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The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

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Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Tharsday

Nevember 9







EIGHTY U.S. PLANES CR

Republican Gains
Will Vex Truman

Democrats Have 2-Vote
Majority In Senate

NEW YORK, Nov. 8.

PRESIDENT TRUMAN today faced a troubled

two years in office with his Democratic Party's} repudiation

majority in Congress dangerously whittled down

by the Republicans in yesterday’s mid

elections.

In the Senate with the Republicans gaining five

seats, the strength of the

Democrats 49, Republicans 47.

In the House of Representatives with some result:

still to come, the position is:
Democrats 232, Republicans 199.

The poll has been heavier than usual in mid-term

elections.



Gammans Has
A Plan

To Keep Empire Together
(Frem Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Noy. 8.

Mr. David Gammans, Conser-
vative MP, has a plan which he
feels may prevent the British
Empire falling apart—a fear he
expresses today in a letter to the
Daily Telegraph.

His plan is to establish here in
London a Council of the Empire
to be attended annually by repre-
sentatives of all British colonies
and members of the Houses of
Commons and Lords. Matters to
be dealt with by this Council
would include foreign policy.
defence, communications, trade,
industry and social services.

“Three or four years ago I

would not have believed such a

Council could be formed,” he

told me today. But we have seeii

a similar model at Strasbourg

successfully carried through ana

I believe an Empire Council on

Strasbourg lines could and

would operate very well in-

deed.”

He points out in a letter to the
Telegraph that apart from the dis-
ruptive influence of Communism,





there is in Empire a great
wpsurge So wales
demands self- ; e
colonies which have the

wou
greatest difficulty in existing with-
cut outside capital want complete
independence at once.

Dictatorship Follows

Mr. Gammans says it is easy to
condemn colonial iticians as
being unrealistic, but most of
them do not realise that without
outside capital their economy
would collapse.

Few of them realise in addition
that a demoeratic constitution
which fails either through lack of
experience or on account of poli-
tical jobbery is inevitably suc-
ceeded by a dictatorship. :

“In the long run an Empire
cannot be held together by ignor-
ing the strong tides of National-
ism”. He says “if it is to survive,
it must be a living, permanent
and growing entity in the minds
end souls of colonial peoples as
well as our own.”

He suggests that the answer to
these problems is the establish-
ment of the Empire Council—‘an
abiding partnership of inte "
and says a body meeting every
year in its cwn Chamber would
not only be a binding link, “but
would enabie Colonial politicians
to contribute their advice and
counsel to problems which are
facing all of us.”




THE YACHT “OREGON” now lying in the outer basin of the Careenage,

CROSSED THE ATLANTIC

Leading Republican Senator}
Taft scored a decisive victory over
his Democrat opponent and ove>
organised labour in Ohio.

The Democrats retained nomi-|
ual control of the Senate with|
their narrqw majority of
seats.

But it was not certain
President Truman could rely
sclidarity among ail 49 Democra-
tic Senators. In the past, some
“rebel” Democrats haye

ACHESON —

WILL NOT
RESIGN

WASHINGTON, Nov 3

Dean Acheson said today that
he had no intention of resigning
as United States Secretary of
State as a result ef yesterday’s
Congressional elections.

He said at his weekly news
conference that he did not think

the election results constitute a
of the American

foreign policy
He said that he hoped and

- term | believed the election would have

no effect on the conduct of the
foreign affairs of the United States.
Acheson had been |

Said he

arties now stands: asked to comment on a statement

by Harold Stassen leading Repub-
lican that election returns con-

g| stituted « demand for the Secre

tary of State’s resignation
—(Reuter.)

_ Liberal “Split

Foreshadowed

LONDON, Noy. 8.
A split among the nine Liberal |

two| Party members in Parliament was ;

foreshadowed today after three of |

that| them failed to support their party |
on|in ervcial votes directed last night

against the Labour Government.
They abstained from voting for

voted|a Liberal sponsored motion which

with Republicans on vital policy| blamed the Government for the

issues.

Republican leaders in Washing-
ton described the results of the
poll as a “vote of no confidence’
in Secretary of State Dean
Acheson and American policy in
the Far East.

Both parties won 18 ceats in the
Senate. The other 60 Senators
were not up for re-election. The
Republicans won six seats from
their opponents but lost one of
their own.

Truman's 4 defeated lieuten-
ants were Senator Scott Lucas
(Illinois), Senator Francis
Myers, Senator Elbert Thomas,
(Utah), Chairman of the Senate

rising cost of living. They were
also absent when the Liberals
joined with Conservatives in yvot-
ing against controls and national-
ization. The Labour Government
won on both divisions.

The names of two of the absent
Liberals, Lady Megan Lloyd
George, deputy party leader and
daughter of the late Lloyd George
and Emrys Roberts, originally ap-
peared as sponsors of the rising
costs’ motion. The third absentee
was Edgar Granville.

Political observers suggested
they abstained because they did
not want the motion to go beyond
a general discussion, when it was,

——





INTRANSIT to Trinidad yesterday by the “Gascogne” was the Indico
Commissioner for the Caribbean Area, Shri Anand Mohan Sahay.

ment.

Accompanied by his daughter he is en route to take up his appoint |

He is pictured here with his danghter at the Baggage Warehous

yesterday.



TRADE BETWEEN INDIA.

AND W.L.MUST BE MUTUAL

Says New Indian Commissioner

Labour Committee and Senator
Millard Tydings (Maryland)
Chairman of the Armed Ser-
vices Committee who went down
after 24 years in the Senate.

pressed to the vote, they backed
out. —Can, Press.



Tory M.P’s Want
To Know Shipping
. Plans For -W.1.

(From Our Own Correypondent)

LONDON, Nov. 8.,
Conservative MP’s here will
shortly take action to try to bring

The loss of these four leading
cffice holders was an even greater
blow to Democrat prestige by the
fact that only senator’ was

known

n by a
politician. He fell to Pennsylva-
nia's Governor, 69-year-old Duff.
In addition to their four main
defeats, the Democrats lost senate
seats in California and Idaho.

Mrs. Helen (Douglas, former|about an improvement in the
film actress was swamped in theishipping sé@rvices between this
tide of votes for the Republican|country and the West Indies. !t

member of the House of Repre-
sentatives, Richard Nixcn, whose
work on the House of Un—-Ameri-
can Activities Committee brought
to public attention evidence which
resulted in the conviction of Alger
Hiss for perjury.

The Republican tide in Cali-

was learned today that the West
Indies Sub-Committee are to ballot
for an adjournment of the debave
on shipping services between the
U.K,, and the Caribbean, In addi.
tion Mr, James Griffiths, Colonial
Secretary who recently told the
1 House that no practical plans hac
fornia also swept James Roose-| yet been submitted for improving
velt, eldest son of the late Presi- | chipping services between the
dent Franklin Roosevelt for the | United Kingdom and the Carih-
state governorship . |bean, is to be asked exactly what
The present Governor, Ez:!/|plang have so far been submitted
Warren was re-elected with dou-|ang by whom.
ble the votes polled for Roosevelt.
Mr. Peter Smithers, Secretary

—Reuter.

of the West Indies Sub-Committee
said that in addition Conservatives
are anxidus at the earliest oppor-
tunity to have a_ half-day
Commons devoted to West India”
affairs.





Malan Progresses

PRETORIA, Nov. 8.
Prime Minister Daniel Malan
continued today to make excep-
tionally good progress after the
operation, his doctor reported.
Doctors stated yesterday that the
pperation on’ his urinary system

was not serious. —Can, Press.

shipping services,

chief obstacle to

services would benefit the

ea — e
; degree by an increase in trade,



Labour Defeated

LONDON, Nov. 8

in

Referring to the question of
Mr. Smithers
said monetary difficulties were the
improvements.
But he pointed out that improved
im-
porters of British goods and thet
as a long-term view it was a con-
‘eivable loss on passenger services
that would be balanced to some

































PAYING HIS FIRST VISIT to the West Indies to take up
his duties as Indian Commissioner for the Caribbean arc
Shri Anand Mohan Sahay told the Advocate yesterday tha:

Price:

FIVE CENTS |

5%,



Flames Rise 21,000 Feet

Over Bombed Town ~

Reds 45 Miles
From Lhasa

NEW DELHI, Novy. 8,

Developments in Tibet are
understood to have given impet.
to “certain non-Communist elc
aents” in Nepal to reinforce thei
ong standing demand for popul.
Government.

The pressure for political reform:
n the world’s only Hindu Kin,
‘om, in its evergreen Himalayn:
valley has grown with the advanc
of the Chinese-led Tibetan “liber-
ation forces” towards the Nepales
border

The Chinese-led
People’s army

Tibeta:
advancing acros
Tibet on Lhasa the capita
vas last reported less than 4
liles away

In Lhasa the new _interi)
abinet has ordered troops of tl
Lhasa Garrison not to resi
dyancing columns
—Renter



New East German
Govt. Formed

BERLIN, Novy. 8,

The East German Parliame)
today re-elected Herr Otto Grote
wohl as Prime Minister.

This followed the formal resig
nation of the provisional Govern
ment today anounced at the fir
meeting of the new Parliament.

The (ull list of new members o
the Cobinet will be announced
the Assembly’s first workir
session on November 15

The new Cabinet is to be ii
creased by the addition of tw
Vice-Premiers. The new East Ge
nan Government will have fiy
nsteed of three Vice-Premie
giving a wider representation
he five permitted parties in tl
joviet Zone,

Today's meeting unanimous
agreed to the formation of a Sta’
Planning Commission to be direc
y responsible to the Cabinet «
Ministers

This new East German admini

direct trade between India and the West Indies must be} tration is to be charged with ti

mutual in order to be prosperous and successful.
that India could supply to the West Indies which would ke
of mutual interest would certainly be encouraged.

ae HLL oh Sate Corinissoner wis” wi.
Jintransit from England on te

BUTLER | members of the Indian Commun-

| ity. He left later in the evening

Is ANGR Y | for Trinidad, his headquarters, ana

| Gaseogne yesterday, was met by
was accompanied by his daugnte



(FeGm. Our Own Core pacers) played a very important part ana

Anything} execution of the five year econom

plan due to start in January nex
ear —Reuter.

POPE SIGNS
PAPAL BULL

VATICAN CITY, Novy, 8
Pope Pius XII to-day signed thi



He said that shipping, no acubt,| 600 word Papal Bull by which hy

proclaimed to the Catholic worl.

7 . 5 sir § ,) last week, the new Dogma of the
PORT-OF-SP. ; a great deal of their Shipping :

Mr. Tuba? Uriah OG Mev, 5, industry was being developed Bodily Assumption af the Blessea

ful labour leader is very angry | Md as it grew, they would have} Virgin Mary into Heaven. In an

: certain lines going to other parts informal ceremony in his private

because he, or one of his party of

six did not obtain a seat in the |Of the world, In_ having such
Executive Council, which would close connections with the V/est
automatically have meant u| indies, they would have cer ain

lines operating in this area, and
it would be of great interest to
him te know that gocds could be
supplied from the West Indies to
India and vice versa, Their inc.us
tries were making very healthy

the country, making wild speeches
abusing and even threatening the
Governor, Sir Hubert Ranee, and
promising to bring -about the
downfall of the Government in
two years.

Ministerial post, He is ‘ani











manufactured goods to many
eountries of Asia and Africa anc
he would be glad to know if he
could be of any service im” that
respect to importers in the \/e

Indies,

He came out to the West Indie:
ta serve, because of the friendship
between India and the Caribbean
and was very happy that he hac
got the assignment to serve suct
a good cause,

He hoped
the fullest co-operation from
the Press in his efforts to do
good to both countries benvause
the importance of the Press
such matters was a little exag
gerated.

His policy will be the polit
of his Government and he w'sh«
to make earnest efforts to crea’:

Even the Speaker, Mr. William
Savary, Trinidad-born ex-judge,
did not escape, but attacks made
on him by Mr. Butler is making
nis presence felt in other diree-
tions too, Several strikes are in
progress in different parts of the
island. He is also attempting to
encroach on the preserves of othe:
Trade Unions. In Port—of—Spain,
for instance, he is trying to win
over the dockworkers from the
Seamen and Waterfront Workers
Union to his own polyglot organi-
sation, So far, he has .not mct
with much success,

he would receiv

But with such an unpredictab.-
rabble-rousing Bible carrying in-
dividual at large, anything may
happen in this Colony which his

took 37 days from Madeira to Barbados.

The Labour Government was
defeated today ky 235 votes to 229
——but on an issue which does not
mean its resignation. It was on
a proposal by Kenneth Pickthorn

(Conservative) to restore the
right of members ito have ten
minutes before debate in which
to introduc2 their cwn private
bills —Reuter




is that Mr. Butler

as one fellow said in Port-of

quiet him,”

A»piquanteumour in Trinidad
is to wed:
When I went to see him last week
ie said ‘no, no” to that query, but

Spain, “if he gets a wife she may

an abundance of explosive a better understanding betwer
material, and I am not referring the Indians and other commun
to the oilfields. So Trinidad may 7 oF ee preere ee ;
be said to be holding its breath, nae (rede ee oe i. yp
mel WepaerIng, “WRSS Hee: Caribbean should work whole-

heartedly for the progress ap
prosperity of the area, their new!
atflopted home, and in that, they
shold co-operate with all other
communities as it would bring
credit to India itself and will be



@ On Page $

Yacht From Scotland Arrives In B’dos
37 Days From. Madeira

AMERICAN born John P, Noble
from New Orleans and a twenty-
three-year-old Scotsman William
Sturreck are in Barbados today
having crossed the Atlantic in the

| 82 ft. yacht “Oregon”. Heaving
from Madeira it took them 37 days
to get to Barbados on Tuesday.

They sailed about one hundred
miles a day except when they
were becalmed for seven days,

They had originally planned to go
to Kingston, Jamaica, but after
they were becalmed and food be-
came short, they decided to change
eourse for Barbados

John Noble told the Adyocate
yesterday that their voyage began
July 29th when they set sail
from Dundee in Seotland taking
a week to reach France From
there they “went to Spain which
took them twelve days ard they
\ another twelve days getting
to Madeira
Noble has been in England for
ten years. In 1940 he volunteer-

certian naa

ed for the R.A.P.

as a Sergeant
Pilot and transferred over the

out of Madeira, losing two head-
sails. About a week after this

American Airforce when they| we were becalmed. On the way
came into the war, as a night| out, several Flying Fish flew on
fighter, flying a “Mosquito”. After| board ahd the fishing was grand
the war he spent three vears at|In all we caught three doradoes
Edinburgh University studying| and three sharks, each over seven
medicine. After that he lived i | feet long.

Dundee, where he learnt to sai} “We first sighted Barbados on
“T learnt the hard way,” he said,}; Sunday, when we picked up
“spending a winter in the North| Ragged Point Lighthouse, but due



Sea learning how to sail,



proverbail North Sea weather.”
Forth Yacht Club.

‘At the beginning of this year
was
time to go home, and it avas about)
this time that I fell in love with
to buy

he continued, ‘I decided it

the
her

Oregon and decided
and sail home.’

Storm

“We had a smooth trip until we
We

left Madeira on October Ist.”

met a terrific storm seven day

ex-
periencing several gales and the;
“I| Carlisle Bay via South Point.”
was then a member of the Rayal|

to another spot of calm it took us
until Tuesday to work around to

Their engine which usually
worked very well, would not
Start.

The two yachtsmen plan ‘|
sail to Jamaica where Sturrock

has friends. There, they will sell
the yacht and Noble will go from
there to New Orleans by ship
‘I'm sure looking forward to see
ing my family after ten years.”
Noble’s father is a Supervisor
the Texas Oil Company’s Branch
‘at Marrero, New Orleans

t
at

upartment at the Vatican Palace he
signed the parchment decree with
the simple Latin words “Ego Pius
Catholicae Ecelesae Episeopus”
For his signature the Pope used a
ilver perm modelled like a quill
dipped in a silver ink-stand decor
ated with a figure of the Virgin
rising into Heaven It had beer

progress and they were supplying ; presented to him specially for the

ceremony by members of the Sod-

alities of Mary
—Keuter.

* . .
3 Die By Poisoning
GEORGETOWN, Novy. 8
Three children who were giver
poison in error died within 4f
hours at Georgetown Public Hos-

pital The mother says she gave
each child gq dose of cascara but
cocte: believe that strychnine

as administered by mistake



The children collapsed at thei
village home on the west coas’
ef Demerara, 15 minutes after
taking the medicine and were
rushed to the Georgetown hos:
pital Doctors battled for thel
lives unsuccessfully, —Reuter.
Newspaper Manager
Put In Court
JOHANNESBURG, Nov. 8
The General Manager and New
Editor of South Africa’s bigger
Sunday newspaper the Johan-

nerburg Sunday Times appeare
n @ Magistrate’s court at the
{ Preparatory examination of alle
gations of contravention of ths

British Official Secrets Act her
today

Mr. E. &, Dawson is Gener
Manager and Mr. R. F. S. Dew

ney is News Editor of the Johan
nesburg Sunday Times.

No evidence was heard in the
case, whieh was remanded to De-
cember 4,

No intimation was given of the
reason for the postponement. Bail
of £500 was allowed. —(Reuter.)

SUDDEN DEATH

Emanuel Christian of Bay Street
died suddenly last night about
8.30 o'clock while he was in the
pick-up A—75 which wag trav-



elling along Black Rock. The
body was carried to the Public
Mortuary after the Police had

heen notified



Rank-holiday
Notice

There will be no pub-
lication of the Advocate

to-morrow, The ne x |
issue will appear on
Saturday.

|



ate

By JULIAN BATES

TOKYO, Nov. 8.

EIGHTY American Sypertorts today wrecked
nine-tenths of the Communists’ new
Sinuiju in a raid described here as ‘one of the

precision jobs of the Korean war’’.

They left it a mass of

flames with smoke rising

21,000 feet. A jet fighter pilot who made a recon-
naissance over it afterwards said that 90 per cent:
of the city was destroyed.

The principal objective of the attack was “to elimi-
nate Sinuiju as a communication centre’. Some
Superforts carrying 650 tons of bombs pin-pointed
on the Korean side the spans of both double tracked
railway bridges crossing the Yalu River between
Sinuiju and Antung on the Manchurian side.

Strikers Will
Lose Jobs
In B.G.

(From Ousx. Own Correspond nt

GEUnGH OWN, B.G. Nov, 8

The atiermah of the recent
itrike of Government subordinave
smployees is the following direc-
ive from the Government to ali
iepartmental heads requesting
chem to note instructions for com
pliance.

“If any employee did not re-
port for duty in the course of
Saturday, November 4, he
should be notified that he is
considered to have vacated his
post. He should not be re-
employed unless there are
grounds for special consider-
ation in which case the prior
authority of the Government for
such re-employment should be
sought and obtained.

The period of an employee’:
absence from duty during th:
strike should be entered in red
ink on his history sheet as a
break in service. The question,
whether this break in service
can be disregarded for superan-
nuation purposes will be ¢on
sidered at a later date, In ne
circumstances should any salary
or wages be paid for the perio
of an employee's absence from
duty”

All was quiet on the labow
front with the exception of the

sugar estates whi
token anaes is Sift in progress.

The Manpower Citizens Associ-
ation today notified the Govern-
roent under the Labour Laws that
a dispute exists between employ-
ees and employers of the Demer-

are Electric Company and was
isking for the appointment under
the Ordinance of an Advisory

Committee to investigate. Accord-
ing to Labour Laws the Governor
must appoint a Committee within
30 days or the workers may call a
Jawful strike



ALPINE GUIDES FIND
PLANE

CHAMOUNIX, France, Noy. 8.
French Alpine guides haye
reached the place where the Air
India Constellation crashed near
the top of Mt. Blane last Friday.

The wreckage was at 4,670
i, just below the summit of
Mt. Blanc. Reuter,








the two weeks |

One pilot said: “We taid, our
bombs right on the nose.”

All erews were carefully briefed
to aveid the Manchurian side of
the Yalu River and to turn south-
east after their bombing runs s9
that they would not viclate the
border.

American fighter-bombers who
went in ahead of the Supertorts
to silence the North Korean anti-
aircraft positions, reported heavy
anti-aircraft fire from the Man-
churian side of the river,

Sinuiju, a city of 10,000 which
the Nerth Koreans have used ag
their capital since the fall af
Pyongyang, has two railway mars
shalling vyerds ind a large
powder mugszine

The United States Far East air
forces flew more than 650 sorties
over Korea in the past 24 hours,
including “constant offensive air
combat patrol’ over the extreme
northwest of Korea at Sinuiju, it
was announced today

Three other Communist jets
were damaged later today in @
dog fight with American fighters.
over northwest Korea, but no furs
ther details of this battle have yet
been reported here,

On the east coast, marine fight«
ers inflicted heavy casualties on a
three-mile-long column ef Come
munists—estimated between bat+
talion strength and regiment
strength which was ‘heading
north from the Wonsan area, .

The general situation had been
“improved and stabilised,” he
added, as British, American and

South Koreans had regained con-

tact with Communists in almost

arews after 36hours | 7

Aa Intelligence officer said that
the Communists were not affected
by a shortage of supplies in their
sudden withdrawal from combat
contact on Sunday, as they could
bring up material from the Man-
churian border in the hours of
darkness without effective inter-
ference from the United Nations’
warplanes.

This was the position ereung
the front according to the lates
report

The American Ist Cavalry
Division north of Kunuri, threw
oack probing attacks.

Reuter.

—_—

TELL THE ADVOCATE

THE NEWS
Ring 3113 Day or Night.
oe THE ADVOCATE

PAYS FOR NEWS.



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TRANSACTED INCLUDE—

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(Including Loss of Profits)

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PAGE TWO



Carth Calling —

Returned Yesterday |
R. AND MRS, BOB KING who |



SEEN CHATTING at the Baggage Warchouse yesterday shortly after
their return from England by the “Gascogne” are Mr. and Mrs. “Bob”

King and Mrs. H. A. Melville.

Tâ„¢ INDIAN COMMUNITY in
Barbados held ‘a luncheon
party at the Marine Hotel yester-

day in honour of Shri Anand
Mohan Sahay, Indian Commis-
sioner for the Caribbean area

with headquarters in Trinidad.
Among those present were Col.
R. T. Michelin, Commissioner of
Police, Hon’ble V. C. Gale, M.L.C.,
Mr. G. H. Adams, M.C.P., Miss
Sahay, Mr. W. A. Crawford,
M.C.P., Mr. R. G. Mapp, M.C.P..
Mr. D. F. Blackett, Mr. Kirp: al-
ani, Mr. Gidwani, Mr. T. Mara),
Mr.D. A Thani, and Mr. N. E.

Wilson. ai@
Intransit

NTRANSIT passengers on the

Gascogne yesterday for Trini-
dad en route to B.G. were Mr. and
Mrs. Hugh Evelyn. They are on
their way home after four,
months’ holiday in England. Mr
Evelyn is with Barclays Bank in’
Georgetown,

Hugh is an old Lodge boy and
will be probably better known to
his old school chums as ‘Pinhead’,
whieh was his nickname when
he Was at school.

For Trinidad Holiday

EAVING on the “Gascogne’

- yesterday for Trinidad on
three weeks’ holiday were Mr.
Ha Spencer, Chief Clerk of
the easury and Mrs. Spencer.

Mrs. Spencer who is a Trini-
dadian, is paying her first visit
back home in many years and is







left Barbados in July re-
turned from England yesterday
morning by the Gascogne. Mr.
King who Was in England mostly
on business is a Director of Messrs.
Alleyne Arthur and Co., Ltd. They
also visited. France and Scotland

Were At The Santa Maria
R. AND MRS. ‘Bill’ Grace
returned from Grenada yes-

terday afternoon by B.W.I.A.

Mr. Grace who is Managing

Director of W. S. Monroe and Co ,

Ltd., went chiefly on business to

Grenada and also visited St.

Lucia. Mrs, Grace was in Grenada

on holiday. They were guests

at the Santa Maria Hotel.

Glad To Be Back
FTER five months’ | oliday in
England, Rev. and Mrs. H. A.

Melville returned yesterday morn-
ing by the Gascogne. Several of
their relatives were at the Baggage
Warehouse to meet them, Mrs.
Melville told Carib that they had
enjoyed their holiday immensely
but they were glad to be home.

Rev. Melville is the Vicar of
St. Ambrose Church.

Prize Possession

R. J. A. COCKBURN, En-

gineer of the Antigua Sugar
Factory, accompanied by his wife
and two sons, Bruce and Colin
arrived by the Gascogne yester-
day morning and left four hours
later for Antigua by B.W.LA.

Prize possession which they
brought with them from England
was a_ recording of the West
Indies Victory calypso.

Another passenger arriving by
the Gascogne. and leaving for
Antigua by B.W.LA. yesterday
was Miss Vida Abbott who is also
w:th the Antigua Sugar Factory.

Rum Publicity

HAT does tt benefit a :nan
who wins the Jamaica Rum

Here Again
ACK IN BARb#4DOS for the
winter is Mr. A. P. Taylor,
retired pensioner of ithe Canadian
Bank of Commerce He arrived
from Montreal yesterday morning
on the “Canadian Cruiser” and is
staying at the Windsor Hotel,
Back From Martinique
R. K, M. B, SIMON who was
spending a holiday in Mar-
tinique, returned by the Gascogne
yesterday morning.
Jamaican Historian
Seen Mrs, Amy
Garvey, who recently re-
turned to Britain after an exten-
sive tour of Africa, is busy writing

a history of Liberia. When asked Cocktail Competition of Great
why she had picked on this Britain—apart from the prize
subject Mrs, Garvey replied: “We Money and the cup presented by

the organisers? This was a ques-
tion put to A, C. Davidge of the

1 the West know
wiveria. We have heard of may

nothing of

scundals—financial and_ political Rekeotnen were one =
—but we have never taken Com n _ We
Liberia and Liberians serious!y ‘necked out this year by Sidney

as we should.” As soon ag she has C°X of the Connaught Rooms, Lon-

don, who went on to win the title.

completed this work Mrs, Garvey os : :

hopes to visit the West Indies on S#id Davidge, “You would be

lecture tour “ ampzed at the publicity arising

* ‘ fro this competition. It does

i 188i not last all year round but it

Sizing: Commitesion | the cettainly brings a temporary in-

+ telly 4 h commission ¢ crease in the calls for Jamaica
enquiry, headed by Sir John 'â„¢? cocktails.

Try This

And if you want to know what

\/addington, who are leaving for
British Guiana to devise a new
colony.













BARBADOS ADVOCATE



HATMAKING



IN GRENADA



THE WOMEN of Hopeland and Marquis, villages along the
road from St. George’s to Grenville in Grenada. British
West Indies, never stop working. As they go about their
business their hands are working the whole time, busily

plaiting a local pine to make sun-hats worn all over the
isiand,

The wild pine grows along the
sides of the road, where it is gath-
ered by the women. It is boiled
and when dry is stripped into con-
venient lengths and widths for
plaiting. Hats are made up and
coloured by locally bought dyes,
It takes a whole day to plait
enough material to make a large-
brimmed hat, and half an hour to
sew it up. The finished hats are





Stella The Star

Gtr ROLE at New York's big-

gest society function of the
season, to take place this month,
will be played by 18-year-old
Ste‘la Jebb, daughter of Britain’s
U.N delegate, Sir Gladwyn Jebb.
She will represent Princess Eliza-
beth in a tableau of the royal
wedding to be staged by couturier

skilfully made and many of them
have the added attraction of being
colourful and pretty in design.
This picture shows: In her shop in
Grenville is Josephine Sitney,
whose handpainted hats have in-

reduced a new vogue in Grenada

and elevated the straw hat into
millinery status.

Picture circulated September 1950

Norman Hartnell.



By permission

of the Queen, Hartnell is flying

from London with duplicates of
the wedding and_ bridesmaids’
dresses.

The news has revived American

offers to buy the duplicate wed-
ding ensembles, But Hartnell vT
say “No,” .







AQUATIC ULUD CENEMA (Members Only)

TO-NIGHT at %. 30 p.m.
ida LUPINO—Paul HENREID—Olivia De HAVILLAND

A Warner Bros.
BRONTE Sisters—CHA

“DEVOTION”

Picture, telling the life-story of the
ARLOTTE

EMILY and ANNE

William THACKERAY and Charles DICKENS _ also appear in this story

FRIDAY TO
TUESDAY NIGHT
at 8.30






MAUREER OHARA
MELVYN BOUGLAS
GLORIA GRAHAME
BILL WILLIS in

















Housewives Guide

Prices of Squash and Lettuce
when the Advocate checked
yesterday were:

Squash 24 cents per lb.
Lettuce 3 cents per head



B.B.C. PROGRAMMES

sHURSDAY, Nuv. ¥, thot
4 am. ane News. (WwW ain News
‘Mays. 749 am. Csose own. 12 woun
ane inew i41u pan, News Analysis,
«a9 pm. Programme Parade, lz.16 p.m.
ees wnome, s pm. Geraid barry
~ Admin, 1.45 pam, Radio Newsreet. 1.50
pom mays a Laugh. 2 p.m. The News
ss” p.m. Home News From Britain, 2.15
apors Keview. 2.30 King up the
rtain. 3.30 pom. Round Briain Quiz
. wm. The News. 4.10 p.m. The Daily
~ vice. 415 p.m, Biigh of the sounty

+45 p.m. The Cathedral Organs. 5 p.m.
Cnoice. 3.15 p.m. Lord Mayors
Jay. 5.45 p.m, Programme Parade. 6 p.m.
vues Verity. 6.15 p.m. Merchant Navy
ewsletter. 6.30 p.m. Educating Archie
7 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m. News Ana-
tySis. 7.15 p.m, We See Britain. 7.45 p.in.
uo.d Mayor’s Day. 8 p.m. Radio News-
cel. 615 p.m. United Nations Report
«we p.m. Composer of the Week. 8.30
pas. Cerald Barry Speaking. 8.45 p.m.
coink on these Things. 9 p.m. Canter-
bury Cathedral. 10 p.m, The News. 10.19
pm. From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m
Vanessa Lee. 10.45 p.m. Special Dispatch.
11 p.m. Close Down.

wrers



FRIDAY, NOV

7 am. The News.
Analysis. 7.15 a.m. Close Down. 12 Noon
The News. 12.10 p.m. News Analysis
12.15 p.m. New Records. 1 p.m. The De-
bate Continues, 1.15 p.ni. Radio News-
reel, 1.30 p.m. The Adventures of P.C. 49
2 p.m. The News, 2.10 p.m. Home News
From Britain. 2.15 p.m. Sports Review
2.30 p.m, English Songs. 3 p.m. Canter-
vury Cathedral. 4 p.m, The News. 4 10
»m, The Daily Service. 4.15 p.m. Nights
it the Opera. 5 p.m. Sandy MacPherson
et the Theatre Organ. 5.15 p.m. Pro-
tramme Parade. 5.30 p.m, Scottish Maga-
ne. 6 p.m. The Music Goes Round. 6.3)
»m. Priest and Pagan. 6.50 p.m. Inter-
ide. 7 p.m. The News. 7.10 p.m. News

10, 1950
7.10 am, News

Analysis 7.15 p.m, West Indian Diary.
7.45 p.m. What the Londoner Doesn't
Know, 8 p.m. Radio Newsreel. 8.15 p.m,

United Nations Report. 8.20 p.m. Com-
208er of the Week. 8,30 p.m, The Debate
sontinues.

| 8.45 p.m. BBC Symphony
Irchestra. 9.45/ p.m Communism in
*ractice. 10 p.m, The News. 10.10 p.m,
om the Editorials. 10.15 p.m. The Ad-

| ventures of P.C. 49. 10.45 p.m. World

\flairs. 11 p.m. Close Porn? iis

‘Gland Discovery
Restores Youth
‘In 24 Hours

| Sufferers from loss of vigour, nervous-
ess, weak body, impure blood, failing
memory, and who are old and worn-out
vefore their time will be delighted to learn
of a new gland discovery by an American
| Doctor.
| This new discovery makes it possible to
quickly and easily restore vigour to your
glands and body, to build rich, pure blood,
to strengthen your mind and memory and
feel like a new man in only 8 days. In fact,
| tuts discovery which Is a home medicine in
| pleasant, easy-to-take tablet form, does
way with gland operations and begins to
build new vigour and enerry n 24 hours,
yet it is absolutely harmless "natural in
«ction. a
The success of this"umazing discovery.
called Vi-Tabs has been so great in Amer-























THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1950



oes

PLAZA Theatre-—sRiDGETOWN
3 SHOWS TO-DAY 3—1.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

Special Planters Matinee Friday 1.30 (please note time)
Also 445 & 8.30 p.m.
SATURDAY (4 Shows) 9.30 a.m., 1.30, 445 & 830 p.m
and continuing indefinitely 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
Cecil B. De Mille’s

“SAMSON AND DELILAH”

Color by Technicolor

All Tiekets booked mast be taken up sot later thin
5.0 p.m. or same will be sold after that time
N.B.—All Complimentary Tickets are cancelled for this Pieture !

PLAZA Theatre m= OISTIN

Last ¢ Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.40 p.m Warner's Double

“HER KIND OF MAN” & “ROMANCE on the HIGH SEAS”

Special Matinee TO-DAY % p.m. (Monogram’s Action Double!) .
Dunean Renalde as Cisco Kid “IN OLD NEW MEXICO”
Jimmy WAKELY in “SONG OF THE Y

FRIDAY, SAT., SUN, 5 & 8.30 p.m. (New Picture)
Bros. presents :
“HOUSE ACROSS THE STREET”
with Wayne Morris, Janis Paige, Bruce Bennett
“COLORADO TERRITORY”

with Joel MeCrea—Virginia Mayo
A Warnet Bros. Double





(Special Notice :



Warner

And

Midnite Sat: “MARINE RAIDERS” plus 2 Leon Errol Shorts

GQAHRETY (The Garden) ST. JAMS

Last ¢ Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.
Warners’ Action Double !

“DEEP VALLEY”
Dane Clarke

FRIDAY, SAT, SUN. 8.30 MAT. SUN. 5 p.m.

20th Century Pox presents Tyrone Power in

and Ida LUPINO
“THE CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE

GLOBE THEATRE

Today and Tomorrow 5 and 8.30 p.m.

THE WOLF MAN

(LON CHANEY — BELA LUGOSI)

THE MUMMY’S TOMB

(BORIS KARLOFF)

“CHEYENNE”
Dennis Morgan





Plus Tonite and Tomorrow

The HAPPY FOUR Orchestra

BERMUDA’S JAM SPECIALISTS
Half Hour of Foreign Music

PIT 20 — HOUSE 36 — BAL. 48 — BOX 60





































constitution for that sort of rum cocktails people drink 1a that it is now being distributed by all cumin oncecnngamamm tine neem,
looking forward to an enjoyable Plans have now been completed in England, then try this recipe MATINEES re A $e cinas EMPIRE ROYAL
stay with her relatives and many {or the party to travel by ait, which was invented by Sidney words, Vi-Tabs must make you fee! full of
friends. serie, tee ie te of Poe Mg og Wioeangeck one younger, or you merely return the empty ||] To-day 4.45 and 8.30 and To-day 4.30 Only
“e y tI 2 ’ - DAC e a
Returned On Tuesday veck ao release: ‘Goshspation Pineaule juice, a dash of fresn FRIDAY AND bial, double-strength bottle of 48 Viv Tabs Continuing Indefinite enavies ue?
b ~ Senin of Flatisscan of a provisional booking for 'emon juice, Prag of o mnie Vi-Tabs guarantee, Sd the Mat, and Night Daily dere
ited of n en a really goc . ; *
La Popping woe oat. 4p Sean tne cialis enas tne once shaking can assure you the SATURDAY Jlestores_ Manhood and Vitality Julian Blausten Production nae
turn m a week’s visi o = . sty. Of course we cata
i t has been received the com- result is very tasty. Sloe y
par Rey. Se ae pimion will be all ready to leave, here would use Barbados rum. 5 p-m. | 1. he vu Bent’ k “ BROKEN ARRO ” sien ne 8-00 2 -
¥ “Fz iy . i . a a ?
n. COLIN WEEKES, Costs Rupert’s Autumn Primrose—7 ce | Color By Technicolor « CADROUPE inn
Officer at well, Who... ie CLE ANER Starring JAMES. STEWART For the Last Time at the
was in witenade Tr : few ‘says * | with Royal
“Tequrnepsesteaaey | Ares noor G L O B E T 1 H E A T R E | Jeff CHANDLER — Debra To eee aera
B.W.LA, He was away on PAGET and Basil RUYS- Friday Only at 4.30 and 8.30
business, | BRIDGETOWN ? DAEL—Will GEER Republic Big Double
Don AMECHE
aes OPENING TO-MORROW | ° e Catherine McLEOD
‘ ‘I| 2. The Advoeate invites ew
J and 6.30 pm. \ your suggestions in ROXY WILL TOMORROW EVER
|! not more than 200 Last Two Shaw To- ~day ci
words. #.80 and “MAN FROM OKLAIOMA”
Q ‘ M-G-M Big Double w oy
3. The best suggestion ea eee ie Dale EVANS
j Ode! Abie rat os aa eee
Rupert determines to try for the for my last try,"’ murmurs the little to be received not d Opening Saturday to
special peize » and taking the bell t. senna, great coms fe trees later than December vor e cies Tt .
irae salt a ane, ate Uo ci, Su sit ||| go wittreeeive ‘ THREE “GODFATHERS”
rows. . B |
be, dem Syey MeoMRae See ay aac |] son. “THE BRIBE
ee lacite eries his pal, :
wat duke" lage Rupe Rupert, ‘1 stares a anonlahyiet. PMercy 00 4. Apane] of three ‘OLYMPIC
other one!"’ us,” she says. one a judges to be an- ” Vo-d
‘ whole ik | “ ‘o-day and Tomorrow
Across he second ba ve ie wide. New __ done thas the teen | nounced later w i 1 1 BIG “TACK 4.30 and 8.15
\. kts eaves are much used tor | === : decide the winning with Wallace BEERY— M-G-M Big Double
feeding silkworms. (8) ; : ent a Claude JARMAN and
9. From which you may prepare ry. Richard CONTE pene BRIAN
nutritious starch. (9) 3 Snows To-DAY e
10. This set 8p yout gone 48! 5. Enclose attached To-morrow oe Sunday “INTRUDER IN THE
§ i 4.45 and 15 .
1a" pomeanitie tor ¢ the litter? (3) L30 - 4.45 and 8.30 p- wee. an with each * DUST’
15. Often quickly noticed on the 3 M entry. W. Lee Presents . and
7. “You *pave’ a” nimble, wit. | SPECIAL PLANTERS MATINEE FRIDAY 1,30 P.M, \:siewidioad anal ompieinen. vanes Aseoie”
re think ‘twas made of ——'s heels © (Please Note Time) Also 4.45 and 8.30 p.m. MARGARET plassipeientdiatlbguer Ace a iS Cesar ROMERO and June with
tri you Like 1b"). 16) SATURDAY (4 SHOWS) 9.30 a.m. — 1.30 — 4.45 and or Margaret O’BRIEN and
19; Sue eeorines’ she: pin 'T: wag 8.30 p.m, and Continuing Indefinitely 4.45 and 8.30 p.m. LOCKWOOD [ B [ Angel LANSBURY
23. re a disguise. (4) ’ e 2 . a mr
& mist ouenoe a | Cecil B. DeMille's Masterpiece DENNIS PRICE (7% “ONCE A THIRE Saturday, Sunday and
2. gris vite 2 sairection-. ($) . | AN HUNTER ll | Monday 4.30 and 8.15
; Down re IAG aca Nhs haw ss Co-Starring . United Artists Double
1. Opion that Is outside the T.U.C, | JOAN NGA “CHAMPAGNE FOR
‘ ! A i CAESAR"
4 SOyeirend ina hurry. (6) GREENWOOD in | Address ....... see epee and “COVER UP”
3. You'll find 16 is one, (4) |
4. Found in 4 sewer extraordinary ' |
5 To. yA ALS equ | POSS OPOPPO PSS PSSST PSS DOSPOPP EP FOOT ee ee
ave ‘
. Wi tf ooking. (7) a ion so my .
Shore [reterence to recent < A PERFECT WAY TO SPEND THIS HOLIDAY 3
f Gnthinking ppereur may bring ! |e ae : %
: 3 {om the novel “THE WHITE UNICORN’ s G I be h %
ib ES tea ae om | Q& seeeetece enececeeme se ” aa Saat < TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. Globe Theatre §
18 {te Holding capacity depends on ee a heuniele A JOHN CORFIELD Production x i 3
20 Lie Feterence to it suggests eS one by Harold Huth ¢ “THE WOLE MAN” (Lon Chaney & Hela Lugosi) x
“Gee || PLAZA THEATRE | (=== os
the ‘answer. ¢
2%. This duct is manufacturea (3) ‘ ‘ van ; x
1 SBuugn gt smurdays ounae gerRte | HRIDGETOWN a “THE MUMMY'S TOMI” (Boris Karloff) :
41 iswe, 12" Old." 15. Rococo: 14, suem SPECIAL NOTICE—All Tickets Booked must be taken up not Plus ‘
25 usd Bi, Fete 22 ves, 28: Code . later than 8.30 p.m. or same will be sold after that time) x EXTRA TO-NITE! ON STAGE %
Dene 3 te Ree lotnde rts echits *: 48. N.B.—AlU complimentary tickets are cancelled for this picture. LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE x , %
Wem I | 179999999999 99SSSS999994 FIVE SO TO HOII ITO T OOS | : :
ae : RA aa ij BERMUDAS :
i *
~HANDBAGS_ a :
(Long & Short Handles) | { ecure ours 0- ay x s
PATENT & MOROCCO 4 % B () P 3
FIN | :
| 2
WHITE ’ {
BLACK | KARLIT INSULATING WALL BOARD | SPECIALIST
)
TAN t Termite Proof %
RED { a ‘3
wi ss eae ions nla aaa ls 1 Sheets : 42” X 4’ 6’, 7, 8’, 9’ and 10 .
| S { ¢ -
IS | * THE
i‘ “
j BEACHSHOR 4 HARD BOARD :
‘or Men & Boys in |i i g
i Termite Proof % ;
| BLUE, WHITE & BEIGE y St un Vv < 6.7 and 8’ & i APPY y
YOUR SHOE STORES \ Sheets : *#" XK 4 X ©, S ‘
° \t ~
| Sharkskin |! ASBESTOS WOOD :
5.80 Sheets: 4’ X 4’, 4 X 8’ x FOUR
SGI... bak EEE | HAND SAWS 24” to 36” in length 8
; ESTRA |
5 s
EVANS and THE BARWADOS Co-opERATIVE ||} ORCH
WHITFIELDS COTTON FACTORY LTD. ¥ :
%,
eve SHOR POR en ce ee ¥1600090860000 665550550000 005000S56 6500000000S0SSSTNSSESTIOSTIOSOSONOSOS.
+ a
‘ ‘ }



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1950 *



C.C. Discusses |
Deep Water
Harbour

}



Members of the Council of!
the Chamber of Comrierce again |
expressed concern at: cheir meet- |
ing yesterday as to what Gov-

ernment intend doing about
proposed deep water harbour. A|/
letter, from the Chamber had
been forwarded to the Govern-
ment on this matter but no
reply has yet-been received.
_Acting Vice-President
V. C. Gale M.L.C. could not
attend the meeting yesterday
and Mr, D. A. Lucie-Smith took
the Chair. Arising out of the
matter of the deep water harbour,
Mr. Lucie-Smith told the mem-
bers he understood that at the
request of the Shipping and
Mercantile Association, the Gov-
ernment had appointed a com-
mittee to look into and report on
the working and operation of the |
port. That was a matter that
concerned the Chamber as well, |
The Shipping and Mercantile
Association had been asked by.!
Government to appoint two mem-
bers to that committee, and he
knew that they had submitted
the names of Mr. W. H. Grannum
and Mr, A. R. Toppin. He under-
stood unofficially that Govern-
ment had or would appoint the
Labour Commissioner and the
Harbour Master and_ that
they had asked Labour to appoint!
two members, probably through
the Barbados Workers’ Union.
When this committée would
be set up he did not know, but
he took it that they would ask
for evidence. He did not know
whether the Chamber would
like to give evidence, ,He knew

the

Hon,

that some members had some
very definite views about the
handling of goods in the ware-
houses, ete,, and might like to
offer some constructive sugges-
tions,
Parking Places
Mr. H. A. C. Thomas referred |

to a letter from the Commissioner !
of Police in reply to one from
the Chamber on the question of
parking places in Bridgetown.

Mr. Thomas said that the
Commissioner had declared his
intention to discuss the matter
with any member of the Chamber,
and he (Mr. Thomas) did not
think they should lose any time
in putting forward their views
to him.

The Council agreed and ap-
pointed Mr, A. del Innis, Mr,
R. M, Cave and Mr. T. O.

Dowding to interview the Com-
missioner on the matter,

In their letter to the Commis
sioner the Chamber had pointed j
out that there were some one-
way streets in the City. where
parking space could be found.

The Council decided that the
Chamber should continue — the
holding of their annual dinners.

The question had been raised
at the last meeting of the Councii!
as to whether it was necessary
to hold the dinner this year and
whether these dinners should be
continued at all, as a good many
members did not seem to be
interested. The Secretary was
instructed to send out a question-
naire to members on the, matter,

He tpla the Council yesterday
that in reply to the question of
the holding of the annual dinners,
59 members had said that they
were in favour as against 37, while
to 20 others the matter was one
of indifference. About the holding
of the dinner this year, 42 hac
promised to attend and 71 did not

| West












e
New Indian |
. * ,
Commissioner
* a Pp
Pays Visit Here
@ From Page i |
of great service and benefit to the}
Indian community here.

He was glad to know that
although these islands in the
Indies were inhabited by
peoples from different parts ol
the world like Africa, Asia, Furope
and America, they all lived like
members of the same farily and
did not observe any recial dis-
crimination or bias, In his opin-
ion, that was an aehievement
which was worth copying by
many other nations of the world
to-day

They were trying to develop
their radio and news service and
the Publicity Department of his
office will be interested in mak-
ing arrangements for better news.

Paying tribute to the late Ma-
hatma Ghandi, the Commissioner
said that it was almest a miracle





|how marvellous their leaders had

managed the same machinery,
which was so complicated, in
spite of all the odds they had.
It was the first time in the his-
tory of the human race that due
to a very unpleasant partition of
their country, millions and mil-
lions of people had to migrate
from one part of United India to
other parts. It was a tremendous
task for any Government to re-
habilitate them.

Adult suffrage was granted to
all in spite of the high -pereentage
of illiteracy, and his Government
would have to. educate the masses
so that they would realise or}
responsibility of the franchise

A medical student at the Indian
Patna University, the Commis-
sioner said that he gave up his
studies .in 1921 and joined the
movement for independenee which
was started by Mahatma Ghandi
about the year before. He was
Private Secretary to Dr. Rajen-|
draprasad, President of India
until 1923 when he left for the
Far East where he remained until |

1946 representing the Thdian
National Congress Independerice
Movement.

He was twice imprisoned for |
short periods, first in 1922 and
then during the last World War
in Singapore, but was released
when some settlement came be-
tween India and England in
1946 when the Cripps Cabinet
Mission visited India,

He returned home in the mid-
dle of 1946 and was interested in
‘the Labour movement and was
President of the Kailway Union
in India.

———

HARBOUR L0G

In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Harviet Whittaker, Sch. D’Ortac,
Seh. Laudalpha, Sch. Lochinvar §,, Sch,
Cyril E, Smith, Sch. Mary M. Lewis,
Seh, Molly N. Jones, Sch. Frances W
Smith, Sch. Mandalay, Sch. Turtle Dove.
M.V. Ferryland, Sch. Lydia Adina 8S.

ARRIVALS

S.S, Gaceogne, 2,681 tons net,
Prigent Francois, from Martinique,

5.5. Canadian Cruiser, 3,935 tons net,
Capt. O'Hara, from Montreal.

American Yaeht Oregon, 4 tons net,
Capt. Nolas, from Dundee.

DEPARTURES

S.S. Goscogne, 2,681 tons net, Capt
ervey Pibeeo for Trinidad.

I - Canadian Cruiser, 3;! tons .
Capt. O'Hara, for St. Vis ne am

In Touch With
Caastal Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd.
advise that they can now communicate
with the following ships through their
Barbados Coast Stations: S.S. Glamor-
gan Seam, S.S. Plymouth, 8.S. Dolores,
Maria De Larrinaga, S.S, Planter,
Lioyderest, S.S. Silver Walnut, 8.5.
Fetterman, S. Uruguay, 5.8.





