 and Cave 17.
COLLEGE vs. WANDERERS

E A. Benjamin.
Ladies’ Doubles (Finals)

hit cn cal te aS coe bate’ College . 95 man topscored with 28 and C, W. oe rare ee rae ne oh “e oe weed his ground sponsored by (2) Lasting hair health,
ORCC meer, tt oe et errs . " ! ' fe as not ou ree i i : i » oH we
lunch the century went up on the Wanderers (for 7 wkts. 69 Smith made a useful 20. D. At- Misc E. Worme. when Dewes was finally J&R BAKERIES ! Besides setting the hair naturally, Brylereem with

caught

tins when Beckles drove a ball _ IN an unbroken bowling spell of ee iat Seah aoe Men’s Doubles on the boundary its pure emulsified oils kceps the roots

from Alleyne for a brace. 14 overs, College's fast bowler J. ‘ F. H. E, Thorne and A. O. V makers of | and promotes natural hair-growth. D ' }
After lunch both boys continued Williams yesterday took six Wan- copes: ., Skinner vs D. I. Lawless and When Queensland batted again, / or ya adr ; "a Br » é

to bat freely and the partnership derers wickets for 38 runs. Wan- ollege won the toss and elected 3; 1,, Toppin. with any hope of a definite result ENRICHED BREAD ANG LignGrue Epate Uecaine Ones oO ne coe
was broken when Beckles derers scored 69 runs for the loss ‘£0 bat on the good wicket. C. W 7. A. Gittens and C. R. Packer out of the question, Warr for the the past when you Brylcreem your hair ( baad /
was deceived by the flight of seven wickets in reply to Col- Smith and Mr. S. O. C. Gittens, ys Dp, BE. Worme and D, Atkinson. second time on this tour, took a and the blenders of ® Ask for Brylcreem, it es hair litt , sols my |
of a ball from Millington lege’s 95 in their first innings the opening batsmen went out to Ww .H. I. Stevenson and E. P. wicket with his first ball and r oy ||
was bowled for 18. After Working himself up to a territic tackle Wanderers attack of Nor- pades vs Dr. C. G. Manning and when stumps were drawn the > j

this partnership ne further pace, and seeming not to tire, @ on page 16 M. E. P. Taylor. State side had scored five for one J&R RUM ENTRIES age ie

say, 't

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PAGE Six

—



oe AC me mate ae



BRITISH NOVELISTS:

— HENRY GREEN

Hy TVerrace Kilmartin

Henry-Green is an interesting
and distinetive figure on the
English literary scene—but an
unobtrusive one. Although he is
well into his 40’s, and has been
writing for over 20 years, he
widely known; and yet. few
novelists now arouse more
nterest and attention in literary
circles. Since the appearance
his first hovel in 1926, each new
book has revealed some new
aspect of a curious and impres-
sive talent. He is not a flawless
writer — he is too audacious an
experimentalist for that: some-
times he disappoints one, but
more often he captivates entirely,

not

and always he has something
original to «fer
It is not easy to define these

strange and fascinating novels,
but the beginning and the end ot
one of them Loving, may provide
oe “Once upon a day =e
e opening phrase of the story
and this is how it closes: “Over
there, in England, they were
married and lived happily ever
after”. It is almost the classi
formula of Perrault. Green's
novels might in fact be described
as fairy < stories—highly sophisti-
cated fairy stories in a realistic
modern -getting. But there is a
good deal more to them than that
description would imply. No other
English .writer has dealt more
convincingly with the world of
the proletariat—an interesting anq
surprising fact in view of Green's
upper-class background. The ex
planation: can be found in his
fascinating autobiographical study,
Pack My Bag, published in 1938

Son of a rich family with in-

dustrial yr hn and country
property, — Green’s upbringin
followed 2a familiar "Seueree

expensiveâ„¢ preparator school,
Bion, and then Oxford. ‘The sensi-
tive, precocious schoolbo ‘Ows
into the intelligent artistic Sieth
who already, before leaving Eton,
was writting poems and had even
started a novel. A life of agree-
able idleness, of literary dilettan-
tism, seemed to suggest itself. But
no: On lea Oxford Henry
Green went to work in his
father’s factory in Birmingham. It
was the time of the General Strike.

Obsessed _ with -
aa or aul i & vague feel
class Green could t, I e. 5
“look a labourer in tap tao.”
Social disturbed hiin;
but instead of launching into
left-wing politics like so maay
other young men of his type, he
decided “to see for myself how
by far the most t part of



the population in England lives—
to work in a factory with
Plump wet hands.”

The experience thus gained has
played a big part in Green’s
development as a novelist, The
principal characters in most of his
books are working people, and al-
though dialect is notoriously diffi-
cult to reproduce, Green can
recapture with extraordinary
fidelity the lilt and cadence o
Cockney and Midland speech, But
this is only one aspect of his ver-
satile talent. He is by no means
a straight-forward naturalistic
writer, but a deeply conscientious
artist who can combine realiyn
with an oddly distinctive kind ‘of
poetic fantasy Poet of Fear is the
title of a short monograph on
Green which appeared recently in
a literary review,
Suggest something of the pre-
dicament in which his characters
are usually placed—the vague
perplexities and disquietudes that
oppress the individual in a too-
romplicated, enigmatic, disconcer-
ting world. In this respect, Green
reminds one of Kafka, but the
setting of his bizarre tragi-
comedies is at once more realistic
and more poetic. And Green has
an exquisite sense of the comic

my



STOCKED 8Y ALL

AGENTS=~ E. A.

Lower Broad

of

DE
306 Plantations Wuilding

Street,

—a shy, subtle ob ique humour
As a stylist he is no less im-
pressive. Buffon’s famous maxim
was never more applicable; “The
style is the man himself”, an in-
tegral pert of his work. He can














fashion and adapt to, vecord
with the changiny anibience of his
novels. Sometimes ! prose is of

almjest biblical simplicity; else-
where the yihms nd the
texture are far ieher At
first, he seems h modelled
his style on the °G ie Stein.
Later, the influence of ce, and
even Proust, shows . But
the writing is always individual,
and in spite of certain rather ir-
ritating mannerisms, at his best
Green can achieve effects of start-
ling and original beauty

Already, in his first two novels

Bti $, published in 1926





when he was still-at Oxford, and



—

:
i|


ARTIE’S HEADLINE






“ Your sudden discovery that
L look just like Jean Simmons
will not make me change mg
mind—1 will not sepele a
thread of eoston!




Living, three

which r €
years later—these striking quali-

appeared

ties were apparent. The first is
the story of a youth suddenly
struck blind—an analysis of the
complex emotions of a man “im-
prisoned in a rudimentary part
of life’ and his efforts to adapt
himself to this condition. With all
its faults of style and structure
(it was written before the author

was yet 20) Blindness is never-
theless the reflection of a remark-
ably precocious talent. Living
(1929) is a far maturer work.
Apart from its “documentary”

value—it is one of the best des-
‘riptions of industrial life yet
written—this novel is impregnat-
ed with poetry and a sense of the
beauty that exists in the most
commonplace things, the most
seemingly banal situations,



Party-Going, which appeared
in 1939 after a.silence of 10 years,
is a novel of quite a different
type--a sly,,evocative fantasy, A
groupeé@f young, people are off on
holiday to Franéé Fog delays

them at Victoria station, and they
are trapped in the hotel. There
a strange little comedy of man-

ners is plaved out while the fog
envelopes the station and an
angry crowd besieges the hotel.
All is mysteriously symbolic, and
the story leaves an odd. rather
ghostly after-taste

With his fourth novel, Caugnt
(1943), based on his experiences
in the National Fire Service
during the blitz on London, Green
returns to the proletarian back-
ground and quasi-documentary
style of Living. But the plot is
a good deal more complex, and
the tone more tragic. Accidental
incest, lunacy and suicide all play
their part in a story set against

a sombre and disquieting back-
ground of war :
Two years later came Loving,

which is perhaps his masferpiece.



LEADING STORES.









JAMIN LTD.




Harbados



Here comedy re-asserts itself,
notwithstanding the almost arbi-
trary misfortunes that befall some
of the characters, their vague
anxieties and ludicrous misunder-
standings. In this delightful
novel Green's gift for authentic
dialogue is seen at its best. The
principal characters are beauti-
fully drawn, with a humane
sympathy mixed with gentle
irony. And the style is marvel-
lously adapted to the subject
matter. The protagonists are the
English sorvants in a castle in
Ireland — Charley Raunce, the
butler. loquacious, despotic and
sentimental; Albert, the bewilder-
ed pantry-boy disturbed by adol-
escent desires; Mrs. Welch, the
drunken cook; and the two pretty,
giggling, amorous housemaids
The castle gardens are peopled
with doves and peacocks, which
pop up at every turn, creatures
of the erotic symbolism that un-
derlies the story. It is a world
at once very real and strangely
magical. The birds, the soft green
landscape seen through the high
Gothic windows, the picnic on the
beach, the evenings in the rain—
from all this Green has produced
2 masterpiece of poetic prose.

Neither of the two subsequent
novels attains the perfection of
Loving. Back (1946) is the story
of a wounded man returning from
ihe war: it deals with his rehab-
ilitation in civilian life, his neu-
roses, his sense of isolation. Again
the documentary touch, and a
plot which hinges on a series of
misunderstandings and _ coinci-
dences. But somehow the hero's
tragi-comic predicament fails to
move one to the extent of the ear-
lier stories.

Concluding, Green's most recent
book (published in 1948), is puz-
zling and perhaps a little disap-
pointing, though stylistically it
marks a considerable advance on
its predecessors. The setting is
novel; the action, such as it is
limited to a single summer day
in a rather nebulous future. The
principal character is an aged
scientist who lives with his grand-
daughter, a pig and a goose in
the grounds of a large country
mansion which has been trans-
formed into a _ state-run girls’
training college. The grand-
daughter is passionately in love
with a young teacher at the col-
lege, and the old man is torment-
ed by the intrigues of the college
directors, two rather frightening
spinsters Who want to get him re-
moved from his cottage. At the
yutset, two of the girls have dis-
appeared. One is found, but the
other never returns. Slowly the
day draws to a close. There is a
ball; the old scientist attends, his
grand-daughter too. But nothing
happens; none of the problems
resolve themselves; all is ambigu-
ous, haunting, enigmatic. There
is a dreamlike quality about this
book, a sense of mystery, of im-
pending doom.,.and a suggestion
of erotic fantasy... It is beautiful-
ly written, and the atmosphere is
evoked with consummate crafts-
manship — the long summer day,
the quivering heat, the clusters of
azaleas and rhododendrons, the
bewitching host of jeunes filles en
fleur. But the characters on the
whole never quite come alive,
and the general effect is vaguely
dissatisfying.

It would be fascinating but idle
to speculate on where Henry
Green is likely to go from here.
He is a singularly unpredictable
writer At 44, he should be at
the prime of his creative life, but
precocious talents are prone to
early decline, and for all one
knows, Green may already have
shot his bolt. Ong thing is cer-
tain, whatever unexpected fruits
he may offer us in the future—
his position as a genuine if un-
orthodox exponent of the art of
the English novel is already safe-
ly assured







SUNDAY ADVOCATE



SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1950









ANY HUSHAND=TO ANY WIFE: 4 amma , —
9 e % Introducing - - - i |
can't give you \ «tm mun | \
* DOMESTIC IRON” | Y

. anything but
love, dear..

By... FEY M. HAWKE

SOMEBODY from Wales —
bless her—commenting on how
humiliating it is for women to
be so dependent on their hus-
bands, proposes that men be
compelled by law to give their
wives a reasonable part of their
earnings.

This isn’t a new suggestion.

I wouldn't mind laying a bet
that the first female who got
clubbed over the head and
dragged into a cave by primitive
man, to skin wild bears and cook
his meals for him for the rest of
her life, at one time or other dug
her teeth into his hand and
screamed: Just what do I get
out of this, chum?”

I think I know what she got
too. Just another crack over the
head.

It must have been a terrific
whack too. It successfully knocked
the spirit out of women for thou-
sands of years, if not for all time.

Without any more talk of
award, they knuckled down and
scrubbed and cooked and swept
and darned. And darned well still
go on doing it.

On the ‘run’

MEN have been clever about
this. They said, in effect. “We'll
#0 out to work, darling — and

you'll run the home.”

The operative word was “run”
—and women have been run off
their feet from morning to night
ever since. It was women,
undoubtedly, who inspired the
title for us of the human race. . .

As it turned out, they were in
fact expected to be super-human
—— to keep going not only every
day, all week, but likewise Sat-
.tdays and Sundays.

Too true, the injustice of hav-
ing all work and no pay is
matched by the fact that no trade
union insists that wives should
down tools at 5.30 p.m.—or be
sacked!

--- and no pay
I IMAGINE

most wives’ idea
of heaven would be a sort of
golden’ door which they couid
bang on their work on Saturday
and forget about till Monday
morning — just like their hus-
bands’ office dor.

In our earthly paradise, if a
wife bangs the front door sh2
knows she'll be cyening it again
in about half an hour, either

MONK’S



A white cowled monk, working
at a potter’s wheel, is reviving an
art which may not only bring
dollars to Britain, but make the
monastery—that of Mount Saint

Bernard, in Charnood Forest—
famous for its medieval repro-
duction stoneware,

The potter is Father Vincent

Eley, who has been at this Cister-
cian Abbey for nearly 20 years.
He studied 14th century pottery,

writing to museums for informa-
tion, and then began to experi-
ment,

An archaeologist to whom ex-
amples of his work were showa
Was convinced they were genuine-
ly medieval. Two formulae for
glazing which he discovered have
been adopted by a pottery firm

Father Vincent spends four ot

WORK LOOKS
600 YEARS OLD

IT MAY EARN DOIiLARS





Burns ordinary Kerosene
—} pint gives 4 hours
normal ironing.

Simple and safe to op-
erate, can be lighted and
used by any inexperi-
enced person.





because she has to go in and cook
the dinner, or clean the front
step, or let the dog out or the cat
in, or possibly just let herself in
beeause a heavy basket is about
to drag her arms out of their

sockets,
you imagine any typist

Special Easy-Grip,
Heat-Proof.

Handle with thumb rest.

Light it and do your
ironing quickly ard
without drudgery.

40?

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Headaches, indigestion, lack cfenergy, inability '
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i the physical and nervous strain caused by over-
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metabolic tone, strengthen your nerves and
increase your energy, start taking Phyllosan

Can
applying for this job? :—

Wanted: A lady to work from
7 a.m. till bedtime. No weekends
off. Food supplied. Live in. Clothes
provided. If employee has any
spare cash to buy them. No pay.

Wouldn’t they queue up?

Also a supply of - - -
Old clo’s man

Tilley Lamp &





LLL PELE LLP LLL LAL APLLP PPLE

BEFORE my own marriage, I



‘,
Ss
o
s
remember visiting a young wife & tablets to-day! Just two tablets three
and listening. to her haggle at Lanterns x times a day before meals, but if you
2 } .
man for half a crown for a pair Manufactured in England } take the tablets regularly, the '
of her part-worn shoes. : ee, Tesults will astonish you. «ex
1 advised her, in all ignorance, }
never to have any truck witn A. S. HUSBANDS, $|
these second-hand door mer- Agent : % {
chants. * wi
“How else do you suppose,” she see x
asked, “that I would ever have Babbs ::: St. Lucy X
any money? Wait till you are y fortifies the over-forties
PSS SSS SSO SSO OSSD.

a poor wife. You'll sell your
shoes to buy stockings, and a few
weeks later you'll be trying to
sell your stockings to buy shoes,”

All that's left

WHAT can we do?

Our money goes on food, the
laundry (in fact, so much on
the laundry there isn’t much for
food), and on getting our shoes





— WONDER WHEELS N° |





mended (a colossal sum. this,
because we're always on our
feet).

And with what is left we buy ;
innumerable tins of wax polisa |
to shine up our shabby homes.

Funny as hats may be, we still
can't get away with dazzling our
husbands with an empty tin of
furniture polish on our heads. |

How can he ?

BUT there is an awful snag.

How can any husband who has
paid the rent, the gas, electri-
city, coal, and rates bills, and
“the housekeeping” and been
stripped of everything else in
income tax,,pay any more—
except his bus fare home?

It just happens to be a good
thing for all concerned that we
love the Brutes!

—LE.S.






Hercules
stands for STRENGTH

Of all the heroes of olden times, the strongest was Hercules.
To-day the name still represents unequalled strength, and the
famous Hercules cycle has proved itself the strongest in the world.

SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS

a i

lhe Finest Bicycle Cui To-day

THE HERCULES CYCLE & MOTOR CO. LTD., BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND
REPRESENTATIVES :

T. GEDDES GRANT LTD.,

five hours a day making the pot-
tery.

He collects clay from local fac-
tories, stone dust and ashes for
glazing from the rocks and trees
of the forest, He makes his own
moulding tools.

Visitors from all over the world
buy his work, stone jugs, bowls,
tankards, candlesticks and brooch-



es.
Five Hours A Day

Father Vincent is convinced

that his work will sell in the

United States. Some reproduction
work has already gone there. The
Victoria and Albert Museum has
asked for specimens. Nottingham
Corporation have bought a num-
ber of pieces for their Castle
Museum.

London Express Service

BRIDGETOWN
cANIAz4











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The tests which consist of boiling samples under 100 Ib. per

proof; rear corner windows; door . i cs
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=



SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10,

Presenting . .

SOME people are born under a
lucky star. The Hon. Patricia
Lowson, the new Lady Mayoress
of the City of London, is certainly

one of oe

_ For she you uty and
riches. Her Suzeone re , &
Lowson, is one of the City’s most
successful financiers, well able to
afford the £20,000 from his own
poset that 12 months as Lord

ayor is likely to cost him.

At 31 she is the youn Lady
Mayoress on record. om the
plump schoolgirl who was a bride
at 17, she has developed into a
slender handsome woman,

At the Guild of Freemen’s din-
ner at Guildhall, Sir Harold
Webbe spoke of her as “the legend-
ary fairy princess, dear to the
hearts of the people,” and he
warned the Lord Mayor: “As first
citizen of the first city of the
world, you have a serious rival
ior the affections of the country.”

Mrs. Lowson (dressed by Nor-
man Hartnell) has been the guest
of the King and Queen at Buck-
ingham Palace; the guest of Queen
Juliana at Claridges and (in a
superb velvet and fox fur ensem-
ble) hostess to the royal visitors
at Guildhall.

J

Three Children

The Mansion Hoyse does not
lend itself to domesticity. The
Lord Mayor’s private aj ments
consist of four rooms only.

Now Mrs. Lowson is the mother
of three children. Two of them—
Gay aged 13, and Melanie, aged
10, are at a boarding school. They
see their mother during holidays
at the’ family’s country home at
Balcombe, Sussex. Her youngest
child, Ian, who is six, lives with
a nanny Balcombe and sees his
mother at week-ends.

When she is at Balcombe, Mrs.
Lowson indulges in her favourite
hobby, riding. She hunts with the
Horsham and Crawley Hunt, rid-



Radio wrong

1980



- The Woman Of The Week

SHE IS YOUNG, RICH AND. BEAUTIFUL

Hy VIVIEN BATCHELOR

ing side-saddle in black habit.
stock and silk hat.
Her accomplishments are

leisured and dignified. She has
studied art and paints well. You
will always see her at the private
views and new art shows. She
reads a good deal, mainly bio-
graphies and books on art.

As her appearance proclairhs,
she has all the teminine under-
standing of clothes. If she had not
married a wealthy man when she
was barely out of the schoolroom,
but had had to earn a living, she
could have done so as a manne-
ee Five feet eight inches tall,

enderly curved, her dressmakers
find her as easy to fit as their own
models.

Her Hands

One of her best features are her
hands, They are long and slender,
with the whiteness accentuated by
tinted nail varnish, but there is
nothing delicate about them. They
are the strong hands of the horse
woman and reveal a capability
not always apparent in her face.

During the war those hands
controlled the stiff, heavy wheels
of new ambulances, often for
hours at a time and for journeys
of hundreds of miles. She worked

as a FANY and her job was to de- d;

liver the ambulances to hospitals
in all parts of the country.

They are ‘never seen stained
with tobacco (for she does not
smoke) or reddened with house-
work (for she has never had to
do any). Although she loves gar-
dens and has a “show” garden at
Balcombe, she never does any
gardening. A better-than-average
pianist, she has already tried out
the piano in the Mansion House
drawing-room. ‘

When they were first married
she and her husband had a mag-
nificent model railway which took
up a whole room. They spent

?—this listener

tells you why

REC USE NEW ROBOT MONITOR

The BBC have one listener who
never pays licence money but
whose opinion they accept with
the deepest respect. He is their
Electronic Man.

The part played by this me-
chanical genius in broadcasting is
revealed in the BBC Year Book
for 1951. ;

Until recently the Corporation
had men listening to the output
of their transmitters to ensure that
quality was maintained. Now
these watchers are being replaced
by the automatic “el lis-
tener.”’.

Mr. R, T. B. Wynn, deputy chief
engineer of the BBC, gives this
camanation of what the robot
does:

“It is possible by the use of
these robot monitors to know in



2s bet BOOTAL anu cider bron women manriened ere Repiciered Prade Mors

London that the programme which
is being sent to, say, the Scottish
transmitting Station at Westerglen,
is being radiated by Westergler.
at the same quality as that
it had when it left London.

Alarm Bell
“Should interference or distor-
tion occur after the programme
has left London, an alarm can be
made to sound in London, or at
Westerglen, which will draw the
attention of the staff to the fault.”

The robot also spots the mis-
take if the wrong programme ar-
rives at a transmitter through
faulty switching on the way,

Advantages of this electronic
wizard: (1) it mever tires; (2)
it costs less than the annua) Ssal-
ary of a trained operator.

London Express Service.





The Lucky Mrs. Lowsens pictured at
the Guildhall dinner,

hours playing with it. Now that
interest has gone; Mrs. Lowson to-
ay prefers flying to trains—a
preference not shared by her
husband who refuses to fly.

“So when we travel we often
meéet at our destination,” she says.

London’s new Lady Mayoress is
London born. She is the younger
daughter of the first Lord Strath-
earron and was christened in St.
Columba's in Pont Street accord-
ing to the rites of the Church of
Scotland. Her husband was 30
when they met and fell in love at
a dinner party, A few weeks later
they were married.

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

Happy Birthday to Yvonne
Griffith, Dorothy Cofeman and
Milanese Skeete who celebrate
their birthdays this week.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

PROGRESSOGRAM|

BEGIN with the three-lettered |
word defined in the first couple’, |
then add the given letter each |
time and transpose the letters un- |
til you get the final word which |
is spelled with 11 letters. |

People should never disagree,

Lest they rouse each other's
THREE.
For, i this FOUR one never

ought—
Since this as children we were |
taught.

|

}
Add §
|
|

Ada #
When Biddy’s too lazy to do the
washing,
She'll simply FIVE— it’s only
sloshing.

Add T
= you seal your note don’t

To SIX the check you want to
mail.

Add U
—— are those who tie and
Like ministers, or one of their
kind. |
Ada O

The usua} procedures we follow
each

day,
Describe by EIGHT, you'll find
you may.

7 NINE pay homage toa

But we don’t have that sort of
thing.

Add P
Musicians know the TEN is D,
In a composition whose key is C.

add ©
The ELEVEN of criminals and
reprobates
Is left to Attorneys of Cities and
States.

“uo}NoVsOI1g
‘sTUOWEdNS ‘soLWUNOD ‘souTyREW ‘s19};Uy
“Mosul ‘OSUTY ‘@8} “Atl iNOLLA'TIOS

WEIGHTY PROBLEM

THEY weighed them and found
the combined weights of three
men, Pablo, Pascual and Pedro,
is 600 pounds. Then it was fig-
ured out that Pablo weighs half
as much again as Pascual, while
Pedro's weight is equal to one-
half of the combined weights of
Pablo and Pascual. On the other
hand, the combined weight of
Pascual and Pedro is exactly 50
per cent. more than the number
of pounds Pablo weighs.

What does each weigh?

“uaAe Spunod paspuny
OM} 7e SoTeos OR Bd OIpag ‘AXIS pur
petpuny suo BSYyBIeM [eNoseg ‘{AyAOF pue
porpuNY Om) SyuszIeM O(Ged :NOLLNTIOS

What does each weigh?



Phat Pied






Ruport’s Autumn

reff ©



Primrose-—30




See ea A
rel ask !"’ says the elf angrily.
we are, trying to do our

per wosk and make the garden

: ee ae all ume

of the Imps pring has got

» and is Filling it with spring

ns, and is overworking the

» If only I could find where
a tuna When I catch him
@ lesson |"



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PAGE RIGHT

BARBADOS 48 ADVOGATE

Qe SS SS SS Yona

Printed by the Adveente Ce., Lid.. Broad St. Bridgetown.





Sunday, December 10, 1950



FIRST THINGS

THE published report of the meeting of
the Caribbean Interim Tourism Commit-
tee is timely.

In all the fields in which Barbados has
lagged behind other West Indian terri-
tories none has been greater than in tour-
ism.

Almost every country in the world to-
day has been convinced that tourism is one
of the greatest of all revenue earners.

But not Barbados

Next year the United Kingdom is run-
ning a special Festival of Britain to attract
millions of American dollars.

Barbados is still sitting on legislation in-
tended to encourage the building of modern
hotels.

In Puerto Rico members of the Carib-
bean Interim Tourism Committee have
planned a Caribbean Festival 1951.

It has been necessary for an American,
a member of the United States Chamber
of Commerce to go to the United Kingdom
to tell them that they should adopt a for-
ward looking plan for tourist development
in the British Caribbean.

It has been necessary too for the same
American to urge local governments in the
West Indies to support tourism.

Why is it that Barbados fails so signally
to give to tourism the priority which it
needs to hold its own with the attractions
offered by other islands?

Is Barbados aware that only a matter of
weeks back Tobago has constructed a
beautiful modern hotel?

Are the people of Barbados so ignorant
that they do not realise how much Grenada,
St. Vincent, Antigua, the Grenadines have
to offer the visitors from northern climates?

Is there anyone still capable of saying
that Barbados has the finest sea bathing in
the world? i

Can it be that education is so backward
in Barbados that the importance of tourism
as an industry is not yet appreciated?

Barbados has now got at Seawell a run-
way sufficiently long and favourably
situated to attract here the largest airliners.

It still retains a reputation for being an
island particularly suitable for tourists by
reason of its settlers, hospitality and
climate. <

Unfortunately that reputation is rapidly
being lost to-day.

Residential areas are being ruined by
industries, windows on the sea are being
closed, trees are being cut down, roads are
not being widened, streets are dirtier than
ever, lavatories and urinals are in short
supply, and the once renowned Barbadian
good manners have taken a nasty knock.

What is the first thing needful?

A change of heart on the part of the Gov-
ernment,

Instead of tenderly nursing the old sore
of colour discrimination and thereby halt-
ing aid to the hotel industry, the present
Government should at once follow the lead
given by all other West Indian islands of
any size and encourage the growth of the

tourist industry by immediate favourable
legislation.

Instead of leaving the tourist committee
as an isolated entity saying a grateful
“thank you” for any small sums that come
their way the Government should make a
department of publicity, planning and
sanitation and pass the legislation neces-
sary to make Bridgetown the cleanest, cool-

est and most orderly capital in the West
Indies.

It was not of Barbados that an American
traveller was talking last week when he
said “it has a very clean town and the
shops are so well kept and the people so
friendly and charming”.

It was of St. George’s Grenada that he
was speaking.

Unsolicited advertisement of this kind
costs nothing and is worth most.

There is no greater asset that Barbados
possesses than its present attraction for
tourists. That asset has been grievously
neglected in the past and is being shame-
fully neglected to-day. :

The Governmert of Barbados can no
longer sit back and watch the daily stacks
of filth in Bridgetown, the daily indiscrim-
inate and uncontrolled building that is
going on, and the contraction of bathing
beaches and views of the sea.

| dog.”

SUNDAY

It must give more thought to legislation
in the interests of the island as a whole
even at the expense of the senseless (if
more emotional and vote catching) legis-
lation based on mud slinging within the
community.

Barbados is not big enough for the in-
dulgence in spitting on your neighbour.
First things first. And tourism stands at
the head of the queue.

WAX FROM CANE

WHITTAKERS for 1950 contained a note
in discoveries of the year 1949 about a new
type of banana in Jamaica which would
resist leaf spot and other diseases which
have laid waste banana crops in the tropics
over a period of years.

It is possible that in the issue for 1951
there will be mentioned a new discovery
for making sugar cane wax in Barbados.

Quietly anc out of the glare of publicity
the West Indies Sugar Producers’ Associa-
tion have under the direction of the Head
of their research department, Sir John
Saint, been investigating the possibility of
making wax from the by products of the
sugar cane and which can be manufac-
tured locally. ®

The Advocate understands that Sir John
Saint has found a satisfactory formula for
the manufacture of sugar cane wax and
that negotiations are presently being made
for the establishment here in Barbados of
2 factory which will manufacture wax
from the by products of the sugar cane.

. In addition to providing Barbados with
a new secondary industry the manufacture
of wax at a time when demand has been
so insistent that the price in one instance
has risen to as much as £1,100 per ton
offers the island an added source of rev-
enue. Noone can accurately forecast what
will be the commercial value of the new
manufacture to Barbados but it is expected
+hat wax can be manufactured locally and
sold at an estimated £400 per ton.

Sugar cane wax is already manufactured
in Cuba and certain South American coun-
tries and it can be used for floor, boot and
shoe and car polishes. It can also be used
as an insulating material. The discovery
that a commodity of such commercial value
can be manufactured here in Barbados is
welcome news. Ht is also a subject for
congratulation that the Sugar Producers’
Association should have decided to make
Barbados the headquarters for its re-
search department.

Sir John Saint has done so much for the
island of Barbados that a grateful people
will know how best to appreciate the
further service which he is devoting to this
island and to the best interests of the
peoples of the Caribbean.



Unfriendly Canines

FEW dogs in this island, it would appear,
have ever heard that little proverb, so
often quoted in Fleet Street, which says
“Dog does not eat dog.” In fact, if Mr.
Gallup ever had the audacity to inquire of
our dogs what slogan interpreted their
philosophy best, the result of the poll
would undoubtedly show that 98% of our
canines were in favour of “Dog eats dog,”
and that the other 2%, inevitably, “didn’t
know.” vei,

Surely it is time for some psychologist,
psycho-analyist, sociologist, or whoever the
competent authority may be, to investigate
the cause of the unfriendliness among our
canines and write a voluminous report. This
important problem has been neglected too

long. a ts ~

Why cannot Bonzo and Rex get on to-
gether? Perhaps, reclining on a couch,
Bonzo would admit that he became em-
bittered with life when still a pup because
his father was a drunkard, and his mother
was a flirt.

On the other hand, and now we believe
we are getting to the root of the problem,
it may not be a question of psychology at
all, but one of breeding. Every afternoon
in Kensington Gardens, London, over a
hundred well bred dogs congregate. They
play games together, gossip a little, swim
in the Round Pond, and behave in a gen-
erally civilized manner. Imagine, how-
ever, the bloodshed if a hundred Bajun
dogs got loose in Queen’s Park!

And this evidence is backed up by the
excellent behaviour of the pedigree dogs
at the Exhibition last week. Perhaps next
year it would be a good idea to arrange
for parties of “sooners’—each securely
muzzled—to visit the Exhibition and ob-
serve the polished manners of the dog
aristocracy. It seems, alas, that in Bar-
bados the era of the common dog is here
to stay, and so every effort must be made
to teach them that “Manners mayketh

in 6





a



| Sitting On Fenee

NATHANIEL GUEGSINS

My

IT WAS like Christmas morn-
ing in the Sea Nest. The fam
sat at breakfast, munching Web
sausages. The postman had de-
livered the letters. Your Uncle
Nat opening one bill after another,
was gradually losing his appetite,

Then he opened the last enve-
lope and out fell a pretty pink
cheque.

“Who's that from?”
of girlish voices asked.

“How much is it for.” A harder,
more practical note could be
heard in the voices this time.

* * *

“It's a present from The Gas
Board.”

Your Uncle Nat’s voice, thick
with toast and emotion, rang
through the room like a muffled
gong in a fog.

The cheque was passed from
hand to hand. Although it pro-
mised to pay N. Gubbins no more
than £2 4s. 8, fur coats were
discussed on the spot. A week-
end in Paris was planned to the
last detail.

a chorus

Your Uncle was so overcome
with amazement that he neglected
his Webb sausage till it grew cold.
This sort of thing had never
happened to him before, except
when Mr. Bloodsucker, the in-
come-tax inspector, sent him a
cheque for repayment of over-
charges one November, and fol-
lowed it with another letter on
Christmas morning saying it was
alla mistake. ¥ "

Although the letter enelosed
with the cheque was not decorat-
ed with holly leaves, it was

posit with interest to date.
ng you a Happy C
|" motto like: —

{ras and dincere,’ sa

it
was a pleasure to refund a 7
io

The Gas Board hopes yowll

have good cheer.

No fuel cuts in the glad New

Year.

But it was the beginning of
what may prove to be a beauti-
ful friendship and gave a chance
to reply in a seasonal spirit: —
Dear Gas Board may your days

be long

Your Christmas gay and Merry
With port type bottles at your

board





ADVOCATE

THEY DO IT AGAIN AND AGAIN









WHEN SOMONE ELSE J'S BUT WHEN
HAVING. I(T OONE , IT SEEMS COMES
LIKE THIS

ms

And Olde Worlde English sherry.
May Mrs. Gas ond Uwole Gas
And all the little Gases
Enjoy their.dins hooked out of

tins
And puds made for the masses.
Are you fit?

DR. GUBBINS answers below
some questions asked by some
of his unhealthy readers wonder-
ing if they are fit to face the
winter.

As a fat man aged 50, do
you think I should be able to
run up two flights of stairs
without blowing like a
whale?

If you can’t do this without
blowing like a whale, walk up.
If you still blow when you walk
up, move into a bungalow. If you
still find it difficult to breathe or
move freely in and_out of a
bungalow don’t send for a doctor.
Send for 2 carpenter.

*

Up to the age of 72 I could
balance myself on one foot
with my eyes shut and my
arms outstretched. 7 try

io you

it now I fall over. yo
think I’m too old for this
now, doctor?

Not at all. Try hopping down
the stairs that way. is should
~ your troubles once and for
all.

Can you help me, doctor?

Soon after eating food I feel
-, if I had swallowed a
a

Maybe you have. A man once
swallowed a toy balloon he was
blowing up for a children’s party.
Every time he drank soda water
he became airborne and floated
to the ceiling. Instead of whining
about it he began a new career aS
a party entertainer and would
have lived happily ever if
he hadn't exploded in a dentist's
chair after a whiff of gas. Avoid
dentists and try to look on the
bright side. ‘

At one time I kept myself
healthy with a simple morn-
ing exercise. I used to bend
forward with knees stiff, look
between my legs at my wife
in bed. and shout, “Top o’ the
morning” twenty or thirty
times. If I do it now I get

ed

A Tale Of

Before I went down to the
garden I knew that the shirt I
had on showed signs of wear. How
unmistakable these signs were,
however, was only brought home
to me when I noticed the peculiar
way in which the garden boy
looked at me and my shirt. Re-
proachful glances at me, and ac-
quisitive ones at my shirt, that
said quite plainly, “I wonder how
much longer he thinks he can go
on wearing it before passing it
on to me”.

When I was changing to go to
the Club, I found the other shirt
I was about to put on was so
frayed at the collar and wristbands
that I had to trim them with a
pair of scissors. Later on at the
Club, when George was showing
dangerous symptoms of being
about to tell me the way in which
U.N.O. should deal with China,
I took the wind out of his sails
by telling him the shirt situation
was now so acute I had decided
to buy myself a brand new one.

“Just like that?” he asked, look-
ing startled and putting down his
glass without finishing its contents.
“What-a-mean-to-say, old top, is,
how-dya-mean to set about it?”

“Why, in the usual way, of
course. Go into a shop, choose a
shirt and buy it.”

“But, but,” he spluttered, “my
dear Bertie don’t you realise that
with a cold war on, you can’t take
unilateral action like that on any-
thing so important without run-
ning the risk of creating a crisis?”

“How-dya-mean?”, I began.

“Mean, mean” he exclaimed,
scornfully cutting me short. “Do
you think you're still. living in
pre-war days? Don’t you under-
stand that in these days of devalu-
ation, hard and soft currency and
price controls, ete., you can’t just
rush out and buy shirts at super-
sonic speed? Oh no, old boy, those
feudal days are over. What you've
got to do is to keep within the
framework of the procedure
adopted by U.N.O.”

“But I want a shirt,” I again
started, only to be again inter-
rupted with:

“You and your wants! What's
that got to do with the point at
issue? The question that’s got to
be first decided is not whether or
not you want a shirt but whether
you need one. The way to decide
this is to appoint a fact finding
committee.” Then clapping his
hands for the waiter, he leant for-
ward and tapping me on the knee,
said: “Look. I'll show you. You
and I will resolve ourselves into a
fact finding committee. Now, do
you want or do you need a shirt?”

“Both,” I teld him, and explained

Hy ¢. G.

all about the frayed edges as well
as the reproachful and acquisitive
eyes of the garden boy.

“Good!” he said. “That's one
thing settled.” Then looking smug
and pleased with himself, “You
see how easy it is? Now the next
step is to appoint a consultative
assembly to decide the question of
what sort of shirt and where tc
buy it. I suggest you and your
wife form this assembly and re-
port back here tomorrow, when
we can decide whether or not it
is necessary to appoint a Security
Council to deal further with the
matter, or ignore that formality
and save time by holding a plen-
ary session of ourselves forth-
with.” -

“But, hang it all, George, I
know the shirt I want and need,
and I know where I can buy one
for $4.75 cash.”

“There you go! There you go
again, harping back on this uni-
lateral complex that’s already been
vetoed”. Then, as he caught the
waiter’s , he said, “Boy! Repeat

those drinks and make ’em doubles and down, and he put on his fam-

this time. Mr. Bertie’s not at his
best today.”

“Look here old fruit,” I protest-
ed. “I’ve had enough of this. I’m
going to buy that shirt. See?

“Okay, okay, okay,” he retorted.
“Have it your own way. But have
you the cash to pay for it?”

Putting my hand in my pocket,
I jingled my keys and small change
for a moment or two, and then
told him, “Well-er-er funnily
enough, now you mention it, I
don’t think I have today; but I
can get them to charge it.”

“Charge!” he exploded. Did you
say—charge? D’you seriously mean
‘to tell me you would run the risk
of burdening yourself with a debt
like that without consulting a
financial expert, or getting the
opinion of an economic adviser
who could tell you what a debt
like that may cost you by the time
you're able to pay it in the only

sort of money we may have by $4.75

then? To hear you talk lightly of
getting things on credit now would
think you had unlimited Marshall
Aid behind you. Well I ask you,
have you any pull with Marshall
Aid?”

“No”, I said. “But——”

“Well, skip it. Never mind the
buts. Listen, old cock, and I'll tell
you. What you've got to do is to
apply to Development and Welfare
to finance the proposition. Give
‘em the works Tell ’em all they
need do is to supply the capital
gum and that you'll guarantee to





SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1950

as sen sees eogug
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pains in the head and back
and feel dizzy. What do you
advise?

See a psychiatrist. at once.
better still, try your exercise
the roof-edge of a high building
with a gale blowing. One day
your wife will thank me for this |!
advice.

Or,
on |



A PRESENT THAT WILL
LAST A LIFETIME !

A ROGERS

UPRIGHT

PIANO

Another shipment just arrived. |



‘Mr. Chairman .. .

TO HELP people like myself,
whose minds become a _ blank;
the moment we stand on our feet
to address our fellow creatures,
an American, Herbert V. Proch-
now, has written “The Toastmas-
ter’s Handbook.”

“If you want a sure fire story
to start your speech.” says the
blurb, ‘turn to Chapter 6 and
choose one of the witty anecdotes
given there. For a few well-
chosen words to introduce a guest
speaker read Mea oo 4. If you
have to make a timely response
turn to Chapter 5.”

And if you want to make an
even bigger fool of the trembling
creature who has sought. this
easy way out of his difficulties, |}
each member of his audience
should: be made to read the book
in advance and be supplied with
a copy ot it at the dinner.

Mr. Chairman and gentlemen,”
the speaker begins, “by way of
introducing our guest tonight I
feel I can do nothing better
then, |. <*

“Turn to Chapter 4,” shout the
audience, noisily turning the |}
pages of their books.

“When I was in a similar posi-
tion,” the red-faced speaker con-
tinues, “that is to say, when I
was a guest and had to make a
timely response. . . .”

“You turned to Chapter 5.”

“But.as I am. not a- good
speaker, and do not wish to bore
you any longer, 1 think I wi'l
end with an amusing story, or at
any rate, it amused me when... .”

“When you read it in Chapter
6,’ chants the audience. “of The
Toastmaster’s Handbook by Her-
bert V. Prochnow. which contains
400 epigrams, 400 anecdotes,
1000 quotations and 100 funny
stories, price 32s., post paid, or

|
|








SUITS.













meet any recurrent expenditure
mecessary for upkeep,”

“But my sainted aunt! Do you
really think they’d fall for a thing
like that?”

“Well, to be perfectly frank,
they probably won't. But tha’
doesn’t matter. All that really mat-
ters is that you will have done
your part and have the satisfaction
of knowing that you have followed
the correct _-rocedure.”

and presented in a range
of Qualities and Colours.
that is certain to include
B your favourites,

a Utne: eseee dercice. a er —_ ee
——_—|% England’s most respected

Sh int Tailoring Houses ! Made

from the finest _ fabrics %



Stop in to-day at...

Da COSTA & C0.

When I got home I told my wife
all that George had said and ex-
plained that she was now a mem-
ber of the consultative committee.

She yawned slightly, then
smiled and went on with what she
was doing.

The next day, when I met
George at the Club, I told him that
the Consultative Committee had
decided that as this was a purely
domestic matter I was entitled to
buy myself a shirt without going
through the routine procedure he
had outlined. That shook him, In
fact, he was obviously so annoyed
that he turned a dull red, his
Adam’s apple moved rapidly up

ous sneer that would have made
him look like a camel, provided a
camel could turn red in the face
and have an Adam’s apple that
could run up and down its throat.
When he could trust himself
to speak he said-in a nasty,
you're trying to tell me is to mind
my own ruddy business.”

It cost me three drinks and a
lunch at the Club before I could
smooth him down enough to hold
a plenary session, at which the



ss
7 oe

PL LOPE LEE ACCES §




it was early closing day.

The next morning when [ wen,
to the shop, the man told me the
sort of shirts I wanted had all
been sold out. Thoroughly dis-
gruntled, I went back home where
I found a parcel addressed to
me on the table.

“What's this?” I asked my wife.

SOOO SOO OOPOOTS

“Your new shirt, dear”, she .
said”. “Bought it yesterday. Cost 3
eerie? GF ODDARDS §
old one to the garden boy.” :
“No, yon ons ioe, because N
you see I gave it is morn- 2 y
ing”, she said, smiling secretly to GOLD BRAID RUM g
herself without looking up from , 3
her knitting, From: $
. %,
I’d be the last person to criticise %
the manner in which she had dealt TO “ M as R R as W >
with the matter, but I do wish x
rhe hadn’t smiled in that irritating ie %
feminine way, However, I suppose ”* e %
one must make allowances, for — %

even the best of wives is, after You'll n
all, merely a woman. SSOSss

C







Sg ~

eed a quantity of this Delightful Brand g



SSSOSSSSSOOO*

|
|
|





SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1950

KLIGHT DOLLARS TO
ST. VINCENT

Hy GEORGE HUNTE





OU can leave Barbados at The Catholic Ch, rch of St
nine o'clock at night and Mary’s, Kingstown is one :
arrive at Kingstown, Lite nestown is one of the

' St. Vincent afchitectural trea 2s of S|
before six the following morning. Indies, Designed and cuasrustes
The journey is 96 miles and the by the late Father Charles of
cost to deck passengers eight Belgium, St. Mary’s. was only
dollars only on the big Lady finished in 1938. Father Charles
Boats. _ got assistance from his brother ia

St. Vincent has a_ volcano Bruges and from local material
Souffriere. It was one of the and labour constructed an oriental

islands which was given back building wi corri
exclusively to the Carib Indians maurc: ne es AR yer

for a short period in West Indian Belaowian i aa, wna
or ab tee ee y of ea monks who n inister to the
n the Catholics o ince ive
morth of the island. It grows the day. i Venere ane oer
finest sea island cotton in the One of verandahs
world and it earns large sums of !0oks over a ravine with a natural
dollars every year from the sale swimming Peol in which boys
of its arrowroot. swim while housewives wash their
From the deck of a boat Kings- laundry in the stream that issues
town presents a pleasing post- further down. On another of these
card effect with its red painted com was 12
og and its archways. High hills ear.
with jagged tops tower over the The rooms of the monaster;
town and houses dot the hills in were full of chairs of Darapens
the hatf circle which surrounds origin and design. There were
the harbour. Statues and buSts, books every-
At 6.15 in the early morning where and an ancient map of
H.M. Customs came off to the ship St.. Vincent.
in a row boat carrying an enor- When we knocked on the iron
mous flag. Two policemen in grille we found one of the monks
shorts were rowing one customs dressed like a workman repairing
officer dressed like a ship’s cap- 4n_ electrical gadget that was
tain, with pipe in mouth and giving trouble. He had been
hand on tiller. : trained at Mount St. Benedict in
The row boat is the normal Trinidad where his order have
method of getting from ship to their headquarters in the hills
shore in Kingstown. His Honour which look down on the Imperial
the Administrator possesses a College of Tropical Agriculture
very fine super luxury launch lying in the valley below.
which was designed for air-sea Handcrafts and woodwork in
rescue but which is now used by “St. Vincent are excellent. We
the officer administering the gov- bought several simple straw . ils
ernment. The police have a row for putting dishes on They could
boat fitted with a tiny outboard made quite easily in Barbados
motor no bigger than a small and might be but I have never
basket full of cabbages. seen them displayed in local shops.
The landing pier at Kingstown In St. Vincent an old man of at
leads directly into a large police least seventy comes on board as
barracks facing the waterfront. scon as the boat is cleared and
On the day of my arrival no less never leaves the deck until half
than twelve policemen were on an hour before the boat. sails.
duty providing a guard of honour After dinner at night is a particu-
for His Excellency the Governor larly good time for his trade, be-
of the Windward Islands who cause passengers are always on
was returning that day to his deck until the boat sails,
seat of Government in the hills After the swell and white foam
overlooking St. George’s had died away when the launch;
Grenada. which brought the Windwards,in Bridgetown yesterday dis-
_ Bay Street, Kingstown unlike Governor on board had returned® charging Christmas cargo, which
its namesake in Bridgetown has to Kingtown the last minutes inyincluded 50 cases of smoked hams.
preserved its natural beauty and harbour were given over to the® They were the s,s. [kana, call-
the water laps on the beach swing band who sat in anotherging from South Africa and India
adjoining a wide spacious road, small row boat. and the Canadian Challenger from
There is a market enclosed by It was a three piece band com-WCanada.
wire and although it is sadly in pTising a banjo, a guitar and an , i i
need of maintenance it is easily oatmeal can. The girl from The Ikana brought plain pil-
recognisable as a market place. . British Guiana, returning from afechards, salted peanuts, peanut
The buses in St. Vincent ar® trip'to Italy and Switzerland re-f>utter, canned cece canoes sr
about one third the size of the quested the “last train to San squash, tea, castor oil and —
buses in Barbados, When they are Fernando”. She got it but thep.Pags. roe Tree pote ‘ a
waiting for passengers they are band never got the coin. It fell brought eae Pe i Rea nit
halted in line in the town’s into the sea and a host of divers ia ee casein oe her from
equivalent of our Probyn Street. swallowed it up. for Cae Siiaed sepa iath sup-
It is in its streets and pave- It only costs eight dollars to)’ ee ON tik? Beatie yaamarith
ments that Kingstown shows a get to St. Vincent. The trouble is at canted fruit jioge rods Mon-
marked superiority to Bridgetown. getting back. It took twelve days

the open

Xmas Hams
Are Here

Two steamships were at anchor



ST. VINCENT PATIO



Spanish archways provide shade before the same ship got back to}®

for the pedestrians and there is “St. Vincent on its return trip

treal.
S.\S. Canadian Challenger

toy
enough room on the sidewalks for Barbados en route for Boston, «brought the 50 cases of smoked

'
two Ford Prefects to pass side by There must be many hundreds
side. The streets of Kingstown of Barbadians who are willing to
are also wide and make our own spend .00 for a brief visit to
Broad Street look like a narrow the sister islanid»of St. Vincent
country lane by..comparison. but not many can afford to spend
The churches are good neigh- 12 days there or travel back by
bours in Kingstown. The air,
Methodist Church is opposite the There are schooners of course
Anglican and from the tower of but most of us like something
the unique Catholie Church you higger when we are out in the
look down into the yard of the Atlantic and it is 96 miles from
Anglican. The Methodist Church Barbados to Kingstown, That is
true to its tradition of sign- more than four times the distance
posting carried in bold letters the from Calais to Dover and who
salutary reminder: “Love can d0 would dream of crossing the
no evil to its neighbour.” channel in a schooner?

COOL SHADY PAVEMENTS

‘hams from Montreal. She also
landed pickled, meat, apples, gro-
ceries, sardines, eggs, cotton goods
and stationery from Montreal
along with pears, mandarines
oranges’ and grapefruit from
Dominica.

The Ikana is a Nourse liner.
Ships of this company make occa-
sional calls at Barbados. Her local
agents are Messrs. DaCosta & Co.,
Ltd.

On Friday evening, the char-
tered Alcoa freighter Essi landed
here 40 cases of smoked Picnic
hams. F ,

The Essi was on her first visit
to Barbados. She left port during
the night for Caripito. Messrs.
Robert Thom Ltd. are her agents
here.

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



School Stages

Nativity Play

A NATIVITY PLAY, “The
Wonderful Journey’ was

Staged by the St. Mark’s Girs

Schoc a the school-ro

Friday afternoon before large

crowd of friends and pupil

The newly renovated wails
vided a good background for
gaily decoratud Christmas tree

Rev. W. B. Brathwaite was the
Chairman. After his address the
choir sang “Jolly Old December

“Bo-Peep’s Christmas Party,”

pro
Rp



short play, was staged by thc
infants and lower junior uf the
school ;

“The Wonderful Journey” is the
story of a little girl, Jean, dis-
cavered lying on a bed in a beau
tifully decorated room. Jean wa

crying over her disappointment o1
being unable to get up for Christ-
mas because of an injured foot

The mother tries to comfort he:
by showing her decorations anc
telling her that Santa Claus would
not visit children who cried

Jean asked her mother for the
picture of the Nativity but whik
her mother is looking for this sh«
falls asleep, During her sleep she
has a dream of her guardiar
angel leading her to the Stable at
Bethlehem where she sees th
Manger with the baby, Mary,
Joseph, the shépherds, angels anc
kings.

She is sad because she has nc
presents to offer but the ange
@ssures her that the baby woul
be happy if only she sung. She
goes to the Manger and sings
“Away in a Mangen”

Soon she awakes from her won-
derful dream and hears carol
singers, _Her mother calls them
in and they sing for her because
they are sorry that she is suffer-
ing from an injured foot

The acting on the whole wa
good but Brenda Wedderbur:
who played the part of the litt!
girl, Jean, deserves special met

A quiet resting place in the Patio of ST. MARYS, ST: VINCENT. _ tion.

VER 200 PUPILS and parent
enjoyed a pleasant evenin;
with many city dwellers. An &t St. Silas’ Girls’ School on Fri-
advantage of the use of the pot day when Mrs. E,; Spencer, Head-
or box too is that the plant is â„¢ustress, and the staff gave a re-
protected from © being. washed Cital of Christmas Carols and a
away, play entitled “Fish.”
ERE WAS KEEN competi
In the vegetable garde . tion at the Local Talent Show
were he eg heel at the Globe on Friday night
tion of tomatoes, cabbages and First prize went to Walter Burke
onions. The object of the section Who sang the favourite “My Fool
was to show the best method of ‘Sh, Heart.”
growing these crops, The exhibits | Eddie Hall, who sang “Moon
ranged from ‘seedlings sown in /ight Cocktails” was awarded th
drills in seed boxes in their pro- second prize. Other good vocal
gressive stages to’ maturity. ists were Nat Dunnah with “Count
Every Star,” Lucille Craig with
A remarkable feature’ of the “Chatanooga Shoe Shine” an
stall was the general healthy con- Holman Rayside; who sang “Mons
dition of the crops displayed. Lisa.”





ae a ee E i ia ii 5 a ra P \C T E ae.
Housing Board
May Open Window | oe

winaow, on sea Phe Hou

Ing’ poa

from the Bay Bstate io |








Area to th e beach

Discussed along with ti |
jecl, was we. question < | by
neids for the Housing Art A ww |
Bay To make rec |
on these two matier’s the Be |
asked the Chief Medical Ortice
transport, fhe Colonial Engine: }
the Director of Highways a
and. the Secretary of the Bx

form a Committec

li connection with the repair
ng and repainting of hous re



eupied by tenants of the Boar
under the hire-purchase agre¢

A wise mother lets baby decide about

ment, the Board yesterday decid a
ed to seek legal advice on whether | the milk for bottle feeds. Lots of energy, steady
to extend the period for payments “i ; ¥
or to enter into a new avreemen: | gains, contented days, peaceful nights — these tell her what she most

with tenants,

The present agreement
lates that tenants are res;
for repairs to the houses
fact is that they are not
cially able to do so

wants to know — baby is doing splendidly on’ Ostermilk.

Why can mother pin her faith so
he firmly on Ostermilk ? Because, where
in breast feeding is difficult or impossible
it is the perfect substitute for mother’s
milk. Ostermailk is finest grade cow's
milk, dried under the most hygienic
condithws. The protein, great body-
buildes, is made easily digestible
by the voller drying process. And

sre OSTERMILK....

For your free copy of illustrated Baby Book—Phone 4675

important additions are made: Iron
to enrich the blood —. sugar to modify
the food for tiny digestions — Vitamin
D to help build strong bones and
teeth, Ostermilk is made by Glaxc
Laboratories Ltd., who, since 1908,
have been pioneers in the develop
ment of the best possible foods for
babies.



TAPER EN ENDN DA DH EK
SUNT IN TIME FOR

| CHRISTMAS





uy

=
= FRESH SOCK

S .



4

; 6563450 <
LOCOS CFCS EE CLEP PEPSI S






RAAAPAAAAAARA DR ABRARAA AA








aN

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD |

S LTD)—Head of Broad St.

a

STANSFELD, SCOTT & Co., Ltd.
Broad Street

RS

a

. >
SS N ‘ y
z OF x x
Ss % ‘ oy %
= 1 ».* > JD on $
S JAMAICA «GR Ape oe seat
Eo % : Toe ings ae
a $ an hr) 7p, ews 2
= > war! ; y - ree t oh} $ x
= CIGARS Ser Ce hae fs
) J ‘4 % rs) ew hs “ x
a * SAE ef %
5 x "© , oy S
: ; Pr ’ ry ‘ J ‘
2 ow mactano 8 YOU ORDER THESE EARLY !! §
we “TROPICALES” % ! %
oY in Boxes of 25KQ | DANISH SLICED BACON per Ib 4 =
= GE) $ PEARS IN SYRUP per: tin 59
Fey GENTLEMEN” S3|0 TRINIDAD ORANGE JUICE per tin 38 %
a in Boxes of 2588]% HEINZ MULLIGATAWNY, OXTAIL per tin a 30 %
mt #G|$ HEINZ MULLIGATAWNY, OXTAIL, & SCOTCH
ag PL R DE MACHADO” sel BROTH SOUP per tin 30 :
a n Boxes of 2568/% wWeinz TOMATO SOUP per tin .33 %
im atts , BIR Lacrocen Lm 14a
a POND RAS 2918 LACTOGEN 2)-Tb tin 380 &
3 am % HEINZ STEM GINGER per bot 112 3
Rt “LONDRES KES ScorrisH CREAM WHISKY per bot 100 &
Me 8 os GS MEINZ TOMATO KETCHUP per bot 7 g
D eee * WG | 8 COCKTAIL CHERRIES per bot 122 3
S ncesaehel taps 5, S| 8 HEERINGS CHERRY BRANDY per bot 5.00 ¥
By. OPERAB OEE | SULTANAS pes Ib 3
tae | Sony rae. wns
“py or ov 9 t} % OURRANTS per Ib ~
BF PANETELAS > & % MIXED PEEL per tb %
RR .. NETELAS” so S¥ | Y CLTRON per tb %
Meeks 35 4 \S BRIDAL ICING SUGAR 1-1) Pkg a2
BB vAPTER SUPPER oe & BANQUET CASTER SUGAR 1-Ib pkg. 22
4
? . yer. %
Brvirc, ' e N ADD COCKADE FINE RUM TO THE
Fel k |
Ne! a) $ GROCERY LIST
n1 Y
GEMS” in Bundles of 5 ox 8
s
¢
3
e
°
+
%
e
-
ys

ae 44,6444
LPVLOO SPL FEISSSSO

-

434,*
1669636965094 5 66 6 OB OBOOCBOCOOSGE OOOO 34%

po
OREN ik PK OK ON GR DK NAN DN OECD LAA AOIES Se0ooe..:
ss ADNENE MENON NAME MGNENE Wid OZ SG NG ACAI HOD NO ANA ANDRE










a
ma
WS

Onion Growing )
May Become
Minor Crop

SUCCESSFUL results in the
cultivation of onions here by the . ;
Department of Agriculture make Ping aa |
it likely that they can be grown : i
to the extent of becoming a minor wa Z
crop, the “Advocate” was told
at the Department of Agricul-
ture, Onions can be success-
fully grown, it was said, in some
of the light and sandy soils of
Barbados.

B®

ea gE) \ a
SEX
‘ : % Dab)



BBC



has led the the way for many Years===and still leads.

Some of the onions grown in Bey : . Pf 23

this way were among the exhibits 5
in the stall of the Department at
the Annual Industrial Exhibition
just ended. In this stall the dis-
play was of vegetable gardening.
There were two sections, the
vegetable garden section and the
pot and box culture section. The
latter is recommended for per-
sons having very little space and
very little soil such as is the case

This Year we have what is possibly the Largest and

Best Assortment of

TOYS AND XMAS GIFTS

WE HAVE EVER OFFERED TO THE PUBLIC
| OUR STOCKS INCLUDE—

ALL KINDS OF MECHANICAL AND OTHER TOYS,



A typical Street in Kingstown, St. Vincent, showing a wide street
running into the sea. Note the Spanish type archways and the

wide covered pavements. This delightful fountain presented by LADY GILBERT CARTER

in 1909 lies disused in the “TRASH HOUSE”, Queen’s Park.











Shirts that will give him shoon dolight

ENDEAVOUR striped shirts with 2





Bi PEEING DEN GAN IN A TU A NAT BN EPA PRI PN DAN FUT





BBUBVEECVV VERE EVEVEES

ELITE and KAY Brand Sport ||| 3 DOLLS, DOLLS PRAMS, DOLLS TEA SETS,
— . eT collars. to ot Crea, uae Brown = 2 METAL SOLDIERS, ELECTRIC TRAINS
match. Sizes to 17. ue, ite, Small, Medium and a3

Large.
Each

EACH soso, SOMO MECCANO SETS, ROCKING HORSES,

TRICYCLES, XMAS TREES AND TREE
DECORATIONS, FANCY GOODS, NOVELTIE

$35.20 & 1.01

RENOWN Broadcloth Sport shirts
with short sleeves in shades of

White, Cream; Grey, and Blue
Sizes: S. M. K.

DURAMEN striped shirts with tru-
benised collars attached. Excel-
lent value,

HAA ANA A RAN OS

MBAS NG NESS




m MN
H



\f :

Wei ack s ieee. 2 $4.38 — Each $1.43 ||/ROF ALL KINDS AND HUNDREDS OF OTHE

. 3 &

te ec ss Bases 'RITEMS EMINENTLY SUITABLE AS GIFTS PORE

Handkerchiets. 7 achernnaeee tien Randers Oe eso | OLD AND YOUNG :
WOGEE ask, sisakcocwsdiasveathen chiefs with initials. Each ........

1 te 94¢ $1.09 & [15 ae

White and Striped fringed



BRING THE CHILDREN AND LET THEM SEE WHAT

WSIS



ach SI, oe 2 fe OOKS LIKE —THEY WILL ENJOY IT
ot i ae, | AER GS CO. ID.) | B.

White and White with col-
oured borders.
Each 55¢

AA AA AA AAA

10; 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

THE “GIFT” SHOP
BROAD STREET



Davi
=.
>
3
AS
nN
©
=
Nm

PA











x
2
3
2
2
2
2
3
3
2
2
S
2
2
>
2
2
=
=
=
=
=
=
8
2
2
2
2
2
2
AF



PAGE TEN



Eastern Caribbean Seeks Capital

Ce



SUNDAY ADVOCATE ~

For Development Of Industries

POR
i

OF-SPAIN, Oct. 27

is driving actively to-
her level of industriali-
hereby counteracting some
ie effects of unemployment.
Although efforts are being made
sughout the Eastern Caribbean
attract outside capital for the
ievelopment of new industries,
his is particularly noticeable in
Trinidad, where the passage o
primary industries assistance leg-





f the

thre

islation is already proving its
worth Construction has com-
nenced during the past few

months of a factory for spinning,
weaving, dyeing, finishing, print-
ing and knitting cotton textiles.
Other industries recently estab-
lished include mixed feeding
stuffs, moulded rubber and plastic
products, ice and cold storage
plants, time-recording equipment,
and a rum and industrial alcohol
distillery and by-product yeast
plant. The new brewery in this
island is now in full production.

In British Guiana, the construc-
tion of a modern sawmill near
Georgetown on the Demerara
River, is in progress, and a soap
factory has been opened in Dutch
Guiana. In Barbados, a new cot-
ton knitting factory is in opera-
tion, and the Gulf Oil Corporation
is starting operations under the
petroleum rospecting licence
granted last May.

The establishment of secondary
industries, based on natural re-
sources of the Caribbean area and
imported raw materials, is of par-
ticular importance. Coupled with
the active development of the for-
est, agricultural and mineral re-
sources of the Eastern Caribbean
and the Guianas, this trend should
strengthen the economy of the
area, whose people have been
largely dependent on agricultur?
for their livelihood.

With a rapidly growing popula-
tion, partly as a result of better
health conditions. it is vital that
the sources of income should be
widened. The implications of such
a trend for Canadian exporters is
obvious. Higher living standards
and incomes less subject to vio-
lent fluctuations will provide op-

;brtunities for expanding the
trade in both variety and quality
of commodities. owever, the

distortions in tye pattern of ex-
ternal trade in the Eastern Carib-
bean have become more serious
since devaluation. If permitted to
continue, they might easily result
in distortions of the internal
economy of the area.

Tcurism Offers Potential

Business Opportunities

It is becoming more and more
apparent that tourism offers one
of the more hopeful business op-
portunities for the islands. Even
here, however, the expansion of
the industry continues to lean
heavily on the advantages of a
favourable exchange rate to vis-
itor from Canada, the United
States and Venezuela. The activi-
ues of

Hy T.
Canadian Goverment

boards, co-ordinated and guided
by an organization set up under
the wing of the Caribbean Com-

f mission and of other commercial

agencies, are bearing fruit. Not-
able has been the rapid develop-
ment of Barbados as an off-season
holiday resort, especially for vis-
itors from Venezuela. With im-
proved facilities for air travel
from the north, there would ap-
pear to be no reason why this
movement should not be extended.

It is apparent, however, that
more and better hotel and guest
house accommodation in all the
islands, and especially in Trinidad,
is essential. Recent developments
in accommodation and travel fa-
cilities include new hotels in St.
Thomas and Tobago. new airfields
in Guadeloupe and Martinique,
and enlarged airports in Trinidad
and Barbados. he airlines con-
tinue to increase their services to
meet new traffic demands but the
same trend is not so evident in
steamship services. This is par-
ticularly true with respect to pas-
senger services between the Car-
ibbean and the United Kingdom,
which are quite inadequate.

The middle quarters of 1950
have been marked by an accen-
tuation of the trendsrwhich have
developed since the devaluation of
sterling in the autumn of 1949.
There was a seasonal falling off
in retail business activity, put
good crops have put more money
into the hands of consumers, and
as the Christmas buying season
approaches there is an evident up-
turn. The upward trend in the
cost of living continues. In gen-
eral, weather conditions have been
favourable, although there has
been damage to crops, livestock,
roads, bridges and buildings in
Trinidad as a result of heavy
rains and floods. In the Leeward
Islands dry weather has caused
some anxiety regarding the grow-
ing crops, while in Antigua and
some of the smaller islands in the
group, heavy damage was caus-
ed by two tropical hurricanes in
August and September. On the
whole, labour conditions have
been satisfactory, although there
have been some difficulties of a
jurisdictional nature amongst the
sugar workers in British Guiana.
The problem of unemployment
continues, especially in the more
populated and highly urbanized
areas, but in Trinidad it is being
met by an active drive towards
industrialization.

Imports of European Goods
* Increased

Supplies of consumer goods are
plentifui. although the continued
restrictions on imports from the



the various local tourist hard-currency countries limit
Chamber Of Commerce Plan
Middle-Class Housing Scheme

(From Our Own Correspondent) struct a middle-class housing

KINGSTON, J’ca., Dec. 5.

Ii the Government consents to
two main points of a plan now
being comp.eted by the Jamaica

hamber of Commerce, Ltd., mid-
aie-ciass housing schemes _ in
Gieater Kingston are to receive
2 capital investment of £80,000
or more from private interests
soon.

First of tne two points is that
the Government should guaran-
tee repayment of the investment
10 those who put it up; and the
second calls for amendments “to
the, present building regulations
{or the city so that prefabricated
houses of the type now being put
up in the U.S.A. and Great Britain
might come to be legally accepted
here. *

Details of the proposal, which
have been decided on, are that a
syndicate -of private investors
would put up the money to con-










WHISKY
BRANDY




WINE










ROEBUOCK STREET.





STOCK UP

THESE FOR
CHRISTMAS.

“ GIN (BOLS)

. CREME DE MENTHE ,,
: APRICOT BRANDY
COINTREAU .. ase
PEACH BRANDY .._,,
CURACAO TRIPLESEC ,,
DRAMBUIE ,, +. ow
GOLDEN ARROW RUM

PERKINS & CO., LTD.

estate in the suburban area of the
city, and after having it erected
would virtually hand it over to
the Government. A middle-class
man in search of a home for his
family would be able to step into
a cottage on the estate for no
more than a month’s rental of the
cottage, but for this facility and
for the faet that he would have
20 years to pay, the Government
would have to guarantee his pay-
ments,

Type of houses on the estate
would be mostly the 2-bedroom

cottage and an effort is being
made to see if the houses and
land together could not be kept
down to under £1,200. In
this connection a_ well-known
Jamaican firm of structural en-
gimeers has been given the job
of planning out the cheapest yet
most durable type of 2-bedroom
houses,





Quors

Pa) ay



(BELL'S) Bots.

Dial 2072 and 4502

Grant








Major
Trade Commissioner

purchasing to the sterling Com-
monwealth and other soft-cur-
rency territories. There has been
a noticeable inerease in the vol-
ume and variety of s from
such countries as Italy, France,
Western Germany, and the Low
Countries. Japanese textiles ap-
peared in appreciable quantities
during the period but qt prices
higher than had been anticipated
During August and September,

the cargo movement from the
United Kingdom and Western
Europe was particularly heavy.

The approach of the holiday sea-
son finds warehouses and shops
well stocked, a'though prices are
higher than last year and there
are indications of still higher
levels during the first quarter of

1951. On the whole, food sup-
plies are plentiful, both imported
and locally produced. Tempor-
ary shortages have developed

from time to time, mainly in those
commodities bulk purchased from
relatively unaccustomed and dis-
tant sources of supply. So long
as discriminatory exchange con-
trols against nearby hard-cur-
rency countries are continued
together with price controls and
subsidies, these irregularities are
likely to continue.

Agricultural Conditions
Generally Good

Agricultural conditio&s have
been good throughout the area,
although the cotton crop in the
Leewards was adversely affected
by dry weather in April and May.
The heavy rainfall in Trinidad is
likely to reduce the yield from
the cocoa, citrus, and _ coffee
crops. Sugar returns have been
satisfactory with record or near
record crops in all the British
colonies, namely: Trinidad, 164,-
500 tons; Barbados, 158,182; An-
tigua, 30,203; and St. Kitts-Nevis,
41.204 tons, Production for the
year in British Guiana is expect-
ed to be in the vicinity of 228,000
tons. Deliveries of nutmegs and
mace in Grenada have been light
and with demand exceeding sup-
ply there has been an upward
trend in prices and an active
export movement. Citrus and
banana supplies have been plen-
tiful and overseas demand strong
with consequent heavy shipments
from Trinidad and Dominica. The
favourable effect of this has been
particularly noticeable in the
latter island where eapnomic con-
ditions recently have shown strik-
ing improvement. There — has
been a satisfactory expansion of
rice production in both British
Guiana and Trinidad, the increas-
ed crop in the former colony per-
mitting the filling of contracts
with ritish Caribbean islands

““Communist”’ Is No Slur
On Character.”

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec, 7

“To call a person a Communist
involves only an imputation on his

political opinions and not upon
his personal character, and sucn
an imputation is outside the-mis-
chief of the section under con-
struction”, said His Honour the
(Srperererel ferme roicw






a <>





TNE

ATTENTION !!

MILD

DIAL 4528





NEW! IMPROVED
ODEX SOAP

© Gets skin really clean
@ Banishes perspiration odour:

© Leaves body sweet and dainty
Odex makes a deep cleansing lather that

ally batho. Odexis ideal fr family use.



FACTORY MANAGERS

Take this opportunity of obtaining your requirements in :-—

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE
Ranging from 44 in. upwards

Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes
BOLTS & NUTS—AIl Sizes
FILTER 9CLOTH—White Cotton Twill

At PRICES that cannot be repeated.

The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lid.

WHITE PARK ROAD, ST, MICHAEL

and opening the possibility of
shipments to Jamaica. ;
There has been a sharp drop in

gold production in British Guiana, |-

only 8,756 ounces being entered
during. the first eight months of
the year as compared with 16,230
ounces during the same period in
1949. The decision of the Ana-
conda British Guiana Mines Lim-
ited to discontinue gold mining
operations and development after
some four years of exploration
work isa serious blow to the in-
dustry. Exports of bauxite from
the colony also declined both in
quantity and value. On the other
hand. the production -of diamonds
cantinues to expand and the ex-
port of timber is up. by over 50
per cent with overseas demand
cantinuing to be strong. Produc-
tien and exports in the Trinidad
petroleum industry have been
good, although it is apparent that
unless new wells come in ata
higher rate than at present, the
refining section of the industry
will become increasingly depend-
ent upon imported crude. A num-
ber of new licences has been
issued recently covering marine
drilling in the Gulf of Paria, but
not much activity can be expect-
ed in the immediate future owing
to delays in the delivery of equip-
ment. New refinery capacity by
Trinidad Leaseholds Ltd. is urder
construction. Exports of natural
asphalt from Trinidad have boen
satisfactory and, with the renewal
of the lease on Pitch Lake, active
efforts are being made to improve
production and handling methods
and to- find wider uses and new
markets for the product.

In the political field, the most
outstanding event has been the
inauguration of a new constitution
for the colony of Trinidad «nd
Tobago. The first election under
the new constitution’ was held in
September and the new legisla-
ture was opened on October 20.
The constitution provides for a
council having a majority of
members (18 out of 26) elected
under an adult franchise, with an
executive coundil including five
members elected by the Legisla-
tive Council. Reserved powers
include finance, defence and ex-
ternal affairs, but the constitution
is a long step in the direction of
self-government. Action has been
taken towards a widening of the
franchise in the Leeward and
Windward Islands. A: Legislative
Council has been established in
the British Virgin Islands, a

residency of the Leeward
slands, and a commission has
been appointed to report on con-
stitvtional changes in British
Guiana. Local self-government
has been inaugurated in Surinam
(Dutch Guiana), but the question
of constitutional relationship with
the Netherlands remains to be
settled. The matter of participa.
tion in the proposed federation of
the British Caribbean. colonies is
presently under consideration by
the various colonial legislatures.



Chief Justice Sir Cecil Furness-
Smith, in. the Trinidad Court of
appeal-yesterday when he allow-
ed the appeal of Mr, Raymond

Watkins, an Arima school teacher |,

against the decision of the Arima
Magistrate ordering him to pay
a fine of $25 for having called
Mr. Edward Lai-Fook, City Solici~
tor who at that time was con-
testing a seat in the Legislative
Council a “Communist.”




FFENDING-USE ODEX














STEEL











mm et






CRANKY

On ‘CERTAIN DAYS’
Of The Month—

Do female functional monthly
disturbances make you feel ner-
vous, fidgety, cranky and irri-
table, so tired and “dragged out”
—at such times?

Then do try Lydia E. Pink-
ham’s Vegetable Compound to
relieve such symptoms. Pink-
ham’s Compound is made espe-
cially for women. Taken regularly
—it helps build up resistance
against such pain and distress.

A particularly fine thing
about Pinkham’s Compound is
that it contains no harmful

lydia €. Pinkhaons

SHOES |.



try this if you’re

NERVOUS



opiates. It's made from eight of
nature’s own precious roots and
herbs (plus Vitamin B)). Pink-
ham’s Compound HELPs NATURE!
And that’s the kind of product
to buy! It is also a grand sto-
machic tonic,

For free sample bottle tear this
out and send with name and ad-
dress to Lydia E. Pinkham Medi-
cine Company, 104 Cleveland
Street, Lynn, Mass.

VEGETABLE
COMPOUND

SPECIAL
NEWS!

Exciting way-ahead-of-time Styles!

A delight to the Smart Woman

who loves

beautiful fashion

SHOES that meet every costume need,

Now Available at...

Limited
THE HOUSE OF
FINE FOOTWEAR

; SHOES that flatter you, comfort you,
B be =
2 far beyond their price,





SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1950





PHOSFERINE (2.

—

for a quick =-

i >\\

convalescence

When the body’s reserves are brought
low by influenza or other debilitating
illness, and convalescence threaten
to be a slow business,
PHOSFERINE can do much to

\\








PHOSFERINE exercises
its fine tonic powers by
coaxing the appetite, pro-
viding the gentle stimulus
to get things going again.
So responsive is the
body to the help of
PHOSFERINE that im-
provement may be looked
for almost immediately—
and every day will bring
signs of returning strength,
In liquid or tablet form. 10
drops of PHOSFERINE
equal 2 tablets.

THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS
for Depression

, Debility, indigestion, Sleeplessness, and
after Influenza,



THERE’S PAIN RELIEF
AND TONIC BENEFIT

Yes!— Yeast-Vite
quickly soothes away
headaches, neuralgia,
nerve and rheumatic
pains — but it does
something else too!
Because of its valu-
able tonic properties
Yeast-Vite helps you
to feel brighter, look
better, sleep more
easily and enjoy more
energy. Next time
you want pain relief
take Yeast-Vite and
get tonic benefit too!



HEINEKEN'S
SCORES AGAIN!

Earns Top Award in West Coast

Tasting

The Wine and Food Society of Southern California
in a special sampling and tasting of beers, ale and stout
held at the Union Oil Company Recreation Park, Brea,
California, on July 15, 1950, showed the following rat-
ings and the brands of beer:

1. 87.20 Heineken’s
2. 85.20 Muenchner-Lowenbrau
ae 84.70 Tuborg
4. 80.65 Bass Ale
5. 74.66 Hackerbrau
6. 73.60 Pilsner Urquell
7. 72.85 Mackeson’s English Stout
8. 72.73 Whitbread’s Pale Ale
9. 7117 Carta Blanca Mexican Beer
10. 69.06 Bohemian Ale
11. 68.91 Coors Golden
12. 68.12 Miller’s High Life
13. 66.11 Guinness Stout
14, 65.78 Budweiser
15, 65. Country Club
16. 61.50 Acme Ale
17. 53.89 Acme Lager
18. 48.05 Eastside
19. 48.03 Blatz
20. 47.50 Burgemeister
21. 41.11 Weilands
22. 40.83 Pabst Blue Ribbon
23. 40.45 Lucky Lager
24. 32.72 Maiers 102
25. 32. Altes
26. 29.09 Regal Pale
27. 21, Rainier
28. 20.55 GB.
Superb 100
Excellent 75
f Good 50
Fair 25
No good 0

Mr. Jules Berman, our West Coast representative,
informs us that the tasting was attended by 165 im-
partial beer connoisseurs and the voting was done in-
dividually so that no results were available until all
votes had been compiled.

Indeed a proud accomplishment for our Heineken
brew masters!



K. R. HUNTE & Co., Ltd. are the Local ‘Agents

for HEINEKEN’S KEER







axiguiceaeiciaias casisseataiameilly

— — —————





SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1), 1950



City Was Busy
Yesterday

The City was again busy yester-
day as men and worgip went
about their shopping “for the
Christmas season

Every now and again the side-
walks become congested with
pedestrians and the streets with
cars, but the policemen were fully
alert and did a good job in keeping
cars and pedestrians alike on the
move,

The use of the loud-speaker by
the mounted police was especially
helpful in this respect. No one
was left in doubt as to whether he
or she was causing a “hold up.”
Crisp instructions were given and
these were complied with, without
hesitation.



Obituary
Miss Carmen Hunt

The death of Miss Carmen
Elaine Hunte, headmistress of the
Wesley Hall Girls’ Sthool oecur-
red at the Tercentenary Ward of
the General Hospital, on #riday
morning. She was buried the;same
evening at St. Mary's CHurch after

? ;

a funeral service at the James
Street Methodist Church where

she had been a member of the >»

choir, and Sunday School teacher
for many years

A procession of the girls of the
school led the cortege. and crowds
lined the roadway in silent tribute
to a friend and teacher. For Miss
Hunte was not only a well re-
spected member of the teaching
fraternity, but one whose influence
for good had earned her the un-
dying esteem of a wide circle.

Miss Hunte began her teaching
career at St. Mary's Girls’ the
school she had attended. Her ap-
titude won quick recognition and
she was sent to the Rawle Train-
ing Institute for teachers. At the
end of her training course she
joined the Wesley Hall Boys’
School staff under the late Mr.
Rawle Parkinson. Her service at
Wesley Hall Boys’ ended when
she was appointed headteacher of
the Wesley Hall Girls’ School in
1931—a_ position she held with
distinction until a few weeks ago
when ill health forced her to re~
main at home.

Her illness was a short one, and
the community is the poorer for
her passing.



May Get Pioneer Aid

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec. 7
The wood-working industry in
Trinidad, is being considereq for
Pioneer Aid. Among industries
recommendeq by the Advisory
Board for pioneer aid, and agreed
to by the Executive Council in
Trinidad are those of the Safle
Bros, Mill, the Renown Shirt and
Garment factory, Caribbean

Hosiery and British Paints Ltd.





YACHT “AXELLE” glides beautifully under full sail.



English Yachtsmen
Reach Barbados

ON WAY TO

NEW ZEALAND

TV/O English Yachtsmen now in Barbados with their
8-ton 34 x 10 foot yacht “Axelle”, completed the third leg
of their planned voyage from the Isle of Wight to New
Zealand when they arrived here two weeks ago.

_Squatty Ronald Frost, 32 and
his slim and slightly taller 29-
year old brother Donald, crossed
the Atlantic in 48 days. “Good
sailing”, they called it. Some
4,700 rilcs they have already

don< -he entire voyage which
oe s ipproximately 14,000 miles
of s zg

T) started off from the Isle
of Wic it some time in June this
year and wefe escorted for about
10 miles by the Smith brothers
who afe famous for Atlantic
crossings, in small yachts.

The Frost brothers made their
first stop at Madeira where they
spent two months replacing stores
and watching the hurricane sea-
son go out. Another two months
were spent at Las Palmas, the
next stop they made before com-
ing to Barbados.

Anxious

Perhaps the most anxious mo-
ments they spent during the At-

them. Lying at anchorage there,
they were one night unfortunate-
ly moored close to a ship which
was being plundered by thieves.
The thieves were manipulating
small rowboats.

Ronald levelled his gun and
fired “high” to scare them. He
was lucky to be missed when one
of the thieves replied wildly with
another shot. “Barbados iss a
bright contrast to dry and dusty
Las Palmas,” thought Ronald
“Las Palmas—no grass, not trees,
but plenty of thieves’, he said.

