Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text



Sanday Price:

November 12
19350

Sunday

HOME OF THE G









URKAS INVA









French
Evacuate |

Another Post

SAIGON, Nov. 1i.
French troops yesterday evacu-
ated a post 11 miles northwest of
the Indochinese town of Moncay
on the Chinese Border, near the

}Commanding General of the
‘United States 24th Division, said
\earlier that he saw no need to
}occupy the town as it has been
“virtually levelled”. by repeated
air bombardment.

He pointed out that patrols hac/ wre g ¢ BETHELL'S FIRST FLIGHT
to give Mr. Betbell his first win of the Meet.
and ridden by Yvenet was second.

Sun Queen. Oateake

been east and west of Pakchon
and found no entry.

South Koreans crossed Taet-



yong river and cut the Kasan-
Pakchon road.

1
They engaged Communist French Red
forces, estimated at Battalion i .
strength, but they had the situa- Ch ief Leaves



(Lytchman up) wins the St. James Handicap
Miss Friendship, also owned by Mr. Bethell

police

The note, referring to the Com-
munist-led cost of living demon- |
strations and strikes on October 4,
and 5, protested against the re-
fusal last month by the Soviet

authorities in Austria to ae |
|
|

— ee - Sethian ee ne ey «
: WRILLIANT FINISH a | R - l i
U.N. Forces Push | . es . ival Governmenis
e ~
On Past Wonnt Operate In Nepal
After Week Long Lull
TOKYO, November 11 See aan RAXAUL, on the Nepalese border, Nov. 11
, November 11. H ds ff [NVADING Nepalese Congress forces struck
UNITED NATIONS forces pressing across rug- an O simultaneously at nine different points in Nepal
ged hill country in their new offensive today Austrian territory today. Their objective was believed to
by-passed bomb-battered Pakchon in Northwest 5, al be the Nepalese capital, Khatmandu.
Korea and reached beyond Wonni, about 19 miles Police |
farther west. The private armed forces of the Nepalese
After a week-long lull, American, British, Australian, and British Tell Reds Congress entered Birgan) - Nepal today and set
South Korean troops jumped off this morning from the up parallel Government States.
Chongchon river -bridgehead towards the Manchurian te siete LONDON, Nov, 11, s st
Border. Pakchon is about 8 miles north of the river. Mean- Navies ‘Sonn ee ee ___ The Nationalist Nepalese Congress supports the deposed
while, British and Australian troops established a road yerterdhy Gite’ Fassia 6 tell her King Tribvuvan, who took refuge four days ago in the
~ block about one mile south of Twon. i ‘Indian Embassy in Khatmandu, the capital of Nepal, and
mt —————-. Major-General John H. Church, rom interfering with Austrian who arrived in India to-day.

The Nepalese Government has officially told India that
King Tribyuvan's three-year-old grandson has been install-
ed as King of Nepal.

hisnaieiladapainide seinlentieteanatonpars 4 The Nepalese Congress yester-

day distributed leaflets calling on

ruling aristocracy and establish a

in the Allied R d Chi their, compatriots to “liberate the
Vienna to discuss the | e Inese country from the shackles of the

behaviour of the Soviet occupation
authorities

during wtrikes,
The British note said: His |

Majesty's Government protest

Ur S If Peoples’ Government with King
ge e | Tribvuvan as constitutiona}) mon-

arch.”

boy a sees he Soviet | Government They pledged themselves to

in Austria of their |

“sacrifice their lives” to protect







































































3rown, denied that there were any
communists am6éng West Indian
students in London.

Mr. Brown, :a former secretary
of the W.I, Students Union in
London, was replying tq charges
made locally by Jamaicans re-
‘urning from Britain—inciuding
His Lordsh’p the Rt. Rev, P. W.
Gibson, Bishop of Kingston, that
zommunism was rampant among
West Indian students in London.

“It is quite a wrong statement
for anyone to say that Communism
s rampant among the students in
London,” Mr. Brown said. “We
have no time for Communism. We
have other problems on our
hands.”

He said that among students
he had known in London, he was
aware of only a single case in
which a Communist had entered

QRT'E'S HEADLINE

new system of wage contracts.

A call was issued by three |
Communist and two non-Commx- |
nist Trade Union Organisations |
in negotiations with Government!
and employers. |

The Union§ ‘also decided to tell
the Minister in Alboa that they
could not go beyond concessions
they had already made.

Italy’s labour troubles were
expected to flare up afresh with
unions representing all shades of |
political opinion working in}





concert for the first time. |
—Reuter. ws.



PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 11
Armed police were combing the
thickly wooded Valencia
around Arima
hunting for a shot-gun carrying
villager who ran amok on Friday

which skirts the forest.
The killed were Nathan Lubin,
38-year old peasant,
year-old wife Rose and another
woman Jainab
was discovered on Saturday, 24
after she had
after fleeing from the gunman
The bodies of Nathan and Rose
avere discovered
garden with Nathan’s hand still
grasping his hoe. Jainab’s body
was found 150 yards from her
home riddled with

Near the end of the day’s racing,
ihe Band reminded those who had
won, those who had lost, and
those who had risked nothing to
‘Enjoy Yourself”, it’s Later Than
You Think.”

Details on Page 4

Don't forget your Gues#
can win $5.00,
Sce Monday's Advocate,



{States had formulated a “masts
The United states Governmen:, |

j world commitments and resources s. |



Delegates Will Boycott
Monday’s Peace Congress _





Gulf of Tonking. tion “well under control” a spokes- e e attempt to institute uniliteral | the King’s cause and overthrow
Fighting is in progress to re-|man of the American First Corps 1e In Bi Swee ore oe _, Austrian police | —I/IN TIBET the hereditary Prime Minister
occupy the post. told the correspondent. KF or Moscow I / . ; Be a ee ie | and his family
| About 1,000 Communist troops 2 the authority of the Austrian | LONDON, Nov. 11
the Se Miter sineuiced | have oe en Kasan. PARIS, Nov. 11. < 7 kena a8 DOE CO: Te The Chinese Communist pro- {
: 2 7 he a : nother Communist French Communist leader Mau- G j We jj ' ’ 2 Me ‘clamation urgin “the entire Nepal, Independent native
sgl Communist attack, During | force, about 1,000 has been located | rice Thorez left here in a Soviet | overnor ate tes ‘His = Majesty's Government (ii otan Ph Thulin all the || kingdom on the north-east
vacuation, units from the|on high ground in the Yonsan- . . . therefore invite the Soviet Gov- ; a kincian
t : eh 8 ie. xO plane today for Moscow. > o- ?v" Lamas’ to help the Chinese frontier of India, comprises
post recovered arms from Viet-|myon area between Kunuri and} He is to undergo treatment in a | kK en R ernment to issue appropriate in-| ies “rid Tibet of imperialist a portion of the southern
minh insurgents. . , | Tokchon. 7 Russian clinic after his recent ill | ee acing structions to their authorities in |' salen hep 1 stablist ve? fonal | slope of the Himalayas It
art Pe waierks end ‘ot Flanked By G.Ls ness. He had cerebral haemorr- | ‘ suetele to desist from interfering ; ‘Cir-government” oe sentan by || is bounded on the north by
to be harassed by Vices capes ae Py Tg singe Weeoe = ene iwin-ohgined ‘Soviet ‘Da | SUN QUEEN and Oascale e my ann Ls gee emerged fuca Gerecnwnec of the. new China (Communist) news | ane ae Sher se —_
tar fire from an unknown direc. | £@St and west, these Communist }yota in a stretcher chair. The| Champion horses of the B.E.C. November Race Meeting| ‘The British note stated that, *8eney relayed on Peking racio|) aig pihar India
5 y : oes : vi ' and on the
tion, ae at ean Poe yes ae Dakota which landed shortly be-; which ended yesterday. These two horses, by tying for |during discussions about the | day. || east by Sikkim and Bengal.
The losses inflicted on the {Man said. ’ fore Thorez arrived at the airfield | first place bring to the holdeéts of Tickets Nos. ‘H-2137 and strikes in the Allied Council in| ‘Phe proclamation stated that/| In the First and Second
Vietminh forces by F: 3; America and _ Australian Thore | J-6479 the sum of $17,952 each. enna on October 13, the “Sovict! the Tibetan people “should buiid World Wars, Nepal (home
evacuating the oar one re Mustangs pr shooting-star Jets 7 ee eee | ne nnn His xcellency the Governor |Tepresentative argued that moby), Ssatersel iainene on a basis of the Ghurkas) gave un-
firmed by the observation planes|supported the United Nations fe teft for the ea er jand Mrs. Savage, accompanied by|Violence in the Soviet Zone of] of friendship and mutual help | Fa ll nen dlp
which saw Vietminh wounded | advance, riddling Communist] ‘Tall Red Army officers in great- | Results At the A.D.C. attended the meeting Austria was not properly the with other nationalities within | Government in men, money
being transported, the spokesman | troops concentrations. coat aah Atk Cotaiaies eves| = Ss yesterday. It was a day of fair |Concern of the Allied Council and| their country.” Together they | and materials, The area of
said, Planes were estimated to have|from the plane and were greeted weather, an — racing wes Bn eee tee by a me should “construct a new Tibet; ween ore eee oa
ee b killed about 600 Communists. by a Russian Embat official A Gl seen on a firm track. \ ander could not be; with) ” the 1
Vietminh forces were dispersed| Elements of the United States’ The crew stayed on at ance Most successful riders for the |diseussed by the Council, wen cual ont ioneat ||: 6988,000. Hinduism ts oe
by patrols and artillery. fire south |1st Cavalry Division on the right Security arrangements at the whole meeting were Crossley and|. “This view cannot be accepted ; | predominant religion
of Chauson about 12% miles|flank of the First Corps advanced | airfield were no more rigid than THIRD DAY Holder with five wins each, Five | His Majesty’s Government in| The proclamation promised that
\ s outheast of Dinhalap on the main see ** tua ak aa ee normally gute ie’ the ni runt saa | ees seored by the Chandfer | © ae eae The Bett. the “life and property of Tibetan Birgan}, Nepal’ a
r of)\four miles north of Kunuri and rture of “very oe mite: Ragan oh ed ot ; - nave e control| Lamas and people will be pro- an), O28 ROC "
the Tonking front, pressed northward. — Sapectut’ noreane” s Bes. Queen ‘Gesasiey? F and other spectatcrs ee ae “states clearly that the | tected, freedom of religious belief | “ity is Just over the border from
Mopping up operations on| 4 Cavalry spokesman said that avidenkov after inspecting the | ® “andmark (Wilder) | turned up in force yesterday and ne negare “er may and should/ wi} be safeguarded, and the|Saxaul in the Indian State of
Havinh Island, about 10 miles east |ne division met only with slight| aircraft came out and satin the} 1. Oateake (Wilder) filled the stands and track. This / Ponerrn f with any matier/-;amas’ temples will be | Bihar.
of Ken hy of ins fee opposition, at first losing’ only one | Waiting room with three Russian | 2 Watererest (O'Neil) was reflected in the better prizes|Telating to the maintenance of! protected ,
sort ae aa ee Ta alin wee slightly wounded, | officials. 3 Mazy Ann (Latches) that were paid, On the first two|/@w and order, and requests that | whos Dakota aircraft flew to
Per ica laphong, resulted in the) put later ran into “very heavy| Two French offers will navi-} 1 whale Wein teers” days of racing, the Field Sweep | it, should support the authority| ‘The proclamation said that no atmandu today from Delhi to
fied Vietminh Checentie: unspeci-~ resistance,” f gate the plane as far as Berlin. 2. Miss Friendship (Yvonet) prizes never climbed to the $700.00 of the Austrian Government change will be made in the exist- ning — ag Serre wee 4
; South Koreans advancing in the} ‘Thorez arrived in a municipal i tii Mh mark. They did so four times ehgraniosd by that agreement.” |ing administrative and military Ren yO ge "p PR sillning 0-9 ahd
‘ te te ee regular troops were} west met moderate resistance 9 See receded by two mo-]| 1. piue Diamond (Lutchman) | aa wae er prize ve the | of the atadinniter Gavin cont systems of Tibet. the King’s eld eat grandson
illed and arms including mortar! mj i OTCY CIE ce, ; 2. Duchess (Holder) day was $753.30 in the Final | - peru : : - ; . as aca le
and machine guns eaptored a the = aa ee ens His wile, Communist deputy for | # Flying Ann (O-Nel) | | #andieap: : pation authorities which is| “Existing Tibetan troops will br ae of the newly installed
mopping up operation 7 miles) Communists dae cmon eat he Seine Department, sat behind} , gern Smee gE ; Highest me, iabien of gompleint i said| become part of the national de- ronal ficial id cial
: i i 2 at in 5 . the n- e . 2's > ic an officials sa yesterday
Simil Somer vere Canorted | ve wr hanee smiling and waving at| * Therlan Ledy. (Thirkell) | Highest Forecast prize was! gtrations in the. Soviet sone ot | Cnfen pote ee et ee flight had been arranged
page Wine caer ka “earth American marines advancing] photographers was carried on a yZWENTY-SECOND RACE £67.08 in the St. Ann’s Handicap | Austria on October 4 and 5, the ; by agreement with the Nepalese
Deleta and northwest of Thiabink |", the centre cf the peninsula] stretcher into the plane. , Veneer eer to the punters who correctly fore Soviet Commander in Weiner-| “All the Lama’s officials and | Government.
56 miles southeast of Hanoi 'wiped out most of the Communist —Reuter, 3 Soprano (Yvonet) cast First Flight and Miss Friend- | Neustdt obstructed the efforts of) chieftains may remain at their | Nepal has treaties of friendship
Lees force of about 100 on the east , FWENTY-THIRD RACE chip as winner and second re-| Austrian Police to restore order! posts, | on page 5
Reuter. | ; rota { Colleton (Crosstey) ; i
}eoast. The American 7th Division ° 2 Foxglove (Wilder) | spectively. and instructed police to return | ; ve ees r
jattacked a Communist battalion Denies Red 3 First Flight (¥vonet) | Biggest upset of the day was/the Federal post office to the| “Pro-imperialist and Kuomin
in the rough hills northwest of ; Ace ECnEee RACE | ee Alou z — on sects control “of the lawless mob” | tang ney where it is evident | TELL THE ADVOCATE
Iwon. T e 2 Pharli i andicap by a head, w ockey ; which had seized the building,| that they have severed relations THE NEWS
Four Hour Both the 7th Division and mar- W est Indians 3 ies Oehen oo | O'Neil in the saddle. but had been ejected, with imperialists and the Kuo-
ines are thrusting toward three io SOL Sal LAR a The Police Band under Capt. -—Revter. | mintang and will not carry out Ring 3113 Dey or Night.
eo, : = ' reservo'rs and hydro - electric (From Our Own Correspondent.) ——~ |} Raison again entertained race- any sabotage or put up resistance, " .
y ‘spol a= THE ADVOCATE
trike Called plants in the north, They were] KINGSTON, Jama‘ca, Nov. 7. A 5 ; goers with music to suit yarious marae imay remain at their posts. SANG. POR. aeee
reported to be meeting only} Addressing a meeting of the fan Runs Amok: yiseies. | She | programe began United States Will ' .
ROME, N fluctuating resistance. —Reuter. eee of Representatives of | with the March Novy yn fn a nited es ! ' Reuter. "
, Nov. 11. e Jamaica Youth Movement in ended with a Calypso Session tha a é j
‘neluded “Cricket, Lovely Cricket.”| Be Russia's Match

IN 1955

LONDON, Noy, 12
A world copyright messace from |

:-—_———_

eh



921
i
i

Washington in to-day’s “Sunday | RALEIGH
Times” declared that the Unite! |

THE ALL-~STEEL BICYCLE

ae




plan” to match Soviet power by
11965.

Ithe “Sunday Times” wrote, he. |
jecmpleted a survey of Americe

—Reuter. |

iA



the Executive of the Union and] wound,

- We in this capacity] “ ‘The Police report that a Port-
nee \ of-Spain labourer who moved
into Valencia six months ago,
e 7@ left home on Friday morning at
ul ims l 11 o’clock armed with ® gun and
r a dozen cartridges with threats
Be Fi : ° that he was going to kill, Beating
inance a mth through the thick under-
bush and swamps he burst into
NASSAU, Bahamas Nov. 11. the clearing of Lubin’s home-
Butlin is not discussing with | Stead where he saw the .couple
the press his plans for refinancing | weeding their garden. Nathan's
the grand Bahamas venture.| brother Jerry reported he heard
Someone near him told me that four shots fired, but saw no gun-

“negotiations are at a delicate] ™an as he fled, escaping.

fcans are ready tc Villagers meanwhile were
ar tor ak aa Soe y scared and were refusing to move

The name of the American in-|@"ound the village without arm-
terest was not revealed; only the| ©d escort. Up to cee ne
company’s lawyer is here, A rep-| 2a8y no ‘trace = tas
resentative of the Cape and Gen-) ®U™™&n. ¥ ‘
eral Finance Company of London,

the largest creditors of Butlin’s,
who also hold considerable stock, Barclays Bank







LONDON, Nov. 11. |
Many foreign delegates may “voluntarily boycott” Monday’s |
World Peace Congress at Sheffield, a high official of the
Peace Movement told Reuter here today.
This action would be in protest against Britain’s ban on som |
of the delegates, |

Congress officials said between already been declared unaccept- |
40 and 45 members of the French | able by the British Home Office |
delegation of 65 had been turned| Others will have to pass a secur- |
back at Dover, after interrogation] ity check before they are admit- |
by immigration officials. ted.

|

The Italian Trade Union today |
issued a call to all _ industrial’
workers for a four hour strike on |
Tuesday afternoon following the
breakdown of negotiations for a
who had been working together |



Bernard Shaw’s Fortune
May Be £150,000

LONDON
BERNARD SHAW’S last will made this year, is 8,000
words long and is in the hands of the Public Trustee, who

will be the sole executor.

Mr, William*Limb, an official of ;ties brought Shaw £50,000 an-
the Public Trustee Office, said last }nually. But his income in the past
night: “I have read the will once. |ten years was cut to about £5,000
It is very detailed but will be]a year by taxes.
pushed through quickly. Shaw paid £200,000 for the

“Probate can be expected this}|printing of his books over the
month.” years. He retained copyright of

he Public Trustee Office is a]his works, got them printed, and
42-year-old Government agency |employed publishers to distribute
for handling settlements. them.

A friend of Shaw said last night In 1948 he got £60,000 film
he may have left only £150,000|royalties for “Cesar and Cleo-
despite £1,000,000 earnings and ajpatra,” and another £60,000 for
life interest in most of his wife’s|Pygmalion.” He got £30,000 ac-




We are stocked with Models
for Ladies & Gentlemen,
Boys, Girls and Small
Children

The only important member of According to information reach-
the French delegation admitted so} ing Congress organisers in Lon- |
far was the painter Pablo Picasso.| don, about 230 British visas have |
_ Reuter learned that the remain-| been granted so far. About 160
ing members of the 200 strong| delegates including 40 Russians |
French party might abandon plans|have been denied visas and 50)
to travel to England later today] from West European countries de |
or tomorrow. clared unacceptable in advance.

Twenty Czech delegates all of} Hundreds of delegates from 7(
them carrying valid visas were! countries were invited to the Con-
reported to have cancelled air| gress which is to continue for six |
passages from Prague. days in Britain's key steel anc

A peace movement official in| armaments making centre, but or. |

AAA AA i

i





CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

£150,000 estate.

Death Duties. cut, his wife's
estate, taxation and generosity cut
his own.

GIFTS: He maintained a widow
whose extravagant husband left
her penniless and he paid for her
children’ at Oxford,

Nobody in the family knew
where the money came from

He paid for repairs to Ayot St.
Lawrence church roof and sub-
scribed to the church funds.

He gave 18 houses in Carlow,
Eire, to the town. His house and

three acres at Ayot St. Lawrence
will go to. the National Trust as a

literary shrine.

Cut to £5,000

TAXES; For many years royal-

cumulated royalties from Germany
after the war. ‘

He had 12,314 pound sHares in
Welwyn Garden City. When it was
taken over by the Ministry of
Town and Country Planning, . =
Shaw collected £14,770 cash, plus Egyptian Women Demand
meres th a new trust - worth Full Political Rights

DUTIES: Of his wife's estate he CAIRO, Nov. 11.
said: “I had to hand over £40,000}. 4 delegation of Egyptian wo-~
in death duties, and practically the | men headed by Madame Doria
whole of the income will go to the |Sbaffik, leader of the Egyptian
tax collector.”

His wife’s money now passes to | €9

He did not arrive and is now ex-
pected here on Tuesday.
—Can. Press.



elocution, deportment, and the arts | ing of full political rights to wo-
of personal contact and social in-- | men including the right to vote,

tercourse.” It is not known exactly | should figure in the King’s speech | will be
bow the money will be used. at next Thursday’s opening of| for

—LES. {Parliament —Reuter.

was expected from London’ yes- oy . a
terday to discuss the settlement. Will Be Rebuilt
(From Our Own Correspondent.)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 9,
Tenders are invited in Trinidad
the rebuilding of, Barclays
iy Bridgetown,

Reekie of the
Watkins and Partners, Architects,
paying a visit to
| Feminist Movement, today hand-|
Prime Minister Nahas Pasha a}
Eire for teaching “self-control, | petition demanding that the grant-/|

finalising the contract document.

It was learned too that United
Kingdom firms
|operating in the Caribbean area
invited to submit tenders
this work as well as
| contractors,

contractors

Prague said that “an important
announcement” would be made
later.

A usually reliable source in
London believed this would call
for ‘a voluntary ban” on the Con-
gress by all delegates not yet in
Britain.

Congress organisers complained
that the British Government had
deliberately placed difficulties in
the way of the delegates reaching
Sheffield

But reinforced squads of immi-
gration officers and men from the
Security services were waiting for
hundreds more of the delegates,
The biggest party consists of 200
Italians, none of whom require
visas. Their leader, Pietro Neni
left-wing Socialist Party chief, has



ganisers believed that only half |
the number will get through the
security net.

Australian, Indian, Canadian,
Brazilian, Icelandic, Bulgarian, |

American, Ceylonese and Argen- |
tinian delegates are already}

known to be in Britain.

About 50 have arrived in shet-|

field where hotel accommodation

has been booked for 1900 dele-|
gates. Congréss organisers will |
have to foot the bill tor forfeited |
bookings and the main burden is}
expected to fall on the British |

Peace Committee.

Pat Sloan, member of the or-|
ganising Committee said that)

Comgress would go spend at aM a

10—13 Broad St.
Sole






ne

ii

Fuk

=,





PAGE TWO



















SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1° __
~ See a Ne NY ts : \ = FFF FFF FEF FFF DEZESE
| , )) oJ a
AOGUATEIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only) |
GL OBE TO-NIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT, AT 8.30 \
TO-NITE 8.30 LAST SHOW : on ee a Witte
yy {f - Tecy ~ . hd i. ' ‘ ae dus
BAD SISTER at \ WOMAN'S SECRET” > wi EO ee
Margaret Ian Dennis A New RKO Radio Picture
} ‘ , )
LOCKWOOD HUNTER PRICE i Based on Vicki Baum’s best-seller
: } “MORTGAGE ON LIFE”

TO-MORROW MONDAY 5 & 8.30

BROADWAY

Geo, RAFT e Pat O'BRIEN

PLAZA Theatre-sriDGETOWN

Ceecll B. De Mille’s Masterpiece !

“SAMSON AND DELILAH”

, Color by Technicolor

10TH DAY HELD OVER!

and 2 SHOWS TO-DAY—4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
° MONDAY 3 SHOWS—1.30, 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
Treat ‘em Rough (*Peind SA pm. tar cucning neers, “uast, be, taken, w9 by G45 fe mattnces

N.6.—Ali Complimentary Tickets are cancelled for this Picture t
Eddie ALBERT & Peggy MORAN L__SSSSSSSSSSS—

i) PLAZA Theatre = oistin |

| iast 2 Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 pm
| Warner Bros. Action Double *

Ss cae omy aus a i aa a RIN NaN AR ETD ok RY .
“HOUSE ACROSS THE STREET”
EMPIRE ROYAL with Wayne Morris, Janis Paige, Brace Bennett »
And “COLORADO TERRITORY” with Joel McCrea
: cn ietecieeineneieansnliRiene
To-day 4.45 and 8.45 To-Day and To-morrow 5.00













——~ \:



Monday and Tues 30 p.m.
and 8.30 | Warver's Double! nday and Tueséay 6 & $6.30 p.m.
“IT'S A GREAT FEELING” — (Technicolor)

Dennis Morgan & Jack Carson and
“CHEYENNE” with Dennis Morgan

Monday 4.45 and 8.30 and M-G-M- Presents
Continuing Indefinite Mat.

And Night Daily * THREE
Julian Blausten Production CODFATHERS” i GALT W (The Garden) ST. JAMFS |
‘eliresinn | SUNDAY, 5 & 8.30 p.m,
“BROKEN ARROW” |













-0th Century Fox presents Tyrone Power in

“CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE”

John Wayne, Harey Caroy and
Pedro Armendariz



MR. AND MRS. COLLES J. COE and their dogs arrived yesterday from
MR, ©. E. HITOHINS, Editor of the “Trinidad Guardian” and Mr. southampton, Long Island, to spend the winter months in Barbados.
“Jimmy” Cozier, Acting Information Officer of the Caribbean Commis- Here Again
sion arrived from Trinidad by B.W.1LA. yesterday. ACK TO SPEND the Winter

months in Barbados are Mr.
and ‘Mrs. Colles J. Coe, who
arrived yesterday from the U.S
via Canada by air. They were
accompanied by their two cocker
spaniels, ‘“‘Laddie” and “Chi-Chi”,
who travel everywhere with them.
Mr. and Mrs. Coe are staying
at “Old Trees’, St. James.

Returned Yesterday

RS. NORMAN FORBES was
at Seawell yesterday morning
» to meet her husband who returned
to Barbados. Mr. and Mrs. Forbes
spent the Summer in France. Mrs.
Forbes returned about six weeks
ago. Mr. Forbes remained over in
Canada and the U.S. settling some
business.

Here For Week
R. AND MRS. C. T. Palaisy
who arrived from Canadu

stones sia Tuesday and Wednesday 5.00 |}| MON., TUES. 8.30 sa ai:
and 8.30

Starring James + with “DAK _
ee er, vee M-G-M Technicolor Musical DAKOTA MIL
Jeff Chandler—Debora Paget a \ the Trinidad Guardian and

mee —_ So -8Uu™’>~>»s@s$]—]—-"-68KAKHVH’™-n.-nnun0=naqnqammm"' i
and Basil Ruysdeal — “TILL THE CLOUDS ee = FF Mr. Jimmy Cozier, Acting Inform-











































R, C. E. HITCHINS, Editor of |











ation Officer of the Caribbean

Will Geer | Commission arrived from Trinidad
R LI BY ” | ( I O B E yesterday morning by B.W.1.A., to

0 fl confer with Cable and Wireless

SR tee eer eee eee with regard to investigating the

possibility of a Caribbean Press
Association News Service.

ROXY | Starring | - Presents On WEDNESDAY, NOV. 15TH 8.30 P.M.
* 4 ee |

“ ~Neeigtti | as

Frank Sinatra — Kathryn’ ||| JOE CLEMENDORE Mr. Hitchins gave a small

Grayson — Robert Walker jupeheon Party A. oe —

as Shows To-day 4.45 —Van Johnson otel yesterday. Among the guests

ast Two Show y a invited were Mr. A. G. L. Douglas,

Divisional Manager, Cable & Wire-

less (W.1.) Ltd., Mr. P. Hewitt- §

Myring, Public Relations Adviser

to C. D. & W., Mr. C, A. L. Gale,

Editor of the Barbados Advocate
and Mr. Jimmy Cozier.

Mr. Hitchins and Mr. Cozier ex-

and 8.15

W. Lee Presents OLYMPIC |
To-day 4.30 and 8.30 DANCING
Cesar Romero and June Havoc Monday 4.30 and 8 15 | ,
| United Artists Double
- AS HOT
United Artists Double Dinnes O'Keefe and William
Bendix

7 Ronald Colman — Celeste SONGS,
“ONCE A THIEF" =" CROSS
Co-Starring “ CHAMPAGNE FOR
Marie McDonald and Lon CARSAR ” TALKS
E.. Abbott and Lou Costello Tuesday and Wednesday 450 AS THE

SENSATIONAL CONTOR-
TIONIST OF THE FAMOUS
MADAM O’LINDY’S

pect to return to Trinidad this
afternoon.

yesterday by air are here for a
TROUPE Meets This Month week, staying at the Ocean View
Hotel. Mr. Palaisy is with
R, JIMMY COZIER told Carib it Gene 4
yesterday that the eleventh min, oda’
+ meeting of the Caribbean Com- s 7

‘THE WEST INDIAN delega-

tion which left here last
week for emigration talks in
Washington are expected back
this afternoon, with the exception
of Mr. F. L. Walcott who will
be spending a few days in Brook-
lyn. The other members of the
, delegation are Sir George Seel,
Mr. E. S. Burrowes, Labour
Officer, and Mr, Raymond Roe.
Mr. Walcott will be returning late
g this week.

A Farewell Luncheon
MR. NORMAN FORBES arrivea @TROLLING through Goddavd’s

mission takes place this month in
Curacao, The meeting begins
November 23rd. Three days later
the West Indian Conference opens.
This conference centres around
the agricultural progress in the
Caribbean area.

and e

Monday and Tuesday 4.30 COVER wp ? A PROGRAM

and 8.15







IN A SERIES OF POSITIVE-
» LY BREATH TAKING
FEATS OF STRENGTH
‘ AND CONTROL. IT’S
UNCANNY! IT’S UNBE-
LIEVABLE BUT IT’S

A series of papers have been
Brepered for it by the Territorial
overnments of the Food and
Agriculture Organisation of the
United Nations as well as the
Federal Housing Administration
of the U.S. and other metro-
politan bodies.

Chaney
and 8.15

in United Artists Double KOREAN

William Boyd and Andy Clyde
in



yesterday, Car rd a gay
TRUE Among the authors of these yesterday from Canada after spend- euachech deci te heaaa
“AFRICA SCREAMS” Dee Othe essor Page, Princi- ing the Summer months in France. covered that the Colonial Devel.
“ 1 pal of the Imperial College of “ af.
“THE MARAUDERS” Tropical Agriculture, Prof. Hardy 3 opment and Welfare Organisation
coe uu with Musie and Syncopation by of the I.C.T.A., Dr. 8 Neumark of Back From Holiday es, nee. eee wena, Were
enter Ss. . . e to
- and THE TRINIDAD HOT SHOT ORCHESTRA the Food and Agriculture Organ-

isation, Mr. Jacob L. Crain of the RS. EDNA HUTCHINSON a farewell luncheon.

ee : { i om ‘bars rs. Moore has resigned as

‘ ROD CLAVARY (Top Vocalist) Federal Housing Administration, a and her daughter Barbara a eee aes 3

“THE CROOKED WAY" || “THE ADVENTURES OF boc, geumoonntntves, fy eit Who lett Barbadian August Sth senographer onthe sta and will
DON COYOTE ” Plus Anferican and Dutch.

Canada yesterday. Miss Hutchin- soon. ‘
: son who is with the Royal Bank Mr. Colin Moore, her_husband,
Mr. Cozier who is the Acting of Canada here was on long leave, formerly of the staff of The Com-
Information Officer of the Carib- r

bermere School, has accepted an
bean Commission will attend both Several of their relatives were appointment with the Education
meetings. at Seawell to meet them. Office in British Guiana.

a
The RECORDER BREAKING Box-Office SMASHER ! |





soaks with Those Wizards of Laughter Bud Abbott and Lou Costelloe

ne
Francis Rafferty and Richard

i hr ota wsac™" 1) in “THE WISTFUL WIDOW OF WAGON GAP"

MECHANICAL TOYS!
PLASTIC TOYS!!
DOLLS — TRAINS
AIRPLANES — TANKS
ETC..

OO







A A A es
= | “GLOBE



POPPOES fh



THE BIGGEST IN THIS OR ANY TOWN!

2 SHOWS TO-DAY 2
4.45 and 2ND 8.30 p.m.

Monday 3 Shows BIG WEEK! | 1.30,4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
P Cecil B.DeMille's Masterpiece

GLOBE

Farewell Show of RAY NUNES
TO-NITE AT 8.30 with



* BAD SISTER



| L veo
PY ita D
Half Hour of Songs by RAY NUNES A we PLL =
Â¥ Supported by a ell rs E
% Keith CAMPBELL (Pianist of The Hot Shots) Z 7 h $ rina ALi
x Rod CLAVARY (Vocalist—Hot Shots) A alot Atrial «irene Sci ed tens WAT
st i - Reman ty net) Land cad i techy = Qasnd wp the hi Seman tnd Doh te th Ry Bia ps 13-18
x Programme j A tepatiin N



SPECIAL NOTICE: All Tickets Booked must be =>
PLA Z. A taken up by 4.45 fer Matinees and 8.30 for Evening Visit



. Shows or same will be sold after that time. PLAZA
x Jealousy—Carayan N.B. All Complimentary Tickets. are cancelled SNACK
x Talent Audition TO-DAY 9.30. aan. for thia Picture | aaa

x
SPEEDBOATS vives ANIMALS : Black Magic—Sweet & Lovely
oh. x
42” & 53” XMAS TREES

Ole Man River—A Sinner Kissed An Angel
DECORATIONS & LIGHTS







SHIRT

FOR INCAUTIOUS BACKERS
WHO LOST THEIRS ON HORSES

All Coat-Style, Collar-Attached
“MICO” all sizes, plain shades 4.09
CRRAe ee ww » 4.47
“REGAL” , _.._ Striped designs 6.31
“ae e 5 we Ke » 4.86

Renovate Your Home

for Christmas
e

COMING SOON!!

Xmas Tree Bubble Lights

We can supply your requirements





Ready Mixed Oil Paints by leading manufacturers
Hails Distemper

Matroil

Sigmarine Flat Wall Enamel

Sigmavar Floor Varnish

Enamels—all colours

Come in and inspect our
stock.

Compare our prices too !!

also material and colours for mixing.



NEW RANGE

-
EVANS ona WHITFIELDS | Men’s Shoes

Diel 4606 Dial 4220 await your inspection

{ | | { ! }

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

THE CORNER STORE









SUNDAY,

os

A Nod Means Yes

N one of the Toy Stores in
Bridgetown there is a model

of Father Christmas. Unlike most
other models, however, he nods
his head continuously.

One little boy about four years
old was seen standing in front of
it yesterday, mumbling under his
breath. Later he was overheard
telling his mother, “Mummy, I've
jo re yee for lots A
things and he keeps nodding his
head” Does that mean I can have
them all?”

For Two Weeks

R. ALFRED NECKLES, a

planter of Grenada, arrived
here on Thursday by the Lady
Rodney for two weeks’ holiday

NOVEMBER 12,

and is staying at Worthing Guest
House. rietor of Bellevue
Estate, St. vid'’s, Mr. Neckles

was in time to see the second day’s
races, He was last here in 1947,

Back From U.K, Holiday

R. ARMEL YEARWOOD of
‘Hanson’, St, George, who

left here im June for a holiday
in England returned yesterday via

Canada accompanied by his
daughter Laurie, who has been
at school in England. Looking

extremely fit after his holiday,
Mr. Yearwood seemed very glad
to be back home.

«Here For The Winter

R. RONALD H. NORCOTT,
and her two children
Joanna and Jonathon arrived
from Ontario yesterday accom-
panied by Mrs. Norcott’s mother,
Mrs. Ann Roach, who spent last
winter in Barbados. They expect
to be here until March and are
guests at the Windsor Hotel.
Norcott, who is with
Canada Packers in Brantford,
Ontario was unable to come down
for the holiday.

On Short Visit
‘ R. ALFONSO B. De LIMA
arrived from Trinidad yes-
terday on a short visit. He will

shortly be opening a new jewellery
store here.



CROSSWORD

id ain rr





Across
1. Outcome of taut tides. (9)
. Limb of a marine? (3)
\1. Drapes in a different way.

(6)
(2. He’s not necessarily averse to
rose, (4) pat (6)
13, 8 Up a broken spear,
\4. Existed, (4)
6. ners {3 the B.B.C. (4)
{6. Close enough to be mean. (4)
(7, Ian’s own. (3)
\8. There can be nothing novel
about it, or can there? (4
20, Playe in many billiard
saloons. (7, 4
@. You'll roduce them with a
grassy dot. (5, 4)
Down

}. Pat a chin for a change. (2, 1, 5)
0 to turn when evicted, (6, 3)
Suggestion, to me, is

volume.
the sweetest
* Russian citizen. (
6. Taver @ snow fall will have them.

)
q. ia sip less in this formation, (9)
8. To be led this shows weakness.

a. i you BF = to 8 a 1¢ will
8! i.
16. $ret blown spout, (5)
19. a give a horse one after
racing. (8)

tion Of yesterday's puszle.—Across:
. i 4. (peur, 8. 3 "
Nee; 11, Lead: 1 fides: 14, Netted; 15,
Gue; 16, Purred; 18, Arteriole; 21, None}
22, Bani 23, Leech; 24. Lait; ‘25, Adher-
nce. own: 1, Ta Wa; 2,

* Mesident: "9 Returied: 14, Getencel

nt; ned; en

va. 11, Oban; 20, Laic,



1950

Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

~ Stocking The
Fernery”

In stocking the fernery the
majority of the ferns will be of
the variéty known as “Adiantum”,
or Maidenhair, of which there are
many different kinds,

There is the common Maiden-
hair, the Bouquet Fern, the Giant
Maidenhair, the fine English fern,
the beautiful Farleyense, and
others, all of which bear the
family name of Maidenhair.
Besides these, no Fernery is quite
complete without a gold Fern, and
a Silver Fern,

In starting a Fernery it will be
the owner’s pleasure to collect and
to get to know as many varieties
of ferns as possible, but for
suceess in the cultivation of these
ferns, some knowledge of how to
treat them is necessary. As has
been stated in a previous article
ferns require moisture, a shady
sheltered position, and a certain
amount of dappled sunshine.
They must not be overcrowded,
and it is a good plan to have space
enough around each pot fern so

|

that the pots can be turned
occasionally, to enable the fern to
keep an even growth all round,

The mixture to be used in
potting out ferns differs with vari-
oue gardeners, and the one given
in this article is rather complicated.
This however can be taken, not
as a necessity, but rather as a
high standard at which to aim, as
it is a well known fact that most
ferns are accommodating plants,
and will slit themselves to almost
any soil conditions.

Potting Mixture For Ferns
(From Garden beok of Barbados
for Amateurs)

3 parts good sifted leaf mould

1 part wood ash,

14 parts dried and well pounded
cow manure,

$ part soot,

1 part’Charcoal well pounded.

1 part coarse well washed sand,
or marl, or small hard stones,

March is considered a good
month for planting, or re-potting
ferns, and in doing this job see
that your pots are “clean” and
dry, and have a good layer of
stones or broken crocks for drain-
age at the bottom.

When a large fern is to be
divided up the best way to do is
as follows: —~

Turn the fern out of the pot,
and having made up your mind
where the division should come,
part the fronds, and with a
sharp knife cut cleanly right
through the roots, This is a better
way than tearing it apart by hand,
as it results in less root injury.

Fern Disease

Ferns sometimes suffer from a
disease called “Rust,” causing the
fronds to turn brown, or rust
colour, The garden book tells us
that this is caused by lack of
proper plant food, and want of
alr,

When the ferns get this disease,
it is best to cut off all the affected
fronds and burn them, Then give
the ferns an application of liquid
manure, or a dressing of G. V, M.
(Garden vegetable manure) and
separate the pots, placing them in
a more roomy, airy position.



SUNDAY



At the Cinema:

Broken Arrow
G. B.

THE average Western film, with its conventional plot,
strict moral values, abundance of action and shooting and
a minimum of dialogue, can be and is, very popular with a
large section of the movie-going public. However, there
are those, to whom this type of film has less appeal, but I
sincerely hope that they will not allow their antipathy for
drama in the wide spaces to cause them to overlook
“BROKEN ARROW”, now playing at the Empire Theatre.

eaahinmeenestpeneemneseisacan 4

ADVOCATE

TREMENDOUS
SAVINGS

ON ALL
Items Advertised

LADIES

PAGE THREE

tna



WHY LOOK OLD?

Regain your youthful looks
by tinting with

SHADEINE

Still the best for GREY HAIR, |
in alt natural tints, Over
30 years reputation. Ask
your chemist to obtain some
for you from his Wholesaler. |



=
f
oe
Sf



ma eres

pares good looks tell you they’re jum right
You know, too, when you look at the price |

On actual historical facts,
“B) ARROW” is an unusu-
al Western drama, in which a
dramatic chapter of Indian war-
fare is given an exceptionally
fine presentation. For once, the
Red Indian is depicted as a human
being and a man of honour, and
an attempt has been made to give
a serious portrayal of the Indian
side of American history. From
the novel “Blood Brother” by
Elliott Arnold, it is the story of
frontiersmanh Tom Jeffords, played
mmy Stewart, who, back in
1870, at the t of the bitter
Indian-white feud in Arizona,
risks his Hf@ to See and talk to
Cochis@é, chief of the Apaches, in
an effort to bring about a cessa-
tion of hostilities and an under-
standing between their two peo-
ples. Though ce does not come
at once, and is still distrust
by both sides and outbreaks of
violence, it is the friqndship of
Jeffords and Cochise and eir
mutual feelings of respect and
trust, that finally bring about a
permanent peace. There is the
touching love story of the Ameri-
can for a young Indian girl, the
tragic culmination of which is
nearly the undoing of all that he
and Cochise have worked for.

The role of Tom Jeffords fits
Jimmy Stewart like a_ glove.
Rugged, humorous at times and
deeply serious in his self appoint-
ed mission, his performance is

fine throughout. A comparative
newcomer, Jeff Chandler, plays

the Apache chief, Cochise. Not
only is he the physical type, but
his interpretation of the role is
marked by strength of character
and dignity, and for a young actor,
he has remarkable maturity. As
the young Indian girl, Debra
Paget is delightfully youthful and
naive and gives a sensitive and
touching performance.

Filmed in Technicolor on the
exact location where the story
took place eighty years ago, the
scenery is breathtaking in its
grandeur, The direction is ex-
cellent, resulting in never—flagging
action and there is no underplaying
of the terror of Indian war. Al-
most four hundred full-blooded
Apaches take part in the film, and
there are interesting scenes of In-
dian tribal rites, including dances
and the Indian marriage ceremony.
It is interesting to note that the
modern Apache has so long lost
interest in his ancient weapons of
war, that an archery expert had
to instruct them in the use of the
bow and arrow!

“To talk peace is easy—to live
peace is hard,” says Cochise, and
in this significant story, we have
the solution brought about by
characters who, in themselves,
match the grandeur of the natural
setting.

BAD SISTER

The rather dubious title of
“BAD SISTER” has been given to
the J. Arthur Rank film now
showing at the Globe Theatre.
Starring Margaret Lockwood, Ian
Hunter, Dennis Price and Joan
Greenwood, it is the story of two
women in a home for delinqutits
—-one the warden and the other
an eighteen-year-old girl who has
been committed for attempted In-
fanticide and suicide, Summoned
to the warden’s office for rebelli-
ous behaviour, the girl is persuad-
ed to tell her story which begins
with the usual poverty in child-
hood and ends with an attempt to
kill her illegitimate baby and her-
self. During the telling of this
tale, the warden remembers her

















tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated .
is a Tan Punched Oxford. Tied to every paiy
is the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign.
which means ‘ just right’! Look fos it t&»

leading stores in Barbados, g" ——




own sheltered childhoed—a sup-
posedly successful marriage to al
wealthy lawyer that finished in|
divorce — her second marriage
ending im tragedy and finally her
present position as warden in a
home for delinquents. Realizing
that the girl in her charge has
been a victim of environment and
circumstance, the warden decides
to help her at the forthcoming
trial, Summoned into court, she
faces her first husband who is the
judge, and through her eloquent
pleading, helps the girl rite. |



her child and start on a new life. | That were formerly

The two stories are told in a de to Se ees . $6.00
series of alternate flashbacks | |
which tend to slow the action 2.50
somewhat and though it never Reduced to $
drags, the pace is definitely slack- Many of them .... 48c. each

ened at various points in the
film. As far as characterizations
go, Margaret Lockwood gives. a
good convincing performance,
though I feel that her becoming
warden of such an instijfution is
out of character. Neither do !
think that any woman, no matter
how sympathetic, could induce
such a girl as Lottie Smith to tell
her story right off the bat, with
no more persuasion than a pat on
the shoulder and a cup of ica.
However, that is the story, and
Miss Lockwood's’ portrayal is
sympathetic and understanding.
Joan Greenwood as Lottie Smith,
the rebel, is a young actress |

have never seen before, but she

obviously has dramatic talent ‘

which she uses with ability. As Coy
first husband, ‘

Miss Lockwood's
Ian Hunter is just what he should

be—stodgy and not Very quick on '&
the up-take. Dennis Price as KAY SER
her second matrimonial venture " .
is competent but not highly ARI SILK
exciting, One or two of the sup-
rting cast stand out—Guy STOCKINGS

liddleton as Fobey and Mabel
Constanduros as Nanny are the They were formerly ..
ones that come to mind. Reduced to only ....
The music is effective, par-
ticularly in the sequence laid in 49c.
Finland and the folk songs and
dances are delightful. Qn the
whole, this film is thoughtful,
serious adult entertainment.

A WOMAN’S SECRET

At the Aquatic ‘Club, “A
WOMAN'S SECRET” is showing,
starring Maureen O'Hara, Melvyn
Douglas and Gloria Grahame.
Based on a story by Vicki Baum,
it tells of a radio singer who has
lost her voice and who befriends
a young protegé and helps her to
Stardom. Somewhere along the
line, the protegé jeopardizes her
career, and her benefactress, in
an effort to save her, is arrested
for attémpted muder, Evefything
comes out in the wash, but the

$1.15

each.



plot is complicated and to my
way of thinking, hasn’t much
sense, However, it is saved py

good acting on the part of the
three principals and by the
humour injected by Melvyn
Douglas. Maureen O'Hara as the
ex-songstress is attractive and
altruistic and is also the possesso:
of obvious vocal talent, when she |
sings one or two songs (before
She loses her voice), Glori:
Grahame is cute and completely
self-centred and Melvyn Douglas, |
as a composer gnd rajtio
favourite, combined with a dash
of the sleuth, is pleasant to |
listen to as always.

A light, trivial picture, amusing
in spots,

Samson and Delilah

SAMSON & DELILAH at the
New Plaza is still a big draw and
seats are ‘selling rapidly in
advance. It will be here for a
few days longer—so if you haven’t

LADIES’ SMART
SKIRTS

Fast Colour Pretty Skirts
Wear them for sport or work

In all Sizes ...,

Pee bee werine







seen it—book early,



TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH



Diary, Engagément Calendar and |
Professional Diaries for 1951 have |
arrived. So also have the Christ- |
mei Cards you will like. |

AMERICAN
TOWELS

Will always wear well. These
| are not only the best available
in quality but they are also
priced most reasonable

From 46c.—$2.09

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

The “Old Vime” Gold
Leaf Ware is here again at
JOHNSON’S HARDWARE









SEA VIEW
GUEST HOUSE

HASTINGS, BARBADOS
EXCELLENT CUISINE
FULLY STOCKED BAR
RATES: $5.00 per Day &
upwards
(Inclusive)

Apply—
Mrs. W! S. HOWELL



FACE CLOTHS

22c. EACH



SPECIAL USEFUL ITEMS
AT SAVINGS

NYLON
DRASSIERES
Only $1.41 per pair

LADIES’ COTTON
WASH FROCKS
$4.32 EACH





LADIES’ COTTON
HOUSECOATS
Shop MODERN and
sh SAVE
SACROOL 3:

‘ -
2 THE LINIMENT THAT ACTS

LIKE MAGIC THE MODERN

Cy,
PAIN



‘ on sale at
S KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

z
SPCC CEEEGS

Broad Street.

SOSESSSS

a

a
{

tLe OWS GCSOES





Blackheads, Pimples, Foot Iteh and other
blemishes. Ordinary treatments give onl
temporary relief because they do not kilt
the germ cause. The new discovery, Nixo-
derm kills the germs in 7 minutes and is
fuaranteed to g' ve you a soft, clear, attrac-
tve, smooth skin In one week, or money
ack on return









of empty
guarantees’? Nixoederm fre

eo os
Nix oder:.°
For Skin Troubles

package, Get
your chemist
today and re-
move the real
cause of skin
trouble.







LAST NIGHT, Mother

WHILE | StePT, I kept
rubbed my chest, throat

breathingin VapoRub’s } direct on my ¢




me In 71 countries more than 40 million
ars of Vicks VapoRub are used yearly!
others like and trust it because:
I's SAFE’ No “dosing’’— just rub it on!
PLEASANT! Children love it, grown-ups,
too! Frels good and srnells good !
QUICK! Relieves nose, throat, chest and
cough almost instantly, Werks direct
and keeps on working for hours.
Why take chances on untried remedies
when Vicks VapoRub has proved its
worth in so many millions of homes?



AGENTS:

L. M. B. MEYERS & (0. LTD.

AND VapoRub worked
hest, too







Here ' a FOR
|

° czema lic Gin & Li '
Jin de Lune ~
> e@ (8)
1] ' #|
nanpuacs [Killed in 7 Minutes AND '
~~ akin has Hoarty 0 millon tiny peame PR 4 2 4 iB}
and pores ere gerros hide cause ter- nQ 7!
eee ar ote beet wm & Lime |



———s
Rs

/
en
Coenen

ae



TODAY, the worst of my
cold is over, thanks to



and back with Vicks ]| soothing, medicinal va- —drawing out tightness } Vicks VapoRub's direct
VapoRub, I began to | pours. They cleared my | and congestion like a } double action! It surely
feel better right away! | nose, calmed my cough, nice, warming poultice, | chases colds fast!
* PROVES ‘ FOR YOU
ce BY MILLIONS OF MOTHERS!

Palmolive Beauty Plan
proved by doctors

brings lovelier skin to
2 women out of d—in 14 days!











Afler tests on 1,384 women for
14 days, 39 doctors (including
leading skin specialists) report
that the ‘* Palmolive
Plan”

noticeable improvement in the

Beauty

brought a definite,

complexions of 2 women out of
3, Definite, noticeable improve-

ments were :—

Fewer blemishes - + *

eee
ners > Ze
Fres ye’

r,° ea et
gna aes®
qosâ„¢

cE SS i,





DRESS SHOPPE |

YOUR SKIN, too, can be improved in 14 days!
All you have to do is what these women did: follow the “ Palmolive
Beauty Plan.” Start today, It’s so simple:

I Wash your face with Palmolive Seap.

2 Massage its rich, olive-oil lather into your skin
for one full minute.

3 Rinse.
that

way

Do this for 14 days and prove for yourself



the “Palmolive Beauty Plan” is the sure
to keep that Schoolgirl Complexion.

KEEP THAT SCHOOLGIRL COMPLEXION



PAGE FOUR

W.I. CRICKET COACHES|

International All-Rounders
A Suitable Choice
BY O. S. COPPIN

THE news that there is a proposal before the West



RACING RESULTS

AT GARRISON SAVANNAH, SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 11, 1950

WEATHER: Fine Firm

$1. LAWRENCE HANDICAP—Class B and Lower—

$900 ($300, $150, $55)—9 Furlongs

TRACK :

Indies Cricket Board of Control to utilise the} 1. TIBERIAN LADY 108 + 5 Ibs. Mr. V. Chase. Jockey O’Neil.
services of International all-rounders Everton|2, SUN QUEEN ...... 128 lbs. Mr. J. W. Chandler.
: Weekes and Clyde Walcott as coaches for the Jockey Crossley.
é - Windward and Leeward Islands will be met with}3. LANDMARK ....... 128 lbs. Mr. V. Chase. Jockey Wilder.
Â¥ satisfaction in responsible West Indian cricket cir- | TIME: 1.573. PARIMUTUEL: Win: $7.18; Place: $2.14, $1.84.

a cles. 2

As far as I have been able to discover, the matter has just reached
the proposal stage but it conforms so readily with any scheme aimed
at the development of cricket in the Windward and Leeward Islands,
that the West Indies Cricket Board of Control, if their word is the
final one, should find no difficulty in doing the obviously right thing
on this occasion.

FORECAST: $25.20.

ALSO RAN: Flieuxce (121 lbs., Thirkell); Infusion (113 Ibs., Hol-
der).

START: Good. FINISH: Easy, 4 lengths, } length.

WINNER: 6-yr.-old br.m, Tiberius-Warm Welcome.

TRAINER: Mr, V. Chase.

"18th Race; ROCKLEY HANDICAP—Class D and Lower—$800
($265, $135, $45)—9 Furlongs
1. OATCAKE . 183 Ibs.. Mr. V. Chase. Jockey Wilder.

GOOD FAITH
fact that at their recent meeting in Trinidad the West Indies
Cricket Board of Control granted £500 to each of the Windward
and Leeward Islands Cricket Associations to aid the improvement of



cricket in those islands, is a sufficient earnest of their good faith and 2. WATERCRESS . - 124 Ibs. Hon. J. D. eee. O'Neil
the appointment of Walcott and Weekes should therefore be an auto- 3. MARY ANN ....... 106 Ibs. Mr. F. E. C. Bethell y en
oe waa be particularly happy too if this comes off for another] »pyy4p; 1.59}. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $4.54: Pine it eee
reason. I have already stressed at some length in this column that cma F F re ere o

FORECAST: $9.72.

ALSO RAN: Kendal Fort (115 lbs., Crossley).

START: Fairly Good. FINISH: Comfortable, 4 lengths, 2 lengths.
WINNER: 5-yr.-old b.g. O.T.C,-Condiment.

TRAINER: Mr. V. Chase.

some definite search should be made by the West Indian cricket
powers-that-be for talent in the Windward and Leeward Islands that
might be of use to future West Indies cricket and I am thinking of
the immediate future of West Indies cricket—their visit to Australia

next year.
FINE OPPORTUNITY ee a a egg lint dasa didi shea al note eee ds
‘HAT being the case, I could think of no finer judges of the merits] 19th Race: ST. JAMES HANDICAP—Class F and F2 Only—$700
of candidates for West Indies’ honours than Clyde Walcott and 115, 1

Everton Weekes nor any opportunity so vo ary for —— so than a on a ee ise Tate
coaching engagement in the Windward an eeward Islands. 1. FIR FLIG .... 113 Ibs. Mr. F. E. C. Bethell.

This brings me back to another argument of mine and I think that wa _ - A Jockey Lutchman,
the time is ripe to throw out the suggestion again. The West Indies} 2. MISS FRIENDSHIP 113 +2 Mr. F. E. C. Bethell.
Cricket Board of Control should at once set about in an endeavour
FOXGLOVE 114 Ibs

a Jockey Yvonet.

to find two good pace bowlers for the Australian tour. 1 . Mr. S. A. Walcott. Jockey Wilder.

It is true that we must always be on the lookout for any cricket | TIME: 1.09}. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $6.40; Place: $2.58; $3.02; $4.16.
FORECAST: $67°08.

talent be it pace bowling, slow bowling, wicket-keeping, batting or
ALSO RAN: Epicure (118 lbs., O’Neil); Colleton (133 lbs., Crossley) ;

fielding.

WE NEED FAST MEN hs at uatah i : i):

UT it must be conceded that it takes more time to train a pace Pharos Il (108 Ibs., Baldwin); Bonnie Lass (104 Ibs., Ali); Apollo
(126 Ibs., P. Fletcher).

bowler and nurse him up to the physical condition that would be] a ‘ ~
required of him in Imperial cricket, than it would in the case of a] START: GOOD. FINISH: Close, Head, # length:
slow bowler or a candidate in any other department of the game. | WINNER: 4-yr.-old. ch.f. Foxbrush-Footlet.

In this respect we could do no better than follow the example] TRAINER: Mr. J. B. Gill.
of Australia. As soon as a talent scout discovers a potential Test} ——
cricketer he is set aside for special treatment and training, aimed at
me him the remorseless machine required of Test match crick-
eters.

Although the feats of the inexperienced Ramadhin and Valentine
seem to contradict this

20th Race: GRAVESEND HANDICAP—Class G and Lowec—$600
($200, $100, $40)—7% Furlongs

1, BLUE DIAMOND ..

6 Ibs Mr, R. E, Gill Jockey Lutchman
, yet these are the exceptions to prove a rule 2 . : al ro

: CHEBS ost case 126 lbs. Mr. F_ E. Bynoe, Jockey Holder

Set nas a found Soetees ae > _ history of Test cricket,| 3 PLYING ANN 126 lbs Mrs, God, Akien Jockey O'Neil
3 ie case of Barbados, but has also been the i ’ : 3 IMU » iia . . .

inote ac With English end Austatian iten ener experience] ‘JME; 1.39%. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $5.96; Place: $1.88, $1.54; $1.70.

FORECAST: $48.48.

ALSO RAN: Mopsy (116 Ibs., Wilder); Wilmar (100 lbs., Baldwin);
Sun Jewel (110 + 2 lbs., Thirkell); Bachelor’s Folly (122 lbs);
Crossley); Front Hopper (100 + 4 lbs Ali); Blue Grass (130 lbs P.
Fletcher); Vixen (126 lbs., Yvonet);

START: Fairly Good. FINISH : Close, % length.

WINNER: 3-yr.-old hb. br.g. O.T.C.-Call Girl.

TRAINER: Mr. J B. Gill.

W.L’s BEST BET

i gee Match winning economy of West Indian cricket, has, up to
the 1939 tour been based on fast bowling and although events
in England this year changed this for the purposes of that tour, yet
it is quife probable that in Australia we may have to find some
very quick men to spearhead our attack,
Where are they? We must find them.
the West Indies and having found reasonabl
train them up to International standards,

They are somewhere in
YY young ones, we must

l. REBATE

2ist Race: NOVEMBER HANDICAP—Class © and Lower—$800 _
5, $135, $59)—9 Furlo:
It would be folly to depend wholely upon the Intercolonial ($265, $135, $59) ngs
matches scheduled for next year to discover who can fill the bill.|1. REBATE .......... 126 lbs, Mr. M. E, R. Bourne
By that time he might not be responsive to the intense training Jockey Baldwin
that would be required of him. ; $. BLIBUXKCE sepa ss. 126 lbs Mr. S. A. Walcott Jockey Wilder
But then, who would train him? All these questions the West |3. TIBERIAN LADY .. 127 Ibs. Mr. V. Chase Jockey Thirkell
Indies Cricket Board of Control must tackle and soon at that. TIME; 1.59. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $3.54; Place: $2.22; $2.60.
WATER POLO SELECTION SOON veer: tare
= ALSO RAN: Ability (115 4- 1 lb., M. Gonzalez); Kitchen Front (113
I N another seven days, the Barbados Water Polo team which Will Ibs., O'Neil) St. Morltz (130 lbs., Holder).
play a series of Test matches against a Trinidad team, will be| START: Fair. FINISH: Close, length, neck.
eenagy Aaa pe a a ought — 6 = announced. They| WINNER: 3-yr.-old dk. br.f. Pay Up-Bachelor’s Dream.
) § 4 © past week and given another couple : . E.R. .
& bata practice, they should definitely give a good account of TRAINER: Mr. M, E. R. Bourne Ae
. 22nd Race: JUNIOR HANDICAP—Class F and Lower—$700
Roddy Bynoe, the Trinidad captain, who is badian, :
his team are also hard at work in "Trinidad. oe ae } ($235, $115, $40)—5?4 Furlongs
It is not yet known whether Trinidad has been practising by

floodlight for two of the tests are to be played under floodlight con- viuee aad oy i ee 3 ‘Gyril Barnard Jockey Holder
ditions. The Barbados team has not yet done any practising at night, SOPRANO 113 + 2 tbe. Mr. L. E. Fisher Jockey Yvonet
but it is anticipated that the lights will be ready tor night practices TIME: 1 108 PARI-MUTUEL, ‘Win: $8 08: Place $1.44; $1.20
in another week. The novelty of these night matches, apart from hk mae, R Wovens 44; $1.20,
the fact that they are intercolonial contests should attract a gigantic | FORECAST: $7.92.
crowd, ALSO RAN: Usher (116 lbs., Baldwin).

START: Fairly Good. FINISH: Close, 1 length, 2 lengths.
A HEAVY shower of rain about mid-day on Sunday last washed | WINNER: 2-yr.-old br.g. O.T.C.-Hurricane,

out play in the Tourists v B.C.L. game at Carlton, It has
however been decided to continue the game as a three day match
one the game will begin to-day and continue on the two Sundays

The ‘Representative Council of the League on Thursday appoint-
ed sub-selection committees for each division. These will select

TRAINER: Mr, A. P. Cox.
23rd Race: BELLEVILLE HANDICAP—Class F and F2 Only—$100
($235, $115, $40)—9 Furlongs

the _o for the sries of games against Tourists XI. 1, COLLETON ....... Ae ie. Fran, 2D. soewa OO Crossley
change of programme was agreed to by the Council, It had
been planned to combine the Leeward and Windward to meet the POE aie: til + 1 1b Me GA, Walants seeKey Wilder

3, FIRST FLIGHT 114 + 1% Mr. F. E, C, Bethell

Jockey Yvonet
TIME: 2.00. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $2.86; Place: $1.68; $2.06.

FORECAST: $15.48.

ALSO RAN: Bonnie Lass (90 + 14 lbs. Ali); April Flowers (126
lbs,. P. Fletcher).

START: Good. FINISH; Comfortable, 14 lengths, 2 lengths.

WINNER: 3-yr.-old br.g. Restigouche-Summer Breeze.

TRAINER: Mr. J. W. Chandler.

24th Race:

Tourists and the South and Central.

The new plans call for a match between Windward and Leeward
anc another between South and Central. On the showing of play-
ers in these two preliminary games the Selections Committee will
select a Representative Country XI to meet the Tourists.

After the Test against the Tourists it is hoped to play a game
against the Barbados Colts,

TRAIN THE UMPIRES

o meeting approved a scheme for the training of umpires in

League Cricket. In future Umpires will be called to register
each season, The registration fee will be sixty cents. The League
will run a class of instructions and all umpires will be invited to
attend. This will be followed by an examination on the results of 1. ATOMIC II
which Umpires will be graded. A Class Umpires will be entitled } 9 PHARLITE
to receive 84 cents per day and B class 60. Clubs will mot be obli- |“ © nt
gated to umpires other than those holding a certificate from the | 3. SUN QUEEN
League, TIME: 1.83%. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $2.80; Place: $1.70; $2.74.
FORECAST: $22.20
ALSO RAN: Rebate (119 lbs., Baldwin); Infusion (97 + 13 lbs.,

Wilder); Gun Site (133 lbs., Crossley).

START: Good. FINISH: Close, head, 4 length.
WINNER: 6-yr.-old b.h. O,T.C.-April Showers.
TRAINER: Dr, C. A. Evelyn.

W

you need to put back strength and
energy. PHOSFERINE soon rex
vives the appetite and, in so doing,
it revives keenness for work, for
enterprise. PHOSFERINE helps
to build up staying power—gives
you reserve of patience and good-
will when you need them most.
Try this grand tonic today. In
liquid or tablet form. 2 Tablets
of PHOSFERINE equal 10 drops.

‘THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS

for Depression, Debility, Indigestion, Sleeplessness, and
ofter Influenza,

FINAL HANDICAP—Class A and Lower—$i,009
($335, $165, $60)—71%4 Furlongs

125 lbs. Mr, James Chin
111 lbs. Mr. Clyde Vierra

Jockey Lutchman
117 lbs. Mr. J. W. Chandler Jockey Holder

Jockey O'Neil”

|e
“4 MAY ENTER SENIOR CRICKET
z HE meeting appointed a special committee comprising of two
representatives of each division together with the officers of
the League to consider to work out details of a scheme for entry
of a B.C.L, XI into the competition of the Barbados Cricket As-
sociation competition,



PUBERTY OT MERA vo.

PHOSFERINE

for more
confidence!

If lack of confidence worries you
and you feel tired and depressed
through overwork remember how
very useful PHOSFERINE has been
to others in a similar state.






Ks



. « » the sharpest edge in the world!

Trade £

nquiries

to Tr. Geddes Grant Limited
‘sa Se so





SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1950



ThirdDay ’sRacing

SEVENTEENTH RACE
ST. LAWRENCE HANDICAP
Tiberian Lady, carrying five

pounds overweight,
from last place to first by O’Neil

as the third day of the B.T.C. =

Meeting got underway. The field
was one of five, River Sprite and
Kidstead having been scratched.
As they passed the Judges the first
time, Infusion (Holder) led, fol-
lowed by Flieuxce (Thirkell), Sun
Queen (Crossley), Landmark
(Wilder) and Tiberian Lady.
Tiberian Lady moved up by the
five furlong pole overtaking Land-
mark. By the three furlong pole,
Tiberian Lady moved up again.
She continued moving up, passing
the field at the mile pole and
reaching home four lengths ahead
of Sun Queen Landmark was
third, half a length behind the
Queen.
EIGHTEENTH RACE
ROCKLEY HANDICAP
This race was easily won by
Oatcake, the opposition fading out
on the straight run for home.
Dulcibella and Firemist were
scratched in this event and four
entrants started. Oatcake was
soon in the lead with Watercress
and Kendal Fort following closely.
Kendal Fort took over the lead
while passing the stands for the
first time, but Oateake drew level
as the field approached the four
furlong pole. They bunched soon
after but nearing the three fur-
long pole Oatcake again went to

the front. Urged by Wilder he
fnereased his pace rapidly and
entered the stretch for home a

winner all the way.

At this stage he was never
seriously challenged and reached
the Judges four lengths in front of
Watercress. This horse was sec-
ond two lengths away from Mary
Ann.

NINETEENTH RACE
ST. JAMES HANDICAP

Tango was scratched leaving a
field of eight, Miss Friendship
carrying 2 lbs. overweight. First
Flight (Lutchman) got off first,
followed by Apollo (P. Fletcher),
First Flight led the field from
pole to pole, in spite of a dour
struggle put up by Miss Friend-
ship (Yvonet), just as the field
raced past the guns. Apollo won
by a head, while Miss Friendship
was in, half a length ahead of
Foxglove (Wilder) .

TWENTIETH RACE
GRAVESEND HANDICAP
Manu and Maytime were
scratched in this race and the re-
maining ten entrants were soon
despatched with Front Hopper
and Sun Jewel carrying 4 and 2

lbs respectively overweight.
Bachelor’s Folly wag left flat-
footed and trailed the field for
the entire distance, Blue Diamond
took the lead and passed the
stands for the first time in this
position followed closely by
Blue Grass, Vixen and Front
Hopper, At the four furlong pole
Vixen moved up, drew level with
and threatened the leader’s posi-
tion, There was some exchange of
places soon after but Blue
Diamond kept to the fore and
though seriously challenged by
Duchess, was well hustled by
jockey Lutchman to win by half a
length, Duchess (Holder up)
second place just a neck away
from Flying Ann,
TWENTY-FIRST RACE
NOVEMBER HANDICAP
Firemist and Fair Contest were
scratched leaving seven to face the
Starter, Ability carrying 2 Ibs
overweight, got the worst of the

jump, while T Lady
(Thirkell) led the Field, with
Flieuxce (Wilder) and Rebate

(Baldwin) following in that order.
Tiberian Lady increased the lead
slightly just after passing the
Paddock Bend, Rebate challenged
are es field bunched at the

‘uns out he usual ding
etnte anteee See

a

ahead of Flieuxe. The hashes ab
second a neck in front of
Tiberian Lady.

TWENTY-SECOND RACE
JUNIOR HANDICAP

Cross Roads, Hi-Lo, Consterna-
tion and Dunese were scratched
and a field of four spirited and
restless two-year-olds faced the
starter.

When the gate flew, Usher with
(Baldwin up) was totally un-
prepared but Flame Flower, the
favourite, carrying top impost of
185 lbs was quickest out of the

was piloted Fla

chute and Holder hustled the filly
to the front so that when the
Hastings Stretch was reached,

Vanguard from Soprano.

Usher trailed another four
lengths behind,

On reaching the guns, Crossley
made a great bid on Vanguard
and lessened the distance between
Flame Flower and his mount.

Soprano meanwhile shook off
a determined bid from Usher for
the third place.

Over the last two furlongs
home a gruelling duel ensued
between ae tun oles and Van-
guard for the first ce,

But over the last fifty yards
home, Vanguard was the stronger
finisher and Crossley piloted him
home first a length ahead of
Flame Flower.

Soprano took third place, win-
ning from Usher by two lengths.

TWENTY-THIRD RACE
BELLEVILLE HANDICAP

Three horses having been
scratched, five started with Bon-
nie Lass, carrying 14.lbs. over-
weight and First Flight and
Foxglove 1.lb. each,

First Flight hustled by Yvonet
was soon in the lead and was
being challenged by April
Flowers and Colleton as the
horses went past the Stands for
the first time. Flight
increased her lead around the
bend.

The others bunched at the
four furlong pole and challenged
stubbornly but First Flight still
kept to the fore. Down the home-
stretch however Colleton and
Foxglove challenged and over-
took her. Colteton (Crossley
up) increased his lead steadily to
win the race by a length and a
half from Foxglove. Foxglove
was second two lengths away
from First Flight.

TWENTY-FOURTH RACE
FINAL HANDICAP

This was a keenly contested
race from start to finish and
Atomic II in what was probably
an upset, won the event by a head
from Pharlite.

Five horses were scratched and
six started with Infusion carrying
13 lbs, overweight. Sun Queen
was in the lead when the horses
passed the Stands for the first
time, followed by Pharlite, Atomtt
II, Infusion, Gunsite and Rebate
in the: order mentioned. Sun
Queen was strongly challenged by
Pharlite at the four furlong pole,
but quickly shook him off. A
further bid, however, brought him
level at the Clock Atomic II who
had been moving up steadily
meanwhile made an all out effort
down the home-stretch to capture
the premier position. Phaflite
urged by Lutchman was going well
in front by now. and at one time
it appeared as if he might have
won. This’ was not to be for
Atomic II came through with a
remarkable burst of speed to
snatch the race by a head. Phar-
lite was second half a length in
front of Sun Queen.

Bw Ore Cae xkel 3
By M. Harrison-Gray
Dealer ; South,

Game all

last trump. ith had still

2 iit het correct lend. of

tn hand at
win

e 3 from his own
trick 3,
tricks.

South can







says Society Debutante

Women who are smart themselves notice more about men than
you think. Ill-shaven men seldom attract artractive women. For that
smooth brisk look which lasts well into the evening, use Colgate
Brushless Shave Cream. So guick to apply—having washed your
face, just dab it on—a few easy sweeps with the razor will give you
that smooth gleam which is the first mark of a well-groomed man!
Save precious morning minutes and assure your face the best and

most comfortable shave there is

tH!
perggoe—
“E COLGATE

!



Brushless Shave Cream



MIXED RESULTS
| Three Outstanding Sons Of O.T.C.

Seen At The November Meeting
BY BOOKIE

IN NEARLY every class at the November meeting
concluded yesterday there were mixed results. Even
= in D class where Oatcake emerged as a veritable
champion he too tasted defeat on the first day at ine
hands of Watercress. But taken as a whole it is

Wi: easily seen how well the meeting an divided when
21 winners out of the 24 races on i.e
we reelise eel — os taee have been more evenly distributed
programme. — concerned.
oo ae eke, clos A there were four different winners of the
rAncnG e vision and having already dealt with Eliza-
races made for this dis day I am left with three on the last
bethan’s victory on the t event strange to say, was the
discussion. The sprint a ; Iam
oe ‘hat I missed but in this Sun Queen,
—_ from Landmark in the last few strides.
told, just think ch difference between these two and
1 dp not aot will bear me out, They are both
corey xe j of distance 1 would place at any~
smart fillies and their range not be sur-
pai Later on however I would
thing from five to 74 furlongs. — cr nine furlongs comfortably,
prised to see either of them getting a eee her running in the Final
— eae i aed Was up against some good horses
Han a y admittedly her weight was handy, 1 thought she held
- Tn the ‘ena A class distance on Thursday, We ae —
uliarly run ee es f eee -_ ey, os small error with
we eee . ’ res have let Infusion
Aer eet, re aan eee te ahtar he could have headed them
for the asking when only two furlongs were completed, By his many
victories in Trinidad Atomic II has clearly shown that he mn =
from in front and the race in which he set up a record for
Trinidad 94 furlongs, it will be remembered, was a fae aah co Ro
affair with himself as pace maker and everything else. Consequent
when he had to be re-awakened to catch up with Rebate and Infusien
I do not think he was accustomed to this sort of thing. ,

Gun Site on the other hand is famous for his grinding efforts
over the last four or five furlongs and once more he came through to
win from behind. In fact I cannot think of any horse who has
snatched victory so consistently in tight finishes as Gun Site. A year
ago at this same meeting we saw himself and The Gambler tie up
with each other in a gruelling run over the final three furlongs of
a B class nine. Last March saw him nose out Beacon Bright at the
finish of a 74 and now we have him giving Atomic Il similar treat-
ie in the Final Handicap yesterday it was Atomic II who came
on the scene in the closing stages. Of course he could hardly have
been expected to outfoot a fast filly like Sun Queen in the early
stages. But he tracked herself and Pharlite until he finally wore
them down with a grand effort in the stretch. The time of the race
was also flattering and it is the only time for the meeting comperable
to any returned when the going has been very hard. It therefore
clearly demonstrates Atomic II’s class. Between himself, Gun Site
and Oateake, with whom I shall deal later, we saw three of the best
sons, in fact I would say “the three best sons” of O.T.C. racing at
one meeting. It is: something which perhaps we will not see again.
6 das ig to the B class we come to the gallant and good little

filly Rebate. For although classified C it is in the higher divi-
sion that she first proved her worth. She is a filly who has im)
me all along from the time she arrived. At first I thought she
might have proved herself better over sprints and being the only
horse capable of keeping up with the late September Song over the
opening two furlongs last June in Trinidad one cannot altogether
blame me for this view. However at this meeting she has shown us
that she can maintain a hot pace for 7} and 9 furlongs and hold on
very well at the finish, Of course she had a very light weight. but
she won handsomely by copious lengths after running Infusion inte
the ground,

The other two B class races went to Landmark and Tiberian Lady
both of the Chase stables, and the latter in particular showed a dash
of the old form after looking a likely brood-mare for the last
year or so. I must say I was very surprised at this. I thought that
she would never recover from that stretching which The Gambler and
Gun Site gave her last year in the same race referred to above, But
once again sound legs have enabled the beaten to live and win another





for
on
sna’

day.
‘WHE FOUR C class races were divided between, Harroween,

Flieuxce, Rebate and St. Moritz and having already dealt with the
first three, that leaves me with only St. Moritz to discuss. He is a
changed horse, of course, and indeed the change for the better only
made itself apparent between the first and second day. How so many
people heard about it I do not know but the publicity was signified
by the amount he paid in the Pari Mutuel. Providing he is got at
early in a race and kept at for the remainder of the distance, what-
ever it is, I think he will make quite a useful horse. I think he is
the first horse by Bobsleigh that I can remember being successful
out here.

Cc DOWN to class D, after the first day it was a ease of Oat-
cake first, the rest nowhere. Last August I wrote that he had
at last come to his true form since his re-entry to the racing game
and I was certainly glad to see my words coming true. His effort
in the nine furlong yesterday was most impressive as he had Kendal
Fort, Mary Ann and Watercress all well extended in turn, yet they
could not even get alongside. However it must be said that there
were excuses for all of them and with Mary Ann and Watercress
particularly. The former received a bad start and the latter looked
terribly overboard.
aoe COLLETON won two of the F Class races I cannot
say he impressed me as a likely candidate for the Trinidad
Derby. His best effort was the nine furlong race yesterday and
while he won easily with top weight of 128 lIbs., the time was
atrocious. Two minutes flat! Reminds me of High Hat and nearly
all plodders I can think of. I should imagine that a really fit and
strong Apollo would give Colleton a good beating and the way the
former ran in the Savannah Lodge Handicap suggests that he is much
the better of the two.

: Meanwhile we had a very impressive win by the reconditioned
First Flight in the F class sprint yesterday and an equally smart
second by the half-bred Miss Friendship in the same race to make
it an all-Bethell victory. It looks as if First Flight will win at
future meetings but I would beware of a trip to.'Trinidad.

Lastly I cannot end the discussion on F Class without some
reference to the Handicappers’ treatment of April Flowers. They
might have been excused for her weight in the first F Class handicap
on Thursday because she was the only aged horse in the race who
had piaced before. But surely 126 Ibs. over nine furlongs after being
third with 128 Ibs. over 7% was nonsense,
eee I would like to end up with a note on the G Class races.

Blue Grass ig obviously another smart Roidan half-bred, and it
was most enjoyable to see him win with an apprentice who did not
carry a whip. But the Handicappers hit him a hard blow by raising
him 11 ts. for a short-head victory and giving him 130 Ibs. to
shoulder over 7% furlongs. To end up I must now remove Blue
Diamond from the ‘class of hopeless ones in which I had him, and
sure enough his perseverance, which I did not expect to pay off at
this meeting, enabled him to win a good race over 7% furlongs.







the VACATOR

WATERPROOF, NON-SKID, ‘‘GROUND-GRIP’’ PUSSYFOOT SOLE...

Clarks introduce the new flexible, resilient Pussyfoot
soling to cushion the impact between feet and floor.
Made to a secret formula of Clarks of England —
the quality shoe firm with 125 years’
experience—Pussyfoot is considered to
be the ideal hot-weather soling —
light as rubber, cool as leather,
tough as you'll ever need,

Pussyfoot Soles are
fitted to Vacator
Sandals (shown here).

Vacators have unlined
uppers for coolness
and unrestricted
comfort.

pe

MADE BY C @ J. CLARE LIMITED (WHOLESALE ONLY) STREET, SOMERSET, ENGLAND
LOCAL AGERTS: AL5C RBSSELA a CO. BARBADOS

(

»







SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12,

1950

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



L.B.W. Out
In Cricket
Discussed

of
writers now
on t constitutes a fair
L.B.W.-dismissal allegations be—
ing not that they are unfair to
Englishmen, but that they inter-
pret rules differently.

For some years now there have
been proposals that with L.B.W.,,
as also with all other dismissals
it should be the duty of the
Umpire to announce when he is
of the opinion that the man is
out without the opposing side
having to yell “hows that.” The
suggestion is that it should always
be left to the Umpire to take the
initiative,

While there are those who hate
to change the ancient laws of the
game, this idea has much in its
favour and very little to be said
against it. The appeal can become
a nuisance, It can be intimidating.

New System

even the best of them, might to-
day give a man out of_a confident
appeal; when, had it been left to
them they would have given the
batsman the benefit of

be said that the bowlers have a
tough enough task as it is, with-
out making it any more difficult.
One novel suggestion appearing in
the British press is that when an
Umpire thinks a man is L.B.W.,
he should be given another “life”
like a penalty kick, in football.
Suggestion of this cricket fan is
that the batsman should stand
aside and the bowler have a free
bowl at the wicket, If he hit it the
mah would be out, but if he failed
then the batsman would go on
batting. An amusing idea but one
eafi hardly see it being received
with even the slightest favour by
the powers that sit in authority
in the Marylebone Cricket Club.
—Reuter












WEST INDIES







of the

MAY TO

Complete with scores,

Edited by Advocate

there have different Bedser



New South Wales
Pile Up 509 For 3

SYDNEY, Nov. 11.

New South Wales again flogged
the M.C.C. bowling when the
second day’s play in their match
here took place today, and they
declared at the tea interval with
a score of 509 for three. Before
stumps were drawn, the M.C.C
replied with 92 for the loss of
Washbrook’s wicket when he had
scored 50. Keith Miller carried
his overnight 99 not out to 214

before he was bowled, and in four

innings of first class cricket this

season he has an average of 308

having twice been not out. Morris
had been dismissed for 168 and
his second wicket stand with
Miller realised 265.

Then Miller and Burke put on
138 for the third wicket, and Burke
and James had an un stand
of 54 for the fourth before declar-
ation.—Reuter.

NEW SOUTH WALES—ist INNINGS



is
Total for 3 wickets declared “<3 ae
Fali of wickets:—l—52, 2—317, 3455.

éoucvur

M.C.C, ist INNINGS

Hutton not out os
Washbrook c Morris b Johnston.... 50
Extras: 4 leg byes . o. 4

BOWLING

32000
roree





Ghurkas Invaded

@ From Page 1

and commerce with India, Britain

and the United States. Its For-

eign affairs are conducted with °

the ‘negotiation and co-operation’
of India

Nepal applied to join the United
Nations in August 1949, but the 4

application was
Soviet Union.
It is the home of 30 000,000
Ghurkas from whom the British
Army’s Ghurka Brigade is_re-
cruited. Nationalists have been
agitating against this recruiting.

vetoed by the

—Reuter. 09:

RECORD TOUR

TO ENGLAND
THE ADVOCATE’S PICTORIAL

SOUVENIR
READY THIS WEEK

visit of

THE WEST INDIES TEAM 10
ENGLAND

SEPTEMBER 1950.

averages, brief details
and commentaries,
Sports Editor O.S. COPPIN.





Big Sweep Prizes

Shared By Eleven

MR. VICTOR CHASE'S bay gelding Oatcake and Mr. J. W
Chandler's brown filly Sun Queen tied with ten poifits each

J-6479 and H-2137, $17,952.00 each as the B.T.C. Autumn
Meeting ended at the Garrison Savannah yesterday.
Following is the prize list :

Ticket Horse Pts. Plate mount
J.6479 Ouatcake | Ist & 2nd} .. $17,952.00
H.2137 Sun Queenj 10 divide {

V.0998 Colleton) 3rd & 4th} 4,028 00
L.2446 Rebate { qe. t divide |

DD.2193 Atomic Il }

DD.5252 Flame Flower} 8 5th, 6th & 7th} 1,642.66
V.0190 Flieuxcé | divide j
1.3809 Landmark )

D.4414 Tiberian Lady} 7 8th, 9th & 2
BB.5556 Vanguard other horsad} 842.03

Z.4938 Watercress divide |

Other horses divide ae each,





Following is the list of horses
drawn:

Results Of 2|- B. 1200, No-to—nite

* D. 93433, Duchess; 4414 ,Tiberian
Field Sweep; 23
1e Ww Pp E. 0415, Firemist
F. 0698, Harroween
THIRD DAY G. 8926, Arunda
H. 4973, Epicure; 2137, Sun
SEVENTEENTH RACE Queen
Prize a aeets “ a ig send
First 31 29 3, 7482, endal Fort; 3809,
Ria” {oat qoreo Land Mark; 6308, ‘Ability
aah ent Pre J 6479, Oateake; 4410, Vixen
oe. 8001, Front Hopper
, hol ¢ Tickets N

218i 218s ofa, “OTia. 1060, 1068, 0408, L. 2189, Kidstead; 2349, Usher;
4 Sales ;
Osr0. cinivennia: nice 6204, Consternation; 2446,
Prize Ticket Amount Rebate
First 3595 $517.75 M. 1118, Tango
ae pd 295.86 N. 7254, St. Moritz; 0716, Fair
Fourth 3098 96 Sally; 2695, Fox Glove; 8158,



$5.00 each to holders of Tickets Nos
359. 3996, 0732, 0734, 0706, 0708, 3097, Bonnie Lass
NINETEENTH RACE O 5676, Sun Jewel
Prize Tieket Amount P. 0843, Elizabethan; 7228
nies ie . Crossroads
Sec 374, . -
feces ae fais Q. 0172, April Flowers; 1322,
a os bier Fair Contest
aan saan jooo R. 8600, Duleibella
Seventh 4112 18.00 S. 1292, Manu; 9982, Maytime;
Eighth 396: \é * *
$6:00-é0ch 40 holders oc? Piakete ‘Nos 1716, Infusion; 7026 Blue
4181. 4183, 1811, 1813, 2853, 2855, 0460 Grass
TWENTIETH RACE - 8424, Miss Friendship
cist ‘as “eee 08s, Phares it; 0408 s
Si id l 392.54 , r opra-
Third 4117 196.27 no; 0190, Flieuxce; b998
Fourth iis se.3 Colleton; 6576, Mopsy.
area oe joo W. 4113, Wilmar; 2859, (Con
Eighth 0247 10.00 High and Low; 1090, Gunsite.
wo 7 ito X. 9051, Musk; 2168, Pharlite;
1$5.00 each to holders of Tickets Nos. 9941, Kitchen Front; 2398,
2194, 2196, 1 ‘ 9, 4116, 4118, 1788, ‘90. i .
TWENTY-FIRST RACE River Sprite; 4881, Blue
Prize Ticket Amount Diamond.
First 2719 $714.60 Y. 0285, Bachelor’s Folly; 1999,
Third. ian 3 © Hite
ir be -
Fourth 4128 102.11
Fifth dass 10.00 Z. 4938, ‘php «roa
a ‘ 10.00 AA, 7118 ary Ann; 0013,
00 each to holders of Tick Nos. * 4
2718, 2720, 1086, 1658. 1410, 1412, 4127, ie cola an a ripe.
, . ard; . (Con.
TWENTY-SECOND RACE ae ‘ )
Prize Ticket Amount ae t
First 2555 $746.13 CC. 0195, Miss Panic; 8030, Nan
a pS 426.36 Tudor.
nirt
Fourth dasa jonso DD. 9252, Flame Flower; 2193,
ante 00, each to holders of Tickets Nos. Atomie II.
2554, 2556, 1140, 1142, 4976, 4578, 4883, ER 0540, First Flight.
TWENTY-THIRD RACE FF. 1790, Flying Ann.
Prize Ticket Amount
First 1944 $749.71
Second 4948 428.41
enon, ed 214.20
r
ritth S008 10.00 YOUR GUESS
san ee to holders of Tickets Nos.
ae 5, 4947, 4949, 5045, 6047, 4221, WILL WIN

TWENTY-FOURTH RACE
Ticket

a Amount FIVE DOLLARS
Seco

Third irae 215.28 SEE MONDAY’S
Fourth 0955 107.61

Sixth tor ip.00 “ADVOCATE”

010
each to holders of Tickets

$5.00 Nos.
oot 0684, 2148, 2150, 1791,
56,

1793, 0954,



HERE IS AN ESSENTIAL
ITEM EVERY MOTORIST

SHOULD HAVE IN HIS








TOOL KIT. of
A KINEX TOWING BRIDLE

In case of a break down or out of Petrol just hitch it to your

>





Car and you can easily be towed

Also Available

CELLULOID in SHEETS

56 ins. x 24 ins.

H
‘

STEEL WIRE BRUSHES

Always Dial 4269 for any make Auto part or Accessory. We



will probably have it.

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY STREET 83s

DIAL 4269

2
“ . : ; I lesb h 1, Derby Coun-
for first place and bring to the lucky holders of tickets ;, aa , i








Football Results {| NOV. 12 — NO. 145 |
The Topic |
of

LONDON, Nov
Ist_ Division
Arsenal 5, Sunderland 1
Buroley Wolverhampton

ll

Chelsea 1, Chester United 0
Everton 1,

Wanderers J }
|

Tottenham Hotspur

2

Huddersfield Town 2, Liverpool |
i
}

y 3.
Newcastle United 1, Fulham 2

Portsmouth 3 Chariton Ath-)|
letic 3.
Sheffield Wednesday 3, Aston!

Villa 2. |

Stoke City 1, Blackpool 0. j
West Bromwich Albion 0, Bol-|
ton Wanderers 1

2nd Division
Birmingham City 0,
Rovers 2

Bury 0, Burnsley 3.

Cardiff City 2, Hull City 1. |

Chesterfield 1 Luton Town 1. |

Coventry Swansea 2.

|

|

|

}
|
Doncaster
|

Grimsby Peon 7, Brentford 2
Leicester City 1, Leeds United

5

Manchester City 1, Leeds United |
a ‘

‘ }
Manchester City 2, Westham,
United 0
Notts County 1, Blackburn Rov-
ers |}
Preston North End 3 South- |
empton 2.
Queen’s Park Rangers 2, Vild
United 1.

Third Division

Bournemouth 1, Northampton
Town 0

Ipswich Town 2, Bristol Rov-
ers 3

Millwall 4, Torquay United 1.

Plymouth Argyle 4, Crystal
Palace 0.

