Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Friday

Â¥

November 24

1935@



Ch

rchill Warns —
Labour Of Censure



Motion In House
Qver Tanks For Egypt

WINSTON CHURCHILL ended a scene of up-

roar in the House of Commons today by
warning the Government that he would hold a
censure motion over its head unless Parliament

LONDON, Nov. 23

had a debate before tanks were sent to Egypt.

The Conservative Opposition last night put
down a censure motion regretting that the Gov-
ernment was unwilling to suspend export of arms
including Centurion tanks to Egypt while the 1936
Anglo-Egyptian Treaty was being challenged by
the Egyptian Government.

— - - ao Churchill told the House to-day
he was prepared to withdraw his
if the Government would

by
Under-

Griffiths Supports
Fund For The Late
Dr. Harold Moody

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Nov. 23.
Mr. James Griffiths, Secretary
of State for the Colonies, his pre-
@ecessor, Mr. Arthur Creech Jones
and the Commissioner in South-
East Asia, Malcolm MacDonaid
are among those actively sup-
porting the appeal for the rais-
ing of a 500 Guinea Fund in
order to perpetuate the memory
of Jamaica’s famed Dr. Harold



Moody who died over three years| who said his censure motion would |

ago.

A two-fold scheme is being
undertaken. One is to acquive a
bronze bust of Dr, Moody by his
distinguished sculptor — brother
Ronald Moody and present it to
the Headquarters of the London
Missionary Society with which
Moody was long associated

The second part of the scheme

is the establishment of a prize| tried to answer, : ir
fund for coloured students from| There were Shouts of “‘erder
the West Indies and Africa. jand “sit down” as the duel be-|

Three hundred guineas of the}
proposed fund would be devoted;
to the latter purpose.

A letter in the “London Times” |
to-day announcing the launching}
of the fund and signed by, among
ethers Lord» Ammon, Griffiths,
Creech Jones and MacDonald re-
fers to Dr. Moody as “one of the
most remarkable men in the re-
ligious and social life of England
; -one of the greatest figures
which the coloured races have
provided since the Emancipation.”

It is recalled that he was the
first President of the League of
Coloured Peoples and was a be-
loved physician in South-East
London.

Chairman of the appeal fund is
Rev. David A. Vaughan and the
Secretary Mr. George A. Green-
wood.



China’s Charges For
“Little Assembly”

LAKE SUCCESS, Nov, 23

The United Nations Political
Committee to-day decided to refer
to the “Little Assembly” Nation-
alist China’s charges of Soviet
aggression against China.

Voting was 34”in favour, 17 op-
posed and 7 abstentions. During
the debate Dr, T. F,. Tsiang, Chin-
ese Nationalist delegate, accused
Britain and France of following an
appeasement policy similar
to their stand before World War II,
“but with much more serious ‘eon-
sequences.” —Reuter.



KILLED BY LIGHTNING

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 23
Fifty — four - year - old Boodram
Ramessar a Warrenville resident
was killed by lightning in Wed-
nesday’s rainstorm while his son
and daughter-in-law were injured,
The three victims were working in
a rice field when the storm burst,
For the second time in two
Weeks the Maracas River over-
flowed its banks destroying crops.
Maracas Village was entirely
isolated for more than two hours.

—Can. Press.

THE

PICTURED HERE are the members of the Ladies’

B.W.LA. yesterday evening

motion
endorse the statement
Ernest Davies, Foreign
Secretary last night.
This was that no more
would go to Egypt until Foreign
Secretary Ernest Bevin had con-

made

cluded talks next week with the

Egyptian Foreign Minister.
Churchill said that Davies’

statement implied there would be

a debate before tanks were sent,
But Herbert Morrison disputed

this, saying that Davies could not |

promise a debate.

Morrison said he did not rule
out a debate but they must wait
and see if it was necessary after
Bevin had reported to Parliament.
| This did not satisfy Churchill

stand and that the Opposition
}would press for a debate next
week,
The uproar
Churchill

started when
asked the Govern-

ment to explain why it had
| changed its mind = suddenly
| about sending t s Morrison
, Was inaudible at (nes amid in-

terruptions from Churchill as he




tween the two men developed,
The scene arose from the sud-

Ernest
Centurion |

Foreign Under-Secretary
Davies that no more

tanks would be sent to Egypt un- |}

til Bevin has concluded talks next
week with the Egyptian Foreign
Minister. |

This announcement of the re- |
version of the Government’s pre- |
vious policy was made after sev-
eral Labour members had threat- |

ened revolt and warned they
would vote against the Govern-
ment if it did not change its |
policy

Troops Safety
At one point when he was in-|
terrupted from the Government |
benches Churchill said: “Do those |
who are laughing opposite realise
these are matters which affect the
lives and safety of our troops?”
Eventually Morrison said he as-!
sociated himself with Davies’
statement that no more tanks|/
would go to Egypt before Bevin |
had ended his talks with the
@ On page 7.

Sell Shaw Books

BUENOS AIRES, Nov. 23.

A Court of Appeal ruled that
the full edition of Bernard Shaw’s
works may freely be sold here.
Lawrence Smith, Shaw’s repre-
sentative here, sued the editor
of the “Americana” for a copy-
wight infringed upon several
weeks ago. On appeal to-day the
Judge established that since Smith





filed register books, he has no
claim.
Commented Smith to-night

“According to English law no ade
ministration is necessary.”
—Reuter,

JULIANA DINED AT
BUCKINGHAM PALACE

LONDON, Nov, 23

Queen Juliana and Prince
Bernhard were ent@rtained by
King George and Queen Elizabeth
at a small private dinner at
Buckingham Palace _ tonight.
Guests included other members
of the Royal Family and the Eari
end Countess Mountbatten | of
Burma .—Reuter.

NYMPHS ARE HERE

Water

tanks

| first with the

Polo team 1

tide
|
|

|

ainsonenniyp einai

|

F. L, Waicott, M.C.P



| Shaw ’s Ashes

| Scattered

InHis Garden {Play To Goalless Draw).

AYOT, ST. LAWRENCE,
Hertfordshire, Nov, 23
ashes of George Bernard
were scattered over the
of his home here to-day.

The
| Shaw
| garden

j}den announcement last night by | This private ceremony ended the
| controversy over whether the great

playwright should be buried among
Britain’s immortals in Westminster
Abbey or whether his ashes should
rest in Dublin his birthplace.

It was at Shaw’s own request
that his last remains were to be
disposed of in this way, mingled
ashes of his wife.
In clause three of his will_pub-
lished to-day he said: “Personally
I prefer a garden to a cloister.”
In clause four of the will whieh
vas also published, Shaw asked
that no memorial to him should
take the form of a cross “or any

other instrument of torture or
symbol of blood sacrifice.”
And no monument to him

should suggest that he accepted the
tenets of any church because his
religion could not be more specifi-
cally defined than “a believer in
creative evolution.”

Shaw's ashes were scattered
by Dr. C. T. Probyn who attend-
ed the 94-year-old dramatist
until he died on November 2,

Most of Shaw’s large fortune,
details of which have not been
published, is expected to go to
advancing his plans for a new
English alphabet of 40 to 44
letters instead of the present 26.
Other beneficiaries are expected

to be the British Museum, the
Royal Academy of Dramatic Art
and the Dublin Art Gallery.

The last chapter of the Shaw
story began early this morning
when F. Wyndsam Hyrst, public
trustee charged with looking after
Shaw’s will accompanied by two
other trustee officers drove to
Golders Green crematorium im
North London to collect two bronze
polished caskets inscribed: George
3ernard Shaw, 2 Nov. 1950 and
Mrs. Bernard Shaw, 12 Sept. 1943.

Mrs, Shaw’s casket imeasured
about nine iniches by four inches
an inch or so larger than that of
her husband. His had been made
so that it would fit exactly on top
of hers. At noon seven persons

@ On page 7.



who arrived from Trinidad by

OFF TO CURACAO yesterday evening by B.W.I.A. via Trinidad for
aes: -. A. om mae. Agricultural Adviser to C.D. and W,,
olonia ttache at the British Embassy in Washington and a Mem of the Caribbean Commission, Mrs
| C.D. and W., Mr. J. C. Hotchkiss, Assistant Adviser for Agricultural "Be av ir G :

for Development and Welfare in the West Indies, Hon'ble H. Garnet Gordon, 0 BE
mission, Mr, Philip Hewitt-Myring, Public Relations Adviser, C.D.




————

DELEGATES FOR @TURACAO TALKS

‘x





-

(Left to
Thompson,
Stenographer
, Comptroter
Caribbean Com

and W. and Mr.

wa. Fourth Session of the West Indien Conference were
‘s Joan Smith, Clerk C.D. and W.. Mr. J. Kenneth
Kath Walcott
and W., Sir George Seol, K CM G
of St. Lucia and a mimber of th
and W., Mr. Bernard Rolfe of the Secretariat of C D

ucation, C.D

Trinidad—Barbados

Kifteen Refuse
Super-State Call

STRASBOURG, Nov. 23
The fifteen-nation assembly ol
inbers of Parliament from free
rope by a roll call vote tonight

used to aceept a proposal call-
for

VISITING LADIES DEFEAT

European super state

‘ . é Voting was 89 for the proposal

HOMESTERS 4d—z2 against and 12 abstentions

. This was the key vote in the

‘ Sah Y ¥ ‘ i battle between quick and = slow
THE first Test in the Intereolonial Water Polo series

groups of the Assembly which
between Trinidad and Barbados opened last night at the hes vontinuéd in private and pub-
Barbados Aquatic Club. Two Games were played. The /!!° for several days. The sponsor

Trinidad Ladies defeated the Barbados Ladies four goals to| pithy, (°/(0n were @ group of
two. The mens mateh was played to a thrilling goalless | cook immediate creation of tht
draw. This is the third encounter between Trinidad and |«Unitea States of Burope.”
Barbados at Water Polo. They proposed “that there

3 Powers Will
ReleaseSecrets
Of The Atom

WASHINGTON, Nov. 23

Britain, Canada and the -United
States

A crowd of 800 people saw the |Should be set up among member
matches which were played under | States or certain of them politica)

floodlight. For the Trinidad Ladies | authority which has competence
Rita Sellier scored 2 goals and|to deal with problems of security
Marissa Plimmer and Bernadette |end foreign policy.—Reuter,

Anderson one each. For Barbados
the Chandler sisters Jean and
Phyllis scored one goal each

123 Killed In U.S.

Holiday Accidents

The Trinidad ladies although
much. heavier than their oppon-
ents had a difficult time getting
through

have agread t release the Barbados back line Me aleadancaratat ‘i i
some atomic sens ial a, frieda Carmichael playing substi- NEW YORK, Nov. 23

tute in goal for Ann Eekstein (who

America’s Thanksgiving holiday
was sick) tried her best but the

not aid rival nations in the de- accidental deaths had risen to 128

velopment of the military appli-

: , ye Tia, $F |, Trinidad team’s attacks were fre- | by noon today From 6 o'clock
oe diate Phsdee leseres auent and accurate. Barbados was on bhrcesecry a aoe wh oars
ae Ss ~}unfortunate in not scoring more | tied in traffle accidents Another
ounieen announced today, goals; they missed two ecitén, op- | six died from various causes and
‘he information covers the} portunities which cost them the}76 died in a® Long Island rafl
design, construction and opera-| match. crash last night, The last ‘Thanks
tion of five low power nuclear wn ‘ wiving accidental deaths totalled
reactors used for research pur- rhe men’s game, of course,|1§1--a record for the holiday
poses, was the highlight of the evening | or this number 13 resulted from
The Commission’s announce- Perhaps it was the most excit- | tpame crashes and 58 from “mis-
ment today said Britain had agreed ing game of Water Polo ever | cellaneous” sources including 4)
to release details of “gleep” the| Seen in Barbados. It was a bit] ,ijled in tornadoes. Reuter

too rough however, and two
players were ordered from the
water in the second half due to

uranium and graphite reactor at
Harwell, and Canada had agreed
release

to information about a i | ital 1 e
“zeep,” the uranium and heavy| Tough tactics. Britain, France
goa i at Chalk River, In Good Form U.S. Warn Russia
The announcement said: “The] The Trinidad team is greatly

three Governments have determin-

' /ASHINGTON, Nov. 2%
improved since the last encounter WASHINGTON, (Ni ,





ed that release of this informa-]| with Barbados ahd the local boys The United States, Britain and

tuon will speed the training of| had to try every trick to stop them | * {ce han warned the Soviet

nuclear reactor engineers and|from scoring. Barcant, Eckstein © 20% Of “grave consequences” if

technicians and will hasten atomic| and Anderson were in good form ternational agreements on Aus-
energy development in’ these}and were always dangerous. The u continue to be disregarded

countries particularly for peace-| Barbados forwards too went all! Notes couched in similar terms

time applications,”’—Reuter. out to score and indeed, took more | Handed yesterday to Andrei

_—_—— shots than their rivals. The de-|Gromyko, Soviet acting Foreign

RED CHINESE fence play on both sides including | Minister by the British, French

GOING TO US pea secpine by beth custodians | and American Ambassadors pro-

o> as a ry oe. Srarnern The | tested at Soviet interference with

: i . cond test takes place to-night atithe Austrian Government's con-

LONDON, Nov. 23 9 o'cloe e othe Panel : ea Sa s

Nine Chinese Communist deie- |). ee 9 nm another huge crowd he ies: Govien Some “eT ee,

gates to the U.N, left here by ai: Din tanria Ward Le Pet eee tie hl a State

to-day for New York. They had ams were was no evidence at ustrian

uuthorities in
of their police

the administration

had been unable to

arrived earlier from Prague at

Trinidad Ladies: P
Northolt and went straight frorn

Knaggs, A
Bradley, R. Sellier (capt.)



j 1 J. Da- | mainte law and ier, rathe
there to London airport to catch | Silva, B. Anderson, P. Sellier, oe had been peewented etn
their New York plane. M. Plimmer, doing so by Soviet intervention
ee ca —Reuter. % @n page 8 t —Reuter,
Carpen ter Sent dTo Di
James Babb, the second man at the General Hospital, lived Jen’s Alley making a search. He
so far at this sitting of the Cour along with Grant’s four children. found a pair of scissors which
of Grand Sessions to be con- The childven were the only eye- appeared to have blood stains
victed of the murder of his Witnesses of the crime. on. it,
reputed wife, was yesterday The case for the Crown was To Mr. Ward: He saw no
sentenced by His Honour the conducted by Mr. F. E, Field, hammer at the house. Captain
Chief Justice, Sir Allan Col- Acting Attornéy General. Babb EB. Grant, Superintendent of
lymore, to be hanged. The was vepresented by Mr. D. H. L. police, said that about 4 a.m
victim of what was described as

i Ward. Both Counsel addressed he went to the General Hospital.
a brutal doing





to death was the Jury yesterday morning Other policemen were there. He
Edna Grant with whom Babb told Babb he was charged with
had lived for more than two Evidence murder and cautioned’ nim
years é When hearing of the case re- Hilda Grant (recalled) said
Babb displayed no particular gymed yesterday Cpl Leon she was present when Cpl
emotion as the foreman of the Devonish of District “A” Station Devonish found a pair of scis-
jury gave their verdict or when said that on July 13 he was de- sors. She had used them on July
tne Chief Justice pronounced tailed to assist in carrying out 12. Tinney were very clean at
the death sentence, but a wo- investigations into the death of the time On that night they |
man, said to be his sister, and Edna Grant. He first saw James were in her mother’s bedtoom
who was standing at one of the Babb at Brittons Hill and sub- P.¢ Bridgeman said that o1
doors of the courthouse, fainte sequently in the prison He July 13 he was detailed for dut
and had to be taken from the was wearing a striped grey at a house in Bullen’s Alle
pants, a white vest and drawers, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The
of the murder was Ju! The three garments were all police photographer came at the
13 this year and it took place 1 blood stained. He took them off end of that time. During the |
Bullen’s Alley, Dalkeith Roa Babb and delivered them to Dr. time he was there, no one went
at the small house where Babb, Walcott into the houst i}
a rpenter, and Grant, a mai Later that he was at Bu @ on page 5 (

Price:
FIVE | CENTS
Rear 553
f



RED CHINESE TROOPS FALLING BACK

As U.N. Prepare
For Offensive

U.S. Troops 3 Miles From
Shattered Chongju

TOKYO, Nov. 23
UNITED NATIONS TROOPS swung forward
in north-west Korea tonight in a move believed
to foreshadow renewed offensive towards North
Korean and Chinese Communist defences. Bigger
forces were going up after nearly two weeks of
stalking or playing for time.

But Chinese who have been carefully avoiding battle
recently were reported still withdrawing wherever con-
tact with the United Nations looked likely.

In the west one patrol of the United States 24th Divis-
on to within 3 miles of the shell shattered city of
Chongju without resistance.

in the east, American advance
) troops extended their hold on the

a - Manchurian frontier to six miles
I rench Reject | today in their western drive from
5 ° be eat ee town of ae
4 M t » | United States marines widening
I our Oo 10ns the split between Communists in
the eastern and western corners
PARIS, Nov. 23 of the Korean Peninsula pushed
The French National Assembly] further up the @astern side of the
ight rejected by 500 votes to] Choisin Yyeservoir dispersing
the Gaullist motion condemn-|cnemy resistance
the “policy of incoherencs ;
cilowed by the Government” ir South Koreans brushed aside
ido-China light opposition and got within
5 miles of the key north-eastern
The Assembly rejected by 418 port of Chongjin 50. miles
tes to 171 the Communist mo from Russia, the Communista
on ealling for immediate nego- were expected to make a deter-
tions with Vietnam's leader He mined stand inside the snow-
hi Minh It rejected by 478 bound port of Chongjin whieh
otes to 100 a motion tabled by was shelled on Tuesday by the
be right wing Republican Liberty American cruiser Saint Paul.
‘arty calling on the Government The lull on the main north-
“practise at last a firm anc] western front continued, activity
oherent policy in Indo-China,’ | being confined to patrol skir-
(t also rejected by 413 votes to 186] mishes. American First Cavalry
» motion tabled by several left] patrols withdrew after driving
ving and pro-Communist Inde-| rine miles north of Yongbon
sndents calling on the Govern-| South Kereans clashed success-
nent to “engage without delay] fully with two enemy groups 9
mn a diplomatic plane actior miles south-east of Taechon
ecessary to stop hostilities.” further east
Reuter Other South Koreans in the
entre of the Peninsula advanced
ee es everal miles towards Sachangni,
‘ce vr 0) 10 miles north-west of the twin
Tl amour wns Hamsune and Hungnam
. . i
In America Locked in Battle



On the 88th parallel, 100 miles

SAYS SFORZA





ehind the main litie, South Ko-
reans and guerillas. ,.remained
ROME, Nov. 23 iocked in a see-saw battle.
Italian Foreign Minister Count Cracked soldiers of the South-
Carlo Sfor7 aid tonight that}ern 17th Regiment were holding
there was a “certain amount off{on desperately to encircled Cor-
understandable ill humour in the] won, only 40 miles north of Seoul,
United States” because “Burope] capital of South Korea, against
os a whole has not collaborated] ettacks by 1,500 seasoned North-
ery much in the fight against; ern troops bypassed by the swift
the North Korean aggression.” United Nations advance north,
The Minister was explaining in Attackers pouring artillery
eh interview with the Italian and mortar fire into the town
Independent newspaper “Il Mes- from the hills were preventing
saggero” the controversy in the reinforcements moving up and
fmerican press over rearmament the position was described as
in Euroy “untenable.”
Reuter.
American war planes patrolled
x the North Korean battle area as
ne . ,AC . usual today
ve aa we. ase The British spokesman in Tokyo
: 1. said today that massive 52-ton
Ring 3113 Day or Night. centurion tanks landed with thé
= THE ADVOCATE 29th British Brigade aro a
PAYS FOR NEWS. week is now moving up to €

in battle
—Reuter

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PAGE TWO



LEAVING BARBADOS yesterday afternoon for Grenada by B.W.I.A. were Mr and Mrs. A. R.
Toppin whose son Fred is getting married to-morrow in Grenada.
along with other members of the family and friends on their way to the aircraft.

R. FRED TOPPIN, son of Mr.
and Mrs. A. R. Toppin of
“Newhaven” Hastings, is to be
matfried to-morrow afternoon in
Grenada to Miss Joyce Johnson.
Leaving yesterday afternoon for
Grenada by B.W.1.A, to aftend the
wedding were his parents, other
members of his family and friends.
They were, Mr. and Mrs. A, I.

Toppin, Mr. and Mrs. Stantun
Toppin, Miss Anne and Christine
Toppin, Mr. and Mrs. Harold

Farmer, Miss Judy Farmer, Mr.
Bert Toppin, Mr. Pat Toppin and
Mr. David Badley.

They will be returning to Bar-
bados on Sunday.

Revelry!

ARIBBEAN Revelry a musi-

cale produced by Miss Judy
Graham was successfully staged
at the Globe Theatre yesterday.
Mr. G. H. Adams, M.C.P., and
Mrs, Adams were patrons and
they were among the appreciative
audience that witnessed the show
-ast night.

theme of the musicale has
a est Indian background and
provided ample scope for an inter-
esting series of West Indian
dances...

Cedric Phillips who needs no
introduction to local audiences was
easily the star of the show and
turned in an excellent all-round
performance as singer, dancer and
clown.

Captain Raison conducted the
Police ‘Band who provided the
music for the show and they gave

one of their best performances to
date.

Intransit
RRIVING yesterday morning
from Trinidad by B.W.LA.
were Mr. and Mrs, John Camp-
bell. Mr, Campbell is Vize
Chairman of the W.I. Committee
in London and Vice Chairman of

Messrs. Booker Bros.

They were met at the airport
by Hon. H. A. Cuke, C.B.E.

Mr. and Mrs. Campbell who
leave to-morrow by air for Cana-
da are guests at the Hotel Wind-
sor.

To See The Water

Polo Games
RS. JOHN TEIXEIRA ae-
companied her husband to
Barbados yesterday. She is here to
see the Intercolonial Water Polo
matches between Barbados and
Trinidad, which began last night.
John is a member of the Trini-
dad team.

Bery! McBurnie
ERYL McBURNIE, Director of
the Little Caribbean Dance
Group in Trinidad, invited to Brit-
ain for two months as the guest of
the British Council, has proved
one of thé liveliest and most ener-
getic guests the Council has yet
had. At a farewell reception in
London last week, she said that
she was en route to Europe—“ulti-
mately going down by Lisbon and
crossing by Gilbraltar to North
Africa. I want to study the dan-
cing there”, She has visited Strat-
ford for the Shakespeare season,
Scotland for the Edinburgh Festi-
val, and Wales for the famous} |
Cardiff Folk Museum, Besides
this, she has broadcast and paid
calls on such well known ballet
schools 4s the Sadlers Wells and
Marie Rambert.

Finding time to stand still for
one Brier moment she said, “I
want'to take as much background
with-me as possible when I return{)
to the West Indies—literature,];
folk-lore and so on. We have so} }
little to work on in Trinidad,” Did |
she find much material in Bng-
land’? “Indeed I did”, she says.

“Every country that at one time or
another occupied the West Indies
left Some traces of their culture
behind, and it is that culture we
incorporate

want to
dancing”.

into our





EVANS and

WHITFIELDS
YOUR SHOE STORES



Returned Yesterday

R. AND MRS. Dudley Leacock

Jnr., arrived here yesterday
morning by B.W.I.A. from Tz ini-
dad. They have been away for
over six months and have visited
England and Canada. Mr. Lea-
cock who is a Director of Messrs.
S. P. Musson, Son, and Co.,
also President of the Chamber of
Commerce.

Off To Trinidad

R. P. C. S. MAFFEI of Maffei's
Tailoring Emporium also left
yesterday evening by B.W.I.A. for

Trinidad. He has gone on a busi-
ness visit and is expected to be
back in about four or five days’
time.

On Short Visit
R. OLIVER JOHNSON, Sta-
tion Superintendent of
B.W.LA., Seawell, left for Trini-
dad yesterday evening by a‘r on
a short visit and will be returning
te-morrow.



Rupert’s Autum



The little dwart listens in sur

Etise
“I've en

arden all my life,"
ve never yet seen

to Rupert's story.
working in phils
he says, “bur I’

m Autumn primrose, and yet you
say you've got one' ‘ou'd better
tell my master.” find the
Professor resting © green-
houses. He ¢r e and





MATINEES:

recently had very long runs in
of the world.

They are pictured here at Seawell,



AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)
TODAY & TOMORROW at 5 P.M.
TONIGHT at 8.30, AND CONTINUING

“TIGHT LITTLE ISLAND”

Starring BASIL RADFORD and JOAN GREENWOOD
This outstanding Comedy, presented by J. Arthur Rank,

On Long Leave
R,. ANL MRS. J. Bourne and

two children arrived irom
B.G. yesterday afternoon by
B.W.LA. to spend three months’

holiday. Mr. Bourne, who is Senior
Inspector of Taxes in the Income

Tax Office in B.G. is on long
leave.
They are staying with Mr.

Bourne’s niece, Mrs. Olive Jones
at “Berwyn” Guest House.

W.I. Autograph Bat

A CRICKET BAT autographed
by the West Indies team and
Sir Pelham Warner, President of
the MCC, will shortly be flown
out to Jamaica to be auctioned in
Kingston in aid of the loca] branch
of the RAF Association, The bat
is a gift from the RAF Sports
Board at the Air Ministry, London,

What’s In A Name

ISS O. TWIGG was a passen-

ger arriving fro? B.G. yester-
day by B.W.LA. Hostess on the
B.G. flight was Miss J. BIRCH.

_Pri mrose—18

n



ey ‘
puts his book down

aud Ruper:
again speaks of his quest. “ Ves
do bring me the cada question.
little bear,” he sighs, ‘‘ and this

time I'm afraid | can't help you. |
wish | could. Jock certainly didn’:
find that primrose here." "' [t's
very puzzling,’’ says Rupert, ‘bur
I'm going to keep on trying.”

most of the principal cities



ee
HELD OVER

22nd DAY!

(See it Now)

PLAZA Theatre-—sriDGETOWwN

The INDUSTRY'S GREATEST HISTORY MAKER !

Cecil B. De Mille’s

“SAMSON AND DELILAH”

Color by Technicolor
2 SHOWS TODAY 2.30 and 8.30 p.m,



2 SPECIAL

George O'BRIEN (in Both) - - -

“BORDER G-MAN” §&

SHOWS SATURDAY
9.30 A.M, and 1.30 P.M, (2

NEW PICTURES)
(RKO-RADIO)
“TIMBER STAMPEDE”

_——————



SS SSSSSS—SE|E=_E=E=>>E>EES=

PLAZA Theatre = osTIN

FRIDAY — SATURDAY — 8U

Warner Bros. Presents -
John GARFIELD in

with a host of Favourites

10: ACTION

NDAY — 5 and 8.30 P.M.

“AIR FORCE”

-— SPECTACLE — ADVENTURE !

ee

MIDNITE SHOW
George O'BRIEN in

“PAINTED DESERT” and



(Tomorrow) SATU

RDAY, “5TH (2 New Westerns)
Tim HOLT in (RKO-RADIO)

“BROTHERS in the SADDLE”



——— a





sANETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES

FRIDAY — SATURDAY — SUNDAY—8.30
PARAMOUNT'S EXCITING MUSICAL | |

= THE

with Eddie BRACKEN—Betty HUTTON and Jimmy D

Dorothy LAMOUR in

MONDAY AND TUESDAY



p.m, MATINEE: SUNDAY 5 p.m.

FLEETS IN”

ORSEY & Orchestra

8.30 PLM

Cecil B. De Mille’s Exciting Adventure +

“STORY OF DR. WASSELL” (T



‘echnicolor) Gary Cooper





Lines to look at.....

Fei litt Nacdihdiderebberecesaoctis ssc ook cavaae sce
1

Ferguson’s (rw)

; 36” Printed Linene ...................... $1.21 yd.
J

| THE SUREST GIFT!

| Ladies Boxed Hankies

i Lace Edged—6 per Box ooo... $3.04

Assorted — 4 per Box $1.56, $1.68. $1.76

$1.85, $1.95

MEN'S TIES

“LONDON SCENES”........ $1.67
New Designs “Broadway” Style 1.57
Plain Browns, Flame ........ 1.38
CLIP BOWS: Assorted 94

——

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

London Adopts A|

“Chinese” Look

Hy Joan Erskine

Every now and then we hear of
the Eastern influence in dress de-
sign or hat styles. This usually
heralds a return to straight tight
skirts, slit at the sides; high round
Chinese collars: short coolie jack-
ets flowing out from a rounded
shoulder line; and smooth coiled
hair. Hats become small, and sit
straight on the head, manderin-
fashion. Women paint their eyes
carefully at the corners, endeay-
our to look tranquil, and behave
as their Eastern counterparts
probably never would do.

The East is an unfailing source
of inspiration to the designer. But
why’ Probably because the ma-
jority of Eastern women have
about them an air of dignity and
refinement which is difficult to
analyse, and extremely tempting
to copy. Designers know that
Western women will succumb im-
mediately to a tight dress of “Ming
Blue” or an evening coat the “col-
our of delicate Chinese porcelain.”

Chen Yu Look

For the first time, however, the
influence of Chinese ancestor por-
traits and traditional costume,
which has proved such a boon to
dress designers, has shed its kinds
ly light on another facet of th
fashion world. The “Chen Y
Look” has made its appearance in
New York, Paris and London. It
comprises lipstick and matching
nail lacquer made from the same
Chinese formula. “The cult of
lovely hands, tipped by perfect
nails” say the makers, “was part
of the education of every Chinese
lady.”

One of the most colourful par-
ties of the season launched the
Chen Yu Look. It was compered
by the Burmese model, Signon
whose Oriental beauty was en-
hanced by a dazzling black velvet
dress and coat designed by Al-
wynn of Paris. The sheath-like
dress, with petal skirt has an ap- |
p'iqued design of flames on a}
white ground at the top, and the
tight-waisted coat has the Chen
Yu dragon worked into the skirt
Her long black hair, elaborately
swathed, had an orchid pinned in
it. “FLOWERING PLUM” was
the colour of her lip and _ nail
make-up. This shade was par-
ticularly created for the new paley}
dark-lipped look, and is
ly for town and form



al evenings.
“For Evening”
|

One of the loveliest longer }
coats, below knee-length, was in!
Butterfly Wing Blue taffeta with
a diamond check of narrow velvet
stripes all over. A red, blue and
gold evening cap went with it.
There is an increasing feeling for
evening caps of Chinese charac-
ter, as opposed to the more usual

cocktail hats. Often these are
authentic reproductions of man-
darin hats.

It must not be imagined that
the Chinese influence is reserved
for evening wear only, Proofed
linen and garbardine coats, in
natural and stone shades, were
cut on classic high-necked lines
and worn with tiny black velvet
pagoda hats. Ornate gold buckles
were used to fasten the necks 6f
these coats,

In London there are many
places where real mandarin coats
can be bought. Women prefer
these to imitations, which cost
almost as much. But for thosa
who cannot afford this, and do
not like the heavy ornamentation,

—— ee T+





essential- ; red, is
; Sun Red.

;





as

SEIGNON wears a dark green satin
coolie jacket with huge buttons, em-
broidered with tiny flowers.

there are many adaptations of
the coolie jacket. Seignon wears
one in dark green satin, fastened
with huge buttons. This type of
jacket is usually worn with tight
trousers. They serve many pur-
poses, A younger girl can wear a
tight skirt beneath one, although
normally a full skirt would suit
her better. An older woman will
like the graceful] wide sleeves and
high fastening. And for the ex-
pectant mother there was never a
more convenient style.

Delightful Names

Delightful names are given to
the Chen Yu_ products—Ffire
Sparkle, Firefly, Sea Shell, Temple
Fire, Shanghai Diamond, Chinese
Red, Peking Pink, The newest
end most chameleon-like colour,
which blends with almost any
a vivid shade called simply
It indicates a return to
brilliant scarlet nails instead of
the darker or pastel shades fash-
ionable in recent years.

Far too few wemen realise that

to achieve perfect results, an
undercoat of varnish should be
used. Most cosmetic firms pro-

duce these plain varnishes—unce1
cifferent names, such as Satin-
base, or Twincott. Using this
undercoat causes the lacquer to
stay on considerably longer with-
out chipping easily, and it is well
worth spending the little extra
time on your nails.

Achieve a sligniiy Chinese look
by: swathing your hair into
switch and making a_ coil;
wearing a little round collar
velvet, with embroidery and a
slit front; by embroidering or
braiding the slit edges of your
skirt; by removing your shoulder
pads and fastening your loose coat
high with an old brooch; and py
paying scrupulous attention to
your hands and face.

Chen Yu means Precious thing.
Could there be a more appealing
name to tempt a_ wavering
‘woman ?

a
by
of



SSS
{

EMPIRE

To-day 2.30 and 8.30 and
Continuing, M.G.M. presents

SIDE STREET

— Starrmg —

Farley Granger

Cathy
O'Donnell
— with —

James Craig and Paul Kelly

ROXY

To-day to Monday, 4,30







and 8.15

M. G. M. Big Double—
Robert Taylor and Bliza-
beth Taylor in

CONSPIRATOR

— AND —

MYSTERY STREET

with
Ricardo Montalban and
Sally Forrest

START Now



YOUR HOUSEHOLD FURNISHINGS—

SILVER STAR CONGOLEUM

A wide range of Patterns and Sizes
ALUMINIUM CURTAIN RODS & FITTINGS
PICTURE CORD & RINGS .

MANSION POLISH
‘CARDINAL POLISH
MIN CREAM
JAXA POLISH

~



THE BARBADOS

COTTON FACTORY LTD.



ROYAL

To-day only—4.30 and 8,30
Republic Double

Richard ARLEN
George (Gabby) HAYES

THE BIG BONNAZA
CHEYENNE WILD CAT
Wild Bill Elliott and Bobby

OLYMPIC.

Last Two Shows To-day-
4.20 and 8.15

Republic Smashing Double

Gene AUTRY and
Smiley BURNETT

in
“HOME IN WYOMING”

AND

“ALIAS THE CHAMP”

with

Robert ROCKWELL and
Introducing:—
Gorgeous GEORGE





TO RENEW

-~

CO-OPERATIVE



B.B.C. Radio
Programme

FRIDAY NOVEMBER #4,
115 p.m. Radio Newsret¢l,
The Adventures of P.C. 49,
The News, 2.10 p.m. Home
Britain, 2.15 p.m. Sports
p.m. English Songs, 3.00 p.m
Centuries, 4.00 p.m. The New, £10 p.m
The Daily Service, 4.4 p.m. Nights at
the Opera, 5.00 p.m. Sandy Mac?herson
the Theatre Organ, 5.15 p.m. Pro-
gramme Parade, 5.30 p.m. Scottish
Magazine, 6.00 p.m. The Musie Gots
Round, 630 p.m. The Reith Lectures,
7.00 pm. The News, 7.10 p.m. New
Aralysis, 7.15 p.m, West Indian Diary,
745 p.m. What the Londoner Doegn't
Know, 8.00 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.15
pm. United Nations Report, 8.20 p.m.
Composer of the Week, 8.20 p.m. The
Debate Continues, 8.45 p.m. BBC Scottish
Orchestra, 945 p.m. Communism in
Practice, 10.00 p.m. The News, “0.10 p.m.
From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m. The
Adventures of P.C. 49, 10.45 p.m. World
Affairs, 11.00 p.m. Close Down,

1950,

».30 p.m.

2.00 p.m.
News From

Review, 2.30

Three Half

ALSE
SHOULDERS

HOLLYWOOD,
Look out, gals, your guys may



wearing falsies teday—false | SSeS SSS
niet eee ; a That is the

Os ’ is ‘ +
Vivian, who'paas oe! anotivetty| MID-NITE HEP-CATS SESSION
of such as Robert Mitchum, Guy ON

Madison, Cornel Wilde and form-
er “Tarzan” Johnny Weissmuller
Irving, who makes movie men
te-men in their suits, States:
“T can up a Man’s sex-appeal
300 per cent by putting him in the
right suit.”

This is in direct rebuttal to
John Garfield’s and Tony Curtis’
“beefcake”—the stripped to the
waist style which is supposed to

send the females in drooling
ecstasies.

Many movie moguls have
checked the box offices and
testified that a rugged manly
chest, exposed to eye consump-
tion, is worth more than any

wide shoulder span.
Bunk

But, no, screams Irving. This
is a lot of bunk, and he should
know. The masculine clothier
pads curves and angles on most
of the celluloid’s charmers—and
he testifies that most of them still
crack the box office moola.

It seems that a national maga-
zine is booming the ‘“T-Look”—
a no-pads look in men’s clothes
This, sneers Irving, has no
woman's appeal at all, He added: }

“Heck, a femme wants her man'
to be rugged—at least to look
rugged, anyway. So who can
make a hit with the gal friend
in a form-revealing suit which |
either shows up the skinny or
fat man? }

“You'll never see your movie
heroes in such skimpy apparel,
believe me. They all know what}
their panting women want—and;
they’re not gofng to settle for}
the bare realities.” |

Irving cites Johnny Weiss-
muller as the A-1 example of a
body-beautiful. His 48-inch chest
sends most males into frenzies
of envy, according to the clothier.

Potatoes

But between pictures, when
Johnny hits the potatoes too
hard and the waist-line hits the
chest measurement, it is Irving’s
job to minimize the maximum.
This he does, says he, with the
correct lines in a suit.

Good woman-bait measure-
ments in a_ six-foot Adonis, to
quote Irving’s tape-measure, are
a 42-inch chest, 34-inch waist and

42-inch hips. Of course these
can be varied—adding to the
chest and subtracting from the

hips and height, says Irving.

Bustling Janie Russel’s hubby,
Bob Waterfield, the pro football
player, also has an eye-rolling
physique, stated Irving. So does
“Mr. World,” John Farbotnik,
who is one of the dresser's
customers.

Probably the biggest breath-
catcher of all is “Geor8eous
George”, the chunky wrestling
muscle man who recently ordered
10 padded custom-made suits in
such screeching colours as
fushia. red kelly green and pit |

MECHANICAL TOYS!
PLASTIC TOYS!!



DOLLS
AIRPLANES
SPEEDBOATS

ETC.

42” & 53” XMAS TREES
DECORATIONS & LIGHTS































































COMING SOON!!

Xmas Tree Bubble Lights
















FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1950

THE TREND OF FASHION

AND

THE RENDEZVOUS OF SOCIETY

THE CHINA DOLL RESTAURANT

(No. 6 Marhill Street)

OPEN TO 12 MIDNITE

Delicious Chinese Foods served in a classy atmosphere
Dial 4730 for Reservations

To-morrow 2 hours of RECORDED MUSIC and CALYPSOES
as presented at the GLOBE THEATRE on Wednesday 22nd

SATURDAY, 25TH NOVEMBER, 10.30 P.M.
(TO-MORROW NITE)

GRAND JIVE and BOP CONTEST

Music by

THE HOT SHOT ORCHESTRA
with the Film
“LL WALK BESIDE YOU”

Cash Prizes Ist, 2nd, and 3rd

GLOBE THEATRE

N.B.—THE JIVE CONTEST is a separate show from our
8.30 p.m. show and starts at 10.30 p.m.

PIT 16c; HOUSE 30c; BALCONY 40c; BOX 54c.







Welton by tortin Rockin ond Warren Duff

TO-NITE 8.30 O’CLOCK
Together with “DANGEROUS PROFESSION”

ALL-STAR TALENT: NITE!

SAM GORDON.
MAL MURRAY

GERALD HAREWOOD..
ALVA ARTHUR

“You’re Always In My Heart”
“Blue Moon”
“My Love, Loves Me”
“Brahm’s Lullaby”
“Now That I Need You”
“My Foolish Heart”
“The Gypsy”
“I Don’t See Me In Your Eyes”
CLAYTON THOMPSON “It Had to be You”

AUSTIN EVELYN
Guest Star :















Who will win the SILVER CUP ?
AND

4 CARTONS of HEINEKEN’S, BEER
Donated by K. R. HUNTE & CO.

oF «6Save your % Tickets TO-NITE!

PIT 20c; HOUSE 36c; BALCONY 48c; BOX 54c.




TRAINS
TANKS
— ANIMALS



nem «dee





Come in and inspect our
stock.

Compare our prices too !!

THE CORNER STORE





FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1956















simiiiaieaatian BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE.

Indo-China Rebels VESITING WATER POLO TEAM _ HARBOUR I OG | KEEP acer FEETox rie TOES! Tuein TOES!

Attack Tanmai Ray srarcee : 1

Ce aisle be teatamoneâ„¢ in In Carlisle Bay
Indo-<« hi 4 have saunched a: vio- s. pha, S s ‘PATE NT’ BARLEY
-_ at ack “es ent oe a ree 7 ; Dawe. Sc nm te makes milk more digestible for baby
tie post o anmai abo 2 Be: sc te Beh, Henny f-
od noes. Ponsa: Waser | SG: Bue star Bh gprereme | . PATENT’ GROATS : d
nounced here to-day. Base | te eat makes weaning a happy tme for baby—

A» French military spokesman eee
said” that operations had been
begun to send help to the threat-
ened post

Another post in the same area
was also attacked but was imme-
diately relieved “Dy “reimforte-
ments of French Legion forces

Since the October defeats in
Indochina, France has sent out
seven intantry battalions and two
artillery groups, a tank regiment,
a bomber group and other mate-
rials. Premjer Rene Plevin said
in Paris to-day.

Replying to criticism -in_ the

and mother
M Precise,
fron, Trinidad

383 ton) net, Cay



DEPARTURES
Schooner Belqueen, 44 tons net, Capt
| Kirw, for St. Vincent
M V. Canadian Constructor, 3,936 tons

net, Capt. Watlace, for Grenada

| _ S.S.- Byfjord, 1,109 tons net, Capt
| Tharaiusen, for St. Vincent

| ——

In Touch with Barbados
Coastal Station



HENS PAIN RELIEF
AND TONIC BENEFIT



and artillery would be despatch-
ed and
progress with our

Barbados Coast Station

' . ’ — Yeast-Vite quickly t
Indochina debate in ‘the National Cat a. Wirel w , bn Bi away Solel neu- ;

~ pe oat nee’ able oan Vireles; (West Indies) Ltd ; 7 k
Assembly, Plevin_ said that fresh advise that they can now communicat Ssenansate? ralgia, nerve and rheumatic s i
reinforcements of aircraft, tanks with the following ships through the pains — but it does something |

else too! Because of its valuable
tonic properties Yeast - Vite
helps you to feel brighter, look

RTT -~

’ ee

“negotiations are in
Allies to speed

=

=
F
S.S. Jeanny,

8s. Castor

s.8. Pinnacles, *.s. Skotaa

Loide Uruguay, s Co



up stili more deliveries of mate- ferry Craftsman, 8.6, Ringdrude, s better, sleep more easily and
rial” he declared. Farmsim, ss. Mykew, M.V. Moraybant (tenant) enjoy more energy. Next time
He said it had been decided to ms. Birkaland, s.s, Kvint Imperis} you Ww n relief take Yeast

Toronto, s.s. Norse Mountain, sa. Jani
Stove Ss. Agamemnon, s.s. Casablanc
8.8 8 Gaspar, s.8. Canadian Cruiser, s
Camadian Constructor, ss, Argentina

i
bring pressure on and get tonic benefit too!
thorities” for the

Vietnamese army

“competent au-
formation of a

Vite



ANDREWS





Earlier in the debate Pierre ita. eat comes | LIWER SALT
Mattes France Geet, See oe ee BS ON Se ena
i Vati 5 is rtugal, ss. coa Cor- -
former Minister of National zavet .



sair, s. Bowplate, s.«. Rio
£8. coa Partner, ss. Sunwalt, 8.9.
Seabreeze, ss. Amakura, ss. Specialist
es. Vinnt, ss. Esso, s.s. Granadero,

Jurateento,





Economy urged the Government
to open negotiations with the
Vietminh leader Ho Chi Minh, He



‘ LOVELIER SKIN IN 14 DAYS ~—

s.s. Alcoa Pennant, s.s, Megna, s.s. Suns
said: “We cannot afford to weak- ‘ vib, ss. Sundale, s.s. Rio Tercero.
en our geen m ee ha ae SOME OF THE MEMBERS of the Men's Water Polo Team who arrived from Trinidad yesterday | Gan. “3, Tgmag : Cunnnenam os
the past three years Fri ming by B.W.Lé remaind by a special flight in the n. Lioyderest, s.s. British Destify, s oO 7
SOHN casita oy tatecian tome Ol morning by Wis 4 The emaihder 0 of the team arrived rived be eo pe ght in afternoo Siti ons ns, Vestine tank F Oo R W oO ME N U T Oo F B Y
her own reconstruction,” Pioneer P.. ahd s.s. T. Path@nder










































—Reuter. J : s f. . v
Rumaztia Wants amaica Must Find DISAGREEMENT aaa
ricans o- . , “4 a .
19 East, Af h “Blacklist Outlets For Milk _ STRASBOURG, Nov. 28. A, TY PLAN
Sentenced To Deat Disagreement on the proposal eawe é
> : KINGSTON, J’ca, Nov, 21 to appoint a Minister of Defence
4 piel r, 23 PRAGUE, Nov. 21. apt ha crccraie 2 ole rs
,, NAIROBI, Kenya Nov. 23° A Rumanian. delegate urged |! the mil production is to keep| for Europe was disclosed in 2
> agpantin mega aay saetat the Wars x "Peite Congress 'to- expanding, outlets for local milk report presented to the_ Stras- ARRIVALS BY B.W.LA
men, members jot the Pgs avs ikaw up ig. oblac ‘klist. of | ™USt be found in markets abroad] bourg Assembly today. The re- ©. J
cult of ‘good grey oy gee. eens ia cua bate hedtied: by 1s fresh milk used to produce] port by British Conservative From TRINIDAD =:
sentenced to deat a ne ) butter and cheese the Acting ¢ rs ber D “ Sandys 4 t Carlos Deigado, Antonie Gonzal os e
bs ie ys 4 a rshal Tito and General g Gov-| member Duncan Sandys was to be | , m
Kitale for having killed 24 per-| Ma é ernor-told f ; } Sak. ai Albetto Komero, Ramon Solorzano
rae ee : ae coe Rant Mis 1 hae . os i. armers at the big agri-| the basis of the Assembly debate |g lodulitmes, Rarnerio. Peres, Cuil-
sons in a pitched spear versus} France,” Prague Radio_reportec imon quez, E 4
rifle battle last April Two other The héad of the Rumanian] Cultural show in western Jamaica} tomorrow on the plan for | lero Fernandes, Juan Lozada, Felix
ued as ¢ * ae js r yeste y eur ‘an army Ortega, Jose Inez Gonzales, Tgnacio ink” 5 i : ‘
teiymen were oraered ‘0 SET Coneeree pa aan VEpeuny Jamaica made a small “i report ruled out immedi Tovar, Gernimo Torres, Marcelino Lhirty-nine doctors — including
i itely caus > re 1g iL t se ae ~ | He idez, Faus Serreno Blanec 4 2 tb
Ee, CORR: Sa eee delegate Shostakovich| Shipment of condensed milk to|ately any idea of a European | Memendes, Fausting Serene | Blanco leading skin specialists have now com-
dbl ain Reve Cuba. Defence Minister responsible for |ner Wandracsek, Ernesto Hernande : .

a id- aelegate: ath dT WIE Lrestili~ . a 7 ‘ ‘ : = aes ult of good spirits has day world there wad -onky one Minister of Agriculture Barrant | operational maiters. The Supreme i Pe aeaPe ae ce ni ‘on, Danie pleted 14 day tests of the Palmolive
belt cine iantae itis eae place for an artist-——“among/v/as convinced after a visit to Commander of the Atlantic Force | ite. Fernando Bust Beauty Plan” on 1,984 women of all
ministration as anti-European and| fighters for peace.” —RKeuter. | British Guiana that by following Aer yet pppoeee but iA net his So eg ple il dg ages and every type of skin. They
ni Antory | Ite fell lai ; these liries, the country of Jamaica] '© be an American) would get his | zales, Eduardo Jose Moll cb a pel i
wees Oe ace tren bape os Pi can produce shortly 60 per cent on on the ns onan ts Sas a ee shoo report a definite, noticeable improve-
e ae : . er ric -mance ‘lare ne Assembly is exp OG} Celestino Pedro Machado, \ . : iy “ a
rdérs to cleanse Africa of all of her rice demand. He declare=! _ : y. wa 7] cole ae ee } “ntin the complexions of 2 women
Eurppeans by black magic U.N. ACKNOWLEDGE that the Guianese could be regard- | vove on: the: moticn of accepting Selcin “Auaven..Rivan, Alteado o| meee ; | ‘

“Once all Europeans are killed TIBET APPEAL ed as politically dead. German participation in a Euro-eitnerc, pedro Guede Het out of 3 (supported by signed states
a eee * se fetes Phi The country abounded wit! oon force within the Atlantic Alberto | Moreno Perez Angel Ram ments by the women themselves).
“black Christ”. will descend on KALIMPUR, Nov, 21. Ta&bour Unions but suffered acute- | ¥S'e™ Reuter Saatin: Ostia, ‘Ghaeianc. Rodrigu t ‘
the African people Tibet's. Finance Secretary ly from lack of leadership | 7 , ben Carvajal, Juan Nieves Soto, Eddie | These were among the improvements
—Can. Press. -|Tsepon Shakabpa said here to- —Can, Press Textira, Biolve Forde, Mary Newtdn,| venaneih,
EXPRESS DERAILED: . }atkiGulehene cr ni comnryrs sane tas aaah 4 a es ported :
3 acknowledgment of his country’s Plan Dis years ury isc arg n Renzi, Mary Renzi, Jean Forbes, Jer |
| i 5 on, Julia Fullerton, John ‘Grecia, |
3 DEAD mppre! fo te Muiped: Nedene - app aiered “Clarke; “Lilian ‘owe. Michel
ecure the withdrawal of Chinese ‘ Al Pa, Clarke, gener. Cow |
RIO DE JANEIRO, Noy, 23. | troops. Over Mountain Larceny Case He AR TTGUE | oft
Three people died and 55 werc The three man Tibetan delega- nie AN. Wyomi Nov. 22 (From Our Own Correspondent) Wallam Odor i | <5
injured, many seriously, when an tion to the United ‘Nations would TROIS V ye eS ead PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 19 | rrom ANTIGUA | n e
Express from Sao Paulo was de-| be arriving here “soon” he added, La parachute ——— ‘ teem oe The case against Rahij Moham- | | oi
railed to-day at Novaiguassu neat Shakabpa confirmed that with | o! today. for Snow-clad Moun {med of San Fernando, for lar-| Canon Hubert Hutehin on, How calle
here. the young Dalai Lama’s assump- Moran where a plane CEeeyaae ceny of a grip containing $28.18, wine pure, avi Thomas Twy1 | Hs arse
Several waggons were over-| tion of full powers, the 72-year- (21) people including women) the property of Louisa Ramper-| my Crichton ess Cc
turned and destroyed and it is} old regent had “retired.” missionaries and children was! sad, came to an abrupt halt. Bes | eicisispemnscncenemmcntesiennasicthibemnen | \
possible that the death total will —Reuter. believed to have crashed in flames.| fore the case was resumed, the |\———————— ae hes
arise when the wreckage is re- The two engined plane owned) Chief Justice Mr. Kenneth Vin- { r Blemis'
moved. : ; by the “New Tribe Mission,” a/cent Brown said: “Mr. Foreman Fewe
The injured were taken to teligious organisation, vanished gentlemen of the jury, I regret | | °°
nearby hospitals. in swirling clouds last night while} yery much to say that this case

_Reuter.

Strike Breaks Up Train
Service In Buenos Aires

BUENOS AIRES, Nov. 23

Trains running into and out of
Buenos Aires to-day were doing
so if when and how they could

The strike which began three
days ago on the Roca Line serv-
ing the suburbs and the towns to
the south had this morning af-
fected other lines.



—Reuter.



6 Spies Exeeuted

TAIPEH, Formosa, Nov. 23.

Chinese Nationalést fring
squads today executed six high
Government officials “including
two generals and aé_ colonel
charged with Communist under-
ground activity.

Announcing the “execution a
Nationalist spokesman, claimed
that Formosa’s biggest Commu
nist spy ring had been broken
up.. Nationalists held three»other
men charged with spying.

The amnesty period for Com-

m&nist underground workers who! demanding a 15 cent. an hour in-

surrender has two days to run.
After that Nationalists have
threatened drastic
anyone caught helping Commu-
nists,—Reuter,





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LONDON, Nov. 20, | Poth, Ameriee.
4 ‘ y. au, Right children
The Foreign Office announced baswengits were
to-day that the British Govern-| ine crew,
ment is consulting with the United | “qin6 parachute team was sent
States, France and Commonwealth ut by the air rescue Haylie At
Governments on the possibility of | M Cora’ air ee dh acepeanen. .
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Its formal statement did not in-
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Booklet Advertising
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(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 19





matic quarters here that it refer-| ‘The Medical Board of Trinidad
red to exchanges through diplo-'jy altogether satisfied that the
matic channels on the feasibility; drugs advertised in a booklet

of establishing a

7 remilitarised published in India, which is be-
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ebeas |ing circulated through the post in



| Ttinidad, have no_ therapeutic
| value whatsoever. The matter of
| citculation of these booklets

| through the mail is therefore re-
Workers At Air Base Strike | | ceiving the immediate attention
of the Minister of Health, Hon.

(Prom Our Own Correspondent)

Norman Tang. m am considering
Mins hele peut Ae ares? at the moment,” said Mr. Tang,

“what steps should be taken to
nites. aed eg -~ etsine| | protect the people of Trinidad

The men are employed with, the ‘20d Tobago from the many dan-

g@rous things that are possible to
Garcia Commercial Inc:, a Puerto result from the circulation of

Rican Company, and they are) thece booklets”. Copies of these
booklets have been widely cir-
eulated throughout the Colony,
and responsible people have be-

because the conditions of
work were not satisfactory. They
claim that some of them had to

high buildings and there
~elief allowed them. | harmful effects of these adver-

| tisements on the health of the
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|
:

cannot go on, and that you will
have to be discharged. One of |
your members was seen speaking |
to a man this morning who is the
brother of the aceused, and an-
other member at any rate, had
approached Counsel for the de-
Both of these
aetions are absolutely improper
and consequently you will have
to be discharged and we will have
to start a new one. You are dis
charged.”

Judge "Sick” Of Floating
Corpse Re-Trial

(From Our Own AIn, Now 49
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov.

Pounding his desk, Mr Gene,
S. E. Gomes declared in Court in
the “Floating Corpse” re-trial that
he was “getting sick and tired.’
“IT don’t want to hear
about a newspaper, a diary o:
anything else, unless there is
some evidence from that witness-
box”, the judge continued,



this case will be prejudiced”,
Chief Justice was
the continued
Counsel for the defence in thc
ease of Rex. vs_ Boysie
Trinidad’s Blue

The
referring to

one night in April last.
the third week of the re-trial,

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PAGE FOUR

.



Friday, November 24, 1950



Vestry Service

IN an advertisement currently appear-
ing in the Press, the Vestry of Christ
“Church calls for applicants for the post of
Assessor in that parish. The post of
assessor in any parish in this island is an
important one in the parochial service,
with that of Parochial Treasurer as the
only other taking precedence to it. It is
therefore one of the highest offices in the
parochial service and should be reserved
for promotion of those who have served in
the lower brackets.

Within recent weeks two instances have
occurred in other parishes which support
the contention that the post of assessor is
important and second only to that of paro-
chial treasurer. In this same parish the
assessor Mr. Wood Goddard was promoted
to the post of Parochial Treasurer on the
resignation of Mr. Grogan.

Only a few weeks ago Mr. Scott the
Assessor of St. Philip was promoted to the
post of Parochial Treasurer in succession
to Mr. W. U. Gooding.

This practice was set in St. Michael
where it was laid down as a principle that
before calling for applicants outside the
Parochial Service the Vestry should pro-
mote its servants, all things being equal.
This was on the motion of Hon. V. C. Gale
who expressed the view that the policy of
‘promoting junior vestry employees to
higher posts would remove the ground of
accusation that the plums of the service
were reserved for those who gave support
to vestrymen seeking election by canvass-
ing for them. And the better the canvasser
the higher the office.

This doctrine is particularly sound in a
place like Barbados where the standard of
public life is not exceptionally high.
Everything should be done to maintain
the dignity of public office and there can
be hardly anything more belittling than to
find men in whom the ratepayers or elec-
tors have reposed their confidence and

trust faced with charges of punishing their
enemies and favouring their friends. It

should be their maxim to be charitable
first with their own goods and not to seek
popularity by dispensing favours at the
expense of the people who elected them.

It is for the Vestry of Christ Church to
discover whether there is not one em-
ployee in the parochial service worthy and
capable of being promoted to the post of
Assessor. And if there is one it should not
be necessary to call for applicants by pub-
lic advertisement. It is unthinkable that
the members of the Christ Church Vestry
would have any desire to debar any of
their employees from promotion which
they deserve; in fact they have meted out
generous treatment to some of their em-
ployees whom they feel have served the
parish faithfully and well. They have
boasted of their service and prided them-
selves in the administration of parochial
affairs. It cannot be said that the adminis-
tration in any other parish is more efficient
than that of Christ Church. This efficiency
is based on the service and allegiance
which their employees give to the parish.

Even although the Christ Church vestry
does not follow in its entirety the practice
adopted in St. Michael they do not debar
junior employees in their service from
applying for the post. This removes any
ground for censure; but the vestry would
be well advised to examine most carefully
the claims of their own employees before
appointing an outsider. When _ they
have sifted the material at their disposal

and satisfied themselves that there are no
vestry employees qualified to fill the post
then they can appoint an outsider. In doing
so they will have justified themselves that
they have endeavoured to get the best
available service for the parish.

Our Readers Say:



, people’s

|
|
ing slowly over the telephone:
‘Achtung. Brandenburg. Watch

You dial REAS and RIP!

Goes the [ron Curtain
By William Hamsher

BERLIN.
RECENTLY in the Soviet sector
of Berlin I put fourpence into a
call-box to listen to the cold war
at dictation speed, .
Just a quiet female voice say-

out for these persons, paid to spy
on you.” :

Then followed a list of six
names and addresses spelt out
and slowly repeated.

Then warning came from the
great new US. transmitting
station called RAS, which
stands for Radio In the American
Sector of Berlin,

By Callbox

RIAS, taking a different dis-
trict each week, makes a point of
giving the names of
form agents spying on factory
“slackers,” “saboteurs,” and
“Western orientated objectivists.”

People who know they are
watched so closely that they think
it dangerous to listen in to the
West on their raido loud-
speakers can still hear Western
news from RIAS by dialling from
a private phone or a call-box.

So far, though it may be
dangerous, it is not officially a
crime in East Germany to listen
to RIAS. Eight in ten of the
3,250,000 German listeners living
behind the Iron Curtain joined
with me in listening to Western
stations tonight.

But one regular listener, Frau
Christa Wagner, a housewife, of
Kreis Doebeln, Saxony, was not
with them. Frau Wagner is in
jail. A people's court sentenced
her to 18 months in the cells
after the People’s Police found in
her flat a letter she wrote, It
was in praise of her favourite
programme: the transmission to
the Soviet zone by RIAS.

Christa Wagner, said the
prosecutor in Kreis
Doebeln, had thus linked herself
Western warmongering
imperialism — “the German’s
greatest enemy.”

In nearby Zwickau, another
listener wrote a letter to RIAS.
down for five years.
letter in the

Comin-

He went
Police found the



LONDON,

Mr. James Griffiths became Sec-
retary of State for the Colonies
nine months ago. Within that
period, the House of Commons has
created history: four Colonial
debates have taken place. The
House has, in fact, devoted three~
~a-half to Colonial affairs
Mr. Griffiths thought this a mat-
ter for congratulation. One won-
ders! & i*

Last week subjects of Colonial
interest in the Commons ranged
from the proposed increase of
£20m for Colonial Development
and Welfare to birth control and
coffee-growing. A Bill now before
Parliament seeks to raise the total
amount available for Colonial
Development and Welfare under
the 1945 Act from £120 million
to £140 million for the years
1945—56.

For a true picture of Colonial
Development, however, it is
necessary to take into account
other agencies than the Colonial

»|Development and Welfare Fund.

What sort of progress has been
made, for example, by the Colo-
nial Development Corporation, Up
to the beginning of October, some
49 undertakings involving a capi-
tal outlay of £29,474,000 have been
launched in 21 different Colonial
territories by C.D.C. These in-
clude such diverse economic pro-
jects as the erection of a freezing
plant to handle up to 50,000 sheep
a year in the Falkland Islands;
the establishment of a gigantic
poultry farm in the Gambia;
financing of a building society in
Malaya; the extraction and saw-
milling of hardwoods in. British
Guiana; and the rebuilding of
Castries, the fire-devastated capi-
tal of St. Lucia.

This is a fine achievement
especially when one thinks of
the many imponderables in such
pioneering activity. Drought and
disease may defeat the best-laid
plans, Political troubles may affect
the supply of labour, A fall in
world prices may cause promising
development to become unecono-
mic,

In moving the second reading
of the C.D. and ill, Mr,
John Dugdale, Minister of State
for Colonial Affairs, pointed out
that the intention of the Bill was
not the allocation of additional,
money to individual Colonies.
Rather, the money should be kept
in reserve for research purposes
and development schemes which



lining of his hat when they took
him off the Berlin train.

It spoke of members of the
East German Government in such
terms that the Zwickau people’s
prosecutor pressed the charge of
attempted murder.

t It

THE East German campaign
against “foreign” listening
will get a still rougher edge.

Women in hospital in Thuringia
have been told they will be sent
home uncured if they switch on
to any but approved stations.
Nurses have been ordered in
writing that they must report
any patient breaking this rule.

Saxon Communist group-leaders
wanted to switch their weekly
meeting time so that they could
hear the RIAS transmission,

Their proposal was “an imperti- w

nent attempt at ‘objectivism’,
and was only narrowly defeated
through patriotic on.” the

vism” is becoming
easier, For RIAS has a new mast
and new equipment, representing
such an increase in power and
range that it now guarantees
clear reception, day and night,
not only throughout the Com-
munist half of Germany, but
also in the “lost lands” fringing
the Eastern borders of the
Fatherland.
‘Cyanide’

RIAS is American, part of the
occupation set-up, backed by all
the power of the dollar. In one
form or other it repeats daily its
claim to know better than Mos-
cow what goes on in the Soviet
zone

To the German Communist
bosses, RIAS is officially the
“eyanide sender.” Unofficially,
they like the daily dose.

Regular listeners .nclude more
than one member of the East
German Government. The proof?
When RIAS beamed out some
cutting comments on Soviet zone
politics, one of the men pilloried
got a telephone call asking
whether he heard the attack.
Came the angry answer: “Of
course I did.”

As I See It From London

By E. BD. Timothy

might become
Colonies.

There were conflicting opinions
among the Members. Mr. A. T.
Lennox-Boyd, who led for the
Opposition, declared that the
lavish and ill-considered expen-
diture by the Government had so
reduced the purchasing power of
sterling that the £120m allocated
in 1945 were now’ worth but
£96m.

Sir Richard Acland (Labour)
thought the increase in expendi-
ture of £20m did too little for
Colonial peoples; Peter Mac
Donald (Conservative) thought it
did too little for private enter-
prise.

No one, however, objected
the increase.

There was drama in the de—-
bate. After performing academic
gymnastics with the philosophies
of religion and ethics, Mr. Wake-
field enunciated the thesis that
“men are equal in the sight of
God, but not equal in capacity”.
Being a man of culture who is
cultured enough to know that it
is unwise to be involved in reli-
gious questions, Mr. Harold
Davies suggested that Britain
should in her dealings with Colo-
nial peoples substitute “a culture
bar for the colour bar”.

Fenner Brockway, whose enthu-
siasm for championing the cause
of Colonial peoples sometimes
causes Colonials to stop and think,
.Was aceused of over-exaggeration
and irresponsibility after painting
a pathetic picture of the plight of
African coffee-growers in Kenya.

Laughter eclipsed embarrass-
ment when Harold Davies stressed
the need for teaching birth control
methods in the Colonies—‘“so as
to give the women a chance’.

In summing-up the debate, the
Secretary of State for the Colo-
nies said;

“If the policy of parallel econo-
mic and social development and
Constitutional advance, carrying
the peoples with us in partner-
ship, is not accepted by any party
in this House, we may fail. That
is the policy of His Majesty’s
Government now, the policy of
the party to which I belong. It is
the right policy”. ‘

How else could it be!

Colonial Council

In July this year, Mr. R, L. M
Kirkwood of the Jamaica Legis-

necessary in the

to



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

On a busy news day,
20,000 people give
and get their cyanide.
East Berlin techniciams jammed

up to
a ring

the first telephone aes
RIAS experts changed e.
“The Reds wou scramble this one

in a hurry,” they say.

Dull, Rather

WHAT programmes go out on
the Eastern air from RIAS and
the West German transmitters?

Well, there was a group of purg-
ed Communist lawyers _ sitting
round a_ table telling the world
how justice has become a Com-
munist Party tool in East Ger-
many. It sounded dreary.

