Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
Sunday

December

1930



Oppose

Atomic Bomb

ON THE BASIS of today’s talks Mr. Attlee will |
be able to represent the views both of France

and Britain when he sees President Truman.

Indications tonight were that the French and Bri-

tish had agreed to such

the use of the atomic bomb in Korea and that every |
effort should be made to reach a political settlement
with the Chinese Communist Government.

After a break for lunch the

Pleven, French Premier, flew here this morning with his
Foreign Minister Robert Schuman, in an attempt to align
British and French policies on the international crisis before

Attlee leaves for America.



Baden Talks
Ended

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Dec. 2.
The Jamaica Banana delegation
having completed negotiations with
the Ministry of Food leaves Eng-
land satisfied with the agreement
reached, No details of the agree-
ment are being revealed in the
meantime but the delegation feels
that they have achieved the maxi-
mum possible, “in view of the
many difficulties confronting the
banana industry” as a statement
from the delegation puts it this

morning.

On their return to Jamaica they
will recommend its acceptance to
the Directors’ Growers Association



and the Governor-in-Executive {
Council.
The official announcement is

expected after the matter has been
considered by the Association and
the Governor.



Truman May
Be Impeached

WASHINGTON, Dec. 2.

Senator Joseph Mc Carthy
(Republican, Wisconsin) told
President Truman today that
Congress ought to’ ‘immediately
impeach you” unless the admin-
istration sanctions the use of
Chinese Nationalist troops against
the Communicts in Korea

“If tus unreasonable farce of
insisting that only American boys
can die while refusing the help
of the soldiers of our Allies con-
tinues, then the time is long over-
due for Congress in the name of
America to stand up and be
counted and immediately impeach
you” Mr. McCarthy said in a
statement directed to the Pres-
ident.—Reuter.













Attlee, Pleven



a

. Sunde





Use Of

LONDON, Dec. 2.

t

questions as opposition to |

discussion was resumed. Rene

The main subjects brought up
were the Korean situation, Ger
nian rearmament and the econo-
mie difficulties being caused by
America’s stock-piling of strate-
gic raw material.

Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin
and Foreign Office experts on
economics and on the Far East
attended the talks.

As the Prime Ministers met,
another conference with vital
bearings on their discussions was
running into difficulties on the
question of a European army.

The Atlantic Pact Deputies
Council failed to agree complete- John the American
ly on the French proposal for}whose anti-Communist speech
such an army and the Britisn|was booed at the recent Warsaw
view that there must be no delay|“Peace” Congress said _ to-day,
in shaping an integrated Atlantic}that he thought the Yugoslav
Pact force. Government had too many prob-

The position was being put to{lems of its own to “take on the
Pleven and Attlee, and it seemed|burden of setting up a new
likely that they would call on}Peace Congress.

Charles Spofford, the United|, Rogge who has planned to ask
States chairman of the Deputies|Marshal Tito to take the lead in a
new independent peace movement



—ROGGE

PARIS, Dec. 2.
Rogge,

POuEal, allowing “free discussion — by
Crisis Discussed . |representatives from both East

The crisis in Korea was dis-|and West,” met the Yugoslav For-
cussed at length by the Prime) ign Minister Eduard Kardelj

Ministers. Pleven, it is believed,
supported strongly the idea that But Rogge said “if I can think
Attlee in his Washington talksjof a good idea I will put it up to
should press for the establishmentythem. I had thought of a move-
of a “buffer zone” south of the/ment backed by nations like
Chinese border. India and Yugoslavia, — nations

Attlee will take off for Wash-}not tied to either Power or bloc.”
ington tomorrow night. It was] He said that the Warsaw Con-
definitely decided today that Field] gress was not “conducted in a

here last week.

Marshal Sir William Slim, Chief] ‘live and let live’ atmosphere, but

of the Imperial General Staff,j with a few exceptions in terms
will go with him, of hatred and violence. “If the
But he is also taking three of Russians are bent on revolution
the Government’s chief economic] by violence as they have indicated
experts, which indicates that mili-|in Korea and Tibet all you can
tary affairs will by no means | do is meet force with force.
aominate the Washington talks. —Reuter
—Reuter,

Attlee, Truman Will
Talk For Two Days

WASHINGTON, Dec. 2.
The American State Depart-
ment said to-day that President
Truman and Prime Minister
Attlee would confer for two days|%o Koreans

SyngmanRheeUrges



U.N. Command

SEOUL, Dec. 2.
President Syngman

that there was




















S. Koreans To Obey

Rhee de-
clared today in a special message
“no

CHOOSING TOYS:

' “tae
CHILDREN having a good look in the toy section of Messrs, Cc. F. Harrison & Co., were snapped by

the ‘‘Advocate’s” cameraman yesterday.



Meet Force \Undeclare
With Force \Between U.N. And Red



> -

UNITED NATIONS FO




#




War Exists

Chinese In Korea

—MacArthur

General Mac Arthur declared today

- TOKYO, Dee. 2.
in written replies to

questions submitted by press correspondents that a “state
of undeclared war between Chinese Communists and United
Nations forces” now exists in Korea.

General Mac Arthur said he
use the atom bomb.

| Etna Is
Quiet Now

CATANIA, Dec, 2,

Mount Etna’s worst eruption
for 40 years appeared early this
morning to have spent its fury,
seven days after the first flames
flared from cracks in the moun-
tain crust. and lava began pour-
ing down the slopes.

After a week of prayer and
preparation for evacuation two
thousand villagers today believed
they had been saved,

The movement of a great wall
of molten lava had all but stopped,
For five days it had ran at an
irregular pace sometimes to six
miles, 50 yards and threatening
with destruction the villages of
Milo and Fornazzo.

On the fifth day a 500
yards wide, five yards high mass
was crawling at a slower rate.

Today the grateful villagers











had not asked for authority to

Immediate Chinese forces. en-
gaged are. approximately 500,000
men divided into two great

echelons, the General said in reply
to another question.

The “front echelon now engaged
in attack on our forces comprises
something more than half this
force with the rear echelon rapidly
moving up from the Yalu river
banks.

Abn in the Yalu sector were
rewwnts of North Korean forces
now being rebuilt under Chinese
auspices amounting to an estim-
ated 100,000 to 150,000 men.

This force overwhelmingly ouft-
numbered the Allies, “the exact
strength of which I would not care
to give”, Mac Arthur said.

He denied that military com-
mand had ever exceeded its
authority and said it had acted “in
complete harmony and co-ordin-
ation with higher authority.”

General Mac Arthur said he
“sincerely hopes” the Korean
problem could be solved by nego-
tiations,

“The settlement of international
issues by peaceful rather than
military means is always to be





UN. Troops 30
Miles North Of

Pyongyang

TOKYO, Dec. 2,

Troops of the American First
Cavalry Division today counter-
etacked Communists on the right
flank of the Eighth Army defence
line in northwest Korea,

Latest reports said they drove
four to five miles towards Song-

chon, 30 miles north of Pyong-
yang, the former North Koreaa
capital,

Earlier it was reported that

trapped American troops began
fighting a withdrawal from the ice-
bound Chosin reservoir area in
northwest Korea today under an
umbrella of American army and
navy planes

American Marines abandoned
Yudamni on the northwest tip of
the Chosin reservoir and started
to hack their way south through
encircling Communist forces to
their supply base Hagaru. On the
east side of the Great Lake, the
American Seventh Division troops



also making for Hagaru came to
grips with Chinese forces put at
several thousands men,

The American Air Force claim-
ed a total of 2,500 Communist
casualties inflicted yesterday, Fly-
ing weather to-day was generally
good,

Later reports also sid that
American cavalrymen fighting as
infantry were’ in contaet with
Communists one mile south of
Songchon.

Songehon during the night but
were later ordered to reoccupy it
—Reuter,



Lie Seeks Solution
Of Far East Crisis

NEW YORK, Dec, 2.

Trygve Lie, United Nations

United Nations forces evacuated |



y
\

\ &
’
\

Price:

Ne i x’ CENTS

Wear 535



CES CUT IN TWO->

Ou inum bered In Korea

By ALEX VALENTINE

SEOUL, Dec. 2.

UNITED NATIONS military commanders faced
tonight a very real danger that the military
situation in North Korea was rapidly becoming

untenable.

A military observer summing up the position listed

these main factors:

1. The United Nations army
of about 150,000 men was over-
whelmingly outnumbered by at
least 250,000 Chinese and North
Korean Communists.

2. The liaison between com-
manders of ground forces had
been split by the wedge down
the centre of the Korean pen-
insula,

3. Chinese Communists had
at least another 10,000 troops
ready to pour over the border
from Manchuria while man-
power reserves immediately
available to the United Nations
forces were limited to about
20,000 men at the most.

4. The advantage of United
Nations forces -— superior
mechanical equipment — was
outweighed in this rugged terri-
tory by the extreme mobility
of the Communist foot soldier,

5. More than 20,000 guerillas,

mainly bypassed North Korean
troops, were scattered behind
front lines tying up about 80,000
United Nations troops and
threatening rear area supply
lines

6. The breaking up of the
South Korean Army

The numerical disadvantage

which drove the United Nations
Army back to the Pusan
perimeter had been overcome
until the open intervention of
Communist China in North
Korea a month ago.

Observers here while conced-
ing that this intervention was
beyond control of the United
Nations command, were. still
uncertain why in the face of it
seneral Douglas MacArthur
attempted his Chongchon River
offensive eight days ago.

This offensive not only found-
ered against a wall of Commu-
nists, but forced the 8th Army
to pull back hurriedly 35 miles
to the south to avoid being cut
off completely.

Great Numbers

Overwhelming numbers were
enly one of the two main factors
of the Communist success.

The other and some observers
here maintained that it was the
more important, was the fact that
Communists had unlimited free-
dom to manoeuvre to the east
of the 8th Army and attempt to
cut in behind it,

This wag caused by the split
command system in operation in
Korea, Zones of responsibility of
commands had been determined
by a crayon mark from North
to South which roughly split the
map of North Korea into two
equal parts, To the West of this
line operated Lieutenant General
Walton M, Walker’s army; on the
right Major General Edward A

Secretary General, conferred today | Almond’s 10th Corps.

















area to outflank the
8th Army. The corps now oper-
ating in the extreme noftheast
was unable to provide any flank
protection for men on the Chong-
chon river. The 10th Corps cut off
from the 8th Army by the Chinese
drive south of Chongchon was in
a precarious position.

The American Marin@ and 7th
Infantry Divisions were virtually
marooned deep in the heart of
Communist-held territory.

10th Corps

Divisions Scatter

Two South Korean divisions
holding the right flank on the
Chongehon made no real attempt
to stand and fight. In fact, after
the first few hours they broke
completely and scattered, From
the time they fled, the Chongchon
River offensive was doomed since
the United Nations line wary com-
pletely exposed.

The conduct of these two divi-
sions was not merely a question
of personal courage, There were
100,000 men under arms in the
South Korean Army today, main-
ly untried, untrained and unwill-
ing conscripts There were few
who had not been in battle almost
continuously since June 25, and
who were not virtually exhausted,

Faced with these considera-
tions, even professional optimista
in official quarters had been
forced to concede the plight of a
fledgling United Nations Army,

The Eighth Army on the West
could be outflanked at any time if
the Communists chose to do so
because there was virtually
nothing on the East to prevent
such a move

If General Walker decided to
stand and fight where he was, he
would be surrounded.

An alternative was a series of
retreats restricted only by the lim-
ited length of the Korean pen-
insula,

Political Settlement
The only way to avoid being
outflanked was to throw a line

completely across the peninsula, , semeygeor:
Military observers said the bright~ *

est and at the same time the most
dubious prospect lay in the hope
of political settlement—brightest
because it seemed the only pos-
sible solution—dubious, because
the basis of such a settlement was
still not clear,

If it was the intention of the
Chinese Communist leader Mao
Tse Tung to drive the United
Nations out of Korea, there would
appear to be little hope of bar-
gaining.

These were the political straws
being grasped by the Military
Command here to-night,—Reuter.













a





. i 1 ; ant | desired”, he add : , f
next week. question” that the objective of peters wees Mae at No ome Bomb oer ee oe pat anos Both men were responsible TELL THE ADVOCATE
€ : 7: t i 2 is ies i ; . ‘ < senior me the Pe - | dir O ’ :
SIR DAVID KELLY IS ON Press Officer Michael gon F | an Spe Pager ese guar The lava stopped 50 yards oe The General said he had not eroment delamationy” ae Tetiber het uke nae THE NEWS
: TAILS matt ‘reported | taet oo Beitish United Nations forces”, the fringe of vineyards and chest- | recommended the atom bomb as a] It is continuing the series of | operations on the other side’ ct the Ring 3113 Day or Night.
WAY TO LONDON speak on Monday wr hi "talles “The enemy is in enormous| "Ut groves ringing Milo, Fornazzo remedy. Any decision .of this|talks that the Secretary General crayon mark : . ‘
| Embassy oad beun on Tues. strength and we must expect|and_ the neighbouring villages! nature belongs to a higher author- | has with the Chief Indian delegate Ccdebmenine apparent » a Sa
2 _. BERLIN, Dec, 2. I Smrondlesely before or| ore severe battles,” he said. “Let| Clustered on Etna’s foothills. pity than my own”, he declared. Sir Benegal Narsing Rau and the} op inis apienaienara eve ® inte the PAYS FOR NEWS.
a = in Me a am in after a luncheon which the Presi-| every man and woman vow we ir ‘atm ts aA ae that the Allied puinese ities ain ba gS on ; oe :
Ambassador in Moscow, sai@ in| é eer ase r ; .| shall never rest until every mem- .. ° ° air and naval forces were giving |to be continued w che —————— an sty
Berlin today on his way to Lon-| dent will give he a nee} ber of the ioampaniniet ‘armies, Nine Guilty Priests invaluable assistance in the cam- |later. ;
don that he was not bringing any| ‘The conversations would con- \whether Korean or Chinese or paign, “but under present condi- It was believed here that Lie
eee Soviet proposals. ' |tinue, on Wednesday and could! any others, shall either be dead Sentenced lions their potential is limited by | Was goareng, Sas for a formula
te said he would see the For-| go beyond that date, but McDer- | ¢)” prisoners or driven from our the fact that they cannot operate |to solve the Far East ores.
— eens Tr eee mera meee pron Fo mean plans cover | land.” PRAGUE, Dec 2 ae oy fee Chinese —Reuter.
Dae ae iy . omy Wo. Uae ie He urged the people to carry! A Prague state court today | forces not immediately situated in
ne but did pet Moy whether _ The date weer a, cut whatever orders local United] goung nine Roman Catholic clergy— North Korea. Indo ‘esia
¢ would cer _Mr. Att oF before 1s ane OAR AO “ | Nations commanders gave them,| men guilty of high treason and General Mac Arthur said he im
United Su ae tee a et oy ee Seer —Reuter. | 2nd if in battle areas to keep off} espionage. They had been on | knew no way in which recent re- oo ell :
—— Maen ee ear main roads, trial for five days verses—due entirely to the over- Denies Report
—_- “Make every village an armed] “Tha pine were sentenced as woeining ground strength of the
4 camp,”’ he continued. follows: ‘ommunists—could have been DJAKARTA, Dec, 2
Tibet Appeals For Peace TRUMAN THREATENED ‘Reuter. Father Jan Opasek, life imprison- avoided under existing conditions. Indonesia officially denied today
ADELPHIA, Dec, 2 ’ ment: Dr. Stanislay Zela, Suffragan| _ He did not think that had the|a_ press report from the Hague L I F E
pene aoe vt a s ine aed anneet Serving’ ap DIED SUDDENLY Bishop, 25 years; Dr. Stanislav United Nations stopped the cam-|that an informal compromise
x lay appealed to 2 " tioni a |Jarolimek, Abbot of a monastery | P#/8n at some stage before reach- | agreement had been reached on
United Nations “for an early eneren eo E8 e A BREAD peace ont in Strahov, 20 years: Dr, Otakar|!%&% the Manchurian border the|the problem of Western New
ent” > ste after \ 7 - ars! ; é i, . c
mg a Be gg gy el Tielke atrived here by train to-day for Rood i ga this Svek 20 years: Dr. Josef Cihak a would have stayed out of eo. ‘ ro ee * O ou
; 5 : ‘ : j oslav Kilac 17 me e report said that inform Ik ——~Baree
vasion of their country. an Army-Navy tootball. game morning shortly after one ee aie mead 25 cas: Mac Arthur disclosed that the top level Indonesian Dutch dis- Sepak Xfce}
Trygve Lie, United Nations ft th o'clock at Baxter's Roud, | years: Ur. - ye | United Nations now held nearl i t the Hague last k tg or
, About 20 to 25 feet from the t the | Jan Boukl 18 years: Father Vac-| s48 a y | cussions a e Hague last wee
Secretary General, received a|president’s car one of the men} Redman was sitting = Gn lav Mrtvy 15 years. ae prisoners. had produced a concrete com- some _less-for-
cable to this effect from the oo was reported to have remarked: corner of eo rgees ik const: trmposeds A. Abbe n answer to the question: “Do promise proposal for Netherlands
, betan Government delegation} If I had a gun now, I could! when he was seen tos ¥ | 150,000 crowns on Dr. Cihak, fines | ¥°U Tegard the present campaign | recognition of Indonesian sover- tunate-than-
, now in India. bump him off. eenkan collapse on the corner. nt 160,006. crowns senah on Dr.|238 continuation of North Korean eignty over Western New Guinea ‘i
—Reuter.. —Reuter. Rei and Abbot Opecsie an a lesser aggression or representing an en- —Reuter. yourself friend
w fines on other defendants eae poem of aggression?”
oe ie General replied: “This in my . or relative
| INNER The court ome Serr opinion is a new war with a new W. German Security Treaty
e “ opponent and a new army. North ‘
ee : roel — destroyed and To Be Discussed
. | ‘ne mission of the United Nations
r Wi command LONDON, Dec. 2. |
practically fulfilled whe: / ' Cc, 4.
Attlee ull | this fresh coaaanen aie Britain will have “als with WITH CHRISTMAS CHEER!
ron | launched.—Re : French and American Govern-
Visit Ottawa eer ments on West German ee
| lor Konrad Adenauer’s request for Send him or her :—
F LONDON, Dec. 2. Be sure and get a Security Treaty to replace the d om
: Prime Minister Clement Attlee the “Eventi aa) | present statute, it is understood in
will definitely visit Ottawa on his | . a ae ening Advo- informed quarters here to-day
way home from talks with Presi- cate OMOrrow, \ K W V B R A N )) y
i dent Truman in Washington, it| Dr Adenauers request has e eVe
j was announced today. | Goan woe oar at Lo a
The time of his visit to Louis ‘ > 5 Saar hag nae Me Sa age
| si,tauret,escxneain Pine” Regulations — |men ih meaner = K WV. CORONATION WINE
Minister, will depend cn how long fe , : “G aul
the Washirigton’ talks will last. | Relaxed eae Ser ver eae
i Pee ge poe In. Jamaica | but chat the possibility was not
; > é DNGOn | lexcl od
by plane tomerrow night. (From Our Oem Correspondent) | “SUC —reuter.|} INEXPENSIVE BUT GOOD!
As forecast yesterday, Field KINGSTON, J’ca, Nov. 27
Marshal Sir William Slim, Chief 5 The Rr emearnes has relaxed | US. A Chi f \
of the Imperial General Staff, finance regulations in Jamaica =, rm 1e | " s rE. sas : ieee es :
Sill: go with Mr. Atte Reuter. releasing funds exceeding 250 U.S, | y Either will warm the cockles of your friend’s heart and
dollars for children under the | | we
age of 15 years in any one year Leaves For Korea |
: to residents in Jamaica wishing WASHINGTON, Dec. 2. |
Berliners Go To Polls Today |; travel to Canada. tne Uae | Gene PSHINGTON, Collins, iat iat OR HER IRITS
BERLIN, Dec. 2. or American account countries | American Army Chief of Staff is i cK Ul HIS 0 . ‘
Both West and East Berlin The Jamaica Chamber of Com-|on his way to the Far East by air .
police were reported tonight in | merce and other business interests|to confer with General Dougla THE K. W. Vv. WAY
preparation for tomorrow’s prin-| as well as the People’s National) Mac Arthur about the situation in|
cipal. elections in which a record |Party have been advocating this| Korea ‘ s ickl ee ieptca ¥3
RALPH D. ROCK standing beside the Hillman car which he won. This cay-q@as raffied in aid of the percentage of 1,664,000 electors | relaxation for some time. As a Announcing this t yan Arn ] He who gives quickly, gives twice !!
Barbados Boys’ Club i the three western sectors result the Govertiment has aban- | spokesman said Collins
Col. RB. T. Michelin who presented the car yesterday can be seen standing (centre) in the back expected to vote doned “keep Jamaicar t left Washingtor 1 2
ground. Presentation took place at Police Headgua rter tory Reuter home’’ polic Reuter Nc a - —/
‘
f ; \








PAGE TWO

AQUATIC CLUB CINE
TO-NIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.36
“HOLLYWOOD CANTEEN’
Starring Bette DAVIS—Dane CLARK—Joan CRAWFORD—
Ida LUPINO—Johh GARFIELD—Paul HENREID

and many other well known Sters
A Warner Bros. Picture



LAZA Theatre—sriDGETowNn

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
Warner's New S Hit!
Joan CRAWFORD in "FLAMINGO ROAD"

with Zachary Scott, Sidney Greenstreet, David Brain

TUES., WED., THURS. 4.45 and 8.30 p.m

Warner’ Hit...
Joel Sona in “COLORADO TERRITORY” 3

Special Matinee Thursday 7th 2 p.m,
Duncan Reynaldo as Cisco Kid in
and Jimmy Wakely in

“GAY CAVALIER”
“TRAIL TO MEXICO”





PLAZA Theatre = OISTIN

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW—5 & 8.30 p.m. (Monogram Double)
Duncan Reynaldo in “CISCO KID RETURNS”

and
“PARTNERS OF THE TRAIL”




Johnny Mack BROWN in




(Monogram Double)

Jimmy WAKELY in
“SONG OF THE SIERRAS”



Tuesday and Wednesday 5 & 8.30 p.m,

Gilbert Roland as Cisco Kid in
“GAY CAVALIER” &








GALETY (the Garden) ST. JAMES

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW 8,30 p.m, MAT. Sun. 5 p.m.
Leo GORCEY in “HARD BOILED MAHONEY”







, and
Johnny Mack BROWN in “PRAIRIE EXPRESS”

A MONOGRAM Double

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY 8.30 p.m. (Monogram Double) — |
Warren Douglas in Jimmy WAKELY in |
“T ” & “SONG OF THE DRIFTER” |











IS EXCELLENCY THE GOV-

ERNOR accompanied by his
A.D.C. Major Denis Vaughan, at-
tended the Annual Dinner of the
Chamber of Commerce last night
at the Marine Hotel, Among the
other guests present were Sir
Allan Collymore, Chiéf Justice,
Mr. Robert N. ‘Turner, Colonial
Secretary, Mr. Henry Seaford,
President of the B.G. Chamber of
Commerce, Sir John Saint, M:
E. J. Petrie, Financial Secretary,
Capt. G. J. Bryan, Mr. E. S. S
Burrowes, Labour Commissioner,
Wing Comdr. L. A. Egglesfield,
Director General of Civil Avia-
tion in the Caribbean, Mr. Sains-
bury, Acting Controller of
Customs, Mr. Kenneth Girling,
Acting Director General of Tele-
Comrnunications (Aeronautical )
in the Caribbean, Major C. Glin-
don Reed, Director of Education,
Col, R. T. Michelin, Commissioner
of Police, Mr. A. V. Nyren, Ameri-
can Consul, Mr. H. N. Armstrong,
Colonial Postmaster, Mr. Dic
Leacock Jr. President of the

Chamber of Commerce, Mr. G. H.
King,
other mémibers of the Chamber
of Commerce,

Jnr. Vice-President and

ASTHMA MUCUS

Loosened First Day

Don't let ing, sneezing, chok-
ing attacks of Bronchitis or Asgima
ruin your sleep and another

Bight wi -

DACO, This m ine not a
emoke, Inject! ‘ierey: but works
throug! 8 blood ¢ reach eo
io warts hel = immedi

jose Bi elp! -
ately 8 ways: 1. ee ee and re-
move thic! mucus. 3. Thus
promotes sounder,
more refreshing allevi-
Fd foustl heen —ae od

uick sa!
guaranteed, Get MENDACO from
shemist today.





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Corner of Broad and Mc.Gregor

NOTICE

Streets.

Our Customers and ftiends are asked

to take note that

THE CORNER
Trafalgar Street

MANNING'S

STORE

SALES DEPARTMENT

AND

ELECTRICAL WORKSHOP

will be closed for Breakfast




The Man Who Came

To Dinner

S WILL BE seen fron the
advertisement appegting
elsewhere in this issue, the book-
ing office for sale of seats fpr THE
MAN WHO CAME TO NER
opens next Friday at the Empire
Bridgetown Players havé, in the
last eight years, built up & repu-
tation for themselves, and Carib
need hardly state that jg this,
their latest production ler the
direction of W. Therold Barnes
and Frank A. Collymore, no pains
bave been spared to make it equal
in entertainment value to their
successes .

The leading parts of Sheridan
Whiteside and tis secretary Maggie
Cutler are played by Frank Colly-
more and Greta Bancroft, and
they are supported by a cast of
over thirty including a few old-
stagers as well as many newcomers
to the local stage, Eleanor Hewitt-
Myring, Peggy Smith, el
Timson, Idris Millg Peggy Wood,
Bruce Hamilton, Dick “Vidmer,
William Bertalan, J

race,
Wendy Inniss, Camp! reen-
idge, Margot Laffan, Piera® Maffei,
Daphne Stehelin, John Burt,

Sheila Ince, Maude Skinner, Biff
Stehelin, and others among whom
are six young members of the
Combermere School Glee CQyb.

And, most appropriately, the
Second and Third Acts of the play
take place on Christmas Eve and
Christmas Day.



Y ADVOCATE

eemenemenn



Successful Show

RS, JOYCE STUART'S repeat

showing of her Reévuedeville,
1950 at the Empire Theatre on
Friday night, was a complete
success, at least as far as perfor-
mance was concerned, although
the audience could have been a
bigger one.

The musicale, writte) around
Barbadiah life, was the vehicle
by which Mrs, Stuart gav@ an apt
opportunity to the pupils of her
dancing class to give a first class
display of modern stage dancing.

There was a jote de vivre
among the entire cast as they
went through the difficult stens
of the tango, the waltz and tne
rhumba that spoke of a confidence
that has no doubt come with the
experience of three previous
showings.

Mrs. Stuart again led the waltz
herself in elegant style, but both
the tango and rhumba were
executed with such good grace
and timing that no individual
can be singled out for special
praise,

Joseph Tudor’s clowning was
again the piece de resistarice or
the show and was responsible in
large measure for keeping the
audience in a happy frame of
mind and in a kindly and recep-
tive mood for the entire show.

The addition of a Christmas
Scene that gave Fitz Harewoo1
the chance to sing “Silent Night”
and “White Christmas” in his fine
voice was a welcome addition to
the first showing.

| A REMINDER

The CHINA DOLL RESTAURANT

6, Marhill Street

OPEN TO-NITE 7.00

P.M. — 12 MIDNITE

gs Forget the home fire to-nite and Dine on
real Chinese Foods !



DIAL 4730 for Reservations

S555 SS SS

|| EMPIRE

TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.45
Monday 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing

20th C.-Fox presents .

“WHERE THE
SIDEWALK ENDS”

Starring
Dana ANDREWS
and
Gene TIERNEY

with
Gary MERRILL &
Bert FREED
ROXY ~
Last Two Shows TODAY
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.



Republic Big Double .
Allan “Rocky” LANE &
Eddy WALLER
, in
“BANDIT KING OF
TEXAS”
AND
“POST OFFICE
INVESTIGATOR”

with
Watren DOUGLAS and
Audrey LONG

George BRENT
Shorts :

FLASH!

FLASH

SELECT A .

GLOBE

TO-NITE 8.30 O'CLOCK — LAST SHOWING
ILLEGAL ENTRY

TOMMY DORSEY’S ORCHESTRA



YES IT’S

GORDON

(A Serial with Buster Crabbe)
lst Part To-morrow and Tuesday, 5.00 & 8.30 p.m.
2nd Part Wednesday and Thursday, 5.00 & 8.30 p.m.



LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE!
@ AUDITION TO-DAY, 9.30 A.M.

“es
FALKS KEROSENE COOKER—1, 2, 3 & 4 Burner Model
OVENS—Single and Double

CARRON DOVER COAL STOVE—Nos. 6, 7 and 8

FOR YOUR BAKING you will need. .

Jerome COUETLAND &
Ruth WARRICK
in

“MAKE BELIEVE
BALLROOM ”

ND

A
“BANDIT — OF
EL DORADO ”

with

Charles STARRETT &
Smiley BURNETT

OLYMPIC

Monday—Last Two Shows
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

Columbia Smashing Double
Joyce REYNOLD &
Ross FORD

“GIRLS SCHOOL”

AND

“TYRANT OF THE
SEA”

with
Rhys WILLIAMS
and RANDELL












Marta FOREN

FLASH!

ar R.

ROYAL
Last Two Shows TODAY
4.30 & 8.15 p.m, |
Columbia Big Double pene

2 | gentlemen
Riism), that the speed of light has

mutations.

® | per




alling

The répeat show concludes a
great ort by Mrs. Stuart t
es‘ablish the musicale as a distinct
part of public entertainment
Barbado:

Canadian Army Retired
T. COL. EMMA PENSE, Can-
adian Army retired, arrive:
from Canada yesterday mornin

by air accompanied by her friend
Miss Pat Tuckett. Here for the
Winter they dre staying at the

Marine Hotel. They were in Bar-
bados once before, after the second
World War.

To Be With Her

RS. EVELYN HARRISON

wife of Mr. M. L. Harrison
of Fontabelle left yesterday for
Trinidad, to connect with T.C.A.,
flight to Canada. Their daughter
who is at Carlton University in
Ottawa has taken suddenly ill and
she has gone up to be with her

Larry’s Back
R. LARRY VAN DUSEN of
California who was in Bar-
bados a little over a year ago
arrived yesterday from Trinidad

Dy BABB A... épizansit from the
U.S... via Mexico” crey » wrier
Panama.

Larry who is an interior decor-
ator by profession has a wide
circle of frierids in Barbados and
is very popular among the younger
set, who frequent the Aquatic
Club.

Mr. Van Dusen hopes to spend
the entire winter here and is stay-
ing at Sam Lord’s.

Back lo Venezuela
ENRIQUE (Henry)
| PEREZ, who has been in
| Barbados since February left yes-
terday morning for Venezuela.
| This was Henry’s second visit here
{in the past two years, During that
} time he has learnt English fluently
|and has made a great number of
| friends in Barbados.

A keen Water Polo player, he

| was goalkeeper for Barracudas
| this year. Several of his team
;mates were at Seawell yesterday
ito see him off.
\ At a farewell party given for
jhim by his friends on Friday
night, he was presented with a
igift, a travelling set with his
jinitials engraved on it. Henry
jwill start work with an oil com-
| pany soon after he gets home and
jnext year he has already planned
ja visit to Barbados.



Mr. ENRIQUE PEREZ
—left for Venezuela yesterday

HERE is reason to béTieve,

(a silly euphem-

again been miscalculated. What
effrontery! That is what comes
of ignoring the fundamental
physical content of atmospheric

The new figure, 186,432 miles
second, will considerably
modify the calculations of Dr.
Strabismus (Whom God Pre-
serve) of Utrecht, who is plan-
ning a fourth attempt to reach
the moon. He has constructed a
proto-nylon rocket, incorporating
a new heavier-than-fish compo-
nent called ditrimnol-oxubdl-gylox-
ene. This vaporous coagulate is
three .times as non-resistant as
nornolite, and is the only known
refulgent with a hypermorphary
action at unknown _ altitudes.
The rocket is complete except
for the nozzle, and Waggling
Parva is cordoned off from the





SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950



P.M.O. St. John Returns
R. and Mrs. E£. B. Carter of
“Villa Nova”, St. John, re-
turned from six months’ holiday
in Canada yesterday morning by
air. The majority of their stay was
spent in Montreal. Canada is Mrs
Carter’s home and their two son
are at present living up there, —
Dr. Carter who is P.M.O., St
John expects to resume his cutt
on December 10.

Returned Yesterday

ISS MAB HASKELL returned

from a short holiday in Trini-
dad yesterday morning by
B.W.LA hi
Back From Short Visit

R. MAURICE JONES, Man-
M ager of the Globe Theatre
who was in Trinidad for three
days, returned yesterday morning
by B.W.1.A

T.C.A, Station Manager

R. “BILL” STUART, T.C.A’s
M Station Manager here, re-
turned from Canada yesterday
morning by air. Mr. Stuart left
Barbados at the end of September.

To Live kn Brooklyn _
ISS K. E. CODRINGTON

who left Barbados yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A. for the US.
via San Juan expects to reside in
Brooklyn with relatives.

Miss MORELA EVANS
—back to Venezuela

‘Holiday Over
FTER two and a half months’
holiday in Barbados, Miss
Morela Evans, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. John Evans of Caracas
returned to Venezuela yesterday
morning by B.W.1LA.

She was staying with her aunt
Mrs. Robinson in Worthing, Mr.
and Mrs. Evans have many friends
in Barbados,

Was Here Two Years Ago

R. AND MRS. GEORGE B.
SOMERS arrived from
Canada yesterday by air accom-
panied by their young son Guy.
They are here for the Winter and
have one of the flats at the Camp,
St. Lawrence.
Mr. Somers who is an importer
and distributor in Toronto was in
Barbados two years ago.

On Month’s Vacation

R,. AND MRS. Mervyn Mar-

shall arrived from Trinidad
yesterday morning by B.W.I.A.
accompanied by their two sons
Michael and Phillip. They plan to
spend a month in Barbados, stay-
ing at the Worthing Guest House,

BY THE WAY — By Beachcomber

world. Only Russian spies are
allowed to loiter in the neigh-
bourhood.

To the moon and back!

HIS time the sage will make

the attempt alone, former
experiences having persuaded
him that a team of experts in the
rocket is about as much help as
a herd of hornets in a telephone
booth. The nylon rocket is built
on the boomerang principle, and
the Doctor hopes to fly across the
moon diagonally, and back again
to earth in five days. He will
not attempt to land on the moon
this time. Asked what he thought
of the theory that anyone flying
as fast as light to the moon would
get back to earth 100,000 years
before he had left_it, Strabismus
said: “That would mean that I
had reached the moon 50,000
years before getting there. The
two _ tim®-space-continuum - lags





would cancel each other out.”



Mr. ERNEST WAKELAM

—new golf pro,

Golf. Pro.
: M* ERNEST WAKELAM and

his son Allan arrived tron
Canada by air yesterday morning
Mr. Wakelam whose home is in
Ottawa will act as Professional a:
the Rockley Golf Club during th«
winter months. His son who is
also a keen golfer will be hi
assistant.

New Year’s Night

HE DINNER of the Loyal

Brothers of the Stars take:
place this year as usual at Miller
Bros. in Tudor Street on New
Year’s Night,

Here Again

M*. & MRS. T. Arthur-Smitn

of Maryland U.S.A., who have
been coming to Barbados for sev-
eral years for the Winter, arrived
yesterday by T. C. A’s B.W.I.A
Charter flight from Trinidad in-
transit from Canada where they
made their connections, They are
Staying at Stafford House,

Special Event

a YEAR is the Centenary
of the Barbados Industrial
Exhibition. To mark the occasion
the exhibition will be running a
new feature on the first night
Wednesday December 6th. ‘There
will be free non-stop dancing on
two of the lawns in the middle of
Queen’s Park from 6 p.m, to 10

p.m.

Percy Green’s and _ Clevie
Gittens’ orchestras will alternate
with the music.

For Barbados Holiday

ISS DOREEN CLARKE,

daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
George Clark of Easy Halli St.
Joseph, arrived from the U.S. via
Canada yesterday morning by air
to spend five weeks’ holiday witn
her parents,

Miss Clarke who now lives in
Cleveland, was last seen in Bar-
bados two years ago. Her good
friend Miss Ethel Lester came
down with her to spend three
weeks’ holiday here.

Staying With His Son

R. CARL COZIER, Manager
of Woodford Lodge Estate
arrived from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.I.A. Here for
three weeks he is staying with
his son and daughter-in-law, Mr.
and Mrs, Lione| Cozier of Worth-
ing.
Two other members of his fam-
ily, his daughter June and son
Winston, are also living here.

Repeat Show

ARIB has heard that in re-

sponse to several requests Judy
Graham’s Caribbean Revelry will
stage a repeat performance of
“The Beetlebottom Affair” on
Wednesday, December 20, at the
Globe Theatre. They are also
planning to introduce some new
features. eh

Water Polo Manager
Returns

R. JOE PLIMMER, Manager
of the Trinidad Water Polo
teams which toured Barbados last
week-end, returned to Trinidad
by B.W.LA. yesterday afternoon.

Leaving To-morrow

R. AND MRS. Maurice N.
Lucie-Smith and family who

are spending a short holiday in
Barbados staying with Mr. Lucie-
Smith’s brether, are due to return

ite Trinidad tomorrow afternoon.



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EVANS and
WHITFIELDS







SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1956
THE MAN WHO CREATED BILLY BUNTER





Charles Hamilton, alias Frank

1.300.000 words
a year

AT 75, Charles Hamilton has
created a new character called
Jack of All Trades. Who is
Hamilton? He is a creator ot

those perennial schoolboys Billy
Bunter, Tom Merry and Harry
Wharton.

“Better stuff
says Hamilton
Trades.

Jack is a rolling stone gather-
ing little moss. Hamilton plans
to make him follow many trades
in many lands. “He ‘will always

eee

Bunter,”
of All

than
of Jack

CREATES A NEW CHARACTER AT 75

Richards, with his cat Sammy.

come
round,”

Three names

Hamilton writes the illy
Bunter stories under pen-name
Frank Richards. He also used
the names Martin Clifford and
Cwen Conquest.

Until the war Hamilton had
kept up aé yearly output of
1,500,000 words for 380 years,
He earned £2,500 a year. The
war, and paper rationing, brought
this to a stop.

Now, at his house near Broad-
stairs, Hamilton’s pen is busy
again.—L.E,S.

up smiling for another



Bikini Bathing Suit Here To Stay

MIAMI.
The Bikini bathing suit, that
wisp of twine and handkerchief

which has hung by a thread in
its

more ways than one since
French creation four years ago,
has apparently reached firm

ground in the United States.. ;

A leading designer sams its
here to stay.

But don’t start rushing for the
beach, boys. That’s only one
man’s opinion and even he admits
that it will take two to three
years to get the girls accustomed

to parading around with not
much more than what nature
provided as a barrier against

curious eyes.

Mal Marshall, a Miami clothing
designer who has a phobia about
stuffy wearing apparel, predicted
that within a matter of months
the Bikini suit will catch more at-
tention on American beaches than
the atom bomb caught at its
namesake.

Remember
And, Marshall continued, within
* a few years grandmothers will
be saying “I remember when”
about the torso covers the girls
are wearing now.

The daring designer shrugs off
the thought that. some people
might frown on his prediction

“They'll just have to get used
to seeing nudes on the beach,”
Marshall remarked. “Those peo-
ple were shocked when girls took
their hose off and men quit wear-
ing high collared shirts. They'll
get used to it.”

Marshall cited what he calls the
“great technological problem of
design” as one reason why the
suits have not hit the mass market,
He explained;

“Designing a Bikini is like
cutting a diamond. The subject is
so tiny that it’s hard to get the
pre perspective.

“Then, of course, every inch of
the suit serves what you might
call an essential purpose. You



JOHN WHITE

means made, justiright



don’t have extra material to play
around with,”
Variety

To solve that problem, the de-
signer plans to rely on colours
and unique materials to give his
suits variety.

“My hottest idea yet,” he re-
vealed, “is a fluorescent job. You
can’t miss a babe on the beach
night or day if she’s wearing one
of them,”

So tar, avout tne oniy sikini
suits to be spotted around Miami
Beach this season have been
stretched around models’ shapes
for photographic purposes. Press-
agenting photographers look on
the suits as the greatest boon to
photography since Sally Rand
discovered fans.

“A Bikini suit,” said one
academic lensman, “gives more
cheesecake per square inch than
a Minsky stripper shows in a



week.” —LN.S.
Know Bob Hope?
Bob Hope, the actor, has be-

come an institution throughout
the world, a symbol of the joy of
living and laughter> The many
films featuring his round eyes,
his funny nose and his gags have
exhilarated young and old and
lave brought cheerful moments
international audiences, even
in trying times.

Bob Hope, the family man, may
not be as well known as Bob Hope
the comedian, but he undoubtedly
deserves the same fame in this
domain

30b is happily married to beau-
tiful Dolores Reade, whom he
charmed away from a _ singing
career by marrying her in 1932,
After eight years of marriage
they decided to adopt a daughter,
Linda, now nine years old, and
later, they adopted a son, Tony,
new aged eight. Recently, they
adepted two more youngsters,
Nora and Kelly, both three-year-

olds

to

' stores in Barbados.

fpaein good looks tell you they're just right,
You know, too, when you look at the price

tag, that you can’t get finer value. Ilnstrated
is a Tan Oxford. Tied to every pair is the John
,White Guarantee Shield—the sign which
“means ‘just right’! Look for it in leading

SUNDAY



Crardening Hints |A* THe Cinema

For Amateurs

THE DAHLIA

DAHLIAS are not as commonly
grown in Barbados as many of the
other flowering plants. The reason
for this may be the prevailing
idea among some gardeners that
there is something especially diffi-
cult in their cultivation. This is
a mistaken idea however, for the
Dahlia is one of the easiest of
plants to grow, not only from
tuber, but from seed, and from
cutting. Dahlias are lovely as pot
plants or out in the open bed,
and they will bear generously
almost right through the year.

The seeds, tubers, or cuttings
should be planted much at the
same time as other annual seeds,
that is any time from November
on. After the plants are put out
in their permanent position,
whether in pot or bed, they re-
quire ordinary garden conditions
of soil and water in a nice open
sunny place. Do not make the soil
they are in very rich however,
as this.tends to encourage exces-
sive foliage, and as a consequence
fewer flowers.

Dahlia plants need some sup-
port, but the stakes should never
be in evidence, but should be of
a size to. help keep the plant in
a good position without being
seen. Decide where the young
plants are to be put, and put in
the stakes before putting in the
plants so as to avoid injuring the
delicate roots.

When planting out the small
variety of Dahlia, place the plants
eighteen inches to two feet apart,
while the medium size or large
variety should be placed four to
five feet apart.



When the plants are well grown,
and just before they start to
flower, a little thinning and trim-
ming may be neéded. It is about
this time too, that a mulch of
manure will be beneficial.

After some time Dahlia plants
tend to die off, and in Northern
climates the custom is to take up
the tubers and hang them up to
dry until Springtime comes round
again. In Barbados this is also
done by some people, but other
most successful Dahlia growers
just cut the plant down to ground
level at the first sign of its dying
back, and it will
with fresh new

being ded by accepted rules in
garde no gardener should
ever be hide-bound by these
rules, but should constantly be
breaking fresh ground in experi-
menting. This is especially so of
gardening in Barbados, where our
local conditions require ways and
methods that cannot be found in
the ordinary garden book, but
which must be worked out locally.

When specimen Dahlia blooms
are desired, some of the lower
branches of the plant should be
cut off, and most of the buds off
the remaining branches nipped
leaving just one or two at each
end.

While the enormous specimen
Dahlias (some the size of a tea-
plate) are very beautiful as speci-
mens, yet the small, or moderate
sized ones, are more useful for
as garden decoration, and
or picking for the house.




Smuggling And
Politics

Hy Gm

“ILLEGAL ENTRY” now playing at the Globe Thea-
tre is exactly what its title implies.
case in the files of the United States Department of Justice,
it shows the activities of the It

ADVOCATE

Taken from an actual

igration Department in

their efforts to prevent the smuggling of aliens, by air, from
Mexico into the United States.

It is an interesting and ex-
citing documentary-type film
with plenty of action and the
Story is graphically told with-
out too much over-emphasis on
the tougher aspects of the case.
The keynote of the film is sus-
pense built up surely and
steadily to a dramatic climax.

As the Chief of the Immigra-
tion district, including southern
California, George Brent and his
assistants are looking for a pilot
who can help them smash the
smuggling ring. Howard Duff, an
ex-army flier, whose job is just
about to fold under him, is sworn
in as a special agent. His in-
structions are to gain the confi-
dence of Marta Toren, widow of
his wartime co-pilot, who is an
unwilling member of the ring,
and to get all the information
possible concerning its members.
To do this, he manages to get a
jeb as a freight pilot with an
airline operated by one of the
smugglers, by which cargo is not
only _ transported, but aliens
smuggled over the border, and he
is eventually assigned to fly the
big boss from Mexico to the
United States, After a tense and
terrifying trip, during which his
indentity is discovered, Duff
ground-loops the plane, and the
immigration authorities take over.

For once, the love interest oes
not overshadow more important
action, and the romance between
Howard Duff and Marta Toren fits
naturally into the plot,

The performances of the whole
cast are realistic and convincing
and the direction is particularly
(good, together with a musical
score that blends with the vary-
ing moods throughout the film.

Flamingo Road

After a four weeks’ visit, Sam-

son and Delilah have departed

CROSSWORD
Sak deceased Baia





Across

1 and 9 Down. Mix it deeper when

you think some patents. (4-7)

6 and 8 Down. Cunning in craft
(10) 9, Create a card game. (6)
+ Nothing eateries: (a)
This is suggestive of hospitality
(6) 14, Trap. (3)
. This must be paid. (5)

.» Wick well-known in the North. (3)
This stag ruled Germany. (9)
22. Arts reformed in Navy. (4)
It could be gate or door, (5)
. The very reverse of 7 Down. (3)
- Area enclosed, (7) .
28. As a clue it is unworthy. (7)
Down
2. Hard water, (3) &%. Dwarf. (7)
Fuanests the heather family. (5)
6. Yield? to compassion. (6)
1. bel this a kid's game, (3)
8. See 5 Across. 4. See 1 Across,
10, Could be late. (4)
%: Sort of wire that shocks one, (4)
f. ffliction. (6)
° Bey. (5) 20. Muse. (4)
. She has a bee and so is a plant, (4)
\ mc a bow is coloured. (4)
tally a goifer's river, (3)®
yesterday's puzale.—Across:
1 Fron OE ze5t 75 Mint 10, Babu; 11,
‘ and 14 nm, Resignation; 15,
i Rest: 18, Mor 20, ‘Lariat; 22)
. Limn; %5, Anglo; 26, See 14








sg Spin. oun! i, Mpa! 2,
“4 re Knwu > e eer; 5, seer,
. Maze: 8, fis: 9. Wastain: 13

ely; i. se 1:
ir Sin® tic: 21. "Away:

, Otle;





and in their
Bridgetown is

from these shores,
place, the Plaza

now showing Joan Crawford in
“FLAMINGO ROAD.” Dealing
with small town politics, wnich
would appear to be tarred with
the same brush as politics the
world over, we have Miss Craw-
ford as an ex-carnival entertain-
er, running foul of Sydney
Greenstreet, the crooked sheriff,
when she becomes friendly with
Zachary Scott who is being
groomed by the sheriff as his
henchman in the state legislature
When she refuses to leave town
Miss «@rawtford its arrested on a
phony charge and sent to a wo-
men’s Metention home. On her
release, she gets a job whereby
she meets the big political boss,
David Brian, with whom she falls
in love and marries. From then
on, the gloves are off between
the sheriff and herself, and it is
literally a battle to his death,
with Greenstreet, goaded by his
personal hatred, using every po-
litical trick to destroy the woman}
who stands between him and his
political ambitions.

Sydney Greenstreet is an ab-
solute genius when it comes to
portraying a thoroughly sinister
character, Without the slightest
effort, he can create an evil at-
mosphere, while at the same time,
joking with the boys, or heaving
his ponderous frame like a slow-
moving pachyderm. As the un-
scrupulous sheriff, he is the nega-
tion of everything that is honest
and decent, and his portrayal is
brilliant and skilful. iss Craw-
ford is smooth and dramatic in
her transition from the carnival
girl] to the hostess on Flamingo
Road. She is a finished actress
and shines in this type of role.
As the deputy sheriff and Green-
street's henchman, Zachary Scott
portrays the weak, spineless po-
litical tool, who finally becomes
so embroiled in political skull-
druggery that he shoots himself.
A newcomer, David Brian, makes
his film debut as the big boss. He

is tough and convincing and not] 2

without his attractions Gladys
George is back again, this timed
as the owner and hostess of a
road-house where boys meet for
their political shindigs. She's a
real old-timer, and it’s good to
see her once more.

“FLAMINGO ROAD” is well
acted and directed and from the
point of view of dramatic enter-
tainment, should satisfy most
people



Â¥
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ROME.

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of a coffin in the centre of Rome.
Five thousand Neapolitans, who
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once mighty Rome destroyed by
Naples.” Ag the match ended in



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DARBADOS, by retaining the Elite Water Polo Cup, has shown
Trinidad that they are still the stronger of the two teams. One

SUNDAY

)
W. I. Beware Of Complacency
Says Board President Nunes

BY O. 8. COPPIN

HAD THE opportunity of listening to a record-

ed broadcast which Mr. R. K. Nunes, President

of the West Indies Cricket Board of Control made

on his return to Jamaica from his stay in Eng-

land, and after he had been re-elected President

of the West Indies Cricket Board of Control] at
their Trinidad meeting.

Mr. Nunes said that he had been asked to give
his impressions of the West Indies tour of England
which he had been privileged to witness.

I do not propose to reproduce here what Mr. Nunes said in its
entirety as we have heard most of it already, that is with regard
to the performance of the team.

TWO POINTS

WO POINTS in his speech however interest me greatly and I

am compelled to offer some comment.

The first is that Mr. Nunes in his speech advises the West Indies
to guard against complacency on the strength of their win in the
series with England and in the face of their forthcoming tour to
Australia in 1951. ®

No one could have greeted this announcement more heartily than
I did since it comes from the head of the controlling body of West
Indies cricket themselves and as such, should be considered as indi-
cative of the policy that would direct their dealings with West Indies

cricket at present. :
BAFFLED
AM BAFFLED at present as to the method I must use to associate
this declaration of policy with the inactivity of the Board as
far as instituting a search for new talent is concerned.

If Mr. Nunes’ advice is to be translated ipto positive action then
a search should have been started already for a pair of keen prom-
ising pace bowlers to train for the tour. °

It is no point waiting until the quadrangular tournament games
between Barbados and Trinidad on the one hand and Jamaica and
British Guiana on the other are concluded next year to select some
pace bowler on the strength of his performance in the respective
fixtures.

If the West Indies are to compete with the leading teams in
Imperial Cricket to-day, then they must adopt modern methods of
team building that have stood the acid test of post-war cricket with
accepted success.

MUST BE TRAINED
~ bowlers must be trained for their arduous duties as carefully
as a two-year-old is trained to be a stayer or a sprinter as the
occasion demands,
If there is no complacency in West Indies Official cricket circles,
then let them set to work building a team and training the key men
before the comparative farce of Intercolonial tournaments leads them

astray.
NO CONGRATS FOR GODDARD

N Mr. Nunes’ speech he made no reference to the Captain of
the West Indies team, John Goddard, although he mentioned
individually Rae, Stollmeyer, Valentine, Weekes and Worrell.

I have already written in these columns that I was surprised that
at the last meeting of the West Indies Cricket Board of Control there
were resolutions passed and honorariums granted to Mr. Nunes for
his great service to West Indies cricket and also to Mr. Lacy, but
nothing was put on record Of the admittedly good job done by John
Goddard in his inspired leadership of the team or to Mr. Jack Kid-
ney, the Manager who is also credited with having done a good job.

NO EXCUSE

VEN if there was a slip at the Board Meeting in Trinidad, surely

the President on his return to Jamaica on having been asked

to say something about the tour should have grasped the opportunity
to pay some tribute to these two officials.

Nunes himself captained the 1928 West Indies team to England
that was not a particularly successful West Indies team but even in
those circumstances I am sure he realises that to captain even a
losing West Indies tearn in a tour of England is no sinecure and
more so the first team to win a single est match and finally the
series of Test matches in England.

I sincerely hope that as Mr. Nunes said in his broadcast, there
has never before been such unanimity among the West Indian Cricket
Board of Control as there is now and that this slip was just a slip.

BARBADOS STILL TOPS AT WATER POLO

outstanding point however is that_the Trinidad team has improved
so greatly between January and November that it has water polo fans
here wondering what is going to happen when Barbados visits Trini-
dad next year. If the Trinidad team continues to improve with such
— strides, by next year they will be definitely better than their
riv a ig
‘he Barbados team has not shown the remarkable teapeoveasn
which the visitors did, but they are nevertheless, still a great force
to be reckoned with.

The stimulating effect that the tour just concluded has had on
the game will show itself clearer when the Water Polo Association
opens its league next year,

A TOUR NEXT SEASON
ITH a possibility of a tour to Trinidad in the minds of the play-
ers, next season they will all strive to be among the best ten
which will be selected, Already youngsters are asking about joining
the Association, so the older players will have to watch their step
against this young talent which the Association hopes will be available
when the 1951 league opens.

Water Polo among the ladies seems to be here to stay. The local
team with only about six weeks steady practising before the Trinidad
tour, has shown great promise. If they can form a league next year
comprised of about three or four teams, they should have a successful
season and the be ey they will gain will put them on an even
footing with their Trinidad rivals,

The only comment on ladies Water Polo is that the field when
they play should be a bit shorter. However these and other minor
problems can be worked out before the 1951 season begins.

GOLF PRO ARRIVES

RNEST WAKELAM, senior Golf professional, at the Royal Ottawa

Golf Club in Canada, arrived yesterday to take up the post of

winter professional at the Rockley Golf and Country Club in succes-

sion to Allan Rennick who has served as winter professional for the
past two years.

Wakelam is a well known professional player in Canada and is
not only a coach but has won the senior championship of the Canadian
Golfers’ Association for the past two years and has recently turned in
a nine hole score of 29 on the difficult Ottawa course.

He makes his first tour of the Rockley Golf Club Course tomor-
row, if possible in a four ball match with three members and will be
ready to start giving lessons this week.

The November Beer Mug Competition which was postponed last
Saturday until yesterday was abandoned when play was not possible.









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ADVOCATE

No Cricket Yesterday wyaT OF BATTLE FRONT?



Rain Washes Out Play

In Four

There was no play yesterday

Fixtures

in any of the games scheduled

to take place in the seventh series of the First Division

Cricket Competition.

Commonwealth
« » € :
304—8 In 2nd Test

BOMBAY, Dec. 2.

Helped by a fifth-wicket stand
of 138 by the Lancashire pair Ken
Grieves and John Ikin, the Com-
monwealth team were 222 runs
ahead at the end of the second
day’s play in the second Test
against India here

The Commonwealth brought
their first innings score to 304 for
8 today in reply *o India’s 82.

Grieves hit 89, including 14
fours in 2 hours, and Ikin scored

77 in just under 4 hours hitting
7 boundaries.

Earlier Frank Worreli and
George Emmett had put on 60
for the third wicket. Worrell

scored 55 before he missed the
ball when attempting to sweep
Nayudu and was l.b.w. He was
at the wicket 157 minutes and hit
5 fours.
Scores:—
INDIA FIRST INNINGS 82
COMMONWEALTH FIRST INNINGS
L. Fishlock c Rajendrs Nath b Alva 11
H. Gimbiett c Hazare b Alva
G. Emmett stpd. Rajendra Nath b
Hazare <
Worrell l.b.w

F b Nayudu .. . $5

J. Ikin b Nayudu ovestuses 7
K. Grieves c Ranjendra Nath b
azare ‘

B. Dooland c Manjrekar b Umrigar 6

H. G. Tribe run out . oean’ 6

Spooner not out eee ea eens 2

J. Laker not out

Extras (4 byes, 4 noballs) 8

Total (for eight wickets)

Fall of wickets 1-19; 2-27; 3—85;
4—124, 5—262, 6—285, 7—293, 8-301.

BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M Bh -.ee
Phadkar : 29 + 27 0

Hazare ....+-+ il 0 27 1
Alva ....+. ‘ 19 4 58 3
Mankad . 21 8 42 0
Umrigar ......-.. 21 5 47 1
Neyudu : 4 4 44 2
—Reuter.

No Play in Test

BRISBANE, Dec. 2,

No play was possible on the
seconé day of the first Test
match between Australia and

England because of the state of
the pitch and surrounding area.

The ground was saturated by
heavy overnight rain and though
the sun shone fiercely in frequent
spells today, further showers did
not hasten the drying of the
pitch.

The captains, Lindsay Hassett
and Freddie Brown inspected the
wickets on three occasions the
last being at four o'clock local
time.

Australia were dismissed for 228
in their first innings yesterday
and England did not start their
reply —Reuter.



Referee Stops
Gatica— Young

*
Fight
NEW YORK, Dec, 2.

Jose Gatica, a lightweight from
Buenos Aires, made an auspicious
North American debut last night
by stopping Terry Young, a vet-
eran New York boxer, in the
fcurth round of their scheduled
10-round bout at Madison Square
Garden.

Gatica, who scaled 138% lbs.,
floored Young (140 lbs.) for a
count of one in the first round
with a left hook. He battered the
New York boxer with his left
hand until the referee stopped
the fight in the fourth round.

Gatica’s victory was expected
by officials to put him in position
for a title fight with world cham-
pion Ike Williams later this win-
ter.

In the main bout on the pro-
gramme Ray Famechon of France,
European featherweight champi-
on, gave a dazzling exhibition in
knocking out Archie Decino of
Newark, New Jersey, in the sev-
enth round of their scheduled 10-
round contest.—Reuter.




Be sure and get
The
“Evening Advocate

a tel tees
<<
to-morrow. |





Heavy rains on Friday and
again yesterday rendered the
ground unfit for play, pools of
water settling in spots on some
playing fields.

There were four games carded:
College v. Wanderers at College.
Carlton v. Pickwick at Carlton.
Spartan v. Lodge at Park.
Empire vy. Combermere at Bank

Hall.

There was no play at Bank Hall
yesterday when Empire and
Combermere were scheduled to
meet there in a First Division
cricket match. The outfield and
wicket were well soaked by the
rain and in some parts of the field
lagge pools of water collected.



ueen’s Horse
Breaks Leg
In Race

LONDON, Dec. 2.

The Queen to-day saw her
famous steeple chaser, Monaveen
hurt and had to be destroye’,
while contesting the £2,(
“Queen Elizabeth Stakes” ru
over three miles at Hurst Park this
afternoon.

Monaveen with whom the Queen
had hopes of winning the Grand
National, broke a leg when falling,
and had to be shot. The horse was
among the leaders when he came
down.

The nine-year-old gelding which
finished fifth in last year’s Grand
National, is owned jointly by the
Queen and Princess Elizabeth now
in Malta.

Monaveen started 9 to 4 favour-
ite to repeat his success of last
year, The race was won by the
topweight Coloured Schoolboy,
who Started 3 to 1. He won an
exciting race.

The Queen’s horse was trained
by Peter Cazelet, and ridden by
Tony Grantham, who was injured
and brought off the course in an
ambulance.

Monaveen ran in the Princess’
colours. When she and her mother
bought the horse last year it was
their first venture into National
Hunt Racing.

The horse came down at the
water jump, It was quickly seen
that he had broken a leg and he
was shot. Jockey Grantham, it was
later learned was cut on the face
and injured his knee. He was
taken to the hospital.

The Queen, watching the race
from the top of the stands through
her binoculars, saw Monaveen
who had been jumping well hith-
erto and was lying in second lace,
fall heavily at the jump, throwing
Grantham over its head. The
horse took off over the the water
splendidly but was struck in mid-
air by another horse and brought
down,

The trainer rushed out to the
injured animal. He returned to
give her the sad news that her
horse worth some £5,000 had had
to be destroyed.

The Queen was most concerned
about her jockey, and sent to the
Course Hospital to have enquiries
made about him. She was delight-
ed to hear he was not badly hurt.
The accident cast a gloom over
the Meeting.—Reuter.

Another W.1I.
Team For Bisley

IT is hoped to be able to send
another West Indian team to
Bisley in 1953, Lt. Colonel J,
Connell, Captain of the Barbados
element of the W.I. Team that
competed at Bisley this year,
states in his report to the Barba-
dos Rifle Association last week.

The Barbados team returned
here on 2nd September,

On behalf of the Barbados
Rifle Association, Col, Connell, in
his report thankeq the Barbados
Government, Messrs. Elders and
Fyffes Steamships Coy., the Mer-
chants and business firms of
Bridgetown and the private indi-
viduals who so generously gave
donations and made it possible to
send the team to Bisley,



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SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950

This Sire Must Not Be Sold Out Of Barbados

BY BOOKIE

HE NEWS that the Barbados Turf Club is offer-
ing the stallion Battle Front for sale is the most

momentous in the affairs of local racing. I can

think of few things which will have a greater effect

on the breeding of the thoroughbred in Barbados.

Of course it depends on whether Battle Front will

be sold out of the island or not but as it is highly

probable that the former will be the case, there is
. a that the prospect of a loss to breeding looms very large
indeed.

Now the Barbados Turf Club has done so much for sg on ng
Barbados in the past, not to mention its contribution to West In
breeding on the whole, that it is difficult to censure the Club off hand
for this new move. It can be imagined that they have good reason
for contemplating such a move and the most obvious is undoubtedly
that they are in the throes of obtaining another new stallion from
England. Consequently they wish to weed out Battle Front to make
room for the new arrival. In point of fact I have no plausible argu-
ment against this procedure and I will not attempt to manufacture
any; but, and it is a very big “but” indeed, I must warn against
allowing Battle Front to go out of the island. Therefore, if the Club
desires to be of further service to Barbados breeding they can at least
endeavour to dispose of Battle Front by selling him to some local
owner.

I N the long run a stallion’s reputation and true value stands or

falls with the success or failure he proves himself to be at stud
and certainly Battle Front has nothing to be ashamed of in this re-
spect. It is quite true that he has been rather overshadowed by O.T.C.

€arly every other stallion in the B.W.I. has. But looking at Battle
Front’s record in the few short years since he has been at stud one
cannot fail to be impressed that he has done well. In the five years
that his stock has been racing he has sired over 23 winners of 51
races valued $51,067. In 1947 he was 5th on the list of sires of win-
ners in the South Caribbean and in 1948 and 1949 he was third. Even
if it is said that his progeny have run at a time when purses are much
higher than they were in former years yet a glance at the actual num.
ber of races won reveals that it is greater than the amount returned
by winners sired by a stallion like Sunplant in a period almost twice
as long.

Neither does Battle Front suffer by comparison with the type of
race horse he has produced. The accent, it is true, has always been
on speed, and if I have ranked him below O.T.C. it is plainly on this
score that I have done so. But it must always be remembered that
Battle Front came along at a time when a much higher standard of
creole was required to make its presence felt and therefore his good
ones have been among some of the best sprinters that we have bred
in the West Indies,

As his leading money winner and most successful progeny we
have Front Bell, a winner of 12 races among which were some very
convincing wins over 6 furlongs from B and A class horses in Trini-
dad, Next there is Will O’The Wisp II, a filly who won the Breeders’
Stakes in a year of unrivalled quality among the two-year-olds. On
top of that there was War Path also in the same year who proved
herself superior to Will O’The Wisp II but was unfortunately unfit
when the Breeders’ Stakes came along. The above three-are among
the fastest creole fillies that I can think of and far better than mere
five furlong sprinters.

As his best progeny over a distance I count Firemist and Battle
Star and the former proves that when put to a mare known for pro-
ducing good stayers, Battle Front could also provide us with a miler
of some distinction.

Taking everything into account I am therefore of the opinion
that the B.T.C. should do all in their power to see that he remains
in the island.

THE GOVERNOR'S CUP

TURING the last two Sundays I have given my ideas on what the

picture is like with regard to the forthcoming Trinidad Derby
and Breeders’ Stakes. To-day it seems only natural that I should
follow with some discussion on the third of the West Indies’ three great
races which are run at the Trinidad Christmas meeting. That is the
Governor’s Cup.

To begin with, I must say how glad I am to welcome the name
back from the oblivion which threatened it in the last two years
and the only thing that could please me more would be to see it
once more a race of a mile and a half. But that is a forlorn hope,
although it is possible that should a Governor who likes races of
this distance take office in Trinidad we might yet see it reverted to.
Therefore here's hoping.

Secondly it is not as easy at the present moment to discuss the
prospects for the Governor’s Cup as it is in the case of the Classics
for the simple reason that there are no definite entries to go by.
However we have some idea of what to expect. The list, I should
imagine will read something like this. Elizabethan, Blue Streak,
Atomic II, Gun Site, Orly, Pharlite, Ocean Pearl, Rebate, Pepper
Wine and Silver Bullet. There may be one or two others like the
new arrivals from England such as White Company but these will
be few. In addition we might see one or two from B.G. like Way
Home, but it is unlikely that there will be more than a dozen run-
ners at the most.

Perusing the above list, it is quite likely that the favourites will
be chosen from among Blue Streak, Elizabethan, Ocean Pearl, Gun
Site and Atomic II by reason of their respective performances at
Arima and the Barbados November meeting. Looking at them all
I could never make up my mind about it from now. But among
the others there is one who hits me fair and square in the eye and
that is Orly. This there-year-old colt was a complete unknown
quantity only last June and although he won from much inferior
company to what he will now be required to meet, yet his manner
of winning left a very favourable and lasting impression on my mind.
He is a magnificent looking specimen, and with the light weight he
will have because of his age, it will definitely take a good horse to
beat him. Our five friends above quoted will therefore have to be
on their mettle and none of their well known weaknesses must be
in evidence on race day if they are to have a chance.

I am also particularly interested to see what Ocean Pearl will
do over 9% furlongs as it seems that she is not the simple sprinter
which we took her for last year. Or perhaps I should say she has
not remained in that category but has rather progressed into a middle
distance runner of some class, She certainly handed out a very
convincing beating to Blue Streak at Arima over 7% furlongs. Can
she do it again over 9%4?

Apart from these nothing else about the race stands out with
the possible exception of the game little filly Rebate, In her I see
a similar threat to that which Elizabethan posed two years ago when
she won the race. Her weight will be approximately the same, her
style of running is also similar and providing she can get off like
her predecessor I think they will have a lot of trouble to subdue
her. But there is a lot of water to go under the bridge between
now and then. So let us wait and see.

ee
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WATER POLO HONOURS DIVIDED | %. 72.2
Trinidad Ladies Win:

PAGE FIVE
( RUPTURE
RELIEF

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an
tired hii sak Niet alle tease coy Geetnsh 08: ttee gaat. cone thi cid tant BEASLEY'S LTD. Dept. 190
Barbados Amateur Water Polo He is fast but lacks experience Ret tains Elite Ce 4 Cork Street, London, W.1, England.
Association entertained a Trini- Next year he will probably play i her retalr
dad Men's Team and for the first in more matches “4 the rE © Water Fo
time a Ladies’ Team in a four- Outstanding Player € But they mt
day Intereolonial Water Polo For Barbados the outstanding , é xt se RHEUMATISM
Tournament. Matches were play- player was easily Kenneth Ince they | to bring
aoe the marnecon auees = Snappers’ sharp shooting centre Trinidad in the 195 i
vere were three Test matches forward. Ken was responsible for i ver Lad Intercolc d i 1

The Barbados men’s team won shooting four of the eight goals pi v i olo w 2 good an agon $ n
two of the tests, the other was in the test series Ken's shots idea ar } paid handsome divi-
played to a goalless draw. Trinie not only baffled the Trinidad dends. T! were a great attrac BACKACHE
dad however took the honours in goalkeeper but the man he was tion for porting public and |
lhe ladies’ matches, the Visitor’ marking His favourite shot is they have proved without doubt |
winning two of the three games. to back the goal push the ball thot the ¢ ean be rccessfulls
Two of the tests were played by away from him then turn, stretch plaved ladies, despite the
floodlight and these matches out his left hand and shoot with opinions expressed by some pes-
attracted huge crowds. The other wel) placed shots im either corner gir The Barbados team was
games too were well attended of goal. Difficulty in antici- » younger group of girls and they Well we @re in Barbados,

The Trinidad men's Team pati these shots were the main put uj; pluck performance The wreatest piace on earl
played a game against the Asso- cause fo Trinidad’s downfall. They tost the rubber, but have it wus the same; believe
ciation’s 1950 league champions Ken was well assisted in the for- mi: iny new friends the| * ates: AORN AE

Snappers Snappers won the ward line by Geoffrey Foster and Land of the Humming Bird. Next 1 to help
game in fine style, defeating the ge Be oe Geolre: pl.y year with | talent shown by ip then
visitors five 1 ed an excellent e in the sec Jean Char Roberta Vidmer ‘ ay © nel he. —_

the Swimming Sette Bho. ond test when, in the back line, and Phyllis Chandler as fast scor ' P Bene) prbibatonae
issa Plimmer of Trinidad woi ~~ to a he not omy 1 the iwba- ing for rere d Jill Gale ome . “ ome people shout ou
’ ‘9 . ar gen os team, he not on scores k Browne and Frieda Carmichael ir And promise to help all Sufferera from
eee — but was responsible for the open- th line, should be a great But Boy wena fee anil round Obstinate rheumatism will
Barbados. wot oth the Men's ‘4 goal of the series When he encouragement for other loca " pie complaints be interested in
and Ladies’ Reley races. ave Ken Ince an excellent pa ir o that ladies’ Water Pols ‘ast hour change-up the experience

iy n twelve to one related in this





relieved by

Vastly Improved s xoing to suffer man’s letter :—



























JOHNNY GATCLIFFE, Trinidad goal-keeper makes a brilliant save in the Second Test Match as The Trinidad Men's Team is a pone eee | KRUSCHEN ag ont zee
he deflects one of Delbert Bannister’s ‘power’ shots over the bar. vastly improved team to the one | Lou used to cook on mornings, | fool rheumat:
‘Although eight goals were scored on him in the Test series, Gatcliffe gave a remarkably good Which played against Barbados For children to go school | in my arms and shoulders, Then
account of himself and saved several certain goals during the tour. in Trinidad in January 1950. In She i onomist ains started in the small of my
every department itis a_ better A woman ain't a foal baak, increasing until they were
team. Their forwards, Dave Bar- , sia thdh's Wieskbast really severe. | bought a bottle
cant, Rex Eckstein, Basil Ander- he back r of Kruschen and was surprised to
son and John Sellier were all in d tt id help the b ng wae I got tte salier. I
top swimming condition and were Because wages low Ronee anes eee eee gous
always a headache for the Bar- But bo e single bour and from that day have not
bades defenders. Rex Eckstein ‘ size any pot peared ai ains were
who is a Barbadian was unfor- Especially if it Sbstteace bat the reliot really
tunate not to score. He js a strong me ene. surprised me.’ R,
swimmer and if left alone has a nd his friend would drive hor Rheumatic peine and backache
deceptive shot But the Barba- his ‘riend’s motor ear are usually the result of poisons
dos captain “Boo” Patterson was But now the hour change-up | in the blood—poisons which lazy
lways clos ine. 2 Rolectel e must walk very far bowels and tired kidneys are
always close on him and Eckstein } faill to expel. For these
it no time got away long enough | t tt de complaints there is no_ finer
to really send in one of his ‘pet’ ; When } ld ne | treatment than Kruschen Salts
shots. Dave Bareant has a quick | be Tn anive which cleanses all the internal
strong shot and with his good ‘ organs, stimulates them to nor-
condition got away several times | hould do we think mal healthy action and thus
but did not get past the Barbados | \ ask a word or two restores freshness and vigour.
goal keeper Paul Foster, ; het anak veanta ate ete All Chemists and Stores ou
In their back line they have a . . Kruschen
definite find in Harry Smith the right procedure
Smith is a big fellow, who al 1 thep you lt clasrly eit.
bine a he has only been playing | Iformity, ’ ‘
e game for ome season, has \ ;
shown by his performance here, ) ‘A @reat caropalsn has started :
that he can mark well and get | Att OF the health wuthorities
a ye to ed Pee e Are fishting this diswrace MUSCLE 1 INS
effectively marke annister in .
the first and second tests and The muck and mire in Bridgetown
won a speciel prize for ali round Mie UR uate Nek abe adie
performance on the rinidac . en ‘antisite it al ‘ Twill be like # nightmare ,
feam. He also placed second in suet ee Winners an] losers avo pictured together in an | ag é arti . : os y mean kidney oad
the Men's 100 yds 1 the aie att eee A function of the kidneys is to
Other members of the Trini- Billy Manning anti Gerard Jorda: league might be a detinite possi Por many unpleasant sayings eliminate lhsrintul lenpurittes (oom
dad back line, skipper Roddy making their debut to intercolo~ bility } Come: #rany the’ pRople's: mauth che system, If the kuineys grow
Bynoe and John Teixeira gave nial Water Polo in the latte The Trinidad Ladies’ team ha heath Claanine start us sluggish, these impurities acenm-
cod accounts of themselves. games showed that they will t heir quota of good players, Rit It shovwld by instele , ulate and settle and often become
ohnny Gatcliffe although he had possible candidates for the Bar ind Patsy Sellier, Marissa Plim.| So that when people quarreling a cause of pain in joints and
eight goals sever: Pr ee - the Eados team for Trinidad nex! :ner, Bernadette Anderson, Ann We wan't Have ia FUR Aad Hime muscles. The way to tackle the
tests gaye an excellent display In year. In the Barbados back line Wradley and Joan da Silva were Wel well! hh Yovember trouble is to help the kidneys.
THE pier of the Barbados Aquatic Club was packed with people for every match. Picture was goal and is much iareual As ert was little to choose for out~ all outstanding, not forgettin ve ri ‘ fleoting Peat ” They should be tod up with
= on Sunday morning during the Snappers- Trinidad match, which Snappers won five goals to aa last qppeasrance against Bar- standing performance, Tim Year- their goalkeeper Pamela Knagg: balay ty A A iy De ne Pills-the medicine
. ; t ados. ick radiey and Pat wood, skipper Boo Patterson an Mr. Joe Pliimmer, Manager of vinililnh Mis ai ah. made specially for this purpose,
The three tiered accommodation facilities desi gned by Basil Brooks and constructed by him and Ambrose only cpanared in the George Reet Ait all played well both teams must be ‘astiy weou i| De Wits Pills have a en ning,
other members of the Water Polo Association, was a most successful venture and allowed everyone on Snappers match. Dick was un- throughout the tour marking thei: of their performanee, and wit! sponsored by | cleansing and antiseptic action on
<4 the pier to have a good view of the games. fortunate not to play in any of menclosely and effectively, Goal- the experienee gained in thi | the Kidneys that brings them
the tests but he had to stand keeper Paul Foster who did nol series, give Barbados a muel J&R BAKERIES | back to perform their natural
down for the heavier players. concede a goal for the entire harder fight when they meet in function properly, This well-
Ambrose, the baby of the team series showed that he has lost Trinidad in 19651 makers of tried medicine is sold all over

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THE TWO CAPTAINS “Boo” Patterson, centre holding towel,
dad captain just before the third test. Seen in the picture are, left to right, Pat Ambrose,
Archie Clarke, (Referee), Cliffy MacLean, (Snappers), Boo Patterson, (Barbados), John
(Trinidad), Roddy Bynoe, (Trinidad), Rex Eckstein (Trinidad) and Ken Ince (Barbados).

chats with Roddy Bynoe,
(Trinidad), BARBADOS retains the Elite Water Polo Cup. Boo Patterson accepts it on behalf of his team from
Gatcliffe, Maj. A. R. Poster, President of the Barbados Water Polo Association, The cup was presented in Janu
ary, 1950 to the Tournament winners, by the Elite Shirt Factory of Trinidad. IKK

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PAGE SIX

Now that the fifth and final
volume of Sir Osbert Sitwell’s au-
tobiography is out, and read, and
standing with its four companions
on a bookshelf where the after-
noon sun glows on the scarlet of
their covers, the grateful reader
can sigh with relief because no
personal mishap or. cosmic disas-
tér has prevented the completion
of a great work.

A great work. That is a judg-
ment which the prevalent timid-
ity of English literary criticism
seldom allows to be passed upon a
contemporary book. But if the
qualities which make for perma-
nence are identical ‘with those
which constitute greatness, then
Left Hand, Right Hand in its five
volumes is undoubtedly a great
work. It is impossible to believe
that any future history of English
literature wiil overlook it. either
as literature or as human history.
Written in the grand manner of
English prose—stately, monumen-
tal, and self-respecting—its only
conspicuous stylistic fault is a re-
eurrent tendency to lapse from
the simplicity which aids clarity.
Yet this is a fault that one will-
ingly condones, even at those mo-
ments when some vast sentence is
ebephantinirig down its involuted
path. Few nowadays can write
in the matiner of the English sev-
enteenth and eighteenth century
masters of prose; few, indeed, wish
to. Nevertheless, in so far as Sir
Osbert’s style is reminiscent from
time to time of the fugal cadences
of Sir Thomas Browne or of the
magisterial gravity of Dr. Johnson,
it speaks also of that whole and
manifold heritage of the past
which is in the Sitwells’ blood and
bones. ' cae

The first four volumes of Left
Hand, Right Hand will be remem-
bered mainly on three accounts:
that they are an authentic record
of the shaping and mis-shaping
impact of early twentieth century
history on a young man of sensi-
tive intelligence; that they lay
bare the desolating grecets which
so many now in middle life have
experienced since 1914—the pro-
cess of being torn from their an-
cestral roots and a civilized tradi-
tion by the blind pressure of “eco-
nomic laws”; and that they frame
a unique portrait of an English
eccentric in the authgr’s detailed
representation of his father, Sir
George Sitwell.

Sir George as his son depicts
him is enshrined in print, for as
long as print endures, as a charac-
ter no less notable than any
drawn by the great novelists, He
is a “true” character most fortun-
ately preserved for posterity by
the circumstance that the son
whom he hedged about for so long

with tal restrictions and a
crippling Tack of ois and
understanding, developed at

length imté a writer with an ex-
ceptional*gift of imaginative per-
ception which enabled him to see
through tHe outer layers of his
father’s character to the complex
and fascinating personality with-
in, In the concluding volume of
the autobiography, Noble Essences
(Macmillan , Sir Osbert recalls
that Bernard Shaw once asked
him “Was Sir George Sitwell a

nice father?” and that in reply he +

“shot out a thunderous NO which
was a pure. reflex. When
I recovered I softened it with the
hackneyed phrase, Yes and No;
. . »” Most readers of the auto-
biography will agree that Sir
George was not a‘nice father, but
how much more memorable Sir
Osbert has made him than most
nice fathers could be made by
even the most imaginative and
generous of sons.

Noble Essences is described as a
“book of characters.” While re-
maining part of the whole design
of the autobiography, it comprises
a series of pen portraits of men
and women with whom the author
has been acquainted, Three mem-
bers of the Sitwell family of this

eneration—Edith, Osbert, and
Sacheverell—have displayed in
public controversy a markedly

combative disposition which is at
variance with their real nature.
An exquisite courtesy radiates
from them in their persona] rela-
tionships, and Sir Osbert’s liter-
ary demeanour in this book (its
subtitle is “Courteous Revela-
tions”) is governed by that in-
nate courtesy which is consistent

By A. C. WARD

with compfiete intellectual hon-
esty. It is a pity that he is beset
by the cenviction that the English
are dominated by an active ha-
tred of artists, and that he fre-
quently hits out under the im-
pulse of this assumption

It is true that the three Sitwells
were often derided in their earlier
years, but that is an experiencé
common to innovators and not
in England alone. While the
English might be accused
of indifference to art, they do
not as a nation rate art high
enough for hatred, however much
they may be inclined to make
rude noises at it when it leaves
the rut of convention in any way
that the newspapers can call “sen-
sational.” Sir Osbert is himself a
very true Englishman whose deep
and genuine love and respect for
art is shared by many of his
countrymen. His subjects in
Noble Essences are artists in
words—-poets, novelists, and critics

ARTIE'’S HEADLINE

Derry

-_



(Wilfred Owen, W. H. Davies; Ar-
nold Bennett, Ronald Firbank,
Ada Leverson; Sir EFamund Gosse,
Robert Ross, Lytton Strachey);
artists in colour and line and
sound (Sickert, Rex Whistler,
Violet Gordon Woodhouse); and
artists in life, of whom there
could be none better and none
more lovingly and admiringly
drawn in the earlier volumes than
several who served the family as
domestics,

Since Lytton Strachey wrote his
essay on Florence Nightingale
(published in Eminent Victorians,
1918) demonstrating that she was
less the tender-hearted minister-
ing angel of popular legend than
a great administrator with a ruth-
less will, there have been periodi-
cal outbreaks of dissent from this
anti-romantic view of the woman
who went to the Crimea in the
1850's to clean up the revolting
shambles in the British army hos-
—— during the war with Russia.

trachey Was a literary artist first
and foremost, and his regard for
facts was governed by the artist's
impulse to use facts as malleable
material for aesthetic ends, It is
now possible to estimate what
degree of essential accuracy
exists in Strachey’s brief assess-
ment of this astonishing woman,
if it is considered in the
a of Cecil Woodham-Smith’s
Florence Nightingale, (Constable)
a new full-length biography, based
partly upon source material not
previously available.

Mrs, Woodham-Smith has writ-
ten a first-rate book which keeps
to the facts, is not overwhelmed
by their mass, and deploys them
so skilfully that her 600 pages are
absorbing from first to last. The
facts having thus been set out
with no partisan bias, the way lies
open for another book on Florence
Nightingale which should attempt
an interpretation of her personal-
ity. She remains an enima. She
was a genius, conscious in early
life of having been born to fulfil
some great mission; yet for many
years she remained in bondage to
a snobbish, convention-ridden
mother and a possessive, jealous,
hysterical _ sister, She
a woman of feeling and compas-
sion who would wear herself out
in the service of suffering people,
yet she would allow them to
die by scores in squalor and
agony, rather than contravene
regulations, the strict observ-
ance of which might ensure long-

was 9

term benefits to future sufferers
She was the victim of prejudice
and stupidity and hypocrisy and
lies, and of political and religious
intrigue; the idol of the British
army and of the common people;
the destroyer of men whom she
wore to death as instruments in
her campaign for reform, which
triumphed in the end over the
War Office, extended to India, and
utterly revolutionized — indeed
originated—the civil as well as
the military nursing service.

Miss C. V. edgwood, who
established herself as a notable
historian with her William the
Silent (1944), makes a most at-

tractive excursion into literary
history in the volume on Seven-
teenth-Century English Literature
which she has written for the
Home University Library (Ox-
ford University Press). It is not
often that a brief book on what
might be supposed an academic
subject can be read for pleasure
as well as for instruction but Miss
Wedgwood has a light touch with
her learned pen. This new book
gives information in plenty about
the major (and a good many of
the minor) English seventeenth-
century writers; and as the author
is devoted to this period more
perhaps than to any other, she
discourses upon it illuminatingly
and with enjoyment which her
readers cannot fail to share.

It is a good many years since
G. M. Young wrote Victorian Eng-
land: Portrait of an Age, and it
is still the best short book on that
subject. His Last Essays (Rupert
Hart-Davis) has a title which
none of his readers will wish to
take seriously, for he is far from
exhausted. Though he includes
essays on Pushkin, Sir Walter
Scott, Thackeray, and Thomas
Hardy in this book, he is a histo-
rian rather than a literary essay-
ist. His sobriety of style befits the
soundness of his matter; he has
scholarship and also wisdom, but
he does not proffer these on easy
terms to casual readers. He re-
quires full attention, and for those
who are prepared to give it he is
a rewarding author. The essays
in this volume on Government, on
Benedetto Croce, on Classical
Criticism, and on “Basic” English
are full of matter for all who look
to reading as a mental gymnastic

Four books on the English canals
have lately appeared within a few
days of one another. In the rail-
way age the inland water-ways of
Britain lost much of their original
commercial importance, though
they came into their own again
during the two world wars. In
certain places they have pic-
turesque features which appeal
to lovers of scenery, and there is
a romantic interest for those who
are attracted to the canal barges
and barge-people. The distinctive
style of painted and carved de-
coration used on the barges which
have family living quarters repre-
sents what is almost the only form
of folk art surviving in Britain.
When the officials who now con-
trol the canals announced a few
months ago that the barges would
in future be painted in a uniform
and less colourful manner, loud
protests were made. If this drab
intention is carried out, Mr. John
O’Connor’s Canals, Barges and
People (art & Technicals)—which
has many wood-engravings (24)
in colour) largely devoted to tra~-
ditional barge-decorations—will
acquire additional interest. It is
an uncommonly pleasing book for
which the artist has also written
the accompanying narrative deal-
ing with life on the canals.

Noble Essences, by Sir Osbert
een published by Macmillan,

/-.

Florence Nightingale, by Cecil
Woodham-Smith, published by
Constable, 15/-

Seventeenth-Century English
Literature, by C. V. Wedgwood,
published by the Oxford Univer-
sity Press in the Home University
Library series, 5/-

Last Essays, by G. M. Young,
ee by Rupert Hart-Dayis,
/6d,

Canals, Barges and People, by
John O'Connor, published by Art
& Technics, 15/-

The book prices given above are
those applying in Britain at this
time. If you consider them use-
less or misleading in your terri-
tory, please delete them.

THANKS TO....

oOHELL MOTOR
GbASULENE

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Mr. Bates

Hy G. M. THOMSON

THE SCARLET SWORD By H. E.
Bates, Michael Joseph, 10s. 6d.
248 pages.

BATES wrote The Purple Plain
scene Burma; dreadful sufferings
of white man after air crash
Then he wrote The Jacaranda
Tree: scene Burma: Dreadful
sufferings of white men and
women fleeing from the Japanese
Now he writes The Scarlet Sword;
seene Kashmir, dreadful suffer-
ings of white men and women in
Pathan attack on a convent.

Bates is a good cook, but need
all his dishes taste of curry?

“When does the raping start?”
asked the Lowland lady of Lord
Elcho during the Rising of °45
In The Scarlet Sword it starts
on page 56. There is quite a lot
of it, providing as it were a thread
of continuity in a tale that is
otherwise little but a series ot
brilliant snapshots.

Bates — now take tropical
scenery and_horri iti
a ta eae. ble atrocities
°H, &. BATES, born 1905, North-
amptonshire, joined RAF 1941—
commissioned as first State short
story writer im England under
name of Flying Officer X, married
with four children, lives'in Kent.
A TOMB WITH A VIEW. By
Lance Sieveking. Faber and Faber,
10s, 6d. 303 pages.

HAVE gaiety urbanity frivolity
gone out of literary fashion? Then
here is Sieveking ‘to restore them
to favour with an ingenious
thriller in which the English lan-
suage is used with civility.

True enough, the tale is more
than a little incredible, the pieces
of the jig-saw puzzle fit together
with all too complacent a click.
But to so. bland a con man, so
adept a writer let us be indulgent.

That a murder committed in
1914 in a grubby London square
should be solved in 1945 in Monte
Carlo 1s—preposterous? No doubt.

But since it brings you into the
company of Walter Cream, that
massive impostor, Alec Larch, a
high-spirited artist with mysteri-
ous lady-loves to say nothing of
Mme. Fornas-Mertz and Count
d’Oznobichine, one a pathetic, and
the other a_ sinister relic of
Edwardian times — you should
complain!

* LANCE SIEVEKING BBC's
drama script editor; born Harrow,
1896, produced first (experimen-
tal) television play from roof of
Baird’s in Long Acre. 1929,

STOLEN JOURNEY. By Oliver



Philpot. Hodder and Stoughton.
15s. 412 pages
WHEN “John” and “Peter”,

the two escapees of The Wooden
Horse arrived in Sweden at the
end of their astonishing journey
they found that “Flight-lieuten-
ant Rowe” had arrived a week
before,

“Rowe” was the third man in
the escape tunnel which led out
of Stalag Luft III through the
sandy soil of Silesia to hope and
possibly to freedom, The “Rowe”
of The Wooden Horse is the
author of Stolen Journey which
tells how Philpot the third man
reached Sweden.

It seems to be impossible to
write a bad escape story. Philpov
has written an excellent one.
Although in fact his dash for
freedom takes up only a third of
the volume.

He was a fast— and lucky—

worker. From the moment he left],

the prison camp until he was
hidden in_the coal_bunkers of a
Swedish ship at Danzig just 48
hours elapsed,

And luck? When his papers
were inspected, the German
police were so busy pointing out
that his photograph had not been
stamped at Dresden that they
failed to notice it was not his
photograph at all. When Philpot,
travelling as a Norwegian busi-
nessman, swore in English, his
German train-companions found
it a very good joke.

Behind such remarkable strokes
of fortune, we may reasonably
assume the presence of a singu-
larly Imperturbable young man
with histrionic gifts. E.S.



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SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950

CUTOUT ELE

‘PEACE’ |

WITH
ORCHIDS

Report On Warsaw
By Evelyn Trons

WARSAW.

THE most astonishing objects
in Warsaw to-day appeared to be
the utility wool-lined suede boots
(76s. Sd. at a Piccadilly store)
in which I tock a walk round
the shopping streets.

Women stopped, nudged, point-
ed, asked where I got them. Pre-
vailing winter mode here is the
traditional felt boot, buckled by

three straps at the back of the |
leg.

Food shops are _ plentifully
stocked with butter, eggs, ham.

Nothing is rationed.
is scarce and dear; most handbags
on show are made of plastic ma-
terial
week’s wages.

Most Warsaw shops have been
taken over by the municipality
or by the State, but, whatever
their ownership, window displays
have a political angle.

To-day all shops carry peace
slogans, portraits of Stalin, Presi-
dent Beirut of Poland or Profes-
sor Joliot Curie,

Shopping crowds are cheered |
by loudspeakers playing stirring |
choral and orchestral music, in-
terrupted occasionally by a news
announcement,

Lorries decorated with flags |
whirl past carrying children who
shout, ‘“Pokoj, pokoj, pokoj” |
(Peace, peace, peace.) |

Night Life
THE. old-fashioned Polonia |

Hotel was the only one left stand-
ing in blitzed Warsaw until sev-
eral new ones Were rebuilt from
the ruins. This is Warsaw’s new
night club.

The dance floor was
All was free and easy.
wore evening dress. Warsaw
workers mingled with Congress
delegates.

We ordered drink and food.
When the’ dilt arrived we found
that at our: official rate of ex-
change (11 zloty to the pound
sterling under the three-week-old
re-valuation) we had to pay 13s.
6d. for a liqueur glass of vodka.
10s. for a thin slice of ham with
bread and butter.

Britons here for the Congress
have discovered that it is absurd
for any but those having British
travellers’ cheques to translate
Polish prices into terms of LSD
without considering the higher
wages here.

ith a wage of 200 zloty a
week (correspondi; roughly to

packed.



But leather |

and leather gloves cost a/|

|} role no

Nobody | director









|

|



By SAM WHITE

PARIS,
| THERE is a Hollywood film
| Star in Paris who, during her
eight months here, has never
, entered a fashionable cocktail
bar or night club, or dined at
Maxims, or ordered clothes from
;One of the leading Paris dress
| houses.