Reading 7, Brighton 0

Southend United 3
County 0.

Walsall 1, Swindon Town

Watford 1, Aldershot 2.

Newport

0

Results F. A. Cup Fourth

Hertford United 1, Scunthorpe
United 0.

Woodford Town 1, Colchester
United 7.

Leyton Orient 1, Stockport

County 2.

Third Division
Northern
Accrington Stanley 0; Bradford

me 2.
arrow 1; Gateshead 1,

4 Bradford 2; Shrewsbury Town

Carlisle United 1; New Brighton
0

Mansfield Town 3; Halifax
‘own 1.

Oldham Athletic 0; Lincoln City

Rotherham United 2; Hartie-
pools United 1.
Southport 1; Rochdale 1.
Tranmere Rovers 3; Chester |.
Wrexham 3; Darlington 1,
4 York City 1, Crewe Alexandra

Scottish League
Division A
Airdrieonians 2; Raith Rovers §
Celtic 3; Falkirk 0.
Dundee 0; Motherwell 0.
East Fife 2; Clyde 1,
Hibernian 2; Morton 0.
Partick Thistle 1; Aberdeen 4
St. Mirren 0 Rangers 2.
Third Lanark 1; Hearts 2
Scottish League Division B.
Dumbarton 1; Albion Rovers 5.
Dunfermline Athletic 3; Queen
of the South 1.
Forfar Athletic 1;
United 3.
Kilmarnock 2; Alloa Athletio 2.
Stenhousmuir 4; Cowdenbeath

Dundee

0
Sterling Albion 1; Alloa United
3.
—Reuter,

A dress that's long and snappy



This week was one of planning
For Christmas is in sight

That's why all the young women
Parade Broad Street at night

So Wednesday Joe and Robert
Stood up a certain place

And heard a young girl bragging {

About her dress of lace

We both at once decided
To listen carefully

To hear the needy of young girls
A growing mystery

The dresses, hats and fine things
That thease two girls longed for
Without exaggeration
Would sink & man-o-war.

Why every piece of cgambric
And voile and plastic too
Was just the thing they needed
And just the thing that'll do.
. . .

A dear old lady passed by
And said “girls in my day
We bought a dress for Christmas
And that was once a year.”
. . .

But now these modern damsels
Like dresses by the score

All they like more than dressing
Is dressing little more

. . .

A morning dress, a lunch dres-
A tea and matinee dress

A sport dres, a dance dress
And Robert is the pest

A dinner dress, a night dres
Some long and some are short

Now add the cost of dremes
The bill makes Robert snort

A tight dress
One that can sweep Bridgetown
And make the City eleaner
And rid it of the dung
. .

a full dress



PAGE FIVE

When

Colds
strike





> remember
7 Phensic !

Two tablets of Phensic with a little water
will quickly check a cold or chill. Phensic
soon clears the head, takes away the burn-
ing pain behind the eyes, the aches in the
limbs, the distracting headache, and helps
to bring the temperature down. But best
| of all, Phensic relieves the depression and
| fatigue that so often accompanies colds
| and chills. Be prepared for colds —keep
| a supply of Phensic handy.

Phensic

for quick, safe relief
FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAIN, LUMBAGO
NERVE PAINS, NEURALGIA, INFLUENZA, COLDS & CHILLS

lust take

Tablets



That's generally called a slack
That makes both Joe and Robert
Pass by But then look back
Joe mid now my dear Robert
That old soul is quite right
But she had better ‘fehut-up”
That talk in town at night
Those old days were the good da
The days of “flour bags”
Trimmed with half-mile of “taw-she why’
And children lived in rags.
To-day boys it is different
Young girls love to look smart
Sometimes with this objective
To break a young man's heart
Joe mid well if they dress up
Something else they must lack
You can't suffice a woman
With belly and with back

Lou said excuse me comrades
These girk; do plan ahead
Whenever they buy these dresses
Thay live on J & R Enriched Bresd

sponsored by
J &R BAKERIES
makers of

ENRICHED BREAD
and the blenders of
J&R RUM

CHEERFUL mind

80 often goes with a
healthy body. To main-
tain good health, don’
forget essential Inner
Cleanliness. Andrews
not only provides a
sparkling, refreshing
drink — it helps to keep
you clean inside as well.

It functions by cleaning the mouth,
settling the stomach and toning up
the liver. Finally, Andrews gently
clears the bowels.

Take this “fizzy” drink whenever
you need refreshing. One teaspoonful
in a glass of water is all you need
to use,

ANDREWS tver satr

THE IDEAL FORM OF
BELG MEL ELA ES LE, OIE!

LAXATIVE

el



Strong as a lion and Guaranteed for as long as you own it—that iy
the Phillips bicycle, made by Hritish craftsmen to last you a lifetime
Look at these points of quality, Frame of true-temper steel — all-
steel hubs—heavy gauge mudguards — Dunlop tyres and rims
and oilbath gearcase, The bicycle is luturiously finished in black
enamel, or colours if required, and sparkles with heavy chromium
plating. For a bicycle that will stand up to the roughest treat~
ment and a pleasure to ride, you can’t beat a Phillips



ATS SAT: TE ARSE a
J. A. PHILLIPS & GO. LTD., BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND

a ne

x)































tf ses



Having to vacate our Premises (ROYAL STORE No; 2
HIGH STREET) within the next few weeks we are
offering to the publie large stocks of merchandise at
drastically reduced prices.

We have opened a genuine sale of hundreds of regular

items at prices which will amaze you, Here are a few

of the articles and prices:

SPUN, SILKS & CREPES 4
Attractive shades guaranteed qualities reduced

from $1.68 and $1.80 to 69c., 80., 92.

PRIN

36” wide, checked and flowered 100 designs
fast colours reduced to 52c. & 59c. ;

LADIES & MEN’S SHOES

New stock of American, Dutch and English shoes
at prices below our own cost.

MEN’S SPORT & DRESS SHIRTS

Largest selection in town, prices cut up to 30%.

i

.



MEN’S TWEEDS, TROPICALS,
FLANNELS & DOESKINS

New stocks recently arrived selling at own cost,

LADIE’'S UNDERWEAR

Cotton panties reduced to 30 & 48¢. Silk panties
excellent quality reduced to 62 & 78¢. Brassiers,
Nighties, Stockings. Also household items all at
sacrificing prices.

—

Come and see us. One glanee at our goods and prices
will convince you of the rare opportunity to shop and

save.

THE



ROYAL STORE }

NO. 2 HIGH STREET









| PAGE SIX





Law In The Colonies “Too 00 Many Hand
Rigid” Centuries-Old English
Precedents Not Enough

Criticisms Of Ex-Chief Justice

(From Our London Correspondent)
LONDON Oct. 30.

The. way in which law is ad-
ministered in the Colonies to-day
does not satisfy a former Chief
Justice in the Colonial Service,
Sir William Fitzgerald, M.C.,
K.C. He wants to see much
greater elasticity in the outlook
of the Colonial judiciary: to see
Colonial judges avoiding the
temptation to solve a dispute be-
tween two cans as to the
ownership of a mealy patch by
quoting from a_ centuries-old
judgment in England.

Sir William expressed these
views in a lecture at Overseas
House, London, on “The Consti-
tutional Foundations of the Col-
onial Empire.”

It is doubtful, he said, if even
now Colonial machinery is gear-
ed up to take its new responsi-
bilities. There has been devolu-
tion of authority to native
administration and native
elected assemblies, but the gen-
eral administration of the law is
“committed almost exchisively to
an imported judiciary adminis-
tering an imported system of ju-
risprudence,”

It was necessary to guide the
young Colonies along the road
ce of experience had
taught Britain was the right one.
But if the new theory of trustee-
ship in the Colonies was to have
any significance, respect must be
paid to those native institutions
which give meaning to the daily
life of the peoples.

In many ways it was a mat-
ter for regret that what he called
“the plantation legal system”—
the dumping down of the English
legal system with all its rigidity
—had become so firmly rooted in
African soil. While Colonial pol-
itical institutions displayed a
great diversity according to the
different people governed, yet the
judicial machinery exhibited a
monotonous sameness.

“We Nave a High Court fash-
ioned on the High Court of Ed-
ward 1. We have judges who set
fe pape the very regent rn
of applying-the legal principles
born of Nee England to con-
ditions that-have arisen in a to-
tally different atmosphere. It is
not alwayS appreciated that in-
Gennes yeople also have their
own dell nceptions which in
many nativé communities have
become as stabilised as our own.”

The D6iiinions are already
adapting “the British Commov
law to their:own different needs
rather than-—following the chan-
nel to which the peculiar needs
of the English people were
directing it-in England,

He often wondered whether we
in Britain appreciated the appal-
ling res) bility on our shoul-
ders—a responsibility. that in-
cluded within our cultural influ-
ence a quarter of the known in-
habitants of the globe, “It would
be the height of political folly”,
Sir William said, ‘to imagine that
this concourse of diversified peo-
ple can be ruled by a paper con-
stitution drafted by an alien bu-
reaucracy”

Discussing the growth of legal
and _ constitutional problems in
the Empire, Sir William pointed
out that that Empire was found-
ed in two ways—either by settle-
ment or by occupation and the
nature of its institutions, legal
and political, were greatly influ-
enced by the manner of acquisi-
tion.

Convincing proof of that was
given if we took as example the
only remaining “plantation set-
tlements” to-day, the West Indies
and compare them with the con-
stitutions of the post-plantation
period. “If the historian of to-
day wanted to paint the back-
ground of se life in England
at the e of Charles I, he
would find his canvas spread in
Barbados and the Bahamas. The

cénstitutions of those territories
are practically identical with the
constitution of England before
the Civil War. And if the local
press of these countries is a mir-
ror of public opinion, one cannot
but reflect on the resemblance
between Charles going down to
open the fatal Parliament on tha?
October day in 1640 attended by
his own chosen ministers, and the
Governors of those colonies going
down to-day to open their Leg-
islative Council attended by their
Executive Council. The funda-
mental prinicples of those consti-
tutions are similar to the princi-
les which dominated most of the

an constitutions in the
seventeenth century, and which
prevailed in Germany ‘and Aus-
tria-Hungary to a modified ex-
tent, down to the time of Kaiser
Wilhelm. The set-up was an ex-
Executive nominated by the
Crown and dependent for sup-
plies for lagislation to imple-
ment its policy on a legislature
elected by the people.

“Tt is my submission that the
constitutions of Barbados and
Bahamas ure to-day open to the
same criticism that proved fatai
to them in pagiend 300 years ago,
and in Canada about 150 years
ago. A clash between the execu-
tive and the legislature is always
a possibility, and is usually in-
evitable. . . There must be a
lack of confidence between the
executive and legislature which
is so essential to progressive ad-
ministration. If ever the need
for broadmindedness and liberal-
ity on the part of the Executive
and a desire for co-operation on
the part of the legislature was
illustrated, but I fear painfully
absent, it was in the case of our
West Indian Colonies. It must
ever be a matter for regret that
most of those plantation colonies
have had to revoke constitutions
which afforded a wonderful field
for democratic development, in
favour of the bureaucracy of
Crown Colony rule. The regret
will not be so profound if that
lesson is taken to heart in this
future empire of ours”.

"
TRUMAN'S HANDSHAKE
NEW YORK.

Ever since President Truman
shook hands with him during his
New York visit, eight-year-old
Johnnie McDermott has refused to
wash, The excuse given his mother
-—“I promised the kids at school I
wouldn’t wash my right hand
until all of them have shaken it.
I don’t think I’ll ever wash it
again.” But his mother, good
Trumanite though she is, has
other plans,
IN SEARCH OF A COOK

TORONTO.

Dan Wood, a 50-year-old ranch-
er from Gadsby, Alberta, sailed
from Montreal to Liverpool
because : “I just got plain fed up
with my own cooking and decided
to eat with my three sisters in
Cumberland.” Asked if he is
seeking a wife in Cumberland,
Wood said : “I don’t commit my-
self, but I will say I don’t intend

to come back to eating and cook-
ing by myself.”
"CHURCHILL HASHISH"
ALEXANDRIA.
A strong woman weighing 150
kilos, and aged 40 has been
arrested by Alexandria police.
She imported and sold large
quantities of hashish, each piece
being carefully packed and bear-
ing a picture of Winston Church-
ill. The pieces were known as
“Churchill Hashish,” When asked
why she had chosen Churchill as
a trade mark she replied “Mr.
‘Churchill is the best man in the
‘world and my hashish is the best
in the world.”









Sa | ey)
mr ied

ae



Sy ay “ae way
Distributors :—. Dear’s Garage Ltd.
127 Roebuck Street, Bridgetown.
Seca BOuns Rede CCI the



A,
giant tyre




* for *
gruelling ¢
conditions.







mt enemas,



weep



Oe ww




MG manna » ) 32.



Bells For

«

Barbados ?
(From Our London Correspondent
LONDON

During the year 1949-50, one-
and-three-quarter million pounds
was alidcated to research in the
Colonies from Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare Funds. Since
1940, the total from the same
source has amounted to about
seven-and~a-qfiarter millions.
Colonial Governments and indus-
try assisted in the same period
with cash and gifts worth another
one-and-three—quarter million
pounds,

Is this enough? Nine million
pounds in ten years for work
that is the chief hope of the
Colonies for their future bet-
terment?

Many people, not only in the
Colonies but in Britain, think
it is not.

The question is the subject of
a leading article in the “Eve-
ning Standard” of October 31,
which deplores the fact that at
present there is a limit of two-
and-a-half million pounds on
the amount that may be spent
on Colonial Development and
Welfare research schemes in
any one year, although alloca-
tions for long term projects may
be higher,

The article cites the important
work of an East African research

“Yes, this is the Frisby
Estate Agency — Mr.
Frisby speaking...”



pioneer, Dr, Rosemary Jackson
carrying out a field survey
in the Malaya district of Tan-
ganyika. There it has been
found that infam mortality is
at the “apalling rate’ of one in
three, This survey, it is stated,
will hasten the day when modern
medical practice will reduce such
a death-rate,

“But”, asks the ‘Evening
Standard”, “are such pioneers on
the spot being given sufficient
help by the Government ct
home?”

The answer, the paper says,
is "No” and it goes on to poini
out that the East African Medi-
etal Survey, with which Dr.
Jackson works, has reported
this year that it is “seriously
hampered by lack of suitable
living and laboratory accommo-
dation.” '

According to the “Standard”,
Britain can find the additional
finance without placing yet
another burden on the “harassed
and overstrained taxpayer.” It
points to the British Council cost-
ing the nation nearly £3 million
last year and _ questions the
Council’s expenditure “on sucn
foolish projects as presenting
handbells to Barbados and reeds
for a B flat clarinet to Professor
Novakovic, of the Stankovic
School of Music, Yugoslavia.”

The Government, the paper
continues, “cannot possibly
justify expenditure on such

dubious activities when British
colonies need the money so
desperately. Britain's resources
of money and energy....must be
concentrated on the development
of the vast colonial territorics
which are the chief heritage and
trust of the British people.”








STOCKED

BY ALL

AGENTS-=

pee SS SSN
Lower Broad







e
E.A. BENJAMIN LTD.

306 Plantations Building
Street, Barbados

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Loneliest
Island Will
Be Developed

£130,000 EXPENDITURE

From Our London Correspondent)
LONDON, Nov. 1
Far away in the southern waters
of the Atlantic, mid-way between
the vast African and South Ameri-
ican continents lies the little
island of Tristan Da Cunha,—one
of the smallest British colonies.
Nine miles long and nine and a
half miles broad, it rises only one
hundred feet above the ocean sur-
face, a tiny outpost of civilisation,
a challenge to the surrounding
mighty waters.
or its population of 230, whose
only link with the outside is the
tiny radio station, life is indeed
primitive. Until recent years there
was no doctor on the island, all
medical duties being carried out
by a missionary. Now the island
boasts its own medical officers, but
so sturdy are the inhabitants that
seldom is he called upon for any
serious cases. '
To care for their frugal needs,

the islanders raise cattle, of which }|

there are about 250 on the island,
and sheep, which outnumber them
in the ratio of four to one; besides
numerous small flocks of poultry.
In recent years the population
of the island has diminished as
first one and then another of the
young men have grown tired of
the humdrum existence and set
forth to earn a living elsewhere.
The setting-up of a South Afri-
can fishery group’ a couple of
years back did something to arrest
this slow but sure exodus which
threatened eventually to make
Tristan Da Cunha an uninhabited

island.
And now comes news that the
Colonial Development Corpora-

tion, alive to the needs of the
islanders for some other form of
livelihood are planning the com-
mercial development of Tristan’s
crawfish industry.

A special vessel equipped with
deep freezing apparatus and deep
cold storage accommodation to
process and transport frozen craw-
tish tails to Capetown for the
North American and European
markets is to be provided. A can-
ning plant will be erected and
operated on the island,

The crawfish will be caught by
the local fishermen around Tristan
as well as by the fishery vessel
operating near the adjacent un-
inhabited island of the group. The
vessel will make the necessary
voyages between Tristan and
Capetown which will, in turn,
establish a regular shipping ser-
vice to the island.

The Tristan Da Cunha Develop-
ment Company which has under-
taken the initial work of investi-
gation, will now be reorganised
and the additional finance, esti-
mated at about £130,000 will be
found by the Colonial Develop-
ment Corporation.

a
KING GUSTAF’S FORTUNE

STOCKHOLM,

The business of being a king

is far from ruinous if properly
conducted, it appears, .or King
Gustaf recently is estimated to
have left just over £1,000,000.
Three factors helped him
amass this considerable for-
tune—he was notoriously econom-
ical, he was a king for almost
43 years und he lived to be more
than 92 years of age.

FORBIDDEN EXPRESSIONS
SYDNEY.

For the guidance of the notor-
iously outspoken members of the
Australian parliament, the Clerk
to the House has compiled a list
of expressions that have earned
the Speaker’s rebuke. The list
includes : assassin, coward, crea-
ture, jackanapes, imbecile, im-
postor, insect, Judas rebel, rene-
gade, scarecrow, scoundrel, thing,
traitor, trickster.

THE CALL-UP
NEW YORK.

In Green Island, New York,
William Maloney got the call-up.
He will be four in December. His
comment : “I don’t wanna go in
the army.”







LEADING STORES.







KAML LONDON Foglane

How. Ob
‘RIT GUAM

Wherever you go—
go in a Hillman Minx

nt kanal
~







GETS AWAY LIKE





toom uth -~

Beaulify every
CREOLE

TER PAINT

he perfect oil-bound
washable distemper

If unobtainable at
your dealers consult

JAMES A. LYNCH

& CO., LTD.,
AGENTS

OF YOUR HEALTH

THERE is a comfortable feeling about the house that possesses
a good watchdog, a feeling of security and peace of mind.

FERROL inspires the same feeling with regard to your

builder.

FERROL IS THE WORLD'S
BEST TONIC.

Obtainable in the yellow

FERROLe="â„¢

STOKES & BYNOE, LTD. Agents.

stores, in liquid or capsule

PARKS
IN A POCKET

tt



GOES FURTHER
ON LéeSS PETROL

A SCARED RABBIT

Thousands of car buyers everywhere are turning
to this latest, smooth-running, eye-catching

Hillman MINX.

They're buying it because

it’s twice as easy to handle as any car they’ve

ever owned,

They all say

oo

Don’t buy any ear until you've

seen and driven the Minx,” Check carefully

its family-size

body; its safety all-steel

construction, its increased vision through
Opticurve windscreen and rear window; its
4-wheel hydraulic brakes and _finger-touch
steering.

Then compare its beautiful, stylish body
design with any car in its class. Take it out
on a rough road and feel how its front coil
springs blot out the bumps.
you'll regard its low petrol consumption as an

By that time,

extra dividend,
See and try for yourself.

A

health. If you take a course of six bottles of FERROL
every few months you can feel that you have taken
excellent precautions to maintain good health. FER-
ROL, with Cod Liver Oil, Iron, and Phosphorus, with

a high Vitamin A and D content, is a resistance

It is your best protection against :
any infection that is stirirng. Take some
now to ensure that this Christmas you will

be free of illness and able to enjoy the

pleasures of the holiday season.

good drug





3

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1950







Alka-Seltzer brings pleasant relief
When a busy day and a hurried
lunch add up to well-known acid
indigestion, you want quick relief.
Fortunately, First Aid for acid in-
digestion is just as well known.
Drop one or two tablets of Alka-
Seltzer in a glass of water. Watch
it fizz, then drink it down. Spark-
Gittestee
ief. Not a ive.






































tze

eee ee















STOPS ON ‘THE
FLASH OF A LIGHT










HUGS THE CURVES
LIKE A BEAR












CRUISES SERENELY













The New |
HILLMAN MINX

With Plus-Fower Engune

COLE & CO., LTD.

PR OD) OR y

Belg Pa = R-©.-0O TES GR-.O.ULP



SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1950 SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Sanaa Mae a eae aaa aaNet aaa PAIR THEM Take A Test

4 % SORT t os IF you could do equally | ASTHMA MUCUS
the following 3-letter two or more different things sim- ,
$ words out in pairs so that when ultaneously, think of Ww much Loosened First Day
a — van a central letter they time you would save! As a test Don’t let coughing, sneezing, chok
. orm T-letter w t Fo: e fw » " ing attacks of Bronchitis or Asthma
‘ emple, THY.s-ee . % of your aptitude or ability in this ruin your sleep and energy another

direction, try drawing a circle] day or night without trying MEN-

PAGE SEVEN









with your left hand and a square | DACO. This great medicine is not a








DRAWN & LET AIL ‘ > 5 as smoke, injection or spray, but works
FUR RAM w ith your right hand both at the through the bi ‘hum rheabing the
ed : ELF KIN same time. lungs and bronchial tubes. The first
O CUR dose starts he! nature immed!
Way “SIN ae. ee tnove tc atrangting tmscup- 2) Thus
0" . 2. Thus
HAT PIT RUN ACT co | promotes freer breathing and sounder,
J aaa yt aAQwsod 194yj,0 o1 more re! ing sleep. 3. Helps allevi-
HER AGE ar Kegebure: Necanatee on a ate Coumhing, wheesing, ;
RED THY’ ee x oe aul > Quick sat! mor

Bivurews “yeyND ‘Tred = “FeskUL DAeo -*

ALL AND :SMOT{OJ SW Paayed oq weo [TV ‘wennes Seer aa -







Rupert’s Autumn Primrose—9

:



The angry voice goes on and

a shiny top hat with a new dent w

Just squeeze Roum fom the ae tnd wee hw Beh 6



Edward moves away from the it. “Just wait until | find who did generous lather; see your hair wih health; fa ew
skittles in some aa, i that b* he storms. “I'll reach him manageable it is, Wiss a wondertel difheosse makes to hats
throwing another ball, With Rupert » 2 lesson."” ** Oh, golly, it must have of every colouring. No no rinseo—yes, eo
he peeps behind the stall. In front boca smy snes that knocked his has At all leading drugstores; in case o! beautifully easy to Brytfoam your In wubes, the Dandy and tp

1B
need apply to: H. P. Cheesman & Co,
Led.

ispers Edward, ~ What
on earth can | do abou un?" He
backs quietly out of sight and the
twe pals gaze at each other in

eeeeeu.

large economy size.
= sa. there’s more foam in

_BRYLF

is THE ORIGINAL CREAM SHAMPOO IN A TUBS

u

ot him he sees the ringmaster and
a clown. The littk man looks ver
‘amused a something, but the tall

show just precisely what the jun- one is very annoyed. He holds out

gle has to help a girl?”
Said Dyall: “I’m devoted to
leppards but never on the head.”

* * *

_ To show how Valentine Dyall—
in spite of himself—can be caught
where he feels it most, Robb draws
the proof.

To-day’s Mantrap—No. 2 in the
series—has the sort of face that
stays like that for the next ten
years. She wears a hat few could.

But the main thing about her
is the ocelot muff. . . “nice even
if a shade vulgar”, said Mr. Dyall
in a voice his radio listeners never



Just Walking Around



il seve



TODAY’S WITNESS:

gâ„¢> Valentine Dyall

By DRUSCILLA BEYFUS



3). MAN IN

a Briefly put, he expects skill too. pear |

7 BLACK He is alll that, “I-look-a-dream-in— ;

eE re > Ses ”’ girls must pray to miss. There’s only one concession.
Sa e trie

to tempt him: “A honey
MANTRAPPERS can be proud blonde drenched in mink?”

of Mr. Valentine Dyall. Men of “Not ithat corny old gag,” he
his sort bring distinction to the replied wearily.

old pastime. We tried again: “A fur finery to

BOY OBSERVERS

The Man in Black makes to the
more orthodox ideas of mantra’
equipment: pearls on black suede

gloves Perfume...
LES.







the loveliest thing



Unwanted Boys

LONDON.

Sparkling, fadeless,

Youth expert Miss Pearl Jeph-
cott, in a lecture in. London to
the National Marriage Guidance
Council, asserted that “boy ob-
serving” was the main occupation
of Britain’s Miss Teen-age, 1950.

From a survey she had made
in one town in Se Midlands,
she continued, a ird of the
girls’ time was spent in ways in
which they could, directly or in-
te meet boys.

The Reverend Henry Hughes,
of St. Barnardo’s Britain’s big-
gest orphanage home, said today
that nearly all people tmanting to
adopt babies ask for the blue-

eyed blonde girls under two





magic-wear CUTEX,
brings your hands
new admiration ..,



* your best "”—
and being beautifel. As wonderful as that, the

Miss Jephcott, a youth re- he said: ears of ; 1 difference fime perfume makes. Goya's lovely
search worker at Nottingham “Going to the movies is a 4 Boys, an added, are seldom easy to apply he \ perfumes create this minacke for you... their lilting 6
University, told her audience socially accepted way of seind asked for.—I.N.8. tine fas encgeions
sist ous oe es- eee ; . ‘af ¢3 faster, too. we,
pecially girls’ clubs, d pay “There is the queue, for - ae 4
jess attention to sport, drama and stance, then there is the close R. RICHARD RICHMAN has two and one-half miles an hour, :

handicrafts and to cater for such

interests as boys, love, romance,

homes, husbands and children,
She added: ~

“The problem of youth organi- Jephcott for “boy-watching” tongue: trated above, each exactly 1,320 his path four times he or she : R
zations is how to attract me were walking, dancing, cycling, Cecil Caesar ceaselessly sawed] feet long. : goes into the house. Breakfast chipping... and
negative, boy-obsessed type of and, with the older girls, the cedar strips. All the members of his family is served when all have entered ;
girl, and to. show her that securi- bars. comes in mck
ty onli ét ulso- be = found: Miss. Jephoott asked: take a constitutional walk If they start their peregrinations

elsewhere than in her ,
whom are all her hopes for a
home and children.”

proximity in the cinema, in the
street afterwards or in the fish
and chip shops.”

Other devices listed by Miss

“I wonder whether youth or-
ganizations should not accept the
situation for this type of girl and

Tongue Testers

READ these aloud rapidly, and
see if you can avoid tripping your

Sunhine on sh
Tioster hissed "Lester Myteri-

cally.
Lester lacked lustre.

a beautiful home surrounded
by a park. Adjoining the house
are four circular paths, ag illus-

around these paths every morn-
ing before breakfast, each having

hour.

and Mr. Richman four miles an
os eighe
fs

As soon ag each walks around

at 7:45, at what hour do they
begin to eat their breakfast ?

The polish that gordi
wears longer — re-
sists peeling and



brilliant shades.





























Miss’. Jephcott warned a for a ig OP eee sg | Glow ‘ ‘ his own path. Lizbeth, the =
Council that most young girls, of sports, handicrafts, drama an owing gleams growing green. » SHB IN WO AoW ‘ouozor0Ny DUW ,,‘o1;UL
especially from the working the like and concentrate on the Shall Sheila scallop shallops? nt walks one mile an hour; suo, panos anos seu op 0), anoit “uw
class, expected to marry young, avowed interests — boys, love, Sheathing sheer sheets. Billy, the boy, one and one-half {0Gita'eah (on uipioooe peu eq yeniul World's most popular P cova 161) mW BemD s¥ABAT | Lompex - wy é
and geared their lives to that romance and a husband?” Bothering both blue blossom miles an hour; Mra. Richman +#¥%ve1q ‘fu0] eM v zo Wanoj-U0 nail polish, Distributora; L. M. B. Magers &@ Co. Led, P.O, Box 101, Bridgetews
expectation. —I.N.8. blowers. 10 9903 O¢S'T 9} Nd Gow uOWNIOg
[edlaniiDihhihitninaiphiinhinlieisenistinnsnnie
E A
For smart women of every age-—
fre Some famous
N! f x at)
Se / TOOTAL favourites
‘ { aD )
3
s ee fs : : : ‘
LYSTAV « spun rayon fabrie of distinetive M
5 : 2 character, highly adaptable, with a sparkling -
Three years old — or thirty-three — every woman enjoys = linen-like surface and supple handle: is
= equally successful for softly draped or clean
ing her best. That’s why, once you're of an age to cut tailored styles, In many rich glowing
looking T re 7 8 prints and clear plain shades. Washable and
A ia marked TeBLLIZED for tested crease-resistance,
choose, you should always treat yourself to Tootal
TOBRALCO the world-favourite fabric for
Guaranteed* Fabrics. There’s just nothing to touch them children’s clothes—a hardwearing, long-
J 8
lusting wash cotton of unrivalled excellence.
. , hip aaa : h i " Will wash (and boil) over and over again, is
for style, enchanting good looks and beauty friendly to sunshine and exceptionally strong,
" : In an unusually wide range of gay colours
of texture. And what wonderful colours!... and delightful prints.

TOOLINA. An attractive dress fabric of spun |
rayon woven in a distinctive style. The
unusual textore heightens the appeal of plain
shades and full-eoloured prints, Similar to
LYSTAY in weight, TOOLINA is just as
versatile, tailoring or draping with equal
Washable and marked TEBILIZED

for tested crease-resistance,

What’: more, they are very hardwearing and
wash superbly. With their wide range of texture
and design, Tootal Fabrics are infinitely

suctess,

adaptable and a joy to make up. Many are marked
f ROBIA « fresh, voile-type cotton that will



4 wash and wear perfeetly, for all its delicate
TEBILIZED for tested creage-resistance. appearance, Gay and enchanting for children’s
party frocks-—-in lovely plain colours of

irresistible soft-toned prints and colour-
woven designs. Marked TeBILizeD for tested
crease-resistance,

All goods sold by the Company and bearing the



< » . . , " 7
: registered trade mark TOOTAL or the words About CREASE RESISTANCE Many Tootal
fabrics carry the additional trade mark
\ A TOOTAL PRODUCT are guaranteed by the Company venitizen. This indicates that the fabric has
% * THE TOOTAL GUARANTEE and are warranted to give satisfaction. Should been treated and tested to ensure that it will
dissatisfaction arise through any defect whatsoever resist and recover from creasing much a»
ey en wool does naturally, Not onernshable, but

in the material Tootal will replace it or refund crease-resisting. Such Cubsics wash perfectly

the price and pay the cost incurred in making up. if you avoid boiling aud strong soap solutions.

Fhe word TOOTAL and other brand names mentioned are Registered Trade Marks





PAGE EIGHT
WRI ene meen

anaavccnamanenn aed

ADNOGATE

BARBADOS 1

srr)

Printed by the Advecate Co., Lid., Broad St. Bridgetown.



Sunday, November 12, 1950



CONSTITUTIONS

THE British Empire.is so large and the
eolonies are scattered throughout the
world to such an extent that it is impos-
sible to generalize about any phase of colo-
nial life. The colonies differ in their
acquisition: by the British crown, in their
history and in their traditions.

A former Chief Justice of Palestine, Sir
William Fitzgerald; in giving a lecture on
the constitutional foundations of the Colo-
nial Empire recognized the above facts, but
still fell in the error of generalizing on
matters which are incapable of generaliza-
tion. He regretted the importation into
the colonies of British juris, rudence.
While in the African colonies there may
exist native institutions which may afford
an alternative of their own, in the West
Indies there are no native institutions, All
the inhabitants of this-area, with the ex-
ception of an insignificant number of
Caribs, have been imported either from
Africa or from the United Kingdom. Those
from Africa were uprooted from their
native element and in the course of years
have lost all affinity with the traditional
institutions of their African forebears. It
is neither regrettable nor inconvenient to
administer in. islands such as these the
common law of England with such amend-
ments and alterations as local statutes
should provide.

Sir William pointed to the constitution
of Barbados as an example of a constitu-
tion which was practically identical with

' that of England in 1640. “The fundamental

principles of those constitutions are similar
to the principles which dominated most of
the European constitutions in the seven-
teenth century. The set up was an execu-
tive nominated by the crown and depen-

dent for supplies and for legislation to
implement its policy on a legislature

elected by the people.” It would appear
however that there is a substantial differ-
ence between the constitution of Barbados
and that of England under the first Stuart.
The executive Committee Act of 1891
created a link between the Legislature and
the Executive which. provided this island
with a stable and efficient government for
almost fifty years, .., «

It was only with the giowel of party
politics that the demand grew that the
members who constituted the link between
the legistature and the executive should
all belong to the same party. The constitu-
tion of Barbados was able to adapt itself
to the changes which circumstances and
the march of history had made necessary.
The Bushe Experiment inaugurated the
system of party government in Barbados
and gave to the Executive both power and
responsibility which at one time Governor
Bushe found so sadly lacking. The up-
heavals of a civil war were not necessary

to effect the changes which were necessary
and while the clash of parties and even

more the clash of personalities deafen the
observer of Barbadian politics, yet it can
be said that it has succeeded in achieving
historical continuity in its political institu-
tions and has never had to revoke its con-
stitution in order to introduce the bureau-
cracy of crown colony government.

It is useful for English people to realise
the responsibilities which the Empire cast
upon them, it is equally important that
they should be made aware of the differ-
ences which exist in the colonies and to
guard against rash generalizations which
can only mislead,



S-BENDS
THE HIGHWAYS DEPARTMENT have
at last started on a programme which if
earried to its logical conclusion, should not
only save considerable sums of the taxpay-

ers’ money but should tend to reduce the
risks of the road.

It is many years since the ‘S’ bend at
Top Rock has been the subject of criticism.
After much prodding the Highways au-
thority have managed to purchase a strip
of land from Mr. Hinds and have started
to straighten one loop of the ‘S’ bend.

The highway along this route carries
heavy traffic and the bend is of a particu-
larly dangerous type.

When the bend has been eliminated it
will bring relief from congestion and risk
of accidents on this particular strip of the
Christ Church Highway. The Highways
Department would be well advised to con-
tinue their programme along this High-
way. The other bend of the ‘S’ should be
tackled. Fortunately there are only chattel
houses to be removed on the upper end of
the bend if or when the Highways Depart-
ment manage to acquire a right of way.
* Eliminating risks on the road is of the

first importance but this in itself is not the

only reason. for straightening bends. It
has been found in Europe and in nearby
Trinidad that although the initial expense
of straightening is heavy, upkeep on the

shortened roadway
halved.

is often more than
The winding roadways of Barbados pre-
sent a charming sight from the air but it
is doubtful whether the Taxpayers will be
satisfied to go on paying for charm that
can only be appreciated from a plane.

There are countless numbers of unneces-
sary bends and twists up and ‘down the
country that could be straightened without
great expense. Many of them occur out-
side built up areas where there would be
no expense in removing even chattel
houses. There should be little difficulty in
acquiring rights of way in these country
districts where the abandoned roadway
would be handed over to the plantation
whose land had been acquired for the new
section of the highway.

A road straightening programme cannot
be carried out overnight. It will take care-
ful planning and time.

But it is not an impossible task and
might be well worth the Department's
time in investigating the possibilities and
estimating the net saving in repair work
when the scheme is completed.



EQUALITY

Slowly but surely the old impassable
berriers are being broken down and the
ideal of equality for all citizens of the
C«mmonwealth is growing apace.

From the wording of a notice appearing
in the Press during the week it would
sc »m that another career has been opened
tc Colonials of any colour, creed or race.
In the past Colonials, except those of
ru se descent, were not elegible for

Sandhurst — the gateway to the commis-
s oned ranks of the professional British
my. At last it is being realized that the
C>lonial is as interested as any other of
His Majesty’s subjects in protecting the
Commonwealth and should be given the
right, in peace as well as in war, to serve
the King in any capacity.

It has taken many years to break down

the old prejudices which surrounded Sand-
hurst where, at one time, Blue Blood

counted far more than physical fitness and
intelligence. And, even during the recent
wars the Army, although willing to admit
all colonials to serve in the ranks, was still
reluctant to promote a certain section of
them to the Commissioned ranks. It was
the Air Force that led the way in sweeping
away the old barriers. A citizen from any
part of the Commonwealth could rise to
the topmost ranks of the R.A.F. and the
new policy paid good dividends. The R.A.F.
gained the pick of the brains from the
Commonwealth, and the experiment
proved highly successful.

The proud bearing of R.A.F. Officers of
any hue did much to show the world that
the British Commonwealth is a_ truly
anited entity and that the peoples from

every remote part of the Commonwealth
are ready and willing to flock to the de-
fence of the Commonwealth.



SHORN SHEEP

IT will be difficult to estimate, at any

been done to the barbers of this Island by
the showing of “Samson and Delilah” at a
local cinema this week.

Now that we have it from the lips of
Mr. Victor Mature (Samson) that the
strongest sheep is the one with the longest
wool, and the shorn sheep cuts a ridiculous
figure, who among us will have the cour-
age — or the stupidity — to bow his head
for a G.I. cut? Must we continue for the
sake of fashion to submit to the Delilahs
among us, whose business it is to rob us
of our strength and dignity? Let us over-
throw these tyrants who have kept us in
subjugation for so long!

According to history, ancient and mod-
ern, men have always, and for no account-
able reason, connected hairiness with
strength. A man’s strength is usually
estimated by numbering the hairs on his
chest, and a bushy beard is regarded as an
emblem of virility. But until “Samson
and Delilah” reminded us forcibly (and in
glorious Technicolor) of the fate of that
Biblical strong man, we were in danger
of forgetting the magic of the crop we
cultivate under our hats.

Now that we have been warned let us
tread the streets of the City warily lest
some wandering barber beguile us into
having a “glass-bottle” cut. Let us shun
the red and white pole.

But in gaining our new strength by the
inch, let us be big enough to spare a tear
over the fate of the tonsorial artist as he
sits regarding his empty chair and rusting

instruments, remembering a saying that
was popular some years ago — Barbers
Must Die.

learnings.
on only tax the workers’ earn-
ngs,
While drones and spivs and use-
less folk .
Regarded ‘taxes as a joke,
Driving in their luxury cars
From luxury bars to luxury bars.
* * *
Maybe as our war gets hotter
You will think “I’ll stop that
rotter,
“He has too much space to fill,
rate for a few weeks, the damage that has |...) ewsprint

SUNDAY ADVOC
THEY bo







Jusz

THAT Nv

‘Sitting

Being a welcome to Hugh
Gaitskell, new Chancellor of
the Exchequer and Blood-
sucker-in-Chief, from his
long-suffering Uncle Nat.

ELCOME Gaitskell, welcome
Hugh,
Here the column waits for

you.

Waits, a watchful living thing,

Snarling, crouching, waits
spring

ene while his victims pass,
As the tiger in the grass

Waits his moment, hour by hour,

To leap, to rend, to tear, devour.

So shall I lonely den,

With sharpened claws and savage

to

pen,
Wait, and never once relax,
Brooding. over specie ta:

Unlike your hanasu Cripps,
ho suffered but the mildest
quips

(Because it seemed unfair to jeer

At one who's always feeling
queer),

You, with young and healthy tum,

Must tremble at the wrath to
come,

Fit and youthful, busy Hugh.

Punches ‘won't be ee for you.

* *

So tell the people near ah far,
Tell the world we are at war,
At war to save the toiling masses
From legions of official asses,
From theorists and other comics
Who got degrees in economics,
But o, despite their books and

shall be shorter

still.”

But I warn you here and now

We can deal with that , (and
how),

In our trade of toil and grief

We can be verbose or brief;

We can publish, at a pinch,

A dirty crack in half an inch,

OUR READERS SAY:

Drama

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—As far as direction is
concerned, I bow to Mr. Barnes’
better jodgment, not only be-
cause he is by far the best pro-
ducer Barbados has, when he has
time for it, but because of his
obvious knowledge of this par-
ticular author,

The first ten minutes of any
play is the most difficult to put
over to an audience and I admit,
through no fault of the players,
the first scene did not get over
at all on the first night—let us
put it down to the fact that
some people were still arriving
fifteen minutes after the
had started, and the fact that
the noise from the street through
2 bar windows was “oe

the windows were

pa the fact that "the ~~ ‘pale
address system failed

for the whole of that cea ot
finally of course that the
players themselves were and
always will be nervous for the
first few minutes. Madam
Arcatis’ part was ruthlessly
ripped from the script at her
own request and we all agreed
that the
enhanced

first curtain was
by the omission.
Remembet also Mr. Barnes, that
Madam Arcatis had plenty of
time to clean up after her cycle
tide. she was “the

came to dinner.”

who

lady

There
Noel

was no
Coward that

mention by
the maid























TIGHTEN

= EXHAUST,

ATE

if AGAIN

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1950





56,6668 900CS
PSS SSO SF OOO FOO OPOOOOOGOOS SERPS OE,

AND AGAIN : .
§ SEE US FOR:—

LUMBER & HARDWARE

T ON

Establishec
1860

Incorporated
1926

T. HERBERT L

10 & 11 Roebuck Street.



FISHERMEN

we have

FISHING LINES—
9, 10, 12, 15, 18, 24, 30, 36 Ibs

WHITE COTTON LINES—
6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 24, 30 thread

STAINLESS STEEL WIRE— 19, 2!, 23 gauge

FISH HOOKS—
Nos. 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 16 1/0 2/0

COPPER PAINT—

and many other items to interest you.



4 gin. tins

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.,
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

PHONES 4472 and 4687

LTD.,

Gust Like Cow's Milk

re

FULL CREAM a,
MILK POWDER

RICH IN CREAM
EXCELLENT FOR









On The Peace
By NATHANIEL GUEBKINS

Or, if harassed, give the bird
In one short, sharp, four-letter








LipDANO

therefore undernourished, bony
because all the surplus fat is worn

Arka gece
















word. off their bodies, writhing in un- CHILDREN & ADULTS FULL haan milk
Welcome Gaitskell, welcome comfortable beds, and red nosed e POWDER on
i Hug m se ia because they are cold. ao i
> e column waits for * * * 4
woe bse whee oi wht de Their “marmoreal emphasis on Ask for LIDANO
+ good form,” which is another way Groc
Marble Man of saying their manners are as at your os
FTER a holiday in England severe and formal as marble ;
an American has written of statuary, are therefore understand- = POPP P POOR LF
“Spartan beds, largely inedible able. cr pie



food, a marmoreal emphasis on
good form which embalms even
trivial relationships,”

Spartan beds and _ Spartan
food we admit because we are a
Spartan race.

*

They are trying to be polite
despite the handicaps of feeling
as cold as marble, having com-
plexions like veined marble and,
after a plateful of plain English ~
cooking, believing that their stom-
achs are full of marbles.
on anc All _ the same we. still
off, with all kinds cf people we frightfully fit.
never disliked, for about 2,000

NOW ON SHOW FOR THE
COMING FESTIVITIES

Smart Dress Materials

* *

We have been at war, keep
Rejections for ser-
vice with the armed forces are not

years. We have been rationed for 34 per cent. of the call-up as they %
ten years. The Kaiser and Hitler are tm America, x
ee made us poor, I Love Ana x
‘ew of us know the comfort of A captured diary taken fror % .

central heating except in offices a ear political officer oa the * MADE TO FLATTER THAT WOMANLY
and flats. That’s why we despise North Korean Army had this %
it, believe it is healthy to be cold, entry; “Kim Chok Chong is
end jump inte cold baths to in love with the daughter of FIGURE
increase our circulations anu the Pukson Hotel owner.’
keep our minds off sex, also eA
considered a Juxury sik

This horror of luxury, which that

Wwiice goes to show
Communists, however harsh
the grim discipline of their devil
worship may be, must sometimes

existed before we were pauper-
ised by Germans, also explains
the severity of English diet. Spar-

Make Your Selection from the following:

tans must not be pampered. Surrender to the emotion. that

“Plain English cooking” is makes the world go round—|¥% CREPES, SHEERS, LACES, CREPE
ey ee it Pe it = “Plain its as the bia eee -school scient—| 9

glish cooking.” Sometimes it is ists as the biologi y ,
so plain that it a fs a wild Tee SATINS ano A BEAUTIFUL ASSORTMENT

exaggeration to call
at all,

it cooking As I hide never mi a secret | ¥
of my love for Ana Pauker, the
lovely woman Communist last
heard of as Rumania’s Foreign | %
Secretary, I don’t mind admitting | $
that the walls of the Sea Nest are|
covered with messages wrung
from a full and aching heart and
written in red chalk by this foolish,
trembling hand,

Despite family protests hearts | }
pierced by arrows, true lover's
knots, “I Love Ana” and “My
Love is Like a Red, Red Rose,”
are scrawled” everywhere, %

I even drew her profile on the
dining room wall, but somebody
has added whiskers making it
look like Karl Marx.

OF TINSELS

* *

Although it can sometimes be
delicious, particularly in some
small hotels far from London, it
is usually so terrible, both away
and at home, that the majority of
Englishmen suffer from chronic
indigestion.

This has made us bad tempered
and may explain why we have
been fighting people for 20
centuries.

The cooking, the cold homes,
the uncomfortable beds may also
explain why typical Englishmen
are lean, bony, and red nosed.

They are lean because they can’t
eat much of the food and are

STOP IN TO-DAY

+

DACOSTA & CO., LTD.
DRY GOODS DEPT.



—LES.

should be a dim wit -—— as a
matter of fact I can» hardly

by the “Golfito” which anchored
im Carlisle Bay four weeks ago.

imagine a novelist in Charles I have not received it yet.
Condomins’ position employing _ We all know that the General
a dim wit, and in my humble Post Office is undergoing changes

and that some delay is inevitable,
but need that delay be quite so
long? To my enquiry by tele- |}
phone an official informed me that |}
he “had good reason for saying | {
that the postal service of NI
compared favourably with that of | {
any country in the world” and‘ }
that he knew that “deliveries in

England often took six weeks,”

opinion Joan King was admira-
ble in the part in every way

I take my hat off to you for
“discovering” her, I really feel
that our worthy § critic has
slipped up when he says, “detail
all through was sadly neglected,
from Burma curtains to Barba-
dos paper-money.” No mention




air | pone of Burma curtains,

perhaps e referred to “that

Burma shawl on the piano,” bon ae phe wing outlook hag 4

For your information that shawl my parcel, or the delivery o

ys Soi from Burma, I brought P

it back when I was there, in

fact I saw it made. The only Yotwe faithfully, PD

detail which was not correct was EDWARD CUNARD BOP IN AT =--

the Barbados paper-money and ; 1 ‘
this was used because the pound Glitter Bay,

note which he had was mislaid | St. James. .

on the night of the show. These November 11. ?

things do Happen you know, Mr
Barnes,

Clean Up

famous for the
Te Lhe Editor, The Advocate—

BEST MEALS
BEST SERVICE
BEST RUM

GODDARD'S

We are not so foolish as to
complacently rest on imaginary
laurels, We have not lost ground,
“ut unfortunately several hun-
dred dollars in the production
that is why our socks are well
and truly pulled up So are our
sleeves, Mr. Barnes for our
next show,

SIR,— With Remembrance Day
approaching on Sunday next
(12th) could not the War Meme |ff
orial be given a scrub and cleaned i
up. I do not know if it is thought |f
that by keeping it in its present
condttion it will look more ven-
erable, but it locks very sadly |f{f
neglected.

Incidentally as five years have
now passed surely the 1939—1945
panel could be added to make it

Very truly yours,
NORMAN WOOD.

Parcel Delivery

a
complete. May I suggest that it Lh
To The Bélior, The Advocate fompiets. May 1 suggest that GOLD BRAID RUM
Ssir,—. ndon firm advised
me that they had sent me a parcel TERRIER.

>.
~



x

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1950



. SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE NINE

lo. #277 ,8 88 .
A Look Around Al The Races Peliaihttiglir ttn rs
PURINA 3
a PIGEON CHOW 8







_ON RACE DAYS at the Gar- “Bank me and break me, there is the man of the roll penny board
rison, many of the thousands nothing to lose.” One will win With an oil skin table cloth St an
keep up an apparent jolfity and cecasionally, but very seldom, and over the table. he all oy
matter-of-fact air but many bear meanwhile “Bank me and break roll a penny down a stick ew ‘it
a money-crazed face. Few seem me’s” heap of coins would be it goes on any of the Ge anes



an 1 in beim wee then, - at g¢ yh bigger and bigger bers which he has marked or TD. butor

id is monev t ot, big omeiimes you will meet a son S , ‘ in;

; 3 some of the squares on the cilskin hat y
money racegoer who had made a few he will give you the same amount pit jones hangs i si u “ee .

ane a ee ee ee ee en eee

Along with the fierce sun which Successive wins—goaded on, his of money as the number indicates
makes one sweat, there is a face showing that he was only But then few seldom roll on ;
medley of various types of gaming, looking for more wins, until he number. You will hear him sa .
shouts of vendors of biack pudding eventually moves off in despair— “roll again, roll again,” as_ he
and souse, a favourable delicacy his last penny gone. As he moves shakes his tin with his easily won
even on race days. off, “Bank me” may be seen to pennies. Pi dtioe

Whseun’ tess Alieneel, dal nudge his assistant and wipe away
leer Se ca ers get the sweat that had begun to run If you come across a woman

i ast ey take to smali down his cheeks when the thought Winning regularly or taking



betting It is to the spinning came to him that he migit be Chances all the time, a looker-on

es ot take their last “broken” indeed. m will wink knowingly at another

te ee ie x. moet = the and say “but she and he is in the 4

— = is pointing s ick as Roll a Penny do, man, that is only an entice.” Be uided
itices you with his call of Another “small gamble” man is Everybody does not think so, how-

ever, and after watching the win
ner with grudging admiration
they wil! bring out their lean
purses and take a try.

A penny is a lot of money to the
many little boys who scour the
Garrison and with their heads just
above the gaming boards, they
carry drawn faces as they wish
that at least two of all those pen-
nies were theirs

It is gambling day for all. Men
skilled in throwing the dice walk

around with their portable tables poe . i ae ene A att
and when théy patch tpld Of a A HAPPY crowd enjoy the races from the shelter of some of the trees which surround the Savannah. They



“greenhorn” who is eager to Win, ny tickets and got all the thrills of the day's fun, (A wise mother lets baby decide about
fingers they will fleece him. the milk for bottle feeds. Low of energy, steady
All Self gains, consemted days, peaceful nights — these tell her whet she most
wants to know — baby is doing splendidly on Ostermilk.

Few people pay any attention
to others. It is all “self. About
the only thing you will hear them
joining in is their agreement as
to the winner of a race. Among the
crowd, Holder seems to be the
favourite. But a race is only a
brief interlude from gaming.

On the sweepstake board on
which the winning numbers are
posted up, the people group, gaz-
ing forlornly. They seem to see
every other number but theirs.
You will see a man take g two-
shilling coin out of his pocket and
by the way he fingers it, you will
know it is his last, The shrugging
of his shoulders and rushing away
to buy a ticket is as much as to
say, “Well win or lose, here goes.”

Nearly all the men smoke. Some
cannot buy cigarettes, they are
“broke” but they beg one. In their
agitation to see if their last money
on a ticket may bring home a win,
they burn down half of a cigar-
ette in one long puff,

Why can mother pin her faith so important additions are made: jron
firmly on Ostermilk? Because, where to enrich the blood — sugar to modify
breast feeding is difficult or impossible the food for tiny digestions — Vitamin
it la the perfect substitute for mother’s D to help build strong bones and
prong oe nar din pido odbta teeth. Ostermilk is made by Glaxo
milk, dried under the most hygienic Laboratories Ltd., who, since 1908,
= The protein, great body- have been pioneers in the develop-
builds, is nait easily digestible ment of the best possible foods for
by @he voller drying process. And babies.

a= OSTERMILK...

For your free copy of illustrated Baby Book—Phone 4675

|
|
|

}





ee

HARRISON'S — Broad street

;
;
|
WE NOW HAVE IN STOCK |
:

=



~
)





THE GOVERNOR, preceded by Hon. J. D. Chandler walked around at Sellers cart hundreds and hun-

ee dreds of water coconuts on the
Garrison. As they are under the
direct rays of the sun all day, the
people welcome the water coco-
nut, Sellers are skilled in cutting
open the coconuts. With their

|
|
sharp knives, it takes but a merge fs ed a '
off.

A COMPLETE RANGE OF



twist of the wrist and the top is 4

So the day passes, a day of bet- s
ting and Wend. of eating are MR, MACINTOSH, the bugler is yet going strong. He has been blowing his bugle at the races for many

drinking, leaving despair on th:
faces of many and satisfaction i
the faces of but few.

long years.

On the right, is seen perhaps the only Ascot hat at the Races yesterday. It is worn by “Charlie”.

t) HUMBER

& "> — Cycle Parts.



THESE SPARES INCLUDE:
BACK STAYS ~ GEAR CASES
CONES and NUTS MUDGUARDS

CENTRE BEARINGS FREE WHEELS
WHEEL AXLES CROWN = RACES

BRAKE GUIDES ee ee
BRAKE TUBES

BALL BEARINGS REFLECTORS
CABLES CHAIN ADJUSTERS



|
|

3 CHAIN WHEELS and CRANKS



and Dozens of other Necessary Items.

It IT'S FOR A “HUMBER”—WE HAVE IT.





lak)

THE “Advocate’s” camera-man thought this lady’s outfit one of the SOME INDIAN LADIES, in their national dress were interested specta- wr mw. §. R. BOURNE right, is congratulated by Mr. K. D, “Tommy” ) HARRISON'S Agents for “HUMBERS”

most attractive at the Races yesterday, so he snapped her. tors at the races. Their picturesque dress attracted much attention. Edwards when his horse Rebate, scored its first win.
BROAD ST.
















































PECETES FSCS STO” !

Be a Master of NEW! imPROVED
ODEX SOAP

English
a et ee , © Gets skin really clean
sian sia rie. hearts hoe to f ~ o We eo Banishes perspiration odour

express yourself attractively and

Wrap them up now for Xmas



WOVEN POPLIN SHIRTS in Stripes with
Trubenised Coller attached. Sizes 14—17






how to avoid embarrassing errors © Leaves body sweet and dainty Each $4.60 & $4.43

Many dente: say that the Wt > ssa Aiea, , ET eT a cleansing latheethat | [ll “EM AG UPC/ Ee 8 Wt 6 cameron. Teub
saoduttte dae | GbaeRes . 108) ROE Odex makes a deep oy — pa With 2 separate “Trubenised Collars ic j
Regent Institute’s Postal Course m is mild and gentle for face, han match. Each . a ; $5.36

ideal for family use.
daily baths. isi Or y JACOB'S CREAM CRACKERS .°..........4... per Tin $1.36

WALL’S OXFORD SAUSAGES ............. _ yo» 60
WALL’S PORK SAUSAGES ...... 66.6505 seees te Ti

Effective English is the best in-
vestment they have ever made.



“BENCOLA” STRIPED PY/AMAS. Smart

WRITE FOR FREE BOOKLET



Send, today to The Regent Designs. Sizes 36 to 44. Suit. .......... $5.48 MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE ............. +++ bb, ove
Gate Londo, W,, 8. Breland, fr CHASE & SANBORN COFFEE ................ 1%, 1,62
free “copy of Word GRANT'S SCOTCH OATMEAL .............. 1 32
which gives full details of the LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS “ENDEAVOUR” STRIPED CAMBRIC GRANT'S SCOTCH OATMEAL ............. ; 1b is 64





Course.
” . Hemstitched with 34 inch hem PYJAMAS, Good designs. Sizes 38 HEINZ MUSHRO!
Jrite for this interestin, ° . . - * 4 | CRE ES ogc hee Fa Sheela ee Pr 41
et NO We There is no obligation EVERYBODY! , BOD iscduninccis, wavs aang to 44 ins, Each... $6.91 & $10.23 HEINZ CHICKEN SOUP ..........0...0055. a
a ail CARR’S CUMBERLAND CAKE .......... a
Ps yr HAND PAINTED TIES with special designs, Each $2.25 KEILLER’S DUNDEE CAKE ............+++- ” 2.12
Start your Xmas _ lai KARDOMAH TIPS TEA ...........--0+0: Ye te pkg: ~.89
JUST RECEIVED Shopping early TOOTAL TIES for Boys. Smart desgins and , CHOTER TIP TBA, «nests 90s ae oom
} iP 5 CHEEMBE 6 oc ccccees ..++ per bot. 2

Attractive Colourings. Each oo... un 62c. OC, & B. MARMALADE <5. cy .ccscievcosccucs 1®tin .32
we have KRAFT MACARONI CHEESE ..... ivi itte DAR Cee

HAND PAINTED TIES for Boys in very
Attractive Designs. Each oo....c.c:cccceescteeereieennes 90c.

THERMOS VACUUM
JARS

XMAS TREES, BELLS, STREAMERS |
TREE DECORATIONS (Lovely Assortment)
TINSEL, CORD TAGS |
|

|

|

|

Order the Finest

i





Wide Mouth
8 Pint & 2 Pint Rum ;
Also JACK FROST, BALLOONS.
REFILLS A varied Assortment COCKADE

for 8 Pint & 4 Pint



Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street

Xmas Wrapping Paper, Xmas Cards
Xmas Cards in Boxes
Xmas Cards (Local Views)

FINE RUM

STANSFELD, SCOTT & Co., Ltd.



CLA LLOI LOL LOLLOO LOLA LLL A

C. CARLTON BROWNE

Wholesste & Retail) Drugecist
136, Reebuck St. Dial 2813

SOSOSSOSSSENSESLESOUEZ*





j
i
}

PRPVPBLLLLLPBPPPPPPPLCPLLLESF GEESE
69S9SSS908%

SOROS





\



|
|
{





PAGE TEN

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



News From Britain
Hy David Temple Roberts

LONDON, Noy. 3. f
Winston Churchill pulled his building 300,000 houses a year—-/
ereatcoat about him and shiver- Labour is building 200,000. This |
ed, gstentatiously, on the Qppo- “impractical” Tory target has
itign Front Bench in the House been accepted by Churchill—who
of Commons this week. The po- has always
litical situation was warming up achieved the impossible. If the
but the complicated technical people want houses, they must
equipment for air-conditioning have houses. The Conservative |
the new House of Commons had Party is standing for this aspect |
broken down. Apparently, the of democracy; and Aneurin Bevan |
apparatus, which is said to re- the Labour house-builder is put)
move fitty toms of. hot air an in the position of saying, “You |
hour during debates, was suck- cannot have what you want.’
ing away the natural warmth of Curiosities In The Courts |
the glowing politicians. An old- Lord Peel has been fined}
fashioned draught blew around £25,000 for erecting without a
the Speaker’s Chair, past Win- building license, some real antique
ston Churchill and down the oak panelling in his Lancashire
frozen lines of M.P.’s. For fur- home. He was prosecuted for |
ther irritation Winston Churchill breaking a building order that
heard his resounding tones Jimits the amount we are allowed |
echoed back to him in a myriad to spend on house-improvements. |
whisper from innumerable “soft- An air-charter company was/|
speakers” toat the electrical fined £60 for breach of a regula- |
engineers had hidden around the tion that put the centre of gravity |
wood-work, The great Parlia~ of a Tudor aircraft outside the
mentarian was trying to modulate |jmits of safety. That afternoon, |
ris tones to the old conversational jast March, carrying eighty pas- |
level customary before Hitler’s sengers from a football match in|
bombs drove the Commons to, Dublin, the airliner crashed near |
refuge in the wide, high andfsCardiff. There were two survivors. |
echoing, red-leather decorated i was emphasised at the trial!
chamber of the House of Lords hat the incorrect loading of the
The next day the House was aircraft “had nothing to do with
warmer. Orders had gone forth. the crash on March 12”.
The new-fe acoustical gad- Returning to Lord Peel, the
gets on the-floor of the cham er wealthy Peer, with a taste for an-
had been switched off. But the tique panelling, in our highly
Press, in their gallery, continue taxed economy it is estimated that
to delight in Churchill’s under- paying his £25,000 fine will cost
tones which he never means to [ord Peel less than 12/6d, a week.
be heard but.get carried up, well fe can sell shares to that value to
amplified to’ the reporters. For pay his fine; he is a millionaire
the present: there is a conspiracy taxed at 97 per cent—so his actual

of silence—the comments are earnings on £25,000 of wealth are
pointed, sometimes ribald; “Han- ¢90 per annum,

card”, the “official report, is tact- G ,
; ao eorge Bernard Shaw
iully pretending not to hear. a": y thousands of words

Their Lordships, also feel un-,._ ya
comfortable now they are back int{Dave been written about Shaw



. 4, this week. There is very little
ee ke ig ang a to add. Yet I feel that there is
Chancellor the most: urbane 22¢ indirect impression missing.

a . . We have read memoirs of Shaw
member of the Government, sail 1 eminent men of letters—H. G.
he suffered real discomfort. The eee e
Lordships got used to speaking Wells, and a great dramatic critic.
; ps 5 ,, For these writers Bernard Shaw
quietly, now they cannot hear one titted Int Id before 1914 wit!
another, and the Chancellor can- Wohin | thie taatiaaites at aed
not hear who is speaking because . , . ay
a pneumatic pick ts reberberuting 1ubbed-shoulders. The great period
somewhere outside. This leads © Shavian brilliance and domina~-
. . tion of the stage was between 1890
to an acute constitutional prob.
: and 1920. Those who are of the
lem. Who should be sent to stop *
them making that noise? If it is _YOUnger generation”—indeed the
in front of the Woolsack, where Warp oF greece" ty really |
the Chancellor sits, then’ “Black come under haw’s influence— |
Rod,” the Lords’ own servant, cannot. remember the fabulous |
must call the workmen to order: ae Patt ick Campbell. For those
but if the foise fs from behind W ho were more than sixty years
the Woolsack then a deputation Pe Lag than Shaw he has always
must go to the Speaker of the een a venerable, aged myth, He}
House of Commons, and he will “28 never, quite, to be taken |
eventually send his Sergeant-at- Gouna setae fe Santee ne
_hy ch h oe 7 > recog
ie yen ie toe, er Ibsen, the understanding of Wag
So there is trouble in Parlia- "€¥, emancipation of women, an
ment the rise of socialism—had all hap
os pened before we became cor
The [ron Is Hot scious of Shaw. In fact his cause
The Conservative O; ition is were won—yet the old man live
= a sens re Party es paradoxes from h
as regaing confidence. The wild Irish mind, scintillating, cor
by-elections — parti tradicting himself, the biologis
last, at Oxford—look good. The the Fabians the Communists an
Labour ree euelaaire pro- anyone bes Souls wet nip hands o
gramme. this wint appears remember, schoo serious)
to indicate complete “loss of defending Shaw in a debate as th
nerve” in ,the face of steadily greatest figure living—I forge
gaining Conservative strength. who the rivals were, Shaw, for th:
Herbert Morrison, to placaté all. latter generation, meant principal
M,P.’s, has agreed that ‘Private ly some anarchistie aphorism
Members’ Bills” can be introduc- from ‘‘Man and Superman”, a fev
ed this i eer The Conservative remarks on communism-socialism
answer cunning stroke and a way of arguing to be founc
introducing a Bill—for freedom more in his Prefaces than hi:
and lower prices—in the House of Plays. In fact the Shaw distillec
Lords. Their majority of Peers to those sixty years his junior war
will carry it through and then a solely a stimulus for thinking, a
Private pn eae the sense of rebellion, an incentive to
young Peter orneycroft, will think what was out of the ordin-
ee ate t0 a ae it ary. We thought the plays them-
in the House. e elf is selves horribly talkative, and the
technical—designed to free part Intelligent Woman’s guide to
of the nationalised road transpor- Socialism was unreadable. No-
tation ‘industry—but it is a body, for fifty years, has bothered
shrewd stroke against the Gov- to ask, seriously, “What does Shaw
eee For eae "Ek aa ee think of it?” on any subject under
servative’s ‘a erence the sun. Everybody would know
seems to have given the Tories that Shaw could only think in
good heart. e Conference, spirals and contradictions— for all
ym ee ek got a bit po that, he was the great educator of
ween its teeth an jeman “Between the Wars”.





FEC.

: RIC
SEHOLD ELECT:
wae APPLIANCES











Bolling water in a few minutes —-this will
help you and this is whataG.E.C. Electric
Kettle will give you, Beautifully mace in
polished aluminium, it has a quick-pour-
ing spout. And it is safe—it can’t boil dry.

THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD.

BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS
REPRESENTING THE GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. LTD., OF ENGLAND



that Tories should stand fo |

undertaken and |



100 MILES ww’
at



Wants Adviser

(From Our Own Correspondent)

JAMAICA, Nov. 10

Steel Band Flop
(From Our Own Correspondent)

Proposals. have been made to the Secretary of State for the Thumping steel bands had con-
Colonies by the Jamaica Govern- siderably cooled down in the city
ment in consultation with the of St. John’s until last Saturday,
Comptroller of Development and when at least seven of them made
Welfare and Governments of their appearance prancing through
other British Caribbean colonies the streets to the Administrator’s
for the appointment of a West office with placards reading: “No
Indian Adviser to the U.K. dele- water so why more taxation”, “No

gation at the Torquay Conference. industry, no taxation; Give us

Proposals have been put forward industry then taxation”. They

which may affect Jamaica’s trade paraded past Goverment House

and the Government has therefore but the bum-bum did not attract
taken action along with other Gov- as large a mob as might have

ernments to secure more direct been anticipated, as people went

representation for the B.W.I, on with their own Saturday after-

than is at present afforded by "oon business. The show petered

U.K. delegation.

NEW EDUCATIONAL
SET UP IN JAMAICA

(From Our Own Correspondent)

JAMAIOA, Nov. 10
As from to-day the top educa-
tional administration of Jamaica
has been re-organised for exten-

ion and efficiency. The country’s ANTIGUA.
‘ducational affairs passed into the The chapel which was built by
ands of a new education author- «6 Americans for the use of the
ty set up to replace the Board armed forces at Coolidge Field
ft Education and the Jamaica has been purchased by the Angli-
chool Commission which looked pan. Diocese with all of its fur-
fler elementary and secondary nishings and fittings except for
ducation respectively, Chairman the organ, which was removed by
f the new authority is Minister (he military. It is called St.

out into hours of the usual scam-



,revalent when the Christmas
eason is approaching.

St. Michael's Antigua

(From Our Own Correspondent)

f Education Hon, J, A. MePher- Michael’s and has come into use
‘on, Vice-Chairman, the Director for the people of Barnes Hill
whose little church St. Augus-

if Education with 22 members.

NO LUNCH?

(From Our Own Correspondent)

‘JAMAICA, Nov. 10

Thousands of Kingston clerks
and shop assistants went without
lunch to-day as B.ILT.U. and U.C,
took joint action to close down city
restaurants over a wage increase
demand. The strike lasted from
ll am. to 4 pm. when it was
called off to await negotiations for
settlement on Monday morning in

tine’s and mission room were de
stroyed by the hurri



repaired so the

age are using St. Mi ’s also.



CHILD DROWNED

(From Our Own Correspondent). ..
ANTIGUA.

Five hundred P.N.P. unemployed four-year-old
workers marched on the main near Macaulay Bay last Sunday.

water laying project in Kingston Patrick ran to his mother and
western industrial area this morn- told her Eric had jumped into the
ecting to discrimination sea, The weeping mother got a
which gave B.1.T.U. men all jobs man to fish the child out. Arti-
As a result work ficial respiration was unsuccess-
was stopped and the project sus- ful. The father of the child, policed | ¢{
pended indefinitely pending a Gov- constable Hubert Jeffery, is at
present stationed in Montserrat.

ing “obj
on the proj

ernment inquiry.



5

Bes

4
%
Vv <
af
Kl
-

XR



Picture of a man about to enjoy
a new driving experience!

UPER-CUSHIONS—running on 24
Ibs. of air—do amazing things
for any car’s performance!

tear! With Super-Cushions there’s
less wear and tear, fewer repairs.















Whether your car is old or new,
Super-Cushions will make it a
better car! You'll get all these
wonderful improvements:

1, Softer, smoother ride— fewer
rattles! Bigger and softer, the
Super-Cushion absorbs all
| shocks and bumps!

| 2, Safer, easier car handling!
Super-Cushions grip the road bet-
ter! Stopping is easier, faster, safer.

| 3 Fewer rattles —less wear and

Super



.) GOODFYEAR

More people, the world over, ride on Goodyear tires than on any other make
City Garage Trading Co., Ltd

pering through the streets that is

cane, St
George’s has not yet had its roof
ie of that
arish and New Win’ ore Vil-

Three-year—old Eric Jeffery wag
a Labour Department Conference. drowned while playing with bis
brother Patrick

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1950



GIRLS! WOMEN:

try this if you’re

|| NERVOU

RESTLESS” ‘
CRANKY a
On ‘CERTAIN DAYS’
Of The Month—

Do female functional monthly
disturbances make you feel ner-
vous, fidgety, cranky and irri-
table, so tired and “dragged out”




opiates. It's made from eight of

—at such times? nature’s own precious roots and
Then do try Lydia E. Pink- herbs (plus Vitamin 5B). Pink-
| ham’s Vegetable Compound to ham's Compound ners warune!
| relieve such Pink- And that’s the kind of product
ham’s Compound is made espe- to buy! It is also a grand sio-
= cially for women. Taken regularly machic tonic.
® —it Belps build up resistance For free sample botile tear this

out and send with name and ad-
dress to Lydia E. Pinkham Medi-

about ‘s Compound is cine Company, 104 Cleveland
By that it contains no harmful Sireet, Lynn, Mass.

BOURJOIS lydia €. Pinkhane teesras

essence of Paris after dark |
v ui | A particularly fine thing
‘ Pinkham



G.B.i
FACE POWDER - ROUGE « LIPSTICK - TALC » COLD CREAM
VANISHING CREAM +: BRILLIANTINE: HAIR CREAM











ATTENTION !!
; FACTORY MANAGERS

Take this opportunity of obtaining your requirements in :—

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE
Ranging from 14 in. upwards

MILD STEEL
Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes

BOLTS & NUTS—AIl Sizes
FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill






















At PRICES that cannot be repeated.



|The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltd.

4

WHITE PARK ROAD, ST. MICHAEL '!
“DIAL 4528 "i
tt





‘The Most Attractive Styles for Ladies and Children at YOUR HOME REQUIRES. ..























Popular Prices. - ‘ ‘ : as
Ts garbage can, eavy gaivanised,
fos and Children—..... 60.0... 5 cee cee eeereeees a@ wash tub, buckets, a mincer or
LADIES and CHILDREN—A fine assortment to suit your a sink, drainboards, coal-stove,

face and Pocket.

HANDBAGS

A Style and match for all Ensembles

oil-stove or a kitchen knife now
doesn’t it? Come in, we have it!

lain Marshal Fabrics in many Shades.
Pp al
COMPARE OUR ASSORTMENT AND PRICES



A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

THE HOME FURNISHING DEPARTMENT
OF

Wm. FOGARTY LTD.

HAS EVERYTHING YOU NEED FOR
‘ YOUR DREAM HOME.

5555595595



+
.... but we have them *

Here are a few items of interest - - -

|



$ READY-MADE MOSQUITO NETS (Single & Double AGRICULTU R AL
Bed) @ $16.00 and $20.00 each respectively
S$ MOSQUITO NETTING—90, 100° & 108 inches wide— $$ FORKS
x @ $1.12, $1.49 and $1.64 per yd. respectively. 4
. een ;
18-INCH TERRY TOWELLING— .... @ .46c. per yd. DIAL |
| = Delightful :
Gee — 4235 or 4302 3
| Brighter “our Home with FURNISHING Hf. + 3
FABRICS of Enlivening Colour Schemes 3 |S :
| 3% THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM |
ab:
Now on Sale at 2 |S (Central Foundry Ltd., Proprietors)
: Win FOG ARTY LTD Corner of BROAD and TUDOR STREETS :
8 ° . Phone 4235 :

ELSSSSOSSSSSSOOSSS398SS SOSSOSSSSOSCSOSSSSSSSSSSSS9SS

s
“A
| Broo

wer

ee







a —-



SUNDAY, NOVEMBER

Puerto Rico

« « . The Lure Of Harlem
Draws Its Men Away

* By NEWELL ROGERS
NEW YORK.
THE firs: thing you need
know about President Truman's
would-be assassins is that they do
not speak and act for the Puerto
Rico people.



to

The two and a quarter million
People crowded on at lush,
tropical isle on the edge of the
Caribbean are no more represent-
ed by the gangsters than all the
Jews in Palestine were represent-
ed by the Stern Gang terrorists.

The core of the trouble is that
the Nationalists seek to end gov-
ernment of the island by America.

Pedro Albizu Campos, leader of
the Nationalist Party, has been
under police siege in his home in
San Juan for the past two days.

Albizu is a Harvard-educated
revolutionary who has served a
six years’ term in the Federal
Penitentiary, Atlanta, Georgia for
insurrectionary activity.

The would-be killers were
among the 1,000 Puerto Ricans a
month who leave their island home



Communists
On Trial

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico,
Nov. 11,
Two Communist leaders

and 140 Nationalists will
face trial in Puerto Rican
courts on charges arising
from the recent revolt here
against American rule, it was
reported to Reuter’s today.
Over 250 Nationalists and
Communists were arrested
after the unsuccessful rising
which broke out on October
30, and was followed on
November 1, by the assas-
sination atttempt by Puerto
Rican Nationalists on Presi-
dent Truman.
—Reuter.



for Harlem where half a million
Negroes live.

They pay airlines £28 each to
bring them, 60 and 80 to a plane.

Thousands of them go on the
dole and for all that they don’t
go back home.

Puerto Rico lies about 1,000
miles south-east of Florida. It is
about half the size of Wales. Pop-
ulation: Just over 2,000,000.

America took over the island
in her war with Spain in 1898.
She gave independence to Spain’s
other Caribbean colony, Cuba,
but kept the smaller Puerto Rico
as a colony. So the Puerto Ricans
became Americans.

This is why they can crowd
into New York without visas, dis-
regarding the immigration laws.

The U.S. keeps on trying to
make things better gor them in
their home island.

In 1900 Congress passed a law
to break up sugar haciendas into
500-acre peasant farms. But it
is a tough battle. Puerto Ricans
know almost nothing about grow-
ing any food except sugar.

Again and again Senate com-
missions of inquiry returned from
the island in despair. What the
Puerto Ricans like to eat is rice.
They disdain other easy growing
foods.



Said Senator Owen Brewster,
after returning from one investi-
gation: “The climate is admirable
for raising tomatoes, potatoes, and
pineapples. Fish is plentiful. But
it is difficult to wean people from
the diet in use for a century.”

But now revolution is a new

item on the menu. Already 26

*people have been killed since the

rioting started on Monday.
London Express Service.



WP
——

12,

1950

Jamaica Trying
To Attract
Industrialists

From Our Own Correspondent.)
KINGSTON, Jca. Nov. 7.
The Jamaica Government is
taking steps to make its appeal! to
industrialists more attractive. A
sub-Committee of the Executive
Council has been set up to speéd
the consideration of applications
under the Pioneer Industries (En-
couragement) Law, and to initi-
ate development proposals inde-
pendently. Consideration is now
being given to the setting up of
an Industrial Development Cor-
poration, and legislature is due
shortly to be placed before the
Legislature to increase the con-
cessions offered to new industries
in like with the Trinidad Indus-

tries ordinance.

Members of the sub-Commit-—
tee of the Executive Council are
the Financial Secretary, as Chair-
man, the two nominated members,
Sir Robert Barker, O.B.E., the
Hon, O. K, Henriques; and
three elected Ministers, the Hon.
W. A. Bustamante, Minister for
Communications, the Hon. Sir
Harold Allan, O.B.E., Minister for
Finance and General Purposes,
and the Hon. I. W. A. Barrant,
Minister for Agriculture, Lands
and Commerce.

Associated with them on the
committee are the Secretary for
Economic Development, the Com-
missioner.of Commerce and Indus-
tries and the Collector General.

The Government is now nego-
tiating with London for the rais-
ing of q £5,000,000 sterling loan
on the British Market, based on
the recent request of the British
Government to all the colonies of
the Cagibbean to furnish a fore-
cast of loan requirements for the
period 1952-56. The sum of
£5,000,000 is considered minimum
requirements for Jamaica.

This loan would be used in the
establishment of the Industrial
Development Corporation which
would promote schemes for the
expansion of agriculture and the
utilisation of products to make
Jamaica more independent of
imports and to increase the
island’s earnings from exports.
It would also give assistance to
industrialists or new industries by
way of loans; and would be used
for prosecuting schemes under the
10-year plan of development such
as irrigation, housing and land
conservation.

Spain Gives Books
To U.C.W.L.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, J’ca, Nov. 7,

A gift collection of books was
presented to the University Col-
lege of the West Indies last week-
end at a function held in the Lec-
ture Room of the Arts Faculty.
‘The gift was made by the Spanish
Government to the University and
‘was presented by Mr. David
Sabio, vice-Consul for Spain in
Jamaica, to Professor M. Sand-
mann, head of the Departmerif cf
Modern Languages at the Univers-
ity College.

Largely made through the initi-
ative of Dr. Xavier Salas, Direc-
tor of the Institute of Spain in
London, the gift was very wel-
come at the University College,
and in making the presentation,
Mr. Sabio said: “As vice-Consul
for Spain in Jamaica, I have this
great privilege to officially present
to-night at this function this col-
lection of books to the University.
I look upon this gift as a small
token of the interest my country
and the literary societies of Spain
have in this new University. They
wish yeour institution unlimited
success.”

Present at the function were
Mr. Philip Sherlock, vice-Princi-
pal of the University College and
Mr. Martin Carazo, Consul of
Costa Rica in Jamaica and Dean
of the Diplomatic Corps here.

$52,000 Is Not Enough
For Trinidad Railways

(From Our Own Correspondent.)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 5.

The Trinidad Government Rail-
ways Department has asked the
Government to increase its expen-
diture vote by $52,000 to meet the
cost of increased consumption of
gasoline and oil.

The Government has also been
asked to provide an additional
$25,000 to cover payinents to the
end of this year to meet police
gratuities, as the number of
members of the Force retiring
this year has exceeded expecta-
tions of the Police Department.





ne Rie es nt

Jockey Cuffed
Solicitor

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 9.

Twenty-nine-year old jockey
Emmanuel Lutchman of Boissiere
Village, Maraval, was ordered by
the City Magistrate to pay a fine
of $75, with an alternative of
three months’ imprisonment when
found guilty of. cuffing§ the
Assistant Crown Solicitor Mr
Neil Fitzwilliam. Mr. Fitzwilliam
told the Court that he went to
the Stirrup Cafe at Maraval one
day leaving his two year old son
in his car outside. While in the
cafe he saw Lutchman with his
head through the window of the
car while the child was backing
away. He called out and _ told
Lutchman to leave the child alone.
He was thén greeted with a flow
of abuse. As he got into the ca:
he received a cuff at the back of
his head by Lutchman.

Lutchman said he was accus-
tomed to playing with that baby
That night the baby waved to
him and while speaking to the
child Mr. Fitzwilliam came up
and chucked him and he chucked
him back, In convicting Lutch-
man the Magistrate said, “There
is too much of this sort of thing
going on—people interfering with
other people for no reason what-
ever”.



Boysie Singh's Son Among 6
Arrested In Pre-Dawn Raid
(From Our Own Correspondent.)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 5
Six people were arrested at a
hotel at 55, Queen Street, Port-
of-Spain when armed men ca”-
ried out a pre-dawn raid on
Saturday. Quantities of mari-
juana and liquor and_ alleged
stolen goods were found by the
Police. The six pérsons include
one woman, One of the men
Singh is the son of Boysie Singh
of the “Floating Corpse” case
which starts tomorrow in the
First Assize Court. (Boysie Singh
and five others were charged for
the murder of one Peyson early
in April). Entering the building
the policemen split up in groups
and entered the rooms before the
occupants could find out what it
was about. About 30 men and
women all nude or scantily
dressed, were found in the rooms.
In one of the rooms the detectives
found a radio in which was hid-
den a quantity of marijuana,
which comes under the dangerous
drugs list. In several parts of the
building,, liquor and_ kitchen
utensils alleged to have been
stolen were brought to light bv
the policemen.

Armed Police Will
Transport Prisoners

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 9,
Armed police are now being put
in charge of prisoners who are
being conveyed from the country
districts to Port-of-Spain. This,
it is believed follows two escapes
by prisoners on their way to
Port-of-Spain from rural districts
by rail. Latest escape was that of
Soogrim 19, who escaped from
police custody while being brought
from San Fernando to Port-of-
Spain.



SUNDAY



ADVOCATE

SOUTH AFRICAN

$1,000 IN
POPPIES

OVER $1,100 were collected
from the sale of poppies in the
Bridgetown and nearby areas. the
Advocate learnt yesterday. There
were not as many sellers as were
needed or possibly the returns
might have been greater. Figures
from the other areas of St. Mich-
ael and the remaining parishes
are not yet to hand.



Rice And Charcoal
Arrive

The schooner “Philip H. David-
son” arrived from British Guiana
yesterday bringing 1,750 bags of
rice for Barbados. The schooner
has also brought 600 bags of char-
coal, 29 tons of firewood, 100 wal-
laba posts and
heart,

The “Davidson” took five days
sailing from British Guiana. Skip-
per Sealy told the “Advocate” yes-
terday that he encountered quite
a lot of calm weather on the trip
up. '



Barclays Bank

(DOMINION, COLONIAL AND
OVERSEAS) ‘

BARBADOS, B.W.L
RATES OF EXCHANGE

COUNTER RATES
lith November, 1950



pieces of green-

LONDON
Selling Buying
4.8125 90 Days Sight4,7225
4.8175 0 ov oe 4.7375
1.8225 16/20 ,, vo» 4.7550
: 4/15 4, — w 4.7625
1/3 » » 477
SiMtin, M4o,) Sight 4.7750 ¥
(Min, .) Sigh ‘
, (Min. 2/-)
4.8240
(Min, $1.) Cable 4.7790
Coupons 4.70
4.8240 ‘ (Min 1/-)
(Min, 12c.) Bank of Eng-
land Notes 4.76
NEW YORK
724/10% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 70 6/10% pr.
Sight or de-
mand Drafts 70 4/10% pr.
72 4/10% pr, Cable
71% pr. Currency 69% pr.
Coupons 68 4/10% pr.
50% pr. Silver 20% pr.
CANADA
66% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 68: 8/10°5 pr.
Demand
Drafts 63.05% pr.
Sight Drafts 63 5/109 pr.
66° pr. Cable
64 5/10% pr. Currency 62 3/10% pr
Coupons 61 6/10% pr.
50% pr. Silver 20% pr.
INTER-COLONIAL
Va% pr. Demand Ya% disc,
(Min, 25¢,) (Min, 25¢.)
44% pr. Cable
(Min. 50c.)
Soupons 1%4% dise,
(Min, 25¢e.)
BAHAMAS
482.50 Demand 477,50
Cable
JAMAICA
461 1/4 Dernand 477%
(Min. 25¢.) (Min, 25¢e.)
481 1/4
(Min, 50¢.) Cable ob G
BERMUDA
Notes $4.56 or 19/-
to £1
BOLIVARES
48 Voc.

The above Rates are subject to change
without notice.





from Head and Chest Colds,

* Catareh, Bronchitis, Influenza,
Sore Throat, Neuritis, Neuralgia,
Toothache, Rheumatism,
Sciatica, Muscular Pains and Strains,
Bruises, Insect Bites, and other Aches and
Pains, rub in Thermogene Medicated Rub —
so soothing, healing and relieving !

Lumbago,

Try it!

‘You will say It ts a real blessing! ~

THERMOGENE:



MEDICATED RUB

In Jars and Tins

In Every Packet &























THERE’S PAIN RELIEF
AND TONIC BENEFIT

Yes !— Yeast - Vite
quickly soothts away
headaches, neuralgia,
nerve and rheumatic
pains — but it does
something else too !
| Because of its valu-
able tonic properties
Yeast-Vite helps you
to feel brighter, look
better, sleep more
easily and enjoy more
energy. Next time
you want pain relief
take Yeast-Vite and
get tonic benefit roo!

Coe

BPN basing on aN

eri}

INSTITUTE

FOR TEACHING TH
COLOURED PEOPLES THE BLESSINGS
OF UNCWV1LI ZATION

Fountain Plays
To-Day

WHEN the fountain in Trafal-
gar Square goes into operation
today, it will be the second time
that it has played since Remem-
prance Day last year which was
celebrated on November 6. It

layed too the week before, on

ovember | when His Excellency
the Governor, Mr. Savage arrived
in Barbados,

Some people got an unexpected
wetting on that occasion. They
were sitting comfartably on the
sides of the fountain when it was
put into operation suddenly.

OBITUARY
ERNEST ALFRED HUMPHREY

There was laid to rest on Sun-
day last ,at Mount 9 Tabor
Moravian Church, St. John in
the presence of a large gathering
cf relatives, friends and members
of the church, the last mortal
remains of E, A. Humphrey at
the age of 82 years. The de-
ceased, from early life was a
staunch member of the Moravian
Church and his devotion to that
religion set an example for many
of the younger members of the
church, He started life as a
shoemaker and by dint of hard
work and thrift rose to the top
rank of his trade,



*
Scouts Enjoy
* : .
Holiday Hike

Members of the
(Cathedral) Troop, thoroughly
eajoyed themselves when they
went on a hike on Thursday last,
9th November, under their
SM.,. Mr, S. E. Knight

rhis was their first hike since
the revival of the Group, and
it was eagerly anticipated,

Wing been postponed since
June last.

Do You Sing?

A Scout smiles and
under all difficulties.”
Eighth Scout Law
there is a difficulty
at which we may smile, but
peither smiling nor whistling
would hep except in appre-
sension, This difficulty is dis-
covered at the campfire of sing-
ong when so very few troops
can take part in the singing—
and don’t forget, campfires and
sing-songs are just as much a
art of your scout training as
notting and first-aid,

In an effort to remedy this, the
DC. wishes to meet all P.L’s and
Snior Scouts of the South
Western District .on Monday,
20t, November at Headquarters,
Peckles Road, between the hours

445 and 5.45 p.m. to teach
them and practise new Campfire
songs,

We know you are interested in
this part of your training, so please
make every effort to attend.

Remembrance Day |

Today like and with others,
we remember those who, through
lcyalty to their King and Coun-
try, laid down their lives.
aong them were many Scouts,

nd to them we dedicate these |

3rd Barbados

whistles
So the
teaches, but

‘nowadays’

few lines poor though they be,|
written by a fellow Scout. |
Vith mingled thoughts of joy and /

pain,
We think today |
©. those who for their Flag was slain |
in set affray









Through them the frantic foe was
erush'd

Not soon to rise;

‘That deafening roar, through them
is hush'd

From out the skies,

Gh! can we eer forget those men

Who gave their lives’
Homage let us pay to them,
Great sacrifice!
Through them the foe was vanquished,
Give them the praise,
\nd those who lve in anguish
The rest of their days.

Let us offer {hanks to God
Who gave the power
To those who broke the tyrants’ rod
In victory’s hour,
Cc. A. WORRELL

Planter" Comes Tomorrow

_ THE Harrison Liner “Planter”
is seheduled to arrive in port
sometime on Monday evening.

Some 40 West Indian seamen who
were selected at the local Harbour
and Shipping Department a week
ago are expected to join the
“Planter’. The 40 seamen are

ratings who will be transferred to
another ship.

ZV Sa OE ee



INDIGESTION?