What the lawyers were really
after was io make out a case
that, having fled from the East,
they are fit to practise in the

est.
Then Frau Gertrud Milke
stepped up to the microphone,
She fled to the West with
her official shorthand record o!
evidence against Germans who
after being freed from Russia”
concentration camps, were handed
over to Communist tribunals to
be sentenced. ,
Prisoners were brought in on
stretchers, Frau Milke said,
“And when they asked permis-
sion to call witnesses to speak
on their behalf, I was ordered
to strike it from my notes.”

‘Like A Thief’

FRAU MILKE'’S account of
Soviet zone justice was less sleep
inducing than that of the
lawyers. But still there was no

in it, no sense that here
was the radio outpost of the
West bringing the hope of free-
dom to the East.

The absence of drama is inten-
tional. “No flourish of trumpets
here,” said a programme director
“Ie we went in for ‘putting i
across’ the letters would soon pile

up telling us to keep it quie’
We just go on the air like a
thief at night, quietly telling

the Easterners what goes On in
their home town. And that way
it sure gets around.”

London Express Service.

lative Council suggested, in a let-
ter published in “The Times
that a Colonial Consultative
Assembly should be set up on the
lines of the Council of Europe.
In recent letters published in the
London “Daily Telegraph” as well
as in a talk given at the Royal
Empire Society, Capt. L. D. Gam-
mans, Conservative M.P., has put
forward a similar suggestion.

This week, I listened to the
House of Commons debate on the
Council of Europe. Nothing on
earth could be duller. However,
it set me thinking seriously about
the possibility of a Colonial Coun-
cil. Many questions arise from
such a proposition. Should the
Assembly be a permanent institu-
tion? If so,.on what legal basis
ean its constitution be drawn up”
What should be the functions of
such a body? Then there are
issues of human rights, the inter-
national situation, language diffi-
culties, etc.

I asked Marjorie Nicholson oi
the Fabian Colonial Bureau foi
her views on this matter, “The
idea is commendable” says Mar-
jorie, “but the Council should not
ecome permanent”. I share that
view. If the Council is set up
permanently, it may in my opin-
ion, be looked upon by Colonial
political leaders as a major deter-
rent towards _ self-government.
The existence of such an organi-
zation may render the status of
the Colonies and the Colonial
peoples immutable.

However, such a Council would
have its good points, It would
enable representatives of the va-
rious Colonial legislatures to meet
together, say, once a year to dis-
cuss common problems such as
Trade, Defence, Trade Unionism
and other allied subjects.

It might also bring Colonial
peoples closely together and
thereby strengthen the ties of

common relationships with Brit-
ain. So far, the Colonial Office
has done nothing concrete about
the formation of such a Council.

Nor have Colonial Legislatures
for that matter, ait.
I think the Colonial’ Oiice |

should arrange a trial meeting in
London of representatives of the
Colonies to diseuss whether or no
such an Assembly is desirable.
Alternately, the Speakers of the
Colonial Legislatures could peti-
tion the King-in-Council that
they want a Colonial Council
which is representative of Colonial
Legislatures.

Who is going to take the initia-
tive?


















A VISIT TO
OBERAMMERGAU

DON FINLEY, formerly a stage designer
in Sydney and now working at Australia
House in London, recently went to Oberam-
mergau to see the famous Passion Play and
in the BBC’s Overseas Service described this
unique and impressive spectacle. The play is
given every ten years but owing to the inter-
ruption of war there has been a gap of six-
teen years since the last performances. The
Passion Play’s tradition goes back to 1603,
when the little mountain village of Oberam-
mergau in Bavaria was surrounded by a
plague-stricken world. It was guarded like a
city under siege for fear that any stranger
should bring in the dread disease. But one
night a man returned from the outer world
and at night slipped past the guards. The
village was infected and forty people died.
The villagers vowed that if no one else caught
the plague they would perform a play of ihe
Passion of Our Lord every ten years for ever
after. They have kept their vow.

Finley’s visit to Oberammergau was com-
pounded of two spectacles; one was the play
itself, the other the attractive and exquisitely
set village with its picturesque inhabitants.
He arrived at Oberammergau by coach, and
was one of six thousand people who had de-
scended on the small village over night by
every form of transport. There were priests

and what Finley referred to as “Ladies of the
international Set, with their sun glasses
and painted finger nats.” On his first night
the village seemed as unreal as a Paris fair.
The brightly lit shop windows displayed a
fantastic array of merchandise to tempt the
“rich Americans,”
from all over Germany amongst which the
lovely wood-carving and pottery of the Ober-
ammergau craftsmen stood out.

The brilliance of the next morning brought
the village to life and dispersed the previous
night’s air of unreality. The Australian. vis-
itor heard the deep tones of the cowbells,
the higher jingle of the goat bells and the
sonorous church bells calling peasants and
visitors to early mass. He breakfasted on
coffee, fresh rolls, farmhouse butter and
honey and by eight o’clock was off down the
village street with a cushion under his arm,
;in company with five thousand, nine hundred
and ninety-nine other visitors. Cameras
clicked everywhere as a little boy with fair
curls to his shoulders whizzed by, delivering
groceries on his bicycle, whilst another long-
haired boy led a small donkey towards the
theatre to play its part in the entry to Jerus-
alem, Finley was lucky to have an almost per-
fect seat in the centre front and near the
stage. He described the vast theatre, which
was planned in such a way that “if it rains,
and it does sometimes, the audience and the

principal actors are sheltered and only the |

chorus gets wet. Overhead the high roof is
arched and there is just enough of a gap lef!
for the sunshine to come through and throw
light on the stage.” He found it strange to
sit in the theatre, seeing above him a section
of brilliant blue sky and in front, on the enor-
mous stage, a chorus of fifty men and women
entering in single file to begin the play.
, He did not describe the play itself, for the
theme is known to everyone, but as it was
performed by the Community of Oberammer-
gau it was an experience he would not have
missed. It was a great, impressive and won-
| derful production, during which the audience
sat almost throughout the day without a
; movement, except for their two-hour brea
for lunch. Only the birds that fluttered and
twittered in the auditorium’s arched cover-
ing broke the silence at tense moments.

For the nine years after the presentatio
of the Passion Play, Oberammergau become:
Just another summer and winter resort. Then
said Finley, “the peasants return to thei
fields, the wood carvers and potters to the!
trades and the community to studying an
living the parts they hope to be chosen t
portray when the time comes for the ‘Play o
the Holy Vow’ to be given again”.







trinkets and vhich he

Holidays
To The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—I was particularly attract-
ed to a correspondent in Our
Readers Say column who signed
as “Iiopper’’ under a letter cap-
tioned Holidays with Pay, on
Tuesday. “Hopper” wants to know
who will cook his food if his cook
is given two weeks’ holiday. He
mentions that he employs a cook,
half-day maid and a washer, His
wife, he says cannot cook, and he
is in the same boat.

1 ean offer “Hopper” the solu-
tion to his problem. He asked for
it. If “Hopper” cannot eat at
home while cookie is away, then
he should eat at the food shops
in town. There are many such in
Swan Street and Broad Street. If
“Hopper” cannot afford to eat in
the food shops, then he has no
business with a cook, halfday maid
and a washer, because he is living
above his means, fooling himself
and trying to fool his friends.
Society brings this on no doubt.
If Hopper’s cook died and he could
not get a cook within two weeks,
would Hopper die of starvation?
You have your solution Mr.
Hopper. Why not give the poor
cook.a break?

FOOD LOVER

Complacent Slaughter
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—A careful reading of sev-
eral volumes of Plutarch’s Lives

will give any one a fair idea of
what the world used to be. and
what it still is. The only real dif
ference between today and the
days of Plutarch is the method
and efficiency of the continuai
slaughter.

What worries one who reads
Plutarch’s acecunt ef those good
old days is the calm way the an-
elent armies took their being
slaughtered fer granted and ac-
tually gave the impression of en-
joying being slaughtered. It is the
same way with the North Koreans
today, soldiers and civilians alike
seem indifferent to being slaugh-
tered.

When the Russian bombs start
raining on New York, the slaugh-
ter will be according to the best
ancient tradition of old Plutarch.
The slaughtered will take it as
all in the day’s work cr the nor-
mal course of events, Like the
ancient Greek and Roman sol-
diers, the New Yorkers will have
taken war for granted to the ex-
tent that they havc made no real
or strenuous effort to arouse the
entire world to the need for peace
and the futility of slaughter.
Humanity still takes mass slaugh-
ter for granted, There ought to be
something that the common people
of all the world can do about it,
or is evolution a sickly joke?

It is high time that the citizens

of all countries rose up in revolt
against this continual slaughter.
Children should be taught at home
amd in school to question the lead-
ership of any aggressor who %c°s
in for mass slaughter.

Some method must be found to
force the “savage” to learn the
best ideas of the best minds on
the subject of peace, We should
learn to recognise that any man
who wants to be a dictator or who
wants to conquer the earth is a
bit insane, and out of line with
normal mental evolution. Only the
insane can possibly go in for atro-
cities. If the insanity of the dic-
tators cannot be cured, it need not
be endured, Such men should be
controlled in some way which will
prevent their perpetrating their
mass slaughter of humanity. All
the people of the world should
feel strongly enough about this to
de something about it. Why sub-
mit tamely to being slaughtered?
The time has come for intelligence
to control human action, If lying
propaganda results in mass slaugh-
ter, why do we not make the
effort to send out sufficient truth-
ful aganda to prevent another
world war’

EDWIN BLAKE WHITING.

Branford, Conn.
U.S.A.

Nov. 10, ’50

What Should Be Done To Ensure The
Of Members At Meetings

Attendance

The Barbados Clerks’ Union
was started five years ago with
the view of improving the general
working conditions and raising
the standard of living of the clerks
of this Island. Since its inception
it has met with varying degrees
of success and failure.

This has been due to the incon-
sistencies, the lack of vision, the
almost puerite attitude of the
diverse collection’ of clerks of
Bridgetown,

As an infant it was expected to
walk and talk.

As a weak and_ struggling
adolescent it was expected to lead
the non-co-operative and some—
times non-supporting clerks into
the promised land of contentment,
wherever that is.

No concerted effort was mace
by the working men, women, boys
and girls of our commercial c
munity to pool their resources,
their ingenuity, and their com-
mon sense to lift the Union up
above the sneers, the ridicule, and
contempt of all and sundry, until
today even the interest of some
of its most ardent supporters is
beginning to wane. This is evi-
denced by the paucity of attend-
ance at most of the meetings.

What then can be done to rouse





By Oliver W. Barnes

This is the Prize Winning
Fssay in the Clerks’ Union
Competition. Mr. J. S. B
Dear was the Judge, and the
Prize $10.

a spirit of interest in our vlerks,
and to ensure their attendance at
meetings?

I think that the Union should
step out of its shell and court the
limelight of public opinion through
the medium of the local press.

I think that the time has come
when the clerks should be asked
publicly the following questions:
e Do you think that a Clerks’
Union is necessary in Barbados?

If so, would you be willing to
give of your time and contribu-
tions to ensure its success

Are you willing to state public-
ly or privately your ideas of the

lines along which such a union
should be run?

I believe that if this could be
done and could even provoke a
controversial issue, not among the
clerks alone, but among others
who air their views freely in the
local press, that it might stimulate
a little interest in our white collar
workers,

When this is done, I suggest
that meetings be held on evenings
before the clerks go home as it

has been sue apparent that
they do not like to come to meet-
ings at night,

Meetings should be called fo
four-thirty and started promptl;
at five.

The President should be giver
full powers to check any atiemp
by anyone to prolong the meetins
when they try to introduce un-
necessary side issues.

Every effort should be made tc
speed the business of the meet
ing, and attend only to the neces
sary things.

Finally, if the clerks do wish <
Union, they must be prepared to
undergo a change of heart. They
must realise that their unton is |
not just a medium through which |
they can obtain a quick raise, ane |
then abandon, but they must be |
prepared to give unstintingly of |
their financial and moral support
at the nadir as well as the zenith |

of its existence. Thus can they |
have a Union which can give

them the support they desirc, anc |
can by its precepts and practises |
set an example to all other such |}

organisations of a high standaré |

of service to the people of Bar- |}
bados in general and employers in}
particular

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24, | 1950



———








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Salt Beef 42c. per Ib

Turtle Soup 24c. per tb





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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24,
———

Carpenter Sentenced To Die

@ From Page 1

Seven-year-old Allan Grant,
who told the Court he knew that
if he told lies he would get burnt
up, said he used to live in Bul-
len’s Alley with his mother.
James Babb was his father.

His two brothers and he were
s‘eeping in a room outside the
bedroom, His brother awoke him
and James Babb, his father ran
out of the bedroom. His bigger
brother ran out of the house.
That brother and his sister went
to the Police Station. James told

on her back and dragged her
down on the floor, His other
brother ran over at the next door
neighbour and after James Babb
ran out he went with his brother.

To Mr. Ward: There was a
quarrel between his mother and
his father, Wnen he was awaken-
ed he saw his father drag her
off the bed and his brother and
sister replaced her on_it.

After Allan Grant's evidence
the case for the Crown was closed.

The Defence
Addressing the jury, Mr. Ward
told them that there was no
doubt that Edna Grant had come

to her death in an atrocious man- |

ner. That fact, however, was
not to weigh in their deliberations
when they retired to debate the
matter. Nor should sympathy for
the accused person or the rela-
tives of the dead woman in any
way influence their decision. They
were only to weigh the evidence
which was adduced in the Court.
He stressed that the onus was
on the Prosecution who had to
establish that the woman was
killed by James Babb in such
circumstances that they could
presume malice. If they feit
that the alleged act was man-
slaughter and not murder, the
accused was entitled to that
verdict.

The evidence of the witnesses
was very conflicting. Three of
them were supposed to have wit-
nessed a scene in the bedroom
at the same time. The one had
said that he saw nine blows pass-
ed and the other two said that
none were passed. That, he ar-
gued, was a serious discrepancy.
How, he asked, could they be
explained away?

The witness Hilda had said
that when Babb ran out of the
house, he was dressed in sleeping
attire, a vest and a drawers, while
her brother said that he had on
a blue pants.

He was alleged to have return--
ed when two of them went to
the police station and then to
have battered the woman to death,
The pants that was produced in
court and whith was examined
by the Government Bacteriologist
was proved to have not one drop
of blood on the outside. Yet
blood was spattered all about the
room. Was it then a miracle that
he should’ have gone into the
house and battered her to death,
and that blood should spatter
every place except upon his
pants.

And the hammer he was al-
leged to have battered her with,
why did it not have a trace of
blood? The doctor had said that it
would have been highly improb-
able that the hammer the police
produced could have fractured
the skull-in such a manner and
that no traces of blood or hair
should be found upon it.

Nor could it be held that the
hammer was washed. The police
who had removed it from the
coop said he ‘saw stains on it,
stains which would not have been
there had Babb washed the ham-
mer. But those stains were not
confirmed to be blood stains.

Retaliation

The violence that was used
against the woman could have
been in retaliation of violence
which was used against the
accused. Thus the circuta-
stances under which she weuld
have lost her life would have
failed to have been proved by
the Prosecution and it might
then drop to manslaughter.
Nobody knew how the fight
started. Both Babb and Grant
might have been attacked by
somebody outside. That possi-~-
bility could not be ruled out.

Were they holding that he
did the murder because he had
blood on his clothes? They
should remember that Babb had
wounds, too, and his clothes
could have been blood stained
from his own wounds.

Thus three possibilities were
floating about. Not only what
the Prosecution was alleging, but
somebody else could have done it
or they could have started a row
and fight and the woman had
got killed, in which case Babb
was entitled to an acquittal.

The English law was that it
was better that 20 guilty per-
sons escape than one innocen‘
be hanged. The evidence that
the Crown had put forward was
not strong enough to swing a

cat. It was unsatisfactory.
The girl had, in addition to
other discrepancies, said that

she awoke the boys after Babb
ran out., while the boys were
stating that they saw what had
happened,

Overwhelming

Mr. Field, for the Crown, told
the jury that the evidence was
so overwhelming that there was
no need for any harangue from
him. The weight of the evidence
did not necessarily depend upon
the age of the witness, but on
his intelligence. They had seen
the three children, a girl of 14
and two boys of 12 and 11. There
was no doubt that they were
children of understanding. They
seemed to be well brought up and
to be sensible. The slight dis-
crepancies in certain points cf
their testimonies were in seme
respects like any reasonably
grown up person’s testimony.

They should imagine them-
selves awakened suddenly and ia
the scene of a fight at night. Did
they think that they could re-
member in meticulous detuaii
every incident?

The story which the Prosecu-
tion had brought forward was a
reasonable and convincing story
Did they think that the woman
had any enmity for Babb
more than she told him that she
more children.

did not want work for

to any

his mother to turn over on her
belly and he gave her two lashes

any |

|

1950



BAR



}

It was said that
; were floating in the air, they
might be floating over Australia
for what he saw of them. The case
was so clearly proved, that there
was nothing he could say to help
them come to their conclusion.
Judge Sums Up
First point made by the Chief
Justice when he summed up to the
jury was a warning to them not to
be swayed by sympathy one way
or the other. “Soon will fall to
your lot”, he said, “one of the
solemn duties which come to citi-
zens of the island, and you will
shortly have to retire, and deliber-
ate and consider your verdict.
“You will not be swayed by
sympathy one way or the other.
It is sad for you, and for me, to
see the accused in the position
which he occupies charged with
this serious offence, as it is sad
to see anyone in the dock
charged with this or any other
offence

cne
both

attacked
such

else might have
of them. Would

strong man as Babb when he}
had got a few cuts in his head, |

hot-foot it so hurriedly,

possibilities

cused will play no part in your
deliberations, and must’ not sway
you anymore than must sympathy
towards the unfortunate woman,
who, it has been admitted by the
Defence, was brutally and foully
done to death. Again, you must
not be swayed by sympathy for
the four children of the deceased,
whom you have seen and heard.
“Your duty is to try the case on
the evidence which you have heard
and to draw such deductions and
such inferences from that evi-
dence as you feel should be drawn.
You are not here to indulge in
the realms of fancy, or matters
which are floating in the air—that
is a term which has been used
to-day. You are here to try the
ease on the evidence and on the
inferences which you are entitled
to draw from the evidence.

“A person who inflicts grievous
injuries on another, intending to
kill that person, or intending to
inflict grievous bodily harm al-
though not intending to kill, but
from which grievous bodily harm
death ensues, is guilty of murder,
if there be present malice afore-
thought express or implied.”

The Chief Justice explained
malice aforethought express or im-
plied. He said that malice afore-
thought simply meant a wicked
intention either to murder or to
ceuse grievous bodily harm from
which death ensued, That wicked
intention could be evidenced by
threats or lying in wait on pre-
vious occasions. The wicked in-
tention might be implied by the
nature of the implement used or
other circumstances of the case,
since the law held that a man in-
tended the reasonable conse-
quences of his action,

It was the duty of the Prosecu-
tion to establish the guilt of the
accused beyond reasonable doubt.
If they were not so satisfied they
must acquit the accused. But the
doubt must not be a whimsical
one, It must be such a doubt as
if it arose in the course of their
business affairs, it would make
them refrain from taking a par-
ticular course.

The Defence in that case was in
a way two-fold, the Chief Justice
said. Mr. Ward had urged on the
one hand that the Prosecution had
not established the guilt of the
accused beyond reasonable doubt,
and on the other hand that if they
did not believe the story of the
little boys about the second attack
of which they spoke, and bearing
in mind that the accused also had
wounds, there was the possibility
that there might have been a
fight, and so the accused could
only be convicted of man-
slaughter.

In considering the case, the
Chief Justice told the jury, they
would realise that there was no
evidence whatsoever of how the
wounds on the accused were in-
flicted. There was no evidence
as to whether they had been
self-inflicted or not.

Another point made by the
Chief Justice was that they (the
jury) were not concerned with the
question of punishment. That
was inflicted, as they probably
knew, not only to punish the in-
dividual concerned, but also as a
deterrent to prevent other people
from committing offences. That
was the greater object of punish-
ment. But they were not con-
cerned with that. Their duty was
clear, to try the case on the evi-
dence and to say whether the
accused was guilty or not guilty.

The Chief Justice then recount-
ed briefly the points made by
Counsel on both sides, reminding
them of salient parts of the evi-
dence. He mentioned the dis-
erepancies which had occurred in
the evidence, and told them it was
for them to say what they thought
of them, They were to consider
whether those discrepancies indi-
cated that the four young children
whose ages ranged from fourteen
to seven had invented a story
against the accused, or whether
ey were the discrepancies that
could be expected fiom children
of those ages, who had gone
through such an experience after



FOR THIS

PLUM PUDDINGS—1-1!6 tins
PLUM PUDDINGS—2-1t tins

HEINZ MANGO CHUTNEY—per bot
CHIVERS COFFEE ESSENCE—per bot
PRUNES IN SYRUP-—1-1b tins .

SEEDLESS GRAPES—per tin
CHIVERS RASPBERRIES—per
PINEAPPLE JUICE—per tin
CHIVERS TURNIPS—per tin
FANCY MACKEREL—per tin
CHICKEN HADDIES—per tin

HORLICKS MALTED MILK—per bot



It was suggested that some-|

“But sympathy towards the ade

WEEK-END !!

j
a

|
|





THE EVERGREEN TREE by Lord Nelson which is being

trimmed.

Trafalgar Square
Loses A Tree

THE LARGE evergreen tree in Trafalgar Square,
which for many years has been shading wood-cutters,
barbers and taxi drivers from sun and rain, has now been
trimmed to nearly. a stump.

This tree is extremely old and many believe that Tra-
ialgar Square was called “The Green” after it.



Thanksgiving And |

| Nelson

A Marriage
Aboard British Ship

Decorated with bunting from
mast to mast, the motor. ship
Jenkins Roberts celebrated the

American Thanksgiving Day yes-
terday.

The Jenkins Roberts is a British
ship. Her skipper and most of her
crew are also British

Her skipper Henry Watson,
when asked why he celebrated
America’s Thanksgiving Day,
calmly said: “America is one of
the United Nations.” Coinciden-
tally, it was also the day when the
vessel’s cook, Frank Camacho, was
married.

Although the Jenkins Roberts
was commemorating the occasion,
it did not mean a holiday for its
crew. While the bunting flew, the
crew were busy freeing the ship’s
hatches of pine lumber,

Henry Watson, 50, has been
master of the Jenkins Roberts only
for a few months, but he has been
going to sea for about 34 years.
During this time he worked on
some 26 schooners and motor ves-
sels.

Watson was a captain for 20
years, Before taking over the
Jenkins Roberts, he skippered
the motor ship Cancora which
traded between Columbia and
the United States

“Mine is a very eventful sea
life,” he said. He has experi-
enced many storms and disturb-
ances and many a drift.

His last experience of a storm
was during the trip before this
one, when the Jenkins Roberts
was tossed about for 24 hours off
the East Coast of Florida.

The Jenkins Roberts was then
Philadelphia bound from Nassau
with a load of scrap iron.

Fortunately, nokody was hurt,
19 damage was done to the ship
and none of the cargo was lost

An accident Captain Watson re-
membered well, was the sinking of
the Lady Shae off the coast of
Cuba in 1923. He was the Chief
Officer of the Lady Shae. This
was his only experience of a ship
sinking out to sea.

The Jenkins Roberts is expected
to leave port on Sunday for Port-
of-Spain, Trinidad.



Wrong Parking

of Work-
George was yesterday
ordered by His Worship Mr.
A. J. H, Hanschell to pay a fine
of 20/- in 28 days or in default
one month’s imprisonment.

He was found guilty of parking
the motor car G—342 on a re-
stricted area on October 14. The
police said in their evidence that
Gumbes was spoken to and
bluntly refused to move the car.

Reginald Gumbes

mans, St.





being awakened in the early hours
of the morning, and who were
giving evidence five months after
the occurrence,

The jury retired at five minutes
past two and returned to Court
with their verdict one hour later.

50 &
tin



THE EVERGREEN





|
|
|

Schomburgh in his “History of
Barbados” tells how before’ the
first stone was laid on February
24, 1813, for the erection of the
Statue the area was
called the “Green.” A committee
appointed for the execution of the
erection of the statue purchased
the “Green” for £1,050 and to-~
wards this sum the Legislature
contributed £500, The name Was
then changed from the “Green”
to Trafalgar Square.

Mr. J. W. B. Chenery told the
“Advocate” yesterday that Mec
Lellan in his book. “Some Phases
in Barbados Life” states that this
tree was blown down during the
Storm and Barbadians thinking
the world would come to an end
got their strongest men to push i |
back up.

Since that time this evergreen |
has grown too big to be pushed
around and instead it served the |
useful purpose of a shelter.

Some lightermen and labourers |
used to take their snacks under
its branches daily but yesterday
it was vacated. Even the wood-







soldiers,



BADOS ADVOCATE

New Books
At Library
To-morrow

NEW COLLEvTION of adult

books will be ptt into circu- |
lation at the Public Library from |







PAGE FIVE
“Sorry | can't see you!” as, ene a a na ee ee es ee

a AGAIN AVAILABLE !!

«= PURINA
= PIGEON CHOW







9 o'clock to-morrow. morning.| fo -e-,
The majority will be making | Be sofe using Amolin. « Wu. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. — Distributors ng
— ee a ae the Siren Prevents perspiration odors | 2uesenue .
shelves for the first time while Pana’ | BSaegsesaueuau
| tf Does sot bore clothes
a few are replacements. They! {+ '
are nearly all fiction. | _@ Bees not iritate shin | ‘Seeeeaeeeaeuus " a
Among the new ones are

“House In The Sun” by Dane
Chandos who is also the author
of “Village in the Sun” and “The
Story of Zarak Khan” by A. J.)
Bevan. The last mentioned tells |
the story of Khan, a hero of the |
jungle fighting in Burma during |
the last war, who saved the British |
He stated that he}
loved the British soldier little }
but hated the Japs more '

|

“Noble Essences”, the fifth and |
final volume by Sir Osbert Sit- |
well, is also included in the col-
lection. The other four volumes |

j}are already at the Library

Another is a story of King
Michael of Rumania called
“Crown against Sickle” by
Arthur Gould Lee, retired Air-
Vice Marshal. Lee tells of a
King reigning behind the lron
Curtain

“I Spied for Stalin’ by Nora
Murray gives an authentic ac-
eount of a Russian-born wat

bride who defied the Kremlin to
marry the man she loved.

There is also the
“Chekhov In My Life”

love stor:

terell’s “Strait and Narrow”,
“Mr. Midshipman Hornblower” by

Cc. S. Forester, and “The Green
Leaves of Summer” by ~ Oriel
Malet

“Elephant Bill” by Lt. Col
J. H. Williams is another good
book. It tells of the great assis-

the 1914-18 war and
describes how they were handled.
Forty-two illustrations are in-
clude a,

HE POLICE BAND will give
at 8 o'clock to-night. The
gramme is as follows:
Radio Diffusion March

“Music Everywhere”

-Eric Coates
Conductor: Cpl. E, Murrell |
Overture — “Classica” Ewings
including excerpts from “Wil-
liam Tell”, ‘Toreador Song”,
Hungarian Rhapsody by Lizt,
and the famous Largo Handel
Conductor: —Sgt, Cecil Archer
Excerpts from Spanish Suites:

pro-

(1) Tango :

¢2) Serenade Night in Spain

(3) Los Toros

—P. Lacombe

Conductor: Cpl. W. T. Best

Suite—Bartered Bride:

(1) Overture, Village Scene,
Love Duet and Opening
Chorus

(2) Jenik’s Aria and Dance of
the Villagers

(4) March of the Comedians,



cutters do not like working in the
sun and for the outdoor ‘barber it
is most inconvenient.

THE PARCELS
ARE COMING

Already the Christmas parcel
mail has started to come in, the
Postmaster told the Advocate yes
terday, These include merchant
goods as well as gift parcels

At the new parcel department
on the wharf, the twelve racks
which hold over 2,000 parcels are
very nearly filled. A fairly large
number of parcels are on the
floor while there are several bags
still unopened.

The Postmaster said that the
opening of parcel mail had speeded
up considerably since the taking
over of the new department and
deliveries as well. There was
hardly likely to be the custom-
ary congestion experienced dur-



Teasing Duet and Dance
of the Comedians
Lotter
Conductor: Cpl. B. Morris
Idyll—The Glow Worm
‘ —P, Lincke
Cpl. E. Murrell
Finian’s Rainbow
—Burton Lane

Conductor.
Musical Play



Conductor: Sgt. Cecil Archer
Waltz Song—Mighty Like a Rose
—Nevin
(Played on the oc ion of
the birth of Prince Eliza-
beth’s First born, Prince
Charles
Conductor: Cpl. Wilfred Best

Entracte Celebre
Perpetuum Mobile —Strauss
The beauty and freshness of
all Johann Strauss’ Music has
been a continuous source of
pure delight to music lovers,
and this bright merry little
piece is no exception, The
Kaleidoscopic variations on
the eight bar theme are ex-
ceedingly attractive, interest-
ing and amusing.
Conductor: Cpl. B. Morris

ing the Christmas season us the) Rythmic—‘Nora, Nora”—Murrell

building could house twice as
many parcels as was the case al
the old department.

The posting of gift parcels from

Conductor: Sgt. Archer

THIEF stole a bicycle valued
$40, owned by Eugene

people here to their relatives in| Barrett of Mount Friendship, St

the States and the United King-
dom had been very heavy during
this week and it is sure to be
heavier in a week or two.

In charge of the new depart-
ment is Mr. K. C. Lewis who has
eleven assistants “I am glad to
say,” said the Postmaster, ‘that
this staff has the situation well
in hand.” He said that letter and
other mail were still normal.

26 COMING

Twenty-six passengers from the
U.K. will be arriving here by
the Elders & Fyffes passenger
ship “Golfito” which is du@ to
call at Barbados at 9.m. on Sat-
urday .

The “Golfito” will be leaving
port about 4 p.m. the same day
for Trinidad. Messrs Wilkinson
& Haynes Co., Ltd., are local
agents.










IGUTFUL




TODAY

PRUNE
CREAM

Drop in at

KNIGHT'S
SODA FO



DELICIOUS!
ENJOY

the houst
Kingston

Michael, from outside
of Verona Fenty at
Road on Wednesday

Another cycle belonging !
Lisle Moseley of St. Matthias,
Christ Church, which was re-
ported stolen from outside
building at Tudor Street on Sep-
tember 27, was found in a fiel
of canes at Bulkeley Plantation
by Clairmagnte Brathwaite of
Jordons, St. George. The fend
ers and head light were missing
Brathwaite took it into the Dis-
trict *B’ Police Station,

HE COUNTER of the fish mar-
ket has been repaired in prep-

by Lydia |
Aviloy, “Through the Valley” by g
Robert Henriques, Geoffrey Cot- |

a concert at Hastings Rocks |

tance given by elephants during |
alse }



Amolin : om
lal ll ANIMATED OPINIONS

rs

DON'T NEGLECT, LITTLE, BURNS

THE THING TO USE IS

NGUENTINE

No holf-way meowres con
do what soothing, antiseptic
UNGUENTINE will do to:

© REVEVE PAIN

© FIGHT INFECTION
@ PROMOTE HEALING









Says Mr. Leo King:
“YOU CAN RE-LION IT
BEING THE SWEETEST TREAT!”

Wahtans

soon go when
you take this!

it
It soothes the throa'
a tastes
and chest os niee!

MADE IN UK.
The Perfection of Confection

a ian

WALTERS’ ‘PALM’ TOFFEE LTD. ‘PALM’ WORKS;
LONDON, W.3





aration for the coming flying Ssh

season but up to yesterday morn
ing no flying fish were brought in



Eighty pounds of Albacore were
sold in the market earlier in the

day 3°
for

the same

and on
offered

of shark were

week
lbs.
sale

SOME

PHOENIX
UNTAIN



WHEN THE |}

(SS OCCASION
| : CALLS FOR }
A Certain Cure
SOMETHING }

a CIAL

. SPE

| Whooping Cough
* ‘PERTUSSIN’ $1.50 VOU"LL }
Also for Bronchial Catarrh }
- NEED

Bonbons
de Pertussin THE
(LOZENGES) $1.08 }
ee Sore Throat and FOLLOWING \



Figured and Flowered ART SILK from ....

$2.25 to 4.50 yd.
$4.50 yd.

Coloured STRIPED SATIN at $4.10 yd.

eevee At $2.66 to 2.77 yd.

eoeeeoecees

Pertussin Balsam

$1.50

For external application in
cases of obstinate cough,
whooping cough and
asthmatic conditions

Pertussin Drops 3/9

FLOWERED SATIN

ALLOVER LACE

\ \
Drop into nose for all acute in Pink, Blue, Green, Black and White
and chronic affections BRODERIE ANGLAIS
aa Ree in Pink and Blue $4.02 & 4.45 yd.

EMBROIDERED ORGANDIE
in Pink, Green and White @
CRINKLE GEORGETTE ;
in Pink, Blue and Green
MOSS CREPE
n Biscuit, Cerise, Tan, Sheba, Pink
Grey and Emerald ... ...

HARRISON'S

Wholesale Prices on applica-
tion to

t $2.40 to 3.85 yd.
at $1.74 yd.

at $3.00 yd.
DIAL 2664

Bruce
Weatherhead
Ltd.













peeve



Imperial
Corsetry

HOOK SIDE CORSETS



Prices from $2.18 to $3.65



Sizes 26 ot 34.

BRASSIERES

Strapless with lace tops in Pink
Black and White

Plain in Pink only

Sizes 32 to 46

Prices from $1.10 to $2.11

PANTIE GIRDLES
Medium and Large

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10,

$3.75







11, 12, & 13 Broad Street





=

* PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE





HENRY~~ BY CARL ANDERSON

MICKEY MOUSE

TiLiL GET BACK ALL J
RIGHT! THERE'S A 4
FELLOW.IN A BOAT
ABOVE, HOLDING THAT | | .
GUIDE ROPE! GOSH! WHAT'LL
I DO Now?

\

950, Wale ivory Productions
Hughes Reserved

BY CHIC YOUNG
















{Gill sane DO ds
0G Jos call tHeM
, UP ALL THE

4 TIME ? cae
\ sat







THERE'S NOTHING
ELSE TO MAKE
DATES WITH!

MARYLYN GIGGLES
TOO MUCH--EMMY





Bi po eu ds

THINK I'Lt EVER
EET A Od

M
ee










Loss OE 5s
THE LONE RANGER
TF WELL KILL.

| HO TRIES TO GETZ. DIE IN FIRE/
(DOW? p= M

YOULL DIE IN THE TRAP YOU SET FOR
THE REST OF US, UNLESS YOU
ADMIT YOU HIRED THEM!










BULLET MARKS TO
by SHOW A MURDER!









a

BRINGING UP FATHER

digestion ie ee
pment cn | | edict i
HUM ALL ME MONev || | Great HEAVENS /

GOIN' FER PAINT AN J t HEAP A NOISE














ma it WuZ ABURGLAe--- )

_ BUT DON'T WORRY ABOUT
= YER PAINTIN' -HE LEFT
'T- BUT TOOK

\ THE Frame” (

aa

ce




EXPENSIVE FRAMES DOWNSTAIRS -
FEP MAGGES IT'S PROBABLY A
) PAINTINGS re BURGLAR-GET UP! |
pre Ss HE 16 AFTER MY }
{ PAINTING 4 _ J
jf





ALL sie |
}













(
>
| ie
,
fi
iG






BY ALEX RAYMOND



" THUS BHE SAT AND SANG THE NIGHT MY HEART BRC

I’M SORRY, SIR... } OH, NO! NO!

(\\
\ NS Vien .
Nw il

SIT HERE, MR. VAN
OORPE... I WILL SING

WY WIFE'S OBATH I SHUNNED
2uD...B SVEN COARDED UP





BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

MONK, YOUVE CAUSED A LOT OF
TROUBLE ~ SAY, YOUVE HAD THAT
PAPER EVER SINCE | TOOK YOU
= _OUT OF THE CAGE.

~WeTs SEE IT++



{MIN A HURRY? DRIVE
|ME TO THE EPGE OF
| THE JUNGLE. 5

3 0

-
|













—_—— --——




.
|
|



}

4 ee Aad atid
SSDS SOG GOO POOF EOE

FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 24, 1950

Teeth Loose
Gums Bleed 3)

ia





One is English, one American




h Mouth or perh



yet their Beauty Care Soatee
) as the same eSktrce Anata aaa da

mon wk on return of emp



jage. Get Amosan Ir

> your +t t
| eu ny. The j ’
Amosan’s
'for Pyorrhea—Trench Mo t#

KIDNEY
TROUBLE

Here’s a medicine made
| specially for it...

meee

ae pe

LADY MAUREEN COOPER, /ovely young

English society woman, entrusts her milk-and-roses

complexion to Pond's.‘' It is simply wonderful what

Pond’s Creams have done for my lexion,””

says Lady Maureen. “1 use Pond’s Cold Cream

for cleansing and Pond's Vanishing Cream to
Fretect ty skin’

NGLISH OR AMERIGAN— socicty’s lovelies
E women use the same beauty care. They use
Pond’s, and it is thanks to Pond’s two Creams that
their complexions keep so radiantly lovely always.

Why not let Pond’s keep your skin lovely, wo?
Every night, before you go to bed, cleanse the skin
thoroughly of dirt and stale make-up with delightful
Pond’s Cold Cream, Then “‘rinsé” with more Cold
Cream for extra-cleansing, extra-sofiness. .

In the morning, before putting on your make-up,
smooth in a thin film of Pond’s Vanishing Cream.
It makes an ideal powder base because it holds
powder matt for hours. It protects the skin, too.
Use Pond’s beauty care re¢ularly and in a short
while you will notice that your skin is clearer, softer,
smoother. It Will glow with new radiance, new
loveliness. Pond’s Creams are inexpensive to buy,
yet they are used by society’s loveliest women on
both sides of the Adantic, You can Buy Pénd’s at
all the best beauty counters,

MRS. CORNELIUS VANDERBILT, Ji.,
charming young New. Yorker, is one of the many
society beauties who use Pond’s. ‘* You won't find a
finer cream anywhere than Pond’s Cold Cream,”
says Mrs. Vanderbilt. ‘‘It leaves the skin feeling
especially soft and smooth and clear

becoming glow of colour in the cheeks"

brings up a

GUARANTEE

De Witt’s Pills are cad

manufactured under strictly hygienic
conditions and the ingredients con-
form to rigid standards of purity.









CLLLLLILS SD Spt
CASS GA fy
SLY

, BLUNDELL’S

PREPARED
PAINT



AT hopeless fceling that you're too weak,
‘not up to it’ any longer simply means that
you've been taking too much out of yourself.
Your body is short of wwo essential strengthening
foods—phosphorus and protein.

Tissues strengthened

To put you right, you need a course of
*Sanatogen’ Nerve Tonic Food. ‘Sanatogen’
combines these two great body-building foods—
phosphorus and protein—in their organic form,
so that they are quickly absorbed into your
system. Day by day glorious new health, youth
and vitality flow through your whole body —

your strength and self-confidence come back f
Start on a course of ‘Sanatogen’ today.

3
j
%

If unobtainable at
your dealers consult

JAMES A. LYNCH

& CO., LTD.,
AGENTS

_ iT @ broover










ees ts ite



On sale at good chemists and druggists

‘SANATOGEN? 2"

restores health, vouch and vitality
The word ‘Sanatogen’ is a registered trade r



DUNLGP rorx

CAR TYRES






—for
=every hour

longer

of the day lif
ire

When everyone else is hot and bothered you will
fascinate by your freshness — if you do this. After your
bath or bathe, shower yourself all over with Cashmere
Bouquet Taleum Powder. Its magie touch will turn your
skin to silk : clothe you in a cool, protecting film that
keeps you daintily fresh all day long. Its delicate perfume
will add new and subtle charm to your Whole personality.
For Cashmere Bouquet is the Taleuin Powder with the
fragrance men love.

Cashmere Bouquet

TALCUM POWDER

DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING C0, LTD.

(ECKSTEIN BROS.)

COLGATE-PALMOLIVE-PEET CO.

SPA LELESSSOS EPPS SSE SOS SCS SSSESSS SOS SS SSTS OOS.

DINE TO-NIGHT &)) arrenrion::
— AT = :/) FACTORY MANAGERS
BARBADOS LEADING :

CHINESE RESTAURANT







5 5s



|





Take this opportunity of obtaining your requirements in :—

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE





x Ranging from 4 in. upwards

Delightful prepared in our spotless S
, kitehen ... rved in our pleasant surround- ~
% |
x ings, we kno. you'll enjoy our chef's specials. g | MILD STEEL
x Stop in tonight ! $ | Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes
x »
% | e
g THE $ | BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes }
* ® | tv)
i ® | - i X
g G R E EB N % FILTER CLOTH—-White Cofton Twill i
* . ?
> y | At PRICES that cannot be repeated.
*‘ DRAGON : |
% e | i
‘ x TA r ))
x Open 9 a.m. to Midnight % } The BARBADOS Fou NDRY Lid. i}
8 No. 9 BROAD STREET > | WHITE PARK ROAD, ST. MICHAEL i
% for Reservations Dial 3896. s { DIAL 4528 {
Â¥ % 1

s
PSSSSS9SSS96666005



|
|

SS





ig eae ntact cece ee pmmmmaaaecmaaamcereeememmcallla

yr gan menace tai teem nih nl ihe ns al aati aan tA)

aunt iin ellie antes teem ag:











FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24,



1950

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

DIED







McINTOSH-—MRS. ELISE at 3 p.m.
3 Her eral will ieave her
te dence rion House”, Deacons
Road at 415 o'clock this afternoon for
the Westbury Cemetery
No Cards. Friends are asked to attend.
R.°T. Harewood, Mrs. Edith Parry.
Lindsay Harewood, Irving Harewood,
Mrs. Ada Hinds, Pi y Hind



24.1,.50—In

MEMORIAM

IN loving memory of our Dear
Mcther and grand mother ADRIANA
TAYLOR who departed this life on the
24th November 1942.

Eight years ago grannie Dear you left

us

Faithful and honest in all your ways

Devoted and true to the end of your







deys

Always patient, loving and kind,
What a beautiful memory you left
behind

Asleep in Jesus! far from thee

Thy kindred and their grave; may be,
But thine is still a blessed sleep,
From which none ever wakes to weep



















FOR RENT
HOUSES

BRAMBLEY, Waterford Gap, St. Mi-
chael. From November Ist; fully furn-
ished residence, For particulars, Phone
3062. 24.10.50.—t.f.n.







LYNSTED — Navy Gardens, 3 Bed-/

rooms, Servants room, Garage, Modern
conveniences, Kitchen Garden, Flower

Garden, Fruit Tree, Lawn, ~ te
Mrs. G. Yvonet. . ;

21.11.50—t.f.n.
“WARSAW” -— Welches Road St.

ee] — Newly built ae con-
open verandah, ‘awing, ing
3 bedrooms with running water, built-in
presses; kitchenette with built-in cup-
boards; Electric light and water, W.C.
and Bath; servants room, garage. Pos-
session st December. 2947.
R. Archer McKenzie, Victoria Street.
22.11.50—3n

BUILDING next to Ramdin; Roebuck
Street; suitable for Bond or Garage











Miss Albertha Taylor: Mrs. Maggie} Apply James Jones, ‘Gloria’, Roebuck
Gooding Mrs. Kathieeén Beckles, Mrs. | Street. 4, 32.80-—Sn
Doreen Wickham, Mrs. Gwen Rollins
(daughter ) Montelle; Oscar, Fred,

Dorris, Mellis, Eunilda, (grand child-
ren PUBLIC SALES
Trinidad and U.S.A. Please Copy.
24.11.50—I1n voll
AUCTION
asohoraeiemerieniniansatiiaes Sajbeberse

By instructions of the Agents of the
FOR SALE UNITED BRITISH INSURANCE CO., |
lh pic sell at are GARAGE, BAY
oa ‘TREET on FRIDAY 2th. at 2 \.

AUTOMOTIVE 1 Hillman Saloon Car with ;
and in working order; damaged in acci-

AUTO CYCLE — New Hudson Auto|] dent. TERMS CASH.

Cycle, excellent condition or nearest. KEN:
$150.00. Apply Evan Ross, Glynville, a eee ee 732 11.503
Pinfold St. 11,50—2n. ane

CAR: One (1) 1937 Vauxhall 10 in
running order Apply A. J. Hilliard, Under The Diamond Hammer
Central Foundry. Day Phone 4668.

24.11.50—6n a> WILL sell on the spot at Upper
jay of November at 2 o'clock, One

CAR — Austin A-40. 1950 Model.| Reckle> Road on Tuesday next the 28th
Cwner driven. Mileage 3,000 Miles.| day of November at 2 o'clock, One
Phone: E. Gill 2454. House built of pine in very good con-

24.11.50—4n aitan. It has Gallery, Drawing and
iring Rooms, 2 bedroom:, Kitchén

VAN—One (1) 8 H.-P. Ford Van, good| ind spacious yard which is enclosed
condition, going cheap. Dial Belgrave} with galvanize. It has Electricity’ and
$063, Purity Bakeries Ltd. water installed. It can be rented for

19.11.50—6n. | $30.00 pr. month. The “land which is
the Government’; can be rented.
ELECTRICAL For inspection see D'Arcy A. Scott,



MOTOR—One (1) G.E.
Phase Electric Motor, never used, in
original package. Phone 8641.
§.0C a.m. or after 3.00 p.m.

“4 HELP. Single

22.11.50—3n

LIVESTOCK

COWS — Four (4) Milch Cows, Two
(2) heifers. One Pure bred Holstein
Cow eight months in calf, one Grade
Holstein Cow six months in calf for





Holstein bull Remus, Rock Dundo, Cave
Hill, St. Michael.

MISCELLANEOUS

GOLD JEWELLERY — Consisting of
hes;







HAMS — 72 cents per 1b; Currants
34 cts. per TM. Raisin 40 cts. per Ib
C. Herbert, 55 Tudor St, Dial 3686.

23.1150—3n.

PARASOLS—Plastic Parasols Many
pretty Colours from which to choose.
At a Special Low Price $1.42 each.
The Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad
Street. 22.11.50—4n.

POOLE POTTERY EARTHENWARE—A
wide variety just received and on sale.
See your Jewellers, Y. De Lima & Co.,
Ltd., 20 Broad Street, Bridgetown.

18.11.60—6n

PEARL NECKLACE 8&4 cts eagh,
beaded necklaces $1.20 up, Beaded ear-



RAINCOATS — Plastic Raincoats in
green, pink and ue me Sach. ae
Sho if roar t.

Modern Dress ppe Oe an



STOCKINGS—Kayser Nylon Stockings
51 gauge The finest available in all
new shades $2.14 Der ht pany Modern

‘ect.
Dress Shoppe, Broa Sets tOAn



Megazine Lane. 24.°/1.50—4n

UNDER THE SILVER >
HAMMER

ON Tuesday 28th by order of Mr:
G. A. Hutchinson we will sell her Fur-



niture at “Avalon Flat 3° Collymore
Rock

which includes
Dining Table: Waggon: Liquor Case:

Arm, Upright and Morris Chairs: China
Cabinet: Ornament Tables: Bookshelf:
AL in Mahogany: Card Table, Glass
and China, Plated and Brass Ware:
Dinner, Tea and Breakfast Services
(Royal Doulton Ware): Frigidaire (good
working order): Cedar Machine Table:
Plaited Grass Mat: Phileo 7 Tube Hadio:
Clock, Books, Simmons and Iron
Single Bedsteads: Springs and Mat-

tresses; Cedar and Mahogany Presses:
Mehog. Dressing Tables: Screens: Pine
Linen Press, Kitchen Table:, Larder

Ware Press: Canon Gas Stove and Oven:
(new). 2 Burner Gas Range. Electric
Iron ¢nd Toaster, Kitchen Utensil;
Wash Basin and Fittings .and other
items. Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms Cash.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.

Auctioneers
24,11,.50—2n

Under The Diamond Hammer

AUCTION 8ALE
By instructions received I will sell
at “Trelawny”, near Pavilion Court,
Hastings on Wednesday next 29th of
November, beginning at 12.30 an entire
lot of household furniture which
includes Mahog. and Painted desks,
Mahog. Tub Chairs, Plant Stools, Rush
Chairs, Rockers and Settee, Kidney
Tables, (1) Upholstered Manog. Antique
Chair on Ca 8, Book Sheives, Carpet,
(1) Green painted dining table with

4 Chairs, (1) Mahog, Serving tabie,
Several painted presses, Mahog and
painted dressing tables, Mirrors, Sim-

mons Bedsteads with springs & Mat-
tresses, Iron Cots with Mattresses,
Electric Stove, Pine tables, Liquor
Case, Several painted tables & Chairs,
(1) Coolerator, Glass Jars, Larder,
Florence Stove & Oven, Lot of Cutlery,
Glass Ware, Linens, Silvers, AJuminium
Saucepans, Plates & Dishes, and several
other items too numerous to mention,
Terms Cash. D'Arcy A. Scott, Auc-
tioneer. 24.11.50—In,



HOGANY TREES—Dial 8105
Ro XING. 21.11.50—T.F.N.

CHT — That desirable Yacht
“WAGABOND". Tel, J. A. Reid, Lone
Star Garage. Dial 91-33 22,11.50—12n.

WANTED

, —
HOUSEMAID/BUTLER — Apply be-
tween 9 and 11 a.m, to Mrs, Eric Man-

ning ,“Benman”, Pine Hill, near Gov-
Venere House. 23.11.50—3n.
eee lit etl Talereeteeeciea acetate

IN VACANT
SITUATIO: © Stationery
store in Trinidad.

perience and tions to P.O. Box
434, Port-of.

Photograph. a
ty. Minimum
commission.

MISCELLANEOUS

— All kinds of Card
Boxes other than corrugated

Apply Advocate Siting eure: xin.







Board
card.

g

z

3

E

Z

&

}

a 8

! 3

JEWELLERY BOUGHT, highest prices

id. See your jewellers, Y. De Lima |
& Co. Ltd., 20, Broad Street Bridge-
town. 18,11.50—6n.

——$—$——— SS ——___—_
WILLING TO PURCHASE Good Joiners

Work in Mahogany, Cedar, Birch and
Pine at Ralph mors eed Rooms,
is yl ley. one

Hardwood Alle aa, a



PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE

Closing to Business from Thursday
23rd_ ‘through puLdey sen re-opening.
th. J. B. Clarke

pony * 22.11.50-—3n





_ NOTICE

Applications for two vacant Vestry
Scholarships (Boys) tenable at the |
Alleyne School, will be received by the |
undersigned up to Friday, December Ist.
Applicants must be sons of Parishioners
in straitened circumstances. Applica-
tions must be accompanied by a Birth





Certificate. Applicant; must present
themselves to the Headmaster at the
Allayne School on Monday December
4th at 9.30 a.m, to take the entrance
examination.

Cc. A. SKINNER,

Vestry Clerk,
St. Andrew.
19.11.50—7n

NOTICE

PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH

Applications (accompanied by bap-
tismal certificates) will be received at
my office up to 3.00 p.m. on Friday
lst December, 1950 for one or more
vacant Christ Church Vestry exhibitions
tenable at the Boys’ Foundation School.

Cendidates must be sons of parigh
ioners in straitened circumstances,
and must not be less than nine year:
or more than twelve years of age on
the date of the examination.

Candidates must

for examination, to the headmaster at |

the Boys’ Foundation School on Friday,

&th December, 1950 at 9.30 a.m
Application forms must be obtained |

from my office
WOOD GODDARD, |

from Pine Road), Belleville, St.
standing on 3,712 square feet of land and
containing closed gallery, drawing and
dining rooms,

present themselves | giving credit to

By kind permission of Messrs. Cole
& Co., Ltd. I will sell at their garage
TO-DAY at 2 o'clock ONE V-8 FORD
SALOON CAR with five new tyres and
in good working order. TERMS CASH.
Dial 2947 R, Archer Me Kenzie.

19.11,50—4n





REAL ESTATE

(2ni

house
ichael,



RUGBY — 10th Avenue

2 bedrooms, (each with
running water), kitchenette, and ‘usual

conveniences, Servants room and garage
in yard. Inspection 10 a.m, to 12 noon,

and 3 p.m. to 430 p.m. on week days,

on application to Mrs, Robinson, on the

premises,

The property will be set up for
by public Competition at our e,
Jemes Street, Bridgetown, on Friday
lst December 1950 at 2 p.m.

YRARWOOD & Follelior
rr
22.11.60-0n
BUILDING SITE FOR SALE

8,570 square feet of land in PINE
ROAD, Belleville, St. Michael (obliquely
opposite 2nd Avenue, and adjoining
“Neath”, the residence of wir. Chees-
man).

The land will be set up for sale by
public competition at our office, James
Street, Bridgetown, on Friday Ist
1950, at aad Sa . ‘

ce, Solicitors
Pome 22.11.50—9n,





—

“THE GARDEN HOUSE” late residence
of Hon. R. Challenor, with 5 acres 4
perches of land situate at Country Road,
Bridgetown,



The use contains spacious
ieee ane” bh Rooms, Sitting
rooms, Breakfast room, Pantry and
Kitchen on Main floor, 6 Bedrooms, 2
bathrooms and large verandah upstairs.
Government water and _ electricity
throughout. 5 servants rooms, garages.
stables etc. in yard, Tennis Lawn and
erie at any time on application to

on the premises.
‘ris Sn aneperie fg within 5 minutes walk
Broad Street.
Otte rs in writing to be sent to the

undersigned.
YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
re Solicitors.
James Street.
14,11.50—10n



13,138 square feet of land situated at
the ated. part of the lands of Bever-
ley” near Schmitts Gate on Friday 24th
November 1950 at 2 p.m. at our office,

Lucas Street. .
CARRINGTON & SEALY.
14,11.50—tn
eeentienciaengS
HOUSE — One Board and shingled
8 wallaba shingles on
house 8 x 14 x a Keele Mears

roof. In good eae
Tucker. hone 2286.
eee : 24.11.50—6n

—$—<—_—$_
PROPERTY at Roebuck Street, opposite
the Coca Cola Factory, two storied
building, the house contains Gallery;
Drawing room; 2 bedrooms upstairs;
down stairs shop; dining room; kitchen,
toilet and bath, maneing ss 100, oa:
of land. Apply to James Jones,
Roebuck Street. 24.91.50—3n

PERSONAL





The public are hereby warned against
my wife (EDNA
BPECKLES (nee Edna Wilkinson) as 1
do not hold mayself responsible for her
or anyone else contracting any debt or
debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me.
ALBERT BECKLES,



Clerk to The Vestry, | Lears,
Christ Church St. Michael.
22.11.50—6n |

the Headmaster and must be












Misadventure:
Jury Verdict

Death by misadventure was the
verdict returned by a nine-man
jury in the inquiry into the cir-
cumstances surrounding the
death of 25-year-old Pauline
Greenidge a dressmaker of
South District, St. George. The
inquiry was held by Mr. C. L. C.
Walwyn and was concluded yes-—
terday.

Pauline Greenidge died on
November 17 after she was in-
volved in an accident along South
District Road with the motor
lorry M—269 which was driven
by _ Harcourt King of Porey
Spring, St. Thomas, She died
on the spot. Harcourt King, 38
yrars old was said to have been
driving for the past 15 years,
Dr. Ward said that he examined
King about 1.30 pm, the same
day of the accident. King com-
plained to him of having a
“black out.’

Evidence was also taken from
Rev. and Mrs. Broomes who said
they were passing and saw the
accident. They stopped their car
and Mrs, Broomes — who is a
member of the St. John Ambu-—
lance Brigade — tried to help

but the woman was alread
dead. "



BRITON ARRESTED
IN E. GERMANY

BERLIN, Nov, 23
A British national Dr, Arthur
Apfel has been arrested by East
German “peoples police” and hc
is being held by the East Berlir:
police, West German News Agen-

cy D.P.A. reported to-night.
Earlier to-day he had been

reported missing.
—Reuter.

NOTICE
THE BENNETT COLLEGE
Sheffield.

Has recently awarded to ROBERT N
WALKES of 5th Avenue, Bush Hall, St.





Michael. AD e ying
ibjerecaite peta in the following
24.1,50 —2n
ee
dad ALLEYNE SCHOOL
ance Exam
School Year January = eee yet wit

be held at the School on Mon Dec.
4th, 1950 at 9 a.m. Applications tilt be
received up to Saturday Dee. 2nd by
accom-

penied by baptismal certificates

testimonials
Applications for a

Scholarship tenable
School, will be

and

vacant Bryant
at the Alleyne
received by the Head-
master up to Saturday Dec. 2nd, 1950.
Laptismal Certificates and testimo-
nials must aceompany applications and
candidates must present themselves to
the Headmaster on Monday Dec 4th
at 9 a.m. for Examination
19 11, 50—5n.

REAL ESTATE

JOHN
:







BLABON

A.F.8S., F.V.A.
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE

“VILLA ROSA"-—-Passage Road,
City Attractive and centrally
located stone bungalow with dou-
ble carriageway Approximately
14,000 square feet. This well
built property contains a front
gallery, large separate
dining room, 3 bedrooms,
toilet, pantry and kitchen
courtyard at rear,

lounge,
large
Good

“ROUMAIKA” — Dayrells Road,



Navy Gardens Attractive
imposing property
flanked by mahogany

bedrooms,
verandahs,
Grounds

reception, 6
pantry, large
and storerooms

proximately 2 acres
House proposition.

ap-
Ideal Gue't

Gap An almost new property
suitable for a variety of
purposes ayart garage

large
from a






GRENADA, #.W.I. A_ beauti-

!

|

i

}

|
TOWER GARAGE—St_ Matthias
ful and well found country home

containing 3 reception, 5 bed

rooms, 4 verandahs, 2 bathrooms, |
3 toilets, 2 garages etc, etc

| The land consists of 14 acres |
12 acres under coconuts and
nutmegs, the remainder pas- '
ture and gardens. Income about

Price £8,000,
application

£200. per annum

Full particulars on



REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

| PLANTATIONS BUILDING



Phone 464¢



|
|
\



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Commons Remove
Sunday Threat

LONDON, Nov. 23.

The House of Commons to
night removed any threat to the
opening on Sundays of next year’s
£ 25,000,000 festival of Britain
By 364 votes to 128 it rejected a
motion put forward by a group
of Conservatives seeking to ban

Sunday’s opening on_ religious
grounds. As it was a matter of
conscience, Conservative leaders

allowed their supporters to vote
as they pleased. Some voted for
Sunday opening, others against

The Commons then without a
vote gave a second reading agree
ing in principle to a Bill pro
tecting the organisers of the Fes-
tival against being sued by a
“common informer” under Sev
enteenth or Eighteenth Century
legislation banning certain amuse-
ments on the Sabbath.

SHAW'S ASHES

@ from page 1



stood in the sitting room of Shaw’s
quiet house at Ayot, St. Lawrence

They watched the opening of the
caskets by Dr. Probyn who then
mixed the ashes on one end of
Shaw’s oak sideboard.

The mixing was carried out in
exact accordance with Shaw’s
wishes, his ashes being emptied
into those of his wife’s,

—Reuter.





LA TOURISTA
VENEZOLANOS

TENEMOS ARTICLOS

ORIENTAL
pe LA INDIA
CHINA EGYPTO

EL PRINCIPAL ESTABLE-
CIMIENTO EN SOUVENIR.

THANI #Nos

Pr. Wm. Henry St. Dial 3466

po

Home-Loving ...

FURNISHERS

will love this

FURNITURE Too







New and Renewed Wardrobes
and Dresser-Robes, with and
without Mirrors—Linen Presses

Vanities, Simpler Dressing Tables
Screen Frames, Washstands, Night
Chairs $4.50 up—Single and Dou
ble Bedsteads, Beds, Cradles



Dining, Kitchen and Fane
Tables, Sideboards, China, Kitchen
and Bedroom Cabinets, Larders,
Wagons, Liquor Cases

Morris and other Suites and
separate Pieces—Bergere, Berbice
and Tub Chairs,, Rockers and
Settees—Bookracks, Book Cases
Desks

L.S. WILSON

Trafalgar Street. Dial 4069.





“If these people are watching from another world you wouldn't like them to see us in our
last year's hats and costumes,

would you, dear?"



CHURCHILL WARNS

from page |

Egyptian Foreign Minister
Churchill appearing to b:*
still dissatisfied said that tho

Opposition’s censure motio.
would not be withdrawn. Con-
servatives would try to arrange

a day next week to debate it

The motion regrets that the
Government is “unwillifng to sus-
pend the export of arms including
Centurion tanks to Egypt whethe:
as a result of previous contracts
or otherwise while the Anglo-
Egyptian treaty of 1936 is being
challenged by the Egyptian Gov-
ernment.” ’

Churchill had earlier asked if
the Government cduld say what
were the new facts which made
it change its policy between the
afternoon statement of Defence
Minister Emanuel Shinwell that
tanks would go and the evening
statement by Davies that they
would not for the present,

Morrison said hethought
Churchill was exaggerating these
statements very much.

Morrison
being
to

accused Churchill of
; provocative, and appealed
him to urge his followers to
give the Government a hearing,
Churchill addressing the Con-
servetives said it was more in the
interests of the Opposition that
Morrison should be fully heard
than that he should be silenced,
Morrison then said that Shin-
well had given assurance yester-
day that nothing would happen
overnight and Davies had said no



BARBADOS BOYS’ CLUBS

WANTED
TO RENT
in Bridgetown
A Building suitable for use
asa
BOYS’ CLUB
Reply to Police Headquarters



—— oo OE
—

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

BRITISH CARs 1950
Photographs and specifica-
tions of all the latest models

in one volume for 7/-

GOLD LEAF WARE,
CUPS. PLATES, Ete.
HERE AGAIN

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE











| CHRISTMAS IS FAST APPROACHING
\

— and we have —

XMAS CRACKERS,

Come in early and select yours.

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
(CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)




{
| Corner of Broad







Fontabelle .

ee





NOTICE

OUR CUSTOMERS are asked to note that effective immediately
we have decided to close

; BUSINESS. Those indebted to the Company are kindly
| asked to settle their accounts by paying the amount due

direct to the registered office of the Company, Sunnyside,
CARIBBEAN FISHERIES LTD
21.11.50

PAGE SEVEN

| SHIPPING NOTICES

ROYAL NETHERLAND

























































STEAMSHIP CO Tae MV. “Dagrwood" ill
° accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada

Sailing from An‘ 5 and and Aruba.
Holland a.8. ¢ * 20th., 2ist, Date of departure will be

25th. November.

oe. from Amsterdam, and Dover
m.s, “ORANJESTAD” 17th. and 18th.
November .

notified

ae etoe. and "Pesowngers tor
e
Damm inica, Antigua,

Sailing to Trinidad, La Guaira, Cura-
cao etc. m.s. “DELFT 6th. Novembgr;
s.s. “FARNSUM” Ipth. November; m.s,
“ORANJESTAD” Ist, November.

Nevis and
day 24th

St. Kitts









-~ B.W.1, SCHOONER OWNERS
ling to. Trinidad. Paramaribo, ocr Inc. ~
Georgetown, m.s. “HELENA” Iith. ideas
aac eeapel Tele. 4047.
to Madeira, Ant-
werp, and Amsterdam, m.s. “WILLEM-
STAD” iTth. November.
Canadian National Steamshi
SOUTHBOUND P
Montreal Halifax Barton Aattedos Berta
ion’ jos
CANADIAN CHALLENGER 23 Nov. 27 Nov. _ TDec. 1 Dee.
LADY RODNEY.. ...... — 2 Dec. 4 Dec. 13 Dec. 14 Dec.
LADY NELSON 8G. ces SLC ee 19 Dee. 2; Dec. 30 Dee. 31 Dec.
LAD oe oe * — " Jan. an. an. an.
LADY NELSON ss ma eo 1\Feb. 3 Feb. 12 Feb. 13 Feb.
NORTHBOUND
a S woe
LADY NELSON 28 Nov. Nov. 9 Dee, 16 Saga
LADY RODNEY 25 Dee. Dec. € Jan. 7 Jan.
LADY NELSON | 11 Jan. 13 Jan. 22 Jan: 23 Jan.
é LADY RODNEY 10 Feb Feb. 21 Feb. 22 Feb.
. only A LADY NELSON | 25 Feb Feb. 8 March 9 March
te) > ae
“.B.—Gubject to change witnout notice, Al’ venseis Atted with cold storage cham-
bers. Passenger and freight s.ce on application to —



rom

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,., LTD. — Agents.

F London Express Service





.

oe

CIE. GLE. TRANSATLANTIQUE
(French Line)





tanks would be shipped to Egypt
until Bevin had reported to the
Commons on the talks.

“To that undertaking I adhere
on behalf of the Government” he

added, Here Churchill broke in S.S. “GASCOGNE” Sailing to Trinidad & Fr. Guiana Novem-
again to say that Davies had ber 8th, 1950
implied that the Government ij .
weeks oe ae The irate}{] §.S. “GASCOGNE” Sailing to PLYMOUTH & LE HAVRE
PETITE TOES: via Martinique and Guadaloupe Novem-
“I am not repudiating what ber 14th, 1950,
Davies said. A statement will
be mare ane Ren mevisiy. 8.S. “COLOMBIE” Sailing to Trinidad, La Guayra, Curacao.
here wi e exchanges across
the floor and the House will con- en and | Jamaica December 8th,
a it,” 1 z
Finally Churchill said: “To con- “7 ” ‘
clude this mateee cur motian wilt S.S. “COLOMBIE” Sailing to 7LYMOUTH & LE HAVRE via
remain on paper, and we shall dis- Martinique and Guadeloupe December
ey Se question wreiner we shall 17th, 1950,
as ra day next week.
Per ae Se er ee ae nies accepting Passengers, Cargo and
ail.
SS. “GASCOGNE” First Class Passages Only.