I present Deanna Durbin in a
Hollywood actress has
ever played convincingly before—
that of a star who really “wants

| to be alone”.

_ To find Miss Durbin in Paris
it is no use looking through the
guest lists of luxury hotels.

| Ever since she arrived she has

lived quietly with her four-year-

| old daughter Jessica in a three-
| roomed £7-a-week flatlet,

in a
Her only servants
nursemaid and a

Paris suburb.
|} are Jessica’s
daily “char”.

Deanna came to Paris with her
fiance, 44-year-old French film
Charles David They
|plan to marry sometime towards
| the end of this year or early next
| year in a small Alsace village
where Davia owns a cottage. This
will be “her. third marriage,
David's first.

At 28 Deanna, though slightly
taller, slightly plumper, still re-
calls the teen-aged film star of
Three Smart Girls.

She dresses simply—her Paris



£6 a week in Britain), the rate

drops to 33 zloty to the pound. |

At this valuation your pound will
buy in Warsaw 11 packets of 20
cheap cigarettes, a man’s shirt, a
pound of coffee or half a pound
of tea.

You will still need as much as
£5 or £6 tO buy a pair of shoes,
and nearly £2 for a lipstick. On
the other hand, r two room
and kitchen flat Will cost you
only about £1.a month including
heat.

Bills Are Big

PLAYS showing cufrently in
Warsaw include As You Like It.

Most movies now running here
are Russian, to celebrate “The
Month of Friendship” with the
Soviet Union.

Favourite diversion for teen-
agers and young people are the
dances organised by trade unions,
youth movements and other
groups. Boys wear lounge suits,
girls like to dress in their best.

The “World Peace Committee,”
who are making themselves re-
sponsible for the cost of the
Warsaw “Peace” Congress, said
through a spokesman they had no
idea how much the bill would be.

A Polish “Peace” Comunittee
representative pointed out that
under nationalisation no private
hotel or other. bills would have
to be met and that much of the
labour was Voluntary.

None the less, the cost of enter-
taining the 2,000 delegates here

am 1 < a *

Rupert is surprised at what Mary-
Quite-Comrary has said. ‘* But
what’s the matter with your gar-
den ?"’ he asks, “1 think it’s won-
detiul. People told me that |
couldn't find primroses in autumn,
but you've got some lovely beds of
them.” Rher's what | roean,”

cries Mary. ‘‘ Something's gone



for a week must be heavy. They
have been treated generously.
They even get nine packets of
20 luxury cigarettes for nothing.

There are all sorts of minor
details of hospitality, including
beer and fruit in delegates’ rooms,
and presents at the Congress
nearly every day.

One day the delegates were
presented with orchids. Another
day they had souvenir notebooks
and red silk flags.

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—London Express Service

clothes are bought “off the peg’’—~
and shuns hats and jewellery.

Deanna became a star at 14. Last
year her contract with Universal
Films expired, and she refused
to renew it.

“Why? For one very good
reason — Hollywood refused to
let me grow up”, she said. And
she added: “You can describe me
as a refugee from Hollywood's
conception of myself.

“Hollywood saw me as the
eternal bobbysoxer. The fact
that I had grown up, married,
had a child, had nothing to do
with it as far as they were con-
cerned” .

David, grey-haired, birdlike,
interjected: “I met Deanna when
I was working in Hollywood. I
realised that unless she took
drastic steps, Hollywood would
first see her a grandmother in the
flesh rather than let her play
the part of an adult woman on
the screen”’.

Deanna does not consider her
film career over. She can afford
to wait. She is wealthy with
property in Hollywood, and her
money carefully invested by her
Lancashire-born. parents.

In Paris Deanna divides her
time between singing practice,
French lessons and sightseeing.
“T have never been happier’ she
said.

—L.E.S.









Wns

es 44 Se ‘
wong with my poor garden.
flowers and ~mrer
autumn flowers ac

Sprin,

flowers a

aus - all out at bo
e spring flowers mustn't

onns out all through the year or

they'll b@ sure to die, and
want w lose them."

approaches s

don't
She stops

re rs
a gakenen



BROWN LOCUSTS

PRETORIA.

A vast swarm of brown locusts,
numbering about 150,000,000 were
destroyed this week after they had
stripped the area of Bushveld a
mile a one a quarter-of—a~mile
wide, ey had flown 800 miles
from the Cape, and, according to
locust officers, weighed about 200
tons,~enough to fill 33 lorries
Hundreds of Africans are clearing
tlhe fields of dead locusts which
e. regarded by them as a tasty







‘kill them'with

LIT



All Flié contains 0.0.7.
FLIT IS AN PRODUCT



4 “refugee.”

FACE POWDER

for glamour that becomes you



By BOURJOIS

* PERFUME

ROUGE
VANISHING CREAM

DEANNA DURBIN

drawn, by

ROBL
_ STAR WHO WANTS TO BE ALONE GIVES PARIS
NIGHTSPOTS A MISS

Deanna Durbin finds
happiness in a 3-room flat




















SUNDAY ADVOCATE
eg
AAU LUEUUEUUETEOOUEDUELEDU UATE ET EY ERE PEED EEE EE 288222 ! ec Shon |
= : = A Hoax in Stone |
aes = |
In one of the delightful chapters}
f Cheries ! “> Pick wick |
Paj.e:., Mr rn discovers a}
= |stone bearing this inscription |
; BILST
yn ? : ws + > : . i U M
loday’s witness is Stephen Potter—inventor p's m1 |
Ss. M.
STEPHEN POTTER one ot . ALOR, N > = | ARK
the few men sitce the war to ot GAMESMA SHIP = jand buys it for ten shillings von |
coin a new word which looks tike a “simple” cottager. The stone is
going into the tanguage: LIVE now im gt Deside you. How to suggest taken to London and becomes the
GAMESMANSHIP—the = art 1 t he clothes she wears, power
while came wikia et retreat 7 he and importance. genius ahd subject of much scholarly debate.
cheating Potter has a new book tem stp is nagnetism Those who know their Diekens
out applying the Gamesimatship Se a im e: the mah de seen striding will remember that ome of Mr,
a te the eee business of = ATE rk. as) 220.4 London street—Pall Mal} Pickwick’s rivals exposed the
iving e call, it }Memansiip-- my’ ee { possible—dressed in (say) 0 | mysterious-looking inscription as
» bh oy fi t t Jer f ogy he ys s
end: case he tacts Pinter GatIes- LATE combhacking Jacke, walle, ror | ® ROX:
tener his | dieatie atten Though it may fool you at first
» anT a tenderly beautiful gir! jas it dic Mr. Pickwick, with a
nreres: to ta hun himself, dressed in a jittle puzzling you can read what
me though tae oh sable coat with hint of it says, What is it?
> 0 1 t pea and intensely expensive “quot
o be one up on Stock ings fueLre ppo ve uy .‘yaew syq ‘aduings
“hoiee 1 3 uking notes With penci! wee pees Ajduuys Sup Iq. emMsUYy
and paper, of an odd big 4 _—
¢ t her escor' rec! “ ,
condescensioc | ‘Time Yourself On
ng her some We
hing to trans This Test

ribe in he

pare time,
This scet

theme—how a girl car


























This
done by

is a test that should be

SS
: the clock, with someone

hel;

iraw attention to a MAN keeping time for you and allow-

ing you two minutes for the test

* xk te or 10 seconds per word, See how
many words of opposite meaning

For example if she enters you can supply for those listed
restaurant bristling with gor below. All the words you supply

furs. glimmering with diamond





or leaving a fairly intense trail « must begin with C, Getting eight
scent, the chamces are that o! or more correct is excellent: six
200 people why want to know is average

| Who S$ fs, one will want to 1.) Open: C

| enue who on earth vou are as 2.) Order: ¢ ‘

|; well. q : .

| But one in 200 ts not enough 3.) Semledt Coa
It is possible that the room 4. meray

| 5 : m de
which the girl is to enter mu 6.) Deseena: C-—-—-~—-——

already be full of dressy wome:

* xv * 8.) Doubtful: C
| 9.) Unsettied: C_——————..
{ To be one up on sucn peopl 10.) Scattered: C-————

therefore: (a) Your companion
nust appear in a black skirt anc
| something simple on top without!
trace of ornament, like the draw
ing by Robb This is a typical!
one-up-on-your-friends creation
| throwing over the weil-dressed
| females brought by vour com
yanions the suspicion that their
| elegance is bad form overdone

Wee ey

tb) it

Genuine: C- —--.
Laity; C-———-_——-—,
“ABO “21 WaypayunaD
wre) 6 “urea 8
asta “G “UNHD “FP
saan ary

)
)
)
)
)
7.) Kmpty: C - - |
}
)
)
)
)

LL ‘WedwoeD ‘ot
PEREPMOID “L QUO 9
URID “€ “SORUD fF ‘'PaoID ‘1

New Members
Norma Small, Spooners
St. Michael.
Dorrine Gill,
Michael.



Hill,

Green Hill, St.

is Just us effective If you

in persuade u distinctly youn i ee
to turn up—again without Hirthday Gr tings
rnament or jewels—and spread Happy Birthds oO .
Pp PP) day to Onita Bos

he rumour that (isn't it marvel-
| us ?) she ts keeping herself on

3 «6s. wu week and (isn't ft
eet?) that is her oniy dress
Mher women are seen surrep
\ously to remove earrings
| rist watches etc, in @ lagi
nue effort to counter this
imbdit

| * Ww *

(¢)—und probably most funda
nental of all—if the women are
oo anxiously 1951 In style, bring

tic, Shirley Best, Erla Hewitt,
Archie Yard and Carl Yard who
celebrate their birthdays this
week,

BAWLING BABIES

LONDON.
Bawling babies will not annoy
the aduit auaiences at a new
movie theatre to be opened at
Wallasey, Cheshire, next year



i; gir] in a dress of 17th centur The soundproof, glass-faced
; yrocade é ; boxes, each with 18 seats, are
| S$ not is, after all Basi beir built 7 ?
Jlothesmanship? Come to thr Ral tani ee Wane 8:

vektail party in Jodhpurs. u EF hes é > w
Sate ber wa Ua tO th TP bid rom these parents will be
rigwick days able to see and hear the film
London Bxpress Service without fear of baby disturbing

| Tiianrnapenelhithihaliineie eitesiekinde magn ilake others

| Be Sound, wired direct from the
| MENTAL QUICKNESS projection box, can be turned

| TESTS FOR DRIVERS
| NEW YORK
Can you slam on your emer-
gency brake in 49-1/100ths of a
second’? This is the perfect mark
at New York’s new psycho-
physical clinic for drivers who are
frequently in accidents. If they
& | fail to put on the brake quickly
enough or do not pass all sorts of
eye, ear and mental quickness
tests, they lose their licences,

down for a whimper or up for
a full-throated roar, Cribs will
also be provided,—LN.8,

AUSTRALIAN BLUE BELLS,
a SYDNEY.
Paterson's Curse is a weed with
a bright blue flower that has
Mtrangled milligns of acres of
Australia’s best grazing lands, The
driver of a three-ton lorry going
cross-country to Sydney stopped,
filled his lorry with the flowers,
drove on to the city, sold them
as Ryne pie Australian
Blue Bells,” and made £360,







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PAGE EIGHT






= a 7
~ ——es

Printed by the Advocate Ce., Lté., Groad St. Bridgotewn.
Sunday, December 3, 1950

2 Schools

THE question of finding a site for
another Girls’ Secondary School in the
parish was raised at the Meeting of the
St. Michael Vestry this week.

The Vestry were given a legal opinion
on the ownership of the Deanery in June
this year. The parsonage and glebe in the
parish of St. Michael are vested by two
separate deeds each dated November 1853
in the Rector of the parish of St. Michael
and his successors, Rectors of St. Michael
forever. Both properties were bought
with the sanction and approval of the Leg-
islature. The Parsonage, now the Deanery,
was purchased in consequence of a petition
by the Vestry of St. Michael to the Legisla-
ture,

It is now the considered opinion of the
Vestry’s Counsel that the building known
as the St. Michael’s Rectory can only be
disposed of with the sanction and approval
of the Legislature. He further stated that
neither the Rectory nor the Glebe Land
can be used for any purpose or use than
that for which they were acquired except
with the consent and approval of the Leg-
islature as expressed in an Act of Parlia-
ment.

Counsel went on to advise the Vestry
of the necessary procedure. The sub-
stance of his advice was that if the prop-
erty is to be used for any other purpose
the Rector of the parish must take the
initiative,

*
a

At that Meeting the Bishop stated that
he was not unsympathetic to the idea the
Vestry was discussing, He counselled the
Vestry to wait until the new Rector was
appointed and he told them that the agree-
ment would have to come from the Rector
as he had no authority to tell him what to
do. +i) deal &

Four months after and with the new
Rector installed the Vestry still appear to
be far from their goal — the acquisition
of the Deanery as a site for another secon-
dary school for girls.

Sites for schools in the Metropolitan
parish are not easy to discover and it is
not surprising that the Vestry have select-
ed the Deanery. It is not the first time
that covetous eyes have fallen on the
Deanery. Years ago there was a sugges-
tion that Queen’s College should be re-.
moved to the Deanery. And when the
Vestry decided to build the St. Michael’s
Girls’ School the Deanery was numbered
among the suggested sites.

The St. Michael’s Vestry can never be
aceused of failing to realize the importance
of education. On many occasions they have
pointed the way for others to follow. When
they decided to launch the St. Michael’s
Girls’ School the critics, amongst whom
were many ratepayers, were of the opinion
that it was too ambitious an undertaking.
The school has fully justified its existence
and now the Vestry is contemplating
building another secondary school for girls
in the Parish.

The quest for education is ever on the
increase and until the other parishes
decide to build secondary schools a heavier
burden in supplying educational facilities
will continue to fall on the Metropolitan
parish.

St. Michael can boast of a Government
Secondary Girls’ School, a Parish School,
a Catholic School for girls, an Anglican
Convent, and one private school of some
proportions. Increasing numbers of
parents desire to give their girls the ad-
vantages to be gained from a secondary
education. But the vacancies in the sev-

eral academies in St. Michael are so few
as to be almost negligible.

Everyone interested in Education is
anxiously awaiting an amicable settlement
over the Deanery so that the Vestry can
proceed with their plan to build another
much needed secondary school for girls.



The Crown

NATIONALISATION has come to
Barbados and the govern-
ment will shortly have to con-

sider what steps they propose to take
to place the government in the same posi-
tion as the individual citizen in the eyes
of the law. The fiction has always existed
in British law that the king could do no
wrong, and as government employees were
the servants of the king he could not be
liable for any wrongs committed by them
in the course of their duties.

Recognising the hardship and injustice
so often caused by the application of this
fiction, the Legislature has from time toâ„¢
time when creating new departments or
Statutory Boards specially provided that
such department or Board could sue or
be sued as though it were a private citizen.
The Natural Gas Corporation Bill, now on
its way through the Legislature makes
such provision for the Corporation.

When the Labour Government took



power in England and embarked on the
policy of nationalisation so many persons
who had formerly been employed by priv-
ate companies now found themselves in

the service of the government through the |

Boards which were constituted to run the
nationalised industries and services, that
it became necessary to pass legislation to
place the government in the same position
as other employers of labour. Accordingly
the Proceedings against the Crown Act
was passed. By the provisions of that Act
the government became responsible not
only for their contracts but for the wrong-
ful acts of their servants committed in the
course of their employment.

An argument which has always been
used against such legislation has been that
juries would award excessive damages
against the government knowing that the
government was backed by the resources
of the public treasury. There is not much
in such an argument. Similar arguments
could be used in the case of big companies,
It is well known that juries are apt to take
into consideration the prosperity of a com-
pany when awarding damages against it
but that has never been regarded as a
good reason for exempting such companies
from liability.

In Barbados, as in England, more and
more government departments are coming
into existence and more and more persons
are being employed by the government.
The employees of the Civil Service in all
grades must run into thousands and it is
time that all the employees of government
should be subject ito the liabilities and
should be accorded the same rights.

This is but another example of the truism
that it is impossible to interfere with one
part of a complicated mechanism without
affecting the whole. In introducing nation-
alisation to Barbados and bringing many
employees under the control of the gov-
ernment, protection must be accorded to

those employees and to the public who
may be affected by the activities of the

government.



Black And White

A LETTER appearing in the Times re-
cently, signed by James Griffiths, Lord
Hall, Creech Jones and Malcolm MacDon-
ald, among others, says of Dr. Harold
Moody: “Born in Jamaica, a descendant of
slaves, he can be named with Booker
Washington as one of the greatest figures

which the cdloured race has provided
since emancipation.”

The description is accurate, what Wash-
ington was to America Moody was to
Britain. Both men spent their lives cam-
paigning for racial tolerance: as Aggrey
would have said, they tried to convince
people that although some sort of tune can
be played on the black keys of the piano,
and some sort of tune can be played on
the white, perfect harmony can only be
achieved if both sets of keys are used.

Dr. Moody, who died over three years
ago, was in his time one of the most re-
markable men in the religious and social
life of England. He founded, and was the
first president of the League of Coloured
Peoples. He had been chairman of the
Colonial Missionary Society, president of
the London Missionary Society, president
of the Christian Endeavour Union of Great
Britan and Ireland, and, just before his
death, was nominated for the chairman-
ship of the Congregation of England and
Wales. All through these years he was a
beloved doctor in the south-east of Lon-
don.

Just before his death Dr. Moody com-
pleted a tour of the West Indies which he
had undertaken for two reasons — to in-
crease his knowledge of the progress of
his fellow West Indians, and to launch a
campaign to collect funds for the erection
of a cultural centre for coloured peoples
in London, He believed that it should not
only be an idea crystallised, but that it
should be an incentive to bigger and better
efforts in the future. That it should sym-
bolise a positive contribution to better
understanding and closer co-operation
among coloured peoples themselves and an
earnest of their desire for international
unity and world peace.

Undoubtedly Dr. Moody would have
wished to have such a centre as his mem-
orial, but perhaps it is better that it is not
so. For a centre such as he envisaged
might have defeated its objects. Instead of
bringing white and coloured closer to-
gether it might have kept them further
apart,

Now an appeal is being organized to per-
petuate the memory of the Doctor. In the
first place it is intended to acquire the fine
bronze bust of him by his distinguished
sculptor brother Ronald Moody. Secondly
it is proposed to establish a prize fund for

coloured students from the West Indies
and Africa.

It would be more in keeping with
Dr. Moody’s teaching, and no doubt he

would wish it, if the prize fund were
awarded to students from Africa and the
West Indies, irrespective of colour. Thus
should we remember one whose greatest
wish was to establish co-operation be-
tween black and white.

_eeresencaiainenene Peeters arenas

|



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



THEY DO IT AGAIN AND AGAIN
SHOWING — Poe Horr

HOW T MANY

é 7 ~ 4
| (SEATS REATE 7

(jy \



ER |
a ee |
On The Fence | icumune Sakeee ee



Sitting

Hy NATHANIEL GUBHINS

“I think it is high time we
started letting other nations
see that not only are we a
sensible, steady people, but a

When an American _ visitor
asked a Rumanian girl what she
learned at school, she recited: —

“We live in peace and safety

rumbustious, creative, excit- because of kind Auntie Ana
ing, energetic, intellectually Pauker. But Auntie Ana
adventurous people. too.”— couldn’t take care of us with-

Francis Williams. out the aid of kind Uncle Joe
RUMBUSTIOUS, rumbustious, Stalin.”
And jolly clever, too, that’s us. * * *
Behind our rather vacant dials Apart from the joy of knowing
And painful, slow, superior smiles, .that my darling Ana, last heard
Behind each ruddy, wooden pan of as Rumania’s Foreign Secre-
There lurks another Englishman. tary, is not being taken care of
A lively, intellectual chap by Uncle Joe in a concentration
In bowler, trilby, huntin cap; camp, may I suggest that children
Creative and excitin fella in this country m'ght be taught
With old school tie and rolled more about their benefactors, in-

umbrella. cluding myself?

. Then any child, asked about the

affairs of the day, would answer
in the following manner.

”
Though most of us appears a gent,

We are uproarious, turbulent;
We want to shout and sing and

dance, Why are we living in peace,
To give the wicked, sidelong if not safety? ,
glance; Because kind Uncle Ernie

Bevin is taking care of us, with

t to devastate and daze
ee, Wane te Coven the help of kind Uncle Harry

The female heart with ardent

hrase. Truman. But neither of them
n love, our beating heart takes could do it without the aid of
wings; kind Uncle Nat, whose income
In each of us the poet sings. tax buys most of the arma-
Though, in the slow pursuit of ments,

Why do you
cheap food to eat?

mate, have

lovely
We are inarticulate.

-. SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950



POPCIOS

rane a
“ je

/

LUMBER & HARDWARE

ee

Establishea
1860

Incorporated
1926

T. HERBERT Ltd.



USEFUL GIFTS

that will be appreciated all the year round

ALUMINUM WARE

SAUCEPANS, COCKTAIL SHAKERS, JELLY
MOULDS, FRY PANS, PRESSURE COOK-
ERS, FRENCH FRIERS, POTATO RICERS.

, TIN WARE
4 CAKE TRAYS, ICING SETS & TUBES, ICING
~ STANDS & BOOKS, CAKE PANS, KITCH-
KR ENWARE.
XP EARTHENWARE

MIXING BOWLS, TEA SETS, DISHES
GLASSWARE

Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.
PHONES 4472 and 4687

produce an engagement ring or

even the smallest gift. |

GEORGE—Yes, dear?

Charlie’s given Enid an en-
gagement ring.—Has he?

It looks ever so nice.—They do
look nice, don’t they? Specially
them with pearls and rubies.

Those your’ favourites?—Oh,
definitely. Unless you ave a sin-
gle diamond.

Yes, I like a single diamond,
More class.—Oh, definitely.

* * *

TO OUR CUSTOMERS
AND FRIENDS—



How long ave we been engaged,
George?— Bngaged? Us? Qh,
years, I should think,

Only the other day Mum was
asking about my engagement ring. | }}
She thought I might ave lost it— ’
Lost it? She must be balmy.

You don’t ave to insult my]
mother, George—Well, you can’t|}}
lose something you've never ad, \

‘
}
{\

We wish to advise that our Dry Goods Depart-
ment will he open to business as usual every
week day (Saturdays and holidays excepted)
from 8.00 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. inclusive, and on
Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 11.30 p.m. inclusive.

Will our Customers and Friends please
take note and "be guided accordingly.

can you? It stands to reason.

Do you know what my sister
says about you? She says you're
mean.—And she’s dam right. I’m
so mean I wouldn’t give a starv- ; e
ing friend a tanner for a cup of

ee 5 4

coffee,

George!—Tell you what, though,
I nearly bought you something
last week. It was so cheap I said

For all we say to her when leavin

Is “Thank you for a smashin
evenin.”
Or, if she walks next day in
tweeds,

With doggies pantin on their
leads,
We raise our hats, and all we say
Is “Mornin, what a smashing day.”
A smashin girl, a smashing dance,
A smashin night, a smashed
romance... .
That’s how a silly English chap
Escapes the matrimonial trap.
+

Rumbustious, rumbustious,
And jolly clever, too, that’s us.
* ”

*
Kind Uncles All
ACCORDING to a report from
Rumania children are taught to
give thanks to the Communist
Government for all the blessings

Because of kind Uncle Maurice
Webb. But he couldn’t do it
without the aid of kind Uncle
Nat’s income tax, which pays the
food_ subsidies.

Why can Mummie get free
medicine when she imagines she
has a headache?

Because of kind Uncle Nye
Bevan. But he couldn’t do it
without the aid of kind Uncle
Nat’s income tax, which pays
for the. health | service.

Then who is your greatest bene-
factor?
Kind Uncle Nat.

Engagement Off

An indignant girl, complain-
ing to a newspaper about the
meanness of her fiance, says
that the broadest hints and

to myself “The very thing for my
girl.” Then I said to myself, “No.
I'll invest it in football pools.”
What happened?—I won £1,000
You know it’s your birthday to-
morrow?
. * *
I ought to, George.—Well, I
tried to forget it, but I couldn't.
So I said to myself, “I'll buy her
some little thing for once.” But
then I said, “No. [lt put the
money in the pools again.” So if
you’re thinking about a birthday
present, you’ve ad it.
I see.—But I tell you what.
Yes, George?—If I win another
£1,000 I'll buy you some bath
salts for Christmas. I will de-
finitely.
Thank you, George.—But if the
money goes down the drain you've
ad it for Christmas, too, De-

DaACOSTA & CO. LTD.

y EEO OES
a

bestowed on them, “even teasing” have failed to



N avy Welfare League Is
Doing Fine Work

By TREVOR GALE

In just under two weeks’ time Publicity in the world cannot
the Royal Merchant Navy Welfare reach.
League will close off a raffle ia The Navy League, of course,
aid of their funds. This rafflé arrange dances and picnics for
takes the place of other forms of the men of the ships and see to it
entertainment which the League that they visit most of the beauty
run annually in order to finance spots of the island. This side of
their activities. their activities probably receives

more publicity and is therefore

To some of us local folk many well known. But there is by far
of these activities may seem ob- a more important part which they
secure, not to mention those who play and this deals with welfare
take the view that charity begins of the men when they get into
at home and therefore reason difficulties locally.
why should we help outsiders For instance, a man may become
before we help our own poor and ill and have to stay in hospital.
destitute. This line of argument They League sees to it that he is
I think is in the minority and visited regularly by members and
is chiefly put forward by peopie provides him with sundries like
who dislike all forms o” visitors cigarettes, extra food and various
or generally have some grudg® toilet requisites. They arrange to
against life and therefore I do write his relatives should he be
not intend to go into xl its seriously ill and here I have a lit-
aspects here, “tle story to tell. It illustrates how
“much this work is
However since we are at et: overseas.
pains to be hospitable to visitors ne ;
at all times it seems to me only I was living in a small Cana-
natural that we should do all dian City at one time. A plac®
can to make life happy during as remotely connected with Bar-
their stay here for those who bados as the other side of the
bring us our food and protect as moon. Imagine my surprise there-
from the submarine menace in fore when a grey haired elderly
times of war. We can gain far lady appeared in the office one
more tasting friendship and the day and asked to see me. Being
goodwill of the world at large by in a newspaper office and being
such a policy as being nice even from a far off place like Barba-
to the tourists who visit us annu- dos I suppose I was good copy
ally, For small islands like this as a rarity and naturally she had
are thought of as the sailor thinks seen my name in the paper, She
of a port, and sailors’ reports fre- ealled, she said, because she was
quently penetrate communities thinking of coming to Barbados
which all the tourist catching and she would like to know

appreciated

. ‘eo

Our Readers Say:

——_—_———————————

», jority manage to get home. The
parlours find it difficult to serve
these clerks at present even be-

. ide tween 9.30 and 12.30 the present

To the Editor, The Advocate— breakfast hours. What should

SIR,—May I say how regret- happen if all had to be served in

i one hour, the accommodation
none ict ciaauina s * section would not be there, so the Clerks
of the order that reads one way aoe have to go home for their
| and is meant to apply in a differ- meals. Anyone who travels on the
ent way. Orders of this kind Bus knows the great difficulty it
should receive greater attention hi to get to var 4 the limited
fore being published. us service and therefore this
natone would be out of the question,
The Clerks who are the back- Clerks would have to do without
bone of a business, do not seem meals
to have received much considera-
tion far as the suggestion for all

Breakfast Hour




Some of the Members of the
Chamber of Commerce stated that

os to close ao ona a as far as the clerks being allowed
same hour is co ‘ “~ to go out to shop during their

jority of Clerks have their break- working hours was concerned, that
fast served at one or other of the no Merchant t

would object, tha
Breakfast parlours, a small

ma- sounds fine and is well meant, but

Suits from

Here are

finitely.
L.E.S.

England’s most respected
; Tailoring Houses ! Made
8 from the fabrics
and presented in a range
of Qualities and Colours.
that is include

your favourites.

finest

certain to

something of the place, But she
really wanted me to come to tea
so that we could sit down and dis-
cuss matters thoroughly,

I duly went to met the rest
of the family, Tah discoverea
that the reason why she wanted to
come to Barbados was because her
son had died here, Whereupon she
produced pictures of the funeral
at our cemetery and there stand-
ing ayound were faces which
were very familiar to me. She
then went into details about the
accident which befell her son
while on ship in port here and
produced letters from a member
of the Navy League, which with-
out being too sad, yet let her
know how things were with her
boy in his last moments. It might
have been written by a brother or
sister of the dead lad and the old
lady, I can assure you appreciated
it just as much,

Ot course the accident had taken
place some months previously and
the initial grief must have been
lessened by then, but that lady
never shed a tear nor did her
voice waver as she re-read what
must have been all too familiar
lines to her, Those letters were
her treasures.

When the time came for me to
leave I was asked to stay on
to dinner, and on departing after
that, I was assured of a constant
welcome. I was a friend of the
friends who had written her. 1
was a Barbadian. I was always
welcome in her home,















Stop in to-day at...

DaCOSTA & CO.
LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPT.





| | ¥ x”
that's the FIRST and LAST

Word in COCKTAILS
blended with

GODDARDS

GOLD BRAID

RUM



every one knows: that if a mer-
chant happened by chance to call
for a particular clerk on a couple |;
of occassions however distant
those calls may be, that the
anxious merchant wotild prompt- |!
ly say “every time I call for such
and such a clerk, they are out, this
will never do.” The unfortunate
clerk gets to hear this and an un-
happy situation begins.

_Great consideration must_ br
given this matter before a final
decision is arrived at.

Here is the opportunity for the
Clerks to ask Mr, Thomas to hold ||
a meeting and give them an op- |}
portunity to express their opinions
so that Mr. Thomas would be ir | |
a better position as their repre-
sentative to discuss the matter.

CLERK.







SUNDAY DECEMBER 3,

1950



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Governor Asks Support For
Missionary

Work

HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor, Mr. W. L. Savage
told the crowded Empire Theatre on Friday evening that
the missionary work of the Church deserved the most

generous support.

He was speaking at the Annual
Missionary meeting, and paid tri-
bute to the work being done
among the Africans.

The Governor said :

A year ago I promised to take
an active part in the next Mission-
ary Meeting, and I propose—while
I can hold your attention— to tell
you of some of my experiences in
twenty-five years in relation to
missionary activities in Africa.
My knowledge of the Gambia is
very limited—only having spent a
few hours there intransit on two
occasions—but in Nigeria and in
Northern Rhodesia I have had
close contacts with the missionary
work of the Anglican Church, and
as conditions there are not very
much different to those in the
Gambia, my remarks should not
be misleading.

First, I want to give you a brief
background of Africa. It is a vast
continent of nearly 200,000,000
people, or a thousand times the
population of this island. Its area
is about 13,000,000 square miles
compared with Barbados (includ-
ing Pelican Island) with 166
square miles. And so, Africa has
a density of population of say 15
persons to a square mile, while
in Barbados the average is about
1,200 to the square mile.

There are many reasons for such
wide differences, but the main one
is lack of water. There are
thousands of square miles of
deserts in Africa and you can
walk for days and never see a
human being. On the other hand,
in areas with heavy rainfalls there
are tropical forests spreading for
hundreds of mites which cannot
support human life.

Dense Population

There are, of course, large
towns densely populated—such as
Ibadan in Nigeria, where 200,009
souls live and which is one of the
most densely populated cities of
the world, but the large majority
of Africans live in villages far
away from towns.

How do they live? The standard
of life of millions of Africans is
that of subsistence agriculture —
living on what they can grow, and
in many, Many cases they can only
grow just enough to keep alive.
There are, of course, large num-
bers who can and do grow more
than they need—e.g. where soils
are good and water is plentiful,
and they sell their surplus, but
because of the great distances and
lack of concentrated markets too
often the development of agricul-
ture is uneconomic.

Hundreds of thousands of Afri-
cans leave their homes to find
work in distant towns or coun-
tries. Some walk hundreds of
miles—over several months—to
find work,

Let me give you another aspect
of their life. Nigeria has a popula-
tion of over 25,000,000 souls and
the government revenue is about
beh fiona pe - = oe Govern
ment services e people repre-
sent about £1 per head of the
population, Here in Barbados, with
a population of about 200,000 and
a government revenue of nearly
£2,000,000 we enjoy services
averaging £10 per head, i.e. ten
times thet of the average Nigerian,

Social Services
And so the social services in
Africa—education, health, subsi-
dization of foodstuffs and housing—
are generally speaking at a far
lower level than here in Barbados.
In this island, although the ser-
vices are not adequate, water can
be obtained fairly easily
mem
Eastern Provinces of Nigeri
African women and _ children

Churches

make their communions.

It is nearly 100 years ago that

David Livingstone

tral Africa, The most. i t
speech he made in his So
addressed to the undergraduates
of Cambridge University, when
towards the end he made this
personal appeal— “I direct your
“attention to Africa. I know in a
“few years I shall be cut-off in that
“country which is now open. Do
“not let it be shut again. Do you
carry out the work I have begun
“I leave it with YOU.”

Universities Mission

It was largely as a result of
this speech that the Universities
Mission to Central Africa was
formed, and when in 1925 I was
appointed to the Colonial Service
I looked with keenness to serve
in Northern Rhodesia where
Livingstone had died and where
his faithful Africans had buried
his heart but carried his embalmed
body hundreds. of miles over
several months to the coast to
hand to: the British Consul.

The U.M.C.A. is a missionary
body of priests, laymen and women



~ c

Mr. W. L. SAVAGE.

who serve a number of countries
in Central and East Africa. They
are the hardest working group of
people I have ever met. They are
not paid salaries as in England or
Barbados, but they are given an
outfit allowance on first appoint-
ment and receive their food and
lodging on a frugal scale and $10
a month pocket money,

In those days it took six days by
train to get from Capetown to
Livingstene and for 5 years I
lived at the Church House in
Livingstone, the capital of North-
ern Rhodesia, which was a port of
call for missionaries of all deno-
minations. So I was able to have
immediate contacts with mission-
ary work. In 1925 the Anglican
Church, St. Andrews, was the
only church in Livingstone, and
the congregation included most
denominations, Visiting clergy of
other denominations from South-
ern Rhodesia used to pay a visit
quarterly and hold services in
halls and in houses.

At Mission Station

After a year there I asked per-
mission to spend a fortnight on a
mission station, and the Bishop
agreed, provided I was prepared
to work, I took my motor-bike
on tke train and went north for

by every
ber of the community, In the about 500 miles to a tiny station

called Choma. From there I had

‘ato drive about 350 miles along a

in ;
the dry season walk sometimes tn path about 8 inches

for 3 to 4 hours to fetch water—
generally in = on their heads.
m many parts of
Africa are at great distances from
villages and thousands of people
walk for hours and sometimes
days—in all kinds of weather—
tropical heat—tropical storms—to

I arrived at my destination,
a U.M.C.A. _ station named
Mpanza, late at night, having
fallen off the motor bike innumer-
able times and having lost both
footrests after hitting concealed
tree stumps.

I should tell you that the ordin-
ary bicycle is a very common
type of public transport in Africa.

to You can travel first class, second
land after his first exploration class or third class.

First class

in Africa seeking more funds and passengers have the right to sit
further .

assistance to his drive
against slavery and the establish-

on the bicycle (either on the pil-
lion or cross bar) the whole way

ment of Christian missions in Cen- uphill and down hill, The second

DELIGHTFUL PRESENTS

a~

GIFT BOXES

XMAS TREE DECORATIONS
ASSORTED BOXES CHOCOLATES

PERFUMES

THERMOS JUGS

LADIES’ COMB & BRUSH SETS

THE COSMOPOLITAN

In view of the explanation given in the

matter of working hours of Shop Assistants we

have decided not to close from 12—1 daily as

advertised. Our Stores will therefore operate

as usual.

KNIGHTS DRUG

STORES



class passenger has to walk up
hills and the third class passenger
has to push the bicycle up the
hills for the owner.

However, I was met by the two
priests of the station, who appear-
ed a a caprmenetsy of the
company for a fortnight of a Civil
Servant—possibly a spy of Gav-
ernment. I was warned that the
mission day started at 5 o’clock
with Mass at 5.30 and breakfast
at 6.30 and work at 7 o’clock. I
was told my duties would be
found set out on the board in the
common room, so I went at once
to have a look. I was detailed to
be in charge of the dispensary
from 7 o'clock to 8.30, to teach
English and Arithmetic in the
training college from 8.30 to 12
o’ciock, to supervise work in the
gardens ftom 2 to 4, to assist in
road work and building from 4.30
to 6.30—straight to Evensong, on
to supper and bed. Although I
doubted my capacity to perform
all these tasks adequately, I was
determined not to let down the
Civil Servant.

Mud Blocks

I woke next morning and had
my first view of the station, The
clergy and guest house was made
of mud blocks with a thatched
roof and had been built entirely
by the students and other friends
of the mission in the area, Many
Africans understand self help,
for they know in Africa that un-
less they do things for themselves
they will have to go without. The
immediate roads to the mission
had also been built by voluntary
labour. Their church also of mud
bricks they had built. Their
schools and the training college
had been built by them under the
supervision of the clergy, one of
whom had been training as *an
engineer when ‘he received the
higher call to the priesthood,

It was a lovely church with not
one item, other than the chalice,
of European workmanship or ma-
terial. It had been built by the
Africans, as had the Altar, the
Chancel, the candlesticks, the lec-
tern, the vestments, the proces-
sional cross. It was and is an
outstanding example of what can
be achieved by people who are
inspired by the love of God and
therefore love of their fellow man
and so are determined to improve
their condition,

After Mass we had breakfast,
when I mentioned to the Principal
that I had no medical knowledge
and I was rather apprehensive of
being put in charge of a dispens-
ary. He said I should find a
medical orderly who would help
me. So I walked down to the dis-
pensary, a small building of three
rooms with about 150 people
lined up—men, women and child-
ren. The commonest complaint
was sores caused by the bite of in-
sects, nearly all of which had been
treated by primitive methods of
applying manure to the sores, re-
sulting in the most dreadful
wounds, some as big as a plate.
Some people came from as far
afield as 150 miles and had walk-
ed the whole way, They had
heard of the mission and hoped
they could be cured where the
witch doctor had failed.

A Chicken For A Tooth

I remember to this day vividly
an old lady who wanted a tooth
extracted, I wrote a note to the
Principal, but he replied, “Dear
Savage, you are in charge of the
dispensary.” There was no doc-
tor or dentist for hundreds of
miles. So the orderly gave me a
box of forceps and sat the old
lady in a chair and I pulled out—
at a second attempt—the offend-
ing tooth. She smiled at me and
gave me a chicken for the mission.

After we had disposed of all the
cases at the dispensary I went
across to the junior school,

The children are just like our
children and thought a new
teacher was interesting and they
endeavoured to divert me from
my purpose of teaching them
English. On some days they suc-
ceeded and persuaded me to tell
them of the capital town of Liv-
ingstone—of the sea which was
over 2,000 miles away, which they
had never seen, and of London
and of England. The school was
made of baked mud blocks simi-
lar to the other buildings I had
seen,

Then I had the usual African
rest for 2 hours in the middle of
the day, and in the afternoon
went out to the gardens. The

Bristol

Standing ....
JOSEPH WILSON

later in the month.

Bristol Brand.
cd

The ever popular

Wilson

Owing to the Labour
Shortage in England,
shipments of the out-

Hats
have been delayed. These
famous hats are expected

Until then Wilson offers
you an excellent pure
felt hat in their popular

schools weekly board-
ing schools, the children going
back to their homes for each
week-end, So they have to be fed
during the week and therefore are
expected to and do grow their
own food as well as learn some-
thing about agriculture. After
two hours of bending and stooping
I returned to the clergy house for
tea, My evening task was to help
build a separate guest house and
a small house for the Bisbop.
Never before had I investigated
the weight of a mud block, but
after handing about 100 from the
floor to the artisan I knew they
each weighed a ton. I went in

Evensong and later to dinner
really tired but satisfied with the
days work. At the end of dinner
the Principal. said with a smile,
“Your time is now your own, but
you must be in bed by 10 o’clock.
I was so worn out I was in bed
and asleep by 9 o'clock.

Village Life

After a few days, the Pringi-
pal asked me if I would like to
visit some far off villages And
so we set out one Friday night
and cycled until near midnight,
when we slept in a hut by the
road. Up again next morning at
daybreak and cycled until mid-
day and reached our destination
in the afternoon. We were wel-
comed by the whole village, the
local catechist explaining the
numbers who had come in for
Sunday Communion I walked
round the villdge with the cate-
chist, who spoke English well, and
he told me of the life and nard-
ships of his people. The soil was
poor and productivity was low.
The condition of the cattle re-
flected the poverty of the soil and
people. They had thought of
moving on but they were too
attached to their land, their only
real possession. I went inside their
houses, which were mud huts
grass mats and some animal skins
some empty tins for cooking and
drinking. Later I went over to
the church, which the villagers
had built A very weh smaller
and cruder church than the other
but I shall never forget the Sun-
day Mass at which I had the
privilege of serving Can you
imagine the oldest barn or store
house you have ever seen with
an Altar at one end and two!
hwndred Africans packed | and,
kneeling on the floor—they don’t)
like chairs or benches when they
are worshipping their God — the
women with their babies _ tied
comfortably to their backs—the|
little heads peeping over _ their|
mothers’ shoulders—the singing |
of the hymns, the Creed and the
responses in a deep melodious
tone, and then the sight of the)
men and women—still with their

there are



|
|
|

babies—making their Commun
fon Some had walked for 3)
days to come to church |
Self-Help |
I listened to a conversation}
between the Principal and the
catechist regarding 6 ‘equest for
another church and 4 uspensary

te be set up in another village
about 100 miles away, The
Principal said, “Tell your people
I will try and help them if they
first show signs of helping them-
selves, If they will clear a path
along the last 20 miles wide
enough for a motorbike to get
through and will build a small
church and dispensary and main-
tein If in good condition, I will
try and get funds for the neces-
sary equipment and for a teacher
and dispenser, The villagers
promised to do so and months
later I heard that they had carried
out their promise and a_ priest
visited them once a month.

I would have liked to have
given a summary of my experi-
ences in Nigeria but time is short
and I would only say that as in
Northern Rhodesia, the church
has made and is making a solid
contribution in the spiritual field,
in health and in education. It is
no exaggeration to say that if the
Church had not sent missions to
Nigeria, the condition of large
numbers of the people would
have been far worse than it is
today.

I do not want to give you the
impression that the Govern-
ments of Northern Rhodesia and
Nigeria have not also been in the
forefront of social development
fn those countries. They have
done and are doing outstanding





The Hat desig





, Will be flood-lit.

.
Dancing On Lawns
+ on ene
At Exhibition

SIXTY-ONE cows have been
entered for the Annual Industrial
Exhibition which takes place on
December 6 and 7 at Queen’s Park.
This equals the figure of last year.
The same thing applies to the
entries of sheep and pigs which
number 43 and 18 respectively.
Sixty goats have been entered but
this figure has fallen somewhat
below that of last year.

A special feature at the exhibi-
tion will be dancing on the lawns
on the east side of the Park House.
This will take place on the first
night and will be from 6 to 10
p.m, The orchestras of Mr. Percy
Green and Mr. Clevie Gittens will
play on the occasion. The lawns
The decision to
have this feature was taken by
the Exhibition Committee at a
meeting yesterday. The event will
be part of the programme to cele-
brate the hundredth anniversary
of the holding of these exhibitions.

Musical Display

Another attraction on the first
day will be a musical display by
mounted police. This will begin at
4 p.m.

Thirty-two booths have gone up
at the Park of which 22 are for
advertising and games. The otherey
are refreshment booths. The new
and attractive type of metal
dexion is much in evidence in
several of the booths and will be
used as the framework for the
new awning which the Agricul-
tural Society is setting up.

It is planned to have a few
new events when the Gymkhana
comes off on Thursday, the last



day Among these will be the
Envelope Race and the Sharp
Shooters Race,

work in health and education
services.

But the purpose of my remarks
this evening is to invite your
attention to two points—

(a) that the missionary work

of the Church deserves
your most generous sup-
port, and
(b) the Africans are trying
to help themselves
I therefore ask you, in the
collection which follows, not to

give what you can afford but to
make a contribution more than
you intended at some personal
sacrifice to yourself.





ARE MADE
SPECIALIZE



’ THE RESULTS OF MANY YEARS
EXPERIENCE
ARE EMBODIED IN THEIR MANU- |

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savoury flavour !




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with just a little Marmite !
Make it better for you too—
Marmite contains the B2
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health and resistance to
illness. That’s why it’s so
good for everyone on bread
and butter or in tasty sand-
wiches. You can do so
much with Marmite in
soups, gravies, sauces and
savoury dishes-—and Marmite
does so much for good cooking.

MARMITE .

The Vitamin B Yeast Food

Nt

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a," "a", ene es a oe een eee |







BY CRAFTSMEN WHO
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SOLE LOCAL DISTRIBUTORS



ned for Gentlemen

of good taste.

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AUSTRALIAN LEG HAMS—14—-16 lbs each per lb, 1.06
NUTRICIA POWDERED MILK 1-lb tin 9664
NUTRICIA POWDERED MILK S-lbtin 4.35 ‘
KRAFT CHEESE ... 12 oz. tin af
SELECTED AUSTRALIAN CURRANTS ., l-lb pkg 39 “
SELECTED AUSTRALIAN SULTANAS 1-lb. pkg. ‘04
MIXED FRUIT for Cakes & Puddings 1-lb. pkg. 46%)
NIAGARA SORREL ..,.:-eseseseeess per doz. ised
JACOBS CREAM CRACKERS per tin 1.36
NEW ZEALAND CHEESE . per lb. pre
TURBAN DATES . per pkg. 303
PALM TREE COOKING BUTTER . 5-lb. tins 3.90
C & B PLUM PUDDINGS 1-lb. tins .96
SEEDLESS GRAPES per tin 29 & .50
RED CURRANT JELLY . per tin 33

HENNESSYS X.0O, BRANDY
COCKADE FINE RUM ,

per bot. 13.00

per bot. 1°16

e
STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO., LTD.

From to-morrow MONDAY 4th December, we will be clos-
ing to business DAILY from 12 noon to 1 p.m. for Breakfast.
On THURSDAYS half holiday, we will be closing as usual at
noon



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009

PAGE NINE

SUC OCCRWE

SHOP EARLY§



WOM

AND GET
THE BEST
OF

CHRISTMAS
GIFTS

|
|
}
|
|
|

AT

Weatherhead’s

“KODAK” CAMBRAS

BABY BROWNIE .. $ 5.00
sm BROWNIE MODEL ..
eT Vers ak sade $10.00
BROWNIE MODEL. .
“E” -..++ $12.00

BROWNIE REFLEX $16.00
KODAK DUAFLEX $20.00
KODAK FOLDING...

CAMERAS . $25.00
$35.00; $50.00 and $80.00
Fresh stock of “KODAK”

FILMS all Sizes Verichrome
and Super XX, also Koda-
chrome K135, Kodachrome
16 MM and Super XX 8 MM.
Cable releases, Colour
Filters, Tripods, Trimmers,
ag Art Corners. Photograph
ALBUMS 1/6 to 10/-
Camera Cases for Brownie
Reflex and Folding—620.
Flasholder to Fit

Model “E.”

Brownie
GERMAN CAMERAS

“Pucky” Reflex —
(120 size) $10.00

“Imperial” Box —

(280 BBO) Svc is $ 9.00
“Adox 66” (120 size) $12.00
“PIPES” All Sizes and

Shapes.

AS $15.36
“Comoy’s” Grand

We kak s habs 9,50

“Comoy’s” Everyman 4.00

“Comoy’s” Aston Bantom
(A Featherweight Pipe)
—$3.00

“Royal Lane” . $ 5.00

“Craftsman” tetas Qe

Other Pipes @ 84c. $1.32,
$1.80, $2.32, $2.38, $3.02,
$3.10, $3.53, $4.64

and the “British Empire”

Pipe at 60 CENTS EACH.

“THERMOS FLASKS”
CMBR ie 5s ettay aed RE
akelite) —

Jugs (B

-s $3.06 & o00
Jugs (Aluminium) — i
Wide Mouth 2 Pint — $6.24
Wide Mouth % gal. — $18.13
Wide Mouth 1 gal. — $25.60
‘hermos Picnic Sets —

$17.00—$28.50

Flashlights 1/- to $2.62
Kitchen Scissors ; $1.69
Cutex Manicure Sets — &








Mouth Organs 1/3, 3/-, 3/6,
Photo Stands (4x6) .10/-

1/-, 7/6, 10/-, 11/-, $5.00
Sheath Knives
Shaving Brushes 2/6, 3/3,

1/- 4/6 & $2.24
Cigarette Tubes 2/6, 3/-, 3/6
Gillette Razors 1/9-—-$7.14
10/-, 14/-, 20/-
4/-, $1.05, $4.83, $5.74,
$5.80, $9.00, $11.22 and
$14.00
PENS & PENCILS
Ps
Parker “51" Gold... .$18.00
Parker “51” Silver... .$16.00
aterman’s “Taperite” ——

—————

$12.00
Waterman's “Lifetime —

. $11.90
Waterman's 555" $ 8.00
Parker ‘460" S$ 4.00

$ 1.80
$ 1.44

and the Famous
Platignum Ball Point 4/6 ea

CHRISTMAS
m DECORATIONS

BWxmas Frost, Red & Green
‘macord, ‘Tinsel Cord, Holly
Sprays, Tags, Seals, Mistle-
toe, Paper Bells (3 sizes)
Paper Garlands (6 kinds),
ae Tinsel Strips, Tinsel
Decorations (4 kinds), Tin-
3e1 Stars (3 kinds), Xmas
Tree glass decorations (18
kinds), Holly Paper, Xmas
Cake Decorations, Holly
Frills for your Xmas Cake
1/- per yard
Christmas Cards (6 in Box)
1/3, 1/9 & 2/3. Christmas
ards with Local Scenes ge
in Colour 18c. ea. Balloons
all shapes and sizes 3c. to
12c. ea. (See use for Whole-
sale Prices). Cake Candles,
Red & Green Candles, Santa
Claus Stockings 4/6 — 12/6
pgcaley’s Crackers (a Beauti-
ful Assortment) Prices
from 3/9 $5.50,
Midget Crackers 4/6 & 6/-
Christmas Tree Lights —
$5.00 & $7.51 Set.

By Crepe Paper all colours,
Cigarettes in Xmas Packages
Du Maurier 50/s .. .$1.00
Craven A 50/s .. $1.02
Baby Comb & Brush Sets—

Crystal, Pink & Blue

Prices $1.40 & 7/6
ohnson's Baby Sets. .$1.85
Mennen's Baby Sets. ..$2.07
e
Roo in and see our complete
Display of
: XMAS GIFTS TO-DAY

Wearever
ars Knight €

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LTD.

Head of Broad Sireet



<

TEPER TE TS FE PAR RP



PAGE TEN



News From Britain

By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

LONDON, 24th Nov.
General MacArthur’s military
offensive in Korea has just begun;
and the British diplomatic offen-
sive to make peace in Korea has
just begun. This is probably a
well advised division of activities.
The temper of British public
feeling has to be estimated with
caution. But I think I am right in
s@msing that the war in Korea has
cOmtinued much further than the
t public interest in it. The
way to report a question of
this kind is to imagine what would
happen if the public temper were
thoroughly aroused—as it was by
the Korean aggression. Newspapers
Would receive innumerable letters,
M.P.’s, also, would report a large
mailbag. “What is the news from
the front?” would be a usual ques-
tion when friends meet in the
evening. But it is not sonow. The
news of the week, in Britain, has
been the row with Egypt and the
report that Aneurin Bevan told
American journalists a strange
version of British ideas on de-
fence. Since Seoul fell and the
United Nations forces marched on-
ward to the Manchurian border
the war news has sli out of
prominence: The only way to
interpret This is to presume the
British nation has doubts.

Lord Salisbury, the leader of
Conservatives in the House of
Lords, is a sensitive man cértain-
ly not far out of touch with British
sentiment on international affairs.
(The heretlitary peerage is often
accused ef-being out of touch with
democrac¥Yy=put often the reverse
is true—the elected politicians in
the Commons have their heads in
the saiid of their own glory). Lord
Salisbury has asked the Govern-
ment to keép open every way to
reach a settlement with Russia—
on the Far East and on Germany.
The noble Lprd who is the grand-
son of a great Foreign Secretary,
is a man of experience and strong
views who tannot be accused of
weakness. He resigned, for in-
stance, with Anthony Eden, in pro-
test against efforts to make a hu-
miliating +reaty with Mussolini in
1938. 6-day there is a strong
current of distrust in Britain. In
Korea there is distrust of
Synghntan™ Rhee,” and of Gen-
eral MacArthur’s support of
him. The reports of South
Korean barbarities against their

Tisoners, which were

the Times, receiv im-
menge publicity through the dis+
mi: of a magazine editor who
wanted to publish an illustrated
report. This morning Generak
MacArthur’s intention to finish the
war by Christmas was published
as tiews, without comment, Fine
as that would be, there is a sense
here that the General would like
to forestall the United Nations
which is, technically, his master.

while peace rumours are cir-
culating among diplomats of all
nations. Indians, as usual, are to
the fore since they are the only
nation with direct links to Peking.
The war in the Far East has ex-
pended itself. If it ends with any
settlement, and without embroiling
the Chinese any further the Gov-

NENG NANG NENG

CVUSCUSE SSBB UN EES

Chocolates,

SONOS



Marshmallows,

(From 40c. — $2.04) (From 72c. — $4.00)

ernment here will feet satisfied
that Russia will not try any more
military adventures in the Far East,
using their client governments.
But the distrust continues—while
there are doubts about where the
Chinese will move.
George Bernard Shaw

So they have scattered the ashes
of Bernard Shaw at Ayot, St.
Lawrence, his home. He suggested
‘this should be done, but left it
open to Westminster Abbey to
claim his remains. The Public
Trustee turned to ecclesiastical
authorities, who were worried at
the blunt clause in Bernard Shaw’s
will, He wrote, “I desire that no
public monument or work of art
or inscription or sermon or ritual
service commemorating me shall
suggest that I accepted the tenets
peculiar to any Established Church
or denomination, nor that the

POCKET CARTGGN
by OSBERT LANCASTER



Bat, acar Lady Liutiehamp
ton it’s just a simple question
of economics i) we 10%
buy coal trom the U.S.
can't run our power static
and tf we can’t run ouf por
stations we can't produce nin.
goods for export and +) we
can't produce more qoods ‘0
export we can’t make the dol
lars to ‘my coat trom the U.S

—see?”



form of a cross or any other in-
strument of torture or symbol of
blood sacrifice.” Westminster Ab-
bey has, (or had), the status of a
national shrine celebrating the
greatness of those buried under its
stones. But it seems that the Pub-
lic Trustee was put off by ecclesi-
astical opinion. He writes “the
feelings of Churchmen would be
offended if ecclesiastical authori-
ties made any move to allow the
burial of his es in any religious
shrine.” This is being regarded as
all very surprising. We did not
think here, that places of Chris-
tian burial were closed to people
because of their beliefs.

And Westminister Abbey has
a special place. As on paper
it puts it: “the sufferer . e,
is not the great man _ but
the reputation of an _ institu-
tion. The prestige of Westminster
Abbey is certainly diminished.
Shaw would chuckle to think how

Barley

&
-

closely the clerical mind can run

to form.”

THE LAD OF THE WEEK is
certainly the lad from Borstal—a
corrective home for juvenile de-
linquents—who escaped at night
and stole a light aircraft. He had
never learnt to fly but got all his
knowledge out of books. It worked.

Apparently he landed twice,
quite safely, before putting down
near Bordeaux. He is now to be
brought back to England where
there will probably be not too
severe punishment waiting him
He is reported to have stated thet
now he supposes he will have no
chance for the R.A.F.—but it
sounds like good material.

COALS BEING IMPORTED to
Newcastle are a bitter reflection on
planning. It seems the Ministry
of Fuel and Power is an ill-fated
coal scuttle of good intentions. Mr.
Philip Noel-Baker, who now graces
that department with his presence,
used to be picked as Labourt’s fu-
ture Foreign Secretary. He tried
his hand at the Foreign Office
under Bevin. But Ernie could not
stand him it is said, and since then
he has wandered by way of the
Air Ministry and Commonwealtn
Relations downward, through the
Transport Ministry, to the Ministry
of Fuel and Power. Still dogged
with ill-luck he now has to face
the odium of a fuel crisis i? a cruel
February comes. Britain, which
Bevan once described as a lump
of coal in a sea full of fish, is par-
ticularly appalled by the prospect
of doing without coal, while we
are exporters to all the world.
Watching, from the gallery, the
well-meaning Minister wriggle un-
der taunts from his political op-
ponents, I remembered it all once
before. Then Shinwelk was the
ruined Minister of the deep coal
crisis of February, 1947. He was
sacked from Fuel to the War Of-
fice—it was the foundation of his
career. Now he stands high in es-
teem—the Minister of Defence. At
that rate Philip Noel Baker may
get back to the Cabinet yet!



Charged With
Four Murders

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 29.

Randolph Fraser on Tuesday
appeared at the Sangre Grande
Court on a preliminary hearing
on four charges of murder arising
out of the recent Valencia shoot-
ing whieh started a 15-day pOlice
manhunt

Magistrate C, H
manded Fraser to

Fraser was later
police Guard to Valencia forest
where a gun, reported missing
luring the manhunt, was found
pear the garden of one of the
victims. The gun was hidden in
the grass and set with a twig
attached to the trigger as a trap.
About 50 feet away a number of
cartridges were found in thick
bushes, The Guardian photogra-
oher narro @seaped the gun
trap when » called out a
varning,—Can,

Markham re-
December 6
taken by a



yd





Decorated Tins of Toffees, Attractive Boxes ol

Sugar







Ff Md
Hi qi |
. bac

SUNDAY

Hugh Springer
Talks Of Barbados
Education System

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, J’ca, Nov. 27,
The education system of Bar-
bados was the subject of an ad
dress by Mr. Hugh Springer, M.A.,
Registrar of the University Col-
lege of the West Indies, to the
St. Andrew's Teachers’ Associa-

tion a week ago.

Mr. Springer, who dealt in
detalii with the educational system
in Barbados said, among other
things, that the sister colony was
much in advance of Jamaica in
education in that there was no
district in the coleny that was not
well served by schools. Because
oi the general awareness towards
education, he said, there was no
necessity for compulsory educa-
tion.

He said, however, that in the
matter of teachers’ training, Bur-
bados was behind Jamaica !n that
their first Training Colleve cam
into existence not more than two
years agi Prior to that a few
teachers were trained ut an ineti-
tution connected with Codrington
College in a sort of poor-rclat on
status. He said also that in B
bados there was a greater num!
of male teachers than fem ik
teachers which was the reve
in Jamaica and attributed this
the fact that in Barbados
hood had not yet
status it has in thi

worn
acquired ie
island



Jamaica Gan Grov.

60% Of Locally
Used Rice

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, J’ca, Nov. 27,

On his return from his ric:-
study visit of British Guiana r>-
cently the Hon, I. W. A. Berro +
Minister for Agriculture, Lan is
and Commerce, said that with 4
proper approach to the indust) y
Jamaica can produce sixty perce it
of the local demand for rice

Mr. Barrant, accompanied ly
Mr. W. Ashman, vice-Chairm.n
of the Jamaica Rice Growers’ As
sociation, spent 10 days in the
mainland colony, which he de-
scribed as “a wonderful country.”

He described the people of
British Guiana as being “just like
Jamaicans” on the whole, but
added that their political cor-
sciousnes8 was 80 low that they
could be regarded as “politically
dead.” The country, Mr. Barrant
said, abounds with Labour Unions
“but suffer acutely from lack of
leadership.”

EAST INDIAN HANGED
BY FLOUR BAG

(From Our Gen Corie. pondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 28
An East Indian, 28 years o! i



and father of six children was
found hanging from a _ cashev
tree by a neighbour at Windsor

Park Estate, Trinidad. It wie
reported that he suftered from

chronic disease, A _ flour ba,
was used for the hanging.

FRENCE PERFUMES including:—
My “in, Scandal, Arpige, Bellogia, Nuit de Noel
Fleu:sde Rocaille, Tabu, Surrender, Reflexions,

ADVOCATE

Jamaica Cannot
Send Volunteer
Force For U.N.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, J’ca, Nov. 27,

The “Jamaica Government doés
not consider that it could properly
make an offer of a volunteer force
from Jamaica for the United Na-
tions.

Recently the Jamaica Chamber
of Commerce, Ltd., forwarded a
suggestion to the Government
asking Executive Council to give
serious consideration to the re-
cruitment of 1,000 volunteers in
Jamaica to be placed at the dis-
posal of the United Nations

In reply the Secretariat has in-
formed the Chamber that the
Government did not consider that
the offer of volunteers to the
United Nations on the conditions
suggested by the Chamber was one
that could properly be made by
Government.



Jamaica Wants War
Risks Insurance
Money

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, J’ca, Nov. 27,

The Jamaica Government is
to make a request to the Secretary
ef State for the Colonies with a
view to Jamaica’s share of the
War Risks Insurance Fund,
amounting to about $625,000 (W.I.)
being made available to the, In-
dustrial Development Corporation
which the Government contem-
plates setting up for encouraging
the expansion of industrial pro-
jects in the island.

Active consideration is being
given for the use of the money
for the development of the island,
including the encouragement of
the establishment of industrial
projects by means of which in-
creased employment would be
afforded and the improvement of
two of the Island’s many Mineral
Spring Baths.

SCHOOL CERTIFICATE
QUESTIONS WERE LOST

From Our Own Correspondent

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 28.
Trinidad candidates taking
the Cambridge School examina-
tion in San Fernando, waited 45
minutes later than the scheduled
time for the beginning of the

examination yesterday. It is
reported that the whereabouts of
the question papers were un-

known by either the supervisors
or observers at the centres, The
papers which were eventually got
through the police, did not reach
the Education Department, and
the San Fernando Office at ail.
This has drawn strong criticism
from various sources, The mat-
ter is being investigated by the
Minister for Education, the Hon.
Roy Joseph.

L’heure iue, Mitzouka, etc., etc.

LOLION

Gifts Fon

PRESENTATIONS OF JACOB BISCUITS ‘ -

Family Assorted”,
Crackers’’

PEEK FREAN:— Play
XMAS CRACKERS, THERMOS FLASKS, LUNCHEON

GOLOGLES including:—
4711, Atkinsons, Marie Farina.

- Houbigant, Crepe de Chine, Tabu,
Mon. cat Supreme, Amour Amour.

PRESEN’ ATION BOXES of Soaps & Dusting Powder.
Mor:.y, Bronnley, Cussons, Yardleys, Elizabeth
Arden s.

GIFT SE\ S:— Yardley, Elizabeth Arden, Max Factor,
Ponds.

COMB é BRUSH SETS; PERFUME NOVELTIES:
Soir De Paris, “Eiffel Tower.” “Shoe’’, Goya’s:---
Cracler, Gift Coffret, Michief ix. “Top Hat".

CALLING ALL CHRISTMAS








Sha Family

Afternoon Tec
“Ox.

SETS, CAKE AND TABLE DECORATIONS.





KNIGH

TS LTD.

ALL BRANCHES

per cent.

factory. This increase brin:
cost-of-living bonus to 4
cent.

~eption.
Cream



SUNDAY DECEMBER 8, 1950
‘ «

B.G. Workers Get |*. 6

5% Cost-of-Living

Increase

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Nov. 28.

The B.G. Sugar Producers’
Association has announced a 5
increase on the cost-

per

The decision to grant the in-
crease followed a meeting between
representatives of the Sugar Pro-
ducers’ Association, the Man-
Power Citizens’ Association and
the Workers’ League at the De-
partment of Labour.

But Workers Ask For More

Despite this announcement a
conference of Estates Joint Com-
mittee Representatives and the
M.P.C.A, District Secretaries
held on Monday voted in support
of a motion calling for an addi-
tional $3,000,000 wages increases
for workers.

It was hoped that the price of
sugar for export would be in-
creased sufficiently to make this
possible by January 1, 1951.

The Conference which was
attended by 70 delegates from 25
estates, also decided that the Sugar |
Producers’ Association be ap-,
proached about incorporating the
45% cost-of-living allowance with |
basic wages of all workers, and)
that unskilled field workers be)
paid a minimum wage of $2.00)
per day, while skilled factory
workers be paid 30 cents per hour
as a minimum. It was also decided |
that the S.P.A. be asked to con-
sider launching a provident scheme
and a contributory pension scheme.



Gomes Praises
Oilfield Workers

‘Trade Union

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-Or'-SPAIN, Nov. 28.

When the Hon. Albert Gomes,
Minister for Labour attended
the 11th Annual Conference of |
the Oilfield Workers’ Trade Union |
at San Fernando, he told scores |
of delegates that “I am all for |
the type of Trade Unionism you |
are endeavouring to give the!
Colony.” The Government's policy |
in this regard, he added, will be |
to give every encouragement to |
the type of sober, responsible, |
and realistic Labour organisation |
you “represent in this Colony.”
Mr. Gomes was the principal |
speaker at this mammoth con- |
ference, and received rounds of
cheers from the audiences as he
denounced “irresponsibility” and
“rebellious actions by those who
seek to destroy you.”

“The great tragedy”, he said “of
the West Indies has always been
the lack of continuity of effort
or purpose in so many of the |
things we undertake and it is a
fact to be lamented that so many
people in this country still be-
lieve that only efforts that ar?
spectacular are efforts worthy of
our recognition and encourage-
ment.”

|

|





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SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950



Voice Of

Scouting
Tomorrow

The last in the series of “The
Voice of Scouting” for 1950 will
be heard over Radio Distribution

tomorrow evening, 4th December,
at 5.45 o’clock when a programme
including Christmas Carols and a
short sketch, together with a re-
port of current events during the
past two months by the D.C. of
the South Western Local Associa-
tion. So don’t forget to listen in
on Monday evening at 5.45.

Congrats!

Hearty congratuiations to Mr.
Graham E. Corbin, A.D.C. of the
Leeward L. A. on gaining the
Wood Badge Part I (Theoretical)
Certificate. Mr. Corbin has now
completed Parts I and II of the
Wood Badge.

Reminder

Members of the Executive Com-
mittee of the Island Scout Council
are reminded of the meeting
to take place at Scout Headquar-
ters tomorrow evening, Monday
4th December, at 5,00 o’clock.



Investigating
Airfields

AS THE proposals the

for

New Houses
To Be Built

THE Housing Board approved
of a plan prepared by the Colonial
Engineer and the Board, a model
of which was made by the Senior
Draughtsman of the Architect
and Town Planning Office and
shown to the Board at their meet-
ing yesterday. The plan will be
forwarded to the Governance
Executive Committee and as soon
as they approve of it, 25 houses
will be built at the Pine and
25 at the Bay.

The model showed that the
houses will have two bedrooms,
a kitchen, hall, and a small room
for washing. Pipes for water wi!!
not be run in the house but stand-
pipes will be placed at convenient
points.

The Director of Medical Ser-
vices said that the model showed
that there would be good placing
of ventilation and sanitation,

The executive engineer of the
Department of Highways and
Transport has suggested that a
toot bridge be placed near th
Belfield area to allow people to
cross the water which prevents
easy passage after heavy rain.

The Secretary of the Board
told members that he had dis-
cussed the matter with the execu-
tive engineer after Mr. Beckles
had brought up the question of
water flooding that area

Ways and means of getting
adequate drainage in other hous-

operation of the Sealand service ing areas is also being discussed

to the Windward’ Islands have
been abandoned, it is again neces-
sary_to investigate the possibility
of providing suitable airfields for
Dominica and St. Vincent, Wing
Commander

and steps will be taken to im-
prove them as early as possible.

It was decided to accept the

recommendation of the Director
L. A. Egglesfield,of Highways and Transport in

Director General of Civil Aviation connection with roads running on
for the Caribbean area told the Beckles Road, The Director had

Advocate yesterday.

He has just returned from a
visit to Grenada where he met
Col. Merrylees of the firm of Sir
Alexander Gibb, Aerodrome Con-
sultants,

Col. Merrylees who has come
out from England to advise on
the engineering aspects of these
problems, is now investigating the
possibilities in Dominica, where
he will be joined by Commander
Egglesfield on Tuesday. They
will later go on to St. Vincent to
see what can be done there, more
particularly as the recent heavy
rains have seriously damaged
Diamond airfield.

Wing Commander Egglesfield
who was on leave in England with
his family, came out via Jamaica
at the beginning of November.
There, by arrangement, he met
an airfield expert from the Min-
istry of Civil Aviation and they
examined the possibility of im-
proving Palisadoes airport, or
alternately finding another site.

Their report is now being
examined by the Government of
Jamaica.

Commander LEgglesfield said
that Barbados can count itself
lucky in having such an excellent
natural site at Seawell. Although
the heavy rains have interfered
with the completion of the work
on the new runway, it is going
to be a very fine job when it is
finished,



recommended that the entrance on
Beckles Road from two of the
minor roads, be abandoned in
order to avoid cross roads, The
entrances will be still available to
pedestrians as a footpath will be
provided. Traffic will come out on
another road.

Sixty-six houses wil! be painted
at Deacon’s Road. The Secretary
of the Board was instructed to
write to Government accordingly.
Those tenants who are capable of
undertaking the work will be
allowed to do so under the super-
vision of a foreman. The Board
also considered the question of
changing the terms of the present
hire-purchase agreements ,

The draft estimates of capital
expenditure for the year 1951-52
was decided on by the Board. This
included the removal of 200
houses to the Bay and Pine as
well as the erection of 50 new
houses.

Mr. Gaulder Chase was granted
vacant bachelor’s quarters at the

Pine.



OPINION

NEW YORK.
“By every step we take towards
making the state the caretaker
of our lives, by that much we move
towards making the state our
mastér”—General Eisenhower.

Motor Cyclist
Injured

ORTY-TWO-YEAR-OLD Elliot
Downes, an engineer of
Blades Hill, St. Philip, injured his
right leg when he fell from motor
cycle P-87 while riding along Two
Mile Hill yesterday morning, He
was taken to the General Hospital
and detained.

Dennis Alleyne, (11), who was
travelling on the pillion, was
treated at the Hospital for injuries
and discharged.

It is understood that the wet
road caused the cycle to skid.
A FIRE of unknown origin

broke out at Pool Plantation;
St. John 6n Friday night and
destroyed 50 holes of first crop
ripe canes which are insured.

The canes belong to the Trustees
of the estate of the late W. H.
Trolloppe. .

ICHARD BAILEY of the
; Mounted Banch of the Trin-
idad Police Force, arrived in the
island during the week to spend
about six weeks’ holiday

He is accompanied by his wife
and three children. They are
staying with relatives at Black
Rock.

P.C. Bailey is a Barbadian who
enlisted in the Trinidad Police
Force in 1942.

Fhe ay CLARKE was awarded
First Prize at the Local Talent
Show at the Globe on Friday
night. He sang “Chatanooga Boy”.
Boy”. c

Second Prize went to Cheston
Holder who sang “Santa Fe”. The
— —e of the night was

colm urray an .
“Blue Moon”. . 7 oe Oe

HE ST. SIMON’S MIXED

SCHOOL held their “Open
Day” on Thursday. Mr. Aubrey
Douglas-Smith distributed the
prizes .

During the afternoon the pupils
performed in a play entitled “The
Black School Master” Mr
Douglas-Smith addressed the
gathering of guardians and par-
ents.

_ Mr. C. G. Smith, Headmaster,
in a short speech appealed to par-
ents for their co-operation with
the staff in training their children

Mr. C. F. Broome moved a
vote of thanks Rev. K. D.
Grannum presided

More Flour
Arrives

The Alcoa steamship “Alcoa
Pegasus” landed 1,155 sacks of
flour from Halifax here yesterday.

She also discharged 27,511
pieces of pine and spruce lumber,
419 sacks of oilmeal, 90 sacks of

oats, and supplies of newsprint,
tobacco and household effects.



The “Alcoa Pegasus’” local
agents are Messrs. Da Costa &
Co., Ltd.

The Schooner “Lucille M.
Smith”, another of yesterday’s
arrivals, brought for Barbados

1,500 bags of rice along with sup-
plies of firewood and charcoal.
The schooner is consigned to
Messrs. Robert Thom Ltd.



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PAGE TWELVE

New Dickens
Serial

BBC Radio Notes:





Church

Services

BBC Radio
Programmes

































SUNDAY ADVOCATE







HARBOUR L0G | GD

7

In Carlisle Bay












































































Sci Laudalpha, Sch. Anita H., M.V + , 7
ie METHODIST Star. M.\ recise, Yacht Tern ill IE ry PREPARATIONS
“Our Mutual Friend” ‘ BETHEL: 11 Rev. B. Crosk SN Pescies, Leen tee. b BEAUTY
A radio adaptation of Dickens’ Pag gg 7 a munion after arate = = W: L Eunicia, Sch. Zita Wonita
+= ; J mm. . es phon” . ct 3loria lenrietta 4
Mutual Friend’ takes the place of Analysis, 7.15 a.m. Strike up the Band DALKEITH m. and Re Sch. Frances W. Smith, Sch. M Choose the
‘The Master of Ballantrae’ as tlie 8.00 a See omen) Soe B. Crosby, Holy Communi each Le MV. ¢ LM. Yannis, Sch. | f
. ‘ ym; 12.01 noon re News ervi lis Mark , ady Joy, 5
current BBC serial, and will run 123@ pm News Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Take _ BELMONT: 11) am. Rev. M. A otis, h, Sch. Gardenia Ad: P z 1 th t .
for twelve successive weeks. In Ripe Here, 12.48 pr , London Forum, Thomas. Holy Communion."7 p.m. M owder atis
. ¥ + ale mn. Radio New «reel, 1.30 p.m. Sun urwen ARRIVALS
this novel of his Dickens returned dey ‘taeviea. 2.00 p.m. The News, 2.10 SOUTH DISTRICT: 9 # M.A Schooner Gunghine M.. 28, 1908. nbs
to his own world of comedy and p.m. Home News From Britain, 2.% p.m. E. Thomas. Holy Communion. 7 p.m. Capt. Barnes, from Ma 4 made for ou
bizzarrerie which had been less Communism in Practice, 2.30 p.m Variety Mr. G Bascombe Schooner Lucille M 74 tone
eae epee $90 p.m. Our Mutual Friend, | PROVIDENCE: 11 a.m. Mr, E. Browne, net. Capt. Hassell, fr¢ Guia
evident in his later works. UE 400 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. Interlude, 7 pam Mr. J. Love SS. Alcoa Peg ‘
Mutual Friend’ nas been described 415 p.m. Music Magazine, $30 p.m. Sun- VAUXHALL: 4 adn. Mr. C. Josies otemie eee
s ‘Dickens at his most mellowed day Half Hour, 4.55 p.m Epilogue, 5.00 pr Mr. G. MeAllister 0 tons FAIR SKIN CPEAM SKIN | OLIVE SKIN N EAN i
su ie es ‘m. Tom Jones Trio, 5.15 p.m Pro- S STREET—11 a.m, Rev. E apt. Joseph, from Dominica ; | SKIN
= r P.
and mature and, in some ways, at gramme Parade; 5.30 p.m, From The pm. Rev, B. McCullough S Bishop dale, 5,006 tons net, Capt 4
his most ambitious.” In it hiS Children’s r, 6.00 p.m. Round Britain 5 BAY—9.30 a.m. Rev. H. Tunnard, from Portsmouth Cream Rose Honey Rose Tan
operb artistry reaches its heighis, Quis; 630 p,m. Sunday Service; 7.00 p.m > S. 7 p.m. Mr. P. Deane DEPARTURES ; SF eet
superb artistry reaches its =) the News; 7.10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.15 © WHITE HALL—9.30 a.m. Rey. R. M M.V. Caribbee, 100 tons nei, Ca) le) | Gitear te Gute Fouas
and the book contains some of pm Caribbean Voices; 7.45 pin, The Cullough f. 7 p.m. H. C, Payne Gumbs, for Dominice. : > j
socis ire > seria ‘coming of Christ; 8.00 p.m, Radio News- GILL MEMORIAL-—il m. Rev. R SS. Bishopdale, 5,006 tons ne apt
best social ae ia ae t reel; 6.15 p.m, United Nations Report; McCullough 8. 7 p.m Mr. F, Moore Tunnard, for Trinidad BRUNETTE Peach Honey | Gere Fonce | SunTan |
adaptation ve be a uM ng 830 p.m. English Magazine; 9,00 p.m HOLETOWN—28.30 a.m. Rev. F. Law a _—— i {$4
days at 3.30 p.m; and on On- Fred Hartley and his Music; 9.30 pm rence § 7 p.m. Mr D_ Scott aie ILV rr
es 15 a t which tirne London Forum; 10,00 p.m. The News; BANK HALL—9.30 a.m. Mr. F. Roach 1 : ANK VES ree Cream Rose Rose Tan
page i "er mi tha air to tae 2010 pm. From the Editorials; 10.15 7 p.m, Rev. E. Griffin i OR WHITE
it will also be or ep 6 r p.m, Anything to eclare; 10.45 p.m SPEIGHTSTOWN—1i a.m Rev F ‘ a sc.('.]-j~ i ial —
West Indies in the special regional Ivor Moreton and Dave Kaye; 11.00 p.m. Lawrence T. 7 p.m, Rev. F. Lawrenc shade: yaedens C-| i-n-g. Care 2 ee ag ne th go
service. Listeners should note that Sree ' CHURCH OF GOD OF COMMERCE Cetunarel, With “Number Sern” the phen oor reikieess perfection, The
the BBC is now broadcasting to BOSTON iat St. Micnael above chart will guide you to your own individual shade, Obtainable from your
the West Indies on 48.43 metres, roa Me WRUW 11.75 Me, WRUX —}1 a.m. River Road, Rev. J, B. Win- chemist or drug store.
6.195 megacycles from 6.00 p.n ‘16 Me. eT ae eae ci) “mop ae aaa Bridgetown, Barbados, B.W.1. Wholesale enquiries to: C. F. Harrison & Co, (Barbados) Ltd, P.O. Box 304, Bridgetown,
onwards and if you have been — Re EE ner Tt ‘ sia john, 7 p.m, Rev. M. B. Pretti-john RATES OF EXCHANGE
troubled with poor reception re~ TM 0.74 3's im. Central Band of the Fr Administration of Lord's Suppe! December 2, 1960 . at iy nage gin
cently this frequency may SOlV@ Royal Air Force, 7.45 am, Chosen Island, y,), 2.7 Eckstein Village, Rev. J. B Léon
some of your difficulties, 4,00 a.m. From the Editorials, 8.10 a.m Cals caltieee esiuip eobias Kt /, ef i ")) 8
Programme Parade; 8.16 a.m. Nights at 11 asm, Vaux Hall, Rev, E. W, Weekes.) 4.8125 90 Days Sight 4.7225 Or TEU) Jah f
Paul T 1 ‘the Opera, 9.00 am. Close Downs 12.00 ST. CATHERINE E. 0. CHURCH 4.8175 60 4.7375 .
More Paul Temple | (noon) ‘The News, 12.10 p.m. News Analy- ST. Ci RINE E. 0. 4.8175 See thee : :
Another BBC serial of a differ- gis, 12.15 p.m =, Midland Light . eae ADVENT SUNDAY < ais |. 4.7625 hs :
ent nature also begins in $16 Sem Peto yp ty ae p.m Educating 7 p.m. Evensong and Liturgy; Preach-p@j +8240 : 4.7750 eho 4 f « \
; 3 & . , ‘oth . i owe Evangel v, Ps tele’ . 4c.) Sight Si 7 ag
ing week. This is another Paul Archie, 2.00 The News, 2 10 p.m. oe: ange ist Parri Celebrant (Min. 24c.) Sigh’ Peta tie) s
Temple Mystery which is just 8S jome |News om Britain, 215 Am CME ves”, an ee A
exciting as its predecessors. As Sports ae iow 2.30 pm ings se Ce LUTHERAN 4.8240 ee }
al Sir Grahe orl - monwealth; 3.00 p.m. Calling a ST, WALTER LUTHERAN HOUM (Min. $1.) Cable -
usual Sir Graham Forbes of Seot= (09 "p.m. “The News: 410 p.m. The DAYRELL'S ROAD CH, CH te
land Yard finds himself puzzled pay “Service; 4.15 (pm. Do | You 7 4m, English Service and Sermon by Coupons 4.70 -one smali tablet a ts
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ple.’ In this new serial Pa ‘- Chotee; 5.15 p.m. Programme Parade ST DURES LOPLERAN land Notes 4.76 ;
‘ ‘ agai ; : : 2K. HOUR ’
ple and his wife move against 4 §.30 p.m. Welgh Magating; 6.00 pm Dukes tenant Bie aieolnan cat eae
y~- Australia vs vgland; p.m. Inter vine Se ayer Denny
OCF Ot ae a er wed fede: B30 pay. Listeners Digae! Bam. The "ating Wut FO Donohue, Spows, 724/10% pr. Cheques, om mee as
on-Thames and Paris .. . but we News; pum: Wows. amalvas; 87, Se ich was Sera bene ae 70 6/10% pr. \ T= Ephazone treatment for Asthma is so
shan’t tell you any more about il. 7.15 p.m, Our Mutual Friend; 7.45 p.m. ST, JOHN’S LUTHERAN HOUR Sight or De- sow pr. - simple, 90 quick, 90 effective! All you do is
i j cl Island; 8.00 p.m. Radio Newsrcel mand D P
ries wee ae ee oe » Sis poe. United. Nations Report, 6.20 Sante ae ace Re 12 4/10% pr. Cable won ae i swallow one small tablet, and relief starts almost |
4. m., on ursdays and : ; ‘ - ¢ . re 30 pr Uestay © 5 pm r ave; 11% pr. Currency . i |
6.30 : mm. on Saturdays begin- Tags taview Pel be 3 By a eohins en “Come let us reason to- " Coupons 68 “0% pr. i immediately. Ephazone contains several healing
S ~ , y : : v : ge . . . od
ing on the 7th and 9th December. Orchestra; 9.30 p.m Books to Read ee Thursday ar ads eee tee a 5¢% pr. Silver » // agents which are released on reaching the stomach
p,m. The Arts; 10.00 p.m. The News: 10.10 sermon by M, Springer, Preacher CANADA and start to dissolve the germ-laden accumulations which congest |
Shake: p.m. From the Editorials; '0.\5 p.m ST. CONTENT LUTHERAN HOUR 64 6/10% pr. Cheques on
speare vs. Bacon ; 10.48 pam. Commonwealth sur- 9 CON : ? y oe he bkOlchial tubes
A Laugh; 10.45 p.m. Cor 7 1} am. Mr. James Lashley 7 pm Bankers 62 6/10% Pp the bronchial tubes.
For just over a hundred years eee Taare SB: sane Chit the Nati ie fe Oeiralts 62.45% pr This scientifically balanced preparation brings the boon of easy
ri 0 P ions rom 7 ‘ a7
now books and pamphlets have our headquarters. The Reverend Eugene |. 4 14 j a Drafts 62 3/10% p breathing, and has the additional advantage of safeguarding the
rte ‘tor-of- 64 6 ~ pr. Ca g . :
sought to prove that Bacon a. SAFE THIEVES r dig ae ee ah Bist Disectorof- 63 1/10% pr. Currency 61 1/10% p mind from the dread of those sudden nerve-racking on t }
some other Elizabethan wrote ame ¢tation ‘nig toe anes ta on ‘Phere is nothing to fear when Ephazone tablets are to hand !
Shakespeare. Anybody, Rowe MILAN THE SALVATION ARMY Wh Dr Bier ONtAL There is nothing vo inject, nothing t inhale, Ephazone has j
times "seems, _ except ilar. — Saie thieves netted £2,800 for a DIAMOND CORNER Cheques on ceeeded in cases of Asthma, Bronchitis and Bronchial Catarsh |
Shakespeare, wrote the works of pight’s work in Venice. They (Harvest Festival) poere %% disc i toate y done for oth
Shakespeare. In reams and reams entered a bank, could not force , 100 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3.00 p.m Be Ok See Min. 28c.) ch previously seerned hopeless. ‘What it has done for others,
of print, skilfully directed at the Seo. * OM ° ¥.P. Harvest Programme, 700 p.m. (Min. 3c.) ag can de for you! ,
ee ; | P© the safe, so they manhandled it senior Altar Service; Condilcted by ye, pr an a ! t
heads of the Baconian:, have {6 , waiting car. Major A, E. Moffett, (Divisional Cor Attn 500.) , FOR AST 5
come the refutations. Both sides mander) . Mt Cousten 1%% dise.
ws seem very convincing. An eaniz ——— SEA VIEW ae Min. 25c. "
. - —— 11,00 a.m. Holiness Meeting p BAHAMAS a
I ver mvincing. An aa rvest Programme >t 5 2 477.50 }
auhae Acerean: sicien Dr, thirty, and not very often heard Sitiok “Ater Guvine. Candccted. " OAMAICA :
Giles E. Dawson, in a talk called today, brought recognition and Mijor Smith 481%4% pr " aT 25c.) : 5 ‘ he ‘
“Te Case for St (first controversy to Arthur Bliss when LONG BAY (Min, 25¢.) Demand (Min. 25¢ Gold by all registered chemists, 1f any difcully, weise 4: a | ‘
The Case for Shakespeare’ (first I dedi- _ 11.00 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3.00 1 481%4% pr : =I
broadcast in the BBC’s Third it was Aet eereeee: ee ee Y.P. Harvest Programme, 7,00 p (Min. 50c.) Cable me. .o (10, the B
; to Si rian Boult who, <. ; Sees, ee atic, 0. 3, Bridgetown.
Programme) in the BBC’s G.O.S. meg seal Shin pear wus oon. ‘Spice Altar Gerviee; Condictea wis: ckilck iaaads ileal has Solt V6: RUBE anagh
in the coming week, strikes the Samer of the BBC Symphony eto SPEIGHTSTOWN without notice. ‘ am adie a 4
latest blow in this seemingly end- ~ ‘ - Ss +, _.11,00 am. Holiness Meeting, 3.00 p , ; SH SERVICES SMR RRAE TT
less controversy. His talk will be Orchestra. The ‘Colour Symphony yp" yarvest Programme, 700 p.m ERAVION Cee ! ; Write Direct or Al il for Fathezly Advice ° :
ac itself will be presented by the senior Altar Service; Conducted | Deeember 3, 1050 He Lise Oo rimai for ratneriy Aayico te
oo, at 6.30 p.m. on Wednes- ‘phimarmonic Orchestra conducted Sr. Captain Bishop a BOBRUCE Srcore, (tely. Com Pt a Ne
next. 9 ee . "OUR ROADS a.m. ev. i oore o -
; by Sis Ares Elias op Toeeday Ay tua am etme diene 3, mel: TBE Sc THE STEPPING STONES
i * is Soncer a ° any une ' eats FRACE AL ws
The Bliss ‘Colour Symphony’ tee eae ann eae OO any eee oe i Hinde 1 a.m, Mr. Hayde, pin. Mr, Swine,
In the BBC’s GO.S,, in the com- but it will be on the air i i - en CHECKER. HALL hae To su CCESS ,
i k Sir Arthur Bliss will P-™. and may be picked up onthe ,, Holindan “Akoating. $00 11am. Mr, Barker, 7 p.m. Mr, Lewis.
ne Meee le cn hin wolous Sem. beams to North America after our Company “Meeting, 7.00 p.m. Salvat MONTGOMERY ' an ae
ve a talk on his ‘Colour Sym-— ni f so, COMpany ting, 7.00 p.m. Salvation 7 5m. Mr. Philips. Don't hesitate about your future ! Goforward, |
ini i jirect ones have closed down. Sir Meeting Lieutenant Reid F Pp ,
phony’ explaining how he came io Arti Bliss’s talk will be broad- _ WELLINGTON STREET ‘pee eee confident that The Bennett College wil! sec |
bc) a ge Weak. lpia calen ‘Tuesday also—at 7.08 qe ee eee Tee ee eivatic DUNSCOMBE * you through to a sound position in any career |
i i i = . — Sompany Meeting, 7 pm. Salvation _m. GG, La Ce? . (
written-when the compoaen. Waa pm. Wank, Mae Sr. Major Gibbs. Gisela ere | Rae you choose. The Bennett College methods
are individual. There’s a friendly,
; personal touch that encour-
















ages quick progress and
makes for early
efficiency.

CHOOSE




pe
YOUR CAREER a al
Exams. All Commercia! Subjects Piumbi:
iaicasel (Enginesriag and Art Quantity terveiing
Wireless) Radie Service Engineering
Book-keeping Radio (Short Wave)

Secretarial Examinations
Shorthand (Pitman’s)

vent Bork of Works








Carpentry and joinery Surveying
Chanietry Teachers of Handicrafts
Civil Engineering ition Telecommunications
Civil Service Mining, | AN Subjects (City & Guilds)
ing, All Branches Move! Writing Television
and Examina- Wireless Telegraphy and
» Special Course Telephony

if your requirements are not listed above, write us for free advice
Direct Mail to DEPT. 188 .
THE BENNETT COLLEGE LTD.
®

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND













remember
Phensic!

The sooner you take Phensic, the sooner
you'll feel better, for Phensic’s quick, safe
action will bring relief, lift away pain-caused
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Phensic

for quick, safe relief
FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO,
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9

—SOSSSSO POOP PF OOS

-

COPS

4

CLASES SCOOP



4 + — “<
oe POLL PPLE LLP PPLE PEA ELEC PPPS ES



pecial Notice



Wim. Fogarty- Ltd.

(Inc. in Br. Guiana)



We take this opportunity of notifying our

699090999 9O9O OOS SOOO SOOOSGOS







Customers and the General Public that Our

i

Store will be opened to business as usual
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. uninterruptedly on
Mondays to Fridays, and on Saturdays from
8.30 am., to 12.30 p.m.



Our decision to keep open throughout the

day is another instance of ....

“FIRST THOUGHT OUR
CUSTOMERS”

and country residents will please note that

A NUTRITIOUS comBinaT!

hineitilat tsiibenidinelll

we are prepared to cause them no incon-
venience by closing our doors any part of

a working day.

WM. FOGARTY ETD.

A604 ¢
VVUVUC SOS OOSS

sienna inate aaa tee i

LLL ELSI SAS



LLLP PPLLPPAPPPAPPPDPPPPES

oe “
PV SOO OU GS SO COSCO








| | dandry if

THE CALi !

SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950
DWN VIII.





WITH
ROSE’S
Lime Juice



Agents: 1. M. B, MEYERS & C0. LTD.

Pfft"





_



ee
You dare

not ignore it!

You can’t keep dandruff



a secret—but you can get rid of it, .

Dandruff means that your hair is under-nourished and
that bodily supplies of natural vital hair foods are running
low. Replenish the supply with Silvikrin and dandruff
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youthful vigour and stays in your head—not in your comb,

Silvikrin

DOES GROW HAIR

Use Pure Silvikrin in severe cases of dandruff
and thinning hair, As a daily dressing use
Silvikrin Hair Tonie Lotion or, for dry heads,
the new Silyikrin Hair Tonic Lotion with Oil,

s Fram ail chemists, hairdressers and stores °
SILVIKRIN LABORATORIES LTO - LONDON - NWIQO » ENGLAND
Oma

4
%
¢
g
s
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PP PPP PSPSPS PSS SPSS POS .

