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The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text




eee

Thursday,

October
1950





~







“BRITAIN COULD NOT CARE LESS”



UN. Troops Reported
In Pyongyang

Communists

On The Run

TOKYO, Oct. 18.

RUSSIAN RADIO reported to-day that spear-

heads of the South Korean First Division had
entered the “main part’’ of the Communist capital
Pyongyang. It said that according to reports from

the front, Pyongyang

airfield on the eastern side

of the Taedong River fell this afternoon.



Butlin’s

Application
(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Oct. 18.
The application to wind up
Butlin’s Bahamas Ltd. was ad-
journed in Nassau to-day until
November 9th. It is reliably
learned that Butlin is trying to
borrow enough to pay all the
creditors except the Cape and
General, London, totalling £143,-
000 and then give Cape a mozt-
og for £463,000.

Cape and General Finance is
bossed by Harold C,. Drayton, city
financier, whose interests have
sunk £1,050,000 into Butlin’s Ba-
hamas.

Of the £1,750,000 a'ready spent
on the vacation village, Cape and
meral have put up £750,000, The
ance company was the biggest
creditor involved in to-day's court
proceedings. In ozder to protec‘
its position it was forced to file ¢
claim for the £450,000 unsecured

loan it made earlier this year in
an attempt to save the village.

U.S. Offers France
£71,000,000

PARIS, Oct. 18.
The United States has offered
to place £71,000,000 at the
disposal of the French Govern-
ment for rearmament during the
first six months of 1951 a French

t





Information was contained in
the report from French Defence
Minister Jules Moch on conver-
sations which he and Finance
Minister Maurice _Petsche had
with top American officials in
Washington,

Moch had talked with high
American officials including Dean
Acheson, Secretary of the Treas-
ury John W. Snyder, and Secre-
tary of Defence General George
C. Marshall.

At meetings they had discussed
means of financing France’s
rearmament plan and solving the
problems of her 1951 budget.

The credit of £71,000,000 may
be used either for the purchase
of material in the dollar zone, or
for financing the manufacture
in France of material provided
for by the French rearmament
rogramme.

" Provision for American mater-
jal under the Atlantic eee
Military Aid Programme wou
add a fusion £17,000,000 to this
credit, Minister of information
Albert Gazier said after a coun-
ci] meeting. —Reuter.

“DAILY CHRONICLE”
MANAGER DIES

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Oct. 18.
Cc. N. Delph, Daily Chronicle
Manager, died in Port-of-Spain
today. A special plane coming
from Trinidad on Thursday brings
the body home.



Minister was informea]

The South Koreans _ spear-
heading a drive for Pyongang
seized an airfield and claimed to
have pressed on into the “main
parw” of the Communist capital

Br' ish and United State:
Forces advancing swiftly south
against stiffening opposition were
also expected in the city to-night.
American Seventh Cavalry Regi-
ment vanguard of this southern
advance were last reported about
10 miles off the capital. They
had taken the lead from the
British Commonwealth Divisio
which had advanced 40 miles ir
24 hours.

Military sources here did not
expect heavy fighting in Pyong-
yang. “The Communist are on
the run”, they said.

Reuter.



Jap Courts Given
Full Responsibility

TOKYO, Oct. 18.

General Douglas MacArthur
announced today that from
November 1, the Japanese courts
will be free to try the United
Nations citizens in criminal cases.

On that date the Government
will assume responsibility for
exercising criminal jurisdiction in-
cluding power of arrest over the
United Nations citizens in Japan
with (he éxception of the occupa-
tion staff, the announcement said.

MacArthur’s action was the
result of a decision adopted by the
Far Eastern Commission in
Washington on September 21.
Alva Cirpeter, Chief of the Legal
Section of General MacArthur’s
Headquarters said that the action
ane “an expression of faith in the
egal, judicial and police institu-
tions that the Japanese police have
adopted and represents a firm be-
lief in the ability of the Japanese
Government to accept and execute
that responsibility impartially
fairly and with justice.

The rights of any United Nations
national detained by Japanese
authorities will be protected by
several provisions .

While confined to prison or
awaiting trial the United Nations
national will be permitted to com-
municate with his country’s diplo-
n:atic mission in Japan.

A representative of the mission
may intercede for and protect the
rights of the arrested national.

No capital or life sentence im-
posed by the Japanese Court on
the United Nations national may
be executed without confirmation
of the Allied Suprerne Com-
mander.—Reuter.

NOT A BONE BROKEN

LONDON, Oct, 18.

The sole survivor from yester-
day’s plane crash near London in
which 28 died, escaped without
breaking a bone, X-rays showed
today.

The survivor, Steward J.
McKissick was thrown over a
100 yards when a crippled British
European Airways Dakota crashed
into a sub-urban garden at Mill
Hill North London and burst into

flames.
—Reuter.





War Spy Story Told
In Parliament

Valet Photographed Documents

LONDON, October 18.

Foreign Minister Bevin today blamed Britain’s war-
time Ambassador to Turkey for letting some of the biggest
secrets of World War II fall into the hands of the Germans.
He confirmed in Parliament the most extraordinary spy
story of the war — the photographing of top secret docu-

ments by the Ambassador’s
Germans.

Govt. Rejects
Rubber Proposal

LONDON, Oct, 18.



British Government to-day re-

jected a proposal that it should ban

all future exports of rubber to

Russia and Communist controlled

countries until Communist guerilla
activities in rubber producing

Malaya had ceased.

Conservative Sir Jocelyn Lucas
made the proposal in the House
of Commons but Colonial Secre-
tary James Griffiths said he could

not accept it —Reuter.

JAMAICA VILLAGE
SUBMERGED

KINGSTON, JAMAICA, Oct. 18.
Flooded underground



depths varying from 18 to 50 feet
All the village livestock

streams
submerged the entire village of
Cave Valley, 80 miles from King-
ston in a few minutes. The 150 in-
habitants escaped in boats to high
ground as the waters rose on Sun-
day night to cover the village to

was

valet who sold the films to the

Among the secrets were refer-
ences to
Allied invasion
Europe.

of

Until to-day doubt had been
thrown on a story which was told
in. a book named
by Ludwig
Moyzisch, a Viennese who worked
in the German Embassy in Ankara.

The Conservative member, Wil-
liam Shepphard asked Mr. Bevin
inquiry had taken
place into the irpident and what
issued to
prevent such a thing happening

iast month
“operation cincero”

today if an

instructions had been

again.

Mr. Bevin replied that

Germans.

ments.
“New instructions
measures taken to prevent
recurrence.”’ (Britain’s Ambé
ador in Ankara at the time
|Sir Hugh Knatchbull

drowned in a lake of flood water. 'now retired).—Reuter.




























“operation overlord”—
Northwest

the
Ambassador’s valet succeeded in
photographing highly secret docu-
ments and selling the films to the
He added “he would
not have been able to do this if
the Ambassador had conformed to
regulations governing secret docu-

have been
issued to all concerned and other
such
3~

Hughert

Doctors |

Condemn —
Mercy Killing

!
NEW YORK, Oct. 18. |

_The World Medical Associa-
tion, after a keen debate here
Fas voved to condemn mercy

killings (euthanasia).

Dr. Gregg af Britain said that
many doctors at some time had!
used drugs to speed the death!
ef incurable patients suffering |
freat pain.

But Dr. Marcel Poumailloux of |
France declared: “I lost my own!
mother by a terrible cancer
lasting for weeks and weeks, ana
none of my colleagues thought of |
shortening her life to alleviate!
her suffering. |

He said that euthanasia would
“open the door to all possible |
crimes and criminal practices ”



—



The resolution which was
passed called euthanasia “con-)|
trary to the public interest anc}
to medical principles as wel] as)
to natural and civil rights.” |

It recommended that national ;
medical associations in each;
country should “condemn the!
practice of euthanasia under any
circumstances.”

Israel proposed that Western
German doctors should not be)
admitted to the Association be-|
cause of the “inhuman experi-
ments” practiced in Germany
during the war.

The charge was made by Dr.
Emil Adire of Jerusalem who
said he did not object to the}
organisation having relations with
German doctors, but that there
should be a “probation time”
before they are admitted to|
membership. }

—Reuter.

Gilkes ‘Walks
Over’ Trinidad

AT CHESS

(From Our Own Corresponaent)
GEORGETOWN, B.G., Oct. 18.
The Intercolonial Chess tourna-
ment got underway on Tuesday
night at Woodbine Hotel and at
the close of play Trinidad and
Barbados had 1% points and Bri-





poo Guigna ape. BOs... F B.
ilies, Barba won
by eae from Pratt, ‘tha

Trinidad captain,

Frank Ogle, B.G, captain, lost
to W. S. Quashie of Trinidad.
G. O. E. Barker of B.G, beat his
team mate Frank Osborne.

H. O. Walton of Barbados drew
with F, E. Brassington of Trini-
dad,

The tournament was formally
opened by His Excellency Sir
Charles Woolley on Monday night,
the Governor making the first
move in the informal exhibition
by J. Quashie of Trinidad and
Frank Osborne of B.G. H. Mc-
Shine of Trinidad and C. B. Gilkes
of Barbados also gave an exhibi-
tion.



GOVERNMENT
WINS AGAIN

LONDON, Oct. 18.
The British Labour Government
seored a 12-vote victory over
Winston Churchill’s Conservative
opposition in Parliament tonight.
It defeated a Conservative chal-
lenge on its running of the
nationalised transport industry—
which made a loss of 20 million
sterling last year.
—Reuter.

a
ARMIE'S HEADLINE





IN BRITALN at the invitation of the British Council,
the Olowo of Owo,

Alaiycluwa Olagbeg,
Nigeria, acompanied by his
Zoo and is seen feeding on



FOOD FOR PENGUIN





uerillas Mass
‘Attack On Langson|

Sa)
a

the Oba
principal town of Western

wife and councillors visited the London
e of the Penguins.

Express.

For

Civilian Residents Evacuated

PARIS, Oct. 18.

VIETMINH GUERILLAS, after occupying the French

frontline fortress
ing today for an

————.

SPORTS
WINDOW

WATER POLO
THIS afternoon at the Barba-
dos Aquatic Club,
meet Flying Fish in their re-
play K.O. fixture. Thig match
Was unfinished. last week and
this afternoon’s enco inter
mises to be another
match,



Snappers

pro-
thrilling

Before this
feams will play a
match, in preparatior
naad tour

lay begins at 5 Pom. A Sil-
ver Collection will be taken
between these two matches

Referee

match two girls’

practice
for the

this afternoon
Mr. Archie Clarke ; 2
rennin!

26,000 Dockers
Strike In Australia

MELBOURNE, Oct 18,
26,000 dock workers today tied
up every port in Australia in a
24 hours cost of living strike,
The strike, first move in the
Labour Party’s campaign against
rising prices launched yesterday
in Sydney, delayed 246 ships and
cost shipowners £100,0%0 Aus-
tralian.

Victoria was without rai] ser-
vices for the third day in
succession because of the strike
by railway guards to back
demands for wage increases,

In Melbourne 500 firemen
carried their “pushbutton strike”
into its third week with no sign
of settlement, The men are
striking against a rule forcing!
them to press a button every ten |
minutes while on duty. |

—Reuter. |





Dondang

r attack on Langson,

French defence post guarding the China road.
einai neces eo ts

formation

were reported

chief

mass-
remaining

The French evacuation of 75

; year old stone fortress of Dong-

dang, fifth bastion to be aban-
doned within a monvn, had left
the way open for a direct attack
on Langson, 10 miles away.

Langson’s civilian residents
have already been evacuated
and the French were not expect-
ed to hold it.

The French National Assem-
bly’s defence Committee to-day
rejected the Communist propo-

sal that Government should open
talks with Dr, Ho Ch Minh
Russian recognised leader

France’s leading military svra-
tegist Eral Alphonse Juin and
‘ean Elourneau Minister for the

Associated Srates who flew into
Saigon yesterday, continued
tuiks invo the early hours of
this. morn ng on the border
situation.

Their discussions with local
military and political leaders
were believed to involve big
strategical «lecis ons and the re-
grouping of French forces now
holding vhe area,

They were expected to leave
siurtly by plane to study the
berder situation on the spot

Albert Vazier, Minister of In-
said in Paris to—day
that the French High Command
was proceeding with the metho-
dical withdrawal of isolated
forces on the northern border of
China with the aim of regroup-
ing them and occupying 4 posi-

tion protected against encircle-
ment

Informed Paris sources said
that 80,000 members of the

French Unon forces were ex-
pected to dig in about 80 miles
3 uth of the mountainous front-
icy region defending a line,
one point, only 20 miles north of
Hanoi the capital itself.
—Reuter.

at

| Archdeacon Accuses U.K.
Of Complete Indifference

In West Indies

(From Our Own Correspondent)

TLM. The King

| Congratulates

| ‘Trinidad
| inida
| LONDON, Oct. 18.
| King George the Sixth has
|Sent a message to the Trinidad
and’ Tobago Legislative Council
| congratu'ating the colony on its
|; “major advance in constitutional
development.”

In the message which will be

|} read to the first session of the
| new Legislative Council te-
|} morrow the King said: “I wish

to convey to my people of Trini-
dad and Tobago an expression of
my sincere satisfaction at this
major advance in the constitu-
Yional development of the colon:
The inauguration of a new
constitution affords great oppor-
tunities It also imposes great
responsibilities on the Legisla-
ture and people alike. I have
watched with close interest and
sympathy the manner in which
my people of the colony have now
availed themselves of the in-
ereasing opportunities for partici-



pation in the work of the Gov-
ernment, and ‘the election has
shown that their interest ir
political affairs continues to

inerease,
I am confident that their repre-

sentatives on this Council and
those who are chosen to share
as members of the Executive

Council the heavy responsibility of
Government will not fail the peo-
ple of these islands and that they
will continue to advance the good
name and prosperity of the colony
whose well being in every sphere is
my deep and abiding concern,”
—Reuter,

125 M.P.H. Winds

Sweep Miami

MIAMI, Florida, Ocb, 18,

A vicious tropical hurricane
slammed Miami with 125-mile an
hour winds early on Wednesday
then whirled on up Florida.

A 70-mile strip of the resort
area including the cities, of Holly-
wood Fort Lauderdale, Pompano
and Boca Ration lay in its path.
The rich Indian River citrus
section was not far to the nortn.

oO. D. Henderson, Miami
Safety Director said that he wi!l
not be surprised if property
damage reaches or
$2,000,000

Henderson made two general
‘ours of the debris littered city
and said: If it is bad all over
as it is in those parts I saw, it
may easily reach that figure, Five
persons were injured but no
deaths were reported. Electricity
was off in most of the city. There
was no water in many sections,

Phone lines were down in the
area where 500,000 people live.

Fort Lauderdale, raked by 100-
mile an hour winds was piungea
into darkness, Some damage was
reported to roofs windows and
shrubbery. Reports from Davis,
just west of Fort Lauderdale said
that the farming community was
hard hit.—OC.P,

Argentine Ambassador
Calls On Bevin

| LONDON, Oct. 18.
Carlos Hogan, Argentine Am-
bassador, called on Ernest Bevin,
British Foreign Secretary, to-day
at his own request

It was believed that he discuss-
ed with Bevin the deadlock in
Argentine meat shipments to Bri-





tain which has persisted since
Argentina suspended shipments
on July 21 after failure to reach
agreement on prices,

E, J. Joint, British Commercial

ed last week that the Argentine
was asking too much for meat,
Britain has agreed to pay £90
per ton but the Argentine gov-
ernment has proposed £140 per
ton with provisional shipments at
£97 per ton.—Reuter.

Minister in Buenos Aires, “a





Cuke Awarded £3,000 Damages

A Court of Common Pleas Jury
yesterday awarded Arden St. C.
Cuke, Manager of Bulkeley’s
Dairies Ltd. £3,000 general dam-
ages, and £4,3.4. special damages
against Chifford Skinner, Man-
ager-Owner of Colleton Planta-
tion, St, Lucy at the end of the
retrial of an action brought by
Cuke.

The action arose out of a
collision between a car driven by
Cuke and one driven by Skinner
on Colleton Hill on November 7,
1947. As a result of the collision
Cuke’s right knee cap was broken
and according to medical evidence
a 35 to 40 per cent. permanent
disability is very likely.

There was an original trial
before the Court of Common
Pleas last year at the end of
which Skinner appealed to the
West Indian Court of Appeal.
That Court ordered a retrial of
the case. In the original trial,
the jury awarded Cuke £1,500

general damages and £4.3.4. spe-
cial damages.

Counsel for Cuke was Mr
D. H. L. Ward, instructed
Messrs Hutchinson & Banfield
Skinner was represented by I



W. W. Reece, K.C., instructed by
Messrs. Carrington & Sealy.

3 Days’ Retrial

Hearing of the retrial began
Monday and continued on Tues-
day. When hearing was resumed
yesterday His Honour the Chief
Judge Sir Allan Collymore
summed up to the jury. The Chief
Judge awarded to Cuke the costs
of the retrial and the original
trial and certified that it was a
proper case to have been tried
by a special jury.

The Chief Judge opened his
summing up by referring to what
he called “an unfortunate refer-
ence appearing in a section of the
Press this morning which should
not have been made.”

Although the matte which had
been mentioned might have been
before the Court previously, he
said, particular care had been
taken that the judgment of tt
West Indian Court of Appeal t:
which the case 1t for retrail
should not be hed, and t
Press had abi
that it should not t











concerned
appeal
before
Appeal.
case on the facts before you
subject to what we know — tha
there was a trial in the Court o'
Common Pleas previously
that the case
West Indian Court of Appeal.

or with what
the West Indian Court o





with the grounds of
happened

You are here to try the

and
did go before the

was the effective cause of the
f accident, and so he was the real
cause of his own undoing. :

. bhe Chief Judge then explained
f as failure to take care.
to take the care

ealled for.”



To Shipping



exceeds |

and that the plaintiff’s negligence

t the legal meaning of “negligence”
“Failure
which the cir-
cumstances of the particular case
The degree of care

i is se Ww " f care which one

You will therefore disabuse was the degree o
your minds of anything that you would expect a reasonable a
may have previously heard in to exercise in the particular cir-
connection with the matter and cumstances of the particular case.

start afresh.”

Case Before Jury
The Chief Judge then

put to
the jury the case for the plaintiff,

Next point made by the Chief
Judge

was that they should not

allow sympathy for the injured

their
not say

party to warp judgment.

They should

that the
plaintiff had suffered and there-

LONDON, Oct. 18.

i" IS impossible to get a booking to the West
Indies by sea before February 1951, and even at
that date there is a long waiting list. This was what

Archdeacon Fr. Banks

of Trinidad was told when

he applied for a passage to one of the leading ship-
ping companies in this country, and he reveals
these facts in a letter to “The Times’’ today.

“Does Britain want her colonies or not?” he asks.

we

do not wish to engage in politics, but I am very interested
in transport, which is looked upon by the Government as
a first essential within the United Kingdom, but outside
(within the Empire) apparently it could not matter less.”

U.K. Will Buy

More Sugar
From W.I.

THE United Kingdom is pre-
pered to buy 30,000 tons more
sugar a year from the British

West Indies at guaranteed prices
irom 1953—57,

The Advocate was told yester-
day that the total West Indian

allocation will now be raised from

640,000 tons to 670,000 tons a year,

The increase is due to the fact
of New

that the Government
Zealand have informed the Gov-
ernment of the United Kingdom
of their desire to participate until
1957 in the Commonwealth Sugar

Agreement. The United Kingdom
Government have expressed to
the New Zealand Government

great satisfaction at this decision
and have informed the Govern-
ments of other participati#g Com-
monwealth countries accordingly.

Under the arrangements pro-
posed by the New Zealand Gov-
ernment the Minister of Food will
continue to supply until the end
of 1952 all New Zealand raw sugar
requirements at prices to be
negotiated each year the
Commonwealth Agreement,
Thereafter from 1953 to 1957 in-
clusive New Zealand has agreed
to purchase 75,000 tons a year of
Commonwealth sugar at Common-

wealth guaranteed prices, New
Zealand will purchase the re-
mainder of her requirements

during this period in the world
market

The United Kingdom Govern-
ment have accordingly informed
participating countries that if pro-
lucers so desire the United King-
dom will be prepared to increase
by 75,000 tons, i.e. from 1,568,000
tons to 1,643,000 tons the amount
of Sugar the United Kingdom has
undertaken to buy each year at
guaranteed preies from 1953—
1957



C.O,L. STEADY

The Cost-of-living figure has
not risen since June.

The figure for September shows
a drop of one point less than May
when it was 242.

—_—_—


























Archdeacon Banks recalls that
two years ago a Commission of
Inquiry reported what was needed
to alleviate the West Indies’ ship-
ping position. But, he says, noth-
ing has been done.

Hundreds of people wanting to
travel to and from the British
Caribbean colonies find themselves
stranded because of lack of ship-
ping space.

Yet, if the question of remov-
ing troops ever arises, it is always
possible to find a ship from some-
where or other.

Inadequate Boats

He also points out that before
the war there were about a dozen
regular passenger steamships on
the U.K.-West Indies run, where-
as today there are “one or two
very inadequate boats running at
long intervals”.

“Such an approach by respon-
sible authorities in this country
is indefensible,” concludes Arch-
deacon Banks, “and to the West
Indian can only appear to be one
of complete indifference.”

Footnote: Checking up with
some of the steamship companies
serving the West Indies from tha
United Kingdom, our correspond-
ent was told: “The position is
hopeless. It is a source of worry
‘to us who are interested in the
West Indies, but there are just not
enough ships to go around. New
ones are expensive to build and
unremunerative to run. That is
al! there is to it.”

SPAT: ON ALTAR

CAGLIARI, Sardinia, Oct. 18.

A Sardinian Court has gaoled a
Communist for 10 months for
spitting on the altar of a local
Church.

The Communist, Giovanni Pud-
du was stated to have forced his
way into the village Church of
Bacu Abis, after the parish priest
had refused to accept a Com-
munist godfather at the baptism
of his child.—Reuter.





TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
Ring 3113 Day or Night,
pe THE ADVOCATE

PAYS FOR NEWS.



MEET
THE CHALLENGE

THE

OF

UNKNOWN TO-MORROW

WITH A

POLICY OF

ASSURANCE

WITH

THE BARBADOS MUTUAL LIFE

ASSURANCE

J. N. WALCOTT )

SOCIETY.

+

Canvassing

DENIS ATKINSON § Representatives

C. K. BROWNE

Cuke, and that for ,defendant, fore he was entitled to damages.

Skinner. The plaintiff's case was On the other hand, sympathy or

that he had suffered personal no sympathy, if they were satis-

njuries and pain, and that from fied that he had made out his

those injuries he had not com- case it would be their duty to

jletely recovered award such damages as they felt
He was alleging that the acci- should be awarded.

lent was due to the negligence of ‘

the defendant in driving his motor Assessing Damages

ar If they came to deal with the
The efence 1 t of damage the vould
c t : nd tha the general
e yr 7

he pl ff On page 8

Secretary

—————————E=E=Ee=Ee=eE=eE=E=E=E=ES=S=S=E=E—llEEEEEeEeaeEeEeEEeeel_—e SS



PAGE TWO

4

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Caub ¢

ON. E. P ARROWSMITH,

Administrator of Dominica
who arrived from. Dominica on
Tuesday, left for Trinidad yester-
day afternooft by B.W.1.A.

On Long Leave
N Barbados ofice affain for his
long leave is ‘Mr. Will Hah-
schell who arrivéd a little over
a week ago from Africa.
Will is in the Government
Service in the Gold Coast.

Delay—Due Bad Weather
RRIVING from Trinidad
yesterday afternoon by
B.W.1.A. intransit from the U.S.,
were Mr. and Mrs. Milton R. Cato.
Mr. and Mrs. Cato are en route to
St. Vincent where Mr. Cafo is a
Barrister.

Before leaving for St. Vincent
however, they will spend a few
days with Mr. Cato’s brother, Dr.
A. S. Cato at “Arndale”, Govern-
ment Hill,

They should have been in Bar-
bados several days ago, but bad
weather in Jamaica delayed their
atrival.

Husband Coming Shortly
RS. R. DULIEU and her young
son John arrived from St.

Lucia on Tuesday to spend a
holiday with Mrs. Dulieu's parents,
Maj. and Mrs. A. De V. Chase
Mr. Dulieu is also expected up for
& holiday shortly,

Enroute From England
R. EMILE DE LISLE of St.
Kitts who has been in Eng-

land for the past two and a half
months, visiting his wife and
children arrived here by the
Geologist a few days ago, and
yesterday he left for St. Kitts by
B.W,LA.

Here For Three Weeks
EV. CANON T. L. S. GOUGH
of St. Patrick’s Rectory in
Grenada arrived from that colony
yesterday by B.W.I1.A to spend
three weeks’ holiday in Barbados.
He is staying at the Hotel Royal.
Fireworks and Parties
UITE a “colony” of Trinidad-
ians are at present staying at
the Hotel Royal. Yesterday after-
neon, two of them returned to
Trinidad by B.W.LA They were
Mr. J6e Herrera and Mr. Conrad
O'Brien . Two weeks ago they
arrivéd for a holiday with Mr.
David Millar who is staying on
until Saturday



These three have thoroughly
enjoyed their holiday and have
been very entertaining company
to the mé@ny friends they have

made here.

What with parties, tours around
the island and “firework displays,”
Joe and Conrad reluctantly said
goodbye to Davitt yesterday after-
noon at Seawell.

Barbadian In Korea
Ce heard yesterday, that
Harold Bourne, now a Lieu-
tenant in the Canddian Army, has
gone to Korea as a member of a
Canadian Expeditionary _ Force
His mission is to train troops in
Korea in Tank Warfare.
Harold is the son of Mr. and

Mrs. Ernest Bourne of 9th Ave.
Belleville.

Y allowing all the unhealthi-

est Labour candidates to get
in unopposed at the next General
Election, the Conservatives might
stand a chance of defeating their
opponents in a_ division soon
afterwards. But the. Labour
people might be astute enough
to allow very sick Conservative
eandidates to get in unopposed,
and so defeat this cunning
manoeuvre. Meanwhile speakers
would do well to get the doctors,
nurses, and ambulance men
their side, and canvassers should
concentrate on making sure of
their votes, for it is they who
will decide the future of party
politics in this country. A strike
of ambulance drivers might bring:
down a Government. =

‘Yes, we have no

Bahamas’ *

The holiday camp has come to
stay,

; (Weekly paper.)
* Disraeli’s famous reply when,

§F9599555551993996










NEW STOCK

BYMIN AMARA HALIBORANGE
LIQUID PARAFFIN SYRUP OF FIGS

and

RUSKS—Baby’s First Solid Food
Also a variety of CIGARS

a

LAWN MOWERS—12” & 14” ..
RAKES ......

SHEARS for Hedges
HAND FORKS . ns
GARDEN TROWELS

i
COTTON

SEEGER OIE



=

BY THE WAY

on ff

LOOK AFTER
YOUR GARDEN
0 and LAWN

SECATEURS ....
HOSE NOZZLES .
MENDERS...... bs
UNIONS .... DUNG s shes:

also V.G.M.—for manuring of



THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY LTD.

ARTIE'S MEADLINE |



Pew
7a 8 . Mate ‘
buy w+ mal the Dis i
bound in co tb) Gamin very

shorty"

Arrives On Wednesday

HE S.S, COLOMBIE is due to

arrive here on Wednesday Oct.
25th. This will be the first time
since the 29th of January 1948
that this ship has called at Ba*-
bados.

At that time she Was still a
hospital ship. Now, reconverted
inte a luxury linér she arrives on
Wednésday at 8 am. with the
Head of the Compagnie Generale
Transpflantique, Mr. Jéan Marie
and his wife.

Also on bard are Mr. Lanier,
Secretary General of the French
line, Mrs. Lanier, Mr. Ramorony,
Deputy of the Merchant Marine
Committee of France, and. Mr.
Abal Durand, President of the
Merchant Marine of France.

Shortly after the ship arrives,
Mr. Marie and party will land at
the Baguage Warehouse, where
they will be inet. by the méthbers
of the Counell of the Chamber of
Commerce, They will afterwards
call at Government House.

In the afternoon, there will be
a luncheon party on board, to
which ys rele the Gov-
ernor, Government Officials and
prominent business men have
been invited.

Postponed

— Queen’s College Old Girls
were to have held a meeting
this afternoon, but they tell me
that it has had to be postponed.





By

during the war of 1878, Gladstone
asked him if it was true that the
Italians had invaded the Bahamas.
The reply became the refrain of
a popular song, with “bandanas”
substituted for “Bahamas,” after
the 1914-18 war.

Anti-Faseist floor-polish

HE visit of an English char-
woman to Moscow, to study
Russian methods _ of lishing
oors, is a gratuitous insult to
Snibbo, Snibbo, by the way, is
the only thing Stalin has not, so
far, been credited with inventing.
he charwoman and her party
are the “guests of the women’s
Anti-Fascist Committee,” so they
will probably return with the
doctrinally correct anti-Fascist
method of polishing floors, It
would be fun if Snibbo were to

be eer into an _ ideological
debate,

The new wines made by Snibbo
differ, of course, from the floor-

OF




Vegetables & Flower Gardens

Managing Direétor Returns
. GEORGE DE NOBRIGA,
Managing Director of the

Barbados Telephone Co., returned

to Trinidad yesterday afternoon by

B.WAL.A. a short visit.
Visited Kaite
. MARIE TA R of
Belleville retiifned from

Grenada yesterday morning by
B.W.1.A.

Three weeks ago, she left Bar-
bad by the “Lady Nelson”,
touching at St. Vincent, Grenada
and Trinidad on her way to B.G.
There, along with somé of the
othér round trippers, shé visited
the Kaiteut Falls.

On the return trip, she stopped
in at Grenada, staying for a few
days at the Santa Maria Hotel.

Board Of Control Meeting
M® F. A. C. CLAIRMONTE

and Mr. Teddy Hoad left
yesterday afternoon by B.W.1.A.
for dad to attend a meeting
of the West Indian Cricket Board
of Control,

Going To Live In Véhezuela
R. AND MRS. KENNETH

EDWARDS who wWefe mar-
ried here recently left yesterday
afternoon by B.W.1.A. for Trini-
dad. This morning they will fly
to Venezuela where Mr. Edwards
wori:s with the Shell Oi) Co. in
Maracaibo. Mrs. Edwards ‘is the
former Patsy Haynes,

Just Depends
ALLOWEEN is just around
the corner, and'I hear that
at the Y.M.P.C’s Halloween
Dance on October 28th there will
be a “real” Witch on hand to tell
fortunes in a specially prepared
Witch’s Tent, in which she will
— your future in her crystal
ball.

Whether at some time during

the night she will climb aboard
her broomstick and fly away, will
no doubt depend on the amount
of liquor that is consumed!
Honeymoon Couple Leave
FTER spending their honey-.

moon ai Crystal Waters,
orthing, Mr. and Mrs, R.
Thomas of Trinidad, returned
home over the week-end by
B.W.LA .

Mr. Thomas is an employee of

B.W.1.A, Ltd, Port-of-Spain,
First Visit

AYING her first visit to Bar-

bados is Miss Pearl Colthrust
of Trinidad. She arvived on
onday by B.W.1.A. for a month’>
holiday and is staying at Crystal

aters, Worthing.

‘Miss Colthrust is Secretary to
the Radiologist of the Colonial
Hospital, Port-of-Spain.

Back From U.S. Trip
TER fivé months in the U.S.
Mr. and Mrs. F. A, Hoyos
arrived Via Trinidad by B.W.LA
yesterday morning.

Mr, and Mrs, Hoyos’ arrival
was also delayed due toy bad
weather in Jamaica. They were

expected here by their families
since Sunday.

Mr. Hoyos is a Master at the
Lodge School.

BEACHCOMBER

polish. There are no canned
grapes in the polish. At least, I
think not,

Heigh-ho!

COMPLAINT from someone
} worn ta (tha bone bn the
treadmill of. what used to be
called “The life of pleasure” re-
nded me of the saying of a
at French lady of the eigh-
teenth century: “Life would be
bearable, it weren't for
pleasures,”

For gourmets

HAT is it that “makes food

flavours sing”? It is mono-
sodium glutumate, “the unique
basic seasoning.” It turns a stew
into an ode, a hash into a sonnet,
a mixed leftover into an epic.
And it is the latest discovery of
the International Minerals and
Chemical Corporation of Chicago.

if its



PLAZA oistin

“BRIDE OF VENGEANCE"

FRIDAY 20th and continu
“DAUGHTER OF

eesti
MIDNITE MATINEE (SAT.) 2ist — Two New Pictures

and

| Cyelist At 91

LONDON,

Miss Eleanor Wigan of Luddes.
down Village, Kent County is 9),
but she is still a keen cyclist.

Every day — rain or fine-~
this tall white-haired and fragile.
looking old lady mounts heg
bicyde for the tén mihutes us-
hill ride to the chufth where she
is wafden.

Miss Wigan is iifipatient with
people coriterned ovér her
safety.

“And why shouldn't I cycle,”
she said, “I feel as fit as a fiddle.’

When she was eighty, Miss
Wigan thought nothing of sevéfa)
hours cycling over the local Nortn
Kent Downs.

“I’ve been at it for 40 years —
or maybe 60, One gets muddled
with at my age,” said Miss
Wigan.

As church warden, Miss Wigan
is in sole charge of churcr
accounts, On Sundays, she rin:s
the church bells. Every day she
does qerdening or = atran,
flowers in the church and
plays the organ.

Apart from short vacations
spent abroad, Miss Wigan has
lived all her life in the same tiny
parish of 200 people. But she has
never | and. has qo
regrets. She said:

“I’ve been happy in this village
and I love it as much now as i
ever did. .I don’t believe Luddes -
down has chan lots since !
was a girl.’"—I.N.8.

Rupert _

=

ten









sae <
Ruper nto the boat, ‘* What

a tiny thing tt iss’ he thinks. ** It's
n smaller ¢



© 9 pam

and the Castaway —29



han the one Koko

ad; and the sides are so thin, if

I'm not careful | shall
through it.
meant
time."*

é coons laugh and
chatter

more loudly than ever a:

CROSSWORD

|








cross
1. With which you papaic. not even
try to speak. (5, 4)

1. Candidate perhaps. (8)

11. If it was this, it 13 Across. (8)
12. Well, this ts praise, (4)

18. Hones differently. (5)

14, The way. (4)

it Garments. (5)

0,

1

5.

. fyepodition. (4)
. Shy tittie SOEs. (3)
20. It deals with alien lands, (2)
. This land js able for a start,
. jean dole provides a drink.
\e brace. (5
» Sound a different note. (4)

Down

8 human practice—an animal,
“Lott reposition. (4
Covered. pi ieee
be in this 18 topical. (7)
mess i#a mess. (6)
laris (8)
Nursed, shall we say? (65,
The spice of adventure.
(4)

bit

is}

apni
SeSSemeonsex -



tay will accept «

* )
22. Without — (s)

i t Saturday's ugsy . = AE TOS>
rs Wolitasue: 6. ‘Aversions: “Tamerlan:
14, 50, 15, Utter; 15. Cigar, 18 Rass
ness. 4) Pekin: 22 Ale: ¥%





DDL DLL DPLEPLLDPLPLPLLLLD

LAST TWO SHOWS TODAY
5 and 8.30 P.M.

“TORNADO” (Paramount)

ing Daily at 5 & 8.40 p.m.
ROSIE O'GRADY"

Color by Techbicolor with June Haver
Jimmy akely in
j “SONG OF T SIERRAS”



——— Se
SSS
FS



with Paul HENREID

FRIDAY, SAT., SUN, 8.30
) Monogram’s Exciting Action Western
) “STAMPEDE” (Sepia-Tone) Rod







TO-NIGHT at 8.30

‘REVUEDEV

Music by the Police
Capt. C. E. Raison,

All Persons who have booked seats for To-night’s
Show and have not paid for them are requested to

take them up by 12 noon
not be

BOX OFFICE

From‘8.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 1.30 to 3.30 p.m.
Prices :— Orchestra and Boxes $1.50; House $1.00:

Balcony 72¢

ee 5



TOMORROW FRIDAY
MATINEE 5 and NIGHT 8.30 p.in.

MRS. A. L. STUART Presents Her SCHOOL
OF DANCING in

Johnny Mack Brown

‘OVERLAND TRAIL”



Garden) ST. JAMES

iy Last Show TONITE 8.30
N “CONSPIRATORS” and “CLOAK and DAGGER” (Warnes)

with Gary COOPER

p.m, MAT. SUN, 5 p.m.

!

Canieron, Johniiy Mack Brown

ILLE 1950

Band Directed by
A.R.C.M., M.B.E.

after this time they will
held

OPEN DAILY

. Reserved

ut my foor
It’s evidently only
to hold one person at a





B.B.C. RADIO
PROGRAMME

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18,
7 am. The News; 7.10 a.m. News
nalysis 7.5 a.m Sporting Record;
2.1m. Music Magazine; 7.45 a.in.
ally Speaking; 8 a.m. Fyom the
als 2.10, am
Par 8.15 c.m. Nancy Weir; 8.30
am. Books to Read; 845 a.m, Film
Review; 9 a.m. Close Down; 12 noon
The News; 12.10 p.m. News Anaiysis;
12.15 p.m Programme Parade; 12.18
p.m. Listeners’ Choice; 1 p.m
ald Barry SpedKing; 1,15 p.m
Newsreel; 1.30 p.m Ray’s a
2 p.m, The News; 2.10 p.m
news from Britain; 2.15 p.m Sports
Review; 2.30 p.m. Ring up the Cur-
tain; 3.30 p.m Round Britain Qyiz
4 tom. The News; 4.10 p.m. The gativ
Service; 4.15 p.m. Bligh of the Boun-
ty; 4.45 p.m. The Cathedral Organs;
5 p.m Listeners’ Choice; 5.15 p.m
rogratume Parade; 5.30 p.m, BBC
Vartety Orchestra; 6 p.m. Gerna Gil
mour; 6.15 p.m. Merchant Navy N-ws-
letter; 6.20 p.m. Educating Archie; +
The News; 7.10 p.m. News Ana
7.15 p.m. We see Britain; 7.45
p.m. Generally Speaking; 6 p.m. Radio
Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. United Nations
Nevort; 8.20 p.m
Week; 8.20 p.m
ir@:; 845 pom
Treason on Trial;
News #10 p.m. From the Edito-
rials; 10.15 p.m. Vanessa Lee; 10.45
p.m. Specia! Dispatch; 11 p.m. What
# Londoner Doesn't Know
Berm 7 por

HUMMING ONLY

Fifty girls went on strike at a
Belfast bakery because their boss
refused to let them sing while

1950



de

Ger-
Rad.e
Laugh:
Home

p.m
Ivsis;

Composer of the
Gerald Barry speak -
Think on these Things
10 p.m. Tne

they worked.

But the srike was soon settled.
In the future, the girls will be
allowed to hum.—LN.8.



I'm

“ Well,
doing what they want,’ he says,
“but what shall I find on that

they wave goodbye.

island ?"’ The boar moves easily.
Then, half way across, some dark
shapes cut the water, and under-

neath are the forms of great fish.
“Good gracious.” he gasps:
** shatks |"









My Foolish Heart
Ole Man River
Roses of Readdy
It Isn’t Fair

In The Mood

hee.

THIS

call

this
the 00 question.
morally, socially,
your life away

your Covntry?

In other words are you a decent citizen or a potential “vagabond” or
“streetwalker”? search your conscience—examine your life carefu
this minute and see which category
don’t kid me because you will be kidding yourself.
man, followed bad company and went to Jail—became worse by associ-
ation with hardened criminals.

or sewer—and——?

But the time came and I fell in love with a beautiful girl and tried to
mend my ways, but it was too late folks.
“CRIME DOES NOT PAY” you will realize
“BAD MAN” in “THEY LIVE BY NIGHT”.
life role I portray—it’s tough—it’s rough—it’s a powerful drama of love and
tears and heartbreak, but you will get a new experience when you see
“THEY LIVE BY NIGHT” starting at ®

The GLOBE THEATRE

Friday October 20th





&



q
gq
y
q
?
gy
q

JAMES BARTON-CUDDLES SAKALL.
_ GENE NELSON-DAVID BUTLER,

SEPP SOO

LAST SHOWING TODAY 4.45 and 8.30

“LUXURY LINER”

Jane POWELL — Geo. BRENT — Xavier CUGAT
and

“THE SEARCH ©

Montgomery CLIFF and Wendel COREY
Aline MacMohan

CHINA DOLL RESTAURANT
SOCIETY'S RENDEZVOUS

Presents

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21ST
From 8 p.m.— 10 p.m.

“RAY NUNES”

B.G’s Radio Singing Star
in a series of favourite ballads

— including —

Little White Lies

Song of Songs

Maybe It’s Because
Sitting by My Window

Agi

Dine, Wine, and Enjoy a Delightful Program in an
atmosphere of charm and positive class

ON THE MENU

Shrimps Chow Mein
Oyster Cocktails

Dial 4692 for Reservations

The

IS NOT FOR THE OLD FOLKS

To the young men and women of this fair island home of yours, We
it Barbados, you call it Little England. As we were saying to you
young folks—you are on the threshold of life—the one
ke GOD has given you.



Are you living each day and improving yourself,
intellectually, and financially?
? Are you keeping good company or bad company? Are
you trying to live decently and making every effort to obey the laws of

LEE LFF EOS OO



THURSDAY, 19TH OCTOBER, 1950

SSS |
:
a
&









WARNER BROS.





FUN OF THE PLAY THAT
SD AND OUT-LASTED THEM ALL!

BRING YOU
OUT-LAVOHE!

—————

A New Coat of Paint . .
A New Picture

FRIDAY 20th 5 & 8.30
p.m. and Continuing



é
$
t

Pree LOIN A Ope tn POWELL. !
ELIZABETH IA W

Opening TO-MORROW (Friday)
at 2.30 and 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing DAILY 5 and 8.30 p.m.

TECHNICOLOR ;
JUNE. GO
HINER MRA

vyyvvyyvrCVvV9





q
q
y

Pianeta by

R ae a = MicHAgL Curriz
ANDSAY RUSSEL CROUSE

hit on iy hanee Serewns Mary by Dynal Gophers Soarerk



PLAZA Oistin has
been completely re-de-
corated. As a grand send
off-—-we offer you Grand +
Entertainment in .

“THE DAUGHTER OF
ROSIE O'GRADY”



ee

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only

TO-NIGHT at 8.30

oe
“BLACK DIAMON.
with RICHARD ARLEN — ANDY DEVINE
A Universal Picture
Commencing Friday 20th
JOAN CRAWFORD — JACK CARSON
ZACHARY SCOTT
in “MILDRED PIERCE”
A Warner Bros, Picture

PLAZA THEATRE
am OISTIN om

SOCOSOOO!



——

:
§
PLAZA Theatre—sri0GETOwN









SPECIAL MATINEE TO-DAY 2 p.m. (Cheap Prices)

Jimmy Davis in “LOUISIANA ™ (Musical) and

Johnny Mack Brown in “PRAIRIE EXPRESS"

(Western)

“TO-DAY 5 & 830 p.m. (Last Two Shows)
Alfred Hitchcock's

“ROP E*

with James Stewart, Farley Granger, Sir Cedric Hardwicke

color by Technicolor







TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.30
Friday 4.30 Only
Republic Smashing Double
Roy ROBERTS and

GEORGE COOPER

“FLAMING FURY"



TO-NIGHT at 8.30
Tomorrow 5 & 8.30

“REVUEDEVILLE 1950”

—_—$—$———









Opening .

AND
Saturday 4.45 & 8.30 My
M-G-M Picture . . , THE LAST BANDIT
with






“KEY 10 THE CITY"

William ELLIOTT &
Adrian BOOTH



FRIDAY NIGHT at 8.30

*CARACAS NIGHT’

OLYMPIC
TO-DAY & Tomorrow
4.30 & 8.15
Republic Big Double . . .

John WAYNE &
Sigrid GURIE

“THREE FACES WEST”
AND
“MAN FROM
OKLAHOMA "

Roy ROGERS & Dale Evans
George (Cabby) HAYES





ROXY

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.15

United Artists Double .

Paul MUNI &
Claude RAINS

in

“ANGEL ON MY
SHOULDER ”

AND

“THE IROQUOIS
TRAIL ”

with

George MONTGOMERY
and Brenda MARSHALL

64.00 Question














ain









and only life on
What are you doing about life? That is

Or are you throwing

wand to
Answer truthfully—
I was a bad young

ou belong.

I got out of Jail and went down the drain—

I say with all my strength
that when you see me as the
You might not like the real



GLOBE
FRIDAY OCT. 20

PLUS
LOCAL TALENT









THURSDAY, 19TH OCTOBER, 1950 -



Korea A Glorious |

WELLINGTON, Oct. 18. 4 »
General Mark Clark, formerly \ Government
e n Commander of the American Fifth TGP From St. Paul’s ' TEL-A-VIV, Oct. 18.
e Army in Italy “ridiculed” a sug-| AT GPO. LONDON, David Ben Gurion, — Israeli
gestion that a light “warning” The much boosted 1951 Festi<| Prime Minister today told Presi-

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 18.
PRESIDENT TRUMAN, broadcasting to the

Mark Clark Blamed
For Abbey Bombing

that the decision to bomb the mon-
astery was a “tragic mistake.”
General Clark in his book “Cal-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

600 Bags Of AING WILL Ben Gurion Unable

Mail Unopened

THE ground floor oc the Steam-

at their Special Meeting. yesterday,
Mr. B. A. Weatherhead had just
spoken of

the cOngestion in the



OPEN FAIR

bers of the royal family, diplo-
mats and
government.

members of the

To Form New

office until elections could be held.
Ben Gurion’s Coalition Govern-
ment resigned last Sunday when







PAGE THREE

bomb be dropped on a Cassino ; val of Britain will be officially|dent Chaim Weizmann that he LUXURY

eye e monastery to give civilians shel-|©TS’ Warehouse on the Whar: | opened by King George making] failed to form a new Government. SMe
tering there a chance to leave which has just been given up t0) a world broadcast from the steps | Early today his caretaker Govern- e ;

l L ar is O This was stated here today by|Government by Messrs. DaCosta] of St. Paul’s Cathedral May 3. ment failed to obtain a vote of ‘ai | | KE a Sy | } AY PS
Major General Sir Howead Kip- an Co., Ltd., may be used by the}» Before the broadcast, King conacaere in Se a9 Salen : .

Ss nberger who commanded the} Post Office as a parcel department,| George and Queen Elizabeth will e House defea y vo
SAYS TRUMAN ew Zealand Second Division, in|members of the Council of the} attend a service of dedication in| to 43 the Premier’s proposal that ® LINDEN BLOSSOM BLUE HYACINTH

reply to General Clark’s assertion | Chamber the Cathedral with other mem-|a_ cabinet of seven should hold

Island meeti
said here tonight:

“General MacArthur told me about the fighting in
Korea. He described the magnificent achievements
of all United Nations forces serving under his
command. Along with soldiers of the Republic of
Korea these forces have now turned back the tide of
aggression. More fighting men are coming from

mS Pais nad hil, | be opened until there was room be the first visitors to the
the free nations all over the world. rae Scneduete responsibility ) “ie knew that the statement of| xhibition. WASHINGTON, Oct. 17.
“T am confident that these forces will soon restore seein ai oeectaninee entit’ Go insufficient space was perfectly The Thames site forms only United States scientists have
ei Italy a request for the bombing of | Te. and for the last three or four) Pl ic 7 4 ; + hae
peace to the whole of Korea. ihe Abber Mane dais the Fourth years it had been getting gradual- pM aa ghapeced, to een eee hut slanicahy Fe Shhe ct
“We Americans naturally take a special pride in the superb | Indian Division y worse. ‘fhe Government knew] tions are pl: ri : ;
. : : 7 ve 7 ‘ ‘ ¢ thi s planned for visitors all | rubber.
achievements of our own soldiers, sailors marines and air- inesthich Renter eevenae a = eer S-vekp. well-aavaiel eae Britain, According to the department of
: : ee ; er tneatil ¥ , be e yas 2 yas men. ‘They have written a glorious new page in military | MINS Nenlien'" mt “which | present tine Lue Christmas. wee] 1658 ecm a eteimates tha | agriculture. which it conducting
aoe: be Bg proud of them. = be ot by eee eae just around the corner and the] accommodation in London during | scientists said that the latest ad-
e are a proud that our and secondly, because 1t was cer-|small merchant depended on the

country was asked to furnish the

tain to be used as “keep’’ by Ger-| parcel post even more than the} campi ; , : ance
\ , , ; i? bP camping sites are being prepared | yielding strains of the rubber
First Commander of United welcomed by sections of this 4 mans offending Monte ——. big merchant. “Am I to under-}to ease the strain on hotels and | plant "bi ceale a shrub which
Nations troops. It is fortunate for | morning’s British press. It was suggested to General} stand,” said Mr. Weatherhead,} boarding houses. grows wild on the dry table lands

the world that we had the right
man for this job a man who is a
very great soldier — General
Douglas MacArthur.

Commonwealth troops and the} warning that the free world was “General Clark ridiculed that | at Christmas time? However, there are many | growing years.
ne —_ — — determined to build up its defen- | suggestion saying that if the Abbey Mr. Weatherhead said he would] critics of the scheme. Some!” The United States imports its
now have a clear run nor ‘

to Pyongyang through the eastern
coastal plain. The only natural
obstacles are a few small rivers
which branch from the Taedong
River upon which Pyongyang
stands.

“United Nations action in Korea

The Serre ane A
is of supreme importance for all} Another paper in time to VATICAN CITY, Oct. 16 Sun Rises: 5.49 a. has already establis pilo : sot Ra oe
peoples of the world. comment editorially on the speech} Pope Pius XII will address the du mates bas oe. Reported Grounded | plantings there to test new fri a ae
Rinso’s rich lather makes %

For the first time in history
nations who want peace have
taken up arms under the banner
of an International Organisation
to put down aggression. Under
that Banner of the United Nations
they are succeeding.

nation on his return from the historic Waxe
with General Douglas MacArthur,

President Truman’s San Fran-

cisco speech last night was

to Soviet “imperialism” and a

ees against further aggression.
This liberal paper referring to
the American President's four
point call to Russia added how-
ever that the appeal would have
no effect although there was
determination behind it.

—Conservative Yorkshire Post—
declared that the United States
must not be left to act alone and
that all freedom loving nations
must show they are eager and
able to share the burden of
safeguarding peace,

enlated Risk” blamed Lieutenant
General Sir Bernard Freyberg
who commanded the New Zealand
Corps in Italy for the bombing.

General Kippenberger — said:
“General Clark. says he was un-
able to change Freyberg’s opinion
and that he then personally auth-
orised the bombing.

“IT would like to say that it is
very uncommon for a Commander
who has to admit that he acquies~
eed in q course of action of whict
he did not approve, to attempt

portunity for any civilians shel-
tering in the Abbey to leave

had to be bombed it had to be
done with heavy bombs.”
—Reuter.



POPE WILL ADDRESS
RECORD GATHERING

greatest gathering of Cardinals,
Archbishops and Bishops in the
modern history of the Catholic
Church at a special assembly in
the Vatican Palace on November 8,
the Vatican announced today.
The meeting will bring together

Parcel
; Office.
| Mr, Weatherhead expressed sur-
prise that when he asked someone
at the Post Office by "phone a few

Department at the Post



of Commerce were’ told
days ago about unopened parcels,
he was told that there were 600
bags of them. His informant said
that the whole Parcel Department
was full, that certain persons in
the City had a lot of parcels in
the Department they would not
take away, and no more bags oan

“that parcels will be in the Post
Office week
small

after week
businessman. will

and the
not be
able to get his goods out to sell

suggest that some member of the
Chamber approach the Postmaster

The Weather

TO-DAY





Moon (Full) October 25
Lighting: 6.00 p.m.
High Water: 12.09 p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) nit
Total for Month to Yester-

In his broadcast the King will
leclare that the Festival of
Britain is open “throughout the
United Kingdom of Great Britain
and Nothern Ireland,”

The King and Queen will drive
to and from the Cathedral in
procession.

The exhibition buildings, in-
cluding a vast Dome of Discovery
over a 27-acre site on the south
bank of the River Thames, On
May 4, the King and Queen will

part of the Festival, the cost of] reported

the Festival A number of

The Festival—centenary of the
1851—is
Britain's

Great Exhibition of
expected to increase
income by millions of dollars,

Britons consider that money and
material spent on vhe exhibition
would be better used in housing
projects. —IN-S



Whaling Ship

BUENOS AIRES.
The Argentine maritime au-
thorities had nothing new this
morning to add to first reports
received yesterday of the ground-
ing of the 7,000 ton whaling fac-

according to these reports but th¢

the powerful orthodox religious
rt the Prime
roadening the

bloc refused to sup’
Minister's plan for
cabinet.

Before the caretaker Govern-
ment’s defeat last night Parliament
decided to authorise its Judicial
Committee to draft a law for gen-
eral elections within a fortnight

—Reuter.

U.S. Have New
Rubber Plant

that they are making

vance is the creation of new high

of Mexico and Texas.

They believe that
strains will produce about
pounds of rubber per acre in five

the new
1,200

natural rubber from the Far East
mostly from Malaya.

Scientists think that the rub-
ber plant would make a suitable
crop on some 2,000,000 acres in
the low rainfall area of Texas, to
be harvested in the fifth year.

varieties and hybrids,—Reuter.

