Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


Sunday

Octeber
19350





The Greatest
Story Ever Told
By FULTON OURSLER

This is uw story of Jesus.
It begins in the “Advocate”
on Monday.

it is a chronology of events
from the betrothal of Mary
and Joseph to the days afier
the Resurrection, and the
episodes are taken from ihe
four Gospels.

In writing anew the
wonderful life of Jesus, the
author has had but one
thought in mind, and that
was to induce readers to g9
to the Gospels and hear the
story at firsthand. It was
Rabbi Solomon B. Frechot,
of a great Jewish temple in
Pittsburgh, who said to me
at dinner oné¢ evening that
the unspoken scandal cf our
times was the hidden fact
that Bible-reading had been
larrely given up in America.

Later, as 4 tfaviteu
arour] the country and taik-
ed to many d.tfeceat kiss of
men ana wome, — fellow
Passengers in Pullman ana
day coach, stenographers,
lecture committee chairmen
—I made casuai allusions im
conversation to biblical
passages. I soon discovereu
that references which in my
boyhood were cliches of
front porch talk had no
meaning whatever for these
later companions. Even such
obvious phrases as “Thirty
pieces of silver” or “The
talent buried in a napkin”
or “The angel that troubled
the waters” left many listen-
ers with blank stares. Yet
when I explained the mean-
ing, their interest was clear,
a sample from the great
history invariably roused the
appetite for more.

These experiments helped
me to come to a long-con-
sidered resolution. Ever
since my first visit to Pales-
tine im 1935, I had been
tempted. A tour of Galilee,
Samaria, Judea, and Trans-

in me a deep interest in
Christianity which had filled
me up when I was young.
on hrenty fare reers
was Stirred up again. I be-
gan to read various chrono-
logies by which Catholic and
Protestgnt theologians had
sought to straighten out the
apparent confusions and con-
tradictions in the Gospels.
This book follows none of
the established time .w4
Sequence formulae but draws
from several, in what seem-
ed to the writer the most
natural and probable lir.
This book ts not offered as
an explanation or an iuter-
pretation. It is rather an at-
tempt to tell, faitnruily, yus.
what the four Apusues,
Matthew, Mark, Luke, ana
John, assert to lave uap-
pened in those thirty-three
years of the life of Jesus.
It is, further, an eifort iw
state the believiag Chris-
tian’s understanding of the
meaning of those years.
There is no intention here to
rationalise or to hunt out a
bymbolism. While some-
times dramatised, the story
is completely faithful to the
literal statements of the text.

With much help and coun-
sel I have told here the great
story once more — the svory
of the greatest event in
human history. For once
upon a time aad long ago 1
actually happened, accord-
ing to the faithful true
believers among which the
author counts himself.

God, who had fashioned
time and space in a clock-
work of billions of suns and
stars and moons, in the form
of His beloved Son became a
human being like ourselves.
On this microscopic midge vt
planet He remained for
thirty-three years. He be-
came a real man, and the
only perfect one. While
coutinuing to be the true
God, He was born in a stable
and lived as a working man
and died on a cross.

He came to show us how
to live, not for a few years
but eternally. He explained

truths that would make our
souls joyous and free.

This is the story of Jesus
— the greatest story ever
told.



Plane Door ys rey Off
During Flight
MICHIGAN, Oct. 14.

The 52 passengers in an Ameri-
ean A‘rlines plene held their
breaths when a door was ripped
off its hinges over this town.

No one was nurt. Suction swept
coats and hats out into space 3,400
yards above the ground. The air-
the door. It wants to determine
line is offering $100 reward for
the cause of the accident.—Reuter.

Argentina Wants
$125,000,000

WASHINGTON, Oct. 14.
Argentina has completed pre-
liminary talks with the United



States Export-Import Bank on the}
$125,000,000 credit to help her set- |

tle debts

accor'di

to American exporters,

to a manager of the



rgentine Central Bank.—Reuter.



| pation
| ctherwise disposed

| prisoners.

jordania had evoked again

15

Murdered

ON DEATH MARCH

| By WILLIAM PARROTT
| SEOUL, Oct. 14.
| At least iwo or three thousand
, People detained in Seoul by North
Koreans were “disposed of” be-
tween the. Inchon landing on Sep-
; tember 15 and the occupation of
| the City at the end of September,
| Official investigators includin;,
|Americans stated today that a
jlarge proportion were murderec
| either in the City or on the death
| March northward when they were
withdrawn as hostage:

They said many bod:e ; had bex
found and they expec'ed to dis-
cover the graves of others a:
| Unite’ Nations Forests pushed
j hearer to Pyongyang.
| The South Korean Governmen
has also begun investigation t
find those responsible.

Villagers just north of Seou}
Saw groups totalling up to 10,000
people trudging wearily along the
read on two successive days

Stragglers unable to keep -pace
with the hasty Communist with
cGrawal were shot. At Uikonju 1+
miles north of Seoul a mass grav:




which was found contained 51
bodies.

Slaughter continued as mor:
stragglers dropped behind. Eve

worse was the progressive
massacre over a four day period —
September 27 to 30—of about 806
South Koreans who were collected
‘in Yangpong on the Han River
31 miles east of Seoul, investiga-|
, tors said. |

Investigators said Communists
curing three months of the ceys|
of Seoul had killed or
of a |
number of

large
additional political !

They also shot many other
South Koreans who showed their
sympathies prematurely sett



‘the period from September 27 to

2) before the United Nations had};
fully assumed control of the South;
Korean Capital.—Reuter.

French Nun
Beatified
TO-DAY

ROMY, Oct. 14.

_ Pius XII will to-morrow
proclaim the beatification of the
French nun who died 99 years ago
Sister Anne Marie Javouhey whom
King Louis Philippe once called a
“great man” because she had more |
than the strength of an ordinary |
woman, |

The solemn beatification cere- |
mony in Saint Peter’s Basilica will ;
be the seventh of this holy year.

Anne Marie Javouhey, foundress |
df the Institute of Sisters of Saint
Joseph of Cluny, was born at Jal- |
langes De Suerre on November 10, |
1779. She took a vow of chastity
at the age of 19 and founded her
first institution at Chalmon for



| aiding the old and infirm and edu-

cating poor children. Later she
established her main hospital at
Cluny.

From humble beginnings the
‘work of the Sisters of Saint Joseph |
spread throughout the world. To-|
day the sisters have 269 hospitals,
schools and charitable institutions.

Anne Marie herself travelled!
widely, especially in French Afri-
can and West Indian colonies. She
was in the vanguard of the move-
ment to abolish slavery. She died
in Paris aged 71, in 1851, after 45
years of unremitting lcbour.

Sabo



sabotage ‘Plot
Investigated

NEWCASTLE, New South Wales
Oct. 14
Special Commonwealth Security
offcers have started investigation
here into reports of an alleged
Communist inspired plot to sabo-
tage the Australian steel industry.
A senior investigation officer
said that the move followed a
confidential report on recent mine
stoppages and a ship hold-up.
One widely experienced officer
said today that it had been sus-
pected for some time that there,
was a “master plan directed by
alien interests aimed at under-
mining Australia’s materials need-
led for defence purpose.” ?
! The present investigation is
believed to be the first of a series
throughout Australia. —Reuter.

LIGHT TRAVELS FASTER









The generally accepted figure of
the speed of light has been wrong
by eleven miles per second, the
British National Physical Labora-



‘tory, claimed to-day.
| The announcement said the
Laboratory's latest experiment

jconfirmed the British figure ob-
| toined in 1947 which displaced the
| figure established by the American
; scientist Albert Abraham Michel-
son who had set the speed at
186,271 miles per second. It is now
i claimed to be 186,282 miles per
| second.—Reuter.

‘ Seeking His Brother
ATHENS, Oct. 14.
Ledovico Brunetti, a younger
; brother of the Brazilian student
‘who disappeared on October 2
|from Agen Island, does not be-
lieve his brother committed sui-
l cide He errived at Athens yes-
jlerday from Sao Paolo
| After cortacting the Brazilian
Legation and the Greek Police
authorities. Brunetti was sailing to
Mykonos to conduct a personal
investigation into his brother's
disappearance.—Reuter



UN. Prisoness|



LONDON, Oct. 14. |





BACK FROM ENGLAND—Mr.

chatting as they arrived at Barbados yosterday from England whe

Indies beat England at cricket

Freedom Of
Press To

Be Upheld

NEW YORK, Oct. 14,

The Inter-American pr con-|
fcrence has decided to establish a
tribunal to investigate complaints
of the violation of the freedom
of the ‘Press’ in the Western}
Hemisphere,

The tribunal upon receiving a
complaint wovld appoint a three
member investigating commission
from countries not contiguous to
the nation from which the com-
plaint originated.

The Commission would make a!
direct investigation on the spot. |
If a Government denied permis...
sion for inquiry, the tribunai
would notify all members of the
Inter-American Press Association: |







and give full publicity to the
n.atter. |
A fortyfive.member Board |

Directors was chosen yesterday by |
the conference after a long debate |
in which some Argentine delegates
contended that the conference was
not representative of the Westerr, |
Hemisphere press because all
newspapers had not been invited. |
—(Reutee.) |

CHURCH BREAKS |
FROM MOSCOW
SPRINGFIELD,
Massachusetts, Oct. 14.

The Russian Orthodox Church
in America announced here that it
was breaking all ties with Moscow
and would in future function in-
dependently of Russia.

Leaders of the church meeting
for the first time on their own
initiative named Metropolitan
Bishop Joseph Krimmowicz of
Springfield as Patriarch of the
Church in the United States.

Metropolitan Bishop Konstantin
Jroshevich was chosen Patriarch
of the church in all foreign coun-
tries.—Reuter.

eens est veinioninienaltin
ARTIE'S HEADLINE

|



ee =





Er. when | sai my
nad amore
Yorialisis |

donkey
SCHSE than the
fidn'?t re
‘Te one”





By SCOTT RANKINE
WASHINGTON, Oct. 14 |
President Truman goes to United |
States citizens next month for a}
| virtual vote of confidence. Votes
can give him two years’ unfettered
tule or two years “hard labour”
under the Republican Party’s
thumb. This is the essence of
Congressional elections to be held
on November 7. About 50 mil-
lion Americans will vote for the
36 seats in the Senate and all 435
seats in the House of Representa-
tives.
Republicans want a change over
}of only 54 seats in their favour—
| 47 in the House and seven in the
|Senate—to secure the domination
| of both Houses

j Then for two year they
| could
i 1 Control all busines id
| debates in Congress

2. Put a Republica







|

F. A. Clairmonte (left), Mr. 7. Kidney (centre) and Mr. K. Nunes

they had watched the West
(See Carib)

at Lords, Trent Bridge and tho-Ovai



Kumchon Falls

To U.N. Forces
Drive On To Red Capital

By JULIAN’ BATES
TOKYO, Oct, 14

SPEARHEADS across the 38th parallel were broadenin;
to-day into solid wedges all aimed at the capital. Kumchon
“little Stalingrad”—12 miles north of the parallel whicS
held up the advance on Pyongyang, fell despite stubborn
Communist resistance whick led to house to house fighting
in its streets last night, ©

Another
Bonaparte

5 Wi. surrounded yesterday by
ithe American First Cavalry divis-
‘ion and British and Australiat
' troops The British Common-
| wealth brigade and the Fifth Cav-
;alry regiment seized Yongadong
| east of Kumchon and from this di-

rection elements of the Fifth Cav-
alry Division closed in on the town

PARIS, Get, 14. | under storm fire from flat trajec-

Prince Louis Napoleon and his}tory guns either self propelled
wife have arrived here for the | artillery or anti tank guns used a
birth of their child expected in a! artillery
few days. It will be the first | It had been defended fanatical-
Bonaparte to be borm on French|ly. Observers here considered its
soil since the head of the former] defence an attempt to cover a mass
reigning families and their eldest; northern withdrawal to new lines
sons were exiled from France 64! south of the Communist capital
years ago.

The exile law was t
May.

The new Bonaparte
direct descendant of » Emperor

Princess Louis mother. of the
Belgian Prince was g Bourboreâ„¢

Prince Louis néw 33 fought in
the Foreign Legion, was arrested
by Germans and escaped. He raining momentum everywhere
fought with French Alpine] aleng the front line, reports said,
troops on the Rhine and the Re-!Americans and British Common-
public awarded him the Croix Ds| wealth troops pushed on from
Guerre Kumehon the keystone Commun-
jist defence system which fell to-
day. South Korean troops were
striking north west from Inchon
In the centre front they reached
Miudong, which is less than 60
miles from the Capital, Other
southern troops advancing west
from Wonsan to-day captured
Yongpori 18 miles away on the
j important road across Korea to
Pyongyang.

Race for Pyongyang



United Nations Forces stretch-
ing in a westward line across
North Korea drove towards the
Communist capital of Pyongyang.
The line ran almost straight trom
Kaesong north north east to Won-
san on the east coast.

The United Nations’ drives were

pealed last

will be a

later

~Reuter



United States Have
Spy Ring In Asia
Accuses Red China

BOMBAY, Oct. 14,
Communist China today charged}
he United States with operating
an espionage net-work in Asia American “Task Force Lynch”
“encircling the new China fandia crack combination of tanks
reaching from Korea to India’| Which carried infantry was ex-
Press Trust India correspondent| peeted to turn northwards and re
reported from Peking. sume the race for Pyongyang after
the-fall of Kurmchon,
Three “arrows” are now aimed
at the Communist Capital. The

pal Chinese Mcvement newspaper
, Sa first is formed by American and

Said “American Intelligence
centres” in Japan, Formosa,
Hong Kong, Saigon and Bangko«
were training large numbers of

‘
The “Peoples Daily” the spuber|

the Kumchon area: the second by
South Korean troops striking to-
former Kuomintang officers and} wards the city from Inchon and the
former Japanese Army Intell'-| third by South Korean troops on
gence men “invended to sneak} the east coast front almost direct-
into China,” | ly opposite Pyongyang

Another official Peking news-| This last force was to-day re-
paper the Kwangming Daily"! ported to be striking hard inland
urged the Chinese people to take |
every precaution against America, | Wonsan,
espionage activities. jthan 70





miles from Pyongyang.

—Reuter. —Reuter.

here is
ewill

ty in all committees which have ; political quarters
day to day handling of Presi-| President Truman
dent Truman's Programme,

british Commonwealth troops in j*

reaching a point 18 miles west of |
This puts it little more

thav
retain Conservative minded people.

| control of Congress with a reduces |

F. rench
Leave

canepeshtinisiaiiniaasiatia: smeaials

SAIGON, Oct. 14.
» French Red Cross to-day |
ted that the Vietminh Red |
s Organisation agreed to the |
ation by air from Thatkhe, |
rench soldiers wounded mi
the recent big frontier battle, }
The message said _ that fe
French and Vietminh Red Cross
‘had agreed on the evacuation |
conditions of the French wounded
1 present under treatment at an
emergency post in Thatkhe.”
“The evacuation will take place |
from Thatkhe airfleld beginning |
at 10 o’clock on October 18. A}
light plane will veconnoitre the |
round and make the first evac- |
uation which will be con:inued b> |
teavior planes under fixed cond:






ions The planes will bear the
Red Cre insignia and will no
be armed.”