An Archbishop

They met the Archbishop of

Canterbury at Las Palmas
and he wishe@q them “bon voy-
age” before they set off on the
2,800-mile run to Barbados,
Cooking was no difficulty for
them during the voyage. They
used a pressure cooker which,
with all the rolling and tumbling

SUNDAY ADVOCATE Pa *>

Jamaican Pianist
Chosen For Empire
Festival

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON.
Eighteen-year old pianist Nigel
Coxe, from Jamaica, had the hon-
our of representing the colonies

in the final concert of the Festival
of Empire Youth in London on
December 6. It was staged in
‘he India and Pakistan Hall of
Overseas House, under the aus-
pices of the Overseas League and
ihe Music Circle Committee.

This was not Nigel's first per-
formance in London. He was the
solist_at the second concert of
he National Youth Orchestra o9f
Great Britain, and soloist again
with that orchestra when it gave
its first overseas concert—in Paris
last April

Nigel came to Britain in 1946
on a scholarship awarded by Clif-
ton College and studied in Bristol
under Douglas Fox. He then
gained the Walter Stokes Scholar-
ship to the Royal Academy ot
Music and became a pupil of
Harold Craxton.

The Festival, an expression of |

youthful talent from the countries

within the Commonwealth, is
unique. The Music Cirele Com-
mittee arranging it hopes that it
will not be merely, another iso-

lated musical event but the first
of an annual series of such Festi-
vals.

Others participating in the con-
cert were from Great Britain,
Northern Ireland, Canada, Aus-
tralia, New Zealand, South Africa,
and Ceylon.

Textile Men
‘Can Sell
More In U.S.’

Among the potential American
markets for British goods is the
Supplying of luxury coffin linings,
Says a report of a British Textile
Marketing Mission,

The mission, which visited the
United States under the auspices
of the U.S, Economic Co-opera-
tion Administration, say many of
the better quality rayons and vel-
veteens bought to line the caskets
were at quite high prices.

“We concluded that the possi-
bility of selling in the better price
ranges was worth further con-
sideration by British exporters,”
they say.

America, says the report, is
“not swamped with the gaudy
ties of the American type seen
in the East End of London,”
Many American-made ties are

designed, in the words of a buyer,
“to look like the sort of tie which
an American would buy in Bond
Street,”

British design centres need an
expert fashion scout in the United
States, whose job would be to
provide a flow of fashion fore-
casting news about trends in col-
our, design and style, says the
mission,



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PAGE ELEVEN



:
you wont
hear
yourselt walk

in Clarks

“MINNESOTA”

(WITH WATERPROOF, NON-SKID



GROUND-GRIP" PUSSYLITE SOLE)

In great demand in many parts of the world, “ Minnesota”
pleases both for its smartly casual design and for its amazing

new soling material.








“ Pussylite" soles are resilient,
non-skid, cushion-comfort -
able, rubber-light,

leaf-cool—and

“ouffed ” upper
tough as you
. ’ new slant heel-shape
could pos-
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sibly need ! spring in your step.

MADE BY

| Clarks OF ENGLAND

THE QUALITY SHOE FIRM WITH 125 YEARS’ EXPERIENCE

Cc. & J. Clark Led. (Wholesale only), Street, Somerset, England
LOCAL AGENTS: ALEC RUSSEL! & CO, BARBADC

Christmas Tree
Decorations



from
Your .lewellers
Y. DELIMA & CO., LTD.
‘Phone 4644 -0- 20, Broad Street



















+ r lantic crossing was on the voyage of the Azelle did not spill any of —LES, |
B.W.LA. Increase Flights Po |
Ww. to Madeira. For three days they the food. When the cooker fell \... im u 7
For Christmas ‘Season — becalmed and drifting out of off the fire they only had to re- thes ae Pe hat ye days i The Broadway First
- eir course, lace it. They i aki tops
(From Our Own Cor-espondent) The second night of the calm at They intend making 10

Do you need some material for a special occasion? See our
assortment. Most likely you will find it.

With regards to shoes, our customers are the most pleased
and satisfied pedestrians.

New SATIN finished PLASTIC HANDBAGS in black are
the ones you dreamed about—only $5.20 each

. the Avelle was caught in a fish- The use of twin spinnakers on after leaving Barbados on their

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec. 7 ing trawl. The a Packtamen the Awelle gave them consider- way to New Zealand, One of the

The British West Indian Air- only knew this when the trawl, able ease. The spinnakers are two stops will be Panama _ where
ways announced this morning that being hauled in for the catch, flat pieces of wood attached to they hope to work for a while
they will be putting on seven brought the Awelle with it and the mast, having two ropes run to before going on to New Zealand.
Viking flights and one Lodestar almost smashed it to the bow of the rudder. In a driving wind The Azelle was bought by the |





trip for the Christmas season. the fishing boat, Next day, they the yacht becomes self-steering Frost brothers in 1944. During | HOUSEHOLD NEEDS FOR CHRISTMAS
fae = sous beens coupe mackerel for food. ei ae were sailing vale devine pare Gk cae oar wanes | SHEETS 807—100" ..........00ccccccucuuees -. $5.53 each
arbados, Tobago, Grenada an eir stay at Las almas winds for the majority of e rebu ler_an¢ ade | Qefinticly Unbostabie (Matablished 1806)
between Caracas and Barbados, npleaant emory for voyage and so they even risked trip to Spain in 1949. The only —Price de n y Un . F i E
ide pda Ala Danae aig oh Sea's rearing together some of the accommodation is one cabin whieh | PILLOW CASES of excellent quality......... - 135 , ATTENTION GOLFERS!
nights, The average day’s sailing holds four bunks and a cot. WHITE DAMASK SERVIETTS ........ 46c, and sO, An accident on the links could cause you much

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DAMASK TABLE CLOTH with coloured borders
—52" x 52” 2.37 »
BREAKFAST TOWELS ............-- ae 8 eee 4 Al»

embarrassment or lay you open to payment of heavy

compensation 5
Allow us to issue you with

Trinidad Architects Will ,

e’







soon have that better





Build U.K. Hospital

Messrs. W. H. Watkins & Part-
ners, F.R.I1.B.A., Chartered
Architects of London and Consult-
ing Architects to the Government
of Trinidad and Tobago in respect
of the new San Fernando Hospi-
tal, the Colonial Hospital, Port of
Spain, and the Caura Sanatorium,
have been appointed architects for
a 750-bed Hospital Centré for
Exeter, England. This eee,
ment was made by the South-West
Regional Hospital Board, and the
announcement follows close on
the commissioning of the same
firm to design a 600-bed Hospital
for Swindon.

Messrs. Watkins & Partners are
architects for the new St. George’s
Hospital and the Royal Free Hos-



pital Group and the Hampstead
General Hospital Group in Lon-
don and for the Bristol Royal In-
firmary Scheme.

In 1944 Mr. W. H. Watkins,
senior partner, was invited to
Barbados in connection with the
proposal to erect a new Hospital
for the Island. He will be visiting ?
Barbados again early in the New
Year accompanied by Mr. Norman
Watkins. M.A,, and Mr. R, Foster
Reekie, F.R.I.B.A., Resident Part-
ner in the West Indies.

Messrs. Watkins & Partners
have designed the new air-condi-
tioned Barclays Bank in Broad
Street, Bridgetown. Tenders for
the construction of this building
are expected to be received in the
near future.
















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treatment of Head and Chest
Colds, Bronchitis, Coughs,
Catarrh, Sore Throat, Rheumatism, Lumbago, Sciatica,
Muscular Pains and Strains, Brulses, =u,
Scratches, Influenza, Neuritis, Neuralgia,
Toothache, Insect Bites and other Aches
and Pains. Healing! Soothing! Relieving!
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gives protection against the entry of
harmful bacteria. You will find, too,
that Germolene draws out dirt from cuts,
abrasions, blisters and sores and stim-
ulates the growth of new skin. Keep @
tin of Germolene handy for family use.

FOR
SPOTS, RASHES, BURNS
IRRITATIONS, ABRASIONS















TOWELS in variety of sizes and qualities from . .
CURTAIN NETS in a good assortment etc., etc,, etc

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Meee y ert

PAGE TWELVE

Kiddies Day
_ At “Woodside”

IT was Kiddies Day at Wood-
side Gardehs, Bay Street, yes-
terday afternoon, The majarity
of the children that attended
were all dressed up attractively
and were constantly seen gui i-
ing their mothers either to the
Lucky Dip, Wheel of Fortune
the Shetland ponies.

The Junior section of t
Police Band, under Cpl. Bet,
played tunes to suit the occasion
and while the children playod
on the lawns, mothers listen:
attentively.



The first prize for the prettic;
costume in the Girls under se /-
en section went to the little tot
who represented the “Queen of
Hearts.” She wore a long satin
gown with tiny hearts stuck all
over it. The prize for the mo:t
original costume in this section
went to the “Policewoman”
while a Consolation prize was
given to the girl who represent-
ed “Night and Day.”

In the Boys’ section first prize
for the most attractive costume
went to little “Buffalo Bil”
while that for the most origir
went to the boy who representc |
“Time to Retire.’ He was sea‘ -
ed with a candle in his than:
The Consolation prize went |»
the lad who represented “San‘
Claus.”

The prettiest costume in th»
“Girls over” section was that wora
y the “Hawaiian Girl,” ne
prize for the most original went
to the girl representing ‘Th’
Clock” while the Consolatio.
prize went to the “fPansy.”

HARBOUR L0G

In Carlisle Bay

ARRIVALS

Sch. Eyerdene, M.V. Sedgefield, %
Wonderful Counsellor, M V Walt
Sweeney, Yacht Tern III,., Yacht Axe!
Sch. W. L. Eunicia, h. Rosarene, M
Lady Joy, Sch. Adalina, Sch. Sunshi
R., Sch. Lueille M. Smith, Sch. Mary '
Caroline. Sch, Zita Wonita, Sch. Gio
Henrietta

Schooner Rainbow M. 30 tons nv}
Capt. Marks, from Trinidad via :
Vincent

§.S. Ikana, 3,969 tons net, Capt Vici
Jefferson, from Caleytta via Trinid

§.S. Essi, 5,357 tons net, Capt. Tho:
sen, from Point a Pitre.

§.S. Canadian Challenger, 3,935 tons
net, Capt. Clarke, from Montreal y.:,

Dominica.
DEPARTURES
Schooner Mary M. Lewis, 69 tons n°,
. Marshall, for British Guiana.
-V. Daerwood, 94 ton; net, Cay
DeCoteau, for St. Lucia.
§.S. Essi, 5,357 tons net, Capt, Thorese °,
‘- Venezuela,
8. Canadian Challenger, 3,935 tons
net, Capt. Clarke, for St. Vincent

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd. adyive
that they can now communicate wt:
the following ships through their Bai
bados coast Station:-

, Olimpia, 8.8. OQurania Gounare
S.8. Meline, SS. Alcoa Polaris, S.S,
ito, S.S. Horata, S.S. Bonaire, 8.8
lemstad, S.8. Fort Townshend, 8.8
Coelombie, S.S. Myken, S.S. Orinoco, 8.8,
Southern Counties, SS. Kim, S.S. S,
» SS. Loide Cuba, §.8. Fernglen,
$8. Alexandros Koryzis, S.S. Quee
beth, S.S. Cavina, 8.5. Plogeet er,
$8. Gundine, 5.S. Moraybank, $9
Jamvica Producer, S.8. Polycrest, 8.5.
ros, S.8. Ancylus, S.S. Robert C.
tle, S.S. Cape Rodney, §.S. Win-
el er, S.S. Vera Cruz, 8.8, Elomntecillo.
8.8. Battle Rock, S.S, Pioneer Cove, 8.8.

” Seawell

From TRINIDAD WRAL

m :

Hess, William Annie Crichlow.
DEPARTURES-—By B.W.LA.L.



x TRIN $
Costa Vaughan, Valence Gale, Eric
ler, Eugenie ey Samuel iley,
Bailey, Hu Mitchell, Helen
hell, Carol Mitchell, M. Mitchell
John Goldie, Harry Harris, Arthur Moore,
ard Soza, Stewart Nock.

—



SUNDAY



TWO TONE DRESS EHC Radio Notes:

Democracy

Sir Gladwin Jebb KG puade by

In a talk in the B.B.C.’s Gen-
eral Overseas Service in the com- |
ing week listeners will hear Sir
Gladwyn Jebb, Britain’s spokes- |
man at the United Nations Secur- |
ity Council Meetings, speakin«
on the promise of communism
and the performance of dem-
ocracy., Originally broadcast jv |
the B.B.C.’s Third Programme. |
this address was given to the In
ternational Chamber of Com- }
merce in New York on Septem- |
ber 19. Much to his embarrassment |
Sir Gladwyn, who is a =|

|
|



“a
a2 © eee
Rae e TO

eee Ee







ye
a

®

working diplomat with no desire

for the limelight, became a popu-

lar figure in the U.S.A., during

the Security Council meetings in

August, attaining almost to the

Status of a film star. Some of our

readers may recall the comment

of the diplomatic correspondent of

the New York Times on Sir Glad- |
wyn who, he said, demonstrated |
that the ‘British have not been

practising the gentle art of verbal

homicide at Oxford all these years |
for nothing.’ Sir Gladwyn’s tal'< |
will be broadcast, under the title

of ‘From the Third Programme.’

at 6.30 p.m., on Wednesday nexi,

13th, inst.

Art In The Caribbean

There will be an unusual
feature in the BBC’s “Caribbean
Voices” on Sunday next, 10th,
December, The programme wil)
open with a talk on “Art in tho
Caribbean” by John Harrison o!
the British Council who is well
known to many in the West Indics
from his work in the Caribbeau,

he programme concludes with
short story by Gordon Woolford
of British Guiana telling of Indian
adolescence. ‘Caribbean Voices,’
the Sunday evening version «cf |
‘Calling the West Indies,’ is to be
heard every Sunday at 7.15 Pp.lo.
Those who have been complainin :
of poor reception from ree

|



ANOTHER attractive costume at
“Woodside Gardens’ yesterday
was that worn by Ann Taylor.
She is dressed as a pierrot.

BBC Radio
Programmes

SUNDAY, Dec, 10 1950.





for beautiful, lustrous hair.
particularly at that time “he
evening, should tune in « ae
49 metre band—6.195 megac, vies,
18.43 metres—where reception is
usually much better than the

Analvele: Te ake Siete ant tee sews alternative beam on the 31 metre | Only Lustre-Creme has this magical biend of
nalysis; 7.15 a » a e ; 2 ; . i
& ain, Gniling alt serene: Chet nd. secret ingredients plus gentle lanolin. So

Down; 2 noon The News; 12.10 p.m

rich-lathering in hardest water, és ha
News Analysis; 12.15 p.m, Take it from Human Relations 8 oi ater, Leay Pe
here; 1245 p.m. London Forum: 115 On Indust ragrantly clean, shining, and so manageable. Try
pam. Radio Newsreel; 1480 pam. ,Gunday ndustry Now on sale everywhere in the handsome
Home News from Britain; 2.15 p.m Last month the BBC planned 4
Communism in Practice; 2.30 pm, Va- two-w: a 7" NOT A SOAP! NOT A LIQUID! BUT
riety Bandbox; 3.30 pm. Our Mutual at exchange programme be

Saas 7 ) tween All India Radio and the
Friend; 4 p.m. The News; 410 p.
Interlude; 4.15 p.m. Musie Magagine; BBC but this had to be postponed,

4.99 pm. Sunday Halthour; 4.85" “pam. ‘The broadcast is now planned fo: COLGATE-PALMOLIVE-PEET LTD.
Spilokue; 56 p.m. Tom Jones rio; 5.15 ‘uesd
p.m. Programme Parade; 5.20 p.m. From qT ay next, 12th. December, at

~ ; *Â¥ ; 9.30 p.m, The subject for discus~
the Children's hour; 6 p.m. Round Bri- “
tuin; 6.80 Sunday Service; 7 p.m. The Sion will be ‘Human Relations

News; 7.10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.19 Industry’ ie)
pm. Carjbbean Voices; 7.45 p.n. The pe Bae the ee eee z
coming of Christ 8 p.m. Radio News- ’

veel; 815 p.m. United Nations Report;
8,30 p.m, English Magazine; 9 p.m, Pred
Hartley; 9380 p.m. London Forum; 10 of T.



indystrialist, and George Wood-
pm, The News; 10,10 pan

Secretary
From the = rn
Editorials; 1015 p.m. Anything to de- from R.

clare; 10.45 pan. Ivor Moreton and Dave Masani and Dr, N. Das, who will
Kaye; 11 p.m. English Song speak from New Delhi.

MONDAY, Dec. 1, 1950 The Creator of



7 am. The News; 710 am. News
Analysis; 7.15 a.m. Band of the Life Everyone knows ‘Alice ja
G ; 145 a.m. C en Island; 8 a.m.
From the ‘hAitorisige io sm, © Pee: Wonderland’ but not many know

‘amme Parade; 8,

am. Nights at the the creator of Alice, not the Lewis
pera; 9 am. Clo

Down; '2 noon The " r -
News: 1210 pam News Anaivsie. 1215 ©atroll whose name appears oi

p.m, BBC Midland Light Orchestra; 1 the title page but the man behind
“m, Seience Reyliew; 1.15 p.m, Radio that pseudonym, the Reverend
lewsareel; 1.30 p.m. Educating Archie; Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, In a

2 pan, The News; 2.10 p.m. Home News
from Britain; 215 pan. Sports Review, BBC talk on Wednesday next you

240 pm. Two wey Exchange; 3 p.m. Can heag trom the "ys St Be whe

Calling all Porees; 4 pum. The News; arles
4.10 pan. The ally Service; 4.15 p.m CS
Do You Remember; 4.30 p.m, Thirty Dodgson, Lecturer in ike

Minutes; 5 mm, Listeners’ Choice; 5.15 ties at Oxford, was ly like.
p.m. Programme Parade; 5.30 pm. The Speaker will be Violet Dodgson,
Story Teller; 545 p.m. Dance Musie; hig niece; her talk, which (s

One Mant moa ral Orme: 6.18 pm, entitled ‘Lewis Carroll As I Re-

News Analysis; 7.15 p.m. Our Mutual member Him,’ will be broadcast
Friend; 7.45 pam. Chosen Island; 8 p.m. at 7.45 p.m., om Wednesday, 13th.
Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. United Na- inst. right after ‘Calling the Wes*
tions Report; 8.20 p.m, Composer of gies

the week; 830 p.m. Science Review Indies.

4.45 p.m. BBC Northern Orchestra; 9.30
pm. Books to Read; 9.45 p.m. Film
Preview; 10 p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m
From the Editorials; 10.16 p.m. Ray's

And=

Proved by severest tests

“CARIBBEAN VOICES” FOR
DECEMBER, 1950






CADBURY'S



nt! : show hi
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2 a Laugh; 1045 p.m, Commonwealth Sur-
Mine Is 1000 BG. feye ti bin. Boia :

BOSTON: WRUL 15.29 Me WRUW 11.75 did.
; 3.00 p.m. Lec-

Down—Or Is It?

Visitors to the Glasgow branch
of the zeavat of R emg next
year will Ww in a coa
mine eae enn think they have
gene down 1,000 ft.

To create the illusion the cage
will start with a slight jerk, go

on at a snail's pace—and stop
ith a bump.

It is
mine

tian Science Programme
ture on Christian Science.

LORRY AND JEEP
COLLIDE



ibition.

“shifts” by a pit overman.

here.
The mine will show the his-

Several bodies had to be

- of coal mining methods from from the wreckage with acetylene
The dead included two
went down clinging to women who were travelling in the

~—Keute:.

days, 200 years ago,
miners
a moving chain.

when torches.

—L.F.S.

jeep.















Shopping made easy at—
* BOOKER'S *°

PERFUMES by CARON :
Nuit de Noel, Ete.
YARDLEY’S : Bond Street, Orchis, April Violets
LANVIN : My Sin, Scandal
LOVELY GIFT SETS by :
Innoxa, Etc., Ete.
HAIR BRUSHES: Gents’ and Ladies’
We carry a wide selection of these
« LADIES’ TOILET SETS
« TRAVELLING SETS
« HANDKERCHIEF PUFF
POWDER BOWLS



Rock Garden, Bellodgia

« BOOK ENDS
« CHROMIUM PIPE
RACKS
« COMOY PIPES

TABLE MATS
SHAVING MIRRORS
ETC., ETC,, ETC.

af The Finest Selection of “XMAS GIFTS” is always found
at.

Booker's 20s) Drug Stores Ltd.

Broad Street and Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY)

MASSACHUSETTES, Dec, 9.

Seven people were killed and
rt of a full-scale coal five others critically injured when Daisy Myre,
a lorry and a jeep collided to-day
Visitors will be divided into on the rain-swept highway near

Potter & Moore, Yardleys, 4711,

3rd Vecember, Diamonds on the Moon
by Kenneth Newton. A crime story
uniting Jewels and snakes, from Trini-

Journey by Train by R. Warren. A
Kingston street-woman returng to the
country,

10th December, Art the Caribbean
by J. Harrison. A talk by the British
Couneil er aavieer Gard Woetsera

The y. rdon Woolford,
A edy of Indian adolescence in Trini+
dad,

17th December, The Kite by “Bar-
nabas”. A clean and exciting story of
a te fight in Trinidad. ‘ Ea
A Plague o indpesses iy gar
Mittleholeer K tharacher sketch from
England with a Christmas feeling.

24th December, Christmas Poe: by
(Jamaica), A. N. Borde
(Grenada), and Barnabas Ramon-Fortune
(Trinidad).

Bus Journey by Marjoria Brown. A
short sketch for Christmas from
Jamaica,

A story to be arranged.





Sist December, Limbo by Willy Rich-

te
>
ardgon (Trinidad). An incident at a ve ax
week-€nd seaside party, a iy
Discovering Tropic by Samuel Selvon Px Cs
(Trinidad), A verse meditation on the SN f/
2,

West Indies.

HOUS

Dec. With



Opening Monday

WITH A COLLECTION OF

WEST INDIAN FLOWER PICTURES

BY

RICHARD CICCIMARRA.

HANDMADE FURNITURE AND POTTERY

ANTIQUES — GIFTS — FABRICS.
COLD SPRING COTTAGE
COAST ROAD ST. JAMES TEL. 91-74

















| DECORATION |:



ADVOCATE



lovelier
your hair cam look



Lustre-Creme !



A: WONDER NEW CREAM SHAMPOO

GLAMOROUS HAIR



iy

eur Costs.

Costume
Jewelry

in Pear] Necklaces, Earrinus,
Brooches, Rings, in loveliést
assortment in Town.
Ladies WRIST WATCHES
in lovely assortment.
REAL JEWELS! Set and
Unset from India.
Piaonsionge, Star Sapphires,
gierens, Rubies, Diamonds,
¢,
SILKS! in Pyjamas Kimon-
os, Underwear, Ete. Ete.
Parasals, Raincoats, Hats,
Purses.

Dress Goods
IN FASHION’S LATEST
CREATIONS

Anglaise Embd. Spuns, Taf-
feta, Jerseys, and a host of
other Lines |
Handbags, Hais, Shoes,
Powders, Perfumes, soaps,
Creams, Lotions, Ete., Etc.
Chanel Joy, Amour Amour,
Moment Supreme, My Sin
and Oto Dil Bahar.







wi

oat

SNS NIG NS NG NN NN 8 NNN NN A 8 8 NW NW BB BW A

4

PRETTIER THAN EVER!
In High Fashion











ee
OO RY MAG rr re eaks vc
Corners 8” x 8” x 16” ....

Halves 4” x 4” x 16” ..... ;

a

Ee]

THANI?’S STO

a

GH AZNANG MS









‘ > ES Will Save You the Worry of
Buying Gifts for Everyone.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 106, 1950







me >

eer : ay
Fabrics!

You'll look neat and trim in the latest and
most exciting ‘‘Tex-made” cotton prints,
available now at surprising savings,

Ask for Old Colony, Glenwood, Victoria,
Beverly and Suzanna. They are styled by
expert designers in beautiful flowers, stripes,
checks and geometric patterns. So fresh . . .
so easy to wash . . . so easy to care for. They
are favourites everywhere.

See this wonderful collection of high fash-
ion ‘*Tex-made”’ colour prints. ‘To be sure
they are genuine “Tex-made”, look for the
identification bands and tag on the piece
goods,

“TEX-MADE” 1S WELL MADE



CONCRETE PRODUCTS CO.

LODGE HILL,
ST. MICHAEL, Phone 2798.

In Spite of INCREASED COST OF CEMENT

we are still able to maintain LOW SELLING
PRICE of our

BUILDING

BLOCKS

WHY ?

: We have accumulated good stocks, which have enabled us to average

ah arahs « a 3 17¢. each Ex Factory
28e. ,, ”
30c. ,, ”
lic. ,, ”

Send in your Orders early while present Stocks last.









Wei i

HAT GIVE JOY
TO THE GIVER
AND RECEIVER!

For Gentlemen

Tweeds in Untold Qualities,
Tropicals, Grey & Cream
Flannels, Etc.

SHIRTS in widest varieties
for all purposes, Under-
wears, Pyjamas, Ties, Socks
in many varieties, Handker- “
chiefs, Belts Cotton and
Woollen Pull-overs,



Household
Goods

BRASSWARE:

‘inger Bowls, Ash Trays,
hant Bells, Cocktail
: & Trays, Flower Vases,
Flower Bowls, Etc, Ete.





ispreads, Bed Sheets,
in Lace & Net in wide
variety, Oilcloth, Bed Tick,
Piilow-cases, Carpets, Bed-
room Rugs Plastic & other
T. Covers, Towels, Napkins
Thermos Flasks, Etc., Ete







(GG NG NNN WG SN NN 8 BN A

7

4











SUNDAY, DECEMBER i6, {530 SUNDAY ADVOCATE P PAGE THIRTEEN *
fle a ee * sas . Ae af
‘ BY CARL ANDERSON |




MICKEY MO
wore MOUSE. BY WALT DISNEY
HE WAS CONVICTED OF RAISING |
HIS VOICE TO HIS MOTHER-IN-LAW
Ss
Loox HERE MAYOR Ont
zs T YOU
Taine yours \ 77,
CARRYING THIS
POLITENESS
THING TOO FAR?
-

on















ans t




NO...THE CITIZEN 1S |
BEING TAKEN OUT TO BE






YES...1 DARE SAY THE CITIZENS OF >
THIS CITY ARE THE KINDEST AND” .
POLITEST ANYWHERE IN CREATION |










BL

-A“CATERPILLAR"







DAGWOCD,









by ae ) BIR ke
INSURANCE eR@ Bh Na ONG
CHECK? 7 pais END CONFIDENCE
Oni geal % git \ > + IN ME?
Re EPP eer
| eles) TRACK-TYPE ws
af TRAC OFF cows
| Sa] 1 fe ee » — 7s
=a) |








- J . | a °
THE. LONE -RANGCER The heavy-duty steering clutches
permit this tractor to make a full





| HOPE THE MARSHAL AND HIS DAUGHTER
Brgx ACT THEIR PART CONVINCINGLY!

if y.

circle turn... Jirectly on its heel




under load. 7 © turning radius of





the Diesel | fer example, is
only 5'7°%,...c. big cdventage for
working in tro w Quarieis

| shost bi seeah-



ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LIMITED

St. Michael Phone 4629 & 4371

nn enreeenninenioniee







WE HEARD kez /( THAT MUST HAVE BEEN HE DIDNT KNOW] |WELLGO TO THE BOTTOM OF THE CAN- SE f§ | KNOW THEM ALL, BUTI mt
A CRASH A WHILE BACK. WE &@\ THE MARSHAL! THE BRIDGE YON AN’ SEE IF WE CAN FIND THE DIDNT KNOW THEY WERE
FOUND IT WAS A WAGON GOIN Z GEN WAS DOWN. ff] | BODIES TO PROVE TO THE BOSS THE WORKIN’ FOR THE UN- |

OVER THE CLIFF! 4 y b Aq | MARSHALS DEAD! ¢- Tweedside Road

















SPP OOVPIDDDO SOOO D D9 POG DEP POPV DODD DOLE LODO DPE VDL PPLVVVPLDP PEPLELPP LLLP PVP PLLA PPV PAPA AVDA AD,
8 %
8 ;
s
‘ Th WY I al” i !
x e oria S ¢€ lhoice e
¢
¢
$
x
: The Petler-Fielding Horizontal engine, built by J. d& H. MeLaren
$ Ltd., of Leeds, is the choice the world over where semi or unskilled
y
i labour is employed, and the minimum of attention and main-
Bh Wit AHOY-mMaTe! Lf I HAD A WONDERFUL ] | |
MORNIN = _0ID YOu Ll SLEEP! THE OCEAN I 1 owl tenance desirable. It is so simple, so sturdy, so trouble-free that
MAGGIE SLEEP WELL = HAS BEEN AS. - WE ARE uP x ;
a ‘ LAST NIGHT ® i] SMOOTH AS A LILY - ON SOME ~ , " Y
|| BE rei BIT : ROCKS! NO : once it is installed and your operator knows the controls, you can %
_ 1 —— 2 a . . . . . “ .
% forget about it for a long time, It is ideal for gravel-pils, saw- %
mills, quarries, etc., or wherever long hours of operation in dusty :
>
and dirty conditions are the rule. 3
%
3
| :
>
PHEW! GOSH, WHAT A WILDCAT! x
MAY YET $
~ *
°
| Ss
%
Ped
Pt

POSSOS OOS LL LI FFSSF





Pe)
$
~
x
g
% $
: :
+
z TYPE B.H.P. R.P.M. | Number of &
AY. % | | Cylinders g
t - A LL

Ma = : 1 Rg Fans te ened "nS ot: % DH 13 - 16 650 - 800 | SINGLE |

% Sr eer | eaneeaoreriay aera | eeepc

THE PHANTOM & RAY MOORES 3 Th be = a | ~ 600-650 | SINGLE |

== NET A. JUMPED OVERBOARD IN a % FH 32 - 40 400 - 500 SINGLE |
—————— ee MID-OCEAN~ON THE OTHER SIDE ' | E = x FH2 64 - 80 |- 400 - 500 TWIN $
THAT DEATHS-HEAD++ITS THE “Sey OF THE EARTH! HES DEAD! SOME | Be N BAR : er nc phage $ Ldn oe ; %
MARK OF THE MASKED 6UY WHO Y/ JOKER IN THE CREW PUT IT THERE, =) ee WE DONT START egret = %
CAME: FOR THE WHITE MONKEY? ) \ TRVIN’TO. BE FUNNY? fr TE we = Se $ x
=| —SS = - ote == B 3 e %
| gee 7 | 1% ASSOCIATED BRITISH OIL ENGINES (EXPORT) LTD. x
| an! is y >
y — o 4 i | ¢ >
RS l! : % Sole Agents for Barbados 8
S
+]
>

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. |

COSSBESSSSOSS

POSOSISS

44, < » $OOSCSS6COOS
PALES EPL LL PCPLPSF SCPE PLLC PFPO GFP SPL PS OOD GSSPOCSSOOOOOS OOS OS SSS SOOO SOSSOS OOS SS





I a ee ee a a ee ee ee ter, Mae ha eerie ik. awk cai «ace,

PAGE FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE ees, DECEMBER 10, 1950































































































































































































: SSS SSDI EL LLSD
“eal SIFIE NOTICE | CHIROPRACTE |
A S I I D A D 5.| : | FACTORY EXPLODES WRAP UP THOSE GIFTS WITH...... IS COMING
PARISH OF ST. PHILIP DR. FERREIRA of “Chiroville* Upper CINCINNATI, OHIO, Dec. 9 LADIES & GENTLEMEN
APPLICATIONS (in Sealed envelopes St. N b: re Se eee GIFT WRAPPING PAPER Srighten your CLOTHES
TELEPHONE 2508 | APPL an tht outsides, cy oe her rage we me tear Beplanaée) ny, Chiropractis At least 15 people were injured, Drighies. up yous CLOTHES
~- a post of Assessor”) will be received by | nose, throat, lungs, stomach, kidneys ang | Several critically, and two were See RAYMOND JORDAN
DIED the undersigned not later than Tuesday | lower organs, Dial 2681 missing after an explosion which — FROM Bay Street
DOTTIN Late mason contractor). | F@R RENT 12th December 1950, for the post of | ——— —_—----] wrecked the plant of the Ameri- Opp. Combermere St.
pate celtdense aeckines, Assessor for this Parish. The CENTRA MPORIU. Se
Christ ch. The funeral will =| Applicants must furnish Birth Cer-| LOST & ‘FOUND can, Weterproofing Company here L E. M4
eave late residence at 4 o'clock tifleates, Medica) ay.
venta dk toe Westoury Dear HOUSES monials. en So Sh i chieas 0b Ga tecaeie (CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—PROPRIETORS). 2
te Friends are invited er Sg oe aan t oe assume LOST _— factory burst into flames. About Corner of Broad & Tudor Streets. i g
wt sas cag nd tng | ee aa Pea ml on en Beet tae tacoty at te inne :TON”
—— 23 one on or co ; office day to— n in the factory a e time > “ oF >
SEALE—ADELAIDE GWENDOLYN. At] safe batt , CHEQUE-—12 A.H. 25090 Barclays Bank
Seng ig a Le di any F Silas SO TEacy, | eaeameen Suns, ast, ezabiegae| the explosion. ETON” §
H funeral will leave her Gin: fy v, Elon Evelyn. Finder will be rewarded —Reuter. Ae “ K"
. clock this SPE r , St. Philip. on returning to Elon Evelyn, Worthing A Piano that is as modern as ¥
I | ESPERANZA—Fully furnished on St. 5.12. ‘in. a. | View, Christ ‘Chr - the age ¥
2 ur Cemetary" | see Bee eee Pie Tee ain, it Chureh, "T1250 A. M. WEBB — STOCKBROKER A Sibert overstrung instrument
attend | 1,12.50—6n,

} Se nd Mrs. Phylis at a moderate price.

$ el and Joseph (childre | WANTED ; Immediate deliveries can be x

‘ * eph (children) FARAWAY=—St, Philip, Skeete's SHIPPING N¢ _ NOTICES Announces removal to more central premises at 33 Broad Street ini 24

_ — By a edrooins, "Water. mall mill HELP Write, Phone or call for a de-
FOU SALE é Ot todas, a eS, ROY NETHERLAND (Upstairs Phoenix Pharmacy) where clients’ requirements in monstration. $
AUVOMOTIVE NEWHAVEN—Crane Coast, Furnished, CLERK—Junior Clerk for Parts De; th : 4 CECIL JEMMOTT >
ne e@ pure stments (stocks, bonds y

CAR—19 Minx new, | 4 bedrooms, Water mill supply, Tighting STEAMSHIP CO. ES FORRES AEN Se ORS a ae SUPRERy SEE Ae Ot negetlette tave me 7 33 Broad St. upstairs Knight's ¥

ewner leaving colony. Phone 8378. lant. Double Garage, servant rooms. The MV. “ ” . iti % Lid. Pt > 4563,
50—n Dial 4476 119.50—t4.n. | , Salling from Amderdam & Dover—a.s. gocept Cargo oak imamenees tor “SorctaaWORLANT wants post @aeve and shares, local and foreign) will be cared for as expeditiously Bayietyenarg
> - oe on “g » December j j PCS SOO SPSS.
CAR—1938 Morris Tourer 8 H yood| FLAT at Sea View, Upper Bay Street, | “Bonaire” Sth., 6th, January, 1980 * nt, St. Lucia, Grenada tary Companion, Good letter writer, as official regulations and local practise permit. APPSOES *
and Aruba. Sailing Frid:
condition. Phone 3199 or 3224. | opposite Bay Mansion from ast wr Satling from ‘Amsterdam—m.s, “Willém- s ay Mh, eos Mage ee Be See “4: SIBBEOSIOOSOOOOSOE
i i ive: 8.12.50—+.f.n. | stad” December, ” “ lomin. . c
See an, | uP ~ ener stad” 19th. January, 3000. ma. aan The M.V. “Caribbee” will J} non resident. Willing to travel. Apply: Postal Address: P.O. Box 266, Bridgetown, Telephone pending.

CAR—On« 8 Car in g ood work.| FLAT— Fully furnished, all modern | 22rd. December, 1950, ace! Cargo and Passengers for Box 33 C/o Advocate Advtg. Dept. ’ W h Di | ..
ing order. Mode Apply to | conveniences (2) Bedrooms, Linen and| Sailing from’ Hamburg, Bremen, and jea, Antigua, Montserrat, 9.12.50—2n. @ have on ISp ay... s}
D'Arcy A. Scot Magazine Lane Cutlery 10 minutes walk from Club and | Amsterdam—s.s| “Boskoop’ 16th. Decem- Nevis and St. Kitt. Sailing — —— y

6.12.50--3n, | Cit Phone 4103, 9.12.50—2n. | her, 1950, s.s. “Hermes” 12th. December, Friday 15th. JUNIOR OVERSEER—Apply in writ- A LOVELY ASSORTMENT or &

es —mernreneene ————-———— | 1950. - itaue ing with oe of references to XMAS GIFTS. "

AR—One ‘1 Forde 16 i perfect UNFURNISHED FLAT At “BRIAR- Sai fded . ” B.WA. SCHOONER OWNE Manager, Lower tate Factory. * : Ss. . 7 y

pithing onic tyres esnd ways blied | FIELD” with Garage, Lower Collymore nie Deine 1950, eee —— ASSOCIATION, inc. 9.12.50—6n. is e YARDLEYS’ GIFTS FOR LADIES &

Driven. Dial 4239 712.50-4.| Rock, St. Michael, Dial 3472. H. Blair | December, 1 ss. “Willemstad” Ist i ae — —- e our ection YARDLEYS’ GIFTS FOR MEN &
Tbs aren ' of Bannister. 6.12.50—t f.n. | Jenuary, 1950, s,s. “Helder” 2nd, January, Per G. CHEESMAN. LADY—Experienced Lady for Office P . YARDLEYS’ SHAVING BOWLS

DODGE MOTOR ENGINE—A_ gc ——_—_—__— 1950. Tele. 4047, work. References required. Write P. 0. YARDLEYS’ SHAVING LOTION §
1939 Dodge Motor - with VI-VILLA ¢ St. ia near Sailing to Madeira, Plymouth, a Box 233, Bridgetown. 8.12.50—6n. e : PERFUMES & COLOGNES. 0
Body, Chassis and Tyres thrown in. | the church. It con open Veran- | Am=-terdam. — m. “Oran: estad’” rd RS ~ >
Diol 4157 0 12 50~2n.| dah, Drawing and Dining Rooms, 3 Bed-| December, 1950. . eesti : ALLEYNE SCHOOL om e Unriv: e BRILLANTINES, POWDERS, ¢

a ————— | rooms, Water toilet and Bath. Now| (Limited passenger accommodation WANTED SOAPS, RAZOR SETS, CHOCO- ¥
ELECTRICAL ake Apply to D'Aroy A. = available). From May 1951, an Assistant Mistress LATES IN BOXES, ALSO x4

UNIVERSAL REFRIGERATOR — | Mozazin® “see. oo S . P. MUSSON, SON & CO,, LTD. BF WISE . ADVERTISE to teach one or mote of the following: GIFTS SETS FROM 2/6 UP- §
Newly overhauled and in perfect con- Agents. ' Art, ee French, Spanish, CUNY WARDS & MANY OTHER suit. %
dition. Apply S. C. Fosier, “Mangrove CES jes. Salary, according to —— se
Cot”, Hindsbury Road. Dial 2803 any PUBLIC NOTI tions ae aoe on scale .E ABLE GIFTS, y,

a p 2 +,
Ce ge ig pons .
‘URMTURE NOTICE Canadian National Steamships | !2!-i Sash ee" :
u FURNITURE tress not later than February 15th. : y : - :
fr Wala, ne Mlahoee. “Suitable tor | NEITHER the Master nor the Con-| SOUTHBOUND pee 12.11:50—0n.|]1 HERE'S YOUR SELECTION TO CHOOSE FROM C. CARLTON BROWNE 3%
Office and Home. Only $5.40 each signees Of Whe MLV, Walter O. ieee te Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Rarbados MISCELLANEOUS Wholessle ,
G. W. HUTCHINSON & CO,, LTD.| will be responsible for any debt | oF 30 Nov -_ 10. Dec. 15 Shes, & Retail Druggist
Dial 4222. 2.13.00-4.£.0. | debie cote ue cag a part ee 2 Dec: 4 Bec. 13 Dec. 14 Bes. BOXES — All kinds of Card Board 136, Roebuck St. Dial 2813
FURNITUPE—If yo = _ = 19 - 2h . . Boxea other than corrugated card YARDLEY’S
2 —If you are interested in 5 ree ?” . Wen. Jen. 29 Jan, Apply Advocate Dept - A 5 OOO eee ;
Purniture puy a visit to Middle Street MANNING & CO., LTD.—Consignees. Sah 1 Feb 3 Feb. 12 Feb. 13 Feb. one 10 60-t.f.n s SS0Sse
Beenit ire Depot at the Corner of Middle 10.12. 50—€n. ° , awe Bond Street Perfume $4.80—$8.00 ‘
Victoria Streets, opposite Cole's , WINTER OVERCOAT and Woollies Lavender Water from $1.55 to |
Winters F } uisaee ee all descriptions j NOTICE Chest 44—40 — Telephone 3035. $6.98. i
5 pee 5) nang Re Estate of Arrives = ails, = Arrives = Arrives 6.12.50~3n. |
See ASHTON WINTHROP HU Barbados Boston . Jo
LIVESTOCK NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all te 33 Jan. 22 Jan. 23 Jan. HOUSE OR APART- pril Violets Cologne $2.32 —
5 _ | persons having any debt or claim upon ++ + 10 Feb. 12 Feb. 21 Feb. 22 Feb. MENT for short or indefinite period, $3.88. 1
wo Pure Bred | or affecting the estate of Beatin LADY NELSON .. ++ 25 Feb. 27 Feb. 8 March $ March preferably St. Jomes Const or Mastings, |
Price $50.09] Winthrop Hunt, late of the Y.M.C.A, % reasonable ren ‘elephone ~
niuls, Grenada, | Hostel in the Datlabiet Saint Séichael M.B.—Sublect to shana without notios. Al vessels Atted with cold ttorugs cham- 9.13.50—2n. 7 sizes,
i 2 : ados who died in bers. and freight reves on — logne for Men........ $2.40
and Island of Barbad .
2.50—3n.]} this Island on the 29th day of July Hair Tonic .............. $1.25 | e
: er ——— | 1948, are hereby reese ae Hair Cream ..... 60c |
€ 3red oltein Fyeife- articulars of their cla : 5, RFF Oo SORES, *
SSL ee: Feats O30 their lake’ S48 GARDINER AUSTIN & CO. LTD. — Agents. THMA MUCU SS ARS
old. One % Bred | care of Messrs, Hutchinson & Banfield, ts: & Lotion 94c—$1.74, i DON
‘Calf seven weeks old. | Solicitors, James Street, Bridgetown, t d Fi { Da vender ine on Sens
\nimals ate Progeny | of on or before the 15th day rere oosene rs Lavender Hair Oil , 62c¢ j
th's Pure Bred Holstein Bull! 1951, after which date shall proce Pe 2
= bert”, Five Times Sine of] to distribute the assets ot ae getate GOVERNMENT NOTICES Ing attacks of ang, rons oF Ath ne Ladies’ Gift Cases co | A.F.S., F.V.A.
Giver Challenge Cup for Best Bull} among the parties — entitle hereto, ntaining
VW. Clarke, “Ivy Lodge”, Ivy Road having regard to the icevts and claims Attention is drawn to the Defence (Control of Drug and aay niin y roBe iat. wither snouner Lavender Water and Toilet | Formerly Dixon & Bladon

. Michael 8,12,50—3n ly of which I shall then have s j oon
ec sek a BESO SE | ony of een tr ahall not be table |Patent and Proprietary Medicine Prices) Order, 1950, No. 11 which re a re erga ete not a Soap, + $3.00 to $10.50 FOR SALE

HORSES — Suitable for Estate Work ssets so distributed to amy person ; er, thi hi the
Agply Wakeheld Fisrtation ‘Telephone |.ct whose debt or claim I shall not will be published in the Official Gazette of Monday 11th December, iets af tae pine the +» ALBO ..

95-213. 9.12.50—8n.] pave had notice at the time of such] 1950. goss starts hel ta halving neture Semen Lavender Water, Bath Dusting ves oun — Pros-
catalina distribution. : : ‘ + ately 8 wi elps nm and re- ’ pect, . James. ery conveni-
MECHANICAL "AND. all. persons indebted to the 2.. Under this Order the maximum retail selling price of | fhove thick strangling mucus, 2 Thus Powder, April Violets, Bond St_, Une ‘stunted’ bitunlow oite

BICYCLE — One Green Raleigh Gents | sid estate are requested to settle their) «Virol is as follows: — Thore refreshing igen. # ne ord wounder, Lavender Toilet Soap. Tere hee, manta eee ed Lone
Sports Model Bic ;cle. Three Speed, Bell, counts aon ah December 1080. Maximum ae cou eo pe - os. dit Seri een ete dante
Pump and light, Tools complete, 2 A ick nts s » ining

ths ole aes ae | SYBIL PAULINE DeCOURCEY HINDS, ‘ Quick sa room, verandah 8 sides,

Months old. Good as new, Owner leav- | SYBIL eaUe ute of the Will of “Item Unit of Sale Retail Price guarante et MENDACO from After Shav. Lotion and Shaving warage, paved courtyard and
ing islanc. Phone 3978 > ae Nchton Winthrop Hunt, deceased. $$$ $$ ehemist . Bowls ........ $3.00 to $6.12 pleasant garden.

ei 9.12.50—4n.| Virol .. «| Medium sized bottle .. 78c. : tia Maa AmeAae a

BICY Gent's Sunbeam, 148 Lar i eu 199 " — Near
Model. 3-speed, elect. igt., pump, per- NOTICE ” ee os Be u} i $ : CHRISTIAN BROTHER- Marine Hotel: A bungalow resi«
fect order. Dial 4109 * a HOOD HOUR vine yen) ae Jounge, wate:

10.12.50—1n. esta’ ies, 9th December, 1950. 3.30 p.m. Today French. windows t galleries ‘ae
ert WILLIAM W
ts SWRITERS i ae oe deceased RADIO DISTRIBUTION pare. 1S enti abet [weg
ewr iter nother shipment uy i nl *
arrived. See these fine machines before | NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that sl PART ONE ORDERS Church of God, Chapman St. | ae eres ree
otherwise conmitting yourself. Apply ae ¢ quar-

A. G. St. Hill. Phone 3199, ach the ee ee ‘Worrell LIRUT.-COL, J. CONNELL, OBE, E.D., Rev. Walter Tiesel Lavender Bath Salte Xtis. .$1.80. | ters, large garage, double carriage-

1.12.50~7n, 0.4, | deceased, late of Jackson in the parish Go Violet Brilliantine .. 760. to 80c. way. Well cared for walled garden,

of Saint Michael, who died in this THE BARBADOS REGIMENT. ee Bond 8t. exion Powder, | ,
MISCELLANEOUS IC are "requened. te send partrcian |.atmee Moe 46 ~egnon re 900, | 4 tevels, cronacky fe, Sua plswer
eaten | of thei Geeta wk Obed Gly’ atoaes 1. PARADES . | port of this unspoiled residential
“ANTIQU £S Of eveny description| to the undersigned Hubert Waterman There will be no further parades until after Christmas. AN OPPORTUNITY Bond St. Dusting Powder $2.16. aiea. This pesicinion is superbly

Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver] Tull, C/o Messrs. Haynes & Griffith] 2, MEDALS te buy Lavender Dusting Powder a 16, built at a when cost was
Watercolours. Early books, Maps. Auto-| No. 12 High Street, Bridgetown Solici- All Officers and Other Ranks on the Active and Reserve Strengths of the a Second Hand Lavender Toilet 7 of little o » It contains large
@taphs etc. at Gorringes Antique Shop| tors, on or before the Sist day of Barbados Regiment who are eligible for medals as a result of service in the GAS ELECTROLUX Soap 540.—88c reception rooms, a study, very
adjoining Royal Yacht Club. December, 50, after which date I last war, and have not yet received such medals, should hand in their names RE Shaving Sticks ............ "2c. commodious galleries, 3 large bed-

3.9.50—t.f.n, | shall proceed to distribute the assets and pereruless of service including their ex-Army number, together wi FRIGERATORS Shaving Bowls $1.56 roms, bathrooms, 2! garages and
coins —_..-.-- | of the deceased among the persons en+ details o! maga for for which they are eligible, so that further inquiries may Owner bought bigger Refri; Les Bt aes all the appurtenances expect-

GIFT SETS—Attructive Gift Sets ot | tiled thereto, having, regard be made to expedite delivery, este hue ‘ ed in a house of this type. The
Tea Spoons, Pastry Forks, Fruit Spoons, | such claims of whiche T shall then 8. PARKING OF CARS AT ST. ANN’S FORT ‘and in peek senae grounds are approximately 4% |
Cocktail Sets and many others. Prices | had notice and I will not be lable for In future no Officer or Other Rank will be allowed to bring his car through SEE IT WORKING acres in extent and. the enclosed
ae low as $2.99 set. G. W. HUTCHINSON | the assets or any part thereof so dis- the tunnel behind the Drill Hall, Permission may however be given in at your GAS SHOWROOM teh tt ua ro ; One
& CO., LTD. Dial 4222. tributed to any person of whose debt certain s by either the Staff O the Quartermaster when heavy Owner asking $90.00 for it e garden w _ t nnis eth ee

2.12,50—t.f.n,] or claim I shall not then have had} Holes. Pye be delivered to the Drill Hall, " : : : ik = Rpg a ine cs agg get
a re pareeamns i notice 2 ne . >

JEWELLERY—A new assortment of | And all persons indebted to the sald The last Volley Ball Match between HQ and “A” Coy was won by “A” Coy. —= fortable property at a reasonable
ladies R.G. watch straps, Pear! earrings.| State are requested to settle their in- 5 ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING (ALL BRANCHES) ! price,

L. M, Clarke, Jeweller, No, 12 James| debtedness without dela ay. 18 DEC, 58. ‘ “OR, VILLA" Modern
Street, Phone 3757. 9.12.50—2n, | Dated. this 31st da: October, 1950. Orderly Offcer—a/Lt. 8. Lashiey BROWNE co. AE eenbet
WAGTmRMCAN “TULL, Orderly Serjeant—2i7 L/S Blackett e Mone: ERaS Saerey au4 acres *

ete” Gas fen ee aera Qualifed Rector’ Ne eis Dmicer—Lieut. P. 2. C, Peterkt COSTUME Wi asa Ep Colne motel cvivaway.

gan: With five sets of Reeds and 2.11.60—4n erly icer—Lieut. P. L. C. Pe in 3
Sub Bass suitable for a small Church Orderly Serjieant—235 L/S Quintyne, K. = asst Hosen: Converted into two hy Ed
or Cottage. Apply: Royal Bakery, M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major, as ec . contained apartments, re en’
Baxters Road. Henry Young. PUBLIC SALES SiGiav.. & Potent Earrings. How the investment. Property with good
9.12.50—4n. 7 atid a The Barbados Regiment. Silver and Gold Necklets. sea bathing, Offers ;

RDERS e Comb and ss 3 MODERN STONE BUNGA-

ONE CABLE PIANO—Apply: Royal THE IMENT SERIAL NO. 33 Inexpensiv 3
Bakery, Baxters Road. Henry Young, AUCTION 8TH Rear SHEET 1. Brush Sets for Ladies y LOWS, also a Stone and Timber

9,12.50-—4n, and Gentlemen. a House are available in a pleasant

PLASTICINE--Harbutts f del a ha ee ae ted and tak trength Shaving Mirrors seaging from et 700" Spwares.

—Harbutts famous model- 580 Pte. Toppin, D. E. ic Attes taken on § r ‘ .
ling clay—multi-colours 24c, $1,80 per UNDER THE SILVER 581 Barto K. w.ef. 4 Dec. 50. } Gold Brooches. Particulars afd appointments to
box. Evans & Whitfields 2. PROMOTIONS } Our usual Xmas Cards gets its long life view on application.

3,12.50—4n. 517 Springer, W. “A" Coy Promoted Cpl. w.ef. 8 Dec. 60. and Xmas Carols. “ ” Dayrells
ie On TUESDAY 12th by order of Mra] 3 MENT — Fine 44 43, Swan 8 ROUMAIKA” = =— | Dayre!

RAIN COATS, RAIN COATS: At $214] J M. Cave, we will sell her Furniture 264 Pte. Bourne, E. L. ” Fined 10s. by the C.O, under section treet. Road, Navy Gardens. Attractive
each lovely colours in Plastic for Ladies. | «t “Greenwich” 2nd Avenus, Belleville 14 (i) of the Volunteer Act and The life expectancy of every part of a Goodyear tire is and imposing property. Drive-
They are so useful and economical, And which includes section 19 (i) of the Volunteer Regs —————————— — . way flanked by mahogany trees.
would make a Bvey Xmas Gift ton.) Dining Table, Cedar Cabinet, Book Cast a for insubordination, on 30 Nov. ———, measured by a great variety of tests. 8 reception, 6 bedrooms, kitchen,
‘THANI BROS. Pr. m. Henry Street,| (gloss doors), M.T. Water ‘ . . pantry, large verandahs, garage
Dial 3466. 29.11:50—tn. | Morris, Chairs, Cedar Desk highabaae 4. LEAVE — PRIVILEGE 10-DAY'S Materials that withstand all of these tests are the onl and storerooms. Grounds approxi-

gag a - : Radio Table, Floor Lump and Ornament Captain FP. N. Grannum Bn HQ Granted 8 days P/leave from 11—18 materials used in Goodyear tires mately 2 acres. Ideal Guest

— Two (2) Top Hung; Tables, Rush U; : ° proposition.
Calloprileli Steel Gates suitable for door- | Glany and China” ‘Pristine Biectrig Pte. Small, 2B, " Granted % days P/leave trom 30-26 i a aay
ways 8 ft. wide x & ft. 9 ins, hish.| Toaster, Hot-plate and Iron; Single iron TY FM As a result, Goodyear has held its place as the world “PLEASANT HALL” — St.
Apply D. M. Simpson & Co., Marhill St. Redsteads and Beds; Painted Furniture M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major, Browne’s nautical Almanac first-choice tire eve ince 1915 Peter. Picturesque Estate House
10.12.50—€n. | in Bedstea S.O.L.F. & Adjutant, Ty year since .
ds (Simmons Springs, Presses dos aen Barbados Regiment. 1951. me in elevated position with ap-
“iia eUAHEHeautitul “Roecd ~ | Dressing Tables, Combination Presses and e j eS proximately 4% acres. Thee arre

: TABLEW ARE Beautiful osedawn Dre “ez Table, Fibre and Cotton filled | Platignum Ni 4 reception, 6 bedrooms, 2 yeran-
“Greydawn", “Goldendawn” seen on all) Ma , Canvas Cots, Linen Press bs for your dahs, fermery, orchard etc. At-
ree oe eS oe a | MODERN HIGH SCHOOL — | ftir: oh
be ie = meres it pe < Garden Bench and other items. Sale
placeable from stock, Evans nitfields. | 11.30 o'clock. Terms cash, REGISTERED AND APPROVED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, “BLACKMAN’S” — St. Joseph.
oe PapAet petal ar - = BRANKES, TSO 2 oe a3 THE En Examinati Friday, 8th inst., the under Ae a wocuenin ee

TEA — eful and attrac- Auctioneers. 302 who sat our Entrance Examination on Friday, nm ni . HN| ’ ER with historic associations is
tive Ae ne A most useful ity Soa 2 .12.50—2n. ned candidates were successful in gairing admission to this school for JO. ISON’S STATION Y still available and offers are
designs and decorations, Prices as low emic Year 1951. Others who passed the enrtance exam, will be accepted : open to consideration. This
as $9.95 set. G. W. HUTCHINSON & CO., Se S000 ts Our building programme is completed. AND HARDWARE The st hee property is well sited on wooded
LAD. Dial 42 212.50-t1n'| UNDER THE SILVER 1, Adams, Owen 61. Hoyte, Iris rongest Hey fil side and powemes very fine

2. Adams, Valicia 62. Hackman, Greta EE > ’ Z views, There are 5 reception |j

YACHT — That desirable yacht “VA- HAMMER 3, Alleyne, Erskine 63, Jemmott, Adeline Goodyerr’s tire cord is rooms, G bedrooms, kitchen,
GABOND". Tel. J. A. Reid, Lone Star + et Age a aching ah stronger, more uniform— pee 2 ayia bigs Servant's
Garage, Dial 91—33. 22.11.50—12n. Picket’ ee aie 1p 7cyrae he Belen RnR. $ Palgrave, peal &. Jones, Walter NOTICE makes a stronger, bruise- quarters for an garages,

wri se er rniture at 5 ntham, reen . Jordan, Victor ‘ - ey RESIDENCE, GRAEME HALL
PERSONAL Windy Wold’ “toh eee z Best wishes 68. King, Harcourt resistant, longer-wearing a an outstanding

The public are hereby warned ae which inelu . Best, stace 69. Kirton, Carmen carcass, property especially with regard
giving credit to my wife, C SE | Golches. Rockers; Tub Chairs; ft 20. 70. Lashley, Clement to the interior arrangements and
BOURNE (nee WHITE) oc 1 do et | Ormement Tables; Plant Stands; ih p, Hugh 71. Lawrence, Coralita Our City Pharmacy Branch fittings. The planning is well
hold myself responsible for her or any- nd Cushions; Tea Din- 12. , Enid 72. Lowe, Agatha will be closed for the thought out, and there is a large
one else contracting any debt or debts won. All in Mahogany, Piano by 18, . Budene 73. Lynch, Agatha weekly half holiday on the The toughest treac L-shaped lounge and dining
in my name unlem by a written order ard and Colard, BW. Chairs, Pie- 4. aite, Maurice 74. Lyte, Adelle Th: y foom with cocktail bar, 3 plea-
signed by me tures, Clock, Oak Rockers Dining and 18. ite, Monica 75. Lyte, Audene ursdays 14th, 21st, and The Goodyear tread is so fant be@rooms, all with

Signed LOUIS BOURNE Real Tables, Glass Ware, Tea Service, 16. Browne, 16. Martindale, Emelda 28th December, and. will ‘ ‘ ‘ wardrobes, a large tiled bath-

Barracks Road, Bank Hal cuble Mahog, Stump Bedstead, Can- i. aurreyes 77. Maynard, Cleophas be open to business on designed that inflation toom serves the imater bedroom.
St, Michael ses Cot, Double Iron Bedstead and 18. Callender, ia 78. Maynard, Cubbin the Saturd squeezes it together— ‘There is also a second ba’

812,30 2n_| Shrink: Mama. Press, Larder, $ Burner} 19. Callender, Gwennyth 79. Maynard, Gwenry:th aturdays, 16th, 28rd , : and toflet, modern kitchen wel

| Spring: Hang, Press, Larder, 3 Burner 20. , 80. Maynard, Winston and 30th December. makes it firmer, harder to vided ‘with ‘built-in’ cup-

EDUCATIONAL other Nenis in Cement Bote and 21. Carter, ue 81. Moore, Lester : cut, harder to wear down, om, garage, ser-

MALVERN ACA Sale 11.3 o'clock. = ae ae pete Banare Our Reliable Branch will vant’s quarters, paved driveway

ALVE ACADEMY o'clock. TERMS CASH. 23. Catling, Gloria 83. Nicholls, Evelyn h be good for thousands of ex- a veer ard ete, All the

EDENVILLE, CREAPSIDE BRANKER TROTMAN & Co. 24. Chapman, Norma \ 84. Nicholls, Myrna owever be open on these ‘1 on saat a one

An entrance examination will be held Auctioneers. © 25. Charles, ' 85. Norville, Elvira Thursdays and closed on oe nee ‘mahogany purenaaee it
at this school on MONDAY ‘8th Decern- 10.12.50—2n. 26. Chase, ‘ 85. Nurse, Cynthia the Saturdays as usual ea may pure! re-
Pee Peo : es aoe 31. Chaseewten, Marie &. Nurse, Albertha Ls aaigetd

1pils are prepare for various Clarke, Viol 7 88. Pilgrim, Jean
magrinations up to the L.C.C. School _ REAL ESTATE 29. Clarke, Allan 99. Pileritn, Madeleine ROGEIEY (nese Gole Couse

€rtificate standard in all subject oe 30. Clarke, Elsa 90. Pinder, Arrindell ,

Backward children are also ON THE SEA 31, Coppin, Coral ' 9%. Pinder, Noel KNIGHT'S DRUG with af er sounes ane eae
coached. Entrance fee $1.20 una at Garden, St. James 32, owas: Bindley 92. &uintyne, Junior Twe versions of tha — a fitted wardrobes)

F, L. MORRIS pavodern Bungalow, 3 bedrooms, two 33. . Bertram 93. Reed, Francis ie At ee ea
eee baths. Overlooking’ Sea, o: iy, 3 Se Derothy 9. Richards, Muriel STORES world's “‘nest tire: tiled bathroom, separate toilet,
bathing beach, Good Yacht vAnsteaeee, 35. Crookendale’ Norma 95, Riley, Athelstan well fitted kitchen, two car gar

-—— + a Phone 91-60. 16.11,50—t.£.n. 36. Dash, Basil 96. Sealy, Yvonne ; De Luxe All-Weather Tread one Sane a or pag

The Coleridge School shinee ae 37, Drakes, Alfred 97. Sealy, Humbert ———————=== ! aa . 4g nes low figure.
oe hl . of € concern business known 38. Gamble, Othniel 98, Selman, Waple ed for sala at & '
st. ¥ Dial Sane! Store 112 Roebuck Street. 3% Goddard, Euland 99. Sheafe, Fern O'Lene

The following candidates ial 3266 9,12.50—3n, 40. Goddard, June 100. Sisnett, LeRoy RENTALS
cessful tt our sseanes ey Mn inatio on, —__—_____ 4). Graham, Patricia 101." Skeete, Elaine BEAUTY
sale ojos wee , JOUSES—There are still 42. Graham, Yvonne 102. Slocombe, Hazel LUXURY BEACH HOUSE, St.
as R. : H. B » 4 ’ chattel houses that you car 43. Greaves, Eglantine 103, Smith, Cynthia 3 Fully furnished. : ‘

1. ; joyce e terms, There {s one at 44. Greaves, 104. Springer, David Samson was defeated not only > ames.

ogee Seeing | ti Gules Road recently repaired and 45. Green, Joan 105. StHill, Dorothy by the gorgeous tinsels an flash- i WINDY RIDGE — St. James.
a Ds M. Bicock ed with water-toilet and bath, 46. Green, Violet 106. StJohn, Bulinda ing gems of Delilah’s apparel, | Unfurnished. Very pleasant 3-
4G. E. Frameis a : he leased for five years, 47. Griffith, Petrina 107, Thomas, “arriet He was captivated by the beauty bedroomed property with an
5. S. 1. Gilles ane t Brandon for $800.00 48. Griffith, Kenneth 108. Thomas, Joan sf her form enhanced by a head acre of garden, Long lease if
& K, H. Headley £ t Hindsbury Road. 49, Griffith, Lisle 109, Thomas, Brenda ot exquisitely styled hair which required.

7 D, W. Jordan © it Beckies Road, 50. Griffith, Elise #0. Thompson, Laurene added charm to her personality. ‘

8, M. McGeary : t Kew Road 51, Harper, Rosamond i111. Trotman, Mary The ability to improve the ‘BEACH HOUSE”, St. Law<
9, D, E. Reece oe { Westbury New Road 52. Hasris, Monica 119. Trotman, Velma growth and add lustre to your tence. Available February on-
19, EB. = mpeauarcs One u Chapa an’s Lane, 58. Headley, Walter @3. Ward, Beryi gs isa “i possessed by few. wards. Furnished.

11. A. . Sampson , fer to D'Arey A. Scott, Magazine 54. Henry Jo! > r a comes after intense training, “ *

12, F. D. Walker Lane D 743 9.12.50. “4 55. urley, Lisle He SS eelin’ study and practice together with St. an Avene aman On
13. GR. Wellington ; — —— 56. Husbands, Jen 1°65. Walthrust, Lucille the right chemicals in correct Coast. Good bathing. Fully fur-

Parents of these boy: will be inter HOUSE Tobago. Old Colont 7. Holder, Grace 117, Williams, Marva proportion to encourage Nature to nished ;
viewed at 10 am, on y, 15st ’ te Beautiful grounds, 3 acres 58. Holder, Monica 119. Wiltshire, Kathleen earry out her purpose to make P :

January 1951. 0-21 E ecluded. One wing con- 59. Holder, Stanton 118. Wiltthire, Honor her hair beautiful “LAS CAMPANAS" — Marine

VPs 4 f contained flat. Freehold. 60, Howell, Yvonne 120, Worrell, Francis There fs one sure way to capture Gardens, Furnished.

Good estment, $24,000.00, For photow cakes ei admiration of ‘a Visit the
bs ve rther particulars apply Wilson, Twelve Scholarshi vere awe Mager peauty Salon, Two Mile
ARLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL | W' lc, Tovedo srr tocan, | beeen Barer eS Cuuing, Gioris Hill, and let Madame Valarie REAL ROTATE AGENE
CRUMPTON ST a —-— —— 7 8, Estwick, Anita 4. Forde, Vivian convince you that you can achieve | AUCTIONEER

‘Regiitered with Dept. of F ,FOR SALE OR LO 5. Grant, Donviile 4. Hurley, De Lisle that conquering beauty which

Gcicieccbin “and niente 2 MOORINGS “ofMiranged as three 3. Knight, Ronald 8. Lord, Oswald wa ‘admiration of the most | MORE PEOPLE, THE WORLD OVER, RIDE ON PLANTATIONS BUILDING |

Seagerayp # ga ts or one house. Six bed s, . Mayers, Winston 10. Niles, Louis : B critic |
tion to-morrow from 9.30 a.m etc. Furniture included. 11. Pierce, Milton 18. Thompson, Marjoric Dial 2790 for an appointment []| GOODYEAR TIRES THAN ON ANY OTHER MAKE |
ter G BATSON tate H € ' Gibson, “Marine I A. LYNCH any time of the day | z j

seca mane 9.12. S0e0dn, inpess Mason: ih Principal 1 tases



































































'




























































































THR CIty GARAGK, TRADING ce. LTD









































SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1950

Church
Services

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Chureh of Christ, a "
Upper Bay Street, Bridgetown,



Radio, same time, same Station, same |
hour }

JAMES STREET METHODIST

ll am, Rev. R. Mc

Rev. H. ©. Payne. —
PAYNES BAY

9.30 a.m. } y

te Mr. G. Marville. 7 p.m. Mr.

LL

7 pm

Ww
9.30 a.m. Mr.

Teer RHA
S a
gart a pm Au etie whith etase: Soll, Syl lrg he eRe
; nelud Ouse, A y
Fasmonin £, Chri ‘1a Science Healing. Me ¢ ullougis. 2 oe
° : on Sermon; God GILL MEM
Preserver of Man , 9.30 a.m. Rev. H on 7
7 pm. Jackmane Whee R J 9. Meal "3 SS
PB. ev. J. B HOLETOWN
s 8.30 .
yi _cinist cH RcH > ‘_ a: E. Griffin, 7 p.m.
5 - Oa ev ‘4 a
For Administration of art's muses ns be ee

feet washing. 9.30 a.m. Mr.

G. Harper. 7 p.m. Mr.

alain F. Moore.
11 a.m. Waverly Cott Rev. E Ww. w 3 , il ov ES 7h
11 a.m, Si > i JAMES rofees Lawrence. Phaped ha 5 F
-m. Sion Hill Rev. A. R. B
? p.m, Sion Hi, Rev. A. R. Brome gipgum Rev. Fe Lawrence, 7 p.m
au y. :
11 a.m. Savane J. B. Winter ee satEEq.
§ ARMY 9.30 a.m. Rev. F.
iarrect redhat Suet wrence, 7 p.m,
MORAVIAN CHU VICE
u a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 p.m. Y. p December Te se .
| iy rogramme 7 p.m. Senior Altar ROEBUCK TREET
rvice conducted by Major A. E Mot- a.m. Rev. A. C. Pagrin. 7 pm. Me
W. S. Arthur. 1 ;

fett (Divisional Commander)
CHECKER HALL”

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 p.m. Y P

GRA HILL
11 a.m.
Harvest Programme 7 “a oe 5. Weeies

12.30 p.m.

-m. S ... Rev. A. C. Pilgrim Sommunion

Soe Conducted Poy Be canes 7 p.m, Mr, FP. aay ® i ys

, K

FOUR ROADS 11 a.m. Mr. Do’ ;

jl a.m, Holiness Meeting 3 p.m. y. p Graham. wnes. 7 p.m. Mr.
Harvest Programme 7 p.m. Senior Altar MONTGOMERY
Service. Conducted by Lieutenant Hinds 7 pm. Mr. .

BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL F SHOP HILL

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 P.m. Co 7 pm. Mr. Green.
any Meeting 7 Salvation Meeting.
PREACHERS Major eo ation Meeting
WELLINGTON STREET
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 P.m. Com-
pany Meeting 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting
PREACHER: Sr. Major Gibbs, ,
ITIN

MBE
11 a.m. Mr, Allman. 7 p.m. Mg, Smith



Device Will

1S’
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 p.m.

f : Com-

pany Meeting 7 p.m. Salvation Meetin c

PREACHER; Lieutenant Gunth “ Hea F r: h
PIE CORNER. r fis

lla * Rolie Meeting 3 p.m. Com-
pany eeting p.m. Salvation Meet:
PREACHER: Sr. Major Hollingswerthe
ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST
TUDOR BRIDGE
Thanksgiving Service for Youths 7 p.m.
Evensong and sermon. Preacher: Rev
J. B. Grant, ist Lesson by Rev, L
Bruce-Clarke 2nd Lesson by Rev. C. A
Young. Xmas Carols rendered on this

occasion,
METHODIST
BETHEL — Harvest Festival Services

11 a.m. Rev. M. A. E. Thomas. 3.30

p.m. Sunday School Song Service. 7

p.m. Rey. B. Crosby.

Monday, 7.30 p.m. Thanksgiving Ser-
DALKEITH—11 a.m, Mr. J. Griffith
p.m. Mr. V. B. St. John.
BELMONT—11 a.m. Mr. D. F. Griffith
p.m. Rev. A. E. Thomas.
SOUTH DISTRICT — 9 a.m. Mr, T

Callender, 7 p.m. Miss E. Bryan
PROVIDENCE—11 a.m, Rev. B. Crosby

And Step Up Catches

Inshore fishermen may ie
getting better catches by aa"

After 18 months’ research, a
new British echo-sounder has
been produced which. it is claim-
ed, will detect the presence oi
herring, Sprats or pilchards.
_ The instrument costs £310, It
is housed in a box not much
larger than a biscuit tin.

When it is switehed on fisher-
men get a constantly changing
picture” of underwater condi-
tions up to 120 fathoms,

Shoals of fish show as a heavy
black smudge on the screen.



Holy Communion 7 p.m. Mr. J. Clarke. =—LES.
VAUXHALL—9 a.m. Rev. B. Crosby
Holy Communion. 7 p.m. Miss L, Pes-
kett. *
LUTHERAN Etna Whistles As

St. Walter Lutheran Hour Dayrells Rd.
Ch. Ch

Villagers Scamper

CATANIA, Sicily, Dec. 8.

A deafening whistle shrilled
from the depths of seething Mount
Etna early to-day as a column of
trucks bore the last frightened
residents from tiny Milo village
wpenaced by the oncoming lava
ide,
_ Volcano experts said the pierc-
ing whistle apparently came from
Etna’s lava-blocked crater as
pent-up gases forced their way
into the outer air.—O,P.

7 p.m. Evensong and Sermon by the
Rev. Wm F. O'Donohue. Speaker.

Wednesday at 7.15 p.m. Public Divine
Service Rev. Leslie B. Clarke preacher

St. Duke Lutheran Hour Duke Ten-
antry, St. Thomas

11 a.m, Rev. W. F. O’Donohue 7.15
p.m. Monday Bible lecture.

St. John’s Lutheran Hour Fairfield Rd.,
Black Rock.

7.15 Tuesday Bible lecture. 7.15 Thurs-
day Preaching Service

t. Content Lutheran Hour Content,
St. Thomas

11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mr. James Lashley
Preacher, also listen to Bringing Christ
to the Nations at 6 p.m. by Dr. Eugene
R. Bertermann Ph. D., D.D. Director of












eno
St enrol
powder



=

FOR YOU

Start training for it NOW!

There Is still room at the top for the fully qualified
man who is fitted for the job. YOU can be that
man—successfal, prosperous, with your future
assured—by studying at home in your spare time,
uided by the personal tuition of The Bennett
College. Distance makes no difference.

WE WILL HELP YOU TO
ACHIEVE YOUR AMBITION

Get your feet on the ladder of success TO-DAY.
Write to The Bennett College and learn how
thousands of people just like you have reached
the top with the right guidance. A well-paid
job can ees this pleasant spare-time
study Ni ;

Direct Mail to DEPT. 188

—










FIRST CHOOSE
YOUR CAREER

ACCOUNTANCY EXAMS.
AVIATION
BLUE

BOILERS

ad














(1) Take the normal amount required to buy a
Man’s Shirt.



(2) Put half of it back in your Pocket.

(3) What's left will buy you a RELIANCE SHIRT
of perfect fit and guaranteed quality.



THE ROYAL STORE

No. 2 High Street
THE SHIRT EMPORIUM OF BARBADOS

SOOO OOPPOPOOPOOSOSS

*
e
°
°

WHY LOOK OLD?












The Canadian Bank of Commerce

SUNDAY



ADVOCATE

HEAD OFFICE — TORONTO, CANADA

Established 1867

STATEMENT AS AT 3isr

ASSETS

Cash on hand and due from Banks

GP TIONG a actin caves wees $ 195,264,432.50
Notes of and Cheques on other

OR. ov ocean ea ok hs obs 73,091,208.02
Government and Not exceeding
other Public Secur- | market value|

Tee co cs take t 747,080,155.65
Other Bonds and |

oo Sey j 75,922,701.89
Call and Short Loans (Security held

of sufficient marketable value to

OE). iv tae een tabeesaeeues 35,760,515.89

$1,127,119,013.95
541,513,515.32
63,372,170.86
18,769,640,7i
4,542,813.22

$1,755,317,154.06

Total Quick Assets......
Loans and Discounts (After full pro-
vision for bad and doubtful debts)

Acceptances and Letters of Credit



OCTOBER, 1950
LIABILITIES
Notes in Circulation... . $ 29,381.36
Deposits ........ peaks ‘ 1,623,712,841.46
Acceptances and Letters of Credit
& contra! | in tacs es 63,372,170 86

Other Liabilities 2,263,268.53

Total Liabilities to the Public $1,689,377,662.21
Capital Paid Up......é5..03;- 30,000,000.00
Reserve Fund 4% 30,000,000.00
Dividends declared and unpaid. . 619,222.58
Provision for Extra Distribution 600,000.00
Balance of Profit as per Profit and

Loss Account scent

4,720,269.27







» $1,755,317,154.06

Total Liabilities ..

PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT

Year

Ended 31st

October, 1950

Profits for the year ended 31st Qetober, 1950, befare Dominion Government taxes but after apprepriations

Less:
Provision for Dominion Government taxes
Depreciation on Bank Premises

Net Profits after the foregoing deductions
Dividends

Provision for Extra Distribution-—-20c. per share, payable 2nd

Amount carried forward
Balance Profit and Loss Aecount 3lst October, 1949

Balance Profit and Loss Account 31st October, 1950............

S. M. WEDD

President








CARLTON

ANNUAL DANCE

AT PLEASANT HALL
HOUSE, St. Peter,




ber, 1950.
Music by Percy Green's









re .
Admission by Invitation
Ticket .. $1.00

ROYAL BARBADOS YACHT
CLUB

COCKTAIL DANCE

on y
13th DECEMBER ¥
1950
(For Members & their Friends)





Buy Your Favourite
e Now !!

BARBADOS
ANNUAL
REVIEW

2/. A COPY
Mie

Advocate Stationery,
Store.

Roberts & Coa.




WEDNESDAY




Dancing 6 pin. to
By Order of
The Commitiee of Mrnagement
T. BRUCE LEWIS
Manager and Secretary.

” p.m.








N.B. Members introducing their &
Friends must enter their names in
the Visitors’ Register or give
them a letter of introduction to
the Secretary. 6.12.50-—3n.






at the Bruce We srhead,
YANKEE STADIUM ruce eatherhead
Britton’s Hill
on
Tuesday N 12th Dec.
1950 a¢ 8.30 p.m,

a. |
KID FRANCIS, Lightheavy-
weight champion of B’dos
170 Ibs



Cosmopolitan Drug

———

RECITAL







vs.
KID RALPH, the Market Sahay aes
rin |
Semi-Finals : The Barbados Choral

BONNIE BLACKMAN vs. Society
TONY GALENTO

who lost to Ralph on points )
8 rounds,

)

(
BELFIELD KID vs.
i SSok LOVELL {

at —
ST, MICHAEL'S CATHEDRAL

rounds TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19TH
Sparkling Preliminaries — at 8.15 pam.
Breezy Amateurs Admission by Programme
Admission: Programmes containing words of

Ringside $2.00, Balcony $1.50
Cage $1.00, Arena $1.00

9 the Carols 1/3d.
Programmes without words 6d.

Obtainable at the Advocate
Stationery. 9.12,



KIRPALANTS

ANNOUNCES with pleasure that they have
opened Dry goods and general Store at 52 Swan
Street, Bridgetown, on Monday, 4th December,
1950 and takes this opportunity of offering to our
numerous customers, friends and the public in
general, full range of dress materials and hosiery,

for Ladies, Gents, and Children.

le

The usual attention and courtesy is assured

similar to that which is characteristic of the

D. P. KIRPALANI

Retail & Wholesale Dry Goods and General
Merchants

52 Swan Street, — Bridgetown,

Phone: 4715.

Barbados

CRICKET

(Kindly lent by Mr. Georga %
Gill) . x
On Saturday, 16th Decem- :

£66 OODEEEEEOSOBSS

OF CHRISTMAS MUSIC

The Cathedral Choir

50—2n.

January,














‘

{

‘to Contingent Reserves, out of which full provision has been made for bad and doubtful debts
































$7,321,637,94

$2,014,340.15
1,292,039,24

3,306,379.3y

$4,015,258.55



$2,400,000,00

« 800,000.00 3,000,000,00

+0 gaa Seg S ROS Obs Cia a SaOE DEAE: 4 ORE $1,015,258,55

1.0 Caley bbs 4 4a6 Lg sab PUES Ubi ee ke 3,705,010.72
CS PAG STATES o's'xp ip pik Fak Cok i eas $4,720,269.27

JAMES STEWART

General Manager,

LUMBER & HARDWARE

ews TMERBERT Ltd.

‘ 10 & i1 Roebuck Street.

Incorporated
1926

L000 LOLOL KK 0

<
2

; C4
\ eee eet VOD Vries 4 ty

Winner 19.50

TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM

(With the. Distinetive Flavour)

Proved by The Judges to be the BEST BY TEST
| All the more reason why YOU should join The Rest

Exhibition Prise

by using this blend always, SIP IT—TO ENJOY IT
BLENDERS

JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.







Roebuck St. Dial 4335 :
EAR BAT |
ee mee ee é ‘'
: ELECTRICAL

y
; si
ACCESSORIES!
WE CAN SUPPLY YOU ‘WITH THE FOLLOWING:
8
§ WIRE ELEMENTS
8 « FLEX PLUGS
% « STARTERS « PLUG CAPS
> « CONNECTING BOXES . SOCKETS
« SWITCHES « FUSES
« PUSH BUTTONS « CEILING ROSES
« BATTEN « WALL
HOLDERS BRACKETS

And many others too numereus to mention.

TO-DAY AND GET YOUR REQUIREMENTS

BARBADOS HARDWARE 0. LID.

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
No. 16, Swan Street *Phone 2109 & 3534.

YOUR HOME
For

CHRISTMAS

We Can Supply A Wide Variety of...