LOOK YOUR




be

coloureds brighter!

It washes gently,
thoroughly, yet casily too—just floats
out dirt in record time. And it’s fine for
washing dishes—gives them an extra
sparkle. Start using Rinso today — you'll

is cca



“This is a tremendous step| The Conservative, Daily Tele-|49 Cardinals and 700 Archbishops|} day: 5.13 7 : he ~ anton pte prt get better results, easier and quicker! ‘ i
forward in an age-old struggle to| graph meanwhile claimed that/fnom all over the world who are femperature (Max 5. F. Which, Gerben. Rae. pom Ge > a> Ie
establish rule and law in the|the two central points of the}expected in Rome for proclama- Wal Geek Tey seyious, Pantory ‘pessminel. nec RINSO for all your. wash!{ yd
world. The United Nations was | President’s speech were his in-|tion of the new dogma of the ind Direction (9 a.m.) gone ashore on Cape Constance ’ — =

P 4

established here in

this very|sistence on the creation of a@|/assumption on November 1. ete ie 4 ;
building five years ago. It a “partnership of peace” with| No information was given on Wind Velocity 5 miles ship’s crew was still aneard,
founded in the hope and in the} Asiatic nations and his emyhasis}the subject of the Pope’s address hietinetel ce 4 ae
belief that mankind could have|on the programme of reconstruc-|which is expected to be of the er (9 am.) 29,866

just and lasting peace.

“Today as a result of the Korean
struggle the United Nations is
stronger than it has ever been.
We know now that the United
Nations can create a system of
international order with authority
to maintain peace.

“When I met with General Mac
Arthur we discussed plans for
completing the task of bringing
peace to Korea. We talked about
plans for establish'ng a ‘cnified,
independent and democratic’ Gov-
ernment in that country in ae-
cordance with the resolution of
the General Assembly of the
United Nations.

“Our sole purpose in Korea is
to establish peace and independ-
ence. Our troops will stay there
only so long as they are needed
by the United Nations for that
purpose.

“We seek no territory or special

tion for Korea, All free nations
would rally to this the Daily Tele-
graph added.

Informed Indian circles at New
Delhi thought President Truman’s
broadeast from San Francisco
mainly a restatement of the well
known state of affairs existing
between the two power blocs
headed by the United States and
the Soviet Union.

They thought it would make
little difference to the _ inter-
national situation.

Indian observers noted the
absence of any reference to Com-
munist China in the Presidential
broadcast. f

Observers felt that the omission
was significant from the Indian
point of view because India had
consistenly advocated the inclu-
sion of the new China in the
United Nations as being perhaps
the only way of strengthening

highest importance.



2 Killed, 15 Injured As
Bus Runs Off Road

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Oct. 18.

Two men were killed, and 15
people injured on Saturday after-
noon when a bus with 30 passen-
gers ran off the road near Cumu-
to and somersaulted 12 feet down
the embankment.

None of the survivors could ex-
plain what happened in _ this
“split second” accident. It took
rescue workers two hours to get
the bodies of the two dead men
from under the bus where they
were pinned by the driver’s seat
against the roof.

One dead man Jonas Etienne,
60, an estate labourer, left his
Coryal home to visit Arima and
pay his Friendly Society dues

E.'S.E. (3 p.m.) E\S.E.

(3 p.m.) 29.772
renner tenes!

to get at the real facts of the case,
He did not know how to believe
that there could be 600ebags of
mail unopened at the Post Office.
Governor Approached
Mr. D. A. Lucie-Smith said that
he happened to know that the
Postmaster went to the Goverrpr
some time ago about the conges-
tion at the Post Office.. The Gov-
ernment had just taken over the
quarters used at the Steamers’
Warehouse by DaCosta’s, for the
purpose of using it as a parcel
cepartment. It was the ground
floor which was about 5,000

ment had got in their arrange-
ments with respect to the matter
he did not know, but he did know
that they were taking steps.
What was happening at present



W.I. Go To U.K. For

T.B. Treatment
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN.

The Secretary of State for the
Colonies has brought to the
attention of the local Governmen:
n Trinidad, that people from
Colonial territories have arrived
in London to get treatmeny for
tuberculosis. It is pointed out,
however, that vhere is a serious
shortage of hospital beds in the
United Kingdom and consequently,
there are long waiting Ists ana
considerable delay in admitting
patients to suitable institutions,



serve as an incentive to people to
take their parcels away

On the suggestion of Mr. A. del.
Inniss a committee of three were



. ; ‘ : ; int t interview the
privilege. Let this be crysval| World organisation and thus! from which nis family enjoy sick} was that the goods of certain Coa basat hae key about the
clear to all—we have no aggres- | enhancing the chances of world! gnd death benefits. He leaves al merchants usually came through Keaitiag ‘ 5 VASELINE is the registers, teade raark of
sive designs in Korea or in any | Peace. é . 1 Chesebrough Manufacturing Go, Gona'l o»

other place in the Far East or
elsewhere.

No country in the world which
really wants peace has any reason
tto fear the United States. The
only victory we seek is the victory
of peace. United Nations’ Forces
in Korea are making spectacular
progress, but fighting there is not
yet over.

North Korean Communists re~
fuse to acknowledge the authority
of the United Nations. They con-
tinue to put up a stubborn but
futile resistance.

a nn NS

FEEL LIKE

—Reuter.



~ LOVE'S STRENGTH

LONDON,
The day after it had been set in
concrete because courting couples
kept moving it behind a hedge, a
wooden seat at Hawkes Hill,
Woodburn, Buckingham county,
was wrenched from its founda.
tions and moved behind the hedge

again.
—LN.S.

The Manchester Guardian said | Clark that a light warning bomb
that the speech was for the most should be dropped, giving a hint
part a strongly worded challenge of what was in store and an op-



55 MILE WALK
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Oct. 15.

The 55-mile professional cham—
pionship walking race is being
held this morning. The race will
siart from New Jersey through
La Brea to Oropouche via San
Fernando then to Port-of—Spait
terminating at Broadway opposite
the Royal Bank of Canada.





parcels sometimes remained in the
Post Office for quite a long time
As a matter of fact the Postmaster
had published a notice begging
these people to take delivery of
their parcels, ‘
Mr. Lucie-Smith said that he
believed the Government had
under consideration, a plan to
charge fees for parcels left too
long in the Post Office. This would

Square feet. How far the












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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS 9 ADVOAATE!

SSeS SB fe)

Printed by the Advorste Co.. Lid., Broad 8t., Bridgetown.
a

Thursday, October 19, 195¢

FIRE

THE absence of extensive fires in this
island within the past year has led to the
abeyance of any serious effort to afford
Bridgetown that protection which it de-
serves. It is a serious omission for which
the Government and people are to be
blamed.



Bridgetown is extremely vulnerable in
that there are more fire hazards to the
square mile than is readily found in any
other city in the West Indies. Added to
this the precautions taken are few and not
such as would allay the fears of those who
take an interest in the well being of the
community.

A few years ago an effort was made to
get a fire officer for this island and in order
to estimate the needs and the approximate
cost, the services of a similar officer in
Trinidad were secured by~the Barbados
Government. Major Cox came to this
island and in two public addresses left no
doubt of the danger to which we were
exposed. His report to the Government
confirmed his spoken fears.

The Legislature was approached to vote
a sum for the removal of the Fire Brigade
Headquarters and to provide for the train-
ing of a local officer in Londcn. The scheme
has not been implemented. Another sug-
gestion that the Headquarters of the
Brigade be removed from Coleridge Street
to Probyn Street where the Government
still owns ‘land’ seems to
death by delay.

In ten years-three buildings valued at
tens of thousahds of dollars were com-
pletely destroyed; in another instance the
vigilance ofa policeman on duty saved
Bridgetown from destruction when he
saw fire blazing in a building off Broad
Street and near the Government spirit
bond.

In addition to all this the Government
maintains a bonding house for rum in the
buildings once used as the Public Market
and adjacent to a cooperage producing
puncheons. It has been pointed out time
and again that=this is one of the greatest-
fire hazards in Bridgetown. :

A few narrow escapés and the absence,
for a long time, of any serious outbreak of
fire seems to have lulled the community
into a false sense of security. There is no
desire to raise any scare or to cause alarm
but it is necessary that we appreciate our
precarious position and face the facts. This
is the only means of remedying the present
unsatisfactory situation. It is too much to
hope that our luck will hold forever and
the direaonsequences of a serious outbreak
of fire in Bridgetown would ‘be the loss or
damage of buildings valued at millions of
dollars and the disruption of trade worth
more than one million dollars ayear. This
is more than Barbados could afford.

have suffered



Trinidad Opening

THE official opening of the new Trinidad
Legislative Council takes place to-morrow
and at that ceremony the Deputy Speaker
of the House of Assembly Mr. A. E. S. Lewis
and the Senior Member of the Legislative
Council Hon. Dr, H. G. Massiah, will-repre-
sent Barbados. ©

Constitutional changes in the West Indies
have been welcomed and the occasions
regarded as events for special rejoicing.
Trinidad with her wealth of natural re-
sources has been long awaiting the change
which would give her people greater voice
in the control of their own affairs, and the
people of Barbados, long accustomed to
representative government and a _ fully
elected House of Assembly, welcome the
opportunity to join in the celebrations.

It is fitting that the Government of that
colony has seen fit to extend officia! invita-
tions to representatives of Barbados on the
oceasion of this outstanding event.



OUR READERS SAY

Sports Federation

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—With all the conferences
of the West Indies and Federation
of different bodies throughout the
islands, I am making this sugges-
tion that there should be some sort
of federation of all sports through-
out tHe islands, so that we can take
part in World events. With a fed-
eration like this it means that
Trinidad and Jamaica, British
Guiana and Barbados, joining
such, this body can be upkept by
contributions received and by

ernment help, I think we can
rain athletes to take part in any
sort of sport.

k at the West Indies crick-
eter’, what success there was; and
there is a tennis team about to go
to England to compete for the
Davis Cup, also a Soccer side to

differences:

has_ been
Society,

try. In

hoist-lift.
The usual

j i ” : fo i does this man
; were at work, The intention had please.” He looked sad and be- rejoined his wife in London. She Assistance Board Taki i ualify id? (2 ;
play in England. The rifle team been to send out application forms wildered when the young recep- left him and jained the Land account allowances he ae Sonat tie bie muctohee Roane
recently returned from Bisley t4 town halls, citizens’ advice tion clerk, with an air of the obvi- Army early in 1947. mortgages, insurance, etc. the tion to the costs?
with distinction, so if the mayer bureaux and solicitors’ offices. But ous and inevitable, said (I quote): — Since his wife deserted him Mr. actual income of a “legally aided | For the lawyers, fees ats nat ah
ments of these sana "gay : ~ printing delays held up supplies. “Under the legal aid scheme you Elliott has lived in a four-bedroom person” may reach £700. But the high as for work ‘outside the
ether and encourage bia fit Those who made the journey to must first apply for an application house with his parents and mar- Board may refuse aid if the appli- scheme, they receive only 85 per
petter sports, I am sure tha Clement’s Inn were at once sent form.” ried sister.-He earns £5, 10s. a cant has a “disposable” capital of cent. of their normal pay. But
will not be regretted. away to. complete and post one Forms, Forms week as a window cleaner at a over £500 as the Government is footing the
EDGAR JOHN, of the six forms appropriate to ONE of the tasks of the com- big London hospital, gives £2 a 2—His actior civil procéed- bill they have the assurance of
i case mittec who will consider appli- week to his mother ings must be the High Court no bad debts
Green Park Lane, They Had Shocks eations for legal aid certificates For many months Mr. Elliott or Court of Appeal. Legal advice (World Copyright Reserved)
St. Michael. OF hose who trudged the is to satisfy themselves that the has wanted to — divores and litigation in the lower courts aol, ie,
4

<< qum ce ———m—-wqe~_, u~re ra
acct ei En eeennimeeemncsceceas 9 (gngslaiaimeesalicipaen hela cata ag neti nanan

THE legal aid scheme which
started this week is in the line of
descent from free spectacles and
medicine. But there are important
assistance under the
scheme is not available to all; it
does not apply in all courts or for
all kinds of legal action; and it
is not necessarily free.

Administration of the scheme

entrusted to the Law
who have set up area
committees throughout the, coun-
London, the committee
have moved into offices on the
upper floors of a dusty building
in Clement’s Inn. ’

By closing time on L.A.-Day
nearly 200 aspiring litigants had
arrived there in an old-fashioned



In Britain

today it is possi-
ble for anyone, young or old, to
obtair any werth-while book,

free of charge, from one or other

of the public libraries existing
in every town and throughout
the country districts. These pub-

lic libraries are provided by the
city, borough and country coun-
cils who maintain them at the
public expense from local
taxation. The first Act of Par-
liament giving local authorities
the power to do this became law
in 1850.

Today the public library is
taken for granted as a normal
and essential service. Of the
total population of Bfitain and
Northern Ireland no fewer than
twenty-five per cent. borrow
books regularly from their locai
libraries. These twelve million
people last year each borrowed
on an average over 25 volumes,
making a total of over 312
million during the twelve months,
These were books of all kinds,
to serve an immense variety of
needs, helping their readers in
their work, their education and
the enjoyment of their leisure, to
broaden their understanding of
social and economic conditions,
to become better citizens of their
own country and of the world.
Children at school, patients in
hospital, research workers, stu-
dents, housewives, farmers, fac-
tory workers, teachers, writers
-— all sorts and conditions of
people — turn as a matter of
course to library books. Because
they can read about whatever in-
terests them they are enabled to
co, think and enjoy everything
else in their lives more fruit-
fully than would be possible
were there no public libraries.
It is, therefore, quite impossible
to estimate the contribution made
to the world of today by the
public library.

We owe much to the founders
ot the movement who laid down
the fundamental principles. We
need, said William Ewart, the
Member of Parliament who was
responsible for the first Act,
libraries “founded by the people,
supported by the people, enjoyed
by the people.” Translated into
practical terms this meant that
publi¢ libraries should be pro-
vided in the same way as roads,
Sanitation, public health services
and education — at the common
expense of all and for the free
use of all. The only way this
could be achieved was by per-
mitting those elected repre-
sentatives of each community
who are responsible for provid-
ing good roads, sanitation and
the like, to be similarly em-
powered to provide libraries, It
was not enough to have libraries
for those who could afford to pay
subscriptions or fees, libraries for
particular sections of the public
or libraries to promote any
special religion or political out-
look, There has never been
Anything to prevent the main-
tenance of subscription, or ciass,
er religious librarfes by those
who wish for them — and such
libraries are to be found in
plenty today. The public library
was something different from and
additional to these. It was —
and is — a place where any man,
rich or poor, could use, without
any direct payment, whatever
books he wanted to read —
which was, in both senses
of the word, a free opportunity.
From the beginning the public
library has made no charge for
any of its services, And though
the political parties pay a_ big
part in local, as in national,
government, and though members
of the various religious denom-
inations have served on library
committees and helped in their
work, at no time has the public
library been subjected to any
political or religious influence.



After four years in business
and four in the army John
Gradon decided to become a

farmer and in a BBC talk he told
listeners how he achieved his
object. The first step was to gain
experience as a farm labourer,
After nine months.he found a
forty-seven acre holding on the
Welsh borders and bought it,
though this meant using his last
penny. The land was very rough
and the small stone house, reached
by a muddy track, showed signs
of decay. It had stone floors, the
water supply came from a spring
outside and there was no electric
light. They used bottled gas and
paraffin lighting, fitted a new
kitehen range, carried out a few
plaster repairs and the place soon
became a home. They bought a
milking cow and her calf, five
heifers, two pigs and an old mare
for carting. Neither Gradon nor
his wife had ever milked before
but gvhen the cow arrived they
set to work. Ten minutes of joint
effort produced only a pint of
milk and they had to retire
_ignominiously aigi leave the calf
to finish the job, Within a fort-
night they were nearly as expert
as the calf. Friendly neighbours,



makeshift
arrived with the

eentres and to

another, unkind
damages for
the cost.

with
some shocks.

first-day gremlins shop, and said: ‘





trestle tables,

those who have spent years in the
waiting-rooms of

cause the new scheme has given
But the majority were those with
sue their claims for
they did not have to worry about

As always when the uncompli-
cated mind makes its first contact

a bureaucracy, there were

One man walked in resolutely,
as he might into an ironmonger’s

‘Britain
Ry L. BR. MeColvin

City Librarian of the West-
minster Public Libraries and
author of “The Public Library
system of Great Britain.”

On its shelves all parties and all
faiths have been represented
impartially, To these two free-
@oms the success of the move-
ment is surely largely due.

A third and important kind of
freedom, though it was dreamed
of by the founders, was not
achieved until about half way
through the century. At first
vhose who used our libraries
were not allowed to go to the
vhelves to choose their own
books, As .is the case even
to-day in some other countries,
readers had to choose whay they
would read by consulting cata-
legues or seeking the help of the
staff.

In 1892, however, one librarian
made a plea for liberty for
readcrs to help themselves and
put into practice the system
known as “open access” which
has long been adopted by al!
British libraries. Under the open
éecess system people can go
among the shelves, examine the
Looks, choose whichever volumes
suit them best. Open access
changed completely the nature
and significance of library use.

We must realise that the public
library is, above all, an edu-
eational institution in whicn
people can learn about books and
the range and variety of vhe mai-
ters with which they deal, The
man who cannot go to the book
shelves and must ask for what
he gets, musi first know what he
wants. The ordinary man, how-
ever, knows little about books—or
ubout the universe of ideas and
cxperience they describe. Even
if he knows what he wants to
read about how can he choose
from a catalogue a suitable book
—not too difficult or too easy?
Free to wander among the shelves
he has vhe opportunity to do this:
to select the book which he can
understand, which will be most
useful to him,

There was at first much oppc-
sition to open access. To-day the
librarian cannoy believe that any
ether system was ever feasible
in the United Kingdom

But it was not only open access
that had its opponents. During
vhe first few decades there were
many people who did not appre-
ciate the value of libraries for
the public, and the foundation of
libraries was slow and gradual,
owing much to the private bene-
factions of far-sighted men \of
wealth, outstanding among these
being Andrew Carnegie. The
British public library has de-
veloped entirely on a voluntary
basis, Local authorities have
never been required to provide
libraries. They could choose for
themselves whether to do so or
not; and they could spend as
much or as little as they thought
fit, and still can. The time has
probably now arrived when all
author'ties should be compelled
ve adopt reasonable minimum
standards. Nevertheless there
must be particular satisfaction in
the knowledge that the navion-
wide coverage we now enjoy has
resulted entirely from the grow-
ing desire of the people to enjoy
library provision. With the
freedom to provide libraries has
gone equal freedom to discontinue
them; but there is not a single
instance of a library once started
ever being discontinued.

to whom they owed a great deal,
helped them to sow a field of
new ley and harrow the seed in,
and also to cut the hay. A hired
binder and their own hand labour
harvested the corn. Shearing in
Wales is a business in which
everyone helps everyone else until
the job is done. For several years
the Gradons were too inefficient
to give as much help as they re-
ceived but this made no difference
to the generous aid they always
get.

All the time they were learning
fast and with the proceeds of their
first harvest they bought twenty-
four ewes and a ram, Later in the
autumn they increased their
acreage of good land by ploughing
seven of their twenty-four acres
of rough bracken, Next year this
land grew an excellent crop of
turnips. They failed to raise day
old chicks or to get their heifers
in calf but they sold some of them
for beef instead. A welcome and
completely unexpected bonus of
twenty-five pounds came from
selling holly at Christmas time,

By 1947 they were growing out
of their little farm and managed
to buy one of seventy-two acres
next door. The Hill Farming Act

many
wild-eyed air o!
by surrounding
legal advice fortress with a
whose hopeless

injection of hope.

a firm and rational resolve to pur- is to benefit by the legal aid
divorce or scheme?
injury, now that Take the case of Mr. John

Elliott (not his
was among the

married. He

‘I want a divorce,



By LESLIE FINER

lous claim, They have made the
task much easier for themselves

ment of forms that only the most
resolute and_ self-confident
gant, would trouble to penetrate.

What happens to the citizen who

Clement’s Inn. He is an intelli-
gent-looking man of 29.

During the war he was a ser-
geant of infantry in Burma. On
a month’s leave in 1945 he was

from Northern Ireland in 1946 and

ADVOCATE

The Public Libraries Of

After ‘ae First World War
hese voluntarily founded libra-
ries began a system of voluntary
co-operation of jmmense benefit
to the public’ Until then all the
libraries in Britain had been
isolated indepemdent units. The
man with specialised require-
ments went ww his local library,
large or small:“it- was the only
source from which he could
ebtain the book he wanted
To-day all whe pubiie libraries
ind .a great many non-pubic
libraries, including those of
specialist and research organisa-
uons, universities and the like.
are united. By means of ihe
Regional Bureaux and the
National Central Library it is
now possible for any man any
where to obtain practically an;
book he may need.

The last factor \o ve mentione’
is maybe, the most important o
all. A good library service need:
men and women capable o
giving it, chosen for their
suitability for the work, trainec
in the techniques of librarianship
experienced in the use of books.

To-day there exists a well
organised, un ted body of pro-
fessional “chaitered” lbrarians

Credit for vis goes to the library
Association, tour.ded in 1877 tc
promote the development ot
libraries and unite all those con-
cerned with library provision. It
has nearly 19,000 members, 2,500
oi them fully qualified by exam-
inavion. This year, to mark tne
centenary of the public library
service, His Majesty King George
VI has beeome Patron of the
Association and the Duke oi
Edinburgh ‘s its President for
1950. ;

There are improvements to be
made in Britain’s library service.
Firstly, libraries have been estab-
lished by a variety of different
types and sizes of independent
library authorities. Too many of
the existing systems are too small
to be efficient; too often neigh-
bouring towns maintain several
separate library services when the
public would be much better
served by one large, co-ordinated
system embracing a larger, natur-
al area. The lesson we have
learned is that to be effective
and economical large systems with
adequate financial resources and
ample book stocks are needed.
We shall achieve this co-ordina-
tion in time. Secondly some of
the areas are much less well
served than others because they
have lacked the necessary money.
Britain’s public libraries have al-
ways had to depend entirely upon
local taxation; they have never
received any help from the na-
tional Government. As libraries
serve individuals the closer the
library can be to the community,
the more related to local needs,
the _ better. Consequentl, we
would insist that libraries @hould
continue to be provided by local
authorities and deplore any at-
tempt to impose a national uni-
form pattern. Nevertheless fin-
ancial help from national funds
to help the poorer districts is de-
sirable.

Britain is not the only country
in the world to enjoy good public
libraries. On the contrary we
have learned a great deal from
the progress made in other lands
and owe our colleagues overseas a
debt of gratitude for help and
example. Nevertheless, we know.
too, that there are other nations
which as yet lack adequate pub-
lic libraries, freely and fully
available to everyone. And to
these we say that during the last
century we have learned without
any doubt or reservation that pub-
lie libraries are a good and neces-
sary thing—that the profession of
librarianship is useful and re-
warding,



Building Up A Farm

allowed them a fifty per cent
grant towards the necessary recon-
structions and reclamation. They
built a road to their house, demol-
ished the derelict house on the
new holding and carted it over
to build a new wing, with bath-
room, on, their own home, reno-
vated ghe farm buildings, remade
two miles of fences and hedges,
reclaimed thirty-two acres more
rough land and improved the
drainage. By then their farm was
working well on four main lines
—beef cattle from the newly
formed breeding herd of nine
cows and a bull, fat lambs from
the steadily increasing flock of
hill sheep, seed potatoes and
accredited poultry. Now, they
have a useful and compact little
farm holding composed of young
grass leys and arable land. “Best
of all,” said Gradon, “is the fact
that from two unoccupied and
rapidly decaying farmsteads there
has now emerged one sturdy farm-
house, a home and centre of new
life in the coun’ , giving)\a
stable background for the up-
bringing of our ur children.
This attempt to find some way of
constructive living has been our
answer to the challenge of a
destructive age. °

“Divorce Please” Said The Caller

Cut-price law suits draw Londoners to Clement's Inn—on the road to the Courts that starts with Form A3.

boards of the corridor into th i ’
waiting room with bare walls seca is not pursuing a frivo-

undefended

their legal aid
barbed entangle-

liti-
smoothly J.

real name), who
first to arrive at

must still

was demobilised

to the mysteries



proceedings against his wife, But
he could not afford the £60 an
action would
Nor could he qualify under the
old poor persons’ rules, because
he earns more than £4 a week.
The Rules
IF the procedure had worked
E. would have been
spared the long trip to Clement’s
Inn. He wou'd have been given
his A.3 form at any of the informa-
tion or advice offices he has con-
sulted during the last feW months.
But now he has his form. He
; comply
conditions before he can be helped.
These are some of them.
1—His disposable income must
not be above £420 a year. “Dis-
posable” is worked out according



MYSTERY |
RADIO

Hy JOHN CAMSELL
LONDON.

Mysterious “radio signals” from space are
baffling Britain’s scientists.

Experimental stations at Holmes Chapel,
Cheshire and Cambridge are receiving sig-
nals every day. But at the moment there
is no suggestion that the signals are anything
but natural phenomena.

Mr. A. C. B. Lovell, senior lecturer in
physics at Holmes Chapel said, “We can trace
and plot the movement of meteors by day
and night.

“We have proved that a form of radio sig-
nal is transmitted by most of the known
stars.

“The problem we are faced with is that a
particularly strong signal is being received
from a part of the sky where no large bodies
are known to be.

“It is no good trying to explain it. We just
don’t know where the signals are coming
from. There is a possible solutiun in the
theory that in this part of the sky there are
invisible bodies.”

Professor Lovell revealed that German
V-2 rocket attacks on Britain during the war
put scientists on the track of the radio “talk”
of the stars. |

The scientists discovered the V-2’s gave a
radar echo as they travelled through the at-
mosphere. It was also found that short lived
echoes were obtained and warnings given
when no rockets were about.

















































These echoes, scientists learned, came from
meteors in the earth’s atmosphere,

The giant radio telescope with which
scientists listen to the radio “talk” of the
stars measures 200 feet across. It contains
14 miles of wire. A circular canopy of wire
mesh with a tall mast rising from the middle
gives it the appearance of a huge spinning
top. Professor Lovell added.

“We study radio waves which originate in
the depths of space and reach the earth after
travelling on their journey with the speed
of light for 100,000 years.

“The giant telescope collects these waves
from a small region of space, adding to the
steadily accumulating store of knowledge
which one day may tell us exactly where
these signals come from — stars, remote
nebulae, or inter-stellar space.”

The signals are heard on telephones in the
form of a continuous hissing noise, and they
are received on a wavelength approximately
two meters at the Holmes Chapel experi-
mental station —ILN.S,

Red Briton

(By JOHN CAMSELL)
LONDON.

Sinclair Cheechoo, 20-year-old raven-hair-
ed trapper from Northern Ontario has be-
come one of Britain’s first Red Indian resi-
dents.

Cheechoo, who was shooting beaver and
moose in his ice-bound home of James Bay,
a month ago, has brought his young English
bride, 20 year old Margaret Dolman, back to
England to live.

Margaret was attracted to Canada after
she had read romantic stories of Hiawatha.
She got a job as a missionary and travelled
to James Bay in search of a Hiawatha life
but she met Sinclair. They fell in love and
married.

“There were square dances in the village
carpenter’s shed,” Margaret said. “I wore a
headdress of red and white ribbons my
bridesmaid made.”

They lived in a small wooden shack, where
Margaret cooked moose meat and beaver on
a wood fire and carried water from the river
150 yards away.

Last winter Margaret got frostbite in her
nose. She persuaded her husband to give
up his trapping, woodcraft, and dog team and
come to England.

Cheechoo, now works for a timber firm in
Surrey County where he goes off into the
woods felling trees.—LN.S.

6599899989



GOSSSE

s

SOOOOSPPP SPOS SSF

oer

SOF




was cut out of the scheme as part
of the economy axe after devalu-
tion,

3—His action must be of the
sanctioned kind. A man will not
be helped, for example, to bring
an action in libel or slander; and
@ woman will not be helped to sue
for breach of promise.

No Bad Debts

WHEN his form, complete in
all four parts, 36 questions and
detailed outline of his case, is
received at Clement’s Inn, that
part which gives full particulars
of his income and finances will
be sent to the National Assistance
Board. =
_ The Board will return the papers
in due course to the legal aid

committee, having answered two
questions: (1)

cost.










with many








of the National








Milk Fed Ducks
}) Ox Tongues
Ox Tails

Cod Fish

| THURSDAY, 19TH OCTOBER, 1950

Tins Silver Leaf Pine

apple Juice

Tins Lelona _ Peaches

(1lb tins) J
Bottles Grolsch Beer

VALOR STOVES

2, 3 and 4 BURNERS, with or without Czaopies

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1 and 2 BURNER, with or without Oven Stands
OVENS, Small, Medium, Large

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Successors To

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you



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Canadian Eggs
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THURSDAY, 19TH OCTOBER, 1950



C.C. Will Not Send

Resolution On Shipp

To Secretary Of State

FOR COLONIES

THE COUNCIL of the Chamber of Commerce at their
Special Meeting yesterday, decided that there is no need i
now to send a Resolution about shipping which was passed “ave to'd the Advocate yesterday,

by the Directors of the Incorporated Chambers of Com-| ,,PF
merce at a meeting this year, to the Secretary of State for} attended the Co

the Colonies,

Spanish

Notices



OME of the signs at the Central
Police Station are now being

written in

both English and

Spanish. Any Venezuelan going
to the Central Station for a driv-
ing licefice will have no trouble

as a sign in Spanish directs them
to the correct office.

Major Stoute, Deputy Com-
missioner of Police,

told the

Advocate yesterday that because

the number of Venezuelans visit-

ing the island has increased, and
many speak Spanish, and could be

séen wandering around the Cen-

tral Station yard without knowing
where to go for their driving

licences the Police has erected a
sign in Spanish indicating the
office.

‘THE 17 traffic offences re-

corded in the Police Reports
during the last two days only two
mortorists were reported for ex-
ceeding the speed limit.

T= POLICE. BAND, under
Capt. C. E. Raison, played at
“the Esplanade at 4.45 o’clock
yesterday evening.
Band will play for the
ville”
at 8.30 o’clock.

SHOW was given by the

Mobile Cinema at Groves
Agricultural Station yard at 8
o’clock last night for the benefit
of residents of the Cottage and
Groves area of St. George. The
show for tonight takes place at
Lascelles Plantation yard, St.
James,

HE BUILDING which housed

Lowe’s Laundry, that was
completely destroyed by fire on
Tuesday evening, is the property
of C, A. Fields of Richmond Gap,
St. Michael.

HE ST. LUCY’S ALMSHOUSE |

was struck by lightning at
about 5.40 a.m, on Tuesday.
wash basin and tap ‘along with
four panes. of glass in the Medical
Officer’s office were damaged. A
telephone pole outside the building
was also damaged.
No'one was injured. The build-
ing is insured.

LARGE QUANTITY of bush

has already been cleared
from the Jewish Cemetery at
Synagogue Lane. Two wood cut-
ters were cutting down tamarind
trees yesterday while outside the
Cemetery masons were plastering
the wall along Magazire Lane.

HE TENNIS COURT and
playfield of the old Y.M.C.A.
are now being made into a car
park. Chelsea Garage Ltd., who
bought over the premises, placed
a bulldozer on both tennis court
and playfield during the week to
level it off.

DALIA GIBSON of Paynes

Bay, St. James reported that
her six-month-old son Anthony
died suddenly at about 6.15 a.m.
on Tuesday. A _ post mortem
examination was performed by
Dr. C. C. Clarke and death
was attributed to natural causes.

HE SEVEN CANDIDATES
who entered for the School
Certificate Examination at the
Ursuline Convent were all suc-
cessful. They are: Patricia Cools
8,
Krogh, Joy Netto,
Lilia Peter and Mary Vaughan,

ENLEY scored an_ outright
victory over Norwich in

* Committee’s

lc
|been brought to the attention of!

—~—— The decision was taken after!

;members had read a Press Re-
lease from the Secretary of State
on the matter.

The Resolution spoke of the
unsatisfactory state of affairs as
regards steamship passenger
accommodation between the
United Kingdom and the British
Caribbean area.

This Resolution was forwarded
by the Secretary of the Chambers
who is in Jamaica, to the Colonial
Secretary of that colony, asking
that it be sent to the Secretary of
State.
Release was received by the
Colonial Secretary on the whole
matter, and the Secretary of the
Chambers was therefore asked if
in view of this it was still con-
sidered desirable to carry out the
request of the Chambers,

The correspondence was for-
warded to Mr. H. A. C. Thomas
the Barbados delegate to the
directors’ meeting and he drew
the matter to the attention of the
Council of the Chamber for their
decision.

Press Release

| The Press Release from the

| Secretary of State reads:

olonies has intimated that it has

His Majesty’s Government that
there has been considerable critic-
ism among sections of the public

Tonight the) in the British West Indies at the
_‘Revuede- | apparent failure of His Majesty’s
Show at the Empire Theatre | Government to take steps to im-
plement Recommendation (1) of;°

port to provide a passenger service | },

the Commonwealth Shipping Re-

between the United Kingdom and |
the West Indies. The Secretary of



AN ORDERLY
NATION

“WE like the British. We
like them because, for in-
stance, they don’t trample
on their grandmothers to
get into a bus or a shop. Not
like a certain South Ameri-

|
|
} ‘can country we were in,
| where so many people leap-
| ed on to a bus that the
| whole side fell off into the
street!””
Oden and Olivia Meeker,
American journalists, telling
listeners to a BBC programme

why they have decided to
settle in London

two







State has, werefore, requested
that with a view te explaining
the difficulties in the way of the
provision of adequate passenger
services and the steps which have
been taken by His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment in considering how those
difficulties could be surmounted,
the following statement should be '
given as wide as a publicity as
possible within the West Indies.
His Majesty’s Government, first
of all, would wish to make it clear
that the importance of increzsing
the passenger service between the
United Kingdom and the West
Indies is fully realized and that
the problem has therefore been
approached in as sympathetic and
constructive a manner as possible.
It will be recalled that the Com-
monwealth Shipping Committee
recommended, as a first step, that
His Majesty’s Government should
seek proposals from shipowners
who might be interested in the
trade. Accordingly, an approach
was made to the shipping industry,
and in due course two firms made
proposals on the lines recommend-
ed in the Commonwealth Shipping

port and amounted to a complete
guarantee against loss, assurance
of minimum interest and deprecia-

their B.C.L. cricket match which | #1”.

ended at Norwich last Saturday.
Henley batted first and made 141

First Scheme
The first scheme would have

runs, B, Bellamy topscoring with |placed an unlimited liability on
50. Bowling for Norwich B. Bar-!His Majesty’s Government as the
row took three for 17 and Spooner |Company found it impossible to

two for 39.

Norwich replied with 73 runs, }-cheme would cost.
with 22. '\ case, it
For Henley B. Bellamy took four | Government
for 24. Henley made only 35 in | jnitial

A. Harper topscoring

their second innings.
C. Arthur, .who was chiefly
responsible for Henley’s collapse,
six for 17. Norwich in their
second innings made 77 runs.
Henley won by 26 runs.

EMBERS of Club 6 of the |

Girls’ Industrial Union and

their friends turned out in full | M
force on Tuesday night to hear |

Dr, G. S i'mtage’s talk on “T.B.
and Its Prevention.”

Another lecture is expected to
be given in a fortnight’s time.



)
)
t
)

E.P.N.S. :
Ash Trays
Desk Diaries
Note Books
Shopping Lists

|



KNIGHTS

PHOENIX or CITY PHARMACY





Chromium Cigarette Cases (with Crest of B’dos)
Chromium Cigarette Cases (with W. I. Islands)
Chromium Cigarette Lighters



ke any estimate of what the
In the second
was suggested that the
should make = an
grant of £500,000, and
guarantee interest on a capital
sum of £1,250,000; in addition,
West Indian Governments were
to make good any deficiency in
passenger revenue and guarantee
provision of the necessary re-
igerated cargo.

Although it is contrary to His
ajesty’s Government's general
policy to subsidise shipping com-
| panies, this general principle was
not allowed to stand in the way
of sympathetic consideration of
ainy reasonable proposal to im-

On Page 8

ma



E.P.N.S. :
Teaspoons
Tea Strainers
Caddy Spoons
Book Markers

LTD.

me

In the meantime a Press|

The Secretary of State for the |



e
Vaccine
For 7 B.
Available

One of the lines in which the
British territories will be able to
get technical assistance if they
desire it, is in the use of B.C.G.
vaecine for the contrel of tuber-
culosis, Dr. J. W. P. Harkness,

| Medical Adviser to the Comp-
jtroller for Development and Wel-

|
|



Dr. Harkness has just returned

Cuidad Trujillo where he
erence of sa
Sanitary Organisation
and the Regional Committee of
the World Health tion
which took place from September
25 to October 11.

He said that other lines of
technical assistance in which
advice and possibly material
assistance could be obtained from
the Regional Committee of the
World Health Organisation were
malaria control, public health
training courses, Aedes eradica-
tion, ete.

The Conference, presided ove~

American

by Generalissimo Rafael L.
Trujillo Molina, President of the
Republic, was attended by a

| delegation representing the Brit-
‘ish territories composed of Dr.
A. A. Peat, Director of Medical
Services and Dr. H. P. Gillette,
Malariologist, representing the
Government of Trinidad, Dr.
J. R. Marcano, Medical Officer of
Health, Port-of-Spain, Dr, H. M.
Johnston, Acting Assistant Direc-
tor of Health, representing the
Government of Jamaica and him-
self as delegate for the United
Kingdom and the remaining Brit-
ish Caribbean territories who
were unable to send repzesenta-
{tives to the Conference.

Supreme Authority

The Pan American Sanitary
Conference is the Supreme gov-
, erning authority of the Pan
|American Sanitary Organisation,
the fundamental purpose of
‘which is to promote and co-
|ordinate efforts of the countries
the Western Hemisphere to
combat disease, lengthen life and
promote the physical and mental
ealth of the people.

By agreement concluded with
the World Health Organisation in
1949, the Pan American Confer-
ence and its executive body, the
Pan American Sanitary Bureau,
serve as the Regional Committee
and the Regional Office of the
World Health Organisation for
the Western Hemisphere and
as such, are responsible for
carrying out in that regic., the
programmes for the promotion of
international health and the sup-
pression of disease which are
adopted by the World Health
Assembly,

He said that the activities of
this organisation are primarily
concerned. with the suppress’on
of epidemic diseases and there-
after with a wide range of health
projects designed to promote the
physical welfare of the general
population, Some extent of the
scope of its activities may be
gathered from the Press Release
of the thirteenth conference which
appeared in the Advocate of
Ortober 18. ,

|

Programmes
The work of the Conference
was largely concerned with the
consideration of programmes and
budgets for the following years.
A considerable amount of time

was also occupied in discussing
changes of organisation and
constitution to facilitate the





What’s On Today

Water Polo, at Aquatie
Club at 5.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema, Lascelles
Plantation Yard. St.
James at 7.30 p.m.

Police Bani at Revuede-
ville, Empire Theatre at
8.30 p.m.

a

future administration and opera.
tion of the organisation in its
wider capacity, and to provide a
basis of participation by the
Dutch, French and British terri-
tories in its work which will be
satisfactory to all concerned,

Of greater interest in the tech-
nical and professional side, were
the reports of the various dele-
gates describing public health
developments in their respective
territories during the four years
which have elapsed since the
preceding meeting.

He said that the exchange of
information on methods = and
techniques for dealing with
common problems were of con-
siderable mutuel value.

The report relating to the
British territories was delivered
by him on behalf of the British
delegation and opportunity was
given to the delegates to visit
hospitals and institutions of the
Dominican ‘+overnment and as
some of these were of recent
constructicn, embodying modern
concepts, the visits were full of
interest on the material as well as
the clinical aspects of medical
work,

Principal Language

Though the principal language

AWS Meeting of the Chamber.

That's why -you enjoy consistent



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

| BARBADOS

RUM WILL

BE ON SHOW AT BRITISH
INDUSTRIES FAIR

BARBADOS will be represented at the 1951 British Indus-

tries Fair.

The rum industry comprising the manufactur-

ers and the bottlers, the molasses industry, the Publicity
Committee, and the Cotton Factory representing the Sea
Island Cotton, wil! be subseribing £500 to pay for 150

square feet of space at the Fair

B.G, Expects
Largest Rice Crop
This Year

BRITISH GUIANA'S rice crop
for this year is expected to be
the largest in the history of the
counti'y Mr. A. S. Rohoman of
the British Guiana Rice Market-
ing Board told the Advocate yes-
terday.

He said that usess something
unforeseen happened, they would
be able to fulfil all their contracts
to Trinidad, Barbados and the
other West Indian Islands.

Mr. Rohoman will be returning
to British Guiana this afternoon
by B.W.LA. after spending five
weeks’ holiday as @ guest at
Crystal Waters, Worthing

He said that almost all reaping
and ploughing of the crop was
now being done by mechanical
means, a replacement of the old
system of reaping by hand and
ploughing by oxen.

Old System Still

There were still a few places
where the old system prevailed
but it was expected that by next
year all that would be finished
and the country would probably
be the granary of the Wes: Indies.

A new concrete building on the
watertront to house the Rice Mar-
keting Board’s offices and bonds
was well underway, and would
probably be completed sometime
next year. That new building
was anticipated to hold about
150,000 bags of rice.

A keen sportsman whose hob-
bies are now shooting and fishing,
Mr. Rohoman is one of the found-
ers of the Boxing Board of Con-
trol ‘n British Guiana, a life
member of the Demerara Turf
Club, a member of the British
Guiana Cricket Club and the East
Indian Cricket Club.

He said that the B.G. Boxing
Board is comprised of 12 members
affiliated with the British Boxing
Board of Control and those in the
West Indian Islands »nd added
that boxing in British Guiana is
of a very high standar”

Boxing in Grenada

In Easter this year, he visited
Grenada as Manager of the B.G.
boxing team which won three of
the four W.I, championships, the
lightweight, welterweight and
heavyweight, losing the middle-
weight to Trinidad.

He was 28 years on the BG.
Boxing Board and judged all the
main bouts except during the last
two years.

He said that there should be a
Boxing Board of Control in Bar-
bados because it would be a good
thing for everyone, the boxers,
the promoters and the general
public,

_Mr. Rohoman said that he re-
tired from playing cricket in 1930,
his last tour being in 1929 when
he captaiied the Indian cricket
team from British Guiana which |
played the Indians in Trinidad. |

NEW MEMBER |

Mr. A. Guy St. Hill was yester- |
day elected a member of the|
Chamber of Commerce. i

The election took place at the |





The exhibits will be rum, mo-
lasses and Sea Island Cotton.
The Chamber of Commerce
will collect the money and for-
ward it to the West India Com-

mittee who will see after the
arrangements.
Representatives of the indus-

tries to be represented and repre-
Sentatives of the Publicity Com-
mittee were present at the Special
Meeting of the Council of the
Chamber yesterday, and discuss-
- arrangements with the mem-
ers,

Mr. A. deL.
meeting :

I have to report that the agents
for the West India Rum Refinery
Ltd. received a letter from Mr.
A. S. Bryden on the 13th instant
fiving all particulars about space
and cost for a Barbados exhibit
it this fair,

As a result of this, I immedi-
ately got in touch with Mr. Peter-
kin who ascertained from Mr.
S. H. Kinch that members of the
trade along with the Publicity
Committee had subscribed £450,
to which the Rum Refinery were
‘villing to add £50. totalling
£500

As this would be the cost of
150 sq. feet, on behalf of the
Council I instructed Mr, Peterkin
to write the Colonial Secretary
requesting him to cable London
with a view of booking this space.

I am pleased to say that a reply
has been received from the Lon-
don Agents of the West India
Runa Refinery Ltd., reading :—
“Fair arrangements made”,

The meeting expressed their
pleasure at receiving this infor-
mation but regretted that the
hote: industry which had been
approached did not propose to
take part this time,

Inniss told the



Molasses Goes

To Canada

Motor vessel “Mary Sweeney”
Sailed through the Chamberlain
Bridge yesterday afternoon § at
about 1.15 p.m. It was well laden
with fancy molasses for Halifax,
Canada, and it left port for
Canada during the evening.
The “Sweeney” arrived here
since Thursday and it has loaded
approximately 650 puncheons of
molasses. The molasses is being
shipped by Messrs, K. R. Hunte
& Co,, Ltd., agents of the ship—
and Messrs. Robert Thom Ltd.
The “Athelbrook"”, the molasses
tanker consigned to Messrs, H,
Jason Jones & Co., Ltd., arrived
shortly after the “Sweeney” left
the inner basin. The “Athel-
brook” occupied the same birth as
the “Sweeney” to take a load of
vacuum pan molasses in bulk,

REMANDED
ELIZABETH KING, a 29-year-
old shopkeeper of Tudor Street

was charged yesterday before His
Worship Mr, A, J. H. Hanschell
with breaking and entering the

shop of Clement Rogers and steal-

ing articles to the value of
£11 15/44%d The offence was
committed sometime between

September 30 and October 1,

King was remanded until Octo-
ber 23, Bail in the sum of £50
was offered,

15'- FOR OILMEAL
A FINE of 15/- to be paid in

1t days or 14 days’ imprisonment
was imposed on Torance Ashby

of Chapman's Lane yesterday by

His Worship Mr. A. J. H. Han-

| schell.

used at the Conference was |
Spanish, there was a simultaneous
translatian into English, and |
French and vice versa which
could be heard through earphones.
That was a creat facility for those |
who were not conversant with the |
language used by the speaker of |
the moment.

The conference was held in the
modern buildings of the medical}
faculty of the University of Santo
Domingo. The arrangements for
the Conference were very ably
handled by the Dominican Gov-
ernment and the comfort of the
delegates was assured by accom-
modation in the very modern
hotel Taragua situated on the
shores of the Caribbean Sea
















MEASURE THE

quality at all times

Ashby was found guilty of the
unlawful possession of a quantity
o! oilmeal which he was convey-
ing along Bay Street on October

18,
TRINIDAD BUYS
ROYAL ALE

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN.
Trinidad hed an opportunity of
purchasing vhe specially brewed

| s:rong ale, surplus of the supply

for the wedding of Princess
Elizabeth and the Duke of
Edinburgh at a bingo party held
#i Government House on Friday
n.ghv, Trinidad’s quota is fifty
cartons. These wil] be sold and

the profits will go to the Red-
Cross,

INGREDIENTS IN

EVERY LOAF OF

J & BR

ENRICHED BREAD







‘ined £3 For |
Stealing Shoes |

HILTON GREAVES, a 36-year-'
old labourer of Peterkin Land,
St. Michael, was found guilty yes-
terday by His nee Mr.
A. J. H. Hanschell of stealing one
pair of brown and white gents’
shoes valued at £2 10/-, the
property of T. R. Evans, on
October 5.

He was fined £3 to be paid
by instalments or was ordered in
default to undergo one month's
imprisonment, Mr. H. Clarke ap-
peared on behalf of Greaves
while Sgt. Garner prosecuted on
behalf of the police.

Greaves in his defence said
that he was riding his bicycle
along Barbarees Hill on October
5. Something went wrong with
the bicycle and aman _ helped
him in fixing it. After the bicycle
was repaired the man asked him
to take a parcel from him which
he would return for in ‘a’ short
tume. While he was waiting for
the man a policeman came up
to him and asked him what was
in the parcel and where he had
got it from. The policeman then
arrested him.

Greav’s said that
know the man who gave him the
parcel. Keith Alleyne, a clerk of
YT. R. Evans, told the court that
from the number on the shoes-—
1281 A—he recognised that the
air of shoes was the property of
i R. Evans and said that that
type of shoe was imported by his
firm only.

In addressing Mr. Hanechell,
Mr. Clarke submitted that it was
to be proved that Greaves had
stolen the shoes and if this was
not done properly, then hig client
should be instantly acquitted,

He further pointed out that
Greaves had not showed any
sign of guilt by running away or
resisting the policeman when he
Was arrested and that it was quite
likely that he (Greaves) meeting
a strange man which gave him
help in repairing his bicycle,
would return the favour by hold-
ing a parcel for him.

He told Mr. Hanschell that if
there was any suspicion he could
not convict on it.

Mr. Hanschell in replying said
that he felt that Greaves’ story
was not reasonable, as both of
the men were strangers. No man
meeting a stranger for the first
time would take a bulky parcel
from him.

Mr. Hanschell then went on to
say that taking the evidence as
a whole he was of the opinion
that the story of Greaves was not
true; therefore he had to convict
him.



goes ae
8
x x
New Arrivals at §
‘*
% NOW AFTIVAIS al §
$
ATHERHEAD'S §
XMAS CARDS — %
6 Lovely Cards in a Box
with envelopes
at 1/3, 1/9, 2/3 per Box.
For INVALIDS —
ARMOUR'S CALF’S
, FOOT JELLY,
Very Nourishing Easily
* Digested—2/6 Bottle,
FIREWORKS OF ALL
DESCRIPTIONS
we See us for Wholesale ¢
Prices of Sparklers %
12 SPARKLERS in a Pack- §
age for l4ec, 5
BOMBS COLOURED
MATCHES DEVILS — %
WHEELS %
and 50 other kinds of %
+ PAIN'S FIREWORKS. x
BRUCE
- ¥
* WEATHERHEAD
5
% ;
‘4
s LTD ¢
% e ¢
e *.

5
$99966699999 90106006000)







WHITE le

7
Wi kk

i

COLOURE






TERRA RRA AAA
Cay RMR Y AYA YN Wied Bi



White Park Road. —



|

Cross-exarmiued by bgt. Garner!
he did not |



|





Also available with Steel Wheels and Half Tracks (For Ploughing)
ge ADDITIONAL SHIPMENT DUE SHORTLY.

CoU





PAGE FIVE







DRINK
CLAYTON’S

|

St SS Na

SMART STYLES IN
BROWN CALF (Brogues and Oxfords)
BLACK BOX CALF AND VICI KID _

OUR WIDE RANGE OF SIZES.

AND FITTINGS ENSURES

PERFECT FIT.

A

Pe i tk PD et

ASK FOR
“K” SHOES
They Last

Longer,
Look Better,

AND

Give Greater
Foot Comfort



whet
We toe,

| ey
wagers |)

LOCAL
Broad St.

DISTRIBUTORS
Tel. 2664.





IP Fasteners

e

ngths of 6" 7" 8" 9" 10° 12" 14"
- 16" 18" 20" 22" & 24"

:D lengths of 6" 7" 8" 9" 10" Il" 12"



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.

10, 11, 12 & 13

(AAA A DAU ALL
UVVEEVENVERER EME MEMEV RV Yh] VV MVVENE MMMM RMEM ee eh

Broad Street





I]



Transport Problem

(7. Massey Harris.
WHEEL TRACTORS

(42 B.H.P.)



RTESY GARAGE
(ROBERT THOM. LTD.)

Dial 4391





PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, 19TH OCTOBER, 1950





A Te ao en

nENRY BY CARL ANDERSON






RENNIES
GIVE YOU













I-l COMMAND YOu
TO RELEASE ME!



NO SPOON, NO WATER,
Suck them like aude






HARPIC
CLEANS IT
FOR YOU ,,

STRONG PEPPERMINT
LOZENGERS

BY CHS. YOUNG

Mitt

maa | Z A. §. BRYDEN & SONS ceareavos) [1D.



\

WGLL, 1 GUESS

WE'LL JUST 2

HAVE TO e
LEARN TO )

4 LIKE IT

HES AGENTS.

Just sprinkle some ‘Harpic’ into the lava-
tory bowl — leave overnight —then flush,
‘Harpic’ cleans, disinfects and deodorises
the whole pan, including the S-bend.

HARPIC

ae siete THE SPECIAL LAVATORY CLEANSER



|

|

| ee
RENAIES
|















HOLD THiS MAN UNTIL I RETU RN
FROM THE FARIGH RANCH ?





GOT None LWES pa
“THAN A CAT! ,














and Self Service too
Soaps &






































Cereals
Household Wale
a Corn Flakes ..... 28
Requisites neg
iimaihabis pak Flakes. ..... 53 24
uaker
Lux Toilet Soap 16 Puffed Wheat 36
an 5 of
Hus tHar cuv's || | See HOW He LOOKS | EEK! Boyou Tine Ee Palmolive Ser... 16 Shredded Wheat 37
aac sh Sena dia lidineel Beso vTap
oe eee cl | ee ee UE I Ace a) eee py IRL nL \\Recre E UR e 23 Tapioca Flakes 19
ss ze Se Lifebuoy T. Soap 15 Morton's Oatmeal 41
Limacol 0.0.00... 81 Allson‘s
pa Fruit Salts 1.00 58 White Oats ...... 48
Dettol voces 1.36 52 Lassie
Phillipe Magnesia 90 46 Rolled Oats ..... 48

Custard, Desserts, Marmalades &
Syrups






















e
lhies
Je ¢ Golden Shred Mar-
Birds Custard Pow- malade .......0...... 47
BILLS... BURGLARS., NE 0 Sescisihoatetenss 38 Silver Shred Mar-
AND NOTHING, NOTHING — BANKRUPTCY... AND NOW Chivers Custard malade ......ccc. 47



SHALL SPOIL OUR

Cooper's M i
HAPPINESS! fi | |WAS EVER A MANIN SUCH (4. AM —_ Ts] A OWGST a. nr ersrerees per arma:

Chivers Custard HACE il cvatscssdasitess 63







WAS EVER A MAN IN SUCH
DESPERATE STRAITS?