Capt.



Fort



S.S. Brasil,

Moscow |
Celebrates

Revolution |

LONDON, Nov. 7.



Marshal Budenny, command-|
ing chief of the Russian South-
western Command and member}

of the Supreme Soviet, took the}
salute at today’s march past in|
Moscow's Red Square on the
33rd anniversary of the October
Revolution, Moscow Radio re-

ported.

Colonel General Pavel
miev, Moscow's District
mander, led the parade.

The square was decorated with
huge portraits of Lenin and
Stalin, the coats of arms, and 16
of the Soviet Republics and
Communist party slogans.

Ministers, “world renowned

Arte-
Com-



scientists” and leading writers
and artists watched the parade.
the radio said.

Foreign guests included
Koreans, Chinese, East Germans,
Italians, Frenchmen and Belgians,

“Anglo-American imperialists
have now passed from prepara-
tions for aggression to direct acts
of aggression,” the army leader
said. “Evidence of which is the
vandit intervention by the United
States in Korea.”

“The Soviet people tcegether
with other freedom lovirg people
would brand with shame Ameri-
can aggressors and express their
sympathy for the Korean people
who are conducting a heroic strug-
gle for the freedom and independ-
ence of their motherland.”

Budenny ended his speech by
acclaiming the Soviet Government
and people and their armed forces,
the Bolshevist Party and “our

wise teacher, great leader and| »$o650056606:

army leader of genius, the organ-
iser of all our victories, our dear
and beloved comrade Stalin.’

Troops and spectators cheered,
an artillery salvo was fired, and
the march past began

“Torch of Liberation”

The most important Russian
pronouncement of the year—the
traditional annual report delivered
on the eve of the revolution anni-
versary — was given by Marshal
Nicoli Bulganin, Deputy Prime
Minister of the Soviet Union, over
Moscow Radio.

He told'an audience of fepre-
sentatives of Moscow's profes-
sional, political and army organi-
sations at the Bolshoi Theatre :
“The basic aims of our five-year
plan have been exceeded.”

Bulganin said: ‘Fulfilling the
duties imposed by Stalin, our
scientists will soon exceed the
achievements of science abroad.”

“After having mastered the
secrets of atomic energy our sci-
entists have passed to the solution
of further problems which will
help to develop our Soviet coun-
try”, he added.

Marshal Bulganin continued:

“Comrade Stalin has said in the
past that the existence of different
systems need not prevent co-oper-
ation between nations and in par-
ticular with the United States.
There is of course a difference
between the desire to co-operate
and the possibility of co-operation.
Possibility always exists.

“People’s democracies together
with the German mocratic Re-
public which firmly stands on a
peace basis, and the heroic Korean
people which is fighti for its
independence, liberty and peace—
all these people constitute the
camp of democracy, socialism and
peace.

“To the camps of peace is op-







See

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
Cf This Motion Picture the Screen Can
Be Proud ...Today... Tomorrow...

a Generation From Now...

BY F 2 (COCO
JEFF CHANDLER : DEBRA PAGET

oeeted DELMER DAVES: rustew»y JULIAN BLAUSTEIN. 20%.
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PAGE THREE



pines:

How happy they are — Mother and Child! Yes, doubts
and difficulties have gone —baby is on Cow & Gate

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Strong, sturdy limbs, sound bones, the happiness of

abounding health—these are some of the gifts bestowed

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want to do so. The Council reason- | Birka,
ed, however, that about 20 hon-
erary members would also b>
attending. It was decided to hold

SS. Lady Rodney,
5.5. Gascogne, S.S, African Crescent,
Alcoa Roamer, S.S. San Rosa, §8.S.

S.S. Folke Bernadotte, S.S. Lam-

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posed a camp of imperialism led
by ruling circles of the United !
States favouring a policy of insti-'





the dinner.
Scenic Beauty

One of the matters set down for
discussion when the Chamber hold
their next Quarterly General
Meeting, will be “the advisability
of asking Government to prohibit
the erection of advertising signs
and hoardings throughout the
island, which is rapidly spoiling
the scenic beauty of the island and
is being adversely commented
upon by visitors.” Notice of this
was given at the Council meeting
yesterday by Mr. Trevor Bow-
ring.

The Council heard a letter read
from the Acting Colonial Secre-
tary about the Chamber's request
by letter to the Airport Manager
with regard to the posting of
passenger lists in the waiting room
at the airport.

It was stated that the Chamber's
letter had been forwarded to the
office of the Colonial Secretary
and that the Government did not
propose to take any action in the
matter. The Chamber’s sugges-

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, SS. Lugano, S.S. Sundale, 8.58,
Fort Amherst, S.S. Del Norte, SS,
Hyeres.

ARRIVALS—By B.W.1A.L,

From Trinidad: Nina Wilson, Jonn
Wilson, Meili Simon, Mark Conyers,
Norah Bradshaw, Hamel Alexander,

Moliy Vignales, Audrey Skinner, Valarey
Gill, Carmen Gill, Hector Mann, Mal-
colm Mann, Ruth Balkin, Lambert Sealy,

Douglas Moore,
From Dominica; Nicol, Nicol, June
F. Harrison.

Nicholls, C.

From St. Lucia: Douglas Wilson, Joan
Wilson, Mabel Eudolie

DEPARTURES—By B,W.1LA.L,.

For Trinidad: John Roland, Agnes
Roland, Joan Groves, Harold Dionysius,
Edward Cote, Gaby Cote. Charles
Me Kenzie, Arthur St. Hill, Louise Cipri-
ani, G. W. Gwyn.

For St. Vincent: William Hughes.

For Dominica: Grace Lockhart, Alexie
Hamilton.
ad St. Lucia: Fannie Charles, Harold

tion, however, had been put to
the managers of B.W.I1.A. and
Trans-Canada Airlines. These had
been assured that Government
would offer no objection to the
posting of the lists-assuming that
the passengers themselves did not
cbject.





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gating the new war policy of a
strong over-riding West.

“American imperialists have
now passed from a policy of pre-
paration for aggression to direct
acts of aggression, the most
blatant example being armed in-
tervention in Korea.

“Americans concentrated in
Korea almost all their armed
forces in the Far East and also
called upon the forces of Britain
and other countries.

“They were able to reap some
military successes, but they have
not weakened the Korean people’s
will to fight. Y

“Korea has become the torch of
the liberation movement of colo-
nial and dependent countries.”

“Anglo-American imperialists
have created an aggressive North
Atlantic oy and are busy knock-
ing together other aggressive mili-
tary blocs.

“They are hindering the conclu-
sion of a peace treaty with Ger-
many and are trying to prolong

—Reuter.





« LEVER rropucy



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1
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HIGH STREET) within the next few weeks we are
offering to the public large stocks of merchandise at
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We have opened a gertuine sale of hundreds of regular
items at prices which will amaze you. Here are a few
of the articles and prices:—

SPUN, SILKS & CREPES

Attractive shades guaranteed qualities reduced
from $1.68 and $1.80 to 69c., 80., 92.

PRINTS

36” wide, checked and flowered 100 designs
fast colours reduced to 52c. & 59e.

LADIES & MEN'S SHOES

New stock of American, Dutch and English shoes
at prices below our own cost.

MEN’S SPORT & DRESS SHIRTS

Largest seleetion in town, prices cut up to 30%.

MEN’S TWEEDS, TROPICALS.
FLANNELS & DOESKINS

New stocks recently arrived selling at own cost.

LADIE’S UNDERWEAR

Cotton panties reduced to 30 & 48c. Silk panties
excellent quality reduced to 62 & 78c. Brassiers,
Nighties, Stockings. Also household items all at
sacrificing prices. ;

Come and see us. One glance at our goods and prices

will convince you of the rare opportunity to shop and
save.

THE ROYAL STORE

NO. 2 HIGH STREET





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Thursday, November 9, 1950



PEACEMAKER

TO-DAY is Peacemaker’s Day and is a
public holiday in Barbados. lit -has been
pointed out more than once that the num-
ber of holidays in this island exceeds that
in any other part of the British Empire.
In England there are public holidays only
on Good Friday, Easter Monday, Whitsun,
August Bank Holiday, Christmas and Box-
ing Day. New Year’s Day is not a holiday
in England, nor is the King’s Birthday, nor

” Empire day.

. In Barbados, however, in addition to
these holidays, there is New Year’s Day,
Queen Victoria’s Birthday (May 24th) His
Majesty's Birthday celebrated in June,
Clerks’ Holiday in October, Peacemaker’s
Day in November, Race and Exhibition
days, fifty two statutory half holidays and
any other number dictated by the state of
ericket during Intercolonial and M.C.C.

Cricket matches, to say nothing of this
year’s Cricket Day.

Barbados like every other country in the
Empire appreciates the services which
King Edward VII rendered to the British
Empire specifically and to Europe gener-
ally, It remembers them uniquely on
Peacemaker’s Day.

King Edward has been referred to in a
tribute as “a powerful factor in the pre-
servation of the peace of Europe, his
friendly intercourse with the heads of the
French, German and other nations earning
for him the title of Edward the Peace-
maker.”

Tt was not a title lightly gained. King
Edward as Prince of Wales travelled wide-
ly and by personal contact with people
realised the vast numbers who comprised
the Commonwealth. He also appreciated
their, differences in outlook and ambitions
and so when he came to the Throne suc-
ceeding Queen Victoria he exhibited a
sympathy and tolerance which made him
beloved by his people overseas and at home.

“His love of life and its enjoyment, his

pleasure in the glitter and glamour in the
ceremonial made him the most “popular
prince in Europe” and his name a house-
hold word in the Courts of the European
capitals. To-day- in Barbados we remem-
ber.him as a maker of peace.

Peacemaker’s holiday became statutory
through the energies of a man now hardly
remembered by many in Barbados, The
late Henry Walter Lofty who was an out-
standing Colonial Treasurer introduced a
bill in the House of Assembly when he
was a member for Bridgetown. He had
made other valuable contributions to Bar-
badian public life but none so popular as
this.

For’Barbados to-day, Peacemaker’s Day
is not merely another holiday. It is a re-
minder of the great desire for the main-
tenance of peace throughout the world, a
peace which this generation hardly knows
anything about, since large scale wars are
waged by some, while others watch in

“intervals of peace.

Sys —_

Remember Flanders

POPPY DAY this year comes at a time
when the news from the East is grave, and
the chances of another World War are not
remote, .Every day in Korea members of
the United Nations forces are being maim-
ed and killed, and the Poppies on sale to-
morrow will serve as a remembrance of
them as well as of the disabled of the First
and Second World Wars.

‘The Poppy League Fund has always
been used to help war disabled soldiers
to, lead a normal life. It is a deserving
fund depending on your generosity. With
the money subscribed the blind at St.
Dunstan’s.are taught to see with their
hands, and the maimed are trained in
trades which they can follow despite their
injuries.

In Barbados we need a minimum of
$8,000 a year to maintain the payment of
pensions and contribute to the running of
the training schools for the disabled. With
the continual rise of the cost of living mean-
ing that every year the pensions can buy

less, let us try to make to-morrow’s col-
lection a record.

This is a cause that has the support of
everyone, but not everyone remembers to
buy a Poppy. It isso easy to forget.
Every contribution, however small, is wel-
come; but when you buy your Poppy to-
day think of the fields of Flanders where so
many were disabled in the cause of free-
dom, and of Korea where men are suffer-
ing for the same ideal, and give generously.

ADNOGATE |

An Investigation by Military Commentator Robert Jessel

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





COLONIAL STUDENTS

THE CHOICE: THIRTY AnpTHECOLOURBAR

MEN-OR ONE TANK

YOUR SON'S CALL-UP—No. 2. Are we getting

BOYS who were six at the time
of Munich make up the 1932 age
class which is being called up
into uniform this P5

“This conscription is so very
unfair,” Mrs. E. M. Ockwell
writes to me from Cumberland-
road, Swindon. :

She tells me of a 19-year-old
boy who wants to be a singer,
and is, she says, “quite naturally
averse to military ideas,” and 1s
the only boy in the road to be
eal'cd up. The others have
esc ped.
l.rs. Ockwell wonders if this
sort of thing encourages parents
to develop their children’s talents.

I ook at the official figures.

Cut of every hundred boys in
the 1932 age class: —

1 WELVE are exempted straight
away on medical grounds,

LLEVEN get off because they
are farm workers or miners.

"‘ WENTY-SIX are “deferred”
as students or apprentices. Even
Mr. Strachey does not think it
wo :h while to interrupt their
esscntial training. (Later they
will be called up, and industry
wil’ have to make the best of it.)

SLX others get off because they
are conscientious objectors, or are
going to live in Australia, or on
compassionate grounds and the
like




















This will leave just 45 out of
the original 100 in the 1932 age
cl::s, Mrs. Ockwell. These will
pt on uniform; and 30 will go
in > the Army,

The System

I \ave looked into the mechanism
o the Labour Ministry’s call-up
s} em. It is efficient and Con-
fo ms to the rules laid down by
P: liament. But it is not, as Mr.
Isc-es asks us to believe, a model
ef “universality,”

!caving gone so far to make the
ca.'-up selective and not universal,
ov ht we to go further and call up
still fewer men? And, inevitably,
cause more heartburning?

i Are we

reinforce the 190,000 Regulars
already serving?

Look at it another way.

If Mr Strachey has £30,000
tt spend, ought he to spend it
on one new Centurion tank, OR
on calling up and training for
two years 30 slightly resentful
soldiers?

MANILA, Thursday.
OW that it’s all over in
Korea, bar the shooting,
what really happened’? we should
seriously ask, and seek to answer
itif we don’t want it all to
vappen again. « mite .

”
The pattern of the campaign
was simple, First, the retreat.
Second, hold and build up.
Third, break out. Fourth, mop

up.
This last phase is still going
on, and it will probably continue

longer than all the rest put
together,
We only just did the job.

People who realise it are asking
two questions, Why did the
enemy come so near success?
And why did he just fail?

He took us by surprise. Was
this due to our poor military
intelligence? We should find out,
for if it was bad in Korea it may
be worse elsewhere,

The American garrison had
withdrawn from Korea, leaving
behind a South Korean “army.”
Why was it so badly trained,
equipped, and _ officered? We
should inquire because the
Philippines and Indonesia (who
are also on Uncle Joe’s list) may
e in no better shape.

Once the war had _ begun,
why did it take so long for the
“fire-brigade” to arrive on the
scene? In the armies on the
United States and the United
Kingdom were far more than 4
million men, yet it was weeks
before the Americans, from
near-by Japan could bring up to
strength the couple of divisions
they rushed in.

As for Britain, for years critics
nave been saying that if trouble
came we would not find an army
ccrps. Trouble came, and we
could not scrapé up a brigade,
‘Someone may say, “But we had
Malaya on our hands.” Too true,
and maybe the next time also.)

As it was the good name of
Britain was saved once again by

OUR READERS SAY:

w Publicity

Might not some of these 30—-
perhaps a dozen of
doing much more to help the
nation if, instead, t were sent
to join the 250,000 workers
by Mr. Isaacs for his rearmament
programme?

If we could winkle out this
duzen, and maybe cut the Army’s
intake by a third, ecouldn’t Mr.
Strachey release a third of his
Regulars from the bloated train-
ing machinery for cperational
theatres where National Service-°
men are now being sent?

Lost Jobs

The time is long overdue for
Parliament to set up a. Se’,
Committee on Manpower to s.u iy
this whole question of call-up,

What is wanted is something
ou the same lines as the Select
Committee on Its

implications of calling up the
young singer from @umberland -
road, Swindon, and the rest of
the 260,000 conscripts now serving
in the Forces.

Cornwall, to tell me that h
17}-year-old boy, who won
scholarships at school, has lost
his job as a junior clerk because
of his im ing call-up.

No one else wall give a job to
a boy who will be off to the
Army in ning months, so the lad
‘s unemployed. There must be
many others in a similar position.

My Select Committee on Man-
power would therefore start by
examining the various reasons
which the Government has
advanced since 1945 for having
the call-up at all,

First, we were told, it was to
release the wartime veterans
straining to be demobilised.

By 1947 it was to build up a
trained reserve in the Territorials.

By 1948 the purpose of the
call-up was “to put heart into
the French,”

And now? It is because Regular
Army recruiting has been so poor
that conscripts are needed in
operational theatres.

It is time for Mrs. Ockwell's
boy to be given a more satis-
factory reason why he must not
be a singer until 1952.

25-hour Week
My Manpower Committee ;
would almost certainly report
that some sort of conscription



value for Money?

will be nece for many years
tu come. It will be a long, long
time before there are 250,000
Regulars in the Army.

at does not mean, however,
that we necessarily need to-day’s
Army of 370,000 to produce Mr.
Attlee’s target force of ten
divisions and a modest com-
ponent of Ack—Ack,

Many of the jobs done by the
Army’s orderlies, or by _ the
R.AS.C. and the Pioneer Corps,
could, for example, be easily
by full or part time civilian
labour.

Take away all those parades
and inspections for troops in the
non-fighting arms, and not many
conscripts would be found work-
ing a 25-hour productive week.

A great many men in _ the
Services work very hard indeed.
My Select Committee would be
interested in those who don't.
A visit for thé committee might
be arranged to the gunner regi-
ment at Larkhill, which is so
stretched, so starved of man-
power, that it has had to recall
some reservists from civilian life.

Yet is contrives to give seven
weeks’ holiday a year to its
Regulars.

The committee would specially
be interested in what has hap-
pened to the half million ex-
conscripts who have passed
through Mr. Strachey’s sausage
machine since 1945,

How many of them could
report tomorrow to a known job
in a known regiment on receipt
of an order broadcast after the
9 o'clock news tonight?

My investigations suggest that
the reserves I have listed, plus
the Class Z reserve, Plus the
Regular Reservists, already
provide the War Office with twice
as many men as the Army could
digest and equip with modern
arms in the first year of a future
World War III.

Welcome

A Manpower Committee set uP
right away could produce the
evidence to prove my case il
time for the New Year.

Something like a million
parents would welcome the de-
cision, Mr, Strachey, So would
a good many of your More
thoughtful serving soldiers.

—LES.
NEXT: How good is our
Army now?



the bravery of the British soldier
when, he arrived on the battle-
eld: as usual too few.

Only 2 to 1

OME other excuses may be
exploded. We were nevér
“overwhelmingly” outnumbered:
two to one at worst—and always
we had absolute air and sea
supremacy, It was claimed tnat
our anti-tank weapons were
unable to» pierce the Russian-
made enemy armour.” It was
probably bad aim, but in any
case we have .knoOwn of the
Russian P.T, 34 for years and
should have known the calibre
of gun required to stop it,

The real reason for our retreat
was simply that the enemy was
better prepared, He used against
our badly organised South
Koreans and green young Ameri-
can occupation troops from
Japan many .veterans drawn
from the Chinese civil wars,

Like The Japs

HY did the North Koreans

just fail to finish them?
Perhaps their military intelli-
gente was as unintelligent as
our own,

More probably they had
reache@ the limit of their punch.

Like the Japs in Burma during
our .retreat in 1942 stopped
when only the remnant of a rear-
guard lay between them and
India, because they had literally
run out of supplies.

So the North Koreans stopped
—and lost the campaign, Few of
us believed it at the time. General
MacArthur was one, and he
calmly went on with the war.

So did those “raw” troops of
his, growing’ riper every hour.
Out of the dark night of the
retreat and siege there shone the
splendid star of the common
soldier’s courage. :

To hold the bridgehead was
hard, for the tougn enemy knew
and used the hills often appear-
ing in our rear, More trouble-
some to fit into the Korean ter-



wealth of Barbadian information
of a wide range, and I may add,



THE NARROW SQUEAK

At last it is possibe to weigh up the Korean War—and the lesson of it:
KEEP THE FIRE BRIGADE READY—By Frank Owen

rain was the American doctrine
ot “Use machines save men.”
Thus, when@yer an infantry
unit was held up even by a
single sniper, the drill was to
whistle up the tanks, artillery
or aircraft and blast the area.

Time .... Money
T COSTS money both before
and after the event, And
time, a precious commodity in
war,

Nor do the “liberated” love
to see their families slaughtered,
their homes smashed even by the
impersonai agency of a general
bombardment and in the name
of collective security,

The military advantages of
machine war were vividly shown
at Inchon when MacArthur
carried out the greatest amphibi-
ous operation since D-Day.

Somebody has called it
most helluva gamble.”
nothing of the kind. It was a
superbly calculated risk, coolly
assessed and courageously taken

"the
It was

Remember .. .
ACARTHUR had to land his
divisions on a shore whose

tides rise and fall 30 ft. Had it
been contested. it would have
been a Gallipoli, It was not-——-
because MacArthur had _ taken
steps to have the enemy else-
where,

Let us learn from Korea for
be sure that the enemy has,

Next time we may have to
fight not only a_ brave, brutal
infantry army with no air force,
no field radio and ox-drawn
transport, Next time we may not
have a great industrial base like
Japan near at hand, Next time
there may not be so much time.
Yes, we MUST learn, for next
time may be the last time for the
free world. Let us have both the
machines and ‘the men standing
by, the Task Force ready, the
fire-brigade with the engines
running.

“Next time we may not have so

much time’



beoky and sell them on
sion.



















—LES. (disease. —IN.S.

By E. B. Timothy

LONDON,
Borough Council authorities, M.P.s, social
workers and housewives are to co-operate in
a big scheme initiated by the British Council
to make London’s 2,000 coloured students
fee] at home in Britain. The first area to be

tackled is the borough of Kensington, where|
|

a quarter of the students live.

The mayor of Kensington, Alderman J. G.
Gapp, has already consented to preside over
a Commonwealth committee of local repre-
sentatives which includes Sir Patrick Spens,
Conservative M.P. for South Kensington and
Mr. G. H. R. Rogers, Labour M.P. for North
Kensington. This committee will endeavour
to find accommodation for Colonial students
with British students or British families and
thereby encourage them to participate in
local activities instead of living in isolation.

Mr. MacFarlane, of the British Council
Press Department, tells me that the colour
problem can be overcome in the cultural
sphere. “The British Council will make it
its responsibility to provide coloured stu-
denis with greater social intercourse with
British people,” he added.

Legally speaking, there is no colour bar
in Britain. It exists to some extent, however,
in a way that is extremely difficult to tackle.
Colonial students experience it particularly
in their search for ‘digs’. While it is true
that there is an acute shortage of accommo-
dation in Britain (as a result of the Second
World War), it is often true that students
are refused accommodation because of their
colour. They are not told so, but it is
implied.

On the other hand, some coloured people
he: e are too sensitive and touchy. They re-
gard every seemingly unpleasant gesture as

colour bar. “{f have found very few cases of
colour prejudice,” commented Sir Patrick
Spens. “But when anyone not of their col-

our disapproves of anything they do, col-
oured students tend to put it down immedi-
ately to prejudice.”

Some British people are definitely .
judiced against coloured people. In some
cases, this is due to a dislike for anything
alien. The misdemeanours of a certain class
ot coloured people—mostly the seamen and
slowaways—have, unfortunately, created
antipathy in the minds of many well-mean-
ing British people. They do not always find
it easy to distinguish the ‘wheat from the
chaff’ because, to them, all coloured people
41e more or less alike.

A leading article in the News Chronicle
doseribes the British Council's campaign as
‘morally and politically timely.” When it is
vcmembered that the British colonies are
now in a state of cultural and political fer-
ment and that the Colonial students dis-
criminated against are the potential leaders
of the Colonies, the gravity of the problem
cannot be overlooked.

The colour bar is undesirable. The ignor-
ance which breeds it must be counteracted

British Council aims to do this by persuasion
and explanation.

New Heart Trouble

CHICAGO, Nov.,

A heart specialist has claimed that con-
stant publicity about coronary disease as
the leading cause of death has given rise
to a relatively new disease, cardiac
neurosis,

Dr. Gilbert H. Marquardt, Assistant Pro-
fessor of Medicine at Northwestern Uni-
versity’s Medical School, said that despite
this, publicity about heart disease has done
more good than harm.

He told some 90 heart specialists attend-
ing The Chicago Medical Society’s refresh-
er courses that two important gains attri-
-butable to more information about heart
disease are:

“It has made more people heart con-
scious, giving us an earlier opportunity
to diagnose the disease; and it has also
opened the purse strings of a concerned
nation to provide generous sums for need-
ed research into complicated heart disease
problems,”

Dr. Marquardt said the cardiac neurotic
is one who reads or hears about heart





commis-

C’wealth Broadcast



2 deliberate and calculated expression of the

* THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1950

D. V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.



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STAINLESS STEEL WIRE— 19, 21, 23 gauge

FISH HOOKS—

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. Holiday Party



To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—I read with great pleas-
ure your criticism of the Barba-
dos Publicity Committee and the
Barbados Government advertis-

ing efforts in general in to-day’s -

“Advocate” November 5th,” As
a result I think you may be
interested to hear the story of
the birth of the Souvenir Book
of Barbados.

This book was compiled and
‘rought out a few years ago by
the joint toil and enthusiasm of
Mrs, Golde White, Miss Kathleen
Hawkins and myself, The book,
which is attractively got up con-
tains a picture map of the island,
a resumé of the history of the
island, pldces of historical - in-
terest, the industries of the
island, beauty spots and drives
and recipies of popular local
food and drink, It is illustrated
by scenes of the island done by
local artists ice. Mrs. Golde
White and Miss Kathleen Hawk-
ins and it advertises the Business
Firms, Hotels, and pleasure spo.s
of the island Altogether a

the only book of its kind in the
island,

At the time of its publication,
before putting it on sale, we
offered it ‘en masse’ at a whole-
sale price to the Barbados Pub-
licity Committee, to use for
advertising the island, and to
sell at a profit to themselves.
Thus the Barbados Government
had handed to them on a
platter a ready made informa-
tive book with which to adver-
tise the island. Did they jump
at it? Dear me no. They turned
it down flat, and after yreat
persuasion consented to buy a
paltry 25 or so of the books,
which were never properly
displayed or introduced to vis-
itors (as many have told me.)

Next we approached the
Hotels, thinking that they would
gladly keep a stock of theses
books selling them at a profit
to themselves for the conveni-

ence of their visitors. They
would have none of it. Some
of them eventually reluctantly

consented to keep a few of the

Some of the big firms in
Bridgetown bought lots of twen-
ty-five or fifty, and sent them as
presents to their business friends
abroad.

Fortunately for the island, we
were disgusted but not daunted,
and, thanks to the. two Gift
Shops, the S.P.C.K. book shop,
Da Costa & Co., and Johnson's
Stationery these books have been
sola. in a steady stream, and
continue to be sold in fact more
have beén sold this year than
any previous year.

So these little books are adver-
tising- Barbados in many parts
of England, Canada, United
States of America, Venezuela
and other parts of the world, not
by any effort of the Barbados
Government or the Publicity
Committée, but by the efforts of
private enterprise.

Sincerely yours,
G. SKINNER
“Amalfi’*

—__ Court
St. Michael.

Hill,

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,— I think cricket enthusi-
asts in Barbados would be
pleased to hear that the Common-
wealth team in India comprising
our two West Indies heroes
Frankie Worrell and Sonny Rama-
dhin are engaged in a Test match
at present in New Delhi and that
the commentary (ball by ball)
is made for one hour every
morning between 6.30 and 7.30
a.m, on short wave on 25 Meter
Band. As there are three more
days still to go in the first Test,
your fans would be thrilled to
hear the commentary even on the
Radio Distribution which I am
sure would be a fine gesture on
the part of Radio Discribution,
even if it is only for half an hour
from 6.30 to 7.00 a.m., and then
at 7.30 the time for close of the
play, give them the scores of the
day’s play. I do hope other
cricket enthusiasts in this island
would crave for this thrill, and
tune in on their private Radios at
the above mentioned time.

D. A. THANT

P.O. Box 9,

sridgetown,

November 6, 1950.

Slightly Corned Beef
Turtic Steak

Turtle Soup

Turtle Stew

Fresh Fruit

Fresh Vegetables





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1. & R. Sandwich Bread
Table Butter in pkgs.

. Miricle Whip Sandwich
Spread in bottles

Cook’s Fish Paste 3 oz. tins
i Swift’s Pate de Fois Gras



Danish Frankfurters in tins

Danish Cocktail Sausages
in tins

Danish Salami
Meat Roll

Danish Cheese

Tin Hams in 8 sizes
Prepared Mustard

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1950



‘Health’ Committee Will |

Visit City Dairies

To Discuss Their Removal

THE GENERAL BOARD OF HEALTH at their meeting
yesterday afternoon appointed a sub-committee to meet :
committee from the Commissioners of Health with a view
to visiting the existing dairies in the City area and dis-

cu.sing their removal.

Mr.

A. E. S. Lewis, Mr. F. C. God-

dard and. Mr. W. Abrahams were appointed to the Com-

mittee.

WATER
SHORTAGE

IN ST. JOSEPH

A FEW DAYS ago many women

in St. Joseph could be seen
washing their clothes in springs
and drying them on_ pastures
nearby. This was because of a
water shortage experienced in that
parish.

Water had to be delivered to
certain districts by a lorry from
the Water Works Department.
Some people did not wait on the
lorry but carried home spring
water and boiled it.

A resident told the Advocate
yesterday although there are now
about 56 stand pipes in the parish
the shortage of water is still being
felt. Some of these pipes were
out of order but began to work
about a week ago.

Te REAR WHEEL of a bicycle
owned and ridden by Vincent
Callendar of the Ivy, St. Michael,
was extensively damaged in an
accident along Trafalgar Square
shortly after 11 o’clock yesterday
morning.

* Also involved in the accident
was a pick-up owned by Messrs.
Barnes & Co., Bridge Street, and
driven by Seymour Cuke of
Crumpton Street.

ITH CHRISTMAS only a tew

weeks off the St. Michael
Combined Choir is making pre-
parations for the celebration of
their 28th anniversary of musical
service to the island.

The Choir was founded, organ-
ised and is being conducted by
Mr. Egbert S. McLean. It has
travelled around the island ex-—
tensively and also given many
concerts at Anglican Churches,

It is intended to give a recital
of Christmas Music at Queen’s
Park on December 31 at 4.00 p.m.

ISS SKINNEK and Miss E. K.
’ Walters of Barbados were
among the fifty nurses from thirty
different Colonial territories that
sat with wartime ministers and
service chiefs who saw Her
Majesty The Queen open the
Nurses’ War Memorial Chapel and
unveil the Memorial Window in
the Upper Islip Chapel of West-
minster Abbey on November 2.

Half of the nurses present were |

European members of Queen
Elizabeth’s Colonial Nursing
Service. The remainder were

Colonials that are being trained in
the U.K. or taking post-certificate
courses,

HE MEMORIAL WINDOW

was designed by Hugh Easton
and symbolizes a kneeling nurse
looking up to the Virgin carrying
a Child. In the tracery above is
Florence Nightingale’s Lamp im-
posed upon a Red Cross. Encir-
cling this is the Crown of Thorng
Bymbolizing the sacrifices of the
nurses who died in the Second
World War. At the foot of the
window are the badges of all
nursing services and names of tha
Colonies, The blue leather, gold-
tooled Roll of Honour containing
the names of 3,076 nurses, is kept
in a bronze casket. Near it will

be two gilded bronze tripod
candle - sticks, the gift of the
Queen.

The Queen is Patron of the
British Empire Nurses’ War
Memorial Fund which has raised
£177,000 towards expenses. Not
all the money raised has gone to
provide the Chapel and Memorial
Window. Scholarships for nurses
have been founded and already
two Colonial nurses are training fn
the U.K. under the scholarship
scheme.

i R. J. A. B. AUSTIN, Head-
5 master of the Lodge Con-
gregation School at Lodge Village,
Demerara, told the Advocate yes-
terday that the elementary schools
in Barbados were ahead of those
in B.G. as far as the providing
of free text books for children was
concerned.

Mr. Austin has completed 15
years as a Headmaster and hopes
to return to B.G. at the end of the
month.

EMBERS of the staff of the
Mental Hospital gave a
farewell function on Saturday
night in honour of 60-year-old
Nurse Elsie Henry who retires
after 28 years of service at the
Hospital .

All of the staff present express-
ed the regret of having to lose
the services “of such an efficient
nurse” and wished her long life
and happy days in retirement.



The question of the removal of
dairies in the City area came up
when a letter from the Commis-
sicners of Health, dated October
19, was vead. This stated that that
Bourd hdd discussed the question
and requested that a committee
from the Board of Health, includ-
ing the Director of Medical Ser-
vices, meet a committee of the
Commissioners of Health with i
view to discussing and visiting
the existing dairies in the City
area in order to discover whether
an amendment with reference ti
the area on which dairies could
be kept, could be made to the
Dairy Regulations of 1948.

Dr. H. G. Cummins, Chairman

of the Board, said that the

dairies referred to should have
been removed earlier, Legisla-
tion was passed and it was
decided that they should remove
in October last year. The Board
recommended to Government to
give these dairy owners another
year because some were hard
hit. The law told these dairy

Owners to move and some did

it.

He asked “Is this Board pre-
pared to a'low these people to
frown on the law that has been
recently passed?” He did not know
if Government would be willin=
to amend the law but it was for
the Board to discuss the matter. |

Awkward Situation |
Mr. A. E. S. Lewis said that he |
expected that during the year
those dairy owners who had any
good and sufficient reasons for not
removing would have come to the}
Board and given their story. It}
had become an awkward situation |
and it was difficult for the Board |
to entertain any other view than
that stated the previous year. He
was surprised that these dairy
owners did nothing between
October 1949 and last October.

Mr. Kidney said that the law
had created hardships on ‘the
dairy keepers who supplied milk
to the thousands in St, Michael
He is against people coming from
St. John to sell milk in St, Michael
and vice versa and said that there
should be a central spot where al!
the milk would be collected and
sold.

When this law comes into oper-
ation it means that the 12 or more
dairies operating in the City area

@on page 8



THE PICK UP waggon 0.-39 which

Street and collided with the section

was broken off.

The vehicle is the property of Frank Lowe of Cleavers Hill,
the time by Garfield Cumberbatch of St. Elizabeth’s Village, St.
The time of the accident was 2.30 p.m. yesterda

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
AFTER THE EXAMINATION

Jumped the gutter on the right side of the Police Station in Coleridge

of the wall opposite the Waterworks.

St. J
Joseph.

driver's examination at Central Station and on leaving the Court yard, he
out the lock. Beside him was Cpl. L. Catlin, Examincr. No one received any injuries.

Acquitted Of Larceny Charge
After Brilliant Defence

AFTER CARRYING ON one of the ablest defences ever
heard from the dock at the Court of Grand Sessions, Erie





40/- For Butting

ETHELBERT MOORE, a_ 26-
year-old labourer of Goodland,
St. Michael, was found guilty of
wounding Naomi Moore by butt-
ing her on the face.

His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma
before whom the case was heard
ordered Ethelbert Moore to pay a
fine of 40/- or in default one
month’s imprisonment.

The offence was committed on |

September 15 and the fine is to be
paid in 14 days.

os ‘ i
Reckless Driving Cost 30’-
JAVAN PARRIS of Friendship,
. Michael, was fined 30/- and



St

| 1/~ costs in 14 days or one month’s |

imprisonment by Mr. H. A. Talma
yesterday for driving the motor
lorry M-1277 on James Street in
a reckless manner.

The offence was committed on
September 20.

REMANDED
SIMEON DENNY a 62-year-old
labourer of Garden Land, St.

Michael was yesterday remanded
until November 10 when he ap-
peared before His Worship Mr.
E. A. McLeod for larceny of goods
valued at $2,26 the property of
R. H. Edwards & Co. Ltd.

The offence was committed on
November 7.



Speightstown Carpenter
Wins “Your Guess”

THE CORRECT ANSWER to the Evening Advocate’s “Your
Guess” competition was the clock in Queen’s Park.
A large number of the 594 entrants guessed correctly but

most popular choice was the

Savannah Club’s clock. There

were several fantastic answers, best of which was “7 minutes

58 seconds past.”
in Broad Street.

£3 For Speeding

A FINE of £3 to be paid by
monthly instalments or in default
two months’ imprisonment was
imposed on Allan Rouse of
Station Hill, St, Michael, by His
Worship Mr. H. A. Talma.

_ Rouse was found guilty of driv-
ing the motor van M-94 on Bush
Hall Road on September 25 at
over 34 miles per hour and the
speed limit on that road for that
type of vehicle is 20 miles per
hour. The licence is to be en-

dorsed,
FREAK PIG

A pig owned by Rupert Alleyne
of Marchfield, St. Philip gave
birth to 11 pigs on Sunday, one
of which was a freak. This freak
which only lived for 24 hours
was double-headed with the upper
part where the two heads were
joined resembling the trunk of
an elephant.

There were four eyes on the
head, two on the lower part and
two on the upper part.

DIED SUDDENLY

GORDON ROCK, a 49-year-old
cooper of Fairfield, St. Michael,

died suddenly at his home about!

10.15 am, yesterday.
mortem examination was later
performed on the body by Dr.
\. S, Cato at the Public Mortuary.
Death was attributed to jaundice.
$$$ -

HE ROAD ieading from
Todd’s Corner to St. Ber-
nard’s Village, St. Joseph, is at
present being repaired. A part,
which had sunken in, was dug
up and fixed. A road roller is
doing the levelling and it 1 ex-
pected that the job will be soon)

completed.

A_ post



C cnaiee WITH THEIR POLICY

O: CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT, the

New CONSUL PRODUCED BY FORD OF DAGENHAM,

S urcaseves ALL

Oo HAVE THE PLEASURE OF SEEING THIS

EXPECTATIONS.

Tuan CAR IN THE NEAR FUTURE



CHARLES Me ENEARNEY & €0. LTD.

FOCCECGOSS95S5SS9SC59S0S90



SCOOPS SCESESSLLSSSOSS,

Another guesser thought it was the clock

St. Peter’s Church Clock and
the clock in St. John’s Churchyard

were two other wild guesses,
Some 50 competitors sent in
guesses. after 10.a.m. on Wednes-
day.

Since the competition opened,
both correct answers to the two
guess pictures were supplied by
residents of Speightstown. Last
week it was won by Cpl. McClean
of Speightstown and this week it
was won by another Speights-
towner Cecil Cozier.

Cecil Cozier is a 20-year-old
carpenter of Queen Street,
Speightstown. -

Cozier had just finished his
lunch yesterday and was getting
ready to return to work when a
representative of the Advocate
told him he had won $5.00.

First Guess Wins

With a face full of smiles and
looking over a half-closed window,
he calmly said “after the first
competition was won, I told a
fellow that the first chance I
should take, I was going to win.

Cozier made his guess while on
his way home from work, Walk-
ing and thinking where it was, he
suddenly remembered that this
‘clock was like the clock in the
Park, :

Cozier was very pleased with
‘himself but at the same time most
surprised because he had won. He
has never been lucky before. He

{has taken many a chance in raf-

files but his first win has been in
the Evening Advocate “Your
' Guess” Competition.

i For five years Cozier has been
working as a carpenter. He was
taken on as an apprentice when
he passed out of the Speightstown
Boys’ School. He is a member of
the 76 Barbados Rovers and he
puts down his accuraie guessing to
the number of observation tests he
has taken as a scout,



FC POLLLCLE CLEC SL FSGGEA.

}



Sealy, described by the Polic
was acquitted yesterday of a

y. Cumberbatch had just completed his preliminary

The front bumper of the waggon

oseph, and was being driven at

j had told “them that he had
juirested the night before



turned right, but failed to take



e as an idler of Nelson Street,
charge of breaking the house

of Ida Shepherd, and stealing condensed milk, cocoa, a

fountain pen and a purse wit

He was discharged by His
Honour the Chief Justice, Sir
A'‘lan Collymore, who presided!
over the Court. The case for the!
Prosecution was conducted by
Miss M, E, Bourne, and was the
first of the two cases that were
tried yesterday.

At the end of the second case,
the Court adjourned until to- |
morrow,

Sealy in his address to the jury
declared he was not asking for
mercy or sympathy, but merely
that justice be done.

Date of the alleged breaking
and entering and stealing was
September 16 last year. The items
of food and the purse belonged tv,
Ida Shepherd, while the pen was
owned by her son, Lionel Shep-
herd.

The story for the Prosecuti.n
was that Ida Shepherd and her
son were away from home between
7 and 7.30 p.m. until about four
hours later, Lionel came back first,
and found that the inside front
door had been unlatched but had
been pulled back in. He had
secured both the inner and outer
doors before leaving.



He entered the house but saw
nothing to attract his attention.

Next morning his mother went
to make tea, but found'no mitk

nor cocoa, She called on Lionel
who was at his joiner’s work
bench, and asked him about it,

He looked and saw none and then
discovered that the pen which was
on the larder was also gone. His
mother also missed the purse wit!
the 27 cents..

Pen Identified

in court. yesterday Lionel
Shepherd said he identified the
pen by its shape, His mother said
she knew it by the colour,

Shepherd and her son gave no
evidence directly connecting the
accused with the offence. Shepherd
said she saw him at a nearby shop
the same night asking for Astoria
cigarettes, When told there were
none he left the shop, not facing
her but walking backwards. She
noticed something in his hands
that looked like a condensed milk

tin with the label off.
Direct evidence was given by
Louise Weekes, a next door

neighbour of the Shepherds, She
said that after they had left home,
the accused had been there ask-
ing for Lionel. She told him no
one was at home, and he asked
her to tell Lionel that he would
return to see him about 8.30
next morning.

She went
house and



back inside her}

soon afterwards












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po sag sated aya





relieves stuffiness.
Prevents many colds
if used in time.



PINE APPLE

PHOENIX SOD

sheila

a Just alow drops up
swollen membrazes, VICKS \

VA-TRO-NOL

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We will be Specially Serving—

PINEAPPLE

KNIGHTS

h 27 cents.

heard a noise of something fall-
‘ing in the Shepherd’s house. She
went to the window and saw
accused latching Shepherd’s door
She called out, “Ida, Ida? Accused
answered, “who you”? He ran
above the house and she could
not see him,

It had been a fairly bright
night. She had known the accused
before.

She had not made a statement
to P.C. Murphy, Weekes said in

reply to the accused, She had
made a statement to another
policeman, She did not mention
his name because she did not
know it. The policeman had
asked her if she would know
him and she had said yes. She

had not been asked to pick aim
out of a number of other men.

Weekes added that she had
seen accused on January 22, 1950
in the direction of Passage- Road,
e statement that was attacked by
the accused in his defence.

Pen Sold

Joseph Kirton told the Courc
that the accused had sold him a
“bluish” fountain pen at the
Nelson Club, Nelson Street on
the night of September 16. He
had sold him it for 2/-.

P.C. Murphy said that after
some investigations, he had seen
the accused at the C.1.D. on
January 21, 1950. He arrested
and charged him, and accused
made a voluntary statement,
admitting that he had _ broken
the house, and stolen the pen,
He added that he had sold the
pen to Kirton.

He accompanied Murphy to
Nelson Street where they saw
Kirton, Kirton corroborated the
story of the selling of the pen.

At the preliminary hearing of
the case before the Magistrate ac-
cused made a statement in which
he denied entering the house
and stealing. He said he had
bought the pen while he was in
Trinidad the year before, and
had not kept the bill,

To the accused Murphy said

that when he had seen him at
the C.I.D he (accused) was
there in connection with other

eases of alleged larceny.

The accused addressing the
jury said he wanted not merey
nor sympathy, but justice.

“The prosecution has brought
many witnesses against me”, he
said. ‘Gentlemen, I will not insult
you by asking you to consider
yourselves in my position, { will
not attempt to argue this case on
point of law because the



CREAMS
d
SUNDAES
at

A FOUNTAIN
LTD.







—





law I d t know I will ar
it me points of fact”
Untrustworthy Witness
So the couse j ext
about half an
time he
had not

eiy

or dor |
hour Duri.t va
submitted that the per
een properly identified, |
nor could they accept Weekegs’}
entification of him She hae!
id she had seen him.in Passage
Road on January 22, and Murpiny
been
Such
untrustworihy.

e® witness was

He had bought the pen in Trini-
Gad and he had lost the bill
There was nothing strange about
that, especially when they remem-
bered that Lionel Shepherd said
he had bought it in Barbados and
hé had no bill either.

The jury arriecg at their ver-
dict of “not guilty” after about
45 minutes’ retirement.

Sentence Postponed

Sentence on 19-year-old Hugh)
Gamble of Horse Hill, St. Joseph |
was postponed after a jury had
found him guilty or shopbreaking |
with intent

Gamble was charged on two
counts, shopbreaking and larceny,
and shopbreaking with intent
He was accused of having broken)
and enfered the shop of Florence |
Burke on September 19 and stolen |
$12.00 from her cash box. |

Though Gambie, pleaded “not |
guilty” on the alternative cours,
he only cross-examined one of
the five witnesses for the prosecu-
tion. He neither gave evidence,
called witnesses nor addressed the
jury He just sat staring around
os evidence was given against him,





The Chief Justice told him that
f he had come there, and pleaded
guilty and said he was sorry,
something might have been able
to be done for him. He had come
there, however, wasted time,
xiven no defence, and after he had
been found guilty, he had nothing
to say for himself

After Florence Burke told the
Chief Justice that Gamble’s father
had chased him from home and
Sat. Henderson said that it was
alleged that he had stolen money
from his father, Gamble’s mother
told the Chief Justice that he had
been chased from home, but not
for stealing, but because he had
been disobedient,

r





PAGE FIVE



Sea aaa aaa aa ae ee aa

® AGAIN AVAILABLE !!
&

= PURINA §&
s PIGEON CHOW 58

pl. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. = dsninos

AGB EBSBSESEEBSBuees a)
S@BeEeSBeaenepepeuazua ee
w es ee er Y



To make a Savoury Di:
really tasty—

|

|
| Se
|
|
|




i

-MARMITE

The Vitamin B Yeast Food

Made in England







Think carefully how you will spend your





Dressing Tables

Wardrobes with and
without Mirrors

Morris Suites

Sideboards

China Cabinets

All in Mahogany in light
and derk stains.

Prices to suit all pockets

LED LPF CEL GRR 6



>

nt ree

SOC E COSTES AITO SPT V OTT F PTT E NT PETOETAET IIT



LADIES’ PLASTIC HANDBAGS from $2.52 to $4.91 each
LADIES’ LIZARD SKIN HANDBAGS from $8.61 & $9.77 each
LADIES’ CROCODILE HANDBAGS from $11.85 each

LADIES’ OVERNIGHT BAGS from $3.63 & $4.91 each

CHILDREN HANDBAGS

HARRISON'S

bonus this Christmas and you will find that there
is no better investment you can make with the

money than to buy yourself some smart Furniture

We have a wide variety of styles and designs
and there is nothing to make you feel more happy
in your home than Furniture you like, We are
sure that you can find something to satisfy you

from among our stock.

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

12, & 13 Broad





10, 11, Strect

=











— Also —

with Short or Long Handles $1.02 & $2.14



BROAD STREET
DIAL 2664

-
%
LECCLLECOP_ CCGG GOOFOGCOPFPOOGP FOG PIS SPOS SIPO SOF FFSF EH,



PAGE

SIX



THE LONE RANGER

THEYRE TAKING THE
MESA KID INTO THE DOCTOR'S OFF

WHAT I$ THE
NEW: SONG
EVERYBODY
IS SINGING?








Â¥ iSzhoUs
BE AJUNGLE WAR |=
THE LLONGO PRINCE
DOESN'T GET BACK

a
Cs



SLUG HIM
4s



“yu DID YOU !

)
ee

i 4
iNOBODYS

A TARIN' MY

op





En i a RS |

WHITE
MONKEYS

1 NOT ONLY

7 SAY DEG... THAT
: LOVELY BALLAD
VOU WERE LISTENING TO

ON THE RADIO VESTBROAV.. “a CAN SING

CAN WHISTLE
ir SiR...T






4CKE, KIRK FLL CHECK



BRING HIM IN, SHERIF HE CAN STAY
HERE UNTIL HE'S.PAST THE DANGER
OF INFECTION.



AMBUSHED THE
MESA KID.

WHAT DID SHE MEAN
TO JACK AND JOE OF

TIN PAN ALLEY % —

¢

-

)
\ ye
3
WHO. |S Aa
MELODY LANE?‘

WHY DID SHE VANISH



Cop 1930, King Peeters Syoaicnne, tne, Wert righen vane

DESMOND, THE
ROMANTIC! LISTENING
TO LOVE SONGS

BUT WHEN Sweet
Tec meet â„¢








OF EDENFALL 7 OUCH. OES! THE
WORDS ARE THE

> SAME, BUT
SOMEHOW I LIKED













THAT GIRL'S VOICE
BETTER! WHO WAS



(BUTCH, Y RELAY USE YOUR BRAINS. WE
DONT WANT TROUBLE OVE'2
THAT LITTLE THING? WE GOT

TOO MUCH AT STAKE ON
THIS SHIPS












lA GRAY FORM RACES UP THE GANG |
Pi eo









—— ra
wie /—2a
erent es. |

MISS DORIAN!