NOTICE














POPPE SPP OSD



Passengers who hold reservations
on and after Ist. December, 1950,
are kindly asked to contact our
Office regarding times and days
of departure of their flights.

BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS
LIMITED

Phones 4585 & 2789.



Lower Broad St.

SPO PO CSSSSOSO PSO SSSO SOP FSP PPPS SEPP PSS IP SD SSS

54

* “
CSCS

SSL LLL SSO FSSSSSSEO

S yx
ME $f our

For generations “ stout and oysters” have been



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value. Now comes Manx Oyster Stout, brewed from
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extract of one whole selected New Zealand Oyster
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Rich, smooth, nutritious, satisfying, Manx Oyster
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ANX 4

ALWAYS {N SEASOM

STOCKISTS

ALLEYNE, ARTHUR & Co.,
S. E, COLE & Co., Ltd.,
D. V. SCOTT & Co,, Ltd.,
SAMUEL GIBBS,
GITTENS, CRONEY & Co.,
J. N. GODDARD & SONS,
E. A. DANIEL & Co

iCE & Co., Ltd.,
SON & REDMAN,
PERKINS & Co., Ltd.,
PITCHER CONNELL & Co.,
c. D. ROGERS
c \. WEBSTER

Ltd.,

Ltd.,
Ltd.,



Ltd Sole

Agent









alll

Mo



SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950

SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN

ee







BY CARL ANDERSON






a good sign
ecco aqnytime!

This black and yellow sign over our

door means we have met Caterpillar
| Tractor Co.'s high requirements as to
business integrity, knowledge of the
equipment field and the resources to
| establish and manage the standout
equipment concern in this territory.

De cock

Ceara IS
ce ALWAYS
NG TO






BO YOU yar?
WANT ME Je @-738





o—* paw + os oe ee ie
THE LONE RANGER
PME, Wave uP pap! Saee 3 Tiknow most Law:
THE BRIDGE 1S DOWN! WED HAVE: AAC on © | | HOwDO You pa MEN BY SIGHT,

BEEN KILLED IF THE MASKED MAN | Op BAT) ete ESPECIALLY GOOD

HADN'T STOPPED OUR HORS ONES. WHY ARE YOU
> mn RUNNING AWAY ?



FOR GOOD! | CANT FIGHT AN
ENEMY | CAN'T SEE /











| Selling, servicing and other details of

WE’RE PROUD
our business are handled to make
and keep customers. * ‘Caterpillar’ TO SHOW iT

owners expect and get this kind of

service.

ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LIMITED.
TWEEEDSIDE ROAD, — ST. MICHAEL, — PHONE 4629 & 4371.



BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS











| | 6-I/VE GIVEN UP MY ART =

" sie poe .
|
| | |
—_— . ———————_|| a — |
DADDY -DID YOU KNOW (LL GAY IT'S | I HAP BETTER NOT Y
MOTHER GAVE UP GOOD / ITS TOO | LET MAGGIE SEE ME I THINK MY ABILITY CAUSES
PAINTING AND GOOD TO BE SO WAPPY-SHE MAY |
SCULPTING FOR GOOD? | L__, TRUE/ | START PAINTIN' AGAIN! |
s | NOW I CAN |
ys |
j 1
| |

eee
FRIENS 6 AND AFTER ALL-
, SSSSSSSSSSSSS SSS SS SSS IO SSS SPSS PPS FP PP PP PPS PPPS A PSPSPS PPPS. GPF SS SPOS > POSSESS PPP OSPR iM A SINGER AT HEART!
tania chen eens J

sea laaestaeretsiincensntt tena Aaideetsieindiicinaion

JEALOUSY AMONG My GIRL |
ae a | AN STAY

eras P } HOME AND BNvOY IT!

af) as

z ek Retry
a5t5 “> fri | . lis i rH

| es

| ay |

ote
gS
wt eect

Age 2 dQ ’
ape

| Cay)/) f
& om

|

. . . . . 2 |
labour is employed, and the minimum of attention and main- | RIP KIRBY










SSSSSOSSO

65S £565999999990999905S90U99S9G 995995999 99999 DO9SO S99 IIIS FOF FFF FO I FOF 5555555999 9999999909959F
6%5SSS599 900 906S
|
a
4 GESS9SSSSSSOO GOSS SSOS9 99S S99 G69959
7.4

The world’s choice!

ts
%
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o
Pe
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%
rs)
3
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%
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The Petter-Fielding Horizontal engine, built by J. & H. McLaren




Ltd., of Leeds, is the choice the world over where semi or unskilled

BY ALEX RAYMOND

| THAT FELLOW, KIRBY. )
HE MUST HAVE _)

I'M NOT BA
9

; iF I'M NOT BACK IN | fy TRAILED ME ; , ie | ce
tigi y 4 l OUR A JERE! , 5
once it is installed and your operator knows the controls, you can g | ; ie Poul | eee Mt oe, in
: ¥ 4 HE POLICE! ¥ ‘
forget about it for along time. Tt is ideal for gravel-pits, saw- ¥ | f rr { j
¥ | Ey. ‘y j
mills, quarries, ete., or wherever long hours of operation in dusty % , 4 3 te f
S, oe 5 Vi
. o,8 4) % a | . y y, Z
and dirty conditions are the rule. %| , ‘0 | 5
5 a of j
% RX ry | \
» ae a>) |
> % 7 ’ Wt >
% yg ee 7 MX NS \s
. ; ~ Me { i |
% ana - dd by hp Ve H
nie x J Ww sat a ’
p x ON, v
a % - , ss ~ ' Bits
Ny i 3 ee fights fever . 2 aN )
|








tenance desirable. It is so simple, so sturdy, so trouble-free that %





MR, KIRBY, YOU ARE RIC
MELODY LANE /S HER
SO IS MY CLIENT MR.
PA BUT I THINK YOU A BS
(iP QUE FOR A LITTLE 4
SURPRISE!

a ~'
ae Ty, r

LL LET










TYPE B.H.LP. ; R.P.M. Number of
Cylinders

DH ; 12, ae 650 - 800 SINGLE

Se 21-27 | 500 - 650 SINGLE
FH 32 - 40 400-500 | SINGLE

- FH2 | 64-80. | 400-500 | TWIN |



(Tre dis é
—E PHANTOM






ro



(THE QUESTION I6-~HOWTOGET
N THE GHIP WITHOUT RAISING A






OKAY UP THERE, \ ;
TAKE 'ER AWAYS 4
i al) 4

ao bs | DEVIL'S ALIVE? THANK ¢ JO? ITSWELL ~
: | Now I'VE GOT TO GE ‘y—|_GUARDED+ +k
THE ‘COND : K





eee i ASSOCIATED BRITISH OIL ENGINES (EXPORT) LTD. COUNTERFEITERS

Sole Agents for Barbados

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

o 4 +, . ¢
2 PDVSTOOOSSSSS9058 GSSOSSGSSSCSSOSSSSION GOGGGSOGSSG506S5S 9G STD 9IGISGSSOSOGS OU SOG SG OV SOOT OS OS GSSGIT OY

SO%S

399999966909!

j # f f





PAGE FOURTEEN

CLASSIFIED ADS.

















































_ SR ERAN ESO CR EPR





PUBLIC SALES
AUCTION







SUNDAY ADVOCATE



SHIPPING NOTICES |

















SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950

NOTICE

We are changing our early closing day
from Saturday to Thursday for the













“Excellent Values!”









































TELEPHONE 2508 oo | month of Decembei. COLLINS LIMITED “Well Worth Every ¢”
cecsingeqnumniapeiedaniaaenlie ATTRACTIVE FURNISHED FLAT— ave been instructed by the Com- SERRE | 3.12 50—2n |
i 5 Hastings. Facing sea. aan one or a = im pe ay ane ROYAL NETHERLAND Cetera | There are some tp the things
~ couple. Available Decem| at. Phone y 2 a said o e Super ‘able mode!
DIED PUBLIC NOTICES on e eee Poceenher. and =? o'clock the STEAMSHIP co | COMBERMERE SCHOOL ome Hot plates At Your Gas
ee aaeinenares ‘allowing items:— (2) Tin buckets, (1) . Showroom, ‘
pARLMONT ROAD. Si nel VIO- rca tade to ontianew ee soins ae She auginesod, 1) Bench, and The M.V. “Daerwood” will ac- ACADEMIC YEAR Why sak: Gall and sos . thom
4 +E ON" t, Michae « 5 . ssengers r 3 ay. y
r PEF CAROLANE “Ali friet ELECTION NOTICES [fie “Ageiy? Couarina’ Club: Tel DARCY A, SCOTT pens from A nee | Sey eere, Rt ramensers, tor Ht] 2. The Governing Bodp ef Comber ||| fa Sant Y out be most use-
. y 5 . * .s. «HELEN. ” , ; : St. L greng choo ve agreed to adopt from a
asked to meet at 4 o’c 5496. 2.12.50—2n. Govt. Auctioneer. 25th. November. and Aruba, Sailing Thursday Tta. 1951 onwards the Standard Ac: For CHRISTMAS.
ras A : . I" a ademic ¥! STM
the BELMONT PARISH OF 8T. MICHAEL 29.11,50—-2n, Sai from Amsterdam, and Dover from September to July. The main culty
™ Roo HEREBY give notice that I have BOULOGNE-—St. Lawrence Gap. Fully on “ORANJESTAD” 17th. and’ 18th, The M.V. “Caribbee” will ac- to the School will not be made, there-| ”
§ ‘ ‘ T inted the Parochial Building, Cum- | furpished, vagant December rn a UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Hetienber cept Cargo and ponsengers ~ fore, until September 1951, and the Bn- |p. $$$
Ce te nd Street, Bridgetown, as the place 8458. 12.0—2n, 5 Deminica: Antigua, ontserrat, trance Examinatior ll take place dur- |
“h aD. 3 where Perishioners of the parish of St By i Sailing to Trinidad, La Guaira, Cura- Nevis and St. Kitts, Date of de- July ‘Term a : mcewanient Ee ee ee
i Michael and other persons duly qualified “CLIFF COT.” Blue Waters Terrace the Rerueiane received I will sell at | eap etc. m.s. “DELFT” 6th. Novembgr; parture to be notified. notified tater.
BURKI Byron esterday. His} to vate at any election of Vestrymen for | Roekley. Fer 6 months Feb jst —July| cit, rochial Building, Cumberland | s.5, “FARNSUM” sth. November; m.s. 2. The Governing Body are aware that
th 1 will leave late residence} (he suid Parish may assemble on Tues-| Sist 1951, Dial 0160. Mre €, ©. Worme,| PHeet on Tuesday, Docember Sth at |“QRANJESTAD” Ist. November. B.W.L. SCHOONER OWNERS this change over tha: Miandadd Anas
Karlville,” Spooners Hill, at 4.30 this} q the 2nd day of January, 1961, be- 12. a. 2 of second hand Sailing to Trinidad, P. bo, a |} demic Year will necessitate some adjust-
| afternoon for the Westbury Cemetery.] tween the houn; of 10 and 11 am. to in good condition. | Geeegetown, m.s. “HELENA” ith. ASSOCIATION Ine. ments; the age limits will therefere be
Cla Mother), Samuel Burke] eect @ Vestry for the Parish of St.| _ESPERANZA—Fully Sur piees on St. cash. Saleee” adjusted. ob: as not te cause aa Meee
ouFat! Fred nel (Brothers), Patsy,| Michael for the year 1951. Jemes Sea Cogit. Phone } ‘ VINCENT GRIFFITH, Tele. 4047. ship to a pupil who would otherwise
rs PERCY H. BURTON, 129.80—Bn. A eee Madtira, Risen, An have been entitled to compete for ad-
jt sone eae Parochial Treasurer, OO oOo e Amsterdam, r mission in January 1951.
» SMITH Ma 1 a a M 2 € € He € aneré 3.12.50—3n. ] conveniences { Bedrooms, nen ani DER TH ‘OR = a vill be plicable 1951 only: —
leave her ne ronldgose on oe Cutlery, 10 minutes walk from Club UNE ER THE IVORY HAMMER a iow candiaate will be sEvbeien for 4.
Land, near King's Gap. for the Kew PARISH OF CHRIST CHUROH and City. Phone 4103. 2.12.50—2n. . examination who is not over 12 years
Pilgrim Holiness Church and thence] 1 HEREBY give notice that I have 1“ oat December 8th at Messrs. e e ° of age on January st, 1951 or under
to the W ce nal, Dale | {PPOlnted the New Vestny Room adjoin-| _FARAWAY—St, Philip, on Skeete’s/ [O10 10° ip’ garege, Probyn Street, (1) n ationa teams S | 11 years of age on Sepiember Ist, 1951.
$e ee ae ean) Oilarens.| 18 the Vestry Room, Oistin, as the place | Bay, Furnished, 3 bedrooms, Lg | mil | Vauxhall Bek muse a "i “ 3. From 1952 onwards the normal age 0 yy
in, § nthony and in ‘ Pst staan x Car . ~ . y OSs
Christina Fenty. (Mother). Arthur and] Sere all persons duly qualified to vote | subplt. Lighting plans, Cas sotk 2 p.m. Terms cash, SOUTHBOUND pep siriclareeagtitiy bay. abo He,
Shirley Bootman (Brothers), Esther] >! soon SS Vemryngn for iw ene) ae 'o Sails Sails Sails Arrives Sails and no} 2 yeu 8 t
Fenty (Sister Parish may amemble on Tussday, the Avetionss Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados | September Ist, in the year of seeking
ae drd day of January, 1961, between the ae roneer: _ | CANADIAN CHALLENG! 30 Nov - Ie Bec. 10 Dec. | admiasion. a instem to the AF.S., F.V.A.
AITHE— UR w cson of | DOUTS of and 1! o'e in the morn- va cree, Coast, LAD DNE ide ‘ : Dec 3 Dec. 14 Dee, applica By
WAViuxhall, Chit Chosen, Yesterdsy | me to elect @ Vestuy for the Parish of Piant Garage. 3 r , LADY NELSON :. <. c] = © games, 28 Decl 30 Dec. 31 Dees _| School must be made before the ist May, Formerly Dixon & Bladon
afternoon at his residence, Funeral | Christ Chureh for the yeer 1961 jo yess. 2, ie Under The Diamond Hummer | (Ady nopney 3 3.2. SS: ls tam. ha gan. 28 Jan. 1051, on which date the Waiting List wil
Ree ee tte Gon tee gece Parochial Treasurer TNGSIS Ty neve bein to sell by Pub- eee steer 9S SAE, NS Ee 5. The attention of all Scholarship FOR SALE
’ after 1 r ré s 1 - 2 i oe ?
Chureh Partsh Church, Friends are Christ Chureh. RUS-IN- urnpten Street from] le Auction on next te 9th Bodies ‘and ‘Authorities 18 eepeciatiy i ‘ :
3.12.50-—3n. vited to this notice LAS CAMPANAS” —
invited OOS | ist January 1980. Dial 4596." | day of December 1800 in the. evenir 3.12,50—3n. Moerine Hotel. A bungalow reat
Mrs iria Vaith wife Lionel 50— vpstairs eid " SOW PO
SWeithe (so: nes Waithe ' (brother) ; wea aive 1S + * mee ath Lane, over 200 Ready. | NORTHBOUND Arrives nares Arrives aves re ean a? ee ae large lounge patio,
aMrs_ Bonnett ete Herbert Waithe ve e ~~ WNY: Annex, on Hastings Main} made over 300 pairs of Barbados jarbados Boston . Jo - Z and dining room with
Mather), Elvira Waithe (mother). | 22Pointed the Vestry Room at the Db-| toed. § Medreoma, running water, several PLadies' | LADY RODNEY Dec. 27 Dee. € Jan. 1 Jan. CHIROPRACTIC French windows to galleries and
New York Papers Please Copy mIsaTy F Davin pairs , r = “¢ ye bon ead Dullt-
N ; : penzary as the place where all persons ig and Sitting room, very eeo over i LADY NELSON 11 Jan 33 Jan 22 Jan Jan. Patio, bedrooms (2 with ‘bullt.
ae eee. aes : duly qualified to vote at any election | fur couple. Phone 3001 2.12.50—2n, |} for children, and several other useful | LADY RODNEY 10 Feb. 12 Feb. 21 Feb. Feb. DR. FERREIRA of “Chiroville’ Upper in’ and 1 with ‘walk-in’ ward-
> ot Vestrymen for the said Parish may r . Ss “| items. You cannot afford to miss this | “ADY NELSON : 26 Feb. 27 Feb. 8 March ® Mareb Bay St. (Near Esplanade) by Chiropractic robes), 2 bathroom:; large kitch-
THANKS assemble on Tuesday, the 3rd dai) of) “CAR ome Ford Prefect (New) drive| Sale. D’Arcy A. Scott, A : method corrects diseases of eyes, €aT>, en, storeroom, laundry, servant's
~ January, 1964, between the hours of 19 if at ial gates for 2.12.50—4n | §-B.—Subject to change witnout AC vessels Atted with coid storage cham | OOo. throat, lungs, stomach, kidneys and Guerters; garage; double carri-
We the undersigned beg through this} aud 11 o'cloek in the morning to elect | ZOUree special ra Berpiguiers ne bers. Passenser Fares and Teves on application to 1— Dose, three Del beet ageway. Weil
Binedium to thank all those kind friends -0—én. saacnial

“who sent

jrad bereay
“AINSLEY
i Millicent





+brother)
son)

Ceeil

t wreaths, cards
wnd sympathised with us in ¢

ement cauved by
Ss MOUR






Wathkir

Thomas faril







th



ve

TAYLO.
or (wife?
chi-dren
ister), Jeffrey
fron-ir




1 letters
ent
ath of





Yvonne
Dudley
grand-
wi, the



® Veetry for the year 1951.
A. A. B. GILL,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Javeph.

PARISH OF ST. PETER
I HEREBY give notice to all persons
duly qualified to vote at the election of
Vestrymen for this Parish, that I have



CLERK for Parts Department,





TUESDAY #2th—Mrs. J. M. Cave’s
Sale. Greenwich, 2nd Ave., Belle-

ville.

3.12,.50—In | appointed the Parish Room, Speights- | $60.00 per month. Apply in petson with] THURSDAY l4th—Miss R_ Piekerin’s



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.,

LTD. — Agents.



GOVERNMENT NOTICES









CHRISTIAN BROTHER-
HOOD HOUR
3.30 p.m, Today
RADIO DISTRIBUTION

Church of God, Chapman St.














garden.







































































































































Milered Carter (daughters), Avril, Clar- purposes.

assemble on Tuesday, the 3rd day of

, ence, and Jenny (grandchildren), Mr.) oMtary. 1961, between the hours of 10]. SCRAP GOLD and gold jewellery | —acngsgumy—and Avenue, Bell Ma lievilia listless and often have diarrhoea sulphur-yellow in colour. The dura- 8 Pint & 2 Pint

| 7 . . —2n . R : ‘ ' r-O . hotel

James Cakter (son-in-law). , and 11 o'clock in the morning to elect] bought, highest prices paid. See your | mi; ee residence ‘faces the} tion of the disease is from one to ten days or even longer. Birds are x HOTEL Old: establianed i
318.5010) o Vestry for the Parish of St, Andrew | Jéwellers, Y. De Lima & Co, Ltd., 20,| Reneville Tennis Courts and contains Also % property on coast is ndw avail



a for the year 1951. Broad Street, Bridgetown. Drawing and Dining rooms, kitchenette often found dead in the morning without showing symptoms of illness able as a going concern at a low

memory of our dear

In ever loving 26.11.60—-12n, bed- ; figure. Full information on ap-
husband orother ; ane sara. CA ena Baretieial po eee? Gama poe Me wecene ne one Lapateirs Sie the night before. ee eoea cemtial cpportupity for
TROTMAN who fell asieep on pem- $ 1, 1 dressii and : ‘ : gi v : \
ber 4th 1949. eal sey St. iss Iw. : Puhlie Notices Contd. Genaue ane Peat ating rooms. The Post Mortem. Catarrhal inflamation of the intestine is often found for 8 Pint & 4 Pint

The shock was grea xe blow severe area

“THE MOORINGS” — Marine
Gardens. This valuable and well
maintained property close to the
contains 3. self-
A well



and an enlarged congested and friable liver,

Prevention & Control. Any bird showing signs of illness should
at once be isolated from the rest of the flock.

feet.
Inspection by appointment with Mrs.
Linle Bayley. Dial No. 3381.
Sale by public competition Friday,
15th December at 2 p.m.

We never thought that death was near
Only those that love can tell

The getns of parting without farewell,
The Lord who giveth hath taken away



}
+
REFILLS

PARISH OF ST. GEORGE
1 HEREBY give notice to all persons

t
duly Marine Hotel

Hairdressing Notice

qualified to vote at the election

C. CARLTON BROWNE

of Vestnymen for thio Parish, that I have CARRINGTON & SEALY. contained apartments.









eS

But we'll meet on those bright shores | © MADAME EDGHILL of Two Mile Hill y t A placed home and a_ secure in-
to part no more appointed the St. Georges Vestry Room) hogs to notify her eustomers that she ct 06 Infection is spread through the droppings hence strict sanitary Wholesale & Retail Druggist vesiment, . Offers, will he cone

Fver to be remembered by Mrs. Clara | 3 7 or at >t tad rot Jin â„¢AY | has resumed business as usual. Phone oo ass ; . i 136, Roebuck St. Dial 2813 sidered,
Totman (wife), Mrs, Irene Small Laat) rg aes the maaee oF Se out 3471 Saturday and Sunday. eam: ON THE SEA measures comprise the most effective method of controlling and pre- ’ UGANDA—East Af A larg:
ilda, Eileen (daughters), | “1013 -12.50—2n. venting ns 1G —Eas rica, arge
Stignone Murrell (niece). ‘clock in the morning to elect a Vestry at Garden. - {ener sae en the disease. At ee ne RADE OMS ION farm of 3,472 acres £23,000, Full

3.12.50-—in, | for the Parish of St. George for the NOTICE Modern Bungalow, Se R ‘ 5 He batin weet cameloniinine
year 1951. baths, Overlooking Sea, own private ecently purchased birds should be isolated for at least fourteen

K. MASON,





cared for walled
“BON ACOCUIL” — Pine Hill.
A lovely property in the higher
part of this unspoiled residential
area. The residence was built at
a period when cost was of little
ebject. It contains large recep-
| tion rooms, very commodious
galleries, 3 large bedrooms, bath-
—— <<< | town as the place where ail such per-| ‘written application to Parts Manager, Sale. Windy World,” Hindsbury Rev. Walter Tiesel roms, 2 garages and all the ap-
We the undersigned beg through thi | sons may meet . purtenances ex
: y on Tuesday, the 3rd day | Eckstein , Bay Street. ‘ pected in a house
Medium to extend our cincere thanks] of January 1951, between the hours of 1.19.60—an.| Bi , TROTMAN & CO. Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend- of this type. The grounds are
end appreciation to the many friends]i0 and 11 o'clock in the Atetioneers | ment) Order, 1950, No. 38 which will be published in the Official approximately 4% acres in extent
geno attended the funeral, cent wreathe| elect a Vestry for the Parish of St. ASSISTANT OVERSEER for Dastells 3.12 Ga: of Th: a 30th Novemt 1950 and the enclosed garden with
Gexpressed sympath in our recent] for the year 151. Dairy ‘atm. Apply in pergen with -12.50—1n ’ jursday _? ¥ ia * . T tennis court, lawns, orchard and
bereavement G. 8. CORRNN, Grits taste wa tee O See 2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail ‘selling BOXING ornamental garden has been well
Darnley Hope thusband), Dillon Parochial Treasurer, Lower Estate Faetory Office. REAL ATE prices of “Beef-Salted” are as follows:— cared for, A comfortable prop-
Hope tron) Myrth and Ermine St. Peter. 1.12.9@--3n, | ———_——_—_..-__ at the erty at a reasonable price,
een tt eee nee | TARY We knowledge of Shorthand ue Ree Gorse s aaa’ Arias WHOLESALE PRICE| RETAIL YANKEE STADIUM ' ‘mind Owe: be ces
’ : - jue at : . = . °
aoc aets ree but not for ever PARISH OF 8ST. JAMES. and Typing requires position as Hotel} Stonewall Seaside Bungalow; Seclusive ARTICLE PRICE Britton’s Hill A mellowed old stone property
La. a apa | HEREBY give notice that I have | Office Assistant or Receptionist. Reply|in a Highly Established Residential (not more than) (not more on en the coast, about 1) mile from
) © rhail meet t over ippointed the Vestry Room near the | to C. R. c/o Advocate. 29.18.60—2n, [Coast for the Distinctive and Financial } than) Tuesday Night, 12th Dec. town, with good boat anchorage.
On the resurrection inor aac Parish Church as the place where all Class, Not more than 8 Milvs from City, 8 ” It has 3% acres of enclosed
: 1.12.50—In tensor: duly’ qualifies to, vote at ny eo STEMOTyPit 7, Apply, by letter, in Superbly Built 3 years ago For and De- | Beef-Salted 1950 at 8.30 p.m. | grounds, rod snajor part is plant.
_ ri - | election o styymen for the sa rst instance. Q. q jarke .. Senedd By “ons ass; Fully re : roductive coconut a
> The Family of Mrs, EMMELINE | may assemble on Tuesday, the 3rd day | Solleltors, P.O, Box’ 215. nished (except. Linen and Cutlery), 8) a ae Plate | 367.40 per bri. of 200 KID FRANCIS, Lightheavy- {}|[M| fruit trees, There are 3 reception,
Mitevase: Garde Hactings, . Gecepied in ee atcaee do eee Ce Davee 26,11.50—6n. | Sandy Beach, Fine Bathing, Nicely Set ounds, Bris ‘ a ibs, or 36c. per lb. in weight champion of B’dos || 4,.begrooms, gallaries, 2 garages
BNavenbe Atal rick nowatdoe | nnd 12 .e'pok in the, morn ng to elect eres in OF Se eee Sree. i ili jots of not less than 170 Ibs 7, a as ain for ‘continued
with deepest apprectation the many 7 P.H. TARILTON. MANAGER Basin) at Thornbury Hill, Main 25 Ibs. 40c. per Ib. vs as a club or boardin, oats os
Poa variou, expre ajone { ayrapathy, and Parochial Treasurer, store in ex- | Roud, A , Modern Convetide : KID RALPH ° the Market & se,
™ as‘istance offered hem in per “ 7 ? 3
*pidde wererven Son, | eRe seal isa | estes ek Rotana" tan oa | (P) Flank or Boneless Fiank | 962.00 per bri, of 290 Mauer Pea
Dr. Alfred T. Robinson : is. or 34e. y ;
Ira L. King, May King, PARISH OF ST. JOHN ty. Sar came tease a5 lots of not less than gentareethe Reetcame a racists tke
3.12.50—1n. apie be Se ee wet have | commission. sn ee Fe , haght, Seine 25 Ibs, 38c. per lb, BONNIE BLACKMAN vs Toogs, 3 tones, 5. Gereues ete.,
a Roo Parish 93.11.50— le Three-! - ie ete. e la ronsis' acres,
IN MEMORIAM pra an’ | eS persena > wall Bungslows | at Navy Gardens and - : a TONY GALENTO 12 acres under coconuts and nut-
~ ——- a | ov ai lectio ANTED one ai le—Seaside, g for ttention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend- ho lost to Ralph on points megs, the remainder pasture and
: oe jonel |of Vestrymen for the said Parish, may x Under , inp. Tworstore: newall : . who tost to Pp) Pp os 7 E
Suen Panga eho wos OF lev io Mane: [assemble on Tuesday, the ard day of ain canto ae VA Oe MNT ne oideee et Fa we | ment) Order, 1950, No. 37 which will be published in the Official 8 rounds, see akc. oie. aa RG
service on December ard 1948 January, 1961, between the hours of 10 to ‘be forw to the {ere Road, Large or Workshep | Gazette of Monday, 27th November, 1950. BELFIELD KID vs. jf particulars on application,
Happy and smiling always content ond 11 o'clock in the morning to elect | p Officer, an, 9 Vacant, ge £2,500. Resi- 2. Und this Ord " ; ; ‘ ; VICTOR LOVELL Ql};
Loved and respected where ever he | Vertry tee, ie Parish ef St. John nog 4th December in — Two and three . nder this Order the maximum retail selling price of é as | THE OLIVES—Upper Colhymore
ne ie H. 8. FRASER 1m ms, C Me for anything in Real | “Cement” is as follows: — roun Rock. ‘This large modern
To a beautilul lifercume bw noble end et we * — If Not — VU are Not Buying! Sparkling Preliminaries — bungalow with about 1 acre
He died as he lived everybody's friend Parochial Treasurer, Arranged. Dia! gill, D. F. |f8|\ should appeal to a buyer who
God ~aw the read wos getting rough St. John, » “Olive Bough", Hastings. ARTICLE RETAIL PRICE Breezy Amateurs {| wants a really solid property
The hills were hard to climb 3.12.60—an, age (not more than) Admission: constructed, of the, best, obiainakie
He gently closed his sleeping eyes . tuate rruiterials. ere is a large livin:
Ane niibered peace be thine t wee OF ST. THOMAS * Jame, contains Ringe OE et room (28 ft. x 4 ft.) gallery (48%
¢ Ever to be remembered by his beloved give notice that 1 Dining oi) CEMENT 4 ws $1.95 per bag of 94 lbs. EO Revyes Senweue va |@| ft. x 10% ft.) 4 bedrooms (qne
‘family Helen Beane \mother) Lioyde | ubainted the Sehool House néer , oe te Bleachers 48c. || 28 ft. x 19 it.) modern kitchen,
“Deane (brother!, Muriel! Corbin, Clarice] © here . wer .12.50.—9n. paved courtyard lawns, en
_ Hope, Lottie Marmara (sisters) and many bersous oo Sieaad So aah ae Savina Go a fasa's pe ‘ 27th November, 1950 28.11,50—2n 8.12 on, gardens and orchard, Well placed
others. 3,12.50-—1n | Pee eee oa TUAEaaY, “wa ‘ind day | young couple, in. FOWL TYPHOID. jor schools and transport to town,
> aida tieiaes , er
wi : ae January, 1951, between the hours of very qu Box Perches of land An outbreak of fowl typhoid has been confirmed in a flock of i
*, In loving memory of my dear beloved : Ld _VMLLA ROSA—Passage Road
} shusband and father James Nathaniel | * Fst p Rage oh Be ee ig elect tr ‘Aavecate Cor” seats nS N, aeons ae about thirty (30) hens, and reports have come in of sudden deaths City. Attractive and centrally
! z Archer, who, departed on November 30th } 1, the year 1961 : po Eg ae, ie johnson and'on = Me| or death after a short illness from several sources in the Brittons Hill JUST RECEIVED acuiie ge aay mane
¢ 1949, ° jouble e ewaly. Ppr
‘ ; 2 F, F. "s " aa
This is one year that has passed since . rn . ; ‘ . imately 14,000 square feet.
Parochial a4 development. area of St. Michael.
’ you have departed St. ‘ in one or ‘en the pre 0 — well built property contains a
, Sete emer ness ue severe 3.12.50—%n,| Na Agents, Box C/o mises. = m This disease is very infectious, readily communicable to other | % ‘ st Sree ain ain: spon 8 ies
” griet PARISH OF WE. ANDREW » 7 prin wet ne set wy tot fowls and very acute in character, Outbreaks frequently occur during THERMOS VACUUM bedrooms, toilet, pantry and
So my beloved ‘sleep in peace. I HEREBY give notice that I have] BOXES — All kinds 3 | Street, I bts | th in: son. Mortalit t! be as high as 100% i tl kitchen. Good courtyard at rear.
|| Edna Archer (wife), Darnley, Jemerson,| ,.dinted the Vestry Room near the ‘other then 51, nts i yew on € rainy season. Mortality rate can as high as ® in recently
| farnsdof, Clarence Grant, Austin, Ken- sa 7 Advocate Friday the December, a’ p.m. infected flocks % JARS ¥ TOWER GARAGE—St. Matthi-
Mineth and Everton (sons), Joyce, Shelia ol ieaetia ind bits oes a ee 5 % R. 8. Tenet eean a as Gap. An almost new property
| Elmo, Shitiey, Pauline, Winifred and Mra. | SU'y Noe ee alin Berten taney cen ene TE en. Symptoms. Affected fowls show loss of appetite, appear dull and Wide Mouth suitable for a large variety of
|
























bathing Good Yacht Anchorage. (14) da: ‘i ee .
FOR SALE Parochial Teeoeratee, | we the, undersigned ‘wilt be. closing 4g | PbODe #8. Netiiectés.| (10) daye betore being, allowed to join the flock, FOR SALE atta teak in ven thee
3.12.80—Bn. | fp isineee for the luncheon interval at COPFAGE—One small’ cottage with | No really effective treatment of affected birds is known, cates Paradise.
e at 1 p.m. each gay, our] Slectriclty on the Greeniage, Roebuck. | 26.11.50.—8n. HINERY AT WILDEY WE HAVE EXTENSIVE LIST-
! I HEREBY “give ae that I have weeety bee mesar os AR GM ee oat ee PLANTATION, INGS OF PROPERTIES AND |

AUTOMOTIVE
* CAR — 188 Model Black Plymouth—
No. T-—-160. Apply to the owner.

3,12.50—1n

$350.00, good



LAND ALL OVER THE
COLONY. UTILISE OUR SBER-
VICES TO SAVE TROUBLE
AND EXPENSE.

WANTED

7 cpposite Spry Street.
appointed the Vestry Room near the ye eae
Parish Church as the place where all] “nd arrange their shopping ‘
persons duly qualified to vote at y J. N. Goddard & Sons Ltd.

clection of Vestrymen for the said Parish} Cave Shepherd & Co. Ltd.

may assemble on Tuesday, the 3rd day C. F, Harrison & Co. (Barbados) Ltd.
of January, 1951, between the hours of oO
10 and 11 o'clock in the morning to elect



ST, MICHAEL

CANE CARRIER
MILL — Duncan Stuart
20” x 30”, Complete.

CAR—One Singer Car
order, apply: C. Jordan, Bicycle Repairer





pnd outoffices together with the palings |

and quiemices a Blectric Fittings. Land the Official Gazette of 27th November relating to the new executive





g ; ee ENGL :
James Street. 2.12.50—2n. 8 Vestry for. the Parish of St. Lucy for Se ye ere si can be Tented. ry epee STEN — hee ($1,728—$3,456) in the Civil Service. Geen fuer Loe 20 to 40 acres of good arable
Sewers seat ip ee joay | the Year alte acco heal hie Kplante Lian Bgitane the, tenset, aa. seve Siraker. Ey, \. Beeneennoy to sit the examination are invited from external MEGASS ELEVATOR — iand with or without house,
model always ower arivet, Apply Cee: Parochial Treasurer, ee Res r 0. I. Churchwarden's Office, Perochiat Build- |! andidates who are the holders of academic or professional qualifica- —Single Strand RENTALS
Here eee ore es.1),80--80. $13.00. Golling Lids a uta ings, Phone #188, 9-12.08". |-ions (of degree standard) and should be addressed to the Colonial BOILER:
. 7. . eee Soe ice eal le



Multitubular 7ft x 12ft. St. James.

“REST HAVEN", George Street ORR | “WINDY RIDGE”.

pl he ore Ry | Seeretary, Secretariat, Bridgetown, setting out the usual particulars

TRUCK: One Chevrolet Truck in good PARISH OF ST. PHILIP











7) . Belleville with the z . . : ¢ "
condition, Tyre. and Battery good.| | HEREBY give notice that I have ap-| H. Jason Jonea & Co. Ltd, (Feed Dept.) oe A Neila 4440. square tees. | f age, place of birth, academic qualifications, career and practical BOILER FEED AND ety -piokeantst Deeosan ae
Appl’: GC. A. Godding, Benk Hall Cross] pointed the Church Boys’ School near] A Barnes & Co. Ltd, The house has drawing and dining rooms. ' cxperience, if any. COLD WATER PUMP : y 7 Pie
Road. 5.1250—20 | the Parish Chureh, as the place where] Johnson & Redman three bedrooms and uswai outofices anc The 15th ; RAW JUICE PUMP. Double ee art
parishioners of the parish of St. Philip, | Perkins & Co. coon e 1 of December, 1950, is the closing date for receiving Action., CLARIFIERS. Three “BEACH HOUSE", St. Law-
and other persons duly qualified to vote} Pitcher Connell & Co. Ltd. Inspection by tment any day such applications. 28.11.5 % . rence. Available fully furnished
ELECTRICAL t any Election of Vestrymen for the] 5. E. Cole & Co. Ltd. ae , : -11.50—3n 600 gins, each. HOT LIQUOR February onwards.
= eaid Parish, may assemble on Pusey abs S Mean i Ene above will be set. up ee ie et PUMPS. Two, Single Action SUNSET HOUSE: Prospect, St
———$ | 2d day of January, 108 between voON chage public competition on Friday - | EVAPORATOR., ASPINAL ; : ished
DRY CELL BATTERIES staige Type woe oY gad iL 8.0, %o sleet a Ves- ae Ford ber at 2 p.m, at the Office of the under PART ONE ORDERS PANS. One large, one small, Jeane, See Cones, Pay see she
for ignition purposes etc ‘volts. 3 P Ss. W. , W. A. Medford & Co. * CARRIN & SEALY. | Léeut Diol 3878. Da Costa & Co., te Parochial Seana Eo Seen rere: ¢ iene Wurest, Bridgetown. ol, 7, Compal, 0. .E., E.D., MONTEJUS.. MEGASS “CUMBERLAND HOUSE: =
, i250 ean Ngining oo, Ltd., (Corner Stone, Stacey Issue No. 45 The Barbados Regiment. 5) ore ELEVATOR ENGINE. 6 ton Pionsant old property with 2 acres
FURNITURE Rectrloal @ Sales bent) |. 6 a, | FOR at Ruble, Commelien | Sang ———___—"_ |} wesron “Lock. "two of garden. «1
——— 1 - the office 6 ‘ARAD) ‘
RS—S , s wel ished December, iso. at 2 pm. | There will be no furthe rades until after Christmas, aa
Wal GP Staion “uttebte vor For Sake—Cont' d NOTICE Ke OwSavunge or store known |2. ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERIPANT FOR WEEK ENGINE and GEARING—
BMG Aha tieme. Oniy 86.40 sech The Parochial rer's Office, St.| No 4a Swan Street, being a three | ENDING 11 DEC. 50. Duncan Stewart, PIPING John M. Bladen
G. W. HUTCHINSON & CO. LTD.|” LARGE CHILDREN'S PLAY HOUSE. | michael, will be c' ‘at 12 o'clock noon - Sect Gna nee Lieut. E, R. Goddard and FITTINGS.
Dial 4222. 2.12.50—t.f.n, Cam be seen at es * Guest House on Wednesday and the 6th and font “6 on ine rderhy mE ae 278 L/S Williams, 8.D. FIREBRICKS. AUCTIONEER.
ee ae —_ . i 2296. 1950. and ————
* FURNITURE—Large variety of Cock- _— * 29.11.50—6n, BURTON, and ft the busi- Orderly Officer 2/Lt. S.G, Lashley TATE AGENT
fai! tables in Mahogany, Cedar ant Ruane Pettit ‘Treasurer, ness known os ae oats Orderly Serjeant 217 L/S Blackett Apply to... REAL ES'
Birch, i Mahogany Dining ‘ables, RAIN COATS, RAIN COATS: At 4 4 ried on oe NEER
Dinner ‘Wasgons and Dinner Chairs, @ | each lovely colours in Plastic for Vadties * 3.18. SKEWES-COX, Major. THE MANAGER, AUCTIO)



good choice of Sideboards, larders and | They are so useful and economical. And and further particulars









M. L. D.
. S.O.L.F. & Adjutant i
Bedsteads. i Ralph Beard’s | Show | would’ make a lovely Xmas Gift too. N to the Manager of the Supply | PART 11 onvEtie Barbados Regiment. Dial oe Plantation. PLANTATIONS BUILDING
Room, Hardwood Alley, (Opposite | tHANT BROS. Pr. Wm. Henry Street. OTICE Stores. | BARBA
Cathedral). Open daily 8 a.m, to 4 p.m. | pial 3486. '29.1150—-t2.n, PARISH OF 8ST. THOMAS COTTLE, CATFORD & CO. DOS REG SERIAL NO, 32 29.11.50.—3n., | Phone 4646
Phone 4603 a cai | erThe, Parochial Omice at Bennets will be 14.11.00-—1in | lst DECEMBER, 1950 si 1,
REE DECO) S—Spec closed on Wednesday Decembe .|). STREN REASE—.
POULTRY discount of 10% now applying on all | 1950. : COPRA/STOCK estate yielding sub- |! SERENGTH INCREASE—Attestations
hi f these decorations. For F. PILGRIM stantial e. Bananas and oranges id Boy Clarke, A
BS sehbaeas foal purchases 0: se ra . a F. F. * {egeMe cunted close to sea, main | 530 " Dorant, L. ; GIVE HER
WHITE MUSCOVY DUCKS —Telephone ymied pares as Pes jewellers, eihia Parochial tetas beanie principals only. Box Number 53) Babb, D. RE ll hae
0. 3.12.50—1n . de ma '0., “ Broad Street, 2.12, in. . Thomas. road. tet iv ra Al *
i Bridgetown. : *"'29.11.50—6n: 88 c/o “Barbados Adv ‘a aii i wee ote Bepprientai AN OIL STOVE FOR XMAS
MECHANICAL ms ” Fields, H. Band boys wef 29 Nov. 50,
Me nthdeibaseat ipo —__._. | _YACHT — That desirable yacht “VA- NOTICE FOR SALE OR LONG LEASE _ 535 ” Laurence, K. 2 & 3 BURNER FLOOR & TABLE MODELS
“TYPEWRITERS — Olympia Portable | GABOND”. Tel. J. A. Reid, Lone Star “MOORINGS” — Arranged as three 396 " Humphrey, W, \ — OBTAINABLE AT —
Pypewriter’. Another shipment just | Garage, Dial 9133. 22.11,50—12n, PARISH OF SAINT MICHAEL apartments or one noe. a hasrostnes 542 % Squires, H. M
; led, See these fine machines before | ARI ete, Furniture ded. MPO
ne eine” ie resi, ’ nay, PLASTICINE--Harbutts famous model- for erection Bee Ue eecupenc, Gibson, Marine $27 Pte. Tudor, P.C. 540 Pte, Roberts, H. Attested and The CENTRAL E. RI.
Sit Phnve dane. ling clay—multi-colours 24c, $1.80 per ot ans ee ens 2 ot — me 3'42.50-—Am0 $28 ,, Dorant, J. $41,’ Rolston, H. taken on (CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.-PROPRIETORS).
; ; 1 12.50--7n. 0.4, | BOX: Evans & Whilfields, “., | Wall at St, Barnabas Chapel met, eee een boi Knight, S. 543 Belgrave, 1. A. ae f Broad & Tudor Streets
Ts 3.12,50—An ficatioh of the work to be 338 =, Chase, E. 544 Lashley, St. A. 29 Nov, 50. Corner 0! 0} 2
. —- ae EI BY) sath Se eel nie A Specifies ee - LAND — 1/8 Acre land at Bush Hall. 539, Blunte, A. L.
f MISCELLANLUVUS TRA SETS—A most useful and attrac. Ofte and Tautere tis coaled envelopes Good building site with govt: ae ao E
Stitt te dal five Gift. 24 piece Teasets in several | marked “Tender for St. Barnabas Wall" | light at hand. Several fruit trees, wey 345, Sealy, W, A. 563 Pte. Barrow, K. S. ~
A ANTIQU £8 Of eveny description | designs and decorations, Prices as law | will be to 3 pam on Man- | vet: Mangoes etc. ete. G. W. Pare 6 3«,_- Parris, R: St. C, 564 ,, Alleyne, C. H.
Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver | us $9.95 set. G. W. HUTCHINSON & CO, Midy Re rene iP abe: Phone 4218; Bush Hall. 3.12.50—10 7 =~ =. Goring, L. F. 565 ,, Spencer, W. A. “
Watercolours. Barly books, Maps. Auto. |1..D. Dial 4222 2.12.50—t . FRED J ¥y. eae M48 |, Tello, C. A. 566 |, Broomes, H, V. H Y T d
aphs etc. at Gorringes Antique Shoo vs Win AE ON 0 eh guurehwaren"s oh = $49; Haynes, 'V."A. S. 567 Belle, L. N ave ou rieqd...
Gioining Royal Yacht Club TABLEWARE—Beautiful “Rosedawn”, 1 Lokey, V_ A. S, 568 Heath, J. H.
¥ 3.9.50—4.f.n. | “Greydawn”, “Goldendawn” seen on ali S areas” PERSONAL 551 Licorish, ‘L. E 569 Alleyne, C. P. Attested and 9
+ —— ~~ - the bet tables. Buy single pieces or ere Bon wi iipeutiadegie-disatian 552, Outram, J. G 570 ., McConney, M. E. wee ea
ACLOCKS Westminster Chiming Clocks | scts for all meals, Unit breakages re- 25.11.50-—Sn THE public are hereby warned against 553. ., Williams, C. O. 571." Brewster, V. St. C oe n led ;
4 day Bin Bam Clocks in Walnut cases | placeable from stock. Evans, Whitfields. giving credit .to my wife ROWENS 554, Williams, L. E. 572 Fields, R. A, ae bey so
Sy the world’ wat makers Kienzle. | Dial 4220, 4606. 3.12.50—4n Hut s 1 do not hold 355 Beckles, H. O 573 Harding, K. :
Price maderate. Alox Yearwood, Jeweller | ————-______ n't way ricauule ter wer ao anyone ae 3568 Chase, P. D. 5, B74 Field, D. A (With the Distinctive Flavour)
Bolton Lane 2.'2.50—-2n JEWRLLERY—Gold and Silver Neck- License Session -) tracting any debt or debt in my 557. ., Bayne, I 575 Goodridge. C. A. : i
5 ere Jets with Charms Set. Gold Cuff Links, , nate uninen by a written order signed 558 Archer, A. M 6 Marsholl, N. W | It is the Blend YOU are looking for.
CLOTHING: Qne (1) Frock Coat, Waist | Gold Brooches, Gents Signet-Rings, Alex. ‘ . that nsing | OY me. 559 Dolphin, J. F. 7 Mayers, J
Coat snd Pants (All Vicuna!. Price very | Yearwood, Jewellcy, Belton Lane. HEREBY give notice a Lice: ¥ igned THOMAS JORDAN, 560 Williams, H. H 578 Guiler, A :
Wiuatia. goed as new, hate ame i et inbo-~2n, | Sesion for the granting of Certificates See a8 iispinine, #t Andrew 361 |, Osborne, K. A 579 Jones, 1. B ge Get Your Supplies From Us For
216 Oiehhs | cer mintthiess cial for the renewal of Liquor Licenses for 2.12.50-—2n 562 ,, Brewster, K The Christmas Season
aes — GIFT SETS Attractive Gift Sets ef} the Parish of St, George and that part
FLOWERS Wreaths and Bouquets | Tea Spoon-, Pastry Forks, Fruit Spoons, | of Christ Church within the Jurisdiction 2. PROMOTIONS
wade to order by Miss A. Eastmond, | Cocktail Sets and many others. Priees of the Police Court, District “B" will be 407 Cpl. Quintyne, L. G. “A” Coy \ Promoted to L/S wef 1 Dec. 50 Blended by
Hindsbury Read. Dial 3766 as low as Bt00 set. G. W. HUTCHINSON Seid at eee an. oS Bitter an. LOST #e Lik Reid, N. t s Promoted to Cpl. wef 1 Dec. 50. Ret mel
2.12.50—4n & CO.. LT Dial 422; ‘vesday the ay BC) er ~ 2 /C urney, D. G | _
ercetelaepiiciaditiicais tain aiepeit 2 ol ¢ 11 o’elock a.m, 283 L/C Turney, D. G >romoted L/C wef nc. 8 Z ir x PD.
FISHING BOAT-One (1) Fiying Fish | GY. peal r Dated this Ist day of December 1950. UMBRELLA—Dr, MatPher:on Lawrie 427 Pie tia aa F Promoted to L/C wef 1 Dec. 50 JOHN ED. TAYLOR & SONS J T. 'e
Yuat “Loreine”. No reasonable offer | ONE COOLERATOR in excellent con- (agd.) C.L. D. M. WALWYN, [Finder suitably rewarded on returning 414 ,, Weatherhead, H. R M.L.D. Skewes-Co }} Roebuck St. Dial 4335
sedy Apply to W 4 Areher, | dition, Apply; No !2 Pavilion Court, Police Magistrate, District uB to Pitt, Upstairs Berta bewer Broad 391 Belgrave, J. S SO.LF, & A {
Welches, Christ Church 2.12,50—2n, | Hastings. 3.12.50—-2n, 3.12,.50—2n | Street. 2.12.50-—2n 268 Smith, A . The Barbados R \ SSSA



























































———<—<$< <<<
CHATTLE DWELLING HOUSE situate APPOINTMENTS TO EXECUTIVE GRADE IN THE
at Upper Dayrells Road, Christ Church. i CIVIL SERVICE
containing Closed gallery, Drawing and |
Dining Rooms, Two bedrooms vines Attention is drawn to paragraph 5 of the Government Notice in



























SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950









POLICE NOTICE
PARKING

There is space available for parking cars in the following
places: — |
1 Jubilee Gardens;
(Near Parochial Buildings)
2. Church Village;

(By the Cathedral) |
Rickett Street between Trafalgar Street and the Wharf:
4. Old Bus Stand, Trafalgar Street.

R. T. MICHELIN,
Commissioner of Police.

°

Police Headquarters,
Bridgetown. }
lst December, 1950. Stat 3.12.50—2n |



POST OFFICE . NOTICE :

From Monday next, 4th December and until further notice air
mails for Great Britain and Europe will be closed at the General |
Post Office at 11.45 A’M. instead of 2 P.M. Mails for these places will
close on Fridays at 2 P.M. as usual.

General Post Office, |

Ist December, 1950. 2.12.50—2n |

POLICE TRAFFIC NOTICE

AGRICULTURAL EXHIBITION ON 6TH AND 7TH DECEMBER, 1950
1. All vehicles proceeding in the direction of Queen’s Park
shall approach by way of Roebuck and Crumpton Streets only, after
which (should they desire to set down their passengers) they shall
leave by way of Constitution Road or St. Michael’s Row.
The same route shall be followed when returning to take up
passengers.
2. Motor cars only shall be allowed to park on Constitution |
Road facing North, and shall when leaving be required to do so by |
way of Belmont Road.
3. No vehicle of burthen shall be allowed to proceed through |
St. Michael's Row, Crumpton Street, or Constitution Road between |
11 a.m, and 11 p.m., with the exception of carts returning to remove |
exhibits. These shall only be allowed to pass down Constitution |
Road from Belmont Corner in single line and enter Queen’s Park by
the Governor’s Gate returning the same way, and proceed in single |
line by way of Belmont Road. }
Made under Regulation 2 of the Bridgetown and Speightstown |
(Traffic) (Amendment) Regulations 1943.
R. T, MICHELIN,
Commissioner of Police.



Police Headquarters,



Bridgetown, 3S
‘,
lst December, 1950. 3.12.50.—3n. | $
»
i?
~
. %,
Department Of Education x
WESTBURY INFANT SCHOOL — ST. MICHAEL 8
Applications are invited for the Headship of the new Westbury %

Infant School from teachers (women) with at least 10 years’ teaching $+
experience. The minimum professional qualification required is the | %
Certificate A of the Department or exemption therefrom. |
Salary will be in accordance with the Government Scale for |
Head Teachers in Grade I, Elementary Schools. %
Candidates ‘who have already submitted application forms in| %
respect of previous vacancies (now filled) may apply by letter, ac- %
companied by a recent testimonial. All other candidates should make | $
application on the appropriate form which may be obtained from the | X
Department of Education, All applications must be enclosed in en-|
velopes marked “Appointments Board” in the top left hand corner

and must reach the Department of Education by Saturday, 9th
December, 1950.

Ist December, 1950.

Ww

of feet, hands and armpits.
This very annoying evil will
be banished
soon by re-
gularly using

-

PPP SS

-













disagreable
odour There-
fore, do try:










YOU CAN GET YOUR - -
GENUINE SORREL
— FROM —
NIAGARA FACTORY
DIAL 4322 — _— Spry Street

<






CRESCENT
‘3 BICYCLE & DEPT.
STORES

| Hercules Biqycles; and Bicycle

Parts are delivered to you with
all art jewels, cosmetics and
toileteries too you can just drop
in if you want to prove



RECITAL OF XMAS
CAROLS

ints AEP ssc

MORAVIAN CHURCH
Roebuck Street
on
Friday, Dec. 15, at 7.45 p.m
Several well known Artistes
will assist,



Come in at No. 30. The Door ¥ ROEBUCK STREET. Dial 2072 and 4502
i r Phone 3061 2.12.50—2n
Programmes at 12c. each {{}| ee E ‘i % Local Agents — JAMES A, LYNCH & CO., LTD.
DCC EESSSO6SS96 ed :
cr SARGERAS ee ee














XMAS IS COMING

LADIES & GENTLEMEN

NOTICE

Brighten up yo CLOTHES
and HATS.
See RAYMOND JORDAN

Bay Street
Opp. Combermere St.
3.12 The Transfer Boolrs of
the Company will be closed

from the Ist day of Decem-



The COTTAGE
GIFT SHOP

has a very good selection
of XMAS Gifts: Cards,
Calendars, and Decora-
tions; Crackers, Children’s
Bocks and Toys; Sweets,
and a well stocked bran
tub for boys and girls.

3.12.50.—1n,

ber, 1950, to the 15th day
of December, 1950, both
days inclusive.

Dated this Ist day of De-
cember, 1950,

By Order of the Board
of Directors.

THE BARBADOS CO-


















SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIFTEEN







SS

tod

THESE FOR a
CHRISTMAS.

WHISKY (BELL'S) Bots,
BRANDY ”
GIN (BOLS)

WINE ;
CREME DE MENTHE
AP’ T BRANDY
EAU ..
PEACH BRANDY

bean’ TRIPLESEC |.
D UIE .. ee
GOLDEN ARROW RUN




For Business or Leisure...
&
A pleasure!







Vhe ‘Double Two’ collar.
atfached shirt has a double
life! When the original
collar wears out, it can easily
be replaced by a new one,





















2 SHIRT ~

with pateated SPARE COLAAR ‘
etateckie : }
MESSRS. C. F. HARRISON & CO., (B’dos) LTD. )





PERKINS & CO., LTD.

RLELPVSTSE







Asricultural Exhibition

SPECIAL ATTRACTION



Ist NIGHT ONLY

FREE FLOOD LIGHT DANCING

ON THE GREEN.

YOUR HOME REQUIRES...












A garbage can, heavy galvanised,
a wash tub, buckets, a mincer or
a sink, drainboards, coal-stove,
oil-stove or a kitchen knife now
doesn’t it? Come in, we have it!









6 TO 10 p.m.





























PCL ESLESESSSSESS | OPERATIVE COTTON °
3) 2 Popular Orchestras Ww
Fl JIRNISH 4 FACTORY, LTD. Pp te B
are, $ E. A. CLARKE, attenda A. BARNES & CO., LTD.
J OME TO A Secretary. 4 sy :
CHRISTMAS TREAT & cae NON-STOP MUSIC.
Streamlined NEW & renewed x
Vanities, Simpler Dressers, Ward- % * caaastenine x si m a
Marble Top “and” ener Wai : _ 8 '
Marble ‘op anc other agsh- Std ; | ¢
stands, Marble Slabs, Night chairs Under the Distinguished yd cor D * . _ .
$4.50 up : Patronage of Le, ’ a iM AS : Ou OR Ss AL
wbrawing Room neety, in x His Excellency the Governor I JO iy te Bi he at fe £
stered or Rush = Berbice, Peta and Mrs, Savage oi - ipa Ze
at and other Easy chairs, $8 to 3
cee) | BRIDGETOWN ° | Thoroughbred Salon
Radio, Cocktail, Sewing. China & | %
and other Cabinet Waggons, x

PLAYERS
L.S. WILSON ’ PRESENTS

Trafalgar Street. Dial 4069, )



SS ccrsoroerseneess || “THE MAN

ill WHO CAME
IGE oN ene

are respectfully requested to note that from Thursday, December 14
MONDAY, 4TH DECEMBER, our entire store



A f | and

the deliciously (including S.P.C.K., Bookshop) will, for Staff

cooling and fant’ Hour, be closed daily MONDAY to ne aan — "
drying PUROL. AY from 12 noon to 1 p.m. +

POWDER which On SATURDAYS i ; us

ena tay the dasoe e alla will, as usual, close

Matinee Friday,

Your Co-operation is Solicited December 15th

BOOKING OFFICE opens

CF. HARRISON & CO. «Dos Ltd, || mm mate

PRICES: $1.50, $1.20, 72c.,

Ac all leading drugstores: in case of and 48¢.
ones apply ‘a HP Chsesmuad & Co. BROAD STREET.

Uid.. Middle Street. dial 3382.

Christmas a
‘Cards & Paper of








Christmas Tree
Decorations

from
Your Jewellers

DELIMA & CO. LTD.

’Phone 4644 -0- 20, Broad Street

Advise ...Shop early for the Exhibition

| LADIES !

e
Beautiful Nylons, Costume Jewellery, Hand Bags, fine
Underwears, Fancy Felt and Straw Hats, Shoes,

Perfumes, Hankies and a grand assortment of

DRESS GOODS

GENTLEMEN



Innumerable qualities of Dress and Sport Shirts, Shoes,

A very big variety of Woollens in stock.
Socks, Ties, H.K., Belts, Underwear etc., ete |

Always at your service. Dial 3466. )
}










All Seats Reserved.

WHAT A SELECTION!

LOVELY CREPE ROMAIN in 6 Enchanting Colours

@ $2.40 per

WHITE CRESPO LOVABILLE ...... @ $1.36 per

PLAITED TAFFETA in 10 designs @ $1.47 per
PLAIN SPUN IN WHITE and 10 more Colours

@ 880, per

ALL OVER LACE in White ..........@ $2.16 per

Black and Rose Beige ........ @ §2.27 per

Many more Materials are awaiting your Inspection
as they are too numerous to be mentioned.

OUR SPECIALTY! SHOES for Ladies, Gents amd Children

BROADWAY DRESS SHOP

Dial 3895 No, 1 Broad Street



YES! IT’S A YEAR’S
SUBSCRIPTION OF
THEIR FAVOURITE

MAGAZINE

MGS
BEAUTIFUL GIFT CARD SENT

XMAS GIFT, BIRTHDAY or any

other Occasions

ROBERTS & CO.

Dial 3361 High Street







— WE OFFER —















BATTLE FRONT

(Bay 1937)
The property of the B’dos Turf Club. Offers will be

Toys, Chocolates, Crackers, Xmas Trees and Decorations
imas Stockings ‘i

PRESENTATION SETS—Yurdley’s, Max Factor, Soie de Paris,
Imperial Heather, Dralle

PRESENTATION BOXES—Cigarettes, Tobaccos, Pipes,

SOAPS—by Yardley, Morny, Cussons, Bronnly

PERFUME—by Yardley, Coty, Hanselle

COLOGNE— 4711, Atkinson's, Dralle

mm. D. MARRIS & CO.

Plantations Building

OC

received in writing by the Secretary up to 31st Decem-
ber 1950.

For full particulars apply to the Secretary, Barba-
dos Turf Club, Synagogue Lane, Bridgetown, Barbados ‘

}

|| Lower Broad Street —
DIAL 4045

SOSSSEI SCS Ss

7



4



FOR

A GOOD PRESENT TO
GIVE YOUR WIFE IS

A FALKS STOVE
AND OVEN

temember Christmas begins in the Xmas Rope, Tags, Tinsel Cord Xmas Trees and
Kitchen 4 a Variety of Decorations

N ya i oO Ww E L L | Be SEE OUR STOCK and SELECT EARLY
piven” tS COLLINS DRUG STORES.

— 2



For Your Convenience, We

have Large Supplies of ...





Lumber & Hardware | |







| »

| Locally Made
‘ Seals {i y®
_f Tags & Seals |] BERTALAN POTTERY
. Children’s Crayons |

The Workmanship and finish in this Pottery is excellent

Lovely Coloured Glazed DISHES Ete with attractive
Tropical Designs.

* Painting Books WILL MAKE EXQUISITE GIFTS
°
G ADVOCATE STATIONERY LOUIS L. BAYLEY — JEWELLERS

BOLTON LANE & BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB
34 Broad Street Phone 2510 l



Sole Representatives Rolex Watch Co., Switzerland.











BRIGHTEN



YOUR HOME

|
| ELECTRICAL
|} ACCESSORIES!

WE CAN SUPPLY YOU WITH THE FOLLOWING :



LINOLEUM, in Rolls and Mats

ge Por Prompt and Courteous service WH ~~ BARBADOS HARDWARE (0. LTD.

Shop at

FOR WIRE « ELEMENTS
« FLEX « PLUGS
CHRISTMAS « STARTERS . PLUG CAPS
« CONNECTING BOXES « SOCKETS
Z x | > « FUSES |
We Can Supply A Wide Variety of... « SWITCHES USE :
PAINTS, DISTEMPERS and fff = «Tes memos ttn nos
: an , « BATTEN « WALL
E N AME LS y HOLDERS BRACKETS
ALSO - y And many others too numerous to mention
FRENCH POLISH, STAINS & VARNISHES §/$ mr pay A VISIT TO OUR ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT
} You can make your rooms more attractive Kg TO-DAY AND GET YOUR REQUIREMENTS
{ by dressing your Floor We have | S |
.

'

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)

PEANTATION LTO: Tk

BEE, POC LLESESS ECE SSS SEBO CECOP GOS PSPOSSOR

; f

|
|
|
|
|







Ma







PAGE SIXTEEN



Ralph Rock

Wins Car

WHEN 18-year-old
Friday morning and

Combermere School to
his examination papers fo1

né€ver suspected that he was the
lucky winner of the Hillman car
raffled by the Barbados Boy:

Club. However laier in the day
he was informed of his good for
tune.

Col. R. T. Michelin, Commis-
sioner of Police, presented Rock
with the car yesterday morning

“zt the Centra] Police Station. The

Second Prize, a bicycle, went to

Mrs, Howard who is at present
in British Guiana while the
Third Prize was won by Bands-
man Colin Bayley

For selling the most tickets, 760,
P.C, Jordon was given a bicycle
Col. Michelin congratulated all
the winners and told Jordon tha
he deserved the cycle

Rock turned up at the Central
Station yard with his two broth-
ers. He was formerly a_ pupil
ot the Barbados Academy anc
this is the first time that he has
been lucky in a raffle.

He told the Advocate that or
the day when he bought the tic-
ket he only had a $1.00 in his
pocket. It was his lunch money
but he walked into the Fire Bri-
gade Station and bought the
ticket from Fireman C. Howard
He returned home in the evening
but did not tell his family that
he had bought the ticket. All along

he had the feeling that he would
win,

Rock cannot drive and intends
selling the car. So far he has one
offer of $1,700 but has not yet
made up his mind to take it. He
will leave the car in the Police
Garage at the Central Station
until he accepts an offer. The cat
is insured until December 23.

The winning numbers were as

follows: —
First Prize .. No. 9738
Second Prize 3176
Third prize ... 9024

Race Horse
Dies

Mr. K. D. Edwards’ Beacon
Bright an “A” Class thorough-
bred who has won races in Trini-
dad and Barbados dropped dead
yesterday morning at the Garri-
son Savannah after exercising.

Beacon Bright was being pre-
pared for the Trinidad Christmas
meeting. Yesterday morning he
was exercising in company with
Mrs. J. D. Chandler's Gun Site.

The two horses galloped about
seven furlongs and after pulling up
on his way back to the paddock,
Beacon Bright stumbled.

His rider Jock Slocombe how-
ever had time to dismount and
loosened the girths before his
mount finally collapsed, Beacon
Bright was a horse by Light House
the Second out of Bright Brocade

Flying Dutchman
Makes Conquests

It might be assumed that most
air travellers are men, This is
wrong, however, for K, L. M
statisticians have calculated that
only 58% of the passengers cat-
ried by K. L. M. during the holi-
day month of August, 1950 were
men. The remaining 42% con-
sisted of women and children
(35% and 7% respectively) .

In the United States the air-
craft is more of an every-day
conveyance than anywhere else
in the world, According to a
recent study, the percentage ol
female travellers carried by the
scheduled airlines in that coun-
try is 24%, which is consider ~
ably lower than the percentage
carried by K.L.M., clearly prov-
ing that the “Flying Dutchman
is favoured by the ladies — a
conquest of which he may well
be proud!

——<—<————

The Weather
TO-DAY

Sun Rises: 6.02 a.m.

Sun Sets: 5.37 p.m.

Moon (New) December 9

Lighting: 6.00 p.m.

High Water: 11.00 a.m.,, 11.04
p.m.

YESTERDAY



Rainfall (Codrington) .11 in.

Temperature (Min.) 72.0° F.

Wind Direction (9 a.m.)
E.N.E; (11 a.m.) E.N.E.

Wind Velocity: 11 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.932;
(ll a.m.) 29.912.









Ralpt D,
Rock of Cave Hill woke up oa
went lo
continue
the
Senior Cambridge Certificate, he

They'll Do It Every ‘Time



ae a"



SIAMESE HOXING



ep

ng Molgus Cota a Casa ‘ cies, 4
BORING th Blam is an “all-in” affair, where not only fists, but feet
and any other part of the body is used. Bouts take place in the

stadium in Bangkok every Sunday
spectators.

‘Jungle Bertha "
Handed Back
To Mother

SINGAPORE, Dec. 2.

and are watched by thousands of
—Express.

Jamaican Studying
B.G. Rice Mills

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Nov. 28.
Week-end_ visitor to British

Thirteen-year-old “Jungle Ber- Guiana, with a view to looking

tha” Hertogh was today handed
Lack to her mother. The

Court here had ruled her marriage
to a Malay Moslem illegal and

over the Colony’s rice mills to
gain ideas on introducing B.G’s

milling system in Jamaica, is Mr.
Gordon Anderson, representative

awarded the custody of the child °f Tillage Ltd., a firm of land

to her Dutch parents.

Bertha burst into tears when she
was told the verdict.

She turned sobbing to Che
Aminah who had left the Court
with Bertha and her mother Mrs.
Hertogh. Just before judgment
was read, Bertha said in Malay:
“Mummy what shall I do now?”

Then Mansoor Adabi, the Mos-
lem school-teacher who went
through the form of a Moslem
ie with Bertha, comforted
er,

Mrs. Hertogh stood apart from
the three calm, but trembling.

Bertha’s counsel said he would
file an appeal on Monday.

The Judge held that the pur-
ported marriage of. Bertha with
Adabi was a “manoeuvre designed
to prejudice the Court proceedings
which is discreditable to all con-
cerned.”

But he was satisfied that Bertha
was neither forced nor tricked
into marriage.

From his observation
Aminah, the Judge said; “I am
unable to resist the impression
that she was persuaded to agree
to this discreditable manoeuvre
by some person in whose mind
the idea of it was conceived.”

Holding the marriage to be in-
valid, the Judge said that as
Bertha's father had never con-

of Che

preparers and contract ploughers
in Spanish Town, Jamaica.

Mr. Anderson arrived on Sat-
urday for a week's stay to be
used in inspecting Government's
Central Miill at the Mahaicony-
Abary Rice Expansion Scheme.

oceania

VIRGINS ELECT FOUR
COUNCILLORS

(From Our Own Correspondent)
VIRGIN ISLANDS.

In the elections for the Virgin
Islands Legislative Council on
November 20 Mr, G. Fonseca got
629 votes, Hon. H. R. Penn 462,
Mr. C. deCastro 402, Mr, Brud-
enell Bruce 353.

Nine candidates contested for the
four seats.

The five who failed to get in
were Messrs Achille Fraser (295),
Antonio Maduro (222), Theodolph
Faulkner (210), Hanford Connor
(191), and I. Hendricks (93).

Registered voters numbered
1,267 of which 853 voted. Five bal-
lots were spoiled. Nine polling
booths were located in Anegada,
Virgin Gorda, East End, Road
Town, Sea Cow Bay, West End,
Carrot Bay, Cane Garden Bay and
Jos Van Dyke.

His Excellency the Governor
accompanied by Mrs, Blackburne
and the A.D.C. Major Martin

sented to his child embracing the Hicks are spending the first week
Moslem faith, she could not be of December in the Virgin Islands.

regarded as Mohamedan. It would
not be in her interests to leave her
in Adabi's custody and such a
course would be entirely deroga-
tory of the sanctity of a Mohame-
dan marriage, the Judge said.

“While I am satisfied that Ami-
nah has brought up Bertha with
care and affection and while I
am prepared to overlook the un-
fortunate impression which she has
made on me as a witness, I can-
not blind myself to the fact that
she was a party to the discredit-
able marriage.”

The Judge said that he attached
particular importance to the wishes
of Bertha’s father, The father was
the judge of what was best for the
child’s welfare,

He awarded costs against Che
Aminah.

—Reuter.

PRIESTS SENTENCED

@ From Page 1
of all property of each of the nine
and deprived them of their citizen
rights for 10 years.

The court found all nine guilty
of high treason and espionage
within the meaning of various
articles of the criminal code,

It also found them all guilty of
having since 1945 attempted to
destroy the economic order of the
Peoples’ Democratic regime and
having entered into contact with
foreign powers for this purpose.

It found that all nine obtained
state secrets and gave them to
foreign powers.

Zela, Kulac and Boukal were
also found guilty of collaboration
during the German occupation.

All of the defendants accepted
their sentence thus waiving their
right to appeal. Most of the
defendants thanked the court and
said they would “attend to
cleansing their conscience of their
crimes.”

Dr. Svac and Dr. Mandl botb
said they accepted the verdict
“with gratitude” .—Reuter.

Sepivtored U.S. Feten: OMe







HOT ff

OH, HENRY MEANT
TO TELL YOU. I JUST
TOOK THAT OUT OF
THE OVEN+IT'S

The Governor will address the
newly established Legislative
Council of the Presidency and, in
St. Thomas, will discuss with the
American Govrnor problems of
common interest to the British and
American Virgin Islands.

S.A. Group Areas Act May
Be Suspended

FLUSHING M#ADOWS, Dee. 2,

United Nations General Assem-
bly today recommenaed twa
South Africa should suspend her
Group Areas Act which proviue
for racial segregation pending the
holding of a Kound ‘able Con-
ference between South Africa,
india and Pakistan,

A recommendation was approv-
ed by 35 votes to 13 with 12
abstentions ,

The recommendation was a
resolution which was approved as
a whole by 33 votes with 21
abstentions .

This recommended that the
Governments of India, Pakistan
and South Africa proceed with
the holding of a Round Table,
Conference to settle the question
of the peoples of Indian origin in
South Africa.

The resolution further recom-
mended that the Governments
concerned should refrain from
taking any steps which would
prejudice their negotiations — in
particular the implementation of
the Group Areas Act pending the
conclusion of such negotiations.
| —Reuter.

SAILOR IN HOSPITAL

Ronald Davies, Junior tngin
eer of the R. F. A. Bishopdale
was landed hére yesterday morn-
ing and taken to the General Hos-
pital to undergo an operation for
appendicitis,

The Bishopdale’s was an em-
ergency call, She was originally
bound for Trinidad from Ports-
mouth to load oil.

She remained here just
an hour.

By Jimmy Hatlo

over

tg
M~avee 4 LITTLE
LATEâ„¢BUT DON'T SAY



SUNDAY



At Exhibition

The Photographic Section
Annual Industrial Exhibiting
will this year be run by the Bar-
bados Camera Club under the
auspices of the Agricultural So-
=o * = —— was formerly
ooked after by the B.
and Crafts Society, coe

The Camera Club is compara-

tively young having been formed}.

only about seventeen months

Its strides have been rapid! aoe
ever, and it now plans to have an
entirely different set-up in the
Photographic Section at the exhi-
bition to that of former years. The
practice followed in big countries
will be resorted to, the “Advo-
cate” was told yesterday,

An_ exhibitor in this section
will have to carry out the com-
plete work of his exhibit, from
the operation of the camera to the
production of the finished print.
This will include taking the pic-
ture, processing the negative and
making and mounting the print.

Professionals and amateurs are
eligible for entry, and photographs
may be taken in the island or
abroad so long as the exhibitor is
resident in the island for the time
being. Any number of prints may
be submitted by an exhibitor, but
no exhibit would be accepted that
has won a prize at a previous
Agricultural Exhibition.

As regards the subject matter,
this may consist of anything.

picture may be landscape, sea-
scape, portrait, sports, news,
figure study, scientific, flower,

animals, etc.

There will be no cash prizes.
The first, second and third best
prints will be selected and six
Honourable Mentions will be
made,

COIN TWO CENTURIES
DLD



Three Coins, one of which is
227 years old, were brought into
the Advocate’s Editorial Office
Friday morning. They were
owned by Mr, C. B. Brandford
of “Archville”’, Hastings.

The oldest is an Irish half
penny from the reign of George
the First and dated 1723. The
other is a Barbados Neptune
penny dated 1792. It carries the
head of a Carib chief,

Mr. Neville Connell, Curator
of the Barbados Museum, told the
Advocate yesterday that no one
knows quite well the origin of
that head. It is also on the first
penny to be issued locally in
1788. This is called the Pine-
apple penny. On both pennies
the word Barbados is written
“Barbadoes” .

The third coin is a British penny
from the reign of George the
Fourth, dated 1826

Mr. Brandford said that he had
these coins for many years. He
bought them from time to time!
when he used to carry on a busi-
ness. He also has many old
American coins.

keen coin collector but at present
he rarely comes across very old
coins so he has given up collecting.

. TRINIDAD AIDS
PIONEER INDUSTRY

(From Our Own Correspondent)



PORT-OF-SPAIN Nov. 28.

Trinidad’s aid to Pioneer In-
dustry proposals have attracted
another foreign industry: manu-
facture of low cost dresses

Soon a Canadian dress manu-
facturer will visit theses}

snores
on an exploration visit, |



MODERN HIGH SCHOOL

(inrgistered and approved by Dept. of
Education)

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

The examination for ntry to thi |

eehool in January 1951 will be held on)

Friday 8th December 1950. Crndidates !
yaust bring a baptismal certifieste and,
# tert'monial from the head teacher

of tt last school attended
limited number can obtsir
Entrance Fee $1.50.

A scholarship) examination

Only 4
entry

1
will be}

held at the same time to select the at

best candidates in order of merit. No
entra-ce fee

L. A, LYNCH,

Principal, |

46.11.50—2n,

is never more pronounced than when you hae

your suits made by us

Expert craftsmanship.

you are assured of the latest and smartest in
men’s styles or your own individual tastes.

'
}



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He said that once he was a very |
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AVOID IMITATIONS —
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lighters—each has a Ronson
“Looks like a dream,” says she.
“Works like a dream,” says he :
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‘SANATOGEN’

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restores health, youth and vitality

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IN OUR HOME PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT

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Bottle 60 ¢

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The crease-resisting finish delays that
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TO OUR CUSTOMERS & FRIENDS

PIO.



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and 1 P.M., instead of as previously between
11 a.m. and Noon.

ALLEYNE ARTHUR & CO., LTD.
HIGH STREET



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PAT".F EIGHT SUNDAY ADVOCATE SI'NUAV DFCT.MBEB S, 1*M MKBAD()Sfii'Am r OTE isw i ---uamssC: Sunduy, December :l. 1950 S.liools THK question f finding a site for another Girl*' Secondary School in the parish was raised at the Meeting of the St. Michael Vestry ihis week. The Vestry were given a legal opinion on the ownership of the Deanery in June this year. The parsonage and glebe in the parish uf St. Michael are vested by two separate deeds each dated November 1853 in the Rector of the parish of St. Michael and his successors, Rectors of St. Michael forever. Both properties were bought with the sanction and approval of the Legislature. The Parsonage, now the Deanery, was purchased in consequence of a petition by the Vestry of St. Michael to the Legislature. It is now the considered opinion of the Vestry's Counsel that the building known as the St. Michael's Rectory can only be disposed uf with the sanction and approval of the Legislature. He further slated thai neither the Rectory nor the Glebe Land can be used for any purpose or use than that for which they were acquired except with the consent and approval of the Legislature as expressed in an Act of Parliament. Counsel went on to advise the Vestry of the necessary procedure. The substance of his advice was that if the property is to be used for any other purpose the Rector of the parish must take the initiative. At that Meeting the Bishop stated that he was not unsympathetic to the idea the Vestry was discussing. He counselled the Vestry to wuil until the new Rector was appointed and he told them that the agreement would have to come from the Rector as he had no authority to tell him what to ^ i saJ MMfcsV Four months after and with the new Rector installed the Vestry still appear to be far from their goal — the acquisition of the Deanery as a site for another secondary school for girls. Sites fur schools in the Metropolitan parish are not easy to discover and it is not surprising that the Vestry have selected the Deanery. It is nut the first time that covetous eyes have fallen on the Deanery. Years ago there was a suggestion that Queen's College should be removed to the Deanery. And when the Vestry decided to build the St. Michael's Girls' School the Deanery was numbered among the suggested sites. The St. Michael's Vestry can never be accused of failing to realize the importance of education. On many occasions they have pointed the way for others to follow. When they decided to launch the St. Michael's Girls' School the critics, amongst whom were many ratepayers, were of the opinion that it was too ambitious an undertaking. The school has fully justified its existence and now the Vestry is contemplating building another secondary school for girls in the Parish. The quest for education is ever on the increase and until the other parishes decide to build secondary schools a heavier burden in supplying educational facilities will continue to fall on the Metropolitan parish. St Michael can boast of a Government Secondary Girls' School, a Parish School, a Catholic School for girls, an Anglican Convent, and one private school of some proportions. Increasing numbers of parents desire to give their girls the advantages to be gained from a secondary education. But the vacancies in the several academies in St. Michael are so few as to be almost negligible. Everyone interested in Education is anxiously uwaiting an amicable settlement over the Deanery so that the Vestry can proceed with their plan to build another much needed secondary school fur girls. TIW Crown l England and embarked on the ; nationalisation so many persons who hjd formerly been employed by privipanies now found themselves in the service of the government through the Boards which were constituted to run the nationalised industries and services, that it became necessary to pass legislation to place the government in the same position as other employers of labour. Accordingly the Proceedings against the Crown Act was passed. By the provisions of that Act the government became responsible not only for their contracts but for the wrongful acts of their servants committed in the course of their employment An argument which has always been used against such legislation has been that juries would award excessive damages against the government knowing that the government was backed by the resources of the public treasury. There is not much in such an argument Similar arguments could be used in the case of big companies. It is well known that juries are apt to take into consideration the prosperity of a company when awarding damages against It but that has never been regarded as a good reason lor exempting such companies from liability. In Barbados, as in England, more and more government departments are coming into existence and more and more persons are being employed by the government The employees of the Civil Service in all grades must run into thousands and it is time that all the employees of government should be subject to the liabilities and should be accorded the same rights. This is but another example of the truism that it is impossible to interfere with one part of a complicated mechanism without affecting the whole. In introducing nationalisation to Barbados and bringing many employees under the control of the government, protection must be accorded tn those employees and In the public who may be affected by the activities of the government. i in \ no IT \.\i\ VM \.\i\ _ii*3 VvTv/lNvO 1 Vl £>fv SEE US FOR:— LUMBER & HARDWARE -n Sitting On The Fence IIS VVril.VMM. tllMHNS NATIONALISATION has come to Barbados and the governmetit will shortly have to consider what steps they propose to take to place the government m the same position as the individual citizen in the eyes of the law. The fiction has always extorted in British law that the king could do no wrong, and as government employees were the servants of the king he could not be liable for any wrongs committed by them in the course of their duties. Recognisin. the hardship and injustice so often caused by the application of this fiction, the Legislature has from time to' time when creating new departments or Statutory Boards specially provided that such department or Board could sue or be sued as though It were a private citizen. The Natural Qai Corporation Bill, now on its way through *.he Legislature makes such provision for the Corporation. When the Labour Government took Black And While A LETTER appearing in the Times recently, signed by James Griffiths, Lord Hall, Creech Jones and Malcolm MacDonald, among others, says uf Dr. Harold Moody: "Born in Jamaica, a descendant of slaves, he can be named with Booker Washington as one of the greatest figures which the cojloured race has provided since emancipation." The description is accurate, what Washington was to America Moody was to Britain. Both men spent their lives campaigning for racial tolerance: as Aggrey would have said, they tried to convince people that although some sort of tune can be played on the black keys of the piano, and some sort of tune can be played on the white, perfect harmony can only be achieved if both sets of keys are used. Dr. Moody, who died over three years ago, was in his time one of the most remarkable men in the religious and social life of England. He founded, and was the lirst president of the League cf Coloured Peoples. He had been chairman of the Colonial Missionary Society, president of the London Missionary Society, president of the Christian Endeavour Union of Great Britan and Ireland, and, just before his death, was nominated for the chairmanship of the Congregation of England and Wales. All through these years he was a beloved doctor in the south-east of London. Just before his death Dr. Moody completed a tour of the West Indies which he had undertaken for two reasons — to increase his knowledge of the progress of his fellow West Indians, and to launch a campaign to collect funds for the erection of a cultural centre for coloured peoples In Ixindon. He believed that it should not only be an idea crystallised, but that it should be an incentive to bigger and better efforts in the future. That it should symbolise a positive contribution to better understanding and closer co-operation among coloured peoples themselves and an earnest of their desire for international unity and world peace. Undoubtedly Dr. Moody would have wished to have such a centre as his memoiial. but perhaps it is better that it is not so. Fur a centre such as he envisaged might have defeated its objects. Instead of bringing white and coloured closer together it might have kept them further apart Now an appeal is being organized to perpetuate the memory of the Doctur. In the first place it is intended to acquire the fine bronze bust of him by his distinguished sculptor brother Ronald Moody. Secondly it Is proposed to establish a prize fund for coloured students from the West Indies and Africa. It would be more in keeping with Dr. Moody's teaching, and no doubt he would wish it, if the prize fund were awarded to students from Africa and the West Indies, irrespective of colour. Thus should we remember one whose greatest wish was to establish co-operation between black and white. -I think It is high time we started letting other naUons set thai not only are we a sensible, steady people, but u rumbustious, creative, exciting, energetie, intellectually adventurous people, too."— Francis William*. RUMBUSTIOUS, rumbustioui, And jolly clever, too, that'i us. Behind our rather vacant dials And painful, slow superior smile-. Behind each ruddy, wooden pan There lurks another Englishman A lively, intellectual chap In bowler, trilby, huntin cap; Creative and excltin fella With old school tie and rolled umbrella. Though most ul us appears a gent. We are uproarious, turbulent; We want to shout and sing and dance, To give the wicked, sidelong glance; We want to devastate and dare The female heart with ardent t hrase. i love, our beating heart takes rings. ... each of us the poet sings. Though, in the slow pursuit of male, We are inarticulate. For all we say to her when leavin li "Thank you for a smash in evenln." r, if she walks next day In tweeds. With doggies pantin on their leads. We raise our hats, and all we ay Is "Mornin, what a smashing day.' A smashin girl, a smashing done. A smashin night, a smashed romance.... That's how a silly English chap Escapes the matrimonial trap. Rumbustious, rumbustious. And Jolly clever, too, that's us. Kind Uncles All ACCORDING to a report from Rumania children are taught to give thanks to the Communist Government for all the blessings bestowed on them. When an A i-ra-.: It lITw.m. 1 m ho i "Wr ire In because Of M Pa uker nut COMld*' tak.> r our the aid of Stall"ican fltOf girl what she BOO recited: Iff and safelu A untie Ana .4 unite Ana %  of tu u-ithind Uncle Joe Apart from the joy of BJWWlni that my darling Ana, last heard ., H Hi.all... h'l.Ifigll Sl-l II %  lary, is not being taken care of by Uncle Joe in %  concentration camp, may 1 suguc '. that children in this country m ght be taught mine about their i mefactors, including myself? Then any child, Diked about the affairs of the day, would answer in the following n UHW. Whp are MM living i" peace, if not safety Because Mud Uncle Ernie Hevin I* taWng rare of us, u*ith the help of kind Uncle Harry Truman. But neither of them could do It u-i" .mi the aid of hind Uncle Nat, whose income tax buys most of the armaments. Why do you have lovely cheap food to eat" Because of kind Uncle Maurice Webb. But he couldn't do It without the aid of kind Uncle Nat's income tax, which pays the (, od lubaidli i Why can Mummie get free medicine u'heti she imagines the ha* a headache!' Because of hind Uncle Nye tievan. But lie couldn't do It without the aid of kind Uncle .Vat's income lax. u'htch pays for the health service. Then who is youi factor'' Kind Uncle Na> greatest beneI ii::.i;:nn' nt Oft* %  indignant girl, complainto a newspaper about the of her nance, says that the bio %  -<< %  •-1 hints and "even teasing' have failed to produce an engagement ring or even the smallest gift GEORGE—Yes. dear? Charlie's given Enid an engagement ring.—Has he? ft looks ever so rOcs -Tfcf| do look nice, don't theu? Specialty them u-ifh pearls and rubies. Thoe your favourites?—Oh. definitely. Unless you ave a single diamond. Yes, I like a single diamond. More class. -Oh. definitely. How long ave we been engaged, George?— Engaged? Us? Oh, years I should think. Only the other day Mum was asking about my engagement ring She thought I might ave lost It.— Lost it? She must he balmy. You dont ave to insult my mother, George—Well, you eon I lose something you'ue never ad. can you? It stands to reason. Do you know what my sister says about you? She says you're mean.—And she's dam right. I'm ro mean 1 wouldn't give a starving friend a tanner for a cup of coffee. George!—Tell you what, though. / nearly bought you something last week It was so cheap I said to myself "The very thing for mg, girt." Then / said to myself, "No. I'll incest it in football pools." What happened?—I won £1.000 You know it's your birthday tomorrow? I ought to. George.—Well, I tried to forget it, but f couldn't. So I said to myself, "I'll buy her some little thing for once." But (hen 1 said. "No. Ill put the money in the pools again." So if you're thinking about a birthday present, you'ue ad it. I see.—But / tell you what. Yes. George?—If I win another £ 1,006 I'll buy you some bath salts for Christmas. 1 will definitely. Thank you. George.—Bui if the money goes down the drain you've ad It for Christmas, too. Definitely. Wavy Welfare League Is Doing Fine Work Hy THEVOR .\l I In Just under two weeks' time publicity In the world cannot Ihe Royal Merchant Navy Welfare reach. league will close off a raffle hi The Navy League, of course, %  id of their funds. This raffle arrange dances and picnics for lakes the place of other form* of the men of the Bhips and see to it crucrtainment which '.he League that they visit 0*001 of the beauty run annually In Order to finance spots of the Island This side of their activities. their activities probably receives more publicity and is therefore To some of us local folk many well known. But there Is by far Ol these activities may seem oba more important part which the/ in re, not to mention those who ploy and this deals with welfare take the view that charity begins of the men when they get Into it home and therefore reason difficulties locally vhy should we help outsiders For instance, a man may become before we help our own poor and ill and have to slay In hosplta 1 destitute. This line of argument They League sees to it that he is 1 think is in the minority an 1 visited regularly by members and %  hicfLy put forward by uougtle provides htm with sundries like who dislike all form* < %  visit". cigarettes, exti.i food and various or ietU %  'ally hav,soerks i-rud-r* toilet requtattOS They arrange, to Against life and IbOTOfori 1 00 write his relativeshould he be not intend to go into ,11 i'seriously ill and here 1 have a Ulaspeels here. He story to tell, li illustrates how much this work is appreciated Iluwvver sine we anal g*sl overseas, tins to be hospitable to visitors at all times it seems to me only I was living in a small Canunutural that we should do ull * %  "ian City at one time. A plac" can to make life happy during ss remotely connected with Bar their stay here for those w?w bados as the other side of the bring 1 us our food and protect us moon. Imagine my surprise therefrom the submarine menace in fore when a grey haired elderly times of war. We can gam far lady appeared in the office one more lasting friendship and the dny and asked to see me. Beln tif>firrciulded accordingly. DA COSTA & CO. LTD. something of the. place. But sir; really wanted me to come to tea so that we could sit down and discuss matters thoroughly. I duly went to tea, met the root of the family, and dlscovereu that the reason why she wanted to come to Barbaric* was because her son had died here Whereupon she produced pictures of the funeral at our cemetery and there standing aoound were faces Wnkb were very familiar to me. She then went Into details about the accident which befell her son while on ship In port here and produced letters from n member Of the Navy League, which without being too sod, yet let h< r know how things were with he: boy In nil last moments. It might h.ivc bean onttton. by u brother or Sister of the d-.ul lad ami the old lady, 1 can OOOUTO >ou appreciated It just as much. Of course the accident had tekm place some months previously ami the initial grief must have been lessened by then, but that lady never shed a tear nor did bar voice waver as she re-read what must have been all too familiar lines to her. Those letters were her treasure*. When the time came for mo to Icove I was asked to stay on to dinner, und on deporting: after lhat, I was asourod of o constant welcome I was a friend of the friends who had written her. I was a Barbadian. I was alwa> • welcome in her homo. MEN'S SUITS. Here are Suits from England's most respected Tailoring Houses Made from the finest fabrics and presented in a range of Qualities and Colours, that is certain to include your favourites. Stop in to-day at ... DA COSTA & CO. LTD. i DRY GOODS DEPT. Our Hraeirr* Hmys Bn-akfaat Hour To the Editor. The Advocate— t) SIR.—May 1 say how regrettable it Is that the Wages Board should have published a Section of the order that reads one wny and Is meant to apply in a different way. Orders of this kind should receive greater attention before being published The Clerks who are the barkbone of a business, do not seem to have received much consider.ition as far as the suggestion for al] stores to close for one and the same hour Is concerned. The ma|0ritj ol Cleroa hove their braekfast served at one or other of the Breakfast parlours, o ansll majority manage to set home The parlours find it difficult to servo these clerks 01 present even between B.30 and 12.30 the present breakfast hours What should happen if all had to be served in one hour, the accommodation would not be there, so the Clerks would have to go home for their meals. Anyone who travels on the Bus knows thvgreat difficulty it is to get to work by the limited bus service and therefore this would be out of the question. Clerks would have to do without meals Some of the Membt-i Chamber of Commerce stated that as far as the clerks being allowed to go out to shop during their working hours was concerned, that no Merchant would object, that sounds fine and Is well meant, but every one knows that If a merchant happened by chance to call for a particular clerk on a couple of occasslons however distant those calls may be. that the anxious merchant w.otild prompt ly say "every time I call (or such and such a clerk, they are out, thi; will never do The unfortunati %  lerk gets to hear this and an unhappy situation begino. On do i i this ion Is sideration must h. attrr before 0 flnn rived at. the opportunitv for 'hi ask Mr Thomss to hold a meeting and give them an opportunity w. express their opinion! so that Mr. Thomas would be i: a better position as their representative to discuss the matter. CLERK. that's the FIRST and LAST Word in COCKTAILS blended with GODDARDS GOLD BRAID RUM /