2 CHARGES DISMISSED

Two cases brought by the police
charging Rupert Nigntingale of
Pank Hall with refusing to pay
the legal fare while travelling on
* motor bus and using indecent
loryguage in the same bus were
cismissed without prejudice by
His Worship Mr, A. J. H. Hans-
chell yesterday,

SS. “COLOMBIE” First, Cabin and Tourist Class Passages.

For further particulars apply to: —

R.M. JONES & CO. LTD.~Agents.









FYFFES LINE





Set. D. Forde who prosecuted
in both cases gave notice of appeal
in the case of refusing to pay the
legal fare. The offences were
alleged to have been committed
on November 15



T.S.S. GOLFITO will be sailing to the United

See Us For The Following - ~ -

HARDWARE ITEMS

4-Pronge Agricultural For
Ready Mixed i

Kingdom on 6th December, 1950 and 17th January,

1951, She still has some accommodation available



















for Ist Class Passengers.
SUNPLEX

Houschold Enamelled Ware, Glass-
ware, Galvanized Buckets and
Sheets

Go To - ~- - -

COZIER & CO.

Roebuck Street, or Dial 3578
22.11.50.-—-6n,

T.S.S. GOLFITO will be sailing, for Trinidad on
25th November, 1950 and 6th January, 1951,

For further information apply to :

WILKINSON & HAYNES €O., LTD.

SOMETHING NEW AGENTS.

Scotch Oatmeal Bread
—1l6c. per loaf
Scotch Oatmeal Biscuits
—3/- per Ib
ALSO
Whole Wheat Bread
—I2e. per loaf
PURITY BAKERIES LTD.
151 & 152 ROEBUCK ST
Dial 3296, 3063, 4529
















EVERY WOMAN KNOWS




Her final appearance can be made or marred by the
Shoes she wears.

WILLIAM =FOGARTY LTD.

Has just received a new shipment of

LADIES’ DRESS SHOES

Platform soles, Backless & Toeless, with High Heels,





XMAS TREES, TOYS.


















and Tudor Streets.











in Brown, Black, Blue Suede, White Nu-buck and
Reptile Calf




down our FISH DELIVERY








White Bu-buck trimmed with Brown Reptile
in Court Style with Spike Heels.




Prices ranging from $11.57 to $14.40 per pr.

THEYRE HEAVENLY!

we They’re the Shoes you have been
3 waiting for.

Call Early at...

WILLIAM «FOGARTY LTD.

The House of Fine Footwear



“EREORPEPPCREL HS Ad



BARBADOS ADVOCATE
BY CARL ANDERSON

* PAGE SIX







!

HENRY ~





T BUT You’L-e

Lilt GET BACK ALL J DEAe ME... SOMEONE MUST HAVE © ‘
BE LOST! t A |

RIGHT! THERE'S A 4) THE ROPE 3

FELLOW.IN A BOAT } |
ABOVE, HOLDING THAT =ZA |
GUIDE ROPE ! l : fi yy Mone !

LADY MAUREEN COOPER, lovely young
| English society woman, entrusts her milk-and-roses
} complexion to Pond's. ‘It is simply wonderful what

Pond’s Creams have done for my a lexion,””
| says Lady Maurven, “I use Pond's C Cream
| for cleansing and Pond's Vanishing Cream to
Prttect my skin’

NGLISH OR AMERICAN — socicty’s lovelies
E women use the same beauty care. They use
Pond’s, and it is thanks to Pond’s two Creams that
their complexions keep so radiantly lovely always.

Why not let Pond’s keep your skin lovely, woo?
Every night, before you go to bed, cleanse the ski
thoroughly of dirt and stale make-up with delightful
Pond’s Cold Cream. Then “ rinse’ with more Cold
Cream for extra-cleansing, extra-softness.

In the morning, before putting on your make-up,
smooth in a thin film of Pond’s Vanishing Cream,

BY CHIC YOUNG

ilicaaae met
T

” HEN. WHY.DO. X= "
Maram GAEL ES YOu CALL PEM Wee fo Mane
WANTS TO EAT ALL - y UP_ALL THE a DATES WITH! g |
THE TIME--ELOISE - r a 2 > aD 5] J
KEEPS Rakin ME) ¥ . aad Be Ff |

vave ACAI ( i" a © as + It makes an ideal powder base because it holds bid
ey 2 fer 2 powder matt for hours. It protects the skin, too.
we alr Use Pond’s beauty care regularly and in a short 9
while you will notice that your skin is clearer, softer, POND S

smoother. It Will glow with new radiance, new
loveliness, Pond’s Creams are inexpensive to buy,
yet they are used by society's loveliest women on
both sides of the Adantic. You can Buy Pénd’s at
all the best beauty counters,

STRIKER ||
|
|



BY FRANK

; YOULL DIE IN THE TRAP YOU SET FOR
af, BULLET MARKS TO
=I)" SHOW A MURDER!

BLUNDELL’S a

WHO TRIES Tourrd DIE IN FIRE/

a

THE REST OF US, UNLESS you
ADMIT YOU HIRED THEM! aga



WINDOW?










One is English, one American

yet their Beauty Care

as the same





oa the

| and you will very

MRS. CORNELIUS. Pag goer 9 Ji, pee ag
charming young New Yorker, is one of the many

society beauties who use Pond’s, “‘ You won't find a chemist and

finer cream anywhere than Pond’s Cold Cream,”
says Mrs. Vanderbilt. ‘‘It leaves the skin feeling
especially soft and smooth and clear — brings up a |
becoming glow of colour in the cheeks” }















)



HE 6 AFTER MY

| OF TOWN! ni
PAINTING 4

| |
, |
|
| |
: oF) 4 ORINSIOE
“FOR OUTSIDE USE . |
If unobtainable at
your dealers consult
JAMES A. LYNCH
& CO., LTD.,
i AGENTS
aonschibtlgh ta i cinta suichintilaiaa
| |
1 Geear Heavens ” heen 4 wt \T_WUZ A BURGLAR---_ ( tse bhoover
Cl HEAP A NOISE THOUGHT onfit BUT DON'T WORRY ABOUT | | ea
DOWNSTAIRS YOU SAID ALL wuz A == YER PAN -~HE LEFT |} “= ve
IT'S PROBABLY A YER RELATIVES | BURGLAR IT- BUT
BURGLAR-GET | Wiz OUT, is ALL RIGHT! | ) THe Rane? “{ e
1) 7,









BY ALEX RAYMOND

THis SHE SAT AND SANS THE NiGHT my HEART B20KE!’
TM SORRY, SIR..





=every hour



OH, NO! NO!

of the day

\\, ea

i

\ \

Ne When everyone else is hot and botheted you will
fascinate by your freshness — if you do this. After your
bath or bathe, shower yourself all over with Cashmere
Bouquet Talcum Powder. Its magie touch will turn your
skin to silk; clothe you in a cool, protecting film that
keeps you daintily fresh all day long. Its delicate perfume
will add new and subtle charm to your whole personality.
For Cashmere Bouquet is the Tale Powder with the
fragrance men love.



| SIT HERE, MR. VAN
DORPE... I WILL SING

S
RADIO... THEY
""\ ARE NOT THE
REAL YOU!
THAT 1S WHY

Cashmere Bouquet

TALCUM POWDER



COLGATE-PALMOLIVE-PEET CO.

PSSSCSSOSOSS SOS PS FOSS IOE. ‘

DINE TO-NIGHT :

AA GRIER PSS SSOP SSS

= AT um .
BARBADOS LEADING _—
CHINESE RESTAURANT











MONK, YOUVE CAUSED A LOT OF









(iM AIN A HURRY? DRIVE y ee
|ME TO THE EDGE OF ! TROUBLE ~ SAY, YOU'VE HAD THAT Delight i tl
THE JUNGLE. S—— Sy PAPER EVER SINCE | TOOK YOU bilan. <-. * re PS caer eee) s ings, we kno,. you'll enjoy our chef's specials.
: > . 3 Stop in tonight !
= s
s
S THE
.

‘ GREEN
‘ DRAGON



Â¥
Â¥ Open 9 a.m, to Midnight

Ss

x No, 9 BROAD STREET

% for Reservations Dial 3896.
4

SSPRVSS SOOO 9GSCCOOS



LLCO

|
|
|
|



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1950

Teeth Loose

by moods:





lee first da sore
1d quickly tightens the teeth !
{ Amosan t ma

1 r



turn of npt
ge. Get ‘Amosan eo 7 ue ‘

Amosan* my
Car Preorrhea—Trench | Mo ia



KIDNEY

|
}
}
i
|



| TROUBLE



f
id
zi













Hl








GUARANTEE
De Witt’s Pills are
manufactured under strictly hygienic
conditions and the mgredients con-
form to rigid standards of purity.







- #77111 11/ |
nolo n> i

AT hopeless feeling that you're too weak,

‘not up to it’ any longer simply means that
you've been taking too much out of yourself.
Your body is short of wwo essential strengthening
hosphorus and protein.

Tissues strengthened

To put you right, you need a course of
‘Sanatogen’ Nerve Tonic Food. ‘Sanatogen’
combines these two great body-building foods—
phosphorus and protein—in their organic form,
so that they are quickly absorbed into your
system. Day by day glorious new health, youth
y and vitality flow through your whole body ~
your strength and self-confidence come back!
Start on a course of ‘Sanatogen’ today.




ern sont have testified
marvellous
On sale at good chemists and druggists

‘SAN ATOGEN? “0

restores health, youth and vitality
The word ‘Sanatogen’ is a registered trade
ec a ee

nines = A a ne ate ®

DUNLGP FORT

CAR TYRES

LASTING SAFETY

Kea.



DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., ETD.

(ECKSTEIN BROS.)





|





ATTENTION !!
FACTORY MANAGERS

Take this opportunity of obtaining your requirements in :—

GALVANISED & STEAM P!PE

Ranging from 4 in. upwards

MILD STEEL

Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes
BOLTS & NUTS—AIl Sizes
FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill

At PRICES that cannot be repeated.



The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltd.

WHITE PARK ROAD, ST. MICHAEL
DIAL 4528

‘
{





bee gee

i i







ae!





FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24,



1950

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

McINTOSH--MRS. ELISE at 3 p.m
> -Sterday Her funeral will ieave her
lete residence “Marion House”, Deacons



Road at 4.15 o'clock thi
the Westbury Cemetery
No Cards. Friends are asked to attend
R.°T. Harewood, Mrs. Edith Parry
Lindsay Harewood, Irving Harewood,

Mrs. Ada Hinds, Percy Hind
24.13.50—In

MEMORIA

IN loving memory of our Dear
Mcther and grand mother ADRIANA
TAYLOR who departed this life on the
24th November 1942.

Eight years ago grannie Dear you left

us

Faithful and honest in all your ways

Devoted and true to the end of your

afternoon for





IN





days
Always patient, loving and kind,
What a4 beautiful memory you left
behind

Asieep in Jesus! far from thee

Thy kindred and their grave: may be,

But thine is still a blessed sleep,

From which none ever wakes to weep

Miss Albertha Taylor: Mrs. Maggie
Gooding Mrs. Kathleen Beckles, Mrs
Doreen Wickham, Mrs. Gwen Rollins
(daughter) Montelle; Oscar, Fred,
Dorris, Mellis, Eunilda, (grand child-
ren

Trinidad and U.S.A. Please Copy.

24.11.50—1n



FOR SALE

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTO CYCLE —
excellent









New Hudson Auto
condition or

CAR: One (1) 1937 Vauxhall 10 in
running order Apply A. J. Hilliard,
Central Foundry Day Phone 4668.

24.11,50—6n



Austin A-40
Cwner driven. Mileage
Phone:— E. Gill 2454,

1950 Model.
3,000 Miles

24.11.50—4n
VAN—One (1) 8 H.P. Ford Van, good

condition, going cheap. Dial Belgrave
3063, Purity Bakeries Ltd,





ELECTRICAL

MOTOR—One (1) G.E. % H.P. Single
never used, in
Before



22.11.50—3n

LIVESTOCK

COWS — Four (4) Milech Cows, Two
(2) heifers. One Pure bred Holstein
Cow eight months in calf, one Grade
Holstein Cow six months in calf for
bred Friesian bull Burgute Hilarious at
Central Livestock Station, still ving
16 pts. of milk per day, one ‘11
months old progeny of the Canadian











Lima & Co., Ltd., 20, Broad Street,
Bridgetown. 23.11,50—6n.
HAMS — 72 cents per Ib; Currants

34 cts. per Tb. Raisin 40 cts. per 1b.
C. Herbert, 55 Tudor St, Dial 3686.
23,11.50—3n.

PARASOLS—Plastic Parasols

At a Special Low Price $1.42 each.
The Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad
Street. 22,11.50—4n.





POOLE POTTERY EARTHENWARE—A
wide variety just received and on sale.
See your Jewellers, Y. De Lima & Co.,

Ltd., 20 Broad Street, Bridgetown.
18.11.6€0—6n
PEARL NECKLACE & cts eagh,

beaded necklaces $1.20 up, Beaded ear-
rings 86 cts per pair, plus wide assort-
ment of costume jewellery, See your
jewellers, wed S Bye & Co,, Ltd., 20,
Broad Street, Bridgetown. \
is 23.11.50—6n.

RAINCOATS — Plastic Raincoats in

22.11.50—4n,





————

STOCKINGS—Kayser Nylon Stockings
51 gauge. The finest available in alli
new shades $2.14 per pr. The Modern

id Street.
Dress Shoppe, Broa 92.11.5 a



TWO MAHOGANY TREES—Dial 8105

21,11.50—T.F.N.

That desirable Yacht
Tel, J. A. Reid, Lone
22.11.50—12n,

R. H. KING.

YAGABOND
OVA o
Star Garage. Dial 91-33

WANTED







ON VACANT
AGRE Le tee Large Stationery

in Trinidad. Write stating ex-



MISCELLANEOUS

BOXES — All kinds of Card Board
Boxes other vias oe ae card.
ee ene "G10 80—t.f.n.



P GOLD AND OLD GOLD
JEWELLERY BOUGHT, highest prices
peid. See your jewellers, Y. De Lima

& Co., Ltd., 20, Broad Street Bridge- |

oun, 18.11.50—6n.

a

LLING TO PURCHASE Good Joiners

a in Mahogany, Cedar, Birch and

Ralph Beard’s Show Rooms,
Phone 4583.

23,11 .50—4n

Work
Pine at
Hardwood Alley.



PUBLIC NOTICES



NOTICE

from Thursday
23rd through Sunday 26th
Monday 27th. J. B aes

Closing to Business

re-opening.

11.50-—3n



. NOTICE

Applications for two vacant
Scholarships (Boys) tenable at
Alleyne School, will be received by the
undersigned up to Friday, December Ist.
Applicants must be sons of Parishioners
straitened circumstances

Applicant; must present
s to the Headmaster at the
Allayne School on Monday December
4th at 9.30 a.m. to take the entrance
examination.





NOTICE

PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
Applications (accompanied by bap-
tismal certificates) will be received at
my office up to 3.00 p.m. on Friday
Ist December, 1950 for one or more
vacant Christ Church Vestry exhibitions
tenable at the Boys’ Foundation School.
Cendidates must be sons of parigh
ioners in straitened circumstances,
and must not be less than nine year:
or more than twelve years of age on
the date of the examination.
Candidates must present themselves
for examination, to the headmaster ai
the Boys’ Foundation School on Friday,
Sth December, 1950 at 9.30 a.m
Application
from my office.
WOOD GODDARD,
Clerk to The Vestry,
Christ Church
22.11.50—6n

d_ bh 50 each. The| Electric Stove,
ee) ee asap evabd Street. | Case, Several painted tables & Chairs,
|
|
1

forms must be obtained |



FOR RENT



HOUSES

|
|
|
BRAMBLEY, Waterford Gap, St. Mi- |



chael, From November ist; fully furn-
ished residence. For particulars, Phone |
3062. 24.10.50.—t.f.n. |

LYNSTED — Navy Gardens, 3 Bed-







21.11.50—t.f.n.

“WARSAW” Wéeiches Road St.

Michael — Newly built bungalow; con-

taining open verandah, 4 ing

3 bedrooms with running water, built-in

+ kitehenette with built-in cup-

is light and water, W.C.

and Bath; servants room, garage. Pos-

session Ist December. Dial 2947.
R. Archer McKenzie, Victoria Street.

22.11.50—3n

gp
BUILDING next to Ramdin; Roebuck



Street; suitable for Bond or Garage
Apply James Jones, ‘Gloria’, uc
Street. 24.11.50-—3n



PUBLIC SALES



AUCTION»

1 Hillman Saloon Car with good tyres
and in working order; damaged in acci-
dent. TERMS CASH,

R. ARCHER McKENZIE.
22.11.50—3n

Under The Diamond Hammer

I WILL sell on the spot at Upper
dayy of November at 2 o'clock, One
Reckle» Road on Tuesday next the 28th
day of November at 2 o'clock, One
House built of pine in very good con-
dition. It has Gallery, Drawing and
Dining Rooms, 2 bedroom, Kitchén



and spacious yard which is enclosed
with galvanize. It has Electricity and
water installed It can be rented for
$20.00 pr. month, The “land which is
the Government’; can be rented.

For inspection see D'Arcy A. Scott,

Megazine Lane. 24.71.50—4n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON Tuesday 28th by order of Mr:.
G. A. Hutchinson we will sell her Fur-

niture at “Avalon Flat 3” Collymore
Rock



which includes

Dining Table: Waggon: Liquor Case
Arm, Upright and Morris Chairs; China
Cabinet: Ornament Tables: Bookshelf:
AL in Mahogany: Card Table, Glass
and China, Plated and Brass Ware:
Dinner, Tea and Breakfast Services
(Royal Doulton Ware): Frigidaire (good
working order): Cedar Machine Table:
Plaited Grass Mat: Phileo 7 Tube Radio:
Clock, Books, Simmons and Iron
Single Bedsteads: Springs and Mat-
tresses; Cedar and Mahogany Presses:
Mahog. Dressing Tables: Screens: Pine
Linen Press, Kitchen Tables, Larder
Ware Press: Canon Gas Stove and Oven’
2 Burner Gas Range. Electric
end Toaster, Kitchen Utensil;
Wash Basin and Fittings .and other
items. Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms Cash.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.

Auctioneers
24,11,50-—2n

Under The Diamond Hammer

AUCTION SALE
By instructions received I will sell
at “Trelawny”, near Pavilion Court,
Hastings on Wednesday next 29th of
November, beginning at 12.30 an entire
lot of household furniture which
includes Mahog. and Painted desks,
Mahog. Tub Chairs, Plant Stools, Rush
Chairs, Rockers and Settee, Kidney
Tables, (1) Upholstered Manoy. Antique
Chair_on Casters, Book Shelves, Carpet,

Seiten Pees oelnng, fable with | police, West German News Agen-
Several painted prosees, waiahon gad cy ntti reported to-night
ainted ressing tables, rrors, m- ier = ) p a
foons Bedsteads with springs & Mat- oa bois day he had been
tresses, Iron Cots with Mattresses,|7@ported missing.

Pine tables, Liquor —Reuter.
(1) Coolerator, Glass Jars, Larder, an.
Florence Stove & Oven, Lot of Cutlery, NOTICE
Glass Ware, Linens, Silvers, AXuminium y
Saucepans, Plates & Dishes, and several THE BENNETT COLLEGE
other items too numerous to mention. Sheffield,

Cash. D'Arcy A. Scott, Auc-

24.11.50—1n,

Terms
tioneer.



By kind permission of Messrs, Cole
& Co., Ltd. I will sell at their garage
TO-DAY at 2 o’clock ONE V-8 FORD:
SALOON CAR with five new tyres and
in good working order. TERMS CASH.
Dial 2947 R. Archer Me Kenzie,

19.11.50—4n







REAL ESTATE ALLEYNE SCHOOL
"I —| aA meranse Examination for the
RUGBY — 10th Avenue (2nd house anuary — July 1951 will
from Pine Road), Belleville, st. Michael.) 96, Mrid, at, the. Sehool on Monday Dec.

standing on 3,712 square feet of land and
containing closed gallery, drawing and
dining rooms, 2 bedrooms, (each with
curning water), kitchenette, and usual
conveniences. Servants room and garage
in yard, Inspection 10 a.m. to 12 noon,
and 3 p.m. to 430 p.m. on week days,
on application to Mrs, Robinvon, on the
premises.

The property will be set up for sale
by public Competition at our 4
Jemes Street, Bridgetown, on Friday
Ist December 1950 at 2 p.m,

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors,
22.11.50—9n



BUILDING SITE FOR SALE .

8,570 square feet of land in PINE
ROAD, Belleville, St. Michael (obliquely
and adjoining

2nd Avenue,
eee vir. Chees-

“Neath”,

man).
The land will be set up for sale by

public competition at our office, Jens

the residence of



Street, ereieeoe, - Friday r
‘ -m.
December, 1950, al Riis
22,11 ,50—9n.

———

“THE GARDEN HOUSE” late residence
of Hon. R. Challenor, with 5 acres 4
perches of land situate at Country Road,
Bridgetown.

se contains spacious
The dwelling hou aitting

Yearwood & Boyce,

Rooms,
room,

and

large
water and

t. 5 servants rooms, garages,
stables ete. in yard.

Tennis Lawn and
1 b
enti et ney time on application fo
er on the premises.

teynis a eemae fe within 5 minutes walk

Broad S
iers in writing to be sent to the

undersigned.
WOOD & BOYCE,

a Solicitors.
James Street.
14,11,60—10n
art
9.138 square feet of land situated at
the Garrison part of the lands of “Bever-
ley” near Schmitts Gate on Friday 24th
November 1950 at 2 p.m. at our office,

Lucas Street. -
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
14.11.50—tn

HOUSE — One Board and shingled
house 8 x 14 x 8 wallaba shingles on
roof. In good condition. eee ee

Tucker. Phone 3
ee 24.11.50-—6n

_—_—

PROPERTY at Roebuck Street, opposite
the Coca Cola Factory, two storied
building, the house contains Gallery;
Drawing room; 2 bedrooms upstairs;
down stairs shop; dining room; kitchen,
toilet and bath, standing on 1,938 sq. ft.
of land, Apply to James Jones, ‘Gloria
Roebuck Street. 24.11.50—3n

PERSONAL







The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife (EDNA
BECKLES (nee Edna Wilkinson) as 1)
do not hold muyself responsible for her
or anyone else contracting any debt or}
debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me.

ALBERT BECKLES,
Lears,
St. Michael







received up t tu:
the Pp to Saturday Dec.

penied
testimonials

Scholarship tenable
School, will be
master up to
Paptismal










“If these people are watching from anoiher world you wouldn't like them to see us in our



Misadventure:
Jury Verdict

Death by misadventure was
verdict returned by a

the

nine-man



jury in the inquiry into the cir-
the

cumstances
death of
Greenidge a dressmaker
South District, St. George.

surrounding

25-year-old Pauline

of

inquiry was held by Mr. C. L. C,
Walwyn and was concluded yes—

terday.

Pauline Greenidge

died
November 17

after she was

on
in-

The

volved in an accident along South

District Road with

the motor

lorry M—269 which was driven

by Harcourt
Spring, St.
on the spot.

King
Thomas.

of

Porey
She died
Harcourt King, 38

yrars old was said to have been

driving for the past
Dr. Ward said that he
King about
day of the accident.
plained to him of

having
“black out.”

a

Evidence was also taken from
Rev. and Mrs. Broomes who said

they were passing and saw
accident. ‘They stopped their

the
car

and Mrs, Broomes — who is a
member of the St, John Ambu—

lance Brigade — tried

but the woman was
dead.



BRITON ARRESTED
IN E. GERMANY

to help
already

BERLIN, Nov, 23.
A British national Dr, Arthur

Apfel has been arrested by East

German “peoples police” and

is being held by the East Berlin

Has recently awarded to ROBERT N

WALKES of 5th Avenue, Bush Hall, St
Michael. A Diploma in the following
subject—Blue Prints,

24,1,50 —2n

EDUCATIONAL

Headmaster bri

by baptismal

Applications for a

certificates
vacant
at the

Certificates and



and must be accom-
and

he

by

Bryant
Alleyne
received by the Head-
Saturday Dec, 2nd, 1950,
testimo-

tials must accompany applications and
candidates must present themselves to

the Headmaster on Monday Dec
at 9 a.m. for Examination











JOHN

M4.
BLABDON

A.F.S., F.V.A.

FOR SALE

“VILLA ROSA"
City Attractive and

Passage Road

ble carriageway

14,000 square feet This wel
| built property contains a

gallery, large
dining room, 3
toilet, pantry and kitchen

courtyard at rear,

lounge,
large bedrooms

“ROUMAIKA” — Dayrells Road

and storerooms. Grounds
proximately 2 acres.

House proposition.

TOWER GARAGE-—St_
Gap An almost
suitable for a
purposes



large ve

apart from a4 garage

BW A

beautl

GRENADA,

wg nn

£200. per annurr

Full particulars on application



AUCTIONEER

| REAL £STATE AGENT
|

Phone 464¢

|

19 11. 50—5n.

REAL ESTATE |

Formerly Dixon & Bladon

centrally

located stone bungalow with dou-
Approximately
1
front
separate
: Good

3

Navy Gardens Attractive and
imposing property Driveway
flanked by mahogany trees

reception, 6 bedrooms, kitchen
pantry, large verandahs, garage

ap-
Ideal Guest

Matthias
new property
ety of

ful and well found country home

containing 3 reception, 5 bed
rooms, 4 verandahs, 2 bathrooms,
3 toilets, 2 garages etc, etc
| The land consists of 14 acres
12 acres under “coconuts and
nutmegs, the remainder pas- ¢
ture and gardens, Income about

Price £8,000

PLANTATIONS BUILDING



15 years.
examined
1.30 pm. the same
King com-



Stood in the sitting room of Shaw’s
quiet house at Ayot, St. Lawrence

exact
wishes, his ashes being emptied
into those of his wife's.








BARBADOS ADVOCATE



last year's hats and costumes, would you, dear?"

Commons Remove

Sunday Threat

LONDON, Nov. 23

The House of Commons

to

night removed any threat to the



SHAW'S ASHES

Egyptian



CHURCHILL WARNS

from page 1
‘oreign Minister
Churchill appearing

still dissatisfied said that th

; Sund t ‘ . Opposition’s censure motio: on age Pin the net cediea he

opening on Sundays of next year’s would not be withdrawn. Con- added, Here Churchill broke in S.S. “GASCOGNE” Sailing to Tr -
£25,000,000 festival of Britain servatives would try to arrange again to say that Davies had hes on eae & Fr. Guiana Novem
te sop to * rejected a a day next week to debate it implied that the sorerucnent .
motion put forwar yY a group The motion regrets that the would allow debate. he irate ss. “ ~ ”
of Conservatives seeking to ban Government is “unwilltng to sus- Morrison replied: GASCOGNE” Sailing to PLYMOUTH & LE HAVRE
Sunday's opening on religious pend the export of arms including ea ay via Martinique and Guadaloupe Novem-
grounds. As it was a matter of Centurion tanks to Egypt whethe: I am not repudiating what ber 14th, 1950,
conscience, Conservative leaders as a result of previous contracts Davies said. A statement will Te “
allowed their supporters to vote or otherwise while the Anglo- Pas tat oe near S.S. “COLOMBIE” Sailing to Trinidad, La Guayra, Curacao,
as they pleased. Some voted for Egyptian treaty of 1936 is being Pw S ac Cartagena and Jamaica Dece
Sunday opening, others against. challenged by the Egyptian Gov- the floor and the House will con- 1980, a mber 6th,

The Commons then without a ernment.” Ser Se ; :

. ‘ ‘ Finally Churchill said: “To con- “SE ” :

ae Ennis. es Be Churchill had earlier asked if clude this matter our motion ‘will SS, “COLOMBIE Sailing to PLYMOUTH & LE HAVRE via

ms p ee ee ei Bh the Government céuld say what remain on paper, and we shall dis- Martinique and Guadeloupe December
tecting the organisers of the Fes etal oe sana ie ans ent . fuss th ti het 7 "th
Gval_ agains being. sed by 2 22 "change its poney between tne sek ter C day mam ee ee
thes, ‘ _ o che e s Cc) D yeen ne Y 8 y eK.

atcents Sa, under Sev— afternoon statement of Defence —Reuter. All ships accepting Passengers, Cargo and
leg leenth or Eighteenth Century Minister Emanuel Shinwell that Maii.
egislation banning certain amuse- tanks would go and the evening Se ee :
ments on the Sabbath, Sarernent. by Ravies that they 2 CHARGES DISMISSED SS. “GASCOGNE” First Class Passages Only.

would not for the present,
Morrison said hethought S.S. “COLOMBIE” First, Cabin and Tourist Class Passages.

Churchill was exaggerating these

statements very much,

@ from page 1

They watched the opening of the

caskets by Dr. Probyn who then
mixed the ashes on one end of
Shaw’s oak sideboard,

The mixing was carried out in
accordance with Shaw’s

—Reuter.



LA TOURISTA
VENEZOLANOS

TENEMOS ARTICLOS

ORIENTAL 3
pe La INDIA
CHINA EGYPTO

EL PRINCIPAL ESTABLE-
CIMIENTO EN SOUVENIR.

Home-Loving ...

FURNISHERS |

will love this

FURNITURE Too }

New and Renewed
and Dresser-Robes, with and
without Mirrors—Linen Presses
Vanities, Simpler Dressing Tables
|
|

Wardrobes



Screen Frames, Washstands, Nigh
d Dou
jles






Chairs $4.50 up—Single
ble Bedsteads, Beds, Cr
Dining, Kitchen — and Fanes
Tables, Sideboards, China, Kitchen
and Bedroom Cabinets, Larders,
Waggons, Liquor Cases

Morris and other Suites and
separate Pieces—Bergere, Berbice
and Tub Chairs,, Rockers and
Settees—Bookracks, Book Cases
Desks ‘

L.S. WILSON |
|

com Swe

Trafalgar Street. Dial 4069.





be!
to

day
overnight and Davies had





Morrison accused Churchill
ing provocative, and
him

that nothing would







BARBADOS BOYS’ CLUBS

WANTED
TO RENT
in Bridgetown
A Building suitable for use
as a
BOYS’ CLUB
Reply to Police Headquarters







——
—

TO-DAY'S NEWS FI.



BRITISH CARS 1950
Photographs and specifica-
tions of all the latest models



in one volume for 7/-

GOLD LEAF WARE,
CUPS. PLATES, Etc.
HERE AGAIN

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE









CHRISTMAS IS FAST APPROACHING

— and we have —

XMAS CRACKERS,

Come in early

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
(CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)



NOTICE

OUR CUSTOMERS are asked to note that effective immediately
we have decided to close
BUSINESS. Those indebted to the Company are kindly
asked to settle their accounts by paying the amount due
direct to the registered office of the Company, Sunnyside,

-

Fontabelle.

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES LTD

21,11.50—3n

eee stam antng

to b>

of
appealed
to urge his followers to
give the Government a hearing.
Churchill addressing the Con-
servetives said it was more in the
interests of the Opposition that
Morrison should be fully heard
than that he should be silenced,
Morrison then said that Shin-
well had given assurance yester-
happen
said no























































PAGE SEVEN

—] | SHIPPING NOTICES

ROYAL NETHERLAND
STEAMSHIP CO.

Sailing from . Rotterdam and
Holland s.a. GEER” 20th., ist,
25th. November.

se RANTEST =
™.8. AD” 17th. and 18th.
November .

Sailing to Trinidad, La Guaira,
cao etc. m.s. “DELFT” 6th. Ni 3
5.5. “FARNSUM” isth. November; m.s,
“ORANJESTAD” Ist. November.

Sailing to Trinidad,
Georgetown, “m.s. “HELENA”
December .







The M.V. “Daerwood” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada
and Aruba

Date of departure
notified

The M.V.

will be

“Moneka” will ac-
for
Cura-

Dominices Antigua, Menasuer
Dominica, _. ‘ak,
Nevis and St. . Sailing Fri-
day 24th.

B.W.1, SOHOONER OWNERS

llth. ASSOCIATION Inc. ~~

Salling to Madeira, svi Ant-
id Amsterdam, m.s. “ -
STAD’ ith, "November

Canadian National

Tele. 4047.





SOUTHBOUND

Steamships

itreal itean - Barbade Barbad

on

CANADIAN CHALLENGER 23 Noy. 27 Nov. = 7 Dec. 7 Dec.
es es oo 2 Dec. 4Dec. 13 Dec. 14 Dec.

LADY NELSON .. * _ 19 Dee. 2. Dec. 30 Dec. 31 Dec,

LADY eo oe +. oo "Jan, 19 Jan. 26 Jan. 29 Jan.

LADY IN .. ee _— 1 Feb. a Feb. 12 Feb. 13 Feb.



NORTHBOUND





Boston St. John
LADY NELSON 24 Nov. Nov. 9 Dec. 10 Dee.
LADY RODNBY 25 Dee. Dee. e€ Jan. 7 Jan.
LADY NELSON 11 Jan. i Jan. 22 Jan. 23 Jan.
et “ LADY RODNEY 10 Feb Feb. 21 Feb. 22 Feb.
a * Fe LADY NELSON 25 Feb Feb. 8 March 9 March
a SS ee -

without notice. AX: vessels Atted with enld torage cham
sppiteation to —

a8. to change
Ce been ba ee Aves on



rm

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO, LTD. — Agents.

. London Express Service



tanks would be shipped to Egypt
until Bevin had reported to the
Commons on the talks.

“To that undertaking I adhere

CIE. GLE. TRANSATLANTIQUE
(French Line)



Two cases brought by the police
charging Rupert Nigntingale of
Pank Hall with refusing to pay
the legal fare while travelling on
# motor bus and using indecent
lomguage in the same bus were
Cismissed without prejudice by
his Worship Mr, A, J, H. Hans-
chell yesterday,

Set. D. Forde who prosecuted
in both cases gave notice of appeal
in the case of refusing to pay the
legal fare. The offences were
alleged to have been committed
on November 15

For further particulars apply to: —

R. M. JONES & CO, LTD.—Agents.







FYFFES LINE

T.S.S. GOLFITO will be sailing to the United












See Us For The Following - - -

HARDWARE ITEMS

4-Prong Agricultural Forks,
Ready Mixed House Paints,
Enamels

in a Variety of Sizes
and Colours

Household Enamelled Ware, Glass-
ware, Galvanized Buckets and
Sheets

Go To - += -~

COZIER & CO.

Roebuck Street, or Dial 3578
22.11,50.—6n.

Kingdom on 6th December, 1950 and 17th January,

1951. She still has some accommodation available

\

for Ist Class Passengers.






SUNPLEX

T.S.S. GOLFITO will be sailing, for Trinidad on
25th November, 1950 and 6th January, 1951,
















For further information apply to :

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LID.

AGENTS.






SOMETHING NEW

Scotch Oatmeal Bread
—l6c, per loaf
Scotch Oatmeal Biscuits
—3/- per Ib
ALSO
‘Whole Wheat Bread
—12e. per loaf
PURITY BAKERIES LTD.
151 & 152 ROEBUCK ST
Dial 3296, 3063, 4529











EVERY WOMAN KNOWS



t?
.




ret






Her final appearance can be made or marred by the









fas meses rows 1 WILLIAM FOGARTY LID. |



Has just received a new shipment of

LADIES’ DRESS SHOES

Platform soles, Backless & Toeless, with High Heels,

rt.










in Brown, Black, Blue Suede, White Nu-buck and
Reptile Calf




down our FISH DELIVERY










White Bu-buck trimmed with Brown Reptile
in Court Style with Spike Heels.

Prices ranging from $11.57 to $14.40 per pr.

THEYRE HMEAVENLY!

we They're the Shoes you have been
waiting for.

Call Early at...

WILLIAM FOGARTY LTD.

The House of Fine Footwear









PAGE EIGHT

Let The |
Jackals
Howl!

By MICHAEL VIGGO

LONDON, Nov. 15

After the Lord Mayor's Show,
they say, comes the dustcart. And
after the eclipse of a champion
comes the wolves, the wiseacres,
and the people who knew it all
the time.

There is a growing opinion in



this country that boxing is no
longer a sport. And after last
night’s fight between Bruce

Woodcock and Jack Gardner, for
the British and Empire Heavy-
weight titles, I couldn’t agree
more. But it is not the big busi-
nessman behind the scenes whe
has degraded boxing. It is that
funny specimen of humanity whc
calls himself a boxing fan—thc
world’s most gullible and easily
swayed dupe—who is responsibl
for the decline, and now the fall
of British boxing.

Until last night, I must confess
I considered myself a boxing fan
But when Woodcock’s eyes wert
closed, mine were opened. His
swan song was mine too.

Two Men

What really happened at Earl's
Court last night? To understand
that we must consider the two men
who enacted this sorry drama,
On the one hand, Woodcock—th«
man who had the nation at his
feet just two or three years ago
and a pack of wolves at his
throat ever since. His spirit was
never broken inside the ring, bu!
his critics—and they were a
numerous as they were ill-in-
formed—tormented him at every

recent championship fight.

























































Gimblett, Emmett
Score 187 In
125 Mins.

BOMBAY, Nov, 23

_— nee he a it A hectic first wicket partnership
m uled as much asf jf 187 in 125 minutes by George
Baksi and Savold to his subse- Te anine cake

Emmett and Harold Gimblett kept
alive interest in the final day of
« drawn match between the Com-
nonwealth touring team and a
sombay Cricket Association
Eleven.

Left with 160 minutes play after
usmissing Bombay for 317 in their
irst innings, the Commonwealth
scored 211 for four wickets in their

quent and ignominious defeat.
We had seen this man Wood-
cock stand up to the giant Baksi
although he must have been in
agony from a broken jaw. We
Saw him fouled—and don’t say he
wasn’t—by Savold in their first
meeting (though I am among the
first to admit that Savold intend-
®d the blow to land several inch-

es higher). And then we saw] 2¢cond innings.
him lambasting into Savel! ave': Gimblett was out lbw when
last June, only to be stopped | 9Mly 1 short of his century but

when a gash three inches long] Emmett went on to make 103 in
appeared over his left eve. ,

Gardner, on the other hand
was a raw recruit to boxing a
couple of years ago. He is little
more than that to-day, although
he is as tough as they come ana
has improved quite considerably
in the last few months, Except
for his victory over Johnny Wil-
Jiams (who last night, ineidental+
ly, gave one of the best displays
of classical boxing I have ever
witnessed), he had done nothing
to inspire great enthusiasm.

two and a half hours,

Vijay Merchant ,India’s test cap-
tain carried his bat through Bom-
bay’s first innings for a chanceless
184,

Final scores: Commonwealth
323 and 211 for 4, Bombay Cricket
Association 317,

—Reuter.



HASSETT LEADS
AUSTRALIA IN IST TEST

MELBOURNE, Nov, 23
Lindsay Hassett (Victoria) aged
37 is to captain the Australia Test

Forgotten
There were many people who
thought he would fiot stand up
to Woodcock for six roufds (and

I was among them), but we had team the Board of Control an-

forgotten one thing—that gash] nounced here to-day.

over Woodcock’s eye. The doc- Arthur Morris (New South
tor’s assurance that it would stand Wales) aged 28 will be vice-
p to hee gruelling test of a captain,

eavyweight championship fight] Hassett has le ‘ ast
was good enough for us—our ? Becatehe ational

matches and captained Australia
in South Africa last year. He was
Bradman’s deputy in England in
1948.

Morris has played in 19 tests.
He captains New South Wales, is
an opening bat and is cciusidered
by many to be the best left-hander
in the world.

“sporting” conscience never ques-
tioned it because all we really
cared about was the fight.

But—heaven forgive us!—we
forgot that Woodcock is made of
flesh and bone like the rest of
us. The medicos can mend a
broken eye, but they can’t mend
mental injury that goes with
ft,

And so we come to the fight
itself. Woodcock opened confi-
dently enough, but his heavier
Opponent was not lacking in con-
fidence either. At the first sign
of real opposition from Gardner,
Woode became visibly wor-
ried. ere Gardner absorbed
some of his most lethal punches
with scarcely a blink, Woodcock
eollansed like a pricked balloon.

—Reutrr.





It was the end—of the fight,
but not, unfortunately, of the
inglorious and thoroughly degrad-~
ed “sport,” which,
the “experts”, somehow
a fillip from last
When it was over, Gardner
forced his broken mouth into a
semblance of a smile—and nobody
begrudged him his moment of
glory. But if he is a wise man,
he must surely have looked be-
yond the bevy of photographers
who swarmed into the ring to see

according te
received
night's fiasen.

Fight Swung
The fight swung from one to

the other. First Woodcock and] What was going on in the other
then Gardner appeared on the] Corner. j
point of going down, only to Eyes Dimmed

weather the storm of leather and
reverse the situation. But while
Woodcock became more worried,
Gardner’s confidence grew, and
it didn’t need a psychologist to
tell which was cause and whieh
was effect.

All the time Woodcock's gloved
hand was apprehensively feeling
his left eye, where the scar left
from his last encounter with
Savold stood out starkly on an
ugly swelling.

The result is a matter of his-
tory. Woodcock, after one last
desperate attempt to flatten Gard-
ner in the eleventh round, groped
his way to his corner, slumped
into the stool and rested his
weary head in his hands,

The choice he had to make was
between fighting on in the hope
of landing a k.o. blow on_ his
opponent, or risking his eyesight.
His decision was the only one a
wise man eould make.

If his eyes were dimmed by the
“glory” of the occasion, his ears
could surely not have been deaf
to the cheers of the crowd, who}
not ten minutes earlier had been}
calling for Woodcock to slaughter |
him. But that’s the way it goes.

As Woodcock retires into well-|
earned obscurity, I would like
to correct a wrong impression
that at least one daily newspap=x |
has spread. That is that a large
section of the crowd greeted
Gardner’s Victory with a vocifer-
ous rendering of “For He’s a Jolly
Good Fellow.” Gardner deserved
it, no doubt, but the singers
were a group of stalwart York-
shiremen who had _ journeyed
from the North to witness the
spectacle. The song was not for
the new champion, but for a very
worthy ex-champion, and it was
sung by men who can still think
straight even when their hero
is vanquished,





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= FONTAINE , ©}







, is
} Referee was Maj. A. R. Foster

OS8SAL*SOOPER MARKEE



FAIR EXCHANG





British and Empire Heavyweight champion.











Yearwood, B, Patterson (capt.), G
MacLean, D. Bannister, K. Ince,
G. Foster





It is understood that the Bar-

bad men’s team. for tonight's
match remains unchanged; the
cther teams have not yet been
selected. ,

After the games tonight there

will be a dance.



U.S. WARN
SOVIETS

WASHINGTON, Nev, 23
The United States has warned









the Soviet Union of “grave con-
sequences” if international agree-
ments on Austria “continue to be
disregarded,”

Admiral Alan G. Kirk, Ameri-
ean Ambassador in Moscow has
handed a second note to the Soviet
Foreign Ministry, protesting at
Soviet interference with the Aus-
trian Government’s control in the
Soviet Zone,—Reuter,
By Jimmy Hatlo |








BARBADOS ADVOCATE















FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1950
| % ~ = ack T ise - ee SASSO
13 7 eams Get Basket PITCH PINE | hye oe PESO POSTS o -
i - .
ry 7. . vy
| Ball Trophies ARRIVES 3 SEE US FOR:—
ie

| The Young Men’s Progressive A shipment of 157,000 feet of |¥

| ctu! won the rst division| pitch pine lumber from the Ba-|

troph

Bai!

won the second division trophy.} vessel Precise. The supply of

Tne Jabez Sealy Chalienge|jumber was consigned to Messrs

| Shield for the Knock Out com-|'T. Geddes Grant Limited.

petition was won by the Har- _ n ated
Vion College Cld Boys’ Club. Establishea T HERBERT Ltd Incorpor

| eam sien ae 1860 . . 1926

The prizes were presented , 9

| yester ay afternoon at Harrison’s What son To-day 10 & 11 Roebuck Street.

College

| Mr. Bob King, Managing Direc- Sheeting for the Trumpeter eocncceseneest
or of the Barbados Bottling Com- Cup continues at the Gov-

pany io making the presentation ernment Rifle Range at |
at the end of the Presentation 6.30 a.m. Request Performance

match at the College, said that he Court of Grand Sessions

was very pleased to see that there continue at 10 a.m. .
was competition in Basket Ball in Association of Cultural So- Mrs. A. L. STUART em its her School of Dancing
~ i land because it was a good a te ee in
Opening the presentation func- poo | Project for Barba- RE EDE I E 1
tion, Mr. H. H. Williams, Presi-|] q4@os) at #45, pam. V U V LL
dent of the Basket Ball Associa- hie a a ae
tion, gave a review of the work of Pasture at 7.30 p.m. 1950
that Association during the year. ae

Through the courtesy of the
British Council Represen-
tative, a film show will be

He said that the series of games

Music by the Police Band directed by Capt.
Stopped in July, but the presenta-

C. E. Raison, AR.C.M.MBE.



re Seales suas given at Boy Scouts’ .Q, “But the clowning of Jos. Tudor, Jr., as the Postman is
from England, He felt that the oben a6 Can In something of which not only the Revuedeville but the

whole of Barbados can be proud.
There has certainly not been anything to rival it on the
Empire stage in the past two years.”

Standard of basket ball during the
year was very good and he wanted
to congratulate the teams.

Police Band gives concert at
Hastings Rocks at 8 p.m.















for the Barbados Basket|hamas arrived at Barbados yes-
ompetition and the ¥.M.C.A.|terday by the 363-ton motor |













































































































GEO. HUNTE,
Gan aa, were m, Sia Comte wets in the Barbados Advocate.
i challenge Cup and 1e Secon -
PICTURE SHOWS Jack Gardner, ex-Guardsman, and Brice Woodeock, exchanging blows during a Division Cup presented by the Th W. h Come and see it for yourself
Bruce Woodcock retired in the eleventh round, Jack Gardner now becomes barbados Bottling Company, e eat er lst D mber 1950
Mr. Williams thanked Mr. Ham- TODAY ece
se —— | Mond, the Headmaster of Harrison ises:
w Pane} 4 College, for allowing them to use pe feu ke AT THE EMPIRE THEATRE
ie only ave ow shen : 5. .m.
RIFL YAGHT CLUB it: i sushi, comes oe] Hean aeen ie oe Matinee and Night Show
— : 6 .m.
=] rvices ing » seas , > rs *
SHOOTING TENNIS € — Fr ete wiki High Water: 3.01 am., 2.28 Orchestra $1.50; House $1.00; Balcony 72¢; Boxes $1.50
; , Secretary of. >» ~~ Associati : 2 ——S/
Results of yesterday’s games: = eo i et ins YESTERDAY
Agius, aad ay 10V a vote of thanks to win infall (Codrington 22
Results of the Rifle Shoot which _—* oe ip the function. in, #
took place yesterday aré as fol-| ; _ Seem Pee oir _Before the presentation, a com- Tetal for Month to Yester-
lows E. P. Taylor beat J. D. Trim-|bired team of Harrison College day: 9.41 ins.
NO. 1 mingham 6-—3, 0—6, 6—4, Old Boys and Y.M.P.C. defeated a Temperature (Max,) 83.5°F
A Class a G. H, Manning vs, D, E. Worme} combined team of the Island and Temperature (Min. ) 73.5°F ‘§
“ie Die en 34 eae te ¥.M.C.A, 39—19, || Wind Direction: (9 a.m.) ld em oes
Ist Mr. F. D. Davi ‘ ‘ Sig Pla a . g 3.N.E,
Ba Cant spe tomdain?! Ladies’ singles fy Bie SE com. anal] VENat mm)
Capt 5 - eee 34 ; (Semi Finais) vith 8 points while Greenidge and hour
ith, Major matey se Miss M. King beat Mrs. C. S.] Deane netted 6 points each. Best Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.844, .
B Class Lee 75, agi scorers for Island and Y.M.C.A. (3 pm.) 29,750
Ist, Mr, P. Chase ‘ « 82 Ladies’ Doubles were R. Forde 8 and C. Gittens 7. OY
2nd, R.S.M. Marshall ‘ oe Mrs. R. S. Bancroft and Miss ee :
3rd, Mr. M. A, Tucker 31]. Wood beat Mrs. F. D. Barnes
4th, R. S. Bancroft /and Mrs, J, Parkinson 6—0, 6—3.
K. S. Yearwood 31 t ig cals bh THE WHOLE TOWN’S TALKING ABOUT BLACK
P.C. C, Cumberbatch TO-DAY’S FIXTURES | PATENT
NO. 10 Men’s Singles : v
The Cadets (Semi Finals) : Ve are = LEATHER
7 Rounds at 300 Yds. H.P.S. 28 c%. HH, Manning vs. D. E. Worme,
Ist, Lt. Rudder (H.C.) 20 Ladies’ Singles pat -
2nd, Sgt. Marshall (H.C.) . 15 (Finals) 3 to 6.... $4.13
3rd, Pte. Beckles (Com.) . 15 Miss M. King vs. Mrs, D. E HOUSEHOLD CLEANSER 7 to 10.... $4.70
NO. 11 Warns “PEN NY TEST” 11 to1.... $5.93
Falling Plate Ladies’ Doubles
usbadon Reatmne Mrs, M. Legge and Miss D i : Wir
is}, Barbados wee a |}Austin vs. Miss L. Branch and TRY IT TODAY— Here s a quick way to WHITE
at ss I, Lenagan prove how easily and efficiently
A Class iia se Teta scat as (richie Lens CHEMICO cleans metal. Dab a little BUCKSKIN
10 Rounds at 600 Yds. H.P.S. 50{ Miss I Cox and Mrs. K, Lena- CHEMICO ona dail penny, rub briske |
Mr, G. F. Pligrim .. 48 |gan vs, Mrs. R. S. Bancroft and ly, and sec how brilliantly the coin Sizes:
2nd, Mr. 'T. A. L. Roberts 46 | Nilee Ds Wood gleams. $-M-O-0-T-H paste CHEMI-” 3 to 6... $3.86 =
18rd, Lt. Col. J. Connell .... 45 | Mixed Doubles CO cleans porcelain, tiles, glass, lino, to 6.... $3. : et ‘
}4th. Mr. 'T. G. McKinstry 45 | *. and Mrs. C. B, Sisnett vs. Daintwork, etc., with equal ease. 7 to 10... $4.36 ; a —-
. E, Worme and Mr. H. A EVELYN ROACH & (C6. “Tp. ll tol.... $504%
Z B Class ait (Jnr.) Bridgetown, — Barbados ° :
ond, Melt rt erie solo. ae, A. O'N. Skinner and Mr To Fit Children from 2 to 6 Years Old
era: E 3.M. Marshall .... 44 C. Thorne vs. Mr. and THE COUNTY CHEMICAL CO. LTD., SHIRLEY, BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND
8rd, R.S.M. M | E. P. Taylor SR ere
4th, Mr. G. BE, Martin ....... 44 i Cin aaod 2
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Major Gritlith Cup | You wiil never be able to get
Ist, Capt. J. R. Jordan .... 46 Unbreakable ‘Pots 0 {
2nd, Major O. F.C. Walcott 46 ; .
vo fe “9 eae tee Major Grits TY] They ge ye 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET r
1 p BQ ees ee de of h iror. material, an
fith Cup, Major O F, C, Walcott niy one soap oe will onver: faa ay imate of Rone
and Captain J. R. Jordan tied for iy os : that, type tela
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dan won, i e = * :
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Full Text



PAGE 1

FRIDAY NOVFMBFR M. 1*5* BARBADOS ADVOCATE Carpenter Sentenced To Die PAGE FITE TH: I VtiM.nKKX • Fram Page 1 IW fMI Ulll All. who told the Court he knew that if he told lira he would get burm up, uid he used to live in Sullen'* Alley with his mother James Babb was his father His two brothers and he were s'eepmg in a room outside the bedroom His brother awoke him and James Babb. his lather ran out of the bedroom. His bigger brother ran out of the house That brother and his sister went to the Police Station James told his mother to turn over on her belly and he gave her two lashes on her back and dragged her down on the floor. His other brother ran over at the next door i>eltfhlK.ur and after James Babb ran out he went with his brother. To Mr. Ward: There was a quarrel between his mother and his father. Wnen he was awakened he saw his father drag her off the bed and his brother ami Mste %  replaced her On It. After Allan Grants evidence the came Tor ihe Crown was closed. The Defence Addressing the Jury. Mr Ward told them that there was no doubt that Edna Grant had come to her death In an atrocious mannal Thai fact, howevn. ,. not to weigh iii their del:beration% when they retired to debate th" matter. Nor should sympathy for the accused person or the relatives of the dead woman in am way influence their decision The'v were only to weigh the evidence which was adduced In the Court He stressed thai the onus was 00 the Prosecution who had to establish that the woman wa k-lled by James Babb in such circumstances thai they could presume malice. If they fe.t that the alleged act was manslaughter and not murder, th-." accused was entitled to that verd.ct. The evidence of the witnesses was very conflicting. Three of them were supposed to have witnessed a scene in the bedroom at the same time. The one had said that he saw nine blows passed and the other two said that none wee passed. That, he ar. S ieri. was a serious discrepancy. ow. he asked, could thev be i xplained away? The witness Hilda had said that when Babb ran out of th; house, he was dressed In sleeping attire, a vest and a drawers, while her brother said that he had on a blue pants. He was alleged to have return ed when two of them went to the police station and then to have battered the woman to death. The pants that was produced in court and whi-h was examined by the Government Ituctcriolop.r; was proved to have not one drop >>f blood on the outside. Yet blood WD. spattered all about the room Was It Lben a miracle that he should have gone into the house and battered her to death. and that blood should spatter every place except upon his pants And the hammer he was alleged to have battered her with, why did it not have a trace of blood? The doctor had said tha" it would have been highly Improbable that the hammer the pohco produced could have fruclurot the skull In such a manner and that no traces of blood or hair should be found upon it. Nor could it be held that the hammer was washed. The police who had removed it from the coop said he saw stains on it, stains which would not have been thorg had Babb wsalmi the haminci mil those stains were nut t nf.rinr-d in lie btOOd battl Retaliation The violence that was used aga ins t th woman could have been m retaliation of violence which was ustd against the accused. Thus the circ.ii.ist.inet's under which she would have lnsl her life would h.ive fulled lo have been proved by the Prosecution and It might then drop to manslaughter Nobody knew how the fight started. Both Babb and Grant might have been attacked by %  onteLociy outside That possibility could not be ruled nut. Were they holding that he did the murder because he had blood on his clothes? They should remember that Babb hod wounds, too. and his clothes could have been blood stained from his own wounds. Thus three possibilities War* floating about. Not only wtstl the Prosecution was alleging, but somebody else could have done it or they could have started a row and light and the woman h,id ,:ot killed. In which case Babb was entitled to an acquittal. The English law was that it was better that 20 guilty persons escape than one innoccn" be hanged. The evidence the*, the Crown had put forward win not strong enough to swing cat. It was unsatisfactory. The girl had. In addition t. other discrepancies. said ilia' she awoke the boys after Bab! ran out., while the boys wen stating that they saw what had happened. It was suggested that sotne. g might have attacked i both of them. Would such a | strong man as Babb when he had got a few cuts In I hotfoot it so hurriedly It was said mat possibilities were floating in the gar, task) might be floating ove, Australia for what he saw of them. The case was so clearly proved, that there was nothing he could say to help them come to their conclusion Judge Sums Up First point made by the Chief Justice when he summed up lo the jury was a warning to them not to be swayed by sympathy one wav or the other. "Soon will tall to your lot", he said, "one of the solemn duties which come to citirens of the island, and you will shortly have to retire, and deliber. att and consider your verdict "You will not be swayed b> sympathy one way or the other It is sad for you. and for me, to see the accused in tin which he occupies charged with this serious offence, as it Is sad to see anyone in the dock churjied with this or any other offence "But sympathy towards the an*1 cused will play no pa'', in yOU di'liberalions, and must not sway you anymore than must sympathy towards the unfortunate woman, who. It has been admitted by the Defence, was brutally and foully done to death. Again, you must not be swayed by sympathy for' the four children ol the deceased, whom you have seen and heard. "Your duty is to try the case on the evidence which you have heard and to draw such deductions and such inferences from that evidence as you feel should be drawn. You are not here lo indulge In the realms of fancy, or matters which are floating in the air—that is a term which has been used to-day. You are here to try the case on the evidence and on the Inferences which you are ntUled to draw from the evidence "A person who inflicts grievous injuries on another, intending to kill that iiersmi. or intending to inflict grievous bodily harm although nut intending to kill, but from which grievous bodily harm death a n au a t i If guilty of murder. If there be present malice aforethought express or implied." The Chief Justice explained malice aforethought express or implied. He said that malice aforethought simply meant a wicked intention either to murder or to cpuse grievous bodily harm from whuh death ensued. That wicked intention could be evidenced by threats or lying In wait on previous occasions. The wicked intention might be Implied by the nature of the implement used or other circumstances of the case, the law held thai a man intended the reasonable conse* of his action. as the duty of the Prosecui establish the guilt of the accused beyond reasonable doubt. If they were not so satisfied they must acquit the accused. But the doubt must not be u whimsical one. It must be such a doubt as if it arose in the course of their business affairs, it would make them refrain from taking a particular course The Defence in that case was in a way two-fold, the Chief Juslio said. Mr. Ward had urged on th one hand that the Prosecution had not established the guilt of the accused beyond reasonable doubt, and on ihe other hand that If they did not believe ihe story of the little boys about the second attack of which they spoke, and bearing in mind that Ihe accused also had wounds, there was the possibility that there might have been a light, and so the accused could only bo convicted of man slaughter. In considering the case, the Chief Justice told the jury, they would realise that there was no evidence whatsoever of how the wounds on the accused were inflicted. There was no evident* as to whether they had been %  alt inflicted or not. Another point made by the Chief Justice was that they (the jury) were not concerned with the question of punishment That was inflicted, as they probably knew, not only to punish the individual concerned, but also as a deterrent to prevent other people from committing offences. That was the greater object of uuni*hment. But they were not concerned with that. Their duty was clear, to try the case on the evidence and to say whether the accused was guilty or not guilty. The Chief Justice then recounted briefly the points made by Counsel on both sides, reminding them of salient parts of the evidence. He mentioned the discrepancies which had occurred In ihe evidence, and told them it was (or them to nay what they thought of them They were to con-nier whether those discrepancies indicated that the four youna children whose ages ranged from fourteen to seven had invented a story against the accused, or whether they were the discrepancies lhat could be expected from children of those ages, who had gone through such an expenenc TH8 BVBBOatBEN TatEE by Lord Nelson which n iintned being Trafalgar Square Loses A Tree THE LAROI evergreen tret in Trafalgar Squan'. which for many years has been shading wood-cull* H -. barbers and laxi drivers from sun uttd rain, has now been tiimmed to nearly-a stump. This tree IN extremely . calmly said: "America is one of the united Nations O ally, it was also the day when the 'csserscook. frank Camacho, waa married. %  %  >. I,I MI* Roberts was commemorating the occasion, it did not mean a holidnv for its crew. While the bunting flew, the crew were busy freeing the ship's batches' Ol Ptna lumber. Hem. w.. %  -..',. ..ii. hag bean master of the JtltMsUj Hubert* only for a few months, but he has been K >ing to sea for about 34 years, uring '.Intime he worked on some 26 schooners and motOf vessels. Watson was a captain for 20 years IVfoie taking over the /rsUll Roberts, he skippered the motor ship Catieoro which traded between Columbia and the United s: % %  "Mine is a very eventful sea life." he said lie has experienced many storms and disturbances and many a drift His last experience of a storm was during the trip before this oo<-. whan the Jew Mel Roberts was tossed about for 24 hours oft the East Coast of Florida The Jenkins RobfTfl was then Philadelphia bound from Nassau with a load of sciap lion Fortunately, nobjody was hurt, to damage was done lo the ship and none of the cargo was lost An accident Captain Watson remembered well, was the sinking of the Lady Shoe off the coast of Cuba In 1923 He was the Chief Officer of the iMdy Shoe This was his only experience ol a ship sinking out to sea. The Jenkins Roberta it expected to leave port on Minds) tol POftof-Sualn. Trinidad Sclmmburgh in his "History of Barbados'* tells how before tin %  %  % %  a* : kid on Pebruar> M, iHi:t. fi i the erection I II % %  "•• 1 %  Statue the ai tailed the "Green A committee appointed for Ihe execution ol tjlf erection of the statue pimhitn 1 the "Green" for f 1.050 and wards this gum the Lef-talattlr* contributed £500 The ni %  -hen changed from the "Green' to Trafalgar Square Mr. J. W B Cheneiy told the "Advocate" yesterday that M. I.ell. n in lus honk "Sun.,. 1'ha.n Barbados Life" states that Mill tree was blown down dtir.ng the Storm and Barbadians thinking Id would come to un end not llieir strongest men to push I' back up Since that time this evergreen %  ii too big to be pughad around and instead it served lb* i seful purpose cf a shelter Some lighteiiiien and InboUiei used to lake their snack, ui,d< i branches daily but yesterday it was vacated. Even the woodcutters do not Ilka working in ths Htn and for Ihe outdoor barbei It is most inconvenient. Wrong Parking Reginald Ouml I I George Workycslcrday ordered i His Worship M A %  H UanschaU to paj %  Una of 20/in 28 days or in default one month's imprisonment, lie asi .if parkii OBI Q MS <*• a n stricted area on October 14. Tim police said in their evidence that spoken to ;• n bluntly refused to move the M being awakened in the early hour of the morning, and who wen giving evidence five months afte the occurrence. The jury retired at live minutes past two and returned to Court with their verdict one hour later Overwhelm in | Mr. Fle'd, for the Crown. toM the jury that the evidencewas so overwhelming that there wag no need for any harangue BfoBl him. The weight of the (Wtdonce did not necessarily depend upon ihe age of the witness, but on his intelligence. They had *U the three children, a girl ol il and two boys of 12 and 11. TV l %  was no doubt that they were children of understanding. They seemed to be well brought up and to be sensible The slight diicrepancies m certain points ol their testimonies were in aonM respects like any reasonably grown up person's testimony. They should imagine themselves awakened suddenly and the scene of a fight at night Did they think that they could member in meticulous detail every incident' The story which the Prose-ution had brought forward was J reasonable and convincing story DM they think that the woman had any enmity for Babb more than she told him that site more children. want to work fur i*n> PLCM PfDDlNGS-l-m tins $ .OL, PLUM PUDDINGS—2-tb ting I 46 HEINZ MANGO CHUTNEY*—per bot M CHIVEJ'S CY-FFKF F-SSENCF. per but B PRUNES IN SYRUP l-Tb tin* i:i SEEDLESS ORAPES—per Un 5" A CHIVERS RASPBF.RRIES per tin PINEAPPLE .ll'ICF-per tin |] CHIVERS TURNIPS—per tin 4|i FANCY M ACKER El,-per tin .an CHICKEN HADDIES per tin 411 HORLICKfl MALTED MILK—per bet 1 2.1 THE PARCELS ARE COMING Already the Christmas parcel nii.ll nas .tailed to come in, the Postmaster told the Advocate yW itin.iv. These include merchant goods as well as gift parcels At the new parcel department on the wharf, the twelve racks which hold over 2,000 parcels are cry nearly tilled. A fairly large lumber of parcels are IMI tho loor while there are several till unopened. The Postmaster said 'hut opening of parrel mail had sjieedcd up considerably since the taking r of the new department ant I as well. ItM 1 %  banU) likely to be the ruMom ary congestion experienced dur ing the Christmas season as the building could house twice many parcel* .. %  the old department. The posting of gill parci'N from people here to their relative the States and the United K dotn had been very heavy dnrlnn and it 1* sure to be heavier in a week or two. In charge of ihe new department is Mr. K. C. Lewis who haeleven assistants "I am glad to %my," said the Postmaster, that this staff has the situation -vei: in band He said that letter and other mall were still norrnaJ New Books it Library To-morrow A MU I (II 1 .; riON books will up phi laUon at the Public Lib H o'clock 10 linn"morning The majority wfll be msking Uair appearance on the Labrsrv thl in I tttTM while p few are replacements They are nearly all ft Among the new 1 Houag In The Sun" by Dane Chandos who is also the author of "Village in the Sun" and The Story of Zarak Khan' by A J Bevan The last mentioned tell* the story of Khan, a hero ol th. n.ngle iigTting in Burma during the last war. who saved the British lold'ers. He stated that lie loved the British soldier Uttla but hated the Japs more "Noble Essence**', the liflh and final volume by Sir Otbert Sit ..eii ,tin Included In lbs eellection The other few vohamej UW 1 .1,1 iT) Another is ., story ol Kiu Michael of Rumania "Crown against Sickle" bv Arthur Gould Lee, retired AnVice Marshal Lea teUi at King; lalgltllH Itehmd ihe hoi Cnnaln I Spied Ibr Malta" by Nora Murray give* an authentic account of a Russian-barn war bride who delicti the Kremlin 10 many the man she lovod There is also the tovi b %  Chekhov In M\ I %  AvUou nwouel Robert Henrique*. Geoffiev < .1 terell's Strut and N Mr Midslupni.iii HoiiiUlowci" by C s forester, and 1 Leaves of Summer" t>% Oriel Malet Elephanl lti|l by l.t Col J. II William* is anolhei good book It tells o| |ha ,;!. lance given by elop h ai I the 1914-18 war and llai now they irere handle.* Forty-two illuttrations are ln elude %  T HE I'OUti: BAND will give ., o oncart si Haatlnj at 8 o'clock lo-nlghl The nro%  rammc 1-H toUowi Radio Diffusion Manh M.I %  BeerywHsare' Bri Ci % %  C.Mdaefor Col E Mlirrrll Overture "CUsstca" FUIM,J. including excerpts from "WilUarn Tall", Toreadoi Sou Hungarian Rhapsody b) Li/i. and 'he famous Largo lla-nlet Coi.dncf.ir: SjR Cecil i from Snanlah *biltai 1 I 1 Tango .'•1 Serenade Night in tsann (3i 1^.* Toros p. Lecoatbt Conahtctof Cpl w 1 s.ni. Bartered Bride: (i) Overture, Village Scene, Love Duel and Opening, Chin us {'il Jenik's Ana and Dance % %  the Villagers (4) March ot the Coii.eiii.iir Teasing Duet and DBBI I nf the Comedians Lotter Condurtor Cpl B Morris Idyll—The fllnw Worm. P Unefce C*pl E Murrell Finian's RainUiw BwrloN l^inr Sal Cecil Archer : 1 it.,., %  eaia *Sorfy I con't see yoyf* ^j/Ooo'tlef.ite ^2^1 happeo.lo you I ievw.\ iniMjff.f. :: %  %  PURINA %  %  PIGEON CHOW %  %  ri. JASON JONES 81 CO. LTD. liti BJ V-V-V.V.-.W.V.V.V mi HEGUCT UTTli BUMS THI IMINO TO V> It UNGUENTINt Mm Ml-Mf -.K. -.. ,-^jA a -W. *m*mm.. —•/^T^ UHGUINTIN( -.o —i j Jtm • HUtVI *AM isssssBB. • SMMOTI Ntauae r^asaw '" %  -yy:i:TK8T TREAT:" Toffee MADE IN U.K. The Perfection of Confection UUnr PAIM rOFFCt ttO flL< WURHS LONDON. W.3 c hirtot Hiulnl PU ('.iri.llK'to' 26 COMING 1 ...1.1 %  • 1 cxengers from the U.K. win bo arriving here tn the Kldem & Fyffes passenger ship "C.olilto" which I* dua to call at Barbados at 9 n. on Saturday. The Gointo" will be leaving port about 4 pm. the same day for Trinidad Man 1 Will, r & llaynes Co. Ltd. are I agents (Plared 1 n U %  aston of i\„ 1,1,th ,,t in,. ( %  1 belh's First I..in. Prince CharU-s Conductor Cpl Wilfred Bt l Bnlracte Celebre Perpetuum Mobile Slrauss The lieauty and freshness 1 t all Johann Strauss' Music has been a contii, pure delight to muah lovers, and tali brtfjhl merry uuir piece is no exception The 1 loecopic variations on the Stght Dal Ibeioe BTl ' ecedingl> attrai tive. ins and amusing ("'....(IK. U>T C|l| V. Mi.Ill Rythmlc"Nora. Nora"— MurrcU Condaci-.r Sgl Archer A TIIIFF rtost I bit %  • l0 value. $4u. owned by Eugent llarrett ol Mount Fi lemfehtu, S' Michael, from OUttldo the nous* of Verona Fcnly at Kiugsto: Road on Wednesday Another cycle belonging ., 1. M.*eley of St. HaUnlBl Christ Church, which was reported stolen from outside building at Turlor Streat on ScuUnnber 27, was found In a Aeh of canes at Bulkelcy Rental by Clairmonte BrathvJordons, St. George Tl .-is and head light were Brulhwaite took it Into UW "' U • I!' PollOa Station T ill. COUMTH f thf Ish matk.'t tuH been r*i 1 %  and ion for the coming flying "*h %  ink 00 n\mg listi were brought n. Eighty pounds of Albacore wer %  Old In the market earlier In thl week and on the same day t A Oertain ('tire FOR Whooping Cough PERTUSSIN $1.50 Alsi. for Hi ,,!.,,, And Bonbons de Pertussin (LOZENGES) $1.08 lair Sore Throat and Pertussin Balsam $1.50 Fur rstrrnal application hi | cases of obatlnate rough. ) whooplns rourh and \\ .1-ihtn.iin iiiuhiionI Pedussin Drops 3/9 Hrup Into nose lor all sriilr alid rhronle afferlloii J the 11 i' %  -H"i • %  II.-"' seaaaa. 11 in \ nor 1 MIS nut SOW IIIIM, SRKVIAL V1H-I.L THE POLLOWINO Fimirrd and Flnwcrcd ART SILK Iroin Wholrojlr Mm on IfftpaV llon la Bruce Wealherhead Ltd. $2.25 to 4.50 yd. U.OWKKKD SATIN $UI )' %  • Coloured STRH'KD SATIN ill $4.10 yd. ALIOVER LACE t $2.66 *• 2.77 yd in Pink. Blue, OtMM, llack and White IIKODKKIK ANfil.AIS n Dfl S A AH i ,1 in Pink and Blue $iM & 4.4D J'fl. in Pink. Green and While ,ll Si.4U 10 4.S.I )0. I CKINKLK oaoaattn ,. in Pink, Blue and < %  > %  yd. IIARttlSON'S — WAl 2664 shark %  .tl. ivl f. MivMf/o scam A ro.. t.ta. Imperial Corsetry miiiK sun roisn< y lirtAsslCHI *t Ot U. Price, Irom $• IK l *3. Pink NUspless *llh lace tups Klaek >i>d White Plain in Pink only Hit" H to 46 Prftesa uom n ie to $211 PANTls" OIRIH.KS M.iliiiri. -oil I -II.. %ns Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, 11, 12, ft 13 Broad Street


+P

tN i







1
‘
|



Friday

Â¥

November 24

1935@



Ch

rchill Warns —
Labour Of Censure



Motion In House
Qver Tanks For Egypt

WINSTON CHURCHILL ended a scene of up-

roar in the House of Commons today by
warning the Government that he would hold a
censure motion over its head unless Parliament

LONDON, Nov. 23

had a debate before tanks were sent to Egypt.