YOu' VE BEEN OUT OF THE
TOO LONG, SIR... SHE'S a Dv
LANE..THE NEW SENSATION...
HER FOLK SONGS HAVE

WK OF THE COWIE M" ae
Ta eT es a

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

BY FRANK STRIKER

(You HEARD THE MASKED MAN SAN EID:
CML ON THE MESA KID. THAT'S WHEN
WE GET RID OF HIM!



YOU WILL FIND THE ANSWERS
IN THE NEW RIP KIRBY STORY
STARTING TOMORROW!







MR. KIRBY!
WELCOME HOME



/ JOR. THIS IS
TERRIBLE! we
G GOTTA GET US
DETECTIVE!











THERES A LOW GROWL+
AS DEVIL LEAPS?





|
;

















DELICATE

as a moorbeam

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1950
sa deena a aaah tinge





COOL BEAUTIFUL

“FERGUSON FABRICS”

FOR WEAR AT NIGHT.





For Cake-Making

Baisins—per Ib .... $ .40
Currants—per tb .. 34
Mixed Peel—per lb .. .27

Glace Cherries—
POT TO. ss Se epee 98

Tins Prunes .... .. 70

Tins Baking Powder
; 21e., 34¢., .61

Essences (All Flavours) 12c.
Butter — Lard Ete.

Ieing Sugar—Pkgs. ... 32c.
Riscuits
Tins Peek Frean’s
Twiglets ........ $1.17
Tins Peek Frean’s
Cheeselets ...... 1.24
Tins Crawford’s Cheese
Straws ...ie.ici. 93
Tins Crawford’s Tartan.
Shortbread. .../.. .20
‘Tins Crawford’s Almond
Shortbread ...... 1.29
Tins Carr’s Celery
Biscuits ......... 1.57
Tins Romary Water
Biscuits ......... 1.06
Tins Jacob’s Cream
Crackers ......... 1.52

Condiments
& Extracts
Tins Colmans
Mustard .... .... $ 57
Tins Madras Curry . 76

Tins Bisto (For Gravies,

Stews Etc.) ...... 33
Bottles Kraft Prepared

Mustard ......... Ail
Bottles French

Mustard ........ 33

Jars Bovril .. $1.60, .90—.60
Jars Bonox .... 7le.—40c.
Jars Marmite 97c., 60¢e.—32c.

Confectionery
Bottles Paseall Mixed
Fruit Drops ...... $ .49
Bottles Pascall Mixed
Fruit Drops .....- 56
Tins Toffee Rolls .. 1.08
Tins Barley Sugar .. 91

Tins Pascall’s Glucose
Barley Sugar 98c.—56e.
Tins Pascall’s Court

Fruit Drops ...... 94
Tins Pascall’s Fruit

Barley Sugar .. . 98
Tins Pascall’s Fruit
EI esi ie ES 1,01

Weiners Sausages per







SPECIAL!










With this in mind



also

Ib.

OX-TAILS
TONGUES
TRIPE
KIDNEYS — HEARTS





STOCKED BY LEADING STORES.

DATES,
FIGS,

——

KLM is av ee until

Jimited quan’ | so use
restrictions coat Ni you
wisely the KLIM “the
can puy now: ai
‘deal mills!





—

_ 8c. pkg.

Liqueurs. Wines. Ete,

it } Copr. e
ernaheroas arden CO





SPECIAL!

We. pkg.

wes

Bottles Kummell ............. $4.00
Bottles Bols Cherry Brandy..... 4.00
Bottles Bols Apricot Brandy.... 4.00
Bottle Bols Bastos Port Wine... . 3.00
Bottles Superior Madeira ........ 3.60

Bottles Gilby’s Empire Red Wine 2.50
Bottles Martini Sweet Vermouth 2.78
Bottles Martini Dry Vermouth ... 2.88



In our Meat Department



PRIME AUSTRALIAN
BEEF including
STEAK & ROAST

Dutch Pate de foie per b___ __ $1.30

é

a

Canned Fruits

Tins Fruit Salad .. $ .87
Tins Peaches ...... 12
Tins Letnna Peaches 37
Tins Apricots ...... 62
Tins Strawberries 57c., 45c.

Tins Cherries .... 49c., 63c.
Tins Prunes ....... 70
Tins Crushed
Pineapple ........ 36
Peanut Batter.
Jams, Ete.
Bottles Peanut
Butter ....... 55¢., 35c.
Tins S.A. Pineapple
JAR RY $ AT
Tins S.A. Fig: Jam .. 52

Tins S.A. Apricot Jam 66

Tins S.A. Peach Jam 60

Bottles Hartley’s

._.. Straw: Jam ...... 60

‘Bottles Hartley’s Black
Currant Jam .... Ml

Bottles Hartley’s Apricot
SOM GT a A5












_ en 8h) > ep AREER SE eee a ne a

ccm. Limes alae: ammaeataReea aS

_





- ee a



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1950

CLASSIFIED ADS.



DIED

BROWNE—THER®SA Her funeral will
leave her late residence “River-
ton” Hiver Road for St Mary’s
Church at 9 a.m. Friends are asked

to attend. na
P w Browne, Clawson Browne

(Brazil), & Cecil Browne,

9.41.50-—-In

CHRISTIAN — Emanuel *., Merchant,
Lower Bay Street, (late of United
States) last night. Funeral will leave
Belmont Funeral Home, Belmont
Road, at 430 p.m, today for the
Westbury Cemetery.

Lillian Christian (Wife—U.S.A.), Jane
Maxwell (Mother-in-law), Enid Maxwell
(Sister-in-law) .

Lucille Gokool (Tunapuna, Trinidad),

HALL—Elien Sophie L. yesterday at her
residence Bertley, Deacons Road. The
funeral will leave her late residence
at 9 o'clock this morning for the
Westbury Cemetery. Friends are in-

Hall, Rosa Toppin, Maggie
Hoad, Ben Goring, Maurice Bourne.

9.11.50.
FOR SALE
AUTOMUTIVE

CAR—Ford Prefect i0 ms. done

17540 miles. PS meee
ruc: eatherhe .

ee ree 20.10.50—t.f.n.

CAR—Ford Prefect, March 1949. Dam-
aged in accident Xmas 1949 not used
sirce, 6,000 miles only. This vehicle will
be sold by auction at McEnearney's
Garage to-morrow, Friday 10th, at 2 p.m.
John M. Bladon, Auctioneer. 8.11.50—In.









st what you want for
ph Aeriy Jos. St. Hill, Tweednide
Road.





9.11,50—gn.
ELECTRICAL
ELECTRIC BLANKETS — Excellent

case of illness etc. 30” x 50”. Dial
S18, Da Costa & Co., Ltd. Electrical
Dept. 4.12.50—6n,

ace enca rete onesie
EDISWAN LAMPS — For House or
Factory. 6; 12; 32; 110 and 220 Volts.
More light for less money. Dial 3878
. Costa & Co., Ltd, Electrical Dept.
4.11.50—6n

2





IMMERSION HEATERS Conveni-
ent Electrical appliance for heating
water for Tea, Hot drinks, shaving etc.
Dial 3878 Da Costa & Co., Lid, Electri-





cal Dept. 4.11,50—6n.
FURNITURE

FURNITURE—New and gewd class

second-hand furniture in Mahogany,

Birch and Pine, large variety at Ralph
Beard’s Show Rooms, Hardwood Alley
(Opposite the Cathedral), open daily:
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Phone 4683.
8.11,50—tn.

MISCELLANEOUS

BRUSHES-—-With long handles for
scrubbing the back, made by Kent.
Last a lifetime. Knights Phoenix.









8.11.50—2n.

ts oor Saleen Sa.
ired— ts each, ng .

= 7.11,50.—3n.

EAR PLUBS, for swimming gnd

diving, made of rubbef. Knights Ltd.

. 8.11 .50—2n.



GAS STOVE—with 2 rings, a Grill and
Oven and a tall splash-back, to be seen
at Mrs. G. A. Waite, The Cottage 6
Avenue, Belleville Phone 2553.
7.11,50—3n

GALVANIZED PIPES in 4”, 3”, 21/2”.
and 2” also galvanized sheets in 6ft.,
7ft., anl 8ft. lengths. Enquire Auto
Tyre Company, Trafalgar Street. Phone
2696 . 8.18 .50—t.f.n.

“TIGHTER WICKS—Made of glass
vne wick lasts foréver, never burn}
wut. Knight; Ltd. 8.11,50—2n:

MARSHMALLOWS — Fresh supplies
just received. Knights Ltd.







8.11, 50—2n.
PLASTIC RAINCOATS—Bargains in
Ladies’ Plastic Raineoats $2.40 each

Plastic Head Ties in Assorted. Colours
each. The Modern Drea; Shoppe,
Broad Street. 9.11.50—4n.

RUBBERISED COATS—If you are
trevelling we have a fine assortment “of
better quality rubberishéd coats suitable
for spring and definitely waterproof
with detachable hood $10.00 each. The
Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad Street.

9.14,50—4n

#







XMAS TREES—Imported, see our
show window, with care these trees
last many years, different sizes. Kni, its
Ltd. . 8.11,50—

XMAS CARDS—with views in colour
of Barbados, are now available at
following places. Cave Shephers, City
Pharmacy, Cole's Printery, llins Ltd.,
Johnson's Stationery, Mayfair Gift Shop,
Phoenix Pharmacy, Roberts. & Co.,
8.P.C.K, Book Shop, Bruce Weatherhead
Ltd., Cottage Gift Shop.

7.11.50.—3n,

BUNGALOW—Golf Club Road. Two
bedrooms, living room and porch, bath-
kitchen, garage, servants rqom
with bath and lavatory. Complete wjth
electricity and built in cupboards.
Phone 4481. 8.11.50—5n.

CRYSTAL SPRINGS — St James
Coast. “Annexe” Now available for
rent. By month Vacant. Nov.
Jan. Fully furnished and equipped.
Excellent sea bathing. Private Beach.
Cook, Butler available.

Tel. 91-54. Appointment to view.

FLAT — At Worthing. Phone 8401.
4.1150—t.f.n

FLAT--Small comfortable unfurnished
Flat at Highgate House, St. Michael
Vacant now. For further particulars
phone 4230, Wilkinson & Haynes Co,
Ltd., Office. 7.11.50—t.f.n,

MODERN BUNGALOW—No. 4. Cliiton
Terrace, Upper Bay Street. Telephone
3902 or call on Miss Alma Griffith on
premises.



F









z







WANTED
HELP

BOOKKEEPER—Assistant Bookkeeper
for Marine Hotel Apply between the
hours of 9 a.m. and 41 a.m,

9.11.50—3n.

SERVANTS—Two General Servants.
Apply Kingsley 2nd. Ave; Belleville

SERVANTS—An experienced Cook
with good wagq;, also an house-servant
Apply to Berwyn Guest House, Hastings
or dial 4669. 8.41.50—3n.

TWO OVERSEERS — Required for
Foursquare Factory. For Crop 1951.
Only applicants who can write and
calculate efficiently need apply.

4.11, 50—tn.

MISCELLANEOUS
BOXES — Ail kinds of Card Board
Boxes other begs Rc aga card.
ly Advocate Dept.
a cm nm to W—t.t.n

WANTED TO RENT
FLAT—Fully_ furnished Flat or House
in December, January, February, by re-
sponsible couple, no children. Phone 8317.























7.11.50,—3n.
WANTED TO BUY
Good clas; furniture in Mahogany.

Birch, Pine. Good prices paid. Willing
to purchase entire house furniture from

people leaving island. Apply Ralph
Beard, Hardwood Alley. Phone 4683.
8.11.50—4n



WANTED TO RENT
“HOUSE by English couple on long
Jease with one acre or more land amy-
where in island. Main water lighting
essential." Box X.Y.Z. Co. Advocate.

ee 9.41.50—-3n






TAR for
A

yards ete.

limited quantity

Remaining for sale
AT
Your Gas Co.......Bay St. \
BASS ix Bets ek pee ee 4308 i
——————————_—_—____~
fd

9.11,50—3n. |

TELEPHONE 2508



PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. PHILIP
The Parochial Treasurer’s Office wil!
be removed to » Church Vil-
a St. Philip from ith Nov. 1950.
e Office will be opened for busi-





ness on Mondays, Tuesdays, & Satur-
days from 9 a.fh. to 11 a.m. and from
noon to 3 p.m.
Sed. P. S. W. SCOTT,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Philip
4.1).50—Jn.

NOTICE

The Captain and Owners of the M.V.
. * will net hold themsety

Captain.
W. 8. MONROE & CO., LTD.,
Agents.

8.11,50—2n.



OTICE

To Applicants for Vacant
St, Michael Vestry Exhibitions
at St. Michael's Girls’ School.
Attention is drawn to the advertise
ment appeairng in the Advocate News
paper of Sunday the Sth November,
1950, on page 14, under the caption-
“EDUCATIONAL”—St. Michael's Girls’
School, which states that girls who are
over 8 and under 11 years will be ex-
amined on Friday the 17th day of Nov~
ember 1950, at 9.30 a.m.



will ts and/or guardians of
children within this age group please
note the change in the date of the

examination and comply with the ad_
vertisement
* By Order,

E. C. REDMAN,
Clerk, St. Michael's Vastry.
9,11.50—3n



NOTICE
re the estate of
HILTON LLEWELLYN GOLLOP
deceased
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debts or claims
we the estate of Hilton Llewellyn
bis) deceased, late of Hart's Gap, in

parish of Christ Chureh in this
Island

Bridgetown, on or before the 3st day of
December, 1950, after which date I
shall proceed to distribute the assets of
the deceased among the parties entitled
thereto having regard only to such
claims of which I shail then have had
motice and I will not be liable for the
cssets or any part thereof so distributed
to any person of whose debt or claim
I shall not then have had notice.

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their said
indebtedness without delay.

Dated this 30th day of October, 1950.



RISSA FEDORA GOLLOP, 5

Quail Administratrix of thé
Estate of Hilton Llewellyn
Gollop, deceased.
31.10.50—4n
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The plication of Esmie Crispin
holder Liquor License No. 333 of 1950

granted to her in respect of bottom
floor of a_ wall building at Diamond
Rock, St. Peter for permission to use
said Liquor License at bottom floor of
a 2 storey wall building at Westbury
Rd. St, Michael.

Dated this 7th day of November, 1950,

To E. A. MeLeod, Esq

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
Signed CRISPIN,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be heid
at Police Court, District “A”, on Friday
the 17th day of November 1950, at 11

o'clock, a.m.
E. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A.
9.11,.50—In



PUBLIC SALES |
AUCTION

BAY FILY—‘Joan's Star’, 2 years
by Dunwk—Colleen will be sold
auction during the afternoon of Satur-
day llth, the last day of the races, at
the B.T.C. paddock. 8.11.50-38n

REAL ESTATE

BUNGALOW —- At Brighton,
Rock, Just completed and standing on
7,230 square feet of land with right of
. 3 Badrooms, Tiled Bath
and Modern Kitchenette. Garage and
Quarters. Apply HUTCH-
INSON & BANFIELD. Phone 4543.

9,11 .50—4n.

et wet NEerecesee

“ROCK DUNDO”—Situate at Cave Hill
St. Michael, with approximately 32
Acres of Land. Consisting of 20 Arable
Acres and 12 Acres in Sour Grass and

8. .
The Arable Acreage is as follows:—
Plant and Ratoon Canes .. 14
Preparation ah sel tee @

The House contains three bedrooms.
toilet ar bath, @rawing and dining
rooms, I!brary, Office, closed gallery
ahd kitchen. Servants rooms,







rain water J a ‘of
25,000 gallons. Electric light and
Company's Water. Three miles out'\of
town, bus service. Suitable for Dali

or Development. Tuesday:
and Thursdays 12 noon to 4 p.m.

erty aie Fi
'y in P. B. Boyell

& Skeete, Lucas Street, Sane *
8.11.80—11n.

PROPERTY — One house standing on
approximately % acre of land at Dea-
cons : House contains 4 rooms
and yard enclosed with wall. Suitable
for small dairy. Apply to Hutchingon







& Banfield, Solicitors, James St.
4.11.50—6n.
LOST & FOUND
LOST



DOG—In the vicinity of Maxwells
and Top Rock, a small female dog. Neck
and shoulders white, body dark-brown,

short hair. Answering to the name, ci
“PEGGY”. Rewarded. Lili Cheek:,
Stratheona, Top Rock. oe tes

8.11,50—2n



nineesnidiieenerie ame
GOLD CHAIN—About half yard long
in an_ Envelope between Green's Park
rnd Bay Street. Finder rewarded on
returning to the Advocate Adytg. Office
9.11,50—1n,

SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS
X-2129, Series C_1169, 1170.
Globe ‘Theatre on Saturday, night
Reward offered on returning to the
Advocate Advertising Department. -

8.11.50—2n

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series BB
9994. Finder please return same to the
Advocate Advtg. Office—Rewerd offered
9.11.50—1n

SS
WATCH—Ladies Gold Rolex Wrist
Watch with a brown leather strap.
Between the Dominica Marketing Co.



ao















Barbados | Officers
Association

PFO



The Annual Dinner of the B.O.A.
will be held on Saturday, the 18th
of November at 7.45 p.m. at the
Drill Hall.

Will members who with to
attend please notify the Hony.
Secty. at Telephone No. 4675 or
the Asst. Horsy. Secty, at 3410 by
tomorrow 10th November.

9.11 .50—1n.

SOCPSSOS9SOOSS



5
}

Building on the Wharf formerly known as the Harrison Line
Warehouse.
From 8.00 A.M. on Friday, 10th November, all pareel post busi- |

ness will be transacted there



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

a

GOVERNMENT NOTICES
POST OFFICE NOTICE

REMOVAL OF PARCEL
The Parcel Branch of the General Post Office, Public Build- |
ings, has been removed to the ground floor of the new Government |

BRANCH

The public entrance to the Branch /

is on Prince William Henry Street opposite the Office of Messrs. R. M.

Jones & Co., Ltd.
Addressees who have received

Final Notice in respect cf parcels | FURNESS, WITHY & Co
are again warned that any of these parcels undelivered will be |

returned to country of origin by the first available opportunity

General Post Office,
8th November, 1950.

9.11.50.—2n.



Attention is drawn to

the
(Amendment) Order, 1950, No. 35 which will be published in the

Control of Prices (Defence)

Official Gazette of Thursday 9th November, 1950.















MONTREAL
ZEALAND

AUSTRALIA
LINE
(M.A.N.Z.
S.S. “GLOUCHESTER” sails Freeman
Ue September Tth, Adelaide September
ish, Meibourne September 28th Devon-

NEw =
LIMITED



The M.V Caribbee”" will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Domin.
ica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis &

port October Ist, Sydney October 12th, St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 17th
Brisbane October 24th, arriving at Bar-
| Dados N 26th

These nee have ample space for The M.V. “Daerwood" will ac

chilled, hard frozen and general cargo cept Cargo and Passengers for St



’ ce . bi Lueia, St. Vineent, Grenada &
j la digit temghioaent oe Caerahe are Aruba. Date of departure will he
| Berbados, British Gwana, Windward ama notified
| Leeward Islands.
| For further particulars apply :— B.W.1. Schooner Owners
Se rainAD Ltd. Association Inc.
BW.
& DA COSTA & Co. Ltd, Tel. 4047,
BARBALOS,
| B.W.1.

| AGENTS |

Sona e

| Alcoa









Steamship (o.
Inc.














2. Under this Order (a) the maximum wholesale and retail
selling prices of “Fish-Fresh” are as follows: — ae ORLEANS sha s08
aml anetietet li seein mercer N.O. Wdes
| |, RETAIL SS. “VINNI" 26th Oct 10th Nov
ARTICLE WHOLESALE PRICE , PRICE STEAMER ie 25th Nov
(not more than) j (not more ener pisiantined ve ee
| than) NEW YORK sxBVION
: i N.Y. Biden
Fish—Fresh: — | | SS. “C. G, THULIN” 24th Nov Sth Dec
(a) Bream Snapper, Group- | 8.S. “BYFJORD” i seta S80
; | ee : ne ements _aancusstshecbwintasndemumisanaiaeniatianinantt
er, Amber Fish . . | 26c. per lb. (ex beach CANADIAN SERVICE
+ or boat) 32c. per lb. SOUTHBOUND ean
i i Sails Sail rrives
(b) Dolphin, Kingfish .. | 22c. per Ib. (ex beach wteite of ule ee ttiehs uatine Barbados
at | or boat). 26c. per Ib. S$. “ALCOA PARTNER” October 27th October S0th November 10th
(ce) Albacore, Bill Fish, Bar- | 2-8. “ALCOA PEGASUS” November 10th November 13th November 23rd
racuda | 20c. per lb. (ex beach 8.8. “ALCOA POLARIS November 24th November 27th Semone Th
or boat). 22c. per Ib. PPR eee FE Ra
(d) Flying Fish Se, each (ex beach or Barba: 16
| boat). 6c. ‘each s/s “ALCOA POLARIS” October Sist For St, Lawrence River Ports.
(e) Seine Fish — Mackerel, These vessels have limited passengers .ccommodation,
Cavally, Johns, Jacks
, ‘aces. | :_D. TA & CO., LTD, Canadian Service.
Sprats, Bonita, Herring, | ROBERT THOM fro_new York ia Guif Service. a
Goat Fish 20c. per Ib. (ex beach ssiidineiadaiiiadi a aan
| or boat). | 22c. per Ib.
(f) Pot Fish, other than | | f j
, | | r s if
Barbers and Rock Hinds _ | 18. per Ib. GET THE HORLICK’S HABIT
Barbers and Rock Hinds | 10c. per Ib.
(g) Shark... . wt _ | 14e, per lb,

sen scenes nasi pana tga a pieiesias
(b) the item “Sea Eggs” has been deleted in its entirety





from

the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amendment) Order, 1950,

No, 23.
8th November, 1950,

_ ‘TAKE NOTICE —



|
‘
That British American Tobaceo Com-
pany (Barbados) Limited whose trade
or business address is Green Hill, Lodge
Road, Saint Michael, Barbados, trading
as manufacturers, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part

“A” of Register in connection with
Cigareties and will be entitled to!



| register the same after one month from

the eighth day of November 1950 unles
some person shall in the meantime
give notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on appli-
cation at my office,

Dated this 8th day of November, 1950. !

WILLIAMS,

H.
Registrar of Trade Marks
8.11.50—3n

TAKE NOTICE
MANITOBA MAID

That Midland Flour Mills Limited,
whose trade or business address is 350
Archibald Street, Saint Boniface, in the
Province of Manitoba in the Dominion
of Canada has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in connection with Wheat flour
and other products or preparations
mode from cereals and all other kinds
of foods and ingredients of food and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the eighth day of
November 1950 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in dupli-
cate to me at my office of opposition
of such registration. The trade mark
can be seen on application at my office

Dated this 8th day of November, 1950

H TLLIAMS,

. WwW .

Registrar of Trade Marks.

TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers,







TAKE NOTICE

That The Goodyear Tire & ‘sansa 4
Company, a company organised under
the laws of the State of Ohio, located
at 1144 East Market Street, Akron in
the County of Summit, State of Ohio,
United States of America, whose trade
or business address is 1144 East Market
Street, Akron, in the County of
Summit, State of Ohio, U.S.A, trading
as The Goodyear Tire & Rubber
Company has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
er in connection with pneumatic, |
Cushion and solid tires constructed
wholly or partly of rubber amd used!
for motor trucks, motor cars, motor-!
cyclés, bicycles, airplanes and other!
vehicles, and including parts of such|
fires such as treads, otiter casings or |
tire shoes and inner tubes therefor, and |
will be entitled to register the same}
after one month from the eighth day of)
November, 1950 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in|
duplicate to me at my office of oppost- |
tion of such registration, The
mark can be seen on application at my
office.

Dated this 8th day of November,

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks
8.11.50—3n





———

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

TEST MATCH CRICKET
BALLS
10/- Each

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
A

Fountain Pen Repair Service

Wats Adous

JOHNSON’S HARDWARE


















































That Hull, Jones & Co., Limited, a
British Company, whose trade or busi-
ness address is No. 1, Chacon Street
in the City of Port-of-Spain in the
Island of Trinidad, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part
“A" of Register in connection with
milk-based foods and all other sub-
stances used as food or as ingredients
in food, and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the
eighth day of November 1950 unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
sition of such registration, The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office

Dated this 8th day of November, 1950,

, H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.

8.11.50—8n,



os
Arrivals

CALENDARS
XMAS CARDS, TAGS
XMAS DOYLEYS
PENKNIVES
Sandow’s Expanders
Leather Photo Frames
Child’s Pram Straps
Child's Hand Bags
Etc, Ete,

NEWSAM & CQ,

——_



New





| REAL ESTATE —

JOHN
4.

BLADON

AF.S., F.V.A.
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE

“ROCKLEY’ (Near Golf Courve)
A modern coral stone villa with
separate lounge and dining room
Three bedrooms (all with basins
ond fitted wardrobes) tiled bath-
room, separate toilet, well fitted
kitchen, two car garage, servant's
quarters and cl¢verhy laid out gar—
den, now offered for sale at a
lew figure

THE OLIVES: Upper Collymore
Rock. This iarge modern stone
bungalow with about 1 aere should
appeal to a buyer who wants a

| really solid property conptructed
ot the best obtainable materials
There is a large living room
2fit x 14ft.) galiery (48%ft, x
lU4ft.) 4 bedrooms (one 23\eft. x
19ft.) modern kitchen, paved
courtyard, lawns, kitchen garden
end orchard Well placed = for
chools and transport to town

“SUNNYSIDE” Gibbs Bay, St

| Peter. A modern coral stone resi-
| dence containing a lounge, dining
| room, kitchen, 3 bedrooms (with
| Wash basins) gallery, ‘toréroom,
| aren garage and servant's



quarters. The house » set well
back in grounds of approximately
2 acres with about 200 ft. road
irontage. The neighbouring prop
eh, is excellent and there is

ht“of Way to the beach oppo-
site. Very suitable for conversion
into a large house and there is
ample room for further develop.
ment on this land

CRANE VIEW AND CRANE
VILLA: These attractive properties
with over 4% acres of land near
the Crane Hotel ure offered for
ale’ as a whole or separately
Full particulars may be obtained
on application

RENTALS

‘WINDY RIDGE” St. Jomes
Unfurnished. 7~roomed Bungalow
) with & gere of ornamental
vegetable gardens.
‘CUMBERLAND HOUSE” Cod
| “ington Hill. With about 2 acres
| Unfurnished.

LUXURY BEACH HOUSE: Fully
Furnished, On St. James Coast

and





REAL £STATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

| PLANTATIONS BUILDING





————

CHRISTMAS IS FAST APPROACHING

— and we

XMAS CRACKERS,
|) THE

have —

XMAS TREES, TOYS.

Come in early and select yours.

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)
Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets.














It’s
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LPOREDOVOR DOSE DV PSSODOE A SPO P EOL IO PSPS SPO OV SOO,
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SHIPPING NOTICES |











PAGE SEVEN



oe ————



—

MARBLES and PISTOLS with CAPS |

ROBERTS & CO.—DIAL 330i—High Street
















j
NOTICE

{

Subscribers to the —
“ADVOCATE” Newspaper in }} cqqSubseribers to the =~
the Belleville Area, are ADVOCATE” Newspaper.
asked to note that Berry ) are asked to note that if there

Callender is no longer in

my employ, and therefore

is not authorised to ¢ollect

any more subscriptions.

N. LAYNE,
Agent.

7.11.50—3n

is any dissatisfaction with
tho

D.al 2287

“LOOK IN AT....

** BOOKER’S ”°

We have just opened a lovely assortment of
XMAS CARDS
XMAS CRACKERS
LADIES TOILET SETS

PLASTIC POWDER BOWLS

PIFCO HAIR DYERS
PIFCO VIBRATORS .
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‘Call in at BOOKER’S Early i

BOOKER'S (e'D0s) DRUG STORES LID.”

Pharmacy

For your XMAS GIFTS :— |
'

eet

Broad Street and Hastings Alpha

I'm UNLOADING
GIFTS
AT COLLINS __

Drop in at COLLINS and
look over our Stocks of
FINE XMAS PRESENTS...

cent

See Our display of FOUNTAIN PENS, CIGAKS, FIPES.
LEATHER GOODS, RAZORS, TOILET GOODS,
PERFUMERY, ETC., ETC.

COLLINS DRUG STORES.



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SUITABLE for BOYS and GIRLS
OF ALL AGES

THE STORY OF TARN by Nora Mylrea (an adventure story for Girls)

THAT IMP MIRANDA by Mary Gervaise (an adventure story for Girls)

A MAID IN ARMOUR by Hugh Chesterman (this story set in fifteenth
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A YEAR WITH JENNIFER by Mary Gervaise (Before Jennifer's arrival,
Lorne Castle was better known ax “Castle Forlorn’. But her Cheerful
disposition was infectious and welcomed by her cousins, and the days
were full of fun and laughter),

A LITTLE PRINCESS by Frances Hodgson Burnett
NANCY—NEW GIRL by Ethel Talbot

for Boys).

and
THE BOYNTON MANOR SECRET by Annerley Wood (spy or
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THE PIRATES OF PAPUA by James M. Downie (this is a t
t the Pacific for Boys)
THE GORI SECRET by David J, Gammon (amazing adventures from Chin-
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MYSTERY at THREE ELMS by Michael D, Gibson
MARLOW of the MOUNTED by T. C. Bridaes
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And you will be thrilled at se Tales of Mystery and Adventure
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CRT alelesiin tens

PAGE EIGHT



THE SWALLOW

ROLF FELDMAN wins the Senior dive at the Harrison College Aquatic |





Sports yesterday with a graceful :wallow dive.

Manning Champion
At Aquatic Sports

BILLY MANNING last ye

v’s Class 1 Victor Ludorum again

emerged champion of Clas; 1 with 41 points in the Harrison
College Annual Aquatic Sports held yesterday at the Bar-
bados Aquatie Club, Charles Evelyn was Class 2 Champion
with 25 points, P. John.on with 11 points was Class ¢
Champion and I. Skinner was champion of Class 4 with 9

points.
by Set A one point behind.

First Test
Left Drawn
In India

NEW DELHI, Nov. 8
The first unofficial Test
tween India and the Common-



wealth Touring Cricket Team
ended here to-day ina tame
draw. After adding 89 this

mowing to the overnight score
of 340 for four, India who made
169 in their first knock declared
their second innings at 429 for
six wickets, leaving the Common-
wealth team (on 272) to get 327
in three hours and 45 minuutes.
When the match ended the Com-—
monwealth had made 214 for one
wicket. Hazare and Adhikari
attacked vigorously when the
final day’s play began. Their
fifth wicket partnership put on
116 in 104 minutes before Adhi-
kari was held at mid-on. Hazare
had garried his overnight score of
98 to 144 not out when India de-
claned .

Hazare batted magnificently and
gave no chances. His innings
lasted altogether just under six
hours and ineluded 17 boundaries,
Laurie Fishlock and Gimblett
opened quietly for the Common-
wealth.

They tried to force the pace
after lunch and Gimblett was
particularly severe on Nayudu the
leg-break bowler. He hit 68 in

cluding’ ten fours before spooning | 2nd, A

a return..catch to Mankad. The

pair put on 105 in just over three] ¢

hours helped by fielding lapses.

Gimblett was twice dropped
while Fishlock also gave a chance.

Emmett joined Fishlock in an-
other three-figure partnérship,
Fishlock completed his century

two minutes before time having
hit a six and seven fours. It was
his first century of the tour,

The scores :—
India ist Innings .

.. 169
Commonwealth ist Innings ....

272

India 2nd Innings ’
(for 6 wkts. decld. ......., 429
(Hagare 144 not out; Adhikari 56)

Worrell 52—21—-120—3; Ramadhin
58—22—-1l1l—1; Shackleton
14—2—41-—1; Commonwealth 2nd
Innings 214 for 1 wicket. Fishlock
102 not out; Gimblett 63; Emmett

not out 43.
Renter,



HE WAY

| HE WANTED A
FIREPLACE



WITH A HOUSE TO PUT 3-FOOT LOGS i lal
ATTACHED: IN IT! NOTHING DINKY! a
I WANT THE REAL
MS COY!!



They'll Do It Every Time

7 Y
CHIMNE!

CHEDDAR TOLD | really DRAW!I WANT

THE CONTRACTOR, / 4 FIREPLACE THE SIZE

OF ONE WALL-ALMOSTâ„¢

YOU KNOWâ„¢BIG ENOUGH

Set F. was the winning set with 80 points followed

It was a fine afternoon and a
crowd of over one hundred people,
which included most of the teach-
ing staff of Harrison College and
many of the boys, was present at

1e Aquatic Club pier to see the
spo,'ts. Very few parents of the

s taking part attended, En-
lirants were not as good as last
} ear and there seemed to be a
jack of interest in aquatics among
the boys, except the small percer-

be-|tage of those taking part. How-

ever, Set rivalry was very keen
among the youngsters who were
looking on.

The results were as follows :
CLASS 1

(A); 2nd, H, Weatherhead (F); 3rd, F
Manning (A). Time 411 secs
CLASS 2. 25 YDS.—l1st, E. Johnson

(F); 2nd, G. Jordan (E); 3rd, C, Evelyn
{F). Time 212 sees.

CLASS 3, 25 YDS.—list, P. Johnson
(D); 2nd, B. Nicholls (E); M. Gibbs (F).
Time: 26) secs.

CLASS 4. 25 £DS.—lIst, I. Skinner (C);
2nd, M. Evelyn (F); 3rd, R. Grannum
\A), Time: 272 sees.

CLASS 1, 100 YDS,—Ist, B. Manning
(A); 2nd, F. Manning (A); 3rd, H
Weatherhead (F), Time: 1 min 31 1/2

secs.

CLASS 2. 50 YDS.—lIst, C. Evelyn (F);
2nd, G. Jordan (E); ard, E. Johnson (F)
Time ; 54 sees.

CLASS 3. 50 YDS.—Ist, B. Nicholls
(E) and P, Johnson (D) (tie); 3rd, L. O.
Taylor (D), Time: 1 min, 10 secs.

CLASS 4. 50 YDS,—Ist, I. Skinner (C);



and, M, Evelyn (F); 3rd, H. Davis (EB),
Time ; 1 min. 13] _ sees.
CLASS ji, 150 ¥YDS.—lIst B. Manning
(A); 2nd, F. Manning (A); 3rd, H
Weatherhead (F). Time: 2 mins 12 secs,
CLASS 2. 100 YDS.—Ist, C. Evelyn
iF); and, G. Jordan (BE); 8rd EB. Johnson

(F}. Time: 1 min, 29) secs.
100 YDS,—Ist,
Nicholls (E); 2nd, P, Johnson (D); 3rd,
L. Taylor (D). Time: 2 mins 10; secs.
BREAST STROKE 50 YARDS (Open)
—Ist, B. Manning (A); and, F. Manning
(A); 3rd, H. Weatherhead (F). Time :
1 min, 8 secs
SENIOR DIVE—lst, R.
Taylor (A); Jrd,
head (F).

ere RELAY.—Ist, Set F; 2nd, Set
7. Ord, Set
JUNIOR RELAY.—l1st, Set C; 2nd, Set
F; 8rd, Set D,

BACK STROKE 50 YDS. (Open).—list
F. Manning (A); 2nd, G. Jordan (EB)
ard, E. Johnson (F), Time: 1 min, 10%

secs,
JUNIOR DIVE.—1st, I. Skinner (C);
me . Evelyn (F); 8rd, P, Johnson
0.

10) secs.
220 YDS. (Open).—ist, C. Evelyn (F);
2nd, B. Manning (A); 3rd, G, Jordan
(EE). Time: 3 mins, 44 secs.

CLASS 3 AND 4.

Feldman (E);
H. Weather-

SUMMARY OF POINTS

Set A, 79, B. 0, C, 20, D. 18, E.49, F. 80.



DESTROYER ON FIRE

RIO DE JANEIRO, Noy. 8.

Seven of the crew of the 1,500-
ton Brazilian destroyer Green-
halgh suffered burns when a fire
broke out in the engine room yes-
terday. The destroyer, which was
taking part in exercises off the
coast, returned to its base with-
cut help.—Can, Press.

Registered U. 5. Putent Oftee








Sonne TOTED IN
THOSE 3-FOOT Logs

JUST ONCE». AND
WHOT HOPPEN #
YOU GASSED IT!

Victoria—M.C.C. Match ::
Ends In Draw |




i
|
THe MATCH between Victoria and the M.C.c. Touring |
team ended in a draw here teday after Victoria had taken with j
first innings lead, rain preventing any play after tea. } :
At the close the MCC were 54 ooh = Pe
runs ahead wit six second Gainpto 22 0 16 ; eS
mnings wickets in hand, having] Close 15 2 63 2
; : 9a ld dain err S66 © 8
lo ‘ ie ~ 79 runs when rain M.C.C. 2nq Innings
curtailed play. ' Hutton ¢ Kerr b Johnston i3
sarlie lictorie VF brought| Washbrook ¢ Loxton b Johnsor 32 BREAKF
serligny sipile BaS Sree Sheppard stpd. MacDonald b Ring 19 QUAKER Oats
theiy Monday score of. 283 fot] pewes ib.w. Johnston 5 carbohydrates
seven to 331 in reply to the MCC Close not out 7 with Quaker Osts Your hair will be
. ‘ lompton not out o | BB pece enweRnGoY.----
sirst innings total of 306 for nine Petre th ine boii alae :
declared . ee Bn eee 5s handsomer by far
R. Howard the Victorian open- Total \for 4 wickets) 79}
ing batsman scored 139 in a) pan of wickets: 1-25, 2-61, 3-06, | |h oooe gtAMINA.---° when you treat it te.
natient innings of just cver six | 4-73. Sia
urs rin yhich he hit one LING ANALYSIS ‘ u
he urs during Ww oe 9 ‘Vaseline’ Hair Tonic,
six and 11 fours. bp ss Bill Johnston il 1 ee |
(From Our Own orrespondent) Kerr 6 0 2S
M.C.C. Tet Innings 306 for 9 declared | lan Johnson os:3- Bee Just use a few drops
VICTORIA—-Ist Innings Ring 2 1
K. Meuleman b Bailey ist ee QUICK HEALTH BREAKFAST! a day... then see
ward |.b.w. Close f ’ eee
arvey ¢ Sheppard b Bailey 7 Boil 2 cups af water. Add salt. When
sett b Bailey 19
S. Loxton c Hutton b Bailey 4
K. Kerr c Close b Bailey 3
lan Johnson run out 26
D. Ring ec Berry b Close 75
1. Me Donald ¢ Bailey b Hollies 4
W. Johnston stpd. MacIntyre b }
Compton ; 30
F. Iverson not out 1 |
Extras (4 byes, 3 leg byes) 7
Total 331
Fall of wickets: 1—17, 2-81, 3—71,
$-#5. 5-89, 6-161, 7-281, 8-287,
Â¥ 5
BOWLING ANALYSIS
S31 ee
hiner “oe a ie
Balley 2 6.6% §



Board of Health
Meeting

From Page 5

wil have to get out within «
month. Some may be hard hi
and have to slaughter their catile
This would mean a shortage oi
milk in St. Michaet. He then ask>¢
hat the sub-committee be a

pointed te meet the committee o
the Commissionérs of Health

Mr. Fred Goddard suppor.c¢e
Mir, Kidneys views and said tha
it would be wise to allow (+

dairies in the City area to remain
until the milk supply beca:ne
better.

No New Dairies

He said that if this law
enforced immediately it would
impose hardship on people who
bought a gill or half pint of milk
No new dairies were springing ur
because very few people wanted
to handle that type of work.

He would support that a sub-
committee be appointed to meet the
committee from the Commission-
ers of Health because some bene-
fit might be derived from such a
meeting,

Dr. F. N. Grannum said that
years ago the Board went into the
matter and it was decided that
the City of Bridgetown was un-
suitable for dairy keeping and
this must remain in force. Dairy
keepers have made no attempt tc
get out and any hardships that
they now encounter they have
brought on their own heads.

After further discussion the
Board decided to appoint the sub-

was

50 YDS.—lst, B. Manning) committee.

The report by the Govern-
ment’s Chief Sanitar: Inspector
for the month of mber, 1940

was received,

What's on Today

Mr. Edmund Watts, man-
aging director of Watts &

atts Shipping Company,
is due to arrive here at day-
break today by the 8.8.
“Lady Rodney”.

Second day’s racing in
the three-day Autumn Meet
of the Barbados Turf Club
takes place at the Garrison
Savannah. The first race
will be run at 12,30 p.m,

The Police Band under
Capt. Raison will play.
..The Shamrock Credit
Union hold a meeting at
St. Patrick’s School
p.m. The Treasurer and
Secretary will submit their
reports.

* 7 +
ASSIZES—FRIDAY
No, 31 Rex vs.
Denald Downes





— ———

The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises; 5.52 a.m.
Sun Sets: 5.36 p.m.
Moon (New): November 9
Lighting: 6.00 p.m.
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington):

Total for Month to Yester-
day: 2.17 ins.

Temperature (Max.) 84.5° F

Temperature (Min,) 71.0° F

Wind Direction: (9 a.m,)
E.8.E.; (3 pm) W.N.W.

Wind Velocity: 5 miles per
hour

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.812;
(3 pm.) 29.722






eT










BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1950

LOOK YOUR BEST







Youngsters grow

Talllv, Stungew

MELBOURNE, Nov. 8.



























HEADLEY WRITING Cook i sictions ge Tee einer

BOOK ON CRICKET e #

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Nov, 1

the difference!
Buy a bottle today!

at’s all.

George Headley is busy io
England completing his first
cricket book. Title i: “Cricket in e
the Middle” and publishers wil}
be the same as for Sir Donald
Bradman’s last book

Â¥ cee MARK
ASE. ia the ii ed trade
fl the Chesebroush Sila, Con Cou'd

Headley, West Indies greatest
batsman, will be the second West
Indian cricketer to write s book
But he will b2 for behind the
other-—-Learie Constantine—wiic
has already written no fewer than
five,

To-day’s Tip

uMOLENE

Let your first act on morning be
to GARGLE with a inixture
of warm water and a
little LIMOLENE

TONIC,











\

i

|

I
YOU'D be surprised at the |
PHLEGM it brings from your
}



throat It’s time to start making

LIMOLENE 18 to 67c. a Bottle

Test Waterman's Ink any way you will.
You will find it infinitely superior for these 3 veasouny)

1. It’s all ink—Is never diluted; no solvents:

2. It costs no more—it is a quality prodvel.
at a low price.

3. It goes further—one bottle of W:
Blue-Black ink writes up to 3 times more wa

When you need ink, ask for W.
%», the finest ink in the most yseful |

aterman’s

up your suits for the

Exhibition and the com-

ORIENTAL

GOODS!
CUROIS,

ing Xmas Season,

JEWELLERY,
SILKS, (Se Habla Espanol)

THANFS

Pr. Wm, Hry. St. DIAL 3466

We have an excellent

of



(Articulos) |
|
{
{
|

selection Tropical





LOOK FOR Suitings in a variety of
THIS BOTTLE

oS

TILT IT FOR
ECONOMY




ao |
PODSOO PPOSSOO, |
'

Mr. REUBEN GILKES

requests the pleqwre of your ‘,
company tg his ’.

s
DANCE :
AY QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE

TO-NIGHT
(Bank-holiday) 2n@ Baces Night
ADMISSION: — — 2/-

Music supplied by Mr. Arnoid
Meannweil's full Orchestra

shades and designs in




als.







We wish you Luck at the Races!

POSS SSSPOSSD SSF OS yy
Ott OS
{
|
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}
|

-

CAVE SHEPHERD & Co.,Ltd.

COSC SOSSSCLES



A Well-stocked Bar—Please Invite But?
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“MATINTO” FLAT PAINT
in White, Cream and Green

For Interior Decoration of Walls and
Woodwork.









For appointments.

9.11.50.—2n.
eo
{9999S SSSSG9S USSD OSOOSâ„¢

POF 9,

FURNSN SF eee ee ow 24

for Enjoyment :

THE MONEY-SAVING
WAY
Don't get

“S” ENAMEL FINISH PAINT
White and Cream

“SPECIAL” PAINTS.
Grey, Dark Grey, Tropical White B’dos
Light & Dark Stone. For’ Exterior
or Interior,

PERMANENT GREEN PAINT
For Exterior or Interior.

RED ROOF PAINT
For Galv. Iron or Shingles.

PAINT REMOVER
For the easy removal of old paint.

Phone 4267, 4456.

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.

DIAL 4692

>



































The Sign of
QUALITY






NEW and renewed MAHOGANY
anc other Wardrober, Dresser.
robes, Chests_of-drawers and
Line mn Pressa —Vanaties, Dressing
Hie bn Stools, Sereen Frame:,—
Single and Double eds!

Separate Side Ralls. Lathe"

Dining Kitchen und Fancy
bai 4 ar ‘aney
Tables, Sideboards $47 up, China
Kitchen and Bedroom Cabinets
"5 Larders, Waggons, Liquor Cases.
Ccolerator 1



SPECIAL 3-piece floral U hobs.
tered Suite to seat Five -Morris,
Tub and Rush Suites and separ-










nervous about

ate pieces—iBerbice and Ba:

‘ e a sy- T @ @O i dh 5
chaits, $3 up—Cheval and thar
thes ene unframed Mirrors up

o bociy—heigh

Ronee eht 50 x 16—Bookracks

ith sloping or Flat Tops.

L.S. WILSON

Trafalgar Street.

YOU NEED!I!

———

Dial 4069.

See Our Show
Room Ditplay

CARPENTERS’ RULES
STEEL & METAI.LIC TAPES
PLANES

PLANE IRONS

SPOKE SHAVES
CHISELS in all sizes
HAND & BREAST DRILLS
DRILL BITS

GIMLETS

HACK SAWS & BLADES
PIPE WRENCHES
SOCKET WRENCHES
NAIL PULLERS






Will be open to Members from 9,00 a.m, to 9.00 p.m.