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SUNDAY DECEMBER 3. 1*50 SUNDAY ADVO< ATE PACE FIVE WATER POLO HONOURS DIVIDED Trinidad Ladies Win: Local Men Triumph DEC. 3 NO. 148 OVEK the last week-end. the H.nbadoe Amateur Water P4o H allon riiU'ilintfd • Trlni1 Men'a Team and for the first %  I i Ladies' Team in a fourIntercolonial Water Pol< . h<1 I m HUH al the game • U fast hui lawka nmertenre %  V vear litill probublv pl;i\ ore iii..Outstanding. PtUyei Pol Bsrbadas ri % %  %  .ar wan easil. Clu' Si .purrs' sharp shooting •d a' the Baibia There were thi T>„ Barbados rr %  the tests the i played to m goalie-* djra Had however took the *. • the forTM'I F..,ler end nether Bannlstet QaosTrej pi. > ed JII cxrellcnl ond test whl due lo .' [too Mam, he not i pluckj (b in the i mini Bird Next i %  ta Vidmei Hid Phyllis i I nrd Piled.i Oarrrm hael In but w t %  r %  and Unlit-: %  Re) M Relay races Yiistl) Improved goal <•! th vc Kin HV %  ncouragcnieiit (or the ntl v, itei Pol JOHNNY OATCLirrE. Trinidad goat-keeper lu.ike* a brUUant -.v.m he deflfrta on* of Dalbert Baiiolatar's %  pewsf shots over the bar. Althongh night goals war* scored en him in th Test sstiss, OsUliflr -tcount of lilm-ell and -aved ievral certain goals dm lag tks tear ic.ond Tent M.iu-h i THE pier of Uis Barbados Aquatic Club was packod with people for araiy m-tth Picture was taken on Sunday morning during the Snapper* Trinidad match, which Snapperwon flea goals ta ferae. The three tiered accommodation facilities deal Kiied by Ba-il Brooks mid constructed by bin and oMer mansbei-H of the Water Polo Association, was a moat successful venture and allowtd everyone on the pier to have a good view of the gamas learn i. ,. yasthj improved team to the one -inch played against B;irb..di in Trinidad in January 1950 In tVOT) department it is a belter u-am Their forwards. Dave Bai.ii't Rex Eckstein. Haul Andei id John S,'||K-r were all in lop twiiiiminu loiniiucai and wars always a headawho for the Barbados defenders Rex l^ksiem who is a Barbadian was unfortunate nul to score Hi l> .1 !,inN. swimmer and if left alone ha .. docopllve hl Bui Ihe Barb* das captain II-HJ'' Patterson v.aalways .lose on him and Eckstein %  ( no lime u<>i away long enough to realli send in one o{ his 'pet' *bols D-ve Barcant has a quick strong KIIOI and with his good condition gol away several UrnM but did not gel past the Barbados goal keeper Paul Poster. %  .-. back line they have %  • Bnd in Hiny Smitli Smith is a big fellow, who al lliough he has only been playing the game for ortv season, ha shown by his performance h that he ran mark well and Iha ball to his forwardi effectively marked Bannister in the first and second toate and won a special prlie for all round n..in.,mon the Trinidad team He also placed second m the Mini 100 yds Other members of the Trinidad back line, skipper noddy Bynoe and John Teixeire gave good accounts of themselves Johnny GatchfTc although he had poa eight goal* scored on him in the bad. 'e-ls gavian excellent display In your goal and is much Improved from thai his last appearance axntnst Barbados Dick Bradley and Pat Ambrose only appeared in trn Snappers match. Dick was unfortunate not to play In any of K KSUSCNIN w .,"V"liI"r fesl rbaumaUam In my arms and shoulders Than pains started in the small of my really i. or Krosi-han and waa surprised to find that I got a little relief. 1 bought another and txtfnre li waa finiahad all my pelns had gone and from that day iiavo not appeared ageln. Uy naim •*rs nhsiinaiand th* relief really aurprised ma -T B Hhaumatle pains and hackaehe IBe result of pnlaona hi.h lasy aaya are For l lose tbare ta no liner Hi the blood—Pols-ma wli bowals and tired kldn Uiltng to eipel Po c"inplalnia tbsre is i iroaFmant than Kruschen *all, which cleanaes all the Internal irn r.., TrlBidad no %  .I. 11. rl>.idoii b lifi little lo i rsfXaH lot out -lat i %  ifdiiii.uii-f rim V..H wooo skipiHi ii' lajed wel tru-nigjioul the lour marking Lhvl itisjn %  > i %  and cffectlvi I ul Fosb gosl %  i % %  %  %  tit II Ball* an, An' %  | inhin tioi reajrotUr I heir en. I > KnaggMr Joa rilniner. Manager %  both leami nor' bo jusiiv proud i.( ihi-n perforrnai rl ihe MpartOBaw aartnod In Ihl 'Do did ... iiiiiii. f"i tin 1 ontlri bav Ihsyj masM i < MUSCLE PAINS May main fcidnatv troub'o %  i "in —> i a ii Htm sponsored by JAR BAKERIES mokora of ENRICHED BREAD and the blenders of J § R RUM A in: l 'J. k •!>, M i '"'""I von VW I.DIM. I'll li H\ l II \l[(il\(, MOTOR Krl'tlllH mm BOLDCN HAKHAIIOS OABAOI Id Kt.emi.k Bit ID Dial 7I eluiiti B ., II : %  M tiling a* • %  iiiii'iiiliraeiciiinuUlr anil sctUc and ullcu tn-come a cause of pain in jo:n:s and imistle. The wn/ to lacfcls ihe Uoubli H to help the kidneys. They slimild be toned up wilh De WlU'l PUk lh( nedicme %  fas Ut:. ptapoM iv w ft PdUhavs aaoWraswx i .. .H| ... ..i nit, ; i I ,.41 v %  the kidneys that bnags UMMII ba>h in parforn their natural ImiiiiMii |Moperly. This erelllned luedn me is sold alt over ^ the woi id and we have many I letti-n fioni Mifterer* teibng *J of runt |maMC Snai years of suifcf nig, by ukmg De Witt* Pills Try them fa pass itnble. Goto %  In ,i.i aud gil a supply today OUR'* GUARANTE De Win's Pil'e Bianufactaied iindei itiulJy hygi*o>c condition, and thingredients conform to ngid hiandards of punty. DE WITT'S PILLS 'oi Kiel iy and Hl-ddIro.-b. -. THE TWO CAPTAINS'Boo" PatUrson. centre holding towel, clu Is with Roddy Bynoe. the Trinl dad captain Just bafor* the third test. Seen In the picture are, left to right. Pat Amhro*r. (Trinidad). Archie Clarke, fBaferee). Cliffy MacLenn. (Bnapprrs) Boo Pittcrson. (Barbado-i. John Oatclifle, (Trintdadl. Roddy Bynoe, (Trinidad). Rex Eckstein (Trinidad) and Ken lore (Barbados). BARBADOS ictainn the Elit. Water Polo Cup. Boo Pat'.-i %  <•• i | it id his sM MI A. R. Po-Ur. President of tin Barbados Water Polo A-sociaUuj The cup til prasauted I ary. law to the Tournament winners, by the Elite Shut Factory of T AfgtVf IMPROVED ODEX SOAP O Sets ikln rally clean O Bar-hes perspiration odour 6 leaves My iweet and dainty ., ,|,, T .!. r,.t Ll-ntlr l- n.i; liil.^r ih.n X, hand, and wwmmMBMnm A TTEXTiOXt! FACTORY >l\\Al.l US Take this opporlually of obtaining your requirements In :— GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE Ranging from ', In. upward* MILD STEEL tlau. RMiada. SqaaxM ID all Hhm BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizet FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill Al PKICBA thai rallDol bp rrprjlrj Thr HAIinitlOS FIHMHIY I.Ul. WHITE PARK SHAD. ST. Mil I1AEI NEW BIGGEf SOFTER TIRi gives amazingly different ride! Thisoreot gam BsBJM Osasssaal i It yiarfrfs instead of r—i-toig in.. lugger, softer lire' It runs on parta. This means an %  I < of air instetid of softer, amoolhoi rub the usual 2H \ M lbs %  —on any road! pSE • Hows eve* bumps A lifts • Lett wear end looi yeur cer Fewer reMlssfewar repair bills /j • Moremileooe end economy %  Greats* blowTho new ffeadsir's by GOODAEAR Shopping mcrr/e easy ul — -BOOKER'S PJ.Krl MrS h> I A RON : Roek f.arden llellodsia Null de Noel. BtC V\Rfll.KV> Bond Street Orehka. April VlwIeU LANVIN : My Sin. Seaadal IHVUV <;iFT SITS h\ : I'olter A Moore. Vjrdlr>. 4711 Innoxa. tie.. Etc liwi: KKI sHhH : (ientand I...in \\f rarry a wide -.elerlluo of three 4 I.ADIf.H' TOILET SETS TRAVEI.I.IS*. ^1 I II II \M ihl I' M M I IM M l()\\ III H I'-i I 1 -:f ROOK HUM ( IfKOMII M PIPE TIHM M\lRACKS HAVING MllilMIK-. 00MO1 PIPEK t "*. n< in SaT" The r'inel Selection of "XMAS OaVTaT l> a4WJI BsMafti at Booker's os) Drug Stores Ltd. Bruul MnM IKI Il4.i,. U nil NUBMAI I i ssaee, i*e weefei ever, rsse ee OaeeSear Hres saast aw emy srawr aseee e*. CITY GAKAQC TTVUHNO CO L.TU DENHAM srocnfo ar MI HADING SIOMS • ll.r.M'SK.A. IMMlMIN I.TII. SOU PlaailulioaiH % %  uildiaag Loner ISruiail Slr.<. II nli nl">



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SUNDAY DFrFMBFR 3. IMA illlllllllllllllllHIIIMIIIIIIIIIIlMlllllllllllllll SUNDAY ADVOCATF. ""I'llMIMIII'l |i|MIIIMIMM'llini|l||fmiM' l, "l l nilM|M|lll!l|ll|l||>!MIIHl" ll li:il!llllllllllllll' PAGE SEtKN iMIIIlh MANTRAP Todays witness Stephen Potter inventor of GAMESMANSHIP I i IV h. I' i* til %  Ofi.de -oil H I h%  vn A PEACE' WITH ORCHIDS II* |.l t On \\ ill Vil.* II* I . I*i* Irons r ^% MM TX>: %  and WARSAW THE mo i MtantoMHl ob)ects iii Wis.i" to-do iWM W d to be the utility wool-lined w %  ;*, .,• PtacadLUf sum-t in Which I lock a walk round DM -hopping . -.ti.pi>ed, nudged, uoiir.: vailing wuitrr mode her* Is the traditional fell l>not. buckled tv three straps ui the back of the leg. Food sh %  : arc plentifully Blocked with butter, eggs, ham Nothing is rationed. But leather %  .,nd dear: most handbags on show are made of plMtk terial and leather gloves cost a week'* wages. Most Warsaw shops have been taken over by *he municipaH'y or by the State, but, whatever their ownership, window dlspla have a political angle. To-day all shops carry peace slogans, portraits of Stalin. President Beirut of Poland 01 Professor Joliot Curie Shopping crowds are cheered by loudspeakers playing stirring choral and orchestral music. Interrupted occasionally by a news announcement. Lorries decorated with Hags whnl past carrying children who shout, "Pokoj. pokoj, pokoj" (met, peace, peace.) NiL'hl Life STAR WHO WANTS TO BE ALONE GIVES PARIS NIGHTSPOTS A MISS Deanna Durbin finds happiness in a 3-room flat THE old-fashioned Poloniii Hotel was the only one left standing: in blitzed Warsaw until several new ones were rebuilt from the ruins. This is Warsaw's new night club. The dance floor was packed. All was free and easy. Nobody wore evening dress. Warsaw workers mingled with Congress dolcgjies. We ordered drink and rood When the W11 arrived we found that at our official rate of exchange (tl iloty to the pound sterling under the three-wrek-old ta i] e r, slight] re-valuatlon) we had to pay 13s. %  Cd. for a liqueur glass of vodka 10sfur a thin slice of ham with bread and butter. Britons here for the Congr*>s have discovered that it 1B absurd for any but those having British travellers' chequesto translate Polish prices into terms of LSD without considering the higher wages here With a wage of 200 doty a ; week (corresponding roughly to I £6 a week in Britain), the r-' drops to 31 iloty to the pound I At tliii valuation vour pound will buv in Warsaw 11 packets of 20 .heap cigarettes, a man's shirt, n pound of coffee or half a pound of tea. You will still need as much a> £5 or £6 tQ buy a pair of shoes, and nearly U f or a lipstick. On the other hand, your two room :ind kitchen flat will cost you only about Cl a month including heat. Bilk Are Bis PLAYS showing currently in Wat saw include As You Like 11 Most movies now running Here are Russian, to celebrate "The Month of Friendship" with the Soviet Union. Favourite diversion for teenagers Hnd young people are the dances organised by trade unions, youth movement* snd other 1 iullN. % %  %  ..''. girls like lo dress in tli.-.i The "World l'.ee Committee," who are making themselves responsible for the tost of the Warsaw "Peace" Congress, said i spohesmnn they had no idea how much the bill would be. A Polish "PSBOr" I'miiinitU-e representatlv* pointed out thut muter nationalisation no private hotel or other bills would htive to be met and that imich of the labour was Voluntary. None the less, the i-ost of enter| taining the 2.000 delegates here %  g SIM u Mil i clothes are bought "off the peg"— PARIS. and shuns hats and jewellery. THERE is a Hollywood film D''t'ins became a star at 14. Last alar in Pan* who, during her HE ner con A rart *•* U'"vwl tight months here, has never rUm *I*^Bnd lie refused entered a fashionable cocktail ,0 !" new bar or nlgiit cluo, or oiiied at "Why? For one wry good Maxima, or ordered clothes from "'"'on — Hollywood refused to one ol the leading Paris dress let ,nc *"** U P"* h w,ld And houses. she added: "You can describe me pit-sent Deanna Ihirbln in i %  refugee from Hollywood* lole no Hollywood sctre.has conception of myself ever played convincingly before— "Hollywood saw me as the that of a star who really "wants eternal bobbysoxer The fact to b alone" that I had grown up. married. To find Miss Durbin in Paris "** child, had nothing to do it is no use looking through the with it as far as they were conguest ljsts of luxury hotels. eemed" David, grey-haired, birdlike. Ever since she arrived she has interjected: "I met Deanna wher lived quietly with her four-yearI was working Li Hollywood. I old daughter Jessica lit a threerealised that unless she took roomed £T-a-week flatlet, in a drastic steps, Hollywood would Paris suburb. Her only servants ilrst see her a grandmother in the are Jessica's nursemaid and a H n rather than let her play daily "char". the part of an adult woman or Deanna came to Paris with her the screen" dance, 44-year-old French film director Charles David They Deanna does nut consider her plan to mam sometime towards I'lm career over She can afford the end of this year or early next to wait. She is wealthy with yeai ui l small Alsace villnge property in Hollywood, and her wl.ere David own* a cottage Tl money carefully Invested by her w'll be her third marriak<\ l*ncashire-born parents. | David's first. In Paris Deanna divides her At 28 Deanna. though slightly time between singing practice. plumper, still reFrench lessons and slghtseeln* ills the teen-aged fllm star of I have never been happier" hr Three Smart Girls said. She dresses simply—her Paris —L.F..S London strtet—Pall M: uiamols-Pressed -n (say) old -i urn*. Uasa aa^ til jacKc: ftlUM Irot tde-aa**oualf elU:: %  irfrrtr t*eeuUnjI gtt: .?. i.nvwlt drsaasd in a v w,'h huU Ot i DsitJ #spensi< %  %  • ;ui pea*. i] *ii odd eord er tw> lioaorei .v 3 *.• I net soror to tnuv :. %  .1I1C this i. a i a—noa M atti cs Ira* alien*i.m t.i a MATpie it she enters brtsura* with fur*, glimmennt IUi dial or leaving a Iain)' Intense trail i scout, the cluhVxo are (hat I aU0 pmplo *IIJ waul lo knn!io SHE I" one *1U *BD1 ktoMi t-j en mrlh voti are aw*H nut i It ts to oone ut> on sucn psou., -!ierefor: Vout eos n aasu uust kppeur in Dlack skin aoti 'K I'.inpLf on top wiUiou *raer ol ornamait, li** 'he draw ni %  Ro"' This l* a :.irnds creat:on hro-ftint over the weiMreased !imitt>m by i-our com wntmv. he sasptelon that then %  li^taniv ts bad firm "rrrdone %  )uat n rflntiVM II you > a distin' t. U turn up— MSS n 1)1 '< %  ..-HDd 1pf*B<1 *ie rumour thai mi i* marrel Mratll on M. a week ana (Isn't I' i-et? 1 uint ts her rtn.v dress iLhe: women are 'n vinei> auslv 'o iri\:' .' % %  .,-.-.I MBJ %  :. I Mr IVkwicS. with ding you can read what What is if m -senag .rab'T thl.> ..MI otobjDi)' nui! tund i? all—II the women ar. oo anstciislv Iffti m KrM nr TI l drew o( ITtS iroCeUe la not mix alter an Bu< i .iishlp T Oome to in* • %  '. party In lodtinurs as I • we USfd to in m oil! lays odon lap J£A ^ X' k i lj 8 1 1 h *2* Thras Yourself On This Test that *.iould t) i DM .Imk. with someone (AM tor you and allow* (CM the test AOid See how i,mi words <>i ttppoMtii i.,. tuppl] .-'i ihose listed %  io-ar, AH ihe srards roll supply with i. UeUing eight i more %  IV 61 ilx ni'Nii'e Oeew < Ordsr l c... created to kep you cool and elegant all through the day 3 1 I i K*le** Mill v V I ttrwrWed: i (..imliie: C \2 I LaM: C-**t. II lfcW-|U'"0 >Inilu is nail. •?po.w-ers Hill EfM IVormi : Mirhae Domne GUI. Onon lid), St Michael IfirllisJaw l.i, • limiM Happy tttrftdaj to Onlta Boslie. Sim i Best Ml Hewnt, \ I i C.il Yard who Ihetl ).iitliduv< this Ml MAI. ( ( ( U KNKSS Tl STS FOB DRIVERS NKW VORK Can you slam on roar snUr" gency brake In 4it-i'iuoihs of . second ? Tins is the perfect mink st New York's new pSyClM phy; CSj clinic (W Bf lvwg who are fretjienUy In accidents If they fall to put iin tiie bK*elai quickly enough or do not p*-s all sorts of eye car an 1 mental quickness tests, they lose their licences r with r he asks. I thuds i PeopH SsU rat couldn't fnd primroMi in lutu-ni but you've BM torrM levalv b-di •Wm." Tfnt'i wkai I raesn. MM ktsrv "Somamini** gor i*h mr poor ti'dta. Sprini and -inmr Howcn snd i lumr tioAi-rj. .. -II out Ih* *I<(.OR Howcra ouuui't keep attiin, out all through rht var ot ther'n bS-.urt to die. and I don't want re '->* %  theai." Sht ttopi %  %  ^:..*%  Hei iklinf. BROWN LOCUSTS PRETORI -\ A vast swarm of brown locust 1 re all sorts of minor numbering about 150,000.000 were details of hospitality. Including 'teatroyed this week after they h,i beer and fruit In delegates'rooms. Gripped the area of Bushvcld a and presents at the Congress mile long and a quarter-of-a-mile u.Mih every day. wide. They had flowi: BOO ffllM „ , from the Cope, and. according to One duy tin d.legates wars | l>CUBt omo ent, weighed about 200 ,.i, nt. %  with orchids. Anothir xwn enough to fill S3 loir day ihc> had SOUveidl notebooks H undr.ds of African* are clearinn ami red silk lla*. u Q flelda of de-d |0CU]lU ^^^ WORLD (opVKicirr atSBBVBD are regarded by them as a tasty —London Express Serutce dish. bare They 2" luxury must be heavy. They treated generously. eat Dine pa ck ets •>< lunettes for uothing. ^U^KIIM MILK 8AW1/N0 BABIES UHUX)N. UawluiK babies will not -iiniiv %  nesa it ,i new ikegin u> be opened at rYalla %  Urt. n< .t yeai The aoundprooi, glass-faced • ich with id seats, are being bum at the back ..t tin lum, Vntn the^-e parents will be ghta Id .see Jin! bear Ihe IM without ft'iii ol biiby disturbing others Bound, wtrad dsrect Irani tinprojection box, can b lurnM down fur a whimper or up for full-UuiMitvd rour. Cribs will be provided I N s AUSTRALIAN ULUK BRLLI SYDNKY i mil Curse is a weed with ,i misfit bluo (lower thai has tlli;tiigleil iiulhuiuof acres of Australia 1 best gnalng hind* The driver of n three-ton lorry going iioss-eouiitiy to Sydney ^^oppe.l. lilled his lorry with the flowers. drove on to the city, sold them as "hotJaUUSe SB-OWP Austraiiiin itluv llells," and made £S60 YARDLEY "iDiir SMS" tar nustrr t$0 J At • %  OaD IOD 11**1, NDEH Soaping" dulls hair — HAib q/orfles't/ Yea. "soBping" your haul with *ea (iiic-i liquid or cream shampoos bidea Its natural lustre with dulling aoap fllm. Halo — .ir hair's naiursl lustre. Wtih your very hm %  %  •.->. Mai brines %  "" %  %  %  • ing luihliihii. Itfhmram latber t away quickly m any hind uf water — nerdi no .iiier-im-e. Km Imr (lun'a katiruui, u Halo. SMISICS'S aiaerir iittiHe iNssisoe In Amerxa. lUkuHiKelhallotliet di.inaeos. Ihereaaon Air*ien -Mnca have BSBSSsJ unl> Ilulu s;iv* hair mi li iuiiii.il radiance. HALO rtveali laa aillea keaalt ol vour kalr prison food i I "kf/J/them mth FLIT 41/ Flit contains D.O.T FLIT IS AN (tssj) PRODUCT ROl'OE • PER Ft* ME • LIPSTU K 1 M • I >l D< KI.AM VANItHINU CREAH • BH1LLIAN1 l.NL • HAIR CKlAM



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SVXDAY DECEMBER 1. 193" SUNDAY ADVOCATE PACK i lll'.l I THE MAN WHO CREATED BILLY BUNTER CREATES A NEW CHARACTER AT 75 Charles Hamilton oliai Fiank Richards, iih hi* cat Sammy. 1.300.000 Mftnb a jfar AT 75. Charlie Hamilton has created a new character called Jack of All Tradi Hamilton? He is a cr< those perennial schoolboy* BiUv Bunler. Torn IA i rj ;*d Hurry Wtiarton. %  -better slut: says Hamilton ol Jack or All Trades. Jack is a rolling avSjM aathcriiiK little BMH HimflUW Diana to make him Coil i in many lands. Hv %  a*ttl alwaya eODM up smiling lor another ...mi.I %  Three uuiui'% Hamilton writes the T*illy Bunler stories under pen-name Frank Richards He also used the name* Martin Clifford and 0*fan Conquest. Until the war Hamilton had kept up a yearly output of 1.5U0.U0U woids for 30 years. He earned £2.300 a year. The paper rationing, brought this to a atop. il his house near BroadHamfltOn'l pen Is busy I. E.B. Gardening Hints For Amateurs THE i MI l l \ DAHLIAS are not as coenmceuy grown in Barbados as many of the other flowering plants The reason for this may be the prevailing idea among some gardeners thai there la something especially duncult in their cultivation. This i j mistaken idea however, for the Dahlia Is one of the easiest uf plants to grow, not only from tuber, but from seed, and from cutting Dahlias are lovely as pot plants or out In the open bed, and they will bear generously almost tight through the year. The seeds, tubers, or cutting* should be planted much at the same time us other annual seed*. that is any time from November on After the plants are put out In their permanent position, whether In pot or bed, they re* quire ordinary garden conditions of soil and water in a nice open sunny place. Do nut make the soil they are In very itch however as this tends to encourage excessive foliage, and as a consequence fewer flowers. Dahlia plants need some support, but the stakes should never be in evidence, but should be of a size to. half keep the plant ID a good 'position without being seen. Decide where the young plants are to be put. and put in the stakes befare putting In the plants so as to avoid injuring the delicate roots. When planting out the small variety uf Dahlia, place the plants eighteen Inches to two feet apat, while the medium site or large variety should be placed four to live feet apart. Bikini Bathing Suit Here To Stay MIAMI The Bikini bathing suit. to1 %  wisp of twine and DansdiUKhlef which has hung by a thread i" more ways than one since It* French creation four years ago. has apparently reached Arm gaound in the United State: A leading designer here to stay. But don't start rushing lor the beach, boys. That's man's opinion and rS that it will take two. years to get the girls accustomed to parading around with not much more than what nature provided as a barrier against curious eyes. Mai Marshall, a Miami clothing designer who has a pt*o stuffv wearing apparel, predicted that within a matter i the Bikini suit will catch more attention on American beaches than the atom bomb caught at Ri namesake Remember And. Marshall continued, within %  a few years grandmothers will bo saying "I remember when' 1 about the torso covers the girU are wearing now. The dating designer shrugs on the thought that, M" i might frown on his prediction. -They'll lur,l hi %  to seeing nudes on the Marshall remarked. %  'Those people were shocked wh". their hose off and men | ing high collared ridrta. They'll get used to It." Marshall oiled wbn< •great technological pnbUn of design" as one reason why the suits have not hit the mass market. He explained: "Designm* a BUdi cutting a diamond. The subject Is so tiny that it's hard to net the proper perspective '•Then, of course, every Inch or the suit serves what you might call an essential purpose. You • \r*S *'** don't have extra material to play around with." Variety To solve that problem, the designer plans to rely on colours MM materials to five hl ilety. itest idea yet." he revealed, "is a fluorescent Job. You cant miss a babe on the beach night or day If she's wearing one ... HU.1 When the plants are well grown, %  %  %  %  •' ,.ikln |(| |u bctotv lhe> sUn ,., %  ted around Miami flowcr> a |m|p tnlnntn< and u^. Beach Uus season have been m|n^ need cd. It is about I1 retched around models' shapes thl8 xime tOQi ^^ m uleh of for photographic purposes. Pressmanure w ,u be beneficial aimting photographers look on After some time Dahlia plants as the greatest boon to tend to die off, and In Northern %  .holography since Sally Rand climates the custom la to take up %  -I fans. the tubers and hang them up to "A Bikini suit." said one dry until Springtime comes round academic lensman. "gives more again In Barbados this la all cheesecake per square inch than done by some people, but other a Minsky stripper shows In a moat successful Dahlia growers week %  -IN > Just cut the plant down to ground ,.— ... level at the first sign of its dyine back, and It will spring again with fresh new growth. This method has been proved most h >pc, the actor, has besuccessful by experience, and institution throughout demonstrates the fact that while rid, a symbol uf the Joy of beans; guided by accepted rules In living and laughterThe many gardening, no gardener should %  iluring his round eyes, ever be hide-bound by these %  nose and his gags have rules, but should constantly be exhilarated young and old and breaking fresh ground In experil.avc brouuht cheerful momenta mentlng. This Is especially so of) .itional audiences, even gardening In Barbados, where our In trying times local conditions require ways andj ,-• the family man, may methods that cannot be found In i. ., .veil known as Bob Hope the ordinary garden book, but! "i:iii. but he undoubtedly which must be worked out locally. I : %  .> fan v in till When specimen Dahlia blooms are desired, some of the lower I Bob is happily married to beaubranches of the plant should be %  tlful Dolores ftcade, whom he cut off, and most of the buds off I away from a singing the remaining branches nipped; ecrcer by marrying her In 19*1. leaving just one or two at each, HI years of marriage end. I led to adopt u daughter. While the fgionnou* specimen Linda, now nine years old, and Dahlias (some the sire of a teai, tar, they adopted a son, Tony, plate) are very beautiful as sped%  CM "ILLEGAL ENTRY" no* playing at the Globe Theatre is exactly what its title unpins. Taken from an actual case in the fllei of the United Stales Department of Justice, it ahows the ariivitiaa of the 1-auuyratiun Department In their efforts to prevent the Mnu^itrif,' of aliens, by air. from Mexico into the United Slates. It if an inteii-stink ... u extt .. i i:> their citing documentary-type film laser, the Plaza Bridgetown Is with plenty of acUOQ and the nt. v bowing Joan Crawfnd in story is graphically told with'FLAMINGO KOAD." Daaflu out too much n\er~emphasi* on with smell n>wn politics, MIIUII the tougher a>pvcts of 'he ossM wWsl Bsspagfl to be fcaiTI The keynote of the Him is susthe pens* — built up surely and sfOtid over, we have Miss Crewsteadily to a dramatic cltmai ford aa an ex-carnival enlcrtainAs the Chief oi the Immigraer. running foul of Sydney Uon district. Including southern Greenstreet. the crooked sheriff, California. QaorgC lirent and his when ehe baeornea fiioinlU v. ith %  asfitanta are looking for a pilot Zarhary Scott who is being *ho can help ih.-m smash the groomed by the sheriff as his smuggling ring Howard Dun*, an hotuhman in Uie slate legislature ex-army flier, whose job is fust Wlui the) refuse* to leave town about to fold under him. la iworn Mils .'Jrawford ie arrested on in as a special agent. His inphony charge and sent to a wotaruclnnts are to gain the osnflmen'*. %  atenUOB home On he: denee of Marta Toren. widow or release, she gees a job whereby his wartime co-pilot, who is an she meets the big political bos*. unwilling member of the ring. D:ivld Brian, with whom the falls and to get all the information In love and marries From thei possible MesW gDln gj Hi member*, on, the gloves are off betweet To do this, he iinilsjges to get %  fee .hei.lf imd herself, and It n job as a freight pi'..it with an ltvru'y a battle to nil degnsi airline operated by one of the with Qreemtreet. goaded by smugglers, by which oargo is not personal hatred, using every poonly transported, but aliens |itn,.l trick to destroy the woman smuggled over the border, and he who standl between him and his Is eventually assigned to fly UM political ambitions big boss frum Mexico to HM s.vdiM ) Greenstrevt is an abUmtrd States After a tens.and -olute genius when it comes U terrifying trip. ilunn winch hi portraying a thoroughly sinister indentitv i 3 discovered, DulT character. Without the slightest ground-loops the plam, and the effort, he can create an evil slimmlgratlon authoriUcs take over BjBjOsBi % %  while al the HDM tune. For once, the love interest (.oe* Joking with the l-iys, or heaving not overshadow HUT.Im portant; |,j.s pondaroui frame like a slowaction, and the roman.v in-twren igovatg pachvderm As the unHoward Duff and Maria Toren tits scrupulous sheriff, he is the neganaturally into Ihe plot. ( < i eemjOlmg that Is honest The parforinancea of the whola %  ( uc-ent, and his portrayal Is east are realistic and G nvil eta I | rtlilant and skilful. Mis* Crawand the direction is particularly ford Is smooth and dramatic In kjood. together with ,i lua t eeJ her transition from the carnival •core that blends wlUi the varyt ul tu the hosteas on Flamingo lng moods throughout th. film Koid. She is a flmshci actress Flamingo Road and shlnasj ba this tyi>e of role After a four weeks' visit. SamAs the deputy sheriff and Greenton and Delilah have departed %  treat') henchman. Zachary Sroit %  — lortrsys the weak, spineless political tool, who Anally becomes o embroiled In political skulliiruggcry that he shoots himself. i i David Brian, makes his film debut as the big boss. He at touKh and convincing and not without his attractions Gladys George is hack again, this timU ag th' owner and hr;tesN of a where toys meet for their i-'hlical shindigs She'%  ical ii-tiiner, and it's good (o .see la. '.nee more. V\ MNGO KOAD 1 is well setatf n d dtraaaaa and from tho point of view of dramatic en (ainmi should satisfy n i %  .pie CROSSWORD r5 %  t 4 i > r r ~ T~T — r i^^FuInn! % %  ii" I Down. •: pslaiiU. 14-'<' ia. Wiek ••U-V'iowii in the IB. Till* still i u.'H ; •fl. Art* retoniiMl p. Navv. %  i4. U could Or gate or door. Bn ssDis. J) 8. Bee 6 Acre*. v. 8e> I Acrat to, Cvuid be law. <•> U. Sort of wire trial mocks ons II. AtlimiL.wi. iti> 17. KulltV. <9l JO. Muse. I*) 21. Slielii*besiid*ii li. %  plant. i> m. fucb s bow i oNourad. <4> 58. InitUUlj a goiters liter. (3) • aakillan at MHeiSai i nuu-MNSSI 1. HSU; K*V. v. M i,i i a. %  .. .. Jut. . (a*: 1, W*I'..L. i i4r*fctrw*aie:"-. **: %  (i "O.NtK MIGHTY ROMK . HOME Tho blttei :oolball rivalry IT luly between Koine and Naple came to a climax .vith the burning of a coffin in Ihe centra of Rome r'i\ thuiuaiu. Niapolilai.-. artkO Ul Napl. U) upporl their team, brought .. laue black i-oltln with the insci ition H HeTC U on mighty Rorna <'elroyed by Naplffg," As th< nuiUh ended in ,i %  fTin was bunied. POOL fflNNKU TOKIO, T ra British aoldlara, wh. beIweea Ihem. Own CD4.U0U. h.ve loii.d the ghting In Korea They heard that they had won the i: ,-. in i football pool while OH tht voyage from England Comment of one or. landing: "They tell me there is nothing to spend BDpney on in Korea Isnt that Just my luck." YOU MODERN GIRLS' who hate suffering distress frora'aOriTHlT' FEMALE PAIN THI HNAI J e asd IO tOU MAKMV CUTEX Magic-wear CUTEX, so •a$y IO apply—givas beauty (o your nugertfpa. This incfedibly loofwaaring polish resists chipping anil pec ling. Stays perfect longer — CUTBX's clear, nun fading shades never seem to lose their brilliant lustre. with its cranky, w nervous, weak, restless feelings Read The ADVANTAGES of Takls,./ This Medicine! Take heed If you at such times suffer from cresapa headache, backache, nervous tension, fesl -**k. draaged out due to female funciumai monthly disturbances. I do like so many modern girls like thousands of girls have for years beek brj l.,ti. K Mnkhsni \ t'iind to rellsvr surh sympiM'Ui fur tlus! PinkhnTii • (' mi|und not only in U monthly pain but AISO accompamins weak, tired. irritable and craraty a Plnkhams Caii| mul one medlnne that can be bought today which —iakrn regularly — helps build up rmlitance against Mali distress and pain. Now lha''$ the kind of produet to buy I Its also a very etacllve %  tiimschlc tonic! For free sample bottle tear this out and send with name and address to Lydla E PinkhsmUedli HIT Company. 1U3 ('lcvclans*j ferUll ifydca 6.0b t MamZUZVo*J& :an •X.W,V-'.',V,-,',-. ;;:%:'. %  >'-' rpHEIR good looks tell you they'te^iat rigAa. Yoa know, too, when you look at the pries tag, that you can't get finer value, ninstrated is a Tan Oxford. Tied to every pair is the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign wUoh |j^jj/lS^ f^K^erV"' means >UJ* ngfcl7 Look for it is fcadkng 1 W stores in Barbados. made by JOHN WHITE means made justinght %  ri % % %  TIT i %  %  %  Designed for elegance and efficiency, titled with a bakclio: handk for comfort and easy control, the G.E.C. iron glides smoothly and effortlev ly, turning your labour into pleasure. THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD. BRIDGETOWN. BARBADOS umsfNTiNC me Gtucujn HECTUC to. tio.,ot LHUANO AKI: vor ( H \iNU ;, WITH Hill l MA IK ^ PAINS T J J Simply .ui.l. SKIIUOI Io the a fleeted parts and rid yourself as* arnnr HACKOOI. COM) I I Hfl PAIN On Hale at kNIGUTSDRl'GSTORRS M; • Co^o'i MeJucTi ifn .i O but, romonliibtitw-iweit. fiofront g'setii{;— a Collccbon of hondbog phioli , four dfffe/ont psrfamej for her changing mood Choose your prrfixns giflt f'om that lastly f'Ofroncei :— *N*.S' <,A"0tU'A CSIAI IX'tC'TIOHl 6or Nff..sa oecistON visa*riON I I At B Atereri 4 Co. l'< 'O 8si ITf. ft< ( .< ^tre**' FOR COLGATE'S ACTIVE. PENETRATING 'FOAM 6ETS INTO HIDOEN CREVICES 6CTWEENTHE TEETH. OEANS f'ENAMFX BRIUIANTLV SAFELV -TOO < IATER THANKS TO COLGATE DENTAL CREAM Clean ) Your Breath While \ I You Clean Your Teeth ^ ^ ANOHEIP^TOP ( TOOTH'. DECAY! Now available NEW OIANT SIZE Extra Big! Extra Value!



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SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1150 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PACE ELEVEN' Voice Of Scouting Tomorrow /Veto Houses To Be Built THE Housing Board approved ot a plan prepared by the Colonial , ,_. Engineer and the Board. %  model %  f Trie ,-i *BKb wo* made bv th.Sorumat 5.45 o'clock when a programme ahort sketch, together with re'5*' 1 1 1 1 ** ft "" port of current events during the %  *"'* %  t-ommitte* and as aoon past two months by the D.C. oC J*e>" approve of it. 25 house* the South Western Local Assocta*' be. built at the Pine and tion. So don't fur.-t to listen In 2i 'he Bay. oti Motiduv evening at 5 43. The model showed that the hiKines will have two bedrooms. CMBgnm 1 kitchen, hall, and a small room „ _> .fw washing. Pipes 'or water wfH E2SS. L A !" SiniD? IK "ft" wl "• ptaMd "' %  %  %  Wood BaduPn I (ThcoreUol) P 0 1 CtlOM. Mr Corbin bil now The D rcctor o( Me) | lc ,| j,,. S"2 1 *n P,m nd " " ""'' "<" •" th. model ,h„w.-l Wood BndJ. „„, ,,,.„. wou d ^ f0||d p | acl| B .. %  **''> %  ,f v.nlilation and mltaUon Membersi or the Exwullv.• ComThr aNCUtlvt mflDMr of in. mittee of Ih. Island Stout council Department of Highways and artreminded of the iiuMlng Tramport hu. .iiunlol' that 1 ptac. at Seoul Hradquyr(ool (£„,,. ,„ ' r „, „„ ,„.. S•^r.^ ro w _.' v .'2: n 5•-..?? ,d • B,in.id . t„ P .now people to cross the water which prevent N 4th DIWIHUT, at 3.00 o'clock. Investigating Airfields easy passage after heavy rain. The Secretary of the Board told members that he had discussed the matter with the execitive engineer after Mr. Becklca had brought up the question of water flooding that area Ways and means of getting th* adequate drainage in other hous,lso being discussed AS THE proposals fgptraUon of the Sealand service | nK areas L In the Windward Islands have and ^cpe will be taken to Imbeen abandoned, it Is again nece. e h#m -f Mr ftg po.,,^ sat* to Investigate h P^'""* It was decided to accept tho Commander 1, A. Egglesfield."' Highways and Transport In Director General of Civil Aviation connection with roads running on for the Caribbean area told the Heckles Road. The Director had Advocate yesterday. recommended that the entrance on He has just returned from a Beckles Road from two of th? visit to Granada sfban he met minor roads, be abandoned in at the llrni of Sir order to avoid cross roads The Alexander Gibb, Aerodrome Conentrance* will be still available to %  Vltasssfc pedestrians as a footpath will bo Col. Uerrylees who has como provided Traffic will come out on out from England to advise on another road. SnhSml,"^^ mSesU%.tini h the Sixty-six houses will be painted pbiUu'e" VriCSSS 1 "Snore •] £••£ %  Road The Secretary Ke will ba loliwd by Commander of the Board was nstmcted to Ettlesfleld on Tuesday. They write to Government nccordingl f. KjO oit to St. Vincent to Those tenants who are capable ot see what can be done there, more undertaking the work will be particularly as the recent heavy allowed to do so under the superrains have seriously damaged vision of a foreman The Board Diamond airfield. „1J 0 considered the question of Wing Commander Kgglerteld ^^.^ *e terms of the present who mi on leave In England with hire-purchase %  £>* his family, came out via Jamaica The draft estimate* of capital at the beginning of November, expenditure for the >enr % %  "l-aa There, b> arrangement, he met was decided On by the Board ini an airfield expert from the Minincluded the removal of zoo Utry of Civil Aviation and they houses to the Bay and Pine JS examined the possibility of ImWP n. as the erection of 30 new prpvniK PaUaaaOM airport,^ or hoiM*, Motor Cyclist Injured POKTY-TWCI-VEAR-OLO EUtoi *• Downos. an enguievt al Blades Hill. Si I right leg when he fell from motor c>cle P-87 while riding along Two Mile Hill yesterday morning. He was taken to the General Hospital and detained Dennis Alleyne. (II), who was travelling on the pillion, was treated at the Hospital lor injuries and discharged It la understood that the wet ioad caused the cycle to skid. A BU of unknown origin broke out at Pool Plantation'. St John on Friday night and destroyed 50 holes of first crop ripe canes which are insured The canes belong to the Trustees of the estate of the late W H Trolloppe. R ICHARD BAILEY of thv Mounted Banch of the Trinidad Police Force, arrived in the island during the week to spend about six week*' holiday. He u accompanied by his wife aiKi three children They are %  trying with relatives „t Black Rock PC. Bailey U a Barbadian who enlisted in the Trinidad Police Force in 1942 J OSEPH CLARKE WM awarded First Prize at the Local Tal.-i.' Show at the Globe on Frldai pi? 1 -" H< Mn " CnuUmoo > Boy" Second Prize went to Cheston Holder who sang "Santa re" The Guest Star of the night was Malcolm Murray and he sang "Blue Moon" -TMIE ST SIMON'S MIXED SCHOOL held their "Open Day" on Thursday. Mr Aubrey Douglas-Smith distributed the prizea. During the afternoon OH I performed in a play entitled "The Black School Master" Mr Douglas-Smith addressed the gathering of guardians and ixrents. Mr C G Smith. Headmaster. m a short speech appealed to pareota for their eo-operatlon with the staff In training their children Mr. C F Broome moved | vote of thanks Rev K D Grannum orealded alfi'inatelv finding another site. .,_ o au ]der Chase was granted Their report Is now ^'"R vaCant bachelor's quarters nt th" examined by the Government of Y, ac n **" Jamalei Pine. OPINION NEW YORK Commander Egglcslicld said that Barbados can count itself luckv In having such an excellent with the completion of the work making the state the caretaker on the new runway, it i s going of our lives, by that much we move to be u vary Una loo when it is towards making the state our finished. master"—General Eisenhower. More Flour Arrives The Alcua steam-hip "Alcoa Pegasus" landed 1.155 flour Iroru Halifax here yesterday She also dlsohargew Subject to < Wl^"" Kadstead KUdwi 1 lank Stn-: 1 Lin* gyi Miss Pann Nan Tudor Ntitonite %  1 iteajka St Morltz Sailors Fun n 1 Start! Nlal; i bati in 1 War Quagfl Dl Bow Bells Wellington r. icas H Comet Keiidal Fort Mary Ann S,intone n Best \V Bow mansion CoUeton Cross ltoad> Dulclbella Join) O 0 Lazy Bones PI Apollo April r Black Shad, w Bonnie Lan. Bullseye Clementina Consternation Cross Bow Dunese Epicure Facetious First Flight F!*iie Flower loSjtOIrl Hi-Lo Mu- 1.Mountbatten M— IMaBOSBlB Perseverance Pha 11 Rivet Mist Sinbad Siren 9 %  Sunbeam Sun Fire i-he EaBta Oahar Vanguard WnterlK'll Ol. s Folly i'I.sTl"i.., i: :.. Bttv Qraai liylni Ann HfffiihTi Starlet %  Vlntlanl Vixen M BUM Diamond Brmhmln'i Choice Chlndit Diana Fronl HpofMi Gallant Hawk Joan's Star Luckv Shot Manu Mayuroa Mom Silk Plant Sun Jewel Valeaka Wilmar lp paMtMuag li4|oM %  poiooou prat I H gaj taw lUn and BOTTIJI TODAT T. N. PEIRCE I. I It Qll i i. I) 11VNOK angc in the event ol any horse taking part In the Barbados Sprim Meeting 1H51. FIRST AIDc MACLEANS -mi D-IUD* TOOTH PASTE keeps TOiMPon wma^is and healthy Cold Discomforts / Alia Siltin bniis ilusiit rillil Alka-Seltier*s unique formula brings quick relief from the feverish "ach'-all-over" feeling and discomfort* I u cold. One or two tableta In a glais of water make a refraahlng, plensant-tasting solution. Take it aa Fust Aid. Keep a package on hand alwa w Not a laxative. For white teeth. ON the PBROXIDB tooth paste—use Maclean* everJjy. Alka-Seltzer MICHELIN the supple tyre of quality n,.i,.t,.i,„,,Dear's Cir.igr Ltd. 127 Roebuck Street. Bridgetown DFrescriDlion •*> -trrrrr.".;.'.'.,-i\'. .vTInw^! ."JKCIKG A PIN UL.IWI.W Iff &6>.C ELECTRIC m .1 .•! i==ini.dj %  tba GJ1C Pttoc u co niielv made that it I .. scaled alter manuind never needs Neman,-. Thii :t:n *.' >r will stand up to anv extreme of clinutc — ana it's %  -i, too I Solid chromiuirv-plstW hand Is Incorponitng cononlsd lock £ THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD. BRIDGETOWN. BARBADOS UnttlENrlNC THf CIHCAAL EUCTWC CO. ITO.. W INOAM0 BY B.O.A.C. CONSTELLATION IN CONJUNCTION WITH B.W.IA Krgulut Spci'tllurd Hervirp to fifty one Countries oe all sis 'ULIIMI.'I raeans tliat rew Journeys arc tee far, ared mk-> too loag. OBT THBBB BOONEK From Barbados to i rViaaj Til No lips or ultras l>" cowfi.rt that reflpeu B.O.A.C's 31-yeaf all tradition of ripetdbird nar vice aad eiperieaf*. ITfcY LONi:k Kiagston by II.W.I A. Flights I Brtnrn Farr WMkly j Also Bagalar ipeadblrd Sarricas P> Enroaa sad loath Asnarics BO.AC TAKFS GOOD C4KI OF YOV Book through your local BOA C Appointed Agent who makta no charge lor advice. Information or bookingt by "SpeedWrd" to all sir contin.-nti. FLY-BO AC BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIMITED %  ndcMvvv SEA VIEW GUEST HOUSE HASTINGS. BARBADOS EXCELLENT CUI8INE FULLY STOCKED BAR I HATES15.00 per Day upwards (lnolnslvel Apply— Mrs. W S. HOWEIJ. Our scientist* protest thai this is a slanderous mitrcpreaentattoo of a serious lest lo safeguard (he Anti-Knock qualities of REG I-NT. Whai really happens is that regular testa are made in a special engine, the compreuum of which can be progressively increoNcd until the fuel u, made lo knock. A "Bouncing Pin" renting on a diaphragm in the cylinder head measures Ibe intensity of Knock electrically, thereby enabling us to determine and control the Anti-Knock qualities of (he sample. I ln> is only one of many tests which safeguard the quality and performance of REGENT petrol. REGENT PETROL a aT%aalBiaraj I sterling Qlit, Through all the Rush of Christmas Remember to keep well with FE1ROL THK JOYS OF CHRISTMAS will all be ipoUed for you if you fall ill at thin season. Most ptopLfl have lo undergo extra physical and mental strain at this time of the year, and need the help of a really good tonic to keep fit and keep going. FERKOL. is excelk-ui lor tins kind of strain, and will help you keep lit and smiling right through all the extra work that the holiday season entails. Take a course of six bottles of FERKOL and make sure that you will enjoy a really Merry Christmas I his year. Rernemfaer there If no finer gift In give yourself than the gift of good health. co. a •. %  ... wra FERROL llll UOIII It s HI SI IOMl STOKES & BYNOE. LTD.—Ajenl.



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PAGE mo 4QCATIC CLWPJ II.MMA |"1 inlirt TO-NIUIIT TO Tl KSDAV MfillT .1 It %  ttori. i ii mm i A.XIEKA Starring Bette DAVISDane CLARK—Joan CRAWFORDIna LtTfNO—Johfi OARFIEl.n -Paul HKNREID and man* other well known MM* A Warner Bro* Picture PLAZA Theatre-sft/DGf TOWN PI IUT TO MORROW 4.45 A R.lfl • in IMfn N'w Km*** llll %  JMn < ItWVFOKI) II lltH|M,0 MlAU" with Zaehar> • sidnr\ (.reenatreel. OtiM Brain TLBS.. WED THI-KN. 4 45 and I JO P m IHrMt'i Arttmi Hll J*l MeCREA in "C4JLORA1MI TEKRITOKT Special Mallnrr Thursday :th 2 p,m. Hevnaldo .. Cisco Kid n "(JAY CAVALIER" mi "jimrm Wakelj .n "TRAIL TO MEXICO" PLAZA Theatre — QISTIN TO-DAY TO-MORROW—I 8.38 p.m. I Monocram Double) Duncan Reynaldo in -CISCO KID RETCRNS" and Johnny Mack BROWN m PARTNERS OK THE TRAIL" Tuesday and Wre.ne.day 5 A 8.30 p.m. I Monogram Double) Gilbert Roland at Cisco Kid in Jimmy WAKELY in "GAY CAVALIER" "HUNG OE THE SIERRAS" GAIETY iTbe Garden) ST. JAMES **t*0-DAV 4> TO-MORROW 8.38 p.m. MAT. Sun 5pm Leo GORCEY in "HARD liulnn MAIlliMV • and Johnny Mark BROWN in "PRAIRIE EXPRESS" A MONOGRAM Double TKHRDAY WRUNRHDAY "31 p.m. (Manegrao. Doable) Warren Douglas in Jimmy WAKELY in "INCIDEITT" & "SONG OE THE DKlrTEH H IS EXCELLENCY THE GOVH accompanied l. his >r Deni, Tataa. teaakxi tin Annual Dinner -if the i hand-, i : ominer.v last nisht %  I the Maim.Hotel. Among thotter pest, present were Sir Allan ruiiyinore. Chief Justice. Mr. RoU*rl N Turner. Colon.nl Secretary. Mr Henry Seafcni PreaJdent of the B(i. Chamber of OaYaWatre*, Sir John Saint. M> E. J. Peirie. Financial Secretar.. Capt. G. J Bryan. Mr. ESS Ilurrowcs, labour Commissioner. Wing t'omdr. L. A Egglesriel'l, Direeloi Oeneral of Civil Aviation in in* Caribbean. Mr Sannbury. Acting Controller ..f Customs. Mr Kcnnelh n.rliiiK. Acting Director General of Telecommunications (Aeronauticalj rilibesn. Major C. Clinton Reed. Dlreetor of Education. :..l R T Michi-iin. Commissioner of Police. Mr A V Nvren, Ameri...n Consul, Mr H N. Armstrong, Colonial Pust master, Mr. Dick Leacork Jr. President of the Chamber of Commerce, Mr. G. H Ring. Jnr Vice-President and other members of the Chamber f Commerce. asa B^_' Y ADVOCATE .1AIIAT DECEMBER 3. 1950 } wub QaUinq TV Man Who Came To Dinner A S WILL Bl ten front the advertisement n ppajjt i < > k elsewhere In ihsi issue, UM boxing office far seas ot seats fjr The MAN WHO CAME TO RfNNEl: opens next Friday at thr Emr-ii' lindsctow n Planers have, in Oic last eight years, built up A re* tation for themaelves, and Ctuv need hardly state that /Miu Ihear IstHi production uffl-r the direction of W Tharold Barne and Frank A Collymore. no painrave been spared to make It equal m entertainm-nt value to kattr previous supasjiiaa. ASTHMA Mucus Loosened First Day I "TI I la I couftilnr. mtfiiri. rhos ln .lla^ka of Brum-t.lt. %  or Aar'ini. ruin your .l.-p and •Bargy anoihar ilar or nlghl without trying 14X14UACO. Thla pal maaleinOa not • iroka, intoetloa *r aa>n>-. bul work. ... i Immadiataly I ways: 1 Help, louaan and fa" %  Ihlrh • %  ranallnr aurai. I. Tt.ua (jrtTi %  %  -a fraar Waa l al a g ang auur.4ar. i or* t -f r -l'"t alaap 1. II.!"• SOarl %  " %  rouablng. whtni. aaaaslng yule* • %  tlaractton or rnwaa* • %  %  narantaaS. Oat htRNDACO fron. •*mti loday. The leading parts of Sheridan Whiteslds and i is secretary Magsir Cutler are played by Frank Collymore and Greta Bancroft, and they are supported by a cast of over thirty including a few old*tagem as well as many newconuTs •o the local stage. Eleanor Hewittyrtng. Peggy Smith, ^fclchac. rimson. Idrts Mill% Pega; y WtKi. Oruce HamUton. Dick Vldmer. William BerUla Wendy Innuw, cami idge, Margot 1-ifT m. Daphne Stehelin. Ji Sheila Ince. Maude Skinner, Bin" Stehelin, and others among whom are six young members of the Combermrro School Olee t%ub And, most appropriati-l, Second and Third Acts of the plai take place on Christmas Eve nn.t Christmas Day Successful Show M RS JOYCE STUARTS repeat %  A ol het RwVibrtitVllle the Empire Theatre .i Friday night, WM „ romplet" f.ii js palvN %  m.mie was concerned, aiihougn the audience could hswe been %  bRkfaf one. The muMi.iir, wrrHRfi ..H>Utd %  %  fwhtelg by which Mrs Stuart gavt an apt opportunity to the pupils of her dancing class to give a first cla-U display of modern stage dancinjt. Thtre WM s joie aV eii-re %  menf Die entire cast as thev went 'hrougl, the difficult stcos of the tango, the wartx and tnc rhumbs that spoke of a confidence that hat no doubt come with th-experience of three previous showings. Mrs. Stuart again led the waltz herself in elegant style, but both the tango and rhumba were executed with such good grace and timing that no individual can be singled out for specljl prMa*, Jnseph Tudor's clowning trpj again the !**ece a> reataaince or the show and was responsible in large measure for keeping th audienre in a happy frame ol mind and In a kindly and receptive mood for the entire show The addition of a Christina'. Scene that gsve Fit/ llarrwt>o 1 the chance to sing "Silent Night" and "White Christmas" in his flm voice was a welcome addition Id the first showing *k$/tiufe SEE the new fashions in watches! Why not buy your Christmas gift walrh new and saee money f special values in the Hatch Fashion Parade Include many excellent Snlaa and domestic movements. A nniiMM it The CHINA DOLL RESTAURANT 8. M.nhill Klri-rt OPEN TO-NITF. IM P.M. — 12 MIDNITF. SW PaHMJl the li.in. lire lo-nlle nnd Dint' on i' .il ( linns* I-. OOMt IN AND IE! rum V/t .ho* only m very few of a MHevlloBal vstaeo on i-plo> tt enr store If y M wmsl cooo naleh priMd from JB.r.e MO. we losteof The Jewel Box of BARBADOS For the Gflt you give wdh pride Ui ALFONSO'S be your Guide ALFONSO B. DE LIMA & CO. Comer ol 6r iod Mc Gragof Streets i >ii>nti: TO-IIAV 4 45 A 84.. Monday 4.4ft a 8.3 i> m .1,1 CanlintalM. 20th C.-Fox presents . -WHERE THE SIDEWALK ENDS" Starring Dtno ANDREWS and Gene TIFRNFV with Gary MERRILL •. ___^__ Be" FREED HOW ""' Last Tea Rkowa TODAY 4.3S 4k • 15 p.m. Republic Bip Double . Allan "Rocky" LANE & Eddy WALLER 'BANDIT KING OF TEXAS" AND "POST OFFICE INVESTIGATOR" with Warren DOUGLAS and Audrey LONG ROYAL UM Two Shows TODAY 4.30 8.1ft p.sn Columbia Dig Double . Jerome COITETLAND At Ruth WARRICK In MARE BELIEVE BALLROOM AND • BANDIT OF ELDORADO" Charles STARRETT & Smiley BURNETTB OLYMPIC TODAY 4.30 A 8 10 p.m. Monday—Laal Two fthows 4.30 A 8.1ft p.m Columbia Smashing Double Joyce REYNOLD A Ross FORD in "GIRLS SCHOOL" • Tl RANT OF THE SEA' with WILLIAMS and RANDEI.I. The repeat ll real sKfi by MrStuart : % %  pan of i .ment i i H.ii t'.i % %  Canadian Army Retired L T COI. EMMA i'K adisst Arm* letuxl. arfftvi from Can*i.i yesl rda) mornin i Miss Pat Tuckctt Berc W taV v/lnu-t OMJ are staying st the Marine Hotel Thc\ ffsH tn Barbados once before, after the second World War To Be With Her M RS. EVELYN It A wife of Mr M L. Harrison of Fontabelle left yesterday foi Trinidad, to connect with T C. A flight to Canada. Their daughfi who is at Carlson University in Ottawa has taken suddenly ill and she has gone up to be with her Larry's Back M R LARRY VAN Hi California who was in Barbados a little over a %  arrived yesterday front Tnntdar "r %  • *•*' /uUanstt from thv : ... %  Panama. Larry who Is an interior decorator by profession has %  wine circle of fiieiids in Barbados an %  i* very popular among thfOSaaflBI set, who freriuent the Aquatk Club. Mr Van Dusen hopes to spene the entire winter here snd Is staying i.i Sam Lord'.* Back ID Venezuela M R. ENRIQUE (Henry PEREZ, who h„% been in Harbados since February left yesterday morning for Venezuela This was Henry's second visit hen In the* past two years During tlm' time he has learnt English fluent! and has made a great number or friends in Barbados. A keen Watii Polo player, he was goalkeeper for Barracuda* this year. Several of his team mates were st Seawcll yestcrda.. to see him off. i At a farewell party given for him by his friends on Friday night, he was presented with a gift, a travelling ^et with his iniUals engraved M it. Henr> will start work with an oil company soon after he gets home and next w-.ir he has alreadv planned a visit to Barbados. P.M.O. St. John Returns fvjt and Mrs, I B Carter of I J John, returned fi n finani nnng by air. The majority of the: •pent in Montreal. Canada Mrs Cart.!'home and then I are at present living u,> Dt c %  i n DwtwtwJ Returned Yesterday IB HASKCLL %  _.W I A Back From Short Visit M R. MAURICE JONES. Manager of the Globe Theatre A ho wss m Trinidad for three i:iV5. ret.. B w I A T.C.A. Station Manager M il HILL" STUART, T.C.A 1 DB-ttM Manager here, returned from Canada yesterday morning by air. Mr S' Uiirbjidos at the end of Septeml*r. M .tad To Live in Brooklyn ISS K. E CODHINGTON who left Barbados yesterday Ingby B W.I A for the US. \1 via San Juan Brooklyn Mi ; MIIIM i \ I.VANS bark lo Vcner NOTICE Our Customers and friends are asked to take note that — — i in; con\i: II STORE Trafalgar Street MA* .MAG'S SALES DEPARTMENT AND I I 14 IIIIC \l WORKSHOP will be closed for Breakfast from 12 noon to I p.m. Daily GLOBE TO-MTE 8.30 O'CLOCK — LAST SHOWING George BRENT Marta rOREN Shorts : TOMMY DORSEY'S ORCHESTRA Mr. i Mill,i i PEREZ ^ —le/l for Venezuela yesterday Holiday Over A FTER two and a half months' holiday in Barbados. Miss Morels Ev;tn, d.iughter "f Mr and Mrs John Evans of Caracas returned lo Venezuela morning by B W.I A. H .staying with her sMU Mrs. Robinson in Worthing. Mr. and Mrs. Evans have many friends in Barbados. Wat Here Two Years Ago M R AND MRS. GEORGE B. SOMEltS BrriVOd from Canada yesterday by ulr accompanied by their young son Ouy. %  here for the Winter and 8 'if the flats at the Camp, S Lawrence. Mr. Somors who is an Importer and distributor in Toronto was la Barbados two years ago. On Month's Vacation M R. AND MRS. Mervyn Marshall arrived from T1....1 yesterday morning by R.W l A accompanied by their two sons Michael and Phillip. They plan to spend a month tn Barbados, staying at the Worthing Guest House. FLASH! FLASH: YES ITS FLASH GORDON (A Scri.'il with Busier Crabbr) IM Par! To-morrow and Tuesday. 3.0(1 It 8.3 p.m. 2nd Part Wednesday nnd Thursday, 5(H) & K.:t(l p.m. LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE! Sr AUDITION TO-DAY, SJu A.M. MAKE YOUR COOKING A PLEASURE F4LKK KEROSENE COOKER—I. 8.1*4 Burner Madel nVENt <4ingle and IKi.hlr I \HhHN HOVER COAL STOVK Nat . 1 and 8 FOR mil RtKlM, you will need . MIXINfl BOWLS. Pt'DDING PANS MTASIRING Cl-rs AND SPOONS ROLLING PINS. CAKK STANDS II l\<. SETS with Imdnirllonj. RAKING AND PASTR1 PANS C\KF BOXFS. BREAK BINS %  BE" \o Parhinc Problem when you Sliop with (Ml BY THE WAY — 8y Beochco^, T HERE is reason to believe gentlemen (a silly euphemism!, that the speed of light h,,again been rniscalculatotL Wnal iflronU'ry' That is what comes of ignoring the fundamental physical content of atmospheric ^nutations The new figure. 188.432 miles per second, will considerably modify the calculation's of Dr Strabismus (Whom Ood Preaervw) of Utrecht, who Is planning a fourth attempt to reach I the moon. He hat constructed a nroto-nylon rocket, incorporating I .< new hcavicr-than-nah compo[ nent called dltritr.nl-oxuol-gyloxene. This vaporous coagulate is 1 three times as non-resistant as | nornohte. and is the only known refulgent with a hypcrmorphat. Inrlion jit unknown altitudes. The rocket is complete except for the noz7lc. and Waggling Parva is cordoned off from the world Only Russian 10108 are allowed to Uilter in the neighbourhood To Ihv moon ami Imrk! T HIS time the sagal will make the idtenipt alone, former experlencea ha%'lng persuaded him that ,1 laaai ,,f ,-xperts in the roeltet Is about :is much help as a herd of hornets in a telephone booth. The nylon rocket Is built on the boomerang principle, and the Doctor hopes to fly across the moon diagona.lv. and back again to earth in live days. He will not attempt to land on the moon this tune Asked what he thoiifiht (if the tbtory that anyone riving as fast as light to the moon would got back to earth iio.oon vrnrs before he had left it, Strabismus -aid: Th.it v..,uld mean that I had reached the moon 50.000 vears before getting there Tin:o tlme-sniiee-eontinuum -lags would -anot each other out." Mr ERNEST WauULAM Goif Pro. V|R EIuVEST WAKELAM and A*A j,is --.on Allan UTtVwd Iro Canada by air yesterday asjornini Mr. Wakelam whose home h Ottawa will act as Proftasiotul .. %  the Roi-kle> Golf Club during U* winter monlhs. His son who 1 New Year's Night T HE DINNER of UM Lays Brothan of the Stars takeplace this year as usual at Miller Bros in Tudor Street on New TwasTa Night. Here Again M R & MRS. T. Arihur-Smlln Of Maryland U.S.A.. who have been coming to Barbados for sev%  for the winter arrive'. by T. C. A.'s B.W.I. A Charier flight from Trinidad 111translt from Canada where thev made their connections. Thev are staying at Stafford House. Special Event •IpHIS YEAR Is the Centenary 'he Barbados Industrial i-xhibilioii To mark the occasio\ the exhibition will be running %  new feature on the first night Wednesday December 8th. Then"ill Ufree non-stop dancing on two or the lawns in the middle of Queen's Park from 6 p.m to |0 p.m. Percy Green's and Clevie Giltem' orchestras will alternate with the music For Barbados Holiday M ISS DOREEN CLARKE daughter 1* Mr. nnd Mrs. Georgo Clark of Easy Hall St Joseph, arrived from the US Via Canada yesterday morning by SJi to spend five weeks* holiday wltn her parents. Miss Clarke who now lives ir Cleveland, was last seen In Barbados two years ago. Her goo-i trim.I Miss Ethel Lest.-r camHuwit with her to upend thre weeks' holiday here. Staying With His Son M R. CARL COZIER. Managei of Wood ford Lodge Estate arrived from Trinidad yesterdav morning) by B.W.IA. Here lor three weeks he is slaying wi'i his son and daughter-in-law. Mr ^nd Mrs. Lionel Cozier of Worthing. Two other members of his family, his daughter June and sou Winston, are also living here. Repeat Show C AKIB has heard that In response to several ri.-o.uest* Jud,Graham's Caribbean Revelry will stage :i repeat performance of "The Beet Iclxtt tm Affair" on Wedn4*day, December 20. at the Globe Theatre They are also planning to Introduce some new features Water Polo Manager Returns M R. JOE PLIMMER. Manager of th..* Trinidad Water Polo teams which toured Barbados las; weak 1 and, returned to Trinidad l\ IIW.I.A yesterday afternoon Leaving To-morrow M R AND MRS. Maurice N Smith and family wh.: are spending a short holiday in Barbados staying with Mr. LucieSmilh's hrrlher. are due to return Mad tomorrow afte MIWIM. A CO.. LTD. ri.rl...-d TIIK HARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LTD. HARDWARE DEPARTMENT — Trlepho LADIES' CANADIAN SHOES 623 7" While, Hack Gold. Silver, Giean, Gray, J NtW FO* (HE FAIR Nulons CLARKE'S SHOES nil INFANTS, CH/LDS S(7C9 Red . white v Brown ALL SHADI.S 8j-in" |60, J.67, \B mP Ladies CANADIAN STYLE HATS 56O Your tboa Stores for "ARCOLA MANSFIELD & LILLEY& SKINNER drew shoes ( EVANS and WHITFIELDS 1





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PAGE TEN -1 \f<\V ADVOCATE SUNDAY DECEMBER 1 1IW News From Britain Hugh Spring*'r Talks Uf BtfWH Jamaica Cannot Send Volunteer II %% in TEMPI.*: IMIIII HIS Education System force For U.N. IX>NDON. 24th Nov. (leneral MacArthur's military oWemiv.m Korea IIH JuM begun; and th, British diplomatic often* %  Y* to make peace in Korea has Just l.-umi This is probably a \ The noble Lprd who Is the grandson of a great Foreign Secretary. is a man of experience and strong views who cannot be accused of weakness. He resigned, for inittoce, ith Anthony Eden, in protest against efforts to make a humiliating -treiity with MuwoUni in 1938 Te-da> there is a strong current of distrust in Britain. In Korea there is distrust of Synghnran Rhec. and or General Mac Arthur's support of him. The reports of South Korean barbarities against their prisoners, whirl; were printed In the Times, received Immense publicity through th* dismissal of a magazine editor who wanted to publish an illustrated report. This morning General MacArthur's intention to finish the war by Christmas was published an Hews, without comment. Tin* as that would be, there is a sens* her* that the General would like to forestall the United Nations which la, technically, his master. Meanwhile peace rumours are circulating among diplomats of all nations. Indians, as usual, are to the fore since they are the only nation with direct links to Peking. Th* war In the Far East has expended Itself. If It ends with any settlement, and without embroiling the Chines,any further the Government here will feel salislled that Russia will not try any more military adventures in the Far East, using their client governments But the distrust continue*— whilo there are doubt* about where the Chinese will move. George Bernard ShamSo they have scattered the ashes of Bernard Shaw at Ayot. St I-awrence. his home. He suggested this should be done, but left it open to Westminster Abbey so claim hut remains. The Public Trustee turned to ecclesiastical authorities, who were worried at the blunt clause In Bernard Shaw'* wlQ. He wrote. "I desire that no public monument or work of art or inscription or sermon or ritual service commemorating me shall suggest that I accepted the tenet* paouUar to any Established Churcn Of denomination, nor that the i in POCKET CARTOuN t>l (i Ml KJ LAM AMI K hug cooi from (ftI i and it ar cant ran oaf MM •tattonf us? cam project ><> [ wood* 'or eiw*t M* • e< reiTf Dfoducr mart aootl 1 *o> I Tporf v ean't makr (aittf •on MI 'IVB coai •rom thr 1/ v closely the clerical mind to font. llll. Ul) OF THE WEEK ut 'he lau from Borslal —a C*R*C*4v* home for juvenile delinquents—who escaped at night %  light aircraft. Ha had never learnt to fly but got all his knon ledae out of books. It worked Apparently he landed twice, quite safely, before putting down near Bordeaux. He is now to be inought back to England where there will probably be not too severe punishment waiting him He la reported to have itaM th*>i now he auppoees he will have n > I the R.A.l".—but il like good material COALS BEING IMPORTED to Newcastle are a bitter reflection on planning It seems the Ministry of Fuel ami Power Is an Ill-fated coal scuttle of good intentions. Mi. Philip Voel-Uakei who now graci thai department with his present! used to be picked as Labour's f., I iemn Secretory. H* trie I his hand at tinF-.reign OflW %  under Bavin Hut Ernie could not .stand him It is said and sine* than I.. \,.,anuwttred by way of In* Air Ministry and I'unin. RHaUona downward, tin Transport Ministry, to Ihe Mlnistr/ of Fin I and IWei Still dogged With ill-In. k he now has to face the odium of a fuel i-rlsis 1/ a crui I February comes Britain, whim Bevan once described ns a lump of t-oo.1 in a see full of flbb. U partlculaily appalled by ihe proepetof doing without coal, while we are exporters to all the world. Watching, from the gallery, the well-meaning Minister wriggle un der taunts from his political opponents. I remembered It all once before. Then Shinwell was the i lined Minister of the deep coal February. 194?. He wa ..K'-d from Fuel to the War Offlc* it was the foundation at his career. Now he stands high In esteem—the Minister of Defence. At that rate Philip Noel Baker mav get back to the Cabinet vet! -— o.. On i.tif.(.M>ili KINGSTON. J'ca. Nov. 2:. The education le.do ar*g the subject of an ad dies* D> Mr. Hugti Springer. MA of the Unleer lege of the Wet Indies, t i Uie St Andrew's Teat her-' AanOcMtton a week ago Mr Springer, who dealt In •stall v.Mh the educational system ui Rurbados said, among other things, thnt the sister i much In advance of Jan education in that there era diitn.t in Uie colony dual well served by schools Because |1 the HI noral awareneeducation, he said, mere was no necessity for compulsory education He said, howr v*r, mat Ir, ihe matter of teachers' training, Bur\ i. •j,, first I'I.L.I-.into I'INIIIIII not i %  rhM t %  years ngc Prior t" UMM uachers lutiuo i onnoctcd a ilh ( Collegin a sort if | lUrtu i!,iaW hv II baoog there WSJ f malt 'i Ben* i lit f*rti l< \, in Jamaica and BttTlbutl the fact that Hi Phood had not yet m uuired n %  has in Ihi I B.G. Workers Get 5% Co6t-of-Liviiig Increase lIWi DIB Own CTHSO>S(MI ' '— O* Ova arM|MtMli GfcORGETOWN. B.G., Nov. 28 KINGSTON. J'u. Nov. 27. The B.G. Sugar Producers' The fafiuuea Government does Association has announced a 5 not comider that it could properly P?r cent, increase on the cost. l...:.. t r n. .-f-iivmar kaMBl Mid M sassn PMic* for the United Na*f tojll workers in field and lions. Rceantly the Jamaica Chamber of Commerce, ltd., forwarded a raa*jB*tfon to the Government ..'king BHSMUtt** Council to give s. rioaa fonidcration to the reituitment of 1.0W volunteers in lama,, to be placed at Ihe disposal of the United Nations In i-pl> ih. Secretariat ha* formed the Chamber that factory. This increase brings the cost-ofliving bonus to 45 per cent. The decision to grant the increase followed a meeting between epresentauvea of the Sugar Proiiueers' Association, the Manpower Citizens* Association and th* Workers' League at the Department of Labour But Workers Ask For More Despite this announcement Government Hid n< 1 consider that conference of Estate* Joint Conith* offer of volunteers to the !" **** BepreientaUves and thiUnit Nations on the conditions M.P C.V Dlatrlct Secretaries sugg, -ed bv the Chamber was one ^ on Monday voted in aupport .uld -properlv Umade by ^^gbSg* !" -— K^St properlv Oovrrrmenl. • r Jumuica Wants War Risks Insurance Money form of a cross ox any other instrument of torture or symbol ol blood aacri'lcc." Westminster Abbey has, (or had), the status of a national ahrlne colebraUng the greatness of those buried under Its atones. But it seems that the Pub lie Trustee was put on* by ecclasi oftlcal opinion. He wnt*s "the fealtngs of Churchmen would be offended if ecclesiastical authorities made any move to ullow the burial of his agha* in any religious shrine Tins Is being regarded as all very surprising We did not think here, that places of Christian burial were closed to people because of their beliefs And Westminister Abbey has a special place. As on paper It puts M 'the sufferer .... la not Ihe great man but th* reputation of an institution The prestige of Westminster Abbey is certainly diminished. Shaw would chuckle to think how Charged With Bour Murders PORT-OF-SI'AIN, Nov. 2. Randolph Fraser on Tuesday appeared at the Sangre Gran-. Court on a preliminary twarmg on four charges of murder arising out of the recent VaJvneM shoot ing winch started a I ft-day police n i annum Magistrate C. II Markham remanded Fraser to December 8 Ki .%  i was later lakn. b) I pohce (;uard to Valencia forest %  here „ nun. reported mlsalnu luring the manhunt, was found .'ear the garden of one of the victimThe Run was hidden In lit* grass and %  *! with a Iwig %  ttached to the tliggci as n trup. About SO feet awa> -i numbei of arlrldges were found In thick rushes The Gaardian photographer narrowly escaped the gu:i rap when Fraser called out a antingCan. Preen. Jamaica Can Grov 60% Of Locally Used Kice KINGSTON, Jca. N On his return from his rh study visit of British Guiana i centlv the Hon I W A I' Minister for Agriculture. Lai i. and Commerce, said that with i proper approach to itie Industi.. Jamaica can produce sixtv psjrn i| of tltc local demand for rice Mr Ban ant, ace mpamed i y Mr W Ashman, vice-C'hairm n of the Jamaica Htce Growers' A-. Bociatlon. spent 10 days in the mainland colony, which he dscribed as "a wonderful country %  He described the people .>l British Guiana aa being ")uat like Bg" on the whole, t %  .\ added mat their political ioi • iciouanaal was so low that tla could be regarded as "political!} dead.'* The cmintrv. Ml Barrant said, abounds with Labour Union, •but suff-i acutely from lack of leadership EAST INDIAN HANGED BY FLOUR BAG PORT-OF-SPA:;. An East Indian. II y**| i aid father of six children was found hanging (rom a i labi tree by s neighbour at Windsi Park K-sUte. Trinidad. It wr reported that he sulli red from chronic diaease. A flour Da wa used for the i.inging ages increasefor worken It was hoped that the price of -ugar for export would be Increased sufficiently to make thi possible by January' 1 1951. Tin' Conference which wag, attended by 70 d*j* snat*g from 25 estate*, also decided that the Suar Producers' Association be approached about incorporating the >rn> u>r O.M i-.mts.aS**!! 5 cost-of-living nUoWame with talc wages of all worken,. and KINGSTON. Jca. Nov 27, that unskilled field workers !• The Jamaica Government is paid a minimum wage of |2t>ol irquest to the Secretarv per day. while skilled factory i Man for the Colonies with n workers be paid 30 cents per hour ; view to Jamaica's share ol the as a minimum. It was also decided War Risks Insurance Fund, that **• S.P.A. be asked to connmojiitinf to about $825,000 (W.I. i s,d f r "unchmg a provident scheme being made available to the. Inand a contributory pension achre. | dustiul Development Corporation which the Government content%  plates selling up for encouraging the expansion of industrial project. In the island. Active consideration is being given for the use of the money Tor the development of the Island, including the encouragement of ,•„, our Own cerra-powtano the establishment of Industrial PORT-Or -SPAIN. Nov 28 projects by means of which InWhen the Hon. Albert Gonvj*. rreastd employment would be Minister for Labour attended •Horded and the Improvt m*nt of the I lth Annual Conference ol two of me Island's many Mineral the Oilfield Workers' Trade Union Spring Baths at San Fernando, he told scort* of delegate! that "I am all for the type of Trade Unionism you are endeavouring to give the Colony." The Government's polu> in this regard, he added, will M lo give every encouragement tJ the type of sober, responsible. fORT-Or-SPAIN, Nov. M. %  "d roHtlc Labour organisation Timidad candidates taking v > "represent in this Colony." Ihe Cambridge School examlnaMr. Gomes was the principal tion in San Fernando, waited 15 %  P*k*r at this mammoth conB*"J %  latei in th* scheduled ference, nnd received rounds of time for the beginning nf the cheers from the audience* as ho examination yesterday. It is denounced "irresponsibility" and Itported that the wherenliouts jf "i*belllous actions by those who the .estion papers were unseek to destroy you." known by either the aui>crvlsors "The great tragedy", he said "of I i i ivers at the centres. Th" In* West Indies has always ben papr:s which were eventually rfo,h0 iac ' continuity of cffoi". hi i the police, did not rrnch or purpose in so many of th*1 the Education Depariineni, and things we undertake and it I dreamed I danced the Charleston in my Ji Gomes Praises OUfield Workers Trade Union SCHOOL CCRTIflCATt QUtsnoNs weite LOST "Dreaming backwards that's me-back to the torrid'20V Sam* skirt, same step... 6ul / have • I9S0 figure I It's lovely, liftod rounded lines for me... and matchless Maidenform fit sbapea m* up perfectly. Haven't you dreamed of i bra like this f" II p> u Mas • •*•" %  •* • More, roa'11 Want Malo'calorm bras.) gfeatsai Maideafona'a Maldnalte*. Ju OM ol a .4.1 coUertie*.* Ceaaiat Msiaenlonn braMiem ar made only in the United Stales el America Supolle. %  • lioutrd: taks Ua care) %  I TOUI favorite Matdealoraa bra. TV*r* to a C th\mdm Tim (or Every Type of Figur*; [ -k, v %  ro* C'urrmAiMltnl the .iii Fernando Ofnc. Thi h.is drawn gtrong criliclsm frot i.irious source*-. The mailer is being investigated by the Minister for Education, the Ho i Roy Jo**ph fact to be lamei.ted thai people in this country still believe mat only efforts that ar> spectacular are efforts worthy of our recognition and encouragement .Must fl*r*gr#e*l CARIBBEAN AGENCY-DISTRIBUTOR ^-W y -a0 I I m %  %  s %  %  8 u ; RENCI FERFUMES including:— My in. Scandal. Arplge. Belloqia, Null d Noi Flet io Rocaille, Tabu, Surrender, RaflextonB, houre I lue. Miizouka. etc.. etc. iJOLOG:,: S includinqi— 4711 Atkinsons. Marie Farina. :OI.ION Moi Houbigant. Crepe de Chine. Tabu, it Supreme. Amour Amour. HRESEN'• '\TION BOXES ol Soaps & Dusting Powder. Mor ,. Bronnley. Cussons. Yardleys. Elizabeth Ardtn s. G1FTSE. : Yardley. Elizabeth Arden, Max Factor. Panda. COMB > BRUSH SETS; PERFUME NOVELTIES: Soir le Porte. "EiHe! Tower," "Shoe", Goya's:— Croc! er. Gilt Cottrel, Michiel ir. "Top Hal". CALLING ALL CHRISTMAS SHOPPERS Decorated Tins ol ToMees. Attractive Boxes ol Chocolates, Marshmallows. Barley Sugar (From 40c -S2.04) (From 72c. — $4.00) PRESENTATIONS OF JACOB BISCUITS -eption. Family Assorted". Afternoon Tec Cream Crackers" PEEK FREAN:— Play ox. XMAS CRACKERS. THFRMOS FLASKS. LUNCHEON SETS, CAKE AND TABU DECORATIONS. KNIGHTS LTD. ALL 111* \\ III N PRESENTATION BOXES OF CIGARS. CIGARETTES. PIPES. CIGARETTE CASES. TOBACCO POUCHES. CIGARETTE LIGHTERS. WALLETS. SHAVING BRUSHES. RAZORS. FOUNTAIN PENS & PEN SETS. SHAVING BOWLS 6 YARDLEY SETS. $MgMlgfMgnYMfllJMffK^ I I



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PAGE TWMA'F. SUNDA1 ADVOCATE SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, ltS i\ew Dickens Serial BBC Radio Programmes Church Services HARBOUR \M In Carlisle Bay SUN BAT U .. i am TV I'liim. II Ttt y* BB< Radio Nolee: "Our .Mutual Kriattd" A radio adaptation of Dlcsei Mutual Friend 1 takes the place %  The Master of Ballantras' a* t current BBC aerial, and will run mi> H,> for tHvt successive weaks 'n it paa tja. M return1 Jg ^E^ *,,;" "," T^'IK^TH to his own world of comedy and rJn Horn* >*>•*. ran BrNMa * pas %  which had been lev. gag y iam k. n^iay.. vg£ evider-. -rkj "Our %  g"^ %  £? &. ia p.m iniilST Mutual Friend* naa been deaenh-'d iispm ^,1* v^H^^ !" w*~. .j^ — -g^gg; and mllurr and. In ion wtyr. Z/^TrHi*. > p~ ft !" TO. Ml*. I % .". h4. n*l nmhitiou.' In ll nil 8&C^.--> !" „**S".M !" luperb artistry prache. IU h.i;h < %£ : £Z?, m „ V-'N." i !" ir. !" in ajid the book contain* some of 1... -m carlbkMn Vow. la viThr bl .0...1 satire. The BBC ttt.al Kjl-i c^u. . „„^ Bjj,^ !" .. ad.pt.ti !" will h. bro.dca on H'-,•a&u*TB-I". T" Sanda: 1 M l m. and on Monna Martin and hi* M...I. %  p n *£ S MB P, -I whit* t r e S-ftJnfe M a r3, B S£ "fe it will also be en the an to l r pil JUrtfcina ... Daew m P> Weai Indies in the special rcglm *' r ,ruf D"*" K,v ,I0B %  "" service. Listener* .vhould note thai =" %  * %  on the HBC is IWW broaidcaatini lo soar ON the West India, on 48.43 saSSM, *^'"' • *"' w WBUX 6.199 megacycles from 600 p.n !" %  onwardnd if vou have b, %  -n MONAV %  f£" a f a I iaa. trouble,! with poor reception ie/XA^Hii 111 = U am I I BaiUHi. • a. 10 am %  'I %  Nights ..( 10 p in N.wa An.1 ; 11, N *-. y A r w. L r_ualarm M-mati.. tarn koaarena. I in. s. MaiyM %  M V L-ly Jo; %  ARKIVAI* U McCuilouah : \l llli> IIAIJ. • ;* %  1 %  I It.MuHlAL KoiXTOWN—t IV .. r*n. T i> m M> I BANK HALL >, ,"rv.. 11, ; • AHPage %  fchaoanf Mar? E Car." %  I S Bishop oaia. SaBS low nrt. Copt. M v C-ribtoaa lo* %  .* Hotbo Nr Analyit* T is ii t-ently thia frequency may %  * %  -loyal An rmir some Of your difficulties. '• J" >"JJ* : M.rr P.ul Temple ISeSTSi i.V Another BBC MTial of s diflerM ..it tspm wr t cnt nature alao I-KIIIIn the com_ .nit week. Thia la anolher l"ul ^* K Temple M. t r> which iu )u*t •* Haaaa us its predeceaaoni Vi Prt. usual Sir Gnthum Forbes of ScotJS 1 land V-rd nnd himself pusile I o^i, and has to say'Send for Paul Tcmaaapani pie.' In this new serial Paul Tern pie and his wife mova ugainat Imcktrround of London, Marlov on-ThMnes and Parts but v %  hant tell you any more about i The serial will l broadcast l 4.15 pm. on Thuradays and 6 30 p m on Saturdays, begn in? n the ?th and Blh Dectunbe a, n,. M Krv J p| WUI%  ^ M B Pratt,I. •' H,hl Lartf % % % %  IHE I'AKADIAN BANK 01 lOMMEBtl "" %  nit". IUra^*, BW.I %  ATSa Ol IklHAKCt < Mi:l-i i HI •(< ll Raw. K WM> MMECIM r. o i HI am 4 00 p-B.. Tti iMiir .wrviea at uv ha* Cholaa. at) p< ) i f W.U Auatrah.I I %  Uda. a. rJU K— f ta BtafaM H*n. %  •• Pi ,. , I .AH e"l N*i. *10 p"> LOMDUS Barua siaat TUI ATiTS a-itM i'Dajr VI! ri. ma p in Ttwri S.OO P TT, LH Nt l-H"SrmiinPi ntMaaaalBa. ••*,,,I,.I i in pm lr.li DiaaM 7 pjn Ti,. Hawa At,..:T WA1.TIS 1.1 llim i\ BOOM HAYIUtlJ S KOAI1 CM.. CTt. -. gltoh *-rvlc ji.l St r ntor. bt Ernr't D Mlr>. junior Praarhcr Evars I>OI1> •> i KB* uniUUtAN Hi'I'll Tt5 %  Mm 4.TI i.tna slink. s|.,.nr vs. Bacon Fu* just ovar a hundred yoa.s now books and pamphlet* have aought to prove that Bacon of dome other FJi?abeUian WTOta Shakespcatf Anybod>', it some limes seems, except Willi.. Shakespeare, wrv-te the works of Shakespeare. In reams and ream* of print, skilfully directed at tha heads of the Buco._.. come the refutations. Both MO. can seem very tiwivmclruL An enn. can seem very convincing. An hlrt tminenl American scholar. Dr. J^^^' Oil.I I)..., ii in a talk call, d "" Tne Caw for Shakespeare* (first broadcast in the BBC's Third Programmei: in the BBCs COS. in tot somiiij; week, strikes the r.ifiMr, Out na-* <•' l" Wok SJS | s.l.nrItovtaw. I*i pn B Cchaauw. JU V TI t-m. Tin Art*. I00D pm Tli*hr. ioi I I m VTOni Ihr Filltari.il" A LUTI. !"%  t % % %  >€T. llJSpm. p.>.iia-~.iT %  III Hrm) Win r ODonolMn -' BtiUlfri IAIIPPI wa* JFIUI horn *T JOHNS LLTIIETtAN HOIK Falitn'i" '-rt Itlark Rock Tnr-1.' at 119 pm Mr O Cl Hubl+,'1 r-m. U-t ua %  • %  , fflaj ." %  %  % %  Chaqirta aw HanHera s.Shl Thurnla. T IS < %  >!, I• .rin.r. .-„„p..„. rlilvar t/ltH. pr. Ifta TO 4,'IS* a*• pr •S 4/10% p SDw pt BAR THHEVn MILAN Salp Ihurvaa. netted L-MW lor night's wurk in VWfclOB The entered a bank, could not for. the safe. M 'hey manhandle-! to a waiting car. by SI SprlHn laaan I—atiW>. 0 pan I'-an i.. mini Christ lo Uir NaUAoa" (rum nilquartrra Tha Rnnri %  '. I. Hi D U.D.. I)" DlAM'lMl tS>lu>Stt iHariMt r-atival II M %  ill I., .in.i. Mr.llufl. 3B> i: Y P. Kai-k-aat Profran.ma, 1 M p Srnla. AM.' a—vic rnndiH^e-rl %  K* pr CAM ASA .,o, P.. ckjr---^^.^ I s Slgril Drafta M !! % %  ,.i Cabla pr Ckirfanry oi I 10Coupon* SO 4 to 1 "' f, '*'" INTra COLON 1AL Chrdun oat Bunker %  Drman* •> dtoe %  I MO PBKPAKAIIOSS Choose the Powder tliut imaile fr vou U///f/M/' h'i\ >•%/ V VVWVNA I (7/ +1 rl SKIS n | SKIN 0L1VS S1K IhaosM V %  • > fl. IK/< ( !ibw /: . sn* ShtU hgey 1 h-*. /.'>-. 1 MtNITtr Piach Hflaarv Oi-fa font* .fun To*. % %  wKm CrtamRoH Ktaarv P-a.h ft'.* Tan • hndi-rinenes\-( -l-i-B-g. Caw in dwn| p.iwdar u nrjal — your -n nsturai .Kkiuruu, and oi court* tha nualilt ol tha powder ilaalf auMbf nwJricJ With Number !mr U nanw Bom* suaranit.t par'^uoo. Tha toovt dlSfl " U"l< you lo TO-JI ea kaJindual ahade. Obisiaabk Iron, your j tirtniM or drug etorc WMaask. aa.ii* i < R Ham a iSaraaa>>> I %  1 POfa.. k i p' Dralta ItMa|< ;ind not very often heanl yj' brought recognition and Ml( controMTsv to Art'iui Blaal ulien It was Ural performed. It wns dedl' J catad to Sir Adnan Bouli who, v ,„ until he retired this year was U.isBeemjng.y endg-J^ ^ ^ w &$% Phllhininonic Orchestra conducteil by Sir Arthur Bliss on Tuesday in the BBC's British Concert Hall but It will lie on Ihi I 11 N p.m. and may be picked upon the lieams to North Aim-t. .1 it. r 1 direct onsa have cli>e >'.I'1-|<1IIT!*T)WN %  ma. top p. Scrvwr. Condnrlrd 1 fkr Caplan. routi m i OM 11 oa >. M. %  I.I ion p i Ompany Maaung. 7 uu P %  MAU 110-.. m Hollnata Mao .ft.. i. H-.--I MH*>. %  ara %  %  )-• • ta • V P Harve-.i pn WBI.WOTON ,,. II..I,-.. ITawhrr S. .VIAM cacaca BKBVICBS. SMaaaakM i. laaa n D C M~.f-HJr Cam. M. < %  Mr.." C.HACR IHI I I p in Mr. awua. HI.Ml i. 11 Barkar 1 Homooti • H1LI. • For relit jf// / AST 11 MA -one small tablet aits quickly and ejfiruvdy 'pHE Lphaauiic ucauneai l^r '. 'Ima U so iimpk, to quick, ehVctive | .-Vll J •wallow tat small tablet, and relief *tan> Jlnnii immcdialcly. Ephaaonc containi several hsssaOg agenta which arc released on reaching die saornadl .h.iolvc the gcrm-ladcn sccuniuUiiona which cungest %  be hrom.hi.il lubcH. %  -. 11 x baUntad preparation brings the boon of tmxf ,.--iiiuiK. and lias the addiuonal advantage of aasVfjMfdbtf dkt -,.r..i II the dnad of ihoae sudden ruivi-rackuig onsl-ughij. :>. ghakl to fear whim Hphaaoar ubkis are lo luist' i inievi. ivtihing lo iiiiial. I | I 1 in caws of AsL'una. ^roachitia and ssfai .. road %  ptj as • •' na. dosv for • < I r ou fOR ASTHMA AMD 3f: 0XCK i7IS TAKE j fatSby sllitl-itarerl r-.-.i.i. :. % %  . mr.^t. ^"1 t :r. %  %  sod .III T t it|istri(i r L I. UlHV IIHII PO B all aH' %  < I WrHt Olract or Airmail for Fatherly Advkf •OUL !3 THE STEPPING SE TO SUCCESS Don't hctlute about your future Goforw,-rd confident that Tha Dennett Cbllfgo wil! IPH you through to a sound position |n |A) Ii you choose. The Bennett Collg>. math are individual. There's > irltntjiy. persoasl touch that ages quick progress and lor early %  iaa as ...i itall..-uai I •aaaWsaasai fiSaaiaaMH Direct Mail to 0EPT. 188THE %  BENNETT COLLEGE LTD.' SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND You can't keep dandrull i a secret— bul you can get rid of it. %  l>:in,lrulT means that your hair is under-nourished and thai bodily supplies of natural vital hair foods arc running low. Replenish the supply with Silvikrin and dandruff disappears. Fed by its natural foods, the hair regains its youthful vigour and stays in your head -not in your comb. Silvikrin DOES GROW HAIR (;w •—rW.lSfU. l-e,.,-,,.. .•W falaaiaf tai'. Ai a eaWy •a-ruua asr fMMl //a,. Twelr il.-.rf.Ai.* nMkb. %  •* MR Wl*i'hf t.mk IsM-m .(laWt/. SIIVIK from alt iktmt'i*. huirjintrn ami aajapj ABUf-A'd* !'. LTO LONPON %  NWie %  INGLANO *-**V#OV!.^V-*0**V>VVV*^*'%VVVVV'*V*VV>*^^^ NOTICE Passengers who hold reservations on and after 1st. December, 1950, are kindly asked to contact our Office regarding times and days of departure of their flights. BlilTISH WEST INDIAN LIMITED AIRWAYS Lower Broad St. Phonea 4585 Ac 2789. ////,V^/X///-V/^VAV////V//^>^///A >-.**',.*.-.',V-V-'..-W/.'.W.V,V,When PAIN strikes Special Notice I THE CA remember Phensic! The sooner you lake Phensic, the sooner you'll feel better, for Phensic's quick, safi; action will bring relief, lift away pain-caused fatigue, and remove weariness in a matter of minutes. Phensic neither harms the heart, nor upsets the stomach. Be prepared for pain — keep a supply of Phensic handy. 'Just take* Tablets^ Phensic for quick, safe relief FROM HEADACHES,RHEUMATIC PAINS,LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS, NEURALGIA,'FLU, COLDS & CHILLS I %  Win. FogarlyLtd. (Inc. in Br. Cuiana) We tales tfiis opportunity o' notifying our Customers and the General Public that Our Store will be opened lo business as usual trom 8 s.m. to 4 p m, uninterruptedly on Mondays to Friday and on Saturdays (rom 8 30 am., lo 1230 p.m. Our decision lo keep open throughout the day is another instance of . "FIRST THOUGHT OUR CUSTOMERS" and country residents will please note that we are prepared to cause them no inconvenience by closing our doors any part of a working day. a WM. FOGARTY LTD. """itioui aaaa* i For generations ** stout and oysters have been appreciated for their appetizing flavour and rich food value. Now comes Manx Oyster Stout, brewed from the linest hops, malted barley and sugar, with tfce extract of one whole selected New Ze a l and Oyster in every bottle. Rich, smooth, nutritious, satisfying, Manx Ovate* Stout is as good as it tasajs. U ALWAYS INSttSQa STOCKISTS M-IEYNet. ARTHim a Co. LU LB a Co.. Ud. ii v lacoTT a Co.. ua. tllTTENH CHONEY Co. Ul. j N OODnARD a SONB, LIJ f A DANIEL a Co. INCC a t'o Ltd -. A RBDMAK PBRK1N1 >-fNBi_L a Co. ua.. c n nootnf" % %  PBsrni. Ltd V',**V^tV^*,VCC^Vt**VjKa%alAVtVVSAr-,V'-* I