Powder .o....sssus 30 Hartley's Marma-
Kraft Ice Cream Mix 69 27 MOI icivessbiictetess> 38
Chivers Table — Marma-
Jellies 0.0... 22 IB Ss esbabosecieeanes 36 . ‘
Hartley's Jelly Crys- Ss. A. Marma- Cocktail Cherries 1.36
MER ise chicaseuscaveedctic 20 lade (2Ib) ............ 46 Cocktail Cherries 54
Monk and Gloss Golden Syrup... 42 33
Table Jelly ........ 19 Australian Honey 1.06 51 Tin Prunes.............. 70

Monk and Glass ° °
Blane Mange Liquaurs E
Powder .........60.5 24 , Wines te.

Bots, Bols CREME DE MENTHE. ...........ccscccsecseecseesseeese
ORANGE CURACAO ...... nd

Pickles & . . APRICOT BRANDY .

" BUCKFAST TONIC WINE ... na

" WINCARNIS osccscsussmonnn, 2.98 138

Sauces ete. " PHOSFERINE TONIC WINE. 240 1.32

“ GORDONS GIN cunt i ae

Morton's Peccalilli 53 si SMEPUEN PE oe QUIY 2. do eesLissastoeassnd coon vcaiebs atetvovovioenstyaar> 2.50

Morton's Chow
Cho










[THEY GOT US \NO GUNG? THEY'RE K HANTOM \HES TALKIN’ (WHATEVER

L Rargpps kek? WANTS. / ENGLISH?
. R

co! : WHATS AE











MEAT DEPARTMENT

PRIME AUSTRALIAN BEEF at cuts
ALSO




Se 75

Mertens Gi . HEARTS — KIDNEYS — TAILS — LIVER
Heinz Mayonnaise 48 MUTTON — VEAL — TRIPE




Heinz Salad
















HERES HALF OF (T= A WHOLE JMNM [THEY AINT BUDGIN’AN INCH=« 1] [NoW=Vou Come Wilt nic ;
Terie eamonDeestiee verre | LOOK-HERES THE Coie on US. UNDERSTAND? Ramm oa} |Mi oo oC
L 308 : en \F YOU FORGET YOU SAW US. -——~ ca 9 47, wae ———— .
Sy = wees AND? \EAK7 it VALL/ KEAT NEA

MHI 191

OL


















THURSDAY,

19TH OCTOBER,

1950



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



CLASSIFIED ADS.

arene Jk 2508

DIED







TAYLOR=MARY ELIZA. a her vesi-
dence ist. Avenue, Tweedside Land
Hee funeral will 1 e her '

mee th afternoon for
an Church emi thence to the
— y Cemetery
FitzGerah! Taylor (musband) Cyril
Cecii: Doris: _Butalie: Gwendoiyne
Germaine’ (children)

19.10,50—2n.
IN MEMORIAM

Levie: . Memory of our Dear
JOSEPH CLIFFORD COPPIN, Beloved
and Father, who departed thi
ber 16h 1949
OMe year ago Joseph Dear you left us
Paithful and henest in all your ways
Devoted and trie to the end of your

ee

AlWays patient loving and kind

What « beautiful memory you've left
behind

Your loving suivile your gentle face

No one can fill your vacant place

Sleep on Dear Joseph your Task 15
o'er
Youur loving hands can do no more

For those you loved, you did not best

May the Almighty grant ou rest.
Martha Coppin, (wife) Sealy, Donaid,
Everton, (Chil n) and all the immedi-



ate family.
19.10,50—2n
ee hh epee ee
IN oever fading memory of our dear
Father HUBERT ADOLPHUS CLARKE
who was called to rest on October \16,
1956
14 years have gone beyond recall
Each year brings memories like
The y cometh when we no
weep
For we" alt
sleep.
Ever remembtred by Beatrice Clarke
(wife!, Vernon, Ruby, Marguerite,
George (Children).



gall
more




will im deep supineness

19. 10,50—1n

FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

CAR, Austin § H.P. Excellent .con-
dition for inspection. Apply M, E, BR.
Bourne & Co., Roebuck Street. Phone
2728.







19.19, 50—dn

6,800
7 -E
St.



CAR—(1
te new.

Andrews

miles good
H.. Farmer
Joseph.

19,10 .50—4n.



Dial
Plantation



vy duty Pick-





BEDFORD-—1'2 ton he:
up. New and already conditioned tor
delivery. Dial 4616, Courtesy Garage

18.10 .50-—3n.



BEDFORD i2 1S cwts.

delivery Van

New and already conditioned for
delivery Dial 4616, Courtesy Garage.
18.10.50—3n.

———

CAR—Dodge 1937 Model, 4 good tyres.
New Battery Apply: Frank Watkins,
c/o Gardin Austin & Co. 18,10,.50—3n.



















— ehnalistinetsteinponiiin tance -N

DODGE TRUCK—1947 Model in excel-
lent condition. Apply to Barbados
Telephone Co Ltd. 18.10.50—5n

” FEDER. AL TRUCK—Offe: will be
received in writing by Courtesy Garage
up to 4.90 p.m on Friday, 2h
October 1950, for one (1) Federal Truck
chassis, dam *. Vehicle nay
be viewed’ at Courtesy Garage, White
Park R 18.10.50—Sn.





> kn good cons ‘dition
order, no reason-
Dial 3369. D. A.



MOTOR HE
& in good working
able offer refused

Brown, Black Rock.

19.10,50—T..N

Model Le
Showrooms
zor
an.



MOTORCYC
1% n.p. On

Courtesy Garage
ladies. Dial 4391.

ELECTRICAL
ELECTRIC IRONS Unbeata
bargain. 5 Ib. Electric Irons attrac
tively finished in Chromium with
coloured handles. Only $4.90 each
complete. G. W,. Hutchinson & Co
Ltd. Dial 4222. 17.10 .50—Sn
ONE PORTABLE / AIR COMPRESSOR:
H.P. Motor with 60 Ibs. pressure



S—Velocette
view at

An opportunity
18.10.50















Yq











fauge and tank Price preci Dial
4086. 6,10.50—5n
RADIO — (1) 9 tube Phillips in good
condition no reasonable offer refused
Apply to Mr. Gandirt Sandford Pla
tation, or Ralph A, Maul, Farm Road,
St. Philip.
19.10.50-—2n
FURNITURE
CHAIRS—Sturdy, attractive, Wooden
Chairs in Walnut, Mahogany and
Natural Finish at .78 each a. Wi



Ltd. Dial 4222
17.10,50-—3n.
FURNITURE Office Equipme
Single and Double Pedestal Steel De
Foolscap or Letter Size 4 drawer Flu
Cabinets; Steel Stationery Cupboards;
Czrd Index Cabinets;
end other office equipment now obtata-
able from stock from T. Geddes Grant
Ltd., Bolton Lane. Phone 4442.
15.10.50—én

MECHANICAL

BICYCLES—Hercules, at
prices. Courtesy Garage.

Hutchins & Co.








special low
Dial 4391
18.10.50.



$n
JACKS—Garage Hydraulic Trolley,
from 2 to 7% tons Capacity, Dial 4301
19.10.50—2n

MISCELLANECUS

ABBOTT'S PREPARATIONS. _Haliver
Malt 6/-; Cofron 12/-. Geo. C. Ward
& Co., St. Lawrence. 15.10, 50—Tn

















B'DOS ENGAGEMENT DIARIES

Months illustrated by Pictures, Make
useful Xmas presents so secure enrly
Special price 2/- each, Obtainable at
KNIGHT’S LTD.

17,.10.50—3n



BUCKLEY’S PREPARATIONS, Cough
Mixture 87c.; White Rub S5c.; Nezine 55c.
Kams 15¢. Geo. C. Ward & Co.

15,10.50.—7n.

“CANDA VAPOUR RUB" Is
commended for Head Colds, Chest
Colds, Coughs, Hoarseness and Throat
Irritation, also is cellent for insect
bites ete. KNIGHT'S LTD

17.10.50-

DOOR MATS—Fibre Door Mats in
several designs and sizes. Prices from
$2.27 up. G. W. Hutchinson & Go
Ltd. Dial 4222 17.10.50—8n

GATOR OACH “HIVES—The
Bait. Easy to use, long lasting and sani-
tary. Only a limited quantity Get
yours now. Knights Ltd.—All Branches.

19.10.50.—3n.











Magic







HORNER'S PREPARATIONS. Maltle-
vol 8/-; Carno! 5/-; Calsol 16/8; Magsol
7/-; Infantol 5/-. Ferénol & Feronol F,
Geo. C. Ward & Co. 15,10.50,—-Tn.

“LAUREL RAZOR Buy a Laurel
Razor for 1/6 and get a utility Knife
with each purchase free. You can use







your old blades in this holder
KNIGHT'S Lid: 18.10.50—2n.
MILD ‘STEEL SHEETS jn various
sizes from 1/32 to 3/8, Also Galvanized
nails. Enquire Atrto Tyre Company,
Trafalgar Stree’) “Phone 2096.

16.10.50—t.f.n
ee ees
SQUIBB’S PREPARATIONS Cod Liver

Oi) 9/- Sulmefrin sone Gluconate.
Glycerine Suppositories 3/6 —Geo. C.
Ward & Co. 15.10.60.—7n.

ee
SALE — Among other items we sell
Khaki at 50e. per yd. ROYAL STORE
14.10,.50—Jn

SHIRTS—2,000 Men‘’s Shirts of guarani-
feed wearing quelity at $2.00 and $2.40
each, ROYAL STORE. 12.10 ,50—-7n,
SHIRTS & PYJAMAS. Boys" and
Men's. Shirts and Pyjamas ordered to
Measure con be delivered within four






hours, RELIANCE SHIRT FACTORY.
12.10, 50—Tn
TORCH LIGHTS
Lights complete with
1 Chrome ¢
W. Huet
4222
VOSENE i
- i
KeNI¢ TD
_ + ,
VOSEMAT x 1
1" ;

Stee! Office Chairs,

























































































PAGE SEVEN















y
WANTED Pa ‘Le gins; Veronica Wiggins: Millicent
| ap Shi Ss Read F " Naughton; Harris Me Naughian: | Be
6 ;
| a J f raed olfe: Mr. D. Murnid \ = —
| HELP | To Trade Again Sea | °
a * Ic
nas | mecca tes vemcg, cage | Tega With Berhad | Pre eS joan me:, noe} ISTEMPER
to Mrs. Tom W t bs : rt. : : Marguis; Claudia Malet; Horvat
‘RENT | Ro. ad, St. Michs Iai ee ar oa More than 500,000 tons wel Coastal Station Mc Clarence; , Fannte ‘Ch artes Pity 1
oes — aoe = Japanese merchant shipping M4Y] CABLE ana Wireless (West Indies! Tek Sadia | is
A GIRL for Grocers Department.—Geo,;5@0N revurn to the world’s trade | Ltd. advise that they con now coni-} His Honour B. P. Arrowsmith; TH | CH
BUNGALOW — Fully furnished 3-/|C. Ward & Co., St. Lawrence. lrcutes a Tokyo news agency saig, | cate with the following ships) Hawkins: E. G. De Abreau._ : |
begresm Busmaion sewiy. built, | 15.20.50.~Ta. | General Mac Arthur's Heage |‘"S'S. Myron: S'S Norse Mon tout
¥ miles rom town, | —- ————— ine } _— 5 * that) Yeon: 58.5 Yorse Mieicvtedm: + DEPARTURES By BW. ;
Available for a period of 12 monthe from| CASHIER (Man) ~ For Club work, | @Uarters might let them operafe]5.S. Geologist: SS. Piotercero: S.S.] For TRINIDAD me |
ist. December. Inspection by appoint-| Write stating experience and qualifi-| regular services as early #3 Moonéresi; 5 S$. Mateo: $8. Fort Arnold Drayton; Pearly frastox | is a recognised first grado WATER PAI NT
jrent. Phone 4476, . cations. Box C.B C/o Advocate Navember it was added io bs ; Mercer: 5.S. Sparrow: $.s Aicoaj Algernon Frampton; Busteen Clarke j}
15, 10.50--6n. | AEVIS.. Debts sph aii owners have wae | os issio “ee Yann, ©. > t a Veni car: a. ended sie ncaa Lance Villanwuewn; ;
a matics dditipas iit iis Seta aial S have as Mission ” i 8 or ‘enezuela; §.S. Seaf Norottahml h a " ‘ 4 ‘
_FREELANDS — Maxwel unfurni iplying 75 vessels 2 routes ~7|Bteere: SS, Norse King; S.8.Mar-| kins: Audrey ian ee Being oil-bound. easy of application
eS whe Meme” On os ii Apply, | MISCELLANEOUS Bangkok Pakistan Formosa | pel oun sent were a3. mers 1 ae soe | si + ee
é I e, premises: vale 5 % , aie ane, | esiden ruger:, §,§ Alcoa nid Lawrence; Florence Roby; Jo% f ety 3 ii it
19.10. 50—an India, Tndon:sia, Norvn and, South | Pioneer: $.S8. Catiformo; 8S. Sundia! | Parkinson ae capacity. it is ideally sulted for at
ee =| TO leno! i, America, and Africa, j= 5. Sunavis: 8-S. Sunreil> S.8, ci For JAMAICA: interior decorative rposes where
FLOWER DEW—Maxwell ‘Coast 3| have few hove tee hen et SO }S.S. Monte Altube, 8.8. Olterra.| Elizabeth Mc Rae: Stanley Nicvoli high da th fin 3 ed
Saeaee a oF ae: Fridge, Ratio, | versation — classes Hurry, #roup oF | iM ; ti ae a Seen eekoonie| coe aaa a ae ee
e and all modern conveniences. j .; Werhingten: 3.5 Atlantic ave or A? As
Lb. Gonsalves, Maxwell Road ingle. Mrs. Portillo, Bbineger,Bav & | PU REAC NOTICES | 23) 'Soomvic” so Soin S'S. |’ Xnarew Ham ;
A eee 19. 10.50 }Loide Venezulea: $.S Ransitat J Ss re Hammond STOCKED BY ALL THE
10. 507r , RL Eee en S.S, Rangitoty c INIC
| COMMUNICATION with relatives. | REMOVAL NOTICE : x OUT aren) Gordon: Ket: Gin LEAGING STORES
: Would any of the Atwell family ‘h Miss Olga Coma French Hair Dresser SEAWELL arn oe eee Sole manufacturers :
PUBLIC SALES | Bemados please communicate “wit! pegs to notify her friends end custo- Te ek Wan SISSONS BROTHERS
their brother, Lionel, at 326 West. 47th] mers that she has fenmeed > Aine ARRIVALS BY BWIAI Beresta Wallace; Edward Hunte; Edith & CO. LTO, HULL, ENG.
tox New York, 19, New York,| Road, Carrington's Village From TRINIDAD . me een Allister Mac Gillivra = ————— —————
; 18,10.30—£0 - Tris Smith; Edw i : - : — OT
AUCTION os = 19.10, 50—2n r m award Smith; Luis; John Alleyne; D. Smitt
———————— Ricca catch Sect iri Sei S al . ere.” , O- 2 ;
Dap eer ys Pog poe ge ee ee Me om th - Rodrigues-Gel sa; Densil, Smith; Mar | For PUERTO RICO Barbados Co-Operative Cotton Factory. Plantations Lid.
|} Good condition. Phone 45380 Q CENSE NOTICE | Banish: “Atitiaka’ cneredaras ee wary Carson Rawlins; Winifred Rawlins, 'T. Herbert Ltd. ©, F. Harrison & Co. (B’dos) Ltd
1 will offer for sale ly Public Com-| 15.10.80—2n. | THE application of Holly hols ; jorsford; L, F. Wig-| Benn 8.45 p4.m A. Barn “
petition at my Office VICTORIA STREET : . [holder of Liquor License No. | 33i of ~ me Sy. SHR Gartor’ & Oo.

on TUESDAY 24th at 2 p.m. the dwetl-
ing house called ‘SEAFORD” jon sea!
standing on
at WORTHING, CHRIST CHUKC!
house contains open verandah, drawing.

H



dining, 4 bedrooms, W.C. Bath, Electrie Gardens



light, enclosed yard. For inspection

and terms of sale apply: Dial 27
R, ARCHER McKENZIE
Auctioneer

17.10, 50—6n



UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received from the In-
surance Company, I will sell at Port
Royal Garage, St, Michael’s Row, cn
Friday, October 20th (1) 1948 Vauxheil
14 H.P. damaged in accident; (1) 1050
Ford Prefect Datnaged by fire. fale



at 2 p.m. Terms CASH
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer
15,10,50.—4n

REAL ESTATE

The proj erty known as
Place”,



“The Market
standing on 5,225 square feet of
land at Orange Street, Speightstown, St
Peter. The above property will be set
up for sale by Public Competition at our
Office, James Street, on Friday 27th
October, 1950, at 2 p,m
to Mr. C. H.

For inspection, apply
Jordan, Speightstown
YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors.

19.10.50.—8n

Pp



PERSONAL

THE PUBLIC are hereby warned
against giving credit to any person or
persons whomsoever in my name, as
1 do not hold myself responsible for
enyone else contracting any debt cr
debts in my name unless by a writte
order signed by me.

Signed KENNETH MORRISON,
ist Avenue, Bush Hall,
St, Michael
18.10,50—2n,



THE PUBLIC are hereby warned
against giving credit to my wif?
LOUISE BARKER (nee Jordan, Cobbin)
os I do not hold myself responsible tor

her or anyone else contracting any
debt or debts in my name unless by 3
~| written order signed by me.
Signed CHARLES BARKER,
Rollings




Michael







St
18.10.50
public are here ay rned
against giving credit to my wife
LILIAN STAURT (n'ee Harris) as 1

do not hold myself responsible for her

or anyone else contracting any debt or

debts in my name unless by a written

order signed by me.

Sgd. THORONTON_ STUART,
Brittons Hull,

St. Michael.
19,10.50—2n

PURLIC NOTICES

POSTPONED

THE meeting of the Queen’s College
Old Girls Association that was to have









taken place this afternoon, has beer
postponed until further notice

17.10, 50—2n
oN MO oe

APPLICATIONS (accompanied by bap-
tiemal certificate) will be received at
my office up to 3 p.m, on Friday, 20th
October, 1950, for one or more vacant
Christ Church Vestry Exhibitions tenable
at the Girls’ Foundation School.




Applicants must be daughters otf
parishioners in straitened circumstan-
ces, and must not be less than ten

years six months or more than twelve
years on the date of the examination.
Candidates must present themseives
for examination to the Headmistress at
the Girls’ Foundation School on Friday
27th October at 9.30 a.m.
Application forms must be obtained

from my office.
WOOD GODDARD
Clerk of the Vestry,
Christ Church.
11,10.50—Sn

NOTICE

THE WOMEN’S SELF HELP ‘will be
opening on Friday 27th October. Mem-
bers are asked to bring in their work
from Monday 23rd. Flowers will sot
be accepted before the morning of the
27th. Consignors will be paid as usual

op Friday 27th. Subscriptions $1.00.
17.10.50-—-6n,



toca

NOTICE

“SEALED tenders for the replacement
of the ceiling of the St. Philip's Parish
Church will be received by thé under-
signed up to the 28th October 1950. tn-
formation on the type of material re-
quired for this work can be obtained
from the Church Warden, D. D. Gar-
ner Esq., Marchfield, St. Philip.

W. U. GOODING,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Philip
17.10.50-—6n





LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of LeRoy Millar, holder
of Liquor License No. 334 of 1950, grant-
ed to him in respect of the bottom floor
of a 3 storey wall building at White's
Alley, St. Michael, for permission to use
said Liquor License at the bottom floor
of a 2 storey wall building in Tudor
Street, City

Dated this 18th day of October, 1950
To the Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”

Signed T. SMALL,
for Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A, on Monday
the 30th day of October, 1950 at 11 o'clock

am
H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
19.10,50.—-1n,





The One Hundredth Annual Agricultural Exhibition will be held
Queen’s Park on 6th and 7th December, 1950.
Sealed tenders in writing are invited for =, right to sell Liquors,

2.

Teas and for supplying Breakfasts an? Dinners.
have decided that the success
facilities to avoid congestion.
Sealed tenders in writing are
Drinks, Te es and Light Refreshments.
Tenders in writing are invited for the operating of Amusements.

9

ai

4.

5.
and mu
| Street
6.





efore 3 p.m.,



lands of GRAEME HALL |














ONE (1) Dachshund. Pu ; 1950 granted to Vernon Yard im respect}
| Dial 4140 or 8509. 19 10.80-In. | of a board & shingle shop at Ivy Cen |
iasernierees Puc tee la ae at lea tral Rd., St. Michael, for permission |
PAYING GUEST to use said Liguér License at said
Mrs. Rose, Minster House, Marine! Premises ivy Central Rd., St. Michael
would like a paying guest Dated this h day of October 1950
Charming house and garden, $28.00 a To the Police Magistrate, Dist, “A
week breakfast and tea. Other meals Signed H. NICHOLL j
when required $1.20. Telephone 2758 Applicant
18.10,50—2n. | N.B.—This application witl be cotsig-
. | ered a Licensing Court to be helt
at Police Court, District "A", on Mom
EDUCATIONAL da the 30th day of October 1950 at
lL o'clock, a.m ®
BE. A. McLEOD, |
Police Magistrate, Dist !

:



ee ——

Tenders must state the form of Amusement
All tenders must be sealed and marked
reach the Secretary’s Office,

All Firms and Persons desirous of obtaining
S are re quested to







VACANT SCHOLARSHIPS | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE



The application of Violet Branker
GIRLS’ FOUNDATION SCHOOL holder of Liquor License No, 716 of 195
There are one or more vacant Founda- | granted to her in respect of a board and






tion Scholarships at the Christ Church] shingle shop at Tweedside Road, St Mi-'
Girls’ Foundation School. Applicants must] chaci, for permission to use said Liquor
be children of Parents residing in the} License at a board and shingle shop with |



Parish of Christ Church and who are in| will frontage at Tweedside Road, St.
straitened circumstances, Michael

The applicants must be between the Dated this 18th day of October, 195¢. |!
ages of 10 years 6 months and 12 years] To the Police Magistrate, Dist. “A". {

on the day of the examination, which
will be held by the Headmistress at the
School on Friday 27th October at 9.30

Signed VIOLET BRANKER,
Appkcant. |
N.B.—This application will be consid-









a.m. ered at a Licensing Court to be held at |
Forms of application can be obtained} Police Court, District “A”, on Monda y
from the Secretary, W. H. Antrobus, Hil-| the 30th day of October, 1050, at
ton House, Bay Street, These forms must] o'ciock a m
be returned accompanied by a baptismal E. A MC LEOD,
certificate to the Secretary not later than Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
4 p.m, on Friday nar ie as 19.10.50.—1n.
H. ANTROBUS, =
Sec. Gov. Body, er
Girls’ Foundation School. 4
B:10.50—8n. FIGHT
|
ENTRANCE EXAMINATION
GIRLS’ FOUNDATION VLCHOOL

An Entrance Examination for the
School Year January—July 1951 will be
held at the s¢hool on Friday 27th October
1950 at 9.30 am, Applications will be
received up to Friday 20th October by
the Headmistress and must be accompan-
led by a baptismal! certificate and a testi-
monial from the Headmistress of the last
school attended by the pupil.

Applicants must be between the ages
of 8 years and 12 years on the date of
the examination.

Parents or Guardians accompanying
their daughters or wards are hereby noti-
fied that there is no accommodation for
them at the school on the date of the
examination and that the examination of
applicants will not start until they leave

the premises.
H. ANTROBUS,
Sec. Gov. Body,
Girls’ Foundation School.

INFLUENZA

with Mentholated pre-war or
(4% Pint Quality) |

LIMOLENE

This grade is especially effective
against FEVER and Feverish
Conditions.







8.10,50-—8n
i 24¢. a Bottle at Your DEALER
NOTICE areca ened ae a aciiaaeniciine a
546560 4, +644
\SEALED Wenders tor the erection | SP OCoo Per Tee e TEI OE |
ef a Communal Bath and Toilet in
Ch: Village, St. Philip; will be re- FOR SALE
ceived by the undersigned up to the] ¢
26th October 1950. Plans and _ Specifi- % BUGGY AND HARNESS—One
eations of same, can be seen from tne % Buggy, 2 Sets Spring Harness,
Ch. Warden D, D, Garner Esu., 8 1 Double Mule Truck 1. Single ,
Marchfield, St. Philip. Mule Truck Apply: Charie
W. U. GOODING, s* McKenzie, Rowans, St. George.
Parochial Treasurer, | 17,10. 503.
St. Philip ¥.

Q
ERLE

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

HOUSING BOARD
Vacancy for Temporary Clerk of Works

APPLICATIONS are invited for the temporary post of Clerk o
Works, Housing Board.

The salaty of the post, which is non-pensionable and terminable
at one month’s notice on éither side, will be at the rate of $1,200
per annum,

Applicants should have a knowledge of building construction and
materials.

Applications, statifig age and experience, together with copies of
testimonials, should be addressed to the Secretary, Housing Board
the Garrison, and will be accepted up to 4 p.m. on 24th October, 1950

19.10.50-—-2%

17.10,50—6n.









ULUCAAWAULULEOUAUEUGUEN UE aa

POLICE NOTICE

Lorrios, Trailers and Tractors—Inspection for Renewal of
Licenses for 1950—51.

APPLICATIONS for inspection of lorries, trailers and tractors
used for agricultural purposes only may be submitted to the 'Traris-
port Section of the Department of Highways and Transport before
the 15th November, 1950.

2. Forms will be supplied on application to the Department of
Highways and Transport (Transport Section) but will not be sent
through the post.

3. Inspection of these vehicles will commence on Wednesday,
lst November, 1950



4. Vehieles will only be inspected as above if they are already
registered fort the period 1949/50.
R. T. MICHELIN,
Commissioner of Police.

Police Headquarter
Bridgetown,
12th Oct 19,10.50—3n

ober, 1950.

ee

Diesel Mechanic—Seawell Airport

APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Grade “A” Diesel
Mechanic at Seawell Airport.

Applicants should have a thorough knowledge of Diesel Engines
and will he required to pass a test.

The post is temporary and terminable by a month's notice on
either side, Remuneration will be in accordance with the Key Scale
rates fixed for Grade “A” Mechanics,

Applications stating age and qualifications should be submitted
to the Manager, Seawell Airport, from whom further information may
be obtained, not later than the 2ist October, 1950.

14.10.50,3n,





NOTICE



N.B. The Committee

ful Tenderer must DrOY ide separate Bar

invited for the selling of Sweet



and the size of space required.
“Tenders for Exhibition”
Bovell & Skeete Building, Lucas
October,





3ls



Tuesdz



sites
ions in

for advertising

forward their applicat writing to the

October
‘



J. R. PETERKIN,

Secretary





4%
iii





SHIPPING NOTICES

MONTREAL AUSTRALIA NEW ZEA.) | s>==2ssesaa AUSTRALIA NEW ZEA-















LAND LINE LIMITED
(MLA.N.Z, LINE) M.V. “T. B. RADAR” wilt
is "4 accept Cargo nd Pa 1)
thesis pve an eee St. Lucta, St x Vineent,. Srenwce
Septembe:
oy a we z eecsber 28th, Devon- he Souda, See et
ctober Ist ydney October 7th, M.V, * Ps
Brismane October 14th, arriving at Cargo aa Pamediee are
Sheen eee te 11th. Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
; essols have ample space for Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing i
eee oer Sven ane general cargo. Friday 20th. {
ry pted on rough bills of uM. ¥ ” > y
fone with transhinment at Trinidad accept Cargo salt favenidede 1
ae tensed ae Guiana, Windward St. Vincent, St, Lucia, "Grenada 4
: - “2 further particulars apply:- alot, Avie, Mee Radia) '
NESS. WITHY & Co. L oon whi {
TRINIDAD, a etree BWL, Bch ero or
aes DA COSTA 2 ong =
A ‘0 & Co. Ltd.,
BARBADOS, Tel. No. 4047 }
B.W.t en ;
= SS SSS
GooDs!
CUROIS,
8.8. “LIBPRVILL&" 28th Sept 12th Oct, |
F
NEW YORK SSRVICE |
Arr. !
ae . Ny. Bdos |
“a OR i 29th Sept. Sth Oct |
. TLIN 13th Oct 23rd Oct.



nea Nee





ORIENTAL

SILKS, (Se Habla Espanol)

THANTIS

Pr. Wm, Hry. St. DIAL 3466

a

A Large Assortment of



Send us your orders for... .

Earthenware Sinks & Basins
Earthenware Gulley Traps

Bibles & Hymn & Prayer Books
ROBERTS & CO.—DIAL 3301—High Street

and Spare Grates
THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(Articulos)
JEWELLERY,

(CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Propsietors)
Cnr. of Broad and Tudor Streets.

ARRIVED

a small shipment of
DE LUXE HOT PLATES
Table Models -
3 BOILING BURNERS
1 GRILL BURNER and PAN
Super finish Green Enamet,
See them at your
«GAS SHOWROOM
and buy before they are al! sold

CANADIAN SER
\OUTHBOUND en | rp K ¢ STREE ET
S Sails Sails Arrives ROE EBU

ay. ee bakin Montreal Halifax Barbados |
vee lige . BER" October 7th October 10t! oO |
3's. . .
ALCOA PARTNER October azth October 30th November 10th a) cl tT *
NORTHBOUND rer | Modern, Spacious and well built Commercial oe .

Arrives | | 2,488 Sq. feet. Ideal for Bakery, rorerys PB ne wg oie

“ATC Barbados | ‘ en to offers which must _be sibnr must be submitted to the
8,8. ALCOA PARTNER” October 10th For St. JOHN, St Lawrence: i me OP sf
2 River Ports |
5.8. “ALCOA PEGASUS” October 2ist For St, Lawrence ! N
= i a 7 Ss" t § ‘ ¢ River Ports
5.4 ALCOA POLARIS October 3ist For St. Lawrence River Ports | e

These vessels have limited passengers aceommodation. | AF. S., BVA,
| ope 7 Building
Apply: DACOSTA & CO., LTD, —Canadian Servic Pouns ae ‘ iserations
ROBERT THOM LTD.—New York and Gulf Service. | presse ESTATE AGENT ~~ AUCTIONEER : — SURVEYOR’
t hati



FIREWOR

LARGE AND VARIED ASSORTMENT IN

ne

PAINS CELEBRATED |

KS

Byard Broadcast Spangles Mt. Pelee
sale es Chinese Drops .. Mt. Vesuvius
None . Flower Pots .. Witch’s Cauldrons

Mapeea Prince of Wales Feathers . Red Lights

aad Yew Trees .. Green Lights

Rae Squibbs Butterfly Twinklers
....., Golden Rain .Emerald Cascades
..... Amber Electrolypes .Radium Dazzlers
..,..,. Serpents . Forge Fires

od Crackers Dizzle Dazzles
...... Electric Whizzers ., Roman Candles Asstd.
...... Torpedoes .. Whirly Twirlers
ia 3c Zing Booms .. Wheels
....., Flying Eagles .. Rockets Asstd.

i Le Blue Devils .Jack-in-the-box
eee es Radium Dazzlers .Mines with Serpents

.Cannon Crashers

¢

.Mt. Vesuvius

Mt. Pelee
eave Golden Rain ..... Prismatic Lights
. Serpents .Mines with Serpents
MNES Sr eae rs Be ke ee ea ee Forge Fires
Mei hn Roman Candles Asstd. ., Crackers
.Starlights _Jack-in-the-box
Wheels -Roman Candles Asstd.

..Dragon Flames
.Mt. Pelee

Canon Crashers
.Radium Dazzlers
.Witch’s Cauldrons
.Crackers

..... Mt. Vesuvius . Wheels
= i .Dizzle Dazzle
.....Broadeast Spangles Roman
.... Forge Fires a

igor ate Emerald Cascades
... Rockets Asstd.

¢d

rua Mines
......Crackers

...Emerald Cascades
...,,Col. Roman Candles
.,..Wheels

. Streamline Rockets

.. Bright Roman Candles
Dizzle Dazzle

.,.. Forge Fires

.Bright Rockets









¢

Roman

Dynamines
Jack-in-the-Box
Spangled Stuer Bombs
Golden Rain



Keep this list. Fill in Quantity,

it in and we will put them up for you.

KNIGHT'S DRUG

Rockets Asstd.
Butterfly

..Monster Fountains
. Jack-in-
.Emerald Cascades

Butterfly Twinklers
Monster Fountains

.. Devil-among-Tailors
_ Jack-in-the-Box

..., Jack-in-the-Box
., Bouquet of Gerbs



Twinkers

the-box

Fans
Candles

with Serpents

-Poman Candles Asstd.
; - | Jack-in-the-Box
Triangle Wheels
.Bouguet of Gewbs

_ Devil-among-Tailors

x

Candles Asstd.

sf

bok Witeh’s Cauldrons )..
yn e wee Crackers .. +... Bombs 2¢. each
Mt. Pelee
_Whirly Twirlers .Matches ‘ Ge. box, ¥|
re Mt. Vesuvius g £
Sparklers We. boxe?

and bring or send



See our Dis



38%
ID

Ih

I
80

STORES






































¢

08
Ad



plays.





























ADVOCATE
v 50/4

COUGHING

_ovg 'S DANGEROUS

=
Every time you cough
your lungs are strained,
and your heart is over-
worked. Swp YouR
cough by taking VENO’S

PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS THURSDAY, 19TH OCTOBER, 1950

Cuke Awarded Joe Louis Willi
£3,000 Damages Fight Next Month

1
|
“In the event of a collision, be- |






















@ From page | ‘ ,
tween two vehicles, one of which 66, s ” att

is on the wrong side, it will be Come-Back Campaign” Still On

presumed that the latter has been

principle of assessing damages
was that the person should be re-



, i | COUGH MIXTURE! This
ereeed to ie ebay —— negligent.” CHICAGO, October 18. | world-famous remedy
s S$ was practic: 2. ‘| . 1

“The Chief Judge gave examples Former World Heavyweight Champion, Joe Louis was stops coughing, makes

Reason Necessary

breathing easy, soothes
On the other hand, the Chief

| away soreness,
and protects the lungs.

of instances in which that could

hich injuri granted an Illinois boxing licence today to face the Argen-
be done, cases in which injuries



-- comes out



could be rectified by medical
treatment. In the case they were
trying, however, they had heard
from the doctor that the plaintiff
was a bleeder, and that as a re-
sult of that it would be hazardous
to attempt any surgical operation.

If they came to consider the
question of damages therefore, it
would be their duty to endeavour
to substitute what could not be

Judge said, it was also laid down
that it is the duty of the driver
of a vehicle to go over to his im-
proper side if he sees that a
collision is imminent, and if in the
exercise of his judgment and
reason he thinks that by going

over to his improper side he can
avoid the collision.

Therefore, from the legal point

of view and from the common

actually computed—-a reasonable conse point of view the case for

amount of compensation for the
injury which they had heard was

the plaintiff was sound
accepted it,

if they

and the case put

tine boxer, Cesar Brion in the opening bout of a “comeback”
campaign at.Cincinatti on November 29.

Gujerat Dismisses
Commonwealth
For 194

BOMBAY, Oct. 18.
The Commonwealth cricketers

to-day began a three-day match
against Gujerat here,

and after

Louis in his first public com-
ment since deciding to try again
for the crown declared “I trained
cna way and fought another for
Crarles”. He lost to Charles, who
i: considered the world champion
in America, on points on Septem-
ber 27

Louis said he thought he need-
d three or four fights before
halenging Charles. Reminded
hat this might take until next

une and he would then be a year

eS ap one
yo te ET



The IDEAL
FAMILY REMED'

>coucns * COLDS -

CATARRH * CATARRHAL








in the flavour !

And what goes in ? Why, pure
Sugar. wheat, fresh eggs and butter—
together with the experience that
has made Huntley and Palmers famous the
whole world over. So many thrilling
Varicties to choose from—lusciously-filled
“Custard Creams‘ and ‘ Reading Creams *
melting! delicious

i G shortcake’... all
ee oe een forward for the Defence was scoring 194 in their first innings Clder, the 36-year-old former ati Maced ts tne at LA Foods,

The Chief, Judge then went into equally sound from the defen- dismissed three of the local side hampion replied, “so will . bts I gts hpaks.
other aspects of damages relating dant’s point of view. for 53 before stumps were drawn. Charles’. Louis declared he was ass

to that case, and points of evi-
dence which they should take into

Referring to the fact that

account, including the fact that defendant at the present time was

there was no loss of earning in-
volved, the fact that the plaintiff
was 94 years old and not a young

advanced in age and faulty in
memory, the Chief Judge told the
‘ury that his evidence should be

agai
weal
first time in five games, but his
side were sent in to bat on the “
matting wicket, a move which ap-

Frank Worrell of the West Indies
captained the Common-
and lost the toss for the

‘n better condition in training
han he was for the actual fight
ith Charles. He said he Had
sur shots of penicillin to comba
pre-fight cold, the last taken
wo days before the fight.









2) sPecmm renter
ORE omUrACVURET TO Hm. Bim CHORES oF

AUNTLE’ & P.LUMERS

man of 21 and the fact that it treated with a certain degree of ‘uetifi “But I’m not making this as an

was likely that he would suffer a caution. In considering his evid- ee aad ~~ ~ Peenee aw oxcuse”, he quickly added. .

permanent disability barring him ence they would bear in mind the a Capertee Crows oO HY nr —Reuter. d, delicious

from some of the amenities of statement which he gave to the touring team struggling for (‘f \

life. ; runs against the spin bowlers, and See dal wholesome
police soan after the accident. thei = he low I e we :

The Chief Judge compared that tour. ‘They lost six wickets too More Profit Bl SC Uo: and nutritious
ss “a ‘ ; y s' ¢kets for
Proof Necessary statement with evidence given j99 tung but then the Australian, i“

Continuing, he dealt with the
degree of proof necessary in such
a case, saying that it was not as
great as in a criminal case. It
was for them to decide whether
the plaintiff has established his
ease, taking into account all the
probabilities, and exercising their
judgment both in the light of
their experience and knowledge
of things of that description.

The Chief Judge reminded the
jury of Mr. Reece's criticism of
the failure of the plaintiff to call
certain witnesses, and said that

subsequently, and told the jury
they would have the statement for
perusal when they retired. He
also reminded the jury of the
Particular of negligence which the
Defence had put in at the last
moment and of Mr. Ward's
criticism in that connection,

“Drove On Wrong Side”

That Particular was: “That
the plaintiff drove on the wrong
side of the road up to a few
moments of the collision and then

George Tribe, who extricated the

visitors from a similar position
last week, again came to the res-
cue. Displaying fighting qualities,
Tribe kept up his end and collect-
ed an aggressive 55 which included
9 fours before being run out.

Worrell was the next highest
scorer with 34, while another West
Indian Test player, Sonny Rama-
dhin, made 1 not out.

Vino Mankad, the Indian Test
all-rounder, caused the touring

In French
Horse Racing

PARIS.
French horse racing could be
made five times as profitable as it
is to-day with a few modern im-
provements. This is the opinion
ef Wilbur Clark, an expert from
Las Vegas, Nevada.



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mi

richness . .

need to do is add hot and cold water. Enjoy it

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80z. and | 60z. TINS





: ; . 6 t t “ame “Why, they could raise their
that applied equally to the de- y;eturned to the near side with- wen ae por ae hee a take 500 per cent by putting in A BOVRIL QUALITY PRODUCT
fence to a certain extent. ou warning.” & wickets for 73 runs.—Reuter a toteboard and an announcer,”

The Chief Judge referred to the ; r iz S Clark said after watching the

salient points of the evidence on
both sides. Dealing with drivi

on the improper side of the r

he cited a passage which Mr,
Ward had also cited, and which
says that, “it is laid down that by
virtue of the rule of the road that
it is the duty of vehicle drivers
. . +. . in the normal case to
keep to a certain side of the road.

“Which side that shall be varied

The Chiet vuage aiso spoke of
a brake mark which only one
witness had seen and whch Mr
Ward had said was not proved
lo have been the brake mark of
Vr. Cuke’s car. On the other
vend Mr, Reece had argued that
the brake merk proved that de-
feadant’s story was right, that
ye had seen Cuke driving on the
voproper side of the road and

e-—_e—o

the Chief Judge reminded the
jury that there were two se-
parate Heads of Damages —
£4, 3s. 4d. special damages and
then general damages.

At Mr. Reece’s request. he
explained that ‘f a person is
driving a motor car and a 100
yards away he sees another car

horse races at Longchamps

Clark should know. He owns
the famous Deseré Inn at Las
Vegas, one of the most successful
zambling establishments in the
world, He parlayed a $9,000 bar
into his $4,000,000 Desert Inn in
a little over nine years

Ceriie Krausnich, Clark’s horse
handicapper at Las Vegas, who is
with Clark on an inspection toyr

with the circumstances; but the that to avoid a collision, the cc ming on its improper side of ra = a gambling establish-
principal rules are by inviolate cefendant, Skinner had pulled and going slowly, the first per- Wan ant nc paket mans
cus om that wheeled traffic keeps cver to his improper side, son naturally was nov going over ou Cont even know over

to the left. Two vehicles meeting

one another must keep each to his saying that the cr tical

left or near side of road. One

ended by
period
for their consideration would b>

The Chief Judge

to his improper side. He would
keep on his proper side with the
natural expectancy that the other

vehicle overtaking another must when the cars were nearing each: fellow would go over to his

here when the race has started.
They start them way on the other
side of the field without announc-
ing it, and the first you know that





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WITH THE CORREGT-SHAPE TOOTHBRUSH






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W/ Queen
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This sovereign Whisky possesses that
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v the race is on is When you see ¢ na a your allegiance from the first sip.
pass that other on the right or off cther. He told vhem they would proper s de, But if vne other fel- them coming down the home CH WHISKY {)
side. ne there is no other have the Sta’ement of Claim low presisted in driving en me stretch. Nobody even cheers { “core — 2
vehicle on the road a driver is not and the Deience which they wrong side up to a few feet of With a public address system tell- ‘ Pi ‘ é
bound to keep to the lett, but if could examine, as well as the the car driving on its proper jng them who is leading right ae edernalclr lear, iGHLAND
the driver of a vehicle elects to certified copy of the stavement side, it would be the duty of the from the start, they'd get all 7 io uses LEITH SCOTLAND
go on the wrong side, then a which the defendant had given driver of the laiter to go over worked up like they do at home.” ne

higher standard of care would be
required from the driver.

«co the police,
At the request of Mr.

to his wrong side in order to

Ward avoid a collision.



C.C. WILL NOT SEND RESOLUTION
TO SECRETARY OF STATE

@ From Page 5.
prove the West Indian services hy
means of a subsidy.
Nevertheless, in considering the
extent of the estimated subsidy
required in the schemes submitted
tor their examination His

duction in Jamaica expanded as
rapidly as forecast.

As regards the Eastern Carib-
bean the position was the reverse.
and it appeared that in running
ships to and from the Caribbean
area as a whole, passengers coulci

arrangements for special sailings
of the s.s. “Empress of Australia’
and the s.s, “Georgie” in order to
assist in meeting the immediate
passenger demands of the Eastern
Caribbean. |

In 1950 it has not up to

“How're you going to know
how to bet when you don’t even





know what the odds are on ¢ %& Wisdom's angle in the’ ¥% Wisdom's widely-spaced
horse?” Clark asked. of cahee handle is the secret of tufts ‘comb’ between teeth
put in an electric toteboard it its comfortable control. clean where decay begins.

would pay for itseif in the first
race with the increased betting
Yes, it would run up the take five
times, "INS.





"Can you lend me
a Paradol tablet?” eet,



Wisdoni

ADDIS LTD. OF HERTFORD, MAKERS OF THE FIRST TOOTHBRUSH IN 1780

DUNLOP

Majesty’s Government felt it to sot be relied upon to provide more presont b eA possible io arrang, “an \

be out of proportion to the benefit than one-third of the revenue, & similar sailing. Further fie F oO

which might accrue to the Carib- cargo providing the remaining Sideration is nevertheless bein r
bean area, having regard to the two-thirds. given as a matter of urgency t a

already substantial financial assis. _ Hence, the Commonwealtn. the possibility of providing

tance given by His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment to West Indian Govern-
ments for other purposes and to
the many other and more pressing
calls upon the financial resources

Shipping Committee’s recommen
dation that the problems of
passenger services to the Eastern
Caribbean and cargo services to
the Western Caribbean should be

special sailing to assist thos» de-
siring to return to the West
Indies from the United Kingdom
in this Autumn,



Wuen A Girt doesn't want to leave
class and have to make embuarrasg.
tq explanations—it's Paradol she
asks for. For Parad:



CAR TYRES





ps



SCOTCH WHISKY

Sole Importers :-—

W.=.MONROE&CO.LTD.
Bridgetown, Barbados.

MACDONALD &

MUIR LTD,, DISTILLERS, LEITH, SCOTLAND,

==—_—_—_————__ «-

Baskets





N.
It will, however, be appreciate x I means quick From our Home Produets Dopt.
available for the development cf regarded as a single problem and that in the light of the politica relief from suffering caused by
the West Indies. solved by the provision of ships situation throughout the work periodic pains—heade.' 7 i

In addition His Majesty’s Gov-

equipped for carrying bananas and

to-day His Majesty’s Governmen

1 |

without disagreeable after-offec ts. |





ernment was compelled to take citrus fruit as well as passengers have the greatest difficulty is Ask your druggist toy Paradel :

into account the apparent un- In consequence, His Majesty's securing suitable tonnage for thi: scientifically compeunded from { Waste Paper Baskets
willingness or inability of West Government set up an inter- purpose, tonnage which inciden-| ingredients, The name “Dr. Chase’,

Indian communities (British departmental working party to tally is already fully committed to] is your assurance. ag he

Guiana excepted) to make finan- consider a practical solution on migrant and trooping activities, *

cial provision towards an_ in-
proved passenger service.

Moreover, the proposals in- In the light of the anticipated in a sugar arate, a beh also PARABOL
volved the laying down of new increase in banana production carried a reasonable number of . " 7
tonnage and ship building prices particularly in Jamaica, it was passengers but no longer do so. mmm Quick Reliof from Puin mmm FOR ADDED

were then considered to be at
their peak. In the circumstances,
it was necessary to inform the
firms that His Majesty's Govern-
ment considered that they woutd
not be justified in providing the
funds. required under their pro-
posals, but they were at the same

time invited to continue to ex- less inducement to embark on a ; : ss a x on Laundr Baskets
plore the possibility of providing building programme owing first sia aan tee'o Saute tenes $ Some As ects Of 3 y
* Perw\dequate Services _the Cameroons whieh has had the i, the services provided by the] Breet 3
. Com ie |Generale Trans-At- i i »
The Commonwealth Shippin; effect of laying up several Elder lantinue will ances this ouanee lt Barbadian History 3 Each__$4.00 & $5.00
Committee reported that so far as and Fyffes’ vessels, and Secondly, Droblem for the Caribbean area, | % BY % RIBUTORS
the western Caribbean wes con- to the probable failure of the 1959 ju they are nevertheless consid. H. A. VAUGHAN % DIST!
cerned passenger services were cur own banana crop to reach its ering further what inducements » A a rH ¥
likely to be adequate within s crtimated yield, : it may be possible to make to THE BRITISH COUNCI .
year or so, but that freight services Special Sailings interest the British shipping in- % a eee + 2 DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING C0 LTD
were likely to be short of require. During the last two years it dustry in the West Indian P&S-19 Basinn e Pri is x sag 4 ve ep er 0.
ments, especially if banana pro- has been possible to make senger trade. x ee anh 3 a: Octo- $ (ECKSTEIN BROS.) 7 °
% er 2th, at 8.15 p.m. x} 5
Th ll Do . - % Fee tor Course. : $1.00 &) |
cy It Eve Time Aepistered U. 5. Patent Oftee By Jimmy Hatlo Meret, at rte Mical x | 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street
ssocis c. R
F . = “ Single lectures 24c. &| ' lai
| . he ¢ . _
DF] AAAVEE ITS NOT HOARDING. Ac NRYDOUHELP THE Leocccoescoesescewuesect ne seiestiaeiiedenahiaa
RL BUT IN THE Gr —
p OCERY STORE THE CAR~ I HAVE Cee Te




Sf Ge
PRD ee
LN i gt SLE
Sl Ar NS

STAMP AT A TIME +>

those lines,

hoped that the companies interes.
ted in the banana trade might be
willing to consider the building
of additional banana tonnage
which might be equipped also with
reasonable passenger accommoda-
tion, but unfortunately, the Com-
panies concerned have, at presen:




To RUN OVER TO THE
POST OFFICE- 4



It has been represented that,
before the war, vessels engaged

It should, however, be pointed out
that both of the ships which were
specially built for carrying pas-
sengers and cargo were sunk
during the war and have been re-
placed by “Liberty” ships, suit-
able only for the carriage of
general and bulk cargoes












DR. CHASE’S

yt POSRPRROOPO SOOO FORE

x UNIVERSITY

Ss COLLEGE OF THE
% WEST INDIES

% Extra-Mural Department
Â¥ A Course of Lectures

oS



EEO











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EESaESESEo——————E™EE—







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Flower Baskets
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Wa are pleased to announce the arrival of

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|
ACROBATS« € -
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a de omnbeais ss Sth a 9a | Restirant STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS
n 58, .79, $2.98 a va

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TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS

e 4G SOA Sites GREEN DRAGON
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But AT THE POST OFFICE- DRAWING ROOM RUGS @ 30c. per sq. ft. x
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§ WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.,LTD.