The bulk of the French gar. |
rison which evacuated the joi
ress at Thatkhe on the Chines»!
frontier fought their way to safet j
at Nacham, 30 milos to the south |
east, French Army Headquariers |
reported to-day French rear-
guards were withdrawn from
Thatkhe on Tuesday night. |
Sporadic actions took pace along | :
the border highway, the Head- |

quarters statement added

Irench forees engaged in
vattle bad totalled 3,500

Thatkhe could now be
be comp! otely
spo’sesrnan added Red Cross
contacts were continuing with}
Vie-nam officia's for the evacua-
tion of th rounded

the |
men

said to.

evacuated, a



“Mopping up” by the French
\rmy wes going on 75 miles fur- |
ther sou-h of the Toa'dn delta |
where 100 Vietnam guerillas

were killed in a local battle near
the port of Haiphong,

Several 100 Vietnam soldiers
were killed in each of the three
“violent assaults” the spokesman
stated

French troops captured mortars
and smali arms,

Strong French patrols encoun-
tered Vietnam. forces in the
Tonkin delta, nine miles south-
west of Hanoi, the delta capital
a French spokesman said.

The enemy suffered losses in
men and equipment.--Reuter

’

‘Truman, MacArthur
Will Talk
On Wake Island

HONOLULU, Oct. 14
Pre sident Truman left on Satur-|
day for tiny Wake Island where a



will confer with General Mac-
Arthur on measures to combat the!
threat of Communism in the Far)
East MacArthur already had
arrived at Wake Island from
Tokyo. The United Nations com-
mander’s plane landed on the
little mid Pacifie atoll Friday night.

Trumen and the General will
meet for a brief but historic con-
ference, The site is the pinpoint
of coral, which a battalion of U.S.
Marines and 1,000 civilian work-
men defended for 16 days in the
second world war before its cap-
ture by Japanese

The Presidentia] party will ar-
rive at Wake about 6.30 a.m. on
Sunday, Wake time, after q hop
of 2,300 miles. In Truman's party
are General Omar Bradley, Chair -
man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
Army Secretary Frank Pace, Am -
bagsador at Large, Phill'p Jessup,
W. Averil' Harriman special Pre-
sidential Assistant for Foreign
Affairs, Dean Rusk, Assistant
Secretary of State for the Far
East and Charles Murphy, the
President’s principal speech writer

It will be the first face to face
meeting of the President and the
Supreme American Commander ir
the Far East. They will confer
communique.—(C.P-)

U.N. General Assembly

Meeting Postponed

LAKE SUCCESS, Oct, 14.

The Political Committee debate
jon the American plan to make the
| United Nations Genera! Assembly
jan effective weapon against aggres-
‘sion has been postponed from
| todey until Monday.

Officials said that sponsors of
the resolution required more time
to complete its documentation.

1 —Reuter.

i





TRUMAN WILL ASK FOR VOTE OF CONFIDENCE

his way recently to woo mare

Light Vote

3. Have their own Speaker majority. Public opinion has | 5 en
he House. " S swung more towards him since} eens in bp en oe
4. Raise their voice higher! his “gamble” in sending American | count on e traditionally hg

in invernational affairs by vir- troops into Korea came off. Taois









tue of installing their own, has largely offsev the blast rene Truman stumping the count
Chairman as Head of the Con-) the iruman sone Meee odd this summer and many non-
gressional Foreign Affairs Com- | Coun ry s mi or oe ¥ ‘a ra partisan voters who were at-
mittee: nee eee Neh Febet Y | tracted by his /ramatic village |
the Korean War ¢
ns , | Village campaign in the 19
Veteran Retires President Truman's appoint-' | acidential elect will pro-
we ment of General George Marshall presidential ele ae ; P

Truman ‘could expect little) - national hero to replace Louis | Dably not vote this time .
spite Se : or al‘ . - . . _ icans “ -Communist’
eee een Vener: 6 Johnson as Secretary of Defence pay Ulan wea ariavcatta
veteran Republican Foreign ~| was also regarded as a successful | eres egains A oe thain’ Deal
er wk Oo. helped him trategic move | ’ y are proba sly veir va t

ugh Y he Marshall Plar Finally pro-Truman Democrats| Vote catching weapon a 7
other Foreign Aid Pro-| ti}; have Trade Unior big city} 4Tgument is that Democrati
ammes, retires this year olitical machine ' evroes | Governments allowed Cem
There is no one else of is) colidly behind ther There i ng | Munists and pro-Communists t
standing i e Republican Party Henry Wallace Party tl time to | infiltrate and give away secre |
Pp attack t Ne dD Left ' vo Russia and soften the policy

he eakened ple ic G A t fre D T wards Russia A lot of peopl



vote of these mid-term elections
The Korean War has prevente:

»ssed.—Reuter



have been imp:

| Mander.

’ Price;

SIX CENTS



Warns ‘‘Danger In Europe”

BLACK? OGL, Oct. 14.
ME. WINSTON CHURCHILL ai the final session
of the Conservative Party’s annual Confer-
ence at Blackpool to-day warned against the danger
of party politics “at this grave time.’’

It is not good for our society or for our survival
as a leading power that we should continue for lorig
periods to be dominated by party politics and that
two halves of a nation who have to sink or swim
together should have to face each other all the time
in the boxing ring,” he said.

Now when everyone could see that everything had
become more grave we found ourselves in the same posi-
tie. ot party strife, impending elections and uncertainty
as.to when the polling day would be fixed as we did a
year ago, Churchill said.

“Yet it is Mr. Atilee’s policy to
‘eeravate the uncertainty and pro-

| long the svrain” he added, Chureh-
| ill said that the Liberal Party who

;}won only vine seats at the last
| general election had done “great

Russians Are
Anxious [feist (loa! ierat
For Peace | |sauig "es Fee
THINKS TRUMAN

HONOLULU, Oct,

con-

In lls first
“ea
tion |

}
| appearance at the
| t

l4 | be Rov?

‘onference, the Oppo-
ader declared: “I do not
that war {ts inovitable, On



Yesterday at Honolulu, Truman} %* co>.vavy I belteve that hopes
stressed that the achievement of | of reaching a peacetul settlement
Jaxiing peace was his only ambi-| with Russia have beon impr ved
tion by wha’ has happened in Korea.

He said he was sure “psoply
behind the iron curtain” were as
nxious to avoid war as he was

Since he left Washington on
Wednesday, the President has
Seemed serious and preoccupied.
He dispensed with «all but the
necessary formalities when he
arrived at San Francisco and at
Honolulu he refused a native
Hawaiian welcome,

On Monday he is due to leave
Honolulu on his way back to San
l’ranciseo where he is to make a
speech on Tuesday night in which
fe is expected to report on his
meéting with the United Nations
Commander in Korea

General Omar Bradley, Chair-
man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,
Army Secretary Frank Pace,
Averill Harriman Special Adviser
on Foreign Affairs, Phillip Jessup
Var Eastern Expert and Dean
Rusk, Assistant Secretary of State
for Far Eastern Affairs are with
Truman.
~ MacArthur left Haneda Airport
in Japan yesterday, John Muchio,
American representative to the
South Korean Government flew
with him in the General's new
gleaming silver Constellation
plane recently brought from the
United States.

“che Conference was expected }
by Washington observers to be a
straight talking session with the
President giving little ground to
the United Nations Supreme Com-
The two have frequently
crossed swords at a distance on
military and diplomatic problems,
particularly on Formosa.

Prompt Action

Churchill said that the United
States under Truman's leadership
and with the formal and moral
sanction and support of the United
fations Organisation, acted with
‘ourage and promptness in resist-
ing aggression by Communists in-
pired by Moscow ‘

“There may be a time—though
no one can quarantee it—to build
uv a European army with strong
eid from Britain, the United States
and Canady for the defence of
famous and 9+ ient states and the
peoples who have no thought or
aim but to dwel' in peace and who
at present are protected from So-
viet Communist ambitions only by
America’s vast superiority of the
atomic bomb.

Continuing Churchill said: —
“The Soviet onslaught upon
South Korea has made many peo-

civilisation.”

He said; ‘We may all rejoice at
the favourable turn the war has
taken in Korea. We admire the
skilful conduct of the campaign by
that great soldier General Mac-
Arthur,

“We all mus’ hone that the
forces of the free poovles of the
world will not become too deeply
involved in the Far East because
the dangers there are on a very
small scale compared to those
which tower up against us on the
continent of Europe’ Churchill
continus |
MacArthur has made no secret —-Reuter.
of his feelings that the United
States should take a stronger line
against Communism in the Far
Fast, The State Department in
Washington has laid down a more
subtle approach,

Truman has often said that it
was he who made the final decis-
ions on American policy,

—Reuter.



TELL

THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
Ring 3113 Day or Night.

me THE ADVOCATE
PAYS FOR NEWS.





hoicost



' Nat ! ,
Gifts

e
K. W. V.
PURE WINES!

THERE IS A K.W.V, WINE FOR EVERY OCCASION!
For WEDDINGS, BIRTHDAY PARTIES, aod «ther

CELEBRATIONS
K.W.V,. SPARKLING FRANSCHHOEK
(White)
K.W.V. SPARKLING ROODEBERG
(Red)
K.W.V. WEMMERSHOEK NO. 1

A Delicious Sauterne

FOR DINNER PARTI®S

Before Dinner, as an appetizer and with
Soup

K.W.V. SHERRY NO. 1
dry

K.W.V. OLD BROWN SHERRY

Very old extra

WITIL CAKE, FRUIT, CIIKESE
K.W.V. PAARL. TAWNY
K.W.V. CORONATION WINE
FOR COCKTAIL PARTIES



K.W.V. PAARLITA COCKTAIL
K.W.V. SWEET VERMOUTH :
DRY VERMOUTH

K.W.V

THERE ARE NO BETTER WINES
THAN K.W.V.

ple c evils which menace
us ant tase left of European.

sitll



PAGE TWO

A












CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT to TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30







TIC



presents

BUD ABBOTT and LOU COSTELLO

]
in “HOLD THAT GHOST”

with Richard CARLSON - Joan DAVIS - Mischa AUER
A Universal Picture.

ROYAL

Last 2 Shows To-day—
4.30 and 8.30

EMPIRE

To-day 4.45 and 8.45 and
continuing to Wed. 4.45





and 8.30 Republic Action Double.
M.G.M. Pictures Presents | Wild Bill Elliott, Vera Ral- Sad TO-D A Y sh tisiiiaa as
“THE DOCTOR .* WYOMING” 8.30 p.m. DAILY
— and — -
AND ey MAMMOTH EW WARNER BROS
«BANDITS OF r . TRIUMPH!
os ‘s
THE GIRL” THE BADLANDS” pee
wring . Starring
Sunsét Carson, Peggy
Gienn Ford, Charles Coburn, Stewart.

Gloria DeHaven, Janet
Leigh, with Bruce
Bennett.

Extra:

Mon. and Tues. 4.30 & 8.30.
Republic Big Double .
Sufset Carson, Peggy






Newsreel Showing:— Stewart in. .
Charles and Louis in Train-
ing * DAYS OF
; OLYMP Cc BUFFALO BILL”
YMPIC are
To-day 4.30 pm. & 8 45 pm
Mon, 4.30 p.m. & 8.15 p.m, ng SONG OF
Republic Smashing Double
pastD.om ARsOW BUREAU ete ee MEKIC AY
fg — With —
Adele Mara.
Wed. & Thurs. 4.30 and
8.30.
Fri. 4.30 only.

All Action Double.
Roberts, George Cooper
—in —

++ FLAMING
Fury °°
— and —
“WHE LAST
BANDIT”

— Starring
Wild Bill Elliott, Adrian
Booth, George (Gabby)

Hayes.

ROBERTS, Jackie] Roy

Starring: Roy
COOPER & David WOLFE

And





Friday Night at 8,30
Madam O’Lindy and Troupe



=—>in —
—— | CARACAS NIGHT’
Tues. First Instalment ;
445 pm. & 815 pm Introducing the “Flying

Saucer.

ROXY

Last 2 Shows To-day—
4.45 and 8.15.

United Artist Presents .
*+hdRS. MIKE °°

— Starring —
Dick Powell, Evelyn Keyes,
With J. M. Kerrigan, Angela
Clarke.

“Monday 4.30 & 8.15
Tues. 4.30 only.

Groucho MARX & Carmen
MIRANDA in—

** COPACABANA ””

— and —

«MR. ACE”



Wed. Final Instalment
4.45 pm. & 8 15 p m
Republic Serial _

THEATRE,










— With —
George Raft, Sylvia Sidney.

Tues. Nite at 8.30
Madam O’Lindy and Troupe
M,

Dm L a




CMa Rea eed ty

- *CARACAS NICHT:

We are in a position to=-

WIRE OR REWIRE YOUR HOUSE

with the LARGEST and BEST STOCK of

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

We also have ELECTRIC MOTORS all Sizes

ESTIMATES GLADLY SUBMITTED

GALETY

“RIVER'S END”

with Virginia MAYO
“GOD IS MY CO-PILOT





(The Gard





MONDAY and TUESDAY 8.30 P.M.
“GIRL FROM JONES’ BEACH”

and Ronald REAGAN
Dennis MORGAN

Special Matinee ursday at 2. p.m.
(Cheap ces)

MONOGRAM'’S EXCITING MUSICAL —

Action Double!
Governor JIMMY DAVIS in

“LOUISIANA

with Margaret LINDSAY—The Sunshine Serenaders

and

Johnny Mack BROWN — Raymond HATTON

“PRAIRIE EXPRESS”

SPECIAL MATINEE SATURDAY 21ST

MORNING 9.30 (Cheap Prices)
BIG WESTERN DOUBLE!

(Pictures to be Announced)

















— SPECIAL NOTICE —

Bridgetown, as soon as possible



TO SEE

HAMLET

: ON :

ADULTS — USUAL PRICES

“Local Talent Audition This Morning 9.30 am.

ALL ARE _ INVITED.

Capt.



GARDEN TROWELS
SECATEURS ......
HOSE NOZZLES ....
MENDERS .....
UNIONS .«...



en) ST. JAMES
Last 2 Shows TODAY 5 and 8.30 p.tn.
“PRAIRIE THUNDER”









——=- BRIDGETOWN —



Headmasters and Headmistresses of Private Schools are re-
quested to get in touch with the Manager
Positively Your Last Chance

MONDAY OCT. 1601.30 p.m.
CHILDREN 18 ANYWHERE



EMPIRE THEATRE

THURSDAY 19th and FRIDAY 20th at 830 P.M.
MATINEE: FRIDAY AT 5 P.M.