TO-DAY

_ And every week-day. Sundays 6.00 p.m. till 9.00 pan

FOR COLD FOOD, SANDWICHES & DRINKS BEFORE AND AFTE!
| THE RACES

Entrance in Luke’s Alley when Colonade Stores are closed











Full Text

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PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 9, 1M0 Tin: SW %l I on iVictoria-M.ee. Match Ends In Draw MELBOLJ r.Tl H between Victoria and Hit HXA, I'ourinu, endad In a draw here today ali< r td t..kei. rail pratEjjilni %  *> pla> ;i! p Ai Ihe eftae* UH Uf %  ;i hunt), having B runs when la had buxiirhi I 283 for dip to 331 in reply Ig MM for nit It Howard the VletOflan openn-g MUman scored 139 in m |safj of just %  KiiiK which he hit 01 lx and 11 four* li...' OBI 0* r*tfl' •4 ( < t.l l".lMi -* %  fr lIMi • IDA '•> InnlnS* (Inward I .*v. Clotr 1-1 : ; -id t> Halter i rUtln i it .... Class b lil.v ,. M Heni.i: dive at tbe 1 Sport* yesterday smli a grateful wallow dive. Manning Champion At Aquatic Sports BILLY MANNING last y< r'sClffW 1 Victor l.udoi Iftl emerged champion of Cla %  1 with 41 points in thr H College Annual Aquatic Uporta held yesterday at the Barbados Aquatic Club. Charles Evelyn was Class 2 Champion with 25 points, P. John n with 11 points was Class 3 Champion and I. Skinner was champion of Class 4 with 9 C Dints. Sat F. was the winning set with 80 points followed y Set A une point behin.l. H was a fin* afternoon unrt crowd of over one hundred paopl First Test Drawn In India Left NEW DELHI, Mov I The llrst unofficial Test betwiwti India and the Commonwealth Touring Cricket Team ended horo to-day in a taim draw. After adding 89 Ihi. morning to the overnight score of 140 lor four. India who made 169 in their first knock declar their second Innings ut 429 1 :.ix wickets, leaving the Commonwealth team (on 272) to get 327 In three hours and 45 mlnuute*. When the match ended the Commonwealth had made 214 for one wicket. Hazarc and Adhlkiiu .-Hacked vigorously when UM final day's play begun Their fifth wfrket partnership put On 116 In 104 minutes before Adhlkarl was held at mid-on. Hazanhad carried his overnight score of 98 to 144 not out when India declared Kazanbutted magnificently and gave no chancell:uum . lasted altogether |US1 under fUX hours and included 17 boundaries Laurie Fishlock and GimbU-n opened quietly for the Commonwealth. They tried to force the pace altar lunch and GunblaU was I artlcularly severe on Nayudu the rg-brcak bowler. Me hit 88 in eluding ten four, before spooning a return catch to Manknd. Tti K iiir put on 105 in just over thre aura helped by Settling lapse Gimblett was twice dropped while Fishlock ab>u K follow* VPS -in. %  Mamn. tralherttMul 1F1; Ifd. CLASS 3 *S S3 ttUl. I KHiniin tnd M Evi>n Tu... i i %  %  .*." rot M i 'JB '.%  %  thorki -i a \ss i ri] M o l(K> YDS -l.v C *<• %  r %  ..„ ill I fid K Jol> i "in l atei llflf \ST -sTIIOKF YARDa lOpw -l.l. U kUimliis lAl, Ind 9 -wM A W4 II Wrni)>*ihr.l ffl Tiim> aiNIOR OIVK-Ul. B rtUmw IB) tnd, A Tuvloi IAI. Jtrt II Wmlici hMd '!'• •srviOH RELAY—lit. Ml r. SIMI. Sri %  S-i A JfNIOR 11B1AY l.l. S.I C. Ind. S. %  IM s, ( D n*rK STBOKr S* YDS (Oprnl —Ul l Uai no rdn ill lid. R J-.hn.on iFl Tim* I min 101 Skl10. | I YDS lOp-n> -Ul. C *vlm in II Mantiinit iA>, 3rd, a Jordan Tirna : S min* *t an %  i MM in or roiNTs A A TS. B 0. C. . D IS, E4S. T SO DfSrROYfR ON FIRE Hit) l)B JANEIRO. Nov 8 Seven of the crew of the 1,600>n Brazilian deMnVvT tlreenbalih su.'Iered burns when u fire broke out In the engine room yesterday Tht destroyer, which vai taking pnrl in exercUes off the coast, returned lo its Iwse withtut help.—can. rreas. Board of Hralth Mt't'tin^ at 1 "in Page a "i I hav !" to get out within m0ql|) Some may be mil have to laught-r tin Th'S would mean a sho lage o' inlk in St Michae' II. M:..i 1 ba| UL'iib-i i % % %  uaet the coi %  he pommivslonera of lleelth i i ; %  da >li. KM-' %  .so to allow %  unlt| ihe -r.iik beftga No New Dailies Id that If this law wa Ottfqrfred immediately ft would iinpos"' hardship on people whe •"•ught .i gill or half pint of milk Ni new duiries were springing ui because very few people ws to handle that type of work Me would support that a committif be appointed to meet :he ccnirnjttcc from the Cominiaaiouera of Health because some bet fil might i.derived fr r i .I-I Una Dr. F N Orunnum said tlvears ago the lloarrl went Into \ matter and it was derided thai I ha Citv of It'idtff'town was unsuilable fin d,.ir> keeping and 'I-.!:..) %  U :: .nil III fun •• J) u keepers have mad* no etteinffri get out anil any hardships |ha| they now enrounter *•) I brought on their own head.s After further duKuasloti Hoard decided to appoint the mblonunlttai The report by the OOVL ment's Chief Sanitary Inspector 'or ihe month of a'ptembr, 19^0 'H received. Youngsters grew lth QUAKER OATS LOOK YOUR BEST What's on Today Mr. ttimiind W-IU aging director of Walla Walt* Shipping Cumpanv. is due to arrive hrre al daybreak today by tli. S 8. "Lady Kodney". Second day racing In Ibe Uirer-dd) Autumn Meet of ihe B-irhado* Turf Club MI.. place al the tiarrlton Savannah. The lint race will be run al 12.30 p m. Thr I'.ill. i Rand under i .nil Ralwn will play. The Sham r oeh C'red 11 I nloii huld A mrellns at tit Patrick s Hrhoel at 7 p.m. The Treaaurer and Secretary will aubmlt Ihrlr reports. AH81ZEH— FRIDAY Ne Si Rex ea. Donald Downr. The Weather TODAY Hun Rises: 5.52 am. Sun Sets. 5.36 pm. Moon (Haw)I Novrmber !l Liibtini: 6.01) p m. HMIHIi\l Rainfall (CodrtoiUin): .07 IB. Total for Month to Yesterday: 2.17 ins. Temperature Mi. 84.5' I i.ir .i I.IIM.1(Mini 71.8 r Wind Jin. %  ti,.i; (t .in E K E: (3 pm) W N W. Wind Vrloclly: 5 miles per hour Barometer: i9 a.m.) |Mltl 13 ii io 29.122 ThcyTl DQ It Every Time *By Jimmy Hado >



PAGE 1

TIIIRSDAY, NOVEMBER , 1S0 BARBADOS ADVOCATE CLASSIFIED ADS. PACE SEVEN TCICPHOXI 1W DIED Dio"n*i CLIHIII Urn.iw I Cecil . %  BKI-TI*N — Baneae*! ?.. Merchant, lover IU> Street, ilal.State*. IMI night Funeral will Mvf %  •I muni Funeral How Helmont HIIM. %  IN p TV. I.KI.1,„ in* Waatbury Ceiitrtery Lillian ChrHtiaii WinUSA". Janr Ma* well "HUIKFI HI !•• n — l.u.ille Gekuol "Tuaiiui. Trmidad" BALL Sophie L • erterdey at her r t ngi n ci Bettlrv DeaconRoad The funeral will Mv* her lata ri~,,|.nr* VI ted. Atnv Hall. R.a Toppm Maiflr Moan Ben Goring. Mauri?Reu roil NAMO AUTOMUllVt CAM lord llelecl Ii) .* do. 1TBVC mile* Apply: H.rold We-lhr l.ra C/O Bruce Wratl.ernead Ltd. Mil SO-I I I CARFord PrrtWI. March 1S*W Damaged In aeeideni Xm. IMS not u-ed Mix* 4.0B0 milea only Thl vehicle will be nM by auction al MtErtunil Girur •o-moirow. Friday loth, at I p.m. John M Bledun. Auctioneer, a 11 -In. TRUCK-One (I) IMI V-8 Ford True* 1,1.1 what you want tar the corning crop. Applv u> Jo. St Hill. TweedMd* Road t 11 -.. ELECTRICAL ULAN KITS Eacelleol IB c.~ ol Ulne** .1. " SO 1H-I Ml. pa Co*l* A Co Lid Electrical D*,t 4.1-40-*. KDISWAN IAMP5 For lleu*e *r Factory ft 11. 31; 110 M • Volt*. Mora light lor leea money. Dial MTB Da Cueta d Co.. Ltd. Uec-.rieel Dapt 4 II 9B-4n LMMF.RSION IIEATERS Convenient Electrical appliance lac healing water for Tn. Hot d-lnkv (having etc Dial 3474 Da Coata A Co .. Ltd Eteetrii.i Dept 4.H.t—*i U KMUKI rURNITURX—New *il %  ..d el*.. a*cond-had furniture In Mahogany. Birch and PIM. large variety at Ralph Braid* Show Huomi. Hardwood All-. IfVlKIIII. • Cl.-K-f.-t.il -IIF lllilV MISCELLANEOUS HHUSHKs wul, long handle* w* rubbing the bach, made by K Lait a lifetime. Knight. Phoenix • .ll.ltEAR PLUBR. (or awlnurdng end diving, made of rubber Knight. Ltd I !J.S0—I"i GAS STOVE--w-IUi 1 ring*, a Grtll and Oven and a tall aplaah-berk. to be aeert at MM U A. Wait*. The Cottage 6 Avanue. Belleville Phone JftSa T.ll.eV-Sn GALVANIZED ] r. s-. 7ft anl 1ft length. Enquire Auto Tyre Company. Trafalgar Street Phono MM 8.U.40—If n. GHTEK WICKB Made of *U>wick laata foravrc. reaver burnt KnlBT.tl.ld t.ll.a*-—' MARRHMAI.LOYVS Freeh aupplle* lu*t received Knight* Lid siL,at-m. I1.VSTIC RAINCOATS Bargain* in I-die. pi* .tic Raincoat* 43 D each Pla.U. Head Tie. tn Avtnrtrd C0I01.1 The Modem Drwai Bhoppv Bmad Hit. i "> %  KUHIIERIRED COAT*--If you are betlrr q k minr riibben.haU taHl iuliable lor aprlni and dennltoly waterproof with .i r t. H I„.I>> hood ||000 eatn TheModern Dreia Srioppe. Bioad Street r SO In XMAS TlttaK Imported. aee oui Miow window, with rum theee treei last many yearr. dlrferent ilrea. Kniaht Ltd%  II M> In XMAt CARDS—with vlewa In Co. of Parbado*, are now available al the ful.uwina pUcea Care Shepherd. City Pharmacy. Cole'a Printer*, Colltru. Ltd,. Johnaon'i Stationery. Mayfalr Olfl Shop, Phoenix Pharmacy, Roberta A Co., R.PCK. Book Shop. Bruce Weatheihead Ltd. Cottaa* Gift Shop FDR KENT BUNGALOW Golf Club Road TWJ bedrooma, livin room and porch, balhwlth bath and lavatory Com pie i" w("i rlei-u-irily and built In eupboardi i-i atM '*.; a.ii so in %  i:t -1 M MPBINOa st Jamaa Coaat "Annexe" Now available (or rant By month Vacant. Nav Dee. Jan. Fully (lirTtimed and ewulpped. BWceilrnl tea bathing Prtvate Beach. Cook. Duller available Tel tl-M Appointment to view. FT^T -Small comfortable uniurolahe Flat at llighat-te Houa*. St Michael Vacant now For further particulfr E one I23U. Wllklnaon at haynea Co it.. Office 7 11.10-4 l.rt MODERN BUNGALOW-No I CIIHOJ Terrace, Upper Ba> Street Tetepboin 3003 or rail on M|n Alma Griffin ); premlaea • 11 90— 3n WAIVTEV HELP Ih-iKKKri'WI Aauelant Bookkeei' Apply between the %  nd II a.m. SERVANT*—An experienced Cook with good %  •,' alan an houae>e-v int Apply to Beravn G.ieni Houae. Ihimn or dial *Bt* I.It H-3n TWO OVERJBEXRS Raqulrad tor louraquare Factory. For Crop Itjjl Only applicant! who can writ* and calculate efficiently need apply PUBLIC NOTICES NOTICE pa— %  OF or raiLir Th. Parochial Tntoaurera OfRre *,>i a* removed w Klngaton. Church Villagr. St. PtUHp from lUh Nev 1MB The OfBao will be opened for bualneaa on Moradayi. Tueedayi. Saturday* from t a.in to 11 a m and fro-n noon is I pa •gd. P S W SCOTT. Parochial Treaiuter. St Philip 4.11 SO Jn NOTICE The Captain and Owner* of the M.V "Fierytand" arm not hold m !" iui ti.nonubUfor *m debt or debu %  <• curred by maoAber* of the crew of 'he %  aid vaeael during her atay In tin* p-i w niuoN Captan. W. S MONROE a. CO LTD Adent. I 11 It—In I.OVIIOMIM MMIIIS NOTICE Tn AppficanU for Vacant S Mtrhael Ve Uy Kkhlbiin.,,. at M Michael Qirla' School \" who mt* over a and aader II year* will be e*-mined on Frtdav the Itih dav of Novrmner 1MO. at %  a m Will parent* and .n guardian* of children within thta age group plea* note the change In the date of tb aaarnlnaUon and comply with the By Order, B. C RBDMAN. Clerk St Michael* V*j4i> NOTICE re the aatate of HILTON LLEWELLYN GOt.LOP NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN (hat P-aoaa bavtrtl aw dab*. Oollop deceaaad. late o( Hart'* Oap. I the pariah of Chrln Cliureh In Uu* % %  '.and who di.d on the Srd day of December IMJ. mie^.te. are requeated to *end In parUciilnr* of thai dl.ly alteated to the undcraurned dart**. Fedora Oollop. C o Meaari Hapne* am Grimih. Solicitor*. No It High Stje.t Bridgetown, on „, before Ihe l!at da. o December. lM. aft,, hjch date %  hall proceed to dUlrlbute th< the deceaaad among the part lea entitled thereto having regard only to aucb> claim* of which I ahail then have had neiicr and I will not be liable (or the to any peraon of whoae debt .i 1 aba 11 not then have had notice And all peraon* Indebted to the M>d eatat* are requested to aettle ih**r indebledne** without del aj Date.! thl. MMh day of October. %  UVKIMHA FEDORA OOLLOP. Qualified AdmliuttratriK of the EM ate of Hilton LleweHyn Oollop. dtreate d POST OFFICE NOTICE REMOVAL OF PAHCEL BRA' The Parcel Branch ot th.General Poai Omcu. IMbhc Buildtnts. has bttT, remove*! to Ihe ground flour M lllliwillll Building on the Wharf formerlv known gaj the Hams W.tren..uaa>. From 8 00 AM ,m PVlBB) mih Novr-mber. all iwicel pa "'' """ %  The iMiulie eninuuv to trkS Brtwafe U on Prince William M.-.u. StrtM opiMMlto the Office of Mews R M Jones at Co.. Ltd. Addrei*ee>. who have received Final Notice in reapect t f imr.-els are again warned that any or these parcels undelivered will bo relumed !o counii> of immn by the llmi uvnilable oppofjiuty iMi.r.il |ont OnVe, •th November. 1950 9.11.50 2n Attention it druwn to the Control of Price* (|> (Anter^tment) Order. 1950. No m whieb trill be published In tho Official Gazette of Thursday 9tti November. 1950. Us Order (a) the maximum wholesale and retail follows: — SHIPPING NOTICES ItBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBfVl'' Olll fl C tit toptembar Tt'i. Adelaide Sept. l-h. Ma.t~.urne septombee nth Dev. port Octabei let l>fln. iktobai Nth a i The M V r.nbbee will accept Cargo and Paw.rt.get. i... Domln lea. AntlgMB. Montaerrai. Ravi* fe ;a Kim Saiimg Pr.aa> ifth MARBLES and PISTOLS with CAPS ROBERTS A CO.—DIAL 330i— High Street LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE rue appbcaUon o( fkenlr Crlapln holder o? Liquor Llcenae No 333 ol ISM granlarl to her In reaped of bottom Poor of a wall I. 'in .it Rock. St. Peter (or parmlaton to uaa >.'.d Liquor Ueen*e al bottom flooe of a 1 •tor** wall buUdtng at Weatbur. Rd St Michael Dated thl* Tth day of November. I MO To E A McLaod. Boi Police Magldrate. Dl "A" Signed ESMIE CRISPIN. Appllcanl N II Thl. application Will be con%  Idered at Ltcmalng Court lo be lierfl at l'il.. Court. Diitnet "A". on Friday Ihe ITth dav uf November flJO al II o'eloc*. a m B A M. i'"i> Police Maglntrate. DIM 'A". P1TBLIC SALES AUCTION BAY PTLLY—"Joan'* Star". b* Duni4-b—Colleen will be auction during the afternoon ol San day 11th. the laal .. %  REAL ESTATE BCNOAIXtW At Brighton. Rock. Jut completed and (landing on 7.KW *quare feet o( land wtUt right of way to eaa 3 Bedroom*. Tiled Bath and Modem Kitchenette Garage *evl Servant'* Quarter* Apply HUTCHINSON BANriELD. Phone 4443. t.H.I0--4n. %  ROCK DUNDO" -Sltuata at Cave Hill St Michael, with approximately .1) Acrea of Land Corrdatuig of SO Arb!'Aerea and II Acre* In Sour Gran, and Road* The Arable Acreage I* a* Plant and Raloon Canei Preparation The Houjva rontalna three bedroam* toilet ana bath. Brewing and dining room* library. Office, rloead gallcrv %  ") kitchen Servant, room*, gang' aa.800 ...._.. Company'* Water Three mile* o-it*,.rf town, bua aaeelea Buhatile for Dairy or Development In-pec I Ion Tneaday* and Thuradayi ii noon lo 4 n m Ofrer* for abovo will bo received In writing by Colin P. B fMale. Bo**fi a. Skeete. Luce* Street. Bridgetown One houa* aianding on approximately % aero of land *1 Dearoni Road. Home contain* 4 rootn* and yard encloaed with waU. Suitable for email dairy. Apply to Hutchlnrin 4 Ranneld. Solicitor*. Jamaa St. LOST roiM LOST DOO -In Ih im-l Top Rock, a .mall f*mal< aponiible couple, no children. Phone B31T 7.1190.—Xn %  1 swrEP*rrAKI TICK FT *Vna BB W Finder please return aame to ihe Advocate Adttg Ofllce-aAewrrd ort-r.i • II *" WANTI.B TO OT Good cl* ftn nit ure In M-ihnganv Birch. Pin* Good price* paid Wltiini to piirche** entire houae furniture (r-wn people leaving uland Appl< Ralph Beard. Hardwood Allot Phor.e tmt g II M -f'i WANTED TO BINT %  HOUSE by EnglHti couple on long ie—e with one acre or more land e>where In Uland Main water llghtmg a-aenlUI Boat X.V.Z. Co Advocate TAB for yards etc. A limited quantity R emaininf lor sale AT Your Gas Co Bay St. Lnal 4309 WATCH-L**aa Gold BoUn, Wn.i w*tch wnn a brown int her (trap Between Ihe Domini,. Marketing Co Kg Poat Office on Tuaada> momlng between B and a Finder return bj Advocate Advtg Ofllre. Rowan, offered Barbidos Oftfcfrs AsMirialimi Tl.e Annual Dinner of the BOA *.ll I* held on Saturday, Ihe lath i.l N'.vembei at 14S p m al Ih* Drill Hall Will member* who -h kg attend pleaae notify Ihe HonBeety. al Telephone No *•)) or t. e A*at Horr.-. Sect I. al lUa b t-marraw 10th November. B II M-lr. SJ\ NET A MI r TO WEiJS AVAttAllC mOM All DfUG STOWS iSIOKES a BYNOC LTD-*9"i Wm. FOGARTY LTD. Invites an inspection of their new and Exclusive creations in BRIDAL MATERIALS VEILS, WREATHS and other Bridal Accessories | WOMAN'S GREATEST DAY ... HER WEDDING DAY Naturally, she must look her best . and can too . with Materials "FIT for a PRINCESS" now obtainable at FOGARTY'S W**J **SS*'S*VA*,



PAGE 1

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER , IN* BARBADOS ADVOCATF PAGE TRBEK C.C. Discusses Deep Water Harbour \ <•!/ %  Indian Com m issioner Pays Visit Here Mi nib. "iCluunbei of Comi i expressed concern „| lag ...-:.nu.v .,i,. „>,.., ,,,,,. criirnefu ... Uc>ul iho 1 roouaro urbour A letter bom the Chamber had been forwarded to ih Government on this matter but no reply has yet been received. Acting Vii-e-Pr-Mldant Hon. 1 ;.:< %  \: L C wuUi not attend the meeting yet' '" .Z~ ~" and Mr. D A. lA.cic-Sm.lh took n,a ^ ,hcr nM the Chair Arising wit of thv[ to ; !" > m Ml of the deep water harbou.. Mr. Luc ic-Smith told the mema> l ruin Page 1 'of great service and oeneiit to the luiuumty here. %  glstt to h' i-tn ilJlti.i : the world like Afri.a. Asia. Europe airi America, they all ttvad like | Mascot members of the same fanily and did not observe any rreial diciuninat.cn or bias. In his opinion, that was an ar, which waa worth copying by f the world The were trvmg t<> develop . and new* service and Moscow Celebrates Revolution LONDON. Nov. 7. I > in lautfctI member "f the Si., look the salute at today'* march past C r TWi Motion Picture the Screen Can request of the Shipping anJ om*dl b^ .nlcrcflrd m makMercanttle Association, the Govin. arrun;err,er.U for belter „,. eminent had appointed a com-t %  **"•• fibu-cto lh.late Mamittee to look into and report on| hatmH Ghaiidi. the Commissioner the working and operation of the'**"** '* %  w * tm * a miracl* port That was a matter that fo* marvellous their Ifaawn naa concerned the Chamber as well, minted ttuna m %  %  r.-l.pli.-..U-.' The Shipping and Mer.auull* Association had been asked by_ Government to appoint two members to that committee, and he knew that they had submitted the names of Mr W. H. Grannum and Mr. A. R. Toppln. He understood unofficially that Government had or would appoint the Labour Commissioner aisfl BM Harbour Master and that they had asked Labour to appoint two members, probably through the Barbados Workers' Union When this commit! %  B*MM be set up he did not know, but he took it that they would ask lor evidence. He did not know whether the Chamber would like to %  !* %  %  VidgQCt. He knew that some members had sumo 'Unite views ahnut the h.iiu'Uin: of poods III the vrant* etc, nnd might Ilka offer some constructive suggesspite of all :he odds they had II was the AM time h* the hls• i. of the Kinin rice that due Measant p.i-t'tlcn of their countrv. millions and mil• hnri lo migrate from one part of United India to It was u tremendous %  aoiS fo> nj Government so If luibilitate them. Adult suffrage was granted to iU m spite of the high percentage of ilMiracy, and his Government would have to educate the . ( thai they would lealifcc i re-pens ibl lily of the franchise A medical student at the Indian and people and their armed force Red Square on the STrd anniversary of the October Revolution. Moscow Radio re-1 ported Colonel General Parv*l Arte•i.v. M •• %  row's District Commander, led the parade. The square was decorated with huge portraits of Lenin and Stalin, the coats of arms, and 14 of the Soviet Republics and Communist party slogans Ministers. "world renowned scientists" and leading wr.tri* and artists watched the parade the radio sala. foreign guests included Koreans. Chinese. East German*. Italians Frenchmen and Belgians. "Anglo-American Imperialist" have now passed from preparations for aggression, lo direct arts of aggression." the army leader sold "Evidence of which Is the uandlt intervention by the United State* in Korea The Soviet people tegether with other freedom loving people would brand with shame American aggressors and express their sympathy for the Korean people who are conducting a heroic struggle for the freedom and Indepenrlcine of their motherland." Budenny ended his speech trj ae.'latming the Soviet Government I'.ti.. t'niversity. the Commia%  'oner said lhal M gave up his studies in 1921 and joined the nicverneiit fot lndepcni Ra>sn* I'M jdanl of India until 12> when he loft for the I'urkiri: Pli>cts Far Baal whfjra he remained until Mi. H. A. C Thorn* referred I IMS representing the Ir.di.iu .i lean from ihe Commissioner jNationuI Congress Independence m reply to one frafl | M. no Clminber on the QjUOBf the Bolshevist Party and "our wise teacher, great Leader and army leader of genius, the organleaf of all our victories, our dear and beloved comrade Stalin' Troops nnd spectators cheered. .HI .nullerv salvo was fired, and the march past began "T&ec/uucofoi JEFF CHANDLER DEBRA PAGET •—,KllDS .—.. lUWIBlMBUIN £>Now showing aild Continuing i nilv EMPIRE THEATRE Smm it vurlfi hi-ruiis*if HI iritl nmnt in ar it iiffiiiii1.ii king places in Bridgetown Mr Thomas said that the Commissioner had declared his intention to discuss the matter with any member of the Chamber, and he (Mr. Thomas) did not think they should lose any timo m putting loiward llkaf] views to Mini Tin Council ... potnMd Mi A 3tL Inni h|i i: M ave and Mr T. o. ii, v Comtho ni.ator. Cornmls stonof the Chaanbar had pointed out that thenthe City whan parking apace could bo found The Cou lhal the Chambor ihotiM conttaw Ul holding <-f their utBual dhineTg ,,i..'sUon had iI :d ihe bjat massUng of U* D to whether it *M I to hold tin* din;.' whether these dinners should be ad at all. us a good many members did not seem to IJO interested! The Secretary was led to send out a questionnaire to members on the malUi. Ho U>Ul ">*• Council yesserduy that in eplv to Ihe question of the holding of the annual dinnerSfi mombara had said that the were in favour as against 37. while to L'U others the matter was one of indifference. About the holding of the dinner this year. 42 had promised to attend and 71 did not want to do so. The Council reasoned, ho'.veve'. that about 20 honr.rnbera would also n attending. It was decided to hold the dinner. Scenic Beauty One of the matters set down foi discussion when the Chamber hold menm-Xl Quart. i\ General \w.-iuiK. will be "the arivtsabllliy .( asklni Government to prohibit the erection of advertising signs and hoardings throughout the island, which Is rapidly spoiling the scenic beauty of the Island and is being adversely commented upon by visitors." Notice of this was given at that Council meeting ...unlay by Mr. Trevor Bowll I The Council heard a letter read from the Acting CoVmlal Secret;.rv about the Chambers request by letter to the Airport Manager with regard to the posting of [inwengcr lista in the waiting room at the airport. It was stated that the Chamber*. letter had been forwarded to th olhee of the Colonial Secretary ::n OH.ia. h,, s\. VMMCHI In Tw.eh With Brb.rfo. < u.ula! Station Hipa lliroush lii I Qlamol MIUI, 8.8. Dolor*' isaa, B9. pumai %  Uver walnut, aj S. Aniran u Luaaw %  %  Del Nortc, SEAWELL AIIHIVAtJ*_Bv nWI A I. f...m Tr pudid Nina Wilon, Jnnn K .*. U>.lt Si—.,1 Mirk i %  l"iah Bradahaw. Him.l AM>>an |UL Carmen Olll. Itrttor Mann. MalBlia Mann lliiih Ralkln I^mbcn Scaly. lot i I a. Moore. S-roin rtoaxnlea fm-L NIcoL Juao fictwlt*. C F rlarriaoa. Fruni HI I.urla Dnuftat Wllcnp, Joan il-/m. Mabel Budoltc nFrArrrrREs-By RWlAt lot Trinidad John Roland. Agnr* %  ..| J.m Orsvra. Harold ptanyiiu-. Idward Cote, 0*b CflSe. Charl Arthur SI Hill. Loulaa Clprln. w. owvi SI VUSBBSU W.M F*r St. Lurla : Fat till He Charlci liar..1 1 Bulgunin said: "Fulfilling Ibo ih.ties JHI|KS

posed o camp of Imperialism led by ruling circles of the United States favouring a policy of Instigating the new war policy of a strong over-riding West. •American imperialists have now passed from a policy of preparation for aggression to direct acts of aggression, the most] blatant example being armed In1 terventinn in Korea. "Americans concentrated In I Korea almost all their armed forces in the Far East and also | called upon the forces of Britain i and other countries. "They were able to reap some' military successes, but they have not weakened the Korean people's will to fight. "Korea has become the torch of the liberation movement of colonial and dependent countries." "Anglo-American Imperial nt* have created an aggressive North Atlantic pact and are busy knork:ng together other aggressive mllitan Hoasj "They arc hindering the roncluitnn of a peace treaty with Gero-wtcv-o*,-*-.*----..'-*•** turn, however, had baen put to the managers of B.W.I.A. and Trans-Canada Airlines. These hud been assured that Government would offer no objection to the many and are Irving to prolong ptsRiiuj of the lists-assuming that j the occupation of Western GerIhc passengers themselves did not many as long as possible, r.bject. I use LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP VouTI feel M> fresh and full of vigour after vnu've trashed with LuVbuoy Toilet Soap. li> decp-clearning lather tree*, you of weariness, and keeps you fresh the whole day ihrough. Keep a ublct of Lifebuoy Toilet Soap handy and u: it regularly for ail day freshness! FOR PERSONAL FRESHNESS ALWAYS lit KV. IS \N BftflFNTlAL HIM IVHtY MOTORIST snori.o iiwi: IN ii A KINEX TOWING BRIDLE lu agasj of a break down or out of rVirol lust hitch it U. >our ^ far and you can easily be towed l/so trisiliihiiCELLULOID in SHEETS 5*1 Ins x 24 InSTEEL WIRE BRUSHES Always Dial 4269 for any make Aul part ar Aecwory. W will probably have It ECKSTEIN BROTHERS appiness How happy they are — Mother and Child I Yes, doubts and difficulties have gone — baby is on Cow 4 Gate Strong, sturdy limbs, sound bones, the happiness of abounding health —these .ire some of the gifts bestowed by this famous food. Buy a tin of Health and Happiness for your little one too. I. IV STUEKT IIIAI, DON'T MISS THIS \ \ I / / / SALE Having to vacate our permlaea (ROYAL STUKK No 2 HIGH STREET) within the next few wek* we art' offering to the public large stocks of Iturvhindlag at drastically reduced prices. VW have opened a genuine sale of hundreds of regular items at prices which will amaze you. Here am a fw :>f the articles and prices:— SPUN. SILKS A ( HI IM S Attractive fkhade* guaranteed qualities ,. %  •!,ic i MEN'S SHORT A. II111 SS Ml III IS I.urgent seleclion in town, prices nil up In '.W < a11i:.\-S IAVIIIIS IIMH'K VIS I I \>M I S A IMII SKINS New stocks recently arrived selling ut own cost. I.AIHI.-S IMIIHUI VII Cotton pagaHaa reduced to :w & 1Htv. Silk swatkea excellenl quality reduced la 62 & "Kc. BraMScrs. Nighties. Stocking*. Also fioustliold items all ul V:K riliciii'.; price*. Come and see ui One jjlunre %  '"I prices will convince you of the rare opportunity to shop and save. THE ROYAL STORE NO. 2 HIGH STREET /


sae aa

At reste





Tharsday

Nevember 9







EIGHTY U.S. PLANES CR

Republican Gains
Will Vex Truman

Democrats Have 2-Vote
Majority In Senate

NEW YORK, Nov. 8.

PRESIDENT TRUMAN today faced a troubled

two years in office with his Democratic Party's} repudiation

majority in Congress dangerously whittled down

by the Republicans in yesterday’s mid

elections.

In the Senate with the Republicans gaining five

seats, the strength of the

Democrats 49, Republicans 47.

In the House of Representatives with some result:

still to come, the position is:
Democrats 232, Republicans 199.

The poll has been heavier than usual in mid-term

elections.



Gammans Has
A Plan

To Keep Empire Together
(Frem Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Noy. 8.

Mr. David Gammans, Conser-
vative MP, has a plan which he
feels may prevent the British
Empire falling apart—a fear he
expresses today in a letter to the
Daily Telegraph.

His plan is to establish here in
London a Council of the Empire
to be attended annually by repre-
sentatives of all British colonies
and members of the Houses of
Commons and Lords. Matters to
be dealt with by this Council
would include foreign policy.
defence, communications, trade,
industry and social services.

“Three or four years ago I

would not have believed such a

Council could be formed,” he

told me today. But we have seeii

a similar model at Strasbourg

successfully carried through ana

I believe an Empire Council on

Strasbourg lines could and

would operate very well in-

deed.”

He points out in a letter to the
Telegraph that apart from the dis-
ruptive influence of Communism,





there is in Empire a great
wpsurge So wales
demands self- ; e
colonies which have the

wou
greatest difficulty in existing with-
cut outside capital want complete
independence at once.

Dictatorship Follows

Mr. Gammans says it is easy to
condemn colonial iticians as
being unrealistic, but most of
them do not realise that without
outside capital their economy
would collapse.

Few of them realise in addition
that a demoeratic constitution
which fails either through lack of
experience or on account of poli-
tical jobbery is inevitably suc-
ceeded by a dictatorship. :

“In the long run an Empire
cannot be held together by ignor-
ing the strong tides of National-
ism”. He says “if it is to survive,
it must be a living, permanent
and growing entity in the minds
end souls of colonial peoples as
well as our own.”

He suggests that the answer to
these problems is the establish-
ment of the Empire Council—‘an
abiding partnership of inte "
and says a body meeting every
year in its cwn Chamber would
not only be a binding link, “but
would enabie Colonial politicians
to contribute their advice and
counsel to problems which are
facing all of us.”




THE YACHT “OREGON” now lying in the outer basin of the Careenage,

CROSSED THE ATLANTIC

Leading Republican Senator}
Taft scored a decisive victory over
his Democrat opponent and ove>
organised labour in Ohio.

The Democrats retained nomi-|
ual control of the Senate with|
their narrqw majority of
seats.

But it was not certain
President Truman could rely
sclidarity among ail 49 Democra-
tic Senators. In the past, some
“rebel” Democrats haye

ACHESON —

WILL NOT
RESIGN

WASHINGTON, Nov 3

Dean Acheson said today that
he had no intention of resigning
as United States Secretary of
State as a result ef yesterday’s
Congressional elections.

He said at his weekly news
conference that he did not think

the election results constitute a
of the American

foreign policy
He said that he hoped and

- term | believed the election would have

no effect on the conduct of the
foreign affairs of the United States.
Acheson had been |

Said he

arties now stands: asked to comment on a statement

by Harold Stassen leading Repub-
lican that election returns con-

g| stituted « demand for the Secre

tary of State’s resignation
—(Reuter.)

_ Liberal “Split

Foreshadowed

LONDON, Noy. 8.
A split among the nine Liberal |

two| Party members in Parliament was ;

foreshadowed today after three of |

that| them failed to support their party |
on|in ervcial votes directed last night

against the Labour Government.
They abstained from voting for

voted|a Liberal sponsored motion which

with Republicans on vital policy| blamed the Government for the

issues.

Republican leaders in Washing-
ton described the results of the
poll as a “vote of no confidence’
in Secretary of State Dean
Acheson and American policy in
the Far East.

Both parties won 18 ceats in the
Senate. The other 60 Senators
were not up for re-election. The
Republicans won six seats from
their opponents but lost one of
their own.

Truman's 4 defeated lieuten-
ants were Senator Scott Lucas
(Illinois), Senator Francis
Myers, Senator Elbert Thomas,
(Utah), Chairman of the Senate

rising cost of living. They were
also absent when the Liberals
joined with Conservatives in yvot-
ing against controls and national-
ization. The Labour Government
won on both divisions.

The names of two of the absent
Liberals, Lady Megan Lloyd
George, deputy party leader and
daughter of the late Lloyd George
and Emrys Roberts, originally ap-
peared as sponsors of the rising
costs’ motion. The third absentee
was Edgar Granville.

Political observers suggested
they abstained because they did
not want the motion to go beyond
a general discussion, when it was,

——





INTRANSIT to Trinidad yesterday by the “Gascogne” was the Indico
Commissioner for the Caribbean Area, Shri Anand Mohan Sahay.

ment.

Accompanied by his daughter he is en route to take up his appoint |

He is pictured here with his danghter at the Baggage Warehous

yesterday.



TRADE BETWEEN INDIA.

AND W.L.MUST BE MUTUAL

Says New Indian Commissioner

Labour Committee and Senator
Millard Tydings (Maryland)
Chairman of the Armed Ser-
vices Committee who went down
after 24 years in the Senate.

pressed to the vote, they backed
out. —Can, Press.



Tory M.P’s Want
To Know Shipping
. Plans For -W.1.

(From Our Own Correypondent)

LONDON, Nov. 8.,
Conservative MP’s here will
shortly take action to try to bring

The loss of these four leading
cffice holders was an even greater
blow to Democrat prestige by the
fact that only senator’ was

known

n by a
politician. He fell to Pennsylva-
nia's Governor, 69-year-old Duff.
In addition to their four main
defeats, the Democrats lost senate
seats in California and Idaho.

Mrs. Helen (Douglas, former|about an improvement in the
film actress was swamped in theishipping sé@rvices between this
tide of votes for the Republican|country and the West Indies. !t

member of the House of Repre-
sentatives, Richard Nixcn, whose
work on the House of Un—-Ameri-
can Activities Committee brought
to public attention evidence which
resulted in the conviction of Alger
Hiss for perjury.

The Republican tide in Cali-

was learned today that the West
Indies Sub-Committee are to ballot
for an adjournment of the debave
on shipping services between the
U.K,, and the Caribbean, In addi.
tion Mr, James Griffiths, Colonial
Secretary who recently told the
1 House that no practical plans hac
fornia also swept James Roose-| yet been submitted for improving
velt, eldest son of the late Presi- | chipping services between the
dent Franklin Roosevelt for the | United Kingdom and the Carih-
state governorship . |bean, is to be asked exactly what
The present Governor, Ez:!/|plang have so far been submitted
Warren was re-elected with dou-|ang by whom.
ble the votes polled for Roosevelt.
Mr. Peter Smithers, Secretary

—Reuter.

of the West Indies Sub-Committee
said that in addition Conservatives
are anxidus at the earliest oppor-
tunity to have a_ half-day
Commons devoted to West India”
affairs.





Malan Progresses

PRETORIA, Nov. 8.
Prime Minister Daniel Malan
continued today to make excep-
tionally good progress after the
operation, his doctor reported.
Doctors stated yesterday that the
pperation on’ his urinary system

was not serious. —Can, Press.

shipping services,

chief obstacle to

services would benefit the

ea — e
; degree by an increase in trade,



Labour Defeated

LONDON, Nov. 8

in

Referring to the question of
Mr. Smithers
said monetary difficulties were the
improvements.
But he pointed out that improved
im-
porters of British goods and thet
as a long-term view it was a con-
‘eivable loss on passenger services
that would be balanced to some

































PAYING HIS FIRST VISIT to the West Indies to take up
his duties as Indian Commissioner for the Caribbean arc
Shri Anand Mohan Sahay told the Advocate yesterday tha:

Price:

FIVE CENTS |

5%,



Flames Rise 21,000 Feet

Over Bombed Town ~

Reds 45 Miles
From Lhasa

NEW DELHI, Novy. 8,

Developments in Tibet are
understood to have given impet.
to “certain non-Communist elc
aents” in Nepal to reinforce thei
ong standing demand for popul.
Government.

The pressure for political reform:
n the world’s only Hindu Kin,
‘om, in its evergreen Himalayn:
valley has grown with the advanc
of the Chinese-led Tibetan “liber-
ation forces” towards the Nepales
border

The Chinese-led
People’s army

Tibeta:
advancing acros
Tibet on Lhasa the capita
vas last reported less than 4
liles away

In Lhasa the new _interi)
abinet has ordered troops of tl
Lhasa Garrison not to resi
dyancing columns
—Renter



New East German
Govt. Formed

BERLIN, Novy. 8,

The East German Parliame)
today re-elected Herr Otto Grote
wohl as Prime Minister.

This followed the formal resig
nation of the provisional Govern
ment today anounced at the fir
meeting of the new Parliament.

The (ull list of new members o
the Cobinet will be announced
the Assembly’s first workir
session on November 15

The new Cabinet is to be ii
creased by the addition of tw
Vice-Premiers. The new East Ge
nan Government will have fiy
nsteed of three Vice-Premie
giving a wider representation
he five permitted parties in tl
joviet Zone,

Today's meeting unanimous
agreed to the formation of a Sta’
Planning Commission to be direc
y responsible to the Cabinet «
Ministers

This new East German admini

direct trade between India and the West Indies must be} tration is to be charged with ti

mutual in order to be prosperous and successful.
that India could supply to the West Indies which would ke
of mutual interest would certainly be encouraged.

ae HLL oh Sate Corinissoner wis” wi.
Jintransit from England on te

BUTLER | members of the Indian Commun-

| ity. He left later in the evening

Is ANGR Y | for Trinidad, his headquarters, ana

| Gaseogne yesterday, was met by
was accompanied by his daugnte



(FeGm. Our Own Core pacers) played a very important part ana

Anything} execution of the five year econom

plan due to start in January nex
ear —Reuter.

POPE SIGNS
PAPAL BULL

VATICAN CITY, Novy, 8
Pope Pius XII to-day signed thi



He said that shipping, no acubt,| 600 word Papal Bull by which hy

proclaimed to the Catholic worl.

7 . 5 sir § ,) last week, the new Dogma of the
PORT-OF-SP. ; a great deal of their Shipping :

Mr. Tuba? Uriah OG Mev, 5, industry was being developed Bodily Assumption af the Blessea

ful labour leader is very angry | Md as it grew, they would have} Virgin Mary into Heaven. In an

: certain lines going to other parts informal ceremony in his private

because he, or one of his party of

six did not obtain a seat in the |Of the world, In_ having such
Executive Council, which would close connections with the V/est
automatically have meant u| indies, they would have cer ain

lines operating in this area, and
it would be of great interest to
him te know that gocds could be
supplied from the West Indies to
India and vice versa, Their inc.us
tries were making very healthy

the country, making wild speeches
abusing and even threatening the
Governor, Sir Hubert Ranee, and
promising to bring -about the
downfall of the Government in
two years.

Ministerial post, He is ‘ani











manufactured goods to many
eountries of Asia and Africa anc
he would be glad to know if he
could be of any service im” that
respect to importers in the \/e

Indies,

He came out to the West Indie:
ta serve, because of the friendship
between India and the Caribbean
and was very happy that he hac
got the assignment to serve suct
a good cause,

He hoped
the fullest co-operation from
the Press in his efforts to do
good to both countries benvause
the importance of the Press
such matters was a little exag
gerated.

His policy will be the polit
of his Government and he w'sh«
to make earnest efforts to crea’:

Even the Speaker, Mr. William
Savary, Trinidad-born ex-judge,
did not escape, but attacks made
on him by Mr. Butler is making
nis presence felt in other diree-
tions too, Several strikes are in
progress in different parts of the
island. He is also attempting to
encroach on the preserves of othe:
Trade Unions. In Port—of—Spain,
for instance, he is trying to win
over the dockworkers from the
Seamen and Waterfront Workers
Union to his own polyglot organi-
sation, So far, he has .not mct
with much success,

he would receiv

But with such an unpredictab.-
rabble-rousing Bible carrying in-
dividual at large, anything may
happen in this Colony which his

took 37 days from Madeira to Barbados.

The Labour Government was
defeated today ky 235 votes to 229
——but on an issue which does not
mean its resignation. It was on
a proposal by Kenneth Pickthorn

(Conservative) to restore the
right of members ito have ten
minutes before debate in which
to introduc2 their cwn private
bills —Reuter




is that Mr. Butler

as one fellow said in Port-of

quiet him,”

A»piquanteumour in Trinidad
is to wed:
When I went to see him last week
ie said ‘no, no” to that query, but

Spain, “if he gets a wife she may

an abundance of explosive a better understanding betwer
material, and I am not referring the Indians and other commun
to the oilfields. So Trinidad may 7 oF ee preere ee ;
be said to be holding its breath, nae (rede ee oe i. yp
mel WepaerIng, “WRSS Hee: Caribbean should work whole-

heartedly for the progress ap
prosperity of the area, their new!
atflopted home, and in that, they
shold co-operate with all other
communities as it would bring
credit to India itself and will be



@ On Page $

Yacht From Scotland Arrives In B’dos
37 Days From. Madeira

AMERICAN born John P, Noble
from New Orleans and a twenty-
three-year-old Scotsman William
Sturreck are in Barbados today
having crossed the Atlantic in the

| 82 ft. yacht “Oregon”. Heaving
from Madeira it took them 37 days
to get to Barbados on Tuesday.

They sailed about one hundred
miles a day except when they
were becalmed for seven days,

They had originally planned to go
to Kingston, Jamaica, but after
they were becalmed and food be-
came short, they decided to change
eourse for Barbados

John Noble told the Adyocate
yesterday that their voyage began
July 29th when they set sail
from Dundee in Seotland taking
a week to reach France From
there they “went to Spain which
took them twelve days ard they
\ another twelve days getting
to Madeira
Noble has been in England for
ten years. In 1940 he volunteer-

certian naa

ed for the R.A.P.

as a Sergeant
Pilot and transferred over the

out of Madeira, losing two head-
sails. About a week after this

American Airforce when they| we were becalmed. On the way
came into the war, as a night| out, several Flying Fish flew on
fighter, flying a “Mosquito”. After| board ahd the fishing was grand
the war he spent three vears at|In all we caught three doradoes
Edinburgh University studying| and three sharks, each over seven
medicine. After that he lived i | feet long.

Dundee, where he learnt to sai} “We first sighted Barbados on
“T learnt the hard way,” he said,}; Sunday, when we picked up
“spending a winter in the North| Ragged Point Lighthouse, but due



Sea learning how to sail,



proverbail North Sea weather.”
Forth Yacht Club.

‘At the beginning of this year
was
time to go home, and it avas about)
this time that I fell in love with
to buy

he continued, ‘I decided it

the
her

Oregon and decided
and sail home.’

Storm

“We had a smooth trip until we
We

left Madeira on October Ist.”

met a terrific storm seven day

ex-
periencing several gales and the;
“I| Carlisle Bay via South Point.”
was then a member of the Rayal|

to another spot of calm it took us
until Tuesday to work around to

Their engine which usually
worked very well, would not
Start.

The two yachtsmen plan ‘|
sail to Jamaica where Sturrock

has friends. There, they will sell
the yacht and Noble will go from
there to New Orleans by ship
‘I'm sure looking forward to see
ing my family after ten years.”
Noble’s father is a Supervisor
the Texas Oil Company’s Branch
‘at Marrero, New Orleans

t
at

upartment at the Vatican Palace he
signed the parchment decree with
the simple Latin words “Ego Pius
Catholicae Ecelesae Episeopus”
For his signature the Pope used a
ilver perm modelled like a quill
dipped in a silver ink-stand decor
ated with a figure of the Virgin
rising into Heaven It had beer

progress and they were supplying ; presented to him specially for the

ceremony by members of the Sod-

alities of Mary
—Keuter.

* . .
3 Die By Poisoning
GEORGETOWN, Novy. 8
Three children who were giver
poison in error died within 4f
hours at Georgetown Public Hos-

pital The mother says she gave
each child gq dose of cascara but
cocte: believe that strychnine

as administered by mistake



The children collapsed at thei
village home on the west coas’
ef Demerara, 15 minutes after
taking the medicine and were
rushed to the Georgetown hos:
pital Doctors battled for thel
lives unsuccessfully, —Reuter.
Newspaper Manager
Put In Court
JOHANNESBURG, Nov. 8
The General Manager and New
Editor of South Africa’s bigger
Sunday newspaper the Johan-

nerburg Sunday Times appeare
n @ Magistrate’s court at the
{ Preparatory examination of alle
gations of contravention of ths

British Official Secrets Act her
today

Mr. E. &, Dawson is Gener
Manager and Mr. R. F. S. Dew

ney is News Editor of the Johan
nesburg Sunday Times.

No evidence was heard in the
case, whieh was remanded to De-
cember 4,

No intimation was given of the
reason for the postponement. Bail
of £500 was allowed. —(Reuter.)

SUDDEN DEATH

Emanuel Christian of Bay Street
died suddenly last night about
8.30 o'clock while he was in the
pick-up A—75 which wag trav-



elling along Black Rock. The
body was carried to the Public
Mortuary after the Police had

heen notified



Rank-holiday
Notice

There will be no pub-
lication of the Advocate

to-morrow, The ne x |
issue will appear on
Saturday.

|



ate

By JULIAN BATES

TOKYO, Nov. 8.

EIGHTY American Sypertorts today wrecked
nine-tenths of the Communists’ new
Sinuiju in a raid described here as ‘one of the

precision jobs of the Korean war’’.

They left it a mass of

flames with smoke rising

21,000 feet. A jet fighter pilot who made a recon-
naissance over it afterwards said that 90 per cent:
of the city was destroyed.

The principal objective of the attack was “to elimi-
nate Sinuiju as a communication centre’. Some
Superforts carrying 650 tons of bombs pin-pointed
on the Korean side the spans of both double tracked
railway bridges crossing the Yalu River between
Sinuiju and Antung on the Manchurian side.

Strikers Will
Lose Jobs
In B.G.

(From Ousx. Own Correspond nt

GEUnGH OWN, B.G. Nov, 8

The atiermah of the recent
itrike of Government subordinave
smployees is the following direc-
ive from the Government to ali
iepartmental heads requesting
chem to note instructions for com
pliance.

“If any employee did not re-
port for duty in the course of
Saturday, November 4, he
should be notified that he is
considered to have vacated his
post. He should not be re-
employed unless there are
grounds for special consider-
ation in which case the prior
authority of the Government for
such re-employment should be
sought and obtained.

The period of an employee’:
absence from duty during th:
strike should be entered in red
ink on his history sheet as a
break in service. The question,
whether this break in service
can be disregarded for superan-
nuation purposes will be ¢on
sidered at a later date, In ne
circumstances should any salary
or wages be paid for the perio
of an employee's absence from
duty”

All was quiet on the labow
front with the exception of the

sugar estates whi
token anaes is Sift in progress.