The Conservative Opposition last night put
down a censure motion regretting that the Gov-
ernment was unwilling to suspend export of arms
including Centurion tanks to Egypt while the 1936
Anglo-Egyptian Treaty was being challenged by
the Egyptian Government.

— - - ao Churchill told the House to-day
he was prepared to withdraw his
if the Government would

by
Under-

Griffiths Supports
Fund For The Late
Dr. Harold Moody

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Nov. 23.
Mr. James Griffiths, Secretary
of State for the Colonies, his pre-
@ecessor, Mr. Arthur Creech Jones
and the Commissioner in South-
East Asia, Malcolm MacDonaid
are among those actively sup-
porting the appeal for the rais-
ing of a 500 Guinea Fund in
order to perpetuate the memory
of Jamaica’s famed Dr. Harold



Moody who died over three years| who said his censure motion would |

ago.

A two-fold scheme is being
undertaken. One is to acquive a
bronze bust of Dr, Moody by his
distinguished sculptor — brother
Ronald Moody and present it to
the Headquarters of the London
Missionary Society with which
Moody was long associated

The second part of the scheme

is the establishment of a prize| tried to answer, : ir
fund for coloured students from| There were Shouts of “‘erder
the West Indies and Africa. jand “sit down” as the duel be-|

Three hundred guineas of the}
proposed fund would be devoted;
to the latter purpose.

A letter in the “London Times” |
to-day announcing the launching}
of the fund and signed by, among
ethers Lord» Ammon, Griffiths,
Creech Jones and MacDonald re-
fers to Dr. Moody as “one of the
most remarkable men in the re-
ligious and social life of England
; -one of the greatest figures
which the coloured races have
provided since the Emancipation.”

It is recalled that he was the
first President of the League of
Coloured Peoples and was a be-
loved physician in South-East
London.

Chairman of the appeal fund is
Rev. David A. Vaughan and the
Secretary Mr. George A. Green-
wood.



China’s Charges For
“Little Assembly”

LAKE SUCCESS, Nov, 23

The United Nations Political
Committee to-day decided to refer
to the “Little Assembly” Nation-
alist China’s charges of Soviet
aggression against China.

Voting was 34”in favour, 17 op-
posed and 7 abstentions. During
the debate Dr, T. F,. Tsiang, Chin-
ese Nationalist delegate, accused
Britain and France of following an
appeasement policy similar
to their stand before World War II,
“but with much more serious ‘eon-
sequences.” —Reuter.



KILLED BY LIGHTNING

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 23
Fifty — four - year - old Boodram
Ramessar a Warrenville resident
was killed by lightning in Wed-
nesday’s rainstorm while his son
and daughter-in-law were injured,
The three victims were working in
a rice field when the storm burst,
For the second time in two
Weeks the Maracas River over-
flowed its banks destroying crops.
Maracas Village was entirely
isolated for more than two hours.

—Can. Press.

THE

PICTURED HERE are the members of the Ladies’

B.W.LA. yesterday evening

motion
endorse the statement
Ernest Davies, Foreign
Secretary last night.
This was that no more
would go to Egypt until Foreign
Secretary Ernest Bevin had con-

made

cluded talks next week with the

Egyptian Foreign Minister.
Churchill said that Davies’

statement implied there would be

a debate before tanks were sent,
But Herbert Morrison disputed

this, saying that Davies could not |

promise a debate.

Morrison said he did not rule
out a debate but they must wait
and see if it was necessary after
Bevin had reported to Parliament.
| This did not satisfy Churchill

stand and that the Opposition
}would press for a debate next
week,
The uproar
Churchill

started when
asked the Govern-

ment to explain why it had
| changed its mind = suddenly
| about sending t s Morrison
, Was inaudible at (nes amid in-

terruptions from Churchill as he




tween the two men developed,
The scene arose from the sud-

Ernest
Centurion |

Foreign Under-Secretary
Davies that no more

tanks would be sent to Egypt un- |}

til Bevin has concluded talks next
week with the Egyptian Foreign
Minister. |

This announcement of the re- |
version of the Government’s pre- |
vious policy was made after sev-
eral Labour members had threat- |

ened revolt and warned they
would vote against the Govern-
ment if it did not change its |
policy

Troops Safety
At one point when he was in-|
terrupted from the Government |
benches Churchill said: “Do those |
who are laughing opposite realise
these are matters which affect the
lives and safety of our troops?”
Eventually Morrison said he as-!
sociated himself with Davies’
statement that no more tanks|/
would go to Egypt before Bevin |
had ended his talks with the
@ On page 7.

Sell Shaw Books

BUENOS AIRES, Nov. 23.

A Court of Appeal ruled that
the full edition of Bernard Shaw’s
works may freely be sold here.
Lawrence Smith, Shaw’s repre-
sentative here, sued the editor
of the “Americana” for a copy-
wight infringed upon several
weeks ago. On appeal to-day the
Judge established that since Smith





filed register books, he has no
claim.
Commented Smith to-night

“According to English law no ade
ministration is necessary.”
—Reuter,

JULIANA DINED AT
BUCKINGHAM PALACE

LONDON, Nov, 23

Queen Juliana and Prince
Bernhard were ent@rtained by
King George and Queen Elizabeth
at a small private dinner at
Buckingham Palace _ tonight.
Guests included other members
of the Royal Family and the Eari
end Countess Mountbatten | of
Burma .—Reuter.

NYMPHS ARE HERE

Water

tanks

| first with the

Polo team 1

tide
|
|

|

ainsonenniyp einai

|

F. L, Waicott, M.C.P



| Shaw ’s Ashes

| Scattered

InHis Garden {Play To Goalless Draw).

AYOT, ST. LAWRENCE,
Hertfordshire, Nov, 23
ashes of George Bernard
were scattered over the
of his home here to-day.

The
| Shaw
| garden

j}den announcement last night by | This private ceremony ended the
| controversy over whether the great

playwright should be buried among
Britain’s immortals in Westminster
Abbey or whether his ashes should
rest in Dublin his birthplace.

It was at Shaw’s own request
that his last remains were to be
disposed of in this way, mingled
ashes of his wife.
In clause three of his will_pub-
lished to-day he said: “Personally
I prefer a garden to a cloister.”
In clause four of the will whieh
vas also published, Shaw asked
that no memorial to him should
take the form of a cross “or any

other instrument of torture or
symbol of blood sacrifice.”
And no monument to him

should suggest that he accepted the
tenets of any church because his
religion could not be more specifi-
cally defined than “a believer in
creative evolution.”

Shaw's ashes were scattered
by Dr. C. T. Probyn who attend-
ed the 94-year-old dramatist
until he died on November 2,

Most of Shaw’s large fortune,
details of which have not been
published, is expected to go to
advancing his plans for a new
English alphabet of 40 to 44
letters instead of the present 26.
Other beneficiaries are expected

to be the British Museum, the
Royal Academy of Dramatic Art
and the Dublin Art Gallery.

The last chapter of the Shaw
story began early this morning
when F. Wyndsam Hyrst, public
trustee charged with looking after
Shaw’s will accompanied by two
other trustee officers drove to
Golders Green crematorium im
North London to collect two bronze
polished caskets inscribed: George
3ernard Shaw, 2 Nov. 1950 and
Mrs. Bernard Shaw, 12 Sept. 1943.

Mrs, Shaw’s casket imeasured
about nine iniches by four inches
an inch or so larger than that of
her husband. His had been made
so that it would fit exactly on top
of hers. At noon seven persons

@ On page 7.



who arrived from Trinidad by

OFF TO CURACAO yesterday evening by B.W.I.A. via Trinidad for
aes: -. A. om mae. Agricultural Adviser to C.D. and W,,
olonia ttache at the British Embassy in Washington and a Mem of the Caribbean Commission, Mrs
| C.D. and W., Mr. J. C. Hotchkiss, Assistant Adviser for Agricultural "Be av ir G :

for Development and Welfare in the West Indies, Hon'ble H. Garnet Gordon, 0 BE
mission, Mr, Philip Hewitt-Myring, Public Relations Adviser, C.D.




————

DELEGATES FOR @TURACAO TALKS

‘x





-

(Left to
Thompson,
Stenographer
, Comptroter
Caribbean Com

and W. and Mr.

wa. Fourth Session of the West Indien Conference were
‘s Joan Smith, Clerk C.D. and W.. Mr. J. Kenneth
Kath Walcott
and W., Sir George Seol, K CM G
of St. Lucia and a mimber of th
and W., Mr. Bernard Rolfe of the Secretariat of C D

ucation, C.D

Trinidad—Barbados

Kifteen Refuse
Super-State Call

STRASBOURG, Nov. 23
The fifteen-nation assembly ol
inbers of Parliament from free
rope by a roll call vote tonight

used to aceept a proposal call-
for

VISITING LADIES DEFEAT

European super state

‘ . é Voting was 89 for the proposal

HOMESTERS 4d—z2 against and 12 abstentions

. This was the key vote in the

‘ Sah Y ¥ ‘ i battle between quick and = slow
THE first Test in the Intereolonial Water Polo series

groups of the Assembly which
between Trinidad and Barbados opened last night at the hes vontinuéd in private and pub-
Barbados Aquatic Club. Two Games were played. The /!!° for several days. The sponsor

Trinidad Ladies defeated the Barbados Ladies four goals to| pithy, (°/(0n were @ group of
two. The mens mateh was played to a thrilling goalless | cook immediate creation of tht
draw. This is the third encounter between Trinidad and |«Unitea States of Burope.”
Barbados at Water Polo. They proposed “that there

3 Powers Will
ReleaseSecrets
Of The Atom

WASHINGTON, Nov. 23

Britain, Canada and the -United
States

A crowd of 800 people saw the |Should be set up among member
matches which were played under | States or certain of them politica)

floodlight. For the Trinidad Ladies | authority which has competence
Rita Sellier scored 2 goals and|to deal with problems of security
Marissa Plimmer and Bernadette |end foreign policy.—Reuter,

Anderson one each. For Barbados
the Chandler sisters Jean and
Phyllis scored one goal each

123 Killed In U.S.

Holiday Accidents

The Trinidad ladies although
much. heavier than their oppon-
ents had a difficult time getting
through

have agread t release the Barbados back line Me aleadancaratat ‘i i
some atomic sens ial a, frieda Carmichael playing substi- NEW YORK, Nov. 23

tute in goal for Ann Eekstein (who

America’s Thanksgiving holiday
was sick) tried her best but the

not aid rival nations in the de- accidental deaths had risen to 128

velopment of the military appli-

: , ye Tia, $F |, Trinidad team’s attacks were fre- | by noon today From 6 o'clock
oe diate Phsdee leseres auent and accurate. Barbados was on bhrcesecry a aoe wh oars
ae Ss ~}unfortunate in not scoring more | tied in traffle accidents Another
ounieen announced today, goals; they missed two ecitén, op- | six died from various causes and
‘he information covers the} portunities which cost them the}76 died in a® Long Island rafl
design, construction and opera-| match. crash last night, The last ‘Thanks
tion of five low power nuclear wn ‘ wiving accidental deaths totalled
reactors used for research pur- rhe men’s game, of course,|1§1--a record for the holiday
poses, was the highlight of the evening | or this number 13 resulted from
The Commission’s announce- Perhaps it was the most excit- | tpame crashes and 58 from “mis-
ment today said Britain had agreed ing game of Water Polo ever | cellaneous” sources including 4)
to release details of “gleep” the| Seen in Barbados. It was a bit] ,ijled in tornadoes. Reuter

too rough however, and two
players were ordered from the
water in the second half due to

uranium and graphite reactor at
Harwell, and Canada had agreed
release

to information about a i | ital 1 e
“zeep,” the uranium and heavy| Tough tactics. Britain, France
goa i at Chalk River, In Good Form U.S. Warn Russia
The announcement said: “The] The Trinidad team is greatly

three Governments have determin-

' /ASHINGTON, Nov. 2%
improved since the last encounter WASHINGTON, (Ni ,





ed that release of this informa-]| with Barbados ahd the local boys The United States, Britain and

tuon will speed the training of| had to try every trick to stop them | * {ce han warned the Soviet

nuclear reactor engineers and|from scoring. Barcant, Eckstein © 20% Of “grave consequences” if

technicians and will hasten atomic| and Anderson were in good form ternational agreements on Aus-
energy development in’ these}and were always dangerous. The u continue to be disregarded

countries particularly for peace-| Barbados forwards too went all! Notes couched in similar terms

time applications,”’—Reuter. out to score and indeed, took more | Handed yesterday to Andrei

_—_—— shots than their rivals. The de-|Gromyko, Soviet acting Foreign

RED CHINESE fence play on both sides including | Minister by the British, French

GOING TO US pea secpine by beth custodians | and American Ambassadors pro-

o> as a ry oe. Srarnern The | tested at Soviet interference with

: i . cond test takes place to-night atithe Austrian Government's con-

LONDON, Nov. 23 9 o'cloe e othe Panel : ea Sa s

Nine Chinese Communist deie- |). ee 9 nm another huge crowd he ies: Govien Some “eT ee,

gates to the U.N, left here by ai: Din tanria Ward Le Pet eee tie hl a State

to-day for New York. They had ams were was no evidence at ustrian

uuthorities in
of their police

the administration

had been unable to

arrived earlier from Prague at

Trinidad Ladies: P
Northolt and went straight frorn

Knaggs, A
Bradley, R. Sellier (capt.)



j 1 J. Da- | mainte law and ier, rathe
there to London airport to catch | Silva, B. Anderson, P. Sellier, oe had been peewented etn
their New York plane. M. Plimmer, doing so by Soviet intervention
ee ca —Reuter. % @n page 8 t —Reuter,
Carpen ter Sent dTo Di
James Babb, the second man at the General Hospital, lived Jen’s Alley making a search. He
so far at this sitting of the Cour along with Grant’s four children. found a pair of scissors which
of Grand Sessions to be con- The childven were the only eye- appeared to have blood stains
victed of the murder of his Witnesses of the crime. on. it,
reputed wife, was yesterday The case for the Crown was To Mr. Ward: He saw no
sentenced by His Honour the conducted by Mr. F. E, Field, hammer at the house. Captain
Chief Justice, Sir Allan Col- Acting Attornéy General. Babb EB. Grant, Superintendent of
lymore, to be hanged. The was vepresented by Mr. D. H. L. police, said that about 4 a.m
victim of what was described as

i Ward. Both Counsel addressed he went to the General Hospital.
a brutal doing





to death was the Jury yesterday morning Other policemen were there. He
Edna Grant with whom Babb told Babb he was charged with
had lived for more than two Evidence murder and cautioned’ nim
years é When hearing of the case re- Hilda Grant (recalled) said
Babb displayed no particular gymed yesterday Cpl Leon she was present when Cpl
emotion as the foreman of the Devonish of District “A” Station Devonish found a pair of scis-
jury gave their verdict or when said that on July 13 he was de- sors. She had used them on July
tne Chief Justice pronounced tailed to assist in carrying out 12. Tinney were very clean at
the death sentence, but a wo- investigations into the death of the time On that night they |
man, said to be his sister, and Edna Grant. He first saw James were in her mother’s bedtoom
who was standing at one of the Babb at Brittons Hill and sub- P.¢ Bridgeman said that o1
doors of the courthouse, fainte sequently in the prison He July 13 he was detailed for dut
and had to be taken from the was wearing a striped grey at a house in Bullen’s Alle
pants, a white vest and drawers, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The
of the murder was Ju! The three garments were all police photographer came at the
13 this year and it took place 1 blood stained. He took them off end of that time. During the |
Bullen’s Alley, Dalkeith Roa Babb and delivered them to Dr. time he was there, no one went
at the small house where Babb, Walcott into the houst i}
a rpenter, and Grant, a mai Later that he was at Bu @ on page 5 (

Price:
FIVE | CENTS
Rear 553
f



RED CHINESE TROOPS FALLING BACK

As U.N. Prepare
For Offensive

U.S. Troops 3 Miles From
Shattered Chongju

TOKYO, Nov. 23
UNITED NATIONS TROOPS swung forward
in north-west Korea tonight in a move believed
to foreshadow renewed offensive towards North
Korean and Chinese Communist defences. Bigger
forces were going up after nearly two weeks of
stalking or playing for time.

But Chinese who have been carefully avoiding battle
recently were reported still withdrawing wherever con-
tact with the United Nations looked likely.

In the west one patrol of the United States 24th Divis-
on to within 3 miles of the shell shattered city of
Chongju without resistance.

in the east, American advance
) troops extended their hold on the

a - Manchurian frontier to six miles
I rench Reject | today in their western drive from
5 ° be eat ee town of ae
4 M t » | United States marines widening
I our Oo 10ns the split between Communists in
the eastern and western corners
PARIS, Nov. 23 of the Korean Peninsula pushed
The French National Assembly] further up the @astern side of the
ight rejected by 500 votes to] Choisin Yyeservoir dispersing
the Gaullist motion condemn-|cnemy resistance
the “policy of incoherencs ;
cilowed by the Government” ir South Koreans brushed aside
ido-China light opposition and got within
5 miles of the key north-eastern
The Assembly rejected by 418 port of Chongjin 50. miles
tes to 171 the Communist mo from Russia, the Communista
on ealling for immediate nego- were expected to make a deter-
tions with Vietnam's leader He mined stand inside the snow-
hi Minh It rejected by 478 bound port of Chongjin whieh
otes to 100 a motion tabled by was shelled on Tuesday by the
be right wing Republican Liberty American cruiser Saint Paul.
‘arty calling on the Government The lull on the main north-
“practise at last a firm anc] western front continued, activity
oherent policy in Indo-China,’ | being confined to patrol skir-
(t also rejected by 413 votes to 186] mishes. American First Cavalry
» motion tabled by several left] patrols withdrew after driving
ving and pro-Communist Inde-| rine miles north of Yongbon
sndents calling on the Govern-| South Kereans clashed success-
nent to “engage without delay] fully with two enemy groups 9
mn a diplomatic plane actior miles south-east of Taechon
ecessary to stop hostilities.” further east
Reuter Other South Koreans in the
entre of the Peninsula advanced
ee es everal miles towards Sachangni,
‘ce vr 0) 10 miles north-west of the twin
Tl amour wns Hamsune and Hungnam
. . i
In America Locked in Battle



On the 88th parallel, 100 miles

SAYS SFORZA





ehind the main litie, South Ko-
reans and guerillas. ,.remained
ROME, Nov. 23 iocked in a see-saw battle.
Italian Foreign Minister Count Cracked soldiers of the South-
Carlo Sfor7 aid tonight that}ern 17th Regiment were holding
there was a “certain amount off{on desperately to encircled Cor-
understandable ill humour in the] won, only 40 miles north of Seoul,
United States” because “Burope] capital of South Korea, against
os a whole has not collaborated] ettacks by 1,500 seasoned North-
ery much in the fight against; ern troops bypassed by the swift
the North Korean aggression.” United Nations advance north,
The Minister was explaining in Attackers pouring artillery
eh interview with the Italian and mortar fire into the town
Independent newspaper “Il Mes- from the hills were preventing
saggero” the controversy in the reinforcements moving up and
fmerican press over rearmament the position was described as
in Euroy “untenable.”
Reuter.
American war planes patrolled
x the North Korean battle area as
ne . ,AC . usual today
ve aa we. ase The British spokesman in Tokyo
: 1. said today that massive 52-ton
Ring 3113 Day or Night. centurion tanks landed with thé
= THE ADVOCATE 29th British Brigade aro a
PAYS FOR NEWS. week is now moving up to €

in battle
—Reuter

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PAGE TWO



LEAVING BARBADOS yesterday afternoon for Grenada by B.W.I.A. were Mr and Mrs. A. R.
Toppin whose son Fred is getting married to-morrow in Grenada.
along with other members of the family and friends on their way to the aircraft.

R. FRED TOPPIN, son of Mr.
and Mrs. A. R. Toppin of
“Newhaven” Hastings, is to be
matfried to-morrow afternoon in
Grenada to Miss Joyce Johnson.
Leaving yesterday afternoon for
Grenada by B.W.1.A, to aftend the
wedding were his parents, other
members of his family and friends.
They were, Mr. and Mrs. A, I.

Toppin, Mr. and Mrs. Stantun
Toppin, Miss Anne and Christine
Toppin, Mr. and Mrs. Harold

Farmer, Miss Judy Farmer, Mr.
Bert Toppin, Mr. Pat Toppin and
Mr. David Badley.

They will be returning to Bar-
bados on Sunday.

Revelry!

ARIBBEAN Revelry a musi-

cale produced by Miss Judy
Graham was successfully staged
at the Globe Theatre yesterday.
Mr. G. H. Adams, M.C.P., and
Mrs, Adams were patrons and
they were among the appreciative
audience that witnessed the show
-ast night.

theme of the musicale has
a est Indian background and
provided ample scope for an inter-
esting series of West Indian
dances...

Cedric Phillips who needs no
introduction to local audiences was
easily the star of the show and
turned in an excellent all-round
performance as singer, dancer and
clown.

Captain Raison conducted the
Police ‘Band who provided the
music for the show and they gave

one of their best performances to
date.

Intransit
RRIVING yesterday morning
from Trinidad by B.W.LA.
were Mr. and Mrs, John Camp-
bell. Mr, Campbell is Vize
Chairman of the W.I. Committee
in London and Vice Chairman of

Messrs. Booker Bros.

They were met at the airport
by Hon. H. A. Cuke, C.B.E.

Mr. and Mrs. Campbell who
leave to-morrow by air for Cana-
da are guests at the Hotel Wind-
sor.

To See The Water

Polo Games
RS. JOHN TEIXEIRA ae-
companied her husband to
Barbados yesterday. She is here to
see the Intercolonial Water Polo
matches between Barbados and
Trinidad, which began last night.
John is a member of the Trini-
dad team.

Bery! McBurnie
ERYL McBURNIE, Director of
the Little Caribbean Dance
Group in Trinidad, invited to Brit-
ain for two months as the guest of
the British Council, has proved
one of thé liveliest and most ener-
getic guests the Council has yet
had. At a farewell reception in
London last week, she said that
she was en route to Europe—“ulti-
mately going down by Lisbon and
crossing by Gilbraltar to North
Africa. I want to study the dan-
cing there”, She has visited Strat-
ford for the Shakespeare season,
Scotland for the Edinburgh Festi-
val, and Wales for the famous} |
Cardiff Folk Museum, Besides
this, she has broadcast and paid
calls on such well known ballet
schools 4s the Sadlers Wells and
Marie Rambert.

Finding time to stand still for
one Brier moment she said, “I
want'to take as much background
with-me as possible when I return{)
to the West Indies—literature,];
folk-lore and so on. We have so} }
little to work on in Trinidad,” Did |
she find much material in Bng-
land’? “Indeed I did”, she says.

“Every country that at one time or
another occupied the West Indies
left Some traces of their culture
behind, and it is that culture we
incorporate

want to
dancing”.

into our





EVANS and

WHITFIELDS
YOUR SHOE STORES



Returned Yesterday

R. AND MRS. Dudley Leacock

Jnr., arrived here yesterday
morning by B.W.I.A. from Tz ini-
dad. They have been away for
over six months and have visited
England and Canada. Mr. Lea-
cock who is a Director of Messrs.
S. P. Musson, Son, and Co.,
also President of the Chamber of
Commerce.

Off To Trinidad

R. P. C. S. MAFFEI of Maffei's
Tailoring Emporium also left
yesterday evening by B.W.I.A. for

Trinidad. He has gone on a busi-
ness visit and is expected to be
back in about four or five days’
time.

On Short Visit
R. OLIVER JOHNSON, Sta-
tion Superintendent of
B.W.LA., Seawell, left for Trini-
dad yesterday evening by a‘r on
a short visit and will be returning
te-morrow.



Rupert’s Autum



The little dwart listens in sur

Etise
“I've en

arden all my life,"
ve never yet seen

to Rupert's story.
working in phils
he says, “bur I’

m Autumn primrose, and yet you
say you've got one' ‘ou'd better
tell my master.” find the
Professor resting © green-
houses. He ¢r e and





MATINEES:

recently had very long runs in
of the world.

They are pictured here at Seawell,



AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)
TODAY & TOMORROW at 5 P.M.
TONIGHT at 8.30, AND CONTINUING

“TIGHT LITTLE ISLAND”

Starring BASIL RADFORD and JOAN GREENWOOD
This outstanding Comedy, presented by J. Arthur Rank,

On Long Leave
R,. ANL MRS. J. Bourne and

two children arrived irom
B.G. yesterday afternoon by
B.W.LA. to spend three months’

holiday. Mr. Bourne, who is Senior
Inspector of Taxes in the Income

Tax Office in B.G. is on long
leave.
They are staying with Mr.

Bourne’s niece, Mrs. Olive Jones
at “Berwyn” Guest House.

W.I. Autograph Bat

A CRICKET BAT autographed
by the West Indies team and
Sir Pelham Warner, President of
the MCC, will shortly be flown
out to Jamaica to be auctioned in
Kingston in aid of the loca] branch
of the RAF Association, The bat
is a gift from the RAF Sports
Board at the Air Ministry, London,

What’s In A Name

ISS O. TWIGG was a passen-

ger arriving fro? B.G. yester-
day by B.W.LA. Hostess on the
B.G. flight was Miss J. BIRCH.

_Pri mrose—18

n



ey ‘
puts his book down

aud Ruper:
again speaks of his quest. “ Ves
do bring me the cada question.
little bear,” he sighs, ‘‘ and this

time I'm afraid | can't help you. |
wish | could. Jock certainly didn’:
find that primrose here." "' [t's
very puzzling,’’ says Rupert, ‘bur
I'm going to keep on trying.”

most of the principal cities



ee
HELD OVER

22nd DAY!

(See it Now)

PLAZA Theatre-—sriDGETOWwN

The INDUSTRY'S GREATEST HISTORY MAKER !

Cecil B. De Mille’s

“SAMSON AND DELILAH”

Color by Technicolor
2 SHOWS TODAY 2.30 and 8.30 p.m,



2 SPECIAL

George O'BRIEN (in Both) - - -

“BORDER G-MAN” §&

SHOWS SATURDAY
9.30 A.M, and 1.30 P.M, (2

NEW PICTURES)
(RKO-RADIO)
“TIMBER STAMPEDE”

_——————



SS SSSSSS—SE|E=_E=E=>>E>EES=

PLAZA Theatre = osTIN

FRIDAY — SATURDAY — 8U

Warner Bros. Presents -
John GARFIELD in

with a host of Favourites

10: ACTION

NDAY — 5 and 8.30 P.M.

“AIR FORCE”

-— SPECTACLE — ADVENTURE !

ee

MIDNITE SHOW
George O'BRIEN in

“PAINTED DESERT” and



(Tomorrow) SATU

RDAY, “5TH (2 New Westerns)
Tim HOLT in (RKO-RADIO)

“BROTHERS in the SADDLE”



——— a





sANETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES

FRIDAY — SATURDAY — SUNDAY—8.30
PARAMOUNT'S EXCITING MUSICAL | |

= THE

with Eddie BRACKEN—Betty HUTTON and Jimmy D

Dorothy LAMOUR in

MONDAY AND TUESDAY



p.m, MATINEE: SUNDAY 5 p.m.

FLEETS IN”

ORSEY & Orchestra

8.30 PLM

Cecil B. De Mille’s Exciting Adventure +

“STORY OF DR. WASSELL” (T



‘echnicolor) Gary Cooper





Lines to look at.....

Fei litt Nacdihdiderebberecesaoctis ssc ook cavaae sce
1

Ferguson’s (rw)

; 36” Printed Linene ...................... $1.21 yd.
J

| THE SUREST GIFT!

| Ladies Boxed Hankies

i Lace Edged—6 per Box ooo... $3.04

Assorted — 4 per Box $1.56, $1.68. $1.76

$1.85, $1.95

MEN'S TIES

“LONDON SCENES”........ $1.67
New Designs “Broadway” Style 1.57
Plain Browns, Flame ........ 1.38
CLIP BOWS: Assorted 94

——

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

London Adopts A|

“Chinese” Look

Hy Joan Erskine

Every now and then we hear of
the Eastern influence in dress de-
sign or hat styles. This usually
heralds a return to straight tight
skirts, slit at the sides; high round
Chinese collars: short coolie jack-
ets flowing out from a rounded
shoulder line; and smooth coiled
hair. Hats become small, and sit
straight on the head, manderin-
fashion. Women paint their eyes
carefully at the corners, endeay-
our to look tranquil, and behave
as their Eastern counterparts
probably never would do.

The East is an unfailing source
of inspiration to the designer. But
why’ Probably because the ma-
jority of Eastern women have
about them an air of dignity and
refinement which is difficult to
analyse, and extremely tempting
to copy. Designers know that
Western women will succumb im-
mediately to a tight dress of “Ming
Blue” or an evening coat the “col-
our of delicate Chinese porcelain.”

Chen Yu Look

For the first time, however, the
influence of Chinese ancestor por-
traits and traditional costume,
which has proved such a boon to
dress designers, has shed its kinds
ly light on another facet of th
fashion world. The “Chen Y
Look” has made its appearance in
New York, Paris and London. It
comprises lipstick and matching
nail lacquer made from the same
Chinese formula. “The cult of
lovely hands, tipped by perfect
nails” say the makers, “was part
of the education of every Chinese
lady.”

One of the most colourful par-
ties of the season launched the
Chen Yu Look. It was compered
by the Burmese model, Signon
whose Oriental beauty was en-
hanced by a dazzling black velvet
dress and coat designed by Al-
wynn of Paris. The sheath-like
dress, with petal skirt has an ap- |
p'iqued design of flames on a}
white ground at the top, and the
tight-waisted coat has the Chen
Yu dragon worked into the skirt
Her long black hair, elaborately
swathed, had an orchid pinned in
it. “FLOWERING PLUM” was
the colour of her lip and _ nail
make-up. This shade was par-
ticularly created for the new paley}
dark-lipped look, and is
ly for town and form



al evenings.
“For Evening”
|

One of the loveliest longer }
coats, below knee-length, was in!
Butterfly Wing Blue taffeta with
a diamond check of narrow velvet
stripes all over. A red, blue and
gold evening cap went with it.
There is an increasing feeling for
evening caps of Chinese charac-
ter, as opposed to the more usual

cocktail hats. Often these are
authentic reproductions of man-
darin hats.

It must not be imagined that
the Chinese influence is reserved
for evening wear only, Proofed
linen and garbardine coats, in
natural and stone shades, were
cut on classic high-necked lines
and worn with tiny black velvet
pagoda hats. Ornate gold buckles
were used to fasten the necks 6f
these coats,

In London there are many
places where real mandarin coats
can be bought. Women prefer
these to imitations, which cost
almost as much. But for thosa
who cannot afford this, and do
not like the heavy ornamentation,

—— ee T+





essential- ; red, is
; Sun Red.

;





as

SEIGNON wears a dark green satin
coolie jacket with huge buttons, em-
broidered with tiny flowers.

there are many adaptations of
the coolie jacket. Seignon wears
one in dark green satin, fastened
with huge buttons. This type of
jacket is usually worn with tight
trousers. They serve many pur-
poses, A younger girl can wear a
tight skirt beneath one, although
normally a full skirt would suit
her better. An older woman will
like the graceful] wide sleeves and
high fastening. And for the ex-
pectant mother there was never a
more convenient style.

Delightful Names

Delightful names are given to
the Chen Yu_ products—Ffire
Sparkle, Firefly, Sea Shell, Temple
Fire, Shanghai Diamond, Chinese
Red, Peking Pink, The newest
end most chameleon-like colour,
which blends with almost any
a vivid shade called simply
It indicates a return to
brilliant scarlet nails instead of
the darker or pastel shades fash-
ionable in recent years.

Far too few wemen realise that

to achieve perfect results, an
undercoat of varnish should be
used. Most cosmetic firms pro-

duce these plain varnishes—unce1
cifferent names, such as Satin-
base, or Twincott. Using this
undercoat causes the lacquer to
stay on considerably longer with-
out chipping easily, and it is well
worth spending the little extra
time on your nails.

Achieve a sligniiy Chinese look
by: swathing your hair into
switch and making a_ coil;
wearing a little round collar
velvet, with embroidery and a
slit front; by embroidering or
braiding the slit edges of your
skirt; by removing your shoulder
pads and fastening your loose coat
high with an old brooch; and py
paying scrupulous attention to
your hands and face.

Chen Yu means Precious thing.
Could there be a more appealing
name to tempt a_ wavering
‘woman ?

a
by
of



SSS
{

EMPIRE

To-day 2.30 and 8.30 and
Continuing, M.G.M. presents

SIDE STREET

— Starrmg —

Farley Granger

Cathy
O'Donnell
— with —

James Craig and Paul Kelly

ROXY

To-day to Monday, 4,30







and 8.15

M. G. M. Big Double—
Robert Taylor and Bliza-
beth Taylor in

CONSPIRATOR

— AND —

MYSTERY STREET

with
Ricardo Montalban and
Sally Forrest

START Now



YOUR HOUSEHOLD FURNISHINGS—

SILVER STAR CONGOLEUM

A wide range of Patterns and Sizes
ALUMINIUM CURTAIN RODS & FITTINGS
PICTURE CORD & RINGS .

MANSION POLISH
‘CARDINAL POLISH
MIN CREAM
JAXA POLISH

~



THE BARBADOS

COTTON FACTORY LTD.



ROYAL

To-day only—4.30 and 8,30
Republic Double

Richard ARLEN
George (Gabby) HAYES

THE BIG BONNAZA
CHEYENNE WILD CAT
Wild Bill Elliott and Bobby

OLYMPIC.

Last Two Shows To-day-
4.20 and 8.15

Republic Smashing Double

Gene AUTRY and
Smiley BURNETT

in
“HOME IN WYOMING”

AND

“ALIAS THE CHAMP”

with

Robert ROCKWELL and
Introducing:—
Gorgeous GEORGE





TO RENEW

-~

CO-OPERATIVE



B.B.C. Radio
Programme

FRIDAY NOVEMBER #4,
115 p.m. Radio Newsret¢l,
The Adventures of P.C. 49,
The News, 2.10 p.m. Home
Britain, 2.15 p.m. Sports
p.m. English Songs, 3.00 p.m
Centuries, 4.00 p.m. The New, £10 p.m
The Daily Service, 4.4 p.m. Nights at
the Opera, 5.00 p.m. Sandy Mac?herson
the Theatre Organ, 5.15 p.m. Pro-
gramme Parade, 5.30 p.m. Scottish
Magazine, 6.00 p.m. The Musie Gots
Round, 630 p.m. The Reith Lectures,
7.00 pm. The News, 7.10 p.m. New
Aralysis, 7.15 p.m, West Indian Diary,
745 p.m. What the Londoner Doegn't
Know, 8.00 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.15
pm. United Nations Report, 8.20 p.m.
Composer of the Week, 8.20 p.m. The
Debate Continues, 8.45 p.m. BBC Scottish
Orchestra, 945 p.m. Communism in
Practice, 10.00 p.m. The News, “0.10 p.m.
From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m. The
Adventures of P.C. 49, 10.45 p.m. World
Affairs, 11.00 p.m. Close Down,

1950,

».30 p.m.

2.00 p.m.
News From

Review, 2.30

Three Half

ALSE
SHOULDERS

HOLLYWOOD,
Look out, gals, your guys may



wearing falsies teday—false | SSeS SSS
niet eee ; a That is the

Os ’ is ‘ +
Vivian, who'paas oe! anotivetty| MID-NITE HEP-CATS SESSION
of such as Robert Mitchum, Guy ON

Madison, Cornel Wilde and form-
er “Tarzan” Johnny Weissmuller
Irving, who makes movie men
te-men in their suits, States:
“T can up a Man’s sex-appeal
300 per cent by putting him in the
right suit.”

This is in direct rebuttal to
John Garfield’s and Tony Curtis’
“beefcake”—the stripped to the
waist style which is supposed to

send the females in drooling
ecstasies.

Many movie moguls have
checked the box offices and
testified that a rugged manly
chest, exposed to eye consump-
tion, is worth more than any

wide shoulder span.
Bunk

But, no, screams Irving. This
is a lot of bunk, and he should
know. The masculine clothier
pads curves and angles on most
of the celluloid’s charmers—and
he testifies that most of them still
crack the box office moola.

It seems that a national maga-
zine is booming the ‘“T-Look”—
a no-pads look in men’s clothes
This, sneers Irving, has no
woman's appeal at all, He added: }

“Heck, a femme wants her man'
to be rugged—at least to look
rugged, anyway. So who can
make a hit with the gal friend
in a form-revealing suit which |
either shows up the skinny or
fat man? }

“You'll never see your movie
heroes in such skimpy apparel,
believe me. They all know what}
their panting women want—and;
they’re not gofng to settle for}
the bare realities.” |

Irving cites Johnny Weiss-
muller as the A-1 example of a
body-beautiful. His 48-inch chest
sends most males into frenzies
of envy, according to the clothier.

Potatoes

But between pictures, when
Johnny hits the potatoes too
hard and the waist-line hits the
chest measurement, it is Irving’s
job to minimize the maximum.
This he does, says he, with the
correct lines in a suit.

Good woman-bait measure-
ments in a_ six-foot Adonis, to
quote Irving’s tape-measure, are
a 42-inch chest, 34-inch waist and

42-inch hips. Of course these
can be varied—adding to the
chest and subtracting from the

hips and height, says Irving.

Bustling Janie Russel’s hubby,
Bob Waterfield, the pro football
player, also has an eye-rolling
physique, stated Irving. So does
“Mr. World,” John Farbotnik,
who is one of the dresser's
customers.

Probably the biggest breath-
catcher of all is “Geor8eous
George”, the chunky wrestling
muscle man who recently ordered
10 padded custom-made suits in
such screeching colours as
fushia. red kelly green and pit |

MECHANICAL TOYS!
PLASTIC TOYS!!



DOLLS
AIRPLANES
SPEEDBOATS

ETC.

42” & 53” XMAS TREES
DECORATIONS & LIGHTS































































COMING SOON!!

Xmas Tree Bubble Lights
















FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1950

THE TREND OF FASHION

AND

THE RENDEZVOUS OF SOCIETY

THE CHINA DOLL RESTAURANT

(No. 6 Marhill Street)

OPEN TO 12 MIDNITE

Delicious Chinese Foods served in a classy atmosphere
Dial 4730 for Reservations

To-morrow 2 hours of RECORDED MUSIC and CALYPSOES
as presented at the GLOBE THEATRE on Wednesday 22nd

SATURDAY, 25TH NOVEMBER, 10.30 P.M.
(TO-MORROW NITE)

GRAND JIVE and BOP CONTEST

Music by

THE HOT SHOT ORCHESTRA
with the Film
“LL WALK BESIDE YOU”

Cash Prizes Ist, 2nd, and 3rd

GLOBE THEATRE

N.B.—THE JIVE CONTEST is a separate show from our
8.30 p.m. show and starts at 10.30 p.m.

PIT 16c; HOUSE 30c; BALCONY 40c; BOX 54c.







Welton by tortin Rockin ond Warren Duff

TO-NITE 8.30 O’CLOCK
Together with “DANGEROUS PROFESSION”

ALL-STAR TALENT: NITE!

SAM GORDON.
MAL MURRAY

GERALD HAREWOOD..
ALVA ARTHUR

“You’re Always In My Heart”
“Blue Moon”
“My Love, Loves Me”
“Brahm’s Lullaby”
“Now That I Need You”
“My Foolish Heart”
“The Gypsy”
“I Don’t See Me In Your Eyes”
CLAYTON THOMPSON “It Had to be You”

AUSTIN EVELYN
Guest Star :















Who will win the SILVER CUP ?
AND

4 CARTONS of HEINEKEN’S, BEER
Donated by K. R. HUNTE & CO.

oF «6Save your % Tickets TO-NITE!

PIT 20c; HOUSE 36c; BALCONY 48c; BOX 54c.




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simiiiaieaatian BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE.

Indo-China Rebels VESITING WATER POLO TEAM _ HARBOUR I OG | KEEP acer FEETox rie TOES! Tuein TOES!

Attack Tanmai Ray srarcee : 1

Ce aisle be teatamoneâ„¢ in In Carlisle Bay
Indo-<« hi 4 have saunched a: vio- s. pha, S s ‘PATE NT’ BARLEY
-_ at ack “es ent oe a ree 7 ; Dawe. Sc nm te makes milk more digestible for baby
tie post o anmai abo 2 Be: sc te Beh, Henny f-
od noes. Ponsa: Waser | SG: Bue star Bh gprereme | . PATENT’ GROATS : d
nounced here to-day. Base | te eat makes weaning a happy tme for baby—

A» French military spokesman eee
said” that operations had been
begun to send help to the threat-
ened post

Another post in the same area
was also attacked but was imme-
diately relieved “Dy “reimforte-
ments of French Legion forces

Since the October defeats in
Indochina, France has sent out
seven intantry battalions and two
artillery groups, a tank regiment,
a bomber group and other mate-
rials. Premjer Rene Plevin said
in Paris to-day.

Replying to criticism -in_ the

and mother
M Precise,
fron, Trinidad

383 ton) net, Cay



DEPARTURES
Schooner Belqueen, 44 tons net, Capt
| Kirw, for St. Vincent
M V. Canadian Constructor, 3,936 tons

net, Capt. Watlace, for Grenada

| _ S.S.- Byfjord, 1,109 tons net, Capt
| Tharaiusen, for St. Vincent

| ——

In Touch with Barbados
Coastal Station



HENS PAIN RELIEF
AND TONIC BENEFIT



and artillery would be despatch-
ed and
progress with our

Barbados Coast Station

' . ’ — Yeast-Vite quickly t
Indochina debate in ‘the National Cat a. Wirel w , bn Bi away Solel neu- ;

~ pe oat nee’ able oan Vireles; (West Indies) Ltd ; 7 k
Assembly, Plevin_ said that fresh advise that they can now communicat Ssenansate? ralgia, nerve and rheumatic s i
reinforcements of aircraft, tanks with the following ships through the pains — but it does something |

else too! Because of its valuable
tonic properties Yeast - Vite
helps you to feel brighter, look

RTT -~

’ ee

“negotiations are in
Allies to speed

=

=
F
S.S. Jeanny,

8s. Castor

s.8. Pinnacles, *.s. Skotaa

Loide Uruguay, s Co



up stili more deliveries of mate- ferry Craftsman, 8.6, Ringdrude, s better, sleep more easily and
rial” he declared. Farmsim, ss. Mykew, M.V. Moraybant (tenant) enjoy more energy. Next time
He said it had been decided to ms. Birkaland, s.s, Kvint Imperis} you Ww n relief take Yeast

Toronto, s.s. Norse Mountain, sa. Jani
Stove Ss. Agamemnon, s.s. Casablanc
8.8 8 Gaspar, s.8. Canadian Cruiser, s
Camadian Constructor, ss, Argentina

i
bring pressure on and get tonic benefit too!
thorities” for the

Vietnamese army

“competent au-
formation of a

Vite



ANDREWS





Earlier in the debate Pierre ita. eat comes | LIWER SALT
Mattes France Geet, See oe ee BS ON Se ena
i Vati 5 is rtugal, ss. coa Cor- -
former Minister of National zavet .



sair, s. Bowplate, s.«. Rio
£8. coa Partner, ss. Sunwalt, 8.9.
Seabreeze, ss. Amakura, ss. Specialist
es. Vinnt, ss. Esso, s.s. Granadero,

Jurateento,





Economy urged the Government
to open negotiations with the
Vietminh leader Ho Chi Minh, He



‘ LOVELIER SKIN IN 14 DAYS ~—

s.s. Alcoa Pennant, s.s, Megna, s.s. Suns
said: “We cannot afford to weak- ‘ vib, ss. Sundale, s.s. Rio Tercero.
en our geen m ee ha ae SOME OF THE MEMBERS of the Men's Water Polo Team who arrived from Trinidad yesterday | Gan. “3, Tgmag : Cunnnenam os
the past three years Fri ming by B.W.Lé remaind by a special flight in the n. Lioyderest, s.s. British Destify, s oO 7
SOHN casita oy tatecian tome Ol morning by Wis 4 The emaihder 0 of the team arrived rived be eo pe ght in afternoo Siti ons ns, Vestine tank F Oo R W oO ME N U T Oo F B Y
her own reconstruction,” Pioneer P.. ahd s.s. T. Path@nder










































—Reuter. J : s f. . v
Rumaztia Wants amaica Must Find DISAGREEMENT aaa
ricans o- . , “4 a .
19 East, Af h “Blacklist Outlets For Milk _ STRASBOURG, Nov. 28. A, TY PLAN
Sentenced To Deat Disagreement on the proposal eawe é
> : KINGSTON, J’ca, Nov, 21 to appoint a Minister of Defence
4 piel r, 23 PRAGUE, Nov. 21. apt ha crccraie 2 ole rs
,, NAIROBI, Kenya Nov. 23° A Rumanian. delegate urged |! the mil production is to keep| for Europe was disclosed in 2
> agpantin mega aay saetat the Wars x "Peite Congress 'to- expanding, outlets for local milk report presented to the_ Stras- ARRIVALS BY B.W.LA
men, members jot the Pgs avs ikaw up ig. oblac ‘klist. of | ™USt be found in markets abroad] bourg Assembly today. The re- ©. J
cult of ‘good grey oy gee. eens ia cua bate hedtied: by 1s fresh milk used to produce] port by British Conservative From TRINIDAD =:
sentenced to deat a ne ) butter and cheese the Acting ¢ rs ber D “ Sandys 4 t Carlos Deigado, Antonie Gonzal os e
bs ie ys 4 a rshal Tito and General g Gov-| member Duncan Sandys was to be | , m
Kitale for having killed 24 per-| Ma é ernor-told f ; } Sak. ai Albetto Komero, Ramon Solorzano
rae ee : ae coe Rant Mis 1 hae . os i. armers at the big agri-| the basis of the Assembly debate |g lodulitmes, Rarnerio. Peres, Cuil-
sons in a pitched spear versus} France,” Prague Radio_reportec imon quez, E 4
rifle battle last April Two other The héad of the Rumanian] Cultural show in western Jamaica} tomorrow on the plan for | lero Fernandes, Juan Lozada, Felix
ued as ¢ * ae js r yeste y eur ‘an army Ortega, Jose Inez Gonzales, Tgnacio ink” 5 i : ‘
teiymen were oraered ‘0 SET Coneeree pa aan VEpeuny Jamaica made a small “i report ruled out immedi Tovar, Gernimo Torres, Marcelino Lhirty-nine doctors — including
i itely caus > re 1g iL t se ae ~ | He idez, Faus Serreno Blanec 4 2 tb
Ee, CORR: Sa eee delegate Shostakovich| Shipment of condensed milk to|ately any idea of a European | Memendes, Fausting Serene | Blanco leading skin specialists have now com-
dbl ain Reve Cuba. Defence Minister responsible for |ner Wandracsek, Ernesto Hernande : .

a id- aelegate: ath dT WIE Lrestili~ . a 7 ‘ ‘ : = aes ult of good spirits has day world there wad -onky one Minister of Agriculture Barrant | operational maiters. The Supreme i Pe aeaPe ae ce ni ‘on, Danie pleted 14 day tests of the Palmolive
belt cine iantae itis eae place for an artist-——“among/v/as convinced after a visit to Commander of the Atlantic Force | ite. Fernando Bust Beauty Plan” on 1,984 women of all
ministration as anti-European and| fighters for peace.” —RKeuter. | British Guiana that by following Aer yet pppoeee but iA net his So eg ple il dg ages and every type of skin. They
ni Antory | Ite fell lai ; these liries, the country of Jamaica] '© be an American) would get his | zales, Eduardo Jose Moll cb a pel i
wees Oe ace tren bape os Pi can produce shortly 60 per cent on on the ns onan ts Sas a ee shoo report a definite, noticeable improve-
e ae : . er ric -mance ‘lare ne Assembly is exp OG} Celestino Pedro Machado, \ . : iy “ a
rdérs to cleanse Africa of all of her rice demand. He declare=! _ : y. wa 7] cole ae ee } “ntin the complexions of 2 women
Eurppeans by black magic U.N. ACKNOWLEDGE that the Guianese could be regard- | vove on: the: moticn of accepting Selcin “Auaven..Rivan, Alteado o| meee ; | ‘

“Once all Europeans are killed TIBET APPEAL ed as politically dead. German participation in a Euro-eitnerc, pedro Guede Het out of 3 (supported by signed states
a eee * se fetes Phi The country abounded wit! oon force within the Atlantic Alberto | Moreno Perez Angel Ram ments by the women themselves).
“black Christ”. will descend on KALIMPUR, Nov, 21. Ta&bour Unions but suffered acute- | ¥S'e™ Reuter Saatin: Ostia, ‘Ghaeianc. Rodrigu t ‘
the African people Tibet's. Finance Secretary ly from lack of leadership | 7 , ben Carvajal, Juan Nieves Soto, Eddie | These were among the improvements
—Can. Press. -|Tsepon Shakabpa said here to- —Can, Press Textira, Biolve Forde, Mary Newtdn,| venaneih,
EXPRESS DERAILED: . }atkiGulehene cr ni comnryrs sane tas aaah 4 a es ported :
3 acknowledgment of his country’s Plan Dis years ury isc arg n Renzi, Mary Renzi, Jean Forbes, Jer |
| i 5 on, Julia Fullerton, John ‘Grecia, |
3 DEAD mppre! fo te Muiped: Nedene - app aiered “Clarke; “Lilian ‘owe. Michel
ecure the withdrawal of Chinese ‘ Al Pa, Clarke, gener. Cow |
RIO DE JANEIRO, Noy, 23. | troops. Over Mountain Larceny Case He AR TTGUE | oft
Three people died and 55 werc The three man Tibetan delega- nie AN. Wyomi Nov. 22 (From Our Own Correspondent) Wallam Odor i | <5
injured, many seriously, when an tion to the United ‘Nations would TROIS V ye eS ead PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 19 | rrom ANTIGUA | n e
Express from Sao Paulo was de-| be arriving here “soon” he added, La parachute ——— ‘ teem oe The case against Rahij Moham- | | oi
railed to-day at Novaiguassu neat Shakabpa confirmed that with | o! today. for Snow-clad Moun {med of San Fernando, for lar-| Canon Hubert Hutehin on, How calle
here. the young Dalai Lama’s assump- Moran where a plane CEeeyaae ceny of a grip containing $28.18, wine pure, avi Thomas Twy1 | Hs arse
Several waggons were over-| tion of full powers, the 72-year- (21) people including women) the property of Louisa Ramper-| my Crichton ess Cc
turned and destroyed and it is} old regent had “retired.” missionaries and children was! sad, came to an abrupt halt. Bes | eicisispemnscncenemmcntesiennasicthibemnen | \
possible that the death total will —Reuter. believed to have crashed in flames.| fore the case was resumed, the |\———————— ae hes
arise when the wreckage is re- The two engined plane owned) Chief Justice Mr. Kenneth Vin- { r Blemis'
moved. : ; by the “New Tribe Mission,” a/cent Brown said: “Mr. Foreman Fewe
The injured were taken to teligious organisation, vanished gentlemen of the jury, I regret | | °°
nearby hospitals. in swirling clouds last night while} yery much to say that this case

_Reuter.

Strike Breaks Up Train
Service In Buenos Aires

BUENOS AIRES, Nov. 23

Trains running into and out of
Buenos Aires to-day were doing
so if when and how they could

The strike which began three
days ago on the Roca Line serv-
ing the suburbs and the towns to
the south had this morning af-
fected other lines.



—Reuter.



6 Spies Exeeuted

TAIPEH, Formosa, Nov. 23.

Chinese Nationalést fring
squads today executed six high
Government officials “including
two generals and aé_ colonel
charged with Communist under-
ground activity.

Announcing the “execution a
Nationalist spokesman, claimed
that Formosa’s biggest Commu
nist spy ring had been broken
up.. Nationalists held three»other
men charged with spying.

The amnesty period for Com-

m&nist underground workers who! demanding a 15 cent. an hour in-

surrender has two days to run.
After that Nationalists have
threatened drastic
anyone caught helping Commu-
nists,—Reuter,





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AT THE

Britain, France, U.S. fiteca for Billings, Montana, from

Consult On Korea Chico, California on its way to!
LONDON, Nov. 20, | Poth, Ameriee.
4 ‘ y. au, Right children
The Foreign Office announced baswengits were
to-day that the British Govern-| ine crew,
ment is consulting with the United | “qin6 parachute team was sent
States, France and Commonwealth ut by the air rescue Haylie At
Governments on the possibility of | M Cora’ air ee dh acepeanen. .
finding a solution for the Korean} Ord at a
problem j
Its formal statement did not in-
dicate along what lines this solu: |
tion might be looked for, but it
was generally believed in diplo-

adult
besides

and ten
aboard



Booklet Advertising
Harmful Drugs

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 19





matic quarters here that it refer-| ‘The Medical Board of Trinidad
red to exchanges through diplo-'jy altogether satisfied that the
matic channels on the feasibility; drugs advertised in a booklet

of establishing a

7 remilitarised published in India, which is be-
zone in North Korea

ebeas |ing circulated through the post in



| Ttinidad, have no_ therapeutic
| value whatsoever. The matter of
| citculation of these booklets

| through the mail is therefore re-
Workers At Air Base Strike | | ceiving the immediate attention
of the Minister of Health, Hon.

(Prom Our Own Correspondent)

Norman Tang. m am considering
Mins hele peut Ae ares? at the moment,” said Mr. Tang,

“what steps should be taken to
nites. aed eg -~ etsine| | protect the people of Trinidad

The men are employed with, the ‘20d Tobago from the many dan-

g@rous things that are possible to
Garcia Commercial Inc:, a Puerto result from the circulation of

Rican Company, and they are) thece booklets”. Copies of these
booklets have been widely cir-
eulated throughout the Colony,
and responsible people have be-

because the conditions of
work were not satisfactory. They
claim that some of them had to

high buildings and there
~elief allowed them. | harmful effects of these adver-

| tisements on the health of the
| population.

crease





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STATIONERY





| fence in this case

;one Peyson also caf¥ed “Bumpe~”
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| (eS

of English, Dutch and American origin.

|
:

cannot go on, and that you will
have to be discharged. One of |
your members was seen speaking |
to a man this morning who is the
brother of the aceused, and an-
other member at any rate, had
approached Counsel for the de-
Both of these
aetions are absolutely improper
and consequently you will have
to be discharged and we will have
to start a new one. You are dis
charged.”

Judge "Sick” Of Floating
Corpse Re-Trial

(From Our Own AIn, Now 49
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov.

Pounding his desk, Mr Gene,
S. E. Gomes declared in Court in
the “Floating Corpse” re-trial that
he was “getting sick and tired.’
“IT don’t want to hear
about a newspaper, a diary o:
anything else, unless there is
some evidence from that witness-
box”, the judge continued,



this case will be prejudiced”,
Chief Justice was
the continued
Counsel for the defence in thc
ease of Rex. vs_ Boysie
Trinidad’s Blue

The
referring to

one night in April last.
the third week of the re-trial,

==

NOTICE

ing hundreds of regular items at sacrificing price
selling almost at own cost a large variety of Men’:
dress shirts, pyjamas, tweeds, tropicals, flannels and doeskins.

We have drastically reduced our large stocks of ladies’ dress

materials; prints, spuns, silks and crepes, also ladies’ shoes

as sheets, pillow-cases and blankets we sell almost without
We invite you to come and see us. Th

sale, and you have a rare opportunity to buy we

Try US. it sill pew you.

THE

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anything |

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the administration of justice in |

interruption by |

Singh, |
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PAGE FOUR

.



Friday, November 24, 1950



Vestry Service

IN an advertisement currently appear-
ing in the Press, the Vestry of Christ
“Church calls for applicants for the post of
Assessor in that parish. The post of
assessor in any parish in this island is an
important one in the parochial service,
with that of Parochial Treasurer as the
only other taking precedence to it. It is
therefore one of the highest offices in the
parochial service and should be reserved
for promotion of those who have served in
the lower brackets.

Within recent weeks two instances have
occurred in other parishes which support
the contention that the post of assessor is
important and second only to that of paro-
chial treasurer. In this same parish the
assessor Mr. Wood Goddard was promoted
to the post of Parochial Treasurer on the
resignation of Mr. Grogan.

Only a few weeks ago Mr. Scott the
Assessor of St. Philip was promoted to the
post of Parochial Treasurer in succession
to Mr. W. U. Gooding.

This practice was set in St. Michael
where it was laid down as a principle that
before calling for applicants outside the
Parochial Service the Vestry should pro-
mote its servants, all things being equal.
This was on the motion of Hon. V. C. Gale
who expressed the view that the policy of
‘promoting junior vestry employees to
higher posts would remove the ground of
accusation that the plums of the service
were reserved for those who gave support
to vestrymen seeking election by canvass-
ing for them. And the better the canvasser
the higher the office.

This doctrine is particularly sound in a
place like Barbados where the standard of
public life is not exceptionally high.
Everything should be done to maintain
the dignity of public office and there can
be hardly anything more belittling than to
find men in whom the ratepayers or elec-
tors have reposed their confidence and

trust faced with charges of punishing their
enemies and favouring their friends. It

should be their maxim to be charitable
first with their own goods and not to seek
popularity by dispensing favours at the
expense of the people who elected them.

It is for the Vestry of Christ Church to
discover whether there is not one em-
ployee in the parochial service worthy and
capable of being promoted to the post of
Assessor. And if there is one it should not
be necessary to call for applicants by pub-
lic advertisement. It is unthinkable that
the members of the Christ Church Vestry
would have any desire to debar any of
their employees from promotion which
they deserve; in fact they have meted out
generous treatment to some of their em-
ployees whom they feel have served the
parish faithfully and well. They have
boasted of their service and prided them-
selves in the administration of parochial
affairs. It cannot be said that the adminis-
tration in any other parish is more efficient
than that of Christ Church. This efficiency
is based on the service and allegiance
which their employees give to the parish.

Even although the Christ Church vestry
does not follow in its entirety the practice
adopted in St. Michael they do not debar
junior employees in their service from
applying for the post. This removes any
ground for censure; but the vestry would
be well advised to examine most carefully
the claims of their own employees before
appointing an outsider. When _ they
have sifted the material at their disposal

and satisfied themselves that there are no
vestry employees qualified to fill the post
then they can appoint an outsider. In doing
so they will have justified themselves that
they have endeavoured to get the best
available service for the parish.

Our Readers Say:



, people’s

|
|
ing slowly over the telephone:
‘Achtung. Brandenburg. Watch

You dial REAS and RIP!

Goes the [ron Curtain
By William Hamsher

BERLIN.
RECENTLY in the Soviet sector
of Berlin I put fourpence into a
call-box to listen to the cold war
at dictation speed, .
Just a quiet female voice say-

out for these persons, paid to spy
on you.” :

Then followed a list of six
names and addresses spelt out
and slowly repeated.