Try just

ONE
DOSE

Of This=a>
Just one dose of
MACLEAN BRAND
STOMACH POWDER
relieves Flatulence
Heartburn, Nausca
Stomach Pains due to
i Prove it

POWDER

STOMACH
with the signature
Geto Aguatee—

‘in
dr
ha



MITCHAM LAVENDER:

LAVENDER WATER
TALCUM POWDER
TOILET SOAP
SHAVING SOAP
BRILLIANTINE
FROZEN BRILLIANTINE
AFTER-SHAVE LOTION

On Sale at BOOKER’S




3 Sati lhe
et rahe
Powder

Beauty, you lifted
up my sleeping eyes, 6

And filled my heart

with longing with a look.’’
JOHN MASEFIFLD

Like a happy memory, the haunting
fragrance of Mitcham Lavender brings
the English countryside to Barbados
‘a Originally made by Potter & Moore

their Mitcham Distillery two hun-
ed years ago, Mitcham Lavender
s ever since been dedicated to

Beauty the World over. ‘

So



B’DOS DEUG STORES

PAGE ELEVEN



Fh ad
FLASTOPLAST-/CiTY

you want im

ete

Se

ler tee,

Elastoplast-icity isthe ~

natural comfortable way Elastoplast
dressings stretch with every skin
movement. They mould firmly to
awkward places and enable you to
carry on whilst the wound heals
Variety of sizes in every tin.

Elastoplast
FIRST —_ eee








Onty one soap
N gives your

YA skin this exciting
Vv Bo
ef uquet

And=

other leading toilet soaps!
Proved by severest tests

BHIDGETOWN ...



= therefore -

KEEP IT CLEAN

START TO-DAY
JOIN THE

COMPETITION

Do you want a

CLEANER
BRIDGETOWN ?

2. The Advocate invites your suggestions in not more
than 200 words.

—— Se

_

a
—————=

3. The best suggestion to be received not r#ter than
December Ist, will receive $25.00.

4. A panel of three judges to be announced later will
decide the winning entry.

a

Enclose attached Coupon with each entry. '

C. B.C.

Barbados Advocate, Bridgetown.





eee







~ 24 ac, 1SLSloire1re)
> “one “vem TBC

PAGE TWELVE

Television
Could Kill
Boxing

NEW YORK,

Abe J. Greene complains that
television could kill off boxing
within five years and something
should be done about it,

Truth of the matter is that box-
ing is killing boxing and fans
who are shunning the arenas
now in favour of theit video sets,
may soon even go so far as a
television “strike.” That is, they
may dial out the fistic monstros-

Young Barbadians
In Golf Finals Today

THE final battle for the C. F
Hartison Cup at Rockley Golf and
Country Club this afternoon wil!
bring together two combinations
that should provide a test of
youth and experience: On one
side in the foursome play will be
the veteran golfers, R. P. Good-
ing and J. K. K. Christie, whose

combined handicaps total only
ten. On the other will be the
young Barbadian team of
William Atkinson and David

Inniss, rated at ten each.

Gooding and Christie played
their way into the cup final by

beating James O’Neal and Rich-
ards Vidmer, 2 up, while Atkin-

ities offered by the boxing game, 50n and Inniss beat ate#her Bar-

in favour of a good, old fashioned
hoss opry or such.

Boxing, as it’s constituted to-
day, is a poor show, It packs
punch neither in the flesh nor in
the comforts of one’s armchair.
The fight game is getting boring
to the public and isn’t going ove)
for the same reason Broadw
shows fail,

No Talent

There’s a lack of talent and the
script is oh so stale.

How else can you explain a
fight coming off next month be-
tween out-dated Joe Louis and
Cesar Brion, a worthy club
fighter at best, from the Argen-
tine?

Louis should be out of the
game. His fight with Ezzird
Charles clearly showed that the
once-invincible bomber has |ost
what he once had in abundance.
People will forget his greatness
if he continues,

a?

Instead, they may remem er
some day that Joe ended up
walking on his heels, a miserable
fate for one of the greatest
heavy-weight kings of all time.

Yet, Greéiie,
missioner of
Association, blames boxing’s fail-
ures on television, It's not tt'r-
vision, Mr. Greene.

“It is fights featuring an old
man like Louis, fight fans do '
not want to see and certainiy
won't pay to see,

Dull Fight

Brion warmed up for his chore
against Louis by decisioning one
Keene Simmons in Baltimore the
other night. It was a dull fight.
The young Argentinian, for all
his merits, must be classed as 2
“dull” fighter.

The question as to whether he
can beat Louis or not isn’t im-
portant, It promises to be a
lousy fight.

Then we have Ezzard Charles,

“heavyweight champ of all the
world, who says he will be a
“fighting champ.”

So the first defence of his title
turns out to be agdinst Nick
Barone, a refugee from the light-
heavy ranks.
ice
The “rematc! ean always
stay in usiness. They can
match Récky Graziano against
Tony Jafiro a few more dozen
times or don’t forget Willie Pep
and featherweight champion San-
dy Saddler.

They’ve got a fourth one com-
ing up. But I doubt it if many
fans want to boast about having
seen the famous “Ten Pep-
Saddler” brawls.

The one series of rematches
that should come off is the sixth
Jake Lamotta-Ray Robinsoa
fight. In this ohe we wotild
probably get the true middle-
weight king. All Ray gets from
Jake are promises.

Ray beats everybody in this
country so now the sugar man is

r to be going to Paris ‘o
eps the Frenchman Milton
tock. —(I.N.S.)















Materials from .....

Silk Linens: Printed
Designs ............

Taffetas: 4 Shades
Satins

Spun Silks: ......
Cotton Prints .........

Beautiful Shades Plain Silk

480 pairs Ballerina-pumps

badian pair, Eric Atkinson and
Colin Bayley, after three extra
holes.
matches turned toward the end
O’Neal afd Vidmer, after being
two down at the turn, played the
next six holes one under par anc
took the lead with a birdie at the
fifth. It appeared as though they

Both of these semi-final

vould be two up with three to go

when O'Neal hit the sixth green

ticely, while Gooding hooked into

the deep rough at the left.

But there the big break came

Christie scrambled a shot onto the

edge of the green, Gooding just
missed a sixteen-foot putt, leav-
ing the ball hanging on the liv
of the cup, and Vidmers putt for
a birdie ran nine inches past the
hole, leaving O’Neal with a quar-
ter stymie to negotiate to win. He
slipped the ball in the cup, but in
doing so knocked his opponents’
in with it so the hole was halved.
Gooding and Christie, taking full
advantage of this good break,
exploited their position and won
the next three holes to win the
match.

Will Atkinson and Inniss had
even a tougher uphill battle for
they were four down with four
holes to play. The situation
seemed hopeless as Eric Afkinson
and Bayley needed only to get a
half on any of the remaining
holes to wim the match. But Will
Atkinson and Inniss won them ail
and then took the decision in

pithree extra holes.



Gordon Richards Rides
200th Win For Season

SUSSEX, Nov. 11.

Gordon Richards, Britain’s
champion jockey, rode his two
hundredth win of the season here
today when he won the £500
Southern Counties Handicap
over seven furlongs, on Mr, J. V.
Rank’s Celebrate.

This 1s the tenth occasion on
which he has ridden 200 or more
winners in a single season. He
rode his first winner in 1921.
Richards has broken neatly all
of Fred Archer's records and to-
day equalled Archer's feat of
ridirig 200 or more winners for
the fifth consecutive season.

Reuter.

“It's just the opposite

to a prison ... easier to
get out than to get in.”



59$95$$SS69S9069S99S99

These Prices Cannot B

Repeated

.+. $1.12 yd.
-» $1.19 yd. 4

Ladies’ Cotton Vests, 2 for ..

Cotton Panties, 2 for..

Rayon Panties, 2 pairs 1.20

Silk Panties, per pair...

Nylons Stockings, per pair... .
FOR GENTS

Pin Stripe Tweeds $2.88 & “a

-.. $ .99 yd. se
5 62 yd. on
$1.34 pr.

84 yd.
55 yd.



MODEL STORE— DIAL 3131

Corner Broad and Tudor Streets.

Bed-Spreads very large

Record Field
Expected

For Manchester Handicap
By VERNON MORGAN

LONDON, Nov. 12.
The 1950 flat, racing season ends
on Saturday. On the closing day,
there will as usual be the Man-
chester November Handicap, one
of the principal handicaps of the
season

This race, run over the Castle
Irwell track on the outskirts of the
busy northern city over a distance
of one and a half miles is likely
to attract a record field this year,

The final acceptors numbered
47, and though a few may drop
out it seems probable that the
field will equal or beat the previ-
ous highest number of 42, which
went to the post in 1931.

The size of the field makes little
difference to the great difficulty
of the owners in winning this
prize, lt being the last chance of
so many to earn their “winter
corn”, thére are any number of
runners who might be described
as “trying for their life,’ whicn
is perhaps better put, as racing to
land the wagers of their connec-
tions.

But only one can win and only
three can place, so some substan-
tial sums of money go into the
pockets of the bookmakers.

The value of the racing is not
large as something over £2,000
goes to the winner.

It is the side bets on the race
which make it so well worth
winning. And yet few really big
gambles have been successfully
accomplished in this race. One
reason for this is because there
is no knowing under what condi-
tions the race will be run. It is
odds on it being very muddy and
probably very misty, (indeed fog
has caused the race to be abar-~-
doned on more than one occasion) .
Nothing upsets form so much as
thick mud, Then again though it
is the end of the season, and all
forms should have been fully ex-
posed there are always several
runners in the race, who find
something extra in this’ final race.

Owners and trainers therefore,
while they may have a tilt at the
ring, do not as a rule lay down the
money in quite the same way as
they do over the Cambridgeshire
and other big nears

Yet there are exceptions. When
North Drift won the race in 1931
from a record field, he brought off
a tremendous coup for his con. It
was said at the time, that his pit-
boy owner, a bookmaker, won
something like £50,000 over the
horse’s victory.

It is generally not a race for the
top wolghts. It is like most handi-
caps extremely difficult for the
punter to find the winner in sev-
eral attempts.

U.C.W.I iN RUGBY

cmos Mal Nov. 7.

ea,
Rugby returned to Jamai-

ca on y afternoon
when the University Col-

Th
team defeated the soldiers
G8.

Willie Shoemaker
Breaks Winning Record

INGLEWOOD, California,

Nov, 11.

The United States record for
riding the most winners in one
season, was broken yesterday by
Willie Shoemaker, Jockey Shoe-
maker won two races at Holly-
wood Park Racecourse, to bring
his total 6f winners for the year
to 321. Previous record of 319
was made by Yorkshire-born
Johnny Longden in the 1948
season ,—Reuter. '

$7.98 each
.. $1.00
1.00

79
1.58

o®





SUNDAY ADVOCATE

France Producing
“Best Weapens”’

MONTREAL, Nov. 10.

Jules Vioch, Freneh Defence
Minister said here ‘hat his coun-
try Was produting the world’s
best Weapons in some fields,

In Montreal to inspect defencs

industries, Moch said yesterday
that he doubted if arms stand-
ardisation would ever be
achieved among Nort Atlantic
Pact eountries.

He suggested that France might
be prepared to supply Canada

with new and superior types of
artillery in exchange for Cana-
da’s all-weather jet fighter
CF-100 if further tests were
satisfactory.

Franee, he said in an interview
was already producing:

i. A jeep which French ex
perts eonsidered better than mos‘
improved United States’ model.

2. A light tank which will be
lighter than anything comparable
preduced anywhere.

3. A gun which Moch de-
scribed only as the “best in the
world”. Its details were secret,

4. A bazooka which he de-
scribed better than American-
produced bazookas.

5. A 50-ton tank “unmatched
anywhere” and reported to carry
120 mm. cannon.—(Reuter. )



U.S. Will Not
Intervene In Tibet

CAILUTTA, Nov, 11.

The United States Ambassador
to India Loy Henderson, told
pressmen here to-day that
America did not intend to inter-
vene in Tibet and considered
the issue as “one entirely for Tibet
and China to decide.’

Henderson said. “Recognition
of China’s suzerainty over Tibet
has been a historic policy of the
United States.”

Referring to the situation in
Nepal, Henderson said that the
issue was primarily India’s prob-
lem.

“We don’t like to com
by any premature
ours,” he added

He said he was studying the
situation in Nepal.

He dénied that Nepal had ap-
pealed for American help or that
ae arms had been supplied to
er.

— (Reuter)

cate it
action of

—

pot The |

Winners
By Jon Hope

In the book business the pace
quickens. Onee again in view is
that most luctative of all objec-
tives—the gift season sales,

There is speculation on which
author will top this year’s gales.
In the non-fiction class I <
James Boswell (1740-95). H
vecently discovered London Jour=
nal should thrust him well in
ront,

Runners-up— Ceeik Woodham-
Smith, with her Florence Night-
ingale biography; Sir Osbert Sit-
well, with his final vohime of
self-revelation, Noble Essenées;
Laurence Earl, with Yangtge In-
cident. :

And the story tellers?
banking en a si
Sir Duff Coope:
Break).

Heresy ( Wall); Neil Paterson
(Behold Thy Daughterj; John
Galsworthy (with the illustrated

who last week gave up his job
as House of Commons librarien,
calls “it ‘The ‘sleeping Bacch
ca us,
Out Youre: Saunders is spen:i-
ing the winter in France.

Self-imposed chore that has
lasted three years comes to an e1d
next week with publication of
Victory Cavalcade, a compre-
hensive What, Whete, When of
World War II.

Book has been compiled by
Joseph Fenston, who took time off
from theatrical and musical
impresario duties to do it. This
is his first venture into authorship,
But he seems to have ventured
most other places—from selling
jewels in China to exporting
oranges from Brazil.

World Copyright ae

Helicopter Lands On Steps

Of St. Peter’s Basilica
VATICAN CITY, Nov. 11.

For the first time in history a
helicopter landed on the steps of
St. Peter’s Basilica today amidst
crowds of pilgrims. It bore a mes-
sage of homage and devotion to
the Pope from the families of
Italian pilots who lost their lives
in the last war.

Inside the Basilica the Pope was
granting a mass audience to
20, from many parts
of the world.—Reuter_

Write Direct or Airmail for Fatherly Advice—Free

Start training for it NOW!

There is still room at the top for the fully qualified
man who Is fitted for the job, YOU can be that
man—successfal, prosperous, with your future
assured—by studying at horne in your spare time,
geifes by the personal tuition of The Bennait

liege.

Distance makes no difference.

WE WILL HELP YOU TO
ACHIEVE YOUR AMBITION

Get your feet on the ladder of suecess TO-DAY.
Write to The Bennett College and learn how
thousands of people just like you have reached

the top with the right

uidance. A well-paid

job can be yours—atart this pleasant spare-time
study NOW.

Direct

os* ¢



Just Received ....
CIGARETTE LIGHTERS
CIGARETTE HOLDERS

BALL POINT PENS.

TORCHLIGHTS-BATTERIES & BULBS

COSMOPOLITAN PI



Mail to DEPT. 188

HARMACY. ;

J



BARBADOS BOYS’ CLUBS



YOU CAN STILL WIN A

CAR ~*~
FOR

$ 1.00

Tickets on sale

;
at Fire Station

Coleridge Street

CLOSING DATE

DRAW

25th Nov.

30th Nev.



































~ sWONDER WHEELS N°7



SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12TH, 1950

“Ce
PP ay
cy a% a
- } 2 '
WY,
1 9
ey
Fd
if



... cfeated to keep you

cool and elegant all through the day

YARDLE Y0724 LAVENDER

and ‘the luxury soap of the world?

also perfumed with the famous Yardley Lavender
Bath Salts : Dusting Powder -

oe

Tale - and othér toilet requisites

YARDLEY: 33 OLD BOND STREET: LONDON







IN A PERFECT 4 COMBINATION

All the world knows that Good stout is a gi‘eat
health builder. All the world Knows’that Oysters
have been eaten since Roman times for their



STOCKISTS
Sr Re run & Co., Ltd., & Co., Ltd.,
Ss. E. & Co., Ltd REDMAN,
D, V. SCOTT & Co., Lid., 7s Ye Co., Ltd.
SAMUEL GIBBS, CONNELL & Go., itd
GYETENS, CRONEY & Co., 1itd., C.D. ROGERS,
B. A. DANIEL & See nae ‘

Co.
L. J. WHLIAMS MARKETING Co. Ltd —Sole Agents







All the best features
are found in the

Hercules cycrez

BONDERIZED
STEEL PREVENTS





COMFORTABLE





HIGH LUSTRE
CHROME PLATING

> FOR
BEAUTIFUL FINISH

SADDLE






SUPER FITTINGS
SUCH AS
S-OPtEO HUB







THE HERCULES CYCLE & MOTOR COMPANY LTD,
BIRMINGHAM ENCLAND. ‘



The Finest Bicycle Cult ay

REPRESENTATIVES :
T. GEDDES GRANT LTD., BRIDGETOWN





|



SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1930 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN












THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER






























HIS NAME IS TONTO, DOC. J
HE'S A FRIEND!











YOU THINK WE
CAN GET THE MASKED MAN AND
THE INDIAN AS WELL A

S SOONAS THE
MAN COMES TO

DOC'S OFFICE!
) =

C FBLUER COME SOON
1S. COMFORTABLE) TRY TO KILL-UM/



MESA KID?



EE ANY KILLERS TRY
KID WHILE ms
7

THE GAMBOL

fr 4
GEORGE #) f YO te =.









w Ue CAVE
Fete One
* ‘‘Caterpillar’’ fuel-filtering method |
assures positive protection of the vital |
heart-parts...the fuel injection pumps

and valves... by preventing the pass- |
age of harmful dust or grit. Filtering

elements are of high quality, wound-



type absorbent material. These filters
are centrally located...readily access-
ible...easily replaced.

Visit us the next time you're near our
store. We'll be glad to show you the
many other advantages of owning
“Caterpillar'’ Diesel power.

ELECTRIC SALES &
SERVICE LIMITED

Tweedside Rd—St. Michael—Phone 4629 4371





BY ALEX RAYMOND

VYes...TM BUSY W NG) 00










SOSSSSSOSS SSO COPPELL LLL OEF

DRINK JEFFREY’S LAGER
BEER AND MILK STOUT

JEFFREYS OFFER TWELVE ATTRACTIVE PRICES
IN THE SECOND COMPETITION




































% r (1) A return ticket to Trinidad by 'Plane with three days’ Hotel accommodation at $7.00 per day and
¥ entertainment to Lunch by JEFFREY’S ‘Trinidad Agent.
Na We ik ate one Neale ; (2) One (1) New Raleigh Three-Speed Bicycle—Gent's Model.

(3) One (1) New Raleigh Bicycle—Lady’s Model.

(4) One (1) New Raleigh Bicycle—Boy’s Model.

(5) One (1) New Raleigh Bicycle—Girl’s Model,

(6) One (1) Case GROUSE Whisky — containing 12 bottles.

(7) One (1) Box ‘FOUR COWS’ Condensed Milk—containing 48 x 14 oz. tins.

(8) One (1) Box ‘SELECT’ Brand Powdered Milk—containing 24 x 1 Ib tins,

(9) Two (2) Tickets at Globe Theatre covering FREE admittance for one year,

(10) Four (4) Cartons JEFFREY’S Beer—containing 24 bottles each, ‘
(11) Four (4) Cartons JEFFREY’S Stout—containing 24 bottles each,

(12) Two (2) Boxes JEFFREY’S Double Scotch Ale and Two (2) Boxes JEFFREY’S Strong Ale.

NOTE:—The dealer, shopkeeper or crocer who sold BEER or STOUT to the winner of the First Prise shall be given Two (2) eases of
JEFFREY'’S BEER and Two (%) cases of JEFFREY’S STOUT FREE, The winner will decide to whom this gift is to 60.

The conditions on which Prizes are to be awarded are as follows :—

For every SIX (6) JEFFREY’S BEER and/or STOUT CAPS produced to the Agents, Messrs, 8. P.
Musson, Son & Co., Ltd., Broad Street, a numbered receipt will be given, the counter part of which will be
retained and placed in a Sealed Box in your presence. . ‘ i | i fe ld .
oo awa

On Friday, 29th December, 1950, the Seal of the Box will be broken in the presence of parties con-
cerned and twenty-four numbers will be withdrawn from the Box at random, This will be done only for
the purpose of elimination. ee eG Mews pee semi aime dm Jedd Va, w

MASH OPP Oro EMHSses Gar ce
. The holders of these twenty-four numbers will be notified and must come to Messrs. 8. P. Musson, Son
& Co.’s Office at 2.00 p.m. on Wednesday of the following week and exercise their skill in judging the weight of

containers filled with JEFFREY’S Caps, PEM) IND ile 1 de de ee,





















Wai The First Prize will be awarded to the person (one of the twenty-four) estimating the exact weight to
Mi Waly oo ee a eee Oe DEVIL? ' the nearest ounce of containers with Caps or the nearest weight thereto. The other Eleven Prizes will be

AD? WHAT IE THAT WHITE Ce wa Ut GETS UNDER WAY. awarded in their respective numerical orders and in the same way.

EAD? WHAT IF THA) * * 4












g BRAIN ¥

THE BEERS OF QUALITY ‘= ‘+ “: | +: ON SALE EVERYWHERE

JEFFREY’S ~

COP’D COME ABOARD~+}
AND LOOKED AROUND ?



SAVE
YOUR
CAPS









ene









ree tee en hae algerintt f
cova tae Wis FOATUE STON ATE tne WORLD ELT) ELS Svs y Sipepemmmnen se ear eraiee : gh | COMPENTIO “ ; AND
g Oe E Boging Secender f
; 5 7 we :

THE INNOCENT CAUSE OF IT « THE 1S PAPERS. CLEARED THE ‘CONME
STOLEN WHITE MONKEY~~/8 ABOARD | | Mt" MOVES OUT WITH THE TIDE ~~

SOMEBODY SLUGGED ME. WHAT.
HAPPENED TO DEVIL? 1 VE
GOT TO REACH THAT GHIP+~
AND GET THE WHITE
MONKEY = UU MY pes
HEAD.



WIN
SOME
OF
THESE
PRIZES

THE ANIMAL TRAPPERS’ FREIGHTER,
THE ‘CONNIE M*. o
Se 7 .*



THIS 1S YOUR LAST PASSAGE THRU
LLONGOLAND# IN THREE oe
OUR BORDERS CLOSE :
TOALL STRANGERS! (

i Wi





GS 9S 999999999 G99 F999 FF 999999 F669 99 999059999956 9965660139

e
as
$
¢é
at
&
e
eo
g
$
+
oe
%
%
e
$
Â¥
rs]
$
¢
$
t
;
4

f : }





PAGE FOURTEEN





CLASSIFIED ADS. rs" “=|

TELEPHONE 2508



DIED
HUTSON CARRIE, Belleville, died
Saturday morning and was buried at

afternoon at













430 p.m, on the same
the Westbury Cemetery







Kate and «Edith Hutson
12.13.50—in
oo
THANK
WE the undersigned beg through this
medium to thank al! those kind friends
who sent wreaths, cards and letters
and sympathised with us in our recent
bereavement caused by the death of
ERNEST HUMPHREY.
Mrs. Kathrin Humphrey . Galvin
Humphrey. Doreen Alleyne
12.11,50.—4n,
The family of EDWI FITZGERALD
INGRAM late of Cheapside, gratefully

return thanks to all who assisted during
his illness and with deepest apprecia-
tion thank all who attended the funeral,
gent wreaths, letters of sympathy or
in any other way condoled with them
in their bereavement.

Lilian Ingram (widow). Mr. and
Mrs. Seibert Ingram (son-in-law and
daughter), Dolly, Muriel: Jean: Joyce:
Pamela: Kenneth Arthur: Frank,
{chifdren). Donald and Charlotte (bro-
ther and Sister) 12.11,.50—In,

IN MEMORIAM

—_
IN ever loving memory of my dear
beloved Husband TIMOTHY CALJ.EIN-
DER who died 12th of November 1943
“Days of Sadness still come oer me,
Secret tears still freely flow.
You are os fresh in memory, Dad’s
Dear
As seven years on this shote below.”
Ever to be remembered by Carnetta
Callender (wife) Edna (daughter
12.19, 56—1n







ever loving memory ot our be-

loved one GLORIA who fell asieep on
13th November 1949

The shock was great the slow Fevere

We never thought her death wis near
Only those who love can tell

The pain of parting without farewell
The Lord who giveth has taken away
But we'll meet on those bright shores
To part no more

Winifred Small (mother) Anthony
(son) Ira Jackson and Prlgn Basra
(sisters); Alan Boyle (uncle) Smal
(grand mother) Peter (nephew)
Hassell (brother-in-law) Joan,

elma (nieces).

oe 12.11.50—1n





of our Dear be-
who

1936.

you

IN loving memory
loved mother ALICE BOURNE
departed this life on 12 November,

Fourteen years ago Alice Dear

left us

Faithful and honest in all your ways

Devoted and true to the end of your

days,

Always patient, loving and kind.

What a beautiful menmozy you've left

behind

Your loving smile, your gentle face
No ore an ti) your vacant place,
Sleep on dear Alice, your task is

o'er

Your loving hands can do no more
For those you loved you did your

best

Jehovah in his

grant you rest
(daughters)
William:

Audrey,

Louise;
Louis:
iclet: David: Alton; Corel;

family.
and all immediate family ha 49 boeminh

FOR SALE

AUTOMOTIVE

940 Hillman, Dial 2690.
Beet 11.11,50-—3n .

i a
CAR — A bargain, one (1) 15 hp 6

cylinder Fiat car in perfect condition

ob and tyres new,
Bron psa 11.11,.50--2n.

a
TRUCK--One (1) 1941 V-8 Ford Truck
just what you want for the coming

y ly to Jos, St. Hill, Tweedside
Roa’ a 9.11.50—3n

ELECTRICAL

TWO Electric gramaphones with Green
Fiver motors and Magnetic Tone arms.





Apply Olympic Store. Dias 4353.
FURNITURE
RE—New and gvod class
second-hand furniture in Mahogany,

Birch and Pine, large variety at Ralph
Beard’s Show Rooms, Hardwood Alley

edral) daily:
(Opposite the Cath . Ss
8.11 50—Hn.

8 a.m, to 4 p.m,
MISCELLANEOUS
ANTIQUES — Of eveny description
Glass, China, old Jewels, Silver
Watercolours, Early books, Maps. Auto-

graphs etc. at Gorringes Antique Shop

Royal Yacht Club.
3.9.50—t.f.n.
ARMCHAIRS—Four Berkeley Spring



Armchaim, almost new $45.00 ich.
Phone 8502, 12,11, nm.

BUGGY AND HARNESS— ey, with
wheels good, slight repairs to . Set
of harness in good order no rearonabie

offer refused. Apply to Other BE, Forde,
Middleton, St. George. 14.11,50—3n,

ENGAGEMENT Calendars in aid of
The Poppy League Fund can be had
from Da Costa, C. Shepherd, Fogarty,
Knights, Self Help, Cottage and Mayfair
Gift Shops. Price 600

12.11 .50—2n.

apneic
GALVANIZED PIPES in 4”, 3”, 21/2”,
and 2” also galvanized sheets in 6it
7ft., anl @ft, Jengths.
Tyre Company, Trafalgar



Enquire
Street.
8.11 .50—t.f.n.

Geri

HORSE AND CART—In_ good con-
dition, no reasonable offer refused,
Apply to Other E. Forde, Middleton,
St. George. 11,11,50—2n.

ED
PILLOWS — Four new Feather Pil-
lows. Apply Branker Trotman & Co,
Dial 4217. 12,11.50—1n

RUBBERISED COATS—If you are
travelling we have a fine assortment of
better quality rubberished coat; suitable
for spring and defini waterproot
with detachable hood $10.00 each, The
Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad Street.

9.1).50—4n

SHAMPOO—Would you like to use
a nice Shampoo that leaves your Hair
soft, glossy and bright. Then try Har-







riet Hubbard Ajyer. Price $1.26 Sat.
Knight; Ltd. 12.11,50—3
SAMPLES popular make Ladies’
Elastic Girdles, Foundations, Garter
Belts., Smail and medium sizes. Call
early, Parisian Dress Shop, Shepherd
St. 12,11,50—In.



“ ——
See the West Indies Cricket Team in
England. Buy a Pocket, Cinema com-
plete with Film Strip (26 Action Pic-
tures) for $1.50, on sale at HARRISON'S,
12.11,50.—1n.

STAMPS—-A ood assortment of Old
lesues Mint and used from ‘ed. fo 10/-
including many islands; also sets and
sheets of later issues. Will os the
for any reasonable offer. Apply “
wood", Hastings. 12.11.50.—1n.

————_—$—$———————
PLASTIC RAINCOATS—Bargains in
Ladies’ Plastic Raincoats $2.40 each
Plastic Head Ties in Assorted Colours





25c. each. The Modern Drea: Shoppe,
Broad Street. 9.11. n.
~ VIGRO toasted pure whole Wheat

Flakes, Stocked by Alleyne, Arthur &

Co. Ltd., W. A. Medford & Co., A. F.
Jones & Co. W. M. Ford, Empire
Pharmacy, Huskisson’s Depot, Distribu-

tor C. B. Phillips, 8 High Street.
12.71.50—1n,

We have in stock Harriet Hubbard
Ayer Skin Lotion which is a non-drying
frechener for all types of skin, and also
aids in refining the pores.—KNIGHTS
LTD. 22.11.50—3n,









We also have Harriet Hubbard Ayer
“Liquid Finish", a foundation lotion for
the olly or shiny &kin, In assorted shades,
Price $1.40 bot..-.KNIGHT’S LTD.

12,11 ,50—3n

RUPTURE
RELIEF

Thousands of ruptured men and
women have found instant relief by



wearing a Beasley Air Cushion
Appliance.

Fitted with a real inflatable air-
cushion, light, strong and easily
washed, it holds the hernia with
such gentie firmness that broken
tissues have inereased chances of
reuniting
For full details and Free Booklet
write to

REASLEY’S LTD, Dept. 190

4 Cork Street, London, W.1, England

Auto
Phone



Apply to E, Stuart
Bakery, Tudor St

Cook, Butler available.



supply, Lighting pl
vant rooms. From Nov

ee

FLAT-~Small comfortable unfurnishe?
Flat at
Vacant

Ltd., Office.

MODERN BUNGALOW—No. 4. Clifton
Terrace, Upper Bay Street.
3902 or call on Miss Alma Griffith on
premises.

















FOR RENT



by Dunusk—Colleen | will
auction during the afternoon of Satir-





SUNDAY ADVOCATE



WANTED 106
~ AUCTION HELP HARBOUR
BAY FILLY— Joan's Star’, @ yeats| BOOKKEEPER—Assistant Bookkeens:

be sold

day llth, the last day of the races,. at!

BEVERLY COURT — Deacons Road
Bryan, Popular

12.11,.50—In





BRAMBLEY, Waterford Gap, St. Mi-







Tel. 91-54. Appointment to view.
ESPERANZA — Fully furnished on
St. James Sea Coast. one 91-33.
12,11.50—6n
FARAWAY—St. Philip, on Skeete’s
Bay, Furnished, 3 » Water mill




port, 2 ser-
r ist. Dial
17.9."50—t.f.n.



























































































Highgate House, St. Michae)
now. For further particulars
4230, Wilkinson & Haynes Co.
7.11,50-—4.f.n.



Telephone
9.11, 50—-dn.

saa aetlica ile —laneinclia- ohana:
picee Soubie Gress, ? sragevtint Tooms.
a velimadbeycs i aes

OFFICE-—-At No. 6 Swan Street, suitable
for “eon Apply Thani Bros. Prince
Wm. Henry Street. 12.11.50—t.f.n,

“RESTAWILE" — Gibbs Beach, St
Peter, Three bedroom bungalow fully
furnished for January and March 1951

Wesley Bayley, High Street
12.11.50—1n,











ROOM — At Westmeath, White Par







Road. Mrs. I. Forde. 12.11,50—in.
“SUMMBRHOME”—Situate at Hastings
on the sea side.

The house oremarng
drawing, dining and breakfast rooms,
bedrooms, and all conveniences. Apply
to Mansion House, Deacons Road

5.11 ,50—2n.

PUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. PHILIP
The Farocnia: Treueurer’s Office will
be removed to Kingston, Church Vil-
lage, St. Philip from llth Nov. 1950.
The Office will be opened for busi-
ness on Mondays, Tuesdays, & Satur-
days from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and from

noon to 3 p.m.
Sed. P. S. W. SCOTT,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Philip
4.11.50—gn.

EXAMINATIONS OF THE ROYAL
SANITARY INSTITUTE

The examinations for the various Cer-
tificates of the Royal Sanitary Institute
will be held in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad,
from the llth to 16th December, 1950.

Candidates desirous of entefing
these examinations should obtain









for
the

necessary forms from the Honorary
ere? Government Buildings, The
arf.

The completed forms together with the
appropriate fees should be returned to
the Honorary Secretary not later than
the 30th November, 1950.

. N, GRANNUM,
Hon. Secty, & Treasurer, British West
Indies Board of Examiners, Royal
Sanitary Institute,

12.11.50.—2n,
NOTICE

To Applicants for Vacant
St. Michael Vestry Exhibitions
at St. Michael's Girls’ School.
Attention is drawn to the advertise





err the News.
Ph lay th ah ee

a _ v e jon
UCATIONAL' St chael's Girls’

School, which states that girls who are
over 8 and under 11 years will be ex-
amined on Friday the 17th day of Nov~
ember 1950, at 9.30 a.m.

Will parents and/or guardians of
children within this age group please
note the change in the date of the
exomination and comply with the ad_
vertisement

By_ Order,

E. C, REDMAN,
Clerk, St. Michael's Vastry.
9,11.50—3n

EDUCATIONAL
PARRY SCHOOL

There will be an Entrance Examination
for candidates desiring (9 enter tne
school next term on Monday, Novembei
27. at 10 a.m. Candidates must present
their baptismal certificates and teiti-
monials from their Headmasters.

11.41. 50—8n,

LYNCH’S SECONDARY

SCHOOL

SPRY STREET

In the July Examination of the Lon-
don Chamber of Commerce Certificates
were gained in the following subjects;—
ENGLISH: Dolores Best, Malvern Nor-
yille, Ethnie Nurse, Elma Skeete, Gozel
Waithe, Gregory Millar, Malcolm Bar-

row.
BOOK-KEEPING: Walton Millington,
COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY: Malcolm
Barrow, Lawrence Gibson,
ARITHMETIC: Malvern Norville (Dis-
tinction), Elma Skeete, Lisle Walcott,
Dolores Best, Ethnie

Lawrence Gibson.
MAR EEMA TION:
lurse (Distinction), Malvern Norville,
(Distinetion), Gozel Waithe, Malcolm
Barrow, Lawrence Gibson (Distinction),





Lisle Walcott (Distiction),
A. McD, FORDE,
Headmaster,
12,11,50,—In.



QUEEN'S COLLEGE

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS
FOR THE YEAR 1951

1, The Examinations for entrance to

Queen's College in January, 1951, will

be held at the School on Monday,

November 13th, beginning at 9 a.m.

prompt. CHILDREN ONLY will be
admitted into the Assembly Hall.

4. Each candidate must bring a testi-
monial of Conduct and Progress ‘om
the Headmistress of the School she

years of age

is now attending.
3. Candidates Over 12
must bri Mathematical instruments.

4. Candidates who have reached a
certain standard of work in their writ-
ten examinations will be summoned
gy ar an erie.

‘ ie names of girls who have
qualified for admission, through inter
view and examination, will be publishec
in the Advocate on Tuesday, December

igth, 1950, when Book Lists, ete. will
be sent to the parents/guardians,

6. Successful candidates must presen
themselves at Queen’s College o1
Monday, January 15th, 1951, at 9 an
acgor panies by their rents/guardians.

t. ie Entrance aminations for

children over 12 years of age will Inst
a whole day, therefore those candidates
must come provided with lunch.

Children under 12 years of age may
be called for at 1.30 p.m.

11,11,80—an.
ST. MICHAEL’s GIRLS’

SCHOOL
ENTRANCE EXAMINATION
Owing to the large number of candi-
dates for this Examination there has
been a change in the dates of examina-
t

ion.
All private candidates, Government
Bursary, Vestry or Friendly Society
candidates will be examined at the
School on the following dates:—
(1) Girls who are over 8 and under
1V on Bist July 1951 on Friday
i7th November at 9.30 a.m

(2) Girls who are 11 and under 12 on
Sist July 196% on Saturday 10th
November at 9.30 a.m

All candidates are asked to be at the
School at 9 a.m. Parents and Guardians
may not remain at the School during
the examination.

5.1), 00—2n

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to any person or persons
whosoever in my nume as T do not
hold myself responsible for amyone cqn-
tracting any debt of debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me

Signed COLLIN BANFIELD, }
|





Joseph
11.11.50--n, |



the B.T.C. paddock.

B. Howell we
includes
Table
ment Tables,
Botiees
Cushions) ,
Waggon, Sideboard, Side Table, Tea Trol-
ley,
China,
Pilates,

8.11.50



UNDER THE SILVER |

@hacl. From November Ist; fully furn-

ished fesidence. For particulars, Phone HAMMER

_— 10,59 .—t.28, By recommendations of Lioyds
Agents we will sell on Tuesday the

CRY RINGS — 14th, at our Mark High Street.

eee mas vital ne |} pee: Art Silk, 3 Cartons All Bran

ie ch available for | 122 Drums One-O-One, 10, Bread Tins,

= Ful ie ans a0! ped. & Tins Paint, 1 Gasotene Truek Tank.

Excell > oi bathing Pavetee Basch. Glassware and other items.

x, B ; » | Sale 12.30 o'clock,

Terms Cash

BRANKER, TOT & CO.



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Thursday 16th, by order of Mrs. J.
will sell her Furniture at
“East Wind,” Rockley New Road, which
very good Extension Dining
to seat 10; Upright Chairs, Orna-
Antique Card, Table and
Arm Chairs (Spring
Mahogany: Dinner



Morris
all in

by Beckstein, Glass and
Coffee Services, Fruit
in Entree Dishes,
Fish Knives and Forks, Tea Service,
Waiters, Spoons, Forks, Cutlery, ete.)
Folding Verandah Chairs, Clock, Pic-)
tures, Single Mahogany Bedstead, Spring
and Bed, Vanity Table (Triplet Mirrors),
M. T. Washstand, Cedar Presses, Single
Iron Bedsteads and Beds, Dressing Tables
Cedar Linen Press, Canvas Cot, West-
inghouse Refrigerator (Unit Years),
Electric Stove, Electric Oven, Kitchen
Utensils, Larder Oil Stove, Scales and
Weights, Electric Iron, Pressure Cooker,
Garden Tools, Garden Benches, Singer
Treadle Sewing Machine and other items.
Sale 11.30 o'clock, Terms Cash.
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers
12.11.50.—2n.

REAL ESTATE

Piano
Tea and
Plated Ware







A new and substantial wall Bungalow
containing Open Verandah (8 x 12), Liv-
ing room (23 ft. 6 ins. x 16 ft.) 2 bed-
rooms (14 x 12), 1 bedroom (11 x 16) with
running water, Kitchenette (8 x 12), W Cc.
& Bath (8 x 4%), water and electric light,
standing on 8,000 sq ft. land VACANT
Possession, property has 4 beautiful view
of Christ Chureh coast. For inspection
apply to 2947 R, Archer McKenzie,
Victoria Street.



12.11,50.—1n,
“BUNGALOW —At Brig Black

BUNGALOW — At __ Brighton,



at} for
| hours of 9 am. and WU a.





Oregon. . Sch.
BICYCLE-—One Child's Bicycl
ehie 2 =. ren nee sult- Wiemetad, Sch. Linsyd It, Henry
12.11.50.—t.£.m. ASEST ALS ae
I ns , Capt
BOXES — All kinds of Cara pene Ses eee.
Bones other than corrugated - | Schooner Philip H. Davidson, 87 tons
Ppiy Advocate Bind Dept. net, Capt. . from British Guiana.
10 50—t.f.m. Schooner M. Smith, 74 tons net,
$$$ British Guiana
Singer Sewing Machi 1 loter. oe. ARTURES
Apply. ‘shes Archer nae 55; 7
PI .

¥ LADY—Tatorea
fale achogh in the island “kogner Precis W. Smith, 6 tons net
sone Beso ae eo
nm for
longer. Write Box 22 Co "Adee |In Touch With Barbados
aoe soo Coastal Station
WANTED TO BUY
Good class furniture in Cable and Wireless (W.I.) Ltd., ad~

Birch, Pine. Good prices paid. Willtm@

to purchase entire house furniture from] the following through their Bar-
people leaving island. Apply Ralph | bados Coast station:
jeard, Hardwood Alley. Phone 4683 §.8. Silvana, Broot, Vancouver City,
8,11.50—4m |Benny, Five Forks, C., G. Thulin,
i | Leide Honduras, Loide Argentina,
ia cae ANT=D TO RENT Triton, Fort Nottingham, Ful-
HO! by English couple on long | or, Southern Vi sund, Car-
lease with one acre or more land any- Cassablanca, Norluna, A! "
where in island. Main water lighting Rosa, * , Vampa,
essential.” Box X.Y.Z. Co. Advocate. S. Barbara, Ravanger, South-
9.41 ,.50—-3n. Athelchief, 5.
-——————————_______. | Matthew, m4 Rodney, ae ree
i. o-
ALEXANDRA SCHOOL — | }vide Halth vecport sort Ammerst, Vera



Rock. Just completed and standing on
7,230 square feet of land with right of
way to sea, 3 Bedrooms, Tiled Bath
and Modern Kitchenette, Garage and
Servant's Quarters. Apply HUTCH-
INSON & BANFIELD, Phone 4643.
9.11,50—4n,
nidiide - saenimesteereemttntiecad

Be Heedful! Going at a Very Attrae-
live Price — A Unique and Artistic
Stonewall Seaside Bungalow; Seclusive
in a Highly Established Residential
Coast for the Distinctive and Financial
Class, Not more than 8 Miles from City,
Superbly Built 3 years ago For and De-
signed By Persons of Class; Fully Fur-
nished (except Linen and Cutlery),
Sandy Beach, Fine Bathing, Nicely Set in
Off Main Road, Trees.

A 3 Bedroom (two large—-one with
Basin), Cottage at Thornbury Hill, Main
Road, Good Condition, Modern Conyeni-
ences, Vacant, Fine View, Spacious Yard
enclosed with Stonewall, about 5,000 sq.
ft, Going for Under £800. A 3 Bedroom
Cottage on Rented Land at Lower Black
Rock, Main. Road, Water, Light, Going
for Under £475. Three-Bedroom Stone-
wall Bungalows at Navy Gardens and
one at Fontabelle—Seaside, Going for
Under £2,100, A Two-storey Stonewall
Business and Residence at Lower Bax-
ters Road, Large Garate or Workshop
Vacant, Going for Under £2,500, Resi-
dences in Belleville — Two and three
. @ Me for anything in Real
lf Not — U are Not Buying!
« Arranged. Dial S111, D, F,
Hastings.

Dwellinghouse known as “Bellevue
standing on lands of Graeme Hall De-
velopment Ltd. at The Stream, Christ
Church, at present tenanted by Mr.
Hugh Leach, The house contains open
verandah on three sides, Drawing and
Dining Room, Three bedrooms, Kitchen,
Pantry, Lavatory and Bath, with run-
ning water and Flectricity throughout

Inspection on application to the tenant
between the hours of 5 p.m, and 7 p.m.

The above will be set up for sale at
Public Competition at our Office No 4
James Street, Bridgetown, on Friday
Vith November 1950 at 2 p.m

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors.
5.11,50—6n.
——_

At Rockley on the sea near Blue
Waters Land, One property suitable for
Guest House, It consists of 14,293 sq, ft.
land and a stone wall howe which has
6 (six) Bedrooms each with running
water and other spare rooms that can
be converted into Bedrooms.

At Silver Sands one newly built ston@









wall house with three sided verandah,
Drawing & Din Rooms, four .(4)
Bedrooms each with water, beautifully
tiled Bath, Pantry, Kitchenette, Ser-

vants’ room with water tollet & shower,
Garage. It stands on 4 acre of land,

At Paynes Bay near the sea, one
small property called Villa Dunean con-
sisting of Y% acre of land together with
house which has drawing & dining
rooms, 2 bedrooms, W.C. & Bath, Kit-
chen, electricity and water. "

For Particulars apply
Scott, Magazine Lane.

to D'arey A
8.11.50-,3n

“ROCK DUNDO"--Situate at Cave Hill
St. Michacl, with approximately 42
Acres of Land. Consisting of 20 Arable
Acres and 12 Acres in Sour Grass and
Roads

The Arable Acreage is as follows:—
Plant and Ratoon Canes .. 14
Preparation FH re

20
The Howe contains three bedrooms,
toilet and bath, drawing and dining
rooms, lHbrary, Office, closed gallery
and kitchen Servants rooms, gargg?
end other out buildings, two concrete
rain water tanks with a capacity of
25,000 gallons. Electric Hight and

Company's Water, Three miles out of

town, bus wervice. Suitable for Dairy
or Development Inspection Tuesdays
and Thursdays 12 noon to 4 p.m.

Offers for above will be received in

writing by Colin P. B. Seale, Bovell

& Skeete, Lucas Street, Bridgetown.
8.11,50—i1n.





PROPERTY - Small Property t
Advent Ave. Bank Hall, 2,800 sa. it.
Land and House 22 x 12, Shed 22 x 10,
Kitchen 8 x 8. Portico. House can be
bought separately,
G. FIELDS c/o Wm. Fogarty Ltd,
or Dial 3232.
12,11,50,—1n,

LOST & FOUND
LOST

BROOCH— (Brilliant)
converted into two
Mary’s Church yard,
returning to the
office.







That can be
clips In St

Rewarded on
Advocate Advts.
11,11.50—2n



WATCH—Ladies Gold Rolex Wrist
Watch with a brown leather strap.
Between the Dominica Marketing Co,
end Post Office on Tuesday morning
between 9 and 9.30. Finder return to
Advocate Advtg. Office. Reward offered.

9.11.50—3n.

DDOOOG9-HFHHHGH-HHOGHGHO9HO94

CHIROPRACTIC

DR. FERREIRA of “Chiroville’ Upper
Bay St. (Near Esplanade) by Chiropractic
method corrects diseases of eyes, ears,
nose, throat, lungs, stomach, kidneys and
lower organs. Dial 2881

24.9.50.

9OGHOSHH-H3H0HHHL-G9O0OGOOO

THE PHARMACEUTICAL
SOCIETY OF BARBADOS







Members are asked to note that the
Annual General Meeting will be held
at the ¥.M.C.A. on Thursday, November
16th, beginning at 8 p.m

AGENDA
1 To receive the Financial Statement
and Annual Report
2 Election of officer

3. Gener

al Busine





Marine Hotel Apply between
m.

9.11,.50—8n.

MISCELLANEOUS








12.11,50.1n,

vise that they can now communicate with



WANTED
May 1951, an Assistant Mistress




h one or more of the following: | Rio oco, Pioneer Gem,

Latin, French, Spanish, Mathe-| Planter, Argentina, Craftsman,
matics. Salary, according to qualifica-|Rangitane, Seven Seas, Alcoa
tions and _ experience, on scale for

Secondary Teachers.
Applications, stating qualifications and
subjects offered, and accompanied by
testimonials, must reach the Headmig-

tress not later than February 15th,
12.11.50,—6n,

WANTED
pe the Vestry of the Parish of St.

ael.

Under the authority of the St.
ael’s Parish Loan Act 1948 (1 y
The Vestry desire to borrow from any
person or ns, bodies or
corporate willing to lend the same, a&
sum of mon not exceeding Three
Thousand Five Hundred Pounds (£3,500),
being part of £12,000 authorised under
the said Act, at a rate of interest not
exceedings four pounds per centum per
#nnum.

Persons tendering must state the minti-
mum ‘rate of interest they are
to accept. Prior consideration be
given to tenders at the most favourable
rate of interest.

Interest is payable on the 30th day of
June each year,

The principal of this loan i repayab!
in twenty (20) annual instalments
£600. each, The first instalment of ae
part of the Loan is payable on the
day of June, 1959.

Sealed offers in writing marked on the
envelope — “OFFER FOR LOAN or
£3,500" will be received by the Clerk
of the Vestry, up to 12 o’clock noon on
Monday the 20th day of November, 1960

CERTIFICATES will bé issued in units

SEAWELL

ARRIVALS—By B.W.LA.L.

For Trinidad:

Rochelle Richards, Jessie Fendt, Audrey
Bourne,

Bourne, Mary Velma Gibson,
Deudre Jardine,
For Grenada



Dialdes Kirpalani.
Gladys Murray, Casford Murray, Lillian
Christian.

More Rubber
Produced Than
Used

WASHINGTON, Nov. 11,

World production of new rubber,
both natural and synthetic, topped

the
Department reported yesterday,

were consumed, the report said.
Russian imports





of £100. only. rubber during the first nine
. ory Order, “opty of 1950 were wan an at
. .C. REDMAN, ,250 tons compared with 87,500
Clerk, St Michael's Vestry. tons in the same period of 1949.
a eae —Reuter.
PART ONE ORDERS
Lieut.-Col, J. Connell, O.B.E., E.D.,
Commanding,
The Barbados Regiment
Issue No, 42, 10 Nov. 50
1. PARADES

All ranks will parade at Regimental Headquarters on Thursday 16 Nov, 50 at

1700 hours, The following will be earried out:

fa) There will be a kit inspection for other ranks and apart from the dress
worn, each Volunteer should bring his second shirt and second pair of
shorts for this inspection.

(b) Those volunteers who have attended 30 parades duri the current year

and were not paid on Wednesday last will be paid on this parade.
(e) Ex-recruits will be attested and will receive their pay.
2. ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING
20 NOV., 50
eut. C. E, Neblett
15 L/S. Husbands, H. A.

ut. S. E. L, Johnson
L/S Williams, E. D.
M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major,
8.0.L.F. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment.

Orderly Officer
Orderly Serjeant
Next for Duty
Orderly Officer
Orderly Serjeant

NOTICE
There will be no Officers’ Mess Meeting on Saturday 25 Nov,
Officers’ Mess Meeting will be he
Honorary members may attond at 5 hours.
PART Il ORDERS
THE BARBADOS REGIMENT
10th November, 1950

1. LEAVE — SICK

SERIAL NO. 29





384 L/S Laurie, C. K. “A” Coy Granted S/Leave wef 1—21 Oct. 50
461 L/C Holder, S. i . 6
PM Re Granted S/Leave wef 6—19 Nov. 50
Captain J. Redhead aa Granted P/Leave with permission to
leave the colony wef 3—15 Oct. 50,

M. L, D. SKEWES-COX, Major,

8.0.L.F, & Adjutant,

The Barbados Regiment.

NOTICE

The first round of the Volley Ball Competition was won by “A” Coy. The next
Teams

match will be played between HQ CG
Ba ieee ate cist ‘oy & Bn HQ on Tuesday 14 Nov, 50,

DO

YOU WANT TO
WIN $100
FOR XMAS?

Buy a sixpenny ticket in
the Modern High School
Xmas Drawing. First prize
$100, Nineteen other valu-
able prizes.

The proceeds will endow a
$4,000 Scholarship fund to
outfit, aid and educate 12
poor, intelligent children. All,
ticket-holders invited to wit-
ness draw at the school in
the boxing ring at 5 p.m.
Wednesday 20th December.
Tickets obtainable from any
pupil, Licence for prize-
drawing granted by kind
permission of the Commis-
sioner of Police.

SOCIETY

There will be a General
Meeting of the O.H. Society
at Harrison College on
Wednesday, 15th Novem-
ber, at 4.45 p.m.

AGENDA

To receive
Statement.

To appoint an Hon.
Secretary.

General Business.
S. GITTENS,

Financial

} "JOIN THE NAVY TO SEE THE SEA”

JOIN OUR R.A.F. SQUADRON TO DRINK AND ENJOY

Taylor's Rum And Falernum

TAYLOR’S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM

(With the Distinctive Flavour)
AND

TAYLOR’S LIQUEUR FALERNUM
Two Outstanding Items

JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.

————

recom-

“mended ~
by the
Medical

Profession

the world

It’s *

all pure
‘pre-digest-

ed nourish-

ment

that is over.

obtainable from Grocers and Chemists.

JOHN F. HUTSON LTD.—Agenis.








world consumption in September.
United States Commerce

September production totalled
214,500 tons, while 197,500 tons

of natural

50, The next
on Saturday 2 Dec. 50 at 2015 hours,

SHEET 1 & ONLY





SUNDAY, NOVEMBER

SHIPPING NOTICES

ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.

Sailing from Antwerp, Rotterdam and



The M.V. “Caribbee” will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Domin-
ica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis &

Holland s.s. ‘‘HELENA” 20th., 2ist, St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 17th.
25th. November.

Sail from Amsterdam, and Dover Th . “Daerwood"* x
wan. SESTAD’ Ith. and 16D. 11] cent Cargo and Passengers for St.
November. Lucia, St. Vineent, Grenada &

Aruba. Date of departure will be

Sailing to Trinidad, La Guaira, Cura- uae :

.9. “DELFT” 6th. November:
2.8. “FARNSUM” 18th. November; m.



“OE ‘AD” ist. November. B.W.I. Schooner Owners
Sailing to Trinidad, Associati Inc.
Georgetown, ™.8 “HELENA” iith. 8
. *

Tel. 4047,

Sailing to Madeira, Plymouth,
werp, and Amsterdam, m.s. “WEULEM-
STAD” 17th. November.

Canadian National Steamships

Sails





Sails Sails



oe i — Barbados —
2. +s * lov. 4 Nov. v. 16 Nov. jov.
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 10 Nov. 14 Nov. _ 24 Nov. 24 Mov.
CANADIAN 23 Nov. 27 Nov. - 7 Dec. 7 Dec.
LADY RODNEY .. a 2 Dec. 4Dee. 13 Dee. 14 Dec.
LADY NELSON .. ‘ — 19 Dee. 2. Dec. 30 Dec. 3b Dec.
LADY RODNEY .. * — 1” Jan. 29Jan. 28 Jan. 29 Jan.
LADY NELSON .. rs _— 1 Feb. 2 Feb, 12 Feb. 13 Feb.
NORTHBOUND e

oui, Ame, A

ar’ . Jo

LADY NELSON 30 Nov. 8 Dec. 10 Dec.
LADY RODNEY 27 Dec. € Jan. 7 Jan.
LADY NELSON 13 Jan. 22 Jan. 23 Jan.
LADY RODNEY 12 Feb. 21 Feb. 22 Feb.
LADY NELSON 27 Feb. 8 March 9





— and we have —

XMAS CRACKERS, XMAS TREES, TOYS.
Come in early and select yours.
THE

CENTRAL EMPORIUM
(CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)
Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets.





PEELS PPE OPEC PEO OOOO

spate, tt



served in a homely atmosphere @
“DELIGHTFUL DRINKS
Al CUISINE

The first place is....

The GREEN





Ss

WE HAVE THE

TOOLS

YOU NEED!I!

4



See Our Show
Room Ditplay

CARPENTERS’ RULES
STEEL & METALLIC TAPES
PLANES

PLANE IRONS

SPOKE SHAVES
OHISELS in all sizes
HAND & BREAST DRILLS
DRILL BITS

GIMLETS

HACK SAWS & BLADES
PIPE WRENCHES
SOCKET WRENCHES
NAIL PULLERS

PLANTATIONS LTD.





| A Fresh Stock Again !!

FOOD YEAST



Can be taken mixed with Cocoa, Milk, Fruit Juices, Ete.

The greatest modern food discovery, supplies Vitamin B2 for

a balanced diet, and for extra Proteins so necessary to health
and strength. Add Foot! Yeast to your normal diet and you
will add more body energy and better health.

Get Food Yeast from your Grocer or Druggist now.

S. P. MUSSON, SON & Co., Ltp.

DISTRIBUTORS

POOSSOSSSSSSSS

%,
PISS SSCS SS SOS SSS OO FOSS SS FOSS OOS oS SOOO SS >

‘







12, 1950
——$_——
9O5OOOOTDOFHOSOOH4

CRICKETERS!

Greet your fellow CRICKETER
in BLAZERS & FLANNEL PANTS
send them today to
ox



RAYMOND JORDAN

in Bay Street, opposite
Combermere Street.

O99 9090690-905-99002%

TAR for yards etc.
A limited quantity
Remaining for sale
AT
Your Gas Co....... Bay St.
TM eto cass as ke -.. 4303

eSesSsSasSsSa—S—a—a—=—=—SSSS——===== ie

ORIENTAL

GOODS! (Articulos)
CUROIS, JEWELLERY,
SILKS, (Se Habla Espanol)

THANTrS

Pr. Wm. Hry. St. DIAL 3466




oo:







Barbados Real Estate |
Agency

INDUSTRIAL, COMMERCIAL, |
RESIDENTIAL

Telephone 2336
Office : Hastings Hotel Ltd.

FOR SALE

|
Christ Church.
New stone Bungalow. The plan is
unusual, All Mahogany doors,
window frames, built in ward-
robes, drespers etc. 3 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms, Living and Dining
rooms, Kitchen. Garage ete. Own
A. C. Engine. Standing in 1 acre |
land facing se safe sea bathing.

COVE SPRING HOUSE. St.
James. Overlooking s®a. Private
bathing cove.

ABBEVILLE GUEST
Worthing. Furnished.

DOVER: Christ Church, 6 lots
on sea 3 x 10.000 and 3 x 12,000
sq. ft. also acreage.

RICES St. Philip. Acreage near
Crane Hotel.

BLOCK OF FACTORY
INGS. In the City.

INCH-HAVEN.



HOUSE:

BUILD-



18.10,50—in

REAL ESTATE



AF.S., F.V.A.
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE

8 MODERN STONE BUNGALOWS,

also a Stone and Timber House,
are available in a pleasant part of
Dayrell's Road, at prices ranging
from £1,700 upwards. Particulars
and appointments to view on
application.

RESIDENCE AT GRAEME



HALL TERRACE, An outstanding
property especially with regard to
the interior arrangement and fit-

tings. The planning i; well
thought out, and there is a large
L-Shaped lounge and dining room
with cocktail bar, 3 pleasant bed-
rooms all with fitted wardrobes, a
lerge tiled bathroom serves the
master bedroom. There is also 4
second bathroom and toilet. mod-
| ern kitchen well provided with

‘built-in’ cupboards, storeroom,
garage, servent's quarter: paved
driveway and rear courtyard ete.
etc. All the new mahogany
furniture and contents may be
purchased if required.

CRANE VILLA. This







modern

stone-built 2-storey property with |
approximately 3% acre by the
Crane Hotel entrance drive is con-
verted into two pleasant relf con-
tained apartments, each with very
spacious rooms. An excelignt
investment property near the sea.
Offers will be considered.
MODERN RESIDENCE AT
ROCKLEY (near the Golf
Cours®). Built by a well known
firm of contractors, the construc-
tion ie of stone and the floors are
polished pine. There are 3 large
bedrooms all with wash basins and
‘built-in’ wardrobes. Bathroom
end toilet are tiled. The lounge
is large and airy with French
andah with magnificent views over

window: leading out on to a ver-
Golf Course and sea, There is a
breakfast room, well fitted kitchen,
double garage and nicely liad out
gardens. Now offered at £4,500.

THE OLIVES: Upper Collymore
Rock. This large modern stone
bungalow with about } acre should
appeal to a buyer who wants a
really solid property constructed
of the best obtainable materials.
There f a@ large living room (28
ft. x 14 ft.) gallery (48% ft. x 10%
ft.) 4 bedrooms (one 23% ft. x
19ft.) modern kitchen, paved
courtyard, lawns, kitehen garden
and orchard. Well placed for
schools and transport to town.

BAPTIST VICARAGE. Paynes
Bay. This two storey house is
placed on one of the most attrac-
tive sites in St. James. There is
a beautiful sandy beach and we |}
bathing is unsurpassed. The house
contains 3 bedrooms,
lounge, galleries,
kitchen etc.

upstairs
dining room,
Viewing by appoint-
ment.

coristruction with wallaba roof



shingles,

DEAN HOLLOW: St. Lucy. A
pretty little country home with
living room, dining room, 3 bed-
rooms, kitchen, servant’s rooms,
2 garages, storerooms etc., Stqne

Fertile ground of over

2% acres planted around house
with shrubs and trees, remainder
cane, option further 24% acres cane-
land.

LUXURY BEACH J
Fully Furnished. St. iaine en

WINDY RIDGE: St. James. 7-
Roomed Bungalow with 1 acre of
ornamental and vegetable gardens.

SUNSET HOUSE: Prospect, St.
James, On Coast. God bathing.
Fully Purnished. December and
January.

CUMBERLAND HOUSE: Cod-
rington Hill. With about 2 ectes,
Unfurnished.

_—_—_
are successful with
| Johm M4. Biladon
Low charges—Prompt payment
REAL ESTATE AGENT )
AUCTIONEER |
| }
| PLANTATIONS BUILDING
Phone 4648









SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12,

1950



Chureh

Services

METHODIST SERVICES

JAMES STREET
1400 am. Rev. F. Lawrence; 7.00 p.m.
Rev, E. Griffin.
PAYNES BAY z
9.30 am. Mr. J. A. Griffith; 7.00 p.m
Mr. W. St. Hill.
WHITEHALL =
9.30 am. Mr. G. Sinckler, 7.00 p.m.
Mr. G. Harper
GILL MEMORIAL “
9.30 am. Rev. E. Griffin; 7.00 p.m.
Rev. R. McCullough (Holy Communion).

HOLETOWN
8.30 a.m. Rev. R. McCullough; 7.00 p.m.
Mr. D. Scott.
BANK HALL
9.30 am. Mr. G. Perkins; 7.00 p.m.
Rev. H. C. Payne.
SPEIGHTSTOWN

11.00 a.m. Mr, V. St. John; 7.00 p.m
Rev. F. Lawrence.
H
11.00 am. Rev. H. C, Payne (Holy

Communion); 7.00 p.m. Supply.
A

9.30 am. Rev. H. C. Payne

(Holy
7.00 p.m. Mr. B.

Communion) ; Greaves.

7.00 p.m. Rev, M. A. E. Th
DALKEITH
10.50 a.m. Mr, Marville; 7.00 p.m. Mr.

Grant. .

BELMONT
10.50 a.m. Mr. Mayers; 7 p.m. Rev
B. Cropby.
SOUTH DISTRICT
9.00 a.m. Mr. J. Whittaker; 7.00 pm,
Mrs. Peskett.
PROVIDENCE
10.50 a.m. Rev. M. A. E. Thomas (Holy
Communion); 7.00 p.m. Mr. Browne.
VAUXHALL
7.00 a.m, Rev, M. A. E. Thomas (Holy
Communion); 1.00 p.m. Miss Bryan,

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Church of Christ, Scientist, Upper
Bay Street, Bridgetown.
Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Wednesdays 8 p.m. A Service which
includes Testimonies of Christian Science

Healing.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1950.

Subject of Lesson-Sermon: MORTALS
AND_ IMMORTALS.

Golden Text: 1 Corinthians 15: 18. As
is the earthy, such are they also that
are earthy: and as is the heavenly,
such are they also that are heavenly.

CHURCH OF GOD

ST MPCHAEL
11.00 a.m. Eckstein Village, Rev. J. B.
Winter; 7.00 p.m. Eckstein Village
Elder R. H. Walkes.
CHRIST CHURCH

7.00 p.m. Cox Road, Rev. E. W.
Weekes.
ST. GEORGE
11.00 a.m. Taitts Hill, Elder R. H.
Walkes.
7.00 p.m. Taitts Hill, Rev. BE. W. Weekes.
ST. PHILIP
11.00 a.m. Long Bay, Rev, BE, Weekes.
8ST. LUCY
11.00 a.m. Grave Yard, Rev. A: R
Brome; for church conference and dis-

tribution of Exhortary
Exhorters.
7.00 p.m. Crab Hill, Rev. A. R. Brome;

Certificates to

for Infant dedication and observance
of Lord's Supper.
SALVATION ARMY

BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL
11.00 a.m, Holiness Meeting, 3.00 Ryn.
Company Meeting, 7.00 p.m, Salvation
Meeting.
PREACHER: Major Smith.
WELLINGTON STREET
11.00 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3.00 pm.
Company Meeting, 7.00 p.m. Salvation
pieeting
CHER: Major Gibby.
DIAMOND CORNER
11.00 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3.00 p.m,
Company Meeting, 7.00 P.m. Salvation
Meeting.
PREACHER: Lieutenant Moore.
CHECKER HALL
11.00 a.m, Holiness Meeting, 3.00 p.m.
Company Meeting, 7.00 p.m. Salvation
Meeting.
PREACHER: Lieutenant Reid.
CARLTON
11.00 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3,00 p.m,
Company Meeting, 7.00 Pm. Salvation
Meeting.
PREACHER; Captain Bourne. ..
LONG BAY

11.00 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3.00 p.m,
Company Meeting, 7.00 p.m. Salvation
Meeting.

PREACHER: Lieutenant

PIE CORNER

11,00 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3.00 p.m.
Company Meeting, 7.00 p.m. Salvation
Meeting,

PREACHER: Major Hollingsworth.

MORAVIAN CHURCH SERVICES
REET

ROEBUCK ST!
11.00 am. Rev. A. C, Pilgrim;
p.m. Rev. D. C. Moore.
11 See HILL,
am. Mr. W, Deane; 12.30 pim
Rev. A. C. Pilgrim, (Holy Communion):
7.00 p.m. Mr. Downes, . we

Etienne.

7.00

FULNECK
11.00 a.m, Mr. Green; 7.00 pm, Mr.
Francis.
MONTGOMERY
7.00 p.m. Mr. Alleyne.
SHOP HILL.
7.00 p.m. Mr. F. Deane.
MBE

11.00 a.m. Mr. Swire; 7.00 pm, Mr.

Smith.

LUTHERAN HOUR
ST. WALTER L HOUR—
Dayrells Road, Christ Church, 7 p.m.
Song, Vespers and Sei Rev.

Trmon,
. O'Donohue, Speaker,
can ee ui
e's Tennant, St. Thomas,
Divine Service. Mr, Fitz Sramo es
ST. CONTENT L
Content, St.

Sermon. The Rev. Wm. F. O’Donohue,



War Will Not End
War

Eisenhower—

TEXAS, Nov. 11.
General Dwight D. Eisenhower
told students here yesterday that

there was no such thing as a
preventive war.

“When people speak to you
about a preventive war, you tell
them to go and fight it” he said,

“After my experience I have
come to hate war“ he said, “War
settles nothing.”

“Before you people were bora
this nation was fighting a_war to
make the world safe for demoa-
racy and then we fought a waâ„¢
to end all wars. Ever since that
war to end all wars we have
wondered about when the next
war will come.



Christmas

Cards & Paper




BLS

Jewellers

Your

Y. DE LIMA

*Phone 4644

. knows

* as foretold by the oracles.” ;
His present

“ts be the .new Incarnation,

and

5 _ Christmas Tree

-O-

“HOLY
BOY’ —

All Was Foretold
By The Oracles

By PETER DACRE

By invading Tibet, Chinese
Communist troops have
into the headlines the wedi
or cloistered and shrouded
and.

The vital gateway to India is
ruled “by a .15-year-old Dalai
Lama — the “Holy Boy” now
fleeing from his Potala Palac2,
which rises high above the flat-
topped houses of Lhasa, his
capital.

No Boyhood
In reality the Lama is a

mal pleasures of boyhood and
nothing of adult life.

he has contacts with the
outside wor

His pi , the Thirteenth
Dalai Lama, however, had a

friend in Sir Charles Bell, a
former British political repre-
sentative in Tibet.

In his book, “Portrait ot tne
Dalai Lama” (published by
Collins) he described how the
Tibetan king fled from the
Chinese once before in 1910.

Travelling on Tibetan ponies,
his party reached Gnatong, a
cluster of huts, snowbound in
the border mountains, at 10.15
one night.

A Whe Ate You ?’
rgeants Luff and Humphreys,
two former British soldiers who
manned the telegraph offices
there, heard a hammering on
the door of their hut, Outside
was a group of Tibetans.

“Who the hell are you?” asked
Sergeant Cuff, “and which of
you blighters is the Dalai Lama?

His Holimess, as Sergeant Luft
insisted on calling him, was
given food a cup of tea, and
sat before the fire.

He asked to sleep on Luff’s
d the sergeants

their

to guard with

The following day, led by a
sergeant with a rifle and fixed
bayonet the procession set off
for safety, “Thank Heavel.
we’ve got the boss of Tibet off
our hands!” said the sergeants.

‘Wheel Of E*.

Like Buddhists, Tibetans
believe in “The Wheel of Life’
or the transmigration of the
souls of men and animals in
one rebirth after another.

When the first Dalai Lama died
it was recognised some years
later that his spirit had passed
into another priest who became
his successor.

Ever since, the Tibetans have
believed that the Dalai Lama ‘has
been reincarnated in the body

‘of a baby.

Visit To Lake

Sir Charles describes the tradi-
tion-bound process by which the
Lamas are chosen,

A council of priests first visits
two of the chief oracles.

The oracles give the name of
the ‘boy’s parents, the where-
abouts of his house,

To choose the Thirteenth Dalai
Lama a high priest visited one
of the mystical lakes which are
supposed to set before men’s
eyes visions of events to come.

In the glass-like surface he
saw the image of a house and a

peach-tree,
Vision
That night he had a vision of
a baby-in-arms. A few days
later he found
the peach
Recounts Sir

.the
was

successor,
Dalai Lama,
Eastern Tibet. . ‘4

Given by oracles the names
of three young boys who mle
riests found one who had died.
SR aother ran away crying when
shown the late Dalai Lama’s
things which he was supposed
to recognise,

The third, hoWever, not only
recognised the fright articles,
but also picked out the head of
the party, “The Phantom Body,
who had disguised himself,

London Express Service





BEACH SHORTS
BIE, WHITE & BEIGE
SHARK SKIN

5.80
EVANS and

WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

4

sow!

Decorations

from

& .cO., LTD.

rifles. cast of



B.B.C. PROGRAMMES

SUNDAY NOVEMBER 12, 1950.
6.15 a.m. Interlude, 6.230 a.m. Tak on
War Graves, 6.35 a.m. Remembrance Day
Service,

he
415 p.m. Music
P.m. Sunday Half Hour,

Treasure
Master of Ballan-

BOSTON
WRUL Me, WRUW 175 Mc,
WRUX 17. me, ricd P.m. Christian
. .m,
Christian Science. oe

B.B.C. RADIO NEWS

_ Learie Constantine

Trinidad is in the news in BBC
programmes in the coming week.
Speaker in next Wednesday’s
series ‘Memories of Childhood’
will be Learie Constantine, the
world-famous cricketer, This fas—
cinating talk about his early life,
his family and their surroundings,
includes an early memory of his
first attempt at cricket—with a
bat cut from a coconut tree and a
sun-dried orange or grapefruit
serving as a ball. He will speak at
7.45 p.m. right after ‘Calling the
West Indies.’

The Library And The
_ Community

“Calling the West Indies” from
London on Wednesday next—the
programme which precedes the
talk by Constantine—will be the
second in the current series by
John Figueroa of Jamaica on
‘The Library and the Community.’
In this programme John Figue7oa
interviews Miss Mary Liggett,
Chief Librarian of Guildford, a
county town just beyond the
fringes of London. Miss Liggett
who had experience of county
library work in Kent and Lan-
eashire before coming to Guild-
ford in 1942 where the work is
urban. will explain to Mr.
Figueroa the ups-and-downs of
work in a representative locality,
the general practice, and the
response of the citizen to the
services provided by the public
library. In the third of this series
Trinidad will again be in the news
as the interviewee will be Willy
Richardson of Trinidad. Broad-
‘The Library and the
Community’_is being given at 7.15
P.m. on Wednesdays.

Poetry Of Jamaica

In ‘Ceczibbean Voices’ oi. Sun-
day, 12th inst. the programme
opens with a review of the poetry
of Jamaica by Wycliffe Bennett,
Secretary of the Poetry League
of Jamaica prompted by the new
anthology, ‘A Treasury of
Jamaica Poetry’ selected and
edited by J. E. Clare McFarlane,
President of the Poetry League
The programme closes with a
short story by the able Trini-
dadian writer, Samuel Selvon,
Broadcast begins at 7.15 p.m.

The Reith Lectures, 1950
J. Z. Young, F.R.S., Professor
of Anatomy at University College,
London is to give this year’s
broadeast Reith Lectures. The
subject chosen is ‘Doubt and Cer-
tainty in Science—A Biologist’s
Reflections on the Human Brain.
The eight lectures will be broad-
cast in the BBC’s General Over-
seas Service on successive Fridays
at 6.30 p.m. beginning on the
17th inst, Professor Young's
starting-point is an account of the
knowledge that recent research
has provided of the way the
human brain functions. In his
later lectures he will give his own
conclusions as to what this new
knowledge can teach us about the
development of human thought in
general and particularly in the
field of science. The first talk is
introductory one, us ‘The
ologist’s Approach

*



THAT CARRIES








(Established
THE POLICY



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Britain May Find |
New Star Secrets
Sir Harold Spencer Jones

Astronomer Royal, believes
many new discoveries about

the
the
the

; universe and the solar system may |

be made with the telescopes ana

apparatus to be ihstalled at
; Herstmonceux, Sussex, the
. new home of the Royal
Observatory .

“There is much to be done

before the whole observatory is
moved from Greenwich, and
many more buildings to be pu
up”, he said to-day
“Part of it is already work
ing in Sussex, but the ent
move will be a slow job”.

“I expect we shall make dis-
coveries rivalling those made
recently in the United States”.

Sir Harold thinks it will be
about three years before Herst-/
monceux is used for calculating |
Greenwich Mean Time. |

Herstmonceux was __ selecte |
Observatory
exhaustive tests. |

—LES. |

as the new Royal
after

site





eee



ay

In aid of RESOLUTE SPORTS |||
CLUB |

At ||
ELLESMERE PLANTATION |
HOUSE St. George |



i
SATURDAY IND DECEMBER,
1950

ADMISSION: 38/ (by ticket only |
Danciing 9-3

Music hy Hopie Jordan'y Orchestra

Tickets not transferable
12.10.50

In

POPPY DANCE

Under the distinguished patronage \
of His Excellency the Governor ,






|

Nik

and Mrs, Savage. x

*

AT %

INE HOTEL =

S|

MAR :
SATURDAY, November 25th, % |

4
ADMISSION $1.00 % {
( Dancing trom 9 P.M ¥ x!
: 7.11,50.—an.” “9)

5

SOOSSOSSOOSEOEL ESOC
DESOSSSSSSPOPOPS SOOT OY TS
s
$|
LEEWARD CRICKET CLUB |
9 |

ANNUAL DANCE x

at

SPRING HALL PLANTATION x
HOUSE g

DEC, 2ND x

4

Music by CLEVE Gis TENS ¥
Admission by ticket %

%

DANCING from 9 p.m. to 3 u “
x |

PBE666666660600



Otte,
{




1845)

THE SEAL OF

SECURITY AND SERVICE.
DA COSTA & CO,, LTD.—Agents.

Results which have just arrived reveal that 42 Certificates witn

15 distinctions

gained by pupils of the Modern High Schoo!

at the Summer 1950 London Chamber of Commerce examination

(Certificate stage).
Details are as follows:

English
ICTOR MASCOLL: English.
Ye EST: English.

CYRIL HA 3 nalish.
STEVEN TAYLOR: English

. COURTLAND H :
. VIVIAN CALLENDER:
tinction).

. HUBERT BYNOE:
WIN WEEKES: A
. FRANCIS SABIN: French.

. MARGOT BLACKMAN:

. DO
. VITA CLARKE: Arithmetic.
ELSA MAYNARD:

N.B.—Since its establishment, this

MOSELEY: Mathematics,

IWELYN JACKSON: Mathematics
: LUE ATLAN OLDER: Mathematics (Distinction)
Mathematics (Distinction),

in their Examinations, the standard of which approximate to
of the Cambridge School Certificate



BOYS

1. EDWIN IFILL: English, Mathematics (Distinction), Arithmetic

(Dis

English, Mathematics.

(Distinction), Arithmetic (Dis-

Arithinetic (Dis

Mathematics (Distinction).
ithmetic.

GIRLS

ROSALINE WORRELL: English, Mathematics.
NE SKEETE: English.

: English, Mathematics
English, Mathematics,
hematics

Arithmetic.

(Distinction), Arithmetic (Distinetion),

CARMETA f
. MONICA SEALY: Mathematics (Distinction), Arithmetic
BENTHAM: Typewritine.
Geography
REEN MORRISON: Arithmetic (Distinction)

French (Distinction

School has gained over 200. Certificates

L. A. LYNCH

Pris

j

|



DUNLOP

UNIVERSAL

MOTOR

CYCLE TYRES
eo» )
ee

DISTRIBUTORS

DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD.

(ECKSTEIN BROS.)

ip

For

Y have Large Supplies of ...
e? we Supp

We

Your Convenience,

Xmas Rope, Tags, Tinsel Cord, Xmas Trees and
a Variety of Decorations

“e- SEE OUR STOCK and SELECT BARLY
COLLINS DRUG STORES.





Here is the Cheaper
Way !!
Por Ceilings and Partitions use
ASBESTOS FLAT SHEETS
Obtainable in 4° X% 8 lengths.

You will find it the most
economical material To-day

N.B. HOWELL

LUMBER AND HARDWARE

Dial 3306





Bay Street

FOR THE FINEST
RANGE OF



visi OUR snow

ROOM

Our Stock Includes:—

Trains, Cap Pistols, Dolls, Doll’s Furniture, Balloons,

Sailing Boats, Xmas Trees & Decorations, Tinsel &

icicles, Cards & Calendars, Crackers. A large Assort-

ment of Children’s Books for all ages. Gift Stationery

and Presentation Boxes of Soap.

ROBERTS



& CO.

Dial 3301 High Street






Specially prepared f

100 LBs.

MILLED FROM

oro?

THREE MAIDS

WARD SPRING
map

FLOUR
FORT GARRY FLOUR MILLS

COMPANY LIMITED

MILLEO IN CANADA



FORT GARRY





' PAGE FIFTEEN








Cateons

@

Baby

Powder

Make Dining



Your Greatest

select these

RHUBARB ......... OATMBAL .. ; Tins,
CHICKEN HADDIES - SODA BISCUITS .. bs
STRAWBERRIES .... |. CHEESE, Ib. and ..., |,
CHICKEN SOUP ...) ° LAMB TONGUES .. |,
MUSHROOM SOUP .. |, PICKLES . : Bois,
VEGEMITE ......... ; MUSTARD

KAISINS (Table) ....Pkgs.

|

i

SSS eee SOO>—GVmnm=n—"

SSS SSS SSS SOF SPSS SSS POS ESE ESSE SOF




IK





or

Â¥V FOR BETTER BREAD!
Â¥ FOR LARGER LOAVES!
e

For a flour high in gluten content,

high in energy values, high in quality —
always insist upon Three Maids brand!
Milled especially for you from the choicest
of Canadian wheats for the finest baking
results in your climate!

Ask your Supplier to-day for this favourite

Brand.

FLOUR MILLS Co., LTD. {

MEAT EXTRACT .... Bots.



:

COSTUME
JEWELLERY
Exquisite New Designs in

OME oi feck. saa
WINEGAR (Heinz) ..

GOLDEN Aftaow RUM
PERKINS & CO., LTD.

ROEBUCK STREET. Dial 2072 and 4502












eee ent
— SSS SS



+

Christmas
Tags & Seals

Children's Crayons

Painting Books

ADVOCATE STATIONERY
Phone 2510




Earrings, Bracelets
and Brooches
Moderately Priced
t

LOUIS L. BAYLEY —

BOLTON

JEWELLERS

LANE.

Sole Representative for the— ROLEX WATCH CO.

Oe /1
“ PEALE I OE

-

TOYS! TOYS! ~—‘TOYS!

COME AND SEE OUR LOVELY RANGE OF TOYS!

We have everything to amuse the kids.
ALSO

XMAS TREE DECORATIONS

We can supply you with the Most Beautiful

Assortment ever thought of.
ALL AT REASONABLE PRICES

Pay Us A Visit TO-DAY, and make your Selections

BARBADOS HARDWARE (CO. LTD.

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)

No. 16, Swan Street



‘Phone 2109 & 3534. ‘

%
566066660000"

TROPICAL BAKING |



———
————



lt

f

oe eee



|
|



PAGE SIXTEEN

Thieves Make
$160 Haul

N FRIDAY thieves made

hauls totalling over $160

The largest haul was from the

Ideal Store, Broad Street. From

this store they took 30 yards of

green cloth from a shelf. The
cloth is valued $72.60



A bicycle valued $55 was stolen
from Herbert’s Bakery, Tudor
Street while another thief took a
quantity of cloth, shirts and
socks, valued $33.59, from a
motor car while it was parked
at James Street (a restricted
area).

While Cpl. Devonish of the
Worthing Police Station was
patrolling along Stream Road,
Christ Church, he: discovered
that the unoccupied house,
“Dingwell”,. was broken ana
entered.

William Sturrock of the Yacht
Gregon, which is at present
anchored in the Careenage, re-
ported that his watch was stolen
while he was at Nelson Street

HE LARGE CROWD that
attended the Jocal Talent

Show at the Globe Theatre on
Friday night saw Gerald Hare-
wood carry off first prize. He
sang “Lucky Old Sun.” Secona
prize went to Cosford Husbands
who sang “Bewildered.”

Betty Taylor was given
consolation prize for singing “My
Foolish Heart.”

URING THE WEEK Mr. C. W
Rudder, Police Magistrate of
District ‘B’, sentenced Eustace
Thomas, alias “Eddie,” of Cane
Hill, St. George, to three month:
imprisonment with hard labour
Thomas was charged with stealing
a quantity of green pears ana
golden apples.

Cpl. Cyrus of the District ‘B’
Station told the Court that on
November: 1 at about 12.30 a.m
someone reported that a shirt was
stolen from a house.

In consequence of this he went
to Mount Hill, St. George where
he saw Thomas going in the dire
tion of Greens with a quantity —!
golden apples and pears. ‘Thoma
eould not tell how he had cor
by these and was arrested

Investigations were made ani
it was found out that both pear:
and apples were stolen from wees
at Good Intent, St Weorge, br-
Jonging to Mrs. Maizie Walcott.

In defence Thomas said that he
heard some boys saying they were
going for pears and he knew that
the only place they could get them
was in Mrs. Walcott’s trees. The
otHers went at 4am. but he went
at 1 a.m.

He said that he intended takin;
the pears and apples to Mrs. Wal
cott but was stopped on the way
by Cpl. Cyrus.

Thomas appeared on another
eharge of housebreaking and
jJarceny and was remanded for
seven days.

WATER SHORTAGE was ex-
/ perienced in Belleplaine this
week. Residents of this area had
to travel over hills to St, Simon's
to get water.
_ A lorry from the Water Works
Department partly relieved the
situation and crowds of peop ¢
could be seen around this.

One resident told the Advoca‘e
that the amount she receives from
the lorry is so small that she cun
only use it for drinking. She has
to find other means to do hex
washing.

HE GENERAL BOARD OF

HEALTH at a meeting ihis
week approved the following: The
land at Upper Collymore Rock and
division and sale of one lot of
Pine Plantation Roads by Wr,
C. B. Layne, qualified executor
estate of James Emanuel Farrel}.

Division and sale of land in lois
at Navy Gardens, Christ Church
by Mrs. E. G. Roach, owner -f
lot 21 by Cividing it into two lots.

Division and sale of land in lots
at Howells Cross Road, St, Michael
at the Barbadas Co-operative
Bank Ltd., with the exception of
seven lots,

Dividing and letting of lots of
land situated at the Belle Plant: -
tion, St. Michael, by the Trusteos
of the Earl of Harewoed.*

Division and sale of land in lots
at Sea View, St. James by Mr.
Cc. R. Armstrong.

Division and sale of land in lots
at Gibbons Plantation by the Bar-
bados Co-operative Bank Ltd. with
the exception of eight lets.

Division and sale of land in lets
at Grazettes Plantation, S!
Michael, by the Barbados Co-
operative Bank Ltd.

The following was postponed:
The division and sale of land in
lots at Bush Hall, St. Michael, by
Mr. Ebenezer Alleyne, Mr, Alleyne
was asked to show the stand
pipe facilities on the plot,

R. DALTON PRESCOTT,

Assistant Master at the
Boys’. Foundation School, has
been successful in the B.A, Hon-
ours (History) examination which
he sat in Barbados ir June — this
year He received Second Class
Honours (Lower Division), Mi
Prescott passed the Intermediate
Arts Examination in July 1948

SOLE COV OOSE GOP VOD SOSOS:



Grey,
Light

The Sign of
QUALITY

\OOSS9S96S6955655S90H% BE SSSSSSGSSSCSSSS ROOF

RED HAND PAINTS

FOR ALL PURPOSES

“MATINTO” FLAT PAINT
in White, Cream and Green

For Interior Decoration of Walls and
“S” ENAMEL FINISH PAINT

“SPECIAL” PAINTS.

or Interior.

PERMANENT GREEN PAINT
For Ext

RED ROOF PAINT
For Galv. Iren or Shingles.

PAINT REMOVER
For the easy removal of old paint

WILKINSON & HAYNES CoO., LTD.

Agents
t FCOD ODO POCO HOO SGO00G LUE 654 1 OE oon




pe

MR. GEORGE FORDE owner of Blue Grass, a St. Vincent entry, leads 1. The prohibition of atomic
‘ him in after his win in the Brighton Stakes. It was Jockey Slocombe’s

first win.

English Opera Gets Lost In

Covent

WORDS and MUSIC
by Marius Pope

WHEN XENIA, in a current
production at Covent Garden,
sings “My sovireign,, let not a
maiden’s foolish. tears unnerve
thee,” Boris Godounov, her father,
replies: “Gelietes kind, dein vater’s
liebling, gehe spiel mit deinen
Gesahrten .. ." ‘

This might seem odd to the
purist or the pedant, but it is not
unprecedented at Covent Garden.
The reason in this case is that
Ludwig Weber, guest star from
Vienna, does not: know English.

The case spotlights the ridicu-
lous system of importing guest
artists for most of the principal
roles at Covent Garden. Whereas
any other opera in the world
might first examine the talent at
its disposal and then plan a reper-
toire, it seems as though Covent
Garden goes about this in the
opposite direction.

For the current season's produc-
tions the guest-artist list reads
like a. Continental Opera
Singers’ Who’s Who. There are
no fewer than 21 artists listed,
who between them will be
singing 45 leading roles.

£400,000 A Year
This, then, is where we have got
vo in the four years that the
Covent Garden Opera Trust has
been in action, We are as far from

HE Y¥.M.C.A'’s “Week of

Prayer and Woerld Fellow-
ship” begins at 4.45 o'clock this
evening at the Y.M.C.A _ head-
guarters, Pinfold Street. The
prayer topic will be “Hallowed Be
Thy Name.” Mrs. A. A. Gib-
bons. President of the Y.W.C.A.,
will act as Chairman while the
Lerd Bishop will be the Speaker.
Special prayers will be offered for
the people of the Middle East.

On Monday the prayer topic
will be “Thy Kingdom Come.’
Mr. C. R. C. Springer will be
Chairman and the speaker, Rev.
D. C. Moore. On this day special
prayers will be offered for th
youth of Europe.

“Thy Will be done in Earth as
it is in Heaven” will be the praye,
topic for Tuesday when Mr, V, PR.
St.John will be Chairman, Th?
speaker will be Rev, H, Lane
Prayers will be offered for the
people of Africa.

1.D. MEN bkave recovered

some of the artic es sto'en last
week. A clock and chairs stolen
from the Pentecost Church at
Marshall Gap and a_e sewing
machine which was stolen from
Aletha Hinds of Baxters Road
were recovered. Two people are
charged in connection with these
thefts,

T 10.30 a.m. today the Police ,

4 Band will play at the
Remembrance Service at St
Michael’s Cathedral.

SERIES OF TALKS on

Health and Child Welfare
will be given at the Princess Alice
Pavilion on November 30. This is
organised by the Health Visitor
of the St, Michael's Sanitary
Department,

RK, CHARLES THOMAS’ fifth

lecture on the Theatre will

take place at the British Council

on Tuesday, November l4th, at

8.15 pm. The subject is “Make
Up.” {



POOP,

Woodwork.

White and Cream

Dark Grey, Tropical White B'dos
& Dark Stone. For Exterior



erior or Interior

Phone 4267, 4456.

OOP LAA A ALLL EAP EELS ILPLA ELLAAL ELL AA AAO A

:



(wm

SUNDAY ADVOCATE
THE WINNER | Peace Congress



To Be Boycotted

@ From Page 1

| costs, no matter how many dele-
| gates were turned back.