PICS EGOS SEEES

F

S264

‘Ke FF





Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE FOl'R BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, 1STH OCTOBER, 1S50 RAK8AD0S t. .r--' f -i TTmr-H.-.\. OcloS.1 :••. IM* m r omi ThePublic* Libraries Of In Hi a., i Lie for mi] I lltl Tilt ut>M'i;( n Brl in this island within the pMt ;<-ii to the abeyance !i it deserves. It is a serious oniMftoo lor which the Government and people are to be blamed. Bridgetown bl extremely vulnerable in that there are more lire hazards M the square mile than is readily found in any other city in the West Indies. Added to this the precaution! taken are lew and not such as would allay the (ears of those who take an interest in the well being of the community. A few years ago an effort was made to get a fire officer lor this island and in order to estimate the needs and the approximate cost, the services of a similar offices in Trinidad were secured by the Barbados Government. Major Cox came to this island and in two public addresses left no doubt of the dancer to which wc were exposed. His report to the Government confirmed his spoken fears. The Legislature was approached to vnt* a sum for the removal of the Kire ilugade Headquarters and to provide (or the training of a local officer in Londcn. The chttmO has not been implemented. Another suggestion that the Headquarters of the Brigade be removed from Coltrtdj to Probyn Street where the Govemmttpl >til! owns land seems to have death by delay. In ten years three buildings valued at tens of thousands of dollars were completely destroyed; in another insi.i vigilance of a policeman on duly s.tve.i Bridgetown from destruction when he saw fire blazing in a building on* Broad Street and near the Government spirit bond. In addition to all this the GovCftllMnl maintains a bonding house for rum in the buildings once used as the Public Market and adjacent to a cooperage producing puncheons. It has been pointed out time and again that this is one of the greatestlire hazards in Bridgetown A few narrow escapes and the absence, for a long time, of any serious outbreak of lire seems to have lulled the community into a false sense of security. There is no desire to raise any scare or to cause alarm but it is necessary that we appreciate our precarious position and face the facts. This Is the only means of remedying the preatnl unsatisfactory situation. It is too much to hope that our luck will hold forever and the direconsequences of a sei ious outbreak > the i augfa IUM oounti ells who maintain them at the public expense been local taxation. The first Act of Parliament giving loc.il authorities > i to do this be m ISM. Today the public library it laker tor granted as a normal aim essential service. Of the total population or Britain nnri Northern Ireland no fewei than borrow books regularly from i libraries. Tnese twelve nUtton people last year each borrowed on an average over 25 volume*, BMjMni a total of ovei 31? million during the twelve month* These were book* of all kind-. U1 immense variety of tlpfna then readers In thenwot I ,. .ition ana the enjoyment of their leisure, to broaden their understanding of social and economic conditions, to become better citizens of their own country *nd of the world at school, patienti In hospital, research worker i. itu> bouaewfvee. farmers, factonf worker*. toechare, wi lien IDfll iind conditions of turn as a matter of course to hhrnry lx*k* Because they Dan read JiboM whatever interests them they are enabled to c'n, think and enjoy everything ette n their lives more fruitfully than would be possible were there no public libraries It is. therefore, quite Impossible tn estimate the contribution made to the world of today by the j uolic library %  much to the founder* • I the movement who laid down mental ,„ .ncipiea, We need, said William Ewart. the Member of Parliament who was le.sponMblc lor the lli-i Act, libraries "founded by the people supported by tn,. people, enjoyed i> UM | read —which S/M, In both senses <>[ the wild. | free opportunity. From the beginning the public library ha* m.ide no charge for any oCils services. And though the politiiiil pifilei pay a big part In local, as in national. government and though members ot the various rellgloua denomInations have served on library committees end helped in their work, at no time has the public library been subjected to any political or religious Influence Dritain Hj I.. H. MH olvin i iii Librarian el the Westminster Public Ubrarlea and author ml "The Public Ubrarv system of Great Britain" On its shelves all parties and all faith JL have been represented impartially. To these two freedoms the success of the movement Is surely largely due. A mlrd and important kind of freedom, though It was dreamed of by the founders, was not achieved unUI about half way through the century. At first those who used our libraries wen not allowed to go to the %  helves to choose their own books. As ,1s the case even to-day in some other countries. readers had to choose wha,' they would read by consulting catalogues or seeking the help of the iitaff. In 1892. however, one librarian made a plea for liberty for '<• i.elp ihcmselves and put into prrwilcr*he system known as "op*n tccesa" which has long been adooted bv al' British libraries Under the open Lcceaa system people can go among the shelves. SI—this ifie i '-'iin choosy whichever volumes suit them best. Open access changed completely the Betim and significance of library use We must realise 'hat the public library is. above all. an educational institution in whicn people can learn about books and the range %  md variety of the mailers with which they deal. The .nun who cannot go tc the book shelves and must ask for what he gets, mus,' first know what he wants. The ordinary man, however, knows little about books—or about the universe of ideas and i xperience they describe. Even If he knows what he wants i nut about how can he choose from a catalogue a suitable book —not too difficult or too easy' Free to wander among the shelves he has the opportun ty to do this. '.. select the book whlrh he can < nder&tand. which will be most i Refill to him. There was at first much opposition to open access. To-day the librarian cannot believe that any ether system was ever feasible in the United Kingdom But It was not only open access that had Its opponents. During i %  Ism decades there were many people who did not appreciate the value of libraries for the public. ..iut the foundation of libraries was slow and gradual, owing much to the private benefactions of far-sighted men v of SreaMh, outstanding among these being Andrew Carnegie. The British public llbrnry has developed entirely on a voluntary basis. I-ocal authorities have never been required to provide libraries. They could choose for themselves 'vhether to do so or not; and ihey could spend as much or as little as they thought fit, and still can. The time has i %  '. %  bib'.v now arrived when all .Lithorties should be compelled iv adopt reasonable minimum standards. Nevertheless there must be particular satisfaction in the knowledge that the nationwide coverage we now enjoy has resulted entirely from the growing desire of the people to enjoy library provision. With the freedom to provide libraries has p.one equal freedom to discontinue them: but there is not a single instance of :i library once started ever being discontinued. rid Wa. hese voluntarily founded libraries began a pM co-operation uf immense benefl; to the public Until ih.ii ..II the libraries m Britain had bean isolated Indfpeodent units. The id BBsssaabssd reason %  large or small: It was the oily source from which he cot U( bUnn the book he wantr-1 To-day all the pub.,.librar.e Lnd a great many nun-pubic libraries, including those of specialist and research organiMiuons. universities and the like are united By % %  am of Regional Bureaux and th< National Central Llbrarj now possible for say man any where to obtain practically an.' book he may need. The last factor 10 OS mentlone is maybe, the most important o til. A good library semes aee I men and v. omen capable o giving It, chosen for thei: suitability for the work .Valn-v in the technique* of librarianshii* ex|>enenced If) the us* of book To-day thcii exists a we organised, un ted body of professional ":htutared" 111 Credit for fhts goes t the Ilbrnrj Association, lourde.. in 1R77 U promoea in. development ol libraries an/I onlie all those concerned with library provision. It I %  i lv IJ.OOO members. 2.50C oi them fully qualified by examiitsrlon. This year, to mark UM icntenary of the public library %  ervice. His Majesty King George VI has become Patron of tm Association and the Duke oi Edinburgh j u PreaUlent foi 19M. There are improvements to be made in Britain's library service. Firstly, libraries have been established by a variety of different types and sizes of independent library authorities. Too many of the existing systems are too small to be efficient; too often neighImuring towns maintain several separate library services when the public would be much better served by one large, co-ordinated system embracing larger, natural area. The lesson wc have learned is that to be effective and economical large systems with adequate financial resources and ample book slocks ate needed We shall achieve this co-ordination in time Secondly some of the areas are much less well served than others because they have lacked the necessary money. Britain's public libraries have always had to depend entirely upon local taxation; they have never received any help from the national Government. As libraries serve individuals the closer the library can be to the community, the more related to local needs. the better. Consequently we would insist that libraries thould continue to be provided by local authorities and deplore any attempt to impose a national uniform pattern. Nevertheless financial help from national funds to help the poorer district* is desirable. Britain is not the only country in the world to enjoy good public libraries. On the contrary have learned a great deal from the progress made In other lands and owe our colleagues oversei debt of gratitude for help and example. Nevertheless, we kno> too. that there are other nations which as yet lack adequate public libraries, freely and full: available to everyone. And to these we say that during the las) century we have learned without ony doubt or reservation that public libraries are a good and necessary thing—that the profession of hbrarlanship is useful and re warding. Building I %  • A Farm After four years in business and four in the nnny John Gradon decided to become a farmer and In n BBC talk he told bow he achieved his object The first step was to gain experience na farm lalourer After nine months he found a holding on the Wehh burden and bought It. though this meant using his lust penny, Tha lend eras very rough and the small stone house, reached by a muddy track, showed signs of decay. It hud stone floors, the water supply came from a spring OUtalde and there was no electric light. They used rxitlled gas and paraffin lighting, fitted .. new kitchen rang*, carried out a few plaster repairs and the place soon became a home They bought a milking cow and her calf, five heifers, two rdia and an old mare for carting. Neither Gradon nor his wife hod ever milked before but when the cow arrived toe> set to work Ten minutes of joint effort produced only a pint of milk and they had to retire ignumlnlousl> uifl leave the calf to finish the job. Within a fortnight they were nearly a< expert as the calf friendly neighbours. to whom they owed a great deal. helped them to sow a field of new ley and harrow the seed in, and also to cut the hay. A hired binder and their own hnnd labour harvested the corn. Shearing in Wales Is a business in which I elps everyone else until the job is done. F' r several years the Gradons were too inefficient to give as much help as they received but this made no difference to the generous aid they always get. AH the time they were learning fast and with the proceeds of their first harvest they bought twentyfnur ewes and a ram. I^ater in the autumn they increased their acreage of good land by ploughing seven of their twenty-four acres of rough bracken Next year this land grew an excellent crop of turnips. They failed to raise day old chicks or to get their heifers In calf but they sold some of them for beef instead. A welcome and completely unexpected bonus of twenty-five pound* came from selling holly at Christmas time. By 1847 they were growing out of their little farm and managed to buy one of seventy-two acres next door. The Hill Farming Act allowed them n fifty per i grant towards the necessary reconstructions and reclamation. Thi built a road to their house, demolished the derelict house on the new holding and carted It ov to build a new wing, with bathroom, on, their own home, renovated *he form buildings, remade two miles of fences and hedges, reclaimed thirty-two ocres more rough land and Improved the drainage. By then their farm was working well on four main Unas —beef cattV from the newly formed breeding herd of nine cows and a hull, fat Inmbs from the steadily increasing fiock hill sheep, seed potatoes accredited poultry. Now, they have a useful and compact little farm holding composed of young grass lays and arable land. "Best of all." said Gradon, "la the fact that from two unoccupied rapidly decaying farmsteadsthere has now emerged toe sturdy farmhouse, a home onit centre of new life In the countryside, giving stable background for the u b inglng of our jfour childrt... This attempt to find some way ot constructive livlm; has been our answer to the challenge of destructive age. MYSTERY RADIO l* JOHN IMMil LONDON. mis "radio signals" from space are baffling Britain's scientists. Experimental stations at Holmes Chapel Cheshire and Cambridge are receiving signals every day. But at the moment there is no suggestion that the signals are anything hut natural phenomena. Mr. A. C. B. Lovell, senior lecturer in physics at Holmes Chapel said, "We can trace and plot the movement of meteors by day and night. "We have proved that a form of radio signal is transmitted by most of the known stars. "The problem we are faced with is that a particularly siiuiu; signal is being received from a part of the sky where no large bodies are known to be. "It bl n<> good trying to explain it. We just Jon't know where the signals are coming from. There is a possible solution in the theory that in this part of the sky there are invisible bodies." Professor Lovell revealed that German V-'l rocket attacks on Britain during the war put scientists on the track of the radio "talk" of the stars. The scientists discovered the V-2's gave a radar echo as they travelled through the at1 mosphere. It was also found that short lived echoes were obtained and warnings given when no rockets were about. These echoes, scientists learned, came from eteors in the earth's atmosphere. The giant radio telescope with which scientists listen to the radio "talk" of the stars measures 200 feet across. It contains 14 miles of wire. A circular canopy of wire mesh with a tali mast rising from the middle gives it the appearance of a huge spinning top. Professor Lovell added. "We study radio waves which originate in the depths of space and reach the earth after travelling on their journey with the speed >f light for 100,000 years. "The giant telescope collects these waves from a small region of space, adding to (he steadily accumulating store of knowledge which one day may tell us exactly where these signals come from — stars, remote nebulae, or inter-stellar space." The signals are heard on telephones in the form of a continuous hissing noise, and they are received on a wavelength approximately two meters at the Holmes Chapel experimental station.—I.N.S. VALOR STOVES :' :: 1 BURNERS, with or withoul IV.i.ipiri 64G STOVES 1 and 2 BURNER, with or without Oven Studs OVENS, Small. Medium. Large PRESSURE STOVES at WILKINSON & HAVNES CO., LTD. Successors To C.S. PITCHER & CO. PHONES W72 & 4687 OF SPECIAL INTEREST TO UPHOLSTERERS Red Briton (By JOHN CAMSELL) LONDON. Sinclair Cheechoo, 20-year-old raven-haired trapper from Northern Ontario has become one of Britain's lirst Red Indian residents. Cheechoo, who was shooting beaver and moose In his ice-bound home of James Bay, a month ago, has brought his young English bride, 20 year old Margaret Dolman, back to England to live. Margaret was attracted to Canada after she had read romantic stories of Hiawatha She got a job as a missionary and travelled to James Bay in search of a Hiawatha life but she met Sinclair. They fell in love and married. "There were square dances in the village carpenter's shed," Margaret said. "I wore a headdress of red and white ribbons my bridesmaid made." They lived in a small wooden shack, where Margaret cooked moose meat and beaver on a wood fire and carried water from the river 150 yards away. Last winter Margaret got frostbite In her nose. She persuaded her husband to gi up his trapping, woodcraft, and dog team and come to England, Cheechoo, now works for a timber firm Surrey County where he goes off into the woods felling trees.—I.N.& OI'HKK,\i:ilSAY Sport* f''ilvrulitm To tin' Editor. Tlie AdVocate— SIR.—With all the conferences of the West Indie* and Ln of diffeienl bodies throughout the islands, I am making this suggestion that there should be some sort of federation of all sports throughout the islands, ao that we can take part In World events With a federation like this it means that Trinidad and Jamaica. British (lUiim.i and i' such, this body can be, upkettl bj contributloni. received ana by government help, I think we van train athletes to take part In any sort of sport. Look at the West Indies cricketers, what success there was; and there Is a tennis team about to u to England to compete for the Davis Cup, also a Soccer side to play In England Th. recently returned from Blsle> with distinction, so if the governments of these Islands Join loind encourage blgjjer pnd oetter sports, I am sure that it uill not be regretted. EDGAR JOHN, I ..ne, St, Michael. 6e> DiTorce Please" Said The Caller Cut-price law suits draw Londoners lo Clement's Inn-on the road to the Courts that start: with Form A3. %  tc ucor Ar_MM ** %  IS HERE AGAIN Ar, h--^. T^^f? OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING GROCERS. IIAKISIV A CO.. I.TW-AGENTS Ulli:\ ONLY nil III SI IN § i. I:\IIIII! M.OTII WILL no A 8 k foi "ARLINGH1DE LEATHER CLOTH" AN EXTRA HEAVY AAM IM I* A III l I I VI II Ml I I OI II I OK III S KEATS AMI i AH* Your Inspection Invited &f DA COSTA A. CO.. LTD. DRY GOODS DEPT. THE Leajel aid scheme which .started tlus week is in the line of dcicem from free spectacles and medicine, Bui thenere important (UiTereDoee: assistance under the scheme Is not available to all; it does not apply in all courts or for all kinds of legal action; and it is not necessarily free Administration of the scheme ha.s been entrusted to the L.AC hi re '-! up area rtSBirnlttees throughout the country In London, the committee have moved into offices on thp upper floors of a dusty hul'din* In Clement's Inn. Hv eloetauj time on L.A-Day 100 aspiring litigants had arrived there In an old-fashioned hoist-lift. The lamal llrsl-dav work The int"I • nd "lit application forms to town halls, iitizens' advice ourriiux and solicitors' offices. Bui printtnsj delaji held up supplies. Those who made the Journey to Inn were at once sent i post one of the six forms appropriate to Had Shocks Ol" n ..j*ed the boards of the corridor Into the waiting room with bare walla makeshift trestle tables, nartived u ith the wild-eyed air oi those who have spent years In the waiting-rooms of legal advice centres fend to whose hopeless cause the new scheme has given another, unkind Injection of hope. But the majority srere those with .i firm mid rational resolve to purme their claims Em divorce or damages for Injury, now that they did not have to worry about the cost. As always when tininn ( .implicated mind makes Its first contact with n bureaucracy, there were •ome shocks. One man walked in resolutely, as he might into on ironmongers shop, and said: "/ tcant a divorce, feed sad and beivhen the young reception clerk, with an air of the obvious and Incvilab'e, said (I quote) |h Icoat aid scheme you must 1r*f apply for an application form." Forms. Forms ONE of the tasks of the comi: consider applifoi legal aid certificates is to satisfy themselves that tha By l i -Til FINER ippllcant Is not pursuing a fnvotous claim They have made the tusk much easier lor themselves by surrounding their legal aid fortress with a barbed entanglement of forms that only the moel resolute and self -con ndent litigant would trouble to penetrate. What happens to rhe eMM* Mhn tt to heneflt by Ihe 1Ci*i poor persons rule?, because sanctioned kind. A man will not he earns more than £4 a week. be helped, for example, to bring "W Kules -n action in libel or slander; and IF the procedure had worke I u woman will not be helped to sue Mnoolhly .1 F. uould have been 'or breach of promise. spared the long trip to Clement's No Bad Debts inn He Wou|d have been given WHEN his form, complete in I,is A3 formi at any of the informsntl four parts. 36 questions and Ivice unices he has cot.detailed outline of his case, is auned during the lost few months, received ai Clc^-.-n*' Inn, that But now he has his form. He part which gives full particulars %  I Comply with many of his income and finances will coeaootu before he can be helped, be sent to the National Assistance The*.are some of them. Board. i"T Hl1 .disposable income must The Board will return the paper. not be above £420 a year. "DisIn due course to the legal ^ld posable is worked out according committee, having answered two N (tonal (l) does this msn Assistance Board Taking into quallf> for aid" (2) what if -ny • for children, should bo his maximum contribuInaunmce, etc the Lan to the costs? actual income of -legalry aided For the lawyers, fees are not as l*' r on i But the high as for work outside the Board may refuse aid If the npplischeme, the? receive onlv 5 per cant has a "disposable" capital of cent, of their normal pay. But v %  gWO as the Government is footing the 2—Hi|] proceedbill thev have the assurance of ings mu't he In the High Court no bod debts. or Court of Appeal. Legal advice (World Copyright Reserved) and litigation in the lower courts



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PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE THTRSDAV. HTH OCTOBER. 1M) Ccuuh CaUuu} H QM WUCTTH, AdmlniMmai <>i \. ho nmvM from Ponunio on VIA On Lonf Leave I nn t", HI* Ion* MVl iMr W.ll H.in" .irnvt*d .1 liuf* tn-rr %  work ago from Africa. the Oownmnl %  ri UM <;"! I < Delay-Due Bad Weather A BBIVINQ Eroan Trinidad ... .ft.i n m>n by B.W.I.A. tntraoMI from ihe US. were Mr snd Mrs Milton R. Clio Mr. and Mrs. Cam arc en route to t'ato is a Bwrtottr Bafon U a v il aJ ler St Virieeni however, they will si>et>d %  few M: I %  %  i %  A. S. Cato at men! Hill. They should i %  %  • been In Barbados stveral na>s ago. but bad weather In Jamaica delayed their arrival Husband Coming Shortly M RS R. DUL1EC and I i •or. John arrived from St Lucia on Ttifniav la Dulicu'i parent.*. Maj. and Mr A !>• V. Chase Mr Dulieu is also i-x|iected up for i. holiday shortly Enroutc From England M R. KMii.K DB LOT i who has been In Rnei.md foitha pail two and a half months. visiting his wife and children arrived here by the Geoloot** ago, and venterdav he left for Bl B Wl A Here For Three Weeks R t:\ C ANON T L. S. GOUGH PatnN k'Urrtn; v in (.renada arrived rrom th.it colony b) I. U I A to spend . !inrbaM Harold non me. now .. Ueutfiiniii in ihitVutHdliin tone \u Ki"*'i. i IBs mission is to train troops In K. raa In Tank warfafa I Mi iin! Mi i aauma <>f 9th Aviv BaUavlUa ARTIES HEADLINE Managing Director Returns M B. GEOROE DE NOOBaOA, Managing Director of the Barbados Telephone Co., returned to Trinidad yesterday afternoon b> i: W.I A afler a short vialt Vialtea! Kaitaw YfKS MARIE TAYLOH of *YI Belleville returned from 'lami*|iic Mr Jean Man and hi:, w'fr. Board Of Control Meeting M R. K A t: t'LAlHMONTE and Mr. Teddy Hoad left yesterday afternooti by B W.I A U* Trinidad to attend a meeting Of the West Indian Cricket Board of Control. Also on board are Mr Limlei. s. ,,:.,,, General of the French line. Mrs Lmler, Mr Ramomn>. Deputy of the Merchant Mario.Committee of r-ance, and Mi Abal Durand. President of the t Marine of France Shortly after the *hip arrives, Mr Marie and party will land ui the B:ivflD|ie. Wnrahousc •.hrrc "irv win be met by the mathhers hi il "1 the Chamber of Commemv They will afterwards call at fiovernmrnt rUMUfe in the %  fternoon, there irtfl be .. luncheon parlv on hoard, to which HiExcellency the Uo\ amor, Govorhhtcnt Offleials and in.in. incut i>uMncss men have been Invited. Postponed T IF. Queen's College Old Girls were to have held u meeting this afternoon, but they tell mc that it has had to be postponed "OAMMLf I'Vfr Dtew OAIP a&VM A net IMtNT ... THAT ftStt frOmfr A GAU.W1 LOMI? M B. AND MRS KENNETH EDWARDS who were mar ned here recently left yesterday .ifternoon by B.W I A for Trimdad This morning they will fly t Veneruela where Mr. Edward-? nrkj with the Shell Oil Co In Maracaibo Mrs. Edwards la the former "atsy Haynea. Just Depends H ALLOWEEN Is just around the comer, and I hear that at the Y M P C.'s Hallowed Dance on October 28th there will 1* u "rear' Witch on hand to tell fortunes in a specially prepared Witch's Tent, in which she will forecast your future in her crystal hall. Whether at some time during the night she will climb aboard her broomstick and fly away, will no doubt depend on the nmoun: of liquor that Is consumed' Honeymoon Couple Leave A FTER spending their honey moon !•; Crystal Waters. Worthing. Mr. and Mrs. P. Xhomas of Trinidad. return* home nver the week-end by M.W I.A Mr Thomas is an emptovec o| BW1 A. Lid. Porl-Of-Spa.n First Visit P AYING her first vilt to Bsrbidois Mist Pearl Cnlthmst of Trinidad She nr ived on Monday by B.W I.A for a month' • holidny and Is stnylnq nt Crystnl Waters. Worthing. Miss Collhrtist Is Secretary to the Rndlotogist of the rolnni;il Hospital, rnrt ra* Itpaln Sack From U.S. Trip A FTEM live months in the U.S Mr and Mrs. F. A. Hoyos arrived via Trtnlriad by B.W.I A yesterday thdrnlhg. Mr. and Mrs. HOVOM 1 arrivul was also delayed due Iw bad weather In Jamaica. They were expected here by their families since Sunday. Mr lloyos Is a Master at th I'-IK %  down VllLige. Kent County s 0j but she is still a Kn-n cy< nt Every dny r.iin or Unsv this tall white-haired and Iracilolooking old lady mou %  i the ten mlnui hill ride to the churrh where %  )> wartl.ri Mlas Wiisan u imr.'ii people cortrerncd o^er lni ..fety "And why shouldn't 1 he said. "1 feel as fit as a OddaS When she was eighty, M Wigan thouxht nothing or -ever ,\ hours cycling over Ihe local Norm Kent Downs "I've been at It for 4fi yenrs %  maybe 80 One gets muddled rth dates at my age,' said Mi Wlgan. As church warden. Mtas Wlga-i In sole charge of churcr oceotsrsal On Sundays, she rin;.Iha church bells Eveiy day ah doSB fwrdening or arrange^ tlowers In the church and of'er phut the organ Apart from short vacation^ spent abroad. Mias Wigan h lived all her llle in the same hn>, parish nf S00 people But she 8*1 never been bored and has %  • regret*. She 'aid: "I've been happy in this vUU*jt>and I love il as much now as i ever did I don't believe Ludde*. down has changed lots Stnea was a girl I If S B.B.(. KADII) PR(MiRAM.ME u i .:. .. j Head. • a nv Film irw. Sam Clow Down: II noo-i 1 10 u Nrw I ( %  l'l'lr II l I SSSMMII" Chntrj 1 B m U*.%  i Lan *Uf Grnn (in IHcllltilln, P W. — Britain; 1 > %  it sua Nssssai 111 nn. Ossstrafl] rvw. !" %  saaai r& 10 IS o if. Vunauii I I %  HUMMING ONLY is em on strike at ll lias* bakery Ini-niise their boss ictuseH to let them sing while orked. But rb8 -vrthe wan soon settled. I future, the (iris will be pllowed to hum —LM.8. Rupert and the Castaway — 29 \ Vis Coat nf Paint i A New Picture FRIDAY 381 h & x.:io jf p ns. and (ontiniiin^ I 8upri %  *(i ma -i 8> b ltd ihin Dihc boat. Whm is." hr thmki. "Vi Kob. had; and thr *id>* at* so thin, it I'm not cartful I shall put my 'w through it. lt' evidently onl, mtani ro hdn one person at a time.' 1 The osoft* laugh ar' thane, -nere 'oodlv Ihsti svai riiossuonn 'he* Wivr goodbye. 'Well. I'ra %  hey *ant. h iayi. "but wh i dull 1 find on thai Ihe boil ro e*.il> iilind >" Thtn. hl nrath ", ihe fcirrr.. ci arrji lull. i"iii'" he gaaps%  •Ooad s : TECHNICOLOR' ^ S*. BY THE WAY By BEACHCOMBER B v elkrwing ail the unhaarfnjl .i did;de> to get in unopposed al tinnaxl QtgaSnl Election, the Consri-vatlves might stand a chanci DI defeaUm their opponents in a division soon r the Labour people might be astute enough to allow .n-crvr.Ilve Ui net in unopposed. ,md so dateal this cunning manoeuvre. Meanwhile speakers WOUld do well ti, Ml Ihe doctors, nurses, and ami sen should Concentrate on making sure of their voto.v. fur It Is tb will decide the future of party In this country. A strike of ambulance drivers might hrlrtg down a Government. •}*•, BM /,„,,. „„ Buhanmn' The holiday tamp hat come to stay • n, i Weekly paper.) iwrswrh %  rasSOSM reply u-hen. diiniifi flic icqr oj 18'S. Glfldaloiie naked him if if wot mu that (lie Italians had Innadrd the Bahamas The reply became the refrain of n j"jKilar soup. uHih "hflpana" Milistirutrd for "Bahama'.'' after the Iflf-JI uar. inti'FiiMcht fUxtr-ftolhh T HE visit of an English charwoman to Moscow, to study Sus-uan methods of polishing Mirs, Is a grslultous insult to Snlbbo. Snibbo, by the wnv. Is the only thing Stalin has not, so S r, been credited with Inventing, le charwoman and her party are the "guests of the women's Anil-Fascist Committee," so they will probably return with the doctrlnally correct anti-Fascist method of polishing floors It would lie fun if Snibbo were to be dragged Into an ideological debate. The new wines made bv Snibbo differ, of course, from the floor%  n ae n ss >eaaaso>88fl polish. There are no canned grapes In the polish At least, I think not. A COMPLAINT from someone worn t tha bone on the treadmill of what used to be t d -Ihe life of pleasure" rcled me of the saying of a t French lady of the elghIh century: "Life would be bearable, It It weren't fnr its pie;..in.-.. For gourmet* W HAT is it that "makes food flavours sing"? It is monosodium gtutumate, 'the unique Msac seasoning." It turns a stew inlo an ode, a hash Into a sonnet, B mixed leftover Into an epic. And il is the latest discover)' of Ihe International Minerals ami rhcmical Corporation of Chicago ri i t i a rP P si r 1 nr • r* ^-^:?!t ^ij r_ i" ) apeak. Candidate perhaps. (•) IT It was this. It 13 Across. IS) Well. tbU U praise. (4) > Hone* differently. (0) Tha way. (*i Oarmenta. ill PrepcMtuon. i4) SH> iitl.r oinipaoj 1J1 It de.iiVhs nflen lauda. (3) Tin* iund is able for a autrt, 161 ii dole provide* a drink. > o. id a aifferant now. (41 ffjssri NL.I n.iuian Dractlos—Bsj aalmai l-.it i. prapoalUQa. (4) CoveieU. i Si TO be in Dili Itopical. ,11 i. rat* mess la a mas*. (S) Polari. III Nursed, saBII we say IS. Bl The apice o( adteniure. (4) S tills means daajgp. 141 illtttng a mt*tT (4) I Humous l Ki ''"'lip ^ liTnie las will rc*oi t rt wimuut ia> %  .. .,i -^i i-nin y i Cr-.r Oe-n 1 1*11*11 Meimi \ M(ob*S; *: SMI*: 3 Inn.r Oai 4 Seroiili W< Assault II Hi H *.*-. iu %  \IW SIIKK OF BVMIX AMARA II \l lllnlt.wlH LIQUID PARAFFIN SYRUP OF FIGS and RUSKS—Baby's First Solid Food Also a variety of CIGARS | Miiuys inn i. si oiiis Akt ***** WTEtt 1/W 0* iititt.X fta?' mnd r.iuwn we oHoe LAWK MOWT,Ra-128 14rrom %\1 46 SS. RAKEB 32f SIir-ARS for Hedges a 2 81 HAND FORKS a3c OARDRN TROWEL8 t 1 21 SFCATF.UKH 11^" ItOSF NOZZLK8 rrom 83c MENDERS j£ Dafioin sac! alao VO.Mfor manuring of Vegetables ft Flower Oardans I'MZA o/sriN %  naint or vtNor.ANcr.' LAST TWO SlKlttS 5 and S.30 P.M. -• hail, al a a S.SB a %  BOSH IM.IIlin [ llh l.l" n . r MT MAii.vrr i VMMSII TRAIL GLOBE LAST SHOWING TODAY 445 and H.30 "LUXURY LINER" Jnnt POWEIJ. — (MO. BRENT Xnvln CUCAT "THE SEARCH" Mcmleomcry CLIFT ami Wewlcl COREY Aline MacMohan CHINA DOLL RESTAURANT SOCIETY'S RENDEZVOUS Presents SATURDAY, OCTOBER ZTST From S p.m.— 10 p.m. RAY jwtrims B.G's Radio Sln^inK Star in a series of luvourite ballads I'l.AZ.l Thealre-BR/DGfrowN SPECIAL MATINEE TO-DAV 2 p.m (ChMp PrtrMl Jimmy Ota* in "g.Of'fAV/l.VS "(Vmirnl) nml I I Ml II I Mil > •H O I' K • EMPIRE TO-NIGHT at 8.88 Tomorrow 5 A 838 REVHEDEVILLE 1950" Opening . Satards. 445 & 8.30 M-G-M Picture . •KEY TO THE CITY' IIOXY LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 438 A 8.15 United Artists Double . Paul MUNI & Claude RAINS •ANGEL ON MY SHOULDER" AND "THE IROQUOIS TRAIL" George MONTGOMEHY and Urenda MARSHALL ROYAL TO-DAY 4.S8 ft R.38 >iday 4.30 Onlj Republic Sma^urxg Double Roy ROBERTS and GEORGE COOPER "FLAMING FURY" THE LAST BANDIT" William ELLIOTT & Adrian BOOTH FRIDAY NK1HT It III •I IHU tSSH.ll I' OLYMPIC TO-DAY & Tomorrow 4.S0 SIS Republic Big Double . John WAYNE St Sigrid CURIE THREE FACES WEST' AND •MAN FROM OKLAHOMA" lov ROGERS At Dale Evan* George (Cabby) HAYES Tin: II \IIH\IIOS IIIl iAIIII Oil ON ID llllll LTD. I ) ST. JAMES "CONSPIRATOM' and "CLOAK aad n M.I.I u iW.rn..-l %  Jilh P;.ul HENREID wilh Gary COOPER FRIDAT T.. %\S. %  .n. MAT IW 1 pi. .-....„... i ., A,U.. ,,,.,. | ,,,I( M '^aU-T... %  •. I.M...N. J.k.M, Mirk e>. EMPIRE THEATRE TO-NIGHT al 8.3H TOMORROW FRIDAY MAT1NKK S anil NIGHT 8.30 p.m. MRS. A. L. STUART Presents Her SCHOOL OF DANCING in 'REVuEDEVILLE 1950' Muslr by Ihe Police Band Directed by Capt. C K. Baiann. A.R.C.M.. M.B.E. All Persons nhi. have hooked aeats lor To-night's Show and have nol paid for them are requested In take Ihem up by 12 noon after this lime they will nol be held BOX OITICK OPEN DAILY From'8.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 1.30 to 3.30 p.m. Price.:— Orchestra and Boxes $1.50; House M tfc. Balcony 72c. Reserved T he $64.00 Question THIS IS NOT FOR THE OLD FOLKS ti?i he voun K men and women of this Fair island home of yours. We call it Harbndos, you call it Little England. As we were saying to you young folks—you arc on the threshold of llle—the one and only life on ihis planel (JOD has ulven yolt What are you doing about life? That is the .Ww.OO question. Are you living each day and improving yourself. morally socially, intellectually, and financially? Or are you throwing your life away? Are you keeping good company or bad company? Are you trying to live decently and making every effort to obey the laws of your Country? In other words are you n decent citizen or a potential "vagabond" or "streetwiilker"? search your conscience—examine your life carefully to this minute mid sec which category you belong. Answer truthfully— don't kid me because you will be kidding yourself. I was a bad young man. followed bad company and went to Jail—became worse by association wilh hardened criminals I got out of Jail and went down the drain— or sewer—and ? But the time came and I fell in love with a beautiful girl and tried to mend my ways, but it was too late folks. 1 say with all mv strength "CRIME DOES NOT PAY" you will realize that when vou see me as the "BAD MAN' in "THEY LIVE BY NIGHT". You might not like the real life role I portra y—i t's tough—it's rough—it's a powerful drama of love and te.irs and heartbreak, but you will get a new experience when vou see I ill V LIVE BY NIGHT" starting at The GLOBE THEATRE Friday aaWo*>•#'29th r#£ r FARLEY GRMUir CATHY C'lONKELL MWMOfiAS'Ln GLOBE FRIDAY OCT. 20 PLUS LOCAL TALENT



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• tfUktr lf 1930 Barbados locate FIVE UU.XTS "BRITAIN COULD NOT CARE LESS 11 U.N. Troops Reported In Pyongyang Communists On The Run TOKYO, Oct. 18. {RUSSIAN RADIO reported to day that spear heads of the South Korean First Division had entered the "main part" of the Communist capital Pyongyang. It said that according to reports from the front, Pyongyang airfield on the eastern side of the Taedong River fell this afternoon. The South Xorean.< hradlns a drive for Pyongung sirtleld and claimed V Butlin'a lication Postponed Appli iProm Our Own C ar r —at o ne—iii LONDON, Oct. 18. The application to wind up Butlln's Bahamas Ltd. was adjourned in Nassau to-day until November 9th. It la reliable learned that Bullin is trying to borrow enough to pay all the creditors except the Cape and (Janeral. 1-ondon. totalling £143.000 and then give Cape a mo-|gage for £463,000. A Cape and Cicneral Finance is bossed by Ha. old C, Drayton. city financier, whose nterests have sunk £1.050,000 into Butlin's Bahamas. Of the CI.7SO.000 a'ready (pent on the vacation village. Cape and General have put up £7*0.000 Tho Finance company was the binges! creditor Involved in to-day's court proceedings In o-der to protec' its position it was forced to file i claim for the £450.000 unsecured loan it made earlier this year in an attempt to save the village. U.S. Offers France £71,000,000 PARIS. Oct. 18. The United Slates has offeree to place £71,000,000 at the disposal of the French Government for rearmament during the llrst six months of 1SS1 a French Council .Minister was inform** (odar. Information was contained In the report from French Defence Minister Jules Moch on conversations which he and Finance Minister Maurice Petsche had with top American officials in Washington. Moch had talked with high American officials Including Dean Acheson, Secretary of the Treasury John W. Snyder. und Secretary of Defence General George C. Marshall. At meetings they had discussed means of financing France's rearmament plan and solving the problems of her 1951 budget. The credit of £71,000.000 may be used either for the purchase of material in the dollar zone, or for financing the manufacture in France of material provided for by the French rearmament programme. Provision for American material under the Atlantic Pact Military Aid Programme would add a further £17,000.000 to this credit. Minister of information Albert Gatier said after a council meeti ng — Beater "DAILY CHRONICLE" MANAGER DIES I From Our Own CoTTespononil • GEORGETOWN, Oct. 18. C. N. Del ph. Dairy Chronicle Manager, died in Port-of-Spaln today. A special plane coming from Trinidad on Thursday brings the bod> home. • cd on Into tfh pan" of the Communist capital Hi '--h and United StaleForces advancing swiftly south against stiffening opposition were also expected In the city to-fURht. American Seventh Cavalry Regiment vanguard of this southern advance were last reported about 10 miles off Ihe capital They had taken Ihe lead from Ihe British Commonwealth Dfvislo' which had advanced 40 miles ir 24 hours. Military sources here did no" expect heavy fighting in Pyongyang "The Commun st are on the run", thev said Keulfr. Ju|i Courts Given Full Responsibility TOKYO. Oil 18 General Douglas MacAr.hur announced today that from November 1, the Japanese courts I be free to try Ihe United Nations omens in criminal cases that dale Ihe Government will assume responsibility for retains criminal jurisdiction including power of arrest over the Umte;i Nnlions cilicenv in Japan with the exception of the occupation st3ff. the announcement said. 19 ^ t .hur's action was the result of a decision adopted by the Far Eastern Commission in Washlnglou on September 21. Alva Cirpeter, Chief of the Legal Section of General MacArthur's Headquarters said that tn action 5 as "an expression of faith in the gal. Judicial and police Institutions that the Japanese police have adopted and represents a firm belief In the ability of the Japanese Government to accept and execute that responsibility Impartially fairly and with Justice. The rights of any United Nations national detained by Japanese authorities will be protected by several provisions While i on tii KM to prison or %  waiting trial the United Nations national will be permitted to communicate with his country's diplomatic mission in Japan. A representative of the mission may intercede for and protect the rights of the arrested national. No capital or life sentence imposed by the Japanese Court on the United Nations national may be executed without confirmation the Allied Supreme Comnder —Keater. Doctors Condemn Mercy Killing, NEW YORK, Oct 18 The World Medical Association attar | keen debate here! fas voted to condemn mercy killings (euthanasia! Dr Gregg uf Britain said thai, many doctors at some time had used drugs to speed the de*ih or incurable patients suffering (real pain. Bui Dr. Marcel Poumallloux of France declared: "1 lost my own mother by u terrible cancer lasting for weeks and weeks, ana none of my colleagues thought of I shortening her life to alleviate' her -iilfeiing. He said that euthanasia Mould "open the door to all possible crimes and criminal practices" The resolution which was passed called euthanasia "contrary to the public interest anc to medical principles as well as to natural and civil rights." It recommended that national medical associations in each country should "condemn the practice of euthanasia under am circumstances." Israel proposed thai Western German doctors should not be admitted to the Association be-, caiiM of the inhuman experiments" practiced in Germany, durum 'he war. The charge was made by Dr. Emit Adlre of Jerusalem who said he did not object to the organisation having relations with German doctors, but that there should be a "probation time" before they are admitted to membership. —Reuter. KMIII Archdeacon Accuses U.K. Of Complete Indifference To Shipping In West Indies H.M. The King Congratulates Trinidad Gilkes 'Walks Over'Trinidad AT CHfSS < Fran Our Own Cotrampaniwnl i GEORGETOWN. B.G., Oct. 18. The intercolonial Chess tournament got underway on Tueada> night at Woodbine Hotel and at the close of play Trinidad and Barbados had IVj points and British Guiana one point. c B. Gilkes, the Barbados captain, won by a walkover from Pratt. th*i Trinidad captain. Frank Ogle. B opened by His Excellency Sir Charles Woolley on Monday night. ihe Governor making the first ve in the Informal exhibition J Quash le of Trinidad and Frank Osbome of B.G H McShlne of Trinidad and C B Gilkeof Barbados also gave an exhibi. N B ? IlAi J* "' tte >vit u on of ">c Bntixh Conn. Alaiycluwa OlagLag. th Olowo of Ow prlncip.I town Nigeria, scompanied by hiwife and councillors rolled zoo and is ieeu feeding one of UJP Peng U, the Oba of Western the London IJ press. Guerillas Mass For Attack On Langson Civilian Residents Evacuated VIETMINH OtnaiLLAS, after occSEytaJ S£ French frontlinefortress **—-I.ONDON, Oct. 10 K MI (.corse the Sixth has .-east a message to the Tunulad %  i r..aKo legislative Cou i ......it atlng the colony on u"i advance la cofttRitutsana] "< v lilniaiisjiu In the message which will ic.ni t. the llrst session of IK | ciMslilllvr COUncll morrow the Kim: said "I I % %  Opla of Ti ini1'nhago in expiessio) "Ti at major ui\ COnStttU%  atoprneni f It* The iiMusjurtfiofl ••' %  MI eal op|Kir f also Imposes gnat responsibilities on the Laniil lure and peoplo alike I have watched with .lose inter* I -ympalhy ihe manner in whicl mj paopta "f tinootooj) km now IteJMd themselves of the i ; 'i Uinli %  foi pintn lpaUon In tha work of the Government, and the election li.i thai Uiati Interest IM.lltlc.l :' i nllnu.-, I im onlldent that their roprera'iitatlves on this Council nnd Ihoae who are chosen to share as members of me Executive Council the heavy responsibility of lirtvi nimeiit will MM f.nl Ihe poopla o| UMOSJ islands and th.u {htfl will continue |0 ailv.mt • llic gi-al name and pmapeut> of tinGflatMky • II being In every sphere is %  ii.i %  i IIK er n —Reuter. ing today fni NOT A BONE BROKEN LONDON. Oct. 18. The sole survivor from yesterday's plane crash near London in which 28 died, escaped without breaking a bone. X-rays showed today. The survivor. Steward McKiasick was thrown over 100 yards when a crippled British European Airways Dakota crashed Into a sub-urban garden at Mill Hill North London and burst Into flames. —Itealer. War Spy Story Told In Parliament Valet Photographed Documents LONDON. October 18. Foreign Minister Bevin today blamed Britain's wartime Ambassador to Turkey for letting some of the biggest secrets of World War II fall into the hands of the Germans. He confirmed in Parliament the most extraordinary spy story of the war — the photographing of top secret documents by the Ambassador's valet who sold the films to the Germans. ~ Among the secrets were referto "operation overlord". Invasion of Nurthwf Govt. Rejects Rubber Proposal LONDON, Oct. 18. British Government to-day rejected a proposal that it should ban all future exports of rubber to I'.ussia and Communist controlled countries until Communist guerilla activities in rubber producing Malaya had ceased. Conservative Sir Jocelyn Lucas made the proposal in the Hou-'-e of Commons but Colonial Secretary James Griffiths said he coul< not accept it — Eeater. JAMAICA VILLAGE SUBMERGED KINGSTON. JAMAICA. Oct. 18. Flooded underground streams submerged the entire village of Cave Valley, 80 miles from Kingston in i few minutes. The 150 inhabitant* escaped in boats to high ground as the waters rose on Sunday night to cover the village to depths varying from 18 to SO feet. Ail the village livestock waa drowned in a lake of flood water GOVERNMENT WINS AGAIN LONDON. Oct. 18. The British Labour Government scored a 12vote victory over Winston Churchill's Conservative pposition in Parliament tonight. It defeated a Conservative challenge on its running of the itlonaliscd transport industry— hich mad* a loss of 20 million sterling last year. —Reuter. Donrtang wert reported rnaaaacfc on LeUigaon, chitf ran lining French defence post guardi ng the China road. The Krenclt evacuation Of 7.1 year old stone fortress of Dongdangt, Bfth bastion to be abandooad within .. month, hud left open i^ ii dtNoi MtacH i %  in i Langson 'B civilian i |sjol r.;ivo already bean H.i HM i-'r< noh i I ed to hold it The rrSJOCfa r. %  I ....... I A.SCI,,. bly's defence CommtttM to-day 1 IMIMIUII|>I propn%  al thai Oon nuntol sacn Udks wllh Dr. Ho eh Miuh SPORTS WINDOW WATBB POLO BSS nnni %  %  K.O IlKture Thl ••nrtauiwd |.„ w £ k BaftM h i t J r NVH J*IJ I W „I IU I „, J .„, > f-.tlorlion will |„ 26,000 Dockers Strike In Australia MELBOURNE. Oct 18 28,000 dock workers today tied up every port in Australia in a 24 hours cost of living strike The strike, first move in the Labour Party's campaign against rising prices launched in Sydney, delayed 246 ships and cost shipowners £100.0^0 Australian. Victoria was without i vices for the third day in succession l>ecause of the strike by railway guards demands for WJ,> In Melbourne 300 firemen carried Iheir "pushbutton strike" into Its third week with no sign at -riilcnent. The men are striking against a rule forcing Ihem to press a button aver) ti n minutes while on duty. —Ureter. Prance's leaning military ssya* %  ri-t Era! Al|:iii.n,e Jan, and .'can Elouroaau Hmlatar for Iht 1 dated Siatc. who ttev. Into S,,igon vesterday. tailks In* 'he early hours of "is moinng on the border situation. Their dJj u liliiry and pollUcal ic beuevad u, invofva big ilwls ons and the "' |roUplng of French Intono* h, Idtny An.m %  They wenexpectci (0 bksVl L -ni\ by plana to ti I rcler situation on Hi. Albert Vazlcr, gCinfltai ol Inf. inatioa said i n I'.nis to-diiy Hi it the French High I wag proceeding with the mcthotii al withdrawal of %  Ch^na wiih the algfl of ragtroupinu them ai i" i back '. I protactad against enelrclen-eni mfornsad Paris sources saia thai 80.000 members i Fi *ttch tin on forces I 10 miles the mountainous fronlic region defen'!in K ., line ,.' e point, only 20 miles n< rth Ol Hanoi the Rruler 125 M.P.H. Winds Sweep Miami slami MIAMI. Florida. Ocl IB. vicious tropical hurricane led Minim with 12.1-mile an hour wnals early on Wednesday then wluileW on up Florida A 70-mile strip of trwt* resort ludlng the cities, of I lollyWOOd Fort l,audcrdalr. I'ompano mid lloca nation lay In Its path. ma rlOfa Indian liiver citrus ii not f.n t" the aortn a Ii Henderson, Miami s.r.-tv Dtnetor Hid H'"' i>e wi'l not be surp f i | ed If proper') damage reaches or i goseai '. HHI Mill-", .on nMdf IWO gem-ral the debris llttored cilj If it Is bad all over as it is in those parts I saw. It may easily reach that Agura Five persona w.i. bsiund <>ul R8 deaths were reported I was off in moat of the city. Ther* ".IT, im watar in many seciiwi.. i .-.ic down in the -• :.00,00ll people live Fort Lniadssrdsua mkd by 100imle an Ii tin wimU was ;.iung<"J lorna damage was sssarnd t ol* windows ano shrubUi> Itoportl from Davis, just west of Fort l-urf*rdale said thai tinfanning conununily w- <;.p. Argentine Ambassador Calls On Bevin LONDON, Oct. 18. Carlos llogan. Argentine Ambassador, called on Ernest Bevin, Brtuah Foreign Secretary, to-day at his own request It was believed thai he discussllevin the deadlock in Aigentinc meat shipinint'.. Hntain which has persisted since Ai'Keiitina suapcn>* agreed to pay £90 per ton but the Argentine government has proposed £140 per ion with provisional shipments al 1107 |er ton.—Krater. Cuke Awarded £3,000 Damages i l mm Our Own Correspondent) LONDON, Oct. 18. IT IS impossible to get a booking to the West Indies by sea before February 1951, and even at that date there is a long waiting List. This was what Archdeacon Fr. Banks of Trinidad was told when he applied for a passage to one of the leading ship ping companies in this country, and he reveals these facts in a letter to "The Times" today. "Does Britain want her colonies or not*" he asks "1 do not wish lo engage m politics, but 1 am very interested in transport, which is looked upon b\ tha Qovanuntnt H :i first essential within the United Kingdom, but OUtgiOsI (within the Empire) apparently it could not matter less." Archdoecon Banks recalls that two years ago a Commission of Inquiry reported what was needed to alleviate the West Indies 1 shipping position But. he says, nothing baa bean done Hundreds of people w %  travel lo and from the British Caribbean colonies And themselves stranded because of lack of snip ping space. Yet. If the question of removing troops ever arises. It Is always possible to And a repnred to Increase 76,000 tons, i.e. from I Mfl.OOO tons to 1.8HS.O0O tons the amount d sugar Ihe United Kingdom has undertaken to buv each year at guaranteed nrcles from IPS3 I Ml Inadequate Boat* He also points out that before the war there were about a doxen regular passenger steamships on the U.K.-West Indies run, whereat today there .ire -one ..r tv... very inadequate boats running at long intervals''. "Such an approach by responslblo authorities In this country li. indefensible." concludes Archdeacon Banks, "and to the West Indian can only appear to be ono of complete indifference t'oatnole: Checking up with iw.mo of the steamship companies /Ing the Wi^t Indies from th* United Kingdom, our correspondwas told "Tho position Is hopeless. It is a source of worry us who are interested In tha West Indies, but there are just not enough ships to go nrounil New ones are expensive u> build and remunerative to run That E there Is to It" COt. STfADY The Cost-of-living figure ha not risen aince June The llgure for September showj drop of one poinl ew than Mu\ when it was 242. SPAT ON ALTAR CAGLIAftl, Sardinia, Ocl. IB. A Sardinian Court has gaoled a Conununlal for m months for spitting on tl>. Church The Communist. Giovanni Pud which Ihe case went for retro:I should not be published, and the Press bad abided by the decision that It should not be. "You and I. however.' the Chief Judge told the Jury, "are not i with the grounds ol j.lipcul or with what happened In We-1 Indi.ui I mrl %  Afjnaai y/ou tra here \, t rrj tha i .ise on Hie fl ibjel to what we know — that there was a trial in the I i onvnon Pleas prertouaty nni %  .ise did go before the West Indian Court of Appeal You will therefore disabuse Of anything thi.t you may have previously heard in a with the n, l reflh." Case Before Jury '. put to 'he jury the case for the puslttUff, '"uke. and that for ase was hat he had suffered personal njuric* and pain, and that from '.hose injuries h. Lug that the aeciI the defend The dad the defendant was no) %  '.he plaintiff was also negligent, und that the plaintiff's negligence was the effective cause of the .uid so he was the real cause of his own undoing 'tin Chief Judge I hen explained tlie legal meaning of "negligent e" as failure to take care. "Failure to take the care which the clrof Ihe particular case called for." The degree of care was the degive of care which one Mould expect a reasonable man to exercise in Ihe particular elreumstances of the particular case I Next point made by the Chief Judge was that they should not allow sympathy for the Injured arty to warp their judgment hey should not say that the plalnttfl bad luffared ami there'i'.led to damages. ind. sympathy or no sympathy, If they were tatls%  he had made out his case it would be their duty to award such damages as they felt should be awarded. A.**eNing I>aniat,esi with the Of damages. lhr> would bear In mind thai thOSMI'I MEET THE CHALLENGE OF THE UNKNOWN TO-MORROW WITH A POLICY OF ASSURANCE WITH THE BARBADOS MUTUAL KIR ASSURANCE SOCIETY. J. N. WALCOTT c .nv„.in f DENIS ATKINSON % %  %  %  •-Hlhfll C. K. BROWNE — Secretary i