MRS. A. L. STUART Presents Her SCHOOL of
DANCING in

‘REVUEDEVILLE 1950’

Music by the Poli
C. E. RAI

His Excellency the Governor and Party will be attending
First Night

BOX OFFICE OPEN DAILY
From 8.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 1.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.

PRICES:— ORCHESTRA and BOXES $1.50; HOUSE $1.00;
BALCONY 72c. RESERVED.

we offer

also V.G.M.—for manuring of Vegetables & Flower Gardens a t















































LOOK AFTER
YOUR GARDEN
and LAWN

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

IS EXCELLENCY THE GOV-
ERNOR and Mrs. Savage
attend the opening of Mrs.

|

} | will

|A. L. Stuart’s “Passport to
| Heaven”, (Revuedeville 1950)
} which opens at the Empire

Theatre on Thursday.

Arrived Safely
M*â„¢ EDDIE BRATHWAITE and
Mr, Fabian Holder, Barba-
dos Scholars of 1949, who left here
about ten days ago by the Will¢m-
stad, have arrived safely in Eng-
land.

On their arrival in England, they
were met by British Countil
representatives, who were most
kind to them.

Eddie is at Pembroke College,
Cambridge, and Fabian is at the
University College, Oxford

Two Sisters
ISS BETTY MARSHALL, has
completed her two-year
course in England at Moorfields
and Westminster Eye Hospital and
has now gone to Middlesex Hos-

pital to do her General Course.

Her sister Pansy, who went up
to England last year, has now
completed her first year at Moor-
fields. She has recently returned
to England from a short holiday

in the South of France.
Betty and Pansy, are daughters
of Mr. and Mrs, A. H. Marshall of

“Grafton”, Black Rock.

Holiday Over

ISS ELAINE WOOD, who is

with Barclays Branch here, re-
turned from Trinidad by B.W.TA.
yesterday morning, Elaine spent
her long leave in the Land of the
Humming Bird, but it’s back to
work on Monday

Back from U.K. Visit

FTER vhree months in
England, Mr. and Mrs, R. PB.
Skeete of “Edgecumbe,” St

Philip returned yesterday mori -
ing via Canada by T.C.A.

Their daughter Elizabeth has
remained in the U.K., at school.
Their other daughter Pat who
accompanied them as far as
Canada remained over for a week.
She will be arriving on Oct. 21.

T.C.A. Arrivals

MONG the passengers arriving
| by T.C.A., yesterday morn—
|ing were Mrs. Agatha McGivern
}who lives in Vancouver Island
| $he is here for about six months
{staying at the Marine Hotel,

} Another arrival was Miss Mary
|Greaves from Montreal. She is
staying with her good friend M1's
Alexander, Radiographer at the
Gen®tral Hospital

Here For A Month

RS. JESSIE FENDT who

arrived yesterday morning
by B.W.LA., plans to Spend a
month’s holiday in Barbados. She
is staying with her son Mr. Harola
Webster who is at present staying
|in one of the bungalows on the
St. Peter coast,

Trinidad Solicitor

R. ARNOLD KELSHALL,

Solicitor of Trinidad arriveu
| yesterday morning by B.W.1.A., to
{spend a couple of weeks’ holiday
at the St. Lawrence Hotel.

Arnold’s brother Phil, is a Pilot

with B.W.LA,

Returned Yesterday

R. JOHN HAMMOND, whv

accompanied Mr. Simon
Wardell to Trinidad on Friday
morning returned yesterday by
|B.W.LA. Mr. Wardell is on his
| way to England for a months
| visit.

Traffic Supt. B.W.LA.

R. CHARLIE MAYNARD,

Traffic Supt. B.W.LA., in
Port-Cf-Spain arrived yesterday
by B.W.1A., on a flying visit, re—
turning to Trinidad yesterday
afternoon.

Short Visit

ING, COMMANDER LAWES

of International Aeradio
| Ltd., arrived from Trinidad yes-
terday by B.W.LA., and will be
| here for about five or six days,

Mr. and Miss Barbados

T the dance at the Barbados
| Aquatic Club last night the
title of Miss Barbados went to Miss
| Hazel Carrington and Mr. Michael
| Lynch was chosen as Mr. Barba-
















Band Directed by
IN, A.R.C.M., M.B.E,



From $17.46
32c.
81

$ 2.

63c. ,,
i
26
83c. ,,
12c.
25c

THE HARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE |
COTTON FACTORY LTD.





}
#1 {

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15,





MR, AND MRS. JEFFREY STOLLMEYER who were intransit from
England on the “Golfito” yesterday.

Back From Cricket U.K. Journalists

* URING the West Indies to

Roo esate - do a_ special issue on the
rday from England were jiritis loni ft “Picture
Mr. J. M. Kidney, Manager of Gritish Colonies or Picture

Post”, England’s largest Weekly
Ilustrated are Mr. F. H. Man,
Chief Photographer and Journal-
ist, and Mrs. L, Henderson-Begy,
Journalist,

They arrived on the Golfite
yesterday intransit for Trinidad.
and might probably visiv British
Guiana before returning to Bar-
bados.

» Mr. Man told Carib that he was
in the newspaper business for 25
years, and was connected with
“Picture Post” from its inception
in 1938. Prior to that, he said

the victorious West Indies team,
Mr. F. A. C, Clairmonte, vice-
President of the Barbados Cricket
Association and Mrs. Clairmonte,
Mr. R. K. Nunés, President of
the West Indies Cricket Board of
Control who was intransit for
Trinidad, Mr. Jeffrey Stollmeyer
a member of the West Indies team
and Mrs. Stollmeyer, who were
also intransit for Trinidad.

Many people were at the Bag-
gage Warehouse to meet them
including members of the Barba-
dos Cricket Association, cricketers
from various clubs, _ relatives,
friends and well wishers.

that he was in Germany with the
Berlino Hiustrated where he spent
six years.



cde Di tal

MR, F. H. MAN and Mrs. L. Henderson-Begg two U.K. Journalists who
are doing a special issue on the British colonies for “Picture Post’.

PLAZA OISTIN

PARAMOUNTS MUSICAL ! ! 1!
Bing CROSBY in “HERE COME THE WAVES”

MONDAY and TUESDAY—5 & 8.30 P.M. (Paramount Double)
“SEVEN WERE SAVED”
With Richard DENNING — and
“THE ACCUSED”
With Loretta YOUNG and Robert CUMMINGS









LAST TWO SHOWS TODAY
5 and 8.30 P.M,



NEWLY
OPENED

mS)

EVANS and
WHITKFIELDS

Shoe Stores

i

Your









JOHN WHIT

1950
Hadi Nice Trip

FTER a pleasant stay in Eng-
land anda_ very nice trip
down oh the “Golfito”, Lady Violet
Stow returned to Barbados yes-
terday and has taken up residence
Highgate, Upper Collymore
Rock. ”

During her six months in the
U.K. she visited her daughter
Mrs. Collyer, wife of Brigadier
Collyer who is stationed in Eng-
land.

Her son Mr. J. M. Stow, the
Administrator of St. Lucia and
his wife and little son Mark wére
also Spending someé time in Efig-
land. Mr. Stow returned to St.
Lucia by air last Wednesday but
his wife who was ill is stayi
on for a further period and wil
be joining him soon.

Governor’s Daughter
Mess E. M. RANCE, daughter
of His Excellency the Gov-
einor and Lady Rance of Trini-
dad. was intransit from England
on thé Golfito yesterday vo spend
about six months with her parents,

For Five Weeks
OLIDAYING in Barbados
’ for five weeks are Mrs,
A. R. Davis and her two
daughters Inez and Dorothy
of British Guiana. They arrived
on Monday morning by the “Lady
Nelson and are staying at
“Leaton-on-Sea”, The Stream.
Mrs. Davis whose husband is
the proprietor of Davis’ Sash,
Door and Blind Manufactory in
Georgetown, is paying her second
visit to the island, while it is
the first time for her daughters
who are simply thrilied with the
island and are enjoying every
moment of it.

Entertained To Luncheon

TR ALLAN COLLYMORE,
President of the Barbados
Cricket Association entertained
to luncheon yesterday at the
Marine Hotel, Mr. R. K. Nunes,
President of the West Indies
Cricket Board of Control, Mr.
J. M. Kidney, Manager of the
West Indies Cricket Team, Mr.
John, Goddard, Captain of the
team, Mr. Jeffrey Stollmeyer, a
member of the team, and Mr.,
F. A. C. Clairmonte, Vice Pres-
both before and after luncheon
and will depart after issuing a
ident of the Barbados Cricket
Association.

Returning To B.G.
EAVING yesterday evening for
Trinidad on their way to
British Guiana on the “Golfito’
were Mr. and Mrs. J. Baxter
and _ their little daughter Jane.
They arrived here earlier in. the
day on the same vessel from
England where they had spent
four months’ holiday.
Mr. Baxter is Manager of Rose

aver.

Hall Plantation in British Guiana.

After Eight Months

FTER AN absence of eight

months in England, Mrs.
W. M. Lambert whose husband
was formerly Private Secretary
to His Excellency the Governor,
returned on the Golfite yesterday
morning to re-join her husband
who is staying at Abbeville Guest
House.

To See His Family

ISS HETTY CHALLENOR.

who was working in England
as a with the British
Motor Trade Associatiom, arrived
yesverday by the Golfito to see
her family.

She is the daughter of Mrs.
Challenor of Vallery, Collymore
Rock, and the late Mr. Georg:

hallenor,

o Take Up Appointment
R. E. B. MARTYN. who
arrived here yesterday morn.-

ing on the Golfito from England
left the same @vening by the same
opporwunity for Trinidad to take
vp an appointment as Plant
Pathologist of the Department of
Agriculture,

Mr. Martyn held a similar pos’
*n Jamaica prior to going to g-
land on leave some months ago.

Back From U.K. Holiday
ETURNING on the “Golfito”
from England yesterday af-
ter spending three months’ holiday
were Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Haynes
of Parks, St. Joseph.

While in England, they visited
their son Anthony who is doing
his last year in Economits at
Cambridge University.

On Annual Leave

R. PETER KING artived

from ‘Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.1LA., to spend his
annual leave in Barbados, Peter
is with the Royal Bank of Cattada
in Port-Of-Spain.

When. he was stationed in Bar-
bados, Péter used to be the goal
getter in the forward line of the
Flying Fish Water Polo Club. No
doubt the Flying Fish team will
be pleased to hear of his arrival,





a small shipment of
DE LUXE HOT PLATES
— Table Models —

G a PAN
Super finish Green mel,
See them at your

GAS SH
and buy before they are all sold



MENS and
YOUTHS SHicies

\





SUNDAY, OCTOBER | 15,

1950



SUNDAY



PUZALE: FIND THE STARS Gardening Hin

Big names, »
£30,000 pay
cheques, have
vanished from
British films.
And audiene-
es like it that
way...

om “i

Fale

The Girl They Forget:

FOR years British studios have
been trying to build up new film
stars on the Hollywood model—
glamourised and over publicised
as an insurance against the pic-
tures being bad.

So inconsistent, misguided and
ineffective have these efforts
proved that today Britain has
practically no genuine film stars
at all.

We have rare star-appearances
by Margaret Lockwood and Phyllis
Calvert, by artists like Olivier and
Celia Johnson. We have periodic
returns of Hollywood-based Brit-
ish actors, and many fine per-
formances of star standing.

But where are the regular,
proved stars whose names will
draw the public to any film?
Their value has been dissipated
in too many bad scripts, too many
wanderings off into other enter-
tainment fields, too much nerv-
ous hiding of their pictures from
the West End.

Above all, there has been disas-
trously cheap publicity for some
promising youngsters at too early
a stage in their careers.

(In this discussion we will
disregard, not overlook, Anna
Neagle, who is an exception to
any rule.)

But here is the significant point:
are British films suffering because
this starpolicy has collapsed? Not
at allthey are doing excellently
without the big names.

They Made Money

THINK of some of the best
money-makers: Whisky Galore,
They Were Not Divided, The Blue
Lamp, The Wooden Horse, The
Happiest Days of Your Life—and
now Seven Days to Noon. No top-
line star name in any of them;
audiences have been flocking in
because they want to see good

stories and direction, not stars.
To put truth before gallantry,
ét is a number of the productions
with star names which have
been doing poor business in the

ir.
Sean like The Third Man and

State Secret have certainly con-
tained some biggish names, mostly
imported. That was a box-office
safeguard for the American mar-
ket. But I guarantee that these
thrillers would have been equally
successful without any star infu-
sions. :

Panos ¥









STELLA ANRDEW

Here, then, is a new, invigorat-
ing element in British film pro-
duction. Producers can now say:
“This is a fine story; who is
most suitable actress for the lead-
ing Tole?” Instead of: “Here we
have Miss X under contract and
doing nothing; we must find some
story with a big star role for her.”

The new way promises a much
higher standard of pictures to
come and at a more economical
cost. £20,000 to £30,000 a year
salaries—like fhe stars who could
ence demand them—have van-
ished. ‘

Some of the stars may not like
it. But this change of policy will
help them in the long run; for it
should prove the saving of the in-
dustry.

rp

Exit Harrison

ONE ACTOR who could make
himself the biggest draw in Brit-
ish films is Rex Harrison,

But Mr. Harrison does not stay
here long @nough to help the in-
dustry.

After a long interval, he has
finished making a murder story
here with his wife, Lilli Palmer—
The Long Dark Hall. It has been
a quick, and what looks like an
expert job—seven weeks on a
budget of £156,000, split between
this country and America.

Now the Harrisons are off again
before the film is shown—to co-—
star on Broadway in John van

Druten’s new play: Bell, Book
and Candle.
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—LES.



Germans Send Toys

BRITISH and German toys are
competing for the Christmas mar-
ket for the first time since the
war. Thousands of pounds are
at stake and British manufactur-
ers are determined to win.

They ‘believe that since Ger-
man toys went off

they have been able to dig them-
selves in and will be able to keep
the_business,

“We welcome the chance of
competing with the Germans,”
said a North London maker of
mechanical toys.

“We competed with them be-
fore the war, but things are much
different now.”



. CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it:
AXYDLBAAKR
is LONGFELLOW

One letter simply stands for another.

In this example A is used

for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc. Single letters, apos-

trophies,
Each day the cod: ‘otiots



nm of the words are all hints.

are different.

A Cryptograra Quotation

PZHYAKX,

DMZ H Z2MYFXKN



PZHYAK

ZDCP

“ KHPPKXK QPCN!
IML CN XK —



KEEP OUT FRO?
FUL PACK—VIRGIL,

rfHEIN

SMALL U

YOU DESIRE THE
BEST TEA — SO USE

RED ROSE TEA!