PAINTS, DISTEMPERS and
ENAMELS

} — ALSO -
) FRENCH POLISH, STAINS & VARNISHES
You can make your rooms more attractive
by dressing your Floors. We have:

LINOLEUM, in Rolls and Mats

RILONEUM, the modern Plastic Floor Covering
ge For Prompt and Courteous Service

Shop at

PLANTATIONS LTD.
:







6OOOO6604%



(
(



=o ee
Se

ee gt SOSA EEE AAA,














SOOO



j

|

:

mF =6PAY A VISIT TO OUR ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT %





WE OFFER
Toys, Chocolates, Crackers, Xm ee Decorations
Xmas Stockings
PRESENTATION SETS. . Vardi: Max Factor, Soie de Paris,
Imperial Heather, Dratle
PRESENTATION BOXES.-Ci Vebaccos, Pipes
SOAPS—by Yardley. Morny, ¢ Bronniy
PERFUME —by Yard Coty, fu :
COLOGNE A71l, Atkinse D 1
‘i PF HABRIS & €.
Lower Broad Street Plantations Building
DIAL 1045
pp OO Ao 656,454,456 t 44 6,44, 466%

.
we

si

Fernando”

hy W. Some

€allizg

oy

»AGE FIFTEEN

alg

hoppers !

Amas
f

Our

ets

rset Maughm

“The Cottage On the Eells”

re
ry

fi

—by

DeVe

re Stacpoole

ADVOCATE

STATIONERY

MEN

A

EGp at

GOOD Sf}

W

A FALKS

INT

@NLW....
PRI

VE YOUR

i)

IS

[FE

STOVE

ANI OVEN

Christmas
Kitchen

Remember



Lg

Jf

oe
Ss

the Workmanship and finish in ¢
Lovely Coloured Glazed DIMI
ropical Designs,
ILL MAKE
¢
JUIS L. BAYLEY’

OL,.TON LANE

Sole Representatives

J

Rolex Wat

CIGARS, CIGARETTES, CIGAI
LIGHTERS
Boxed CHOCOLATES by ¢

CONFECTIONERY

Piequre

from CORLELN.

DIARIES !

tETTE

begins in the

N. BB HOWELE

ST

Luinber & Hardware

‘ally Made
4 BERTALAN POTTERY

Pottery is excellent

ES Ete with attractive

JEWELLERS
AQUATIC CLUB

Switverland,

LDOS

ch Co





Come im amd

eelect youw gifts

CASE, PIPES

vibury—Fry Rowntree

\ssorted Kinds

6 LTD.



DIARIES !

e
A Letts’ Diary for Every Purpose
| Pocket and Desk, Electrical and
Business Diaries, Mechanical
Engineers, School Boys and School
Girls Diaries, Boys Scouts and
Girls Guides Diaries, and Index
Diaries.
ALSO
|
Loose Leaf Note Books and Refills.
°

ROBERTS

Dial lH

&

CO



)

>

PLL LISTS

Oo

PLAS

LPL

%,
.











PAGE STXTEEN





me - : — ; {
Ist XI Cricket POLICE GUD yo), “ape ules Attlee—Truman jj |
3 direct but Thorpe failed to hold Talks = ge 4
@, from pare 5 a3 : Phone 4456 for |
man Marshall and Eric Atkinson Wanderers lost their first From page i
The two batsmen began confi- wicket when fast_bowler J. Willi-]:the appointment as Huropean
dently, going after runs in an easy ams got Roy Marshal] bowled in unluicsy suggested—but eee CARRIAGE BOLTS & NUTS 5/16” & 3/8” |
though cautious manner his fourth over. Roy Marshall] ye qaecisions in Kurope are not
After Eric Atkinson had bowled was half the total, 22, Eight runs} (ouched on, SQUARE BOLTS & NUTS ¥%”" & 5"
iwo overs he was replaced by D. later Williams claimed a second rinauy it must be said that on
Atkinson, D. Atkinson and Nor- wicket, G Proverbs could not iwo aspects the communique 1s PAINT BRUSHES ali sizes
man Marshall continued, gather- negotiate the fourth ball of his} reassuring to British opinion. Att-
ing a good length although little next over which was very fast! ee nus pledged wat the use of SAFETY HASPS & STAPLES 2” to 6”
ground was given, until in his < ne was nee i aie a.om.c. tomb will be consid-
sixth over Norman Marshall got ; anderers urc Wiehe = i lug, caretully and inter- > . |
Mr. Gittens playing high to mid- tak Se eater 7 tee nationally, before it is decided PADLOCKS 2 |
7) . " irce as f >] ling , £ sO ve § *é a! ) 4 ma a . ‘ *
pga sharing plates ms That who was fielding at mid-off when pei, Steer name of the United DEADLOCKS 5

wicket had fallen when College

reached 26. Mr. Gittens had con- a ne a ale eae the Communique that important NIGHT LATCHES

tributed 12. <4 Smitt J. Williams who was having ee ee xe eee = ne ore RIM LATCHE

nile. Blackman joined Smith.. everything all his own way,|¢ e isastrous price-raising ef- alt 4 Ss

Blackman’s keyword ee re bowled his third batsman. | fects of American stockpiling. .

caution and runs came very siow- E. Atkinson before he could Probably stockpiling will be KNOB LOCKS

ly. Another bowling change was make any runs. slightly slowed. The re-establish

soon made, Roy Marshall taking Norman Marshal who was| ment of the wartime joint com- and HARDWARE of all kinds

ever from D. Atkinson The bats- going good then took a six off | modity boards is also a possibility.

men were not seriously troubled Williams with scarcely any Another outcome of the Wash-

by the change and Peirce was effort. He followed up his big}‘ngton talks appears to be the! |
brought on to relieve Norman stroke with a twd, but fell a vic- | decision to make immediate dip-

Marshall. In his third over, Peirce tim to pacer Williams when he] {omatic contact with the Soviet |

wicket He
and made

second

W. Smith

claimed the
tricked C

him edge the ball through to loss of five wickets. inswer to the Soviet Union’s re-
wicket-keeper Skinner. The scort J. Williams bowled his fifth |quest for Four Power talks on FIOVSVOOUCOOIUR 909 Ee Yes
was 43, Smith having made a good baisman when another five runs]Germany. According to reports ’

contribution of 20
Another Loss

College met a further less a run
later when Mr. Sam _ Headley,
through bad anticipation, was run
out. He had scored the added
single. Mr. J. Williams and C
Blackman then got together in an







he lifted a ball from ..Simmons

bowled. in the
The score was 61

following
for the

was
ball,

were scored. It was R. Atkinson,
who, like the others before him,
could not tally with Williams’
swift pace and was sént back to
the wicket with but three to his
credit,

Wilkes and Skinner made a
valiant effort to hold on until the

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

There is a suggestion also in

Union, This has reporiedly re-
versed sharply the decision on an

from Paris still unconfirmed of-
ficially, the United States, Britain
ind France have accepted the
USSR proposal on a meeting with
a limited agenda confined to Ger-
many—their hope is to expand
the scope of the talks in conver-
sations “on the side.” —Reuter,







WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.





Time To
Select Your



Xmas









Wind Direction (9 a.m.)
N.E. (11 a.m.) N.N.E.
Wind Velocity: 5 miles per

hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29,929,
(11 a.m.) 29.915

Given the small total of 96 to man Marshall was given a chance —Reuter.

be alata end of the day’s play, during
attempt to repair College's sinking pI~7LE MARGARET COX, which period three maidens ——
oe and nye ane oes dressed as the Policewoman was were delivered. But Williams +4 °
added 25 to the score before Mr. awarded first prize for the most gained another wicket when he I h W " hk
Williams was caught by R. At- original costume in the Girls’ powled Wilkes, his sixth for the e eather avourites 10, 1, 12 &
kinson off D. Atkinson's bowling. Under Seven section at the Ohil- gay. TODAY a
The last brave effort to make @ dren's Carnival tet eats F openers naires Sun Rises: 6.06 a.m.
stand against Wanderers attack, dens” yesterday afternoon. e is F Sun Sets: 6.39 p.m.
was put up by M. Mayers and just over a year old. COMMONWEALTH Moon (First Quarter) Dec. oe saa > aie a seme
Blackman. Mayers was bowled b DL Sa Aer es SCORE 66 FOR 4 16 LEG HAMS Ub. tn 9 A Bargain
Peirce when the score reached 80 SF Lighting: 6.00 p.m. § 79 Ib.. Ti HAMS’ $1 40. er 1b. a
and without any addition to the gain first innings lead, Wander- INDORE, Dec. 9. High Water: 4.29 a.m., 4.02 ‘ CHIVERS THI LIES—22c oon k 6 Tins of
score Blackman was adjudged ers sent Norman Marshall and The Holkar Association, win- wa, RED CURRANT JEI LY in My ,
1.b.w. to D. Atkinson’s bowling. Roy Marshall to open their ning the toss, batted first and YES—~ERDAY . . ie Bike ee tin Assorted
The other four wickets fell for batting while College’s pacers, J. scored 148 runs today before: dis- Rainfall (Codrington) nil PEACHES & PEARS 59c tin ea
the small muster of 15 runs Williams and H. Simmons began missing four of the Common- Total for Month to yester- APPLES a al Jams I's
To score their 95 runs, College the attack. wealth team for 66° at which day: .66 ins. 2 COCKTAIL BISCUITS in tins
took over two and a half hours. When he was four runs Nor- score, the stumps were drawn, ‘Temperature - (Min.) 67.0°F from 96c ‘upwards 6/-

SALTED NUTS tins 38c & 58c ea,
< WEETABIX in pkgs 24c each.

ALLEYNE ARTHUR & CO., LTD.







Reginered Ub Patent Ofer








They'll Do It Every Time

LY
LOOK! you GUYS Z
ARE SUPPOSED TO BE
WRITERS“NEXT WEEK

By Jimmy Hatlo

¢€
ARE YOU GUYS TRYIN’
TO TELL ME ABOUT
SHOW BUSINESS? SO



























ig

* Putte
* COUGH













So THEY ove
HIM JUST WHAT

Artie every
PROGRAM THE













ee I WANT ANORIGINAL | | HE ORDERED / qiece Are ALL NEW
RITING SCRIPT-I'M SICK AND’ GAGS™BUT HOW DO WE —_—_—
GET THIS =| TIRED PAYING OUT THE KNOW THEY'RE FUNNY 2

ROUTINE =*> LOOT YOU GUYS GET

FOR OLD, MOTH-EATEN
GAGS!IT'S FRESH

WHERE'S THE BOFFOLAS ?
THE PEOPLE LIKE CORN
AS LONG AS IT'S GOOD
MATERIAL, OR CORN“EITHER I GET
YOU GUYS ARE AYOCK SCRIPT, OR
: [ {CON YOU'RE THROUGH:

he LOOK y cot5F

|

is never more pionounced than when you hae

your suits made by us
Expert craftemanship. Expcrienced outfitters

you are assured of the latest and smartest in

men’s styles or your own individual tastes.



P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co. Ltd.

TOP SCORERS IN TAILORING














KNIGHTS |
PPING GUIDE

es en

RAL
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
at
=
=
=
=
s
Bd
=
=
=
=
a
«
&
a
&
we
x
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Gifts for
the Family !





Gifts for

Comb & Brush Sets, Mennen’s Baby Sets, Johnson & John-

the Business

son Sets, Williams’ Baby Sets, Mennen’s, J & J, and Colgate’s French Perfumes by Guerlain, Shali-}









mar, L’Heure Blue, Coque D’or,} from $11.25 t
Baby Talc, Baby Rattlers. ete, ete. .
also Colognes asstd, Scents
Man PATOU—Crepe de Chine, Moment’
Supreme, Amour Amour, Toy, | w $ 5.60.,,
etc., ete. }
also
Lotions & Colognes a ie vid 9 93.504,
CIROUS — Reflexion l
a Surrender, etc. ( » $9.50 ,,
WARDONIA RAZORS i $ 1.08 — $ 2.76 e a ae nie a hrlgedidighon (ne eet Ot tinea
GILLETTE RAZORS . from $ 1,21 — $ 5.50 Gifts for LANVIN — My Sin ” rr ee
‘ AUTO STROP RAZORS $ 2.67 — $12.40 Scandal | a ++ 9 $ 8.00 ,
ROSS RAZORS $11.00 Arpege :
FOUNTAIN PENS & PENCILS $ 1.08 26.00 LE GALION — Gardenia SUG! ot av. $6.00
DRESSING SETS $ 5.00 — $24.10 Boys and CARON, = Bellodgia ; } ‘:
SHAVID BRUSHES $ 1.00 ~~ $21.00 ae So a eee ae



Nuit de Noel }
also Colognes
and all the other French Makers as
ROGER & GALLET, HOUBIGANT, ETC., ETC
COLOGNES by 4711, Atkinsons, Yardley, Pivers and
at various prices
Yardley’s Presentation Sets in Layender & Bond Street
Arden’s Presentation Cases
also
Presentation Sets by Max Factor, Ponds, ete

JAMAICA CIGARS

Presentation Boxes of CIGARETPES
DUNHILL & COMOY PIPES

CIGARETTE CASES & RONSON LIGHTERS
fHERMOS LUNCHEON SETS

Thermos Luncheon Sets & Bottles
Presentation boxes of Biscuits by

GRAS: A LAGNA GND GAN DHSS AAA PS A DA DH NN NN TA PA A NN

all the makers
Boxes Chocolates
Tins Toffee
Foal Xmas Crackers














é a Table Decorations in numerous Morny’s Bath & Toilet Soap
7 TONER Y — ¥ 3 ’ y’s Be
z CONFECTIONERY OF FVERY KIND BY PASCALL, styles “a Tale & Body Powder
& CADBURY, SHARP, MciNTOSH. SUCH AS BARLEY Xmas Trees & Ornaments, etc. in Gardenia, Jasmin, Sandalwood, French Fern, etc
ag: SUGAR, TOFFEE mC TINS Vv! 1 Plum Pudding Charms Bronnley’s Soap now reduced.
& SUGAR, TOFFEE in DECORATED TINS, VARIOUS 8 . ELIZABETH ARDEN’S Soaps and all other usual C
at SIZES. BOTTLES OF ASSORTED SWEETS. BROWNIE For. putting up your presents in Rouges, Lipsticks, etc.
Dee ‘ 8 : ’ i true Holiday shape Holly and Lovely assortment of boxes of Chocolates with Pictori
= CAMERAS & FILMS. PHOTO ALBUMS. FOUNTAIN “a a Ne ~ a a a oiher designs on covers including the special

= other oS: $s Sheets or yard, agic” , ree Ye ny , Perr ste

bos Yardley’s Presentation Sets. Kent’s Military Hair Brushes. PENS, SAFETY RAZORS, 2tc. SNOW BALLS AND ins nia 7 . _—_ a eee. cones Soe aes
i& Kent’s Shaving Brushes, Dressing Sets by CUSSONS and Tinsel Cord, Tape Callard & Bowser’s Nougat & Butter Scotch.
& other m: Thermos Bottles. Thermos Luncheon Sets. HOSES Xmas Seals & Tags For your Friends overseas send a B’dos Diary with Pictorial
eee Gillette Strop, & Wardonia Razors. also Kropp & Red & Green Cord, etc pages.
& Rolls fF Dressing Sets in Leather Yardley’s and 7 : ‘ Souvenirs of B’dos in Leather and Electroplated.
3 other 17 es of Solid and Liquid Brilliantine Shaving
a sowls, Sticks & Creams. Hair & Face Lotions. Dunhill &
tow Comoy Pipes. Tobacco Pouches. Cigarette Cases & Light- 3
be I Cigarette Tubes Came; various makes sizes ll B } :
i Hea ; All Branches.
ri, , :
ra











ENG NG NG NG NS NIN NNN NN RN NN NDR DN NR NON ON RON ON

A ee ee

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1950

WHITE SPUNROSA
36” wide. Per Yd. %

WHITE MERCERISED
VOILE -

36” wide. Per ¥d. ....

36” wide. Per yd.

WHITE BROCAD
CREPE
31” wide. Per yd.

WHITE FANCY V
36” wide. Per yd

13. BROAD STREET

made easily with

36” wide. Per Yd. .., wo?

WHITE RAYON TAFFETA

84 & 957
' BI & ong
Ba?










OO

ED

OILE

957



Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. |





———





MIXTURE

JANTZEN BATHING TRUNKS
PYRAMID HANDKERCHIEFS

FROM

C. B. RICE & CO.

OF
BOLTON LANE










ai +

$50.00

She will
be Delighte

$19.00



































$ 9.50

$17.50
$17.00

$25.00
$10.00
$30.00

others

reams,

al and
“Black

NN NW NG NN NN NG NGG NW NN NB NNN ss HN 9 NB NN 8 8 8 aN A

XMAS GIFT SUGGESTIONS

PURE LAMB'S WOOL SLIPOVERS

AUSTIN REED PYJAMAS

VAN HEUSEN SHIRTS
AUSTIN REED SOCKS IN WOOL,

PURE LISLE, RAYON & LISLE |

—

7 sain

NDS IRIS PRIN TR ISON SENDS.





4

SENNA SEMAN SEG

Af

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53M

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Welcome

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ao. OS ei,
Pe
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@ fawictumas

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& : : ea) \ A
ar a> msi Fron the authorized bottlers of ‘Coca-Cola 2) yy
Fr ¥ P ’ ry TaN ‘ mire I A\N™
BARBADOS BOTTLING CO., LTD. -- fy
a



Printed at Advocate Press—Barbados

A mm,
D ~

THE CAREENAGE

td i

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ae

ca

BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

0, Bes 2 4

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REE TING

From ADVOCATE COMPANY, LIMITED
Sunday, December, 10th, 1950

*% ~â„¢ }
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etal

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of anent!:

= with the Loeal Agents

ELECTRICAL DEPT.
Pierhead — Dial 4284.

AAW

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ss

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\\\
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‘Messrs Manning & Co., Ltd. :

ALM

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. 3





A new style fn radio design was born when cre-
ators of fashion inspired the creative staff engaged
upon designing today’s fashion in radio. We
-proudly-announce the arrival of the sensational,
new PHILIPS range. You MUST make time to
come and listen to the new sets, and to admire
their style as well as the fashion they brought
with them.

Pn

PHILIPS)

tas RADIOPLAYERS

SS”

- Arrange for a Demonstration 4



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8-Diamond

Fishtail
Ensemble

10-Diamond
Ensemble
gold set

FOR YULETIDE BRIDES

Christmas is a wonderful time to say, “I do”! Whether you select a

tlassic wedding {s:and, a traditional bridal ensemble or a gleam-




Classically

Ing double ring set, your choice will always be a shining symbol Designed Duet
bf your enduring love, because of the skilled craftsmanship and

qualliy Of eacn creation.

>” »




Diamonds
all around

OUR NEWLY OPENED STORE is at your disy

20sal to



pick and choose the gifts you desire, It is our aim to

: : ® Sut soli
provide you with everything that it is possible to buy Diamond so
: taire set in sim

in the best Jewelry Shops in any part of the world, pie mounting of
gold
because we know that -
Expansion watch is-
bande #66 man ace you are the most dis.
women,

criminating shopper
but once pleased we
can count on you and
you on us.

Here you see a few of



the hundreds of lovely

Costume
Items we have in... Jewelery =
Golden color metal stock. in a Variety of }
compacts in all de- tyles and designs of
Signs.

Every Deseription



et
See our Special Competition elsewhere in this

issue then turn back to this advertisement and
win a Wrist Watch

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+



CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT



‘SISTER BE

Christmas time we gladly greet
“Each old familiar face.

“At Christmas time we hope to meet
“At th’ old familiar place,

“Five hundred loving greetings, dear,
“From you to

me,
“To welcome in the glad New Year
see

“I look to i"

TILDA TRENT turned the

Christmas card over with

her c manicured fingers as
she read the idiotic lines aloud.

“Did you ever hear anything so
completely palsied?” she asked
her husband. “I wonder who on
earth they can get to write the
stuff. Timothy, do you know any-
body called Leech ?”

“Leech ?”

“Yes—that’s what it says: ‘From
your old Leech.’ Must be a friend
ot yours.” She looked at the
envelope. “Yes, it was addressed
to you. Who is the old leech ?”
She flicked the card across the
breakrf:

‘ast table.
aw. oe iad at the
‘hyme an e@ scrawled message
beneath it, -

“I haven’t the least idea,” he
said slowly. As he spoke he was
taking in, with a sense of cold
misery, the fact that the printed
message on the card had been
neatly altered by hand.

The word “Five” was in ink,

© poet, no dou had
been content with “a ated
loving greetings.”

“Put it on the mantelpiece with
the others,” said his wife,

“Damn it, no!” In a sudden
rage, he tore the card in two and
flung the pieces into the fire.

J T was silly of him, he reflected

as he travelled up to the City
half an hour later, to break out
in that way in front of Hilda; but
she would put it down to the nerv-
ous strain about which she was
always pestering him to take
Medical advice,

Not for all the gold in the Bank
of England could he have stood
the sight of that damnable jingle
on his dining-room mantelpiece.
The insolence of it! The cool, cal-
culated devilry! All the way to
London the train wheels beat out
the maddening rhythm—

“At Christmas time we gladly
greet....”

And he had the thought that the
last payment had seen the end
of it. He had returned from
James's funeral triumphant in
the certain belief that he had
attended the burial of the blood-

* * ° *

sucker who called himself
“Leech.” But he was wrong, it
seemed.
“Five

hundred loving greetings
dear....”

statel How
in the name of all that was horri-

ble was he going to raise the
money?

He would raise it, of course. -

He would have to. The
routine

ive parcel and left
in the cloak room at Waterloo.

N= DAY, he would park his
car as usual in the railway
yard at his local station. Beneath
the windscreen —“the old
familiar place”-—would be tucked
the cloak room ticket. When he
came back again from work in
the evening the ticket would be

gone,

And that would be that—
till next time. It was the way
that Leech preferred it, and he
had no option but to comply.

The one certain thing that Trent
knew about the identity of his
blackmailer was that he—or could
it be she?—-was a member of his

Thank heaven they
were no true kindred of his.
far as he knew, he had no b
relatives alive. But “his” family
they had , ever since, when
he was a tiny, ailing boy, his
father had married the gentle, in-
effective Mary Grigson, with her
long trail of soft, useless children.
And, when the influenza
demic of 1919 carried off Jo!
Trent, he had been left to be
brought up as one of that cling-
ing, grasping clan. He had got on
fm the world, made money, mar-
ried money, but he had never got
away from the Grigsons.

° .
AVE for his stepmother. to
whom he grudgingly acknowl-
edged that he owed his start in
life, how he loathed them all! But
“his” family they remained, ex-
pecting to be treated with broth-
erly affection, demanding his pres-

ence at family reunions, especially
at Christmas time.

“At Christmas time we hope to
meet... .” ‘

He put down his paper unread,
and stared forlornly out of the
carriage window. It was at Christ-
mas ime, four years before that
the whole thing started—at his
stepmother’s Christmas Eve
party, just such a boring family
funciion as the one he would
have to attend in a few days’
time,

There had been some silly
games to amuse the children—
Blind Man’s Buff and Musical
Chairs—and in the course of
them his wallet must have slip-
ped from h's pocket.

He discovered vhe loss next
morning, went round to the house
and retrieved it. But when it
came into his hands again there
was one item missing from its
contenis. Just one.

A letter, quite short and ex-
plicit, signed in a name that had
ubout then become fairly
notorious in connection with an
unsavoury inquiry into certain
large - scale dealings in Govern-
meni securities.

How he could have been fool
enough to keep it a moment
longer than was necessary!—but
it was no good going back on
that.

. * *
ANP then the messages from
Leech had begun, Leech
had the levter. Leech considered
it his duty te send it to the
principal of Trent’s firm, who
was also Tren’t father-in-law.
But, meanwhile,
trifle short of money, and for a
small consideration . » at
had begun, and so, year in and
year out, it had gone on.

He had been so sure that
was James! “~

That seedy, unsuccessful stock-
Jobber, with his gambling debts
and his inordinate thirst for
whisky had seemed the very
stuff of which blackmailers are
made.

But he had got rid of James
last February, and here was
Leech aga’n hungrier than ever,

Trent shifted uneasily in his
seat. “Got rid of him,” wa
hardly the right way to put it.
One must be fair to oneself,

He had merely assisted James
to get rid of his worthless self
He had done no more than ask
James to dinner at his club, fill
him up with wh'sky and leave
him vo drive home on a___ foggy
night with the roads _ treachar-
ous with frost.

There had been an unfortunate
accident on the Kingston By-
pass, and vhat was the end of
James — and, incidentally, of
two perfect strangers who had
happened to be on the road at
the same time.

ib

Forget it! The pom was that
the dinner — and the whisky —
had been a dead loss. He could
not make the same m'stake
again.

This Christmas he intended to
make sure who his _ persecutor
was. Once he knew, vhere would
be no half-measures,

Reveiation came to him mid-
way through Mrs. John Trent’s
party — at the very Moment, in
fact, when the presents were
being distributed from the

It was so simple, and so un-
expected that he could have
laughed aloud, Appropriately
enough it was his own contribu-
tion to vhe party that was re-
sponsible.

For some time past it had been

So his unwritten duty, as the pros-

perous member of the family, to
preseny his stepmother with some
delicacy to help out the straight-
ened resources of her house in
providing a feast worthy of the
occasion.

This year, his had taken
the form of half Pan bottles
of champagne—part of
signment which he suspected of
being corked. That champagne,
acting on a head unused to
thing stronger than 1 ’
was enough to loosen Bessie’s
tongue for one fata] instant,

Bessie! Of all le, faded,
spinsterish Bessie! with her
woolwork and her charities —
Bessie with her large, stupid, ap-
pealing eyes.

And yet, when you came to
think of it, it was natural enough.
Probably, of all the Grigson tribe,

lisliked her the most.

soo ih ye Li I A eta UNE ie a a aL ei es A ae Skea Sa ea ea is ei

Leech was a -



by Cyril Hare

He felt for her all the loathing
one must naturally feel for a per-
son one has treated badly; and
he had been simple enough to be-
lieve that she did not resent it.

She was just his own age, and
from the moment that he had been
introduced into the family had
constituted herself his protector
against the unkindness of his old-

er stepbrothers
St had been, in her revolting-
ly sentimental phrase, his
“own special sister.” As they grew
up, the roles were reversed, and
she became his protegee, the ad-
miring spectator of his early strug-
gles.

Then it had become pretty clear
that she and everyone else expect-
ed him to marry her. He had
considered the idea quite serious-
ly for some time. She was pretty
enough in those days, and, as the
phrase went, worshipped the
ground he trod on.

But he had had the good sense
to see in time that he must look
elsewhere if he wanted to make
his way in the world.

His engagement to Hilda had
been a blow to Bessie. Her old-
maidish look and her absorption
in good works dated from them,
But she had been sweetly for-
giving—to all appearences.

Now, as he stood there under
the mistletoe, with a ridiculous
paper cap on his head, he marvel-
led how he could have been so
easily deceived. As though, after
all, anyone could have written
that Christmas card but a woman!
Bessie was smiling at him still
smiling with the confidential air
of the mildly tipsy, her upturned
shiny nose glowing pink in the
candlelight. She had assumed a
slightly puzzled expression, as
though trying to recollect what
she had said.

Timothy smiled back and raised
his glass to her. He was stone-cold
sober, and he could remind her
of her words when the occasion

* . * *

arose’



“My present for you, Timothy,
is in the post. You'll get it to-
morrow, I expect. I thought you’d
like a change from those horrid
Christmas cards!” And the words
had been accompanied by an un-
mistakable wink.

He moved away from the mis-
tletoe and strolled round the room,
exchanging pleasantries with all
the family. He could look them â„¢
the face now without a qualm.

He clicked glasses with Roger,
the prematurely aged, overworked
GP. No need to worry now
whether his money was going in
that direction!

He slapped Peter on the back
and endured patiently five minutes
confidential chat on the difficulties
of the car business in those days.

To Majorie, James’s widow.
looking wan and ever so braye in
her made-over black frock, he

ke just the right words of
blended sympathy and cheer.

E even found in his pockets

some half crowns for his
great hulking step-nephews. Then
he was standing by his stepmother
near the fireplace, whence she
presided quietly over the noisy
cheerful scene, beaming gentle
good nature from her faded blue
eyes.
“A delightful evening,” he said,
and meant it.

“Thanks to you, Timothy in
great part,” she replied. “You have
always been so good to us.”

Wonderful what a little doubtful
champagne would do! He would
have given a lot to see her face
if he were to say: “I suppose you
are not aware that your youngest
daughter, who is just now pulling
a with that ugly little boy
of Peter’s, is blackmailing me and
that I shortly intend to stop her
mouth for good?”

He turned away. What a gang
they all were! What a shabby
out-at-elbows gang! Not a decently
eut suit or a well turned out wo-
man among the lot of them!

And he had imagined that his
money had been going to support
some of them. Why, they all
simply reeked of honest poverty.
He could see it now Bessis ex-

plained everything. It was typica!
of her twisted mind to wring cash
from him by threats and give it
all away in charities.

“You have always been so good
to us.” Come to think of it, his
stepmother was worth the whole
of the rest put together, She must
be hard put to it, keeping u
father’s old house, with precious
little coming in from her children.

Perhaps one day, when his
money was really his own again,
he might see his way to do some-
thing for her. But there was a
lot to do before he could indulge
in extravagant fancies like that.

Hilda was coming across the
room towards him. Her elegance
made an agreeable contrast to the
get-up of the Grigson woman. She
looked tired and rather bored,
which was not unusual for her at
parties at this house
* “Timothy,” she murmured,
“can't we get out of here? My
head feels like a ton of bricks,
and if I’m going to be fit for any-
thing to-morrow morning——”’

IMO'THY cut ber short.
“You go home straignt away,
darling,” he said. "I can see its
high time you were in bed, ‘ake
the car. I can walk, it’s a tine
evening, Dont wait up ior me,”
“Youre not coming? 1 wouguar

.you said~—-~-

“No, 1 shall have to stay and
see tie party through. There's a
little macter of tamuy business I'd
better dispo.e of while I have tne
cnalice,

Huiaa looked at him in slightly
omused surprise.

“Well, if you feel that way,” she

said. “You seem to be very de-
voted to your family all of a
sudden.

You'd better keep au eye
on Bessie while you are about it,
She’s had about as much as she
can carry,”

Hilda was right. Bessie was
decidedly merry. And Timothy
continued to keep an eye on her.
Thanks to his attentions, by the
end of the evening, when Christ-
mas Day haq been seen in and
the guests were fumbling for their
wraps, she had reached a stage
when she could barely stand.

“Another glass,” thought Tim-
othy from the depths of his ex-
perience, “and she'll pass right
out.”

‘TH give you a lift home,
Bessie,” said Roger, looking at her
with q professional eye. “We can
Just squeeze you in.”

_“Oh, nonsense, Roger!” Bessie
giggled. “I can manage perfectly
well. As if I couldn’t walk as far
as the the end of the drive!”

“Tl look

“ after her’, said
Timothy heartily. “I’m walking
myself, and .we can guide each

other’s wandering footsteps home.
Where’s your coat, Bessie? Are
you sure you've get all your
precious presents?”

He prolonged his leave-takings
until all the rest had gone, then
helped Bessie into her worn fur
coat, and stepped out of the house.
supporting her with an affection-
ate *rm. It was all going to be
deliciously simple.

* * *

ESSiE lived 1n me lodge of the
old house. She preferred to
be independent, ang the arrange-
ment suited everyone, especially
James, after one of his
reverses on the turf, had brought
his family to live with his mother
to save the expense,

It suited Timothy admirably
now. Tenderly he escorted her
to the, enq of the drive, tenderly
he assisted her to insert her little
latchkey in the door, tenderly he
suppo! her into the little sit-
ee that gave out of the
hal

There, Bessie considerately
saved him an enormous amount
of trouble and a possibly unpleas-
ant scene. As he put her down
upon the sofa she finally suc-

cumbed to the champagne. Her had b

eyes closed, her mouth opened,
and she lay like a log where he
had placed her.

Timothy was genuinely reliev-
ed. He was prepared to go to any
lengths to rid himself of the
menace of blackmail, but if he
could lay his hands on the damn-
ing letter without physical vio-
lence he would be well satisfied.

It would be open to him to take
it out of Bessle im other ways
later on, He looked quickly round
the room. He knew its contents
by heart.

It had hardiy changed at all
since the day when Bessie first
furnished her own room when she
left school. The same old beatter-



PAGE THREE |

SSIE’"—a Detective Story

ed desk stood in the corner, where
trom the earliest days she ha@
kept her treasures.

He flung it open and a flood of
bills, receipts, charitable appeals
and yet more charitable appeals

came cascading out. One aftem
another, he went through the
drawers with Trae tt ee
urgency, but still failed to fin
what he sought.

* . ,
WINALL yY, he came upon a
4” small inner drawer which re

sisted his attempts to open it. He
tugged at it in vain, and then
seized the poker from the fire-
place and burst the flimsy lock by
main force, Then he dragged the
drawer from its place and settled
himself to examine the contents, «

it was crammed as full as it
could be with papers, At the very,
top was the programme of a May,
Week Ball for his last year at
Cambridge.

Then there were snapshots,
Press-cuttings—an account of his
own wedding among them—and,
for the rest, letters, Piles of let«
ters, all in his handwriting.

The wretched woman seemed
‘> have every scrap he had ever
written to her, As he turned them
over, some of the phrases he had
used in them floated into his
mind, and he began to apprehend
for the first time what the depth
of her resentment nrust have been
when he threw her over,

But where the devil did she
keep the only letter that matter-

ed? f

S he straightened himself
A from the desk he heard close
behind him a hideous, choking
sound, He spun round quickly.

Bessie was standing behind
him, her face a mask of horror.
Her mouth was wide open in dis~
may. She drew a long, shudder-
ing breath. In another moment
she was going to scream at the
top of her voice.

Timothy’s pent-up fury could
be contained no longer. With all
his force he drove his fist full
into that gaping, foolish face,
Bessie went down as though she
had been shot, and her head
struck the leg of a table with thea
crack of a stick broken in
two. She did not move again.

Although it was quiet enough
in the room after that, he never
heard his stepmother come in.
Perhaps it was because the sound
of his own pulses drumming ig ,
his ears had deafened him. )

He did not even know how lon,
she had been there. Certainly
was long enough for her to taka
in everything that was to be seem
there for her voice, when she
spoke was perfectly under con-
trol..

“You have killed Bessie,” she
said. It was a calm statement of
fact, rather than an accusation.

He nodded speechless.

“But you have not found the
letter.” !

He shook his head.

“Didn’t you understand what
she told you this evening? The
Jetter is in the post. It was her
Christmas "present to you. Poor,
simple loving Bessie!”

*

He at her aghast.

“It was only just now that
I found that it was missing from
my jewel case,” she went on, still
in the same flat, quiet voice, “I
dont know how she found out
about it, but love — even wg
crazy love like hers—gives people
a strange insight sometimes,”

“Then you were Leech?” he

faltered.

“Ot course. Who else? How
otherwise do ze think I could
have kept the house open and my,

of debt on my

out
income?”

“No, Timothy, don’t come any,
nearer, You are not going to com=
mit two murders tonight, I don’®
think you would have the nerve,
in any case, but to be on the safe
side I have brought the little pis~
to] your father gave me when he
came out of the Army in 1918,
Sit down.” {

He found himself crouching om
the sofa, looking helplessly up inta
her pitiless face. e body that

een Bessie lay between
“Bessie’s heart was very weak,
she said reflectively. “Roger had
been worried about it for some
time. If I have a word
him I dare say he will see hig
way to issue a death certificate,
Tt will, of course, be a little ex-
pensive. Shall we say a thousand
pounds this year, instead of five
hundred? You would prefer that,
Timothy, I dare say to—the ala
ternative?”

Once more, Timothy nodded in
silence, \

“Very well. I shall speak ta
Roger in the morning—after youl

e returned me Bessie’s Christ-
I shal] require ff

You can go now,



mas present.
for future use

Timothy.’



PAGE FOUR



CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT





DAMES & WICKED SISTERS

High Fantasie Of Pantomime

By BEVERLEY BAXTER
THE PANTOMIME

The

As a dramatic critic I receive
two free seats for every new
theatrical production in the West
End, as well as the smaller
theatres in the suburbs, This
sounds very agreeable, and indeed
it has its pleasurable side, but a
eriti¢ must see plays which no
sané man would think of doing.
As a professional grave digger we
havé no warning as to the condi-
tion of the corpses.

Yet. ohce a year the critic
abandons his lofty pose of su-
periority and becomes as gullible
as any other citizen. It is when
Mr, Littler invites him to “Mother
Goose,” or Jack Hylton to “Alad-
diti,”. of Tom Arnold to “Cinder-
ella.” Chtistmas is at hand and
thé Pantomime Season is about to
open,

ThE critic discovers to his sur-
prisé, that he is an intensely
popiilar fellow, his merits being
recdgnised«not only by his mature
@riends but even mpre so by
their sofis ahd daughters. As for
nephéws, nieces and god-children,
you are never out of their hearts
at this gladsome season. Warmed
by this unaccustomed affectjon
and interest the critic gets on the
telephone and actually purchases,
for ready money, extra tickets
fn all directions. It is said that
thé spéctacle of a critic purchasing
a ticket has caused even the most
hard-boiled box office attendants
to burst into tears,

XS & SN
Blame The Kids

Now the strange part about all
this is that the critic (and we
shall dispose of him altogether
in a minute) actually looks for-
ward to seeing the Pantomime.
“It’s fun to go with the kids,” he
says. “They like all this non-
sense about dames and brothers’
men and wicked sisters.”

“And the principal boy?” says
his wife sweetly,

“Queer thing,” says the critic,
“I often wonder why the Princi-
pal Boy is played by a girl.”

“IT can think oi two well shaped
reasons,” says the wife.

“Probably goes back to the
Elizabethans,” declares the critic
pompously, “when girls used to
be played by boys. That’s why
Shikespeste was always dressing
his boys up in boys’ clothes be-
cause they were more convincing
that. way than dressed as girls.’

“You mean,” says his stupid
wife, “that when a boy dresses
up i. a boy he looks more like
a girl.”

w &
Quite Wrong

Where did this theatrical ex-
travaganza of pantomime begin?
Of course the average parsdn
would say that pantomime is as
English as Brussels sprouts, that
it sprang from the soil of England
and has never really taken root
in any other country. That answer
is about twenty-three centuries
wrong in the matter of origin.

The original pantomimes came
to Rome from Etruria, (look it up
on the map yourself, I’m too
busy), in the year 364 B.C. They
were called histriones, from
histor, a dancer, which accounts
for the modern word histrionic
which has nothing to do with
dancing at all. But in those days
the dancers were the only actors,
wearing masks and speaking no
lines.

Augustus became the
patron of this art, so much
fact that he is regarded by
historians (from histoire,
stofy) as the inventor of

great
so in
some
a tall
dumb

acting. If that is so he has an
awful lot to answer for the
modern theatre

You all know that history
péats itself, so it is interesting to
note that the mimes, that is the
dumb actors, became so popular
with fhe knights and nobles that
there was a great deal of frater-
nisatioh, and drinking of Hemlock
Fizzies_ at the local pub. This
made Tiberius angry, h

iy

cht
nobles tg east actors’ houses
ot bé seen wi ¢€ with them in

re-

the streets, or climbing the Seven
Hills,

However, things began to im-
prove for the Pantomimists in
Rome when Caligula looked on
them with favour. You will re-
member (at any rate you ought to
if you don’t) that Caligula was so
devoted to his horse that he made
it a senator. I’ve often met a sen-
ator who proved to be an ass, but
this was the first time, I am al-
most certain of my facts, that a
horse was made a senator.

But again you see history tell-
ing the same story twice. Cali-
gula’s horse was the authentic
origin of the Pantomime horse at
Christmas, the one with the wide
grin and the collapsible back legs.



Sometimes Right

Caligula however, does not de-
serve as much credit as Nero who
not only played the violin, but also
fancied himself as an actor. So
he became one of the dumbest
stars in the history of Pantomimes
and was much acclaimed by the
critics of his day who did not want
to be on the menu at the Coliseum.
Unfortunately Nero’s influence
was not good. He took the view
that since the actors’ faces were
masked, and their voices were not
used, the audience ought to be
given something for their money.
In other words, he was in favour
of the human body being revealed
since it had to do all the acting.

This may well have been the
st discovery of the femalé leg
although I doubt it. At any rate
the local Jane Russells livened up
the old mythological tales which
were the chosen theme, but I am
glad to say that this exhibitionism
did not take place without protest.
The early Christians were right
on the job and said that if this
kind of thing continued the Ro-
man Empire would collapsé. And
so it did, whith shows that the
critics aren't always wrong.

flr

It was not until the 17th cen-
tury that the pantomimic art
spread to England, but the public
did not enthuse as much as the
Romans did about the mythologi-
cal legends. So eventually the
popular form was the story of Co-
lumbine and Harlequin in which
Columbine was a simple village
lass and Harlequin, note careful-
ly, was always being chased by
comic constables. Thus we begin
to see the unfolding of the pattern
which has become exclusively
British. Instead of being a figure
of awe, the iceman is always
worsted. by 4 @ comics who have
the enthusiisfic suppoftt of the





1
children in the audience in their
attempts to evade arrset.

& & &
Begin With Dishes

There is in every normal child
an instinctive love of the absurd
and the incongruous. It demon-
strates. itself even in the first
months in life when a baby will
throw dishes from its high chair
on to the floor, and gurgle witn
satisfaction over the deed. The
baby well knows that this is
breaking the law, as well as the
dishes, but that only adds zest to
the crime. Not only that, it likes
to see its father stand on his head.
or put on his wife’s hat, or fall
down the stairs, (this always gets
a great laugh from the dear little
cherub), or crawl under the sofa
and bark like a dog.

Deep ctown in its little mind the
infant is making its unconscious
protest against the drabness of
life in later years, when we all
begin slowly to die from creeping
common sense. And here let me
say that the wise man, and cer-
tainly the happy one, never en-
tirely loses that early love of
absurdity. The keener the mind,
the more vivid the imagination,
the deeper is the appreciation of
the nonsensical. Nothing but a
superbly cultivated intellect could
have written “Alice in Wonder-
land” or “The Importance of
being Earnest.”

The aeveiopment of the Panto-
mime was shrewdly based on
ec hild_ psychology. Thus in
modern times the rapturous Box-



Long may it survive.

ing Day audience finds that the
“Babes in the Wood” are none
other than those eminent adult
London comedians, Mr. Nervo and
Mr. Knox. Are the Babes fright~
ened when they are lost in the
wood? In a way, Yes; but they
indicate by their jokes that they
will be quite all right. Even
when they lie down to sleep Mr.
Knox takes care to place a large
rat under Mr. Nervo’s pillow of
leaves, and Mr. Nervo carefully
places his shoes on the other
Babe's face.

sh
Bless Her...

And who is their mother? Bless
her heart, it is Monsewer Eddie
Grey with his alcoholic nose, his
prodigious moustache and his ex-
quisite French phrases, The Mon-
sewer is of course the Dame and
when she loses her temper in the
kitchen does she send the Babes
to bed without supper? Not a bit
of it. She hits them over the head
with a broom while they pull her
skirt off, revealing two such
spindly legs that the Monsewer
admits he won them from a spar-
row in a wager.

But the finer things are not for-
gotten. There is compulsory
education in Pantomimes as in real
life, so off the Babes go to school
where Bud Flanagan, (I admit
that this is an all star cast I am
assembling), is the schoolmaster
who writes on the blackboard:—

How much
Is
Too and Too?
Mr. Nervo says the answer is

HORSES DANCE

“Too Much” whereupon he and
the other Babe give the teacher a
spanking, Now to any well regu-
lated child with normal instincts
this is exactly how life ought to
be. No Adolf Hitler could rise
to power in a_ setting where
everything pompous is oe
and everything cruel is pu

There is wisdom as well as in¢on-
gruity in the kingdom of child-
hood’s imagination.

5 >
Cinderocracy

The Pantomime which differs
from all the others is “Cinderella”
and I wonder that the Labour
Government permits it to be
shown. In its romantic unfolding
it extol class distinction, praises
the pfofit motive, atid preaches
the lesson that a really nice gitt
in lowly position should be cate-
ful to marry into the aristocracy
where there is a lot of money
It is true that Cinders is fond
Buttons but she does not allow
her head to be ruled by her heart.
Buttons is her only friend,
of course her poor,
father, but she has had enougt
of the kitchen “and dreams of
better things, Thus she does not
even pretend to be coy when the
Prince offers his hand after find-
ing her foot. Cinders knew a
good thing when she saw it.

Personally I have never been
convinced that the size of a maid-
en’s foot was sufficient reason for
marriage, But neture in her
determination to preserve the
continuity of the human race,
moves in her own mysterious,
inexorable way. It is well known
that the daughters of the British
aristocracy nearly all have large
feet, no doubt due to the amount
of exercise they take in their
youth. But perhaps for political
reasons, the Prince felt that it
would be wiser to marry a com-
moner,

The Americans cannot under=
stand our passion for pantominé.
To them it just doesn’t maks
sense, but that of course is itg
charm. Pantomine doesn’t make
sense, and if it ever does it will
die.

A Toast

But if you go to one this year
think of its long history and its
ancient origin, how in its own
way it is the human spirit firiding
relief from the cares and dfab-
ness of everyday life. Above all,
when you laugh- at the comedians
give a thought to the great
Grimaldi, “the genuine droll, the
grimacing, filching, irresistible
clown”, who laboured so hard
in bringing laughter to London
that he died prematurely, worn
nut by his exertions.

Sweet ladies and gentlemen, I
give you the British pantomime.
Long may it survive to keep the
wisdom of childhood ‘alive in alt
of us,



CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE FIVE





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PAGE SIX

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

eindeer Are

by Oden and Olivia Wacker

LAPLAND, Christmas Eve.
«sANTA CLAUS is called Joulu-

pukki here, where he finds
his reindeer. Everybody in Fin-
aush Lapland, like Joulupukki,
cacives a reindeer. Joulupukki,
himself lives on a mountain called
Korvantuturi, which is not far
from the Soviet frontier. In Lap-
land he drives his reindeer straight
up to the door and rings the door-
pell—instead of coming down, the
chimney. (Inside the Arctic circle
it is only the devil who comes
down the chimney). And out of
his pack he takes toboggaus,
skates, or a new pair of skis, for
small admirers who have out-
grown their old ones.,

For Father Christmas’s annual
circular tour from Korvantutus!,
he has only to draw on the local
supply of reindeer. Since almost
all Lapps and Finns keep reindeer,
and twenty-five thousand some-
times turn up at a single fall
roundup, there is an adequate
number. Lapland is stil] based
firmly on a reindeer economy, A
Lapp is reckoned in reindeer, and
since he may owm a herd of 3,000
worth five million finmarks, his
financial position is comparable
to that of a British captain of
industry. f

Rangifer tarandus fennicus, the
Christmas deer power, is about six
feet three inches long and looks
silly every year when his antlers
fall off. Fortunately, they grow
back by Noel. He is the only do-
mesticated member of the deer
family, and has been employed
since Neolithic times. He can pull
about two hundred and twenty
pounds, or pack sixty-five. If he
skids going downhill he can brake
with his forefeet; when tired he
lies down in harness until rest and
food are provided. He can cover
thirty-five or forty miles a day,
usually in a series of long curves.
A reindeer who follows a straight
track has a high market value.

The reindeer pulls a pulkka, a
small sled with a single runner
on its bottom. The general effect
is that of someone riding around
in an old slipper. Santa’s sleigh
is closest to that of the eastern
Skolt Lapps who employ a sort of
troika with runners, pulled by
three reindeer, Reindeer, natural-
ly, are guided with reins. They
do not use a bit.

The Lapps, Who came to Finland
from the east, are nice to their
reindeer, as well they should be.
They sleep on reindeer skins, and
wear reindeer hats, boots and mit-
tens, They eat reindeer meat, and
Lapp spoons are made from rein-
deer horn. Surgical sutures are
made of reindeer sinews The
poor reindeer supplies the raw
material for al] his own harness
except for one bit of metal.
Reindeer milk is turned into
cheese which is cut into cubes

and put into Lappish coffee.
The meat is always fresh in
wintertime since it is frozen

solid, ready to be cut into paper-
thin slices and fried in butter.
Reindeer meat is often sold in
London as venison. The certi-
fied Finnish gourmet may dally
with saddle of reindeer at his
banquet, but the great Lappish
delicacies are the bone marrow
and the tongue. Mrs, Eleanor
Roosevelt tried the tongue when



she turned up % the Arctic temperatures.
Cashbox the accountant has D spends £3 on B; so she also |

four daughters. Annabel is !1,
Briony is nine, Charmain is eight.
Deidre is seven. He gave each of
them as many pounds as she ‘ts
years old to spend upon her
sisters. (Too much, maybe;
we're not concerned with that).

Each of the girls spent so many
pounds exactly on each of the
other three and thé net result of
their efforts was that each of them
received presents worth just as
much as she herself had spent,

“Exchange no robbery’, com-
mented Cashbox.
Neither Annabel nor Briony

nor Charmian spent the same
amount on any two of the others
The largest single expenditure
was Annabel’s on Briony; £5.
Charmian only spent £1 on Briony
and Deidre spent only £1 on
Charmian. How did Briony |ay
cut her money?
ANSWER

Call the four girls A. B. C.D,
and draw the outlines of a chart
A Cc

B D ‘Total
A— 5 11
B — 9
Cc i— 8
D 1 — 7
Totals 11 9 -8

7
The chart is quickly completed.




circle last summer and she said

it was fine. ;
Lapland lives on reindeer, ani the

the reindeer live on reindeer

T

smoking

JOULUPUKKI

Ua

In Lapland everybody arived

he Lappish costume is tailored

of black or dark blue barathea—

stuff from which taileoats and
jackets are ordinarily

moss, which it scoops out of the made — with canary and scarlet

snow with its forefeet.

They trimmings around the edges and

can smell the moss under three topped off with a tetra-peaked

feet of snow. During

the floppy affair known as the Cap

summer the deer cannot be kepi of the Four, Winds. But barathea,

together in herds because they
rush off into the hills to escape?

the mosquitos and gad flies which @re

like coffee,
Finland, so that when

is rationed, now in

4 e Lapps
at a loss to think up something

‘ay their eggs under their skin ‘© spend their money on, they
end in their nostrils. In the Just go out and bury it in the
all roundups, after the first ground in a secret place in the
snowfall, the deer are caught forest, and carefully refrain from
with the aid of skis, lassos

spitzes . The ears of

are notched with the registered
owners,

mark ot their and for
‘urther identification the
may have a name

|

perhaps Pikku Soturi (Little
Warrior) or Neata (Curved
Antlers). Government taxes are

computed in the number of rein -

deer a man Owns. govern-
ment, incidentally, is almost the
only outfit which may know the
extent of a man’s Treindeer

holdings—to inquire of a Lapp
how many eer he owns is a
gaucherie equivalent to asking
a stockbroker the extent of his
bank account.

Money doesn’t tnean much in
Lapland, Rich Lapps live very
much like poor Lapps, except that
they like to spend money on)
clothes, and may buy a little ex-
tra snuff, aquavit, and Frencn
brandy (beer is useless’ since it
freezes). But the favorite ex-
travagance is coffee, and when
on the social merry-go-round at
Christmas, a Lapp- may drink as
many as forty or fifty cups a day.
Lapp teeth decay very quickly om
this regime because the enamel
cracks from the effect of scalding
hot coffee drunk at near-zero

CECCUAL EGC SS

spends £3 on_A. A can only

spend £4 on C (for if she spends |

¢2, B spends £5). The chart can

now be completed at sight. j

Briony spent £4 gn_ Annabel; |

¢3 on Charmian; £2 on Deidre.
* *



Here are two variations of ©
party game that should get a lot
of laughs this Christmas. |

Firstly the Orange trick. This
is best played as a team game 3

One person on each side takes *
an orange and places it firmly | a
under their chin, Then the next
person tries fo remove it by Plac- EB

2
ing it under their chin without
2
=
>
x
=
>
z
>
=

using their hands, and so on
down the line. The team that}
pets the orange to the end of the |
line first without dropping it is,
the winner |

The variation on this game re- |
quires a match-box cover Place |
one of the open ends firmly over |
the nose and then get the person
rearest to you in ‘your team to
remove it with their nose an‘
pass it down the line, Again th«
first team to make the complete
journey is the winner. But it 3?
the match-box should be dropped,
then it is necessary to start all
over again














We



telling anyone—so that it will be
sure to be lost,

Lapps are short, swart, stooped
but agile, with prominent fore-
heads, flattish noses and timor-
ous dispositions. They used to be
noted as great sorcerers and war-
locks who were able to stop ships
under full sail. They could also
throw magic darts miles through
the air at their enemies (one of
the first guided missiles in Eu-
rope) and they believed in Thor
and the Sun, and a host of demi-
gods, daemons, spectres, spooks

alth





and so on, Reindeer sacrifices
were especially appreciated, and
heaps of ten thousand antlers
were sometimes dedicated to
Storjunkare, the lieutenant god
in charge of all fish, foxes, bear,
wolves, reindeer and other game.
Storjunkare resembled a man
dressed in a conservative black
suit, except for his bird’s feet.

Those Lapps who aren’t noma-
dic now often make their houses
out of Tate and Lyle sugar box
(presumably they know all so
Mr. Cube), but otherwise they
haven't changed a great deal since
they came to Lapland about a
thousand years ago. They are
technically Christians, but offer-
ings of reindeer horns stib
turn up for the old gods at the
old places. Lapp babies are cradled
in little pulkka-like and
as soon as they are big enough to
run about, the dren ey
“reindeer”. For each new tooth, a
child is given a real reindeer of
his own to take care of, “He who
intends to marry looks out for
a Maid wel] stocked with Rein-
deer ... for a Laplander does
not regard anything else, neither
Honesty nor Beauty .. .” reported
John Scheffer, Professor of Law
end Rhetoric at Upsala University,
who in 1674 wrote the first com-
prehensive account of Lapland.
According to Scheffer, the suitor
courts his beloved with roast
reindeer tongue, and woos her
with love songs:

KULNAFATZ, My Reindeer
We have a long journey to go,
The Moors are Vast,

And we must haste...
Winged with impatient Fire
My Reindeer let us haste.

Before he can claim the lady,
however, the young man must
extract permission not only from
her parents but from all her rela-
cives, all of whom demand gifts.
This custom has died out re-
cently, but Lapps still don’t ex-
change presents at Christmas.

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PAGE EIGHT

® 5

'’S a bad thing, are told,

to mix one’s drinks. A salutary
piece of advice, no doubt, around
‘Christmas and other festive
periods. But what’s a poor Scots-
rman to do when it’s next to im-
possible for him in these hard
tunes to get the only drink that
really appeals to him for celebra-
tion hours.

“Scotch” is scarce and dear in
the land of its production. One of
Scotland’s Christmas pantomime
favourites, the late Will Fyffe,
used to bring the house down
after World War I with a song
that complained about the price
of food (as he called it)—
“Twelve-and-a—tanner a_ bottle!”
12/6d. a bottle! The dourest Scot
to-day would be prepared to sell
his soul for a bottle at that price.
At thrice 12/6d. almost, it’s still
a rationed commodity five years
after World War II; and black
market prices are fantastic. It cau
be no consolation at all, avound
Christmas anyway, that whisky
(not whiskey, please--that’s not
Scotch in spelling +r taste!) ex-
ercises such attraction across “ue
Atlantic that it’s one 0% Britain’s
biggest dollar earners.

we

KEN literally or metaphor

ically, this question of mix-
ing drinks affects the Scot in,
varied ways His hereditary in- |
stincts are all against mixing}
things: be it a matter of drinks, |
of religion, or of po¥itics. He)

may be willing enough on occa-|
sion, in the warmth of his fav-

ourite “loreal” (public drinking
house) to discuss with a crony
both politics and religion. But

dare suggest that these two mix}
and pretty sharply he'll draw at-

tention to the fact that if the
Church of England timidly suf-
fers association with. the State,
his own Established Church of}
Scotland brooks no such entan-
glement of affairs spiritual and}
secular.

The spirit of the 16th Century |
Reformer John Knox, the spirit
of Jenny Geddes, who threw a
stool at the head of a preacher
in St. Giles daring to use a
prayer book offensive to her P”o-
festant faith, has lived on in the



Scot, It affects to this day his
very attitude to Christmas re-
joicing



“tal
For the celebration of Christ-|
mas in Scotland, though chang-
ing Slightly in recent years, is a}
quite different affair from that in
England. Christmas for the te-
nighted Sassenach (Englishman)
is a “holiday”; for the Scot it’s
a “holy day”, Throughout Eng-|
land, the Christmas holiday mood
is so exuberant that it cannot be
confined to one day; there they
had to institute a Boxing Day
(day after Christmas) in order
to have two days’ holiday. Box-
ing Day, forsooth—and the Sas-
senach has the nerve to point the
finger of scorn at our “Caledonia,
stern and wild!”
gens Scots celebration of Christ~
mas, in fact, is much more}
akin to that of France and other
European countries. The em-
phasis there on recognition of
Chritsmas Day as Nativity Day i3|
increasingly reflected in Scotland
nowadays by the attendances, both |
on Christmas Eve and on Christ-
mas Day itself, at church services,
Not that we suggest the Eng-
lishman does not attend Christ-
mas religious services, He does
so, be it agreed, in greater num-
bers than his fellow Briton north
of the Tweed. But the average
Scot, with the ghost of Knox hov-
ering around him, reminds him-
self that Christmas Day was for-
merly Old Yule Day—a pagan
festival, if ever there was! And
he has already enough jibes to
contend with from the Sassenach
about the “pagan” North. |
When Mr. Knox’s shadow isn’t |
too closely around, it may be ad-|
mitted by the Scott that he, too,
observes his pagan festivals. And |
what festivals! Gorgeous festivals
of fire, veritable sunworship. At |
the close of the hallow days of |
“ule (feast of the Winter Sols- |
tive, in case you don't know), in
J: nuary, you should see at Burg-
head, a Moray Firth town, the!
erremony of the “Burning of the |
©lavie”—an occasion, and night, of
real pagan revelry, Or, still more |{
lively spectacle, the ceremony on |
January 6, (December 25, by the!





CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT





he Christmas Spirit Of Che Scot

By Douglas IM. R. Cobban

old style calendar), of Up-Heily
Aa, in Shetland, when a gaily
bedecked vessel in the Norse
tradition is put to sea and set
merrily ablaze, as the seal on not
just one day’s festival, but a
whole month of Yule festivity. In
the far north of Scotland, de-
scendants of the Norse invaders
of many centuries ago cling to
Yule traditions in a way ich
no other part of Britain emulates
nowadays.

But the point is that in what-
ever way the Scot recognises he
has a pagan past, he intends tc
make it obvious that Christmas,
for him, is something different.
He refuses to let any of the pagan
instincts left in him clash witk
his Christian conscience—at an:
rate in such public celebration as
that of Christmas day. lz the
Englishman can’t see the differ-

between the two neoples. Yes?
Wicked nationalist pride? No,
no, No, a :

PRUVE IT, I'll confess, as a
Scot, that the Scots are just

€
rk
4

-nad, much madder than the dogs
“who go out in the mid-day sun.”
The Scots, when you mention

ence — well, it just goes to show Christmas time to them, have that

there exists that clea: distinction





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not really thinking of Christmas at
all; they’re dreaming of Hogma-
nay, of black bun and ginger
wine and yes, even to-day, of
whisky—not Irish, Canadian, or
Australian impurities but the
“real Mackey.”

Hogmanay? It’s a madness, a
lovely madness, that isn’t confined
to any “pagan” remna:.: of the
country, but sweeps the whole of
Scotland off its Presbyterian legs,
draws back home every year
thousands upon thousands of the
20 million Scots exiles, spread,
according to the Sassenach, in
nauseating ubiquity over the
earth’s surface.

a

Come to King’s Cross Station,
London, on the eve of Hogmanay,
the last day of the year. You'll
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night of greatest merriment of the
year for Scots at home or abroad.

Christmas in Scotland is still
the beautiful festival of the
children, Santa Claus and all that,
and homage to the basically re-
ligious outlook of the Scot. New
Year—Hogmanay — is the euper+
seding “fling” of the adults, the
night and a day when the Scot
really lets his hair down. From
any time after dark on New
Year’s Eve until any time on
New Year’s Day itself, the Scot
is at his sentimental best—the
friend of all the world. And,
especially these days, it isn’t just
whisky-inspired. Even the Sas-
senach privileged to share in the

that.
“Auld Lang Syne”, the world’s

most popular au revoir, is sung in
the land of its origin during
Hogmanay with a fervour which
lets you deep into the secret of
the Scot’s character. When he is
religious, he is religious. When
he is pagan, he is pagan. He
doesn’t mix his drinks.

Hoch aye (Scots for Q.E.D.)!
a ? ’





ACTOR





CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE NINE

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PAGE TEN

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT



Selection Of Christmas

Recipes
by Joan Ershina

At Christmas, food usually pre-
sents a problem, Do you keep to
the time-honoured recipes that
have served you so well in the
past, or do you experiment reck-
lessly, and try out new ideas? We
would suggest this year a com~-
promise. Without abandoning your
favourite Christmas recipes com-
pletely, turn to other countries for
imspiration, and introduce a little
variety into the festive fare.

‘The majority of the recipes be-
low, collected from reliable friends
’ gil over the world, are for sweet
palates, and are easy and quick to

prepare.

KOURABIEDES

(Popular throughout Greece and eaten
on all Festive

Cream } lb. butter, work in gtad-
wally 1 lb, flour, 4 Ib. icing sugar
and 1 teaspoon of baking powder.

Work thoroughly, roll out and
divide into pieces 2 inches wide
and about 3 inches long. Bake in
a slow oven
browning. When done, dip in
icing sugar, being careful that each
piece is evenly coated.

Morocco,
BANANA FRITTERS

The bananas are peeled, cut into
4 lengthwise and cooked in liqueur.
‘They are then dipped in a good
irying batter, flavoured with the
same liqueur in which the bananas
swere marinated, sprinkled with
breadcrumbs and fried in hot fat
‘te a golden colour. They are then
sprinkled with crystallised sugar.

"Turkey,
RAHAT EL HALKUM

Make a thick syrup with just
over 2 lbs of sugar and % pints
water, adding 1 tablespoon lemon
juice and stirring in 5 ozs. fine
starch. Stir continuously and when
the mixture begins to thicken, add
a few blanched almonds, pistachio
nuts and shelled and halved hazel-
nuts, Pour mixture into deep dish,
sprinkled with fine starch, cut into
squares and let stand till cold.

MUNKACZINA

This is a simple and popular
ad, suitable for hors-d’oeuvre.
oranges, sliced onions, small
black olives, with dressing of
little oil, salt and red pepper.
Arabia. (Contd)
FOUJA DJEDJAD
¢ les stuffed with chicken)
ny slice from the top of an
apple, remove the core, but with-
out piercing fhe other side of the
fruit and wees out some
of the interior.
breast chicken

es, Sprinkle
tan prend crumbs, moisten with
a little fat and bake in the oven.

lew
sugar,

and a

Persia
CHICKEN WITH SAFFRON

‘ Boiled chicken is carved up and
put on a piled-up dish of rice.
Saffron is then generously sprin-
kled over the top.

SALTED GREEN PEAS
First cook peas in cinders and

then salt them like almonds,
BITTER CHERRIES
Simply coat them with) iting
sugar,

Ivory Coast, Africa
FOUTOU

for % hours without -

peeled and pounded in a mortar
and highly seasoned th salt,
pepper, red peppers and grated
nutmeg. This is eaten with either
chicken or meat fricasses cooked
in palm oil.

Guinea
DOCONO

Coarse semolina, in
sweetened milk with sliced
‘aenee, and flavoured with van-
illa cinnamon. It is served
either hot or cold,

CHAKCHOUKA

4 or 5 large onions are browned
in oil and well ed, the
same number of sliced tomatoes
are added and three or four sweet

wi the egg has just

Eastern Asia
NEMS (Annamese Rissoles)

Make a somewhat stiff rissole
paste, which is cut into a
round, about the size of a
and quite thick. On this
spoonful of finely chopped
meat consisting of pork, mush-

uncooked

rooms or cepes, a little

vermicelli, crab meat, all
well seasoned with salt > pep-
per. Pancake is then rolled and
fried in hot fat.

French West Indies
CONFITURE DE COCO
(Coconut Jam)

It is better made when required
and served either or just
slightly cold, With 1 of sugar
and a little water make a syrup,
flavouring it with vanilla. Ade
the grated coconut and simmer
very gently, stirring occasionally
until the coconut is almost trans-
parent.

Italy

ta

PIZZA “PIGLIATA”

This excellent sweet consists of
short-crust ro out ,
aeiesne or brushed over with

oney and strewn with
walnuts and hazel nuts, on
candied peel and mixed spices. It
is then rolled up to form a long
sausage, and this is twisted into
a spiral and baked in a moderate
oven for 30 minutes till it is of
a golden colour.



Austria

SARDELL LN MUSCHELN
(Anchovies in shells)

, This is a very special hors-
po eee made by creaming 6

butter, then adding the yolks
of four eggs, a few pounded an-
chovies, 1% ozs. grated Parmesan
cheese, chopped chives, and fin-
ally the white of egg beaten to
a stiff froth. The mixture is put
on scallop shats and cooked in a
hot oven for "en minutes.

Hungevry

BOSZORKANYHAL
( Witches’ froth)

Ingredients
2 Ibs apples
Whites of 2 or 3 eggs
6 tablespoons sugar
Little lemon juice
Sliced fresh fruit
Whipped Cream

Methot: Bake the apples till

pulp gradually to the whites of
eggs to a very stiff snow,
to which the sugar and lemon
juice have been added. Put in a
glass dish and garnish with slices
of fresh fruit and whipped cream

Poland
OGORKI ZAPIEKANE
(Baked cucumbers)

Take 12 pickling cucumbers,
peel and steam them. Put them
in a fireproof dish, cover with
Bechamel or white sauce, sprinkle

i and bread-
crumbs, salt and pepper. Dot
with pats of butter and put in the
oven to brown. This is served as
a hot hors-d’oeuvre.

Sweden
GRADDVAFFLER
(Swedish waffles)

Whip 1 pint of sour cream till
quite stiff and add 3 cups of flour
gradually, 2 ozs. of melted but-
ter and 1 gill of water—in Swe-
den the equivalent amount of
snow is used and this is said to
improve the waffles. Pour a lit-
tle of the mixture on the well-
greased and hot waffle iron and
cook to a golden brown. Serve
with sugar or jam.

Denmark
RISENGROD
(Rice porridge)

\% lb. of rice, 4 pints of milk,
ss cream, beer, cinnamon
sal

Put the rice (previously wash-
ed in cold and scalded
with boiling water) in the boil-
ing milk. Stir well and simmer
for one hour. Season with a little
salt and add thick cream just be-
fore serving. This is eaten with
a lump of cold butter in each
plate, a little sweet beer, sugar
and cinnamon.



China

FOO YONG HY

(Crab omelette)

1 tin crab, 2 eggs.
Beat the eggs tho

roughly. Put
id the crab in a hot oiled pan with

a little pepper and salt and fry
for one or two minutes. Then ada
the beaten eggs, stir continuously
and fry for one more minute.

America (New Orleans)
CREOLE COOKIES

12 oz. plain flour

2 level teaspoons Baking Powder

6 ozs. margarine

4 oe sugar

1 tablespoon coffee syrup
(recipe follows)

144 teaspoon vanilla

Pinch of salt

Roughly chopped nuts and gin-

. ger or raisins

Golden syrup

(or molasses if
available)

eggs (keeping
half an egg to brush over
later) vanilla and coffee i
— me a a which has
ns e nein’
der and salt, until the aoe
a stiff dough. Roll out on a flour-
ed board till about an eighth of
an ineh thick. Cut with a 3-ineh
cutter into biscuits. B with
the remains of the Rd into which
a teaspoon of golden syrup or
beaten,

molasses has been and
sprinkle with chopped nuts and
chopped ginger. Bake in a mod-
erate oven for 15 minutes. This
amount should make about 30
cookies.

Coffee syrup:

4 tablespoons ground o> vacuum
packed coffee

% pint water

4 tablespoons Demerara sugar

% teaspoon vanilla

Method: Infuse the coffee and
water by your usual method and
strain it very carefully, making
sure no grounds pass through,
into a clean saucepan. Add the
Demerara sugar and bring to the
boil; let it simmer for two min-
utes. Remove from the heat, ada
vanilla and allow the mixture t
ool. Then pour it off into a bot-

; : , very soft, remove the peel and tle, cork it and store in the re-
Their great national dish con- core and rub the pulp through a frigerator or a very cool place
sists of yams boiled in water, sieve. When quite cold, add this till required.

ON WASSAIL
by Our Special Investigators

Christmas presents us with a

wonderful excuse to indulge in an them

orgy of eating and drinking.
Steaming bowls of punch, a pro-
fusion of sweetmeats, ice-cold
cocktails, and blazing plum-
puddings fill our thoughts.
Whether we celebrate in style, or
quietly at home with the family,
new recipes are tried out, new
drinks concocted, and a glutton-
ous time is had by all.
In the words of an old drinking
song:—
“This ancient silver bowl of
mine, it tells of good old times
Of joyous days and jolly nights,
and Merry Christmas 2
They were a free and jovial
race,
but honest, brave and true
That dipped their ladle in the

punch
when this old bowl was new.”
Here are two favourite punch
recipes:

BOMBAY PUNCH

Stir gently.
Surround
Punch b o wl
with cracked
ice and decor-
ate with fruits
in season.

on

4 ats. Cl Champagne
2 qts. Carbonat-
ed Water

GLASGOW PUNCH

Melt lump sugar in cold water,
with the juice of a couple of
lemons, and pass through a fing
hair strainer. This is the sher-
bert and must be well mingled.
Then add old Jamaica rum—one
part of rum to five of sherbert.
Cut a couple of limes in two and
run each section rapidly round
the edge of the jug or bowl,-
gently s in some of the
delicate acid. done, the
punch s made. | Imbibe freely.

Cocktails lead a rather _ more

si ticated existence. Earliest

to the cocktail in print

comes from an American periodical

“The Balance,” dated May

13th, 1806. It says “Cocktail is a

fiertetine sg composed <
spirits of any , sugar, wa’

and bitters—it is vulgarly called

bittered sling and is supposed to

he an excellent celectioneering

potion.”

Here are some stimulating, and
reliable, recipes:
CHARLES COCKTAIL (Now

becoming popular again be-
cause it is the only known
authentic Jacobite cocktail—
and Princess Elizabeth’s two
children, Princess Anne and

Prince Charles both bear
Jacobite’ names—the first
Royal children to do so for
generations).
1 dash Angostura Stir well and
Bitters strain into
4 Italian Ver- cocktail glass.
mouth
4 Brandy
DAM-THE-WEATHER
COCKTAIL

3 dashes Curacao Shake well and
¢ Orne We strain into

Italian Ver- cocktail glasses
: mouth

ERCLAP COCKTAIL
Thoroughly shake up 2 glasses
of Brandy, 2 of Gin. and 2 of
Whiskey. Serve! To the six peo-
ple. Then run for your life.

CHINESE. COCKTAIL
1 dash Angostura Shake well and
bitters strain into
3 dashes Maras-
chino

cocktail glasses
3 dashes Curacao
1/3 Grenadine
2/3 Jamaica rum

SPANISHTOWN COCKTAIL
5 glasses Rum Pour into shak-

1 dessertspoon er, add a large
Curacao quantity of ice
and shake thor-
ou Grate
a little nutmeg
over each glass

and serve.

ARTISTS’ (SPECIAL)

COCKTAIL

1/3 Whisky Shake well and
1/3 Sherry strain into

1/6 Lemon Juice cocktail glass.
1/6 Groseille

Syrup

(A recipe from the Artist’s Club,
Rue, Pigalle, Paris)

PANAMA COCKTAIL
1/3 Creme de Shake well and

Cacao strain into
1/3 Sweet Cream cocktail glass
1/3 Brandy

WELCOME STRANGER
COCKTAIL
1/6 Grenadine Shake’ well and
1/6 Orange Juice strain into
1/6 Lemon Juice cocktai! glass
1/6 Gin
1/6 .Cederlund’s

Swedish Punch
1/6 Brandy

Amuse yourselves with the fol-





lowing variations on a well-known

e:

SINGAPORE SLING
Juice of } lemon Shake well and
} Dry Gin strain into me-
} Cherry Brandy dium size d
glass and fill
with soda wa-
ter. Add one
lump of ice.

TEXAS FIZZ

The juice of 4 Shake well,
orange strain into me-
The juice of 4 dium sized glass
lemon and fili with

1 teaspoonful syphon soda
powdered water.

gar
1 glass of dry gin

MANHATTAN COOLER

4 tablespoon Shake well and
powdered sugar strain I

Juice of 1 lemon

1 glass Calvados

su-

. SANTA CRUZ
Use small Bar

Glass

3 or 4 Getece
2 or 3 dashes
Maraschino or

Curacao
Tuice of 4 small
lemon

SOUTHERN MINT JULEP

4 sprigs Fresh mint

} tablespoon Powdered Sugar
1 glass of Bourbon, Rye, or
Canadian Club Whisky.

Use long tumbler and crush the
mint leaves and dissolved sugar
lightly together. Add spirits and
fill glass with cracked ice; stir
gently until glass is frosted. Deco
ate on top with three sprigs of
mint

And to really liven up the
party—

A BLUE BLAZER f
Use A large silver-piated mugs
WwW . *
1 Wineglass Scotch Whisky
I Wineglass Boiling water

Put the whisky into one mug
and the boiling water ifto we
other, ignite the whisky with fire
and while blazing, mix both in-
gredients by pouring them four
or five times from one mug to the
other. If well done, this will have
the appearance of a continued
stream of liquid fire.

Sweeten with one teaspoonful
of white sugar, and
serve in a small bar tumbler, with
a piece of lemon peel.

“The name may not be very
tlassic, but it tastes better than it
sounds. Novices should be careful
not to scald themselves. Practise
for sometime with cold water
throwing from one mug to the
other.”

For teenagers here is a noa-
alcoholic punch:

PARTY PUNCH (For Fifty)

Take 14 pints thin syrup, 1%
pints boiling water, 4 cup tea, dry,
iM pints ange —. 4 pint
emon squash, PD
juice or grapefruit squash, 14 ats.
ginger ale, slices of orange, Maras-
chino cherries or any other avail-
able fruit.

Put the syrup into a large bowl.
Make the tea with the boiling
water, then allow to steep, then
strain into the syrup. Mix the re-
maining ingredients and add them.

Serve very cold.
And to finish the evening—
COFFEE CREOLE
Freshly-made fairly strong
ee,
Demerara sugar or Coffee
crystals,

dy. ‘

_ Prepare the coffee and when
it is ready to serve, pour into
your finest coffee cups. Fill a tea-
spoon with hte sugar and brandy
mixed and hold it over a flame
(the heater for your vaccum cof-
fee maker or hot-plate is best) un—
til the sugar melts and bubbles
with the brandy. Then, while the
spoon with the sugar and brandy
the cup of coffee. The spoonfuls
of brandy earamel are prepared
individually for each cup, and you
will find your guests enjoy making
their own.

KAFFEE MIT SCHLAGOBERS
(Coffee topped with whipped
Cream)

Make a jug of strong coffee; add
a little milk and sufficient sugar

to taste and let it dissolve.

Whip cream very stiffly, adding
a little sugar and vanilla flavour-
ing while whipping. Serve the
coffee in tall glasses, topped with
the cold whipped cream







CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE ELEVEN

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SAVE YOUR
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Broad Street, before FRIDAY, December 29th, 1950

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PAGE TWELVE

CHRISTMAS





)WAOKEY woke up.

The room

was dark, “How strange!”
ne thought. “I must have woken
up earlier than usual.”

It was very strange, because
Mokey was a lazy little donkey,
and nearly always woke up later
than usual.

He lit the candle which stood by
his bedside, and looked at his
clock. The hands pointed to eight
o’clock, This was not so strange,
because they always did.

Mokey had found the clock pn
a rubbish heap, months ago, and
he was very proud of it.

Not only the clock but an empty
feeling inside told Mokey that’ it
was breakfast-time. This made
the darkness seem eVen more
queer. He glanced towards the
window, It was light after all.
Through the half-drawn curtains
he could see light. But something
very queer indeed happened. The
fir tree had gone in the night.

From where he lay in bed
Mokey could always see the fir
tree through the curtains, Some-
times he would see it on moonlight
— ~ glittering with frost, but it

ways the first thing which
be ‘Tooked for in the daylight. And
now it had gone.

Mokey jumped out of bed and
pulled the curtains wide apart.
Everything had gone. There was
nothing to be seen except the

and his mouth closed on a bunch
of grass. But not for long.
In another second, he shot back

in the tunnel, and his cries
echoed along it. “Ooh....ow!
coh....owd” he yelled. “Some-

thing has pricked my nose all
over.”

“Tt serves you right,” came a
cross voice from the turning, “for
trying to eat my bed.”

It was aaa = Hedgehog, in
the middle of his winter's sleep.

“Fancy tee to eat a person’s
bed,” he went on. “Not only
that, but you’ve woken me up
six wi too soon. Please go
away and take that light with
you. It is keeping me awake.”

Mokey picked up his lantern
and went on. He had not gone
far before he heard the most tre-
mendous snoring. Hod was set-
tling down to sleep again. Mokey’s
nose still smarted.

* * *

OULDY, who had gone on
ahead, was waiting for his
companion at the mouth of the
tunnel. As he came out into the
daylight, Mokey took a deep
breath. How lovely it was to be
in the fresh air again !
He was trying to think of some
way im whieh he could repay
Mouldy for his kindness in rescu-
ing him when he suddenly thought

Sinan panes glittering in the of Penelope’s party.

candle-light, | . “I say, Mouldy, are you goin
“Hoar frost,” said Mokey to to Penelope: party.” he noe
himself. He pulled down the ”

window in order to see out A

shower of snow fell on top of his

head; For a moment he was tpo

surprised to do anything. Then

he closed the window with a bang.
cs « oD

E took the key from the door
and peeped through the key
hole. He could see nothing. Very
gently he turned the handle and
opened the door just a tiny bit. He
was Mot going to be caught again.
Mokey shut the door quickly, He
had seen enough through the
crack. There was snow right up ]a§k>——————————————————————————————————
the top of the door. The very,
very worst had happened. He was
snowed in.

Mokey went back to bed and
began to think of all the awful
things which were going to happen
to him. He was going to be hun-
gry. He was going to be lonely.
He was going to miss Penelope’s
party, Since Penelope was a witch,
her parties were most exciting.
Mokey began to feel very lonely
indeed,

He was just beginning to think
about having a good cry, when he
heard a faint “tap-tap. . . tap.
tap.” It seemed to come from the
bottom of the door. He jumped

out of bed, put his ear to the door,
and called. “Who is there?”

“Open the door,” <7 a
voice. “It’s me Mouldy.”

Mokey opened the door, and

was instantly buried in a mound of
snow. He had forgotten to be
careful this time

%

E had hardly got to his feet
when Mouldy the mole pqp-
ped out of the snow-mound.

“That's a nice welcome to give
any one, I must say,” squeaked
Mouldy. “But still,
of welcome I get wherever T go.
Only not quite so much of it, as
a rule. '

“It wasn’t really my fault,” said
Mokey. “In fact, I've never been
so pleased to see anyone in my
life.”

“I should hope not,” answered
Mouldy. “I’ve been digging for you
for two hours, I’ve made g tunnel
big enough for you to crawl along.
There is only a huge great snow-
drift round your house. My tun-
nel comes into the open by the
field-path. Come along. You had
better bring your lantern, You
creatures are so clumsy in the
dark.”

When they had gone some little
distance, Mokey noticed in the
glimmer of his lantern a turning
which went to the right.

“What is that turning?” he
asked.

“Ts not a turning, really,” an-
swered Mouldy. “It’s one of Rab-

it’s old burrows. My tunnel
just ren to cut across it.

It was the smell of dried grass.
This was too much for a donkey
who had had no breakfast. Mokey
thrust his head into the turning,

it’s the sort]

“because if... .

“Party!” said Mouldy, ‘Nobody
ever invites me to a party. That
is what comes of living under-
ground. One gets out of touch
with things.”

“Well, come along

to Pene-



By BRUCE BLUNT

SUPPLEMENT



hey And Jhe Snow



AWAKES



It is 8 o'clock.

“Just my luck,” sighed Mouldy.
“When I am invited to a party,
it would be an old one.” He
vanished into the ground.

As for Mokey, he was so hun-
gry that he could have cried.

“Oh, I am so hungry,” he said,
half aloud.

“IT think I can find you a very
small carrot,” said a voice from
somewhere inside the room. And
the next moment a kitten came
through the doorway.



lope’s, then,” said Mokey.

“T'll come,” said Mouldy sadly.
“but I shan’t know what to do,
or eat, or drink, or say. I shall
be very unhappy.”