The Manpower Citizens Associ-
ation today notified the Govern-
roent under the Labour Laws that
a dispute exists between employ-
ees and employers of the Demer-

are Electric Company and was
isking for the appointment under
the Ordinance of an Advisory

Committee to investigate. Accord-
ing to Labour Laws the Governor
must appoint a Committee within
30 days or the workers may call a
Jawful strike



ALPINE GUIDES FIND
PLANE

CHAMOUNIX, France, Noy. 8.
French Alpine guides haye
reached the place where the Air
India Constellation crashed near
the top of Mt. Blane last Friday.

The wreckage was at 4,670
i, just below the summit of
Mt. Blanc. Reuter,








the two weeks |

One pilot said: “We taid, our
bombs right on the nose.”

All erews were carefully briefed
to aveid the Manchurian side of
the Yalu River and to turn south-
east after their bombing runs s9
that they would not viclate the
border.

American fighter-bombers who
went in ahead of the Supertorts
to silence the North Korean anti-
aircraft positions, reported heavy
anti-aircraft fire from the Man-
churian side of the river,

Sinuiju, a city of 10,000 which
the Nerth Koreans have used ag
their capital since the fall af
Pyongyang, has two railway mars
shalling vyerds ind a large
powder mugszine

The United States Far East air
forces flew more than 650 sorties
over Korea in the past 24 hours,
including “constant offensive air
combat patrol’ over the extreme
northwest of Korea at Sinuiju, it
was announced today

Three other Communist jets
were damaged later today in @
dog fight with American fighters.
over northwest Korea, but no furs
ther details of this battle have yet
been reported here,

On the east coast, marine fight«
ers inflicted heavy casualties on a
three-mile-long column ef Come
munists—estimated between bat+
talion strength and regiment
strength which was ‘heading
north from the Wonsan area, .

The general situation had been
“improved and stabilised,” he
added, as British, American and

South Koreans had regained con-

tact with Communists in almost

arews after 36hours | 7

Aa Intelligence officer said that
the Communists were not affected
by a shortage of supplies in their
sudden withdrawal from combat
contact on Sunday, as they could
bring up material from the Man-
churian border in the hours of
darkness without effective inter-
ference from the United Nations’
warplanes.

This was the position ereung
the front according to the lates
report

The American Ist Cavalry
Division north of Kunuri, threw
oack probing attacks.

Reuter.

—_—

TELL THE ADVOCATE

THE NEWS
Ring 3113 Day or Night.
oe THE ADVOCATE

PAYS FOR NEWS.



GUARDIAN

ASSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

















Established 1821

a

CLASSES OF BUSINESS
TRANSACTED INCLUDE—

FIRE

CONSEQUENTIAL FIRE LOSS
(Including Loss of Profits)

PERSONAL ACCIDENT
EMPLOYERS’ LIABILITY
PUBLIC LIABILITY
BURGLARY
CASH IN TRANSIT
“ALL RISKS”

BAGGAGE AND PERSONAL EFFECTS

PROSPECTUSES RELATING TO ANY OF THE ABOVE
CLASSES OF BUSINESS MAY BE OBTAINED UPON
APPLICATION TO LOCAL AGENTS—

S.P. MUSSON SON & CO., LTD.

Broad Street
Telephone

4465

<< oes


PAGE TWO



Carth Calling —

Returned Yesterday |
R. AND MRS, BOB KING who |



SEEN CHATTING at the Baggage Warchouse yesterday shortly after
their return from England by the “Gascogne” are Mr. and Mrs. “Bob”

King and Mrs. H. A. Melville.

Tâ„¢ INDIAN COMMUNITY in
Barbados held ‘a luncheon
party at the Marine Hotel yester-

day in honour of Shri Anand
Mohan Sahay, Indian Commis-
sioner for the Caribbean area

with headquarters in Trinidad.
Among those present were Col.
R. T. Michelin, Commissioner of
Police, Hon’ble V. C. Gale, M.L.C.,
Mr. G. H. Adams, M.C.P., Miss
Sahay, Mr. W. A. Crawford,
M.C.P., Mr. R. G. Mapp, M.C.P..
Mr. D. F. Blackett, Mr. Kirp: al-
ani, Mr. Gidwani, Mr. T. Mara),
Mr.D. A Thani, and Mr. N. E.

Wilson. ai@
Intransit

NTRANSIT passengers on the

Gascogne yesterday for Trini-
dad en route to B.G. were Mr. and
Mrs. Hugh Evelyn. They are on
their way home after four,
months’ holiday in England. Mr
Evelyn is with Barclays Bank in’
Georgetown,

Hugh is an old Lodge boy and
will be probably better known to
his old school chums as ‘Pinhead’,
whieh was his nickname when
he Was at school.

For Trinidad Holiday

EAVING on the “Gascogne’

- yesterday for Trinidad on
three weeks’ holiday were Mr.
Ha Spencer, Chief Clerk of
the easury and Mrs. Spencer.

Mrs. Spencer who is a Trini-
dadian, is paying her first visit
back home in many years and is







left Barbados in July re-
turned from England yesterday
morning by the Gascogne. Mr.
King who Was in England mostly
on business is a Director of Messrs.
Alleyne Arthur and Co., Ltd. They
also visited. France and Scotland

Were At The Santa Maria
R. AND MRS. ‘Bill’ Grace
returned from Grenada yes-

terday afternoon by B.W.I.A.

Mr. Grace who is Managing

Director of W. S. Monroe and Co ,

Ltd., went chiefly on business to

Grenada and also visited St.

Lucia. Mrs, Grace was in Grenada

on holiday. They were guests

at the Santa Maria Hotel.

Glad To Be Back
FTER five months’ | oliday in
England, Rev. and Mrs. H. A.

Melville returned yesterday morn-
ing by the Gascogne. Several of
their relatives were at the Baggage
Warehouse to meet them, Mrs.
Melville told Carib that they had
enjoyed their holiday immensely
but they were glad to be home.

Rev. Melville is the Vicar of
St. Ambrose Church.

Prize Possession

R. J. A. COCKBURN, En-

gineer of the Antigua Sugar
Factory, accompanied by his wife
and two sons, Bruce and Colin
arrived by the Gascogne yester-
day morning and left four hours
later for Antigua by B.W.LA.

Prize possession which they
brought with them from England
was a_ recording of the West
Indies Victory calypso.

Another passenger arriving by
the Gascogne. and leaving for
Antigua by B.W.LA. yesterday
was Miss Vida Abbott who is also
w:th the Antigua Sugar Factory.

Rum Publicity

HAT does tt benefit a :nan
who wins the Jamaica Rum

Here Again
ACK IN BARb#4DOS for the
winter is Mr. A. P. Taylor,
retired pensioner of ithe Canadian
Bank of Commerce He arrived
from Montreal yesterday morning
on the “Canadian Cruiser” and is
staying at the Windsor Hotel,
Back From Martinique
R. K, M. B, SIMON who was
spending a holiday in Mar-
tinique, returned by the Gascogne
yesterday morning.
Jamaican Historian
Seen Mrs, Amy
Garvey, who recently re-
turned to Britain after an exten-
sive tour of Africa, is busy writing

a history of Liberia. When asked Cocktail Competition of Great
why she had picked on this Britain—apart from the prize
subject Mrs, Garvey replied: “We Money and the cup presented by

the organisers? This was a ques-
tion put to A, C. Davidge of the

1 the West know
wiveria. We have heard of may

nothing of

scundals—financial and_ political Rekeotnen were one =
—but we have never taken Com n _ We
Liberia and Liberians serious!y ‘necked out this year by Sidney

as we should.” As soon ag she has C°X of the Connaught Rooms, Lon-

don, who went on to win the title.

completed this work Mrs, Garvey os : :

hopes to visit the West Indies on S#id Davidge, “You would be

lecture tour “ ampzed at the publicity arising

* ‘ fro this competition. It does

i 188i not last all year round but it

Sizing: Commitesion | the cettainly brings a temporary in-

+ telly 4 h commission ¢ crease in the calls for Jamaica
enquiry, headed by Sir John 'â„¢? cocktails.

Try This

And if you want to know what

\/addington, who are leaving for
British Guiana to devise a new
colony.













BARBADOS ADVOCATE



HATMAKING



IN GRENADA



THE WOMEN of Hopeland and Marquis, villages along the
road from St. George’s to Grenville in Grenada. British
West Indies, never stop working. As they go about their
business their hands are working the whole time, busily

plaiting a local pine to make sun-hats worn all over the
isiand,

The wild pine grows along the
sides of the road, where it is gath-
ered by the women. It is boiled
and when dry is stripped into con-
venient lengths and widths for
plaiting. Hats are made up and
coloured by locally bought dyes,
It takes a whole day to plait
enough material to make a large-
brimmed hat, and half an hour to
sew it up. The finished hats are





Stella The Star

Gtr ROLE at New York's big-

gest society function of the
season, to take place this month,
will be played by 18-year-old
Ste‘la Jebb, daughter of Britain’s
U.N delegate, Sir Gladwyn Jebb.
She will represent Princess Eliza-
beth in a tableau of the royal
wedding to be staged by couturier

skilfully made and many of them
have the added attraction of being
colourful and pretty in design.
This picture shows: In her shop in
Grenville is Josephine Sitney,
whose handpainted hats have in-

reduced a new vogue in Grenada

and elevated the straw hat into
millinery status.

Picture circulated September 1950

Norman Hartnell.



By permission

of the Queen, Hartnell is flying

from London with duplicates of
the wedding and_ bridesmaids’
dresses.

The news has revived American

offers to buy the duplicate wed-
ding ensembles, But Hartnell vT
say “No,” .







AQUATIC ULUD CENEMA (Members Only)

TO-NIGHT at %. 30 p.m.
ida LUPINO—Paul HENREID—Olivia De HAVILLAND

A Warner Bros.
BRONTE Sisters—CHA

“DEVOTION”

Picture, telling the life-story of the
ARLOTTE

EMILY and ANNE

William THACKERAY and Charles DICKENS _ also appear in this story

FRIDAY TO
TUESDAY NIGHT
at 8.30






MAUREER OHARA
MELVYN BOUGLAS
GLORIA GRAHAME
BILL WILLIS in

















Housewives Guide

Prices of Squash and Lettuce
when the Advocate checked
yesterday were:

Squash 24 cents per lb.
Lettuce 3 cents per head



B.B.C. PROGRAMMES

sHURSDAY, Nuv. ¥, thot
4 am. ane News. (WwW ain News
‘Mays. 749 am. Csose own. 12 woun
ane inew i41u pan, News Analysis,
«a9 pm. Programme Parade, lz.16 p.m.
ees wnome, s pm. Geraid barry
~ Admin, 1.45 pam, Radio Newsreet. 1.50
pom mays a Laugh. 2 p.m. The News
ss” p.m. Home News From Britain, 2.15
apors Keview. 2.30 King up the
rtain. 3.30 pom. Round Briain Quiz
. wm. The News. 4.10 p.m. The Daily
~ vice. 415 p.m, Biigh of the sounty

+45 p.m. The Cathedral Organs. 5 p.m.
Cnoice. 3.15 p.m. Lord Mayors
Jay. 5.45 p.m, Programme Parade. 6 p.m.
vues Verity. 6.15 p.m. Merchant Navy
ewsletter. 6.30 p.m. Educating Archie
7 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m. News Ana-
tySis. 7.15 p.m, We See Britain. 7.45 p.in.
uo.d Mayor’s Day. 8 p.m. Radio News-
cel. 615 p.m. United Nations Report
«we p.m. Composer of the Week. 8.30
pas. Cerald Barry Speaking. 8.45 p.m.
coink on these Things. 9 p.m. Canter-
bury Cathedral. 10 p.m, The News. 10.19
pm. From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m
Vanessa Lee. 10.45 p.m. Special Dispatch.
11 p.m. Close Down.

wrers



FRIDAY, NOV

7 am. The News.
Analysis. 7.15 a.m. Close Down. 12 Noon
The News. 12.10 p.m. News Analysis
12.15 p.m. New Records. 1 p.m. The De-
bate Continues, 1.15 p.ni. Radio News-
reel, 1.30 p.m. The Adventures of P.C. 49
2 p.m. The News, 2.10 p.m. Home News
From Britain. 2.15 p.m. Sports Review
2.30 p.m, English Songs. 3 p.m. Canter-
vury Cathedral. 4 p.m, The News. 4 10
»m, The Daily Service. 4.15 p.m. Nights
it the Opera. 5 p.m. Sandy MacPherson
et the Theatre Organ. 5.15 p.m. Pro-
tramme Parade. 5.30 p.m, Scottish Maga-
ne. 6 p.m. The Music Goes Round. 6.3)
»m. Priest and Pagan. 6.50 p.m. Inter-
ide. 7 p.m. The News. 7.10 p.m. News

10, 1950
7.10 am, News

Analysis 7.15 p.m, West Indian Diary.
7.45 p.m. What the Londoner Doesn't
Know, 8 p.m. Radio Newsreel. 8.15 p.m,

United Nations Report. 8.20 p.m. Com-
208er of the Week. 8,30 p.m, The Debate
sontinues.

| 8.45 p.m. BBC Symphony
Irchestra. 9.45/ p.m Communism in
*ractice. 10 p.m, The News. 10.10 p.m,
om the Editorials. 10.15 p.m. The Ad-

| ventures of P.C. 49. 10.45 p.m. World

\flairs. 11 p.m. Close Porn? iis

‘Gland Discovery
Restores Youth
‘In 24 Hours

| Sufferers from loss of vigour, nervous-
ess, weak body, impure blood, failing
memory, and who are old and worn-out
vefore their time will be delighted to learn
of a new gland discovery by an American
| Doctor.
| This new discovery makes it possible to
quickly and easily restore vigour to your
glands and body, to build rich, pure blood,
to strengthen your mind and memory and
feel like a new man in only 8 days. In fact,
| tuts discovery which Is a home medicine in
| pleasant, easy-to-take tablet form, does
way with gland operations and begins to
build new vigour and enerry n 24 hours,
yet it is absolutely harmless "natural in
«ction. a
The success of this"umazing discovery.
called Vi-Tabs has been so great in Amer-























THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1950



oes

PLAZA Theatre-—sRiDGETOWN
3 SHOWS TO-DAY 3—1.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

Special Planters Matinee Friday 1.30 (please note time)
Also 445 & 8.30 p.m.
SATURDAY (4 Shows) 9.30 a.m., 1.30, 445 & 830 p.m
and continuing indefinitely 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
Cecil B. De Mille’s

“SAMSON AND DELILAH”

Color by Technicolor

All Tiekets booked mast be taken up sot later thin
5.0 p.m. or same will be sold after that time
N.B.—All Complimentary Tickets are cancelled for this Pieture !

PLAZA Theatre m= OISTIN

Last ¢ Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.40 p.m Warner's Double

“HER KIND OF MAN” & “ROMANCE on the HIGH SEAS”

Special Matinee TO-DAY % p.m. (Monogram’s Action Double!) .
Dunean Renalde as Cisco Kid “IN OLD NEW MEXICO”
Jimmy WAKELY in “SONG OF THE Y

FRIDAY, SAT., SUN, 5 & 8.30 p.m. (New Picture)
Bros. presents :
“HOUSE ACROSS THE STREET”
with Wayne Morris, Janis Paige, Bruce Bennett
“COLORADO TERRITORY”

with Joel MeCrea—Virginia Mayo
A Warnet Bros. Double





(Special Notice :



Warner

And

Midnite Sat: “MARINE RAIDERS” plus 2 Leon Errol Shorts

GQAHRETY (The Garden) ST. JAMS

Last ¢ Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.
Warners’ Action Double !

“DEEP VALLEY”
Dane Clarke

FRIDAY, SAT, SUN. 8.30 MAT. SUN. 5 p.m.

20th Century Pox presents Tyrone Power in

and Ida LUPINO
“THE CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE

GLOBE THEATRE

Today and Tomorrow 5 and 8.30 p.m.

THE WOLF MAN

(LON CHANEY — BELA LUGOSI)

THE MUMMY’S TOMB

(BORIS KARLOFF)

“CHEYENNE”
Dennis Morgan





Plus Tonite and Tomorrow

The HAPPY FOUR Orchestra

BERMUDA’S JAM SPECIALISTS
Half Hour of Foreign Music

PIT 20 — HOUSE 36 — BAL. 48 — BOX 60





































constitution for that sort of rum cocktails people drink 1a that it is now being distributed by all cumin oncecnngamamm tine neem,
looking forward to an enjoyable Plans have now been completed in England, then try this recipe MATINEES re A $e cinas EMPIRE ROYAL
stay with her relatives and many {or the party to travel by ait, which was invented by Sidney words, Vi-Tabs must make you fee! full of
friends. serie, tee ie te of Poe Mg og Wioeangeck one younger, or you merely return the empty ||] To-day 4.45 and 8.30 and To-day 4.30 Only
“e y tI 2 ’ - DAC e a
Returned On Tuesday veck ao release: ‘Goshspation Pineaule juice, a dash of fresn FRIDAY AND bial, double-strength bottle of 48 Viv Tabs Continuing Indefinite enavies ue?
b ~ Senin of Flatisscan of a provisional booking for 'emon juice, Prag of o mnie Vi-Tabs guarantee, Sd the Mat, and Night Daily dere
ited of n en a really goc . ; *
La Popping woe oat. 4p Sean tne cialis enas tne once shaking can assure you the SATURDAY Jlestores_ Manhood and Vitality Julian Blausten Production nae
turn m a week’s visi o = . sty. Of course we cata
i t has been received the com- result is very tasty. Sloe y
par Rey. Se ae pimion will be all ready to leave, here would use Barbados rum. 5 p-m. | 1. he vu Bent’ k “ BROKEN ARRO ” sien ne 8-00 2 -
¥ “Fz iy . i . a a ?
n. COLIN WEEKES, Costs Rupert’s Autumn Primrose—7 ce | Color By Technicolor « CADROUPE inn
Officer at well, Who... ie CLE ANER Starring JAMES. STEWART For the Last Time at the
was in witenade Tr : few ‘says * | with Royal
“Tequrnepsesteaaey | Ares noor G L O B E T 1 H E A T R E | Jeff CHANDLER — Debra To eee aera
B.W.LA, He was away on PAGET and Basil RUYS- Friday Only at 4.30 and 8.30
business, | BRIDGETOWN ? DAEL—Will GEER Republic Big Double
Don AMECHE
aes OPENING TO-MORROW | ° e Catherine McLEOD
‘ ‘I| 2. The Advoeate invites ew
J and 6.30 pm. \ your suggestions in ROXY WILL TOMORROW EVER
|! not more than 200 Last Two Shaw To- ~day ci
words. #.80 and “MAN FROM OKLAIOMA”
Q ‘ M-G-M Big Double w oy
3. The best suggestion ea eee ie Dale EVANS
j Ode! Abie rat os aa eee
Rupert determines to try for the for my last try,"’ murmurs the little to be received not d Opening Saturday to
special peize » and taking the bell t. senna, great coms fe trees later than December vor e cies Tt .
irae salt a ane, ate Uo ci, Su sit ||| go wittreeeive ‘ THREE “GODFATHERS”
rows. . B |
be, dem Syey MeoMRae See ay aac |] son. “THE BRIBE
ee lacite eries his pal, :
wat duke" lage Rupe Rupert, ‘1 stares a anonlahyiet. PMercy 00 4. Apane] of three ‘OLYMPIC
other one!"’ us,” she says. one a judges to be an- ” Vo-d
‘ whole ik | “ ‘o-day and Tomorrow
Across he second ba ve ie wide. New __ done thas the teen | nounced later w i 1 1 BIG “TACK 4.30 and 8.15
\. kts eaves are much used tor | === : decide the winning with Wallace BEERY— M-G-M Big Double
feeding silkworms. (8) ; : ent a Claude JARMAN and
9. From which you may prepare ry. Richard CONTE pene BRIAN
nutritious starch. (9) 3 Snows To-DAY e
10. This set 8p yout gone 48! 5. Enclose attached To-morrow oe Sunday “INTRUDER IN THE
§ i 4.45 and 15 .
1a" pomeanitie tor ¢ the litter? (3) L30 - 4.45 and 8.30 p- wee. an with each * DUST’
15. Often quickly noticed on the 3 M entry. W. Lee Presents . and
7. “You *pave’ a” nimble, wit. | SPECIAL PLANTERS MATINEE FRIDAY 1,30 P.M, \:siewidioad anal ompieinen. vanes Aseoie”
re think ‘twas made of ——'s heels © (Please Note Time) Also 4.45 and 8.30 p.m. MARGARET plassipeientdiatlbguer Ace a iS Cesar ROMERO and June with
tri you Like 1b"). 16) SATURDAY (4 SHOWS) 9.30 a.m. — 1.30 — 4.45 and or Margaret O’BRIEN and
19; Sue eeorines’ she: pin 'T: wag 8.30 p.m, and Continuing Indefinitely 4.45 and 8.30 p.m. LOCKWOOD [ B [ Angel LANSBURY
23. re a disguise. (4) ’ e 2 . a mr
& mist ouenoe a | Cecil B. DeMille's Masterpiece DENNIS PRICE (7% “ONCE A THIRE Saturday, Sunday and
2. gris vite 2 sairection-. ($) . | AN HUNTER ll | Monday 4.30 and 8.15
; Down re IAG aca Nhs haw ss Co-Starring . United Artists Double
1. Opion that Is outside the T.U.C, | JOAN NGA “CHAMPAGNE FOR
‘ ! A i CAESAR"
4 SOyeirend ina hurry. (6) GREENWOOD in | Address ....... see epee and “COVER UP”
3. You'll find 16 is one, (4) |
4. Found in 4 sewer extraordinary ' |
5 To. yA ALS equ | POSS OPOPPO PSS PSSST PSS DOSPOPP EP FOOT ee ee
ave ‘
. Wi tf ooking. (7) a ion so my .
Shore [reterence to recent < A PERFECT WAY TO SPEND THIS HOLIDAY 3
f Gnthinking ppereur may bring ! |e ae : %
: 3 {om the novel “THE WHITE UNICORN’ s G I be h %
ib ES tea ae om | Q& seeeetece enececeeme se ” aa Saat < TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. Globe Theatre §
18 {te Holding capacity depends on ee a heuniele A JOHN CORFIELD Production x i 3
20 Lie Feterence to it suggests eS one by Harold Huth ¢ “THE WOLE MAN” (Lon Chaney & Hela Lugosi) x
“Gee || PLAZA THEATRE | (=== os
the ‘answer. ¢
2%. This duct is manufacturea (3) ‘ ‘ van ; x
1 SBuugn gt smurdays ounae gerRte | HRIDGETOWN a “THE MUMMY'S TOMI” (Boris Karloff) :
41 iswe, 12" Old." 15. Rococo: 14, suem SPECIAL NOTICE—All Tickets Booked must be taken up not Plus ‘
25 usd Bi, Fete 22 ves, 28: Code . later than 8.30 p.m. or same will be sold after that time) x EXTRA TO-NITE! ON STAGE %
Dene 3 te Ree lotnde rts echits *: 48. N.B.—AlU complimentary tickets are cancelled for this picture. LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE x , %
Wem I | 179999999999 99SSSS999994 FIVE SO TO HOII ITO T OOS | : :
ae : RA aa ij BERMUDAS :
i *
~HANDBAGS_ a :
(Long & Short Handles) | { ecure ours 0- ay x s
PATENT & MOROCCO 4 % B () P 3
FIN | :
| 2
WHITE ’ {
BLACK | KARLIT INSULATING WALL BOARD | SPECIALIST
)
TAN t Termite Proof %
RED { a ‘3
wi ss eae ions nla aaa ls 1 Sheets : 42” X 4’ 6’, 7, 8’, 9’ and 10 .
| S { ¢ -
IS | * THE
i‘ “
j BEACHSHOR 4 HARD BOARD :
‘or Men & Boys in |i i g
i Termite Proof % ;
| BLUE, WHITE & BEIGE y St un Vv < 6.7 and 8’ & i APPY y
YOUR SHOE STORES \ Sheets : *#" XK 4 X ©, S ‘
° \t ~
| Sharkskin |! ASBESTOS WOOD :
5.80 Sheets: 4’ X 4’, 4 X 8’ x FOUR
SGI... bak EEE | HAND SAWS 24” to 36” in length 8
; ESTRA |
5 s
EVANS and THE BARWADOS Co-opERATIVE ||} ORCH
WHITFIELDS COTTON FACTORY LTD. ¥ :
%,
eve SHOR POR en ce ee ¥1600090860000 665550550000 005000S56 6500000000S0SSSTNSSESTIOSTIOSOSONOSOS.
+ a
‘ ‘ }
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1950 *



C.C. Discusses |
Deep Water
Harbour

}



Members of the Council of!
the Chamber of Comrierce again |
expressed concern at: cheir meet- |
ing yesterday as to what Gov-

ernment intend doing about
proposed deep water harbour. A|/
letter, from the Chamber had
been forwarded to the Govern-
ment on this matter but no
reply has yet-been received.
_Acting Vice-President
V. C. Gale M.L.C. could not
attend the meeting yesterday
and Mr, D. A. Lucie-Smith took
the Chair. Arising out of the
matter of the deep water harbour,
Mr. Lucie-Smith told the mem-
bers he understood that at the
request of the Shipping and
Mercantile Association, the Gov-
ernment had appointed a com-
mittee to look into and report on
the working and operation of the |
port. That was a matter that
concerned the Chamber as well, |
The Shipping and Mercantile
Association had been asked by.!
Government to appoint two mem-
bers to that committee, and he
knew that they had submitted
the names of Mr. W. H. Grannum
and Mr, A. R. Toppin. He under-
stood unofficially that Govern-
ment had or would appoint the
Labour Commissioner and the
Harbour Master and_ that
they had asked Labour to appoint!
two members, probably through
the Barbados Workers’ Union.
When this committée would
be set up he did not know, but
he took it that they would ask
for evidence. He did not know
whether the Chamber would
like to give evidence, ,He knew

the

Hon,

that some members had some
very definite views about the
handling of goods in the ware-
houses, ete,, and might like to
offer some constructive sugges-
tions,
Parking Places
Mr. H. A. C. Thomas referred |

to a letter from the Commissioner !
of Police in reply to one from
the Chamber on the question of
parking places in Bridgetown.

Mr. Thomas said that the
Commissioner had declared his
intention to discuss the matter
with any member of the Chamber,
and he (Mr. Thomas) did not
think they should lose any time
in putting forward their views
to him.

The Council agreed and ap-
pointed Mr, A. del Innis, Mr,
R. M, Cave and Mr. T. O.

Dowding to interview the Com-
missioner on the matter,

In their letter to the Commis
sioner the Chamber had pointed j
out that there were some one-
way streets in the City. where
parking space could be found.

The Council decided that the
Chamber should continue — the
holding of their annual dinners.

The question had been raised
at the last meeting of the Councii!
as to whether it was necessary
to hold the dinner this year and
whether these dinners should be
continued at all, as a good many
members did not seem to be
interested. The Secretary was
instructed to send out a question-
naire to members on the, matter,

He tpla the Council yesterday
that in reply to the question of
the holding of the annual dinners,
59 members had said that they
were in favour as against 37, while
to 20 others the matter was one
of indifference. About the holding
of the dinner this year, 42 hac
promised to attend and 71 did not

| West












e
New Indian |
. * ,
Commissioner
* a Pp
Pays Visit Here
@ From Page i |
of great service and benefit to the}
Indian community here.

He was glad to know that
although these islands in the
Indies were inhabited by
peoples from different parts ol
the world like Africa, Asia, Furope
and America, they all lived like
members of the same farily and
did not observe any recial dis-
crimination or bias, In his opin-
ion, that was an aehievement
which was worth copying by
many other nations of the world
to-day

They were trying to develop
their radio and news service and
the Publicity Department of his
office will be interested in mak-
ing arrangements for better news.

Paying tribute to the late Ma-
hatma Ghandi, the Commissioner
said that it was almest a miracle





|how marvellous their leaders had

managed the same machinery,
which was so complicated, in
spite of all the odds they had.
It was the first time in the his-
tory of the human race that due
to a very unpleasant partition of
their country, millions and mil-
lions of people had to migrate
from one part of United India to
other parts. It was a tremendous
task for any Government to re-
habilitate them.

Adult suffrage was granted to
all in spite of the high -pereentage
of illiteracy, and his Government
would have to. educate the masses
so that they would realise or}
responsibility of the franchise

A medical student at the Indian
Patna University, the Commis-
sioner said that he gave up his
studies .in 1921 and joined the
movement for independenee which
was started by Mahatma Ghandi
about the year before. He was
Private Secretary to Dr. Rajen-|
draprasad, President of India
until 1923 when he left for the
Far East where he remained until |

1946 representing the Thdian
National Congress Independerice
Movement.

He was twice imprisoned for |
short periods, first in 1922 and
then during the last World War
in Singapore, but was released
when some settlement came be-
tween India and England in
1946 when the Cripps Cabinet
Mission visited India,

He returned home in the mid-
dle of 1946 and was interested in
‘the Labour movement and was
President of the Kailway Union
in India.

———

HARBOUR L0G

In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Harviet Whittaker, Sch. D’Ortac,
Seh. Laudalpha, Sch. Lochinvar §,, Sch,
Cyril E, Smith, Sch. Mary M. Lewis,
Seh, Molly N. Jones, Sch. Frances W
Smith, Sch. Mandalay, Sch. Turtle Dove.
M.V. Ferryland, Sch. Lydia Adina 8S.

ARRIVALS

S.S, Gaceogne, 2,681 tons net,
Prigent Francois, from Martinique,

5.5. Canadian Cruiser, 3,935 tons net,
Capt. O'Hara, from Montreal.

American Yaeht Oregon, 4 tons net,
Capt. Nolas, from Dundee.

DEPARTURES

S.S. Goscogne, 2,681 tons net, Capt
ervey Pibeeo for Trinidad.

I - Canadian Cruiser, 3;! tons .
Capt. O'Hara, for St. Vis ne am

In Touch With
Caastal Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd.
advise that they can now communicate
with the following ships through their
Barbados Coast Stations: S.S. Glamor-
gan Seam, S.S. Plymouth, 8.S. Dolores,
Maria De Larrinaga, S.S, Planter,
Lioyderest, S.S. Silver Walnut, 8.5.
Fetterman, S. Uruguay, 5.8.





Capt.



Fort



S.S. Brasil,

Moscow |
Celebrates

Revolution |

LONDON, Nov. 7.



Marshal Budenny, command-|
ing chief of the Russian South-
western Command and member}

of the Supreme Soviet, took the}
salute at today’s march past in|
Moscow's Red Square on the
33rd anniversary of the October
Revolution, Moscow Radio re-

ported.

Colonel General Pavel
miev, Moscow's District
mander, led the parade.

The square was decorated with
huge portraits of Lenin and
Stalin, the coats of arms, and 16
of the Soviet Republics and
Communist party slogans.

Ministers, “world renowned

Arte-
Com-



scientists” and leading writers
and artists watched the parade.
the radio said.

Foreign guests included
Koreans, Chinese, East Germans,
Italians, Frenchmen and Belgians,

“Anglo-American imperialists
have now passed from prepara-
tions for aggression to direct acts
of aggression,” the army leader
said. “Evidence of which is the
vandit intervention by the United
States in Korea.”

“The Soviet people tcegether
with other freedom lovirg people
would brand with shame Ameri-
can aggressors and express their
sympathy for the Korean people
who are conducting a heroic strug-
gle for the freedom and independ-
ence of their motherland.”

Budenny ended his speech by
acclaiming the Soviet Government
and people and their armed forces,
the Bolshevist Party and “our

wise teacher, great leader and| »$o650056606:

army leader of genius, the organ-
iser of all our victories, our dear
and beloved comrade Stalin.’

Troops and spectators cheered,
an artillery salvo was fired, and
the march past began

“Torch of Liberation”

The most important Russian
pronouncement of the year—the
traditional annual report delivered
on the eve of the revolution anni-
versary — was given by Marshal
Nicoli Bulganin, Deputy Prime
Minister of the Soviet Union, over
Moscow Radio.

He told'an audience of fepre-
sentatives of Moscow's profes-
sional, political and army organi-
sations at the Bolshoi Theatre :
“The basic aims of our five-year
plan have been exceeded.”

Bulganin said: ‘Fulfilling the
duties imposed by Stalin, our
scientists will soon exceed the
achievements of science abroad.”

“After having mastered the
secrets of atomic energy our sci-
entists have passed to the solution
of further problems which will
help to develop our Soviet coun-
try”, he added.

Marshal Bulganin continued:

“Comrade Stalin has said in the
past that the existence of different
systems need not prevent co-oper-
ation between nations and in par-
ticular with the United States.
There is of course a difference
between the desire to co-operate
and the possibility of co-operation.
Possibility always exists.

“People’s democracies together
with the German mocratic Re-
public which firmly stands on a
peace basis, and the heroic Korean
people which is fighti for its
independence, liberty and peace—
all these people constitute the
camp of democracy, socialism and
peace.

“To the camps of peace is op-







See

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
Cf This Motion Picture the Screen Can
Be Proud ...Today... Tomorrow...

a Generation From Now...

BY F 2 (COCO
JEFF CHANDLER : DEBRA PAGET

oeeted DELMER DAVES: rustew»y JULIAN BLAUSTEIN. 20%.
‘Screwn Play by MICHAEL BLANKFORT- Based on the Move! “Blood Brother” by EL. 01T ARNOLD

Daily

EMPIRE THEATRE

it early because you
want to see it again.

Now Showing and Continuing





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ewili

PAGE THREE



pines:

How happy they are — Mother and Child! Yes, doubts
and difficulties have gone —baby is on Cow & Gate

now!

Strong, sturdy limbs, sound bones, the happiness of

abounding health—these are some of the gifts bestowed

‘é a a ee at i i
SPL Ao

by this famous food.

Buy a tin of Health and Happiness for your litti!e

one too.

COW & GATE Pus



SELLE OPE I LEE M A

4,

J. B. LESLIE & CO. LTD.—Agents





want to do so. The Council reason- | Birka,
ed, however, that about 20 hon-
erary members would also b>
attending. It was decided to hold

SS. Lady Rodney,
5.5. Gascogne, S.S, African Crescent,
Alcoa Roamer, S.S. San Rosa, §8.S.

S.S. Folke Bernadotte, S.S. Lam-

S.S. Alcoa Patriot, S.S. J. W. Van










posed a camp of imperialism led
by ruling circles of the United !
States favouring a policy of insti-'





the dinner.
Scenic Beauty

One of the matters set down for
discussion when the Chamber hold
their next Quarterly General
Meeting, will be “the advisability
of asking Government to prohibit
the erection of advertising signs
and hoardings throughout the
island, which is rapidly spoiling
the scenic beauty of the island and
is being adversely commented
upon by visitors.” Notice of this
was given at the Council meeting
yesterday by Mr. Trevor Bow-
ring.

The Council heard a letter read
from the Acting Colonial Secre-
tary about the Chamber's request
by letter to the Airport Manager
with regard to the posting of
passenger lists in the waiting room
at the airport.

It was stated that the Chamber's
letter had been forwarded to the
office of the Colonial Secretary
and that the Government did not
propose to take any action in the
matter. The Chamber’s sugges-

l keep fresh all day...!



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You'll feel so fresh and

you’ve washed with Lifebuoy Toilet Soap.

Its deep-cleansing lather

ness, and keeps you fresh the whole day
through. Keep a tablet of Lifebuoy Toilet

Soap handy and use it
day freshness !














, SS. Lugano, S.S. Sundale, 8.58,
Fort Amherst, S.S. Del Norte, SS,
Hyeres.

ARRIVALS—By B.W.1A.L,

From Trinidad: Nina Wilson, Jonn
Wilson, Meili Simon, Mark Conyers,
Norah Bradshaw, Hamel Alexander,

Moliy Vignales, Audrey Skinner, Valarey
Gill, Carmen Gill, Hector Mann, Mal-
colm Mann, Ruth Balkin, Lambert Sealy,

Douglas Moore,
From Dominica; Nicol, Nicol, June
F. Harrison.

Nicholls, C.

From St. Lucia: Douglas Wilson, Joan
Wilson, Mabel Eudolie

DEPARTURES—By B,W.1LA.L,.

For Trinidad: John Roland, Agnes
Roland, Joan Groves, Harold Dionysius,
Edward Cote, Gaby Cote. Charles
Me Kenzie, Arthur St. Hill, Louise Cipri-
ani, G. W. Gwyn.

For St. Vincent: William Hughes.

For Dominica: Grace Lockhart, Alexie
Hamilton.
ad St. Lucia: Fannie Charles, Harold

tion, however, had been put to
the managers of B.W.I1.A. and
Trans-Canada Airlines. These had
been assured that Government
would offer no objection to the
posting of the lists-assuming that
the passengers themselves did not
cbject.





full of vigour after

frees you of weari-

regularly —for all

FOR PERSONAL FRESHNESS ALWAYS

CAaT oct Ons

| the occupation of Western Ger-
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gating the new war policy of a
strong over-riding West.

“American imperialists have
now passed from a policy of pre-
paration for aggression to direct
acts of aggression, the most
blatant example being armed in-
tervention in Korea.

“Americans concentrated in
Korea almost all their armed
forces in the Far East and also
called upon the forces of Britain
and other countries.

“They were able to reap some
military successes, but they have
not weakened the Korean people’s
will to fight. Y

“Korea has become the torch of
the liberation movement of colo-
nial and dependent countries.”

“Anglo-American imperialists
have created an aggressive North
Atlantic oy and are busy knock-
ing together other aggressive mili-
tary blocs.

“They are hindering the conclu-
sion of a peace treaty with Ger-
many and are trying to prolong

—Reuter.





« LEVER rropucy



'

1
I







Having to vacate our permises (ROYAL STORE No, 2
HIGH STREET) within the next few weeks we are
offering to the public large stocks of merchandise at
drastieally reduced prices.

We have opened a gertuine sale of hundreds of regular
items at prices which will amaze you. Here are a few
of the articles and prices:—

SPUN, SILKS & CREPES

Attractive shades guaranteed qualities reduced
from $1.68 and $1.80 to 69c., 80., 92.

PRINTS

36” wide, checked and flowered 100 designs
fast colours reduced to 52c. & 59e.

LADIES & MEN'S SHOES

New stock of American, Dutch and English shoes
at prices below our own cost.

MEN’S SPORT & DRESS SHIRTS

Largest seleetion in town, prices cut up to 30%.

MEN’S TWEEDS, TROPICALS.
FLANNELS & DOESKINS

New stocks recently arrived selling at own cost.

LADIE’S UNDERWEAR

Cotton panties reduced to 30 & 48c. Silk panties
excellent quality reduced to 62 & 78c. Brassiers,
Nighties, Stockings. Also household items all at
sacrificing prices. ;

Come and see us. One glance at our goods and prices

will convince you of the rare opportunity to shop and
save.

THE ROYAL STORE

NO. 2 HIGH STREET





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Thursday, November 9, 1950



PEACEMAKER

TO-DAY is Peacemaker’s Day and is a
public holiday in Barbados. lit -has been
pointed out more than once that the num-
ber of holidays in this island exceeds that
in any other part of the British Empire.
In England there are public holidays only
on Good Friday, Easter Monday, Whitsun,
August Bank Holiday, Christmas and Box-
ing Day. New Year’s Day is not a holiday
in England, nor is the King’s Birthday, nor

” Empire day.

. In Barbados, however, in addition to
these holidays, there is New Year’s Day,
Queen Victoria’s Birthday (May 24th) His
Majesty's Birthday celebrated in June,
Clerks’ Holiday in October, Peacemaker’s
Day in November, Race and Exhibition
days, fifty two statutory half holidays and
any other number dictated by the state of
ericket during Intercolonial and M.C.C.

Cricket matches, to say nothing of this
year’s Cricket Day.

Barbados like every other country in the
Empire appreciates the services which
King Edward VII rendered to the British
Empire specifically and to Europe gener-
ally, It remembers them uniquely on
Peacemaker’s Day.

King Edward has been referred to in a
tribute as “a powerful factor in the pre-
servation of the peace of Europe, his
friendly intercourse with the heads of the
French, German and other nations earning
for him the title of Edward the Peace-
maker.”

Tt was not a title lightly gained. King
Edward as Prince of Wales travelled wide-
ly and by personal contact with people
realised the vast numbers who comprised
the Commonwealth. He also appreciated
their, differences in outlook and ambitions
and so when he came to the Throne suc-
ceeding Queen Victoria he exhibited a
sympathy and tolerance which made him
beloved by his people overseas and at home.

“His love of life and its enjoyment, his

pleasure in the glitter and glamour in the
ceremonial made him the most “popular
prince in Europe” and his name a house-
hold word in the Courts of the European
capitals. To-day- in Barbados we remem-
ber.him as a maker of peace.

Peacemaker’s holiday became statutory
through the energies of a man now hardly
remembered by many in Barbados, The
late Henry Walter Lofty who was an out-
standing Colonial Treasurer introduced a
bill in the House of Assembly when he
was a member for Bridgetown. He had
made other valuable contributions to Bar-
badian public life but none so popular as
this.

For’Barbados to-day, Peacemaker’s Day
is not merely another holiday. It is a re-
minder of the great desire for the main-
tenance of peace throughout the world, a
peace which this generation hardly knows
anything about, since large scale wars are
waged by some, while others watch in

“intervals of peace.

Sys —_

Remember Flanders

POPPY DAY this year comes at a time
when the news from the East is grave, and
the chances of another World War are not
remote, .Every day in Korea members of
the United Nations forces are being maim-
ed and killed, and the Poppies on sale to-
morrow will serve as a remembrance of
them as well as of the disabled of the First
and Second World Wars.

‘The Poppy League Fund has always
been used to help war disabled soldiers
to, lead a normal life. It is a deserving
fund depending on your generosity. With
the money subscribed the blind at St.
Dunstan’s.are taught to see with their
hands, and the maimed are trained in
trades which they can follow despite their
injuries.

In Barbados we need a minimum of
$8,000 a year to maintain the payment of
pensions and contribute to the running of
the training schools for the disabled. With
the continual rise of the cost of living mean-
ing that every year the pensions can buy

less, let us try to make to-morrow’s col-
lection a record.

This is a cause that has the support of
everyone, but not everyone remembers to
buy a Poppy. It isso easy to forget.
Every contribution, however small, is wel-
come; but when you buy your Poppy to-
day think of the fields of Flanders where so
many were disabled in the cause of free-
dom, and of Korea where men are suffer-
ing for the same ideal, and give generously.

ADNOGATE |

An Investigation by Military Commentator Robert Jessel

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





COLONIAL STUDENTS

THE CHOICE: THIRTY AnpTHECOLOURBAR

MEN-OR ONE TANK

YOUR SON'S CALL-UP—No. 2. Are we getting

BOYS who were six at the time
of Munich make up the 1932 age
class which is being called up
into uniform this P5

“This conscription is so very
unfair,” Mrs. E. M. Ockwell
writes to me from Cumberland-
road, Swindon. :

She tells me of a 19-year-old
boy who wants to be a singer,
and is, she says, “quite naturally
averse to military ideas,” and 1s
the only boy in the road to be
eal'cd up. The others have
esc ped.
l.rs. Ockwell wonders if this
sort of thing encourages parents
to develop their children’s talents.

I ook at the official figures.

Cut of every hundred boys in
the 1932 age class: —

1 WELVE are exempted straight
away on medical grounds,

LLEVEN get off because they
are farm workers or miners.

"‘ WENTY-SIX are “deferred”
as students or apprentices. Even
Mr. Strachey does not think it
wo :h while to interrupt their
esscntial training. (Later they
will be called up, and industry
wil’ have to make the best of it.)

SLX others get off because they
are conscientious objectors, or are
going to live in Australia, or on
compassionate grounds and the
like




















This will leave just 45 out of
the original 100 in the 1932 age
cl::s, Mrs. Ockwell. These will
pt on uniform; and 30 will go
in > the Army,

The System

I \ave looked into the mechanism
o the Labour Ministry’s call-up
s} em. It is efficient and Con-
fo ms to the rules laid down by
P: liament. But it is not, as Mr.
Isc-es asks us to believe, a model
ef “universality,”

!caving gone so far to make the
ca.'-up selective and not universal,
ov ht we to go further and call up
still fewer men? And, inevitably,
cause more heartburning?

i Are we

reinforce the 190,000 Regulars
already serving?

Look at it another way.

If Mr Strachey has £30,000
tt spend, ought he to spend it
on one new Centurion tank, OR
on calling up and training for
two years 30 slightly resentful
soldiers?

MANILA, Thursday.
OW that it’s all over in
Korea, bar the shooting,
what really happened’? we should
seriously ask, and seek to answer
itif we don’t want it all to
vappen again. « mite .

”
The pattern of the campaign
was simple, First, the retreat.
Second, hold and build up.
Third, break out. Fourth, mop

up.
This last phase is still going
on, and it will probably continue

longer than all the rest put
together,
We only just did the job.

People who realise it are asking
two questions, Why did the
enemy come so near success?
And why did he just fail?

He took us by surprise. Was
this due to our poor military
intelligence? We should find out,
for if it was bad in Korea it may
be worse elsewhere,

The American garrison had
withdrawn from Korea, leaving
behind a South Korean “army.”
Why was it so badly trained,
equipped, and _ officered? We
should inquire because the
Philippines and Indonesia (who
are also on Uncle Joe’s list) may
e in no better shape.

Once the war had _ begun,
why did it take so long for the
“fire-brigade” to arrive on the
scene? In the armies on the
United States and the United
Kingdom were far more than 4
million men, yet it was weeks
before the Americans, from
near-by Japan could bring up to
strength the couple of divisions
they rushed in.

As for Britain, for years critics
nave been saying that if trouble
came we would not find an army
ccrps. Trouble came, and we
could not scrapé up a brigade,
‘Someone may say, “But we had
Malaya on our hands.” Too true,
and maybe the next time also.)

As it was the good name of
Britain was saved once again by

OUR READERS SAY:

w Publicity

Might not some of these 30—-
perhaps a dozen of
doing much more to help the
nation if, instead, t were sent
to join the 250,000 workers
by Mr. Isaacs for his rearmament
programme?

If we could winkle out this
duzen, and maybe cut the Army’s
intake by a third, ecouldn’t Mr.
Strachey release a third of his
Regulars from the bloated train-
ing machinery for cperational
theatres where National Service-°
men are now being sent?

Lost Jobs

The time is long overdue for
Parliament to set up a. Se’,
Committee on Manpower to s.u iy
this whole question of call-up,

What is wanted is something
ou the same lines as the Select
Committee on Its

implications of calling up the
young singer from @umberland -
road, Swindon, and the rest of
the 260,000 conscripts now serving
in the Forces.

Cornwall, to tell me that h
17}-year-old boy, who won
scholarships at school, has lost
his job as a junior clerk because
of his im ing call-up.

No one else wall give a job to
a boy who will be off to the
Army in ning months, so the lad
‘s unemployed. There must be
many others in a similar position.

My Select Committee on Man-
power would therefore start by
examining the various reasons
which the Government has
advanced since 1945 for having
the call-up at all,

First, we were told, it was to
release the wartime veterans
straining to be demobilised.

By 1947 it was to build up a
trained reserve in the Territorials.

By 1948 the purpose of the
call-up was “to put heart into
the French,”

And now? It is because Regular
Army recruiting has been so poor
that conscripts are needed in
operational theatres.

It is time for Mrs. Ockwell's
boy to be given a more satis-
factory reason why he must not
be a singer until 1952.

25-hour Week
My Manpower Committee ;
would almost certainly report
that some sort of conscription



value for Money?

will be nece for many years
tu come. It will be a long, long
time before there are 250,000
Regulars in the Army.

at does not mean, however,
that we necessarily need to-day’s
Army of 370,000 to produce Mr.
Attlee’s target force of ten
divisions and a modest com-
ponent of Ack—Ack,

Many of the jobs done by the
Army’s orderlies, or by _ the
R.AS.C. and the Pioneer Corps,
could, for example, be easily
by full or part time civilian
labour.

Take away all those parades
and inspections for troops in the
non-fighting arms, and not many
conscripts would be found work-
ing a 25-hour productive week.

A great many men in _ the
Services work very hard indeed.
My Select Committee would be
interested in those who don't.
A visit for thé committee might
be arranged to the gunner regi-
ment at Larkhill, which is so
stretched, so starved of man-
power, that it has had to recall
some reservists from civilian life.

Yet is contrives to give seven
weeks’ holiday a year to its
Regulars.