Then warning came from the
great new US. transmitting
station called RAS, which
stands for Radio In the American
Sector of Berlin,

By Callbox

RIAS, taking a different dis-
trict each week, makes a point of
giving the names of
form agents spying on factory
“slackers,” “saboteurs,” and
“Western orientated objectivists.”

People who know they are
watched so closely that they think
it dangerous to listen in to the
West on their raido loud-
speakers can still hear Western
news from RIAS by dialling from
a private phone or a call-box.

So far, though it may be
dangerous, it is not officially a
crime in East Germany to listen
to RIAS. Eight in ten of the
3,250,000 German listeners living
behind the Iron Curtain joined
with me in listening to Western
stations tonight.

But one regular listener, Frau
Christa Wagner, a housewife, of
Kreis Doebeln, Saxony, was not
with them. Frau Wagner is in
jail. A people's court sentenced
her to 18 months in the cells
after the People’s Police found in
her flat a letter she wrote, It
was in praise of her favourite
programme: the transmission to
the Soviet zone by RIAS.

Christa Wagner, said the
prosecutor in Kreis
Doebeln, had thus linked herself
Western warmongering
imperialism — “the German’s
greatest enemy.”

In nearby Zwickau, another
listener wrote a letter to RIAS.
down for five years.
letter in the

Comin-

He went
Police found the



LONDON,

Mr. James Griffiths became Sec-
retary of State for the Colonies
nine months ago. Within that
period, the House of Commons has
created history: four Colonial
debates have taken place. The
House has, in fact, devoted three~
~a-half to Colonial affairs
Mr. Griffiths thought this a mat-
ter for congratulation. One won-
ders! & i*

Last week subjects of Colonial
interest in the Commons ranged
from the proposed increase of
£20m for Colonial Development
and Welfare to birth control and
coffee-growing. A Bill now before
Parliament seeks to raise the total
amount available for Colonial
Development and Welfare under
the 1945 Act from £120 million
to £140 million for the years
1945—56.

For a true picture of Colonial
Development, however, it is
necessary to take into account
other agencies than the Colonial

»|Development and Welfare Fund.

What sort of progress has been
made, for example, by the Colo-
nial Development Corporation, Up
to the beginning of October, some
49 undertakings involving a capi-
tal outlay of £29,474,000 have been
launched in 21 different Colonial
territories by C.D.C. These in-
clude such diverse economic pro-
jects as the erection of a freezing
plant to handle up to 50,000 sheep
a year in the Falkland Islands;
the establishment of a gigantic
poultry farm in the Gambia;
financing of a building society in
Malaya; the extraction and saw-
milling of hardwoods in. British
Guiana; and the rebuilding of
Castries, the fire-devastated capi-
tal of St. Lucia.

This is a fine achievement
especially when one thinks of
the many imponderables in such
pioneering activity. Drought and
disease may defeat the best-laid
plans, Political troubles may affect
the supply of labour, A fall in
world prices may cause promising
development to become unecono-
mic,

In moving the second reading
of the C.D. and ill, Mr,
John Dugdale, Minister of State
for Colonial Affairs, pointed out
that the intention of the Bill was
not the allocation of additional,
money to individual Colonies.
Rather, the money should be kept
in reserve for research purposes
and development schemes which



lining of his hat when they took
him off the Berlin train.

It spoke of members of the
East German Government in such
terms that the Zwickau people’s
prosecutor pressed the charge of
attempted murder.

t It

THE East German campaign
against “foreign” listening
will get a still rougher edge.

Women in hospital in Thuringia
have been told they will be sent
home uncured if they switch on
to any but approved stations.
Nurses have been ordered in
writing that they must report
any patient breaking this rule.

Saxon Communist group-leaders
wanted to switch their weekly
meeting time so that they could
hear the RIAS transmission,

Their proposal was “an imperti- w

nent attempt at ‘objectivism’,
and was only narrowly defeated
through patriotic on.” the

vism” is becoming
easier, For RIAS has a new mast
and new equipment, representing
such an increase in power and
range that it now guarantees
clear reception, day and night,
not only throughout the Com-
munist half of Germany, but
also in the “lost lands” fringing
the Eastern borders of the
Fatherland.
‘Cyanide’

RIAS is American, part of the
occupation set-up, backed by all
the power of the dollar. In one
form or other it repeats daily its
claim to know better than Mos-
cow what goes on in the Soviet
zone

To the German Communist
bosses, RIAS is officially the
“eyanide sender.” Unofficially,
they like the daily dose.

Regular listeners .nclude more
than one member of the East
German Government. The proof?
When RIAS beamed out some
cutting comments on Soviet zone
politics, one of the men pilloried
got a telephone call asking
whether he heard the attack.
Came the angry answer: “Of
course I did.”

As I See It From London

By E. BD. Timothy

might become
Colonies.

There were conflicting opinions
among the Members. Mr. A. T.
Lennox-Boyd, who led for the
Opposition, declared that the
lavish and ill-considered expen-
diture by the Government had so
reduced the purchasing power of
sterling that the £120m allocated
in 1945 were now’ worth but
£96m.

Sir Richard Acland (Labour)
thought the increase in expendi-
ture of £20m did too little for
Colonial peoples; Peter Mac
Donald (Conservative) thought it
did too little for private enter-
prise.

No one, however, objected
the increase.

There was drama in the de—-
bate. After performing academic
gymnastics with the philosophies
of religion and ethics, Mr. Wake-
field enunciated the thesis that
“men are equal in the sight of
God, but not equal in capacity”.
Being a man of culture who is
cultured enough to know that it
is unwise to be involved in reli-
gious questions, Mr. Harold
Davies suggested that Britain
should in her dealings with Colo-
nial peoples substitute “a culture
bar for the colour bar”.

Fenner Brockway, whose enthu-
siasm for championing the cause
of Colonial peoples sometimes
causes Colonials to stop and think,
.Was aceused of over-exaggeration
and irresponsibility after painting
a pathetic picture of the plight of
African coffee-growers in Kenya.

Laughter eclipsed embarrass-
ment when Harold Davies stressed
the need for teaching birth control
methods in the Colonies—‘“so as
to give the women a chance’.

In summing-up the debate, the
Secretary of State for the Colo-
nies said;

“If the policy of parallel econo-
mic and social development and
Constitutional advance, carrying
the peoples with us in partner-
ship, is not accepted by any party
in this House, we may fail. That
is the policy of His Majesty’s
Government now, the policy of
the party to which I belong. It is
the right policy”. ‘

How else could it be!

Colonial Council

In July this year, Mr. R, L. M
Kirkwood of the Jamaica Legis-

necessary in the

to



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

On a busy news day,
20,000 people give
and get their cyanide.
East Berlin techniciams jammed

up to
a ring

the first telephone aes
RIAS experts changed e.
“The Reds wou scramble this one

in a hurry,” they say.

Dull, Rather

WHAT programmes go out on
the Eastern air from RIAS and
the West German transmitters?

Well, there was a group of purg-
ed Communist lawyers _ sitting
round a_ table telling the world
how justice has become a Com-
munist Party tool in East Ger-
many. It sounded dreary.

What the lawyers were really
after was io make out a case
that, having fled from the East,
they are fit to practise in the

est.
Then Frau Gertrud Milke
stepped up to the microphone,
She fled to the West with
her official shorthand record o!
evidence against Germans who
after being freed from Russia”
concentration camps, were handed
over to Communist tribunals to
be sentenced. ,
Prisoners were brought in on
stretchers, Frau Milke said,
“And when they asked permis-
sion to call witnesses to speak
on their behalf, I was ordered
to strike it from my notes.”

‘Like A Thief’

FRAU MILKE'’S account of
Soviet zone justice was less sleep
inducing than that of the
lawyers. But still there was no

in it, no sense that here
was the radio outpost of the
West bringing the hope of free-
dom to the East.

The absence of drama is inten-
tional. “No flourish of trumpets
here,” said a programme director
“Ie we went in for ‘putting i
across’ the letters would soon pile

up telling us to keep it quie’
We just go on the air like a
thief at night, quietly telling

the Easterners what goes On in
their home town. And that way
it sure gets around.”

London Express Service.

lative Council suggested, in a let-
ter published in “The Times
that a Colonial Consultative
Assembly should be set up on the
lines of the Council of Europe.
In recent letters published in the
London “Daily Telegraph” as well
as in a talk given at the Royal
Empire Society, Capt. L. D. Gam-
mans, Conservative M.P., has put
forward a similar suggestion.

This week, I listened to the
House of Commons debate on the
Council of Europe. Nothing on
earth could be duller. However,
it set me thinking seriously about
the possibility of a Colonial Coun-
cil. Many questions arise from
such a proposition. Should the
Assembly be a permanent institu-
tion? If so,.on what legal basis
ean its constitution be drawn up”
What should be the functions of
such a body? Then there are
issues of human rights, the inter-
national situation, language diffi-
culties, etc.

I asked Marjorie Nicholson oi
the Fabian Colonial Bureau foi
her views on this matter, “The
idea is commendable” says Mar-
jorie, “but the Council should not
ecome permanent”. I share that
view. If the Council is set up
permanently, it may in my opin-
ion, be looked upon by Colonial
political leaders as a major deter-
rent towards _ self-government.
The existence of such an organi-
zation may render the status of
the Colonies and the Colonial
peoples immutable.

However, such a Council would
have its good points, It would
enable representatives of the va-
rious Colonial legislatures to meet
together, say, once a year to dis-
cuss common problems such as
Trade, Defence, Trade Unionism
and other allied subjects.

It might also bring Colonial
peoples closely together and
thereby strengthen the ties of

common relationships with Brit-
ain. So far, the Colonial Office
has done nothing concrete about
the formation of such a Council.

Nor have Colonial Legislatures
for that matter, ait.
I think the Colonial’ Oiice |

should arrange a trial meeting in
London of representatives of the
Colonies to diseuss whether or no
such an Assembly is desirable.
Alternately, the Speakers of the
Colonial Legislatures could peti-
tion the King-in-Council that
they want a Colonial Council
which is representative of Colonial
Legislatures.

Who is going to take the initia-
tive?


















A VISIT TO
OBERAMMERGAU

DON FINLEY, formerly a stage designer
in Sydney and now working at Australia
House in London, recently went to Oberam-
mergau to see the famous Passion Play and
in the BBC’s Overseas Service described this
unique and impressive spectacle. The play is
given every ten years but owing to the inter-
ruption of war there has been a gap of six-
teen years since the last performances. The
Passion Play’s tradition goes back to 1603,
when the little mountain village of Oberam-
mergau in Bavaria was surrounded by a
plague-stricken world. It was guarded like a
city under siege for fear that any stranger
should bring in the dread disease. But one
night a man returned from the outer world
and at night slipped past the guards. The
village was infected and forty people died.
The villagers vowed that if no one else caught
the plague they would perform a play of ihe
Passion of Our Lord every ten years for ever
after. They have kept their vow.

Finley’s visit to Oberammergau was com-
pounded of two spectacles; one was the play
itself, the other the attractive and exquisitely
set village with its picturesque inhabitants.
He arrived at Oberammergau by coach, and
was one of six thousand people who had de-
scended on the small village over night by
every form of transport. There were priests

and what Finley referred to as “Ladies of the
international Set, with their sun glasses
and painted finger nats.” On his first night
the village seemed as unreal as a Paris fair.
The brightly lit shop windows displayed a
fantastic array of merchandise to tempt the
“rich Americans,”
from all over Germany amongst which the
lovely wood-carving and pottery of the Ober-
ammergau craftsmen stood out.

The brilliance of the next morning brought
the village to life and dispersed the previous
night’s air of unreality. The Australian. vis-
itor heard the deep tones of the cowbells,
the higher jingle of the goat bells and the
sonorous church bells calling peasants and
visitors to early mass. He breakfasted on
coffee, fresh rolls, farmhouse butter and
honey and by eight o’clock was off down the
village street with a cushion under his arm,
;in company with five thousand, nine hundred
and ninety-nine other visitors. Cameras
clicked everywhere as a little boy with fair
curls to his shoulders whizzed by, delivering
groceries on his bicycle, whilst another long-
haired boy led a small donkey towards the
theatre to play its part in the entry to Jerus-
alem, Finley was lucky to have an almost per-
fect seat in the centre front and near the
stage. He described the vast theatre, which
was planned in such a way that “if it rains,
and it does sometimes, the audience and the

principal actors are sheltered and only the |

chorus gets wet. Overhead the high roof is
arched and there is just enough of a gap lef!
for the sunshine to come through and throw
light on the stage.” He found it strange to
sit in the theatre, seeing above him a section
of brilliant blue sky and in front, on the enor-
mous stage, a chorus of fifty men and women
entering in single file to begin the play.
, He did not describe the play itself, for the
theme is known to everyone, but as it was
performed by the Community of Oberammer-
gau it was an experience he would not have
missed. It was a great, impressive and won-
| derful production, during which the audience
sat almost throughout the day without a
; movement, except for their two-hour brea
for lunch. Only the birds that fluttered and
twittered in the auditorium’s arched cover-
ing broke the silence at tense moments.

For the nine years after the presentatio
of the Passion Play, Oberammergau become:
Just another summer and winter resort. Then
said Finley, “the peasants return to thei
fields, the wood carvers and potters to the!
trades and the community to studying an
living the parts they hope to be chosen t
portray when the time comes for the ‘Play o
the Holy Vow’ to be given again”.







trinkets and vhich he

Holidays
To The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—I was particularly attract-
ed to a correspondent in Our
Readers Say column who signed
as “Iiopper’’ under a letter cap-
tioned Holidays with Pay, on
Tuesday. “Hopper” wants to know
who will cook his food if his cook
is given two weeks’ holiday. He
mentions that he employs a cook,
half-day maid and a washer, His
wife, he says cannot cook, and he
is in the same boat.

1 ean offer “Hopper” the solu-
tion to his problem. He asked for
it. If “Hopper” cannot eat at
home while cookie is away, then
he should eat at the food shops
in town. There are many such in
Swan Street and Broad Street. If
“Hopper” cannot afford to eat in
the food shops, then he has no
business with a cook, halfday maid
and a washer, because he is living
above his means, fooling himself
and trying to fool his friends.
Society brings this on no doubt.
If Hopper’s cook died and he could
not get a cook within two weeks,
would Hopper die of starvation?
You have your solution Mr.
Hopper. Why not give the poor
cook.a break?

FOOD LOVER

Complacent Slaughter
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—A careful reading of sev-
eral volumes of Plutarch’s Lives

will give any one a fair idea of
what the world used to be. and
what it still is. The only real dif
ference between today and the
days of Plutarch is the method
and efficiency of the continuai
slaughter.

What worries one who reads
Plutarch’s acecunt ef those good
old days is the calm way the an-
elent armies took their being
slaughtered fer granted and ac-
tually gave the impression of en-
joying being slaughtered. It is the
same way with the North Koreans
today, soldiers and civilians alike
seem indifferent to being slaugh-
tered.

When the Russian bombs start
raining on New York, the slaugh-
ter will be according to the best
ancient tradition of old Plutarch.
The slaughtered will take it as
all in the day’s work cr the nor-
mal course of events, Like the
ancient Greek and Roman sol-
diers, the New Yorkers will have
taken war for granted to the ex-
tent that they havc made no real
or strenuous effort to arouse the
entire world to the need for peace
and the futility of slaughter.
Humanity still takes mass slaugh-
ter for granted, There ought to be
something that the common people
of all the world can do about it,
or is evolution a sickly joke?

It is high time that the citizens

of all countries rose up in revolt
against this continual slaughter.
Children should be taught at home
amd in school to question the lead-
ership of any aggressor who %c°s
in for mass slaughter.

Some method must be found to
force the “savage” to learn the
best ideas of the best minds on
the subject of peace, We should
learn to recognise that any man
who wants to be a dictator or who
wants to conquer the earth is a
bit insane, and out of line with
normal mental evolution. Only the
insane can possibly go in for atro-
cities. If the insanity of the dic-
tators cannot be cured, it need not
be endured, Such men should be
controlled in some way which will
prevent their perpetrating their
mass slaughter of humanity. All
the people of the world should
feel strongly enough about this to
de something about it. Why sub-
mit tamely to being slaughtered?
The time has come for intelligence
to control human action, If lying
propaganda results in mass slaugh-
ter, why do we not make the
effort to send out sufficient truth-
ful aganda to prevent another
world war’

EDWIN BLAKE WHITING.

Branford, Conn.
U.S.A.

Nov. 10, ’50

What Should Be Done To Ensure The
Of Members At Meetings

Attendance

The Barbados Clerks’ Union
was started five years ago with
the view of improving the general
working conditions and raising
the standard of living of the clerks
of this Island. Since its inception
it has met with varying degrees
of success and failure.

This has been due to the incon-
sistencies, the lack of vision, the
almost puerite attitude of the
diverse collection’ of clerks of
Bridgetown,

As an infant it was expected to
walk and talk.

As a weak and_ struggling
adolescent it was expected to lead
the non-co-operative and some—
times non-supporting clerks into
the promised land of contentment,
wherever that is.

No concerted effort was mace
by the working men, women, boys
and girls of our commercial c
munity to pool their resources,
their ingenuity, and their com-
mon sense to lift the Union up
above the sneers, the ridicule, and
contempt of all and sundry, until
today even the interest of some
of its most ardent supporters is
beginning to wane. This is evi-
denced by the paucity of attend-
ance at most of the meetings.

What then can be done to rouse





By Oliver W. Barnes

This is the Prize Winning
Fssay in the Clerks’ Union
Competition. Mr. J. S. B
Dear was the Judge, and the
Prize $10.

a spirit of interest in our vlerks,
and to ensure their attendance at
meetings?

I think that the Union should
step out of its shell and court the
limelight of public opinion through
the medium of the local press.

I think that the time has come
when the clerks should be asked
publicly the following questions:
e Do you think that a Clerks’
Union is necessary in Barbados?

If so, would you be willing to
give of your time and contribu-
tions to ensure its success

Are you willing to state public-
ly or privately your ideas of the

lines along which such a union
should be run?

I believe that if this could be
done and could even provoke a
controversial issue, not among the
clerks alone, but among others
who air their views freely in the
local press, that it might stimulate
a little interest in our white collar
workers,

When this is done, I suggest
that meetings be held on evenings
before the clerks go home as it

has been sue apparent that
they do not like to come to meet-
ings at night,

Meetings should be called fo
four-thirty and started promptl;
at five.

The President should be giver
full powers to check any atiemp
by anyone to prolong the meetins
when they try to introduce un-
necessary side issues.

Every effort should be made tc
speed the business of the meet
ing, and attend only to the neces
sary things.

Finally, if the clerks do wish <
Union, they must be prepared to
undergo a change of heart. They
must realise that their unton is |
not just a medium through which |
they can obtain a quick raise, ane |
then abandon, but they must be |
prepared to give unstintingly of |
their financial and moral support
at the nadir as well as the zenith |

of its existence. Thus can they |
have a Union which can give

them the support they desirc, anc |
can by its precepts and practises |
set an example to all other such |}

organisations of a high standaré |

of service to the people of Bar- |}
bados in general and employers in}
particular

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24, | 1950



———








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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24,
———

Carpenter Sentenced To Die

@ From Page 1

Seven-year-old Allan Grant,
who told the Court he knew that
if he told lies he would get burnt
up, said he used to live in Bul-
len’s Alley with his mother.
James Babb was his father.

His two brothers and he were
s‘eeping in a room outside the
bedroom, His brother awoke him
and James Babb, his father ran
out of the bedroom. His bigger
brother ran out of the house.
That brother and his sister went
to the Police Station. James told

on her back and dragged her
down on the floor, His other
brother ran over at the next door
neighbour and after James Babb
ran out he went with his brother.

To Mr. Ward: There was a
quarrel between his mother and
his father, Wnen he was awaken-
ed he saw his father drag her
off the bed and his brother and
sister replaced her on_it.

After Allan Grant's evidence
the case for the Crown was closed.

The Defence
Addressing the jury, Mr. Ward
told them that there was no
doubt that Edna Grant had come

to her death in an atrocious man- |

ner. That fact, however, was
not to weigh in their deliberations
when they retired to debate the
matter. Nor should sympathy for
the accused person or the rela-
tives of the dead woman in any
way influence their decision. They
were only to weigh the evidence
which was adduced in the Court.
He stressed that the onus was
on the Prosecution who had to
establish that the woman was
killed by James Babb in such
circumstances that they could
presume malice. If they feit
that the alleged act was man-
slaughter and not murder, the
accused was entitled to that
verdict.

The evidence of the witnesses
was very conflicting. Three of
them were supposed to have wit-
nessed a scene in the bedroom
at the same time. The one had
said that he saw nine blows pass-
ed and the other two said that
none were passed. That, he ar-
gued, was a serious discrepancy.
How, he asked, could they be
explained away?

The witness Hilda had said
that when Babb ran out of the
house, he was dressed in sleeping
attire, a vest and a drawers, while
her brother said that he had on
a blue pants.

He was alleged to have return--
ed when two of them went to
the police station and then to
have battered the woman to death,
The pants that was produced in
court and whith was examined
by the Government Bacteriologist
was proved to have not one drop
of blood on the outside. Yet
blood was spattered all about the
room. Was it then a miracle that
he should’ have gone into the
house and battered her to death,
and that blood should spatter
every place except upon his
pants.

And the hammer he was al-
leged to have battered her with,
why did it not have a trace of
blood? The doctor had said that it
would have been highly improb-
able that the hammer the police
produced could have fractured
the skull-in such a manner and
that no traces of blood or hair
should be found upon it.

Nor could it be held that the
hammer was washed. The police
who had removed it from the
coop said he ‘saw stains on it,
stains which would not have been
there had Babb washed the ham-
mer. But those stains were not
confirmed to be blood stains.

Retaliation

The violence that was used
against the woman could have
been in retaliation of violence
which was used against the
accused. Thus the circuta-
stances under which she weuld
have lost her life would have
failed to have been proved by
the Prosecution and it might
then drop to manslaughter.
Nobody knew how the fight
started. Both Babb and Grant
might have been attacked by
somebody outside. That possi-~-
bility could not be ruled out.

Were they holding that he
did the murder because he had
blood on his clothes? They
should remember that Babb had
wounds, too, and his clothes
could have been blood stained
from his own wounds.

Thus three possibilities were
floating about. Not only what
the Prosecution was alleging, but
somebody else could have done it
or they could have started a row
and fight and the woman had
got killed, in which case Babb
was entitled to an acquittal.

The English law was that it
was better that 20 guilty per-
sons escape than one innocen‘
be hanged. The evidence that
the Crown had put forward was
not strong enough to swing a

cat. It was unsatisfactory.
The girl had, in addition to
other discrepancies, said that

she awoke the boys after Babb
ran out., while the boys were
stating that they saw what had
happened,

Overwhelming

Mr. Field, for the Crown, told
the jury that the evidence was
so overwhelming that there was
no need for any harangue from
him. The weight of the evidence
did not necessarily depend upon
the age of the witness, but on
his intelligence. They had seen
the three children, a girl of 14
and two boys of 12 and 11. There
was no doubt that they were
children of understanding. They
seemed to be well brought up and
to be sensible. The slight dis-
crepancies in certain points cf
their testimonies were in seme
respects like any reasonably
grown up person’s testimony.

They should imagine them-
selves awakened suddenly and ia
the scene of a fight at night. Did
they think that they could re-
member in meticulous detuaii
every incident?

The story which the Prosecu-
tion had brought forward was a
reasonable and convincing story
Did they think that the woman
had any enmity for Babb
more than she told him that she
more children.

did not want work for

to any

his mother to turn over on her
belly and he gave her two lashes

any |

|

1950



BAR



}

It was said that
; were floating in the air, they
might be floating over Australia
for what he saw of them. The case
was so clearly proved, that there
was nothing he could say to help
them come to their conclusion.
Judge Sums Up
First point made by the Chief
Justice when he summed up to the
jury was a warning to them not to
be swayed by sympathy one way
or the other. “Soon will fall to
your lot”, he said, “one of the
solemn duties which come to citi-
zens of the island, and you will
shortly have to retire, and deliber-
ate and consider your verdict.
“You will not be swayed by
sympathy one way or the other.
It is sad for you, and for me, to
see the accused in the position
which he occupies charged with
this serious offence, as it is sad
to see anyone in the dock
charged with this or any other
offence

cne
both

attacked
such

else might have
of them. Would

strong man as Babb when he}
had got a few cuts in his head, |

hot-foot it so hurriedly,

possibilities

cused will play no part in your
deliberations, and must’ not sway
you anymore than must sympathy
towards the unfortunate woman,
who, it has been admitted by the
Defence, was brutally and foully
done to death. Again, you must
not be swayed by sympathy for
the four children of the deceased,
whom you have seen and heard.
“Your duty is to try the case on
the evidence which you have heard
and to draw such deductions and
such inferences from that evi-
dence as you feel should be drawn.
You are not here to indulge in
the realms of fancy, or matters
which are floating in the air—that
is a term which has been used
to-day. You are here to try the
ease on the evidence and on the
inferences which you are entitled
to draw from the evidence.

“A person who inflicts grievous
injuries on another, intending to
kill that person, or intending to
inflict grievous bodily harm al-
though not intending to kill, but
from which grievous bodily harm
death ensues, is guilty of murder,
if there be present malice afore-
thought express or implied.”

The Chief Justice explained
malice aforethought express or im-
plied. He said that malice afore-
thought simply meant a wicked
intention either to murder or to
ceuse grievous bodily harm from
which death ensued, That wicked
intention could be evidenced by
threats or lying in wait on pre-
vious occasions. The wicked in-
tention might be implied by the
nature of the implement used or
other circumstances of the case,
since the law held that a man in-
tended the reasonable conse-
quences of his action,

It was the duty of the Prosecu-
tion to establish the guilt of the
accused beyond reasonable doubt.
If they were not so satisfied they
must acquit the accused. But the
doubt must not be a whimsical
one, It must be such a doubt as
if it arose in the course of their
business affairs, it would make
them refrain from taking a par-
ticular course.

The Defence in that case was in
a way two-fold, the Chief Justice
said. Mr. Ward had urged on the
one hand that the Prosecution had
not established the guilt of the
accused beyond reasonable doubt,
and on the other hand that if they
did not believe the story of the
little boys about the second attack
of which they spoke, and bearing
in mind that the accused also had
wounds, there was the possibility
that there might have been a
fight, and so the accused could
only be convicted of man-
slaughter.

In considering the case, the
Chief Justice told the jury, they
would realise that there was no
evidence whatsoever of how the
wounds on the accused were in-
flicted. There was no evidence
as to whether they had been
self-inflicted or not.

Another point made by the
Chief Justice was that they (the
jury) were not concerned with the
question of punishment. That
was inflicted, as they probably
knew, not only to punish the in-
dividual concerned, but also as a
deterrent to prevent other people
from committing offences. That
was the greater object of punish-
ment. But they were not con-
cerned with that. Their duty was
clear, to try the case on the evi-
dence and to say whether the
accused was guilty or not guilty.

The Chief Justice then recount-
ed briefly the points made by
Counsel on both sides, reminding
them of salient parts of the evi-
dence. He mentioned the dis-
erepancies which had occurred in
the evidence, and told them it was
for them to say what they thought
of them, They were to consider
whether those discrepancies indi-
cated that the four young children
whose ages ranged from fourteen
to seven had invented a story
against the accused, or whether
ey were the discrepancies that
could be expected fiom children
of those ages, who had gone
through such an experience after



FOR THIS

PLUM PUDDINGS—1-1!6 tins
PLUM PUDDINGS—2-1t tins

HEINZ MANGO CHUTNEY—per bot
CHIVERS COFFEE ESSENCE—per bot
PRUNES IN SYRUP-—1-1b tins .

SEEDLESS GRAPES—per tin
CHIVERS RASPBERRIES—per
PINEAPPLE JUICE—per tin
CHIVERS TURNIPS—per tin
FANCY MACKEREL—per tin
CHICKEN HADDIES—per tin

HORLICKS MALTED MILK—per bot



It was suggested that some-|

“But sympathy towards the ade

WEEK-END !!

j
a

|
|





THE EVERGREEN TREE by Lord Nelson which is being

trimmed.

Trafalgar Square
Loses A Tree

THE LARGE evergreen tree in Trafalgar Square,
which for many years has been shading wood-cutters,
barbers and taxi drivers from sun and rain, has now been
trimmed to nearly. a stump.

This tree is extremely old and many believe that Tra-
ialgar Square was called “The Green” after it.



Thanksgiving And |

| Nelson

A Marriage
Aboard British Ship

Decorated with bunting from
mast to mast, the motor. ship
Jenkins Roberts celebrated the

American Thanksgiving Day yes-
terday.

The Jenkins Roberts is a British
ship. Her skipper and most of her
crew are also British

Her skipper Henry Watson,
when asked why he celebrated
America’s Thanksgiving Day,
calmly said: “America is one of
the United Nations.” Coinciden-
tally, it was also the day when the
vessel’s cook, Frank Camacho, was
married.

Although the Jenkins Roberts
was commemorating the occasion,
it did not mean a holiday for its
crew. While the bunting flew, the
crew were busy freeing the ship’s
hatches of pine lumber,

Henry Watson, 50, has been
master of the Jenkins Roberts only
for a few months, but he has been
going to sea for about 34 years.
During this time he worked on
some 26 schooners and motor ves-
sels.

Watson was a captain for 20
years, Before taking over the
Jenkins Roberts, he skippered
the motor ship Cancora which
traded between Columbia and
the United States

“Mine is a very eventful sea
life,” he said. He has experi-
enced many storms and disturb-
ances and many a drift.

His last experience of a storm
was during the trip before this
one, when the Jenkins Roberts
was tossed about for 24 hours off
the East Coast of Florida.

The Jenkins Roberts was then
Philadelphia bound from Nassau
with a load of scrap iron.

Fortunately, nokody was hurt,
19 damage was done to the ship
and none of the cargo was lost

An accident Captain Watson re-
membered well, was the sinking of
the Lady Shae off the coast of
Cuba in 1923. He was the Chief
Officer of the Lady Shae. This
was his only experience of a ship
sinking out to sea.

The Jenkins Roberts is expected
to leave port on Sunday for Port-
of-Spain, Trinidad.



Wrong Parking

of Work-
George was yesterday
ordered by His Worship Mr.
A. J. H, Hanschell to pay a fine
of 20/- in 28 days or in default
one month’s imprisonment.

He was found guilty of parking
the motor car G—342 on a re-
stricted area on October 14. The
police said in their evidence that
Gumbes was spoken to and
bluntly refused to move the car.

Reginald Gumbes

mans, St.





being awakened in the early hours
of the morning, and who were
giving evidence five months after
the occurrence,

The jury retired at five minutes
past two and returned to Court
with their verdict one hour later.

50 &
tin



THE EVERGREEN





|
|
|

Schomburgh in his “History of
Barbados” tells how before’ the
first stone was laid on February
24, 1813, for the erection of the
Statue the area was
called the “Green.” A committee
appointed for the execution of the
erection of the statue purchased
the “Green” for £1,050 and to-~
wards this sum the Legislature
contributed £500, The name Was
then changed from the “Green”
to Trafalgar Square.

Mr. J. W. B. Chenery told the
“Advocate” yesterday that Mec
Lellan in his book. “Some Phases
in Barbados Life” states that this
tree was blown down during the
Storm and Barbadians thinking
the world would come to an end
got their strongest men to push i |
back up.

Since that time this evergreen |
has grown too big to be pushed
around and instead it served the |
useful purpose of a shelter.

Some lightermen and labourers |
used to take their snacks under
its branches daily but yesterday
it was vacated. Even the wood-







soldiers,



BADOS ADVOCATE

New Books
At Library
To-morrow

NEW COLLEvTION of adult

books will be ptt into circu- |
lation at the Public Library from |







PAGE FIVE
“Sorry | can't see you!” as, ene a a na ee ee es ee

a AGAIN AVAILABLE !!

«= PURINA
= PIGEON CHOW







9 o'clock to-morrow. morning.| fo -e-,
The majority will be making | Be sofe using Amolin. « Wu. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. — Distributors ng
— ee a ae the Siren Prevents perspiration odors | 2uesenue .
shelves for the first time while Pana’ | BSaegsesaueuau
| tf Does sot bore clothes
a few are replacements. They! {+ '
are nearly all fiction. | _@ Bees not iritate shin | ‘Seeeeaeeeaeuus " a
Among the new ones are

“House In The Sun” by Dane
Chandos who is also the author
of “Village in the Sun” and “The
Story of Zarak Khan” by A. J.)
Bevan. The last mentioned tells |
the story of Khan, a hero of the |
jungle fighting in Burma during |
the last war, who saved the British |
He stated that he}
loved the British soldier little }
but hated the Japs more '

|

“Noble Essences”, the fifth and |
final volume by Sir Osbert Sit- |
well, is also included in the col-
lection. The other four volumes |

j}are already at the Library

Another is a story of King
Michael of Rumania called
“Crown against Sickle” by
Arthur Gould Lee, retired Air-
Vice Marshal. Lee tells of a
King reigning behind the lron
Curtain

“I Spied for Stalin’ by Nora
Murray gives an authentic ac-
eount of a Russian-born wat

bride who defied the Kremlin to
marry the man she loved.

There is also the
“Chekhov In My Life”

love stor:

terell’s “Strait and Narrow”,
“Mr. Midshipman Hornblower” by

Cc. S. Forester, and “The Green
Leaves of Summer” by ~ Oriel
Malet

“Elephant Bill” by Lt. Col
J. H. Williams is another good
book. It tells of the great assis-

the 1914-18 war and
describes how they were handled.
Forty-two illustrations are in-
clude a,

HE POLICE BAND will give
at 8 o'clock to-night. The
gramme is as follows:
Radio Diffusion March

“Music Everywhere”

-Eric Coates
Conductor: Cpl. E, Murrell |
Overture — “Classica” Ewings
including excerpts from “Wil-
liam Tell”, ‘Toreador Song”,
Hungarian Rhapsody by Lizt,
and the famous Largo Handel
Conductor: —Sgt, Cecil Archer
Excerpts from Spanish Suites:

pro-

(1) Tango :

¢2) Serenade Night in Spain

(3) Los Toros

—P. Lacombe

Conductor: Cpl. W. T. Best

Suite—Bartered Bride:

(1) Overture, Village Scene,
Love Duet and Opening
Chorus

(2) Jenik’s Aria and Dance of
the Villagers

(4) March of the Comedians,



cutters do not like working in the
sun and for the outdoor ‘barber it
is most inconvenient.

THE PARCELS
ARE COMING

Already the Christmas parcel
mail has started to come in, the
Postmaster told the Advocate yes
terday, These include merchant
goods as well as gift parcels

At the new parcel department
on the wharf, the twelve racks
which hold over 2,000 parcels are
very nearly filled. A fairly large
number of parcels are on the
floor while there are several bags
still unopened.

The Postmaster said that the
opening of parcel mail had speeded
up considerably since the taking
over of the new department and
deliveries as well. There was
hardly likely to be the custom-
ary congestion experienced dur-



Teasing Duet and Dance
of the Comedians
Lotter
Conductor: Cpl. B. Morris
Idyll—The Glow Worm
‘ —P, Lincke
Cpl. E. Murrell
Finian’s Rainbow
—Burton Lane

Conductor.
Musical Play



Conductor: Sgt. Cecil Archer
Waltz Song—Mighty Like a Rose
—Nevin
(Played on the oc ion of
the birth of Prince Eliza-
beth’s First born, Prince
Charles
Conductor: Cpl. Wilfred Best

Entracte Celebre
Perpetuum Mobile —Strauss
The beauty and freshness of
all Johann Strauss’ Music has
been a continuous source of
pure delight to music lovers,
and this bright merry little
piece is no exception, The
Kaleidoscopic variations on
the eight bar theme are ex-
ceedingly attractive, interest-
ing and amusing.
Conductor: Cpl. B. Morris

ing the Christmas season us the) Rythmic—‘Nora, Nora”—Murrell

building could house twice as
many parcels as was the case al
the old department.

The posting of gift parcels from

Conductor: Sgt. Archer

THIEF stole a bicycle valued
$40, owned by Eugene

people here to their relatives in| Barrett of Mount Friendship, St

the States and the United King-
dom had been very heavy during
this week and it is sure to be
heavier in a week or two.

In charge of the new depart-
ment is Mr. K. C. Lewis who has
eleven assistants “I am glad to
say,” said the Postmaster, ‘that
this staff has the situation well
in hand.” He said that letter and
other mail were still normal.

26 COMING

Twenty-six passengers from the
U.K. will be arriving here by
the Elders & Fyffes passenger
ship “Golfito” which is du@ to
call at Barbados at 9.m. on Sat-
urday .

The “Golfito” will be leaving
port about 4 p.m. the same day
for Trinidad. Messrs Wilkinson
& Haynes Co., Ltd., are local
agents.










IGUTFUL




TODAY

PRUNE
CREAM

Drop in at

KNIGHT'S
SODA FO



DELICIOUS!
ENJOY

the houst
Kingston

Michael, from outside
of Verona Fenty at
Road on Wednesday

Another cycle belonging !
Lisle Moseley of St. Matthias,
Christ Church, which was re-
ported stolen from outside
building at Tudor Street on Sep-
tember 27, was found in a fiel
of canes at Bulkeley Plantation
by Clairmagnte Brathwaite of
Jordons, St. George. The fend
ers and head light were missing
Brathwaite took it into the Dis-
trict *B’ Police Station,

HE COUNTER of the fish mar-
ket has been repaired in prep-

by Lydia |
Aviloy, “Through the Valley” by g
Robert Henriques, Geoffrey Cot- |

a concert at Hastings Rocks |

tance given by elephants during |
alse }



Amolin : om
lal ll ANIMATED OPINIONS

rs

DON'T NEGLECT, LITTLE, BURNS

THE THING TO USE IS

NGUENTINE

No holf-way meowres con
do what soothing, antiseptic
UNGUENTINE will do to:

© REVEVE PAIN

© FIGHT INFECTION
@ PROMOTE HEALING









Says Mr. Leo King:
“YOU CAN RE-LION IT
BEING THE SWEETEST TREAT!”

Wahtans

soon go when
you take this!

it
It soothes the throa'
a tastes
and chest os niee!

MADE IN UK.
The Perfection of Confection

a ian

WALTERS’ ‘PALM’ TOFFEE LTD. ‘PALM’ WORKS;
LONDON, W.3





aration for the coming flying Ssh

season but up to yesterday morn
ing no flying fish were brought in



Eighty pounds of Albacore were
sold in the market earlier in the

day 3°
for

the same

and on
offered

of shark were

week
lbs.
sale

SOME

PHOENIX
UNTAIN



WHEN THE |}

(SS OCCASION
| : CALLS FOR }
A Certain Cure
SOMETHING }

a CIAL

. SPE

| Whooping Cough
* ‘PERTUSSIN’ $1.50 VOU"LL }
Also for Bronchial Catarrh }
- NEED

Bonbons
de Pertussin THE
(LOZENGES) $1.08 }
ee Sore Throat and FOLLOWING \



Figured and Flowered ART SILK from ....

$2.25 to 4.50 yd.
$4.50 yd.

Coloured STRIPED SATIN at $4.10 yd.

eevee At $2.66 to 2.77 yd.

eoeeeoecees

Pertussin Balsam

$1.50

For external application in
cases of obstinate cough,
whooping cough and
asthmatic conditions

Pertussin Drops 3/9

FLOWERED SATIN

ALLOVER LACE

\ \
Drop into nose for all acute in Pink, Blue, Green, Black and White
and chronic affections BRODERIE ANGLAIS
aa Ree in Pink and Blue $4.02 & 4.45 yd.

EMBROIDERED ORGANDIE
in Pink, Green and White @
CRINKLE GEORGETTE ;
in Pink, Blue and Green
MOSS CREPE
n Biscuit, Cerise, Tan, Sheba, Pink
Grey and Emerald ... ...

HARRISON'S

Wholesale Prices on applica-
tion to

t $2.40 to 3.85 yd.
at $1.74 yd.

at $3.00 yd.
DIAL 2664

Bruce
Weatherhead
Ltd.













peeve



Imperial
Corsetry

HOOK SIDE CORSETS



Prices from $2.18 to $3.65



Sizes 26 ot 34.

BRASSIERES

Strapless with lace tops in Pink
Black and White

Plain in Pink only

Sizes 32 to 46

Prices from $1.10 to $2.11

PANTIE GIRDLES
Medium and Large

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10,

$3.75







11, 12, & 13 Broad Street


=

* PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE





HENRY~~ BY CARL ANDERSON

MICKEY MOUSE

TiLiL GET BACK ALL J
RIGHT! THERE'S A 4
FELLOW.IN A BOAT
ABOVE, HOLDING THAT | | .
GUIDE ROPE! GOSH! WHAT'LL
I DO Now?

\

950, Wale ivory Productions
Hughes Reserved

BY CHIC YOUNG
















{Gill sane DO ds
0G Jos call tHeM
, UP ALL THE

4 TIME ? cae
\ sat







THERE'S NOTHING
ELSE TO MAKE
DATES WITH!

MARYLYN GIGGLES
TOO MUCH--EMMY





Bi po eu ds

THINK I'Lt EVER
EET A Od

M
ee










Loss OE 5s
THE LONE RANGER
TF WELL KILL.

| HO TRIES TO GETZ. DIE IN FIRE/
(DOW? p= M

YOULL DIE IN THE TRAP YOU SET FOR
THE REST OF US, UNLESS YOU
ADMIT YOU HIRED THEM!










BULLET MARKS TO
by SHOW A MURDER!









a

BRINGING UP FATHER

digestion ie ee
pment cn | | edict i
HUM ALL ME MONev || | Great HEAVENS /

GOIN' FER PAINT AN J t HEAP A NOISE














ma it WuZ ABURGLAe--- )

_ BUT DON'T WORRY ABOUT
= YER PAINTIN' -HE LEFT
'T- BUT TOOK

\ THE Frame” (

aa

ce




EXPENSIVE FRAMES DOWNSTAIRS -
FEP MAGGES IT'S PROBABLY A
) PAINTINGS re BURGLAR-GET UP! |
pre Ss HE 16 AFTER MY }
{ PAINTING 4 _ J
jf





ALL sie |
}













(
>
| ie
,
fi
iG






BY ALEX RAYMOND



" THUS BHE SAT AND SANG THE NIGHT MY HEART BRC

I’M SORRY, SIR... } OH, NO! NO!

(\\
\ NS Vien .
Nw il

SIT HERE, MR. VAN
OORPE... I WILL SING

WY WIFE'S OBATH I SHUNNED
2uD...B SVEN COARDED UP





BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

MONK, YOUVE CAUSED A LOT OF
TROUBLE ~ SAY, YOUVE HAD THAT
PAPER EVER SINCE | TOOK YOU
= _OUT OF THE CAGE.

~WeTs SEE IT++



{MIN A HURRY? DRIVE
|ME TO THE EPGE OF
| THE JUNGLE. 5

3 0

-
|













—_—— --——




.
|
|



}

4 ee Aad atid
SSDS SOG GOO POOF EOE

FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 24, 1950

Teeth Loose
Gums Bleed 3)

ia





One is English, one American




h Mouth or perh



yet their Beauty Care Soatee
) as the same eSktrce Anata aaa da

mon wk on return of emp



jage. Get Amosan Ir

> your +t t
| eu ny. The j ’
Amosan’s
'for Pyorrhea—Trench Mo t#

KIDNEY
TROUBLE

Here’s a medicine made
| specially for it...

meee

ae pe

LADY MAUREEN COOPER, /ovely young

English society woman, entrusts her milk-and-roses

complexion to Pond's.‘' It is simply wonderful what

Pond’s Creams have done for my lexion,””

says Lady Maureen. “1 use Pond’s Cold Cream

for cleansing and Pond's Vanishing Cream to
Fretect ty skin’

NGLISH OR AMERIGAN— socicty’s lovelies
E women use the same beauty care. They use
Pond’s, and it is thanks to Pond’s two Creams that
their complexions keep so radiantly lovely always.

Why not let Pond’s keep your skin lovely, wo?
Every night, before you go to bed, cleanse the skin
thoroughly of dirt and stale make-up with delightful
Pond’s Cold Cream, Then “‘rinsé” with more Cold
Cream for extra-cleansing, extra-sofiness. .

In the morning, before putting on your make-up,
smooth in a thin film of Pond’s Vanishing Cream.
It makes an ideal powder base because it holds
powder matt for hours. It protects the skin, too.
Use Pond’s beauty care re¢ularly and in a short
while you will notice that your skin is clearer, softer,
smoother. It Will glow with new radiance, new
loveliness. Pond’s Creams are inexpensive to buy,
yet they are used by society’s loveliest women on
both sides of the Adantic, You can Buy Pénd’s at
all the best beauty counters,

MRS. CORNELIUS VANDERBILT, Ji.,
charming young New. Yorker, is one of the many
society beauties who use Pond’s. ‘* You won't find a
finer cream anywhere than Pond’s Cold Cream,”
says Mrs. Vanderbilt. ‘‘It leaves the skin feeling
especially soft and smooth and clear

becoming glow of colour in the cheeks"

brings up a

GUARANTEE

De Witt’s Pills are cad

manufactured under strictly hygienic
conditions and the ingredients con-
form to rigid standards of purity.









CLLLLLILS SD Spt
CASS GA fy
SLY

, BLUNDELL’S

PREPARED
PAINT



AT hopeless fceling that you're too weak,
‘not up to it’ any longer simply means that
you've been taking too much out of yourself.
Your body is short of wwo essential strengthening
foods—phosphorus and protein.

Tissues strengthened

To put you right, you need a course of
*Sanatogen’ Nerve Tonic Food. ‘Sanatogen’
combines these two great body-building foods—
phosphorus and protein—in their organic form,
so that they are quickly absorbed into your
system. Day by day glorious new health, youth
and vitality flow through your whole body —

your strength and self-confidence come back f
Start on a course of ‘Sanatogen’ today.

3
j
%

If unobtainable at
your dealers consult

JAMES A. LYNCH

& CO., LTD.,
AGENTS

_ iT @ broover










ees ts ite



On sale at good chemists and druggists

‘SANATOGEN? 2"

restores health, vouch and vitality
The word ‘Sanatogen’ is a registered trade r



DUNLGP rorx

CAR TYRES






—for
=every hour

longer

of the day lif
ire

When everyone else is hot and bothered you will
fascinate by your freshness — if you do this. After your
bath or bathe, shower yourself all over with Cashmere
Bouquet Taleum Powder. Its magie touch will turn your
skin to silk : clothe you in a cool, protecting film that
keeps you daintily fresh all day long. Its delicate perfume
will add new and subtle charm to your Whole personality.
For Cashmere Bouquet is the Taleuin Powder with the
fragrance men love.

Cashmere Bouquet

TALCUM POWDER

DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING C0, LTD.

(ECKSTEIN BROS.)

COLGATE-PALMOLIVE-PEET CO.

SPA LELESSSOS EPPS SSE SOS SCS SSSESSS SOS SS SSTS OOS.

DINE TO-NIGHT &)) arrenrion::
— AT = :/) FACTORY MANAGERS
BARBADOS LEADING :

CHINESE RESTAURANT







5 5s



|





Take this opportunity of obtaining your requirements in :—

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE





x Ranging from 4 in. upwards

Delightful prepared in our spotless S
, kitehen ... rved in our pleasant surround- ~
% |
x ings, we kno. you'll enjoy our chef's specials. g | MILD STEEL
x Stop in tonight ! $ | Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes
x »
% | e
g THE $ | BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes }
* ® | tv)
i ® | - i X
g G R E EB N % FILTER CLOTH—-White Cofton Twill i
* . ?
> y | At PRICES that cannot be repeated.
*‘ DRAGON : |
% e | i
‘ x TA r ))
x Open 9 a.m. to Midnight % } The BARBADOS Fou NDRY Lid. i}
8 No. 9 BROAD STREET > | WHITE PARK ROAD, ST. MICHAEL i
% for Reservations Dial 3896. s { DIAL 4528 {
Â¥ % 1

s
PSSSSS9SSS96666005



|
|

SS





ig eae ntact cece ee pmmmmaaaecmaaamcereeememmcallla

yr gan menace tai teem nih nl ihe ns al aati aan tA)

aunt iin ellie antes teem ag:








FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24,



1950

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

DIED







McINTOSH-—MRS. ELISE at 3 p.m.
3 Her eral will ieave her
te dence rion House”, Deacons
Road at 415 o'clock this afternoon for
the Westbury Cemetery
No Cards. Friends are asked to attend.
R.°T. Harewood, Mrs. Edith Parry.
Lindsay Harewood, Irving Harewood,
Mrs. Ada Hinds, Pi y Hind



24.1,.50—In

MEMORIAM

IN loving memory of our Dear
Mcther and grand mother ADRIANA
TAYLOR who departed this life on the
24th November 1942.

Eight years ago grannie Dear you left

us

Faithful and honest in all your ways

Devoted and true to the end of your







deys

Always patient, loving and kind,
What a beautiful memory you left
behind

Asleep in Jesus! far from thee

Thy kindred and their grave; may be,
But thine is still a blessed sleep,
From which none ever wakes to weep



















FOR RENT
HOUSES

BRAMBLEY, Waterford Gap, St. Mi-
chael. From November Ist; fully furn-
ished residence, For particulars, Phone
3062. 24.10.50.—t.f.n.







LYNSTED — Navy Gardens, 3 Bed-/

rooms, Servants room, Garage, Modern
conveniences, Kitchen Garden, Flower

Garden, Fruit Tree, Lawn, ~ te
Mrs. G. Yvonet. . ;

21.11.50—t.f.n.
“WARSAW” -— Welches Road St.

ee] — Newly built ae con-
open verandah, ‘awing, ing
3 bedrooms with running water, built-in
presses; kitchenette with built-in cup-
boards; Electric light and water, W.C.
and Bath; servants room, garage. Pos-
session st December. 2947.
R. Archer McKenzie, Victoria Street.
22.11.50—3n

BUILDING next to Ramdin; Roebuck
Street; suitable for Bond or Garage











Miss Albertha Taylor: Mrs. Maggie} Apply James Jones, ‘Gloria’, Roebuck
Gooding Mrs. Kathieeén Beckles, Mrs. | Street. 4, 32.80-—Sn
Doreen Wickham, Mrs. Gwen Rollins
(daughter ) Montelle; Oscar, Fred,

Dorris, Mellis, Eunilda, (grand child-
ren PUBLIC SALES
Trinidad and U.S.A. Please Copy.
24.11.50—I1n voll
AUCTION
asohoraeiemerieniniansatiiaes Sajbeberse

By instructions of the Agents of the
FOR SALE UNITED BRITISH INSURANCE CO., |
lh pic sell at are GARAGE, BAY
oa ‘TREET on FRIDAY 2th. at 2 \.

AUTOMOTIVE 1 Hillman Saloon Car with ;
and in working order; damaged in acci-

AUTO CYCLE — New Hudson Auto|] dent. TERMS CASH.

Cycle, excellent condition or nearest. KEN:
$150.00. Apply Evan Ross, Glynville, a eee ee 732 11.503
Pinfold St. 11,50—2n. ane

CAR: One (1) 1937 Vauxhall 10 in
running order Apply A. J. Hilliard, Under The Diamond Hammer
Central Foundry. Day Phone 4668.

24.11.50—6n a> WILL sell on the spot at Upper
jay of November at 2 o'clock, One

CAR — Austin A-40. 1950 Model.| Reckle> Road on Tuesday next the 28th
Cwner driven. Mileage 3,000 Miles.| day of November at 2 o'clock, One
Phone: E. Gill 2454. House built of pine in very good con-

24.11.50—4n aitan. It has Gallery, Drawing and
iring Rooms, 2 bedroom:, Kitchén

VAN—One (1) 8 H.-P. Ford Van, good| ind spacious yard which is enclosed
condition, going cheap. Dial Belgrave} with galvanize. It has Electricity’ and
$063, Purity Bakeries Ltd. water installed. It can be rented for

19.11.50—6n. | $30.00 pr. month. The “land which is
the Government’; can be rented.
ELECTRICAL For inspection see D'Arcy A. Scott,



MOTOR—One (1) G.E.
Phase Electric Motor, never used, in
original package. Phone 8641.
§.0C a.m. or after 3.00 p.m.

“4 HELP. Single

22.11.50—3n

LIVESTOCK

COWS — Four (4) Milch Cows, Two
(2) heifers. One Pure bred Holstein
Cow eight months in calf, one Grade
Holstein Cow six months in calf for





Holstein bull Remus, Rock Dundo, Cave
Hill, St. Michael.

MISCELLANEOUS

GOLD JEWELLERY — Consisting of
hes;







HAMS — 72 cents per 1b; Currants
34 cts. per TM. Raisin 40 cts. per Ib
C. Herbert, 55 Tudor St, Dial 3686.

23.1150—3n.

PARASOLS—Plastic Parasols Many
pretty Colours from which to choose.
At a Special Low Price $1.42 each.
The Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad
Street. 22.11.50—4n.

POOLE POTTERY EARTHENWARE—A
wide variety just received and on sale.
See your Jewellers, Y. De Lima & Co.,
Ltd., 20 Broad Street, Bridgetown.

18.11.60—6n

PEARL NECKLACE 8&4 cts eagh,
beaded necklaces $1.20 up, Beaded ear-



RAINCOATS — Plastic Raincoats in
green, pink and ue me Sach. ae
Sho if roar t.

Modern Dress ppe Oe an



STOCKINGS—Kayser Nylon Stockings
51 gauge The finest available in all
new shades $2.14 Der ht pany Modern

‘ect.
Dress Shoppe, Broa Sets tOAn



Megazine Lane. 24.°/1.50—4n

UNDER THE SILVER >
HAMMER

ON Tuesday 28th by order of Mr:
G. A. Hutchinson we will sell her Fur-



niture at “Avalon Flat 3° Collymore
Rock

which includes
Dining Table: Waggon: Liquor Case:

Arm, Upright and Morris Chairs: China
Cabinet: Ornament Tables: Bookshelf:
AL in Mahogany: Card Table, Glass
and China, Plated and Brass Ware:
Dinner, Tea and Breakfast Services
(Royal Doulton Ware): Frigidaire (good
working order): Cedar Machine Table:
Plaited Grass Mat: Phileo 7 Tube Hadio:
Clock, Books, Simmons and Iron
Single Bedsteads: Springs and Mat-

tresses; Cedar and Mahogany Presses:
Mehog. Dressing Tables: Screens: Pine
Linen Press, Kitchen Table:, Larder

Ware Press: Canon Gas Stove and Oven:
(new). 2 Burner Gas Range. Electric
Iron ¢nd Toaster, Kitchen Utensil;
Wash Basin and Fittings .and other
items. Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms Cash.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.

Auctioneers
24,11,.50—2n

Under The Diamond Hammer

AUCTION 8ALE
By instructions received I will sell
at “Trelawny”, near Pavilion Court,
Hastings on Wednesday next 29th of
November, beginning at 12.30 an entire
lot of household furniture which
includes Mahog. and Painted desks,
Mahog. Tub Chairs, Plant Stools, Rush
Chairs, Rockers and Settee, Kidney
Tables, (1) Upholstered Manog. Antique
Chair on Ca 8, Book Sheives, Carpet,
(1) Green painted dining table with

4 Chairs, (1) Mahog, Serving tabie,
Several painted presses, Mahog and
painted dressing tables, Mirrors, Sim-

mons Bedsteads with springs & Mat-
tresses, Iron Cots with Mattresses,
Electric Stove, Pine tables, Liquor
Case, Several painted tables & Chairs,
(1) Coolerator, Glass Jars, Larder,
Florence Stove & Oven, Lot of Cutlery,
Glass Ware, Linens, Silvers, AJuminium
Saucepans, Plates & Dishes, and several
other items too numerous to mention,
Terms Cash. D'Arcy A. Scott, Auc-
tioneer. 24.11.50—In,



HOGANY TREES—Dial 8105
Ro XING. 21.11.50—T.F.N.

CHT — That desirable Yacht
“WAGABOND". Tel, J. A. Reid, Lone
Star Garage. Dial 91-33 22,11.50—12n.

WANTED

, —
HOUSEMAID/BUTLER — Apply be-
tween 9 and 11 a.m, to Mrs, Eric Man-

ning ,“Benman”, Pine Hill, near Gov-
Venere House. 23.11.50—3n.
eee lit etl Talereeteeeciea acetate

IN VACANT
SITUATIO: © Stationery
store in Trinidad.

perience and tions to P.O. Box
434, Port-of.

Photograph. a
ty. Minimum
commission.

MISCELLANEOUS

— All kinds of Card
Boxes other than corrugated

Apply Advocate Siting eure: xin.







Board
card.

g

z

3

E

Z

&

}

a 8

! 3

JEWELLERY BOUGHT, highest prices

id. See your jewellers, Y. De Lima |
& Co. Ltd., 20, Broad Street Bridge-
town. 18,11.50—6n.

——$—$——— SS ——___—_
WILLING TO PURCHASE Good Joiners

Work in Mahogany, Cedar, Birch and
Pine at Ralph mors eed Rooms,
is yl ley. one

Hardwood Alle aa, a



PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE

Closing to Business from Thursday
23rd_ ‘through puLdey sen re-opening.
th. J. B. Clarke

pony * 22.11.50-—3n





_ NOTICE

Applications for two vacant Vestry
Scholarships (Boys) tenable at the |
Alleyne School, will be received by the |
undersigned up to Friday, December Ist.
Applicants must be sons of Parishioners
in straitened circumstances. Applica-
tions must be accompanied by a Birth





Certificate. Applicant; must present
themselves to the Headmaster at the
Allayne School on Monday December
4th at 9.30 a.m, to take the entrance
examination.

Cc. A. SKINNER,

Vestry Clerk,
St. Andrew.
19.11.50—7n

NOTICE

PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH

Applications (accompanied by bap-
tismal certificates) will be received at
my office up to 3.00 p.m. on Friday
lst December, 1950 for one or more
vacant Christ Church Vestry exhibitions
tenable at the Boys’ Foundation School.

Cendidates must be sons of parigh
ioners in straitened circumstances,
and must not be less than nine year:
or more than twelve years of age on
the date of the examination.

Candidates must

for examination, to the headmaster at |

the Boys’ Foundation School on Friday,

&th December, 1950 at 9.30 a.m
Application forms must be obtained |

from my office
WOOD GODDARD, |

from Pine Road), Belleville, St.
standing on 3,712 square feet of land and
containing closed gallery, drawing and
dining rooms,

present themselves | giving credit to

By kind permission of Messrs. Cole
& Co., Ltd. I will sell at their garage
TO-DAY at 2 o'clock ONE V-8 FORD
SALOON CAR with five new tyres and
in good working order. TERMS CASH.
Dial 2947 R, Archer Me Kenzie.

19.11,50—4n





REAL ESTATE

(2ni

house
ichael,



RUGBY — 10th Avenue

2 bedrooms, (each with
running water), kitchenette, and ‘usual

conveniences, Servants room and garage
in yard. Inspection 10 a.m, to 12 noon,

and 3 p.m. to 430 p.m. on week days,

on application to Mrs, Robinson, on the

premises,

The property will be set up for
by public Competition at our e,
Jemes Street, Bridgetown, on Friday
lst December 1950 at 2 p.m.

YRARWOOD & Follelior
rr
22.11.60-0n
BUILDING SITE FOR SALE

8,570 square feet of land in PINE
ROAD, Belleville, St. Michael (obliquely
opposite 2nd Avenue, and adjoining
“Neath”, the residence of wir. Chees-
man).

The land will be set up for sale by
public competition at our office, James
Street, Bridgetown, on Friday Ist
1950, at aad Sa . ‘

ce, Solicitors
Pome 22.11.50—9n,





—

“THE GARDEN HOUSE” late residence
of Hon. R. Challenor, with 5 acres 4
perches of land situate at Country Road,
Bridgetown,



The use contains spacious
ieee ane” bh Rooms, Sitting
rooms, Breakfast room, Pantry and
Kitchen on Main floor, 6 Bedrooms, 2
bathrooms and large verandah upstairs.
Government water and _ electricity
throughout. 5 servants rooms, garages.
stables etc. in yard, Tennis Lawn and
erie at any time on application to

on the premises.
‘ris Sn aneperie fg within 5 minutes walk
Broad Street.
Otte rs in writing to be sent to the

undersigned.
YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
re Solicitors.
James Street.
14,11.50—10n



13,138 square feet of land situated at
the ated. part of the lands of Bever-
ley” near Schmitts Gate on Friday 24th
November 1950 at 2 p.m. at our office,

Lucas Street. .
CARRINGTON & SEALY.
14,11.50—tn
eeentienciaengS
HOUSE — One Board and shingled
8 wallaba shingles on
house 8 x 14 x a Keele Mears

roof. In good eae
Tucker. hone 2286.
eee : 24.11.50—6n

—$—<—_—$_
PROPERTY at Roebuck Street, opposite
the Coca Cola Factory, two storied
building, the house contains Gallery;
Drawing room; 2 bedrooms upstairs;
down stairs shop; dining room; kitchen,
toilet and bath, maneing ss 100, oa:
of land. Apply to James Jones,
Roebuck Street. 24.91.50—3n

PERSONAL





The public are hereby warned against
my wife (EDNA
BPECKLES (nee Edna Wilkinson) as 1
do not hold mayself responsible for her
or anyone else contracting any debt or
debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me.
ALBERT BECKLES,



Clerk to The Vestry, | Lears,
Christ Church St. Michael.
22.11.50—6n |

the Headmaster and must be












Misadventure:
Jury Verdict

Death by misadventure was the
verdict returned by a nine-man
jury in the inquiry into the cir-
cumstances surrounding the
death of 25-year-old Pauline
Greenidge a dressmaker of
South District, St. George. The
inquiry was held by Mr. C. L. C.
Walwyn and was concluded yes-—
terday.

Pauline Greenidge died on
November 17 after she was in-
volved in an accident along South
District Road with the motor
lorry M—269 which was driven
by _ Harcourt King of Porey
Spring, St. Thomas, She died
on the spot. Harcourt King, 38
yrars old was said to have been
driving for the past 15 years,
Dr. Ward said that he examined
King about 1.30 pm, the same
day of the accident. King com-
plained to him of having a
“black out.’

Evidence was also taken from
Rev. and Mrs. Broomes who said
they were passing and saw the
accident. They stopped their car
and Mrs, Broomes — who is a
member of the St. John Ambu-—
lance Brigade — tried to help

but the woman was alread
dead. "



BRITON ARRESTED
IN E. GERMANY

BERLIN, Nov, 23
A British national Dr, Arthur
Apfel has been arrested by East
German “peoples police” and hc
is being held by the East Berlir:
police, West German News Agen-

cy D.P.A. reported to-night.
Earlier to-day he had been

reported missing.
—Reuter.

NOTICE
THE BENNETT COLLEGE
Sheffield.

Has recently awarded to ROBERT N
WALKES of 5th Avenue, Bush Hall, St.





Michael. AD e ying
ibjerecaite peta in the following
24.1,50 —2n
ee
dad ALLEYNE SCHOOL
ance Exam
School Year January = eee yet wit

be held at the School on Mon Dec.
4th, 1950 at 9 a.m. Applications tilt be
received up to Saturday Dee. 2nd by
accom-

penied by baptismal certificates

testimonials
Applications for a

Scholarship tenable
School, will be

and

vacant Bryant
at the Alleyne
received by the Head-
master up to Saturday Dec. 2nd, 1950.
Laptismal Certificates and testimo-
nials must aceompany applications and
candidates must present themselves to
the Headmaster on Monday Dec 4th
at 9 a.m. for Examination
19 11, 50—5n.

REAL ESTATE

JOHN
:







BLABON

A.F.8S., F.V.A.
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE

“VILLA ROSA"-—-Passage Road,
City Attractive and centrally
located stone bungalow with dou-
ble carriageway Approximately
14,000 square feet. This well
built property contains a front
gallery, large separate
dining room, 3 bedrooms,
toilet, pantry and kitchen
courtyard at rear,

lounge,
large
Good

“ROUMAIKA” — Dayrells Road,



Navy Gardens Attractive
imposing property
flanked by mahogany

bedrooms,
verandahs,
Grounds

reception, 6
pantry, large
and storerooms

proximately 2 acres
House proposition.

ap-
Ideal Gue't

Gap An almost new property
suitable for a variety of
purposes ayart garage

large
from a






GRENADA, #.W.I. A_ beauti-

!

|

i

}

|
TOWER GARAGE—St_ Matthias
ful and well found country home

containing 3 reception, 5 bed

rooms, 4 verandahs, 2 bathrooms, |
3 toilets, 2 garages etc, etc

| The land consists of 14 acres |
12 acres under coconuts and
nutmegs, the remainder pas- '
ture and gardens. Income about

Price £8,000,
application

£200. per annum

Full particulars on



REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

| PLANTATIONS BUILDING



Phone 464¢



|
|
\



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Commons Remove
Sunday Threat

LONDON, Nov. 23.