So the two set off across the
snow for Badger’s Wood, where
Penelope’s cottage was. When
they got there the door was open,
anl they could see Penelope in-
side the room, looking very cross.

“What are you doing here?”
she sereeched at them.

“Please, we've come to the
party”, Mokey answered.

“What y?”’ cried Penelope.
“Oh! that party! It’s over. It

was the day before yesterday.”








family gatherings ag

all over

T was Ugly’s Ginger Baby.

“Hello! What a. you doing
here,” asked Mok

“Dm living haoe “now,” said the
Ginger Baby. “Ever since the
black cat left her because he
could not put up with her sing-
ing, I’ve been Penelope’s cat.”

“And my magic has gone to
pieces ever since you came,”
sna i eee

magic?” asked Mokey.

“Ginger magic, of course,” yel-
led the witch. “Always do the
magic which matches the cat.
Black cat—black magic. White
cat—white magic. I’d even have

ee



IT’S CHRISTMAS TIME

She Season of goodwill warm

wishes and ha ppy

es pe or

a try at tabby magic, if I had a
tabby cat. But ginger magic is
difficult enough. The books say
very little about it. I cannot
— to get it right. Leok at my
r.” ;

Mokey looked and saw with a
shock that half of it was grey and
the other half bright red.

“That is what comes of trying
to dye my hair ginger,” said
Penelope. “Only half the spel!
worked.”

By this time the Ginger Baby

shad brought along a very small

carrot. “Ask Penelope to make
it larger,” said the kitten. Mokey
immediately asked her to make
it into the largest carrot ever
known

The witch made some passes
and mumbled some words. The
carrot shrank, and turned into a
knob of solid ginger.

* * *

OKEY could not eat ginger,
and wished that he had been
content with the*carrot, however
small it was. He began to think
that his only chance of getting a
good meal was from the store of
food in his own garden-shed.
“Please, Penelope, can you
make the snow disappear from
round my house?” he asked.
“Oh, that is quite easy,” said
the witch. She picked up a
handful of snow, made it into a
ball, and melted it in a cauldron.









Rel shank gcckl

t he world

at Christmas

time when friends and

families unite, you will

there is...

HENNESSY

in the house.....
THE BRANDY THAT MADE COGNAC FAMOUS.

sTokes @ syNOe Lrv.-AGENTS







“The snow reund your house has
gone already,” she said.

Mokey started to turn round
for home.

“Have a cup of tea before you
go?” the witch asked him.

As he was very cold Mokey
was glad to accept it. But when
it was poured out he took one
gulp of it aiid ran. It had turned
into ginger beer.

* * *
EFORE he got out of the
wood he heard frightful
yells and shrieks behind him, He
turned round to see Penelope and
the Ginger Baby dancing about in
what seemed to be a yellow lake.
The house had gone. Penelope
had made another slight mistake.
She had turned her house into
ginger marmalade.

When he came within sight of
his own house Mokey found that
the snow had not gone at all, It
had simply changed to a dark-

colour. In fact, it had changed
into gingerbread.
When he came sadly to the

edge of it her saw a mouse nib-
bling at a corner.

" evening, Mouse,” said
Mokey, “How long will it take
you to eat all this?”

“Years,” said the mouse.

“Then please go and tell your -
friends about it,” said Mokey.

So the mouse went off and
fetched every mouse in Elfland.
The gingerbread was gone in no
time.

* om *
B” they had eaten so much,
and were so fat, that as soon
as they fiad finished the last piece
the mice just fell asleep where
they were. There was an emor-
mous pile of them. So, instead of
being blocked by gingerbread,
Mokey’s house was blocked by
mice.

Suddenly Mokey heard @
“Miaou....miaou,” behind him.
So did the mice. They wera

awake and gone in no time. It
was Ugly’s Ginger Baby.

“Penelope has turned me out,”
said the kitten in a “eS hurt
‘tone of voice.

“Then come and live with me,”
said Mokey, “so long as nothing
is likely to turn into ginger in
my house.”

“Of qourse not,” answered the
kitten.

So Mokey got the kitten some
milk, and fetched a basketful of
carrots from his store.

When he had eaten them all
he went to bed; and the Gingen
Baby curled up by the fireplace,

“I suppose it was because [ was
only a kitten that the spells eo
came half right. She ought ta
have thought of that,” mused the
Ginger Baby, as it fell asleep.

cheer ahounds







Pri. 0 Oi em CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE THIRTEEN
caer ast netore teres epee caiepebiasiimbeinnhls oni

co BXSNG* EBRENSES SUE EE MEE ARE SSRN SS SEES SO CSCO SES te
vil,
a



A CHOICE SELECTION

OF YOUR FAVOURITES RECORD S;







DANCE MUSIC CAROLS CLASSICS

“Hoop-de-Doo”—Perry Como. 1

“I Wanna Go Home”—Perry Como. “aie a ee The Night” “Symphony No. 1”—Brahms.

a ene i 7, a “See Amid The Winter Snow” “Violin Concerto”—Beethoven.
eRe, oe Te “The Holly And The Ivy” i . ne

Sitting By The Window”—Dinah Shore “The First Nowell” Symphonic Variations

aay deuce anak Rave “While Shepherds Watched” —Caesar Franck.
“Wandering”—Sammy Kaye. “Hagel The Herald Angels Sing” ies -Mandel.

‘My Foolish Heart”—Allan Jones. O Come All Ye Faithful -_
“Leave Us Leap”—Gene Krupa. “Once in Royal Dayid’s City” “On Wings of Song”—Mendelssohn.
“Tf You Were My Girl’—Perry Como. “It ¢ U The Midni ‘lear” i ‘ ‘
“Enjoy Yourself”—Geraldo. “Good Ring Wonca Clear Swan Lake Ballet”—Tehaikowsky.





a seal

IF It’S A GIFT FOR
EVERYONE IN THE HOME remember the Best is a

Pe meets & REFRIGERATOR

. Electrical Dept.
PoP a CaRRURRRRERE CEEOL DL IARAARAREE eit CRERRRUERRRCERERERE RS

FANCY BISCUITS in 1- and
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ASSORTED CHOCOLATES in
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TINS OF TOFFEES in various
sizes.

Boxes of CHRISTMAS CRACK-

as.
TINNED FRUIT all kinds.





pie]














Tinned Hams, Leg Hams and





Christmas Puddings in 1- and












Dike sinee Picnic Hams. Mackintosb's Qual-
Fuller's Kmas Cakes, 2- and Fresh Apples, ity Street Sweets.

4-lb, Icing Sugar,
Desert Dates in packages. Jacobs Biscuits, plete Selec-
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Prunes and Sultanas, Qur- cuits, SCOTT'S

rants and Mixed Peel

Carrs Biscuits

ee ee
SAAN AA

%



PAGE FOURTEEN



i

CHRISTMAS



SUPPLEMENT



(ELETELE LY LLY OO OS OY Yes

(First)

“ST JOHN’S CHURCH”



3
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om

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eat
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. E. HUGHES

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—R. W. BELL

.

SS eo

a Peioe: MU ivitiers >

She piclures on this page won
; / . : sc GF *
the three prizes in the “Advocate

“7, J ) oe ‘
Photo Competition i November.

requirements of the pictures sub-
/

miulted.

Other competition pictures on

page. 15, 718, and 26

UVC C EEN UMMM,

&
a
Historical interest was one of the :
é
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et f Abb OOD” PF gh gti Me Sse s 9'S, ¢ 6465664
LP eo eee rs LESSEE SOOSSS SOS CPOE L ADDI ID ELPA OIL ILE PALL EES - LEE LLO SPP VS

(Third)



“ EAST POINT LIGHTHOUSE ” —A. E. HUGHES



CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE FIFTEEN









LOLOL LE Le ee



“ FARLEY HILL” — —P. JEFFERS

1555445354 a. < “ - + +,%,0 +4 $5565 95% 9o% “6 $9999 960O8H
PPLE LALO IE ELLIE LD EDP DER i PPOLIK SS OF PPLE LL PLEADED ALLELE AALTF

99S99999599566 oH bee



PUBLIC BUILDINGS ” — —WILLIAM ALLEY NI

LEE LE LDL LLL ILE GG AGE



PAGE SIXTEEN CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT











Mh. & Ms. Gohn
Goddard

speaking home from
England after the

G Team had

wan the cricket series.
Z ’ Gohn was the

pO Me ie WS Mote ao! 0 NE ON, ANN N ANA Shipper.

SPORTS QUIZ

Here are some not-too~difficult (1) What was the name of the



ETINGG

TO All SPORTS FANGS
A MERRY CHRIGTMA
AND A _ GUCCESSFUL NEW YEAR
EVERY GAME YOU

2 Picture Of
The Year
a
y
a
iN PLAY °

yer

questions to be answered after the horse that won the 1950
“os dinner. Grand National?
core 10 fo: answer n
five if partly ae qarwet, and (2) What is the America’s Cup
150 points is very good. — and which countries contest
it?
(1) Who is Britain's Champion
jockey? (3) What is the correct height of
(2) What is the water speed a table tennis net?
record? _ (4) What is the maximum weight
(3) Who is the Table Tennis of the wood used in the game
Champion of the World? of bowls?

(4) In the game of bowls what
is the name of the ‘target’? (5) Who is the world professional

(5) What is the maximum pos- snooker champion?
sible break at snooker? (6) What was the name of the
(6) To which country does Mrs. athlete who won the Il0u
Blankers-Koen, quadruple metres sprint at the 1948
gold-medal winner at the Olympics?
1948 Olympics belong? (7) What is the fastest speed

(7) Who is the world profes-
sional cycle-sprint cham—
pion?

(8) What is the correct name of ¢
the former world wrestling Gh aoe
champion, “The Angel” ?

(9) Who is the world speedway
champion?

(paced) ever achieved by a
pedal cyclist?

is the name of
former world heavywe
boxing champion who is now
wrestling professionally in



ath rel

10) What cricketer , daso- America?

as date aor ae (9) England and Australia re-
DC .8:60,? eo cently took part in a series

(11) For which English profes- of speedway “Test” matches.
sional football club does Which country won _ the
Joe Mercer play? “rubber?

9 ; , “oR : aie. |
(12) wee aren Brown Bom (10) What is the highest inctivid
(13) Who is the British Open® ual score ever made in first

Golf Champion? class cricket?

(14) Which famous Welsh Inter-
national Rugby player has
recently announced his re-

(11) Which is the only non-Eng-| 3}
lish club ever to win the} :

tirement? BA, Cupt

(15) Which for mer England (12) Who was the only English-
Cricket Captain was five man ever to win the heavy-
times winner of the North weight boxing championship |
of England Squash Cham- of the world?
pionship?

(16) What is the name of the (13) Who won the first British
.. “ball” used in Ice Hockey? Open Golf Championship?
(17) Do you know what the ini- (14) Which country is present

tials G.R.A. stand for? holder of the Triple Crown?
(18) What two teams compete in (3) What is the correct width of

the most famous of all
English boat races?

(19) Where is the Grand National (16) How many players are there
run? in an Ice Hockey Team?
(20) Can you name the cricket-
ers from these initials: (17) One of the most famous
D.G.B., F.R.B., N.W.D. wi: of all racing greyhounds was
JI.D.G.? known as the Miller.

Can you supply the missing

& SN name? "gs
sy (18) How many men are there in

each boat in the Oxford and
ANSWERS TO SPORTS. Cambridge boat race?

19) Who is Johnny Longden?
QUIE (ray ONE) (20) Can you name the cricketers
(1) Gordon Richards. m these initials: W.M.W..
(2) 141.74 m.p.h., ty late Sir wea . DW.H.T.D., W.SE.?

43) een Campbell in 1939.
chard Bergmann. % S
(4) The Jack. s
(5) 147.
(6) Holland.

(7) Reg Harris (Great Britain). ANSWERS TO SPORTS
(8) Maurice Tillet

a squash rackets court?





GIFTS FOR THE HOME
WORTH GIVING!

°

ALUMINIUM JELLY MOULDS
si SPONGE PANS

(9) D. Williams, QUIZ (PART TWO)

Pie elites” ReagRN VALOR STOVES & OVENS 3
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(13) A. D. Locke. since 1937.

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{83 tee en ee (3) Ue Donaldson.

e .
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(19) Aintree, Liverpool. ; 1992.
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DEDEDE DE DNDN DN IN DN PN DH DNDN DADE DS BIN IN DIETS KIN GN IN IN DN IN IN GN ETN DNDN TS DN NDS



9) England. ‘ LEMONADE 35ETS and XMAS DECORATIONS
Goddard (West Indies). (10) 452 by Sir Donald Bradman. a
® sy Sy iy fantig Civ > ie. S
2 m. 5 f = : 4
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(14) Wales. e. t
SPORTS QUIZ (15) 30 ft. Po
PART 2 19) Mick = PLANTATIONS LTD.
_ If you found the previous ques- (18) Nine. Don’t forget the cox. | ae
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ad fi f 1 is (2 oodgfull, race, as
scadebeaaniess tall hi Sates || EON OE DE DH DENG DH ON GE DH DN BN LO DN ON DK BN FR DIE GN SR ON DN DN G8 NOS Da Pa NN



CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE SEVENTEEN






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NG NG NS NG NG AS A NG NG NG NA RR

PAID IRA ISA IN IS ITER IN ON ON GE OE EO OK OE



WILL TELL!

ORDER EARLY FOR THE
XMAS HOLIDAYS.



PURITY BAKERIES

A NS NG NG NN NN NN A A



:
4



_FAGE EIGHTEES ___ EIGHTEEN



smectandectnt i

BOTANICAL ‘GARDENS St. Vincent

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT







° &



XMAS PUZZLES

Answers On Page 2].

“INTELLIGENCE FES

























Â¥ ;
By T. O. HARE
“1p HE firis are ignora-
muses aid Dr Pem-
Mican to his wile | propuse 5
to dv something about it
Go head” said = Mrs 5
Pemmican
For fiv su ‘Cussive nigtits 3
the doctor subjecied tm vtf-
spring to a protracted quis
Each quiz consisted of &
Q questions nnd a puolnt was
2 awarded | the wi:t whe first
Gave the right answer Rather
to _Pemmnicé 1S surprise, one
of them answered
fon correctly He
fiso interested to note,
totting up the final
that on no night had +
the girls failed to
fewer than five points: «
¢ no two girls scored the
¢ number points on
§ one occ
2 ec 30 pot
il buted
$ yon each of the five nights.
$ The performances
§ were tairly consistent Azalea
$ clocked up the same total for
four nights but. on the fifth,

dropped one point Begonia
made on impressive start; at
the end of two sessions her
total was 20 points. On the
remaining three occasions she
scored the same number of
DON tS Cyclamen's score was
he same for the first three
sessions, and the same on the
arth night as on the fourth.

‘How many points in all
were scored by manne ?











we

ELLIG E TEST

THREE
COLOURS

By T. O. HARE

MPIO-DAY'S test shouldnt take
many minutes though you
may not at see how to set
about solv
I have
They are o
blue and yel
If

.











sles in a bag
colours; red,





andom from



marbles (but
zh) to ensure
east one

r which

twice



marbles (b
to make $\
drawn at |
the number v
is equal to
r umb er of t

aHow many marbles of each
colour are there in the bag?

QeeneeeecssccerteessRSteenseneasrecsenesssaesssassesesenees










Ree

GOOD OLD
LYSANDER

By T, O. HARE

“Goop old Lysander!”
wrote Will Weasel! to his
father. “We walloped Her-
cules in the tast of our three
matches. So, although we're
at the bottom of the table, we
cored the maximum number
of goals consistent with the



ES









:
=
t
5
:
:
:
:
:

















srest of the data I've given :
& you.” .
3 The “rest of the data” were 3
§ as follow The four Houses §
» at Will's school had = each ¢§
played one match at soccer §
against each of the others, The §
total number of goals scored §
was the same in each match. ¢
each game produced a dif- §
ferent score; Lysander's §
aggregate of ¢ S Was the 8
same as that of Alexander &
Alexander headed the table §
(on points); Hercules and 8
Hector scored the same §
mber of points, and also the §
§ same number of goals The 8
§ total number of goals was the §
§ least that could have been §
§ scored in the circumstances §
§ summarised above 5
: a the seore in the i
: ‘nh the champions &
: ander) and Hector. 5
} sueeneneeusnecwesseunenatnesucessassacueet
WITS TES? :.:
ERE'S a littie |
may s
but wait till
Without ! ’

paper, draw
produce ten t
rilaterals
pentagon
as a five-pol
(A solution
in the page, t « t
you've tried getting
unaided.)
@ Solution below

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eAoOuW sMOr
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COMMIS MMOD oroyy vaour *Z

sat pue _ uo si08
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‘e8ed oy} uy
eam aleyMesta po
“7838 woqoid
OMVeUIOeT 9yy

3O udoWNTog

2
me
=
2
im
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BY
2
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=
=
2
3
2
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2
me
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2
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2
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'







CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT ; PAGE NINETEEN
Ne en

XMAS PUZZLES See

Solutions Below It’s a

Squaring the Circles

“CLASSIC’’
Present to

give this

Xmas !!

CLASSIC }
SHOES





[= problem contributed by Jessie R. Smith re-
quires you to place the numbers 1 to 11 inclu-
aive in the 11 circles above so that you have a sort
of olreular magic square—with every three num-
bers in any straight line totalling 18.

(There’s & wolution elsewhere in the page; but
@on’t peak till you've tried solving this unaided.)

Cross - Number
BANNERS |

By T. O. HARE

(TELEVISION in Hysteria is
a somewhat tricky business.
Every drama submitted is
reviewed by a Board of five
Censors, any two of whom can
forbid its betng televised. All
five Censors themselves write
108 the Sater tvions screen
quant situation arose
sonenbig Each of the five
Censors Subnen & tele-
y = hye

promptly
by. two yor its author's
leagues en at ot aa em
banned the
eee ‘panned tite “oin Plays
k@ineto wiadne, while
the aut sof these harmless
works combined to ban Fever-
fev Crents Beneecd the work:
ot Duil and Saltire wi
tosether co**ed c

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ul

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Feverfew and Mincing pring.

taur. Saltire tmpo ed his
t+ on “eae plays sub-
sp Puremind ance

~~



Aner

SG 555 5 OE IS BB Bs NN NNN NN NS NG NN NG ENS NNN ge
MAKE YOURS A CHRISTMAS OF
HEALTH AND STRENGTH

— ORDER —

feds, VI- STOUT

NUTRICIA

POWDERED

Of how many of the five
plays can you. with certainty
mame the author? §

nw

Match Play ‘HE method of solving 4

o—, i cross-number is the same as
c~olving a crossword. The “defini-
tions” given below indicate the
numbers that are to be placed
:n the squares above, one digit
to each square.

HORIZONTAL
1, The cube of 43.
4. The square of an uniucky
number.
5. A prime number—the first in
the 300 series
7. The square of 30. '

——— 8. $200 less 4444% discount. i

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*

Y¥ this on friends as an “ice- = 11. CMXLV in our digits.
breaker.” Place 12 matches to 12. A constant needed to find the
form four equi-sized squares, 6s area of a circle.
above. Now, the problem is to re- VERTICAL
arrange four matches and to 2 It’s just a little under 10,000.





form three squares, each the 5 When it’s noon in New York |
same size as the original ones. —what time is it in Hono- |
(All the matches ae used.) tulu ?
; Solution elsewi page. 4. The value of $1 at 3% % ,
} compound interest after 20 HOLLAND'S RICHEST POWDERED
4 ‘eSed og} uy oroqmosTO UMONS years.
a qneod qo;eu oy oazos 07 “oH Express 25/32 in decimals.

Oe

WHOLE MILK



. The year the first railroad

J , tecomotive began running in
‘us.
9. The year of Japanese attack
on Pearl Harbor.
(Solution elsewhere in page.)





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NUTROGEN

THAT GIVES
NEW VITALITY

Containing Cocoa, Milk, Malt, Eggs

and Nutrition Salts 3
&
pag

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PAGE TWENTY

LLL LE LLL ELLE LLL LE LLL
& THE ADVOCATE XMAS NUMBER COMPETITION

Win a 15tb. Turkey and your
favourite Wines.

©) This year our competition takes the form of clues and

questions to be answered similar to those we published two

| years ago. This type of competition seems to be more popular
than the writing of stories.

The prize is once again a lovely 15 lbs. Christmas turkey,

a bottle of Dry Monopole Champagne, a bottle of the Sherry
you like best, a bottle of Gold Braid Rum and a bottle of
Scott’s Liqueur Rum.

Here are the rules of the competition:

q 1) For each clue, question, or space left out in the follow-
ing 34 posers you will find an answer in each adver-
tisement.

2) The answer might be the name of a firm, an item in
the advertisement. a slogan, sentence or name.

8) Only one answer will be found in each advertisement,
therefore all the advertisements appearing in the issue
must be consulted.

4) The first correct solution to all 34 clues opened by the
Advertising Manager of the Barbados Advocate will be
the winner of the Competition.

5) In the event of. no completely correct solution being
received the highest number of correct answers first
opened will receive the prize.

Here is an example to guide you.

Let us suppose the clue was “A famous Artist.” The

answer might be “Goya”. This name appears on an item

in DaCosta & Co.'s advertisement. No other answer would
then be found in DaCosta’s advertisement.
6) The competition closes December 22nd at 3 p.m.

below.

CHRISTMA

SUPPLEMENT

—_——



3)

MARE

THANE







BROS.

Your Shopping Centre.

LADIES’!

High Class Dress Goods,

Underwear,
Hats, Perfumes, etc.

GENTS'!

Shoes and

Woollens, Shirts, Shoes,

Ete., in widest variety.

Household Goods such as
Carpets, Bedspreads,

&
&
&
&
&
&
é
é
&
&
&
&
&
&.
&
&
&
&
&
é
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
&

8) No entry without a coupon will be accepted
CLUES.

. Sounds like a garden im-
plement. °

2. On dry ground: Sir Ralph

Whe? Wess ees

house.
. Stands for Rum and bread
. Purchasers of these will
not clash
She was a lady.
Brothers associated with a
Prince’s name.



Three builders.
Free from national limita-
tions and prejudices.
Fashion setters.

. What is the countryman’s
number?

Preheat Pe Pepe peep

Answer.

€ 7) Each entry must be accompanied by the coupon printed

€) Bes Ter OOlee SateT Oe [ROR GEG. 2...) scans. © cacao sa ea

LaF Ue Gh l S. Bae Pacem olek soe cde ah oteie

¢ 15. They make Liskin +) Oe tebe he beeee ee Cee eb ent
16. In and sometimes on the



resents

. @THE FINEST SELECTION

INCLUDING

by all leading makers,

Presentation BOXES OF SOAPS

POWDERS

Presentation BOXES OF PERFUMERY

AND

Gift Sets for Baby; Pipes

and Tobaccos: Comb and
Leather
Purses; Pen & Pencil Sets;
Thermos Flasks; Boxes of
of

Brush

Sets;

Chocolates; Boxes

Fancy Biscuits.

THE COSMOPOLITAN

Opposite Canadian Bank of. Commerce



26. If you don’t know your Bed Sheets, Pillow Cases,
5S Rb 4 ¢ Btn WO POPOMIAT ie ne ee yd ik cake cathe ae cee iat
28. Might be concerned in a
PRN ee ee a et ee eae
29. With something from two
ORG vi emi amenneT Mame OK AL ca hs Naan ibe a ea
30.

31.

eq 3. All you need . ook 2 RE Sekte Sea) tee FAST IG ct 32.
4. It may rhyme, but there is 33.
€) TIO. GPUGME WIENS iss eb cm ey Bb 8 i sl Quen ahs <9 2 sae ats en 2
€ 5. A Battle was fought there. 9.6 i saw secc ccs ereverseece 34.
G: “What's. BOG == pete TN ae
7... Pwo Buropean OMise: oo aa sais Sa ee
€) 8. The quality of fresh eff OTT EG ls s
9. Famous in Trimfdad. ... . ssseeeinces ely oiees eee
€) 10. Cricket made @asy by. .3.¢: ‘Weegee Nc Ree as 4 cae Pe
1%... Think hard; giV@ a... Gigs 4. ccc ee et) ee ee ee kk
Q 12. Three attractions on one
banner.

LO LL



DOLLS —

KETTLES - ELECTRIC

PYREX WARE
ELECTROPLATED

STOVES
VARNISHES &

ae ess tee eeeeemeets
They play _Intercolonial
Cricket and Football.
They opened last year.

One word for King and
vessel.

Easy to take home because

She is cold royalty.

ENTRY FORM
(Cut eut and fill in)

Follow the Crowd to - -

THANT BROS.

PR. WM. HRY. STREET

NAME
ADDRESS .

ee GG GG GG GG GEG EGG GEG

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2
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8
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ieaseyaee Date and 53 Swan Street.

(Sign here.)

eee





TOYS for the Children

STEP UPSTAIRS AND SELECT
YOURSELF

BALLOONS — CARS — TOY TRAINS
ALL “THAT CHILDREN ADORE !!

ACCESSORIES



TRONS




WELCOME TO _

“A BARBADOS

GOODS i, \ HARDWARE Lid. \

CONGOLEUM ¢% #) Corner of Swan \
TEA SETS ‘i and Lucas Streets \





ENAMELS ed Saal





Dial 3466 also Nos. 6, 42, 46

NIN DR GS NTS DS DS SEIN NTR TS BRINN 8 NNN

se

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TE

ee ee See





QUIZ - CROSSWORD PUZZLE THAT

By Bugene Sheffer
HORIZONTAL

1—What was the early Old Test-
ament spelling of Amos? (?
Ki, 19:2)

5—What priest was told by Sau!
to bring the ark of God from
the children of Israel?) (1
Sam 14:18)

10—Who was the father of all’ th
children of Eber? (Gen. 10:21)

14—“Bring forth therefore fruits
meet for ." (Mat. 3:8)

16—Mood.

17—In what place did Paul leave
Titus to carry on the gospe)
work? (Tit. 1:5)







18—Portico.

19—Branch of study.

20—"The of the children
of cael.” (Acts 5:21)

22—Wozihless scrap.

23—Marcin date.





24—“Betwcen Beth-cel and ce
(Gen. 13:3)
26—“For now is our salvation
than when we be-
leved.” (Rom. 13:11)

28—What is the 20th book of the
Old Testament?

» 33—Prefix: apart.

84—Protestant denomination.

(abbr.)
36—Mechanical device for pros-

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT







PrrPa te Pl
PLL iret tT tty

hl
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WUUY, he) fife
f1 rg
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TESTS

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called my- mighty ——— for
mine anger,*even them that
rejoice in my highness.” (Usa
13:3)
VERTICAL

I~—Curves

2—Nothing but

3—"——-— thy motth for the

dumb in the catise of all such
as are appointed to destruc-
tion.” (Pr. 31:8)

4—Greek letter.

5—About.

6—Possesses.

7i—‘Enter, ~—— his gates with
thanksgiving, and ~—— his
courts with praise.” (Ps. 100:4)

§—Fruit of oak tree

9—Excitedly.

10—Upon what did Paul stand
after he had been rescued

from arrest?
1—Multitude
’—Undertaking
3—VNisorder

; {Acts 21:40)
1
1
15- On what pat «i
did the people st
with God
(Ex. 19:17)
21—What did Simon Peter cut off
with his sword from Mal-
chus? (John 18:10)

25—Who foljowed Jephthah as a
udge o Israel? (Jude 128)

and lo meet
through Moses?



PAGE TWENTY-ONE

‘OUR KNOWLEDGE OF BIBLE

Paul's hands? (Acts 19:11)

42—“An ungodly ——— diggeth
up evil: and in his lips there
‘ at a burning fire.” (Pr.
led

44—The whole.

45—"Laying aside all ——, and
all guile, and hypocrisies, and
envies, and all evil speak-
ings.” (1 Pet. 2:1)

47—“Behold, he taketh away, who
can — him?” (Job, 9:12)

49—Obscure.

51—“The —— is prepared against
the day of battle: but safety
is of the Lord.” (Pr, 21:31)

52—Artless.

ian Ws wag. Adoniram’s father?
( i. 4:6

56—Outer husk of grain.

58—Singly.

59—"Consider the of the
field, how they grow; they
toil nat, neither do they ——.’



lilies

t\
61—Haicns

64—Printer's measures

66—Goddess of earth.











sure 27— hrec toec
—Ferv “home
Socdoies tisice: 29—" A Phartc n vile,
ee est poini. a doctor ca ve Ty id in
41—Wed tacts gan® ali the people
42—"And he prt them all out, ; :
and took hc by the hand, when Amaick as four; “th wines ahall ter: 30- Pty shalt the. shor as a
sayi ———, (%, 12) Soononttes (3-5) } eee I ne of
arise. ea a4 45—T: = AL ae em W thine anger.” (Ps, 21:9)
43—“Of the trive of Ephraim, 50—One of the Cars: ” ¢ Rites, “he a speak unto
Oshea the son of ———. by Judah. (Judg. 1°19 Gr trod mmedicotiot sear Tie hintheaae
(Num. 13:6) -Suffer. 67—"Piliv OA DS Pn sore displeasure
44—Scorch. Solar disk. €2—U tse Revit -Twilled fabric
45—I onage. 5—Publie vehic'e y ? () i—L arg e Nort! sin duc
46—Street. (abbr.) 57—Fails to hit. 70—5 38a-Biatl at combat.
7—Who assisted Aaron in hold 1 ——— of the cir skull 72 oooh : r ne » re
ing up the hands of Mocs (hé. voice, 1 that t ! we 41-





INTELLIGENCE TEST
SOLUTION

(1) The number ot girts ts not

UYTERStEa es TEST

Solutions |




















isan attsmpt to produce a :
stated but clearly there can only T 1g Te eee ae By M. Harrison-Gray
be four t , t hole ne have to be :
¢ sever yint-distribu rr Dealer: South
sine an only bate “been 2 ta) oO es S 1 Wil Oe See ae ae eeoeee | North-South game.
56712 (bo) 56411 tc) 56410 Pp 18 t th x matches are 1( 9-1 as
(d) 67810 (e, fF 789 aD oor o
(3) A’s scores were 66665 Su on age . "hoe ¥ A107 5
fa) ts the fifth days distribution 20 ‘ @AGKH?
(4) B cannot have wed Aon “ z “er 2 aati se
macs at Us epee ig INTELLIGENCE TEST Naw we shell and i, ee
sl yu ' : ; ’ SOLUTION the “League Table can or be $ aiwor4 3 KQ652 ¢ |
he irst Lwo a ‘ ‘ 2s unde - : - Qez
m (3) Hane ent Let the number of marbles of A Her Hee L 5 3 K9843 @Q11007 ;
1 ad each colour oe fr b and v 2 Y
re Seah oe st he. Task tt : 5 Lie respectively. ; A f a @ 9 6 t 3 &AISB &K05
thira night's distribution is i As a btyti- . I 1 7 a@as |
at ae ae tea aie From (1) t= b+1 L 4 10 ro j 4 JO864 “VES,” said Mr. Bovine, “I
A ae ESI IE Ly (2) y=2b—1 ; : ’
me ee With ioto Hence 4b=20, or b=5 Mexsander defeated Uector dz ' & 10652 | have 20 of the milknut
as ee Beas There are six red marbles, five 9 goals tod > The natural limit raise ¢ | trees. The big seeds in their
Pails sesenaas 49 no mis in on blue Shes. ant Sine panee ones London Express Service > gained points on, fils cee! ) fruit yield an oil that can be
ondon rprase Se yondon Express Service » trom match play n hoom 3 ” ne
BNE sericea at ¥ Wi as Ww say » South's One Heart was eee § a yo need oP aaa Tt tastes
VAVAAVAYTA ¥ \ QAi ’ to Three. East was silenc R.
[SAESRESES ESSENCES ENN NSN SN NNN | to Taree, Ba wa eee "haley Ee” aitiaaee Sen
ae Heart: gambling bid, in > Lupine. “Wish I had some."
- ; View of his light opening 5 ia oe :
> West led @ 10. East's @Q § They're arranged in a de
» falling to @ A. South had to ¢ sign,” said Bovine, making a
» hope for a favourable Ne of § sketch like the one above. “If 1
} the ¢ ard e ruffed two Dia- § : se
wie) drew trumps. and { took up any of them, I'd spoil it.
) used @J asa card of exit. ¢ Show me how to plant ten of
Whatever East led, his, side ¢ } the trees so that I'll still have
ould only win two tricks In ¢ .
Club: ‘ five rows of four trees each, and
, In Room 2, North was not ; I'll give you a basket of the
YOu ) "Tl i Keytonewmarketsin ) strong enough for a foreime- « nuts.”
a critical world —the

o-game Three Hearts and ‘



Mr. Lupine drew a sketch how



’ | nad to bid Two Diamonds, |
new S.M. 1500. New | » The result was that Kast-; | this could be done. How can it?
: : West bid up to Pour Spades : | “yous no;
BE in comfortand rootiiness = {ou'ed and were only | | JO 801 G49 aay O1 ‘Ime ene oAB
a five-six seater in the 1}-litre class. New in road-flattcring independent fefeated by the lead .of § | W €¥ #992) U9} 94) eFUvILy SUOTNION



, im : South s singleton: their team
suspension, precision control and generows performance. The answer to a Uius gained 520 points on the
> deal
’

PROUD

demand familiar in many languages —* by all means

ve Lee oo

a British car —bul give us the car we want! London Express Service.

TO
OWN !!



1500 SITY ee toes

By M. Harrison-Gray

Exclusively for Export

SINGER MOTORS LiMiTED: BIRMINGHAM AND COVENTRY

SS GAS SAN ATA EN EAN TAN RN ETN





















7 Dealer : South, ¢
= Se Game all, $
s . & N. $
' 1 z ok 105
Satine Joo OT WOFrK: $9 02%: USIC
DECIDE = 3 a5 CORK M
a A £. ? 5
|THE S lt a‘ 43 aji982 PRING brings back the songs
& 6@ v4i7 of many birds. Have you ever
: | $ 2Q10832 ¢@ a 8i4 tried to imitate their calls?
. OVER ’ gee o 71096 s $! Te Whistles are made for the pur-
& oQi § pose, but the same result can be
i § 9 * x6 42 5 had with an ordinary cork and
] TAs , an ordinary glass tumbler.
santasisgy ~~ & : . es iayé. abun { Dip the cork in water and rub
wo eee LAN a7 $ ‘ ane tans b " he dha 0 it on the side of the tumbler.
this compact little nm ? controls. The bidding et | ‘The result will be a musical-like
icle i vh & {rubber Bridge. against note similar in sound to a bird
vehicle is a four-wheel | cautions ornoilticn, wes One
* : | } Heart—Two Hearts, Tiree call. With practice, you can
rea: se ? Hearts—Four Heart li laarn how to produce a variety
wagon, a mobile power RO VER & Sours decides 19 resid. 8 of notes and simulate a number
% trial 4 of ‘tiiree Diemoucds
4 ot et tea 5 of bird songs. Experiment with
pla. ee ee : ; ag : eon ae é drinking-glasses of different
vehicle on the road. There ‘ ? Nability. and signs of in 4 heights and. thicknesses and
: is no end to the jobs which & , Three ara N eae eae ; corks of different sizes, as their
4 can be done—quicker and TO DA Vy mi et her he ped the Q effects vary.
: a A cards at w §
easier — when the thi ¢
Land-Rover is around. te | g e es rd yg ot § FIND THE NUMBER
e | t! jot @ 7. South's HERE is a number undér 100
; , 54 was tater captured by that cannot be evenly di-
m Britain's most versatile vehicle a and @ 3 yas returned. {| 4 Mt tig without «trace
5 I HAM - ENGLAND ca rond. South finessed ¢ | tional remainder) by any other
MADE BY THE ROVER CO. LTD « SOLIHULL. - BIRMINGHA ENGL | fy iy and ended up tire’ | Dumber except itself yet it will
wn E West, however. 4 . ae " 4
’ WE\ could have made Four { { evenly divide 111, 222, 338, 446.
REDMAN & TAYLORS GARAGE LTD. St: 3 ieetes, { | S55" 906, 777, 688, 900. What ts
& . ae the nuraber 7
ages Distributors S| London Express Service. | “UsAIa-/11T) S| TGQUEINT egy 1MOTIAIOm )











PAGE TWENTY-TWO

SHOES, HANDBAGS,
BRIDAL VEILS, GLOVES
PLASTIC PARASOLS,
DRESS MATERIALS

Gents

RAD

SHIRTS, TIES, PYJAMAS, &

S
SUITINGS, SHOES, ETC,,
BICYCLES

b- Home

R

s

CURTAIN NETS,
BEDSPREADS, ETC.

SHOP THIS XMAS
AND SAVE
AT...

N. BE. WILSON
& Co, itd &

The Ultra Modern Store with

SP the Broad Street Goods at Qn
the Swan Street Prices. &

Dial 3676 &&

aay 3
Bough GeOMDNSNENSNSNDO





ieee accompanied most of the tight
* dresses. Made in fine matching

: flowed backwards, giving a misty

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT





CHRISTMAS FASHION

D? YOU associate Christmas
with Yule logs, falling snow
and mistletoe? Or’ is it garden
parties and moonlight bathing in
the tropics for you? For the first
time, designers have catered for
all types of women on all sorts of
occasions, and there is more
variety in evening dresses than
we have seen for many years.

There are three quite distinct
lines, First there is the ever
romantic full-skirted ball-dress,
making the most of a tiny waist
and good shoulders. Second comes
the sheath dress, tapering from
waist to ankle, and giving a
smooth unbroken line, ‘Third is the
most difficult of all styles—the
sheath that bursts into a switl of
flounces just below the knee, giv-
ing a “mermaid” silhouette. Here
you must be honest with your-
self. To wear a dress that fits like
a glove to the knees before flowing
out in fullness requires a svelte
figure of reasonable height, with
small hips, Otherwise the effect is
ludicrous,

sy NS

The most beautiful dresses of
the season were shown by the
Rahvis sisters recently. Here, the
mermaid line vies for popularity
with the ballet-length full-skirted
type A touch that was wniversal-
ly admired, and would be simple
to copy, was the tulle coat that

net, with long tight sleeves, it

floating look to the outfit.

‘Spanish Manta*» was the name
given to a black diess that draped
round the body like a second
skin until it reached the knees,
where it burst into a frou-frou
of scarlet, green, blue and black
net layers. Another, in this style,
was brilliant scarlet,
with jewel drops. The skirt was
draped round to the front where
it fell into sash-like ends, with
something of an Eastern look
about it.

%

Although I personally feel that
lace and tulle are not well suited
to each other, many dresses are
now seen with this mixture.
Rahvis showed one that billowed
out in graceful folds—the main
part being in lace, and the frills
round the bottom in tulle. It is
an excellent idea for the home
dressmaker who frequently finds
herself with old pieces of lace
salvaged from many years ago,



sparkling |



By Joan Erskine

XMAS DANCE DRESS

VICTOR STIEBEL uses quantities of tulle in different colours for
his kaleidescopic dance dress for Christmas. The colours are sugar
pink, mauve, white and spinach green. The brief bodice is in green,
which completely veils the enormous skirt, giving a softshadowy
appearance to it. .A thick garland of velvet ivy leaves are entwined
round the bodice, and climb over one shoulder.

and is at a loss to know how to trend for cocktail dresses is a
fit them into a dress. slim line, broken only by fine
If you are making your own pleating, a neat bodice scarcely
dress, instead of attempting a any sleeves, and a high neck.
very ambitious style, why not Nothing is more effective than
keep to the classic line, but use a dress of this type in an inter-
a really lavt8h fabric? Lately in esting material,
London we have seen such orig- The two best colours are blac’
inal materials as tinsel lame and white. If you like neither,
(woven in fine check designs), then new shades called banana
gleaming metallic jersey, glitter- cream or geranium red might
ing brocade and worsted with a appeal. Pastel colours are not
gold thread stripe. The current fashionable. If both black and

MAKE HER REALLY

WITH A |

LKS

KEROSENE COOKER

AND

ATMUS OVEN

=

é

&

HAPPY THIS CHRISTMAS |

————white take your fancy, there is

nothing more sophisticated ‘tha’
wearing a black pleated chiffon
skirt over a rustling white taffeta
petticoat, but wear it with an ait!
Tiny jewélled caps that fit
over very short, or long coiled
hair, are an important accessory
for cocktail parties. Long curling
slender féathers high in the air,
and sweeping on to one shoulder,
are sometimes fixed in the hair
with a jewelled clip. Real flow-
ers in your hair are charming,
pretty and fresh, but please
remember that it gives a very
youthful appearance and if you
are striving for glamour, this is
not the way to achieve it,
Perfume should be as carefuliy
chosen as all your other acces-
sories. Choose one that clings,
and since Christmas is one time
that you may be excused for suc-
cumbing to an appealing name,
what about “Magic ', “Nose.
gay”, “My Love”, “Heaven”, or
our own favourite “Sweet Sug-
gestion”? Quite the most attrac-
tive perfume phials ‘s@en recently
have a “touch value” that pre-
vents leakage. It is only neces-
sary to stroke the Perfumair on
the skin to release the scent.

& &

But Chrismas is not entirely
composed of cocktail parties or
balls. You still want something
new to wear in the mornings and
afternoons, and perhaps the latest
London idea will suit, Velvet, in
all colours, is being used for neat
straight jackets, cut exactly like a
school blazer, with huge smoked
pear! buttons, large stitched poc-
kets, and rolled revers, They
look extremely attractive over
straight tight skirts, are fashion-
able for cocktails and casual
enough to go shopping in.

It will be ag season for velvet
and tulle. We have seen tucked,
pleated, gathered or ruffled tulle
worn with a velvet bodice and
velvet stole. Alternatively, slim
velvet dresses have gained new
elegance with the addition of a
wide tulle stole. These are apt to
float, and in order to cope with
the situation gracefully, embroider
the ends and weight them with a
jewelled fringe.

me &

For the first grown-up winter,
the safest things to choose are
full skirts amd neat sweater-like
tops. For cool evenings, black
quilted satin skirts with velvet
tops are pretty. Sweaters are not
neccessarily hot and sticky affairs.
Lately we have seen very glamor-

@ on p. 23

ones WA NG WG NG NE NG NG NG NN NG A NN NN a NNN I NN WN NN NB NN NN NN NS
Darling! [t's Just
What Il Wanted!










Le ————

i ie Le

a

7"

FASHION QUIZ

(1) Who is the Queen’s dress-
maker and also the leader
of the Incorporated Society
of London Fashion Design-
ers?

(2) Who is the world famous

milliner who designs hats

for the Royal Family?

(3) Name three well-known

Paris couturiers.

Who
Look”

(4) introduced the

and when?

“New

What is the synthetic mate-
rial that ruined
trade?

(6) What is the new exagger-
ated eye make-up called?

(7) What do the terms gauge
and denier mean to you?

To which era do short skirts.
cloche hats, long cigarette
holders and shingled hair
belong?

Is it correct
at a cocktail party?

(10) In which country is the
wearing of evening hats in
restaurants banned?
evening dress).

(8)

(9) to wear a hat

(11) What world-famous material
is at present having a greater
boom than when it was
favoured by Queen Victoria
in the last century? And
from what country does it
come?

(12) What was the original name
of a brassiere?

(13) What were suspenders orig-
inally called?

Which or the following
materials would not be used
for a suit: barathea, hop-
sack, tweed, chiffon, faille?

Name three or more mate-

vials popular for summer
dresses,

Waistcoats have become
very popular lately, especi-
ally the embroidered vari-
ety. To what period of
history do they belong?

(14)

(15)

(16)

(17) The sarong is often used
nowadays to form the basic
design of an evening dress.
From which country did it
come first?

(18) Guess what this name refers
to: Is it animal, vegetable or
mineral? “The Grafton
Poodle?”

What ts a switch?

Name three types of hats for
women,

What is the
expensive fur?

world’s most

:

cman race

Dry Monopo
Madrinkc.
QO Bim ©



DIP R DN DR NGA DNA PRN NTA N TEN TUN 8 DR SSR OR SR DORR RAN

ss

the silk ;

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

PAGE



BLUE EVENING GOWN

(with ‘



NOMAN HARTNELL, who knows debutante tastes so well, produced
the heavy ivory Duchesse satin evening gown with hyacinth blue em-

broidery anglaise.

The matching coatee, with hyacinth blue satin

collar and bows, hides an off-the-shoulder bodice.

(22) Name three types of hats

for men,

(23) Which is the latest and most
revolutionary type of make-
up? Is it Pancake, Shiny, or
Silk?

(24) How many different “Jooks”
can you think of that have
been introduced over the
past few years?

(25) A new synznetic fibre is
manufactured that very
closely resembles wool. Do
you know what it is mad»
from?

(1)
(2)
(3).

(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)

(8)
(9)
(10)

Embodying the spirit of

Answers

Norman Hartnell,

Aage Thaarup.

Christian Dior, Jacques
Fath, Pierre Balmain,
Christian Dior in 1947,
Nylon.

Doe-eyed look.

Terms used in nylon stock-
ing manufacture. Gauge is
the number of stitches to
1% inches; and denier is the
weight of the yarn.

The ‘Twenties.

Yes.

England.

Christmas & New Year Festivities

DRY MONOPOLE
CHAMPAGNE

Produced from the finest growths of the Marne district, matured
H and bottled since 1781 in the famous old vaults of Reims. the

world-known Heidsieck Dry Monopole is well and truly

(1)
(12)
(13)
(14)
(15)

Tartan from
Bust bodice.
Hose supporters.

Chiffon,

Linen, pique, cotton, seer-
sucker, poplin,

Regency period

Malaya.

The latest short hair-style
designed by Raymonde.

A length of hair used to
supplement shorter styles.

Cloche, beret, bonnet.
Mink.
(22) Homburg, bowler, boater.

})Helena Kubinstein’s Silk,
made from raw silk, into
lipstick.

The New Look, the Petit
Garcon or Little Boy look,
the Blown forward look,
the Masculine Look, the
Doe-eyed look.

25) Groundnuts.

Scotland,

BGO

(16)
(17)

(18)



19)

(21)



Xmas Fashion

@ from p. 22

cus ones for evening made in silk
jersey, chenille, or fine lawn, with
knitted neck, cuffs and welt. One |
was made in two halves, each with
the one-shouldered look. When
worn together, it simply looked like
a sweater with a deep V neck.

BUCY CCE C CECE ey

The new vogue for tunie dresses
is something of a god-send, It is
a simple matter to cut the bottom |
from an unfashionable skirt, make
long sleeves, and wear the finished
product over a tight slashed under-
skirt, or a full pleatea one. Both
are fashionable. This idea can be
worked out in different ways. For
cocktails, a full-skirted brocade
dress is graceful. For
evening, simply add a black under-
skirt. For an evening coat, buy
a genuine Chinese mandarin jack-
et, or have one copied in a rich
material. Women in this country
are buying great lengths of fine
nylon and having it embroidered
or painted. They wear it like
an Indian sari, one of the most
becoming garments ever designed
for a woman. Another style from
the East is the short embroidered
bolero, worn over a draped Sarong-
like skirt.

Primarily, Christmas is a time
to enjoy yourself, so don’t choose
skirts that make sitting a physical
effort. Make certain you have a
strapless bra that fits perfectly, or
a strapless dress will look com-
pletely wrong. Wash your hands
in cologne for an added touch of |

SENENG NEN



fragrance, and for fun, attach a|
flower to your bare shoulder by |
using transparent adhesive tape. |

THE CHAMPAGNE YOUR GUESTS WILL PREFER

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TWENTY-THREE

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CHRISTMAS
DRINKS

BURNEIT'S
GIN



EXTRA SMOOTH AND MELLOW
WITH A FLAVOUR AND
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e
H. JASON JONES & Co.,

Ltd. —acents
SN NN HNN

“4

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2
2
2
2
»
2
2
Pa
2
2
2
2
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5
2
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Se

tui

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nen Aether =

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PAGE TWENTY-FOUR



fatters “TOS

®- PVBRY year, the Danish Tourist
Asst ciation has to deal with a flood
of 8,000 letters to Father Christ-
mas, addressed to the Danish
colony of Greenland. They do a
good job of it, the Danes being a
jolly, cosy lot obviously destined
to deputise for Santa. When one
reads the letters, Santa’s girth is
no longer a mystery. At least
fifty per cent. of Santa’s fans
tempt him with edibles: sugar for
the reindeer, lemonade, apples,
whisky, “a glass of wine and a
biscuit” (the sephisticated touch),
“supper ona tray in the dining
room” and “mince pies and a
drink.” “Tf you bring your wife
please tell me then I can put tw
lots hot chocolate.”

The letters themselves vary
greatly but they do give a clear,
almost frightening insight into the
British younger generation. There
are a great many routine notes
demanding walkie-talkie dolls,
Tocking horses and football boots,
but mixed up with the rest are
some pathetic requests.

“Could you bring Mummie a
pair of shoes because she dors
not have many?” “Dear Santa
Claus, my father ‘has broken his
leg and my mother cannot afford
to give us all a present, there
are seven of us.” “Dear Santa, I
will get toys but I want my big
brother home for Xmas, he 1s
nineteen and in the RAF”. “Please
would you send my brother Peter
a strong heart so that he can be
home wext Xmas. .”

The moppets keep up with the
times. ‘Though the youngest stil!
ask for “a napple and a norng
and sum seets,” their elders want
everything from radar to earth-
moving equipmént. The most
popular item seems to be the
Meccano set. Also appreciated
are lerries, police sets, cowboy
sets, light houses, traffic lighta, toy
airports and a mysterious some-
thing called a walking choclate
pot. Requests for literature seem
in a minority, and literary criti-
cism seems governed by bulk or
weight rather than content: “Dear
Santa, Will you pleas bring me
two big books and three small
ones,”

Some letters, on the other hand,
are faintly sinister, like the mod-
est request of one seven-year-old
for “a bull-dozer, a cement mixer
and some Egyptian mummy
tpoks.” And some requests are
distinctly threatening.

Dear Santa Claus, Would you
please send me a Diana air gun
for my Xmas I am eight years
of age but my mummy said she
thought you would send me
one as you are good to little
boys who behave. I have been



TOWS=THE FINEST SELECTION

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT



PLEASE SANTA

jo 2,

Yaw, tree Orive,

Block burn

bie RS ge



Lancs

iKe very much a Silver
weistlet watreh With a
a plasrick one they
hurt your wrists
Shirley.
case, NEW TOR
iG are



Have you written your letter to Santa Claus?

a very good’ boy and have went
to church every Sunday

Lots of love.

“deear Santa, Toyland,

You are my good Santa. Fairy Land”

A Merry Xmas.

P.S.—I will leave a lump of Lane

sugar for your Raindeer. IfI ana “The Old Man,

don’t get my air gun then I will Oman, Greenland.” And the Dan-
The letters are usually written nes, See bl

them, h ts i oons.

by four to nine year olds, though receives pty: Pe ae See

not always:

“T am writing on behals or my
five little brothers
as I am the eldest at twelve
and a half. I would have wrote
sooner only I have been look-
ing after the house as mummy
has not been well with rheu-
matic fever. . .
A note of

creeps in when the correspondert

reaches ten:

there is no Santa.

”

doubt

Dear Santa: Send
r and

eG GN DATA ANN DN ON NN NNN ON ON ON NINN NN

CHILDREN’S BOOKS — for all ages
XMAS TREE DECORATIONS
GIFT STATIONERY -PRESENTATION




ice

UTE np

HIGH STREET

BOXES OF SOAP etc.

Mi fly GIVE YOUR FRIENDS A YEARS
SUBSCRIPTION OF
THEIR FAVOURITE
MAGAZINE

Arrange this at once with

ROBERTS & CO.

DIAL 3301



a little story. The
ones at school say there is no
Santa so send me a letter and

“Santa Claus, Reindeerland, Ice-
“Father Christmas, Ice
, Snowy White Ice Forest,”

land”...

h ‘Tourist

sometimes

me a let-

me




we
MuuEREEeEeeeN

MENG



m STOVES

"amma pe gmapeneaee re GE



WB WGN 8 NNN NNN NN NNN ANN NS 8 NN



I will show it to them. . .
The letters are addressed

c/o Post



@ LANTERNS Etc, and

All You'll need to
make Home Bright
and Gay !!

a gnome (she is disguised as a
most human, warm-hearted Dan-
ish lady) called “Marta Stjerns-
ward” who has composed a
cheerful reply to all the children
who write. It is printed in a
wobbly blue hand and runs:

Dear Little Friend,
I was delighted to have
your letter which reached me
in my country Denmark, of

‘ which Greenland is a colony.

If you are very good I be-
lieve you will have your
Christmas wishes fullfilled. . .
The letter goes on to enclose

a particularly Iugubrious Hans
Christian Anderson fairly tale
about the starving Little Match
Girl who was frozen to death on
New Year’s Eve. At any rate
she is highly popular with pud-
ding-stuffed junior Britons, who
continue nevertheless to concen-
trate on Santa himself.

Letters contain a variety of in-
structions: “I hope you will wear
your fur coat and fur hat as it is
very cold”. “Do not forget the
baby bunting she did not be here
at the last time.” “Our chimney
is very small, do please be care-
ful not to get stuck wen you come
down.” “Please don’t make too
much _ soot
chimney.”

Letters to Santa may be writ-
ten on cheap ruled paper with
old sums on the back, or formal
note paper ornamented with Mr.
Punch, or Snow White and the
Seven Dwarfs. It may be decor-
ated with scratchy, surrealist
reindeer, with clouds and chim-
neys in bright crayon, but with
few exceptions the messages a*e
ene —-

“Dear Santa, I shall be very
glad to see you when you come
next Thursday,

Love,

Christine
“Dear Santa, Will you give me
something if you have it. I am
seven.
Thank you notes to Santa are
surprisingly common:
Father Christmas, thangk
you fora that eroplan set and _
plaing krads and the trais

coming down the

this (hustmas
YOU can Select

@ PAINTS & VARNISHES
@ FURNITURE POLISHES
@ KITCHEN WARE

m@ ENAMEL WARE

W GLASS WARE

m@ OVEN WARE

@ PLASTIC WARE

fl
f




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FSSC N NITION | aS SN GN SAN Bi BTN GTN GN MN DH BR NR DK DG DN TN ON ESA SN NN SN SR ORNS



&
tig
C/T

SAVE AT —
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.,



anta Claus

I have pontep a fas on them

Moth agn.
Bi bi fora Now
From Michael.
3ut best of all we liked the
following:

Dear Father Xmas:
What would you
present.

like for a

a

grsuuuuneicions

7

y
Select from =
Finest Gifts in @
Town! =

DR voys, Chocolates, Crackers Age
Xmas Trees and Decorations,
Sh Xmas Stockings
a ge en BOXES—.
igarettes, Tobaccos, Pipes
BB cOLOGNE A711, Atkin-
son's, Dralle

PRESENTATION SETS—

x
= Yardley’s, Max
mR
z

Factor,
Soir de Paris, Imperial
Leather,
Hp SOAPS—t
by Yardley, Morny,
Cussons, Bronnley.
RRPERFUME—by Yardley,
Coty, Lanselle.

S.P. HARRIS &

= Lower Broad Street
xs Plantations Building

DIAL 4045

Dralle.

iemanna

IEC ONES UNC ERR R CREE
SO SAYS SANTA:=—

Make Your



LTD.

enema an 00 eco ev 0. 0 oo OCONEE OREN

a





CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE TWENTY-FIVE

sided llbilinictnsatiaicaitiniiihieieresnenseciea tts

— BEST BY TEST ae
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w SOLE DISTRIBUTORS












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Santa wont have to tell you.....
But thore’s nova a (Chrustmas

without

BREAD AND HAM

FOR THAT PERFECT SANDWICH
YOU'LL NEED

J&R SANDWICH BREAD

FOR THAT SPECIAL PARTY
YOU'LL NEED

DELICIOUS CAKES & PASTRIES

THE EARLIER YOU ORDER-THE BETTER



YOUR FRIENDS WILL BE COMING FROM NEAR & FAR

SO ORDER MANY GALLONS OF «J & R” — JOHNSON & REDMAN

+ ‘



CHRISTMAS .SUPPLEMENT

PAGE TWENTY-SIX

CONSTITUTION RIVER



si ei:
a Ae :

RARE

§

W

Enjoy that rich, mellow iaste




of HOLLAND'S FINEST BEER.





Youll be delighted with its

quality and the quantity too...





more people love HEINEKEN'S Ne
ae

Therefore Stock up’ a few




Cartons for the Season.
e

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Ba PAE MEREK ON ENT ON EV ERDNONERENTN EN ENRON RE RENE ENTON NO DUDE DN BN PERE DEON DN




§





SOP SSSSSSS,



6
&
o
o
3s
es
e
“

$44,666

‘os

Ernest



Murrel

Jry hase

CRYPTOGRAM

A PHRASE of a masculine
“* author, “uncertain, coy and
hard to please,” has been quoted
about women for centuries. How-
ever, long before Scott wrete it,
a woman said the same thing in
another way. Her remark is pre-
sented as a cryptogram for you
to solve. Try it:

ZFEQ KER SER

SEISWIJIEQB LR

ZFEQ E DGPJ

4G3IJ OEU LP YL?

OU Aamo MEL ae “eyeunwog £q

' Ov 40 S88 itm [21 @ ywUK To

eur TPUAA,. ? MONO

{POOGOSSSSSSSSSS9SSSSS99555959505SS690000E

Win A Wrist Watch Competition

ALFONSO B. De LIMA & CO., offers a

WRIST WATCH
to the Winner of the following competitien

The Competition is known as

Competition”
items in the

Gregor Street.

until they went into......
decided to buy John a...
that Mary must have

they thought they would look around for things
home and to their delight they found
After purchasing all that they wanted they decided that in

future they could

NAME .

ADDRESS

I agree to abide by the decision of the Advertis-
ing Manager of the Barbados Advocate, whose de-

cision shall_be final.

one entrants are requested = “ in
ank spaces provided in the '.
§ Each space must be filled in with an item, name, sentence. word
g or words, which will be found appearing in the advertisement
on the page opposite. The first co
4 the winner of the competition. Cut out the coupon below and
send it in with your entry addressed to the Ad
ager, The Barbados Advocate, Advertising Department, Mc-

STORY
Mary and John had decided that

be Christmas Eve and that the rings
But neither could decide what to give

rrect solution opened will. be

the other as a present
wre .. and John
Ls ee ts sscccees

Anagrambles

N this game, you are

given a word and an addi-
tional letter and are required to
make & new word composed of
the combined letters. For ex-
ample, SLOPED with I is spoiled.

word









Now try these:
1. GALLED with E is ?
2. NEATER with V is ?
3. EAGLES with U is ?
4. NOSES with A is ?

5. TWINE with H is ———?
POLO with 8 is

[0Ods “@ “HOU “¢ ‘UORRES “p we
‘SB URIOle. % ‘paSaiwe Ts emeyg

?














“the Alfonso B, De Lima
a the correct

their wedding date would

WOU TG dd ais ode ces




SOSSSSSS SSSSSS SOOO SOS SO SSSSOOS SOOO

+S OSSSSS



Full Text

PAGE 1

< HRIS1MAS SUPPLEMENT PACE T1IKLK "SISTER BESSIE —A Detects Story A AI CfcTUtlM. UDM ... • %  -el. old tamilUt lace Al ChrUtniu HIT* we bop* lp niMI 'AI UV old farnillar pUn. "Trom you to To —fcoiM I •I look to no* I II-DA TRENT Christmas By CifAil Manx %  ha cnce at fanuly reunion.^ especially at Christmas time. "" Nl V.'V'-K".;-^"";,"."" "' "' * —" %  %  e %  ' '"' n all tut loalhiug plained everything, It v.aa I ITII.DA TRENT turned the ^,*%"",!^'; im ,„. must naturally feel lor per5 K-. twisted mm., to ,„„ | XI Christmas card over with meet C *" !" m " "> >pe "> "- Heated badly; and from him by threat, and 2ve il her carefully manicured fingers as H e' put'down his aaoei unread S* l^*"w s,m ple cnou h ,0 * %  - "y In charities. ah,_r.ad the Idiotic line, aloud. „„T s^rcd forlornlvTu.. "o7"he VS. v? e;.. a i rh.ist. ,Ui 1 nis own ""*' on,i lo ,!s Come to Hunk ol I, hta man VnW f'uwait he, .n that '""" ,h """ "' 1 """ "' %  ** "' "• ""h the Whole the whole thini etnad ••• Ma ml "< 1 '"' 1 """ g '"<">* fcxl of the re.1 pat M M>£| CkS> Kv. '"•"""'" >"'" ",. protect... I,hard but to M. I ,X; h us. "s U ch L nr i2rS. LSi g**< •" %  M funcvion ns the one he would Yes,h a ,S what It y s: From g£J "^ "' *" "^ your old Leech.' Must be a friend ba4 I10.-J Ol lines aloud "Did you ever hear anything so completely palsied ?" she naked her husband. "1 wonder who on •atth they can get to write the %  tuff. Timothy, do you know anybody called Leech?" "Leech ?' ed disk stood in li,c com •he earliest days kepi her (MHni He .tuna* it open mid .i-rim charlbsbli dpi• %  his way to d the he J was silly CHE had been, in her revoltingthbig for her [1 gomes to amuse the children— *-* ly sentimental phrase, his lot to do before lie could Indulge Musical "own special sister." As they grew in extrav.igi.nt faDCtee like Uiiit tho course ot up. the role*, were reversed, and Hild.i was comimthem his wallet must have slipshe became hi* protegee, the adroom towards him Ho %  !, ped from hs pocket. miring spectator of his early strugmade an agreeable NOtraal i i., He discovered ihe lou next '* %  get-up of the Origson woman Sh. morning, went round to the house Then it had become pretty clear looked tired and ratbar bored and retrieved it. But when It that she and everyone else expectwhich was not unusual for hei came into his hands again there *'' nlm t0 marry her. He had parties at this hou>r was one utem missing from its considered the idea quite serious"Timothy she murmured contend. Just one. 'X foe some time She was pretty "ean't we get out of line MA letter, quite short and ex•-•nougn in those days, and, as the head feels like a ton of bricks plicit. signed in a nam e that had P nr * wOOl, worshipped the and if I'm going to be fit for anv then become fairly ro u *~ t h u "V d L w lw thing to-morrow mornm* 'ith an u ne na nad *"' ood aen e .„.,,',.. to see In time that he must look _,.... ... 'n! !" n \. Mid ,!. 15 S*Hov t h CoUld have bwo fo ' Hengagement to Hilda had high time you were in bed „lWJl "' n n sudden enough to keep it a moment u,-en a blow to Bessie. Her oldf the mildly tipsy, her upturned sudden You'd better Keep ,,%  0 II shiny nose glowing pink in the on Bessie while you are about d i ami candlelight She had a-stimed .i flic's had about as much %  -. me slightly puzzled expression, os can carrysunthat it though trying to recollect what Hilda was right. Bcsaiv w she had said F i \i i Y. iw com upon a mall iiinci diawci which icsistcd bis attempts to open it. Ha ,t it in vain, and then the poker from the rtrcpla I tmist |ha llinv-y lick by main force. Tlicn he djlttod tha %  .!,• ei from its plai <• .nd .nled (l tnaell tO examine the contents. It was crammed as full as II i > % % %  ill. papcts. At titive-iy lop was the programme of a May; Week Ball for his last year at i 'ambtldfe. Than there were snapchota, lit cuttings— an account of hie own wedding among them—and, i..i inrest, letters. Piles of letters, all In his handwriting. Tha wretched woman seemed *o have every scrap he had ever -1 ittcn to her. As he turned them over, borne of the phrase* he had used in them floated into hut Hin l. and he began to apprehend in. [or the llrst time what the depth I'akc of her lesentment must have been line when he threw her over Bui where the devil did tha 1 Of coming? i Uiougm heap the only lottai that matt* iraiuci ul stockTimothy smiled back and i At Christmas time we gladly t'> b, w. wUi his gambling debts I'" 1 ***** lo h ''r He was stone >kt -,wJ kl. la II -a.<-,.• ...l., r **nrt S>a xmllrt FB-IIII> and And he had the though! that the whisky had seemed the very f "' 1 his inordinate thirst for ">her. and he could remind her end of the evening wlum' su 1 s a .a ... ._* 1..... alaaBaaaala aaB^afeaas ak A ^aA^einn .i ihall have to stay .mi • party through. Therea a AH he sliaighie.l bhnaal| %  iiei i tamuj buaine id A fiomthede.k b* rw-ard cloea i f wnua i bavi ina behlncj him a bidaoua, chokinn %  ound Ho spun round quickly Bessie Was standing behind him, her face a mask of horror. i i nth was wide open in dlsIII. She drew a lung, 'hudderinn lueath In sjnotnar moment she was going to sjcrsjam at the) lop Of her voice. Timothy's pent-up ftn I i ould be contalnad no loosjw With all tin force he drove hi* list full nt. that gaping, foolish face. And riinoihy Bessie went down us though she) bar. had boon shot, and her headj b) IM tiu.k the leg of a table with tha decidedly merry ' oo n tlnuad io MM hi Thanka to his attentioi'is last payment had aeen tha and T It He had returned from James's funeral tftumphant In the certain belief that he had attended the burial of the bloodsucker who called himself In* •vhich blackmailers arf "Leech seemed But he • :tuft made. But he had got rid of Jamea List February, and here was 1-eech aga n hungrier than ever. nt shifted uneasily In his "Got nd of him," wsft wrortjj. it hardly Ihe rlgtvf way to put It %  JH. hundre,, lov,^ ^^ •g.'K *£? £?%„„ Five hundred! Last w,r |, hll 1? .^fJ^JL I "' wor ""' l srs. s tRSS ErvSSap a out some holding, a, „ twkw ^ J !" ^P h ^"V There had been Uay had been seen ... the guesu were fumbling Ioi wraps, she had reache.1 ( whan she could barely sl-i. "Another glass," thought othy from the depths of ii penence, and she'll paaa out." "I'll Bcshic. lu> "My present for you. Timothy, ,. st is in the post You'll get it to". ( morrow. I expectI thought like a change from those 1 nd Jeave Chrtfln M card : A nd the words thristgjve you In the name of all that was horri. ble was he going to raise the money? He would raise it. of courae Ha would have to. Tha sickening familiar routine would be fotuthrough asain. The caah In Treasury notes would be packeu in an unobtrusive parcel and left In the eloale room at Waterloo. oggy nac i heen accompanied by an un !" chmistakable wuik. He moved away from the mis„, ">rtuiiate tietoe and strolled round the room, accident on the Kingston Byexchanging pleasantries with all k of a dry ottos, brokan Iwo She did not iimvr again. A ".hough It was quiet enough HI 'he room after th.ii. heart his stepmother oornt m, 1'crhap* il was because the sound) of his own pulses drumming la his cars had deafened him. I Hidid not even know how li.nsl she had been there. Certainly il --. wa long enough for her U> take) said Koger. looking ..t he, in everything that was to be seen i professional eye "W e can there for her voice, when sha jueeze you in spoke was perfectly under con, nonsense, Roger'" Beside *">' % %  giggled "I can manage perfectly You h v k '*ou Poor, ollra Where-. ~"'"' "" e-mamon Bjc.chonitln, pleasantries KS3 l""* ,• 'he family. He cool.i look them D g?f.~ nd meldenuJly. ol the laee now without a qualm •"" Iwo perfect strangers who had He clicked gla.ses with None !"""" %  presnU. UptatnM to be on the road at the prematurely aed. ..verworkiM "'' liiolraiwd his leave-lakliuts tne some time Qp. pj 0 need TO w orrv now until all Ihe rest had gone, then hether hb money wa.s aointt It. helped Beasie Into her worn fur that direction! *. and stepped out of the house He slapped Peter on tile b-ck "'pporllng her with an affect! dmple loving Hcasle'Forget it' The pome was that Ihe dinner — and the whisky had been I.. .K d "* d lM He could am] endured patiently V minute N EXT DAY. he would park his again m "* confidential chat on the dlfnriilti. car as usual in the railway T hi rinlaioi," a. of the car business In those days l^atlttoao^tlagon. SSaS ^Sf^VPf^* *?***' %  ' Wo Ma]orle. James's widow H' 7 It Heliciousiy lmp|. all going to hthe windscreen wiper—"th old wi wiiiuscrcrcn %  IH0S Ilia old w ,„ r I1P ,. h !# %  .... %  .*. . ,liv *"'a w *" 1 "••" %  % %  ^ familiar place"—would be tucked il ,,, !-^. li'c.aUon can>e to dim midblended sympathy and ch O-CSSU lived in ho P old bouse, she preferred to "1SJ2*1£Z£P* W* I lodge of Ihe larcd at her aghast, t was only just now that I found that It was missing from my jrwal case." she went on, sUU in the same flat, quiet voice. "I don i know how she found out about it. but love — even %  nothei have kept the hotlM onarj and my. children out of debt on mi persecutor looking wan and ever so brave In Sg wore. S b. u,Sepl.„,. = jS=,5 • S"* MiPJ-.JMg. ..mpathy end cheer nicnl suited everyone, cap...-, fssiiila L*ecb7 be) tha evenin/j the ticket would ba WA > trough Mrs John Trent's ice James, after one of his ••STflana u/h,. i> ir— Ka. P""> -; l >he very moment, in • • • • reverses or, the turf, had brought nlhenrlw £> -o,7 ii*.-* I -SSi And that would be that— J**. whan the preaent. were hiB fanuly to live with hi. — tnink l cou 1 till next time. It was the way b "'"R distributed from -he TIE even found in ins pockets to save the expanse, that Leach preferred it, and ha Christmas tree. Ik some half crowns for his It mlted Timothy admirably had no option but to comply. was so simple, and so ungreet hulking step-nephews Then now Tenderly he escorted hei The one certain thing that Trent expected that he could have he was standing by his stepmother to the end of the drive, tenderly knew about the Identity of his laughed aloud. Appropriately near the fireplace, whence she he as-ijted her to insert ban little blackmailer was that he—or could enough it was hs own contribupresided quietly over the noisy latchkey In the door tenderly he it be she? -was a member of his tion to the party thai was recheerful scene, beaming gentle supported her Into th* linkHI* family. sponslble good nature from her faded bin.* ting-room that gave out of DM His family' Thank heaven they Tor some time past It hd bean *-***• haff were no true kindred of hn So his unwritten duty, as the pros" A lcl, **tful evening." he said There, Bessie conalden.t.lv far as he knew, be had noWood perous member of the family to "''<*meent it. saved him an enormous amount relatives alive But his family presen.-his stepmother with some "Thanks to vou. Timothy in of trouble and a poasJUf unplcn;. they had bean, ever awce. when deI1 to JJJ <*,, (Jie SJEg *re,t perl -he rapSad ~Yx, bavo a, t s,-ene A. he put her down L e L Wa ? ? ^iW N ^ *? '"^ oourcas of her hSIse in ; lwa ^ ***" " Bood to *• U P"" Th e -** *• nnally sue„ ..._._ding a f*. woru?r3 the Wonderful what a little doubtful cumbad to the champagnT Her b ^&SBJli£H2Z!2?l£B* T champagne would do' He would eyes closed, her mouth opened, n \'l 9 l^^ T J52 !" K have given a lot to see her fare and she lay like a log where he {Jj JiorrSd^bout ft forborne! if r have • %  rd wB ny he will l JiSl n S ^! Kl "J c f blackmail, but If he pe„^„ shall wc ,.,y .. thousand tied money but he had never got '"" .trongei un lemonade. *•',' *?5Uj! < "' 1 '" *"> %  h :",'.*.' ''".H* 1 ".' "lOt? '."T" '"">" ""' >"' %  >">* %  "< "' !" •wav tYon? the Griganm w0 "ough to loosen Bessie's tag"* <•" ***


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PAGE TWELVE MMIIV ADVOCATE si sow l>l ( F MHKR l. 150 Kiddies Day At "WoodHirie* IT os Kici.1: side GanJUja. H.. Slrext. \. tenliiv afternoon. i %  W*ff Jill dr**5Cd U| and wi'tf constant i\ aeen U ing their mother? either to | I.uck;. Hip. Wheel o( Fortune i the Shetland ponies The Junior MctlOO of Police Band, under Cpl. Be played tunes to ratt the orcas • and while the children plat on the lawns, mother attentively The first prize for the prettn .: costume in the Girls under se en section went to UM who represented the "Queen of Hearts'" She wore 4 long *tt' I ow n with tiny heart* stuck .'i over It. The prize for original costume in this tiectic 1 went :>< the Policewoman' while a Consolation prize w is given to the mrl who represented "Niirht and Day [ %  • % % %  : %  ; %  j for the most attracti\> toatunuwent to little %  Buffalo Bil while that for the most orimi went to the bov who represent. "Time to Retire.' He was sea ed with a candle i n his han The Consolation prize went > the lad who represented "San 1 Claus." The prettiest costume in tr • "Girli over" section was that wo. 1 by the "Hawaiian Girl." Trprize for the most original we' to the girl representing "TV Clock" while the Consolatm prize went to the 'fl*ansy IUO TOM MM MM ftatffc Nmtmt I niriiniini-Ml \ild Democrat-* sir Cladwln Je*b %  -ik in |ke B B I ing week listener will hear Sir r,lHwy n Jebb, Union's spoke. tlM United Natiotis Seen; •ty Council Medina.spckl '•r. the promise ,.f communism . % %  '. Originally broadcast B C.*i Third profframm.•his address was given to the In ternational Chamber of Coin merce in New York on SecrtemI Mr 19 Much to his embarrassment Sir Gladwyn, who Is a hardI working diplomat with no desire lor the llmebght became a popoar figure in the U.S.A.. durajng Uie Security Council meetings in Auiiust. attaining almost to th!..!ll Mf tih, -**.ll HARBOUR LOG In Carlisle Bay AHHJVAla •Th rvardana. MV SaxietArkl. WimJclul l|T|n. W V 8iw* !" >. Vochl Tam III Vachl Anr> rh w 1. BunK-w. Bch Ho...,*,* M Ldv •„ fch. Ae*Iia. B*h B.,,,,1,, R. "*i. i^iui. M. smith. s.h M .„. Caroiirif hih m WoMiii it, Bthoonrr Rainbow If. 30 |on f „ • C#pt Marki. from Trinidad vl* ANOTHER .it tractive c out ulna at Woodside Oarden" yesterday was that worn by Ann Taylor. She is drevied an a piorrot. BBC Radio Programmes Mi 1 S JBr. I...; SUNDAY. l>tr 10 ItAO from Okuttji %  B aaai JJ3T Um ni. Cap. Th.> 'torn Point a Pltr MS Canadian Chjllnr. VMS tn1. dpi CUrtta. fiom Vontr-al v DM'AnTtni*^ %  rtioonn Maty IT 1\; aa ton. 1 C*m Marahall. for B|U1.h fJMai %  V D^rwood. DaColrii.. t.r Bl 1 gs Kmi. |M tun, nt i t.ipi. TI* for VmnnfU is r.nn.rti*, rjifcallumi Ml ret dp' Ciukr. fur Ri Vlnrati Analyiln. t IS 1 F n.m (-_ln> Da* Htrlke up Ih. Mixlr. lorrn 4 .. i %  a New.: 1-. „',,. Tube ii Iruni %  %  .>ii ti eon tMBJ %  •r iin> dlploraatk corre'>ondent of IM New York Times on Sir Gladwyn who, he said, demonstrate. I thut the 'British have not been l,r;,ctislnff the gentle art of Verbal % %  mi ride at Oxford all thasH — for nothing.' Sir Glndwvn will be broadcast, under tt or From the Third Progn t fl.3ft p.m.. on Wedra %  Stfa inst Art In The Caribbean There will be an unusu-.l feature in the BBC'i "CaribU-rt Voices" on Sunday next, 10f Dei-ember. The programme wfll open with a talk on "Art In th • Caribbean" by John Harrison r.l au British Council who is well known to Iruin > ,„ i ne u/e.st indu Mom his work m the CaribbMl The programmecoiulun. *ht story iy Gordon Wtmirm I "f British Guiana telling of India i .iiiolescence. 'Caribbean Voices.' the Sunday evening version i C ailing the West Indies,' is to b.. iiegrri every Sunday at 7.13 PJD rhose who have been complalnln : • %  f poor reception from Ixirdon, i i^rticulnrly at that to,.. -h-* 'veiling. shoulJ tune in ne 19 metre band—6.185 megac.cle^. ifl43 metres—where reception %  usually much better than the alternative hc-.ini on the 31 metre hand %  ,,M ( New. An-liM.. 11.15 Mr-, II*.'. „,, l-idon Forui Bi-lW. Nr- rc i ; I^B p m „,„,. The Sew-. S 10 p II. E ...._ %  ..„. ,,.,„! BIIUIH. J II p II rrtl*: IS* |im \\, .'. BandboM, ;InUrlud*. 4.|6 p IH :l 4 pin 8un II i Touch With Barbndoi ..->^_ tvln; UM *ir.l. Arrtm 7 pjl NW; 7..-0 p.m Nr^.^ %  ^ i j ar tam-masrsi "sa 1_P"' : UniiM Nalinna lltpmi CoaiUl Station Human Relations On Industry Ust month the BBC planm-.i two-way exchange programme b%V tweei. AH India Radio and ft*' BBC but this had to be postpone!. The broadcast Is now planned for Tuesday next, 12th December, at 9-30 i-m The subject for dUcun slon will be 'Human Relations hidustry' and the speakers will biPRETTIER THAH EVER! i in High Fashion ^i| 5 W .-y Fabrics! Cat.* and Wavlethai tas .an now the lollnwlnn ,i,i|~ dado! dtaft M*1IUH SI tW' %  • %  ii -. II., %  OejUto. 88 lloraU. U lUil.nr. S wnKtiirtMl. IB. Port Too MHhi-n*. S a CakmiliiK, 8S Mjk*n. s unpoco, HR aeuiiwm Luuiu*. s.b Kun. ss s Reaa. IS I. .araa... a.*, atind.ii*. S Karaibank. %  Jspu-ira J*>aduir. hi %  *0lf(irf l I" HSIroi. U Antvtua. SS BOb>n TUIUa. a.B Cap* nodnri'. SS Win. ciw<-r. S-* V. r Crus, B. tlo.i.r|.-.ii:. Ill Batii. iioci SB Flune-r Cov*. 81. Brtll. Seawell AJWrVAIA-m BWIAI If THIN1UA1) HOM. William Aiuil* Crkhlow. topnai n> n WIAI Foi TKJN1DAD: PrClxIa Vaushun. VBMIIC* Qal' Ki" Holder. Kuttnu N.lai.. Sanutrl llatkl. KkMnor BalMy. Hush Mitch.: Mrl.-' MOchaM. Caml Mili-hrll M Mil.'. JShn ooldle. Harr. HarnAc .1 M ne-u<1 Bfa Slcwarl Nuc 11 cook, AsaUtant Qeoeral Secrrtar v i.ai 101:. ... t„ fosa Inn d—. BBsd lafe. M, R. Uasum a cl Dr. N. Da*, who u .1 II IMI. EIUI MCIMltA \* Th. New. 7 10 The Creator of Alice % %  1 Kpom ir.< ianmi.1 S -Mi.itia I'a.ad* iflia. Nmh *!. .m. cio- 1-'*. I n Nat*. 11 ie pin M pm. IIBC Midl.ixl Usrrit On b era. Spl'li.*' rUrvti Ml pi, Nt'ilHl. 1 10 p 1 1 Everyone knows "Alice 1 I Wonderland' but rtoi many know she rrrator uf Alice, not trie l>ewn Carroll whose name appears on the title page but the man hehin ; that pseudonym, the Keverend Charles Lutwldge Dudgson. L. BBC talk on Wednesday next yon x> 1 1 can heor from the Up* of one wh'. ..•nine -II i.'iott p.m TK* Ne knew him well what Chard-s !.;,T B ..*.fTV "T"', Dodgson. Lecturer m Mathemu !•?L^r,?cho l cTh r.a tic. at Oxford, was really hk< p.m. ifoaramm* P^nda. so p.m. TI Speaker will be Violet Doditwi'. awry Trilar a IM Dm.c. HUSH, hli nteot; her talk, which is olht&r*&Tl£l£l&. P iM e "" llwl ,L wl (arr 11 Aa I RiNI Attaiymi.., 7 is p.m. o U r Mutu. Oi ua *n laLaod a pjn. at 1.45 pm. on Wednesday. 13th imiMi >. lllS | 1 i( .ht after 'Cwlltng the W.V Tonight he can sci new iheeo In yoor hair, EL iti careuablf loftnew. Ye*, 1 %  • %  if you use Luitre-Creme Shimpoo XoOiy Only Luitre-Creme has |hi| magical blend of iecret ingredwoti plui gentle lanolin. So rich-lathering In hardest water. Leaves ha.r ragrantly dean, ihining. and so manafeaDte Mow on sale everywhere la the hand* •WT a SOA-I NOT A LIOUi:> I ..,.^..AMPOO ^OISCOVIR* v*i'.. LANOLIN FO* HjJ ClAMCWOlrt HAIR — — coi6rc.-aLMOLi-a--ccr LTD ^_ Itppoii Cvnp |L. Mine Is 1000 Ft. Down—Or la It? Vuitors to the Glasgow brand-. of the Festival of Britain next year win go down ltft. in a coal rain* cage—and think they havi gone down 1,000 ft. To create the illusion the cag< will start with a alight jerk, ffl damn at a snail's pace—and stop with a bump. It la part of a full-scale coal mine exhibition. Visitors will be divided Into shifts" by a pit overman. The mine will show the history of coa) mining methods from the days. 200 years ago. when miners went down clinging u> a moving chain. —L.R.S. .it* prr Hill" Northern OrchoUa i>m n— >k lo H*d. *.U pi.' I -raviea 1a, m TINCWI; 10.10 p rrom liManorial*l II p.m a %  Lauah. I" 41 p.OL Cmiiliionwrallli VFV. I p-1 SoRmton POSTON witri HI wmrx im nan Sclaw. Pruarasnma. SO* p m (ma on LhrMiMi Brlene* LORRY AND JEEP COLLIDE Indi. rd uawrmnr.. D lw w l i • %  la. Na KaniKl'i Nawlon A crln>* tory ruang )•**!• and nuik><, (rom Trlniid i.nirit.1 .r Tfwka by B Wanan. A 1. 11-lon -iml-wvapan irluin f lo lha %  untry. %  i>lli Dmii.bii. Afl la lb* t arlab.ii> I J II*" .>, A nlk hv the BrK.'l. rbe Talk VMl b Ooidon Woallord. i lud> ul Indian adoVaacK In Tltnlklustr %  ad lllh !>•'•-1 nbar. Tba KM. by I IM lltil.l in TtliiMUd. A riasaa -1 K...4....'. In i. uMASSACHUSETTES. Dec. 9 SSSSftl,, \'l!ff ,$!$£ fro0 Seven peOpU were killed and J4U1 pocambn. CknMaaaa Paaau by five others critlcoUj Injured when n r -f JJ-'* % %  '.." %  .'''SJ!*~ A ~-H^ 1 lotTJ gild ;i jeep collided to-dn labai Kai HU u.-u-swcpl hlghw,.> ne. here. Several bodies had lo be cut Irom the wreckage witli antyli 1 1 torches. The dead Included two women who WON travelling In UM jeep -Kevu (JIIIMHIBI. and Dai in. 1,1 ..1 ii. Jaar**r by Uarlcii -i-ori thelch (or Ch .' .11 u-a \ lion t" ••• ananaad JUI l).,.mbrr, UaaW by Willy Blfh .rUaon .Tiimdaai. An Ineldtnl at A..b-...l laanMe P*T. liUr-iriiai TrapN by Samual Ban .Tllii ,..lll ,1 Unly one so.-ip giv'N your .^ skin 1 his exeiling laoiiqiiel !_AndCashmere Bouquet Soap is actually milder ihoa most I other leading toilet soaps I / Xy^Zl Proved by severest tests on oil skin types' You'll look neat and trim in Ihe latest and moil i-xcitinu "Tex-made" cotton prints, (vailabk now at hurprisitiK Nvinga Ask for Old Colony, (Jlenwood, Victoria, Hi'verly and Su/anna. They are styled by expert designers in beautiful flowers, stripes, checks and geometric patterns. S. 1 fresh . to ,asy to wash ... so easy to cart for. They .ire favourite* everywhere. See this wonderful collection of high fashion "Tex-madc" colour prints. To be sure they are genuine "Tex-made", look for the identification bands and lag on the piece goods. m-HADE" IS WELL MADE CONCRETE PRODUCTS CO. LODGE HILL, ST. MICHAEL. Phone 2798. In Spite of IMIII ASIII COST OF II >IIM we are still able to maintain LOW SELLING PIIMK of our III II III \<: lllh WITH A COLLECTION OF WEST INDIAN FLOWER PICTUKES BY RICHARD CICCIMARRA. • HANDMADE FURNITURE AND POTTERY ANTIQUES — GIFTS — FABRICS. • COLD SPRING COTTAGE '^^^m^m^tmmmammM .'M %  i*H*v\9m*m*m*ito*HMy',^ filET THAT GIVE JOY TO THE GIVER AND RECEIVER! COAST ROAD ST JAMES TEL 91-74 0 is I tint *• .ffttfli-pf in Pearl Necklace*. BajTUiKa. Ilroochea, Kings, In loveliest nt in Town. .dies WRIST WATCHES in lovoly assortment. HEAL JEWELS! Sot and Unset from India. Moonstones, Star Sapphire.., /iriyna. Rubles. Diamonds, Etc SILKS! In Pyjamas Kimonu-*. Underwear, Etc. Etc Parasol*, Raliuuuis F lint-, purses. $ 0rm m* 1mtntur Ami Mument Supreme. My Sin I aVassF f*M**/f**ff#*M Tweeds In Unload QUBUttas, Tropicab. Grcv & Cream Flannels. Etc. SHIRTS in widest varieties (or all purposes, UnderJ %  Ties, Socks In many varieties, HandkerBalta Cotton and \H. ,llen Pull-overs. //..,isi/i.// i; \SSUAHI Bosrl \A I Flower Vases. Etc. %  • n l-ace Net m wi'l>CXIcloth, ik-d Tick. ( .-. Hi-iI other N I Ftc THANI'S STORES — Will Save You the Worry of Buying Gifii for Everyone. r jMtt^ttai^3tilgi B lsfJ.3tj.w^