The committee would specially
be interested in what has hap-
pened to the half million ex-
conscripts who have passed
through Mr. Strachey’s sausage
machine since 1945,

How many of them could
report tomorrow to a known job
in a known regiment on receipt
of an order broadcast after the
9 o'clock news tonight?

My investigations suggest that
the reserves I have listed, plus
the Class Z reserve, Plus the
Regular Reservists, already
provide the War Office with twice
as many men as the Army could
digest and equip with modern
arms in the first year of a future
World War III.

Welcome

A Manpower Committee set uP
right away could produce the
evidence to prove my case il
time for the New Year.

Something like a million
parents would welcome the de-
cision, Mr, Strachey, So would
a good many of your More
thoughtful serving soldiers.

—LES.
NEXT: How good is our
Army now?



the bravery of the British soldier
when, he arrived on the battle-
eld: as usual too few.

Only 2 to 1

OME other excuses may be
exploded. We were nevér
“overwhelmingly” outnumbered:
two to one at worst—and always
we had absolute air and sea
supremacy, It was claimed tnat
our anti-tank weapons were
unable to» pierce the Russian-
made enemy armour.” It was
probably bad aim, but in any
case we have .knoOwn of the
Russian P.T, 34 for years and
should have known the calibre
of gun required to stop it,

The real reason for our retreat
was simply that the enemy was
better prepared, He used against
our badly organised South
Koreans and green young Ameri-
can occupation troops from
Japan many .veterans drawn
from the Chinese civil wars,

Like The Japs

HY did the North Koreans

just fail to finish them?
Perhaps their military intelli-
gente was as unintelligent as
our own,

More probably they had
reache@ the limit of their punch.

Like the Japs in Burma during
our .retreat in 1942 stopped
when only the remnant of a rear-
guard lay between them and
India, because they had literally
run out of supplies.

So the North Koreans stopped
—and lost the campaign, Few of
us believed it at the time. General
MacArthur was one, and he
calmly went on with the war.

So did those “raw” troops of
his, growing’ riper every hour.
Out of the dark night of the
retreat and siege there shone the
splendid star of the common
soldier’s courage. :

To hold the bridgehead was
hard, for the tougn enemy knew
and used the hills often appear-
ing in our rear, More trouble-
some to fit into the Korean ter-



wealth of Barbadian information
of a wide range, and I may add,



THE NARROW SQUEAK

At last it is possibe to weigh up the Korean War—and the lesson of it:
KEEP THE FIRE BRIGADE READY—By Frank Owen

rain was the American doctrine
ot “Use machines save men.”
Thus, when@yer an infantry
unit was held up even by a
single sniper, the drill was to
whistle up the tanks, artillery
or aircraft and blast the area.

Time .... Money
T COSTS money both before
and after the event, And
time, a precious commodity in
war,

Nor do the “liberated” love
to see their families slaughtered,
their homes smashed even by the
impersonai agency of a general
bombardment and in the name
of collective security,

The military advantages of
machine war were vividly shown
at Inchon when MacArthur
carried out the greatest amphibi-
ous operation since D-Day.

Somebody has called it
most helluva gamble.”
nothing of the kind. It was a
superbly calculated risk, coolly
assessed and courageously taken

"the
It was

Remember .. .
ACARTHUR had to land his
divisions on a shore whose

tides rise and fall 30 ft. Had it
been contested. it would have
been a Gallipoli, It was not-——-
because MacArthur had _ taken
steps to have the enemy else-
where,

Let us learn from Korea for
be sure that the enemy has,

Next time we may have to
fight not only a_ brave, brutal
infantry army with no air force,
no field radio and ox-drawn
transport, Next time we may not
have a great industrial base like
Japan near at hand, Next time
there may not be so much time.
Yes, we MUST learn, for next
time may be the last time for the
free world. Let us have both the
machines and ‘the men standing
by, the Task Force ready, the
fire-brigade with the engines
running.

“Next time we may not have so

much time’



beoky and sell them on
sion.



















—LES. (disease. —IN.S.

By E. B. Timothy

LONDON,
Borough Council authorities, M.P.s, social
workers and housewives are to co-operate in
a big scheme initiated by the British Council
to make London’s 2,000 coloured students
fee] at home in Britain. The first area to be

tackled is the borough of Kensington, where|
|

a quarter of the students live.

The mayor of Kensington, Alderman J. G.
Gapp, has already consented to preside over
a Commonwealth committee of local repre-
sentatives which includes Sir Patrick Spens,
Conservative M.P. for South Kensington and
Mr. G. H. R. Rogers, Labour M.P. for North
Kensington. This committee will endeavour
to find accommodation for Colonial students
with British students or British families and
thereby encourage them to participate in
local activities instead of living in isolation.

Mr. MacFarlane, of the British Council
Press Department, tells me that the colour
problem can be overcome in the cultural
sphere. “The British Council will make it
its responsibility to provide coloured stu-
denis with greater social intercourse with
British people,” he added.

Legally speaking, there is no colour bar
in Britain. It exists to some extent, however,
in a way that is extremely difficult to tackle.
Colonial students experience it particularly
in their search for ‘digs’. While it is true
that there is an acute shortage of accommo-
dation in Britain (as a result of the Second
World War), it is often true that students
are refused accommodation because of their
colour. They are not told so, but it is
implied.

On the other hand, some coloured people
he: e are too sensitive and touchy. They re-
gard every seemingly unpleasant gesture as

colour bar. “{f have found very few cases of
colour prejudice,” commented Sir Patrick
Spens. “But when anyone not of their col-

our disapproves of anything they do, col-
oured students tend to put it down immedi-
ately to prejudice.”

Some British people are definitely .
judiced against coloured people. In some
cases, this is due to a dislike for anything
alien. The misdemeanours of a certain class
ot coloured people—mostly the seamen and
slowaways—have, unfortunately, created
antipathy in the minds of many well-mean-
ing British people. They do not always find
it easy to distinguish the ‘wheat from the
chaff’ because, to them, all coloured people
41e more or less alike.

A leading article in the News Chronicle
doseribes the British Council's campaign as
‘morally and politically timely.” When it is
vcmembered that the British colonies are
now in a state of cultural and political fer-
ment and that the Colonial students dis-
criminated against are the potential leaders
of the Colonies, the gravity of the problem
cannot be overlooked.

The colour bar is undesirable. The ignor-
ance which breeds it must be counteracted

British Council aims to do this by persuasion
and explanation.

New Heart Trouble

CHICAGO, Nov.,

A heart specialist has claimed that con-
stant publicity about coronary disease as
the leading cause of death has given rise
to a relatively new disease, cardiac
neurosis,

Dr. Gilbert H. Marquardt, Assistant Pro-
fessor of Medicine at Northwestern Uni-
versity’s Medical School, said that despite
this, publicity about heart disease has done
more good than harm.

He told some 90 heart specialists attend-
ing The Chicago Medical Society’s refresh-
er courses that two important gains attri-
-butable to more information about heart
disease are:

“It has made more people heart con-
scious, giving us an earlier opportunity
to diagnose the disease; and it has also
opened the purse strings of a concerned
nation to provide generous sums for need-
ed research into complicated heart disease
problems,”

Dr. Marquardt said the cardiac neurotic
is one who reads or hears about heart





commis-

C’wealth Broadcast



2 deliberate and calculated expression of the

* THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1950

D. V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.



PACKAGES CAKE MIX............ 50 44
TINS NESTLE’S CREAM...........0 40° 34 :
BOTTLES ALLSOPP’S. BEER...... 26 20

FISHING LINES—

TO-DAY’S SPECIALS













at THE COLONNADE

Usually NOW

FISHERMEN

we have

9, 10, 12, 15, 18, 24, 30, 36 lbs

WHITE COTTON LINES—
6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 24, 30 thread

STAINLESS STEEL WIRE— 19, 21, 23 gauge

FISH HOOKS—

Nos. 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 16 1/0 2/0

COPPER PAINT—

3 gin. tins

and many other items to interest you.

WILKINSON

& HAYNES CoO.,

LTD.,

Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

PHONES 4472 and 4687



RICH IN
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THE THRIFTY WILL SHOP NOW

CREAM
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Ask for LIDANO

at your Grocer.
IN SPITE OF THE RISE IN PRICE OF--

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EARLY BUYING OF LARGE STOCKS



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TROPICALS, GABERDINES,
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Ps



For ayo

—

. Holiday Party



To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—I read with great pleas-
ure your criticism of the Barba-
dos Publicity Committee and the
Barbados Government advertis-

ing efforts in general in to-day’s -

“Advocate” November 5th,” As
a result I think you may be
interested to hear the story of
the birth of the Souvenir Book
of Barbados.

This book was compiled and
‘rought out a few years ago by
the joint toil and enthusiasm of
Mrs, Golde White, Miss Kathleen
Hawkins and myself, The book,
which is attractively got up con-
tains a picture map of the island,
a resumé of the history of the
island, pldces of historical - in-
terest, the industries of the
island, beauty spots and drives
and recipies of popular local
food and drink, It is illustrated
by scenes of the island done by
local artists ice. Mrs. Golde
White and Miss Kathleen Hawk-
ins and it advertises the Business
Firms, Hotels, and pleasure spo.s
of the island Altogether a

the only book of its kind in the
island,

At the time of its publication,
before putting it on sale, we
offered it ‘en masse’ at a whole-
sale price to the Barbados Pub-
licity Committee, to use for
advertising the island, and to
sell at a profit to themselves.
Thus the Barbados Government
had handed to them on a
platter a ready made informa-
tive book with which to adver-
tise the island. Did they jump
at it? Dear me no. They turned
it down flat, and after yreat
persuasion consented to buy a
paltry 25 or so of the books,
which were never properly
displayed or introduced to vis-
itors (as many have told me.)

Next we approached the
Hotels, thinking that they would
gladly keep a stock of theses
books selling them at a profit
to themselves for the conveni-

ence of their visitors. They
would have none of it. Some
of them eventually reluctantly

consented to keep a few of the

Some of the big firms in
Bridgetown bought lots of twen-
ty-five or fifty, and sent them as
presents to their business friends
abroad.

Fortunately for the island, we
were disgusted but not daunted,
and, thanks to the. two Gift
Shops, the S.P.C.K. book shop,
Da Costa & Co., and Johnson's
Stationery these books have been
sola. in a steady stream, and
continue to be sold in fact more
have beén sold this year than
any previous year.

So these little books are adver-
tising- Barbados in many parts
of England, Canada, United
States of America, Venezuela
and other parts of the world, not
by any effort of the Barbados
Government or the Publicity
Committée, but by the efforts of
private enterprise.

Sincerely yours,
G. SKINNER
“Amalfi’*

—__ Court
St. Michael.

Hill,

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,— I think cricket enthusi-
asts in Barbados would be
pleased to hear that the Common-
wealth team in India comprising
our two West Indies heroes
Frankie Worrell and Sonny Rama-
dhin are engaged in a Test match
at present in New Delhi and that
the commentary (ball by ball)
is made for one hour every
morning between 6.30 and 7.30
a.m, on short wave on 25 Meter
Band. As there are three more
days still to go in the first Test,
your fans would be thrilled to
hear the commentary even on the
Radio Distribution which I am
sure would be a fine gesture on
the part of Radio Discribution,
even if it is only for half an hour
from 6.30 to 7.00 a.m., and then
at 7.30 the time for close of the
play, give them the scores of the
day’s play. I do hope other
cricket enthusiasts in this island
would crave for this thrill, and
tune in on their private Radios at
the above mentioned time.

D. A. THANT

P.O. Box 9,

sridgetown,

November 6, 1950.

Slightly Corned Beef
Turtic Steak

Turtle Soup

Turtle Stew

Fresh Fruit

Fresh Vegetables





GOLD BRAID RUM
TUBORG BEER

1. & R. Sandwich Bread
Table Butter in pkgs.

. Miricle Whip Sandwich
Spread in bottles

Cook’s Fish Paste 3 oz. tins
i Swift’s Pate de Fois Gras



Danish Frankfurters in tins

Danish Cocktail Sausages
in tins

Danish Salami
Meat Roll

Danish Cheese

Tin Hams in 8 sizes
Prepared Mustard

BE ELEGANT
WITH YOUR GUESTS

PS



SERVE CHOYCE TIPS
TEA with CARR’S

BISCUITS
Phone

j GODDARDS

Teday


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1950



‘Health’ Committee Will |

Visit City Dairies

To Discuss Their Removal

THE GENERAL BOARD OF HEALTH at their meeting
yesterday afternoon appointed a sub-committee to meet :
committee from the Commissioners of Health with a view
to visiting the existing dairies in the City area and dis-

cu.sing their removal.

Mr.

A. E. S. Lewis, Mr. F. C. God-

dard and. Mr. W. Abrahams were appointed to the Com-

mittee.

WATER
SHORTAGE

IN ST. JOSEPH

A FEW DAYS ago many women

in St. Joseph could be seen
washing their clothes in springs
and drying them on_ pastures
nearby. This was because of a
water shortage experienced in that
parish.

Water had to be delivered to
certain districts by a lorry from
the Water Works Department.
Some people did not wait on the
lorry but carried home spring
water and boiled it.

A resident told the Advocate
yesterday although there are now
about 56 stand pipes in the parish
the shortage of water is still being
felt. Some of these pipes were
out of order but began to work
about a week ago.

Te REAR WHEEL of a bicycle
owned and ridden by Vincent
Callendar of the Ivy, St. Michael,
was extensively damaged in an
accident along Trafalgar Square
shortly after 11 o’clock yesterday
morning.

* Also involved in the accident
was a pick-up owned by Messrs.
Barnes & Co., Bridge Street, and
driven by Seymour Cuke of
Crumpton Street.

ITH CHRISTMAS only a tew

weeks off the St. Michael
Combined Choir is making pre-
parations for the celebration of
their 28th anniversary of musical
service to the island.

The Choir was founded, organ-
ised and is being conducted by
Mr. Egbert S. McLean. It has
travelled around the island ex-—
tensively and also given many
concerts at Anglican Churches,

It is intended to give a recital
of Christmas Music at Queen’s
Park on December 31 at 4.00 p.m.

ISS SKINNEK and Miss E. K.
’ Walters of Barbados were
among the fifty nurses from thirty
different Colonial territories that
sat with wartime ministers and
service chiefs who saw Her
Majesty The Queen open the
Nurses’ War Memorial Chapel and
unveil the Memorial Window in
the Upper Islip Chapel of West-
minster Abbey on November 2.

Half of the nurses present were |

European members of Queen
Elizabeth’s Colonial Nursing
Service. The remainder were

Colonials that are being trained in
the U.K. or taking post-certificate
courses,

HE MEMORIAL WINDOW

was designed by Hugh Easton
and symbolizes a kneeling nurse
looking up to the Virgin carrying
a Child. In the tracery above is
Florence Nightingale’s Lamp im-
posed upon a Red Cross. Encir-
cling this is the Crown of Thorng
Bymbolizing the sacrifices of the
nurses who died in the Second
World War. At the foot of the
window are the badges of all
nursing services and names of tha
Colonies, The blue leather, gold-
tooled Roll of Honour containing
the names of 3,076 nurses, is kept
in a bronze casket. Near it will

be two gilded bronze tripod
candle - sticks, the gift of the
Queen.

The Queen is Patron of the
British Empire Nurses’ War
Memorial Fund which has raised
£177,000 towards expenses. Not
all the money raised has gone to
provide the Chapel and Memorial
Window. Scholarships for nurses
have been founded and already
two Colonial nurses are training fn
the U.K. under the scholarship
scheme.

i R. J. A. B. AUSTIN, Head-
5 master of the Lodge Con-
gregation School at Lodge Village,
Demerara, told the Advocate yes-
terday that the elementary schools
in Barbados were ahead of those
in B.G. as far as the providing
of free text books for children was
concerned.

Mr. Austin has completed 15
years as a Headmaster and hopes
to return to B.G. at the end of the
month.

EMBERS of the staff of the
Mental Hospital gave a
farewell function on Saturday
night in honour of 60-year-old
Nurse Elsie Henry who retires
after 28 years of service at the
Hospital .

All of the staff present express-
ed the regret of having to lose
the services “of such an efficient
nurse” and wished her long life
and happy days in retirement.



The question of the removal of
dairies in the City area came up
when a letter from the Commis-
sicners of Health, dated October
19, was vead. This stated that that
Bourd hdd discussed the question
and requested that a committee
from the Board of Health, includ-
ing the Director of Medical Ser-
vices, meet a committee of the
Commissioners of Health with i
view to discussing and visiting
the existing dairies in the City
area in order to discover whether
an amendment with reference ti
the area on which dairies could
be kept, could be made to the
Dairy Regulations of 1948.

Dr. H. G. Cummins, Chairman

of the Board, said that the

dairies referred to should have
been removed earlier, Legisla-
tion was passed and it was
decided that they should remove
in October last year. The Board
recommended to Government to
give these dairy owners another
year because some were hard
hit. The law told these dairy

Owners to move and some did

it.

He asked “Is this Board pre-
pared to a'low these people to
frown on the law that has been
recently passed?” He did not know
if Government would be willin=
to amend the law but it was for
the Board to discuss the matter. |

Awkward Situation |
Mr. A. E. S. Lewis said that he |
expected that during the year
those dairy owners who had any
good and sufficient reasons for not
removing would have come to the}
Board and given their story. It}
had become an awkward situation |
and it was difficult for the Board |
to entertain any other view than
that stated the previous year. He
was surprised that these dairy
owners did nothing between
October 1949 and last October.

Mr. Kidney said that the law
had created hardships on ‘the
dairy keepers who supplied milk
to the thousands in St, Michael
He is against people coming from
St. John to sell milk in St, Michael
and vice versa and said that there
should be a central spot where al!
the milk would be collected and
sold.

When this law comes into oper-
ation it means that the 12 or more
dairies operating in the City area

@on page 8



THE PICK UP waggon 0.-39 which

Street and collided with the section

was broken off.

The vehicle is the property of Frank Lowe of Cleavers Hill,
the time by Garfield Cumberbatch of St. Elizabeth’s Village, St.
The time of the accident was 2.30 p.m. yesterda

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
AFTER THE EXAMINATION

Jumped the gutter on the right side of the Police Station in Coleridge

of the wall opposite the Waterworks.

St. J
Joseph.

driver's examination at Central Station and on leaving the Court yard, he
out the lock. Beside him was Cpl. L. Catlin, Examincr. No one received any injuries.

Acquitted Of Larceny Charge
After Brilliant Defence

AFTER CARRYING ON one of the ablest defences ever
heard from the dock at the Court of Grand Sessions, Erie





40/- For Butting

ETHELBERT MOORE, a_ 26-
year-old labourer of Goodland,
St. Michael, was found guilty of
wounding Naomi Moore by butt-
ing her on the face.

His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma
before whom the case was heard
ordered Ethelbert Moore to pay a
fine of 40/- or in default one
month’s imprisonment.

The offence was committed on |

September 15 and the fine is to be
paid in 14 days.

os ‘ i
Reckless Driving Cost 30’-
JAVAN PARRIS of Friendship,
. Michael, was fined 30/- and



St

| 1/~ costs in 14 days or one month’s |

imprisonment by Mr. H. A. Talma
yesterday for driving the motor
lorry M-1277 on James Street in
a reckless manner.

The offence was committed on
September 20.

REMANDED
SIMEON DENNY a 62-year-old
labourer of Garden Land, St.

Michael was yesterday remanded
until November 10 when he ap-
peared before His Worship Mr.
E. A. McLeod for larceny of goods
valued at $2,26 the property of
R. H. Edwards & Co. Ltd.

The offence was committed on
November 7.



Speightstown Carpenter
Wins “Your Guess”

THE CORRECT ANSWER to the Evening Advocate’s “Your
Guess” competition was the clock in Queen’s Park.
A large number of the 594 entrants guessed correctly but

most popular choice was the

Savannah Club’s clock. There

were several fantastic answers, best of which was “7 minutes

58 seconds past.”
in Broad Street.

£3 For Speeding

A FINE of £3 to be paid by
monthly instalments or in default
two months’ imprisonment was
imposed on Allan Rouse of
Station Hill, St, Michael, by His
Worship Mr. H. A. Talma.

_ Rouse was found guilty of driv-
ing the motor van M-94 on Bush
Hall Road on September 25 at
over 34 miles per hour and the
speed limit on that road for that
type of vehicle is 20 miles per
hour. The licence is to be en-

dorsed,
FREAK PIG

A pig owned by Rupert Alleyne
of Marchfield, St. Philip gave
birth to 11 pigs on Sunday, one
of which was a freak. This freak
which only lived for 24 hours
was double-headed with the upper
part where the two heads were
joined resembling the trunk of
an elephant.

There were four eyes on the
head, two on the lower part and
two on the upper part.

DIED SUDDENLY

GORDON ROCK, a 49-year-old
cooper of Fairfield, St. Michael,

died suddenly at his home about!

10.15 am, yesterday.
mortem examination was later
performed on the body by Dr.
\. S, Cato at the Public Mortuary.
Death was attributed to jaundice.
$$$ -

HE ROAD ieading from
Todd’s Corner to St. Ber-
nard’s Village, St. Joseph, is at
present being repaired. A part,
which had sunken in, was dug
up and fixed. A road roller is
doing the levelling and it 1 ex-
pected that the job will be soon)

completed.

A_ post



C cnaiee WITH THEIR POLICY

O: CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT, the

New CONSUL PRODUCED BY FORD OF DAGENHAM,

S urcaseves ALL

Oo HAVE THE PLEASURE OF SEEING THIS

EXPECTATIONS.

Tuan CAR IN THE NEAR FUTURE



CHARLES Me ENEARNEY & €0. LTD.

FOCCECGOSS95S5SS9SC59S0S90



SCOOPS SCESESSLLSSSOSS,

Another guesser thought it was the clock

St. Peter’s Church Clock and
the clock in St. John’s Churchyard

were two other wild guesses,
Some 50 competitors sent in
guesses. after 10.a.m. on Wednes-
day.

Since the competition opened,
both correct answers to the two
guess pictures were supplied by
residents of Speightstown. Last
week it was won by Cpl. McClean
of Speightstown and this week it
was won by another Speights-
towner Cecil Cozier.

Cecil Cozier is a 20-year-old
carpenter of Queen Street,
Speightstown. -

Cozier had just finished his
lunch yesterday and was getting
ready to return to work when a
representative of the Advocate
told him he had won $5.00.

First Guess Wins

With a face full of smiles and
looking over a half-closed window,
he calmly said “after the first
competition was won, I told a
fellow that the first chance I
should take, I was going to win.

Cozier made his guess while on
his way home from work, Walk-
ing and thinking where it was, he
suddenly remembered that this
‘clock was like the clock in the
Park, :

Cozier was very pleased with
‘himself but at the same time most
surprised because he had won. He
has never been lucky before. He

{has taken many a chance in raf-

files but his first win has been in
the Evening Advocate “Your
' Guess” Competition.

i For five years Cozier has been
working as a carpenter. He was
taken on as an apprentice when
he passed out of the Speightstown
Boys’ School. He is a member of
the 76 Barbados Rovers and he
puts down his accuraie guessing to
the number of observation tests he
has taken as a scout,



FC POLLLCLE CLEC SL FSGGEA.

}



Sealy, described by the Polic
was acquitted yesterday of a

y. Cumberbatch had just completed his preliminary

The front bumper of the waggon

oseph, and was being driven at

j had told “them that he had
juirested the night before



turned right, but failed to take



e as an idler of Nelson Street,
charge of breaking the house

of Ida Shepherd, and stealing condensed milk, cocoa, a

fountain pen and a purse wit

He was discharged by His
Honour the Chief Justice, Sir
A'‘lan Collymore, who presided!
over the Court. The case for the!
Prosecution was conducted by
Miss M, E, Bourne, and was the
first of the two cases that were
tried yesterday.

At the end of the second case,
the Court adjourned until to- |
morrow,

Sealy in his address to the jury
declared he was not asking for
mercy or sympathy, but merely
that justice be done.

Date of the alleged breaking
and entering and stealing was
September 16 last year. The items
of food and the purse belonged tv,
Ida Shepherd, while the pen was
owned by her son, Lionel Shep-
herd.

The story for the Prosecuti.n
was that Ida Shepherd and her
son were away from home between
7 and 7.30 p.m. until about four
hours later, Lionel came back first,
and found that the inside front
door had been unlatched but had
been pulled back in. He had
secured both the inner and outer
doors before leaving.



He entered the house but saw
nothing to attract his attention.

Next morning his mother went
to make tea, but found'no mitk

nor cocoa, She called on Lionel
who was at his joiner’s work
bench, and asked him about it,

He looked and saw none and then
discovered that the pen which was
on the larder was also gone. His
mother also missed the purse wit!
the 27 cents..

Pen Identified

in court. yesterday Lionel
Shepherd said he identified the
pen by its shape, His mother said
she knew it by the colour,

Shepherd and her son gave no
evidence directly connecting the
accused with the offence. Shepherd
said she saw him at a nearby shop
the same night asking for Astoria
cigarettes, When told there were
none he left the shop, not facing
her but walking backwards. She
noticed something in his hands
that looked like a condensed milk

tin with the label off.
Direct evidence was given by
Louise Weekes, a next door

neighbour of the Shepherds, She
said that after they had left home,
the accused had been there ask-
ing for Lionel. She told him no
one was at home, and he asked
her to tell Lionel that he would
return to see him about 8.30
next morning.

She went
house and



back inside her}

soon afterwards












One moment, nose â„¢
po sag sated aya





relieves stuffiness.
Prevents many colds
if used in time.



PINE APPLE

PHOENIX SOD

sheila

a Just alow drops up
swollen membrazes, VICKS \

VA-TRO-NOL

TO-MORROW .
We will be Specially Serving—

PINEAPPLE

KNIGHTS

h 27 cents.

heard a noise of something fall-
‘ing in the Shepherd’s house. She
went to the window and saw
accused latching Shepherd’s door
She called out, “Ida, Ida? Accused
answered, “who you”? He ran
above the house and she could
not see him,

It had been a fairly bright
night. She had known the accused
before.

She had not made a statement
to P.C. Murphy, Weekes said in

reply to the accused, She had
made a statement to another
policeman, She did not mention
his name because she did not
know it. The policeman had
asked her if she would know
him and she had said yes. She

had not been asked to pick aim
out of a number of other men.

Weekes added that she had
seen accused on January 22, 1950
in the direction of Passage- Road,
e statement that was attacked by
the accused in his defence.

Pen Sold

Joseph Kirton told the Courc
that the accused had sold him a
“bluish” fountain pen at the
Nelson Club, Nelson Street on
the night of September 16. He
had sold him it for 2/-.

P.C. Murphy said that after
some investigations, he had seen
the accused at the C.1.D. on
January 21, 1950. He arrested
and charged him, and accused
made a voluntary statement,
admitting that he had _ broken
the house, and stolen the pen,
He added that he had sold the
pen to Kirton.

He accompanied Murphy to
Nelson Street where they saw
Kirton, Kirton corroborated the
story of the selling of the pen.

At the preliminary hearing of
the case before the Magistrate ac-
cused made a statement in which
he denied entering the house
and stealing. He said he had
bought the pen while he was in
Trinidad the year before, and
had not kept the bill,

To the accused Murphy said

that when he had seen him at
the C.I.D he (accused) was
there in connection with other

eases of alleged larceny.

The accused addressing the
jury said he wanted not merey
nor sympathy, but justice.

“The prosecution has brought
many witnesses against me”, he
said. ‘Gentlemen, I will not insult
you by asking you to consider
yourselves in my position, { will
not attempt to argue this case on
point of law because the



CREAMS
d
SUNDAES
at

A FOUNTAIN
LTD.







—





law I d t know I will ar
it me points of fact”
Untrustworthy Witness
So the couse j ext
about half an
time he
had not

eiy

or dor |
hour Duri.t va
submitted that the per
een properly identified, |
nor could they accept Weekegs’}
entification of him She hae!
id she had seen him.in Passage
Road on January 22, and Murpiny
been
Such
untrustworihy.

e® witness was

He had bought the pen in Trini-
Gad and he had lost the bill
There was nothing strange about
that, especially when they remem-
bered that Lionel Shepherd said
he had bought it in Barbados and
hé had no bill either.

The jury arriecg at their ver-
dict of “not guilty” after about
45 minutes’ retirement.

Sentence Postponed

Sentence on 19-year-old Hugh)
Gamble of Horse Hill, St. Joseph |
was postponed after a jury had
found him guilty or shopbreaking |
with intent

Gamble was charged on two
counts, shopbreaking and larceny,
and shopbreaking with intent
He was accused of having broken)
and enfered the shop of Florence |
Burke on September 19 and stolen |
$12.00 from her cash box. |

Though Gambie, pleaded “not |
guilty” on the alternative cours,
he only cross-examined one of
the five witnesses for the prosecu-
tion. He neither gave evidence,
called witnesses nor addressed the
jury He just sat staring around
os evidence was given against him,





The Chief Justice told him that
f he had come there, and pleaded
guilty and said he was sorry,
something might have been able
to be done for him. He had come
there, however, wasted time,
xiven no defence, and after he had
been found guilty, he had nothing
to say for himself

After Florence Burke told the
Chief Justice that Gamble’s father
had chased him from home and
Sat. Henderson said that it was
alleged that he had stolen money
from his father, Gamble’s mother
told the Chief Justice that he had
been chased from home, but not
for stealing, but because he had
been disobedient,

r





PAGE FIVE



Sea aaa aaa aa ae ee aa

® AGAIN AVAILABLE !!
&

= PURINA §&
s PIGEON CHOW 58

pl. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. = dsninos

AGB EBSBSESEEBSBuees a)
S@BeEeSBeaenepepeuazua ee
w es ee er Y



To make a Savoury Di:
really tasty—

|

|
| Se
|
|
|




i

-MARMITE

The Vitamin B Yeast Food

Made in England







Think carefully how you will spend your





Dressing Tables

Wardrobes with and
without Mirrors

Morris Suites

Sideboards

China Cabinets

All in Mahogany in light
and derk stains.

Prices to suit all pockets

LED LPF CEL GRR 6



>

nt ree

SOC E COSTES AITO SPT V OTT F PTT E NT PETOETAET IIT



LADIES’ PLASTIC HANDBAGS from $2.52 to $4.91 each
LADIES’ LIZARD SKIN HANDBAGS from $8.61 & $9.77 each
LADIES’ CROCODILE HANDBAGS from $11.85 each

LADIES’ OVERNIGHT BAGS from $3.63 & $4.91 each

CHILDREN HANDBAGS

HARRISON'S

bonus this Christmas and you will find that there
is no better investment you can make with the

money than to buy yourself some smart Furniture

We have a wide variety of styles and designs
and there is nothing to make you feel more happy
in your home than Furniture you like, We are
sure that you can find something to satisfy you

from among our stock.

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

12, & 13 Broad





10, 11, Strect

=











— Also —

with Short or Long Handles $1.02 & $2.14



BROAD STREET
DIAL 2664

-
%
LECCLLECOP_ CCGG GOOFOGCOPFPOOGP FOG PIS SPOS SIPO SOF FFSF EH,
PAGE

SIX



THE LONE RANGER

THEYRE TAKING THE
MESA KID INTO THE DOCTOR'S OFF

WHAT I$ THE
NEW: SONG
EVERYBODY
IS SINGING?








Â¥ iSzhoUs
BE AJUNGLE WAR |=
THE LLONGO PRINCE
DOESN'T GET BACK

a
Cs



SLUG HIM
4s



“yu DID YOU !

)
ee

i 4
iNOBODYS

A TARIN' MY

op





En i a RS |

WHITE
MONKEYS

1 NOT ONLY

7 SAY DEG... THAT
: LOVELY BALLAD
VOU WERE LISTENING TO

ON THE RADIO VESTBROAV.. “a CAN SING

CAN WHISTLE
ir SiR...T






4CKE, KIRK FLL CHECK



BRING HIM IN, SHERIF HE CAN STAY
HERE UNTIL HE'S.PAST THE DANGER
OF INFECTION.



AMBUSHED THE
MESA KID.

WHAT DID SHE MEAN
TO JACK AND JOE OF

TIN PAN ALLEY % —

¢

-

)
\ ye
3
WHO. |S Aa
MELODY LANE?‘

WHY DID SHE VANISH



Cop 1930, King Peeters Syoaicnne, tne, Wert righen vane

DESMOND, THE
ROMANTIC! LISTENING
TO LOVE SONGS

BUT WHEN Sweet
Tec meet â„¢








OF EDENFALL 7 OUCH. OES! THE
WORDS ARE THE

> SAME, BUT
SOMEHOW I LIKED













THAT GIRL'S VOICE
BETTER! WHO WAS



(BUTCH, Y RELAY USE YOUR BRAINS. WE
DONT WANT TROUBLE OVE'2
THAT LITTLE THING? WE GOT

TOO MUCH AT STAKE ON
THIS SHIPS












lA GRAY FORM RACES UP THE GANG |
Pi eo









—— ra
wie /—2a
erent es. |

MISS DORIAN!

YOu' VE BEEN OUT OF THE
TOO LONG, SIR... SHE'S a Dv
LANE..THE NEW SENSATION...
HER FOLK SONGS HAVE

WK OF THE COWIE M" ae
Ta eT es a

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

BY FRANK STRIKER

(You HEARD THE MASKED MAN SAN EID:
CML ON THE MESA KID. THAT'S WHEN
WE GET RID OF HIM!



YOU WILL FIND THE ANSWERS
IN THE NEW RIP KIRBY STORY
STARTING TOMORROW!







MR. KIRBY!
WELCOME HOME



/ JOR. THIS IS
TERRIBLE! we
G GOTTA GET US
DETECTIVE!











THERES A LOW GROWL+
AS DEVIL LEAPS?





|
;

















DELICATE

as a moorbeam

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1950
sa deena a aaah tinge





COOL BEAUTIFUL

“FERGUSON FABRICS”

FOR WEAR AT NIGHT.





For Cake-Making

Baisins—per Ib .... $ .40
Currants—per tb .. 34
Mixed Peel—per lb .. .27

Glace Cherries—
POT TO. ss Se epee 98

Tins Prunes .... .. 70

Tins Baking Powder
; 21e., 34¢., .61

Essences (All Flavours) 12c.
Butter — Lard Ete.

Ieing Sugar—Pkgs. ... 32c.
Riscuits
Tins Peek Frean’s
Twiglets ........ $1.17
Tins Peek Frean’s
Cheeselets ...... 1.24
Tins Crawford’s Cheese
Straws ...ie.ici. 93
Tins Crawford’s Tartan.
Shortbread. .../.. .20
‘Tins Crawford’s Almond
Shortbread ...... 1.29
Tins Carr’s Celery
Biscuits ......... 1.57
Tins Romary Water
Biscuits ......... 1.06
Tins Jacob’s Cream
Crackers ......... 1.52

Condiments
& Extracts
Tins Colmans
Mustard .... .... $ 57
Tins Madras Curry . 76

Tins Bisto (For Gravies,

Stews Etc.) ...... 33
Bottles Kraft Prepared

Mustard ......... Ail
Bottles French

Mustard ........ 33

Jars Bovril .. $1.60, .90—.60
Jars Bonox .... 7le.—40c.
Jars Marmite 97c., 60¢e.—32c.

Confectionery
Bottles Paseall Mixed
Fruit Drops ...... $ .49
Bottles Pascall Mixed
Fruit Drops .....- 56
Tins Toffee Rolls .. 1.08
Tins Barley Sugar .. 91

Tins Pascall’s Glucose
Barley Sugar 98c.—56e.
Tins Pascall’s Court

Fruit Drops ...... 94
Tins Pascall’s Fruit

Barley Sugar .. . 98
Tins Pascall’s Fruit
EI esi ie ES 1,01

Weiners Sausages per







SPECIAL!










With this in mind



also

Ib.

OX-TAILS
TONGUES
TRIPE
KIDNEYS — HEARTS





STOCKED BY LEADING STORES.

DATES,
FIGS,

——

KLM is av ee until

Jimited quan’ | so use
restrictions coat Ni you
wisely the KLIM “the
can puy now: ai
‘deal mills!





—

_ 8c. pkg.

Liqueurs. Wines. Ete,

it } Copr. e
ernaheroas arden CO





SPECIAL!

We. pkg.

wes

Bottles Kummell ............. $4.00
Bottles Bols Cherry Brandy..... 4.00
Bottles Bols Apricot Brandy.... 4.00
Bottle Bols Bastos Port Wine... . 3.00
Bottles Superior Madeira ........ 3.60

Bottles Gilby’s Empire Red Wine 2.50
Bottles Martini Sweet Vermouth 2.78
Bottles Martini Dry Vermouth ... 2.88



In our Meat Department



PRIME AUSTRALIAN
BEEF including
STEAK & ROAST

Dutch Pate de foie per b___ __ $1.30

é

a

Canned Fruits

Tins Fruit Salad .. $ .87
Tins Peaches ...... 12
Tins Letnna Peaches 37
Tins Apricots ...... 62
Tins Strawberries 57c., 45c.

Tins Cherries .... 49c., 63c.
Tins Prunes ....... 70
Tins Crushed
Pineapple ........ 36
Peanut Batter.
Jams, Ete.
Bottles Peanut
Butter ....... 55¢., 35c.
Tins S.A. Pineapple
JAR RY $ AT
Tins S.A. Fig: Jam .. 52

Tins S.A. Apricot Jam 66

Tins S.A. Peach Jam 60

Bottles Hartley’s

._.. Straw: Jam ...... 60

‘Bottles Hartley’s Black
Currant Jam .... Ml

Bottles Hartley’s Apricot
SOM GT a A5












_ en 8h) > ep AREER SE eee a ne a

ccm. Limes alae: ammaeataReea aS

_


- ee a



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1950

CLASSIFIED ADS.



DIED

BROWNE—THER®SA Her funeral will
leave her late residence “River-
ton” Hiver Road for St Mary’s
Church at 9 a.m. Friends are asked

to attend. na
P w Browne, Clawson Browne

(Brazil), & Cecil Browne,

9.41.50-—-In

CHRISTIAN — Emanuel *., Merchant,
Lower Bay Street, (late of United
States) last night. Funeral will leave
Belmont Funeral Home, Belmont
Road, at 430 p.m, today for the
Westbury Cemetery.

Lillian Christian (Wife—U.S.A.), Jane
Maxwell (Mother-in-law), Enid Maxwell
(Sister-in-law) .

Lucille Gokool (Tunapuna, Trinidad),

HALL—Elien Sophie L. yesterday at her
residence Bertley, Deacons Road. The
funeral will leave her late residence
at 9 o'clock this morning for the
Westbury Cemetery. Friends are in-

Hall, Rosa Toppin, Maggie
Hoad, Ben Goring, Maurice Bourne.

9.11.50.
FOR SALE
AUTOMUTIVE

CAR—Ford Prefect i0 ms. done

17540 miles. PS meee
ruc: eatherhe .

ee ree 20.10.50—t.f.n.

CAR—Ford Prefect, March 1949. Dam-
aged in accident Xmas 1949 not used
sirce, 6,000 miles only. This vehicle will
be sold by auction at McEnearney's
Garage to-morrow, Friday 10th, at 2 p.m.
John M. Bladon, Auctioneer. 8.11.50—In.









st what you want for
ph Aeriy Jos. St. Hill, Tweednide
Road.





9.11,50—gn.
ELECTRICAL
ELECTRIC BLANKETS — Excellent

case of illness etc. 30” x 50”. Dial
S18, Da Costa & Co., Ltd. Electrical
Dept. 4.12.50—6n,

ace enca rete onesie
EDISWAN LAMPS — For House or
Factory. 6; 12; 32; 110 and 220 Volts.
More light for less money. Dial 3878
. Costa & Co., Ltd, Electrical Dept.
4.11.50—6n

2





IMMERSION HEATERS Conveni-
ent Electrical appliance for heating
water for Tea, Hot drinks, shaving etc.
Dial 3878 Da Costa & Co., Lid, Electri-





cal Dept. 4.11,50—6n.
FURNITURE

FURNITURE—New and gewd class

second-hand furniture in Mahogany,

Birch and Pine, large variety at Ralph
Beard’s Show Rooms, Hardwood Alley
(Opposite the Cathedral), open daily:
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Phone 4683.
8.11,50—tn.

MISCELLANEOUS

BRUSHES-—-With long handles for
scrubbing the back, made by Kent.
Last a lifetime. Knights Phoenix.









8.11.50—2n.

ts oor Saleen Sa.
ired— ts each, ng .

= 7.11,50.—3n.

EAR PLUBS, for swimming gnd

diving, made of rubbef. Knights Ltd.

. 8.11 .50—2n.



GAS STOVE—with 2 rings, a Grill and
Oven and a tall splash-back, to be seen
at Mrs. G. A. Waite, The Cottage 6
Avenue, Belleville Phone 2553.
7.11,50—3n

GALVANIZED PIPES in 4”, 3”, 21/2”.
and 2” also galvanized sheets in 6ft.,
7ft., anl 8ft. lengths. Enquire Auto
Tyre Company, Trafalgar Street. Phone
2696 . 8.18 .50—t.f.n.

“TIGHTER WICKS—Made of glass
vne wick lasts foréver, never burn}
wut. Knight; Ltd. 8.11,50—2n:

MARSHMALLOWS — Fresh supplies
just received. Knights Ltd.







8.11, 50—2n.
PLASTIC RAINCOATS—Bargains in
Ladies’ Plastic Raineoats $2.40 each

Plastic Head Ties in Assorted. Colours
each. The Modern Drea; Shoppe,
Broad Street. 9.11.50—4n.

RUBBERISED COATS—If you are
trevelling we have a fine assortment “of
better quality rubberishéd coats suitable
for spring and definitely waterproof
with detachable hood $10.00 each. The
Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad Street.

9.14,50—4n

#







XMAS TREES—Imported, see our
show window, with care these trees
last many years, different sizes. Kni, its
Ltd. . 8.11,50—

XMAS CARDS—with views in colour
of Barbados, are now available at
following places. Cave Shephers, City
Pharmacy, Cole's Printery, llins Ltd.,
Johnson's Stationery, Mayfair Gift Shop,
Phoenix Pharmacy, Roberts. & Co.,
8.P.C.K, Book Shop, Bruce Weatherhead
Ltd., Cottage Gift Shop.

7.11.50.—3n,

BUNGALOW—Golf Club Road. Two
bedrooms, living room and porch, bath-
kitchen, garage, servants rqom
with bath and lavatory. Complete wjth
electricity and built in cupboards.
Phone 4481. 8.11.50—5n.

CRYSTAL SPRINGS — St James
Coast. “Annexe” Now available for
rent. By month Vacant. Nov.
Jan. Fully furnished and equipped.
Excellent sea bathing. Private Beach.
Cook, Butler available.

Tel. 91-54. Appointment to view.

FLAT — At Worthing. Phone 8401.
4.1150—t.f.n

FLAT--Small comfortable unfurnished
Flat at Highgate House, St. Michael
Vacant now. For further particulars
phone 4230, Wilkinson & Haynes Co,
Ltd., Office. 7.11.50—t.f.n,

MODERN BUNGALOW—No. 4. Cliiton
Terrace, Upper Bay Street. Telephone
3902 or call on Miss Alma Griffith on
premises.



F









z







WANTED
HELP

BOOKKEEPER—Assistant Bookkeeper
for Marine Hotel Apply between the
hours of 9 a.m. and 41 a.m,

9.11.50—3n.

SERVANTS—Two General Servants.
Apply Kingsley 2nd. Ave; Belleville

SERVANTS—An experienced Cook
with good wagq;, also an house-servant
Apply to Berwyn Guest House, Hastings
or dial 4669. 8.41.50—3n.

TWO OVERSEERS — Required for
Foursquare Factory. For Crop 1951.
Only applicants who can write and
calculate efficiently need apply.

4.11, 50—tn.

MISCELLANEOUS
BOXES — Ail kinds of Card Board
Boxes other begs Rc aga card.
ly Advocate Dept.
a cm nm to W—t.t.n

WANTED TO RENT
FLAT—Fully_ furnished Flat or House
in December, January, February, by re-
sponsible couple, no children. Phone 8317.























7.11.50,—3n.
WANTED TO BUY
Good clas; furniture in Mahogany.

Birch, Pine. Good prices paid. Willing
to purchase entire house furniture from

people leaving island. Apply Ralph
Beard, Hardwood Alley. Phone 4683.
8.11.50—4n



WANTED TO RENT
“HOUSE by English couple on long
Jease with one acre or more land amy-
where in island. Main water lighting
essential." Box X.Y.Z. Co. Advocate.

ee 9.41.50—-3n






TAR for
A

yards ete.

limited quantity

Remaining for sale
AT
Your Gas Co.......Bay St. \
BASS ix Bets ek pee ee 4308 i
——————————_—_—____~
fd

9.11,50—3n. |

TELEPHONE 2508



PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. PHILIP
The Parochial Treasurer’s Office wil!
be removed to » Church Vil-
a St. Philip from ith Nov. 1950.
e Office will be opened for busi-





ness on Mondays, Tuesdays, & Satur-
days from 9 a.fh. to 11 a.m. and from
noon to 3 p.m.
Sed. P. S. W. SCOTT,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Philip
4.1).50—Jn.

NOTICE

The Captain and Owners of the M.V.
. * will net hold themsety

Captain.
W. 8. MONROE & CO., LTD.,
Agents.

8.11,50—2n.



OTICE

To Applicants for Vacant
St, Michael Vestry Exhibitions
at St. Michael's Girls’ School.
Attention is drawn to the advertise
ment appeairng in the Advocate News
paper of Sunday the Sth November,
1950, on page 14, under the caption-
“EDUCATIONAL”—St. Michael's Girls’
School, which states that girls who are
over 8 and under 11 years will be ex-
amined on Friday the 17th day of Nov~
ember 1950, at 9.30 a.m.



will ts and/or guardians of
children within this age group please
note the change in the date of the

examination and comply with the ad_
vertisement
* By Order,

E. C. REDMAN,
Clerk, St. Michael's Vastry.
9,11.50—3n



NOTICE
re the estate of
HILTON LLEWELLYN GOLLOP
deceased
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debts or claims
we the estate of Hilton Llewellyn
bis) deceased, late of Hart's Gap, in

parish of Christ Chureh in this
Island

Bridgetown, on or before the 3st day of
December, 1950, after which date I
shall proceed to distribute the assets of
the deceased among the parties entitled
thereto having regard only to such
claims of which I shail then have had
motice and I will not be liable for the
cssets or any part thereof so distributed
to any person of whose debt or claim
I shall not then have had notice.

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their said
indebtedness without delay.

Dated this 30th day of October, 1950.



RISSA FEDORA GOLLOP, 5

Quail Administratrix of thé
Estate of Hilton Llewellyn
Gollop, deceased.
31.10.50—4n
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The plication of Esmie Crispin
holder Liquor License No. 333 of 1950

granted to her in respect of bottom
floor of a_ wall building at Diamond
Rock, St. Peter for permission to use
said Liquor License at bottom floor of
a 2 storey wall building at Westbury
Rd. St, Michael.

Dated this 7th day of November, 1950,

To E. A. MeLeod, Esq

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
Signed CRISPIN,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be heid
at Police Court, District “A”, on Friday
the 17th day of November 1950, at 11

o'clock, a.m.
E. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A.
9.11,.50—In



PUBLIC SALES |
AUCTION

BAY FILY—‘Joan's Star’, 2 years
by Dunwk—Colleen will be sold
auction during the afternoon of Satur-
day llth, the last day of the races, at
the B.T.C. paddock. 8.11.50-38n

REAL ESTATE

BUNGALOW —- At Brighton,
Rock, Just completed and standing on
7,230 square feet of land with right of
. 3 Badrooms, Tiled Bath
and Modern Kitchenette. Garage and
Quarters. Apply HUTCH-
INSON & BANFIELD. Phone 4543.

9,11 .50—4n.

et wet NEerecesee

“ROCK DUNDO”—Situate at Cave Hill
St. Michael, with approximately 32
Acres of Land. Consisting of 20 Arable
Acres and 12 Acres in Sour Grass and

8. .
The Arable Acreage is as follows:—
Plant and Ratoon Canes .. 14
Preparation ah sel tee @

The House contains three bedrooms.
toilet ar bath, @rawing and dining
rooms, I!brary, Office, closed gallery
ahd kitchen. Servants rooms,







rain water J a ‘of
25,000 gallons. Electric light and
Company's Water. Three miles out'\of
town, bus service. Suitable for Dali

or Development. Tuesday:
and Thursdays 12 noon to 4 p.m.

erty aie Fi
'y in P. B. Boyell

& Skeete, Lucas Street, Sane *
8.11.80—11n.