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SUNDAY UECEMBCB1 1*W SUNDAY ADVOCATI P VC.E NINE Governor Asks Support For Missionary DancingOn l.atcns At I' rhihitii'n Work id SIXTY ONE cosn hav. bca .\l f"i lho Annual Industrial ilass passenger has to walk up school* there are weekly r> ardExhibition whirr, takes place on hilts and the third class passenger ing schools, the children ing Dscembar 6 and 7 at Queen's Hark. has to push the bicycle up the back to their homes for i jch Thlt l ua l" tn c rtgure of last year hills for the owner. week-end So they have to U fed Th* %  •"* ,hl iig applies to the n ,..., during the week and therefor,are entries of sheep and pigs which How ". "; Iw *• m " J the • %  expected to and do grow heir number 4S and 18 reapecUvely. s of the station, who appearown rood as well as learn s. meSl *'. v I* 81 "" ve been entered but little apprehensive of the h mg about agriculture After "us llgure has fallen somewhat utc cvrrt 1 rvrv .k. r? as. if r o c ompan y for a fortnight of a Civil wo hours of bending and atooplns hflow ">' of last year. H1S> EXCELLENCY Ihe Governor, Mr. V\ L. Savage Servant—possibly a spy of Gov, P turn,d i„ the clergy house f.r A special feature at the cxluoito!d the crowded Empire Theatre on Friday evening that ernment. I was warned that the • ,, M, 1( .ning task was to h.lp '"" l "'" ,H danting on the lawns the missionary work of the Church deserved the most EX" 0 !...?* ."J"? 1 •' ' c J~ k huild a" separate guest house and ''" the cast side ol! the 1'ark House Kenerous support. ?,.?.?.," i? ."J" Jj**!"**! "* <<"" 'or the Blaaop This will uke place on the first lie was -peaking at the Annual SL? ?-i\ "'"'a t,' clo ff J <*" b "" %  lnv.lig.tSd tight and will be from > to 10 M.sslonir, meeting and paid St"" "<'• The most Important ? %  -* m >' "^es !" >* be the weight of a mud block, but "•" The orchestra, of Mr Percy nilTw the work berniT done "Peech he mad. in his life was ,ou d •" <" " the board In the n „ ha „ d ,„, jb oul 100 from h, ',...„ and Mr Clevlc Glttens will "nan.the African? &£st '" undergraduate. £ %  "" '"on? '" % % %  • door to the 'artisan I knew the, P> ^ JKc town. of Cambridge University, when 1 "? %r f look .' • detailed to each weighed a ton. I wenl ". "IH D %  ood-Ut. The decision to •swards the end ha made this f in charge of the dispensary Evensong and later to dltincr '•"" this feature waa taken by Uon%  %  """•I •Peal— "I direct your B !" 7 ocloc '" !" ; ,0 ,M f h really tired but satisfied with the 'he Exhibition Committee at a art Meeting and 1 KOpnaZ-wluk"•oentlon to Africa. I know in a English and Arithmetic In the day. work At the end of dinner meeting yesterday. The event will I can hold vour >tteniw """ "P?" garden, from" twenty-nve year. In relation to " >" ,, be .hut again. Do you f" '" '"""* *• ', !" ". iW must be %  missionary activities In Africa c "f " lh e work 1 have begun f?~ .~ 0 !" ^ n l bul'dlng from 4JO .„ 1 AtSAUV A l ill 1 HI I I | 1 PURINA i*i4.i:o\ CHOW %  H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. o u ..,b>-o.. ^mnwnnwmmuwii |SH0P EARLY m I For that rich aft savoury flavour! square miles. And so, Africa hu a d-Muity of population of lay IS persons to a square mile, while in Barbados the average la about 1.200 lo the square mile. There are many reasons for such wide differencea, but the main one is lack of water. There arc thousands of square mllet of deserts in <\frica and you can walk for days and never se* A human being. On the other hand. hi areas with heavy rainfalls there urp tropical forests spreading for hundreds of miles which cannot support human life. Dense Population There are, of course, large towns densely populated—such as Ibadan In Nigeria, where 200.on" souls live and which is one of the most densely populated cities of the world, but the Urge majority of Africans live In villages far away from towns. How do they Uve? The standard of life of millions of Africans is that of subsistence agriculture — living on what they can grow, and „ ,_, in many, many caaes they can only !" r grow just enough to keep alive. who ierve % health rdu .11. n vour own but '"';'te the hundredth anniversary i bed by 10 o'clock "' lD holding of these exhibitions i out I was In bed ., %  .. EauglwBffif """""""" .r5hete'Vi;k,Tde,u.i:„rfc vi...,, ..,„ i&siSArss^Stt'i S', %  •.., .Si i i TT*H i. "•" "rfely as a result ol determined not to let down the Alter a few days, lhe I'm*,a p .„,. ii „ !" ,,„.. „.l,i ,v ,.J ._ ,hu "peech that the Universltlea Civil Servant. pal asked me If I would like ,o Thnly-two lMhs have gone UP w £ H i? ""r, m "'l? B !" a "*" 'o Central Africa wa> vis.t *,* far off village. A.id ,1 Ihe Hark of which 22 are f„, aV enndlHeeJ?K i £ 'J^S armed %  "hen In 125 1 was ,,, „.„.. *, we set out one Friday mail! .idv.nlsinn ud game. Tile other, m.,ce^.r£?.VT* ?ZL ? ^7 appointed to the Colonial Service M,,d •"'"• k „„| ,,,I,M until near mid,,..I,-, an r. %  fresh.nent booth. The DM Gambia ,Z rlmfri,. ^,„ld „„, l . k d -"h keine B to ,.. „„„,. „„, „„ _,„,, „ when we slept In a hut by II W ""-l..! I. ii^lead n. '," N< "" !" RhodeMa where m „„, n „, nc ,u tlu „" The "•"' U P ak" !" l morning al dexlon Is much In ev.dence in Plrio want to g!v. you a brief HTT'UT. h a*.1i "Ti ," he S ""*> """ "" "oulTwa. miae d.ybrc./.nd cycled unul „,ld>'. %  of II.I..II,. ,! .mi. WcSriund ol AfiEa llTl a S2 ^T'-V* 1 A,rt fi"th d J"?"^ -' '" u "oc-ks with a thatched da, and reached our dwllnal.oi, "ed • the framework for lhe comiS-nt 1 ""„' nearly MMS. K tSSreJ."'.1 S !" r'^'"' h, b ~" bu "' n "-'> '" ,he '""" w " "f" ''" d'^" ef, ? h ,i,',g' u u"'""" people. „r a thousand lime, the .everal month, to ihl ,^ ", 36? ".""ents and other friend, corned by the whole village, the "i, J \; „i, n v J d t." 1 .. 'i" r.^ population of thla Island. Its are. E5*Caeena2 Cmd^ .', "* """"'" '" %  ""• "•">• >cal calechi.l explain,^, the '"t''!??*,.**?.' \j£L\ is about 13.000.000 ,u.re mile, Umd ,0 "" BrUtan COMU1 "" %  >• understand lf help, numbers who had come In b 1 "^ „" ThJ^av' he u .' %  compared with Barbados (IncludThe U.M.C.A. Is a missionary , JJ* y ""; ln Africa that unSunday Communion 1 walked a~ .,,„„' .,"J. ,,,ii !,„ ti,., Ing PWlcan bland) with 1M ldy of priests, laymen and won, !" l^'^f, nave'tTa, ["', OlZIFn? """"' ""' •""*" w h %  '""'Knvclope Rare and the Un ;—ta g .oCm,„^i;, 'ui 1 dme^u.e''.i'.f;:;' u rar'',S " %  "• !;bour' S "T?.;r SjAal?5j?22 ^o. hi, people." TI, %  "S. met h rt bu i? Thiir '" r M P^-clivMy waa low scno?., and' tr^raSn'.couS, £• J"*!^ of the c.,„. ; re had been budt by them under the M ">e poverty of the lupervislon of the clergy, one of I* 0 ?"They hod thought „i %  horn had been training as'an '"oving on but they were l It was a lovely church with not grass mala and some animal aMnf in* 'Item, other than the chalice. ..ome empty tins for cooking ami il Euiopean workmanship or madrinking. latter I wild psssl I I It hsd been built by the lhe church, which the vlllaaerIhe Altar, the had built A vary ajdi gmsillef and cruder church lhan lhe other J D V? ce *hul I shall never fornct the Sunday Mas. at which I ha, privilege of servinx Can >on laglne lhe oldest barn or store! use you have ever seen will, Altar at one end and two hundred Africans packed and kneeling on the floor—thrv don't After Mass we had breakfast, like chairs or benches when the, ivhan I mentioned to the Principal are worshipping their God — the lhat I had no medical knowledge women with their babies tic and 1 was rather apprehensive of comfortably to their backs—the I being put in charge of a dtspenslittle heads peeping over then ..umber of countries "'a, ? e ?', ? h ould find a mothers' shoulders—the slngin. I in central and East Africa Thcv """leal orderly who would help o( the hymns, the Creed and 11" ber. who c, and do grow more .„ lh „ hardest working group Vf !~-_ l^&gB*3 J* "V !" I" deep melodic* AND GET THE BEST OF CHRISTMAS GIFTS AT %  s s I K %  X K K hancel, the candlesticks, the lecrn, the vestments, the onal cross. It was an jtstanding cxnmple of what can t achieved by people who are nsplred by the love of God and therefore love of their fellow man and so are determined to improve their condition. work in service*. Hut the purpoxe of my lenuirl" this evening it to invite youi ittenlion tu two poinU— (a) that the missionary work of the I'inn.v your most generous support, and (b) the African:. • tivio.: to help themselves I therefore usk you. in the collection whicli taUoWt, Ml '<• tlve what you can afTor %  Ing>-d becau of the great distance, snd "Hf "'?. %  } "JJ*2 "' '"•". %  ren The commonest complaint lack of concentrated markets too !" and ML fif *S*£l •' •"* ""^ h >' 'he hfS of Inoften the development of agrlculfgJ* TSug.l scWtrfd i.0 S2S "'•'" 1) "" ' whllh h d W '" lure i. uneconomic. '"'*' !" JTT !" „ a " treated by prlmillve methods of Hundred, of thousand, of Afri. m " ,n P 0011 money. applying manure lo lhe sores, recan, leave their homes to find In those aav. It took six days by suiting in the most dreadful work in distant towns or countrain to get from Capclown ti wounds, some as big as a plate tries. Some walk hundred, of Livingstone and for 5 year. I Some people came from as far miles—over several months—to lived at the Church House In afield as 150 miles and had walkllnd work. Livingstone, the capital of North^ ,he wh ole way. They had sive vou another aspect e rn Rhodesia, which was a port of ,,ear d ' l h mlsalon and hoped i populaca |i f or missionaries of all denomcv *" ul<1 h"' cured where the about 100 witch doelor had failed Principal said, 'Tell your peocle of their life Nigeria has lion of over 15.000.000 soul, and mlnallons. So I was able lo have iVtSu !" ffiFS •E?" """<"*<• t.cu win, 322. i. J.MWO.ooo. so thai the governHr v work In 11^ ih> antrtliWn WkSHere^ r B. h S. d doi'^ £" S^X^ISB^ nS VK" !" """ %  " <* nearly ol h„ denomination, from Southbabies—making their Comnuin loo Some had walk"d for S Hays to come to church Self-Help I listened to a QODVvnatlBa, l>etween the l*rincipa1 and tie i jU'i'lil-t regaixling i MUM! f i another church ami „ .ispensa-v be set up In another villii :•* 'K' SHOES ARK MADK BY CRAtTSMKN WHO SPKCIALIZK IN GKNTS' KOOTWKAR THK RESULTS OF MANY YEARS KXPKKIMKNT AND KXPERIENCK ARE EMBODIED IN THKIK MANUFACTURE AND A Chicken For A Tooth r2.O00.000 we enjoy services averaging £10 per head, I.e. ten times that of the average Nigerian Rhodesia used tc quarterly and hold halls and In houses. pay a visit services In Social Services And so the social services In Africa—education, health, subsidization of foodstuffs and housingare generally speaking at a far ,,„ ,0 T„",hr^"'"rt ^ "'f, ^ K 0 "'h B 1L b d •• MS provided in this island, although the aer%  1> i .__., are not adequate water can At Mission Station vices i After a year there I asked perission to spend a fortnight on a tssion station, and the Bishop I was prepared to work. I took my motor-bike tl-e train and went north for I will try and help tliein llrst 'how signs of helpini! I %  1 remember to this day vividly ,v *'* ,' f *F "g "• %  >' h an old lady who wanted a tooth ">"•* L *• %  '•' %  > 1 1 '" extracted. I wrote a note to the enough for a motorbike to evl Principal, but he replied, -Dear through and will build a snv.ll Savage, you are in charge of the church nnd dispensary and maindispensary" There was no docUlh It In good condition. I will tor or dentist for hundreds of try and get funds for the neeeg* mlles. So the orderly gave me a i-ary equipment and for a teat'.er lox of forceps and sat the old nnd dispenser The vlllayrs lady in a chair and I pulled out— promised to do so and monilis at a second attempt—the offendut,r I he..rd that they had earriod ing tooth. She smiled at me and l)U | their promise and a prii-st gave me a chicken for the mission, visited them once a month ZLlSl*£& ly e l ^ M by eve r> ''bout 500 miles to a tiny station ESS? Li*, communIl F"nth* called Choma. From there I had fgg ,^ r0VlncM J -geW slMo drive about 350 miles along African women and children m Dedv < the dry season walk aomctimei r:,,,for 3 to 4 hour* to fetch water— [enerally U Churches i!nl C ?~"L B , ^ M, '"'""i** tn ^ able' tinVei 'and'' havlnV lost both After we had disposed of all the sea at the dispensary I went to the Junior school. I would have liki'l to have given a summary of my experiences in Nigeria but time is fhort are just like our and I would only say that a.' in thought %  new Northern Rhodesia. the church path about 8 Inches teacher was interesting and they has made and Is making a solid ived at my destination, endeavoured to divert me from contribution In the spiritual i.eld, i U M.C.A. station named my purpose of leaching them m health and in education It is P nSliv.1iJ? rf M P !" u, • n 1 ** 1 'hsving English On some days they suero exaggeration to say lhat if the OI fallen off the motor bike innumerceeded and persuaded me to tell church had not sent missions to them of the capital town of LivNigeria, the condition of larue %  IVT („. ,-l— Z"T' "..rr.* 1 "" looirests aner niinng conceaiea ingstone—of the sea whicn was „ um h-— „# ,(, IKHIHII. would tSJrJS£X ieS ,r '"""" %  ed, neTr m l"n'and' ftlSZ jg* '"-'-'• £B?}JCS5£3i ""fma—'" I should tell you that the ordln„ nd of England. The school was ,od 5 rnau their communion.. ary bicycle I. a very common maAt 0 baked mud blocks slml, a„ „„, ,. .,,., hi tTi^U 00 '"" %  "• """-'Pe of public transport in Africa. ,.. ,.. % „,h„ h„,iHine. I h.d do no1 %  l •"..•'' David Uvlngstone returned to You can travel flrsl clan, second England alter his Hist esploration clan or third clan. First clan in Arnca seeking more funda and passengers have the right to sit assistance to further his drive on the bicycle (either on the pllagainst .lavery and the establishlion or cross bar) the whole way ment of Christian mission. In Canuphill and down hill The .econd the other buildings I had cS1 J do not want to give you the Impression that the Governments of Northern Rhodesia and Then I had the usual African Nigeria have not also been in ttie rest for 2 hours In the middle of forefront of social development the day. and In the afternoon In those countries. They have went out to the gardens. The done and are doing outstanding, I^* EVERY PAIR COMBINES FOOT COMFORT WITH STYLISH APPEARANCE AND GREAT DURABILITY. :.d Super XX 8 MM f %  tu-. lelease*. Colour | j|r"i.tei Tnpods, Trimmer: a Art Corners Photograph I — ALBUMS i a to 10 -I %  Camel Cases lor Brownie Reflex an,I Folding—1120. | Flasholder t<> Fit Brnwnicj M..drl F" t.F.HMAN CAMERAS %  1'urkV Retlex — (120 sire) $10 00| "Imperial" Box — i i2n si/.i t eool "Adox 66" (120 size) S12 00I Tll'FS All BUM andf Shapes. "Dunhill • SIS 381 "Comov's" drand t Slam I 950] "ComoyV Everyman % 4.00| !"Comoy's" Aston Bnntom M (A Featherweight Pipe) i —|3 0 %  "Roval Lane" $ S.00| %  I"Ci .ftsman" % 5.001 Bother Pipes I Me $1.33.1 %  SI HO $2 32. $23H, $302,1 %  Jj $3 10. $3.53. 14M S;MUI ihe "Htltlsh Empin %  pipe -t no CENTS EACH. 5 "K" SHOES AKK ."JOW ObTAlNABLK IN MAVY SMART STYLES AND EACH MOUKl. IS STOCKED IN A WIDE HANOE OF FITTINGS THUS ENSURING A PERFECT FIT INSIST ON HAVING THE BEST IS THE K BEST AND BRAND "THERMOS FLASKS" 1 Pint $ l.$l| 'Jugs (Hnkrlltel — $3 06 t t* 121 Uugs (Aluminium) -$8-00| Wide Mouth .' I'ml *" 2 if Wi.le Mouth ' gal. $18,131 Wide Mouth I gal. — $25,801 Picnic Bail — I $17.00$28 Ml i UghU 7/to $3831 Kit* hen S, i M.I-S $1 69f Manicure Sets — l l 6 a $2.24 [Mouth Organs 1/3. 3/-. 3/8, ] 7/-. 7/2. 10/-, 11/-. $5.00 CigjMtt,TUDM 2 6, 3/-, 3/8 [(lillettf It HOI !<9 -$7.14 l,.,r. %  I*r.i 10'%  Sheath Knivei 10/-, 14/-, 20/%  Shavlng Itnishes 2/8, 3/3, M A % %  -. $1 05. $483, $3.74. $5.80, $9 00. $1122 and $UH0 H ARRI SON'S .0D STREET SOLE LOCAL DISTRIBUTORS : %  .: %  %  %  %  %  %  .: %  -.-.-., %  --.-.-,-,-,-,',-,-,-.-.-. : I'KS" •Parker "i %  Parker M a/alrniiaii ^ I'l.Mi'llS Gold I800 Silver $16 00 I Taperllc" $1200 Lifetime" — ll 0 i.1 IIIUIIIUI CKIMMs IN Cll I MUX! % XMAS TEEE UK (IkAMONS A880KTED BOXES CHOCOLATES 1'innxn — rut HMIIS HIGH LADIES' COMB BRUSH SETS THE COSMOPOLITAN The ever popular Wilson Bristol NOTICE the Labour ill I n I.Hi.: of ihe main view of the explanation given in the matter of working hours of Shop Assistants we have decided not to close from 12—1 daily as advertised. Our Stores will therefore operate as usual. Ouinii u Shurlaue sliipniem^ standing .... JOSEPH WILSON' Hats have been delayed. These famous Maal arc expected later in lhe month. Until then Wilson offrrs you an excellent purr felt hat in their popular Bristol Brand. The Hat designed for Gen./emen of good taste. hXHtltIS DHl'G STOKES Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET. miTIUCIA I'OWUEHKD MI1.K 1-lhtm NCTIUi 1A POWMUD MILK .'.-.Mm KIIArr CRHU 13 ot.ttn in i Al si KALIAN CURRAHT8 D At'STHAl.lAN BULTANA1 MPCIP raurr tor cakw Pu l-H) |ATF-S perpkg. .3oJ PALM THaV CQOKSHQ BUTTE1 5-ib. tins 3.80 c A II 1'I.UM PUDDINGS 1-ib.tins .$ SEKDLF-SS CHAPES per Un 29 St SO RED CUHUANT JELLY [*r Un 33 HENNESSYS X-0 BRANDY per bot. 13 00 COCKADE FINE RUM per hot 1 1 lo-inurruvi MONDAY


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PAGE SIXTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY DECEMBER 3. 1* Ralph Rock Wins Car WHEN 1-yes Hoc* oi i U p „., Frloau morning and went to Cnmbfnnw School 1< .onlinup %  ., %  Senlnr Cambridge Certificate he JPWT suspecteo that luck\ winner le I.ix-k lUl I'd up .it the Central Station yard with hi* tw,, broUi•n He was formerly a pupil this is the first time thai I I been lucky in a raffle He told the Advocate that on the day when he bought the ticket he only had .1 $1 00 In hi* Eli was hi* lunch money it he walker |B)M %  ''• %  '" %  Be /fade Station and bough. QM tuket from Firrm.ir. c Howard He returned home m tbo tVOOla I but did not tell his family that he had bought the ticket All along he had the feeling that be wotil-i win. MVUIM HO \ I .\ . B<5JtiTfl Tii"W*ro in an "all-in" affair, where not only Osta. but faet and any oUior part of the body i used. Boutn take place In the %  'indium in Bangkok every Sunday and are watobad tiy thousands of •..H-cutcrExpres. Camera Club At Exhibition The Photographic Section at the Annual Industrial Exhibition •ear be run by the Baroad<.> ( jrnera Club under the auhpiceaot the Agricultural Society Thu section WM f ormerIy lookU after by the Barbados Arts • rafts Society. The Camera Club is comparai Z U ?* h V '" 8 bwn < !" d niy about seventeen month* ago. Ii> v,rides have been rapid, howv.i. and it now plans to have an entirely different aet-up in the I'holographic Section at the exhibition to that of former years. The pracUeo followed in big countrioa will be resorted to. the "Advocate" was told yesterday. %  An exhibitor in this section will have to carry out the com* ptohl work of his exhibit, from the operation of the camera to the production of the finished print. This will include taking the picture, processing the negative and naking and mounting the print. Professionals and amateurs are eligible for entry, ;ind photographs may be taken in the island or abroad so long as the exhibitor is resident in the island for the time being. Any number of prints may be submitted by an exhibitor, but no exhibit would be accepted that "Jungle Bertha** Jamaican Studvinis A K"cultura 1, i Exhibition* 1 ,_ _. / * As regards the subject Handed Back B.G. Rice Mills To Mother w Rock cannot drive and Intendselling the car. So far he has one offer of $1/700 but has not yet made up his mind to take It. H" will leave the cur in the Police Garage at the Central Station until he r The cat Is insured until December 23. The winning numbers were %  follows: — First Prize Second Prize Third prise SINGAPORE. Dec. 2 Thirteen-year-old "Jungle Bertha" Hcrtogh was today handed uvi r lhl Colony's rice mills to : ick to her mother. The High Kam rtet * " introducing B.G's Court here had ruled her marriage mll,,n 8 system in Jamaica, is Mr %  M..1.I. M.. : ,|t-„. ill,,;;,! and ,'"!!"" Anderson reprewntative awarded the custodv ,.f the child "' Tlllfl e td firm of land lo her Dutch parents preparcr* and contract ploughed Bertha burst Into tears when she '" *P a '> i *> Town. Jamaica. was told the verdict *" %  Anderson arrived on SalShe turned sobbing to Che u *. y • weeks stay to be Aio.nah who had left the Court £5 '? w n "P eC,mK G ^emment'a with Bertha and her mother Mrs. it '2 l ,he Mah >">v Heriogh. Just before judgment M>arv R,c ^ Expansion Schenie read, Bertha said In Malay: matter, consist of anything A picture may be landscape, seascape, portrait. sports, news. figure study, scientific, flower, animals, etc. There will be no cash prize*. I im. "? The first, second and third beat prints will be selected and six Honourable Mentions will be made Flan Oar Oa> < ., rtipaMaal) GLOHCETOWN. Nov. 28 k-end visitor to British Race Horse Dies "" %  "'* 'Mumm, whal .hall 1 do ..„ Mil Tht n Mansoor Ad,ibt, th ThreeLoins, one of which is 227 years old, were brought into the Advocate* Editorial Office Friday morning. They ff I r e owned by Mr C B. Brandford ol "Archvllle". Hastings The oldest is an Irish half penny from the reign Of George the First and dated 1723. The other || a Barbadus Nept' VIRGINS ELECT FOUR COUNCILLORS Trom Our Own CotmponMti. VIRGIN ISLANDS. In the elections for the Virgin penny dated 1792. It carries the n IVhJ, ." i ^ *S^ ,rom IS 1 !" 1 ^ I*>slative Council on head of a Carlb chief n^^ Ul i U *!5 b L m,< (J November 20 Mr. G Fonseca got Mr Neville Connell. Curator Bertha s counsel said he would 829 votes, Hon. H U Pviin 462 I le an appeal on Monday. Mr. C deCustrc "~ The Judge held that the purenell Bruce 353 Mr. K D Edwards' Beacon ^ u J rt f d "•"' %  * of Bertha with Nine candidates contested for the Bright an "A" Class thorough;' roc * ,ima8 Thc ve whu %  ! lo in dnd and Barbados dropped dead whlc i h J* "'""editable to nil conwere Messrs Achifle Fraser (2B5|, vcetarday morning at the Garrir '^" ... „ .. „ _, L Antonio Maduro (222). Theodolpli son Savannah after exercising ""'Jfr*," y"" ", 1 lh; 1 "^ ^'"""r <210), Hanford Connor Beacon Bright was being prev s ""• forced nor tricked (191). and 1 Hcndrlcks (93) I or the Trinidad Christmas m,0 JJ" !" "*-. Registered voters numbered meeting Yesterday morning he rrom h h ouswation of Che 1.287 of which 853 voted. Five bal„ WM exercising in company with Aminah the Judge said "I am lots were spoiled Nine polling ^urth. dated 1826 Mrs .1 1) Chandler*! Gun Site. unable to resist the Impression booths were located In Anegado Mr Rrandford sold that be had The two horse* galloped about that she was persuaded to agree Virgin Gorda. East End, Road these coins for manv years. Ht seven furlongs and after, pulling u, '' lh "'•" l *" l,i %  ueuyie T.mn. Sea Cow Hay. West End. lUKht th.-m from lime to limeon his way back to the paddock. '' v *, m '' Person In whose mind Carrot Bay, Cane Garden Hoy and wn n hp u * to r rrv nn %  burt Beacon Hright stumbled ,hc ,dM ' !l WBS conceived.' Jug Van Dyke. nes*. He also has many old HIS rider Jock Slcxombe how"" w,n lhc '" %  r Tia> to be inHis Excellency thc Governor American coins. ever had lime to dismount and yalW. the Judge said that as accompanied by Mrs Bluckburnc e •^' that once he wns a very loosened the girths before his Herthn s father had never conftn d the A.D.C Major Martin keen ;oln collector but at present mount finally collapsed. Beacon "*" led to his child embracing the Hicks are spending the first week he rarely comes across very old Bright was a horse by Light House Moslem faith she could not be „f December in the Virgin Islands, roi the Second iHit of Bright Brocade regarded as Mohamedan It would The Governor will address the not be In her Interests to leave her ne wlv established Legislative in Adabi's custody and such a Council of the Presidency and. In course would be entirely derogalS t Thomas, will discuss with thc lory of the sanctity of a MohumeAmerican Oovrnor problems of ""..l".?, i lgP .. „ ?V ; <'"mmon Interest to the British and ••While I am satisfied that AmiAmerican Virgin Islands nah has brought up Bertha with Flying Dutchman Makes Conquests ._. of the Barbados Museum, told thi 402. Mr. BrudAdvocate yesterday that no one knows quite well the origin of that head II is also on the first penny to be issued locally In 1788 This is called the Pineapple penny. On both pennies • be word Barbados || written "Barbadoes" The third coin Is a British penny from the reign of (.eorge the > he has given up collecting. TRINIDAD AIDS P/O/VffR INDUSTRY These ties are winners I theVre v.a-li.ilile they're rreune-re-i-lm they're money -savers %  nj film %  bshic — "Loot* like a draw -Worti like Jie -A Ron.of. IfhH ap run ISM c> time People in lhc limelight haw only live hoi Niiuiatly moU ol %  chootc PONSON WORLD'S G.l.usi LICHTIR Thanks to Toolal •,., ran now iuanu.it a l.tlrrv .4 n->ralehiiil.|ibii tim at Ear lr-. OSSI limn you r„ r 'l|*.l.-,l; i^, ,,t uuimn H.--I l.-.k. They wai*h. l Wag an.l u# anaaa> fulh6ii"i ISMI aakaM atjBBsar, n lhal %  -!!..I %  tta StfaSSBTf rantin-, .h. They're %  >• a.• -1 r-i .in^. IV aassaBBlisBs] aatsh trU ihsi aurmg cn-mm-,i U-4. r,.i,n.| llv kn..i f ihr itr. Vou will %  ihr trade ntark 'TlfnifaT' on tfw T.-Ul Talabrl. h aland* fur falmr. .nh r-ir-l .,,-..... sssjatasj c *SANATOGEI' NERVE TONIC WOOD lu at mcJ health, youth and rtUBty It might be assumed that most ir travellers are men. This is wrong, howover. for K. L *"** Thc'unl SA Crou P Anm Act May am prepared to fortunate Impression which she hi tde on me as a witness, 1 canfie Suspended statisticians have calculated that not blind myself to the fact that t'mied Nations General'Acol only Mn oC the passengers .-.. ,he was a party to the discreditbl ^ njtfum nwiacd lllui ried by K L M .luring the honable marriage. Sou In Africa xhnul.1 tnctn-ml hat day month of AuKUst. 1950 we..The Judge said that he attached g !" ^' l 1^2.,*^^.^' ference between South Africa, India and Pakistan. A recommendation wus upprovRouter vti D y 35 votes to 13 with 12 (.Indentions. The recommendation was a resolution which was approved u:> a whole by 33 votes with 21 m, From I'age 1 abstentions irried by KIM, clearly pmvof all property of each of the nine _TOH rinni llllllllilljl that_ the nitEd the Flving Dutchman' and deprived them of their citizen Ctnwrimants of India. Pakistan ^avouril by i be" Indies rights for lOyoars. g< ** Airi ca g !" " *' The court found all nine guilty ''. lc .holding of a Hound 71& ^TTrJSS^T' KpPfSSiSrgteS S^-T==L? : In the United States the nirchild's welfare craft is more of an every-day He awarded costs against Che conveyance than anywhere •**• Aminah in the world. According to I recent study, the [>ercentage "l female travellers carried by the scheduled airlines in that eoun\i, i 24^. which is considerably lower than the percentage PRIESTS SENTENCED PORT-Or SPAIN Nov Trinidad's aid to Pioneer dustry proposals have attr.. nnother foreign IndU I facture of low cost dTO r* Soon a Canadian dn fno'urer will visit these i on an exploration visit MODOsN iiir.ii smoo i.ldav Sin IWmb-r > .uM 'Tins a baptun I main numbar rsi Mranes *** •> %  * %  A %  • %  holarahlp liald I Uia aamr I" lint utdldalm In t., • nln ^ LA I '. Mil conquest of l>e proud! which he may The Weather TO-DAY Sun KI*H: 6.AZ a.m. sun srp.; 5 37 p m Moon I New) Iteeember f l.itliinii. 6U0 p.m High Water: 11 00 a.m. 11 •< p m VIslKKDW Rainfall a'odrlngtonl 11 l" Temperature E N E: (II a.m > E.N E Wind Velocity. 11 miles per honr Barometer (9 a.m ) ZS83'£'. (11 i n I M.9K. article, olth. criminnl •—>" S" mmli So. 6S—" x f No. 9 —3" x IS" nediuai w.t*ht No. 14—3" > Itlifhl WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. TYRES and TUBES It.iirABLh f.V M.I. muss USE THE TYRES < IIAMI'lOXS USE Charles Mc Enearney & Co., Ltd TO OUR CUSTOMERS & FRIENDS W'K WISH to draw to your attention thut :is from TO MORROW. MONDAY lilt our GROCERY DEPARTMENT AND OUR PROVISION DEPARTMENT will lie el.iM'd helween the: hours of 12 NOON and 1 P.M., instead of as previously between 11 a.m. und NIHMI. AMJJBWNB HUM it A CO.. tLttk HIGH STREET



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SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, lSu SUNDU ADVOCUl P.M.I illlltfl.IV HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON Gordons MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY AND TWEN CE tf a -^ BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG a good sign^ ••• anyfimef Th$ black and yellow sign over our door means we have met Caterpillar Tractor Co.'s high requirements as to business integrity, knowledge of the equipment field and the resources to establish and manage the standout equipment concern in this territory. Selling, servicing and other details of our business are handled to make and keep customers. "Caterpillar" owners expect and get this kind of service. Illllllll KALES A SERVICE LIMITED. TWEEEDSIDE ROAD, ST. MICHAEL, PHONE 4629 & 4371. WE'RE PROUD TO SHOW IT HLONOIE, WILL NOU PLEASE BRING ME TM' ii us fniNMa %  'WHY DOF.O ME WANT THE ncncNNtv %  /' %  B -N %  -.PWlCW %  | '.. J • • ix y m %  9 i THE LONE RANGER WAKE UP DAD T* BRIDGE IS DOW WEDHAVI 3ffN KHUPIFWMASKEPmN. OT STOPPED OUP HOSES" (v*OARE'rtXIAIi'JlKN0WM05ri>W HOW DO 113U f3 MEN B SIGHt ,KN0WMf?_JM ESPECIALLY GOOD ONES WMVAfS KU RUNNING AWAY" BRINGING UP FATHER A i. '. : -"L... BY FRANK STRIKER i '.V.'.'.'.'.V.'.'.'.V.'.r AV,^6V/W//.V/.V#W'^/V-V/*'/>'*V/W.V,V.V,*,v The world's choice! k V 77c //,,;-/ %  '/. Ztfiflp Horizontal emjine, built by ./. s installed anil nli'i>ls, i/mi 0OH forget about it for a long time, ft is ideal for growsUpits, taut' mills, guatrrit • %  .'< %  .. or wht n vt r I>>II-/ hours of "p< ration in d i and dirt// conditions an the rah. rwxw-OK 1 • %  ).-. -. TT %  MCCC'itV i.., L ii .:..-_ %  -. ,,''' %  .-: IS CPE ALSO... I l*

Sunday

December

1930



Oppose

Atomic Bomb

ON THE BASIS of today’s talks Mr. Attlee will |
be able to represent the views both of France

and Britain when he sees President Truman.

Indications tonight were that the French and Bri-

tish had agreed to such

the use of the atomic bomb in Korea and that every |
effort should be made to reach a political settlement
with the Chinese Communist Government.

After a break for lunch the

Pleven, French Premier, flew here this morning with his
Foreign Minister Robert Schuman, in an attempt to align
British and French policies on the international crisis before

Attlee leaves for America.



Baden Talks
Ended

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Dec. 2.
The Jamaica Banana delegation
having completed negotiations with
the Ministry of Food leaves Eng-
land satisfied with the agreement
reached, No details of the agree-
ment are being revealed in the
meantime but the delegation feels
that they have achieved the maxi-
mum possible, “in view of the
many difficulties confronting the
banana industry” as a statement
from the delegation puts it this

morning.

On their return to Jamaica they
will recommend its acceptance to
the Directors’ Growers Association



and the Governor-in-Executive {
Council.
The official announcement is

expected after the matter has been
considered by the Association and
the Governor.



Truman May
Be Impeached

WASHINGTON, Dec. 2.

Senator Joseph Mc Carthy
(Republican, Wisconsin) told
President Truman today that
Congress ought to’ ‘immediately
impeach you” unless the admin-
istration sanctions the use of
Chinese Nationalist troops against
the Communicts in Korea

“If tus unreasonable farce of
insisting that only American boys
can die while refusing the help
of the soldiers of our Allies con-
tinues, then the time is long over-
due for Congress in the name of
America to stand up and be
counted and immediately impeach
you” Mr. McCarthy said in a
statement directed to the Pres-
ident.—Reuter.













Attlee, Pleven



a

. Sunde





Use Of

LONDON, Dec. 2.

t

questions as opposition to |

discussion was resumed. Rene

The main subjects brought up
were the Korean situation, Ger
nian rearmament and the econo-
mie difficulties being caused by
America’s stock-piling of strate-
gic raw material.

Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin
and Foreign Office experts on
economics and on the Far East
attended the talks.

As the Prime Ministers met,
another conference with vital
bearings on their discussions was
running into difficulties on the
question of a European army.

The Atlantic Pact Deputies
Council failed to agree complete- John the American
ly on the French proposal for}whose anti-Communist speech
such an army and the Britisn|was booed at the recent Warsaw
view that there must be no delay|“Peace” Congress said _ to-day,
in shaping an integrated Atlantic}that he thought the Yugoslav
Pact force. Government had too many prob-

The position was being put to{lems of its own to “take on the
Pleven and Attlee, and it seemed|burden of setting up a new
likely that they would call on}Peace Congress.

Charles Spofford, the United|, Rogge who has planned to ask
States chairman of the Deputies|Marshal Tito to take the lead in a
new independent peace movement



—ROGGE

PARIS, Dec. 2.
Rogge,

POuEal, allowing “free discussion — by
Crisis Discussed . |representatives from both East

The crisis in Korea was dis-|and West,” met the Yugoslav For-
cussed at length by the Prime) ign Minister Eduard Kardelj

Ministers. Pleven, it is believed,
supported strongly the idea that But Rogge said “if I can think
Attlee in his Washington talksjof a good idea I will put it up to
should press for the establishmentythem. I had thought of a move-
of a “buffer zone” south of the/ment backed by nations like
Chinese border. India and Yugoslavia, — nations

Attlee will take off for Wash-}not tied to either Power or bloc.”
ington tomorrow night. It was] He said that the Warsaw Con-
definitely decided today that Field] gress was not “conducted in a

here last week.

Marshal Sir William Slim, Chief] ‘live and let live’ atmosphere, but

of the Imperial General Staff,j with a few exceptions in terms
will go with him, of hatred and violence. “If the
But he is also taking three of Russians are bent on revolution
the Government’s chief economic] by violence as they have indicated
experts, which indicates that mili-|in Korea and Tibet all you can
tary affairs will by no means | do is meet force with force.
aominate the Washington talks. —Reuter
—Reuter,

Attlee, Truman Will
Talk For Two Days

WASHINGTON, Dec. 2.
The American State Depart-
ment said to-day that President
Truman and Prime Minister
Attlee would confer for two days|%o Koreans

SyngmanRheeUrges



U.N. Command

SEOUL, Dec. 2.
President Syngman

that there was




















S. Koreans To Obey

Rhee de-
clared today in a special message
“no

CHOOSING TOYS:

' “tae
CHILDREN having a good look in the toy section of Messrs, Cc. F. Harrison & Co., were snapped by

the ‘‘Advocate’s” cameraman yesterday.



Meet Force \Undeclare
With Force \Between U.N. And Red



> -

UNITED NATIONS FO




#




War Exists

Chinese In Korea

—MacArthur

General Mac Arthur declared today

- TOKYO, Dee. 2.
in written replies to

questions submitted by press correspondents that a “state
of undeclared war between Chinese Communists and United
Nations forces” now exists in Korea.

General Mac Arthur said he
use the atom bomb.

| Etna Is
Quiet Now

CATANIA, Dec, 2,

Mount Etna’s worst eruption
for 40 years appeared early this
morning to have spent its fury,
seven days after the first flames
flared from cracks in the moun-
tain crust. and lava began pour-
ing down the slopes.

After a week of prayer and
preparation for evacuation two
thousand villagers today believed
they had been saved,

The movement of a great wall
of molten lava had all but stopped,
For five days it had ran at an
irregular pace sometimes to six
miles, 50 yards and threatening
with destruction the villages of
Milo and Fornazzo.

On the fifth day a 500
yards wide, five yards high mass
was crawling at a slower rate.

Today the grateful villagers











had not asked for authority to

Immediate Chinese forces. en-
gaged are. approximately 500,000
men divided into two great

echelons, the General said in reply
to another question.

The “front echelon now engaged
in attack on our forces comprises
something more than half this
force with the rear echelon rapidly
moving up from the Yalu river
banks.

Abn in the Yalu sector were
rewwnts of North Korean forces
now being rebuilt under Chinese
auspices amounting to an estim-
ated 100,000 to 150,000 men.

This force overwhelmingly ouft-
numbered the Allies, “the exact
strength of which I would not care
to give”, Mac Arthur said.

He denied that military com-
mand had ever exceeded its
authority and said it had acted “in
complete harmony and co-ordin-
ation with higher authority.”

General Mac Arthur said he
“sincerely hopes” the Korean
problem could be solved by nego-
tiations,

“The settlement of international
issues by peaceful rather than
military means is always to be





UN. Troops 30
Miles North Of

Pyongyang

TOKYO, Dec. 2,

Troops of the American First
Cavalry Division today counter-
etacked Communists on the right
flank of the Eighth Army defence
line in northwest Korea,

Latest reports said they drove
four to five miles towards Song-

chon, 30 miles north of Pyong-
yang, the former North Koreaa
capital,

Earlier it was reported that

trapped American troops began
fighting a withdrawal from the ice-
bound Chosin reservoir area in
northwest Korea today under an
umbrella of American army and
navy planes

American Marines abandoned
Yudamni on the northwest tip of
the Chosin reservoir and started
to hack their way south through
encircling Communist forces to
their supply base Hagaru. On the
east side of the Great Lake, the
American Seventh Division troops



also making for Hagaru came to
grips with Chinese forces put at
several thousands men,

The American Air Force claim-
ed a total of 2,500 Communist
casualties inflicted yesterday, Fly-
ing weather to-day was generally
good,

Later reports also sid that
American cavalrymen fighting as
infantry were’ in contaet with
Communists one mile south of
Songchon.

Songehon during the night but
were later ordered to reoccupy it
—Reuter,



Lie Seeks Solution
Of Far East Crisis

NEW YORK, Dec, 2.

Trygve Lie, United Nations

United Nations forces evacuated |



y
\

\ &
’
\

Price:

Ne i x’ CENTS

Wear 535



CES CUT IN TWO->

Ou inum bered In Korea

By ALEX VALENTINE

SEOUL, Dec. 2.

UNITED NATIONS military commanders faced
tonight a very real danger that the military
situation in North Korea was rapidly becoming

untenable.

A military observer summing up the position listed

these main factors:

1. The United Nations army
of about 150,000 men was over-
whelmingly outnumbered by at
least 250,000 Chinese and North
Korean Communists.

2. The liaison between com-
manders of ground forces had
been split by the wedge down
the centre of the Korean pen-
insula,

3. Chinese Communists had
at least another 10,000 troops
ready to pour over the border
from Manchuria while man-
power reserves immediately
available to the United Nations
forces were limited to about
20,000 men at the most.

4. The advantage of United
Nations forces -— superior
mechanical equipment — was
outweighed in this rugged terri-
tory by the extreme mobility
of the Communist foot soldier,

5. More than 20,000 guerillas,

mainly bypassed North Korean
troops, were scattered behind
front lines tying up about 80,000
United Nations troops and
threatening rear area supply
lines

6. The breaking up of the
South Korean Army

The numerical disadvantage

which drove the United Nations
Army back to the Pusan
perimeter had been overcome
until the open intervention of
Communist China in North
Korea a month ago.

Observers here while conced-
ing that this intervention was
beyond control of the United
Nations command, were. still
uncertain why in the face of it
seneral Douglas MacArthur
attempted his Chongchon River
offensive eight days ago.

This offensive not only found-
ered against a wall of Commu-
nists, but forced the 8th Army
to pull back hurriedly 35 miles
to the south to avoid being cut
off completely.

Great Numbers

Overwhelming numbers were
enly one of the two main factors
of the Communist success.

The other and some observers
here maintained that it was the
more important, was the fact that
Communists had unlimited free-
dom to manoeuvre to the east
of the 8th Army and attempt to
cut in behind it,

This wag caused by the split
command system in operation in
Korea, Zones of responsibility of
commands had been determined
by a crayon mark from North
to South which roughly split the
map of North Korea into two
equal parts, To the West of this
line operated Lieutenant General
Walton M, Walker’s army; on the
right Major General Edward A

Secretary General, conferred today | Almond’s 10th Corps.

















area to outflank the
8th Army. The corps now oper-
ating in the extreme noftheast
was unable to provide any flank
protection for men on the Chong-
chon river. The 10th Corps cut off
from the 8th Army by the Chinese
drive south of Chongchon was in
a precarious position.

The American Marin@ and 7th
Infantry Divisions were virtually
marooned deep in the heart of
Communist-held territory.

10th Corps

Divisions Scatter

Two South Korean divisions
holding the right flank on the
Chongehon made no real attempt
to stand and fight. In fact, after
the first few hours they broke
completely and scattered, From
the time they fled, the Chongchon
River offensive was doomed since
the United Nations line wary com-
pletely exposed.

The conduct of these two divi-
sions was not merely a question
of personal courage, There were
100,000 men under arms in the
South Korean Army today, main-
ly untried, untrained and unwill-
ing conscripts There were few
who had not been in battle almost
continuously since June 25, and
who were not virtually exhausted,

Faced with these considera-
tions, even professional optimista
in official quarters had been
forced to concede the plight of a
fledgling United Nations Army,

The Eighth Army on the West
could be outflanked at any time if
the Communists chose to do so
because there was virtually
nothing on the East to prevent
such a move

If General Walker decided to
stand and fight where he was, he
would be surrounded.

An alternative was a series of
retreats restricted only by the lim-
ited length of the Korean pen-
insula,

Political Settlement
The only way to avoid being
outflanked was to throw a line

completely across the peninsula, , semeygeor:
Military observers said the bright~ *

est and at the same time the most
dubious prospect lay in the hope
of political settlement—brightest
because it seemed the only pos-
sible solution—dubious, because
the basis of such a settlement was
still not clear,

If it was the intention of the
Chinese Communist leader Mao
Tse Tung to drive the United
Nations out of Korea, there would
appear to be little hope of bar-
gaining.

These were the political straws
being grasped by the Military
Command here to-night,—Reuter.













a





. i 1 ; ant | desired”, he add : , f
next week. question” that the objective of peters wees Mae at No ome Bomb oer ee oe pat anos Both men were responsible TELL THE ADVOCATE
€ : 7: t i 2 is ies i ; . ‘ < senior me the Pe - | dir O ’ :
SIR DAVID KELLY IS ON Press Officer Michael gon F | an Spe Pager ese guar The lava stopped 50 yards oe The General said he had not eroment delamationy” ae Tetiber het uke nae THE NEWS
: TAILS matt ‘reported | taet oo Beitish United Nations forces”, the fringe of vineyards and chest- | recommended the atom bomb as a] It is continuing the series of | operations on the other side’ ct the Ring 3113 Day or Night.
WAY TO LONDON speak on Monday wr hi "talles “The enemy is in enormous| "Ut groves ringing Milo, Fornazzo remedy. Any decision .of this|talks that the Secretary General crayon mark : . ‘
| Embassy oad beun on Tues. strength and we must expect|and_ the neighbouring villages! nature belongs to a higher author- | has with the Chief Indian delegate Ccdebmenine apparent » a Sa
2 _. BERLIN, Dec, 2. I Smrondlesely before or| ore severe battles,” he said. “Let| Clustered on Etna’s foothills. pity than my own”, he declared. Sir Benegal Narsing Rau and the} op inis apienaienara eve ® inte the PAYS FOR NEWS.
a = in Me a am in after a luncheon which the Presi-| every man and woman vow we ir ‘atm ts aA ae that the Allied puinese ities ain ba gS on ; oe :
Ambassador in Moscow, sai@ in| é eer ase r ; .| shall never rest until every mem- .. ° ° air and naval forces were giving |to be continued w che —————— an sty
Berlin today on his way to Lon-| dent will give he a nee} ber of the ioampaniniet ‘armies, Nine Guilty Priests invaluable assistance in the cam- |later. ;
don that he was not bringing any| ‘The conversations would con- \whether Korean or Chinese or paign, “but under present condi- It was believed here that Lie
eee Soviet proposals. ' |tinue, on Wednesday and could! any others, shall either be dead Sentenced lions their potential is limited by | Was goareng, Sas for a formula
te said he would see the For-| go beyond that date, but McDer- | ¢)” prisoners or driven from our the fact that they cannot operate |to solve the Far East ores.
— eens Tr eee mera meee pron Fo mean plans cover | land.” PRAGUE, Dec 2 ae oy fee Chinese —Reuter.
Dae ae iy . omy Wo. Uae ie He urged the people to carry! A Prague state court today | forces not immediately situated in
ne but did pet Moy whether _ The date weer a, cut whatever orders local United] goung nine Roman Catholic clergy— North Korea. Indo ‘esia
¢ would cer _Mr. Att oF before 1s ane OAR AO “ | Nations commanders gave them,| men guilty of high treason and General Mac Arthur said he im
United Su ae tee a et oy ee Seer —Reuter. | 2nd if in battle areas to keep off} espionage. They had been on | knew no way in which recent re- oo ell :
—— Maen ee ear main roads, trial for five days verses—due entirely to the over- Denies Report
—_- “Make every village an armed] “Tha pine were sentenced as woeining ground strength of the
4 camp,”’ he continued. follows: ‘ommunists—could have been DJAKARTA, Dec, 2
Tibet Appeals For Peace TRUMAN THREATENED ‘Reuter. Father Jan Opasek, life imprison- avoided under existing conditions. Indonesia officially denied today
ADELPHIA, Dec, 2 ’ ment: Dr. Stanislay Zela, Suffragan| _ He did not think that had the|a_ press report from the Hague L I F E
pene aoe vt a s ine aed anneet Serving’ ap DIED SUDDENLY Bishop, 25 years; Dr. Stanislav United Nations stopped the cam-|that an informal compromise
x lay appealed to 2 " tioni a |Jarolimek, Abbot of a monastery | P#/8n at some stage before reach- | agreement had been reached on
United Nations “for an early eneren eo E8 e A BREAD peace ont in Strahov, 20 years: Dr, Otakar|!%&% the Manchurian border the|the problem of Western New
ent” > ste after \ 7 - ars! ; é i, . c
mg a Be gg gy el Tielke atrived here by train to-day for Rood i ga this Svek 20 years: Dr. Josef Cihak a would have stayed out of eo. ‘ ro ee * O ou
; 5 : ‘ : j oslav Kilac 17 me e report said that inform Ik ——~Baree
vasion of their country. an Army-Navy tootball. game morning shortly after one ee aie mead 25 cas: Mac Arthur disclosed that the top level Indonesian Dutch dis- Sepak Xfce}
Trygve Lie, United Nations ft th o'clock at Baxter's Roud, | years: Ur. - ye | United Nations now held nearl i t the Hague last k tg or
, About 20 to 25 feet from the t the | Jan Boukl 18 years: Father Vac-| s48 a y | cussions a e Hague last wee
Secretary General, received a|president’s car one of the men} Redman was sitting = Gn lav Mrtvy 15 years. ae prisoners. had produced a concrete com- some _less-for-
cable to this effect from the oo was reported to have remarked: corner of eo rgees ik const: trmposeds A. Abbe n answer to the question: “Do promise proposal for Netherlands
, betan Government delegation} If I had a gun now, I could! when he was seen tos ¥ | 150,000 crowns on Dr. Cihak, fines | ¥°U Tegard the present campaign | recognition of Indonesian sover- tunate-than-
, now in India. bump him off. eenkan collapse on the corner. nt 160,006. crowns senah on Dr.|238 continuation of North Korean eignty over Western New Guinea ‘i
—Reuter.. —Reuter. Rei and Abbot Opecsie an a lesser aggression or representing an en- —Reuter. yourself friend
w fines on other defendants eae poem of aggression?”
oe ie General replied: “This in my . or relative
| INNER The court ome Serr opinion is a new war with a new W. German Security Treaty
e “ opponent and a new army. North ‘
ee : roel — destroyed and To Be Discussed
. | ‘ne mission of the United Nations
r Wi command LONDON, Dec. 2. |
practically fulfilled whe: / ' Cc, 4.
Attlee ull | this fresh coaaanen aie Britain will have “als with WITH CHRISTMAS CHEER!
ron | launched.—Re : French and American Govern-
Visit Ottawa eer ments on West German ee
| lor Konrad Adenauer’s request for Send him or her :—
F LONDON, Dec. 2. Be sure and get a Security Treaty to replace the d om
: Prime Minister Clement Attlee the “Eventi aa) | present statute, it is understood in
will definitely visit Ottawa on his | . a ae ening Advo- informed quarters here to-day
way home from talks with Presi- cate OMOrrow, \ K W V B R A N )) y
i dent Truman in Washington, it| Dr Adenauers request has e eVe
j was announced today. | Goan woe oar at Lo a
The time of his visit to Louis ‘ > 5 Saar hag nae Me Sa age
| si,tauret,escxneain Pine” Regulations — |men ih meaner = K WV. CORONATION WINE
Minister, will depend cn how long fe , : “G aul
the Washirigton’ talks will last. | Relaxed eae Ser ver eae
i Pee ge poe In. Jamaica | but chat the possibility was not
; > é DNGOn | lexcl od
by plane tomerrow night. (From Our Oem Correspondent) | “SUC —reuter.|} INEXPENSIVE BUT GOOD!
As forecast yesterday, Field KINGSTON, J’ca, Nov. 27
Marshal Sir William Slim, Chief 5 The Rr emearnes has relaxed | US. A Chi f \
of the Imperial General Staff, finance regulations in Jamaica =, rm 1e | " s rE. sas : ieee es :
Sill: go with Mr. Atte Reuter. releasing funds exceeding 250 U.S, | y Either will warm the cockles of your friend’s heart and
dollars for children under the | | we
age of 15 years in any one year Leaves For Korea |
: to residents in Jamaica wishing WASHINGTON, Dec. 2. |
Berliners Go To Polls Today |; travel to Canada. tne Uae | Gene PSHINGTON, Collins, iat iat OR HER IRITS
BERLIN, Dec. 2. or American account countries | American Army Chief of Staff is i cK Ul HIS 0 . ‘
Both West and East Berlin The Jamaica Chamber of Com-|on his way to the Far East by air .
police were reported tonight in | merce and other business interests|to confer with General Dougla THE K. W. Vv. WAY
preparation for tomorrow’s prin-| as well as the People’s National) Mac Arthur about the situation in|
cipal. elections in which a record |Party have been advocating this| Korea ‘ s ickl ee ieptca ¥3
RALPH D. ROCK standing beside the Hillman car which he won. This cay-q@as raffied in aid of the percentage of 1,664,000 electors | relaxation for some time. As a Announcing this t yan Arn ] He who gives quickly, gives twice !!
Barbados Boys’ Club i the three western sectors result the Govertiment has aban- | spokesman said Collins
Col. RB. T. Michelin who presented the car yesterday can be seen standing (centre) in the back expected to vote doned “keep Jamaicar t left Washingtor 1 2
ground. Presentation took place at Police Headgua rter tory Reuter home’’ polic Reuter Nc a - —/
‘
f ; \





PAGE TWO

AQUATIC CLUB CINE
TO-NIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.36
“HOLLYWOOD CANTEEN’
Starring Bette DAVIS—Dane CLARK—Joan CRAWFORD—
Ida LUPINO—Johh GARFIELD—Paul HENREID

and many other well known Sters
A Warner Bros. Picture



LAZA Theatre—sriDGETowNn

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
Warner's New S Hit!
Joan CRAWFORD in "FLAMINGO ROAD"

with Zachary Scott, Sidney Greenstreet, David Brain

TUES., WED., THURS. 4.45 and 8.30 p.m

Warner’ Hit...
Joel Sona in “COLORADO TERRITORY” 3

Special Matinee Thursday 7th 2 p.m,
Duncan Reynaldo as Cisco Kid in
and Jimmy Wakely in

“GAY CAVALIER”
“TRAIL TO MEXICO”





PLAZA Theatre = OISTIN

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW—5 & 8.30 p.m. (Monogram Double)
Duncan Reynaldo in “CISCO KID RETURNS”

and
“PARTNERS OF THE TRAIL”




Johnny Mack BROWN in




(Monogram Double)

Jimmy WAKELY in
“SONG OF THE SIERRAS”



Tuesday and Wednesday 5 & 8.30 p.m,

Gilbert Roland as Cisco Kid in
“GAY CAVALIER” &








GALETY (the Garden) ST. JAMES

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW 8,30 p.m, MAT. Sun. 5 p.m.
Leo GORCEY in “HARD BOILED MAHONEY”







, and
Johnny Mack BROWN in “PRAIRIE EXPRESS”

A MONOGRAM Double

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY 8.30 p.m. (Monogram Double) — |
Warren Douglas in Jimmy WAKELY in |
“T ” & “SONG OF THE DRIFTER” |











IS EXCELLENCY THE GOV-

ERNOR accompanied by his
A.D.C. Major Denis Vaughan, at-
tended the Annual Dinner of the
Chamber of Commerce last night
at the Marine Hotel, Among the
other guests present were Sir
Allan Collymore, Chiéf Justice,
Mr. Robert N. ‘Turner, Colonial
Secretary, Mr. Henry Seaford,
President of the B.G. Chamber of
Commerce, Sir John Saint, M:
E. J. Petrie, Financial Secretary,
Capt. G. J. Bryan, Mr. E. S. S
Burrowes, Labour Commissioner,
Wing Comdr. L. A. Egglesfield,
Director General of Civil Avia-
tion in the Caribbean, Mr. Sains-
bury, Acting Controller of
Customs, Mr. Kenneth Girling,
Acting Director General of Tele-
Comrnunications (Aeronautical )
in the Caribbean, Major C. Glin-
don Reed, Director of Education,
Col, R. T. Michelin, Commissioner
of Police, Mr. A. V. Nyren, Ameri-
can Consul, Mr. H. N. Armstrong,
Colonial Postmaster, Mr. Dic
Leacock Jr. President of the

Chamber of Commerce, Mr. G. H.
King,
other mémibers of the Chamber
of Commerce,

Jnr. Vice-President and

ASTHMA MUCUS

Loosened First Day

Don't let ing, sneezing, chok-
ing attacks of Bronchitis or Asgima
ruin your sleep and another

Bight wi -

DACO, This m ine not a
emoke, Inject! ‘ierey: but works
throug! 8 blood ¢ reach eo
io warts hel = immedi

jose Bi elp! -
ately 8 ways: 1. ee ee and re-
move thic! mucus. 3. Thus
promotes sounder,
more refreshing allevi-
Fd foustl heen —ae od

uick sa!
guaranteed, Get MENDACO from
shemist today.





tite. Fee Mk

ae et
Why not buy your Christ-
mas gift watch now and
save money ? Special values
in the Watch Fashion Parade
include many excellent
Swiss and domestic move-
ments.



©GOME IN AND SEE THEM!

We show only a very few of
the exceptional values on
Gisplay at our store. Hf you
want a good watch priced
from $9.50 up, we suggest
you come in now.



The Jewel Box

of



BARBADOS t ;



For the Gifts you
give with pride
let
ALFONSO’S
be your Guide



ALFONSO B. DE LIMA & CO.

Corner of Broad and Mc.Gregor

NOTICE

Streets.

Our Customers and ftiends are asked

to take note that

THE CORNER
Trafalgar Street

MANNING'S

STORE

SALES DEPARTMENT

AND

ELECTRICAL WORKSHOP

will be closed for Breakfast




The Man Who Came

To Dinner

S WILL BE seen fron the
advertisement appegting
elsewhere in this issue, the book-
ing office for sale of seats fpr THE
MAN WHO CAME TO NER
opens next Friday at the Empire
Bridgetown Players havé, in the
last eight years, built up & repu-
tation for themselves, and Carib
need hardly state that jg this,
their latest production ler the
direction of W. Therold Barnes
and Frank A. Collymore, no pains
bave been spared to make it equal
in entertainment value to their
successes .

The leading parts of Sheridan
Whiteside and tis secretary Maggie
Cutler are played by Frank Colly-
more and Greta Bancroft, and
they are supported by a cast of
over thirty including a few old-
stagers as well as many newcomers
to the local stage, Eleanor Hewitt-
Myring, Peggy Smith, el
Timson, Idris Millg Peggy Wood,
Bruce Hamilton, Dick “Vidmer,
William Bertalan, J

race,
Wendy Inniss, Camp! reen-
idge, Margot Laffan, Piera® Maffei,
Daphne Stehelin, John Burt,

Sheila Ince, Maude Skinner, Biff
Stehelin, and others among whom
are six young members of the
Combermere School Glee CQyb.

And, most appropriately, the
Second and Third Acts of the play
take place on Christmas Eve and
Christmas Day.



Y ADVOCATE

eemenemenn



Successful Show

RS, JOYCE STUART'S repeat

showing of her Reévuedeville,
1950 at the Empire Theatre on
Friday night, was a complete
success, at least as far as perfor-
mance was concerned, although
the audience could have been a
bigger one.

The musicale, writte) around
Barbadiah life, was the vehicle
by which Mrs, Stuart gav@ an apt
opportunity to the pupils of her
dancing class to give a first class
display of modern stage dancing.

There was a jote de vivre
among the entire cast as they
went through the difficult stens
of the tango, the waltz and tne
rhumba that spoke of a confidence
that has no doubt come with the
experience of three previous
showings.

Mrs. Stuart again led the waltz
herself in elegant style, but both
the tango and rhumba were
executed with such good grace
and timing that no individual
can be singled out for special
praise,

Joseph Tudor’s clowning was
again the piece de resistarice or
the show and was responsible in
large measure for keeping the
audience in a happy frame of
mind and in a kindly and recep-
tive mood for the entire show.

The addition of a Christmas
Scene that gave Fitz Harewoo1
the chance to sing “Silent Night”
and “White Christmas” in his fine
voice was a welcome addition to
the first showing.

| A REMINDER

The CHINA DOLL RESTAURANT

6, Marhill Street

OPEN TO-NITE 7.00

P.M. — 12 MIDNITE

gs Forget the home fire to-nite and Dine on
real Chinese Foods !



DIAL 4730 for Reservations

S555 SS SS

|| EMPIRE

TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.45
Monday 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing

20th C.-Fox presents .

“WHERE THE
SIDEWALK ENDS”

Starring
Dana ANDREWS
and
Gene TIERNEY

with
Gary MERRILL &
Bert FREED
ROXY ~
Last Two Shows TODAY
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.



Republic Big Double .
Allan “Rocky” LANE &
Eddy WALLER
, in
“BANDIT KING OF
TEXAS”
AND
“POST OFFICE
INVESTIGATOR”

with
Watren DOUGLAS and
Audrey LONG

George BRENT
Shorts :

FLASH!

FLASH

SELECT A .

GLOBE

TO-NITE 8.30 O'CLOCK — LAST SHOWING
ILLEGAL ENTRY

TOMMY DORSEY’S ORCHESTRA



YES IT’S

GORDON

(A Serial with Buster Crabbe)
lst Part To-morrow and Tuesday, 5.00 & 8.30 p.m.
2nd Part Wednesday and Thursday, 5.00 & 8.30 p.m.



LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE!
@ AUDITION TO-DAY, 9.30 A.M.

“es
FALKS KEROSENE COOKER—1, 2, 3 & 4 Burner Model
OVENS—Single and Double

CARRON DOVER COAL STOVE—Nos. 6, 7 and 8

FOR YOUR BAKING you will need. .

Jerome COUETLAND &
Ruth WARRICK
in

“MAKE BELIEVE
BALLROOM ”

ND

A
“BANDIT — OF
EL DORADO ”

with

Charles STARRETT &
Smiley BURNETT

OLYMPIC

Monday—Last Two Shows
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

Columbia Smashing Double
Joyce REYNOLD &
Ross FORD

“GIRLS SCHOOL”

AND

“TYRANT OF THE
SEA”

with
Rhys WILLIAMS
and RANDELL












Marta FOREN

FLASH!

ar R.

ROYAL
Last Two Shows TODAY
4.30 & 8.15 p.m, |
Columbia Big Double pene

2 | gentlemen
Riism), that the speed of light has

mutations.

® | per




alling

The répeat show concludes a
great ort by Mrs. Stuart t
es‘ablish the musicale as a distinct
part of public entertainment
Barbado:

Canadian Army Retired
T. COL. EMMA PENSE, Can-
adian Army retired, arrive:
from Canada yesterday mornin

by air accompanied by her friend
Miss Pat Tuckett. Here for the
Winter they dre staying at the

Marine Hotel. They were in Bar-
bados once before, after the second
World War.

To Be With Her

RS. EVELYN HARRISON

wife of Mr. M. L. Harrison
of Fontabelle left yesterday for
Trinidad, to connect with T.C.A.,
flight to Canada. Their daughter
who is at Carlton University in
Ottawa has taken suddenly ill and
she has gone up to be with her

Larry’s Back
R. LARRY VAN DUSEN of
California who was in Bar-
bados a little over a year ago
arrived yesterday from Trinidad

Dy BABB A... épizansit from the
U.S... via Mexico” crey » wrier
Panama.

Larry who is an interior decor-
ator by profession has a wide
circle of frierids in Barbados and
is very popular among the younger
set, who frequent the Aquatic
Club.

Mr. Van Dusen hopes to spend
the entire winter here and is stay-
ing at Sam Lord’s.

Back lo Venezuela
ENRIQUE (Henry)
| PEREZ, who has been in
| Barbados since February left yes-
terday morning for Venezuela.
| This was Henry’s second visit here
{in the past two years, During that
} time he has learnt English fluently
|and has made a great number of
| friends in Barbados.

A keen Water Polo player, he

| was goalkeeper for Barracudas
| this year. Several of his team
;mates were at Seawell yesterday
ito see him off.
\ At a farewell party given for
jhim by his friends on Friday
night, he was presented with a
igift, a travelling set with his
jinitials engraved on it. Henry
jwill start work with an oil com-
| pany soon after he gets home and
jnext year he has already planned
ja visit to Barbados.



Mr. ENRIQUE PEREZ
—left for Venezuela yesterday

HERE is reason to béTieve,

(a silly euphem-

again been miscalculated. What
effrontery! That is what comes
of ignoring the fundamental
physical content of atmospheric

The new figure, 186,432 miles
second, will considerably
modify the calculations of Dr.
Strabismus (Whom God Pre-
serve) of Utrecht, who is plan-
ning a fourth attempt to reach
the moon. He has constructed a
proto-nylon rocket, incorporating
a new heavier-than-fish compo-
nent called ditrimnol-oxubdl-gylox-
ene. This vaporous coagulate is
three .times as non-resistant as
nornolite, and is the only known
refulgent with a hypermorphary
action at unknown _ altitudes.
The rocket is complete except
for the nozzle, and Waggling
Parva is cordoned off from the





SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950



P.M.O. St. John Returns
R. and Mrs. E£. B. Carter of
“Villa Nova”, St. John, re-
turned from six months’ holiday
in Canada yesterday morning by
air. The majority of their stay was
spent in Montreal. Canada is Mrs
Carter’s home and their two son
are at present living up there, —
Dr. Carter who is P.M.O., St
John expects to resume his cutt
on December 10.

Returned Yesterday

ISS MAB HASKELL returned

from a short holiday in Trini-
dad yesterday morning by
B.W.LA hi
Back From Short Visit

R. MAURICE JONES, Man-
M ager of the Globe Theatre
who was in Trinidad for three
days, returned yesterday morning
by B.W.1.A

T.C.A, Station Manager

R. “BILL” STUART, T.C.A’s
M Station Manager here, re-
turned from Canada yesterday
morning by air. Mr. Stuart left
Barbados at the end of September.

To Live kn Brooklyn _
ISS K. E. CODRINGTON

who left Barbados yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A. for the US.
via San Juan expects to reside in
Brooklyn with relatives.

Miss MORELA EVANS
—back to Venezuela

‘Holiday Over
FTER two and a half months’
holiday in Barbados, Miss
Morela Evans, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. John Evans of Caracas
returned to Venezuela yesterday
morning by B.W.1LA.

She was staying with her aunt
Mrs. Robinson in Worthing, Mr.
and Mrs. Evans have many friends
in Barbados,

Was Here Two Years Ago

R. AND MRS. GEORGE B.
SOMERS arrived from
Canada yesterday by air accom-
panied by their young son Guy.
They are here for the Winter and
have one of the flats at the Camp,
St. Lawrence.
Mr. Somers who is an importer
and distributor in Toronto was in
Barbados two years ago.

On Month’s Vacation

R,. AND MRS. Mervyn Mar-

shall arrived from Trinidad
yesterday morning by B.W.I.A.
accompanied by their two sons
Michael and Phillip. They plan to
spend a month in Barbados, stay-
ing at the Worthing Guest House,

BY THE WAY — By Beachcomber

world. Only Russian spies are
allowed to loiter in the neigh-
bourhood.

To the moon and back!

HIS time the sage will make

the attempt alone, former
experiences having persuaded
him that a team of experts in the
rocket is about as much help as
a herd of hornets in a telephone
booth. The nylon rocket is built
on the boomerang principle, and
the Doctor hopes to fly across the
moon diagonally, and back again
to earth in five days. He will
not attempt to land on the moon
this time. Asked what he thought
of the theory that anyone flying
as fast as light to the moon would
get back to earth 100,000 years
before he had left_it, Strabismus
said: “That would mean that I
had reached the moon 50,000
years before getting there. The
two _ tim®-space-continuum - lags





would cancel each other out.”



Mr. ERNEST WAKELAM

—new golf pro,

Golf. Pro.
: M* ERNEST WAKELAM and

his son Allan arrived tron
Canada by air yesterday morning
Mr. Wakelam whose home is in
Ottawa will act as Professional a:
the Rockley Golf Club during th«
winter months. His son who is
also a keen golfer will be hi
assistant.

New Year’s Night

HE DINNER of the Loyal

Brothers of the Stars take:
place this year as usual at Miller
Bros. in Tudor Street on New
Year’s Night,

Here Again

M*. & MRS. T. Arthur-Smitn

of Maryland U.S.A., who have
been coming to Barbados for sev-
eral years for the Winter, arrived
yesterday by T. C. A’s B.W.I.A
Charter flight from Trinidad in-
transit from Canada where they
made their connections, They are
Staying at Stafford House,

Special Event

a YEAR is the Centenary
of the Barbados Industrial
Exhibition. To mark the occasion
the exhibition will be running a
new feature on the first night
Wednesday December 6th. ‘There
will be free non-stop dancing on
two of the lawns in the middle of
Queen’s Park from 6 p.m, to 10

p.m.

Percy Green’s and _ Clevie
Gittens’ orchestras will alternate
with the music.

For Barbados Holiday

ISS DOREEN CLARKE,

daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
George Clark of Easy Halli St.
Joseph, arrived from the U.S. via
Canada yesterday morning by air
to spend five weeks’ holiday witn
her parents,

Miss Clarke who now lives in
Cleveland, was last seen in Bar-
bados two years ago. Her good
friend Miss Ethel Lester came
down with her to spend three
weeks’ holiday here.

Staying With His Son

R. CARL COZIER, Manager
of Woodford Lodge Estate
arrived from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.I.A. Here for
three weeks he is staying with
his son and daughter-in-law, Mr.
and Mrs, Lione| Cozier of Worth-
ing.
Two other members of his fam-
ily, his daughter June and son
Winston, are also living here.

Repeat Show

ARIB has heard that in re-

sponse to several requests Judy
Graham’s Caribbean Revelry will
stage a repeat performance of
“The Beetlebottom Affair” on
Wednesday, December 20, at the
Globe Theatre. They are also
planning to introduce some new
features. eh

Water Polo Manager
Returns

R. JOE PLIMMER, Manager
of the Trinidad Water Polo
teams which toured Barbados last
week-end, returned to Trinidad
by B.W.LA. yesterday afternoon.

Leaving To-morrow

R. AND MRS. Maurice N.
Lucie-Smith and family who

are spending a short holiday in
Barbados staying with Mr. Lucie-
Smith’s brether, are due to return

ite Trinidad tomorrow afternoon.



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SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1956
THE MAN WHO CREATED BILLY BUNTER





Charles Hamilton, alias Frank

1.300.000 words
a year

AT 75, Charles Hamilton has
created a new character called
Jack of All Trades. Who is
Hamilton? He is a creator ot

those perennial schoolboys Billy
Bunter, Tom Merry and Harry
Wharton.

“Better stuff
says Hamilton
Trades.

Jack is a rolling stone gather-
ing little moss. Hamilton plans
to make him follow many trades
in many lands. “He ‘will always

eee

Bunter,”
of All

than
of Jack

CREATES A NEW CHARACTER AT 75

Richards, with his cat Sammy.

come
round,”

Three names

Hamilton writes the illy
Bunter stories under pen-name
Frank Richards. He also used
the names Martin Clifford and
Cwen Conquest.

Until the war Hamilton had
kept up aé yearly output of
1,500,000 words for 380 years,
He earned £2,500 a year. The
war, and paper rationing, brought
this to a stop.

Now, at his house near Broad-
stairs, Hamilton’s pen is busy
again.—L.E,S.

up smiling for another



Bikini Bathing Suit Here To Stay

MIAMI.
The Bikini bathing suit, that
wisp of twine and handkerchief

which has hung by a thread in
its

more ways than one since
French creation four years ago,
has apparently reached firm

ground in the United States.. ;

A leading designer sams its
here to stay.

But don’t start rushing for the
beach, boys. That’s only one
man’s opinion and even he admits
that it will take two to three
years to get the girls accustomed

to parading around with not
much more than what nature
provided as a barrier against

curious eyes.

Mal Marshall, a Miami clothing
designer who has a phobia about
stuffy wearing apparel, predicted
that within a matter of months
the Bikini suit will catch more at-
tention on American beaches than
the atom bomb caught at its
namesake.

Remember
And, Marshall continued, within
* a few years grandmothers will
be saying “I remember when”
about the torso covers the girls
are wearing now.

The daring designer shrugs off
the thought that. some people
might frown on his prediction

“They'll just have to get used
to seeing nudes on the beach,”
Marshall remarked. “Those peo-
ple were shocked when girls took
their hose off and men quit wear-
ing high collared shirts. They'll
get used to it.”

Marshall cited what he calls the
“great technological problem of
design” as one reason why the
suits have not hit the mass market,
He explained;

“Designing a Bikini is like
cutting a diamond. The subject is
so tiny that it’s hard to get the
pre perspective.

“Then, of course, every inch of
the suit serves what you might
call an essential purpose. You



JOHN WHITE

means made, justiright



don’t have extra material to play
around with,”
Variety

To solve that problem, the de-
signer plans to rely on colours
and unique materials to give his
suits variety.

“My hottest idea yet,” he re-
vealed, “is a fluorescent job. You
can’t miss a babe on the beach
night or day if she’s wearing one
of them,”

So tar, avout tne oniy sikini
suits to be spotted around Miami
Beach this season have been
stretched around models’ shapes
for photographic purposes. Press-
agenting photographers look on
the suits as the greatest boon to
photography since Sally Rand
discovered fans.

“A Bikini suit,” said one
academic lensman, “gives more
cheesecake per square inch than
a Minsky stripper shows in a



week.” —LN.S.
Know Bob Hope?
Bob Hope, the actor, has be-

come an institution throughout
the world, a symbol of the joy of
living and laughter> The many
films featuring his round eyes,
his funny nose and his gags have
exhilarated young and old and
lave brought cheerful moments
international audiences, even
in trying times.

Bob Hope, the family man, may
not be as well known as Bob Hope
the comedian, but he undoubtedly
deserves the same fame in this
domain

30b is happily married to beau-
tiful Dolores Reade, whom he
charmed away from a _ singing
career by marrying her in 1932,
After eight years of marriage
they decided to adopt a daughter,
Linda, now nine years old, and
later, they adopted a son, Tony,
new aged eight. Recently, they
adepted two more youngsters,
Nora and Kelly, both three-year-

olds

to

' stores in Barbados.

fpaein good looks tell you they're just right,
You know, too, when you look at the price

tag, that you can’t get finer value. Ilnstrated
is a Tan Oxford. Tied to every pair is the John
,White Guarantee Shield—the sign which
“means ‘just right’! Look for it in leading

SUNDAY



Crardening Hints |A* THe Cinema

For Amateurs

THE DAHLIA

DAHLIAS are not as commonly
grown in Barbados as many of the
other flowering plants. The reason
for this may be the prevailing
idea among some gardeners that
there is something especially diffi-
cult in their cultivation. This is
a mistaken idea however, for the
Dahlia is one of the easiest of
plants to grow, not only from
tuber, but from seed, and from
cutting. Dahlias are lovely as pot
plants or out in the open bed,
and they will bear generously
almost right through the year.

The seeds, tubers, or cuttings
should be planted much at the
same time as other annual seeds,
that is any time from November
on. After the plants are put out
in their permanent position,
whether in pot or bed, they re-
quire ordinary garden conditions
of soil and water in a nice open
sunny place. Do not make the soil
they are in very rich however,
as this.tends to encourage exces-
sive foliage, and as a consequence
fewer flowers.

Dahlia plants need some sup-
port, but the stakes should never
be in evidence, but should be of
a size to. help keep the plant in
a good position without being
seen. Decide where the young
plants are to be put, and put in
the stakes before putting in the
plants so as to avoid injuring the
delicate roots.

When planting out the small
variety of Dahlia, place the plants
eighteen inches to two feet apart,
while the medium size or large
variety should be placed four to
five feet apart.



When the plants are well grown,
and just before they start to
flower, a little thinning and trim-
ming may be neéded. It is about
this time too, that a mulch of
manure will be beneficial.

After some time Dahlia plants
tend to die off, and in Northern
climates the custom is to take up
the tubers and hang them up to
dry until Springtime comes round
again. In Barbados this is also
done by some people, but other
most successful Dahlia growers
just cut the plant down to ground
level at the first sign of its dying
back, and it will
with fresh new

being ded by accepted rules in
garde no gardener should
ever be hide-bound by these
rules, but should constantly be
breaking fresh ground in experi-
menting. This is especially so of
gardening in Barbados, where our
local conditions require ways and
methods that cannot be found in
the ordinary garden book, but
which must be worked out locally.

When specimen Dahlia blooms
are desired, some of the lower
branches of the plant should be
cut off, and most of the buds off
the remaining branches nipped
leaving just one or two at each
end.

While the enormous specimen
Dahlias (some the size of a tea-
plate) are very beautiful as speci-
mens, yet the small, or moderate
sized ones, are more useful for
as garden decoration, and
or picking for the house.




Smuggling And
Politics

Hy Gm

“ILLEGAL ENTRY” now playing at the Globe Thea-
tre is exactly what its title implies.
case in the files of the United States Department of Justice,
it shows the activities of the It

ADVOCATE

Taken from an actual

igration Department in

their efforts to prevent the smuggling of aliens, by air, from
Mexico into the United States.

It is an interesting and ex-
citing documentary-type film
with plenty of action and the
Story is graphically told with-
out too much over-emphasis on
the tougher aspects of the case.
The keynote of the film is sus-
pense built up surely and
steadily to a dramatic climax.

As the Chief of the Immigra-
tion district, including southern
California, George Brent and his
assistants are looking for a pilot
who can help them smash the
smuggling ring. Howard Duff, an
ex-army flier, whose job is just
about to fold under him, is sworn
in as a special agent. His in-
structions are to gain the confi-
dence of Marta Toren, widow of
his wartime co-pilot, who is an
unwilling member of the ring,
and to get all the information
possible concerning its members.
To do this, he manages to get a
jeb as a freight pilot with an
airline operated by one of the
smugglers, by which cargo is not
only _ transported, but aliens
smuggled over the border, and he
is eventually assigned to fly the
big boss from Mexico to the
United States, After a tense and
terrifying trip, during which his
indentity is discovered, Duff
ground-loops the plane, and the
immigration authorities take over.

For once, the love interest oes
not overshadow more important
action, and the romance between
Howard Duff and Marta Toren fits
naturally into the plot,

The performances of the whole
cast are realistic and convincing
and the direction is particularly
(good, together with a musical
score that blends with the vary-
ing moods throughout the film.

Flamingo Road

After a four weeks’ visit, Sam-

son and Delilah have departed

CROSSWORD
Sak deceased Baia





Across

1 and 9 Down. Mix it deeper when

you think some patents. (4-7)

6 and 8 Down. Cunning in craft
(10) 9, Create a card game. (6)
+ Nothing eateries: (a)
This is suggestive of hospitality
(6) 14, Trap. (3)
. This must be paid. (5)

.» Wick well-known in the North. (3)
This stag ruled Germany. (9)
22. Arts reformed in Navy. (4)
It could be gate or door, (5)
. The very reverse of 7 Down. (3)
- Area enclosed, (7) .
28. As a clue it is unworthy. (7)
Down
2. Hard water, (3) &%. Dwarf. (7)
Fuanests the heather family. (5)
6. Yield? to compassion. (6)
1. bel this a kid's game, (3)
8. See 5 Across. 4. See 1 Across,
10, Could be late. (4)
%: Sort of wire that shocks one, (4)
f. ffliction. (6)
° Bey. (5) 20. Muse. (4)
. She has a bee and so is a plant, (4)
\ mc a bow is coloured. (4)
tally a goifer's river, (3)®
yesterday's puzale.—Across:
1 Fron OE ze5t 75 Mint 10, Babu; 11,
‘ and 14 nm, Resignation; 15,
i Rest: 18, Mor 20, ‘Lariat; 22)
. Limn; %5, Anglo; 26, See 14








sg Spin. oun! i, Mpa! 2,
“4 re Knwu > e eer; 5, seer,
. Maze: 8, fis: 9. Wastain: 13

ely; i. se 1:
ir Sin® tic: 21. "Away:

, Otle;





and in their
Bridgetown is

from these shores,
place, the Plaza

now showing Joan Crawford in
“FLAMINGO ROAD.” Dealing
with small town politics, wnich
would appear to be tarred with
the same brush as politics the
world over, we have Miss Craw-
ford as an ex-carnival entertain-
er, running foul of Sydney
Greenstreet, the crooked sheriff,
when she becomes friendly with
Zachary Scott who is being
groomed by the sheriff as his
henchman in the state legislature
When she refuses to leave town
Miss «@rawtford its arrested on a
phony charge and sent to a wo-
men’s Metention home. On her
release, she gets a job whereby
she meets the big political boss,
David Brian, with whom she falls
in love and marries. From then
on, the gloves are off between
the sheriff and herself, and it is
literally a battle to his death,
with Greenstreet, goaded by his
personal hatred, using every po-
litical trick to destroy the woman}
who stands between him and his
political ambitions.

Sydney Greenstreet is an ab-
solute genius when it comes to
portraying a thoroughly sinister
character, Without the slightest
effort, he can create an evil at-
mosphere, while at the same time,
joking with the boys, or heaving
his ponderous frame like a slow-
moving pachyderm. As the un-
scrupulous sheriff, he is the nega-
tion of everything that is honest
and decent, and his portrayal is
brilliant and skilful. iss Craw-
ford is smooth and dramatic in
her transition from the carnival
girl] to the hostess on Flamingo
Road. She is a finished actress
and shines in this type of role.
As the deputy sheriff and Green-
street's henchman, Zachary Scott
portrays the weak, spineless po-
litical tool, who finally becomes
so embroiled in political skull-
druggery that he shoots himself.
A newcomer, David Brian, makes
his film debut as the big boss. He

is tough and convincing and not] 2

without his attractions Gladys
George is back again, this timed
as the owner and hostess of a
road-house where boys meet for
their political shindigs. She's a
real old-timer, and it’s good to
see her once more.

“FLAMINGO ROAD” is well
acted and directed and from the
point of view of dramatic enter-
tainment, should satisfy most
people



Â¥
“ONCE MIGHTY ROME .. .”
ROME.

The bitter football rivalry in
Italy between Rome and Naples
came to a climax with the burning
of a coffin in the centre of Rome.
Five thousand Neapolitans, who
cane to Naples to support their
team, brought a large black coffin
with the inscription, “Here lies
once mighty Rome destroyed by
Naples.” Ag the match ended in



a goaled draw, the coffin was
burned.
POOL WINNERS
TOKIO.

Two British soldiers, whc be-
tween them, own £94,000, have
joined the ghting in Korea. They
heard that they had won the

money in a football pool while on
the voyage from England. Com-
ment of one on landing: “They
tell me there is nothing to spend
money on in Korea. Isn't that just
my luck.”

Designed for elegance and efficl-

| ency, fitted with a bakelite handle

for comfort and easy control, the
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DARBADOS, by retaining the Elite Water Polo Cup, has shown
Trinidad that they are still the stronger of the two teams. One

SUNDAY

)
W. I. Beware Of Complacency
Says Board President Nunes

BY O. 8. COPPIN

HAD THE opportunity of listening to a record-

ed broadcast which Mr. R. K. Nunes, President

of the West Indies Cricket Board of Control made

on his return to Jamaica from his stay in Eng-

land, and after he had been re-elected President

of the West Indies Cricket Board of Control] at
their Trinidad meeting.

Mr. Nunes said that he had been asked to give
his impressions of the West Indies tour of England
which he had been privileged to witness.

I do not propose to reproduce here what Mr. Nunes said in its
entirety as we have heard most of it already, that is with regard
to the performance of the team.

TWO POINTS

WO POINTS in his speech however interest me greatly and I

am compelled to offer some comment.

The first is that Mr. Nunes in his speech advises the West Indies
to guard against complacency on the strength of their win in the
series with England and in the face of their forthcoming tour to
Australia in 1951. ®

No one could have greeted this announcement more heartily than
I did since it comes from the head of the controlling body of West
Indies cricket themselves and as such, should be considered as indi-
cative of the policy that would direct their dealings with West Indies

cricket at present. :
BAFFLED
AM BAFFLED at present as to the method I must use to associate
this declaration of policy with the inactivity of the Board as
far as instituting a search for new talent is concerned.

If Mr. Nunes’ advice is to be translated ipto positive action then
a search should have been started already for a pair of keen prom-
ising pace bowlers to train for the tour. °

It is no point waiting until the quadrangular tournament games
between Barbados and Trinidad on the one hand and Jamaica and
British Guiana on the other are concluded next year to select some
pace bowler on the strength of his performance in the respective
fixtures.

If the West Indies are to compete with the leading teams in
Imperial Cricket to-day, then they must adopt modern methods of
team building that have stood the acid test of post-war cricket with
accepted success.

MUST BE TRAINED
~ bowlers must be trained for their arduous duties as carefully
as a two-year-old is trained to be a stayer or a sprinter as the
occasion demands,
If there is no complacency in West Indies Official cricket circles,
then let them set to work building a team and training the key men
before the comparative farce of Intercolonial tournaments leads them

astray.
NO CONGRATS FOR GODDARD

N Mr. Nunes’ speech he made no reference to the Captain of
the West Indies team, John Goddard, although he mentioned
individually Rae, Stollmeyer, Valentine, Weekes and Worrell.

I have already written in these columns that I was surprised that
at the last meeting of the West Indies Cricket Board of Control there
were resolutions passed and honorariums granted to Mr. Nunes for
his great service to West Indies cricket and also to Mr. Lacy, but
nothing was put on record Of the admittedly good job done by John
Goddard in his inspired leadership of the team or to Mr. Jack Kid-
ney, the Manager who is also credited with having done a good job.

NO EXCUSE

VEN if there was a slip at the Board Meeting in Trinidad, surely

the President on his return to Jamaica on having been asked

to say something about the tour should have grasped the opportunity
to pay some tribute to these two officials.

Nunes himself captained the 1928 West Indies team to England
that was not a particularly successful West Indies team but even in
those circumstances I am sure he realises that to captain even a
losing West Indies tearn in a tour of England is no sinecure and
more so the first team to win a single est match and finally the
series of Test matches in England.

I sincerely hope that as Mr. Nunes said in his broadcast, there
has never before been such unanimity among the West Indian Cricket
Board of Control as there is now and that this slip was just a slip.

BARBADOS STILL TOPS AT WATER POLO

outstanding point however is that_the Trinidad team has improved
so greatly between January and November that it has water polo fans
here wondering what is going to happen when Barbados visits Trini-
dad next year. If the Trinidad team continues to improve with such
— strides, by next year they will be definitely better than their
riv a ig
‘he Barbados team has not shown the remarkable teapeoveasn
which the visitors did, but they are nevertheless, still a great force
to be reckoned with.