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CHKISTMAS SUN'I.KMI.VI PACK MNKTKKN XMAS PUZZLES Solution* Hi h>u Squaring the Circles jjpmsKi It's a j "CLASSIC" Present to give this %*mmwMummm*m w^ Xmus ! TUB problem contributed by Jessie It. Smith re* quires yon to piece the numbeni 1 to 11 Inclusive In the 11 circles above so that you hare eWt #4 olresalar mule square— with every three nume*ea la any atHaight line totalling 1$. (There's a solution elsewhere In the page: but dssVl peak till you've tried olv!nf this unaided > BANNERS i r. o. ma "rossNumber TT _. ottos lit 11> ten %  1* -.nm'*iu.-. tricky busine*•rr drama •ubmltted tirwnl B Board of five < lurMd IU •">'*'•*• %  • %  Ued jS (lie Otiwin thenv-.-Wewrlir A puiuaiii Hliuaiion ir*f remnut Eaob of lae tie O e— % %  aubmftiso i> teic lMWll lMt .-in each %  %  < i: • plat'. wprosiot | banned bv %  •<> ol IU aulhoi ootieesueNone of Uicm banned ih •a.mr %  •"' PePurmilr.H batmrd llifplat"" %  and Ai-.mii while iOr* Of lhe-e lia'tnlo'.i..Ki lo .i.. rrc I Pfrrfe mid M UW Sam re tow* -n niMM' Ma|> Mil*; Piiretnlnd an< : Of hew nun. at the Bwr Bier* can ou with certain!* name the luther? Match Play T HY this on friends as an "Icebreaker." Place 12 matches to form four equl-elied squares, as above. Now. tba problem la to rearrange four matches and to form three squares, each the sauna stse as the ortginal ones. (All the matches must be used.) Solation elsewhere in pass. •Mtai een -a nn nan "^ ooo Hi .Di-oin.,0 iim rtwio --onto 4t(l *)0 p U |UM>n 4 KM I 4iM|*uee m,a an wee %  eg pas i -iir.i X jn jsertrra & i i*iua || (|> vtnrra.ee nw at an ..jam pti* aiwp ai ipt oa KBJoneao q^uia prinoj aq II^ nonnioe a uonda m— uuiu no W \ ui|iu rn joqine stn h i J %  uaq rn( 'j, ina x^d *e*riw *B| MtlM* v„ | mn W n-r* pus 0. Pe d *0 **"rl ua R -t ueiu. in a j ii -id iAy eqi P M B o O j amie.-i *u *qi feo Nonmos ISli. I3NirMTI14.NI 9 3? I %  I CLASSIC SHOES Renowned for Quality Comfort, Style and Finish. tfJeer #Vw . HWIU iinsifr on MW forlicf / / cL\SHo > j MARK Of, :UALITV ENGLAND Xivft /or "CLASSiC" SHOES at Your Store. MAKE YOiBS .\ < ItHISiMW OF s^*^ HI li III A.\'i0 .Mill X1.III ORDER HE method %  cmM-number ie the %  icing a cross word. The "deflnl11008" Riven beluvt Indicate the numbers that are to be placed ..' the squares above, one dlc.lt 10 each square. HdHI/UM \l I The cube of 43. 4 The square of an unlucky mmber 1 A prime number— the first m the 300 series .'. The squsre of 30. 8 1300 less %% discount. 10. SMsil.) 11 CMXLV In our dlflU 1? A constant needed to nnd tharea of a circle. Vr RIK \l. 2 IV just a little under 10.000 I Whan It's noon In New York —w hat time la It tn Honolulu? The vsiue at (U at 1%% caiwpaem< l Interest sfter M years. 6 Kxpresa 25'32 in decimals S. The year tba first railroad lacamoti'e beajan running In n. s. v The year of Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. I notation tlsewhere In page.) ui astqsva %  | • m? %  s\ si uiaiqoid W^ j\ .ui sianbe.. *>i J -' l Noumos "!l VI STOUT THE VITAMIN STOUT NUTRICIA POWDERED MILK HOLLANDS RICHEST POWDERED WHOLE MILK NUTROGEN THE FOOD-DRINK THAT GIVES NEW VITALITY Containing Cocoa. Milk. Malt. Eggs and Nutrition Salts SIMEON HUNTE & SON Ltd— Agents! I



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BUNDA1 HI i i \IHKR in. Utt SUNDAY ADVOCATK %  PACE THREE UAR1B S EVERAL TCA. Staff twinbns arrivwi : yesterday on the TCA. High' They wore Mis* 1 Air Stewardess tan the Caribbean run. ShiIg her* for a week staying at l 1 "* Oreun View Hotel. Mr. Brian Ramce whose broth, cr Glenn was hre a month -no with hi* wife also arrived yeatei day. He is with TCA In Monlreui and Is here for two weeks, staying at "Cncrabank "' Mr. Willi;ur. Benson who is a TCA pilot on tba Toronto-Mun treal and Toronto-Windsor flights. :.icen,panled by his wile arrived vssterdey to "pend two weeks at Ufct Ocean View Hotel Other arrival waMi Ki. no C'oughUn who is a navignlur H %  || henfor a week and Is also staylni at the Ocean View Hotel Back From Curacao Talk* M R. LISLE WARD. M.C.P who attended the W I. CooftrMM e in Curacao, returned via Trinidad by B.W.I.A. Arriving on the amp 'plane with him war Mr. Michael Han*. rhell. Superintcndetu of Apiculture in St Vincent, who attended the same conference *J Adviser to the Windward Islands delegation He i> here lor a few days, staying with his mother in Eagle Hall. before returning to St. Vincent by the Lady Rodney. Labour Commissioner M R. E. S. S. BURROWES. Labour Commissioner and Mr Darnley Lewis of the Labour Office here left for Jamaica yesterday by B W.I A They expect to be away a week. Here For a Few Days M R. AND MRS. Jose dc Montbrun arrived from Trinidad yesterday morning by B.W.I.A., to spend a few days in Barbados They are staying it the Hotel Hastings nnd plan to return to Trinidad on Thl Mr. de Mnnthurn is a Director of Grell and Co.. in Trinidad. Former intercolonial Cricketer M R. CYRIL MEKKY. who i.with Gordon Grant Ltd.. in Purt-of-Spain arrived from Trimdad yesterday by B.W.I.A. on %  short visit. Mr Merry will be remembered ly local cricket fan.' ...%  .1 Trinidad and Intercolonial efMMtSt B.W.I. Station Officer A RRIVING from Jamaica via Trinidad y e s t e r d a v by B.W I A was Mr. Walter Girling. Here for two weeks' holiday, be is staying with his brother and Mlter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs Kenneth Girling. Walter is H.W.l.A.'s Station Officer at Palisadoes Alrporl In Jamaica. Library Courte M ISS NANCY WENT o' the Barbados Public Library wtv was in Trinidad for six weeks on a library count, returned from Trinidad yesterday by B.W.I A. Advcntist Convention R EV. VERNON BERRY, Educational and Young People* Secretary of the Intel I Division of UM Severtth Day Adventists arrived from Trinidad yesterday by B.W I.A. He is here lor .1 Seventh Da) Advcntist Convention which begins this morning. Ha leaves Barbados on Tuesday. Representatives from Antigua. St. Kit!*. Dominica, St. Lucia, Montserrat and the Virgin Islands are alreadyhere for the Con van* tion. To Take Up Appoinrment R EV. Walter Fairweallur who came to Barbados in October, 1947 to study for the Anglican Ministry at Codri:tgto-i 1 left yesterday for his home. British Honduras via Jamaica by Ho is returning to take up an appointment It Si. John's Cathedral ,n Belize. (iardening Hints For Amateurs t.KOIND URCHIDs ( %  round Orchids are grow ng in throughout the .land. for gardqn lovers are i i.kly iinding out how lovely and nard working these useful plant? are. TWy deserve the term hard working, for the low gr> wing Bower continuous^; all through the year, and once well tftabllshcd they need no pampering or special care, but caa s* left practically to thetr 0WT1 O.'VICOS. Be sure however, If you ara starting a bed of Ground OrchMi to >ea that you get the ever bearing kind, and not thtall v.i.tv which flowers only at times. Description In appearance the Ground Orchids have slender nbb, n-llke leaves, growing 111 clumps, which terminate in a bulbous growth with a bunch of roots under; eath. In tome of these 'he rtowi, „rs a deep purple, and in other*, a ri.rer variety, a lovely pink which rartea in shade. BoUl vaneUes are hardy and easy to grow and can be left undisturbed for three or four years. To PUnt Plant the bulbs in s sunny open bed, thoroughly prepared with plenty of well rotted pen manure The roots of the plants should be well spread out and pressed iirnily Al ihr (innig CRISIS By G. B. DICTATOR versus revolutionaries is the thorn, ta "CRISIS" now playing at the Empire Theatre with an American doctor thrown in on the democratic side Kidnapped, with his wife by the government forces, while on holiday in a South American republic, he is cuiidueied li> the President's Palace, where he is firmly persuaded to operate on him for brain tumor. It appears that '.he dictator n rone loo popular and therefore there is some doubt thai the opei •ition would be successful if performed by any of the varwu* local surgeons. When our doctor agrees tc operate, he finds himself all mixed up with the dictator* henchmen, who want to make. sure there is DO slip of a scalpel, and with the revolutionaries, who are equally determined that the president will not leave the table alive. To ensure tin*, they kidnap the doctor's wife when she E leaving: the country and send him a message to the effect that she 1* safe with them and will remain ao—unless—. What might have happened had the message ever reached its destination Is anybody's guess, but It never does and the operation is performed— successfully. Events however, lake a sharp turn in favour of the revolutionaries, and with bis wife safely restored to him, the doctor finds his services in demand by the victorious group. />*&: _>-v<§^ na$tv, % tuck~ up. shllltna-a-lb. bird* Lomdon liprM SfTHM. in tlie bed, sinking the bulbous ,. %  :' to three quarters of its depth. Do not bury tho bulb entirely Oive the bed periodic application of manure, and water the plants well. Ground Orchids are slow starters and they will take a little lime to get established before they begin to flower, but once started they make up for their slowness by flowering profusely all the time. It is said that they flower best when they become Close packed m the bed Treatment As has been said, these plantcan be left undisturbed for many years, but after a time Ihey become %  0 l v.rrrow'ded that the plant. begin to Rlfler, and then they must be dug up, divided, and replanted again in a freshly made up bed. When the plants are Uken up it wiU be found that the bulbs have greatly increased, and after their division it will probably be possible to puss on a number of plants to friends. There is no special time of the year for taking up the Orchids, the time being entirely governed by the condition of the bed. The pink around Orchids are rarer than the purple ones, their bulbs often selling for as much as one to two dollars each. They grow however just as easily as the purple, and are so beautiful that they amply repay tho expenditure of a few dollars to get them established in the garden. There is plenty of drama and shooting, with tanks and soldier.) milling about and you will notice the extraordinary likeness of both conflicting; groups in their lust for K *ei and their ruthless use of 11. th Gary Grant and Jose Ferrar %  re to be commended for thair excellent performances. As the doctor. Gary ('.rant is smooth and sardonic in his nrst bcrtoua rolo for many a long day, and Jose, rerrar as the ranaUcnl dictator is thoroughly convincing and diabolical. There are a couple of reasonably amusing soenes, particularly one where Mr. Orant, scalpel in hand, demonstrates, on a rubber model, the opening steps of the operation to be performed. This seems to be a year for the real old-timers and in "Crtaat*. Ramon Novarro, Antonio Moreno and Gilbert Roland all take part. though thetr rotes are a f*r cry from the romantic ones of twenty five years ago. Personally, I think they're more Interesting now, but i-erhaps that's because I'm getting on too' The background muflc Is plnyed almost entirely on the guitar by Vincente Gomez and It ir. astonishing how many different types of atmosphere can be and are created by the skilful playing of this instrument. MONTANA MONTANA now playing at the Plaza. Bridgetown. Is a colourful Western film with plenty of action and good direction, westerns in technicolor always excel m their magnificent scenery and this one Is no exception, but In addition, the validity of its subject matter Is an improvement on the usual run-of the-mUi plot. It Is the story of the war that existed, toward the latter part of the nineteenth century, between the cattle barons of the West and the sheepranchers who wished to move in on cattle territory. In those days, there was a belief that no catUe could grate where aheap had been, and it is Up to F-rrol nynn. In this film, to prove the fallacy of the Idea As an Australian sheephcrdrr. Mr. Flytm moves in on forbiddei land, to find himself Involved with three families, who seem to own moat of the state and who are death on sheep. Not to be beaten. he rounds up the small cattleewners, who have been shoved around a good deal and who aren't making much money anywav. and persuades them to march their cattle, along with his sheep onto a large tract of valley he has acquired. There it a violent climax. some pretty tough lighting and thunderous catUe stampede before peace is restored and cattle and sheep grare together. I am not an ardent admirer of Errol Flynn, but 1 enjoyed his performance in this film, where his acting is far more realistic than I have seen hitherto, nnd in the rote of the hero—he has to use his brains as well a* his brawn H* exchanges rapier* for pistols, and .seems to be equally proficient with the latter, and of course, his horse manship Is superb. Alexis Smith. as the fiery haired young woman involved, whose disposition matches her crowning glory Is adequately bitchy, and S.K. (Cuddles) Sakall supplies delightful comedy as a pedlar and perennial tenderfoot. Incidentally, there are nr> Indians in this film, and I must admit there Is plenty of excitement, even Without the air being full of whizzing' arrows THE LISBON STORY THE LISBON STOKY showing at the Aquatic Club was according 1o all account*, an exciting play, but something seem* to have gone very much am'ss where the film is concerned. To begin with. it has been chopped up like a piece of hamburger before ever reaching thenshores, and In ronaeuuence. the abrupt transitions from mie scene to another are confusing ana annoying Apart from this, the story is *n coaspt> rated that I have a feeling that even the director got lost in its maze, and how the main character ever remembered who hwas supposed to be—and al the right time—Is a mystery* The story has to do with a British Intelligence agent during the last war. who seems to have ditiUulu in persuading (he Frem h that he's on their side, and yet Is received wiUi open arms by the German!, when he Informs them he Is, one of their secrets agents. Fortunately for him, lie remembers who he Is at the end, and emerges with a whole skin. As >ou can guess, the locale of thl* confusion is IJsbon David Farrar Is a good actor, but even he. ably assisted h> the glorious voice of the late Hiehard Tauber. couldn't save this film. Pat Burke, who also sings, has a charming voice, hut her acting Is not up to the same standard. Epstein Model Geft A Haircut A man whose statue will stan.. outside the Dome of Discover v. en the South Bank Festival site. has Ju&t been t, the barber fo. the in"! time in months. S h o u 1 d e r-length hair was needed for his Job a> a model fo. Epstein's new sculpture for the FesUval As yet unnamed, the statue depicts a young man striding forward. The model, Aubrey Griindon, 31. of Hyde Vale. Blackheath. %  ays: "It was Epstein'* wish thin 1 should grow my hnir long "Passers-by stared at it in the streets and friends nick-named me the Red Indian." Mr Cirandon had to pose moie than 30 times. London Gxprern Service \K, TOV CHAINFD WITH RHEUMATIC FAINS t MgffJjBJ aepty SA'-HOOL to the affected parts Sad rid yevrself ef agvaj MACKOOL CONQUERS ... 1*A1N Oa Sale at Htm DRUG STORES 111 I'II KI 1111111 'iwmeu ha<* feue nui*> %  wrarlrui %  Sn.1i Alt I aikiia %  fjeaaii, V.tW will a il MMUtsblr n— %  % % %  HSM. -tr*** >nal VM II. wi'hrd. tl hoM> th* hernia uti M*k *Ml* itminem thai bream aiasa %  ( n.u gaSH %  : iraa BssftM 111: v.i 1 v, 1 1 n 11 ,.[ ISI 4 Cork SUHt London. Itch Germs Killed in 7 Minutes •hd foraa wh*r g*TM Mil*nH MOM lI nfcl* II.Mti. Ln.dlM k .. Buralna:. i.ii-. Ringworm I'-odaala. Wacahaae*. PimplM, t\-t It '. an.) r-di-i | MamUliaa ttnliiiiri II %  •aaparatr rt*M4 N-.tia. th.. .].> anl klS 1 ta farm eaiaaa Th* a*w akwovfy. Hlaa-1 earaa kill. Ihr (mi in 1 mlnuiaa and laj auarantr.-d In ai>a vou a anrt.oWar.ama.--1 tW awoaia allIn MM aat. or taowii kark an ralurn or ample i^.Haj. Oall Nixdderm SJ^I c#*# 6*8& mmmm&mH* CUTEX Spsrkling, rsdelen, 11' L K 11 w ear CITT.X, bruigj your baodJ DCW adnvirstu 11 . csiy to spplj %  %  dries raster, too. The polish rut wears longer — resists peeling sod chipping . and comes in such brillisjii shades. CDTIX lakagj/0 SO EASY! No fuss. UO IBJIUI t roll chest, throat ..il I with Vkks VapeKnb SO PLEASANT! Nothing in wnllow. It ferh 1.-Hi and amess goi' ChsV .Imi love Vki. VapuKubl DOUBL; 1 CllARS Mtift v nosr. ciliii* (DUglung, with its soothing, nie.lii.irwl vapoini, 2. lAtlt ikdR; idky clmt and'Mniws oufconge-tiort like a wanning poultior. Tlili dmihlc .KI..". woilu for hsajn .iul Jmaks up msny colds uvemlght. -0&**t NO WAITING I KsUsf starts Ins hurry I Kigtit then and then ths rhild begin. tPlWI awttatl OW VOUNO MOTHlt i.-.l ai % %  nunlrfc*. O\TI 40 tiullHW) lar used every MM M *il odd. diHil>U'-uuick thu pleasant, '•in ay. IVMI 1 take lumai with untried n-medies. Vlckl Vapoltub .* homeproved and (mie-te>ied^for .IllMl.II %  %  KI .IIIIWII l||-*, tut VJSK5 OVI* 40 MILLION TIMES A YIARI i. .1 mvl sow, In : of Vfcks VapoRuh 1 MR. MOTORIST!! THE IDEAL XMAS PRESENT FOK YOUR CAR f ^%.S i ItOLL HAS SOMETHING YOU CANT GET ELSEWHERE OIL + DETERGENTS + TIN + CHROMIUM EQUALS efftSe ELECTRIC j2ffolq4k0&$b LOVELIER SKIN IN 14 DAYS FOK H WOMEN OUT OF 11 BY PALMOLIVfi BEAUTY PLAN I'lijiiy-iiine LtOOUMM inrlmlint; leading *kin s|HTJ.iliorlrd liy sit(iiei| • iements by the WOOMB ilirmsclvrs). These were amonn the IvsHtovcsMna reported: •sje v.* O'AI U e Co f Blaml* he Few r Frather, smoothar Br 'har, claarar •""•re r '"ok,, The refrigerating mm ..( the G.B I refrigcraior i. K. final* made ihaf ii hermeticallr sealed after nun facture and nevn need: This refrigerator will stand up 1 any extreme of climate — and lovely to look at, too 1 Wild chremmm-platad hand* incorporating contasled lock. & THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD. BRIDGETOWN. BARBADOS WntEStNTWC 7M£ Ct lltCTK CO. IID.. 01 LNCDHD Oe Sec what thii Plan will do (or your okin—in only 14 dayo! If you would like yimx romplexioo lo be as lovely as you have always hoped it could be. try (he Palniolivc Beauty Flan." It's to simple. 1 in. is all you du: 1 If'djA yiMTjote itilh Palmliu Soap. 2 Motion* i'' 'uh, olict-oil lalhn irtioyo* tkukftr urn full mimtt. 3 Hiiui. Start now, continue for 14 days. And prove as the doctors proved — thai if you keep your skin cleansed by Falmolive's beautifying otive-oU lather, you are s*r to KEEP THAT SCHOOLGIRL COMPLEXION



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SIVTtAY. DECEMBER in. UM BBNDAT \nvrx \ n T\C I' EIGHT DOLLARS TO ST. VINCENT II* 4.1.Olll.I. Ill N I I ST. VWflWT r \ i in Y OU can leave Barbados dl Tbe CaUwl,, Q MM o'clock j| niithl ;>n.i Mary's. Kuigitown arrive M K.ntfstown, St. Vincent architectural tressuiv before six the following mornint Indies DeAtfUd ami The journey | j miles and thby the late fatte, coat to deck passengers eut h! BaLnum. St Man dolors only on the bis Boats St. Vincent has SoufTiw re. 11 cfa of Si ant <>. the (the Wev. ..wistructed ChVtaj ,,: only finished m 1938 Father Chariei £ >t assistance from hibrother ix. rugea and from local material __ one of the and labour constructed an oriental Island* which was given bark buiMloa; with ccrrYdM M & exclusive)., to Uudrib Indian mai: -^V iul ,hand history. It still ha> a colony of ... ... th r Z£L% J&SFQ^*" lQ "w c lno !" <>< St Vinc-ni live toaorth of tbe Island. grows the day. SS S ifftH f*^* U *? • n S ne o( • %  Pverwid.h* woriu .md it earn* Urg.sums of %  ** %  over a ravine with a Datura dollars cver> year from the sale swimming pool %  which lm\* mSL! r I? W !? K, L . -vrtmwhUahousewl v S waanthei, rrom the deck of a boat King*laundry in the stream tlat issue. town presents J plonslnn postfurther down (V ,, -,. (lf thl „ card effect with its red pairit-i WJaafJ sWasVala*. ( roofs and its archways. High hills ear. with jagged tops tower over the' The rooms of u town and houses dot the hills in were full of chair* the half circle which surrounds origin and design the harbour statue* and easts. ) At 615 in the early mornine. where and an ant H.M. Customs came off to the ship St. V; bout -carrying an enotWhen we knocked lQ %  |."!Ul-'.IM European map of In on the iron I the monk* i repairing that w..% nad bec.i noua flag. Two policemen in Krllle we found one shirts were rowing one customs dressed like a workm officer dressed like a ship's capan electrical gadget tain, with pipe i n mouth and giving trouble He hand on tiller. trained at Mount St Benedict ... The row boat Is the norm.il Trinidad where hi, <*& have method of getting from ship to "e*r headquarters LQ the hills shore in Bnaaapwn. Ills Honuwhich look dow„ on the Import..: the Administrator poeesses l College of Tropical AurtcuUu very line super luxury launch lying i n the vallev Ulow which wus designed for air-sea Handcrafts and w,.*i W ork In rescue but which is now used bv St. Vincent are extent We the officer administering the govbought several simple htraw .'s eminent. The police have a row 'or putting dishes on They could outboard be made quite easih ,r, Bp.rbad<.^ small (1 might be but I seen them displaced bj St. Vincent an ol la>e never l.icaishopv --1 man of at large polic.' 'east seventy comes on board as A-aterfron* scon a> the boil |g cleared and BCVei leaves the deck until half an hour before the boat sail*. After dinner at mglu ); „ partlrui trade, beSchool Stages Nativity Play A >\mm in. Wcnderful .i A quirt rrstlni slur In la* Falle ot ST HAIII, ST. VINCENT. \ mas Hams Are Here with many city aweilers. An advantage of the uo< of the pot or box too Is that the plant Is protected from being washed boat fitted motor no bigger thar basket full of cabbages The landing pier at Kingstown leads directly into a barrack* facing the On the day of my arrival no les* than twelve policemen were on duty providing a guard of honour for His Bxecllency the Governor larly good time f. of the Windward Islands who cause passengers was returning that day to his deck until the boa. ._. seat of Government in the hill* After the swell and white roam overlooking St Georges had died away when the launcn. Grenada. which brought the Windwards Bay Street. Kingstown unlike Governor on board hud returned*charging Christmas cargo." which tion of tomatoes, cabbages Its namesake in Bridgetown has to Kmgtown the last minutes irl: included 50 caws of smoked hams onions. The object of th preserved its natur.il beauty and harbour were given over to the* the water laps on the beach swing band who sal in another adjoining a wide spacious road sin.dl row boat There is a market enclosed by* It was a three piece band comprising a banjo, a guil-ir and an latmeal can. The girl from British Guiana, returning frm I trip to Italy and Switzerland re S uested the "last train to Sa: ernando". She got it but th> •vo steamship' Bridgetovt n Hand never ,„'f tTco'^ SC^f< £ ffS&S into the sea and a host of diver%  wallowed it up nly coats eight dollars t gel to St Vincent. The trouble i getting back It took twelve daysL^'^j S.S. Ca-iadto-i C h a 11 Klaj From Trinidad, she of fruit pan The cargo arriving by her from Capetown included moderate supplies of wine, brandy, vermouth 'and canned fruit Juices from Monwire and although It is sadly need of maintenance It Is easily recognisable as a market place The buses In St. Vincent orabout one third the gbM of th< buses in Barbados. When they in waiting for passengers they ar< halted in line in the town? equivalent of our Probyn Stree'. It la In Its streets and pavements that Kingstown shows %  marked superiority to Bridgetown Spanish archways provide ghade before the same ship got back V for the pedestrians and there i St. Vincent on Its return trip to enough room on the sidewalks for Barbados en route for Boston. two Ford Prefects to pass, side oy There must be many hundred-. side. Tbe streets of Kingstown of Harltadlans who are willing to are also wide and make our own upend 18 00 for a brief visit to Broad Street look like a narrow the slater island of St. Vincent country lane by comparison. but not many can afford to spend The churches are good neigh12 days there or travel back by bours In Kingstown. T h a air. Methodist Church la opposite the There are schooners: of course Anglican and from the tower of but most of us like something siorial calls at Barbados Her 1 the unique Catholic Church you h'gger when we are out In the :>--nu .ire Messrs. DaCosta A Co. It ok down Into the yard of th Atlantic and it is M miles from Ltd. Anglican, The Methodist Church Barbados to Kingstown. That is On Friday evening, the chartrue to Its tradition of signmore than four times the distance tered Alcoa freighter F*il landed posting carried in bold letters the from Calais to Dover and who here 40 cases of smoked Pli were at anchor In the vegetable garden section yesterday diswere demonstrated the cultiva.and %  tlon They were the s.s. Ikana. callwas to show the best method or g fmm South Africa and India growing these crops. The exhibit* nd the Canaduxi rhaMencer from ranged from seedlings sown in isda. drills In seed boxes In their progressive stages to maturity The Ikana brought plain pilhards. salted peanuts. Pnut A remarkable feature of Ihc >uttcr canned Jams canned fish sUll waj (hc ,^ tlcIal heulthy con{^£L e V&J& 5l l S!l! !" '"" **• cnipa dlsplsycd DM %  %  crowd if frkMhSfl arm I i> nimvatci ..ll>. yet vided a good backgron' calls (itvrjK.i K.-s W B. BmthwailChairman After his address the Choir sang "Jolly Old 1 N -Bo-Peep's Cblletaflsg ihori pia>. vrss] Magad h) Ba (. ,,ichool 11 i ffortderful J .,i i.. i ihi %  hiiip gtrL Jean, dafti.iveu-d 1> lifully derorated room Jean wa intment o being unable to get up r mas because of an mjuiiil f.-t The mothei ii : %  by showing her decoration* aw tellmg her that Santa Claus would DO) VIMI chiliiii T Jean asked her mother f^i Uu picture of the Natm'y bU. arhlli bee mother Is looking foi falls asleep. Duniii: tan has a dream of bar guerdiaj angel leading her to the St iblc at Hcthleheni wh. I Manger with the bal>> Hat] Joseph, the she(.r-T.ls. angels am kkaga. She iMO bei 11 %  to otTer bul the angp assures her that the baby woul. be happ> if nctq ana 8h> goes to Ihe Mangai and singi "Away in a Manger." Sonn she awakes from hei wonderful dream and hears carol %  mgan H mother ealli theio in and they sing for her because that she is suffering from an Injured foot The acting on Ihe a good but Breml.. W> who played the part of I girl, Jean, deserves snedal men O VER 20* m*nj H enjoyed a pleissant eva&ln %  1 St. SUaa* tin is School on Pit' day when Mrs. E. Spencer, Headmistress, and the staff gave a renal of Christmas Caiols and u play entitled "Ft* %  1 pUBU HAS KUN -1 tion at the Local Talent Show at the Globe op Wd lust prue went to Walter Burk. who sang the favourite "My Pool ish Heart." Eddie Hall, who sang "Moon light Cocktails" was awarded th> second prize, other g I vooal Istl were Nat Dunnah with "Count Every Star." Lucille Cratg v. "Chutanoogs Shoe Stunt" llolman RavUle\ who HfTnriiifl Board Ma) Open W IIMIOH %  %  Utscussed aaMag Wtth I jeca, was me Qgasn i .... %  asked thv tmef Bedicsj ;. i el i! gha I lurm .. in oesuiaetaan uu : i under the hire p uienl, the Board w ad b) M'-k lagal ad> in in enter mto .i ran agmoniei with tenants. The prMnt %  gran l pin hei fsith so nnsUy oo Oatcfmllk ? Becsue, when -~rM< fwUsa U difficuli oc Unpouihlr itltuU perfect substitute for mcther's railsOauraiiui Is finest grsdc cow's collk, artsd nadcr iha most hygienic oodkasBS. Tbs protein, great bodyttuttesa, la auos easily itigcitiMe By daa saffhw errtat proeew And imponsni ad^nioni i menrich ihe blood -nt.i to m<>iif\ thr fjaadtai 'ms daaeti Vitamm li iu help hgaad ^trwig bone* and tecih iKiemulk b ms-le by Gblu laboiatoriei Ltd., who. tUue I90K, have been pmneers in tbe development of tbe best pcniolc foods toi bdbaa. OSTERMILK I. M \( II IIKI AU8" iS£i\S*Ji L.IVTII L.l\.. r**i or your (reo copy of illustrated Baby Book-Phone 4675 AVAW-VAW-WW/.V,'. V.VA'/'.'///. m YOU ORDER THESE EARLY!! tbrought the 50 cases of smoked hams from Montreal She also landed pickled, meat, apples, groceries, sardines, egg*, cotton goods and stationery from Montreal along with pear*, mandarines oranges ami grapefruit from Dominica The Ikana is a Nourse liner Ships of this company make occnialutary reminder: "Love no evil to its neighbour i l would dream of crossing channel in a schooner? DM ((MM SHADY IWMMIMS hams The Esri was on her first visit to Barbados She left port during the night for Carlpilo Messrs. Robert Thorn Ltd. are her agents A typical Street In Kingstown. SL Vincent, shewing a wide street running Into the aea. Note the Spanish type archway* and the wide covered %  eeements. Onion Growing May Become Minor Crop SUCCESSFUL results in the cultivation of onions here by the Department of Agriculture make it likely that they can be grown to the extent of becoming a minor crop, the "Advocate" was told at the Department of Agriculture Onions can be successfully grown, it was said, in some of the light and sandy soils of Barbados. Some of the onions grown In this way were among the exhibits in tbe stall of the Department at the Annual Industrial Exhibition just ended. In this stall the disf lay was of vegetable gardening here were two sections, the vegetable garden section and the pot and box culture section. The lotter is recommended for persons having very little apace and very little soil such as is the case "l>ANETEl.AN i vi Vfl I.WI-.II -.I.H ll BACON per lh 1-I.AKS IN SMlt I' ner It" TRIMDAII IIIUM.I Jl It'fr. per tin III IN/ Ml I.I.H.A1 UVW OM \ll. per tin Ml IN/ MI'LLIOATAHNY. OXTAIL, A H Itlto III sot 1ier Un HI IN/ TOMATO sol %  per liu i \t lot,I N I ii. i \< roach 1 ib mi HUN/ MtrM CilM.Ht nei hot lOlllsll CKEAM HI1ISKV lirr hot ill IN/ TOMATO hlltllir prihot MIIKl All. i -i I.IAN \s pt.Ib S ( IKK \N i pet I'l MINI P PI I I. per Ih OITBON i>er IU HKIIMI. K INI-I •• \K I lb Phi I' \Ntl II CABTI It >1 I'AR I Ibpks *in .30 ,t; 1.44 Ml LSI l.*u .:: un :.. AS .3S .St 4 .3t ADD COCKADE FINE GROCERY RUM LIST TO THE HMCEWKAmilEADl V IJIf-Hacd ol Broid 51 £ r' sitAswii>. mean *% #>... im. Broad Slrect tKtCOAts \ ^ re .IS IS I IS S OUR ANNUAL XMAS BAZAAR has led the the way lor many Years—and still leads. This Year we have what is possibly the Largest and Best Assortment of TOYS AND XMAS GIFTS This delightful fountain presented b> LADY (.11 Ml I: I CARTER in 1909 lies disused In the "1 RAM HOUSE". Queen'm Park. ~4) t Shvd& thai will qivsi him AAGXA dsdiqhi PNDEAVOUR striped thirls with 2 vpiratr Irubrni.rd collars to match. Si/es II to I". £ %  > Sli.JHI KI.NOW.N Broadcloth Sport shin, with short sleeves in shades of White. Cream. Grey, and III.., Sixes: S. M. K. I I II and KAV Rrnnd Spoil ShirU with lonit sleeves in shailr. of Cream, Diirk Brown. Grey, Blue, White Small, Medium and UA ggjag A 1.01 Each *i.:ia III'K \MF.N striped shirts with lmbenlaal collars jllached. I Mil Icil value. E. I. Milt Sheer Linen hand Handkerchiefs. Each oiled 1.20 While and Striped fringed SCBTM'V Each SI.80 A 2.42 IOOIAL Handkerchiefs. While and White with coloured borders. Each SSf II.MI.CII, luil Linen Handkrr. chiefs with initials. fMf/ nd IjM-h OTIS VESTS, rihhrd plain. Sizes il. to I 1 Each


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PACE TWENTY CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT ,^^^.^^^.£^^-Z>^<^^<^<>^-2>^^^^<^^^<^"*& r-. THE ADVOCATE XMAS NUMBER COMPETITION Win a I Jib. link.-* and favourite Wine*. inr This year our competition takes the form of clues and question?, to be answered similar to those we published two years ago. This type of competition seem* to be more popular than the writing of stories The priie is once again a lovely 15 lbs. Christmas turkey, a bottle of I>r> Monopole Champagne, a bottle of the Sherry you like best, a bottle of Gold Braid Rum and a bottle of s. .." I i %  M i. ..r Hum. Il< i. an the rules of the competition: 1) For each clue, question, or space left out in the following 34 posers you will find an answer in each adver2) The answer might be the name of n firm, an item in the advertisement, a slogan, sentence or name. 3) Only one answer will be found in each advertisement, therefore all the advertisements appearing in the Issue must be consulted. 4> The first correct solution lo V.I 34 dues, opened by the Advertising Mananer of the Barbados Advocate will be the winner of the Competition. 5) In the event of no completely correct solution being received the highest number of correct answers first opened will receive the prlw is an example to guide you. Let us suppose the clue was "A famous Artist." Th< answer might be "Goya". This name anpaan on an item In DaCosta A Co ,*a advert I sement. No other answer would i found In DaCosta's advertisement. Hi The competition closes December 22nd at 3 p.m. 7| Each entry must he accompanied hv the coupon printed ll.'lliW r m r.hout | coupon will be i %  Hen £l CLUES I. Boundi hi" JI|I mi 111 2. On dry ground: Sir Ralph the 3. All you need 4. It may rhyme, but there is no grudge with 5. A battle was fought there 6. What's iK.tllc.l' 7. Two European Cities. 8. The quality of fresh air. 9 Famous, in Trinidad. J 10. Cricket made easy by ii Think bard, irn a / 12 Three attractions on one banner. M 13 Coolti than Unequal led. -. Answer. > ) I 6 26 If you opened last year. 81 One word for King and . % %  %  34. She Is cold royalty. $ ENTRY FORM 1 ' NAMK ftDDR] BS i I aurn i-.< ss and or dome) % %  dreirto., of the Editor and Advcr Ofler oj the Bmrbados Admcntr. r> 1 Inland .onwuine. on the ;'.V 23" 22 23 22 23'/: Q f> "O "Q ''23" 23'' MAKE THANll BROS. Your Shopping Centre. LADIES'! High Class Dress Goods, Underwear. Shoes and Hals. Perfumes, etc. GENTS'! Woollens. Shirts. Shoes, F.tc., in widest variety. Household Goods such as Carpets. Bedspreads. Bed Sheets. Pillow Cases, Brassware always in Slock. Follow the Crowd to TIIANI BROS. n WH HRY. STREH Dial 3466 aloo Noa. , I 46 and 53 Swan Street \ i7. atandi 18 for Hum and bread, of 1h. N ...11 i I M i i lady. %  I with ;i name. : I orn national limlta.1 pri ]uni" a, 23 Fai Ion i etters. 24. What is the countryman* bt i |MHWliWMW4HaMWWWM^lJtf ft rf W tfM WM WMM^ £ £S--J3 %  • 2>^a% %  >&• K5— 2>^-. £s33-. ££-) | S a ad m lihrhhm I IE FINEST SELECTION INCLUDING resrntalion BOXES OF PERFUMERY by all leading makers. I Presentation BOXES OF SOAPS POWDERS OH) Vis IH Bakyi Pip. .mil Tobaccos; Comb anil Brush Sflta; I.ealhcr Purs.s: Pan & Pencil SotSi Thermos Flasks; Boxes of Chocolules: Boxes of Fancy Biscuits. THE COSMOPOLITAN w* Opposite Canadian Bank of Commerce I I i Of] iresenh ,5rti^liJ§liiiMtlWM^



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PAGE FOUR (HB1STMAS SI PPI.KMKNT I DAMES <& WICKED The High Fantasie Of Pantomime As dramatic critic r receive iw free seats for every new theatrical production in tho We*t End, aa well as the smaller theatres in the suburbs. This oounds very agreeable, and indeed 11 has 1U plenurabU tide, but a %  ntlc must !iee plays which no uM man would think of doing. At a proaWional grove digger we hav no warning as to the condition of the corpses. Ye: once a year the critic abendons his lofty pose of sul-iiority and becomes a* gulliblu as any other citizen. It is when Mr*. Littler invites him In "Mother Goose." or Jack Hylton to Aladdid." or Tom Arnold U "Cinderella.'' Christmas Is at hand and the Pantomime Season Is about to open. The rritlr discovers to his surprise, thai he is an intensely popular fellow, his merits being ie*Tiis*d'not only by his mature friends but even mpre so by tnelr sons and daughters. As for nephews, nieces and god-children, you are never out of their hearts at this gladsome season. Warmed by this unaccustomed affection and Interest the critic gets on the telephone nnd actually purchase*. for ready money, extra ticket* In all directions It Is said that t!ie spectacle of n critic purchasing a ticket has caused even the most hard-boiled box office attendant!, to burst into tear* By BEVERLEY BAXTfR Tilt: rwiOMiHi * Blame The Kids Now the strange part about all this U thai the critic (and we Khali dispose of htm altogether in a minute) actually looks forward to seeing the Pantomime. • It's fun to go with the kids," he KITS. "They like all this non%  .ense about domes and brothers' men and wicked sisters." "And the principal boy"" say-. his wife sweetly. "Queer thing." says the critic. • i Often wonder why the PTincii ,1 I'.. i nhiyed by .1 girl "I can think i two well shaped joasons," says the wife'. "Probably goes back to the Elizabethan*.' declares the critic pompously, "when girls used to !• played by boya. Thai';why Shakespeare was always dressing his boys up in boys' clothes because they were more convincing that way than dressed as girls "You mean," says his stupid wife, "that when a boy dresses up as a boy he looks more like -. girl." * % Quite Wrong Where did this theatrical extravaganza of pantomime begin? Of course the average person would say that pantomime Is as English as Brussels sprouts, that il sprang from the soil of England and t-n* never really taken root lu any other country. That answer Is about twenty-three centuries wrong in the matter of origin. The original pantoimr to Rome from Etruria. (look it up on the map yourself, I'm too busy>. In the year 384 H C They were called hlstrtone*. from hitter, a dancer, whir). for the modern word histrionic vhlch has nothing to do with .' memg at all. But in those day* the dancers were the only actors, wearing masks and ip< lines. AUcnirtus became the great patron of this art. so mu fact that he is regarded by some historians (from hktetre. 1 tall f-tory) as the inventor of dumb .ictlng If that is so l %  .'WfuT lot to .mswer for %  tho mode: n theatre You all know that hlstoi repeat* Itself, so it Is interestiiv. i 0 note that the mime*, that is the iamb actors, became so popii 1 r wUB fhe knights and nobles that •itere was a great deal of fraternisation, and drinking of Hemlock Fizziesat the local p U h. Tnta U U tfus^y ,, 'prohlDttliiS s to frequent actors* bouses >>r be se*n wanting; with them In the streets, or climbing the Seven Hills. However, things began to improve for the Pantomimists in Rome when Caligula looked on them with favour You will remember (at any rate you ought to if you don't) '.hat Caligula aral M devoted to his horse that he made it a senator. I've often met a senator who proved to be tl this was the first time. I am almost certain of my facts, that I horse was marie a senator. But again you see history tell' Ing the same story twice. Caligula's horse was the authentic origin of the Pantomime horse at Christmas, the one with the wide grin nnd the collapsible hack less. Sometimes Right Caligula however, docs not deserve as much credit ss Nero who not only played the violin, but also fancied himself as an actor. So he became one of the dumbest stars in the history of Pantomimes and was much acclaimed by the critics of his day who did not want lo be on the menu at the Coliseum. Unfortunately Nero's influence was not good. He took the view thai -nice the actors' faces were masked, and their voices were not u ed, the audience ought to be given something for their money. %  1 Is, I In favour of the human body l>cmg revealed Ml to do all the acting. iv well have l*en tin->vrry of the feni.de legalthough I doubt it At any rale Ihc locnl Jane HUSH the old mythotouu.il tales which %  glad to say that this exhibitionism %  n place without proteef The early Christians were rich! on the Job and said that if Qua kind of thing continued the Roman Empire would collapse And ihat the critics arent always wrong. It was not until the i"th century that the pantomimic art spread to England, but the public >iid not enthuse as much as the [tomans did about the mythologi1.1! legends. So eventually the popular form was the story of Columbine and Harlequin In which C< :iimblne was a simple village asi and Harlequin, note carefully, was always beuig chased by comic constables Thus we begin '•• -ee the unfolding of the pattern which has become exclusively British. Instead of being a figure of awe the policeman Is always worsted by the comics who ham the enthusiastic support of the children in the audience in their attempts to evade ftrrsct. * llegin With Dishes There is In every normal child .11 instinctive love of the absurd and the incongruous. Il deinonitratea Itself even In the first months in life when 0 baby will throw dishes from its high rhau on to the floor, and gurgle wun satisfaction over the deed. The baby well knows that this is breaking the law. us well as the dishes, but thai only adds zest lo the -i Una, Not only that, it likes lo see its father stand on his head or put on his wife's hat. or full down the stair*, (this always gets a great laugh from the dear little cherub), or crawl under the sofa and bark like a dog. Deep aown In its little mind the infant is makinit its unconscious protest against the drabness of life in later years, when we all begin slowly to die from creeping common sense And here let me say that the wise man. and certainly the happy one. never entirely loses that early love of absurdity. The keener the mind, the more vivid the imagination, the deeper is the appreciation of the nonsensical. Nothing but a superbly cultivated intellect could have written "Alice in Wonderland" or "The Importance of being Earnest." The neveiopment of the Pantomime was shrewdly based on child iycholoy Thus in modern limes th c rapturous Boxing Day audience nods that the "Babes in the Wood" are none other than those eminent adult London comedians. Mr. Nervo and Mr. Knox. Are the Babes frightened when they are lost In the wood? In a way, Yes; but they Indicate by their jokes that they will br quite all right. Even when they lie down to sleep Mr Knox takes core to place a large rat under Mr. Nervo's pillow of 'eaves, and Mr. Nervo carefully ptaeM ins ^hoes on the other !'.' % %  *4 ** Bless Her . And who is their mother? Bless her heart, it is Monsewer Eddie Grey with his alcoholic nose, his prodigious moustache and his exquisite French phrases. The Monsewer is of course the Dame and when she loses her temper in the kitchen does she send the Babes to bed without supper? Not a bit of it She hits them over the head with a broom while they pull her skirt off. revealing two such spindly legs that the Monsewer admits he won them from a sparrow in a wager. But the finer things are not forgotten There is compulsory %  ducation in Pantomimes a* In real lift, so off the Babes go to school where Bud Flanagan. (I admit that this is an all star cast I am assembling), is the schoolmaster who writes on the blackboard:— How much IS Too and Too? lervo says the "Too Much" whereupon he and the other Babe give the teacher a spanking. Now to any well regulated child with normal Instincts this is exactly how life ought to be. No Adolf Hitler could rise to power in a setting when everything pompous Is ridiculed and everything cruel Is punished. There is wisdom as weU as incongruity in thc kingdom or childhood's imagination * m ** Cinderocrocy The Pantomime which duTera from all the others is "Cinderella" and X wonder that the Labour Government permits It to be shown. In its romantic unfolding; it extols class distinction, praises the profit motive, and preaches the lesson that a really nice girl in lowly position should be careful to marry into the aristocracy where there is a lot of money] It is true that Cinders Is fond of Buttons but she does not allow her head to be ruled by her heart. Buttons Is her only friend, exsjaas] of course her poor, badjnresl father, but she has bad enougji of the kitchen and dreams of better things. Thus she doe* no* even pretend to be coy when the Prince offers his hand after finding her foot. Cinders knew a good thing when she saw H. Personally I have never beeu convinced that the sue of a maiden's foot was sufficient reason for marriage. But nature in her determination to preserve the co ntinuity of the human race, moves in her own mysterious, inexorable way. It is well known that the daughters of the British aristocracy nearly all have large feel, no doubt due to the amount of exercise they take in their \oulh But perhaps for political reasons, the Prince fell lhat It would be wiser to marry a commoner. Thc Americans cannot underhand our passion for pantomme To them It Just doesn't maka seme, but that of course is it* charm. Pentomine doesn't make) sense, and If It ever does it will die. * A Toast But if you go to one this year think of Its long history and Its undent origin, how in its own way it la the human spirit finding relief from the cares and drabness of everyday life. Above all. when you laugh' at thc comedian* give a thought to the great Grlmaldl. the genuine droll, the grimacing, filching, irresistible clown", who laboured so hard in bringing laughter to Indon that he died prematurely, worn nit by his exertions. Sweet ladle* and gentlemen, I Hive you the British pantomime. Long may It survive to keep tho wisdom of childhood alive In all of us.



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CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE FIVE fc jKftjb CONSULATE PYJAMAS. skiped: GREY FLANNELS for upon. RAZOR SETS, leading brand.: DRESSING GOWNS, cotton and silk BATH ROBES in various designs. GENTS' WALKING SHOES In Sued... Two Tone. Brogue.. Oxford, and Casuals of .very make; GENTS' LEATHER SLIPPERS in Brown and Black. i LADIES HANDKERCHIEFS COSTUME JEWELLER LADIES' HAND BAGS -in many stylos: LIBERTY SCARFS: NYLOM STOCKINGS SMART SWIM SUITS CREAM and BLACK TROPICALS for formal overling wear: BLACK VICUNA tor Evening Suns. pan*, lockets: CREAM GABERDINE and SERGE for Evening jacket* Ready Made CREAM EVENING DRESS JACKETS Ready Made CREAM EVENING DRESS JACKETS Gentlemen'. EVENING SHOES. Kid and patent: TOOTAL HANDKERCHIEFS. Plain Whit, and While with coloured border.. SILK HANDKERCHIEFS with figured designs: SILK HANDKERCHIEFS, in self colours of while, grey, maroon and blue. TIES in all manner of styles eon colours, tig ured designs and hand painted: WOVEN SHIRTS in stripes with trubenised /*ty collar attached. / KENTS SHAVING BRUSHES f DRESSING TABLE MEN'S SETS: SPORTS COATS—Fawn INDIVIDUAL DRESS LENGTHS No two pesos* alike. 7 and 5 yard lengths In richly Dowered Crepe ekt Chine. Sola and Taffeta. PURE IRISH LINEN PILLOW CASES In three styles: COLOURED COTTON and RAYON TABLE CLOTHS with Napkins to match: COLOURED BEDSPREADS assorted designs: WHITE COTTON SHEETS, double and single beds: WOOL EMBROIDERED WAIST-LENGTH COATS: NYLON NIGHTIES and PANTIES in dainty styles CRESCENT EVENING SHOES in Gold and Silver: ADIES' WALKING SHOES styled by the lomou. Dock. fop Ihir list/ and Cream. PERFUMES In a large variety: WR1TING CASES: WEDGEWOOD CHINA UBESTY FABRICS: including Pure Silk I Foulard. Pure SUk Shantung, Crepe de Chine. Sungleam Crepe. Printed Linens, Plain Linens. Tana Lawn. METAL CLOTH in Royal and Silver. Light Blue & Silver. Black & Silver: and Ivory a Silver. BLACK GEORGETTE embroidered with Silver. Esquisite Linen Glass Cloths. Cloth.. All-over LACES and FLOUNCINGS in Light Blue. Pink. Peach. Biege. Navy. Black and White. SEA ISLAND COTTON in Strip*., diagonal and straight BEDFORD CORDUROY in multi colours. r£3 COMB 4 BRUSH SETS, A DECORATED BABY BASKET, BOOTIES. BONNETS. WOOLLEN BABY COATS. BABY KHUS KHUS HANGERS. BABY BIBS. WOOLLEN BABY BLANKETS. PLAY SUITS. ETC. AND TOYS OF EVERY DESCRIPTIONS IN OUR TOY DEPT. I CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd. 10. 11. 12 & 13 Broad Street — The Ideal Department Store.



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PAGE Fir.HT SW1MY ADVOCATF SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10. 1930 BARBA^Sj^ADV^E Sunday. December 10. IIS* HUM TIII\4,S THE published report of the meeting of the Caribbean Interim Tourism Committee n timely. In all the fields in which Barbados has lagged behind other West Indian territories none has been greater than in tourism. Almost every country in the world today has been convinced that tourism is one of the greatest of all revenue earners. But not Barbados Next year the United Kingdom is running a special Festival of Britain to attract millions of American dollars. Barbados is still sitting on legislation intended to encourage the building of modern hotels. In Puerto Rico members of the Caribbean Interim Tourism Committee have planned a Caribbean Festival 1951. M It has been necessary for an American, a member of the United States Chamber of Commerce to go to the United Kingdom to tell them that they should adopt a forward looking plan for tourist development in the British Caribbean. It has been necessary too for the same American to urge local governments in the West Indies to support tourism. Why is it that Barbados fails so signally to give to tourism the priority which it needs to hold its own with the attractions offered by other islands? Is Barbados aware that only a matter of weeks back Tobago has constructed a beautiful modern hotel? Are the people of Barbados so Ignorant that they do not realise how much Grenada. St. Vincent, Antigua, the Grenadines have to offer the visitors from northern climates? Is there anyone still capable of saying that Barbados has the finest sea bathing in the world? Can it be that education is so backward in Barbados that the importance of tourism as an industry is not yet appreciated? Barbados has now got at Seawel] a runway sufficiently long and favourably situated to attract here the largest airliners. I It still retains a reputation for being an island particularly suitable for tourists by reason of its settlers, hospitality and climate. V Unfortunately thai reputation is rapidly being lost to-day. Residential areas are being ruined by industries, windows on the sea are being closed, trees are being cut down, roads are not being widened, streets are dirtier than ever, lavatories and urinals axe in short supply, and the once renowned Barbadian good manners have taken a nasty knock. What is the first thing needful? A change of heart on the part of the Government. Instead of tenderly nursing the old sore of colour discrimination and thereby halting aid to the hotel industry, the present Government should at once follow the lead given by all other West Indian islands of any size and encourage the growth of the tourist industry by immediate favourable legislation. Instead of leaving the tourist committee as an isolated entity saying a grateful "thank you" for any small sums that come their way the Government should make a department of publicity, planning and sanitation and pass the legislation necessary to make Bridgetown the cleanest, coolest and most orderly capital in the West Indies. It was not of Barbados that an American traveller was talking last week when he said "it has a very clean town and the shops are so well kept and the people so friendly and charming". It was of St. George's Grenada that he was speaking. Unsolicited advertisement of this kind costs nothuig and is worth most. There is no greater asset that Barbados possesses than its present attraction for tourists. That asset has been grievously neglected in the past and is being shamefully neglected to-day. The Government of Barbados can no longer sit bark and watch the dally stacks of filth in Bridgetown, the daily indiscriminate and uncontrolled building that is going on. and the contraction of bathing beaches and views of the sea. It must give more thought to legislation in the IntVMti of the island as a whole even at the expense of the senseless (if more emotional and vote catching) legislation based on mud slinging within the community. Barbados is not big enough for the indulgence in spitting on your neighbour. First things first. And tourism stands at the head of the queue. WAX FROM CJUfl WHITTAKKRS for 1950 contained a note in discoveries of the year 1949 about a new tvpe of banana in Jamaica which would resist leaf spot and other diseases which have laid waste banana crops in the tropics over a period of years. It is possible that in the issue for 1951 there will be mentioned a new discovery for making sugar cane wax in Barbados. Quietly an saying il was a pleasure to refund a deposit with interest to date. No wishing you a Happy Christmas N-. iiM.ltii like The Oat Board hopes you'll hotv good cheer. No fuel can in (he fllod Sew Vear But it was the beginning of what may prove to be a beautiful friendship and gave a chance lo reply in a seasonal spirit: — Hear Gat Board may your day be long Your Christmas oord Unfriendly Canines* FEW dogs in this island, it would appear, have ever heard that little proverb, so < ftcn quoted in Fleet Street, which says "Dog does not eat dog." In fact, if Mr. Callup ever had the audacity to inquire of our dogs what slogan interpreted their philosophy best, the result of the poll would unooubtedly show that 98** of our canines were in favour of "Dog eats dog." and that the other 21. inevitably, "didn't know." ^ Surely it is time for some psychologist, psycho-analylst, sociologist, or whoever the competent authority may be, to investigate the cause of the unfriendliness among our canines and write a voluminous report. This important problem has been neglected too Ion 8„ ^ %.. V Why cannot Bonzo and Rex get on tonether? Perhaps, reclining on a couch. Bonzo would admit that he became embittered with life when still a pup because his father was a drunkard, and his mother was a flirt. On the other hand, and now we believe we are getting to the root of the problem, it may not be a question of psychology at all, but one of breeding. Every afternoon in Kensington Gardens, London, over a hundred well bred dogs congregate. They play games together, gossip a little, swim in the Round Pond, and behave in a generally civilized manner. Imagine, however, the bloodshed if a hundred Bajun dogs got loose in Queens Park! And this evidence is backed up by the excellent behaviour of the pedigree dogs at the Exhibition last week. Perhaps next year it would be a good idea to arrange for parties of "sooners"—each securely muzzled—to visit the Exhibition and observe the polished manners of the dog aristocracy. It seems, alas, that in Barbados the era of the common dog is here to stay, and so every effort must be made to teach them that "Manners mayketh dog." And Olde Worlde English sherry May Mrs. Co* and Unele Ga* Avd all the Itffle Gatei Enjoy their dim hooked nut of tint And puds made (or ihe masses. Are you fit? DR. GUBBINS answer* below some questions asked by some of his unhealthy readers wondering if they are (It to face the winter. As a fat man aged 50. do you think I should be able to run up tu*> fllohls of stairs without blowing like a u-hale? If you cant do this without blowing like a whale, walk up. If you still blow when you walk up, move Into a bungalow. If you still And It difficult to breathe or move freely in and out of a bungalow don't send for a doctor. Send for a carpenter. Up to the ape of 12 I could balance myself on one foot u'ilh my eyes shut and ttiy me outstretched. If I try now I fail over. Do you nk I'm too old for this ti\ doctor? Not at all. Try hopping down the stair* that way This should end vour troubles once and for Can you help me. doctor? Soon after eon-.u food / feel as if i had wallowed a balloon. Maybe you have. A man once twnllowen a toy balloon he was blowing up for a children's party. Fvery time he drank soda water he became airborne and floated to the ceiling. Instead of whining about it he began a n*w career us a party entertainer and would have lived happily ever aftor if he hadn't exploded In a dentist's chair after a whiff of gag. Avoid dentists and try to look on the bright side. At one time I kept myself healthy with a simple morning exercise 1 used to bend forward with knees stiff, lookbeiu'i'Di my ley* at my wife in bed. and shout. "Top o' the mon,ino" twenty or thirty times. If I do it now f pet pains in the head and bark: and feel di:ry. What do you •advite? See a psychiatrist at once. Or. belter still, try your exercise on the roof-edge of a high buiUung with a gale blowing. One day your wife will tlmnk me (or .hiadvire. 'Mr. ( li.iinii.iti . .' TO HELP people like myself. whose minds become a blank ihe moment we stand on our feel to address our fellow creatures, an American, Herbert V. Prochn(i*', has written "The Toastmaster's Handbook." "II you want a sure fire story to start your speech" sys the blurb, 'turn to Chapter 6 and choose one of the witty anecdotes given there For a few wellchosen words lo Introduce a guest speaker read Chapter 4. If you have to make a timely response turn lo Chapter 5." And if you want lo makeeven bigger fool of the tremblini creature who has sought this easy way out of hi difficulties, each member of big audience should be made to read the book in advance and be supplied with a copy of It at the r nner Mr. Chairman and gentlemen." the speaker begins. by way of introducing our guest tonight I feel I can do nothing better than. . ." "Turn lo Chapter 4, shout the audience, noisily turning the pages of their books. "When I was in n similar poslUon," the red-faced speaker continues, "that i to say. when I was a guest and had to make a timely response. . ." "You turned lo Chapter 5." "But as I am not a good speaker, and do not wish to bora you any longer, 1 think I w 1 end with an amusing story, ur at any rate. It amused me when.,. •When you read it In Chapter ." chants the audience, "of The Toasinioster Handbook by Herbert V, Prochnow. irMrh rotttaius 400 eptfrrami. 401 anecdotes, 1.000 quotations and 100 funny stories, price Jl's., poll paid, or 12a. 6a. cash on delivery" —London Expret Sen-ire. USEFUL GiFTS that will be appreciated all Ihe year rimntl AS.SJMINMM WASUE SAUCEPANS, COCKTAIL SHAKERS. JELLY MOULDS. FRY PANS. PRESSURE COOKERS, FRENCH FRIERS. POTATO RICERS. %  IN WABtE CAKE TRAYS, ICING SETS It TUBES, ICING STANDS & BOOKS, CAKE PANS, KITCHENWARE. %  vmiiisw peed? Oh no, old boy. those feudal days are over. What you'vo got to do is to keep within the framework of the procedure adopted by U.N.O." "But 1 want a shirt," I again started, only to be again interrupted with: "You and your wants! What's that got to do with the point at Httuc? The question that's got to be firt decided is not whether or m>i you want a shirt but whether you steed one. The way to decide this is to appoint a fact finding committee." Then clapping his hands for the waiter, he leant forward and tapping me on the knee, said: "Look I'll show you You and I will resolve ourselves Into a fact finding committee. Now. do you want or do you need a shirt?" "Both," I tojd Um, and explained Hv • Is. %  (necessary lor upkeep." all about the frayed edges as well "But my sainted aunt! !>. as the reproachful and acquisitive ^"V 1 *' 1 1 1 lho > '' ra nr %  tY eyes of Ihe garden boy. .,.,,. _, .. "Good 1 he said. "Thai's one "Well, to be perf..tl> M thing settled." Then looking smug l0 > P-b-uly wont. But I and pleased with himself, "You 'iw--" I mailer. All that really rr see how easy it is" Now the next ,c "' '* "> v, -u will hm .1 step is to appoint a consultative >o^ pan and have Ihe salisfacl assembly to decide the question of ' "*"* that you have followed what sort of shirt and where tc mc cor "*< ,rocedure. buy It I suggest you and your Whrtl -ut nomc x 1old m Wlfe wl fe form this assembly and rea „ Uial Q. nad >aid and porl back hen.' ^morrow, when plalned lhat „„, wa now a mrm we can decide whether ornot ll ber of the consulianve committee. is necessary lo appoint a purity shc Bwned s)lghtlv tlwil Council to deal further with the -. •;. matter, or ignore that formality "I' ,,.?"" enl on wllh nHl Bhc and save time by holding a pl*nu ary session of ourserves forthThe next day. when I met with." George at the Club, I told him lhat "But. hang it all, George, I the Consultative Committee had know the shirt I want and need, decided that as this was a purely and I know where I can buy one domestic matter I was entitled to for $4.75 cash." buy myself a shirt without going "There you go? There you go ihrough too routine procedure he again, harping back on this urnhad outlined. That shook him. In lateral complex that's already been fact, he was obviously so annoyed vetoed". Then, as he caughl ihe that he turned a dull red, his waiter's eye, he said, "Boy! Repeat Adam's apple moved rapidly up those drinks and make "em double* and down, and he put on his famthls time. Mr Bertie's not at his ous sneer that would have made best today." him look like a camel, provided s camel could turn red in the face "Look here old fruit," I protestllIld have an Adam's apple thai ed. "I've had enough of this. I'm could run up and down its throat going to buy that shirt See? When he could trust himself "Okay, okay, okay." he retorted, to speak he said In a nasty. "Have it your own way. But have you're trying to tell m* It to mmd you the cash to pay for it?" my own ruddy business-" Putting my hand in my pocket. It cost me three drinks and a I Jingled my keys and small change lunch al the Club before I could for a moment or two. and then smooth him down tn^isjk to hold told him. "Wcll-tr-er funnily a plenary session, at which the enough, now you mention it. I purchase of the shirt was appr don't think I have today: but I nem. con. And then Ire*ner>'.>. % %  ran get them to charge It." ,t wa* early closing day. "Charge!" he exploded. Did you say—charge? D'you seriously mean to tell me you would run the risk of burdening yourself with a debt like that without consulting a financial expert, or getting the opinion of an economic adviser who could tell you what a debt like that may cost you by the time you're able to pay it in the only sort of money we may have by then" To hear you talk lightly of gett..-.g things on credit now would think you had unlimited Marshall Aid behind you. Well I ask you, have vou nnv pull with Marshall Aid*" "No", I said. "But "Well. *ktp it Never mind the but*. Listen, old cock, and I'll tell you Wh.it you've got to do is to apply to Development and Welfare to finance the proposition. Give *em the works Tell 'em all thev need do Is to supply H < turn and that you'll guarantee lo The next morning when I wen. to the shop, the man told me Ihe tart Of shirts I wanted had ail been sold out. Thoroughly db aruntled, 1 went back home when I found a parcel addressed to me on the table "What's this*" I asked my wife "Tour new shirt, dear", she said**. "Bought It yesterday. Cost M.T5"Oh. good. Now I can give the old one to the garden boy." "Wo, you cant, dear, because you see I gave it to him this morning", she ald\ smiling aeeretlT to herself without looking up from her knitting I'd be the last person to criticise the manner in which she had dealt with the matter, but f do wish she hadn't smiled in that irritating feminine way, However, I suppose OM mu*j| make allowances, for %  •ran in,, best of wtrea la. altar all, merely a GODDARDS GOLD BRAID RUM From : TO-MORROW I r. BsT#T You'll nevd a quantity of this Delightful Brand g



PAGE 1

PAGE TWENTY-SEX CHRISTMAS SITPLKMENT m ~1^> *JL*. A > _ % Jw ypi > *' ^^^ Mpc-ai m. *~~ J&&*, 1 .# 2£ ... .> *V* • -CO\SIITVTKI\ KIVKK En—I Hurn-I (Dhinh JkU JA&AB HEINEKENS BEER • Enjoy that rich, mellow laste of HOLLANDS FINEST BEER You'll be delighted with its quality and the quantity loo... more people love HEINEKENS Therefore Stock up a few Cartons for the Season. • ON SALE AT YOUR GROCER K. B. HUNTE & CO, LTD.-Agents A CRYPTOGRAM PHRASE of a tniKUlln* tiur, 'uncertain, coy -m*,. hnrd to piM*?;' has been quoted about women for centuries. However, long before Scott wrote It, %  woman said the same thing In nnoliur way Her remark Is preleritrd as a cryptogram for you to solve. Try it: / r' B Q HER 8 C ft ^rjKUJEQB IK ZFEtJ r ii ( r j ZfliJ OBD LP TLT Bffl m -ainniiu ( ."• w • m. na „ mm ^ Anagrambles IN Uua von) iiimr, you ata given %  *'rd and an additxmil Itltai and ure required to %  flam a nau word composed of the eombtnad letter* For ex•mpta, SLOPED arltb f xpotlro Now IT; thae: l '. W.I.Kh with E is -' NEATER with V | 3. EAGLES with I'M NOSES with All !. .'WINE wttk H la — : POLO with I ii — ',--•,-,*.•,---,-,.','.,',',->-,-,',panili i % %  •i|ff I s w %  %  Win A Wrist Watch Competition ALFONSO B. Da UMA A CO.. oB.r. WRIST WATCH r w Iba %  •Ilawtaui %  % %  i %  ^V-OW PPMIHOII is known a "the Alfonao B. Da % %  — i Z' 1 ^ "J!" """nh re reoueslcd in nil In taio "ems in me blank span's provided In the foUowtna Each space must be micd In wllh an ilem, name. Motanaa. or ivoids. which will be found appearing In Ihe atttwCa>__, on the pace opposite The first correct solution opanad wHl ba Ihe winner of the competition Cut out the coupSnbSowand ~ xi" B i '?'" c ."Jf v u <'~*. Advcrli..i> DepartSS, Mci. ?til&^Jtt£&&2i&&? m •" —• decided to buy John a a .-* j^!rZS2 %  I.M M;M %  :n S t h;,vc A#gftfi they thought thfy would look around for things ftir that* % %  *• %  home and to thel: delight they found that ^^ !" After purchasing ..!! that they wanted they deddakd oUt*"to future ihey could ^^^ !" !" tmd that CbrilbnH tim.> was the time to say! !!!.!!'. NAME I agree to abide by (he decision of the AdrmnUi"0 Managrr of fh* Barbados Adoocate. tchoao decision shall be final.



PAGE 1

CHRISTMAS SUPPLKMKNT I'AUl: SUVENTKEN %  I you A QSIWBJIBAA Y. De LIMA & CO.. Ltd. iiO ^ 26 tSWt/ Stout IMifllfSlltiraSllfaMi^ s %  %  K %  K K IK %  K K PURITY BREAD A WINNER EVERYTIME QUALITY PURITY BAKERIES LIMITED. 9 V 5? X> WILL TELL! 91 m ORDER EARLY FOR THE XMAS HOLIDAYS.



PAGE 1

SI-VDAT, DECEMBER 1. 19M SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAf.F THIRTEEN' HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON Gordons Sfo*tds ?Supt&m2 A "CATERPILLAR"E£ TRACK-TYPE %  %  The heavy-duty steering clutches permit this tractor to make a fOil circle turn... ii.ectly on its heel under leer 1 e turning radius of the DiM*l : 5 / working : she. i,___ re; oxamrle, is ;_, c dvCiita r fo,ELECTRIC SALES & Iwoedside Road Si Michaol * ITS *& SERVICE LIMITED Phoni4629 & 4371 The world's choice! Thi Path r-Fill.ii*,,i Horisontal mgima, buUi by ./. <• Hint nun ii i installed mill your operator knows "" controls, vow can • Ygfii about >t fur n invij Hmi. Ii is ideal for gravrl-pitg, taw* mill*, quarries, etc., or wherevt r long hour* <>•' mu ration in dustn and dirt* conditions an tin ml'. FYPK Number of Cylinders DII 1.1 IU G5U 800 SINGLE Ell 21 XT 500 650 m 500 1 ii 32 40 SINCI.K III.' M 80 •loo r,oo TWIN ASSOCIATED BRITISH OIL ENGINES (EXPORT) LTD. Sole Agents for Barbados CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. .^v,v-vwv,t^V/V,v-'XV,^(^wvAV*v,^^^^^^^^^^^^v^-v^CAM J



PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT t&he Christmas Spirit Of 'She Scot . 1 1 s .1 bad thin*, we arc told. to mix one's drinks. A jaHitap, i'iece of advice, no doubt, around tieistmas and other festive i.vrlod*. Bui what's a poor Scotsman to do when it's next to iml-.*sible for him in thiw: hard innes to get the only drink that ically appeals to him for celebrailon houra. "Sn>:. h" i.i scarce and dear in the land of its production One of Scotland's Christmas pantomime /avotn*es. the late Will Pyffe used to bring the house down after World War I with a aong that complained about the price of food (as he called it) — "Tweive-and-a—tanner a bottle!" lt/6d. a bottle! The dourest Scot to-day would be prepared to sell his soul for a bottle at that price. At thrice 12/fld. almost, it's fUll a r.itioned commodlt* live years after World War II: and black market prices are fantastic It M be no consolation at all. iiound Christmas anyway, thft* whisky (not whiskey, please--that's not Scotch in spelling '.r UMtsM M in.' iich attraction across \ie Atlantic that lt*j one o* Britain's lollar earners. rrotKEN literally in reci at %  .. m nuite different affair f-om that In England Chrtstmai lor the temghted s %  "dishnvin I is o "holiday'; foe the Scot it's a "holy day". Throughout England, the Christmas holiday mood is so exuberant that It cannot be coniineii to one day; there thai had to institute a Boxing Day (day after Christmas) in order to have two days' hoUdav Boxing Day. ror,ooth—and the Sassenach has the nerve to point the Anger of worn at our "Caledonia stern and wild:" j'HE Scuts celebration of ChrlstX mas. In fact, is much more •kin to that of Fiance and other European countries. The emphasis the e on recognition of ChlltMi %  I.,. ., \aij v ly I) ;) , increasingly reflected in Scotland nowadays by the attendances, both On Christmas Eve and on Christmas Dnv itself, .v church services. ftot that we suggest the Engllshman does not attend Christinas religious services He does jo, be it agreed, in greater numbers; than his fellow Briton north of the Tweed. But the average Scot, with the ghost of Knox hovering around him, reminds himself that Christmas Dnv wa formerly Old Yule Day—a pagan festival if ever there was! And he has already enough jibes to contend with from the Sassenach about the "pegan" North When Mr. Knox's shadow isn't loo closely around. It mav be admitted bv the Scott thai he. t.-o ohscrves his pagan festivals And what festival*! Gorgeous festivals or lire, veritable sunworship At •he close of the hallow davs of ile (feast of the Winter Solsi e, In case you don't know), in -iiiary. you should see at Burgi i ,m. a Moray Firth town, the i 'omonv of the "Burning of the lavle"—an occasion, and nighr. of j'i pagan revelry. Or. still more lively spectacle, the ceremony on January . 'December 25, by the r.ight of greatest merriment of the y ear for Scots at home or abroad-l Christmas in Scotland b sUUl the beautiful festival of thai children, Santa Claus and all that | and homage to the basically : ligious outlook of the Scot. New ] Year—Hogmanay — is the superseding "fling" of the adults, the night and a da.v when the Scot really lets his hair down. Froan any time after dark on New I Year's Eve until any time New Year's Day itself, the Soot is at his sentimental best—the friend of all the world. And, especially these days, it isn't Just whisky-inspired. Even the Sassenach privileged to share in the Hogmanay revels must appreciate that. "Auld Lang Syne", the world's most popular au revoir. is sung la the land of itorigin during Hogmanay with u fervour which lets you deep into the secret of the Scot's character When he Is religious, he is religious. Wheat he i* pagan, he is pagan. Ha doesn't mix his drinks Hoch aye (Scots for Q E D.)t t-. woic let Max Factor reveal the REAL you today . Ihit very night .. tee hmc beautiful you really can be . INSTANTLY! Mr* . the $ecret ia H <^\AX FACTOR Jji -^ 4 OI.OH IIARMOW MAKE-UP Utf Ihv HlltVH ft These are the five inot indispensable beauty NfBsMtsj of the screen's most glamorous I stars. Try the correct color i harmony shades created esi preuly for your type ... end see what sn amasing difference I they make in your own beauty ] PAN-CAKE" MAKEUP... l*e II4IUS %  make-ap fee a %  , *•**•!-fiiuik eooipleatM M *•** Hsa Wsts c=. skeejja enliven* lh beauty of your skin's aalnral color loars CHEEK ROUGE... UM perfect touch of gbasoar f*r a letoller facial coaasav NEW LIPSTICK... the pee'ticM. -M iaviiing faahlea shades ym'rt e*r •* EYELASH IP... Bashes -... Udus leek longer eanl rear eyes leek l i r sMst i i M '. %  i Tke Mmke-Vp For The Stars-And You MAX FACTOR HOLLYWOOD Al Lading Drug and [ta|>rtment Store, J^" If Km rmm'i (MH.~i WM > immt # eM aw—a *i



PAGE 1

I-A<;K KIGHTKKN ( IIK1STMAS SIPPI.KMKNT BOTANICAL GARDENS Vincent -Arlhu XMAS PUZZLES Answers On Page 21. vmnnmrnsm j "IGNORAMUSES I I Bv 7 0 HARE %  I'm. i. %  IVtiiriiiiji. For n the il. id/nuraH IVlllINTELLIGENCE TEST GOOD OLD LYSANDER BY T. O HARE i ,.] %  %  punt n ( K .i. i. %  Mlipll-*. Ullf < n nitothrt ol u.i'in awimred < #* %  Qiie-'i.. He ( %  Mill W IKIU*. when loiuim MI tiurtt had I I ltl ii total for fen. tiichti hm on to* nith. It. *ni: san _.. lmpr**ivr Havre; t tin end HI tutal wa* 30 point* On "* rrmiliiliitf ituec mvaMona I*t Hiilihrr of point. CICIUIMII wort -•• Die omr for the fir t tint* -ewio rtd the %  fl(tl) iilfht ' %  on the fourth How many onintt In all win %  li'-n h OIHII T JHTELLIfiEHCE TEST THREE COLOURS By T, 0. H*Jtf 1 10 UAV I icn iiwu an; UNC may nol at Br.t •*• ho* to act about aolvin* t i imt>*r n eh %  %  If I draw -• marhlei lb to maiif MT( tnai I niva dran at leaat ona, red, .one. me %  lumber h.cn i l:jn*i the number ol olae marb'.aa "(J" u lathar. cuiaa in th. ma'rhe* at the born *r %  :'npe.i lata I'vf The rei f 'lie data wei The tout Hnuari.t Will* nho.il had .. played one tnatcti at *occr j^aintt each "I the olheii Th total number ol (oali aooreti >u the iimr in tacn match each mm produced .1 dif latent ncoie; I.yander'. fi a:%  %  • il" %  4'eiandei Aienander h*.ided the tabu run poinut ; Hercule* am 1 %  in.. u; 1 %  wd I .0 "i. Tri. miH-r 01 *"•>* i the 1 hjv*. been What .v the -rorr iAlrtan>trr> M Wl l WITS TES1 H ERES a llttll may %  < ; but wnit I ill you try It' Without ralal'i; in n I paper. .IraftV€ Ira -lit 1 pr-NlUfi' Un I:: 1 • rOaterali ptntagon %  i nn ii.polnltd *tr I 1 A %  ollU In ItirM J %  . • flotation i" ion ul ajwda auo • akOtu iioj 1*1 aoz 1 j oq o •(. jmn c* uiiin M*nd *>o "as pu VI o punom main OAOUI 'J |iUW I UO Bl>3 %  in; aaM • -ltU oiti u| jau..sia p a •1*1* uiaiqojj 3U)JUIO*8 ai|; i o uofiniog. M ASSORTMENTS


1930

y
r 10



U.N. Will Not

Unda

nn

WARSHIPS STAND BY OFF KOREA

Be Driven Out
Of Korea

Canadian Prime Minister

OTTAWA, Dec. 9.