Sloan said that the British Gov-
ernment was “planning to keep
out all members of the 150 strong
| permanent Committee of the
| Peace movement though they
annot ban Congress.

Tvor Montagu, British member
| of the permanent Committee flew
.o Prague last night to discuss
arrangements with other members
concerning delegates stranded
there following the British Gov-
ernment’s withdrawal of their
chartered planes. The Committee
may decide to hold a simultane-
cus conference in the Czech capi-
| tal.

Tightened security arrange-
}ments were in force at all ports
| and airfields in Britain. Each dele-
gate will be checked against
dossiers prepared by the Home
Office in consultation with the
Foreign Office.

Immigration men today ordered
a ban on reporters and pnoto-
graphers at Harwich quayside
where Dutch and Danish dele-
gates were expected.

The Congress has been called to
further the aims of the “Stock-
holm Peace Petition” which calls
for:














weapons with international con-
trol and inspection.

2. A declaration that the first
users of atomic weapons be
branded as war criminals,

The agenda will include dis-
cussions on the reduction of arma-
ments, the halting of war propa-
ganda and the war in Korea.

IT's
TIME.

HURRY
and Order





Garden

the establishment of a national
opera as we were before we
started,

A tremendous amount of money
is being spent, but so far there
has not been the glimmer of a
long-term benefit. Sir Steuart
Wilson has revealed that running
costs at Covent Garden are £400,-
000 a year, not including produc-
tion costs. The Arts Council gives
£ 120,000.

What has all this money
bought us? A few good produc-
tions, many indifferent and
bad ones... But no national
opera.

There are several reasons for
this, but one of the most import-
ant, I believe, is that English as
a singing language falls below its
chief operatic rivals in sonority,
carrying power and articulation.
In short, English opera gets lost
somewhere in the’ vastness of
Covent Garden.

But on the other hand the
opera at Sadler's Wells Theatre,
also sung in English translation,
succeeds where Covent Garden
fails) The new production of the
Wolf-Ferrari , opera, School for
Fathers, is a delight visually and
acoustically.

Astonishingly most of the Eng-
Jish words of all the singers can
be heard and understood, making
the printed synopsis superfluous.

If there is a germ of a National
Opera in English anywhere at
the moment, it exists at Sadler's
Wells.

What Does It Mean ?

Second important reason for
the muddle at Convent Garden
is the schizophrenia this organ-
isation seems to suffer when it
tries to define what it meaas
by a “national opera.”

At various times this phrase
has meant:

(a) English-composed operas
sung by English singers;

(b) Italian, French or German
operas sung in their origina!
language with some English
singers in the cast; and

(c) Italian French, German or
Russian operas sung in’ English,
even though most of the princi-
pals are foreign

They Know

At least Sadler’s Wells, within
# more modest framework, have
a clear idea of where they are
going, It wou'd not come amiss
at this stage for the premier opera
house to go cap in hand and seek
some guidance from its clear-
minded junior partner.

An authoritative statement on
‘ts aims and progress is long
overdue from the Royal Ope
House administration.

WORLD COPYRIGHT






































































EXHIBITION





RESERVED AND
London Express Servic:
The Weather XMAS SUI S

TO-DAY
Sun Rises; 5.53 a.m, °
Sun Sets: 5.35 p.m. |
Moon (First Quarter) No-
vember 16,
Lighting: 6.00 p.m.
High Water: 5.47 a.m., 5.20
p.m.
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) Nil
Total for month to yesterday
1.37 ins.

Temperature (Min), 71.0 °F.

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.
(11 a.m.) E.N.E,

Wind Velocity 6 miles per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.944
(11 a.m.) 29,939



You are assured of
looking at your best
in a Suit tailored

by
PCS. MAPFEL &
C0., ITD.

Top Scorers in Tailoring

cd



2
L GORGONZOLA CHEESE

EDAM CITEESE (Dutchman's Head)
| E
| LUSCIOUS COOKING PRUNES

GOUDA CHEESE
New Zealand CHEESE 3/- |b.
~ : es
% || AHegne Arthur & Co., Ltd. }j
——— ew 4







































| CAVE

10, 1, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET





—oOo———————eEeEeEeeeEEEeeeeeee—







See our showcase

Cc. B. Rice & Co.

—

for the season's
ot

NEW
> TWEEDS

~~ the cream of our
â„¢

specialists

in

em

Department
se

PRS FF PO Oe FOG

of materials which we have

| This is an entirely new stock
|! just opened.

Fancy striped in light and
dark shades to suit your
tastes.

high class

See them to-day —
wear them to the
Exhibition

SHEPHERD & Co.,Ltd.

tailoring

Bolton Lane
Bridgetown








KING “SMILER ~

MAKES HIS SELECTION
FROM HIS LOYAL

‘

Here are the twelve subjects of His Majesty King “Smiler” who have been
selected for final judging on November 18th at the Hastings Rocks :

‘, Sm
Here they are, all bouncing babies with the ‘glow of health and happiness
associated with all COW & GATE babies. MN" =e" a tear ana |

TOP ROW. (left to right) Richard Linton, son of Mrs. Joan Linton Of Rellman’s Land, Black Rock,
St. Michael.
Betty Leigh Clarke, daughter of Mr. and Mrs, Clyde Clarke of “Galveston”, Strathclyde”
St. Michael.

Jeffrey Carlisle Barrow, son of Mr. and Mrs. Deighton Barrow, of Bridge Road St. Michael.

SECOND_ROW:—Anderson King, son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy King of St. Leonard's Village, Westbury
Road, St. Michael.

Bernard Wilkie, son of Mr. and Mrs. Colin Wilkie of “Elswick”, 8th Ave., Belleville.
Marcia A. Watts, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L., M, Watts of “Coralynn”, Belmont Road, St.
Michael.

Winston Roosevelt Gilkes, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lolita Gilkes of “Bronxville”, Black Rock, St.
Michael.

Beverley Haynes, daughter of Mr, and Mrs. Beresford Haynes. of Bannister’s Land, Martin-
dale’s Road, St. Michael.

THIRD ROW:—LaJu N. Thani, daughter of Mr. and Mrs, N. A. Thani of Brighton, Black Rock.
Wendy Angela Roach, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Roach, of Three Houses Factory, St.
Philip.

BOTTOM ROW:—Valerie Evelyn McKenzie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. N. McKenzie of “McNeath”,
Navy Gardens, Christ Church.

Carson Elvin Grannum, son of Mr. and Mrs. Warwick Grannum of “La Song”, Dayrells
Road, Christ Church.

The final judging for- Barbados’ Bonniest Baby will take place at Hastings
Rocks on Saturday, November 18th at 3.30 p.m when all parents with their children
who have entered the competition are cezdially invited to attend.



£

: {

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1950



+ ¥ OOO, sv
LPL SEM ELLE LLL AE BLE A PLL LESEPPLEE POSS

PRCOCESSES" LOL 080000000006 554--O1E16:5S ‘FOO NOOOOG



SUBJECTS i

SSS.

PRELLS +





f
|



t. B. LESLIE & CO., LTD eke



Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE TWKI.VF. SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 12TH. IIS* Television Could Kill Boxing oiiug Barbadian* In Golf Finals Today CB> LAUTOS CARVI Mi Al J ManrWoa could hill" THE final batlle !< %  lh dJ %  %  thrt ?I! -" n, r should be done .bo,,, Jj,,,, 0 £ rb g *SJ Truth oth. ma„er 1> that bag. <, llu m Au ,, n , n and rjav, i '" %  "" *>mg and ian> ,„„,„, „, M „ lm Mfh who are anuniung ,he arenai now in faVMlr of thalr video *eti. Guoding and Chruue pla>i'i may soon oven go ao far and '""'" beat aaaflier Barin favour of a good, old fashioned ^d'aii J^J' ETi }r Atkinson ami hoas oprv or such C U" Bayley. after thme xt .. o opry or sum ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ .„„,.,,„„, Boxing. H if. constituted to5JJJ*" turtied toward the i-n,l day, I. a poor show It parka Nc "' Bd Vidmer. after belns punch neither in th. flesh nor in <"*"•" ' "> lurn pUyed Ihc th., aKftm „f Muva -.r.. rxl 9ix hole s on. under par Mi: shows lau. ||I |J whU< „„^ mii hooked ,„,, No Talent ..„ rough a. the toft. But there the Ug break eenv There's a lack of talent and the Christie scrambled a shot onto lh< script is oh so stale. edge of the green. <."-tlng ju How flw can you •xplam a missed a six. e-n-foot putt, m*\ light coming off next month hemit the ball hanging on the llo tween out-dated Joe Louis uirl of the cup. and Vldmers putt foi Cesar Brion, a worthy duo %  birdie ran nine inches past th. fighter ut bear, from the Argenhole, leaving O'Neal with a qu.iriiiii" ler -1 > ii. j. : %  > negotiate to win nc Louis should be out of the dipped the ballin the cup. but In game. His fight with E*v rd doing NO "nocked his oppom-r^' Charles clearly showed that :1Kin wjlh It so the hole was halved :.c*-invinc.bl bombtr has %  *. < *^ " ,,nd rf Ch iit t,c 'S' n ^ '^ People if ha continue*. the next three holes to win the match Instead, they may reman. r Will Atkinson and Inniss had some day that Joe andad up even a tougher uphill battle for. wolking on his lu-ela, a miser.i Ma they ware four down with four fate for one of the greatest holes to play. The situation heavy-weight king* of all tin.e. s etnad hopeless as Eric Atkinson Yet, Greene tha eminent comend Bayley needed only to get a misxioner of toe National liooung half on any of the ranwmng Assodullon. blatuuc boxum's fallhole* to win the mutch. But Will urea on television. It's not V Atkinson and Inniss won them vision. Mr Greene. It Js fights featuring an man like Louis, fight fans not want to see and carte i won't pay to sea. -" ind then took the decision holes Dull Fight Gordon Richards Rides 200th Win For Season Brion~wrmed up for bl against Louis by declsionlng Keene Simmons other night It SUSSEX, Nov. 11. Gordon Richards, Britain's sWnimor* the champion jockey, rode his two duU fighi. hundredth win of the season here %  ~ he won the i.500 > L ..n I 111*1 i l p. naaw .' *'k'> . .. Tho young Argentinian, for ell '"dy wh *' n i merits, must be classed "dull" fighter. Th* question as to whether t* can beat Louis or not Isn't Important. It promises to be | lousy fight. Southern Counties Handirap (.ver seven furlongs, on Mr. J. V Rank's Celebrate. This is the tenth occasion on k-hich he has ridden 200 or more ,. inner* In a single season. He Then we have Ezzard Charier rode his fiXSt J*m *"; Richards has broken nearly an of Fred Archer's records and today equalled Archer* feat o( riding 200 or more winners for %  oreieeutive season -Metlter Record Field Expected For Manchester Handicap H. VnJtOH MiiHi.W LONDON, Nov 12 The 1850 flat racing season ends lay (hi the dosing day. there will as usual be the ManM Handicap, one of the pHncJpal handlrajw of the season This race, run over the Castle IrwelJ track on the outskirts of the busy northern city over a distance of one and a half miles Is likely to attract a record field this yfr. The final acceptors numbered 47. and though a few may drop out It seems probable that the field will equal or beat the previous highest number of 42, which went to the post In 1931 The sire at the field makes little to the great difficulty of the owners in winning this prtaV, it bring the last chance of so many to earn their "winter core**, there are any number of runners who might be defcrtl>e.l as "trying for their life.' whic l is perhai* better put. as racing to ICM the wagers of their connections But only one can win and only three can place, so some substantial sums of money go into the iM-kei.% of the bookmakers The Value of the racing Is not h>rgt as something over 12.000 Koes to the winner It is the side bets on the race which make It so well wort'i winning And yet few really big gambles have been successfully accomplished In this race. One reason for this Is because there is no knowing under what conditions the race will be run It Is odds on it being very muddy and probably very misty, (Indeed fog has caused the race to be abandoned on more than one occasion). Nothing upsets form so much as thick mud. Then ugaln though it is the end of the season, and all forms should have been fully exposed there are always sever 11 runners in the race, who find something extra In this final race. Owners and trainers therefore. while they may have a tilt at th' ring, do not as a rule lay down th money in quite the same way as they do over the Cambridge*!.!! • and other big handicaps. Yet there are exceptions Whe-i North Drift won the race in 1931 from a record Held, he brought nlf a tremendous coup for his con. It was said at the time, that his plthoy owner, a bookmaker, won .something like £30,000 over (he horse's victory It Is generally not a race for the tup weights. It Is like most handicaps extremely difficult for 'he punter to find the winner In several attempts. Frttncv Producing "Rest Weapons" \! CM U with new and super intypes of .ir'iUen in e-ttfangll far Canada's all-weather jet tighter CP-100 if further lasts were satisfactory. F 'ii(.. he said in -n interview was already producing: 1 A Jeep which French ex pert! considered better than ITIQV improved United States* model 2 A light tank which will be light*, than anything comparable. i:''lined anywhere 1 A gun which Moch destril-ed only as the 'best in the %  rorler Its details were secret. t A bazooka which he desinher' better than Amerlcenproduced baiookas. .' %  A 50-ton tank "unmatched anywhere" and reported to earn* 120 mm cannon. -(Renter ) U.S. Will Not Intervene In Tibet CALCUTTA, Nov. 11 The United State* Ambraseador lo India Loy Henderson, told pressmen here to-dsy thai America did not intend to intervene In Tibet and considered the issue as "one entirely for Tii>e: and China to decide." Henderson said. '•Recugmt %  >,., of China's suzerainty over Ti^wt has been a historic policy of .h<> United States." Referring to the situation in Nepal. Henderson said that ihe issue was primarily India's problem. 'We don't Like to complicate it by any premature action of ours." he added He said he was studying the situation in Nepal. He denied that Nepal had apI pealed for American help or thai any arms hod been supplied to her. —(ReuUr.) Spot The Winners By Jon Hope In the boon business the pace Once again IQ view is that most lucrative of all objectives -the gift season sales. I speculation on which aiutbor will top this year's aales. In the non-fiction class I tip la les Boswell O740-S5I Ills uncovered London Journj shoultl thrust him well in I .1 tuiuiers-up— CeeU WoadhamSniiia. with her Florence Nigl t.r.gale biography; Sir Oshert S.twell. with his final volume of setf-ieveJaUon. Noble Eseencis. Laurence Kr\. with Yangtse In. cid.r.t And the story tellers? 1 am i*nking on a surpris* entrant — Sir Duff Cooper (Operation Her.rt Break! Other favourites — Jo'in Heresy (The WaU); NeU ratem^a (Behold Thy Daughter); John. OsUworthy (with the illuslratrxl Forsyte Saga). Hilary St George SaUnsWfs. who last week gave up his j >b a. House of Commons Iibrarien, has written his first novel. Me -.'IIIt The Sleeping Bacchus Out February. Saunders Is span 1ing the winter in France. Self-imposed chore that las l< i led three years comes to an e id next week with publication of Victory Cavalcade, u comprelensive What. Where. When <>f World W II Book has been compiled by Juseph Fenslen. who took time ofT from theatrical and musical impresario duties to do It This is his first venture Into authorship. But he seems to have ventured most other places—from selling Jeeraal in China to exporting oranges from Brazil. World C'opvrtehl Reserved ii: s. Helicopter Lands On Steps Of St. Peters Basilica VATICAN CITY. Nov. 11 For the first time in history J i.f-Ucopter landed on the steps of st Peter's Basilica today amidst i-rowds of pilgrims. It bore a mes*<:ge of homage and devotion to Ihe Pope from the families of Italian pilots who lost their lives In the Lait war. Inside the Basil Ira the Pope "ranting a mass audience jO.OtO pilgrims from many paxte ol the world—Renter •vyweight champ of all world, who says he will be a "fighting champ." So the first defence of his liUe turns out to be against Nick the llftn Barone, a refugee from the lightheavy ranks. stay in business. They can match Rocky Oraziano again.-: Tony Janiro a few more dozen times or don't fofget Willie Pound featherweight champion Sandy Saddler. They've got a fourth one coming up. But I doubt it if many fans want to boast about having seen the famous "Ten PepSaddler" brawls. The one scries of remalche* that should come off is the sixth Jake Lajnottn-Ray Robins i fight. In this one we would probably get the true middle weight king* All Ray gets fro-n Jake are promises. Ray beats everybody in this country so now the sugar man is reported to bo going to Paris to fight the Frenchman Milton Stock.—(I N.8.) % %  /( just the opposife to a prison . easier !o set out than to get in." U.C.W.I. WIH HUCBY MATCH KINGSTON. Jea., Nov. 7. Rugby returned to Jamai ea on Saturday afternoon when Ihe University College of the West Indies engaged a Oarrlaon XV in .. rugbf 1 mateh nt Mona. The University College team defeated the soldleri B—I Willie Shoemaker Breaks Winning Record INQLBWOOD, California. Nov I! The United States record for tiding the most winners in one reason, was broken yesterday by Willie Shoemaker. Jockey Shoemaker won two races at Hollywood Park Racecourse, to bring his total of winners for the year to 321. Previous record of 31 was made by Yorkshire-bom Johnny Longden In the 1IM8 P H Y R Writs Direct or Airmail for Fatherly Advice—Fro* A KEY P.0SITION.! WAI riRST CHOOSE YOUR CAREER i it mil M %  W*iuM H Ml *iJ B**W. %  mat w ff (VFOR YOU Start training for it NOW! Thtt't mull roG'n n tde ropfoi i— 'n'.lf qmfiAatJ msn who h ntisd lor ths Job. YOU on b* that min—luctMifol, pfOtpBroul. with your fuuir* suurad—by .tudriog M hom* in your ip.ro lima, f uldad by a c ptrtonal tuition o( Tha Ben no.. Ollfjgt. Di .;.inca ITOJIM no fligrw a Ben-> %  .. Co!legs •nd taarn hew thouundi ol people jutt like you have rssched die top -ill the right suidanca. A well-paid fob CSn bfl ft ufl—iMri this pleuint apira-tims %  tudy NOW. Direct Mail to DEPT. 188 Hie Rennet! Colleoe SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND X CHARLES McENEARNEY & CO. LTD. \&+v, 'v--v'.-co-yooa o oB06apoiooe I^WM These Prices Cannot Be i Repealed Bnuliful Slmil.-s Plain Silk Malerials from Jill ji. Silk Linen*: Printed Desigin tl.lt yd. Tafletas: 4 Shade* .80 yd. Satin. G2 > d. 480 pairs Bulleriaa-pum|M SUM pr. Spun Silks 84 yd. Cotton Print. 55 yd. B ^-Spreads very lar R e •lie. '• Lau'les' Cotton Vests, 2 for „ Cotton Panties, 2 for „ Rayon Panties. 2 pairs Silk Panties, per pair Nylons Stockings, per pair. FOR GENTS Pin Stripe Tweeds SZAH & S3.48 each $1.00 1.IMI 1.20 .79 1.58 MODEL STORE— I\I tin Corner Broad and Tudor Streets. J( Hwrinirf .... CIGARETTE LIGHTERS CIGARETTE HOLDERS BALL POINT P ENS TORCHLIGHTS-BATTERIES & BULBS COSMOPOLITAN PHARMACY. '--.•.^*.%',*.*-**',-.^-,v>'^.%-,v%^v-.v^v-* .mi.. Bath Salt. %  Uu.ring HowaVr • Tale %  nd othaT i-Wt na^iltltM TAIO.II II OLD BOND ITIIIT LONDON ft^2^ FOOD 6 DRINK IN A PERFECT V COMBINATION All the world knows that Qood stout !• a rrvat health builder. All the world knowifthat Oyiters have been eaten since Roman times for their health riving Food value. 1t/tka<*./tetfectiUtte com^uiaGon in "&£#* cvsre* tick antf L %  o teti N h MM aaail •taa at i*. aiias It. S t COLC Si Co Ltd D v strrrrr a> Co., Ltd.. sASiun, omtv. OaTTBtSB, CHUNKY A Co LM J . OODDARD Si SONS, Ltd., f A. DA.VIEL a Cb I.. J. W nH AMS MARKETING Co Lid .s..],. AasaUi iNca. a < %  Ltd >HNSO>N KBtDMAN. nWCtNS Co.. Ltd I'lTCHaSi CONNUX A Co Ltd -WONDtn WHEtLS N* 7 All the best features are found in the Hercules CYCLE





PAGE 1

PACK FOIRTKEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, NOVEMBEU 12. 1S CLASSIFIED ADS. TELEPHONl I SOS MED CARRIE. Belleville, chad morning end • %  Mm al 4 m.m. on ihe ome •ll*me al IM Wntkur. ceeraetacy THANKS the undersigned beg throuS* late %  DW1N 1 ITTOEBALf n..,.. ,0c 1 who as* Ih *WPH> apprr.-ia ••HI lha.k all h. .11. ,..I..I %  | .... ,.r .. RMHH < % %  E ... UMl *•! ,... i,.i-i with then !..-.„ %  %  Idowi Mr am M S, ,. % %  im v, ,.,.. MM %  >">•-' KM sU> U*M Frank iv--.; i mi < BS ... %  i, kn IN mMUH F0)R BEST BFVBBI v < Bate., TuMt si m.AMltlXT. WaleBYO,,. C^fcaa? sJ? rhaei FreBa NoveBaaaM I>. Fully furnButt BBHlBB. Il I %  IY1TL ""IM Coast. "AngsB a a" KB,"n Fully fdraaBBawJ and ro..,lppe.1 Eaceiiem BOB baihang Private Beeei. Cook. BuUcT a*a lata.se Tl 1-M Appotrtlmenl to v, !" r<|-FKANZA Fully furnl.hod m JHM See CnaM Phone tin FARAWAY-St Philip. ""~"fcS:-5S IM'IUJI SAM'S AUCTION WAIVTEB HKLP %  AY n: J v nag the after iRf la.i a-., at i pedd-b will ba MM •HX*tXBD"f_Al.i Bookaa. nr \la.lne Hold Apply M tnMI I ajn and il m. MISCELLANEOUS UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER B i, MM aL-?"0 4th" '.I our Mark High S' 13 1110-11*. Bra* l-i, ml I.— I r lea. Tank I pre: An Ml. tip DM I Tin* Paint I thisaavre beto-i Ever bt tM rememheTe.; bv (-'" %  Ifei Edna KlMlWi 11 II %  Only 11. The I Anlhony .•Mi Ira Jae-.ec and %  %  ''*'> """'\ rhiESwi UliDIRN BUNQAI.OW--NO. a Cimor mail, Upper Bay Ittrart. TaWuUuiM M r uU M Ml* Alma GrlftUh M t nadrooma. Water mill BVgepiy, riant .Daw-bla Oaraao, B.oeeyBart ZUOm iraae 1 at let. Dial MIC lit* t "RERTAWlLE" Olbtn Beeth. Peier. Three bedroom bunfalaw U forntmed for January and Marrh II Wraley Bayley. High Rtreel LS mother' ibroCau and 'el#. toved Mother Al.llF BOl'RKE •! O'li.nea tl> life on 11 NoHWwr. IH. •^fourWr, ye.... Alice Dear !" ,, and Ur I your vacant pa %  MM Vi.ta Mr Doivald LouM: Pavld. Alton. Corel immediate lamlly. I otaMi n Will tain Aodrey. FOB Sill AUTOMOTIVE CAR-On* 1M0 lltllman "ul I*I MI A bargain cylinder Mai tar paini job and l>'r paini |ohii Plio-.eajOfperfect condltlo 11 II SB1 tsut what T*W -ant for tna oomirii ^ 2S-* to J.. p. %  *^ yjgg* larXTEICAL TWO BOOt"" gra.naphoite--.Ub ^ t '"" I. n"mil! %  a,i '•f^mvrlBJWOMr.--Plliiate at H-ttnB^ ^ the aaa aide Th bouaa conaalnal ialn. dining and ta-eakfait rooma. rdmon,.. and all convablenC ^ Appi> Table iAnllO.ua %  YOUNG LADY—Tutored at leadaM irl arboat in the inland RchaBl eriiacMe Baaj n arnploymant a* caahaw, %  %  endant In Dtuf Store, wiling to nggd >• aunBbia aaaiuon for %  > %  aaanlauil lonaer Wrlla Boa B, Co AdvucOaa AdrtaDaa* la II 5WANTV.B TO BUT Ciaad fUa. furniture In MahogaaV, %  irth. Plaa. Good pcicc. paid WU i" aurehaaa entire houaa fumltura fl aaopia tearing liland Apply %  card. MaMoood "" i;i,rgiii iba.i-. '"*; |-.Mt Card. Tat.ie and t-ha-r>inn Cu*hKB-. -'I m Manoaany Dinner Waui. M.l.ooa.d Bide Table Taa Trot*. r. by He,*^a,n. Otaan* % %  TUh Kni.> *'' '*"'" %  ' %  • "*"" %  S3 I | IM Mab.*an> H-1 trad spring d Red. Vaedty.TBMt iTlll'' i Waaniland. < %  Cat. nilaaiaial and Bed., Dreealng T-'.ie. ,.i liMjkDi.ae Refrlferator (Unit afaaiK uchen •M** *"" Walghla. r.U-ctrir Iron. iTeaaura CTOfcer. Oardae. ToaK Garten B->Tteadle Be.ing Machine and Sale 1130 o'clock Trim* Ca-n BRANKIIt. TROTMAN A CO. Anrtlonrrnt llll.H-3n. Phoi.a a3. HARBOUR LOG in Crliiie Bay SHIPPING NOTICES ni"i" rh LgrudaJnha. *" Loft.mvarP.aMi Cyril C Braltn. Brh MidK N Joawa. Ba* Turtle larva. Bt A r.rrvU.-a. Brh. I.ydla Adln. A !" '**" Yatfei Orafan. Bch Mandate*; H. Bab v.-Llkmatad. aa* Unayd II. Rrb. Hanry Jl W ,,.te ARRIVALS Bar nar Sunahln. R . tana net Cap! R.me-. from Brlta* Guiana fataaaaar FhlUp "Daa^daorv PI to-i. net. f^pt Se.tr from %  rtllah, OoUn. Bgr^amr id-saDa M. Pawlth 14 toaa net ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. Sailing from Antwerp. Rottrd>' Holland tii KHaWA'* 10th and 1Mb Balling; o Trtn'dad La Oualra CWa cao etc m.a. "iici^T' atn. No^cmb^r. • %  -TARNBUMipth. NovaaMMTi m a. -OttAKJaaTTAD" lat. Novaaaaar. walunM to Tririlaad. FarairMirLho, Oeorgeiown, ma -RaB-wNA-' lltb I .. i 11 ahara In a-aantlal." BJ IflaaY "land Main w.te! %  llghtBMI Advoraal MIW B ALEXANDRA SCHOOL WANTBD Fr..m May 1B5I. an Aulitant Ml.lraa. tn teacb one or more of the MtowUal An. latin, f tench. Spani.h. MalhoI Haa| iii quallAaala>nand eperlenc. on acale far %  ~. %  H i..' r. .1. at i i -. •taiing qitaiinrationi and •uliJecta nlTrrrd. and anai..panl*d fea* ir.timonial.. muit reach the HeadnUatre*. not later than February 15th. II ii sa-ao BEAL ESTATE i and WANTED llv the Vretry of the Pariah of ftt 635 ihe authority af aaa Bt. % %  >&• Del-. Pariah Loan Act IMg iia*a_SB. The Vaawy daMra la .borrow from BBS%  kroonar ItoT M U-P. IP ton. net CadlaVahaU, for Brttiah Odlaaav S*e, Lady Rodney. PaT long ran, Capt leBleaw. far Bt l-"l* %  arltaaaaar Pnahcia W BmlOi. 14 lona net r.Dt it.aanl. for Brttaab Ouaana In Touch With Barbivdow Coaital Sution CMC and Wl.Bieea IW I.I Lid., adviaa thai tbay con now communicate Uh tho f.,llowln ahlpa through thalr Barbado. t'oait BUtkm:— Si Silvarva, Brad, Vaneouvar Cll#. |IVmny. Flva Forka. C. O Thulln. %  lida Hoaduraa, Lolde Argentina. Tnion. Tort N o t t I n a h a .-.. Fulgor. >>ulaaii Vanturar. Brrgeaund. Carina, Caajgfclara-a. Norluna. Ale., Pilgrim, a. Roaa. Uruguay. Beraalna. Vnnp.. Lolrdcreet. B. Barbara. Ravarurer. Son-.' cm Dl-trlcta. Tralar.ua. AthaRhlaf. I Matthew. Lady Rodnav. l*d* Nel on I-*le Haiti, Varport. Bteiu Marina. J— R^aa, Uranktrdaoni. Fort Amherat. Vm. I. Nuava Caparta. Benator daa. Ke Moran. Fort Fattarman. Seeoree.e Uilruww. i*onaar Oenv nip I ,tgg. Airentlru.. Crnftaman. Beaci. HangtUna. Sevan Saaa. Alcoa Cllpae'. A.ntank, %  - A.aarv-llle. Tullahom. RI A. Gold Rangar, Myryam. SEAWELL ARHIVALB-By W.LA.L For Trinidad; Hochellr Richard.. JagaM Fandl. Audn-. Bourna. Mary Bourne-. VeinOlbaon, Drudra Jardlna. DUldea Kirpalam. For Grenada; aiadja Murray. Caaford Muna*. Lillian Chrlellan. ftalllna; to lgadalra, Plymouth, AMv.arp. and ArngUrdam. mi. Wall lBl STAD* ITth Noverabar Tba M V Caribbea'' will accept Canon and Fwaaangara for Dominic. AKir.il Montaarrat, MeM. St Kitu Bailing Friday ITth .... ,„) P* Lucia, Bt. Vincent Grenada A.uba Dale of deparlura will rtaUBad B.W.I. BBBIBBWF UWM AawacidtlOB Inc. Canadian National Steamships >14 PI If I H NOTICES NOTICE i vi.l-H OF -I PHILIP la l-arocnia, Tra-^irer'a Offlco will removed to Kingalon. Church VH lagr. w. Philip from lllh No*. IPP9 The OlWca will ba opened for builraa on Monday. Tuoadari. A Sat.irtyi from t a.m. to II am and from Bfd. p. •. W. BCOTT. 1'aro.nUl Treatiirrr. Bt Philip 4 11 W V* KXAMINATIONH OT THB ROYAL HANITABT IXBTITI'TK Tha aaamlnaUona for Ihe rarloua CerUlWalea of Ihe Royal Sanitary lnatltut< will ba held In Port-of-Bpaln. Tnnlde.1 from the lllh to Ifilh Decrmber. 1PW %  minalloi Qoverr I. ahould obtain IInm the BHaaBtW :nt Itolldlnga. Thr I U It Hi 1 rr K. '^S.rff.'srtff. | ^s !" ." Jt5 s?w I M I beda Balk %  .landing "'I -'-" Paa laJ aff o H i T %  !" -1 0 plv to 1" Victoria Blreet _. erreedlng Thrw. t. with Thouaand FlTB Hundred Pour di 1CS.UWI. WC being part of C 11.000 aulborlaed under aald Art. at a rale of IntereM not %  M v. ; > heaoltful View %  ..peril H Archer McKemii M li in IIUNOALOW At iwlghkri. Btack i ...molet-d nn.1 .t.irmiiwi Ofl TEW eaiMr* fret of land with right of War to aaa S B-h • TUod H'"' and Modem Kltchrnatte. <>-'M r 2 a servant. quarter. Apply HUTCH" BANFTaXD Phone *M3 • II SOdn MBOM •rURNITUKE r.c^,d J ^'."Vul nr; i .e^n ^UhoeV, |i.i. i Becrel Whgrf The completed form* tog-thar with thr appropriate fee* ahould be relumed to Ihe Honorary Secretary not later than the *llh November. IBM P H GRANNUM. lion Beciy ATreaaurrr. Ilrin.h Wel Indie. Hoard of Eaamlnrra, Rural Sanitary Inalllute II II 0 In li.. | ta i Phone i H.U.N 1 Al.l-v daily! Ml an M ISC ELLA N KOI TS ANTigUm Of aveny deacrlpt^n DtBaaV China, old Jgwela, Bna Bll-ar Watcrci>lur" Kjrty booka. Map* Autopaphi etc at Gorrlngei Antique Bhop adjoining Royal Yaehl Club^ ARMCHAll*^ POW Armchalm, elmon Phone BS01. Berkeley Bprlna new HI ft" """ 11 i|.M-*Ii i good, alight rapalra to I M harneaa In good order no re ofler refined. Apply to Other 1 Mlddlaaan. Bt Groig*. Ill In Old rNUAGF.MFTVT _._ 1,r pp> I"• -n be had ,...„ 5 DBW C a W> "Ml QKSS K"ia"Sell Help. Cottaae and Ma>fair (lift Shop* Price II GAI.VANI7.KD PIPBS in 4". 1 —• 1" alao Balvalilied aheeta Enquire Auto Cajr. Tft anl Bft. Irngtha Enquire Aui Tyre Company, TYafalBar -J*^ **>';/ HUKSi; AND CABT-In B !" > %  nlMon. no reaaoiuible ofler reiueeo Apply to Other St. George b ..i 4117 II COATS II nai.ilii.eut "I ... nntabii w.tarpr^ each. Thi Modem nrea. Bhoppe. Broad Blreet B II SO—4n iiUHHFJus:n Irrvelllru! w N.. brlU'l qu.llly rubtieiune,! coni (or aprtni and definitely with detachable hood lioao i aVIAMPOOv-Would you I'ke to i n|c* Bhampoo that leave, your li .ft Bfc*a and brlBhl Than trv Hi vt IfuMaard A.ver. Price II >• i>'i mm LM -tiii%  > SAMPLES popular make La< Elaatic G.rdlea. raundallono. Q* Hell. pBU I a.-, medium iuee Call l.in Drew St^>p Wiepherd II II 9—In early Par Man 11'^^ifvSiSpPv NOT1CK To Applicants for Vacant St. Michael Vedry Exhibitions at Bt Mlchaeli Girl.' School. Attention la drawn to tha advertise i.e..! %  upeelrng in Uie Advoea.le Nmi Mper of Bundav the III. Novrmorr •SB. on aaea 1* under Ilia eagttl.-. TtnlTATTONAI." At Michael's Girl. ichool. which sUtaa that girls who are ref R and aader II years will be emlned on Frtdav Ihe ITth day ol Nuv%  naar 1PM. at • a* a.m Will parenta ant nr guardlana of hlldren within thlaga group pleau lamina lion and comply with tha adClerk. At Mkha sam I Nil \TIO\AI Beadfal! Oalag ol a Very Atlrae Prise A Unique and ArtUtli n rgnlOw aay&waW Hlatdi t UlllfBDad BU Mgaattol for Ihe Dliimctlve and rinancial Miles from Citv. , ago For and Dent Clasa. Fully Finnuhed teatepl Linen at" i Sandy Tlearh. Fine Halhing. Nlraly Bat (PIT Main Hoed. Tree. Bed'o)m itwo large-one with e at Tn.,rnbury Hill Main on, Modern C.mvanl, Vacgnt. Fine View. Si> >• Tat ,td With Rtonewall. taaMl 14aB aq. -^_ „ n rt _, £100 A 3 Hedroom Land at I*.er Rlark k. Main Road. Water. Light. Going Under C41V Three-Re.wall nunflalowa at Na*v Gardena and F.iiilauelleSea-.rte. Going fur Under CHOP A To..i-.rev stonewall mrt Hraldence al Lower Ba*| large Garage Of W..ik>hop Going for Under CLSOO. Real. n llellevllle Two and Ihrre ,M, { .. % %  |h i.g In Heal TI N,.i 1! Bra %  Arranged Dial 3111. D. V. DeAIlRKU -OHviRough-. HJ-1IIV. aa known Ba "Bellovuo" anBB aa Graeme 11.11 lle1 al The BWOawB, CRfW ...eaant %  three Mdna, Druwlnc and ,, Three hedioomKiclimt Hory and Bath, with runund Ele.-t.lelly throorhot.l on application to the tenant hour* will ha set un lor sal* .11,f-nrepetllion al OUT Office No r,eRtreel. Bridgetown, on rrld. ;ilh November lM> at I p % %  YEAR WOOD %  miYCBI. Ml IBM | n r-o r. Per HI; %  tendering must elate tha minimm rate of interest they are preparad ta) acaapt Prior otmaldaaaMea, will aw given t<> tenders at the moat favourable rate of interest Inlerasl is payable on the Bath day Ba June each rear. Tha principal of this loan B repa.abla in Iwenly iMI annual instalment, af £ %  100 each. The flrit Inatalmenl Ol this part of the l..ari la payable on lha 38th dov of Juno. IBM. B aalad afttr. u> writing marked on lha mvelope -OPFBB FOB LOAM OP t .•' %  will be received by Ihe Clerk of tha Veatlv. up to II o'clock noon ON M..nday the RMh day of November. IBM I-F.RTIF1CATBS will ba b-wad in unlW of c 100 only. By Order. l: C. REDMAN Clerk. Bt. Michaels Ve.try. IADY NEUsON I Nov. CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR Nov CANADIAN CHAldXHOnt S3 No IADY RODNEY — IADY KBBUBON — IADY RODNEY .. — LADY NE1BON — H.nfai 4 Nor. 14 Nov. XT Nor Dec. It Dae. 1" Jan. 1 PPb. Pal la Boston B Nov 4 Dec. r. Doe. IB Jan a PBB. Arrivao Bash* BarttedO* Barhndo< IB No. IB Nov. B4 No*. 1* M Jan. Bt Jan. 13 rob. 13 rob. MMIH I MIMM 1 CRICKETERS! Great your faaaPtl CRICKLJM m BLAZERS A, n_>' RAYMOND JORDAN In Bar Street, oppotvitr C4vnbcranejrc KlrroH. TAR lor yards etc. A limited quantity R emalning for sale AT Your Gas Co Bay St. Dial .., 303 NOBTBBOLNO IADY NELSON IADY RODNEY LADY NEJAON IADY RODNEY LADY NBBAON •.HiM.rh.iJ... 3. Nor. BT Dec. li Jan. 13 Feb. IT Fab. Arrive* Si John Hi Dec. li Jan. ^1 Fab. b Marrk GARDINLR AUSTIN St iwu BBS. gSS "J Mon, CMS CO„ LTD. — Ag eoU. L^_ .i, T ^-;,.TT ORIENTAL GOODS! (ArUcolos) I'UROIS. II \MI.I ERY. SILKS, -imi • TIIAMS Pr. Wm. Ilry. Rt DIAL 14M TARRY SCHOOL There will be an RntramExiamnat'' at IB am Candidates baptismal cerUneatea and • fra moaJals their Headmi l.bl LYNCH'S SECONDARY SCHOOI, Hl-BY KtkFIT tn the July Examination of lha U... dun Chamber of Commerce Certificate wera gained In Ihe fnllnwtng suhlerir.NGl.lSH Do lore. Heal, Malvfm N villa, ftlhnle Nurse. Elu.a Skeele. Goi-I Waithe. Grraory Millar. Malcolm Bai BOOK-KEEPING: Walton Mllllnglon COMMEHCIAI. GEOGKAPHYr Malcoll l'-.i(i-. I-i-irnre Gibson. AltlTHMFTIC Matvern Korvllaa iDit1lncti.ini. Elma Skeele Ll.lr Walcoll. Um-. Gibson MATIIKMATKS Dolores Best, Elhnls Nurse iDistlnctioni. Malvern Norvlllc i Distinction i. Oo.el Wallhe, Mulch. narrow. Lawrence Gibson iDistinctioni More Rubber Produced Than Uaed WASHINGTON, Nov. 11, World production of new rubber, both natural and Bynthetlc. topped world consumption in September the United States Commerce Department reported yesterday. September production totalle-t 1 214.500 tons, while 107,500 tons were consumed, the report Baid. Russian Imports of natural rubber during the first nine months of 1050 were estimated n< 53.250 tons compared with 87.500 tons in the same period of isn. —Reater CHRISTMAS IS FAST APPROACHING — and we hav* — XMAS CRACKERS. XMAS TREES, TOYS. Come In early and helect youn. THE CEXTRAL E3iPORM€3t (CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors) Cornor of Broad and Tudor Streets. 'e*,^e-e'e*.*eVe*e'e*e*e'e*e*-*e*e''e*e'.-e' I'.VAW.'AVAV/AVA'r'/ lerlr Oftli-er lerly Berjeent ^l far Daly Orderly OPVsr Orderly Srrleanl LEAVE W0m SB* I.H lanri.C K 4BI 1. C Holder. 8. lAAVB PaiMI.lt.I CBi.raln J Be.lrtee.1 %  I).-' Metl FORDK. II' "I l-T II 11 Ml 1 QUEEN'S COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS FOB THB VBAB IMI Tha Eanmlnaliun. for rut rumen's Collage In Janua.y. IBM. held at the School on Mondav ill sell II Apply %  in. 11iiim* many lalondw. rr %  of lair, ksr-oa. Will a." tna W unable offer Apply rlolv!- % %  Hasting. 13 II M -In PTASTIC RAINCOAT* -B-rgaim ladlea* Pla Uc RalncoaU BB-O* PUatar Head Ties In Assorted Colo. J9e. each. Tha Moderii Drea; Bhop] Broad Street Prea Bhoppe. B II B0~4n '...i.-.l whole Whei ay Al'ayna. Arthur i Medford t CO .A F W M Ford. Empi. r..ilon which la a frpT-rner for nil trpae of akin and >laa aide in reenlngr Ihe i.re. -KNIOIITB LTD MMBC-in. ~^. -I-, Mn Harriet H bl>ard i q i T a fnondati %  BRaaa BBJ h ..%  %  %  in In a.. KNIGHT* ladea LTD J '1 —3n m I'n III RELIEF woman have found Instant .elief by s Bsailsi Air Caahlaa ApHtaaaa. AIU> a redl inflatable ajfea. cusillon. light, strong and easily wB.hed, it hold, the hernia with such gentle fl,-nines* that broken i.ve increased chances of detail, and Free Booklet BEASLEYK LTD., Ussl. ISA 4 Cork Street. London, W I. prompt CHILDREN ONLY will b.flmute.1 inio the Assembly Hall I Each candidate must bring a lesil monlsl nf Conduct aivd Prngrru from the Headmi.I.ess of the School shi Is now attending 3 Candidates "HI II fmi* of agi must bung Mathematical Instruments 4 Candidates who have reached I certain standard of work In their wilt ten eiemlnallona will be summoned later (or an Interview. 5 Tha namee of glrla Who qiia.iBed for admission, through view and examination, will ba pub in Use Agserale on Tuesday, nee, Itth. IBM. wcien Book Lists, etc ba aent lo the parents guardlana • Sucreasful candidate* Mbit p themselves at Queen'a Colled* Monday. January I'th. IMI. at S a accompanied by Ihelr parenli guardi I Tha Entrance Eramlnallona children o.-rr II years of age wlU a.st a whole day. therefore those candidate* .noil come provided with lunch Children aadsr II yean of ad* may bec-Ded for a, 1-.-,,,,^ ST. MICHAF.Ls CURLS' SCHOOL BNTSANCB EEABIDfATlON lha following < who Candidates 'chool on IH Gill. 11 on 31M July IMI ITlh November at • M am <1> Okray who are II and under H on |lat July IM* Od Saturday lllh November al • M am All candldalee are safced la ba M the School at B a m Parenla and Guardiam PERSONAL The public are hereby warned Banlnel giving credit lo any aaraan or parses, i whosoever in mv name a* I do not hold myself reeponalble for anyano rantracllng any debt of deMa In my name • ana *rUMn_order signed b, PART ORE ORDERS l-sl.-tsl. J. Cdaarl Command The Barbads. O.II, I Kflaaeal I NaT. M Thursday II Nov. SB PABAIIFH All rank, will no. ode ,, Realmenlal lleaxlonarler" 1100 liour". Thr following will be earned out : 'a. The.will be a kll inspection for other ranks and apart from tha drasa each Volunteer shouU bring hi. second shirt and second pali i for this Inaperlli-n -In Thn- Omcer.' MrsMewling on Saturday IT, N officer* Me— Meeting will be I.IW -,n Salurday I Dec. i members may alt nd at i %  hours PABT II OBDSRB THF IIAIIHADOS ItllilMENT lath Nossmber. inoa Granted B/Lcava wef a--IS Nov. M Granted P/Leave with permission to leave the colony waf 3 11 Oct SO. M. 1. D. SKEWES-COX. Major. S.O.Ur Ji Adjutant. The Barbados Regiment. NOTICE DO YOU WANT TO WIN $100 FOR XMAS? Buy n stxpennv ticket in •InModem Hitih School Xm&s DruwIiiK. First prize $100. Nln.eteen other valuable prizes. The proceed*, will endow a $4,000 Scholarship fund to outfit, aid nntl eaucate 12 i. mu-lliirent children. AIL ticket -holders invited to wiln< %  draw at the school in lha l-ixinii rinif ut 5 p.m. Wednesday 20lh December Tickets obtainable from any pupil Licence for prizedrawing granted by kind permission of the Commnlorm of Police. OLD IIARR1S0MAN SOCIETY There will be a General Meeting of the Oil Society at Harrison College Wednesday. 15th Nov bar, st 4.45 p.m. AGENDA 1. To receive Finan Statement. t To appoint an 1 Secretary 3 General Business. S. GITTENS. Hon Sec. iA. JOIN T/rf NAVY TO SEE THE SEA' JOIN ui K RAF HQI'AllRON TO DRINK AND ENJOY Taylor's Rum And Falernum TAYLORS SPECIAL BLENDED RUM urn. Hi. iii.i,a.live rUrarl AND TAYLOR'S LIQUEUR FALERNUM 1 "„ OnbUndtol IteoH .IOHX It. T.XYi.OH & SOXS LTD. j*XS9ESSC=£*£$ m GET THE HORUCK'S HAtilT obuinsblo froai Orocars and rraaauiti. JOHN F. HUTSON LTD.—Agents Barbados Krai Estate Agenty INDVRTRIAU COMMERCIAL. REKIDENTIAL Telephone 338 OfBca : BwStM Botal Ltd. FOR SALE IMii MtllN. Chrlat Church. %  asj %  ,BJI aaddsi TBS i>i I unuaual. AH Mahogany doors. window frames, built in wordrober, .Irr^rr* etc 3 twdroornf, t balhroouia. Living and Dimng room*. Kltchrn Qaiaaal %  ''" '*' n A. C. Engine BUrdlnt: > I attr band facing aca. rafe aaa bathing. IOV1 arRixi. in" • Jama*. Overl.mklng aaa, Prlvulc bathing core. \IUil \ 1 i l-l Htil 'I Worthing. IVmlahed DOVER: Christ Church, fl lots on aaa 3 > DOOo and 3 s U.OUO %  BJ. B. alao arrcagc. Kit Li* St Philip. Acreage nr* Crane Hotel. BLOCK OP IACTORY Bt 11.11 INOS In Ihe City. igjajBe II REAL ESTATE JOHN BLABON A-F.S-. F.V.A. Formerly Dixon & Bladon FOR SAXE i MODI UN •!" l s,. li.O -, i tin i „:...|,om tl.700 upwards. P*** and appoint inenta H vts-w on application. KI-MIIMI M '"*V'; I.M.I 11.11... I Bgggaagt Da .. ...jp-nw-nl and Utwell bardaj A Fresh Stock Again !! FDDD YEAST I Can be Uken mixed with Coeos. Milk. Fruit Jukes. He. The greatest modern food discovery, supplies Vitamin B2 for a balanced diet, and for extra Proteins ao necessary to health and strength. Add Foo<' Yeast to your normal diet and you will add more body eneigy and better health. Get I.nl Teaat fram your r.rorer or Drugihtt now. S. P. MUSS0N. SON & Co.. LTD. DISTRIBUTORS bt>tat)BjBjRfjM aujBjsTaaa) awv//. -. •lug-. Th. Ihnughl out. and tl 1.-Shaped lounge .ind dining With cockLill bar. 3 pleagont a*adrppms all with fitted wardrotiea, a Lego tiled laathroom aaesrBB ihe %  %  ernnd bathroom an" em btlrhs". well t 'built-in' riiptmard'.. garage, aervt-.es quarter., naved ..... atr All the new TMhogany furniture and conlente may ba purchased If required. CBAS-r VII I A This modem stone-built 3-ston-v nroprrtv with with Cr-na> lintel enlr alga ilrve verted Inlo two n'.-.tmut rail con%  spacloii. ii-. i Ofler. wilt be considered. MOIil B\ BBBBM MM \> ROCKI.EV near thOotf tt bv a well known %  „-lo.-a. tlur conaUuctn.i. >of .time aid the floorare nollshrd pine There are 3 Urge hedronma .-.II with u. i %  hnllt-ln' w.rdrobes. Bathroom .,,d toilet are tiled The toniuir Ig lanre and airy •'th Preach window leading nut on t,, a v-randah wRh n-agnlftranl .-lewa peer Onlf canir* .mri aaa. There Is brra*fa-l r-oni. well filled kit'hen double g...ae and narciy ihsd Bat gardena. Now offried el E4 SB THE Ol IVEB Upper Collyinara Rock. Thi. i.irge modern stone bungalow winabout I acre ahould i.-,IW solid property conetructsd of Ihe bast obtalikabla matertaa. Thare bi a large living room Its n 14 fl I g;.l>ry I4B', ft lot, R i 4 bed corns lone SSXi fl. a %  Bft i madam kitchen paved caurtyard lawns kitchen garden and orchard Well placed for srhoot, and Iranaport lo town, mill. mi. M.I i„ Th.. attn tm .it-. i M si IgsBBfeB, There ta a beautiful sandy beach and Utr h.thing la uikuirruased Th<< hou.e contain* J bedrooma. upsuirs kitchen etc. Viewing by appointor iv Mm. IOW HI Lucy.' A eoiintrv home with living room, dining room. 3 bed1 garagea. storerooms ale.. fMsjjne I.MI Imclkin wtlh wallaba roof shlngrlr* Fertile ground of over 3'i -eras planted around house with ahrubs and trcee, renuunder oana. option furthar MB acres canaland. RENTALS SINBBT HOI BE Proaparl, St Junes. On (iu>l InnK..: g Dal BB B4BJ ....I CIMBEBXANB MOL'SK: Codnngton Hill With about j Ml I nwBl BBBBlsa FUHMTUHE AUCTIONS are successful with lei... M. IIUS.> Low eKa.go-Prornpl payment SEAL ESTATE AGENT AUCTIONEER rLAMTATIONS BUMJHNO rhoD 4SM





Sanday Price:

November 12
19350

Sunday

HOME OF THE G









URKAS INVA









French
Evacuate |

Another Post

SAIGON, Nov. 1i.
French troops yesterday evacu-
ated a post 11 miles northwest of
the Indochinese town of Moncay
on the Chinese Border, near the

}Commanding General of the
‘United States 24th Division, said
\earlier that he saw no need to
}occupy the town as it has been
“virtually levelled”. by repeated
air bombardment.

He pointed out that patrols hac/ wre g ¢ BETHELL'S FIRST FLIGHT
to give Mr. Betbell his first win of the Meet.
and ridden by Yvenet was second.

Sun Queen. Oateake

been east and west of Pakchon
and found no entry.

South Koreans crossed Taet-



yong river and cut the Kasan-
Pakchon road.

1
They engaged Communist French Red
forces, estimated at Battalion i .
strength, but they had the situa- Ch ief Leaves



(Lytchman up) wins the St. James Handicap
Miss Friendship, also owned by Mr. Bethell

police

The note, referring to the Com-
munist-led cost of living demon- |
strations and strikes on October 4,
and 5, protested against the re-
fusal last month by the Soviet

authorities in Austria to ae |
|
|

— ee - Sethian ee ne ey «
: WRILLIANT FINISH a | R - l i
U.N. Forces Push | . es . ival Governmenis
e ~
On Past Wonnt Operate In Nepal
After Week Long Lull
TOKYO, November 11 See aan RAXAUL, on the Nepalese border, Nov. 11
, November 11. H ds ff [NVADING Nepalese Congress forces struck
UNITED NATIONS forces pressing across rug- an O simultaneously at nine different points in Nepal
ged hill country in their new offensive today Austrian territory today. Their objective was believed to
by-passed bomb-battered Pakchon in Northwest 5, al be the Nepalese capital, Khatmandu.
Korea and reached beyond Wonni, about 19 miles Police |
farther west. The private armed forces of the Nepalese
After a week-long lull, American, British, Australian, and British Tell Reds Congress entered Birgan) - Nepal today and set
South Korean troops jumped off this morning from the up parallel Government States.
Chongchon river -bridgehead towards the Manchurian te siete LONDON, Nov, 11, s st
Border. Pakchon is about 8 miles north of the river. Mean- Navies ‘Sonn ee ee ___ The Nationalist Nepalese Congress supports the deposed
while, British and Australian troops established a road yerterdhy Gite’ Fassia 6 tell her King Tribvuvan, who took refuge four days ago in the
~ block about one mile south of Twon. i ‘Indian Embassy in Khatmandu, the capital of Nepal, and
mt —————-. Major-General John H. Church, rom interfering with Austrian who arrived in India to-day.

The Nepalese Government has officially told India that
King Tribyuvan's three-year-old grandson has been install-
ed as King of Nepal.

hisnaieiladapainide seinlentieteanatonpars 4 The Nepalese Congress yester-

day distributed leaflets calling on

ruling aristocracy and establish a

in the Allied R d Chi their, compatriots to “liberate the
Vienna to discuss the | e Inese country from the shackles of the

behaviour of the Soviet occupation
authorities

during wtrikes,
The British note said: His |

Majesty's Government protest

Ur S If Peoples’ Government with King
ge e | Tribvuvan as constitutiona}) mon-

arch.”

boy a sees he Soviet | Government They pledged themselves to

in Austria of their |

“sacrifice their lives” to protect







































































3rown, denied that there were any
communists am6éng West Indian
students in London.

Mr. Brown, :a former secretary
of the W.I, Students Union in
London, was replying tq charges
made locally by Jamaicans re-
‘urning from Britain—inciuding
His Lordsh’p the Rt. Rev, P. W.
Gibson, Bishop of Kingston, that
zommunism was rampant among
West Indian students in London.

“It is quite a wrong statement
for anyone to say that Communism
s rampant among the students in
London,” Mr. Brown said. “We
have no time for Communism. We
have other problems on our
hands.”

He said that among students
he had known in London, he was
aware of only a single case in
which a Communist had entered

QRT'E'S HEADLINE

new system of wage contracts.

A call was issued by three |
Communist and two non-Commx- |
nist Trade Union Organisations |
in negotiations with Government!
and employers. |

The Union§ ‘also decided to tell
the Minister in Alboa that they
could not go beyond concessions
they had already made.

Italy’s labour troubles were
expected to flare up afresh with
unions representing all shades of |
political opinion working in}





concert for the first time. |
—Reuter. ws.



PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 11
Armed police were combing the
thickly wooded Valencia
around Arima
hunting for a shot-gun carrying
villager who ran amok on Friday

which skirts the forest.
The killed were Nathan Lubin,
38-year old peasant,
year-old wife Rose and another
woman Jainab
was discovered on Saturday, 24
after she had
after fleeing from the gunman
The bodies of Nathan and Rose
avere discovered
garden with Nathan’s hand still
grasping his hoe. Jainab’s body
was found 150 yards from her
home riddled with

Near the end of the day’s racing,
ihe Band reminded those who had
won, those who had lost, and
those who had risked nothing to
‘Enjoy Yourself”, it’s Later Than
You Think.”

Details on Page 4

Don't forget your Gues#
can win $5.00,
Sce Monday's Advocate,



{States had formulated a “masts
The United states Governmen:, |

j world commitments and resources s. |



Delegates Will Boycott
Monday’s Peace Congress _





Gulf of Tonking. tion “well under control” a spokes- e e attempt to institute uniliteral | the King’s cause and overthrow
Fighting is in progress to re-|man of the American First Corps 1e In Bi Swee ore oe _, Austrian police | —I/IN TIBET the hereditary Prime Minister
occupy the post. told the correspondent. KF or Moscow I / . ; Be a ee ie | and his family
| About 1,000 Communist troops 2 the authority of the Austrian | LONDON, Nov. 11
the Se Miter sineuiced | have oe en Kasan. PARIS, Nov. 11. < 7 kena a8 DOE CO: Te The Chinese Communist pro- {
: 2 7 he a : nother Communist French Communist leader Mau- G j We jj ' ’ 2 Me ‘clamation urgin “the entire Nepal, Independent native
sgl Communist attack, During | force, about 1,000 has been located | rice Thorez left here in a Soviet | overnor ate tes ‘His = Majesty's Government (ii otan Ph Thulin all the || kingdom on the north-east
vacuation, units from the|on high ground in the Yonsan- . . . therefore invite the Soviet Gov- ; a kincian
t : eh 8 ie. xO plane today for Moscow. > o- ?v" Lamas’ to help the Chinese frontier of India, comprises
post recovered arms from Viet-|myon area between Kunuri and} He is to undergo treatment in a | kK en R ernment to issue appropriate in-| ies “rid Tibet of imperialist a portion of the southern
minh insurgents. . , | Tokchon. 7 Russian clinic after his recent ill | ee acing structions to their authorities in |' salen hep 1 stablist ve? fonal | slope of the Himalayas It
art Pe waierks end ‘ot Flanked By G.Ls ness. He had cerebral haemorr- | ‘ suetele to desist from interfering ; ‘Cir-government” oe sentan by || is bounded on the north by
to be harassed by Vices capes ae Py Tg singe Weeoe = ene iwin-ohgined ‘Soviet ‘Da | SUN QUEEN and Oascale e my ann Ls gee emerged fuca Gerecnwnec of the. new China (Communist) news | ane ae Sher se —_
tar fire from an unknown direc. | £@St and west, these Communist }yota in a stretcher chair. The| Champion horses of the B.E.C. November Race Meeting| ‘The British note stated that, *8eney relayed on Peking racio|) aig pihar India
5 y : oes : vi ' and on the
tion, ae at ean Poe yes ae Dakota which landed shortly be-; which ended yesterday. These two horses, by tying for |during discussions about the | day. || east by Sikkim and Bengal.
The losses inflicted on the {Man said. ’ fore Thorez arrived at the airfield | first place bring to the holdeéts of Tickets Nos. ‘H-2137 and strikes in the Allied Council in| ‘Phe proclamation stated that/| In the First and Second
Vietminh forces by F: 3; America and _ Australian Thore | J-6479 the sum of $17,952 each. enna on October 13, the “Sovict! the Tibetan people “should buiid World Wars, Nepal (home
evacuating the oar one re Mustangs pr shooting-star Jets 7 ee eee | ne nnn His xcellency the Governor |Tepresentative argued that moby), Ssatersel iainene on a basis of the Ghurkas) gave un-
firmed by the observation planes|supported the United Nations fe teft for the ea er jand Mrs. Savage, accompanied by|Violence in the Soviet Zone of] of friendship and mutual help | Fa ll nen dlp
which saw Vietminh wounded | advance, riddling Communist] ‘Tall Red Army officers in great- | Results At the A.D.C. attended the meeting Austria was not properly the with other nationalities within | Government in men, money
being transported, the spokesman | troops concentrations. coat aah Atk Cotaiaies eves| = Ss yesterday. It was a day of fair |Concern of the Allied Council and| their country.” Together they | and materials, The area of
said, Planes were estimated to have|from the plane and were greeted weather, an — racing wes Bn eee tee by a me should “construct a new Tibet; ween ore eee oa
ee b killed about 600 Communists. by a Russian Embat official A Gl seen on a firm track. \ ander could not be; with) ” the 1
Vietminh forces were dispersed| Elements of the United States’ The crew stayed on at ance Most successful riders for the |diseussed by the Council, wen cual ont ioneat ||: 6988,000. Hinduism ts oe
by patrols and artillery. fire south |1st Cavalry Division on the right Security arrangements at the whole meeting were Crossley and|. “This view cannot be accepted ; | predominant religion
of Chauson about 12% miles|flank of the First Corps advanced | airfield were no more rigid than THIRD DAY Holder with five wins each, Five | His Majesty’s Government in| The proclamation promised that
\ s outheast of Dinhalap on the main see ** tua ak aa ee normally gute ie’ the ni runt saa | ees seored by the Chandfer | © ae eae The Bett. the “life and property of Tibetan Birgan}, Nepal’ a
r of)\four miles north of Kunuri and rture of “very oe mite: Ragan oh ed ot ; - nave e control| Lamas and people will be pro- an), O28 ROC "
the Tonking front, pressed northward. — Sapectut’ noreane” s Bes. Queen ‘Gesasiey? F and other spectatcrs ee ae “states clearly that the | tected, freedom of religious belief | “ity is Just over the border from
Mopping up operations on| 4 Cavalry spokesman said that avidenkov after inspecting the | ® “andmark (Wilder) | turned up in force yesterday and ne negare “er may and should/ wi} be safeguarded, and the|Saxaul in the Indian State of
Havinh Island, about 10 miles east |ne division met only with slight| aircraft came out and satin the} 1. Oateake (Wilder) filled the stands and track. This / Ponerrn f with any matier/-;amas’ temples will be | Bihar.
of Ken hy of ins fee opposition, at first losing’ only one | Waiting room with three Russian | 2 Watererest (O'Neil) was reflected in the better prizes|Telating to the maintenance of! protected ,
sort ae aa ee Ta alin wee slightly wounded, | officials. 3 Mazy Ann (Latches) that were paid, On the first two|/@w and order, and requests that | whos Dakota aircraft flew to
Per ica laphong, resulted in the) put later ran into “very heavy| Two French offers will navi-} 1 whale Wein teers” days of racing, the Field Sweep | it, should support the authority| ‘The proclamation said that no atmandu today from Delhi to
fied Vietminh Checentie: unspeci-~ resistance,” f gate the plane as far as Berlin. 2. Miss Friendship (Yvonet) prizes never climbed to the $700.00 of the Austrian Government change will be made in the exist- ning — ag Serre wee 4
; South Koreans advancing in the} ‘Thorez arrived in a municipal i tii Mh mark. They did so four times ehgraniosd by that agreement.” |ing administrative and military Ren yO ge "p PR sillning 0-9 ahd
‘ te te ee regular troops were} west met moderate resistance 9 See receded by two mo-]| 1. piue Diamond (Lutchman) | aa wae er prize ve the | of the atadinniter Gavin cont systems of Tibet. the King’s eld eat grandson
illed and arms including mortar! mj i OTCY CIE ce, ; 2. Duchess (Holder) day was $753.30 in the Final | - peru : : - ; . as aca le
and machine guns eaptored a the = aa ee ens His wile, Communist deputy for | # Flying Ann (O-Nel) | | #andieap: : pation authorities which is| “Existing Tibetan troops will br ae of the newly installed
mopping up operation 7 miles) Communists dae cmon eat he Seine Department, sat behind} , gern Smee gE ; Highest me, iabien of gompleint i said| become part of the national de- ronal ficial id cial
: i i 2 at in 5 . the n- e . 2's > ic an officials sa yesterday
Simil Somer vere Canorted | ve wr hanee smiling and waving at| * Therlan Ledy. (Thirkell) | Highest Forecast prize was! gtrations in the. Soviet sone ot | Cnfen pote ee et ee flight had been arranged
page Wine caer ka “earth American marines advancing] photographers was carried on a yZWENTY-SECOND RACE £67.08 in the St. Ann’s Handicap | Austria on October 4 and 5, the ; by agreement with the Nepalese
Deleta and northwest of Thiabink |", the centre cf the peninsula] stretcher into the plane. , Veneer eer to the punters who correctly fore Soviet Commander in Weiner-| “All the Lama’s officials and | Government.
56 miles southeast of Hanoi 'wiped out most of the Communist —Reuter, 3 Soprano (Yvonet) cast First Flight and Miss Friend- | Neustdt obstructed the efforts of) chieftains may remain at their | Nepal has treaties of friendship
Lees force of about 100 on the east , FWENTY-THIRD RACE chip as winner and second re-| Austrian Police to restore order! posts, | on page 5
Reuter. | ; rota { Colleton (Crosstey) ; i
}eoast. The American 7th Division ° 2 Foxglove (Wilder) | spectively. and instructed police to return | ; ve ees r
jattacked a Communist battalion Denies Red 3 First Flight (¥vonet) | Biggest upset of the day was/the Federal post office to the| “Pro-imperialist and Kuomin
in the rough hills northwest of ; Ace ECnEee RACE | ee Alou z — on sects control “of the lawless mob” | tang ney where it is evident | TELL THE ADVOCATE
Iwon. T e 2 Pharli i andicap by a head, w ockey ; which had seized the building,| that they have severed relations THE NEWS
Four Hour Both the 7th Division and mar- W est Indians 3 ies Oehen oo | O'Neil in the saddle. but had been ejected, with imperialists and the Kuo-
ines are thrusting toward three io SOL Sal LAR a The Police Band under Capt. -—Revter. | mintang and will not carry out Ring 3113 Dey or Night.
eo, : = ' reservo'rs and hydro - electric (From Our Own Correspondent.) ——~ |} Raison again entertained race- any sabotage or put up resistance, " .
y ‘spol a= THE ADVOCATE
trike Called plants in the north, They were] KINGSTON, Jama‘ca, Nov. 7. A 5 ; goers with music to suit yarious marae imay remain at their posts. SANG. POR. aeee
reported to be meeting only} Addressing a meeting of the fan Runs Amok: yiseies. | She | programe began United States Will ' .
ROME, N fluctuating resistance. —Reuter. eee of Representatives of | with the March Novy yn fn a nited es ! ' Reuter. "
, Nov. 11. e Jamaica Youth Movement in ended with a Calypso Session tha a é j
‘neluded “Cricket, Lovely Cricket.”| Be Russia's Match

IN 1955

LONDON, Noy, 12
A world copyright messace from |

:-—_———_

eh



921
i
i

Washington in to-day’s “Sunday | RALEIGH
Times” declared that the Unite! |

THE ALL-~STEEL BICYCLE

ae




plan” to match Soviet power by
11965.

Ithe “Sunday Times” wrote, he. |
jecmpleted a survey of Americe

—Reuter. |

iA



the Executive of the Union and] wound,

- We in this capacity] “ ‘The Police report that a Port-
nee \ of-Spain labourer who moved
into Valencia six months ago,
e 7@ left home on Friday morning at
ul ims l 11 o’clock armed with ® gun and
r a dozen cartridges with threats
Be Fi : ° that he was going to kill, Beating
inance a mth through the thick under-
bush and swamps he burst into
NASSAU, Bahamas Nov. 11. the clearing of Lubin’s home-
Butlin is not discussing with | Stead where he saw the .couple
the press his plans for refinancing | weeding their garden. Nathan's
the grand Bahamas venture.| brother Jerry reported he heard
Someone near him told me that four shots fired, but saw no gun-

“negotiations are at a delicate] ™an as he fled, escaping.

fcans are ready tc Villagers meanwhile were
ar tor ak aa Soe y scared and were refusing to move

The name of the American in-|@"ound the village without arm-
terest was not revealed; only the| ©d escort. Up to cee ne
company’s lawyer is here, A rep-| 2a8y no ‘trace = tas
resentative of the Cape and Gen-) ®U™™&n. ¥ ‘
eral Finance Company of London,

the largest creditors of Butlin’s,
who also hold considerable stock, Barclays Bank







LONDON, Nov. 11. |
Many foreign delegates may “voluntarily boycott” Monday’s |
World Peace Congress at Sheffield, a high official of the
Peace Movement told Reuter here today.
This action would be in protest against Britain’s ban on som |
of the delegates, |

Congress officials said between already been declared unaccept- |
40 and 45 members of the French | able by the British Home Office |
delegation of 65 had been turned| Others will have to pass a secur- |
back at Dover, after interrogation] ity check before they are admit- |
by immigration officials. ted.

|

The Italian Trade Union today |
issued a call to all _ industrial’
workers for a four hour strike on |
Tuesday afternoon following the
breakdown of negotiations for a
who had been working together |



Bernard Shaw’s Fortune
May Be £150,000

LONDON
BERNARD SHAW’S last will made this year, is 8,000
words long and is in the hands of the Public Trustee, who

will be the sole executor.

Mr, William*Limb, an official of ;ties brought Shaw £50,000 an-
the Public Trustee Office, said last }nually. But his income in the past
night: “I have read the will once. |ten years was cut to about £5,000
It is very detailed but will be]a year by taxes.
pushed through quickly. Shaw paid £200,000 for the

“Probate can be expected this}|printing of his books over the
month.” years. He retained copyright of

he Public Trustee Office is a]his works, got them printed, and
42-year-old Government agency |employed publishers to distribute
for handling settlements. them.

A friend of Shaw said last night In 1948 he got £60,000 film
he may have left only £150,000|royalties for “Cesar and Cleo-
despite £1,000,000 earnings and ajpatra,” and another £60,000 for
life interest in most of his wife’s|Pygmalion.” He got £30,000 ac-




We are stocked with Models
for Ladies & Gentlemen,
Boys, Girls and Small
Children

The only important member of According to information reach-
the French delegation admitted so} ing Congress organisers in Lon- |
far was the painter Pablo Picasso.| don, about 230 British visas have |
_ Reuter learned that the remain-| been granted so far. About 160
ing members of the 200 strong| delegates including 40 Russians |
French party might abandon plans|have been denied visas and 50)
to travel to England later today] from West European countries de |
or tomorrow. clared unacceptable in advance.

Twenty Czech delegates all of} Hundreds of delegates from 7(
them carrying valid visas were! countries were invited to the Con-
reported to have cancelled air| gress which is to continue for six |
passages from Prague. days in Britain's key steel anc

A peace movement official in| armaments making centre, but or. |

AAA AA i

i





CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

£150,000 estate.

Death Duties. cut, his wife's
estate, taxation and generosity cut
his own.

GIFTS: He maintained a widow
whose extravagant husband left
her penniless and he paid for her
children’ at Oxford,

Nobody in the family knew
where the money came from

He paid for repairs to Ayot St.
Lawrence church roof and sub-
scribed to the church funds.

He gave 18 houses in Carlow,
Eire, to the town. His house and

three acres at Ayot St. Lawrence
will go to. the National Trust as a

literary shrine.

Cut to £5,000

TAXES; For many years royal-

cumulated royalties from Germany
after the war. ‘

He had 12,314 pound sHares in
Welwyn Garden City. When it was
taken over by the Ministry of
Town and Country Planning, . =
Shaw collected £14,770 cash, plus Egyptian Women Demand
meres th a new trust - worth Full Political Rights

DUTIES: Of his wife's estate he CAIRO, Nov. 11.
said: “I had to hand over £40,000}. 4 delegation of Egyptian wo-~
in death duties, and practically the | men headed by Madame Doria
whole of the income will go to the |Sbaffik, leader of the Egyptian
tax collector.”

His wife’s money now passes to | €9

He did not arrive and is now ex-
pected here on Tuesday.
—Can. Press.



elocution, deportment, and the arts | ing of full political rights to wo-
of personal contact and social in-- | men including the right to vote,

tercourse.” It is not known exactly | should figure in the King’s speech | will be
bow the money will be used. at next Thursday’s opening of| for

—LES. {Parliament —Reuter.

was expected from London’ yes- oy . a
terday to discuss the settlement. Will Be Rebuilt
(From Our Own Correspondent.)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 9,
Tenders are invited in Trinidad
the rebuilding of, Barclays
iy Bridgetown,

Reekie of the
Watkins and Partners, Architects,
paying a visit to
| Feminist Movement, today hand-|
Prime Minister Nahas Pasha a}
Eire for teaching “self-control, | petition demanding that the grant-/|

finalising the contract document.

It was learned too that United
Kingdom firms
|operating in the Caribbean area
invited to submit tenders
this work as well as
| contractors,

contractors

Prague said that “an important
announcement” would be made
later.

A usually reliable source in
London believed this would call
for ‘a voluntary ban” on the Con-
gress by all delegates not yet in
Britain.

Congress organisers complained
that the British Government had
deliberately placed difficulties in
the way of the delegates reaching
Sheffield

But reinforced squads of immi-
gration officers and men from the
Security services were waiting for
hundreds more of the delegates,
The biggest party consists of 200
Italians, none of whom require
visas. Their leader, Pietro Neni
left-wing Socialist Party chief, has



ganisers believed that only half |
the number will get through the
security net.

Australian, Indian, Canadian,
Brazilian, Icelandic, Bulgarian, |

American, Ceylonese and Argen- |
tinian delegates are already}

known to be in Britain.

About 50 have arrived in shet-|

field where hotel accommodation

has been booked for 1900 dele-|
gates. Congréss organisers will |
have to foot the bill tor forfeited |
bookings and the main burden is}
expected to fall on the British |

Peace Committee.

Pat Sloan, member of the or-|
ganising Committee said that)

Comgress would go spend at aM a

10—13 Broad St.
Sole






ne

ii

Fuk

=,


PAGE TWO



















SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1° __
~ See a Ne NY ts : \ = FFF FFF FEF FFF DEZESE
| , )) oJ a
AOGUATEIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only) |
GL OBE TO-NIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT, AT 8.30 \
TO-NITE 8.30 LAST SHOW : on ee a Witte
yy {f - Tecy ~ . hd i. ' ‘ ae dus
BAD SISTER at \ WOMAN'S SECRET” > wi EO ee
Margaret Ian Dennis A New RKO Radio Picture
} ‘ , )
LOCKWOOD HUNTER PRICE i Based on Vicki Baum’s best-seller
: } “MORTGAGE ON LIFE”

TO-MORROW MONDAY 5 & 8.30

BROADWAY

Geo, RAFT e Pat O'BRIEN

PLAZA Theatre-sriDGETOWN

Ceecll B. De Mille’s Masterpiece !

“SAMSON AND DELILAH”

, Color by Technicolor

10TH DAY HELD OVER!

and 2 SHOWS TO-DAY—4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
° MONDAY 3 SHOWS—1.30, 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
Treat ‘em Rough (*Peind SA pm. tar cucning neers, “uast, be, taken, w9 by G45 fe mattnces

N.6.—Ali Complimentary Tickets are cancelled for this Picture t
Eddie ALBERT & Peggy MORAN L__SSSSSSSSSSS—

i) PLAZA Theatre = oistin |

| iast 2 Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 pm
| Warner Bros. Action Double *

Ss cae omy aus a i aa a RIN NaN AR ETD ok RY .
“HOUSE ACROSS THE STREET”
EMPIRE ROYAL with Wayne Morris, Janis Paige, Brace Bennett »
And “COLORADO TERRITORY” with Joel McCrea
: cn ietecieeineneieansnliRiene
To-day 4.45 and 8.45 To-Day and To-morrow 5.00













——~ \:



Monday and Tues 30 p.m.
and 8.30 | Warver's Double! nday and Tueséay 6 & $6.30 p.m.
“IT'S A GREAT FEELING” — (Technicolor)

Dennis Morgan & Jack Carson and
“CHEYENNE” with Dennis Morgan

Monday 4.45 and 8.30 and M-G-M- Presents
Continuing Indefinite Mat.

And Night Daily * THREE
Julian Blausten Production CODFATHERS” i GALT W (The Garden) ST. JAMFS |
‘eliresinn | SUNDAY, 5 & 8.30 p.m,
“BROKEN ARROW” |













-0th Century Fox presents Tyrone Power in

“CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE”

John Wayne, Harey Caroy and
Pedro Armendariz



MR. AND MRS. COLLES J. COE and their dogs arrived yesterday from
MR, ©. E. HITOHINS, Editor of the “Trinidad Guardian” and Mr. southampton, Long Island, to spend the winter months in Barbados.
“Jimmy” Cozier, Acting Information Officer of the Caribbean Commis- Here Again
sion arrived from Trinidad by B.W.1LA. yesterday. ACK TO SPEND the Winter

months in Barbados are Mr.
and ‘Mrs. Colles J. Coe, who
arrived yesterday from the U.S
via Canada by air. They were
accompanied by their two cocker
spaniels, ‘“‘Laddie” and “Chi-Chi”,
who travel everywhere with them.
Mr. and Mrs. Coe are staying
at “Old Trees’, St. James.

Returned Yesterday

RS. NORMAN FORBES was
at Seawell yesterday morning
» to meet her husband who returned
to Barbados. Mr. and Mrs. Forbes
spent the Summer in France. Mrs.
Forbes returned about six weeks
ago. Mr. Forbes remained over in
Canada and the U.S. settling some
business.

Here For Week
R. AND MRS. C. T. Palaisy
who arrived from Canadu

stones sia Tuesday and Wednesday 5.00 |}| MON., TUES. 8.30 sa ai:
and 8.30

Starring James + with “DAK _
ee er, vee M-G-M Technicolor Musical DAKOTA MIL
Jeff Chandler—Debora Paget a \ the Trinidad Guardian and

mee —_ So -8Uu™’>~>»s@s$]—]—-"-68KAKHVH’™-n.-nnun0=naqnqammm"' i
and Basil Ruysdeal — “TILL THE CLOUDS ee = FF Mr. Jimmy Cozier, Acting Inform-











































R, C. E. HITCHINS, Editor of |











ation Officer of the Caribbean

Will Geer | Commission arrived from Trinidad
R LI BY ” | ( I O B E yesterday morning by B.W.1.A., to

0 fl confer with Cable and Wireless

SR tee eer eee eee with regard to investigating the

possibility of a Caribbean Press
Association News Service.

ROXY | Starring | - Presents On WEDNESDAY, NOV. 15TH 8.30 P.M.
* 4 ee |

“ ~Neeigtti | as

Frank Sinatra — Kathryn’ ||| JOE CLEMENDORE Mr. Hitchins gave a small

Grayson — Robert Walker jupeheon Party A. oe —

as Shows To-day 4.45 —Van Johnson otel yesterday. Among the guests

ast Two Show y a invited were Mr. A. G. L. Douglas,

Divisional Manager, Cable & Wire-

less (W.1.) Ltd., Mr. P. Hewitt- §

Myring, Public Relations Adviser

to C. D. & W., Mr. C, A. L. Gale,

Editor of the Barbados Advocate
and Mr. Jimmy Cozier.

Mr. Hitchins and Mr. Cozier ex-

and 8.15

W. Lee Presents OLYMPIC |
To-day 4.30 and 8.30 DANCING
Cesar Romero and June Havoc Monday 4.30 and 8 15 | ,
| United Artists Double
- AS HOT
United Artists Double Dinnes O'Keefe and William
Bendix

7 Ronald Colman — Celeste SONGS,
“ONCE A THIEF" =" CROSS
Co-Starring “ CHAMPAGNE FOR
Marie McDonald and Lon CARSAR ” TALKS
E.. Abbott and Lou Costello Tuesday and Wednesday 450 AS THE

SENSATIONAL CONTOR-
TIONIST OF THE FAMOUS
MADAM O’LINDY’S

pect to return to Trinidad this
afternoon.

yesterday by air are here for a
TROUPE Meets This Month week, staying at the Ocean View
Hotel. Mr. Palaisy is with
R, JIMMY COZIER told Carib it Gene 4
yesterday that the eleventh min, oda’
+ meeting of the Caribbean Com- s 7

‘THE WEST INDIAN delega-

tion which left here last
week for emigration talks in
Washington are expected back
this afternoon, with the exception
of Mr. F. L. Walcott who will
be spending a few days in Brook-
lyn. The other members of the
, delegation are Sir George Seel,
Mr. E. S. Burrowes, Labour
Officer, and Mr, Raymond Roe.
Mr. Walcott will be returning late
g this week.

A Farewell Luncheon
MR. NORMAN FORBES arrivea @TROLLING through Goddavd’s

mission takes place this month in
Curacao, The meeting begins
November 23rd. Three days later
the West Indian Conference opens.
This conference centres around
the agricultural progress in the
Caribbean area.

and e

Monday and Tuesday 4.30 COVER wp ? A PROGRAM

and 8.15







IN A SERIES OF POSITIVE-
» LY BREATH TAKING
FEATS OF STRENGTH
‘ AND CONTROL. IT’S
UNCANNY! IT’S UNBE-
LIEVABLE BUT IT’S

A series of papers have been
Brepered for it by the Territorial
overnments of the Food and
Agriculture Organisation of the
United Nations as well as the
Federal Housing Administration
of the U.S. and other metro-
politan bodies.

Chaney
and 8.15

in United Artists Double KOREAN

William Boyd and Andy Clyde
in



yesterday, Car rd a gay
TRUE Among the authors of these yesterday from Canada after spend- euachech deci te heaaa
“AFRICA SCREAMS” Dee Othe essor Page, Princi- ing the Summer months in France. covered that the Colonial Devel.
“ 1 pal of the Imperial College of “ af.
“THE MARAUDERS” Tropical Agriculture, Prof. Hardy 3 opment and Welfare Organisation
coe uu with Musie and Syncopation by of the I.C.T.A., Dr. 8 Neumark of Back From Holiday es, nee. eee wena, Were
enter Ss. . . e to
- and THE TRINIDAD HOT SHOT ORCHESTRA the Food and Agriculture Organ-

isation, Mr. Jacob L. Crain of the RS. EDNA HUTCHINSON a farewell luncheon.

ee : { i om ‘bars rs. Moore has resigned as

‘ ROD CLAVARY (Top Vocalist) Federal Housing Administration, a and her daughter Barbara a eee aes 3

“THE CROOKED WAY" || “THE ADVENTURES OF boc, geumoonntntves, fy eit Who lett Barbadian August Sth senographer onthe sta and will
DON COYOTE ” Plus Anferican and Dutch.

Canada yesterday. Miss Hutchin- soon. ‘
: son who is with the Royal Bank Mr. Colin Moore, her_husband,
Mr. Cozier who is the Acting of Canada here was on long leave, formerly of the staff of The Com-
Information Officer of the Carib- r

bermere School, has accepted an
bean Commission will attend both Several of their relatives were appointment with the Education
meetings. at Seawell to meet them. Office in British Guiana.

a
The RECORDER BREAKING Box-Office SMASHER ! |





soaks with Those Wizards of Laughter Bud Abbott and Lou Costelloe

ne
Francis Rafferty and Richard

i hr ota wsac™" 1) in “THE WISTFUL WIDOW OF WAGON GAP"

MECHANICAL TOYS!
PLASTIC TOYS!!
DOLLS — TRAINS
AIRPLANES — TANKS
ETC..

OO







A A A es
= | “GLOBE



POPPOES fh



THE BIGGEST IN THIS OR ANY TOWN!

2 SHOWS TO-DAY 2
4.45 and 2ND 8.30 p.m.

Monday 3 Shows BIG WEEK! | 1.30,4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
P Cecil B.DeMille's Masterpiece

GLOBE

Farewell Show of RAY NUNES
TO-NITE AT 8.30 with



* BAD SISTER



| L veo
PY ita D
Half Hour of Songs by RAY NUNES A we PLL =
Â¥ Supported by a ell rs E
% Keith CAMPBELL (Pianist of The Hot Shots) Z 7 h $ rina ALi
x Rod CLAVARY (Vocalist—Hot Shots) A alot Atrial «irene Sci ed tens WAT
st i - Reman ty net) Land cad i techy = Qasnd wp the hi Seman tnd Doh te th Ry Bia ps 13-18
x Programme j A tepatiin N



SPECIAL NOTICE: All Tickets Booked must be =>
PLA Z. A taken up by 4.45 fer Matinees and 8.30 for Evening Visit



. Shows or same will be sold after that time. PLAZA
x Jealousy—Carayan N.B. All Complimentary Tickets. are cancelled SNACK
x Talent Audition TO-DAY 9.30. aan. for thia Picture | aaa

x
SPEEDBOATS vives ANIMALS : Black Magic—Sweet & Lovely
oh. x
42” & 53” XMAS TREES

Ole Man River—A Sinner Kissed An Angel
DECORATIONS & LIGHTS







SHIRT

FOR INCAUTIOUS BACKERS
WHO LOST THEIRS ON HORSES

All Coat-Style, Collar-Attached
“MICO” all sizes, plain shades 4.09
CRRAe ee ww » 4.47
“REGAL” , _.._ Striped designs 6.31
“ae e 5 we Ke » 4.86

Renovate Your Home

for Christmas
e

COMING SOON!!

Xmas Tree Bubble Lights

We can supply your requirements





Ready Mixed Oil Paints by leading manufacturers
Hails Distemper

Matroil

Sigmarine Flat Wall Enamel

Sigmavar Floor Varnish

Enamels—all colours

Come in and inspect our
stock.

Compare our prices too !!

also material and colours for mixing.



NEW RANGE

-
EVANS ona WHITFIELDS | Men’s Shoes

Diel 4606 Dial 4220 await your inspection

{ | | { ! }

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

THE CORNER STORE






SUNDAY,

os

A Nod Means Yes

N one of the Toy Stores in
Bridgetown there is a model

of Father Christmas. Unlike most
other models, however, he nods
his head continuously.

One little boy about four years
old was seen standing in front of
it yesterday, mumbling under his
breath. Later he was overheard
telling his mother, “Mummy, I've
jo re yee for lots A
things and he keeps nodding his
head” Does that mean I can have
them all?”

For Two Weeks

R. ALFRED NECKLES, a

planter of Grenada, arrived
here on Thursday by the Lady
Rodney for two weeks’ holiday

NOVEMBER 12,

and is staying at Worthing Guest
House. rietor of Bellevue
Estate, St. vid'’s, Mr. Neckles

was in time to see the second day’s
races, He was last here in 1947,

Back From U.K, Holiday

R. ARMEL YEARWOOD of
‘Hanson’, St, George, who

left here im June for a holiday
in England returned yesterday via

Canada accompanied by his
daughter Laurie, who has been
at school in England. Looking

extremely fit after his holiday,
Mr. Yearwood seemed very glad
to be back home.

«Here For The Winter

R. RONALD H. NORCOTT,
and her two children
Joanna and Jonathon arrived
from Ontario yesterday accom-
panied by Mrs. Norcott’s mother,
Mrs. Ann Roach, who spent last
winter in Barbados. They expect
to be here until March and are
guests at the Windsor Hotel.
Norcott, who is with
Canada Packers in Brantford,
Ontario was unable to come down
for the holiday.

On Short Visit
‘ R. ALFONSO B. De LIMA
arrived from Trinidad yes-
terday on a short visit. He will

shortly be opening a new jewellery
store here.



CROSSWORD

id ain rr





Across
1. Outcome of taut tides. (9)
. Limb of a marine? (3)
\1. Drapes in a different way.

(6)
(2. He’s not necessarily averse to
rose, (4) pat (6)
13, 8 Up a broken spear,
\4. Existed, (4)
6. ners {3 the B.B.C. (4)
{6. Close enough to be mean. (4)
(7, Ian’s own. (3)
\8. There can be nothing novel
about it, or can there? (4
20, Playe in many billiard
saloons. (7, 4
@. You'll roduce them with a
grassy dot. (5, 4)
Down

}. Pat a chin for a change. (2, 1, 5)
0 to turn when evicted, (6, 3)
Suggestion, to me, is

volume.
the sweetest
* Russian citizen. (
6. Taver @ snow fall will have them.

)
q. ia sip less in this formation, (9)
8. To be led this shows weakness.

a. i you BF = to 8 a 1¢ will
8! i.
16. $ret blown spout, (5)
19. a give a horse one after
racing. (8)

tion Of yesterday's puszle.—Across:
. i 4. (peur, 8. 3 "
Nee; 11, Lead: 1 fides: 14, Netted; 15,
Gue; 16, Purred; 18, Arteriole; 21, None}
22, Bani 23, Leech; 24. Lait; ‘25, Adher-
nce. own: 1, Ta Wa; 2,

* Mesident: "9 Returied: 14, Getencel

nt; ned; en

va. 11, Oban; 20, Laic,



1950

Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

~ Stocking The
Fernery”

In stocking the fernery the
majority of the ferns will be of
the variéty known as “Adiantum”,
or Maidenhair, of which there are
many different kinds,

There is the common Maiden-
hair, the Bouquet Fern, the Giant
Maidenhair, the fine English fern,
the beautiful Farleyense, and
others, all of which bear the
family name of Maidenhair.
Besides these, no Fernery is quite
complete without a gold Fern, and
a Silver Fern,

In starting a Fernery it will be
the owner’s pleasure to collect and
to get to know as many varieties
of ferns as possible, but for
suceess in the cultivation of these
ferns, some knowledge of how to
treat them is necessary. As has
been stated in a previous article
ferns require moisture, a shady
sheltered position, and a certain
amount of dappled sunshine.
They must not be overcrowded,
and it is a good plan to have space
enough around each pot fern so

|

that the pots can be turned
occasionally, to enable the fern to
keep an even growth all round,

The mixture to be used in
potting out ferns differs with vari-
oue gardeners, and the one given
in this article is rather complicated.
This however can be taken, not
as a necessity, but rather as a
high standard at which to aim, as
it is a well known fact that most
ferns are accommodating plants,
and will slit themselves to almost
any soil conditions.