PAGE 1

THURSDAY, 1DTH OCTOBER, 150 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE country wo* asked lo ftjrriish lh<> First Commander of United Nations troops. It is fortunate f<>r the world that we had the right man for this Job a man who la a very great soldier — Goner il Douglas MueAnhur. Commonwenlih troops and the American 24th Division alongside them now have a dear run north to PyiniKjang through the eastern coastal plain. The only natural obsUul.-. arc a tew small rivers which branch from the Taedong Hlver upon uhlch Pyongyang stands. "United Nations action in Korea is of supreme importance for all rcopies of the world. Tor the ilrst time in history nations who want j %  taken up urms under the banner of an International Organisation to put down aggression. Under that Banner of the United Nations they are succeeding. "This Is a tremendous step iorward In an age-old struggle to establish rule and law In the world Tba Unite,, Nation* was established here in this very bunding live years ago. It was in the hope and In the baiaaf that mankind could have juat and lasting peace "Today as a result of the Korean struggle the United Nations Is stronger than it has ever been We know now that the United Nations can iu. International order with authority to maintain peace. "When I met w iih General MatArthur we discussed plans for completing the tank of (.ringing peace to Korea. We talked about plans for establish ng a -nifted, independent and democratic' Government in that country In accordance with the resolution of the General Assembly of the United Nations. "Our sole purpose In Korea is to establish peace and independence. Our troops will stay there only so long as they are needed by the United Nations for that purpose. "We seek no territory or special privilege. I,ct this be crystal clear to all—we have no aggressive designs in Korea or In any other place in the Tar East or elsewhere. No country in the world which really wants peace has any reason to fear the United States. The only victory we seek is the victory of peace. United Nation.-,' Forcein Korea are making spectacular progress, but lighting than II BO. yet over North Korean Communists refuse to acknowledge tho authority of the United Nations. They continue to put up a stubborn but futile resistance. President Truman's Son Francisco speech last night was welcomed by sections of this morning's British press The MaJMhester Guardian said that the speech was for the moat part a strongly worded challenge to Soviet "Imperialism" and a warning that the free world was determined to build up its defences against further aggression. This liberal paper referring to the American President's four point cull to Russia added however that the appeal would have no effect although there was determination behind it. Another paper In time to comment editorially on the speech -Conservative Yorkshire Pssl— declared that the United States must not be left to act alone and that a|| freedom loving nntions must show they are eager and %  big to share the burden of •afeguardlng peace. The Conservative, Dally Telegraph meanwhile claimed that the two central points of the President's speech were his In%  MegMSJ on the creation of a hip of peace" with Asiatic nations and his emphasis rmH the programme of reconstruction for Korea. All free nations would rully to this the Dally Tele. raph added. Informed Indian circle* at New Delhi thought President Truman'* broadcast from San Francisco mainly .1 :estatement of the well known state of affairs existing bt t l—B tintwo power bloc* headed by the United States and the Soviet Union. They thought It would make little difference to the international situation. Indian observers noted the absence of any reference to Communist China in the Presidential broadcast. Observers felt that the omission was significant from the Indian potBl M view because India had consistent}advocated the inclusion of the new China in the United Nations as being perhaps the only way of strengthening world organisation and thus enhancing the chances of world peace —Heater. WELLINGTON. Oct 18 Commandan Fifth Army in Italy "ridiculed" a sun* gesuon that a light bomb be dropped on a Casatno monastery lo give civilians sheltering there a c-This was stated here penberger who commanded the New Zealand Second Division. In reply to General Clark %  assertion thai 1h* decision to bend astery was a "iui. General Clark In his i enisled Risk'' blamed Lieutenant General Sir Bernard • mho commanded the New Zealand j i luly for tlie bombum General Klppenuerger said: "General Clark says he able to change Prey berg's opinion and that he then personally authIhe bombing. I would like to say that it U "inmander %  uctiuiesced in a course of action of whtc* he did not approve, to atiemi>'. afterwards to throw responsibility on to a subordinate %  General Kinn.mber.-er >aid in Italy a request for the bombing .if the Abbey came from the Fourth "It was considered ii must be bombed, llrs'.ly. because it was an ideal observation i"t, which might he used by '.he %  and secondly, because it was certain to be mans offending Monte Cassino." It was suggested to General Clark that alight warning bomb should be dropped, giving a hint of what was in store and an opK rtunlty for any civilians sliding in the Abbev to %  .,] Clark ddiculcd that suggestion saying that if the Abbey had to be bombed It had to be done with heavy bombs." —Reuter Mailliioijeiied OPEA FAIR Jfc^..^. A r/-.;niie'r .2" n Hk r l 600 Bags Of A/AC WILL KOrea A IrlOriOUS For Abbey Bombing -,,„.,,-_. _j nDrA1( New Page In Military History SAYS TRUMAN SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 18. PRESIDENT TRUMAN, broadcasting to the nation on his return from the historic Wake Island meeting with General Douglas MacArthur, said here tonight: "General MacArthur told me about the lighting in Korea. He described the magnificent achievements of all United Nations forces serving under his command. Along with soldiers of the Republic of Korea these forces have now turned back the tide of aggression. More fighting men are coming from the free nations all over the world. "I am confident that these force-) will soon restore peace to the whole of Korea." "We Americans naturally take a special pride in the superb achievements of our own soldiers, sailors marines and airmen. They have written a glorious new page in military We can all be proud of them. */ %  are nlso proud that LOVE'S STRENGTH LONDON. The day after It had been set in concrete because courting couples kept moving ii behind a hedge, n wooden sent at Hawkes Hill. Woodburn, Buckingham county. v as wrenched from its founda • lions and moved behind the hedgo I.N.8. up. AT G.P.O. THE gr |N Sieani>.ii the Whar. which has just been given up to < i and Co, Ltd. may be used by the l\.-i OfM ..%  faVWl M... isagaal m e n .be* i <>t ih< were toM I yesterday Mi It A Wcumrncad had just Hen in the Parcel Department at the Post OAsN Mi Wealhechead expressed surprise that when he asked someone at the Post Office by 'pin i •ibout unopened parcels. told that there were 600 bags of them His informant said that the whole Pgjrc* I was full, that certain persons in i ..ireels In %  .i.i US IMS** tement of %  %  lust three or fou years it ha seen soiling gra hial%  It eras >il at the %  Ju*t a"Otind thi 1 led on parcel post even more than the Am I to understand," Mdd Mr Weatherhead. "that parcel* will \,, In the Post OAcw an :. .tnessman will not able to art hi.atO di out to sell %  n 'time? be would sugaest that some member of the Chamber approach the Postmaster POPE WILL ADDRESS RECORD GATHERING VATICAN CITY. Oct 16 Pope Pius XII will addreaa tne greatest gather,ng of Cardinals. Archbishops and Bishops in thmorfem history •>{ the Cat hull Church at a special assembly b the Vatican Palace on November 3 the Vatican announced today. The meeting win bring togelln'i 40 Cardinals and 7no Archbishop; from all over the world expected in Romr for prrwUiroa lion of the new dogma of t h < assumption on November I No Information was given oi tlio subject of the Pope's address hich is expecte-i to M r highest importance. 2 Kitted, 15 Injured As Bus Runs Off Road POHT-OF-SPAIN. Oct. IB. Two men were filled, and I people injured on Saturday alir-inoon when a bus with 30 passengers ran off the road near Cumuto and somersaulted 12 feet down the embankment. None of the survivors could explain what happened In this "split second" accident It took rescue workers two hours to get the bodies of the two dead r from under the bus where the) were pinned by the driver's seat against the roof One dead man Jon.>EUecex 60. an estate labourer, left hi Coryal home to visli' Arima and pay his Fr>cndly Society dmfrom which .;* %  family enjoy sick %  i biiii'llts He leaves i widow, two children nnd severe grand-child rer. —Can. Press. 55 MILE WALK • Frnni Our Own CtorrePOR'T-OF SPAIN. Oct. lfi The 55-mi.o profesj.ii > kinship walking race eld this morning. The race will gitart from New Jersey througr La Urea to Oropouche via San Fernando .hen to Port-of-Spain terminating at Broadway oppoB.Uthe Royal Bank of Canada. IF YOUFEEL LIKE THISTAKE WINCARNIS TONIC WINE AND FEEL LIKE THIS! BE HEALTHY & HAPPY. The Wrather TO-IIAY Sun Rlsea: 5.49 a.m Sun Set*: 5.43 s.m '1 i iS'ulli ttctuber :5 Ugattsigi i. on ,>,,,. ltlh Hater: I MIS p.m I STFRDAV lt.Miil.ill '(idiiiiiiUui) nil Total (or Mtiiiili Ig Yesterday: 3 13 Ins Tea*] e.atiirr (Ma\) R4.X F. lemfieralure iMIn) 73. K. Wind lllrrctloii {9 a.m.) U* i;t nm > IU Hind Velocity 5 miles per hour ii. ...HI., in ,ni ) 29 866 (S p.m.) 21.772 From St. Paul's LONDON. The much boosted 1*M revival ol Brit.tin Mjt be orhVlally opened by Kin* George making .i sreeid broadca ul"s Cathedral Maj 3 Before the broadcast. King George and Queen Eli?.ahr:h will dtend a ser\'ice of ctadacatsan (n ihe Cathedral with other memberi of the royal familj. diplomats and members of the governiti-1 In his broadcast the King, will %  eclare that tlie Festival of Britain Ii open "ttirout I t'nited Kingdom of Great Britain and Nothern Iroland." The King and QMBSJII erill drive to and from the Cathedral in .. OBShstaB The exhibition buildings, in. Uidtng a vast Dome of Discovery ivcr a 27-ncre site OP the soutn bank of the River Thames. On l la* KUll BBd Queen will be the first visitors to the .vhibitlon The Thames idle forms only perl of the Festival, the cost of •'hlch is expected to total $J5.20(.000 Many other attractions are planned for visitors all over Britain. % %  100.000 people will nightly EMSja nccommn,: i..n during the Festiv.il A number of %  ainping sites are being pfeaar*d lag strain on hotels and tmuiiing houses. r ft uval '-entcnary of tho ;ireat Exhibition of IBM—is expected to increase Brltnin'i* iiiiome by millions of dollars. M %  IM.I'.V critics of the scheme Some llritons consider that mor.ev gnd Material spent on die exhibition would be bettor used in housing LNJI Whaling Ship Ucpurh-il Grounded BUENOS AJRES The Ariieii'.iiic iii.Mitiine guUwfltleg had nothing new this morning to add to tlrst report' received yesterday of the grounding of the 7.000 ton whaling factory ship Erseato Terna"! *! winch davCrlbad her position a* serious. Factory peaaon rsel ha t t'ape Consume? ..icording to these rei>orts hut the -A ,i; 'II aboard. —Reuler. Ren Gurion Unable To Form NtfH I.IHt'I-Ullll'PlI TEL-A-VIV. Oct IB David Ben Gurion, lsraeb Prime Minister today told President Chaim Wetunann that he tailed to form, a new Government Early today his caretaker Government failed to obtain a vote of confidence in Parliament. The House defeated by 57 votes to 43 the Premier's proposal that i cabinet of seven should hold dice until elections could be held. Baa r.urion's Coalition Government resigned last Sunday when the powerful orthodox religious bloc refused to support the Prime Minister's plan for broadening the cabinet. Before the caretaker Govern(Mt last night Parliament ssMtdad to authorise Its JudMal Committee to drsft a law for general elections within a fortnight — %  cater. U.S. Have New Rubber IMant WASHINGTON. Oct 17. United States scientists have reported that they are making -low but significant progress' towards producing a native crop ot rubber. According lo the department of agriculture which Is conducting rubber growing experiments. scientists said that the latest adis the creation of new high yielding strains of the rubber plant gunyale. ii shrub which %  row a-fid on the dry Uble lands ot Mexico and Texas. They believe that the new .strums will produce about 1.200 IHiunds of rubber per acre in five growing years. The United State* Imports its natural rubtwr from the Tar East mostly from Malaya. Scientists think that the rubber plant would make a suitablcrop on some 2.000,000 aCTM fc the low rainfall art's of Texas, to be harvested in the lifth year The Agriculture Department has already estsblished pilot plantings there to teat new varieties ntid hybrids.—Realer. LOPKW BEST ^gskjbr. -' 0&Z && I l \l K\ T SOAPS IMPtaiAL U \iliwn I IMHN Hl>"OM to gel at the real facu of the case. He did not know how to believe that there could be 600. bags ol mail uiioponed at the Post Oftice. Governor Approached Mr U A l.uciv-Smllh said that he bapps-ataj |o know Uiat the to lha tiovrn/.i some iime ago about tiie congestion *1 tlie Post Ufflor. ITie OoV%  rruneiii had Just taken over the used at ihe Steamers' warehouse by DaCosta's, for the purpose of using it as a parcel < e|...rtnient. It w as the ground lid) was about 5.000 Square feet. How far the Coven.ment hnd got m their arrangements wi" [he niatt.-i he did nm know, but he did know % %  king steps. What was happening at present the goods of certain usually cam. QW bank and •umelimes they did not find it convenient lo lake ,i. livery of then, urn lediatcly These parcels sometimes remar I for quite H long time As n matter of f,i< t the Postmaster i had DUbUlbod u notice begging these people to take dehvei v of %  %  %  %  %  ne-Smith said lhal he believed the QoVafBlUCat had under consideration, a plan to panssli leu too long In the Post Office. Thi* would W.I. Go To U.K. Fo T.B. Treatment PORT-OF-SPAIN. The StCn 'iv ol State for th' b mmight tn th<* vi'rnineii. a Tune sepia from Colonial lanltorb nava aniTad in Uuudoii to get tn'stiuenv foi tut--1< iil.i.iB. fl Is jKiinted out. however, that .here is a serious shortage of nospitnl beds In the Umtod Ki in i waiting I sts ana %  drnlittnl patients to an'..il>h' nistilutioiis. Rinso's rich lather makc\ whites whiicr, cokHircdi hrighicr' It washes gently, thoroughly, y' easily UM — iuit fltwits out dirt in record time. And it's tine for washing dishes. — gives them an extra vparkk. Surt usingRinso today—you'll get better reviln, csucr and quicker! RINSO for off your, wash/ serve as an incentive to people to On the H 'A del, Innlss n committe...f t: appointed to interview the Colonial Secretary about the matter. HAIR TONICfi/ 4 The "Five-Star" Cars The VENTNOR PLIMSOLL %  mida of VtatssM rifi.ii iivd |„ .i -pruili It tin b oDini>-d ill *hl*. is.blwt wuh -tine binding snd tolt or kl*tk nh blltk IOISPORTS SHOES CHARLES MtENEARNEY & CO. LTD. 10-DAYS NEWS FLASH WAI.KINII KTICKS 1/6 / „f I H.-I. i Ah .nd Clwrrr C'llt'RCIIWARUtN PIPES I HIST UK ILLS—AM slim at JOHNSON S STATIONERY and HARDWARE % %  We Offer:i iitnla S-HNM; M.ird V-S-4-J H BMttH *'nilr.| Onion i. CSCIM->I Onion.. Ilu VinSM. Tonu%  Tln> P*M. la S r f Thln.

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PAGE 1

PACE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, 1STH OCTOBER, l5U_ HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY [ Tf^T TO ae^E*s= MHI OA.--S A26 1ST AiCUT Ed. tNgi NOW...1B ONLV 1 CATS FINP JAG AND C3L.S IN TIMS %  X L %  nmmTT %  BLONDiE BY CHIC YOUNG n YOU i S • %  THE LONE RANGER I wcN'T ou. N IUE IAW, WAPLE.WHL YOU MCXO Trit^ MAN UN^iL I RETUAN FIKW~M£ FAF06H RANCH ? /-; '' SAD BY FRANK STRIKER in.MM TMA .ft' Wr-i fts j • vi i1 BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC.MANUS %  5* *-"i' • / •OI'TV.ATGLP.'' • % %  -',.< lv A ... 1 • £ V)B'-iMV L ^.>v o*v >cu IT **r> C€F MOW >-C LOO-'. IN ACTfOWQCH CLOTHF* %  i Ttxr KM TO t*jT tyn A flA-V COAT AM? *.TBCeD TBOLf + £>.' • i OWNftTlWiTlW ANXOU-5 1)'-** MM J APTSBWOON Lonsjp r MAT TEO DO >Ou THINK I RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND , flNO TUf \HOT JUST T^ r CL6NTMI )A"AV3CSP... fcl *AAN$L£RT y I'M ALSO ^•lUTfOgcrp-! N HTaj J THE COUNTS *T\ ^"^v BUSI Nest %  lUbS-BuM tAleaC ST" SANUNDtKt*MPfJ LMDEI BUPGIH'ANINCH-F lOOK-llFWSTHF OTMEtL MILLION-) F YOU FOQGEl YOU SAW US. i ^ UNDEHSTAWI JNKI 1 -At.; NOW.'YOU Hi UNDERSTAND. Remember thit lab*l IT IS ONLY PLACED OK GOODS Of PWIT QUALITY •Always ask for MORTON STRONG PEPPERMINT LOZENGERS A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LTD. AGENTS. DISCOMFORT .after meals? REMNIES _uvcvou At the first twinge of pun, suck Two Ranoiee. one after the other. Your tauTS carries ihe fast-acting Mend of ut*.i Ji ttraujht to your Kotnch. Acidiiy n quitfcly corrected, ead jour pain §oeTherc'i no need to lei iu.luv make your life a misery—-atweyi carry %  few Ff !" leach one is wrapped like a sweet) in your pocket or haodbsi II they Ji.:. : help, it's hiph tune you taw your doctor. Get Rcnoies at any DIGESTIF KENNIES HO SPOOS. SO VATER .. .MM* ihm !.• ..HAHPIC (LEAKS IT TOU JunipnnSle nmc'Hirp**' tnioih* Uiaiof> bowl — Ua*r OKirUghi — ih fluni 'lUrpi.' .!cn. duinlecK and drodoiM*! ih hok pan, Uwludina ilw S-bm4. HARPIC THE SPECIAL UVMOUT CLEANSER 'AMSF^I and Self Service too Soaps & Household Requisites Liu Toilet Soap 16 Palmoiivo Soap.... 16 Ca,hmre Bouquet Soap 23 Lilebuoy T. Soap 15 Limacol 81 Eno', Frail Sain 1.00 58 Dsttol 1.36 52 Phillips Magneaia 90 46 Cereals Quaker Com Flake, Quaker Oat Flakas Quaker PuBed Wheat ... Shredded Wheat White. Tapioca Flake, Morton's Oatmeal Alison's While Oats . Lassie Rolled Oats .... 28 48 Custard, Desserts, Jellies Birds Custard Powder 38 Olivers Custard Powder 53 Ch Ivors Custard Powder 30 Kraft Ice Cream Mis 69 27 Olivers Table tellies Hartley's Jelly Cry,lals Monk and Glass Table leUy Monk and Glass Blanc Mange Powder 22 20 Marmalades Syrups Golden Shied Marmalade Silver Shred Marmalade Cooper's Marmalade ....„ Hartley's Marmalade Trinidad Marmalade S. A. M a r m alade(21b) Golden Syrup & 36 46 42 33 19 Australian Honey 1.06 51 Canned Fruits Strawberries 63 49 Cherrie. 57 45 Frail Salad 87 Peachesi 72 Apricots 62 Black Currants 96 Cocktail Cherries 138 Cocktail Cherries 54 Tin Prunes 70 24 Sauces etc. Morton* Peccalilli Morton'a Chow Chow Morton'e Mixed Pickle* in Mm C & B M t xed Pickles in Vinegar Morton's Silver Skin Onion* Morton's Ghirkins Heinz Mayonnaise Heinz Salad Cream Bols. Bols CREME DE MENTHE .. ORANGE CURACAO „ APRICOT BRANDY ., BUCKFAST TONIC WINE ... ., WINCARNIS 53 s s 4.00 4.00 4.00 2.90 2.88 138 PHOSFERINE TONIC WINE 2.40 1.32 GORDONS GIN 2.50 BURNETT'S GIN 2.60 71 MEAT PKPAHTMEXT PRIME AUSTRALIAN BEEF ALL curs ALSO HEARTS KIDNEYS TAILS LIVER MUTTON VEAL TRIPE J c PM 1 %  i ( i mm






eee

Thursday,

October
1950





~







“BRITAIN COULD NOT CARE LESS”



UN. Troops Reported
In Pyongyang

Communists

On The Run

TOKYO, Oct. 18.

RUSSIAN RADIO reported to-day that spear-

heads of the South Korean First Division had
entered the “main part’’ of the Communist capital
Pyongyang. It said that according to reports from

the front, Pyongyang

airfield on the eastern side

of the Taedong River fell this afternoon.



Butlin’s

Application
(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Oct. 18.
The application to wind up
Butlin’s Bahamas Ltd. was ad-
journed in Nassau to-day until
November 9th. It is reliably
learned that Butlin is trying to
borrow enough to pay all the
creditors except the Cape and
General, London, totalling £143,-
000 and then give Cape a mozt-
og for £463,000.

Cape and General Finance is
bossed by Harold C,. Drayton, city
financier, whose interests have
sunk £1,050,000 into Butlin’s Ba-
hamas.

Of the £1,750,000 a'ready spent
on the vacation village, Cape and
meral have put up £750,000, The
ance company was the biggest
creditor involved in to-day's court
proceedings. In ozder to protec‘
its position it was forced to file ¢
claim for the £450,000 unsecured

loan it made earlier this year in
an attempt to save the village.

U.S. Offers France
£71,000,000

PARIS, Oct. 18.
The United States has offered
to place £71,000,000 at the
disposal of the French Govern-
ment for rearmament during the
first six months of 1951 a French

t





Information was contained in
the report from French Defence
Minister Jules Moch on conver-
sations which he and Finance
Minister Maurice _Petsche had
with top American officials in
Washington,

Moch had talked with high
American officials including Dean
Acheson, Secretary of the Treas-
ury John W. Snyder, and Secre-
tary of Defence General George
C. Marshall.

At meetings they had discussed
means of financing France’s
rearmament plan and solving the
problems of her 1951 budget.

The credit of £71,000,000 may
be used either for the purchase
of material in the dollar zone, or
for financing the manufacture
in France of material provided
for by the French rearmament
rogramme.

" Provision for American mater-
jal under the Atlantic eee
Military Aid Programme wou
add a fusion £17,000,000 to this
credit, Minister of information
Albert Gazier said after a coun-
ci] meeting. —Reuter.

“DAILY CHRONICLE”
MANAGER DIES

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Oct. 18.
Cc. N. Delph, Daily Chronicle
Manager, died in Port-of-Spain
today. A special plane coming
from Trinidad on Thursday brings
the body home.



Minister was informea]

The South Koreans _ spear-
heading a drive for Pyongang
seized an airfield and claimed to
have pressed on into the “main
parw” of the Communist capital

Br' ish and United State:
Forces advancing swiftly south
against stiffening opposition were
also expected in the city to-night.
American Seventh Cavalry Regi-
ment vanguard of this southern
advance were last reported about
10 miles off the capital. They
had taken the lead from the
British Commonwealth Divisio
which had advanced 40 miles ir
24 hours.

Military sources here did not
expect heavy fighting in Pyong-
yang. “The Communist are on
the run”, they said.

Reuter.



Jap Courts Given
Full Responsibility

TOKYO, Oct. 18.

General Douglas MacArthur
announced today that from
November 1, the Japanese courts
will be free to try the United
Nations citizens in criminal cases.

On that date the Government
will assume responsibility for
exercising criminal jurisdiction in-
cluding power of arrest over the
United Nations citizens in Japan
with (he éxception of the occupa-
tion staff, the announcement said.

MacArthur’s action was the
result of a decision adopted by the
Far Eastern Commission in
Washington on September 21.
Alva Cirpeter, Chief of the Legal
Section of General MacArthur’s
Headquarters said that the action
ane “an expression of faith in the
egal, judicial and police institu-
tions that the Japanese police have
adopted and represents a firm be-
lief in the ability of the Japanese
Government to accept and execute
that responsibility impartially
fairly and with justice.

The rights of any United Nations
national detained by Japanese
authorities will be protected by
several provisions .

While confined to prison or
awaiting trial the United Nations
national will be permitted to com-
municate with his country’s diplo-
n:atic mission in Japan.

A representative of the mission
may intercede for and protect the
rights of the arrested national.

No capital or life sentence im-
posed by the Japanese Court on
the United Nations national may
be executed without confirmation
of the Allied Suprerne Com-
mander.—Reuter.

NOT A BONE BROKEN

LONDON, Oct, 18.

The sole survivor from yester-
day’s plane crash near London in
which 28 died, escaped without
breaking a bone, X-rays showed
today.

The survivor, Steward J.
McKissick was thrown over a
100 yards when a crippled British
European Airways Dakota crashed
into a sub-urban garden at Mill
Hill North London and burst into

flames.
—Reuter.





War Spy Story Told
In Parliament

Valet Photographed Documents

LONDON, October 18.

Foreign Minister Bevin today blamed Britain’s war-
time Ambassador to Turkey for letting some of the biggest
secrets of World War II fall into the hands of the Germans.
He confirmed in Parliament the most extraordinary spy
story of the war — the photographing of top secret docu-

ments by the Ambassador’s
Germans.

Govt. Rejects
Rubber Proposal

LONDON, Oct, 18.



British Government to-day re-

jected a proposal that it should ban

all future exports of rubber to

Russia and Communist controlled

countries until Communist guerilla
activities in rubber producing

Malaya had ceased.

Conservative Sir Jocelyn Lucas
made the proposal in the House
of Commons but Colonial Secre-
tary James Griffiths said he could

not accept it —Reuter.

JAMAICA VILLAGE
SUBMERGED

KINGSTON, JAMAICA, Oct. 18.
Flooded underground



depths varying from 18 to 50 feet
All the village livestock

streams
submerged the entire village of
Cave Valley, 80 miles from King-
ston in a few minutes. The 150 in-
habitants escaped in boats to high
ground as the waters rose on Sun-
day night to cover the village to

was

valet who sold the films to the

Among the secrets were refer-
ences to
Allied invasion
Europe.

of

Until to-day doubt had been
thrown on a story which was told
in. a book named
by Ludwig
Moyzisch, a Viennese who worked
in the German Embassy in Ankara.

The Conservative member, Wil-
liam Shepphard asked Mr. Bevin
inquiry had taken
place into the irpident and what
issued to
prevent such a thing happening

iast month
“operation cincero”

today if an

instructions had been

again.

Mr. Bevin replied that

Germans.

ments.
“New instructions
measures taken to prevent
recurrence.”’ (Britain’s Ambé
ador in Ankara at the time
|Sir Hugh Knatchbull

drowned in a lake of flood water. 'now retired).—Reuter.




























“operation overlord”—
Northwest

the
Ambassador’s valet succeeded in
photographing highly secret docu-
ments and selling the films to the
He added “he would
not have been able to do this if
the Ambassador had conformed to
regulations governing secret docu-

have been
issued to all concerned and other
such
3~

Hughert

Doctors |

Condemn —
Mercy Killing

!
NEW YORK, Oct. 18. |

_The World Medical Associa-
tion, after a keen debate here
Fas voved to condemn mercy

killings (euthanasia).

Dr. Gregg af Britain said that
many doctors at some time had!
used drugs to speed the death!
ef incurable patients suffering |
freat pain.

But Dr. Marcel Poumailloux of |
France declared: “I lost my own!
mother by a terrible cancer
lasting for weeks and weeks, ana
none of my colleagues thought of |
shortening her life to alleviate!
her suffering. |

He said that euthanasia would
“open the door to all possible |
crimes and criminal practices ”



—



The resolution which was
passed called euthanasia “con-)|
trary to the public interest anc}
to medical principles as wel] as)
to natural and civil rights.” |

It recommended that national ;
medical associations in each;
country should “condemn the!
practice of euthanasia under any
circumstances.”

Israel proposed that Western
German doctors should not be)
admitted to the Association be-|
cause of the “inhuman experi-
ments” practiced in Germany
during the war.

The charge was made by Dr.
Emil Adire of Jerusalem who
said he did not object to the}
organisation having relations with
German doctors, but that there
should be a “probation time”
before they are admitted to|
membership. }

—Reuter.

Gilkes ‘Walks
Over’ Trinidad

AT CHESS

(From Our Own Corresponaent)
GEORGETOWN, B.G., Oct. 18.
The Intercolonial Chess tourna-
ment got underway on Tuesday
night at Woodbine Hotel and at
the close of play Trinidad and
Barbados had 1% points and Bri-





poo Guigna ape. BOs... F B.
ilies, Barba won
by eae from Pratt, ‘tha

Trinidad captain,

Frank Ogle, B.G, captain, lost
to W. S. Quashie of Trinidad.
G. O. E. Barker of B.G, beat his
team mate Frank Osborne.

H. O. Walton of Barbados drew
with F, E. Brassington of Trini-
dad,

The tournament was formally
opened by His Excellency Sir
Charles Woolley on Monday night,
the Governor making the first
move in the informal exhibition
by J. Quashie of Trinidad and
Frank Osborne of B.G. H. Mc-
Shine of Trinidad and C. B. Gilkes
of Barbados also gave an exhibi-
tion.



GOVERNMENT
WINS AGAIN

LONDON, Oct. 18.
The British Labour Government
seored a 12-vote victory over
Winston Churchill’s Conservative
opposition in Parliament tonight.
It defeated a Conservative chal-
lenge on its running of the
nationalised transport industry—
which made a loss of 20 million
sterling last year.
—Reuter.

a
ARMIE'S HEADLINE





IN BRITALN at the invitation of the British Council,
the Olowo of Owo,

Alaiycluwa Olagbeg,
Nigeria, acompanied by his
Zoo and is seen feeding on



FOOD FOR PENGUIN





uerillas Mass
‘Attack On Langson|

Sa)
a

the Oba
principal town of Western

wife and councillors visited the London
e of the Penguins.

Express.

For

Civilian Residents Evacuated

PARIS, Oct. 18.

VIETMINH GUERILLAS, after occupying the French

frontline fortress
ing today for an

————.

SPORTS
WINDOW

WATER POLO
THIS afternoon at the Barba-
dos Aquatic Club,
meet Flying Fish in their re-
play K.O. fixture. Thig match
Was unfinished. last week and
this afternoon’s enco inter
mises to be another
match,



Snappers

pro-
thrilling

Before this
feams will play a
match, in preparatior
naad tour

lay begins at 5 Pom. A Sil-
ver Collection will be taken
between these two matches

Referee

match two girls’

practice
for the

this afternoon
Mr. Archie Clarke ; 2
rennin!

26,000 Dockers
Strike In Australia

MELBOURNE, Oct 18,
26,000 dock workers today tied
up every port in Australia in a
24 hours cost of living strike,
The strike, first move in the
Labour Party’s campaign against
rising prices launched yesterday
in Sydney, delayed 246 ships and
cost shipowners £100,0%0 Aus-
tralian.

Victoria was without rai] ser-
vices for the third day in
succession because of the strike
by railway guards to back
demands for wage increases,

In Melbourne 500 firemen
carried their “pushbutton strike”
into its third week with no sign
of settlement, The men are
striking against a rule forcing!
them to press a button every ten |
minutes while on duty. |

—Reuter. |





Dondang

r attack on Langson,

French defence post guarding the China road.
einai neces eo ts

formation

were reported

chief

mass-
remaining

The French evacuation of 75

; year old stone fortress of Dong-

dang, fifth bastion to be aban-
doned within a monvn, had left
the way open for a direct attack
on Langson, 10 miles away.

Langson’s civilian residents
have already been evacuated
and the French were not expect-
ed to hold it.

The French National Assem-
bly’s defence Committee to-day
rejected the Communist propo-

sal that Government should open
talks with Dr, Ho Ch Minh
Russian recognised leader

France’s leading military svra-
tegist Eral Alphonse Juin and
‘ean Elourneau Minister for the

Associated Srates who flew into
Saigon yesterday, continued
tuiks invo the early hours of
this. morn ng on the border
situation.

Their discussions with local
military and political leaders
were believed to involve big
strategical «lecis ons and the re-
grouping of French forces now
holding vhe area,

They were expected to leave
siurtly by plane to study the
berder situation on the spot

Albert Vazier, Minister of In-
said in Paris to—day
that the French High Command
was proceeding with the metho-
dical withdrawal of isolated
forces on the northern border of
China with the aim of regroup-
ing them and occupying 4 posi-

tion protected against encircle-
ment

Informed Paris sources said
that 80,000 members of the

French Unon forces were ex-
pected to dig in about 80 miles
3 uth of the mountainous front-
icy region defending a line,
one point, only 20 miles north of
Hanoi the capital itself.
—Reuter.

at

| Archdeacon Accuses U.K.
Of Complete Indifference

In West Indies

(From Our Own Correspondent)

TLM. The King

| Congratulates

| ‘Trinidad
| inida
| LONDON, Oct. 18.
| King George the Sixth has
|Sent a message to the Trinidad
and’ Tobago Legislative Council
| congratu'ating the colony on its
|; “major advance in constitutional
development.”

In the message which will be

|} read to the first session of the
| new Legislative Council te-
|} morrow the King said: “I wish

to convey to my people of Trini-
dad and Tobago an expression of
my sincere satisfaction at this
major advance in the constitu-
Yional development of the colon:
The inauguration of a new
constitution affords great oppor-
tunities It also imposes great
responsibilities on the Legisla-
ture and people alike. I have
watched with close interest and
sympathy the manner in which
my people of the colony have now
availed themselves of the in-
ereasing opportunities for partici-



pation in the work of the Gov-
ernment, and ‘the election has
shown that their interest ir
political affairs continues to

inerease,
I am confident that their repre-

sentatives on this Council and
those who are chosen to share
as members of the Executive

Council the heavy responsibility of
Government will not fail the peo-
ple of these islands and that they
will continue to advance the good
name and prosperity of the colony
whose well being in every sphere is
my deep and abiding concern,”
—Reuter,

125 M.P.H. Winds

Sweep Miami

MIAMI, Florida, Ocb, 18,

A vicious tropical hurricane
slammed Miami with 125-mile an
hour winds early on Wednesday
then whirled on up Florida.

A 70-mile strip of the resort
area including the cities, of Holly-
wood Fort Lauderdale, Pompano
and Boca Ration lay in its path.
The rich Indian River citrus
section was not far to the nortn.

oO. D. Henderson, Miami
Safety Director said that he wi!l
not be surprised if property
damage reaches or
$2,000,000

Henderson made two general
‘ours of the debris littered city
and said: If it is bad all over
as it is in those parts I saw, it
may easily reach that figure, Five
persons were injured but no
deaths were reported. Electricity
was off in most of the city. There
was no water in many sections,

Phone lines were down in the
area where 500,000 people live.

Fort Lauderdale, raked by 100-
mile an hour winds was piungea
into darkness, Some damage was
reported to roofs windows and
shrubbery. Reports from Davis,
just west of Fort Lauderdale said
that the farming community was
hard hit.—OC.P,

Argentine Ambassador
Calls On Bevin

| LONDON, Oct. 18.
Carlos Hogan, Argentine Am-
bassador, called on Ernest Bevin,
British Foreign Secretary, to-day
at his own request

It was believed that he discuss-
ed with Bevin the deadlock in
Argentine meat shipments to Bri-





tain which has persisted since
Argentina suspended shipments
on July 21 after failure to reach
agreement on prices,

E, J. Joint, British Commercial

ed last week that the Argentine
was asking too much for meat,
Britain has agreed to pay £90
per ton but the Argentine gov-
ernment has proposed £140 per
ton with provisional shipments at
£97 per ton.—Reuter.

Minister in Buenos Aires, “a





Cuke Awarded £3,000 Damages

A Court of Common Pleas Jury
yesterday awarded Arden St. C.
Cuke, Manager of Bulkeley’s
Dairies Ltd. £3,000 general dam-
ages, and £4,3.4. special damages
against Chifford Skinner, Man-
ager-Owner of Colleton Planta-
tion, St, Lucy at the end of the
retrial of an action brought by
Cuke.

The action arose out of a
collision between a car driven by
Cuke and one driven by Skinner
on Colleton Hill on November 7,
1947. As a result of the collision
Cuke’s right knee cap was broken
and according to medical evidence
a 35 to 40 per cent. permanent
disability is very likely.

There was an original trial
before the Court of Common
Pleas last year at the end of
which Skinner appealed to the
West Indian Court of Appeal.
That Court ordered a retrial of
the case. In the original trial,
the jury awarded Cuke £1,500

general damages and £4.3.4. spe-
cial damages.

Counsel for Cuke was Mr
D. H. L. Ward, instructed
Messrs Hutchinson & Banfield
Skinner was represented by I



W. W. Reece, K.C., instructed by
Messrs. Carrington & Sealy.

3 Days’ Retrial

Hearing of the retrial began
Monday and continued on Tues-
day. When hearing was resumed
yesterday His Honour the Chief
Judge Sir Allan Collymore
summed up to the jury. The Chief
Judge awarded to Cuke the costs
of the retrial and the original
trial and certified that it was a
proper case to have been tried
by a special jury.

The Chief Judge opened his
summing up by referring to what
he called “an unfortunate refer-
ence appearing in a section of the
Press this morning which should
not have been made.”

Although the matte which had
been mentioned might have been
before the Court previously, he
said, particular care had been
taken that the judgment of tt
West Indian Court of Appeal t:
which the case 1t for retrail
should not be hed, and t
Press had abi
that it should not t











concerned
appeal
before
Appeal.
case on the facts before you
subject to what we know — tha
there was a trial in the Court o'
Common Pleas previously
that the case
West Indian Court of Appeal.

or with what
the West Indian Court o





with the grounds of
happened

You are here to try the

and
did go before the

was the effective cause of the
f accident, and so he was the real
cause of his own undoing. :

. bhe Chief Judge then explained
f as failure to take care.
to take the care

ealled for.”



To Shipping



exceeds |

and that the plaintiff’s negligence

t the legal meaning of “negligence”
“Failure
which the cir-
cumstances of the particular case
The degree of care

i is se Ww " f care which one

You will therefore disabuse was the degree o
your minds of anything that you would expect a reasonable a
may have previously heard in to exercise in the particular cir-
connection with the matter and cumstances of the particular case.

start afresh.”

Case Before Jury
The Chief Judge then

put to
the jury the case for the plaintiff,

Next point made by the Chief
Judge

was that they should not

allow sympathy for the injured

their
not say

party to warp judgment.

They should

that the
plaintiff had suffered and there-

LONDON, Oct. 18.

i" IS impossible to get a booking to the West
Indies by sea before February 1951, and even at
that date there is a long waiting list. This was what

Archdeacon Fr. Banks

of Trinidad was told when

he applied for a passage to one of the leading ship-
ping companies in this country, and he reveals
these facts in a letter to “The Times’’ today.

“Does Britain want her colonies or not?” he asks.

we

do not wish to engage in politics, but I am very interested
in transport, which is looked upon by the Government as
a first essential within the United Kingdom, but outside
(within the Empire) apparently it could not matter less.”

U.K. Will Buy

More Sugar
From W.I.

THE United Kingdom is pre-
pered to buy 30,000 tons more
sugar a year from the British

West Indies at guaranteed prices
irom 1953—57,

The Advocate was told yester-
day that the total West Indian

allocation will now be raised from

640,000 tons to 670,000 tons a year,

The increase is due to the fact
of New

that the Government
Zealand have informed the Gov-
ernment of the United Kingdom
of their desire to participate until
1957 in the Commonwealth Sugar

Agreement. The United Kingdom
Government have expressed to
the New Zealand Government

great satisfaction at this decision
and have informed the Govern-
ments of other participati#g Com-
monwealth countries accordingly.

Under the arrangements pro-
posed by the New Zealand Gov-
ernment the Minister of Food will
continue to supply until the end
of 1952 all New Zealand raw sugar
requirements at prices to be
negotiated each year the
Commonwealth Agreement,
Thereafter from 1953 to 1957 in-
clusive New Zealand has agreed
to purchase 75,000 tons a year of
Commonwealth sugar at Common-

wealth guaranteed prices, New
Zealand will purchase the re-
mainder of her requirements

during this period in the world
market

The United Kingdom Govern-
ment have accordingly informed
participating countries that if pro-
lucers so desire the United King-
dom will be prepared to increase
by 75,000 tons, i.e. from 1,568,000
tons to 1,643,000 tons the amount
of Sugar the United Kingdom has
undertaken to buy each year at
guaranteed preies from 1953—
1957



C.O,L. STEADY

The Cost-of-living figure has
not risen since June.

The figure for September shows
a drop of one point less than May
when it was 242.

—_—_—


























Archdeacon Banks recalls that
two years ago a Commission of
Inquiry reported what was needed
to alleviate the West Indies’ ship-
ping position. But, he says, noth-
ing has been done.

Hundreds of people wanting to
travel to and from the British
Caribbean colonies find themselves
stranded because of lack of ship-
ping space.

Yet, if the question of remov-
ing troops ever arises, it is always
possible to find a ship from some-
where or other.

Inadequate Boats

He also points out that before
the war there were about a dozen
regular passenger steamships on
the U.K.-West Indies run, where-
as today there are “one or two
very inadequate boats running at
long intervals”.

“Such an approach by respon-
sible authorities in this country
is indefensible,” concludes Arch-
deacon Banks, “and to the West
Indian can only appear to be one
of complete indifference.”

Footnote: Checking up with
some of the steamship companies
serving the West Indies from tha
United Kingdom, our correspond-
ent was told: “The position is
hopeless. It is a source of worry
‘to us who are interested in the
West Indies, but there are just not
enough ships to go around. New
ones are expensive to build and
unremunerative to run. That is
al! there is to it.”

SPAT: ON ALTAR

CAGLIARI, Sardinia, Oct. 18.

A Sardinian Court has gaoled a
Communist for 10 months for
spitting on the altar of a local
Church.

The Communist, Giovanni Pud-
du was stated to have forced his
way into the village Church of
Bacu Abis, after the parish priest
had refused to accept a Com-
munist godfather at the baptism
of his child.—Reuter.





TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
Ring 3113 Day or Night,
pe THE ADVOCATE

PAYS FOR NEWS.



MEET
THE CHALLENGE

THE

OF

UNKNOWN TO-MORROW

WITH A

POLICY OF

ASSURANCE

WITH

THE BARBADOS MUTUAL LIFE

ASSURANCE

J. N. WALCOTT )

SOCIETY.

+

Canvassing

DENIS ATKINSON § Representatives

C. K. BROWNE

Cuke, and that for ,defendant, fore he was entitled to damages.

Skinner. The plaintiff's case was On the other hand, sympathy or

that he had suffered personal no sympathy, if they were satis-

njuries and pain, and that from fied that he had made out his

those injuries he had not com- case it would be their duty to

jletely recovered award such damages as they felt
He was alleging that the acci- should be awarded.

lent was due to the negligence of ‘

the defendant in driving his motor Assessing Damages

ar If they came to deal with the
The efence 1 t of damage the vould
c t : nd tha the general
e yr 7

he pl ff On page 8

Secretary

—————————E=E=Ee=Ee=eE=eE=E=E=E=ES=S=S=E=E—llEEEEEeEeaeEeEeEEeeel_—e SS
PAGE TWO

4

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Caub ¢

ON. E. P ARROWSMITH,

Administrator of Dominica
who arrived from. Dominica on
Tuesday, left for Trinidad yester-
day afternooft by B.W.1.A.

On Long Leave
N Barbados ofice affain for his
long leave is ‘Mr. Will Hah-
schell who arrivéd a little over
a week ago from Africa.
Will is in the Government
Service in the Gold Coast.

Delay—Due Bad Weather
RRIVING from Trinidad
yesterday afternoon by
B.W.1.A. intransit from the U.S.,
were Mr. and Mrs. Milton R. Cato.
Mr. and Mrs. Cato are en route to
St. Vincent where Mr. Cafo is a
Barrister.

Before leaving for St. Vincent
however, they will spend a few
days with Mr. Cato’s brother, Dr.
A. S. Cato at “Arndale”, Govern-
ment Hill,

They should have been in Bar-
bados several days ago, but bad
weather in Jamaica delayed their
atrival.

Husband Coming Shortly
RS. R. DULIEU and her young
son John arrived from St.

Lucia on Tuesday to spend a
holiday with Mrs. Dulieu's parents,
Maj. and Mrs. A. De V. Chase
Mr. Dulieu is also expected up for
& holiday shortly,

Enroute From England
R. EMILE DE LISLE of St.
Kitts who has been in Eng-

land for the past two and a half
months, visiting his wife and
children arrived here by the
Geologist a few days ago, and
yesterday he left for St. Kitts by
B.W,LA.

Here For Three Weeks
EV. CANON T. L. S. GOUGH
of St. Patrick’s Rectory in
Grenada arrived from that colony
yesterday by B.W.I1.A to spend
three weeks’ holiday in Barbados.
He is staying at the Hotel Royal.
Fireworks and Parties
UITE a “colony” of Trinidad-
ians are at present staying at
the Hotel Royal. Yesterday after-
neon, two of them returned to
Trinidad by B.W.LA They were
Mr. J6e Herrera and Mr. Conrad
O'Brien . Two weeks ago they
arrivéd for a holiday with Mr.
David Millar who is staying on
until Saturday



These three have thoroughly
enjoyed their holiday and have
been very entertaining company
to the mé@ny friends they have

made here.

What with parties, tours around
the island and “firework displays,”
Joe and Conrad reluctantly said
goodbye to Davitt yesterday after-
noon at Seawell.

Barbadian In Korea
Ce heard yesterday, that
Harold Bourne, now a Lieu-
tenant in the Canddian Army, has
gone to Korea as a member of a
Canadian Expeditionary _ Force
His mission is to train troops in
Korea in Tank Warfare.
Harold is the son of Mr. and

Mrs. Ernest Bourne of 9th Ave.
Belleville.

Y allowing all the unhealthi-

est Labour candidates to get
in unopposed at the next General
Election, the Conservatives might
stand a chance of defeating their
opponents in a_ division soon
afterwards. But the. Labour
people might be astute enough
to allow very sick Conservative
eandidates to get in unopposed,
and so defeat this cunning
manoeuvre. Meanwhile speakers
would do well to get the doctors,
nurses, and ambulance men
their side, and canvassers should
concentrate on making sure of
their votes, for it is they who
will decide the future of party
politics in this country. A strike
of ambulance drivers might bring:
down a Government. =

‘Yes, we have no

Bahamas’ *

The holiday camp has come to
stay,

; (Weekly paper.)
* Disraeli’s famous reply when,

§F9599555551993996










NEW STOCK

BYMIN AMARA HALIBORANGE
LIQUID PARAFFIN SYRUP OF FIGS

and

RUSKS—Baby’s First Solid Food
Also a variety of CIGARS

a

LAWN MOWERS—12” & 14” ..
RAKES ......

SHEARS for Hedges
HAND FORKS . ns
GARDEN TROWELS

i
COTTON

SEEGER OIE



=

BY THE WAY

on ff

LOOK AFTER
YOUR GARDEN
0 and LAWN

SECATEURS ....
HOSE NOZZLES .
MENDERS...... bs
UNIONS .... DUNG s shes:

also V.G.M.—for manuring of



THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY LTD.

ARTIE'S MEADLINE |



Pew
7a 8 . Mate ‘
buy w+ mal the Dis i
bound in co tb) Gamin very

shorty"

Arrives On Wednesday

HE S.S, COLOMBIE is due to

arrive here on Wednesday Oct.
25th. This will be the first time
since the 29th of January 1948
that this ship has called at Ba*-
bados.

At that time she Was still a
hospital ship. Now, reconverted
inte a luxury linér she arrives on
Wednésday at 8 am. with the
Head of the Compagnie Generale
Transpflantique, Mr. Jéan Marie
and his wife.

Also on bard are Mr. Lanier,
Secretary General of the French
line, Mrs. Lanier, Mr. Ramorony,
Deputy of the Merchant Marine
Committee of France, and. Mr.
Abal Durand, President of the
Merchant Marine of France.

Shortly after the ship arrives,
Mr. Marie and party will land at
the Baguage Warehouse, where
they will be inet. by the méthbers
of the Counell of the Chamber of
Commerce, They will afterwards
call at Government House.

In the afternoon, there will be
a luncheon party on board, to
which ys rele the Gov-
ernor, Government Officials and
prominent business men have
been invited.

Postponed

— Queen’s College Old Girls
were to have held a meeting
this afternoon, but they tell me
that it has had to be postponed.





By

during the war of 1878, Gladstone
asked him if it was true that the
Italians had invaded the Bahamas.
The reply became the refrain of
a popular song, with “bandanas”
substituted for “Bahamas,” after
the 1914-18 war.

Anti-Faseist floor-polish

HE visit of an English char-
woman to Moscow, to study
Russian methods _ of lishing
oors, is a gratuitous insult to
Snibbo, Snibbo, by the way, is
the only thing Stalin has not, so
far, been credited with inventing.
he charwoman and her party
are the “guests of the women’s
Anti-Fascist Committee,” so they
will probably return with the
doctrinally correct anti-Fascist
method of polishing floors, It
would be fun if Snibbo were to

be eer into an _ ideological
debate,

The new wines made by Snibbo
differ, of course, from the floor-

OF




Vegetables & Flower Gardens

Managing Direétor Returns
. GEORGE DE NOBRIGA,
Managing Director of the

Barbados Telephone Co., returned

to Trinidad yesterday afternoon by

B.WAL.A. a short visit.
Visited Kaite
. MARIE TA R of
Belleville retiifned from

Grenada yesterday morning by
B.W.1.A.

Three weeks ago, she left Bar-
bad by the “Lady Nelson”,
touching at St. Vincent, Grenada
and Trinidad on her way to B.G.
There, along with somé of the
othér round trippers, shé visited
the Kaiteut Falls.

On the return trip, she stopped
in at Grenada, staying for a few
days at the Santa Maria Hotel.

Board Of Control Meeting
M® F. A. C. CLAIRMONTE

and Mr. Teddy Hoad left
yesterday afternoon by B.W.1.A.
for dad to attend a meeting
of the West Indian Cricket Board
of Control,

Going To Live In Véhezuela
R. AND MRS. KENNETH

EDWARDS who wWefe mar-
ried here recently left yesterday
afternoon by B.W.1.A. for Trini-
dad. This morning they will fly
to Venezuela where Mr. Edwards
wori:s with the Shell Oi) Co. in
Maracaibo. Mrs. Edwards ‘is the
former Patsy Haynes,

Just Depends
ALLOWEEN is just around
the corner, and'I hear that
at the Y.M.P.C’s Halloween
Dance on October 28th there will
be a “real” Witch on hand to tell
fortunes in a specially prepared
Witch’s Tent, in which she will
— your future in her crystal
ball.

Whether at some time during

the night she will climb aboard
her broomstick and fly away, will
no doubt depend on the amount
of liquor that is consumed!
Honeymoon Couple Leave
FTER spending their honey-.

moon ai Crystal Waters,
orthing, Mr. and Mrs, R.
Thomas of Trinidad, returned
home over the week-end by
B.W.LA .

Mr. Thomas is an employee of

B.W.1.A, Ltd, Port-of-Spain,
First Visit

AYING her first visit to Bar-

bados is Miss Pearl Colthrust
of Trinidad. She arvived on
onday by B.W.1.A. for a month’>
holiday and is staying at Crystal

aters, Worthing.

‘Miss Colthrust is Secretary to
the Radiologist of the Colonial
Hospital, Port-of-Spain.

Back From U.S. Trip
TER fivé months in the U.S.
Mr. and Mrs. F. A, Hoyos
arrived Via Trinidad by B.W.LA
yesterday morning.

Mr, and Mrs, Hoyos’ arrival
was also delayed due toy bad
weather in Jamaica. They were

expected here by their families
since Sunday.

Mr. Hoyos is a Master at the
Lodge School.

BEACHCOMBER

polish. There are no canned
grapes in the polish. At least, I
think not,

Heigh-ho!

COMPLAINT from someone
} worn ta (tha bone bn the
treadmill of. what used to be
called “The life of pleasure” re-
nded me of the saying of a
at French lady of the eigh-
teenth century: “Life would be
bearable, it weren't for
pleasures,”

For gourmets

HAT is it that “makes food

flavours sing”? It is mono-
sodium glutumate, “the unique
basic seasoning.” It turns a stew
into an ode, a hash into a sonnet,
a mixed leftover into an epic.
And it is the latest discovery of
the International Minerals and
Chemical Corporation of Chicago.

if its



PLAZA oistin

“BRIDE OF VENGEANCE"

FRIDAY 20th and continu
“DAUGHTER OF

eesti
MIDNITE MATINEE (SAT.) 2ist — Two New Pictures

and

| Cyelist At 91

LONDON,

Miss Eleanor Wigan of Luddes.
down Village, Kent County is 9),
but she is still a keen cyclist.

Every day — rain or fine-~
this tall white-haired and fragile.
looking old lady mounts heg
bicyde for the tén mihutes us-
hill ride to the chufth where she
is wafden.

Miss Wigan is iifipatient with
people coriterned ovér her
safety.

“And why shouldn't I cycle,”
she said, “I feel as fit as a fiddle.’

When she was eighty, Miss
Wigan thought nothing of sevéfa)
hours cycling over the local Nortn
Kent Downs.

“I’ve been at it for 40 years —
or maybe 60, One gets muddled
with at my age,” said Miss
Wigan.

As church warden, Miss Wigan
is in sole charge of churcr
accounts, On Sundays, she rin:s
the church bells. Every day she
does qerdening or = atran,
flowers in the church and
plays the organ.

Apart from short vacations
spent abroad, Miss Wigan has
lived all her life in the same tiny
parish of 200 people. But she has
never | and. has qo
regrets. She said:

“I’ve been happy in this village
and I love it as much now as i
ever did. .I don’t believe Luddes -
down has chan lots since !
was a girl.’"—I.N.8.

Rupert _

=

ten









sae <
Ruper nto the boat, ‘* What

a tiny thing tt iss’ he thinks. ** It's
n smaller ¢



© 9 pam

and the Castaway —29



han the one Koko

ad; and the sides are so thin, if

I'm not careful | shall
through it.
meant
time."*

é coons laugh and
chatter

more loudly than ever a:

CROSSWORD

|








cross
1. With which you papaic. not even
try to speak. (5, 4)

1. Candidate perhaps. (8)

11. If it was this, it 13 Across. (8)
12. Well, this ts praise, (4)

18. Hones differently. (5)

14, The way. (4)

it Garments. (5)

0,

1

5.

. fyepodition. (4)
. Shy tittie SOEs. (3)
20. It deals with alien lands, (2)
. This land js able for a start,
. jean dole provides a drink.
\e brace. (5
» Sound a different note. (4)

Down

8 human practice—an animal,
“Lott reposition. (4
Covered. pi ieee
be in this 18 topical. (7)
mess i#a mess. (6)
laris (8)
Nursed, shall we say? (65,
The spice of adventure.
(4)

bit

is}

apni
SeSSemeonsex -



tay will accept «

* )
22. Without — (s)

i t Saturday's ugsy . = AE TOS>
rs Wolitasue: 6. ‘Aversions: “Tamerlan:
14, 50, 15, Utter; 15. Cigar, 18 Rass
ness. 4) Pekin: 22 Ale: ¥%





DDL DLL DPLEPLLDPLPLPLLLLD

LAST TWO SHOWS TODAY
5 and 8.30 P.M.

“TORNADO” (Paramount)

ing Daily at 5 & 8.40 p.m.
ROSIE O'GRADY"

Color by Techbicolor with June Haver
Jimmy akely in
j “SONG OF T SIERRAS”



——— Se
SSS
FS



with Paul HENREID

FRIDAY, SAT., SUN, 8.30
) Monogram’s Exciting Action Western
) “STAMPEDE” (Sepia-Tone) Rod







TO-NIGHT at 8.30

‘REVUEDEV

Music by the Police
Capt. C. E. Raison,

All Persons who have booked seats for To-night’s
Show and have not paid for them are requested to

take them up by 12 noon
not be

BOX OFFICE

From‘8.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 1.30 to 3.30 p.m.
Prices :— Orchestra and Boxes $1.50; House $1.00:

Balcony 72¢

ee 5



TOMORROW FRIDAY
MATINEE 5 and NIGHT 8.30 p.in.

MRS. A. L. STUART Presents Her SCHOOL
OF DANCING in

Johnny Mack Brown

‘OVERLAND TRAIL”



Garden) ST. JAMES

iy Last Show TONITE 8.30
N “CONSPIRATORS” and “CLOAK and DAGGER” (Warnes)

with Gary COOPER

p.m, MAT. SUN, 5 p.m.

!

Canieron, Johniiy Mack Brown

ILLE 1950

Band Directed by
A.R.C.M., M.B.E.

after this time they will
held

OPEN DAILY

. Reserved

ut my foor
It’s evidently only
to hold one person at a





B.B.C. RADIO
PROGRAMME

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18,
7 am. The News; 7.10 a.m. News
nalysis 7.5 a.m Sporting Record;
2.1m. Music Magazine; 7.45 a.in.
ally Speaking; 8 a.m. Fyom the
als 2.10, am
Par 8.15 c.m. Nancy Weir; 8.30
am. Books to Read; 845 a.m, Film
Review; 9 a.m. Close Down; 12 noon
The News; 12.10 p.m. News Anaiysis;
12.15 p.m Programme Parade; 12.18
p.m. Listeners’ Choice; 1 p.m
ald Barry SpedKing; 1,15 p.m
Newsreel; 1.30 p.m Ray’s a
2 p.m, The News; 2.10 p.m
news from Britain; 2.15 p.m Sports
Review; 2.30 p.m. Ring up the Cur-
tain; 3.30 p.m Round Britain Qyiz
4 tom. The News; 4.10 p.m. The gativ
Service; 4.15 p.m. Bligh of the Boun-
ty; 4.45 p.m. The Cathedral Organs;
5 p.m Listeners’ Choice; 5.15 p.m
rogratume Parade; 5.30 p.m, BBC
Vartety Orchestra; 6 p.m. Gerna Gil
mour; 6.15 p.m. Merchant Navy N-ws-
letter; 6.20 p.m. Educating Archie; +
The News; 7.10 p.m. News Ana
7.15 p.m. We see Britain; 7.45
p.m. Generally Speaking; 6 p.m. Radio
Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. United Nations
Nevort; 8.20 p.m
Week; 8.20 p.m
ir@:; 845 pom
Treason on Trial;
News #10 p.m. From the Edito-
rials; 10.15 p.m. Vanessa Lee; 10.45
p.m. Specia! Dispatch; 11 p.m. What
# Londoner Doesn't Know
Berm 7 por

HUMMING ONLY

Fifty girls went on strike at a
Belfast bakery because their boss
refused to let them sing while

1950



de

Ger-
Rad.e
Laugh:
Home

p.m
Ivsis;

Composer of the
Gerald Barry speak -
Think on these Things
10 p.m. Tne

they worked.