‘THE CANADIAN Prime Minister, Mr. Louis St.

Laurent, said tonight after a conference with Mr.
Clement Attlee, the British Prime Minister: “the
information I have is that the United Nations are

not going to be driven out of Korea.’’

Mr. St. Laurent made his comment to correspondents
as he emerged from a full Canadian Cabinet meeting which
heard a report from the British Prime Minister on his
Washington talks with President Truman.

Britain, France, U.S.
Agree On Notes

To Russia

PARIS, Dec. 9.

Britain, France and the United
States agreed in talks here today
on “positive recommendations” in
reply to the Russian note propos-
ing a “Big Four” conference on
Germany, a communique issued
by the French Foreign Ministry
said. These recommendations have
been submitted to the three Gov-
ernments.

The British Ambassador, Sir
Oliver Harvey, the American Am-
bassador David Bruce, and the
Secretary General of the French
Foreign Ministry Alexandre Par-
odi are replying today. Experts
handled the final editing of the
reply late last night and the am-
bassadors decided that there was
no need for a full session today.

The reply is expected to reject
Moscow’s suggestion that the
resolutions drawn up by the East-
ern Foreign Ministers in Prague
should be used as the basis for
future talks on Germany,

—Reuter.



Electric Fishing

HAMBURG, Dec, 9.

Two German inventors will test
an “electric net” with which they
expect to revolutionise fishing in
the North Sea next year.

Devised by the engineer Herbert
Peglow and physiologist Conradin
Kreutzer, the apparatus consists
of a generator feeding two op-
posite poles attached to the mouth
of the net.

The inventors claim that the
current passing between the poles
will attract the fish into the net
and paralyse them long enough
for them to be hauled on board.
The system has already been suc-
cessfully tried in fresh water, but
salt water dissipates the current
much more.

Dr. Kreutzer thinks this can be
overcome by using regular short
shocks instead of a constant cur-
rent.—Reuter.



Saboteurs Damage
Transport Ship

SEATTLE, Dec. 9.

Saboteurs have damaged the
12,000-ton American Navy ship
A. W. Greely used to transport
troops and military supplies to
Korea, Naval Authorities an-
nounced last night.

The Greely is said to have been
damaged in five places,

Naval Intelligence and other
officials were investigating. The
Greely is now undergoing repairs.

—Reuter.

AUSSIES BUY, NEW
JET FIGHTERS

CANBERRA, Dec. 9.

Australia has bought 36 of
Britain’s latest Meteor Jet
fighters to re-equip the Austra—
lian 77 squadron now operating
in Korea with the American
Mustangs.

The Prime Minister, Robert
Menzies said that the Meteors with
spare engines and other equip-

Mr, St. Laurent said the Cabinet
has had a “very satisfactory in-
terview” with Mr. Attlee.

He added: “All of us feel quite
comforted by the _ information
which he and Field Marshal Slim
were able to give us as to their
talks with President Truman in
Washington. The information I
have is that the United Nations
are not going to be driven out of
Korea.”



i Main power lines
Factories and

cal refineries

& Coalfields

XX Iron fields

Hydro-electric:
a plants

Fort Arthur

—~

N

Yellow





Boy Performing



According to a London report.
the non-Communist world gave
general approval to the results of
the Truman-Attlee conference,
though in some places there was
apprehension about “‘unanswered
problems.”

Practical Work
ashington report states that
nited States
today started the practical
ih out the Truman-




me for the defence
of the free’ wprid against aggres-
sion within 24*hours of its publi-
cation.

} General George Marshall, the
Secretary of Defence, urged im-
mediate action by the Senate Ap-
propriations Committee on their
providing $18,000,000.000 for in-
creased arms productign here and
the enlargement of the armed

forces.
Some Senators. proposed that
declare a

the Government shoul
state of national emer, y for
an all-out economic mobilisation.
—Reuter.

Reds Charge U.S.
With Cruelty |

LONDON, Dec, 9.

The North Korean Government
has charged American forces i"
Korea with violating “the uni-
versally recognised standards of
international law on the conduct
of war,” according to a Tass (offi-
cial Soviet news agency) despatch
received in London to-day.

The statement charged that
American aircraft during the sec-
ond half of October had “virtually ;
completely destroyed” some 14



Government | d.

“Magic Cure”

CUTTACK, Orissa, N. E, India,
Dec. 9

Thousands of sick people are
pouring into Rantallai, a village
near here to avail themselves cf
the “magic cure” of a 12-year-old
shepherd boy Nepali Babu, accord-
ing to reports reaching here to-
ay.

Pressure on railways has been
so great that Orissa authorities
had to revoke an earlier decision
not to run special trains to Mer-
mandally, the nearest stetion, 26
miles from Rantallai until a com

mittee of experts had investigated
the “cures,”

Reports said over 200,000 people
had visited the shepherd boy tor
treatment.

A Dakota aircraft was reported
to have made three trips from
eo to — with “pa-
tien yesterday. 7

‘The boy has been doling ott
his “medicine” to thousands of
patients with chronic ailments
like leprosy and tubereulosis who
flock to his hut.

The “medicine” which he gives
without diagnosis consists of the
“divine bark” of a plant which
he claims was given him by 4
Hindu beggar.

—Reuter.



Peasants Anxious
To Return To Etna

CATANIA, Dec. 9,
Police were to-night turning
back peasants trying to return too
hastily to their homes on the
slopes of Mount Etna as the vol-
cano’s two week old eruption went

towns in Korea and wiped out gown for the second time.

about 9,000 villages and other
sociai communities.

—Reuter.

Tremors Shake

Messina

REGGIO CALABRIA, Dec. 9,
A series of strong earth tremors



to-day rocked both coasts of the }-

Straits of Messina between Italy
and Sicily. About 20 tremors
reaching a climax over a period
of four hours shook the city of
Messina on the Sicilian coast
where half a dozen people were
hurt in a panic scramble to get
out of a covered market.

The tremors were thought to be
reflections of the vast underground
explosions which have caused the
Etna volcano some 64 miles away
to erupt for the last two weeks.

—Reuter.

B.G. ELECTIONS

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Dec. 9.

Councillors George Francois
De Sebastiani and Edgar Wads-
worth Adams whose seats were
contested, returned as the George-
town Municipal General Election
ended after five days.

Nine were elected including



ment were expected to arrive in|four commercial men and a wo-
Australia early in the New Year. man secretary. Three Government | a member of the Caribbean Com-

—Reuter.



A T.C.A
new runway
.

{

nominees are not yet named.—CP) | mission.—Can. Press.

ON RUN AGAIN.

DC-4 plane after. an absence of seven weeks was able to land at Seawell yesterday on

The villagers had evacuated
their homes at Milo Rinazzo and
Fornazzo on the northeastern
slopes of Etna.

Lava slowed down to a halt last
night but the explosive activity of
the craters has not stopped, .

Black lava has formed 10-yard
high barricades north of the vil-
lage.—Reuter. ;

PLAN FOR SOIL
SAVING IN WI.

CURACAO, Dec. 9

The West Indian Conference
yesterday adopted a proposal to
establish a pilot plant for soil con-
servation in the British territories
of St Vincent and St. Lucia.

The proposal was submitted by
U.S. Allison, Director of the
Caribbean area of soil conserv-
ation service of Puerto Rico. Two
British islands were chosen be-
cause conditions there are sirnilar
to those in the surrounding terri-
tories of other nations.

The Conference also adopted the
suggestion that the Caribbean
Commission should seek outside
financial assistance and cabled
congratulations to Dr, Ralph
Bunche, Nobel Peace Prize Winner,
in appreciation of his services as



the

It is pictured bere on the parking apron and passengers are seen alighting

WHAT Irs ALL





Liat Ae "hae
“Sea of Japan—
0 Sheen



THIS “MAP shows” clearly what Communist China means to the war in Koi



12-Year-Old Indian| Byitish Emphasise F ailings
Of Atilee—Truman Talks

(From Our Own

THE COMMUNIQUE issued from Washington at the
conclusion of the Attlee-Truman *eonversations has not
been very enthusiastically received by informed diplomatic

quarters here.
It certainly represents

have already been emphasised, but its failings and omis-
sions are now being underlined here in the following

terms.



Over 3,000,000 |

Made Pilgrimage |
To Rome 1950 |

VATICAN CITY, Dec: 9. ;
Vatican officials have calculated}
that a_ _of between 3, \
and 4,000,000 pilgrims .came . to}

Reme this year, Western Ger-
many sent about 150,000, Spain
42,000, the countries of South
America 38,000, Holland 3,000,
Austria 30,000, and Scandinavian
countries 28,000.

About 15,000 came on foot, 9,000
of them Italians and the remaining
6,000 chiefly from France, Austria,
Holland, Britain, Western Ger-
many, Belgium and Spain. Others
used a total of 300,000 tourist
coaches, it was estimated, and hun-
dreds used special trains —Reuter





uestiog ©. calling a halt at the
Bit Gate, the United Nati,
-renwiF divided on the approatl





Correspondent)
LONDON, Dec. 9.

certain achievements which

These exchanges at the highest
level have not reached rny agree-
ment on the must urgent problem
which is the terms for negotia-
tions with the Chinese-Peking
Government, While hopeful re-
ports pour in, (particularly from
Indian rters), that the Chinese
are willing to negotiate on the

to two of the three issues likely
to be raised in any negotiation,
First the Communique admits
the Anglo-American difference
on the admission of China to the
Security Council; the second, the
Attlee-Truman Communique
avoids the issue of Formosa by
taking refuge in the formula:
“interests of the people of For-
mosa and the maintenance of
peace and security in the Pacific”.
Consulwation, A Farce
It is pointed out here that there
is no existing machinery for con-
sultation of the “people of For-

| mosa”, and that there won't be

Attlee Was Not |
“France’s Delegate

PARIS Dec. 9.

A French War Ministry spokes-
man said here today that he did
not think the Truman-Attlee
decision to “increase the military
capacities of the U.S. and U.K.,”
would mean the neglect of other
‘Atlantic Pact countries defence
requirements,

The “United States undoubt-
edly realises that French defence
must rely to a considerable ex-
tent on American aid”, he said

He pointed out that at the
meeting of Premier Attlee and
President Truman, only the in-
terests of Great Britain and
America were represented,

“French Premier, Rene Pleven

has made it quite clear in the
last few days that Attlee was
not acting as a delegate foi

France,” he said. —Reuter.

Peking Wants Peace

LAKE SUCCESS, Dec, 9.



Sir Benqgal Rau, leader of the|

Indian delegation to the United)
Nations, said today talks with
Communist China indicated that
she was giving “careful considera- |
tion” to the 13-nations appeal to!
halt her forces at the 38th paral-
lel.

The Peking Gevernment was
“desirous uf bringing fighting to
an end as early as possible,” he



told reporters after an 80-minute
talk with Wu Chan, leader of the |

delegation It was their third |
meeting to discuss Korea,
—Reuter.



|U.K. WILL APPEAL FOR

until Chiang’s Government supei -
seded—moreover the security of
the Pacific begs the whole ques-
tion, On the other hand, Attlee
and Truman have reached an
agreement on the third important
issue that would arise in nego-
tiations with Chinese authorities
—they have agreed to grant as-
surances that the United Nations
would not regroup in South
Korea for re-entry into North:
Korea, once a_ cease-fire was
achieved on an agreed line

These are the limitations seen
in the understanding reached
between ‘Attlee and Truman

There are also some glaring
omissions. Nothing ts said about
the re-armament of Germany on
which all Europe is now agitated.
Up to recently it was presumed
that the United States made an
agreement that German re-arma-
ment was a pre-condition of the
appointment of General Eisenhow-
er as Supreme Commander of the
Atlantic Pact

Vague Wording
Wording is vague in the Com-
munique but according to the
most likely reading, the Ameri-
cans are agreed to go ahead with
@ O nPage 16

Big Four Meeting

PARIS, Dec. 9,
The Big Three western powers
are to tell Russia they are willing
to join in a Four-Power Meeting
in an effort to settle outstanding
difficulties, it was reliably learned
here to-night, but they will pro-—
pose that a suitable agenda for
the meeting should be worked out
beforehand through diplomatic

channels, it was understood.
—Reuter




















Reds Demand.
| Withdrawal |
\Of U.N. Troops

LAKE SUCCESS, Dec, 9
Russia submitted to the United!
Nations today. a resolution call-
ing for the immediate withdrawal
of all foreign troops fron Korea
and recommending that the solu-

|

tion of the Korea question be |
vested in the Korean people it- |
self.

Presenting the resolution to the
Political Committee of the Gen-
eral Assembly, the Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei Vyshinsky said
it was the only way which could



MacArthur Orders

News Blackout

TOKYO, Dec. 9.

FLEET transports and warships stood by tonight

off Hungnam, the Korean east coast port just
above the peninsula, waiting for “the possible
evacuation of 15,000 American marines and British
Commandos whose forward elements had linked up
with relief forces from the port after battling their

way out of the Chinese

encirclement.

The American Third and Seventh Divisions—
brought back from Port Chongjin, only 50 miles
from the Siberian border — had established a
beach-head around Hamhung and Sungram.



bring about peace.

Vyshinsky moved the resolution

afier describing as “nonsense”,
the estimates by the United
States and the United Nations
Commission in Korea of the
strength of the Chinese Com-j;
mun st Forces there. j
The Commission report yes-
terday that the Chinese forces,
definitely identified in Korea,
totalled 231,000 and that one
“responsible” estimate placed the

total at 400,000.

Vyshinsky referred to these
figures and to the statement by
Warren Austin, the United States

delegate, that there were no
fewer than 3) Chinese divisions
in Korea.

—Reuter.

f

30 Year's
In Gaol

PHILADELPHIA, Dec. 8.
Harry Gold, a research ehem-
3. Was today sentenced to 30



years in prison as the self-con-
fessed courier of the Rusy.an
atomic spy ring.

Gold had pleaded guilty ww
serving as the go-between for
Doctor Fuchs, the convicted Brit-
ish atom scientist, and Soviet
agents

He was sentenced by the Dis-

trict Judge James P, McGranery
to two terms of 30 years to run
concurrently. He was charged with
espionage in wartime which car-

ries the maximum penalty olf
death
The Federal Government had

recommended 25 years in prison.
Gold received sentence calmly.
After a brief statement before the
bar, he said:

“Nothing has served more
since my arrest to prove to me
what a terrible m'stake I have

made than the manner in which
my court-appointed Counsel have
worked hard on my behalf despite
personal criticism and invective

It could not have happened in
Russia.”
—Reuter.



AIRLINER CRASHES
IN CONGO

PARIS, Dec. 9
The French air liner taking 5f
Senegalese troops from Bangui ir
the French Congo to Madagasca)

crashed in the Belgian Congo
few minutes after taking off las
night, it was learned here to-day
The Intercontinental Air Trans-
port Company announced that
there were 18 survivors, three
crew and 15 Senegalese soldiers,
three survivors of the crew, pilot
co-pilot, and the mechanic, were

injured and are in hospital at
Bangui.

The Air Transport Company
stated that of the Senegalese

survivors 13 were injured; some
of them very slightly,-Reuter,

SCRAP IRON

21,000 Unemployed In Liverpool

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Dec, 9.
Two signs of the times appear
in today’s morning newspapers
One is the Manchester Guardian's
strong leader, advocating that the
21,063 unemployed. on Liverpool’s |
Merseyside—just revealed in the
Ministry of Labour analysis—be |
absorbed by the rearmamenit |
programme. The other is the re-|
port that there shortly is to be!
an urgent appeal for scrap meta:
in Britain, to meet the deficiency
of 1,000,000 tons a year which

has arisen since the Korean cam



> GUardian points out that it
was not until the secc ear f
the war that Britain made f

ise of its 1,500,000 unemployed
vorkers, This mistake should |
not be made again, It draws at-

tention to the wisdom of utilising
such unused labour, before

ae

The “ Advocate Co, Ltd
takes pleasure
ing with to-day’s ‘‘ Sunday
Advocate’’ our FREE
Xmas Supplement to sub

in present

seribers and thanks then
for their loyalty, support
and vterest through f
the year

‘

’

| diverting valuable workers from
{trades most needed for rearm-
ament
| On the scrap metal problem of
, equal importance to rearmment,
| the Daily Telegraph comments on
| the fact that it is America’s heavy
| purchases of scrap metal in Ger-
many that have reduced supplies
| available to the British steel
| market, and sees an urgent neces-
| sity for a widely planned serap-
| drive in Britain and on the con-
tinent, and for a higher ie
f
}
j
|
\

tion of pig iron

Stra

al
ilso

Minister U
warned the ntry f
hortage Pxy fer

etals

WITHDRAWAL —





MEK Par

“We intend to operate offensively from this line of sup-
ply”, Major General Edward Almond, Tenth Corps Com-

mander said to-day.
Admiral Charles Joy,

Commander-in-Chief of the

United States Far Eastern Fleet, was asked at a Press Con-
ference to-day whether a naval force were gathering off
Hungnam to evacuate the 10th Corps.

“The navy is standing by for any }area

eventuality,” he replied. The
Tenth Corps officers here did not
minimise the seriousness of the
situation now facing the United
Nations commanders, but they ex-
pressed confidence that greater
Amertean fire power would be
decisive

Marines and Commandos linked
up with the American rescue
column in the “hell fire valley”.
The “break out” force had been
cut off in the Chosin reservoir





- CSE aR a =.
MANCHURA ea REA [gies g
Suibe es o % oO Con as. ee)

;
/ =| US. TROOPS AND
( BRITISH COMMANDOS
TRY 10 FIGHT
Our





British Tug
In Korea

HONG KONG, Dec. 9.

The Gritisn tug Allegiance, hit
twice today by gunfire from the
Ladroncs Islands southwest of
Hong Mong reached port here
tonight

Captain C. Thomas of Mel-

bourne and the two Ch'nese crew
were safe,

Also aboard and unhurt were
23 survivors from a Philippines
freighter which foundered off the
South-China coast yesterday.

Captain Thomas said tonight
that the Communists fired about
five small shells without warning
when the tug was two miles off
the shore,-Reuter,



of northeast Korea, soon
after the Chinese Communists
launched their big offensive in
Korea on November 27,
Withdrawal

United Nations forces in North-
west Korea withdrew towards the
38th parallel today General
MacArthur clamped down a
blackout on official news of the
retreat

Military observers here said to-
day that the logical line for Allied
forees to defend it they go below
the 38th parallel was on the Im-
jin river 25 miles north of Seoul,
the South Korean capital

The Truman-Attlee announce-
ment was seen here as an indica-
tion that the western powers were
willing to negotiate on a basis of
the division of Korea on the 38th
parallel, Observers expected that
British, American and South
Korean forces will go below the
parallel to see what the Chinese

as

will do,
The British Admiralty an-
nounced in London today the

successful withdrawal by sea of
7,000 wounded and civilian re-
fugees from the Pyongyang
area-—one of the most hazard-
ous naval operations of the
Korean war.
Through darkness and
through the swept channel of a,
minefield, destroyers nave® (ed
30 unlit miles of been vaiers
to cover the withdra VAT of
civilian and non-essential mili-
tary personnel and wounded
from the Pyongyang area to
more advantageous points
Front line reports said that the
maximum withdvawal by Unite
Nations forces in the past 24 hours
was 40 miles

15,000 American marines, 200
British Commandos and a body of
South Koreans were trying to
fight thelr way to the sea to the

twin Korean towns of Hambhung
and Hungnam where the Ameri
ean Seventh and Thi Divisions
have taken up positions around

the beachhead,Reuter.
TE,



TELL
THE NEWS

Ring 3113 Day or Night.

oe THE ADVOCATE

*
THE ADVOCATE
PAYS FOR NEWS.









ever.

We have them in

colours of black

speeds.

We also have

The cycle that has made
cycling famous and will make

you want to cycle more than

inch Frames in your favourite
and

with or without three or four

models

22 and 24

green,

Lor

ladies and sports models for

ladies or gents.

See us too for tricycles for

children.

“<}

CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Lid.

Distributors 10, 11



12 & 13 Broad Street



IS

THE RATION)
Dot tae
os



cB
=
PAGE TWO

eee
PLAZA Theatre = ostN |||

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m, (Warner's Thriller)
John GARFIELD in “CASTLE ON THE HUDSON |

Renee enn enn ee eee eee re eee
MONDAY & TUESDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. (Warner’s Double



PLA ZA—Bridgetown

WED. & THURS. 8.30 to 9.00 Pm
(On Stage) (Two Days Only)

“THE BERMUDA BOP
SPECIALIST

GLOBE ||

TO-NITE 8.30



== —D/——————————— / iS EXCELLENCY







SUNDAY ADVOCATE

the Gov-|

erner and Mrs, Savage will |
attend a Christmas Celebration
entitled “Carols Come to Life’
at Queen's College on Saturday
afternoon, December 16, This

ente t will also be per-








and

“OVERLAND TRAULS”

« ” « . formed on Thursday at 8 p.m.

ED GALAHAD" _& _ “FIND THE BLACKMAILER: LAST SHOW "tl dole se in ein Door childpen have been
MID-NITE MATINEE SATUR DAY 16TH Also Feature Film nvited to attend, but a limited

“ONE THRILLING NIGHT” & “THE KNOCKOUT” RED SKELTON | oe the ‘ona —

and Retired

| LA Z M* A. J. HILLIARD who ieft

here on Thursday by the

GAIETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES Arlene DAHL BRIDGETOWN AlGaten ek eee
rye (2) Shows TOcIneD ~_ ae URNS’ & in : Comiral Foundyy and his place has

ncan REYNALDO in IRNS” & een taken by Mr. Moroukham en
ies WAKELY in “SONG OF T SIERRAS” in oo Baby it's WILD Inside ! ; @ Pwo year contragt,
Mon. & Tucsday 830 p.m.) ~~~S*Wed. and Thurs 8.30 px ERROL FLYNN in cotPpointed :
Johnny Mack GROWN iin both) Leo GA RC EY and the DR. CARLTON B. |
“PARTNERS OF PRE TRATI aerate SOUTHERN |



A REMINDER

The China Doll Restaurant

ISOPEN FROM 7 P.M. 10 12 MID-NITE T0-NITE
DIAL



EMPIRE

TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.45
Monday, Tuesday &

Wednesday 4.45 & 8.30
M. G. M, Presents .

“CRISIS"

Starring
Cary Grant — Jose Ferrer



— with —

Paula Baymend and Signe



ROXY

ST TWO SHOWS
“DAY 430 and 8.15

United Artists Big Double
“TOO LATE FOR
TEARS”
ym FN
* and
“JOHNNY ONE-EYE”
— WITH —

Pat and Wayne



Monday and Tuesday
4.30 and 8.15

Columbia Smashing Double

“END OF THE
ROAD "”
— AND —
“RENEGADES OF
THE DONORA”

— WITH —

Allan “Rocky” Lane and
his Stallion Black Jack

BUY






3
3



———e
ESS

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)
TONIGHT & TOMORROW NIGHT at 8.380
“LISBON | STORY”

- with —

PATRICIA BURKE, RICHARD TAUBER, DAVID FARRAR
A British National Film

Commencing TUESDAY at 8.30 p.m.

RODDY McDOWALL
in Robert Louis Stevenson's

4730 FOR RESERVATIONS

os a ae

CONGOLEUM FLOOR COVERING

6 ft. wide $1.52 yd.
9 ft. wide $2.28 yd.

CONGOLEUM RUNN ERS

27” wide and 36” wide

XMAS TREE DECORATIONS—Bubble and Plain.

IMPORTANT NOTICE

WE HAVE TRIED THE NEW BREAKFAST HOUR 12 to 1 P.M. AND IT
AS PROVED UNSATISFACTORY. WE WILL NOW RESUME OUR
*REAKFAST HOUR BETWEEN 11 A.M. AND 12 NOON (EXCEPT SAT.

URDAYS) BEGINNING FROM MONDAY, DECEMBER



MANNING'S



his FIGHTIN’EST MOOD in
WARNER BROS.

MR. HEX” and
Gilbert ROLAND ns Cisce Kid in
“GAY CAVALAER

z=
L GODDARD, son of
cayuely Geddar,
. ALG

Mrs.
and the late
dard, has been



YANKEE




Major

Republic, :
Lt. Comdr. Goddard is at pres-
ent living in Trinidad.
Hotel Manager Returns
R. NORMAN MITCHELL,
Manager of the Ocean View
Hotel returned from a five

Alexis SMIT—S. Z. SAKALL
—Now Playing—
445 and 8.30 pm. and

Continuing

mes

J & 6.30 p.m.
Dick POWELL
and
June ALLYSON










(real yesterday morning by T.C.A.



“KIDNAPPED”



in
THE REFORMER

and

THE RED HEAD

Talent Audition To-day
9.30 A.M.
——





>








WONDERFUL . . .

CHRISTMAS PARTY

Proceeds for THE OLD LADIES' HOME,
Constitution Road
SATURDAY, 23RD DECEMBER 19,20
Floor Show 9.380 p.m. o Dancing 10.
THE POLICE BAND :
Directed by Capt. RAISON, M.B.E., A R.cC.M.



ROYAL
THE CROSS OF LORRAINE
— WITH — 4
Jean Pierre Aument an .
Gene Kelly. GREAT
Tuesday and Wednesday

FLOOR SHOW

Staged at 9.30 p.m. by Norman Wood
GRAND FINALE





BRITTANY
and
M-G-M Double . ; Our CHEF has a certain
Kathryn Grayson and

flair with food that makes






Jose Tturbi in

appointed honorary Vice-Consu! !
———— MONTA NA of the Dominican Republic by
T0-MoRROW ri ee General Trujillo, President of the i

week visit to New York and Mon- |

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1950
ee

Caub Calling

SIR GEORGE RELAXES



HIS EXCELLENCY Dr. L. A. H. Peters and Mrs. Peters, on the right, gave a cocktail party in Cura-

Sn" . i aribbean Com-
cao recently. In this picture, l. to r. are Mr. Ward Canaday, U.S. Co-Chairman of the Garibbe

| mission, behind Dr. Peters; Mr. Nicholas Debrot, a member of Curacao’s Executive Council; Sir George

Seel, British Co-Chairman; Mrs. Peters; and, behind her, Baron Edmond Petit de Beauverger, French Co-

PRIZE PORTRAIT

| Chairman.
Not Since 1926
AJ. and Mrs, R. M

terday
spend

morning by
a couple

TC.A.
of months holi-

Watson F
arrived from Montreal yes- —

; day in Barbados. They are Staying —°-

| With their son-in-law and daugh-

| ter, Mr. and Mrs. Lionel Williams = *

' of “Canbar”, St. Joseph.

| Maj. Watson opened the Cana-
dian Bank of Commerce Branch
here in 1920 and left Barbados
in 1926. He has net visited
here since then.

| Back From Canada—U.S.
} Visit
Mé« and Mrs. Ian Niblock wi'o

have been away for about
}two and aie hal months re-
turned from Canada sterday
morning by T.C.A. Mrs. Niblock

| spent most of the time in Windsor,
while Mr. Niblock was in New
York and other parts of the U.S.

With T.C.A. In Toronto

every item on the Menu | : ; - sleigh R. and Mrs, David E. Moore
: ee | Entrance of Santa Claus in winter sleig eee Pia ie
THAT MIDNIGHT KISS really special, Enjoy our | with sack of Christmas Presents ame es oe + Canada. —
P hrilli | ay by é
and palate—t ng dishes Admission : $1.00 | week they are staying at the
, ; Ocean View Hotel. Mr. Moore 1s
SHADOW A aad WALE TO-DAY with T.C.A. in Toronto.





Ann Sothern and “Zachary
Scott



~ ALY MPIC
TO-DAY 4.30 and 8.30

Monday: Last Two Shows
; 4.30 and 8.15
Randolph Scott and George

("Gabby")

TO-DAÂ¥Y & TOMORROW
4.30 and 8.30
M.G.M. Big Double . .
Jean Pierre Aumont and
Signe Hasso in —
ASSIGNMENT IN
4.30 and 8.30
Hayes in—



With National Film Board

| A RRIVING by T.C.A, yesterday
| morning was Mr. Geoffrey
| T, Taylor who is hereon a month's
tholiday staying at the Windsor
| Hotel, Mr. Taylor is with the
(avetontel Film Board in Ottawa

Fourth Winter

OMDR. G. J. KING-LANDALE
arrived from England yes-
terday via Curacao and Trinidad





| by B.W.IA. and is staying with
with . |Sir Edwar Cunard at “Glitter
Betty Grable and Victor Bay”, St. es. Here for five

Mature Make a date with YOU jmonths, this will be the fourth

(Not suitable for children) FRIENDS at = in succession that he has



Tuesday and Wednesday
4.30 and 8.15
20th Century Fox Double . .
Dick Haymes and Vera
Ellen in

CARNIVAL IN COSTA
RICA

=_‘zOw ee SSS

GLOBE

REPEAT PERFORMANCE

THE GREEN
DRAGON

FOR BETTER MEALS





THE CARIBOO TRAIL
AND
WABASH AVENUE




AND and By
THE es BETTER SERVICE "
— Ww :
Cornel Wilde and Maureen For Reservation Dial 3896 | NUMEROUS REQUESTS \
O'Hara R |
JUDY GRAHAM'S

YOUR “CARIBBEAN REVELRY ”






Starring :
CEDRIC PHILLIPS and MAY RAMDIN
CONGOLEUM on |
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 20TH, 830 P.M.
’ e
Now For Xmas! ioe i
CAPT. RAISON AND THE POLICE BAND
we offer e
PRICES : Orchestra Seats oa es ss $1.00 ;
CONGOLEUM SQUARES ma eee
2 yds. x 3 yds. °
. ‘ : : BF Keep the 20th DECEMBER Clear






For This GRAND MUSICALE !

——



x4





Select some of these
CHRISTMAS GIFTS, |





Tea Blectric Teasters
Peon ‘> Carving Sets ” Kettles
- 2rns . se F ruit ” Boiling Rings
Over 20 Patterns To Choose From. Nickel Plated Ash Trays Irons




Cigarette Cases

Imme
Cigarette Lighters “ona”

Pyrex Gift Sets
Pyrex Ovenware

ALSO
Christmas Tree Decorations and

Bubble Lights.

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
AND — COTTON FACTORY LTD.

ELECTRICAL WORKSHOP I HARDWARE DEPARTMENT — Telephone No. 2039

SS =| === === | asses
=





LiTH








THE CORNER STORE
Trafalgar Street

SALES DEPARTMENT















; winter
| spent in Barbados.



THIS PORTRA!T won first

ing.



It was drawn by Osc

T. C. A. OFFICIALS

PICTURED here are some of the passengers who arrived by T.C.A.

Seen coming down the steps are Mrs. R )
Watson and Mrs. Charles Whitney. At the bottom
to T.C.A. officials is Mr. Norman Mitchell, Man.

yesterday from Canada.

View Hotel.

for

TOYS



of the steps talking
ager of the Occen



Owen) Cie

Dyeerwesgera

prize at the exhibition for pencil draw-
ar DaC. Walkes.

Chief Reason
RS. CHARLES WHITNEY ar-
tived from Montreal yesterday
by T.C.A. and plans to remain
here for a holiday until the first
week in January, 1951. Mrs.
Whitney is the former Joan God-
dard, daughter of Dr. and Mrs.
A. L. Goddard of “Heathfield”,
Pine Hill, She expects her husband
down next Saturday by T.C.A.
accompanied by his parents.
Chief reason of Mrs. Whitney’s
visit is to be Matron of Honour at
Rosemarie Robinson's wedding
later this month
Her last visit to Barbados was
in August last year.

Staying With His Brother

R. O’KILL MILLER, whose
brother Douglas lives‘in Bar-
bados, arrived from Canada yes-
terday by T.C.A. to spend about a
month’s holiday here.
Mr. Miller is with a newsprint
manufacturing company in Keno-
gami. Quebec.

Back From Montreal

FTER two and a half months
4 in Montreal, Miss May Hart
of “Callendars”, Christ Church,

returned from Canada yesterday
by T.C.A,

To, Be Married Shortly
MSs ELAINE JEMMOTT leit
yesterday by B.W.LA. for
Puerto Rico, She is shortly to be
married in San Juan to Mr, Allen
K. Payne of the Distrust Engii-

eer’s Office in San Juan. Mr.
Payne was at one time stationed
in Barbados.



FOR GIRLS; Dolls, Prams,

Push Chairs,
Cooking Sets,

Embroidery &
Teddy Bears.

BOYS: Lorries, Cars, Cranes

trains, barrows,

mouth-organs, pen-knives,

XMAS WRAPPINGS, BALLOONS & DECORATIONS =:--—--ewes eee ere ere meer

EVANS “ WHIT FIELDS — vour shoe stores



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NEW HATS Now |
Ladies Stylish |
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«
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| SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10,

CARIB

EVERAL T.C.A. Staff mem-

bers arrived from Canada
yesterday on the T.C.A. flight-
They were Miss E. Bishop Boucher
who is an Air Stewardess on the
Caribbean run. She is here for a
week staying at the Ocean View
Hotel.

Mr. Brian Ramage whose broth-
er Glenn was here a month ago
with his wife also arrived yester-
day. He is with T.C.A. in Montreal
and is here for two weeks, stay-
ing at “Cacrabank.”

Mr. William Benson who is a
T.C.A. pilot on the Toronto-Mon -
treal and Toronto-Windsor flights,
accompanied by his wife arrived
yesterday to spend two weeks at
the Ocean View Hotel.

Other arrival was Mr. Frank
Coughlin who is a navigator. He
is here for a week and is also
staying at the Ocean View Hotel.

Back From Curacao Talks

R. LISLE WARD. M.C.P. who
attended the W.I. Conference
in Curacao, returned yesterday
via Trinidad by B.W.LA.
Arriving on the same ‘plane
with him was Mr. Michael Hans-
chell, Superintendent of Agricul-
ture in St. Vincent, who attended
the same conference as Adviser to
the Windward Islands delegation.
He is here for a few days, stay-
ing with his mother in Eagle Hall,
before returning to St. Vincent by
the Lady Rodney.

Labour Commissioner

R, E. S. S. BURROWES, Lab-
our Commissioner and Mr.
Darnley Lewis of the Labour
Office here left for Jamaica yes-
terday by B.W.LA.
They expect to be away a week.

Here For a Few Days
R. AND MRS. Jose de Mont-
brun arrived from Trinidad
yesterday morning by B.W.1.A.. to
spend a few days in Barbados.
They are staying at the Hotel
Hastings and plan to return to
Trinidad on Thursday.
Mr. de Montburn is a Director
of Grell and Co., in Trinidad.

Former Intercolonial

Cricketer

R. CYRIL MERRY, who is

‘ with Gordon Grant Ltd., in

Port-of-Spain arrived from Trini-

dad yesterday by B.W.I.A. on a
short visit,

Mr Merry will be remembered

by local cricket fans as a Trini-

dad and Intercolonial cricketer.

B.W.I1. Station Offtcer
RRIVING from Jamaica via
Trinidad yesterday by
B.W.1.A. was Mr. Walter Girling.
Here for two weeks’ holiday, he
is staying with his brother and
sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs, Ken-

neth Girling.

Walter is B.W.1.A.’s Station Offi-



cer at Palisadoes Airport in
Jamaica.
Library Course
ISS NANCY WENT of the

Barbados Public Library whx
was in Trinidad for six weeks on
a library course, returned from
Trinidad yesterday by B.W.I.A.

Adventist Convention
EV. VERNON BERRY, Educa-
tional and Young Peoples
Secretary of the Inter-American
Division of the Seventh Day
Adventists arrived from Trinidad
yesterday by B.W.I.A.

He is here for a Seventh Day
Adventist Convention which be-
gins this morning. He leaves Bar-
bados on Tuesday.

Representatives from Antigua,
St. Kitts, Dominica, St. Lucia,
Montserrat and the Virgin Islands
are already here for the Conven-
tion.

To Take Up Appoinrment
EV. Walter Fairweather who
came to Barbados in Octo-
ber, 1947 to study for the Anglican
Ministry at Codriigton College,
left yesterday for his home, Brit-
ish Honduras via Jamaica by
B.W.LA.

He is returning to take up an

appointment at St. John’s Cathe-
dral in Belize.



| “A nast

1950

(ardening Hints
Kor Amateurs

GROUND ORCHIDS

Ground Orchids are growing in
popularity throughout the island,
for gardqn lovers are quickly
finding out how lovely and hard
working these useful plants are.

They deserve the term hard
working, for the low growing
variety flower continuously
through the year, and once well
established they need no pamper-
ing or special care, but can be
left practically to their owh
devices .

Be sure however, if you are
starting a bed of Groung Orchids
to sea that you get the ever
bearing kind, and not the tall

variety which flowers only at
times.

Description
In appearance the Ground

Orchids have slender ribbon-like
leaves, growing in clumps, which
terminate in a bulbous growth
with a bunch of roots underneath.
In some of these the flowers ure
a deep purple, and in others, a
rarer variety, a lovely pink which
varies in shade. Both varieties
are hardy and easy to grow and
can be left undisturbed for three
or four years.

To Plant
Plant the bulbs in a sunny open
bed, thoroughly prepared with
plenty of well rotted pen manure.
The roots of the plants should be
well spread out and pressed firmly

y. stuck- u ,
ten-shilling-a-lb. bird,



London Express Service. _

in the bed, sinking the bulbous
part to three quarters of its depth.
Do not bury the bulb entirely.
Give the bed periodic applications
of manure, and water the plants
well, Ground Orchids are slow
starters and they will take a
little time to get established before
they begin to flower, but once
started they make up for their
slowness by flowering profusely
all the time.

It is said that they flower best
when they become close packed
in the bed



Treatment
As has been said, these plants
can be left undisturbed for many
years, but after a time they become
so overcrowded that the plants

begin to suffer, and then they
must be dug up, divided, and
replanted again in a freshly

made up bed.

When the plants are taken up
it will be found that the bulbs
have greatly increased, and after
their division it will probably be
possible to pass on a number of
plants to friends.

There is no special time of the
year for taking up the Orchids,
the time being entirely governed
by the condition of the bed.

The pink Ground Orchids are
rarer than the purple ones, their
bulbs often selling for as much
as one to two dollars each. They
| grow however just as easily as
the purple, and are so beautiful
that they amply repay the expen-
diture of a few dollars to get them
established in the garden,







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At the Cinema

CRISIS

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



POGOe

By CG. B. |
DICTATOR versus revolutionaries is the theme of |
“CRISIS” now playing at the Empire Theatre, with an

American doctor thrown in

on the democratic side. maa. |

napped, with his wife by the government forces, while on
holiday in a South American republic, he is conducted to
the President’s Palace, where he is firmly persuaded to
operate on him for brain tumor.

It appeats that the dictator is
none too popular and therefore
there is some doubt that the oper-
ation would be if per-
formed by any of the various local
surgeons, Whi

to make
sure there is no slip of a scalpel,
and with the revolutionaries, who
are equally determined that the
president will not leave the table
alive. To ensure this, they

the doctor’s wife when she is
leaving the country and send him
a message to the effect that she is
safe with them and will remain
so—unless—, What might have
happened had the fe ever
reached its destination is any-
body’s guess, but it never does
and the operation is performed—
successfully. Events however,
take a sharp turn in favour of the
revolutionaries, and with his wife
safely restofed to him, the doctor
finds his services in demand by
the victorious group.

There is plenty of drama and
shooting, with tanks and soldierg
milling about and you will notice
the extracrdinary likeness of both
conflicting groups in their lust for
gopet and Siete paliees use of 3.
Cary Grant and Jose Ferrar
are

excellent performances.
doctor, Cary Grant is smooth an
sardonic in his first serious role
for many a long day, and Jose
Ferrar as the fanatical dictator is
thorough convincing and dia-
oneaiey are a couple of
Teasonal amusing scenes, par-
ticularly one where Mr. Grant,
scalpel in demonstra’
a rubber model, the opening steps
of the operation to be

This seems to be a year for the
real old-timers and in “Ortsis’’,
Ramon Novarro, Antonio Moreno
and Gilbert Roland all take part,
though their roles are a far cry
from the romantic ones of twenty-
five years ago. Personally, T think
ne more interes: now, but
perhaps that’s because I'm getting
on too! The background music is
played almost entirely on the
guitar by Vincente Gomez and it
is astonishing how many different
types of atmosphere can be and
are created by the skilful play-
ing of this instrument.

MONTANA

MONTANA how ing at the
Plaza, Bridgetown, is a colourful
Western film with plenty of action
and direction. Westerns in

color always excel in
magnificent scenery and this one is
no exception, but in addition, the
validity of its subject matter is an
improvement on the usual run-of-
the-mill plot. It is the story of the
war that existed, toward the latter
part of the nineteenth century, be-
tween the cattle barons of the

tory. In those days, there was
a belief that no cattle could graze

rsuades them to march their cat-
le, along wii

qu






, depicts a





some pretty tough fighting and a
thunderous cattle stampede before
peace is restored and cattle and
sheep graze together,

I am not an ardent admirer of
Errol Flynn, but 1 enjoyed his per-
formance in this film, where his
acting is far more realistic than 1}
have seen hitherto, and in the role
of the hero—he has to use his
brains as well as his brawn. He
exchanges rapiers for pistols, and
seems to be equally proficient with
the latter, and of course, his horse.
manship is superb. Alexis Smith,
as the fiery haireq young woman
involved, whose _ disposition
matches her crowning glory is

adequately bitchy, and S.K. (Cud-
dles) f
comedy as a pedlar and perennial

Sakall supplies delightful

tenderfoot.

Incidentally, there are no Indi-
ans in this film, and I must admit

there is plenty of excitement, even

without the air being full of

whizzing arrows.
THE LISBON STORY

THE LISBON STORY showing
at the Aquatic Club was accord-
ing to all accounts, an exciting
play, but something seems to have
gone very much amiss where the
film is coneerned. To begin with,
it has been chopped up like a
piece of hamburger before ever
reaching these shores, and in
consequence, the abrupt transitions
from” one scene to another are
confusing and annoying. Apart
from this, the story is so compli-
cated that I have a feeling that
even the director got lost in its
maze, and how the main char-
acter ever remembered who he
was 5 ed to be—and at the
right me—is a mystery! The
story has to do with a British In-
telligence agent during the last
war, who seems to have difficulty
in persuading the French that
he’s on their side, and yet is re-
ceived with open arms by the
Germans when he informs them
he is, one of their secrets agents.
Fortunately for him, he remem-
bers who he is at the end, and
emerges with a whole skin, As
you can guess, the locale of thie
confusion is Lisbon.

David Farrar is a good actor,
but even he, ably assisted by the
glorious voice of the late Richard
Tauber, couldn’t save this film.
Pat Burke, who also sings, has a
charming voice, but her acting is
not up to the same standard.

Epstein Model
Gets A Haircut

A man whose statue will stand
outside the Dome of Discovery,
cn the South Bank Festival site,
has just been to the barber fox
the first time in months.

Shoulder-length hair was
needed for his job as a model for
Epstein’s new sculpture for the
Festival.

As yet the statue
man = striding

unnamed,
young
forward,

The model, Aubrey Grandon,
831, of Hyde Vale, Blackheath,
says: “It was Epstein’s wish that
I should grow my hair long.

“Passers-by stared at it in the
streets and friends nick-named
me the Red Indian.”

Mr. Grandon had to pose more
than 30 times.

London Express Service,



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TOO FEW CRICKETERS
ASKED TO PRACTISE

Why Is Mullins Left Out?
BY O. S. COPPIN

EST INDIES captain John Goddard has been

included in the twenty-eight players invited
by the Selection Committee of the Barbados Cricket
Association to practise for the forthcoming Inter-
colonial tournament that takes place here in Jan-
Â¥ uary-February next year.
Vie It is obvious that as long as John Goddard has
- participated in the selection of the twenty-eight
invitees and has himself stated his willingness to play in the tourna-
ment, that he will be the Barbados captain.

That follows as the night the day. But I am afraid that the
decisions of the Selection Committee do not follow however.
— I have never offered an apology for any criticism I

have ever made in these notes and hope never to be forced to do
so, yet I must make this observation that must not be taken in the
light of an apologia.

1 am a member of the Selection Committee of the Barbados
Amateur Football Association and so I am not unmindful of the
| meres and thankless job of a committee as such.



seismsesvennieasinassiniesitsiueintayserneusmennpnish-nsnisineaeialtisceetiaiiianasin



‘Clyde Walcott Hits;
Fine N.O.



Century

BOWLERS HAD GOOD DAY

FINE WEATHER favoured cricketers yesterday for the
first time in this series of First Division games, and a good

day’s play resulted.

Clyde Walcott, skipper of Spartan turned in the best
performance of the day by scoring a century against Lodge.
His team’s 214 for 7 wickets declared was the highest re-

corded in any game.

The four games opened yester-
day as the first day’s play was
completely washed out by rain.
In each game both sides batted,
and bowlers had quite a good day.
J. Williams of College and Edghill
of Carlton took six wickets each.

The games will be concluded on

Theretore if I criticise the Selection Committee of the Barbados | 5@turday next.

| Cricket Association on this particular issue, and I feel that I must,
Fr intend to be purely academic.

eight players.
tween Trinidad and Barbados, on the one harfid and Jamaica and Brit-
ish Guiana on the other hand will constitute Trial games for the 1951
West Indies tour to Australia.

That being the case it is intriguing that Barbados who have been
acclaimed as one of the leading sources of West Indies cricket
talent, should have found themselves in a position in which they have
invited only twenty-eight players to practise as against thirty-four





HE Selection Committee have invited, in the first place, twenty | Spartan (for 7 wits. dee.) ..
It is no secret that these intercolonial games be- | Lodse (for 1 wkt.)

SPARTAN vs. LODGE
218
3
s brillant i!+ mot out by the
rnational piajer Clyde Wal-
t of Spartan, \vas the highlight

inte

cot

of yesterday's piay in the match
between Lodge and Spartan at
College.

Spartan won the toss and bat-

in Trinidad, forty in British Guiana and as many or more in Jamaica. |ted on an easy-puced wicket, Most

NO INVITATION FOR MULLINS
HAT is most perplexing is the fact wat Carl Mullins, admitted-

ly, a force to be reckoned with in local pace bowling circles,
has not been invited. ,

of their batsmen, however, found
runs difficult to inake due to some
accurate and steady bowling by
the school boys. They lost their

The point that strikes me most forcibly about this is, that Carl |first four wickets with only 39
Mullins, when he was only an up-and-down rough ground pace bowler}runs on the board, but at this

in the Barbados Cricket League, was invited to practise, but since he |stage

has had the opportunity to play senior division cricket this season in

Walcott cume prominently
into the picture and stopped the

the Barbados Cricket Association competition with the Police First Di- | rot

vision team, it seems as if the members of the Barbados Cricket Selec-
tion Committee have failed to realise the benefit of the experience
which Mullins will have gained by playing first class. cricket on gr-
thodox wickets under conditions which have already been approved
by the Barbados cricket authorities as suitable for the staging of West

Indies cricket.
NOT SO RICH

O one could hope to convince me that the pace bowling depart-

ment in any proposed Barbados Eleven could be so rich as to
dispense, at least on paper, with the services of Car] Mullins.

It is true that he has not been eminently successful in the senior
division games in which he took part this season, But I feel that the
Barbados cricket authorities, if they could invite him in a series o!
trial games prior to the visit of the 1948-49 M.C.C, team to the West
Indies, then, all the more so should they have included him in this
list of invitees.

Mullins, who in my opinion, is one of the most promising young
iast bowlers in the West Indies to-day, should have been given a
chance to show nis wares,

FAIL to see too how L. F. “Shell” Harris of Spartan, and R. St, C.

Hutchinson of, Carlton and L. St. Hill of Wanderers were also
omitted, But I must commend the Selection Committee for including
young players like K. Bowen, Spartan’s slow right arm spin bowler,
A, Cave, Lodge and Empire's batting “find”, J. Williams and C. Smith
of College and K. A. Branker of Y.M.P.C.

A further criticism 1 must make is with regard to the inclusion of
B. Me Collin of the Barbados Cricket League. In a chat yesterday
with Mr, J. M. Hewitt I could learn nothing, nor did Mr. Hewitt know
at once of Mr. McCollin. He shared my view that the Selection Com-
mittee of the Barbados Cricket Association would have been better
served if they had in turn asked the Selection Committee of the Bar-
bados Cricket League to nominate whom they considered the best

possible candidace.
WHY NOT GODDARD?

CAN see ne reason why Kenneth Goddard of Telephone Club

should nui have been invited again.

Goddard bowled, fielded and batted comparatively well in his
first Intercolonial outing against Trinidad a year ago and on the
| strength of this he should have been invited to practise,
| If Trinidad can invite thirty-four players to practise, tish
| Guiana forty and Jamaica not less tMan forty, then why shou ar~
| bados limit themselves to twenty-eight players, when the Colony
justifiably claims that it holds a commanding position in West Indies

cricket to-day?
SO MUCH BOWLING TALENT?
ae in my opinion would be laying claim to an excellence
| in bowling talent which they do not really possess if they decide
that they can dispense with the services of Carl Mullins even if he
has not been shining on some atrocious wickets which he has met by
accident or design this season.
WILLIAMS IGNORED TOO

NOTICE that E. A. V. Williams has not been asked to practise.

I do not know whether he had been approached and has refused
but that is hardly likely seeing that he is still taking a most active
part with the Empire First Division team in their competition in the
senior division this season.

ihe memories of Barbados Cricket Selectors are notoriously
short and unfortunately they suffer from a disease that has confused
the terms “experienced” with aged.

i. A, V,. Williams, in my opinion, and this is shared by people
n the colony who are more competent to judge than I am, should
not only walk into a Barbados team today”as an all-rounder but he
should be able, on his merit, to demand his place in a West Indies
veam as well.

Trinidad and British Guiana have not made this mistake since
British Guiana have invited John Trim, Berkeley Gaskin and A. B.
Rollox, all older men than E. A. V. Williams to practise.

I am sure that Williams could well replace some of the nincom-
poops invited to practise for this forthcoming tournament.

Fortunately, the Selection Committee can go outside this pre-
scribed list and select players whom they consider up to Intercolonial
standard. 1 sincerely hope that they would make every use of this
fortunate safeguard.

LIGHT-HEAVYWEIGHT BOUT
ID FRANCIS and Kid Ralph, two well-known names in local
boxing circles, are billed to meet in the main event of a

programme to be staged at the Yankee Stadium on Tuesday night,
December 12,



Kid Ralph has been more in the public eye of late and has in|

four years disposed of all opposition both local and intercolonial in
the Welterweight and Middleweight division.

Now Kid Francis, who took the Middleweight Championship from |

Jack Montelle as far back as 1941 and who scored victory over such
with Kid Ralph,



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Most successful bowlers for the
school were Mr. McComie who
took 3 for 49 and Brookes 2 for 41.

C. Atkins ana N. Wood opened
Spartan's innings against the
bowling of pace bowlers Welch
and Brookes, These two bowlers
struck an early blow for their
side by dismissing two batsmen
before ten runs were hoisted. The
batsmen were Harris and Wood
who made 7 and “duck”, respec-
tively. Clyde Walcott then joined
Atkins, and the former, got three
successive boundaries to send the
total into double figures, A bowl-
ing change brought Lodge further
success, when Mr. MeComie, who
replaced Welch, cleaned bowled
Atkins, after sending down a mai-
den.

The score was then 29--3—12.
Pilgrim joined Walcott, but he
was quickly returned to the pavil-
ion. The half century mark was
reached, when Haynes, who had
joined Walcott, snicked one of
Mr. McComie’s deliveries through
slips for a couple, Play at this
stage became dull, as the batsmen
were contented to play some ac-
curate bowling, Walcott who was
now settled, delighted the crowd
with some. fine stroke play.

Half the side was out, when,
with the total at 84, Haynes
who had collected a _ patient
20, was bowled, while play-
ing back to a_ delivery from
Brookes. Four runs later, B. K.
Bowen, who was_sent.to the
wicket, was caught behind the
wicket, before scoring. Skipper
Glasgow brought back Mr. Mc-
Comie, as Morris came in to
partner Clyde Walcott, who was
well set and he reached his half
century, with a glide to leg for
a couple. Lunch was taken with-
out any further addition. On the
resumption the rate of scoring
increased as the batsmen began
to dominate the bowling and
soon 12 runs were passed. Skip-
per Glasgow, a spinner replaced
fast bowler Brookes, but he
received rough treatment especi-
ally by Clyde Walcott, who was
now having things his own way.

Walcott, scoring all around the
wicket moved quickly from 50 to
100 in spite of frequent bowling
changes. It was his first century
for the season. Morris his part-
ner then had a “go” and 12 runs

|



were added at the expense of
Hutchinson. He was bowled soon
after by Mr. McComie, his con-

tribution being 45. Seven wickets
had now fallen for 192. With the
score at 218 for 7, L. F. Harris,
deputy skipper in the absence of
K. Walcott, declared the innings
clased.

Going to the wicket Lodge
suffered an early loss, Hutchin-
son and Stoute played until time
call with the score at 8 for 1.

CARLTON vs. PICKWICK
Pickwick 81
Carlton (for 3 wkts.) .... 76
j G, Edghill, Carlton's number
one pacer, ran through the Pick-
wick team yesterday, taking 6 of
their wickets for 23 runs in 10
overs,

of these beautiful pens.
* IN BLUE, GREY,
MAROON, BLACK

a ‘

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WITH THE WORLD

ROOR J. KIRTON LTD. 2

JUST THE GIFT



FOR CHRISTMAS

If you want to gain credit for choosing a gift as
attractive as it is useful give Biroette to all your friends.
‘This slim elegant pen in any of four delightful colours
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|

Edghill was always accurate
and was getting a lot of pace out
of the well-surfaced wicket.

Pickwick, winning the toss de-
cided. to bat and were all out
shortly after lunch for 81 runs.
At the time of call, Carlton were
76 for 3 wickets. .

Best batting performance for
Pickwick was turned in by Har-
old Kidney who defied Carlton’s
attack for quite a while to score
24 runs. The only other Pick-
wick batsman to reach double
figures was B. Inniss, 10.

The day’s brightest batting
came from K. Greenidge and R
Hutchinson who scored 32 not
out and 28 not out respectively.

Pickwick sent their opening
pair G. Wood and Eric Edwards
to the wicket. Carlton’s attack
was led by pacers G, Edghill and
K, B. Warren.

The first two overs yielded 14
runs and it was at this stage that
Pickwick lost their first wicket.
Edghill, in the fourth ball of ) 3
second over, deceived and c!: |
bowled Wood for 8, T. S. Bi) ¢
joined Edwards.

Edwards Out

Three runs later, Edwards fol-
lowed Wood to the pavilion and
Edghill had struck the second
blow for Carlton. Edwards had
only got three when he was snap-
ped up by Marshall fielding at
silly mid-on, The score was 17
runs for two wickets.

Wickets then started to tumble
Without further addition to the
score, Taylor who came two down,
lost his hand to Edghill for
“duck.’”’ Taylor pushed his bat at
one wide outside the off-stump
and gave a good catch to C, Green-
idge at third slip.

Edghill had now taken three
quick wickets for 7 runs in 2
overs, 2 balls.

Birkett, who was not yet set-
tled, was joined by Harold Kid-
ney. His was the next wicket to
fall. He played forward to a fast-
ish one from Edghill and was ad-
judged lb.w. for 2, The score-
board read 28 runs for four wick-
ets.

H. A. King, the next man in,
was immediately returned by
Edghill. King flashed at an out-
swinger outside the off — stump,
did not connect properly and skied
the ball for K. Hutchinson at
cover to take a simple catch, Five
of Pickwick’s wicket were taken
for 23 runs and Edghill had done
all the damage.

Kidney, in the meanwhile, was
playing in his hand and punishing
the few loose balls,

Good Partnership

With Kidney and B. Inniss at
the wicket things looked better for
Pickwick. This partnership yield-
ed 32 runs. Z

They improved the rate of scor-
ing and 55 runs reached the tins
before Pickwick lost their sixtn
wicket,

K. Greenidge came into action.
He got Inniss to cut a slowish ball
into the safe hands of “Brickie”’
Lucas at gully. Inniss made i?
and Kidney was then 17 not out.

Skipper John Goddard anil
Kidney came together. John was
soon back in the pavilion for...
He played back to a good lengt”
ball from Edghill and played the
ball on to his stumps, Kidney
was run out a few balls later in
attempting to take a couple, He
was the team’s topscorer with 24.

The score was now 62 for 8,
with Jordan and Clarke holding
stubbornly for Pickwick.

They took the score on to 75
when the interval was taken.

After Lunch

On resumption, Warren clean-
bowled Jordan in his first over
after lunch for 7, Warren came
back the next over to dismiss
Clarke. for 7. Clarke cut ata
rising ball to give Lucas a catch
at gulley.

With E. L. G. Hoad, not out,
the Pickwick team was all out for
81. Carlton made use of only four

@ On page 5.

It gives easy

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, BROADWAY, PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD a)





















SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1950 ~

PLENTY OF PADDING
Many New Names On Entry List

For Christntas Meeting
BY BOOKIE



ONE thing that impresses immediately about the
entries for the Trinidad Christmas meeting is the
large number of horses that need not have been
entered. One is even tempted to say “should not
have been entered.”

Some years ago when 130 horses took a

i i i t a
this annual fixture it was evident tha’

South Caribbean had made considerable pe gry tol
that the number was considerably padded was — io A coo
later when entries for iehowins ae eee eet 2 a

-day the situation is similar wi he e2 °
* mais up the padding are er arcivals from Bog eed enna
; is expected that in the near Tu ’
7 this Ag one that nearly all will be entrants with some semblance

of a chance

However for the present it is unlikely that horses aces
rived from England only a few weeks ago will be wor - ones
and apart from noting the new — on the programme Ww y

iss without much comment. f
ve Time to the Governor's Cup once again we now bere ie en-
tries before us and to my surprise there are ee vas Pw
surprising is the absence of Orly. News from Trini . - gel
has leg trouble. This, I hope, will not be the en a oS st
have already said, he is a magnificent specimen and I am s = we
are due to see a great horse if and when he ever gets going in

best form.
i y there i f seven or eight
Nevertheless without Orly there is a hard core 0}
ie tr nineteet who will 4 — of eee 2 —
ace ittle uncertain abou ea .
gg Fa Caracas among the a ht cae er eee
would not have been sent over unless 1t D
aes good, This is Delhi and I know nothing of his (or her) on
it is clear ‘that 1 do not even know what the — is. ee
> likely winners until we .
must be counted among the like eet 7 rear ike
The other seven with the best chances si :
Streak, Elizabethan, Atomic 11, Gun Site, Ocean Pearl. Silver Bullet
and Rebate. I gave my reasons last week why I thought them the
best so we may leave them at this juncture. Perhaps when the exer-
cise gallops get warmer there might be some changes of opinion to be
made.

There is also no change in the situation about the Derby but what
interests me about it, now that the final entries have closed is the fact
that it will probably break the record for prize money set up last year
when Ocean Pearl won. This means that it will be worth well over
$4.500 to the winner, and if bred in ‘Trinidad the owner~-breeder will
receive over $5,000. Thus if Wavecrest is the eventual winner his own-
er can count on $500 more than the Jamaicans or Vincentians if they
win, Nevertheless it is possible that for the first time in the history of
racing in these parts a £1,000 stake will be paid out to the winner.
We will know definitely in a few weeks.

Something which has not failed to attract my attention is the
number of times that Bow Bells and Footmark have been mentioned
as respective winners of the Trinidad Breeders’ Stakes and the Jamai-
cen Derby. This is quite incorrect, of course. Bow Bells was beaten
in the Breeders’ last year, finishing unplaced, and Footmark was
beaten in the Jamaican Derby by Mark Twain et al. In fact Footmark
has not won one classic in his home country. I hope that by the
time the forecasting for the races comes to be written the poor public
will not be served up with large headlines, that the Jamaican and
Barbados Derby winners are about to clash in the Trinidad classic.

_In the entries for B class races I see two old stagers have been
revived after a long absence. First of these is War Lord and for the
first time he will be racing as a whole Trinidadian. Previously he was
owned in Trinidad and trained in Barbados and we therefore num-
bered him among our contingent. But he is now owned and trained
in Trinidad. Incidentally he will be Mr, Trestrail’s leading candidate
now that Orly has been withdrawn. Nine years old and still going
strong. Very good going indeed for the old son of O.T.C. and Pique.

The other staging a come back is Devon Market.
ported to"be going well but this has happened before so we must be
careful how we view him. Nevertheless his trainer, Johnny Marcel,
has brought back some good ones like Just Fair and Sherwood Archer
in his time so we might see Devon Market recapture his form of two
years ago. If so we shall be in for some good sprint races both in
B class and A class during the course of the meeting.

He is also re-

in fact there seems to be such a number of good sprinters on the
programme that the six furlong races will turn out to be more evenly
coniested than the distances. There Lady Pink. Jolly Friar, White
Company, Foot Mark, Vindima, Ocean Pearl, Balandra, Devon Market
and War Lord, all in A or B. In addition there is also Tuffley Bell
who is a winner of sprint races in England although being one of
the recent arrivals, she might be one of those whom we have to count
out of the picture.

NEW STALLION BOUGHT

The Barbados Turf Club has again earned the plaudits of all
West Indian breeders by purchasing last week the horse Star Witness
for stud duties here. By Fair Trial out of Speckle, by Solario out of
Post Mark, by Friar Marcus, Star Witness won five races in good
company in England in the last four years among which was the
Wilburton Handicap at Newmarket worth some £900. In this race.
as a three year old, he carried the heavy weight of 133 lbs.

The rest of his form and particulars about his breeding will come
later but on what I can see from the above he has some very strong
lines on his dam’s side. His dam and grand dam it should be noted
are by Solario and Friar Marcus respectively and the latter in particu-
lar was noted as a sire of good brood mares. When I have gone into
the family history thoroughly I shall deal with them again.

Meanwhile now that it is clear that we are set for big things in
the breeding of thoroughbred race horses in Barbados, and with as
many as seven stallions standing here it would be wise if we paid
some attention to the husbanding of more brood mares. In this con-
nection I must once again reiterate the suggestion that the B.T.C.
should do something about importing mares as well as the horses
which they now purchase to offer as consolation prizes.




Every time I speak to some planter who keeps horses on his
lantation I am again assured that there is a demand for thorough-
red mares at reasonable prices. But the prices which are asked for

mares (most of them former consolation prize horses) when they are
finished racing out here is out of all proportion to what they would
have fetched if they had retired from racing in England. In the end
a number of them are sold out of the island because no one here is
willing to pay the price. Why not therefore buy a few mares at the
sales in England and sell them at cost price to purchasers who the
B.T.C. could have ready listed as persons willing to take them? I can
see nothing in this plan to be afraid of. It is well to remember that
many a dam of classic winners has been sold for £50 or less and more
urgent still to consider that we cannot keep a lot of stallions and
have only a few mares to send to each.



4 4 a

“ss J Aabes

BRILLIANTINE & HAIR CREAM




to highlight your
crowning glory

sO a SM
ae x i RRM hk
\



Eo
By BOURJOIS

}
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1950



SUNDAY



Ist XI Cricket

SCOREBOARD



ADVOCATE

M.C.C. Drew Game



DEC. 10

NO. 149

PAGE FIVE



wie es SPARTAN vs. LODGE L. Harris 8 ~ :
now ers. SPARTAN—Ist Lonings M. Murrell ¢ Millington b King 0 ;
Carlton was to the wicket by A- Atkins b Mr. McComie 12 Extras 10 4 e Opic
4.10 pam. E, W. Marshall and F. ( Harris b Brookes." 7 i
BS a i: ae ie arris b Brookes 7 Total 1s
Hutchinson were sent to receive C. Walcott not out Be ONO ac a Re a ueens anc ”
the new ball from pacers H. King Cc. Pilgrim c Glasgow b Mr. McComie 4 Fall of wickets 1 fop 1, 2 for 1. 3 of

A. Haynes b Brookes 21

and R. Clarke. They lost three x:

Bowen c (wkpr. b Welch

. 0 122, 8 f a ‘or
quick wickets. > a b Mr. McComie a5 " aarti ANAL YSsIs
Carliton’s first wicket fell at 7 oe v mM FR Ww I
L i E. Smith and Qiinaior : ec
Hutchinson moved into his wicke. K Wolcott did not bat reg 7 . = is LAIADON, Dec. 4
t _King. ai not get a touch and xtras 5 King eee 8 8 RAIN which played such an important part in the first | ast Week
was giv , r 8 Alleyne 5 - ‘ . ,
= Gove oat Mw, See Total (for T wkts.) decid.) .. 218 Que’ 2s Test match on this ground serkaey interfered with the
ios wan eee ae _ Fall of wickets: 1—3, cae nobin ee TERE, Lt INNINGS ‘ M.C.C.’s match against Queensland although the State side
: s . . s 39; 5—78; 7 * © Robinsor ou : ‘
given out Lb.w to Clarke. MY 8 BOWLING ANALYsis ©. Grant b Murrell ¢ _ attained the better of @ draw. Alka-Seltzer brings pleasant relief
With the score at10 for 2 o mm rn w. V- Babb } Sealy 8 Se i ee ee This match, the match of the .
7 yf + Welch ; W- © Cave not out 17 Sean ; : ‘
Skipper Hutchinson went to part- Brookes site S — ° rr wee notable for four fine in- When you need First Aid fast for the ,
ner Marshall. Five runs later Wilkie i 0m 8 “* M 88 D oe eee by Bedser, pains of a headache, take Alka-Seltzer Tubes of
Marshall was nicely caught in the Sacomle 16 2 “8 a Total (for 2 wkts.) _” ° ie ra per Washbrook and Dew es Its bubbling, effervescent action helps 12 & 30 tablets.
slips by Inniss off King, Hutchinson 3 9. M8 sFan of wickets: 1 for 9, 2 for 37 aa =e magnificently on the first Alka-Seltzer’s pain-relieving agent to
Tem 15 for 3, R. Hutchinson LODGE—Ist Insines BOWLING ANALYSIS “Va atc y. otter Guesnsland had won go to work fast. Not a laxative—y
: F. Cheeseman b C. Walcott 0 M R Wz the toss and elected to bat, Bed te Pees S Hane ye ypu er
and K. Greenidge took the score Stoute not out .. 2 smith ‘- 8 = and Warr had all the bats = take Alka-Seltzer at ANY time. Drop
on to 76 without further loss. F. Hutchinson not out 1 Murrell t's (a 2 ° Mr eee ee , .
The t : Beaty :. aoe QUEENSLAND, Dec. trouble and eight wickets were une or two tablets in a glass of water
ae = ae ae a ye ve Total (for 1 wkt.) 8 Collins g a oe The Marylebone Cricket Club down for 216. Of these Carrigan Watch it fizz and dissolve into a spa
2, st for the day. After z tourists drew their two days who was dropped when only 13. | Kling, pleasant-tasting
. ; ses ) 3) . , & drink. |
they had got their eyes in, they BOWLING ANALYSIS Cone BGE Vs. WANDERERS | match with the Queensland Coun- made exactly 100 | x4 t
were going for the ball and runs Walcott eg By OF WANOEREMG (fer 3 wai oo 6 try = XI. to-day when after dis 4 eee
were coming easily. Falls m, 2 $8 COLLEGE ist INNINGS missing the local side for 220 iv Unfortunately, the M.C.C. cou } f Y
: d
Both 7 P ‘all of wickets: 1—4 cw.s ; | ‘ a.
th Hutchinson and Greenidge PICKWICK vs. CARLTON ply, Smith ¢ (wk! Skinner b reply to their own score of 426 not press home this advantage We went to Queen's Park T ey
were undefeated at close of play PICKWICK'S Ist INNINGS Mr. Gittens ¢ Peirce b WN. iMarshali ig $0, 6 wickets declared, they And after one day's play had been Twas Exhibition Yay a ¥. Sa ee ) ae
for 28 and 32 respectively. a wood b Edghill : a C. Bisckman bw, D. Atkingon .. —— again gna scored 204 fo: lost through rain, Queensland re- Ana ail the people turned out 0 be E
; is ¢ Marshall b Edghill Mr. S, Headley run outy....... 7 wickets declared, suming on the Monday , ooking quite smart and ga MILES LABORATORIES INC! Sv s
T. S$ Bitket " 3 . . r ¢ x ' 8 e Monday morning - . . 5 Ladin. eee
EMPIRE vs. COMBERMERE a x. Taylor ¢ Creetin. 6 Baghili 4 “te eben ccReer is ; The follow-on was not enforced added 89 runs for the last two Some wore those sweeping dress: -
Combermere ............ 139 «i Kidney run out ,D mdgnil | MM. Mayers B Petes clint. ¢ im deference to the home captain wickets, That take a mile of voile
Empire (for 2 wkts.) 69 ge td ce R. Hutchinson, ¢ E. Hope 1.b.w. D. Atkinson 4 who wanted the local spectators Tic Wee % needie workers
After winning the toss Com- ™-_Iniss ¢ N.S. “Luicas, b K oo ene eae) Spee > to have another look at the tour- , ae addition of runs by the © went through all ‘the toil. |
bermere sco 3 ot C Gites... ee aoe 4 ists batting. Douglas Wright hai Willenders was another blow to the — The scallops and the trimming
runs in their 10 C. Thorpe b D. Atkinson 4 M.¢ ’
first innings, on a perfect wicket 1. @“sard,? Ail SS ae or cro. 2. the exbelient fguren of 5 wickets — --\. Prestige ahd certainly: took Worn by a certain girl
against Empire at Bank Hall = >" oo 2 arren 7 N. Simmons not out s . -@ for 52 runs in 16.4 overs during * 8 much of the glory of their Waseaie wheat the long dress {
». : “ : a . bys al te el ‘ ¢ Joe's hair curl j
yesterday, the second day of © l.G.Hoad not out Ass oe # the Country team’s first innings. °°"!!! performances re etn. ® e
their first division cricket match Extras; 11 b.,2.b.4w..2nb. 19 Total 5 A feature of the Marylebone's Ww But boys, it_was a tetas
" . , ob. Banat i a or 4 mor
Rain prevented any play on the Total | » —— second innings batting was a orse With four firsts to their credit
first day. When stumps were UU 1 Fall of wickets; 1 for 26, 2 for 43, hectic unbroken 8th wicket stand

were

for 1, 4 for 60, 5 for yi, 5 for Fe, 7 tor
2, 10 for 133



3
for 44, 4 for 69, 5 for 80, 6 for 80. 7 for

(From Our London Correspondent)

But worse was to follow. Before



Now place them miles ahead
‘ . -

Ps























drawn Empire in reply had Pall of wickets; > | as 3 of 66 between Trevor Bailey and
scored ets; 1 for Id, 2 for 17, 85, 8 for 88, 9 for 95 : : > clos ay - ; ; .

@ suas a the he of two %,!9%,1% 4 for 23, 8 tor 23, 6 iH, ©, $ for 2 eS soe Wright, Bailey being not out 63 aaa pjose of play Hutton, Simpson 42. #R famous Sait bread oO e sure .
wickets. OF BOWEN ‘Sivakysad GM. Rw. when the dectaration came and Davition with only 106 rane on the Tyee, and Low and Robe de

For Combermere Mr. S. Smith eal ai Gage Sey ed n 3 18 1 4there was not sufficient time to poard— this again 6 runs on the Twas not a great surpris«
who went at number four in the &: Bdghill ® 3 2 6 OD. Atkinson 124 3 19 4 Mallow the home side to bat ayein 45), i ee ee Deere SOM ’ I Salt |
batti ; K. B. Warren 9 3 15 2 R. Marshall cs 4 . Reuter. aining not one bowler good For if vor eat this Salt bread
an ie | oy aes — an K. Greenidge ........ 5 2 7 1. T. Peirce ee a. enough to get into the first Aus- er suniply good and grand
a cuve Jy . uarless 31, N. S. Lucas ..... oy G. Toppi 5 amt, aie PT ee : traliar - 4 ou'll want no other Salt bread
while opening batsman Mr. G. , CARLTON’S ‘Ist INNINGS” WANDERERS Ist INNINGS Ba bad S ndin h Test team Nowhere throughout thie land )
Sealy scored a patient 26. Bowl- - Boel ¢ Tomes b King 1 =O aie ¥ J we tt rr Os e. t 8 A fighting innings by Cyril Next first prize was plain Sweet bre |
ing honours went to H. “King the N. S. Lucas 1.b.w. Clarke ER ane ER pl Washbrook who was undefeated —p,The ,breed vou must enjo |
a oe tae Empire spinner 2+ Hutchinson not out 28D. Atkinson c Hope b H. Simmonds 1 16 Horses To ime 44 at the close saved the Pik cry ts “onore bend bo
who took five wickets for 47 reenidge not out 32 §E. Atkinson b J, Williams 0 M.C.C, from worse collapse t . e a ee

. : 7 Extras 2 5 s Pse but :
runs a , , a ‘ 2 A. Skinner not out 4 Denis . 4 . Next first . an i heat: tae
Tall Tene ane over 16 overs, 2. Atkinson b J. Williams 3 T. ole Meet . t ; iL eee had, for him, the And this’ you ought to x ow

a rro illington bowled a Total (for 3 wkts.) 76 Wilkes b J. Williams ‘ isual experience of being barrack- 11 is the loaf that strength«
ee length to take four for 39 EMPIRE ys. COMBERMERE Extra 1 (abla Gur Gen Coreeonteit ~ tor slow play His 28 runs All children while they grow

ever anticipation was shown COMBERMERE Ist INNINGS PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec. 7 which included one six straight E
. : Mr. G. Sealy c rn : Total (for 7 wkts.) 69 “VE— ‘ c.f. = ‘ & igh Next first soe st

By M. Jones who kept wicket for 4" Wilkin-on tow. b Millington * eee ee - sci Among the 16 Barbados horses “'!ven off McCool occupied 101 ‘That lovely wedding Cak

mpire when he stumped Smith, G. Grant b Millington 0 Fall of wickets: ' for 22, 2 for 28, that have entered for the T.T.C minutes, with one other boundary It was something quite similar
Algeria, ond nena, ain Mr. 8. Smith stpd. (w.k. Jones) b 3 for 39. 4 for 46, 9 for 61, 6 for 65. Christmas meeting which opens thrown i as his only worthwhile That tled Joe to the stake

be . ealy an ilkinson 5 to hee tune : ‘ 36 7 for at the Queen's Bk Savannat scoring stroke,
; R. Quarless 1.b.w. b Milli 1 4 BC + ANALYS z _ 4 in Lou stood up with amazement

opened the batting for Comber- 6) Beckles b Millington . SOWLING ANALYSIS | w,. on December 26; is “Bow Bells”, And this she calmly said i
mere against the pace bowling of i. Licorish stpd. (w.k. Jones) b King 4 J. Williams 14 4 «38 «66 «6.1949 Breeders’ Stakes winner. No It was left to Washbrook and Even. the judges own that
oa and Barker. Wilkinson €: Sotkise sted. w.k. dongs) biking © ‘C. Wi 'Bmitn 8 + 1% 1 fewer than 193 animals have Dewes, the overnight not-out 3:0 Fe OREM ie Peg bread

= a grace | of the first aoa oae ee ns ny \ = been entered altogether. The batsmen, to save the MCC from Yes boys you ean believe \
over from Millington and in his resistance to the steady bowling Williams hit the wickets of all Previous highest was 130. further disgrace on the fourth and =, We _-say_ it very plain t
second ball Wilkinson was given of Millingto ; last day. Together they put on 2xtime you judge J. & KR. Bread
out leg before to Millington. G. up, and C a on King was put six batsmen whom he got out. 106 batdre Tiwoles died. me Twill win first prize aga

. . , a ombermere ended their The only batsman who played his . » Mewes had to retire ;

Grant followed and with the first
ball he took—the third in Milling-

Tennis Results

Those bakers got the sec

a sae at 133. bowling with any show of ease, with an attack of cramp They don't bake “witt burst



ton’s first over—he w ) e ; an hour's play left and that not convincingly, was TWO games of tennis were Washbrook took his score to 81 9 They tke the time and trouble

beaten Sg bowled etere te with cpanes their first innings Wanderers’ opening bat, Norman played at the Barbados Yacht before being yorked iy dehkeean aR Rees

had a chance to score. force taking: dee ay _ Marshall who , made more than Club yesterday. They were: and then Dewes, returning, play So when you eat J. & R Bread
Mr. . Smith then came in ana {rmer taking the first ball from half his team’s total. Marshall Men's Singles (Finals) ed his way into the Test tearm by rat's why in every housthold

he played out the remainder of pressively was Salen wit his made 41 which included a six E. P, Taylor defeated D, E. Scoring a valiant 117 before being J. & R. Bread's not enough

the over. Sealy and Smith then score was four by Murrell after boundary. It was off Williams’ Worme 6—4, 6—0, 2—6, 6—3. last out when trying to gein first . °

Pratt 3 ps i x - i . nnings leac The daddy and the mum
began to play cautiously taking he played over a yorker.’ Babo bowling that Marshall took his Ladies’ Doubles innings jeac ee ontianan. aril ‘cones

short runs between the wicket. pa vi Six. He followed up that stroke Mrs. D. E. Worme, and Miss E 4 J. & R. Bread ty the best bread
nF Wee bbs tonre nad reeset by Sealy ee ae eee with a two, but was bowled, by the Worme defeated Mrs. C. Skinner van ee wae oo ie rs st To enjoy. with morning tear
‘the first ball. ieee Allaveve in his en ee Babb scored 8. gt Ag was given a .s Mrs. C. 6. Lae, Sek, Ft. this year "dae be toasted "4 sai Wrapnne for ver! rotegtion ® ser
% it 7< r r —2. . _ . - , t's freshness it will keep
first over for the day missed the tthe tea Ghee po age Mie “life” at 4 when he went through MONDAY’S TENNIS learn that when the last man Ho! And when the Kiddie ce. it makes a tidy dif erence to your hair
ball and was nicely stumped vy joined Robinson and they doth Sipe ih the eekly pees ef Wee Mixed Doubles they be hae eee ee eM es
aurice Jones, arless follow- i derers’ batting and was dropped ; g + pat- an he has taken wickets, cam 30 Chris: 8 two wee ° leree ‘ rh ’
ed _and soon Sealy fell a victim jenock. mak the Nid ut pike by Thorpe. He then went on in mig = Mise 'B. Benjamin aa in, Dewes was still 18 short of hi Sot co ote in abu ee Let Brylereem look afiex your hair and you're bound

to King when he gave Millington
who was fielding at second slip
a fine catch. He scored 26. Beck-

Send in your orders early

century It seemed the is
1 nat his For J. & R. first prize bread

chances of reaching it were slight
but Hollies, in what for him ranks

to benefit—for Brylcreem gives your hair this double benefit.
(1) Day-long smartress.

a fair manner until he failed to
play the ball from Williams.
Out of College’s 95, C. Black-

they were undefeated with

Robinson 31 and Cave 17.
COLLEGE vs. WANDERERS

E A. Benjamin.
Ladies’ Doubles (Finals)

hit cn cal te aS coe bate’ College . 95 man topscored with 28 and C, W. oe rare ee rae ne oh “e oe weed his ground sponsored by (2) Lasting hair health,
ORCC meer, tt oe et errs . " ! ' fe as not ou ree i i : i » oH we
lunch the century went up on the Wanderers (for 7 wkts. 69 Smith made a useful 20. D. At- Misc E. Worme. when Dewes was finally J&R BAKERIES ! Besides setting the hair naturally, Brylereem with

caught

tins when Beckles drove a ball _ IN an unbroken bowling spell of ee iat Seah aoe Men’s Doubles on the boundary its pure emulsified oils kceps the roots

from Alleyne for a brace. 14 overs, College's fast bowler J. ‘ F. H. E, Thorne and A. O. V makers of | and promotes natural hair-growth. D ' }
After lunch both boys continued Williams yesterday took six Wan- copes: ., Skinner vs D. I. Lawless and When Queensland batted again, / or ya adr ; "a Br » é

to bat freely and the partnership derers wickets for 38 runs. Wan- ollege won the toss and elected 3; 1,, Toppin. with any hope of a definite result ENRICHED BREAD ANG LignGrue Epate Uecaine Ones oO ne coe
was broken when Beckles derers scored 69 runs for the loss ‘£0 bat on the good wicket. C. W 7. A. Gittens and C. R. Packer out of the question, Warr for the the past when you Brylcreem your hair ( baad /
was deceived by the flight of seven wickets in reply to Col- Smith and Mr. S. O. C. Gittens, ys Dp, BE. Worme and D, Atkinson. second time on this tour, took a and the blenders of ® Ask for Brylcreem, it es hair litt , sols my |
of a ball from Millington lege’s 95 in their first innings the opening batsmen went out to Ww .H. I. Stevenson and E. P. wicket with his first ball and r oy ||
was bowled for 18. After Working himself up to a territic tackle Wanderers attack of Nor- pades vs Dr. C. G. Manning and when stumps were drawn the > j

this partnership ne further pace, and seeming not to tire, @ on page 16 M. E. P. Taylor. State side had scored five for one J&R RUM ENTRIES age ie

say, 't

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PAGE Six

—



oe AC me mate ae



BRITISH NOVELISTS:

— HENRY GREEN

Hy TVerrace Kilmartin

Henry-Green is an interesting
and distinetive figure on the
English literary scene—but an
unobtrusive one. Although he is
well into his 40’s, and has been
writing for over 20 years, he
widely known; and yet. few
novelists now arouse more
nterest and attention in literary
circles. Since the appearance
his first hovel in 1926, each new
book has revealed some new
aspect of a curious and impres-
sive talent. He is not a flawless
writer — he is too audacious an
experimentalist for that: some-
times he disappoints one, but
more often he captivates entirely,

not

and always he has something
original to «fer
It is not easy to define these

strange and fascinating novels,
but the beginning and the end ot
one of them Loving, may provide
oe “Once upon a day =e
e opening phrase of the story
and this is how it closes: “Over
there, in England, they were
married and lived happily ever
after”. It is almost the classi
formula of Perrault. Green's
novels might in fact be described
as fairy < stories—highly sophisti-
cated fairy stories in a realistic
modern -getting. But there is a
good deal more to them than that
description would imply. No other
English .writer has dealt more
convincingly with the world of
the proletariat—an interesting anq
surprising fact in view of Green's
upper-class background. The ex
planation: can be found in his
fascinating autobiographical study,
Pack My Bag, published in 1938

Son of a rich family with in-

dustrial yr hn and country
property, — Green’s upbringin
followed 2a familiar "Seueree

expensiveâ„¢ preparator school,
Bion, and then Oxford. ‘The sensi-
tive, precocious schoolbo ‘Ows
into the intelligent artistic Sieth
who already, before leaving Eton,
was writting poems and had even
started a novel. A life of agree-
able idleness, of literary dilettan-
tism, seemed to suggest itself. But
no: On lea Oxford Henry
Green went to work in his
father’s factory in Birmingham. It
was the time of the General Strike.