Potting Mixture For Ferns
(From Garden beok of Barbados
for Amateurs)

3 parts good sifted leaf mould

1 part wood ash,

14 parts dried and well pounded
cow manure,

$ part soot,

1 part’Charcoal well pounded.

1 part coarse well washed sand,
or marl, or small hard stones,

March is considered a good
month for planting, or re-potting
ferns, and in doing this job see
that your pots are “clean” and
dry, and have a good layer of
stones or broken crocks for drain-
age at the bottom.

When a large fern is to be
divided up the best way to do is
as follows: —~

Turn the fern out of the pot,
and having made up your mind
where the division should come,
part the fronds, and with a
sharp knife cut cleanly right
through the roots, This is a better
way than tearing it apart by hand,
as it results in less root injury.

Fern Disease

Ferns sometimes suffer from a
disease called “Rust,” causing the
fronds to turn brown, or rust
colour, The garden book tells us
that this is caused by lack of
proper plant food, and want of
alr,

When the ferns get this disease,
it is best to cut off all the affected
fronds and burn them, Then give
the ferns an application of liquid
manure, or a dressing of G. V, M.
(Garden vegetable manure) and
separate the pots, placing them in
a more roomy, airy position.



SUNDAY



At the Cinema:

Broken Arrow
G. B.

THE average Western film, with its conventional plot,
strict moral values, abundance of action and shooting and
a minimum of dialogue, can be and is, very popular with a
large section of the movie-going public. However, there
are those, to whom this type of film has less appeal, but I
sincerely hope that they will not allow their antipathy for
drama in the wide spaces to cause them to overlook
“BROKEN ARROW”, now playing at the Empire Theatre.

eaahinmeenestpeneemneseisacan 4

ADVOCATE

TREMENDOUS
SAVINGS

ON ALL
Items Advertised

LADIES

PAGE THREE

tna



WHY LOOK OLD?

Regain your youthful looks
by tinting with

SHADEINE

Still the best for GREY HAIR, |
in alt natural tints, Over
30 years reputation. Ask
your chemist to obtain some
for you from his Wholesaler. |



=
f
oe
Sf



ma eres

pares good looks tell you they’re jum right
You know, too, when you look at the price |

On actual historical facts,
“B) ARROW” is an unusu-
al Western drama, in which a
dramatic chapter of Indian war-
fare is given an exceptionally
fine presentation. For once, the
Red Indian is depicted as a human
being and a man of honour, and
an attempt has been made to give
a serious portrayal of the Indian
side of American history. From
the novel “Blood Brother” by
Elliott Arnold, it is the story of
frontiersmanh Tom Jeffords, played
mmy Stewart, who, back in
1870, at the t of the bitter
Indian-white feud in Arizona,
risks his Hf@ to See and talk to
Cochis@é, chief of the Apaches, in
an effort to bring about a cessa-
tion of hostilities and an under-
standing between their two peo-
ples. Though ce does not come
at once, and is still distrust
by both sides and outbreaks of
violence, it is the friqndship of
Jeffords and Cochise and eir
mutual feelings of respect and
trust, that finally bring about a
permanent peace. There is the
touching love story of the Ameri-
can for a young Indian girl, the
tragic culmination of which is
nearly the undoing of all that he
and Cochise have worked for.

The role of Tom Jeffords fits
Jimmy Stewart like a_ glove.
Rugged, humorous at times and
deeply serious in his self appoint-
ed mission, his performance is

fine throughout. A comparative
newcomer, Jeff Chandler, plays

the Apache chief, Cochise. Not
only is he the physical type, but
his interpretation of the role is
marked by strength of character
and dignity, and for a young actor,
he has remarkable maturity. As
the young Indian girl, Debra
Paget is delightfully youthful and
naive and gives a sensitive and
touching performance.

Filmed in Technicolor on the
exact location where the story
took place eighty years ago, the
scenery is breathtaking in its
grandeur, The direction is ex-
cellent, resulting in never—flagging
action and there is no underplaying
of the terror of Indian war. Al-
most four hundred full-blooded
Apaches take part in the film, and
there are interesting scenes of In-
dian tribal rites, including dances
and the Indian marriage ceremony.
It is interesting to note that the
modern Apache has so long lost
interest in his ancient weapons of
war, that an archery expert had
to instruct them in the use of the
bow and arrow!

“To talk peace is easy—to live
peace is hard,” says Cochise, and
in this significant story, we have
the solution brought about by
characters who, in themselves,
match the grandeur of the natural
setting.

BAD SISTER

The rather dubious title of
“BAD SISTER” has been given to
the J. Arthur Rank film now
showing at the Globe Theatre.
Starring Margaret Lockwood, Ian
Hunter, Dennis Price and Joan
Greenwood, it is the story of two
women in a home for delinqutits
—-one the warden and the other
an eighteen-year-old girl who has
been committed for attempted In-
fanticide and suicide, Summoned
to the warden’s office for rebelli-
ous behaviour, the girl is persuad-
ed to tell her story which begins
with the usual poverty in child-
hood and ends with an attempt to
kill her illegitimate baby and her-
self. During the telling of this
tale, the warden remembers her

















tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated .
is a Tan Punched Oxford. Tied to every paiy
is the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign.
which means ‘ just right’! Look fos it t&»

leading stores in Barbados, g" ——




own sheltered childhoed—a sup-
posedly successful marriage to al
wealthy lawyer that finished in|
divorce — her second marriage
ending im tragedy and finally her
present position as warden in a
home for delinquents. Realizing
that the girl in her charge has
been a victim of environment and
circumstance, the warden decides
to help her at the forthcoming
trial, Summoned into court, she
faces her first husband who is the
judge, and through her eloquent
pleading, helps the girl rite. |



her child and start on a new life. | That were formerly

The two stories are told in a de to Se ees . $6.00
series of alternate flashbacks | |
which tend to slow the action 2.50
somewhat and though it never Reduced to $
drags, the pace is definitely slack- Many of them .... 48c. each

ened at various points in the
film. As far as characterizations
go, Margaret Lockwood gives. a
good convincing performance,
though I feel that her becoming
warden of such an instijfution is
out of character. Neither do !
think that any woman, no matter
how sympathetic, could induce
such a girl as Lottie Smith to tell
her story right off the bat, with
no more persuasion than a pat on
the shoulder and a cup of ica.
However, that is the story, and
Miss Lockwood's’ portrayal is
sympathetic and understanding.
Joan Greenwood as Lottie Smith,
the rebel, is a young actress |

have never seen before, but she

obviously has dramatic talent ‘

which she uses with ability. As Coy
first husband, ‘

Miss Lockwood's
Ian Hunter is just what he should

be—stodgy and not Very quick on '&
the up-take. Dennis Price as KAY SER
her second matrimonial venture " .
is competent but not highly ARI SILK
exciting, One or two of the sup-
rting cast stand out—Guy STOCKINGS

liddleton as Fobey and Mabel
Constanduros as Nanny are the They were formerly ..
ones that come to mind. Reduced to only ....
The music is effective, par-
ticularly in the sequence laid in 49c.
Finland and the folk songs and
dances are delightful. Qn the
whole, this film is thoughtful,
serious adult entertainment.

A WOMAN’S SECRET

At the Aquatic ‘Club, “A
WOMAN'S SECRET” is showing,
starring Maureen O'Hara, Melvyn
Douglas and Gloria Grahame.
Based on a story by Vicki Baum,
it tells of a radio singer who has
lost her voice and who befriends
a young protegé and helps her to
Stardom. Somewhere along the
line, the protegé jeopardizes her
career, and her benefactress, in
an effort to save her, is arrested
for attémpted muder, Evefything
comes out in the wash, but the

$1.15

each.



plot is complicated and to my
way of thinking, hasn’t much
sense, However, it is saved py

good acting on the part of the
three principals and by the
humour injected by Melvyn
Douglas. Maureen O'Hara as the
ex-songstress is attractive and
altruistic and is also the possesso:
of obvious vocal talent, when she |
sings one or two songs (before
She loses her voice), Glori:
Grahame is cute and completely
self-centred and Melvyn Douglas, |
as a composer gnd rajtio
favourite, combined with a dash
of the sleuth, is pleasant to |
listen to as always.

A light, trivial picture, amusing
in spots,

Samson and Delilah

SAMSON & DELILAH at the
New Plaza is still a big draw and
seats are ‘selling rapidly in
advance. It will be here for a
few days longer—so if you haven’t

LADIES’ SMART
SKIRTS

Fast Colour Pretty Skirts
Wear them for sport or work

In all Sizes ...,

Pee bee werine







seen it—book early,



TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH



Diary, Engagément Calendar and |
Professional Diaries for 1951 have |
arrived. So also have the Christ- |
mei Cards you will like. |

AMERICAN
TOWELS

Will always wear well. These
| are not only the best available
in quality but they are also
priced most reasonable

From 46c.—$2.09

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

The “Old Vime” Gold
Leaf Ware is here again at
JOHNSON’S HARDWARE









SEA VIEW
GUEST HOUSE

HASTINGS, BARBADOS
EXCELLENT CUISINE
FULLY STOCKED BAR
RATES: $5.00 per Day &
upwards
(Inclusive)

Apply—
Mrs. W! S. HOWELL



FACE CLOTHS

22c. EACH



SPECIAL USEFUL ITEMS
AT SAVINGS

NYLON
DRASSIERES
Only $1.41 per pair

LADIES’ COTTON
WASH FROCKS
$4.32 EACH





LADIES’ COTTON
HOUSECOATS
Shop MODERN and
sh SAVE
SACROOL 3:

‘ -
2 THE LINIMENT THAT ACTS

LIKE MAGIC THE MODERN

Cy,
PAIN



‘ on sale at
S KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

z
SPCC CEEEGS

Broad Street.

SOSESSSS

a

a
{

tLe OWS GCSOES





Blackheads, Pimples, Foot Iteh and other
blemishes. Ordinary treatments give onl
temporary relief because they do not kilt
the germ cause. The new discovery, Nixo-
derm kills the germs in 7 minutes and is
fuaranteed to g' ve you a soft, clear, attrac-
tve, smooth skin In one week, or money
ack on return









of empty
guarantees’? Nixoederm fre

eo os
Nix oder:.°
For Skin Troubles

package, Get
your chemist
today and re-
move the real
cause of skin
trouble.







LAST NIGHT, Mother

WHILE | StePT, I kept
rubbed my chest, throat

breathingin VapoRub’s } direct on my ¢




me In 71 countries more than 40 million
ars of Vicks VapoRub are used yearly!
others like and trust it because:
I's SAFE’ No “dosing’’— just rub it on!
PLEASANT! Children love it, grown-ups,
too! Frels good and srnells good !
QUICK! Relieves nose, throat, chest and
cough almost instantly, Werks direct
and keeps on working for hours.
Why take chances on untried remedies
when Vicks VapoRub has proved its
worth in so many millions of homes?



AGENTS:

L. M. B. MEYERS & (0. LTD.

AND VapoRub worked
hest, too







Here ' a FOR
|

° czema lic Gin & Li '
Jin de Lune ~
> e@ (8)
1] ' #|
nanpuacs [Killed in 7 Minutes AND '
~~ akin has Hoarty 0 millon tiny peame PR 4 2 4 iB}
and pores ere gerros hide cause ter- nQ 7!
eee ar ote beet wm & Lime |



———s
Rs

/
en
Coenen

ae



TODAY, the worst of my
cold is over, thanks to



and back with Vicks ]| soothing, medicinal va- —drawing out tightness } Vicks VapoRub's direct
VapoRub, I began to | pours. They cleared my | and congestion like a } double action! It surely
feel better right away! | nose, calmed my cough, nice, warming poultice, | chases colds fast!
* PROVES ‘ FOR YOU
ce BY MILLIONS OF MOTHERS!

Palmolive Beauty Plan
proved by doctors

brings lovelier skin to
2 women out of d—in 14 days!











Afler tests on 1,384 women for
14 days, 39 doctors (including
leading skin specialists) report
that the ‘* Palmolive
Plan”

noticeable improvement in the

Beauty

brought a definite,

complexions of 2 women out of
3, Definite, noticeable improve-

ments were :—

Fewer blemishes - + *

eee
ners > Ze
Fres ye’

r,° ea et
gna aes®
qosâ„¢

cE SS i,





DRESS SHOPPE |

YOUR SKIN, too, can be improved in 14 days!
All you have to do is what these women did: follow the “ Palmolive
Beauty Plan.” Start today, It’s so simple:

I Wash your face with Palmolive Seap.

2 Massage its rich, olive-oil lather into your skin
for one full minute.

3 Rinse.
that

way

Do this for 14 days and prove for yourself



the “Palmolive Beauty Plan” is the sure
to keep that Schoolgirl Complexion.

KEEP THAT SCHOOLGIRL COMPLEXION
PAGE FOUR

W.I. CRICKET COACHES|

International All-Rounders
A Suitable Choice
BY O. S. COPPIN

THE news that there is a proposal before the West



RACING RESULTS

AT GARRISON SAVANNAH, SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 11, 1950

WEATHER: Fine Firm

$1. LAWRENCE HANDICAP—Class B and Lower—

$900 ($300, $150, $55)—9 Furlongs

TRACK :

Indies Cricket Board of Control to utilise the} 1. TIBERIAN LADY 108 + 5 Ibs. Mr. V. Chase. Jockey O’Neil.
services of International all-rounders Everton|2, SUN QUEEN ...... 128 lbs. Mr. J. W. Chandler.
: Weekes and Clyde Walcott as coaches for the Jockey Crossley.
é - Windward and Leeward Islands will be met with}3. LANDMARK ....... 128 lbs. Mr. V. Chase. Jockey Wilder.
Â¥ satisfaction in responsible West Indian cricket cir- | TIME: 1.573. PARIMUTUEL: Win: $7.18; Place: $2.14, $1.84.

a cles. 2

As far as I have been able to discover, the matter has just reached
the proposal stage but it conforms so readily with any scheme aimed
at the development of cricket in the Windward and Leeward Islands,
that the West Indies Cricket Board of Control, if their word is the
final one, should find no difficulty in doing the obviously right thing
on this occasion.

FORECAST: $25.20.

ALSO RAN: Flieuxce (121 lbs., Thirkell); Infusion (113 Ibs., Hol-
der).

START: Good. FINISH: Easy, 4 lengths, } length.

WINNER: 6-yr.-old br.m, Tiberius-Warm Welcome.

TRAINER: Mr, V. Chase.

"18th Race; ROCKLEY HANDICAP—Class D and Lower—$800
($265, $135, $45)—9 Furlongs
1. OATCAKE . 183 Ibs.. Mr. V. Chase. Jockey Wilder.

GOOD FAITH
fact that at their recent meeting in Trinidad the West Indies
Cricket Board of Control granted £500 to each of the Windward
and Leeward Islands Cricket Associations to aid the improvement of



cricket in those islands, is a sufficient earnest of their good faith and 2. WATERCRESS . - 124 Ibs. Hon. J. D. eee. O'Neil
the appointment of Walcott and Weekes should therefore be an auto- 3. MARY ANN ....... 106 Ibs. Mr. F. E. C. Bethell y en
oe waa be particularly happy too if this comes off for another] »pyy4p; 1.59}. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $4.54: Pine it eee
reason. I have already stressed at some length in this column that cma F F re ere o

FORECAST: $9.72.

ALSO RAN: Kendal Fort (115 lbs., Crossley).

START: Fairly Good. FINISH: Comfortable, 4 lengths, 2 lengths.
WINNER: 5-yr.-old b.g. O.T.C,-Condiment.

TRAINER: Mr. V. Chase.

some definite search should be made by the West Indian cricket
powers-that-be for talent in the Windward and Leeward Islands that
might be of use to future West Indies cricket and I am thinking of
the immediate future of West Indies cricket—their visit to Australia

next year.
FINE OPPORTUNITY ee a a egg lint dasa didi shea al note eee ds
‘HAT being the case, I could think of no finer judges of the merits] 19th Race: ST. JAMES HANDICAP—Class F and F2 Only—$700
of candidates for West Indies’ honours than Clyde Walcott and 115, 1

Everton Weekes nor any opportunity so vo ary for —— so than a on a ee ise Tate
coaching engagement in the Windward an eeward Islands. 1. FIR FLIG .... 113 Ibs. Mr. F. E. C. Bethell.

This brings me back to another argument of mine and I think that wa _ - A Jockey Lutchman,
the time is ripe to throw out the suggestion again. The West Indies} 2. MISS FRIENDSHIP 113 +2 Mr. F. E. C. Bethell.
Cricket Board of Control should at once set about in an endeavour
FOXGLOVE 114 Ibs

a Jockey Yvonet.

to find two good pace bowlers for the Australian tour. 1 . Mr. S. A. Walcott. Jockey Wilder.

It is true that we must always be on the lookout for any cricket | TIME: 1.09}. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $6.40; Place: $2.58; $3.02; $4.16.
FORECAST: $67°08.

talent be it pace bowling, slow bowling, wicket-keeping, batting or
ALSO RAN: Epicure (118 lbs., O’Neil); Colleton (133 lbs., Crossley) ;

fielding.

WE NEED FAST MEN hs at uatah i : i):

UT it must be conceded that it takes more time to train a pace Pharos Il (108 Ibs., Baldwin); Bonnie Lass (104 Ibs., Ali); Apollo
(126 Ibs., P. Fletcher).

bowler and nurse him up to the physical condition that would be] a ‘ ~
required of him in Imperial cricket, than it would in the case of a] START: GOOD. FINISH: Close, Head, # length:
slow bowler or a candidate in any other department of the game. | WINNER: 4-yr.-old. ch.f. Foxbrush-Footlet.

In this respect we could do no better than follow the example] TRAINER: Mr. J. B. Gill.
of Australia. As soon as a talent scout discovers a potential Test} ——
cricketer he is set aside for special treatment and training, aimed at
me him the remorseless machine required of Test match crick-
eters.

Although the feats of the inexperienced Ramadhin and Valentine
seem to contradict this

20th Race: GRAVESEND HANDICAP—Class G and Lowec—$600
($200, $100, $40)—7% Furlongs

1, BLUE DIAMOND ..

6 Ibs Mr, R. E, Gill Jockey Lutchman
, yet these are the exceptions to prove a rule 2 . : al ro

: CHEBS ost case 126 lbs. Mr. F_ E. Bynoe, Jockey Holder

Set nas a found Soetees ae > _ history of Test cricket,| 3 PLYING ANN 126 lbs Mrs, God, Akien Jockey O'Neil
3 ie case of Barbados, but has also been the i ’ : 3 IMU » iia . . .

inote ac With English end Austatian iten ener experience] ‘JME; 1.39%. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $5.96; Place: $1.88, $1.54; $1.70.

FORECAST: $48.48.

ALSO RAN: Mopsy (116 Ibs., Wilder); Wilmar (100 lbs., Baldwin);
Sun Jewel (110 + 2 lbs., Thirkell); Bachelor’s Folly (122 lbs);
Crossley); Front Hopper (100 + 4 lbs Ali); Blue Grass (130 lbs P.
Fletcher); Vixen (126 lbs., Yvonet);

START: Fairly Good. FINISH : Close, % length.

WINNER: 3-yr.-old hb. br.g. O.T.C.-Call Girl.

TRAINER: Mr. J B. Gill.

W.L’s BEST BET

i gee Match winning economy of West Indian cricket, has, up to
the 1939 tour been based on fast bowling and although events
in England this year changed this for the purposes of that tour, yet
it is quife probable that in Australia we may have to find some
very quick men to spearhead our attack,
Where are they? We must find them.
the West Indies and having found reasonabl
train them up to International standards,

They are somewhere in
YY young ones, we must

l. REBATE

2ist Race: NOVEMBER HANDICAP—Class © and Lower—$800 _
5, $135, $59)—9 Furlo:
It would be folly to depend wholely upon the Intercolonial ($265, $135, $59) ngs
matches scheduled for next year to discover who can fill the bill.|1. REBATE .......... 126 lbs, Mr. M. E, R. Bourne
By that time he might not be responsive to the intense training Jockey Baldwin
that would be required of him. ; $. BLIBUXKCE sepa ss. 126 lbs Mr. S. A. Walcott Jockey Wilder
But then, who would train him? All these questions the West |3. TIBERIAN LADY .. 127 Ibs. Mr. V. Chase Jockey Thirkell
Indies Cricket Board of Control must tackle and soon at that. TIME; 1.59. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $3.54; Place: $2.22; $2.60.
WATER POLO SELECTION SOON veer: tare
= ALSO RAN: Ability (115 4- 1 lb., M. Gonzalez); Kitchen Front (113
I N another seven days, the Barbados Water Polo team which Will Ibs., O'Neil) St. Morltz (130 lbs., Holder).
play a series of Test matches against a Trinidad team, will be| START: Fair. FINISH: Close, length, neck.
eenagy Aaa pe a a ought — 6 = announced. They| WINNER: 3-yr.-old dk. br.f. Pay Up-Bachelor’s Dream.
) § 4 © past week and given another couple : . E.R. .
& bata practice, they should definitely give a good account of TRAINER: Mr. M, E. R. Bourne Ae
. 22nd Race: JUNIOR HANDICAP—Class F and Lower—$700
Roddy Bynoe, the Trinidad captain, who is badian, :
his team are also hard at work in "Trinidad. oe ae } ($235, $115, $40)—5?4 Furlongs
It is not yet known whether Trinidad has been practising by

floodlight for two of the tests are to be played under floodlight con- viuee aad oy i ee 3 ‘Gyril Barnard Jockey Holder
ditions. The Barbados team has not yet done any practising at night, SOPRANO 113 + 2 tbe. Mr. L. E. Fisher Jockey Yvonet
but it is anticipated that the lights will be ready tor night practices TIME: 1 108 PARI-MUTUEL, ‘Win: $8 08: Place $1.44; $1.20
in another week. The novelty of these night matches, apart from hk mae, R Wovens 44; $1.20,
the fact that they are intercolonial contests should attract a gigantic | FORECAST: $7.92.
crowd, ALSO RAN: Usher (116 lbs., Baldwin).

START: Fairly Good. FINISH: Close, 1 length, 2 lengths.
A HEAVY shower of rain about mid-day on Sunday last washed | WINNER: 2-yr.-old br.g. O.T.C.-Hurricane,

out play in the Tourists v B.C.L. game at Carlton, It has
however been decided to continue the game as a three day match
one the game will begin to-day and continue on the two Sundays

The ‘Representative Council of the League on Thursday appoint-
ed sub-selection committees for each division. These will select

TRAINER: Mr, A. P. Cox.
23rd Race: BELLEVILLE HANDICAP—Class F and F2 Only—$100
($235, $115, $40)—9 Furlongs

the _o for the sries of games against Tourists XI. 1, COLLETON ....... Ae ie. Fran, 2D. soewa OO Crossley
change of programme was agreed to by the Council, It had
been planned to combine the Leeward and Windward to meet the POE aie: til + 1 1b Me GA, Walants seeKey Wilder

3, FIRST FLIGHT 114 + 1% Mr. F. E, C, Bethell

Jockey Yvonet
TIME: 2.00. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $2.86; Place: $1.68; $2.06.

FORECAST: $15.48.

ALSO RAN: Bonnie Lass (90 + 14 lbs. Ali); April Flowers (126
lbs,. P. Fletcher).

START: Good. FINISH; Comfortable, 14 lengths, 2 lengths.

WINNER: 3-yr.-old br.g. Restigouche-Summer Breeze.

TRAINER: Mr. J. W. Chandler.

24th Race:

Tourists and the South and Central.

The new plans call for a match between Windward and Leeward
anc another between South and Central. On the showing of play-
ers in these two preliminary games the Selections Committee will
select a Representative Country XI to meet the Tourists.

After the Test against the Tourists it is hoped to play a game
against the Barbados Colts,

TRAIN THE UMPIRES

o meeting approved a scheme for the training of umpires in

League Cricket. In future Umpires will be called to register
each season, The registration fee will be sixty cents. The League
will run a class of instructions and all umpires will be invited to
attend. This will be followed by an examination on the results of 1. ATOMIC II
which Umpires will be graded. A Class Umpires will be entitled } 9 PHARLITE
to receive 84 cents per day and B class 60. Clubs will mot be obli- |“ © nt
gated to umpires other than those holding a certificate from the | 3. SUN QUEEN
League, TIME: 1.83%. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $2.80; Place: $1.70; $2.74.
FORECAST: $22.20
ALSO RAN: Rebate (119 lbs., Baldwin); Infusion (97 + 13 lbs.,

Wilder); Gun Site (133 lbs., Crossley).

START: Good. FINISH: Close, head, 4 length.
WINNER: 6-yr.-old b.h. O,T.C.-April Showers.
TRAINER: Dr, C. A. Evelyn.

W

you need to put back strength and
energy. PHOSFERINE soon rex
vives the appetite and, in so doing,
it revives keenness for work, for
enterprise. PHOSFERINE helps
to build up staying power—gives
you reserve of patience and good-
will when you need them most.
Try this grand tonic today. In
liquid or tablet form. 2 Tablets
of PHOSFERINE equal 10 drops.

‘THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS

for Depression, Debility, Indigestion, Sleeplessness, and
ofter Influenza,

FINAL HANDICAP—Class A and Lower—$i,009
($335, $165, $60)—71%4 Furlongs

125 lbs. Mr, James Chin
111 lbs. Mr. Clyde Vierra

Jockey Lutchman
117 lbs. Mr. J. W. Chandler Jockey Holder

Jockey O'Neil”

|e
“4 MAY ENTER SENIOR CRICKET
z HE meeting appointed a special committee comprising of two
representatives of each division together with the officers of
the League to consider to work out details of a scheme for entry
of a B.C.L, XI into the competition of the Barbados Cricket As-
sociation competition,



PUBERTY OT MERA vo.

PHOSFERINE

for more
confidence!

If lack of confidence worries you
and you feel tired and depressed
through overwork remember how
very useful PHOSFERINE has been
to others in a similar state.






Ks



. « » the sharpest edge in the world!

Trade £

nquiries

to Tr. Geddes Grant Limited
‘sa Se so





SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1950



ThirdDay ’sRacing

SEVENTEENTH RACE
ST. LAWRENCE HANDICAP
Tiberian Lady, carrying five

pounds overweight,
from last place to first by O’Neil

as the third day of the B.T.C. =

Meeting got underway. The field
was one of five, River Sprite and
Kidstead having been scratched.
As they passed the Judges the first
time, Infusion (Holder) led, fol-
lowed by Flieuxce (Thirkell), Sun
Queen (Crossley), Landmark
(Wilder) and Tiberian Lady.
Tiberian Lady moved up by the
five furlong pole overtaking Land-
mark. By the three furlong pole,
Tiberian Lady moved up again.
She continued moving up, passing
the field at the mile pole and
reaching home four lengths ahead
of Sun Queen Landmark was
third, half a length behind the
Queen.
EIGHTEENTH RACE
ROCKLEY HANDICAP
This race was easily won by
Oatcake, the opposition fading out
on the straight run for home.
Dulcibella and Firemist were
scratched in this event and four
entrants started. Oatcake was
soon in the lead with Watercress
and Kendal Fort following closely.
Kendal Fort took over the lead
while passing the stands for the
first time, but Oateake drew level
as the field approached the four
furlong pole. They bunched soon
after but nearing the three fur-
long pole Oatcake again went to

the front. Urged by Wilder he
fnereased his pace rapidly and
entered the stretch for home a

winner all the way.

At this stage he was never
seriously challenged and reached
the Judges four lengths in front of
Watercress. This horse was sec-
ond two lengths away from Mary
Ann.

NINETEENTH RACE
ST. JAMES HANDICAP

Tango was scratched leaving a
field of eight, Miss Friendship
carrying 2 lbs. overweight. First
Flight (Lutchman) got off first,
followed by Apollo (P. Fletcher),
First Flight led the field from
pole to pole, in spite of a dour
struggle put up by Miss Friend-
ship (Yvonet), just as the field
raced past the guns. Apollo won
by a head, while Miss Friendship
was in, half a length ahead of
Foxglove (Wilder) .

TWENTIETH RACE
GRAVESEND HANDICAP
Manu and Maytime were
scratched in this race and the re-
maining ten entrants were soon
despatched with Front Hopper
and Sun Jewel carrying 4 and 2

lbs respectively overweight.
Bachelor’s Folly wag left flat-
footed and trailed the field for
the entire distance, Blue Diamond
took the lead and passed the
stands for the first time in this
position followed closely by
Blue Grass, Vixen and Front
Hopper, At the four furlong pole
Vixen moved up, drew level with
and threatened the leader’s posi-
tion, There was some exchange of
places soon after but Blue
Diamond kept to the fore and
though seriously challenged by
Duchess, was well hustled by
jockey Lutchman to win by half a
length, Duchess (Holder up)
second place just a neck away
from Flying Ann,
TWENTY-FIRST RACE
NOVEMBER HANDICAP
Firemist and Fair Contest were
scratched leaving seven to face the
Starter, Ability carrying 2 Ibs
overweight, got the worst of the

jump, while T Lady
(Thirkell) led the Field, with
Flieuxce (Wilder) and Rebate

(Baldwin) following in that order.
Tiberian Lady increased the lead
slightly just after passing the
Paddock Bend, Rebate challenged
are es field bunched at the

‘uns out he usual ding
etnte anteee See

a

ahead of Flieuxe. The hashes ab
second a neck in front of
Tiberian Lady.

TWENTY-SECOND RACE
JUNIOR HANDICAP

Cross Roads, Hi-Lo, Consterna-
tion and Dunese were scratched
and a field of four spirited and
restless two-year-olds faced the
starter.

When the gate flew, Usher with
(Baldwin up) was totally un-
prepared but Flame Flower, the
favourite, carrying top impost of
185 lbs was quickest out of the

was piloted Fla

chute and Holder hustled the filly
to the front so that when the
Hastings Stretch was reached,

Vanguard from Soprano.

Usher trailed another four
lengths behind,

On reaching the guns, Crossley
made a great bid on Vanguard
and lessened the distance between
Flame Flower and his mount.

Soprano meanwhile shook off
a determined bid from Usher for
the third place.

Over the last two furlongs
home a gruelling duel ensued
between ae tun oles and Van-
guard for the first ce,

But over the last fifty yards
home, Vanguard was the stronger
finisher and Crossley piloted him
home first a length ahead of
Flame Flower.

Soprano took third place, win-
ning from Usher by two lengths.

TWENTY-THIRD RACE
BELLEVILLE HANDICAP

Three horses having been
scratched, five started with Bon-
nie Lass, carrying 14.lbs. over-
weight and First Flight and
Foxglove 1.lb. each,

First Flight hustled by Yvonet
was soon in the lead and was
being challenged by April
Flowers and Colleton as the
horses went past the Stands for
the first time. Flight
increased her lead around the
bend.

The others bunched at the
four furlong pole and challenged
stubbornly but First Flight still
kept to the fore. Down the home-
stretch however Colleton and
Foxglove challenged and over-
took her. Colteton (Crossley
up) increased his lead steadily to
win the race by a length and a
half from Foxglove. Foxglove
was second two lengths away
from First Flight.

TWENTY-FOURTH RACE
FINAL HANDICAP

This was a keenly contested
race from start to finish and
Atomic II in what was probably
an upset, won the event by a head
from Pharlite.

Five horses were scratched and
six started with Infusion carrying
13 lbs, overweight. Sun Queen
was in the lead when the horses
passed the Stands for the first
time, followed by Pharlite, Atomtt
II, Infusion, Gunsite and Rebate
in the: order mentioned. Sun
Queen was strongly challenged by
Pharlite at the four furlong pole,
but quickly shook him off. A
further bid, however, brought him
level at the Clock Atomic II who
had been moving up steadily
meanwhile made an all out effort
down the home-stretch to capture
the premier position. Phaflite
urged by Lutchman was going well
in front by now. and at one time
it appeared as if he might have
won. This’ was not to be for
Atomic II came through with a
remarkable burst of speed to
snatch the race by a head. Phar-
lite was second half a length in
front of Sun Queen.

Bw Ore Cae xkel 3
By M. Harrison-Gray
Dealer ; South,

Game all

last trump. ith had still

2 iit het correct lend. of

tn hand at
win

e 3 from his own
trick 3,
tricks.

South can







says Society Debutante

Women who are smart themselves notice more about men than
you think. Ill-shaven men seldom attract artractive women. For that
smooth brisk look which lasts well into the evening, use Colgate
Brushless Shave Cream. So guick to apply—having washed your
face, just dab it on—a few easy sweeps with the razor will give you
that smooth gleam which is the first mark of a well-groomed man!
Save precious morning minutes and assure your face the best and

most comfortable shave there is

tH!
perggoe—
“E COLGATE

!



Brushless Shave Cream



MIXED RESULTS
| Three Outstanding Sons Of O.T.C.

Seen At The November Meeting
BY BOOKIE

IN NEARLY every class at the November meeting
concluded yesterday there were mixed results. Even
= in D class where Oatcake emerged as a veritable
champion he too tasted defeat on the first day at ine
hands of Watercress. But taken as a whole it is

Wi: easily seen how well the meeting an divided when
21 winners out of the 24 races on i.e
we reelise eel — os taee have been more evenly distributed
programme. — concerned.
oo ae eke, clos A there were four different winners of the
rAncnG e vision and having already dealt with Eliza-
races made for this dis day I am left with three on the last
bethan’s victory on the t event strange to say, was the
discussion. The sprint a ; Iam
oe ‘hat I missed but in this Sun Queen,
—_ from Landmark in the last few strides.
told, just think ch difference between these two and
1 dp not aot will bear me out, They are both
corey xe j of distance 1 would place at any~
smart fillies and their range not be sur-
pai Later on however I would
thing from five to 74 furlongs. — cr nine furlongs comfortably,
prised to see either of them getting a eee her running in the Final
— eae i aed Was up against some good horses
Han a y admittedly her weight was handy, 1 thought she held
- Tn the ‘ena A class distance on Thursday, We ae —
uliarly run ee es f eee -_ ey, os small error with
we eee . ’ res have let Infusion
Aer eet, re aan eee te ahtar he could have headed them
for the asking when only two furlongs were completed, By his many
victories in Trinidad Atomic II has clearly shown that he mn =
from in front and the race in which he set up a record for
Trinidad 94 furlongs, it will be remembered, was a fae aah co Ro
affair with himself as pace maker and everything else. Consequent
when he had to be re-awakened to catch up with Rebate and Infusien
I do not think he was accustomed to this sort of thing. ,

Gun Site on the other hand is famous for his grinding efforts
over the last four or five furlongs and once more he came through to
win from behind. In fact I cannot think of any horse who has
snatched victory so consistently in tight finishes as Gun Site. A year
ago at this same meeting we saw himself and The Gambler tie up
with each other in a gruelling run over the final three furlongs of
a B class nine. Last March saw him nose out Beacon Bright at the
finish of a 74 and now we have him giving Atomic Il similar treat-
ie in the Final Handicap yesterday it was Atomic II who came
on the scene in the closing stages. Of course he could hardly have
been expected to outfoot a fast filly like Sun Queen in the early
stages. But he tracked herself and Pharlite until he finally wore
them down with a grand effort in the stretch. The time of the race
was also flattering and it is the only time for the meeting comperable
to any returned when the going has been very hard. It therefore
clearly demonstrates Atomic II’s class. Between himself, Gun Site
and Oateake, with whom I shall deal later, we saw three of the best
sons, in fact I would say “the three best sons” of O.T.C. racing at
one meeting. It is: something which perhaps we will not see again.
6 das ig to the B class we come to the gallant and good little

filly Rebate. For although classified C it is in the higher divi-
sion that she first proved her worth. She is a filly who has im)
me all along from the time she arrived. At first I thought she
might have proved herself better over sprints and being the only
horse capable of keeping up with the late September Song over the
opening two furlongs last June in Trinidad one cannot altogether
blame me for this view. However at this meeting she has shown us
that she can maintain a hot pace for 7} and 9 furlongs and hold on
very well at the finish, Of course she had a very light weight. but
she won handsomely by copious lengths after running Infusion inte
the ground,

The other two B class races went to Landmark and Tiberian Lady
both of the Chase stables, and the latter in particular showed a dash
of the old form after looking a likely brood-mare for the last
year or so. I must say I was very surprised at this. I thought that
she would never recover from that stretching which The Gambler and
Gun Site gave her last year in the same race referred to above, But
once again sound legs have enabled the beaten to live and win another





for
on
sna’

day.
‘WHE FOUR C class races were divided between, Harroween,

Flieuxce, Rebate and St. Moritz and having already dealt with the
first three, that leaves me with only St. Moritz to discuss. He is a
changed horse, of course, and indeed the change for the better only
made itself apparent between the first and second day. How so many
people heard about it I do not know but the publicity was signified
by the amount he paid in the Pari Mutuel. Providing he is got at
early in a race and kept at for the remainder of the distance, what-
ever it is, I think he will make quite a useful horse. I think he is
the first horse by Bobsleigh that I can remember being successful
out here.

Cc DOWN to class D, after the first day it was a ease of Oat-
cake first, the rest nowhere. Last August I wrote that he had
at last come to his true form since his re-entry to the racing game
and I was certainly glad to see my words coming true. His effort
in the nine furlong yesterday was most impressive as he had Kendal
Fort, Mary Ann and Watercress all well extended in turn, yet they
could not even get alongside. However it must be said that there
were excuses for all of them and with Mary Ann and Watercress
particularly. The former received a bad start and the latter looked
terribly overboard.
aoe COLLETON won two of the F Class races I cannot
say he impressed me as a likely candidate for the Trinidad
Derby. His best effort was the nine furlong race yesterday and
while he won easily with top weight of 128 lIbs., the time was
atrocious. Two minutes flat! Reminds me of High Hat and nearly
all plodders I can think of. I should imagine that a really fit and
strong Apollo would give Colleton a good beating and the way the
former ran in the Savannah Lodge Handicap suggests that he is much
the better of the two.

: Meanwhile we had a very impressive win by the reconditioned
First Flight in the F class sprint yesterday and an equally smart
second by the half-bred Miss Friendship in the same race to make
it an all-Bethell victory. It looks as if First Flight will win at
future meetings but I would beware of a trip to.'Trinidad.

Lastly I cannot end the discussion on F Class without some
reference to the Handicappers’ treatment of April Flowers. They
might have been excused for her weight in the first F Class handicap
on Thursday because she was the only aged horse in the race who
had piaced before. But surely 126 Ibs. over nine furlongs after being
third with 128 Ibs. over 7% was nonsense,
eee I would like to end up with a note on the G Class races.

Blue Grass ig obviously another smart Roidan half-bred, and it
was most enjoyable to see him win with an apprentice who did not
carry a whip. But the Handicappers hit him a hard blow by raising
him 11 ts. for a short-head victory and giving him 130 Ibs. to
shoulder over 7% furlongs. To end up I must now remove Blue
Diamond from the ‘class of hopeless ones in which I had him, and
sure enough his perseverance, which I did not expect to pay off at
this meeting, enabled him to win a good race over 7% furlongs.







the VACATOR

WATERPROOF, NON-SKID, ‘‘GROUND-GRIP’’ PUSSYFOOT SOLE...

Clarks introduce the new flexible, resilient Pussyfoot
soling to cushion the impact between feet and floor.
Made to a secret formula of Clarks of England —
the quality shoe firm with 125 years’
experience—Pussyfoot is considered to
be the ideal hot-weather soling —
light as rubber, cool as leather,
tough as you'll ever need,

Pussyfoot Soles are
fitted to Vacator
Sandals (shown here).

Vacators have unlined
uppers for coolness
and unrestricted
comfort.

pe

MADE BY C @ J. CLARE LIMITED (WHOLESALE ONLY) STREET, SOMERSET, ENGLAND
LOCAL AGERTS: AL5C RBSSELA a CO. BARBADOS

(

»




SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12,

1950

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



L.B.W. Out
In Cricket
Discussed

of
writers now
on t constitutes a fair
L.B.W.-dismissal allegations be—
ing not that they are unfair to
Englishmen, but that they inter-
pret rules differently.

For some years now there have
been proposals that with L.B.W.,,
as also with all other dismissals
it should be the duty of the
Umpire to announce when he is
of the opinion that the man is
out without the opposing side
having to yell “hows that.” The
suggestion is that it should always
be left to the Umpire to take the
initiative,

While there are those who hate
to change the ancient laws of the
game, this idea has much in its
favour and very little to be said
against it. The appeal can become
a nuisance, It can be intimidating.

New System

even the best of them, might to-
day give a man out of_a confident
appeal; when, had it been left to
them they would have given the
batsman the benefit of

be said that the bowlers have a
tough enough task as it is, with-
out making it any more difficult.
One novel suggestion appearing in
the British press is that when an
Umpire thinks a man is L.B.W.,
he should be given another “life”
like a penalty kick, in football.
Suggestion of this cricket fan is
that the batsman should stand
aside and the bowler have a free
bowl at the wicket, If he hit it the
mah would be out, but if he failed
then the batsman would go on
batting. An amusing idea but one
eafi hardly see it being received
with even the slightest favour by
the powers that sit in authority
in the Marylebone Cricket Club.
—Reuter












WEST INDIES







of the

MAY TO

Complete with scores,

Edited by Advocate

there have different Bedser



New South Wales
Pile Up 509 For 3

SYDNEY, Nov. 11.

New South Wales again flogged
the M.C.C. bowling when the
second day’s play in their match
here took place today, and they
declared at the tea interval with
a score of 509 for three. Before
stumps were drawn, the M.C.C
replied with 92 for the loss of
Washbrook’s wicket when he had
scored 50. Keith Miller carried
his overnight 99 not out to 214

before he was bowled, and in four

innings of first class cricket this

season he has an average of 308

having twice been not out. Morris
had been dismissed for 168 and
his second wicket stand with
Miller realised 265.

Then Miller and Burke put on
138 for the third wicket, and Burke
and James had an un stand
of 54 for the fourth before declar-
ation.—Reuter.

NEW SOUTH WALES—ist INNINGS



is
Total for 3 wickets declared “<3 ae
Fali of wickets:—l—52, 2—317, 3455.

éoucvur

M.C.C, ist INNINGS

Hutton not out os
Washbrook c Morris b Johnston.... 50
Extras: 4 leg byes . o. 4

BOWLING

32000
roree





Ghurkas Invaded

@ From Page 1

and commerce with India, Britain

and the United States. Its For-

eign affairs are conducted with °

the ‘negotiation and co-operation’
of India

Nepal applied to join the United
Nations in August 1949, but the 4

application was
Soviet Union.
It is the home of 30 000,000
Ghurkas from whom the British
Army’s Ghurka Brigade is_re-
cruited. Nationalists have been
agitating against this recruiting.

vetoed by the

—Reuter. 09:

RECORD TOUR

TO ENGLAND
THE ADVOCATE’S PICTORIAL

SOUVENIR
READY THIS WEEK

visit of

THE WEST INDIES TEAM 10
ENGLAND

SEPTEMBER 1950.

averages, brief details
and commentaries,
Sports Editor O.S. COPPIN.





Big Sweep Prizes

Shared By Eleven

MR. VICTOR CHASE'S bay gelding Oatcake and Mr. J. W
Chandler's brown filly Sun Queen tied with ten poifits each

J-6479 and H-2137, $17,952.00 each as the B.T.C. Autumn
Meeting ended at the Garrison Savannah yesterday.
Following is the prize list :

Ticket Horse Pts. Plate mount
J.6479 Ouatcake | Ist & 2nd} .. $17,952.00
H.2137 Sun Queenj 10 divide {

V.0998 Colleton) 3rd & 4th} 4,028 00
L.2446 Rebate { qe. t divide |

DD.2193 Atomic Il }

DD.5252 Flame Flower} 8 5th, 6th & 7th} 1,642.66
V.0190 Flieuxcé | divide j
1.3809 Landmark )

D.4414 Tiberian Lady} 7 8th, 9th & 2
BB.5556 Vanguard other horsad} 842.03

Z.4938 Watercress divide |

Other horses divide ae each,





Following is the list of horses
drawn:

Results Of 2|- B. 1200, No-to—nite

* D. 93433, Duchess; 4414 ,Tiberian
Field Sweep; 23
1e Ww Pp E. 0415, Firemist
F. 0698, Harroween
THIRD DAY G. 8926, Arunda
H. 4973, Epicure; 2137, Sun
SEVENTEENTH RACE Queen
Prize a aeets “ a ig send
First 31 29 3, 7482, endal Fort; 3809,
Ria” {oat qoreo Land Mark; 6308, ‘Ability
aah ent Pre J 6479, Oateake; 4410, Vixen
oe. 8001, Front Hopper
, hol ¢ Tickets N

218i 218s ofa, “OTia. 1060, 1068, 0408, L. 2189, Kidstead; 2349, Usher;
4 Sales ;
Osr0. cinivennia: nice 6204, Consternation; 2446,
Prize Ticket Amount Rebate
First 3595 $517.75 M. 1118, Tango
ae pd 295.86 N. 7254, St. Moritz; 0716, Fair
Fourth 3098 96 Sally; 2695, Fox Glove; 8158,



$5.00 each to holders of Tickets Nos
359. 3996, 0732, 0734, 0706, 0708, 3097, Bonnie Lass
NINETEENTH RACE O 5676, Sun Jewel
Prize Tieket Amount P. 0843, Elizabethan; 7228
nies ie . Crossroads
Sec 374, . -
feces ae fais Q. 0172, April Flowers; 1322,
a os bier Fair Contest
aan saan jooo R. 8600, Duleibella
Seventh 4112 18.00 S. 1292, Manu; 9982, Maytime;
Eighth 396: \é * *
$6:00-é0ch 40 holders oc? Piakete ‘Nos 1716, Infusion; 7026 Blue
4181. 4183, 1811, 1813, 2853, 2855, 0460 Grass
TWENTIETH RACE - 8424, Miss Friendship
cist ‘as “eee 08s, Phares it; 0408 s
Si id l 392.54 , r opra-
Third 4117 196.27 no; 0190, Flieuxce; b998
Fourth iis se.3 Colleton; 6576, Mopsy.
area oe joo W. 4113, Wilmar; 2859, (Con
Eighth 0247 10.00 High and Low; 1090, Gunsite.
wo 7 ito X. 9051, Musk; 2168, Pharlite;
1$5.00 each to holders of Tickets Nos. 9941, Kitchen Front; 2398,
2194, 2196, 1 ‘ 9, 4116, 4118, 1788, ‘90. i .
TWENTY-FIRST RACE River Sprite; 4881, Blue
Prize Ticket Amount Diamond.
First 2719 $714.60 Y. 0285, Bachelor’s Folly; 1999,
Third. ian 3 © Hite
ir be -
Fourth 4128 102.11
Fifth dass 10.00 Z. 4938, ‘php «roa
a ‘ 10.00 AA, 7118 ary Ann; 0013,
00 each to holders of Tick Nos. * 4
2718, 2720, 1086, 1658. 1410, 1412, 4127, ie cola an a ripe.
, . ard; . (Con.
TWENTY-SECOND RACE ae ‘ )
Prize Ticket Amount ae t
First 2555 $746.13 CC. 0195, Miss Panic; 8030, Nan
a pS 426.36 Tudor.
nirt
Fourth dasa jonso DD. 9252, Flame Flower; 2193,
ante 00, each to holders of Tickets Nos. Atomie II.
2554, 2556, 1140, 1142, 4976, 4578, 4883, ER 0540, First Flight.
TWENTY-THIRD RACE FF. 1790, Flying Ann.
Prize Ticket Amount
First 1944 $749.71
Second 4948 428.41
enon, ed 214.20
r
ritth S008 10.00 YOUR GUESS
san ee to holders of Tickets Nos.
ae 5, 4947, 4949, 5045, 6047, 4221, WILL WIN

TWENTY-FOURTH RACE
Ticket

a Amount FIVE DOLLARS
Seco

Third irae 215.28 SEE MONDAY’S
Fourth 0955 107.61

Sixth tor ip.00 “ADVOCATE”

010
each to holders of Tickets

$5.00 Nos.
oot 0684, 2148, 2150, 1791,
56,

1793, 0954,



HERE IS AN ESSENTIAL
ITEM EVERY MOTORIST

SHOULD HAVE IN HIS








TOOL KIT. of
A KINEX TOWING BRIDLE

In case of a break down or out of Petrol just hitch it to your

>





Car and you can easily be towed

Also Available

CELLULOID in SHEETS

56 ins. x 24 ins.

H
‘

STEEL WIRE BRUSHES

Always Dial 4269 for any make Auto part or Accessory. We



will probably have it.

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY STREET 83s

DIAL 4269

2
“ . : ; I lesb h 1, Derby Coun-
for first place and bring to the lucky holders of tickets ;, aa , i








Football Results {| NOV. 12 — NO. 145 |
The Topic |
of

LONDON, Nov
Ist_ Division
Arsenal 5, Sunderland 1
Buroley Wolverhampton

ll

Chelsea 1, Chester United 0
Everton 1,

Wanderers J }
|

Tottenham Hotspur

2

Huddersfield Town 2, Liverpool |
i
}

y 3.
Newcastle United 1, Fulham 2

Portsmouth 3 Chariton Ath-)|
letic 3.
Sheffield Wednesday 3, Aston!

Villa 2. |

Stoke City 1, Blackpool 0. j
West Bromwich Albion 0, Bol-|
ton Wanderers 1

2nd Division
Birmingham City 0,
Rovers 2

Bury 0, Burnsley 3.

Cardiff City 2, Hull City 1. |

Chesterfield 1 Luton Town 1. |

Coventry Swansea 2.

|

|

|

}
|
Doncaster
|

Grimsby Peon 7, Brentford 2
Leicester City 1, Leeds United

5

Manchester City 1, Leeds United |
a ‘

‘ }
Manchester City 2, Westham,
United 0
Notts County 1, Blackburn Rov-
ers |}
Preston North End 3 South- |
empton 2.
Queen’s Park Rangers 2, Vild
United 1.

Third Division

Bournemouth 1, Northampton
Town 0

Ipswich Town 2, Bristol Rov-
ers 3

Millwall 4, Torquay United 1.

Plymouth Argyle 4, Crystal
Palace 0.

Reading 7, Brighton 0

Southend United 3
County 0.

Walsall 1, Swindon Town

Watford 1, Aldershot 2.

Newport

0

Results F. A. Cup Fourth

Hertford United 1, Scunthorpe
United 0.

Woodford Town 1, Colchester
United 7.

Leyton Orient 1, Stockport

County 2.

Third Division
Northern
Accrington Stanley 0; Bradford

me 2.
arrow 1; Gateshead 1,

4 Bradford 2; Shrewsbury Town

Carlisle United 1; New Brighton
0

Mansfield Town 3; Halifax
‘own 1.

Oldham Athletic 0; Lincoln City

Rotherham United 2; Hartie-
pools United 1.
Southport 1; Rochdale 1.
Tranmere Rovers 3; Chester |.
Wrexham 3; Darlington 1,
4 York City 1, Crewe Alexandra

Scottish League
Division A
Airdrieonians 2; Raith Rovers §
Celtic 3; Falkirk 0.
Dundee 0; Motherwell 0.
East Fife 2; Clyde 1,
Hibernian 2; Morton 0.
Partick Thistle 1; Aberdeen 4
St. Mirren 0 Rangers 2.
Third Lanark 1; Hearts 2
Scottish League Division B.
Dumbarton 1; Albion Rovers 5.
Dunfermline Athletic 3; Queen
of the South 1.
Forfar Athletic 1;
United 3.
Kilmarnock 2; Alloa Athletio 2.
Stenhousmuir 4; Cowdenbeath

Dundee

0
Sterling Albion 1; Alloa United
3.
—Reuter,

A dress that's long and snappy



This week was one of planning
For Christmas is in sight

That's why all the young women
Parade Broad Street at night

So Wednesday Joe and Robert
Stood up a certain place

And heard a young girl bragging {

About her dress of lace

We both at once decided
To listen carefully

To hear the needy of young girls
A growing mystery

The dresses, hats and fine things
That thease two girls longed for
Without exaggeration
Would sink & man-o-war.

Why every piece of cgambric
And voile and plastic too
Was just the thing they needed
And just the thing that'll do.
. . .

A dear old lady passed by
And said “girls in my day
We bought a dress for Christmas
And that was once a year.”
. . .

But now these modern damsels
Like dresses by the score

All they like more than dressing
Is dressing little more

. . .

A morning dress, a lunch dres-
A tea and matinee dress

A sport dres, a dance dress
And Robert is the pest

A dinner dress, a night dres
Some long and some are short

Now add the cost of dremes
The bill makes Robert snort

A tight dress
One that can sweep Bridgetown
And make the City eleaner
And rid it of the dung
. .

a full dress



PAGE FIVE

When

Colds
strike





> remember
7 Phensic !

Two tablets of Phensic with a little water
will quickly check a cold or chill. Phensic
soon clears the head, takes away the burn-
ing pain behind the eyes, the aches in the
limbs, the distracting headache, and helps
to bring the temperature down. But best
| of all, Phensic relieves the depression and
| fatigue that so often accompanies colds
| and chills. Be prepared for colds —keep
| a supply of Phensic handy.

Phensic

for quick, safe relief
FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAIN, LUMBAGO
NERVE PAINS, NEURALGIA, INFLUENZA, COLDS & CHILLS

lust take

Tablets



That's generally called a slack
That makes both Joe and Robert
Pass by But then look back
Joe mid now my dear Robert
That old soul is quite right
But she had better ‘fehut-up”
That talk in town at night
Those old days were the good da
The days of “flour bags”
Trimmed with half-mile of “taw-she why’
And children lived in rags.
To-day boys it is different
Young girls love to look smart
Sometimes with this objective
To break a young man's heart
Joe mid well if they dress up
Something else they must lack
You can't suffice a woman
With belly and with back

Lou said excuse me comrades
These girk; do plan ahead
Whenever they buy these dresses
Thay live on J & R Enriched Bresd

sponsored by
J &R BAKERIES
makers of

ENRICHED BREAD
and the blenders of
J&R RUM

CHEERFUL mind

80 often goes with a
healthy body. To main-
tain good health, don’
forget essential Inner
Cleanliness. Andrews
not only provides a
sparkling, refreshing
drink — it helps to keep
you clean inside as well.

It functions by cleaning the mouth,
settling the stomach and toning up
the liver. Finally, Andrews gently
clears the bowels.

Take this “fizzy” drink whenever
you need refreshing. One teaspoonful
in a glass of water is all you need
to use,

ANDREWS tver satr

THE IDEAL FORM OF
BELG MEL ELA ES LE, OIE!

LAXATIVE

el



Strong as a lion and Guaranteed for as long as you own it—that iy
the Phillips bicycle, made by Hritish craftsmen to last you a lifetime
Look at these points of quality, Frame of true-temper steel — all-
steel hubs—heavy gauge mudguards — Dunlop tyres and rims
and oilbath gearcase, The bicycle is luturiously finished in black
enamel, or colours if required, and sparkles with heavy chromium
plating. For a bicycle that will stand up to the roughest treat~
ment and a pleasure to ride, you can’t beat a Phillips



ATS SAT: TE ARSE a
J. A. PHILLIPS & GO. LTD., BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND

a ne

x)































tf ses



Having to vacate our Premises (ROYAL STORE No; 2
HIGH STREET) within the next few weeks we are
offering to the publie large stocks of merchandise at
drastically reduced prices.

We have opened a genuine sale of hundreds of regular

items at prices which will amaze you, Here are a few

of the articles and prices:

SPUN, SILKS & CREPES 4
Attractive shades guaranteed qualities reduced

from $1.68 and $1.80 to 69c., 80., 92.

PRIN

36” wide, checked and flowered 100 designs
fast colours reduced to 52c. & 59c. ;

LADIES & MEN’S SHOES

New stock of American, Dutch and English shoes
at prices below our own cost.

MEN’S SPORT & DRESS SHIRTS

Largest selection in town, prices cut up to 30%.

i

.



MEN’S TWEEDS, TROPICALS,
FLANNELS & DOESKINS

New stocks recently arrived selling at own cost,

LADIE’'S UNDERWEAR

Cotton panties reduced to 30 & 48¢. Silk panties
excellent quality reduced to 62 & 78¢. Brassiers,
Nighties, Stockings. Also household items all at
sacrificing prices.

—

Come and see us. One glanee at our goods and prices
will convince you of the rare opportunity to shop and

save.

THE



ROYAL STORE }

NO. 2 HIGH STREET






| PAGE SIX





Law In The Colonies “Too 00 Many Hand
Rigid” Centuries-Old English
Precedents Not Enough

Criticisms Of Ex-Chief Justice

(From Our London Correspondent)
LONDON Oct. 30.

The. way in which law is ad-
ministered in the Colonies to-day
does not satisfy a former Chief
Justice in the Colonial Service,
Sir William Fitzgerald, M.C.,
K.C. He wants to see much
greater elasticity in the outlook
of the Colonial judiciary: to see
Colonial judges avoiding the
temptation to solve a dispute be-
tween two cans as to the
ownership of a mealy patch by
quoting from a_ centuries-old
judgment in England.

Sir William expressed these
views in a lecture at Overseas
House, London, on “The Consti-
tutional Foundations of the Col-
onial Empire.”

It is doubtful, he said, if even
now Colonial machinery is gear-
ed up to take its new responsi-
bilities. There has been devolu-
tion of authority to native
administration and native
elected assemblies, but the gen-
eral administration of the law is
“committed almost exchisively to
an imported judiciary adminis-
tering an imported system of ju-
risprudence,”

It was necessary to guide the
young Colonies along the road
ce of experience had
taught Britain was the right one.
But if the new theory of trustee-
ship in the Colonies was to have
any significance, respect must be
paid to those native institutions
which give meaning to the daily
life of the peoples.

In many ways it was a mat-
ter for regret that what he called
“the plantation legal system”—
the dumping down of the English
legal system with all its rigidity
—had become so firmly rooted in
African soil. While Colonial pol-
itical institutions displayed a
great diversity according to the
different people governed, yet the
judicial machinery exhibited a
monotonous sameness.

“We Nave a High Court fash-
ioned on the High Court of Ed-
ward 1. We have judges who set
fe pape the very regent rn
of applying-the legal principles
born of Nee England to con-
ditions that-have arisen in a to-
tally different atmosphere. It is
not alwayS appreciated that in-
Gennes yeople also have their
own dell nceptions which in
many nativé communities have
become as stabilised as our own.”

The D6iiinions are already
adapting “the British Commov
law to their:own different needs
rather than-—following the chan-
nel to which the peculiar needs
of the English people were
directing it-in England,

He often wondered whether we
in Britain appreciated the appal-
ling res) bility on our shoul-
ders—a responsibility. that in-
cluded within our cultural influ-
ence a quarter of the known in-
habitants of the globe, “It would
be the height of political folly”,
Sir William said, ‘to imagine that
this concourse of diversified peo-
ple can be ruled by a paper con-
stitution drafted by an alien bu-
reaucracy”

Discussing the growth of legal
and _ constitutional problems in
the Empire, Sir William pointed
out that that Empire was found-
ed in two ways—either by settle-
ment or by occupation and the
nature of its institutions, legal
and political, were greatly influ-
enced by the manner of acquisi-
tion.

Convincing proof of that was
given if we took as example the
only remaining “plantation set-
tlements” to-day, the West Indies
and compare them with the con-
stitutions of the post-plantation
period. “If the historian of to-
day wanted to paint the back-
ground of se life in England
at the e of Charles I, he
would find his canvas spread in
Barbados and the Bahamas. The

cénstitutions of those territories
are practically identical with the
constitution of England before
the Civil War. And if the local
press of these countries is a mir-
ror of public opinion, one cannot
but reflect on the resemblance
between Charles going down to
open the fatal Parliament on tha?
October day in 1640 attended by
his own chosen ministers, and the
Governors of those colonies going
down to-day to open their Leg-
islative Council attended by their
Executive Council. The funda-
mental prinicples of those consti-
tutions are similar to the princi-
les which dominated most of the

an constitutions in the
seventeenth century, and which
prevailed in Germany ‘and Aus-
tria-Hungary to a modified ex-
tent, down to the time of Kaiser
Wilhelm. The set-up was an ex-
Executive nominated by the
Crown and dependent for sup-
plies for lagislation to imple-
ment its policy on a legislature
elected by the people.

“Tt is my submission that the
constitutions of Barbados and
Bahamas ure to-day open to the
same criticism that proved fatai
to them in pagiend 300 years ago,
and in Canada about 150 years
ago. A clash between the execu-
tive and the legislature is always
a possibility, and is usually in-
evitable. . . There must be a
lack of confidence between the
executive and legislature which
is so essential to progressive ad-
ministration. If ever the need
for broadmindedness and liberal-
ity on the part of the Executive
and a desire for co-operation on
the part of the legislature was
illustrated, but I fear painfully
absent, it was in the case of our
West Indian Colonies. It must
ever be a matter for regret that
most of those plantation colonies
have had to revoke constitutions
which afforded a wonderful field
for democratic development, in
favour of the bureaucracy of
Crown Colony rule. The regret
will not be so profound if that
lesson is taken to heart in this
future empire of ours”.

"
TRUMAN'S HANDSHAKE
NEW YORK.

Ever since President Truman
shook hands with him during his
New York visit, eight-year-old
Johnnie McDermott has refused to
wash, The excuse given his mother
-—“I promised the kids at school I
wouldn’t wash my right hand
until all of them have shaken it.
I don’t think I’ll ever wash it
again.” But his mother, good
Trumanite though she is, has
other plans,
IN SEARCH OF A COOK

TORONTO.

Dan Wood, a 50-year-old ranch-
er from Gadsby, Alberta, sailed
from Montreal to Liverpool
because : “I just got plain fed up
with my own cooking and decided
to eat with my three sisters in
Cumberland.” Asked if he is
seeking a wife in Cumberland,
Wood said : “I don’t commit my-
self, but I will say I don’t intend

to come back to eating and cook-
ing by myself.”
"CHURCHILL HASHISH"
ALEXANDRIA.
A strong woman weighing 150
kilos, and aged 40 has been
arrested by Alexandria police.
She imported and sold large
quantities of hashish, each piece
being carefully packed and bear-
ing a picture of Winston Church-
ill. The pieces were known as
“Churchill Hashish,” When asked
why she had chosen Churchill as
a trade mark she replied “Mr.
‘Churchill is the best man in the
‘world and my hashish is the best
in the world.”









Sa | ey)
mr ied

ae



Sy ay “ae way
Distributors :—. Dear’s Garage Ltd.
127 Roebuck Street, Bridgetown.
Seca BOuns Rede CCI the



A,
giant tyre




* for *
gruelling ¢
conditions.







mt enemas,



weep



Oe ww




MG manna » ) 32.



Bells For

«

Barbados ?
(From Our London Correspondent
LONDON

During the year 1949-50, one-
and-three-quarter million pounds
was alidcated to research in the
Colonies from Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare Funds. Since
1940, the total from the same
source has amounted to about
seven-and~a-qfiarter millions.
Colonial Governments and indus-
try assisted in the same period
with cash and gifts worth another
one-and-three—quarter million
pounds,

Is this enough? Nine million
pounds in ten years for work
that is the chief hope of the
Colonies for their future bet-
terment?

Many people, not only in the
Colonies but in Britain, think
it is not.

The question is the subject of
a leading article in the “Eve-
ning Standard” of October 31,
which deplores the fact that at
present there is a limit of two-
and-a-half million pounds on
the amount that may be spent
on Colonial Development and
Welfare research schemes in
any one year, although alloca-
tions for long term projects may
be higher,

The article cites the important
work of an East African research

“Yes, this is the Frisby
Estate Agency — Mr.
Frisby speaking...”



pioneer, Dr, Rosemary Jackson
carrying out a field survey
in the Malaya district of Tan-
ganyika. There it has been
found that infam mortality is
at the “apalling rate’ of one in
three, This survey, it is stated,
will hasten the day when modern
medical practice will reduce such
a death-rate,

“But”, asks the ‘Evening
Standard”, “are such pioneers on
the spot being given sufficient
help by the Government ct
home?”

The answer, the paper says,
is "No” and it goes on to poini
out that the East African Medi-
etal Survey, with which Dr.
Jackson works, has reported
this year that it is “seriously
hampered by lack of suitable
living and laboratory accommo-
dation.” '

According to the “Standard”,
Britain can find the additional
finance without placing yet
another burden on the “harassed
and overstrained taxpayer.” It
points to the British Council cost-
ing the nation nearly £3 million
last year and _ questions the
Council’s expenditure “on sucn
foolish projects as presenting
handbells to Barbados and reeds
for a B flat clarinet to Professor
Novakovic, of the Stankovic
School of Music, Yugoslavia.”

The Government, the paper
continues, “cannot possibly
justify expenditure on such

dubious activities when British
colonies need the money so
desperately. Britain's resources
of money and energy....must be
concentrated on the development
of the vast colonial territorics
which are the chief heritage and
trust of the British people.”








STOCKED

BY ALL

AGENTS-=

pee SS SSN
Lower Broad







e
E.A. BENJAMIN LTD.

306 Plantations Building
Street, Barbados

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Loneliest
Island Will
Be Developed

£130,000 EXPENDITURE

From Our London Correspondent)
LONDON, Nov. 1
Far away in the southern waters
of the Atlantic, mid-way between
the vast African and South Ameri-
ican continents lies the little
island of Tristan Da Cunha,—one
of the smallest British colonies.
Nine miles long and nine and a
half miles broad, it rises only one
hundred feet above the ocean sur-
face, a tiny outpost of civilisation,
a challenge to the surrounding
mighty waters.
or its population of 230, whose
only link with the outside is the
tiny radio station, life is indeed
primitive. Until recent years there
was no doctor on the island, all
medical duties being carried out
by a missionary. Now the island
boasts its own medical officers, but
so sturdy are the inhabitants that
seldom is he called upon for any
serious cases. '
To care for their frugal needs,

the islanders raise cattle, of which }|

there are about 250 on the island,
and sheep, which outnumber them
in the ratio of four to one; besides
numerous small flocks of poultry.
In recent years the population
of the island has diminished as
first one and then another of the
young men have grown tired of
the humdrum existence and set
forth to earn a living elsewhere.
The setting-up of a South Afri-
can fishery group’ a couple of
years back did something to arrest
this slow but sure exodus which
threatened eventually to make
Tristan Da Cunha an uninhabited

island.
And now comes news that the
Colonial Development Corpora-

tion, alive to the needs of the
islanders for some other form of
livelihood are planning the com-
mercial development of Tristan’s
crawfish industry.

A special vessel equipped with
deep freezing apparatus and deep
cold storage accommodation to
process and transport frozen craw-
tish tails to Capetown for the
North American and European
markets is to be provided. A can-
ning plant will be erected and
operated on the island,

The crawfish will be caught by
the local fishermen around Tristan
as well as by the fishery vessel
operating near the adjacent un-
inhabited island of the group. The
vessel will make the necessary
voyages between Tristan and
Capetown which will, in turn,
establish a regular shipping ser-
vice to the island.

The Tristan Da Cunha Develop-
ment Company which has under-
taken the initial work of investi-
gation, will now be reorganised
and the additional finance, esti-
mated at about £130,000 will be
found by the Colonial Develop-
ment Corporation.

a
KING GUSTAF’S FORTUNE

STOCKHOLM,

The business of being a king

is far from ruinous if properly
conducted, it appears, .or King
Gustaf recently is estimated to
have left just over £1,000,000.
Three factors helped him
amass this considerable for-
tune—he was notoriously econom-
ical, he was a king for almost
43 years und he lived to be more
than 92 years of age.

FORBIDDEN EXPRESSIONS
SYDNEY.

For the guidance of the notor-
iously outspoken members of the
Australian parliament, the Clerk
to the House has compiled a list
of expressions that have earned
the Speaker’s rebuke. The list
includes : assassin, coward, crea-
ture, jackanapes, imbecile, im-
postor, insect, Judas rebel, rene-
gade, scarecrow, scoundrel, thing,
traitor, trickster.

THE CALL-UP
NEW YORK.

In Green Island, New York,
William Maloney got the call-up.
He will be four in December. His
comment : “I don’t wanna go in
the army.”







LEADING STORES.







KAML LONDON Foglane

How. Ob
‘RIT GUAM

Wherever you go—
go in a Hillman Minx

nt kanal
~







GETS AWAY LIKE





toom uth -~

Beaulify every
CREOLE

TER PAINT

he perfect oil-bound
washable distemper

If unobtainable at
your dealers consult

JAMES A. LYNCH

& CO., LTD.,
AGENTS

OF YOUR HEALTH

THERE is a comfortable feeling about the house that possesses
a good watchdog, a feeling of security and peace of mind.

FERROL inspires the same feeling with regard to your

builder.

FERROL IS THE WORLD'S
BEST TONIC.

Obtainable in the yellow

FERROLe="â„¢

STOKES & BYNOE, LTD. Agents.

stores, in liquid or capsule

PARKS
IN A POCKET

tt



GOES FURTHER
ON LéeSS PETROL

A SCARED RABBIT

Thousands of car buyers everywhere are turning
to this latest, smooth-running, eye-catching

Hillman MINX.

They're buying it because

it’s twice as easy to handle as any car they’ve

ever owned,

They all say

oo

Don’t buy any ear until you've

seen and driven the Minx,” Check carefully

its family-size

body; its safety all-steel

construction, its increased vision through
Opticurve windscreen and rear window; its
4-wheel hydraulic brakes and _finger-touch
steering.

Then compare its beautiful, stylish body
design with any car in its class. Take it out
on a rough road and feel how its front coil
springs blot out the bumps.
you'll regard its low petrol consumption as an

By that time,

extra dividend,
See and try for yourself.

A

health. If you take a course of six bottles of FERROL
every few months you can feel that you have taken
excellent precautions to maintain good health. FER-
ROL, with Cod Liver Oil, Iron, and Phosphorus, with

a high Vitamin A and D content, is a resistance

It is your best protection against :
any infection that is stirirng. Take some
now to ensure that this Christmas you will

be free of illness and able to enjoy the

pleasures of the holiday season.

good drug





3

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1950







Alka-Seltzer brings pleasant relief
When a busy day and a hurried
lunch add up to well-known acid
indigestion, you want quick relief.
Fortunately, First Aid for acid in-
digestion is just as well known.
Drop one or two tablets of Alka-
Seltzer in a glass of water. Watch
it fizz, then drink it down. Spark-
Gittestee
ief. Not a ive.






































tze

eee ee















STOPS ON ‘THE
FLASH OF A LIGHT










HUGS THE CURVES
LIKE A BEAR












CRUISES SERENELY













The New |
HILLMAN MINX

With Plus-Fower Engune

COLE & CO., LTD.

PR OD) OR y

Belg Pa = R-©.-0O TES GR-.O.ULP
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1950 SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Sanaa Mae a eae aaa aaNet aaa PAIR THEM Take A Test

4 % SORT t os IF you could do equally | ASTHMA MUCUS
the following 3-letter two or more different things sim- ,
$ words out in pairs so that when ultaneously, think of Ww much Loosened First Day
a — van a central letter they time you would save! As a test Don’t let coughing, sneezing, chok
. orm T-letter w t Fo: e fw » " ing attacks of Bronchitis or Asthma
‘ emple, THY.s-ee . % of your aptitude or ability in this ruin your sleep and energy another

direction, try drawing a circle] day or night without trying MEN-

PAGE SEVEN









with your left hand and a square | DACO. This great medicine is not a








DRAWN & LET AIL ‘ > 5 as smoke, injection or spray, but works
FUR RAM w ith your right hand both at the through the bi ‘hum rheabing the
ed : ELF KIN same time. lungs and bronchial tubes. The first
O CUR dose starts he! nature immed!
Way “SIN ae. ee tnove tc atrangting tmscup- 2) Thus
0" . 2. Thus
HAT PIT RUN ACT co | promotes freer breathing and sounder,
J aaa yt aAQwsod 194yj,0 o1 more re! ing sleep. 3. Helps allevi-
HER AGE ar Kegebure: Necanatee on a ate Coumhing, wheesing, ;
RED THY’ ee x oe aul > Quick sat! mor

Bivurews “yeyND ‘Tred = “FeskUL DAeo -*

ALL AND :SMOT{OJ SW Paayed oq weo [TV ‘wennes Seer aa -







Rupert’s Autumn Primrose—9

:



The angry voice goes on and

a shiny top hat with a new dent w

Just squeeze Roum fom the ae tnd wee hw Beh 6



Edward moves away from the it. “Just wait until | find who did generous lather; see your hair wih health; fa ew
skittles in some aa, i that b* he storms. “I'll reach him manageable it is, Wiss a wondertel difheosse makes to hats
throwing another ball, With Rupert » 2 lesson."” ** Oh, golly, it must have of every colouring. No no rinseo—yes, eo
he peeps behind the stall. In front boca smy snes that knocked his has At all leading drugstores; in case o! beautifully easy to Brytfoam your In wubes, the Dandy and tp

1B
need apply to: H. P. Cheesman & Co,
Led.

ispers Edward, ~ What
on earth can | do abou un?" He
backs quietly out of sight and the
twe pals gaze at each other in

eeeeeu.

large economy size.
= sa. there’s more foam in

_BRYLF

is THE ORIGINAL CREAM SHAMPOO IN A TUBS

u

ot him he sees the ringmaster and
a clown. The littk man looks ver
‘amused a something, but the tall

show just precisely what the jun- one is very annoyed. He holds out

gle has to help a girl?”
Said Dyall: “I’m devoted to
leppards but never on the head.”

* * *

_ To show how Valentine Dyall—
in spite of himself—can be caught
where he feels it most, Robb draws
the proof.

To-day’s Mantrap—No. 2 in the
series—has the sort of face that
stays like that for the next ten
years. She wears a hat few could.

But the main thing about her
is the ocelot muff. . . “nice even
if a shade vulgar”, said Mr. Dyall
in a voice his radio listeners never



Just Walking Around



il seve



TODAY’S WITNESS:

gâ„¢> Valentine Dyall

By DRUSCILLA BEYFUS



3). MAN IN

a Briefly put, he expects skill too. pear |

7 BLACK He is alll that, “I-look-a-dream-in— ;

eE re > Ses ”’ girls must pray to miss. There’s only one concession.
Sa e trie

to tempt him: “A honey
MANTRAPPERS can be proud blonde drenched in mink?”

of Mr. Valentine Dyall. Men of “Not ithat corny old gag,” he
his sort bring distinction to the replied wearily.

old pastime. We tried again: “A fur finery to

BOY OBSERVERS

The Man in Black makes to the
more orthodox ideas of mantra’
equipment: pearls on black suede

gloves Perfume...
LES.







the loveliest thing



Unwanted Boys

LONDON.

Sparkling, fadeless,

Youth expert Miss Pearl Jeph-
cott, in a lecture in. London to
the National Marriage Guidance
Council, asserted that “boy ob-
serving” was the main occupation
of Britain’s Miss Teen-age, 1950.

From a survey she had made
in one town in Se Midlands,
she continued, a ird of the
girls’ time was spent in ways in
which they could, directly or in-
te meet boys.

The Reverend Henry Hughes,
of St. Barnardo’s Britain’s big-
gest orphanage home, said today
that nearly all people tmanting to
adopt babies ask for the blue-

eyed blonde girls under two





magic-wear CUTEX,
brings your hands
new admiration ..,



* your best "”—
and being beautifel. As wonderful as that, the

Miss Jephcott, a youth re- he said: ears of ; 1 difference fime perfume makes. Goya's lovely
search worker at Nottingham “Going to the movies is a 4 Boys, an added, are seldom easy to apply he \ perfumes create this minacke for you... their lilting 6
University, told her audience socially accepted way of seind asked for.—I.N.8. tine fas encgeions
sist ous oe es- eee ; . ‘af ¢3 faster, too. we,
pecially girls’ clubs, d pay “There is the queue, for - ae 4
jess attention to sport, drama and stance, then there is the close R. RICHARD RICHMAN has two and one-half miles an hour, :

handicrafts and to cater for such

interests as boys, love, romance,

homes, husbands and children,
She added: ~

“The problem of youth organi- Jephcott for “boy-watching” tongue: trated above, each exactly 1,320 his path four times he or she : R
zations is how to attract me were walking, dancing, cycling, Cecil Caesar ceaselessly sawed] feet long. : goes into the house. Breakfast chipping... and
negative, boy-obsessed type of and, with the older girls, the cedar strips. All the members of his family is served when all have entered ;
girl, and to. show her that securi- bars. comes in mck
ty onli ét ulso- be = found: Miss. Jephoott asked: take a constitutional walk If they start their peregrinations

elsewhere than in her ,
whom are all her hopes for a
home and children.”

proximity in the cinema, in the
street afterwards or in the fish
and chip shops.”

Other devices listed by Miss

“I wonder whether youth or-
ganizations should not accept the
situation for this type of girl and

Tongue Testers

READ these aloud rapidly, and
see if you can avoid tripping your

Sunhine on sh
Tioster hissed "Lester Myteri-

cally.
Lester lacked lustre.

a beautiful home surrounded
by a park. Adjoining the house
are four circular paths, ag illus-

around these paths every morn-
ing before breakfast, each having

hour.

and Mr. Richman four miles an
os eighe
fs

As soon ag each walks around

at 7:45, at what hour do they
begin to eat their breakfast ?

The polish that gordi
wears longer — re-
sists peeling and



brilliant shades.





























Miss’. Jephcott warned a for a ig OP eee sg | Glow ‘ ‘ his own path. Lizbeth, the =
Council that most young girls, of sports, handicrafts, drama an owing gleams growing green. » SHB IN WO AoW ‘ouozor0Ny DUW ,,‘o1;UL
especially from the working the like and concentrate on the Shall Sheila scallop shallops? nt walks one mile an hour; suo, panos anos seu op 0), anoit “uw
class, expected to marry young, avowed interests — boys, love, Sheathing sheer sheets. Billy, the boy, one and one-half {0Gita'eah (on uipioooe peu eq yeniul World's most popular P cova 161) mW BemD s¥ABAT | Lompex - wy é
and geared their lives to that romance and a husband?” Bothering both blue blossom miles an hour; Mra. Richman +#¥%ve1q ‘fu0] eM v zo Wanoj-U0 nail polish, Distributora; L. M. B. Magers &@ Co. Led, P.O, Box 101, Bridgetews
expectation. —I.N.8. blowers. 10 9903 O¢S'T 9} Nd Gow uOWNIOg
[edlaniiDihhihitninaiphiinhinlieisenistinnsnnie
E A
For smart women of every age-—
fre Some famous
N! f x at)
Se / TOOTAL favourites
‘ { aD )
3
s ee fs : : : ‘
LYSTAV « spun rayon fabrie of distinetive M
5 : 2 character, highly adaptable, with a sparkling -
Three years old — or thirty-three — every woman enjoys = linen-like surface and supple handle: is
= equally successful for softly draped or clean
ing her best. That’s why, once you're of an age to cut tailored styles, In many rich glowing
looking T re 7 8 prints and clear plain shades. Washable and
A ia marked TeBLLIZED for tested crease-resistance,
choose, you should always treat yourself to Tootal
TOBRALCO the world-favourite fabric for
Guaranteed* Fabrics. There’s just nothing to touch them children’s clothes—a hardwearing, long-
J 8
lusting wash cotton of unrivalled excellence.
. , hip aaa : h i " Will wash (and boil) over and over again, is
for style, enchanting good looks and beauty friendly to sunshine and exceptionally strong,
" : In an unusually wide range of gay colours
of texture. And what wonderful colours!... and delightful prints.

TOOLINA. An attractive dress fabric of spun |
rayon woven in a distinctive style. The
unusual textore heightens the appeal of plain
shades and full-eoloured prints, Similar to
LYSTAY in weight, TOOLINA is just as
versatile, tailoring or draping with equal
Washable and marked TEBILIZED

for tested crease-resistance,

What’: more, they are very hardwearing and
wash superbly. With their wide range of texture
and design, Tootal Fabrics are infinitely

suctess,

adaptable and a joy to make up. Many are marked
f ROBIA « fresh, voile-type cotton that will



4 wash and wear perfeetly, for all its delicate
TEBILIZED for tested creage-resistance. appearance, Gay and enchanting for children’s
party frocks-—-in lovely plain colours of

irresistible soft-toned prints and colour-
woven designs. Marked TeBILizeD for tested
crease-resistance,

All goods sold by the Company and bearing the



< » . . , " 7
: registered trade mark TOOTAL or the words About CREASE RESISTANCE Many Tootal
fabrics carry the additional trade mark
\ A TOOTAL PRODUCT are guaranteed by the Company venitizen. This indicates that the fabric has
% * THE TOOTAL GUARANTEE and are warranted to give satisfaction. Should been treated and tested to ensure that it will
dissatisfaction arise through any defect whatsoever resist and recover from creasing much a»
ey en wool does naturally, Not onernshable, but

in the material Tootal will replace it or refund crease-resisting. Such Cubsics wash perfectly

the price and pay the cost incurred in making up. if you avoid boiling aud strong soap solutions.

Fhe word TOOTAL and other brand names mentioned are Registered Trade Marks


PAGE EIGHT
WRI ene meen

anaavccnamanenn aed

ADNOGATE

BARBADOS 1

srr)

Printed by the Advecate Co., Lid., Broad St. Bridgetown.



Sunday, November 12, 1950



CONSTITUTIONS

THE British Empire.is so large and the
eolonies are scattered throughout the
world to such an extent that it is impos-
sible to generalize about any phase of colo-
nial life. The colonies differ in their
acquisition: by the British crown, in their
history and in their traditions.

A former Chief Justice of Palestine, Sir
William Fitzgerald; in giving a lecture on
the constitutional foundations of the Colo-
nial Empire recognized the above facts, but
still fell in the error of generalizing on
matters which are incapable of generaliza-
tion. He regretted the importation into
the colonies of British juris, rudence.
While in the African colonies there may
exist native institutions which may afford
an alternative of their own, in the West
Indies there are no native institutions, All
the inhabitants of this-area, with the ex-
ception of an insignificant number of
Caribs, have been imported either from
Africa or from the United Kingdom. Those
from Africa were uprooted from their
native element and in the course of years
have lost all affinity with the traditional
institutions of their African forebears. It
is neither regrettable nor inconvenient to
administer in. islands such as these the
common law of England with such amend-
ments and alterations as local statutes
should provide.

Sir William pointed to the constitution
of Barbados as an example of a constitu-
tion which was practically identical with

' that of England in 1640. “The fundamental

principles of those constitutions are similar
to the principles which dominated most of
the European constitutions in the seven-
teenth century. The set up was an execu-
tive nominated by the crown and depen-

dent for supplies and for legislation to
implement its policy on a legislature

elected by the people.” It would appear
however that there is a substantial differ-
ence between the constitution of Barbados
and that of England under the first Stuart.
The executive Committee Act of 1891
created a link between the Legislature and
the Executive which. provided this island
with a stable and efficient government for
almost fifty years, .., «

It was only with the giowel of party
politics that the demand grew that the
members who constituted the link between
the legistature and the executive should
all belong to the same party. The constitu-
tion of Barbados was able to adapt itself
to the changes which circumstances and
the march of history had made necessary.
The Bushe Experiment inaugurated the
system of party government in Barbados
and gave to the Executive both power and
responsibility which at one time Governor
Bushe found so sadly lacking. The up-
heavals of a civil war were not necessary

to effect the changes which were necessary
and while the clash of parties and even

more the clash of personalities deafen the
observer of Barbadian politics, yet it can
be said that it has succeeded in achieving
historical continuity in its political institu-
tions and has never had to revoke its con-
stitution in order to introduce the bureau-
cracy of crown colony government.

It is useful for English people to realise
the responsibilities which the Empire cast
upon them, it is equally important that
they should be made aware of the differ-
ences which exist in the colonies and to
guard against rash generalizations which
can only mislead,



S-BENDS
THE HIGHWAYS DEPARTMENT have
at last started on a programme which if
earried to its logical conclusion, should not
only save considerable sums of the taxpay-

ers’ money but should tend to reduce the
risks of the road.

It is many years since the ‘S’ bend at
Top Rock has been the subject of criticism.
After much prodding the Highways au-
thority have managed to purchase a strip
of land from Mr. Hinds and have started
to straighten one loop of the ‘S’ bend.

The highway along this route carries
heavy traffic and the bend is of a particu-
larly dangerous type.

When the bend has been eliminated it
will bring relief from congestion and risk
of accidents on this particular strip of the
Christ Church Highway. The Highways
Department would be well advised to con-
tinue their programme along this High-
way. The other bend of the ‘S’ should be
tackled. Fortunately there are only chattel
houses to be removed on the upper end of
the bend if or when the Highways Depart-
ment manage to acquire a right of way.
* Eliminating risks on the road is of the

first importance but this in itself is not the

only reason. for straightening bends. It
has been found in Europe and in nearby
Trinidad that although the initial expense
of straightening is heavy, upkeep on the

shortened roadway
halved.

is often more than
The winding roadways of Barbados pre-
sent a charming sight from the air but it
is doubtful whether the Taxpayers will be
satisfied to go on paying for charm that
can only be appreciated from a plane.

There are countless numbers of unneces-
sary bends and twists up and ‘down the
country that could be straightened without
great expense. Many of them occur out-
side built up areas where there would be
no expense in removing even chattel
houses. There should be little difficulty in
acquiring rights of way in these country
districts where the abandoned roadway
would be handed over to the plantation
whose land had been acquired for the new
section of the highway.

A road straightening programme cannot
be carried out overnight. It will take care-
ful planning and time.

But it is not an impossible task and
might be well worth the Department's
time in investigating the possibilities and
estimating the net saving in repair work
when the scheme is completed.



EQUALITY

Slowly but surely the old impassable
berriers are being broken down and the
ideal of equality for all citizens of the
C«mmonwealth is growing apace.

From the wording of a notice appearing
in the Press during the week it would
sc »m that another career has been opened
tc Colonials of any colour, creed or race.
In the past Colonials, except those of
ru se descent, were not elegible for

Sandhurst — the gateway to the commis-
s oned ranks of the professional British
my. At last it is being realized that the
C>lonial is as interested as any other of
His Majesty’s subjects in protecting the
Commonwealth and should be given the
right, in peace as well as in war, to serve
the King in any capacity.

It has taken many years to break down

the old prejudices which surrounded Sand-
hurst where, at one time, Blue Blood

counted far more than physical fitness and
intelligence. And, even during the recent
wars the Army, although willing to admit
all colonials to serve in the ranks, was still
reluctant to promote a certain section of
them to the Commissioned ranks. It was
the Air Force that led the way in sweeping
away the old barriers. A citizen from any
part of the Commonwealth could rise to
the topmost ranks of the R.A.F. and the
new policy paid good dividends. The R.A.F.
gained the pick of the brains from the
Commonwealth, and the experiment
proved highly successful.

The proud bearing of R.A.F. Officers of
any hue did much to show the world that
the British Commonwealth is a_ truly
anited entity and that the peoples from

every remote part of the Commonwealth
are ready and willing to flock to the de-
fence of the Commonwealth.



SHORN SHEEP

IT will be difficult to estimate, at any

been done to the barbers of this Island by
the showing of “Samson and Delilah” at a
local cinema this week.

Now that we have it from the lips of
Mr. Victor Mature (Samson) that the
strongest sheep is the one with the longest
wool, and the shorn sheep cuts a ridiculous
figure, who among us will have the cour-
age — or the stupidity — to bow his head
for a G.I. cut? Must we continue for the
sake of fashion to submit to the Delilahs
among us, whose business it is to rob us
of our strength and dignity? Let us over-
throw these tyrants who have kept us in
subjugation for so long!

According to history, ancient and mod-
ern, men have always, and for no account-
able reason, connected hairiness with
strength. A man’s strength is usually
estimated by numbering the hairs on his
chest, and a bushy beard is regarded as an
emblem of virility. But until “Samson
and Delilah” reminded us forcibly (and in
glorious Technicolor) of the fate of that
Biblical strong man, we were in danger
of forgetting the magic of the crop we
cultivate under our hats.

Now that we have been warned let us
tread the streets of the City warily lest
some wandering barber beguile us into
having a “glass-bottle” cut. Let us shun
the red and white pole.