PROPERTY — One house standing on
approximately % acre of land at Dea-
cons : House contains 4 rooms
and yard enclosed with wall. Suitable
for small dairy. Apply to Hutchingon







& Banfield, Solicitors, James St.
4.11.50—6n.
LOST & FOUND
LOST



DOG—In the vicinity of Maxwells
and Top Rock, a small female dog. Neck
and shoulders white, body dark-brown,

short hair. Answering to the name, ci
“PEGGY”. Rewarded. Lili Cheek:,
Stratheona, Top Rock. oe tes

8.11,50—2n



nineesnidiieenerie ame
GOLD CHAIN—About half yard long
in an_ Envelope between Green's Park
rnd Bay Street. Finder rewarded on
returning to the Advocate Adytg. Office
9.11,50—1n,

SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS
X-2129, Series C_1169, 1170.
Globe ‘Theatre on Saturday, night
Reward offered on returning to the
Advocate Advertising Department. -

8.11.50—2n

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series BB
9994. Finder please return same to the
Advocate Advtg. Office—Rewerd offered
9.11.50—1n

SS
WATCH—Ladies Gold Rolex Wrist
Watch with a brown leather strap.
Between the Dominica Marketing Co.



ao















Barbados | Officers
Association

PFO



The Annual Dinner of the B.O.A.
will be held on Saturday, the 18th
of November at 7.45 p.m. at the
Drill Hall.

Will members who with to
attend please notify the Hony.
Secty. at Telephone No. 4675 or
the Asst. Horsy. Secty, at 3410 by
tomorrow 10th November.

9.11 .50—1n.

SOCPSSOS9SOOSS



5
}

Building on the Wharf formerly known as the Harrison Line
Warehouse.
From 8.00 A.M. on Friday, 10th November, all pareel post busi- |

ness will be transacted there



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

a

GOVERNMENT NOTICES
POST OFFICE NOTICE

REMOVAL OF PARCEL
The Parcel Branch of the General Post Office, Public Build- |
ings, has been removed to the ground floor of the new Government |

BRANCH

The public entrance to the Branch /

is on Prince William Henry Street opposite the Office of Messrs. R. M.

Jones & Co., Ltd.
Addressees who have received

Final Notice in respect cf parcels | FURNESS, WITHY & Co
are again warned that any of these parcels undelivered will be |

returned to country of origin by the first available opportunity

General Post Office,
8th November, 1950.

9.11.50.—2n.



Attention is drawn to

the
(Amendment) Order, 1950, No. 35 which will be published in the

Control of Prices (Defence)

Official Gazette of Thursday 9th November, 1950.















MONTREAL
ZEALAND

AUSTRALIA
LINE
(M.A.N.Z.
S.S. “GLOUCHESTER” sails Freeman
Ue September Tth, Adelaide September
ish, Meibourne September 28th Devon-

NEw =
LIMITED



The M.V Caribbee”" will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Domin.
ica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis &

port October Ist, Sydney October 12th, St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 17th
Brisbane October 24th, arriving at Bar-
| Dados N 26th

These nee have ample space for The M.V. “Daerwood" will ac

chilled, hard frozen and general cargo cept Cargo and Passengers for St



’ ce . bi Lueia, St. Vineent, Grenada &
j la digit temghioaent oe Caerahe are Aruba. Date of departure will he
| Berbados, British Gwana, Windward ama notified
| Leeward Islands.
| For further particulars apply :— B.W.1. Schooner Owners
Se rainAD Ltd. Association Inc.
BW.
& DA COSTA & Co. Ltd, Tel. 4047,
BARBALOS,
| B.W.1.

| AGENTS |

Sona e

| Alcoa









Steamship (o.
Inc.














2. Under this Order (a) the maximum wholesale and retail
selling prices of “Fish-Fresh” are as follows: — ae ORLEANS sha s08
aml anetietet li seein mercer N.O. Wdes
| |, RETAIL SS. “VINNI" 26th Oct 10th Nov
ARTICLE WHOLESALE PRICE , PRICE STEAMER ie 25th Nov
(not more than) j (not more ener pisiantined ve ee
| than) NEW YORK sxBVION
: i N.Y. Biden
Fish—Fresh: — | | SS. “C. G, THULIN” 24th Nov Sth Dec
(a) Bream Snapper, Group- | 8.S. “BYFJORD” i seta S80
; | ee : ne ements _aancusstshecbwintasndemumisanaiaeniatianinantt
er, Amber Fish . . | 26c. per lb. (ex beach CANADIAN SERVICE
+ or boat) 32c. per lb. SOUTHBOUND ean
i i Sails Sail rrives
(b) Dolphin, Kingfish .. | 22c. per Ib. (ex beach wteite of ule ee ttiehs uatine Barbados
at | or boat). 26c. per Ib. S$. “ALCOA PARTNER” October 27th October S0th November 10th
(ce) Albacore, Bill Fish, Bar- | 2-8. “ALCOA PEGASUS” November 10th November 13th November 23rd
racuda | 20c. per lb. (ex beach 8.8. “ALCOA POLARIS November 24th November 27th Semone Th
or boat). 22c. per Ib. PPR eee FE Ra
(d) Flying Fish Se, each (ex beach or Barba: 16
| boat). 6c. ‘each s/s “ALCOA POLARIS” October Sist For St, Lawrence River Ports.
(e) Seine Fish — Mackerel, These vessels have limited passengers .ccommodation,
Cavally, Johns, Jacks
, ‘aces. | :_D. TA & CO., LTD, Canadian Service.
Sprats, Bonita, Herring, | ROBERT THOM fro_new York ia Guif Service. a
Goat Fish 20c. per Ib. (ex beach ssiidineiadaiiiadi a aan
| or boat). | 22c. per Ib.
(f) Pot Fish, other than | | f j
, | | r s if
Barbers and Rock Hinds _ | 18. per Ib. GET THE HORLICK’S HABIT
Barbers and Rock Hinds | 10c. per Ib.
(g) Shark... . wt _ | 14e, per lb,

sen scenes nasi pana tga a pieiesias
(b) the item “Sea Eggs” has been deleted in its entirety





from

the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amendment) Order, 1950,

No, 23.
8th November, 1950,

_ ‘TAKE NOTICE —



|
‘
That British American Tobaceo Com-
pany (Barbados) Limited whose trade
or business address is Green Hill, Lodge
Road, Saint Michael, Barbados, trading
as manufacturers, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part

“A” of Register in connection with
Cigareties and will be entitled to!



| register the same after one month from

the eighth day of November 1950 unles
some person shall in the meantime
give notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on appli-
cation at my office,

Dated this 8th day of November, 1950. !

WILLIAMS,

H.
Registrar of Trade Marks
8.11.50—3n

TAKE NOTICE
MANITOBA MAID

That Midland Flour Mills Limited,
whose trade or business address is 350
Archibald Street, Saint Boniface, in the
Province of Manitoba in the Dominion
of Canada has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in connection with Wheat flour
and other products or preparations
mode from cereals and all other kinds
of foods and ingredients of food and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the eighth day of
November 1950 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in dupli-
cate to me at my office of opposition
of such registration. The trade mark
can be seen on application at my office

Dated this 8th day of November, 1950

H TLLIAMS,

. WwW .

Registrar of Trade Marks.

TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers,







TAKE NOTICE

That The Goodyear Tire & ‘sansa 4
Company, a company organised under
the laws of the State of Ohio, located
at 1144 East Market Street, Akron in
the County of Summit, State of Ohio,
United States of America, whose trade
or business address is 1144 East Market
Street, Akron, in the County of
Summit, State of Ohio, U.S.A, trading
as The Goodyear Tire & Rubber
Company has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
er in connection with pneumatic, |
Cushion and solid tires constructed
wholly or partly of rubber amd used!
for motor trucks, motor cars, motor-!
cyclés, bicycles, airplanes and other!
vehicles, and including parts of such|
fires such as treads, otiter casings or |
tire shoes and inner tubes therefor, and |
will be entitled to register the same}
after one month from the eighth day of)
November, 1950 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in|
duplicate to me at my office of oppost- |
tion of such registration, The
mark can be seen on application at my
office.

Dated this 8th day of November,

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks
8.11.50—3n





———

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

TEST MATCH CRICKET
BALLS
10/- Each

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
A

Fountain Pen Repair Service

Wats Adous

JOHNSON’S HARDWARE


















































That Hull, Jones & Co., Limited, a
British Company, whose trade or busi-
ness address is No. 1, Chacon Street
in the City of Port-of-Spain in the
Island of Trinidad, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part
“A" of Register in connection with
milk-based foods and all other sub-
stances used as food or as ingredients
in food, and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the
eighth day of November 1950 unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
sition of such registration, The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office

Dated this 8th day of November, 1950,

, H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.

8.11.50—8n,



os
Arrivals

CALENDARS
XMAS CARDS, TAGS
XMAS DOYLEYS
PENKNIVES
Sandow’s Expanders
Leather Photo Frames
Child’s Pram Straps
Child's Hand Bags
Etc, Ete,

NEWSAM & CQ,

——_



New





| REAL ESTATE —

JOHN
4.

BLADON

AF.S., F.V.A.
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE

“ROCKLEY’ (Near Golf Courve)
A modern coral stone villa with
separate lounge and dining room
Three bedrooms (all with basins
ond fitted wardrobes) tiled bath-
room, separate toilet, well fitted
kitchen, two car garage, servant's
quarters and cl¢verhy laid out gar—
den, now offered for sale at a
lew figure

THE OLIVES: Upper Collymore
Rock. This iarge modern stone
bungalow with about 1 aere should
appeal to a buyer who wants a

| really solid property conptructed
ot the best obtainable materials
There is a large living room
2fit x 14ft.) galiery (48%ft, x
lU4ft.) 4 bedrooms (one 23\eft. x
19ft.) modern kitchen, paved
courtyard, lawns, kitchen garden
end orchard Well placed = for
chools and transport to town

“SUNNYSIDE” Gibbs Bay, St

| Peter. A modern coral stone resi-
| dence containing a lounge, dining
| room, kitchen, 3 bedrooms (with
| Wash basins) gallery, ‘toréroom,
| aren garage and servant's



quarters. The house » set well
back in grounds of approximately
2 acres with about 200 ft. road
irontage. The neighbouring prop
eh, is excellent and there is

ht“of Way to the beach oppo-
site. Very suitable for conversion
into a large house and there is
ample room for further develop.
ment on this land

CRANE VIEW AND CRANE
VILLA: These attractive properties
with over 4% acres of land near
the Crane Hotel ure offered for
ale’ as a whole or separately
Full particulars may be obtained
on application

RENTALS

‘WINDY RIDGE” St. Jomes
Unfurnished. 7~roomed Bungalow
) with & gere of ornamental
vegetable gardens.
‘CUMBERLAND HOUSE” Cod
| “ington Hill. With about 2 acres
| Unfurnished.

LUXURY BEACH HOUSE: Fully
Furnished, On St. James Coast

and





REAL £STATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

| PLANTATIONS BUILDING





————

CHRISTMAS IS FAST APPROACHING

— and we

XMAS CRACKERS,
|) THE

have —

XMAS TREES, TOYS.

Come in early and select yours.

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)
Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets.














It’s
mended

by the
Medical

Profession



all pure



pre-digest-








+d nourish-




ment the world












that is over.

obtainable from Grocers and Chemists.

JOHN F. HUTSON LTD.—Agents.

LPOREDOVOR DOSE DV PSSODOE A SPO P EOL IO PSPS SPO OV SOO,
ss
y

*.
%



s
“
4
“



THANPS SALE

PRINCE WM. HENRY STREET DIAL 3466
MANY ALLURING OFFERS AWAITING YOU !

LADIES !
Embroiderea ANGLAISE in charming Patterns
has just arrived. Quantity limited.

SOOO LOSS



GOoOop NEWS FOR
THE ACTIVE WOMAN !



USE

Q
“SILKESEPT” ==

For
Perfect

Sanitary Protection

Made
by Sweden's
Leading
Manufacturing

Specialists

SILKESEPT

provides greatest

comfort through

super
| maximum



softness and

absorbency “4

| SULKESEPT
| SANITARY TOWELS

AVAILABLE FROM ALL DRUG STORES.

——— OO

STOKES & BYNOE LTD.—Agents





SHIPPING NOTICES |











PAGE SEVEN



oe ————



—

MARBLES and PISTOLS with CAPS |

ROBERTS & CO.—DIAL 330i—High Street
















j
NOTICE

{

Subscribers to the —
“ADVOCATE” Newspaper in }} cqqSubseribers to the =~
the Belleville Area, are ADVOCATE” Newspaper.
asked to note that Berry ) are asked to note that if there

Callender is no longer in

my employ, and therefore

is not authorised to ¢ollect

any more subscriptions.

N. LAYNE,
Agent.

7.11.50—3n

is any dissatisfaction with
tho

D.al 2287

“LOOK IN AT....

** BOOKER’S ”°

We have just opened a lovely assortment of
XMAS CARDS
XMAS CRACKERS
LADIES TOILET SETS

PLASTIC POWDER BOWLS

PIFCO HAIR DYERS
PIFCO VIBRATORS .
XMAS TREE LIGHTS... .ete. ete..
‘Call in at BOOKER’S Early i

BOOKER'S (e'D0s) DRUG STORES LID.”

Pharmacy

For your XMAS GIFTS :— |
'

eet

Broad Street and Hastings Alpha

I'm UNLOADING
GIFTS
AT COLLINS __

Drop in at COLLINS and
look over our Stocks of
FINE XMAS PRESENTS...

cent

See Our display of FOUNTAIN PENS, CIGAKS, FIPES.
LEATHER GOODS, RAZORS, TOILET GOODS,
PERFUMERY, ETC., ETC.

COLLINS DRUG STORES.



BOOKS

SUITABLE for BOYS and GIRLS
OF ALL AGES

THE STORY OF TARN by Nora Mylrea (an adventure story for Girls)

THAT IMP MIRANDA by Mary Gervaise (an adventure story for Girls)

A MAID IN ARMOUR by Hugh Chesterman (this story set in fifteenth
century England, tells how Ann Payton travels to London to her Brother
who is wounded and in hiding after the defeat and rout of the Lancas-
trians at Barnet)

A YEAR WITH JENNIFER by Mary Gervaise (Before Jennifer's arrival,
Lorne Castle was better known ax “Castle Forlorn’. But her Cheerful
disposition was infectious and welcomed by her cousins, and the days
were full of fun and laughter),

A LITTLE PRINCESS by Frances Hodgson Burnett
NANCY—NEW GIRL by Ethel Talbot

for Boys).

and
THE BOYNTON MANOR SECRET by Annerley Wood (spy or
ing tale of

THE PIRATES OF PAPUA by James M. Downie (this is a t
t the Pacific for Boys)
THE GORI SECRET by David J, Gammon (amazing adventures from Chin-
Kiang to Pekin and thence to the Gobi Desert).
MYSTERY at THREE ELMS by Michael D, Gibson
MARLOW of the MOUNTED by T. C. Bridaes
+ IN GREAT WATERS by B. Keble Chatterton (Chinese Pirates of Modern
Days! Chang Kling's mighty submarine roves the seas from Shanghai
to Plymouth, destroying and pillaging)
Make your selection now at the

8. P. C.K. :
BOOK DEPARTMENT

lst Floor,
Cc, F. HARRISON & CO,, LTD,
And you will be thrilled at se Tales of Mystery and Adventure
between the pages of these BOOKS

4







| POGARTY'S




| December~ \

Wm. FOGARTY LTD.

Invites an inspection of their new and

Exclusive creations in

BRIDAL MATERIALS
VEILS, WREATHS and

other Bridal Accessories

WOMAN'S GREATEST DAY...
HER WEDDING DAY

Naturally, she must look her best...
and can too... with Materials

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tt dna tareanestitdat

7)

Be)
;
i



CRT alelesiin tens

PAGE EIGHT



THE SWALLOW

ROLF FELDMAN wins the Senior dive at the Harrison College Aquatic |





Sports yesterday with a graceful :wallow dive.

Manning Champion
At Aquatic Sports

BILLY MANNING last ye

v’s Class 1 Victor Ludorum again

emerged champion of Clas; 1 with 41 points in the Harrison
College Annual Aquatic Sports held yesterday at the Bar-
bados Aquatie Club, Charles Evelyn was Class 2 Champion
with 25 points, P. John.on with 11 points was Class ¢
Champion and I. Skinner was champion of Class 4 with 9

points.
by Set A one point behind.

First Test
Left Drawn
In India

NEW DELHI, Nov. 8
The first unofficial Test
tween India and the Common-



wealth Touring Cricket Team
ended here to-day ina tame
draw. After adding 89 this

mowing to the overnight score
of 340 for four, India who made
169 in their first knock declared
their second innings at 429 for
six wickets, leaving the Common-
wealth team (on 272) to get 327
in three hours and 45 minuutes.
When the match ended the Com-—
monwealth had made 214 for one
wicket. Hazare and Adhikari
attacked vigorously when the
final day’s play began. Their
fifth wicket partnership put on
116 in 104 minutes before Adhi-
kari was held at mid-on. Hazare
had garried his overnight score of
98 to 144 not out when India de-
claned .

Hazare batted magnificently and
gave no chances. His innings
lasted altogether just under six
hours and ineluded 17 boundaries,
Laurie Fishlock and Gimblett
opened quietly for the Common-
wealth.

They tried to force the pace
after lunch and Gimblett was
particularly severe on Nayudu the
leg-break bowler. He hit 68 in

cluding’ ten fours before spooning | 2nd, A

a return..catch to Mankad. The

pair put on 105 in just over three] ¢

hours helped by fielding lapses.

Gimblett was twice dropped
while Fishlock also gave a chance.

Emmett joined Fishlock in an-
other three-figure partnérship,
Fishlock completed his century

two minutes before time having
hit a six and seven fours. It was
his first century of the tour,

The scores :—
India ist Innings .

.. 169
Commonwealth ist Innings ....

272

India 2nd Innings ’
(for 6 wkts. decld. ......., 429
(Hagare 144 not out; Adhikari 56)

Worrell 52—21—-120—3; Ramadhin
58—22—-1l1l—1; Shackleton
14—2—41-—1; Commonwealth 2nd
Innings 214 for 1 wicket. Fishlock
102 not out; Gimblett 63; Emmett

not out 43.
Renter,



HE WAY

| HE WANTED A
FIREPLACE



WITH A HOUSE TO PUT 3-FOOT LOGS i lal
ATTACHED: IN IT! NOTHING DINKY! a
I WANT THE REAL
MS COY!!



They'll Do It Every Time

7 Y
CHIMNE!

CHEDDAR TOLD | really DRAW!I WANT

THE CONTRACTOR, / 4 FIREPLACE THE SIZE

OF ONE WALL-ALMOSTâ„¢

YOU KNOWâ„¢BIG ENOUGH

Set F. was the winning set with 80 points followed

It was a fine afternoon and a
crowd of over one hundred people,
which included most of the teach-
ing staff of Harrison College and
many of the boys, was present at

1e Aquatic Club pier to see the
spo,'ts. Very few parents of the

s taking part attended, En-
lirants were not as good as last
} ear and there seemed to be a
jack of interest in aquatics among
the boys, except the small percer-

be-|tage of those taking part. How-

ever, Set rivalry was very keen
among the youngsters who were
looking on.

The results were as follows :
CLASS 1

(A); 2nd, H, Weatherhead (F); 3rd, F
Manning (A). Time 411 secs
CLASS 2. 25 YDS.—l1st, E. Johnson

(F); 2nd, G. Jordan (E); 3rd, C, Evelyn
{F). Time 212 sees.

CLASS 3, 25 YDS.—list, P. Johnson
(D); 2nd, B. Nicholls (E); M. Gibbs (F).
Time: 26) secs.

CLASS 4. 25 £DS.—lIst, I. Skinner (C);
2nd, M. Evelyn (F); 3rd, R. Grannum
\A), Time: 272 sees.

CLASS 1, 100 YDS,—Ist, B. Manning
(A); 2nd, F. Manning (A); 3rd, H
Weatherhead (F), Time: 1 min 31 1/2

secs.

CLASS 2. 50 YDS.—lIst, C. Evelyn (F);
2nd, G. Jordan (E); ard, E. Johnson (F)
Time ; 54 sees.

CLASS 3. 50 YDS.—Ist, B. Nicholls
(E) and P, Johnson (D) (tie); 3rd, L. O.
Taylor (D), Time: 1 min, 10 secs.

CLASS 4. 50 YDS,—Ist, I. Skinner (C);



and, M, Evelyn (F); 3rd, H. Davis (EB),
Time ; 1 min. 13] _ sees.
CLASS ji, 150 ¥YDS.—lIst B. Manning
(A); 2nd, F. Manning (A); 3rd, H
Weatherhead (F). Time: 2 mins 12 secs,
CLASS 2. 100 YDS.—Ist, C. Evelyn
iF); and, G. Jordan (BE); 8rd EB. Johnson

(F}. Time: 1 min, 29) secs.
100 YDS,—Ist,
Nicholls (E); 2nd, P, Johnson (D); 3rd,
L. Taylor (D). Time: 2 mins 10; secs.
BREAST STROKE 50 YARDS (Open)
—Ist, B. Manning (A); and, F. Manning
(A); 3rd, H. Weatherhead (F). Time :
1 min, 8 secs
SENIOR DIVE—lst, R.
Taylor (A); Jrd,
head (F).

ere RELAY.—Ist, Set F; 2nd, Set
7. Ord, Set
JUNIOR RELAY.—l1st, Set C; 2nd, Set
F; 8rd, Set D,

BACK STROKE 50 YDS. (Open).—list
F. Manning (A); 2nd, G. Jordan (EB)
ard, E. Johnson (F), Time: 1 min, 10%

secs,
JUNIOR DIVE.—1st, I. Skinner (C);
me . Evelyn (F); 8rd, P, Johnson
0.

10) secs.
220 YDS. (Open).—ist, C. Evelyn (F);
2nd, B. Manning (A); 3rd, G, Jordan
(EE). Time: 3 mins, 44 secs.

CLASS 3 AND 4.

Feldman (E);
H. Weather-

SUMMARY OF POINTS

Set A, 79, B. 0, C, 20, D. 18, E.49, F. 80.



DESTROYER ON FIRE

RIO DE JANEIRO, Noy. 8.

Seven of the crew of the 1,500-
ton Brazilian destroyer Green-
halgh suffered burns when a fire
broke out in the engine room yes-
terday. The destroyer, which was
taking part in exercises off the
coast, returned to its base with-
cut help.—Can, Press.

Registered U. 5. Putent Oftee








Sonne TOTED IN
THOSE 3-FOOT Logs

JUST ONCE». AND
WHOT HOPPEN #
YOU GASSED IT!

Victoria—M.C.C. Match ::
Ends In Draw |




i
|
THe MATCH between Victoria and the M.C.c. Touring |
team ended in a draw here teday after Victoria had taken with j
first innings lead, rain preventing any play after tea. } :
At the close the MCC were 54 ooh = Pe
runs ahead wit six second Gainpto 22 0 16 ; eS
mnings wickets in hand, having] Close 15 2 63 2
; : 9a ld dain err S66 © 8
lo ‘ ie ~ 79 runs when rain M.C.C. 2nq Innings
curtailed play. ' Hutton ¢ Kerr b Johnston i3
sarlie lictorie VF brought| Washbrook ¢ Loxton b Johnsor 32 BREAKF
serligny sipile BaS Sree Sheppard stpd. MacDonald b Ring 19 QUAKER Oats
theiy Monday score of. 283 fot] pewes ib.w. Johnston 5 carbohydrates
seven to 331 in reply to the MCC Close not out 7 with Quaker Osts Your hair will be
. ‘ lompton not out o | BB pece enweRnGoY.----
sirst innings total of 306 for nine Petre th ine boii alae :
declared . ee Bn eee 5s handsomer by far
R. Howard the Victorian open- Total \for 4 wickets) 79}
ing batsman scored 139 in a) pan of wickets: 1-25, 2-61, 3-06, | |h oooe gtAMINA.---° when you treat it te.
natient innings of just cver six | 4-73. Sia
urs rin yhich he hit one LING ANALYSIS ‘ u
he urs during Ww oe 9 ‘Vaseline’ Hair Tonic,
six and 11 fours. bp ss Bill Johnston il 1 ee |
(From Our Own orrespondent) Kerr 6 0 2S
M.C.C. Tet Innings 306 for 9 declared | lan Johnson os:3- Bee Just use a few drops
VICTORIA—-Ist Innings Ring 2 1
K. Meuleman b Bailey ist ee QUICK HEALTH BREAKFAST! a day... then see
ward |.b.w. Close f ’ eee
arvey ¢ Sheppard b Bailey 7 Boil 2 cups af water. Add salt. When
sett b Bailey 19
S. Loxton c Hutton b Bailey 4
K. Kerr c Close b Bailey 3
lan Johnson run out 26
D. Ring ec Berry b Close 75
1. Me Donald ¢ Bailey b Hollies 4
W. Johnston stpd. MacIntyre b }
Compton ; 30
F. Iverson not out 1 |
Extras (4 byes, 3 leg byes) 7
Total 331
Fall of wickets: 1—17, 2-81, 3—71,
$-#5. 5-89, 6-161, 7-281, 8-287,
Â¥ 5
BOWLING ANALYSIS
S31 ee
hiner “oe a ie
Balley 2 6.6% §



Board of Health
Meeting

From Page 5

wil have to get out within «
month. Some may be hard hi
and have to slaughter their catile
This would mean a shortage oi
milk in St. Michaet. He then ask>¢
hat the sub-committee be a

pointed te meet the committee o
the Commissionérs of Health

Mr. Fred Goddard suppor.c¢e
Mir, Kidneys views and said tha
it would be wise to allow (+

dairies in the City area to remain
until the milk supply beca:ne
better.

No New Dairies

He said that if this law
enforced immediately it would
impose hardship on people who
bought a gill or half pint of milk
No new dairies were springing ur
because very few people wanted
to handle that type of work.

He would support that a sub-
committee be appointed to meet the
committee from the Commission-
ers of Health because some bene-
fit might be derived from such a
meeting,

Dr. F. N. Grannum said that
years ago the Board went into the
matter and it was decided that
the City of Bridgetown was un-
suitable for dairy keeping and
this must remain in force. Dairy
keepers have made no attempt tc
get out and any hardships that
they now encounter they have
brought on their own heads.

After further discussion the
Board decided to appoint the sub-

was

50 YDS.—lst, B. Manning) committee.

The report by the Govern-
ment’s Chief Sanitar: Inspector
for the month of mber, 1940

was received,

What's on Today

Mr. Edmund Watts, man-
aging director of Watts &

atts Shipping Company,
is due to arrive here at day-
break today by the 8.8.
“Lady Rodney”.

Second day’s racing in
the three-day Autumn Meet
of the Barbados Turf Club
takes place at the Garrison
Savannah. The first race
will be run at 12,30 p.m,

The Police Band under
Capt. Raison will play.
..The Shamrock Credit
Union hold a meeting at
St. Patrick’s School
p.m. The Treasurer and
Secretary will submit their
reports.

* 7 +
ASSIZES—FRIDAY
No, 31 Rex vs.
Denald Downes





— ———

The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises; 5.52 a.m.
Sun Sets: 5.36 p.m.
Moon (New): November 9
Lighting: 6.00 p.m.
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington):

Total for Month to Yester-
day: 2.17 ins.

Temperature (Max.) 84.5° F

Temperature (Min,) 71.0° F

Wind Direction: (9 a.m,)
E.8.E.; (3 pm) W.N.W.

Wind Velocity: 5 miles per
hour

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.812;
(3 pm.) 29.722






eT










BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1950

LOOK YOUR BEST







Youngsters grow

Talllv, Stungew

MELBOURNE, Nov. 8.



























HEADLEY WRITING Cook i sictions ge Tee einer

BOOK ON CRICKET e #

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Nov, 1

the difference!
Buy a bottle today!

at’s all.

George Headley is busy io
England completing his first
cricket book. Title i: “Cricket in e
the Middle” and publishers wil}
be the same as for Sir Donald
Bradman’s last book

Â¥ cee MARK
ASE. ia the ii ed trade
fl the Chesebroush Sila, Con Cou'd

Headley, West Indies greatest
batsman, will be the second West
Indian cricketer to write s book
But he will b2 for behind the
other-—-Learie Constantine—wiic
has already written no fewer than
five,

To-day’s Tip

uMOLENE

Let your first act on morning be
to GARGLE with a inixture
of warm water and a
little LIMOLENE

TONIC,











\

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|

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YOU'D be surprised at the |
PHLEGM it brings from your
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throat It’s time to start making

LIMOLENE 18 to 67c. a Bottle

Test Waterman's Ink any way you will.
You will find it infinitely superior for these 3 veasouny)

1. It’s all ink—Is never diluted; no solvents:

2. It costs no more—it is a quality prodvel.
at a low price.

3. It goes further—one bottle of W:
Blue-Black ink writes up to 3 times more wa

When you need ink, ask for W.
%», the finest ink in the most yseful |

aterman’s

up your suits for the

Exhibition and the com-

ORIENTAL

GOODS!
CUROIS,

ing Xmas Season,

JEWELLERY,
SILKS, (Se Habla Espanol)

THANFS

Pr. Wm, Hry. St. DIAL 3466

We have an excellent

of



(Articulos) |
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selection Tropical





LOOK FOR Suitings in a variety of
THIS BOTTLE

oS

TILT IT FOR
ECONOMY




ao |
PODSOO PPOSSOO, |
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Mr. REUBEN GILKES

requests the pleqwre of your ‘,
company tg his ’.

s
DANCE :
AY QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE

TO-NIGHT
(Bank-holiday) 2n@ Baces Night
ADMISSION: — — 2/-

Music supplied by Mr. Arnoid
Meannweil's full Orchestra

shades and designs in




als.







We wish you Luck at the Races!

POSS SSSPOSSD SSF OS yy
Ott OS
{
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CAVE SHEPHERD & Co.,Ltd.

COSC SOSSSCLES



A Well-stocked Bar—Please Invite But?
your Friends, 9.117.501",
3 pegeccoceoscoce: || WE COULD DO MUCH BETTER!
) SSS A
\ We Give You 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET



FOOD OUT OF THIS WORLD
As Prepared by

MAYFAIR
BEAUTY
SALON

MRS, LEVITT
NICER THAN EVER!
BETTER THAN EVER !

For the convenience of our
Customers

NEW LOCATION—
HOTEL ROYAL

PHONE 2504

plain and striped materi-





At
B’DOS FASHIONABLE “EATERY”

CHINA DOLL RESTAURANT

No. 6 Marhill Street
SOCIETY’S RENDEZVOUS
OVEN TO MIDNITE




RED HAND PAINTS
FOR ALL PURPOSES

“MATINTO” FLAT PAINT
in White, Cream and Green

For Interior Decoration of Walls and
Woodwork.









For appointments.

9.11.50.—2n.
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for Enjoyment :

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White and Cream

“SPECIAL” PAINTS.
Grey, Dark Grey, Tropical White B’dos
Light & Dark Stone. For’ Exterior
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PERMANENT GREEN PAINT
For Exterior or Interior.

RED ROOF PAINT
For Galv. Iron or Shingles.

PAINT REMOVER
For the easy removal of old paint.

Phone 4267, 4456.

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.

DIAL 4692

>



































The Sign of
QUALITY






NEW and renewed MAHOGANY
anc other Wardrober, Dresser.
robes, Chests_of-drawers and
Line mn Pressa —Vanaties, Dressing
Hie bn Stools, Sereen Frame:,—
Single and Double eds!

Separate Side Ralls. Lathe"

Dining Kitchen und Fancy
bai 4 ar ‘aney
Tables, Sideboards $47 up, China
Kitchen and Bedroom Cabinets
"5 Larders, Waggons, Liquor Cases.
Ccolerator 1



SPECIAL 3-piece floral U hobs.
tered Suite to seat Five -Morris,
Tub and Rush Suites and separ-










nervous about

ate pieces—iBerbice and Ba:

‘ e a sy- T @ @O i dh 5
chaits, $3 up—Cheval and thar
thes ene unframed Mirrors up

o bociy—heigh

Ronee eht 50 x 16—Bookracks

ith sloping or Flat Tops.

L.S. WILSON

Trafalgar Street.

YOU NEED!I!

———

Dial 4069.

See Our Show
Room Ditplay

CARPENTERS’ RULES
STEEL & METAI.LIC TAPES
PLANES

PLANE IRONS

SPOKE SHAVES
CHISELS in all sizes
HAND & BREAST DRILLS
DRILL BITS

GIMLETS

HACK SAWS & BLADES
PIPE WRENCHES
SOCKET WRENCHES
NAIL PULLERS






Will be open to Members from 9,00 a.m, to 9.00 p.m.

TO-DAY

_ And every week-day. Sundays 6.00 p.m. till 9.00 pan

FOR COLD FOOD, SANDWICHES & DRINKS BEFORE AND AFTE!
| THE RACES

Entrance in Luke’s Alley when Colonade Stores are closed












PAGE 1

Iliiirsdai I 9 5 • Barbalms lutrocafe Pr|.: FIVI 1INTJ, EIGHTY U.S. PLANES CRIPPLE RED TA Republican Gains Will Vex Truman Democrats Have 2-Vote Majority In Senate NEW YORK, Nov. 8. PRESIDENT TRUMAN today faced a troubled two years in office with his Democratic Party'; majority in Congress dangerously whittled down by the Republicans in yesterday's mid term elections. In the Senate with the Republicans gaining five seats, the strength of the parties now stands: Democrats 49, Republicans 47. In the House of Representatives with some results still to come, the position is: Democrats 232, Republicans 199. The poll has been hen-Tier thn usual in mid .tern •lections. s.-i, .,*... ACHESON WILL NOT RESIGN WASHING HIV Nov 1 Dean Acheeon ald today th,u ne had no intention Of re* if run* a* United S*ate* Secretary o' State a> a rvojlt ". CongretMCnal election*. i rMU) "iu %  %  thai h.did i Sinn remit" condiluu .1 repudiation of the Amerh-.fi foreign policy Hi ., %  !h.4 %  11 .in believed the election would hey** sn >* aondud of the %  an Of UH I'nifd Stale* Aihi*4i|| satri ne had been ;iski-i to comment on %  tateineni by H.irnl'i Stasscn leading Republic.m mat election returns C0nstituied ;, neiiiatid fo; tinSceie tarv ol State'* re-ngnatlnn —CRrutcr.l FATHER AMI lilM.illlK Gammans Has A Plan To Keep fmpi'rt Togethei %  IF..O OB e esrisaseiseai LONDON. Not H Mr. David Gamman*, Conservative MP. ha* a plan which he feels may prevent the British Empire falling apart—a expresses today in a leuar to the Ociilp Telegraph. His plan is to establish here in London a Council of the Empire to be attended annually by reprc M-ntatlves of all British colon!.-* and members of the Houses ol Commons and Lords Mailer* t" be dealt with by this Council would Include foreign pollc defence, communication*, trad*, industry and social services "Three or four years ago I would not have believed such a Council could be formed." he told me today. But we have see* u similar model at Strasbourg successfully carried through an : 1 believe an Bmplre Council or. Strasbourg lines could and would operate very well Indeed." H> points out in a letter to the Teletrape. that apart from the disruptive influence of Communism, there is in the Empire a great upsurge of Nationalism which 'Vmsul* *elf-gv*s*a*ent Tlie colonies which would have the Kreatett difficulty Jn exlatlng wlthtut outside capital want complete independence at once. Dictatorship Follow* Mr. Gammane says it Is eaay to condemn colonial politicians 11 being unrealistic, out most of them do not realise that without outside capital their economy would collapse. Few of them realise in addition that a democratic constltut'on which fails either through lack ol experience or on account of political jobbery i* Inevitably succeeded by a dictatorship "In the long run an Empire cannot be held together by ignoring the strong tides of Nationalism" He says "If it la to survive. It must be a living, permanen*. end growing entity in the mind; .%  nd souls of colonial peoples a: well at our own." He suggest* that the answer u theae problems is the establishment of the Empire Council—'an abiding partnership of Interests"— and says a body meeting every year in its own Chamber would not only be a binding link, "but would enable Colonial politician^ to contribute their advice and Republican a declrve victory Leading Taft scored hi* Democrat opponent and oraanised labour in Ohio The Democrats retained nnm,"i of the Senate with rr|W inajoiity uf !*.< -eats am it was not certain that President Truman could re'y on irfid nt) among ail 49 Deinocn He Senaton in the post, some rebel" Democrat* hai with Hepubllcans on vital poIVv issues Hepiiblican leader* in Wjihjii*ton described the result* of the ooll as a "vote of no confidence' In Secietarv of State Dean Acheron and American policv in I he Far East. Both parties won 18 -e'lt* in the Senate The other 60 Senator.were not up for re-election. The Republicans won six seats from their opponents but lost oi\* of their own. Truman's 4 defeated lieutenant were SenateScot' Luca* f Illinois). Senator Fmnci Myers, Senator ElbeiThomas. (Utah), Chairman of the Seuat< Lnbour Committee and SenarMillnrri Tydlngs (Maryland) Chairman of the Armed Services Committee who went d' after 24 years in the Senate The loss of these four leading rfice holders was an even greate •low to Democrat prestige by th< fact that only one senator was beaten by a nationally known politician He fell to pennsylwiV* Governor, 69-ycar-old Duff In addition to their four main d* feats, the Democrats lost senate seats in California and Idaho Helen .Douglas. (01 m film actress was swamped In ti tide of votes for the Republic) member of the House of Representatives. Richard Nix. n. ernOM •vork on the House of Un American Activities Committee brought to public attention evidence which resulted In the conviction of Alger Htas for perjury. The Republican tide in California alto *wupt J;.rueJ Roosevelt. eldest son of the late I'n-ident Franklin Roosevelt for the state governorship The present Governor. E,';l Warren was re-elected with double the votes polled for Roosevelt. —Renter rounsel facing to problem* which arc II of us" Liberal Split Foreshadowed i.iMni:; Nov S spill among the nine liberal r> P irtlamenl vn foreshadowed today, after three of them failed U support thrli nartf otes directed last night against the Laboui Cjovcrnmen' Thev abstained from \oting for Liberal sponsored motion which olamid the Government tat the J of IIVI.IK Thev were also absent when the Liberals Joined with Conservatives In voting against control* and nationalization The labour Government on on both divisions The name* of 1*0 of the absent Liberals. Lady Megan Lloyd Qoorae, dcouty party leader and daughter of the late Lloyd George and Emrvs Rotierts, origlnallv appeared as sponsors uf the rising costs' motion The third absentee as Edgar Granville. Political observers suggested they abstained because they did not want the motion to go beyond a general discussion, when it was pressed to the vote, thev backed out —Can. Press 1NTRANMT to Trinidad ynUrday by the %  '0*-.cog^ % %  • %  tor Indl; 1 Coauni*ionei for the Caribbean Ax*-. Him Aimnrt Mohan Sahay Accoatpanisd by hi* daughUr ho u an route to take up hi* sppoln* meat. Be 1* pictured here wiUi his gaiuhter *t the BoKgog" Wu.li. %  yenUrdny Tory3f.P 9 8 Want To Know Shipping Plans For W.i. LONDON, Nov • Conservative MP's here wrl %  horlK take action to try lo bring about an improvement in the shipping %  ffrVMM ie t ween this country and the West bMstag 11 was learned todav that the Weil Indie* Sub-Committee aielo ballot for an adjournment of the deha shippl ,ou, ItllK vice bjntwwn I Mulun Progresses PRETORIA. Nov. 8 Prime Minister Daniel Malnn continued today to make exceptionally good progress after the operation, his doctor reported Doctors stated yesterday that the Operation on' his urinary system was not serious —fan. Prrsa. i IIOSSMI Hi I All AM H U K and (ha rnrthbeen. In addi. lion Mr James Griffiths. Colontil Snentary who re.-enii> told the House that no practical plans hnn Mibmitled for improvii'i: shipping service* between the United Kingdom and the Carih!*jn. 1* to be asked exactly whai KI.UIS have o far been submitted and by whom. Mr Peter Smdher-, Secreur> ol HM We*! Indie* Sub-Commlttei* -aid that in addition Conservative.* in anxious at the earliest opportunity tr> have n half-day Commondevoted to West Indl afii.ir Referring to the question of hipping service*, Mr Smithei* aid mofiel ir| dsnlgsflasai were the chief obstacle to improvement* lim In' iKunted out that improved services would benefit the Iniuorters ol British goods and thit as a lone-term view it was a txn•eivable loss on passenger service 1 that would be balanced to some 'egree by an incre.!**' in trade TRADE BETWEEN INDIA AND W.I.MUST BE MUTUAL Says New Indian Comtnissiomir PAYING HIS FIRST VISIT t-> the West Indus to tatki hU duties as Indian CummtkaioiiiM foi the Cariblw.ni .1 1 Shn Anand Mohan Sahay told the Advocate yesterday ihh. dhect trade between India and the WtM UMJWI must 1 mutual in order to be prosperous and successful. Anything that India could supply to th West indies which would 1 of mutual interest would certainly be encouraged. BUTLER IS ANGRY by Labour Defeated LONDON, Nov 8 The Labour Government w< defeated todny I > 235 v..tcs to 2W but on .111 Lsaui which mean its resignation I' a proposal by KrnneCi I': "t He 1-tuinptnn the country nuuUai il which h abundance of exphM*. % %  material, and I am not refciiing to the oilfield*. So Trinidad mev lie said to be holding it* bream. and woiiii.-i niK what no • 1 1 Hit ran* it iron) fnajaud %  Uaacoine ya*ierda. was invi momper i of the Indian 1 ily. lie left later in Hi. gee n isia lor Trinidad, hi* headguailei*, BSO wS accompanied by hll He said that sliippmt. played a very Imp a great deal ot thell Industry wa* being and as it grew, they would ha\i certain line* going to ottu of the world In havtnj 1 I close connections with the V/eal : idi. ihey would ham cm am lines operating in this area, and it would be uf great inter .m ii. supplied from the weal Indw India and vice versa Their tries were making very healthy P Flames Rise 21,000 Feet Over Bombed Town Reds 45 Miles Front Lhasa NEW DELHI. Nov. 8. -incut* in Tibet at Id to have given Impel i certain nen-Cornini M ii'inlorea) thvi %  nand for popul-i Qovernmoat %  .uro lor political rsfdrn n the world's iwU Hindu Kin >om, In its evergreen lllmalay %  JHQ has Brown with tin..L1V.HI Ol the Chinese-led Tibetan "libei .'..II force.-" Iov4.ir.la the NcpaleM %  JM The ChineM'-h.l Tibet at i '...pic's aim* advancing acrw Til>et on Lhasa the capita leportcd less than l ivat] It, Lhasa the new inter, ib not hat ordered troops of ti %  i rlaon not to reai I .1 irK retUBUM Rruter rogres* and they WOTO suppl>ln| [l % %  %  u-n t hj A-p* li, Trinicln is to wed. i last week. that Mr Butler %  Vhen I went to see hi \t said "no, no" to that query, bit tg cur fellow *id in Port-of Spam "if he gel* a wife she ntaj quiet him" nianufacturcd goods to countries of Asia and Africa he would be glad to know could be of BO] re*iecl to importer* In the \ *e Indies He came out to II.. *• to serve, becauoe ot the batwi en iiii., and the i and was very happy that he h< not the assignmant to i a good cause He hoped he would the fullest co-operation fn i the Prom In in < IIgood to both cnunti U -.n. nportance ..f th. such matter s geratcd Hi* ufdicy will be U ..I hi* Oovornment and to make earnest effoits %  .. better understanding Ihe Indians and Othei ron ties of thti Caribbean *re He Tell That the |nd had hiade thoii home, m tit Caribbean aoould arort orhoat heartedlv for the pro.; arohperity .>t the an... thell i.< v-l th.t, they lio%ld co-operate with all oth> rOMmunltiei ,.s it woul I irini %  edit to India Raelf U on rang I New East GtTiiian Govts I unlit (I htHLlN. N... II. I I Boat Oaonan I'arliame. ... tod Han Qtlo Oroti M N Prune Minister. I foilowod the formal ream ...i" i ii.e prnrlilooal Oovori %  Dead at the lit i (In new Parliament Trie lull ii-.t Of BOOJ members i. ||M C ibinot will be announced th*' Assembly's llr*t workn HrdM .a. November IS The new Cabinet is to be Ii .leased by Ihe addition of Iv I. i I'lic lie* K.ist lie nan '• rvci ntnont will lie i ii-. anaod ol Uiroi vn Proqui |*j roi rotontaUoti ne ii-.ptnnittod portloi in t: loviel /..in Today's meeting unanimous uffoed to "" %  torniBtioa "f %  Bb %  'laiinmg CommalBiOn to I".In' the Cabmi-I atlnistan Vi ... Besi Oora Imlnl tration is lo he chaig<-d with U .'. OII.IT olan due lo start in Janual > DAI 'ear. — fteutar POPE SIGNS PAPAL III LI. VATK AN i II v. No* li Pope I'mXII todav Igiied Uti 1,00 word POpal Hull b) h I | proclaimed to the Catholic woii last week, tha new Dogma of the ilodil> AMuniption of the Blesseu Virgin Mai %  mtq Hoavon in an Informal ccremont in hi* prtvuti portmenl %  ) lha VaUcon Palace hi • lulled the o^i chinint m the simple lattin word* "Ego I'un ('athoUeoo Eecle*ae Epweopus" !..| hll llfpMtUlO lh-' I'lipf u*ed leiled like a quill dipped in vllvOI mk Aland decor .led with i (l|Uf* "' 'be VligU rlatn| Into Heaven It had beei s|H-nally for th* tbera of the Bod Momony by me Mary .'. Die By Poigoiiing i ,i AOBTOWM, Nov a Three children who were glvei p..i*on in areeJ dk Fa* e a a y ail "'• %  .1 lOWfi H(. Nnv. 8 %  %  ink.<.| %  I %  iv. (n.ti. tha Oca % % %  nrnoi I i nueatln t t, inatrti tloni '"i roan allonoo. "If any employer did not report (or duty in ihe course ol K;tt ur day, November *. he ii.'ui.i in 1".tit 1 .i that he is considered to h*ve varaiM hi* post Me hould not lie reeinplu.cd unless there ir> ground* for special consideration In which ease the prim authoiity of the Oowornmoni fcM such v •onnlovRMail \lmuid in sough: KII.I ohttuned The period of an gOBDlasM'l %  from (IUMIIK u *trlke should he entered in rrd ink on laIn-ill heel >> luck In service. The guestioi. whether this hreak in *ervlei can l*e ili*regsrded for MI pern n lUOtt n |iUlpiweH will •ddered .it | l.ilei tlntc In n itcum'-l.ii..i'> should .in. .I.ii or wage< be paid foi ihe portO I ,.l. tn pic, ..[, ,'l r duty" All was UUlel on tl)C l..ooti %  TOaat with the c*.option of 1h< S ic the twti week;, rn *lnke I* •tin in ptogress. The Manpower Citi2eiui Assuci' tion todav II. .titled iht Govern* rOnl iindci the I-abour I-aws thiil dispute exisls hetween nnplo> ves and employers of the Oemerifg Hniin Cornparu and wai i*kniK for Ihe .ippointinenl under tha who v ent in abend of the Supertoila i tllei, %  the M< rth Korean inl ...nt paaltloais, reporiwl heavy anti-aircraft on from tbc Marscliuiiuii *idt uf 'he %  I -, | e||jr nf 10 BM a* al Kmc. HIh..ve used SO their capital since the fall uf Pvongya.ig, has two rail us v marshalli'iy yrdl md large %  rda i laaoalne TI. Vnited Stale* Far Cast air force* He* more than e*" •'-'ties IIVH K. ica H the pa>t 14 hourt. iniiiiuniK "constant: offensive air combat ptr<>i" over the extreme noithwe-i of Kin t..' Slnullu. it was announced tnda* Thiee oii.i i Coennainiat jrU were damaged later today In a dog tight Aim American lighters OVOl nurtliMest Korea, but no furihei detail! of Una battle have yet been icporled hcie On the east cooOt, marine fighter* inflicted heavy casualties on a three-mile-lung column of Com* unut* estimated between battatton .liength and reglmenl strength wbKh wa* headinf north from the Won*uu area. The uenci.il Mtualion had been 'improved and stabilised." he iiiih. American and South Koieann had regained eontact with CommunHU in almt>t all a****** -lu-i savour* lull An InUlUoonee i.meer said that the OommuniM* were not afTected b> a shortage of *upplies in their sudden withdrawal from combat contact on Sunday. % %  ihey could bring up ma ten a I from Ihe Wanthurian border In the hours of darkness without effective interference from the OnttOd NsUoni' war planes This was the position around the front according to lite late-I i cpnrt Tha American 1*1 Cavelrj Hi vision mirth of Kunuri, threw sack probing ait.i TKIA. TH; AtlVOCATF I in NCW Hhi, ilia n* or Met** *er mi M'vui Ait PAV0 FOR NEW* iV4*V%>*'''*'-'**'-'-'-'. W-'*'.V>V'.'. w.wwviv.'. hildiei. ollapsed village home on the west %  i Ik-merara, IB minute* .,1.1. | lha imilu me and nit ooof/gokwa pital Dorhsr* baltlvd for an u,\\\ Rrui th i..... aftei wer< hog thPl fVewspaper Manager Put In Court .P'HIANNKHIU'Mfi The General Mananef „ Kin..i ..f South Afuca'' paper the -ini.il. Ne m New Uiggc Jottan ippcarc tin Yacht From Scotland Arrives In B'dott 37 Days From Madeira THYACHT "OEEOOM" now lying m ta outar basin of the Careenage took 37 daps fros* Uadalra u Bsettsde*. AMERICAN l>orii J< hn IV Noble from N-w Orleans and l htentyIhree-year-old SeoUina. Wtlli;ini Sturr^ck are in Barlmdo* today haVinj riowKl the Atlantic in the 32 ft. yacht "Oregon". Heaving from Madeira it took them 37 day to get to Barbados OB Tuesday They sailed about ^9th when they set sail Scotland takina a weett to reach France. Prom there they 07010 tiSpam wtUoh took them twelve days ard they Thcr twelve dovs getting i. Uade Noble has been m Inoland for left Madeira on October 1st *?n years In 140 he v!unte-rmet a terrific storm seven ed f. r the K A P as a %  erfeantl Pilot and transferTrd over e the American Alrforce when the* came into the war, as ,. BtjM fighter, flying a "Mosquito" After the war he spent three years at Edinburgh University studying medicine. After that he lived In | feet long Dundee, where he learnt to sail "We ftraO "1 leamt the hard way," ne .aid. "spending a winter in the North Sea learning how to sail. ia> %  everal gales and th. proverball North Sea was then a member Forth Yacht Club. A' the beginning of this year •.'.nued. 'I decided it * %  time to f> home, and it OTOf ^boui l vail this time that I fell in love | :hi i>reron and her and sail home mt of Mddeim. IOMIIK •alls About a week after thii we were becalmed On the WB) ut, several Flying EMa ll<>" ot board and the ii-hin,; wa* grand In all we caught three do r ado .I.., i i 'l.ll Storm "We had a smooth trip until ithted Barbados a Sunday, when we picked u taogtii Point Llghtrn IIM u\t\ du •0 another spot of calm it took U mid Tuevlay to work around i leather." I i larllala Bay via South Pa if the Royal i Their engine which usuall vorkeii verv well %  Id not -tart The Two yachtsmen plan tr> Jamaica where Sturroci. nds There, they will toll the yacht and Noble will go from there lo New Orieam % %  ins; my family after ten year' Noble's lather ll ihe Texas OU Company's Branch at Marrerv New Orleans. Magistrate's BDUsi %  iimnation of alii* gatlon of onlraventlon of th Act hei t'day. i : Manager ami Mr It F | i> t I Ne: idltOI of the Johan snda> Tliwes No evidence .is heard in the case, which wa. remanded to Derembei 4 ttmatlon was given ol Ok reason for the postponement. Bail of £500 wea allowed. — t Header SUDDEN DEATH Emnnuel (nristwm of Bay Street died Middenly last night abou* :; in o'clock while he was in th< pick-up A 7 which w*t travelling along Black Rock the bodv wa* carried to the Publu Mortuary after the Police had < 227 Telepho 4465 :VS*IVASA ••