IT IS GOOD TEA.

pen cee noite nema moan

For Amateurs

October Is Seed-Box
Time

_ Now that October is here it is
time to route out those Seed-
boxes from last year, and begin
preparing them for the new an-
nual seeds. :

It may seem very early to do
this but these preparations take
time and if October is set as a
target it will be found that at
least some of the boxes will be
ready by November which is seed
planting time. .

Look over your Seed—boxes well,
repair any that can stand repair—
ing and discard those that are too
old and shaky to mend. Do not
be tempted to use any old broken
down ones, for that so often re
sults in the box collapsing and
spilling the seedlings just before
they are ready to be planted out,
and so weeks of patient care is
lost.

Have thé boxes scrubbed and
dried in the sun. See that they
have several holes bored in the
bottom, and after covering the
holes with a layer of stones for
drainage, your boxes are ready to
be filled.

The soil that is used to fill the
boxes should be a mixture of
mould, dry cow manure, and
charcoal, Combine this mixture
well, and sift it through a garden
seive once or twice before using
it to fill out the boxes Place
four bricks (or stones) under the
four corners of the box, whether
it is on a plant stand or on the

Wy

“1 think we've crossed }
the wires somewhere —
we've got Morgan Phillips

discussing the date of the §

next General Election
with Lord Woolton !’



London. Express Service
PUP pr
ground, as this
drainage and prevents the
from getting soggy. _

To make quite certain that

soil pilots



At the Cinema:

History

‘‘Flattops”

By G. B.

The title of “TASK FORCE”
must, of necessity, have more than a vague meaning to
those of us who achieved matusity prior to World War LI,
but remember something of World I and the years immedi-

ately following it.

This vital and gripping motion
picture, now showing at the New
Plaza, is not only the history of a
great war weapon, but also a pic-
torial chronometer measuring the
rapid strides of progress in avia-
tion during the span of only
twenty years. This picture is
virtually the biography of the Air-
craft Carrier, and is impersonally
dedicated to the Naval Officers and
Architects who foresaw its necess-
ity and struggled first to bring it
into being and then to prefect it in-
to the superb weapon which it
eventually became. For withou; the
Aircraft Carrier or “Flattop,” the
war in the Pacific would have cost
infinitely more in loss of life and
human suffering than it did, and
even with the “Flattops” the losses
were staggering.

The picture opens with a hand-
ful of post War I Naval Aviators
on a rather desolate sandpit
aerodrome waiting for their com-
manding officer to land. He even-
tually lands his fragile biplane,
and informs them that the U.S.
Navy has sunk most of her capital
ships and heavy cruisers. is,
of course, actually happened in
1920 or 1921 and was considered
by the entire nation as a fitting
expression of their belief that the
holocaust of 1914-1918 had, by its
mere occurrence, and by the even-
tual triumph of Right over Might
and the subsequent peace treaty,
banished all chances of future
wars. In 1921, the Naval Air Ser-
vice of the U.S.N. consisted of a
group of fliers, maintained for
purely experimental purposes,
who wore uniforms more suitable
for Cavalry Officers than for Avia-
tors. In this sequence, the Com
manding Officer informs his fliers
that the Navy has kept a coal
tender, the U.S.S. “Langley” with
which it intends to experiment as
a carrier of sea-borne aircraft.
accordingly, they commence mak-
ing practice landings and take-
offs on 4 section of the aerodrome,
the size of the flight deck of the
U.S.S. “Langley,”

The story quickly unfolds, of out

ADVOCATE

Of The |

wth all that the words imply

The main characters in this
picture are almost perfectiy cast,
and nowhere does the film lack
personal realism Much of the
film is cOmposed of actual battle
sequences released for the first
time by the U.S. Navy, which
cover Pearl Harbour, Midway, and
in Technicolor, the Okinawa
campaign. They are woven into
the general plot of the film and

add considerable authenticity to
production, The actual carrier
ceck shots.of the cast in their
respective roles were made on

board the. U.S.S. Antietam, one of
the most modern carriers.

Filmed with the full co-opera-
tion of the U.S. Navy, excellent
acting, an intelligent plot, with
just enough human interest, and a
w@tith of interesting Naval and
Aeronautical detail are combined
to make a memorable picture.

“THE DUCHESS OF IDAHO”
now playing at the Globe Theatre
is the type of musical extravaganza
that has a wide popular appeal,
particularly having such stars as
Esther Williams and Van Johnson
in the leading romantic roles. Its
title is derived from the famous
Idaho potato, the appearance of
which is short but impressive and
contributes to the general amuse-
ment, However Idaho also pro-
duces corn, and I’m afraid that
some of this has been allowed to
filter into the plot and the devel-
opment thereof. Anyway—in a
picture of this kind, the story is
always secondary to the spectacle.

Filmed in Technicolor, the in- |

terior settings and the clothes worn
by the various female members of
the cast are luxurious to put it
mildly. The outdoor scenes of
America’s famous playground, Sun
Valley, are beautiful, particularly
the winter sequences There is
spectacular ski-ing, and the Toreh
Parade of skiers at night is like
a fairyland Christmas. The water
ballet, which is the main feature
is most colourful, with the camera
following Miss Williams through-
her graceful aquatic man-

those early days of struggle for oeuvres, The setting for this ballet

recognition, not only of ability,

but also of ideas and foresight,
when the airplane was still con-

is rather unusual and the light-
ing highly effective.
The story concerns an impres-

sidered to be purely an ancilliary sjonable, rich young man, who uses

weapon.

ing Officer, Lt.-Com,

are
“Langley”

transferred
and

Lead by their Command-

his attractive secretary to get him

y Pete out of various romantic entangle-
Richards, played by Walter Bren- ments 1

aan, Gary Cooper as Lt, Scott aad herself, but meeting with no sake?
ensures good 4iS original Naval Air Service ¢ess, she and her girl-friend con
to the gect a plan, which, if successful,
are greeted by will make him realise where his
ants Capt. Reeves (Jack Holt), later yeal happiness lies.

do not get your seeds and this is to become Admiral Reeves, a sea-

Being in love with him

Esther Williams and Paula Ray-

the cause of. many failures) put dog of the old school, whose criti, .mond play the two girls, and at-

the feet of the plant stand

around each box.

If it is possible to have sOMme fojjows
sort of shelter for your gee which was very
boxes in case of heavy rain, all o¢ tria) and error anid was attende

the better.

An open verandah is }

an excellent place for them, But
if they have to be outside, nail

four short uprights to the four

corners of the box, and have

in que of the battle of Jutland is “tractive girls they are too, while
the market tins of water or tie Hoo-doo tape considered a classic, and who is ‘Van Johnson and John Lund givi

frequently called the father cf plenty of romantic support. Mr

Naval Carrier Aviation. Then johnson does a spot of singing

their initial training, and dancing and leads a dance

much a matter }pand, when he is not doing his

d darnedest to keep up with Miss

y tragic accidents that are forever Williams, while Mr. Limd is an

the lot of tke pioneer, There enthusiastic though amateur cook
follows the historic battle between —for all his million.

; Navy fliers and penny pinching Lena Horne sings a number and

piece of ply-wood, or an old box politicians, the latter more than Eleanor Powell is back again—as

cover that can be placed on the
uprights forming a cover to th
box above the seeds.

e Sighted
This can Portrays

ably abetted by a stubborn short
The film then
development of

press.
the

herself—to show that she is still
nimble when it comes to tap dan-
cing—though her technique seems

quickly be used on the boxes in carriers, from the early makeshift to have suffered slightly in the

case of heavy weather.

All this preparation takes time, early enthusiasts of Naval Avia- the whole
so it is just as well to start early. tion,

“Langley” to the mighty ships ct
today. The vicissitudes of those

between the two wars

It may seem a lot of fuss and receive sympathetic treatment,

unnecessary trouble to take, and
some people do plant their seeds
just anywhere and anyhow and get
away with it. But many also have
failures, due not to bad seeds,
although they always get the
blame, but to the neglect of proper
care and preparation taken pefore
hand. .






SER





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Can We Finanee It?

Ye ’ By O. S. COPPIN

WEST INDIES tour to Australia or an Australian tour to the

West Indies — this is the burning question that is exciting

the greatest interest and speculation ever in a half century of organ-
ised West Indies cricket.

Since the re-establishment of Test cricket after World War Il,
there can be no denial of the fact that this has been the means éf
the éstablishing of a firm hold on all peoples throughout the British
Empire and Commonwealth. :

W.I. HAVE GONE A LONG WAY

HE West Indies have travelled all the way to the Far East to

lay down the gauntlet to India, the M.C.C. has visited The West
Indies and South Africa; India has fought strenuous Tests with Aus-
tralia. and both Australia and New Zealand have paid their visits to
the Mother Country,

More recent of all, the West Indies have just concluded a tour of
England with signal success, carrying off the rubber in a manner
so praiseworthy and convincing that it is the concensus of opinion
that by virtue of this performance, following their victories over
India and the M.C.C. in Tests in consecutive years, they have earn-

ed the right to challenge Australia for present world cricket suprem-
acy.

SUCCESS EBBS AND FLOWS
E ADMIT at once that success in these Homeric contests in the
Imperial cricket fields ebbs and flows like the tide but still the
West Indies have won their chance and it is up to the cricket pow
ers-that-be to exploit it to the full advantage of future West Indie
cricket,

Like most people, the prospect of seeing Arthur Morris, Keith
Miller, Neils Harvey, Ray Lindwall and company do battle on the
Kensington turf, to say nothing of the picturesque Queen’s Park Oval
at Port-of-Spain or historic Sabina Park of Kingston, renders me
alternately hot and cold with excitement and anticipation,

ON SOBER REFLECTION

B’" on sober reflection and on the examination of what the finan-

cial implications of an Australian visit to the West Indies would
mean, I think that the chances of an Australian visit are negligible
it the present moment,

But | would not attempt to, dismiss this important question at
that. Here are some of the facts that have fortified me in my view
‘hat the tour to the West Indies is not practical.

The Australians although they play the finest brand of cricket one
could ask for, are also one hundred per cent efficient on the business
side, Their players each received a bonus of £800 at the conclusion
of their 1948 tour of England and by simple arithmetic this figure
multiplied by sixteen amounts to £12,800, ;

MCC WAS CHEAPER BY HALF
The M.C.C, professional cricketers that toured the West Indies in
1947-48 received £325 each and if we multiply this by sixteen we get
£5,200—a far cry from £12,800. .

But let us assume that the Australian figure per man were reduced
to six hundred pounds in view of the fact that the tour to the West
Indies would necessarily be shorter than an English tour. Even then
the figures would be almost twice the amount paid the English pro-

fessionals and this would be only a part of the financial commitments
of the West Indies cricket authorities.

COULD HIGHER CHARGES HELP?

Some have expressed the viéw that considerably higher charges
could be made for admission to the games. I agree with this, if at
any time it is possible to stage the games here. One however could
hardly take the peak figures of 7,000 a day at the Tests at Barbados,
15,000 a day at the Tests at Trinidad and compare them with the
933,513 who watched the five Test matches between England and Aus<
tralia in 1936-37, the 863,608 persons who paid £75,324. 16s to watch
the five Test matches between England and Australia in 1928-29.

The cost of transporting them from the Antipodes to the West

Indies, through the islands of the member colonies of th
Cricket Board and then back to Australia Fearn Petite

figures if one attempted to compare them with a

ny other figures ii
Nam _ West Indies Cricket Board of Control has been angie
nvolved,

THESE FAVOUR THEIR MIN

S° much for the cons and now for the a I ioe heard from

those who think that the tour can be made. In the first instance
they claim that in view of the present high rating of the West Indies
in world cricket circles that the Australians should come since we
could now afford to drop £5,000 but our world rating would still
remain. Our prestige is well worth this they state.

Others think that a good many of our key players would be
availabke here but would decline to make the trip to Australia so
soon after the tours to India and England.

W.I. CAN ONLY WIN AT HOME
Another school of thought subscribes to the view that we are sure

of beating Australia only if we play them in the West Indies on our
own wickets.

I have already given my views and I cannot find anything in
the pros to persuade me otherwise.
ei To sum up, it seems to me that the West Indies should accept the
invitation of the Australian Cricket Board of Control if and when it
comes. They should go forward resolved to do their best to bring
back the “ r. ;

After this tour, they should have gathered together sufficient
funds, sufficient laurels and sufficient prestige to undertake any reason-
able scheme in the attractive and charming drama of cricket.

WHAT OF SOME PACE BOWLERS
One final thought is that the West Indies Cricket Board of Control

should set about at once looking for some fast men to train. They

}| need at least two good ones as it is definite that they could not expect

tl





Johnson to grow younger from his fortieth birthday, and although
either Pierre or Jones might be called upon in an emergency yet
the quest mus¢ be on for three really fast young men to train in time
for the visit to Australia if it materialises.













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-

W.L-Australian Tour EMPIRE DEFEAT

LODGE

. Three Other Games At
Interesting Stages

EMPIRE defeated Lodge yesterday by ten wickets as
the fifth series of First Division Cricket games, entered

its second day.

Wanderers are leading Police in their game at the Bay
while Cariton dismissed Spartan to secure a 61 run lead
at the Park. College and Pickwick are fighting keenly at

Kensington.

These games end: on Saturday next.
E

LODGE vs. EMPIR
Lodge — 67 and 78
Empire — 123 and (for 0 wkts.) 26

Empire gained six points from
Lodge School in the second day
of their three day First Division
cricket match at Lodge School
yesterday when they defeated the
school team by 10 wickets.

Lodge Schools’ C. E. Gill played
a splendid innings when he ended
up with 41 not .out, more than
half of the team’s score, but his
valiant effort did not save them
from defeat.

Lodge made 67 and 78 and Em-
pire 123 and for no wickets, 26

After Empire had bowled out
Lodge for 67 in the first over after
the luncheon interval on the first
day, Empire put up 71 for the ioss
es five wickets by the end of the
lay.
Errol Millington, besides taking
five wickets for 22 runs then,
dashed up 25 for his, team at a
critical stage of the game. Grant
was the 16 not out and yesterday
he went on to topscore for Empire
with 30 iuns

King took tour first innings
Lodge wickets for 33 runs.

K. Brookes, Lodge School pace
bowler claimed four wickets for
25 runs during his 20 overs.
Brookes can quickly attain and
maintain « steady length.

In their second innings, be-
sides Gill 41 not out, the only
other Lodge bat who entered
double figures was Glasgow who
scored 13.

Errol Millington and-H. Barker
each took four Lodge School sec-
ond innings wickets for 16 and 15
runs respectively.

O. M. Robinson and B. Bourne
the Empire opening batsmen made
12 and 11 runs, both not out, for
Empire in their second innings
to help their side win the two
day victory.