But in gaining our new strength by the
inch, let us be big enough to spare a tear
over the fate of the tonsorial artist as he
sits regarding his empty chair and rusting

instruments, remembering a saying that
was popular some years ago — Barbers
Must Die.

learnings.
on only tax the workers’ earn-
ngs,
While drones and spivs and use-
less folk .
Regarded ‘taxes as a joke,
Driving in their luxury cars
From luxury bars to luxury bars.
* * *
Maybe as our war gets hotter
You will think “I’ll stop that
rotter,
“He has too much space to fill,
rate for a few weeks, the damage that has |...) ewsprint

SUNDAY ADVOC
THEY bo







Jusz

THAT Nv

‘Sitting

Being a welcome to Hugh
Gaitskell, new Chancellor of
the Exchequer and Blood-
sucker-in-Chief, from his
long-suffering Uncle Nat.

ELCOME Gaitskell, welcome
Hugh,
Here the column waits for

you.

Waits, a watchful living thing,

Snarling, crouching, waits
spring

ene while his victims pass,
As the tiger in the grass

Waits his moment, hour by hour,

To leap, to rend, to tear, devour.

So shall I lonely den,

With sharpened claws and savage

to

pen,
Wait, and never once relax,
Brooding. over specie ta:

Unlike your hanasu Cripps,
ho suffered but the mildest
quips

(Because it seemed unfair to jeer

At one who's always feeling
queer),

You, with young and healthy tum,

Must tremble at the wrath to
come,

Fit and youthful, busy Hugh.

Punches ‘won't be ee for you.

* *

So tell the people near ah far,
Tell the world we are at war,
At war to save the toiling masses
From legions of official asses,
From theorists and other comics
Who got degrees in economics,
But o, despite their books and

shall be shorter

still.”

But I warn you here and now

We can deal with that , (and
how),

In our trade of toil and grief

We can be verbose or brief;

We can publish, at a pinch,

A dirty crack in half an inch,

OUR READERS SAY:

Drama

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—As far as direction is
concerned, I bow to Mr. Barnes’
better jodgment, not only be-
cause he is by far the best pro-
ducer Barbados has, when he has
time for it, but because of his
obvious knowledge of this par-
ticular author,

The first ten minutes of any
play is the most difficult to put
over to an audience and I admit,
through no fault of the players,
the first scene did not get over
at all on the first night—let us
put it down to the fact that
some people were still arriving
fifteen minutes after the
had started, and the fact that
the noise from the street through
2 bar windows was “oe

the windows were

pa the fact that "the ~~ ‘pale
address system failed

for the whole of that cea ot
finally of course that the
players themselves were and
always will be nervous for the
first few minutes. Madam
Arcatis’ part was ruthlessly
ripped from the script at her
own request and we all agreed
that the
enhanced

first curtain was
by the omission.
Remembet also Mr. Barnes, that
Madam Arcatis had plenty of
time to clean up after her cycle
tide. she was “the

came to dinner.”

who

lady

There
Noel

was no
Coward that

mention by
the maid























TIGHTEN

= EXHAUST,

ATE

if AGAIN

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1950





56,6668 900CS
PSS SSO SF OOO FOO OPOOOOOGOOS SERPS OE,

AND AGAIN : .
§ SEE US FOR:—

LUMBER & HARDWARE

T ON

Establishec
1860

Incorporated
1926

T. HERBERT L

10 & 11 Roebuck Street.



FISHERMEN

we have

FISHING LINES—
9, 10, 12, 15, 18, 24, 30, 36 Ibs

WHITE COTTON LINES—
6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 24, 30 thread

STAINLESS STEEL WIRE— 19, 2!, 23 gauge

FISH HOOKS—
Nos. 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 16 1/0 2/0

COPPER PAINT—

and many other items to interest you.



4 gin. tins

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.,
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

PHONES 4472 and 4687

LTD.,

Gust Like Cow's Milk

re

FULL CREAM a,
MILK POWDER

RICH IN CREAM
EXCELLENT FOR









On The Peace
By NATHANIEL GUEBKINS

Or, if harassed, give the bird
In one short, sharp, four-letter








LipDANO

therefore undernourished, bony
because all the surplus fat is worn

Arka gece
















word. off their bodies, writhing in un- CHILDREN & ADULTS FULL haan milk
Welcome Gaitskell, welcome comfortable beds, and red nosed e POWDER on
i Hug m se ia because they are cold. ao i
> e column waits for * * * 4
woe bse whee oi wht de Their “marmoreal emphasis on Ask for LIDANO
+ good form,” which is another way Groc
Marble Man of saying their manners are as at your os
FTER a holiday in England severe and formal as marble ;
an American has written of statuary, are therefore understand- = POPP P POOR LF
“Spartan beds, largely inedible able. cr pie



food, a marmoreal emphasis on
good form which embalms even
trivial relationships,”

Spartan beds and _ Spartan
food we admit because we are a
Spartan race.

*

They are trying to be polite
despite the handicaps of feeling
as cold as marble, having com-
plexions like veined marble and,
after a plateful of plain English ~
cooking, believing that their stom-
achs are full of marbles.
on anc All _ the same we. still
off, with all kinds cf people we frightfully fit.
never disliked, for about 2,000

NOW ON SHOW FOR THE
COMING FESTIVITIES

Smart Dress Materials

* *

We have been at war, keep
Rejections for ser-
vice with the armed forces are not

years. We have been rationed for 34 per cent. of the call-up as they %
ten years. The Kaiser and Hitler are tm America, x
ee made us poor, I Love Ana x
‘ew of us know the comfort of A captured diary taken fror % .

central heating except in offices a ear political officer oa the * MADE TO FLATTER THAT WOMANLY
and flats. That’s why we despise North Korean Army had this %
it, believe it is healthy to be cold, entry; “Kim Chok Chong is
end jump inte cold baths to in love with the daughter of FIGURE
increase our circulations anu the Pukson Hotel owner.’
keep our minds off sex, also eA
considered a Juxury sik

This horror of luxury, which that

Wwiice goes to show
Communists, however harsh
the grim discipline of their devil
worship may be, must sometimes

existed before we were pauper-
ised by Germans, also explains
the severity of English diet. Spar-

Make Your Selection from the following:

tans must not be pampered. Surrender to the emotion. that

“Plain English cooking” is makes the world go round—|¥% CREPES, SHEERS, LACES, CREPE
ey ee it Pe it = “Plain its as the bia eee -school scient—| 9

glish cooking.” Sometimes it is ists as the biologi y ,
so plain that it a fs a wild Tee SATINS ano A BEAUTIFUL ASSORTMENT

exaggeration to call
at all,

it cooking As I hide never mi a secret | ¥
of my love for Ana Pauker, the
lovely woman Communist last
heard of as Rumania’s Foreign | %
Secretary, I don’t mind admitting | $
that the walls of the Sea Nest are|
covered with messages wrung
from a full and aching heart and
written in red chalk by this foolish,
trembling hand,

Despite family protests hearts | }
pierced by arrows, true lover's
knots, “I Love Ana” and “My
Love is Like a Red, Red Rose,”
are scrawled” everywhere, %

I even drew her profile on the
dining room wall, but somebody
has added whiskers making it
look like Karl Marx.

OF TINSELS

* *

Although it can sometimes be
delicious, particularly in some
small hotels far from London, it
is usually so terrible, both away
and at home, that the majority of
Englishmen suffer from chronic
indigestion.

This has made us bad tempered
and may explain why we have
been fighting people for 20
centuries.

The cooking, the cold homes,
the uncomfortable beds may also
explain why typical Englishmen
are lean, bony, and red nosed.

They are lean because they can’t
eat much of the food and are

STOP IN TO-DAY

+

DACOSTA & CO., LTD.
DRY GOODS DEPT.



—LES.

should be a dim wit -—— as a
matter of fact I can» hardly

by the “Golfito” which anchored
im Carlisle Bay four weeks ago.

imagine a novelist in Charles I have not received it yet.
Condomins’ position employing _ We all know that the General
a dim wit, and in my humble Post Office is undergoing changes

and that some delay is inevitable,
but need that delay be quite so
long? To my enquiry by tele- |}
phone an official informed me that |}
he “had good reason for saying | {
that the postal service of NI
compared favourably with that of | {
any country in the world” and‘ }
that he knew that “deliveries in

England often took six weeks,”

opinion Joan King was admira-
ble in the part in every way

I take my hat off to you for
“discovering” her, I really feel
that our worthy § critic has
slipped up when he says, “detail
all through was sadly neglected,
from Burma curtains to Barba-
dos paper-money.” No mention




air | pone of Burma curtains,

perhaps e referred to “that

Burma shawl on the piano,” bon ae phe wing outlook hag 4

For your information that shawl my parcel, or the delivery o

ys Soi from Burma, I brought P

it back when I was there, in

fact I saw it made. The only Yotwe faithfully, PD

detail which was not correct was EDWARD CUNARD BOP IN AT =--

the Barbados paper-money and ; 1 ‘
this was used because the pound Glitter Bay,

note which he had was mislaid | St. James. .

on the night of the show. These November 11. ?

things do Happen you know, Mr
Barnes,

Clean Up

famous for the
Te Lhe Editor, The Advocate—

BEST MEALS
BEST SERVICE
BEST RUM

GODDARD'S

We are not so foolish as to
complacently rest on imaginary
laurels, We have not lost ground,
“ut unfortunately several hun-
dred dollars in the production
that is why our socks are well
and truly pulled up So are our
sleeves, Mr. Barnes for our
next show,

SIR,— With Remembrance Day
approaching on Sunday next
(12th) could not the War Meme |ff
orial be given a scrub and cleaned i
up. I do not know if it is thought |f
that by keeping it in its present
condttion it will look more ven-
erable, but it locks very sadly |f{f
neglected.

Incidentally as five years have
now passed surely the 1939—1945
panel could be added to make it

Very truly yours,
NORMAN WOOD.

Parcel Delivery

a
complete. May I suggest that it Lh
To The Bélior, The Advocate fompiets. May 1 suggest that GOLD BRAID RUM
Ssir,—. ndon firm advised
me that they had sent me a parcel TERRIER.

>.
~
x

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1950



. SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE NINE

lo. #277 ,8 88 .
A Look Around Al The Races Peliaihttiglir ttn rs
PURINA 3
a PIGEON CHOW 8







_ON RACE DAYS at the Gar- “Bank me and break me, there is the man of the roll penny board
rison, many of the thousands nothing to lose.” One will win With an oil skin table cloth St an
keep up an apparent jolfity and cecasionally, but very seldom, and over the table. he all oy
matter-of-fact air but many bear meanwhile “Bank me and break roll a penny down a stick ew ‘it
a money-crazed face. Few seem me’s” heap of coins would be it goes on any of the Ge anes



an 1 in beim wee then, - at g¢ yh bigger and bigger bers which he has marked or TD. butor

id is monev t ot, big omeiimes you will meet a son S , ‘ in;

; 3 some of the squares on the cilskin hat y
money racegoer who had made a few he will give you the same amount pit jones hangs i si u “ee .

ane a ee ee ee ee en eee

Along with the fierce sun which Successive wins—goaded on, his of money as the number indicates
makes one sweat, there is a face showing that he was only But then few seldom roll on ;
medley of various types of gaming, looking for more wins, until he number. You will hear him sa .
shouts of vendors of biack pudding eventually moves off in despair— “roll again, roll again,” as_ he
and souse, a favourable delicacy his last penny gone. As he moves shakes his tin with his easily won
even on race days. off, “Bank me” may be seen to pennies. Pi dtioe

Whseun’ tess Alieneel, dal nudge his assistant and wipe away
leer Se ca ers get the sweat that had begun to run If you come across a woman

i ast ey take to smali down his cheeks when the thought Winning regularly or taking



betting It is to the spinning came to him that he migit be Chances all the time, a looker-on

es ot take their last “broken” indeed. m will wink knowingly at another

te ee ie x. moet = the and say “but she and he is in the 4

— = is pointing s ick as Roll a Penny do, man, that is only an entice.” Be uided
itices you with his call of Another “small gamble” man is Everybody does not think so, how-

ever, and after watching the win
ner with grudging admiration
they wil! bring out their lean
purses and take a try.

A penny is a lot of money to the
many little boys who scour the
Garrison and with their heads just
above the gaming boards, they
carry drawn faces as they wish
that at least two of all those pen-
nies were theirs

It is gambling day for all. Men
skilled in throwing the dice walk

around with their portable tables poe . i ae ene A att
and when théy patch tpld Of a A HAPPY crowd enjoy the races from the shelter of some of the trees which surround the Savannah. They



“greenhorn” who is eager to Win, ny tickets and got all the thrills of the day's fun, (A wise mother lets baby decide about
fingers they will fleece him. the milk for bottle feeds. Low of energy, steady
All Self gains, consemted days, peaceful nights — these tell her whet she most
wants to know — baby is doing splendidly on Ostermilk.

Few people pay any attention
to others. It is all “self. About
the only thing you will hear them
joining in is their agreement as
to the winner of a race. Among the
crowd, Holder seems to be the
favourite. But a race is only a
brief interlude from gaming.

On the sweepstake board on
which the winning numbers are
posted up, the people group, gaz-
ing forlornly. They seem to see
every other number but theirs.
You will see a man take g two-
shilling coin out of his pocket and
by the way he fingers it, you will
know it is his last, The shrugging
of his shoulders and rushing away
to buy a ticket is as much as to
say, “Well win or lose, here goes.”

Nearly all the men smoke. Some
cannot buy cigarettes, they are
“broke” but they beg one. In their
agitation to see if their last money
on a ticket may bring home a win,
they burn down half of a cigar-
ette in one long puff,

Why can mother pin her faith so important additions are made: jron
firmly on Ostermilk? Because, where to enrich the blood — sugar to modify
breast feeding is difficult or impossible the food for tiny digestions — Vitamin
it la the perfect substitute for mother’s D to help build strong bones and
prong oe nar din pido odbta teeth. Ostermilk is made by Glaxo
milk, dried under the most hygienic Laboratories Ltd., who, since 1908,
= The protein, great body- have been pioneers in the develop-
builds, is nait easily digestible ment of the best possible foods for
by @he voller drying process. And babies.

a= OSTERMILK...

For your free copy of illustrated Baby Book—Phone 4675

|
|
|

}





ee

HARRISON'S — Broad street

;
;
|
WE NOW HAVE IN STOCK |
:

=



~
)





THE GOVERNOR, preceded by Hon. J. D. Chandler walked around at Sellers cart hundreds and hun-

ee dreds of water coconuts on the
Garrison. As they are under the
direct rays of the sun all day, the
people welcome the water coco-
nut, Sellers are skilled in cutting
open the coconuts. With their

|
|
sharp knives, it takes but a merge fs ed a '
off.

A COMPLETE RANGE OF



twist of the wrist and the top is 4

So the day passes, a day of bet- s
ting and Wend. of eating are MR, MACINTOSH, the bugler is yet going strong. He has been blowing his bugle at the races for many

drinking, leaving despair on th:
faces of many and satisfaction i
the faces of but few.

long years.

On the right, is seen perhaps the only Ascot hat at the Races yesterday. It is worn by “Charlie”.

t) HUMBER

& "> — Cycle Parts.



THESE SPARES INCLUDE:
BACK STAYS ~ GEAR CASES
CONES and NUTS MUDGUARDS

CENTRE BEARINGS FREE WHEELS
WHEEL AXLES CROWN = RACES

BRAKE GUIDES ee ee
BRAKE TUBES

BALL BEARINGS REFLECTORS
CABLES CHAIN ADJUSTERS



|
|

3 CHAIN WHEELS and CRANKS



and Dozens of other Necessary Items.

It IT'S FOR A “HUMBER”—WE HAVE IT.





lak)

THE “Advocate’s” camera-man thought this lady’s outfit one of the SOME INDIAN LADIES, in their national dress were interested specta- wr mw. §. R. BOURNE right, is congratulated by Mr. K. D, “Tommy” ) HARRISON'S Agents for “HUMBERS”

most attractive at the Races yesterday, so he snapped her. tors at the races. Their picturesque dress attracted much attention. Edwards when his horse Rebate, scored its first win.
BROAD ST.
















































PECETES FSCS STO” !

Be a Master of NEW! imPROVED
ODEX SOAP

English
a et ee , © Gets skin really clean
sian sia rie. hearts hoe to f ~ o We eo Banishes perspiration odour

express yourself attractively and

Wrap them up now for Xmas



WOVEN POPLIN SHIRTS in Stripes with
Trubenised Coller attached. Sizes 14—17






how to avoid embarrassing errors © Leaves body sweet and dainty Each $4.60 & $4.43

Many dente: say that the Wt > ssa Aiea, , ET eT a cleansing latheethat | [ll “EM AG UPC/ Ee 8 Wt 6 cameron. Teub
saoduttte dae | GbaeRes . 108) ROE Odex makes a deep oy — pa With 2 separate “Trubenised Collars ic j
Regent Institute’s Postal Course m is mild and gentle for face, han match. Each . a ; $5.36

ideal for family use.
daily baths. isi Or y JACOB'S CREAM CRACKERS .°..........4... per Tin $1.36

WALL’S OXFORD SAUSAGES ............. _ yo» 60
WALL’S PORK SAUSAGES ...... 66.6505 seees te Ti

Effective English is the best in-
vestment they have ever made.



“BENCOLA” STRIPED PY/AMAS. Smart

WRITE FOR FREE BOOKLET



Send, today to The Regent Designs. Sizes 36 to 44. Suit. .......... $5.48 MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE ............. +++ bb, ove
Gate Londo, W,, 8. Breland, fr CHASE & SANBORN COFFEE ................ 1%, 1,62
free “copy of Word GRANT'S SCOTCH OATMEAL .............. 1 32
which gives full details of the LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS “ENDEAVOUR” STRIPED CAMBRIC GRANT'S SCOTCH OATMEAL ............. ; 1b is 64





Course.
” . Hemstitched with 34 inch hem PYJAMAS, Good designs. Sizes 38 HEINZ MUSHRO!
Jrite for this interestin, ° . . - * 4 | CRE ES ogc hee Fa Sheela ee Pr 41
et NO We There is no obligation EVERYBODY! , BOD iscduninccis, wavs aang to 44 ins, Each... $6.91 & $10.23 HEINZ CHICKEN SOUP ..........0...0055. a
a ail CARR’S CUMBERLAND CAKE .......... a
Ps yr HAND PAINTED TIES with special designs, Each $2.25 KEILLER’S DUNDEE CAKE ............+++- ” 2.12
Start your Xmas _ lai KARDOMAH TIPS TEA ...........--0+0: Ye te pkg: ~.89
JUST RECEIVED Shopping early TOOTAL TIES for Boys. Smart desgins and , CHOTER TIP TBA, «nests 90s ae oom
} iP 5 CHEEMBE 6 oc ccccees ..++ per bot. 2

Attractive Colourings. Each oo... un 62c. OC, & B. MARMALADE <5. cy .ccscievcosccucs 1®tin .32
we have KRAFT MACARONI CHEESE ..... ivi itte DAR Cee

HAND PAINTED TIES for Boys in very
Attractive Designs. Each oo....c.c:cccceescteeereieennes 90c.

THERMOS VACUUM
JARS

XMAS TREES, BELLS, STREAMERS |
TREE DECORATIONS (Lovely Assortment)
TINSEL, CORD TAGS |
|

|

|

|

Order the Finest

i





Wide Mouth
8 Pint & 2 Pint Rum ;
Also JACK FROST, BALLOONS.
REFILLS A varied Assortment COCKADE

for 8 Pint & 4 Pint



Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street

Xmas Wrapping Paper, Xmas Cards
Xmas Cards in Boxes
Xmas Cards (Local Views)

FINE RUM

STANSFELD, SCOTT & Co., Ltd.



CLA LLOI LOL LOLLOO LOLA LLL A

C. CARLTON BROWNE

Wholesste & Retail) Drugecist
136, Reebuck St. Dial 2813

SOSOSSOSSSENSESLESOUEZ*





j
i
}

PRPVPBLLLLLPBPPPPPPPLCPLLLESF GEESE
69S9SSS908%

SOROS





\



|
|
{


PAGE TEN

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



News From Britain
Hy David Temple Roberts

LONDON, Noy. 3. f
Winston Churchill pulled his building 300,000 houses a year—-/
ereatcoat about him and shiver- Labour is building 200,000. This |
ed, gstentatiously, on the Qppo- “impractical” Tory target has
itign Front Bench in the House been accepted by Churchill—who
of Commons this week. The po- has always
litical situation was warming up achieved the impossible. If the
but the complicated technical people want houses, they must
equipment for air-conditioning have houses. The Conservative |
the new House of Commons had Party is standing for this aspect |
broken down. Apparently, the of democracy; and Aneurin Bevan |
apparatus, which is said to re- the Labour house-builder is put)
move fitty toms of. hot air an in the position of saying, “You |
hour during debates, was suck- cannot have what you want.’
ing away the natural warmth of Curiosities In The Courts |
the glowing politicians. An old- Lord Peel has been fined}
fashioned draught blew around £25,000 for erecting without a
the Speaker’s Chair, past Win- building license, some real antique
ston Churchill and down the oak panelling in his Lancashire
frozen lines of M.P.’s. For fur- home. He was prosecuted for |
ther irritation Winston Churchill breaking a building order that
heard his resounding tones Jimits the amount we are allowed |
echoed back to him in a myriad to spend on house-improvements. |
whisper from innumerable “soft- An air-charter company was/|
speakers” toat the electrical fined £60 for breach of a regula- |
engineers had hidden around the tion that put the centre of gravity |
wood-work, The great Parlia~ of a Tudor aircraft outside the
mentarian was trying to modulate |jmits of safety. That afternoon, |
ris tones to the old conversational jast March, carrying eighty pas- |
level customary before Hitler’s sengers from a football match in|
bombs drove the Commons to, Dublin, the airliner crashed near |
refuge in the wide, high andfsCardiff. There were two survivors. |
echoing, red-leather decorated i was emphasised at the trial!
chamber of the House of Lords hat the incorrect loading of the
The next day the House was aircraft “had nothing to do with
warmer. Orders had gone forth. the crash on March 12”.
The new-fe acoustical gad- Returning to Lord Peel, the
gets on the-floor of the cham er wealthy Peer, with a taste for an-
had been switched off. But the tique panelling, in our highly
Press, in their gallery, continue taxed economy it is estimated that
to delight in Churchill’s under- paying his £25,000 fine will cost
tones which he never means to [ord Peel less than 12/6d, a week.
be heard but.get carried up, well fe can sell shares to that value to
amplified to’ the reporters. For pay his fine; he is a millionaire
the present: there is a conspiracy taxed at 97 per cent—so his actual

of silence—the comments are earnings on £25,000 of wealth are
pointed, sometimes ribald; “Han- ¢90 per annum,

card”, the “official report, is tact- G ,
; ao eorge Bernard Shaw
iully pretending not to hear. a": y thousands of words

Their Lordships, also feel un-,._ ya
comfortable now they are back int{Dave been written about Shaw



. 4, this week. There is very little
ee ke ig ang a to add. Yet I feel that there is
Chancellor the most: urbane 22¢ indirect impression missing.

a . . We have read memoirs of Shaw
member of the Government, sail 1 eminent men of letters—H. G.
he suffered real discomfort. The eee e
Lordships got used to speaking Wells, and a great dramatic critic.
; ps 5 ,, For these writers Bernard Shaw
quietly, now they cannot hear one titted Int Id before 1914 wit!
another, and the Chancellor can- Wohin | thie taatiaaites at aed
not hear who is speaking because . , . ay
a pneumatic pick ts reberberuting 1ubbed-shoulders. The great period
somewhere outside. This leads © Shavian brilliance and domina~-
. . tion of the stage was between 1890
to an acute constitutional prob.
: and 1920. Those who are of the
lem. Who should be sent to stop *
them making that noise? If it is _YOUnger generation”—indeed the
in front of the Woolsack, where Warp oF greece" ty really |
the Chancellor sits, then’ “Black come under haw’s influence— |
Rod,” the Lords’ own servant, cannot. remember the fabulous |
must call the workmen to order: ae Patt ick Campbell. For those
but if the foise fs from behind W ho were more than sixty years
the Woolsack then a deputation Pe Lag than Shaw he has always
must go to the Speaker of the een a venerable, aged myth, He}
House of Commons, and he will “28 never, quite, to be taken |
eventually send his Sergeant-at- Gouna setae fe Santee ne
_hy ch h oe 7 > recog
ie yen ie toe, er Ibsen, the understanding of Wag
So there is trouble in Parlia- "€¥, emancipation of women, an
ment the rise of socialism—had all hap
os pened before we became cor
The [ron Is Hot scious of Shaw. In fact his cause
The Conservative O; ition is were won—yet the old man live
= a sens re Party es paradoxes from h
as regaing confidence. The wild Irish mind, scintillating, cor
by-elections — parti tradicting himself, the biologis
last, at Oxford—look good. The the Fabians the Communists an
Labour ree euelaaire pro- anyone bes Souls wet nip hands o
gramme. this wint appears remember, schoo serious)
to indicate complete “loss of defending Shaw in a debate as th
nerve” in ,the face of steadily greatest figure living—I forge
gaining Conservative strength. who the rivals were, Shaw, for th:
Herbert Morrison, to placaté all. latter generation, meant principal
M,P.’s, has agreed that ‘Private ly some anarchistie aphorism
Members’ Bills” can be introduc- from ‘‘Man and Superman”, a fev
ed this i eer The Conservative remarks on communism-socialism
answer cunning stroke and a way of arguing to be founc
introducing a Bill—for freedom more in his Prefaces than hi:
and lower prices—in the House of Plays. In fact the Shaw distillec
Lords. Their majority of Peers to those sixty years his junior war
will carry it through and then a solely a stimulus for thinking, a
Private pn eae the sense of rebellion, an incentive to
young Peter orneycroft, will think what was out of the ordin-
ee ate t0 a ae it ary. We thought the plays them-
in the House. e elf is selves horribly talkative, and the
technical—designed to free part Intelligent Woman’s guide to
of the nationalised road transpor- Socialism was unreadable. No-
tation ‘industry—but it is a body, for fifty years, has bothered
shrewd stroke against the Gov- to ask, seriously, “What does Shaw
eee For eae "Ek aa ee think of it?” on any subject under
servative’s ‘a erence the sun. Everybody would know
seems to have given the Tories that Shaw could only think in
good heart. e Conference, spirals and contradictions— for all
ym ee ek got a bit po that, he was the great educator of
ween its teeth an jeman “Between the Wars”.





FEC.

: RIC
SEHOLD ELECT:
wae APPLIANCES











Bolling water in a few minutes —-this will
help you and this is whataG.E.C. Electric
Kettle will give you, Beautifully mace in
polished aluminium, it has a quick-pour-
ing spout. And it is safe—it can’t boil dry.

THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD.

BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS
REPRESENTING THE GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. LTD., OF ENGLAND



that Tories should stand fo |

undertaken and |



100 MILES ww’
at



Wants Adviser

(From Our Own Correspondent)

JAMAICA, Nov. 10

Steel Band Flop
(From Our Own Correspondent)

Proposals. have been made to the Secretary of State for the Thumping steel bands had con-
Colonies by the Jamaica Govern- siderably cooled down in the city
ment in consultation with the of St. John’s until last Saturday,
Comptroller of Development and when at least seven of them made
Welfare and Governments of their appearance prancing through
other British Caribbean colonies the streets to the Administrator’s
for the appointment of a West office with placards reading: “No
Indian Adviser to the U.K. dele- water so why more taxation”, “No

gation at the Torquay Conference. industry, no taxation; Give us

Proposals have been put forward industry then taxation”. They

which may affect Jamaica’s trade paraded past Goverment House

and the Government has therefore but the bum-bum did not attract
taken action along with other Gov- as large a mob as might have

ernments to secure more direct been anticipated, as people went

representation for the B.W.I, on with their own Saturday after-

than is at present afforded by "oon business. The show petered

U.K. delegation.

NEW EDUCATIONAL
SET UP IN JAMAICA

(From Our Own Correspondent)

JAMAIOA, Nov. 10
As from to-day the top educa-
tional administration of Jamaica
has been re-organised for exten-

ion and efficiency. The country’s ANTIGUA.
‘ducational affairs passed into the The chapel which was built by
ands of a new education author- «6 Americans for the use of the
ty set up to replace the Board armed forces at Coolidge Field
ft Education and the Jamaica has been purchased by the Angli-
chool Commission which looked pan. Diocese with all of its fur-
fler elementary and secondary nishings and fittings except for
ducation respectively, Chairman the organ, which was removed by
f the new authority is Minister (he military. It is called St.

out into hours of the usual scam-



,revalent when the Christmas
eason is approaching.

St. Michael's Antigua

(From Our Own Correspondent)

f Education Hon, J, A. MePher- Michael’s and has come into use
‘on, Vice-Chairman, the Director for the people of Barnes Hill
whose little church St. Augus-

if Education with 22 members.

NO LUNCH?

(From Our Own Correspondent)

‘JAMAICA, Nov. 10

Thousands of Kingston clerks
and shop assistants went without
lunch to-day as B.ILT.U. and U.C,
took joint action to close down city
restaurants over a wage increase
demand. The strike lasted from
ll am. to 4 pm. when it was
called off to await negotiations for
settlement on Monday morning in

tine’s and mission room were de
stroyed by the hurri



repaired so the

age are using St. Mi ’s also.



CHILD DROWNED

(From Our Own Correspondent). ..
ANTIGUA.

Five hundred P.N.P. unemployed four-year-old
workers marched on the main near Macaulay Bay last Sunday.

water laying project in Kingston Patrick ran to his mother and
western industrial area this morn- told her Eric had jumped into the
ecting to discrimination sea, The weeping mother got a
which gave B.1.T.U. men all jobs man to fish the child out. Arti-
As a result work ficial respiration was unsuccess-
was stopped and the project sus- ful. The father of the child, policed | ¢{
pended indefinitely pending a Gov- constable Hubert Jeffery, is at
present stationed in Montserrat.

ing “obj
on the proj

ernment inquiry.



5

Bes

4
%
Vv <
af
Kl
-

XR



Picture of a man about to enjoy
a new driving experience!

UPER-CUSHIONS—running on 24
Ibs. of air—do amazing things
for any car’s performance!

tear! With Super-Cushions there’s
less wear and tear, fewer repairs.















Whether your car is old or new,
Super-Cushions will make it a
better car! You'll get all these
wonderful improvements:

1, Softer, smoother ride— fewer
rattles! Bigger and softer, the
Super-Cushion absorbs all
| shocks and bumps!

| 2, Safer, easier car handling!
Super-Cushions grip the road bet-
ter! Stopping is easier, faster, safer.

| 3 Fewer rattles —less wear and

Super



.) GOODFYEAR

More people, the world over, ride on Goodyear tires than on any other make
City Garage Trading Co., Ltd

pering through the streets that is

cane, St
George’s has not yet had its roof
ie of that
arish and New Win’ ore Vil-

Three-year—old Eric Jeffery wag
a Labour Department Conference. drowned while playing with bis
brother Patrick

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1950



GIRLS! WOMEN:

try this if you’re

|| NERVOU

RESTLESS” ‘
CRANKY a
On ‘CERTAIN DAYS’
Of The Month—

Do female functional monthly
disturbances make you feel ner-
vous, fidgety, cranky and irri-
table, so tired and “dragged out”




opiates. It's made from eight of

—at such times? nature’s own precious roots and
Then do try Lydia E. Pink- herbs (plus Vitamin 5B). Pink-
| ham’s Vegetable Compound to ham's Compound ners warune!
| relieve such Pink- And that’s the kind of product
ham’s Compound is made espe- to buy! It is also a grand sio-
= cially for women. Taken regularly machic tonic.
® —it Belps build up resistance For free sample botile tear this

out and send with name and ad-
dress to Lydia E. Pinkham Medi-

about ‘s Compound is cine Company, 104 Cleveland
By that it contains no harmful Sireet, Lynn, Mass.

BOURJOIS lydia €. Pinkhane teesras

essence of Paris after dark |
v ui | A particularly fine thing
‘ Pinkham



G.B.i
FACE POWDER - ROUGE « LIPSTICK - TALC » COLD CREAM
VANISHING CREAM +: BRILLIANTINE: HAIR CREAM











ATTENTION !!
; FACTORY MANAGERS

Take this opportunity of obtaining your requirements in :—

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE
Ranging from 14 in. upwards

MILD STEEL
Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes

BOLTS & NUTS—AIl Sizes
FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill






















At PRICES that cannot be repeated.



|The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltd.

4

WHITE PARK ROAD, ST. MICHAEL '!
“DIAL 4528 "i
tt





‘The Most Attractive Styles for Ladies and Children at YOUR HOME REQUIRES. ..























Popular Prices. - ‘ ‘ : as
Ts garbage can, eavy gaivanised,
fos and Children—..... 60.0... 5 cee cee eeereeees a@ wash tub, buckets, a mincer or
LADIES and CHILDREN—A fine assortment to suit your a sink, drainboards, coal-stove,

face and Pocket.

HANDBAGS

A Style and match for all Ensembles

oil-stove or a kitchen knife now
doesn’t it? Come in, we have it!

lain Marshal Fabrics in many Shades.
Pp al
COMPARE OUR ASSORTMENT AND PRICES



A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

THE HOME FURNISHING DEPARTMENT
OF

Wm. FOGARTY LTD.

HAS EVERYTHING YOU NEED FOR
‘ YOUR DREAM HOME.

5555595595



+
.... but we have them *

Here are a few items of interest - - -

|



$ READY-MADE MOSQUITO NETS (Single & Double AGRICULTU R AL
Bed) @ $16.00 and $20.00 each respectively
S$ MOSQUITO NETTING—90, 100° & 108 inches wide— $$ FORKS
x @ $1.12, $1.49 and $1.64 per yd. respectively. 4
. een ;
18-INCH TERRY TOWELLING— .... @ .46c. per yd. DIAL |
| = Delightful :
Gee — 4235 or 4302 3
| Brighter “our Home with FURNISHING Hf. + 3
FABRICS of Enlivening Colour Schemes 3 |S :
| 3% THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM |
ab:
Now on Sale at 2 |S (Central Foundry Ltd., Proprietors)
: Win FOG ARTY LTD Corner of BROAD and TUDOR STREETS :
8 ° . Phone 4235 :

ELSSSSOSSSSSSOOSSS398SS SOSSOSSSSOSCSOSSSSSSSSSSSS9SS

s
“A
| Broo

wer

ee




a —-



SUNDAY, NOVEMBER

Puerto Rico

« « . The Lure Of Harlem
Draws Its Men Away

* By NEWELL ROGERS
NEW YORK.
THE firs: thing you need
know about President Truman's
would-be assassins is that they do
not speak and act for the Puerto
Rico people.



to

The two and a quarter million
People crowded on at lush,
tropical isle on the edge of the
Caribbean are no more represent-
ed by the gangsters than all the
Jews in Palestine were represent-
ed by the Stern Gang terrorists.

The core of the trouble is that
the Nationalists seek to end gov-
ernment of the island by America.

Pedro Albizu Campos, leader of
the Nationalist Party, has been
under police siege in his home in
San Juan for the past two days.

Albizu is a Harvard-educated
revolutionary who has served a
six years’ term in the Federal
Penitentiary, Atlanta, Georgia for
insurrectionary activity.

The would-be killers were
among the 1,000 Puerto Ricans a
month who leave their island home



Communists
On Trial

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico,
Nov. 11,
Two Communist leaders

and 140 Nationalists will
face trial in Puerto Rican
courts on charges arising
from the recent revolt here
against American rule, it was
reported to Reuter’s today.
Over 250 Nationalists and
Communists were arrested
after the unsuccessful rising
which broke out on October
30, and was followed on
November 1, by the assas-
sination atttempt by Puerto
Rican Nationalists on Presi-
dent Truman.
—Reuter.



for Harlem where half a million
Negroes live.

They pay airlines £28 each to
bring them, 60 and 80 to a plane.

Thousands of them go on the
dole and for all that they don’t
go back home.

Puerto Rico lies about 1,000
miles south-east of Florida. It is
about half the size of Wales. Pop-
ulation: Just over 2,000,000.

America took over the island
in her war with Spain in 1898.
She gave independence to Spain’s
other Caribbean colony, Cuba,
but kept the smaller Puerto Rico
as a colony. So the Puerto Ricans
became Americans.

This is why they can crowd
into New York without visas, dis-
regarding the immigration laws.

The U.S. keeps on trying to
make things better gor them in
their home island.

In 1900 Congress passed a law
to break up sugar haciendas into
500-acre peasant farms. But it
is a tough battle. Puerto Ricans
know almost nothing about grow-
ing any food except sugar.

Again and again Senate com-
missions of inquiry returned from
the island in despair. What the
Puerto Ricans like to eat is rice.
They disdain other easy growing
foods.



Said Senator Owen Brewster,
after returning from one investi-
gation: “The climate is admirable
for raising tomatoes, potatoes, and
pineapples. Fish is plentiful. But
it is difficult to wean people from
the diet in use for a century.”

But now revolution is a new

item on the menu. Already 26

*people have been killed since the

rioting started on Monday.
London Express Service.



WP
——

12,

1950

Jamaica Trying
To Attract
Industrialists

From Our Own Correspondent.)
KINGSTON, Jca. Nov. 7.
The Jamaica Government is
taking steps to make its appeal! to
industrialists more attractive. A
sub-Committee of the Executive
Council has been set up to speéd
the consideration of applications
under the Pioneer Industries (En-
couragement) Law, and to initi-
ate development proposals inde-
pendently. Consideration is now
being given to the setting up of
an Industrial Development Cor-
poration, and legislature is due
shortly to be placed before the
Legislature to increase the con-
cessions offered to new industries
in like with the Trinidad Indus-

tries ordinance.

Members of the sub-Commit-—
tee of the Executive Council are
the Financial Secretary, as Chair-
man, the two nominated members,
Sir Robert Barker, O.B.E., the
Hon, O. K, Henriques; and
three elected Ministers, the Hon.
W. A. Bustamante, Minister for
Communications, the Hon. Sir
Harold Allan, O.B.E., Minister for
Finance and General Purposes,
and the Hon. I. W. A. Barrant,
Minister for Agriculture, Lands
and Commerce.

Associated with them on the
committee are the Secretary for
Economic Development, the Com-
missioner.of Commerce and Indus-
tries and the Collector General.

The Government is now nego-
tiating with London for the rais-
ing of q £5,000,000 sterling loan
on the British Market, based on
the recent request of the British
Government to all the colonies of
the Cagibbean to furnish a fore-
cast of loan requirements for the
period 1952-56. The sum of
£5,000,000 is considered minimum
requirements for Jamaica.

This loan would be used in the
establishment of the Industrial
Development Corporation which
would promote schemes for the
expansion of agriculture and the
utilisation of products to make
Jamaica more independent of
imports and to increase the
island’s earnings from exports.
It would also give assistance to
industrialists or new industries by
way of loans; and would be used
for prosecuting schemes under the
10-year plan of development such
as irrigation, housing and land
conservation.

Spain Gives Books
To U.C.W.L.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, J’ca, Nov. 7,

A gift collection of books was
presented to the University Col-
lege of the West Indies last week-
end at a function held in the Lec-
ture Room of the Arts Faculty.
‘The gift was made by the Spanish
Government to the University and
‘was presented by Mr. David
Sabio, vice-Consul for Spain in
Jamaica, to Professor M. Sand-
mann, head of the Departmerif cf
Modern Languages at the Univers-
ity College.

Largely made through the initi-
ative of Dr. Xavier Salas, Direc-
tor of the Institute of Spain in
London, the gift was very wel-
come at the University College,
and in making the presentation,
Mr. Sabio said: “As vice-Consul
for Spain in Jamaica, I have this
great privilege to officially present
to-night at this function this col-
lection of books to the University.
I look upon this gift as a small
token of the interest my country
and the literary societies of Spain
have in this new University. They
wish yeour institution unlimited
success.”

Present at the function were
Mr. Philip Sherlock, vice-Princi-
pal of the University College and
Mr. Martin Carazo, Consul of
Costa Rica in Jamaica and Dean
of the Diplomatic Corps here.

$52,000 Is Not Enough
For Trinidad Railways

(From Our Own Correspondent.)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 5.

The Trinidad Government Rail-
ways Department has asked the
Government to increase its expen-
diture vote by $52,000 to meet the
cost of increased consumption of
gasoline and oil.

The Government has also been
asked to provide an additional
$25,000 to cover payinents to the
end of this year to meet police
gratuities, as the number of
members of the Force retiring
this year has exceeded expecta-
tions of the Police Department.





ne Rie es nt

Jockey Cuffed
Solicitor

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 9.

Twenty-nine-year old jockey
Emmanuel Lutchman of Boissiere
Village, Maraval, was ordered by
the City Magistrate to pay a fine
of $75, with an alternative of
three months’ imprisonment when
found guilty of. cuffing§ the
Assistant Crown Solicitor Mr
Neil Fitzwilliam. Mr. Fitzwilliam
told the Court that he went to
the Stirrup Cafe at Maraval one
day leaving his two year old son
in his car outside. While in the
cafe he saw Lutchman with his
head through the window of the
car while the child was backing
away. He called out and _ told
Lutchman to leave the child alone.
He was thén greeted with a flow
of abuse. As he got into the ca:
he received a cuff at the back of
his head by Lutchman.

Lutchman said he was accus-
tomed to playing with that baby
That night the baby waved to
him and while speaking to the
child Mr. Fitzwilliam came up
and chucked him and he chucked
him back, In convicting Lutch-
man the Magistrate said, “There
is too much of this sort of thing
going on—people interfering with
other people for no reason what-
ever”.



Boysie Singh's Son Among 6
Arrested In Pre-Dawn Raid
(From Our Own Correspondent.)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 5
Six people were arrested at a
hotel at 55, Queen Street, Port-
of-Spain when armed men ca”-
ried out a pre-dawn raid on
Saturday. Quantities of mari-
juana and liquor and_ alleged
stolen goods were found by the
Police. The six pérsons include
one woman, One of the men
Singh is the son of Boysie Singh
of the “Floating Corpse” case
which starts tomorrow in the
First Assize Court. (Boysie Singh
and five others were charged for
the murder of one Peyson early
in April). Entering the building
the policemen split up in groups
and entered the rooms before the
occupants could find out what it
was about. About 30 men and
women all nude or scantily
dressed, were found in the rooms.
In one of the rooms the detectives
found a radio in which was hid-
den a quantity of marijuana,
which comes under the dangerous
drugs list. In several parts of the
building,, liquor and_ kitchen
utensils alleged to have been
stolen were brought to light bv
the policemen.

Armed Police Will
Transport Prisoners

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 9,
Armed police are now being put
in charge of prisoners who are
being conveyed from the country
districts to Port-of-Spain. This,
it is believed follows two escapes
by prisoners on their way to
Port-of-Spain from rural districts
by rail. Latest escape was that of
Soogrim 19, who escaped from
police custody while being brought
from San Fernando to Port-of-
Spain.



SUNDAY



ADVOCATE

SOUTH AFRICAN

$1,000 IN
POPPIES

OVER $1,100 were collected
from the sale of poppies in the
Bridgetown and nearby areas. the
Advocate learnt yesterday. There
were not as many sellers as were
needed or possibly the returns
might have been greater. Figures
from the other areas of St. Mich-
ael and the remaining parishes
are not yet to hand.



Rice And Charcoal
Arrive

The schooner “Philip H. David-
son” arrived from British Guiana
yesterday bringing 1,750 bags of
rice for Barbados. The schooner
has also brought 600 bags of char-
coal, 29 tons of firewood, 100 wal-
laba posts and
heart,

The “Davidson” took five days
sailing from British Guiana. Skip-
per Sealy told the “Advocate” yes-
terday that he encountered quite
a lot of calm weather on the trip
up. '



Barclays Bank

(DOMINION, COLONIAL AND
OVERSEAS) ‘

BARBADOS, B.W.L
RATES OF EXCHANGE

COUNTER RATES
lith November, 1950



pieces of green-

LONDON
Selling Buying
4.8125 90 Days Sight4,7225
4.8175 0 ov oe 4.7375
1.8225 16/20 ,, vo» 4.7550
: 4/15 4, — w 4.7625
1/3 » » 477
SiMtin, M4o,) Sight 4.7750 ¥
(Min, .) Sigh ‘
, (Min. 2/-)
4.8240
(Min, $1.) Cable 4.7790
Coupons 4.70
4.8240 ‘ (Min 1/-)
(Min, 12c.) Bank of Eng-
land Notes 4.76
NEW YORK
724/10% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 70 6/10% pr.
Sight or de-
mand Drafts 70 4/10% pr.
72 4/10% pr, Cable
71% pr. Currency 69% pr.
Coupons 68 4/10% pr.
50% pr. Silver 20% pr.
CANADA
66% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 68: 8/10°5 pr.
Demand
Drafts 63.05% pr.
Sight Drafts 63 5/109 pr.
66° pr. Cable
64 5/10% pr. Currency 62 3/10% pr
Coupons 61 6/10% pr.
50% pr. Silver 20% pr.
INTER-COLONIAL
Va% pr. Demand Ya% disc,
(Min, 25¢,) (Min, 25¢.)
44% pr. Cable
(Min. 50c.)
Soupons 1%4% dise,
(Min, 25¢e.)
BAHAMAS
482.50 Demand 477,50
Cable
JAMAICA
461 1/4 Dernand 477%
(Min. 25¢.) (Min, 25¢e.)
481 1/4
(Min, 50¢.) Cable ob G
BERMUDA
Notes $4.56 or 19/-
to £1
BOLIVARES
48 Voc.

The above Rates are subject to change
without notice.





from Head and Chest Colds,

* Catareh, Bronchitis, Influenza,
Sore Throat, Neuritis, Neuralgia,
Toothache, Rheumatism,
Sciatica, Muscular Pains and Strains,
Bruises, Insect Bites, and other Aches and
Pains, rub in Thermogene Medicated Rub —
so soothing, healing and relieving !

Lumbago,

Try it!

‘You will say It ts a real blessing! ~

THERMOGENE:



MEDICATED RUB

In Jars and Tins

In Every Packet &























THERE’S PAIN RELIEF
AND TONIC BENEFIT

Yes !— Yeast - Vite
quickly soothts away
headaches, neuralgia,
nerve and rheumatic
pains — but it does
something else too !
| Because of its valu-
able tonic properties
Yeast-Vite helps you
to feel brighter, look
better, sleep more
easily and enjoy more
energy. Next time
you want pain relief
take Yeast-Vite and
get tonic benefit roo!

Coe

BPN basing on aN

eri}

INSTITUTE

FOR TEACHING TH
COLOURED PEOPLES THE BLESSINGS
OF UNCWV1LI ZATION

Fountain Plays
To-Day

WHEN the fountain in Trafal-
gar Square goes into operation
today, it will be the second time
that it has played since Remem-
prance Day last year which was
celebrated on November 6. It

layed too the week before, on

ovember | when His Excellency
the Governor, Mr. Savage arrived
in Barbados,

Some people got an unexpected
wetting on that occasion. They
were sitting comfartably on the
sides of the fountain when it was
put into operation suddenly.

OBITUARY
ERNEST ALFRED HUMPHREY

There was laid to rest on Sun-
day last ,at Mount 9 Tabor
Moravian Church, St. John in
the presence of a large gathering
cf relatives, friends and members
of the church, the last mortal
remains of E, A. Humphrey at
the age of 82 years. The de-
ceased, from early life was a
staunch member of the Moravian
Church and his devotion to that
religion set an example for many
of the younger members of the
church, He started life as a
shoemaker and by dint of hard
work and thrift rose to the top
rank of his trade,



*
Scouts Enjoy
* : .
Holiday Hike

Members of the
(Cathedral) Troop, thoroughly
eajoyed themselves when they
went on a hike on Thursday last,
9th November, under their
SM.,. Mr, S. E. Knight

rhis was their first hike since
the revival of the Group, and
it was eagerly anticipated,

Wing been postponed since
June last.

Do You Sing?

A Scout smiles and
under all difficulties.”
Eighth Scout Law
there is a difficulty
at which we may smile, but
peither smiling nor whistling
would hep except in appre-
sension, This difficulty is dis-
covered at the campfire of sing-
ong when so very few troops
can take part in the singing—
and don’t forget, campfires and
sing-songs are just as much a
art of your scout training as
notting and first-aid,

In an effort to remedy this, the
DC. wishes to meet all P.L’s and
Snior Scouts of the South
Western District .on Monday,
20t, November at Headquarters,
Peckles Road, between the hours

445 and 5.45 p.m. to teach
them and practise new Campfire
songs,

We know you are interested in
this part of your training, so please
make every effort to attend.

Remembrance Day |

Today like and with others,
we remember those who, through
lcyalty to their King and Coun-
try, laid down their lives.
aong them were many Scouts,

nd to them we dedicate these |

3rd Barbados

whistles
So the
teaches, but

‘nowadays’

few lines poor though they be,|
written by a fellow Scout. |
Vith mingled thoughts of joy and /

pain,
We think today |
©. those who for their Flag was slain |
in set affray









Through them the frantic foe was
erush'd

Not soon to rise;

‘That deafening roar, through them
is hush'd

From out the skies,

Gh! can we eer forget those men

Who gave their lives’
Homage let us pay to them,
Great sacrifice!
Through them the foe was vanquished,
Give them the praise,
\nd those who lve in anguish
The rest of their days.

Let us offer {hanks to God
Who gave the power
To those who broke the tyrants’ rod
In victory’s hour,
Cc. A. WORRELL

Planter" Comes Tomorrow

_ THE Harrison Liner “Planter”
is seheduled to arrive in port
sometime on Monday evening.

Some 40 West Indian seamen who
were selected at the local Harbour
and Shipping Department a week
ago are expected to join the
“Planter’. The 40 seamen are

ratings who will be transferred to
another ship.

ZV Sa OE ee



INDIGESTION?

Try just

ONE
DOSE

Of This=a>
Just one dose of
MACLEAN BRAND
STOMACH POWDER
relieves Flatulence
Heartburn, Nausca
Stomach Pains due to
i Prove it

POWDER

STOMACH
with the signature
Geto Aguatee—

‘in
dr
ha



MITCHAM LAVENDER:

LAVENDER WATER
TALCUM POWDER
TOILET SOAP
SHAVING SOAP
BRILLIANTINE
FROZEN BRILLIANTINE
AFTER-SHAVE LOTION

On Sale at BOOKER’S




3 Sati lhe
et rahe
Powder

Beauty, you lifted
up my sleeping eyes, 6

And filled my heart

with longing with a look.’’
JOHN MASEFIFLD

Like a happy memory, the haunting
fragrance of Mitcham Lavender brings
the English countryside to Barbados
‘a Originally made by Potter & Moore

their Mitcham Distillery two hun-
ed years ago, Mitcham Lavender
s ever since been dedicated to

Beauty the World over. ‘

So



B’DOS DEUG STORES

PAGE ELEVEN



Fh ad
FLASTOPLAST-/CiTY

you want im

ete

Se

ler tee,

Elastoplast-icity isthe ~

natural comfortable way Elastoplast
dressings stretch with every skin
movement. They mould firmly to
awkward places and enable you to
carry on whilst the wound heals
Variety of sizes in every tin.

Elastoplast
FIRST —_ eee








Onty one soap
N gives your

YA skin this exciting
Vv Bo
ef uquet

And=

other leading toilet soaps!
Proved by severest tests

BHIDGETOWN ...



= therefore -

KEEP IT CLEAN

START TO-DAY
JOIN THE

COMPETITION

Do you want a

CLEANER
BRIDGETOWN ?

2. The Advocate invites your suggestions in not more
than 200 words.

—— Se

_

a
—————=

3. The best suggestion to be received not r#ter than
December Ist, will receive $25.00.

4. A panel of three judges to be announced later will
decide the winning entry.

a

Enclose attached Coupon with each entry. '

C. B.C.

Barbados Advocate, Bridgetown.





eee




~ 24 ac, 1SLSloire1re)
> “one “vem TBC

PAGE TWELVE

Television
Could Kill
Boxing

NEW YORK,

Abe J. Greene complains that
television could kill off boxing
within five years and something
should be done about it,

Truth of the matter is that box-
ing is killing boxing and fans
who are shunning the arenas
now in favour of theit video sets,
may soon even go so far as a
television “strike.” That is, they
may dial out the fistic monstros-

Young Barbadians
In Golf Finals Today

THE final battle for the C. F
Hartison Cup at Rockley Golf and
Country Club this afternoon wil!
bring together two combinations
that should provide a test of
youth and experience: On one
side in the foursome play will be
the veteran golfers, R. P. Good-
ing and J. K. K. Christie, whose

combined handicaps total only
ten. On the other will be the
young Barbadian team of
William Atkinson and David

Inniss, rated at ten each.

Gooding and Christie played
their way into the cup final by

beating James O’Neal and Rich-
ards Vidmer, 2 up, while Atkin-

ities offered by the boxing game, 50n and Inniss beat ate#her Bar-

in favour of a good, old fashioned
hoss opry or such.

Boxing, as it’s constituted to-
day, is a poor show, It packs
punch neither in the flesh nor in
the comforts of one’s armchair.
The fight game is getting boring
to the public and isn’t going ove)
for the same reason Broadw
shows fail,

No Talent

There’s a lack of talent and the
script is oh so stale.

How else can you explain a
fight coming off next month be-
tween out-dated Joe Louis and
Cesar Brion, a worthy club
fighter at best, from the Argen-
tine?

Louis should be out of the
game. His fight with Ezzird
Charles clearly showed that the
once-invincible bomber has |ost
what he once had in abundance.
People will forget his greatness
if he continues,

a?

Instead, they may remem er
some day that Joe ended up
walking on his heels, a miserable
fate for one of the greatest
heavy-weight kings of all time.

Yet, Greéiie,
missioner of
Association, blames boxing’s fail-
ures on television, It's not tt'r-
vision, Mr. Greene.

“It is fights featuring an old
man like Louis, fight fans do '
not want to see and certainiy
won't pay to see,

Dull Fight

Brion warmed up for his chore
against Louis by decisioning one
Keene Simmons in Baltimore the
other night. It was a dull fight.
The young Argentinian, for all
his merits, must be classed as 2
“dull” fighter.

The question as to whether he
can beat Louis or not isn’t im-
portant, It promises to be a
lousy fight.

Then we have Ezzard Charles,

“heavyweight champ of all the
world, who says he will be a
“fighting champ.”

So the first defence of his title
turns out to be agdinst Nick
Barone, a refugee from the light-
heavy ranks.
ice
The “rematc! ean always
stay in usiness. They can
match Récky Graziano against
Tony Jafiro a few more dozen
times or don’t forget Willie Pep
and featherweight champion San-
dy Saddler.

They’ve got a fourth one com-
ing up. But I doubt it if many
fans want to boast about having
seen the famous “Ten Pep-
Saddler” brawls.

The one series of rematches
that should come off is the sixth
Jake Lamotta-Ray Robinsoa
fight. In this ohe we wotild
probably get the true middle-
weight king. All Ray gets from
Jake are promises.

Ray beats everybody in this
country so now the sugar man is

r to be going to Paris ‘o
eps the Frenchman Milton
tock. —(I.N.S.)















Materials from .....

Silk Linens: Printed
Designs ............

Taffetas: 4 Shades
Satins

Spun Silks: ......
Cotton Prints .........

Beautiful Shades Plain Silk

480 pairs Ballerina-pumps

badian pair, Eric Atkinson and
Colin Bayley, after three extra
holes.
matches turned toward the end
O’Neal afd Vidmer, after being
two down at the turn, played the
next six holes one under par anc
took the lead with a birdie at the
fifth. It appeared as though they

Both of these semi-final

vould be two up with three to go

when O'Neal hit the sixth green

ticely, while Gooding hooked into

the deep rough at the left.

But there the big break came

Christie scrambled a shot onto the

edge of the green, Gooding just
missed a sixteen-foot putt, leav-
ing the ball hanging on the liv
of the cup, and Vidmers putt for
a birdie ran nine inches past the
hole, leaving O’Neal with a quar-
ter stymie to negotiate to win. He
slipped the ball in the cup, but in
doing so knocked his opponents’
in with it so the hole was halved.
Gooding and Christie, taking full
advantage of this good break,
exploited their position and won
the next three holes to win the
match.

Will Atkinson and Inniss had
even a tougher uphill battle for
they were four down with four
holes to play. The situation
seemed hopeless as Eric Afkinson
and Bayley needed only to get a
half on any of the remaining
holes to wim the match. But Will
Atkinson and Inniss won them ail
and then took the decision in

pithree extra holes.



Gordon Richards Rides
200th Win For Season

SUSSEX, Nov. 11.

Gordon Richards, Britain’s
champion jockey, rode his two
hundredth win of the season here
today when he won the £500
Southern Counties Handicap
over seven furlongs, on Mr, J. V.
Rank’s Celebrate.

This 1s the tenth occasion on
which he has ridden 200 or more
winners in a single season. He
rode his first winner in 1921.
Richards has broken neatly all
of Fred Archer's records and to-
day equalled Archer's feat of
ridirig 200 or more winners for
the fifth consecutive season.

Reuter.

“It's just the opposite

to a prison ... easier to
get out than to get in.”



59$95$$SS69S9069S99S99

These Prices Cannot B

Repeated

.+. $1.12 yd.
-» $1.19 yd. 4

Ladies’ Cotton Vests, 2 for ..

Cotton Panties, 2 for..

Rayon Panties, 2 pairs 1.20

Silk Panties, per pair...

Nylons Stockings, per pair... .
FOR GENTS

Pin Stripe Tweeds $2.88 & “a

-.. $ .99 yd. se
5 62 yd. on
$1.34 pr.

84 yd.
55 yd.



MODEL STORE— DIAL 3131

Corner Broad and Tudor Streets.

Bed-Spreads very large

Record Field
Expected

For Manchester Handicap
By VERNON MORGAN

LONDON, Nov. 12.
The 1950 flat, racing season ends
on Saturday. On the closing day,
there will as usual be the Man-
chester November Handicap, one
of the principal handicaps of the
season

This race, run over the Castle
Irwell track on the outskirts of the
busy northern city over a distance
of one and a half miles is likely
to attract a record field this year,

The final acceptors numbered
47, and though a few may drop
out it seems probable that the
field will equal or beat the previ-
ous highest number of 42, which
went to the post in 1931.

The size of the field makes little
difference to the great difficulty
of the owners in winning this
prize, lt being the last chance of
so many to earn their “winter
corn”, thére are any number of
runners who might be described
as “trying for their life,’ whicn
is perhaps better put, as racing to
land the wagers of their connec-
tions.

But only one can win and only
three can place, so some substan-
tial sums of money go into the
pockets of the bookmakers.

The value of the racing is not
large as something over £2,000
goes to the winner.

It is the side bets on the race
which make it so well worth
winning. And yet few really big
gambles have been successfully
accomplished in this race. One
reason for this is because there
is no knowing under what condi-
tions the race will be run. It is
odds on it being very muddy and
probably very misty, (indeed fog
has caused the race to be abar-~-
doned on more than one occasion) .
Nothing upsets form so much as
thick mud, Then again though it
is the end of the season, and all
forms should have been fully ex-
posed there are always several
runners in the race, who find
something extra in this’ final race.

Owners and trainers therefore,
while they may have a tilt at the
ring, do not as a rule lay down the
money in quite the same way as
they do over the Cambridgeshire
and other big nears

Yet there are exceptions. When
North Drift won the race in 1931
from a record field, he brought off
a tremendous coup for his con. It
was said at the time, that his pit-
boy owner, a bookmaker, won
something like £50,000 over the
horse’s victory.

It is generally not a race for the
top wolghts. It is like most handi-
caps extremely difficult for the
punter to find the winner in sev-
eral attempts.

U.C.W.I iN RUGBY

cmos Mal Nov. 7.

ea,
Rugby returned to Jamai-

ca on y afternoon
when the University Col-

Th
team defeated the soldiers
G8.

Willie Shoemaker
Breaks Winning Record

INGLEWOOD, California,

Nov, 11.

The United States record for
riding the most winners in one
season, was broken yesterday by
Willie Shoemaker, Jockey Shoe-
maker won two races at Holly-
wood Park Racecourse, to bring
his total 6f winners for the year
to 321. Previous record of 319
was made by Yorkshire-born
Johnny Longden in the 1948
season ,—Reuter. '

$7.98 each
.. $1.00
1.00

79
1.58

o®





SUNDAY ADVOCATE

France Producing
“Best Weapens”’

MONTREAL, Nov. 10.

Jules Vioch, Freneh Defence
Minister said here ‘hat his coun-
try Was produting the world’s
best Weapons in some fields,

In Montreal to inspect defencs

industries, Moch said yesterday
that he doubted if arms stand-
ardisation would ever be
achieved among Nort Atlantic
Pact eountries.

He suggested that France might
be prepared to supply Canada

with new and superior types of
artillery in exchange for Cana-
da’s all-weather jet fighter
CF-100 if further tests were
satisfactory.

Franee, he said in an interview
was already producing:

i. A jeep which French ex
perts eonsidered better than mos‘
improved United States’ model.

2. A light tank which will be
lighter than anything comparable
preduced anywhere.

3. A gun which Moch de-
scribed only as the “best in the
world”. Its details were secret,

4. A bazooka which he de-
scribed better than American-
produced bazookas.

5. A 50-ton tank “unmatched
anywhere” and reported to carry
120 mm. cannon.—(Reuter. )



U.S. Will Not
Intervene In Tibet

CAILUTTA, Nov, 11.

The United States Ambassador
to India Loy Henderson, told
pressmen here to-day that
America did not intend to inter-
vene in Tibet and considered
the issue as “one entirely for Tibet
and China to decide.’

Henderson said. “Recognition
of China’s suzerainty over Tibet
has been a historic policy of the
United States.”

Referring to the situation in
Nepal, Henderson said that the
issue was primarily India’s prob-
lem.

“We don’t like to com
by any premature
ours,” he added

He said he was studying the
situation in Nepal.

He dénied that Nepal had ap-
pealed for American help or that
ae arms had been supplied to
er.

— (Reuter)

cate it
action of

—

pot The |

Winners
By Jon Hope

In the book business the pace
quickens. Onee again in view is
that most luctative of all objec-
tives—the gift season sales,

There is speculation on which
author will top this year’s gales.
In the non-fiction class I <
James Boswell (1740-95). H
vecently discovered London Jour=
nal should thrust him well in
ront,

Runners-up— Ceeik Woodham-
Smith, with her Florence Night-
ingale biography; Sir Osbert Sit-
well, with his final vohime of
self-revelation, Noble Essenées;
Laurence Earl, with Yangtge In-
cident. :

And the story tellers?
banking en a si
Sir Duff Coope:
Break).

Heresy ( Wall); Neil Paterson
(Behold Thy Daughterj; John
Galsworthy (with the illustrated

who last week gave up his job
as House of Commons librarien,
calls “it ‘The ‘sleeping Bacch
ca us,
Out Youre: Saunders is spen:i-
ing the winter in France.

Self-imposed chore that has
lasted three years comes to an e1d
next week with publication of
Victory Cavalcade, a compre-
hensive What, Whete, When of
World War II.

Book has been compiled by
Joseph Fenston, who took time off
from theatrical and musical
impresario duties to do it. This
is his first venture into authorship,
But he seems to have ventured
most other places—from selling
jewels in China to exporting
oranges from Brazil.

World Copyright ae

Helicopter Lands On Steps

Of St. Peter’s Basilica
VATICAN CITY, Nov. 11.

For the first time in history a
helicopter landed on the steps of
St. Peter’s Basilica today amidst
crowds of pilgrims. It bore a mes-
sage of homage and devotion to
the Pope from the families of
Italian pilots who lost their lives
in the last war.

Inside the Basilica the Pope was
granting a mass audience to
20, from many parts
of the world.—Reuter_

Write Direct or Airmail for Fatherly Advice—Free

Start training for it NOW!

There is still room at the top for the fully qualified
man who Is fitted for the job, YOU can be that
man—successfal, prosperous, with your future
assured—by studying at horne in your spare time,
geifes by the personal tuition of The Bennait

liege.

Distance makes no difference.

WE WILL HELP YOU TO
ACHIEVE YOUR AMBITION

Get your feet on the ladder of suecess TO-DAY.
Write to The Bennett College and learn how
thousands of people just like you have reached

the top with the right

uidance. A well-paid

job can be yours—atart this pleasant spare-time
study NOW.

Direct

os* ¢



Just Received ....
CIGARETTE LIGHTERS
CIGARETTE HOLDERS

BALL POINT PENS.

TORCHLIGHTS-BATTERIES & BULBS

COSMOPOLITAN PI



Mail to DEPT. 188

HARMACY. ;

J



BARBADOS BOYS’ CLUBS



YOU CAN STILL WIN A

CAR ~*~
FOR

$ 1.00

Tickets on sale

;
at Fire Station

Coleridge Street

CLOSING DATE

DRAW

25th Nov.

30th Nev.



































~ sWONDER WHEELS N°7



SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12TH, 1950

“Ce
PP ay
cy a% a
- } 2 '
WY,
1 9
ey
Fd
if



... cfeated to keep you

cool and elegant all through the day

YARDLE Y0724 LAVENDER

and ‘the luxury soap of the world?

also perfumed with the famous Yardley Lavender
Bath Salts : Dusting Powder -

oe

Tale - and othér toilet requisites

YARDLEY: 33 OLD BOND STREET: LONDON







IN A PERFECT 4 COMBINATION

All the world knows that Good stout is a gi‘eat
health builder. All the world Knows’that Oysters
have been eaten since Roman times for their



STOCKISTS
Sr Re run & Co., Ltd., & Co., Ltd.,
Ss. E. & Co., Ltd REDMAN,
D, V. SCOTT & Co., Lid., 7s Ye Co., Ltd.
SAMUEL GIBBS, CONNELL & Go., itd
GYETENS, CRONEY & Co., 1itd., C.D. ROGERS,
B. A. DANIEL & See nae ‘

Co.
L. J. WHLIAMS MARKETING Co. Ltd —Sole Agents







All the best features
are found in the

Hercules cycrez

BONDERIZED
STEEL PREVENTS





COMFORTABLE





HIGH LUSTRE
CHROME PLATING

> FOR
BEAUTIFUL FINISH

SADDLE






SUPER FITTINGS
SUCH AS
S-OPtEO HUB







THE HERCULES CYCLE & MOTOR COMPANY LTD,
BIRMINGHAM ENCLAND. ‘



The Finest Bicycle Cult ay

REPRESENTATIVES :
T. GEDDES GRANT LTD., BRIDGETOWN





|
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1930 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN












THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER






























HIS NAME IS TONTO, DOC. J
HE'S A FRIEND!











YOU THINK WE
CAN GET THE MASKED MAN AND
THE INDIAN AS WELL A

S SOONAS THE
MAN COMES TO

DOC'S OFFICE!
) =

C FBLUER COME SOON
1S. COMFORTABLE) TRY TO KILL-UM/



MESA KID?



EE ANY KILLERS TRY
KID WHILE ms
7

THE GAMBOL

fr 4
GEORGE #) f YO te =.









w Ue CAVE
Fete One
* ‘‘Caterpillar’’ fuel-filtering method |
assures positive protection of the vital |
heart-parts...the fuel injection pumps

and valves... by preventing the pass- |
age of harmful dust or grit. Filtering

elements are of high quality, wound-



type absorbent material. These filters
are centrally located...readily access-
ible...easily replaced.

Visit us the next time you're near our
store. We'll be glad to show you the
many other advantages of owning
“Caterpillar'’ Diesel power.

ELECTRIC SALES &
SERVICE LIMITED

Tweedside Rd—St. Michael—Phone 4629 4371





BY ALEX RAYMOND

VYes...TM BUSY W NG) 00










SOSSSSSOSS SSO COPPELL LLL OEF

DRINK JEFFREY’S LAGER
BEER AND MILK STOUT

JEFFREYS OFFER TWELVE ATTRACTIVE PRICES
IN THE SECOND COMPETITION




































% r (1) A return ticket to Trinidad by 'Plane with three days’ Hotel accommodation at $7.00 per day and
¥ entertainment to Lunch by JEFFREY’S ‘Trinidad Agent.
Na We ik ate one Neale ; (2) One (1) New Raleigh Three-Speed Bicycle—Gent's Model.

(3) One (1) New Raleigh Bicycle—Lady’s Model.

(4) One (1) New Raleigh Bicycle—Boy’s Model.

(5) One (1) New Raleigh Bicycle—Girl’s Model,

(6) One (1) Case GROUSE Whisky — containing 12 bottles.

(7) One (1) Box ‘FOUR COWS’ Condensed Milk—containing 48 x 14 oz. tins.

(8) One (1) Box ‘SELECT’ Brand Powdered Milk—containing 24 x 1 Ib tins,

(9) Two (2) Tickets at Globe Theatre covering FREE admittance for one year,

(10) Four (4) Cartons JEFFREY’S Beer—containing 24 bottles each, ‘
(11) Four (4) Cartons JEFFREY’S Stout—containing 24 bottles each,

(12) Two (2) Boxes JEFFREY’S Double Scotch Ale and Two (2) Boxes JEFFREY’S Strong Ale.

NOTE:—The dealer, shopkeeper or crocer who sold BEER or STOUT to the winner of the First Prise shall be given Two (2) eases of
JEFFREY'’S BEER and Two (%) cases of JEFFREY’S STOUT FREE, The winner will decide to whom this gift is to 60.

The conditions on which Prizes are to be awarded are as follows :—

For every SIX (6) JEFFREY’S BEER and/or STOUT CAPS produced to the Agents, Messrs, 8. P.
Musson, Son & Co., Ltd., Broad Street, a numbered receipt will be given, the counter part of which will be
retained and placed in a Sealed Box in your presence. . ‘ i | i fe ld .
oo awa

On Friday, 29th December, 1950, the Seal of the Box will be broken in the presence of parties con-
cerned and twenty-four numbers will be withdrawn from the Box at random, This will be done only for
the purpose of elimination. ee eG Mews pee semi aime dm Jedd Va, w

MASH OPP Oro EMHSses Gar ce
. The holders of these twenty-four numbers will be notified and must come to Messrs. 8. P. Musson, Son
& Co.’s Office at 2.00 p.m. on Wednesday of the following week and exercise their skill in judging the weight of

containers filled with JEFFREY’S Caps, PEM) IND ile 1 de de ee,





















Wai The First Prize will be awarded to the person (one of the twenty-four) estimating the exact weight to
Mi Waly oo ee a eee Oe DEVIL? ' the nearest ounce of containers with Caps or the nearest weight thereto. The other Eleven Prizes will be

AD? WHAT IE THAT WHITE Ce wa Ut GETS UNDER WAY. awarded in their respective numerical orders and in the same way.

EAD? WHAT IF THA) * * 4












g BRAIN ¥

THE BEERS OF QUALITY ‘= ‘+ “: | +: ON SALE EVERYWHERE

JEFFREY’S ~

COP’D COME ABOARD~+}
AND LOOKED AROUND ?



SAVE
YOUR
CAPS









ene









ree tee en hae algerintt f
cova tae Wis FOATUE STON ATE tne WORLD ELT) ELS Svs y Sipepemmmnen se ear eraiee : gh | COMPENTIO “ ; AND
g Oe E Boging Secender f
; 5 7 we :

THE INNOCENT CAUSE OF IT « THE 1S PAPERS. CLEARED THE ‘CONME
STOLEN WHITE MONKEY~~/8 ABOARD | | Mt" MOVES OUT WITH THE TIDE ~~

SOMEBODY SLUGGED ME. WHAT.
HAPPENED TO DEVIL? 1 VE
GOT TO REACH THAT GHIP+~
AND GET THE WHITE
MONKEY = UU MY pes
HEAD.



WIN
SOME
OF
THESE
PRIZES

THE ANIMAL TRAPPERS’ FREIGHTER,
THE ‘CONNIE M*. o
Se 7 .*



THIS 1S YOUR LAST PASSAGE THRU
LLONGOLAND# IN THREE oe
OUR BORDERS CLOSE :
TOALL STRANGERS! (

i Wi





GS 9S 999999999 G99 F999 FF 999999 F669 99 999059999956 9965660139

e
as
$
¢é
at
&
e
eo
g
$
+
oe
%
%
e
$
Â¥
rs]
$
¢
$
t
;
4

f : }


PAGE FOURTEEN





CLASSIFIED ADS. rs" “=|

TELEPHONE 2508



DIED
HUTSON CARRIE, Belleville, died
Saturday morning and was buried at

afternoon at













430 p.m, on the same
the Westbury Cemetery







Kate and «Edith Hutson
12.13.50—in
oo
THANK
WE the undersigned beg through this
medium to thank al! those kind friends
who sent wreaths, cards and letters
and sympathised with us in our recent
bereavement caused by the death of
ERNEST HUMPHREY.
Mrs. Kathrin Humphrey . Galvin
Humphrey. Doreen Alleyne
12.11,50.—4n,
The family of EDWI FITZGERALD
INGRAM late of Cheapside, gratefully

return thanks to all who assisted during
his illness and with deepest apprecia-
tion thank all who attended the funeral,
gent wreaths, letters of sympathy or
in any other way condoled with them
in their bereavement.

Lilian Ingram (widow). Mr. and
Mrs. Seibert Ingram (son-in-law and
daughter), Dolly, Muriel: Jean: Joyce:
Pamela: Kenneth Arthur: Frank,
{chifdren). Donald and Charlotte (bro-
ther and Sister) 12.11,.50—In,

IN MEMORIAM

—_
IN ever loving memory of my dear
beloved Husband TIMOTHY CALJ.EIN-
DER who died 12th of November 1943
“Days of Sadness still come oer me,
Secret tears still freely flow.
You are os fresh in memory, Dad’s
Dear
As seven years on this shote below.”
Ever to be remembered by Carnetta
Callender (wife) Edna (daughter
12.19, 56—1n







ever loving memory ot our be-

loved one GLORIA who fell asieep on
13th November 1949

The shock was great the slow Fevere

We never thought her death wis near
Only those who love can tell

The pain of parting without farewell
The Lord who giveth has taken away
But we'll meet on those bright shores
To part no more

Winifred Small (mother) Anthony
(son) Ira Jackson and Prlgn Basra
(sisters); Alan Boyle (uncle) Smal
(grand mother) Peter (nephew)
Hassell (brother-in-law) Joan,

elma (nieces).

oe 12.11.50—1n





of our Dear be-
who

1936.

you

IN loving memory
loved mother ALICE BOURNE
departed this life on 12 November,

Fourteen years ago Alice Dear

left us

Faithful and honest in all your ways

Devoted and true to the end of your

days,

Always patient, loving and kind.

What a beautiful menmozy you've left

behind

Your loving smile, your gentle face
No ore an ti) your vacant place,
Sleep on dear Alice, your task is

o'er

Your loving hands can do no more
For those you loved you did your

best

Jehovah in his

grant you rest
(daughters)
William:

Audrey,

Louise;
Louis:
iclet: David: Alton; Corel;

family.
and all immediate family ha 49 boeminh

FOR SALE

AUTOMOTIVE

940 Hillman, Dial 2690.
Beet 11.11,50-—3n .

i a
CAR — A bargain, one (1) 15 hp 6

cylinder Fiat car in perfect condition

ob and tyres new,
Bron psa 11.11,.50--2n.

a
TRUCK--One (1) 1941 V-8 Ford Truck
just what you want for the coming

y ly to Jos, St. Hill, Tweedside
Roa’ a 9.11.50—3n

ELECTRICAL

TWO Electric gramaphones with Green
Fiver motors and Magnetic Tone arms.





Apply Olympic Store. Dias 4353.
FURNITURE
RE—New and gvod class
second-hand furniture in Mahogany,

Birch and Pine, large variety at Ralph
Beard’s Show Rooms, Hardwood Alley

edral) daily:
(Opposite the Cath . Ss
8.11 50—Hn.

8 a.m, to 4 p.m,
MISCELLANEOUS
ANTIQUES — Of eveny description
Glass, China, old Jewels, Silver
Watercolours, Early books, Maps. Auto-

graphs etc. at Gorringes Antique Shop

Royal Yacht Club.
3.9.50—t.f.n.
ARMCHAIRS—Four Berkeley Spring



Armchaim, almost new $45.00 ich.
Phone 8502, 12,11, nm.

BUGGY AND HARNESS— ey, with
wheels good, slight repairs to . Set
of harness in good order no rearonabie

offer refused. Apply to Other BE, Forde,
Middleton, St. George. 14.11,50—3n,

ENGAGEMENT Calendars in aid of
The Poppy League Fund can be had
from Da Costa, C. Shepherd, Fogarty,
Knights, Self Help, Cottage and Mayfair
Gift Shops. Price 600

12.11 .50—2n.

apneic
GALVANIZED PIPES in 4”, 3”, 21/2”,
and 2” also galvanized sheets in 6it
7ft., anl @ft, Jengths.
Tyre Company, Trafalgar



Enquire
Street.
8.11 .50—t.f.n.

Geri

HORSE AND CART—In_ good con-
dition, no reasonable offer refused,
Apply to Other E. Forde, Middleton,
St. George. 11,11,50—2n.

ED
PILLOWS — Four new Feather Pil-
lows. Apply Branker Trotman & Co,
Dial 4217. 12,11.50—1n

RUBBERISED COATS—If you are
travelling we have a fine assortment of
better quality rubberished coat; suitable
for spring and defini waterproot
with detachable hood $10.00 each, The
Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad Street.

9.1).50—4n

SHAMPOO—Would you like to use
a nice Shampoo that leaves your Hair
soft, glossy and bright. Then try Har-







riet Hubbard Ajyer. Price $1.26 Sat.
Knight; Ltd. 12.11,50—3
SAMPLES popular make Ladies’
Elastic Girdles, Foundations, Garter
Belts., Smail and medium sizes. Call
early, Parisian Dress Shop, Shepherd
St. 12,11,50—In.



“ ——
See the West Indies Cricket Team in
England. Buy a Pocket, Cinema com-
plete with Film Strip (26 Action Pic-
tures) for $1.50, on sale at HARRISON'S,
12.11,50.—1n.

STAMPS—-A ood assortment of Old
lesues Mint and used from ‘ed. fo 10/-
including many islands; also sets and
sheets of later issues. Will os the
for any reasonable offer. Apply “
wood", Hastings. 12.11.50.—1n.

————_—$—$———————
PLASTIC RAINCOATS—Bargains in
Ladies’ Plastic Raincoats $2.40 each
Plastic Head Ties in Assorted Colours





25c. each. The Modern Drea: Shoppe,
Broad Street. 9.11. n.
~ VIGRO toasted pure whole Wheat

Flakes, Stocked by Alleyne, Arthur &

Co. Ltd., W. A. Medford & Co., A. F.
Jones & Co. W. M. Ford, Empire
Pharmacy, Huskisson’s Depot, Distribu-

tor C. B. Phillips, 8 High Street.
12.71.50—1n,

We have in stock Harriet Hubbard
Ayer Skin Lotion which is a non-drying
frechener for all types of skin, and also
aids in refining the pores.—KNIGHTS
LTD. 22.11.50—3n,









We also have Harriet Hubbard Ayer
“Liquid Finish", a foundation lotion for
the olly or shiny &kin, In assorted shades,
Price $1.40 bot..-.KNIGHT’S LTD.

12,11 ,50—3n

RUPTURE
RELIEF

Thousands of ruptured men and
women have found instant relief by



wearing a Beasley Air Cushion
Appliance.

Fitted with a real inflatable air-
cushion, light, strong and easily
washed, it holds the hernia with
such gentie firmness that broken
tissues have inereased chances of
reuniting
For full details and Free Booklet
write to

REASLEY’S LTD, Dept. 190

4 Cork Street, London, W.1, England

Auto
Phone



Apply to E, Stuart
Bakery, Tudor St

Cook, Butler available.



supply, Lighting pl
vant rooms. From Nov

ee

FLAT-~Small comfortable unfurnishe?
Flat at
Vacant

Ltd., Office.

MODERN BUNGALOW—No. 4. Clifton
Terrace, Upper Bay Street.
3902 or call on Miss Alma Griffith on
premises.

















FOR RENT



by Dunusk—Colleen | will
auction during the afternoon of Satir-





SUNDAY ADVOCATE



WANTED 106
~ AUCTION HELP HARBOUR
BAY FILLY— Joan's Star’, @ yeats| BOOKKEEPER—Assistant Bookkeens:

be sold

day llth, the last day of the races,. at!

BEVERLY COURT — Deacons Road
Bryan, Popular

12.11,.50—In





BRAMBLEY, Waterford Gap, St. Mi-







Tel. 91-54. Appointment to view.
ESPERANZA — Fully furnished on
St. James Sea Coast. one 91-33.
12,11.50—6n
FARAWAY—St. Philip, on Skeete’s
Bay, Furnished, 3 » Water mill




port, 2 ser-
r ist. Dial
17.9."50—t.f.n.



























































































Highgate House, St. Michae)
now. For further particulars
4230, Wilkinson & Haynes Co.
7.11,50-—4.f.n.



Telephone
9.11, 50—-dn.

saa aetlica ile —laneinclia- ohana:
picee Soubie Gress, ? sragevtint Tooms.
a velimadbeycs i aes

OFFICE-—-At No. 6 Swan Street, suitable
for “eon Apply Thani Bros. Prince
Wm. Henry Street. 12.11.50—t.f.n,

“RESTAWILE" — Gibbs Beach, St
Peter, Three bedroom bungalow fully
furnished for January and March 1951

Wesley Bayley, High Street
12.11.50—1n,











ROOM — At Westmeath, White Par







Road. Mrs. I. Forde. 12.11,50—in.
“SUMMBRHOME”—Situate at Hastings
on the sea side.

The house oremarng
drawing, dining and breakfast rooms,
bedrooms, and all conveniences. Apply
to Mansion House, Deacons Road

5.11 ,50—2n.

PUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. PHILIP
The Farocnia: Treueurer’s Office will
be removed to Kingston, Church Vil-
lage, St. Philip from llth Nov. 1950.
The Office will be opened for busi-
ness on Mondays, Tuesdays, & Satur-
days from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and from

noon to 3 p.m.
Sed. P. S. W. SCOTT,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Philip
4.11.50—gn.

EXAMINATIONS OF THE ROYAL
SANITARY INSTITUTE

The examinations for the various Cer-
tificates of the Royal Sanitary Institute
will be held in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad,
from the llth to 16th December, 1950.

Candidates desirous of entefing
these examinations should obtain









for
the

necessary forms from the Honorary
ere? Government Buildings, The
arf.

The completed forms together with the
appropriate fees should be returned to
the Honorary Secretary not later than
the 30th November, 1950.

. N, GRANNUM,
Hon. Secty, & Treasurer, British West
Indies Board of Examiners, Royal
Sanitary Institute,

12.11.50.—2n,
NOTICE

To Applicants for Vacant
St. Michael Vestry Exhibitions
at St. Michael's Girls’ School.
Attention is drawn to the advertise





err the News.
Ph lay th ah ee

a _ v e jon
UCATIONAL' St chael's Girls’

School, which states that girls who are
over 8 and under 11 years will be ex-
amined on Friday the 17th day of Nov~
ember 1950, at 9.30 a.m.

Will parents and/or guardians of
children within this age group please
note the change in the date of the
exomination and comply with the ad_
vertisement

By_ Order,

E. C, REDMAN,
Clerk, St. Michael's Vastry.
9,11.50—3n

EDUCATIONAL
PARRY SCHOOL

There will be an Entrance Examination
for candidates desiring (9 enter tne
school next term on Monday, Novembei
27. at 10 a.m. Candidates must present
their baptismal certificates and teiti-
monials from their Headmasters.

11.41. 50—8n,

LYNCH’S SECONDARY

SCHOOL

SPRY STREET

In the July Examination of the Lon-
don Chamber of Commerce Certificates
were gained in the following subjects;—
ENGLISH: Dolores Best, Malvern Nor-
yille, Ethnie Nurse, Elma Skeete, Gozel
Waithe, Gregory Millar, Malcolm Bar-

row.
BOOK-KEEPING: Walton Millington,
COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY: Malcolm
Barrow, Lawrence Gibson,
ARITHMETIC: Malvern Norville (Dis-
tinction), Elma Skeete, Lisle Walcott,
Dolores Best, Ethnie

Lawrence Gibson.
MAR EEMA TION:
lurse (Distinction), Malvern Norville,
(Distinetion), Gozel Waithe, Malcolm
Barrow, Lawrence Gibson (Distinction),





Lisle Walcott (Distiction),
A. McD, FORDE,
Headmaster,
12,11,50,—In.



QUEEN'S COLLEGE

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS
FOR THE YEAR 1951

1, The Examinations for entrance to

Queen's College in January, 1951, will

be held at the School on Monday,

November 13th, beginning at 9 a.m.

prompt. CHILDREN ONLY will be
admitted into the Assembly Hall.

4. Each candidate must bring a testi-
monial of Conduct and Progress ‘om
the Headmistress of the School she

years of age

is now attending.
3. Candidates Over 12
must bri Mathematical instruments.

4. Candidates who have reached a
certain standard of work in their writ-
ten examinations will be summoned
gy ar an erie.

‘ ie names of girls who have
qualified for admission, through inter
view and examination, will be publishec
in the Advocate on Tuesday, December

igth, 1950, when Book Lists, ete. will
be sent to the parents/guardians,

6. Successful candidates must presen
themselves at Queen’s College o1
Monday, January 15th, 1951, at 9 an
acgor panies by their rents/guardians.

t. ie Entrance aminations for

children over 12 years of age will Inst
a whole day, therefore those candidates
must come provided with lunch.

Children under 12 years of age may
be called for at 1.30 p.m.

11,11,80—an.
ST. MICHAEL’s GIRLS’

SCHOOL
ENTRANCE EXAMINATION
Owing to the large number of candi-
dates for this Examination there has
been a change in the dates of examina-
t

ion.
All private candidates, Government
Bursary, Vestry or Friendly Society
candidates will be examined at the
School on the following dates:—
(1) Girls who are over 8 and under
1V on Bist July 1951 on Friday
i7th November at 9.30 a.m

(2) Girls who are 11 and under 12 on
Sist July 196% on Saturday 10th
November at 9.30 a.m

All candidates are asked to be at the
School at 9 a.m. Parents and Guardians
may not remain at the School during
the examination.

5.1), 00—2n

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to any person or persons
whosoever in my nume as T do not
hold myself responsible for amyone cqn-
tracting any debt of debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me

Signed COLLIN BANFIELD, }
|





Joseph
11.11.50--n, |



the B.T.C. paddock.

B. Howell we
includes
Table
ment Tables,
Botiees
Cushions) ,
Waggon, Sideboard, Side Table, Tea Trol-
ley,
China,
Pilates,

8.11.50



UNDER THE SILVER |

@hacl. From November Ist; fully furn-

ished fesidence. For particulars, Phone HAMMER

_— 10,59 .—t.28, By recommendations of Lioyds
Agents we will sell on Tuesday the

CRY RINGS — 14th, at our Mark High Street.

eee mas vital ne |} pee: Art Silk, 3 Cartons All Bran

ie ch available for | 122 Drums One-O-One, 10, Bread Tins,

= Ful ie ans a0! ped. & Tins Paint, 1 Gasotene Truek Tank.

Excell > oi bathing Pavetee Basch. Glassware and other items.

x, B ; » | Sale 12.30 o'clock,

Terms Cash

BRANKER, TOT & CO.



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Thursday 16th, by order of Mrs. J.
will sell her Furniture at
“East Wind,” Rockley New Road, which
very good Extension Dining
to seat 10; Upright Chairs, Orna-
Antique Card, Table and
Arm Chairs (Spring
Mahogany: Dinner



Morris
all in

by Beckstein, Glass and
Coffee Services, Fruit
in Entree Dishes,
Fish Knives and Forks, Tea Service,
Waiters, Spoons, Forks, Cutlery, ete.)
Folding Verandah Chairs, Clock, Pic-)
tures, Single Mahogany Bedstead, Spring
and Bed, Vanity Table (Triplet Mirrors),
M. T. Washstand, Cedar Presses, Single
Iron Bedsteads and Beds, Dressing Tables
Cedar Linen Press, Canvas Cot, West-
inghouse Refrigerator (Unit Years),
Electric Stove, Electric Oven, Kitchen
Utensils, Larder Oil Stove, Scales and
Weights, Electric Iron, Pressure Cooker,
Garden Tools, Garden Benches, Singer
Treadle Sewing Machine and other items.
Sale 11.30 o'clock, Terms Cash.
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers
12.11.50.—2n.