The House of Commons to
night removed any threat to the
opening on Sundays of next year’s
£ 25,000,000 festival of Britain
By 364 votes to 128 it rejected a
motion put forward by a group
of Conservatives seeking to ban

Sunday’s opening on_ religious
grounds. As it was a matter of
conscience, Conservative leaders

allowed their supporters to vote
as they pleased. Some voted for
Sunday opening, others against

The Commons then without a
vote gave a second reading agree
ing in principle to a Bill pro
tecting the organisers of the Fes-
tival against being sued by a
“common informer” under Sev
enteenth or Eighteenth Century
legislation banning certain amuse-
ments on the Sabbath.

SHAW'S ASHES

@ from page 1



stood in the sitting room of Shaw’s
quiet house at Ayot, St. Lawrence

They watched the opening of the
caskets by Dr. Probyn who then
mixed the ashes on one end of
Shaw’s oak sideboard.

The mixing was carried out in
exact accordance with Shaw’s
wishes, his ashes being emptied
into those of his wife’s,

—Reuter.





LA TOURISTA
VENEZOLANOS

TENEMOS ARTICLOS

ORIENTAL
pe LA INDIA
CHINA EGYPTO

EL PRINCIPAL ESTABLE-
CIMIENTO EN SOUVENIR.

THANI #Nos

Pr. Wm. Henry St. Dial 3466

po

Home-Loving ...

FURNISHERS

will love this

FURNITURE Too







New and Renewed Wardrobes
and Dresser-Robes, with and
without Mirrors—Linen Presses

Vanities, Simpler Dressing Tables
Screen Frames, Washstands, Night
Chairs $4.50 up—Single and Dou
ble Bedsteads, Beds, Cradles



Dining, Kitchen and Fane
Tables, Sideboards, China, Kitchen
and Bedroom Cabinets, Larders,
Wagons, Liquor Cases

Morris and other Suites and
separate Pieces—Bergere, Berbice
and Tub Chairs,, Rockers and
Settees—Bookracks, Book Cases
Desks

L.S. WILSON

Trafalgar Street. Dial 4069.





“If these people are watching from another world you wouldn't like them to see us in our
last year's hats and costumes,

would you, dear?"



CHURCHILL WARNS

from page |

Egyptian Foreign Minister
Churchill appearing to b:*
still dissatisfied said that tho

Opposition’s censure motio.
would not be withdrawn. Con-
servatives would try to arrange

a day next week to debate it

The motion regrets that the
Government is “unwillifng to sus-
pend the export of arms including
Centurion tanks to Egypt whethe:
as a result of previous contracts
or otherwise while the Anglo-
Egyptian treaty of 1936 is being
challenged by the Egyptian Gov-
ernment.” ’

Churchill had earlier asked if
the Government cduld say what
were the new facts which made
it change its policy between the
afternoon statement of Defence
Minister Emanuel Shinwell that
tanks would go and the evening
statement by Davies that they
would not for the present,

Morrison said hethought
Churchill was exaggerating these
statements very much.

Morrison
being
to

accused Churchill of
; provocative, and appealed
him to urge his followers to
give the Government a hearing,
Churchill addressing the Con-
servetives said it was more in the
interests of the Opposition that
Morrison should be fully heard
than that he should be silenced,
Morrison then said that Shin-
well had given assurance yester-
day that nothing would happen
overnight and Davies had said no



BARBADOS BOYS’ CLUBS

WANTED
TO RENT
in Bridgetown
A Building suitable for use
asa
BOYS’ CLUB
Reply to Police Headquarters



—— oo OE
—

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

BRITISH CARs 1950
Photographs and specifica-
tions of all the latest models

in one volume for 7/-

GOLD LEAF WARE,
CUPS. PLATES, Ete.
HERE AGAIN

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE











| CHRISTMAS IS FAST APPROACHING
\

— and we have —

XMAS CRACKERS,

Come in early and select yours.

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
(CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)




{
| Corner of Broad







Fontabelle .

ee





NOTICE

OUR CUSTOMERS are asked to note that effective immediately
we have decided to close

; BUSINESS. Those indebted to the Company are kindly
| asked to settle their accounts by paying the amount due

direct to the registered office of the Company, Sunnyside,
CARIBBEAN FISHERIES LTD
21.11.50

PAGE SEVEN

| SHIPPING NOTICES

ROYAL NETHERLAND

























































STEAMSHIP CO Tae MV. “Dagrwood" ill
° accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada

Sailing from An‘ 5 and and Aruba.
Holland a.8. ¢ * 20th., 2ist, Date of departure will be

25th. November.

oe. from Amsterdam, and Dover
m.s, “ORANJESTAD” 17th. and 18th.
November .

notified

ae etoe. and "Pesowngers tor
e
Damm inica, Antigua,

Sailing to Trinidad, La Guaira, Cura-
cao etc. m.s. “DELFT 6th. Novembgr;
s.s. “FARNSUM” Ipth. November; m.s,
“ORANJESTAD” Ist, November.

Nevis and
day 24th

St. Kitts









-~ B.W.1, SCHOONER OWNERS
ling to. Trinidad. Paramaribo, ocr Inc. ~
Georgetown, m.s. “HELENA” Iith. ideas
aac eeapel Tele. 4047.
to Madeira, Ant-
werp, and Amsterdam, m.s. “WILLEM-
STAD” iTth. November.
Canadian National Steamshi
SOUTHBOUND P
Montreal Halifax Barton Aattedos Berta
ion’ jos
CANADIAN CHALLENGER 23 Nov. 27 Nov. _ TDec. 1 Dee.
LADY RODNEY.. ...... — 2 Dec. 4 Dec. 13 Dec. 14 Dec.
LADY NELSON 8G. ces SLC ee 19 Dee. 2; Dec. 30 Dee. 31 Dec.
LAD oe oe * — " Jan. an. an. an.
LADY NELSON ss ma eo 1\Feb. 3 Feb. 12 Feb. 13 Feb.
NORTHBOUND
a S woe
LADY NELSON 28 Nov. Nov. 9 Dee, 16 Saga
LADY RODNEY 25 Dee. Dec. € Jan. 7 Jan.
LADY NELSON | 11 Jan. 13 Jan. 22 Jan: 23 Jan.
é LADY RODNEY 10 Feb Feb. 21 Feb. 22 Feb.
. only A LADY NELSON | 25 Feb Feb. 8 March 9 March
te) > ae
“.B.—Gubject to change witnout notice, Al’ venseis Atted with cold storage cham-
bers. Passenger and freight s.ce on application to —



rom

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,., LTD. — Agents.

F London Express Service





.

oe

CIE. GLE. TRANSATLANTIQUE
(French Line)





tanks would be shipped to Egypt
until Bevin had reported to the
Commons on the talks.

“To that undertaking I adhere
on behalf of the Government” he

added, Here Churchill broke in S.S. “GASCOGNE” Sailing to Trinidad & Fr. Guiana Novem-
again to say that Davies had ber 8th, 1950
implied that the Government ij .
weeks oe ae The irate}{] §.S. “GASCOGNE” Sailing to PLYMOUTH & LE HAVRE
PETITE TOES: via Martinique and Guadaloupe Novem-
“I am not repudiating what ber 14th, 1950,
Davies said. A statement will
be mare ane Ren mevisiy. 8.S. “COLOMBIE” Sailing to Trinidad, La Guayra, Curacao.
here wi e exchanges across
the floor and the House will con- en and | Jamaica December 8th,
a it,” 1 z
Finally Churchill said: “To con- “7 ” ‘
clude this mateee cur motian wilt S.S. “COLOMBIE” Sailing to 7LYMOUTH & LE HAVRE via
remain on paper, and we shall dis- Martinique and Guadeloupe December
ey Se question wreiner we shall 17th, 1950,
as ra day next week.
Per ae Se er ee ae nies accepting Passengers, Cargo and
ail.
SS. “GASCOGNE” First Class Passages Only.

2 CHARGES DISMISSED

Two cases brought by the police
charging Rupert Nigntingale of
Pank Hall with refusing to pay
the legal fare while travelling on
* motor bus and using indecent
loryguage in the same bus were
cismissed without prejudice by
His Worship Mr, A. J. H. Hans-
chell yesterday,

SS. “COLOMBIE” First, Cabin and Tourist Class Passages.

For further particulars apply to: —

R.M. JONES & CO. LTD.~Agents.









FYFFES LINE





Set. D. Forde who prosecuted
in both cases gave notice of appeal
in the case of refusing to pay the
legal fare. The offences were
alleged to have been committed
on November 15



T.S.S. GOLFITO will be sailing to the United

See Us For The Following - ~ -

HARDWARE ITEMS

4-Pronge Agricultural For
Ready Mixed i

Kingdom on 6th December, 1950 and 17th January,

1951, She still has some accommodation available



















for Ist Class Passengers.
SUNPLEX

Houschold Enamelled Ware, Glass-
ware, Galvanized Buckets and
Sheets

Go To - ~- - -

COZIER & CO.

Roebuck Street, or Dial 3578
22.11.50.-—-6n,

T.S.S. GOLFITO will be sailing, for Trinidad on
25th November, 1950 and 6th January, 1951,

For further information apply to :

WILKINSON & HAYNES €O., LTD.

SOMETHING NEW AGENTS.

Scotch Oatmeal Bread
—1l6c. per loaf
Scotch Oatmeal Biscuits
—3/- per Ib
ALSO
Whole Wheat Bread
—I2e. per loaf
PURITY BAKERIES LTD.
151 & 152 ROEBUCK ST
Dial 3296, 3063, 4529
















EVERY WOMAN KNOWS




Her final appearance can be made or marred by the
Shoes she wears.

WILLIAM =FOGARTY LTD.

Has just received a new shipment of

LADIES’ DRESS SHOES

Platform soles, Backless & Toeless, with High Heels,





XMAS TREES, TOYS.


















and Tudor Streets.











in Brown, Black, Blue Suede, White Nu-buck and
Reptile Calf




down our FISH DELIVERY








White Bu-buck trimmed with Brown Reptile
in Court Style with Spike Heels.




Prices ranging from $11.57 to $14.40 per pr.

THEYRE HEAVENLY!

we They’re the Shoes you have been
3 waiting for.

Call Early at...

WILLIAM «FOGARTY LTD.

The House of Fine Footwear



“EREORPEPPCREL HS Ad
BARBADOS ADVOCATE
BY CARL ANDERSON

* PAGE SIX







!

HENRY ~





T BUT You’L-e

Lilt GET BACK ALL J DEAe ME... SOMEONE MUST HAVE © ‘
BE LOST! t A |

RIGHT! THERE'S A 4) THE ROPE 3

FELLOW.IN A BOAT } |
ABOVE, HOLDING THAT =ZA |
GUIDE ROPE ! l : fi yy Mone !

LADY MAUREEN COOPER, lovely young
| English society woman, entrusts her milk-and-roses
} complexion to Pond's. ‘It is simply wonderful what

Pond’s Creams have done for my a lexion,””
| says Lady Maurven, “I use Pond's C Cream
| for cleansing and Pond's Vanishing Cream to
Prttect my skin’

NGLISH OR AMERICAN — socicty’s lovelies
E women use the same beauty care. They use
Pond’s, and it is thanks to Pond’s two Creams that
their complexions keep so radiantly lovely always.

Why not let Pond’s keep your skin lovely, woo?
Every night, before you go to bed, cleanse the ski
thoroughly of dirt and stale make-up with delightful
Pond’s Cold Cream. Then “ rinse’ with more Cold
Cream for extra-cleansing, extra-softness.

In the morning, before putting on your make-up,
smooth in a thin film of Pond’s Vanishing Cream,

BY CHIC YOUNG

ilicaaae met
T

” HEN. WHY.DO. X= "
Maram GAEL ES YOu CALL PEM Wee fo Mane
WANTS TO EAT ALL - y UP_ALL THE a DATES WITH! g |
THE TIME--ELOISE - r a 2 > aD 5] J
KEEPS Rakin ME) ¥ . aad Be Ff |

vave ACAI ( i" a © as + It makes an ideal powder base because it holds bid
ey 2 fer 2 powder matt for hours. It protects the skin, too.
we alr Use Pond’s beauty care regularly and in a short 9
while you will notice that your skin is clearer, softer, POND S

smoother. It Will glow with new radiance, new
loveliness, Pond’s Creams are inexpensive to buy,
yet they are used by society's loveliest women on
both sides of the Adantic. You can Buy Pénd’s at
all the best beauty counters,

STRIKER ||
|
|



BY FRANK

; YOULL DIE IN THE TRAP YOU SET FOR
af, BULLET MARKS TO
=I)" SHOW A MURDER!

BLUNDELL’S a

WHO TRIES Tourrd DIE IN FIRE/

a

THE REST OF US, UNLESS you
ADMIT YOU HIRED THEM! aga



WINDOW?










One is English, one American

yet their Beauty Care

as the same





oa the

| and you will very

MRS. CORNELIUS. Pag goer 9 Ji, pee ag
charming young New Yorker, is one of the many

society beauties who use Pond’s, “‘ You won't find a chemist and

finer cream anywhere than Pond’s Cold Cream,”
says Mrs. Vanderbilt. ‘‘It leaves the skin feeling
especially soft and smooth and clear — brings up a |
becoming glow of colour in the cheeks” }















)



HE 6 AFTER MY

| OF TOWN! ni
PAINTING 4

| |
, |
|
| |
: oF) 4 ORINSIOE
“FOR OUTSIDE USE . |
If unobtainable at
your dealers consult
JAMES A. LYNCH
& CO., LTD.,
i AGENTS
aonschibtlgh ta i cinta suichintilaiaa
| |
1 Geear Heavens ” heen 4 wt \T_WUZ A BURGLAR---_ ( tse bhoover
Cl HEAP A NOISE THOUGHT onfit BUT DON'T WORRY ABOUT | | ea
DOWNSTAIRS YOU SAID ALL wuz A == YER PAN -~HE LEFT |} “= ve
IT'S PROBABLY A YER RELATIVES | BURGLAR IT- BUT
BURGLAR-GET | Wiz OUT, is ALL RIGHT! | ) THe Rane? “{ e
1) 7,









BY ALEX RAYMOND

THis SHE SAT AND SANS THE NiGHT my HEART B20KE!’
TM SORRY, SIR..





=every hour



OH, NO! NO!

of the day

\\, ea

i

\ \

Ne When everyone else is hot and botheted you will
fascinate by your freshness — if you do this. After your
bath or bathe, shower yourself all over with Cashmere
Bouquet Talcum Powder. Its magie touch will turn your
skin to silk; clothe you in a cool, protecting film that
keeps you daintily fresh all day long. Its delicate perfume
will add new and subtle charm to your whole personality.
For Cashmere Bouquet is the Tale Powder with the
fragrance men love.



| SIT HERE, MR. VAN
DORPE... I WILL SING

S
RADIO... THEY
""\ ARE NOT THE
REAL YOU!
THAT 1S WHY

Cashmere Bouquet

TALCUM POWDER



COLGATE-PALMOLIVE-PEET CO.

PSSSCSSOSOSS SOS PS FOSS IOE. ‘

DINE TO-NIGHT :

AA GRIER PSS SSOP SSS

= AT um .
BARBADOS LEADING _—
CHINESE RESTAURANT











MONK, YOUVE CAUSED A LOT OF









(iM AIN A HURRY? DRIVE y ee
|ME TO THE EDGE OF ! TROUBLE ~ SAY, YOU'VE HAD THAT Delight i tl
THE JUNGLE. S—— Sy PAPER EVER SINCE | TOOK YOU bilan. <-. * re PS caer eee) s ings, we kno,. you'll enjoy our chef's specials.
: > . 3 Stop in tonight !
= s
s
S THE
.

‘ GREEN
‘ DRAGON



Â¥
Â¥ Open 9 a.m, to Midnight

Ss

x No, 9 BROAD STREET

% for Reservations Dial 3896.
4

SSPRVSS SOOO 9GSCCOOS



LLCO

|
|
|
|



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1950

Teeth Loose

by moods:





lee first da sore
1d quickly tightens the teeth !
{ Amosan t ma

1 r



turn of npt
ge. Get ‘Amosan eo 7 ue ‘

Amosan* my
Car Preorrhea—Trench | Mo ia



KIDNEY

|
}
}
i
|



| TROUBLE



f
id
zi













Hl








GUARANTEE
De Witt’s Pills are
manufactured under strictly hygienic
conditions and the mgredients con-
form to rigid standards of purity.







- #77111 11/ |
nolo n> i

AT hopeless feeling that you're too weak,

‘not up to it’ any longer simply means that
you've been taking too much out of yourself.
Your body is short of wwo essential strengthening
hosphorus and protein.

Tissues strengthened

To put you right, you need a course of
‘Sanatogen’ Nerve Tonic Food. ‘Sanatogen’
combines these two great body-building foods—
phosphorus and protein—in their organic form,
so that they are quickly absorbed into your
system. Day by day glorious new health, youth
y and vitality flow through your whole body ~
your strength and self-confidence come back!
Start on a course of ‘Sanatogen’ today.




ern sont have testified
marvellous
On sale at good chemists and druggists

‘SAN ATOGEN? “0

restores health, youth and vitality
The word ‘Sanatogen’ is a registered trade
ec a ee

nines = A a ne ate ®

DUNLGP FORT

CAR TYRES

LASTING SAFETY

Kea.



DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., ETD.

(ECKSTEIN BROS.)





|





ATTENTION !!
FACTORY MANAGERS

Take this opportunity of obtaining your requirements in :—

GALVANISED & STEAM P!PE

Ranging from 4 in. upwards

MILD STEEL

Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes
BOLTS & NUTS—AIl Sizes
FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill

At PRICES that cannot be repeated.



The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltd.

WHITE PARK ROAD, ST. MICHAEL
DIAL 4528

‘
{





bee gee

i i




ae!





FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24,



1950

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

McINTOSH--MRS. ELISE at 3 p.m
> -Sterday Her funeral will ieave her
lete residence “Marion House”, Deacons



Road at 4.15 o'clock thi
the Westbury Cemetery
No Cards. Friends are asked to attend
R.°T. Harewood, Mrs. Edith Parry
Lindsay Harewood, Irving Harewood,

Mrs. Ada Hinds, Percy Hind
24.13.50—In

MEMORIA

IN loving memory of our Dear
Mcther and grand mother ADRIANA
TAYLOR who departed this life on the
24th November 1942.

Eight years ago grannie Dear you left

us

Faithful and honest in all your ways

Devoted and true to the end of your

afternoon for





IN





days
Always patient, loving and kind,
What a4 beautiful memory you left
behind

Asieep in Jesus! far from thee

Thy kindred and their grave: may be,

But thine is still a blessed sleep,

From which none ever wakes to weep

Miss Albertha Taylor: Mrs. Maggie
Gooding Mrs. Kathleen Beckles, Mrs
Doreen Wickham, Mrs. Gwen Rollins
(daughter) Montelle; Oscar, Fred,
Dorris, Mellis, Eunilda, (grand child-
ren

Trinidad and U.S.A. Please Copy.

24.11.50—1n



FOR SALE

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTO CYCLE —
excellent









New Hudson Auto
condition or

CAR: One (1) 1937 Vauxhall 10 in
running order Apply A. J. Hilliard,
Central Foundry Day Phone 4668.

24.11,50—6n



Austin A-40
Cwner driven. Mileage
Phone:— E. Gill 2454,

1950 Model.
3,000 Miles

24.11.50—4n
VAN—One (1) 8 H.P. Ford Van, good

condition, going cheap. Dial Belgrave
3063, Purity Bakeries Ltd,





ELECTRICAL

MOTOR—One (1) G.E. % H.P. Single
never used, in
Before



22.11.50—3n

LIVESTOCK

COWS — Four (4) Milech Cows, Two
(2) heifers. One Pure bred Holstein
Cow eight months in calf, one Grade
Holstein Cow six months in calf for
bred Friesian bull Burgute Hilarious at
Central Livestock Station, still ving
16 pts. of milk per day, one ‘11
months old progeny of the Canadian











Lima & Co., Ltd., 20, Broad Street,
Bridgetown. 23.11,50—6n.
HAMS — 72 cents per Ib; Currants

34 cts. per Tb. Raisin 40 cts. per 1b.
C. Herbert, 55 Tudor St, Dial 3686.
23,11.50—3n.

PARASOLS—Plastic Parasols

At a Special Low Price $1.42 each.
The Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad
Street. 22,11.50—4n.





POOLE POTTERY EARTHENWARE—A
wide variety just received and on sale.
See your Jewellers, Y. De Lima & Co.,

Ltd., 20 Broad Street, Bridgetown.
18.11.6€0—6n
PEARL NECKLACE & cts eagh,

beaded necklaces $1.20 up, Beaded ear-
rings 86 cts per pair, plus wide assort-
ment of costume jewellery, See your
jewellers, wed S Bye & Co,, Ltd., 20,
Broad Street, Bridgetown. \
is 23.11.50—6n.

RAINCOATS — Plastic Raincoats in

22.11.50—4n,





————

STOCKINGS—Kayser Nylon Stockings
51 gauge. The finest available in alli
new shades $2.14 per pr. The Modern

id Street.
Dress Shoppe, Broa 92.11.5 a



TWO MAHOGANY TREES—Dial 8105

21,11.50—T.F.N.

That desirable Yacht
Tel, J. A. Reid, Lone
22.11.50—12n,

R. H. KING.

YAGABOND
OVA o
Star Garage. Dial 91-33

WANTED







ON VACANT
AGRE Le tee Large Stationery

in Trinidad. Write stating ex-



MISCELLANEOUS

BOXES — All kinds of Card Board
Boxes other vias oe ae card.
ee ene "G10 80—t.f.n.



P GOLD AND OLD GOLD
JEWELLERY BOUGHT, highest prices
peid. See your jewellers, Y. De Lima

& Co., Ltd., 20, Broad Street Bridge- |

oun, 18.11.50—6n.

a

LLING TO PURCHASE Good Joiners

a in Mahogany, Cedar, Birch and

Ralph Beard’s Show Rooms,
Phone 4583.

23,11 .50—4n

Work
Pine at
Hardwood Alley.



PUBLIC NOTICES



NOTICE

from Thursday
23rd through Sunday 26th
Monday 27th. J. B aes

Closing to Business

re-opening.

11.50-—3n



. NOTICE

Applications for two vacant
Scholarships (Boys) tenable at
Alleyne School, will be received by the
undersigned up to Friday, December Ist.
Applicants must be sons of Parishioners
straitened circumstances

Applicant; must present
s to the Headmaster at the
Allayne School on Monday December
4th at 9.30 a.m. to take the entrance
examination.





NOTICE

PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
Applications (accompanied by bap-
tismal certificates) will be received at
my office up to 3.00 p.m. on Friday
Ist December, 1950 for one or more
vacant Christ Church Vestry exhibitions
tenable at the Boys’ Foundation School.
Cendidates must be sons of parigh
ioners in straitened circumstances,
and must not be less than nine year:
or more than twelve years of age on
the date of the examination.
Candidates must present themselves
for examination, to the headmaster ai
the Boys’ Foundation School on Friday,
Sth December, 1950 at 9.30 a.m
Application
from my office.
WOOD GODDARD,
Clerk to The Vestry,
Christ Church
22.11.50—6n

d_ bh 50 each. The| Electric Stove,
ee) ee asap evabd Street. | Case, Several painted tables & Chairs,
|
|
1

forms must be obtained |



FOR RENT



HOUSES

|
|
|
BRAMBLEY, Waterford Gap, St. Mi- |



chael, From November ist; fully furn-
ished residence. For particulars, Phone |
3062. 24.10.50.—t.f.n. |

LYNSTED — Navy Gardens, 3 Bed-







21.11.50—t.f.n.

“WARSAW” Wéeiches Road St.

Michael — Newly built bungalow; con-

taining open verandah, 4 ing

3 bedrooms with running water, built-in

+ kitehenette with built-in cup-

is light and water, W.C.

and Bath; servants room, garage. Pos-

session Ist December. Dial 2947.
R. Archer McKenzie, Victoria Street.

22.11.50—3n

gp
BUILDING next to Ramdin; Roebuck



Street; suitable for Bond or Garage
Apply James Jones, ‘Gloria’, uc
Street. 24.11.50-—3n



PUBLIC SALES



AUCTION»

1 Hillman Saloon Car with good tyres
and in working order; damaged in acci-
dent. TERMS CASH,

R. ARCHER McKENZIE.
22.11.50—3n

Under The Diamond Hammer

I WILL sell on the spot at Upper
dayy of November at 2 o'clock, One
Reckle» Road on Tuesday next the 28th
day of November at 2 o'clock, One
House built of pine in very good con-
dition. It has Gallery, Drawing and
Dining Rooms, 2 bedroom, Kitchén



and spacious yard which is enclosed
with galvanize. It has Electricity and
water installed It can be rented for
$20.00 pr. month, The “land which is
the Government’; can be rented.

For inspection see D'Arcy A. Scott,

Megazine Lane. 24.71.50—4n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON Tuesday 28th by order of Mr:.
G. A. Hutchinson we will sell her Fur-

niture at “Avalon Flat 3” Collymore
Rock



which includes

Dining Table: Waggon: Liquor Case
Arm, Upright and Morris Chairs; China
Cabinet: Ornament Tables: Bookshelf:
AL in Mahogany: Card Table, Glass
and China, Plated and Brass Ware:
Dinner, Tea and Breakfast Services
(Royal Doulton Ware): Frigidaire (good
working order): Cedar Machine Table:
Plaited Grass Mat: Phileo 7 Tube Radio:
Clock, Books, Simmons and Iron
Single Bedsteads: Springs and Mat-
tresses; Cedar and Mahogany Presses:
Mahog. Dressing Tables: Screens: Pine
Linen Press, Kitchen Tables, Larder
Ware Press: Canon Gas Stove and Oven’
2 Burner Gas Range. Electric
end Toaster, Kitchen Utensil;
Wash Basin and Fittings .and other
items. Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms Cash.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.

Auctioneers
24,11,50-—2n

Under The Diamond Hammer

AUCTION SALE
By instructions received I will sell
at “Trelawny”, near Pavilion Court,
Hastings on Wednesday next 29th of
November, beginning at 12.30 an entire
lot of household furniture which
includes Mahog. and Painted desks,
Mahog. Tub Chairs, Plant Stools, Rush
Chairs, Rockers and Settee, Kidney
Tables, (1) Upholstered Manoy. Antique
Chair_on Casters, Book Shelves, Carpet,

Seiten Pees oelnng, fable with | police, West German News Agen-
Several painted prosees, waiahon gad cy ntti reported to-night
ainted ressing tables, rrors, m- ier = ) p a
foons Bedsteads with springs & Mat- oa bois day he had been
tresses, Iron Cots with Mattresses,|7@ported missing.

Pine tables, Liquor —Reuter.
(1) Coolerator, Glass Jars, Larder, an.
Florence Stove & Oven, Lot of Cutlery, NOTICE
Glass Ware, Linens, Silvers, AXuminium y
Saucepans, Plates & Dishes, and several THE BENNETT COLLEGE
other items too numerous to mention. Sheffield,

Cash. D'Arcy A. Scott, Auc-

24.11.50—1n,

Terms
tioneer.



By kind permission of Messrs, Cole
& Co., Ltd. I will sell at their garage
TO-DAY at 2 o’clock ONE V-8 FORD:
SALOON CAR with five new tyres and
in good working order. TERMS CASH.
Dial 2947 R. Archer Me Kenzie,

19.11.50—4n







REAL ESTATE ALLEYNE SCHOOL
"I —| aA meranse Examination for the
RUGBY — 10th Avenue (2nd house anuary — July 1951 will
from Pine Road), Belleville, st. Michael.) 96, Mrid, at, the. Sehool on Monday Dec.

standing on 3,712 square feet of land and
containing closed gallery, drawing and
dining rooms, 2 bedrooms, (each with
curning water), kitchenette, and usual
conveniences. Servants room and garage
in yard, Inspection 10 a.m. to 12 noon,
and 3 p.m. to 430 p.m. on week days,
on application to Mrs, Robinvon, on the
premises.

The property will be set up for sale
by public Competition at our 4
Jemes Street, Bridgetown, on Friday
Ist December 1950 at 2 p.m,

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors,
22.11.50—9n



BUILDING SITE FOR SALE .

8,570 square feet of land in PINE
ROAD, Belleville, St. Michael (obliquely
and adjoining

2nd Avenue,
eee vir. Chees-

“Neath”,

man).
The land will be set up for sale by

public competition at our office, Jens

the residence of



Street, ereieeoe, - Friday r
‘ -m.
December, 1950, al Riis
22,11 ,50—9n.

———

“THE GARDEN HOUSE” late residence
of Hon. R. Challenor, with 5 acres 4
perches of land situate at Country Road,
Bridgetown.

se contains spacious
The dwelling hou aitting

Yearwood & Boyce,

Rooms,
room,

and

large
water and

t. 5 servants rooms, garages,
stables ete. in yard.

Tennis Lawn and
1 b
enti et ney time on application fo
er on the premises.

teynis a eemae fe within 5 minutes walk

Broad S
iers in writing to be sent to the

undersigned.
WOOD & BOYCE,

a Solicitors.
James Street.
14,11,60—10n
art
9.138 square feet of land situated at
the Garrison part of the lands of “Bever-
ley” near Schmitts Gate on Friday 24th
November 1950 at 2 p.m. at our office,

Lucas Street. -
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
14.11.50—tn

HOUSE — One Board and shingled
house 8 x 14 x 8 wallaba shingles on
roof. In good condition. eee ee

Tucker. Phone 3
ee 24.11.50-—6n

_—_—

PROPERTY at Roebuck Street, opposite
the Coca Cola Factory, two storied
building, the house contains Gallery;
Drawing room; 2 bedrooms upstairs;
down stairs shop; dining room; kitchen,
toilet and bath, standing on 1,938 sq. ft.
of land, Apply to James Jones, ‘Gloria
Roebuck Street. 24.11.50—3n

PERSONAL







The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife (EDNA
BECKLES (nee Edna Wilkinson) as 1)
do not hold muyself responsible for her
or anyone else contracting any debt or}
debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me.

ALBERT BECKLES,
Lears,
St. Michael







received up t tu:
the Pp to Saturday Dec.

penied
testimonials

Scholarship tenable
School, will be
master up to
Paptismal










“If these people are watching from anoiher world you wouldn't like them to see us in our



Misadventure:
Jury Verdict

Death by misadventure was
verdict returned by a

the

nine-man



jury in the inquiry into the cir-
the

cumstances
death of
Greenidge a dressmaker
South District, St. George.

surrounding

25-year-old Pauline

of

inquiry was held by Mr. C. L. C,
Walwyn and was concluded yes—

terday.

Pauline Greenidge

died
November 17

after she was

on
in-

The

volved in an accident along South

District Road with

the motor

lorry M—269 which was driven

by Harcourt
Spring, St.
on the spot.

King
Thomas.

of

Porey
She died
Harcourt King, 38

yrars old was said to have been

driving for the past
Dr. Ward said that he
King about
day of the accident.
plained to him of

having
“black out.”

a

Evidence was also taken from
Rev. and Mrs. Broomes who said

they were passing and saw
accident. ‘They stopped their

the
car

and Mrs, Broomes — who is a
member of the St, John Ambu—

lance Brigade — tried

but the woman was
dead.



BRITON ARRESTED
IN E. GERMANY

to help
already

BERLIN, Nov, 23.
A British national Dr, Arthur

Apfel has been arrested by East

German “peoples police” and

is being held by the East Berlin

Has recently awarded to ROBERT N

WALKES of 5th Avenue, Bush Hall, St
Michael. A Diploma in the following
subject—Blue Prints,

24,1,50 —2n

EDUCATIONAL

Headmaster bri

by baptismal

Applications for a

certificates
vacant
at the

Certificates and



and must be accom-
and

he

by

Bryant
Alleyne
received by the Head-
Saturday Dec, 2nd, 1950,
testimo-

tials must accompany applications and
candidates must present themselves to

the Headmaster on Monday Dec
at 9 a.m. for Examination











JOHN

M4.
BLABDON

A.F.S., F.V.A.

FOR SALE

“VILLA ROSA"
City Attractive and

Passage Road

ble carriageway

14,000 square feet This wel
| built property contains a

gallery, large
dining room, 3
toilet, pantry and kitchen

courtyard at rear,

lounge,
large bedrooms

“ROUMAIKA” — Dayrells Road

and storerooms. Grounds
proximately 2 acres.

House proposition.

TOWER GARAGE-—St_
Gap An almost
suitable for a
purposes



large ve

apart from a4 garage

BW A

beautl

GRENADA,

wg nn

£200. per annurr

Full particulars on application



AUCTIONEER

| REAL £STATE AGENT
|

Phone 464¢

|

19 11. 50—5n.

REAL ESTATE |

Formerly Dixon & Bladon

centrally

located stone bungalow with dou-
Approximately
1
front
separate
: Good

3

Navy Gardens Attractive and
imposing property Driveway
flanked by mahogany trees

reception, 6 bedrooms, kitchen
pantry, large verandahs, garage

ap-
Ideal Guest

Matthias
new property
ety of

ful and well found country home

containing 3 reception, 5 bed
rooms, 4 verandahs, 2 bathrooms,
3 toilets, 2 garages etc, etc
| The land consists of 14 acres
12 acres under “coconuts and
nutmegs, the remainder pas- ¢
ture and gardens, Income about

Price £8,000

PLANTATIONS BUILDING



15 years.
examined
1.30 pm. the same
King com-



Stood in the sitting room of Shaw’s
quiet house at Ayot, St. Lawrence

exact
wishes, his ashes being emptied
into those of his wife's.








BARBADOS ADVOCATE



last year's hats and costumes, would you, dear?"

Commons Remove

Sunday Threat

LONDON, Nov. 23

The House of Commons

to

night removed any threat to the



SHAW'S ASHES

Egyptian



CHURCHILL WARNS

from page 1
‘oreign Minister
Churchill appearing

still dissatisfied said that th

; Sund t ‘ . Opposition’s censure motio: on age Pin the net cediea he

opening on Sundays of next year’s would not be withdrawn. Con- added, Here Churchill broke in S.S. “GASCOGNE” Sailing to Tr -
£25,000,000 festival of Britain servatives would try to arrange again to say that Davies had hes on eae & Fr. Guiana Novem
te sop to * rejected a a day next week to debate it implied that the sorerucnent .
motion put forwar yY a group The motion regrets that the would allow debate. he irate ss. “ ~ ”
of Conservatives seeking to ban Government is “unwilltng to sus- Morrison replied: GASCOGNE” Sailing to PLYMOUTH & LE HAVRE
Sunday's opening on religious pend the export of arms including ea ay via Martinique and Guadaloupe Novem-
grounds. As it was a matter of Centurion tanks to Egypt whethe: I am not repudiating what ber 14th, 1950,
conscience, Conservative leaders as a result of previous contracts Davies said. A statement will Te “
allowed their supporters to vote or otherwise while the Anglo- Pas tat oe near S.S. “COLOMBIE” Sailing to Trinidad, La Guayra, Curacao,
as they pleased. Some voted for Egyptian treaty of 1936 is being Pw S ac Cartagena and Jamaica Dece
Sunday opening, others against. challenged by the Egyptian Gov- the floor and the House will con- 1980, a mber 6th,

The Commons then without a ernment.” Ser Se ; :

. ‘ ‘ Finally Churchill said: “To con- “SE ” :

ae Ennis. es Be Churchill had earlier asked if clude this matter our motion ‘will SS, “COLOMBIE Sailing to PLYMOUTH & LE HAVRE via

ms p ee ee ei Bh the Government céuld say what remain on paper, and we shall dis- Martinique and Guadeloupe December
tecting the organisers of the Fes etal oe sana ie ans ent . fuss th ti het 7 "th
Gval_ agains being. sed by 2 22 "change its poney between tne sek ter C day mam ee ee
thes, ‘ _ o che e s Cc) D yeen ne Y 8 y eK.

atcents Sa, under Sev— afternoon statement of Defence —Reuter. All ships accepting Passengers, Cargo and
leg leenth or Eighteenth Century Minister Emanuel Shinwell that Maii.
egislation banning certain amuse- tanks would go and the evening Se ee :
ments on the Sabbath, Sarernent. by Ravies that they 2 CHARGES DISMISSED SS. “GASCOGNE” First Class Passages Only.

would not for the present,
Morrison said hethought S.S. “COLOMBIE” First, Cabin and Tourist Class Passages.

Churchill was exaggerating these

statements very much,

@ from page 1

They watched the opening of the

caskets by Dr. Probyn who then
mixed the ashes on one end of
Shaw’s oak sideboard,

The mixing was carried out in
accordance with Shaw’s

—Reuter.



LA TOURISTA
VENEZOLANOS

TENEMOS ARTICLOS

ORIENTAL 3
pe La INDIA
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EL PRINCIPAL ESTABLE-
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Home-Loving ...

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Vanities, Simpler Dressing Tables
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Screen Frames, Washstands, Nigh
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Chairs $4.50 up—Single
ble Bedsteads, Beds, Cr
Dining, Kitchen — and Fanes
Tables, Sideboards, China, Kitchen
and Bedroom Cabinets, Larders,
Waggons, Liquor Cases

Morris and other Suites and
separate Pieces—Bergere, Berbice
and Tub Chairs,, Rockers and
Settees—Bookracks, Book Cases
Desks ‘

L.S. WILSON |
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com Swe

Trafalgar Street. Dial 4069.





be!
to

day
overnight and Davies had





Morrison accused Churchill
ing provocative, and
him

that nothing would







BARBADOS BOYS’ CLUBS

WANTED
TO RENT
in Bridgetown
A Building suitable for use
as a
BOYS’ CLUB
Reply to Police Headquarters







——
—

TO-DAY'S NEWS FI.



BRITISH CARS 1950
Photographs and specifica-
tions of all the latest models



in one volume for 7/-

GOLD LEAF WARE,
CUPS. PLATES, Etc.
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JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE









CHRISTMAS IS FAST APPROACHING

— and we have —

XMAS CRACKERS,

Come in early

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
(CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)



NOTICE

OUR CUSTOMERS are asked to note that effective immediately
we have decided to close
BUSINESS. Those indebted to the Company are kindly
asked to settle their accounts by paying the amount due
direct to the registered office of the Company, Sunnyside,

-

Fontabelle.

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES LTD

21,11.50—3n

eee stam antng

to b>

of
appealed
to urge his followers to
give the Government a hearing.
Churchill addressing the Con-
servetives said it was more in the
interests of the Opposition that
Morrison should be fully heard
than that he should be silenced,
Morrison then said that Shin-
well had given assurance yester-
happen
said no























































PAGE SEVEN

—] | SHIPPING NOTICES

ROYAL NETHERLAND
STEAMSHIP CO.

Sailing from . Rotterdam and
Holland s.a. GEER” 20th., ist,
25th. November.

se RANTEST =
™.8. AD” 17th. and 18th.
November .

Sailing to Trinidad, La Guaira,
cao etc. m.s. “DELFT” 6th. Ni 3
5.5. “FARNSUM” isth. November; m.s,
“ORANJESTAD” Ist. November.

Sailing to Trinidad,
Georgetown, “m.s. “HELENA”
December .







The M.V. “Daerwood” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada
and Aruba

Date of departure
notified

The M.V.

will be

“Moneka” will ac-
for
Cura-

Dominices Antigua, Menasuer
Dominica, _. ‘ak,
Nevis and St. . Sailing Fri-
day 24th.

B.W.1, SOHOONER OWNERS

llth. ASSOCIATION Inc. ~~

Salling to Madeira, svi Ant-
id Amsterdam, m.s. “ -
STAD’ ith, "November

Canadian National

Tele. 4047.





SOUTHBOUND

Steamships

itreal itean - Barbade Barbad

on

CANADIAN CHALLENGER 23 Noy. 27 Nov. = 7 Dec. 7 Dec.
es es oo 2 Dec. 4Dec. 13 Dec. 14 Dec.

LADY NELSON .. * _ 19 Dee. 2. Dec. 30 Dec. 31 Dec,

LADY eo oe +. oo "Jan, 19 Jan. 26 Jan. 29 Jan.

LADY IN .. ee _— 1 Feb. a Feb. 12 Feb. 13 Feb.



NORTHBOUND





Boston St. John
LADY NELSON 24 Nov. Nov. 9 Dec. 10 Dee.
LADY RODNBY 25 Dee. Dee. e€ Jan. 7 Jan.
LADY NELSON 11 Jan. i Jan. 22 Jan. 23 Jan.
et “ LADY RODNEY 10 Feb Feb. 21 Feb. 22 Feb.
a * Fe LADY NELSON 25 Feb Feb. 8 March 9 March
a SS ee -

without notice. AX: vessels Atted with enld torage cham
sppiteation to —

a8. to change
Ce been ba ee Aves on



rm

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO, LTD. — Agents.

. London Express Service



tanks would be shipped to Egypt
until Bevin had reported to the
Commons on the talks.

“To that undertaking I adhere

CIE. GLE. TRANSATLANTIQUE
(French Line)



Two cases brought by the police
charging Rupert Nigntingale of
Pank Hall with refusing to pay
the legal fare while travelling on
# motor bus and using indecent
lomguage in the same bus were
Cismissed without prejudice by
his Worship Mr, A, J, H. Hans-
chell yesterday,

Set. D. Forde who prosecuted
in both cases gave notice of appeal
in the case of refusing to pay the
legal fare. The offences were
alleged to have been committed
on November 15

For further particulars apply to: —

R. M. JONES & CO, LTD.—Agents.







FYFFES LINE

T.S.S. GOLFITO will be sailing to the United












See Us For The Following - - -

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Ready Mixed House Paints,
Enamels

in a Variety of Sizes
and Colours

Household Enamelled Ware, Glass-
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Go To - += -~

COZIER & CO.

Roebuck Street, or Dial 3578
22.11,50.—6n.

Kingdom on 6th December, 1950 and 17th January,

1951. She still has some accommodation available

\

for Ist Class Passengers.






SUNPLEX

T.S.S. GOLFITO will be sailing, for Trinidad on
25th November, 1950 and 6th January, 1951,
















For further information apply to :

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LID.

AGENTS.






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PAGE EIGHT

Let The |
Jackals
Howl!

By MICHAEL VIGGO

LONDON, Nov. 15

After the Lord Mayor's Show,
they say, comes the dustcart. And
after the eclipse of a champion
comes the wolves, the wiseacres,
and the people who knew it all
the time.

There is a growing opinion in



this country that boxing is no
longer a sport. And after last
night’s fight between Bruce

Woodcock and Jack Gardner, for
the British and Empire Heavy-
weight titles, I couldn’t agree
more. But it is not the big busi-
nessman behind the scenes whe
has degraded boxing. It is that
funny specimen of humanity whc
calls himself a boxing fan—thc
world’s most gullible and easily
swayed dupe—who is responsibl
for the decline, and now the fall
of British boxing.

Until last night, I must confess
I considered myself a boxing fan
But when Woodcock’s eyes wert
closed, mine were opened. His
swan song was mine too.

Two Men

What really happened at Earl's
Court last night? To understand
that we must consider the two men
who enacted this sorry drama,
On the one hand, Woodcock—th«
man who had the nation at his
feet just two or three years ago
and a pack of wolves at his
throat ever since. His spirit was
never broken inside the ring, bu!
his critics—and they were a
numerous as they were ill-in-
formed—tormented him at every

recent championship fight.

























































Gimblett, Emmett
Score 187 In
125 Mins.

BOMBAY, Nov, 23

_— nee he a it A hectic first wicket partnership
m uled as much asf jf 187 in 125 minutes by George
Baksi and Savold to his subse- Te anine cake

Emmett and Harold Gimblett kept
alive interest in the final day of
« drawn match between the Com-
nonwealth touring team and a
sombay Cricket Association
Eleven.

Left with 160 minutes play after
usmissing Bombay for 317 in their
irst innings, the Commonwealth
scored 211 for four wickets in their

quent and ignominious defeat.
We had seen this man Wood-
cock stand up to the giant Baksi
although he must have been in
agony from a broken jaw. We
Saw him fouled—and don’t say he
wasn’t—by Savold in their first
meeting (though I am among the
first to admit that Savold intend-
®d the blow to land several inch-

es higher). And then we saw] 2¢cond innings.
him lambasting into Savel! ave': Gimblett was out lbw when
last June, only to be stopped | 9Mly 1 short of his century but

when a gash three inches long] Emmett went on to make 103 in
appeared over his left eve. ,

Gardner, on the other hand
was a raw recruit to boxing a
couple of years ago. He is little
more than that to-day, although
he is as tough as they come ana
has improved quite considerably
in the last few months, Except
for his victory over Johnny Wil-
Jiams (who last night, ineidental+
ly, gave one of the best displays
of classical boxing I have ever
witnessed), he had done nothing
to inspire great enthusiasm.

two and a half hours,

Vijay Merchant ,India’s test cap-
tain carried his bat through Bom-
bay’s first innings for a chanceless
184,

Final scores: Commonwealth
323 and 211 for 4, Bombay Cricket
Association 317,

—Reuter.



HASSETT LEADS
AUSTRALIA IN IST TEST

MELBOURNE, Nov, 23
Lindsay Hassett (Victoria) aged
37 is to captain the Australia Test

Forgotten
There were many people who
thought he would fiot stand up
to Woodcock for six roufds (and

I was among them), but we had team the Board of Control an-

forgotten one thing—that gash] nounced here to-day.

over Woodcock’s eye. The doc- Arthur Morris (New South
tor’s assurance that it would stand Wales) aged 28 will be vice-
p to hee gruelling test of a captain,

eavyweight championship fight] Hassett has le ‘ ast
was good enough for us—our ? Becatehe ational

matches and captained Australia
in South Africa last year. He was
Bradman’s deputy in England in
1948.

Morris has played in 19 tests.
He captains New South Wales, is
an opening bat and is cciusidered
by many to be the best left-hander
in the world.

“sporting” conscience never ques-
tioned it because all we really
cared about was the fight.

But—heaven forgive us!—we
forgot that Woodcock is made of
flesh and bone like the rest of
us. The medicos can mend a
broken eye, but they can’t mend
mental injury that goes with
ft,

And so we come to the fight
itself. Woodcock opened confi-
dently enough, but his heavier
Opponent was not lacking in con-
fidence either. At the first sign
of real opposition from Gardner,
Woode became visibly wor-
ried. ere Gardner absorbed
some of his most lethal punches
with scarcely a blink, Woodcock
eollansed like a pricked balloon.

—Reutrr.





It was the end—of the fight,
but not, unfortunately, of the
inglorious and thoroughly degrad-~
ed “sport,” which,
the “experts”, somehow
a fillip from last
When it was over, Gardner
forced his broken mouth into a
semblance of a smile—and nobody
begrudged him his moment of
glory. But if he is a wise man,
he must surely have looked be-
yond the bevy of photographers
who swarmed into the ring to see

according te
received
night's fiasen.

Fight Swung
The fight swung from one to

the other. First Woodcock and] What was going on in the other
then Gardner appeared on the] Corner. j
point of going down, only to Eyes Dimmed

weather the storm of leather and
reverse the situation. But while
Woodcock became more worried,
Gardner’s confidence grew, and
it didn’t need a psychologist to
tell which was cause and whieh
was effect.

All the time Woodcock's gloved
hand was apprehensively feeling
his left eye, where the scar left
from his last encounter with
Savold stood out starkly on an
ugly swelling.

The result is a matter of his-
tory. Woodcock, after one last
desperate attempt to flatten Gard-
ner in the eleventh round, groped
his way to his corner, slumped
into the stool and rested his
weary head in his hands,

The choice he had to make was
between fighting on in the hope
of landing a k.o. blow on_ his
opponent, or risking his eyesight.
His decision was the only one a
wise man eould make.

If his eyes were dimmed by the
“glory” of the occasion, his ears
could surely not have been deaf
to the cheers of the crowd, who}
not ten minutes earlier had been}
calling for Woodcock to slaughter |
him. But that’s the way it goes.

As Woodcock retires into well-|
earned obscurity, I would like
to correct a wrong impression
that at least one daily newspap=x |
has spread. That is that a large
section of the crowd greeted
Gardner’s Victory with a vocifer-
ous rendering of “For He’s a Jolly
Good Fellow.” Gardner deserved
it, no doubt, but the singers
were a group of stalwart York-
shiremen who had _ journeyed
from the North to witness the
spectacle. The song was not for
the new champion, but for a very
worthy ex-champion, and it was
sung by men who can still think
straight even when their hero
is vanquished,





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} Referee was Maj. A. R. Foster

OS8SAL*SOOPER MARKEE



FAIR EXCHANG





British and Empire Heavyweight champion.











Yearwood, B, Patterson (capt.), G
MacLean, D. Bannister, K. Ince,
G. Foster





It is understood that the Bar-

bad men’s team. for tonight's
match remains unchanged; the
cther teams have not yet been
selected. ,

After the games tonight there

will be a dance.



U.S. WARN
SOVIETS

WASHINGTON, Nev, 23
The United States has warned









the Soviet Union of “grave con-
sequences” if international agree-
ments on Austria “continue to be
disregarded,”

Admiral Alan G. Kirk, Ameri-
ean Ambassador in Moscow has
handed a second note to the Soviet
Foreign Ministry, protesting at
Soviet interference with the Aus-
trian Government’s control in the
Soviet Zone,—Reuter,
By Jimmy Hatlo |








BARBADOS ADVOCATE















FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1950
| % ~ = ack T ise - ee SASSO
13 7 eams Get Basket PITCH PINE | hye oe PESO POSTS o -
i - .
ry 7. . vy
| Ball Trophies ARRIVES 3 SEE US FOR:—
ie

| The Young Men’s Progressive A shipment of 157,000 feet of |¥

| ctu! won the rst division| pitch pine lumber from the Ba-|

troph

Bai!

won the second division trophy.} vessel Precise. The supply of

Tne Jabez Sealy Chalienge|jumber was consigned to Messrs

| Shield for the Knock Out com-|'T. Geddes Grant Limited.

petition was won by the Har- _ n ated
Vion College Cld Boys’ Club. Establishea T HERBERT Ltd Incorpor

| eam sien ae 1860 . . 1926

The prizes were presented , 9

| yester ay afternoon at Harrison’s What son To-day 10 & 11 Roebuck Street.

College

| Mr. Bob King, Managing Direc- Sheeting for the Trumpeter eocncceseneest
or of the Barbados Bottling Com- Cup continues at the Gov-

pany io making the presentation ernment Rifle Range at |
at the end of the Presentation 6.30 a.m. Request Performance

match at the College, said that he Court of Grand Sessions

was very pleased to see that there continue at 10 a.m. .
was competition in Basket Ball in Association of Cultural So- Mrs. A. L. STUART em its her School of Dancing
~ i land because it was a good a te ee in
Opening the presentation func- poo | Project for Barba- RE EDE I E 1
tion, Mr. H. H. Williams, Presi-|] q4@os) at #45, pam. V U V LL
dent of the Basket Ball Associa- hie a a ae
tion, gave a review of the work of Pasture at 7.30 p.m. 1950
that Association during the year. ae

Through the courtesy of the
British Council Represen-
tative, a film show will be

He said that the series of games

Music by the Police Band directed by Capt.
Stopped in July, but the presenta-

C. E. Raison, AR.C.M.MBE.



re Seales suas given at Boy Scouts’ .Q, “But the clowning of Jos. Tudor, Jr., as the Postman is
from England, He felt that the oben a6 Can In something of which not only the Revuedeville but the

whole of Barbados can be proud.
There has certainly not been anything to rival it on the
Empire stage in the past two years.”

Standard of basket ball during the
year was very good and he wanted
to congratulate the teams.

Police Band gives concert at
Hastings Rocks at 8 p.m.















for the Barbados Basket|hamas arrived at Barbados yes-
ompetition and the ¥.M.C.A.|terday by the 363-ton motor |













































































































GEO. HUNTE,
Gan aa, were m, Sia Comte wets in the Barbados Advocate.
i challenge Cup and 1e Secon -
PICTURE SHOWS Jack Gardner, ex-Guardsman, and Brice Woodeock, exchanging blows during a Division Cup presented by the Th W. h Come and see it for yourself
Bruce Woodcock retired in the eleventh round, Jack Gardner now becomes barbados Bottling Company, e eat er lst D mber 1950
Mr. Williams thanked Mr. Ham- TODAY ece
se —— | Mond, the Headmaster of Harrison ises:
w Pane} 4 College, for allowing them to use pe feu ke AT THE EMPIRE THEATRE
ie only ave ow shen : 5. .m.
RIFL YAGHT CLUB it: i sushi, comes oe] Hean aeen ie oe Matinee and Night Show
— : 6 .m.
=] rvices ing » seas , > rs *
SHOOTING TENNIS € — Fr ete wiki High Water: 3.01 am., 2.28 Orchestra $1.50; House $1.00; Balcony 72¢; Boxes $1.50
; , Secretary of. >» ~~ Associati : 2 ——S/
Results of yesterday’s games: = eo i et ins YESTERDAY
Agius, aad ay 10V a vote of thanks to win infall (Codrington 22
Results of the Rifle Shoot which _—* oe ip the function. in, #
took place yesterday aré as fol-| ; _ Seem Pee oir _Before the presentation, a com- Tetal for Month to Yester-
lows E. P. Taylor beat J. D. Trim-|bired team of Harrison College day: 9.41 ins.
NO. 1 mingham 6-—3, 0—6, 6—4, Old Boys and Y.M.P.C. defeated a Temperature (Max,) 83.5°F
A Class a G. H, Manning vs, D, E. Worme} combined team of the Island and Temperature (Min. ) 73.5°F ‘§
“ie Die en 34 eae te ¥.M.C.A, 39—19, || Wind Direction: (9 a.m.) ld em oes
Ist Mr. F. D. Davi ‘ ‘ Sig Pla a . g 3.N.E,
Ba Cant spe tomdain?! Ladies’ singles fy Bie SE com. anal] VENat mm)
Capt 5 - eee 34 ; (Semi Finais) vith 8 points while Greenidge and hour
ith, Major matey se Miss M. King beat Mrs. C. S.] Deane netted 6 points each. Best Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.844, .
B Class Lee 75, agi scorers for Island and Y.M.C.A. (3 pm.) 29,750
Ist, Mr, P. Chase ‘ « 82 Ladies’ Doubles were R. Forde 8 and C. Gittens 7. OY
2nd, R.S.M. Marshall ‘ oe Mrs. R. S. Bancroft and Miss ee :
3rd, Mr. M. A, Tucker 31]. Wood beat Mrs. F. D. Barnes
4th, R. S. Bancroft /and Mrs, J, Parkinson 6—0, 6—3.
K. S. Yearwood 31 t ig cals bh THE WHOLE TOWN’S TALKING ABOUT BLACK
P.C. C, Cumberbatch TO-DAY’S FIXTURES | PATENT
NO. 10 Men’s Singles : v
The Cadets (Semi Finals) : Ve are = LEATHER
7 Rounds at 300 Yds. H.P.S. 28 c%. HH, Manning vs. D. E. Worme,
Ist, Lt. Rudder (H.C.) 20 Ladies’ Singles pat -
2nd, Sgt. Marshall (H.C.) . 15 (Finals) 3 to 6.... $4.13
3rd, Pte. Beckles (Com.) . 15 Miss M. King vs. Mrs, D. E HOUSEHOLD CLEANSER 7 to 10.... $4.70
NO. 11 Warns “PEN NY TEST” 11 to1.... $5.93
Falling Plate Ladies’ Doubles
usbadon Reatmne Mrs, M. Legge and Miss D i : Wir
is}, Barbados wee a |}Austin vs. Miss L. Branch and TRY IT TODAY— Here s a quick way to WHITE
at ss I, Lenagan prove how easily and efficiently
A Class iia se Teta scat as (richie Lens CHEMICO cleans metal. Dab a little BUCKSKIN
10 Rounds at 600 Yds. H.P.S. 50{ Miss I Cox and Mrs. K, Lena- CHEMICO ona dail penny, rub briske |
Mr, G. F. Pligrim .. 48 |gan vs, Mrs. R. S. Bancroft and ly, and sec how brilliantly the coin Sizes:
2nd, Mr. 'T. A. L. Roberts 46 | Nilee Ds Wood gleams. $-M-O-0-T-H paste CHEMI-” 3 to 6... $3.86 =
18rd, Lt. Col. J. Connell .... 45 | Mixed Doubles CO cleans porcelain, tiles, glass, lino, to 6.... $3. : et ‘
}4th. Mr. 'T. G. McKinstry 45 | *. and Mrs. C. B, Sisnett vs. Daintwork, etc., with equal ease. 7 to 10... $4.36 ; a —-
. E, Worme and Mr. H. A EVELYN ROACH & (C6. “Tp. ll tol.... $504%
Z B Class ait (Jnr.) Bridgetown, — Barbados ° :
ond, Melt rt erie solo. ae, A. O'N. Skinner and Mr To Fit Children from 2 to 6 Years Old
era: E 3.M. Marshall .... 44 C. Thorne vs. Mr. and THE COUNTY CHEMICAL CO. LTD., SHIRLEY, BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND
8rd, R.S.M. M | E. P. Taylor SR ere
4th, Mr. G. BE, Martin ....... 44 i Cin aaod 2
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Major Gritlith Cup | You wiil never be able to get
Ist, Capt. J. R. Jordan .... 46 Unbreakable ‘Pots 0 {
2nd, Major O. F.C. Walcott 46 ; .
vo fe “9 eae tee Major Grits TY] They ge ye 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET r
1 p BQ ees ee de of h iror. material, an
fith Cup, Major O F, C, Walcott niy one soap oe will onver: faa ay imate of Rone
and Captain J. R. Jordan tied for iy os : that, type tela
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Barn “shoot off” and Captain Jor- ~y gin es your tram veer oa Bay Street
dan won, i e = * :
ee this exciting SPC RO SCOT OREM
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i