The stimulating effect that the tour just concluded has had on
the game will show itself clearer when the Water Polo Association
opens its league next year,

A TOUR NEXT SEASON
ITH a possibility of a tour to Trinidad in the minds of the play-
ers, next season they will all strive to be among the best ten
which will be selected, Already youngsters are asking about joining
the Association, so the older players will have to watch their step
against this young talent which the Association hopes will be available
when the 1951 league opens.

Water Polo among the ladies seems to be here to stay. The local
team with only about six weeks steady practising before the Trinidad
tour, has shown great promise. If they can form a league next year
comprised of about three or four teams, they should have a successful
season and the be ey they will gain will put them on an even
footing with their Trinidad rivals,

The only comment on ladies Water Polo is that the field when
they play should be a bit shorter. However these and other minor
problems can be worked out before the 1951 season begins.

GOLF PRO ARRIVES

RNEST WAKELAM, senior Golf professional, at the Royal Ottawa

Golf Club in Canada, arrived yesterday to take up the post of

winter professional at the Rockley Golf and Country Club in succes-

sion to Allan Rennick who has served as winter professional for the
past two years.

Wakelam is a well known professional player in Canada and is
not only a coach but has won the senior championship of the Canadian
Golfers’ Association for the past two years and has recently turned in
a nine hole score of 29 on the difficult Ottawa course.

He makes his first tour of the Rockley Golf Club Course tomor-
row, if possible in a four ball match with three members and will be
ready to start giving lessons this week.

The November Beer Mug Competition which was postponed last
Saturday until yesterday was abandoned when play was not possible.









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ADVOCATE

No Cricket Yesterday wyaT OF BATTLE FRONT?



Rain Washes Out Play

In Four

There was no play yesterday

Fixtures

in any of the games scheduled

to take place in the seventh series of the First Division

Cricket Competition.

Commonwealth
« » € :
304—8 In 2nd Test

BOMBAY, Dec. 2.

Helped by a fifth-wicket stand
of 138 by the Lancashire pair Ken
Grieves and John Ikin, the Com-
monwealth team were 222 runs
ahead at the end of the second
day’s play in the second Test
against India here

The Commonwealth brought
their first innings score to 304 for
8 today in reply *o India’s 82.

Grieves hit 89, including 14
fours in 2 hours, and Ikin scored

77 in just under 4 hours hitting
7 boundaries.

Earlier Frank Worreli and
George Emmett had put on 60
for the third wicket. Worrell

scored 55 before he missed the
ball when attempting to sweep
Nayudu and was l.b.w. He was
at the wicket 157 minutes and hit
5 fours.
Scores:—
INDIA FIRST INNINGS 82
COMMONWEALTH FIRST INNINGS
L. Fishlock c Rajendrs Nath b Alva 11
H. Gimbiett c Hazare b Alva
G. Emmett stpd. Rajendra Nath b
Hazare <
Worrell l.b.w

F b Nayudu .. . $5

J. Ikin b Nayudu ovestuses 7
K. Grieves c Ranjendra Nath b
azare ‘

B. Dooland c Manjrekar b Umrigar 6

H. G. Tribe run out . oean’ 6

Spooner not out eee ea eens 2

J. Laker not out

Extras (4 byes, 4 noballs) 8

Total (for eight wickets)

Fall of wickets 1-19; 2-27; 3—85;
4—124, 5—262, 6—285, 7—293, 8-301.

BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M Bh -.ee
Phadkar : 29 + 27 0

Hazare ....+-+ il 0 27 1
Alva ....+. ‘ 19 4 58 3
Mankad . 21 8 42 0
Umrigar ......-.. 21 5 47 1
Neyudu : 4 4 44 2
—Reuter.

No Play in Test

BRISBANE, Dec. 2,

No play was possible on the
seconé day of the first Test
match between Australia and

England because of the state of
the pitch and surrounding area.

The ground was saturated by
heavy overnight rain and though
the sun shone fiercely in frequent
spells today, further showers did
not hasten the drying of the
pitch.

The captains, Lindsay Hassett
and Freddie Brown inspected the
wickets on three occasions the
last being at four o'clock local
time.

Australia were dismissed for 228
in their first innings yesterday
and England did not start their
reply —Reuter.



Referee Stops
Gatica— Young

*
Fight
NEW YORK, Dec, 2.

Jose Gatica, a lightweight from
Buenos Aires, made an auspicious
North American debut last night
by stopping Terry Young, a vet-
eran New York boxer, in the
fcurth round of their scheduled
10-round bout at Madison Square
Garden.

Gatica, who scaled 138% lbs.,
floored Young (140 lbs.) for a
count of one in the first round
with a left hook. He battered the
New York boxer with his left
hand until the referee stopped
the fight in the fourth round.

Gatica’s victory was expected
by officials to put him in position
for a title fight with world cham-
pion Ike Williams later this win-
ter.

In the main bout on the pro-
gramme Ray Famechon of France,
European featherweight champi-
on, gave a dazzling exhibition in
knocking out Archie Decino of
Newark, New Jersey, in the sev-
enth round of their scheduled 10-
round contest.—Reuter.




Be sure and get
The
“Evening Advocate

a tel tees
<<
to-morrow. |





Heavy rains on Friday and
again yesterday rendered the
ground unfit for play, pools of
water settling in spots on some
playing fields.

There were four games carded:
College v. Wanderers at College.
Carlton v. Pickwick at Carlton.
Spartan v. Lodge at Park.
Empire vy. Combermere at Bank

Hall.

There was no play at Bank Hall
yesterday when Empire and
Combermere were scheduled to
meet there in a First Division
cricket match. The outfield and
wicket were well soaked by the
rain and in some parts of the field
lagge pools of water collected.



ueen’s Horse
Breaks Leg
In Race

LONDON, Dec. 2.

The Queen to-day saw her
famous steeple chaser, Monaveen
hurt and had to be destroye’,
while contesting the £2,(
“Queen Elizabeth Stakes” ru
over three miles at Hurst Park this
afternoon.

Monaveen with whom the Queen
had hopes of winning the Grand
National, broke a leg when falling,
and had to be shot. The horse was
among the leaders when he came
down.

The nine-year-old gelding which
finished fifth in last year’s Grand
National, is owned jointly by the
Queen and Princess Elizabeth now
in Malta.

Monaveen started 9 to 4 favour-
ite to repeat his success of last
year, The race was won by the
topweight Coloured Schoolboy,
who Started 3 to 1. He won an
exciting race.

The Queen’s horse was trained
by Peter Cazelet, and ridden by
Tony Grantham, who was injured
and brought off the course in an
ambulance.

Monaveen ran in the Princess’
colours. When she and her mother
bought the horse last year it was
their first venture into National
Hunt Racing.

The horse came down at the
water jump, It was quickly seen
that he had broken a leg and he
was shot. Jockey Grantham, it was
later learned was cut on the face
and injured his knee. He was
taken to the hospital.

The Queen, watching the race
from the top of the stands through
her binoculars, saw Monaveen
who had been jumping well hith-
erto and was lying in second lace,
fall heavily at the jump, throwing
Grantham over its head. The
horse took off over the the water
splendidly but was struck in mid-
air by another horse and brought
down,

The trainer rushed out to the
injured animal. He returned to
give her the sad news that her
horse worth some £5,000 had had
to be destroyed.

The Queen was most concerned
about her jockey, and sent to the
Course Hospital to have enquiries
made about him. She was delight-
ed to hear he was not badly hurt.
The accident cast a gloom over
the Meeting.—Reuter.

Another W.1I.
Team For Bisley

IT is hoped to be able to send
another West Indian team to
Bisley in 1953, Lt. Colonel J,
Connell, Captain of the Barbados
element of the W.I. Team that
competed at Bisley this year,
states in his report to the Barba-
dos Rifle Association last week.

The Barbados team returned
here on 2nd September,

On behalf of the Barbados
Rifle Association, Col, Connell, in
his report thankeq the Barbados
Government, Messrs. Elders and
Fyffes Steamships Coy., the Mer-
chants and business firms of
Bridgetown and the private indi-
viduals who so generously gave
donations and made it possible to
send the team to Bisley,



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SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950

This Sire Must Not Be Sold Out Of Barbados

BY BOOKIE

HE NEWS that the Barbados Turf Club is offer-
ing the stallion Battle Front for sale is the most

momentous in the affairs of local racing. I can

think of few things which will have a greater effect

on the breeding of the thoroughbred in Barbados.

Of course it depends on whether Battle Front will

be sold out of the island or not but as it is highly

probable that the former will be the case, there is
. a that the prospect of a loss to breeding looms very large
indeed.

Now the Barbados Turf Club has done so much for sg on ng
Barbados in the past, not to mention its contribution to West In
breeding on the whole, that it is difficult to censure the Club off hand
for this new move. It can be imagined that they have good reason
for contemplating such a move and the most obvious is undoubtedly
that they are in the throes of obtaining another new stallion from
England. Consequently they wish to weed out Battle Front to make
room for the new arrival. In point of fact I have no plausible argu-
ment against this procedure and I will not attempt to manufacture
any; but, and it is a very big “but” indeed, I must warn against
allowing Battle Front to go out of the island. Therefore, if the Club
desires to be of further service to Barbados breeding they can at least
endeavour to dispose of Battle Front by selling him to some local
owner.

I N the long run a stallion’s reputation and true value stands or

falls with the success or failure he proves himself to be at stud
and certainly Battle Front has nothing to be ashamed of in this re-
spect. It is quite true that he has been rather overshadowed by O.T.C.

€arly every other stallion in the B.W.I. has. But looking at Battle
Front’s record in the few short years since he has been at stud one
cannot fail to be impressed that he has done well. In the five years
that his stock has been racing he has sired over 23 winners of 51
races valued $51,067. In 1947 he was 5th on the list of sires of win-
ners in the South Caribbean and in 1948 and 1949 he was third. Even
if it is said that his progeny have run at a time when purses are much
higher than they were in former years yet a glance at the actual num.
ber of races won reveals that it is greater than the amount returned
by winners sired by a stallion like Sunplant in a period almost twice
as long.

Neither does Battle Front suffer by comparison with the type of
race horse he has produced. The accent, it is true, has always been
on speed, and if I have ranked him below O.T.C. it is plainly on this
score that I have done so. But it must always be remembered that
Battle Front came along at a time when a much higher standard of
creole was required to make its presence felt and therefore his good
ones have been among some of the best sprinters that we have bred
in the West Indies,

As his leading money winner and most successful progeny we
have Front Bell, a winner of 12 races among which were some very
convincing wins over 6 furlongs from B and A class horses in Trini-
dad, Next there is Will O’The Wisp II, a filly who won the Breeders’
Stakes in a year of unrivalled quality among the two-year-olds. On
top of that there was War Path also in the same year who proved
herself superior to Will O’The Wisp II but was unfortunately unfit
when the Breeders’ Stakes came along. The above three-are among
the fastest creole fillies that I can think of and far better than mere
five furlong sprinters.

As his best progeny over a distance I count Firemist and Battle
Star and the former proves that when put to a mare known for pro-
ducing good stayers, Battle Front could also provide us with a miler
of some distinction.

Taking everything into account I am therefore of the opinion
that the B.T.C. should do all in their power to see that he remains
in the island.

THE GOVERNOR'S CUP

TURING the last two Sundays I have given my ideas on what the

picture is like with regard to the forthcoming Trinidad Derby
and Breeders’ Stakes. To-day it seems only natural that I should
follow with some discussion on the third of the West Indies’ three great
races which are run at the Trinidad Christmas meeting. That is the
Governor’s Cup.

To begin with, I must say how glad I am to welcome the name
back from the oblivion which threatened it in the last two years
and the only thing that could please me more would be to see it
once more a race of a mile and a half. But that is a forlorn hope,
although it is possible that should a Governor who likes races of
this distance take office in Trinidad we might yet see it reverted to.
Therefore here's hoping.

Secondly it is not as easy at the present moment to discuss the
prospects for the Governor’s Cup as it is in the case of the Classics
for the simple reason that there are no definite entries to go by.
However we have some idea of what to expect. The list, I should
imagine will read something like this. Elizabethan, Blue Streak,
Atomic II, Gun Site, Orly, Pharlite, Ocean Pearl, Rebate, Pepper
Wine and Silver Bullet. There may be one or two others like the
new arrivals from England such as White Company but these will
be few. In addition we might see one or two from B.G. like Way
Home, but it is unlikely that there will be more than a dozen run-
ners at the most.

Perusing the above list, it is quite likely that the favourites will
be chosen from among Blue Streak, Elizabethan, Ocean Pearl, Gun
Site and Atomic II by reason of their respective performances at
Arima and the Barbados November meeting. Looking at them all
I could never make up my mind about it from now. But among
the others there is one who hits me fair and square in the eye and
that is Orly. This there-year-old colt was a complete unknown
quantity only last June and although he won from much inferior
company to what he will now be required to meet, yet his manner
of winning left a very favourable and lasting impression on my mind.
He is a magnificent looking specimen, and with the light weight he
will have because of his age, it will definitely take a good horse to
beat him. Our five friends above quoted will therefore have to be
on their mettle and none of their well known weaknesses must be
in evidence on race day if they are to have a chance.

I am also particularly interested to see what Ocean Pearl will
do over 9% furlongs as it seems that she is not the simple sprinter
which we took her for last year. Or perhaps I should say she has
not remained in that category but has rather progressed into a middle
distance runner of some class, She certainly handed out a very
convincing beating to Blue Streak at Arima over 7% furlongs. Can
she do it again over 9%4?

Apart from these nothing else about the race stands out with
the possible exception of the game little filly Rebate, In her I see
a similar threat to that which Elizabethan posed two years ago when
she won the race. Her weight will be approximately the same, her
style of running is also similar and providing she can get off like
her predecessor I think they will have a lot of trouble to subdue
her. But there is a lot of water to go under the bridge between
now and then. So let us wait and see.

ee
“4 =< + ov Sh, Inve





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SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950 SUNDAY ADVO¢ ATE

WATER POLO HONOURS DIVIDED | %. 72.2
Trinidad Ladies Win:

PAGE FIVE
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an
tired hii sak Niet alle tease coy Geetnsh 08: ttee gaat. cone thi cid tant BEASLEY'S LTD. Dept. 190
Barbados Amateur Water Polo He is fast but lacks experience Ret tains Elite Ce 4 Cork Street, London, W.1, England.
Association entertained a Trini- Next year he will probably play i her retalr
dad Men's Team and for the first in more matches “4 the rE © Water Fo
time a Ladies’ Team in a four- Outstanding Player € But they mt
day Intereolonial Water Polo For Barbados the outstanding , é xt se RHEUMATISM
Tournament. Matches were play- player was easily Kenneth Ince they | to bring
aoe the marnecon auees = Snappers’ sharp shooting centre Trinidad in the 195 i
vere were three Test matches forward. Ken was responsible for i ver Lad Intercolc d i 1

The Barbados men’s team won shooting four of the eight goals pi v i olo w 2 good an agon $ n
two of the tests, the other was in the test series Ken's shots idea ar } paid handsome divi-
played to a goalless draw. Trinie not only baffled the Trinidad dends. T! were a great attrac BACKACHE
dad however took the honours in goalkeeper but the man he was tion for porting public and |
lhe ladies’ matches, the Visitor’ marking His favourite shot is they have proved without doubt |
winning two of the three games. to back the goal push the ball thot the ¢ ean be rccessfulls
Two of the tests were played by away from him then turn, stretch plaved ladies, despite the
floodlight and these matches out his left hand and shoot with opinions expressed by some pes-
attracted huge crowds. The other wel) placed shots im either corner gir The Barbados team was
games too were well attended of goal. Difficulty in antici- » younger group of girls and they Well we @re in Barbados,

The Trinidad men's Team pati these shots were the main put uj; pluck performance The wreatest piace on earl
played a game against the Asso- cause fo Trinidad’s downfall. They tost the rubber, but have it wus the same; believe
ciation’s 1950 league champions Ken was well assisted in the for- mi: iny new friends the| * ates: AORN AE

Snappers Snappers won the ward line by Geoffrey Foster and Land of the Humming Bird. Next 1 to help
game in fine style, defeating the ge Be oe Geolre: pl.y year with | talent shown by ip then
visitors five 1 ed an excellent e in the sec Jean Char Roberta Vidmer ‘ ay © nel he. —_

the Swimming Sette Bho. ond test when, in the back line, and Phyllis Chandler as fast scor ' P Bene) prbibatonae
issa Plimmer of Trinidad woi ~~ to a he not omy 1 the iwba- ing for rere d Jill Gale ome . “ ome people shout ou
’ ‘9 . ar gen os team, he not on scores k Browne and Frieda Carmichael ir And promise to help all Sufferera from
eee — but was responsible for the open- th line, should be a great But Boy wena fee anil round Obstinate rheumatism will
Barbados. wot oth the Men's ‘4 goal of the series When he encouragement for other loca " pie complaints be interested in
and Ladies’ Reley races. ave Ken Ince an excellent pa ir o that ladies’ Water Pols ‘ast hour change-up the experience

iy n twelve to one related in this





relieved by

Vastly Improved s xoing to suffer man’s letter :—



























JOHNNY GATCLIFFE, Trinidad goal-keeper makes a brilliant save in the Second Test Match as The Trinidad Men's Team is a pone eee | KRUSCHEN ag ont zee
he deflects one of Delbert Bannister’s ‘power’ shots over the bar. vastly improved team to the one | Lou used to cook on mornings, | fool rheumat:
‘Although eight goals were scored on him in the Test series, Gatcliffe gave a remarkably good Which played against Barbados For children to go school | in my arms and shoulders, Then
account of himself and saved several certain goals during the tour. in Trinidad in January 1950. In She i onomist ains started in the small of my
every department itis a_ better A woman ain't a foal baak, increasing until they were
team. Their forwards, Dave Bar- , sia thdh's Wieskbast really severe. | bought a bottle
cant, Rex Eckstein, Basil Ander- he back r of Kruschen and was surprised to
son and John Sellier were all in d tt id help the b ng wae I got tte salier. I
top swimming condition and were Because wages low Ronee anes eee eee gous
always a headache for the Bar- But bo e single bour and from that day have not
bades defenders. Rex Eckstein ‘ size any pot peared ai ains were
who is a Barbadian was unfor- Especially if it Sbstteace bat the reliot really
tunate not to score. He js a strong me ene. surprised me.’ R,
swimmer and if left alone has a nd his friend would drive hor Rheumatic peine and backache
deceptive shot But the Barba- his ‘riend’s motor ear are usually the result of poisons
dos captain “Boo” Patterson was But now the hour change-up | in the blood—poisons which lazy
lways clos ine. 2 Rolectel e must walk very far bowels and tired kidneys are
always close on him and Eckstein } faill to expel. For these
it no time got away long enough | t tt de complaints there is no_ finer
to really send in one of his ‘pet’ ; When } ld ne | treatment than Kruschen Salts
shots. Dave Bareant has a quick | be Tn anive which cleanses all the internal
strong shot and with his good ‘ organs, stimulates them to nor-
condition got away several times | hould do we think mal healthy action and thus
but did not get past the Barbados | \ ask a word or two restores freshness and vigour.
goal keeper Paul Foster, ; het anak veanta ate ete All Chemists and Stores ou
In their back line they have a . . Kruschen
definite find in Harry Smith the right procedure
Smith is a big fellow, who al 1 thep you lt clasrly eit.
bine a he has only been playing | Iformity, ’ ‘
e game for ome season, has \ ;
shown by his performance here, ) ‘A @reat caropalsn has started :
that he can mark well and get | Att OF the health wuthorities
a ye to ed Pee e Are fishting this diswrace MUSCLE 1 INS
effectively marke annister in .
the first and second tests and The muck and mire in Bridgetown
won a speciel prize for ali round Mie UR uate Nek abe adie
performance on the rinidac . en ‘antisite it al ‘ Twill be like # nightmare ,
feam. He also placed second in suet ee Winners an] losers avo pictured together in an | ag é arti . : os y mean kidney oad
the Men's 100 yds 1 the aie att eee A function of the kidneys is to
Other members of the Trini- Billy Manning anti Gerard Jorda: league might be a detinite possi Por many unpleasant sayings eliminate lhsrintul lenpurittes (oom
dad back line, skipper Roddy making their debut to intercolo~ bility } Come: #rany the’ pRople's: mauth che system, If the kuineys grow
Bynoe and John Teixeira gave nial Water Polo in the latte The Trinidad Ladies’ team ha heath Claanine start us sluggish, these impurities acenm-
cod accounts of themselves. games showed that they will t heir quota of good players, Rit It shovwld by instele , ulate and settle and often become
ohnny Gatcliffe although he had possible candidates for the Bar ind Patsy Sellier, Marissa Plim.| So that when people quarreling a cause of pain in joints and
eight goals sever: Pr ee - the Eados team for Trinidad nex! :ner, Bernadette Anderson, Ann We wan't Have ia FUR Aad Hime muscles. The way to tackle the
tests gaye an excellent display In year. In the Barbados back line Wradley and Joan da Silva were Wel well! hh Yovember trouble is to help the kidneys.
THE pier of the Barbados Aquatic Club was packed with people for every match. Picture was goal and is much iareual As ert was little to choose for out~ all outstanding, not forgettin ve ri ‘ fleoting Peat ” They should be tod up with
= on Sunday morning during the Snappers- Trinidad match, which Snappers won five goals to aa last qppeasrance against Bar- standing performance, Tim Year- their goalkeeper Pamela Knagg: balay ty A A iy De ne Pills-the medicine
. ; t ados. ick radiey and Pat wood, skipper Boo Patterson an Mr. Joe Pliimmer, Manager of vinililnh Mis ai ah. made specially for this purpose,
The three tiered accommodation facilities desi gned by Basil Brooks and constructed by him and Ambrose only cpanared in the George Reet Ait all played well both teams must be ‘astiy weou i| De Wits Pills have a en ning,
other members of the Water Polo Association, was a most successful venture and allowed everyone on Snappers match. Dick was un- throughout the tour marking thei: of their performanee, and wit! sponsored by | cleansing and antiseptic action on
<4 the pier to have a good view of the games. fortunate not to play in any of menclosely and effectively, Goal- the experienee gained in thi | the Kidneys that brings them
the tests but he had to stand keeper Paul Foster who did nol series, give Barbados a muel J&R BAKERIES | back to perform their natural
down for the heavier players. concede a goal for the entire harder fight when they meet in function properly, This well-
Ambrose, the baby of the team series showed that he has lost Trinidad in 19651 makers of tried medicine is sold all over

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THE TWO CAPTAINS “Boo” Patterson, centre holding towel,
dad captain just before the third test. Seen in the picture are, left to right, Pat Ambrose,
Archie Clarke, (Referee), Cliffy MacLean, (Snappers), Boo Patterson, (Barbados), John
(Trinidad), Roddy Bynoe, (Trinidad), Rex Eckstein (Trinidad) and Ken Ince (Barbados).

chats with Roddy Bynoe,
(Trinidad), BARBADOS retains the Elite Water Polo Cup. Boo Patterson accepts it on behalf of his team from
Gatcliffe, Maj. A. R. Poster, President of the Barbados Water Polo Association, The cup was presented in Janu
ary, 1950 to the Tournament winners, by the Elite Shirt Factory of Trinidad. IKK

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RAGE TRADING CO. LID
PAGE SIX

Now that the fifth and final
volume of Sir Osbert Sitwell’s au-
tobiography is out, and read, and
standing with its four companions
on a bookshelf where the after-
noon sun glows on the scarlet of
their covers, the grateful reader
can sigh with relief because no
personal mishap or. cosmic disas-
tér has prevented the completion
of a great work.

A great work. That is a judg-
ment which the prevalent timid-
ity of English literary criticism
seldom allows to be passed upon a
contemporary book. But if the
qualities which make for perma-
nence are identical ‘with those
which constitute greatness, then
Left Hand, Right Hand in its five
volumes is undoubtedly a great
work. It is impossible to believe
that any future history of English
literature wiil overlook it. either
as literature or as human history.
Written in the grand manner of
English prose—stately, monumen-
tal, and self-respecting—its only
conspicuous stylistic fault is a re-
eurrent tendency to lapse from
the simplicity which aids clarity.
Yet this is a fault that one will-
ingly condones, even at those mo-
ments when some vast sentence is
ebephantinirig down its involuted
path. Few nowadays can write
in the matiner of the English sev-
enteenth and eighteenth century
masters of prose; few, indeed, wish
to. Nevertheless, in so far as Sir
Osbert’s style is reminiscent from
time to time of the fugal cadences
of Sir Thomas Browne or of the
magisterial gravity of Dr. Johnson,
it speaks also of that whole and
manifold heritage of the past
which is in the Sitwells’ blood and
bones. ' cae

The first four volumes of Left
Hand, Right Hand will be remem-
bered mainly on three accounts:
that they are an authentic record
of the shaping and mis-shaping
impact of early twentieth century
history on a young man of sensi-
tive intelligence; that they lay
bare the desolating grecets which
so many now in middle life have
experienced since 1914—the pro-
cess of being torn from their an-
cestral roots and a civilized tradi-
tion by the blind pressure of “eco-
nomic laws”; and that they frame
a unique portrait of an English
eccentric in the authgr’s detailed
representation of his father, Sir
George Sitwell.

Sir George as his son depicts
him is enshrined in print, for as
long as print endures, as a charac-
ter no less notable than any
drawn by the great novelists, He
is a “true” character most fortun-
ately preserved for posterity by
the circumstance that the son
whom he hedged about for so long

with tal restrictions and a
crippling Tack of ois and
understanding, developed at

length imté a writer with an ex-
ceptional*gift of imaginative per-
ception which enabled him to see
through tHe outer layers of his
father’s character to the complex
and fascinating personality with-
in, In the concluding volume of
the autobiography, Noble Essences
(Macmillan , Sir Osbert recalls
that Bernard Shaw once asked
him “Was Sir George Sitwell a

nice father?” and that in reply he +

“shot out a thunderous NO which
was a pure. reflex. When
I recovered I softened it with the
hackneyed phrase, Yes and No;
. . »” Most readers of the auto-
biography will agree that Sir
George was not a‘nice father, but
how much more memorable Sir
Osbert has made him than most
nice fathers could be made by
even the most imaginative and
generous of sons.

Noble Essences is described as a
“book of characters.” While re-
maining part of the whole design
of the autobiography, it comprises
a series of pen portraits of men
and women with whom the author
has been acquainted, Three mem-
bers of the Sitwell family of this

eneration—Edith, Osbert, and
Sacheverell—have displayed in
public controversy a markedly

combative disposition which is at
variance with their real nature.
An exquisite courtesy radiates
from them in their persona] rela-
tionships, and Sir Osbert’s liter-
ary demeanour in this book (its
subtitle is “Courteous Revela-
tions”) is governed by that in-
nate courtesy which is consistent

By A. C. WARD

with compfiete intellectual hon-
esty. It is a pity that he is beset
by the cenviction that the English
are dominated by an active ha-
tred of artists, and that he fre-
quently hits out under the im-
pulse of this assumption

It is true that the three Sitwells
were often derided in their earlier
years, but that is an experiencé
common to innovators and not
in England alone. While the
English might be accused
of indifference to art, they do
not as a nation rate art high
enough for hatred, however much
they may be inclined to make
rude noises at it when it leaves
the rut of convention in any way
that the newspapers can call “sen-
sational.” Sir Osbert is himself a
very true Englishman whose deep
and genuine love and respect for
art is shared by many of his
countrymen. His subjects in
Noble Essences are artists in
words—-poets, novelists, and critics

ARTIE'’S HEADLINE

Derry

-_



(Wilfred Owen, W. H. Davies; Ar-
nold Bennett, Ronald Firbank,
Ada Leverson; Sir EFamund Gosse,
Robert Ross, Lytton Strachey);
artists in colour and line and
sound (Sickert, Rex Whistler,
Violet Gordon Woodhouse); and
artists in life, of whom there
could be none better and none
more lovingly and admiringly
drawn in the earlier volumes than
several who served the family as
domestics,

Since Lytton Strachey wrote his
essay on Florence Nightingale
(published in Eminent Victorians,
1918) demonstrating that she was
less the tender-hearted minister-
ing angel of popular legend than
a great administrator with a ruth-
less will, there have been periodi-
cal outbreaks of dissent from this
anti-romantic view of the woman
who went to the Crimea in the
1850's to clean up the revolting
shambles in the British army hos-
—— during the war with Russia.

trachey Was a literary artist first
and foremost, and his regard for
facts was governed by the artist's
impulse to use facts as malleable
material for aesthetic ends, It is
now possible to estimate what
degree of essential accuracy
exists in Strachey’s brief assess-
ment of this astonishing woman,
if it is considered in the
a of Cecil Woodham-Smith’s
Florence Nightingale, (Constable)
a new full-length biography, based
partly upon source material not
previously available.

Mrs, Woodham-Smith has writ-
ten a first-rate book which keeps
to the facts, is not overwhelmed
by their mass, and deploys them
so skilfully that her 600 pages are
absorbing from first to last. The
facts having thus been set out
with no partisan bias, the way lies
open for another book on Florence
Nightingale which should attempt
an interpretation of her personal-
ity. She remains an enima. She
was a genius, conscious in early
life of having been born to fulfil
some great mission; yet for many
years she remained in bondage to
a snobbish, convention-ridden
mother and a possessive, jealous,
hysterical _ sister, She
a woman of feeling and compas-
sion who would wear herself out
in the service of suffering people,
yet she would allow them to
die by scores in squalor and
agony, rather than contravene
regulations, the strict observ-
ance of which might ensure long-

was 9

term benefits to future sufferers
She was the victim of prejudice
and stupidity and hypocrisy and
lies, and of political and religious
intrigue; the idol of the British
army and of the common people;
the destroyer of men whom she
wore to death as instruments in
her campaign for reform, which
triumphed in the end over the
War Office, extended to India, and
utterly revolutionized — indeed
originated—the civil as well as
the military nursing service.

Miss C. V. edgwood, who
established herself as a notable
historian with her William the
Silent (1944), makes a most at-

tractive excursion into literary
history in the volume on Seven-
teenth-Century English Literature
which she has written for the
Home University Library (Ox-
ford University Press). It is not
often that a brief book on what
might be supposed an academic
subject can be read for pleasure
as well as for instruction but Miss
Wedgwood has a light touch with
her learned pen. This new book
gives information in plenty about
the major (and a good many of
the minor) English seventeenth-
century writers; and as the author
is devoted to this period more
perhaps than to any other, she
discourses upon it illuminatingly
and with enjoyment which her
readers cannot fail to share.

It is a good many years since
G. M. Young wrote Victorian Eng-
land: Portrait of an Age, and it
is still the best short book on that
subject. His Last Essays (Rupert
Hart-Davis) has a title which
none of his readers will wish to
take seriously, for he is far from
exhausted. Though he includes
essays on Pushkin, Sir Walter
Scott, Thackeray, and Thomas
Hardy in this book, he is a histo-
rian rather than a literary essay-
ist. His sobriety of style befits the
soundness of his matter; he has
scholarship and also wisdom, but
he does not proffer these on easy
terms to casual readers. He re-
quires full attention, and for those
who are prepared to give it he is
a rewarding author. The essays
in this volume on Government, on
Benedetto Croce, on Classical
Criticism, and on “Basic” English
are full of matter for all who look
to reading as a mental gymnastic

Four books on the English canals
have lately appeared within a few
days of one another. In the rail-
way age the inland water-ways of
Britain lost much of their original
commercial importance, though
they came into their own again
during the two world wars. In
certain places they have pic-
turesque features which appeal
to lovers of scenery, and there is
a romantic interest for those who
are attracted to the canal barges
and barge-people. The distinctive
style of painted and carved de-
coration used on the barges which
have family living quarters repre-
sents what is almost the only form
of folk art surviving in Britain.
When the officials who now con-
trol the canals announced a few
months ago that the barges would
in future be painted in a uniform
and less colourful manner, loud
protests were made. If this drab
intention is carried out, Mr. John
O’Connor’s Canals, Barges and
People (art & Technicals)—which
has many wood-engravings (24)
in colour) largely devoted to tra~-
ditional barge-decorations—will
acquire additional interest. It is
an uncommonly pleasing book for
which the artist has also written
the accompanying narrative deal-
ing with life on the canals.

Noble Essences, by Sir Osbert
een published by Macmillan,

/-.

Florence Nightingale, by Cecil
Woodham-Smith, published by
Constable, 15/-

Seventeenth-Century English
Literature, by C. V. Wedgwood,
published by the Oxford Univer-
sity Press in the Home University
Library series, 5/-

Last Essays, by G. M. Young,
ee by Rupert Hart-Dayis,
/6d,

Canals, Barges and People, by
John O'Connor, published by Art
& Technics, 15/-

The book prices given above are
those applying in Britain at this
time. If you consider them use-
less or misleading in your terri-
tory, please delete them.

THANKS TO....

oOHELL MOTOR
GbASULENE

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Mr. Bates

Hy G. M. THOMSON

THE SCARLET SWORD By H. E.
Bates, Michael Joseph, 10s. 6d.
248 pages.

BATES wrote The Purple Plain
scene Burma; dreadful sufferings
of white man after air crash
Then he wrote The Jacaranda
Tree: scene Burma: Dreadful
sufferings of white men and
women fleeing from the Japanese
Now he writes The Scarlet Sword;
seene Kashmir, dreadful suffer-
ings of white men and women in
Pathan attack on a convent.

Bates is a good cook, but need
all his dishes taste of curry?

“When does the raping start?”
asked the Lowland lady of Lord
Elcho during the Rising of °45
In The Scarlet Sword it starts
on page 56. There is quite a lot
of it, providing as it were a thread
of continuity in a tale that is
otherwise little but a series ot
brilliant snapshots.

Bates — now take tropical
scenery and_horri iti
a ta eae. ble atrocities
°H, &. BATES, born 1905, North-
amptonshire, joined RAF 1941—
commissioned as first State short
story writer im England under
name of Flying Officer X, married
with four children, lives'in Kent.
A TOMB WITH A VIEW. By
Lance Sieveking. Faber and Faber,
10s, 6d. 303 pages.

HAVE gaiety urbanity frivolity
gone out of literary fashion? Then
here is Sieveking ‘to restore them
to favour with an ingenious
thriller in which the English lan-
suage is used with civility.

True enough, the tale is more
than a little incredible, the pieces
of the jig-saw puzzle fit together
with all too complacent a click.
But to so. bland a con man, so
adept a writer let us be indulgent.

That a murder committed in
1914 in a grubby London square
should be solved in 1945 in Monte
Carlo 1s—preposterous? No doubt.

But since it brings you into the
company of Walter Cream, that
massive impostor, Alec Larch, a
high-spirited artist with mysteri-
ous lady-loves to say nothing of
Mme. Fornas-Mertz and Count
d’Oznobichine, one a pathetic, and
the other a_ sinister relic of
Edwardian times — you should
complain!

* LANCE SIEVEKING BBC's
drama script editor; born Harrow,
1896, produced first (experimen-
tal) television play from roof of
Baird’s in Long Acre. 1929,

STOLEN JOURNEY. By Oliver



Philpot. Hodder and Stoughton.
15s. 412 pages
WHEN “John” and “Peter”,

the two escapees of The Wooden
Horse arrived in Sweden at the
end of their astonishing journey
they found that “Flight-lieuten-
ant Rowe” had arrived a week
before,

“Rowe” was the third man in
the escape tunnel which led out
of Stalag Luft III through the
sandy soil of Silesia to hope and
possibly to freedom, The “Rowe”
of The Wooden Horse is the
author of Stolen Journey which
tells how Philpot the third man
reached Sweden.

It seems to be impossible to
write a bad escape story. Philpov
has written an excellent one.
Although in fact his dash for
freedom takes up only a third of
the volume.

He was a fast— and lucky—

worker. From the moment he left],

the prison camp until he was
hidden in_the coal_bunkers of a
Swedish ship at Danzig just 48
hours elapsed,

And luck? When his papers
were inspected, the German
police were so busy pointing out
that his photograph had not been
stamped at Dresden that they
failed to notice it was not his
photograph at all. When Philpot,
travelling as a Norwegian busi-
nessman, swore in English, his
German train-companions found
it a very good joke.

Behind such remarkable strokes
of fortune, we may reasonably
assume the presence of a singu-
larly Imperturbable young man
with histrionic gifts. E.S.



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SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950

CUTOUT ELE

‘PEACE’ |

WITH
ORCHIDS

Report On Warsaw
By Evelyn Trons

WARSAW.

THE most astonishing objects
in Warsaw to-day appeared to be
the utility wool-lined suede boots
(76s. Sd. at a Piccadilly store)
in which I tock a walk round
the shopping streets.

Women stopped, nudged, point-
ed, asked where I got them. Pre-
vailing winter mode here is the
traditional felt boot, buckled by

three straps at the back of the |
leg.

Food shops are _ plentifully
stocked with butter, eggs, ham.

Nothing is rationed.
is scarce and dear; most handbags
on show are made of plastic ma-
terial
week’s wages.

Most Warsaw shops have been
taken over by the municipality
or by the State, but, whatever
their ownership, window displays
have a political angle.

To-day all shops carry peace
slogans, portraits of Stalin, Presi-
dent Beirut of Poland or Profes-
sor Joliot Curie,

Shopping crowds are cheered |
by loudspeakers playing stirring |
choral and orchestral music, in-
terrupted occasionally by a news
announcement,

Lorries decorated with flags |
whirl past carrying children who
shout, ‘“Pokoj, pokoj, pokoj” |
(Peace, peace, peace.) |

Night Life
THE. old-fashioned Polonia |

Hotel was the only one left stand-
ing in blitzed Warsaw until sev-
eral new ones Were rebuilt from
the ruins. This is Warsaw’s new
night club.

The dance floor was
All was free and easy.
wore evening dress. Warsaw
workers mingled with Congress
delegates.

We ordered drink and food.
When the’ dilt arrived we found
that at our: official rate of ex-
change (11 zloty to the pound
sterling under the three-week-old
re-valuation) we had to pay 13s.
6d. for a liqueur glass of vodka.
10s. for a thin slice of ham with
bread and butter.

Britons here for the Congress
have discovered that it is absurd
for any but those having British
travellers’ cheques to translate
Polish prices into terms of LSD
without considering the higher
wages here.

ith a wage of 200 zloty a
week (correspondi; roughly to

packed.



But leather |

and leather gloves cost a/|

|} role no

Nobody | director









|

|



By SAM WHITE

PARIS,
| THERE is a Hollywood film
| Star in Paris who, during her
eight months here, has never
, entered a fashionable cocktail
bar or night club, or dined at
Maxims, or ordered clothes from
;One of the leading Paris dress
| houses.

I present Deanna Durbin in a
Hollywood actress has
ever played convincingly before—
that of a star who really “wants

| to be alone”.

_ To find Miss Durbin in Paris
it is no use looking through the
guest lists of luxury hotels.

| Ever since she arrived she has

lived quietly with her four-year-

| old daughter Jessica in a three-
| roomed £7-a-week flatlet,

in a
Her only servants
nursemaid and a

Paris suburb.
|} are Jessica’s
daily “char”.

Deanna came to Paris with her
fiance, 44-year-old French film
Charles David They
|plan to marry sometime towards
| the end of this year or early next
| year in a small Alsace village
where Davia owns a cottage. This
will be “her. third marriage,
David's first.

At 28 Deanna, though slightly
taller, slightly plumper, still re-
calls the teen-aged film star of
Three Smart Girls.

She dresses simply—her Paris



£6 a week in Britain), the rate

drops to 33 zloty to the pound. |

At this valuation your pound will
buy in Warsaw 11 packets of 20
cheap cigarettes, a man’s shirt, a
pound of coffee or half a pound
of tea.

You will still need as much as
£5 or £6 tO buy a pair of shoes,
and nearly £2 for a lipstick. On
the other hand, r two room
and kitchen flat Will cost you
only about £1.a month including
heat.

Bills Are Big

PLAYS showing cufrently in
Warsaw include As You Like It.

Most movies now running here
are Russian, to celebrate “The
Month of Friendship” with the
Soviet Union.

Favourite diversion for teen-
agers and young people are the
dances organised by trade unions,
youth movements and other
groups. Boys wear lounge suits,
girls like to dress in their best.

The “World Peace Committee,”
who are making themselves re-
sponsible for the cost of the
Warsaw “Peace” Congress, said
through a spokesman they had no
idea how much the bill would be.

A Polish “Peace” Comunittee
representative pointed out that
under nationalisation no private
hotel or other. bills would have
to be met and that much of the
labour was Voluntary.

None the less, the cost of enter-
taining the 2,000 delegates here

am 1 < a *

Rupert is surprised at what Mary-
Quite-Comrary has said. ‘* But
what’s the matter with your gar-
den ?"’ he asks, “1 think it’s won-
detiul. People told me that |
couldn't find primroses in autumn,
but you've got some lovely beds of
them.” Rher's what | roean,”

cries Mary. ‘‘ Something's gone



for a week must be heavy. They
have been treated generously.
They even get nine packets of
20 luxury cigarettes for nothing.

There are all sorts of minor
details of hospitality, including
beer and fruit in delegates’ rooms,
and presents at the Congress
nearly every day.

One day the delegates were
presented with orchids. Another
day they had souvenir notebooks
and red silk flags.

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—London Express Service

clothes are bought “off the peg’’—~
and shuns hats and jewellery.

Deanna became a star at 14. Last
year her contract with Universal
Films expired, and she refused
to renew it.

“Why? For one very good
reason — Hollywood refused to
let me grow up”, she said. And
she added: “You can describe me
as a refugee from Hollywood's
conception of myself.

“Hollywood saw me as the
eternal bobbysoxer. The fact
that I had grown up, married,
had a child, had nothing to do
with it as far as they were con-
cerned” .

David, grey-haired, birdlike,
interjected: “I met Deanna when
I was working in Hollywood. I
realised that unless she took
drastic steps, Hollywood would
first see her a grandmother in the
flesh rather than let her play
the part of an adult woman on
the screen”’.

Deanna does not consider her
film career over. She can afford
to wait. She is wealthy with
property in Hollywood, and her
money carefully invested by her
Lancashire-born. parents.

In Paris Deanna divides her
time between singing practice,
French lessons and sightseeing.
“T have never been happier’ she
said.

—L.E.S.









Wns

es 44 Se ‘
wong with my poor garden.
flowers and ~mrer
autumn flowers ac

Sprin,

flowers a

aus - all out at bo
e spring flowers mustn't

onns out all through the year or

they'll b@ sure to die, and
want w lose them."

approaches s

don't
She stops

re rs
a gakenen



BROWN LOCUSTS

PRETORIA.

A vast swarm of brown locusts,
numbering about 150,000,000 were
destroyed this week after they had
stripped the area of Bushveld a
mile a one a quarter-of—a~mile
wide, ey had flown 800 miles
from the Cape, and, according to
locust officers, weighed about 200
tons,~enough to fill 33 lorries
Hundreds of Africans are clearing
tlhe fields of dead locusts which
e. regarded by them as a tasty







‘kill them'with

LIT



All Flié contains 0.0.7.
FLIT IS AN PRODUCT



4 “refugee.”

FACE POWDER

for glamour that becomes you



By BOURJOIS

* PERFUME

ROUGE
VANISHING CREAM

DEANNA DURBIN

drawn, by

ROBL
_ STAR WHO WANTS TO BE ALONE GIVES PARIS
NIGHTSPOTS A MISS

Deanna Durbin finds
happiness in a 3-room flat




















SUNDAY ADVOCATE
eg
AAU LUEUUEUUETEOOUEDUELEDU UATE ET EY ERE PEED EEE EE 288222 ! ec Shon |
= : = A Hoax in Stone |
aes = |
In one of the delightful chapters}
f Cheries ! “> Pick wick |
Paj.e:., Mr rn discovers a}
= |stone bearing this inscription |
; BILST
yn ? : ws + > : . i U M
loday’s witness is Stephen Potter—inventor p's m1 |
Ss. M.
STEPHEN POTTER one ot . ALOR, N > = | ARK
the few men sitce the war to ot GAMESMA SHIP = jand buys it for ten shillings von |
coin a new word which looks tike a “simple” cottager. The stone is
going into the tanguage: LIVE now im gt Deside you. How to suggest taken to London and becomes the
GAMESMANSHIP—the = art 1 t he clothes she wears, power
while came wikia et retreat 7 he and importance. genius ahd subject of much scholarly debate.
cheating Potter has a new book tem stp is nagnetism Those who know their Diekens
out applying the Gamesimatship Se a im e: the mah de seen striding will remember that ome of Mr,
a te the eee business of = ATE rk. as) 220.4 London street—Pall Mal} Pickwick’s rivals exposed the
iving e call, it }Memansiip-- my’ ee { possible—dressed in (say) 0 | mysterious-looking inscription as
» bh oy fi t t Jer f ogy he ys s
end: case he tacts Pinter GatIes- LATE combhacking Jacke, walle, ror | ® ROX:
tener his | dieatie atten Though it may fool you at first
» anT a tenderly beautiful gir! jas it dic Mr. Pickwick, with a
nreres: to ta hun himself, dressed in a jittle puzzling you can read what
me though tae oh sable coat with hint of it says, What is it?
> 0 1 t pea and intensely expensive “quot
o be one up on Stock ings fueLre ppo ve uy .‘yaew syq ‘aduings
“hoiee 1 3 uking notes With penci! wee pees Ajduuys Sup Iq. emMsUYy
and paper, of an odd big 4 _—
¢ t her escor' rec! “ ,
condescensioc | ‘Time Yourself On
ng her some We
hing to trans This Test

ribe in he

pare time,
This scet

theme—how a girl car


























This
done by

is a test that should be

SS
: the clock, with someone

hel;

iraw attention to a MAN keeping time for you and allow-

ing you two minutes for the test

* xk te or 10 seconds per word, See how
many words of opposite meaning

For example if she enters you can supply for those listed
restaurant bristling with gor below. All the words you supply

furs. glimmering with diamond





or leaving a fairly intense trail « must begin with C, Getting eight
scent, the chamces are that o! or more correct is excellent: six
200 people why want to know is average

| Who S$ fs, one will want to 1.) Open: C

| enue who on earth vou are as 2.) Order: ¢ ‘

|; well. q : .

| But one in 200 ts not enough 3.) Semledt Coa
It is possible that the room 4. meray

| 5 : m de
which the girl is to enter mu 6.) Deseena: C-—-—-~—-——

already be full of dressy wome:

* xv * 8.) Doubtful: C
| 9.) Unsettied: C_——————..
{ To be one up on sucn peopl 10.) Scattered: C-————

therefore: (a) Your companion
nust appear in a black skirt anc
| something simple on top without!
trace of ornament, like the draw
ing by Robb This is a typical!
one-up-on-your-friends creation
| throwing over the weil-dressed
| females brought by vour com
yanions the suspicion that their
| elegance is bad form overdone

Wee ey

tb) it

Genuine: C- —--.
Laity; C-———-_——-—,
“ABO “21 WaypayunaD
wre) 6 “urea 8
asta “G “UNHD “FP
saan ary

)
)
)
)
)
7.) Kmpty: C - - |
}
)
)
)
)

LL ‘WedwoeD ‘ot
PEREPMOID “L QUO 9
URID “€ “SORUD fF ‘'PaoID ‘1

New Members
Norma Small, Spooners
St. Michael.
Dorrine Gill,
Michael.



Hill,

Green Hill, St.

is Just us effective If you

in persuade u distinctly youn i ee
to turn up—again without Hirthday Gr tings
rnament or jewels—and spread Happy Birthds oO .
Pp PP) day to Onita Bos

he rumour that (isn't it marvel-
| us ?) she ts keeping herself on

3 «6s. wu week and (isn't ft
eet?) that is her oniy dress
Mher women are seen surrep
\ously to remove earrings
| rist watches etc, in @ lagi
nue effort to counter this
imbdit

| * Ww *

(¢)—und probably most funda
nental of all—if the women are
oo anxiously 1951 In style, bring

tic, Shirley Best, Erla Hewitt,
Archie Yard and Carl Yard who
celebrate their birthdays this
week,

BAWLING BABIES

LONDON.
Bawling babies will not annoy
the aduit auaiences at a new
movie theatre to be opened at
Wallasey, Cheshire, next year



i; gir] in a dress of 17th centur The soundproof, glass-faced
; yrocade é ; boxes, each with 18 seats, are
| S$ not is, after all Basi beir built 7 ?
Jlothesmanship? Come to thr Ral tani ee Wane 8:

vektail party in Jodhpurs. u EF hes é > w
Sate ber wa Ua tO th TP bid rom these parents will be
rigwick days able to see and hear the film
London Bxpress Service without fear of baby disturbing

| Tiianrnapenelhithihaliineie eitesiekinde magn ilake others

| Be Sound, wired direct from the
| MENTAL QUICKNESS projection box, can be turned

| TESTS FOR DRIVERS
| NEW YORK
Can you slam on your emer-
gency brake in 49-1/100ths of a
second’? This is the perfect mark
at New York’s new psycho-
physical clinic for drivers who are
frequently in accidents. If they
& | fail to put on the brake quickly
enough or do not pass all sorts of
eye, ear and mental quickness
tests, they lose their licences,

down for a whimper or up for
a full-throated roar, Cribs will
also be provided,—LN.8,

AUSTRALIAN BLUE BELLS,
a SYDNEY.
Paterson's Curse is a weed with
a bright blue flower that has
Mtrangled milligns of acres of
Australia’s best grazing lands, The
driver of a three-ton lorry going
cross-country to Sydney stopped,
filled his lorry with the flowers,
drove on to the city, sold them
as Ryne pie Australian
Blue Bells,” and made £360,







ben TT}

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ied

PAGE EIGHT






= a 7
~ ——es

Printed by the Advocate Ce., Lté., Groad St. Bridgotewn.
Sunday, December 3, 1950

2 Schools

THE question of finding a site for
another Girls’ Secondary School in the
parish was raised at the Meeting of the
St. Michael Vestry this week.

The Vestry were given a legal opinion
on the ownership of the Deanery in June
this year. The parsonage and glebe in the
parish of St. Michael are vested by two
separate deeds each dated November 1853
in the Rector of the parish of St. Michael
and his successors, Rectors of St. Michael
forever. Both properties were bought
with the sanction and approval of the Leg-
islature. The Parsonage, now the Deanery,
was purchased in consequence of a petition
by the Vestry of St. Michael to the Legisla-
ture,

It is now the considered opinion of the
Vestry’s Counsel that the building known
as the St. Michael’s Rectory can only be
disposed of with the sanction and approval
of the Legislature. He further stated that
neither the Rectory nor the Glebe Land
can be used for any purpose or use than
that for which they were acquired except
with the consent and approval of the Leg-
islature as expressed in an Act of Parlia-
ment.

Counsel went on to advise the Vestry
of the necessary procedure. The sub-
stance of his advice was that if the prop-
erty is to be used for any other purpose
the Rector of the parish must take the
initiative,

*
a

At that Meeting the Bishop stated that
he was not unsympathetic to the idea the
Vestry was discussing, He counselled the
Vestry to wait until the new Rector was
appointed and he told them that the agree-
ment would have to come from the Rector
as he had no authority to tell him what to
do. +i) deal &

Four months after and with the new
Rector installed the Vestry still appear to
be far from their goal — the acquisition
of the Deanery as a site for another secon-
dary school for girls.

Sites for schools in the Metropolitan
parish are not easy to discover and it is
not surprising that the Vestry have select-
ed the Deanery. It is not the first time
that covetous eyes have fallen on the
Deanery. Years ago there was a sugges-
tion that Queen’s College should be re-.
moved to the Deanery. And when the
Vestry decided to build the St. Michael’s
Girls’ School the Deanery was numbered
among the suggested sites.

The St. Michael’s Vestry can never be
aceused of failing to realize the importance
of education. On many occasions they have
pointed the way for others to follow. When
they decided to launch the St. Michael’s
Girls’ School the critics, amongst whom
were many ratepayers, were of the opinion
that it was too ambitious an undertaking.
The school has fully justified its existence
and now the Vestry is contemplating
building another secondary school for girls
in the Parish.

The quest for education is ever on the
increase and until the other parishes
decide to build secondary schools a heavier
burden in supplying educational facilities
will continue to fall on the Metropolitan
parish.

St. Michael can boast of a Government
Secondary Girls’ School, a Parish School,
a Catholic School for girls, an Anglican
Convent, and one private school of some
proportions. Increasing numbers of
parents desire to give their girls the ad-
vantages to be gained from a secondary
education. But the vacancies in the sev-

eral academies in St. Michael are so few
as to be almost negligible.

Everyone interested in Education is
anxiously awaiting an amicable settlement
over the Deanery so that the Vestry can
proceed with their plan to build another
much needed secondary school for girls.



The Crown

NATIONALISATION has come to
Barbados and the govern-
ment will shortly have to con-

sider what steps they propose to take
to place the government in the same posi-
tion as the individual citizen in the eyes
of the law. The fiction has always existed
in British law that the king could do no
wrong, and as government employees were
the servants of the king he could not be
liable for any wrongs committed by them
in the course of their duties.

Recognising the hardship and injustice
so often caused by the application of this
fiction, the Legislature has from time toâ„¢
time when creating new departments or
Statutory Boards specially provided that
such department or Board could sue or
be sued as though it were a private citizen.
The Natural Gas Corporation Bill, now on
its way through the Legislature makes
such provision for the Corporation.

When the Labour Government took



power in England and embarked on the
policy of nationalisation so many persons
who had formerly been employed by priv-
ate companies now found themselves in

the service of the government through the |

Boards which were constituted to run the
nationalised industries and services, that
it became necessary to pass legislation to
place the government in the same position
as other employers of labour. Accordingly
the Proceedings against the Crown Act
was passed. By the provisions of that Act
the government became responsible not
only for their contracts but for the wrong-
ful acts of their servants committed in the
course of their employment.

An argument which has always been
used against such legislation has been that
juries would award excessive damages
against the government knowing that the
government was backed by the resources
of the public treasury. There is not much
in such an argument. Similar arguments
could be used in the case of big companies,
It is well known that juries are apt to take
into consideration the prosperity of a com-
pany when awarding damages against it
but that has never been regarded as a
good reason for exempting such companies
from liability.

In Barbados, as in England, more and
more government departments are coming
into existence and more and more persons
are being employed by the government.
The employees of the Civil Service in all
grades must run into thousands and it is
time that all the employees of government
should be subject ito the liabilities and
should be accorded the same rights.

This is but another example of the truism
that it is impossible to interfere with one
part of a complicated mechanism without
affecting the whole. In introducing nation-
alisation to Barbados and bringing many
employees under the control of the gov-
ernment, protection must be accorded to

those employees and to the public who
may be affected by the activities of the

government.



Black And White

A LETTER appearing in the Times re-
cently, signed by James Griffiths, Lord
Hall, Creech Jones and Malcolm MacDon-
ald, among others, says of Dr. Harold
Moody: “Born in Jamaica, a descendant of
slaves, he can be named with Booker
Washington as one of the greatest figures

which the cdloured race has provided
since emancipation.”

The description is accurate, what Wash-
ington was to America Moody was to
Britain. Both men spent their lives cam-
paigning for racial tolerance: as Aggrey
would have said, they tried to convince
people that although some sort of tune can
be played on the black keys of the piano,
and some sort of tune can be played on
the white, perfect harmony can only be
achieved if both sets of keys are used.

Dr. Moody, who died over three years
ago, was in his time one of the most re-
markable men in the religious and social
life of England. He founded, and was the
first president of the League of Coloured
Peoples. He had been chairman of the
Colonial Missionary Society, president of
the London Missionary Society, president
of the Christian Endeavour Union of Great
Britan and Ireland, and, just before his
death, was nominated for the chairman-
ship of the Congregation of England and
Wales. All through these years he was a
beloved doctor in the south-east of Lon-
don.

Just before his death Dr. Moody com-
pleted a tour of the West Indies which he
had undertaken for two reasons — to in-
crease his knowledge of the progress of
his fellow West Indians, and to launch a
campaign to collect funds for the erection
of a cultural centre for coloured peoples
in London, He believed that it should not
only be an idea crystallised, but that it
should be an incentive to bigger and better
efforts in the future. That it should sym-
bolise a positive contribution to better
understanding and closer co-operation
among coloured peoples themselves and an
earnest of their desire for international
unity and world peace.

Undoubtedly Dr. Moody would have
wished to have such a centre as his mem-
orial, but perhaps it is better that it is not
so. For a centre such as he envisaged
might have defeated its objects. Instead of
bringing white and coloured closer to-
gether it might have kept them further
apart,

Now an appeal is being organized to per-
petuate the memory of the Doctor. In the
first place it is intended to acquire the fine
bronze bust of him by his distinguished
sculptor brother Ronald Moody. Secondly
it is proposed to establish a prize fund for

coloured students from the West Indies
and Africa.

It would be more in keeping with
Dr. Moody’s teaching, and no doubt he

would wish it, if the prize fund were
awarded to students from Africa and the
West Indies, irrespective of colour. Thus
should we remember one whose greatest
wish was to establish co-operation be-
tween black and white.

_eeresencaiainenene Peeters arenas

|



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



THEY DO IT AGAIN AND AGAIN
SHOWING — Poe Horr

HOW T MANY

é 7 ~ 4
| (SEATS REATE 7

(jy \



ER |
a ee |
On The Fence | icumune Sakeee ee



Sitting

Hy NATHANIEL GUBHINS

“I think it is high time we
started letting other nations
see that not only are we a
sensible, steady people, but a

When an American _ visitor
asked a Rumanian girl what she
learned at school, she recited: —

“We live in peace and safety

rumbustious, creative, excit- because of kind Auntie Ana
ing, energetic, intellectually Pauker. But Auntie Ana
adventurous people. too.”— couldn’t take care of us with-

Francis Williams. out the aid of kind Uncle Joe
RUMBUSTIOUS, rumbustious, Stalin.”
And jolly clever, too, that’s us. * * *
Behind our rather vacant dials Apart from the joy of knowing
And painful, slow, superior smiles, .that my darling Ana, last heard
Behind each ruddy, wooden pan of as Rumania’s Foreign Secre-
There lurks another Englishman. tary, is not being taken care of
A lively, intellectual chap by Uncle Joe in a concentration
In bowler, trilby, huntin cap; camp, may I suggest that children
Creative and excitin fella in this country m'ght be taught
With old school tie and rolled more about their benefactors, in-

umbrella. cluding myself?

. Then any child, asked about the

affairs of the day, would answer
in the following manner.

”
Though most of us appears a gent,

We are uproarious, turbulent;
We want to shout and sing and

dance, Why are we living in peace,
To give the wicked, sidelong if not safety? ,
glance; Because kind Uncle Ernie

Bevin is taking care of us, with

t to devastate and daze
ee, Wane te Coven the help of kind Uncle Harry

The female heart with ardent

hrase. Truman. But neither of them
n love, our beating heart takes could do it without the aid of
wings; kind Uncle Nat, whose income
In each of us the poet sings. tax buys most of the arma-
Though, in the slow pursuit of ments,

Why do you
cheap food to eat?

mate, have

lovely
We are inarticulate.

-. SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950



POPCIOS

rane a
“ je

/

LUMBER & HARDWARE

ee

Establishea
1860

Incorporated
1926

T. HERBERT Ltd.



USEFUL GIFTS

that will be appreciated all the year round

ALUMINUM WARE

SAUCEPANS, COCKTAIL SHAKERS, JELLY
MOULDS, FRY PANS, PRESSURE COOK-
ERS, FRENCH FRIERS, POTATO RICERS.

, TIN WARE
4 CAKE TRAYS, ICING SETS & TUBES, ICING
~ STANDS & BOOKS, CAKE PANS, KITCH-
KR ENWARE.
XP EARTHENWARE

MIXING BOWLS, TEA SETS, DISHES
GLASSWARE

Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.
PHONES 4472 and 4687

produce an engagement ring or

even the smallest gift. |

GEORGE—Yes, dear?

Charlie’s given Enid an en-
gagement ring.—Has he?

It looks ever so nice.—They do
look nice, don’t they? Specially
them with pearls and rubies.

Those your’ favourites?—Oh,
definitely. Unless you ave a sin-
gle diamond.

Yes, I like a single diamond,
More class.—Oh, definitely.

* * *

TO OUR CUSTOMERS
AND FRIENDS—



How long ave we been engaged,
George?— Bngaged? Us? Qh,
years, I should think,

Only the other day Mum was
asking about my engagement ring. | }}
She thought I might ave lost it— ’
Lost it? She must be balmy.

You don’t ave to insult my]
mother, George—Well, you can’t|}}
lose something you've never ad, \

‘
}
{\

We wish to advise that our Dry Goods Depart-
ment will he open to business as usual every
week day (Saturdays and holidays excepted)
from 8.00 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. inclusive, and on
Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 11.30 p.m. inclusive.

Will our Customers and Friends please
take note and "be guided accordingly.

can you? It stands to reason.

Do you know what my sister
says about you? She says you're
mean.—And she’s dam right. I’m
so mean I wouldn’t give a starv- ; e
ing friend a tanner for a cup of

ee 5 4

coffee,

George!—Tell you what, though,
I nearly bought you something
last week. It was so cheap I said

For all we say to her when leavin

Is “Thank you for a smashin
evenin.”
Or, if she walks next day in
tweeds,

With doggies pantin on their
leads,
We raise our hats, and all we say
Is “Mornin, what a smashing day.”
A smashin girl, a smashing dance,
A smashin night, a smashed
romance... .
That’s how a silly English chap
Escapes the matrimonial trap.
+

Rumbustious, rumbustious,
And jolly clever, too, that’s us.
* ”

*
Kind Uncles All
ACCORDING to a report from
Rumania children are taught to
give thanks to the Communist
Government for all the blessings

Because of kind Uncle Maurice
Webb. But he couldn’t do it
without the aid of kind Uncle
Nat’s income tax, which pays the
food_ subsidies.

Why can Mummie get free
medicine when she imagines she
has a headache?

Because of kind Uncle Nye
Bevan. But he couldn’t do it
without the aid of kind Uncle
Nat’s income tax, which pays
for the. health | service.

Then who is your greatest bene-
factor?
Kind Uncle Nat.

Engagement Off

An indignant girl, complain-
ing to a newspaper about the
meanness of her fiance, says
that the broadest hints and

to myself “The very thing for my
girl.” Then I said to myself, “No.
I'll invest it in football pools.”
What happened?—I won £1,000
You know it’s your birthday to-
morrow?
. * *
I ought to, George.—Well, I
tried to forget it, but I couldn't.
So I said to myself, “I'll buy her
some little thing for once.” But
then I said, “No. [lt put the
money in the pools again.” So if
you’re thinking about a birthday
present, you’ve ad it.
I see.—But I tell you what.
Yes, George?—If I win another
£1,000 I'll buy you some bath
salts for Christmas. I will de-
finitely.
Thank you, George.—But if the
money goes down the drain you've
ad it for Christmas, too, De-

DaACOSTA & CO. LTD.

y EEO OES
a

bestowed on them, “even teasing” have failed to



N avy Welfare League Is
Doing Fine Work

By TREVOR GALE

In just under two weeks’ time Publicity in the world cannot
the Royal Merchant Navy Welfare reach.
League will close off a raffle ia The Navy League, of course,
aid of their funds. This rafflé arrange dances and picnics for
takes the place of other forms of the men of the ships and see to it
entertainment which the League that they visit most of the beauty
run annually in order to finance spots of the island. This side of
their activities. their activities probably receives

more publicity and is therefore

To some of us local folk many well known. But there is by far
of these activities may seem ob- a more important part which they
secure, not to mention those who play and this deals with welfare
take the view that charity begins of the men when they get into
at home and therefore reason difficulties locally.
why should we help outsiders For instance, a man may become
before we help our own poor and ill and have to stay in hospital.
destitute. This line of argument They League sees to it that he is
I think is in the minority and visited regularly by members and
is chiefly put forward by peopie provides him with sundries like
who dislike all forms o” visitors cigarettes, extra food and various
or generally have some grudg® toilet requisites. They arrange to
against life and therefore I do write his relatives should he be
not intend to go into xl its seriously ill and here I have a lit-
aspects here, “tle story to tell. It illustrates how
“much this work is
However since we are at et: overseas.
pains to be hospitable to visitors ne ;
at all times it seems to me only I was living in a small Cana-
natural that we should do all dian City at one time. A plac®
can to make life happy during as remotely connected with Bar-
their stay here for those who bados as the other side of the
bring us our food and protect as moon. Imagine my surprise there-
from the submarine menace in fore when a grey haired elderly
times of war. We can gain far lady appeared in the office one
more tasting friendship and the day and asked to see me. Being
goodwill of the world at large by in a newspaper office and being
such a policy as being nice even from a far off place like Barba-
to the tourists who visit us annu- dos I suppose I was good copy
ally, For small islands like this as a rarity and naturally she had
are thought of as the sailor thinks seen my name in the paper, She
of a port, and sailors’ reports fre- ealled, she said, because she was
quently penetrate communities thinking of coming to Barbados
which all the tourist catching and she would like to know

appreciated

. ‘eo

Our Readers Say:

——_—_———————————

», jority manage to get home. The
parlours find it difficult to serve
these clerks at present even be-

. ide tween 9.30 and 12.30 the present

To the Editor, The Advocate— breakfast hours. What should

SIR,—May I say how regret- happen if all had to be served in

i one hour, the accommodation
none ict ciaauina s * section would not be there, so the Clerks
of the order that reads one way aoe have to go home for their
| and is meant to apply in a differ- meals. Anyone who travels on the
ent way. Orders of this kind Bus knows the great difficulty it
should receive greater attention hi to get to var 4 the limited
fore being published. us service and therefore this
natone would be out of the question,
The Clerks who are the back- Clerks would have to do without
bone of a business, do not seem meals
to have received much considera-
tion far as the suggestion for all

Breakfast Hour




Some of the Members of the
Chamber of Commerce stated that

os to close ao ona a as far as the clerks being allowed
same hour is co ‘ “~ to go out to shop during their

jority of Clerks have their break- working hours was concerned, that
fast served at one or other of the no Merchant t

would object, tha
Breakfast parlours, a small

ma- sounds fine and is well meant, but

Suits from

Here are

finitely.
L.E.S.

England’s most respected
; Tailoring Houses ! Made
8 from the fabrics
and presented in a range
of Qualities and Colours.
that is include

your favourites.

finest

certain to

something of the place, But she
really wanted me to come to tea
so that we could sit down and dis-
cuss matters thoroughly,

I duly went to met the rest
of the family, Tah discoverea
that the reason why she wanted to
come to Barbados was because her
son had died here, Whereupon she
produced pictures of the funeral
at our cemetery and there stand-
ing ayound were faces which
were very familiar to me. She
then went into details about the
accident which befell her son
while on ship in port here and
produced letters from a member
of the Navy League, which with-
out being too sad, yet let her
know how things were with her
boy in his last moments. It might
have been written by a brother or
sister of the dead lad and the old
lady, I can assure you appreciated
it just as much,

Ot course the accident had taken
place some months previously and
the initial grief must have been
lessened by then, but that lady
never shed a tear nor did her
voice waver as she re-read what
must have been all too familiar
lines to her, Those letters were
her treasures.

When the time came for me to
leave I was asked to stay on
to dinner, and on departing after
that, I was assured of a constant
welcome. I was a friend of the
friends who had written her. 1
was a Barbadian. I was always
welcome in her home,















Stop in to-day at...

DaCOSTA & CO.
LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPT.





| | ¥ x”
that's the FIRST and LAST

Word in COCKTAILS
blended with

GODDARDS

GOLD BRAID

RUM



every one knows: that if a mer-
chant happened by chance to call
for a particular clerk on a couple |;
of occassions however distant
those calls may be, that the
anxious merchant wotild prompt- |!
ly say “every time I call for such
and such a clerk, they are out, this
will never do.” The unfortunate
clerk gets to hear this and an un-
happy situation begins.

_Great consideration must_ br
given this matter before a final
decision is arrived at.

Here is the opportunity for the
Clerks to ask Mr, Thomas to hold ||
a meeting and give them an op- |}
portunity to express their opinions
so that Mr. Thomas would be ir | |
a better position as their repre-
sentative to discuss the matter.

CLERK.




SUNDAY DECEMBER 3,

1950



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Governor Asks Support For
Missionary

Work

HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor, Mr. W. L. Savage
told the crowded Empire Theatre on Friday evening that
the missionary work of the Church deserved the most

generous support.

He was speaking at the Annual
Missionary meeting, and paid tri-
bute to the work being done
among the Africans.

The Governor said :

A year ago I promised to take
an active part in the next Mission-
ary Meeting, and I propose—while
I can hold your attention— to tell
you of some of my experiences in
twenty-five years in relation to
missionary activities in Africa.
My knowledge of the Gambia is
very limited—only having spent a
few hours there intransit on two
occasions—but in Nigeria and in
Northern Rhodesia I have had
close contacts with the missionary
work of the Anglican Church, and
as conditions there are not very
much different to those in the
Gambia, my remarks should not
be misleading.

First, I want to give you a brief
background of Africa. It is a vast
continent of nearly 200,000,000
people, or a thousand times the
population of this island. Its area
is about 13,000,000 square miles
compared with Barbados (includ-
ing Pelican Island) with 166
square miles. And so, Africa has
a density of population of say 15
persons to a square mile, while
in Barbados the average is about
1,200 to the square mile.

There are many reasons for such
wide differences, but the main one
is lack of water. There are
thousands of square miles of
deserts in Africa and you can
walk for days and never see a
human being. On the other hand,
in areas with heavy rainfalls there
are tropical forests spreading for
hundreds of mites which cannot
support human life.

Dense Population

There are, of course, large
towns densely populated—such as
Ibadan in Nigeria, where 200,009
souls live and which is one of the
most densely populated cities of
the world, but the large majority
of Africans live in villages far
away from towns.

How do they live? The standard
of life of millions of Africans is
that of subsistence agriculture —
living on what they can grow, and
in many, Many cases they can only
grow just enough to keep alive.
There are, of course, large num-
bers who can and do grow more
than they need—e.g. where soils
are good and water is plentiful,
and they sell their surplus, but
because of the great distances and
lack of concentrated markets too
often the development of agricul-
ture is uneconomic.

Hundreds of thousands of Afri-
cans leave their homes to find
work in distant towns or coun-
tries. Some walk hundreds of
miles—over several months—to
find work,

Let me give you another aspect
of their life. Nigeria has a popula-
tion of over 25,000,000 souls and
the government revenue is about
beh fiona pe - = oe Govern
ment services e people repre-
sent about £1 per head of the
population, Here in Barbados, with
a population of about 200,000 and
a government revenue of nearly
£2,000,000 we enjoy services
averaging £10 per head, i.e. ten
times thet of the average Nigerian,

Social Services
And so the social services in
Africa—education, health, subsi-
dization of foodstuffs and housing—
are generally speaking at a far
lower level than here in Barbados.
In this island, although the ser-
vices are not adequate, water can
be obtained fairly easily
mem
Eastern Provinces of Nigeri
African women and _ children

Churches

make their communions.

It is nearly 100 years ago that

David Livingstone

tral Africa, The most. i t
speech he made in his So
addressed to the undergraduates
of Cambridge University, when
towards the end he made this
personal appeal— “I direct your
“attention to Africa. I know in a
“few years I shall be cut-off in that
“country which is now open. Do
“not let it be shut again. Do you
carry out the work I have begun
“I leave it with YOU.”

Universities Mission

It was largely as a result of
this speech that the Universities
Mission to Central Africa was
formed, and when in 1925 I was
appointed to the Colonial Service
I looked with keenness to serve
in Northern Rhodesia where
Livingstone had died and where
his faithful Africans had buried
his heart but carried his embalmed
body hundreds. of miles over
several months to the coast to
hand to: the British Consul.

The U.M.C.A. is a missionary
body of priests, laymen and women



~ c

Mr. W. L. SAVAGE.

who serve a number of countries
in Central and East Africa. They
are the hardest working group of
people I have ever met. They are
not paid salaries as in England or
Barbados, but they are given an
outfit allowance on first appoint-
ment and receive their food and
lodging on a frugal scale and $10
a month pocket money,

In those days it took six days by
train to get from Capetown to
Livingstene and for 5 years I
lived at the Church House in
Livingstone, the capital of North-
ern Rhodesia, which was a port of
call for missionaries of all deno-
minations. So I was able to have
immediate contacts with mission-
ary work. In 1925 the Anglican
Church, St. Andrews, was the
only church in Livingstone, and
the congregation included most
denominations, Visiting clergy of
other denominations from South-
ern Rhodesia used to pay a visit
quarterly and hold services in
halls and in houses.

At Mission Station

After a year there I asked per-
mission to spend a fortnight on a
mission station, and the Bishop
agreed, provided I was prepared
to work, I took my motor-bike
on tke train and went north for

by every
ber of the community, In the about 500 miles to a tiny station

called Choma. From there I had

‘ato drive about 350 miles along a

in ;
the dry season walk sometimes tn path about 8 inches

for 3 to 4 hours to fetch water—
generally in = on their heads.
m many parts of
Africa are at great distances from
villages and thousands of people
walk for hours and sometimes
days—in all kinds of weather—
tropical heat—tropical storms—to

I arrived at my destination,
a U.M.C.A. _ station named
Mpanza, late at night, having
fallen off the motor bike innumer-
able times and having lost both
footrests after hitting concealed
tree stumps.

I should tell you that the ordin-
ary bicycle is a very common
type of public transport in Africa.

to You can travel first class, second
land after his first exploration class or third class.

First class

in Africa seeking more funds and passengers have the right to sit
further .

assistance to his drive
against slavery and the establish-

on the bicycle (either on the pil-
lion or cross bar) the whole way

ment of Christian missions in Cen- uphill and down hill, The second

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GIFT BOXES

XMAS TREE DECORATIONS
ASSORTED BOXES CHOCOLATES

PERFUMES

THERMOS JUGS

LADIES’ COMB & BRUSH SETS

THE COSMOPOLITAN

In view of the explanation given in the

matter of working hours of Shop Assistants we

have decided not to close from 12—1 daily as

advertised. Our Stores will therefore operate

as usual.

KNIGHTS DRUG

STORES



class passenger has to walk up
hills and the third class passenger
has to push the bicycle up the
hills for the owner.

However, I was met by the two
priests of the station, who appear-
ed a a caprmenetsy of the
company for a fortnight of a Civil
Servant—possibly a spy of Gav-
ernment. I was warned that the
mission day started at 5 o’clock
with Mass at 5.30 and breakfast
at 6.30 and work at 7 o’clock. I
was told my duties would be
found set out on the board in the
common room, so I went at once
to have a look. I was detailed to
be in charge of the dispensary
from 7 o'clock to 8.30, to teach
English and Arithmetic in the
training college from 8.30 to 12
o’ciock, to supervise work in the
gardens ftom 2 to 4, to assist in
road work and building from 4.30
to 6.30—straight to Evensong, on
to supper and bed. Although I
doubted my capacity to perform
all these tasks adequately, I was
determined not to let down the
Civil Servant.

Mud Blocks

I woke next morning and had
my first view of the station, The
clergy and guest house was made
of mud blocks with a thatched
roof and had been built entirely
by the students and other friends
of the mission in the area, Many
Africans understand self help,
for they know in Africa that un-
less they do things for themselves
they will have to go without. The
immediate roads to the mission
had also been built by voluntary
labour. Their church also of mud
bricks they had built. Their
schools and the training college
had been built by them under the
supervision of the clergy, one of
whom had been training as *an
engineer when ‘he received the
higher call to the priesthood,

It was a lovely church with not
one item, other than the chalice,
of European workmanship or ma-
terial. It had been built by the
Africans, as had the Altar, the
Chancel, the candlesticks, the lec-
tern, the vestments, the proces-
sional cross. It was and is an
outstanding example of what can
be achieved by people who are
inspired by the love of God and
therefore love of their fellow man
and so are determined to improve
their condition,

After Mass we had breakfast,
when I mentioned to the Principal
that I had no medical knowledge
and I was rather apprehensive of
being put in charge of a dispens-
ary. He said I should find a
medical orderly who would help
me. So I walked down to the dis-
pensary, a small building of three
rooms with about 150 people
lined up—men, women and child-
ren. The commonest complaint
was sores caused by the bite of in-
sects, nearly all of which had been
treated by primitive methods of
applying manure to the sores, re-
sulting in the most dreadful
wounds, some as big as a plate.
Some people came from as far
afield as 150 miles and had walk-
ed the whole way, They had
heard of the mission and hoped
they could be cured where the
witch doctor had failed.

A Chicken For A Tooth

I remember to this day vividly
an old lady who wanted a tooth
extracted, I wrote a note to the
Principal, but he replied, “Dear
Savage, you are in charge of the
dispensary.” There was no doc-
tor or dentist for hundreds of
miles. So the orderly gave me a
box of forceps and sat the old
lady in a chair and I pulled out—
at a second attempt—the offend-
ing tooth. She smiled at me and
gave me a chicken for the mission.

After we had disposed of all the
cases at the dispensary I went
across to the junior school,

The children are just like our
children and thought a new
teacher was interesting and they
endeavoured to divert me from
my purpose of teaching them
English. On some days they suc-
ceeded and persuaded me to tell
them of the capital town of Liv-
ingstone—of the sea which was
over 2,000 miles away, which they
had never seen, and of London
and of England. The school was
made of baked mud blocks simi-
lar to the other buildings I had
seen,

Then I had the usual African
rest for 2 hours in the middle of
the day, and in the afternoon
went out to the gardens. The

Bristol

Standing ....
JOSEPH WILSON

later in the month.

Bristol Brand.
cd

The ever popular

Wilson

Owing to the Labour
Shortage in England,
shipments of the out-

Hats
have been delayed. These
famous hats are expected

Until then Wilson offers
you an excellent pure
felt hat in their popular

schools weekly board-
ing schools, the children going
back to their homes for each
week-end, So they have to be fed
during the week and therefore are
expected to and do grow their
own food as well as learn some-
thing about agriculture. After
two hours of bending and stooping
I returned to the clergy house for
tea, My evening task was to help
build a separate guest house and
a small house for the Bisbop.
Never before had I investigated
the weight of a mud block, but
after handing about 100 from the
floor to the artisan I knew they
each weighed a ton. I went in

Evensong and later to dinner
really tired but satisfied with the
days work. At the end of dinner
the Principal. said with a smile,
“Your time is now your own, but
you must be in bed by 10 o’clock.
I was so worn out I was in bed
and asleep by 9 o'clock.

Village Life

After a few days, the Pringi-
pal asked me if I would like to
visit some far off villages And
so we set out one Friday night
and cycled until near midnight,
when we slept in a hut by the
road. Up again next morning at
daybreak and cycled until mid-
day and reached our destination
in the afternoon. We were wel-
comed by the whole village, the
local catechist explaining the
numbers who had come in for
Sunday Communion I walked
round the villdge with the cate-
chist, who spoke English well, and
he told me of the life and nard-
ships of his people. The soil was
poor and productivity was low.
The condition of the cattle re-
flected the poverty of the soil and
people. They had thought of
moving on but they were too
attached to their land, their only
real possession. I went inside their
houses, which were mud huts
grass mats and some animal skins
some empty tins for cooking and
drinking. Later I went over to
the church, which the villagers
had built A very weh smaller
and cruder church than the other
but I shall never forget the Sun-
day Mass at which I had the
privilege of serving Can you
imagine the oldest barn or store
house you have ever seen with
an Altar at one end and two!
hwndred Africans packed | and,
kneeling on the floor—they don’t)
like chairs or benches when they
are worshipping their God — the
women with their babies _ tied
comfortably to their backs—the|
little heads peeping over _ their|
mothers’ shoulders—the singing |
of the hymns, the Creed and the
responses in a deep melodious
tone, and then the sight of the)
men and women—still with their

there are



|
|
|

babies—making their Commun
fon Some had walked for 3)
days to come to church |
Self-Help |
I listened to a conversation}
between the Principal and the
catechist regarding 6 ‘equest for
another church and 4 uspensary

te be set up in another village
about 100 miles away, The
Principal said, “Tell your people
I will try and help them if they
first show signs of helping them-
selves, If they will clear a path
along the last 20 miles wide
enough for a motorbike to get
through and will build a small
church and dispensary and main-
tein If in good condition, I will
try and get funds for the neces-
sary equipment and for a teacher
and dispenser, The villagers
promised to do so and months
later I heard that they had carried
out their promise and a_ priest
visited them once a month.

I would have liked to have
given a summary of my experi-
ences in Nigeria but time is short
and I would only say that as in
Northern Rhodesia, the church
has made and is making a solid
contribution in the spiritual field,
in health and in education. It is
no exaggeration to say that if the
Church had not sent missions to
Nigeria, the condition of large
numbers of the people would
have been far worse than it is
today.

I do not want to give you the
impression that the Govern-
ments of Northern Rhodesia and
Nigeria have not also been in the
forefront of social development
fn those countries. They have
done and are doing outstanding





The Hat desig





, Will be flood-lit.

.
Dancing On Lawns
+ on ene
At Exhibition

SIXTY-ONE cows have been
entered for the Annual Industrial
Exhibition which takes place on
December 6 and 7 at Queen’s Park.
This equals the figure of last year.
The same thing applies to the
entries of sheep and pigs which
number 43 and 18 respectively.
Sixty goats have been entered but
this figure has fallen somewhat
below that of last year.

A special feature at the exhibi-
tion will be dancing on the lawns
on the east side of the Park House.
This will take place on the first
night and will be from 6 to 10
p.m, The orchestras of Mr. Percy
Green and Mr. Clevie Gittens will
play on the occasion. The lawns
The decision to
have this feature was taken by
the Exhibition Committee at a
meeting yesterday. The event will
be part of the programme to cele-
brate the hundredth anniversary
of the holding of these exhibitions.

Musical Display

Another attraction on the first
day will be a musical display by
mounted police. This will begin at
4 p.m.

Thirty-two booths have gone up
at the Park of which 22 are for
advertising and games. The otherey
are refreshment booths. The new
and attractive type of metal
dexion is much in evidence in
several of the booths and will be
used as the framework for the
new awning which the Agricul-
tural Society is setting up.

It is planned to have a few
new events when the Gymkhana
comes off on Thursday, the last



day Among these will be the
Envelope Race and the Sharp
Shooters Race,

work in health and education
services.

But the purpose of my remarks
this evening is to invite your
attention to two points—

(a) that the missionary work

of the Church deserves
your most generous sup-
port, and
(b) the Africans are trying
to help themselves
I therefore ask you, in the
collection which follows, not to

give what you can afford but to
make a contribution more than
you intended at some personal
sacrifice to yourself.





ARE MADE
SPECIALIZE



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EXPERIENCE
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savoury flavour !




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with just a little Marmite !
Make it better for you too—
Marmite contains the B2
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health and resistance to
illness. That’s why it’s so
good for everyone on bread
and butter or in tasty sand-
wiches. You can do so
much with Marmite in
soups, gravies, sauces and
savoury dishes-—and Marmite
does so much for good cooking.

MARMITE .

The Vitamin B Yeast Food

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BY CRAFTSMEN WHO
IN GENTS’ FOOTWEAR

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oa
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SOLE LOCAL DISTRIBUTORS



ned for Gentlemen

of good taste.

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AUSTRALIAN LEG HAMS—14—-16 lbs each per lb, 1.06
NUTRICIA POWDERED MILK 1-lb tin 9664
NUTRICIA POWDERED MILK S-lbtin 4.35 ‘
KRAFT CHEESE ... 12 oz. tin af
SELECTED AUSTRALIAN CURRANTS ., l-lb pkg 39 “
SELECTED AUSTRALIAN SULTANAS 1-lb. pkg. ‘04
MIXED FRUIT for Cakes & Puddings 1-lb. pkg. 46%)
NIAGARA SORREL ..,.:-eseseseeess per doz. ised
JACOBS CREAM CRACKERS per tin 1.36
NEW ZEALAND CHEESE . per lb. pre
TURBAN DATES . per pkg. 303
PALM TREE COOKING BUTTER . 5-lb. tins 3.90
C & B PLUM PUDDINGS 1-lb. tins .96
SEEDLESS GRAPES per tin 29 & .50
RED CURRANT JELLY . per tin 33

HENNESSYS X.0O, BRANDY
COCKADE FINE RUM ,

per bot. 13.00

per bot. 1°16

e
STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO., LTD.

From to-morrow MONDAY 4th December, we will be clos-
ing to business DAILY from 12 noon to 1 p.m. for Breakfast.
On THURSDAYS half holiday, we will be closing as usual at
noon



6366 (COSCO COO pt,

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PPPS SOOM

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See
009

PAGE NINE

SUC OCCRWE

SHOP EARLY§



WOM

AND GET
THE BEST
OF

CHRISTMAS
GIFTS

|
|
}
|
|
|

AT

Weatherhead’s

“KODAK” CAMBRAS

BABY BROWNIE .. $ 5.00
sm BROWNIE MODEL ..
eT Vers ak sade $10.00
BROWNIE MODEL. .
“E” -..++ $12.00

BROWNIE REFLEX $16.00
KODAK DUAFLEX $20.00
KODAK FOLDING...

CAMERAS . $25.00
$35.00; $50.00 and $80.00
Fresh stock of “KODAK”

FILMS all Sizes Verichrome
and Super XX, also Koda-
chrome K135, Kodachrome
16 MM and Super XX 8 MM.
Cable releases, Colour
Filters, Tripods, Trimmers,
ag Art Corners. Photograph
ALBUMS 1/6 to 10/-
Camera Cases for Brownie
Reflex and Folding—620.
Flasholder to Fit

Model “E.”

Brownie
GERMAN CAMERAS

“Pucky” Reflex —
(120 size) $10.00

“Imperial” Box —

(280 BBO) Svc is $ 9.00
“Adox 66” (120 size) $12.00
“PIPES” All Sizes and

Shapes.

AS $15.36
“Comoy’s” Grand

We kak s habs 9,50

“Comoy’s” Everyman 4.00

“Comoy’s” Aston Bantom
(A Featherweight Pipe)
—$3.00

“Royal Lane” . $ 5.00

“Craftsman” tetas Qe

Other Pipes @ 84c. $1.32,
$1.80, $2.32, $2.38, $3.02,
$3.10, $3.53, $4.64

and the “British Empire”

Pipe at 60 CENTS EACH.

“THERMOS FLASKS”
CMBR ie 5s ettay aed RE
akelite) —

Jugs (B

-s $3.06 & o00
Jugs (Aluminium) — i
Wide Mouth 2 Pint — $6.24
Wide Mouth % gal. — $18.13
Wide Mouth 1 gal. — $25.60
‘hermos Picnic Sets —

$17.00—$28.50

Flashlights 1/- to $2.62
Kitchen Scissors ; $1.69
Cutex Manicure Sets — &








Mouth Organs 1/3, 3/-, 3/6,
Photo Stands (4x6) .10/-

1/-, 7/6, 10/-, 11/-, $5.00
Sheath Knives
Shaving Brushes 2/6, 3/3,

1/- 4/6 & $2.24
Cigarette Tubes 2/6, 3/-, 3/6
Gillette Razors 1/9-—-$7.14
10/-, 14/-, 20/-
4/-, $1.05, $4.83, $5.74,
$5.80, $9.00, $11.22 and
$14.00
PENS & PENCILS
Ps
Parker “51" Gold... .$18.00
Parker “51” Silver... .$16.00
aterman’s “Taperite” ——

—————

$12.00
Waterman's “Lifetime —

. $11.90
Waterman's 555" $ 8.00
Parker ‘460" S$ 4.00

$ 1.80
$ 1.44

and the Famous
Platignum Ball Point 4/6 ea

CHRISTMAS
m DECORATIONS

BWxmas Frost, Red & Green
‘macord, ‘Tinsel Cord, Holly
Sprays, Tags, Seals, Mistle-
toe, Paper Bells (3 sizes)
Paper Garlands (6 kinds),
ae Tinsel Strips, Tinsel
Decorations (4 kinds), Tin-
3e1 Stars (3 kinds), Xmas
Tree glass decorations (18
kinds), Holly Paper, Xmas
Cake Decorations, Holly
Frills for your Xmas Cake
1/- per yard
Christmas Cards (6 in Box)
1/3, 1/9 & 2/3. Christmas
ards with Local Scenes ge
in Colour 18c. ea. Balloons
all shapes and sizes 3c. to
12c. ea. (See use for Whole-
sale Prices). Cake Candles,
Red & Green Candles, Santa
Claus Stockings 4/6 — 12/6
pgcaley’s Crackers (a Beauti-
ful Assortment) Prices
from 3/9 $5.50,
Midget Crackers 4/6 & 6/-
Christmas Tree Lights —
$5.00 & $7.51 Set.

By Crepe Paper all colours,
Cigarettes in Xmas Packages
Du Maurier 50/s .. .$1.00
Craven A 50/s .. $1.02
Baby Comb & Brush Sets—

Crystal, Pink & Blue

Prices $1.40 & 7/6
ohnson's Baby Sets. .$1.85
Mennen's Baby Sets. ..$2.07
e
Roo in and see our complete
Display of
: XMAS GIFTS TO-DAY

Wearever
ars Knight €

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LTD.

Head of Broad Sireet



<

TEPER TE TS FE PAR RP
PAGE TEN



News From Britain

By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

LONDON, 24th Nov.
General MacArthur’s military
offensive in Korea has just begun;
and the British diplomatic offen-
sive to make peace in Korea has
just begun. This is probably a
well advised division of activities.
The temper of British public
feeling has to be estimated with
caution. But I think I am right in
s@msing that the war in Korea has
cOmtinued much further than the
t public interest in it. The
way to report a question of
this kind is to imagine what would
happen if the public temper were
thoroughly aroused—as it was by
the Korean aggression. Newspapers
Would receive innumerable letters,
M.P.’s, also, would report a large
mailbag. “What is the news from
the front?” would be a usual ques-
tion when friends meet in the
evening. But it is not sonow. The
news of the week, in Britain, has
been the row with Egypt and the
report that Aneurin Bevan told
American journalists a strange
version of British ideas on de-
fence. Since Seoul fell and the
United Nations forces marched on-
ward to the Manchurian border
the war news has sli out of
prominence: The only way to
interpret This is to presume the
British nation has doubts.