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r I-AOE row BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. NOVEMBER •. 10 B\KBADOSfi|AlA'(MTE An Investigation by Military Commentator Robert lessel Tliur il.is. November 0. I9.it> PEACEMAKER TO-DAY is Peacemaker's Day and is a public holiday in Barbados. .* has been poiiiled out more than once that the number of holidays in this island exceeds that in any other part of the British Empire. In England there are public holidays only on Good Friday, Easter Monday. Whitsun. AUKUSI Bank Holiday. Christmas and Boxing Day. New Year's Day is not a holiday in England, nor is the King's Birthday, nor Empire day. In Barbados, however, in addition to these holidays, there is New Year'a Day. Queen Victoria's Birthday (May 24th) His Majesty's Birthday celebrated in June. Clerks* Holiday in October, Peacemaker's Day in November, Race and Exhibition days, fifty two statutory half holidays and any other number dictated by the state of cricket during Intercolonial and M.C.C. Cricket matches, to say nothing of this year's Cricket Day. Barbados like every other country in the Empire appreciates the services which King Edward VII rendered to the British Empire specifically and to Europe generally. It remembers them uniquely on Peacemaker's Day. King Edward has been referred to in a tribute as "a powerful factor in the preservation of the peace of Europe, his friendly intercourse with the heads of the French. German and other nations earning for him the title of Edward the Peacemaker." It was not a title lightly gained King Edward as Prince of Wales travelled widely and by personal contact with people realised the vast numbers who comprised the Commonwealth. He also appreciated their differences in outlook and ambitions and so when he came to the Throne succeeding Queen Victoria he exhibited a sympathy and tolerance which made him beloved by his people overseas and at home. His love of life and its enjoyment, his pleasure in the glitter and glamour in the ceremonial made him the most "popular prince in Europe" and his name a household word in the Courts of the European capitals. To-day in Barbados wc remember him as a maker of peace. Peacemaker's holiday became statutory through the energies of a man now hardly remembered by many in Barbados. The late Henry Walter Lofty who was an outstanding Colonial Treasurer introduced a bill in the House of Assembly when he was a member for Bridgetown. He had made other valuable contributions to Barbadian public life but none so popular as this. For Barbados to-dny, Peacemaker's Day is not merely another holiday. It is a reminder of the great desire for the maintenance of peace throughout the world, a peace which this generation hardly knows anything about, since large scale wars are waged by some, while others watch in intervals of peace. I III 4 MOM I THIRTY A .M)1 [E COLOUR BAR >ll \-OI. ON I I A Mi YOUR SONS CAU-UP-No. 2. Are we getting value for Money? BOYS who were six .1 the timi Might not tome of these 80will be necessity tor many year* of Munich make up the 1032 age perhaps a dozen of them—be to come. It wlfi !>e a lone. Ion! class which li being called up K U Ockwell i,, Mr. Ireora for hli rearmament that we neceeaanly need to-day'l " 7* Cumb erlandprogrammeArmy of 370.00(1 t.. produce Mr roa.l. Swlnoon |, . could wkn kle out this Attire 1 target force of lf n She tell! me of a Iw-year-old n .,ien. and maybe cm the Army' divisions and a modest combo., who wanu to be a lniT. im ,, br „ s,, ru ecAii.,,,1. Mr. ponent of Ack-Ack and le. .he nays, quite naturally strachey release ,. third of hi. Many of the lob. done by the fk'""'I "." ?"".,! tii"! ?Z R a"""> trom the bloated trainArmy', orderlies, or by the the only boy In 'be road to he ln „,„.„„,,„ !,„ , a rational RASC and the Pioneer Corps, cal ~d up The other, ha/c lhMlre „„.„ Nalion.,i S rvlcecould, for example, be easily dtase "rTockwell wonder. If thl, !" " now being jen,7 E.full or part time civilian sari of thing encourage, parents MM MM Take ,,„ alt inner parades to fVwVPC their children's talent! TKr time Is lonr. ..verdue (or !" ""**" ""f^'TTh. I * at the official ngirres. Parliament lo set up f if, •" Inspections lor "*•'"** I ,it of everv hundred boy. In Committee on Manpower to • u I non-'lahtlng arms and not many the 1.32 age class Ink, whole uuctlo,, of cull-up -"" "'J"\ SB* 2 \ WELVE are exempted straight y on medical grounds I uueatu What la wanted the same line aeaisethiiiat "Ml %  M-hour aredecllve week the Select treat many men in 11* Service! work very hard indeed tt^ESTS-JTSSm the, Committee_ on &&TX ^^T&ZSJ? wou'ic be farm worke.. or miners. £5*5** be to nrpojrt on the " "J2J 1 S^'" w 'ion. 'aro=Cafe SSL-l^lrnnT^AgS' i^v^or^he^m^ee -tSh. be irniilN to th* gunner r*gitudents or apprentices. Even young H% K. II. Tiisiss.li* LONDON, Uoruugh Council authorities M.PJ. social workers and housewives ar* to co-operate in H big scheme initiiited by the British Council to make London's 2,000 coloured students feel at home in Britain. The lirst area to bel tackled is the borough of Kensington, where' a quarter of the students live The mayor of Kensington, Alderman J. Q.I Gapp. has already i over a Commonwealth committee of local n-presentatives which includes Sir Patnck Spens. Conservative MR for South Kfawtafton and Mi U. H. R. Rogers. Labour MR tor North KaStatagton This committee will endeavour to find accummodation for Colonial students with British students or British families and thueby encourage them to participate in Irani activities instead of living in isolation. Mr. MacKarlane. of the British Council \ : %  -. Department, tells me that the colour [in blem can be overcome in the cultural I n 'The British Council will make it its responsibility to provide coloured studen.s with greater social intercourse with Bi.tish people." he added. Legally speaking, there is no colour bar ii. Britain. It exists to some extent, however, in a way that is extremely difficult to tackle G lonial students experience it particularly Ui their search for 'digs'. While it is true that there is an acute shortage of accommodation in Britain (as a result of the Second World War), it is often true that students iii'c infused accommodation because of their col 'in. They are not told so, but it is In. tiled, (>n the other hand, some coloured people fm """| h* • -oe too sensitive and touchy They regard every seemingly unpleasant gesture as mM1& %J h A^ M JS J£S5Z^£EX,'2?!Z ,^,^wT e c r ou.d m pn5ucr',ne '<<"*-• %  and calculated expression of the need. .11 of 180,000 conscripts to that conscripts are needed in evidence to prove my case It. itlnforce the 190.000 Regulars operational theatres. time for the New Year alr-ady serving? It Is time lor Mr. Ockwell. Something like a million Look .1 it another way. boy to be given a more satisparent, would welcome the def Mr Strachey ha. 130.000 lactory reason why he must no* riston. Mr. Strachey. So would spend, ought he lo spend it be n singer until 1952. j goon many of your more en one new Centurion tank. OH 25-hour Week -huughtful serving soldiers. ailing up and training for My Manpower Committee —L.E.S. years 30 .lightly resentful would almost certainly report NEXT: How food Is our ers, ili.it some sort of con!chption Army now? I / V SCOTT 4 CO.. LTD. TO-I.AYS SPECIALS at THK counts UM I'M K MIS I AKr MIX I I \s si STI.K'S t RE AM 1IOTTI ES AI.I.SOPP'S. BEER Usually SOW .-rll .1 111 34 26 20 Ml Str.cheydJS noTVhlnk It %  *. SwLndon. and the r ot ^^^^rUtlU wITlS' |7 wc h while to interrupt thel^e 260.000con.crip., now serving "^^ 't 0 ,U ^' irv ^"of manem.iiUal Ualnlng. (Later they m the rorca. y^ ^ h d w ^call unll be called up, and Induatry A farmer write, to me ( : ^, !" rvlats from civiUan life II have to make the bern of it.) Cornwall. k tell me that n *^,, T. !" ?i o i Vvta SIX other, get off becuae they l'l-year-old boy. who „"." h S ,,, r !" arc conscientious objectors, or are scholarships at school, hss losi nS,,?. "" g< inf to live In Australia, or on M. Job a. a junior clerk because ^1 committee would specially comps.Uon.lc ground, snd the ^f hi. Impending call-up bcBlS" S"ha, hapllh ,; vi ,„ .... , ? n k I *,!? U w* 1v V )ob i !" d '" u > half mlUio.i iYhls wlU leave Just " %  ' boy who will be off to the corjcrlpt! who have passed H" ""Si" ASJln Thli? iffi Army '" 1 Jn a mn S! h " " 'r 1 ""ougi; Mr. Strachey'. sausage ell '. Mr.. Ockwell. These win ;. unemployed. There must bo nia chinc since 1945 pi on uniform; and 30 will go many others in similar position. Ho w many of them could In the Army My Select Committee on Man„,„„, tomorrow to a known Job The System power would therefore start bj „ known regiment on receipt .ave looked Into the mechanism examining the various reasons .,. an order broadcast after the o the Labour Ministry's call-up which the Government has u 0 c |ocfc news tonight 9 sj em. It is efficient and eonadvanced since 1945 for having My investigation, ,uggest that 1-. ns to the rule, laid down by the call-up at all. Ule reserve. I have listed, plus P. Ilament. But It Is not, a. Mr First, we were told. It wa. to i^ claw Z reserve, plus the Jr.cs esks u. to believe, a model release the wartime veterans Regular Reservists. already tf unlveraallty." .framing to be demobilised provide the War Office with twice : avlng gone so far to make the By 1947 It was to build up n „, many men as the Army could ea -up selective and not universal, trained reserve in the Territorial., digest nnd equip with ot lit we to go further and call up By '948 the purpose of the ana. in the Unit year of I • : I fewer men? And, Inevitably, call-up was "to put heart Into World War HI. use more heartburning? the French." Welcome FISHERMEN we have FISHING LINES9. 10. 12. 15. IB, 24. M, 36 lbs WHITE COTTON LINES— 6, 9. 12. lo, 18, 24. 30 thread STAINLESS STEEL WIRE— I* II, W gi!IJ FISH HOOKS— Nos. 6. 7, 8. 9, 10. 12, 14. 16 1, 0 2/0 COPPER PAINT— 1 Kin. ting and many other items to interest you. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTIX, Successors To C. S. PITCHER & CO. PHONES 4472 and 4687 Remember Flanders POPPY DAY this year comes at a time when the news from the East is grave, and the chances of another World War are not remote. Every day in Korea members of the United Nations forces are being maimed and killed, and the Poppies on sale tomorrow will serve as a remembrance of them as well as of the disabled of the First and Second World Wars. TV Poppy League Fund has always been used to help war disabled soldiers to lead a normal life. It is a deserving fund depending on your generosity. With the money subscribed the blind at St. Dunstan's are taught to see with their hands, and the maimed are trained in trades which they can follow despite their injuries. In Barbados we need a minimum of $8,000 a year to maintain the payment of pensions and contribute to the running of the training schools for the disabled. With the continual rise of the cost of living meaning that every year the pensions can buy less, let us try to make to-morrow's collection a record. This is a cause that has the support of everyone, but not everyone remembers to buy a Poppy. It Is so easy to forget. Every contribution, however small, is welcome; but when you buy your Poppy today think of the fields of Flanders where so many were disabled in the cause of freedom, and of Korea where men are suffering for the same ideal, and give generously. THE NARROW SQUEAK At last it is possibe to weigh up the Korean War—and the lesson of it: KEEP THE FIRE BRIGAbE READY-By Frank Owen MANILA. Thursday. N OW that ll'a all over m Kiit-ivi. bur tinahootlng, "hat really happened.' we shoul:) "iimisl.v a<-k. and **ek :.. anxwfi itIf we dont want It all to %  "l-eti .i,:.ii!i The puiiuin of DM rampfif" *.is simple. Firm, ihe retreat. Second, hold and build u|>. Third, break out. Fourth, mop up. This lagt phase if still foinx 0ft, and It will probably continue longer than all the rest put together. We only Just did the Job. 1'it.ple who realise it are asking 10 questions. Why did the lemy come so near succvfli* And why did he Just (ail? lip ti.ik us by surprise. Was thin due to our poor military intelligence? We should and out, lor if It was bad In Korea It may elsewhere. The American garrison had wiihdn.wn from Korea, leaving behind a South Korean "army." Why was it no badly trained. equipped, and officered? We sh-.uld inquire because the Philippines and Indonesia (who are also on Uncle Joe's list) may .in no better shape. Once the war had begun. why did It take so long for the Are-brigade" to arrive on the scene? In the armies on the United States and the United Kingdom were far more than a tmllion men. yet It was weeks before the Americans, from near-by Japan could bring up to strength the couple of divisions they rushed In. As for lint.mi. for years critics iv been saying that if trouble came we would not llnd an army r rps. Trouble came, and wc could not scrape up a brigade. Someone may say. "But we hd Malaya on our hands." Too true. and maybe the next time also.) As It was the good name of Britain was saved once aguln by the bravery of the BrtUah soldier whvn he arrived on the battleeld: as aiu.il too few. Only 2 to 1 S OME other aawojH may h-.exploded. Wc were never overwhelming!)' %  outnumberedtwo to one at worstand alwayt wc had ubfioliite air and oeu supremacy. It was claimed tnut our anti-tank weapons were unable to pierce the Russianmade enemy armour." It w.improbably bod iiim. but in any case we have known of the Ruaalan P-T. 34 for years ani should have known the calibre of gun required to stop it The real reason for our retreit was simply that the enemy was better prepared. He used again*', our badly organised South Koreans and green young American occupation troops from Japan many .veterans drawn from the Chinese civil wars. Like The Japs W HY did the North Koreans Just fail to flnish them 1 Perhaps their military Intelligence was as unintelllgrnl as More probably they ha 1 leacheff the limit of their punch. LJke the Japs in Burma during our .retreat in 1S42 stopped when only the remnant of a rearguard lay between them and %  ndla, because they had literallv i on out of supplies. So the North Koreans stopi>e.i —and lost the campaign Few oi us believed it at the time General MacArthur was one. and ho calmly went on with Hie war S did those "raw" troops of his, growing' riper every hour Out of the dark night of the tetreat and siege there shone the • piciuii.i star of the common soldier*), courage. To hold the brtdgjahead was bard, for the to-ign enemy knew and used the hills often appearing ln our rear. More troublesome to fit Into the Korean terrain was the American doctrine >i "Use mucliiuvs save men" Thua. whenever an mfaniiv unit was held up even by single sniper, the drill was to whistle up the tanks, artillery or aircraft and blast the area. Time .... Money I T COSTS money both befoie and after the event. And time, a precious commodity war. Nor do the "liberated" love to see their families slaughtered, their homes smashed even by the impersonal agency of a general bombardment and In the name of collective security. The military advantages machine war were vividly she at Inchon when MacArthur carried out the greatest amphibious operation since D-Day. Somebody has called It th-most helluva gamble." It was nothing of tha kind It was a superbly calculated risk, coolly assessed and courageously taken Remember . M ACARTHUR had to land his division), on a shore whose tides rise and fall 30 ft. Had it been contested it would have been a Galltpoll. It was not— because MacArthur had taken steps to have the enemy elsewhere. Let us learn from Korea I be sure that the enemy has. Next time we may have to iinht not only a brave, brutal infantry army with no air force. DO field radio and ox-drawn transport. Next time we may not Java I great industrial base Ilk Japan near at hand Next tlm there may not be so much tlm' Yes. we MUST learn, for next time may be the last time for tin free world. Let us have both th' machine* and the men sUndins by. tha Task Force ready, the 'ire-brigade with the engine running. 'Next time we. may not have w clour oar. "I have found very few cases of oiour prejudice." commented Sir Patrick ip:ns. "But when anyone not of their colmr disapproves of anything they do. colii'ied students tend to put it down immedialely to prejudice." Botafl British people are definitely prejuiiced against coloured people. In some C&SM, this is flue to a dislike fnr anything a..en. The misdemeanours of a certain class oi coloured people—mostly the seamen and si'iwaways—have, unfortunately, created, a I'ipathy in the minds of many well-meanIrsj British people. They do not alw.iv find l| easy to distinguish the 'wheat from the • %  haft because, to them, all coloured people tie more or less alike. A lending article in the News Chronicle j-scribes the British Council's campaign as 'nioially and politically timely When it is .uneinbered that the British colonies are now in a state of cultural and political ferment and that the Colonial students dist:mina!ed against are the potential leaders of the Colonies, the gravity of the problem afulflOt be overlooked. The colour bar is undesirable. The ignorance which breeds It must be counteracted and the prejudice must be destroyed. The British Council aims t> do this by persuasion and explanation. New Heart Trouble CHICAGO. Nov.. A heart specialist has claimed that constant publicity about coronary disease as the leading cause of death has given rise lo a relatively new disease, cardiac neurosis. Dr. Gilbert H. Marquardt, Assistant Prolessor of Medicine at Northwestern University's Medical School, said that daWDlta this, publicity about heart disease has done more good than harm. He told some 90 heart specialists attend%  ng The Chicago Medical Society'.irft osier courses that two important gains attributable to more information about heart disease are: "It has made more people heart conscious, giving us an earlier opportunity to diagnose the disease; and it has also opened the purse strings of a concerned nation to provide generous sums for needed research into complicated heart disease prohienu. w Dr. Marquardt said the cardiac neurotic is one who neads or hears about heart disease.—l.N.S. OI n READERS SAYx „ Publicity To The Editor. The Advocate— SIR,—1 read with great pleasure your criUcIsm of the Barbados Publicity Committee and the Barbados Government advert.* ing efforts In general in to-dav'.-> Advocate" November 5th. A* a resuh I think you may be interested to hear the story of the birth of the Souvenir Book oi Barbados. Thia book was compiled and rcught out a few years ago by the joint toil and enthusiasm k; and sell them on commission. Some of the big firms in llri.igetown bought lots of twenly-t ve or fifty, and aent them as presents lo their business frtatuh abr..d. Fortunately for the island, W we:., diafuated but not daunted, %  no. thanks to the two Gift BbOBS, the SPC.K book shop Da tosta a Co.. and Johnsons Stationery these books have been sold In a steady stream, ami continue to be sold in fact more havi' been aold this year thn-v any previous year. So Iheae little books arc advertising Barbados in many parts of Cn gland. Canada. United State* of America. Venezuela and other parts of the world, not in any effort of the Barbados G-'\i>rnment or the Publicilv CommlMt, but by .he effort* of private enterprise. Sincerely yours. SKINNER IN SPITE OF THE RISE IN PRICE OF— WOOLLENSl EARLY BUYING OF LARGE STOCKS HAVE KEPT OUR PRICES DOWN THE THRIFTY WILL SHOP NOW YOUR CHOICE OF WORSTED, FLANNELS, TROPICALS, GABERDINES, TWEEDS & DOESKINS DA COSTA & CO., LTD. DRY GOODS DEPT. VV-V*VVtV*V*V/*VV/V*V*V/-^V//*'V>V/A Bt tahOP's Court Hill St Michael. CAreailh Broadcoat To The Editor. The Advocute— SIR.— 1 think cricket %  nthusiasts in Barbados would be BtMfad to hear that th* Commonwealth team in India compriJtn.. our two West Indies heroes Frankle Worrell and Sonny Ramadhin are engaged in a Test mnuh at present in New Delhi ami th.i* the commentary (ball by ball) is made for one hour everv morning between &30 aid 7 30 a.m. on short wave on 25 Veter Band. As there are three mure days still to go in the first Test, your fans would be thrilled to hear the commentary even on the Radio Distribution which I am sure would be a fine gesture on the part of Radio Distribution. even if it is only for half an hour from 6.30 to 7.00 a m and then Bl I 3o the time for close of th play, give them the scores of the play. I do hope other crickot enthusiasts in this Island would crave for this thrill, and tune la on ihcn private Radios al the above mentioned I D A THAN!. !' 0 Box 9. Bridgetown. November S. lttSO Slight I.. CSCMC. Beef Turn. Steak TarUr Soup TarUe Slew Prsafa Fruit Fresh Vegetables 1 *?/£ OOLO BRAID RIM TTBORG mil: '. a R. Sandwich Bread TaUe Butler in pkgs 'UrielWhip Sandwtrh Bprrad in holll** rooks FUh Paste 3 ot. lim Swift's Pale de FeU Gi Danish f'eckUil Sausages in Una Danish Salami Meat Roll Danish Cheese Tin Hams In 3 sites Prepared Mustard BE ELEGANT WITH YOUR GUESTS SERVE CHOYCE TIPS TEA with CARR'S BISCUITS IMlOlMGODDARD'S Tod a*/



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PACE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, N'OVEMBER , 15 THE LONf RANGEK *in *. .JB *.— ') m uk.\ BY FRANK STRIKER :,, %  %  • **RwnBJ i TC(RE U*W6 Tie %  laaws HIM m, suinw. cm si* ueaKOiNTOvc OOCDRM cca| | HERE jwx HESPST-JECHWER i 10s 0! ta :~*tUN6 WBuMMTr e ( UXX At "HE 6* i< JetJ [ F&IB* NftVt f> T-I I re !" TNOU a s. _J Ian*. is** WMCRKkHSiH TNEaarHw. 1 THE j HO !*,• I*. HWK4, -t &a! p. —^-^BEMREWar? c*MCEp<3Eti RIP klRBY ALEX RAYMOND TO j*c* *o JO* or C*SVO* TW§ ^a.T.C! (.iCTSN V5 TO L^E SX3£ AS l-SJA*,... VOJ *1U. FlC T^ -NS*iiS. ik'.* i**. 9iP Kiflffv STr^Jv STAPTISJS TO>VC*JCY' TT— ,, ceo* 7**v DM TU4T > ^W wSffE L'S'SN'NS T On TWE BAH ve-ofly. IT Mdf. want. W*N6. %  < NGW SS*t>.T, _>-... -fie POL* SONGS -*.£ .4 *k -w 3kd ra-.*PLSTi_> JACK! THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK 8 RAY MOORES IEAJI ,..'. HEWONtME '"EUONSO nma.r-> we. nwwtt) KSSH'l ST 8At ^ 7 MONKEV ru | W I I MONM ( ; ; •oxv l r-.> cf THAT.. . IATISH.' r^~ci —\1 DELICATE as a moonbeam COOL BEAUTIFUL 66 FERGUSON FABRICS" FOR WEAR AT NIGHT. STOCKED BY LEAKING STORES. There is no Safermore milk than SHU %  *'". ideal milW„„^ SPECIAL!^' via, i, SPECIAL! Hi/// tliin in mind Fur lako-Maklag lt.HMllS~|),T lb ... $ .40 Currann—per . .34 Mixrd I'nl—per lb .27 Olacr Cherries— per It 98 Tin Prunes 7 Tins ItukiiiK Powder 21c. 34c. . Tins Toffee Bolls 1.08 Tins Barley Sugar .91 Tins Pascall's Glucose Barley Sugar '!8c—56c Tins Pascall's Court Fruit Drops .94 Tins Pascall's Fruit Barley Sugar .98 Tina Pascall's Fruil Salad 1.01 l.i<|iit-iirs. IViiK's. Etc. Bottles Kumtnell s l.liu Bottles II..K Cherry Brandy 4.00 Bottles Bols Apricot Brandy . 4.00 Bottle Bob Bastos Port Wine 3.00 Bottles Superior Madeira 3 .60 Bottles Gilby's Empire Red Wine 2.50 Bottles Martini Sweet Vermouth 2.78 Bottles Martini Dry Vermouth . 2.88 In our Heal Department PRIME AUSTRALIAN BEEF including STEAK & ROAST also OX-TAILS TONGUES TRIPE KIDNEYS HEARTS Weiners Sausages t>' fc 48< Dutch Pate de foie P it, $1.30 fanned I i-nils Tins Fruit Salad S .87 Tins Peaches .T2 Tins Letnna Peaches .37 Tins Apricots .62 Tins Strawberries 57c. -15c Tins Cherries 49c. t!3c Tins Prunes 70 Tins Crushed Pineapple ... .36 I'ranul Holier. Jams. Etc. Bottles Peanut Butter 55c. 35c Tins S.A. Pineapple Jam S .H Tins S.A. Fig: Jam .52 Tins S.A. Apricot Tarn .(• Tins S.A. Peach Jam .60 Bottles Hartley's Straw: Jam 60 Bottles Hartley's Black Currant Jam .... .54 Bottles Hartley's Apricot Jam 45 YTTTy X HJE I



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PAf.r rwo BARBADOS ADVOCATE THVBSDAY, NOVEMBER , 150 Ccutib gaUwcf II Vl>l YKI\. Vk .lll\Alr\ SEEN CHATT1NO at tha Baisaa* Warehouw thair return from England by tha "OaMOine" KiiH and Mm I! A. MclvillT HE INDIAN COMMUNITY in Barbados hold a luncheon party at ihc Mininc Hold yesterday in honour of Shn Anand Mohan Sahay, Indian Commissioner for the Caribbean arc.i with head<|UH[iri< in Trinidad. Among those present were Col R. T Mlrhclin, C >nirrdssionor of Police. Hon'ble V C Gale, M.LC. Mr Q H Adam*. M.CP, Mis* Sahay, Mr. W. A Crawford M( 1'. Mr K G Mapp, M.C P Mr. D. F. Blackett Mr Kirpulthiiquani, Mr. Gidwani, Mr. T Maraj. vestcrda. Mr. D A Thanl. and Mr N K Wilson. *iafl lntransit yantarday ahorttjr after ire Mi and Mr. "Bob" Here Again >ACK IN IJARrn-iyJS I winter in Mi* A Kin.,i panaMMMr of in Bank of Commerce fiom Montreal yenlerd.. "ii ttflj "Canadian Cruu.1-1 and Maying at Ihe Windsor Hotel Back From Martinique D R. K. M I) SIMON who SJ ipendinc %  holiday in irtumed by the GOSCOQTI, morning Hi Returned Yesterday M R ANI) MRS. BOB RIM, -he tofl Barbados in Juts i Red France and Scotland Were At The Santa Maria M K AND MRS It, II i-i..,< leturned f.-om Grenada yesterday afternoon bv BWIA Mi Grace who u Managing rof W. B Man • Lid. went chiefly on business to Grenada and also visitrd St Lucia Mrs Grace wai in Grenan. on hohdav. They were guest.at the Santa Maria Hotel Glad To Be Back A FTER five months* I olida; in England. Rev and Mrs. 11 A Msffrilte returned yesterday morning li> the ilastrngne Several of itives were at the Baggage WarahOUga lO meet them Mrs MalvUla told Carib that they had enjoyed their holiday immensely but they were glad to Hev Melville i> the Vn.ir of St Ambrose Church. Prize Possession M R. J A COCKBURN. Engineer of the Antigua Sugar Factory, accompanied by his wife id two sons. Bruce and Colic hMd fas the Canrngnr yester%  HIMMII •" %  #* ntorning and left four hours !" Inter for Antigua by BWIA Prtn jioMiession which they biought with them from England was a recording of the West liulien Victory calypso Another passengei arriving by Marthe Goarogne and leaving for the Taylor. i..W IS a Trlnldadian. is paying her first visit back home In many years and 1" looking forward to nn enjoyable stay with her relatives and many friends Returned On Tuesday TL/n* A. H MARSHALL wno 1VI Is In charge of Plantations Lid's. Shipping Department returned from a week's visit to Trinidad on Tuesday morning bv Customs Officer 1R. COLIN WEEKES, Cu-torns L Officer at ScawcU. who. in Grenada for a few day*-. •returned veslerday afternoon bysj BWIA. He was away on business. CROSSWORD Flying Commission [ HAVE new* this week of tho four-man commission f enquiry, headed by Sir John .'addinglon. who are leaving for British Guiana to devise 'ho went on to win the title. S.iUi Davldge. "You would amtazed nt the publicity anfrojn this competition It d noO last all year round but certainly brings a temporal %  ,n the calls for Jami i i Hi fu. k tails." Try This And if you want to know what M R constitution for that colony, sort of rum cocktails people drink Plan* have now been completed in England, then try this rerioe lor the party to travel by a.i. which was Invented by BUM nine lime in the middle >f Cox One-third Jamairn rum. oneDecember Thev will fly via New third Peach Liqueur, one-third York and Trinidad. Confirmation 1'mcapple Juice, II dash of Ire of a provisional booking for 'emon Juice, a dash of the wh December 12. is now. being uwaited of an egg and then a really good irom the airline company and once shaking I can assure you the that has been received the comresult Is very tasty. Of course wtf mission will be all ready to leave, ben would use Barbados rum. Rupert's Autumn Primro$e—7 Housewives'Guide Prices of Squash and Lettuce when the Advocate checked yw'erdy were: Squash 24 cents per lb. Ixiiucc i cents per head %  HI. MUNiKAMMLN .. mu. K*I... *••<*•• i i LUII lam Tnr Nwi me Nrw< iiom Britain III .v— IJS ina up .aTHE WOMEN of Hopeland and Matquis. village* along the r>s4 from St. Oeorgc'ii to Orenvllle in Grenada. BrlUut Weat Indien navar stop workUu A they go abont their tiuslnsa^ Uiir hand* an warking the whole Ume. boMly Visiting a local pinr to maka snn hatworn all over Oie i-isnd. i'l pine grows along the sides of the road, where it is ..ihIbs women. It la boiled and when dry is stripped into convenient lengths and widths for plaiting. Hats are made up and coloured by locally bought dyes, It takes a whole day to plait enough material to make a largebrimmed hat. and half an hour to aew it up. The finished hata are of laem have trie added .. %  colourful and pretty In design ii. pseture %  howl on iirr ahup in C Is Josephine SUney, whose handpalnted hats have inter, duced a new vogue In Grenada and elevated the straw hat into I'dJlinerv status Picture circulated September 1050 Stella The Star OTAR ROLE at New York's blg*** gest society function of the season, to take place this month, will be played by lA-year-old Ste la Jebb. daughter of BitainV V N delegate. Sir Otadv She will represent Princes* Elizabeth in a tableau of the ioyal %  •dding to be staged by couturier Norman llartnell liy permission of the Queen, llartnell is flykmi from London with duplicates of the wedding and bridesmaids' dresses. The news has revived American offers to buy the duplicate wedding ensembles But Hartnrtl will %  ay %  No." Tiw f*w 16 p.m. ThDail Baati a) Bs ooum.' .41 p .. Tlw i-alhnUal Oiaana J p n. | i:. p.m uim Urn — .>-, 1 41 p IN, Piogramina Faiule • p %  %  \ la p.m. Mercltanl Mv) .-.WlWr IN in. Educabna Arctiia T p.n Tha Nawa 3 10 p m Neva An lytSB. 7-li p.m WP V-T BriUln. l.S pin Oa> S pm HSdm N-. .1 %  11 p in I'mi*4 Manas* *p.m p r..,,.,„—, ,.f ii..' Week %  > Oral* Barry BppaKma 146 u •<> IM.A/A Theatre-flWOGfrowN 3 SHOWS TO-DAY 3—1.30, 4.45 A 8.30 p.m. ..! Pla-Ur. i*..a... I iih.ui? i.i'. a .'II H Da Mint. MMXM /liV UKUI.XHI %  ! | Th Na< in l CJallwdral. la p. i, % %  Ediiunai-. in is pi" V.i— .. IJI IU 41 pin Spn.nl IHl*l.l> II u "> Cl.* [>.•> lIO\ SO* Ii l"i1 am Th* New 110 ••" Nr.Artalyua T.1S a in Cbtaa Duo<. II Noon Tha N>. Il.io pm N.A...l"iVI Ii pm. N** Hrtuid' 1 p.m Tha Da iialr Ouilmuaa 1.19 pnl Radm New.. ...1 1 10 p m Tha AdvtnluMt of P.C. f I New. 1 10 p m llumtN-^ rrOJB Billaln SIB pm Sport. Ravlaw Bnaltah Sons*. J p m Th* Nr I -lh..|f. pn The Dally Servic 10 m. Pio'i !" Parad* 5 JO p m Scolli.h MaSant • pm The Miuir Ooaa Hound. II I.M Pitaal and Paaan S M pm tnlida. 7 p.m. Tha Nawi 1.IS pm Naw. An.lv.i. Ji; pm Waal Indian D.ai> J.U p.m What th* London*' DoaMi I •Cnu*, fl pm H-,11,1 Nrirr*l. B.IS p.m. •:miad Nallixin Raporl. ISO p.m Com jar of the W#*K IN pm Th* Drbalf rucitinua. tut, p.m BBC 8vmphon- •laclU*. 10 P.r.i TIM HSWa. I 10 PLAZA o Thentre a— OISTIN • HKK KINO Ol MAN" a"ROMANCE M theHHill SEAS" iB'.UI MaUpra 10.11*1 ; p.aa %  Slaaaermaa** AaHaa Da a*** t> Oaaaa* BtaaaMa aa fM. Kid 'IS OLD NEW MEXICO' Jwaanr WAKBLV i "SONG OF THE SIERRAS" lMI*> T "IN. 1 a • a m %  N riclarn "lim Bra. ptraanl. H. H si ACROSS THE STREET" -Ilk %  •> %  • Mum JaaU Falta Bfpaa BMU And "LORADO I I'KKI tOKV" MIUI Jaal HKiu Vlralala Mara A .I...I Braa. Dakla HMnl MASK H Mill %  l'. Srral Sbadi <..\ILTY (The G.rdcn) ST. JAM, .', DkffJ %  Arnon Double 1 DEEP VALLEY" >-•.— • TO-H4V II ia Ms, & •CHEYENNE raiUAT. SAT. aiiN BJO HAT st'N. a p.aa. I | VI • %  r-n'..-.-I Mi "THE CAPTAIN PROM CASTILE v ImKdlt tha World \^l 1IH !!.! %  l.l.^liiltA {Members OnfyJ TO.NIQHl rl Id* LUPINo Paul HSJfHBID—OH in -DEVOTIOK" A Watnrr Broa Pkilur*. lalltfiB Ow lll*-alOTy d and nmniory and (r-l Ilka a naw man In only I da In fan, •1. dlov.ry hkh 1. a horn, m.dlcl-.. nt iraaaal. raay-to*laka BW i (i.L.r and •nT -. .. la abaolulrly harmlii Tha -..%  -.. of lhl>\m. ..:~d Vl-Taki hu hean a. thai li la now i-rni di na atasmi ribui*.! b. ilila bar* ut>__. .. :.i aatlalscllon or mon-y bark In mhar w..rda. Vl-Tabt muni mata. you fl full „f :-.ur and ancraj and from 10 H> M yH" jounaer. or ynu mcrvly r*lurn tha *mpt> I -" "aand fat your money back A epa 4 t 14 r--r —r-"*__ _^___H._^ SO flu 12 r 1 f IT 1 | III 11a !• %  %  are mucn uaao lui ItaQUUl allka/urma. (SI Prom whicn you may piep-iIIUUIUOUH alarch. create a tlr. IBS %  Wing. *t >or rooging i'i SbOQ referriica bn 'Sfftni weather t ISI Unthinking itrtia-iour ma* trim i-ninplalnt. 4i i Do u ppratecl water doea. I4i I ^ee 3 Down. Hi Ita aoldlna mparitf cirpenda ori tha way it h> been dr1 saB^l4j i I KMa reference U> it •uaaau> i rn* las Orable dlapia arotid-th* snawer. ISI ,_ / Thla due' la manufacturao ia. II rtai; \'i t>'I* Bocora '•-. "if !" 1 I wafegafeaS Hupeit daiirmjaai w try ax tha -. i ['i if. and taking %  r basi b* sunds vtry atss*r. Than IH ihrows. "Oh. grand ahot. fon *• knockad a—' %  ofM of SBt blaa* ikinlu." "? dona that iha whola ot rha waak I GLOBE THEATRE OM*E<\IXi; TO-MOIUtOW .J tmtl H..'tO p. in. %  mflj % %  i 11?.? tin iu.-d f >fS.,, .1 1-1. Daaa %  I. Onrvinu I m %  %  T">" TS B 3 Snows TO-DAY 3 1.30 1.1.1 amtt il.-'BO /..#SPECIAL PLANTERS MATINEE FRIDAY I.WP M (Pleas.' Nole Time) Also 4 45 and B 30 p m. SATCKDAV II HHOWSI 3 — 1 • — * K HI p m and CMiUnalni li..lMinii..|. 4 U and S 30 p m Cecil BDeMilles Masterpiece tV5 Satttsof I -1 BNItOLQll PLAZA THEATRE IIIIUM.I IOU \ (SPECIAL NOTICE—All Tickals Booked must bo taken up not later than B SO p.m or same will ba sold after that limei .V.B.—d4ll tumpllmsnlarv tickefi nr,cnna-Ucd lor rhU picture HANDBAGS A Short llandl PATBNT MOROCCO HMHII HIIITF. BLACK BROWN TAN %  ED [BEATcHirToRTS F Mm B>. In Bum, Inn BBMM VOI'a SHOE STORES Sruirlcskin [ _5.80 EVANS and* WHITFIELDS YOUR SHOE STORE 1. Do vim want a CLEANER BRIDGETOWN? 2. The Advocate invites your suggestions in not more than 200 words. 3. The best suggestion to be received not later than December 1st, will receive $25.00. A p a n e I ui three judges to be announced later will decide the winning entry. Enclose attached Coupon with each entry. C. B. C. i >ii'iiu To-dsy 4 45 and It 31 and ConUnulBf lndrllnlte Mai. and Night Dally Julian Blausten I'rodurtlon "BROKEN ARROW Color Bj Technicolor Starring JAMES STEWART with Jeff CHANDLER — Dehra PAGET and Basil RUYSDAEL—Will OEER HOW Last Two Shows To-dsy 4 'in and R 15 M-G-M Bla Itoublr Robert TAYLOR — Ava UABDNER "THE BRIBE" AND "BIG JACK" *.'llh Wallace BEEHY— Richard CONYG To-morrow To Sundsy II. -ml h i i W. Lee Presenlu . Cesar ROMERO and June HAVOC "ONCE A THIEF Oi Hail I lii| Mane McUONALD and Lon CHANEY ROYAL To-day 4.3* Only BIG DOUBLE -COVER UP" and "THE i MUIni • DORSEYS' 1 To-nitf at H 30 p.m. MADAM O'LINDY AND TROUPE In CARACAS NIGHT*' Fur the Last Time at the Roya l Friday Only at 4 30 and I 3 Republic Big Double Don AMECIIE Catherine McLEOD In "WILL TOMORROW EVER COM*" and "MAN FROM OKLAHOMA' with Roy ROGERS Dale EVANS Opentn* Saturday U Monday IftlU •THREE GODFA1IIERS" OLYMPIC To-day and Tomorrow 1.30 and I IS M-C-M Big Double Claude JAHMAN and David BRIAN "INTRUDER IN THE DIIRT" and •TENTH AVENUE ANGEL" with Margaret O'BRIEN and Angel LANSBURY Saturday. Sunday ajad Monday 4.St and 8.15 United Artists Double "CHAMPAGNE FOR CAESAR'' and "COVER UP" .1 nmFEcr •• ^*V*W**W** ,t f ',* r e ;' e r r ;r -,; i ,' e l ;',;',',* t *S t ',*S'*' t IV TO SPKMO THIS IlinilHi ro-ni v .# A n.:iOp.m. Globe Theatre I III Hill! JI.VV (Lon (Imiifj A llrln I iiii..si| and "THE >U M.1M S TOMHf |ll.ris Kurl..ff| EXTRA TO-JViTEt O.X STAGE Secure Yours To-day KARLIT INSULATING WALL BOARD Termite %  X4' Trool 6'. 7', 8', ' and If Sheets : I HARD BOARD Termite Proof Sheets I W X •'• '' %  nd *' ASBESTOS WOOD Sheets : 4' X 4'. 4' < HAND SAWS 24" to 36" in length IIIK II Mill VIMIS I IMII'I It A M\ I lO'llin FAITOn%' LTD. BERMUDA'S BOP SPECIALIST THE HAPPY FOUR ORCHESTRA


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THURSDAY. NOVEMBER , USO BARBADOS ADVOCATE 'Health' Committee Will Visit City Dairies To Discuss Their Removal THE GENERAL BOARD OF HEALTH :n therti nmUnq yesterday afternoon appointed a sub committee to meet 3 committee from the Commissioners ot Health w:th a view to visiting the existing dairies in the City aiea and distu. sing their removal. Mr. A. E. S Lcwtw, Mr. F C. Goddaid and Mr. W. Abraham* were appointed to the Committee —— The qucnit shopbreakmg with mteni He was accused of having broken (atwr Hie shop <-t noraraai Muike on September I* and stolen %l| OU from Her cash bo*. Though Gamble pleaded "nol nnltv" an the alt.inative cour's 1 iross-examlued onv oi U l Avaj %  %  proseculion, He neither gave evidence, called witnesses nor addressed tha |VJ Hi ui,; -.a rttitna around > vi< 1<-nee was given against him. The Chief JuStsOl told him that ie had come then-, and pleaded %  illy and Nai li. w.i sorr> % methuig might have been able i i dona rot hbn Ha hag) coma li te, howevei \:ivt.sl linu Ivan no defence, jiui ufter he h;il [en found g\nlly, he had nothing taj toi inniscir .v.v.v.v.ViV.v: > .u.ii.\ AVAMMJtmMti p ii it i m A i I'H.ION (HOW ,H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. MM • %  v %  %  ] ProseciiUon was conducted .. %  M", Speightstown Carpenter Wins "Your Guess" THE CORRECT ANSWER to Ihe Kvci.inu Advoc.lA "Your Guess" competition was the clock in Queen's Park. A large number of the 594 entrants guessed correct Iv hut most popular choice was the Savannah Club's clock. There were several fantastic answers, best of which was "7 minulcs 58 seconds past." Another guesser thought it was the clock in Broad Street. £3 For Speeding A FINE of £3 to be paid by monthly Instalments or in default two months' imprisonment was imposed on Allan Rouse of Station Hill. St. Michael, by His Worship Mr II A. Talma. House was iound guilty of driving the motor van M-94 on Hush Hall Road on September 25 at over 34 miles per hour and the speed limit on that road for that type of vehicle is 20 miles per hour. The licence is to be en(lor %  >-n>htslowner Cecil Co/ict Cecil Coster is a 20-yenr-old enrpenter of Queen Street. Speightstown. g Cozier had just finished his luiKh yesterday and was getting ready to return tn work when n representative of the Adi>ocaftold him he had won $5.00. First Guess Win-. triad vfterday At the end of the second the Court adjourned until morrow •ealy in his address to the jur.* declared he was not asking for mercy or sympathy, but merely that Justice be done Date of the alleged breaking und entering and stealing wa. Septemlier 16 last ye ur The itemOf food and the purac belonged p Ida Shepherd while the JHII arai owned by her son, Lionel Shepherd. The story for the Prosecuti n was that Ida Shepherd and hn von were away from home between 7 and 7 30 p.m. until about four hours later. Lionel came back BW nnd found that the inside (Kml door had been unlatched but had been pulled back in. He had ured both the inner and outer doors before leaving. He entered the house hut saw nothing to attract hts attention. N>Xl morning his mother wnt to make tea, but found no mtlfc nor cocoa. She called on Lionel who was at his joiner's work bench, and asked him about It He looked nnd saw none and then discovered that the |X>n which wit* %  na <-ii by asking you to consider yourselves in my position I will not attempt to argue this case on a point of law because the JwiniiuAs, iked you'll <£ov& Dreasinu Tables Wardrobes with and wlthoul Mirror* Morris Suite* Sideboard* China Cabln.ls All In Mahogany in light your Think rureiiilly how you will spend boniiH this ChrisinuM nnd you will find that there is no better investment you can make with the money than t buy yourself MOM smart Furniture We buve a wide variety of styles anil designs and there i% nothinie lo make you Ceel more happy in your home Ihan Furniture you Uke. We sre sure that you can find tomethlne; to satisfy you from .union: our slock. / Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 12, & 13 Brud Ont morntm, noss "•loppad-up by s head mlrl or catarrh Nest moment. K 'rt brOBthlnf easily — thanks u* iro-noll Jusc a few drops up %  actl nostril HtflnkS mai mi •wolUn mambrscMs, Wlvl&aV relieves stuffiness Pntvenfi many cold: tfuaed toons*. VATRONOL IN HANDBAGS We will be Specially ServingPINE 4PPLE CREAMS Mild PINEAPPLE SUNDAES •i PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN KM (.HI'S I I It LADIES' PLASTIC HANDBAGS from 2.S2 lo J4.91 each LADIES' LIZARD SKIN HANDBAGS from $8.61 & $9.77 e.eh LADIES' CROCODILE HANDBAGS from $11.85 each LADIES' OVERNIGHT BAGS from $3.63 & $4.91 each — AUo CHILDREN HANDBAGS with Short or Long Handles $1.02 & S2.14 HARRISON'S /KW-HVlWWOK9tMn( iV-V.VC.-AV-Vrt'-.-.<* BROAD STREET HBaM>Marvw D1AL 2e64