PICKWICK vs. COLLEGE

Pickwick (for 9 wkts.) 323
and (for 5 wkts.) 48
College — 182

James Williams, brother of
“Boogles” Williams, W.I. and In-
tercolonial Cricketer gave an ex-
cellent all-round performance for
Harrison College in their match
against Pickwick at Kensington
Oval yesterday. He played a real

ipper’s game, top-scoring for

ollége in their first innings with
64 and capturing four Pickwick
second innings wickets for 20
runs. A partnership of 93 runs
between James and his brother Mr.
Albert Williams was the best for
the day.

Pickwick so far has given Col-
lege 189 runs for victory but they
still have five second innings
wickets in hand,

The Kensington team declared
at their overweek total of 323 for
the loss of nine wickets. College
replied with 182 runs. The best
scorers were J. Williams 64, A.
Williams 45 and N. Harrison 21.

E. L. G. Hoad, the Pickwick slow
right arm bowler, gave the best
bowling performance for his team,
taking four for 61. Skipper John
Goddard and H. King took two
éach

'Pickwick got off to a very bad
start in their second innings and
at one stage they were 15 runs
for the loss of three wickets. At
close of play they were however
48 for five. J. Williams took four
for 20 and the other wickets went
to Simmons.

The Game

Pickwick declared at their
over week total of 323 for 9 wic-
kets. Harrison College opened
their first innings with C. W.
Smith and E. Hope.

Smith faced the bowling of H.

. King from the northern end,

e scored a single off the fourth
ball and Hope played out the re-
mainder of the over.

yo A moor

a“









Mike Foster was brought on
from the southern end. Smith
played the first three balls but
was out leg before in the fourth
ball.

Blackman filled the breach but
when the total was only eight he

was clean bowled by King for
five.
His place at the wicket was

taken by Mr. Headley. Both Mr.
Headley and Hope appeared to be
getting settled down but at 31
Hope was bow!ed by King for 11.
N. Harrison partnered Mr.
Headley wno was later caught by
Birkett off the bowling of E. L.
G. Hoad jnr also for 11.

Run Out

Mr. Albert Williams went
in to bat with N. Harrison. At 62
Harrison was unfortunately run
out for 21. James Witliams,
brother of Mr Albert Williams,
came in next. Both brothers
played confidently and at lunch
the total was 137 for the loss of
five wickets, each 40 not out.

On resumption J. Williams
erashed the fourth delivery of
Birkett's third over from the
southern end to the boundary for
four to make his score 51 and
the total 152.

Soon after Mr. A. Williams
gave Hoad an easy return. His
score of 45 included six fours.

C,. Thorpe playing his first
match in this Division, partnered
J. Williams at 154 for six.
Thorpe had a chance at two when
Gerald Wood, the Pickwick wic-
ket-keeper failed to take an easy
catch off the third ball of Hoad’s
sixth over. In the following ball
he was however clean bowled by
Hoad.

H. Simmons, who was next to
bat, got off the mark with a single
off Hoad. He scored two twos off
the next over from John Goddard
at the southern end.

At 178 J. Williams gave Hoad
at mid-on an easy catch off the
bowling of John Goddard. Wil-
liams made a valuable 64 which
included nine fours, J. Corbin
replaced Williams but before any
runs were added Simmons went
out to one of Hoad’s deliveries,
missed and was stumped by wic-
ket-keeper Wood for seven.

K. King partnered Corbin wh?
was later caught by the substitute
off Goddard before he could open
his account. The College first in-
nings closed at 182 with King
three not out

They saved the follow on by
nine runs.

Pickwick Batting

Pickwick opened their second
innings with G. Wood and E.
Edwards. J. Williams opened the
attack for College. Six runs were
scored off this over by Wood. J.
Corbin started to bowl the next
over from the southern end but
could only deliver one ball. He
gave up the ball because of an
injured shoulder.

J. Williams came on again an‘?
in the last ball of this over he
had Edwards caught at second
slip by Thorpe for two runs.

Simmons was brought on at the
southern end in place of Corbin.
B, Inniss who had partnered
Wood, edged the third delivery of
Simmons’ first over and J. Willi-
ams at second slip took a brilliant
catch.

The total was 12 runs for the
loss of two wickets when T Bir-
kett went in to. bat. With only
three runs added to the total
“Theo” Birkett was returned to
the Pavilion after being clean
bowled by one of J. Williams
fast in-swingers which kept low.
He did not open his account.
Harold Kidney was next to bat.

Steady Bowling

Both Williams and Simmons
were keeping good lengths. In
Williams’ next over, his sixth, he
got Wood out leg before in the

@ On Page 5

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PHOSFERINE.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950

. BREEDING

What is Our Policy in The W.1.
By BOOKIE

last Sunday on Hon. J. D. Chandler’s Burns
seems to have aroused some local interest in the question of the
breeding of thoroughbred horses in the West Indies. It is not the
first time that I have mentioned the subject in this column and 1
do not intend to repeat my views on what I think the set-up should
be. But with the recent influx of quite a number of high class
stallions into the West Indies perhaps we should make some exam-
ination of what we we have on hand to breed from and what we
might expect them to produce.

Last Sunday I said the accent was on speed
t the pedigrees of the new stallions and couple this
with wae ee who have been with us for many years have already
produced in the shape of race horses on the track. Briefly let us
look at some of the best
noted for speed only: Seawell,
Pek, Beant Bell, Sailor’s Fun, Greenwood, Ocean Pearl, Bow Bells
by Binge is speed plus enough stamina for mile races: Jetsam,
Gleneagle, Maid of Honour, Belledune, Pippin, Sundial, Gun Site,
Ligan, The Gambler, Il, Pepper “ee om Hill,
Those capable of staying beyond a mile and a quarter: Rass
Taffare and. ...+-+-s
That's just the point “and who else?”
a might add to the last list the names of creoles who
‘ook Dae tae & few races of 1% miles but they could not by any
means be called stayers. However there were so few mile and a half
races that even those who might have proved good stayers were
not really given the chance to develop. Hence I think the racing
authorities out here were really putting the cart before the horse
when they used the argument that we had no true stayers in support
of their move in abolishing all er ee aaa races, te we shall
hich are the ers among our creoles.
abe Ay vg anes hcadiee to find that those in authority cut
their suit to fit their cloth by importing stallions who are not likely
to produce anything more than good milers. Pride of India is * gl
haps the most high class horse ever to be imported to the West Indies.
But his limitations were strictly a mile and within, and both his sire.
Colombo, and his dam, The Bud (by Diophon) are bred for middle
distances.

Next we have Sunstroke and Timar II imported by the T.T.C.
I am not conversant with the latter’s pedigree but Sunstroke, by
Hyperion out of Grass Widow, by Son-in-Law_ appears ~
strong stamina lines through both sire and dam. Yet his best effor
were over a mile and alinough he did win over 1% miles he was
subsequently put back to mile races before terminating his career.
Obviously his connections thought this to be his limit.

Tha. cecMpr.ses the importations by the ‘Lurf Clubs. Now -
come to privately owned ions. We find Burning Bow already
showing us his type with Bow Bells and seeing that he was a
champion sprinter it indicates that he will transmit more speed than
anything else. Then we have the recent arrival Head Worker and
the expected Burns. By Rhodes Scholar out of Berette (by Felstead),
Headworker it seems must play the part of infusing in our stock
the much needed stamina. For although he is no better bred for
stamina on his sire’s side than the above mentioned, on his dam’s
side, he is well fortified with stayers in nearly every line. What is
more he gave definite proof on the race course that he was at his
best at a mile and a half.

Place them all together, the new and the old, and I see a picture
like this: Burning ew, Battle Front and Burns to give us all the
speed we require; Flotsam, Zollas, Sunshaft, Rockphoon, Sunstroke,
Timar IJ, Pride of India and Jetsam to supply us with Se —
distance type; O.T.C., Mont Agel, Restigouche, ‘Brown Bomber,
Cracker-Jack and Head Worker to provide us with the — plus.

Incidentally I learn from John Goddard that Headwor er will
not be racing and his stud duties are expected to begin next season.
His fee, which I understand will be $100, although it may seem og 4
out here, is well within what might have been charged for him
England. Being the last remaining Rhodes Scholar of any ee
in England it is probable that it might have been mere ng en
£75 upwards. Dependent on his success or failure it migh
gone up or down but hardly, I think, below £50. Again this gt
to emphasize the extent to which the Turf Club stallions are su
sidized,

and so it is. One

FORM OF DOLDRUM AND LUNWAYS

There was no space to give the form and breeding of Doldrum
last Sunday. This is the filly now on her way out for Mr. Norman
Inniss. By Wyndham out of Serenity, she ran six times this year,
was second once and third three times, In her first five engagements
she ran in small races but in her sixth her connections must have
fancied her when they sent her out in the Princess Mary Nursery
at Doncaster, a race worth £1,383. In a field of 22 she is reported
to have finished sixth with the first six or seven runners fairly

1 the finish.

nee sire Wyndham was better known as the Bossover Colt who
along with Mahmoud was one of the best two-year-olds of 1935.
Later however, he did not win again, Her dam Serenity has not
thrown any winners yet but won one race. The next dam is Divine
Lady who dead-heated in the Quarndon Plate, her only win, but
produced the good horse Sir Edward (by Rhodes Scholar) who won
15 races and £4,287 in stakes. Divine Lady’s dam was Most Beautiful
winner of the Nassau Stakes at Goodwood and later dam of four
winners including Divine Lady and Osiris, winner of six races and
£4,649 in Stakes.

Mr. Tommy Edwards’ filly Lunways, who has already arrived,
raced four times this season and incidentally was once in the same
race as Harroween, the consolation filly bought by Mr. Rupert Mayers
and syndicate. Lunways was once second and_once third her best
effort being in the Sunbury Stakes at Kempton Park. Here she was
second to Sally Rose in a field of nine, Sally Rose was a winner of
six races this season. .

Lunways is by the Thousand Guineas winner Kingsway out of
Lundy by Bala Hissar and no doubt she will be beginning her racing
in the West Indies at our March meeting next year.

BROWN RUBY AGAIN

It certainly looks as if the possibility which I mentioned last
Sunday about Brown Ruby becoming another Whitsun Folly, may
come true, Yesterday as the B.G. October meeting came to a close
this filly appeared for the second time at the meeting and won
This, announced Mr. Luckhoo, was her fourth straight win in as many
starts, She had already won twice at a small meeting in the country -
districts of B.G.

Of course the class of horse which Brown Ruby was racing
against in B.G. was probably not very high. However it must be
considered that she was racing against horses of all ages, as was the
case yesterday, and she beat them handsomely. I am therefore
hoping that we will see her racing at Christmas with the other two-
year-olds of Barbados and Trinidad. It is a long time that we have
not had any contestants in our classic races from B.G. and the addi-
tional intercolonial rivalry will be heartening.

a

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950



Yesterdays’

@ From Page 4
last ball, for 16 Wee. 7 total
was now 18 runs for loss of
four wickets. H. King ited the
breach, ie Se. was : ston
he got a chance illiams.

Kidney carried his Nate] to five
with a beautiful glide to the
boundary off the last ball of Wil-
liams’ seventh over.

In the next over H_ King got
another chance in slips at five
off the bowling of Simmons.

The total soon onnene reached
the quarter King
was later Ar Pox ‘Williams
for 20. Charlie Taylor re
nered Kidney. At the close of
play the total was 48 for five

wickets; Kidney and Taylor 10
and 0 not out respectively.

WANDERERS ys. POLICE
Wanderers (for 7 wkts. dec.) a
Police 218, and (for 2 wkts.) ..

On a wicket which gave ine
bowlers a little help yesterday,
Dennis Atkinson and Norman
Marshall of Wanderers bowled
out Police to enforce a follow on.

Atkinson returned the excel-
lent figures of 20 overs, 12 maidens,
24 runs, 5 wickets while Marshall
got 4 wickets for 80 runs in 23.4
overs.

Wanderers declared at the over-
week score of 369 for 7 wickets
and bowled out Police in their Ist
innings for 218, two runs before
Police had saved the follow on.
Police were sent back and lost 2
wickets for only 3 runs.

Batting for Police, Capt. Farmer
and H. Wiltshire gave fine dis-
plays.

Farmer in an enjoyable knock
of 69, hit seven fours and five
sixes, Wiltshire’s 55 included two
fours and four sixes. Both
batsmen hit six sixes off Norman
Marshall.

Both Wiltshire and Farmer gave
chances while they were engaged
in a partnership which yielded 95

runs.
Play

Police opened their first innings
with C. Blackman and F. Taylor
to the Wanderers’ attack led by
N. Marshall and D. Atkinson.

Both Marshall and Atkinson
were getting the ball to move a
lot, and were getting a little nip
off the wicket.

Blackman and Taylor
quietly, ing a single now and
again in the gaps.

The score was taken on to 24
before the pair was separated.

Blackman was deceived while
playing forward to a well flighted
off-break from Norman Marshall
and he was cleaned bowled for 9.
Taylor was then 11 not out.

H. Wiltshire joined Taylor. Roy
Marshall was brought on in Atkin-
son’s place. Two overs later,
Norman Marshall, whose ipo
were at that time 6. 3. 10. 1,
gave place to L. St. Hill.

The vate of scoring increased
and 50 runs were on the tins after
55 minutes of play.

Police lost their second wicket
in Taylor with the score at 70.

Atkinson, who was brought back
from the Northern end, got one to
lift at good length. Taylor made

started

an upp stroke and the
came off the outside edge of the
bat to C. Proverbs at gully.

Taylor made 28,

“Life”
Capt. W. A. Farmer was next
in and was. given a_ chance off

Atkinson before he scored. He
drove hard and straight to Skin-
ner standing at silly mid-off.

Skipper Skinner was ringing
bowling changes while runs came
freely for the Police. Farmer and
Wiltshire were having a “go” at
the ball. Farmer hit Norman
Marshall for two sixes in succes-
sion while Wiltshire hit St. Hill
on the pavilion for another.

The 100 went up in 105 minutes
-—Farmer 34 not out and Wiltshire
37 not out.

Farmer and Wiltshire were in a
race for 50 and Farmer beat Wilt-
shire to it.
| Farmer took an over from
Greenidge, who was brought on
from the Northern end. He hit
a four in the first ball and three
balls later pulled Greenidge over-
head for two successive sixes to
give him his 50. Wiltshire’s
score was then 37.

In the 50, Farmer had made
four sixes and five fours, Four
fours and two sixes were consecu-—
tive scoring strokes.

The luncheon interval was
taken with the score at 148 for 2
wickets, Farmer 58 not out and
Wiltshire 38 not out.