But the srike was soon settled.
In the future, the girls will be
allowed to hum.—LN.8.



I'm

“ Well,
doing what they want,’ he says,
“but what shall I find on that

they wave goodbye.

island ?"’ The boar moves easily.
Then, half way across, some dark
shapes cut the water, and under-

neath are the forms of great fish.
“Good gracious.” he gasps:
** shatks |"









My Foolish Heart
Ole Man River
Roses of Readdy
It Isn’t Fair

In The Mood

hee.

THIS

call

this
the 00 question.
morally, socially,
your life away

your Covntry?

In other words are you a decent citizen or a potential “vagabond” or
“streetwalker”? search your conscience—examine your life carefu
this minute and see which category
don’t kid me because you will be kidding yourself.
man, followed bad company and went to Jail—became worse by associ-
ation with hardened criminals.

or sewer—and——?

But the time came and I fell in love with a beautiful girl and tried to
mend my ways, but it was too late folks.
“CRIME DOES NOT PAY” you will realize
“BAD MAN” in “THEY LIVE BY NIGHT”.
life role I portray—it’s tough—it’s rough—it’s a powerful drama of love and
tears and heartbreak, but you will get a new experience when you see
“THEY LIVE BY NIGHT” starting at ®

The GLOBE THEATRE

Friday October 20th





&



q
gq
y
q
?
gy
q

JAMES BARTON-CUDDLES SAKALL.
_ GENE NELSON-DAVID BUTLER,

SEPP SOO

LAST SHOWING TODAY 4.45 and 8.30

“LUXURY LINER”

Jane POWELL — Geo. BRENT — Xavier CUGAT
and

“THE SEARCH ©

Montgomery CLIFF and Wendel COREY
Aline MacMohan

CHINA DOLL RESTAURANT
SOCIETY'S RENDEZVOUS

Presents

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21ST
From 8 p.m.— 10 p.m.

“RAY NUNES”

B.G’s Radio Singing Star
in a series of favourite ballads

— including —

Little White Lies

Song of Songs

Maybe It’s Because
Sitting by My Window

Agi

Dine, Wine, and Enjoy a Delightful Program in an
atmosphere of charm and positive class

ON THE MENU

Shrimps Chow Mein
Oyster Cocktails

Dial 4692 for Reservations

The

IS NOT FOR THE OLD FOLKS

To the young men and women of this fair island home of yours, We
it Barbados, you call it Little England. As we were saying to you
young folks—you are on the threshold of life—the one
ke GOD has given you.



Are you living each day and improving yourself,
intellectually, and financially?
? Are you keeping good company or bad company? Are
you trying to live decently and making every effort to obey the laws of

LEE LFF EOS OO



THURSDAY, 19TH OCTOBER, 1950

SSS |
:
a
&









WARNER BROS.





FUN OF THE PLAY THAT
SD AND OUT-LASTED THEM ALL!

BRING YOU
OUT-LAVOHE!

—————

A New Coat of Paint . .
A New Picture

FRIDAY 20th 5 & 8.30
p.m. and Continuing



é
$
t

Pree LOIN A Ope tn POWELL. !
ELIZABETH IA W

Opening TO-MORROW (Friday)
at 2.30 and 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing DAILY 5 and 8.30 p.m.

TECHNICOLOR ;
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Commencing Friday 20th
JOAN CRAWFORD — JACK CARSON
ZACHARY SCOTT
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64.00 Question














ain









and only life on
What are you doing about life? That is

Or are you throwing

wand to
Answer truthfully—
I was a bad young

ou belong.

I got out of Jail and went down the drain—

I say with all my strength
that when you see me as the
You might not like the real



GLOBE
FRIDAY OCT. 20

PLUS
LOCAL TALENT






THURSDAY, 19TH OCTOBER, 1950 -



Korea A Glorious |

WELLINGTON, Oct. 18. 4 »
General Mark Clark, formerly \ Government
e n Commander of the American Fifth TGP From St. Paul’s ' TEL-A-VIV, Oct. 18.
e Army in Italy “ridiculed” a sug-| AT GPO. LONDON, David Ben Gurion, — Israeli
gestion that a light “warning” The much boosted 1951 Festi<| Prime Minister today told Presi-

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 18.
PRESIDENT TRUMAN, broadcasting to the

Mark Clark Blamed
For Abbey Bombing

that the decision to bomb the mon-
astery was a “tragic mistake.”
General Clark in his book “Cal-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

600 Bags Of AING WILL Ben Gurion Unable

Mail Unopened

THE ground floor oc the Steam-

at their Special Meeting. yesterday,
Mr. B. A. Weatherhead had just
spoken of

the cOngestion in the



OPEN FAIR

bers of the royal family, diplo-
mats and
government.

members of the

To Form New

office until elections could be held.
Ben Gurion’s Coalition Govern-
ment resigned last Sunday when







PAGE THREE

bomb be dropped on a Cassino ; val of Britain will be officially|dent Chaim Weizmann that he LUXURY

eye e monastery to give civilians shel-|©TS’ Warehouse on the Whar: | opened by King George making] failed to form a new Government. SMe
tering there a chance to leave which has just been given up t0) a world broadcast from the steps | Early today his caretaker Govern- e ;

l L ar is O This was stated here today by|Government by Messrs. DaCosta] of St. Paul’s Cathedral May 3. ment failed to obtain a vote of ‘ai | | KE a Sy | } AY PS
Major General Sir Howead Kip- an Co., Ltd., may be used by the}» Before the broadcast, King conacaere in Se a9 Salen : .

Ss nberger who commanded the} Post Office as a parcel department,| George and Queen Elizabeth will e House defea y vo
SAYS TRUMAN ew Zealand Second Division, in|members of the Council of the} attend a service of dedication in| to 43 the Premier’s proposal that ® LINDEN BLOSSOM BLUE HYACINTH

reply to General Clark’s assertion | Chamber the Cathedral with other mem-|a_ cabinet of seven should hold

Island meeti
said here tonight:

“General MacArthur told me about the fighting in
Korea. He described the magnificent achievements
of all United Nations forces serving under his
command. Along with soldiers of the Republic of
Korea these forces have now turned back the tide of
aggression. More fighting men are coming from

mS Pais nad hil, | be opened until there was room be the first visitors to the
the free nations all over the world. rae Scneduete responsibility ) “ie knew that the statement of| xhibition. WASHINGTON, Oct. 17.
“T am confident that these forces will soon restore seein ai oeectaninee entit’ Go insufficient space was perfectly The Thames site forms only United States scientists have
ei Italy a request for the bombing of | Te. and for the last three or four) Pl ic 7 4 ; + hae
peace to the whole of Korea. ihe Abber Mane dais the Fourth years it had been getting gradual- pM aa ghapeced, to een eee hut slanicahy Fe Shhe ct
“We Americans naturally take a special pride in the superb | Indian Division y worse. ‘fhe Government knew] tions are pl: ri : ;
. : : 7 ve 7 ‘ ‘ ¢ thi s planned for visitors all | rubber.
achievements of our own soldiers, sailors marines and air- inesthich Renter eevenae a = eer S-vekp. well-aavaiel eae Britain, According to the department of
: : ee ; er tneatil ¥ , be e yas 2 yas men. ‘They have written a glorious new page in military | MINS Nenlien'" mt “which | present tine Lue Christmas. wee] 1658 ecm a eteimates tha | agriculture. which it conducting
aoe: be Bg proud of them. = be ot by eee eae just around the corner and the] accommodation in London during | scientists said that the latest ad-
e are a proud that our and secondly, because 1t was cer-|small merchant depended on the

country was asked to furnish the

tain to be used as “keep’’ by Ger-| parcel post even more than the} campi ; , : ance
\ , , ; i? bP camping sites are being prepared | yielding strains of the rubber
First Commander of United welcomed by sections of this 4 mans offending Monte ——. big merchant. “Am I to under-}to ease the strain on hotels and | plant "bi ceale a shrub which
Nations troops. It is fortunate for | morning’s British press. It was suggested to General} stand,” said Mr. Weatherhead,} boarding houses. grows wild on the dry table lands

the world that we had the right
man for this job a man who is a
very great soldier — General
Douglas MacArthur.

Commonwealth troops and the} warning that the free world was “General Clark ridiculed that | at Christmas time? However, there are many | growing years.
ne —_ — — determined to build up its defen- | suggestion saying that if the Abbey Mr. Weatherhead said he would] critics of the scheme. Some!” The United States imports its
now have a clear run nor ‘

to Pyongyang through the eastern
coastal plain. The only natural
obstacles are a few small rivers
which branch from the Taedong
River upon which Pyongyang
stands.

“United Nations action in Korea

The Serre ane A
is of supreme importance for all} Another paper in time to VATICAN CITY, Oct. 16 Sun Rises: 5.49 a. has already establis pilo : sot Ra oe
peoples of the world. comment editorially on the speech} Pope Pius XII will address the du mates bas oe. Reported Grounded | plantings there to test new fri a ae
Rinso’s rich lather makes %

For the first time in history
nations who want peace have
taken up arms under the banner
of an International Organisation
to put down aggression. Under
that Banner of the United Nations
they are succeeding.

nation on his return from the historic Waxe
with General Douglas MacArthur,

President Truman’s San Fran-

cisco speech last night was

to Soviet “imperialism” and a

ees against further aggression.
This liberal paper referring to
the American President's four
point call to Russia added how-
ever that the appeal would have
no effect although there was
determination behind it.

—Conservative Yorkshire Post—
declared that the United States
must not be left to act alone and
that all freedom loving nations
must show they are eager and
able to share the burden of
safeguarding peace,

enlated Risk” blamed Lieutenant
General Sir Bernard Freyberg
who commanded the New Zealand
Corps in Italy for the bombing.

General Kippenberger — said:
“General Clark. says he was un-
able to change Freyberg’s opinion
and that he then personally auth-
orised the bombing.

“IT would like to say that it is
very uncommon for a Commander
who has to admit that he acquies~
eed in q course of action of whict
he did not approve, to attempt

portunity for any civilians shel-
tering in the Abbey to leave

had to be bombed it had to be
done with heavy bombs.”
—Reuter.



POPE WILL ADDRESS
RECORD GATHERING

greatest gathering of Cardinals,
Archbishops and Bishops in the
modern history of the Catholic
Church at a special assembly in
the Vatican Palace on November 8,
the Vatican announced today.
The meeting will bring together

Parcel
; Office.
| Mr, Weatherhead expressed sur-
prise that when he asked someone
at the Post Office by "phone a few

Department at the Post



of Commerce were’ told
days ago about unopened parcels,
he was told that there were 600
bags of them. His informant said
that the whole Parcel Department
was full, that certain persons in
the City had a lot of parcels in
the Department they would not
take away, and no more bags oan

“that parcels will be in the Post
Office week
small

after week
businessman. will

and the
not be
able to get his goods out to sell

suggest that some member of the
Chamber approach the Postmaster

The Weather

TO-DAY





Moon (Full) October 25
Lighting: 6.00 p.m.
High Water: 12.09 p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) nit
Total for Month to Yester-

In his broadcast the King will
leclare that the Festival of
Britain is open “throughout the
United Kingdom of Great Britain
and Nothern Ireland,”

The King and Queen will drive
to and from the Cathedral in
procession.

The exhibition buildings, in-
cluding a vast Dome of Discovery
over a 27-acre site on the south
bank of the River Thames, On
May 4, the King and Queen will

part of the Festival, the cost of] reported

the Festival A number of

The Festival—centenary of the
1851—is
Britain's

Great Exhibition of
expected to increase
income by millions of dollars,

Britons consider that money and
material spent on vhe exhibition
would be better used in housing
projects. —IN-S



Whaling Ship

BUENOS AIRES.
The Argentine maritime au-
thorities had nothing new this
morning to add to first reports
received yesterday of the ground-
ing of the 7,000 ton whaling fac-

according to these reports but th¢

the powerful orthodox religious
rt the Prime
roadening the

bloc refused to sup’
Minister's plan for
cabinet.

Before the caretaker Govern-
ment’s defeat last night Parliament
decided to authorise its Judicial
Committee to draft a law for gen-
eral elections within a fortnight

—Reuter.

U.S. Have New
Rubber Plant

that they are making

vance is the creation of new high

of Mexico and Texas.

They believe that
strains will produce about
pounds of rubber per acre in five

the new
1,200

natural rubber from the Far East
mostly from Malaya.

Scientists think that the rub-
ber plant would make a suitable
crop on some 2,000,000 acres in
the low rainfall area of Texas, to
be harvested in the fifth year.

varieties and hybrids,—Reuter.

LOOK YOUR




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It washes gently,
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sparkle. Start using Rinso today — you'll

is cca



“This is a tremendous step| The Conservative, Daily Tele-|49 Cardinals and 700 Archbishops|} day: 5.13 7 : he ~ anton pte prt get better results, easier and quicker! ‘ i
forward in an age-old struggle to| graph meanwhile claimed that/fnom all over the world who are femperature (Max 5. F. Which, Gerben. Rae. pom Ge > a> Ie
establish rule and law in the|the two central points of the}expected in Rome for proclama- Wal Geek Tey seyious, Pantory ‘pessminel. nec RINSO for all your. wash!{ yd
world. The United Nations was | President’s speech were his in-|tion of the new dogma of the ind Direction (9 a.m.) gone ashore on Cape Constance ’ — =

P 4

established here in

this very|sistence on the creation of a@|/assumption on November 1. ete ie 4 ;
building five years ago. It a “partnership of peace” with| No information was given on Wind Velocity 5 miles ship’s crew was still aneard,
founded in the hope and in the} Asiatic nations and his emyhasis}the subject of the Pope’s address hietinetel ce 4 ae
belief that mankind could have|on the programme of reconstruc-|which is expected to be of the er (9 am.) 29,866

just and lasting peace.

“Today as a result of the Korean
struggle the United Nations is
stronger than it has ever been.
We know now that the United
Nations can create a system of
international order with authority
to maintain peace.

“When I met with General Mac
Arthur we discussed plans for
completing the task of bringing
peace to Korea. We talked about
plans for establish'ng a ‘cnified,
independent and democratic’ Gov-
ernment in that country in ae-
cordance with the resolution of
the General Assembly of the
United Nations.

“Our sole purpose in Korea is
to establish peace and independ-
ence. Our troops will stay there
only so long as they are needed
by the United Nations for that
purpose.

“We seek no territory or special

tion for Korea, All free nations
would rally to this the Daily Tele-
graph added.

Informed Indian circles at New
Delhi thought President Truman’s
broadeast from San Francisco
mainly a restatement of the well
known state of affairs existing
between the two power blocs
headed by the United States and
the Soviet Union.

They thought it would make
little difference to the _ inter-
national situation.

Indian observers noted the
absence of any reference to Com-
munist China in the Presidential
broadcast. f

Observers felt that the omission
was significant from the Indian
point of view because India had
consistenly advocated the inclu-
sion of the new China in the
United Nations as being perhaps
the only way of strengthening

highest importance.



2 Killed, 15 Injured As
Bus Runs Off Road

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Oct. 18.

Two men were killed, and 15
people injured on Saturday after-
noon when a bus with 30 passen-
gers ran off the road near Cumu-
to and somersaulted 12 feet down
the embankment.

None of the survivors could ex-
plain what happened in _ this
“split second” accident. It took
rescue workers two hours to get
the bodies of the two dead men
from under the bus where they
were pinned by the driver’s seat
against the roof.

One dead man Jonas Etienne,
60, an estate labourer, left his
Coryal home to visit Arima and
pay his Friendly Society dues

E.'S.E. (3 p.m.) E\S.E.

(3 p.m.) 29.772
renner tenes!

to get at the real facts of the case,
He did not know how to believe
that there could be 600ebags of
mail unopened at the Post Office.
Governor Approached
Mr. D. A. Lucie-Smith said that
he happened to know that the
Postmaster went to the Goverrpr
some time ago about the conges-
tion at the Post Office.. The Gov-
ernment had just taken over the
quarters used at the Steamers’
Warehouse by DaCosta’s, for the
purpose of using it as a parcel
cepartment. It was the ground
floor which was about 5,000

ment had got in their arrange-
ments with respect to the matter
he did not know, but he did know
that they were taking steps.
What was happening at present



W.I. Go To U.K. For

T.B. Treatment
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN.

The Secretary of State for the
Colonies has brought to the
attention of the local Governmen:
n Trinidad, that people from
Colonial territories have arrived
in London to get treatmeny for
tuberculosis. It is pointed out,
however, that vhere is a serious
shortage of hospital beds in the
United Kingdom and consequently,
there are long waiting Ists ana
considerable delay in admitting
patients to suitable institutions,



serve as an incentive to people to
take their parcels away

On the suggestion of Mr. A. del.
Inniss a committee of three were



. ; ‘ : ; int t interview the
privilege. Let this be crysval| World organisation and thus! from which nis family enjoy sick} was that the goods of certain Coa basat hae key about the
clear to all—we have no aggres- | enhancing the chances of world! gnd death benefits. He leaves al merchants usually came through Keaitiag ‘ 5 VASELINE is the registers, teade raark of
sive designs in Korea or in any | Peace. é . 1 Chesebrough Manufacturing Go, Gona'l o»

other place in the Far East or
elsewhere.

No country in the world which
really wants peace has any reason
tto fear the United States. The
only victory we seek is the victory
of peace. United Nations’ Forces
in Korea are making spectacular
progress, but fighting there is not
yet over.

North Korean Communists re~
fuse to acknowledge the authority
of the United Nations. They con-
tinue to put up a stubborn but
futile resistance.

a nn NS

FEEL LIKE

—Reuter.



~ LOVE'S STRENGTH

LONDON,
The day after it had been set in
concrete because courting couples
kept moving it behind a hedge, a
wooden seat at Hawkes Hill,
Woodburn, Buckingham county,
was wrenched from its founda.
tions and moved behind the hedge

again.
—LN.S.

The Manchester Guardian said | Clark that a light warning bomb
that the speech was for the most should be dropped, giving a hint
part a strongly worded challenge of what was in store and an op-



55 MILE WALK
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Oct. 15.

The 55-mile professional cham—
pionship walking race is being
held this morning. The race will
siart from New Jersey through
La Brea to Oropouche via San
Fernando then to Port-of—Spait
terminating at Broadway opposite
the Royal Bank of Canada.





parcels sometimes remained in the
Post Office for quite a long time
As a matter of fact the Postmaster
had published a notice begging
these people to take delivery of
their parcels, ‘
Mr. Lucie-Smith said that he
believed the Government had
under consideration, a plan to
charge fees for parcels left too
long in the Post Office. This would

Square feet. How far the












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A

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-

PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS 9 ADVOAATE!

SSeS SB fe)

Printed by the Advorste Co.. Lid., Broad 8t., Bridgetown.
a

Thursday, October 19, 195¢

FIRE

THE absence of extensive fires in this
island within the past year has led to the
abeyance of any serious effort to afford
Bridgetown that protection which it de-
serves. It is a serious omission for which
the Government and people are to be
blamed.



Bridgetown is extremely vulnerable in
that there are more fire hazards to the
square mile than is readily found in any
other city in the West Indies. Added to
this the precautions taken are few and not
such as would allay the fears of those who
take an interest in the well being of the
community.

A few years ago an effort was made to
get a fire officer for this island and in order
to estimate the needs and the approximate
cost, the services of a similar officer in
Trinidad were secured by~the Barbados
Government. Major Cox came to this
island and in two public addresses left no
doubt of the danger to which we were
exposed. His report to the Government
confirmed his spoken fears.

The Legislature was approached to vote
a sum for the removal of the Fire Brigade
Headquarters and to provide for the train-
ing of a local officer in Londcn. The scheme
has not been implemented. Another sug-
gestion that the Headquarters of the
Brigade be removed from Coleridge Street
to Probyn Street where the Government
still owns ‘land’ seems to
death by delay.

In ten years-three buildings valued at
tens of thousahds of dollars were com-
pletely destroyed; in another instance the
vigilance ofa policeman on duty saved
Bridgetown from destruction when he
saw fire blazing in a building off Broad
Street and near the Government spirit
bond.

In addition to all this the Government
maintains a bonding house for rum in the
buildings once used as the Public Market
and adjacent to a cooperage producing
puncheons. It has been pointed out time
and again that=this is one of the greatest-
fire hazards in Bridgetown. :

A few narrow escapés and the absence,
for a long time, of any serious outbreak of
fire seems to have lulled the community
into a false sense of security. There is no
desire to raise any scare or to cause alarm
but it is necessary that we appreciate our
precarious position and face the facts. This
is the only means of remedying the present
unsatisfactory situation. It is too much to
hope that our luck will hold forever and
the direaonsequences of a serious outbreak
of fire in Bridgetown would ‘be the loss or
damage of buildings valued at millions of
dollars and the disruption of trade worth
more than one million dollars ayear. This
is more than Barbados could afford.

have suffered



Trinidad Opening

THE official opening of the new Trinidad
Legislative Council takes place to-morrow
and at that ceremony the Deputy Speaker
of the House of Assembly Mr. A. E. S. Lewis
and the Senior Member of the Legislative
Council Hon. Dr, H. G. Massiah, will-repre-
sent Barbados. ©

Constitutional changes in the West Indies
have been welcomed and the occasions
regarded as events for special rejoicing.
Trinidad with her wealth of natural re-
sources has been long awaiting the change
which would give her people greater voice
in the control of their own affairs, and the
people of Barbados, long accustomed to
representative government and a _ fully
elected House of Assembly, welcome the
opportunity to join in the celebrations.

It is fitting that the Government of that
colony has seen fit to extend officia! invita-
tions to representatives of Barbados on the
oceasion of this outstanding event.



OUR READERS SAY

Sports Federation

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—With all the conferences
of the West Indies and Federation
of different bodies throughout the
islands, I am making this sugges-
tion that there should be some sort
of federation of all sports through-
out tHe islands, so that we can take
part in World events. With a fed-
eration like this it means that
Trinidad and Jamaica, British
Guiana and Barbados, joining
such, this body can be upkept by
contributions received and by

ernment help, I think we can
rain athletes to take part in any
sort of sport.

k at the West Indies crick-
eter’, what success there was; and
there is a tennis team about to go
to England to compete for the
Davis Cup, also a Soccer side to

differences:

has_ been
Society,

try. In

hoist-lift.
The usual

j i ” : fo i does this man
; were at work, The intention had please.” He looked sad and be- rejoined his wife in London. She Assistance Board Taki i ualify id? (2 ;
play in England. The rifle team been to send out application forms wildered when the young recep- left him and jained the Land account allowances he ae Sonat tie bie muctohee Roane
recently returned from Bisley t4 town halls, citizens’ advice tion clerk, with an air of the obvi- Army early in 1947. mortgages, insurance, etc. the tion to the costs?
with distinction, so if the mayer bureaux and solicitors’ offices. But ous and inevitable, said (I quote): — Since his wife deserted him Mr. actual income of a “legally aided | For the lawyers, fees ats nat ah
ments of these sana "gay : ~ printing delays held up supplies. “Under the legal aid scheme you Elliott has lived in a four-bedroom person” may reach £700. But the high as for work ‘outside the
ether and encourage bia fit Those who made the journey to must first apply for an application house with his parents and mar- Board may refuse aid if the appli- scheme, they receive only 85 per
petter sports, I am sure tha Clement’s Inn were at once sent form.” ried sister.-He earns £5, 10s. a cant has a “disposable” capital of cent. of their normal pay. But
will not be regretted. away to. complete and post one Forms, Forms week as a window cleaner at a over £500 as the Government is footing the
EDGAR JOHN, of the six forms appropriate to ONE of the tasks of the com- big London hospital, gives £2 a 2—His actior civil procéed- bill they have the assurance of
i case mittec who will consider appli- week to his mother ings must be the High Court no bad debts
Green Park Lane, They Had Shocks eations for legal aid certificates For many months Mr. Elliott or Court of Appeal. Legal advice (World Copyright Reserved)
St. Michael. OF hose who trudged the is to satisfy themselves that the has wanted to — divores and litigation in the lower courts aol, ie,
4

<< qum ce ———m—-wqe~_, u~re ra
acct ei En eeennimeeemncsceceas 9 (gngslaiaimeesalicipaen hela cata ag neti nanan

THE legal aid scheme which
started this week is in the line of
descent from free spectacles and
medicine. But there are important
assistance under the
scheme is not available to all; it
does not apply in all courts or for
all kinds of legal action; and it
is not necessarily free.

Administration of the scheme

entrusted to the Law
who have set up area
committees throughout the, coun-
London, the committee
have moved into offices on the
upper floors of a dusty building
in Clement’s Inn. ’

By closing time on L.A.-Day
nearly 200 aspiring litigants had
arrived there in an old-fashioned



In Britain

today it is possi-
ble for anyone, young or old, to
obtair any werth-while book,

free of charge, from one or other

of the public libraries existing
in every town and throughout
the country districts. These pub-

lic libraries are provided by the
city, borough and country coun-
cils who maintain them at the
public expense from local
taxation. The first Act of Par-
liament giving local authorities
the power to do this became law
in 1850.

Today the public library is
taken for granted as a normal
and essential service. Of the
total population of Bfitain and
Northern Ireland no fewer than
twenty-five per cent. borrow
books regularly from their locai
libraries. These twelve million
people last year each borrowed
on an average over 25 volumes,
making a total of over 312
million during the twelve months,
These were books of all kinds,
to serve an immense variety of
needs, helping their readers in
their work, their education and
the enjoyment of their leisure, to
broaden their understanding of
social and economic conditions,
to become better citizens of their
own country and of the world.
Children at school, patients in
hospital, research workers, stu-
dents, housewives, farmers, fac-
tory workers, teachers, writers
-— all sorts and conditions of
people — turn as a matter of
course to library books. Because
they can read about whatever in-
terests them they are enabled to
co, think and enjoy everything
else in their lives more fruit-
fully than would be possible
were there no public libraries.
It is, therefore, quite impossible
to estimate the contribution made
to the world of today by the
public library.

We owe much to the founders
ot the movement who laid down
the fundamental principles. We
need, said William Ewart, the
Member of Parliament who was
responsible for the first Act,
libraries “founded by the people,
supported by the people, enjoyed
by the people.” Translated into
practical terms this meant that
publi¢ libraries should be pro-
vided in the same way as roads,
Sanitation, public health services
and education — at the common
expense of all and for the free
use of all. The only way this
could be achieved was by per-
mitting those elected repre-
sentatives of each community
who are responsible for provid-
ing good roads, sanitation and
the like, to be similarly em-
powered to provide libraries, It
was not enough to have libraries
for those who could afford to pay
subscriptions or fees, libraries for
particular sections of the public
or libraries to promote any
special religion or political out-
look, There has never been
Anything to prevent the main-
tenance of subscription, or ciass,
er religious librarfes by those
who wish for them — and such
libraries are to be found in
plenty today. The public library
was something different from and
additional to these. It was —
and is — a place where any man,
rich or poor, could use, without
any direct payment, whatever
books he wanted to read —
which was, in both senses
of the word, a free opportunity.
From the beginning the public
library has made no charge for
any of its services, And though
the political parties pay a_ big
part in local, as in national,
government, and though members
of the various religious denom-
inations have served on library
committees and helped in their
work, at no time has the public
library been subjected to any
political or religious influence.



After four years in business
and four in the army John
Gradon decided to become a

farmer and in a BBC talk he told
listeners how he achieved his
object. The first step was to gain
experience as a farm labourer,
After nine months.he found a
forty-seven acre holding on the
Welsh borders and bought it,
though this meant using his last
penny. The land was very rough
and the small stone house, reached
by a muddy track, showed signs
of decay. It had stone floors, the
water supply came from a spring
outside and there was no electric
light. They used bottled gas and
paraffin lighting, fitted a new
kitehen range, carried out a few
plaster repairs and the place soon
became a home. They bought a
milking cow and her calf, five
heifers, two pigs and an old mare
for carting. Neither Gradon nor
his wife had ever milked before
but gvhen the cow arrived they
set to work. Ten minutes of joint
effort produced only a pint of
milk and they had to retire
_ignominiously aigi leave the calf
to finish the job, Within a fort-
night they were nearly as expert
as the calf. Friendly neighbours,



makeshift
arrived with the

eentres and to

another, unkind
damages for
the cost.

with
some shocks.

first-day gremlins shop, and said: ‘





trestle tables,

those who have spent years in the
waiting-rooms of

cause the new scheme has given
But the majority were those with
sue their claims for
they did not have to worry about

As always when the uncompli-
cated mind makes its first contact

a bureaucracy, there were

One man walked in resolutely,
as he might into an ironmonger’s

‘Britain
Ry L. BR. MeColvin

City Librarian of the West-
minster Public Libraries and
author of “The Public Library
system of Great Britain.”

On its shelves all parties and all
faiths have been represented
impartially, To these two free-
@oms the success of the move-
ment is surely largely due.

A third and important kind of
freedom, though it was dreamed
of by the founders, was not
achieved until about half way
through the century. At first
vhose who used our libraries
were not allowed to go to the
vhelves to choose their own
books, As .is the case even
to-day in some other countries,
readers had to choose whay they
would read by consulting cata-
legues or seeking the help of the
staff.

In 1892, however, one librarian
made a plea for liberty for
readcrs to help themselves and
put into practice the system
known as “open access” which
has long been adopted by al!
British libraries. Under the open
éecess system people can go
among the shelves, examine the
Looks, choose whichever volumes
suit them best. Open access
changed completely the nature
and significance of library use.

We must realise that the public
library is, above all, an edu-
eational institution in whicn
people can learn about books and
the range and variety of vhe mai-
ters with which they deal, The
man who cannot go to the book
shelves and must ask for what
he gets, musi first know what he
wants. The ordinary man, how-
ever, knows little about books—or
ubout the universe of ideas and
cxperience they describe. Even
if he knows what he wants to
read about how can he choose
from a catalogue a suitable book
—not too difficult or too easy?
Free to wander among the shelves
he has vhe opportunity to do this:
to select the book which he can
understand, which will be most
useful to him,

There was at first much oppc-
sition to open access. To-day the
librarian cannoy believe that any
ether system was ever feasible
in the United Kingdom

But it was not only open access
that had its opponents. During
vhe first few decades there were
many people who did not appre-
ciate the value of libraries for
the public, and the foundation of
libraries was slow and gradual,
owing much to the private bene-
factions of far-sighted men \of
wealth, outstanding among these
being Andrew Carnegie. The
British public library has de-
veloped entirely on a voluntary
basis, Local authorities have
never been required to provide
libraries. They could choose for
themselves whether to do so or
not; and they could spend as
much or as little as they thought
fit, and still can. The time has
probably now arrived when all
author'ties should be compelled
ve adopt reasonable minimum
standards. Nevertheless there
must be particular satisfaction in
the knowledge that the navion-
wide coverage we now enjoy has
resulted entirely from the grow-
ing desire of the people to enjoy
library provision. With the
freedom to provide libraries has
gone equal freedom to discontinue
them; but there is not a single
instance of a library once started
ever being discontinued.

to whom they owed a great deal,
helped them to sow a field of
new ley and harrow the seed in,
and also to cut the hay. A hired
binder and their own hand labour
harvested the corn. Shearing in
Wales is a business in which
everyone helps everyone else until
the job is done. For several years
the Gradons were too inefficient
to give as much help as they re-
ceived but this made no difference
to the generous aid they always
get.

All the time they were learning
fast and with the proceeds of their
first harvest they bought twenty-
four ewes and a ram, Later in the
autumn they increased their
acreage of good land by ploughing
seven of their twenty-four acres
of rough bracken, Next year this
land grew an excellent crop of
turnips. They failed to raise day
old chicks or to get their heifers
in calf but they sold some of them
for beef instead. A welcome and
completely unexpected bonus of
twenty-five pounds came from
selling holly at Christmas time,

By 1947 they were growing out
of their little farm and managed
to buy one of seventy-two acres
next door. The Hill Farming Act

many
wild-eyed air o!
by surrounding
legal advice fortress with a
whose hopeless

injection of hope.

a firm and rational resolve to pur- is to benefit by the legal aid
divorce or scheme?
injury, now that Take the case of Mr. John

Elliott (not his
was among the

married. He

‘I want a divorce,



By LESLIE FINER

lous claim, They have made the
task much easier for themselves

ment of forms that only the most
resolute and_ self-confident
gant, would trouble to penetrate.

What happens to the citizen who

Clement’s Inn. He is an intelli-
gent-looking man of 29.

During the war he was a ser-
geant of infantry in Burma. On
a month’s leave in 1945 he was

from Northern Ireland in 1946 and

ADVOCATE

The Public Libraries Of

After ‘ae First World War
hese voluntarily founded libra-
ries began a system of voluntary
co-operation of jmmense benefit
to the public’ Until then all the
libraries in Britain had been
isolated indepemdent units. The
man with specialised require-
ments went ww his local library,
large or small:“it- was the only
source from which he could
ebtain the book he wanted
To-day all whe pubiie libraries
ind .a great many non-pubic
libraries, including those of
specialist and research organisa-
uons, universities and the like.
are united. By means of ihe
Regional Bureaux and the
National Central Library it is
now possible for any man any
where to obtain practically an;
book he may need.

The last factor \o ve mentione’
is maybe, the most important o
all. A good library service need:
men and women capable o
giving it, chosen for their
suitability for the work, trainec
in the techniques of librarianship
experienced in the use of books.

To-day there exists a well
organised, un ted body of pro-
fessional “chaitered” lbrarians

Credit for vis goes to the library
Association, tour.ded in 1877 tc
promote the development ot
libraries and unite all those con-
cerned with library provision. It
has nearly 19,000 members, 2,500
oi them fully qualified by exam-
inavion. This year, to mark tne
centenary of the public library
service, His Majesty King George
VI has beeome Patron of the
Association and the Duke oi
Edinburgh ‘s its President for
1950. ;

There are improvements to be
made in Britain’s library service.
Firstly, libraries have been estab-
lished by a variety of different
types and sizes of independent
library authorities. Too many of
the existing systems are too small
to be efficient; too often neigh-
bouring towns maintain several
separate library services when the
public would be much better
served by one large, co-ordinated
system embracing a larger, natur-
al area. The lesson we have
learned is that to be effective
and economical large systems with
adequate financial resources and
ample book stocks are needed.
We shall achieve this co-ordina-
tion in time. Secondly some of
the areas are much less well
served than others because they
have lacked the necessary money.
Britain’s public libraries have al-
ways had to depend entirely upon
local taxation; they have never
received any help from the na-
tional Government. As libraries
serve individuals the closer the
library can be to the community,
the more related to local needs,
the _ better. Consequentl, we
would insist that libraries @hould
continue to be provided by local
authorities and deplore any at-
tempt to impose a national uni-
form pattern. Nevertheless fin-
ancial help from national funds
to help the poorer districts is de-
sirable.

Britain is not the only country
in the world to enjoy good public
libraries. On the contrary we
have learned a great deal from
the progress made in other lands
and owe our colleagues overseas a
debt of gratitude for help and
example. Nevertheless, we know.
too, that there are other nations
which as yet lack adequate pub-
lic libraries, freely and fully
available to everyone. And to
these we say that during the last
century we have learned without
any doubt or reservation that pub-
lie libraries are a good and neces-
sary thing—that the profession of
librarianship is useful and re-
warding,



Building Up A Farm

allowed them a fifty per cent
grant towards the necessary recon-
structions and reclamation. They
built a road to their house, demol-
ished the derelict house on the
new holding and carted it over
to build a new wing, with bath-
room, on, their own home, reno-
vated ghe farm buildings, remade
two miles of fences and hedges,
reclaimed thirty-two acres more
rough land and improved the
drainage. By then their farm was
working well on four main lines
—beef cattle from the newly
formed breeding herd of nine
cows and a bull, fat lambs from
the steadily increasing flock of
hill sheep, seed potatoes and
accredited poultry. Now, they
have a useful and compact little
farm holding composed of young
grass leys and arable land. “Best
of all,” said Gradon, “is the fact
that from two unoccupied and
rapidly decaying farmsteads there
has now emerged one sturdy farm-
house, a home and centre of new
life in the coun’ , giving)\a
stable background for the up-
bringing of our ur children.
This attempt to find some way of
constructive living has been our
answer to the challenge of a
destructive age. °

“Divorce Please” Said The Caller

Cut-price law suits draw Londoners to Clement's Inn—on the road to the Courts that starts with Form A3.

boards of the corridor into th i ’
waiting room with bare walls seca is not pursuing a frivo-

undefended

their legal aid
barbed entangle-

liti-
smoothly J.

real name), who
first to arrive at

must still

was demobilised

to the mysteries



proceedings against his wife, But
he could not afford the £60 an
action would
Nor could he qualify under the
old poor persons’ rules, because
he earns more than £4 a week.
The Rules
IF the procedure had worked
E. would have been
spared the long trip to Clement’s
Inn. He wou'd have been given
his A.3 form at any of the informa-
tion or advice offices he has con-
sulted during the last feW months.
But now he has his form. He
; comply
conditions before he can be helped.
These are some of them.
1—His disposable income must
not be above £420 a year. “Dis-
posable” is worked out according



MYSTERY |
RADIO

Hy JOHN CAMSELL
LONDON.

Mysterious “radio signals” from space are
baffling Britain’s scientists.

Experimental stations at Holmes Chapel,
Cheshire and Cambridge are receiving sig-
nals every day. But at the moment there
is no suggestion that the signals are anything
but natural phenomena.

Mr. A. C. B. Lovell, senior lecturer in
physics at Holmes Chapel said, “We can trace
and plot the movement of meteors by day
and night.

“We have proved that a form of radio sig-
nal is transmitted by most of the known
stars.

“The problem we are faced with is that a
particularly strong signal is being received
from a part of the sky where no large bodies
are known to be.

“It is no good trying to explain it. We just
don’t know where the signals are coming
from. There is a possible solutiun in the
theory that in this part of the sky there are
invisible bodies.”

Professor Lovell revealed that German
V-2 rocket attacks on Britain during the war
put scientists on the track of the radio “talk”
of the stars. |

The scientists discovered the V-2’s gave a
radar echo as they travelled through the at-
mosphere. It was also found that short lived
echoes were obtained and warnings given
when no rockets were about.

















































These echoes, scientists learned, came from
meteors in the earth’s atmosphere,

The giant radio telescope with which
scientists listen to the radio “talk” of the
stars measures 200 feet across. It contains
14 miles of wire. A circular canopy of wire
mesh with a tall mast rising from the middle
gives it the appearance of a huge spinning
top. Professor Lovell added.

“We study radio waves which originate in
the depths of space and reach the earth after
travelling on their journey with the speed
of light for 100,000 years.

“The giant telescope collects these waves
from a small region of space, adding to the
steadily accumulating store of knowledge
which one day may tell us exactly where
these signals come from — stars, remote
nebulae, or inter-stellar space.”

The signals are heard on telephones in the
form of a continuous hissing noise, and they
are received on a wavelength approximately
two meters at the Holmes Chapel experi-
mental station —ILN.S,

Red Briton

(By JOHN CAMSELL)
LONDON.

Sinclair Cheechoo, 20-year-old raven-hair-
ed trapper from Northern Ontario has be-
come one of Britain’s first Red Indian resi-
dents.

Cheechoo, who was shooting beaver and
moose in his ice-bound home of James Bay,
a month ago, has brought his young English
bride, 20 year old Margaret Dolman, back to
England to live.

Margaret was attracted to Canada after
she had read romantic stories of Hiawatha.
She got a job as a missionary and travelled
to James Bay in search of a Hiawatha life
but she met Sinclair. They fell in love and
married.

“There were square dances in the village
carpenter’s shed,” Margaret said. “I wore a
headdress of red and white ribbons my
bridesmaid made.”

They lived in a small wooden shack, where
Margaret cooked moose meat and beaver on
a wood fire and carried water from the river
150 yards away.

Last winter Margaret got frostbite in her
nose. She persuaded her husband to give
up his trapping, woodcraft, and dog team and
come to England.

Cheechoo, now works for a timber firm in
Surrey County where he goes off into the
woods felling trees.—LN.S.

6599899989



GOSSSE

s

SOOOOSPPP SPOS SSF

oer

SOF




was cut out of the scheme as part
of the economy axe after devalu-
tion,

3—His action must be of the
sanctioned kind. A man will not
be helped, for example, to bring
an action in libel or slander; and
@ woman will not be helped to sue
for breach of promise.

No Bad Debts

WHEN his form, complete in
all four parts, 36 questions and
detailed outline of his case, is
received at Clement’s Inn, that
part which gives full particulars
of his income and finances will
be sent to the National Assistance
Board. =
_ The Board will return the papers
in due course to the legal aid

committee, having answered two
questions: (1)

cost.










with many








of the National








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}) Ox Tongues
Ox Tails

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| THURSDAY, 19TH OCTOBER, 1950

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apple Juice

Tins Lelona _ Peaches

(1lb tins) J
Bottles Grolsch Beer

VALOR STOVES

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THURSDAY, 19TH OCTOBER, 1950



C.C. Will Not Send

Resolution On Shipp

To Secretary Of State

FOR COLONIES

THE COUNCIL of the Chamber of Commerce at their
Special Meeting yesterday, decided that there is no need i
now to send a Resolution about shipping which was passed “ave to'd the Advocate yesterday,

by the Directors of the Incorporated Chambers of Com-| ,,PF
merce at a meeting this year, to the Secretary of State for} attended the Co

the Colonies,

Spanish

Notices



OME of the signs at the Central
Police Station are now being

written in

both English and

Spanish. Any Venezuelan going
to the Central Station for a driv-
ing licefice will have no trouble

as a sign in Spanish directs them
to the correct office.

Major Stoute, Deputy Com-
missioner of Police,

told the

Advocate yesterday that because

the number of Venezuelans visit-

ing the island has increased, and
many speak Spanish, and could be

séen wandering around the Cen-

tral Station yard without knowing
where to go for their driving

licences the Police has erected a
sign in Spanish indicating the
office.

‘THE 17 traffic offences re-

corded in the Police Reports
during the last two days only two
mortorists were reported for ex-
ceeding the speed limit.

T= POLICE. BAND, under
Capt. C. E. Raison, played at
“the Esplanade at 4.45 o’clock
yesterday evening.
Band will play for the
ville”
at 8.30 o’clock.

SHOW was given by the

Mobile Cinema at Groves
Agricultural Station yard at 8
o’clock last night for the benefit
of residents of the Cottage and
Groves area of St. George. The
show for tonight takes place at
Lascelles Plantation yard, St.
James,

HE BUILDING which housed

Lowe’s Laundry, that was
completely destroyed by fire on
Tuesday evening, is the property
of C, A. Fields of Richmond Gap,
St. Michael.

HE ST. LUCY’S ALMSHOUSE |

was struck by lightning at
about 5.40 a.m, on Tuesday.
wash basin and tap ‘along with
four panes. of glass in the Medical
Officer’s office were damaged. A
telephone pole outside the building
was also damaged.
No'one was injured. The build-
ing is insured.

LARGE QUANTITY of bush

has already been cleared
from the Jewish Cemetery at
Synagogue Lane. Two wood cut-
ters were cutting down tamarind
trees yesterday while outside the
Cemetery masons were plastering
the wall along Magazire Lane.

HE TENNIS COURT and
playfield of the old Y.M.C.A.
are now being made into a car
park. Chelsea Garage Ltd., who
bought over the premises, placed
a bulldozer on both tennis court
and playfield during the week to
level it off.

DALIA GIBSON of Paynes

Bay, St. James reported that
her six-month-old son Anthony
died suddenly at about 6.15 a.m.
on Tuesday. A _ post mortem
examination was performed by
Dr. C. C. Clarke and death
was attributed to natural causes.

HE SEVEN CANDIDATES
who entered for the School
Certificate Examination at the
Ursuline Convent were all suc-
cessful. They are: Patricia Cools
8,
Krogh, Joy Netto,
Lilia Peter and Mary Vaughan,

ENLEY scored an_ outright
victory over Norwich in

* Committee’s

lc
|been brought to the attention of!

—~—— The decision was taken after!

;members had read a Press Re-
lease from the Secretary of State
on the matter.

The Resolution spoke of the
unsatisfactory state of affairs as
regards steamship passenger
accommodation between the
United Kingdom and the British
Caribbean area.

This Resolution was forwarded
by the Secretary of the Chambers
who is in Jamaica, to the Colonial
Secretary of that colony, asking
that it be sent to the Secretary of
State.
Release was received by the
Colonial Secretary on the whole
matter, and the Secretary of the
Chambers was therefore asked if
in view of this it was still con-
sidered desirable to carry out the
request of the Chambers,

The correspondence was for-
warded to Mr. H. A. C. Thomas
the Barbados delegate to the
directors’ meeting and he drew
the matter to the attention of the
Council of the Chamber for their
decision.

Press Release

| The Press Release from the

| Secretary of State reads:

olonies has intimated that it has

His Majesty’s Government that
there has been considerable critic-
ism among sections of the public

Tonight the) in the British West Indies at the
_‘Revuede- | apparent failure of His Majesty’s
Show at the Empire Theatre | Government to take steps to im-
plement Recommendation (1) of;°

port to provide a passenger service | },

the Commonwealth Shipping Re-

between the United Kingdom and |
the West Indies. The Secretary of



AN ORDERLY
NATION

“WE like the British. We
like them because, for in-
stance, they don’t trample
on their grandmothers to
get into a bus or a shop. Not
like a certain South Ameri-

|
|
} ‘can country we were in,
| where so many people leap-
| ed on to a bus that the
| whole side fell off into the
street!””
Oden and Olivia Meeker,
American journalists, telling
listeners to a BBC programme

why they have decided to
settle in London

two







State has, werefore, requested
that with a view te explaining
the difficulties in the way of the
provision of adequate passenger
services and the steps which have
been taken by His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment in considering how those
difficulties could be surmounted,
the following statement should be '
given as wide as a publicity as
possible within the West Indies.
His Majesty’s Government, first
of all, would wish to make it clear
that the importance of increzsing
the passenger service between the
United Kingdom and the West
Indies is fully realized and that
the problem has therefore been
approached in as sympathetic and
constructive a manner as possible.
It will be recalled that the Com-
monwealth Shipping Committee
recommended, as a first step, that
His Majesty’s Government should
seek proposals from shipowners
who might be interested in the
trade. Accordingly, an approach
was made to the shipping industry,
and in due course two firms made
proposals on the lines recommend-
ed in the Commonwealth Shipping

port and amounted to a complete
guarantee against loss, assurance
of minimum interest and deprecia-

their B.C.L. cricket match which | #1”.

ended at Norwich last Saturday.
Henley batted first and made 141

First Scheme
The first scheme would have

runs, B, Bellamy topscoring with |placed an unlimited liability on
50. Bowling for Norwich B. Bar-!His Majesty’s Government as the
row took three for 17 and Spooner |Company found it impossible to

two for 39.

Norwich replied with 73 runs, }-cheme would cost.
with 22. '\ case, it
For Henley B. Bellamy took four | Government
for 24. Henley made only 35 in | jnitial

A. Harper topscoring

their second innings.
C. Arthur, .who was chiefly
responsible for Henley’s collapse,
six for 17. Norwich in their
second innings made 77 runs.
Henley won by 26 runs.

EMBERS of Club 6 of the |

Girls’ Industrial Union and

their friends turned out in full | M
force on Tuesday night to hear |

Dr, G. S i'mtage’s talk on “T.B.
and Its Prevention.”

Another lecture is expected to
be given in a fortnight’s time.



)
)
t
)

E.P.N.S. :
Ash Trays
Desk Diaries
Note Books
Shopping Lists

|



KNIGHTS

PHOENIX or CITY PHARMACY





Chromium Cigarette Cases (with Crest of B’dos)
Chromium Cigarette Cases (with W. I. Islands)
Chromium Cigarette Lighters



ke any estimate of what the
In the second
was suggested that the
should make = an
grant of £500,000, and
guarantee interest on a capital
sum of £1,250,000; in addition,
West Indian Governments were
to make good any deficiency in
passenger revenue and guarantee
provision of the necessary re-
igerated cargo.

Although it is contrary to His
ajesty’s Government's general
policy to subsidise shipping com-
| panies, this general principle was
not allowed to stand in the way
of sympathetic consideration of
ainy reasonable proposal to im-

On Page 8

ma



E.P.N.S. :
Teaspoons
Tea Strainers
Caddy Spoons
Book Markers

LTD.

me

In the meantime a Press|

The Secretary of State for the |



e
Vaccine
For 7 B.
Available

One of the lines in which the
British territories will be able to
get technical assistance if they
desire it, is in the use of B.C.G.
vaecine for the contrel of tuber-
culosis, Dr. J. W. P. Harkness,

| Medical Adviser to the Comp-
jtroller for Development and Wel-

|
|



Dr. Harkness has just returned

Cuidad Trujillo where he
erence of sa
Sanitary Organisation
and the Regional Committee of
the World Health tion
which took place from September
25 to October 11.

He said that other lines of
technical assistance in which
advice and possibly material
assistance could be obtained from
the Regional Committee of the
World Health Organisation were
malaria control, public health
training courses, Aedes eradica-
tion, ete.

The Conference, presided ove~

American

by Generalissimo Rafael L.
Trujillo Molina, President of the
Republic, was attended by a

| delegation representing the Brit-
‘ish territories composed of Dr.
A. A. Peat, Director of Medical
Services and Dr. H. P. Gillette,
Malariologist, representing the
Government of Trinidad, Dr.
J. R. Marcano, Medical Officer of
Health, Port-of-Spain, Dr, H. M.
Johnston, Acting Assistant Direc-
tor of Health, representing the
Government of Jamaica and him-
self as delegate for the United
Kingdom and the remaining Brit-
ish Caribbean territories who
were unable to send repzesenta-
{tives to the Conference.

Supreme Authority

The Pan American Sanitary
Conference is the Supreme gov-
, erning authority of the Pan
|American Sanitary Organisation,
the fundamental purpose of
‘which is to promote and co-
|ordinate efforts of the countries
the Western Hemisphere to
combat disease, lengthen life and
promote the physical and mental
ealth of the people.

By agreement concluded with
the World Health Organisation in
1949, the Pan American Confer-
ence and its executive body, the
Pan American Sanitary Bureau,
serve as the Regional Committee
and the Regional Office of the
World Health Organisation for
the Western Hemisphere and
as such, are responsible for
carrying out in that regic., the
programmes for the promotion of
international health and the sup-
pression of disease which are
adopted by the World Health
Assembly,

He said that the activities of
this organisation are primarily
concerned. with the suppress’on
of epidemic diseases and there-
after with a wide range of health
projects designed to promote the
physical welfare of the general
population, Some extent of the
scope of its activities may be
gathered from the Press Release
of the thirteenth conference which
appeared in the Advocate of
Ortober 18. ,

|

Programmes
The work of the Conference
was largely concerned with the
consideration of programmes and
budgets for the following years.
A considerable amount of time

was also occupied in discussing
changes of organisation and
constitution to facilitate the





What’s On Today

Water Polo, at Aquatie
Club at 5.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema, Lascelles
Plantation Yard. St.
James at 7.30 p.m.

Police Bani at Revuede-
ville, Empire Theatre at
8.30 p.m.

a

future administration and opera.
tion of the organisation in its
wider capacity, and to provide a
basis of participation by the
Dutch, French and British terri-
tories in its work which will be
satisfactory to all concerned,

Of greater interest in the tech-
nical and professional side, were
the reports of the various dele-
gates describing public health
developments in their respective
territories during the four years
which have elapsed since the
preceding meeting.

He said that the exchange of
information on methods = and
techniques for dealing with
common problems were of con-
siderable mutuel value.

The report relating to the
British territories was delivered
by him on behalf of the British
delegation and opportunity was
given to the delegates to visit
hospitals and institutions of the
Dominican ‘+overnment and as
some of these were of recent
constructicn, embodying modern
concepts, the visits were full of
interest on the material as well as
the clinical aspects of medical
work,

Principal Language

Though the principal language

AWS Meeting of the Chamber.

That's why -you enjoy consistent



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

| BARBADOS

RUM WILL

BE ON SHOW AT BRITISH
INDUSTRIES FAIR

BARBADOS will be represented at the 1951 British Indus-

tries Fair.

The rum industry comprising the manufactur-

ers and the bottlers, the molasses industry, the Publicity
Committee, and the Cotton Factory representing the Sea
Island Cotton, wil! be subseribing £500 to pay for 150

square feet of space at the Fair

B.G, Expects
Largest Rice Crop
This Year

BRITISH GUIANA'S rice crop
for this year is expected to be
the largest in the history of the
counti'y Mr. A. S. Rohoman of
the British Guiana Rice Market-
ing Board told the Advocate yes-
terday.

He said that usess something
unforeseen happened, they would
be able to fulfil all their contracts
to Trinidad, Barbados and the
other West Indian Islands.