Lord Salisbury, the leader of
Conservatives in the House of
Lords, is a sensitive man cértain-
ly not far out of touch with British
sentiment on international affairs.
(The heretlitary peerage is often
accused ef-being out of touch with
democrac¥Yy=put often the reverse
is true—the elected politicians in
the Commons have their heads in
the saiid of their own glory). Lord
Salisbury has asked the Govern-
ment to keép open every way to
reach a settlement with Russia—
on the Far East and on Germany.
The noble Lprd who is the grand-
son of a great Foreign Secretary,
is a man of experience and strong
views who tannot be accused of
weakness. He resigned, for in-
stance, with Anthony Eden, in pro-
test against efforts to make a hu-
miliating +reaty with Mussolini in
1938. 6-day there is a strong
current of distrust in Britain. In
Korea there is distrust of
Synghntan™ Rhee,” and of Gen-
eral MacArthur’s support of
him. The reports of South
Korean barbarities against their

Tisoners, which were

the Times, receiv im-
menge publicity through the dis+
mi: of a magazine editor who
wanted to publish an illustrated
report. This morning Generak
MacArthur’s intention to finish the
war by Christmas was published
as tiews, without comment, Fine
as that would be, there is a sense
here that the General would like
to forestall the United Nations
which is, technically, his master.

while peace rumours are cir-
culating among diplomats of all
nations. Indians, as usual, are to
the fore since they are the only
nation with direct links to Peking.
The war in the Far East has ex-
pended itself. If it ends with any
settlement, and without embroiling
the Chinese any further the Gov-

NENG NANG NENG

CVUSCUSE SSBB UN EES

Chocolates,

SONOS



Marshmallows,

(From 40c. — $2.04) (From 72c. — $4.00)

ernment here will feet satisfied
that Russia will not try any more
military adventures in the Far East,
using their client governments.
But the distrust continues—while
there are doubts about where the
Chinese will move.
George Bernard Shaw

So they have scattered the ashes
of Bernard Shaw at Ayot, St.
Lawrence, his home. He suggested
‘this should be done, but left it
open to Westminster Abbey to
claim his remains. The Public
Trustee turned to ecclesiastical
authorities, who were worried at
the blunt clause in Bernard Shaw’s
will, He wrote, “I desire that no
public monument or work of art
or inscription or sermon or ritual
service commemorating me shall
suggest that I accepted the tenets
peculiar to any Established Church
or denomination, nor that the

POCKET CARTGGN
by OSBERT LANCASTER



Bat, acar Lady Liutiehamp
ton it’s just a simple question
of economics i) we 10%
buy coal trom the U.S.
can't run our power static
and tf we can’t run ouf por
stations we can't produce nin.
goods for export and +) we
can't produce more qoods ‘0
export we can’t make the dol
lars to ‘my coat trom the U.S

—see?”



form of a cross or any other in-
strument of torture or symbol of
blood sacrifice.” Westminster Ab-
bey has, (or had), the status of a
national shrine celebrating the
greatness of those buried under its
stones. But it seems that the Pub-
lic Trustee was put off by ecclesi-
astical opinion. He writes “the
feelings of Churchmen would be
offended if ecclesiastical authori-
ties made any move to allow the
burial of his es in any religious
shrine.” This is being regarded as
all very surprising. We did not
think here, that places of Chris-
tian burial were closed to people
because of their beliefs.

And Westminister Abbey has
a special place. As on paper
it puts it: “the sufferer . e,
is not the great man _ but
the reputation of an _ institu-
tion. The prestige of Westminster
Abbey is certainly diminished.
Shaw would chuckle to think how

Barley

&
-

closely the clerical mind can run

to form.”

THE LAD OF THE WEEK is
certainly the lad from Borstal—a
corrective home for juvenile de-
linquents—who escaped at night
and stole a light aircraft. He had
never learnt to fly but got all his
knowledge out of books. It worked.

Apparently he landed twice,
quite safely, before putting down
near Bordeaux. He is now to be
brought back to England where
there will probably be not too
severe punishment waiting him
He is reported to have stated thet
now he supposes he will have no
chance for the R.A.F.—but it
sounds like good material.

COALS BEING IMPORTED to
Newcastle are a bitter reflection on
planning. It seems the Ministry
of Fuel and Power is an ill-fated
coal scuttle of good intentions. Mr.
Philip Noel-Baker, who now graces
that department with his presence,
used to be picked as Labourt’s fu-
ture Foreign Secretary. He tried
his hand at the Foreign Office
under Bevin. But Ernie could not
stand him it is said, and since then
he has wandered by way of the
Air Ministry and Commonwealtn
Relations downward, through the
Transport Ministry, to the Ministry
of Fuel and Power. Still dogged
with ill-luck he now has to face
the odium of a fuel crisis i? a cruel
February comes. Britain, which
Bevan once described as a lump
of coal in a sea full of fish, is par-
ticularly appalled by the prospect
of doing without coal, while we
are exporters to all the world.
Watching, from the gallery, the
well-meaning Minister wriggle un-
der taunts from his political op-
ponents, I remembered it all once
before. Then Shinwelk was the
ruined Minister of the deep coal
crisis of February, 1947. He was
sacked from Fuel to the War Of-
fice—it was the foundation of his
career. Now he stands high in es-
teem—the Minister of Defence. At
that rate Philip Noel Baker may
get back to the Cabinet yet!



Charged With
Four Murders

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 29.

Randolph Fraser on Tuesday
appeared at the Sangre Grande
Court on a preliminary hearing
on four charges of murder arising
out of the recent Valencia shoot-
ing whieh started a 15-day pOlice
manhunt

Magistrate C, H
manded Fraser to

Fraser was later
police Guard to Valencia forest
where a gun, reported missing
luring the manhunt, was found
pear the garden of one of the
victims. The gun was hidden in
the grass and set with a twig
attached to the trigger as a trap.
About 50 feet away a number of
cartridges were found in thick
bushes, The Guardian photogra-
oher narro @seaped the gun
trap when » called out a
varning,—Can,

Markham re-
December 6
taken by a



yd





Decorated Tins of Toffees, Attractive Boxes ol

Sugar







Ff Md
Hi qi |
. bac

SUNDAY

Hugh Springer
Talks Of Barbados
Education System

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, J’ca, Nov. 27,
The education system of Bar-
bados was the subject of an ad
dress by Mr. Hugh Springer, M.A.,
Registrar of the University Col-
lege of the West Indies, to the
St. Andrew's Teachers’ Associa-

tion a week ago.

Mr. Springer, who dealt in
detalii with the educational system
in Barbados said, among other
things, that the sister colony was
much in advance of Jamaica in
education in that there was no
district in the coleny that was not
well served by schools. Because
oi the general awareness towards
education, he said, there was no
necessity for compulsory educa-
tion.

He said, however, that in the
matter of teachers’ training, Bur-
bados was behind Jamaica !n that
their first Training Colleve cam
into existence not more than two
years agi Prior to that a few
teachers were trained ut an ineti-
tution connected with Codrington
College in a sort of poor-rclat on
status. He said also that in B
bados there was a greater num!
of male teachers than fem ik
teachers which was the reve
in Jamaica and attributed this
the fact that in Barbados
hood had not yet
status it has in thi

worn
acquired ie
island



Jamaica Gan Grov.

60% Of Locally
Used Rice

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, J’ca, Nov. 27,

On his return from his ric:-
study visit of British Guiana r>-
cently the Hon, I. W. A. Berro +
Minister for Agriculture, Lan is
and Commerce, said that with 4
proper approach to the indust) y
Jamaica can produce sixty perce it
of the local demand for rice

Mr. Barrant, accompanied ly
Mr. W. Ashman, vice-Chairm.n
of the Jamaica Rice Growers’ As
sociation, spent 10 days in the
mainland colony, which he de-
scribed as “a wonderful country.”

He described the people of
British Guiana as being “just like
Jamaicans” on the whole, but
added that their political cor-
sciousnes8 was 80 low that they
could be regarded as “politically
dead.” The country, Mr. Barrant
said, abounds with Labour Unions
“but suffer acutely from lack of
leadership.”

EAST INDIAN HANGED
BY FLOUR BAG

(From Our Gen Corie. pondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 28
An East Indian, 28 years o! i



and father of six children was
found hanging from a _ cashev
tree by a neighbour at Windsor

Park Estate, Trinidad. It wie
reported that he suftered from

chronic disease, A _ flour ba,
was used for the hanging.

FRENCE PERFUMES including:—
My “in, Scandal, Arpige, Bellogia, Nuit de Noel
Fleu:sde Rocaille, Tabu, Surrender, Reflexions,

ADVOCATE

Jamaica Cannot
Send Volunteer
Force For U.N.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, J’ca, Nov. 27,

The “Jamaica Government doés
not consider that it could properly
make an offer of a volunteer force
from Jamaica for the United Na-
tions.

Recently the Jamaica Chamber
of Commerce, Ltd., forwarded a
suggestion to the Government
asking Executive Council to give
serious consideration to the re-
cruitment of 1,000 volunteers in
Jamaica to be placed at the dis-
posal of the United Nations

In reply the Secretariat has in-
formed the Chamber that the
Government did not consider that
the offer of volunteers to the
United Nations on the conditions
suggested by the Chamber was one
that could properly be made by
Government.



Jamaica Wants War
Risks Insurance
Money

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, J’ca, Nov. 27,

The Jamaica Government is
to make a request to the Secretary
ef State for the Colonies with a
view to Jamaica’s share of the
War Risks Insurance Fund,
amounting to about $625,000 (W.I.)
being made available to the, In-
dustrial Development Corporation
which the Government contem-
plates setting up for encouraging
the expansion of industrial pro-
jects in the island.

Active consideration is being
given for the use of the money
for the development of the island,
including the encouragement of
the establishment of industrial
projects by means of which in-
creased employment would be
afforded and the improvement of
two of the Island’s many Mineral
Spring Baths.

SCHOOL CERTIFICATE
QUESTIONS WERE LOST

From Our Own Correspondent

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 28.
Trinidad candidates taking
the Cambridge School examina-
tion in San Fernando, waited 45
minutes later than the scheduled
time for the beginning of the

examination yesterday. It is
reported that the whereabouts of
the question papers were un-

known by either the supervisors
or observers at the centres, The
papers which were eventually got
through the police, did not reach
the Education Department, and
the San Fernando Office at ail.
This has drawn strong criticism
from various sources, The mat-
ter is being investigated by the
Minister for Education, the Hon.
Roy Joseph.

L’heure iue, Mitzouka, etc., etc.

LOLION

Gifts Fon

PRESENTATIONS OF JACOB BISCUITS ‘ -

Family Assorted”,
Crackers’’

PEEK FREAN:— Play
XMAS CRACKERS, THERMOS FLASKS, LUNCHEON

GOLOGLES including:—
4711, Atkinsons, Marie Farina.

- Houbigant, Crepe de Chine, Tabu,
Mon. cat Supreme, Amour Amour.

PRESEN’ ATION BOXES of Soaps & Dusting Powder.
Mor:.y, Bronnley, Cussons, Yardleys, Elizabeth
Arden s.

GIFT SE\ S:— Yardley, Elizabeth Arden, Max Factor,
Ponds.

COMB é BRUSH SETS; PERFUME NOVELTIES:
Soir De Paris, “Eiffel Tower.” “Shoe’’, Goya’s:---
Cracler, Gift Coffret, Michief ix. “Top Hat".

CALLING ALL CHRISTMAS








Sha Family

Afternoon Tec
“Ox.

SETS, CAKE AND TABLE DECORATIONS.





KNIGH

TS LTD.

ALL BRANCHES

per cent.

factory. This increase brin:
cost-of-living bonus to 4
cent.

~eption.
Cream



SUNDAY DECEMBER 8, 1950
‘ «

B.G. Workers Get |*. 6

5% Cost-of-Living

Increase

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Nov. 28.

The B.G. Sugar Producers’
Association has announced a 5
increase on the cost-

per

The decision to grant the in-
crease followed a meeting between
representatives of the Sugar Pro-
ducers’ Association, the Man-
Power Citizens’ Association and
the Workers’ League at the De-
partment of Labour.

But Workers Ask For More

Despite this announcement a
conference of Estates Joint Com-
mittee Representatives and the
M.P.C.A, District Secretaries
held on Monday voted in support
of a motion calling for an addi-
tional $3,000,000 wages increases
for workers.

It was hoped that the price of
sugar for export would be in-
creased sufficiently to make this
possible by January 1, 1951.

The Conference which was
attended by 70 delegates from 25
estates, also decided that the Sugar |
Producers’ Association be ap-,
proached about incorporating the
45% cost-of-living allowance with |
basic wages of all workers, and)
that unskilled field workers be)
paid a minimum wage of $2.00)
per day, while skilled factory
workers be paid 30 cents per hour
as a minimum. It was also decided |
that the S.P.A. be asked to con-
sider launching a provident scheme
and a contributory pension scheme.



Gomes Praises
Oilfield Workers

‘Trade Union

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-Or'-SPAIN, Nov. 28.

When the Hon. Albert Gomes,
Minister for Labour attended
the 11th Annual Conference of |
the Oilfield Workers’ Trade Union |
at San Fernando, he told scores |
of delegates that “I am all for |
the type of Trade Unionism you |
are endeavouring to give the!
Colony.” The Government's policy |
in this regard, he added, will be |
to give every encouragement to |
the type of sober, responsible, |
and realistic Labour organisation |
you “represent in this Colony.”
Mr. Gomes was the principal |
speaker at this mammoth con- |
ference, and received rounds of
cheers from the audiences as he
denounced “irresponsibility” and
“rebellious actions by those who
seek to destroy you.”

“The great tragedy”, he said “of
the West Indies has always been
the lack of continuity of effort
or purpose in so many of the |
things we undertake and it is a
fact to be lamented that so many
people in this country still be-
lieve that only efforts that ar?
spectacular are efforts worthy of
our recognition and encourage-
ment.”

|

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SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950



Voice Of

Scouting
Tomorrow

The last in the series of “The
Voice of Scouting” for 1950 will
be heard over Radio Distribution

tomorrow evening, 4th December,
at 5.45 o’clock when a programme
including Christmas Carols and a
short sketch, together with a re-
port of current events during the
past two months by the D.C. of
the South Western Local Associa-
tion. So don’t forget to listen in
on Monday evening at 5.45.

Congrats!

Hearty congratuiations to Mr.
Graham E. Corbin, A.D.C. of the
Leeward L. A. on gaining the
Wood Badge Part I (Theoretical)
Certificate. Mr. Corbin has now
completed Parts I and II of the
Wood Badge.

Reminder

Members of the Executive Com-
mittee of the Island Scout Council
are reminded of the meeting
to take place at Scout Headquar-
ters tomorrow evening, Monday
4th December, at 5,00 o’clock.



Investigating
Airfields

AS THE proposals the

for

New Houses
To Be Built

THE Housing Board approved
of a plan prepared by the Colonial
Engineer and the Board, a model
of which was made by the Senior
Draughtsman of the Architect
and Town Planning Office and
shown to the Board at their meet-
ing yesterday. The plan will be
forwarded to the Governance
Executive Committee and as soon
as they approve of it, 25 houses
will be built at the Pine and
25 at the Bay.

The model showed that the
houses will have two bedrooms,
a kitchen, hall, and a small room
for washing. Pipes for water wi!!
not be run in the house but stand-
pipes will be placed at convenient
points.

The Director of Medical Ser-
vices said that the model showed
that there would be good placing
of ventilation and sanitation,

The executive engineer of the
Department of Highways and
Transport has suggested that a
toot bridge be placed near th
Belfield area to allow people to
cross the water which prevents
easy passage after heavy rain.

The Secretary of the Board
told members that he had dis-
cussed the matter with the execu-
tive engineer after Mr. Beckles
had brought up the question of
water flooding that area

Ways and means of getting
adequate drainage in other hous-

operation of the Sealand service ing areas is also being discussed

to the Windward’ Islands have
been abandoned, it is again neces-
sary_to investigate the possibility
of providing suitable airfields for
Dominica and St. Vincent, Wing
Commander

and steps will be taken to im-
prove them as early as possible.

It was decided to accept the

recommendation of the Director
L. A. Egglesfield,of Highways and Transport in

Director General of Civil Aviation connection with roads running on
for the Caribbean area told the Beckles Road, The Director had

Advocate yesterday.

He has just returned from a
visit to Grenada where he met
Col. Merrylees of the firm of Sir
Alexander Gibb, Aerodrome Con-
sultants,

Col. Merrylees who has come
out from England to advise on
the engineering aspects of these
problems, is now investigating the
possibilities in Dominica, where
he will be joined by Commander
Egglesfield on Tuesday. They
will later go on to St. Vincent to
see what can be done there, more
particularly as the recent heavy
rains have seriously damaged
Diamond airfield.

Wing Commander Egglesfield
who was on leave in England with
his family, came out via Jamaica
at the beginning of November.
There, by arrangement, he met
an airfield expert from the Min-
istry of Civil Aviation and they
examined the possibility of im-
proving Palisadoes airport, or
alternately finding another site.

Their report is now being
examined by the Government of
Jamaica.

Commander LEgglesfield said
that Barbados can count itself
lucky in having such an excellent
natural site at Seawell. Although
the heavy rains have interfered
with the completion of the work
on the new runway, it is going
to be a very fine job when it is
finished,



recommended that the entrance on
Beckles Road from two of the
minor roads, be abandoned in
order to avoid cross roads, The
entrances will be still available to
pedestrians as a footpath will be
provided. Traffic will come out on
another road.

Sixty-six houses wil! be painted
at Deacon’s Road. The Secretary
of the Board was instructed to
write to Government accordingly.
Those tenants who are capable of
undertaking the work will be
allowed to do so under the super-
vision of a foreman. The Board
also considered the question of
changing the terms of the present
hire-purchase agreements ,

The draft estimates of capital
expenditure for the year 1951-52
was decided on by the Board. This
included the removal of 200
houses to the Bay and Pine as
well as the erection of 50 new
houses.

Mr. Gaulder Chase was granted
vacant bachelor’s quarters at the

Pine.



OPINION

NEW YORK.
“By every step we take towards
making the state the caretaker
of our lives, by that much we move
towards making the state our
mastér”—General Eisenhower.

Motor Cyclist
Injured

ORTY-TWO-YEAR-OLD Elliot
Downes, an engineer of
Blades Hill, St. Philip, injured his
right leg when he fell from motor
cycle P-87 while riding along Two
Mile Hill yesterday morning, He
was taken to the General Hospital
and detained.

Dennis Alleyne, (11), who was
travelling on the pillion, was
treated at the Hospital for injuries
and discharged.

It is understood that the wet
road caused the cycle to skid.
A FIRE of unknown origin

broke out at Pool Plantation;
St. John 6n Friday night and
destroyed 50 holes of first crop
ripe canes which are insured.

The canes belong to the Trustees
of the estate of the late W. H.
Trolloppe. .

ICHARD BAILEY of the
; Mounted Banch of the Trin-
idad Police Force, arrived in the
island during the week to spend
about six weeks’ holiday

He is accompanied by his wife
and three children. They are
staying with relatives at Black
Rock.

P.C. Bailey is a Barbadian who
enlisted in the Trinidad Police
Force in 1942.

Fhe ay CLARKE was awarded
First Prize at the Local Talent
Show at the Globe on Friday
night. He sang “Chatanooga Boy”.
Boy”. c

Second Prize went to Cheston
Holder who sang “Santa Fe”. The
— —e of the night was

colm urray an .
“Blue Moon”. . 7 oe Oe

HE ST. SIMON’S MIXED

SCHOOL held their “Open
Day” on Thursday. Mr. Aubrey
Douglas-Smith distributed the
prizes .

During the afternoon the pupils
performed in a play entitled “The
Black School Master” Mr
Douglas-Smith addressed the
gathering of guardians and par-
ents.

_ Mr. C. G. Smith, Headmaster,
in a short speech appealed to par-
ents for their co-operation with
the staff in training their children

Mr. C. F. Broome moved a
vote of thanks Rev. K. D.
Grannum presided

More Flour
Arrives

The Alcoa steamship “Alcoa
Pegasus” landed 1,155 sacks of
flour from Halifax here yesterday.

She also discharged 27,511
pieces of pine and spruce lumber,
419 sacks of oilmeal, 90 sacks of

oats, and supplies of newsprint,
tobacco and household effects.



The “Alcoa Pegasus’” local
agents are Messrs. Da Costa &
Co., Ltd.

The Schooner “Lucille M.
Smith”, another of yesterday’s
arrivals, brought for Barbados

1,500 bags of rice along with sup-
plies of firewood and charcoal.
The schooner is consigned to
Messrs. Robert Thom Ltd.



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STOKES & BYNOE, LTD.—Agents
PAGE TWELVE

New Dickens
Serial

BBC Radio Notes:





Church

Services

BBC Radio
Programmes

































SUNDAY ADVOCATE







HARBOUR L0G | GD

7

In Carlisle Bay












































































Sci Laudalpha, Sch. Anita H., M.V + , 7
ie METHODIST Star. M.\ recise, Yacht Tern ill IE ry PREPARATIONS
“Our Mutual Friend” ‘ BETHEL: 11 Rev. B. Crosk SN Pescies, Leen tee. b BEAUTY
A radio adaptation of Dickens’ Pag gg 7 a munion after arate = = W: L Eunicia, Sch. Zita Wonita
+= ; J mm. . es phon” . ct 3loria lenrietta 4
Mutual Friend’ takes the place of Analysis, 7.15 a.m. Strike up the Band DALKEITH m. and Re Sch. Frances W. Smith, Sch. M Choose the
‘The Master of Ballantrae’ as tlie 8.00 a See omen) Soe B. Crosby, Holy Communi each Le MV. ¢ LM. Yannis, Sch. | f
. ‘ ym; 12.01 noon re News ervi lis Mark , ady Joy, 5
current BBC serial, and will run 123@ pm News Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Take _ BELMONT: 11) am. Rev. M. A otis, h, Sch. Gardenia Ad: P z 1 th t .
for twelve successive weeks. In Ripe Here, 12.48 pr , London Forum, Thomas. Holy Communion."7 p.m. M owder atis
. ¥ + ale mn. Radio New «reel, 1.30 p.m. Sun urwen ARRIVALS
this novel of his Dickens returned dey ‘taeviea. 2.00 p.m. The News, 2.10 SOUTH DISTRICT: 9 # M.A Schooner Gunghine M.. 28, 1908. nbs
to his own world of comedy and p.m. Home News From Britain, 2.% p.m. E. Thomas. Holy Communion. 7 p.m. Capt. Barnes, from Ma 4 made for ou
bizzarrerie which had been less Communism in Practice, 2.30 p.m Variety Mr. G Bascombe Schooner Lucille M 74 tone
eae epee $90 p.m. Our Mutual Friend, | PROVIDENCE: 11 a.m. Mr, E. Browne, net. Capt. Hassell, fr¢ Guia
evident in his later works. UE 400 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. Interlude, 7 pam Mr. J. Love SS. Alcoa Peg ‘
Mutual Friend’ nas been described 415 p.m. Music Magazine, $30 p.m. Sun- VAUXHALL: 4 adn. Mr. C. Josies otemie eee
s ‘Dickens at his most mellowed day Half Hour, 4.55 p.m Epilogue, 5.00 pr Mr. G. MeAllister 0 tons FAIR SKIN CPEAM SKIN | OLIVE SKIN N EAN i
su ie es ‘m. Tom Jones Trio, 5.15 p.m Pro- S STREET—11 a.m, Rev. E apt. Joseph, from Dominica ; | SKIN
= r P.
and mature and, in some ways, at gramme Parade; 5.30 p.m, From The pm. Rev, B. McCullough S Bishop dale, 5,006 tons net, Capt 4
his most ambitious.” In it hiS Children’s r, 6.00 p.m. Round Britain 5 BAY—9.30 a.m. Rev. H. Tunnard, from Portsmouth Cream Rose Honey Rose Tan
operb artistry reaches its heighis, Quis; 630 p,m. Sunday Service; 7.00 p.m > S. 7 p.m. Mr. P. Deane DEPARTURES ; SF eet
superb artistry reaches its =) the News; 7.10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.15 © WHITE HALL—9.30 a.m. Rey. R. M M.V. Caribbee, 100 tons nei, Ca) le) | Gitear te Gute Fouas
and the book contains some of pm Caribbean Voices; 7.45 pin, The Cullough f. 7 p.m. H. C, Payne Gumbs, for Dominice. : > j
socis ire > seria ‘coming of Christ; 8.00 p.m, Radio News- GILL MEMORIAL-—il m. Rev. R SS. Bishopdale, 5,006 tons ne apt
best social ae ia ae t reel; 6.15 p.m, United Nations Report; McCullough 8. 7 p.m Mr. F, Moore Tunnard, for Trinidad BRUNETTE Peach Honey | Gere Fonce | SunTan |
adaptation ve be a uM ng 830 p.m. English Magazine; 9,00 p.m HOLETOWN—28.30 a.m. Rev. F. Law a _—— i {$4
days at 3.30 p.m; and on On- Fred Hartley and his Music; 9.30 pm rence § 7 p.m. Mr D_ Scott aie ILV rr
es 15 a t which tirne London Forum; 10,00 p.m. The News; BANK HALL—9.30 a.m. Mr. F. Roach 1 : ANK VES ree Cream Rose Rose Tan
page i "er mi tha air to tae 2010 pm. From the Editorials; 10.15 7 p.m, Rev. E. Griffin i OR WHITE
it will also be or ep 6 r p.m, Anything to eclare; 10.45 p.m SPEIGHTSTOWN—1i a.m Rev F ‘ a sc.('.]-j~ i ial —
West Indies in the special regional Ivor Moreton and Dave Kaye; 11.00 p.m. Lawrence T. 7 p.m, Rev. F. Lawrenc shade: yaedens C-| i-n-g. Care 2 ee ag ne th go
service. Listeners should note that Sree ' CHURCH OF GOD OF COMMERCE Cetunarel, With “Number Sern” the phen oor reikieess perfection, The
the BBC is now broadcasting to BOSTON iat St. Micnael above chart will guide you to your own individual shade, Obtainable from your
the West Indies on 48.43 metres, roa Me WRUW 11.75 Me, WRUX —}1 a.m. River Road, Rev. J, B. Win- chemist or drug store.
6.195 megacycles from 6.00 p.n ‘16 Me. eT ae eae ci) “mop ae aaa Bridgetown, Barbados, B.W.1. Wholesale enquiries to: C. F. Harrison & Co, (Barbados) Ltd, P.O. Box 304, Bridgetown,
onwards and if you have been — Re EE ner Tt ‘ sia john, 7 p.m, Rev. M. B. Pretti-john RATES OF EXCHANGE
troubled with poor reception re~ TM 0.74 3's im. Central Band of the Fr Administration of Lord's Suppe! December 2, 1960 . at iy nage gin
cently this frequency may SOlV@ Royal Air Force, 7.45 am, Chosen Island, y,), 2.7 Eckstein Village, Rev. J. B Léon
some of your difficulties, 4,00 a.m. From the Editorials, 8.10 a.m Cals caltieee esiuip eobias Kt /, ef i ")) 8
Programme Parade; 8.16 a.m. Nights at 11 asm, Vaux Hall, Rev, E. W, Weekes.) 4.8125 90 Days Sight 4.7225 Or TEU) Jah f
Paul T 1 ‘the Opera, 9.00 am. Close Downs 12.00 ST. CATHERINE E. 0. CHURCH 4.8175 60 4.7375 .
More Paul Temple | (noon) ‘The News, 12.10 p.m. News Analy- ST. Ci RINE E. 0. 4.8175 See thee : :
Another BBC serial of a differ- gis, 12.15 p.m =, Midland Light . eae ADVENT SUNDAY < ais |. 4.7625 hs :
ent nature also begins in $16 Sem Peto yp ty ae p.m Educating 7 p.m. Evensong and Liturgy; Preach-p@j +8240 : 4.7750 eho 4 f « \
; 3 & . , ‘oth . i owe Evangel v, Ps tele’ . 4c.) Sight Si 7 ag
ing week. This is another Paul Archie, 2.00 The News, 2 10 p.m. oe: ange ist Parri Celebrant (Min. 24c.) Sigh’ Peta tie) s
Temple Mystery which is just 8S jome |News om Britain, 215 Am CME ves”, an ee A
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al Sir Grahe orl - monwealth; 3.00 p.m. Calling a ST, WALTER LUTHERAN HOUM (Min. $1.) Cable -
usual Sir Graham Forbes of Seot= (09 "p.m. “The News: 410 p.m. The DAYRELL'S ROAD CH, CH te
land Yard finds himself puzzled pay “Service; 4.15 (pm. Do | You 7 4m, English Service and Sermon by Coupons 4.70 -one smali tablet a ts
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For just over a hundred years eee Taare SB: sane Chit the Nati ie fe Oeiralts 62.45% pr This scientifically balanced preparation brings the boon of easy
ri 0 P ions rom 7 ‘ a7
now books and pamphlets have our headquarters. The Reverend Eugene |. 4 14 j a Drafts 62 3/10% p breathing, and has the additional advantage of safeguarding the
rte ‘tor-of- 64 6 ~ pr. Ca g . :
sought to prove that Bacon a. SAFE THIEVES r dig ae ee ah Bist Disectorof- 63 1/10% pr. Currency 61 1/10% p mind from the dread of those sudden nerve-racking on t }
some other Elizabethan wrote ame ¢tation ‘nig toe anes ta on ‘Phere is nothing to fear when Ephazone tablets are to hand !
Shakespeare. Anybody, Rowe MILAN THE SALVATION ARMY Wh Dr Bier ONtAL There is nothing vo inject, nothing t inhale, Ephazone has j
times "seems, _ except ilar. — Saie thieves netted £2,800 for a DIAMOND CORNER Cheques on ceeeded in cases of Asthma, Bronchitis and Bronchial Catarsh |
Shakespeare, wrote the works of pight’s work in Venice. They (Harvest Festival) poere %% disc i toate y done for oth
Shakespeare. In reams and reams entered a bank, could not force , 100 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3.00 p.m Be Ok See Min. 28c.) ch previously seerned hopeless. ‘What it has done for others,
of print, skilfully directed at the Seo. * OM ° ¥.P. Harvest Programme, 700 p.m. (Min. 3c.) ag can de for you! ,
ee ; | P© the safe, so they manhandled it senior Altar Service; Condilcted by ye, pr an a ! t
heads of the Baconian:, have {6 , waiting car. Major A, E. Moffett, (Divisional Cor Attn 500.) , FOR AST 5
come the refutations. Both sides mander) . Mt Cousten 1%% dise.
ws seem very convincing. An eaniz ——— SEA VIEW ae Min. 25c. "
. - —— 11,00 a.m. Holiness Meeting p BAHAMAS a
I ver mvincing. An aa rvest Programme >t 5 2 477.50 }
auhae Acerean: sicien Dr, thirty, and not very often heard Sitiok “Ater Guvine. Candccted. " OAMAICA :
Giles E. Dawson, in a talk called today, brought recognition and Mijor Smith 481%4% pr " aT 25c.) : 5 ‘ he ‘
“Te Case for St (first controversy to Arthur Bliss when LONG BAY (Min, 25¢.) Demand (Min. 25¢ Gold by all registered chemists, 1f any difcully, weise 4: a | ‘
The Case for Shakespeare’ (first I dedi- _ 11.00 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3.00 1 481%4% pr : =I
broadcast in the BBC’s Third it was Aet eereeee: ee ee Y.P. Harvest Programme, 7,00 p (Min. 50c.) Cable me. .o (10, the B
; to Si rian Boult who, <. ; Sees, ee atic, 0. 3, Bridgetown.
Programme) in the BBC’s G.O.S. meg seal Shin pear wus oon. ‘Spice Altar Gerviee; Condictea wis: ckilck iaaads ileal has Solt V6: RUBE anagh
in the coming week, strikes the Samer of the BBC Symphony eto SPEIGHTSTOWN without notice. ‘ am adie a 4
latest blow in this seemingly end- ~ ‘ - Ss +, _.11,00 am. Holiness Meeting, 3.00 p , ; SH SERVICES SMR RRAE TT
less controversy. His talk will be Orchestra. The ‘Colour Symphony yp" yarvest Programme, 700 p.m ERAVION Cee ! ; Write Direct or Al il for Fathezly Advice ° :
ac itself will be presented by the senior Altar Service; Conducted | Deeember 3, 1050 He Lise Oo rimai for ratneriy Aayico te
oo, at 6.30 p.m. on Wednes- ‘phimarmonic Orchestra conducted Sr. Captain Bishop a BOBRUCE Srcore, (tely. Com Pt a Ne
next. 9 ee . "OUR ROADS a.m. ev. i oore o -
; by Sis Ares Elias op Toeeday Ay tua am etme diene 3, mel: TBE Sc THE STEPPING STONES
i * is Soncer a ° any une ' eats FRACE AL ws
The Bliss ‘Colour Symphony’ tee eae ann eae OO any eee oe i Hinde 1 a.m, Mr. Hayde, pin. Mr, Swine,
In the BBC’s GO.S,, in the com- but it will be on the air i i - en CHECKER. HALL hae To su CCESS ,
i k Sir Arthur Bliss will P-™. and may be picked up onthe ,, Holindan “Akoating. $00 11am. Mr, Barker, 7 p.m. Mr, Lewis.
ne Meee le cn hin wolous Sem. beams to North America after our Company “Meeting, 7.00 p.m. Salvat MONTGOMERY ' an ae
ve a talk on his ‘Colour Sym-— ni f so, COMpany ting, 7.00 p.m. Salvation 7 5m. Mr. Philips. Don't hesitate about your future ! Goforward, |
ini i jirect ones have closed down. Sir Meeting Lieutenant Reid F Pp ,
phony’ explaining how he came io Arti Bliss’s talk will be broad- _ WELLINGTON STREET ‘pee eee confident that The Bennett College wil! sec |
bc) a ge Weak. lpia calen ‘Tuesday also—at 7.08 qe ee eee Tee ee eivatic DUNSCOMBE * you through to a sound position in any career |
i i i = . — Sompany Meeting, 7 pm. Salvation _m. GG, La Ce? . (
written-when the compoaen. Waa pm. Wank, Mae Sr. Major Gibbs. Gisela ere | Rae you choose. The Bennett College methods
are individual. There’s a friendly,
; personal touch that encour-
















ages quick progress and
makes for early
efficiency.

CHOOSE




pe
YOUR CAREER a al
Exams. All Commercia! Subjects Piumbi:
iaicasel (Enginesriag and Art Quantity terveiing
Wireless) Radie Service Engineering
Book-keeping Radio (Short Wave)

Secretarial Examinations
Shorthand (Pitman’s)

vent Bork of Works








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Chanietry Teachers of Handicrafts
Civil Engineering ition Telecommunications
Civil Service Mining, | AN Subjects (City & Guilds)
ing, All Branches Move! Writing Television
and Examina- Wireless Telegraphy and
» Special Course Telephony

if your requirements are not listed above, write us for free advice
Direct Mail to DEPT. 188 .
THE BENNETT COLLEGE LTD.
®

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND













remember
Phensic!

The sooner you take Phensic, the sooner
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pecial Notice



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(Inc. in Br. Guiana)



We take this opportunity of notifying our

699090999 9O9O OOS SOOO SOOOSGOS







Customers and the General Public that Our

i

Store will be opened to business as usual
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. uninterruptedly on
Mondays to Fridays, and on Saturdays from
8.30 am., to 12.30 p.m.



Our decision to keep open throughout the

day is another instance of ....

“FIRST THOUGHT OUR
CUSTOMERS”

and country residents will please note that

A NUTRITIOUS comBinaT!

hineitilat tsiibenidinelll

we are prepared to cause them no incon-
venience by closing our doors any part of

a working day.

WM. FOGARTY ETD.

A604 ¢
VVUVUC SOS OOSS

sienna inate aaa tee i

LLL ELSI SAS



LLLP PPLLPPAPPPAPPPDPPPPES

oe “
PV SOO OU GS SO COSCO








| | dandry if

THE CALi !

SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950
DWN VIII.





WITH
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Agents: 1. M. B, MEYERS & C0. LTD.

Pfft"





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You dare

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Passengers who hold reservations
on and after Ist. December, 1950,
are kindly asked to contact our
Office regarding times and days
of departure of their flights.

BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS
LIMITED

Phones 4585 & 2789.



Lower Broad St.

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54

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ALWAYS {N SEASOM

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c \. WEBSTER

Ltd.,

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Ltd Sole

Agent






alll

Mo



SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950

SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN

ee







BY CARL ANDERSON






a good sign
ecco aqnytime!

This black and yellow sign over our

door means we have met Caterpillar
| Tractor Co.'s high requirements as to
business integrity, knowledge of the
equipment field and the resources to
| establish and manage the standout
equipment concern in this territory.

De cock

Ceara IS
ce ALWAYS
NG TO






BO YOU yar?
WANT ME Je @-738





o—* paw + os oe ee ie
THE LONE RANGER
PME, Wave uP pap! Saee 3 Tiknow most Law:
THE BRIDGE 1S DOWN! WED HAVE: AAC on © | | HOwDO You pa MEN BY SIGHT,

BEEN KILLED IF THE MASKED MAN | Op BAT) ete ESPECIALLY GOOD

HADN'T STOPPED OUR HORS ONES. WHY ARE YOU
> mn RUNNING AWAY ?



FOR GOOD! | CANT FIGHT AN
ENEMY | CAN'T SEE /











| Selling, servicing and other details of

WE’RE PROUD
our business are handled to make
and keep customers. * ‘Caterpillar’ TO SHOW iT

owners expect and get this kind of

service.

ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LIMITED.
TWEEEDSIDE ROAD, — ST. MICHAEL, — PHONE 4629 & 4371.



BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS











| | 6-I/VE GIVEN UP MY ART =

" sie poe .
|
| | |
—_— . ———————_|| a — |
DADDY -DID YOU KNOW (LL GAY IT'S | I HAP BETTER NOT Y
MOTHER GAVE UP GOOD / ITS TOO | LET MAGGIE SEE ME I THINK MY ABILITY CAUSES
PAINTING AND GOOD TO BE SO WAPPY-SHE MAY |
SCULPTING FOR GOOD? | L__, TRUE/ | START PAINTIN' AGAIN! |
s | NOW I CAN |
ys |
j 1
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eee
FRIENS 6 AND AFTER ALL-
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sea laaestaeretsiincensntt tena Aaideetsieindiicinaion

JEALOUSY AMONG My GIRL |
ae a | AN STAY

eras P } HOME AND BNvOY IT!

af) as

z ek Retry
a5t5 “> fri | . lis i rH

| es

| ay |

ote
gS
wt eect

Age 2 dQ ’
ape

| Cay)/) f
& om

|

. . . . . 2 |
labour is employed, and the minimum of attention and main- | RIP KIRBY










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The Petter-Fielding Horizontal engine, built by J. & H. McLaren




Ltd., of Leeds, is the choice the world over where semi or unskilled

BY ALEX RAYMOND

| THAT FELLOW, KIRBY. )
HE MUST HAVE _)

I'M NOT BA
9

; iF I'M NOT BACK IN | fy TRAILED ME ; , ie | ce
tigi y 4 l OUR A JERE! , 5
once it is installed and your operator knows the controls, you can g | ; ie Poul | eee Mt oe, in
: ¥ 4 HE POLICE! ¥ ‘
forget about it for along time. Tt is ideal for gravel-pits, saw- ¥ | f rr { j
¥ | Ey. ‘y j
mills, quarries, ete., or wherever long hours of operation in dusty % , 4 3 te f
S, oe 5 Vi
. o,8 4) % a | . y y, Z
and dirty conditions are the rule. %| , ‘0 | 5
5 a of j
% RX ry | \
» ae a>) |
> % 7 ’ Wt >
% yg ee 7 MX NS \s
. ; ~ Me { i |
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nie x J Ww sat a ’
p x ON, v
a % - , ss ~ ' Bits
Ny i 3 ee fights fever . 2 aN )
|








tenance desirable. It is so simple, so sturdy, so trouble-free that %





MR, KIRBY, YOU ARE RIC
MELODY LANE /S HER
SO IS MY CLIENT MR.
PA BUT I THINK YOU A BS
(iP QUE FOR A LITTLE 4
SURPRISE!

a ~'
ae Ty, r

LL LET










TYPE B.H.LP. ; R.P.M. Number of
Cylinders

DH ; 12, ae 650 - 800 SINGLE

Se 21-27 | 500 - 650 SINGLE
FH 32 - 40 400-500 | SINGLE

- FH2 | 64-80. | 400-500 | TWIN |



(Tre dis é
—E PHANTOM






ro



(THE QUESTION I6-~HOWTOGET
N THE GHIP WITHOUT RAISING A






OKAY UP THERE, \ ;
TAKE 'ER AWAYS 4
i al) 4

ao bs | DEVIL'S ALIVE? THANK ¢ JO? ITSWELL ~
: | Now I'VE GOT TO GE ‘y—|_GUARDED+ +k
THE ‘COND : K





eee i ASSOCIATED BRITISH OIL ENGINES (EXPORT) LTD. COUNTERFEITERS

Sole Agents for Barbados

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

o 4 +, . ¢
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399999966909!

j # f f


PAGE FOURTEEN

CLASSIFIED ADS.

















































_ SR ERAN ESO CR EPR





PUBLIC SALES
AUCTION







SUNDAY ADVOCATE



SHIPPING NOTICES |

















SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950

NOTICE

We are changing our early closing day
from Saturday to Thursday for the













“Excellent Values!”









































TELEPHONE 2508 oo | month of Decembei. COLLINS LIMITED “Well Worth Every ¢”
cecsingeqnumniapeiedaniaaenlie ATTRACTIVE FURNISHED FLAT— ave been instructed by the Com- SERRE | 3.12 50—2n |
i 5 Hastings. Facing sea. aan one or a = im pe ay ane ROYAL NETHERLAND Cetera | There are some tp the things
~ couple. Available Decem| at. Phone y 2 a said o e Super ‘able mode!
DIED PUBLIC NOTICES on e eee Poceenher. and =? o'clock the STEAMSHIP co | COMBERMERE SCHOOL ome Hot plates At Your Gas
ee aaeinenares ‘allowing items:— (2) Tin buckets, (1) . Showroom, ‘
pARLMONT ROAD. Si nel VIO- rca tade to ontianew ee soins ae She auginesod, 1) Bench, and The M.V. “Daerwood” will ac- ACADEMIC YEAR Why sak: Gall and sos . thom
4 +E ON" t, Michae « 5 . ssengers r 3 ay. y
r PEF CAROLANE “Ali friet ELECTION NOTICES [fie “Ageiy? Couarina’ Club: Tel DARCY A, SCOTT pens from A nee | Sey eere, Rt ramensers, tor Ht] 2. The Governing Bodp ef Comber ||| fa Sant Y out be most use-
. y 5 . * .s. «HELEN. ” , ; : St. L greng choo ve agreed to adopt from a
asked to meet at 4 o’c 5496. 2.12.50—2n. Govt. Auctioneer. 25th. November. and Aruba, Sailing Thursday Tta. 1951 onwards the Standard Ac: For CHRISTMAS.
ras A : . I" a ademic ¥! STM
the BELMONT PARISH OF 8T. MICHAEL 29.11,50—-2n, Sai from Amsterdam, and Dover from September to July. The main culty
™ Roo HEREBY give notice that I have BOULOGNE-—St. Lawrence Gap. Fully on “ORANJESTAD” 17th. and’ 18th, The M.V. “Caribbee” will ac- to the School will not be made, there-| ”
§ ‘ ‘ T inted the Parochial Building, Cum- | furpished, vagant December rn a UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Hetienber cept Cargo and ponsengers ~ fore, until September 1951, and the Bn- |p. $$$
Ce te nd Street, Bridgetown, as the place 8458. 12.0—2n, 5 Deminica: Antigua, ontserrat, trance Examinatior ll take place dur- |
“h aD. 3 where Perishioners of the parish of St By i Sailing to Trinidad, La Guaira, Cura- Nevis and St. Kitts, Date of de- July ‘Term a : mcewanient Ee ee ee
i Michael and other persons duly qualified “CLIFF COT.” Blue Waters Terrace the Rerueiane received I will sell at | eap etc. m.s. “DELFT” 6th. Novembgr; parture to be notified. notified tater.
BURKI Byron esterday. His} to vate at any election of Vestrymen for | Roekley. Fer 6 months Feb jst —July| cit, rochial Building, Cumberland | s.5, “FARNSUM” sth. November; m.s. 2. The Governing Body are aware that
th 1 will leave late residence} (he suid Parish may assemble on Tues-| Sist 1951, Dial 0160. Mre €, ©. Worme,| PHeet on Tuesday, Docember Sth at |“QRANJESTAD” Ist. November. B.W.L. SCHOONER OWNERS this change over tha: Miandadd Anas
Karlville,” Spooners Hill, at 4.30 this} q the 2nd day of January, 1961, be- 12. a. 2 of second hand Sailing to Trinidad, P. bo, a |} demic Year will necessitate some adjust-
| afternoon for the Westbury Cemetery.] tween the houn; of 10 and 11 am. to in good condition. | Geeegetown, m.s. “HELENA” ith. ASSOCIATION Ine. ments; the age limits will therefere be
Cla Mother), Samuel Burke] eect @ Vestry for the Parish of St.| _ESPERANZA—Fully Sur piees on St. cash. Saleee” adjusted. ob: as not te cause aa Meee
ouFat! Fred nel (Brothers), Patsy,| Michael for the year 1951. Jemes Sea Cogit. Phone } ‘ VINCENT GRIFFITH, Tele. 4047. ship to a pupil who would otherwise
rs PERCY H. BURTON, 129.80—Bn. A eee Madtira, Risen, An have been entitled to compete for ad-
jt sone eae Parochial Treasurer, OO oOo e Amsterdam, r mission in January 1951.
» SMITH Ma 1 a a M 2 € € He € aneré 3.12.50—3n. ] conveniences { Bedrooms, nen ani DER TH ‘OR = a vill be plicable 1951 only: —
leave her ne ronldgose on oe Cutlery, 10 minutes walk from Club UNE ER THE IVORY HAMMER a iow candiaate will be sEvbeien for 4.
Land, near King's Gap. for the Kew PARISH OF CHRIST CHUROH and City. Phone 4103. 2.12.50—2n. . examination who is not over 12 years
Pilgrim Holiness Church and thence] 1 HEREBY give notice that I have 1“ oat December 8th at Messrs. e e ° of age on January st, 1951 or under
to the W ce nal, Dale | {PPOlnted the New Vestny Room adjoin-| _FARAWAY—St, Philip, on Skeete’s/ [O10 10° ip’ garege, Probyn Street, (1) n ationa teams S | 11 years of age on Sepiember Ist, 1951.
$e ee ae ean) Oilarens.| 18 the Vestry Room, Oistin, as the place | Bay, Furnished, 3 bedrooms, Lg | mil | Vauxhall Bek muse a "i “ 3. From 1952 onwards the normal age 0 yy
in, § nthony and in ‘ Pst staan x Car . ~ . y OSs
Christina Fenty. (Mother). Arthur and] Sere all persons duly qualified to vote | subplt. Lighting plans, Cas sotk 2 p.m. Terms cash, SOUTHBOUND pep siriclareeagtitiy bay. abo He,
Shirley Bootman (Brothers), Esther] >! soon SS Vemryngn for iw ene) ae 'o Sails Sails Sails Arrives Sails and no} 2 yeu 8 t
Fenty (Sister Parish may amemble on Tussday, the Avetionss Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados | September Ist, in the year of seeking
ae drd day of January, 1961, between the ae roneer: _ | CANADIAN CHALLENG! 30 Nov - Ie Bec. 10 Dec. | admiasion. a instem to the AF.S., F.V.A.
AITHE— UR w cson of | DOUTS of and 1! o'e in the morn- va cree, Coast, LAD DNE ide ‘ : Dec 3 Dec. 14 Dee, applica By
WAViuxhall, Chit Chosen, Yesterdsy | me to elect @ Vestuy for the Parish of Piant Garage. 3 r , LADY NELSON :. <. c] = © games, 28 Decl 30 Dec. 31 Dees _| School must be made before the ist May, Formerly Dixon & Bladon
afternoon at his residence, Funeral | Christ Chureh for the yeer 1961 jo yess. 2, ie Under The Diamond Hummer | (Ady nopney 3 3.2. SS: ls tam. ha gan. 28 Jan. 1051, on which date the Waiting List wil
Ree ee tte Gon tee gece Parochial Treasurer TNGSIS Ty neve bein to sell by Pub- eee steer 9S SAE, NS Ee 5. The attention of all Scholarship FOR SALE
’ after 1 r ré s 1 - 2 i oe ?
Chureh Partsh Church, Friends are Christ Chureh. RUS-IN- urnpten Street from] le Auction on next te 9th Bodies ‘and ‘Authorities 18 eepeciatiy i ‘ :
3.12.50-—3n. vited to this notice LAS CAMPANAS” —
invited OOS | ist January 1980. Dial 4596." | day of December 1800 in the. evenir 3.12,50—3n. Moerine Hotel. A bungalow reat
Mrs iria Vaith wife Lionel 50— vpstairs eid " SOW PO
SWeithe (so: nes Waithe ' (brother) ; wea aive 1S + * mee ath Lane, over 200 Ready. | NORTHBOUND Arrives nares Arrives aves re ean a? ee ae large lounge patio,
aMrs_ Bonnett ete Herbert Waithe ve e ~~ WNY: Annex, on Hastings Main} made over 300 pairs of Barbados jarbados Boston . Jo - Z and dining room with
Mather), Elvira Waithe (mother). | 22Pointed the Vestry Room at the Db-| toed. § Medreoma, running water, several PLadies' | LADY RODNEY Dec. 27 Dee. € Jan. 1 Jan. CHIROPRACTIC French windows to galleries and
New York Papers Please Copy mIsaTy F Davin pairs , r = “¢ ye bon ead Dullt-
N ; : penzary as the place where all persons ig and Sitting room, very eeo over i LADY NELSON 11 Jan 33 Jan 22 Jan Jan. Patio, bedrooms (2 with ‘bullt.
ae eee. aes : duly qualified to vote at any election | fur couple. Phone 3001 2.12.50—2n, |} for children, and several other useful | LADY RODNEY 10 Feb. 12 Feb. 21 Feb. Feb. DR. FERREIRA of “Chiroville’ Upper in’ and 1 with ‘walk-in’ ward-
> ot Vestrymen for the said Parish may r . Ss “| items. You cannot afford to miss this | “ADY NELSON : 26 Feb. 27 Feb. 8 March ® Mareb Bay St. (Near Esplanade) by Chiropractic robes), 2 bathroom:; large kitch-
THANKS assemble on Tuesday, the 3rd dai) of) “CAR ome Ford Prefect (New) drive| Sale. D’Arcy A. Scott, A : method corrects diseases of eyes, €aT>, en, storeroom, laundry, servant's
~ January, 1964, between the hours of 19 if at ial gates for 2.12.50—4n | §-B.—Subject to change witnout AC vessels Atted with coid storage cham | OOo. throat, lungs, stomach, kidneys and Guerters; garage; double carri-
We the undersigned beg through this} aud 11 o'cloek in the morning to elect | ZOUree special ra Berpiguiers ne bers. Passenser Fares and Teves on application to 1— Dose, three Del beet ageway. Weil
Binedium to thank all those kind friends -0—én. saacnial

“who sent

jrad bereay
“AINSLEY
i Millicent





+brother)
son)

Ceeil

t wreaths, cards
wnd sympathised with us in ¢

ement cauved by
Ss MOUR






Wathkir

Thomas faril







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TAYLO.
or (wife?
chi-dren
ister), Jeffrey
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Yvonne
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® Veetry for the year 1951.
A. A. B. GILL,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Javeph.

PARISH OF ST. PETER
I HEREBY give notice to all persons
duly qualified to vote at the election of
Vestrymen for this Parish, that I have



CLERK for Parts Department,





TUESDAY #2th—Mrs. J. M. Cave’s
Sale. Greenwich, 2nd Ave., Belle-

ville.

3.12,.50—In | appointed the Parish Room, Speights- | $60.00 per month. Apply in petson with] THURSDAY l4th—Miss R_ Piekerin’s



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.,

LTD. — Agents.



GOVERNMENT NOTICES









CHRISTIAN BROTHER-
HOOD HOUR
3.30 p.m, Today
RADIO DISTRIBUTION

Church of God, Chapman St.














garden.







































































































































Milered Carter (daughters), Avril, Clar- purposes.

assemble on Tuesday, the 3rd day of

, ence, and Jenny (grandchildren), Mr.) oMtary. 1961, between the hours of 10]. SCRAP GOLD and gold jewellery | —acngsgumy—and Avenue, Bell Ma lievilia listless and often have diarrhoea sulphur-yellow in colour. The dura- 8 Pint & 2 Pint

| 7 . . —2n . R : ‘ ' r-O . hotel

James Cakter (son-in-law). , and 11 o'clock in the morning to elect] bought, highest prices paid. See your | mi; ee residence ‘faces the} tion of the disease is from one to ten days or even longer. Birds are x HOTEL Old: establianed i
318.5010) o Vestry for the Parish of St, Andrew | Jéwellers, Y. De Lima & Co, Ltd., 20,| Reneville Tennis Courts and contains Also % property on coast is ndw avail



a for the year 1951. Broad Street, Bridgetown. Drawing and Dining rooms, kitchenette often found dead in the morning without showing symptoms of illness able as a going concern at a low

memory of our dear

In ever loving 26.11.60—-12n, bed- ; figure. Full information on ap-
husband orother ; ane sara. CA ena Baretieial po eee? Gama poe Me wecene ne one Lapateirs Sie the night before. ee eoea cemtial cpportupity for
TROTMAN who fell asieep on pem- $ 1, 1 dressii and : ‘ : gi v : \
ber 4th 1949. eal sey St. iss Iw. : Puhlie Notices Contd. Genaue ane Peat ating rooms. The Post Mortem. Catarrhal inflamation of the intestine is often found for 8 Pint & 4 Pint

The shock was grea xe blow severe area

“THE MOORINGS” — Marine
Gardens. This valuable and well
maintained property close to the
contains 3. self-
A well



and an enlarged congested and friable liver,

Prevention & Control. Any bird showing signs of illness should
at once be isolated from the rest of the flock.

feet.
Inspection by appointment with Mrs.
Linle Bayley. Dial No. 3381.
Sale by public competition Friday,
15th December at 2 p.m.

We never thought that death was near
Only those that love can tell

The getns of parting without farewell,
The Lord who giveth hath taken away



}
+
REFILLS

PARISH OF ST. GEORGE
1 HEREBY give notice to all persons

t
duly Marine Hotel

Hairdressing Notice

qualified to vote at the election

C. CARLTON BROWNE

of Vestnymen for thio Parish, that I have CARRINGTON & SEALY. contained apartments.









eS

But we'll meet on those bright shores | © MADAME EDGHILL of Two Mile Hill y t A placed home and a_ secure in-
to part no more appointed the St. Georges Vestry Room) hogs to notify her eustomers that she ct 06 Infection is spread through the droppings hence strict sanitary Wholesale & Retail Druggist vesiment, . Offers, will he cone

Fver to be remembered by Mrs. Clara | 3 7 or at >t tad rot Jin â„¢AY | has resumed business as usual. Phone oo ass ; . i 136, Roebuck St. Dial 2813 sidered,
Totman (wife), Mrs, Irene Small Laat) rg aes the maaee oF Se out 3471 Saturday and Sunday. eam: ON THE SEA measures comprise the most effective method of controlling and pre- ’ UGANDA—East Af A larg:
ilda, Eileen (daughters), | “1013 -12.50—2n. venting ns 1G —Eas rica, arge
Stignone Murrell (niece). ‘clock in the morning to elect a Vestry at Garden. - {ener sae en the disease. At ee ne RADE OMS ION farm of 3,472 acres £23,000, Full

3.12.50-—in, | for the Parish of St. George for the NOTICE Modern Bungalow, Se R ‘ 5 He batin weet cameloniinine
year 1951. baths, Overlooking Sea, own private ecently purchased birds should be isolated for at least fourteen

K. MASON,





cared for walled
“BON ACOCUIL” — Pine Hill.
A lovely property in the higher
part of this unspoiled residential
area. The residence was built at
a period when cost was of little
ebject. It contains large recep-
| tion rooms, very commodious
galleries, 3 large bedrooms, bath-
—— <<< | town as the place where ail such per-| ‘written application to Parts Manager, Sale. Windy World,” Hindsbury Rev. Walter Tiesel roms, 2 garages and all the ap-
We the undersigned beg through thi | sons may meet . purtenances ex
: y on Tuesday, the 3rd day | Eckstein , Bay Street. ‘ pected in a house
Medium to extend our cincere thanks] of January 1951, between the hours of 1.19.60—an.| Bi , TROTMAN & CO. Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend- of this type. The grounds are
end appreciation to the many friends]i0 and 11 o'clock in the Atetioneers | ment) Order, 1950, No. 38 which will be published in the Official approximately 4% acres in extent
geno attended the funeral, cent wreathe| elect a Vestry for the Parish of St. ASSISTANT OVERSEER for Dastells 3.12 Ga: of Th: a 30th Novemt 1950 and the enclosed garden with
Gexpressed sympath in our recent] for the year 151. Dairy ‘atm. Apply in pergen with -12.50—1n ’ jursday _? ¥ ia * . T tennis court, lawns, orchard and
bereavement G. 8. CORRNN, Grits taste wa tee O See 2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail ‘selling BOXING ornamental garden has been well
Darnley Hope thusband), Dillon Parochial Treasurer, Lower Estate Faetory Office. REAL ATE prices of “Beef-Salted” are as follows:— cared for, A comfortable prop-
Hope tron) Myrth and Ermine St. Peter. 1.12.9@--3n, | ———_——_—_..-__ at the erty at a reasonable price,
een tt eee nee | TARY We knowledge of Shorthand ue Ree Gorse s aaa’ Arias WHOLESALE PRICE| RETAIL YANKEE STADIUM ' ‘mind Owe: be ces
’ : - jue at : . = . °
aoc aets ree but not for ever PARISH OF 8ST. JAMES. and Typing requires position as Hotel} Stonewall Seaside Bungalow; Seclusive ARTICLE PRICE Britton’s Hill A mellowed old stone property
La. a apa | HEREBY give notice that I have | Office Assistant or Receptionist. Reply|in a Highly Established Residential (not more than) (not more on en the coast, about 1) mile from
) © rhail meet t over ippointed the Vestry Room near the | to C. R. c/o Advocate. 29.18.60—2n, [Coast for the Distinctive and Financial } than) Tuesday Night, 12th Dec. town, with good boat anchorage.
On the resurrection inor aac Parish Church as the place where all Class, Not more than 8 Milvs from City, 8 ” It has 3% acres of enclosed
: 1.12.50—In tensor: duly’ qualifies to, vote at ny eo STEMOTyPit 7, Apply, by letter, in Superbly Built 3 years ago For and De- | Beef-Salted 1950 at 8.30 p.m. | grounds, rod snajor part is plant.
_ ri - | election o styymen for the sa rst instance. Q. q jarke .. Senedd By “ons ass; Fully re : roductive coconut a
> The Family of Mrs, EMMELINE | may assemble on Tuesday, the 3rd day | Solleltors, P.O, Box’ 215. nished (except. Linen and Cutlery), 8) a ae Plate | 367.40 per bri. of 200 KID FRANCIS, Lightheavy- {}|[M| fruit trees, There are 3 reception,
Mitevase: Garde Hactings, . Gecepied in ee atcaee do eee Ce Davee 26,11.50—6n. | Sandy Beach, Fine Bathing, Nicely Set ounds, Bris ‘ a ibs, or 36c. per lb. in weight champion of B’dos || 4,.begrooms, gallaries, 2 garages
BNavenbe Atal rick nowatdoe | nnd 12 .e'pok in the, morn ng to elect eres in OF Se eee Sree. i ili jots of not less than 170 Ibs 7, a as ain for ‘continued
with deepest apprectation the many 7 P.H. TARILTON. MANAGER Basin) at Thornbury Hill, Main 25 Ibs. 40c. per Ib. vs as a club or boardin, oats os
Poa variou, expre ajone { ayrapathy, and Parochial Treasurer, store in ex- | Roud, A , Modern Convetide : KID RALPH ° the Market & se,
™ as‘istance offered hem in per “ 7 ? 3
*pidde wererven Son, | eRe seal isa | estes ek Rotana" tan oa | (P) Flank or Boneless Fiank | 962.00 per bri, of 290 Mauer Pea
Dr. Alfred T. Robinson : is. or 34e. y ;
Ira L. King, May King, PARISH OF ST. JOHN ty. Sar came tease a5 lots of not less than gentareethe Reetcame a racists tke
3.12.50—1n. apie be Se ee wet have | commission. sn ee Fe , haght, Seine 25 Ibs, 38c. per lb, BONNIE BLACKMAN vs Toogs, 3 tones, 5. Gereues ete.,
a Roo Parish 93.11.50— le Three-! - ie ete. e la ronsis' acres,
IN MEMORIAM pra an’ | eS persena > wall Bungslows | at Navy Gardens and - : a TONY GALENTO 12 acres under coconuts and nut-
~ ——- a | ov ai lectio ANTED one ai le—Seaside, g for ttention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend- ho lost to Ralph on points megs, the remainder pasture and
: oe jonel |of Vestrymen for the said Parish, may x Under , inp. Tworstore: newall : . who tost to Pp) Pp os 7 E
Suen Panga eho wos OF lev io Mane: [assemble on Tuesday, the ard day of ain canto ae VA Oe MNT ne oideee et Fa we | ment) Order, 1950, No. 37 which will be published in the Official 8 rounds, see akc. oie. aa RG
service on December ard 1948 January, 1961, between the hours of 10 to ‘be forw to the {ere Road, Large or Workshep | Gazette of Monday, 27th November, 1950. BELFIELD KID vs. jf particulars on application,
Happy and smiling always content ond 11 o'clock in the morning to elect | p Officer, an, 9 Vacant, ge £2,500. Resi- 2. Und this Ord " ; ; ‘ ; VICTOR LOVELL Ql};
Loved and respected where ever he | Vertry tee, ie Parish ef St. John nog 4th December in — Two and three . nder this Order the maximum retail selling price of é as | THE OLIVES—Upper Colhymore
ne ie H. 8. FRASER 1m ms, C Me for anything in Real | “Cement” is as follows: — roun Rock. ‘This large modern
To a beautilul lifercume bw noble end et we * — If Not — VU are Not Buying! Sparkling Preliminaries — bungalow with about 1 acre
He died as he lived everybody's friend Parochial Treasurer, Arranged. Dia! gill, D. F. |f8|\ should appeal to a buyer who
God ~aw the read wos getting rough St. John, » “Olive Bough", Hastings. ARTICLE RETAIL PRICE Breezy Amateurs {| wants a really solid property
The hills were hard to climb 3.12.60—an, age (not more than) Admission: constructed, of the, best, obiainakie
He gently closed his sleeping eyes . tuate rruiterials. ere is a large livin:
Ane niibered peace be thine t wee OF ST. THOMAS * Jame, contains Ringe OE et room (28 ft. x 4 ft.) gallery (48%
¢ Ever to be remembered by his beloved give notice that 1 Dining oi) CEMENT 4 ws $1.95 per bag of 94 lbs. EO Revyes Senweue va |@| ft. x 10% ft.) 4 bedrooms (qne
‘family Helen Beane \mother) Lioyde | ubainted the Sehool House néer , oe te Bleachers 48c. || 28 ft. x 19 it.) modern kitchen,
“Deane (brother!, Muriel! Corbin, Clarice] © here . wer .12.50.—9n. paved courtyard lawns, en
_ Hope, Lottie Marmara (sisters) and many bersous oo Sieaad So aah ae Savina Go a fasa's pe ‘ 27th November, 1950 28.11,50—2n 8.12 on, gardens and orchard, Well placed
others. 3,12.50-—1n | Pee eee oa TUAEaaY, “wa ‘ind day | young couple, in. FOWL TYPHOID. jor schools and transport to town,
> aida tieiaes , er
wi : ae January, 1951, between the hours of very qu Box Perches of land An outbreak of fowl typhoid has been confirmed in a flock of i
*, In loving memory of my dear beloved : Ld _VMLLA ROSA—Passage Road
} shusband and father James Nathaniel | * Fst p Rage oh Be ee ig elect tr ‘Aavecate Cor” seats nS N, aeons ae about thirty (30) hens, and reports have come in of sudden deaths City. Attractive and centrally
! z Archer, who, departed on November 30th } 1, the year 1961 : po Eg ae, ie johnson and'on = Me| or death after a short illness from several sources in the Brittons Hill JUST RECEIVED acuiie ge aay mane
¢ 1949, ° jouble e ewaly. Ppr
‘ ; 2 F, F. "s " aa
This is one year that has passed since . rn . ; ‘ . imately 14,000 square feet.
Parochial a4 development. area of St. Michael.
’ you have departed St. ‘ in one or ‘en the pre 0 — well built property contains a
, Sete emer ness ue severe 3.12.50—%n,| Na Agents, Box C/o mises. = m This disease is very infectious, readily communicable to other | % ‘ st Sree ain ain: spon 8 ies
” griet PARISH OF WE. ANDREW » 7 prin wet ne set wy tot fowls and very acute in character, Outbreaks frequently occur during THERMOS VACUUM bedrooms, toilet, pantry and
So my beloved ‘sleep in peace. I HEREBY give notice that I have] BOXES — All kinds 3 | Street, I bts | th in: son. Mortalit t! be as high as 100% i tl kitchen. Good courtyard at rear.
|| Edna Archer (wife), Darnley, Jemerson,| ,.dinted the Vestry Room near the ‘other then 51, nts i yew on € rainy season. Mortality rate can as high as ® in recently
| farnsdof, Clarence Grant, Austin, Ken- sa 7 Advocate Friday the December, a’ p.m. infected flocks % JARS ¥ TOWER GARAGE—St. Matthi-
Mineth and Everton (sons), Joyce, Shelia ol ieaetia ind bits oes a ee 5 % R. 8. Tenet eean a as Gap. An almost new property
| Elmo, Shitiey, Pauline, Winifred and Mra. | SU'y Noe ee alin Berten taney cen ene TE en. Symptoms. Affected fowls show loss of appetite, appear dull and Wide Mouth suitable for a large variety of
|
























bathing Good Yacht Anchorage. (14) da: ‘i ee .
FOR SALE Parochial Teeoeratee, | we the, undersigned ‘wilt be. closing 4g | PbODe #8. Netiiectés.| (10) daye betore being, allowed to join the flock, FOR SALE atta teak in ven thee
3.12.80—Bn. | fp isineee for the luncheon interval at COPFAGE—One small’ cottage with | No really effective treatment of affected birds is known, cates Paradise.
e at 1 p.m. each gay, our] Slectriclty on the Greeniage, Roebuck. | 26.11.50.—8n. HINERY AT WILDEY WE HAVE EXTENSIVE LIST-
! I HEREBY “give ae that I have weeety bee mesar os AR GM ee oat ee PLANTATION, INGS OF PROPERTIES AND |

AUTOMOTIVE
* CAR — 188 Model Black Plymouth—
No. T-—-160. Apply to the owner.

3,12.50—1n

$350.00, good



LAND ALL OVER THE
COLONY. UTILISE OUR SBER-
VICES TO SAVE TROUBLE
AND EXPENSE.

WANTED

7 cpposite Spry Street.
appointed the Vestry Room near the ye eae
Parish Church as the place where all] “nd arrange their shopping ‘
persons duly qualified to vote at y J. N. Goddard & Sons Ltd.

clection of Vestrymen for the said Parish} Cave Shepherd & Co. Ltd.

may assemble on Tuesday, the 3rd day C. F, Harrison & Co. (Barbados) Ltd.
of January, 1951, between the hours of oO
10 and 11 o'clock in the morning to elect



ST, MICHAEL

CANE CARRIER
MILL — Duncan Stuart
20” x 30”, Complete.

CAR—One Singer Car
order, apply: C. Jordan, Bicycle Repairer





pnd outoffices together with the palings |

and quiemices a Blectric Fittings. Land the Official Gazette of 27th November relating to the new executive





g ; ee ENGL :
James Street. 2.12.50—2n. 8 Vestry for. the Parish of St. Lucy for Se ye ere si can be Tented. ry epee STEN — hee ($1,728—$3,456) in the Civil Service. Geen fuer Loe 20 to 40 acres of good arable
Sewers seat ip ee joay | the Year alte acco heal hie Kplante Lian Bgitane the, tenset, aa. seve Siraker. Ey, \. Beeneennoy to sit the examination are invited from external MEGASS ELEVATOR — iand with or without house,
model always ower arivet, Apply Cee: Parochial Treasurer, ee Res r 0. I. Churchwarden's Office, Perochiat Build- |! andidates who are the holders of academic or professional qualifica- —Single Strand RENTALS
Here eee ore es.1),80--80. $13.00. Golling Lids a uta ings, Phone #188, 9-12.08". |-ions (of degree standard) and should be addressed to the Colonial BOILER:
. 7. . eee Soe ice eal le



Multitubular 7ft x 12ft. St. James.

“REST HAVEN", George Street ORR | “WINDY RIDGE”.

pl he ore Ry | Seeretary, Secretariat, Bridgetown, setting out the usual particulars

TRUCK: One Chevrolet Truck in good PARISH OF ST. PHILIP











7) . Belleville with the z . . : ¢ "
condition, Tyre. and Battery good.| | HEREBY give notice that I have ap-| H. Jason Jonea & Co. Ltd, (Feed Dept.) oe A Neila 4440. square tees. | f age, place of birth, academic qualifications, career and practical BOILER FEED AND ety -piokeantst Deeosan ae
Appl’: GC. A. Godding, Benk Hall Cross] pointed the Church Boys’ School near] A Barnes & Co. Ltd, The house has drawing and dining rooms. ' cxperience, if any. COLD WATER PUMP : y 7 Pie
Road. 5.1250—20 | the Parish Chureh, as the place where] Johnson & Redman three bedrooms and uswai outofices anc The 15th ; RAW JUICE PUMP. Double ee art
parishioners of the parish of St. Philip, | Perkins & Co. coon e 1 of December, 1950, is the closing date for receiving Action., CLARIFIERS. Three “BEACH HOUSE", St. Law-
and other persons duly qualified to vote} Pitcher Connell & Co. Ltd. Inspection by tment any day such applications. 28.11.5 % . rence. Available fully furnished
ELECTRICAL t any Election of Vestrymen for the] 5. E. Cole & Co. Ltd. ae , : -11.50—3n 600 gins, each. HOT LIQUOR February onwards.
= eaid Parish, may assemble on Pusey abs S Mean i Ene above will be set. up ee ie et PUMPS. Two, Single Action SUNSET HOUSE: Prospect, St
———$ | 2d day of January, 108 between voON chage public competition on Friday - | EVAPORATOR., ASPINAL ; : ished
DRY CELL BATTERIES staige Type woe oY gad iL 8.0, %o sleet a Ves- ae Ford ber at 2 p.m, at the Office of the under PART ONE ORDERS PANS. One large, one small, Jeane, See Cones, Pay see she
for ignition purposes etc ‘volts. 3 P Ss. W. , W. A. Medford & Co. * CARRIN & SEALY. | Léeut Diol 3878. Da Costa & Co., te Parochial Seana Eo Seen rere: ¢ iene Wurest, Bridgetown. ol, 7, Compal, 0. .E., E.D., MONTEJUS.. MEGASS “CUMBERLAND HOUSE: =
, i250 ean Ngining oo, Ltd., (Corner Stone, Stacey Issue No. 45 The Barbados Regiment. 5) ore ELEVATOR ENGINE. 6 ton Pionsant old property with 2 acres
FURNITURE Rectrloal @ Sales bent) |. 6 a, | FOR at Ruble, Commelien | Sang ———___—"_ |} wesron “Lock. "two of garden. «1
——— 1 - the office 6 ‘ARAD) ‘
RS—S , s wel ished December, iso. at 2 pm. | There will be no furthe rades until after Christmas, aa
Wal GP Staion “uttebte vor For Sake—Cont' d NOTICE Ke OwSavunge or store known |2. ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERIPANT FOR WEEK ENGINE and GEARING—
BMG Aha tieme. Oniy 86.40 sech The Parochial rer's Office, St.| No 4a Swan Street, being a three | ENDING 11 DEC. 50. Duncan Stewart, PIPING John M. Bladen
G. W. HUTCHINSON & CO. LTD.|” LARGE CHILDREN'S PLAY HOUSE. | michael, will be c' ‘at 12 o'clock noon - Sect Gna nee Lieut. E, R. Goddard and FITTINGS.
Dial 4222. 2.12.50—t.f.n, Cam be seen at es * Guest House on Wednesday and the 6th and font “6 on ine rderhy mE ae 278 L/S Williams, 8.D. FIREBRICKS. AUCTIONEER.
ee ae —_ . i 2296. 1950. and ————
* FURNITURE—Large variety of Cock- _— * 29.11.50—6n, BURTON, and ft the busi- Orderly Officer 2/Lt. S.G, Lashley TATE AGENT
fai! tables in Mahogany, Cedar ant Ruane Pettit ‘Treasurer, ness known os ae oats Orderly Serjeant 217 L/S Blackett Apply to... REAL ES'
Birch, i Mahogany Dining ‘ables, RAIN COATS, RAIN COATS: At 4 4 ried on oe NEER
Dinner ‘Wasgons and Dinner Chairs, @ | each lovely colours in Plastic for Vadties * 3.18. SKEWES-COX, Major. THE MANAGER, AUCTIO)



good choice of Sideboards, larders and | They are so useful and economical. And and further particulars









M. L. D.
. S.O.L.F. & Adjutant i
Bedsteads. i Ralph Beard’s | Show | would’ make a lovely Xmas Gift too. N to the Manager of the Supply | PART 11 onvEtie Barbados Regiment. Dial oe Plantation. PLANTATIONS BUILDING
Room, Hardwood Alley, (Opposite | tHANT BROS. Pr. Wm. Henry Street. OTICE Stores. | BARBA
Cathedral). Open daily 8 a.m, to 4 p.m. | pial 3486. '29.1150—-t2.n, PARISH OF 8ST. THOMAS COTTLE, CATFORD & CO. DOS REG SERIAL NO, 32 29.11.50.—3n., | Phone 4646
Phone 4603 a cai | erThe, Parochial Omice at Bennets will be 14.11.00-—1in | lst DECEMBER, 1950 si 1,
REE DECO) S—Spec closed on Wednesday Decembe .|). STREN REASE—.
POULTRY discount of 10% now applying on all | 1950. : COPRA/STOCK estate yielding sub- |! SERENGTH INCREASE—Attestations
hi f these decorations. For F. PILGRIM stantial e. Bananas and oranges id Boy Clarke, A
BS sehbaeas foal purchases 0: se ra . a F. F. * {egeMe cunted close to sea, main | 530 " Dorant, L. ; GIVE HER
WHITE MUSCOVY DUCKS —Telephone ymied pares as Pes jewellers, eihia Parochial tetas beanie principals only. Box Number 53) Babb, D. RE ll hae
0. 3.12.50—1n . de ma '0., “ Broad Street, 2.12, in. . Thomas. road. tet iv ra Al *
i Bridgetown. : *"'29.11.50—6n: 88 c/o “Barbados Adv ‘a aii i wee ote Bepprientai AN OIL STOVE FOR XMAS
MECHANICAL ms ” Fields, H. Band boys wef 29 Nov. 50,
Me nthdeibaseat ipo —__._. | _YACHT — That desirable yacht “VA- NOTICE FOR SALE OR LONG LEASE _ 535 ” Laurence, K. 2 & 3 BURNER FLOOR & TABLE MODELS
“TYPEWRITERS — Olympia Portable | GABOND”. Tel. J. A. Reid, Lone Star “MOORINGS” — Arranged as three 396 " Humphrey, W, \ — OBTAINABLE AT —
Pypewriter’. Another shipment just | Garage, Dial 9133. 22.11,50—12n, PARISH OF SAINT MICHAEL apartments or one noe. a hasrostnes 542 % Squires, H. M
; led, See these fine machines before | ARI ete, Furniture ded. MPO
ne eine” ie resi, ’ nay, PLASTICINE--Harbutts famous model- for erection Bee Ue eecupenc, Gibson, Marine $27 Pte. Tudor, P.C. 540 Pte, Roberts, H. Attested and The CENTRAL E. RI.
Sit Phnve dane. ling clay—multi-colours 24c, $1.80 per ot ans ee ens 2 ot — me 3'42.50-—Am0 $28 ,, Dorant, J. $41,’ Rolston, H. taken on (CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.-PROPRIETORS).
; ; 1 12.50--7n. 0.4, | BOX: Evans & Whilfields, “., | Wall at St, Barnabas Chapel met, eee een boi Knight, S. 543 Belgrave, 1. A. ae f Broad & Tudor Streets
Ts 3.12,50—An ficatioh of the work to be 338 =, Chase, E. 544 Lashley, St. A. 29 Nov, 50. Corner 0! 0} 2
. —- ae EI BY) sath Se eel nie A Specifies ee - LAND — 1/8 Acre land at Bush Hall. 539, Blunte, A. L.
f MISCELLANLUVUS TRA SETS—A most useful and attrac. Ofte and Tautere tis coaled envelopes Good building site with govt: ae ao E
Stitt te dal five Gift. 24 piece Teasets in several | marked “Tender for St. Barnabas Wall" | light at hand. Several fruit trees, wey 345, Sealy, W, A. 563 Pte. Barrow, K. S. ~
A ANTIQU £8 Of eveny description | designs and decorations, Prices as law | will be to 3 pam on Man- | vet: Mangoes etc. ete. G. W. Pare 6 3«,_- Parris, R: St. C, 564 ,, Alleyne, C. H.
Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver | us $9.95 set. G. W. HUTCHINSON & CO, Midy Re rene iP abe: Phone 4218; Bush Hall. 3.12.50—10 7 =~ =. Goring, L. F. 565 ,, Spencer, W. A. “
Watercolours. Barly books, Maps. Auto. |1..D. Dial 4222 2.12.50—t . FRED J ¥y. eae M48 |, Tello, C. A. 566 |, Broomes, H, V. H Y T d
aphs etc. at Gorringes Antique Shoo vs Win AE ON 0 eh guurehwaren"s oh = $49; Haynes, 'V."A. S. 567 Belle, L. N ave ou rieqd...
Gioining Royal Yacht Club TABLEWARE—Beautiful “Rosedawn”, 1 Lokey, V_ A. S, 568 Heath, J. H.
¥ 3.9.50—4.f.n. | “Greydawn”, “Goldendawn” seen on ali S areas” PERSONAL 551 Licorish, ‘L. E 569 Alleyne, C. P. Attested and 9
+ —— ~~ - the bet tables. Buy single pieces or ere Bon wi iipeutiadegie-disatian 552, Outram, J. G 570 ., McConney, M. E. wee ea
ACLOCKS Westminster Chiming Clocks | scts for all meals, Unit breakages re- 25.11.50-—Sn THE public are hereby warned against 553. ., Williams, C. O. 571." Brewster, V. St. C oe n led ;
4 day Bin Bam Clocks in Walnut cases | placeable from stock. Evans, Whitfields. giving credit .to my wife ROWENS 554, Williams, L. E. 572 Fields, R. A, ae bey so
Sy the world’ wat makers Kienzle. | Dial 4220, 4606. 3.12.50—4n Hut s 1 do not hold 355 Beckles, H. O 573 Harding, K. :
Price maderate. Alox Yearwood, Jeweller | ————-______ n't way ricauule ter wer ao anyone ae 3568 Chase, P. D. 5, B74 Field, D. A (With the Distinctive Flavour)
Bolton Lane 2.'2.50—-2n JEWRLLERY—Gold and Silver Neck- License Session -) tracting any debt or debt in my 557. ., Bayne, I 575 Goodridge. C. A. : i
5 ere Jets with Charms Set. Gold Cuff Links, , nate uninen by a written order signed 558 Archer, A. M 6 Marsholl, N. W | It is the Blend YOU are looking for.
CLOTHING: Qne (1) Frock Coat, Waist | Gold Brooches, Gents Signet-Rings, Alex. ‘ . that nsing | OY me. 559 Dolphin, J. F. 7 Mayers, J
Coat snd Pants (All Vicuna!. Price very | Yearwood, Jewellcy, Belton Lane. HEREBY give notice a Lice: ¥ igned THOMAS JORDAN, 560 Williams, H. H 578 Guiler, A :
Wiuatia. goed as new, hate ame i et inbo-~2n, | Sesion for the granting of Certificates See a8 iispinine, #t Andrew 361 |, Osborne, K. A 579 Jones, 1. B ge Get Your Supplies From Us For
216 Oiehhs | cer mintthiess cial for the renewal of Liquor Licenses for 2.12.50-—2n 562 ,, Brewster, K The Christmas Season
aes — GIFT SETS Attractive Gift Sets ef} the Parish of St, George and that part
FLOWERS Wreaths and Bouquets | Tea Spoon-, Pastry Forks, Fruit Spoons, | of Christ Church within the Jurisdiction 2. PROMOTIONS
wade to order by Miss A. Eastmond, | Cocktail Sets and many others. Priees of the Police Court, District “B" will be 407 Cpl. Quintyne, L. G. “A” Coy \ Promoted to L/S wef 1 Dec. 50 Blended by
Hindsbury Read. Dial 3766 as low as Bt00 set. G. W. HUTCHINSON Seid at eee an. oS Bitter an. LOST #e Lik Reid, N. t s Promoted to Cpl. wef 1 Dec. 50. Ret mel
2.12.50—4n & CO.. LT Dial 422; ‘vesday the ay BC) er ~ 2 /C urney, D. G | _
ercetelaepiiciaditiicais tain aiepeit 2 ol ¢ 11 o’elock a.m, 283 L/C Turney, D. G >romoted L/C wef nc. 8 Z ir x PD.
FISHING BOAT-One (1) Fiying Fish | GY. peal r Dated this Ist day of December 1950. UMBRELLA—Dr, MatPher:on Lawrie 427 Pie tia aa F Promoted to L/C wef 1 Dec. 50 JOHN ED. TAYLOR & SONS J T. 'e
Yuat “Loreine”. No reasonable offer | ONE COOLERATOR in excellent con- (agd.) C.L. D. M. WALWYN, [Finder suitably rewarded on returning 414 ,, Weatherhead, H. R M.L.D. Skewes-Co }} Roebuck St. Dial 4335
sedy Apply to W 4 Areher, | dition, Apply; No !2 Pavilion Court, Police Magistrate, District uB to Pitt, Upstairs Berta bewer Broad 391 Belgrave, J. S SO.LF, & A {
Welches, Christ Church 2.12,50—2n, | Hastings. 3.12.50—-2n, 3.12,.50—2n | Street. 2.12.50-—2n 268 Smith, A . The Barbados R \ SSSA



























































———<—<$< <<<
CHATTLE DWELLING HOUSE situate APPOINTMENTS TO EXECUTIVE GRADE IN THE
at Upper Dayrells Road, Christ Church. i CIVIL SERVICE
containing Closed gallery, Drawing and |
Dining Rooms, Two bedrooms vines Attention is drawn to paragraph 5 of the Government Notice in
























SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, 1950









POLICE NOTICE
PARKING

There is space available for parking cars in the following
places: — |
1 Jubilee Gardens;
(Near Parochial Buildings)
2. Church Village;

(By the Cathedral) |
Rickett Street between Trafalgar Street and the Wharf:
4. Old Bus Stand, Trafalgar Street.

R. T. MICHELIN,
Commissioner of Police.

°

Police Headquarters,
Bridgetown. }
lst December, 1950. Stat 3.12.50—2n |



POST OFFICE . NOTICE :

From Monday next, 4th December and until further notice air
mails for Great Britain and Europe will be closed at the General |
Post Office at 11.45 A’M. instead of 2 P.M. Mails for these places will
close on Fridays at 2 P.M. as usual.

General Post Office, |

Ist December, 1950. 2.12.50—2n |

POLICE TRAFFIC NOTICE

AGRICULTURAL EXHIBITION ON 6TH AND 7TH DECEMBER, 1950
1. All vehicles proceeding in the direction of Queen’s Park
shall approach by way of Roebuck and Crumpton Streets only, after
which (should they desire to set down their passengers) they shall
leave by way of Constitution Road or St. Michael’s Row.
The same route shall be followed when returning to take up
passengers.
2. Motor cars only shall be allowed to park on Constitution |
Road facing North, and shall when leaving be required to do so by |
way of Belmont Road.
3. No vehicle of burthen shall be allowed to proceed through |
St. Michael's Row, Crumpton Street, or Constitution Road between |
11 a.m, and 11 p.m., with the exception of carts returning to remove |
exhibits. These shall only be allowed to pass down Constitution |
Road from Belmont Corner in single line and enter Queen’s Park by
the Governor’s Gate returning the same way, and proceed in single |
line by way of Belmont Road. }
Made under Regulation 2 of the Bridgetown and Speightstown |
(Traffic) (Amendment) Regulations 1943.
R. T, MICHELIN,
Commissioner of Police.



Police Headquarters,



Bridgetown, 3S
‘,
lst December, 1950. 3.12.50.—3n. | $
»
i?
~
. %,
Department Of Education x
WESTBURY INFANT SCHOOL — ST. MICHAEL 8
Applications are invited for the Headship of the new Westbury %

Infant School from teachers (women) with at least 10 years’ teaching $+
experience. The minimum professional qualification required is the | %
Certificate A of the Department or exemption therefrom. |
Salary will be in accordance with the Government Scale for |
Head Teachers in Grade I, Elementary Schools. %
Candidates ‘who have already submitted application forms in| %
respect of previous vacancies (now filled) may apply by letter, ac- %
companied by a recent testimonial. All other candidates should make | $
application on the appropriate form which may be obtained from the | X
Department of Education, All applications must be enclosed in en-|
velopes marked “Appointments Board” in the top left hand corner

and must reach the Department of Education by Saturday, 9th
December, 1950.

Ist December, 1950.

Ww

of feet, hands and armpits.
This very annoying evil will
be banished
soon by re-
gularly using

-

PPP SS

-













disagreable
odour There-
fore, do try:










YOU CAN GET YOUR - -
GENUINE SORREL
— FROM —
NIAGARA FACTORY
DIAL 4322 — _— Spry Street

<






CRESCENT
‘3 BICYCLE & DEPT.
STORES

| Hercules Biqycles; and Bicycle

Parts are delivered to you with
all art jewels, cosmetics and
toileteries too you can just drop
in if you want to prove



RECITAL OF XMAS
CAROLS

ints AEP ssc

MORAVIAN CHURCH
Roebuck Street
on
Friday, Dec. 15, at 7.45 p.m
Several well known Artistes
will assist,



Come in at No. 30. The Door ¥ ROEBUCK STREET. Dial 2072 and 4502
i r Phone 3061 2.12.50—2n
Programmes at 12c. each {{}| ee E ‘i % Local Agents — JAMES A, LYNCH & CO., LTD.
DCC EESSSO6SS96 ed :
cr SARGERAS ee ee














XMAS IS COMING

LADIES & GENTLEMEN

NOTICE

Brighten up yo CLOTHES
and HATS.
See RAYMOND JORDAN

Bay Street
Opp. Combermere St.
3.12 The Transfer Boolrs of
the Company will be closed

from the Ist day of Decem-



The COTTAGE
GIFT SHOP

has a very good selection
of XMAS Gifts: Cards,
Calendars, and Decora-
tions; Crackers, Children’s
Bocks and Toys; Sweets,
and a well stocked bran
tub for boys and girls.

3.12.50.—1n,

ber, 1950, to the 15th day
of December, 1950, both
days inclusive.

Dated this Ist day of De-
cember, 1950,

By Order of the Board
of Directors.

THE BARBADOS CO-


















SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIFTEEN







SS

tod

THESE FOR a
CHRISTMAS.

WHISKY (BELL'S) Bots,
BRANDY ”
GIN (BOLS)

WINE ;
CREME DE MENTHE
AP’ T BRANDY
EAU ..
PEACH BRANDY

bean’ TRIPLESEC |.
D UIE .. ee
GOLDEN ARROW RUN




For Business or Leisure...
&
A pleasure!







Vhe ‘Double Two’ collar.
atfached shirt has a double
life! When the original
collar wears out, it can easily
be replaced by a new one,





















2 SHIRT ~

with pateated SPARE COLAAR ‘
etateckie : }
MESSRS. C. F. HARRISON & CO., (B’dos) LTD. )





PERKINS & CO., LTD.

RLELPVSTSE







Asricultural Exhibition

SPECIAL ATTRACTION



Ist NIGHT ONLY

FREE FLOOD LIGHT DANCING

ON THE GREEN.

YOUR HOME REQUIRES...












A garbage can, heavy galvanised,
a wash tub, buckets, a mincer or
a sink, drainboards, coal-stove,
oil-stove or a kitchen knife now
doesn’t it? Come in, we have it!









6 TO 10 p.m.





























PCL ESLESESSSSESS | OPERATIVE COTTON °
3) 2 Popular Orchestras Ww
Fl JIRNISH 4 FACTORY, LTD. Pp te B
are, $ E. A. CLARKE, attenda A. BARNES & CO., LTD.
J OME TO A Secretary. 4 sy :
CHRISTMAS TREAT & cae NON-STOP MUSIC.
Streamlined NEW & renewed x
Vanities, Simpler Dressers, Ward- % * caaastenine x si m a
Marble Top “and” ener Wai : _ 8 '
Marble ‘op anc other agsh- Std ; | ¢
stands, Marble Slabs, Night chairs Under the Distinguished yd cor D * . _ .
$4.50 up : Patronage of Le, ’ a iM AS : Ou OR Ss AL
wbrawing Room neety, in x His Excellency the Governor I JO iy te Bi he at fe £
stered or Rush = Berbice, Peta and Mrs, Savage oi - ipa Ze
at and other Easy chairs, $8 to 3
cee) | BRIDGETOWN ° | Thoroughbred Salon
Radio, Cocktail, Sewing. China & | %
and other Cabinet Waggons, x

PLAYERS
L.S. WILSON ’ PRESENTS

Trafalgar Street. Dial 4069, )



SS ccrsoroerseneess || “THE MAN

ill WHO CAME
IGE oN ene

are respectfully requested to note that from Thursday, December 14
MONDAY, 4TH DECEMBER, our entire store



A f | and

the deliciously (including S.P.C.K., Bookshop) will, for Staff

cooling and fant’ Hour, be closed daily MONDAY to ne aan — "
drying PUROL. AY from 12 noon to 1 p.m. +

POWDER which On SATURDAYS i ; us

ena tay the dasoe e alla will, as usual, close

Matinee Friday,

Your Co-operation is Solicited December 15th

BOOKING OFFICE opens

CF. HARRISON & CO. «Dos Ltd, || mm mate

PRICES: $1.50, $1.20, 72c.,

Ac all leading drugstores: in case of and 48¢.
ones apply ‘a HP Chsesmuad & Co. BROAD STREET.

Uid.. Middle Street. dial 3382.

Christmas a
‘Cards & Paper of








Christmas Tree
Decorations

from
Your Jewellers

DELIMA & CO. LTD.

’Phone 4644 -0- 20, Broad Street

Advise ...Shop early for the Exhibition

| LADIES !

e
Beautiful Nylons, Costume Jewellery, Hand Bags, fine
Underwears, Fancy Felt and Straw Hats, Shoes,

Perfumes, Hankies and a grand assortment of

DRESS GOODS

GENTLEMEN



Innumerable qualities of Dress and Sport Shirts, Shoes,

A very big variety of Woollens in stock.
Socks, Ties, H.K., Belts, Underwear etc., ete |

Always at your service. Dial 3466. )
}










All Seats Reserved.

WHAT A SELECTION!

LOVELY CREPE ROMAIN in 6 Enchanting Colours

@ $2.40 per

WHITE CRESPO LOVABILLE ...... @ $1.36 per

PLAITED TAFFETA in 10 designs @ $1.47 per
PLAIN SPUN IN WHITE and 10 more Colours

@ 880, per

ALL OVER LACE in White ..........@ $2.16 per

Black and Rose Beige ........ @ §2.27 per

Many more Materials are awaiting your Inspection
as they are too numerous to be mentioned.

OUR SPECIALTY! SHOES for Ladies, Gents amd Children

BROADWAY DRESS SHOP

Dial 3895 No, 1 Broad Street



YES! IT’S A YEAR’S
SUBSCRIPTION OF
THEIR FAVOURITE

MAGAZINE

MGS
BEAUTIFUL GIFT CARD SENT

XMAS GIFT, BIRTHDAY or any

other Occasions

ROBERTS & CO.