After Lunch
Norman Marshall bowled the
first over after resumption to

Farmer who pulled the fifth ball

a Ford

ball six. At 52



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

PAGE FIVE



SCOREBOARD

PICKWICK vy. COLLEGE.
Pickwick—ist Innings (For 9 Deetared





$ 1
b H ll
. b& ove 6
fe
f DO GR swe casen- gas
Mr. “Willtans ce b Hoad 8
J. Williams ¢ Hoad, b Goddard 64
Â¥ e b Hoad a aga arn 2
tt. 5
. not out 3
Extras rn
Total 182
my of a —1, , &—45,
6—~155, win, $178: oie.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
O. Ee By. @.
H. King ll 4 2 2
M. Foster os
EB. Hoad 18 5 35 2
J. Goddard 75 0 35 2
3 Inniss .. ea. 2
. Birkett 2 4 6 6
G. 16
Â¥ 2
f 0
B. 0
Hu. 10
H. 20
C. Taylor not out 0

Total (for & wickets)

Fall of wickets: 1—9, 2—12, 3—15,

BOWLING aoe
. Williams
. Corbin . Wis °
8 3

erosg altel

ames
a
Hf
B

* wer

Lodgse—67 a
Empire—123 and (Fer 7 5 aemattaeg

Empire—ist

M. Robinson c Deane D MeComle
Jones run out
Bourne b a ae os
W. Cave c b Brookes
W. Grant, fits wee % Welch
Millington b McComie
Harper c Gill b Wilkie
Fields b Brookes
Alleyne ¢ Deane b Brookes’
King ¢ & b Wilkie
Barker not out
Extras

Total *
Fall of wickets: oa 2—16, 3—22,
36, 5—71, ‘sowes 8—1

105,
WLING Al ANALYSIS

geil Set

Scom



eae

Erlel

comuungs
BN
=
=
Freon wovears

Cheesman 1.b.w., b Millington

vr. MeComie b Barker

_oneene nee
2
3
8
2
=

7 ee, b Millington ....

|

Bl wemohe

Total

Fall of wickets: 1—8, 2—38, 3—13, 4
~16, 5—27, 6—28, 7-—61, 8—61, 9—64,



overhead for six to send up 150
runs in about 135 minutes.

Wiltshire followed suit. In
Norman Marshall’s next over, he
hit the fifth ball for six.

D. Atkinson succeeded break-
ing the valuable partnership,
He yorked Farmer at 69.
The scoreboard then read 165 for
3 with Wiltshire 44 not out.

Johnnie Byer partnered Wil‘
shire and played the last ball
from Atkinson

Wiltshire made himself 50 ov
Norman Marshall’s next over by
pulling him overhead for another

he attempted another
big hit off Marshall’s bowling.
The ball skied, but Marshall failed
te take his own catch,

Wiltshire cid nov last much
longer. He was caught over-
head by Roy Marshall off Norman
Marshall. Wiltshire scored 55
and the scoreboard read 177 for
4.

This brought G. Cheltenham
and Byer together.

Cheltenham got 2 runs before
he was clean bowled by D.
Atkinson. He played over one
pitched well vp between his bat
and pads.

With the score at 181 for 5,
I. Warner joined Byer. Roy
Marshall was given another spell
from the Northern end and he
got Warner for 8 in the first over
of that spell.

Fine Catch

Warner tried to hit Marshall
everhead but Marshall stuck out
his right hand above his head
to take a lovely return catch.
The score read 191 for 6.

C. Brewster followed. This pair
saw the 200 go up in about 190
minutes. The new ball was taken

at 207 when 66 overs were
bowled, :

Norman Marshall bowled it
and immediately he had Byer in
difficulty.

Byer was beaten in the third
ball and drove the fourth pas:
the bowler for 4. The next ball
he was caught at mid-off by
Skinner for 25.

BARBADOS BOYS CLUBS

Three Prizes will be given as follows :

1st Prize:
2nd Prize :
3rd Prize:

A FORD ANGLIA
RALEIGH 3 SPEED CYCLE
ROLEX TUDOR WATCH

Drawing to take place not later than Nov. 30th, 1950

Auditors :





FITZPATRICK GRAHAM & CO.



BOWLING — ALYSIS

4 Bem.
E. Millington B 4 6 a
H. Barker * 2 ee. oe
Cc. G,. Alleyne 0 10 0
H. King é oO 30 2
Empire—fnd Innings
0. M. Robinson not out 12
B. Bourne not out 11
Extras 3
Total (for 0 wkts.) 26
SPARTAN y. CARLTON
Cariton—238
Spartan—Ist Innings
A. Atkins b W. Greenidge 0
L, Harris c & b Luc
C. Walcott l.b.w. b Lucas . 3
K. Walcott l.b.w. b W. Greenidge 17
C. Pilgrim not out. ar
Vv. Wood “e" (wkpr. ) b Laveas 0
K. Bowen b Warren 16
F. Phillips c & b % Warrant 0
A. Haynes run out, 0
B. Morris b Greenidge v
Extras ¥
Total 197
Fell of wickets; 1 for 12. 2 for .%..
3 for 37, @ for 8, 5 fcr 153. 6 for 1:3,
7 for 176, 8 for 176 and 8 for 177
BOWLING Aa AX ¥Sis
M R w
G. Edghill 9 5 2 !
eer 6 2 1 a
N. S. Lucas 4 5 3} 4
W. Greenidge. 4.5 1 30
K. Greenidge 9 2 9 0
E. Marshall ; 3 6 19 0
K. Hutechinson.... ee L. u v
Cariton—2nd Innings
K. Hutchinson c wkpr. b Philips 0
A not out. %
N. Clarke not out * ”
Extras, ; v
Total ifor 1 wicket) i ”
BOWLING ae
: M R. w
Phillips es S o : 1
Walcott 1 0 9
WANDERERS vy. POLICE.
Wanderers (For 7 Wickets Dec.) 369
Police—ist Innings
C. Blackman b N. Marshall. \9
F. Taylor ¢ Proverbs b D. Atkinson 28
Capt. W. A. Farmer b D. Atkinson 69
Wiltshire c R. Marshall,
b N. Marshall. - &
J. Byer ¢ Skinner, b N. Marshall. 2
G. Cheltenham b D. Atkinson S
C. Brewster b N. Marshall 7
I. Warner c & b R. Marshail 3
B. Morris b Atkinson 0
C. Mullins c Proverbs b Atkinson 0
C. Bradshaw not out 0
Extras (b. 10 1b, 4w. 1)..." 15
Total ‘ coeees 218
Fall of wickets: 1 for 24, 2 for 70

165, 4 for 177, 5 for 181, 6 for
191, 7 for 213, 8 for 214, 9 for 218 ana
10 for 218

BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M

R w

D Atkinson 20 12 24 5

N. Marshall 3.4 7 80 4

Cc. Packer ‘ 2 1 3 0

R. Marshall 12 1 43 1

L. St. Ain 6 1 16 9

H. Toppin ; 1 8 0

L. Greenidge 0 29 0

Police—2nd iinet z

C. Bradshaw not out.... mn 0
C. Brewster c St. Hill

b D. Atkinson... 2

C. Mullins run out... 0

G. Cheltenham not out. 1

Total (for 2 wkts.)



The score was 213 for 7 and the
eighth wicket fell at 214. B.
Morris was cleaned bowled by
D. Atkinson for “duck”. He at-
tempted to cut a good length in--
swinger,

Police wanted 6 runs to save
the follow-on with 2 wickets in
hand. C. Mullins and C. Brew-—
ster were at the wicket with
Brewster 6 not out.

At 218 for 8 Mullins was
caught for nought by Proverbs
at gully off D. Atkinson.

C. Bradshaw and _ Brewster,
‘the last pair in, were to make
2 runs to save the follow-on, N.
Marshall and D. Atkinson were
kept on the ball.

They could not do it. N.
Marshall cleaned bowled Brews-
ter with the total score at 212,
giving Wanderers a lead of 15}.

Brewster made 7 and Bradshaw
was 0 not out

Follow-On

Wanderers forced the follow-
on and Police started on their
second innings at 5.30 p.m.

Police’s 2nd innings was opened
by C, Bradshaw and C. Brewster,
Norman Marshall and D. Atkinson
took charge of the third new ball
used for the day by Wanderers,

Atkinson's first over claimed
the first Police wicket. C. Brews-
ter was caught at silly mid-on by
St. Hill for 2. Brewster played
‘orward lazily to one pitched
well up on his pads.

C. Mullins was next in, He
was run out without scoring. C.
Cheltenham ~ joined Bradshaw
and the score was 3 for 2 at time
of call.

SPARTAN vs. CARLTON

Carlton 238 and (for 1 wkt.).. 6
Spartan 17

Carlton dismisseqd Spartan at
Queen’s Park yesterday for 177
runs to lead them by 61 runs on
the first innings. The Queen's
Park team had dismissed Carlton
for 238 runs in the opening day of
the match,

Batting honours for

@ On Page 11.

the home

contac tieiatliatan ts tlaenestiaat innocent cemanieheteniocientpens nice ia ih tat anata Lt neo

rd a

Shooting
Competition

Mr. Kidne
Proud O

OCT. 15 — NO. 141

In November W.1. Team | The Topic

The Barbados Rifle Association
are holding their annual Rifle
Meeting 1950 from Saturday 18th
to Saturday 25th November in-
elusive. The qualifying stage for
the “Trumpeter Cup” will take
place on Saturday the 18th and
the Final stage on Saturday 25th
after which the trophies and prizes
will be presented.

. There will be competitions for
the Barbados Regiment and the
Police and it is proposed this year
to have a competition for the Ca-
det Force. There will also be a
Falling Plate Competition be-

tween the Regiment, Police, Ca-~
dets and the B.R.A. A detailed
programme wi'l be published

later. Members are asked to not
that closing date for Entrie- ‘s
Saturday 4th November.



Reporting First To
Cricket Board

I have the happiest recollections
ot three glorious weeks which I
spent pkaying cricket in Barbados
early im 1925 aS Captain of the
Jamaica team against Barbados
Mr. R. K. Nunes, President of the
West Indies Cricket Board of Con-
trol told the “Advocate”.

He arrived by the “Golfite” from
England yesterday intransit for
Trinidad where he will be at-
tending a meeting of the West
fnaies Cricket Board of Control on
Octeber 19 and 20 before fiying
home to Jamaica two days later.

Mr. Nunes said that his last
visit to Barbados was in 1928 when
he spent a few hours here on his
way to England with the 1928
West Indies team and was unfor-
tunate not to have come back
before.

Nothing To Say

Asked his views as to whether
or not the West Indies could afford
to send a team to Australia, he
said that as President of the
Cricket Board of Control he wished
to give the public all the informa-
tion which was possible, but he
must refer the matter to the Board
for their discussion and decision
before any statement could be
made.

He said that any imformation to
be given concerning the West
Indies cricket, must be released
to the different colonies simul-
taneously.

He lived in Jamaica and the
Jamaica papers never got any
information before any of the
other islands.

He said that apart from at-
tending the games in England he
had gone over to arrange other
matters in connection with West
Indies Cricket.



Argentinian Loses
Boxing Bout
NEW YORK, Oct. 14.
Markarian

Manourk the
Argentine lost on points “* an
eight-round bout nere against
Joe Carkido of are, Ohio,

The| referee took two rounds
away from the Argentine boxe:
for low blows Reuter.

Racing Results

GEORGETOWN, BG., Oct. 14.
LODGE HANDICAP—@ Furs., Class 6
Genno, Gonsalez, 116 Ibs, cae
Goldnie, Campbell, 126 Wa cassis
Flower Path, Na » 112 Fg
Just-By-Chanee, mereend. Ibs,
Time: 1 min.

PRESIDENT'S WAN aia

Class F
Liack Shadow, Naidoo, 115 Ibs.
Ormondes Battery, eneates 104 ibs.
‘Toybomk, Joseph, 135 I . 4

Jolly Miller, Yvonet, ies lbs.





euke

Sede

Time: 1 min, 17 2/5 secs,
LADIES BANSNNr ow Mile, 100 Yds,
Class C
Swiss Roll, Singh, 120 Ibs. .....-.65« 1
Miss Shirley, O'Neil, 122 Ibs, vee

Sunny Jim, Persaud, 106 lbs.
ES Yvonet, 116 Ibs.

DU RUAN Ln eae soe Furs, Chose
Lady Pink, Sunich, 145 Ibs,
115 Ibs
118 Ibs.
ig ibe

Vindima, Gonsal ez,
Sandhurst, Wilder,
Galectt Joseph,
Time; 1 min. 30
OCTOBER HANDICAPS ‘Furs,
Brown Ruby, Joseph, 115 Ibs.
Indusval 105 Ibs.
Blackshadow, Gobin, bs.
Mont Pelier, O'Neil,
Time: 1 min. 32/5 secs.
STEWARDS HANDIOAP—7 Furs, Class
Millionaire, Naidoo, 108 -
Just Reward, Beckles, 1)7 Ibs.
Pensive, Gonsalez, 126 Ibs,
Dedision, Singh, 122 ia ‘
Time: 1 min, 31
FINAL HANDICAP “a ‘Furs.,
Way Home, Jose; 130 Ibs.
Miss Shirley, ONeill, 112 Ibs.
Vindima, Gonsalez, 116 Ibs.
Waverley, Singh, 114° MEME \snidbaks she

Class





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covered with Dairy Milk Chocolate, are back
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11h, and s/h. Aine

The winning of ‘three Test
matches in addition to the all-
reund performances by the mem-
bers of the 1950 West Indies team
which had just completed its tour
of England is something which
must be regarded as a very great
achievement for West Indies
cricket, Mr J, M, Kidney, Manager
of the team, told the “Advocate.”

Mr. — returned from Eng-
land yesterday morning on the
S.S. “Golfito.”

He said that the boys played as
a team and there was never an
occasion when some particular
member who was expected to
make runs or get wickets failed,
and some other member did not
pooame the responsibility and rise

to the occasion.

As an instance he gave Gerry
Gomez’s 147 against Kent when
runs were very badly needed.

Wonderful

Not having seen Valentine or
Ramadhin in action before the
tour, he said it was a wonderful
experience to have seen those two
great bowlers who were
ful through sheer ability.

In Valentine,
had a real spinner with consistent
—_e and full of determination
and even on occasions when he
had long spells of bowling he
just went on even with sore
fingers and aching limbs,

The same thing he said could be
applied to Ramadhin whom he
considered must be classed among
the best spin bowlers ever t6 be
seen in England,

Both these bowlers on occasions
had to be treated for the soreness
which resulted from their efforts.

Mr. Kictney said that it was a
great privilege and pleasure to be
associated with the 1950 West
Indies team so ably led by John
Goddard especially when making
comparisons with other W.1. teams
of which he had the honour to
manage in 1933 and 1939, There
were also great players then such
as George Headley, but on this
oceasion, they had the “W”" forma-
tion Worrell, Weekes and Walcott;
Jeffrey Stollmeyer, Gomez, Rae
7: Christiani, not forgetting Mar-
sna

Altogether he said |that they
had a fine combination of sports-
men and gentlemen and he was
very proud of their achievement
which would live long in the mem-
ory of West Indies cricket.