Mr. Rohoman will be returning
to British Guiana this afternoon
by B.W.LA. after spending five
weeks’ holiday as @ guest at
Crystal Waters, Worthing

He said that almost all reaping
and ploughing of the crop was
now being done by mechanical
means, a replacement of the old
system of reaping by hand and
ploughing by oxen.

Old System Still

There were still a few places
where the old system prevailed
but it was expected that by next
year all that would be finished
and the country would probably
be the granary of the Wes: Indies.

A new concrete building on the
watertront to house the Rice Mar-
keting Board’s offices and bonds
was well underway, and would
probably be completed sometime
next year. That new building
was anticipated to hold about
150,000 bags of rice.

A keen sportsman whose hob-
bies are now shooting and fishing,
Mr. Rohoman is one of the found-
ers of the Boxing Board of Con-
trol ‘n British Guiana, a life
member of the Demerara Turf
Club, a member of the British
Guiana Cricket Club and the East
Indian Cricket Club.

He said that the B.G. Boxing
Board is comprised of 12 members
affiliated with the British Boxing
Board of Control and those in the
West Indian Islands »nd added
that boxing in British Guiana is
of a very high standar”

Boxing in Grenada

In Easter this year, he visited
Grenada as Manager of the B.G.
boxing team which won three of
the four W.I, championships, the
lightweight, welterweight and
heavyweight, losing the middle-
weight to Trinidad.

He was 28 years on the BG.
Boxing Board and judged all the
main bouts except during the last
two years.

He said that there should be a
Boxing Board of Control in Bar-
bados because it would be a good
thing for everyone, the boxers,
the promoters and the general
public,

_Mr. Rohoman said that he re-
tired from playing cricket in 1930,
his last tour being in 1929 when
he captaiied the Indian cricket
team from British Guiana which |
played the Indians in Trinidad. |

NEW MEMBER |

Mr. A. Guy St. Hill was yester- |
day elected a member of the|
Chamber of Commerce. i

The election took place at the |





The exhibits will be rum, mo-
lasses and Sea Island Cotton.
The Chamber of Commerce
will collect the money and for-
ward it to the West India Com-

mittee who will see after the
arrangements.
Representatives of the indus-

tries to be represented and repre-
Sentatives of the Publicity Com-
mittee were present at the Special
Meeting of the Council of the
Chamber yesterday, and discuss-
- arrangements with the mem-
ers,

Mr. A. deL.
meeting :

I have to report that the agents
for the West India Rum Refinery
Ltd. received a letter from Mr.
A. S. Bryden on the 13th instant
fiving all particulars about space
and cost for a Barbados exhibit
it this fair,

As a result of this, I immedi-
ately got in touch with Mr. Peter-
kin who ascertained from Mr.
S. H. Kinch that members of the
trade along with the Publicity
Committee had subscribed £450,
to which the Rum Refinery were
‘villing to add £50. totalling
£500

As this would be the cost of
150 sq. feet, on behalf of the
Council I instructed Mr, Peterkin
to write the Colonial Secretary
requesting him to cable London
with a view of booking this space.

I am pleased to say that a reply
has been received from the Lon-
don Agents of the West India
Runa Refinery Ltd., reading :—
“Fair arrangements made”,

The meeting expressed their
pleasure at receiving this infor-
mation but regretted that the
hote: industry which had been
approached did not propose to
take part this time,

Inniss told the



Molasses Goes

To Canada

Motor vessel “Mary Sweeney”
Sailed through the Chamberlain
Bridge yesterday afternoon § at
about 1.15 p.m. It was well laden
with fancy molasses for Halifax,
Canada, and it left port for
Canada during the evening.
The “Sweeney” arrived here
since Thursday and it has loaded
approximately 650 puncheons of
molasses. The molasses is being
shipped by Messrs, K. R. Hunte
& Co,, Ltd., agents of the ship—
and Messrs. Robert Thom Ltd.
The “Athelbrook"”, the molasses
tanker consigned to Messrs, H,
Jason Jones & Co., Ltd., arrived
shortly after the “Sweeney” left
the inner basin. The “Athel-
brook” occupied the same birth as
the “Sweeney” to take a load of
vacuum pan molasses in bulk,

REMANDED
ELIZABETH KING, a 29-year-
old shopkeeper of Tudor Street

was charged yesterday before His
Worship Mr, A, J. H. Hanschell
with breaking and entering the

shop of Clement Rogers and steal-

ing articles to the value of
£11 15/44%d The offence was
committed sometime between

September 30 and October 1,

King was remanded until Octo-
ber 23, Bail in the sum of £50
was offered,

15'- FOR OILMEAL
A FINE of 15/- to be paid in

1t days or 14 days’ imprisonment
was imposed on Torance Ashby

of Chapman's Lane yesterday by

His Worship Mr. A. J. H. Han-

| schell.

used at the Conference was |
Spanish, there was a simultaneous
translatian into English, and |
French and vice versa which
could be heard through earphones.
That was a creat facility for those |
who were not conversant with the |
language used by the speaker of |
the moment.

The conference was held in the
modern buildings of the medical}
faculty of the University of Santo
Domingo. The arrangements for
the Conference were very ably
handled by the Dominican Gov-
ernment and the comfort of the
delegates was assured by accom-
modation in the very modern
hotel Taragua situated on the
shores of the Caribbean Sea
















MEASURE THE

quality at all times

Ashby was found guilty of the
unlawful possession of a quantity
o! oilmeal which he was convey-
ing along Bay Street on October

18,
TRINIDAD BUYS
ROYAL ALE

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN.
Trinidad hed an opportunity of
purchasing vhe specially brewed

| s:rong ale, surplus of the supply

for the wedding of Princess
Elizabeth and the Duke of
Edinburgh at a bingo party held
#i Government House on Friday
n.ghv, Trinidad’s quota is fifty
cartons. These wil] be sold and

the profits will go to the Red-
Cross,

INGREDIENTS IN

EVERY LOAF OF

J & BR

ENRICHED BREAD







‘ined £3 For |
Stealing Shoes |

HILTON GREAVES, a 36-year-'
old labourer of Peterkin Land,
St. Michael, was found guilty yes-
terday by His nee Mr.
A. J. H. Hanschell of stealing one
pair of brown and white gents’
shoes valued at £2 10/-, the
property of T. R. Evans, on
October 5.

He was fined £3 to be paid
by instalments or was ordered in
default to undergo one month's
imprisonment, Mr. H. Clarke ap-
peared on behalf of Greaves
while Sgt. Garner prosecuted on
behalf of the police.

Greaves in his defence said
that he was riding his bicycle
along Barbarees Hill on October
5. Something went wrong with
the bicycle and aman _ helped
him in fixing it. After the bicycle
was repaired the man asked him
to take a parcel from him which
he would return for in ‘a’ short
tume. While he was waiting for
the man a policeman came up
to him and asked him what was
in the parcel and where he had
got it from. The policeman then
arrested him.

Greav’s said that
know the man who gave him the
parcel. Keith Alleyne, a clerk of
YT. R. Evans, told the court that
from the number on the shoes-—
1281 A—he recognised that the
air of shoes was the property of
i R. Evans and said that that
type of shoe was imported by his
firm only.

In addressing Mr. Hanechell,
Mr. Clarke submitted that it was
to be proved that Greaves had
stolen the shoes and if this was
not done properly, then hig client
should be instantly acquitted,

He further pointed out that
Greaves had not showed any
sign of guilt by running away or
resisting the policeman when he
Was arrested and that it was quite
likely that he (Greaves) meeting
a strange man which gave him
help in repairing his bicycle,
would return the favour by hold-
ing a parcel for him.

He told Mr. Hanschell that if
there was any suspicion he could
not convict on it.

Mr. Hanschell in replying said
that he felt that Greaves’ story
was not reasonable, as both of
the men were strangers. No man
meeting a stranger for the first
time would take a bulky parcel
from him.

Mr. Hanschell then went on to
say that taking the evidence as
a whole he was of the opinion
that the story of Greaves was not
true; therefore he had to convict
him.



goes ae
8
x x
New Arrivals at §
‘*
% NOW AFTIVAIS al §
$
ATHERHEAD'S §
XMAS CARDS — %
6 Lovely Cards in a Box
with envelopes
at 1/3, 1/9, 2/3 per Box.
For INVALIDS —
ARMOUR'S CALF’S
, FOOT JELLY,
Very Nourishing Easily
* Digested—2/6 Bottle,
FIREWORKS OF ALL
DESCRIPTIONS
we See us for Wholesale ¢
Prices of Sparklers %
12 SPARKLERS in a Pack- §
age for l4ec, 5
BOMBS COLOURED
MATCHES DEVILS — %
WHEELS %
and 50 other kinds of %
+ PAIN'S FIREWORKS. x
BRUCE
- ¥
* WEATHERHEAD
5
% ;
‘4
s LTD ¢
% e ¢
e *.

5
$99966699999 90106006000)







WHITE le

7
Wi kk

i

COLOURE






TERRA RRA AAA
Cay RMR Y AYA YN Wied Bi



White Park Road. —



|

Cross-exarmiued by bgt. Garner!
he did not |



|





Also available with Steel Wheels and Half Tracks (For Ploughing)
ge ADDITIONAL SHIPMENT DUE SHORTLY.

CoU





PAGE FIVE







DRINK
CLAYTON’S

|

St SS Na

SMART STYLES IN
BROWN CALF (Brogues and Oxfords)
BLACK BOX CALF AND VICI KID _

OUR WIDE RANGE OF SIZES.

AND FITTINGS ENSURES

PERFECT FIT.

A

Pe i tk PD et

ASK FOR
“K” SHOES
They Last

Longer,
Look Better,

AND

Give Greater
Foot Comfort



whet
We toe,

| ey
wagers |)

LOCAL
Broad St.

DISTRIBUTORS
Tel. 2664.





IP Fasteners

e

ngths of 6" 7" 8" 9" 10° 12" 14"
- 16" 18" 20" 22" & 24"

:D lengths of 6" 7" 8" 9" 10" Il" 12"



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.

10, 11, 12 & 13

(AAA A DAU ALL
UVVEEVENVERER EME MEMEV RV Yh] VV MVVENE MMMM RMEM ee eh

Broad Street





I]



Transport Problem

(7. Massey Harris.
WHEEL TRACTORS

(42 B.H.P.)



RTESY GARAGE
(ROBERT THOM. LTD.)

Dial 4391


PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, 19TH OCTOBER, 1950





A Te ao en

nENRY BY CARL ANDERSON






RENNIES
GIVE YOU













I-l COMMAND YOu
TO RELEASE ME!



NO SPOON, NO WATER,
Suck them like aude






HARPIC
CLEANS IT
FOR YOU ,,

STRONG PEPPERMINT
LOZENGERS

BY CHS. YOUNG

Mitt

maa | Z A. §. BRYDEN & SONS ceareavos) [1D.



\

WGLL, 1 GUESS

WE'LL JUST 2

HAVE TO e
LEARN TO )

4 LIKE IT

HES AGENTS.

Just sprinkle some ‘Harpic’ into the lava-
tory bowl — leave overnight —then flush,
‘Harpic’ cleans, disinfects and deodorises
the whole pan, including the S-bend.

HARPIC

ae siete THE SPECIAL LAVATORY CLEANSER



|

|

| ee
RENAIES
|















HOLD THiS MAN UNTIL I RETU RN
FROM THE FARIGH RANCH ?





GOT None LWES pa
“THAN A CAT! ,














and Self Service too
Soaps &






































Cereals
Household Wale
a Corn Flakes ..... 28
Requisites neg
iimaihabis pak Flakes. ..... 53 24
uaker
Lux Toilet Soap 16 Puffed Wheat 36
an 5 of
Hus tHar cuv's || | See HOW He LOOKS | EEK! Boyou Tine Ee Palmolive Ser... 16 Shredded Wheat 37
aac sh Sena dia lidineel Beso vTap
oe eee cl | ee ee UE I Ace a) eee py IRL nL \\Recre E UR e 23 Tapioca Flakes 19
ss ze Se Lifebuoy T. Soap 15 Morton's Oatmeal 41
Limacol 0.0.00... 81 Allson‘s
pa Fruit Salts 1.00 58 White Oats ...... 48
Dettol voces 1.36 52 Lassie
Phillipe Magnesia 90 46 Rolled Oats ..... 48

Custard, Desserts, Marmalades &
Syrups






















e
lhies
Je ¢ Golden Shred Mar-
Birds Custard Pow- malade .......0...... 47
BILLS... BURGLARS., NE 0 Sescisihoatetenss 38 Silver Shred Mar-
AND NOTHING, NOTHING — BANKRUPTCY... AND NOW Chivers Custard malade ......ccc. 47



SHALL SPOIL OUR

Cooper's M i
HAPPINESS! fi | |WAS EVER A MANIN SUCH (4. AM —_ Ts] A OWGST a. nr ersrerees per arma:

Chivers Custard HACE il cvatscssdasitess 63







WAS EVER A MAN IN SUCH
DESPERATE STRAITS?




Powder .o....sssus 30 Hartley's Marma-
Kraft Ice Cream Mix 69 27 MOI icivessbiictetess> 38
Chivers Table — Marma-
Jellies 0.0... 22 IB Ss esbabosecieeanes 36 . ‘
Hartley's Jelly Crys- Ss. A. Marma- Cocktail Cherries 1.36
MER ise chicaseuscaveedctic 20 lade (2Ib) ............ 46 Cocktail Cherries 54
Monk and Gloss Golden Syrup... 42 33
Table Jelly ........ 19 Australian Honey 1.06 51 Tin Prunes.............. 70

Monk and Glass ° °
Blane Mange Liquaurs E
Powder .........60.5 24 , Wines te.

Bots, Bols CREME DE MENTHE. ...........ccscccsecseecseesseeese
ORANGE CURACAO ...... nd

Pickles & . . APRICOT BRANDY .

" BUCKFAST TONIC WINE ... na

" WINCARNIS osccscsussmonnn, 2.98 138

Sauces ete. " PHOSFERINE TONIC WINE. 240 1.32

“ GORDONS GIN cunt i ae

Morton's Peccalilli 53 si SMEPUEN PE oe QUIY 2. do eesLissastoeassnd coon vcaiebs atetvovovioenstyaar> 2.50

Morton's Chow
Cho










[THEY GOT US \NO GUNG? THEY'RE K HANTOM \HES TALKIN’ (WHATEVER

L Rargpps kek? WANTS. / ENGLISH?
. R

co! : WHATS AE











MEAT DEPARTMENT

PRIME AUSTRALIAN BEEF at cuts
ALSO




Se 75

Mertens Gi . HEARTS — KIDNEYS — TAILS — LIVER
Heinz Mayonnaise 48 MUTTON — VEAL — TRIPE




Heinz Salad
















HERES HALF OF (T= A WHOLE JMNM [THEY AINT BUDGIN’AN INCH=« 1] [NoW=Vou Come Wilt nic ;
Terie eamonDeestiee verre | LOOK-HERES THE Coie on US. UNDERSTAND? Ramm oa} |Mi oo oC
L 308 : en \F YOU FORGET YOU SAW US. -——~ ca 9 47, wae ———— .
Sy = wees AND? \EAK7 it VALL/ KEAT NEA

MHI 191

OL















THURSDAY,

19TH OCTOBER,

1950



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



CLASSIFIED ADS.

arene Jk 2508

DIED







TAYLOR=MARY ELIZA. a her vesi-
dence ist. Avenue, Tweedside Land
Hee funeral will 1 e her '

mee th afternoon for
an Church emi thence to the
— y Cemetery
FitzGerah! Taylor (musband) Cyril
Cecii: Doris: _Butalie: Gwendoiyne
Germaine’ (children)

19.10,50—2n.
IN MEMORIAM

Levie: . Memory of our Dear
JOSEPH CLIFFORD COPPIN, Beloved
and Father, who departed thi
ber 16h 1949
OMe year ago Joseph Dear you left us
Paithful and henest in all your ways
Devoted and trie to the end of your

ee

AlWays patient loving and kind

What « beautiful memory you've left
behind

Your loving suivile your gentle face

No one can fill your vacant place

Sleep on Dear Joseph your Task 15
o'er
Youur loving hands can do no more

For those you loved, you did not best

May the Almighty grant ou rest.
Martha Coppin, (wife) Sealy, Donaid,
Everton, (Chil n) and all the immedi-



ate family.
19.10,50—2n
ee hh epee ee
IN oever fading memory of our dear
Father HUBERT ADOLPHUS CLARKE
who was called to rest on October \16,
1956
14 years have gone beyond recall
Each year brings memories like
The y cometh when we no
weep
For we" alt
sleep.
Ever remembtred by Beatrice Clarke
(wife!, Vernon, Ruby, Marguerite,
George (Children).



gall
more




will im deep supineness

19. 10,50—1n

FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

CAR, Austin § H.P. Excellent .con-
dition for inspection. Apply M, E, BR.
Bourne & Co., Roebuck Street. Phone
2728.







19.19, 50—dn

6,800
7 -E
St.



CAR—(1
te new.

Andrews

miles good
H.. Farmer
Joseph.

19,10 .50—4n.



Dial
Plantation



vy duty Pick-





BEDFORD-—1'2 ton he:
up. New and already conditioned tor
delivery. Dial 4616, Courtesy Garage

18.10 .50-—3n.



BEDFORD i2 1S cwts.

delivery Van

New and already conditioned for
delivery Dial 4616, Courtesy Garage.
18.10.50—3n.

———

CAR—Dodge 1937 Model, 4 good tyres.
New Battery Apply: Frank Watkins,
c/o Gardin Austin & Co. 18,10,.50—3n.



















— ehnalistinetsteinponiiin tance -N

DODGE TRUCK—1947 Model in excel-
lent condition. Apply to Barbados
Telephone Co Ltd. 18.10.50—5n

” FEDER. AL TRUCK—Offe: will be
received in writing by Courtesy Garage
up to 4.90 p.m on Friday, 2h
October 1950, for one (1) Federal Truck
chassis, dam *. Vehicle nay
be viewed’ at Courtesy Garage, White
Park R 18.10.50—Sn.





> kn good cons ‘dition
order, no reason-
Dial 3369. D. A.



MOTOR HE
& in good working
able offer refused

Brown, Black Rock.

19.10,50—T..N

Model Le
Showrooms
zor
an.



MOTORCYC
1% n.p. On

Courtesy Garage
ladies. Dial 4391.

ELECTRICAL
ELECTRIC IRONS Unbeata
bargain. 5 Ib. Electric Irons attrac
tively finished in Chromium with
coloured handles. Only $4.90 each
complete. G. W,. Hutchinson & Co
Ltd. Dial 4222. 17.10 .50—Sn
ONE PORTABLE / AIR COMPRESSOR:
H.P. Motor with 60 Ibs. pressure



S—Velocette
view at

An opportunity
18.10.50















Yq











fauge and tank Price preci Dial
4086. 6,10.50—5n
RADIO — (1) 9 tube Phillips in good
condition no reasonable offer refused
Apply to Mr. Gandirt Sandford Pla
tation, or Ralph A, Maul, Farm Road,
St. Philip.
19.10.50-—2n
FURNITURE
CHAIRS—Sturdy, attractive, Wooden
Chairs in Walnut, Mahogany and
Natural Finish at .78 each a. Wi



Ltd. Dial 4222
17.10,50-—3n.
FURNITURE Office Equipme
Single and Double Pedestal Steel De
Foolscap or Letter Size 4 drawer Flu
Cabinets; Steel Stationery Cupboards;
Czrd Index Cabinets;
end other office equipment now obtata-
able from stock from T. Geddes Grant
Ltd., Bolton Lane. Phone 4442.
15.10.50—én

MECHANICAL

BICYCLES—Hercules, at
prices. Courtesy Garage.

Hutchins & Co.








special low
Dial 4391
18.10.50.



$n
JACKS—Garage Hydraulic Trolley,
from 2 to 7% tons Capacity, Dial 4301
19.10.50—2n

MISCELLANECUS

ABBOTT'S PREPARATIONS. _Haliver
Malt 6/-; Cofron 12/-. Geo. C. Ward
& Co., St. Lawrence. 15.10, 50—Tn

















B'DOS ENGAGEMENT DIARIES

Months illustrated by Pictures, Make
useful Xmas presents so secure enrly
Special price 2/- each, Obtainable at
KNIGHT’S LTD.

17,.10.50—3n



BUCKLEY’S PREPARATIONS, Cough
Mixture 87c.; White Rub S5c.; Nezine 55c.
Kams 15¢. Geo. C. Ward & Co.

15,10.50.—7n.

“CANDA VAPOUR RUB" Is
commended for Head Colds, Chest
Colds, Coughs, Hoarseness and Throat
Irritation, also is cellent for insect
bites ete. KNIGHT'S LTD

17.10.50-

DOOR MATS—Fibre Door Mats in
several designs and sizes. Prices from
$2.27 up. G. W. Hutchinson & Go
Ltd. Dial 4222 17.10.50—8n

GATOR OACH “HIVES—The
Bait. Easy to use, long lasting and sani-
tary. Only a limited quantity Get
yours now. Knights Ltd.—All Branches.

19.10.50.—3n.











Magic







HORNER'S PREPARATIONS. Maltle-
vol 8/-; Carno! 5/-; Calsol 16/8; Magsol
7/-; Infantol 5/-. Ferénol & Feronol F,
Geo. C. Ward & Co. 15,10.50,—-Tn.

“LAUREL RAZOR Buy a Laurel
Razor for 1/6 and get a utility Knife
with each purchase free. You can use







your old blades in this holder
KNIGHT'S Lid: 18.10.50—2n.
MILD ‘STEEL SHEETS jn various
sizes from 1/32 to 3/8, Also Galvanized
nails. Enquire Atrto Tyre Company,
Trafalgar Stree’) “Phone 2096.

16.10.50—t.f.n
ee ees
SQUIBB’S PREPARATIONS Cod Liver

Oi) 9/- Sulmefrin sone Gluconate.
Glycerine Suppositories 3/6 —Geo. C.
Ward & Co. 15.10.60.—7n.

ee
SALE — Among other items we sell
Khaki at 50e. per yd. ROYAL STORE
14.10,.50—Jn

SHIRTS—2,000 Men‘’s Shirts of guarani-
feed wearing quelity at $2.00 and $2.40
each, ROYAL STORE. 12.10 ,50—-7n,
SHIRTS & PYJAMAS. Boys" and
Men's. Shirts and Pyjamas ordered to
Measure con be delivered within four






hours, RELIANCE SHIRT FACTORY.
12.10, 50—Tn
TORCH LIGHTS
Lights complete with
1 Chrome ¢
W. Huet
4222
VOSENE i
- i
KeNI¢ TD
_ + ,
VOSEMAT x 1
1" ;

Stee! Office Chairs,

























































































PAGE SEVEN















y
WANTED Pa ‘Le gins; Veronica Wiggins: Millicent
| ap Shi Ss Read F " Naughton; Harris Me Naughian: | Be
6 ;
| a J f raed olfe: Mr. D. Murnid \ = —
| HELP | To Trade Again Sea | °
a * Ic
nas | mecca tes vemcg, cage | Tega With Berhad | Pre eS joan me:, noe} ISTEMPER
to Mrs. Tom W t bs : rt. : : Marguis; Claudia Malet; Horvat
‘RENT | Ro. ad, St. Michs Iai ee ar oa More than 500,000 tons wel Coastal Station Mc Clarence; , Fannte ‘Ch artes Pity 1
oes — aoe = Japanese merchant shipping M4Y] CABLE ana Wireless (West Indies! Tek Sadia | is
A GIRL for Grocers Department.—Geo,;5@0N revurn to the world’s trade | Ltd. advise that they con now coni-} His Honour B. P. Arrowsmith; TH | CH
BUNGALOW — Fully furnished 3-/|C. Ward & Co., St. Lawrence. lrcutes a Tokyo news agency saig, | cate with the following ships) Hawkins: E. G. De Abreau._ : |
begresm Busmaion sewiy. built, | 15.20.50.~Ta. | General Mac Arthur's Heage |‘"S'S. Myron: S'S Norse Mon tout
¥ miles rom town, | —- ————— ine } _— 5 * that) Yeon: 58.5 Yorse Mieicvtedm: + DEPARTURES By BW. ;
Available for a period of 12 monthe from| CASHIER (Man) ~ For Club work, | @Uarters might let them operafe]5.S. Geologist: SS. Piotercero: S.S.] For TRINIDAD me |
ist. December. Inspection by appoint-| Write stating experience and qualifi-| regular services as early #3 Moonéresi; 5 S$. Mateo: $8. Fort Arnold Drayton; Pearly frastox | is a recognised first grado WATER PAI NT
jrent. Phone 4476, . cations. Box C.B C/o Advocate Navember it was added io bs ; Mercer: 5.S. Sparrow: $.s Aicoaj Algernon Frampton; Busteen Clarke j}
15, 10.50--6n. | AEVIS.. Debts sph aii owners have wae | os issio “ee Yann, ©. > t a Veni car: a. ended sie ncaa Lance Villanwuewn; ;
a matics dditipas iit iis Seta aial S have as Mission ” i 8 or ‘enezuela; §.S. Seaf Norottahml h a " ‘ 4 ‘
_FREELANDS — Maxwel unfurni iplying 75 vessels 2 routes ~7|Bteere: SS, Norse King; S.8.Mar-| kins: Audrey ian ee Being oil-bound. easy of application
eS whe Meme” On os ii Apply, | MISCELLANEOUS Bangkok Pakistan Formosa | pel oun sent were a3. mers 1 ae soe | si + ee
é I e, premises: vale 5 % , aie ane, | esiden ruger:, §,§ Alcoa nid Lawrence; Florence Roby; Jo% f ety 3 ii it
19.10. 50—an India, Tndon:sia, Norvn and, South | Pioneer: $.S8. Catiformo; 8S. Sundia! | Parkinson ae capacity. it is ideally sulted for at
ee =| TO leno! i, America, and Africa, j= 5. Sunavis: 8-S. Sunreil> S.8, ci For JAMAICA: interior decorative rposes where
FLOWER DEW—Maxwell ‘Coast 3| have few hove tee hen et SO }S.S. Monte Altube, 8.8. Olterra.| Elizabeth Mc Rae: Stanley Nicvoli high da th fin 3 ed
Saeaee a oF ae: Fridge, Ratio, | versation — classes Hurry, #roup oF | iM ; ti ae a Seen eekoonie| coe aaa a ae ee
e and all modern conveniences. j .; Werhingten: 3.5 Atlantic ave or A? As
Lb. Gonsalves, Maxwell Road ingle. Mrs. Portillo, Bbineger,Bav & | PU REAC NOTICES | 23) 'Soomvic” so Soin S'S. |’ Xnarew Ham ;
A eee 19. 10.50 }Loide Venezulea: $.S Ransitat J Ss re Hammond STOCKED BY ALL THE
10. 507r , RL Eee en S.S, Rangitoty c INIC
| COMMUNICATION with relatives. | REMOVAL NOTICE : x OUT aren) Gordon: Ket: Gin LEAGING STORES
: Would any of the Atwell family ‘h Miss Olga Coma French Hair Dresser SEAWELL arn oe eee Sole manufacturers :
PUBLIC SALES | Bemados please communicate “wit! pegs to notify her friends end custo- Te ek Wan SISSONS BROTHERS
their brother, Lionel, at 326 West. 47th] mers that she has fenmeed > Aine ARRIVALS BY BWIAI Beresta Wallace; Edward Hunte; Edith & CO. LTO, HULL, ENG.
tox New York, 19, New York,| Road, Carrington's Village From TRINIDAD . me een Allister Mac Gillivra = ————— —————
; 18,10.30—£0 - Tris Smith; Edw i : - : — OT
AUCTION os = 19.10, 50—2n r m award Smith; Luis; John Alleyne; D. Smitt
———————— Ricca catch Sect iri Sei S al . ere.” , O- 2 ;
Dap eer ys Pog poe ge ee ee Me om th - Rodrigues-Gel sa; Densil, Smith; Mar | For PUERTO RICO Barbados Co-Operative Cotton Factory. Plantations Lid.
|} Good condition. Phone 45380 Q CENSE NOTICE | Banish: “Atitiaka’ cneredaras ee wary Carson Rawlins; Winifred Rawlins, 'T. Herbert Ltd. ©, F. Harrison & Co. (B’dos) Ltd
1 will offer for sale ly Public Com-| 15.10.80—2n. | THE application of Holly hols ; jorsford; L, F. Wig-| Benn 8.45 p4.m A. Barn “
petition at my Office VICTORIA STREET : . [holder of Liquor License No. | 33i of ~ me Sy. SHR Gartor’ & Oo.

on TUESDAY 24th at 2 p.m. the dwetl-
ing house called ‘SEAFORD” jon sea!
standing on
at WORTHING, CHRIST CHUKC!
house contains open verandah, drawing.

H



dining, 4 bedrooms, W.C. Bath, Electrie Gardens



light, enclosed yard. For inspection

and terms of sale apply: Dial 27
R, ARCHER McKENZIE
Auctioneer

17.10, 50—6n



UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received from the In-
surance Company, I will sell at Port
Royal Garage, St, Michael’s Row, cn
Friday, October 20th (1) 1948 Vauxheil
14 H.P. damaged in accident; (1) 1050
Ford Prefect Datnaged by fire. fale



at 2 p.m. Terms CASH
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer
15,10,50.—4n

REAL ESTATE

The proj erty known as
Place”,



“The Market
standing on 5,225 square feet of
land at Orange Street, Speightstown, St
Peter. The above property will be set
up for sale by Public Competition at our
Office, James Street, on Friday 27th
October, 1950, at 2 p,m
to Mr. C. H.

For inspection, apply
Jordan, Speightstown
YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors.

19.10.50.—8n

Pp



PERSONAL

THE PUBLIC are hereby warned
against giving credit to any person or
persons whomsoever in my name, as
1 do not hold myself responsible for
enyone else contracting any debt cr
debts in my name unless by a writte
order signed by me.

Signed KENNETH MORRISON,
ist Avenue, Bush Hall,
St, Michael
18.10,50—2n,



THE PUBLIC are hereby warned
against giving credit to my wif?
LOUISE BARKER (nee Jordan, Cobbin)
os I do not hold myself responsible tor

her or anyone else contracting any
debt or debts in my name unless by 3
~| written order signed by me.
Signed CHARLES BARKER,
Rollings




Michael







St
18.10.50
public are here ay rned
against giving credit to my wife
LILIAN STAURT (n'ee Harris) as 1

do not hold myself responsible for her

or anyone else contracting any debt or

debts in my name unless by a written

order signed by me.

Sgd. THORONTON_ STUART,
Brittons Hull,

St. Michael.
19,10.50—2n

PURLIC NOTICES

POSTPONED

THE meeting of the Queen’s College
Old Girls Association that was to have









taken place this afternoon, has beer
postponed until further notice

17.10, 50—2n
oN MO oe

APPLICATIONS (accompanied by bap-
tiemal certificate) will be received at
my office up to 3 p.m, on Friday, 20th
October, 1950, for one or more vacant
Christ Church Vestry Exhibitions tenable
at the Girls’ Foundation School.




Applicants must be daughters otf
parishioners in straitened circumstan-
ces, and must not be less than ten

years six months or more than twelve
years on the date of the examination.
Candidates must present themseives
for examination to the Headmistress at
the Girls’ Foundation School on Friday
27th October at 9.30 a.m.
Application forms must be obtained

from my office.
WOOD GODDARD
Clerk of the Vestry,
Christ Church.
11,10.50—Sn

NOTICE

THE WOMEN’S SELF HELP ‘will be
opening on Friday 27th October. Mem-
bers are asked to bring in their work
from Monday 23rd. Flowers will sot
be accepted before the morning of the
27th. Consignors will be paid as usual

op Friday 27th. Subscriptions $1.00.
17.10.50-—-6n,



toca

NOTICE

“SEALED tenders for the replacement
of the ceiling of the St. Philip's Parish
Church will be received by thé under-
signed up to the 28th October 1950. tn-
formation on the type of material re-
quired for this work can be obtained
from the Church Warden, D. D. Gar-
ner Esq., Marchfield, St. Philip.

W. U. GOODING,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Philip
17.10.50-—6n





LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of LeRoy Millar, holder
of Liquor License No. 334 of 1950, grant-
ed to him in respect of the bottom floor
of a 3 storey wall building at White's
Alley, St. Michael, for permission to use
said Liquor License at the bottom floor
of a 2 storey wall building in Tudor
Street, City

Dated this 18th day of October, 1950
To the Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”

Signed T. SMALL,
for Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A, on Monday
the 30th day of October, 1950 at 11 o'clock

am
H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
19.10,50.—-1n,





The One Hundredth Annual Agricultural Exhibition will be held
Queen’s Park on 6th and 7th December, 1950.
Sealed tenders in writing are invited for =, right to sell Liquors,

2.

Teas and for supplying Breakfasts an? Dinners.
have decided that the success
facilities to avoid congestion.
Sealed tenders in writing are
Drinks, Te es and Light Refreshments.
Tenders in writing are invited for the operating of Amusements.

9

ai

4.

5.
and mu
| Street
6.





efore 3 p.m.,



lands of GRAEME HALL |














ONE (1) Dachshund. Pu ; 1950 granted to Vernon Yard im respect}
| Dial 4140 or 8509. 19 10.80-In. | of a board & shingle shop at Ivy Cen |
iasernierees Puc tee la ae at lea tral Rd., St. Michael, for permission |
PAYING GUEST to use said Liguér License at said
Mrs. Rose, Minster House, Marine! Premises ivy Central Rd., St. Michael
would like a paying guest Dated this h day of October 1950
Charming house and garden, $28.00 a To the Police Magistrate, Dist, “A
week breakfast and tea. Other meals Signed H. NICHOLL j
when required $1.20. Telephone 2758 Applicant
18.10,50—2n. | N.B.—This application witl be cotsig-
. | ered a Licensing Court to be helt
at Police Court, District "A", on Mom
EDUCATIONAL da the 30th day of October 1950 at
lL o'clock, a.m ®
BE. A. McLEOD, |
Police Magistrate, Dist !

:



ee ——

Tenders must state the form of Amusement
All tenders must be sealed and marked
reach the Secretary’s Office,

All Firms and Persons desirous of obtaining
S are re quested to







VACANT SCHOLARSHIPS | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE



The application of Violet Branker
GIRLS’ FOUNDATION SCHOOL holder of Liquor License No, 716 of 195
There are one or more vacant Founda- | granted to her in respect of a board and






tion Scholarships at the Christ Church] shingle shop at Tweedside Road, St Mi-'
Girls’ Foundation School. Applicants must] chaci, for permission to use said Liquor
be children of Parents residing in the} License at a board and shingle shop with |



Parish of Christ Church and who are in| will frontage at Tweedside Road, St.
straitened circumstances, Michael

The applicants must be between the Dated this 18th day of October, 195¢. |!
ages of 10 years 6 months and 12 years] To the Police Magistrate, Dist. “A". {

on the day of the examination, which
will be held by the Headmistress at the
School on Friday 27th October at 9.30

Signed VIOLET BRANKER,
Appkcant. |
N.B.—This application will be consid-









a.m. ered at a Licensing Court to be held at |
Forms of application can be obtained} Police Court, District “A”, on Monda y
from the Secretary, W. H. Antrobus, Hil-| the 30th day of October, 1050, at
ton House, Bay Street, These forms must] o'ciock a m
be returned accompanied by a baptismal E. A MC LEOD,
certificate to the Secretary not later than Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
4 p.m, on Friday nar ie as 19.10.50.—1n.
H. ANTROBUS, =
Sec. Gov. Body, er
Girls’ Foundation School. 4
B:10.50—8n. FIGHT
|
ENTRANCE EXAMINATION
GIRLS’ FOUNDATION VLCHOOL

An Entrance Examination for the
School Year January—July 1951 will be
held at the s¢hool on Friday 27th October
1950 at 9.30 am, Applications will be
received up to Friday 20th October by
the Headmistress and must be accompan-
led by a baptismal! certificate and a testi-
monial from the Headmistress of the last
school attended by the pupil.

Applicants must be between the ages
of 8 years and 12 years on the date of
the examination.

Parents or Guardians accompanying
their daughters or wards are hereby noti-
fied that there is no accommodation for
them at the school on the date of the
examination and that the examination of
applicants will not start until they leave

the premises.
H. ANTROBUS,
Sec. Gov. Body,
Girls’ Foundation School.

INFLUENZA

with Mentholated pre-war or
(4% Pint Quality) |

LIMOLENE

This grade is especially effective
against FEVER and Feverish
Conditions.







8.10,50-—8n
i 24¢. a Bottle at Your DEALER
NOTICE areca ened ae a aciiaaeniciine a
546560 4, +644
\SEALED Wenders tor the erection | SP OCoo Per Tee e TEI OE |
ef a Communal Bath and Toilet in
Ch: Village, St. Philip; will be re- FOR SALE
ceived by the undersigned up to the] ¢
26th October 1950. Plans and _ Specifi- % BUGGY AND HARNESS—One
eations of same, can be seen from tne % Buggy, 2 Sets Spring Harness,
Ch. Warden D, D, Garner Esu., 8 1 Double Mule Truck 1. Single ,
Marchfield, St. Philip. Mule Truck Apply: Charie
W. U. GOODING, s* McKenzie, Rowans, St. George.
Parochial Treasurer, | 17,10. 503.
St. Philip ¥.

Q
ERLE

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

HOUSING BOARD
Vacancy for Temporary Clerk of Works

APPLICATIONS are invited for the temporary post of Clerk o
Works, Housing Board.

The salaty of the post, which is non-pensionable and terminable
at one month’s notice on éither side, will be at the rate of $1,200
per annum,

Applicants should have a knowledge of building construction and
materials.

Applications, statifig age and experience, together with copies of
testimonials, should be addressed to the Secretary, Housing Board
the Garrison, and will be accepted up to 4 p.m. on 24th October, 1950

19.10.50-—-2%

17.10,50—6n.









ULUCAAWAULULEOUAUEUGUEN UE aa

POLICE NOTICE

Lorrios, Trailers and Tractors—Inspection for Renewal of
Licenses for 1950—51.

APPLICATIONS for inspection of lorries, trailers and tractors
used for agricultural purposes only may be submitted to the 'Traris-
port Section of the Department of Highways and Transport before
the 15th November, 1950.

2. Forms will be supplied on application to the Department of
Highways and Transport (Transport Section) but will not be sent
through the post.

3. Inspection of these vehicles will commence on Wednesday,
lst November, 1950



4. Vehieles will only be inspected as above if they are already
registered fort the period 1949/50.
R. T. MICHELIN,
Commissioner of Police.

Police Headquarter
Bridgetown,
12th Oct 19,10.50—3n

ober, 1950.

ee

Diesel Mechanic—Seawell Airport

APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Grade “A” Diesel
Mechanic at Seawell Airport.

Applicants should have a thorough knowledge of Diesel Engines
and will he required to pass a test.

The post is temporary and terminable by a month's notice on
either side, Remuneration will be in accordance with the Key Scale
rates fixed for Grade “A” Mechanics,

Applications stating age and qualifications should be submitted
to the Manager, Seawell Airport, from whom further information may
be obtained, not later than the 2ist October, 1950.

14.10.50,3n,





NOTICE



N.B. The Committee

ful Tenderer must DrOY ide separate Bar

invited for the selling of Sweet



and the size of space required.
“Tenders for Exhibition”
Bovell & Skeete Building, Lucas
October,





3ls



Tuesdz



sites
ions in

for advertising

forward their applicat writing to the

October
‘



J. R. PETERKIN,

Secretary





4%
iii





SHIPPING NOTICES

MONTREAL AUSTRALIA NEW ZEA.) | s>==2ssesaa AUSTRALIA NEW ZEA-















LAND LINE LIMITED
(MLA.N.Z, LINE) M.V. “T. B. RADAR” wilt
is "4 accept Cargo nd Pa 1)
thesis pve an eee St. Lucta, St x Vineent,. Srenwce
Septembe:
oy a we z eecsber 28th, Devon- he Souda, See et
ctober Ist ydney October 7th, M.V, * Ps
Brismane October 14th, arriving at Cargo aa Pamediee are
Sheen eee te 11th. Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
; essols have ample space for Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing i
eee oer Sven ane general cargo. Friday 20th. {
ry pted on rough bills of uM. ¥ ” > y
fone with transhinment at Trinidad accept Cargo salt favenidede 1
ae tensed ae Guiana, Windward St. Vincent, St, Lucia, "Grenada 4
: - “2 further particulars apply:- alot, Avie, Mee Radia) '
NESS. WITHY & Co. L oon whi {
TRINIDAD, a etree BWL, Bch ero or
aes DA COSTA 2 ong =
A ‘0 & Co. Ltd.,
BARBADOS, Tel. No. 4047 }
B.W.t en ;
= SS SSS
GooDs!
CUROIS,
8.8. “LIBPRVILL&" 28th Sept 12th Oct, |
F
NEW YORK SSRVICE |
Arr. !
ae . Ny. Bdos |
“a OR i 29th Sept. Sth Oct |
. TLIN 13th Oct 23rd Oct.



nea Nee





ORIENTAL

SILKS, (Se Habla Espanol)

THANTIS

Pr. Wm, Hry. St. DIAL 3466

a

A Large Assortment of



Send us your orders for... .

Earthenware Sinks & Basins
Earthenware Gulley Traps

Bibles & Hymn & Prayer Books
ROBERTS & CO.—DIAL 3301—High Street

and Spare Grates
THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(Articulos)
JEWELLERY,

(CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Propsietors)
Cnr. of Broad and Tudor Streets.

ARRIVED

a small shipment of
DE LUXE HOT PLATES
Table Models -
3 BOILING BURNERS
1 GRILL BURNER and PAN
Super finish Green Enamet,
See them at your
«GAS SHOWROOM
and buy before they are al! sold

CANADIAN SER
\OUTHBOUND en | rp K ¢ STREE ET
S Sails Sails Arrives ROE EBU

ay. ee bakin Montreal Halifax Barbados |
vee lige . BER" October 7th October 10t! oO |
3's. . .
ALCOA PARTNER October azth October 30th November 10th a) cl tT *
NORTHBOUND rer | Modern, Spacious and well built Commercial oe .

Arrives | | 2,488 Sq. feet. Ideal for Bakery, rorerys PB ne wg oie

“ATC Barbados | ‘ en to offers which must _be sibnr must be submitted to the
8,8. ALCOA PARTNER” October 10th For St. JOHN, St Lawrence: i me OP sf
2 River Ports |
5.8. “ALCOA PEGASUS” October 2ist For St, Lawrence ! N
= i a 7 Ss" t § ‘ ¢ River Ports
5.4 ALCOA POLARIS October 3ist For St. Lawrence River Ports | e

These vessels have limited passengers aceommodation. | AF. S., BVA,
| ope 7 Building
Apply: DACOSTA & CO., LTD, —Canadian Servic Pouns ae ‘ iserations
ROBERT THOM LTD.—New York and Gulf Service. | presse ESTATE AGENT ~~ AUCTIONEER : — SURVEYOR’
t hati



FIREWOR

LARGE AND VARIED ASSORTMENT IN

ne

PAINS CELEBRATED |

KS

Byard Broadcast Spangles Mt. Pelee
sale es Chinese Drops .. Mt. Vesuvius
None . Flower Pots .. Witch’s Cauldrons

Mapeea Prince of Wales Feathers . Red Lights

aad Yew Trees .. Green Lights

Rae Squibbs Butterfly Twinklers
....., Golden Rain .Emerald Cascades
..... Amber Electrolypes .Radium Dazzlers
..,..,. Serpents . Forge Fires

od Crackers Dizzle Dazzles
...... Electric Whizzers ., Roman Candles Asstd.
...... Torpedoes .. Whirly Twirlers
ia 3c Zing Booms .. Wheels
....., Flying Eagles .. Rockets Asstd.

i Le Blue Devils .Jack-in-the-box
eee es Radium Dazzlers .Mines with Serpents

.Cannon Crashers

¢

.Mt. Vesuvius

Mt. Pelee
eave Golden Rain ..... Prismatic Lights
. Serpents .Mines with Serpents
MNES Sr eae rs Be ke ee ea ee Forge Fires
Mei hn Roman Candles Asstd. ., Crackers
.Starlights _Jack-in-the-box
Wheels -Roman Candles Asstd.

..Dragon Flames
.Mt. Pelee

Canon Crashers
.Radium Dazzlers
.Witch’s Cauldrons
.Crackers

..... Mt. Vesuvius . Wheels
= i .Dizzle Dazzle
.....Broadeast Spangles Roman
.... Forge Fires a

igor ate Emerald Cascades
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Dynamines
Jack-in-the-Box
Spangled Stuer Bombs
Golden Rain



Keep this list. Fill in Quantity,

it in and we will put them up for you.

KNIGHT'S DRUG

Rockets Asstd.
Butterfly

..Monster Fountains
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Butterfly Twinklers
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.. Devil-among-Tailors
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..., Jack-in-the-Box
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the-box

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with Serpents

-Poman Candles Asstd.
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sf

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yn e wee Crackers .. +... Bombs 2¢. each
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re Mt. Vesuvius g £
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and bring or send



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ADVOCATE
v 50/4

COUGHING

_ovg 'S DANGEROUS

=
Every time you cough
your lungs are strained,
and your heart is over-
worked. Swp YouR
cough by taking VENO’S

PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS THURSDAY, 19TH OCTOBER, 1950

Cuke Awarded Joe Louis Willi
£3,000 Damages Fight Next Month

1
|
“In the event of a collision, be- |






















@ From page | ‘ ,
tween two vehicles, one of which 66, s ” att

is on the wrong side, it will be Come-Back Campaign” Still On

presumed that the latter has been

principle of assessing damages
was that the person should be re-



, i | COUGH MIXTURE! This
ereeed to ie ebay —— negligent.” CHICAGO, October 18. | world-famous remedy
s S$ was practic: 2. ‘| . 1

“The Chief Judge gave examples Former World Heavyweight Champion, Joe Louis was stops coughing, makes

Reason Necessary

breathing easy, soothes
On the other hand, the Chief

| away soreness,
and protects the lungs.

of instances in which that could

hich injuri granted an Illinois boxing licence today to face the Argen-
be done, cases in which injuries



-- comes out



could be rectified by medical
treatment. In the case they were
trying, however, they had heard
from the doctor that the plaintiff
was a bleeder, and that as a re-
sult of that it would be hazardous
to attempt any surgical operation.

If they came to consider the
question of damages therefore, it
would be their duty to endeavour
to substitute what could not be

Judge said, it was also laid down
that it is the duty of the driver
of a vehicle to go over to his im-
proper side if he sees that a
collision is imminent, and if in the
exercise of his judgment and
reason he thinks that by going

over to his improper side he can
avoid the collision.

Therefore, from the legal point

of view and from the common

actually computed—-a reasonable conse point of view the case for

amount of compensation for the
injury which they had heard was

the plaintiff was sound
accepted it,

if they

and the case put

tine boxer, Cesar Brion in the opening bout of a “comeback”
campaign at.Cincinatti on November 29.

Gujerat Dismisses
Commonwealth
For 194

BOMBAY, Oct. 18.
The Commonwealth cricketers

to-day began a three-day match
against Gujerat here,

and after

Louis in his first public com-
ment since deciding to try again
for the crown declared “I trained
cna way and fought another for
Crarles”. He lost to Charles, who
i: considered the world champion
in America, on points on Septem-
ber 27

Louis said he thought he need-
d three or four fights before
halenging Charles. Reminded
hat this might take until next

une and he would then be a year

eS ap one
yo te ET



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melting! delicious

i G shortcake’... all
ee oe een forward for the Defence was scoring 194 in their first innings Clder, the 36-year-old former ati Maced ts tne at LA Foods,

The Chief, Judge then went into equally sound from the defen- dismissed three of the local side hampion replied, “so will . bts I gts hpaks.
other aspects of damages relating dant’s point of view. for 53 before stumps were drawn. Charles’. Louis declared he was ass

to that case, and points of evi-
dence which they should take into

Referring to the fact that

account, including the fact that defendant at the present time was

there was no loss of earning in-
volved, the fact that the plaintiff
was 94 years old and not a young

advanced in age and faulty in
memory, the Chief Judge told the
‘ury that his evidence should be

agai
weal
first time in five games, but his
side were sent in to bat on the “
matting wicket, a move which ap-

Frank Worrell of the West Indies
captained the Common-
and lost the toss for the

‘n better condition in training
han he was for the actual fight
ith Charles. He said he Had
sur shots of penicillin to comba
pre-fight cold, the last taken
wo days before the fight.









2) sPecmm renter
ORE omUrACVURET TO Hm. Bim CHORES oF

AUNTLE’ & P.LUMERS

man of 21 and the fact that it treated with a certain degree of ‘uetifi “But I’m not making this as an

was likely that he would suffer a caution. In considering his evid- ee aad ~~ ~ Peenee aw oxcuse”, he quickly added. .

permanent disability barring him ence they would bear in mind the a Capertee Crows oO HY nr —Reuter. d, delicious

from some of the amenities of statement which he gave to the touring team struggling for (‘f \

life. ; runs against the spin bowlers, and See dal wholesome
police soan after the accident. thei = he low I e we :

The Chief Judge compared that tour. ‘They lost six wickets too More Profit Bl SC Uo: and nutritious
ss “a ‘ ; y s' ¢kets for
Proof Necessary statement with evidence given j99 tung but then the Australian, i“

Continuing, he dealt with the
degree of proof necessary in such
a case, saying that it was not as
great as in a criminal case. It
was for them to decide whether
the plaintiff has established his
ease, taking into account all the
probabilities, and exercising their
judgment both in the light of
their experience and knowledge
of things of that description.

The Chief Judge reminded the
jury of Mr. Reece's criticism of
the failure of the plaintiff to call
certain witnesses, and said that

subsequently, and told the jury
they would have the statement for
perusal when they retired. He
also reminded the jury of the
Particular of negligence which the
Defence had put in at the last
moment and of Mr. Ward's
criticism in that connection,

“Drove On Wrong Side”

That Particular was: “That
the plaintiff drove on the wrong
side of the road up to a few
moments of the collision and then

George Tribe, who extricated the

visitors from a similar position
last week, again came to the res-
cue. Displaying fighting qualities,
Tribe kept up his end and collect-
ed an aggressive 55 which included
9 fours before being run out.

Worrell was the next highest
scorer with 34, while another West
Indian Test player, Sonny Rama-
dhin, made 1 not out.

Vino Mankad, the Indian Test
all-rounder, caused the touring

In French
Horse Racing

PARIS.
French horse racing could be
made five times as profitable as it
is to-day with a few modern im-
provements. This is the opinion
ef Wilbur Clark, an expert from
Las Vegas, Nevada.



Maralyn\,

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a wonderful neW flavour... plenty
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mi

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80z. and | 60z. TINS





: ; . 6 t t “ame “Why, they could raise their
that applied equally to the de- y;eturned to the near side with- wen ae por ae hee a take 500 per cent by putting in A BOVRIL QUALITY PRODUCT
fence to a certain extent. ou warning.” & wickets for 73 runs.—Reuter a toteboard and an announcer,”

The Chief Judge referred to the ; r iz S Clark said after watching the

salient points of the evidence on
both sides. Dealing with drivi

on the improper side of the r

he cited a passage which Mr,
Ward had also cited, and which
says that, “it is laid down that by
virtue of the rule of the road that
it is the duty of vehicle drivers
. . +. . in the normal case to
keep to a certain side of the road.

“Which side that shall be varied

The Chiet vuage aiso spoke of
a brake mark which only one
witness had seen and whch Mr
Ward had said was not proved
lo have been the brake mark of
Vr. Cuke’s car. On the other
vend Mr, Reece had argued that
the brake merk proved that de-
feadant’s story was right, that
ye had seen Cuke driving on the
voproper side of the road and

e-—_e—o

the Chief Judge reminded the
jury that there were two se-
parate Heads of Damages —
£4, 3s. 4d. special damages and
then general damages.

At Mr. Reece’s request. he
explained that ‘f a person is
driving a motor car and a 100
yards away he sees another car

horse races at Longchamps

Clark should know. He owns
the famous Deseré Inn at Las
Vegas, one of the most successful
zambling establishments in the
world, He parlayed a $9,000 bar
into his $4,000,000 Desert Inn in
a little over nine years

Ceriie Krausnich, Clark’s horse
handicapper at Las Vegas, who is
with Clark on an inspection toyr

with the circumstances; but the that to avoid a collision, the cc ming on its improper side of ra = a gambling establish-
principal rules are by inviolate cefendant, Skinner had pulled and going slowly, the first per- Wan ant nc paket mans
cus om that wheeled traffic keeps cver to his improper side, son naturally was nov going over ou Cont even know over

to the left. Two vehicles meeting

one another must keep each to his saying that the cr tical

left or near side of road. One

ended by
period
for their consideration would b>

The Chief Judge

to his improper side. He would
keep on his proper side with the
natural expectancy that the other

vehicle overtaking another must when the cars were nearing each: fellow would go over to his

here when the race has started.
They start them way on the other
side of the field without announc-
ing it, and the first you know that





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cal

WITH THE CORREGT-SHAPE TOOTHBRUSH






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v the race is on is When you see ¢ na a your allegiance from the first sip.
pass that other on the right or off cther. He told vhem they would proper s de, But if vne other fel- them coming down the home CH WHISKY {)
side. ne there is no other have the Sta’ement of Claim low presisted in driving en me stretch. Nobody even cheers { “core — 2
vehicle on the road a driver is not and the Deience which they wrong side up to a few feet of With a public address system tell- ‘ Pi ‘ é
bound to keep to the lett, but if could examine, as well as the the car driving on its proper jng them who is leading right ae edernalclr lear, iGHLAND
the driver of a vehicle elects to certified copy of the stavement side, it would be the duty of the from the start, they'd get all 7 io uses LEITH SCOTLAND
go on the wrong side, then a which the defendant had given driver of the laiter to go over worked up like they do at home.” ne

higher standard of care would be
required from the driver.