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PACE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE ITIIDAV \OVTMBFR J4. 1950 Cahib Calilnq LEAVINO BARBADOS yeatardar art* mean for Granada by B W I A ware Mr sod MrA R Toppin who., non FiPd w fatuac marrlad to-morrow in Or.-n.da Thar ara pictured hare at Seawall, along wltb other %  amber* of Uia family and friend" on their way to the aircraft. M R FRED TOPPIN son oi Mr. and Mr* A, H Toppin of Mcwtieven" Haatinas, | a to be married lo-morrow afternoon In Grenade, lo Mia* Jo*** Johnson. Leaivm* yesterday afternoon for Grenada by HWI A !o attend the wedding; were his parents, other members of his lamilv and friends They were. Mr and Mrs A. R. Toppin. Mr and Mr*. StanU.n Toppin, Milk Anne und Christ in.' Toppin, Mr and Mrt Harold Farmer, Miss Judy Farmer. Mr Bert Toppin, Mr Pal Toppm arid Mr. David Badley They will be returning to Barbados on Sunday Revelry! C ARIBBEAN Revelry a muilcale produced by Mias Judy Graham was successfully staged at the (Slobe Theatre yesterday. Mr. G. H. Adams. M.C.P.. and Mrs. Adams were patrons and they were among the appreciative audience thai witnessed the show •ast night ^J*? *••• %  ' "•• muaickU H. u wen Indian background and provided ample *cope for an interesting series of West Indian dances. Cedrii Phillip;, who needs no introduction to local audience* was easily the star of the shew and tuned in .in aatcellent all-round performance as singer, dancer and clown. Captain Ralson conducted the Police Band who provided the music for the show and th#y gave one of their best performanceto date. Intransit A RRIVING yesterday morning from Trinidad by |.W I A. were Mr. and Mrs. John Campbell. Mr. Campbell | s Vi Chairman of the W.I. Committee in London and Vice Chairman of Messrs Booker Bros They -ere met at the afrpoH by Hon. H. A. Cuke. ( II K Mr. and Mrs. Campbell who leave to-morrow by air for Canada are guests at the Hotel Wind-I Returned Yesterday M R AND MRS Dudley Leacock Jnr.. aiTivr.l hart mornmjr b> II W 1 A from T.,mcsterda> ivc-nin* by B W.I A /or Trinidad. He has none on a business visit and is expected to be back in about four or time On Short Vitit M R. OLIVER JOHNS' lion Supcrintende.it ol BWIA. Seawell. left for Trimdad yesterday evening by pj short visit and will be returning temorrow. On Long Leave M H ANL MILS J llourne and two children arrived B.G. yesterday afternoon by BWIA to spend three months" holiday. Mr Bourne, who is Senior Inspector of Taxes in t... li Tax Office in B.G. Is on long leave. They are staying with Mr. Bourne's niece, Mrs. Olive Jones at "Berwyn" Guest House W.I. Autograph Bat A CRICKET BAT autographed %  > by the West Indies team and Sir Pelham Warner. President of the MCC. will shortly be flown out to JiimaVa to be auctioned in K l wt an in aid of the local branch of the RAF Association The bat is a gift trom the RAF Sports Hoard at the Air Ministry, London. What's In A Name M ISS O TWIGG was a passen11IVUUJ froi B-G. vesterday by BWIA Hostess on the HO flight was Miss J. BIRCH London Adopts A L "Chinese" Look HH Joan I rskin, <>.* lad then we hiar of ires* design or bal styleThis usually return to straight tight .it the sideshign round 1 ets flowing out from a rounded shoulder line, and inn-' hair Hat! l""tnr small, and -it straight on the head, nuusdssdj fashion Women paint their eye* rarefully at the corners, endeavur to look tranquil, and behave as their Eastern counterparts pratksbtj iicvi'i would do If an ontaiting source Mon to the designer But wlu I'n.bably because the malority of Eastern women have about 'hem an air of dignity and mine%  -nt which is difficult to anal % %  if and extremely temi.lin|[ •.., ,r. t > Designer* know that Mimen will succumb immediately to a Ught dress of "Ming Blue" or an evening coat the "colour of delicate Chinese porcelain Chen Vu Look For the first time, however, the influence of Chinese ancestor portraits and tradiUonal costume, which has proved such a boon to dress designers, has shed its kindly light on another facet of toft fashlon world. The "Chen Yfc I-ook" has made its appearance in New York. Paris and London It comprises lipstick and matching nail lacquer made from the same Chinese formula "The cult of lovely hands, Upped by perfect nails" say the makers, "was part i of the education of everv Chinese lady." One of the most colourful parties of the season launched the %  Chen Yu look It was compered I by the Burmese model. Slgnon 1 whose Oriental beauty was enhanced by a dazzling black velvet dress and coat designed by Alwynn of Paris. The sheath-like < dress, with petal skirt has an apI p Jqued design of flames on a j white ground at the top, and the, tight-walsted coat has the Chen [ Vu dragon worked Into the skirt Her long black hair, elaborately ,th %}-Jlit!L" n "'•'hid pinned in "FLOWERINO PLUM" wa* the colour of her Up and nail I make-up. This shade was par-' ticularly created for the new pale,; dark-lipped look, and is essentialfor town and formal evenings. B.B.C. Radio Programme T> •d\inluni r %  m Hum 1* IT. SBmrU llcir* Z %  MM* sons*, la* B" Tin— Hfii ,.,LS0 ,. | Th New 4 10 P m IK %  4 g. n. Op..SOU |> *. Tfialr* I rs. Sis pm er." %  Pa ..-i. ISS pm .*lli.h n Tha. M.-W O... %  id aw p.n pm Th N . t 10 i but. T.li pvrn W-l L.UI.T Dl.l.. pm sr.i t %  1%  %  %  > %  hi %  %  u rVport. %  SB p.m. % %  Wrrk Bla p ii Tha a P m mac sxmith <> i ...( %  .. su m Cominunlun >o h IW-r. IB 00 p n ID 10 p oi • %  ih* ESIloi mU, le IS pm Tha %  VI n,l„[T( uf Pi %  ASMn. 11 OS pm CI Don FALSE SHOULDERS Rupert's Autumn Primrose—18 :T" io Rupert'* iio'varotking in iltii gr ( lrn ill my liff.' ht uya. "hui Pvr ntvtl ri iaai m Auluttn pdsv H ,. uv yoii'vr KM PM. "ott'i bri tII my mt'itt find u lof"*0r rtl • Krrrn ri, |H book down JI.J Ku r ,. tpuks oi hn ouest. Y^ i i"H me lh od.ir.1 ,|,., %  Imta bail." ha .ih.. and ih:nm I'm liriid I can'i help you. I wwh I could, lock eermnl* didn' (iJ rhu pr.mroar her*." "II'I y puHlirlg." My* Rupert. hm M To See The Water Polo Gamei RS. JOHN TEIXEI1CA n|'.i i-il husband t Barbadi see the Intercolonial Water Polo matches between Barbados and Trinidad, which began List nigh*.. John is a member of (he TriiUiiad team Beryl McBurnic B ERYL McBURNIE. Director of the Little Caribbean Dance Group in Trinidad, invited to Brit.iiii foe two months as the guest of the British Council, has proved one of tha liveliest and moat energetic guesU. the Council has yet had. At a farewell recepUoti In London last week, she said that she was en route to Europt?—"ultimately going down by Lisbon and dossing by Gibraltar to North Africa I want to study tha dancing there". She has visited Stratford 'or the Shakespeare season. Scotland fur the Edinburgh Festival, and Wales for the famous Cardiff Folk Museum. besides this, she has broadcast and paid calls on *uch well known ballet schools as the Sadler-. Wollf, ud Marie Rambert. Finding tune to stand still (or ana bfl*I moment sh said, "I want to take as much background with me a> possible when I return to the West Indies—literature. lolk-lore and so on. We have to little to work on in Trinidad Did she find much material in England 'Indeed I did'. she says. "Every country that at one time or another occupied the West Indies UMt some traces of then i lltUTf behind, und it is that culture want to incorporate into dancing". AQUATIC CUM CINEMA (Mambar, OnJy^ MATINEES TODAY A. TOMORROW at 5 P M TONHHIT at 8.30. AND CONTINUING "TMGMT LITTLE ISLA.X10" Starring BASIL RADFOHI) and JOAN GHEENWOQD This outstanding Comedy, presented by J Arthur Rank recently had very long run* in most of the print inal of the world. "For Kvening" One ,.{ the loveliest longer ; .>.its. 1-cU.w knee-length, was In Putterily Wing Blue taffeta wlUi a diamond check of narrow velvet stripes all over. A red. blue ami %  lil .veiling cap went with it There is an increasing feeling foi %  •runt caps of Chinese character, as opposed to the more usual cocktail hats. Often these arc JUthentic reproductions of mandarin hate It must not be imagined that the Chinese influence is reserved for evening wear only. Proofed linen and garbardine coats, in natural and stone shades, were cut on classic hsgh-necked line* i>nd worn with tiny black velvet pngoda hats Ornate gold buafcU* wan used to fasten the necks of In n .outs. In London there are manv places where real mandarin coals bought. Women prater these to imitations, which cost almost as much. But for thoso t afford (In and do the henvv ornaB SLIONON wasra a dark green aa coolie |ackt •lib hogs buttons. brni4*f*>f with Uny Bo wars. BMH He many adaptations the coolie jacket. Selgnon we irk green satin, fastened with huge buttons. This tvpe of Jacket is usually worn with light .lousers. They serve many purl^ses. A younger girl can wear a tight skirt beneath one. altboufjli r.irmaily a full skirt would suit her better. An older woman will like the graceful wide sleeves and %  mug. And for the expectant mother there .i noic convenient style Delightful Naiiirs Dtlightful n-imci in glMn ..i the Chen Yu products—Fire S ( ..;.!.. F.ieilj. Sea Shell, Temple Ulghal Diamond, fhlnsaa Red. Peking Pink. The newest end most (h;imeleon-hkc colour, which blends with almost any red. u a vivid shade called simply Sun Ked. It indicates a return to brilliant scarlet nails instead of I or pastel sh:i otiable In recent yenrs. Pit too tew wrmen reallre that lo achieve perfect results, an undercoat of varnish should be used. Most cosmetic Arms produce these plain varnishes—urn ei r'ln'erent names, such as SatinIT Twjncott Using tl.„ undercoat causes the lacquer to stay on considerably longer wi.hcut chipping easily, and It is well worth spending the little exira time on your nails. A ... ;, -.ligm-.y Cfttnesr look liv nrattUlUJ your bail ndu ., switch and making a coil; by wearing a litUe round collar of velvet, with embroidery and slit front; by embroidering braiding the slit edge* of yi fkirt; by removing your shoulder pads and fastening your loose coat ingh with an old brooch; and oy pu.vkig scrupulous attention your hands and face. Chen Yu means Precious aaSawT. Cm.Id there be a mure appealing name to tempt a 1IF1.I) OVFR nSt DAY! (faM It Now) PLAZA Theatre-BRiDGETOWN . lu!J TRV S GRKATEST BUaWOM MAKER I "S1MVWA AJVB iMlAlAIM" i •' %  t>r Teikalealar 2 SHOWS TODAY 2.30 and B 30 p.m. HOLLYWOOD Look out. gals, your guys ma> be wearing fnlsies today—false shoulders that is. Most men are That is the sworn statement of Irving Verman, who pads the shoulder* of such as Robert Milchum. C.UN Madison, Cornel Wilde and former TaiMA 11 Ir.hi.ny Wnl.mill|.r Irving, who makes movie men I !•-iT.cn in their suits. states: "1 can up a man's sex-appeal 300 per cent by putting him in tin right suit." This is in du-erl rebuttal to John Gartleld's and Tony Curtis' "beefcake"—the stripped to the waist style which is supposed to send the females in droolliiK ccswi'.' Many movie moguls have check ivi the box oftlces and testified that a rugged manly chest, exposed to eye consumption, is worth more than a> wide shoulder span. Bunk But, no. screams Irving. Thi* is a lot of bunk, and he should know The masculine clothiei pads curves and angles on moat of tho celluloid's charmers—and M r a st l n aa that most of them still crack the box office moola. ( It seems that a national maga-1 zine is booming the "T-Look"— a no-pads look in men's clothes This, sneers Irving, has n woman's appeal at all. He added:) "Heck, a femme wants her man to be rugged—at least to look I igged, anyway. So who can. make a hit with the g.il brlend In a form-revealing suit which either shows up the skinny or' fat man' "You'll never see your movie heroes in such skimpy apparel, believe me They all know what their panting women want—and they're not going to settle for the bare realities." Irving cites Johnny Weissmuller as the A-l example of a body-beautiful. HU 48-inch chest sends mot males into frenzies Of envy according to the clothier Potatoes But between pictures, when Johnny hits the potatoes too hard and tho waist-line hits the %  ' %  t iin-.iM,n-mciit. it i.s Irving** job lo minimize the maximum. This he does, says he. with the correct lines in a suit. Good woman-bait measurements in a six-foot Adonis, to quote Irving's tnpe-mcasure. are a 42-inch chest. 34-mch waist und 42-inch hips. Of course those can be varied—adding to the chest MM] -ut.tiuetiliK from the hips and height, savs Irvinj' Bustling Janie Russet's hubby. Bob Watcrtlcld, the pro football player, also has an eye-rolling physique, stated Irving. So does "Mr World." John Farbotnik. who is one of the dresser's customers. Probably the biggest breathcatcher of all is "GeerCcous Oeorge". the chunky wrestling iscle man who recently ordered II padded custom-made suits In *uch screech! ng colours a fushla. red kellv green and pink —I.N.S. THE TREND OF FASHION AND THE RENDEZVOUS OF SOCIETY THE CHINA DOLL RESTAURANT (No < M...-h.ii Street) OPEN TO 12 MIDNTTE hum Cbinrst Food* irrved in a tliuy almmphrrr Dial 1730 (or lU-icrvatlolu ... m„.t.... : hoar, of RECORDED MUSIC and M.VPSOCX aa prn*nled a. b GLOBE THEATRE on Wrdnraday ttiui S SPECIAL SHOWS SATURDAY .-. Nrw run K... I.K. IM.i, TIMHEK StAMriulI I.A/..V Theatre HI OISTIN "W-WW-alMl.^ulM ttSEbSFS "AiH VOH1K" ill%  lv.| of r.vou .iif„ ACTION BPECTACLE ADVBNTUHE M in NITS SHOW T.n..,..-, \ri KDAT. irN it N "PAINTED ntSKRT and BK^THERS in £^AXWU GAIBTV tThe Garden) ST. JAMES mi* l — MA l'AFAMOt'MT1 EXCITtNCJ Oofothy LAMOUR in w.Ui Irt.1l.HHAi-KEN II. •THI: I HI IS IHJM 1 ' POsssKV a oi*hi, aim it tsDAi as* ri MOSOAT I Caat i. II. ktiii*. BSBsaasa STORY Or OR HA88EIX(Tethnlertor) Oar, OcdgW Lines to look at Ferguson \ (NEW) 36'' Prinlad Linana THE SUREST GIFT! Ladies Boxed Hankies Laca Edged—6 par Box Aaaoricd 4 per Box S1.S6. J1.6C 51.76 SI 85. SI K MEN'S TIES TTHITFIELDS ^. New Deaion, "Broadway" Slyl. ^ 1ST Plain Browne. Flam* ... 1.38 YOVR SHOE STORES CUPBOWS. s-oned .94 EVANS and TO-NITE 8.30 O'CLOCK Together wilh "DANGEROUS PROFESSION" ALL-STAR TALENT NITE! SAM CORDON "You're Alwajr In My Heart" MAL MURRAY "Blue Moon" ritEVOR MARSHALL "My Love, Loves Me" GERALD HAREWOOD "Brahm'. Lullaby" AI.VA ARTHUR "Now That I Need You" COSFORD HUSBANDS "My Foolish Heart" HETTY TAYLOR "The Gypsy" AUSTIN EVELYN "I Don't See Me In Your Eyes" Gue.1 SUr : CLAYTON THOMPSON "It Had la be Yea' Who will win the SILVER CUP ? AND 4 CARTONS ol HEINEKEN'S BEER Donated by K R HUNTE A CO. 3ar Save > our Ii Tlekela TO-NITE I PIT 20e; HOUSE 34e: BALCONY IH, BOX 54c. MECHANICAL TOYS! PLASTIC TOYS!! DOLLS — TRAINS AIRPLANES — TANKS SPEEDBOATS — ANIMALS ETC. 42" & 53" XMAS TREES DECORATIONS & LIGHTS Xmas Tree Bubble Lights S Come in anil innpeet our slork. Compare our prires too 11 THE CORNER STORE



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TAC.F. SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATF. Fliinvv NOVEMBER M, MM HENRYBY CARL ANDERSON MOUSE ^ e 3MT:THK6S A CJLLOW 'N A OAT ABOVE MO-CT.%3 TMATT ru PC fforB ,—rrBY WALT DISNEY .MWEONB W^ST >-*VB. CUT J5 \DIE BY CHIC YOUNG BRINGING UP FATHER GEORGE MC. MANUS --•.Mt', %  I %  l*-NeN6' 1 f ABLV I VEP ffCLATlVE ; I l-CAtf T* P908ALV (Jutt AR--iE' |S> 1 AiT*jO — „ **JZ CUT _/ ^ OC TOWM' J r T WLi/ AB.JMLAH--•urixf' #av *ow •m PAIMTN' --W uKT BoT TOOK It-** C9AMg 1 RIP KtKBY ALEX RAYMOND 1 pO0 f-^ORlTW rV*ST>C'BC0#ALL\ YTHUB fin? S*r AA£> 54V5 *-f Av*-r iv -J^5MCKV/ fAjJjUT '. % %  Bis*! %  'AtSffr TVB_#CCWN PV<*.-> %  P i !' %  • %  % %  -. I E N I. Mill II H AMERICAN —K>cir(\'. women use the unir hfimv rare. Tbes uPond's. and it i" thanks In Pnnd\ tWO N I ilirir rocnpicxinni keep 10 radiatuh lnv*iv ah. aw Why noi In I'ond'a keep ?> %  *< skin !<>•. %  I ,rr\ Mlghl) bdM \nu y I>nl, i Ira rue Hit skin. i TOII V IIIV %  •! iliin film ol Pmftl \'.uiisliiiin &NBL h makrs JII ideal |mwdiT bate bc.auv it lu>ld powdet man fee hotmi It DRMCU ihr kin, ioo. i i'.i. !'• u.iih ran mfuhiTy iftd in a *on \Jiilr you will nntitr ihal >imr -kir Mrtearrr. nrtpr. %  li Ml glow witli BffW rmdianrc, new lovrlinoA. Pontl'i Creamt atr inevpemive in buy. ^-l tliev ate uied by WtfJUcft loVflMN women on You can feuy Pod" ai all ihe \tes\ beamy countert. \IKS (IIHMIIIS \\MHHIllll. J, f*utv AnMlMl K*> mr Pom.li. tW i'r A-J i tor (" %  umTrA.fr IAoa PomT, CM t'r**m" Mvt Afn. FaiuVrMi. 7i fco.,, r** %  %  --/,• fi/wiM'Iy Mj/f a*/ imoofA a*4 itn*< btimgi u; 6*.a|cat feeling thi y,-u*rc MB *eak. *nol up to it* any Inn :cr ttinply m*r. that you've been inking hM madl out ol >our*air. Your body uahoiiui ivwi'i^muliirtnuibenini foods—pboifjti.nu* oa piuteio. Tissues strengthencs] To pnt you nghU vnu need a course of 'SanatOBen' Nervs ronw KHMI. S.ii.moen* trombinei ihess Iwo ireal bodybuildlnt foods— photphotus and proiein in their mgini. form, so that they are quickly abiorhatl into >oor lystera. Day by day glorious oe w hcBlih. youth sad vtulily flow ihroush your whole body— your strength nd -.-II confidence corns back t Start oa a course of 'Saojiogen* lodsy. On aala at good ihrmiHs mud iliuggitt 'SAMTO<*SL\" v iERVF TOSIC tOUD rcstnrrt health. • !i nsf] DUNLOP FORT CAR TYRES V* ben evf-rynnrt rtlae is hot and bothered t/mi wilt faariruit.. by your fnwluiesi — if you do thia. Afte-r yntir bttth or but be. nhowor yoursir all over with Caabmem Bouqtivt Tnlciim Powder. Ita magio touch will turn your akin to silk | riot he you in a cool, protrxrting film tbat keepe you daintily frmb all day long. Its deJicato perfuma will add mrw and aubtle charm to your whole parsonnbt y. For Caaliiuore Ilouquet u tba Taloum Powdar with tba fragrance moo. lov. ^e=a Cashmere Bouquet TALCUM POWDER "II CO. IIIM; I o -\it.ii I AT it utit tints 1.1:HUM. t IIIMM IIISI AIIIAM i)t*liuhtful i prepared In our spotless kitchen Md in our pleasant surroundIfafg, aag K; ou'll enjoy ouf chefs specials. Has) in tonight THE DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD. (BCKSTEIN BROSJ i: GREEN |DRAGON Va 9 BKOAI) STRICT llrserratlona Dial 1W. ATTBmWBNtt FACTORY MAXAI.EIIS Take this opportunity of obtaining yeur requirements In r— GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE Ranging;


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PA HE rom BARBADOS ADVOCATE r'KID.W MIVI Mill R 24, lM BARBADOS 0 AlA'OGffE Pride) November 24, 19511 Vewiry Service? IN an advertisement currently appearing in the Pre**, the Vestry of Christ Church calls for applicants for the post of Assessor in that parish. The post of assessor in any parish in this island is an important one in the parochial service, with that of Parochial Treasurer as the only other taking precedence to it. It is therefore one of the highest offices in the parochial service and should be reserved for promotion of those who have served in the lower brackets. Within recent weeks two instances have occurred in other parishes which support the contention that the post of assessor is important and second only to that of parochial treasurer In this same parish the assessor Mr. Wood Cloddard was promoted to the post ol Parochial Treasurer on the resignation of Mr. Grogan. Only a few weeks ago Mr. Scott the Assessor of St. Philip was promoted to the post of Parochial Treasurer in succession to Mr. W. U Cooding. This practice was set in St. Michael where it was laid down as a principle that before calling for applicants outside the Parochial Service the Vestry should promote its servants, all things being equal. This was on the motion of Hon. V. C. Gale who expressed the view that the policy of •promoting junior vestry employees to higher posts would remove the ground of accusation that the plums of the service were reserved for those who gave support to vestrymen seeking election by canvassing for them. And the better the canvasser the higher the office. This doctrine is particularly sound in a place tike Barbados where the standard ot public life is not exceptionally high. Everything should be done to maintain the dignity of public office and there can be hardly anything more belittling than to find men in whom the ratepayers or electors have reposed their confidence and trust faced with charges of punishing their enemies and favouring their friends. It should be their maxim to be charitable lirst with their own goods and not to seek popularity by dispensing lavours at the expense ol the people who elected them. It is lor the Vestry of Christ Church to discover whether there is not one employee in the parochial service worthy and capable of being promoted to the post of Assessor. And if there ts one it should not be necessary to call for applicants by public advertisement. It is unthinkable that the members of the Christ Church Vestry would have any desire to debar any gf their employees from promotion which they deserve; in fact they have meted out generous treatment to some of their employees whom they feel have served the parish faithfully and well. They have boasted of their service and prided themselves in the administration of parochial affairs. It cannot be said that the administration in any other parish is more efficient than that of Christ Church. This efficiency is based on the service and allegiance which their employees give to the parish. Even although the Christ Church vestry does not follow in its entirety the practice adopted in St. Michael they do not debar junior employees in their service from applying for the post. This removes any ground for censure; but the vestry would be well advised to examine most carefully the claims of their own employees before appointing an outsider. When they have sifted the material at their disposal and satisfied themselves that there are no vestry employees qualified to till the post then they can appoint an outsider. In doing so they will have justified themselves that they have endeavoured to get the best available service for the parish. You flial III AS and Kll'! Cot's flu Iran Curtain H* %%'illiiim HHHVIK i *.•* % %  %  ,. ... B ^ RL1N lining of his hat when they took On a busy IH-WS daj, up RErBNTI.Y m the Soviet sector Wm orT lhfl ,^ r|in lrilll 2Q *£? **" ^ p ^ <-f Berlin I put fourpence into a It .poke of member, of the and get the. ( .ill-box to listen to the cold war Eat German Government in such fM Berlin tachScto Jammed SS \*\ MISHLU -. terms that the Zwickau peopl• the first tele**.*..connection J 0,,]v o?er t£i ^I^K*?." VS"*?*? pm *** *"* **• %  • "' RIAS perU aiigd the tins cut for the*, pontons, paid to spy Report It ,n *"*"*• %  > •**• jn you." THE Cast German campaign Dull, K.it her Then followed a hit of six against "foreign" listening WHAT programme* go out name* and addresses spelt out will a still rougher edge Im Eastern air from MAS anci and slowly repeated. Women in hospital in Thunngia the Went Cerrnai transmittei Then warning came frorp the have been told they will be sent Well, there wa .i group of purggreat new U.S. transmitting home uneurcd if they switch on >d Communist lawyers sitting station called RJAS. which to any but approved station? round a table telling the world stands for Radio In the American Nurses have lieen ordered in how Justice has become a CornSector of Berlin. By Callbox KIAS. taking a different district each week, makes a point ot giving the names uf Cominform agentspying on factory "slackers." "saboteurs," and %  Western orientated objectivlits." People who know they are watched no closely that they think it dangerous to listen in to the West on their raido Utuuhpeakcrs can still hear Western news from KIAS by dialling (rom a private phun-v or u call-box. So far, though It may bo dangerous, It Is not officially %  crime in East Germany to listen to Hi AS Eight in ien of the 3.250.000 German listeners living behind Ihe Iron Curtain joined writing that they mint report „ lUn iiit Party tool in East Oerany patient breaking this nile. many 11 sounded dreary Saxon Communist group.leaders What the lawyers were really wanted to switch their weekly after was to make out meeting time < %  •> that the* could that, having fl.nl from the East, hear the R1AS transmission m ey are At to practise in the Their propovil was "en imperilWest nent attempt at 'obje, tivism". Then FTau Gertrud Milk? and was only narrowly defeated ateppeel up |o ?he miernphctie. through pertriotic action." the sh 0 ned to the West with li-csl paper reported. j, t r official shorthand record ot But "obJectlvuBBj'* la becomUiL; tvldaoce Iglftj | Germans who easier. For RIA3 has a new mast an > r being freed from Russiaand new equipment, representing concentration .ampwere handed suih an incr* >* %  In power and oV er to Communist tribunal* bo range that LI now guarantees ^ sentenced. tlear reception, day and night, }• %  ere brought in on r.ot only thronghcrut the Com.t (V t. h.is Frau Mllke said. munitt hsrf of Germany but -And when they asked P"'n ..lso In the M loM lands'' fringing Uoa i 0 rail wil~M CO spe'iK „. the KaMtern itordors of the ,,„ a, mlr behall, I was ordered with me m listening to Western Fatherland. to strike it from my notesstations tonight "Cyanide w|,i,f But one regular listener, Frau R1AS Is American, part of the L 'A. . Chrlsta Wagner, a housewife, ol occupation set-up, backed by all FRAU Mil KEb account o< Kreis Docbeln. Saxony, was not the power of the dollar In one Soviet zone Jut Icea with them. Frau Wagner is in form or other it repeats dally its inducing th.m that tail A people's court sentenced claim to know lietter than MOBlawyers. But *till there \va. no her to 18 months in the cells cow what goes on in the Soviet drama In It, no sense that here after the Peoples Police found in zone was the radii, outpost her flat a letter she wrote. Jt To the German Communist West bringing the hopewas in praise of her favourite bosses, RIAS is officially the dom to the F,..st programme: the transmission to "cyanide sender." Unofficially. The absence or drain the Soviet i. %  .. bv HI AS they llk c the dally doee. tional. "No flo insh or Christa Wagner, said the Regular listeners .nclude more here." Mid a programme iiirccini people's prosecutor a? Kreis than one member of the East "If we went in Doebeln, had thus linked herseli German Government. The proof across' the letter with Western warmongering When RIAS beamed out some up telling us 10 Imperialism — "the German's cutting comments on Soviet zone We just go on greatest enemy." politics, one of the men pilloried thief In nearby Zwickau. another got a telephone call asking the Ea ternei listener wrote a letter to RIAS. whether he heard the attack, then home town H c went down for live years. Came the angry answer "Ol it sure nvU ; i mind Police found the letter in the course I did *' London Expres of is intenirumpet.* S uiting soon pi'" keep it quie the air like a quietly tellim vhat goes on in And thnt wa.. Service As I See It From London LONDON. Mr James Griffiths became Secretary of State for the Colonies nine months ago. Within that period, the House of Commons has created history: four Col might becom CnloniCH. latlve Council NUggested. in a letter published in "The Times that a Colonial Consultative lOCessarv In the Assembly should be wl up on the f the Council of Europe The %  were confli debates hav v taken place. The >"ong the Members M House has. in fact, devoted three1-ennox-Uoyd. who led for the and-a-halfdaystoColotUalsdtaJni Opposition declared that the Mr Griffiths thought uYs a mat^3* and ill-considered eitpenter for congratulation. One won^""J* 3 ,*. < *X rrnnicnt had "^ dersl tinu .minions In racssat lett'm published in UN ting opinions ^^ „ Dfl |y Tc f egrBph .., we | l^>ndon —. as In a talk given at the Royai Empire Society. Capt. L D Gammans, Conservative M.P., has put forward a similar suggestion. This week, 1 listened I!lw t£ C ^ ^n K 'T",^ House" of Commons debate -. and Wellorr to birth control ai... lurc „ f I20m d[d , |u f J"• %  >',,.,„„ Bh „, lM hl coflco.powlnj. A Bill now Wtor.. ,.„,„„,„, ,„. p .,„ M c JJ^J, "^"„ „„,„„, ,„„„„PBilinromt Mk. to ralK thr total „„„,,,, IC on.erv.tiv^) thounht It Uon V „* „. „' what limal bull "" did loo little for private entc-ran it> constitution lie drawn up' prlae. What rfMUld he the (UneUOCM W No one. however, objected to such a bodyl Then therr ut the IncreaM 1 Issues ot human nithts, the inli'i There was drama in the denaUonal sttunUon, liniuasi dimbate, After performing aeademie culties. etc. nymnastics with the philosophies I asked Maijonc Nicliolson c. Mr Wakethe Fabian Colonial Bureau lo. Development and Welfare Fund. !" — !" rtt^Smt K. TZ^^tE* What rt „f proress has been Q ^" !" not^uaMn capacitylo.io, -I,,,-. the Councl I,,,UI ";"?'rJ". "• m < A ^ by iS C ?" Belnn a man of culture who is become.pe.n.anent nlal Development Corporation. Up ,.„,„",„, cnoul(h „, „„„„ ,„„ „ ion, be looked upon by Colonial political leaders as a major detei rent towards self-governmen' The.* In"hould In her dealings with Colo._. e v ls t ot icc of such an nrganictd"s'uc'h b Z v !" £ !" 2"£&ff&JS&.* c ul,ure ^4S *•"*: as Tr n r\ i.H-t (.n the -.rerlinn uf a frwrtnn bnr f r lnc vol<,UT bar %  the Colonies and the Colonial p?.m.o£nd^ /-"""I" lh ; k ..,>.who.e !" t.,upeople. Immutable a vear in the Falkland IslaiuK',' '"' 'hamplonlng the cause However, such a Council would the establishment of a idganllc "' to '? n 1 "'. ee>"P'*" somctimM „,„ „, ,„„„ pomis. |, „„ u id poultry tarn, m the Gambia; '""" t-" 1 "'""'" to "P nd think. „,), „.p,c„ .ilalives of the vannanclni of a bulldlnl society in w !" K2SS .?I.i'u*""f,***T!l 0 ^ ou Colonial lexislalu n.-e, Malavathe extraction and saw" nd I'rwponslbillty after painting IcaJMhir say, OOM a year to disnillling of hardwoods in British IJi?"' 01 "' P' 1 '"""" of ""' "'i?" 1 of <•• common problems such as fiuiana; and the rebuilding o( African c^ll.^-jtrowers in Kenya. Tiade, Defence trade Unionism Castries Ihe nre-devastatwl canl1-aughlcr eclipsed embarrassand other allied subjects, ill list I ucia """•"""> "I" mem when Harold Davles stressed It might also bring Colonial 'THI*' i< ,. "fl... -...iii.ii.ni>.....! Hie need for teaching birth control peoples ili.sely together aim „ methods in the Colonies—"so as thcrebi .tnngthen the ttej Ol III Hi iiounl available for Colonial Development and Welfare under the 1945 Acl from £120 million to CUO million for the years IMS—M. For a true picture of Colonial Development. however. it la necessary to take into account p-ii,,,. other agencies than. the Colonial Jcl" enui'Via't'lV U,e %  lew. H the Council is set up i:^j"rt* "** %  "^ %  ," %  unwrse l •;^c^;;vo %  ived',;'•rell %  .• ** %  %  >*>. %  ' m > *-. 49 undertakings involving a capital outlay of C29.474.000 have been launched In 21 different Colonial gious n.ivuquettU %  u|gMted Mr. that ipeciallv when one thinks of the many imponderables in such pioneering activity. Drought and A VISIT TO OBEKAMMERGAU I >< >.\ K.NurJY. formerly a stage designer y and nov. wnrkinj, ;it Australia %  i.tly went la mcrxau to see the famous Passm.i P in the BIK' i %  i *' i • %  play is given every ten years but owing to the inter%  uption of war there has teen a gap of sixteen years since the last perform a; Passion Play's tradition goes back to 1603. when the little mountain village of Oberammergau in Bavaria was surrounde, glri 1 gin I.IKEGI'AIMI LNAY.EL i yl i 2 p| MAHOGANY VARNISH STAIN COPAL VARNISH HRL'SHES-all sis.-. 4 gin.. I gin. M aln I gin. I gin CO., IAD* WILKINSON & HAYNES Successors To C.S. PITCHER & CO. PHONES 4472 and 4687 RANSOMES LAWN MOWERS women a chance', common reUQonahijM wun nm-i. %  ... i-up the debate the alii &, tu, UM ColODlel Oflkc lor lunch. Only the birds that fluttered and ^^"^'a^ysrvSbSi ssiTs. 0 s ,uip ror ihc c,rto tS s^s^sTiJ&\\ wiluindi in the audiiorium s arched ** %  '""it UW'policy of parallel econoNor hav Colonial l-eBslutuie.' in.^ broke the silence at tense moments. lc and social development and *or that f roprOMntatlVM ->f Iha in HiLs 11 oust-, wr mnv fail That CotOnlW M "" no ; is the policy of Kll Mo]*>stv's su w w %  Colonial Council Individual Colonies £, ?"' 1; ** ., itlv* .if Colonial \ money should be kept Colonial Council i,egisl;.iui for research purposes In July tins year; Mr. H. 1. M Who is got | i.. uk.* the initiaJohn Dugdal.'. Minister of Slate ,J"JZ. ., for Colonial Affairs, pointed out ,C^VJ^ '".'*, ,' that the Intention of the Dill was ffi 5KS iSiffl* bc nol the alloration i.( additional moony lo indiviiii Rather, the anil developmant whrnw which Kirk wood ..t iiie Jamaica I^glstlve? Ol tin Passion Play. Oberammernau becODU fuel in"iher summer and winter resort Then mid Finley, "the peasants return to tin Heidi the WOOd carvers and potters to tin %  nd the community to studying an' living the pert! they hope R) be chosen t< portray when the time comes fur the'Play o the Holy Vow' to be given igaln**, With xows tm TO st it 1 0 Hal us(;i's Klerlriral Depi. FOR THOSE WHO LIKE TO KEEP COOL AND KEEP WILL GROOMED AT THE SAME TIME' THE NEW MOYGASHEL ANTI-CRUSHABLE LINENS ARK JUST THE TICKET FOR YOUR SELECTION WE HAVE THE FOLLOWING COLOURS IN SHOOK BROWN. DARK BROWN, BEIC.E. RL'ST. FAWN. GREEN. BLUE-GREY. NAVY. AND WHITE Come in TODAY and Maki' Your Selection. DA COSTA A CO., LTD. DRY GOODS DEPT. Our lt..i.l..s !*y: Mil KlVIivii.il the rVOTt. fun idea fen-n betrt ot all cnunu-icr. rose up in rc\-o t against this continual slaugliUH ^1 T'" ,i"'".,"". Cbildren should l>p taught nt home •rv,. Li„ A JK %  • l" hool to question the lead."To."" • %  % %  %  ^ %  %  • yp•"->;"" %  • *• % % %  • — for mxi slaughter llululuyn To The Editor. Th* Advocate SIR. 1 was particular!;* %  ttrnctcd to ;i corn %  nil in Our Readers Sav column who signed d y > Plutarch is the moth.nl as "Hopper" under a letter capand efficiency of the continual tionad Holidays with Pay, on "lauehter Tuesday. "Hopper" want* to know Who wUl eeekhie food if htacook J£* worrtai one who reads la given two weeks' holiday, He nutMctrt eeoouni .1 ibote gii menUoni dial be or ployi %  cook, •' (l d "> s ". ">•' "* %  > *•? ,h f "• half-day maid and a wuhe HU < %  *'t armivs took their being wife, he i cennoi ... k, and he slaughtered f r aTantcd and acy ( iuaii> pm the iinpr.-ssion of an. nrirmolmo ', 1 Mi.*; Items slaughtered It is the Aith the North Kore is n. the same boat 1 cm OHM 1 tion to hll problem 11. It. If '•Hopper" %  I Q Mluisked r< homo while cookie is away, then he should eut si ihe food shops u re '' jn town. There are many such in 8WU Street and Brou.i Street I "Hopper" cennoi afford lo eat In the food .--hops, then he has no business with a cook, halfdiiy maid Pfjl al today, soldier* and civilians alike indifferent to r*inn | ugh&MIIP method must be found I. force the "savage" to le.trn Ihl best Ideei "f UM betl mbMh 1 n ihe Miiiiivi of p<-ni-c. We sh"idd to reooKnlse tiut JQ m >n ho wants to be a dictator or wh | to i-oni|in-r ime 11 -.'i i nd out --f line with normal mental evolution Only the insane can possibly go In for atroetttge 'f Ihe insanity of the dictators cannot be cured, it need not be endured Such men sin uld be controlled in some wny which will prevent their perpetrntinji theii masts slaughter of humanity All the people of the world sh* uld High about th" to something about it Why submit tamelv to being slaughtered' The lime has come for intelligence to control humnn action If lyn'i slnughnot make the il effort to M-nd out sufficient truthYou have" your solution Mr. or ^strenuous ^effort to^arour the fulj^guaganda to prevent ,IFV thcr Hopper. Why not When the Russian bombs start ruining on New York, the slaughter will be according to the best J"J. J^'V, t tradition of old Plutarch "*' •*KH)' ill take u as 11 in the day's work or the nor11.il course of event-. I.ike thenot get a eook within two weeki k "" •" """'^ g tnc " l would Hopper die of starvation" ,, '' Jl1 *"• ^ ,vt mad< ' '" 'ul-mujpui. ,i.rTffw?f* and a washer, because ho is living ?}>* slaughtered above his means, fooling himsel' "' and ti\ln£ to fool his friends Society brings this on no doubt the poor and Ihe rid to the need h* peace ana tnc (utility of slaughter FOOD LOVEK Humanity still takes mass slaughf a oi s.ai-'er for granted There ought to be Complaipnl >Uiunnlvr something that the common pe<.pie rjranford Conn To Ihe Editor. Tlie .tdrocate— of ill the world can do about it, V S.A SIR.—A carol ulution a sickly Joke? oral volumes oi* Pluta It is high time that the clttnni EDWIN I1LAKR WHITING No\ 10. '50 What Should Be Done To Ensure The Attendance Of Members At Meetings Th.> llarlMidos Clerk: >n as started live years ago niflj the view of improving the general .diking conditions and | 9 tile si.in.i.ud of living of thi of this Island Since its IncCptlOk, It has met with varying defl •** of success and failure. This halieen due to the b isistem ics. Hie lack of vision, :rn almost pucrlki altitude of the dlx'erse collection of clerki I Bridgetown. As nn Infant It was expected to .Ik and talk As weak and struggling •]< | il was expected to lead the non-co-operative and sometimes non-supporting clerks into the promised land of contentment, where* IT tbBl 11 By Oliver W. Barnes Thi, ,, |> i ney in ti Cum pet it ion lear was It 1'rlsc *I0. PrkM Winuinr rierks I ni.m Mr J H B Judge 4iid tiir When this is done, I suggest that meetings be held on evening.' before the clerks go home as It hM u-en quite apparent that the) do not like to come to niwi(nsa .it night. M.t lings should b* called foi roiu-ihirtv and started prensj>tl i .,„,., m* ,, , T he President should be givci "TV" ., when they try to introdu un I think that the Union should ticrcaurv side Issues, step out of Its shell and courl the Every effort should be tr..de t. limelight of public opinion thrcuirh speed the business of the moot Hum of the local press ing, and attend <>nK lo the nee* I think that the time has eome sarv things. When the clerks should bo asked publicly the following question Hi .if the clerks do wish jv. yon think thnt a Clerks' Union, the) must be prepared t< Union is neceesoo In Berbvkel undereo a change of heart. They If so. WOOII you be willing to must realise th.it their union il civ. of '"in Uino and contnounot just i medltun through which the> can obtain %  quick raise, anr* ite public'hen abandon, but then vatel) your ideas of the pr*l unstinting!* lines along which such n iinion 'heir BnaDdal and mor.it Mppoti hould bt al thi II as the 7emth , „ of its existence Thu. can the\ i beUevi ihai :r this could bo Have .1 Unloi whkfa OBB give ^sirr. and %  exted effort was "> c by the workm : men. %  and girls ol our commr %  nunity to pool their resoui-es, their ingenuity, and then mon sense to lift the Unio.< up above the sneers, the ridlcuU I contempt of all and sund-y. m I of Its most ardent upp"rtei.. lectori -.,, M)t beginning to wane Thi, U 1. linSZrt the paucity of attendlocal press, thnt it mi:l %  people of Baton of the meetings. a little interest in our white collar bedos In fsxterel and employers in particular danced b* ance at What then can be done to rouse orkei 1 STAMF Hiffi 0 HiliSTMAS smmww .vow Leg Hams Hams in tins, 3 sizes Table Butter in Pkgs. Cooking Butter in tins Corned Beef in tins Sultanas in Pkgs RakUDs 16 c Per lb. Cook's Paste 6 cent* per tin Sail Beef 44c. per th Turtle Soup 24c per th (ft. TripeLiver, Frozen Salmon. Fresh Frui! Smoked Kipper. Cod Fillets, Haddock Fn-ih V'i. %  C'AOII'.V HHIXKS-J A It 11III lit PHONE GODDARDS



PAGE 1

rrtinw vovrvBEU 21 im BARBADOS ADVOCATE CLASSIFIED ADS. PAGF SKTON TfLEPMONE 230 DIED W.IMO-M % %  111.4 PI—iJ .1 1 II uClwK I. 1 %  Wn.li.. Ma ColdV.. Ada III J'. %  '"i ..... : %  .iin m lima) Ml. la li IN .11 Mill,I \M T \ 1 m m I.,.' >,-.,, I IHI ttlial balin t A Mr*i> 11 th** %  ii.il .nrt lhr HI %  %  lint tnin* i. -till a l>br-*d IINU. Trom wnicn nona avar waaa* lo wcco Mi.. Alb.rO!. TkVtM Mi Maw Ooonans Mr* Kathlc-xii Bart 1 h*m. M11 Civ., •aaughiri OHM, rivd ftarrM, Main*. Eumltta. (grand i-hiklTrlnWad and USA PI... Mill lAil AUTOMOTIVE AUTO CYCUE N,w IIIHUOCI Auli Cyrta. exertion condition 01 nurM HMD* Apply Evan Roaa. CiUnvUla m.iou st m-ir. A !' %  :'"-> CAR Cwnar drivan Mllrase rhot,r E Gill MM. VAN-One ID I H.P. Ford Van. p*l cvndit.im. suin* chaap. Dial Brlfravr SOSS. Puriiy Bakarla* Lid. Him ELBCnOCAt MOTOR-On* 1I1 GE ', HP Sms" PKaaa Elaclrlc Motor, nrvir uNd. In uriinjl pat-kaaw Phot* SMI Before SOT am 01 attar 100 pm n .} so ir, LIVESTOCK COWS Tour 1*1 Milch Cow*. Two On* Pur* brad Hol.lain Cow alsht months in calf, oiw Grwdr HoaaMIn Cow alx monlhi In call for bled rrirtun bull Buraut* HU.rk.vi. -t OnUal Llvattork Station. >UU fllving 16 pta. ol milk par day. one fialfar II nunthi old proa arty of the Canadian llolitein bull Rvmua. Rock Dundo, Cav.Hiii. Si Michael an.w : %  ...SCEIXANEOUS GOLD JEWELLERY — Cor.*l%tln( ol ••. Urn plna. brooch*., nacklacaa, pandant* All naw food* Excaltanl Xmai GUU S*w Your Jawrll.rv Y. Da Lima Co. Ltd S. Broad Hlrawt Itrldlrtown 13 11.SU : %  1 HAMS 73 cenia pat lb. CurriiW" S4 tU par . lUlidn 40 cU pas 1). C Haibarl. W Tudor 81 Dial SHS Ull.f-.li PARASOLS Plaatlc Paraaota Many pratty Colour* from which to thooaa Al a Special Low Price >l 41 each The Modern Draw Stioppe. Broad Street 39 II 50—an POOLE POTTERY EARTHENWARE--A wide variety )uet received and on as la Sao jour Jrwellara, Y Da Lima Co. Lid. }0 Bniad Street, Brtd|rlown IS.I:A— On PEARL NTXTKUME M ft. each, beaded necklace.* f I up. He^drd earrlrur. M ct* par pal., plua wide a.aori. n.ent of coatume Jewellery Be* your Jawallar-, Y Da 1 IMA Co.. Ltd. : %  : Broad Street. Brldfetown 23 11 SO-*i K..r. In RAINCOATS Pla.tlc Brawn, pink and blue 3 M e.nh The Modern Drew Shoppe, Bicad sure' STOCKINGSKayaar Nylon Stock".** 51 |if> The finest available in al. ntw atiadaa S3 It par pr The Modern Dreaa Shoppe. Broad Street. YACHT — That VAGABOND". Tal. BtSI Oaraa*. Dial Hl-J labl* Yacht Held. Lone 3311 M—lln WANTED HOUSEMAID BUTLER — Apply b> tween and II am. to Mr. Ertc Mai Mir.f ."Bemnar.-. Pine Hill, newr Oo' r-rn-M Houaa 33.11.S0-* wmm Hi;.\r HOUSES %  aUMSaaWr cnael From N*. i*hed red*an. LYNSTED — Kavy Garden*, 1 Baa| rwoaaa. Barvantf room Oarafe. MITIPT caanlae*ja, Kltrttan CMrden, Flow. G.raVm. Fruit Tra--. Law. Ma a Yvwnet Telephowe mm umma t Wetcnea Baad Bt wit built bunaakiw. coning, doting •r, built-in faWaM H Duut-in cup e-l .watar. W C praawa*. kitchen. hiaidi. Elactrle lth' and Bath earvanta r___ %  —! let Dawambar Dm K Archer McKamle. Vlrtorla Str Bll GU.ru Baabuck I'l HI II N \n s AUCTION of the Afeata of the I DfSURANCK CO,. I '".' —" t COUTB OARAGE BAY '1R*T on FRIDAY 34th al I nun Milkman Saloon Or with cod tyre* nd In working order, damagea ,„ ... ; ml. TERMS CASH R ARCHER McKENZIt 'fU^h SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLAND STEAMSHIP CO. Sailing lo Trinidad. La Oualru ceo ate m a "DBLTr14k N.^embg* • %  "PARMSUM" tftk NivamBar. mt ORANJf3BTAaIri M. Sailing to r> iniaVad. STSSL, f' • %  M V 'Manafca" wi LI ar at Cargo and Va Canadian National Steamships *ol TBBOUNB W "U tht people are wntclring from ano.her woild you woi.i.ii like them last year t hats and costumes, would you, dear?' \ \y.' 1 The III.MI: I Huinm-r I WILL aall on Ihe MI Uupar' km of November at 3 o'rloeh. Or *eckle Road on Tueaday neil Ihe 3SI Bq M Novwmber at I oVIack. Ot I %  H ol pi.in v H) good cot l.tlon II ha* Gallery. Dra-lng ar l> inn Room*. 3 bedroom Kurh* >nd *partou> >,>rd nhkah -lib tfalvantie U n„ Elrctiwil, ... •Bfj in-tailed H r*i be RVaM I. PJUK pr month The land ahich kg Government.an I, rented For inapecliun aar D AnA Scm to see us in our London Bxpreu art vice 'ANAD1AN CIIAUJkNO ADV RODWEY .. -Atiy rfaSLfaOM LADY KOUNIY .ADY NELeON .. Mm LADT 1 >nv l-ADY NBOl SI) Nta SON BOOWaTV NaaLaOtl HOOtTRV NElJtON Ball* MiHitraal Ma.Hu El Nav r Nov • — 3 Dor — l Sag. • — I* Jaaj • 1 r*> 4 Daa. I Dae. it Jan 1 Fatt. flatbed..* 1 llav 14 1* 11 Daa. >* Jan. 13 Fab UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER by order of U> lll ..ti ha* r..rFlal !' %  Coliymor* '%  ".. Uqoor C.w I Morria Chalrt ChtlM |>I Table.: Hmik.ti.-lf 1... and Bre Brut. %  Royal Doulloii War.. FYlgidalre .good • orklng orderi Cedar MachUie Table Plalled Grata Mat Ph.lro 7 Tube HadU. Clock. Ib-ik*. Simmon, and 1...H tuhgle Red-lead. Spil'>*> .nd Miil%  %  eaae Cadai and Muhogant :t.< w 61.hoi Dieting T'ble* Screena Pine linen Pie**. Kitchen Table. Larder Ware Prew Canon Ga. Move and Oven inawi 3 Burner U.. Range Electric Iron /nd To..ter, KlU lien Utenall, Wi,*ii H.*in and Fltlinga and ..II.. AucUonrrrg I 111I1 1 Kir i 11 • 11 %  u,. 11 Ilium, Pavll 1 Carpet. 11 — li.,.. on Wedneadoy November, beginning al 11 JO an entire lot of household furniture which Include* Mahng and polnled rtcnk* Kahog Tub Chair*. Plant Htonl., R,,l| Chair*. Rocker* and Sen— Kidney Die.. Hi Uplinl.trled Mai air in Caatara. Book sn. 1 Green palmed dining ._. Chair*, ill Mahog Ce-.n | j • eil pain led prr w ai. Malm*; and inted drawing laule*. MlrroiSlmm. Bed*teada wiih ipring* AMaihuaa. Iron Col* with Mattreaaea, F.lerlrtc Stove. Pine table*. Liquor 1. Several painted table* a Chair*. Coo I-t.lor. Obna Jar*, Larder. Florence Slave Oven. 1*1 ol Cutlery. Ulaw Ware. I.ineiii, Silver*. A umlnlum Saucepan*. Plate* • Dlahea. and neveral olher Item* too numerou* lo metilin Term* Caah D'Arcy A Srott. AucUonaar. 3*11 v> i, r kind permlaWon of Meier*. Cole *.. Lid 1 will *ell id Iheir ii-iaa.TO-DAY -1 3 n'rlork ONE V- FORD' SA*UXXN CAR with five new lyrai and good w.irkin ..rder. TEHM1 CASH ,1 3MI R Aicher Mc Keniie 1*11.SO In REAL ESTATE Misadventure: Jury Verdict Doslh by misadventure was rardicl rfitirned by ,1 ninr-n 111 in the iiu|iin into the 1 *"**"**"*TTI surrou tiding death of 25-year-old Pauline (Iret'iiiditf %  dressmaker of South District. St. George The inquiry was held by Mr. C. L. C Walwyn and was concluded yesterday. totalise riieeiililia died on November 17 after she was involved in .m accident ulung South pMrtet l(Md With the motor. lorry M 269 which was driven by Harrourt King of Porey Spring, St. Thomas. Shr. Arth, Aprel has been arrested by I t.eim.in i-..|,k.s iKilice' 1 and |. is being held by the East Rerll< |x>lice. West German Ns cy D.P..V reported tu-nighl Earlier to-dny he had beat reported missing. — 1;. in. NOTICE Tilt: Bl VNETT COLLEGE Shefflfld %  9t^VaBUft < Bush^an v Michael A Diploma m ihi %  11.J-C HIM !>,,,... I IHI VIIO\ VI rm Pine Roadl. Ballsvllle. SI tt-'h'ael %  ndlna on 1.711 aquare feal of land and; mi.lining rlo-ed gallery, drawing and lilng room*. 1 bedroomifaeh wllh 1 nlng water 1. knehenette. and uvial mvanlencaaBarvanta SITUATION TACAMT MNAQgft — FCC Large SUlloiiei* %  toiw In Trinidad. Write rtaUng ereriance snd quallOcatlona lo PO B01 34, port-cl-Bpalo aoetoatng raeanl Photogitph. Salary according to ability. Minimum S3J0B0O per annum phli .xMnml-loa sf,ll*>_im MISCELLANEOUS !..*[ j 1? I ae 3nd b lh* Haadmarter and murtta accomP*"'" •*; bapUamai certiflcalaa and taillmonlala Appllcatlona for a vacant Rrvatit Scholarship unable .1 the AUavne IM21-"'". ta -, r r *"" d •• <•H.adMpttsnaT C-rtllteate. , ld taMi.no~lt,i,M ,' • c, 0^, • • n -PPllCBllon. -id .w ,, mu * e *"l lhe*n*elvr tn Ihe lie-dm.*te, on Monday Dec th • a.m. for CaaminaUon It II %  *—Sn -*l NOTICE Ckolng to BuMnea* from Thundav 33rd through Sunday 3Sih re-openin# Monday 37lh J B Clarke NOTICE Application, for two varant Velrv Srhour-huiMov.t tenable at Ihe Alletne School, will be received bv the underilgned up to Frldav. December 1*3 AppllcanU muat be -on* of Piriatilonei. in tr.illenad t uciinuuiii •• Applir %  norm mutt be accompanied b a Bu-lh No' Ccrt.flc.la Applicant murt praaanl %  Lm %  r>em*elve< lo Ihe Headmader al the Allan* School on Monday Dacarnber 4th al 130 a.m. lo lake Ihe entrance — e ami nail on %  C. A. SKL-.NEW hat •THE HARDEN HOUSE" late laaldencof Hon. R. Challenor. wllh s acre* 4 parchat ol Und *lluale al Country Road Bridgetown The dwelling houaa containapaernu. Drgwing and Dining Room*. Slttin*. room*, BreaklaM room. Pantry add Kitcwac on Main Boor. • Badrootna. 3 bathroom* and large verandah upetelr Oovarnment water and electricllv throughout • aervanta room* ggraafStj t.hie. etc. In yard. Tannla Lawn ana '"t'lilperlKin "at anr Una on appilreUor, Jo the caretaker oa the premiw* Thil propartj M within 3 minutawall; Ir.m Broad SbeWt. Ofert in wntlrg to be aant to the undar,isn*d YEARWOOD h BOYCE. Solicitor* Jaraaa Strae*. 13.131 aquare feet ot land allwUd at U* Oarnaon part ol the land, ol >*".'* ;ev" naar Schmitt* Oale on Friday sun IMS at 1 P m at our arnce. t One Board and thttigted %  14 > %  wallaba ahlrgle* <,<• good eondlllim Appl> Me*aj. ftd Tucker Phone SStS 34 11 tO ••> NOTICE FARIaH OF 1 111:1-1 1 in I. 11 ApplKalinna laccompanled bv bap ll.mal certlncelaai will be received % %  my oflke up lo 3 00 p m on Friday in December. ISM tor one air more %  assail Ctimt Churth VeMry exhibition* tenable al lha Boy*' Foundation School C*ndldataa ml be *on> ol pa.tfh loner* in elraltanad clrcumitanca*. and mu*t not be la** than nine year* nr more than twelve year* of age on II* dale of the •lamination Candidate, mint preaenl tha-maalve* loi ci-mlnallon. lo the headmater .^' the Boy*' Foundation School on Friday, aih December. Ifeo at 3 30 m Application lorme muat be obtained ,, a* I do not hold myaalf rwaponalbU for bar or anyone alee contracUng anv debt or dabta in ray name unleia ta> *wl1tl Gue 1 Houaa proportion. TOWER GARAf.l Gap An almo naw piopert^ %  ultable lor a lalSt purpoaea aiwrt Irom a garage GRENADA. V W I A bae^ lul and well found '-.• ". 1 cottlainmg 3 raaMglM . %  ,. .... tV pe KBAL CHTATE AC;ENT Mvonom n PLANTATIONS Bni.HIVfi Phonr UM Coiiinioiis Hcmovi* Sundav Threat CHURCHILL WARNS LONDON, Nov 23 Tin* 11 HUM.' ot Commons tc n.ght removed any threat to th opening on Sundays of next year' £25,000.000 festival of Britain iJy 364 votes to 128 it rejeeled I 1' ftirrtard by a group "i i'"ii"i \ ..'i\ 1 %  -i-i-k Sunday's upenlng on religii As it was a matter 0 conscience, t'onservalive leadei BaafaWOd tlieir .supporters to voti a* they pleased. opening. e i'""i page I > Foreign Mlntstei BgypUan %  tun appeatini to 1 sAtiaJled said that th Opposttaon' wiiiild nol le witMrawn Cot M would li> tn arrange a day next week to rlebetfl it The BOttoa rcKirts that the ig io ban Government |g SuwlLitng t<. Miathe export nl arm* including Centurion tajiks to Fnyi" wtaethi i .11 a result .if pn or otherwise while the Angloiome voted foi r"n>|iti.in in.'.v ( >f 1936 in beinj: >thers against challenged by U* 1 taUakl would l*> .ihi|)|ied U) l':v|>l until Bavin had reported to the Comnwiu on lha talks To thai uiideit.ikini: I adhtff • HI behall ol the liovetmnenl h~c ktod Hera Churchill broke In •.gam to say that Davies had Implied that tin(Miveriiment WOUld allow debate. The irale Morrison replied: The Commons then without a ernment ote gave a second reading agree ng in principle lo a Bill pro cling Ihe orgnnisem of tin F, livai against being sued bv a "^ the new facts which made "common informerunder Sev!V| C J' -..ESHl ntssnlh ns K IU I,I.„.K .L.-.e. """""' l.n.in.ni ol iWence "I am not repudiating what Davies said. A statement will be made. (By Mr. Bevin). I'licie will be exchanges across ihe floor and the House will conHdei it Fimdlv Churchill said: "To conCl full had earlier atked If elude this matter our motion will the Government cAuld say what remain on paper, and we shell dtaIhe new facts which made cuss the question whether we shall he ask for a day next week %  %  legislate ments or banning i'l! 1111 the Sabbath SHAWS ASHES from page I l,, r >' Minister Emanuel Bhlnwell thai nuse, iinkK would go and the evening statement < would not for the pn %  Morrison said he Ihuuihi Churchill wai OaTJagwaraUng iiv -tatements ver> much haai Mood in the sitting room of Shaw s quiet house at Ayot, Si 1... They watched the opening of the caskets by Dr. Probyn who then mixed Ihe ashes on one end of Shaw's oak sideboard. The mixing was carried out in exact accordance with Shaw's %  ana*, his ashes being emptied to those of his wife's. —Hauler. 2 CHARGES DISMISSED Two cases brought by Inc police charging Itupert Nightingale ol Berth Hull wi'.h refusing to pay Morrison accused Churchill ol llel legal tan While travelling on ''nig provocative, and appealed motor bus and using to mm to urge In, roUowen Lo lilfiuage in Ihe same buwera give the Government a hearing < ismisted without prejudice Churchill addressing the Con• said It was more in the interests of the Opposition thai Morrison should be fulh beard than that he should he .1!, Morrison then Mid thai Boln well had given iissuraii-. day that nothing would happen overnight and Davies hud said no Kb) Worship Mr A J II Ma i hell yesterday. St< D Kniile who prtwecuti gave MteM Of apiieal W the case of refusing to pay llulegul fare The offence* Mleged to have !**<•„ cOllllllltleil Oft Novt'inlH'r IS LA TOURISTA ^ VENEZOLA1NOS I TKNKMOS u;i ORIENTAL 0E LA INDIA CHINA EGYPT0 I;L ream D*AL I:STABI.I. ('IMII:.VTO EN 801'VENIR. IMKHIIHls Bills' I I.I B WWTKU TO HErVT in Mini 1, n ,. A Building suitable for ir.uM* a BOafS' t LIB Kepi, |„ poh,, Hr|,,„ a ricr. HARDWARE ITEMS t I-.-..* tin. allaral l I'LYMOUTH 4 LE HAVRE via Martinique and Guadeloupe November 14th. 1*50 Sailing to Trinidad. La Guayra. Curacao. Cartagena and Jamaica December U|, 1930 Sailing lo .'I.YMOUTH 1 LT. HAVRE via Martinique and Guadeloupe December 17th. 1*90 All ahipB I Mali. Firm Cla 5S COLOMBIE" SS VO1.0MBIF eptlng PasiengerA. Cargo and •OASCOCNE" Firm Cla Pnuage. Only "COI.OMBIE•' Firrt. Ci.bin and Tourlat Clasa Paasagea. For further particulars apply to: — JONES & CO.. LTD.-Agents. R. M. FYFFES LINE T.S.S. GOtaFRO will be Bniltn,'. to the United Kinndnin on 6th December. 1950 und 17th January, 1951. She still has some accummudutiun available fi 1st Class Passonni'i '1 SS 'itil.KITO will be aailinji.for Trinidad on 25th November. 1950 und 6th January. 1951 Km further information apply to: WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. AGENTS EVERY WOMAN KNOWS l!< r final appeurnnce ran be mude or marred by trie Shoes she wears. WILLIAM FOGARTY LTD. Has JUM received a new •.hlpmrnt of LADIES' DRESS SHOES Plullorni U)ls, Backless & Toless. with lliuli Heels. in Brown. Black, Blue Suede. While Nu-buck and Reolile Call White Bu-btirk Iriiamed wilh Brown U. pnUin Court Style wilh Spike Heels. Price, ranging from $11.57 lo -II!" per pr. THE Y'HK HKA I I 1 1. Yt aa-s*** They're the Shoes you have b*en waiting for. Call Early at WILLIAM FOGARTY LTD. The House of Fine Footwenr ....



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n.in.v VOVTMRF.R 24 BARBAIMK ADVOCATE PAGE THREE. Iiulo-Chinu It. l U \ltack laiimai ... 24 : IIP lit* II lent attacn <.n Uie ti< tier po%: ol Tanm-i .ibuut U %  A F %  n h rr.i J 11.>i > poki il OpmlteM had been U-gUh IO .-'11.! | %  { ,it. .Another port in (he .same area was also madwd i>ui m i alievefl by menu of Francs, l*g*on form Ltaaci u-feaU in sent out %  n ations and two %  bo. idne Plevm said in, %  critu lam in thj ti debate in inv NaUonkl Assembly. Plevm said that frcm. %  %  %  to-patched and ncautiat ions are in progress a ith our Allies to speed up stili more deliveries of matc%  Hisaid it had been decided to %  %  | (Or ti> fjpftra**twi of a Vietaann Earlier In the debate Picrri* Mende* France Radical and former Minister or Natton*. Economy umM to open negotiations with tin* oadct Ho Chi ;aid*We (.aiuiot afford lo weak. •n our posit! Europe Durtny the past Three years France has •pent more en Indochina than on ItCi ow reconstruction," —Renter \|MII\. U Ml It I'OIO |>\>| /9 fasf Africans Sentenced To Death NAIROBI. K.K N -• %  Eaa4 African tribesmen, members ol '.•.< %  tanauca] cult of 'Kood spirits' to-day were aanteoced to death at hsssrby Kitalc for havlni killed 24 persons In a pitched spear vatnil rille batlU last April. Two otlwi were ordered to ja I indefinitely because they are %  n mora wen* iequitteo. The i nit of good spirits lias %  inti-Europaan and 'e.asilain bavi -'i|A*Aiun' %  tagic ;ire killed %  i thos baliave thnt •ascend ibftn people. —Can. l*rr-. EXPRESS DERAILED 3 DEAD RIO D| JANEIRO; Not 23. Three people died and 55 wci\ Injured, man-, serious! v, when an m Paulo was d< %  tuaaau neai Several wauKons were overturned and destroyed and it possible thai the death toUl will • wreckage 1^ removed Tinledurad iron taken nearby hospitals —Reuler HARBOUR IOC, In irlbli Bay %  %  acv. sjue a—, arh c*>. *•-• o !" •***• -a II M v lasssflb At-nivAia (r*aw rsEPAirrriuDx SklMri Il-.n MM i. Kir*. (Bl UFEETDMHIITOES! ROBINSONS la Touch with Barbadot Coastal Station SOME Or THE MEMBERS of Ui Men's Water Polo Team who arrived from Trinidad yeaterday nioii'lnti l.v BWIA Tlie remainder of the lean arrived by a %  epeetal fllKht In the afternoon. Rumania Wants "Blacklisf PRAGUE. Nov. 21. %  the War...v Peace Congress lom up a "blai klisl of %  Marsha,! Tito and C.ener.l tporti The Mad ol the Rumanian dcles;atlon mada the proposal Rumanian dalagate Shostakovich day world there was only one place for an artist — '"ainoof hghtera for peace." U.N. ACKNOWLEDGE TIBET APPEAL KALlMI'UIi, .Nov. 21. TtbeV* %  "mane* Secralury Tsepon Shakabpa said liere to,e had received formal appeal lo the Bnttad Nations lo h-awal ol Chinese troops. • The three ni.tn Tibetan delegathm to the United Nauana would ix arriving hare -soon" ha added. Shakabpa ooDflxmad that with v.-c youna Daiei Lama's asaumptlon of mil power*, the 72-yearold regent had "retired." —It ruler Jamaica Musi Find Outlets For Milk KINGSTON. JVa NOT, 21 li the milk production . io keep capanding. outlets for local milk must IKlouno in marketabroad or fresh milk used to pioou.c • haaae the AcUaej Go*. ernor told (armors at the big agricultural show in western Jamaica yesterday. uasarnie Jnirmin made a small %  Inrnant of .ondenseij milk to Cuba. Minister Ol AgrlCultuTI l;..n.,i. waj. convinied after u rissl I i Oulana that b> foUowins these hues, the country of Jamalc.i ejn pciiduoa shortly 60 pet cent tf her rice 'K'tiianil He declare'. ;uianese could 11 ed a.pollUoaaly dead. The country abounded wit! Fhloru hut suffered acuti'lj from lack ot leadership —Can. Pre--. DISAGREEMENT STRASBOURG, W tf men) on liie iiroposai to appoint a Minister i : . ... %  bourg Assembly today. The report by EarlU I member Duncan Sandy.-. w:ito be la ol 'lie Aasernbl] debati liiinorrow on the plan for The report ruled out aiely any idea of a I %  %  Supn inc lor i>f ih,. Atlantic Force Tin yet appointed but expected bo in v rdera ft* The As-i I. xpeeted to rota mi the IfsOtli Gerrnan parttclpauori In %  EUTOr within the Atlumi. :vum —RruU-r Strike Breaks Up Train Service In Buenos Aires Bl BIOS AlIiES. NOV. 23 ii.ii.. running into and out ot BUOnoa Aires to-day were doing ^ if when and how thev eouM Thi rtrUDB Whiofa bexan three on tinRo li( One %  ervInu the suburbs and the towns to th had this morning affected other lines. —Reuter 6 Spies Executed TAII'KH. rormoaa, N ("hmeae NationaMst i>rinn %  %  %  tyiivct-nient nrrlcinl*. Including two generals and a colonel charged with Communist underground activity Announcing the execution a Nationalist spokesman claimed that Formosa's biggest C'wnn.i nisi spy ring had been broken up. Nationalists htld three other men charged with spying. The amnesty period for Communist underground workers who surrender has two dayl After that Nationalists hnv threatened drastic action against anyone caught helping Communists.—Reuter. Britain, Fiance, U.S. Consult On Korea LONDON. Nov. 20. The rVxretgri onVe announced i Bntlah Govecnig i the i:niu-u S I %  ibilit. Of Bndlng a sohitu.n foi the Korean % %  nenl did not Ini ., %  %  ... i Don might be looked for, but it was generallv believed in diplomatlc quarteri ba red i %  exchangee ihrnugh diplomatli channels on the feasibility a r*emlUtarlaed row in North Korea —Reute Plane Disappears Over Mountain hat, Wyoming %  i ..it lodaj toi Moran where a plane i^'li people iiHiudiiig wome.i missionaries and children wil bel.eved to have crashed In flames. Tho two engined plane aaaitod Oy Iba "New Tribe Mauuon," a iell,:lous organisation, vanished artliina] clouds last night while bound for Billing'.. Monlaiui, from Chico, California on Its way to S^i.th America. Eight children and ten adult pas-tcngerWOte iba BJVW, ThO parachute team waa sent %  ... srvk-e %  i air base.--RUr arm bun*-* IM %  i '* %  '* -" %  h v \ .i ..., %  K — J I X • a i < - %  CM HMt. -. Al^r..1lH IIHaV . l^TIK., %  % %  .. %  *-.tlW:lS. • lTl%  SJJlUlJ.. . 'MaWluxail %  Alcoa Ct-i ^ir. • % %  BawplaUv .. id,. %  AICKJ PraiUirr. %  .Soli Kill, • %  >a\rp*M>. %  IMk;.u ai Spnu!i< • a. A rM IVniaatiM via, •. aunOala. • R> T %  atll %  a a TlMVtvI (iriru a' Oointo. %  • aw*ll. ea. I*'| "I M Briltah IK sa-sW Otor, • TJ.-H. % %  lurai.n lion*-I' -nd T Pil"aa-Sea we 11 UUUVeUal m ii ; A Crl.IVlfHil.1 Aul.ml. Alban. H-ii-ro H-nvo.. aaSMMI IK>drUIUarl. llrf'iatfla' !'" %  "! !' %  %  %  ortsas. Jatw iurr ejensaiM, ifn**.'" itvmr, (.ni".i> ... in.,,,.. %  | Mn !• ^ %  *IL.U— 'a* I I Bn %  P ..n. Iti.i. V i/5* (•as) Un) •s ANDREWS LIVER SALT •PATENT' BARL8T nvakaa milk naora d.aa.Ubla aV aaay PATENTC ROATS makn wa.r..n| a maafv dnea aW hak> IC BENEFIT THEIIE'S PAIN RELIEF AND TONIC BENEF IT fOl 1 Ycati Vw. quwkiy n the* awjy hesdache*, neunUaia. nerte and rrwurnsne < ^LiA Ml dees soni.thini I "OJ W'Kf'iwt of i' valuable "^ *-*>. -A-^.1 i iKfirs WJ.IViie h*lps *rt-u lo led brajhur. look i-.l %  %  RR ionic tvnrftt tool SBJBS..-LOVELIER SKIN IN 14 DAYS FOR 2 WOMEN OUT OF 3 BY PALMOLIVE BEAUTY PLAN a Workers At Air Base Strike It...,. OBI IHlll < aUr-.J..., drill. PORT-OF-SPAJN, NO" More than 300men employed ,ii the Waller Field Air Base. Trinidad, have grme on st-ike. The men are employed with the Garcia Commercial Inc a Puerto I "in pan v. and they are demanding a IS cent an hour inBtJfauM beeauae the conditions of work were not satisfactory. The>claim that some of them had f" oUfflb high buildings and there was no sick -chef allowed them. Only one soap gives your Booklet Advertising Harmful Drugs > %  >•* %  Oar 0> t'rrraf*nifnli PORT-OF-Sl'AIN. Nov. 19 The Medical Board of Trinidad la altogether satisfied that th dri-es advertLsed In a booklet published in Indlu, which is beInsj circulated through the poet In TnnldaiL have no therapeutic value whatsoever. The matter of eiriulatjon of these bookie's th-MUKh the mail is therefore receiving the immediate attention M.nister of Health. Hen r.ing. "1 am considering at the moment.' said Mr Tang, "what steps should be taken to protect the people of Trinidad and Tobago from the many dangoyiia things that are possible |o rat'i't from the circulation of tlV'e bookletB•' Copies of thes bo. klets have been widely cl~cul.ited throughout the Colony. %  Sd rei-K-insible people have lenearnod over the poesib'r harmful effects uf these advertis.*ments on the health of the population. Jury Discharged In Larceny Case iSYoni Our Own POHT-OF-SPAIN, Nov 1 ITt* eaa* agadnal riant] aaanamnied of San Fernando, for lar* ( in. i ji imp contaimng $23 iti. i Ihe property of Loutaa Hamperlad, cama to ait abrupt halt. l(elore the case win resumed, the I Chief Justice Mr. Kenneth Vln-\ cent Brown said. "Mr. Foreman gentlemen of the Jury. I regret very much to say that this case cannot go on. and that you will have to be discharged One of vour members was seen speaking 10 a man this morning who n tinbrother of the accused, and ani I her member at anv rote, had rfipl-Oaehed Counsel for the do loll case. Buth ot thewe LCtions are absolutely impropei and consequently you will hav I i e will hav to start a new one You JIdie charged. *' i i • Anaf. I %  Ci iSSHriri l"rto Mi %  1 AJbertn M %  %  i %  I i LaekM %  %  i %  l hi, ni*. A'M.I %  I I . Hi I %  .i\njn Wlllla %  la,". A IOVA CsnOn M.iti.ri skin ihis exciting Bouquet J / %  Mil 1 --\tiur caaasaaaaaMBU POKT-OF-SPAIN. Nov \u Pounding his de.k Mi Ji. i > B i: QoUtaa declared in Court in .Una Cof-paa" re Mai ma he was "getting sick and tired.' "I don't want to heai viythtng about a newspaper, n diary oi anything else, unles* there i, %  OtTftO evidence from that witnessbox", the judge continued, "e)n> the administration of luaoca n this case will be prejudiced". The Chief Justice was refe -ring I the continued interruption h Counsel for the defence in thi can of Hex n B<>vsle Singh. Trinidad's Blue Beard and four others, charged for the murder ol %  n*. Pevson also called "Bumpe-" one night In April last 'Ihi' bl the third week of the re-trial. \oni i: Thirty-iunr .!<*.Eton In luilin^ Ic.uliiit: -kiii ipeciaLsMhtVCasCHI M'lnplcinl 14-dav t<-K i.l the Pnlmolivr Mftajtj) I'l.ili nil t>lft4 W-.ll\eli ul all BSJI 1 .mil ever) type of ikln, 1 hsq u|nit .1 definite, nofscshsbk un|mivrIIK-III 111 tin comptorioni d a WQIMII tmt <>i { (gtuppiarttd by ssfiMcl Mates IIHIIIV l>\ tin VSI.IUCII themselves). 'I'hrw win UssOaa] tlir irnpin\emrhU reported: sv.\ vH* 001 w.* iMaaaai Few*' Frciher, smoother • • • • Bri,hter. e | Ml .. r Sec what thin I*lan will do for your MU in — in only II days! II you would like your complexion tobe as lovely as you have always hoped it could Ite, try the Palmolivc Beauty Flan." It'• so aiuipk:. ThU is all you do: 1 Waihyourjace with Paimliix Hoop. 2 Mauagt ik rich, OHM-QII latin inlojwr ikinjvr out JullminuU. 3 Rinti. Start now, continue for 14 days, And prove ta the docton proved—that il you keep your skin cleansed by Palmoaivc'a beautifying olive-oil lather, you ore ture to . KEEP THAT SCHOOLGIRL COMPLEXION WITH THE FRAGRANCE MEN LOVE C-* We beg to notify our friends and customers and the general puUfcc that ar are under ..bligation to vacate our premises (fKI nOYAI. STORE. No 2 High Street) at the do* of this year. Compelled by this necessity, we have opened a sale offering hundred* of regular items at sacrificing pri<. w, arc telling almost at own cost a large variety of Men aaod and dress shirts, pyjamas, tweeds, tropuaU. flannels and doeskin* &mmw&i*m*wwwm&HH%mmmsi l Christmas Cards A WONDERFUL ASSORTMENT VFT IIIIM K0W . . AT THE ADVOCATE STATIONERY ^KmfmHfiMifi9*mmfiVifiSififxMi^' W(have drastically reduced our large stocks of lilies' dres:; mnterlals; print-., spuns. silks and crepes, also 1.idles' sloes of English. Du'.ch and American origin. Such houm hold items as sheeta, pillow-cases and blankets we sell aimed without profit We invite you to come and BOO US This U n rcnuine sale, and you have a rare opportunity to DU> 0tl and /*" %  / I'Sm it I* ill /*•/ •/*•THE ROYAL STORE yo. 2 HIGH STREET