Obsessed _ with -
aa or aul i & vague feel
class Green could t, I e. 5
“look a labourer in tap tao.”
Social disturbed hiin;
but instead of launching into
left-wing politics like so maay
other young men of his type, he
decided “to see for myself how
by far the most t part of



the population in England lives—
to work in a factory with
Plump wet hands.”

The experience thus gained has
played a big part in Green’s
development as a novelist, The
principal characters in most of his
books are working people, and al-
though dialect is notoriously diffi-
cult to reproduce, Green can
recapture with extraordinary
fidelity the lilt and cadence o
Cockney and Midland speech, But
this is only one aspect of his ver-
satile talent. He is by no means
a straight-forward naturalistic
writer, but a deeply conscientious
artist who can combine realiyn
with an oddly distinctive kind ‘of
poetic fantasy Poet of Fear is the
title of a short monograph on
Green which appeared recently in
a literary review,
Suggest something of the pre-
dicament in which his characters
are usually placed—the vague
perplexities and disquietudes that
oppress the individual in a too-
romplicated, enigmatic, disconcer-
ting world. In this respect, Green
reminds one of Kafka, but the
setting of his bizarre tragi-
comedies is at once more realistic
and more poetic. And Green has
an exquisite sense of the comic

my



STOCKED 8Y ALL

AGENTS=~ E. A.

Lower Broad

of

DE
306 Plantations Wuilding

Street,

—a shy, subtle ob ique humour
As a stylist he is no less im-
pressive. Buffon’s famous maxim
was never more applicable; “The
style is the man himself”, an in-
tegral pert of his work. He can














fashion and adapt to, vecord
with the changiny anibience of his
novels. Sometimes ! prose is of

almjest biblical simplicity; else-
where the yihms nd the
texture are far ieher At
first, he seems h modelled
his style on the °G ie Stein.
Later, the influence of ce, and
even Proust, shows . But
the writing is always individual,
and in spite of certain rather ir-
ritating mannerisms, at his best
Green can achieve effects of start-
ling and original beauty

Already, in his first two novels

Bti $, published in 1926





when he was still-at Oxford, and



—

:
i|


ARTIE’S HEADLINE






“ Your sudden discovery that
L look just like Jean Simmons
will not make me change mg
mind—1 will not sepele a
thread of eoston!




Living, three

which r €
years later—these striking quali-

appeared

ties were apparent. The first is
the story of a youth suddenly
struck blind—an analysis of the
complex emotions of a man “im-
prisoned in a rudimentary part
of life’ and his efforts to adapt
himself to this condition. With all
its faults of style and structure
(it was written before the author

was yet 20) Blindness is never-
theless the reflection of a remark-
ably precocious talent. Living
(1929) is a far maturer work.
Apart from its “documentary”

value—it is one of the best des-
‘riptions of industrial life yet
written—this novel is impregnat-
ed with poetry and a sense of the
beauty that exists in the most
commonplace things, the most
seemingly banal situations,



Party-Going, which appeared
in 1939 after a.silence of 10 years,
is a novel of quite a different
type--a sly,,evocative fantasy, A
groupeé@f young, people are off on
holiday to Franéé Fog delays

them at Victoria station, and they
are trapped in the hotel. There
a strange little comedy of man-

ners is plaved out while the fog
envelopes the station and an
angry crowd besieges the hotel.
All is mysteriously symbolic, and
the story leaves an odd. rather
ghostly after-taste

With his fourth novel, Caugnt
(1943), based on his experiences
in the National Fire Service
during the blitz on London, Green
returns to the proletarian back-
ground and quasi-documentary
style of Living. But the plot is
a good deal more complex, and
the tone more tragic. Accidental
incest, lunacy and suicide all play
their part in a story set against

a sombre and disquieting back-
ground of war :
Two years later came Loving,

which is perhaps his masferpiece.



LEADING STORES.









JAMIN LTD.




Harbados



Here comedy re-asserts itself,
notwithstanding the almost arbi-
trary misfortunes that befall some
of the characters, their vague
anxieties and ludicrous misunder-
standings. In this delightful
novel Green's gift for authentic
dialogue is seen at its best. The
principal characters are beauti-
fully drawn, with a humane
sympathy mixed with gentle
irony. And the style is marvel-
lously adapted to the subject
matter. The protagonists are the
English sorvants in a castle in
Ireland — Charley Raunce, the
butler. loquacious, despotic and
sentimental; Albert, the bewilder-
ed pantry-boy disturbed by adol-
escent desires; Mrs. Welch, the
drunken cook; and the two pretty,
giggling, amorous housemaids
The castle gardens are peopled
with doves and peacocks, which
pop up at every turn, creatures
of the erotic symbolism that un-
derlies the story. It is a world
at once very real and strangely
magical. The birds, the soft green
landscape seen through the high
Gothic windows, the picnic on the
beach, the evenings in the rain—
from all this Green has produced
2 masterpiece of poetic prose.

Neither of the two subsequent
novels attains the perfection of
Loving. Back (1946) is the story
of a wounded man returning from
ihe war: it deals with his rehab-
ilitation in civilian life, his neu-
roses, his sense of isolation. Again
the documentary touch, and a
plot which hinges on a series of
misunderstandings and _ coinci-
dences. But somehow the hero's
tragi-comic predicament fails to
move one to the extent of the ear-
lier stories.

Concluding, Green's most recent
book (published in 1948), is puz-
zling and perhaps a little disap-
pointing, though stylistically it
marks a considerable advance on
its predecessors. The setting is
novel; the action, such as it is
limited to a single summer day
in a rather nebulous future. The
principal character is an aged
scientist who lives with his grand-
daughter, a pig and a goose in
the grounds of a large country
mansion which has been trans-
formed into a _ state-run girls’
training college. The grand-
daughter is passionately in love
with a young teacher at the col-
lege, and the old man is torment-
ed by the intrigues of the college
directors, two rather frightening
spinsters Who want to get him re-
moved from his cottage. At the
yutset, two of the girls have dis-
appeared. One is found, but the
other never returns. Slowly the
day draws to a close. There is a
ball; the old scientist attends, his
grand-daughter too. But nothing
happens; none of the problems
resolve themselves; all is ambigu-
ous, haunting, enigmatic. There
is a dreamlike quality about this
book, a sense of mystery, of im-
pending doom.,.and a suggestion
of erotic fantasy... It is beautiful-
ly written, and the atmosphere is
evoked with consummate crafts-
manship — the long summer day,
the quivering heat, the clusters of
azaleas and rhododendrons, the
bewitching host of jeunes filles en
fleur. But the characters on the
whole never quite come alive,
and the general effect is vaguely
dissatisfying.

It would be fascinating but idle
to speculate on where Henry
Green is likely to go from here.
He is a singularly unpredictable
writer At 44, he should be at
the prime of his creative life, but
precocious talents are prone to
early decline, and for all one
knows, Green may already have
shot his bolt. Ong thing is cer-
tain, whatever unexpected fruits
he may offer us in the future—
his position as a genuine if un-
orthodox exponent of the art of
the English novel is already safe-
ly assured







SUNDAY ADVOCATE



SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1950









ANY HUSHAND=TO ANY WIFE: 4 amma , —
9 e % Introducing - - - i |
can't give you \ «tm mun | \
* DOMESTIC IRON” | Y

. anything but
love, dear..

By... FEY M. HAWKE

SOMEBODY from Wales —
bless her—commenting on how
humiliating it is for women to
be so dependent on their hus-
bands, proposes that men be
compelled by law to give their
wives a reasonable part of their
earnings.

This isn’t a new suggestion.

I wouldn't mind laying a bet
that the first female who got
clubbed over the head and
dragged into a cave by primitive
man, to skin wild bears and cook
his meals for him for the rest of
her life, at one time or other dug
her teeth into his hand and
screamed: Just what do I get
out of this, chum?”

I think I know what she got
too. Just another crack over the
head.

It must have been a terrific
whack too. It successfully knocked
the spirit out of women for thou-
sands of years, if not for all time.

Without any more talk of
award, they knuckled down and
scrubbed and cooked and swept
and darned. And darned well still
go on doing it.

On the ‘run’

MEN have been clever about
this. They said, in effect. “We'll
#0 out to work, darling — and

you'll run the home.”

The operative word was “run”
—and women have been run off
their feet from morning to night
ever since. It was women,
undoubtedly, who inspired the
title for us of the human race. . .

As it turned out, they were in
fact expected to be super-human
—— to keep going not only every
day, all week, but likewise Sat-
.tdays and Sundays.

Too true, the injustice of hav-
ing all work and no pay is
matched by the fact that no trade
union insists that wives should
down tools at 5.30 p.m.—or be
sacked!

--- and no pay
I IMAGINE

most wives’ idea
of heaven would be a sort of
golden’ door which they couid
bang on their work on Saturday
and forget about till Monday
morning — just like their hus-
bands’ office dor.

In our earthly paradise, if a
wife bangs the front door sh2
knows she'll be cyening it again
in about half an hour, either

MONK’S



A white cowled monk, working
at a potter’s wheel, is reviving an
art which may not only bring
dollars to Britain, but make the
monastery—that of Mount Saint

Bernard, in Charnood Forest—
famous for its medieval repro-
duction stoneware,

The potter is Father Vincent

Eley, who has been at this Cister-
cian Abbey for nearly 20 years.
He studied 14th century pottery,

writing to museums for informa-
tion, and then began to experi-
ment,

An archaeologist to whom ex-
amples of his work were showa
Was convinced they were genuine-
ly medieval. Two formulae for
glazing which he discovered have
been adopted by a pottery firm

Father Vincent spends four ot

WORK LOOKS
600 YEARS OLD

IT MAY EARN DOIiLARS





Burns ordinary Kerosene
—} pint gives 4 hours
normal ironing.

Simple and safe to op-
erate, can be lighted and
used by any inexperi-
enced person.





because she has to go in and cook
the dinner, or clean the front
step, or let the dog out or the cat
in, or possibly just let herself in
beeause a heavy basket is about
to drag her arms out of their

sockets,
you imagine any typist

Special Easy-Grip,
Heat-Proof.

Handle with thumb rest.

Light it and do your
ironing quickly ard
without drudgery.

40?

Stop over-forty overstrain!

Headaches, indigestion, lack cfenergy, inability '
to concentrate, aré often the consequences of
i the physical and nervous strain caused by over-
: work and worry. To restore your digestive and
metabolic tone, strengthen your nerves and
increase your energy, start taking Phyllosan

Can
applying for this job? :—

Wanted: A lady to work from
7 a.m. till bedtime. No weekends
off. Food supplied. Live in. Clothes
provided. If employee has any
spare cash to buy them. No pay.

Wouldn’t they queue up?

Also a supply of - - -
Old clo’s man

Tilley Lamp &





LLL PELE LLP LLL LAL APLLP PPLE

BEFORE my own marriage, I



‘,
Ss
o
s
remember visiting a young wife & tablets to-day! Just two tablets three
and listening. to her haggle at Lanterns x times a day before meals, but if you
2 } .
man for half a crown for a pair Manufactured in England } take the tablets regularly, the '
of her part-worn shoes. : ee, Tesults will astonish you. «ex
1 advised her, in all ignorance, }
never to have any truck witn A. S. HUSBANDS, $|
these second-hand door mer- Agent : % {
chants. * wi
“How else do you suppose,” she see x
asked, “that I would ever have Babbs ::: St. Lucy X
any money? Wait till you are y fortifies the over-forties
PSS SSS SSO SSO OSSD.

a poor wife. You'll sell your
shoes to buy stockings, and a few
weeks later you'll be trying to
sell your stockings to buy shoes,”

All that's left

WHAT can we do?

Our money goes on food, the
laundry (in fact, so much on
the laundry there isn’t much for
food), and on getting our shoes





— WONDER WHEELS N° |





mended (a colossal sum. this,
because we're always on our
feet).

And with what is left we buy ;
innumerable tins of wax polisa |
to shine up our shabby homes.

Funny as hats may be, we still
can't get away with dazzling our
husbands with an empty tin of
furniture polish on our heads. |

How can he ?

BUT there is an awful snag.

How can any husband who has
paid the rent, the gas, electri-
city, coal, and rates bills, and
“the housekeeping” and been
stripped of everything else in
income tax,,pay any more—
except his bus fare home?

It just happens to be a good
thing for all concerned that we
love the Brutes!

—LE.S.






Hercules
stands for STRENGTH

Of all the heroes of olden times, the strongest was Hercules.
To-day the name still represents unequalled strength, and the
famous Hercules cycle has proved itself the strongest in the world.

SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS

a i

lhe Finest Bicycle Cui To-day

THE HERCULES CYCLE & MOTOR CO. LTD., BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND
REPRESENTATIVES :

T. GEDDES GRANT LTD.,

five hours a day making the pot-
tery.

He collects clay from local fac-
tories, stone dust and ashes for
glazing from the rocks and trees
of the forest, He makes his own
moulding tools.

Visitors from all over the world
buy his work, stone jugs, bowls,
tankards, candlesticks and brooch-



es.
Five Hours A Day

Father Vincent is convinced

that his work will sell in the

United States. Some reproduction
work has already gone there. The
Victoria and Albert Museum has
asked for specimens. Nottingham
Corporation have bought a num-
ber of pieces for their Castle
Museum.

London Express Service

BRIDGETOWN
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The tests which consist of boiling samples under 100 Ib. per

proof; rear corner windows; door . i cs
2 panels. $q. inch oxygen pressure in “bombs’’, are quite safe. We have
di Comtroded- welsipentots : aieinte ae never lost a scientist—or for that matter—a customer because
demisting; sliding rear wi 3



of a sticky valve. This test is one of many which guarantee the
quality and performance of REGENT petrol.

REGENT

ulation and radio,

FRVICE Austin Service covers the

PETROL
Sterling Quality



$$$ TT tt nner nnn tte

BIRMINGHAM «6

EnGiLano

=
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10,

Presenting . .

SOME people are born under a
lucky star. The Hon. Patricia
Lowson, the new Lady Mayoress
of the City of London, is certainly

one of oe

_ For she you uty and
riches. Her Suzeone re , &
Lowson, is one of the City’s most
successful financiers, well able to
afford the £20,000 from his own
poset that 12 months as Lord

ayor is likely to cost him.

At 31 she is the youn Lady
Mayoress on record. om the
plump schoolgirl who was a bride
at 17, she has developed into a
slender handsome woman,

At the Guild of Freemen’s din-
ner at Guildhall, Sir Harold
Webbe spoke of her as “the legend-
ary fairy princess, dear to the
hearts of the people,” and he
warned the Lord Mayor: “As first
citizen of the first city of the
world, you have a serious rival
ior the affections of the country.”

Mrs. Lowson (dressed by Nor-
man Hartnell) has been the guest
of the King and Queen at Buck-
ingham Palace; the guest of Queen
Juliana at Claridges and (in a
superb velvet and fox fur ensem-
ble) hostess to the royal visitors
at Guildhall.

J

Three Children

The Mansion Hoyse does not
lend itself to domesticity. The
Lord Mayor’s private aj ments
consist of four rooms only.

Now Mrs. Lowson is the mother
of three children. Two of them—
Gay aged 13, and Melanie, aged
10, are at a boarding school. They
see their mother during holidays
at the’ family’s country home at
Balcombe, Sussex. Her youngest
child, Ian, who is six, lives with
a nanny Balcombe and sees his
mother at week-ends.

When she is at Balcombe, Mrs.
Lowson indulges in her favourite
hobby, riding. She hunts with the
Horsham and Crawley Hunt, rid-



Radio wrong

1980



- The Woman Of The Week

SHE IS YOUNG, RICH AND. BEAUTIFUL

Hy VIVIEN BATCHELOR

ing side-saddle in black habit.
stock and silk hat.
Her accomplishments are

leisured and dignified. She has
studied art and paints well. You
will always see her at the private
views and new art shows. She
reads a good deal, mainly bio-
graphies and books on art.

As her appearance proclairhs,
she has all the teminine under-
standing of clothes. If she had not
married a wealthy man when she
was barely out of the schoolroom,
but had had to earn a living, she
could have done so as a manne-
ee Five feet eight inches tall,

enderly curved, her dressmakers
find her as easy to fit as their own
models.

Her Hands

One of her best features are her
hands, They are long and slender,
with the whiteness accentuated by
tinted nail varnish, but there is
nothing delicate about them. They
are the strong hands of the horse
woman and reveal a capability
not always apparent in her face.

During the war those hands
controlled the stiff, heavy wheels
of new ambulances, often for
hours at a time and for journeys
of hundreds of miles. She worked

as a FANY and her job was to de- d;

liver the ambulances to hospitals
in all parts of the country.

They are ‘never seen stained
with tobacco (for she does not
smoke) or reddened with house-
work (for she has never had to
do any). Although she loves gar-
dens and has a “show” garden at
Balcombe, she never does any
gardening. A better-than-average
pianist, she has already tried out
the piano in the Mansion House
drawing-room. ‘

When they were first married
she and her husband had a mag-
nificent model railway which took
up a whole room. They spent

?—this listener

tells you why

REC USE NEW ROBOT MONITOR

The BBC have one listener who
never pays licence money but
whose opinion they accept with
the deepest respect. He is their
Electronic Man.

The part played by this me-
chanical genius in broadcasting is
revealed in the BBC Year Book
for 1951. ;

Until recently the Corporation
had men listening to the output
of their transmitters to ensure that
quality was maintained. Now
these watchers are being replaced
by the automatic “el lis-
tener.”’.

Mr. R, T. B. Wynn, deputy chief
engineer of the BBC, gives this
camanation of what the robot
does:

“It is possible by the use of
these robot monitors to know in



2s bet BOOTAL anu cider bron women manriened ere Repiciered Prade Mors

London that the programme which
is being sent to, say, the Scottish
transmitting Station at Westerglen,
is being radiated by Westergler.
at the same quality as that
it had when it left London.

Alarm Bell
“Should interference or distor-
tion occur after the programme
has left London, an alarm can be
made to sound in London, or at
Westerglen, which will draw the
attention of the staff to the fault.”

The robot also spots the mis-
take if the wrong programme ar-
rives at a transmitter through
faulty switching on the way,

Advantages of this electronic
wizard: (1) it mever tires; (2)
it costs less than the annua) Ssal-
ary of a trained operator.

London Express Service.





The Lucky Mrs. Lowsens pictured at
the Guildhall dinner,

hours playing with it. Now that
interest has gone; Mrs. Lowson to-
ay prefers flying to trains—a
preference not shared by her
husband who refuses to fly.

“So when we travel we often
meéet at our destination,” she says.

London’s new Lady Mayoress is
London born. She is the younger
daughter of the first Lord Strath-
earron and was christened in St.
Columba's in Pont Street accord-
ing to the rites of the Church of
Scotland. Her husband was 30
when they met and fell in love at
a dinner party, A few weeks later
they were married.

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

Happy Birthday to Yvonne
Griffith, Dorothy Cofeman and
Milanese Skeete who celebrate
their birthdays this week.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

PROGRESSOGRAM|

BEGIN with the three-lettered |
word defined in the first couple’, |
then add the given letter each |
time and transpose the letters un- |
til you get the final word which |
is spelled with 11 letters. |

People should never disagree,

Lest they rouse each other's
THREE.
For, i this FOUR one never

ought—
Since this as children we were |
taught.

|

}
Add §
|
|

Ada #
When Biddy’s too lazy to do the
washing,
She'll simply FIVE— it’s only
sloshing.

Add T
= you seal your note don’t

To SIX the check you want to
mail.

Add U
—— are those who tie and
Like ministers, or one of their
kind. |
Ada O

The usua} procedures we follow
each

day,
Describe by EIGHT, you'll find
you may.

7 NINE pay homage toa

But we don’t have that sort of
thing.

Add P
Musicians know the TEN is D,
In a composition whose key is C.

add ©
The ELEVEN of criminals and
reprobates
Is left to Attorneys of Cities and
States.

“uo}NoVsOI1g
‘sTUOWEdNS ‘soLWUNOD ‘souTyREW ‘s19};Uy
“Mosul ‘OSUTY ‘@8} “Atl iNOLLA'TIOS

WEIGHTY PROBLEM

THEY weighed them and found
the combined weights of three
men, Pablo, Pascual and Pedro,
is 600 pounds. Then it was fig-
ured out that Pablo weighs half
as much again as Pascual, while
Pedro's weight is equal to one-
half of the combined weights of
Pablo and Pascual. On the other
hand, the combined weight of
Pascual and Pedro is exactly 50
per cent. more than the number
of pounds Pablo weighs.

What does each weigh?

“uaAe Spunod paspuny
OM} 7e SoTeos OR Bd OIpag ‘AXIS pur
petpuny suo BSYyBIeM [eNoseg ‘{AyAOF pue
porpuNY Om) SyuszIeM O(Ged :NOLLNTIOS

What does each weigh?



Phat Pied






Ruport’s Autumn

reff ©



Primrose-—30




See ea A
rel ask !"’ says the elf angrily.
we are, trying to do our

per wosk and make the garden

: ee ae all ume

of the Imps pring has got

» and is Filling it with spring

ns, and is overworking the

» If only I could find where
a tuna When I catch him
@ lesson |"



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PAGE RIGHT

BARBADOS 48 ADVOGATE

Qe SS SS SS Yona

Printed by the Adveente Ce., Lid.. Broad St. Bridgetown.





Sunday, December 10, 1950



FIRST THINGS

THE published report of the meeting of
the Caribbean Interim Tourism Commit-
tee is timely.

In all the fields in which Barbados has
lagged behind other West Indian terri-
tories none has been greater than in tour-
ism.

Almost every country in the world to-
day has been convinced that tourism is one
of the greatest of all revenue earners.

But not Barbados

Next year the United Kingdom is run-
ning a special Festival of Britain to attract
millions of American dollars.

Barbados is still sitting on legislation in-
tended to encourage the building of modern
hotels.

In Puerto Rico members of the Carib-
bean Interim Tourism Committee have
planned a Caribbean Festival 1951.

It has been necessary for an American,
a member of the United States Chamber
of Commerce to go to the United Kingdom
to tell them that they should adopt a for-
ward looking plan for tourist development
in the British Caribbean.

It has been necessary too for the same
American to urge local governments in the
West Indies to support tourism.

Why is it that Barbados fails so signally
to give to tourism the priority which it
needs to hold its own with the attractions
offered by other islands?

Is Barbados aware that only a matter of
weeks back Tobago has constructed a
beautiful modern hotel?

Are the people of Barbados so ignorant
that they do not realise how much Grenada,
St. Vincent, Antigua, the Grenadines have
to offer the visitors from northern climates?

Is there anyone still capable of saying
that Barbados has the finest sea bathing in
the world? i

Can it be that education is so backward
in Barbados that the importance of tourism
as an industry is not yet appreciated?

Barbados has now got at Seawell a run-
way sufficiently long and favourably
situated to attract here the largest airliners.

It still retains a reputation for being an
island particularly suitable for tourists by
reason of its settlers, hospitality and
climate. <

Unfortunately that reputation is rapidly
being lost to-day.

Residential areas are being ruined by
industries, windows on the sea are being
closed, trees are being cut down, roads are
not being widened, streets are dirtier than
ever, lavatories and urinals are in short
supply, and the once renowned Barbadian
good manners have taken a nasty knock.

What is the first thing needful?

A change of heart on the part of the Gov-
ernment,

Instead of tenderly nursing the old sore
of colour discrimination and thereby halt-
ing aid to the hotel industry, the present
Government should at once follow the lead
given by all other West Indian islands of
any size and encourage the growth of the

tourist industry by immediate favourable
legislation.

Instead of leaving the tourist committee
as an isolated entity saying a grateful
“thank you” for any small sums that come
their way the Government should make a
department of publicity, planning and
sanitation and pass the legislation neces-
sary to make Bridgetown the cleanest, cool-

est and most orderly capital in the West
Indies.

It was not of Barbados that an American
traveller was talking last week when he
said “it has a very clean town and the
shops are so well kept and the people so
friendly and charming”.

It was of St. George’s Grenada that he
was speaking.

Unsolicited advertisement of this kind
costs nothing and is worth most.

There is no greater asset that Barbados
possesses than its present attraction for
tourists. That asset has been grievously
neglected in the past and is being shame-
fully neglected to-day. :

The Governmert of Barbados can no
longer sit back and watch the daily stacks
of filth in Bridgetown, the daily indiscrim-
inate and uncontrolled building that is
going on, and the contraction of bathing
beaches and views of the sea.

| dog.”

SUNDAY

It must give more thought to legislation
in the interests of the island as a whole
even at the expense of the senseless (if
more emotional and vote catching) legis-
lation based on mud slinging within the
community.

Barbados is not big enough for the in-
dulgence in spitting on your neighbour.
First things first. And tourism stands at
the head of the queue.

WAX FROM CANE

WHITTAKERS for 1950 contained a note
in discoveries of the year 1949 about a new
type of banana in Jamaica which would
resist leaf spot and other diseases which
have laid waste banana crops in the tropics
over a period of years.

It is possible that in the issue for 1951
there will be mentioned a new discovery
for making sugar cane wax in Barbados.

Quietly anc out of the glare of publicity
the West Indies Sugar Producers’ Associa-
tion have under the direction of the Head
of their research department, Sir John
Saint, been investigating the possibility of
making wax from the by products of the
sugar cane and which can be manufac-
tured locally. ®

The Advocate understands that Sir John
Saint has found a satisfactory formula for
the manufacture of sugar cane wax and
that negotiations are presently being made
for the establishment here in Barbados of
2 factory which will manufacture wax
from the by products of the sugar cane.

. In addition to providing Barbados with
a new secondary industry the manufacture
of wax at a time when demand has been
so insistent that the price in one instance
has risen to as much as £1,100 per ton
offers the island an added source of rev-
enue. Noone can accurately forecast what
will be the commercial value of the new
manufacture to Barbados but it is expected
+hat wax can be manufactured locally and
sold at an estimated £400 per ton.

Sugar cane wax is already manufactured
in Cuba and certain South American coun-
tries and it can be used for floor, boot and
shoe and car polishes. It can also be used
as an insulating material. The discovery
that a commodity of such commercial value
can be manufactured here in Barbados is
welcome news. Ht is also a subject for
congratulation that the Sugar Producers’
Association should have decided to make
Barbados the headquarters for its re-
search department.

Sir John Saint has done so much for the
island of Barbados that a grateful people
will know how best to appreciate the
further service which he is devoting to this
island and to the best interests of the
peoples of the Caribbean.



Unfriendly Canines

FEW dogs in this island, it would appear,
have ever heard that little proverb, so
often quoted in Fleet Street, which says
“Dog does not eat dog.” In fact, if Mr.
Gallup ever had the audacity to inquire of
our dogs what slogan interpreted their
philosophy best, the result of the poll
would undoubtedly show that 98% of our
canines were in favour of “Dog eats dog,”
and that the other 2%, inevitably, “didn’t
know.” vei,

Surely it is time for some psychologist,
psycho-analyist, sociologist, or whoever the
competent authority may be, to investigate
the cause of the unfriendliness among our
canines and write a voluminous report. This
important problem has been neglected too

long. a ts ~

Why cannot Bonzo and Rex get on to-
gether? Perhaps, reclining on a couch,
Bonzo would admit that he became em-
bittered with life when still a pup because
his father was a drunkard, and his mother
was a flirt.

On the other hand, and now we believe
we are getting to the root of the problem,
it may not be a question of psychology at
all, but one of breeding. Every afternoon
in Kensington Gardens, London, over a
hundred well bred dogs congregate. They
play games together, gossip a little, swim
in the Round Pond, and behave in a gen-
erally civilized manner. Imagine, how-
ever, the bloodshed if a hundred Bajun
dogs got loose in Queen’s Park!

And this evidence is backed up by the
excellent behaviour of the pedigree dogs
at the Exhibition last week. Perhaps next
year it would be a good idea to arrange
for parties of “sooners’—each securely
muzzled—to visit the Exhibition and ob-
serve the polished manners of the dog
aristocracy. It seems, alas, that in Bar-
bados the era of the common dog is here
to stay, and so every effort must be made
to teach them that “Manners mayketh

in 6





a



| Sitting On Fenee

NATHANIEL GUEGSINS

My

IT WAS like Christmas morn-
ing in the Sea Nest. The fam
sat at breakfast, munching Web
sausages. The postman had de-
livered the letters. Your Uncle
Nat opening one bill after another,
was gradually losing his appetite,

Then he opened the last enve-
lope and out fell a pretty pink
cheque.

“Who's that from?”
of girlish voices asked.

“How much is it for.” A harder,
more practical note could be
heard in the voices this time.

* * *

“It's a present from The Gas
Board.”

Your Uncle Nat’s voice, thick
with toast and emotion, rang
through the room like a muffled
gong in a fog.

The cheque was passed from
hand to hand. Although it pro-
mised to pay N. Gubbins no more
than £2 4s. 8, fur coats were
discussed on the spot. A week-
end in Paris was planned to the
last detail.

a chorus

Your Uncle was so overcome
with amazement that he neglected
his Webb sausage till it grew cold.
This sort of thing had never
happened to him before, except
when Mr. Bloodsucker, the in-
come-tax inspector, sent him a
cheque for repayment of over-
charges one November, and fol-
lowed it with another letter on
Christmas morning saying it was
alla mistake. ¥ "

Although the letter enelosed
with the cheque was not decorat-
ed with holly leaves, it was

posit with interest to date.
ng you a Happy C
|" motto like: —

{ras and dincere,’ sa

it
was a pleasure to refund a 7
io

The Gas Board hopes yowll

have good cheer.

No fuel cuts in the glad New

Year.

But it was the beginning of
what may prove to be a beauti-
ful friendship and gave a chance
to reply in a seasonal spirit: —
Dear Gas Board may your days

be long

Your Christmas gay and Merry
With port type bottles at your

board





ADVOCATE

THEY DO IT AGAIN AND AGAIN









WHEN SOMONE ELSE J'S BUT WHEN
HAVING. I(T OONE , IT SEEMS COMES
LIKE THIS

ms

And Olde Worlde English sherry.
May Mrs. Gas ond Uwole Gas
And all the little Gases
Enjoy their.dins hooked out of

tins
And puds made for the masses.
Are you fit?

DR. GUBBINS answers below
some questions asked by some
of his unhealthy readers wonder-
ing if they are fit to face the
winter.

As a fat man aged 50, do
you think I should be able to
run up two flights of stairs
without blowing like a
whale?

If you can’t do this without
blowing like a whale, walk up.
If you still blow when you walk
up, move into a bungalow. If you
still find it difficult to breathe or
move freely in and_out of a
bungalow don’t send for a doctor.
Send for 2 carpenter.

*

Up to the age of 72 I could
balance myself on one foot
with my eyes shut and my
arms outstretched. 7 try

io you

it now I fall over. yo
think I’m too old for this
now, doctor?

Not at all. Try hopping down
the stairs that way. is should
~ your troubles once and for
all.

Can you help me, doctor?

Soon after eating food I feel
-, if I had swallowed a
a

Maybe you have. A man once
swallowed a toy balloon he was
blowing up for a children’s party.
Every time he drank soda water
he became airborne and floated
to the ceiling. Instead of whining
about it he began a new career aS
a party entertainer and would
have lived happily ever if
he hadn't exploded in a dentist's
chair after a whiff of gas. Avoid
dentists and try to look on the
bright side. ‘

At one time I kept myself
healthy with a simple morn-
ing exercise. I used to bend
forward with knees stiff, look
between my legs at my wife
in bed. and shout, “Top o’ the
morning” twenty or thirty
times. If I do it now I get

ed

A Tale Of

Before I went down to the
garden I knew that the shirt I
had on showed signs of wear. How
unmistakable these signs were,
however, was only brought home
to me when I noticed the peculiar
way in which the garden boy
looked at me and my shirt. Re-
proachful glances at me, and ac-
quisitive ones at my shirt, that
said quite plainly, “I wonder how
much longer he thinks he can go
on wearing it before passing it
on to me”.

When I was changing to go to
the Club, I found the other shirt
I was about to put on was so
frayed at the collar and wristbands
that I had to trim them with a
pair of scissors. Later on at the
Club, when George was showing
dangerous symptoms of being
about to tell me the way in which
U.N.O. should deal with China,
I took the wind out of his sails
by telling him the shirt situation
was now so acute I had decided
to buy myself a brand new one.

“Just like that?” he asked, look-
ing startled and putting down his
glass without finishing its contents.
“What-a-mean-to-say, old top, is,
how-dya-mean to set about it?”

“Why, in the usual way, of
course. Go into a shop, choose a
shirt and buy it.”

“But, but,” he spluttered, “my
dear Bertie don’t you realise that
with a cold war on, you can’t take
unilateral action like that on any-
thing so important without run-
ning the risk of creating a crisis?”

“How-dya-mean?”, I began.

“Mean, mean” he exclaimed,
scornfully cutting me short. “Do
you think you're still. living in
pre-war days? Don’t you under-
stand that in these days of devalu-
ation, hard and soft currency and
price controls, ete., you can’t just
rush out and buy shirts at super-
sonic speed? Oh no, old boy, those
feudal days are over. What you've
got to do is to keep within the
framework of the procedure
adopted by U.N.O.”

“But I want a shirt,” I again
started, only to be again inter-
rupted with:

“You and your wants! What's
that got to do with the point at
issue? The question that’s got to
be first decided is not whether or
not you want a shirt but whether
you need one. The way to decide
this is to appoint a fact finding
committee.” Then clapping his
hands for the waiter, he leant for-
ward and tapping me on the knee,
said: “Look. I'll show you. You
and I will resolve ourselves into a
fact finding committee. Now, do
you want or do you need a shirt?”

“Both,” I teld him, and explained

Hy ¢. G.

all about the frayed edges as well
as the reproachful and acquisitive
eyes of the garden boy.

“Good!” he said. “That's one
thing settled.” Then looking smug
and pleased with himself, “You
see how easy it is? Now the next
step is to appoint a consultative
assembly to decide the question of
what sort of shirt and where tc
buy it. I suggest you and your
wife form this assembly and re-
port back here tomorrow, when
we can decide whether or not it
is necessary to appoint a Security
Council to deal further with the
matter, or ignore that formality
and save time by holding a plen-
ary session of ourselves forth-
with.” -

“But, hang it all, George, I
know the shirt I want and need,
and I know where I can buy one
for $4.75 cash.”

“There you go! There you go
again, harping back on this uni-
lateral complex that’s already been
vetoed”. Then, as he caught the
waiter’s , he said, “Boy! Repeat

those drinks and make ’em doubles and down, and he put on his fam-

this time. Mr. Bertie’s not at his
best today.”

“Look here old fruit,” I protest-
ed. “I’ve had enough of this. I’m
going to buy that shirt. See?

“Okay, okay, okay,” he retorted.
“Have it your own way. But have
you the cash to pay for it?”

Putting my hand in my pocket,
I jingled my keys and small change
for a moment or two, and then
told him, “Well-er-er funnily
enough, now you mention it, I
don’t think I have today; but I
can get them to charge it.”

“Charge!” he exploded. Did you
say—charge? D’you seriously mean
‘to tell me you would run the risk
of burdening yourself with a debt
like that without consulting a
financial expert, or getting the
opinion of an economic adviser
who could tell you what a debt
like that may cost you by the time
you're able to pay it in the only

sort of money we may have by $4.75

then? To hear you talk lightly of
getting things on credit now would
think you had unlimited Marshall
Aid behind you. Well I ask you,
have you any pull with Marshall
Aid?”

“No”, I said. “But——”

“Well, skip it. Never mind the
buts. Listen, old cock, and I'll tell
you. What you've got to do is to
apply to Development and Welfare
to finance the proposition. Give
‘em the works Tell ’em all they
need do is to supply the capital
gum and that you'll guarantee to





SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1950

as sen sees eogug
yYourR Tourn Oates te ete n es ee eo”

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SAUCEPANS, COCKTAIL SHAKERS, JELLY
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CAKE TRAYS, ICING SETS & TUBES, ICING

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PHONES 4472 and 4687

pains in the head and back
and feel dizzy. What do you
advise?

See a psychiatrist. at once.
better still, try your exercise
the roof-edge of a high building
with a gale blowing. One day
your wife will thank me for this |!
advice.

Or,
on |



A PRESENT THAT WILL
LAST A LIFETIME !

A ROGERS

UPRIGHT

PIANO

Another shipment just arrived. |



‘Mr. Chairman .. .

TO HELP people like myself,
whose minds become a _ blank;
the moment we stand on our feet
to address our fellow creatures,
an American, Herbert V. Proch-
now, has written “The Toastmas-
ter’s Handbook.”

“If you want a sure fire story
to start your speech.” says the
blurb, ‘turn to Chapter 6 and
choose one of the witty anecdotes
given there. For a few well-
chosen words to introduce a guest
speaker read Mea oo 4. If you
have to make a timely response
turn to Chapter 5.”

And if you want to make an
even bigger fool of the trembling
creature who has sought. this
easy way out of his difficulties, |}
each member of his audience
should: be made to read the book
in advance and be supplied with
a copy ot it at the dinner.

Mr. Chairman and gentlemen,”
the speaker begins, “by way of
introducing our guest tonight I
feel I can do nothing better
then, |. <*

“Turn to Chapter 4,” shout the
audience, noisily turning the |}
pages of their books.

“When I was in a similar posi-
tion,” the red-faced speaker con-
tinues, “that is to say, when I
was a guest and had to make a
timely response. . . .”

“You turned to Chapter 5.”

“But.as I am. not a- good
speaker, and do not wish to bore
you any longer, 1 think I wi'l
end with an amusing story, or at
any rate, it amused me when... .”

“When you read it in Chapter
6,’ chants the audience. “of The
Toastmaster’s Handbook by Her-
bert V. Prochnow. which contains
400 epigrams, 400 anecdotes,
1000 quotations and 100 funny
stories, price 32s., post paid, or

|
|








SUITS.













meet any recurrent expenditure
mecessary for upkeep,”

“But my sainted aunt! Do you
really think they’d fall for a thing
like that?”

“Well, to be perfectly frank,
they probably won't. But tha’
doesn’t matter. All that really mat-
ters is that you will have done
your part and have the satisfaction
of knowing that you have followed
the correct _-rocedure.”

and presented in a range
of Qualities and Colours.
that is certain to include
B your favourites,

a Utne: eseee dercice. a er —_ ee
——_—|% England’s most respected

Sh int Tailoring Houses ! Made

from the finest _ fabrics %



Stop in to-day at...

Da COSTA & C0.

When I got home I told my wife
all that George had said and ex-
plained that she was now a mem-
ber of the consultative committee.

She yawned slightly, then
smiled and went on with what she
was doing.

The next day, when I met
George at the Club, I told him that
the Consultative Committee had
decided that as this was a purely
domestic matter I was entitled to
buy myself a shirt without going
through the routine procedure he
had outlined. That shook him, In
fact, he was obviously so annoyed
that he turned a dull red, his
Adam’s apple moved rapidly up

ous sneer that would have made
him look like a camel, provided a
camel could turn red in the face
and have an Adam’s apple that
could run up and down its throat.
When he could trust himself
to speak he said-in a nasty,
you're trying to tell me is to mind
my own ruddy business.”

It cost me three drinks and a
lunch at the Club before I could
smooth him down enough to hold
a plenary session, at which the



ss
7 oe

PL LOPE LEE ACCES §




it was early closing day.

The next morning when [ wen,
to the shop, the man told me the
sort of shirts I wanted had all
been sold out. Thoroughly dis-
gruntled, I went back home where
I found a parcel addressed to
me on the table.

“What's this?” I asked my wife.

SOOO SOO OOPOOTS

“Your new shirt, dear”, she .
said”. “Bought it yesterday. Cost 3
eerie? GF ODDARDS §
old one to the garden boy.” :
“No, yon ons ioe, because N
you see I gave it is morn- 2 y
ing”, she said, smiling secretly to GOLD BRAID RUM g
herself without looking up from , 3
her knitting, From: $
. %,
I’d be the last person to criticise %
the manner in which she had dealt TO “ M as R R as W >
with the matter, but I do wish x
rhe hadn’t smiled in that irritating ie %
feminine way, However, I suppose ”* e %
one must make allowances, for — %

even the best of wives is, after You'll n
all, merely a woman. SSOSss

C







Sg ~

eed a quantity of this Delightful Brand g



SSSOSSSSSOOO*

|
|
|


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1950

KLIGHT DOLLARS TO
ST. VINCENT

Hy GEORGE HUNTE





OU can leave Barbados at The Catholic Ch, rch of St
nine o'clock at night and Mary’s, Kingstown is one :
arrive at Kingstown, Lite nestown is one of the

' St. Vincent afchitectural trea 2s of S|
before six the following morning. Indies, Designed and cuasrustes
The journey is 96 miles and the by the late Father Charles of
cost to deck passengers eight Belgium, St. Mary’s. was only
dollars only on the big Lady finished in 1938. Father Charles
Boats. _ got assistance from his brother ia

St. Vincent has a_ volcano Bruges and from local material
Souffriere. It was one of the and labour constructed an oriental

islands which was given back building wi corri
exclusively to the Carib Indians maurc: ne es AR yer

for a short period in West Indian Belaowian i aa, wna
or ab tee ee y of ea monks who n inister to the
n the Catholics o ince ive
morth of the island. It grows the day. i Venere ane oer
finest sea island cotton in the One of verandahs
world and it earns large sums of !0oks over a ravine with a natural
dollars every year from the sale swimming Peol in which boys
of its arrowroot. swim while housewives wash their
From the deck of a boat Kings- laundry in the stream that issues
town presents a pleasing post- further down. On another of these
card effect with its red painted com was 12
og and its archways. High hills ear.
with jagged tops tower over the The rooms of the monaster;
town and houses dot the hills in were full of chairs of Darapens
the hatf circle which surrounds origin and design. There were
the harbour. Statues and buSts, books every-
At 6.15 in the early morning where and an ancient map of
H.M. Customs came off to the ship St.. Vincent.
in a row boat carrying an enor- When we knocked on the iron
mous flag. Two policemen in grille we found one of the monks
shorts were rowing one customs dressed like a workman repairing
officer dressed like a ship’s cap- 4n_ electrical gadget that was
tain, with pipe in mouth and giving trouble. He had been
hand on tiller. : trained at Mount St. Benedict in
The row boat is the normal Trinidad where his order have
method of getting from ship to their headquarters in the hills
shore in Kingstown. His Honour which look down on the Imperial
the Administrator possesses a College of Tropical Agriculture
very fine super luxury launch lying in the valley below.
which was designed for air-sea Handcrafts and woodwork in
rescue but which is now used by “St. Vincent are excellent. We
the officer administering the gov- bought several simple straw . ils
ernment. The police have a row for putting dishes on They could
boat fitted with a tiny outboard made quite easily in Barbados
motor no bigger than a small and might be but I have never
basket full of cabbages. seen them displayed in local shops.
The landing pier at Kingstown In St. Vincent an old man of at
leads directly into a large police least seventy comes on board as
barracks facing the waterfront. scon as the boat is cleared and
On the day of my arrival no less never leaves the deck until half
than twelve policemen were on an hour before the boat. sails.
duty providing a guard of honour After dinner at night is a particu-
for His Excellency the Governor larly good time for his trade, be-
of the Windward Islands who cause passengers are always on
was returning that day to his deck until the boat sails,
seat of Government in the hills After the swell and white foam
overlooking St. George’s had died away when the launch;
Grenada. which brought the Windwards,in Bridgetown yesterday dis-
_ Bay Street, Kingstown unlike Governor on board had returned® charging Christmas cargo, which
its namesake in Bridgetown has to Kingtown the last minutes inyincluded 50 cases of smoked hams.
preserved its natural beauty and harbour were given over to the® They were the s,s. [kana, call-
the water laps on the beach swing band who sat in anotherging from South Africa and India
adjoining a wide spacious road, small row boat. and the Canadian Challenger from
There is a market enclosed by It was a three piece band com-WCanada.
wire and although it is sadly in pTising a banjo, a guitar and an , i i
need of maintenance it is easily oatmeal can. The girl from The Ikana brought plain pil-
recognisable as a market place. . British Guiana, returning from afechards, salted peanuts, peanut
The buses in St. Vincent ar® trip'to Italy and Switzerland re-f>utter, canned cece canoes sr
about one third the size of the quested the “last train to San squash, tea, castor oil and —
buses in Barbados, When they are Fernando”. She got it but thep.Pags. roe Tree pote ‘ a
waiting for passengers they are band never got the coin. It fell brought eae Pe i Rea nit
halted in line in the town’s into the sea and a host of divers ia ee casein oe her from
equivalent of our Probyn Street. swallowed it up. for Cae Siiaed sepa iath sup-
It is in its streets and pave- It only costs eight dollars to)’ ee ON tik? Beatie yaamarith
ments that Kingstown shows a get to St. Vincent. The trouble is at canted fruit jioge rods Mon-
marked superiority to Bridgetown. getting back. It took twelve days

the open

Xmas Hams
Are Here

Two steamships were at anchor



ST. VINCENT PATIO



Spanish archways provide shade before the same ship got back to}®

for the pedestrians and there is “St. Vincent on its return trip

treal.
S.\S. Canadian Challenger

toy
enough room on the sidewalks for Barbados en route for Boston, «brought the 50 cases of smoked

'
two Ford Prefects to pass side by There must be many hundreds
side. The streets of Kingstown of Barbadians who are willing to
are also wide and make our own spend .00 for a brief visit to
Broad Street look like a narrow the sister islanid»of St. Vincent
country lane by..comparison. but not many can afford to spend
The churches are good neigh- 12 days there or travel back by
bours in Kingstown. The air,
Methodist Church is opposite the There are schooners of course
Anglican and from the tower of but most of us like something
the unique Catholie Church you higger when we are out in the
look down into the yard of the Atlantic and it is 96 miles from
Anglican. The Methodist Church Barbados to Kingstown, That is
true to its tradition of sign- more than four times the distance
posting carried in bold letters the from Calais to Dover and who
salutary reminder: “Love can d0 would dream of crossing the
no evil to its neighbour.” channel in a schooner?

COOL SHADY PAVEMENTS

‘hams from Montreal. She also
landed pickled, meat, apples, gro-
ceries, sardines, eggs, cotton goods
and stationery from Montreal
along with pears, mandarines
oranges’ and grapefruit from
Dominica.

The Ikana is a Nourse liner.
Ships of this company make occa-
sional calls at Barbados. Her local
agents are Messrs. DaCosta & Co.,
Ltd.

On Friday evening, the char-
tered Alcoa freighter Essi landed
here 40 cases of smoked Picnic
hams. F ,

The Essi was on her first visit
to Barbados. She left port during
the night for Caripito. Messrs.
Robert Thom Ltd. are her agents
here.

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



School Stages

Nativity Play

A NATIVITY PLAY, “The
Wonderful Journey’ was

Staged by the St. Mark’s Girs

Schoc a the school-ro

Friday afternoon before large

crowd of friends and pupil

The newly renovated wails
vided a good background for
gaily decoratud Christmas tree

Rev. W. B. Brathwaite was the
Chairman. After his address the
choir sang “Jolly Old December

“Bo-Peep’s Christmas Party,”

pro
Rp



short play, was staged by thc
infants and lower junior uf the
school ;

“The Wonderful Journey” is the
story of a little girl, Jean, dis-
cavered lying on a bed in a beau
tifully decorated room. Jean wa

crying over her disappointment o1
being unable to get up for Christ-
mas because of an injured foot

The mother tries to comfort he:
by showing her decorations anc
telling her that Santa Claus would
not visit children who cried

Jean asked her mother for the
picture of the Nativity but whik
her mother is looking for this sh«
falls asleep, During her sleep she
has a dream of her guardiar
angel leading her to the Stable at
Bethlehem where she sees th
Manger with the baby, Mary,
Joseph, the shépherds, angels anc
kings.

She is sad because she has nc
presents to offer but the ange
@ssures her that the baby woul
be happy if only she sung. She
goes to the Manger and sings
“Away in a Mangen”

Soon she awakes from her won-
derful dream and hears carol
singers, _Her mother calls them
in and they sing for her because
they are sorry that she is suffer-
ing from an injured foot

The acting on the whole wa
good but Brenda Wedderbur:
who played the part of the litt!
girl, Jean, deserves special met

A quiet resting place in the Patio of ST. MARYS, ST: VINCENT. _ tion.

VER 200 PUPILS and parent
enjoyed a pleasant evenin;
with many city dwellers. An &t St. Silas’ Girls’ School on Fri-
advantage of the use of the pot day when Mrs. E,; Spencer, Head-
or box too is that the plant is â„¢ustress, and the staff gave a re-
protected from © being. washed Cital of Christmas Carols and a
away, play entitled “Fish.”
ERE WAS KEEN competi
In the vegetable garde . tion at the Local Talent Show
were he eg heel at the Globe on Friday night
tion of tomatoes, cabbages and First prize went to Walter Burke
onions. The object of the section Who sang the favourite “My Fool
was to show the best method of ‘Sh, Heart.”
growing these crops, The exhibits | Eddie Hall, who sang “Moon
ranged from ‘seedlings sown in /ight Cocktails” was awarded th
drills in seed boxes in their pro- second prize. Other good vocal
gressive stages to’ maturity. ists were Nat Dunnah with “Count
Every Star,” Lucille Craig with
A remarkable feature’ of the “Chatanooga Shoe Shine” an
stall was the general healthy con- Holman Rayside; who sang “Mons
dition of the crops displayed. Lisa.”





ae a ee E i ia ii 5 a ra P \C T E ae.
Housing Board
May Open Window | oe

winaow, on sea Phe Hou

Ing’ poa

from the Bay Bstate io |








Area to th e beach

Discussed along with ti |
jecl, was we. question < | by
neids for the Housing Art A ww |
Bay To make rec |
on these two matier’s the Be |
asked the Chief Medical Ortice
transport, fhe Colonial Engine: }
the Director of Highways a
and. the Secretary of the Bx

form a Committec

li connection with the repair
ng and repainting of hous re



eupied by tenants of the Boar
under the hire-purchase agre¢

A wise mother lets baby decide about

ment, the Board yesterday decid a
ed to seek legal advice on whether | the milk for bottle feeds. Lots of energy, steady
to extend the period for payments “i ; ¥
or to enter into a new avreemen: | gains, contented days, peaceful nights — these tell her what she most

with tenants,

The present agreement
lates that tenants are res;
for repairs to the houses
fact is that they are not
cially able to do so

wants to know — baby is doing splendidly on’ Ostermilk.

Why can mother pin her faith so
he firmly on Ostermilk ? Because, where
in breast feeding is difficult or impossible
it is the perfect substitute for mother’s
milk. Ostermailk is finest grade cow's
milk, dried under the most hygienic
condithws. The protein, great body-
buildes, is made easily digestible
by the voller drying process. And

sre OSTERMILK....

For your free copy of illustrated Baby Book—Phone 4675

important additions are made: Iron
to enrich the blood —. sugar to modify
the food for tiny digestions — Vitamin
D to help build strong bones and
teeth, Ostermilk is made by Glaxc
Laboratories Ltd., who, since 1908,
have been pioneers in the develop
ment of the best possible foods for
babies.



TAPER EN ENDN DA DH EK
SUNT IN TIME FOR

| CHRISTMAS





uy

=
= FRESH SOCK

S .



4

; 6563450 <
LOCOS CFCS EE CLEP PEPSI S






RAAAPAAAAAARA DR ABRARAA AA








aN

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD |

S LTD)—Head of Broad St.

a

STANSFELD, SCOTT & Co., Ltd.
Broad Street

RS

a

. >
SS N ‘ y
z OF x x
Ss % ‘ oy %
= 1 ».* > JD on $
S JAMAICA «GR Ape oe seat
Eo % : Toe ings ae
a $ an hr) 7p, ews 2
= > war! ; y - ree t oh} $ x
= CIGARS Ser Ce hae fs
) J ‘4 % rs) ew hs “ x
a * SAE ef %
5 x "© , oy S
: ; Pr ’ ry ‘ J ‘
2 ow mactano 8 YOU ORDER THESE EARLY !! §
we “TROPICALES” % ! %
oY in Boxes of 25KQ | DANISH SLICED BACON per Ib 4 =
= GE) $ PEARS IN SYRUP per: tin 59
Fey GENTLEMEN” S3|0 TRINIDAD ORANGE JUICE per tin 38 %
a in Boxes of 2588]% HEINZ MULLIGATAWNY, OXTAIL per tin a 30 %
mt #G|$ HEINZ MULLIGATAWNY, OXTAIL, & SCOTCH
ag PL R DE MACHADO” sel BROTH SOUP per tin 30 :
a n Boxes of 2568/% wWeinz TOMATO SOUP per tin .33 %
im atts , BIR Lacrocen Lm 14a
a POND RAS 2918 LACTOGEN 2)-Tb tin 380 &
3 am % HEINZ STEM GINGER per bot 112 3
Rt “LONDRES KES ScorrisH CREAM WHISKY per bot 100 &
Me 8 os GS MEINZ TOMATO KETCHUP per bot 7 g
D eee * WG | 8 COCKTAIL CHERRIES per bot 122 3
S ncesaehel taps 5, S| 8 HEERINGS CHERRY BRANDY per bot 5.00 ¥
By. OPERAB OEE | SULTANAS pes Ib 3
tae | Sony rae. wns
“py or ov 9 t} % OURRANTS per Ib ~
BF PANETELAS > & % MIXED PEEL per tb %
RR .. NETELAS” so S¥ | Y CLTRON per tb %
Meeks 35 4 \S BRIDAL ICING SUGAR 1-1) Pkg a2
BB vAPTER SUPPER oe & BANQUET CASTER SUGAR 1-Ib pkg. 22
4
? . yer. %
Brvirc, ' e N ADD COCKADE FINE RUM TO THE
Fel k |
Ne! a) $ GROCERY LIST
n1 Y
GEMS” in Bundles of 5 ox 8
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¢
3
e
°
+
%
e
-
ys

ae 44,6444
LPVLOO SPL FEISSSSO

-

434,*
1669636965094 5 66 6 OB OBOOCBOCOOSGE OOOO 34%

po
OREN ik PK OK ON GR DK NAN DN OECD LAA AOIES Se0ooe..:
ss ADNENE MENON NAME MGNENE Wid OZ SG NG ACAI HOD NO ANA ANDRE










a
ma
WS

Onion Growing )
May Become
Minor Crop

SUCCESSFUL results in the
cultivation of onions here by the . ;
Department of Agriculture make Ping aa |
it likely that they can be grown : i
to the extent of becoming a minor wa Z
crop, the “Advocate” was told
at the Department of Agricul-
ture, Onions can be success-
fully grown, it was said, in some
of the light and sandy soils of
Barbados.

B®

ea gE) \ a
SEX
‘ : % Dab)



BBC



has led the the way for many Years===and still leads.

Some of the onions grown in Bey : . Pf 23

this way were among the exhibits 5
in the stall of the Department at
the Annual Industrial Exhibition
just ended. In this stall the dis-
play was of vegetable gardening.
There were two sections, the
vegetable garden section and the
pot and box culture section. The
latter is recommended for per-
sons having very little space and
very little soil such as is the case

This Year we have what is possibly the Largest and

Best Assortment of

TOYS AND XMAS GIFTS

WE HAVE EVER OFFERED TO THE PUBLIC
| OUR STOCKS INCLUDE—

ALL KINDS OF MECHANICAL AND OTHER TOYS,



A typical Street in Kingstown, St. Vincent, showing a wide street
running into the sea. Note the Spanish type archways and the

wide covered pavements. This delightful fountain presented by LADY GILBERT CARTER

in 1909 lies disused in the “TRASH HOUSE”, Queen’s Park.











Shirts that will give him shoon dolight

ENDEAVOUR striped shirts with 2





Bi PEEING DEN GAN IN A TU A NAT BN EPA PRI PN DAN FUT





BBUBVEECVV VERE EVEVEES

ELITE and KAY Brand Sport ||| 3 DOLLS, DOLLS PRAMS, DOLLS TEA SETS,
— . eT collars. to ot Crea, uae Brown = 2 METAL SOLDIERS, ELECTRIC TRAINS
match. Sizes to 17. ue, ite, Small, Medium and a3

Large.
Each

EACH soso, SOMO MECCANO SETS, ROCKING HORSES,

TRICYCLES, XMAS TREES AND TREE
DECORATIONS, FANCY GOODS, NOVELTIE

$35.20 & 1.01

RENOWN Broadcloth Sport shirts
with short sleeves in shades of

White, Cream; Grey, and Blue
Sizes: S. M. K.

DURAMEN striped shirts with tru-
benised collars attached. Excel-
lent value,

HAA ANA A RAN OS

MBAS NG NESS




m MN
H



\f :

Wei ack s ieee. 2 $4.38 — Each $1.43 ||/ROF ALL KINDS AND HUNDREDS OF OTHE

. 3 &

te ec ss Bases 'RITEMS EMINENTLY SUITABLE AS GIFTS PORE

Handkerchiets. 7 achernnaeee tien Randers Oe eso | OLD AND YOUNG :
WOGEE ask, sisakcocwsdiasveathen chiefs with initials. Each ........

1 te 94¢ $1.09 & [15 ae

White and Striped fringed



BRING THE CHILDREN AND LET THEM SEE WHAT

WSIS



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AF
PAGE TEN



Eastern Caribbean Seeks Capital

Ce



SUNDAY ADVOCATE ~

For Development Of Industries

POR
i

OF-SPAIN, Oct. 27

is driving actively to-
her level of industriali-
hereby counteracting some
ie effects of unemployment.
Although efforts are being made
sughout the Eastern Caribbean
attract outside capital for the
ievelopment of new industries,
his is particularly noticeable in
Trinidad, where the passage o
primary industries assistance leg-





f the

thre

islation is already proving its
worth Construction has com-
nenced during the past few

months of a factory for spinning,
weaving, dyeing, finishing, print-
ing and knitting cotton textiles.
Other industries recently estab-
lished include mixed feeding
stuffs, moulded rubber and plastic
products, ice and cold storage
plants, time-recording equipment,
and a rum and industrial alcohol
distillery and by-product yeast
plant. The new brewery in this
island is now in full production.

In British Guiana, the construc-
tion of a modern sawmill near
Georgetown on the Demerara
River, is in progress, and a soap
factory has been opened in Dutch
Guiana. In Barbados, a new cot-
ton knitting factory is in opera-
tion, and the Gulf Oil Corporation
is starting operations under the
petroleum rospecting licence
granted last May.

The establishment of secondary
industries, based on natural re-
sources of the Caribbean area and
imported raw materials, is of par-
ticular importance. Coupled with
the active development of the for-
est, agricultural and mineral re-
sources of the Eastern Caribbean
and the Guianas, this trend should
strengthen the economy of the
area, whose people have been
largely dependent on agricultur?
for their livelihood.

With a rapidly growing popula-
tion, partly as a result of better
health conditions. it is vital that
the sources of income should be
widened. The implications of such
a trend for Canadian exporters is
obvious. Higher living standards
and incomes less subject to vio-
lent fluctuations will provide op-

;brtunities for expanding the
trade in both variety and quality
of commodities. owever, the

distortions in tye pattern of ex-
ternal trade in the Eastern Carib-
bean have become more serious
since devaluation. If permitted to
continue, they might easily result
in distortions of the internal
economy of the area.

Tcurism Offers Potential

Business Opportunities

It is becoming more and more
apparent that tourism offers one
of the more hopeful business op-
portunities for the islands. Even
here, however, the expansion of
the industry continues to lean
heavily on the advantages of a
favourable exchange rate to vis-
itor from Canada, the United
States and Venezuela. The activi-
ues of

Hy T.
Canadian Goverment

boards, co-ordinated and guided
by an organization set up under
the wing of the Caribbean Com-

f mission and of other commercial

agencies, are bearing fruit. Not-
able has been the rapid develop-
ment of Barbados as an off-season
holiday resort, especially for vis-
itors from Venezuela. With im-
proved facilities for air travel
from the north, there would ap-
pear to be no reason why this
movement should not be extended.

It is apparent, however, that
more and better hotel and guest
house accommodation in all the
islands, and especially in Trinidad,
is essential. Recent developments
in accommodation and travel fa-
cilities include new hotels in St.
Thomas and Tobago. new airfields
in Guadeloupe and Martinique,
and enlarged airports in Trinidad
and Barbados. he airlines con-
tinue to increase their services to
meet new traffic demands but the
same trend is not so evident in
steamship services. This is par-
ticularly true with respect to pas-
senger services between the Car-
ibbean and the United Kingdom,
which are quite inadequate.

The middle quarters of 1950
have been marked by an accen-
tuation of the trendsrwhich have
developed since the devaluation of
sterling in the autumn of 1949.
There was a seasonal falling off
in retail business activity, put
good crops have put more money
into the hands of consumers, and
as the Christmas buying season
approaches there is an evident up-
turn. The upward trend in the
cost of living continues. In gen-
eral, weather conditions have been
favourable, although there has
been damage to crops, livestock,
roads, bridges and buildings in
Trinidad as a result of heavy
rains and floods. In the Leeward
Islands dry weather has caused
some anxiety regarding the grow-
ing crops, while in Antigua and
some of the smaller islands in the
group, heavy damage was caus-
ed by two tropical hurricanes in
August and September. On the
whole, labour conditions have
been satisfactory, although there
have been some difficulties of a
jurisdictional nature amongst the
sugar workers in British Guiana.
The problem of unemployment
continues, especially in the more
populated and highly urbanized
areas, but in Trinidad it is being
met by an active drive towards
industrialization.

Imports of European Goods
* Increased

Supplies of consumer goods are
plentifui. although the continued
restrictions on imports from the



the various local tourist hard-currency countries limit
Chamber Of Commerce Plan
Middle-Class Housing Scheme

(From Our Own Correspondent) struct a middle-class housing

KINGSTON, J’ca., Dec. 5.

Ii the Government consents to
two main points of a plan now
being comp.eted by the Jamaica

hamber of Commerce, Ltd., mid-
aie-ciass housing schemes _ in
Gieater Kingston are to receive
2 capital investment of £80,000
or more from private interests
soon.

First of tne two points is that
the Government should guaran-
tee repayment of the investment
10 those who put it up; and the
second calls for amendments “to
the, present building regulations
{or the city so that prefabricated
houses of the type now being put
up in the U.S.A. and Great Britain
might come to be legally accepted
here. *

Details of the proposal, which
have been decided on, are that a
syndicate -of private investors
would put up the money to con-










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estate in the suburban area of the
city, and after having it erected
would virtually hand it over to
the Government. A middle-class
man in search of a home for his
family would be able to step into
a cottage on the estate for no
more than a month’s rental of the
cottage, but for this facility and
for the faet that he would have
20 years to pay, the Government
would have to guarantee his pay-
ments,

Type of houses on the estate
would be mostly the 2-bedroom

cottage and an effort is being
made to see if the houses and
land together could not be kept
down to under £1,200. In
this connection a_ well-known
Jamaican firm of structural en-
gimeers has been given the job
of planning out the cheapest yet
most durable type of 2-bedroom
houses,





Quors

Pa) ay



(BELL'S) Bots.

Dial 2072 and 4502

Grant








Major
Trade Commissioner

purchasing to the sterling Com-
monwealth and other soft-cur-
rency territories. There has been
a noticeable inerease in the vol-
ume and variety of s from
such countries as Italy, France,
Western Germany, and the Low
Countries. Japanese textiles ap-
peared in appreciable quantities
during the period but qt prices
higher than had been anticipated
During August and September,

the cargo movement from the
United Kingdom and Western
Europe was particularly heavy.

The approach of the holiday sea-
son finds warehouses and shops
well stocked, a'though prices are
higher than last year and there
are indications of still higher
levels during the first quarter of

1951. On the whole, food sup-
plies are plentiful, both imported
and locally produced. Tempor-
ary shortages have developed

from time to time, mainly in those
commodities bulk purchased from
relatively unaccustomed and dis-
tant sources of supply. So long
as discriminatory exchange con-
trols against nearby hard-cur-
rency countries are continued
together with price controls and
subsidies, these irregularities are
likely to continue.

Agricultural Conditions
Generally Good

Agricultural conditio&s have
been good throughout the area,
although the cotton crop in the
Leewards was adversely affected
by dry weather in April and May.
The heavy rainfall in Trinidad is
likely to reduce the yield from
the cocoa, citrus, and _ coffee
crops. Sugar returns have been
satisfactory with record or near
record crops in all the British
colonies, namely: Trinidad, 164,-
500 tons; Barbados, 158,182; An-
tigua, 30,203; and St. Kitts-Nevis,
41.204 tons, Production for the
year in British Guiana is expect-
ed to be in the vicinity of 228,000
tons. Deliveries of nutmegs and
mace in Grenada have been light
and with demand exceeding sup-
ply there has been an upward
trend in prices and an active
export movement. Citrus and
banana supplies have been plen-
tiful and overseas demand strong
with consequent heavy shipments
from Trinidad and Dominica. The
favourable effect of this has been
particularly noticeable in the
latter island where eapnomic con-
ditions recently have shown strik-
ing improvement. There — has
been a satisfactory expansion of
rice production in both British
Guiana and Trinidad, the increas-
ed crop in the former colony per-
mitting the filling of contracts
with ritish Caribbean islands

““Communist”’ Is No Slur
On Character.”

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec, 7

“To call a person a Communist
involves only an imputation on his

political opinions and not upon
his personal character, and sucn
an imputation is outside the-mis-
chief of the section under con-
struction”, said His Honour the
(Srperererel ferme roicw






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The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lid.

WHITE PARK ROAD, ST, MICHAEL

and opening the possibility of
shipments to Jamaica. ;
There has been a sharp drop in

gold production in British Guiana, |-

only 8,756 ounces being entered
during. the first eight months of
the year as compared with 16,230
ounces during the same period in
1949. The decision of the Ana-
conda British Guiana Mines Lim-
ited to discontinue gold mining
operations and development after
some four years of exploration
work isa serious blow to the in-
dustry. Exports of bauxite from
the colony also declined both in
quantity and value. On the other
hand. the production -of diamonds
cantinues to expand and the ex-
port of timber is up. by over 50
per cent with overseas demand
cantinuing to be strong. Produc-
tien and exports in the Trinidad
petroleum industry have been
good, although it is apparent that
unless new wells come in ata
higher rate than at present, the
refining section of the industry
will become increasingly depend-
ent upon imported crude. A num-
ber of new licences has been
issued recently covering marine
drilling in the Gulf of Paria, but
not much activity can be expect-
ed in the immediate future owing
to delays in the delivery of equip-
ment. New refinery capacity by
Trinidad Leaseholds Ltd. is urder
construction. Exports of natural
asphalt from Trinidad have boen
satisfactory and, with the renewal
of the lease on Pitch Lake, active
efforts are being made to improve
production and handling methods
and to- find wider uses and new
markets for the product.

In the political field, the most
outstanding event has been the
inauguration of a new constitution
for the colony of Trinidad «nd
Tobago. The first election under
the new constitution’ was held in
September and the new legisla-
ture was opened on October 20.
The constitution provides for a
council having a majority of
members (18 out of 26) elected
under an adult franchise, with an
executive coundil including five
members elected by the Legisla-
tive Council. Reserved powers
include finance, defence and ex-
ternal affairs, but the constitution
is a long step in the direction of
self-government. Action has been
taken towards a widening of the
franchise in the Leeward and
Windward Islands. A: Legislative
Council has been established in
the British Virgin Islands, a

residency of the Leeward
slands, and a commission has
been appointed to report on con-
stitvtional changes in British
Guiana. Local self-government
has been inaugurated in Surinam
(Dutch Guiana), but the question
of constitutional relationship with
the Netherlands remains to be
settled. The matter of participa.
tion in the proposed federation of
the British Caribbean. colonies is
presently under consideration by
the various colonial legislatures.



Chief Justice Sir Cecil Furness-
Smith, in. the Trinidad Court of
appeal-yesterday when he allow-
ed the appeal of Mr, Raymond

Watkins, an Arima school teacher |,

against the decision of the Arima
Magistrate ordering him to pay
a fine of $25 for having called
Mr. Edward Lai-Fook, City Solici~
tor who at that time was con-
testing a seat in the Legislative
Council a “Communist.”




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HEINEKEN'S
SCORES AGAIN!

Earns Top Award in West Coast

Tasting

The Wine and Food Society of Southern California
in a special sampling and tasting of beers, ale and stout
held at the Union Oil Company Recreation Park, Brea,
California, on July 15, 1950, showed the following rat-
ings and the brands of beer:

1. 87.20 Heineken’s
2. 85.20 Muenchner-Lowenbrau
ae 84.70 Tuborg
4. 80.65 Bass Ale
5. 74.66 Hackerbrau
6. 73.60 Pilsner Urquell
7. 72.85 Mackeson’s English Stout
8. 72.73 Whitbread’s Pale Ale
9. 7117 Carta Blanca Mexican Beer
10. 69.06 Bohemian Ale
11. 68.91 Coors Golden
12. 68.12 Miller’s High Life
13. 66.11 Guinness Stout
14, 65.78 Budweiser
15, 65. Country Club
16. 61.50 Acme Ale
17. 53.89 Acme Lager
18. 48.05 Eastside
19. 48.03 Blatz
20. 47.50 Burgemeister
21. 41.11 Weilands
22. 40.83 Pabst Blue Ribbon
23. 40.45 Lucky Lager
24. 32.72 Maiers 102
25. 32. Altes
26. 29.09 Regal Pale
27. 21, Rainier
28. 20.55 GB.
Superb 100
Excellent 75
f Good 50
Fair 25
No good 0

Mr. Jules Berman, our West Coast representative,
informs us that the tasting was attended by 165 im-
partial beer connoisseurs and the voting was done in-
dividually so that no results were available until all
votes had been compiled.

Indeed a proud accomplishment for our Heineken
brew masters!



K. R. HUNTE & Co., Ltd. are the Local ‘Agents

for HEINEKEN’S KEER







axiguiceaeiciaias casisseataiameilly

— — —————


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1), 1950



City Was Busy
Yesterday

The City was again busy yester-
day as men and worgip went
about their shopping “for the
Christmas season

Every now and again the side-
walks become congested with
pedestrians and the streets with
cars, but the policemen were fully
alert and did a good job in keeping
cars and pedestrians alike on the
move,

The use of the loud-speaker by
the mounted police was especially
helpful in this respect. No one
was left in doubt as to whether he
or she was causing a “hold up.”
Crisp instructions were given and
these were complied with, without
hesitation.



Obituary
Miss Carmen Hunt

The death of Miss Carmen
Elaine Hunte, headmistress of the
Wesley Hall Girls’ Sthool oecur-
red at the Tercentenary Ward of
the General Hospital, on #riday
morning. She was buried the;same
evening at St. Mary's CHurch after

? ;

a funeral service at the James
Street Methodist Church where

she had been a member of the >»

choir, and Sunday School teacher
for many years

A procession of the girls of the
school led the cortege. and crowds
lined the roadway in silent tribute
to a friend and teacher. For Miss
Hunte was not only a well re-
spected member of the teaching
fraternity, but one whose influence
for good had earned her the un-
dying esteem of a wide circle.

Miss Hunte began her teaching
career at St. Mary's Girls’ the
school she had attended. Her ap-
titude won quick recognition and
she was sent to the Rawle Train-
ing Institute for teachers. At the
end of her training course she
joined the Wesley Hall Boys’
School staff under the late Mr.
Rawle Parkinson. Her service at
Wesley Hall Boys’ ended when
she was appointed headteacher of
the Wesley Hall Girls’ School in
1931—a_ position she held with
distinction until a few weeks ago
when ill health forced her to re~
main at home.

Her illness was a short one, and
the community is the poorer for
her passing.



May Get Pioneer Aid

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec. 7
The wood-working industry in
Trinidad, is being considereq for
Pioneer Aid. Among industries
recommendeq by the Advisory
Board for pioneer aid, and agreed
to by the Executive Council in
Trinidad are those of the Safle
Bros, Mill, the Renown Shirt and
Garment factory, Caribbean

Hosiery and British Paints Ltd.





YACHT “AXELLE” glides beautifully under full sail.



English Yachtsmen
Reach Barbados

ON WAY TO

NEW ZEALAND

TV/O English Yachtsmen now in Barbados with their
8-ton 34 x 10 foot yacht “Axelle”, completed the third leg
of their planned voyage from the Isle of Wight to New
Zealand when they arrived here two weeks ago.

_Squatty Ronald Frost, 32 and
his slim and slightly taller 29-
year old brother Donald, crossed
the Atlantic in 48 days. “Good
sailing”, they called it. Some
4,700 rilcs they have already

don< -he entire voyage which
oe s ipproximately 14,000 miles
of s zg

T) started off from the Isle
of Wic it some time in June this
year and wefe escorted for about
10 miles by the Smith brothers
who afe famous for Atlantic
crossings, in small yachts.

The Frost brothers made their
first stop at Madeira where they
spent two months replacing stores
and watching the hurricane sea-
son go out. Another two months
were spent at Las Palmas, the
next stop they made before com-
ing to Barbados.

Anxious

Perhaps the most anxious mo-
ments they spent during the At-

them. Lying at anchorage there,
they were one night unfortunate-
ly moored close to a ship which
was being plundered by thieves.
The thieves were manipulating
small rowboats.

Ronald levelled his gun and
fired “high” to scare them. He
was lucky to be missed when one
of the thieves replied wildly with
another shot. “Barbados iss a
bright contrast to dry and dusty
Las Palmas,” thought Ronald
“Las Palmas—no grass, not trees,
but plenty of thieves’, he said.

An Archbishop

They met the Archbishop of

Canterbury at Las Palmas
and he wishe@q them “bon voy-
age” before they set off on the
2,800-mile run to Barbados,
Cooking was no difficulty for
them during the voyage. They
used a pressure cooker which,
with all the rolling and tumbling

SUNDAY ADVOCATE Pa *>

Jamaican Pianist
Chosen For Empire
Festival

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON.
Eighteen-year old pianist Nigel
Coxe, from Jamaica, had the hon-
our of representing the colonies

in the final concert of the Festival
of Empire Youth in London on
December 6. It was staged in
‘he India and Pakistan Hall of
Overseas House, under the aus-
pices of the Overseas League and
ihe Music Circle Committee.

This was not Nigel's first per-
formance in London. He was the
solist_at the second concert of
he National Youth Orchestra o9f
Great Britain, and soloist again
with that orchestra when it gave
its first overseas concert—in Paris
last April

Nigel came to Britain in 1946
on a scholarship awarded by Clif-
ton College and studied in Bristol
under Douglas Fox. He then
gained the Walter Stokes Scholar-
ship to the Royal Academy ot
Music and became a pupil of
Harold Craxton.

The Festival, an expression of |

youthful talent from the countries

within the Commonwealth, is
unique. The Music Cirele Com-
mittee arranging it hopes that it
will not be merely, another iso-

lated musical event but the first
of an annual series of such Festi-
vals.

Others participating in the con-
cert were from Great Britain,
Northern Ireland, Canada, Aus-
tralia, New Zealand, South Africa,
and Ceylon.

Textile Men
‘Can Sell
More In U.S.’

Among the potential American
markets for British goods is the
Supplying of luxury coffin linings,
Says a report of a British Textile
Marketing Mission,

The mission, which visited the
United States under the auspices
of the U.S, Economic Co-opera-
tion Administration, say many of
the better quality rayons and vel-
veteens bought to line the caskets
were at quite high prices.

“We concluded that the possi-
bility of selling in the better price
ranges was worth further con-
sideration by British exporters,”
they say.

America, says the report, is
“not swamped with the gaudy
ties of the American type seen
in the East End of London,”
Many American-made ties are

designed, in the words of a buyer,
“to look like the sort of tie which
an American would buy in Bond
Street,”

British design centres need an
expert fashion scout in the United
States, whose job would be to
provide a flow of fashion fore-
casting news about trends in col-
our, design and style, says the
mission,



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‘Phone 4644 -0- 20, Broad Street



















+ r lantic crossing was on the voyage of the Azelle did not spill any of —LES, |
B.W.LA. Increase Flights Po |
Ww. to Madeira. For three days they the food. When the cooker fell \... im u 7
For Christmas ‘Season — becalmed and drifting out of off the fire they only had to re- thes ae Pe hat ye days i The Broadway First
- eir course, lace it. They i aki tops
(From Our Own Cor-espondent) The second night of the calm at They intend making 10

Do you need some material for a special occasion? See our
assortment. Most likely you will find it.

With regards to shoes, our customers are the most pleased
and satisfied pedestrians.

New SATIN finished PLASTIC HANDBAGS in black are
the ones you dreamed about—only $5.20 each

. the Avelle was caught in a fish- The use of twin spinnakers on after leaving Barbados on their

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec. 7 ing trawl. The a Packtamen the Awelle gave them consider- way to New Zealand, One of the

The British West Indian Air- only knew this when the trawl, able ease. The spinnakers are two stops will be Panama _ where
ways announced this morning that being hauled in for the catch, flat pieces of wood attached to they hope to work for a while
they will be putting on seven brought the Awelle with it and the mast, having two ropes run to before going on to New Zealand.
Viking flights and one Lodestar almost smashed it to the bow of the rudder. In a driving wind The Azelle was bought by the |





trip for the Christmas season. the fishing boat, Next day, they the yacht becomes self-steering Frost brothers in 1944. During | HOUSEHOLD NEEDS FOR CHRISTMAS
fae = sous beens coupe mackerel for food. ei ae were sailing vale devine pare Gk cae oar wanes | SHEETS 807—100" ..........00ccccccucuuees -. $5.53 each
arbados, Tobago, Grenada an eir stay at Las almas winds for the majority of e rebu ler_an¢ ade | Qefinticly Unbostabie (Matablished 1806)
between Caracas and Barbados, npleaant emory for voyage and so they even risked trip to Spain in 1949. The only —Price de n y Un . F i E
ide pda Ala Danae aig oh Sea's rearing together some of the accommodation is one cabin whieh | PILLOW CASES of excellent quality......... - 135 , ATTENTION GOLFERS!
nights, The average day’s sailing holds four bunks and a cot. WHITE DAMASK SERVIETTS ........ 46c, and sO, An accident on the links could cause you much

—Unrepeatable.
DAMASK TABLE CLOTH with coloured borders
—52" x 52” 2.37 »
BREAKFAST TOWELS ............-- ae 8 eee 4 Al»

embarrassment or lay you open to payment of heavy

compensation 5
Allow us to issue you with

Trinidad Architects Will ,

e’







soon have that better





Build U.K. Hospital

Messrs. W. H. Watkins & Part-
ners, F.R.I1.B.A., Chartered
Architects of London and Consult-
ing Architects to the Government
of Trinidad and Tobago in respect
of the new San Fernando Hospi-
tal, the Colonial Hospital, Port of
Spain, and the Caura Sanatorium,
have been appointed architects for
a 750-bed Hospital Centré for
Exeter, England. This eee,
ment was made by the South-West
Regional Hospital Board, and the
announcement follows close on
the commissioning of the same
firm to design a 600-bed Hospital
for Swindon.