«co the police,
At the request of Mr.

to his wrong side in order to

Ward avoid a collision.



C.C. WILL NOT SEND RESOLUTION
TO SECRETARY OF STATE

@ From Page 5.
prove the West Indian services hy
means of a subsidy.
Nevertheless, in considering the
extent of the estimated subsidy
required in the schemes submitted
tor their examination His

duction in Jamaica expanded as
rapidly as forecast.

As regards the Eastern Carib-
bean the position was the reverse.
and it appeared that in running
ships to and from the Caribbean
area as a whole, passengers coulci

arrangements for special sailings
of the s.s. “Empress of Australia’
and the s.s, “Georgie” in order to
assist in meeting the immediate
passenger demands of the Eastern
Caribbean. |

In 1950 it has not up to

“How're you going to know
how to bet when you don’t even





know what the odds are on ¢ %& Wisdom's angle in the’ ¥% Wisdom's widely-spaced
horse?” Clark asked. of cahee handle is the secret of tufts ‘comb’ between teeth
put in an electric toteboard it its comfortable control. clean where decay begins.

would pay for itseif in the first
race with the increased betting
Yes, it would run up the take five
times, "INS.





"Can you lend me
a Paradol tablet?” eet,



Wisdoni

ADDIS LTD. OF HERTFORD, MAKERS OF THE FIRST TOOTHBRUSH IN 1780

DUNLOP

Majesty’s Government felt it to sot be relied upon to provide more presont b eA possible io arrang, “an \

be out of proportion to the benefit than one-third of the revenue, & similar sailing. Further fie F oO

which might accrue to the Carib- cargo providing the remaining Sideration is nevertheless bein r
bean area, having regard to the two-thirds. given as a matter of urgency t a

already substantial financial assis. _ Hence, the Commonwealtn. the possibility of providing

tance given by His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment to West Indian Govern-
ments for other purposes and to
the many other and more pressing
calls upon the financial resources

Shipping Committee’s recommen
dation that the problems of
passenger services to the Eastern
Caribbean and cargo services to
the Western Caribbean should be

special sailing to assist thos» de-
siring to return to the West
Indies from the United Kingdom
in this Autumn,



Wuen A Girt doesn't want to leave
class and have to make embuarrasg.
tq explanations—it's Paradol she
asks for. For Parad:



CAR TYRES





ps



SCOTCH WHISKY

Sole Importers :-—

W.=.MONROE&CO.LTD.
Bridgetown, Barbados.

MACDONALD &

MUIR LTD,, DISTILLERS, LEITH, SCOTLAND,

==—_—_—_————__ «-

Baskets





N.
It will, however, be appreciate x I means quick From our Home Produets Dopt.
available for the development cf regarded as a single problem and that in the light of the politica relief from suffering caused by
the West Indies. solved by the provision of ships situation throughout the work periodic pains—heade.' 7 i

In addition His Majesty’s Gov-

equipped for carrying bananas and

to-day His Majesty’s Governmen

1 |

without disagreeable after-offec ts. |





ernment was compelled to take citrus fruit as well as passengers have the greatest difficulty is Ask your druggist toy Paradel :

into account the apparent un- In consequence, His Majesty's securing suitable tonnage for thi: scientifically compeunded from { Waste Paper Baskets
willingness or inability of West Government set up an inter- purpose, tonnage which inciden-| ingredients, The name “Dr. Chase’,

Indian communities (British departmental working party to tally is already fully committed to] is your assurance. ag he

Guiana excepted) to make finan- consider a practical solution on migrant and trooping activities, *

cial provision towards an_ in-
proved passenger service.

Moreover, the proposals in- In the light of the anticipated in a sugar arate, a beh also PARABOL
volved the laying down of new increase in banana production carried a reasonable number of . " 7
tonnage and ship building prices particularly in Jamaica, it was passengers but no longer do so. mmm Quick Reliof from Puin mmm FOR ADDED

were then considered to be at
their peak. In the circumstances,
it was necessary to inform the
firms that His Majesty's Govern-
ment considered that they woutd
not be justified in providing the
funds. required under their pro-
posals, but they were at the same

time invited to continue to ex- less inducement to embark on a ; : ss a x on Laundr Baskets
plore the possibility of providing building programme owing first sia aan tee'o Saute tenes $ Some As ects Of 3 y
* Perw\dequate Services _the Cameroons whieh has had the i, the services provided by the] Breet 3
. Com ie |Generale Trans-At- i i »
The Commonwealth Shippin; effect of laying up several Elder lantinue will ances this ouanee lt Barbadian History 3 Each__$4.00 & $5.00
Committee reported that so far as and Fyffes’ vessels, and Secondly, Droblem for the Caribbean area, | % BY % RIBUTORS
the western Caribbean wes con- to the probable failure of the 1959 ju they are nevertheless consid. H. A. VAUGHAN % DIST!
cerned passenger services were cur own banana crop to reach its ering further what inducements » A a rH ¥
likely to be adequate within s crtimated yield, : it may be possible to make to THE BRITISH COUNCI .
year or so, but that freight services Special Sailings interest the British shipping in- % a eee + 2 DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING C0 LTD
were likely to be short of require. During the last two years it dustry in the West Indian P&S-19 Basinn e Pri is x sag 4 ve ep er 0.
ments, especially if banana pro- has been possible to make senger trade. x ee anh 3 a: Octo- $ (ECKSTEIN BROS.) 7 °
% er 2th, at 8.15 p.m. x} 5
Th ll Do . - % Fee tor Course. : $1.00 &) |
cy It Eve Time Aepistered U. 5. Patent Oftee By Jimmy Hatlo Meret, at rte Mical x | 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street
ssocis c. R
F . = “ Single lectures 24c. &| ' lai
| . he ¢ . _
DF] AAAVEE ITS NOT HOARDING. Ac NRYDOUHELP THE Leocccoescoesescewuesect ne seiestiaeiiedenahiaa
RL BUT IN THE Gr —
p OCERY STORE THE CAR~ I HAVE Cee Te




Sf Ge
PRD ee
LN i gt SLE
Sl Ar NS

STAMP AT A TIME +>

those lines,

hoped that the companies interes.
ted in the banana trade might be
willing to consider the building
of additional banana tonnage
which might be equipped also with
reasonable passenger accommoda-
tion, but unfortunately, the Com-
panies concerned have, at presen:




To RUN OVER TO THE
POST OFFICE- 4



It has been represented that,
before the war, vessels engaged

It should, however, be pointed out
that both of the ships which were
specially built for carrying pas-
sengers and cargo were sunk
during the war and have been re-
placed by “Liberty” ships, suit-
able only for the carriage of
general and bulk cargoes












DR. CHASE’S

yt POSRPRROOPO SOOO FORE

x UNIVERSITY

Ss COLLEGE OF THE
% WEST INDIES

% Extra-Mural Department
Â¥ A Course of Lectures

oS



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F

S264

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PAGE 1

IWf.F EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATI THUmSDAY 19TH OCTOBER. 1M Cuke Awarded / oe Louis Will £3,000 Damages Fight Next Month so 0 I'rwN Mir 1 "In thr event of a collision, bel*fn IMVO vchiclw, one of which vsein dsmaa** on the wrong side, it will be -•Ll h ". "T '" '"*'' I'rrwnied thai the latter has km-n stored U> his previ.ni* condition ;,__i 10 __ r % %  (lias-nt. The Cht.l Judfl gave i*.iinpU %  JMIII N* r p\ir\ of instance* in which th*l could ,, ,f** "*"" ,[' ... be don.-. COeei '" which Injuries %  *•* her h "ff"* C,,, *' f could be rectified by medic.) .^T.^'V Tf •^' 1 f w *'"*" irentment In the cise thev were Tn ** * *"* dul * <"• <" rtvrr trying. hcW W I fi they hnd heard "' vehicle to go over to his Imfrom the doctor that the plaintiff was %  bleeder, and that at a result of lit.I || would IKhazardous to attempt any surgiIf they came to consider the %  if damages therefore. It theti dut) IQ endeavour to substitute what could not be %  irusJIl) computed I r**;isonablc .'•mount of compensation for the IIM>I-T side if he sees that coUiatOk. Is imminent, and if in th" exercise of his judgment and peratlom reuson he thinks that by going over to his Improper side he ran •void the collision. "Gome-Back Campaign" Slill On cue u IB. Tormn World Heuvywi-iht Champion. J<>I %  d .in IlUnoJi boxing Ucvno U lintboxer. Cesar Brion in the opening bout of ;i "a n* campaign at Cincinattt on November 29. — Louis In his (,n>t pubta i Mm.doefcttnf in try again 1 trained LMther foi (<• Ion to Chi x.isidered the world .-hninpli Therefore, from the legal point <;f view and from the common tense point of view the cm It injury which thev had heard w ( t 'l* 15 1 "* rt , ,r ""' ^ Und *£ VSBi be permanent. -JJJJJ & !" <& -J wa The Chief. Judge then went into equally sound from the clefetiottier aspects of damages relating dant's point of view. to that case, and points of evidence which they should take Into Referring to the Tact that account, including the fact that defendant at the preeen; time wns there was no loss of earning inadvanced in age and faulty in volved. the tact that the plaintiff memory, the Chief Judge told the was 34 years old and not a young L ury that his evidence should be man of 2l and the fact that it r iitVd with a certain degree of was likely that he would suffer a au e,on. In considering his evid££?"""m VlB bain ? t E hta <-<* **"> would *** r in mind the from some of the amen.ties of ^(emetil which he gave to the iwllce soon after the accident l'ro.,1 ssVsaassssskssi Tne t -' nlef jLO r ewnpared that a SS iil£ tB: wL'no."^ thc wouM h * < h statement to aTeoTas^VSmmaT"." 1 U 'T^Lr 1 *' % ."'^ fi was for them to decide whether i 1 0 ,, """'"d" 1 "• Jury of OH the plaintiff has established his Partlc ' 1 '"' of negligence which the case, taking into account all the I*"""* had put in at th* last probabilities, and exercising their rnoment and of Mr. Ward's judgment both in the light of mlieisn. in that connection. Unit experience and knowledge of things of that description. "Drove On Wrong Side" The thief Judge reminded the That Particular was: "Th:.' l! ,y M Heece's criticism of the plainMl drov e on the wron* the failure of the plaintiff to call ride of il:c road up to a few certain witnesses and said that moment of the collision and then that Jpp hed eoually lo the doreturned to the near sid c wlthfence to a certain extent The Chief Judge referred fo the salient points of tni evidence on both sides Dealing with driving on the improper side of the road he cited i Ward had savs that, "it is laid down that by virtue of the rule of the road thai it is the duty of vehicle driven in the normal case to keep to a certain side of Ihe road. warning The Chiei juuge also spoke %  >( brake mark which only one -lines* had seen and wh ch Mr %  age which Mr. grjgc] had ^ald was not proved Ml have been the brake mark ot >.r. Cuke's car On the other ad Mr. Rvece had argued th... tl e brake rocrk proved that de'i .idant's story was right, that Khad seen Cuke driving on the proper side of the road and %  stances; but the that to avoid a collision, ih.are by Jnviolate I'erendant. Skinner had pulled ver to his improper side. The Chief Judge ended t>v Gujerat DismisseH Commonwealth For 194 UOMbAY. Oct. IB The Ci.iiiinonwealiii o K-,1., | to-da> began a tnrw-daj nkBtCh agaiiutt Gujerat here, and after souring 194 in their first buUngi dismissed three of the local sidc for 53 before stumps were drawn Frank Worrell of the West Indie* again captained the Commonwealth and lost the toss for the first time in live games, but his bldo were sent in to but on the matting wicket, u move which appeared at llr.it to be justified. A capacity CTOWd K 20.000 saw the louring team struggling finruns against the spin bowltr t j and their total was the lowest of the tour. They lost six *rtd 109 runs but then the Australia i George Tribe, who extricated the visitors from a similar po last week, again came to the rescue. Displaying fighting qualities. Tribe kept up his end and collected an aggressive 5f which included 9 fours before being run out. Worrell was the next highest scorer with 34, while another W*H Indian Test player, Sonny Ramadhin, made 1 not out. Vino Mankad. the Indian Test all-rounder, caused the team the most trouble and camq nut with the excellent figure* f H wlekets for 73 nmi —Heater r 27 i %  kng Charlos. Iti-iniiidou until next line and he would then be a yetn Ida*, the 38-year-ol.i former hamplon rapist d T..iilf" LOUM %  londitioii in han he was for the actual tlgh 1 •ith Charles. He saM be nd 4 intiu-illn lo comba prc-tight cold, the last taken wo days before the fight. "But I'm not making this as an % %  i.ied —Renter. ad %  Whn ii side that shall be with the cin prlndsMil rui cul om that wheeled traffic kec|i„ to the left Two vehicles meeting the Chief Judge reminded die lury ihat therr .were two separate Heads of Damigcs — fl 3s. 4d. special danusi liien general damages At Mr |h ne*> lequetl he explained that 'f a person is driving a motor car and a IbO handlcapper al I More Profit In French Horse Racing PARIS French horse radDi could M made five times u pr tUable as II few modern lmprovemen's This is the opinion f Wilbur Clark, an expert from touring '-"> Vegas. Nevada. "Why, they could raise the talta NO pei % %  n1 i %  pi ttlnp In a loleboard and an announcer,'' Clark said after Watefing the hnrM racea ..t Lot Clark should know. He owns ;he famous Desert Inn at Las Vegas, on ol lb gambling eslah'ishmen' %  m*o his V4.000.000 Deserl Inn li .i Little u% nil %  "h, Clark's horw Vegas, who ll COUGHING 1IS DANGEROUS l-fT ns r vour lun n an %  M! your han votfecd Sup mugh by lakini VEAW— • UMi.il HHIIIII %  Th.| ^p< U world %  fsosoui remedy Mop* [outhms. makes """i"i| riir, •UOUSCS -.. row* fBSStal ft/6atfoesintHe ..-IDfSi fAMitrniMiDr r.. '(oocrn coin asow>.ri! )MTASM UISSMAl SI I MM tSSem 1COCM CMLOSta t touaas :0UCH MIXTURE THE NEW MILK DRINK one another must keep each to hla raying that the cr tleal period ien ( ,r near side of road Ono for their consideration woul-j b vehicle overtaking another must -hen Uie can warg BsMrtDg aacll pass that other on the right or off 'ther. He told them they woul I side. When there is no other lam the Hta ement of Claim vehicle on the road a driver is not and the Deiei.ce which t"<.Iun-I to keeii lo the loll, but If could examine, as well as the tho driver of a vehicle elects to certified copy of the sta^menl go on the wrong side, then a which the defendant had given higher standard of care would be o the police lequired from the driver At the request of Mr Ward C.C. WILL NOT SEND RESOLUTION TO SMMETARY OF STATE .v.irda away hp ttti uwiher c. li, Curt on an liupectlon ln' that In the li-;hl of the snii.iiien throughout lh< worli to-day His Majesty's Govcrnnvii have the greatest difficulty u securing suitable tonnage for tha purpose, tonnage which incidentally is already fully committed L migrant and trooping oetlvltksl It has been represented that, %  ofore the war. vessels engttod in the sugar carrying trade also carried a reasonable nimber of passengers but no longer do so It should, however, be pointed out that both of the ships which were specially built for carrying pas> fengers and cargo were sunk during the war and have been replaced by "Liberty" ships, suitable only for the carmine ol general and bulk cargoes HiMajest> Government hope (hat the proposed increase m the services provided by the Compagnip Generale Trnns-Atlantlque will ease the passenger problem lor the Caribbean area, but they are nevertheless considering further what Inducements it may be possible to make to interest the British shipping industry in the West Indian passengei trade. By Jimmy Hatlo •Can you tend me a Parade! tablet!" WllKN AGlRLdoe.li'l u rim and have to n...L. we %  an iaaatsoee |i p ks 'or For Pal r**W/ fr.nr. Ml iT. Pfrtodk palaa I "tti. % %  m dlasareei Ak yam .im,, sciraiifieally en in,,i. ,1M nis. The nOssM "D Cto*i %  • your .< —iir.i :. i Off. CHASES PARADOL —Stitt (taW tmm F^m -n ._ UNIVERSITY { COLLEGE OF THE i ; ; WEST INDIES ; V ExIra-.Mnral I>i'parliniMi| I t A Count of LMUITM ". Soar hatdi (If Karbadian History uv II. A. VAUCIIAN AT THK HltlTISII COrNCII. WakaAvld. Beginning Fridav. Ocli)ber 27th, al 815 p.m fjo for Coursr : %\ oo Mfmbprv a| K\lr.,-Mu, .1 Aaioclallon 84.Single I.-'III. Ifa comes out in the flavour! And uliat f oei In Why pan Ng*i vfaaaA, freuli tggt$ttd l.nti.ricgclirr with the eiperimcf Out li rn.l. Iluntlav and Falmrr. farooua lh •mnlp -.<.rld over So oianv UnttlaM *an<. %  lochooaefrom In-. ;, %  :.]. filled Cuala-.l I'nmma aid Heading LYeuiu %  MNbwh del „ ,, hirtoak-' . all o..i,.|.,!,.„,,| i, n,, ib t riJlpakl |HUNTU^ &PLMERS Maralun • a tgt ^ f a is t&fy/mmff nchnes. . • ..ndcrtul ne*. flavour pkniv NO NFED TO ADD xzrtrtzrgr* |U( 0R UM iBarr — ... ^i c .,irfHutbed-Hme. tax. and laal. TINS A BOVRIL QUALITY PRODUCT delicious i fflSCUl and nutritiom -•?. ,. a. mi.i a c ifa.ra.IM „,. .a,osiToal5 BRUSH... UP... YOUR... SMILE.. r;"^ WITH THE CORRECT-SHAPE*TOOTHBRUSH *H'uJom i tbrnighlli* Kni sw(Ai MNKWt H'letWi ssgi* is -' *V,,,Jom; rns*r-*sci th.it dastini tion ol Ravour which wU] claim MMII .illryi.inrri|.nn ,)ir lu-i -jp. Jg^f* IHJICHLAND %  _m"' —__ _' BBSSSSSSSJ QUEEN SCOTCH WHISKY So', Imr...... W.C MONROE t CO. LTD Br.dfuown, •..b.do. DISTRIBUTORS IHWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD. (ICKSTBIN BROS.) From our Homv l'r,„l„,is 1), ,,i Waste Paper Baskets Each 72^ & $1.08 Flower Baskets Each_$1.20 & $1.32 Laundry Baskets Each_$4.00 & $5.00 Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, 11, 12 ft 13 Broad Street SHOP EAftf.Y FOB TlirSF. MOHMU (iildlis OIL CLOTH .ii II %  > SI M a vd CRETTONES — .58. TB, S28B a %' HEI> TICKS in AUurinji BUipai SI.18. ft.20. tlM A yd CROCKERY in BOWLfl PLATES, Eti39 UD SUIT CASES All Sues ... 1231 up DRAWING ROOM — S12.SI PLASTIC TABLE COVERS (Also DAMASK > In Man] \i>s.-i.. ( ,,.,. w iu, Fringes S381 ca Di'slpm Aud. Colours. Also Innumrrshlp OthO* Hems r.. r Total H THANIS Pr. Wa Hrj Swan Bta. Hurbutlos' I iiMiliiiff hinisf HfMiaurmnt GREEN DRAGON opvn from a.m. until mitlniaut .. variatji al Oriental Dishes prepared by a Chinese Chef with years of experience N 9 Broad Street For Reservations Dial 3K9 k iri i mw i nnm' I U HII UB I ii mauu B vuo o uuu i )uu ttooa


PAGE 1

TiirRSMY. l*Tn OfTOnii; its* BAKRAIHIS Anvor.vn: P.K.I -I \ I %  CLASSIFIED ADS. WMfnB TELEPHONE 2508 UA' cihJldrof.. IN Mr.MOKIXM our Dea* ii *—-1 HNS rmtf I u d DfVDlM .1-1 HUT %  •• lha I %  kird What %  I.. pmM <" %  Bleep on Dear Jo*op*\ your Tk i Yuur loving bands n | ~l. you did not be< front vou re* %  i %  fiver ion, iChudrvnl anil nil %  L.thcr flUBEHT %  -. %  .. v appointnant "hone MM. i. U i.i ... ISIOM. IK A G1H1 : C Wa-d A . eatporie c.lion. Boa C B Arfvlg Der-t %  MIM | I.I \M (IV S m i: row .M • u 'TS. w* >.e (c-w Mi • ro.p O* r.gle Mn. Porrillo. Ei..-.., Ju|> Ships KVath To Trade Igaia* rOKTO Oct. 10. %  Japan**' %  pane* saf>. %  quarter* .nieht in ih"(. as early /i .-.•ion for bangkofc, Pakii IIAKKOIH 1,01, In Touch With Barbados Coastal Slation %  arludoa UnM*. Station %  S Span,.I %  araeti S S PaatMi .MhJI S S I-I.l VniMurl. 9 S B*l HMN: a %  Nor** Kin* S Mar n.iian ih.it S Oas-logi. K %  i in i< Minns %  %  ... %  t'uioa SC For we all FO M S.Vi.li. AUTOMOTTVl %  aurat %  Co CAM .* new Di A..1..%  I H. rn I'l delivery Dial *tU. Court*-** Garage .. %  i 1 .| f i CAR—Itodrfe lln Mi-)*l 4 food I'l New Batter;. Aptlv F>*nk Walk coOarfl.iK Co. ll.10.lt—IB. DODGE rSUcK tent, condition Apply to Itartwdaw i i %  i.td id 10 so—W HEDBHAI. TRUCH %  October 108S, 1M onr %  !> FedaraJ Trues chaaalB. o Vrhkir nay ,1 Courtesy 0*iif. WlUtc 11 10 •%  at Sttowroonn ELECTRICAL i i.r. : %  '. bargain B lb Electric I lively fluidicd In Chromium wl coloured I 41' On I) MM en (; W Hulchlnaon Ai c Ltd. Dial 4133 IT.10 Ml l ONE FtlhTAHIX AMI I I V* H.P pr*. %  aug* and tank Ptico *mo no Dial RADIO li c Mb* I'luiiip. in Boad rundillun Apply i" mttORl PUH R.ipii A, Haul I SI Philip -.1 IK\I I I Bl I %  riiii.ii MALES AUCTION ,. MMfMi,.!..; Would %  > ni II,. AtH.ll ( %  .%  \V. %  Yorti, 1 Nr. i \ H VI 1 will oftMfor aalo bjFi %  1 -IT..., %  %  %  -,. | \ lt-T 1A %  on TUBBDAY Mlh t S p m In| kaaiaa aaOM SIAH >iii) ujaj aajaji F. >iandli>| or land, ol I %  i WORTMIM. CHJUaT hout* codl^ma opti vrrand.<' uiiimii. bwdrooiut. W C K-ln. Ki -.# C llahl. rncktaed yard PVir Inauattinn I C and icrmi ol an IF M R AKl ,irii MrKENZIi: I %  Auf % % % %  IT in N PAYING QLKai Hn. a.,, idrna would Ilka a patifur guru "<"!" %  and rard-,, BJB 01 p tk broakTaal and lea o'hn mrali •il II 30 Totrphona' ITS! II || N In UNDER THE IVORY HAMMLR sat niTivtd (MM nt. Company, I will aril ol I I al GaiaaiSI Micltoal'i Row. bnj Friday. Octobr-r Mil, |. iWfl Vatul i.-Knl in a.vldml; .1! %  ..i' rd Frrlorl Damaa^i b> Bri p i.i Tf.m. CASH VISKillf GniFFtTH. VIIOWI VACANT SCHOLARSHIPS I.IK1 5 %  III MMTIUS i no REAL ESTATE The proi rrtv known a> '*Th UAJ kr knd Bl Otina* 3d.. %  ill be -. ip lor Mir petition at no Otnr... Jarnr. Stracl, on Friday I1U law, at t put %  %  i.-:. la hb c. ii i' YEARWOOD IIOYCE, II.I0.U *> FIIISO\ Al. do not l-oid myaall roaponaJbi* 1 mi ronliarlMuj any debt tl drbla In my name unlaaa by a wriiii Slirord i-.l-NNETII MOPaUSON. ll i,h Hall. si MMwal not Ptmu • aalni' visn.u cieUii •<> mv wll IOUIRR BAHKrn i sa 1 do not hold my*alf raap irr or anpon* i-iii-oftlracllrur an iirbl nr drhta 'n mv nam*> union b nnUrii order -l||iird bv me sup-ert rllARtilM RARKI-K. !! % %  U my wif. • i .mil i.. i do not hold inyatil mpotialMf loi IKI aa i.itilnn any dehi or daMj In mv .mine unloaa b riler %  •i|liil Bed TIIOBONTON RTVAltT. %  fi<.i.. H.H t Michael Iff 10 M 2 I'l III M Ml I II I S SihniBrahipi al r ,mt> muat rhtldren of Parents roidina In Ihe n ral Chii-t ChUfCk and who arc In imi-d cireumitan**a applicant* muit he between the i ol 10 yrara • montht and II yaara thrla> e,l the e.nnMnallon. which will he bald by the Headmkuraaa al Iba ~.l on Friday fTlh October at I W rmi ol application can be obtained retary, w n Arm 1 ma mui leturncd aceo->ipnnl*d by a hnptlnmal lary rwil later than p. on Filday 20th O. Hoc i: ENTRANCE EXAMINATION (ilaisI01M1AT1ON I.CBOOL An Entianee ExaihlnaUoii PM •ICT-OOI Year January—July IBM will h. held al Ihe u*,*! on Pr day i'lh Oelober IBM at 010 am Appilrallont will -.reived up lu Fr.day JOth October t) Ihe HaodmKtreu an leet ty a bapri*fM*l eeTtlfleale anil a I. ihe Hendmlateaaa of lha bwt whonl a'temled liv II Ai.pllc.ini. mual he between Iba a ol %  yearn and II yean on ihe dale •hoaniinaHon. Paianla nr nuardlani acrompanylnt ihelr daughter* or ward) are hereby 1 fled thai thera I* no accommodation ... them al the arhool on the date of the ..•i.i that the examination o" u nil aiart until thay Mavi the premlaei w ii AMTRonim. Girls' Founda'' BinW—ln NOTICE •SEALF^ Tenderfor the erecll Bath mid Til let ehVllbur* ft PhlUp will he i %  % % %  21th Oclobrr ItAO Plans and fpec raiionB of "in*, caa .11 r:..n.e. l> MBrchlteld. St I'Mlip W V i. Parochial Tre—urc, IT 10 %  -< RBMOl \l %  %  Road. Carriiurton-a Vi %  SEA WELL :> H W I A THINlnAD SmlUi Edward Snuili Mi CLioance Fann t %  DEfAIITVTuTB By B a 1 For THIMDATl Pvariii %  I.UH'OR LIC INS! NOTICE : %  A 1 n i i.. A,inn,-, r. ,, ,,u. ,; i I "• Kx.drr Fer ST LSOU > .i : Farkinaon For JAMAICA M. Ba, I IOUA Andrew Hajaavoal i. Yard, firPat ST vis BerraU Wallai-e. Edward H i, %  [ ("arw.n Halm. nifred Rawlin. i.l.. U I :., ... No >a-d a i Hi repeal : • .1 Bd si Mi, %  i i %  tl Rd I Dited 'h %  twr iota %  *r-en It SKI • R —Thi> i •a h* haBjl D i October IWW at H.LOR LICENSE NOTH i. i IL.ixker pert ol a board and d.i.1. f,.r i ;n*Bj at a baard and -hinale th.*p v. lit .-at TweedalOc Road. Stocr. IMC. i A" Slenrd VIOLET HHANKBIt. %  M>I rat ..i, -ill be con. IdI so-n da tii*. at II SHIPPING NOTICES ,V. "GHoui-eat.-uila Freemantle Kept amber T'h. Adelaldi Bapt ember %  ml-. lath. Devon. 1 'etabar tih BrlBhaiie October I4(h -rru m^ *, ttBtbado. November 11th Theaa vea.i-1. have ample apaco *or i rratan B t:il of I tin.1,11.mrm Li IMirbadI ,l I, .. ..,._ WuHlward %  I Lrewanl U ind. lid., DA (' BAHM v M V T R RADAB win I and A ruttkala ol departure I" he iM \' CAinHIIFjrv.ll a.rcp' Carlo and PIIIBI rpii lor J tHBM aw i' Wevi. and t Kill* I M. V DASVIWOOD wll' ".tvrpi Carao ..nd ISiwiim x .%  Aruba Saillnc Sa'urdj) Jl.l BWI. Srhwifin Atoo. fffJHt), Tel. No. 4047 •iv.ii">' HALL'f DISTEMPER is • rocogniwd first fti WATER PAINT 6.f>9 ra'-Vwjnd. I R • -ar-no • %  t -'era arvuh aandj/d tlotfrift.i dai'ad. STOCKED V ALL THE LEADING STORES SISSONS %  ROTHERS %  CO. LTD. HULL. rUrbAdo* < a tperallve Cutlun Isrlory. PlanUIHtna LM. I Herbert Ltd. V. F. Ilarrl. n X (o iR'alml ltd A Rarnra A Co I M Carl '.< %  %  • A Large Aiiortmcnt of ItibllK & Hymn & Prayer Books ROBERTS & CO.— DIAL 3301 -High Street %  lad ti* four MBBM fnrlfci.Hii.il.. Sinlis A llii-if I iirlhfim -• iiullt'fi I'm/i* unit S/mi-f iirutPH THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM • I MRM. MIIMIhl LTD.I'roprl.l.in) Cnr. f H.....I Mill Tudor Slrrrtv A&COGL. SisuxmAhip Qo. 9m. FIGHT INFLUENZA -,..'.i. Meiuli.il.iM'tl {Ea-WaV gB0> %  :I'l!:: W" i. LIMOLENE Thli groi-'e ta cspm-liilly effCottt* ii-i.ims! FEVER and Fnvirlsii \ CotidllioriB. 2lr. a Bottle at Vnur MAfjflfe I.IHFPtVILL. ORIENTAL I f.OOIlS! (Arllrulnnl J CUKOIS. JEWKLLKRV. I SILKS. i'I 'I III VMS I l'r. Win lire. St. DIAL S4M I Ol TMtlOl Nil I nl Ship |'\NI;UI CANADIAN WJIVICE III Oalob Ml t*ctoti An i vaii I...,I.,. October Mlh November 101. I**(1A rAHTNLII For St. JOHN. SI Lamrnc Itiver Porta For ljiwrene, i Far SI Ijwrer.e.| •-'la hjve limited p-ewner. ummmodJUon l. HllEllHK STREET CITY M, idrru fcMiilmii and wall ball! C nawial i>i..iicrty n x£SS2 „___ ' JOHN M. BLADON .,•.-.-,-,-,-.-.-.-.•.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.'.•.-. %  .-._ FOR SALE X BUOOY AND IIAHNEBB'-O'i* 1 Seta Hprini llarneu Mul> Trnek Apfil. POSTPONED %  -inn of the tjucei,' t.nnrUtkHi iruri v..ii.-ken place tnh %  fl rVHNrn %  %  Faohiop •I.-.-BT Ftiini %  Cird Index C-Onin.: Steel Ofnce Chrii %  nd other ofltca cQulpmarJ able fmm alack frot Lid Dolloo t.ane ptvono 4M1 NOTICE APPLICATIONS taccompanied by bap%  Hin-I rntllVatei will be re. II to 1 p.tn on ) Ortol>er. IBM. lor one i* more v-canl in li Veatry FoihiblllonB (enable nl lha Glrla' Foundation arhool Applicania mux be dauhtera ol p.-iiiatiinner* In traiier>ed i cea. and muat not be lea* than tki itU %  MECHANICAL MISCELLANEOUS ABBOTT'S rRFPAltATl"^-Hntlvec i ,lr, 1(l If/-. Geo. C. Ward A Co.. 8t. LaWTance 15.10 W—Tn BI'CKIEVS PHM'tHATl,.-. Mllture BTc White Rub BV.i Neilne BV Kan' lie Co C Ward A C I3.10.S0 7n "CANDA \.\ltn R HUD" I.'eonunandK -ICl.e-I raeneaa and Ttiroat Irrtlatlon. nl-o i. axirolletit loi maett bltaa etc KNIGHTS I,TT> H 10 in DOOIt MAT* Filirictrral deilima and al %  Ltd Dial 4B2 OATOp ROACH lilVts-Ttve Ma** Bjalt F.i>>to use. lunar l..tini and -.inilan Onla limited Qua. vouri now. KnightLid %  t!*i'. HI HOnNFl"FUFFARATl INS .1 Cal • FeronOao C. w Maltle. Mait—I IS.IDM— 7n %  ILiror fit .SO -n HHJ> STBRT. BllUVrs In vartouB Sm J B Ah* nalla FriTi :re Am., T Trf-'i-i i'reo"! Pbone MM. rara on Ihe data of the Candidatemuat peeaent themaelvea %  iCth October iilDia. Application Inrma muet be obtBinrn Irom my omee WOOD GODDAKD Clerk of the Veatry. Churrti II W.M-Jn NOTICE TIIF WOMEN'S ST-1JHBIJ will be i' ?:ih October Memb*TB are aakad to bring m Iheir work from Monday Urd Floweri will OOI he MTceeitd before ihe moniiri* ol ibITrti ConalnotB will be paid aa uauai nr FTklai 17(h Sutccrlptlon* 11 00 i: in to—n NOTICE '-SEALED tender, loi ii .-t .>! the ceiling ol the Bl. Philip i Par Id I'hurch Will ba? received bv the iniilei r igned up lo Hit Mlh October IBW bv formation on the type ol materi-i i quired lor tl.la work can be "bl.unVoBl the Church Warden, D H Ooi nor E-n Marchtlald, 91 Philip W U GOOD IN G. parochial TrraBurer. M Philip |J m Jo-n LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE %  llluir, hold* l.i.enaa No 1H ol 1M0. grant reaped o( a 1 atorev wall buildir.a al White' Alley, fit. Michael, for prim aald Liquor Lleenae at the bottom Boo of a S Blorev wall build.| Si.eet. City Dated tk.. IBIli d." of Or-lnl>er. 19v0 To the Poltee Mja^lrale Dial "A" Signed T SMALL. lor Applicanl Nil Thi> apptication will be cnnild ered at 1 A -in M'HidB' the SOth day ol October 1PV, | GOVERNMENT NOTICES HOUSING BOARD Vacancv for Temporary Clerk of Works .M'i'i ICATI0 *>i Clark < %  The sal.irv ol ttw f nl on. nimi' %  : MM'., nn r>ttrH-r Ulo. will lie nt th* Nit "I $1.20" %  num. AppUcanti ihould hnve s kii..wi.'f and Wptrt Housing .. | ; t'ti October, i '>(> in in. MI 3rr POLICE NOTICE Lorrias, Trailers and Tractors—Inspection for Renewal of License* for 1D50—61. APPLICATIONS Irsed foi rmrt Re %  I ' '' the !5lh NoweffUtoer, IflBO, I HiKiiwsv:. ind Tranapoti [Transport Nc tf on) bul t through id. 3. Tnspcctlon of II %  %  i |M HOY. 4. H48 50 R. T. HICH1 Coinniishitn %  Polks H !' %  I2*.ii October, io. I9.' 1 Di.vfl Mcclianit-—Scnwell Airport fhi.ii.' -I'.-l" Rl M BTATI A'iVN'i APS. V V A .;nantntKins' I Al CTIONRII Uiooei AI'I LICATJi .it Soawell Airport. Applirants should have tlunnugh knowledge of Die* BBd will Ix. ri'tiulrod to u.'iSS %  I The post Is temporary and teiininablc by a month's notice on inca with the Key Beak 1 for Giadt> "A" 1MB Applications stating age and qualifications should be submitted to the Manage %  '. Seawell Airport, from whom further information m\ be obtained, not later Hum lha 21*1 Oetobtr, 1950, H 10 PAOBTf--9-''0O Men*. Bbtrta ol guaran. I0*d wearing qn-llre al •> 00 And %  *• each BOY BWTnTS -• and P-jam. Meaiirc %  hourRKI.IANCi: BMTBT I I T fj H ANNUAL AGRICLLTLUAL EXHIBITION \OIHI: i Tin* H Agricultural Exhibition will lxIPork on 6tl, %  m writing are mvitcxl for the rifllu to sell Li Dinners. N.B. The Committed Ivave deckled thai lha tuocai tul %  %  %  ra invitcKl for the scllinfi of Sweet Drinks Ic and Light Refreshments. 4. Tenders in writing ai Ing nl Amusemt'iits Tender trie form of Arn %  and marked "Tenders for Exhibition" and must reach the ilovcll &c Skeete Building, Lucas day. 31st October. 6. All Firms and Persons desirous of obtaining sites for advei in writing to the iiber., J H PETERKIN, Sect' t PAIR'S l I I llll All l FIREWORKS I #!**-# I.V/J> I MM n IS VOfI rffaVAY' BV aflWCK Ilroadcast Spunules Chinese Drops Flowat Pots Plteea of Wales Ee.ithi'i 1'ew Trees SajnuVbs (aoldcn Kaiit Amber Electrolypes Serpents Crackan i I'lini WMSJBW %  Torpedoes Ziaa BaoiiM Flving Eiiules Itlue MVlll Katlilun PaillaTB Cannon Crasher-. 4< (aol.l.ii Kain Serpents Stfiiibhs K.MiLin Candle* Asstil StarlightB H I.e.U Oration Elames Ml. Pelee Caawn Cjathati Kadiinn Oa//leri Wllrb's CnnlHron* Crackers \ll Vtsnviiis Mais DaazU Brondcnst Spangles Ynmo Eires EiiHiaUi Caacaas. Koi-kels Aistd. Crackers Emerald Caotadl I Col. Basskaai Candli"Whee4s Streamline Roekeiv Bright Rjiman Candles Dnzle Dazzle Eoriie Fires Briyht lUickHs I 12, MI Palaa Ml. Vesuvius Witch* Ciiiildntns Ketl Lights (•reen Lights Buttarfy INrlnUati Emerald Cascades I. MIIMIII H,l//ll I Eorge Eire* Dhnta Daaala* Knman Candles Asutd. Whirly Twirlers H heels Roahafs Asid Jack-in-lhe-box Mines with Ser|>eiitMl. Vesuvius Mt. Falsa Prisimtlir Lights Mines with Serpents Force Fires Crnckers Jack-in-the-box Romiin Candles Assld. Rockets Asstd. Ilutlerlly Twinkers Monster Fountains I | I. in ll'\ n %  Jaek-in-lhe.Box Spitngled SIMI Baaabi Ooldea Kain Witrh's CauMron-. CraiUn> Mt. Pelee Whirly Twirlers . Ml. Vesuvius %  %<*•/* thin lint* Jack-in-ihe-Box Bouquet of Cerbs $1.80, Boml.s 2e. eneh jMatcheii •haw [| i| Spurklirs I le. !• *. HII in Quantity, anil brina nr si-nil 16, it in ami inn ill put Ihi-in up tar unu. Seaour IHiiplau*. KMs.llTS D1IHG STORES



PAGE 1

THURSDAY, 1STH OCTOBER, MM BARBADOS ADVOCATE C.C. Will Not Send Resolution On Shipping To Secretary Of State FOR COLONIES THE COUNCIL of the Chamber of Commerce at their Special Meeting yesterday, decided that there is no need now to send a Resolution about shipping which was pasted by the Directors of the Incorporated Chambers of Commerce at a meeting this year, to the Secretary of State for the Colonies. %  —— The decision was taken after member* had raad a Press Release from the Secretary of State on the matter. The Resolution spoke of the unsatisfactory slate of affairs as regards steamship passenger accommodation between the United Kingdom and the British PAGE FIVE Vaccine For T.B. Available Spanish Notices S OME of the signs at the Central Police Station are now being written in both English and Spanish Any Venezuelan going to the Central Station for a driving licence will have no trouble as a sign in Spanish direct! them to the correct office. Major Stout c. Deputy Commissioner of Police, told the Adveeaie yesterday that because the number of Venezuelans visiting the island has increased, and many speak Spanish, and could be seen wandering around the Central Station yard without knowing where to go for their driving licences the Police has erected a sign in Spanish indicating the office. -pT*' of fw bnei in which the British territo-ies will be able to get technical assistance if the\ neaire it, is in the use of B C.U. MSsM foi the eontrl of tjbereutosia. Dr. J W P Harkne*. Medical Adviser to the Comptroller for Development and Welfare to'd the Advocate vesterda\ Or Harknes* has just relurnel from Cuidad Trulillo where he attended the Conference of Pan American Sanitary Organlsatiu i and the Regional Committee of the World Health Organisation which took place from Septcmbei 15 to October 11. He said that other lines of technical assistance In which advice and possibly material assistance could be obtained from the Regional Committee of the World Health Organisation w malaria control, pubtc health Aed* eradk-aCaribbean This Resolution was forwarded by the Secretary of the Chambers training who is in Jamaica, to the Colonial | llon <*r Secretary of that colony, asking' The Conferen-e. presided ove* that it be sent to the Secretary of< pv Generalissimo Rafael L State. In the meantime a Press: Trujillo Molina. President of the Release was received by the, Rc P UD,,c WM attended by a Colonial Secretary on the whole *legtton representing the Britmatter, and the Secretary of the %  'ci'ilorles composed of Dr Chambers was therefore aaked if fr *• P** 1 .. DJrectoor Medical O F THE 17 traffic offences recorded in the Police Reports during the last two days only two Secretary of State reads mortorisis were reported for exThe Secretary of State fo ceedlng the rpeed limit. [Colonies has intimated that it has Services and Dr H. P Gilletl-. Mala rlolog.it, representing the Government of Trinidad. Dr J. R Marcano. Medical Officer of Hearth, Port-of-Spain. Dr H M Johnston. Acting Assistant Di~ector of Health, representing the Government of Jamaica and himself as delegate for the United Kingdom and the remaining British Caribbean territories who III view of this it was still sldered desirable to carry out the request of the Chambers. The correspondence was forwarded to Mr. H. A. C. Thomas the Barbados delegate to the directors' meeting and he drew the matter to the attention of the Council of the Chamber for their decision. Press Release Supreme Authority American T IB BAiirr .tun ~J— been brought to the attention of The Pan American Sanitary ?, I A BAND """"His Majesty's Government that Confereme is the Supreme BOVLap.. C E. Raison. played at tnere ha be ^ considerable criticerning authority of the Pan -the Esplanade al 4.45 o'clock tsm among sections of the public Amer ran Sanitary Organiaation yesterday evening. TOIUKM ihe ln tnc unHjh u/esl Indies at the ,h fundamental purpos.. of "SI"!?.'" "'"' .'""J 1 Rov 1 A^ ££. 2?rZJ22'Lff to" he.? Sk? to subsidise shipping comSTc" mage's ulk on "T B Knies. this general prnciple was Ind ft. P^SSS 5 aw agtj. *XideraUon Wa rf Another lecture is expected to I ' 'vmp-rthetc conf^ !" '' 0 be given In a fortnight's time •> reasjjabk PJ^J 1 W their second innings. C. Arthur, who was rsaponsible for Henley's took six for 17 Norwich second innings made Henley won by 28 runs. .. ... contrary to His Government's general also occupied In discussing changes of .institution .srgnnisation to facilitate %  gsfl What's OnToday Water Polo, al Aqustle Clab at 500 |, in Mobile Cinema. Laiicelle^ PUnUUon Yarg. HL James at 7.30 p.m Police Bsisi at Revuedevllle. Empire Theatre al 8 M pm B.G. Ex/wets Largest Rice Crtty Thin Year HlilTISH GUIANA'S nee crop for this pi the largest In th,history of the ci.unt A if, A. S j the British Guiana Rice Marketing Board told UM terday. Hg mid tnai uuaaa unforeseen hnppeneil, thev would be able lo fultil all then to Trinidad, Barbados and the other West Indian Isl.n Mr Rohomnn will be returning to llnlish Guiana this by U.WI.A. after >p'iuilng rive weeks' holiday as a. guest at Crystal Waters. Woithing He said that almost all icapini: and ploughing of the crop wgg now being done by UM means, a replacement of the old S stcm of reaping by hand and jughing by oxen Old System Still There were still a few places where the old system prevailed but It was expected that bj) next year all that would uand the country would probably be the granary of tba we*, 'ndiei. A new concrete huild ng on the waterfront to house the ii keting Board's ofl was well undcrwus'. ..nil would probably be com) next year That nev 'n ipa'.cd to h 150.000 bags of rice. A keen sportsman whose nobbles are now shooting and lishing Mr Rohoman is one of the 'minders of the Boxing Board of Control 'n British QuUna, .. life member of the Damarara Tuif Club, a niemlwr nd added that boxing in British Guiana Is of a very nigh standard Boxing in (ir-iiidH In Easter this year, he visited Grenada as Manager of the B.C. boxing team which won I the I0Ur W.l championi lightweight, welterweight and heavyweight, losing the middleweight to Trinidad. He was 28 years on 1 lioxlnu Board and nidged all the main bouts except during tha lag) I wo years He said that there should be a Boxing Board of Control in Barbados because It would be a good thing for everyone, the boxertba promoters and the general public. NEW MEMBEk BARBADOS RUM WILL BE ON SHOW A TBRITISH INDUSTRIES FAIR BARBADOS will bo represented at the 19S1 British Irui u> trios Fair The iuti industry compnsinK thtnumufacturUM molasses industry, the Publicity Committee, and the Cotton Factory repreaentini; tinSou Island Cotton, will be siibacf ibin^ £500 to pay for 150 square fei't of space at the Fair. The exhibits will be rum. molasata and Sea Island Cotton. The Chamber of Commerce • ill collect the money and forward it to the West India Commntee who will see after the ai i.mgements Representatives of the uuiusti lei to he represented and repre• of the Publicity Committee were present at the Special Meeting of the Council of thrantaroay, and discussed arrangements with the members. Mr A. deL. Inniss told the n .ceting : 1 have to report that the agents foi the West India Hum Bellnery Ltdreceived a letter from Mr. A s. Bryden on the 13th instant .riving all particulars about space rid cost for a Barbados exhibit fair. As a result of this. I immedi%  ter* got m touch with Mr. Petern who ascertained from Mr. 3. M Kmch that members of the tr.'.iie along with the Publicltv Committee had subscribed £450. to which the Rum Refinery were •rilling to add £50. totalling £500 As this would be the cost of 50 sq. feet, on behalf of the Council 1 instructed Mr. Peterkln rite the Colonial Secretary requesting him to cable London with a view of booking this space I am pleased to say that a reply ha.t been received from the London Agents of the West India turn Refinery Ltd., reading'— "Fair arrangements made". The meeting expressed their pleasure at receiving this information but regretted that Ihe hoto Industry which had been %  pproached did not propose to i ike part this time. Molasses Goes To Canada Motor vessel "Mary Sweeney" sailed through the Chamberlain llndgtyesterday afternoon about 1.15 p.m. It was well laden with fancy molasses for Halifa Canada, and it left poit for Canada during the evening The "Sweeney" arrived here since Thursday and it has loaded approximately 650 puncheons of .nolasses. The molasses Is being shipped by Messrs. K. R. Hunte Co*. Ltd., agents of the ship— and Messrs. Robert Thorn Ltd. The "Athelbrook", the molasses tanker consigned to Messrs. H. Jason Jonss & Co.. Ltd.. arrived shortly after tho "Swney" loft the inner basin. The 'Athelbrook" occupied thsame birth a* the "Su.-cney" to lake a load of vacuum pan molasses In bulk REMANDED EI.IZAHKTII KING, a 29-yearold shopkcciH-r „f Tudor Street. was charged veMcrdnv before His Mr Ruhoman iaM thi.1 he reWorship Mr ,\ .1 l| H.nscheiJ lire, from pi.ivmoM.k..: ,,i i 83 u. wtth breaking and antartn. he last tour being in 1929 when shop of Clement tigers .mdslralcaptaiied the Indlun cnket.ing articles to the value of team from British Guiana which ''11 !5/4U J d The offence was played the Indians n Trinidad. committed sometime IM-IWITI, Septarnbei 30 and October I. King M...% %  .,.. i,..| ,i nl || o,i,,. r 23 Mail in the sum of £50 is nil. red Fineil £J For Stealing Shoes -. C.KKAVES. | old labourer of Peterkin land, St. Michael, wus found guilty yesterday by His Worship Mr \. J H. tlnnschell of stealing one pair of brown and while gents' shoes valued at £2 1" -. the of T B Evans, on October 5. He was lined £3 to be paid bv instalments or was ordered in default to undergo one month's impiiv..Mmcnt Mr. H. Clarke appeared on behalf of Greaves while Sgt. Garner prosecuted on btnall "f the police. Greaves In his defence said ihal he was ruling his bicycle .long HiiiKii..-. Mill .>n October ihlng went wrong with the blcvcle and a rn.in helped htm in fixing it After the lm> le was repaired the man BBBBMI kttrn lo take a parcel from him *hnh h v tvould reiurn f ( .i big rSOti time. While he was waiting for the man a policeman came up to him and asked him what was In th" parcel and where ha had go; it bcait The policeman then arrested him. Crosa-exaini..d by 3gt Garner Greavs said that he did not know the man who gave him the parcel Keith Alleyne. a clerk of T H I'.vans, told th" court that Iran the .iiimber on the shoes 1281 A—he recognised that the pair of shoes was the property or T. R. Evans and said that that braa uf shoe was Imported by his firm only In address in* Mr. Hanschell. Mr Clarke submitted that it was to be proved that Greaves had stolen the shoes and if this was not done properly, then hij CUCnt should be instantly acquitted. He further pointed out that Greaves had not showed any sign of guilt by running away or resisting the policeman when he was arrested and that It was quite 1 likely that he (Greaves) meeting a strange man which gave him help in repairing his bicycle, would return the favour by holding a parcel for him lie told Mr Hanschell that if there was any suspicion he could not convict on it. Mr HanschaM In replying said that he felt that Greaves' storv was not reasonable, as both of the men were strangers No man II ,'.'.. %  i a ..df.ri (.I ihg tn if tuiu' would take a bulky parcel rran him Mr Hanschell then went on lo say that taking the evidence as a whole he was of the opinion that the story of Greaves was not true; therefore he had to convict him DRINK CLAYTONS KOLA TONIC ','.-.'.-.*^.-.'.'.*. 66 I New Arrivals at I WEATHERHEAD'S Mr A Guy Si Hill was yester. Ic / cr n „ ./-,., day elected a member of tha '5 FOR OILMEAL Chamber of Commerce FINK of 15/to be paid in Tinelection took place ot thel ' '' av, r '* days' imprisonment Special Meeting of the Chamber w "" "m**ed on Torance Ashbv of Chapman's lane yesterday by — 1 His Worship Mr A J II II...,XMAS CARDS 6 Lovely Cards In a Box with envelopes at 1/3, 1/9. 2/3 par Box For INVALIDS ARMOUR'S CALF'S FOOT JELLY, Verv Nourishing Easily fj 2.6 Bottle. FIREWORKS OF ALL DKS( lUITlONS sar fgg UB for Wholesale Prices of Sparklers 12 SPAItKLERS In a Package for lag. BOMB V COLOURED MATCHES DEVILS Will H '. and 50 Other kind* ..I PAIN'S FIREWORKS K" SHOES III1IU ire administration and ojiera • tion of the oiganiaalion in its rider capacity, and to provide a basts of participation by the Dutch, French and British territories in its work which will be satisfactory to all concerned. Of greater Interest in the technical and professional side, were the reports of the various delegates describing public health uvvYtopments in their respective territories during the four years which have elapsed ginm tha preceding meeting. He said that the exchange :f information on methods and techniques for dealing with common problems were of considerable muluel value. The report relating to the British tirri'.ries was delivered by him on behalf of the British oelegatton and opportunity was given to the delegates to visit hospitals and institutions of the Dominican %  uvemment and ns some of these were of recent lonstructloi. embodying modern concepts, the visits were full < interest on the material as well .. the clinical aspects of medical ork. Principal Language Though the principal language used at the Conference was %  **hhy was found guilty of the Spanish, there was a simultaneous I "P !" .?"*' V ou nlon ot %  quantity translation into English. and | \\ ^."'Jff^* mc Shc wai ?veyFrench aiul vice versa which could bebaard through curphotii chcll ling along Bgff Strrc ^ | IS. i OrtolM That was a treat facility for tii conversant with In* language ittssd by tti. spaattai oil the moment The conlerei.ee was held in th.' odern buildings of the medical faculty of the University of Sand I/omlngo. Th. m nuigemeiits (tor the Conlarance were i handled by '.be : en.inonl a'.d Iflg comfort <>f (he delegates was assuied by accornlodatioii in tie hotel TaragUK situated on the shores of the Caribovut. •> i TRINIDAD BUYS ROYAL ALE • from Our own COtrncamlwili IORT-OF SPAIN Trinidad n