Dial 3361 High Street







— WE OFFER —















BATTLE FRONT

(Bay 1937)
The property of the B’dos Turf Club. Offers will be

Toys, Chocolates, Crackers, Xmas Trees and Decorations
imas Stockings ‘i

PRESENTATION SETS—Yurdley’s, Max Factor, Soie de Paris,
Imperial Heather, Dralle

PRESENTATION BOXES—Cigarettes, Tobaccos, Pipes,

SOAPS—by Yardley, Morny, Cussons, Bronnly

PERFUME—by Yardley, Coty, Hanselle

COLOGNE— 4711, Atkinson's, Dralle

mm. D. MARRIS & CO.

Plantations Building

OC

received in writing by the Secretary up to 31st Decem-
ber 1950.

For full particulars apply to the Secretary, Barba-
dos Turf Club, Synagogue Lane, Bridgetown, Barbados ‘

}

|| Lower Broad Street —
DIAL 4045

SOSSSEI SCS Ss

7



4



FOR

A GOOD PRESENT TO
GIVE YOUR WIFE IS

A FALKS STOVE
AND OVEN

temember Christmas begins in the Xmas Rope, Tags, Tinsel Cord Xmas Trees and
Kitchen 4 a Variety of Decorations

N ya i oO Ww E L L | Be SEE OUR STOCK and SELECT EARLY
piven” tS COLLINS DRUG STORES.

— 2



For Your Convenience, We

have Large Supplies of ...





Lumber & Hardware | |







| »

| Locally Made
‘ Seals {i y®
_f Tags & Seals |] BERTALAN POTTERY
. Children’s Crayons |

The Workmanship and finish in this Pottery is excellent

Lovely Coloured Glazed DISHES Ete with attractive
Tropical Designs.

* Painting Books WILL MAKE EXQUISITE GIFTS
°
G ADVOCATE STATIONERY LOUIS L. BAYLEY — JEWELLERS

BOLTON LANE & BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB
34 Broad Street Phone 2510 l



Sole Representatives Rolex Watch Co., Switzerland.











BRIGHTEN



YOUR HOME

|
| ELECTRICAL
|} ACCESSORIES!

WE CAN SUPPLY YOU WITH THE FOLLOWING :



LINOLEUM, in Rolls and Mats

ge Por Prompt and Courteous service WH ~~ BARBADOS HARDWARE (0. LTD.

Shop at

FOR WIRE « ELEMENTS
« FLEX « PLUGS
CHRISTMAS « STARTERS . PLUG CAPS
« CONNECTING BOXES « SOCKETS
Z x | > « FUSES |
We Can Supply A Wide Variety of... « SWITCHES USE :
PAINTS, DISTEMPERS and fff = «Tes memos ttn nos
: an , « BATTEN « WALL
E N AME LS y HOLDERS BRACKETS
ALSO - y And many others too numerous to mention
FRENCH POLISH, STAINS & VARNISHES §/$ mr pay A VISIT TO OUR ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT
} You can make your rooms more attractive Kg TO-DAY AND GET YOUR REQUIREMENTS
{ by dressing your Floor We have | S |
.

'

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)

PEANTATION LTO: Tk

BEE, POC LLESESS ECE SSS SEBO CECOP GOS PSPOSSOR

; f

|
|
|
|
|







Ma




PAGE SIXTEEN



Ralph Rock

Wins Car

WHEN 18-year-old
Friday morning and

Combermere School to
his examination papers fo1

né€ver suspected that he was the
lucky winner of the Hillman car
raffled by the Barbados Boy:

Club. However laier in the day
he was informed of his good for
tune.

Col. R. T. Michelin, Commis-
sioner of Police, presented Rock
with the car yesterday morning

“zt the Centra] Police Station. The

Second Prize, a bicycle, went to

Mrs, Howard who is at present
in British Guiana while the
Third Prize was won by Bands-
man Colin Bayley

For selling the most tickets, 760,
P.C, Jordon was given a bicycle
Col. Michelin congratulated all
the winners and told Jordon tha
he deserved the cycle

Rock turned up at the Central
Station yard with his two broth-
ers. He was formerly a_ pupil
ot the Barbados Academy anc
this is the first time that he has
been lucky in a raffle.

He told the Advocate that or
the day when he bought the tic-
ket he only had a $1.00 in his
pocket. It was his lunch money
but he walked into the Fire Bri-
gade Station and bought the
ticket from Fireman C. Howard
He returned home in the evening
but did not tell his family that
he had bought the ticket. All along

he had the feeling that he would
win,

Rock cannot drive and intends
selling the car. So far he has one
offer of $1,700 but has not yet
made up his mind to take it. He
will leave the car in the Police
Garage at the Central Station
until he accepts an offer. The cat
is insured until December 23.

The winning numbers were as

follows: —
First Prize .. No. 9738
Second Prize 3176
Third prize ... 9024

Race Horse
Dies

Mr. K. D. Edwards’ Beacon
Bright an “A” Class thorough-
bred who has won races in Trini-
dad and Barbados dropped dead
yesterday morning at the Garri-
son Savannah after exercising.

Beacon Bright was being pre-
pared for the Trinidad Christmas
meeting. Yesterday morning he
was exercising in company with
Mrs. J. D. Chandler's Gun Site.

The two horses galloped about
seven furlongs and after pulling up
on his way back to the paddock,
Beacon Bright stumbled.

His rider Jock Slocombe how-
ever had time to dismount and
loosened the girths before his
mount finally collapsed, Beacon
Bright was a horse by Light House
the Second out of Bright Brocade

Flying Dutchman
Makes Conquests

It might be assumed that most
air travellers are men, This is
wrong, however, for K, L. M
statisticians have calculated that
only 58% of the passengers cat-
ried by K. L. M. during the holi-
day month of August, 1950 were
men. The remaining 42% con-
sisted of women and children
(35% and 7% respectively) .

In the United States the air-
craft is more of an every-day
conveyance than anywhere else
in the world, According to a
recent study, the percentage ol
female travellers carried by the
scheduled airlines in that coun-
try is 24%, which is consider ~
ably lower than the percentage
carried by K.L.M., clearly prov-
ing that the “Flying Dutchman
is favoured by the ladies — a
conquest of which he may well
be proud!

——<—<————

The Weather
TO-DAY

Sun Rises: 6.02 a.m.

Sun Sets: 5.37 p.m.

Moon (New) December 9

Lighting: 6.00 p.m.

High Water: 11.00 a.m.,, 11.04
p.m.

YESTERDAY



Rainfall (Codrington) .11 in.

Temperature (Min.) 72.0° F.

Wind Direction (9 a.m.)
E.N.E; (11 a.m.) E.N.E.

Wind Velocity: 11 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.932;
(ll a.m.) 29.912.









Ralpt D,
Rock of Cave Hill woke up oa
went lo
continue
the
Senior Cambridge Certificate, he

They'll Do It Every ‘Time



ae a"



SIAMESE HOXING



ep

ng Molgus Cota a Casa ‘ cies, 4
BORING th Blam is an “all-in” affair, where not only fists, but feet
and any other part of the body is used. Bouts take place in the

stadium in Bangkok every Sunday
spectators.

‘Jungle Bertha "
Handed Back
To Mother

SINGAPORE, Dec. 2.

and are watched by thousands of
—Express.

Jamaican Studying
B.G. Rice Mills

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Nov. 28.
Week-end_ visitor to British

Thirteen-year-old “Jungle Ber- Guiana, with a view to looking

tha” Hertogh was today handed
Lack to her mother. The

Court here had ruled her marriage
to a Malay Moslem illegal and

over the Colony’s rice mills to
gain ideas on introducing B.G’s

milling system in Jamaica, is Mr.
Gordon Anderson, representative

awarded the custody of the child °f Tillage Ltd., a firm of land

to her Dutch parents.

Bertha burst into tears when she
was told the verdict.

She turned sobbing to Che
Aminah who had left the Court
with Bertha and her mother Mrs.
Hertogh. Just before judgment
was read, Bertha said in Malay:
“Mummy what shall I do now?”

Then Mansoor Adabi, the Mos-
lem school-teacher who went
through the form of a Moslem
ie with Bertha, comforted
er,

Mrs. Hertogh stood apart from
the three calm, but trembling.

Bertha’s counsel said he would
file an appeal on Monday.

The Judge held that the pur-
ported marriage of. Bertha with
Adabi was a “manoeuvre designed
to prejudice the Court proceedings
which is discreditable to all con-
cerned.”

But he was satisfied that Bertha
was neither forced nor tricked
into marriage.

From his observation
Aminah, the Judge said; “I am
unable to resist the impression
that she was persuaded to agree
to this discreditable manoeuvre
by some person in whose mind
the idea of it was conceived.”

Holding the marriage to be in-
valid, the Judge said that as
Bertha's father had never con-

of Che

preparers and contract ploughers
in Spanish Town, Jamaica.

Mr. Anderson arrived on Sat-
urday for a week's stay to be
used in inspecting Government's
Central Miill at the Mahaicony-
Abary Rice Expansion Scheme.

oceania

VIRGINS ELECT FOUR
COUNCILLORS

(From Our Own Correspondent)
VIRGIN ISLANDS.

In the elections for the Virgin
Islands Legislative Council on
November 20 Mr, G. Fonseca got
629 votes, Hon. H. R. Penn 462,
Mr. C. deCastro 402, Mr, Brud-
enell Bruce 353.

Nine candidates contested for the
four seats.

The five who failed to get in
were Messrs Achille Fraser (295),
Antonio Maduro (222), Theodolph
Faulkner (210), Hanford Connor
(191), and I. Hendricks (93).

Registered voters numbered
1,267 of which 853 voted. Five bal-
lots were spoiled. Nine polling
booths were located in Anegada,
Virgin Gorda, East End, Road
Town, Sea Cow Bay, West End,
Carrot Bay, Cane Garden Bay and
Jos Van Dyke.

His Excellency the Governor
accompanied by Mrs, Blackburne
and the A.D.C. Major Martin

sented to his child embracing the Hicks are spending the first week
Moslem faith, she could not be of December in the Virgin Islands.

regarded as Mohamedan. It would
not be in her interests to leave her
in Adabi's custody and such a
course would be entirely deroga-
tory of the sanctity of a Mohame-
dan marriage, the Judge said.

“While I am satisfied that Ami-
nah has brought up Bertha with
care and affection and while I
am prepared to overlook the un-
fortunate impression which she has
made on me as a witness, I can-
not blind myself to the fact that
she was a party to the discredit-
able marriage.”

The Judge said that he attached
particular importance to the wishes
of Bertha’s father, The father was
the judge of what was best for the
child’s welfare,

He awarded costs against Che
Aminah.

—Reuter.

PRIESTS SENTENCED

@ From Page 1
of all property of each of the nine
and deprived them of their citizen
rights for 10 years.

The court found all nine guilty
of high treason and espionage
within the meaning of various
articles of the criminal code,

It also found them all guilty of
having since 1945 attempted to
destroy the economic order of the
Peoples’ Democratic regime and
having entered into contact with
foreign powers for this purpose.

It found that all nine obtained
state secrets and gave them to
foreign powers.

Zela, Kulac and Boukal were
also found guilty of collaboration
during the German occupation.

All of the defendants accepted
their sentence thus waiving their
right to appeal. Most of the
defendants thanked the court and
said they would “attend to
cleansing their conscience of their
crimes.”

Dr. Svac and Dr. Mandl botb
said they accepted the verdict
“with gratitude” .—Reuter.

Sepivtored U.S. Feten: OMe







HOT ff

OH, HENRY MEANT
TO TELL YOU. I JUST
TOOK THAT OUT OF
THE OVEN+IT'S

The Governor will address the
newly established Legislative
Council of the Presidency and, in
St. Thomas, will discuss with the
American Govrnor problems of
common interest to the British and
American Virgin Islands.

S.A. Group Areas Act May
Be Suspended

FLUSHING M#ADOWS, Dee. 2,

United Nations General Assem-
bly today recommenaed twa
South Africa should suspend her
Group Areas Act which proviue
for racial segregation pending the
holding of a Kound ‘able Con-
ference between South Africa,
india and Pakistan,

A recommendation was approv-
ed by 35 votes to 13 with 12
abstentions ,

The recommendation was a
resolution which was approved as
a whole by 33 votes with 21
abstentions .

This recommended that the
Governments of India, Pakistan
and South Africa proceed with
the holding of a Round Table,
Conference to settle the question
of the peoples of Indian origin in
South Africa.

The resolution further recom-
mended that the Governments
concerned should refrain from
taking any steps which would
prejudice their negotiations — in
particular the implementation of
the Group Areas Act pending the
conclusion of such negotiations.
| —Reuter.

SAILOR IN HOSPITAL

Ronald Davies, Junior tngin
eer of the R. F. A. Bishopdale
was landed hére yesterday morn-
ing and taken to the General Hos-
pital to undergo an operation for
appendicitis,

The Bishopdale’s was an em-
ergency call, She was originally
bound for Trinidad from Ports-
mouth to load oil.

She remained here just
an hour.

By Jimmy Hatlo

over

tg
M~avee 4 LITTLE
LATEâ„¢BUT DON'T SAY



SUNDAY



At Exhibition

The Photographic Section
Annual Industrial Exhibiting
will this year be run by the Bar-
bados Camera Club under the
auspices of the Agricultural So-
=o * = —— was formerly
ooked after by the B.
and Crafts Society, coe

The Camera Club is compara-

tively young having been formed}.

only about seventeen months

Its strides have been rapid! aoe
ever, and it now plans to have an
entirely different set-up in the
Photographic Section at the exhi-
bition to that of former years. The
practice followed in big countries
will be resorted to, the “Advo-
cate” was told yesterday,

An_ exhibitor in this section
will have to carry out the com-
plete work of his exhibit, from
the operation of the camera to the
production of the finished print.
This will include taking the pic-
ture, processing the negative and
making and mounting the print.

Professionals and amateurs are
eligible for entry, and photographs
may be taken in the island or
abroad so long as the exhibitor is
resident in the island for the time
being. Any number of prints may
be submitted by an exhibitor, but
no exhibit would be accepted that
has won a prize at a previous
Agricultural Exhibition.

As regards the subject matter,
this may consist of anything.

picture may be landscape, sea-
scape, portrait, sports, news,
figure study, scientific, flower,

animals, etc.

There will be no cash prizes.
The first, second and third best
prints will be selected and six
Honourable Mentions will be
made,

COIN TWO CENTURIES
DLD



Three Coins, one of which is
227 years old, were brought into
the Advocate’s Editorial Office
Friday morning. They were
owned by Mr, C. B. Brandford
of “Archville”’, Hastings.

The oldest is an Irish half
penny from the reign of George
the First and dated 1723. The
other is a Barbados Neptune
penny dated 1792. It carries the
head of a Carib chief,

Mr. Neville Connell, Curator
of the Barbados Museum, told the
Advocate yesterday that no one
knows quite well the origin of
that head. It is also on the first
penny to be issued locally in
1788. This is called the Pine-
apple penny. On both pennies
the word Barbados is written
“Barbadoes” .

The third coin is a British penny
from the reign of George the
Fourth, dated 1826

Mr. Brandford said that he had
these coins for many years. He
bought them from time to time!
when he used to carry on a busi-
ness. He also has many old
American coins.

keen coin collector but at present
he rarely comes across very old
coins so he has given up collecting.

. TRINIDAD AIDS
PIONEER INDUSTRY

(From Our Own Correspondent)



PORT-OF-SPAIN Nov. 28.

Trinidad’s aid to Pioneer In-
dustry proposals have attracted
another foreign industry: manu-
facture of low cost dresses

Soon a Canadian dress manu-
facturer will visit theses}

snores
on an exploration visit, |



MODERN HIGH SCHOOL

(inrgistered and approved by Dept. of
Education)

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

The examination for ntry to thi |

eehool in January 1951 will be held on)

Friday 8th December 1950. Crndidates !
yaust bring a baptismal certifieste and,
# tert'monial from the head teacher

of tt last school attended
limited number can obtsir
Entrance Fee $1.50.

A scholarship) examination

Only 4
entry

1
will be}

held at the same time to select the at

best candidates in order of merit. No
entra-ce fee

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PAGE 1

SUNDAY DECEMBER 3. IKt SUNDAY ADVOCATE. PAOE FIFTTTN POLICE NOTICE PARKING There is spare available for parking car? In the following place* %  — 1. Jubilee Gardens; (Near Parochial Builiiing") Church \ (By the Cathedral) 3 Hickett Street between Trafalgar Street and the Wharf; 4 Old Bus Stand, Trafalgar Street R T MICHELIN. Commission*! of Police Police Headquarter*. Bridgetown. Ill December. 1950 3 12.50—2n POST OFFICE NOTICE From Monday next. 4th December and until further notice air mails for Great Britain and Europe will be closed al the General POM Office it 11.45 AM instead of 2 P M Mails for these places will close on Friday* at I P.M. as usual General Post Office, 1st December. 1050 2.12.SO 2n POLICE TRAFFIC NOTICE AGRICrLTIRAL EXHIBITION ON 6TII AM* 7TH DECEMBER. 1934 £ 1 All vehicles proceeding in the direction of queen's Park •hall approach by way of Roebuck and Crumpton Streets only, after which (should they desire to set down their passengers) they shi.ll leave by way of Constitution Road or St. Michael's Row. The same route shall be followed when returning to take up passengers. 2. Motor cars only shall be allowed lo park on Constitution Road facing North, and shall when leaving be required to do so by way of Bclmont Road. 3 No vehicle of burthen shall be allowed to proceed through 1 Si Michael's Row. Crumpton Street, or Constitution Road between ', 11 a.m. and 11 p.m., with the exception of carts returning to remove I exhibits. These shall only be allowed to pass down Constitution Road from Belmont Corner in single line and enter Queen's Park by i the Governor's Gate returning the same way, and proceed in single line by way of Belmont Road. Made under Regulation 2 of the Bridgetown and Speightstown' (Traffic) (Amendment) Regulations 1043. R. T. MICHELIN Commissioner of Police. Police Headquarters, Bridgetown, 1st December, 1950. 1.12.50.—3n. Department Of Education WESTBl'RY INFANT SCHOOL — ST. MICHAEL Applications are Invited for ihe Headship of the new Westbury Infant School from teachers (women) with at least 10 yean' teaching experience. The minimum professional qualification required Is the Certificate A of the Department or exemption therefrom. Salary will be in accordance with the Government Scale for Head Teachers in Grade II, Elementary Schools. Candidates "who have already submitted application forms In respect of previous vacancies (now filled) may apply by letter, accompanied by J recent testimonial. All other candidates should make application on the appropriate form which may be obtained from the Department of Education. All applications must be enclosed In envelopes marked "Appolnimr-nU Boardin the top left hand corner and must reach the Department of Education by Saturday December. 1990 1st December, 1050 msMK t Uuur*... A pleasure/ It** 'OsMbU Two' collar attached shirt has a double Whan the, original •van out, it can oasily bytntwoM, wtlh ovary shirt. Double Two' shirts ore from fine labf.es in a •MOO erf colours and ik & ** SHIRT -iifc *-'•"•< si-All COLUI MLSSRS. C f. HAKKISON & CO., (B'doa) LTD l.l %  *>< %  JAM*. *. LTNCS1 CO.. LTD. STOCK UP THESE FOB CHRISTMAS. %  s SfoWINE But. HIIISKt Hill mi win C1IM li'I Wl.1l (If III MINTHI trKK'OT BRANDY COINTEKAl' II II II UK Will i i ii \( \ii Tmpi rire IIR1MHI II COI.IUN ARROW REN* PERKINS A ro.. LTD. nil ill i h -mill 1)1.1 mi and MM Agricultural Exhibition FURNISH HH'K IIOMk TO A CHRISTMAS TKKAT Htr^.Tnimwl NEW A nrirwril Vjtiiiiio. Himplvr Dtin. Ward I ^f.of-Dtaw. %  'I., u ,., h Haa mgM .i..',-.. % % % %  I 111 4 I I HAC I ION l*t \ 11.111 OVM FREE FL(MH) LIGHT DANCING ON THE GREEN. 6 fO 10 it. in. 2 Popular Orchestras in attentUince \o\-smi' MLSIC. Dining, Hodlo. OMhUlU. Iambi of (. h4n.ii and armpits This very annoying evil will be h.embed soon b* regularly HassJ ihe drliciously cooling and drying PUROt •0W0CI which expels also the ditagrcablc odour Therefore, do try ^sSs? NOTICE Our Cuslomrrs and IhiPafclk eenrrallv FRIDAY from 12 noun lo 1 p. m will, an usual. closiOn SATURDAYSi fur the day al 12 num. Your Co-operation is Solicited C.F. HARRISON & CO. mm Ltd. BROAD STREET. Christmas ^ Cards & Paper and Christmas Tree Decorations from Your JeweUers Y. UELIMA & CO., LTD. 'Phone 4644 -o20, Broad Street fnder the Diilingul*hr Patronage of Hit Excellency the Coper and Mrs. Savaa? BRIDGETOWN PLAYERS PRESENTS "THE MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER" Thursday, December 11 and Friday. December IS at 8.:il> p.m. &f Matinee Friday. I>ecember 15tb HOOKING OFFICE uprn* Friday Dee. 8th Fmplrr Theatre. I'RK US: S1.5I. $1.20, lie. and 4a> All SraU Rr-w-rvrd SEEI NG %  BELIEVING u A CHOICE I WHAT A *l I III ION! LOVELY CREPE ROM UN In i, Enchantlni ('.lour. • II per yd UIIITI. i iiisiii I in inn if „ ,, „„ VJ PI.AITEII TAFFETA In III dnlna .. SI 11 per Id. PLAIN SPIN IN WHITE .nd 10 mure Clour. •i SSr. per Yd. ALE OVER LACE In White -I IS pet Vd Black Hi Rn-e BeUe | BJ *: per \d. Man* m..re Material, are .,,. „ ,Ilirr lira Hi* I'KI>IM\IIO\ IIIIM* ritaratlM. %  %  %  % % %  r\\* %  OAPfl h> i*a#*t*i Mum,. Oaaaaasa. %  raaMU rFRFi MK in VaraHej Coir, H.IS^-HIOOLOONI I'll. AHthwoit v llrallr ##. IK M\MUS A CM. YOUB HOME REQUIRES... A garbage can. heavy calvanlaAd, a wash tub, buokats, a mincer or a sink, dralnboarda, coal-atova, oil-atova or a kitchen knlfa now doasn't It? Come In, wt> have Itt A 6ARNES ft CO.. LTD r^9V/V/V/^/V**rrtV-'.VAV/,V*V-OV J V-V/-V//*VV*/>'/V l IOI. SAI I Thiirouilh-lireil Stallion BATTLE FRONT (Bay 1937) i INproperly nf Ihe R'dos Turf Club. OAVri will a rorrived in wrillniby the Seiretary up lo 3l*t December 1950. For full particular* apply t the Secretary. Barbados Tur! Club. Synagogue Lane. Bridgetown. Barbados ** ^V'V'V^^^'^W'''''''-''''''.'.','-',*.'--,'.'.',',',*,', '.;:;•*'& ion MEN o\i.v A COOI) i'RESKNT TO oiva irouB mn is A PALMS SIO\ i: \xn o\ i;\ KrincnihtT t'hristiniis iMgfaaj in the Kitilu-ii X. II. II O WELL liAY SI l.uinlier & llanlwure SANTAS QeleOumFor lour *'onr**iiienee. Be haw I a/: %  i Supplivn of ... Xmai Rope, Taga, Tinael Cord L Xmai Treas and a Variety of Decoration* -II .>• your room, more attiactive v %  UNOLJ t \i >M Bolla i Matt ULONEIIM, Hi.IIMMI. rn PlaaUc I l


PAGE 1

I'M-.I I.UK SUNDAY ADVOCATE -l MIAV DKCEMBF.R 3, 1*M What do you know about ENO? DO YOU KNOW ih.; 3 giu. of cooling, refreshing ENO, will correct the effects ol .Overeating and drinking? DO YOU KNOW that ENO, with in gentle laxative action, will Ircshcu you up menially and physically ? 3*U in bottltajor lotting frisk**W Enos Fruit Salt' The Gift of the year NEW FEATURES NEW PRECISION NEW BEAUTY the only pen with the Hiss's NSWS jhoui the worldi mc. warned Bin, rhc nr* Parker "'51" hu.v a rcmark-Me. new Aero-metric Ink System . ami if* the nicatert ever Jcviwd. The Aeio-meirii Ink Svfiem li a wholly t %  cKnllfk method of drawing in. %  toting, wlcguarding arid releasing ink, to give Ihe rxosl • wwiNK-KOWoovfRNoa ^.ftao,, „„ reifoniuiKC e.e knoen. • MWWj-GLAMWMavo* See tins bcauliful pen anj wp l l aaoi n atasf • MW vis am INK sum.i writing. Hcic. indeid, li a Kill eSJtlhf ol the most • Nil* rOTO-MLL hits* and 4 other greml odrantri tprntil —tftfUctt most uhmted oM /j&n. W. I. Beware Of Complacency No Cricket \esterday y^HAT OF BATTLE FRONTS SUVH Board Preflkkafl NIUMM 3 IaW>Ji II:, Prices: With .tolled ('.old Cap With I.u>truloy Cup Distributors fur Barbados: A. S. BKYDKN A: SONS (BAKRAIH>S) LTD. P.O. Bo\ 403, Bridgetown. tv/,v/,v',%^v-/,^vv/Ar*ov.vrtV'*v*'x*v,'//'*'*v Av***'| BY O. S. COPPIS 1 HAD THE opportunity of Listening to a ncwded broadcast whieh Mr K K Nunes. r*res.dent W.il Indies Clicks*. Board .,f Control mask return to Jamaica from his stay in Er.gland, and afur he had been re-elected Presidi-nt Ol the Weal Indie*. Cricket Board of Control at .ui. HI mealing Mb Nunes said that he had been asked to give his impressions of the We-it Indies tour of El ii] privileged in witness pose to re p rod ore her* what Mr. Nunes said In Ha lave heard most of it already, that is with regard 'earn. TWO POINTS T WO I'OINTS in his speech however interest me greatly and I am compelled to offer some comment The tirst is that Mr. Nunes in his ipeeeh advises the West India* to guard against complacency on the strength of their win in the series with England and In the face of their forthcoming tour 'o Australia in IBSl No one could have-greeted this announcement more heartily thau I did Mine a mines from the head of the controlling body of West Indies cricket themselves and as such, should be considered as indi' %  > %  that would direct their dealings with West Indies cricket at BATTLED I AM BAfsTLB) at present as to the method I must use to associate this declaration of poUey with Iho Inactivity ol the Hoard as -.luting a search for new talent is concern,.! If Mi Nunes' advice hi 1" tc translated ioto positive action then a search should have bean started already for a pair of keen prom%  i*>wlcrs to train for the tour. 11 i no point w.iitniK until the quadrangular tourn merit garnet "ii* and Trinidad on the one hand and Jamaica and Brftlafa Qiuana on the other are concluded next year to scii. • ..i on the .itremith of his performance In the respe>'ivi fixtures. If the West Indies are to compete with the leading teams In Imperial Cricket to-day, then they must adopt modern methods of team building that have stood the acid lest of post-war cricket with accepted success MUST BE TRAINED F AST bowlers must be trained fur their arduous duties as carefully as a two-year-old is trained to be u stayer or a sprinter as the occasion demands. If there is no complacency in West Indies Official cricket circles, then let them set to work building a team and training the ke> men bafUrt the comparative farce of Intercolonial tournaments leads them astray. NO CONGRATS FOR GODIIARD I N Mi Nunes' speech he made no reference to the Captain ol the Want Indies team, John Goddard, although he mentioned individually Hae, Stollmcyer, Valentine, Weckes and Worrell. I have already written in these columns that 1 was surprised that at the hist meeting of the West Indies Cricket Boaru ol Control there were resolutions pa as ad and honorariums granted to air. Nunes fui in grcji >eivice to West Indie, cricket and also to Mr. Lacy, but nothing t %  ..I of the i Indited!) good Job done by John tioddard in lus iiispiicU leadership of the team or to Mr. Jack Kidney, the Manager who is also credited with having done a good job NO EXCUSE E VEN if there was a slip at the Board Meeting in Trinidad, surely the President on lus return to Jum.ma on •aUrUhg been asked to nay something about the tour should have grasped the opportunil> to pay some tribute to these two officials. Nunes himself Captained the Iu2 West Indies team to England that was not %  particularly successlul Wcsi Iriuics learn but even i those drcuntftsUMM I am sure lie iculises thai to captain even %  losing West Indies team .n .. tour of England is no sinecure and to win a -ingle lest match and dually the %  n % %  : ..i Inin l...,.l.u.-i 1 sincurcly hope that aa Mr. Nunes said in his broadcast, then i iibeen such unanimity among the West Indian Ciickc' Hoard of Control aa there la now and that this slip was just a slip. BARBADOS STILITOPS AT WATER POLO PAJtBADOS, by retaining the Elite Water Polo Cup, has shown Trinidad that they are still the stronger of the two teams. On* outstanding point however is that the Trinidad team has improve so greatly between January and November that it has water polo fan* hart arondetlnf what is going to happen when Barbados visits 'I nmdad next year If the Trinidad team continues to improve with such large strides, by next year they will be definitely belter than their rivals. :i_. Ihc Barbados team has not shown the remarkable Improvement which the visitors did, but they are nevertheless, still a gre.it force to be reckoned with. The stimulating effect that the tour just concluded has had on tingome will show itself clearer when the Water Polo Association ujiens its league next year. A TOUR NEXT SEASON W ITH a possibility of o tour to Trinidad in the minds of the players, next season they will all strive to be among the best ten arnica will be selected. Already youngsters are asking about joining the Association, so the older player?, will have to watch their step against this young talent which the Association hopes will be available when Ihc 11*51 league opens Water Polo among the ladies seems to be here to uw. The local team with only about six weeks steady practising before the Trinidad lour, has shown great promise. If they can form a league next year comprised of about three or four teams, they should have a successful season and the experience they will gain will put them on an even footing with their Trinidad uvula. The only comment on ladies Water Polo is that the Held when they play should be u bit shorter. However these and other minor problems cnu be worked out before the 1951 season begins. GOLF PRO ARRIVES E UNEST WAKE LAM, senior Golf professional at Ihe Royal Ottawa Golf Club In Canada, arrived yesterday to take up the post of winter professional at the Itoekley Golf and Country Club in succession to Allan Kennick who has served as winter professional for th ...i-t i .'... .w.n.s. Wnkelam Is a well known professional player In Canada and is not only a coach but has won the senior championship of the Canadian il'.ifei A : ... -;.,n '..i Ui. n,i \ two M .ii. and has recently lurned i %  nine hole score of 29 on the difficult Ottawa course. Ha makes his llrst tour of Ihe Itoekley Golf Club Course tomorrow, if possible in a four ball match with three members and will be I '' %  ."' 1" ik. %  % %  %  I 11.i: wick The Novembai Baa* Mug Competition which was postponed last Saturday until yesterday was abandoned when play was not possible. Rain Washes Out Play In Four Fixtures //.Sir* Hull Xot rsV Sold Out Of barbado* Than was no play yeaterda) in any ol tht fUBM scheduled [i place m the seventh series of the First Division Cricket Competition. Heavy rains on Friday and again yesterday rendered the giound unfit for play, pools of 404—H In 2nd lest piyinneids There were four games carded Common wea ith BY BOOKIE T HE NEWS thai the Barbados Turt Club is offering the stallion Battle Front for sale Is the most momentous in the affairs of local racing. I can think of few thing, which will have a greater effect the breeding of the thoroughbred In Barbados Of course it depends on whether Battle Front will be sold out of the island or not but as it Is highly probable that the former will be the case, there Is no doubt that the prospect of a loss to breeding looms very large indeed. f£ w.ii deren at ffrtaaga Pickwick at Carlton. Lodge at Park. Comhermere at the Barbados Turf Club has do; rh for breeding In Barbados in the past, not to mention Its contribution to West Indian breeding c I oUega] Carlton Spartan v. Lodge at Park. breeding"on the whole, that it is difficult to censure Uie Club off hand" r.mpiro v comhermere at Bank for thls mw movc it ,,m u imagined that they have good reason Hall. f or contemplating such a move and the most obvious is undoubtedly second Tt There was no play at Bank Hall that thev are in the throes of obtaining another new stallion from %  "" ie "* yesterday when Empire and England. Consequently they wish to weed out Battle Front to make comhermere were scheduled to room for the new arrival. In point of fact I have no plausible argumeet there in a First Division muni against this procedure and I will not attempt to manufacture cricket match The outfield and any: but. and u Is a very big "but" indeed, I must warn against •wicket were well soaked by the allowing Battle Front to go out o* the Island. Therefore, if the Club I in some parts of the field desires to be of further .service to Barbados breeding they can at least olleeled endeavour to dispose of Battle Front by selling him to some local 010SSI BOMBAY, Dec. 2. Helps** by a C:f:b-wicket stand of 138 by the Lancashire pair Ken Grieves and John Uin, the Commonwealth team were 222 runs ahead at the ena of the second an i PMJ against Inch., gag The Common' eaith brought their first innings sosgsj to 304 for 8 today in reply o India's 82. Grieves hit 81. including 14 fours In 2 hours, and Ikin scored T. in just undet 4 hours hitting u '** I*"' 5 of water 7 boundaries. ^^_Earlier Frank WorrcU and George Bmmett had put on 00 for Ihc '.bird u-ke! Worrell scored 55 before he missed the ball when attempting to sweep Nayudu and was l.b.w. He was mniiies and hit S fours I.NKIA rili-ST NNINOS S3 COMMONWEALTH >-lHST 1. rbtlork c SUltna N-th b Alva 11 11 ClmbHll H., i l> Alv S O bnmrtl atpd H.: i.dra Nalh b ll.ai r Wicll I b l, ."jymlu U J thin b Nayudu II K Orin c RJUdr NaUi b Queen's Horse JJ^!, Breaks Leg In Race 2. r u Umnsar S LONDON. Dec. Queen to-day saw her higher than they were in former years yet a glance at "the actual nunu iteeplc cliuaer, Monaveei bcr of races won reveals that It is greater than the amount returned by winners sired by a stallion like Sunplant in a period almost twice as long. Neither does Battle Front suffer by comparison with the type of race horse he has produced. The accent, it is true, has alwavs been i below O.T.C. it is %  i IT. i r, the long run a stallions reputation and true value stands or falls with the success or failure he proves himself to be at stud ertainiy Battle Front has nothing to be ashamed of in this respect. It is quite true that he has been rather overshadowed by O.T.C Nean> rvy oiK-r .i-ii.ou in tn U.W.I has. But looking at Battle Front's record in the few abort years -iuw he im:. i r „ „, rtu u one cannot fail to be impressed that he has done well. In the live years that his stock has been racing he has sired over 23 winners of 61 races valued (51,067. In 1947 he was 5lh on the list of sires of winners in the South Caribbean and in 1948 and 1949 he was third. Even if it is said that his progeny have run at a time when purses are much The famous hurt and had to be destroy • while contesting the £2.' "Queen Elisabeth Stakea** i. over three miles at Hum Park thu f !c!£?L.n with whm the Dueen "" SDeed nnd if l havc ranke have i^,, om ong some of the best sprinters that we have bred among the leaders when he came ,„ the West Indus down. The nine-year-old gelding which As his lassfHni money u/bmtt gnd most successful progeny we finished filth in last year's Grand have Front Bell, a winner of 12 races among which were some very National, is owned Jointly by the convincing wins over 6 fuiionns from B and A class horses in Trinind princess Elisabeth now dadNext there is Will OThe Wisp 11. a filly who won the Breeders' u ,1,., Stakea In a year of unrivalled quality among the two-year-olds. On Monaveen started 9 to 4 favour,0 P oI Mlil thero wa War patn aito ln th '' Mme y ear wno proved .* w S5.ftET !" £. o? '•SBSKiS'BSS!"' ?"LT h0 „ W i!P ~ ul w "<"'•*> " > %  .SrS~ w U v teafflaVTl exciting race. j\s his best progeny over %  dist;ue I count Firemist and Battle The Queen's horse was trained star and the former proves that when put to a mare known for pro. *} i 1( y Pcter Cazclet, and ridden by rtucing good stayers. Battle Front could also provide Ug with a miler Australia and Tony Grantham, who was injured of some distinction %  t the state of and brought off the course In an rounding urea, uinbulance. Taking everything Into account I am therefore of the opinion is saturated by Monaveen ran in the Princess" that the B.T.C should do all in their power to see that he remains heavy overnight rain and though colours. When shp and her mother tn lhe island the sun shone th realy in frequent i^,,,^ ^ hom las% ycar u wa s -.._-.-, ..... -pells today, further showers did thelr nni vent||re nto Nallonal THE GOVERNOR S CUP not hasten the drying of the „ unt Racing Pitch. The horse came down at the rVJRlNG the last two Sundays I have given my ideas on what the The captains. Lindsay Hassett v, aler ump a was quickly seen picture is like with regard to the forthcoming Trinidad Derby LtMl riadahl Brown inspected the lnal he hHj( broken a \^ and ne jnd Breeders' Slakes. To-day it BBemi only utunU that I should wickets on three occasions the was shot. Jockey Grantham, it was fullow with some discussion on the third of the West Indies'three great last being at four o'clock local 1;|ter | eame( | wa5 cul on lllt faoi tftcCS which are run at the Trinidad Christmas meeting. That Is the Extrai (4 byes. TUI ((or lht ran ,.i .,k*4* t n. -114, s—aa, a—StS. 1—L._. llOWl.tNf. ANALYSIS O M I-I, id f M.nkl No Play In Test BHIS11ANE, Dec. 2, No play was possible on the second day of match between England beeause the pitch and su The ground • along. The above three are among on think of and far better than mere time. and Australia were dismissed for 2ZH Il|l(h |B their first innings yesterday and England did not start their reply — Renter Referee Stops Galieu—Young He Governor's Cup. Fight Aires, made an auspicious North American debut last mght by stopping Terry Young, a vetYoik boxer, in the Injured his knee. TW 1.1 '^nt^hino .ho -,. !" To bc s in wlth musl ,nv now K ,ad am ,0 welcome the name The Queen, wauhing the race back from h ob lvi(in
. ained In that category but has rather progressed Into a middle distance runner of some CUM, She certainly handed out a very %  invlnclng healing to Blue Streak at Arima over 7Uj furlongs. Can On behal, „f th. Barbados he do "*"" V tW Kifle Association. CoL Connell, ii his report thanked the Barbadtx tlovornment, Messrs. Elders and ryffes Steamshipg Coy., the Merchants and Bridgetown _— who %  i rt"t*nously gave her. But there is a lot of water to go under the bridge between donations and made it possible to now and then. So let us wait and see tend the team to Blsley. .. 1 ,,,,,__.^^_^-!.....--_!...............---!i..,!.!.............^__. M ._.__^__ Apart from these nothing else about the race stands out with the possible exic./l<.n of the game little filly Rebate. In her I see a similar threat to that which Klizabethun posed two years ago when she won the race Her weight will be approximately the same, her business firms of style of running is also similar and providing she can get off like nl the privateindiher predecessor I think they will have a lot of trouble to subdue the VACATOR WATERPROOF. NON-SKID. GROUND-GRIP" PUSSYfOOf SOU Clarki Introducs the new flexible, re."* !" Pmiytooi toling to (uiiion ihc Impact batwe.cn (cet and floor. Hide to %  tecrrt tarmuli of Cl.rki of l'-gUd — the i,.i n. ihoa firm i' 125 yean* experience Putiftoot U eoniiilcred M be the ideal hot-weather soling — ll|ht M rwabar. cool si leather, tough m rea'll ever aeed. nils k Dta ranrTM kaaa... Ii Ihon lztr*r. funyfoot %om mrm filir. io Vocater Seeeafi (aSown asra). Vat-tw. ee wmJmmd upean ft caataaa* sag aarsiirlctag comfort. •ALL' L EAD< N6 H rite lior Ui.il 1269. ^"•/'a, ECKSTEIN BROTHERS I £2LcVsM %  \' rrt>ii fiily gives aa ihst dean, fresh look all day aed well into the evetuog —it isvci you precious morning minuies as wcD_ Quick to apply —having vyedied your face, iuit dah it on—a tear easy wccpi with the rwor and you're u.ing thr most ijn imM vliaviog medium knoni. io the world of sown r u C O L GATE Brushless Shave Cream Good mornings begin Gillettg ... the ifurpeil tdgt in ihe tmrl


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PACil rot UTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY DECEMBERS. 1S0 CLASSIFIED ADS. TELEPHONE 2*W 1HKI> %  frtdStd* .k thl P.. %  1 4 On .. II .Ik. 1*^ 111 Ihr %  %  r the He. and llvenes iCniktrerii j'* 1. 1 IL Mllll %  tjiirr 'i* IM III M K4TI Ii>:w ELECTION NOTICES PABUN nr Iff Ml. BABI I IIW:BV *ava MUM th-t I ro-c %  %  I Mllf> StBSf permn> dulv 41 .1 IK* Ind dav l I'FHCY H BI-BTON Parochial TtHUFR, St. MJrhi. ||>J I-'KISH in t MBI-1 INI %  >< 1 M iiotle* that I lu-vr .ppnl'ilrd the New Vnttf. Room adjoinM djUdliMdd U. vote -ii> election of VrMrvmen lor Ihe wild laaxiiW on TueeOav. tha ltd day or January. INI. IM.MH the at 10 and I! r'rMrt In In* morneh-cl a Vert*, lor Ihe Pariah of %  tile >..r IMi WOOD OODDAJIO. Parochial Trsaaursr. Chriet Church i likt %  rmu HKVT HOUSES ATTRACTIVE rL*KNUTKD -at las* Paring — SullaM .Liable l**mbw i*L Phone St ^. > amHvmni or yi Co HMftf.il Club. HOUIXXHO 1 jMJto>4 id.' I %  curr COT. IM WBM Hoshley. Por • ." %  'hd PS* lit July >i-i 1001 DM IWt Mr* C. C Wit".. r^rF3lANA -Full. fisSru-feod on W %  mee *do C* I phone • %  • %  . UMM IXAT Fully Mrnuhsd. at) modern unventenre* ifl Bedroom*. Unen and VtbTy. 10 mlnutae walk (ram flub ind CMy Phone 4101 1 119* In FABAWAY-Bl PhlUp, I *>. Furnldhsd, 1 bedroom*. Water null LlgnUng BlnnL Cf port. *• %  .' Mr n Da*. IMI and if %  Lava* Th dtparted %  Itu* lie y.r thai Y\a* |>a aed On laRrVM Ul tenlhi .rtura has nudd u adver %  rldl So my beloved alsep in pv—e Edna Archer iwlfs 1 Darrilsv. Jaaiieraui' %  inadcif. Clarence Or.nl AUetatl Ken -"• -nd K" Shlrldir. Pdoline Winifred dnd Mid. Mlk-red Carter id. dt*e. dJ I JunnCWI lo.l %  !, %  .. Av.il. C1.I %  M M I l l U t htldbaidl ii TROTVAN whn tell %  Uep on Da ber h l*ii The M UN i.iiWe iir> n.'-tli %  %  u.nte thai UH'o fan Tiio %  %  •>• i'f parUiui w*i The Lofd I ineel on tnodr brianl %  %  > %  >• %  TioOnan tv.ilei. MrIrene ftmal ... I I I on SAldB Al'TOMOTIVi: KLBCTUCAL ni.v ciax UATTiJUKs f..ignition purpote. ell Pul 3fW Dd Oot.i A Co rXKNITimp: Dut i 3 11M I tv ol CockCddM 4M^ Vlrrh. l o Mabofny Dining Table* Dinner V/dCfoni and Dinner Chain, I • leddcdd* J Ralph Beard! Slwm Room. lUrdw—t All*". 'Opp Cal"edi~l Opdii ddllj I fn | | ,-. | Mil POULTRY T>P i %  MKCIIANICAI. rARUH Of -i IMIIS I I1P.IWIIV |tve iHitne that 1 haw* .ppomted the Veatry Room at the Parldh h'l-eh di the place where all prraoni IfWd lo vote >uny elerttoi nen lor the f l Pariah ol tt John lor FHafLlr SALES AUCTION %  *d been InetrucMld) iHl>* InatrucUona rcelvadl I ,U ,i| at rorochMI Boil.i, -,. Cdru^l ( %  •el on Tudddld). IMtmkt, tth % m. d roUddUo.. dl ..nnd h.iMl RSris,*— — -*"VINCBMT rlRirPITH Aufdjon,ear. I H-W-Sai ROYAL NETHERLAND STEAMSHIP CO. %  Mllnf from Antwerp. Rotterdam and H*BrJ M %  "T3JGNA)0th.. Hat mh. Se.-mb. aW-i-d* fom Am>tdrda*n. and Dovi_ m a, -onANJEIITAO" ITth and 1MB. NdPambdr •MM .nr • TTt'ilddd. Ld Gualrd. ..TV T i "DOJ-rMk. Novdmafar; a a %  fAtt.SHUU1Kb Ndvdd*di m.t, %  JtAhJUTTADlet Novwdbdl iliiid to Trinidad, Pdramarlbo. HU UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Bv in. IT --lluna rereivrd I will aeU *! PrMlav. Dorember Wh ad Meear. >le A Co. avacB. Probvn Bum ii. IHi II H P Moiria Car III INI 14 II f aladtira. Plpanouth, APIWdep. and Air.nrrdam. m a. 'Wlli/M BTAD" in*. November 1 Thp M V • D..., %  cepi Cardk. -ind PdaWtt OrdiwMH and Arubd. S-ii.ni; lHwltod) %  Twd M.V Cwtoir %  d I i-epi CaaPdj and Padaaeujera •" 1 l>d*Wiiiiw: Ai'idui. Uearta-rrai 1 Nddtd iuad M Kill* D-B, of eB.WJ. % %  it""Ml. ODMBBB AUO11ATI0N tad. Tat*. 4*4" Canadian National Steamships COMBERMERE SCHOOL ACADEMIC YEAR I Thd Cotonu..g Bod*. >l Combor. have djrr-i u. adoot fiw t anwdxa* IbdBiaMdUrd A.- i ltd -ill be anoptdd fat namlnaiMMi who la not ovr IS yean of a*, on Japvari I.i INI or under of dB* oil dtoMernber 1>, MlSCBUaANCOUS I Advo. ate Co nudjrlct. Mi WTIU R* M.Y l.lt-at-to A IBr>Uaa>-aagOM tJJAdC OR OVTIUOHT injIIOIAJK. Btorn (wndtrucUM. I odam adfreNBOBMS 1-4 % %  *-* dWW. -UltAI' 001.0 .ml gold lawelUry r.ougtit. higher prtrdd paid J-T-rllcr Y. Da Uma a. CO Ltd . Broad SUart, Btidawtoi BB 1I.SB Un 1'ul.lir NoUeea Contd Hairdrrssinf; Nitirr MADAMK HXIHP J of Tdro MIU Hill heg to notify Bar •uatoanarthat all ha* reaumad bmin !" a* usual. Pteor WT1 Jtolurdav and Sunday %  aw j lMM .II OP IT. Lt'CT 1 HKJil-lii give iiolw* thai I have ...uoinii-d the Veatry Room n**r 1-ri.li Church d* the pUca where l ( %  .. %  !* dul' qualified lo vote al any ( action ol Vaatryman lor Ih* .did Pariah r •}>*aembl* on Tudaddy, lbs . ,.| January. INI bdtweon the hour* al 10 jrd II o'clock In Ihe morning ta sloe' a "e*tr> for Ihr Pan* of St. Luey CM Ihe vear INI (MWAIJD DKANI. I'-r... nial Treaaurai. St Lucy a II W-Sn MKIMI Ol M PBIL1P I lirJtuatY ( ive noln-e (hat I havd ap|K>lnled the Church Boya' School naar d>e r*n.h Church, oIhs pl' where n-.rlMifii.i' %  ( Ihr p.M li of M Philip. ."id Other peima dul. quailhdd to vote .1 .n. .l*cdon of Vrelrymen lot the r.ild Pdlib. nui* aaaeinble on Tuaaday 2nd dav of January. INI between Ih* l.n V ii of 10 and II a in. lo alact a Vaatn for |h pariah of St Philip PS. W SCOTT. r.:.. '. %  Tir-.uier. St Philip fcJtBVBB I , ind aflar ktonday Oi December mideitgned will be cloalng lor Ih* Itutcheon Interval For Sake—Cont'd l.AH<.r. CMILDRBWR PlJkY HOU^s; Can b* aeon at % %  Abbeville Qiml II,.,. Ravg W. M Fortes IMt B> 11.90—ftn RAIN CO ATM. RAIN COATS: At %  14 rwch lovdly coloma In rusllc for Ladled. They are an uaaful and economical Ani on Id make a lovely Xnui Girt too. TIIANl BROS Pr Wm Henry Street Dial 3*N JSII W Hi ,. .btj al I iiiri ddch day. oui • eskly half-holiday accepted Our Cualoman are naked to cw-opsrat* %  id arrange Ihelr •hopping accordlrurlg J N Ooddard •> Rona Ltd ran* Shepherd At Co Lid C P. Harrlaon 41 Co iBarbadoal Ltd. Plantations Ltd II H Johrvn.ii Co BUn.fcld Scott A Co. Ltd Y. D* Uma *j Cs. Ltd Kill!. Ltd. Alleyn* Arthur A Co. LM Laehleva LM. Colllna Lid. Bruce WealharhSdd Ltd. Mi.' r Sewing Machine Co. H J.aa.i J.inea A Co I .Id Ipeed Dspl A DapiM A Co. Ltd Jahnwn 1 Per kia* A Co. fitcher ConosU A Co. Ud h E. Col* A Co. Ltd. AOii.i A afedtord Ltd J O Tudor A Co LU W M. PPrd B H I -hrp.iL.il W A. Btl di MS A Co. II II liul.tune A CO. Lid C A BWIhwait* Manning Co Ld iCdct.er Man*, %  ectrlcal Saks* Dspt.i 1 II* v. XMAS TIITJ-. OH'ORATIONS Special diarount ml If* now applying on all C rctidBSa of Uts*s dec oration* Por a nwd i^rlod only See your Irwrlkwa. de Uma A Co.. Ud 10. Broad Strsst. frllSf Kl.l.AM ..US AN'TIQtgn IM P**N dsecrtpl-Mi GU.t. China, old Jr-ri. Walereolnur. R-ely bn.li. M.., Auto %  Taph* t't al tlorrlngi Aniline Shoat ,„„... had *-" n* tl# iin ,. ggajNwi NUN—dn YACHT ML..M1 H.rage Hi. Tti M J i.. able yacht "VAHeld. Lone Star HUM IJn 1'I.ASTIC Nl ILirUutti fa % % %  I It %  i.i 01.00 pet utaAi i BBrn A ioit I.MILII aiul altrar;. it...Tra>et. in •dvoral ak g dr N aajta. rim. t lost U W Him.lllhS.lN A CO %  %  %  %  I ,e -TTO HI Ml to, FISHING Bov. No rs re-Mead* Apply U> W WcktMM. Cb:i-1 l IMUIXAIIl Uaaollli.l |i isiad **Tll fit l<. Bo. .ni.i. peacad or •idaa* Uiul I i nklto 1 % %  •iSaMOB a UN .. ( .' %  bjB*> -i H .d Silver Neck, i ..,.Id CMR l-nhl. '*mt HiiigAlea Boliaii l-iw I UN -On i.ii i ( prktoil A CO IH II. -in other* (I W 1HTC1I1.N-M1N am . Clark to r siMi l atoaV aMBBatBVB IfdAll %  .. %  I !> % %  0-1 Tough" MO VO st On* Chatwi Hiu>a. .iin.u at PilH VllUg*. At. Jam. ••.!• lain* Oalkarv. Drawing and Dming Boom. Kltdhen and ouMr* P**., Taykw. My MWhasl N H H-In Acs* I Rood BV. Pstchsd af iai... altuMa al Ms C lsaa-. c. y B'Uion* Hill. abultlng on land* of CUrk. I >...-h. BirUth. Lsula* Johntr.i. and .... M Clan* Gap a*ors>aiJ BdOdlHnt alts for dsvelopmei.t Inapaetlor. on app Hc l l d B on Ins ; %  Tba abovs psopsrly will bs act up fa* •Bis by public Auction at our office 111. Bosbuck Street. Bridgetown. on Prldaothe tth Docember. at S n.m H B, M(ll"ll-s A Co Trlssfcsns Ns BM ja*!al BTI H. . Mil. --KWOtUEY-'-Irvd Avsnu Thla dcilrable ic*ldncc BsJeviii* TsnnU Court* Drawing and Dining rooma. niK.iind open verandah*, and 'ipilaln 1 two rooma, I drse.ing room and uaual i.rlWaa Gaiag* and > iei-raMa' fsaniu.. The who!* urea la 0,TM BMdt f*dt iKtpsrtbin by appointment -I U le Rae l-v Dial No. SJSI Bals b> public competll ISIh I '.% % %  n % %  i rABJtlNGT()N A fBtALY 1.1read direst MiIt nl %  Attention Is drawn to the Control of Piics (Drtence) (Amendmmt) Orfk-r, 1B90, No 37 which will be published In the Official | Gazette of Mond,i>, 27th November. 1950. t. Under this Order the maximum rt'tail soiling prica "Cement" is oi follows: — ARTICLE RETAIL PRICE : HONNIE BLACKMAN vs. TONY GALENTO who lost lo Ralph on points t rasuida. BELF1ELD KID vs. VICTOR LOVELL Sparkling Prellmlnaties — ih-.--,. Anutenrs Adm: Ringside >-Miu. Baleen* fl.50 Cage 11.00. Arena si nu IIII. in-i> 48c. 3.12.50.—On. JUST RECEIVED IliEHMOS VACUUM JARS Wide Mouth s rim A ? Pint Also REFILLS far 8 Pint A 4 Plnl lag* with si pels. Hoebuck • treatment uf affected birds is kno 26.11.50 —Sn MATTIJC DWELLING HOUSE .llu-l %  4 Upper Doyrsll* Koad. Chmt Ch^rcl containing Clo-ed gallsry. Drawing an Dining Room*. Two bedroom*. Kili'he together i J *^ and WaWr and BH-rtrW PH ran bs rented Por inapecll (he tend*! Mlda Ddru (.1. raakar or dlisct 'o Pisd Chursh.ardSii OAV-e. Par%  '"nans %  %  appl OB k.r. Drss> j Aahbv. nidi Build 1 UN On rarr HAVEN II, Avantid. B „..._•• eonlaliilni The house hdi did* beui...iiian Osoras IK |t,vill* win i t.,40 *u %  u-w, pMkM ,,-ept Sunday Phone 0J Tai atov. will bs art up foi aala al .tills S*snr*ii<->n on *••""> •" %  1W !-" ,t 1 n.m al In. OTAs. ..I Ih. undWr ra* EALst *l PuMbi C>enawAUsn thTW of Ih. -*-**-O,-*0 " Hi, day af Dessanbsr. ION. al I P mKf&srKmfJsfi APPOINTMENTS TO EXECITIVE GRADE IS THE CIVIL SERVICE Attention Ii drawn to paragraph 5 of the Government Notice in m. Official Gazette of 27th November relating to the new executive ::r>de <*U2*-J3,86> In the Civil Service. Applications to sit the examination arc Invited from external %  mdidatcs who are the holders of academic or professional quallflca.ina (of degree standard) and should be addressed lo the Colonial ccretary, Secretariat. Bridgetown, setting out the usual particulars 1 I age. place of birth, academic qualifications, career and practical .experience, if any. The 151h of December. 1950. Is the closing dale for receiving uch applications. 2 8 | \ 50 3n PART ONE ORDERS No. %  narbndo. .It.: I Otfff-*—ill""and rto*k In Irada of th. bu.i 'S^nnsunrmVissi I "AHADDl There will bs no further psrsn. • ''' 'rSoiNV^^/'SS-* 1 ^ AMI> " r % %  I BWIIT vm Wm Orderly Office. Ordsrl.Srs)e.rl ^^ >M '•* *"r Orderlv Offlesr j Lt THI HARUAOOS. nnriiMENT lat DBXTMBXR. UMO M. L. D. SrlJCWES-COX, M* % %  BOLT. A Adjutant. Tha Barbadoi nSglmeni nanras SEJUAL NO. : SlirSTT I .„!• Boa Numbs 3.. -Barbadoa Advoc ^ ^^_ rOB OAJLA OB LOHO LBAaVB UfmaiUflt — Arranged .>• lire* *J?5S5l BBO hooaa St. >>>*u-r>ri*. balhioorna, ale rurniturs lr*lude-d ?mm*dl.U uc..p-nc. uCo Vgg Hol.1. iB ta. %  1AND I ACTS toaat %  l***h Hall Good building af*. with govt. watss and iff alSS-J*** "m;.zr~ I 1 ,,; uu uu.i. .Lu ii. > %  IM HSt> A I ListK lleti SesiM I HtlUtHV tlva HOIKS lhal a Ld ae.*n*n tor Ih. gidulUig dl Ces' for One renewal of Itouoi l-rv'. Mva Partar, of St. ti*rS* and th .,i im-i Church within lb. ol Ihs Pulm Couil. InairKl H -III I. rid .1 Dl.trh-t -n\" PoBc. Court Ti— I.L the ISIh da> ad Occeenber I a" 11 o'clock a.m. USited lol* 1*1 -Id* dl l*KT-..ber N igjgd • C 1 I H %  PoMrs Magflr.tr •> %  '"*' "J THI PbAdto aw heivt JOHOAN iii.arlf iriuonalbli(Or I %  u trading any debi a a M itrl Signed TlttiMA ,. ,i .-. aSBMM rfefg 1KIWENH 1 .,.. ...t 'u.UI ii oid>i ngned toariMM I.OSf VMBUU A Dl Me--'her-on lawrle Under .uitab.v rsw-rded on rstMtrltn. to Pitt Up*tilr* B. U lower Broil %  THEMim INCnEAMOAtleOilk,,,, HP Dai-d Bov cUrks. A MB Dorant. L" Ml Babb. D MI Chclie^ham, C MB Walrond. M. MS Field., M C. CARLTON BROWNE ^ M iit.lr**!.. Retail llrugglal HH. kusbstk hu Dial 11 ..-,--.--ie 1 e^ v-v',--.e-.'^ .e; I OH SALE MACHINI:RY AT Wir.DEV ; PLANTATION. ST. MICHAKL CANE CARRIER MILL — Duncan Stuart 20" x SO Complete ENGINE and GEARING; Geo. Fletcher Ii Co. MEG ASS EI.EVATOR — —Single Strand BO 1 LEU Multitubular 7ft x 12ft. HOILEK FEED AND COLD WATER 1'UMP RAW JUICE PUMP. Double Action.. CLARIFIEKS Thr-e 600 Kins. each. HOT LIQUOR PUMPS. Two. Sinitlc AcUo EVAPORATOR. ASPINAL PANS. One large, one small. FILTER PRESSES. Two.. | MONTEJUS., MEGASS ELEVATOR ENGINE. 6 ton WESTON Ml.(UK TWO HOPE BLOCKS. MILL ENGINE and GEARING— Duncan Stewnn PIPHVG and FITTINGS. riREBRICKS Apply to . THE MANAGER, Wildey Plantation Dial 2850 20 11.50.—3n, BON AtVllL pi,,. H)ll Inv**, property | n the nigher -p.^"' 1 "' %  •'>"*<• rsdidenllal e.i The rsiideisce wa* bull) al t*rlod wha,, coal of llltle rbjsct. II cofitaliM Urge -*-.n room-. v*ry com.nodloua llsrida. 3 lari'e bedroom*. b*th-na. 1 gMags. .no all tne *prtrnaiwer.period In a btUeS Ths ground* are %  imstMy dv, aer*. ,„ „ MT(t Kloasd garden wlih lawn", arc hard and Idrderi rui> been wrll A comfortable propraaonablo price 111: \M.UN-, %  % x MICbawL m*llow*d old atone propart* Wio coaM, about I. mil* from with good boot ;irn-hor-gr-. i plantIt ha. grnunda. th* major pirl "d wllh pnadurllve f-Ult tr-ts There ar. 3 recptmn. 4 bedi^ioend. gallarlea. 3 garagd> rti" SuUablti either for continued private re*idente or ir boarding hotnw. Br NAD A B.W.I. A beautlI and wall found country iiiUini>| 1 tsc.pilon. 0 verandah*. 1 bath* •U. I gdrdgea etc ate. Ths land -.mi-t. sf 14 acrsa. IS arrsa under eoron.it. .nd rnrlmpp. the remnlnder paature and %  %  ruru. Incom* about gWO. per annum PTICS £0.000. Pull particular* on ..pp!i. ..n... TIIB OI.1VI l~Upper Coll-mor* largo modem Ih about I aero lo a raujrar who lly *olld pTopsrty the bsst obtalntvblO ire la J large living 4 II gallery IMS rwvrd courlvard lawrri. kltalvn garden* and orcrurrd. Well plicel \ A.I_\ KUSA i'-Mp. Road < iti Allractlv. and contrails 'oca led atone bungalow wllh •louble c image %  *,/. Approximatoly 14.000 aquar* fast. Ttu* well bulll properly contains a iLinge. TOWER GARAGEs-fll. Matthlx. Gap An almo-1 new property •uiUbls for a laiga variety of i %  IT .i ti.,1 %  %  i. i r-u: ...per'.. U II coast |, rtdw avallbls ** • going conssrn al a low gurr Pull information on aplie a lion Good ippoiluulty for nergetic eoupls. nrt MOOH1NOS" — Marlns I. ideiit Thl. v.luabls and well -miaorii-d pmpertv cloae to lbs larins Hotel contains 1 .slfA WSll and Offer* will bs ANDA ta t Africa. A Uigof S.47S acre* £13.000 Pull • OU ..pplUMllOII. Pi-rod Us. Wr: HAVE EXTr^SIVFLSSTmOS OP PI>PEMTlErl AND .xMi AL*. OVKH THE CXHeONV. UTI1JSE OUR BBRVICXS TO BAVTC TROUBLE .v_\u aa*3i9X. WANTED RENTALS "WINDY RIDOaT'. L Jam** Very pleaunt 3 IM-dionrncd property with an acTS of pirden. laWdj l*da* if isqulrsd. BEACH HOIK0-, St. !wri.ics Avdllabld fully furnlaned February onward*. %  'Cl'MUrJUJIND HOUSE-' — Codiington nil) Unfurnl*h*d rveaaanl old propsrty with a acrse ol garden. %  •a** M. BU*MB AUCTION1XR. REAL ESTATE AGENT AUCTIONEER PLANTATIONS BUILDINa Knight. S. Chad.. E BJunte. A Purl.. R f Oorlivg. 1 T.. -. 0 A Oulram. J t William*. |a IV. .1.4. |l j Cha**. P. D Heine 1 Archer. A. I. Dolphin, J William.. H. OaiM B g K Btrwater. K RolielU. II Holvten. H Bslgravs. I. la.blsy. Bt Bpsncss. W A Alts-ted on* uken on Mronglh wc( Belle. U N Hddth. J H. Allevive. C. P MCOB) '.r. H I Brsw.l'. \ Bl Field*. RA. •ai.iiii^'.r, .. Ml 1. C 1 Held. D A OnodildgiI* A Marshdll. N W Mayan. J Ouller A Jons*. 1. B. Promoted to IVC wef I Doe. BS. Ml.P Skrwe.-Cox. Major. SO LF A Adjutant. 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T-^ wmm Ss Sumdmj •••-i • in! %  • %  r :t 14 irlr.: CENTS Year 5.1 UNITED NATIONS FORCES CUT IN TWO Attlee, Pleven Oppose Use Of Atomic Bomb -_ LONDON, Dec. 2. O" THE BASIS of today's talks Mr. Attlee will be able to represent the views both of France and Britain when he sees President Truman. Indications tonight were that the French and Bn tish had agreed to such questions as opposition to the use of the atomic bomb in Korea and that every effort should be made to reach a political settlement with the Chinese Communist Government. After a break for lunch the discussion was resumed. Rene Pleven. French Premier. Hew here this morning with his Foreign Minister Robert Schuman, in an attempt to align British and French policies on the international el isis before Attlee leaves for America. Banana Talks Ended *r..i. T Oat Own Carr*i***anl LONDON, live. 2 The Jamaica Banana dok-^tioi having completed negotiations with the Ministry of Food leaves England satisfied with the agreement reached. No details of the agreement are being revealed j n the menntime but the delegation feels mat they have achieved the maximum possible, "in view of the many difficulties confronting the banana industry" as a statement from the delegation puts it this morning. On their return to Jamaica they will recommend its acceptance t Ihe Directors' Growers Association and the Governor-in-Executivc < i-uiit-il. The official announcement is expected after the matter has been considered by the Association and the Governor. Truman May Be Impeached WASHINGTON, Dot. 2. Senator Joseph Mc Carthy 'Hepubhcan. Wisconsin) told f'resident Truman today thai Congress ought to' 'immediately impeach you" unless the adminirtratlon sanctions the use ol Chinese Nationalist troops against the Con Komi "If t.._, unreasonable farce of insisting that only American boys tan die while refusing the help of the soldiers of our Allies BOntinues. then the time is long over1 due for Congress in the MUM Ol America to stand up und bo counted and immediately impeach you" Mr. McCarthy said in a statement directed to the President— Rruter. The mum -ubjects brought up %  Kenan situation. GOT I i' i' rmvncnt .uid the economic ditiicultics being caused by stock-piling i gSc raw material. Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevm *n Office experts on und on the Far East •Handed the talks. As the Prime Ministers met, mother confarence with vita bei .ssions wa running into difficulties on thquestion of a European army. The Atlantic Pad DepuUai Council failed to agree completely in the French proposal for such an army and the Brilis.vicw that there must be no dalaj in shaping an integrated Atlantic The position WBI being put to i i ,. ..nd Attlee. and tt seemed likely that they would call i %  s; %  .1.1. the Unltad Of tlie Deputii %  Crisis Discussed it. Korea was diseu al lot fth bj the Pi In Plevao, it is believed, supported strongly the Idea that Atticin his Washington talk: should press for the establishment of a "buffer zone" south of the Chinese border. Attlee will take off for Washington tomorrow night It dennltely decided today that Field Marshal Sir William Slim. Chief of the Imperial General Staff, will go with him. But he Li also taking three Df tbi '..Acrnment's chief econom expert-, which indicates that military affairs will by no mear | n nan and woman vow we shall never rest until every membar of the Communist armies, whether Korean or Chinese or any others, shall citiu-i be dead or prisoners or driven from land." He urged the people to carry out whatever orders local United commanders gave them. and if In battle areas to keep off loads. •Make every village an armed camp." he continued. It.-ul.-r bump him off." DIED SUDDENLY A BREAD VENDOR named < cell Redman of VVeslbury Road, died suddenly Ihta marnlnf shortly after one o'clock at Baxter's Road. Redman waa sltUmr at Ihe corner of Wh*rton* Gap when he waa aero to suddenly eolUpae on the corner WlWIlt RALPH D. BOCK standing beside tie HUlnan car wlu Barbados Boys' Club. Col R. T Mlcbellu who presented the car yeeterdi greaadPsaaautaUou teak pleee at FoUee BUJ, I V*' raffled in aid of th •finding (centre) In the backUndeclared War Exists Between U.N. And Red Chinese In Korea — Mac Arthur TOKYO, Dec. 2. Genera] Mac Arihur declared today In written replies to questions submitted by press •orraMjondgjrrbj ili.it a "atata of undeclared war between Chinese Communists ami I'mtrd Nations forces'" now exists in Kor.-.i ti.iirial Mac Arthur said he had not usked for authority to lute Chinese rorces engaB I. approximately 300.000 men divkieu Into two grant sets Ihe General mid %  -. reply to %  stOt h nT question. The front echelon now engaged in all. k on our forces comprises lOTnntninfl more than half this fangs u ith the rear echelon rapidly movn. up from the Yalu rivet hankAJM in the Yalu sector were ol North Korean forces now being rebuilt under Chinese SUSpicei amounting to an estimated 100.000 to 150,000 men. This force overwhelmingly outnumbered the Allies, "the exact strength of which I would not care to give". Mac Arthur said He denied that military command had ever ex nefO. lu lions, The settlement of int. | paacnful rather tr,.,n military means Is alwayo l<. he d< trod", he .aided No Atom Bomb The General said he hud not recommended the atom I %  remedy. Any decision of this |^ nature belongs to a higher author Jdy than my own", he declared Mac Arthur said that the Allied air and naval force* were giving i(.valuable BSSlStanOS in Ma nUB> l iign, "bul under present rondltlOQf their potential .limited hv Tlie fact that they cannot operate -.:aint any element of Chinese foreas not immediately situated In Nrrth Korea General Mac Arthur md |, k'iew no way in which recant ra* vrses duo entirely to the over^nelmins; ground strength of the < >mmunists—could have been .i oided under existing QsqsUtkMM He did not think that had the United Nations stopped the cam^ paign at some stage before ranchDr Otaksr Ji* ,ne Msnchurian border the Joaef Cihak thnese would have stayed out of tv>n .1 Mae Arthur disclosed that tlie I'nited Nations now held nesrly 145.000 prisoners In answer to the question; "l)o you regard the present campaign as a continuation of North Korean asgression or representing an enlirely new phase of aggression*"' The General replied: "Th;in my %  pinion is a new war with a new • %  pponent and a new army. North Korean forces were destroyed and 'he mission of the United Nations ommand practically fulfilled when this fresh aggression was -uriched. Reuter use the atom bomb. Etna Is Quiet Now CATANIA, Dec. 2, Mount Etna's worst eruption for 40 years appeared early this morning to have spent Its fur^. seven day* after the first flames flared from cracks in the mountain crust, and lava began pouring down the slopes. After a week of prayer and praparaUon for cvucuation two ftOUSnod villagers today believed •hey had been snvasl The movement of a great wall of molten lava had all but Itoppext) For five days It had ran at an irregular pace sometimes to $lx miles, 50 yard-, and thi. .t. run with destruction the til sflSSl n| Milo and Fomszzo. On the flfth d a y a 500 vards wide, five yards high mass wa crawling at a slow i %  Today the Krateful rlUagSrS percolvwl hardly any movement at all. The lava stopped 50 yards from the fringe of vineyards snd chestnut grovi s ringing Milo. Fornaz'> and the neighbouring village clustered on Etna's foothills UJ\. Troops 30 Miles North Of Pyongyang TOKYO, De. 2. Am.J lOS n %  Cavalry Division loda) i the l igllt tank .( ihe Eighth Armj dafenca Ihws Knit Latest reports sud ne. drove :our tn live mi!. I I chon, so %  sssta norta af pyocsfyanst, lbs ronnei Nortl Earlier it was reported that trapped Alnerlean trOODS BSsBsB flghtsni a withdrawal front ihe n-ebound Chosin reservoir srea in north west Korea tona) undej sn umbrella of AlMticM irnt) and %  American Marines abandoned Yudamni on the northwest Un of ihe ChOSin revcrvoir and sUrUHl la hack Ihetr way south through encircling Communist tones to then uppl\ base H.i^.iru On the I nda "' tin r.\i Lake, the American Seventh DlVtl making for Hagaro came to grips with ChlncM' forces put at severs) thousands man The American Air Force claimed a tola) of 2,iii ColaWUjual nasuallies inflicted yesterday. Flytng weather u-da. was generally good I-itet reports also said thai Amei i, ,i, r.tv dryman BghUni %  Infiinlry were in contact with Communists one mile south or Son gill* HI United Nations force* evacuated Boagcbon during the night but were later ordered to reoccupy it —Reuter. By ALEX VALENTINE SEOUL, Dec 2. UNITED NATIONS military commanders faced tonight a very real danger that the military situation in North Korea waa rapidly becoming untenable. A military observer summing up the position listed these main factors: loth Btli Army The corps n lating in the extreme north***t was unable t provide any flunk I foe men on the ChflOSjchon river. The 10th Corps cut oh* from the 8th Army 1 > tbs i lm i e drive south of Chongchon was in a precarious position. The American Marina Infantry DlvlSsUUS iratl maroened deep In the heart of Cnmmumst-held territory. Ih\ isiomi Sc-atler Two South Korean hoMlng ihe right flank on thu Chongchon made no real sttempt to stand and tight \„ fact, after the Brat few hums ihsn hrraini completely and the nine they fled, tho Chuiigchon B tag iileiisive was doomed since the tTnitexl Nations line war onmpsetalj exposed. The conduct of these two diviIMN merely a ejuasUoil of personal courage There vrere IfKi.OOU men under amis In tho Bout!) Korean Arm. soday, mainiv untried untralnad ami unarUli rtpts Than srare tow erite had net t^-^-M m battle almost continuously slnoS June 25, and SfhO were not virtually exhausted. Faced with these considerni profeasional opUnnslhl official quarters had hevn Wine Guilty Priestn Sentenced PKA(iUK. Dec 2 A Prague slate COUrl today Cound Olnsj lloinan Catholu men guilty of high treason and espionage. They had been on ial for five days Th nine were sentenced as follows. Father Jan Opasek, life nn prisonMl l Star !],.. %  /.ela. Suffragan Bishop, 25 years. Dr. Stanislav Jarolimek. Abbot of a monastery Strahov. 20 years Bvah 20 years: Dr 10 years: Dr Jsrohlav Kilsc If years: Dr. Antonin Mandl 25 years; Jan Boukl 18 years. Father Vac|av KrtVy 15 yesrs. The court Imposed a fine of 150.000 crowns on Dr. CUiafc, fines 100.000 crown* each on Dr Zela and Abbot Opasek and lesser fines on other defendants The court ordered confiscation sfe On Page Id Lie mdu Solution Of Far East Crisi* NEW YOHK, Dec 2 ] %  .. LLa, 1'nite.i Nations Secretary General, conferred today with CMafD Chen, the second senior rnendter of the Peking 'iovernment delegation. it i: continuing the series of talks that the Secretary General has with the Chief Indian delegaU' Sir Henci(el Narslng Kau and the Chinese leader W U. Hsluchan ntiiiued with Mr. Wuuet to be alei It V III Ulievcd here that U< lung hard for a formula Far East crisis. —Reuter Indonesia Denies Report DJAKARTA, lh< 2 Indonesia officially denied today s press report from the Hsgu that an infniitial ninpromise agreement had bessfl rssHflsad %  the problem of Western New Guinea The report said that informal top level Indonesian Dutch discussions at the Hague List week had produced a concrete compromise proposal for Netherlands recognition of Indonesian sovereignty over Western New Guinea —Reuter. Attlee Will Visit Ottawa LONDON, l>ee 2 I'rime Minister Clement At tie** \>. ill definitely visit Ottawa on hi^ v ay home from talks with President Truman m iFaahlngtOtti A.I" announced today. The time of his visit to Louis' Launnt lbs Canadian Prime Minister, will depend • n how long the Washington talks will last This is not yet known Mr Attlee will leave London by plane tomorrow night. -esterday. Field Marshal Sir William Slim, Chief of the Imperial General Staff, will go with Mr Attlee Reuter. It' sun unit tf C*rrMt*B*a>l> KINGSTON. J'ca Nov 27 The Government has relaxed finance regulations in Jamaica releasing funds exceeding 250 U.S. dollars for children tinder the age of 15 years in ." %  > to residents in Jamaica wishing to travel to Canada, the USA. or American account The Jamaica Chamber of Commerce and other business Interests si well as the People's NsUonsI Party have been advocating this relaxation for some time As a result the Government has abandoned its "keep Jamalrani at W. German Security Treaty To Be Discussed LONDON. Dec. 2 Britain will tum talks with French and Ami*iiortant, was the fact that Communists had unlimited freedom to manoeuvre to the east nf the Jtth Army ami attempt lo I ut in behind it. This wa* caused by the split command system In operation in Korea Zones of responsibility of i i.mm.m l' Matt i <%  : .! %  Vi mine.l by a crayon mark from North to South which roughly split the map of North Korea into two %  qua! |.nt T.i tile We*t of Ull lm.operated Lieutenant General Walton M Walker's army; on the right Major General Edward A Almond's 10th Corps Beth men were I. .poll ihle llreetly to Mac Arihur in Tok... Neither had any authority over 'i I lore. .Ii H,e %  Ihei hie nf Ihe eiayon mark Communists apparently aware of tins arrangement swept Into the fnn.-ii io oonoede Ihe plight Ions Am Qf : fledgling United Nations Xrmy The Bghth Arm) on Uu West could be outflanked at any time if the Cnnimuriitt.s clmse to do so because there was virtualU nothing on the East to tucvcnt such s move If General Walker decided to stand and light where he was, he would be surrounded An alternative wss a series of retreats restricted only by the limited length of the Korean peninsula. Political Settlement The only way to avoid being outflanked was to UtlfM completely across the peninsula. Military observers said the bright • est and at the same lime | dubious prospect lay in the hope of political settlement—brightest because It seemed the only possible solid the basis of such .. tettlsv i ;lill not clear If it was the intention of the Chinese Communist leader Mao Tse Tung to drive II Nations out of Km. appear to be little hope of barRaining There were the |i..hthal straw i being Ki,isp,-d hv the Military Comoi ind here to nUht Renter TKI.L THE BDTOOATI TIIF. NEWR Rins 3113 Day or Nlihl. BeT" TIIF. ADVOCATE PAYS KIR NEWH. US. Army Chief Leaves For Korea WASHINGTON. D> General J Lawton Collins, American Army Chief of Staff Is OR nil way to the K.ir East by sir tat with General Dnughi Mae Arthur about the situation in Korea. Announcing this today an Armv "pokenrnan said: General Collins %  —Restrr. 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PAGE SIX SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY DECEMBER 3, lt LEFT AND RIGHT U 7 A. €. h comflye intelUciual honi It Is a pity that he i* r --art -. Ihe cecrviction that the English Io *t ^J^J^'l^LSi • oecrunated by an acUve hagrateful reader lrvd of ^SSi, and that he frcuucntlv rutmil un u ity of English literary criticism common to Innovators ind seldom allows io be passed upon a contempuraiy book But if the qualities which make for para* nen...lie identical with those %  stuck constitute greatness, then Le/i Hand. Jtifjht Hand in Hi five volumes IP undoubtedly a great work It is impossible to believe ^ !" 5 0 ^Jr *, that any future history of English Ule r,,t <* CT,nv ,, Watch The Curry Mr. Bates s true that the three SI were often derided in their e Whil.— . -&SB mXSz.mzz* „ ^. England alon. English mlftit be of indifference Io art. the> do not as a nation rate art high enough for hatred, however much they may be inclined to make rude noise* at U when It leaver ion in any way call "eenWAIW !*"" bmu to fu,ur ufferers lb. ti.tun of prejudice .tnd stupidit* .ind hypocrisy and lies, and of political and religious W. |' %f TIIa1fe*fa..flfe% I Intrigue, the idol of the British M 7 %  • IHll.tlW.^ | .1 of the common people, THE SCARLET SHORI) B II I ioyei of men whom she Bale* Michael Jaaeph. 10a. M.I wore to death as instruments in t*% *gee her campaign for reform, which HATES wn>ie The Purple Plain triumphed In the end over the scene Burma; dreadful lurTeril War Office, extended to India, and of while man after air crash I utter I., i evolution! ted — indeed Then he wrote The Jacnranda %  I— Ihe civil a* well as Tree: scene Burma Dreadful I lha nulitarj nursing %  srvlce. sufferings of white men and ^ JSs^Si LJUSTLSS s££ §•£. RT?.:^SKH sn with her IVII.ICI... the „„.. K.K,^J „ ./ UH4I make, a mog ^J^SSA^ff^J^^ into literal* pjfcan -tU( k ^ „ Clinvwi history in the volume on Aereni^,,, is Iood k ^ ^ elli -vhjch afic has wnlten fop ihe Um whoa does the raping start?* ss literature or as human history. Written in the grand manner of English prose—stately, monumental, and self-respecting—its only conspicuous stylistic fault Is s recurrent tendency to lapse the simplicity which aids clarity Yet this Is a fault that one willingly condones, even at those moment-, when some vast sentence Is cBBjiiuintiniiiC down Its involuted path Few nowadays can write in the manner of the English seventeenth and eighteenth century mas-tern of prose: few, Indeed, wish to. Nevertheless. In so far ss Sir Osbert i style is reminiscent from time to Ume of the fugal cadences of Sir Thomas Browne or of the magisterial gravity of Dr. Johnson, n speaks also of that whole and manifold heritage of the past which is in the Sitwells' blood and bones, I %  "• The Aral four volumes of Lefl Hand. Rujhi Hand will be remembered mainly on three accounts: that they are an authentic record of the shaping and mis-shsp.n*: impact of early twentieth century history on a young man of sensilive Intelligence: that they lay ^a, 'ery Irue Englishman whose deep and genuine love and respect for art Is shared by many of his countrvmen. His subjects In from Nobu E**"v are artists in words pool ndctiltea Hour Tmvervitv Ubrarv CO*. L I u *" c raping slartToflen that b.i,-( bock on what S'^'SSJ 1 "'""•' <•' %  mi.ht be uiopoMd an academic '" !" f? r !2JL*', ord '""• .ubject can be road (or pleasure ^./""iJK, T 1 !" u 1 ull lot ai well as for instruction but Mm %  ,"? %  " WCT * %h M Wedioruud h JS a Ufht touch with ,",J !" "" f„ '"' "'' ""< am Uarncl IB *hl new book ''" u !" '" M, "j ."•" • %  %  . of mfu^a.lon in plenty about '"SJ !" 1 S'R ho, the major (and a good many of log minor) English wventeenlhcentury writers; and as the author Is devoted tmlanil l'i>rtratt of an Ayj.-. and It i* still the best short book on that .subj.'i %  Hi* I.ati Eitav$ (Rupert Hart-Davis i has a UUc whicliKht now Uke M*hrj nd horrible off the mat -H tropics: itroeities bare the desolating process which so many now in middle life have I'ushklt Scott. Thackeray, and Thorn Hardy in this book, he is a hlstorlsn rather than a literary essayist. His sobriety of style befits the (Wilfred Owen. W. H Davies; Arsoundness of his matter, he has %  Id Bennett. Ronald Firbank, scholarship and also wisdom, buLcverson. Sir ETImund Goaae, he does not proff HATES born 105. North. PiniMMia, joined RAF lMi_ .".'.missioned as flrwt Stair short story writer n England under %  MIH of Flying Officer X, married u ,ihjour children. Urea tn Kent. A TOMB WITH A VIEW. 1: 1-anee Slevekln* Faber and Fabrr. IIH Sd. iul pun HAVE gaiety urbanity frivol "v gone out of llterarv fusluOn'' The^ none of h readers will wish to here is Sieveklng "to restore therii take seriously, for he is far from io favour with an ininr, .m exhausted Though he includes thriller in which the WoSSblS Walter guage Is used with civility. TrUe fi?, 0 "*"' Ihe "•'e is more Kobert Boss. Lytton icheyt. ,,.,,, "J a ii.' '! Wle Incr *'ble, the piece, ,L ,V MW P u "' At together with an too complacent a click Hut to so bland a con man. !" ;pt a writer art us be indulgent rder committed in That -asual readers He relu mu !" *r committed In so many now m middle lite have r ut, n ..uloui and line and milmfuir.iinr.iHrt. and'for tho.. !. A n TUD y London square exDerienced since WM* pro%*j Sickirt Rex Whistler, K ,?arl prep-^d^ Pve he U fi X, ""^ ln '^ 5 ln Monte cestral roots and i civilised tradlar iy a u "itT Tlfi. "oT~whom"there ^7""! U rne fl onTovcTnment* a on But •*• bringa you into the tionby. the.bbnd pressure of : eeo, Jd ^ ^ d njh^durjeon Governmer^on f ^, lovingly and admirinjriy criticism, and on "Basic" English th"..^^^^ "ifc L r J a the earlier volumes tbaa „,. (ll ,l ,,f mutter for all who look !" 5. h ;X rtted -." r J tel wlln m ?erinomlc laws", and that they frame mon a unique portrait of an English dtflwn ( eccentric in Ihe author's detailed representation of his father, Sir George Sltwell. Sir George as his son depicts him is enshrined in print, for as long as print endures, as a character no less notable than any drawn by the great novelists He is a "true" character most fortunately preserved for posterity by the circumstance that the son whom he hedged about for so long with parental restrictions and a crippling tack of sympathy and understamang. developed at length into a writer with an exceptional gift of imaginative perception which vnabled him to see through tQe outer layers of his father's character to the complex and fascinating personality within. In the concluding volume of the autobiography, Noble Essenrei (Macirdllat.). Sir Osbert recalls that Bernard Shaw once asked him 'Was Sir Georoe Situ-ell a nice lather'"' and that in reply he "shot out a thunderous NO which was a pure reflex When i who served the family as ,„ rea dlng as a mental gymnastic domestics. Four books on the English canals Since Lytton Strachev wrote hi* nave IaWy ., p ,„. ar cd within a few essay on Florence Nightingale ,i ay8 0 f one another. In the rall(published in Eminent Victoria. • Wi4v ,.,,.. tnp iniiind water-v...vs of 1918) demonMraUng that she wa*, Britain lost much of their original les* the tender-hearted ministern ,mm.-rci;il Importance, though ing angel of popular legend than ihey great administrator with a ruthj uri; lady-loves to say nothing of Mme. Fomas-MerU and Count d'Omobichine. one a pathetic, and ihe other a sinister relic of E-lwardlnn times — you should complain* LANCE SIEVEKINC, BBCJ into" their own again ','l" ia %  'for. born Harrow, the two world wars. In ,8 !" nr "*'Uc'd flrsf (cxpertmenless will, there have been period!ceVt'aln places" they !" have" picI "' ) MevitUm play from roof eal outbreaks of dissent from this -uresque features which appeal l,a "<* n Lonp Acre. 1929. anU-romantlc view of the woman to i ovo „ of „o n ery. and there Li _HH H JO,1 Ni:Y > Oliver who went to the Crimea in the a romantic interest for those who Phllpot. Hadder and Stoughton laoOs to clean up the revolting bre attracted to the canal barges 13 1* psaea shambles In the British army hoean< t barge-people The distinctive WHEN "John" and "Peter" pitals during the war with Russia „.. \ e o( painted and carved dethe two escapees of The Wooden Strachey was a literary artist first .oration used on the barges which Horse arrived in Sweden at the and foremost, and his regard for have family living quarters repreend of their astonishing Journey facts was governed^ by the artists ^ what is almost the only form they found that Flight-lieutenirnpulse to use facts as malleable ,,f folk art surviving in Britain ant Rowe" had arrived a week material for aesthetic ends. It is When the officials who now contx-fore possible to estimate what lro i the canals announced a few -Rowe" was the third man In go that the barges would the escape tunnel which led out T* painted in a uniform ,,f Stalag Luft III through the __ colourful manner. loud v.indv soil of miiwia 1. hi.i %  >. %  if it is considered ln the protests were made H tindrab ,^ ^ibW to freedom &a^ffi*sS light of Cecil W Klham-Smilhs Intention is carried out. Mr. John I^The Woo*5i HorS "The Barges and lt „ihor of Stolen Journey which degree of essential accuracy exists In Strachey'a brief asseasm futun ment of this astonishing woman, nd leu Wood ham-Smith's .Vightiapale, (Conntablel O'Connor's light Flurei I recnvereil I iftened It with the new full-length biography, based People i..rt fc Technicals)-which '.,.,,, h n harSeyeT Jhrai Ye "Si No. JS? T'" B2£ "**" " l ?"* T"^ 2S&EX&1 ,2 *' ."Most readers of the autopreviously available. in colour) largely devoted lo Irahlonranhv will mrr-ethat Sir diUonal barnp-dei-nr.it Inns will ffiSi. w, ,.01 .VG father hut Mrs Woodham-Smlth has writacquire additional interest. It is Ut len a llrst-rate book which keeps an uncommonly pleasing book for Phllpot the third i-uched Sweden. It seems to be impossible to nie a bad escape story. Philpov OabertT., made MnTthln'raSt <• V 1 ,'' %  • '• jg overwhelmed which the artlit-ha. alao written nice fathers could be made by bv ")"'„"":?• nd \ r u P' ov "" m *• accompanylns narrative dealmm the moat Imanlnatlve and "V XUrully that her 80S paiea e ln| with life generous of sons. 1 the canals. ma with absorbing from first lo last. The JVoble EsM-ncei. by Sir Osbert fuels having thus been set out Siiwell, published by Macmlllan, Noble Essences is described as a with no partisan bias, the way lies 21/-. "book of characters While reopen for another book on Florence Florence Nightingale, by Cecil maining part of the whole design Nightingale which should attempt Wood ham-Smith, published bv of the autobiography, it comprises " Interpretation of her personalConstable, 18/a series oC pen portraits of men ity. She remains an cnima She .Veventrenlh-Crufury Enyltsh and women with whom the author was a genius, conscious in early Literature, by C. V. Wedgwood. rltten Although in freedom take the volume. He was a worker. Fron the prt hidden in the coal bunke Swedish snip at 'TTinrig |.1M %  !..[ -.-I And luck? wnc were Inspected. Kent fact his dash up only a third of fast— and lucky— the moment he left camp until he was rs of a Just 48 1 his the has been acquainted. Three memlife of having been born to fulfil published by the Oxford Univerpoued were so busy pointing ben of the Sitwell family of this some great mission; yet for many sity Press in the Home University S cneratlon—Edith, Osbert. and years she remained In bondage to Library seri< B acheverell—have displayed in a snobbish, convention-ridden Last Essays, by G. M. Young, public controversy a markedly mother and a possessive, jealous, published by Rupert Hart-Daps, combative disposition which is at hysterical sister. She was 9/6d. variance with their real nature, a woman of feeling and compasCanal*. Barges and People, by An exquisite courtesy radiates "ion who would wear herself out John O'Connor, published by Art from them in their personal relain the service of suffering people. & Technics, 15/tionships. and Sir Osbert'• literyet she would allow them to The book prices given above are ary demeanour in this book (Its die by scores in squalor und those applyfr subtitle Is "Courteous Revelsagony, rather than contravene lime. tions") Is governed by that lnregulations, the strict observless or r note courtesy which is consistent ance of which might ensure longtory. pie that his photograph had not been stamped at Dresden that they failed to notice it was not his photograph at all. When Phllpot, Travelling as a Norwegian businessman, swore in English. hU German train-companions found it a very good joke. Behind such remarkable strokes in Britain at this of fortune, we may reasonably consider HICTII usea*sume the presence of a slnguUlffldlna; in your lerriM> delete them. irly Imperturbable young %  viih hlstr'—lc gifts. -LES THANKS TO.... SHELL MDTDH GASOLENE STRONG as a LION Breathe it in! When head and nose feel 1 • oold. $tlr a teaspoonful of Thermogene 1 lato a Jug half-filled with boiling water a rt a e In the steam for fifteen ^K^kH^. Anot h e r way is to spread .1 FTES&SJ %  kW dM Rob on a handkerchief '-, ^*W m\ h frtu l Ki medicinal vapour THERMOGENE I m a lion and Ouaranreed for as long si you own it that is Jlipi bicycle, made by British craftsmen io isst you a lifetime, %  t these poinu of qualiiy. 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