REAL ESTATE

Piano
Tea and
Plated Ware







A new and substantial wall Bungalow
containing Open Verandah (8 x 12), Liv-
ing room (23 ft. 6 ins. x 16 ft.) 2 bed-
rooms (14 x 12), 1 bedroom (11 x 16) with
running water, Kitchenette (8 x 12), W Cc.
& Bath (8 x 4%), water and electric light,
standing on 8,000 sq ft. land VACANT
Possession, property has 4 beautiful view
of Christ Chureh coast. For inspection
apply to 2947 R, Archer McKenzie,
Victoria Street.



12.11,50.—1n,
“BUNGALOW —At Brig Black

BUNGALOW — At __ Brighton,



at} for
| hours of 9 am. and WU a.





Oregon. . Sch.
BICYCLE-—One Child's Bicycl
ehie 2 =. ren nee sult- Wiemetad, Sch. Linsyd It, Henry
12.11.50.—t.£.m. ASEST ALS ae
I ns , Capt
BOXES — All kinds of Cara pene Ses eee.
Bones other than corrugated - | Schooner Philip H. Davidson, 87 tons
Ppiy Advocate Bind Dept. net, Capt. . from British Guiana.
10 50—t.f.m. Schooner M. Smith, 74 tons net,
$$$ British Guiana
Singer Sewing Machi 1 loter. oe. ARTURES
Apply. ‘shes Archer nae 55; 7
PI .

¥ LADY—Tatorea
fale achogh in the island “kogner Precis W. Smith, 6 tons net
sone Beso ae eo
nm for
longer. Write Box 22 Co "Adee |In Touch With Barbados
aoe soo Coastal Station
WANTED TO BUY
Good class furniture in Cable and Wireless (W.I.) Ltd., ad~

Birch, Pine. Good prices paid. Willtm@

to purchase entire house furniture from] the following through their Bar-
people leaving island. Apply Ralph | bados Coast station:
jeard, Hardwood Alley. Phone 4683 §.8. Silvana, Broot, Vancouver City,
8,11.50—4m |Benny, Five Forks, C., G. Thulin,
i | Leide Honduras, Loide Argentina,
ia cae ANT=D TO RENT Triton, Fort Nottingham, Ful-
HO! by English couple on long | or, Southern Vi sund, Car-
lease with one acre or more land any- Cassablanca, Norluna, A! "
where in island. Main water lighting Rosa, * , Vampa,
essential.” Box X.Y.Z. Co. Advocate. S. Barbara, Ravanger, South-
9.41 ,.50—-3n. Athelchief, 5.
-——————————_______. | Matthew, m4 Rodney, ae ree
i. o-
ALEXANDRA SCHOOL — | }vide Halth vecport sort Ammerst, Vera



Rock. Just completed and standing on
7,230 square feet of land with right of
way to sea, 3 Bedrooms, Tiled Bath
and Modern Kitchenette, Garage and
Servant's Quarters. Apply HUTCH-
INSON & BANFIELD, Phone 4643.
9.11,50—4n,
nidiide - saenimesteereemttntiecad

Be Heedful! Going at a Very Attrae-
live Price — A Unique and Artistic
Stonewall Seaside Bungalow; Seclusive
in a Highly Established Residential
Coast for the Distinctive and Financial
Class, Not more than 8 Miles from City,
Superbly Built 3 years ago For and De-
signed By Persons of Class; Fully Fur-
nished (except Linen and Cutlery),
Sandy Beach, Fine Bathing, Nicely Set in
Off Main Road, Trees.

A 3 Bedroom (two large—-one with
Basin), Cottage at Thornbury Hill, Main
Road, Good Condition, Modern Conyeni-
ences, Vacant, Fine View, Spacious Yard
enclosed with Stonewall, about 5,000 sq.
ft, Going for Under £800. A 3 Bedroom
Cottage on Rented Land at Lower Black
Rock, Main. Road, Water, Light, Going
for Under £475. Three-Bedroom Stone-
wall Bungalows at Navy Gardens and
one at Fontabelle—Seaside, Going for
Under £2,100, A Two-storey Stonewall
Business and Residence at Lower Bax-
ters Road, Large Garate or Workshop
Vacant, Going for Under £2,500, Resi-
dences in Belleville — Two and three
. @ Me for anything in Real
lf Not — U are Not Buying!
« Arranged. Dial S111, D, F,
Hastings.

Dwellinghouse known as “Bellevue
standing on lands of Graeme Hall De-
velopment Ltd. at The Stream, Christ
Church, at present tenanted by Mr.
Hugh Leach, The house contains open
verandah on three sides, Drawing and
Dining Room, Three bedrooms, Kitchen,
Pantry, Lavatory and Bath, with run-
ning water and Flectricity throughout

Inspection on application to the tenant
between the hours of 5 p.m, and 7 p.m.

The above will be set up for sale at
Public Competition at our Office No 4
James Street, Bridgetown, on Friday
Vith November 1950 at 2 p.m

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors.
5.11,50—6n.
——_

At Rockley on the sea near Blue
Waters Land, One property suitable for
Guest House, It consists of 14,293 sq, ft.
land and a stone wall howe which has
6 (six) Bedrooms each with running
water and other spare rooms that can
be converted into Bedrooms.

At Silver Sands one newly built ston@









wall house with three sided verandah,
Drawing & Din Rooms, four .(4)
Bedrooms each with water, beautifully
tiled Bath, Pantry, Kitchenette, Ser-

vants’ room with water tollet & shower,
Garage. It stands on 4 acre of land,

At Paynes Bay near the sea, one
small property called Villa Dunean con-
sisting of Y% acre of land together with
house which has drawing & dining
rooms, 2 bedrooms, W.C. & Bath, Kit-
chen, electricity and water. "

For Particulars apply
Scott, Magazine Lane.

to D'arey A
8.11.50-,3n

“ROCK DUNDO"--Situate at Cave Hill
St. Michacl, with approximately 42
Acres of Land. Consisting of 20 Arable
Acres and 12 Acres in Sour Grass and
Roads

The Arable Acreage is as follows:—
Plant and Ratoon Canes .. 14
Preparation FH re

20
The Howe contains three bedrooms,
toilet and bath, drawing and dining
rooms, lHbrary, Office, closed gallery
and kitchen Servants rooms, gargg?
end other out buildings, two concrete
rain water tanks with a capacity of
25,000 gallons. Electric Hight and

Company's Water, Three miles out of

town, bus wervice. Suitable for Dairy
or Development Inspection Tuesdays
and Thursdays 12 noon to 4 p.m.

Offers for above will be received in

writing by Colin P. B. Seale, Bovell

& Skeete, Lucas Street, Bridgetown.
8.11,50—i1n.





PROPERTY - Small Property t
Advent Ave. Bank Hall, 2,800 sa. it.
Land and House 22 x 12, Shed 22 x 10,
Kitchen 8 x 8. Portico. House can be
bought separately,
G. FIELDS c/o Wm. Fogarty Ltd,
or Dial 3232.
12,11,50,—1n,

LOST & FOUND
LOST

BROOCH— (Brilliant)
converted into two
Mary’s Church yard,
returning to the
office.







That can be
clips In St

Rewarded on
Advocate Advts.
11,11.50—2n



WATCH—Ladies Gold Rolex Wrist
Watch with a brown leather strap.
Between the Dominica Marketing Co,
end Post Office on Tuesday morning
between 9 and 9.30. Finder return to
Advocate Advtg. Office. Reward offered.

9.11.50—3n.

DDOOOG9-HFHHHGH-HHOGHGHO9HO94

CHIROPRACTIC

DR. FERREIRA of “Chiroville’ Upper
Bay St. (Near Esplanade) by Chiropractic
method corrects diseases of eyes, ears,
nose, throat, lungs, stomach, kidneys and
lower organs. Dial 2881

24.9.50.

9OGHOSHH-H3H0HHHL-G9O0OGOOO

THE PHARMACEUTICAL
SOCIETY OF BARBADOS







Members are asked to note that the
Annual General Meeting will be held
at the ¥.M.C.A. on Thursday, November
16th, beginning at 8 p.m

AGENDA
1 To receive the Financial Statement
and Annual Report
2 Election of officer

3. Gener

al Busine





Marine Hotel Apply between
m.

9.11,.50—8n.

MISCELLANEOUS








12.11,50.1n,

vise that they can now communicate with



WANTED
May 1951, an Assistant Mistress




h one or more of the following: | Rio oco, Pioneer Gem,

Latin, French, Spanish, Mathe-| Planter, Argentina, Craftsman,
matics. Salary, according to qualifica-|Rangitane, Seven Seas, Alcoa
tions and _ experience, on scale for

Secondary Teachers.
Applications, stating qualifications and
subjects offered, and accompanied by
testimonials, must reach the Headmig-

tress not later than February 15th,
12.11.50,—6n,

WANTED
pe the Vestry of the Parish of St.

ael.

Under the authority of the St.
ael’s Parish Loan Act 1948 (1 y
The Vestry desire to borrow from any
person or ns, bodies or
corporate willing to lend the same, a&
sum of mon not exceeding Three
Thousand Five Hundred Pounds (£3,500),
being part of £12,000 authorised under
the said Act, at a rate of interest not
exceedings four pounds per centum per
#nnum.

Persons tendering must state the minti-
mum ‘rate of interest they are
to accept. Prior consideration be
given to tenders at the most favourable
rate of interest.

Interest is payable on the 30th day of
June each year,

The principal of this loan i repayab!
in twenty (20) annual instalments
£600. each, The first instalment of ae
part of the Loan is payable on the
day of June, 1959.

Sealed offers in writing marked on the
envelope — “OFFER FOR LOAN or
£3,500" will be received by the Clerk
of the Vestry, up to 12 o’clock noon on
Monday the 20th day of November, 1960

CERTIFICATES will bé issued in units

SEAWELL

ARRIVALS—By B.W.LA.L.

For Trinidad:

Rochelle Richards, Jessie Fendt, Audrey
Bourne,

Bourne, Mary Velma Gibson,
Deudre Jardine,
For Grenada



Dialdes Kirpalani.
Gladys Murray, Casford Murray, Lillian
Christian.

More Rubber
Produced Than
Used

WASHINGTON, Nov. 11,

World production of new rubber,
both natural and synthetic, topped

the
Department reported yesterday,

were consumed, the report said.
Russian imports





of £100. only. rubber during the first nine
. ory Order, “opty of 1950 were wan an at
. .C. REDMAN, ,250 tons compared with 87,500
Clerk, St Michael's Vestry. tons in the same period of 1949.
a eae —Reuter.
PART ONE ORDERS
Lieut.-Col, J. Connell, O.B.E., E.D.,
Commanding,
The Barbados Regiment
Issue No, 42, 10 Nov. 50
1. PARADES

All ranks will parade at Regimental Headquarters on Thursday 16 Nov, 50 at

1700 hours, The following will be earried out:

fa) There will be a kit inspection for other ranks and apart from the dress
worn, each Volunteer should bring his second shirt and second pair of
shorts for this inspection.

(b) Those volunteers who have attended 30 parades duri the current year

and were not paid on Wednesday last will be paid on this parade.
(e) Ex-recruits will be attested and will receive their pay.
2. ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING
20 NOV., 50
eut. C. E, Neblett
15 L/S. Husbands, H. A.

ut. S. E. L, Johnson
L/S Williams, E. D.
M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major,
8.0.L.F. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment.

Orderly Officer
Orderly Serjeant
Next for Duty
Orderly Officer
Orderly Serjeant

NOTICE
There will be no Officers’ Mess Meeting on Saturday 25 Nov,
Officers’ Mess Meeting will be he
Honorary members may attond at 5 hours.
PART Il ORDERS
THE BARBADOS REGIMENT
10th November, 1950

1. LEAVE — SICK

SERIAL NO. 29





384 L/S Laurie, C. K. “A” Coy Granted S/Leave wef 1—21 Oct. 50
461 L/C Holder, S. i . 6
PM Re Granted S/Leave wef 6—19 Nov. 50
Captain J. Redhead aa Granted P/Leave with permission to
leave the colony wef 3—15 Oct. 50,

M. L, D. SKEWES-COX, Major,

8.0.L.F, & Adjutant,

The Barbados Regiment.

NOTICE

The first round of the Volley Ball Competition was won by “A” Coy. The next
Teams

match will be played between HQ CG
Ba ieee ate cist ‘oy & Bn HQ on Tuesday 14 Nov, 50,

DO

YOU WANT TO
WIN $100
FOR XMAS?

Buy a sixpenny ticket in
the Modern High School
Xmas Drawing. First prize
$100, Nineteen other valu-
able prizes.

The proceeds will endow a
$4,000 Scholarship fund to
outfit, aid and educate 12
poor, intelligent children. All,
ticket-holders invited to wit-
ness draw at the school in
the boxing ring at 5 p.m.
Wednesday 20th December.
Tickets obtainable from any
pupil, Licence for prize-
drawing granted by kind
permission of the Commis-
sioner of Police.

SOCIETY

There will be a General
Meeting of the O.H. Society
at Harrison College on
Wednesday, 15th Novem-
ber, at 4.45 p.m.

AGENDA

To receive
Statement.

To appoint an Hon.
Secretary.

General Business.
S. GITTENS,

Financial

} "JOIN THE NAVY TO SEE THE SEA”

JOIN OUR R.A.F. SQUADRON TO DRINK AND ENJOY

Taylor's Rum And Falernum

TAYLOR’S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM

(With the Distinctive Flavour)
AND

TAYLOR’S LIQUEUR FALERNUM
Two Outstanding Items

JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.

————

recom-

“mended ~
by the
Medical

Profession

the world

It’s *

all pure
‘pre-digest-

ed nourish-

ment

that is over.

obtainable from Grocers and Chemists.

JOHN F. HUTSON LTD.—Agenis.








world consumption in September.
United States Commerce

September production totalled
214,500 tons, while 197,500 tons

of natural

50, The next
on Saturday 2 Dec. 50 at 2015 hours,

SHEET 1 & ONLY





SUNDAY, NOVEMBER

SHIPPING NOTICES

ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.

Sailing from Antwerp, Rotterdam and



The M.V. “Caribbee” will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Domin-
ica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis &

Holland s.s. ‘‘HELENA” 20th., 2ist, St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 17th.
25th. November.

Sail from Amsterdam, and Dover Th . “Daerwood"* x
wan. SESTAD’ Ith. and 16D. 11] cent Cargo and Passengers for St.
November. Lucia, St. Vineent, Grenada &

Aruba. Date of departure will be

Sailing to Trinidad, La Guaira, Cura- uae :

.9. “DELFT” 6th. November:
2.8. “FARNSUM” 18th. November; m.



“OE ‘AD” ist. November. B.W.I. Schooner Owners
Sailing to Trinidad, Associati Inc.
Georgetown, ™.8 “HELENA” iith. 8
. *

Tel. 4047,

Sailing to Madeira, Plymouth,
werp, and Amsterdam, m.s. “WEULEM-
STAD” 17th. November.

Canadian National Steamships

Sails





Sails Sails



oe i — Barbados —
2. +s * lov. 4 Nov. v. 16 Nov. jov.
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 10 Nov. 14 Nov. _ 24 Nov. 24 Mov.
CANADIAN 23 Nov. 27 Nov. - 7 Dec. 7 Dec.
LADY RODNEY .. a 2 Dec. 4Dee. 13 Dee. 14 Dec.
LADY NELSON .. ‘ — 19 Dee. 2. Dec. 30 Dec. 3b Dec.
LADY RODNEY .. * — 1” Jan. 29Jan. 28 Jan. 29 Jan.
LADY NELSON .. rs _— 1 Feb. 2 Feb, 12 Feb. 13 Feb.
NORTHBOUND e

oui, Ame, A

ar’ . Jo

LADY NELSON 30 Nov. 8 Dec. 10 Dec.
LADY RODNEY 27 Dec. € Jan. 7 Jan.
LADY NELSON 13 Jan. 22 Jan. 23 Jan.
LADY RODNEY 12 Feb. 21 Feb. 22 Feb.
LADY NELSON 27 Feb. 8 March 9





— and we have —

XMAS CRACKERS, XMAS TREES, TOYS.
Come in early and select yours.
THE

CENTRAL EMPORIUM
(CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)
Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets.





PEELS PPE OPEC PEO OOOO

spate, tt



served in a homely atmosphere @
“DELIGHTFUL DRINKS
Al CUISINE

The first place is....

The GREEN





Ss

WE HAVE THE

TOOLS

YOU NEED!I!

4



See Our Show
Room Ditplay

CARPENTERS’ RULES
STEEL & METALLIC TAPES
PLANES

PLANE IRONS

SPOKE SHAVES
OHISELS in all sizes
HAND & BREAST DRILLS
DRILL BITS

GIMLETS

HACK SAWS & BLADES
PIPE WRENCHES
SOCKET WRENCHES
NAIL PULLERS

PLANTATIONS LTD.





| A Fresh Stock Again !!

FOOD YEAST



Can be taken mixed with Cocoa, Milk, Fruit Juices, Ete.

The greatest modern food discovery, supplies Vitamin B2 for

a balanced diet, and for extra Proteins so necessary to health
and strength. Add Foot! Yeast to your normal diet and you
will add more body energy and better health.

Get Food Yeast from your Grocer or Druggist now.

S. P. MUSSON, SON & Co., Ltp.

DISTRIBUTORS

POOSSOSSSSSSSS

%,
PISS SSCS SS SOS SSS OO FOSS SS FOSS OOS oS SOOO SS >

‘







12, 1950
——$_——
9O5OOOOTDOFHOSOOH4

CRICKETERS!

Greet your fellow CRICKETER
in BLAZERS & FLANNEL PANTS
send them today to
ox



RAYMOND JORDAN

in Bay Street, opposite
Combermere Street.

O99 9090690-905-99002%

TAR for yards etc.
A limited quantity
Remaining for sale
AT
Your Gas Co....... Bay St.
TM eto cass as ke -.. 4303

eSesSsSasSsSa—S—a—a—=—=—SSSS——===== ie

ORIENTAL

GOODS! (Articulos)
CUROIS, JEWELLERY,
SILKS, (Se Habla Espanol)

THANTrS

Pr. Wm. Hry. St. DIAL 3466




oo:







Barbados Real Estate |
Agency

INDUSTRIAL, COMMERCIAL, |
RESIDENTIAL

Telephone 2336
Office : Hastings Hotel Ltd.

FOR SALE

|
Christ Church.
New stone Bungalow. The plan is
unusual, All Mahogany doors,
window frames, built in ward-
robes, drespers etc. 3 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms, Living and Dining
rooms, Kitchen. Garage ete. Own
A. C. Engine. Standing in 1 acre |
land facing se safe sea bathing.

COVE SPRING HOUSE. St.
James. Overlooking s®a. Private
bathing cove.

ABBEVILLE GUEST
Worthing. Furnished.

DOVER: Christ Church, 6 lots
on sea 3 x 10.000 and 3 x 12,000
sq. ft. also acreage.

RICES St. Philip. Acreage near
Crane Hotel.

BLOCK OF FACTORY
INGS. In the City.

INCH-HAVEN.



HOUSE:

BUILD-



18.10,50—in

REAL ESTATE



AF.S., F.V.A.
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE

8 MODERN STONE BUNGALOWS,

also a Stone and Timber House,
are available in a pleasant part of
Dayrell's Road, at prices ranging
from £1,700 upwards. Particulars
and appointments to view on
application.

RESIDENCE AT GRAEME



HALL TERRACE, An outstanding
property especially with regard to
the interior arrangement and fit-

tings. The planning i; well
thought out, and there is a large
L-Shaped lounge and dining room
with cocktail bar, 3 pleasant bed-
rooms all with fitted wardrobes, a
lerge tiled bathroom serves the
master bedroom. There is also 4
second bathroom and toilet. mod-
| ern kitchen well provided with

‘built-in’ cupboards, storeroom,
garage, servent's quarter: paved
driveway and rear courtyard ete.
etc. All the new mahogany
furniture and contents may be
purchased if required.

CRANE VILLA. This







modern

stone-built 2-storey property with |
approximately 3% acre by the
Crane Hotel entrance drive is con-
verted into two pleasant relf con-
tained apartments, each with very
spacious rooms. An excelignt
investment property near the sea.
Offers will be considered.
MODERN RESIDENCE AT
ROCKLEY (near the Golf
Cours®). Built by a well known
firm of contractors, the construc-
tion ie of stone and the floors are
polished pine. There are 3 large
bedrooms all with wash basins and
‘built-in’ wardrobes. Bathroom
end toilet are tiled. The lounge
is large and airy with French
andah with magnificent views over

window: leading out on to a ver-
Golf Course and sea, There is a
breakfast room, well fitted kitchen,
double garage and nicely liad out
gardens. Now offered at £4,500.

THE OLIVES: Upper Collymore
Rock. This large modern stone
bungalow with about } acre should
appeal to a buyer who wants a
really solid property constructed
of the best obtainable materials.
There f a@ large living room (28
ft. x 14 ft.) gallery (48% ft. x 10%
ft.) 4 bedrooms (one 23% ft. x
19ft.) modern kitchen, paved
courtyard, lawns, kitehen garden
and orchard. Well placed for
schools and transport to town.

BAPTIST VICARAGE. Paynes
Bay. This two storey house is
placed on one of the most attrac-
tive sites in St. James. There is
a beautiful sandy beach and we |}
bathing is unsurpassed. The house
contains 3 bedrooms,
lounge, galleries,
kitchen etc.

upstairs
dining room,
Viewing by appoint-
ment.

coristruction with wallaba roof



shingles,

DEAN HOLLOW: St. Lucy. A
pretty little country home with
living room, dining room, 3 bed-
rooms, kitchen, servant’s rooms,
2 garages, storerooms etc., Stqne

Fertile ground of over

2% acres planted around house
with shrubs and trees, remainder
cane, option further 24% acres cane-
land.

LUXURY BEACH J
Fully Furnished. St. iaine en

WINDY RIDGE: St. James. 7-
Roomed Bungalow with 1 acre of
ornamental and vegetable gardens.

SUNSET HOUSE: Prospect, St.
James, On Coast. God bathing.
Fully Purnished. December and
January.

CUMBERLAND HOUSE: Cod-
rington Hill. With about 2 ectes,
Unfurnished.

_—_—_
are successful with
| Johm M4. Biladon
Low charges—Prompt payment
REAL ESTATE AGENT )
AUCTIONEER |
| }
| PLANTATIONS BUILDING
Phone 4648






SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12,

1950



Chureh

Services

METHODIST SERVICES

JAMES STREET
1400 am. Rev. F. Lawrence; 7.00 p.m.
Rev, E. Griffin.
PAYNES BAY z
9.30 am. Mr. J. A. Griffith; 7.00 p.m
Mr. W. St. Hill.
WHITEHALL =
9.30 am. Mr. G. Sinckler, 7.00 p.m.
Mr. G. Harper
GILL MEMORIAL “
9.30 am. Rev. E. Griffin; 7.00 p.m.
Rev. R. McCullough (Holy Communion).

HOLETOWN
8.30 a.m. Rev. R. McCullough; 7.00 p.m.
Mr. D. Scott.
BANK HALL
9.30 am. Mr. G. Perkins; 7.00 p.m.
Rev. H. C. Payne.
SPEIGHTSTOWN

11.00 a.m. Mr, V. St. John; 7.00 p.m
Rev. F. Lawrence.
H
11.00 am. Rev. H. C, Payne (Holy

Communion); 7.00 p.m. Supply.
A

9.30 am. Rev. H. C. Payne

(Holy
7.00 p.m. Mr. B.

Communion) ; Greaves.

7.00 p.m. Rev, M. A. E. Th
DALKEITH
10.50 a.m. Mr, Marville; 7.00 p.m. Mr.

Grant. .

BELMONT
10.50 a.m. Mr. Mayers; 7 p.m. Rev
B. Cropby.
SOUTH DISTRICT
9.00 a.m. Mr. J. Whittaker; 7.00 pm,
Mrs. Peskett.
PROVIDENCE
10.50 a.m. Rev. M. A. E. Thomas (Holy
Communion); 7.00 p.m. Mr. Browne.
VAUXHALL
7.00 a.m, Rev, M. A. E. Thomas (Holy
Communion); 1.00 p.m. Miss Bryan,

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Church of Christ, Scientist, Upper
Bay Street, Bridgetown.
Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Wednesdays 8 p.m. A Service which
includes Testimonies of Christian Science

Healing.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1950.

Subject of Lesson-Sermon: MORTALS
AND_ IMMORTALS.

Golden Text: 1 Corinthians 15: 18. As
is the earthy, such are they also that
are earthy: and as is the heavenly,
such are they also that are heavenly.

CHURCH OF GOD

ST MPCHAEL
11.00 a.m. Eckstein Village, Rev. J. B.
Winter; 7.00 p.m. Eckstein Village
Elder R. H. Walkes.
CHRIST CHURCH

7.00 p.m. Cox Road, Rev. E. W.
Weekes.
ST. GEORGE
11.00 a.m. Taitts Hill, Elder R. H.
Walkes.
7.00 p.m. Taitts Hill, Rev. BE. W. Weekes.
ST. PHILIP
11.00 a.m. Long Bay, Rev, BE, Weekes.
8ST. LUCY
11.00 a.m. Grave Yard, Rev. A: R
Brome; for church conference and dis-

tribution of Exhortary
Exhorters.
7.00 p.m. Crab Hill, Rev. A. R. Brome;

Certificates to

for Infant dedication and observance
of Lord's Supper.
SALVATION ARMY

BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL
11.00 a.m, Holiness Meeting, 3.00 Ryn.
Company Meeting, 7.00 p.m, Salvation
Meeting.
PREACHER: Major Smith.
WELLINGTON STREET
11.00 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3.00 pm.
Company Meeting, 7.00 p.m. Salvation
pieeting
CHER: Major Gibby.
DIAMOND CORNER
11.00 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3.00 p.m,
Company Meeting, 7.00 P.m. Salvation
Meeting.
PREACHER: Lieutenant Moore.
CHECKER HALL
11.00 a.m, Holiness Meeting, 3.00 p.m.
Company Meeting, 7.00 p.m. Salvation
Meeting.
PREACHER: Lieutenant Reid.
CARLTON
11.00 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3,00 p.m,
Company Meeting, 7.00 Pm. Salvation
Meeting.
PREACHER; Captain Bourne. ..
LONG BAY

11.00 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3.00 p.m,
Company Meeting, 7.00 p.m. Salvation
Meeting.

PREACHER: Lieutenant

PIE CORNER

11,00 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3.00 p.m.
Company Meeting, 7.00 p.m. Salvation
Meeting,

PREACHER: Major Hollingsworth.

MORAVIAN CHURCH SERVICES
REET

ROEBUCK ST!
11.00 am. Rev. A. C, Pilgrim;
p.m. Rev. D. C. Moore.
11 See HILL,
am. Mr. W, Deane; 12.30 pim
Rev. A. C. Pilgrim, (Holy Communion):
7.00 p.m. Mr. Downes, . we

Etienne.

7.00

FULNECK
11.00 a.m, Mr. Green; 7.00 pm, Mr.
Francis.
MONTGOMERY
7.00 p.m. Mr. Alleyne.
SHOP HILL.
7.00 p.m. Mr. F. Deane.
MBE

11.00 a.m. Mr. Swire; 7.00 pm, Mr.

Smith.

LUTHERAN HOUR
ST. WALTER L HOUR—
Dayrells Road, Christ Church, 7 p.m.
Song, Vespers and Sei Rev.

Trmon,
. O'Donohue, Speaker,
can ee ui
e's Tennant, St. Thomas,
Divine Service. Mr, Fitz Sramo es
ST. CONTENT L
Content, St.

Sermon. The Rev. Wm. F. O’Donohue,



War Will Not End
War

Eisenhower—

TEXAS, Nov. 11.
General Dwight D. Eisenhower
told students here yesterday that

there was no such thing as a
preventive war.

“When people speak to you
about a preventive war, you tell
them to go and fight it” he said,

“After my experience I have
come to hate war“ he said, “War
settles nothing.”

“Before you people were bora
this nation was fighting a_war to
make the world safe for demoa-
racy and then we fought a waâ„¢
to end all wars. Ever since that
war to end all wars we have
wondered about when the next
war will come.



Christmas

Cards & Paper




BLS

Jewellers

Your

Y. DE LIMA

*Phone 4644

. knows

* as foretold by the oracles.” ;
His present

“ts be the .new Incarnation,

and

5 _ Christmas Tree

-O-

“HOLY
BOY’ —

All Was Foretold
By The Oracles

By PETER DACRE

By invading Tibet, Chinese
Communist troops have
into the headlines the wedi
or cloistered and shrouded
and.

The vital gateway to India is
ruled “by a .15-year-old Dalai
Lama — the “Holy Boy” now
fleeing from his Potala Palac2,
which rises high above the flat-
topped houses of Lhasa, his
capital.

No Boyhood
In reality the Lama is a

mal pleasures of boyhood and
nothing of adult life.

he has contacts with the
outside wor

His pi , the Thirteenth
Dalai Lama, however, had a

friend in Sir Charles Bell, a
former British political repre-
sentative in Tibet.

In his book, “Portrait ot tne
Dalai Lama” (published by
Collins) he described how the
Tibetan king fled from the
Chinese once before in 1910.

Travelling on Tibetan ponies,
his party reached Gnatong, a
cluster of huts, snowbound in
the border mountains, at 10.15
one night.

A Whe Ate You ?’
rgeants Luff and Humphreys,
two former British soldiers who
manned the telegraph offices
there, heard a hammering on
the door of their hut, Outside
was a group of Tibetans.

“Who the hell are you?” asked
Sergeant Cuff, “and which of
you blighters is the Dalai Lama?

His Holimess, as Sergeant Luft
insisted on calling him, was
given food a cup of tea, and
sat before the fire.

He asked to sleep on Luff’s
d the sergeants

their

to guard with

The following day, led by a
sergeant with a rifle and fixed
bayonet the procession set off
for safety, “Thank Heavel.
we’ve got the boss of Tibet off
our hands!” said the sergeants.

‘Wheel Of E*.

Like Buddhists, Tibetans
believe in “The Wheel of Life’
or the transmigration of the
souls of men and animals in
one rebirth after another.

When the first Dalai Lama died
it was recognised some years
later that his spirit had passed
into another priest who became
his successor.

Ever since, the Tibetans have
believed that the Dalai Lama ‘has
been reincarnated in the body

‘of a baby.

Visit To Lake

Sir Charles describes the tradi-
tion-bound process by which the
Lamas are chosen,

A council of priests first visits
two of the chief oracles.

The oracles give the name of
the ‘boy’s parents, the where-
abouts of his house,

To choose the Thirteenth Dalai
Lama a high priest visited one
of the mystical lakes which are
supposed to set before men’s
eyes visions of events to come.

In the glass-like surface he
saw the image of a house and a

peach-tree,
Vision
That night he had a vision of
a baby-in-arms. A few days
later he found
the peach
Recounts Sir

.the
was

successor,
Dalai Lama,
Eastern Tibet. . ‘4

Given by oracles the names
of three young boys who mle
riests found one who had died.
SR aother ran away crying when
shown the late Dalai Lama’s
things which he was supposed
to recognise,

The third, hoWever, not only
recognised the fright articles,
but also picked out the head of
the party, “The Phantom Body,
who had disguised himself,

London Express Service





BEACH SHORTS
BIE, WHITE & BEIGE
SHARK SKIN

5.80
EVANS and

WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

4

sow!

Decorations

from

& .cO., LTD.

rifles. cast of



B.B.C. PROGRAMMES

SUNDAY NOVEMBER 12, 1950.
6.15 a.m. Interlude, 6.230 a.m. Tak on
War Graves, 6.35 a.m. Remembrance Day
Service,

he
415 p.m. Music
P.m. Sunday Half Hour,

Treasure
Master of Ballan-

BOSTON
WRUL Me, WRUW 175 Mc,
WRUX 17. me, ricd P.m. Christian
. .m,
Christian Science. oe

B.B.C. RADIO NEWS

_ Learie Constantine

Trinidad is in the news in BBC
programmes in the coming week.
Speaker in next Wednesday’s
series ‘Memories of Childhood’
will be Learie Constantine, the
world-famous cricketer, This fas—
cinating talk about his early life,
his family and their surroundings,
includes an early memory of his
first attempt at cricket—with a
bat cut from a coconut tree and a
sun-dried orange or grapefruit
serving as a ball. He will speak at
7.45 p.m. right after ‘Calling the
West Indies.’

The Library And The
_ Community

“Calling the West Indies” from
London on Wednesday next—the
programme which precedes the
talk by Constantine—will be the
second in the current series by
John Figueroa of Jamaica on
‘The Library and the Community.’
In this programme John Figue7oa
interviews Miss Mary Liggett,
Chief Librarian of Guildford, a
county town just beyond the
fringes of London. Miss Liggett
who had experience of county
library work in Kent and Lan-
eashire before coming to Guild-
ford in 1942 where the work is
urban. will explain to Mr.
Figueroa the ups-and-downs of
work in a representative locality,
the general practice, and the
response of the citizen to the
services provided by the public
library. In the third of this series
Trinidad will again be in the news
as the interviewee will be Willy
Richardson of Trinidad. Broad-
‘The Library and the
Community’_is being given at 7.15
P.m. on Wednesdays.

Poetry Of Jamaica

In ‘Ceczibbean Voices’ oi. Sun-
day, 12th inst. the programme
opens with a review of the poetry
of Jamaica by Wycliffe Bennett,
Secretary of the Poetry League
of Jamaica prompted by the new
anthology, ‘A Treasury of
Jamaica Poetry’ selected and
edited by J. E. Clare McFarlane,
President of the Poetry League
The programme closes with a
short story by the able Trini-
dadian writer, Samuel Selvon,
Broadcast begins at 7.15 p.m.

The Reith Lectures, 1950
J. Z. Young, F.R.S., Professor
of Anatomy at University College,
London is to give this year’s
broadeast Reith Lectures. The
subject chosen is ‘Doubt and Cer-
tainty in Science—A Biologist’s
Reflections on the Human Brain.
The eight lectures will be broad-
cast in the BBC’s General Over-
seas Service on successive Fridays
at 6.30 p.m. beginning on the
17th inst, Professor Young's
starting-point is an account of the
knowledge that recent research
has provided of the way the
human brain functions. In his
later lectures he will give his own
conclusions as to what this new
knowledge can teach us about the
development of human thought in
general and particularly in the
field of science. The first talk is
introductory one, us ‘The
ologist’s Approach

*



THAT CARRIES








(Established
THE POLICY



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Britain May Find |
New Star Secrets
Sir Harold Spencer Jones

Astronomer Royal, believes
many new discoveries about

the
the
the

; universe and the solar system may |

be made with the telescopes ana

apparatus to be ihstalled at
; Herstmonceux, Sussex, the
. new home of the Royal
Observatory .

“There is much to be done

before the whole observatory is
moved from Greenwich, and
many more buildings to be pu
up”, he said to-day
“Part of it is already work
ing in Sussex, but the ent
move will be a slow job”.

“I expect we shall make dis-
coveries rivalling those made
recently in the United States”.

Sir Harold thinks it will be
about three years before Herst-/
monceux is used for calculating |
Greenwich Mean Time. |

Herstmonceux was __ selecte |
Observatory
exhaustive tests. |

—LES. |

as the new Royal
after

site





eee



ay

In aid of RESOLUTE SPORTS |||
CLUB |

At ||
ELLESMERE PLANTATION |
HOUSE St. George |



i
SATURDAY IND DECEMBER,
1950

ADMISSION: 38/ (by ticket only |
Danciing 9-3

Music hy Hopie Jordan'y Orchestra

Tickets not transferable
12.10.50

In

POPPY DANCE

Under the distinguished patronage \
of His Excellency the Governor ,






|

Nik

and Mrs, Savage. x

*

AT %

INE HOTEL =

S|

MAR :
SATURDAY, November 25th, % |

4
ADMISSION $1.00 % {
( Dancing trom 9 P.M ¥ x!
: 7.11,50.—an.” “9)

5

SOOSSOSSOOSEOEL ESOC
DESOSSSSSSPOPOPS SOOT OY TS
s
$|
LEEWARD CRICKET CLUB |
9 |

ANNUAL DANCE x

at

SPRING HALL PLANTATION x
HOUSE g

DEC, 2ND x

4

Music by CLEVE Gis TENS ¥
Admission by ticket %

%

DANCING from 9 p.m. to 3 u “
x |

PBE666666660600



Otte,
{




1845)

THE SEAL OF

SECURITY AND SERVICE.
DA COSTA & CO,, LTD.—Agents.

Results which have just arrived reveal that 42 Certificates witn

15 distinctions

gained by pupils of the Modern High Schoo!

at the Summer 1950 London Chamber of Commerce examination

(Certificate stage).
Details are as follows:

English
ICTOR MASCOLL: English.
Ye EST: English.

CYRIL HA 3 nalish.
STEVEN TAYLOR: English

. COURTLAND H :
. VIVIAN CALLENDER:
tinction).

. HUBERT BYNOE:
WIN WEEKES: A
. FRANCIS SABIN: French.

. MARGOT BLACKMAN:

. DO
. VITA CLARKE: Arithmetic.
ELSA MAYNARD:

N.B.—Since its establishment, this

MOSELEY: Mathematics,

IWELYN JACKSON: Mathematics
: LUE ATLAN OLDER: Mathematics (Distinction)
Mathematics (Distinction),

in their Examinations, the standard of which approximate to
of the Cambridge School Certificate



BOYS

1. EDWIN IFILL: English, Mathematics (Distinction), Arithmetic

(Dis

English, Mathematics.

(Distinction), Arithmetic (Dis-

Arithinetic (Dis

Mathematics (Distinction).
ithmetic.

GIRLS

ROSALINE WORRELL: English, Mathematics.
NE SKEETE: English.

: English, Mathematics
English, Mathematics,
hematics

Arithmetic.

(Distinction), Arithmetic (Distinetion),

CARMETA f
. MONICA SEALY: Mathematics (Distinction), Arithmetic
BENTHAM: Typewritine.
Geography
REEN MORRISON: Arithmetic (Distinction)

French (Distinction

School has gained over 200. Certificates

L. A. LYNCH

Pris

j

|



DUNLOP

UNIVERSAL

MOTOR

CYCLE TYRES
eo» )
ee

DISTRIBUTORS

DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD.

(ECKSTEIN BROS.)

ip

For

Y have Large Supplies of ...
e? we Supp

We

Your Convenience,

Xmas Rope, Tags, Tinsel Cord, Xmas Trees and
a Variety of Decorations

“e- SEE OUR STOCK and SELECT BARLY
COLLINS DRUG STORES.





Here is the Cheaper
Way !!
Por Ceilings and Partitions use
ASBESTOS FLAT SHEETS
Obtainable in 4° X% 8 lengths.

You will find it the most
economical material To-day

N.B. HOWELL

LUMBER AND HARDWARE

Dial 3306





Bay Street

FOR THE FINEST
RANGE OF



visi OUR snow

ROOM

Our Stock Includes:—

Trains, Cap Pistols, Dolls, Doll’s Furniture, Balloons,

Sailing Boats, Xmas Trees & Decorations, Tinsel &

icicles, Cards & Calendars, Crackers. A large Assort-

ment of Children’s Books for all ages. Gift Stationery

and Presentation Boxes of Soap.

ROBERTS



& CO.

Dial 3301 High Street






Specially prepared f

100 LBs.

MILLED FROM

oro?

THREE MAIDS

WARD SPRING
map

FLOUR
FORT GARRY FLOUR MILLS

COMPANY LIMITED

MILLEO IN CANADA



FORT GARRY





' PAGE FIFTEEN








Cateons

@

Baby

Powder

Make Dining



Your Greatest

select these

RHUBARB ......... OATMBAL .. ; Tins,
CHICKEN HADDIES - SODA BISCUITS .. bs
STRAWBERRIES .... |. CHEESE, Ib. and ..., |,
CHICKEN SOUP ...) ° LAMB TONGUES .. |,
MUSHROOM SOUP .. |, PICKLES . : Bois,
VEGEMITE ......... ; MUSTARD

KAISINS (Table) ....Pkgs.

|

i

SSS eee SOO>—GVmnm=n—"

SSS SSS SSS SOF SPSS SSS POS ESE ESSE SOF




IK





or

Â¥V FOR BETTER BREAD!
Â¥ FOR LARGER LOAVES!
e

For a flour high in gluten content,

high in energy values, high in quality —
always insist upon Three Maids brand!
Milled especially for you from the choicest
of Canadian wheats for the finest baking
results in your climate!

Ask your Supplier to-day for this favourite

Brand.

FLOUR MILLS Co., LTD. {

MEAT EXTRACT .... Bots.



:

COSTUME
JEWELLERY
Exquisite New Designs in

OME oi feck. saa
WINEGAR (Heinz) ..

GOLDEN Aftaow RUM
PERKINS & CO., LTD.

ROEBUCK STREET. Dial 2072 and 4502












eee ent
— SSS SS



+

Christmas
Tags & Seals

Children's Crayons

Painting Books

ADVOCATE STATIONERY
Phone 2510




Earrings, Bracelets
and Brooches
Moderately Priced
t

LOUIS L. BAYLEY —

BOLTON

JEWELLERS

LANE.

Sole Representative for the— ROLEX WATCH CO.

Oe /1
“ PEALE I OE

-

TOYS! TOYS! ~—‘TOYS!

COME AND SEE OUR LOVELY RANGE OF TOYS!

We have everything to amuse the kids.
ALSO

XMAS TREE DECORATIONS

We can supply you with the Most Beautiful

Assortment ever thought of.
ALL AT REASONABLE PRICES

Pay Us A Visit TO-DAY, and make your Selections

BARBADOS HARDWARE (CO. LTD.

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)

No. 16, Swan Street



‘Phone 2109 & 3534. ‘

%
566066660000"

TROPICAL BAKING |



———
————



lt

f

oe eee
|
|



PAGE SIXTEEN

Thieves Make
$160 Haul

N FRIDAY thieves made

hauls totalling over $160

The largest haul was from the

Ideal Store, Broad Street. From

this store they took 30 yards of

green cloth from a shelf. The
cloth is valued $72.60



A bicycle valued $55 was stolen
from Herbert’s Bakery, Tudor
Street while another thief took a
quantity of cloth, shirts and
socks, valued $33.59, from a
motor car while it was parked
at James Street (a restricted
area).

While Cpl. Devonish of the
Worthing Police Station was
patrolling along Stream Road,
Christ Church, he: discovered
that the unoccupied house,
“Dingwell”,. was broken ana
entered.

William Sturrock of the Yacht
Gregon, which is at present
anchored in the Careenage, re-
ported that his watch was stolen
while he was at Nelson Street

HE LARGE CROWD that
attended the Jocal Talent

Show at the Globe Theatre on
Friday night saw Gerald Hare-
wood carry off first prize. He
sang “Lucky Old Sun.” Secona
prize went to Cosford Husbands
who sang “Bewildered.”

Betty Taylor was given
consolation prize for singing “My
Foolish Heart.”

URING THE WEEK Mr. C. W
Rudder, Police Magistrate of
District ‘B’, sentenced Eustace
Thomas, alias “Eddie,” of Cane
Hill, St. George, to three month:
imprisonment with hard labour
Thomas was charged with stealing
a quantity of green pears ana
golden apples.

Cpl. Cyrus of the District ‘B’
Station told the Court that on
November: 1 at about 12.30 a.m
someone reported that a shirt was
stolen from a house.

In consequence of this he went
to Mount Hill, St. George where
he saw Thomas going in the dire
tion of Greens with a quantity —!
golden apples and pears. ‘Thoma
eould not tell how he had cor
by these and was arrested

Investigations were made ani
it was found out that both pear:
and apples were stolen from wees
at Good Intent, St Weorge, br-
Jonging to Mrs. Maizie Walcott.

In defence Thomas said that he
heard some boys saying they were
going for pears and he knew that
the only place they could get them
was in Mrs. Walcott’s trees. The
otHers went at 4am. but he went
at 1 a.m.

He said that he intended takin;
the pears and apples to Mrs. Wal
cott but was stopped on the way
by Cpl. Cyrus.

Thomas appeared on another
eharge of housebreaking and
jJarceny and was remanded for
seven days.

WATER SHORTAGE was ex-
/ perienced in Belleplaine this
week. Residents of this area had
to travel over hills to St, Simon's
to get water.
_ A lorry from the Water Works
Department partly relieved the
situation and crowds of peop ¢
could be seen around this.

One resident told the Advoca‘e
that the amount she receives from
the lorry is so small that she cun
only use it for drinking. She has
to find other means to do hex
washing.

HE GENERAL BOARD OF

HEALTH at a meeting ihis
week approved the following: The
land at Upper Collymore Rock and
division and sale of one lot of
Pine Plantation Roads by Wr,
C. B. Layne, qualified executor
estate of James Emanuel Farrel}.

Division and sale of land in lois
at Navy Gardens, Christ Church
by Mrs. E. G. Roach, owner -f
lot 21 by Cividing it into two lots.

Division and sale of land in lots
at Howells Cross Road, St, Michael
at the Barbadas Co-operative
Bank Ltd., with the exception of
seven lots,

Dividing and letting of lots of
land situated at the Belle Plant: -
tion, St. Michael, by the Trusteos
of the Earl of Harewoed.*

Division and sale of land in lots
at Sea View, St. James by Mr.
Cc. R. Armstrong.

Division and sale of land in lots
at Gibbons Plantation by the Bar-
bados Co-operative Bank Ltd. with
the exception of eight lets.

Division and sale of land in lets
at Grazettes Plantation, S!
Michael, by the Barbados Co-
operative Bank Ltd.

The following was postponed:
The division and sale of land in
lots at Bush Hall, St. Michael, by
Mr. Ebenezer Alleyne, Mr, Alleyne
was asked to show the stand
pipe facilities on the plot,

R. DALTON PRESCOTT,

Assistant Master at the
Boys’. Foundation School, has
been successful in the B.A, Hon-
ours (History) examination which
he sat in Barbados ir June — this
year He received Second Class
Honours (Lower Division), Mi
Prescott passed the Intermediate
Arts Examination in July 1948

SOLE COV OOSE GOP VOD SOSOS:



Grey,
Light

The Sign of
QUALITY

\OOSS9S96S6955655S90H% BE SSSSSSGSSSCSSSS ROOF

RED HAND PAINTS

FOR ALL PURPOSES

“MATINTO” FLAT PAINT
in White, Cream and Green

For Interior Decoration of Walls and
“S” ENAMEL FINISH PAINT

“SPECIAL” PAINTS.

or Interior.

PERMANENT GREEN PAINT
For Ext

RED ROOF PAINT
For Galv. Iren or Shingles.

PAINT REMOVER
For the easy removal of old paint

WILKINSON & HAYNES CoO., LTD.

Agents
t FCOD ODO POCO HOO SGO00G LUE 654 1 OE oon




pe

MR. GEORGE FORDE owner of Blue Grass, a St. Vincent entry, leads 1. The prohibition of atomic
‘ him in after his win in the Brighton Stakes. It was Jockey Slocombe’s

first win.

English Opera Gets Lost In

Covent

WORDS and MUSIC
by Marius Pope

WHEN XENIA, in a current
production at Covent Garden,
sings “My sovireign,, let not a
maiden’s foolish. tears unnerve
thee,” Boris Godounov, her father,
replies: “Gelietes kind, dein vater’s
liebling, gehe spiel mit deinen
Gesahrten .. ." ‘

This might seem odd to the
purist or the pedant, but it is not
unprecedented at Covent Garden.
The reason in this case is that
Ludwig Weber, guest star from
Vienna, does not: know English.

The case spotlights the ridicu-
lous system of importing guest
artists for most of the principal
roles at Covent Garden. Whereas
any other opera in the world
might first examine the talent at
its disposal and then plan a reper-
toire, it seems as though Covent
Garden goes about this in the
opposite direction.

For the current season's produc-
tions the guest-artist list reads
like a. Continental Opera
Singers’ Who’s Who. There are
no fewer than 21 artists listed,
who between them will be
singing 45 leading roles.

£400,000 A Year
This, then, is where we have got
vo in the four years that the
Covent Garden Opera Trust has
been in action, We are as far from

HE Y¥.M.C.A'’s “Week of

Prayer and Woerld Fellow-
ship” begins at 4.45 o'clock this
evening at the Y.M.C.A _ head-
guarters, Pinfold Street. The
prayer topic will be “Hallowed Be
Thy Name.” Mrs. A. A. Gib-
bons. President of the Y.W.C.A.,
will act as Chairman while the
Lerd Bishop will be the Speaker.
Special prayers will be offered for
the people of the Middle East.

On Monday the prayer topic
will be “Thy Kingdom Come.’
Mr. C. R. C. Springer will be
Chairman and the speaker, Rev.
D. C. Moore. On this day special
prayers will be offered for th
youth of Europe.

“Thy Will be done in Earth as
it is in Heaven” will be the praye,
topic for Tuesday when Mr, V, PR.
St.John will be Chairman, Th?
speaker will be Rev, H, Lane
Prayers will be offered for the
people of Africa.

1.D. MEN bkave recovered

some of the artic es sto'en last
week. A clock and chairs stolen
from the Pentecost Church at
Marshall Gap and a_e sewing
machine which was stolen from
Aletha Hinds of Baxters Road
were recovered. Two people are
charged in connection with these
thefts,

T 10.30 a.m. today the Police ,

4 Band will play at the
Remembrance Service at St
Michael’s Cathedral.

SERIES OF TALKS on

Health and Child Welfare
will be given at the Princess Alice
Pavilion on November 30. This is
organised by the Health Visitor
of the St, Michael's Sanitary
Department,

RK, CHARLES THOMAS’ fifth

lecture on the Theatre will

take place at the British Council

on Tuesday, November l4th, at

8.15 pm. The subject is “Make
Up.” {



POOP,

Woodwork.

White and Cream

Dark Grey, Tropical White B'dos
& Dark Stone. For Exterior



erior or Interior

Phone 4267, 4456.

OOP LAA A ALLL EAP EELS ILPLA ELLAAL ELL AA AAO A

:



(wm

SUNDAY ADVOCATE
THE WINNER | Peace Congress



To Be Boycotted

@ From Page 1

| costs, no matter how many dele-
| gates were turned back.

Sloan said that the British Gov-
ernment was “planning to keep
out all members of the 150 strong
| permanent Committee of the
| Peace movement though they
annot ban Congress.

Tvor Montagu, British member
| of the permanent Committee flew
.o Prague last night to discuss
arrangements with other members
concerning delegates stranded
there following the British Gov-
ernment’s withdrawal of their
chartered planes. The Committee
may decide to hold a simultane-
cus conference in the Czech capi-
| tal.

Tightened security arrange-
}ments were in force at all ports
| and airfields in Britain. Each dele-
gate will be checked against
dossiers prepared by the Home
Office in consultation with the
Foreign Office.

Immigration men today ordered
a ban on reporters and pnoto-
graphers at Harwich quayside
where Dutch and Danish dele-
gates were expected.

The Congress has been called to
further the aims of the “Stock-
holm Peace Petition” which calls
for:














weapons with international con-
trol and inspection.

2. A declaration that the first
users of atomic weapons be
branded as war criminals,

The agenda will include dis-
cussions on the reduction of arma-
ments, the halting of war propa-
ganda and the war in Korea.

IT's
TIME.

HURRY
and Order





Garden

the establishment of a national
opera as we were before we
started,

A tremendous amount of money
is being spent, but so far there
has not been the glimmer of a
long-term benefit. Sir Steuart
Wilson has revealed that running
costs at Covent Garden are £400,-
000 a year, not including produc-
tion costs. The Arts Council gives
£ 120,000.

What has all this money
bought us? A few good produc-
tions, many indifferent and
bad ones... But no national
opera.

There are several reasons for
this, but one of the most import-
ant, I believe, is that English as
a singing language falls below its
chief operatic rivals in sonority,
carrying power and articulation.
In short, English opera gets lost
somewhere in the’ vastness of
Covent Garden.

But on the other hand the
opera at Sadler's Wells Theatre,
also sung in English translation,
succeeds where Covent Garden
fails) The new production of the
Wolf-Ferrari , opera, School for
Fathers, is a delight visually and
acoustically.

Astonishingly most of the Eng-
Jish words of all the singers can
be heard and understood, making
the printed synopsis superfluous.

If there is a germ of a National
Opera in English anywhere at
the moment, it exists at Sadler's
Wells.

What Does It Mean ?

Second important reason for
the muddle at Convent Garden
is the schizophrenia this organ-
isation seems to suffer when it
tries to define what it meaas
by a “national opera.”

At various times this phrase
has meant:

(a) English-composed operas
sung by English singers;

(b) Italian, French or German
operas sung in their origina!
language with some English
singers in the cast; and

(c) Italian French, German or
Russian operas sung in’ English,
even though most of the princi-
pals are foreign

They Know

At least Sadler’s Wells, within
# more modest framework, have
a clear idea of where they are
going, It wou'd not come amiss
at this stage for the premier opera
house to go cap in hand and seek
some guidance from its clear-
minded junior partner.

An authoritative statement on
‘ts aims and progress is long
overdue from the Royal Ope
House administration.

WORLD COPYRIGHT






































































EXHIBITION





RESERVED AND
London Express Servic:
The Weather XMAS SUI S

TO-DAY
Sun Rises; 5.53 a.m, °
Sun Sets: 5.35 p.m. |
Moon (First Quarter) No-
vember 16,
Lighting: 6.00 p.m.
High Water: 5.47 a.m., 5.20
p.m.
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) Nil
Total for month to yesterday
1.37 ins.

Temperature (Min), 71.0 °F.

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.
(11 a.m.) E.N.E,

Wind Velocity 6 miles per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.944
(11 a.m.) 29,939



You are assured of
looking at your best
in a Suit tailored

by
PCS. MAPFEL &
C0., ITD.

Top Scorers in Tailoring

cd



2
L GORGONZOLA CHEESE

EDAM CITEESE (Dutchman's Head)
| E
| LUSCIOUS COOKING PRUNES

GOUDA CHEESE
New Zealand CHEESE 3/- |b.
~ : es
% || AHegne Arthur & Co., Ltd. }j
——— ew 4







































| CAVE

10, 1, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET





—oOo———————eEeEeEeeeEEEeeeeeee—







See our showcase

Cc. B. Rice & Co.

—

for the season's
ot

NEW
> TWEEDS

~~ the cream of our
â„¢

specialists

in

em

Department
se

PRS FF PO Oe FOG

of materials which we have

| This is an entirely new stock
|! just opened.

Fancy striped in light and
dark shades to suit your
tastes.

high class

See them to-day —
wear them to the
Exhibition

SHEPHERD & Co.,Ltd.

tailoring

Bolton Lane
Bridgetown








KING “SMILER ~

MAKES HIS SELECTION
FROM HIS LOYAL

‘

Here are the twelve subjects of His Majesty King “Smiler” who have been
selected for final judging on November 18th at the Hastings Rocks :

‘, Sm
Here they are, all bouncing babies with the ‘glow of health and happiness
associated with all COW & GATE babies. MN" =e" a tear ana |

TOP ROW. (left to right) Richard Linton, son of Mrs. Joan Linton Of Rellman’s Land, Black Rock,
St. Michael.
Betty Leigh Clarke, daughter of Mr. and Mrs, Clyde Clarke of “Galveston”, Strathclyde”
St. Michael.

Jeffrey Carlisle Barrow, son of Mr. and Mrs. Deighton Barrow, of Bridge Road St. Michael.

SECOND_ROW:—Anderson King, son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy King of St. Leonard's Village, Westbury
Road, St. Michael.

Bernard Wilkie, son of Mr. and Mrs. Colin Wilkie of “Elswick”, 8th Ave., Belleville.
Marcia A. Watts, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L., M, Watts of “Coralynn”, Belmont Road, St.
Michael.

Winston Roosevelt Gilkes, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lolita Gilkes of “Bronxville”, Black Rock, St.
Michael.

Beverley Haynes, daughter of Mr, and Mrs. Beresford Haynes. of Bannister’s Land, Martin-
dale’s Road, St. Michael.

THIRD ROW:—LaJu N. Thani, daughter of Mr. and Mrs, N. A. Thani of Brighton, Black Rock.
Wendy Angela Roach, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Roach, of Three Houses Factory, St.
Philip.

BOTTOM ROW:—Valerie Evelyn McKenzie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. N. McKenzie of “McNeath”,
Navy Gardens, Christ Church.

Carson Elvin Grannum, son of Mr. and Mrs. Warwick Grannum of “La Song”, Dayrells
Road, Christ Church.

The final judging for- Barbados’ Bonniest Baby will take place at Hastings
Rocks on Saturday, November 18th at 3.30 p.m when all parents with their children
who have entered the competition are cezdially invited to attend.



£

: {

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1950



+ ¥ OOO, sv
LPL SEM ELLE LLL AE BLE A PLL LESEPPLEE POSS

PRCOCESSES" LOL 080000000006 554--O1E16:5S ‘FOO NOOOOG



SUBJECTS i

SSS.

PRELLS +





f
|



t. B. LESLIE & CO., LTD eke




PAGE 1

SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 12, 1IM SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN VA-AWAWAV MANTRAP how )u*t precisely what the Junto help a gle has Said Dyall leopards but never ilevoted tt I'..head 'TODAY'S WITNESS: Valentine Dyall THE MAN IN BLACK B) UBISI ILLA MVUS Briefly put. he expects skill too. He is all that "J-look-a-druam-in To show how Valentine Dyall— in spite of himself—can be caught where he feels it moat. Robb draws the proof. To-day'* Mantrap -No, 2 In the series—has the sort of face that stays like that for the next ten Years. She wears a hat few could. But the main thing about her is the ocelot muff . "nice even if a shade vulgar", said Mr. Dyall in a voice his radio listeners never MANTRAPPEKS can be proud o! Mr Vnlentine Dyuil. Men or his sort bring distinction to the re; old pastime. anything" girl: We tried t> tempt hi must pray to miss. 'A honey blonde drenched in mink?" "Sot that corny old gag." he died wearily. re tried again: "A fur finery to There's only one concession. The Man in Black makes to the mooorthodox ideas of mantrap luipment pcarb on black sure* CllUlpI glove L.ES BOY OBSERVERS Youth expert Miss Pearl Jephmtl in a lecture in London to ide National Marriage Guidance Council, asserted that "boy observing" was the main occupation of Britain's Miss Teen-age, 1950. Miss Jephcott. a youth research worker at Nottingham University, told her audience that youth organisations. especially girls' clubs, should pay less attention to sport, drama and handicrafts and to cater for such interests as boys, love, romance, homes, husbands and children. She added: "The problem of youth organizations is how to attract the negative. boy-c*essed type of girl, and to show her. thai security can in (act also be %  found. elsewhere than In her boy. In whom are all her hopes for %  home and children." Mils Jephcott warned the Council that most young girls. especially from the working class, expected to marry young, and geared their lives to that expectation tn, i. -.< %  From a survey she had madi in one town in the Midland:* she continued, a third of tin girls' time was spent In ways it which they could, directly or indirectly meet boys. She said: "Going to the movies Is < socially accepted way of seem, boys," "There is the queue, for -i-iHiiien lliere is thv proximity in the cinema. In thi street afterwards oi in the ll'h and chip tdiops." Other devices listed by Miss Jephcott for boy -watching" were walking, dancing, cycling, and, with the older girls, the bars. Miss JopheoU asked: •'I wonder whether youth organisations should not accept the situation for this type of girl and for a time give up their dangling of sports, handicrafts, drama and the tike and concentrate on the avowed Interests — boys, love, romance and a husband?" —I.N.8. Unwanted Boys LONDON The Reverend Henry Hughes. of St. Bernardo's Britain's biggest orphanage home, said today that nearly all people wanting to adopt babies ask for the bit eyed blonde girls under veers of age. Boys, he added, are •eld asked for— IN 8. Tongue IVsiiis READ those aloud rapidly, and se* if you can avoid tripping your tongue: Cecil Caesar ceaselessly sawed cedar strlos. Sunhlne on shop signs. liester hissed Loeter MyteelcaUy. Lester lacked lustre. Glowing gleams growing green Shall Sheila scallop shallop*" Sheathing sheer sheets. Bothering both blue bl< bloweis. PAIR THEM SORT tbc following 3-lUcr words out m pain to Owl when llh mtiol luior OWN form 7-letter wot* For n(riple. THY-S-IL LET FVR ELF II K HAY UA1 HER I:I it ALL AIL K \M KIN ARK SIN FIT M.I THY AND Take A Test IF ft .|iiall> %  ullaneouAg a t""st %  %  with your left hand and a square ".'h your rtght hand hot* at fesM K-inr lime CAB ATK %  UN ACT ! %  %  > % % %  a.qt01 J*MU. %  I**" tl*'l -4TI 'isiiM iwu"* *n"i •• -im •* P*l|l *i umi ]|V %  •fief* ASiHMA MUCUS loosened First Day %  mi )-ur %  l-T %  vti-1 riiarsT annthrr .|>r or at|hl •nh.ul (Tflni HUN !>*('<' Thi. irii rnxllrlB* la aet %  %  mas*. lHiciidB w i.fT, but •,.!*-. ihrauk %  > bln-4. thiM IM.IUM ifcr lunga ea btonchUJ Mkw The fin' •low MSI fcll a ht a •<-'• ln.rr*l • i-It 1 warm I H*lpa leoan an.l re!" % %  UOra MTBIII>C HUH-.*!, t. Tfcu. 'i •! Iir'ml FIIIIC mid Bi'unSa' EJE IflHRfRl Rupert's Autumn Primrose—9 The jngry votot got* on and Edward movai sway from th< %  kstlea m MOM anxiety, without •hm*ing aaochcr ball. W>h R up ii he peeps behind ihc sull. In (ront el hint as ttu the rsaginaaier and J .low-n. The litiW imar. laolu sen %  mused u tenaeihing. but tht tall one ia -*ar annoyed. Ht holdi ool a ahint top hi: *xh it. luai wan LIIHII I nnd who did tha* I" ha iioimt. "I'll KI. I. hon i Ireson." "Oil. goll>. >t n beta my .hot |h*J kiw*-krd hia hi cat I" whiar*'* Ed.n.l. -*hn oa can* can I do abota H ?" He baika quit fly out ol ught aravaa. eui A*e||e|e CUTEX SpsjUiiig, fiuiclcss, in sgit w rs r CUTBX, brings your haudg aew admiration ... easy to apply.,. dries faster, too. The polish that wears lunger — resists peeling and chipping . and comes in such brilliant sluuies. eTeVeTESX WnU i BHII p.a.j-r %*^0Vm So beautifully i m eafJteaT JsjaeafWW because "—" %  '' %  %  i ii *— %  i^ 1 -ban Uwi.kaA, F—RW gli m ** I I ...i uxii B.. Iloui (Ma lk> •*• orf mat Urn kAka • iMi • -...""••• '•"'". >ki|a !(•• wk katfki k km %  aoaaaobla n u Wk • •••Jarfwl ARwwi Rflvwwwm mmm m M> of m coloonot. Ho i m i ni l n m •* %  *iu >ii. tf> m snuufuu. an IIIMI k. Msieianting good looln ami bswut) of lexlurt'. Ami wlial wundfrful (oUnirn!. .. \\ li.ii ii.i.nthey artvery hardwrariug and %  Testl. -up.il.l). V^ith tin ir gfisfa rjiiiiol hxliirt* and dfMgn. Tootal Flbficsl are inhnitily ail.iplahliand I joy li< make up. \l.in\ anliurLvd i. rui.mii (ur Ic-ti d fgf gjgai Hsjiitapog. Snine I'aiuoui TOOTAL la\ouriles I.VSTAV < %  •! %  %  > hsyssj Mail ••( dlatieelive %  lwt.nli-i. Iii.Iih j.l-i.l-l.li-. hitti u tparkbng I I,, wrfses end ..ipplr IMSBSI i. SSMSB] %  '•< BH — H| esSBfVi •" ->* %  int iriiliinil •l)kr> In iuiin> mil alniu I I loi |>Uii. -I,J.. \\ ...(..,i.,. .in.l ni.iik"! n HII i/U'lnf Ir.itd iirawrraiajeuoe. AT? ^-u All good. .1,1,1 l,\ ili. CasssaafSBj ajjsj bsssSSSb] tin r'-giahrrd iradr mark l*i 01 Ittt wwral> AII.IIHI r-Knui i i aos assssgaUl• dl NSjIaM "< M ">luiid thf pries and pay thr CSstt in.urred in making up. 1UHKAIIO il.. wil d fc l U SMe t S U\HU BM %  Irea'i rkrtl ssMiiilWeSg, '• I, | ..-M I BSMll ill I rsrrllrntr. .11 i, (ssal aesl) sfai SHI aw sfjgea, <• >< • i n-i. .inil r.. i piipnasjl sfsnaga l JII a ulli *>id" raiie of s>y culuuf* ..ml SSsegBtfWl printa. TOOUM4. \B atiraclivr drraa fehric uf apun rayon te*ea in di.liix Ur -l>lr. I'hr nniiMi il li llnrr lirinlllrii' llir ii|i| UiaTA^ n, tar • 111. IIHHIW si |..~f B* M...iii. leilafiag -.r drapMej *.tli anal .,.,... w ,.i, ,i.i. ,,,.) inuk.-i ii mi i/i n lur tr-lni i r.'iia'-ir'aialiill.r ROMA i sMk refcsyas teassa ih-i *.di kreao sasl trasf Miiilasilj. sat nil Hs rfaai Us aspaaraff G] asrissMl MagSsffeaseSsBeTa |. in. Iri.il..atl Uvrly pUiu ..il.i.irm Ins be) -..liiunrd pritii. ewd ssSjajg•.IM.I .1. i.'". M.nii'l liUIII/tD bir Ir.trJ II.I.I lKI-\s|. SKShlANO: MUM TnolJ leaVrtgi rsffj tag ssUsttsskfJ liasV "*** %  I mi if) i. I In null. ulr llml ill' futiri' ha* I IM.I i.-ird lasasaaae il,.i ,i b ,ll -.,.1 .1, i „.l-rak\BBSSrsaeaVtS. hui irests i sslnlsg >u.L leftssss *-*-ii |sjgsaa)| it \ ,,, .... i rkoaeSf "i"l rtreCaJ "i4(i .olutmufa> CM luWTaU. aM •> / ^(^(^ / r J 7 ^J J 5U***nA*d $U** % 



PAGE 1

PAGE FOUm SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12. I4M I W.I. CRICKET COACHES I ii I <1 ii.11 i< >n.11 \ II Ki HI mil r A Suitable Choice BY O S. COPPIN :l &T" ..ltd 'ci|i€is.il licfm* cket Boaro of Control to utilise ihe ..'...-. I Weckca i Valcotl as roaches for di iil be mat %  .. %  da* + As far as 1 have been able to discover, the HftttM hag just readied the proposal stage but H OODl it'i any scheme aimed at the development of erickrl in the Windward and Leeward Islands, that the West Indies Cricket Board of Control, if their word Is the final one, should find no difficulty in doins the obviously rtghi thing on this occasion. GOOD FAITH TMiE fact that at their recent meeting in Trinidad the Weal Indies X Cricket Board of Control granted £500 to each of the Windward and Leeward Islands Cricket Associations to aid the improvement of cricket in those Islands, is a suHicicnt earnest of their g-od faith and the appointment of Walcott and Weekes should therefore be an automatic one. I would be partafularl) happy l o "' this comes of! for another reason. I have already stressed at some length in this column that some definite search should be made by the West Indian cricket powers -t hat -be for talent in the Windward and Leeward Islands that might be of use to future West Indies cricket and I am thinking of the immediate future of West Indies cricket—their viait to Australia next year. FINE OPPORTUNITY T HAT being the cose, I could think of no finer judge* of the menu of candidates for West Indies' honours than Clyde Walcott and Everton Weekes nor an> Opportunity so fitted for doing so than coaching engagement in the Windward and Leeward Islands. This hung* me back to another argument of mine and I think that the time is npe to throw out the suggestion again The Woat Indies Cricket Board of Control should -d once set about in an endeavour to find two good pace bowlers for the Australian lour. It 15 true that we must always be on the lookout for any cricket talent be it pace bowling, slow bowling, wicket-keeping, batting or lielding. WE NEED FAST MEN B UT il must be conceded that it takes more time to train a pace bOWllC und nama him up to the physical condition that would be inquired of him in Imperial cricket, thin it would in the ... of slow bowler el these are the exceptions to prove a rule that has been found correct through the long history of Test cricket rot only in the case of Barbados, but has alsp been the exnerien. BOn to with English ond Australian Test cricket RACING RESULTS ThirdDafsRacing AT GARRISON SAVANNAH, SATL'KDAY. •* C7 AT GARRISON SAVANNAH, SATL'KDAY NOVEMBER 11. 1950 \\\ \\ Ht.K : Mne TRACK : ST. LAWRENCE HANDICAP—Clasa B -n* Lame WM (MM, |1M. W*t- Farlang* TIUEHIAN LADY 108 5 lbs. SUN WUEEN 128 lbsSEVENTEENTH RAVE got underway, The lleKI Vanguard from Sopr.no. of five. Iliv.r Sprite and Usher trailed another four V. Chase. Jockey Wilder %  18; Placer $2 14. $1.84 3. LANUMAItK 128 lbs. 1 TIME |jf|, I'AKIMUTL'EL Win KOHECAST. 25.20. ALSO RAN. Fheuxce (121 lbs., Thirk.-ll>, Infusion (113 lbs., Ho). dctj STAHT: Good. FINISH; Easv. 4 lengths, | length. %  PINNER: 6-yr-old br.m. Tiberius-Warm Welcome. TRAINER: Mr. V. Chase. i -in Race : ROCKLEV HANDU Ar-Ctaea D and Lower—$§t*T (fZU, UU, M5>— Furlong. OATCAKE 133 lbs Mr V ChtsM Jogta Wilder. 2. WATERCRESS 124 lbs. Hon. J. D. Chandler. Jockey O'Neil MARY ANN 106 lbs. Mr. F. E C. bethel I. Jockey Lutchman. TIME: 1.591. PARI-MUTUEL; Win: 54 34; Place: $2.04; $2.00 KOHKCAST: $9.72. ALSO RAN: KendaJ FOtl 115 lbs.. Crossley). START. Fairly Good. FINISH Comfortable. 4 lengths. 2 lengths WINNER: 5-yr.-old b.g. O.T.C.-Condiment TRAINER: Mr. V. Cha V. Chase. Jockey O'Neil. J. W. Chandler. J2**Ugg2!f* Kidstcad having been scratched l*Ui behind. On reaching the guns, Crossley made a great bid on Vanguard and lessened the distance between Flame Flower and his mount. Soprano meanwhile shook off determined bid from Usher for \s they passed the Judges the first : i>ion (Holder) led, folti.wed by Fllouxi.(Thirkell). Sun (vueen • %  %  !" %  del. with ttS^"iV _^.rir J'.SJ'SVE SI'S Qn home first a length ahead of Flame Flower. Soprano took third place, winning from Usher by two lengths I91h I K.II I I I N II RACE ROCKLEY HANDICAP This race wa easily won by • >ata k< in. oppi Mtion riding out tin trt.gh' ,m for home. I).. .i-elhi .i. Firi'mri were scratched in Uiii-vent and four entrants started Oatcake was soon m the lend with Watercress ST. JAMES HANDICAP—Class F *m€ Vt Only—Site und Kendal Fort following closely. Kendal Fort took over the lead v;hlle passing the stands for the C Bethell r,ral llme l "> Onleake drew level being challenged by April Jockey Lutchman % %  '"•' "* 1 1 %  "•OtstJ UU four Flowers and Colkton as Uie 2. MISS FRIENDSHIP 113 + 2 Mr. F. E. C. Bethell. furlong pole I ey bunched soon horses went past the Stands for Jockey Yvonet after but neanmj the three fur,he fl l L Ume ."* Flight 3. FOXGLOVE 114 lbs. Mr S A Walcott. Jockey Wilder long pole Oatcake again went to 'fC !" 8 *** 1 her lead afou nd tn e TIME: 1.001 PAHI-MUTL'EL Win $.140, Place $2 58; $3.02; $4.16 the front Ur K ed by Wilder ho **"* %  . ^ .K. FORECAST: $67.08 Increased his pace rapidly and Tn * hm H1 bunc ^ rt h .?,' 25 O80AAM Mcur. (Ill U 0TW1) I ... Urn IM In r,.,,, . i tared \ \ me S&J^'igtlE* ifflrTSS Pharos II <103 lbs. Baldwin). Bonnie Lass (104 lbs., All); Apollo "'".V"..!' 11 u ]' kept to the fore. Down the home(1235. 5115. $4t>—H Filssiia FIRST FMCJHT 111 tb HI TWKNTY-TIIIRD RACE BELLEVILLE HANDICAP Three horses Having been cratched. five started with Bonite Lass, carrying 14.lbs. overweight and First Flight and Foxglove Lib. eachFirst Flight hustled by Yvonet was soon in the lead and (126 lbs.. H Fletchei i START: GOOD. FINISH CkOM WINNER: 4-yr.-old. ch f. Fox brush -Foutlet. TRAINER Mr. J. B. Gill. head, I length MMj lac* | GRAVESEND HANDICAP—Claaa G and Ltmr $itv ($2M. $100. $40)—IV. Furlongs VV.I.'H BKST Bi-rr T HE match winning economy of West Indian cricket, has, up lo the 1039 tour been based on fast bowling and although events m England this year changed this for the purposes of that lour yel it is quite probable that in Australia we may have to find mm very quick men to spearhead oui attack. Where are they? Wi Dust : Lh. ED TDtJ .„,somewhere in the West Indies and having found reasonably young ones we must train them up to International standards. Jt would be lolly to iliim wliulely upon Uu Intcuulonial matches scheduled lor next year to discover who can Ml ihc hi|[ Uy that unithe might not be responsive lo the intense i raining' tnat would be required of him. —**; But then, who would train him? All these questions the West Indies Cricket Hoard of Control must tackle and soon at that WATLR POLO SELECTION SOON N^anotlier seven days, tho Isurbados Water POBQ team which will field of eight. Miss Friendship carrying 2 lbs. overweight. First Flight (Lutchman) got of! first, followed by Apollo (P Fletcher). FlrWt Flight led il l.l.ri. DIAMOND . 106 lbs Mr. R. E. Gill Jockey Lutchman DUCHSSS • %  126 lbs. Mr. F E. Bynoe. Jockey Holder FLYING ANN 120 lbs Mrs. C. J. Akien Jockey O'Neil TIME; 1.39j. PAHI-MUTUEL: Win: $5.00; Place: $1 88, $1 54; $1.10. FORECAST; $48.48. ALSO RAN: Mopsy (116 lbs.. Wilder); Wllmar (100 lbs., Baldwin); pole topofe m Sun Jewel (110 + 2 lbs.. Thirkell); Bachelors Folly (122 lbs); *tni(r<;le put Dp b v Miss FriendCrossley); Front Hopper (100 + 4 lbs All); Blue Grass (130 lbs P. "hip (Yvonet). ,ust as the field Fletcher); Vixen (126 lbs. Yvnnclj; START : Fairly Good. FINISH : Close, ', length. WINNER: 3-yr.-old hb. brg. O.T.C.-Call Girl. TRAINER: Mr. J B. Gill inner all th At this ftau.. he was never 6u ^ton however CoUeton MTious y challenged and reached Foxglove challenged and over" %  '-'' '•• %  i-rigthi in fi m oi .,„. k her Coli ten (Crossley Watercress. This horse was secU p) increased his lead steadily to ond two lengths away from Mary win the race by a length and a Ann. nn if from Foxglove. Foxglove NINKTKI-A'TI! RACE was second two lengths away 8T. JAMES HANDICAP t' om Flrst Flight. Tango was vt.itched leaving raced jiast thf i hend. while Mis TWKNTY-FOURTII RACK FINAL HANDICAP This was a keenly contested race from start to finish and Atomic II in what was probably !" an upset, won the event by a head from Pharlitc. Five horses were scratched and six started with Infusion carrying 13 lbs. overweight Sun Queen in the lead when the horse S*rM4Tnde"for this division and having *^ V Jo?S^ ^PrintTven" str^g. to two days lor *" iCU 7^ h j[ ££!L 0ul m this Sun Queen, I am told, |U0t ^^^^^^rin^rSce between the* two and i'do'aot think there is much certainly results at this meeting w* 11 rt Him-s and their range of distal very i Apollo won Friendship ill be They past week and given another couple practice, they should definitely give a good account of l).iit>afl %  mid play a series of Test roaUhes against a Trinidad team, selected. The ladies team too ought soon to bo announced .•ave improved gieallv of weeks | themaelvea. Koddy Bynoe. the Trinidad captain, wh> liis team are also hard al work in Trinidad. It Is not yet known whether Trinidad has been practising bv lluodlight for two of the testa are to be played under tloodhglit C0Oilitions. The liarbiidos learn has not yet done any practising at nigh' but it is anticipated that the lights will be ready [or night practice* IB another week. The novelty of these night matches, apait from ihefact that they are intercolonial contests should attract a gigantic MM A HEAVY shower of rain about mid-day on Sunday last washed r out play in tho Tourists v B.C.L. game at Carlton. it has however been decided to continue the game as a three day match and the game will begin to-day and continue on the two Sundays following. !" The Representative Council of the League ou Thursday appointed sub-selection committees for each division. These will select the teams for the Mies of games against Tourists XI. A change of programme was agreed to by the Council, it had been planned to combine the Leeward and windward t. imi %  tin Tourists and the South and Central. The new plans call for a match between Windward ami l Uti anuihcr between South and Central. On the showing of players in IheM two preliminary games the Selections Committee will select a U t.i'.ive Country XI to meet the Tourists. After the Tost against the Tourists it Is hoped to play a game against the Barbados Colts. TRAIN THE UMPIRES T HE meeting approved a scheme for the training of umpires in League Cricket. In future Umpires will be called to rcgister cach season The registration fee will be sixty cents. T(je League will run a class of instructions and all umpires will liiltend This will be followed by an examination on the results of which Umpires will be graded. A Class Umpires will be tnUttod to receive B4 cents per day and B class 60. Clubs will not be obligated to umpires other than those holding a certitlcute fiem the League. f IM Race : NOVEMBER HANHICAP—Clasa C and Lawrr—*IM (026.1 iisj. 50)-0 Furlongs REUATE 126 lbs. Mr. M E. R. Bourne Jockey Baldwin FUEUXCE 126 lbs Mr S A. Walcott Jockey Wilder TIBERIAN LADY 127 lbs. Mr. V. Chase Jockey Thirkell TIME. t.00. PAHI-MUTUEL. Win: 0S.S4; Place; $2.22; $2.00. FORECAST; $10.08. ALSO RAN: Ability (115 f 1 lb. M. Gonzalez); Kitchen Front (113 lbs., O'Neil) St. Morltz (130 lbs., Holdci >. START: Fair. FINISH: Close, length, neck. WINNER: 3-yr.-old dk. br.f. Pay Up-Bachelor's Dream. TRAINER: Mr. M. E. R. Bourne. was In, half a length ahead of pawed' the 'stands'"for"the'*nrst Foxglove (Wilder) time, followed by Phorlite. AtomtP TWENTH'Til R\("F *"' intus on Gunsito and Rebate i.mvivi \n i.v,i* •'! 'be "icier mentioned. Sun oSSLt 1^51, M "* Um ,_*•>• l'hnrlil.at Ihf (our turloiiK pole. i.lmi ,,T,Z ""-,' illM>rbut quickly shook him off. A oSS.^.X a "^* T"S "2 further l„u howovcr. bright h, m f !" """ *P" Hopper l.vol at tho Clock Atomic II who :V£ZL J .??J! ^^fj. %  •< 2 "-I been moving steadily ??n4 i; % %  | Jt'NIOK 1IAND1CAT—Claaa T aad Lsrer— $T% ($235, $115. $40)—5H Furiosurs I. VANGUARD . .. 116 lbs.. Mr. V. E. Cox Jockey Thirkell 2 FLAME FLOWER 126 lbs. Mr. Cyril Barnard Jockey Holder .' %  SOPRANO 113 | lUl Ml L K Fish.-. Jockey Yvonel TIBO |.I0|. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $6.00; Place $1.44; $1.20. FORECAST: $7.02. ALSO RAN: Usher (116 lbs., Baldwin). START: Fairly Good. FINISH: Close, 1 length, 2 lengths WINNER 2-yr-old brg. OT.C.-Hurrieane. TRAINER: Mr. A. P. Cox. BISS^ %  k., ov,rwel hl meanwhile made an all out effort liaoieiors Folly was left flaidown the home-stretch to capture %  ooted and trailed the Held for the premier position. PhaPlite |iic entiro disuin**. uiu* Diamond urged by Lutchman was going well towi the lead and passed the in front by now and at one time ''"'"' 'or the llrsl time in this it appeared as if be might have m S foUowe \126 lbs lion J. D. Chandler Jockey Crossley 2. FOXGLOVE 1 10 + 1 lb. Mr. S. A. Walcott Jockey Wilder 3. FIRST FLIGHT 114 4 1 lb Mr. F. E. C. Bethell Jockey Yvonet TIME: 2 00 PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $2.86; Place: $1.68; $2.06. FORECAST: $13.48. ALSO RAN: Bonnie Lass (90 f 14 lbs, AH); April Flowers (126 lbs,. P. Fletcher). START: Good. FINISH: Comfortable. 1| lengths, 2 lengths. WINNER: 3->r.-old brg. Rcstlgouehe-Summer Breere TRAINER: Mr J. W Chandler. 24th Race; FINAL HANDICAP—Claast A and Lower 51.000 ($335, $105. $00)—IM Farlonga i t .f u. MAY ENTER SENIOR CRICKET T HE meeting appointed a special committee compri. representatives of each division together with tinofficers of the League to consider to work out details of a scheme fur entry of a B.C.L. XI into the competition of the Barbados Cricket Association competition. Diamond kepi i„ the fore and though seriously challenged by Duchess, was well hustled by jockey Lutchman to win by half, u length, Duchev (Holder %  •vond place just a ueck .. from Flying Ann. TWENTY-FIRST RACE NOVEMBER HANDICAP Firemisl and Fair Contest were Kiratched leaving seven to face the Starter. Ability carrying 2 lbs overweight, got the worst of the jump. while Tiberian Lady iThirkell) led the Field, with Flleuxce (Wilder) and Rebate (Baldwin) following in that order. Tiberian Lady increased tho lead .lightly just after passing the 1'addock Bend. Rebate challenged strongly. The Held bunched at thj Guns and out of tho usual dJtagt %  long struggle in theHomeatretcii Rebate emerged winner a lengtn ahead of Flieuxe. The latter was By M. Hitnson CrjDeater 0760 f IHI &f J 4 A 16? WE. AH... 4>AKI0$ 1. %  10 • K 1U 3 & • %  4111 K g v a 4> 4 I 0 A J n f AfliJ j 0AI41 ] South ignored his part> ner's sign oil and the penalty neck Tiberian Lady front Of Jockey ON ATOMIC II 125 lbs. Mr. James Chin PHARLITF. Ill lbs. Mr Clyde Vierra Jockey Lutchman W. Chandler Jockey Holder 3. SUN QUEEN 117 lbs. Mr TIME: I 33|. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $2.80; Place: $1 FORECAST: $22 20 AISO KAN: Rebate (110 lb*. Baldwin); Infusion (97 Wilder*; Gun Site (133 lbs., Crossley). START: Oood FINISH: Close, head. length. WINNER 6-yr.-old b.h. O.T.C.-Aprll Shi TRAINER: Dr. C. A. Evelyn $2.74. TWENTY SECOND RACE JUNIOR HANDICAP Cross Rood*. Hi-Lo, Consternation and Dunese were scratched and a field ol four spirited and restless tw.i-year-olds faced the starter. + 13 lbs. When the gate Dew. Usher with (Baldwin up) was totally uuprepared but Flame Flower, tho favourite, carrying top impost of I3S lbs was quickest out of the X Heart. North Did Two Hearts. East Tso spades and South %  > Thne Diamonds. Three > Clubs Is a better uial bid, as \ Uiat ts where help la needed I With eight losers only. l Norths Three Hearts was I ^ conservative, bu*. South went ; on to game and West doubled ) Declarers plaf matched nis bidding Determmed to (_|H cvei %  I mease "• Mfl>'( be led Z alter rufflng.Uie i second l > alter ruBni the 1 Hpadr. East HV 10. i last trump. South had still %  fifth trick to lose. By j maklna the correct lead ol 4 3 from his own hand at ( i trick 3. South can win 10 | tricks bear me out. They are botii „ balance l would pUica at any.*., % %  — Tai.r .xi however I would not he surr^us^^^^-s^s^%  u, M h d S: the asking when only two furlong* were complcU-^. By his many victoria. In Trinidad Atomic U has clearly ^o** %  ** "g ffl Irom in front and the race in which he set up a "^/"^ Trmidad Si furl(gs, it will be rcinwnbered, was a flag-faU-4o-flnih SuTwith lumseif as pace maker and everything else. Consequently when ho had to be re-awakened to catch up with Rebate and Infuslqn 1 do not think he was accustomed to this sort of thing. Gun Site on the other hand is famous tor his grinding snorts over the last lour or five furlongs and onc# more he came through to win from behind. In fart 1 cannot think of any horse who has %  .Hatched victory 6o consistently in tight lini.shes a ft Gun Site. A year ago at this same meeting we saw himself and The Gambler oe up with each other in a gruelling run over the final three 'urlongs | a B class nine. Last March saw him nose out Beacon Brignt at tne finish of a 7, and now we have him giving Atomic H similar treatBut In the Final Handicap yesterday it was Atomic II who came on the scene in the closing stages. Of course he could hardly have been expected to outfoot a But lUly like Sun (Jueen in the early stages But he tracked herself and PharlUe until he finally wore them down with a grand effort in the stretch. The time of the race was also flattering and it Is the only time for the meeting comparable to any returned when the going has been very hard. It therefore clearly demonstrates Atomic Il's class. Between himself. Gun Siio and Oatcake, with whom I shall deal later, we saw three of the best sons, in fact I would say "the three best sons" of O.T.C. racing at one meeting. It is something which perhaps we will not see again. T URNING to the B class we come to the gallant and good llttlo (Illy Rebate For although classified C it is in the higher division that she flrst proved her worth. She is a Ally who has hnpKlWd me all along: from the time she arrived. At flrst I thought she might have proved herself better over sprints; and being the only horse capable of keeping up with the lute Se pt ember Song over the opening two furlongs lost June In Trinidad one cannot altogether blame me for this view. However at this meeting she has shown us that she can maintain a hot pace for 7| and 9 furlongs and hold on very well at the finish. Of course she had a very light weight but she won handsomely by copious lengths after running Infusion Into the ground. The other two B class races went to Landmark and Tiberian Lady both of the Chase stables, and the latter In particular showed a dash of the old form after looking a likely brood-mare for the last year or so. I must say I was very surprised at this I thought that she would never recover from that stretching which The Gambler and Gun Sue gave her last year in the same race referred to above. But once again sound legs have enabled the beaten to live and win another day. T* HE FOUR C class races were divided between, Harroween. Flleuxce, Rebate and St. Moritz and having already dealt with the flrst three, that leaves mo with only St. Moritz to discuss. He is a changed horse, of course, and indeed the change for the better only made Itself apparent between the flrst and second day. How so many C >ople heard about it 1 do not know but the publicity was signified Y (he amount he paid in th* Pri Muluel. Providing he II got at early in a race and kept at for the remainder of the distance, whatever it is, I think he will make quite a useful horse I think he is the first horse by Bobsleigh that I can remember being successful out here. C O.YING DOWN to class D, after the flrst day it was a case of Oatcake first, the rest nowhere. Last August I wrote that he had at last come to his true form since his re-entry to the racing game and I was certainly glad to see my words coming true. His effort in the nine furlong yesterday was most impressive as he had Kendal Fort, Mary Ann ond Watercress all well extended in tum. yet they could not even get alongside However it must be said that there were excuses for all of them and with Mary Ann and Watercress particularly. The former received a bad start and the latter looked terriblv overboard. A LTHOUGH COLLETON won two of the F Class races 1 cannot J*. say he impressed me as a likely candidate for the Trinidad Derby. His best effort was the nine furlong race yesterday and while he won easily with top weight of 128 IBs., the time was atrocious. Two minutes flat Reminds me of High Hat and nearly all plodders I can think of. I should imagine that a really lit and strong Apollo would give Collcton o good boating and the way the former ran in tho Savannah Lodge Handicap suggests that he is much the better of the two. Meanwhile we had a very nnpressiv? win by the reconditioned i First Flight in the F class sprui*. yesterday ond on equally smart second by the half-bred Miss Friendship in the same race to make it an all-Bethell victory. It looks as if First Flight will win ot future meetings but I would beware of a trip toTrlnkiad. Lastly I cannot end the discussion on F CUuw without some reference lo the Handicappers' treatment of April Flowers. They might have been excused for her weight in the first F Clasa handicap on Thursday because she was the only aged horse in the race who had piaccd before. Hut surely 120 lbs. over nine furlongs after being third with 128 lbs. over 7H was nonsense. piNALLY I would like to end up with a note on the G Class racer. % % %  Blue Grass h. obviously another smart Itoidan half-bred, and it was most enjoyable to see him win with an apprentice who did not carry a whip. But the Handicappers hit him a hard blow by raising him 11 lbs. for a short-head victory and giving him 130 lbs. to :_houlder over IVt furlongs. To end up I must now remove Blue Diamond from the class of hopeless ones in which I had him. and sure enough his perseverance, which I did not expect to pay oil at this meeting, enabled him to win a good race over 7"* furlongs. PH0SFERINE for more confidence! If lack of confidence worries you and you feel tired and depressed through overwork remember how j very useful PHOSFHRINH has been j to others in a similar btatc. PHOSFERINBmaybeiustwhat you need to put back strength and energy. PHOSFERINE soon revives the appetite and, in to doing, it revives keenness for work, for enterprise. PHOSFERINB helps to build up staying power—fives you reserve of patience and goodwill when you need them most. Try this grand tonic today. In liquid or tablet form. 2 Tablets 0*PHOSFERINE equal io drops. Good mornings begin with THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS for Depression, Debl/fty, liwfif eition, 51— plasswats, sf oftar tnpWso. 1 Gillette .. the sharpest edge in the world! li'Ji Lnjaitien to: T. Utddei Gfaat Limned %  rarrrjgafj rvi Socitty Dtbu\ Women who are smart thenwtvc* m ute more shout men than you think. Ill-shaven men .-IJusn atiu.i mi>j>mv women Kw ilut •jnnoth bruk look which Lisa well into the evening, ute Colgate Bruihleu Shave Cream. So qunh io apply—having washed your bet, iimdtbiton—a few easy aweeps with the razor will give you thai smooth gleam whidi is ihc tint mark of a well-groomed man' Save precKtua morning minutes and aurc your face the best and I fomfforiatii shave thi USE COLGATE Brushless Shave Cream the VACATOR WITH WATERPROOF, NON-SKID. "GROUND-GRIP" PUSSYFOOT S0t£ .. CUrki Introduce the MW flexible. rvtltlnt Putiffoot soling to cuthion the Impact between feet and floor. Md* to a secret formula of Clarki of England — tbt quality ahos firm with 125 yean' experience—Pussyfoot li considered t b* tha Ideal hot>reather soling — light aa rukber. cool U leather. tough as rou'll aver easel. Th* k Om hmyftm Ms ... fifhtar then Mother. tMrt htigtr *• then leather 1 Pussyfoot Sain era fitiid to Vacate' iandoh tihovn htny Vocotor. tn asWiaed upper, far OkWrssti and unraiirfciaa* comfort. ENGLAND OSKTI iTiur. soMaauT. %  a Co* UttaDoa I



PAGE 1

4? 8lTVn-\Y. NOVEMBFR 11 l$o SUNDAY ADVOCATE PACE NINE A Look Around At The Races %  riaon. many of th*< thousands k|> up M w i rn l tolOty ami i 'act air but many bear l-V'W *en. thi ir MttOH %  BMHS Alone mi wMdi uk OIK IWMI, inert is H m*dif> of various typai ol gaming. ahouu of vendors of block j-uddina and ou. n favourable delicacy •van on raea day*. M ttMM fortune teekan set kv. m L:^H. ihf> (nice to small battlBg It la In thr -cinrmi. board that tiny ukt thaw las: ra. The owner of the board ipli tail stick as aVtth his call nf "Bank me and break im nothing to lose." One win win illy, but very wldom. and maanwhila "Bank me and break me's" heap of coins would be Wftffr and bl| Soimum.-* you will meet a racegoer who hud made a few successive wins—goaded on. h i s %  >.ii(i that he wu only lookinii for more wins, until he eventually moves off in despair— his last penny gone As he move* off. -Bank me" may be seen to nudge his assistant and wipe away the sweal that had begun to run down im cheeks when the though*. came to him that he mi*, it be "broken" indeed. Roll a Penny Another "small gamble" man i* THE GOVERNOR, preceded by Hoii J D ChandUr walkad around at the Raceyottordsy. rhe man nf the roll penn> board. With an oil skin table cloth spread rret :ni' tabla, he allow roll a penny down a stick and if it goes on any of the many number which he has maread a. tfM square* on Iho < ilskin; he will give you the same amount Of money as the number nuiicsiU-r But than few seldom roll on a number. You will hear hrVn say. "roll again, roll again.** as he shakes his tin with his c pennies. If you come acrof* n woman winning regularly or taking chance*; all the time, a looker-on will WINK knowingly at anothei and say "but she and he is in the do. man, that is only an entice" B>agjbao*fJ doe?, noi think.so, however, nnd after watching thr win nar with grudging aonuratten ihaj win bring out then lean purses and take a trv. A penny Is ;i lot of money to the many little boys who scour the Garrison and with their heads just above the gaming l>oards, they carry drawn HutM BBOf Wtttl that a', least two of all Ik i •• 11 nbll : ir.ifoi I skilled in throwing the diet watt uround with taafa portabhl tables nnd when they catch liolit of a %  greenhorn" who i eap-r lo VDI, with that flip of Ihe fingers Kiev will tleece him .All Self Few people pay any attention to others. It is all "ielf". About the only thing you will hear them joining In is thatr agreement as to the wlnier of a race. Among the crowd. Holder seems lo be the favourite. But a race Is only n brief interlude from gaming, i in the sweepstake board on which the winning numbers art posted up. the people group, gazing forlornly. They seem to see %  tars othai number bul t hebi You will see a man take a '**"*%  hilling coin out of his pocket and by the way he lingers it. you will know H bj his last Tinihruglliu of liis stiuuUit'i's ami rusliing away to buv a ticket r. as much ns to nx -Well win or loca. h. Nearly .ill Ihe men amORO. SOUM cannot buv cigarettes, they are 'broke" bul Uiev leg one In their agitation lo see if IhUr lasl money on a ticket may bring home a win, ihi> burn iluwii ban of a cigarette In one long puff. Sellers cart hundreds and hundreds of water coconuts on the Garrison. As they are under the direct rays of the sun all day, the people welcome the water cocomil Sellers are skilled in culling open the coconuts. With their sharp knives. It lakes but a mrnj Iwist of ihe wrist and the too la* oft. So the dny passes, a day of betm MAC iNT08H. ting, and losing, of eating ar, on| ytm W U WWW wWw W fcV a i. \i.\ A MI \HI t it %  PURINA %  %  I'M.I OX CHOW %  H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. D,..b*. *j V.\V.V.V.V.\V.Va\ K HAPPY crowd enjoy the .. y BohoU and net Ml the thrtllof the day* from the shelter of some of the t round the lavaiuiah. They A snas motber lew bat? dedde about 'be milk far book feeds. Lots of cnerry. .ready I oars, peaceful nujhu -these tell her what she IDOM i to knowbaby i* doing iplcndidly on <*mermilk imponaai additions are aaade: Iroa loeorkhuw blood -sugar to modify (be food for liny digestions — Vitamin D to help build strong bones and tcnh OMernulk n made by Glaxo I.aboraiories Ltd., who, suVe I90K, lisve baso pionecn in the devetopmciit of tbs best possible foods fot babies. Way eaa taotttac pia bar faith so Anary on Omaniil'i > Beowsc. where beeaat flihwg k difficult or impossible 11 Is the parsa ci subuhuiv for motber'i ndla. Oseanssuk to Baeet grade cow'i eaDk, dried andw the most hygienk Tba protssn, (real bodyfa made easily digciublc by ose eahar drriag process. And U right KOSTERMILK lo: your free copy of illustrated Baby Book—Phone 4675 MMII MHI 111 nim 1 71 fvn HARRISON'S Braad Street WE NOW HAVE IN STOCK A COMPLETE RANGE OF drinking, leaving despair on in faces of many nnd satisfaction i Ihe fares of bul few On the mlit ithe. bugler i* yet K.HIIR otrong He has hen blowing hi> bugls at the rarea for nany i parhaps tbe only A-cot hat at the THE "AdvocaU's" camera-man thought this Udy's ontflt one of the %  Met attractive at the Races yesterday, so he snapped her. HOME INDIAN LADIES, in their national dress were interested tore at the races. Their picturesque dress attracted mnrh attention MR M I It BOIirs'B light, Is congratulated by Mr K. D. Edwards when hi horse lobate, scored its first win. Be a Master of English iudsl by ihe way 3 waire roa nil ajooaur Send today lo Th Resell lurtllule iDepI 4MA. P-iGaie. London. W S fa-e-and. %  hie" iOOOOC> JUST RECEIVED I THERMOS VACUUM JAKS Wide Meath g Pint oV Z Pint Also REFILLS for ft Pint Si Pint C CARLTON BROWNE ) Wholes*** eiali Omgefcrt j 134. Raebnek Si Dial 2111 1 fjgWl IMPROVED ODEX SOAP O GeH skin mil) clem O Banishes perspiration odour Q Leaiei body sweel anil dainty Od mtoi *P ck-.mi8 tathjr lhi imld .nd unillr f '•". I"^ •" uly lll. Odd K Jl l '""'y "" %  • AVOID OFFENDING-USEODEX HELLO EVERYBODY! Sturi your Imiiv Shn/tpinff t-tirlff ff hurtXHAS TREES. BELLS. STREAMERS TREE DECORATIONS (Lovelr MMftRMal) TINSEL. CORD TAOS JACK FROST. BALLOONS. A varied Assortment . KNIGHTS LTD.-au BACHES Wrap Ihpm up now for \man WOVEN POPLIN SHIRTS in Stripe.* wlih TrubnUd Collor atlachod. SUoi 14 17 Each S4.60 & M4H With 2 Hvparate Trubi)i->cd CollarH 10 i-iatrh. Each SS.36 "BENCOLA" STRIPED PYlAMAS. Smart Dnlqm. SllM36ta44. Suit S5.48 LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS Hemstitched with "4 inch hem. Each 6 1c. to 44 Int. Each HAND PAINTED TIES with epeclal deeiani. Each S2 25 TOOTAL TIES lor Boyi. Smart desatne and Attractive Colourinqe. Each 62c. ENDEAVOUR" STRIPED CAMBRIC PYJAMAS. Good do.iqni. SUM 3D S6.91 4 S10.33 HAND PAINTED TIES lor loyi m %  Attractive Deeiana. Each 0c. L;-t^A'ZJ: I Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street %  fi HUMBER Cycle Parts. THESE SPARES INCLUDE: BACK STAYS CONES and NUTS CENTRE BEARINGS WHEEL AXLES BRAKE GUIDES BALL BEARINGS CABLES GEAR CASES MUDGUARDS FREE WHEELS CROWN RACES COTTER PINS BRAKE TUBES REFLECTORS CHAIN ADJUSTERS CHAIN WHEELS and CRANKS nil Dozens of other Necessary Items. II ITS FOR A -WE HAVE IT. HARRISON'S Agfnb (or -III Millli.v BROAD ST. .V,'/^,V//.V//rtO'////'/,'A'*V*T>W//.Vi'.V.V//^rtV We Specialise in Quality and Service JAi'lill SCREAM CRACKERS p er Tin 11.36 WALL'S OXFORD SAUSAGES „ „ .00 WALL'S PORK SAUSAGES ?! ..IAXWELL HOUSE COITEE 111 .. 71 CHAW A SANBORN COPTEE 1 IB .. I 62 GRANT'S SCOTCH OATMEAL I It.. 3: CHANT'S SCOTCH OATMEAL 2 16 .. 6 HEINZ MUSHROOM SOUP per .. 41 HEINZ CHICKEN SOUP *1 1 Aims CUMBERLAND CAKC -' -"J KEII.LER'S DUNDEE CAKK t-IB KARDOMAH TIPS TIA y. m pk, M CHOYCE TIPS TEA '.In ., t* MAYPOLE LEMON CHEESE p er bM. .48 C & H MARMALADE 1 tin .32 KRAFT MACARONI CHEESE per .. .37 Order the Finest Rum M KAIH I IM III >l STrtJVSFKLO. SCOT! A Vo.. i.lH. 4 I .-.•.-.-.-.-.-.•-•,•.-.-----.--•.-.---.•.