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Friday ><>•• HI In-r 2-1 1 9 I • Barbabns FIVE riJiTs „__ __ RED CHINESE TROOPS FALLING BACK Churchill Warns Labour Of Censure Motion In House Over Tanks For Egypt LONDON, Nov. 23 \yiNSTON CHURCHILL ended a scene of up roar in the House of Commons today by warning the Government that he would hold a censure motion over its head unless Parliament had a debate before tanks were sent to Egypt. The Conservative Opposition last night put IB down a censure motion regretting that the G"v eminent was unwilling to suspend export of arms including Centurion tanks to Egypt while the 1936 Anglo Egyptian Treaty was being challenged by the Egyptian Government. Chun-hill lold llM HOUM lO-dgJ le was prepared to withdraw his %  tag Government would endorse tha statatnanl nadn by Ernest Davit*, Forei.cn Undersecretary lust nighl. Thli was thai mi more tanks would So to E*vpt until Fnrein %  <: %  \ In had concluded talk* next week with the Egyptian Fuii'mii Minister. Chun-hill said thai David' statement implied there would be i %  Itul Herbert Morrison disputed this. sayliiK that Davlcs could not promise a debate. Morrison .said he did not rule I,I.' i il.lmte hut the> must wait and see if it was n i C IWr J afta) Bevln had renorted to Parliament. This did not sa'-isfv Churchill n. -tui hil .ensure motion >.mild \T BCLMunaa ran IHIA.%O TALKS %  fq r r m m* wg j Griffiths Supports Fund For The Late IJr. Harold Moody iriom Our Own Corns*] LONDON, Nov. 23. Mr. James Griffiths, Secretary of State for the Colonies. hi* predecessor. Mr. Arthur Cri.-fh JOOCI and the Commissioner in Smiti.East Asia. Malcolm Mat-DonaiJ are among those actively .supporting the appeal (or the raising of a 500 Guinea Fund in order to perpetuate the memoir of Jamaica's famed Dr Harold Moody who died over IhCM yea | ago. A two-fold scheme la lieing Undertaken One ll lo %  tgiue a bronze bust of Di Moo.lv b\ hidistinguished sculptor brother Ronald Moodv and Off Mil it Lo the Headquarters of the London Missionary Societ. with which Moody WM long utr>cMVfl The second part of thi I* the establishment of a prize fund for coloured students from the West Indies and Afn. Thnnhundrod gulut proposed fund would be devoted to the latter purpose A letter in the "London Times" to-day announcing the launching of the fund and nigncd by. among ether* Lord Ammon. Griffiths. Creech Jones and Mar Donald refers to Dr Moody as 'one of the most remarkable men liglous and social life of England .ono of the greatest figure; which the coloured races have provided since the Emancipation" It is recalled that he was the first President of the League of Coloured Peoples and was a beloved physician in Smith-East London Chairman of the appeal fund L* Rev. David A. Vaughan and the Secretary Mr George A. Greenwood .it (ci U IV 'H iw, w JO-.II | Si, i OFF TO CURACAO y-.ters.y •r*tun* bjr B.WI.A via Trinidad lo rlilit Mr. A. dcK. Framptou. Agricultural Adviser to C D and Colonial Attach* St the British Embansy in Washington and CD ...id W Mr J. C. Hotchkiu. Asslatant Adviser for Agricultural fJsunaUon C I lor Dvrlupniriii and W>lfre In the Woal ladle.. Hoiible H. Oarmet Oordoi,. O B E v BUSlon, Mr. Philip Hewitt Myrtng. PaMlr IUII.UMS Adviser. CD as* W.. Mr Bernard Rolfr of the Be. F. L Waicott, M C P iion of tinWest indl i Clerk C D and V. bean Coninuwlon. Mr* •nd W BIT (eoir of Hi Lucia and K uli Wal at ..I. K C M rnWf Of the I Uual of CD tn Taaanj i n Htanographn Comptr>n>i aiibbeau Com Ml M .nd Mi. thai the Opposition. fi>i ,i debate next China's Charges For "Little Assembly" LAKE SUCCESS. Nov. 23 The United Nations Political Committee to-day decided to refer to the "Little Assembly" Nationalist ChlnVi charges of Sovie* aggression against China Voting was 34 in favour, M upIto'-ed and 7 abstentions. During the debate Dr. T F T i.nu:. (hm **><• Nationalist delegate, accused Britain and France of follow a an appeasement policy similar It i.m-ir -land before World War II. "but with much more serious eon%  eouencas." —ReaHei KILLED BY LIGHTNING PORT-OF-SPAI.Y N< Fifty four year old Boodran Ramessar a Warrenvilh was killed by lightning in Wednesday's rainstorm while hai ft and daughter-in law were injured The thi re victims were working in a rice Meld when the storm burst. For the gaco n d time in weeks the Maraeas Hivet •• flowed its hanks destroying crops. Maraeas Village was entirely Isolated for more than two nou Pre... stand would week The uproar started when Churchill asked the Government i" tag* i.ii whj ll i %  changed Its mind suddenly about sending Urdu. MorrhMfi ii i V M amid interruptions from Churchill as he tried t answer There were kuU of 'arder'' '-.I "sit down*" AS the duel tie'weeu the two men developed. The, gctna groM Iroin lha suo> len announcement last night by Foreign Under-Set-rot a i Davks fi %  benturlcfl tanks would be sent to Eg) i IUV til Bevln hea concluded talks next ek with the Egvptifln Foreign Minister Thii .ininiiiiiermem of the reof the Government's pre. %  ious policy wos made after sevral Labour members had thre.itn.r-u i.idlt .in over wlietner the great playwright should be buried among Britain's immortals in Westminster Abbey or whether his ashes should rest In Dublin hi? birthplace It p/H at Shaw's own request tli.it hii last remains wart to bg oisposed of in this way. mingled first with the ashea of his wife. In etottN three of hi* will published to-day he said. "Personally I prefer a garden to a cloister." In clause four of the will which vas also published, Shaw asked that no memorial to him should tnke the form of a cross or uher instrument of torture or \\mbol of blood sacrifice."' And no monument to him should suggest that he accepted 1h it nets of any church because hi religion could not be more tptdri. 'My fJoflmd than .i l.ehever In '•'eative evolution." Shaw's aa h eg were scattered by Dr. C T Probyn who attended the 94-yeor-old dramatist until he died on November 2 HO I "f Shaw's largo fortune, detail! of which have not been published, is expected to go to ,"ivjn,nig hit plans for a new English alphabet of 40 to 44 letters instead of the presant 20 Other benetlciaries are expected tbthe British Museuni. Iht Hoyal Academy of Dramatit An add the Dublin An Gallery. The last Chapter of the Shaw .story began early thi 1 Wyndsam Hyrst. public kargad w^itri looking aft' Shaw's will accompanied by two drove to erefrMlofiurn [forth Lon I v.vo bronae K egaaggfl laavtbad: Gcorga ernard Shaw. ? Nov 1950 and %  Xd Shaw. 12 Sept. 1D41 Mrs. Shaw's %  sskci .,t.'.tit nine mrhiby ffHir IllchOo-* .in iiuli t-i so largOl than that of tier husband His had been made so that It would nt exactly mi top of hers At noon seven persona • On pace 1 Trinidad—Barbados Play To Goalless DraM VISITING LADIES DEFEAT HOMESTERS 4—2 THE iirsi Test In Ihe Intfit* Initial Watt-r Polo wrlea between Trinidad and Barhado opened lust night at the Miirbados Aquatic Club. T*d Games were played The Trinidad Ladie.; defeated the Barbados Ladies four yoals to two. The mens Match was played lo I thrilling goalless draw. This is the third encounter between Trinidad and Barbados at Water Polo As U.N. Prepare For Offensive U.S. Troops 3 Miles From Shattered Chongju TOKYO, Nov. 23 UNITED NATIONS TROOPS swung forward in north west Korea tonight in a move believed to foreshadow renewed offensive towards North Korean and Chinese Communist defences. BiffRer forces were going up after nearly two weeks of atalkiiiR or playing for time. Bui ChiDtM who have been caretulh avoiding battle ...' iirgpOfftad shll withdrawing WMTVPlf BOO* tact u h thg Ullitad NatfOM looked likely In the wan one patrol of Ihe United States 24th Divia.1 ill.... Mill... ,.t ll... ulll'll .1 .K.1-...I i.'v ..I ... Within ; nule.s .'I tinshell bhatlered city of rin n. |u i it) out resiM.uu"' In Hie OHII. American advance oof i held un the \l .! %  .. ."in i. III imiitui in MX mllea %  i.inv III iKi'ii tfaaWrn diive from n d town t Hyeaaniiii. l'iiiti'0 gbrUa in.nini-v 'lie spill between Communists in %  of the Korean Peninsula puhed further up ihe ea'cin slda "f the C hoi al ii jeaervnii tal)^'^• French Reject Four Moiioiis Tin: MMI'IIS ARE mill riCTURED HEREi B W.I A. yesterday tvsolng who arrived from Trinidad by 3 Powers Will ReleiiseSecrets Of The Atom WASHINGTON. Nov 23 Britain, Canada and UW4Jnttao Slates have agreekl to rafoa a some atomic secrets which "wouhl not aid nval nations In the development of the miliim> appll cations of atomic enernv," the United Stales Atomic Energy Commission announced toda>. The 'ii.,i n,..,,:. coejati Uw design, construction and operation of five low power nuclear reactors used for research pui poses. The Commission.; announcement today said Britain had agreed to release details of "gltap the uranium and graphite reacior : %  Harwell, and Canada had agreed to release inforrruition about "seep." the uranium and heav>' water reactor at Chalk Hiver. Ontario. 'I'tiijiinouncoment said: -The Ihn-f (invei nmenta have determined that release of this Information will speed the training of nuclear reactor engineers and ill hasten atomic energy development m these countrie* particularly for peace time applications' Reuter. R£D CHINESE GOING TO US I.HN. N 23 Nine Chineae Cononuntet delegates to the UN left here by alt to-day for New York They had arrivi-i c.nliei from Prague a! Northolt and went straight Irom there to I-nndnti airport to efetetl their Ne-v York A crowd of BOO people MS mati hai % %  iill h en i>i" 11 tloodlight Poi tin Trinliljd I !" Klti i„„ Marlssa PttHanMl Andaraon MM tac the Chandlei > Ph) mi arad 01 %  ami Bernadehe i r*OI B I id) g-al %  ih Tbi Trinidad indies ilthough nuch heavier than their oppnnenti had %  diiii.uit time getting through th Barl II III;... ,.:.: iiitcri Loai I'n Am Brkataln twhu Trieii hii livst DUt the ri.lilci.nl li-.m .'.' %  %  Ii. qucnt and accurate !', m., unfortunate m not scoring more KO*K they misM^i two sHsaOfl DI portunitles which cost then, t|i.i"..uh The men's game, ol was the iiiui.light ..f lha Perl ipi II was the mo ing fame of watai Polo evai %  tan In Karhadus II sft loo rough hnweiii'i. and two I ere i len from the sraiel In the -emnd half due to rough tactics. In Good Form The Trinidad UUM imnrovad sim. ih* lag) i % %  in Bamon ibd Uu local baVt had to try ever> trkch t.. orlng. Baroanl • nd Ami. | „,,! form .nd srere al lyi dangcrouf. The Oarbi ..... out to score Hi ii Ipdaad, tM.k more %  hoii| );i n their rtvab r. Boalkatalng n IJOII, custodians n %  • iii li.i I %  i %  ( TI | %  ( k .h'M irwUin 1.0(1 ,i Is exueeted The ii % %  A iftvvn Rt'fusi' SufHT-Stair Call %  RO, Nov. 23 The nftcon-natioa aati Pai naanl from frag i I e propo %  Thi wai iha kaj vota m lha %  %  %  %  %  of ihe M.I n. n Mftgra u rrenoh .mil itillan mam n of thr %  'United States or i Tnev i %  %  thai in ii It I i. states or certain of than si-., h hai 11 to deal wit I i %  -' ttd Igl P I" 1 Renter. L28 Killed In U.S. Holiday Accident* NEW YORK N Thankaglinni hoUday i idental I i i KM. i, 'Clock n v.oiii.i died in traltk aocldents Anoth-t uroin various < %  i I ..! ir i : %  lal deaths Iota bad IHI ,i racord '<" lha holida) or tin-, numbai II raaallad ir m %  d > from "" luding l Rriitri Trinidad Ladles Bradley. R SaUlcr Silva. B Anders M Pflmi %  P Knaggs A (caaL). .i ii., in. P gftesi page I Britain, i'ruiict* U.S. WML-H UuHbiu WASHING I I t nrM "-ti.ii" i %  % %  .-, %  %  on AusI ,I..I t. in,. retard Andrei I %  I nd Arm i I oi i i %  %  %  trol in tin lo Thi rti %  I eg that Au^triH %  i HI baan unable to • i baan praaai b it inlarvanUoi —Reatri Carpenter Sentenced To Die .lorn Babb. the second mm -i fur at this sitting of the Coui' Ol Grand Sessions to be convicted of the murder of hi" reputed wife, was yesterda fentenced by ITis Honour the Chief Justice. Sir Allan Collymore. to be hanged. T|M victim ttf what was describeo a i a brutal doing to death w.-s Edna Grant with whim Bath had lived for more than two Babb displayed no particular emotion as the foreman of the • or Whs %  trie Chief Justice PCW the death sentence, hut g woman, said to be his si %  who was standing at ol I doors of the courthouse and had to be taken from (*Date of the murder was Ju 1 13 this year and It took %  Bullen's Alley. Dalkeiv at the small house where Bubb a carpenter, and Gram, a maiu %  t the General Hospitil i,w i along With Giant's four children. The child, en were lha ml witnesses of the crime Tlii' egta for the CrOWU was d by Mr K E Plaid, Acting Attorney General llabu raaented by Mr D H. L. Ward. Both Counsel addressed fi.. Juy yesterday morning rVidencc Whin hearing of the case ralumcd yesterday Cpl LnOII %  : of District -A said that on July 13 he was de tailed to assist In can investigations into the death of Edna Grant. He first saw James Babb at Bctttotu Hill Jm l u bIn •*•' %  prison, He was wearing I Ants, a white vest anil | hlor^i ft;, Miem off Babb and rtn to Dr. Walcott that day he was at BuiI ay making a March Ha found %  appeari-ii | |O0d sUunTo Mi (Card H. hatnmar at the bouai C aptain B. Grant, fciparirrtafsalanl • % %  oil that al^.ul 4 a in to !!.General HoSpttal fithi-r postcernen wan thart Ki lold Bab %  _H**1 with i nlrn Hilda Oranl in-^iiefi) said Devonlsh found a pair of sclson Jul> %  ran vai. I • %  that night the) %  p i Bndgeman said that or. %  t %  hou I %  : %  r \ Alias from in a m to i p.m. The ncr came at the rmg the kajgen mi page 5 PARIS, Nov 23 ,. i motion condamn* lha polk] ol lowad % %  riment" •> I I royactod ba Ul Communist moi. ii colling i"i Imrnadtata "%  % %  itlooa a 1th Viet i v in tabled %  i i %  %  ti calllni mi the Oovernmenl %  1.1.1, i, i it laat %  %  %  ni i"iiu v In Ind tjaetod by in %  nit ami pin-i'ommuni identi call m in %  iii-i... .i iiiiiliiio.it I. r i %  • ... %  %  tlnilri "ill Ifumour" In America SAYS SFORZA ROMS, Nov 2 Italian I Carlo si> i Rid lonlgh* thai .. ii.nn anwun iderstainiiible ill hum U loiu.i Stataa" l.ecause Eui ... • c u i hb ocaui I 1 %  rcan aggreasi I t.. M n tai v. .• explai i intatvi #lw the Italian %  I'wapapar "I' the t'onliuvany In tho y \ -R-uler I'll "IIP AnVOCATI' THK NEW* ntng UM EMv or NlgsVi %  sgrTHK ADVOCATE PAVM nil: NHWH .smuh Koraang bniahi Ugbl epaoaltten gnd g<>t withm .i mUai ol Us* ha) ninth-eastern port of Chmimm ,'io miles from Rusata, the .^nmunlst*. war* niwMt %  mssssa •> aoterinined stand inside the snowbound i" it oi ChoiMfjMi which was shell.il mi luestlav by tha Aiuetii.i .II. scr Saint Paul. The lull an the main northwaatarn ri-.i i w linuafl artfvlly i"tii: mi Plrca ( ivalr) patroai adgMliawi after driving Irta mil'' %  rth ol Yongbon. BOtlth Kno HUJIW i %  • item* groups t miles gauth-oaal %  •' Tseehon luither east Othai s ii Koraang m 'he ntrn or %  .•dvaneed • v< ral mltee towards s.i I m mile-, n irii<-we*t of lha t. in %  I q Bana %  ral Hungl Reg Locked in lt.nl. on tha Ift i paraUal 100 mUes LUM bouth Koroan and gueitluo. .oehed n bafllc i.li.i. f Ihe Southett) 17th Regiment were holding i daa p ai ital) to ancfralad • >vtan. only *" iruati north of Seoul. ,i it..i • louM K. ran, Rgalnal i Hacks by IJOO sssuonod North. Hie swift Unltad Nilions advance north. pouring ainllery mil mortar Ara Into thi from the hilli aata pravani iriiitor.'. ri %  M IW I bng up ..ml i non was described a* iintmnblr-" fcmi rleati trai planaa ReMnUad iin' Ninth Karaan brittle area ag Uaiial today. Tha BrtUeh M-okesnum in Tokyo said toflay that massive 52-ton centurion tunks lauded wnih tha 29th Driii'h Brigade afhlCh this moving up to the I front for its nmt test in battle —grater FOR PLEASURABLE SMOKING Satisfying ... Easy on your Throat 1 It ill 111) III ll h 4'tutts 0 ii/tii-fiif Buy a 10s Package now and enjoy the rich flavour of the cigarette for discriminating folk.



PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE Let The Jackals Howl! By MICHAEL V/GGO LONDON, NW. IS r> Show they my, romn the ri. \< after the rctljw ,>f a rhumpton vanes the wolve*. the wiseacre*, ana the |Ms>pic wtw knew it d ll the time. There is a grow-tni. opinion 1 (hi* country Ihut boxing n n> longer a sport And after la., ni Kins ftjht between Bruc. Woodcuc-k and Jack Gardner, for ihe Brllish and Empire rlcavvwfhl litlo. .ouldn'I arce more. B.. | bis; businessman behind the scenes wh. has degraded boxing It la thai funny specimen of humanity wh< calls himaelf a boxing fan—Ui< world's most gullible and easil\ swayed dupe—who Is responsibl' lor the decline, and now the fall or British boxing. I'ntil U*t miiht. I must confess I considered myself a boxing fat Rut Brian WiH>dcock's eyes wen closed, mine were opened HI* awan song wta mine too. Two Men What reolltv happened at Earl's Coun |gg| night'.' Tp understand that we must consider the two men who enacted this sorry drama. On the one hand. Woodtotk MM man uliu had the nation nt hi /eel just two or three years ago and a pa.k of wolves at hi' throat ever since. His spirit wav rpkgn inside the ling, bu Ms critics—and they were a numerous as they were Ill-informed—tormented him at every turn when he wtg Otltsldl They contributed as much Baksi and Savold to his subseQnem ;,r tl l Ignominloui defeat seen tin.man WoodNek stand up to the glnnt Baks %  lthougti he must have been In PfOny '""Hi :i broken Jaw We stiw him fouled—and don't say h wasnt—by Savold In thHr flrsi meeting Hhough I am among th first to admit thai Savold Intended the blow to land several inches higher) And then we s* him lambasting into Bftvt if last June, only to be atopueu when a gash three inches lony appeared over hileft eve Gardner, on the other hand was a raw recruit to boxing; : couple of year.:igo He ]s little nore than that tn-dny although he Is as tough as they come an hand was •pprenen Ivelj MUni his left eye. where the scar lett from his la i encounter witli Savold stood out starkly on an Ugly swelling The result bj ., matter of history. Woodcock, after one last i:rttempt to flatten Gardner in the eleventh round, groped his way to his corner, slumpeU Into the stool and rested h-i weary head in his hands. The choice he had to make was between fighting on in the hove e.i l.iinilng ,i k.o blow on his opponent, or risking his eyesight. His decision was the only one a wise man could make. FRIDAY NOVEMBER 24. lKf 3 Trams Gel Baskrl PITCH PilS'E PICTURE BHOWfl Jack Osrdner. PI Oimrduns recent championship fight Bruce Woodcock reti: Brlti-li mid Empire Heavyweight ili.impion exnaangtng blow* durum A Jack Oirdncr now beconvi Gimblett, Eininetl Score 187 In 125 Min-. BOMBAY, Km n A hectic first wicket partnership %  I 18? In 125 minutes b; /.minelt and Harold Ghnl Jlive Interest in the hnal day of • 'ii.iwn trui'.c-h i > Igfi i imiiwe.iith tourmi team and a jumbby Cricket A Bmn l-oft with 160 minutes piny after ...-inissin,,. Hombay for 317 in the! Ural innings, the C'lTinnonwealth .cored 211 for four srfcfc) ^ei*ond InnJngi (iimblett was out Ibw when anly 1 short of his effltUI but Emmctt went on to make 103 in two and a half hours. Vijay Merchant .Indiu\f tain carried his bat through Bombay's first Inning184 Final scores: Commonwealth 323 and 211 for 4. Bomi... \ '"'ii .117 It .-nlrr HASSETT LEADS AUSTRALIA IN 1ST TEST MEUttirhNK. Nov 23 Undssty rBJtlMt (Vki 37 Is to captain the Australia Test Board of Control announced here to-day Arthur Mo.rl* (New B0Ut| Wales; aged 28 will be vicecaptain. Haasett has played in 24 test matches and captained Australia in South Africa last year He „*, Hradinan's deputy In England in 1MB Morns has played in 19 tests. He captains New South Wales. Is 0P—si n sj bat and is cci.-tdered by many to l** the i. % %  • the world Renter RIFLE SHOOTING rot which %  %  RMUII took pli lowi NO I A Uav. II I'S 35 :t4 all ipt E *1 : M 01 I M .lev t B cta> 1st, Mr p Chase .):• M Uai II ., A Tucfci i 91 4th, l< S i K S V., i wood } 31 PC C CiimbeiUiUh Ml | Hie I Ait. i. at 30li Yds lll'S H li,. %  ft i.t Kilddei (ll.C It was the end—of the fight, but not. unfortunately, ..f the inglorious an.I UiOTOUflhly degraded "sport." which, according u the "experts", somelu." fillip Iran i-t night's fiasco. When il WH over. (lardixi or..il his oiuken mtnitn Into %  Mhl., %  %  % %  ;, .... begrudged htm his mt glory. But if he is a wise man. must surely have looked beond the bevy of photographers 'ho swarmed into the ring to see Wing on in QM other 2nd. Sgl M.ii-t,..ll .11 ( i %  Ml II l-ilUm Phlte 1st, Barbados Regiment NO .'. A Class. 0 Yds II I' %  .in 2nd. Mi T A L Roberts %  ..nnell Kh Mi 1 Q McKli li n ciaaa i |. I'." O SlieplHid LKtfl 3rd, R S.M Marshall .. 4th. Mr. G I NO 12 Mat-i (irlNiUi Cup % %  c .,'• %  Jord ii 2no. Malor 0 K C Wai.o't *•> %  u Mi It. -i ..s 45 i the Major GrllHill Cup. M.io, Cl IC Walcott .iii.i C.i|it..ii .1 li Ji.nl.in lied foi i pteef wuii M poinU. i h II. all IM C • % % %  d..r. won ii YACHT CLUB TENNIS NM I ffaMi .rlt-n's Singles iSenn liiMi-.i ii I D TrimiTiingliani tl—3. li—8, 0—4. ll : I i .: I ;ulic\ .IIIILII-S i-.ni. lisil*) KIIIK beat Mi I !. % %  Ladies Dmibles Mr*, ii. .s. Bancroft D .Wood beat Mrs. F. D I r.ukiiison 0—0. tl—J. TO-DAYS KIXTl:KKS Mt-nS Single* i Semi Final*) <; H Maanli i\ D I K I,-dies' Blnfici IFfaHUStJ 111 HI 'i %  II.-Ladies' Double* ilri MI... L. Miss I. Lcnagnn. Miv I Cos ., %  „: Mi K 1-ena; BBH I) 9 Mixed Doubles Mr. and MrC M S.snelt vs. I Ml H. A. :.. .Inr.) i and Mr .' II I Mr. and !! i 1 p Taylor. Hall Tiuphin %  ognsasive Clul vi niviMon i the I'aibaoos Basnet %  tan lompi ii trophy. ln nnn-mm. of the Association. m vtgl a vote of thanks to wind B|) Hie (unciu.ii lu-fore the presentation, j, comMned team of Harrison College nd V HIT defeated a au nbttkffd tiim of the Island jnd "'—19. I'M HCOH ,|;d 0 Krtn.-lnll .. ; 1 polnti while c;n-.-nidgeand >i e netted C polnti each. Best i l Island and Y.M.C A. • %  • %  R ronte a gnd c. Oitteni 7 •~'AS^'^,'S,',**S.',' r 'Sr r ~X*'^rS>'.'^,'sVn'>+*'>'>****9* ARRIVES A s.upmMil of 157.000 fact of I lumbrr from the Banunu arrivn) nl Barbadoa ye.!•> by the 301-ton moloi^"*^l Pnpclaa. The supply l m i* %  "*• o"lBKl to Man T. Oxides Cram Limilod SEE US FOR.— LUMBER & HARDWARE Vtfiat's on To-day .>bo<.Uni foe the Trn.upetrr Cup ronunues .,, the i ia . ernmeni lun. Kange al It a.m. Court of m Asaeelatlon of cultural 8eeleiies *ponor dUesuslon at 'WakeHeld" en V Ihratrr prejert for Barbados' al 4.45 pjn. The Mobile Cinema gives a BhOV. at M Karn., t..iPaslnre at 7 31 p.m. Through the rouriesy of the British 9 isi S p.m> E. Wind Velerity: 9 mile per hour Raremeter (9 am) 29.844. IS p.m.) 29.750 Request Performance Mrs A. L STUART prestflls her School of Dancing REVUEDEVILLE 1950 Music by Ihe PoUe Band directed by Capl. C F Kaiton. AUCM.MMt. "Bel Ihe clowning of Jos Tudor. Jr. i. the Pmlnun Is ..mrthiiii; of whleh not only the Revuedeville but the whole or Barbados ran be proud. There has rertalnlv net been anything lo rtval It en Ihe Fmplre slase In the past two years OK) IIUNTE, in Ihe Barbados /.deocate. Come and see 1 for yours*'/ 1st December 1950 AT THE EMPIRE THEATRE Mali nee and Night Show Orchestra $1 50. House $1 *0: Balcony 72e: Boxes M SO 1 THI WHOLE TOWN S TALKING ABOUT 9r irieMICO ^K>4> HOUSEHOLD CLEANSER "PENNY TEST" IHY II TODIff—ifcrc'a a quick way to %  %  • ejs.lv 6 nd emcienily i IM MICOchnmrnsgai Dshu l.ulc t III Ml( <.. ii.i jiiiipcMny. nib briskly, and ice h-v* hnllunilv the coin I VM (MM.ll |v,.|,(IH M|. cu ctenns panakun, tint, gUw. im,.. MiMoil. cU.. *,ih cqusl caw I nt V. RI.MH A If. .TO. nn*i-i..>r — nwii.dot TMl COUNTY CHlHICftL CO LTD.. tHIRLIY. aiSHM Water Polo ii".' p-tgr I li HcKlnnon. Vldmi %  P Ch.unilei. Trmlrfad Met J OalcHJti H Snutli. J T.L\. ii... I: (cant I, D Ban an) P I (TSKM Unrbado. .M. n P. Falter, T | %  | Miicl>ean. D Bannister, K [net corner • 0 Fo %  *gfl lliinm-rl WM Ma > A Foster If hi. evewire l.nu .,, b) th-l ll %  "i*od .hsl u glory" of Ihe 0.. ly one soap gives your {^skin ihi> exeiting %  •oii|iiel ( I ONLYA PEW MOftE LEFT! ] v TS^ML' Unbreakable Pats Thi m lealb; '*• mr rue* n-au. of i,fMv iroe nilnlil. and w will o* hi.v* any mo-* f I Im i Ivpe Wl %  •! I" ll l'-l <% al.|l ould surel;. not hnv>been deal .! %  • %  ..; the crowd, who not ten ralnutN %  •rUel eallliig I. r Wciodcock to slaughtei* him But that's Ihe way it goM As Woodcock retire! L nt• > wellearned obscurity. [ woul I l I. %  .i wrong iin|iresslon that Jt legal '. daiU ha* sprtMid. Th..t scetinn of the ciu\nJ greeted Gardner's vlctoi • %  > i lag of "KmHe's a Jolly r : it. DO iloubl. but the llDgail were a group of stulwart Yorkshi rente n who had journeyed from the North to wit news Ihp •Tieetaele The song wa< net tot the new champion, but BBC %  • very thy ex-champion, and it was sung by men Who eun still think straight evon when their hero is vanquished. i i ATtei the games '.ill Iw I dance. tonlghl %  %  uinged; the %  ;\. U.S. WARN SOVIETS WASU1NOTI The United W ll .. %  t Union of "grav< %  1 %  'i ne l,i lie %  % %  Irsl A Kirk, AmerJ' %  -i a.adoi ... %  '. -row Im lote i" II. e Soviet i MtnU.tr>. piutvatiiis, al Soviet Interterence with the Austrian Government'! e.mtrol in the Zone.Kruter. ^They'll Do It Every Time -By Jimmy Harlo .And— Cashmere Bouquet Soap is actually milder than mosl • other leading toilet soaps) Proved by severest lests on oil skin type;! -V/V/V/AV-V/W-WV, I'HF BEST I PICK in I TOWN! %Sm Diadem Shoes n^ For Kids BLACK PATENT LEATHER %  liiev 3 to 6 4 13 7 te I* 44 70 M to I 3 WHITE BUCKSKIN MNU 3 la (1 •• lo 10 S4 .16 II la I MM To Fit Children from 2 to 6 Years Old CAVE SHEPHERD &Co„Ltd. 10. II. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET NOW *f|| 'j PRINTS! PRINTS! WASHABLE AND DURABLE | 43* a yd. IT'S ONLY AT I THAN! IOWISI raici IN HISTORY. Pf Wm Henrv Slraat jfc-ISE LUCKY TO SET A B4RKINS SWCE A MALR MILE BM THE DOOR— HEN you COME OUT-BUT LOADED — AND VO0R HEAP IS THE ONIV OWE IN UME — mm'* a pip.... KfORE .mada Iroai Una labrici in a wlala ranga ol colour! and O)ol>k< n -llh ei.*t- SMII COLA4* %  J4BJ4II MESSRS. C. r. HARRISON & CO., (B'dos) LTD leffll Ai.u JAMES A. LIMC'U A CO.. LTD. --•--.-. %  .'.**-*----'V-*-*-*--i*-->V-'* 1PM*J6 '--.*,-V5--J r. ti. Rice A Co. specialists in high class tailoring Hulton l.mnv Hridyfluu it s**0'*t*'.c**,','-.^oa .<^cfcoc.e.i^oc.n*.<.o*-t. (^M..


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* MCI -IX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY NOVEMBER M lM BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY 3 LOST! i e.3WT! -TMBfcE'S A .*. PELLOW IN A OAT ABOVE. -OLD N*3 TMAT yu ?c sor*c ] -—_—O ^ ^EAfiT/VvE... SOWiONB MUST *VE CUT T* '-B COPE 1 .< — i — f—'J! 50S! WMJT'UU I PO NOW :NDIE BY CHIC YOUNG DOVCU V'N, %  ftp? THE LONE RANGER MAPVUVM QOGLCS WAN'S -v) EM %  I THE TIME--ELU.^E KEEPS ASKING Mf WMV I rXXT —-. WAVE A CAP y BY FRANK STRIKER ^riOSE ARE MEN, HAWKS BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC.MANUS K ( <"^V -to.-**.— GO*/ =8^ •* %  '. AM %  &a*r %  *Avawe>*' 1 I HCAtf A -**** ... rr^POOBABtv A OLen-AB-'jET LP' -47 '. 4rTBJO MY I TIC.. %  WXJ#AC>AU. I %  L *\J2 OUT _J f WLtf ARJMUAB--.•PlrJTlN'--e U tT W ft 6OT TOOK / %  ; TV* PI?*MB 1 %  RIP KfRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND / E.1N N8..AfO SAMS . g %  ; Efrm -y BES\-'^,. sis -a*TS A^V A'-PTS C€A": S-.SN?1 gf...: THE PHANTOM --•ESS *CC*RN ADSfi*S... PVCC33AP-S... a Bui TW 6 One is English, one American Teeth L00S8 Gums Bleed yet their Beauty Care is the same Tsr '''••. &f •*' I U MM HUN < (M)l'l R. %  -,/, .,.., <*b u ,* M fW', /I M nm&v -w**VrfW t.tal (W. 1 rr !" Mm, Ami fv my ,m*i/*.m. E NOI.lt.il UK AHIRICAM—*xl\". lowUa women u*r Ihe umr IJPBUIS urf ttltj "" Pond'i, and ii i* ihank* m Ptawl't MO I IW 'ii|lrxi<>ti* k<*p •<• niduiuh lovrly alwa>s. Why not In I'OIMI". keep K>W *km lrteh, WO? I .i-i\ iiiglil, brfiT )T*ii go U) brd. flranw ihr Ain ili'iroughlyofdirt and ulr makr-uo with dHiumful Pood*t Gold OeMfcTBta-rlMe''will mon Cold ntctJ^oAncw III llir niitriiiiif, (irfnrr piillmR Ofl JTOUI mkr-nj>. iin-i'li in .1 thin lilni ol Pood'l VwMthlnf OrMBL It BMka JII ideal powder \ue bCCMIM it hotdi ( % %  Mit'-| mall tor lloun. ll proleiu ihr ".kin, too. i iI'ni'i!'" bnM) ttn nsttdatT) ind In J dion uhileyouiMll MMBM Ihiii yourtUi i* 11 %  .im-iihrr. Ii will glow with new radiance, new POOd*! I mm are innpemive 10 buy. i'i the\ .tie uaed by vnietv'r loV tB aM women on I., of the Atlantic. Vou can buy Pnd' at all the br*l be.iiitv counien. / MKS (HHMIIIs \\M)IHBIIT, 3. ftint-mux want \n Yurkf ir cw nf Iht man< WOVQ -.,i.wi t*nr /Wi. )"• tmii') M /!-<. %  a-vtiArrr !*. r\.Wi C-U r .. ... N/. .W-. C--JrtWf "ft lr*t '* %  a rifwnaf/v 10/1 o.l inmlA (iJmr — frriAf i it/i a b: >w% glov ul mbi*' la Ihr ihrttt" Amosan for Prvrrlie*—Trench k'3' *• KIDNEY TROUBLE Here's a nwdfCJM —rf l special/y for it II you anspect that thare'i "onelhing wrong with foor kidney* it gtoHaJlUIMHI thai they need a oa iie co w maflVtPa Neglected aadaera (in riae to venous diatreaaing symptoDaa such aa bwekaeba, rheamabc paiDB, lumbago, aciAtica, bladdar diaordera with a caJdioa; and baxniog. The trouble atarta wfaeo the kidneya grow alnggiab and fail to perf orai their natural (unction ot helpcoa; to fihnr awmy hArmfo) Unporttkai hrOB the ayatejn. Yoa oao reatore tbeac vitaJ organa to normal actiTTty b tahana; De Witt*a Pill*. I They act directly on the kidneys and yoa wil vary quickly reel the e qual t aw/ are doing. Try them for your trouble. Go to your cheanat and POND'S OUR GUARANTiE De Witt'a Pilla manutadured under atiictrr bygjenar conditions and UV ingredients coo(orm to rigid vandarda of purity D^/VITT'S PILLS If* d'-Y *"d Bladder Troubki BLUNDELL'S PREPARED owes WITH A 0000 £IL.0M^ tMtNil0t fOAOVTSPIVM II „Mlullt .1 ya.r j.iir.i ....nil JAMES A. LYNCH >f : -every hour of the day '-""'tin,mill •THAT hopolcai Lellrs thai you're lo.. *t*k. 'not up in It' any loaf* umpl) meani that you've been askirtg loo mu.ri out ol aaoitaV, Yourbody ustaoit of luuo-Ki'tuI >uekp(i><;ua and piolcio. TlMuet ttreriKthcnoat To pal you riahi. vou need a course of 'Sanalogcn' Ner>c lorn, PoOdi 'Siiulufru' combines thaai tro greal bodybuild inn foods— phosphorus and protein —in their orginic li-rra. an thai the* are quickly absorbed into your ivsUan. Day by day tloitous neo tic.ilrh. >i>uia and vHality Dosr (hrouth your whuk i your atrennh and ^elf-cxnAdeiKe come back I Star! on a uturse of 'Sanaioiteo' uaday. On /il _-..f > 'SAXATO2-:x' M "::; iniKa and tlrugglm t TOMC OUU rcslorci health, ym.h .u< %  %  i DUNLOP FORT CAR TYRES WsafJB evr>r>-nnn elao ia hot ajirl bothere• : "u'll enjoy our cher specials Stop in tonight j THE GREEN DRAGON <>pi.n tan i. MiihwKhi No I BtOAD STREET Tor Iwmlliu DUI UK. DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD. (ICKSTEIN BROS.) ATTE.XTiO.XU FACTORY >IA\ YI.M.S Take Uik opponnalty of obtaining your requirementIn :— GALVANISED & STEAM f'PE Ranihsi from % in. upward* MILD STEEL I hit*. Rnnnds. Sqnares In all Siiea BOLTS & NUTS—All Size. FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill At PR1CFS that cannot be repeated. #** BARBADOS MH'.XDRY Ltd. "Ill 11 PARK ROAD. ST. MICHAEL



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I'Rin\V NOVEMBER U 19511 ADVf't ATI CLASSIFIED ADS. PAC.F SKVfcN TELEPHONE 250B DIED NeaYTOaaj i i 1-1 %  ( .f Hon*e '. DNnmi RoeO it 4 IS ui U II. j.r,.i,-trr> %  to atlrneV Mr. fallH P**l" Pi ** %  >, Om -i IN MKMOK1AN •jtu gren>e Oral y*i 41 nonw in all your *m> p*llal IUMIIB; .aid kind. '*•! •• %  behind A, lean In Jeee far (rum Ihee Thy K.iMlrM .ntl their grave* me be Bui thine M iltU a DlMN >leeu. Pram which mmr ever -e to weep M. Maggie Goodlnc Mi. Kathle**' IWd.tr.. Mr. ... I %  Item'. Meiu.. EuruMa. 'grand ihildTrinidad -..d UK* HM Cap FOB SAfJt AUTOMOTIVE AUTO CYCLE Nev. HIKIXHI Auln Crete, excellent tondltior. or UNTM. IIM.C* Apply Evan Ri Ol a. %  M rirJold SI S3 11.V—1„ Apply A J f>* Phone VAN On* Ul I H.P. Ford Van. good condition. going cheap. Dial Bclgrave 30t3. Putlt> OakerM. Ltd It 11 0—gn ELBCIUCAL MOTOR One -It OF. ', HP ftlngL fha.e Electric Motor, never ueed. In irlglr.al package Phone SMI IWI.it. I.OC a.m. or alter J.W p.m LIVESTOCK COWS Four i' Milch Cowa. Two 111 I,elfin Onr Pur* bred Hol.latn Cow eight month, in call, on* Grade MuUlFln Cow eta month. In calf fu> brad Prtaatan bull Burgute llilarlou. at Central Llvntock nation. Ull giving IS 1.1. of milk par day. one heifer 11 monUia old progeny of the Canadian Hol.teln bull Hernua. Kork Dundo. Caw Hlll. It Michael UlLSO : %  •HSCfcLLANbOUS UOIJl JEWELLERY Conei.ting of warting*. U* pic, brooch*., necklace*, pmdanla. All new good. EacvlWnt Xma. Olfta. S*a Your Jeweller.. V. Da Lima Co. Lad , Broad Ktrrvt BHdawtown. s n HAMS 71 mu p*r lb. Currant. M eU par lb Balain 40 ct. prr It. C lleibert. U Tudor It. DM) MM IJIlOU-Jn I'AKASni B..ph. Salary a*cordlnd to abUlty. Minimum KJMM par annum pin' '" %  '" 1IJ-I2.. MISCETJ.ANEOUS %  OXBI — All lilnda 0* Card Board Boa 4> othar than cetruafa'ad card FOR HfcVr IIOl'SES SCRAP GOLD AND OLD GOLD Jf.ftTl.llHY BClUOHT. hIBhert price* Ptld. Ba* your lawallar.. Y Da lima Co. LM.. . Droad Str'et BrtddeW1LLING TO PURCHASE Good J Weak In Maho*-ny. Cedar. Birch ar* Pint at KaJph Beatrd'a Show Hoom. V.-rdond All*.-. Phone a3,, __ PInxir NOTICES NOTK 1 %  RAMBLEY. Waaaahwd Gap. St Mlchael Floaa NovetiuWt l.t. fully fum' latkad raatdia x i. For partiruUr.. Phone "•A H10 50 tin LYNSTED Navy Garden* 1 Bad rooma. Baavanta room. Odrmge, Modarr r-MivaaaBicii. Kitchen Garden, Flowe. Oaiden. Fruit Treat Lawn Anply 1 Mr. O Teorr-I Talaptana SST II 11 SO t : %  -VAIUB" WatctM* Road St Michael Newly built bunaalow. containmr open verandah, dialing, dmlng 1 h a d rtto—a wltn running water. bullt-iTi peoaaaa. kitchenette wl|h built-in cup hwrda. E la a tHc light !" i waVr. W C and Bath aarvanti room, aarage pea' % % %  "• lat December DUI *aWI R Archer McKanai*. Victoria Btieit BUM-In Bt'ILDING neat (.> Ramdli.. Roeb.ick street. aullable rnr Bond or Oar__. Apply Jamea Jonea. Gloria'. Roabuck Street 14 II So In IMHIH S\% I -S AUCTION' II v__Uu .tructlon %  of the Agent, of the iMTED RHITUCH IWUTIANCT. CO. I *1 _" %  %  COLE'S OARAGE. BAY STREET ,.11 FRIDAY path, at 1 pjn. 1 Hllkmaii Saloon Car with good tyre. and In working order, dpfiiagrd 111 aaM> Igflt T1RMS CASH R ARCHER McKENZIE I IPIIIT The llfammid Hum,., id WIIX SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLAND STEAMSHIP CO. Balling from Antwerp Butteirdam and Sailing Ui Trinidad, La O Icao ate ... %  'iin/T tin 1 %  > PAHNSITM 'ORANJKMTADfth Noveenbee November ad. Panmanb*. EuTAaWAI lib Sailing to Madeira. Faymoutfc. AM*rp. and Anuterdam, m I STAC ITth Novembw and Aiube Data of aeparture nffl 1notified The M V MoneauV' will w •wt Cargo and Pa 111 n ^t r. hi i>ominWa Antigua Matataiiia Nevt. % %  .1 at Kilt. taiUtig Frtav Mm B.W I BttMUNRB OWNSia AsatMTATION lad. Canadian National Steamships ••in TSaKlt.'MD • "If these people ate w-il-linig from another woild you Wfauldn't like Iliem lo see UB in our last years hats and costumes, would you. dear?' London Baptrai SfTvl H'HIMI CANADIAN CHAUJaNOB l-ADY RODfTEY t-ADY NTEaVON LADY KOUNTY .. I*li\ NaXBON .. Sail. Montreal 13 Nev Sail. Ha.if*. n Nay 1 Da* Bo* Ion Arrtvaa Ball* Barbadoe Baibadoe I Da* 1 Dae 4 Dee 1) Daw 14 Dae. 1 Dec al Dec i\ Doc. If Jan Jen m Jen. 11 9 P I MiaiBBOl Nil -ADY NaaLBON -HY RODNEY I ADY NBJKJN IAIIY HontntY I-ADY NDAON mber the apot Upr-tt* Road on Tueedav neat the *th Noyember al 1 o'clock, On* llouw i>„tit of ptrai |n ,..,, juoa .„„ II ha. Gallery. Drawirut and Boom.. 2 bedniom Kitche'i. nd it****" nanj arttta* la enc-io.ed Ka Kan lie. It ha. FJectncie P* tailed •m It can be h %  > %  (/-..I-: 1 % %  %  1 The land in be rented *> DAiry A Scott. *4 J SO -an UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER ON Tuewlay Uth by order of Mi 1 A HutChlnDM we will Bell her Fin ''""'• %  Avalon Flal f Collymnr Dining Table W-ggon Liquor C- Arm. Upright and Mum* Chair. C'hm Cabinet Ornament Table*. Book.hel. Al. in Mahogany Card Table. Gl.a and China, plated and Bragg War*; DfearMr, Teui.it Birakfoat BfrVim tn>al Doullon Warei Frlgldalre .good forking order 1: Cedar Machine Table Plaited Graa. Mai Phlleo 7 Tube H-li.> Clock Hooka, Simmon, and Iron single Bed-tead. SprliaT. and M.ltieeae Cedar and Mahogan. JTeaaea: Mabog Dreating Table. Screen. Pine Linen Pie... Kitchen Table.. Larder Ware Preae Cano.i Oaa Stove and Oven inarw). 2 Buinrr (in. Range Electric Iron rnd Toa.tee. Kitchen Ulen.ll W-Ui Baaln aim Filtinga and olfnr BKANKER. TROTMAN" % CO? ABrtloncera I mln I lir 11 i.in ur ul II.IIIMIM:I AI'CTION SALE Uture which -m 1 • %  .!. Btr-.l.. Hu-h Wmdvenlure: Commons ReBKYW CHURCHILL WARNS Jury Verdict Death by misadventure was the verdict returned by u nine man JUT] in the Inquiry into the circumstances surrounding Uiv death of 25-year-old Pauline Grccnidgc a dressmaker of South District. St. George Thv inquiry wag held by Mr. C. L. C. Walwyn and was concluded yesterday. Pauline Greonidge tlied Oft November 17 after she was involved in an accident along South District Road with the motor lorry M— 269 which was driven l>y Harcourt King of Porey apring. St Thomas. She died on the spot. Harcourt King, 38. yi-aie old was said to have been driving for the put 15 years. Dr Wiird said thai he exnmined King about 1.30 pjn. the Mnu day of the accident. King complained to him of having 11 "black out." Evidence was also taken from Rev and Mrs Broomes who said Ihsa were passing and saw the KcMeot They ilopBed Ihefa CBJ an.l Mrs. Broomes — who is a member of the St John Ambulance Brigade — tried u< help but the woman was already dead. Rocket 1 UplmUlered Mali*,. >i Camera. Bonk Binvr. r lntad tlinir... tai.t Ma hog C-..II, painted prc.ae.. HHBnl ..,.,r.ng. At Mat ..h Matlreew. lab lea. Lkquo Elect rar Stove. P lav. Several palnlni table, a m.in. Hi Coolera tor. Olaae Jar^ larder. Florence Stove Oven. Lot of Cutlery. Glaaa Ware. Unena. Klltei.. AAimlnlum Saucepans Plata, a Dlahe*. and aeveral other Hem. loo numerou. to mention Termi Caah D'Arcy A Scott. Auclioncer 24 11 S0-ln. BRITON ARRESTED IN E. GERMANY HKRUN. Nov. 23 A Bl-.tisli national Dr Anhi r Apfel has been nrrested bv Ei-' German "peoples pollc. %  is being held by the East Belli'; police. West German News Aen_ cy DP A. reported to-night. Earlier to-d> \„h;nl I. M reported missing —Re tiler U> kind permlulon of Meaar*. Cnli AC Ltd 1 will ell -1 their garagi TO-DAY al 3 o'clock ONE V-B FOR SAa/KXN CAR with S\-e new tyrp. and in good working order. TERMS CABH Dial SHI R Aichrr Mr Kentle 1SII.90—4n REAI> ESTATE RUOBV lOth Avenue frrm rine Boadi. Belleville, •landing on 2 Til eauare feel containing clo ed gallery, d dining roomi. 1 bednmin. runveniri'ice*. Servant, room In yard. Inrpeclton 10 am and S p.m. lo 430 pan on on application to Mr. Robli The properly will be aet by public Competition at Jrme. Street. Brldgeton. lit December lflto at I p.m YXARWOOD . ,Jivd h.1.1.. It Michael ,1 land aneived up lo Kuturdiv Lkar ln> hv the Headma.ler and muitb. artom! prnlad by bapllamal cerUflcalea and leatlmnriUla Applicallona for a vacant Prvant SchoUr.l,ip wnafcla .1 lnAllay tie School, will b* received by the He-dnia.ter up to Saturday Dec. and. !*4A Papllunal Certificate. and tertirno. Z£U2£ ""*t> !" y -ppUcalto... aM candidate. lnll M preaenl themeelve. t. %  he Meadmaiter on Monday Dec 4tfi at t a.m. lor EKamlnatlon .. I B II Bn C lo -1 rig to BualnM* from Thureday Etrd through Sunday SOth re-openlng Monday ITth J B Clarke mi M -sn NOTICE Application, for two vacant Vc-trv Scholarship* .Bov.i tenable at the Alleyr* School, will be received bv the iimjerilgned up to Friday. December lat Applicant %  muit be >ona of Piriehionfi %  in tiailened circumalaiice. Applir >linnr mutt be accompanied by a Birth Ccrtiftcale Applicant. mud preaenl iremar-l.e. to the Headma.ler at the Allavne School on Monda> Decamtoar tlh al OSO a.m. to lake the entrance •a am Mat! on C. A. BKD.NEB. Veetry Carrh. %  L Andrew li.ll IT. •Ttn OABOEN IIOUBE" late realden.e of Hon R. Challenot. with 5 acre. 4 perche. of Land alluale al Country flood Bridgetown The dwelling houae containapaclou. Drawing and Dining ftooma. Bitting rooma, Bre.kfaal room. Pantny and Kitchen on Main Boor. • BatoOM, I I .IM %  >! %  %  and barge vetandah up.ialr Oovernment water and electtieiiv throughout. ^rvant. room., garage* .tableetc M yard. Tannn Laam and beautiful gardana IneperUon al any time on eppllcauon y> th* ^,. %  -laker o Ul* raraealeee. This proparty la wllhln S minuter wan, from Broad Sweet Offert in arrttlr.g to be eant to the U ndar.Ujb.d WOOD „ ^yc, S.I1.1 sot Jame. SlreeIIII % %  IBS )3 |jg aqua re feel Of land Mlualed at tlVaarnaan part of Ihe land, of '*"'' ley" near Schmltta Date on Friday Siin Nnvember :M0 at 7 p m at our onV*. L.icaa Btmet ^ MaiaTOK m gtALY. HUM-an NOTICE HOURS On* Board and altlti hntaaa 1 1 M • 1 wallaba ehlngie. roof In good condition Appl> M Cuirh and Tucker 1 r-me J !" aM B| 1 %  in-'i or in" 11 11 n Appllcatlnna 1 accompanied bv bap li.mal certlflcalaai w'll be received at my office up to a Of pm on Friday 1-t December. ISM for on* or more vacant Chn.t Church Veetry r.hlbitlon. tenable al ihe Boy* Foundation School. C.ndldaiea mu.t be aom of parl/t> loner. In 11 r aliened clrcunutonoaa. and muet not be Ltaa than nine yeeeor more than twelve year, of age on the dnt* of th* examination (arulldalr. nml preaenl themaelve. lot eaamlnatlon. to the headmarter . n School on Friday. ath December. 1*00 at IM a m Application lurma rouat be obtained from my ofBce. WOOD OODDABD. Clerk to Th* Ve Irj Oriel Church ailW-Oa PROPERTY al Boebucli Street, oppoaiti th* Coca Cola Factory, two atorled h.lldin.. >"• hou^ae contain. OaaUOJTI Drawing room, a badrooma Pf ' !" down rUir. ahop. dining niom^llchen. toilet and bath, .tending on I.Ue -1 fi of land. Apply to Jame. Jo"" '•' Street *4 II aO Jr%  >i:nso\.ti. REAL ESTATE JOHN M. Kl 1BOS A F S r.T A. Formerly Dlson A Bladon FOR SALE Sunday Threat UJNDON. HOT 23 The Mouse i>t Coniinoiis t< lii it-intived any threat to tin iipenlng un Sundays of next veai' 12 25.000.000 festival of Britain By 3t>4 vules |o 1-8 K rejected .1 notion put forward by d group of ConservaUves wfking to ban Sunday's opening on religion grounds. As it u... .1 mallei %  rWSaBcsence, ConservaUve lead>i allowed their supporters to vote as they pleased Some voted foi Sunday opening, others .(gains' The Commons then wilh.n.t 1 vole gave. 41 second rending agree ing In principle to a Bill p*0 livting the organisers of the Ft %  tlval against being sued by a "common informer" under Sarventeenth or Eighteenth Century legislation baniung cert.un gmusfin.-ills OB the Sabbath a, Ironi BBJ| SHAW'S ASHfS f> from pace 1 %  UH-I m the sittin B roon of Shaw > I.IIIM" would try to arrange a day next week to dtbau* U The motion regret, that tht Government is "tin willing to suspend the export of arms uuliMing Centurion Links U> Egypt whelhu as a result of previous eonlne K 'i OtherWaM while Ihi .-f IW:il. i< hem:; ehallengetl by the Egvpti.in (,..\ernment .,!,, %  %  1 kWn merit OOULfJ I I were tinne* raots which made H oaVaUvtM it-poucj between tinafternoon statement 0. Defai Minister Emanuel Sim 1 1 Links WOUld go and the < VOflinj sLittnu-nl bj DSraiM th it the, would not for the present. Morrison said he t h o u g h t I'hurchlll was exiiggefiiting these nil rerj much Morrison accused Chun hill ,,( MJJUJ piovoeatite. and apiws.leit 10 htm to urge hi^ followers to give the Government a hewing ( hurt-lull addressing the ConSS said It was nmi • %  m tin ri %  of the o PI Kiti„, ihi, Miirrison should be fully heard than that he should he -1 1 Morrison then said that Shlnel| had given nssunn %  1 My thai nothing woui.i hsapptn overnight and Uavien had said no tank-. WOUM lie shi|i|X'il bo I'rvul until lU-vin had leportetl to the I'Minmoni,n Ihe talks To that undertaking 1 adhete mi U-h.ill o| the Covernnient" l"e kted Hent'huiihill broke in ..gam to say that Davies had m.iilie.l that UM Cxvernment would all.w detiate. The irate Mm 1 i-oii leplled: "I am not repudiating what Davies said. A statement will be made. (By Mr. Bevinl. There will be exchanges across the floor and the House will consider it." Finally Churchill said: "To conclude this matter our moUou will remain on paper, and we shall discuss the iiuestlon whether we shall ask for a day next week Rente. 2 CHARGES DISMISSED Two cases brought by tne police charging Huperi Nigntlngalo of Tank Hall with refusing to pay i tare wtula iraveUliai oo raotrg btifi ami ladjif totojageni li.itgunge In the same Im m ciamiased without prejudice In liis Worship Mr A J II llan-thell yosterday. Sgi l>. Kordv who prosecuted] in both casegave notice of anneal 11 Hie ia.-. f terming lo pat tinI legal fare. The ofTencea were! allegwl to haw U-.'n cOmmilled| OP November \f> GARDINER AUSTIN A CO> LTD. Agnta. t IK. ti.t. riLt>iN.vii v>rioi 1: (French Line) SS. "OASCOGNE" Sailing to Tritddad 4 Fr. Guiana November 8th. 1950. SS. "GASCOGNE" Sailing to PLYMOUTH LE HAVRE via Martinique and Guadeloupe NovemUr 14th, 1950. SS -COLOMBIE'' Sailing lo Trinidad. U Guayra. Curacao. Cartagena and Jamaica December tXh, 1930 SS "COLOMBIE" Mailing to PLYMOUTH A LE HAVRE via Martinique and Guadeloupe December ITth. 1930 AU ships accepting Passengers, Cargo and Mali. SS "GASCOGNE First Class Passages Only. SS. "COLOMBIE" Flist. Cabin and Tourist Clan Passages. For further particulars apply to R. M. JONES & CO.. LTD.-Agents. FYFFES LINE LA TOURISTA VENEZOLAJNOS TF.NEMOS ARTKXOS ORIENTAL OE LA INDIA CHINA EGYPT0 B. I'RINt IFAI, FSTABLI-;IIMIIMI) EN Stll \l Mi: THANI HNOS Pr \\ m llrnr* HI I1UI 3I6G KAKHAKos ItflVs i||H. WA.\rt: IO III M In lln.lr ,(.,,,, \ ftulltling u Iuhie for iwe as a hoi's (I IB Kr-pl. lu I'ullre II. .,(,,,,.1. 1 HARDWARE ITEMS lh.-l Aarl'.IUral Eeri.. • %  Hl.rg II.a., ratal. -l\lll*: i R Varletr ef Star* a*0 t'alaara 11-... 11. |.> I .......11.a War., llltn • a.. Oal.ahli.g tt-.h.!. ..„ Shr.U SM T. ... COZIER & CO. >.-.'.*,','.*j"X.*,'. '. ^aQaCaVfjaSaaaX^ V 1 .•.%  1 .-,..... The publk are hereby eimel againrt giving credit to mj wife IEDNA I'DTKIjat niee Edna Wllklnaore a. I do Ml hold rroaelr rarapondbltor peer anyone elae rontracUrai an debt a wrlll'n nr<4 xgned by in* -DCXIE5 laaSffB, St MIcLae'. Ewll.tS Bj (arrlagaway Appro* Im air i\ 14.000 *)!.,. tr feel Thi. wh\ bull) property goM %  J ailer? large lenmge. ^[ and k 11 %  IMIMAIKA -Dg Na. Oardan. A'' impoelng property Driveway ItanHed try mahogany Iree. 1 reception 6 bedroom., I.IKIF. pantrv. large ver,.n.i TOWER UARAfiE St Madhl*. L.p A. %  ultable for a aatga purpoer. apart Horn a garage OHRNADA. P W I A beautiful and -ell found rountry hom. containing 1 reception S bed REAL ESTATE AtiENT \1 l I I11M I K FLANTATION8 BtTTLIHNfi Fhoae MM /'< un I 1,nil, . FURNISHERS will lor.' Ihi, nmianu T<, Wardrobei.itli i 11 1 ral %  • Waahataii'lNtah. Bed a. Cradle. en and fane 1. China Ki'.hi .'abliieU. LanHr .1 bfgaaa n ~ eilhoul Mirror. Ui simpler Di Waggon. 1.11)111.1 Monla and other Bulte. am •rii.i-te l'lTt Berg.rr llerlm ind Tub Chair... rW*e>. am s.".r** -SI-IIITMII. B<-ik Caaoi 11. pi L. S.WILSON rO-DAr.S NEWS HASH H1.1n-.ll 1/tKS i'i .ii 1'hologfgpba and apeeltleaUOIIB of all tile 1.1..1 modeb In .imvolume In 7/OOLD LEAF 11 nil rrpH PLATES. Me, Mini AGAIN JOHNSONS STATIONERY and HAHDWARE SOMETHING NEW Srulrh Oatmeal Bread —lCe per loaf Hrotrh Oatmeal HlsrulU —3/per IB ALSO Whole Wheat Bread I2e. per laf PIHITY II \l-.f lill '. LTD. 131 & 152 ROEHIH K ST DUI 3ZM. 19S3. 4SZS TS.S QOLFTTO will be Bailing lo the United Kingdom on 6th iH>cernber. 1950 and 17th January, 1951. ShtMill has some accommodation available for 1st CIHSS Passengers. 1 SS <;oi.KIT() will be sailing, for Trinidad on gtftth November. 1950 and 6th January, 1951. roi Further mfurmation apply to: WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. AGENTS CIIKIST.MVS IS PAST APPROACHINC. %  11.1 we linvi. — XMAS CRACKERS. XMAS TREES, TOYS. Come in early and select yours. run 1 i:\1n\1. iMiumn n (CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprtolon) Cornm of Broad and Tudor StrMla. NOTICE Ol'lt II STOMKRHaie asked lo note that effective imm< dialely m have decided to clot.down VAV-V/'.W,V>V) %  > e "H Us ^ CHARLES McENEARNEY & CO. LTD. 11—< u O O B EVERY WOMAN KNOWS Hi r final appeumnee ran be made or marred by the Shoes she wears. WILLIAM FOGARTT LTD. Has in 1 MI 1 IM ii u new shipment of LADIES' DRESS SHOES Planera lakM, Backirv. a T.irs,. with High Be**, \ in Brown, Black, Blue Sued. While Nu-buck mil Reptile Call While Bii-buck Iriinmed with Brown Replile in Court St>le with Spike Heell. Prices ranging Ironi SI 1.57 to $14.40 per pr. im fit i HI. tit. xi.tr gaT" They're the Shon you have b#en waiting for. Call Karl, at . WILLIAM FOGARH LTD. The House ol Fine Footwear