.

Cricket Match
‘ s

At Garrison

The annual cricket match be-
tween the Owners and Trainers
and the Grooms will take place
to-day at the Garrison.

The team will be picked from
the following :—

Messrs, T. N, Peirce (Capt.),
G. A. Lewis, V. E. Cox, T. A, D
Gale, J. Massiah, J. B. Meri,
P. B. Walker, J. R. Goddard, E.
Evelyn, D, Wilkie, P. Fletcher,
D. Inniss and Hon. V. C. Gale.

The Grooms team will be:
M. Bynoe (Capt.), S. Clarke, G.
Hollingsworth, C. Applewhite, Cc.
Watkins, C, Grandison, C, Durante,
J. Young, F, Alleyne, D. Flatts,
T. Stanton and G. Blackman.

England Defeats
Wales 22—4

ABERTILLE, Oct, 14.
England beat Wales by 22
points to four in the season's first
Rugby League International game
played here to-day.





the West nines

of
Last Week



iT wane last Tuesday evening

We heard a low voice cry

Tell Lou and Joe and Robert
The landship passing by |

We ran across the ene. bridge

The crowd was |

As they idiiehchad take Nelson
The Admiral — vives right"
In honour a her
"Who once fouant the good fight

Well women love commotion
Suppose that's why Lou said

“lL want a landship funeral
Please! Joe; when Tam dead”

Joe said my dear; with pleasure
Al ships will sail that ay
The “Iron Duke, the “Deli
Will steam in Carlisle Bay
. * °

Lou my dear, Pi thank God
For ridding vou of pain
And I would plead this one thing
We never meet again

Bo Lou went home “bewildered”
And in the dead of night

Rub in six pots of skin cream
To make a black face white

Joe woke in time to hear her
Say “It won't change poor me”
‘Twas then Joe said my dear Lou
You've “lost the. boundary"

. ;

You've tried to fool poor Robert
That you could pass for white
But girl you could not fool Joe
Not even at midnight
. °

Well Thursday in the evening
Betsy cried, look this thing
Tell Joe and Lou and Robert
The Church bells start to, ring
. .

And Betsy in all goodness
Cried out a storm ahéad
Whenever you hear a church bell
That's what the fadio ond

But boys it was a wedding
The folks were in their glee
It was a ding-dong party
The old man stood the spree
. ‘

Just like the very pieture
The bride was steeped in thrills
But the old man in the arm chair
Sa counting up the bille
. *. -
‘.ou_ turned and said to Betsy
“Hamlet” I want to see
I want to see if Shakespeare
Can put something on me
When Lou said this to Betsy
Betsy's face shone with glee
And then she said my dear Lou
Bring some the “Ham” for me
. .
Lou, Joe and Robert all three
Heard classies at the best

‘Twas then Joe sald to Robert
J & R can do the rest

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J&R _ BAKERIES
makers of

ENRICHED BREAD
and the blenders of
J&R RUM



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PAGE SIX

The PRIEST from!

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



MOSCOW

Tells How the Russian People Live To-day

No Bevan Teeth—and an Injection costs 10|- ... .
Women queue for shoes and take what they are given



from EVELYN IRONS |



VESOUL, Haute—Saone.

Se France.
FATHER Jean De Matha
Thomas, the French priest who
was father confessor to thousands
of Russian~ Catholics in Moscow,
is back in France and kas just
given me a frank and revealing
account of life under Stalin in

1950.
For three years and three
months he had _ opportunities

given to few foreigners to see
how the Russian people really
live. He went into Moscow
homes to visit the sick and ad-
minister last rites to the dying.

As cure of the church of St. »

Louis, Catholic parish for the
whole of the diplomatic corps m
Moscow, he ministered to 200
diplomats of all nations,

Then abruptly, a month ago
he was expelled from Moscow
“By order of the Soviet adminis -
traticn,” he was told when he
asked why.

The Dying Woman

I met the silver-haired, beardeJ
priest ashe strode from the
Church of. the Sacre Coeur after
saying the™seven o’clock mass in
his native town,

And later we talked
quiet study.

“There is no room for incur
ables in Moscow hospitals,” he
said. “One woman I visited was
dying of tuberculosis in her oue
small room. A neighbour brought
her a glass of water or some
bread occasionally, Because she
bad no relatives or friends +.
eare for her, she had to die in :
corner. No hospital would take
her. And there were many
similar cases.” '

Four To A Room

“Lack of privacy was the wors'
feature of the homes I entered.”
Father Thomas said. “In spite
of the new apartment blocks going
up, people are still strictly
rationed for living space. Unless,
of course, they are in the upper
grades ef society and are allowed
flats or houses suitable for their
rank.

“Many of the houses I visited
stil] had rooms divided into four
with one person living in each.
The division was made by a

ardrobe or some other piece of

ture, or by a piece of cur-
tain. Outside in the passage was
a stove on which these close
neighbours took turns to cook.”

Teeth A Luxury

For those who could get admis-
sion to Moscow hospitals, treat-
ment was free, “But only for the
basic necessities," said Father
Thomas. “Any special diet or
other amenity had to be paid
for.”

And according to Father
Thomas, Bevan teeth are a
luxury beyond the dreams of
Mescow,

in bs

“A dentist will draw teeth
free,” he told me. “But if the
patient wants an_ injection, he

must pay about 10s. If he asks
for dentures, or prefers a crown
or a stopping, the dentist demands
the rouble rate for the job. In
the case of a good worker who
is worthy of such consideration,
the industrial worker's own or-
ganisation will give him the
teeth.”

Women Navvies
Life in Moscow is hardest for

women, reports Father Thomas.
“I saw them doing the toughest



tne COMOSTAR works narder...

eee Decause the



task—-stone-breaking, barrowing
loads on building sites, navvies’
jobs of all kinds. .““Many of them
smoked Pipes like the men, and
broke off their work to eat a
labourer’s hunk of black bread and
a raw onion.

“The young ones were gay in
spite of it all. But the faces of
the women around forty were
bleak and sad, I saw no signs of
elegance among the Moscow
women,

“Not even,” he added with a

chuckle, “a dash of nail colour-
ing or face powder to keep them
retty.”
When a Moscow housewife
wants a broken window or a
faulty’ light-switch repaired, she
cannot go direct to the glazier
or electrician.

“Everything must go through
official channels, and application
nust be made to the house-
holder’s industrial organisation,”
said Father Thomas. “My own
problem was a bathroom door
which would not open properly.
Since I arrived in 1947 I wrote
sume 30 letters about it. Finally,
last January, a workman came and
shook his head over it.



THE MAN THEY EXPELLED,
Father Themes

“Then he said, ‘If you give me
00 roubles (about £45), I will
arrange it, The door was put
right at once,”

Queues continue to waste thou-
sands of woman-hours a week at
the Moscow shops.

£50 A Pair

“Hundreds of women waited
outside the biggest Moscow de-
partment store every day,” Father
Thomas said, ‘Queues were long-
est when the news went around
that a consignment of shoes had
arrived, for shoes were scarce and
although they were of poor quality
they were dear—about £50 in
English money the same as for a
man’s suit. But when a woman
reached the head of the queue she
could not choose her style. She
gave her size and was handed the
shoes. If she wanted another
shape or colour she could do
nothing about it.”

The housewife’s choice of food?
“Plentiful,” said Father Thomas.
“Officially it is unrationed, But
with meat costing 25s. a pound
and butter £2 10s. rationing is
in foree—by price.”

WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED
—LES.




































high quality of the work, and

driver’s work is easier!

Aboriginal |
Children’s Art |
May Be Televised |

(From Our Londen Correspondent)

Sir OSBERT
brings out the
family gems...

by .. . . GEORGE

‘MALCOLM THOMSON

LONDON, October. |

A small book is shorily to be|
produced in London called “Little |
Black Fingers.” It is written by;
Mrs. Florence Rutter. who was|
responsible for introducing the
artistic efforts of young aboriginal
children to Londoners a_ short!
while ago. The book is made up}
of extracts from a larger book, to
be published in the New Year, and






























NOBLE ESSENCES. By the hooded, tragic eyes. Listen,to

will reese an Sitwell Macmillan. 21s. $24 this snatch of conversavion:

of the children’s work. Iv wil Pages. “What are joing to be when
deal with many aspects of IT is impossible to refrain from you grow wT ace

aboriginal life in Australia, show-| applause at the conclusion, with “A genius.”

ing their implements and weapons

this fifth volume, of so grandiose
end way of life, and will contaia

a project as the ‘Sitwell autobio- pan eee ere ee

not be of long duration.

a catalogue of 100 pictures painted | yraphy—or from the suspicion Unlik: t. i “5
by the children. that it might, with advantage, verell ie nottterineneas #) aloe
Six of the most attractive | have been shorter by one volume.

lose my temper unless sqmeone
does something to annoy me.”
Then he will refuse Yo eat, In
similar circumstances his brother
will smash 24 cheap plates put
‘nat for the purpose by his house-
keeper. 7

When the eminent critic Sir
Edmund Gosse brings the new
complete edivion of Swinburne
he has edited, it is through sheer,
nervousness that Sachevere’
exclaims: “How delightful to have
them at last in a cheap edition!”

Startled that St. Sebastian can
shoot arrows as well as be their
target, Gosse retorts: “Not so
cheap as all that!”

pictures are to be made into
Christmas cards and prints for
framing.

Osbert Sitwell speaks of the
“design” as if no departure from
it was possible, In fact, the “‘de-
sign” was originally for a four-
volume book.

When the pictures were first
shown in London, many eminent
art critics and anthropologists

No harm at all if a writer finds
were puzzled by the extremely

he has more to say than he had
expected. But Noble Essences has
a different character from, its
four predecessors and only with
some effort elbows its way into
their company.

It isa series of biographical
articles. The main performance is
over. After the last chords of the
finale have died away we hear
the prattle in the boxes. An¢
lively prattle it is, sprinkled with
anecdote and spiced with malice
Now and again some minor poet
of the twenties is dragged out
from under the leayes where
those Wicked Uncles the vears
have buried him, so that he may
be chivvied.

many doubted that it was por~
sible for young children to
produce such finished works ©!
arts. Owing Vo the great interest
still being displayed in them,
Mrs. Rutter imtends exhibiting
ell over the country, and in ’
few weeks they will be shown at
the Rochdale Gallery and
Museum, in the Midlands.

“From November to December
we hope to have them on show
again in London”, said Mrs,
Rutter to-day. “At this exhib:-
vion, we may run a short colour
film, taken by a friend, of the
aboriginal boys in their settle-
ment, when I visited them. We
also think it may interesy the
public to be able to buy carts,
prints and the book at the same
time.”

Yet the displeasure did not lasi
long. The Sitwells were of dis-
tinguished birth; Giosse, a snob
who found his perfect niche as
librarian of the House of Lords.

Ronald Firbank, rich, invalid
author of precious novels, leaves
a fainter impression. As ‘he
writer of a postcard: “To-morrow
I go to Haiti. They say the
President is a perfect dear.” As
the owner of a palm-tree which
ke carried from one London flat
to another. It was watered twice
a day by a gardener whose greer
baize apron pleased Firbank—
‘just like being in the country.’

Walter Sickert, the artist, Sells
a litter of pictures for £40, and

Of Sir George Sitwell, the au-
thor's father-victim, we are alas,
ifforded only a fleeting glimpse.
But how characteristic! Having
evicted some peasants from his
Italian palace. Sir George typical-
ly misunderstands their sullen
look, ‘You see, I can always make
myself popular when I waui to!”

This is not to say, however, that
the public is denied a fresh in-

Mrs. Rutver is the proud pos~
sessor of 24 letters from aborigi-
children, One, which si:
received only this week, is from
Barry now 16-years-old
He is working, and has no time

for painting, but tells her in his|spection of the Sitwell family when Sivwell expostulates, replies
letter how they gave up heir] treasures, Far from it. As if he “Supply and Demand. The inex-
playtimes and week-ends forjwere the owner-turned-curator orable laws of Supply ano

three years in order to attai:
the degree of perfection in the:

of a property handed over to the

the “Demand. The young man wantec
‘National Trust, the author points

my pictures and I wanted his

art which has been remarked |out to the conducted party his money.”

upon by so many. All honowr,|orother Sacheverell at a time

says the child, must go to the'r|when, although an officer in the But it would be wrong to sup-
teacher who used to take them |Grenadier Guards, he united pose that Noble Essences is. i

on rambles, and then tell ther! |“something of the Gothic saint.

1 compilation of stories. It is rich
Yo draw what they had seen from |St, Sebastian perhaps with some~

in devailed yet vivid descriptions

memory. thing of the young Bacchus”. Note of scenes and people, the product

Gne of the points raised m|the “untidy grace”, which the of an astonishing memory, | I!
London was that the children | sergeant - major has overlooked closes in a passage of sombre elo-
raight grow cut of this artistic the “faunal faroucheness,” the quence touched with self-approval.

ebility, and vhat they might iose mind “brilliantly coloured as a
their virtuosity as they grew up.{ tropical bird.”
Mrs. Rutter is not inclined ‘9} Respectfully sidling away from
this view. this prodigy {hat in hand and
“They have litvle opportunity | avoiding the priceles carpets), the
to pursue their studies when| party is just in time to see thay
they are older”, she told me,| sister Edith (aged four) has swept
end my greatest ambition is to| into the room and “seems to fill
return vo Australia and found an| it with her personality. . it’s five years since we met?”—
art school for them, with perhaps| | Observe, whispers our guide, “Rather a nice interval, don’t
scholarships to Europe ult| the Byzantine or Sienese profile, you think?”—LE.S.° —- :
mately.” ae “

And are we to have no More
Osbert Sitwells? There is hirit ot
a new “design”—“if I am allowed
the vime.” :

In such matters there need be
no undue haste. As Lytton
Strachey replied to the young
man who said, “Do you realise

i. ~
a ee



Mrs. Rutter broadcast recently









in a radio series called “Mee\! ‘

the Commonwealth.” She gave; ae

bona talks on the aboriginal | | |
children’s art, and in a few °

months television viewers in | Relieves ”

Britain may see this art for | |
themselves,

“The letter I had from Barry”,
she said, “will do a lot to con-
vince the many sceptics that the
work is really their own,”



INDIGESTION

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M.P. "Chieftain”

LONDON

A. Fenner Brockway, labour
M.P., stepped from a plane here ,
wearing the silk-lined fur robe of ; BM
a chieftain in the Kikuyu tribe.
He had just returned from a two-
month visit to Africa where Ken-
ya tribesmen made him an hon
orary chieftain.