PAGE 1

PAGE SIX SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12. 1S0 Law In The Colonies "Too Rigid" Centuries-Old English Precedents Not Enough Criticisms Of Ex-Chief Justice (Flam Our LooSon Cnnt> LONtX>N Oct 30. The my In which law is administered in Ihc Colonies to-day does not satisfy a former Chief Justice in the Colonial Service. Sir William Fitrgcrald. M.C K.C. He wants to see much g w lir eiamciij in the outlook of the Colonial judiciary: to aee Colonial Judges avoiding the temptation to solve a dispute between two Africans as to the ownership of a mealy patch by quoting from a centuries-old judgment In England. Sir William expressed these views In a lecture at Overseas House. London, on "The Constitutional Foundations of the Colonial Empire.'' It Is doubtful, he said, if even now Colonial machinery is geared up to take its new rcsponslbilrNes. There has been devolution of authority to native administration and native elected assemblies, but the general administration of the law Is %  'committed almost exclusively to an imported judiciary administering an Imported system of jurisprudence." It was necessary to guide tho young Colonies along the road centuries' of experience had tauglit Britain was the right one. Hut if the new theory of trusteeship in the Colonies was to have any significance, respect must be paid to those native Institutions which give meaning to the daily life of the peoples In many ways it was a matter for regret*, that what he called "the plantation legal system"— the dumping down of Ihc English legal system with all Its rigidity — had become so tlrmly rooted In African soil. While Colonial political institutions displayed a great diversity according to the different people governed, yet the judicial machinery exhibited a monotonous sameness. "Wo have a High Court fashioned on the High Court of Edward I. We have judges who set themselvej the very dlfncult task of applying tho legal principle born of Norman England to conditions that have arisen in a totally oiflotettt atmosphere. It is not always appreciated that indigenous people also have their own legal Conceptions which in many native communities have become a* stabilised as our own." The Dominion* are already adapting the British Common law to their own different needs rather than following the channel to which I' 11peculiar needs of the English people were directing it-in England. He often wondered whether we in Britain appreciated the appalling responsibility on our shoulders—a responsibility that included within our cultural influence a quarter of the known inhabitants of the globe, "It would be the height of poUUcal roily". Sir WtUtam said, to imagine that, this concourse of divernUled people can be ruled by a paper constitution drafted by an alien bureaucracy" Discussing the growth of legal and constitutional problems in the Empire. Sir William pointed out that that Empire was founded In two ways—either by settlement or by occupation and the nature of ita institutions, local and poiiucal. were greatly Influenced by the manner of acquisition. Convincing proof of that was given if we took as example the only remaining "plantation settlements" to-day, the West Indies and compare them with the constitutions of the post-plantation period "If the historian of today wanted to paint the background of political life in England at the time of Charles I. he would find his canvss spread in Barbados and the Bahamas. The constitutions of those iBRttortea are practically identical with the constitution of England before the Civil War And if the local press of these countries is a mirror of public opinion, one cannobut reflect on the resemblance l''livn Charles going down to open the fatal Parliament on thai October day in 1040 attended b) his own chosen ministers, and the (Governors of those colonies going down to-day to open their Legislative Council attended by their ExecuUve Council. The fundamental prinicples of those constitutions are similar to the principles which dominsted moat of the European constitutions In tho seventeenth century, and which prevailed m Germany and Austria-Hungary to a modified extent, down to tho time of Kaiser Wllheun The set-up was an exExecutive nominated by the Crown and dependent for supplier for legislation to implement Its policy on a legislature elected by the people. "It is my submission that the constitutions of Barbados and Bahamas are to-day open to the same criticism that proved fatal to them In England 300 yenrs ag'>. and in Canada about ISO years ago A clash between the executive and the legislature Is always a possibility, and is usually Inevitable There must be a lack of confidence between the executive and legislature which la so essentlnl to progressive administration. If ever the need for broadmindedness and liberality on the part of the Executive and a desire for co-operation on the part of the legislature was Illustrated, but I fear painfully absent. It was in the case of our West Indian Colonies It musB ever be a matter for regret that most of those plantation colonies have had to revoke constitution, which afforded a wonderful field for democratic development. In favour of the bureaucracy ol Crown Colony rule. The regret will not be so profound If that lesson ta taken to heart in this future empire of ours". Too Mirny Hand Bells For Barbados? LONDON Dur.ng the year 11149-50. one.i'id three-quarter million pounds was allocated to research in th*Colonies from Colonial Development and Welfare Funds Sim — 1940. the total from the BBBBW source has amounted to about *evcn-and-a-q£arter millions Colonial Governments and indittry assisted In the same period with cash and gifts worth another one-und-three-quarter mlllio'i pounds. Is this enough? Nine million pounds in ten years for wort that Is the chief hope of the Colonies for their future betterment? Many people, not only In the ('"Ionics but in Britain, think it is not. The question is the subject of a leading article in the "Evening Standard'* of October 31. which deplores the fact that .t present there is a limit of twoand-a-hatf million pounds on the amount that may be spent on Colonial Development and Welfare research schemes In %  By one year, although allocations for long term projects muy be higher. The article cites the Important work of an East African research V. thU U the Frothy Estate Agency — Afr. Frltby speaking ..." TRUMAN'S HANDSHAKE NEW YORK Ever since President Truman ahook hands with him during his New York visit, eight-year-old Johnnie McDermotl has refused to wash. The excuse given his mother —"I promised the kids at school I wouldn't wash my right hand until all of them have shaken it. I don't think III ever wash it again." But his mother, good Trumanite though she is, has other plans IN SEARCH OF A COOK TORONTO. Dan Wood; a 50-year-old rancher from Gadsby, Alberta, sailed from Montreal to Liverpool because : "1 just got plain fed up with my own cooking and decided to eat with my three sisters in Cumberland." Asked if he is seeking a wife in Cumberland. Wood said : "I don't commit myself, but I will say I don't intend to come back to eating and cooking by myself." "CHURCHILL HASHISH" ALEXANDRIA A strong woman weighing 150 kilos, and aged 40 has been arrested by Alexandria police. She imported and sold Urge quantities of hashish, each piece bring carefully packed and bearing a picture of Winston Churchill. Tho pieces were known as Churchill Hashish." When asked why she had chosen Churchill as n trade mark she replied "Mr. Churchill is the best man in the world and my hashish is the best In the world. pioneer, Dr. Rosemary Jackso-i carrying out a Held survey in the Malaya district of Tanganyika There it has be ;'i found that InfanV mortality i;it the "apalling rate" of one in three. This survey, it is stated, will hasten the day when modern medical practice will reduce such a death-rate. "Hut". asks the "Evening Standard", "are such pioneers on the spot being given sufficient help by the Government .-i I'ome?" The answer, the paper says, is "No" and It goes on to poin> out that the East African Modi cal Survey, with which Dr. Jackson works, hns reported this year that It Is "seriously hampered by lack of suitable living and laboratory accommodation." According to the "Standard". Britain can And the additional flnance without placing yet another burden on the "harassed and overstrained taxpayer." It points to the British Council costmg the nation nearly £3 million lust year and questions the Council's expenditure "on such foolish projects as presenting handbells to Barbados and reeds for a B flat clarinet to Professor Novakuvlc, of the Stankov.c School of Music. Yugoslavia." The Government, the paper continues, "cannot possibly justify expenditure on such dubious activities when British colonies need the money so desperately. Britain's resource. of money and energy... .must be concentrated on the development of the vast colonial territory %  which are the chief heritage and trust of the British people." Loneliest Island Will Be Developed £130.000 EXPENDITURE from Out 1JMJ1->II Cu rr — ponawm LONDON, Nov. I Far away in the southern waters of the Atlantic, mid-way between the vast African and South AmeriIcan continents lies the little island of Tristan Da Cunha,—on British r-.lonies Nine mile* long and nine and i half miles broad, it rises only one hundred feet above the ocean surM. outpost of civilisation, a challenge to the surrounding mighty waters. For Its population of 230, whose only link with the outside is the tiny radio station, life Is indeed primitive. Until recent years there was no doctor on the island, all medical duties being carried out by a missionary. Now the Island boasts Its own medical officers, but so sturdy are the Inhabitants that seldom is he called upon for any •erious cases. To care for their frugal needs, the islanders raise cattle, of which there are about 250 on the island, and sheep, which outnumber them in the ratio of four to one; besides numerous small flocks of poultry. In recent years the population of the island has diminished as first one and then another of the young men have grown tired of '.he humdrum existence and set forth to earn a living elsewhere. The setting-up of a South African fishery group' a couple of vears back did something to arrest this slow but sure exodus which threatened eventually to make Tristan Da Cunha an uninhabited latHM And now comes news that the Colonial Development Corporation, alive to the needs of the islanders for some other form of livelihood are planning the commercial development of Tristan's i rawtl.sh industry. A special vessel equipped with dean freezing apparatus and deep cold storage accommodation to process and transport frozen crawfish tails to Capetown for the North American and European maikets is to be provided. A canning plant will be erected and operated on the Island. The crawfish will be caught b; the local fishermen around Triatai as well as by the fishery vessel operating near the adjacent uninhabited island of the group. The vessel will make the necessary voyages between Tristan and Capetown which will. In turn,' establish a regular shipping ser-. vice to the island. The Tristan Da Cunha Development Company which has undertaken the Initial work of investigation, will now be reorganised and the additional finance, esli-1 mated at about £130,000 will be found by the Colonial Development Corporation. KING GUSTAF'S FORTUNE STOCKHOLM. The business of being a king Is far from ruinous if uroperly conducted, it appears, .jr King Guslaf recently is estimated to j have left just over £1,000.000 Three factors helped hirr amasa this considerable fortune—he was notoriously economical, he was a king for almost 43 years and he lived to be more] than 92 years of age. FORBIDDEN EXPRESSIONS SYDNEY. For the guidance of the notorI % % %  % %  outspoken members of the I Australian parliament, the Clerk I to the House has compiled a liM of expressions that have earned the Speaker's rebuke. The list includes l assassin, coward, creature. Jackanapes, Imbecile, im-1 postor. Insect, Judas rebel, renegade, scarecrow, scoundrel, thing. | traitor, trickster. THE CALL-UP NEW YORK. In Green Island, New York. | William Maloney got the call-up Hi will be four in December. Hii comment : "I don't wanna go ir the army." THE MICHELIN TYRE A giant tyre for gruelling | conditions. Distributors:. Dear's .Garage Ltd. 127 Roebuck Street. Bridgetown. %  " -J.32. DENHAM STOCKED It AU HADING STOMS. • AGENTSI. A. BENJAMIN I III. SOO Plantation* Building Lower Broad Street. Barbadow CMM


PAGE 1

Smminj %  aweaslMv 12 19 5 0 ^uniau Mwcale Price: SIX €K.\TS HOME OF THE GHURKAS INVA U.N. Forces Push On Past Wonni After Week Long Lull TOA\U, November 11. JJNITED NATIONS forces pressing across rug ged hill country in their new offensive today: by passed bomb-battered Pake li oil in Northwest' Korea and reached beyond Wonni, about 19 miles farther west. After a week-Ion,; lull, American, British, Austuhan, and South Korean troops jumped off this morning from the Chongchon river bridgehead towards the Manchurian Border. Pakchon is about 8 miles north of the river. Meanwhile, British and Australian troops established a road block about one mile south of Twon. Major-Gcneral John H Church. Commanding General of lh. Tinted Slates 24th Division, said [earlier that he saw no need to occupy the town as it has beer. French Evacuate Another Post SAIGON, Nov li. Frenoh troops yesterday evacuated a post 11 -mires northwest.of the Induchlnese town of Moncay on the Chinese Border, near the Gulf of Tonking Pifhting is in progress lu reoccupy the post irtuallv levelled" farj rope; '• I air bombardment Ho pointed out that pal rob lu. %  i and west of Pakchon and found no entr\ South Koreans crossed Taelyong nver and cut the KasanPakchon road. They engaged Communist forces, estimated t Battalion ftnUth, but they had the siluaboa 'well under control" a apoKesman of the American First Corps told the correspondent. About 1.000 Communlit troop* The French Minister announced naV( been lighted west of Kasa Rival Governments Operate In Nepal MR. I', t: 0 MHTaVBAI FIRST FLIGHT ili'lrhtinn up> win* Ihe Si IMHlUndlcap to five Mr. H.H It hl •irtt w'n of fte Mitt Mi". I rlrndihli inn OWBed by Mr and ridden h> V' onel was atsssjf. th ( evacuation of a small post after a Communist attack During the evacuation, units from the post recovered arms from Vletmlnh insurgents. Moncay at the eastern end o' the Tonklng front was reported to be harassed by Vletmlnh mortar (Ire from an unknown direction. idded Another Commun foice. about 1.000 has been located on high ground in the Yonsann.voii area between Kunurl and Tokchon. Flanked By C.l.s Flanked by American troops to cist and west, these Communist Iroops were in position and in danger of being cut off, a spoknThe losses inflicted on thtfi man6i,,d Vietminh forces by French force?' A.i.cucan and Australiu'i evacuating the post were conM>o— M;:. .m.l shooting-star Jets firmed by the observation planes [supported the United Nations which saw Vietminh wounded being transported, the spokesman snid. Vietminh forces were dispersed by patrols and artillery fire south of Chausnn about 12 1 miles southeast of Dinhalap on the main road in the northeast sector of the Tonklng front. Mopping up operations on Havinh Island, about 10 miles cast of Kenan, south of the important, -port of Haphong. resulted in the \ mun wno w align tly wounded, recovery of arms and in unspeci-| bu later ran into "vcr> hen fled Vietminh casualties. I resistance. South Koreans Advancing in trie 20 Vletmlnh regular troops w.i.11C V „„. ; tnodonta refl killed and arms including mortur f niiles south or Hasan, which Is 9 and machine guns captured In the ; mlles wes of Pakchon. from mopping up operation 7 miles t Communists dug in around Ungi south southeast of Namdinh. K Similar operations were reported | in the Hadnng sector in North Deleta und northwest of Thlabink 58 miles southeast of Hanoi advance, riddling Communist tr-iops concentrations. Planes were estimated to have killed about 000 Communists. Elements of the United State*' 1st Cavalry Division on the right flank of the First Corps advanced rcross Chongchon River about mac miles north of Kunurl anil pressed northward. A Cavalry spokesman said that me division met only with slight pposition, at first losing* only one —Renter Four Hour Strike Called HOME, Nov. 11. The Italian Trade Union toda: issued a call to all IndHatrU workers for a four hour strike ei Tuesday afternoon following th breakdown of negotiations for new system of wage contract* A call was issued by thiee Communist and two non-Communist Trade Union Org., who had been working together in negotiations with Government and employeis. The Unions also decided to tell the Minister in Alboa that they could not go beyond concessions they had already made. Italy's labour troubles were expected to flare up afresh with unions representing all shades of political opinion working In concert for the tirst time. American marines advancing 1 m the centre of the peninsula [wiped out most of the Communist I force of about 100 on the agat coast. The American 7lh Dlvis. attacked a Communist battal In the rough hills northwest of I won. Both the 7th Division and marines are thrusting toward thret resrrvo is and hydro electric plants in the north They reported to 1* meeting only fluctuating resistance. —Reuter French Red g un Queen. Oatcake Chief Leaves, .-,-,. %  ,-, &f o, For Moscow \ fie Iii Big Sweep I'M* Is Nov II French Communist leader Manrice Thorer left here in a Soviet plane today for Moscow. "1c is li> undsTgO treatment in a isian clink after his recent ills. He had cerebral haemorrhage last month He was taken on board a twin-engined Soviet Dakota in a stretches .hair. The Dakota which landed shortl> baler* Thorez arrived at the airfield bore a red star on its tail Six maanban of Tharag' guar | stood in front of his home before he left for the airfield Tall Red Army officers in greatcoats and gold epaulettes stepped from the plane and were greeted by a Russian Embassy official The crew stayed on board. Security arrangements at the airfield were no more rigid than those normally enforced for the arrival and departure of "very I m por tan t persons." Davldenkov after inspecting the aircraft came out and sat In the waiting room with three Russian Adah Two French officers wilt navfgate the plane as far as Berlin. Thorez arrived in a municipal ambulance preceded by two motorcycle police His wife. Communist deputy for he Seine Department, sat behind him Thorer. smiling and waving at photographers was carried on a stretcher into the plane—Reuter Bernard Shaw's Fortune May Be £150,006 LONDON BERNARD SHAW'S last will made this year, is 8,000 words long and is in the hands of the Public Trustee, who will be the sole executor. UM broufhl Shaw £50.000 Denies Red West Indians i From Oiir Own Ct rraefidn.t > KINGSTON, Jama ca, Nov 7. Addressing a meeting of Ihe Assembly of Representatives ol he Jamaica Youth Movement id Kingston this week, Mr. Arthur 3rown, denied that there were any ummun.sts among West India,< I'.udvnis In London. Mr. Brown, a former secretary if the W.I. Students Union In LondOn, was replying to cliaiges made locally by Jamaicans reiriung from Britain--including Ills Loidsh p the Rl. Rev. P. W. llbson. Bishop of Kingston, that ommunism was rampant among West Indian students in London. "It it quite a wrong statement or anyone to say that Communism s rampant among the students in London." Mr Brown said "W'~ ave no time for Communism. W> have othe: problems on on hands." He said that among students he had known m Ixmrion. he wa aware of only a single case in %  hlrh a Communist had entered ..e Executive of the Union and he had only served in this capaclt six months. Mr. William-Limb, an official of the Public Trustee Office, said last night; **I have rend the will once. It Is very detailed but will be pushed through quickly. "Probate can be expected this month." The Public Trustee Office is a 42-year-old Government agency for'handling settlements A friend of Shaw said last night he may have left only £150.000 despite £ 1,000.000 earnings and a life interest in most of his wife's £ 150,000 estate Death Duties cut his wife's estate, taxation and generosity cut his I GIFTS He maintained a widow whose extravagant husband left her penniless and he paid for her children at Oxford Nobody In the family knew where the monev came from He paid for repairs to Ayot St. I-awrenee church roof and subscribed to Ihe church funds. He gave 18 houses in Carlow. Eire, to the town. His house and three acres at Ayot St". Lawrence nually. But his Income In the past ten years was cut to about £5.000 taxes Shaw paid £200.000 for the printing of his books over tr He retained copyright of his works, got them printed, and employed publishers tn distribute them In 1948 he got £60.000 Aim for "Caesar and Cleopatra," and another £80,000 for "Pygmalion.' He got £30.000 cumulated royalties from Germany after the war. He had 12.314 pound shares I Welwvn Garden City When It was tnken over by the Ministry of Town and Coontrv Planning, Bbaw collected £ 14.770 shares in a new trust worth £23,000 DUTIES Of his wife's estate he siiid I had to hand over £40.000 in death duties, and practically the whole of the inrome will go to the lU collector His wife's money now passes tt Eire for leaching "self-control, | P*V ,lnf \ Egyptian Women Demand Full Political Rights CAIRO, Nov II A .leiegaiion of Egyptian women headed by Madame Doria Shafflk. leader of the Egyptian Feminist Movement, today handMinister Nahas Pasha a manding that the grantwill to to the N.tlon.1 Trul a. I elocution, deportment, and th.art. | mgol lull !"><* %  right, to wo-, ^ Carlbb#>r literary shrine. .rial contact and aodal In! men including ihe ''gut to vote., ._ t ^ # .„.,__„ ,, ItercourseIt Unot known cmrtli, ahould ngure in Ihe %  King*, "paed! Cut to M00 bow the saonar wlU be uaad at oral Thuraday s opening TAXIS: ror mao7 Ton rofaa-1 —LES. JFeaiiament —r Butlin's Will Be Financed NASSAU. Bahamas Nov. 11 Butlin Is not discussing witr. the press his plans for reflnancinf the grand Bahamas venture Someone near him told me that "negotiations are at a del leal stage, but Amtrlcans are reidv t put up the money". The name of the American in terest was not revealed; only thi.company's lawyer Is here A representative of the Cape and General Finance Company of Ixmdon. the largest creditors of Butlin\. who also hold considerable stock. was expected from London yesdiscus* the settlement He did not arrive and Is now expected here mi Tuesday —Can. Press. Governor Watches Keen Racing SUN QUKKN and Oatcake with len points each emerged champion hores of the B.T.C November Race Meeting which ended yealerdgy These two horses. l>v tying for lirst place bring to the holders <>f Tickets Nos H-2137 and J-47fl the sum of $17,952 each, II -v.iiieinj ihe Governor Savage, accompanied by the A 0 C attended the meeting It was u day of fair weather, and keen racing was l ;. Arm track Most successful riders for th" whole meeting were Crossley and Holder with rive wins each Kive scored by th* ChatuMsi Results At A Glance THIRD DAY ftaVIMTKKNT* l>U I: Tl*rfe ld( iO-SIM, % %  > q."= ,< ...at*. IIM1*H1 IHIMMI RIOKTIINTBI BACK -.Iriirnl lO-Mflli Mar. Asa I.alrhinin i NIMTEBMTH KA11 rlra< Muhl .1 ,.1 .... M... > it.n.t.biu 'lian-l' rsSSlSM >M.,1-. TWSMTIV1H KAI t Hliir IMini.inl iLaKhmani l., he.. iHaNrri Mrl.i Aan iO Nr.lt 1-IMI IIS-1 SM I •t.1,.1. I'.l.-m, Hands Off Austrian Police British Tell Reds LONDON. Nov 11. A British note handed in ihe S< viei Government In Moscow yesterday asked Russia to tell her .oiiiioriiies In Austria to refruiti roni interfering wilh Auslnsn I-lice The note, referring to the ComrUtnlBt lad coat of liung dtnun%  traUosal and strike on October 4. protested mtalnst the relast month by the Soviet BoteHes b. the Atted Council tn Vlaona to discuss the f the Soviet occupation The British note said: Hi Ma|est\' Oovssron >ni protest fmphaUcBlly against authorities in Ausli the Soviet a of their ICerlat li. IThlrkel and other *pert,.t. i|urnad up In force yesterday nnd filled the stands and track. Thi* writ, reflected In the better pHaeg that were paid. On the first two days of racing, the Field Sweep pro-.-: never climbed to the 1700.00 mark. They did so fnur lime Highest prize for the a*|| 3d in the Final H.n dicap Highest Highest Forecast prise was I HI Ml -I. I' I ..II.I..I. I r...le. r.,.,1, .e Wilder' Ii-.l Mllhl iV,.,...l. TWSNTV-tOI BTH DM1 AUmlr II O \.ll, l-harllir I airamat,, -,aa> 0-.H. lN.Ml.tl ttempt to Institute unllileral ontrols over Austrian polle* rhlch would rotnet or eliminate tie authority of the AuMrim. Government in part of Its let rllm > •His Majesty's Goveniment therefore invite the Sovot i;,>\(rnment to issue appropriate Instructions to their authorities in Austria To desist from intei lering in the police funclions ol ihe AiiHirlsn Governmenl The BrlUsli note staled thai %  Hiring discussion-, about the strikes In the Allied Counril In Vienna ,,r. Odoliri H. i.. represcntallvr argued that mob Violence In Ihe Soviet Zone of Austria was not propcrl* the comem of the AHie I Council and that actions taken by the loc.d Soviet Commander could not be discuised by ihe Council "This view cannot be .tccepte I by His Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom %  The Brit lah note said that Uu agreement "slates clearly that the Allied Council may and should concern Itself with any matter relating to Ihe maintenance of law and order, und requests th.it It should support the author!'-' of the Austrian Government Ituariiiiteed by that iiKrremenl The note then gave a sumrmiy of the behaviour of Sovh nation authorities which the subject of complaint It lhat In the mursOf tha %  Stratlons in ihe Soviet ?"i RAXAUL, on the Nepalese border, Nov. 11 [NVADINO Nepalese Conxi-eRs forces struck simultaneously at nine different points in Nepal territory today. Their obiective was believed to be the Nepalese capital, Khatmandn The private armed forces of the Nepalose Congress entered Birganj in Nepal today and set up parallel Government States. Th-'Nationalist Nopales* 1 Congress support-ilu>d King Trtbvuvan, who took reftujcfour days aM tn the Indian Embassy in Khatrnandu. the oapatal of NVpal. and %  in tvtd In fmlin to-dy. The Nepalese (Vovernment has omcially toW India th •' Khiit Tribvuv.ii thrtM % %  -.ear-old randm has basrtl [Mtell %  H as Kintf of Nepal. The Nepalese Cw day dsatrtbuti ailng on their comp itrloti to %  I tt from the ahacklt ii ith King TribviiVHn JS c.>nstltutit>ii-l monitrvh %  lves to <,.-u Uvea" to pruiei-r the King's cause and overthrow KM h.-iiiil;ir > Prime Minister and bis famll> Red Chinese Urge Self Government -IN TtBET U>NIK>N. Nov II Tha Crimes* I'onoiiunist proclamation urging "the enlue %  Iil.ft.ni people including all th" llamas' to help the Chlnai nuies. "rid Tllx't .tt iniperuili.-! iitiii.iLi. and establish regional self-governmenl" was MsOtag i>> new China (Cotninunist) newt ,.neni> telaved on Peking radio Inday. The proclaroalin the Tioel.in jeoiile up fraternal relalu if friendship and with other nationalities ntry." Togetlv stated II. .it houlil bui'.d on a basis mutual help iihiu thev should "construct new Tllwt within New China." tha proclamation said Tlie prnelainalion promised tha! the "lite and property of T.baVi-i Utmas and paoyU will be .• %  % %  • %  Meted, ireedom of religious l*lief will Ixsafeguarded, and Ihe Ijimas' temples will oe protected The proclamation said that no change will be made in Ihe exls*Lng admlnlatntlva and milliary t yat aiPi of Tibet. Nepal, independetit native %  in..! on the n.irUi-el Irnntler f India. comprl>es a portion uf the southern • i..i" of the lllmalayaa It Is bounded on Ilie north by Tibet, on the south and uest bv the i mi-.i rrovlnrrt. uxl Hiii.i Imli.i and on tincast b> Sikklm and Bengal. In she rtret and Second World Wan. Nepal (home of the flharkas) gave nn-t i nini .nl t.. the llritUh (Invemmenl In men. muiie> •nd material*. The area sf Nepal Is 54 •*> -, miles and It has a population of 0'irtSS Hinduism Is the iitnl.intlTi.ini rellflon •tn I* in the St. Ann's Handicap I Austria on October 4 l ilu punters who ..orrectlj for t-i Ftrsi Plight .11. 'I Miss Friend•.-inner and second rethc %  s| "Existing Tilx'lun lTO0|M will nl bacOtna part of the national driI fence of tlu' Peeple'l Itcpubli. of I. China tbip as %  IM-I'. Miggest upset of the day was Arften Atomic II won Itsi Final llaniiicap by a head, with Jockey i )*NeJJ in the saddle. The police Uand under Capt. usain aiitartalned race. ( goers with rmnlc to suit various Irian tlUnS AMOK! \ ****** The programme fceiari 'with Ihe March "Inl.-.nthe". and ended with a Calypso Session that .ncludcd "Cricket. Lovely Cricket." Meg'' the end ol the day's racing. ha Band ntalodad those who had .von, thnss? who hud lost, and ihost who I so rlssBi I .thing to %  F.iiiiv Yourtatr, it's Liiler Than V. II Think Details %  P Shoots Thrvv POHT-OF-SI'AIN. Nov. II Armed police were combing the thickly wooded Valencia fore*: %  roond Arimi .-ill Prldj tiuiiting lor a sho:-gun carryini; villa^ci who ran am'.k %  afternoon killing Ihre-felloivillagers In taolataij Valrncii which skirts the forest The killed were Natha.i Lubin. SB-year old paaaant, his fiftyyear-old wife Ro^e and anothei woman Jalnab Ali wlv.se bodywas di'covercd on Saturday, 24 hours after she had after fleeing from the gunman The bodjes of Nathan and Rose jwere discovered shot in their garden with Nathan's hand still grasping his hoe. Jalnnb's body was found 150 paraf rrom her home riddled with a gunshot %  ra tnd The Police report that a Portof-Spaln labourer who moved into Valencia six months ago, left home on Friday morning at 11 o'clock armed with a gun and u doxen cartridges with threat' that he was going to kill. BoatinK a math through the thick underbush and <.wamps he burst int< the clearing of Lubln's homestead where he saw the .coupl' 1 weeding their garden. Nathan's brother Jerry reported he heard four shots fired, but saw no gunman aa he fled, escaping Villagers meanwhile were -cared and were refusing to mov around the village without armed escort. Up to Saturday mlddav no trace was found of *r runman (Can. Press! Irou't forget your Guess ran win ss.aa. See MKtaa*'B Advocate. Soviet Commander Neustdt obstructed the effort* of Austrian Police to M -tore on • Instructed police to return the Federal post Ottoa In Iba control "of the lawli which hnd seized the lunldiir' bid h;nl bOOn %  -Iteui-r I:'iiilrd Slates \\ ill Be RiiHHia's Vlalcli IN 1955 LOtfDOft Not A ..iiii cQpyrtghi n.i II in ti koctared thai tha Unlti States hnd lorrhul plan" to match Sovtai power by i ass. LTnltOd Stutes Oovornmei'the 'Sunday Times" wrote, hn ecmplatod a lurrO] of Aowiico wi.ild K.nimitmer.ts a:id resouici —Resler. "All the Lunio's ufllcials mid %  M I' 'in may remain at their 'PTo-lmgajgOstUi end Kuomin ling o.Hijjis, whera it i rtdoi have avorod n Lttsona with imperiallsls and the Kuoininl.ii.it and will nut carry out n. : ulmtiigi m \,\\\ ni> ui '.ai.n may remain id tholr posts. Keiiter. lUrgunl, Nepal's sec on. t taife^t %  ily Is lust over the liordei from KJIVHHI In Itsllldip.n StatOf ttlhnr T*n Dakola aircraft flew lo Khatmandn loday from Delhi to liring out King Tribvuvan and his part] .,f ibotil 2ii iiwludlng hn IWO wlven. the ''rown Prince and LtM King's eldest gl btothOO of LhO newh installed ruler. Indian officials said yesterday that this flight hnd been arranged lv agrceme.it with tha Governmenl Nepal has treaties of friendship an P4KC .", TELI lilt ADTOOATI T1IF. Nl .VYS Mai 1111 Dry or Nl-ht "^ 111* ,\1IV('ATK PAVH FOR NEWH. Barclays liank Will Be Rebuilt n on D of the delegates.. already been declared unacceptable by the British Home OfllcCrthers will have to pass a secur.. before they are admit led According to information reaching Congress organisers In Ixmdon. shout 230 British visas ha v. been granted so far About ISO delegates Including 40 Russianhave been denied visas and 9< from West European countries de dared unacceptable in advance Hundreds of delegates from 7' countries were invited to the Con gress which Is to ronUnue for si* days in Britain's key steel am armaments making centre, but organtsers believed that only half the number will get through ih. %  ecurll) net. Australian, Indian, Canadian Brasillan. Icelandic. Bulgarian American. Ceylonese and Argentinian delegates are alrtad> known to INI In Britain. About 50 have arrived in Sheffield where hotel accommodation has been booked for 1900 delegates Congres s organisers will have to foot the bill tor forfeited bookings and the main burden is expected to fall on the British Peace Committee Pat Sloan, member <>t thi ganislng Committee said that Congress would go ahead at aU OSJ page If CoQsssssj officials ssid between 40 and 45 members of the French %  ii-lck-ation of K had been turned back at Dover, after interrogation by immigration officials The only important member of the French delegation admitted so tar was the painter Pablo Picasso Reuter loomed that the remaining members of the 200 strong French party might abandon plans to travel to England Ister today or tomorrow Twenty C/eth delegates all of them carrying valid visas were reported to have cancelled air passages from Prague A peace movement official in Prague said that "an Important announcement" would be mad* source In would call on the Con* not yet In A usually reliablg London believed this for 'a voluntary ban" gress by all delegate. HnUin Congress organisers complained that the British Government had deliberately placed difficulties in the way of the delegates reaching Sl.emel'l But reinforced squads of immigration officers and men from the Security services ware wailing for hundreds more of the delegates The biggest party consists of 200 Italians, none of visas. Their leader, Pletro left-wing Socialist Pary chief, We are stocked with Models for Ladies Boys, Girls Ch.ldren Gentlemen, nd Small CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10-13 Broad St Distributor



PAGE 1

SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 12, 1*M SUNDAY ADVOCATE %  Ccuiib A Nod Means Ye. I N sot of the Toy gl o w In Bndgelov. n tiu'nH uf Father Christmas. UHIJUJ notf flher model*, however, he nods his head cootinuouair. On*" little boy about Tour yrnr* old was seen standing Ut front of il yeaterday. mumbling under hi* breath. L. overheard telling his niftther. 'Mummy. I've asked Santa Clam for lots of things and ha keeps nodding hi* r.eoa. Does that mean I rain nave tl.rm all?" For Two Weeki M R. ALFRED NTCKXES. a planter of Grenada, arrived here on Thursday by th> I.ady Rodney for two weeks' holiday and is staying at Worthing Guest House. Proprietor <>f Drllevu* Estate. St. David's. Mr. Necklet* %  In *ee 'hi' ol a maim*? (S) ,1. Ucspaa lu %  uiitcimit war. t. Hc'-i not : %  >. ._ be nothing novel %  bout It, or ran 'here? HI Played In many billiard saloons. (7, 3) %  You'll protl'.icthem s-lth a gruaar dot. is. 41 Down 1. Pat a chin (or a change. (3. 1. 6) a. Wl.o to turn wliau am cud, l. Si 3. TUs •ugaeatloo. to ma, la volume. (4 1 t. The aong lugfs-rts tbi sweetest girl lives hare, 5. TIiU lit lau proves to be a Jsnaatan dtlasn. (si 4 Later a snow fall will ban Uiem. JSff 7. fa alp IrM tn itila tormatton. <> a. TO be led mis snows w—snail. 9. if TOU do tiii to a train it win UDut the aleapera. (B i 16. A saad blown about. |o) It*. Uausl to Hive a burse one site* racing. (8j • %  MM ot w'-r.i.T aasji stsssej \fj^\A^mS^-U!Xs^ ft that the pots can be turned occasionally, to enable the fern to keep an even growth all round. The mixture to be used in polling out fems differs with various gardeners, and the ono given in this article u rather complicated. This however can be taken, not as a necessity, but rather as a high standard al which to aim, as ll is n well known fact that most ferns are accommodating plant.*, and wlfl suit themselves to almost any soil conditions. Potting Mixture For Ferns iFrem Garden hawk -f Barbados far Amateurs) 3 parts good aifled leaf mou.d I part wood ash. II parts dried and well pounded cow manure. | part soot. 1 parCXTharcoai well pounded. 1 part coarse well washed sand, or mail, or small bard stones. March is considered a good month for planting, or re-potting ferns, and in doing this job see iti.it your puts are "clean" and dry. and have a good layer '•! stunes or broken crocks for dramage at the bottom. When w large fern Is to be divided up the best way to do is as follows: — Turn the fern out of the pot. and having made up your mind where the division should mm.-, part the fronds, and with u hnr)> knife cut cleanly right '1.rough the roots. This is a better way than tearing it apart by hand, as it results In lees root Injury. At il.. I iurma: Broken Arrow G. B. THE average Western lilm, with III conventional plot strict moral values, abundance ol action ami ihool a minimum of dialogue, can be and is. very populaj with a large section ol the movie-going public n are those, to whom this type of film has less appeal, but 11 sincerely hope that they will nol au < "BROKEN ARROW", now playing at the Empire Theatre. Based on actual historical tacts, own sheltarwd childhood—a %  "•%  BHOKEN ARROW" is an unusuposedly aoccesaful mnrnage m a al Western drama, in which a wealthy tawyor that Hi dramatic chapter of Indian wardivorce — her second n-.image fare is given an exceptionally ooding in touted. %  In* presentation. For once, the present position as ward* Hed Indian is depicted as a human home far sttlnqtMnU, Heah/mg being and a man of honour, and that Ihe girl In her eharga ha:.n attempt has been made to give been a victim of envlroniiieni and a serious portrayal of the Indian circumstance, the ward* I aide of American history. From to hilp her al the .^incoming the novel "Wood nrouVr" by trial Summoned mil court, sli*Elliot: Arnold, it Is the story of face* her flrht husband wi frrmtiersmah Tom JefTords. plaved judge, and through htr clonuani by Jimmy Stewart, who, back m pleading, helps the girl regain 1870, at the height of the hitter her child and start on a new lire. Indian-while feud in An/or... The two atpfflej af* risk* hi* Uf* to swe and talk to series of alternate flashbacks 0 slow ll an effort to bring about a eesaasomewhat and though tion of hostilities and an underdrag*, the pace i* definitely slackstanding between their two peo*"ed at various pouts in the pies Though peace does not o^ii. %  '" %  A i. at once, and there la still distrust g">. Margaret I-ockwood gives a by both sides and outbreak* .f IOOC %  mumc violence. It Is the friajuWili) of though i real that bar > %  Jeffords and Coehlse and their warden of such an institution is mutual feelings of respect am) out of Character. Neither do I trust, that finally bring about o think that ana womacs, B permanent peace There i* the how sympathetic, oould tnHuee touching love story of the Amenfa* 8*1 can for a voung Indian girl, the her atory right uif the bat. with tragic culmination of which la ' more perraortoii Ihiin %  pat on nearlv the undoing of all th.it he '"* shoulder and a vu>, and Cochise have work.>ilit>'. As newcomer, Jeff Chandler, play-. Ml Ickwood*s first Imsband, the Apache chief, Cochise. Not Ian Hunter Is Just what ha only u. he the physical tvpe, but be^—stodgy and net w*ry nulck on his interpretation of the r.de ... the up-lake Dennis Price marked by strength of character and dignity, and for a young actor, he has remarkable maturity. A? the young Indian girl. Debra Paget 1* delightfully youthful and naive and gives a sensitive Ua touching performance. TREMENDOIS SAVINGS her Fern Dii*ca*e Ferns somenmes suffer fiom | disease called "Rust," causing tho fronds to turn brown, or rust colour. The garden book tellf us that this Is caused by lack of proper plum* food, and want of air. When the fems get this oiseas^. It Is best to cut off all the affected fronds and burn them. Then give the nsTU an application of liquid manure, or a dressing of G. V. M. fGardan vegetable manure) and separate the pots, placing them iu a more roomy, airy position. leeond matrimonial is competent but not highl? exciting. One or two of the supS orting, cast stand out QQ %  Iiddleton as Fobe.v nrut Mabei Conslanduros us Nanny are the ones that come to The music is effective, parFilined in Technlrlor on DM Ucularly in the sequence laid in exact location where the story ftnlgnd god the 'oik songs and took place eighty years ago, the dances are delightful. OJI the scenery U breathtaking in In whose, tins Rbn is thoughtful, grandeur. The direction is exaerious ndult entertainment, cellent, resulting in never-flagging nction and there is no underpaying A WOMAN'S SWBKT of the terror of Indian war. AlAt the Aquatic ClHb, "A most four hundred full-bloodeil WOMAN'S StX'KKT'' %  BhOWhUf Apaches take part in the film, and lUrruuj Maureen O'llara. Mrlvyr there are interesting scenes <>( InDouglas and Gloria Grnhnmc dian tribal rites, including donees Based on a story by Vlekj Daun and the Indian marriage ceremony It is Interesting to note that ttu modern Apache has so long lost interest In his ancient weapons of war, that an archery expert had line, the Drchsgd to instruct them In the use of the oaTMr. and bar benefactress, in bow and arrow! an effort to "To talk peace is easy--lo live for atswfllptad muder. srerythmg peaeo Is hard," says Cochise. and comet out m Ihe •rgaht but the in thi* Significant sfciry, we have plot Is complicated and u> my tha solution brought about by way uf thinking, hasn't much eharacters who. In thrmselv. match the grandeur of IB) %  aitlrja BAD SISTKR The rather dubiou-s tiile ol "BAD SISTER" has been given to the J. Arthur Rank Plm e.ou showuig at the Glube jt.irring Margaret Lockwood. Ian %  >' loses Hunter. Dennis Price and Joan Grahame it teui or a radio ateffar wh lost her voice and who befriends a young | Jtardom. lomawhere .iWmg the %  % % % %  Huwev. i. ii i. .iweti oy good acting on Bag part of the three principals ..nd by th. humour Uafeyri Douglas. Maureen Oitara as the '' %  I 'i ICttvaj and allruLitlc and is also the possessoi ol obrfeHsi roeal t..i< nt, when sh %  .' %  ngs one or two her vofcej Qlorl nd complwtolj Greenwood, it is tho story of two women In H home for OsWhqVwnl —ono Ihe warden and the other an eighteen-year-old girl who lv of the ntciith batn ci>mmitted for attempted 1Mlisten to as always. f.iiitu niland suicide Summoned A light, triiinl picture, nniu.inc t.> the warden's office for rrbclli In spot*. oiii behaviour, the girl u persuadSHIIIMIII and l>rlilah ed to tell her story which liegm SAMSON & PELILAM at the With the usual poverty In child New Plasa is ,mi big draw and hood and ends with an attempt to awU arc selling rnidlr In kill her lUegitimatc baby and heradvance. It will he he !" r„ r self. During the telling of th %  fw days longer— Ude, the warden remembers her seen it—book ear lf -centred and M as a eajnjnaor mi rojin %  favounte. cdhiblned with a dash pleasant to If you haven't TO-DArs mi FLASH -f""-I btorto. f ur IHI km %  tf. Oo ai tastW gts ChrtatGhnli >DU will liitr JOHNflON'8 STATIONERY The Old lime (...Id l-eaf Ware Is here 4|sin at IOIINMINS IIAH11UAKK I Mill S VM.MIT SKIIITS KM Colour Prelly skn i Wear them for sport or work In nil Sirea $3.98 EACH Pailmolive Beauty Plan proved by doctors brings lovelier skin to 2 women out of 3—in 14 days! iMBMCAN TOW IIS i they're ;Mr%fc] iu look at the |riM r 11 I!; I look, tell you 1 You know, loo, when you tag. that you can't get finer value. UluB tit teJ i a Tan l'unrhrd Oxford. Tied to every paftr ithe John White Guarantee Shield—the a%D vliivk mfan. juwt right'I Look £M k ta leading .tor*, in Uarbadae. fSEA VIEW I.I LSI lllll M. IIASTIMJS HAKHA1MIS EXI HUNT I t IKIM. PI 1.1, V SFIl(hH) MAR RATES: >5.00 per Day A \ upward* isnrlaslvrt Apply— Mn W s IIOWELL Will eJwawg wear well. These are not only the best uvuilahle m qunliiy hut they are also pnreil must reasonable From 46c—$2.00 made by JOHN WHITE means made.justwgtdi S.M IIOOI THE LINIMENT THAT ACTS ? LIKE MASIC on tale at [Nflfl UN STORES I m %  a • a t t^o^<.c^pooo in.nt wen : Jl "'n less oily LM coarse .... f *er blemish" %  raws* I AIIIKV rOTTO.\ IIOISMOATS Shop MODERN and SAVE • THE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE Broad Street. smoo*"-" •#* &f *• _s#* YCH'R SKIN, loo, can be improved in H dayal Ml >..ii bars lo ilo %  what llifso women Jid: AJltM Iha "MmoUra Bant* Plan." Stirl today. It'l n ktrnplo: / Waih your fart icil* P a h w HH Saaua, 2 \/.mu*. Ut rich. o/ii*-oi/ /.II/IIT into >uiir skin fur on. full mi'iulr. 3 R.'nir. I). Iliifor 11 il.iy" and piDTe ibat the I'almolitu Beauty Plan" wa| to keap dial Schoolgirl Compl KEEP THAT SCHOOLGIRL COMPLEXION


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EDFI9GLIF_AFXBS3 INGEST_TIME 2011-10-12T13:59:05Z PACKAGE UF00098964_02432
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 12. ltM SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGI 1 HI L.B. W. Out In Cricket Discussed Frees VttNON MORGAN LONDON. NOV. 12. Tnere is no nor* urisaHefactor. -•:• ( fitting out at cricket than to be (Wen out leg-before-wlcket Some layers may And hitting the wicket or pitying on more aimnUng. but Ussy a: lean have the evidence that they are weU and truly out L.B.W., run-out and stumped, are all (iiscrvUaa.il 'in-iilo. .i but in ihe caae of the two last named H Is rare!/ that a player teat* he baa been the victim of Judicial error. With LB W It Is a v#o .Ufferent matter; and area the most hooatt of plircn from their first day i as schoolboys do not like to admit that the referee'* lecunon was correct Generally 'he player thinks, or likes to thinn that he has been done an injustice and thst be would not have been out had he not put his legs In the way of the ball. Interpretation Judging by comments of some "f the English cricket writers now In Australia, there have different views on what constitutes a fair L.B.W -dismissal allegations be lng not that they an unfair to Englishmen, but that they Interpret rules differently For some years now there have been proposals that with L.B.W.. as also with all other dismissals it should be the duty of the Umpire to announce when he is "f the opinion that the man Is out without the opposing sido having to yell "hows that." The suggestion Is that it should alway* be left to the Umpire to take lh> initiative. While there ara those who hat-to change the ancient laws of the game, this idea has much In its favour and very little to be said against It. The appeal can become n nuisance It ca n be Intimidating New System Under the new system, there might be occasions when a man was given out whan under the existing one. none might havo uppealed. Generally however, it would work the other way. And the side in the field would have .i stlffer task than now. Umpires, even the best of them, might today give a man out of a confident appeal; when, had It been left to them they would have given tha batsman the banco t of the doubt. and remained silent. So It might be said that the bowlers have a tough enough task as It la. without making It any more difficult One novel suggestion appearing in the British press Is that when so Umpire thinks a man is L.B.W.. ho should be given another "life" like a penalty kick, in football. Suggestion of this cricket fan is that the batsman should stand aside and the bowler have a free bowl at the wicket. If he hit it the man would be out, but if he failed theti the batsman would go on baiting. An amusing idea but one can hardly see it being received with even the slightest favour bv the powers that sit in authority in the Marylebone Cricket Club —neuter New South Wales Big Sweep Prizes Shared By Eleven SYDNEY. Nov II New South Wales again floggv UW M C.C bowling when the second day's play In their match here took place today, and tbev declared at the tea Interval wit!-, a score of 509 for three Bef on stumps were drawn, the M C C replied with 92 for the Iocs of Washbrook's wicket when he hud scored 50 Keith Miller carried his overnight 99 not out u> 2 u before he was bowled, and In four innings of first clasa cricket thll season he has an average of 308 having twice been not out. Mom*. had been dismissed for 168 and his second wicket stand with Miller realised 263 Then Miller and Burke put on 138 for the third wicket, and Burke and James hsd an unbroken sumd of 54 for the fourth before declaration —fteuler HBW mil IS WAUS—IM issisi.letiM MR VICTOR CHASE'S bay fielding Oatcake and Mr J. W Chandler's brown rillv Sun Queen tied with ten points each td the luckv holders of tickets J-6479 and H-3137, $17,952.00 each as the B.T.C Autumi. Meeting ended at tht Harrison Savannah yesterday. Following is the prize list: J M7fl II 2137 V.0W8 mi tin DD 52*2 V 0190 I 380* D MM BB 5556 Z 1938 Hon. Oatcake i Hun Queen | CoUatonl Rebate I .V.oimc II Flame Flower nteuxea landmark Tiber.an Lady Vanguard Watcrcresi Pis Other horses divide $27801 each Piece 1st a fndf divide \ 3rd & 4tli| divi.lv | 5th. flth 7th I divide \ 8th, 9th a i, ..ther horse*, divide Mill.-l ft J*M %  nat out ... JO aktrea (4i i br. i %  *>•>' I nakalli • fr-lal lor 1 "fklrli 4cl*r*d " rail o* wickvta—s-as. s—six. a—* MWUNS Results Of 2/Field Sweep Football Results LONDON. Nov II. 1st Division Ar*"nal 5. Aundvland I Hurt >v I. Wokerhjmpt.ni Wanderers J Chelsea 1. Chester United Evert.in 1. Tottenham Hotspur lltuiderstlelu Town t. Liverpool 2 Middleabrouih I, Dattj PsWeaaOe United I. Fulham 3 PorUunouth S Char lion Alhi.-ii. 3 Sheffield Wednesday 3. Aston "Ills 2 Stoke City I. Blackpool 0. Wei Hromwiclt Albion 0, Bol4,S28 On n Wanderer I 2nd DIM. .on 1.04266 Hiimuigham City 0. Lancaster Hovers 2 Bur> u. Burruler 3. Cardiff City 2. Hull I %  42.03 Oie*ter field I Ulton TOwB l Coventry 3. IWansea 2. Grimsby Town 7. Brentford 2 Ihe list of home* LeicWear Clly I, Leed> United NOV. 12 — NO. 145 The Topic of Last Week A Ml DO lllli:n DAV ConvUdi * • Clo**> IS 0 I M.C.C. M D4MSKO* Hullon not ul Wuhbrook c "MTU b j ohm ion Extra* IM br* Llftd**" Davidson F. JfXM<..<. WaiKer ISV 1 "***" ""* •M 1 M* rir.1 Third Fourth SS.00 %  iS84. 351 THEGAMBOLS h *rt MXI'BS\Mi ALL tKmiM 10U DON'T CA(* WHICH TrtW WIN 40 LONG AC TAt HWT GAMK V0U CUOKt DOWN OIIJ %  sal IMS 04DS SIM 10 00 r* > holdrn of Tick*** No* •711. I4. I0SS. lOSt. S4SS. 1 II.Mil 1 Nil BAt'k Ttchal MM fj| TMBS ll'l) SOBS BSB 1 M 1 4 lea of Tik*U No. rm 1'Tjt OTOS *TO. SSST. ^INFTSBMTN %  Arc Tlrhet A*M*Bl 41B3 S4SAI3 ISII 374 M SS*4 %  •fit 04SI ssss 1413 10 00 3004 ISM 4111 ISM Ghurkas Invuded % From Page 1 and commerce with India, Britain and the United States. Its Foreign affairs ure conducted with the 'negotiation and co-ouerstton' of India Nepal applied to Join the United Nation. 111 August 1949, but the application was vetoed by the Soviet Union. It la the home of 30 OUO.OUO Ghurkaa from whom the British Army's Ghurka BrlKiide Is recruited. Nationalists have been %  KitatliiK against this rei-ruilinn —Renter SeanD 17M •S.U1 ruts SS7S 10M Sl*lh SMI 10 M -., m %  I0.M •B47 ISM MI.UL S73S 10.M Trnlh SMS 10 M SB 00 Mh to haU*n IIS4. 11 •! 1UI I41B. 411 IS. %  IBB, ITSC. 1 W( M 1 IIK-I RACI lilt I714M lS1 40S4S 1411 M4n 41M 101 11 Flflh 4.1J3 10 no f*llh Eai ases i.. h-iatrat 10 M T,.,f. S.<. ma nso. ISM. ISM 141*. 1411. 4117. lamt-fcuoNo SACK A*****l Flrat Msa 1744 17 1141 4MM Third 4377 SHIS 4SS4 INK SSOO c*eh la holder* at Tl.krt, N,~ B| 1140 1141 4ST4. 4STI. %  %  4SS3. %  KIWI IHII %  ACS llrk.l rtrat 1*44 SI 4971 WM 43S4I Thlid SOW 214 W. 4HS Fifth SMS S6.M IS43. -4M7. MS. 4B3 HI M 1 1 "1 11 i 11 BACK erW. TlrkH A — u-l Tir-I sets •733 sn 2140 430 40 Third ITSS 1IM3 Fntirlh MBQ 107 41 Fifth MM ISM Suit10 M SSOO 01 R BSBi V 1 nr*. am* ll liv --I Hgi SBg| ,.. .. 1200, No-to-nitv 1431, Duchess; 4414 Tibenai Lady 041 ft. Ftremist oflvJt. rurroweer 8U26. Arun.i.-i 4973. Epliun-. 2137. Son Queen 7402. Kaadal roct; aso. Land Mark. 6308. Alilit% J 0479, Oatcake. 4410. Vix. K 8001. Front Hopper L 2189. Kiditead; 2349. Usher: 6204. Consternation. 2446. Rebate M till. Tanao N 72M, St. Moritz; 0716. Faif Sally; 2098. Fox filnvr 9158. Bonnie Lass O 5878. Sun, Jewel I* 0843, EHasbethBti; 7228 Cross rondft Q 0172. April Flowr; |322. Fair Contest R 8600. DulelbellH S 1292, Manu; 9982, Muytime; 1716. Infuion; 7026 Blue Grass T 8424. Miss Friendship U 5729. Crossbow V 0085. Pharos Hi 0401 Soprano. 0190, Flleuxce. 099R Colleton: 6576. Mopsy W. 4113, Wllmar. 2889, (Con High and Low; 1090, OUIIMIX 9051. Musk; 2162, Pharllte: 9941. Kitchen Front. 2398, River Sprite. 4881, Blue Diamond V 0285. Bachelor'* Folly: 1999. HI-LO. Z. 4938. Watorcres* AA 7111. Mary Ann; 0013. Apollo, 1128, Dunne BB. 5558. Vanguard; 1916. (Con ) Aberfurd CC 0195. Miss Panic: 8030. Nan Tudor. DD 5952, Flitme Flower: 2193. Atomic II Ft. 0540. First Flitfht FF 1790. Flying Ann. laMBRBaflgf, Cttf I, Leeds United Manchester City 2, Westham United 0 ,:>irn ItovI'reslon North FJKI 2 Southin pi on 2 Wii-e,.. f>a IH Hangers i. Vild United 1 Third Division Hi.iirnemouth 1. NoTl Town 0 [p-twich Town 2. Bridtil H. Mlllwall 4. Torquay United 1 Plymouth Argyle 4 Palace 0 I'M tal YOUR GUESS Waist WIN FIVE DOLLARS SF,E MONDAY'S "ADVOCATE" Reading 7. Brighton <> Soulhend United 3 Newport County 0. WaUall I. Swindon Town D Watford 1. Aldeishiil 2 Kenults F. A. (up Fourth Hertford United l< Seuiilhorpe United 0 Wood ford Town I. Ctili-he-ter United 7 Ley Ion Oriom |, Stockport Count v 2 Third Division Northern A.crinston Stanlev 0. Hi,i,|f. -, both -i i*.* a**i M—l'lllV To h*r Ih* %  >**<>T youne glrll A Srii'ln* m>W" Tli* drum*, had and i* minaTh*t lh* two flrl* h.iianl fm i. :T'-..,T asssBjaast m Would nK %  Wh> *v**v pier* nl rambittAnd roll* and pUHtr loo IVaa Ju*l th* thing lh*y l>**d*rf And )t the Ihins Ihslll d And Mid "SSda in MJ *T t~i*ttl a ilir— fur ChrlMin** And thai *r*a once a **ar.' %  th*H mndrrii lik* IIIMM br in* %  **• All lh*y Ilk* mor* lh*n dTMSlnf 1. diMMnS ittll* m>re A nwrmlng ** %  .. a lunrh df*A ta and rnMina* drcaa A %  aori dr**s %  4>i'f dmA ltd nS*rl li MS P**l A diitnei *>—. a tileht d>*M atom* Inns and *"* ai* %  hml N0 .-Ul ta* cort „f dfMXM Th* hill iiwkra Rnbarl anort A tistit dr*a* a mil draas On* that tan ••/***! IVlrt*1.i i> A.id h-k* IfCllr rl*an*i And rWI II l Iha duns i daaffj li,.) |_na and .n.in Thall ni^rali, i.llrd >la. k Thai > %  Bnlh Inr and rtal—n n H it'" iw u-* b*-k JH aald MSJ Bll fSBf. II'4*H Thai ,M MUI i T. hi) ban YmiriB Slrln tov* Sxun*tlm*i with tht To break a yixana J** oa ran easU be lowed n„ \ r ..ii.,bi. CELLULOID in SHEETS 5 Ins a 14 nss STEEL WIRE^BRUSHES Alwars Dial 4W9 tor say maae Aato part or Ateeasorr. W. -Ill probablr have It BAT HTEECT A CHEEJU UL mind so often goc-l uiih %  bcaHhy hodv To main lain good health, don'. forget cvtcniial ln-i. Cleanliruti Andrew noi only provider n tparkliag, rcfrcihin^ drink — it helps to keep you clean iruide a well It lunttmin by deamrijc Ibe mouth, enling the Momsch and loning up the liver. Finally, Aodresrv gently clean the bowel*. Take this "li/./y" drink whenever you need refreshing. One teupoonful in a glass of water is all you need Two lablcta of Phensic with a little wai will quickly Jicvk a cold or chill. Pbensic soon clean the head, takes away the burning pain behind the eves, the aches in the limbs, the distracting headache, and help to bring the temperature down. But best of all, 1'hensic relieves ihe depression and I fatigue thai so often accompanies colds and chills. Be prepared for colds keep a supply of Phensic handy. Justtake* 2 .Tablets, Phensic for quick, siifc relief FROM HEMMCHIS, RHEUMATIC P4IN, LUMIAGO i NERVE PAINS, NEURALGIA. INFLUENZA. C0L0S A CHILLS j STRONG as a Slrans; as a IHSI and Osaranit-ed ha m% hsig "*' "*'" '" %  'ihpPhlllipihicYcle.rnJehvliiii>tiLrirmrni(il4l eou hlrilmt Look al these puinit nl i|iialnv PraOH€ %  *iiu.lrmpei Heel — all Heel bub* —heavy gauge mu.lsuarth — Danlup tvre and rim* and oilbath gearia.e 'llie tm-vd* i luiiiriouslv flnwlie.l m t-la.1 enamel, or colour* if rroum .1. anal iparklei wllh hrav* ihrnmluni pUiina, for a h vclf Oisi wtU Hand ap n> ihe r>mal>r*i ireal• a pla J A. PHILLIM 1 CO. LTD.. BIRMINGHAM. Ff-01 AND D0NT MISS THIS \ \ I I / f SMuE \<> vacate our Premises .' men STREET) within tha MBI f,. w ersjaJn w* an udcinin to tho public large stocks of irietcli.MidiSE.*• drasilcally reduced prices. We have opened %  genuine sale ol hundtfldi ol regular items at pricM vrhlch will amaze you ll< n Ut .1 tow (if the nrlirles niul prices: SPUN, Ml KS A I III ITS Altniclivishiiilr, i{liiininlpi'H i|iiiililii's ri'duccd^ from $I.X iiml SI 0 lo Mb, ML, 2. PHI.NTS 36" Witt, cluckitl mill llow.r.d 100 ilrsiunv IBM mloan rcilucnl to 52c. & 5J. I IIIIIIS A >1I\S SIIOI.S NVw stork of American. Duteli and BasgUdl MMeal Hi i % %  In lll \ N IHIIIIV lltOI'H \l S II \>MIS A SKINS New slock* recently arrived selling al own cost. i \llll S IMMItUI VII Colloil panties reduced to 311 At 18c. Silk pnnlicexeellent quallly reduced In l2 cV 78*. Brs^ierH, Nl ;(iln %  Sloikiin; Aba llOUHI'llold lll'llls all al %acrificliuc prices. Come and see us. One glance at our goods and pria I will convince you of the rare opportunity to shop and save. ECKSTEIN BROTHERS ANDREWS UVERSALT THE IDfcAL FORM Ur LAXATIVE THE ROYAL STORE NO. 2 HIGH STREET



PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, NOVKMBRR 12. 1931) BAgMDOS %  & iOVDOTE Sunday. NnvrmWr 12, 19511 CONSTITUTIONS THE British Empire is so large and the colonies are scattered throughout the world to such an extent that it is impossible To generalize about any phase of colonial life. The colonies differ in their acquisition by the British crown, in their history and in their traditions. A former Chief Justice of Palestine, Sir William Fitzgerald, in giving a lecture on the constitutional foundations of the Colonial Empire recognized the above facts, but still fell in the error of generalizing on matters which are incapable of generalization. He regretted the importation into the colonies of British jurisprudence. While in the African colonies there may exist native institutions which may afford an alternative of their own, in the West Indies there are no native institutions. All the inhabitants of this area, with the exception of an Insignificant number of Caribs, have been imported either from Africa or from the United Kingdom. Those from Africa were uprooted from their native element and in the course of years have lost all affinity with the traditional institutions of their African forebears. It is neither regrettable nor inconvenient to administer in islands such as these the common law of England with such amend* ments and alterations as local statutes should provide. Sir William pointed to the constitution of Barbados as an example of a constitution which was practically identical with that of England in 1640. "The fundamental principles of those constitutions are similar to the principles which dominated most of the European constitutions in the seventeenth century. The set up was an executive nominated by the crown and dependent for supplies and for legislation to implement its policy on a legislature elected by the people." It would appear however that there Is n substantial difference between the constitution of Barbados and that of England under the first Stuart. The executive Committee Act of 1891 created a link between the Legislature and the Executive which provided this island with a stable und efficient government for almost fitly years. It was only with the growth of party politics that the demand grew that the members who constituted the link between the legislature and the executive should all belong to the same party. The constitution of Barbados was able to adapt itself to the changes which circumstances and the march of history had made necessary. The Bushe Experiment inaugurated the system of party government in Barbados and gave to the Executive both power and responsibility which at one time Governor Bushe found so sadly lacking. The upheavals of a civil war were not necessary to effect the changes which were necessary and while the clash of parties and even more the clash of personalities deafen the observer of Barbadian politics, yet it can be said thai it has succeeded in achieving historical continuity in its political institutions and has never had to revoke its constitution in order to introduce the bureaucracy of crown colony government It is useful for English people to realise the responsibilities which the Empire cast upon them, it is equally important that they should be made aware of the differences which exist in the colonies and to guard against rash generalizations which can only mislead. S-BEATDS THE HIGHWAYS DEPARTMENT have at last started on a programme which if carried V> its logical conclusion, should not only save considerable sums of the taxpayers' money but should tend to reduce the risks of the road. It is many years since the 'S' bend at Top Rock has been the subject of criticism. After much prodding the H f ghways authority have managed to purchase a strip of land from Mr. Hinds and have started to straighten one loop of the 'S' bend. The highway along this route carries heavy traffic and the bend is of a particularly dangerous type. When the bend has been eliminated it will bring relief from congestion and risk of accidents on this particular strip of the Christ Church Highway. The Highways Department would be well advised to continue their programme along this Highway. The other bend of the *S' should be tackled. Fortunately there are only chattel houses to be removed on the upper end of the bend if or when the Highways Department manage to acquire a right of way. Elimination risks on the road is of the first importance but this in itself is not the only reason for straightening bends. It found in BMOpt and in nearby Trinidad that although the initial expense of straightening is heavy, upkeep on the shortened roadway is often more than halved. The winding roadways of Barbados present a charming sight from the air but it is doubtful whether the Taxpayers will be satisfied to g" on paying for charm that can only be appreciated from a plane. There are countless numbers of unnecessary bends and twists up and down the country that could be straightened without great expense. Many of them occur outside built up areas where there would be no expense in removing even chattel houses. There should be little difficulty in acquiring rights of way in these country districts where the abandoned roadway w>>uld be handed over to the plantation wiiose land had been acquired for the new section of the highway. A road straightening programme cannot be carried out overnight. It will take careit.I planning and time. But it is not an impossible task and m >**^*VW^VW^V>VVVVV^^ FISHERMEN we have FISHING LINES— 9. 10, 12, 15. 18, 24, 30, 36 lbs WHITE COTTON LINES— 6, 9, 12. 15, 18. 24, 30 thread STAINLESS STEEL WIRE— 19,21.23 gauge FISH HOOKS— Nos. 6, 7, 8. 9, 10, 12. 14. 16 1/0 2/0 COPPER PAINT— 1 gin. tins and many other items to interest you. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD, Successors To C. S. PITCHER & CO. PHONES 4472 and 4687 *.--'-'i„rwv.> Sitting On The Fenee Wj vviii.vMii 61 BOONS BHng a welcome to Hugh (Jaitslcell, henChancellor of the Exchequer and Bloodsucker-In-Chief, from Ms lona-suffering Uncle Nat. W ELCOME (laltskcll, welcome Hush. Here the column waits for you. Waits, u watchful living thing. Snarling, crouching, watts to spring Crouches while his victims past. As the tiger In the grass Waits his moment, hour by hour. To leap, to rend, to tear, devour. S shall I lonely den, With iharpened claws and savage pen. Wall, and never once relax. Brooding over income tax. • • *~ Unlike your predecessor, C'rlpp'. Who Miltrred hut the mlldeM quips (1IH-;IUKC il seemed unfair to jwi At one WIK.'S always toting quest i. You, with young and healthy turn, Musi tremble al Die wrath 10 come. Fit and youthful, busy Hugh Punches won't be pulled for you So tell the people near and far. Tell the world wo are at war, At war to save the tolling From legions of official asses. From theorists and oth Who got degrees In economics. But who, despite their books and learnings. Could only tax the workers' earning*. While drones and spivs and useless folk Regarded taxes as a Joke, Driving in their luxury cars From luxury bars (o luxury bnrs Maybe as our war gets holler TOU will ihink "I'll stop thai rotter. "He has too much space lo (111, "Newsprint .shall be shorter still." But I warn you here and now We can deal with that (and how). In our trade of toil and grief We can be verbose or brief; We can publish, at a pinch. A dtrty crack in half an inch, Or, if harassed, give the bird In one short, sharp, four-letter word. Welcome Galltkell, wclcoms IfUflll, Here the column waits /or you . Wain io see u>hai j/ou will do. Marble Man A FTEB a holiday in England an American hag written of •Spartan beds, largely inedible lood, a marmoreal emphasis on Hood form which embalms even trivial relationships." Spartan beds and Spartan fnxt wo admit because we are a Spartan race. We have been at war, on UIKI < Jf. with all kinds %  i people wo never disliked, fa about 1,009 years. We have been rationed for tin years The K.i HW and Ihllei Have made % %  pool K<'U of iiknow il • %  cossforl of central fMSating i pi in office* and flats. That's why we despise it, believe II is healthy to be cold, rnd jump inte cold baths to our em ilatknu anu keep our minds off sex, also considered a luxury This horror of luxury, which existed before era wore, pauperised by Germans, also explains the severity of Bullish diet. Spartans must not be pampered. "Plain English cooking" is exactly what il says it is, "Plain English cooking." Sometime* it Is so plain that it %  fa a wild exaggeration to cull it cookliiu at all. Allhough it can sometime* be delicious, particularly in some MIL ill hotels fur from London, it Is usually so terrible, both away and al home, that the majority of Englishmen suffer f r o in chronic iiHllgrsllon. This has made us bad tempered and may explain why we have been fighting people for 20 centuries. The cooking, the cold homes. the uncomfortable beds may also explain why typical Englishmen are lean, bony, and red nosed. They are lean because they can't eal much of the food and nre thtfsfora undernourished, bony because all the surplus fat Is w off their bodies, writhing in uncomfortable beds, and red nosed because they are cold. Their "marmoreal emphasis or good form," which is another was of saying their manners are ai severe and formal as marble statuary, arc therefore understandable. They are trying to be polite despite the handicaps Of ntinlhlg as cold as marble, having complexions like veined marble and. sftOr .i plateful of plain English cooking, believing that their stomachs are full of marbles. All fh* same MM itill keep frightfully fit. Rejections for vice With (Me armed forces ore nof :<4 per OfSf. of flu' eafl-up as "ten ore In America. I Love Anu A i.iplurcd diary taken from a dead poIIUcul officer of the North Korean Army had thai entry: "Kim Chok Chong is in love with the daughter of Uie Puksoti Hotel owner." —A. 1>. YX7HICH goes to show liia. Communists, however btxahj the grim discipline of iheir • worship may be, must someti....„ surrender lo the emotion that makes the world go roundknown among night-school scientists as the biological urge. As I have never made B si Di my love for Ana Pauker, the lovely woman Communist last heard of as Rumania's Foreign Secretary. I don't mind admitting; that the walls of the Sea Nesl covered with messages wrung Irom a full and aching hear, anc written In red chalk by this foolish trembling hand. Despite family protests heart* pierced by arrows, true lover knots, "I Love Ana" and "My 1-ovc Is Like a Red. Red Rose." nre serawled'everywhere. I even drew her profile on th dining room wall, but somebod has added whiskers making i look like Karl Marx. —L.E.S. Ollt READERS SAY: Drama To the Editor, The Advocate— SIR,—As far as direction is concerned, I bow lo Mr. Barnes' belter lodgment, not only because he Is by far the best producer Barbados has, when he ha* time for it, but because of his obvious knowledge of this particular author. The first ten minutes of any play Is the most difficult to put over to an audience and I admit, through no fault of the players, the first scene did not get over • I ill on the first night—let us put it down to the fact that some people were still arriving fifteen minutes after the play had started, and the fact that the noise from the street through the bar windows was deafening till the windows wen closed, and th* fact that the public address system failed to work for the whole of that scene and anally of course that the players themselves were and always will be nervous for the first few minutes. Madam Arcatis' part was ruthlessly ripped from the script at her •WII request and we all agreed that the first curtain wni enhanced by the omission. Remember also Mr. Barnes, that Madam Arcatis had plenty of time to clean up after her cycla ride, she was "the lady who came to dinner." There was DO nwinttau by Noel Coward that thsj asaii should be a dim wit — as a matter of fact 1 can hardly imagine a novelist In Charles Condomins' position employing a dim wit, and In my humble oninlon Joau King was admirable In Ihe Dart in every way I take my hat off to you for "discovering" her. I really feel that our worthy critic tuul slipped up when he sayi l *isHsil nil through was sadly neglected, from Burma curtains to Barbados paper-money." No mention was made of Burma curtain*. lrhaps he referred to "that Jturma shawl on the piano.'' rot your Information that shawl did come from Burma. I brought it back when t was there, in fact 1 saw it made. The on.y detail which was not correct was the Barbados paper-money n could not the War Memorial be given a scrub and cleaned up. I do not know if it is thought that by keeping It In Its present condition it will look more venerable, but It looks very sadly DAssswHSd Incidentally as five years have now passed surely the 1939—IJ4.1 panel--could be added to make it complete. May 1 suggest that ; be also floodlighted for a week. TERRIER. BEST MEALS BEST SERVICE BEST RUM GODDARD*S GOLD Hit lit* R13M



PAGE 1

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1*50 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER CCMWG UASXHKJ 1M0K1 THEGAMBOL THEGAMBOL 9 & < §S&M d p/?-** *— I'LL Be fit-Aiw c; V I W^" !" "" '' %  H Ll ""~"T^gg?^gggggM *iV*KaiB**Sg^*a*lKa1 P*"T???SVT^^^FP BY ALEX RAYMOND "0 **"•• '^0UM %  ': -->, %  fl *S| SS TMAT BLANK XET IN -- TvDp.vRITaa. v35-[ I CA-/T *CQK! sgs THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES t ~3 I WW BACKKTllESHIP.AWDIF ll fe_ s ,— 'I ME&RAWI.1C ..._. Any I.IOBE Atcur "THAT WHITE MONKEV, I'LL ( I^M BBA1NY3U,' Stf ttJW/£ */ -&EABIN6 ITS CAB60 Of KUPMIKALS.TNE WHITE ^gflH MONKEY,lND THE TWANTOM'S DEVIL' '^ G ETS UHDER MY.\ MM %  .,., i—^ n ABSORBENT-TYPE FILTERS PROTECT "Caterpillar" fuel-filtering method assures positive protection of the vital heart-parts... the fuel injection pumps and valves... by preventing the passage of harmful dust or grit. Filtering elements are of high quality, woundtype absorbent material. These filters are centrally located...readily accessible...easily replaced. Visit us the next time you're near our store. We'll be glad to show you the many other advantages of owning Caterpillar' Diesel power. ELECTRIC SALES A SERVICE LIMITED Twedide Rd—St. Michael — Pfcone 4629 4371 DRINK JEFFREY'S LAGER BEER AND MILK STOUT .*#;#i#ii s owEit TWELVE IMIIHMII imr*/,s M tut Si 1OM0 #OI//JM///OA (l)A return ticket to Trinidad by >l.mwith three day-' Hotel arcommodatlau al $7.Ut per day and %  ni.. i. i.-iu f> Luiiih by JEFFREYS i rlnldad Agent. <2> On* (II New Kalrlgh Thrce-Sprcd Hlcycle — Two I*) llfkfU *t <,lol>e Theatre covering I 1(1 E admittance (or uiie year. 110) Four (41 Carton* JEFFREY'S Beer—containing 24 bottlen each (111 Four (4) Cartons JEFFREY'S Stout—contain In* 24 bottle* each. (I2| Two < 2 Boxes JUIKIVS Double Scotch Ale and Two < '.) Boxes JUT KEY'S Strong Al*. NOTr I in i • h" • Th. I ',1 I •c Ilol I -ill I •w* Thu condition* on which Prliea are lo be awarded are a* folio For every SIX JHIKIVs t:i i i; indVoi STOCT CATS produred to the Agent*. Meaart. H. P. MUMOII. Son A Co.. Ltd.. Broad Slreel, a numbered rreelpt will be given, the counter part of which will b*> rrtatned and plared I" a Scaled Box In your presence. t_ J I I • . • On Friday. 2 Bin Fll— % %  cerned and twenty-four numbers the purpoae of elimination. Ihe presence of partlea eawThk will be done only far l' %  Ihe Sral of the Box will he hrnkc III be withdrawn from Ihe Box at random *t-'l*-i.'i''**'ia l f*'.. j %  %  . .db %  = • ~ %  •-:•na-.-,-' T ^ ^?* holder* of ilu-, twenty four numbera will be notllled and must rome to Meaara. H. P. Muaaon, ten 4% <.. a Office at Z.* p m on Wednesday of the following week and exerrlse their *klll In Judging the weight of container* Ailed with JEFFREYS OgC, mi:! tltff'1*11 A .Ih 111 % %  IIP IgMJI ll — Tn '" Flr * r rt %  • %  *HI he i". .1 to Ihe peraon (one of (he Iwenly-fourl eatunatlag the aBjwt weight to Ihe nearest ounce of roi.Ulnerlib Capa or the neareat weight thereto. The other Eleven Prhea will be awarded In their respective numerhal ordera and In the UDF way. THE BEERH OF ,l AI.ITV '.j : ON SALE EVIKTWHERE JEFFREY'S "" THIS 16 yXIB LAST PAS6£ TUOu) ILONcSOUNPf IN IX8EE . J~~~iS L !HE iHMocEf/rcAuUof/r • m SJOICN WHITEMOHKEV'-ISAMAUl THE ANIMAL IHAPfflt?EtE/SH/tt, WE 'CONNIEMl. .. ^ I IIS PAKBt OEAgEI} THE CCNNIL UTMOVES OUT WIN WEWCiE-. <-; 40Mui, ..' i.U66i5 Vf. *MArJ MWPt.FSTO PEVIL? IVE M 60T T 0 ItEACM : IIAT 0MIP%  %  ... .' PRIZES ////.V///.W,',V,V.','/,V//,V//,' / -,',',','/,-/,',','/,',



PAGE 1

PACE TIN -I NDA1 ADVOCATE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1*0 News From Britain eaT~ This I ha* leg >hould stand Labour is rnillding 200,000 UMpfWUM %  "'•f 1 ,,i beM. accepted by churrtUll—who ru is always undertaken and ..thieved uV impossible. II U* liouiM, they must LONDON. Now J WinMor. Churchill pulled hu %  • %  '• it about him and shiveied, ostentatiously, mi th* Opi— tie. Pr. • lu-iK-h ii, ih* Roue. %  I Commons this week The poliucil situation war. warming up bul thg technical people want equipment IM *ir-coadlUotiiD iuv* h