Messrs. Watkins & Partners are
architects for the new St. George’s
Hospital and the Royal Free Hos-



pital Group and the Hampstead
General Hospital Group in Lon-
don and for the Bristol Royal In-
firmary Scheme.

In 1944 Mr. W. H. Watkins,
senior partner, was invited to
Barbados in connection with the
proposal to erect a new Hospital
for the Island. He will be visiting ?
Barbados again early in the New
Year accompanied by Mr. Norman
Watkins. M.A,, and Mr. R, Foster
Reekie, F.R.I.B.A., Resident Part-
ner in the West Indies.

Messrs. Watkins & Partners
have designed the new air-condi-
tioned Barclays Bank in Broad
Street, Bridgetown. Tenders for
the construction of this building
are expected to be received in the
near future.
















medicated ointment for the
treatment of Head and Chest
Colds, Bronchitis, Coughs,
Catarrh, Sore Throat, Rheumatism, Lumbago, Sciatica,
Muscular Pains and Strains, Brulses, =u,
Scratches, Influenza, Neuritis, Neuralgia,
Toothache, Insect Bites and other Aches
and Pains. Healing! Soothing! Relieving!
Try it—you will say it is a real blessing ! C=

THERMOGENE |
MEDICATED RUB

In Jars and Tins

A double-action








ASEPTIC OINTMENT

Children’s skin ailments need the soothing
touch of Germolene Ointment. It re-
lieves irritation, subdues inflammation and
gives protection against the entry of
harmful bacteria. You will find, too,
that Germolene draws out dirt from cuts,
abrasions, blisters and sores and stim-
ulates the growth of new skin. Keep @
tin of Germolene handy for family use.

FOR
SPOTS, RASHES, BURNS
IRRITATIONS, ABRASIONS















TOWELS in variety of sizes and qualities from . .
CURTAIN NETS in a good assortment etc., etc,, etc

HROADWAY

Dial 3895

THE PERFECT PAIR ~—

.







DRESS SHOP

No. 1 Broad Street







PERFECT ENJOYMENT

OF MOTORING

A GOLFERS’ INSURANCE POLICY

that will give you full protection against this risk.

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents.























Meee y ert

PAGE TWELVE

Kiddies Day
_ At “Woodside”

IT was Kiddies Day at Wood-
side Gardehs, Bay Street, yes-
terday afternoon, The majarity
of the children that attended
were all dressed up attractively
and were constantly seen gui i-
ing their mothers either to the
Lucky Dip, Wheel of Fortune
the Shetland ponies.

The Junior section of t
Police Band, under Cpl. Bet,
played tunes to suit the occasion
and while the children playod
on the lawns, mothers listen:
attentively.



The first prize for the prettic;
costume in the Girls under se /-
en section went to the little tot
who represented the “Queen of
Hearts.” She wore a long satin
gown with tiny hearts stuck all
over it. The prize for the mo:t
original costume in this section
went to the “Policewoman”
while a Consolation prize was
given to the girl who represent-
ed “Night and Day.”

In the Boys’ section first prize
for the most attractive costume
went to little “Buffalo Bil”
while that for the most origir
went to the boy who representc |
“Time to Retire.’ He was sea‘ -
ed with a candle in his than:
The Consolation prize went |»
the lad who represented “San‘
Claus.”

The prettiest costume in th»
“Girls over” section was that wora
y the “Hawaiian Girl,” ne
prize for the most original went
to the girl representing ‘Th’
Clock” while the Consolatio.
prize went to the “fPansy.”

HARBOUR L0G

In Carlisle Bay

ARRIVALS

Sch. Eyerdene, M.V. Sedgefield, %
Wonderful Counsellor, M V Walt
Sweeney, Yacht Tern III,., Yacht Axe!
Sch. W. L. Eunicia, h. Rosarene, M
Lady Joy, Sch. Adalina, Sch. Sunshi
R., Sch. Lueille M. Smith, Sch. Mary '
Caroline. Sch, Zita Wonita, Sch. Gio
Henrietta

Schooner Rainbow M. 30 tons nv}
Capt. Marks, from Trinidad via :
Vincent

§.S. Ikana, 3,969 tons net, Capt Vici
Jefferson, from Caleytta via Trinid

§.S. Essi, 5,357 tons net, Capt. Tho:
sen, from Point a Pitre.

§.S. Canadian Challenger, 3,935 tons
net, Capt. Clarke, from Montreal y.:,

Dominica.
DEPARTURES
Schooner Mary M. Lewis, 69 tons n°,
. Marshall, for British Guiana.
-V. Daerwood, 94 ton; net, Cay
DeCoteau, for St. Lucia.
§.S. Essi, 5,357 tons net, Capt, Thorese °,
‘- Venezuela,
8. Canadian Challenger, 3,935 tons
net, Capt. Clarke, for St. Vincent

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd. adyive
that they can now communicate wt:
the following ships through their Bai
bados coast Station:-

, Olimpia, 8.8. OQurania Gounare
S.8. Meline, SS. Alcoa Polaris, S.S,
ito, S.S. Horata, S.S. Bonaire, 8.8
lemstad, S.8. Fort Townshend, 8.8
Coelombie, S.S. Myken, S.S. Orinoco, 8.8,
Southern Counties, SS. Kim, S.S. S,
» SS. Loide Cuba, §.8. Fernglen,
$8. Alexandros Koryzis, S.S. Quee
beth, S.S. Cavina, 8.5. Plogeet er,
$8. Gundine, 5.S. Moraybank, $9
Jamvica Producer, S.8. Polycrest, 8.5.
ros, S.8. Ancylus, S.S. Robert C.
tle, S.S. Cape Rodney, §.S. Win-
el er, S.S. Vera Cruz, 8.8, Elomntecillo.
8.8. Battle Rock, S.S, Pioneer Cove, 8.8.

” Seawell

From TRINIDAD WRAL

m :

Hess, William Annie Crichlow.
DEPARTURES-—By B.W.LA.L.



x TRIN $
Costa Vaughan, Valence Gale, Eric
ler, Eugenie ey Samuel iley,
Bailey, Hu Mitchell, Helen
hell, Carol Mitchell, M. Mitchell
John Goldie, Harry Harris, Arthur Moore,
ard Soza, Stewart Nock.

—



SUNDAY



TWO TONE DRESS EHC Radio Notes:

Democracy

Sir Gladwin Jebb KG puade by

In a talk in the B.B.C.’s Gen-
eral Overseas Service in the com- |
ing week listeners will hear Sir
Gladwyn Jebb, Britain’s spokes- |
man at the United Nations Secur- |
ity Council Meetings, speakin«
on the promise of communism
and the performance of dem-
ocracy., Originally broadcast jv |
the B.B.C.’s Third Programme. |
this address was given to the In
ternational Chamber of Com- }
merce in New York on Septem- |
ber 19. Much to his embarrassment |
Sir Gladwyn, who is a =|

|
|



“a
a2 © eee
Rae e TO

eee Ee







ye
a

®

working diplomat with no desire

for the limelight, became a popu-

lar figure in the U.S.A., during

the Security Council meetings in

August, attaining almost to the

Status of a film star. Some of our

readers may recall the comment

of the diplomatic correspondent of

the New York Times on Sir Glad- |
wyn who, he said, demonstrated |
that the ‘British have not been

practising the gentle art of verbal

homicide at Oxford all these years |
for nothing.’ Sir Gladwyn’s tal'< |
will be broadcast, under the title

of ‘From the Third Programme.’

at 6.30 p.m., on Wednesday nexi,

13th, inst.

Art In The Caribbean

There will be an unusual
feature in the BBC’s “Caribbean
Voices” on Sunday next, 10th,
December, The programme wil)
open with a talk on “Art in tho
Caribbean” by John Harrison o!
the British Council who is well
known to many in the West Indics
from his work in the Caribbeau,

he programme concludes with
short story by Gordon Woolford
of British Guiana telling of Indian
adolescence. ‘Caribbean Voices,’
the Sunday evening version «cf |
‘Calling the West Indies,’ is to be
heard every Sunday at 7.15 Pp.lo.
Those who have been complainin :
of poor reception from ree

|



ANOTHER attractive costume at
“Woodside Gardens’ yesterday
was that worn by Ann Taylor.
She is dressed as a pierrot.

BBC Radio
Programmes

SUNDAY, Dec, 10 1950.





for beautiful, lustrous hair.
particularly at that time “he
evening, should tune in « ae
49 metre band—6.195 megac, vies,
18.43 metres—where reception is
usually much better than the

Analvele: Te ake Siete ant tee sews alternative beam on the 31 metre | Only Lustre-Creme has this magical biend of
nalysis; 7.15 a » a e ; 2 ; . i
& ain, Gniling alt serene: Chet nd. secret ingredients plus gentle lanolin. So

Down; 2 noon The News; 12.10 p.m

rich-lathering in hardest water, és ha
News Analysis; 12.15 p.m, Take it from Human Relations 8 oi ater, Leay Pe
here; 1245 p.m. London Forum: 115 On Indust ragrantly clean, shining, and so manageable. Try
pam. Radio Newsreel; 1480 pam. ,Gunday ndustry Now on sale everywhere in the handsome
Home News from Britain; 2.15 p.m Last month the BBC planned 4
Communism in Practice; 2.30 pm, Va- two-w: a 7" NOT A SOAP! NOT A LIQUID! BUT
riety Bandbox; 3.30 pm. Our Mutual at exchange programme be

Saas 7 ) tween All India Radio and the
Friend; 4 p.m. The News; 410 p.
Interlude; 4.15 p.m. Musie Magagine; BBC but this had to be postponed,

4.99 pm. Sunday Halthour; 4.85" “pam. ‘The broadcast is now planned fo: COLGATE-PALMOLIVE-PEET LTD.
Spilokue; 56 p.m. Tom Jones rio; 5.15 ‘uesd
p.m. Programme Parade; 5.20 p.m. From qT ay next, 12th. December, at

~ ; *Â¥ ; 9.30 p.m, The subject for discus~
the Children's hour; 6 p.m. Round Bri- “
tuin; 6.80 Sunday Service; 7 p.m. The Sion will be ‘Human Relations

News; 7.10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.19 Industry’ ie)
pm. Carjbbean Voices; 7.45 p.n. The pe Bae the ee eee z
coming of Christ 8 p.m. Radio News- ’

veel; 815 p.m. United Nations Report;
8,30 p.m, English Magazine; 9 p.m, Pred
Hartley; 9380 p.m. London Forum; 10 of T.



indystrialist, and George Wood-
pm, The News; 10,10 pan

Secretary
From the = rn
Editorials; 1015 p.m. Anything to de- from R.

clare; 10.45 pan. Ivor Moreton and Dave Masani and Dr, N. Das, who will
Kaye; 11 p.m. English Song speak from New Delhi.

MONDAY, Dec. 1, 1950 The Creator of



7 am. The News; 710 am. News
Analysis; 7.15 a.m. Band of the Life Everyone knows ‘Alice ja
G ; 145 a.m. C en Island; 8 a.m.
From the ‘hAitorisige io sm, © Pee: Wonderland’ but not many know

‘amme Parade; 8,

am. Nights at the the creator of Alice, not the Lewis
pera; 9 am. Clo

Down; '2 noon The " r -
News: 1210 pam News Anaivsie. 1215 ©atroll whose name appears oi

p.m, BBC Midland Light Orchestra; 1 the title page but the man behind
“m, Seience Reyliew; 1.15 p.m, Radio that pseudonym, the Reverend
lewsareel; 1.30 p.m. Educating Archie; Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, In a

2 pan, The News; 2.10 p.m. Home News
from Britain; 215 pan. Sports Review, BBC talk on Wednesday next you

240 pm. Two wey Exchange; 3 p.m. Can heag trom the "ys St Be whe

Calling all Porees; 4 pum. The News; arles
4.10 pan. The ally Service; 4.15 p.m CS
Do You Remember; 4.30 p.m, Thirty Dodgson, Lecturer in ike

Minutes; 5 mm, Listeners’ Choice; 5.15 ties at Oxford, was ly like.
p.m. Programme Parade; 5.30 pm. The Speaker will be Violet Dodgson,
Story Teller; 545 p.m. Dance Musie; hig niece; her talk, which (s

One Mant moa ral Orme: 6.18 pm, entitled ‘Lewis Carroll As I Re-

News Analysis; 7.15 p.m. Our Mutual member Him,’ will be broadcast
Friend; 7.45 pam. Chosen Island; 8 p.m. at 7.45 p.m., om Wednesday, 13th.
Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. United Na- inst. right after ‘Calling the Wes*
tions Report; 8.20 p.m, Composer of gies

the week; 830 p.m. Science Review Indies.

4.45 p.m. BBC Northern Orchestra; 9.30
pm. Books to Read; 9.45 p.m. Film
Preview; 10 p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m
From the Editorials; 10.16 p.m. Ray's

And=

Proved by severest tests

“CARIBBEAN VOICES” FOR
DECEMBER, 1950






CADBURY'S



nt! : show hi
Fomt 1m how much

same magical LANOLIN-biend lather .

Tonight he can see new sheen in your hair,
FEEL its caressable softness. Yes, tonight...
if you use Lustre-Creme Shampoo today !

DISCOVERY WITH LANOLIN FOR SOFT |
’

Oniy one soap
gives your

~ =

Xt skin this exciting

Lg y Bouquet

other leading toilet soaps

2 a Laugh; 1045 p.m, Commonwealth Sur-
Mine Is 1000 BG. feye ti bin. Boia :

BOSTON: WRUL 15.29 Me WRUW 11.75 did.
; 3.00 p.m. Lec-

Down—Or Is It?

Visitors to the Glasgow branch
of the zeavat of R emg next
year will Ww in a coa
mine eae enn think they have
gene down 1,000 ft.

To create the illusion the cage
will start with a slight jerk, go

on at a snail's pace—and stop
ith a bump.

It is
mine

tian Science Programme
ture on Christian Science.

LORRY AND JEEP
COLLIDE



ibition.

“shifts” by a pit overman.

here.
The mine will show the his-

Several bodies had to be

- of coal mining methods from from the wreckage with acetylene
The dead included two
went down clinging to women who were travelling in the

~—Keute:.

days, 200 years ago,
miners
a moving chain.

when torches.

—L.F.S.

jeep.















Shopping made easy at—
* BOOKER'S *°

PERFUMES by CARON :
Nuit de Noel, Ete.
YARDLEY’S : Bond Street, Orchis, April Violets
LANVIN : My Sin, Scandal
LOVELY GIFT SETS by :
Innoxa, Etc., Ete.
HAIR BRUSHES: Gents’ and Ladies’
We carry a wide selection of these
« LADIES’ TOILET SETS
« TRAVELLING SETS
« HANDKERCHIEF PUFF
POWDER BOWLS



Rock Garden, Bellodgia

« BOOK ENDS
« CHROMIUM PIPE
RACKS
« COMOY PIPES

TABLE MATS
SHAVING MIRRORS
ETC., ETC,, ETC.

af The Finest Selection of “XMAS GIFTS” is always found
at.

Booker's 20s) Drug Stores Ltd.

Broad Street and Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY)

MASSACHUSETTES, Dec, 9.

Seven people were killed and
rt of a full-scale coal five others critically injured when Daisy Myre,
a lorry and a jeep collided to-day
Visitors will be divided into on the rain-swept highway near

Potter & Moore, Yardleys, 4711,

3rd Vecember, Diamonds on the Moon
by Kenneth Newton. A crime story
uniting Jewels and snakes, from Trini-

Journey by Train by R. Warren. A
Kingston street-woman returng to the
country,

10th December, Art the Caribbean
by J. Harrison. A talk by the British
Couneil er aavieer Gard Woetsera

The y. rdon Woolford,
A edy of Indian adolescence in Trini+
dad,

17th December, The Kite by “Bar-
nabas”. A clean and exciting story of
a te fight in Trinidad. ‘ Ea
A Plague o indpesses iy gar
Mittleholeer K tharacher sketch from
England with a Christmas feeling.

24th December, Christmas Poe: by
(Jamaica), A. N. Borde
(Grenada), and Barnabas Ramon-Fortune
(Trinidad).

Bus Journey by Marjoria Brown. A
short sketch for Christmas from
Jamaica,

A story to be arranged.





Sist December, Limbo by Willy Rich-

te
>
ardgon (Trinidad). An incident at a ve ax
week-€nd seaside party, a iy
Discovering Tropic by Samuel Selvon Px Cs
(Trinidad), A verse meditation on the SN f/
2,

West Indies.

HOUS

Dec. With



Opening Monday

WITH A COLLECTION OF

WEST INDIAN FLOWER PICTURES

BY

RICHARD CICCIMARRA.

HANDMADE FURNITURE AND POTTERY

ANTIQUES — GIFTS — FABRICS.
COLD SPRING COTTAGE
COAST ROAD ST. JAMES TEL. 91-74

















| DECORATION |:



ADVOCATE



lovelier
your hair cam look



Lustre-Creme !



A: WONDER NEW CREAM SHAMPOO

GLAMOROUS HAIR



iy

eur Costs.

Costume
Jewelry

in Pear] Necklaces, Earrinus,
Brooches, Rings, in loveliést
assortment in Town.
Ladies WRIST WATCHES
in lovely assortment.
REAL JEWELS! Set and
Unset from India.
Piaonsionge, Star Sapphires,
gierens, Rubies, Diamonds,
¢,
SILKS! in Pyjamas Kimon-
os, Underwear, Ete. Ete.
Parasals, Raincoats, Hats,
Purses.

Dress Goods
IN FASHION’S LATEST
CREATIONS

Anglaise Embd. Spuns, Taf-
feta, Jerseys, and a host of
other Lines |
Handbags, Hais, Shoes,
Powders, Perfumes, soaps,
Creams, Lotions, Ete., Etc.
Chanel Joy, Amour Amour,
Moment Supreme, My Sin
and Oto Dil Bahar.







wi

oat

SNS NIG NS NG NN NN 8 NNN NN A 8 8 NW NW BB BW A

4

PRETTIER THAN EVER!
In High Fashion











ee
OO RY MAG rr re eaks vc
Corners 8” x 8” x 16” ....

Halves 4” x 4” x 16” ..... ;

a

Ee]

THANI?’S STO

a

GH AZNANG MS









‘ > ES Will Save You the Worry of
Buying Gifts for Everyone.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 106, 1950







me >

eer : ay
Fabrics!

You'll look neat and trim in the latest and
most exciting ‘‘Tex-made” cotton prints,
available now at surprising savings,

Ask for Old Colony, Glenwood, Victoria,
Beverly and Suzanna. They are styled by
expert designers in beautiful flowers, stripes,
checks and geometric patterns. So fresh . . .
so easy to wash . . . so easy to care for. They
are favourites everywhere.

See this wonderful collection of high fash-
ion ‘*Tex-made”’ colour prints. ‘To be sure
they are genuine “Tex-made”, look for the
identification bands and tag on the piece
goods,

“TEX-MADE” 1S WELL MADE



CONCRETE PRODUCTS CO.

LODGE HILL,
ST. MICHAEL, Phone 2798.

In Spite of INCREASED COST OF CEMENT

we are still able to maintain LOW SELLING
PRICE of our

BUILDING

BLOCKS

WHY ?

: We have accumulated good stocks, which have enabled us to average

ah arahs « a 3 17¢. each Ex Factory
28e. ,, ”
30c. ,, ”
lic. ,, ”

Send in your Orders early while present Stocks last.









Wei i

HAT GIVE JOY
TO THE GIVER
AND RECEIVER!

For Gentlemen

Tweeds in Untold Qualities,
Tropicals, Grey & Cream
Flannels, Etc.

SHIRTS in widest varieties
for all purposes, Under-
wears, Pyjamas, Ties, Socks
in many varieties, Handker- “
chiefs, Belts Cotton and
Woollen Pull-overs,



Household
Goods

BRASSWARE:

‘inger Bowls, Ash Trays,
hant Bells, Cocktail
: & Trays, Flower Vases,
Flower Bowls, Etc, Ete.





ispreads, Bed Sheets,
in Lace & Net in wide
variety, Oilcloth, Bed Tick,
Piilow-cases, Carpets, Bed-
room Rugs Plastic & other
T. Covers, Towels, Napkins
Thermos Flasks, Etc., Ete







(GG NG NNN WG SN NN 8 BN A

7

4








SUNDAY, DECEMBER i6, {530 SUNDAY ADVOCATE P PAGE THIRTEEN *
fle a ee * sas . Ae af
‘ BY CARL ANDERSON |




MICKEY MO
wore MOUSE. BY WALT DISNEY
HE WAS CONVICTED OF RAISING |
HIS VOICE TO HIS MOTHER-IN-LAW
Ss
Loox HERE MAYOR Ont
zs T YOU
Taine yours \ 77,
CARRYING THIS
POLITENESS
THING TOO FAR?
-

on















ans t




NO...THE CITIZEN 1S |
BEING TAKEN OUT TO BE






YES...1 DARE SAY THE CITIZENS OF >
THIS CITY ARE THE KINDEST AND” .
POLITEST ANYWHERE IN CREATION |










BL

-A“CATERPILLAR"







DAGWOCD,









by ae ) BIR ke
INSURANCE eR@ Bh Na ONG
CHECK? 7 pais END CONFIDENCE
Oni geal % git \ > + IN ME?
Re EPP eer
| eles) TRACK-TYPE ws
af TRAC OFF cows
| Sa] 1 fe ee » — 7s
=a) |








- J . | a °
THE. LONE -RANGCER The heavy-duty steering clutches
permit this tractor to make a full





| HOPE THE MARSHAL AND HIS DAUGHTER
Brgx ACT THEIR PART CONVINCINGLY!

if y.

circle turn... Jirectly on its heel




under load. 7 © turning radius of





the Diesel | fer example, is
only 5'7°%,...c. big cdventage for
working in tro w Quarieis

| shost bi seeah-



ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LIMITED

St. Michael Phone 4629 & 4371

nn enreeenninenioniee







WE HEARD kez /( THAT MUST HAVE BEEN HE DIDNT KNOW] |WELLGO TO THE BOTTOM OF THE CAN- SE f§ | KNOW THEM ALL, BUTI mt
A CRASH A WHILE BACK. WE &@\ THE MARSHAL! THE BRIDGE YON AN’ SEE IF WE CAN FIND THE DIDNT KNOW THEY WERE
FOUND IT WAS A WAGON GOIN Z GEN WAS DOWN. ff] | BODIES TO PROVE TO THE BOSS THE WORKIN’ FOR THE UN- |

OVER THE CLIFF! 4 y b Aq | MARSHALS DEAD! ¢- Tweedside Road

















SPP OOVPIDDDO SOOO D D9 POG DEP POPV DODD DOLE LODO DPE VDL PPLVVVPLDP PEPLELPP LLLP PVP PLLA PPV PAPA AVDA AD,
8 %
8 ;
s
‘ Th WY I al” i !
x e oria S ¢€ lhoice e
¢
¢
$
x
: The Petler-Fielding Horizontal engine, built by J. d& H. MeLaren
$ Ltd., of Leeds, is the choice the world over where semi or unskilled
y
i labour is employed, and the minimum of attention and main-
Bh Wit AHOY-mMaTe! Lf I HAD A WONDERFUL ] | |
MORNIN = _0ID YOu Ll SLEEP! THE OCEAN I 1 owl tenance desirable. It is so simple, so sturdy, so trouble-free that
MAGGIE SLEEP WELL = HAS BEEN AS. - WE ARE uP x ;
a ‘ LAST NIGHT ® i] SMOOTH AS A LILY - ON SOME ~ , " Y
|| BE rei BIT : ROCKS! NO : once it is installed and your operator knows the controls, you can %
_ 1 —— 2 a . . . . . “ .
% forget about it for a long time, It is ideal for gravel-pils, saw- %
mills, quarries, etc., or wherever long hours of operation in dusty :
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== NET A. JUMPED OVERBOARD IN a % FH 32 - 40 400 - 500 SINGLE |
—————— ee MID-OCEAN~ON THE OTHER SIDE ' | E = x FH2 64 - 80 |- 400 - 500 TWIN $
THAT DEATHS-HEAD++ITS THE “Sey OF THE EARTH! HES DEAD! SOME | Be N BAR : er nc phage $ Ldn oe ; %
MARK OF THE MASKED 6UY WHO Y/ JOKER IN THE CREW PUT IT THERE, =) ee WE DONT START egret = %
CAME: FOR THE WHITE MONKEY? ) \ TRVIN’TO. BE FUNNY? fr TE we = Se $ x
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PAGE FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE ees, DECEMBER 10, 1950































































































































































































: SSS SSDI EL LLSD
“eal SIFIE NOTICE | CHIROPRACTE |
A S I I D A D 5.| : | FACTORY EXPLODES WRAP UP THOSE GIFTS WITH...... IS COMING
PARISH OF ST. PHILIP DR. FERREIRA of “Chiroville* Upper CINCINNATI, OHIO, Dec. 9 LADIES & GENTLEMEN
APPLICATIONS (in Sealed envelopes St. N b: re Se eee GIFT WRAPPING PAPER Srighten your CLOTHES
TELEPHONE 2508 | APPL an tht outsides, cy oe her rage we me tear Beplanaée) ny, Chiropractis At least 15 people were injured, Drighies. up yous CLOTHES
~- a post of Assessor”) will be received by | nose, throat, lungs, stomach, kidneys ang | Several critically, and two were See RAYMOND JORDAN
DIED the undersigned not later than Tuesday | lower organs, Dial 2681 missing after an explosion which — FROM Bay Street
DOTTIN Late mason contractor). | F@R RENT 12th December 1950, for the post of | ——— —_—----] wrecked the plant of the Ameri- Opp. Combermere St.
pate celtdense aeckines, Assessor for this Parish. The CENTRA MPORIU. Se
Christ ch. The funeral will =| Applicants must furnish Birth Cer-| LOST & ‘FOUND can, Weterproofing Company here L E. M4
eave late residence at 4 o'clock tifleates, Medica) ay.
venta dk toe Westoury Dear HOUSES monials. en So Sh i chieas 0b Ga tecaeie (CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—PROPRIETORS). 2
te Friends are invited er Sg oe aan t oe assume LOST _— factory burst into flames. About Corner of Broad & Tudor Streets. i g
wt sas cag nd tng | ee aa Pea ml on en Beet tae tacoty at te inne :TON”
—— 23 one on or co ; office day to— n in the factory a e time > “ oF >
SEALE—ADELAIDE GWENDOLYN. At] safe batt , CHEQUE-—12 A.H. 25090 Barclays Bank
Seng ig a Le di any F Silas SO TEacy, | eaeameen Suns, ast, ezabiegae| the explosion. ETON” §
H funeral will leave her Gin: fy v, Elon Evelyn. Finder will be rewarded —Reuter. Ae “ K"
. clock this SPE r , St. Philip. on returning to Elon Evelyn, Worthing A Piano that is as modern as ¥
I | ESPERANZA—Fully furnished on St. 5.12. ‘in. a. | View, Christ ‘Chr - the age ¥
2 ur Cemetary" | see Bee eee Pie Tee ain, it Chureh, "T1250 A. M. WEBB — STOCKBROKER A Sibert overstrung instrument
attend | 1,12.50—6n,

} Se nd Mrs. Phylis at a moderate price.

$ el and Joseph (childre | WANTED ; Immediate deliveries can be x

‘ * eph (children) FARAWAY=—St, Philip, Skeete's SHIPPING N¢ _ NOTICES Announces removal to more central premises at 33 Broad Street ini 24

_ — By a edrooins, "Water. mall mill HELP Write, Phone or call for a de-
FOU SALE é Ot todas, a eS, ROY NETHERLAND (Upstairs Phoenix Pharmacy) where clients’ requirements in monstration. $
AUVOMOTIVE NEWHAVEN—Crane Coast, Furnished, CLERK—Junior Clerk for Parts De; th : 4 CECIL JEMMOTT >
ne e@ pure stments (stocks, bonds y

CAR—19 Minx new, | 4 bedrooms, Water mill supply, Tighting STEAMSHIP CO. ES FORRES AEN Se ORS a ae SUPRERy SEE Ae Ot negetlette tave me 7 33 Broad St. upstairs Knight's ¥

ewner leaving colony. Phone 8378. lant. Double Garage, servant rooms. The MV. “ ” . iti % Lid. Pt > 4563,
50—n Dial 4476 119.50—t4.n. | , Salling from Amderdam & Dover—a.s. gocept Cargo oak imamenees tor “SorctaaWORLANT wants post @aeve and shares, local and foreign) will be cared for as expeditiously Bayietyenarg
> - oe on “g » December j j PCS SOO SPSS.
CAR—1938 Morris Tourer 8 H yood| FLAT at Sea View, Upper Bay Street, | “Bonaire” Sth., 6th, January, 1980 * nt, St. Lucia, Grenada tary Companion, Good letter writer, as official regulations and local practise permit. APPSOES *
and Aruba. Sailing Frid:
condition. Phone 3199 or 3224. | opposite Bay Mansion from ast wr Satling from ‘Amsterdam—m.s, “Willém- s ay Mh, eos Mage ee Be See “4: SIBBEOSIOOSOOOOSOE
i i ive: 8.12.50—+.f.n. | stad” December, ” “ lomin. . c
See an, | uP ~ ener stad” 19th. January, 3000. ma. aan The M.V. “Caribbee” will J} non resident. Willing to travel. Apply: Postal Address: P.O. Box 266, Bridgetown, Telephone pending.

CAR—On« 8 Car in g ood work.| FLAT— Fully furnished, all modern | 22rd. December, 1950, ace! Cargo and Passengers for Box 33 C/o Advocate Advtg. Dept. ’ W h Di | ..
ing order. Mode Apply to | conveniences (2) Bedrooms, Linen and| Sailing from’ Hamburg, Bremen, and jea, Antigua, Montserrat, 9.12.50—2n. @ have on ISp ay... s}
D'Arcy A. Scot Magazine Lane Cutlery 10 minutes walk from Club and | Amsterdam—s.s| “Boskoop’ 16th. Decem- Nevis and St. Kitt. Sailing — —— y

6.12.50--3n, | Cit Phone 4103, 9.12.50—2n. | her, 1950, s.s. “Hermes” 12th. December, Friday 15th. JUNIOR OVERSEER—Apply in writ- A LOVELY ASSORTMENT or &

es —mernreneene ————-———— | 1950. - itaue ing with oe of references to XMAS GIFTS. "

AR—One ‘1 Forde 16 i perfect UNFURNISHED FLAT At “BRIAR- Sai fded . ” B.WA. SCHOONER OWNE Manager, Lower tate Factory. * : Ss. . 7 y

pithing onic tyres esnd ways blied | FIELD” with Garage, Lower Collymore nie Deine 1950, eee —— ASSOCIATION, inc. 9.12.50—6n. is e YARDLEYS’ GIFTS FOR LADIES &

Driven. Dial 4239 712.50-4.| Rock, St. Michael, Dial 3472. H. Blair | December, 1 ss. “Willemstad” Ist i ae — —- e our ection YARDLEYS’ GIFTS FOR MEN &
Tbs aren ' of Bannister. 6.12.50—t f.n. | Jenuary, 1950, s,s. “Helder” 2nd, January, Per G. CHEESMAN. LADY—Experienced Lady for Office P . YARDLEYS’ SHAVING BOWLS

DODGE MOTOR ENGINE—A_ gc ——_—_—__— 1950. Tele. 4047, work. References required. Write P. 0. YARDLEYS’ SHAVING LOTION §
1939 Dodge Motor - with VI-VILLA ¢ St. ia near Sailing to Madeira, Plymouth, a Box 233, Bridgetown. 8.12.50—6n. e : PERFUMES & COLOGNES. 0
Body, Chassis and Tyres thrown in. | the church. It con open Veran- | Am=-terdam. — m. “Oran: estad’” rd RS ~ >
Diol 4157 0 12 50~2n.| dah, Drawing and Dining Rooms, 3 Bed-| December, 1950. . eesti : ALLEYNE SCHOOL om e Unriv: e BRILLANTINES, POWDERS, ¢

a ————— | rooms, Water toilet and Bath. Now| (Limited passenger accommodation WANTED SOAPS, RAZOR SETS, CHOCO- ¥
ELECTRICAL ake Apply to D'Aroy A. = available). From May 1951, an Assistant Mistress LATES IN BOXES, ALSO x4

UNIVERSAL REFRIGERATOR — | Mozazin® “see. oo S . P. MUSSON, SON & CO,, LTD. BF WISE . ADVERTISE to teach one or mote of the following: GIFTS SETS FROM 2/6 UP- §
Newly overhauled and in perfect con- Agents. ' Art, ee French, Spanish, CUNY WARDS & MANY OTHER suit. %
dition. Apply S. C. Fosier, “Mangrove CES jes. Salary, according to —— se
Cot”, Hindsbury Road. Dial 2803 any PUBLIC NOTI tions ae aoe on scale .E ABLE GIFTS, y,

a p 2 +,
Ce ge ig pons .
‘URMTURE NOTICE Canadian National Steamships | !2!-i Sash ee" :
u FURNITURE tress not later than February 15th. : y : - :
fr Wala, ne Mlahoee. “Suitable tor | NEITHER the Master nor the Con-| SOUTHBOUND pee 12.11:50—0n.|]1 HERE'S YOUR SELECTION TO CHOOSE FROM C. CARLTON BROWNE 3%
Office and Home. Only $5.40 each signees Of Whe MLV, Walter O. ieee te Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Rarbados MISCELLANEOUS Wholessle ,
G. W. HUTCHINSON & CO,, LTD.| will be responsible for any debt | oF 30 Nov -_ 10. Dec. 15 Shes, & Retail Druggist
Dial 4222. 2.13.00-4.£.0. | debie cote ue cag a part ee 2 Dec: 4 Bec. 13 Dec. 14 Bes. BOXES — All kinds of Card Board 136, Roebuck St. Dial 2813
FURNITUPE—If yo = _ = 19 - 2h . . Boxea other than corrugated card YARDLEY’S
2 —If you are interested in 5 ree ?” . Wen. Jen. 29 Jan, Apply Advocate Dept - A 5 OOO eee ;
Purniture puy a visit to Middle Street MANNING & CO., LTD.—Consignees. Sah 1 Feb 3 Feb. 12 Feb. 13 Feb. one 10 60-t.f.n s SS0Sse
Beenit ire Depot at the Corner of Middle 10.12. 50—€n. ° , awe Bond Street Perfume $4.80—$8.00 ‘
Victoria Streets, opposite Cole's , WINTER OVERCOAT and Woollies Lavender Water from $1.55 to |
Winters F } uisaee ee all descriptions j NOTICE Chest 44—40 — Telephone 3035. $6.98. i
5 pee 5) nang Re Estate of Arrives = ails, = Arrives = Arrives 6.12.50~3n. |
See ASHTON WINTHROP HU Barbados Boston . Jo
LIVESTOCK NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all te 33 Jan. 22 Jan. 23 Jan. HOUSE OR APART- pril Violets Cologne $2.32 —
5 _ | persons having any debt or claim upon ++ + 10 Feb. 12 Feb. 21 Feb. 22 Feb. MENT for short or indefinite period, $3.88. 1
wo Pure Bred | or affecting the estate of Beatin LADY NELSON .. ++ 25 Feb. 27 Feb. 8 March $ March preferably St. Jomes Const or Mastings, |
Price $50.09] Winthrop Hunt, late of the Y.M.C.A, % reasonable ren ‘elephone ~
niuls, Grenada, | Hostel in the Datlabiet Saint Séichael M.B.—Sublect to shana without notios. Al vessels Atted with cold ttorugs cham- 9.13.50—2n. 7 sizes,
i 2 : ados who died in bers. and freight reves on — logne for Men........ $2.40
and Island of Barbad .
2.50—3n.]} this Island on the 29th day of July Hair Tonic .............. $1.25 | e
: er ——— | 1948, are hereby reese ae Hair Cream ..... 60c |
€ 3red oltein Fyeife- articulars of their cla : 5, RFF Oo SORES, *
SSL ee: Feats O30 their lake’ S48 GARDINER AUSTIN & CO. LTD. — Agents. THMA MUCU SS ARS
old. One % Bred | care of Messrs, Hutchinson & Banfield, ts: & Lotion 94c—$1.74, i DON
‘Calf seven weeks old. | Solicitors, James Street, Bridgetown, t d Fi { Da vender ine on Sens
\nimals ate Progeny | of on or before the 15th day rere oosene rs Lavender Hair Oil , 62c¢ j
th's Pure Bred Holstein Bull! 1951, after which date shall proce Pe 2
= bert”, Five Times Sine of] to distribute the assets ot ae getate GOVERNMENT NOTICES Ing attacks of ang, rons oF Ath ne Ladies’ Gift Cases co | A.F.S., F.V.A.
Giver Challenge Cup for Best Bull} among the parties — entitle hereto, ntaining
VW. Clarke, “Ivy Lodge”, Ivy Road having regard to the icevts and claims Attention is drawn to the Defence (Control of Drug and aay niin y roBe iat. wither snouner Lavender Water and Toilet | Formerly Dixon & Bladon

. Michael 8,12,50—3n ly of which I shall then have s j oon
ec sek a BESO SE | ony of een tr ahall not be table |Patent and Proprietary Medicine Prices) Order, 1950, No. 11 which re a re erga ete not a Soap, + $3.00 to $10.50 FOR SALE

HORSES — Suitable for Estate Work ssets so distributed to amy person ; er, thi hi the
Agply Wakeheld Fisrtation ‘Telephone |.ct whose debt or claim I shall not will be published in the Official Gazette of Monday 11th December, iets af tae pine the +» ALBO ..

95-213. 9.12.50—8n.] pave had notice at the time of such] 1950. goss starts hel ta halving neture Semen Lavender Water, Bath Dusting ves oun — Pros-
catalina distribution. : : ‘ + ately 8 wi elps nm and re- ’ pect, . James. ery conveni-
MECHANICAL "AND. all. persons indebted to the 2.. Under this Order the maximum retail selling price of | fhove thick strangling mucus, 2 Thus Powder, April Violets, Bond St_, Une ‘stunted’ bitunlow oite

BICYCLE — One Green Raleigh Gents | sid estate are requested to settle their) «Virol is as follows: — Thore refreshing igen. # ne ord wounder, Lavender Toilet Soap. Tere hee, manta eee ed Lone
Sports Model Bic ;cle. Three Speed, Bell, counts aon ah December 1080. Maximum ae cou eo pe - os. dit Seri een ete dante
Pump and light, Tools complete, 2 A ick nts s » ining

ths ole aes ae | SYBIL PAULINE DeCOURCEY HINDS, ‘ Quick sa room, verandah 8 sides,

Months old. Good as new, Owner leav- | SYBIL eaUe ute of the Will of “Item Unit of Sale Retail Price guarante et MENDACO from After Shav. Lotion and Shaving warage, paved courtyard and
ing islanc. Phone 3978 > ae Nchton Winthrop Hunt, deceased. $$$ $$ ehemist . Bowls ........ $3.00 to $6.12 pleasant garden.

ei 9.12.50—4n.| Virol .. «| Medium sized bottle .. 78c. : tia Maa AmeAae a

BICY Gent's Sunbeam, 148 Lar i eu 199 " — Near
Model. 3-speed, elect. igt., pump, per- NOTICE ” ee os Be u} i $ : CHRISTIAN BROTHER- Marine Hotel: A bungalow resi«
fect order. Dial 4109 * a HOOD HOUR vine yen) ae Jounge, wate:

10.12.50—1n. esta’ ies, 9th December, 1950. 3.30 p.m. Today French. windows t galleries ‘ae
ert WILLIAM W
ts SWRITERS i ae oe deceased RADIO DISTRIBUTION pare. 1S enti abet [weg
ewr iter nother shipment uy i nl *
arrived. See these fine machines before | NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that sl PART ONE ORDERS Church of God, Chapman St. | ae eres ree
otherwise conmitting yourself. Apply ae ¢ quar-

A. G. St. Hill. Phone 3199, ach the ee ee ‘Worrell LIRUT.-COL, J. CONNELL, OBE, E.D., Rev. Walter Tiesel Lavender Bath Salte Xtis. .$1.80. | ters, large garage, double carriage-

1.12.50~7n, 0.4, | deceased, late of Jackson in the parish Go Violet Brilliantine .. 760. to 80c. way. Well cared for walled garden,

of Saint Michael, who died in this THE BARBADOS REGIMENT. ee Bond 8t. exion Powder, | ,
MISCELLANEOUS IC are "requened. te send partrcian |.atmee Moe 46 ~egnon re 900, | 4 tevels, cronacky fe, Sua plswer
eaten | of thei Geeta wk Obed Gly’ atoaes 1. PARADES . | port of this unspoiled residential
“ANTIQU £S Of eveny description| to the undersigned Hubert Waterman There will be no further parades until after Christmas. AN OPPORTUNITY Bond St. Dusting Powder $2.16. aiea. This pesicinion is superbly

Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver] Tull, C/o Messrs. Haynes & Griffith] 2, MEDALS te buy Lavender Dusting Powder a 16, built at a when cost was
Watercolours. Early books, Maps. Auto-| No. 12 High Street, Bridgetown Solici- All Officers and Other Ranks on the Active and Reserve Strengths of the a Second Hand Lavender Toilet 7 of little o » It contains large
@taphs etc. at Gorringes Antique Shop| tors, on or before the Sist day of Barbados Regiment who are eligible for medals as a result of service in the GAS ELECTROLUX Soap 540.—88c reception rooms, a study, very
adjoining Royal Yacht Club. December, 50, after which date I last war, and have not yet received such medals, should hand in their names RE Shaving Sticks ............ "2c. commodious galleries, 3 large bed-

3.9.50—t.f.n, | shall proceed to distribute the assets and pereruless of service including their ex-Army number, together wi FRIGERATORS Shaving Bowls $1.56 roms, bathrooms, 2! garages and
coins —_..-.-- | of the deceased among the persons en+ details o! maga for for which they are eligible, so that further inquiries may Owner bought bigger Refri; Les Bt aes all the appurtenances expect-

GIFT SETS—Attructive Gift Sets ot | tiled thereto, having, regard be made to expedite delivery, este hue ‘ ed in a house of this type. The
Tea Spoons, Pastry Forks, Fruit Spoons, | such claims of whiche T shall then 8. PARKING OF CARS AT ST. ANN’S FORT ‘and in peek senae grounds are approximately 4% |
Cocktail Sets and many others. Prices | had notice and I will not be lable for In future no Officer or Other Rank will be allowed to bring his car through SEE IT WORKING acres in extent and. the enclosed
ae low as $2.99 set. G. W. HUTCHINSON | the assets or any part thereof so dis- the tunnel behind the Drill Hall, Permission may however be given in at your GAS SHOWROOM teh tt ua ro ; One
& CO., LTD. Dial 4222. tributed to any person of whose debt certain s by either the Staff O the Quartermaster when heavy Owner asking $90.00 for it e garden w _ t nnis eth ee

2.12,50—t.f.n,] or claim I shall not then have had} Holes. Pye be delivered to the Drill Hall, " : : : ik = Rpg a ine cs agg get
a re pareeamns i notice 2 ne . >

JEWELLERY—A new assortment of | And all persons indebted to the sald The last Volley Ball Match between HQ and “A” Coy was won by “A” Coy. —= fortable property at a reasonable
ladies R.G. watch straps, Pear! earrings.| State are requested to settle their in- 5 ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING (ALL BRANCHES) ! price,

L. M, Clarke, Jeweller, No, 12 James| debtedness without dela ay. 18 DEC, 58. ‘ “OR, VILLA" Modern
Street, Phone 3757. 9.12.50—2n, | Dated. this 31st da: October, 1950. Orderly Offcer—a/Lt. 8. Lashiey BROWNE co. AE eenbet
WAGTmRMCAN “TULL, Orderly Serjeant—2i7 L/S Blackett e Mone: ERaS Saerey au4 acres *

ete” Gas fen ee aera Qualifed Rector’ Ne eis Dmicer—Lieut. P. 2. C, Peterkt COSTUME Wi asa Ep Colne motel cvivaway.

gan: With five sets of Reeds and 2.11.60—4n erly icer—Lieut. P. L. C. Pe in 3
Sub Bass suitable for a small Church Orderly Serjieant—235 L/S Quintyne, K. = asst Hosen: Converted into two hy Ed
or Cottage. Apply: Royal Bakery, M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major, as ec . contained apartments, re en’
Baxters Road. Henry Young. PUBLIC SALES SiGiav.. & Potent Earrings. How the investment. Property with good
9.12.50—4n. 7 atid a The Barbados Regiment. Silver and Gold Necklets. sea bathing, Offers ;

RDERS e Comb and ss 3 MODERN STONE BUNGA-

ONE CABLE PIANO—Apply: Royal THE IMENT SERIAL NO. 33 Inexpensiv 3
Bakery, Baxters Road. Henry Young, AUCTION 8TH Rear SHEET 1. Brush Sets for Ladies y LOWS, also a Stone and Timber

9,12.50-—4n, and Gentlemen. a House are available in a pleasant

PLASTICINE--Harbutts f del a ha ee ae ted and tak trength Shaving Mirrors seaging from et 700" Spwares.

—Harbutts famous model- 580 Pte. Toppin, D. E. ic Attes taken on § r ‘ .
ling clay—multi-colours 24c, $1,80 per UNDER THE SILVER 581 Barto K. w.ef. 4 Dec. 50. } Gold Brooches. Particulars afd appointments to
box. Evans & Whitfields 2. PROMOTIONS } Our usual Xmas Cards gets its long life view on application.

3,12.50—4n. 517 Springer, W. “A" Coy Promoted Cpl. w.ef. 8 Dec. 60. and Xmas Carols. “ ” Dayrells
ie On TUESDAY 12th by order of Mra] 3 MENT — Fine 44 43, Swan 8 ROUMAIKA” = =— | Dayre!

RAIN COATS, RAIN COATS: At $214] J M. Cave, we will sell her Furniture 264 Pte. Bourne, E. L. ” Fined 10s. by the C.O, under section treet. Road, Navy Gardens. Attractive
each lovely colours in Plastic for Ladies. | «t “Greenwich” 2nd Avenus, Belleville 14 (i) of the Volunteer Act and The life expectancy of every part of a Goodyear tire is and imposing property. Drive-
They are so useful and economical, And which includes section 19 (i) of the Volunteer Regs —————————— — . way flanked by mahogany trees.
would make a Bvey Xmas Gift ton.) Dining Table, Cedar Cabinet, Book Cast a for insubordination, on 30 Nov. ———, measured by a great variety of tests. 8 reception, 6 bedrooms, kitchen,
‘THANI BROS. Pr. m. Henry Street,| (gloss doors), M.T. Water ‘ . . pantry, large verandahs, garage
Dial 3466. 29.11:50—tn. | Morris, Chairs, Cedar Desk highabaae 4. LEAVE — PRIVILEGE 10-DAY'S Materials that withstand all of these tests are the onl and storerooms. Grounds approxi-

gag a - : Radio Table, Floor Lump and Ornament Captain FP. N. Grannum Bn HQ Granted 8 days P/leave from 11—18 materials used in Goodyear tires mately 2 acres. Ideal Guest

— Two (2) Top Hung; Tables, Rush U; : ° proposition.
Calloprileli Steel Gates suitable for door- | Glany and China” ‘Pristine Biectrig Pte. Small, 2B, " Granted % days P/leave trom 30-26 i a aay
ways 8 ft. wide x & ft. 9 ins, hish.| Toaster, Hot-plate and Iron; Single iron TY FM As a result, Goodyear has held its place as the world “PLEASANT HALL” — St.
Apply D. M. Simpson & Co., Marhill St. Redsteads and Beds; Painted Furniture M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major, Browne’s nautical Almanac first-choice tire eve ince 1915 Peter. Picturesque Estate House
10.12.50—€n. | in Bedstea S.O.L.F. & Adjutant, Ty year since .
ds (Simmons Springs, Presses dos aen Barbados Regiment. 1951. me in elevated position with ap-
“iia eUAHEHeautitul “Roecd ~ | Dressing Tables, Combination Presses and e j eS proximately 4% acres. Thee arre

: TABLEW ARE Beautiful osedawn Dre “ez Table, Fibre and Cotton filled | Platignum Ni 4 reception, 6 bedrooms, 2 yeran-
“Greydawn", “Goldendawn” seen on all) Ma , Canvas Cots, Linen Press bs for your dahs, fermery, orchard etc. At-
ree oe eS oe a | MODERN HIGH SCHOOL — | ftir: oh
be ie = meres it pe < Garden Bench and other items. Sale
placeable from stock, Evans nitfields. | 11.30 o'clock. Terms cash, REGISTERED AND APPROVED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, “BLACKMAN’S” — St. Joseph.
oe PapAet petal ar - = BRANKES, TSO 2 oe a3 THE En Examinati Friday, 8th inst., the under Ae a wocuenin ee

TEA — eful and attrac- Auctioneers. 302 who sat our Entrance Examination on Friday, nm ni . HN| ’ ER with historic associations is
tive Ae ne A most useful ity Soa 2 .12.50—2n. ned candidates were successful in gairing admission to this school for JO. ISON’S STATION Y still available and offers are
designs and decorations, Prices as low emic Year 1951. Others who passed the enrtance exam, will be accepted : open to consideration. This
as $9.95 set. G. W. HUTCHINSON & CO., Se S000 ts Our building programme is completed. AND HARDWARE The st hee property is well sited on wooded
LAD. Dial 42 212.50-t1n'| UNDER THE SILVER 1, Adams, Owen 61. Hoyte, Iris rongest Hey fil side and powemes very fine

2. Adams, Valicia 62. Hackman, Greta EE > ’ Z views, There are 5 reception |j

YACHT — That desirable yacht “VA- HAMMER 3, Alleyne, Erskine 63, Jemmott, Adeline Goodyerr’s tire cord is rooms, G bedrooms, kitchen,
GABOND". Tel. J. A. Reid, Lone Star + et Age a aching ah stronger, more uniform— pee 2 ayia bigs Servant's
Garage, Dial 91—33. 22.11.50—12n. Picket’ ee aie 1p 7cyrae he Belen RnR. $ Palgrave, peal &. Jones, Walter NOTICE makes a stronger, bruise- quarters for an garages,

wri se er rniture at 5 ntham, reen . Jordan, Victor ‘ - ey RESIDENCE, GRAEME HALL
PERSONAL Windy Wold’ “toh eee z Best wishes 68. King, Harcourt resistant, longer-wearing a an outstanding

The public are hereby warned ae which inelu . Best, stace 69. Kirton, Carmen carcass, property especially with regard
giving credit to my wife, C SE | Golches. Rockers; Tub Chairs; ft 20. 70. Lashley, Clement to the interior arrangements and
BOURNE (nee WHITE) oc 1 do et | Ormement Tables; Plant Stands; ih p, Hugh 71. Lawrence, Coralita Our City Pharmacy Branch fittings. The planning is well
hold myself responsible for her or any- nd Cushions; Tea Din- 12. , Enid 72. Lowe, Agatha will be closed for the thought out, and there is a large
one else contracting any debt or debts won. All in Mahogany, Piano by 18, . Budene 73. Lynch, Agatha weekly half holiday on the The toughest treac L-shaped lounge and dining
in my name unlem by a written order ard and Colard, BW. Chairs, Pie- 4. aite, Maurice 74. Lyte, Adelle Th: y foom with cocktail bar, 3 plea-
signed by me tures, Clock, Oak Rockers Dining and 18. ite, Monica 75. Lyte, Audene ursdays 14th, 21st, and The Goodyear tread is so fant be@rooms, all with

Signed LOUIS BOURNE Real Tables, Glass Ware, Tea Service, 16. Browne, 16. Martindale, Emelda 28th December, and. will ‘ ‘ ‘ wardrobes, a large tiled bath-

Barracks Road, Bank Hal cuble Mahog, Stump Bedstead, Can- i. aurreyes 77. Maynard, Cleophas be open to business on designed that inflation toom serves the imater bedroom.
St, Michael ses Cot, Double Iron Bedstead and 18. Callender, ia 78. Maynard, Cubbin the Saturd squeezes it together— ‘There is also a second ba’

812,30 2n_| Shrink: Mama. Press, Larder, $ Burner} 19. Callender, Gwennyth 79. Maynard, Gwenry:th aturdays, 16th, 28rd , : and toflet, modern kitchen wel

| Spring: Hang, Press, Larder, 3 Burner 20. , 80. Maynard, Winston and 30th December. makes it firmer, harder to vided ‘with ‘built-in’ cup-

EDUCATIONAL other Nenis in Cement Bote and 21. Carter, ue 81. Moore, Lester : cut, harder to wear down, om, garage, ser-

MALVERN ACA Sale 11.3 o'clock. = ae ae pete Banare Our Reliable Branch will vant’s quarters, paved driveway

ALVE ACADEMY o'clock. TERMS CASH. 23. Catling, Gloria 83. Nicholls, Evelyn h be good for thousands of ex- a veer ard ete, All the

EDENVILLE, CREAPSIDE BRANKER TROTMAN & Co. 24. Chapman, Norma \ 84. Nicholls, Myrna owever be open on these ‘1 on saat a one

An entrance examination will be held Auctioneers. © 25. Charles, ' 85. Norville, Elvira Thursdays and closed on oe nee ‘mahogany purenaaee it
at this school on MONDAY ‘8th Decern- 10.12.50—2n. 26. Chase, ‘ 85. Nurse, Cynthia the Saturdays as usual ea may pure! re-
Pee Peo : es aoe 31. Chaseewten, Marie &. Nurse, Albertha Ls aaigetd

1pils are prepare for various Clarke, Viol 7 88. Pilgrim, Jean
magrinations up to the L.C.C. School _ REAL ESTATE 29. Clarke, Allan 99. Pileritn, Madeleine ROGEIEY (nese Gole Couse

€rtificate standard in all subject oe 30. Clarke, Elsa 90. Pinder, Arrindell ,

Backward children are also ON THE SEA 31, Coppin, Coral ' 9%. Pinder, Noel KNIGHT'S DRUG with af er sounes ane eae
coached. Entrance fee $1.20 una at Garden, St. James 32, owas: Bindley 92. &uintyne, Junior Twe versions of tha — a fitted wardrobes)

F, L. MORRIS pavodern Bungalow, 3 bedrooms, two 33. . Bertram 93. Reed, Francis ie At ee ea
eee baths. Overlooking’ Sea, o: iy, 3 Se Derothy 9. Richards, Muriel STORES world's “‘nest tire: tiled bathroom, separate toilet,
bathing beach, Good Yacht vAnsteaeee, 35. Crookendale’ Norma 95, Riley, Athelstan well fitted kitchen, two car gar

-—— + a Phone 91-60. 16.11,50—t.£.n. 36. Dash, Basil 96. Sealy, Yvonne ; De Luxe All-Weather Tread one Sane a or pag

The Coleridge School shinee ae 37, Drakes, Alfred 97. Sealy, Humbert ———————=== ! aa . 4g nes low figure.
oe hl . of € concern business known 38. Gamble, Othniel 98, Selman, Waple ed for sala at & '
st. ¥ Dial Sane! Store 112 Roebuck Street. 3% Goddard, Euland 99. Sheafe, Fern O'Lene

The following candidates ial 3266 9,12.50—3n, 40. Goddard, June 100. Sisnett, LeRoy RENTALS
cessful tt our sseanes ey Mn inatio on, —__—_____ 4). Graham, Patricia 101." Skeete, Elaine BEAUTY
sale ojos wee , JOUSES—There are still 42. Graham, Yvonne 102. Slocombe, Hazel LUXURY BEACH HOUSE, St.
as R. : H. B » 4 ’ chattel houses that you car 43. Greaves, Eglantine 103, Smith, Cynthia 3 Fully furnished. : ‘

1. ; joyce e terms, There {s one at 44. Greaves, 104. Springer, David Samson was defeated not only > ames.

ogee Seeing | ti Gules Road recently repaired and 45. Green, Joan 105. StHill, Dorothy by the gorgeous tinsels an flash- i WINDY RIDGE — St. James.
a Ds M. Bicock ed with water-toilet and bath, 46. Green, Violet 106. StJohn, Bulinda ing gems of Delilah’s apparel, | Unfurnished. Very pleasant 3-
4G. E. Frameis a : he leased for five years, 47. Griffith, Petrina 107, Thomas, “arriet He was captivated by the beauty bedroomed property with an
5. S. 1. Gilles ane t Brandon for $800.00 48. Griffith, Kenneth 108. Thomas, Joan sf her form enhanced by a head acre of garden, Long lease if
& K, H. Headley £ t Hindsbury Road. 49, Griffith, Lisle 109, Thomas, Brenda ot exquisitely styled hair which required.

7 D, W. Jordan © it Beckies Road, 50. Griffith, Elise #0. Thompson, Laurene added charm to her personality. ‘

8, M. McGeary : t Kew Road 51, Harper, Rosamond i111. Trotman, Mary The ability to improve the ‘BEACH HOUSE”, St. Law<
9, D, E. Reece oe { Westbury New Road 52. Hasris, Monica 119. Trotman, Velma growth and add lustre to your tence. Available February on-
19, EB. = mpeauarcs One u Chapa an’s Lane, 58. Headley, Walter @3. Ward, Beryi gs isa “i possessed by few. wards. Furnished.

11. A. . Sampson , fer to D'Arey A. Scott, Magazine 54. Henry Jo! > r a comes after intense training, “ *

12, F. D. Walker Lane D 743 9.12.50. “4 55. urley, Lisle He SS eelin’ study and practice together with St. an Avene aman On
13. GR. Wellington ; — —— 56. Husbands, Jen 1°65. Walthrust, Lucille the right chemicals in correct Coast. Good bathing. Fully fur-

Parents of these boy: will be inter HOUSE Tobago. Old Colont 7. Holder, Grace 117, Williams, Marva proportion to encourage Nature to nished ;
viewed at 10 am, on y, 15st ’ te Beautiful grounds, 3 acres 58. Holder, Monica 119. Wiltshire, Kathleen earry out her purpose to make P :

January 1951. 0-21 E ecluded. One wing con- 59. Holder, Stanton 118. Wiltthire, Honor her hair beautiful “LAS CAMPANAS" — Marine

VPs 4 f contained flat. Freehold. 60, Howell, Yvonne 120, Worrell, Francis There fs one sure way to capture Gardens, Furnished.

Good estment, $24,000.00, For photow cakes ei admiration of ‘a Visit the
bs ve rther particulars apply Wilson, Twelve Scholarshi vere awe Mager peauty Salon, Two Mile
ARLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL | W' lc, Tovedo srr tocan, | beeen Barer eS Cuuing, Gioris Hill, and let Madame Valarie REAL ROTATE AGENE
CRUMPTON ST a —-— —— 7 8, Estwick, Anita 4. Forde, Vivian convince you that you can achieve | AUCTIONEER

‘Regiitered with Dept. of F ,FOR SALE OR LO 5. Grant, Donviile 4. Hurley, De Lisle that conquering beauty which

Gcicieccbin “and niente 2 MOORINGS “ofMiranged as three 3. Knight, Ronald 8. Lord, Oswald wa ‘admiration of the most | MORE PEOPLE, THE WORLD OVER, RIDE ON PLANTATIONS BUILDING |

Seagerayp # ga ts or one house. Six bed s, . Mayers, Winston 10. Niles, Louis : B critic |
tion to-morrow from 9.30 a.m etc. Furniture included. 11. Pierce, Milton 18. Thompson, Marjoric Dial 2790 for an appointment []| GOODYEAR TIRES THAN ON ANY OTHER MAKE |
ter G BATSON tate H € ' Gibson, “Marine I A. LYNCH any time of the day | z j

seca mane 9.12. S0e0dn, inpess Mason: ih Principal 1 tases



































































'




























































































THR CIty GARAGK, TRADING ce. LTD






































SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1950

Church
Services

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Chureh of Christ, a "
Upper Bay Street, Bridgetown,



Radio, same time, same Station, same |
hour }

JAMES STREET METHODIST

ll am, Rev. R. Mc

Rev. H. ©. Payne. —
PAYNES BAY

9.30 a.m. } y

te Mr. G. Marville. 7 p.m. Mr.

LL

7 pm

Ww
9.30 a.m. Mr.

Teer RHA
S a
gart a pm Au etie whith etase: Soll, Syl lrg he eRe
; nelud Ouse, A y
Fasmonin £, Chri ‘1a Science Healing. Me ¢ ullougis. 2 oe
° : on Sermon; God GILL MEM
Preserver of Man , 9.30 a.m. Rev. H on 7
7 pm. Jackmane Whee R J 9. Meal "3 SS
PB. ev. J. B HOLETOWN
s 8.30 .
yi _cinist cH RcH > ‘_ a: E. Griffin, 7 p.m.
5 - Oa ev ‘4 a
For Administration of art's muses ns be ee

feet washing. 9.30 a.m. Mr.

G. Harper. 7 p.m. Mr.

alain F. Moore.
11 a.m. Waverly Cott Rev. E Ww. w 3 , il ov ES 7h
11 a.m, Si > i JAMES rofees Lawrence. Phaped ha 5 F
-m. Sion Hill Rev. A. R. B
? p.m, Sion Hi, Rev. A. R. Brome gipgum Rev. Fe Lawrence, 7 p.m
au y. :
11 a.m. Savane J. B. Winter ee satEEq.
§ ARMY 9.30 a.m. Rev. F.
iarrect redhat Suet wrence, 7 p.m,
MORAVIAN CHU VICE
u a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 p.m. Y. p December Te se .
| iy rogramme 7 p.m. Senior Altar ROEBUCK TREET
rvice conducted by Major A. E Mot- a.m. Rev. A. C. Pagrin. 7 pm. Me
W. S. Arthur. 1 ;

fett (Divisional Commander)
CHECKER HALL”

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 p.m. Y P

GRA HILL
11 a.m.
Harvest Programme 7 “a oe 5. Weeies

12.30 p.m.

-m. S ... Rev. A. C. Pilgrim Sommunion

Soe Conducted Poy Be canes 7 p.m, Mr, FP. aay ® i ys

, K

FOUR ROADS 11 a.m. Mr. Do’ ;

jl a.m, Holiness Meeting 3 p.m. y. p Graham. wnes. 7 p.m. Mr.
Harvest Programme 7 p.m. Senior Altar MONTGOMERY
Service. Conducted by Lieutenant Hinds 7 pm. Mr. .

BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL F SHOP HILL

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 P.m. Co 7 pm. Mr. Green.
any Meeting 7 Salvation Meeting.
PREACHERS Major eo ation Meeting
WELLINGTON STREET
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 P.m. Com-
pany Meeting 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting
PREACHER: Sr. Major Gibbs, ,
ITIN

MBE
11 a.m. Mr, Allman. 7 p.m. Mg, Smith



Device Will

1S’
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 p.m.

f : Com-

pany Meeting 7 p.m. Salvation Meetin c

PREACHER; Lieutenant Gunth “ Hea F r: h
PIE CORNER. r fis

lla * Rolie Meeting 3 p.m. Com-
pany eeting p.m. Salvation Meet:
PREACHER: Sr. Major Hollingswerthe
ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST
TUDOR BRIDGE
Thanksgiving Service for Youths 7 p.m.
Evensong and sermon. Preacher: Rev
J. B. Grant, ist Lesson by Rev, L
Bruce-Clarke 2nd Lesson by Rev. C. A
Young. Xmas Carols rendered on this

occasion,
METHODIST
BETHEL — Harvest Festival Services

11 a.m. Rev. M. A. E. Thomas. 3.30

p.m. Sunday School Song Service. 7

p.m. Rey. B. Crosby.

Monday, 7.30 p.m. Thanksgiving Ser-
DALKEITH—11 a.m, Mr. J. Griffith
p.m. Mr. V. B. St. John.
BELMONT—11 a.m. Mr. D. F. Griffith
p.m. Rev. A. E. Thomas.
SOUTH DISTRICT — 9 a.m. Mr, T

Callender, 7 p.m. Miss E. Bryan
PROVIDENCE—11 a.m, Rev. B. Crosby

And Step Up Catches

Inshore fishermen may ie
getting better catches by aa"

After 18 months’ research, a
new British echo-sounder has
been produced which. it is claim-
ed, will detect the presence oi
herring, Sprats or pilchards.
_ The instrument costs £310, It
is housed in a box not much
larger than a biscuit tin.

When it is switehed on fisher-
men get a constantly changing
picture” of underwater condi-
tions up to 120 fathoms,

Shoals of fish show as a heavy
black smudge on the screen.



Holy Communion 7 p.m. Mr. J. Clarke. =—LES.
VAUXHALL—9 a.m. Rev. B. Crosby
Holy Communion. 7 p.m. Miss L, Pes-
kett. *
LUTHERAN Etna Whistles As

St. Walter Lutheran Hour Dayrells Rd.
Ch. Ch

Villagers Scamper

CATANIA, Sicily, Dec. 8.

A deafening whistle shrilled
from the depths of seething Mount
Etna early to-day as a column of
trucks bore the last frightened
residents from tiny Milo village
wpenaced by the oncoming lava
ide,
_ Volcano experts said the pierc-
ing whistle apparently came from
Etna’s lava-blocked crater as
pent-up gases forced their way
into the outer air.—O,P.

7 p.m. Evensong and Sermon by the
Rev. Wm F. O'Donohue. Speaker.

Wednesday at 7.15 p.m. Public Divine
Service Rev. Leslie B. Clarke preacher

St. Duke Lutheran Hour Duke Ten-
antry, St. Thomas

11 a.m, Rev. W. F. O’Donohue 7.15
p.m. Monday Bible lecture.

St. John’s Lutheran Hour Fairfield Rd.,
Black Rock.

7.15 Tuesday Bible lecture. 7.15 Thurs-
day Preaching Service

t. Content Lutheran Hour Content,
St. Thomas

11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mr. James Lashley
Preacher, also listen to Bringing Christ
to the Nations at 6 p.m. by Dr. Eugene
R. Bertermann Ph. D., D.D. Director of












eno
St enrol
powder



=

FOR YOU

Start training for it NOW!

There Is still room at the top for the fully qualified
man who is fitted for the job. YOU can be that
man—successfal, prosperous, with your future
assured—by studying at home in your spare time,
uided by the personal tuition of The Bennett
College. Distance makes no difference.

WE WILL HELP YOU TO
ACHIEVE YOUR AMBITION

Get your feet on the ladder of success TO-DAY.
Write to The Bennett College and learn how
thousands of people just like you have reached
the top with the right guidance. A well-paid
job can ees this pleasant spare-time
study Ni ;

Direct Mail to DEPT. 188

—










FIRST CHOOSE
YOUR CAREER

ACCOUNTANCY EXAMS.
AVIATION
BLUE

BOILERS

ad














(1) Take the normal amount required to buy a
Man’s Shirt.



(2) Put half of it back in your Pocket.

(3) What's left will buy you a RELIANCE SHIRT
of perfect fit and guaranteed quality.



THE ROYAL STORE

No. 2 High Street
THE SHIRT EMPORIUM OF BARBADOS

SOOO OOPPOPOOPOOSOSS

*
e
°
°

WHY LOOK OLD?












The Canadian Bank of Commerce

SUNDAY



ADVOCATE

HEAD OFFICE — TORONTO, CANADA

Established 1867

STATEMENT AS AT 3isr

ASSETS

Cash on hand and due from Banks

GP TIONG a actin caves wees $ 195,264,432.50
Notes of and Cheques on other

OR. ov ocean ea ok hs obs 73,091,208.02
Government and Not exceeding
other Public Secur- | market value|

Tee co cs take t 747,080,155.65
Other Bonds and |

oo Sey j 75,922,701.89
Call and Short Loans (Security held

of sufficient marketable value to

OE). iv tae een tabeesaeeues 35,760,515.89

$1,127,119,013.95
541,513,515.32
63,372,170.86
18,769,640,7i
4,542,813.22

$1,755,317,154.06

Total Quick Assets......
Loans and Discounts (After full pro-
vision for bad and doubtful debts)

Acceptances and Letters of Credit



OCTOBER, 1950
LIABILITIES
Notes in Circulation... . $ 29,381.36
Deposits ........ peaks ‘ 1,623,712,841.46
Acceptances and Letters of Credit
& contra! | in tacs es 63,372,170 86

Other Liabilities 2,263,268.53

Total Liabilities to the Public $1,689,377,662.21
Capital Paid Up......é5..03;- 30,000,000.00
Reserve Fund 4% 30,000,000.00
Dividends declared and unpaid. . 619,222.58
Provision for Extra Distribution 600,000.00
Balance of Profit as per Profit and

Loss Account scent

4,720,269.27







» $1,755,317,154.06

Total Liabilities ..

PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT

Year

Ended 31st

October, 1950

Profits for the year ended 31st Qetober, 1950, befare Dominion Government taxes but after apprepriations

Less:
Provision for Dominion Government taxes
Depreciation on Bank Premises

Net Profits after the foregoing deductions
Dividends

Provision for Extra Distribution-—-20c. per share, payable 2nd

Amount carried forward
Balance Profit and Loss Aecount 3lst October, 1949

Balance Profit and Loss Account 31st October, 1950............

S. M. WEDD

President








CARLTON

ANNUAL DANCE

AT PLEASANT HALL
HOUSE, St. Peter,




ber, 1950.
Music by Percy Green's









re .
Admission by Invitation
Ticket .. $1.00

ROYAL BARBADOS YACHT
CLUB

COCKTAIL DANCE

on y
13th DECEMBER ¥
1950
(For Members & their Friends)





Buy Your Favourite
e Now !!

BARBADOS
ANNUAL
REVIEW

2/. A COPY
Mie

Advocate Stationery,
Store.

Roberts & Coa.




WEDNESDAY




Dancing 6 pin. to
By Order of
The Commitiee of Mrnagement
T. BRUCE LEWIS
Manager and Secretary.

” p.m.








N.B. Members introducing their &
Friends must enter their names in
the Visitors’ Register or give
them a letter of introduction to
the Secretary. 6.12.50-—3n.






at the Bruce We srhead,
YANKEE STADIUM ruce eatherhead
Britton’s Hill
on
Tuesday N 12th Dec.
1950 a¢ 8.30 p.m,

a. |
KID FRANCIS, Lightheavy-
weight champion of B’dos
170 Ibs



Cosmopolitan Drug

———

RECITAL







vs.
KID RALPH, the Market Sahay aes
rin |
Semi-Finals : The Barbados Choral

BONNIE BLACKMAN vs. Society
TONY GALENTO

who lost to Ralph on points )
8 rounds,

)

(
BELFIELD KID vs.
i SSok LOVELL {

at —
ST, MICHAEL'S CATHEDRAL

rounds TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19TH
Sparkling Preliminaries — at 8.15 pam.
Breezy Amateurs Admission by Programme
Admission: Programmes containing words of

Ringside $2.00, Balcony $1.50
Cage $1.00, Arena $1.00

9 the Carols 1/3d.
Programmes without words 6d.

Obtainable at the Advocate
Stationery. 9.12,



KIRPALANTS

ANNOUNCES with pleasure that they have
opened Dry goods and general Store at 52 Swan
Street, Bridgetown, on Monday, 4th December,
1950 and takes this opportunity of offering to our
numerous customers, friends and the public in
general, full range of dress materials and hosiery,

for Ladies, Gents, and Children.

le

The usual attention and courtesy is assured

similar to that which is characteristic of the

D. P. KIRPALANI

Retail & Wholesale Dry Goods and General
Merchants

52 Swan Street, — Bridgetown,

Phone: 4715.

Barbados

CRICKET

(Kindly lent by Mr. Georga %
Gill) . x
On Saturday, 16th Decem- :

£66 OODEEEEEOSOBSS

OF CHRISTMAS MUSIC

The Cathedral Choir

50—2n.

January,














‘

{

‘to Contingent Reserves, out of which full provision has been made for bad and doubtful debts
































$7,321,637,94

$2,014,340.15
1,292,039,24

3,306,379.3y

$4,015,258.55



$2,400,000,00

« 800,000.00 3,000,000,00

+0 gaa Seg S ROS Obs Cia a SaOE DEAE: 4 ORE $1,015,258,55

1.0 Caley bbs 4 4a6 Lg sab PUES Ubi ee ke 3,705,010.72
CS PAG STATES o's'xp ip pik Fak Cok i eas $4,720,269.27

JAMES STEWART

General Manager,

LUMBER & HARDWARE

ews TMERBERT Ltd.

‘ 10 & i1 Roebuck Street.

Incorporated
1926

L000 LOLOL KK 0

<
2

; C4
\ eee eet VOD Vries 4 ty

Winner 19.50

TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM

(With the. Distinetive Flavour)

Proved by The Judges to be the BEST BY TEST
| All the more reason why YOU should join The Rest

Exhibition Prise

by using this blend always, SIP IT—TO ENJOY IT
BLENDERS

JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.







Roebuck St. Dial 4335 :
EAR BAT |
ee mee ee é ‘'
: ELECTRICAL

y
; si
ACCESSORIES!
WE CAN SUPPLY YOU ‘WITH THE FOLLOWING:
8
§ WIRE ELEMENTS
8 « FLEX PLUGS
% « STARTERS « PLUG CAPS
> « CONNECTING BOXES . SOCKETS
« SWITCHES « FUSES
« PUSH BUTTONS « CEILING ROSES
« BATTEN « WALL
HOLDERS BRACKETS

And many others too numereus to mention.

TO-DAY AND GET YOUR REQUIREMENTS

BARBADOS HARDWARE 0. LID.

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
No. 16, Swan Street *Phone 2109 & 3534.

YOUR HOME
For

CHRISTMAS

We Can Supply A Wide Variety of...

PAINTS, DISTEMPERS and
ENAMELS

} — ALSO -
) FRENCH POLISH, STAINS & VARNISHES
You can make your rooms more attractive
by dressing your Floors. We have:

LINOLEUM, in Rolls and Mats

RILONEUM, the modern Plastic Floor Covering
ge For Prompt and Courteous Service

Shop at

PLANTATIONS LTD.
:







6OOOO6604%



(
(



=o ee
Se

ee gt SOSA EEE AAA,














SOOO



j

|

:

mF =6PAY A VISIT TO OUR ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT %





WE OFFER
Toys, Chocolates, Crackers, Xm ee Decorations
Xmas Stockings
PRESENTATION SETS. . Vardi: Max Factor, Soie de Paris,
Imperial Heather, Dratle
PRESENTATION BOXES.-Ci Vebaccos, Pipes
SOAPS—by Yardley. Morny, ¢ Bronniy
PERFUME —by Yard Coty, fu :
COLOGNE A71l, Atkinse D 1
‘i PF HABRIS & €.
Lower Broad Street Plantations Building
DIAL 1045
pp OO Ao 656,454,456 t 44 6,44, 466%

.
we

si

Fernando”

hy W. Some

€allizg

oy

»AGE FIFTEEN

alg

hoppers !

Amas
f

Our

ets

rset Maughm

“The Cottage On the Eells”

re
ry

fi

—by

DeVe

re Stacpoole

ADVOCATE

STATIONERY

MEN

A

EGp at

GOOD Sf}

W

A FALKS

INT

@NLW....
PRI

VE YOUR

i)

IS

[FE

STOVE

ANI OVEN

Christmas
Kitchen

Remember



Lg

Jf

oe
Ss

the Workmanship and finish in ¢
Lovely Coloured Glazed DIMI
ropical Designs,
ILL MAKE
¢
JUIS L. BAYLEY’

OL,.TON LANE

Sole Representatives

J

Rolex Wat

CIGARS, CIGARETTES, CIGAI
LIGHTERS
Boxed CHOCOLATES by ¢

CONFECTIONERY

Piequre

from CORLELN.

DIARIES !

tETTE

begins in the

N. BB HOWELE

ST

Luinber & Hardware

‘ally Made
4 BERTALAN POTTERY

Pottery is excellent

ES Ete with attractive

JEWELLERS
AQUATIC CLUB

Switverland,

LDOS

ch Co





Come im amd

eelect youw gifts

CASE, PIPES

vibury—Fry Rowntree

\ssorted Kinds

6 LTD.



DIARIES !

e
A Letts’ Diary for Every Purpose
| Pocket and Desk, Electrical and
Business Diaries, Mechanical
Engineers, School Boys and School
Girls Diaries, Boys Scouts and
Girls Guides Diaries, and Index
Diaries.
ALSO
|
Loose Leaf Note Books and Refills.
°

ROBERTS

Dial lH

&

CO



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Ist XI Cricket POLICE GUD yo), “ape ules Attlee—Truman jj |
3 direct but Thorpe failed to hold Talks = ge 4
@, from pare 5 a3 : Phone 4456 for |
man Marshall and Eric Atkinson Wanderers lost their first From page i
The two batsmen began confi- wicket when fast_bowler J. Willi-]:the appointment as Huropean
dently, going after runs in an easy ams got Roy Marshal] bowled in unluicsy suggested—but eee CARRIAGE BOLTS & NUTS 5/16” & 3/8” |
though cautious manner his fourth over. Roy Marshall] ye qaecisions in Kurope are not
After Eric Atkinson had bowled was half the total, 22, Eight runs} (ouched on, SQUARE BOLTS & NUTS ¥%”" & 5"
iwo overs he was replaced by D. later Williams claimed a second rinauy it must be said that on
Atkinson, D. Atkinson and Nor- wicket, G Proverbs could not iwo aspects the communique 1s PAINT BRUSHES ali sizes
man Marshall continued, gather- negotiate the fourth ball of his} reassuring to British opinion. Att-
ing a good length although little next over which was very fast! ee nus pledged wat the use of SAFETY HASPS & STAPLES 2” to 6”
ground was given, until in his < ne was nee i aie a.om.c. tomb will be consid-
sixth over Norman Marshall got ; anderers urc Wiehe = i lug, caretully and inter- > . |
Mr. Gittens playing high to mid- tak Se eater 7 tee nationally, before it is decided PADLOCKS 2 |
7) . " irce as f >] ling , £ sO ve § *é a! ) 4 ma a . ‘ *
pga sharing plates ms That who was fielding at mid-off when pei, Steer name of the United DEADLOCKS 5

wicket had fallen when College

reached 26. Mr. Gittens had con- a ne a ale eae the Communique that important NIGHT LATCHES

tributed 12. <4 Smitt J. Williams who was having ee ee xe eee = ne ore RIM LATCHE

nile. Blackman joined Smith.. everything all his own way,|¢ e isastrous price-raising ef- alt 4 Ss

Blackman’s keyword ee re bowled his third batsman. | fects of American stockpiling. .

caution and runs came very siow- E. Atkinson before he could Probably stockpiling will be KNOB LOCKS

ly. Another bowling change was make any runs. slightly slowed. The re-establish

soon made, Roy Marshall taking Norman Marshal who was| ment of the wartime joint com- and HARDWARE of all kinds

ever from D. Atkinson The bats- going good then took a six off | modity boards is also a possibility.

men were not seriously troubled Williams with scarcely any Another outcome of the Wash-

by the change and Peirce was effort. He followed up his big}‘ngton talks appears to be the! |
brought on to relieve Norman stroke with a twd, but fell a vic- | decision to make immediate dip-

Marshall. In his third over, Peirce tim to pacer Williams when he] {omatic contact with the Soviet |

wicket He
and made

second

W. Smith

claimed the
tricked C

him edge the ball through to loss of five wickets. inswer to the Soviet Union’s re-
wicket-keeper Skinner. The scort J. Williams bowled his fifth |quest for Four Power talks on FIOVSVOOUCOOIUR 909 Ee Yes
was 43, Smith having made a good baisman when another five runs]Germany. According to reports ’

contribution of 20
Another Loss

College met a further less a run
later when Mr. Sam _ Headley,
through bad anticipation, was run