Brand
Stomach y

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she has over 160,000 miles cf pipe-
lines for transport of crude oil.

keep it moving.

of which is already in operation.



SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950

STORY OF
THE OIL
PIPELINE

(From Our Own Correspondent’

LONDON. |

What led to the modernisation
of pipe-lines for oil transport? It
was the establishment of the inter-
national oil industry in Pennsyl-
vania in 1859. The really success-
ful line was a cast iron, 5-mile-
long, 2 ins-diameter pipe-line, laid |
in 1865.

About 7,000 yeurs ago, the in-
ventive Chinese were using bam-
boo pipe-lines to carry the “na-.
tural gas” given off from their
brine wells to the stills, where it
served as fuel to distil the salt
from the brine solution. The an-;
cient Assyrians, Egyptians, Greeks
and Romans built pipe-lines of#
clay or hollowed rock as water-
mains, while Cambyses, King of
Persia, used a pipe-line of sewn
oxhide to supply water to his.
troops when invading Egypt in
525 B.C. '

Since that time, a

one oe
SOAPS

elemoe

continued
taken‘



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nn
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Generally,

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land and by

ravines, swamps and rivers. Some-
times, the oil flows through gravi-
tational force alone, but normally,
it requires pumping “boosting” to





The great trunk pipe-lines of
America, (as intricate as any
freight railway network) are
serviced by pumping _ stations
whose controls are as numerous
as those of the main-line signal
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the patrol men and repair squads,
losses through leakages are gen-
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Life of a pipe-line under nor--
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Manufacture o1 oil pipe is

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PAGE SEVEN

gm = | ARE YOU JUSTA

© PLAYTHING-NATURE?.

you with
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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950 SUNDAY ADVOCATE





Life with | rr

Kather-3 ar vicemarsna TRAIN—JUST LIK

bagels duct saps - det’) ARSENAL STARS:
|





\ Nature may endow
| breathtaking beauty,

CHOOL holidays are the pest times for me, because
S: at home and fatherand I have such good "ee OW do the big clubs traim their men to become sta: Seeue ca'Yen tah aces 300










































together. footballers? And can a small team—a school turn-out } stow gifts on you that make you
But sometimes when 1 come down to breakfast, he isn't or a Boy Scout club for instance—hope to do anything j @ brilliant actress, a leader in
there. I ask where he is, and mother says he has flown off | 9 ail in that tine? your class at college, sought
to, say, at half-past four that morning. > aad answer is Yes. Ali ieading footballers nave after at dances, or a charming
ws, noe wes ieBaaktege ated SOP Being aah a Phat ae rn |. Mae and mote:
he’ll go abroad some- e! and when
where else. We never know when along the pavement they probably used’ the wall to d ect \ Siamee, glown -ecoredug oF ane roe © = yo
we're going to see him the ball around an imaginary opponent . @ Ourerent stone tor assauit. ye you may yo
pent when wp ae tomaner, tite comes trom I Past veel ten ditierentine 7) these distressing symptoms,
n . en erently. 7) s ;
ago ae How to drive jAlex Wilson® fe Ba ie which so many unfortunate
a car and @ miniature motor- ; jktainer for 19. bad’ back Es” tc "anion girls and women do.
bike. Sometimes 1 drive him in esos eee o. . 3)
dower teorten Dut we bee ion | ball eens 3 i was, * (0) ee Something een forget — Pinkham's Compound
— Rese of all. iildats “in wut two Kind - Loe be dope ditferentiy * shor Not Joke Abo ors more than relieve such
Switzerland, which is my mother's eguipmen: oe" | $0 if female functional monthly — monthly pain. This great medi-
home country, e: tally in the to develop tHe i . ees Down | disturbances are causing you to cine aLso relieves accompanying
winter when we ski : the skiii ol ki i DEURBLINE FLAGS; Be sure to practise \. Much the same as 19 Across Sparkling fadel suffer from pain, nervous dis- nervous tension, irritability,
I want my life to be as full of young players ‘icmina with both tet You will soon be expert 4 Ones sou a gc ro 8» mses, tress and feel weak, restless, so those tired-out, mean ‘pick-on-
thrills as my father's, so when NOREEN PPNNETI sai x UO CARS See x equal, e : cranky and irritable that you everyone’ feelings—when due to
i ant Ones ous like wo be a ‘We bojh love speed.” fine. “paveoee WAN 4 (nitially part of tne Bible (2 magic-wear CUTEX, almost turn into a ‘she-devil’ this cause. Taken regularly
poe ae vy lg oat oon ae Dractice “sew i; he or oe brings your hands on such days—THIs 1s SOMETHING «= thruout the month—Pinkham’s
summer a@ riding ‘instructor | : age Hi aut iet distances worry | grounds \ Sti, i These boys are spivs. (&) Bs y' YOU SHOULDN'T JOKE ABOUT, Start Compound helps build up resis-
or LU go by jet-plane just ¥ : t ‘i 4 You want lots it on holiday . right awa: Lydia E. Pink- tance against such distress—a
Australia. my father ou can rg 2 a 8 BAe new admiration ight away—try Ly
7 these up your re ba Aee ink iene 1s ee ham’s Vegetable Compound to very sensible thing to do. Just
ser. > 14. Black the Scot? ‘No! Hes .« easy to a 1 relieve such symptoms. It’s fa- see if you, too, don’t remarkably
Says Alex,— the road. (6 y PP+Y:-- | mous for this purpose. And don't benefit! All drugstores,
. 1a ee fa siete canet! big 16 oe tn mot necessari:, dries faster too. | >
‘ é fauritius, «a sritish jelubs have 4 . . \
r “olany 8. The littl - 6 e e Z, TA
This one i \ sg sunrnins inden tide vee ting — \____ g Belntins, 4, | lydia E. Pinkhama tsnvesns
, . Animal to flatter (@)
Pak ve Sik the ¥ fastened to a 22! Carriage. (3) The polish that }
wron f , utitude,” nalfway up the right: pole mounted on !4% HMEAD-PENNIS; Yuu can set up this ring on “ Yous bie Mie centre ie ,
& ° rand side Sa bape base any pieee of ground , “glutton of yesterday's puesic, Across weats longer — re- }
Phe figure reuds~ 217 10 3S le Canno: vor ; 8. ivory keys O, New
oe - jeasily be knockee ver. ” ‘ fonds: 35. Orem; 2, Sit; 17. isle, ih ; ; /
Can you spot why 3)"segiass' eget UR ot theve ut six: omit" from” wend the mek ee BiMirue! $5 Noid ue Gritch Bees, sists peeling and
Ser) sibutes south vard interval» | Diagram 1 and over the net and into the opposit: Eres OR & hone dvste eg vore chipping... and
ne were. But it should bared Seat re {m court, and it may be rewurned b) Lv atiract 1% Bemvers hier | pp1ng
read j As ) ’ B : onic: 20 AA : |
Pridatoe Othe i Coles cone as fe i art, me. tHe An Pe aie comes in such |
ist parallel of eres ‘ark out the court. only, please.” Seas |
atitude runs stretch a (ws: over two cross ——————— rilliant shades.
0 fallen oe Supports of sod and pee down. * Writing in the Football Asso- b CA bi
4) Mauritius, Says Alex Arsenal plays this ciation’s Book for Boys, 1950-51
How did the game, with four plavers aside ‘Naldrett Press, 10s.). WH
nistake come — Ay ?
to be made s NEW?
Vall, the stamp 9 L win fw talest water Love |
lesigner may D t Call Jack-itt-w- Bu nd World's most popular
rave been used Here's the on Pen Pals we contro) submarine i. et sald pote. |
chart { ynd rows itself ucross 2
jhe Nortnern ore The B John Crosby, Bethel Mission i)" i? °° phe Satis |
A Wiriechote "adh mavibiecsd: by e Oss House, Bay Street, St. Michael. dives und has @ Sate esi 4
you spot the mis idding as’ he looked’ orth Hobbies are Stamp collecting, a real conning- RFOCSSOOSOOR OS OOF GOS
take on this stamp’? Ut nsiead of subtracting ; Li . Reading, and playing cricket. He / on “ tower, 68, 11d. , ‘|
costs sixpence and be NbiOde thie’ sae lar is also a Wolf Cub and likes 3 / Sit kone OH! MOTHER |
cause of the mistake it w) sion ti epee, bit. which swimint Genet US... cheaper ‘ ‘
soon be worth more. nog lived on Mauritius out could ng. (¢ carpenters’ tool . |
‘ ot Hy and was killed off LONDON. sels at 185, und =| It’s a SPRAIN !! "
Stam; with “Errors wt! Perforation is 13} by ; 25s rob ‘ |
ught. We Getlambrd kl ver th hae fopation Is 13) by 144, una Judge John Blagden, 49, at’ Franklyn Belgrave, St, Charles ae Ray eeoline. Ts
world, Nout 2d. yu, 1? cents 18 | Westminster County Court ruled Village, South Naparima, Sax 16s, 6d... . anc
; Fernando, $t. John’s P.O. TRINI- {or anyone's young bro:her ‘who

e, a 12 t, colouré

y in a se

P.S.
‘rror stamp next week-end

I shal! dea) witn another

4,

8k tt hat «0 eet eee
OO LALO POLAR AOL OE SAA LAPP SIGS T FFP TGS F SY

‘that to call a boss a liar justifies
dismissal.

summary

The judge refused damages for
wrongful dismissal to Mrs. Kath-
leen Perira, former stenographer
of Sidney Lewis, managing di-
rector of a London manufacturing

| Ly

| So beautifully easy...”

| so easily beautiful
|

cannot YET tell the time, id
and-black plastic. clock * with
removable numerals 15s

This on
Olive, was issued im J

DAD. Hobbies are stamp collecting,
cinemas, dancing, photography
Wants pen pals between the ages
of 14 and 20, (Boys and girls).



Goadon



A Nice Cup Of Tea

By MILTON KAPLAN ss, is o> Savane dMy gy dot wt Rupert and the because Brylfoam cleanses so thoroughly yet so gently, your
was alle, .< MFT, 80 thoro
a liar” ating 2 ‘argument with m4 hair is infused with new reahele new Gane. Let

LONDON.

So you want a ‘‘nice cuppa tea.”

Americans are drinking more
tea than ever, according to re-
ports reaching the tea-drinkingest
land in the world, and an Ameri-
can in England would be abjectly
remiss if he did mot warn that
tea-making is not as easy as it
looks. as

What Americans regard as tea-

When boiling water has been
poured into the teapot, allow four
to six minutes for “infusion”—
the larger the pot, the harder the
water, the more time should be
allowed for the tea leaves and
water to get together.

If the American has gone this
far, he is ready for the last big
hurdle. That is, to use milk (or
cream) with the tea, This is not of



Lewis over office instructions.

She contended that she said
“It’s a lie’—but only .after she
had been fired.

Giving judgment for the firm
with costs, the judge commented:

“In duelling days, to call a man
a liar was enough to justify the
drawing of his rapier by any man

honour.

our mirror tell the story-=the story of glow: hair-
health! And how wonderfully er 9 ge ee oes
| your hap how economical it vie. Popeyes the 5 ls
creamy lather suits ev oO} _- or greasy, or
fair, “Ask for Brylfoam and see how beautiful your hair can
be! In tubes, the handy and the Jarge economy size,

there’s more foam in

_BRYLFOAM

And She Applies - - -

SACROOL

Because Sacrool Conquers
PAIN



PS ee
SLES SOS IIOP IP ALGO IIE IIE Ew







malding is about as ct pritish cor Particularly inviting to Ameri- «gven in these days it seems to ent See a On Sale at - - -
D ~ cans, for reasong which tend to that for Mrs, Per all When Rupert.has had agood reason § his.’ h
foo is from drinkable. Just POU become obscured after the Drac- Cmaloyer a iar or to sey At de a real he ie Gi Gs timeies test. They Wert to know jus win |) NU SOEs THE ORIGINAL CREAM SHAMPOO IN A TUBE
add some tea leaves? That won’t P-gp been followed for @ ligt was an act of indliscipline bp Pleas a ete hin ie sth they ; nn ae Aad COCBCBEEAOESOOEN EA SCBOEOE WEE con —
} . : : 7 ;
do. No, sirriee. But without milk (or cream)— a justified summary dismis- and urge him out of the village and 9y'8\) * Rand cast ea este resertnaiatenteacenpeecenesinta srr seiconipraresinaidhinbiapieesteba scacens eeeceeseiaieia tetera teleshesiaciascudbe race dassdaciay

To follow thé'rules prescribed ©M€-quarter or one-third of cup— back into the forest. When they “Across the water Rupert can see

’ LOVELIER SKIN IN 14 DAYS
ror 2 WOMEN OUT oF

4 he Paecs PALMOLIVE BEAUTY PLAN
aes -aoctonu purove tt!

so intimately yours
Thirty-nine

leading skin specialists have now com-
pleted 14-day tests of the “ Palmolive
Beauty Plan” on 1,384 women of all
ages and every type of skin. They _
report a definite, noticeable improve-
ment in the complexions of 2 women
out of 3 (supported by signed state-
ments by the women themselyes),

one-q' h a hill they pull him and push more island d f
to-day by the British Tea Centre, it isn’t tea. Or so the British say, 1 was a statement calculated fim, and he Rishi gaan Pian ethie monet wat G
gather around you the following Md they should know. to rouse most intense indignation they lead. There must be some Haig basse 1s tea Me oe :

One last word of warning: don’t
be found dead (at least by a
meticulous Briton) pouring fresh
tea into a cup containing the
dregs of a previous tea bout.

It just isn’t done, old boy?-~INS

—

Are You A

DAZZLER?

YOU

ma :
Supply of tea leaves (a more or
less essential ingredient).

One kettle for boiling water.

Ofe teapot.

One stop-watch,

Milk (or cream)

Ready now?

First, the teapot should be
warmed and rinsed thoroughly
with boiling water before insert-
ing the dry leaf.

Next, boil “freshly-drawn” water
in the kettle—water goes stale,
and once boiled should never be
used again. When the water “has
reached the point of bubbling
fiercely,” as the book says, snatch
the pot off the fire. Don’t waste
&@ second.

Now comes the really impor-
tant principle of tea-making—
what is known as “the short pour”
and reads as follows:

“Take the teapot to kettle and
not kettle to teapot.” This is fun-
damental because water should
reach the tea leaves as near boil-
ing point as possible.

in any man who had any self-
respect at all.

“Some element of discipline
must still prevail in every rela-
tion between master and ser-
vant,”"—ILN.S. ..



ib



tance apart as the lamp centres,

By taking a line to the wall
from the side of the car you can
check that they are truly ahead
and not pointing to one side.
Finally make sure that the dip-
ping device works, _

Spot or pass lamps must be
by law 2ft. above the ground,
And the beam should be checked
in the same way to di about
6in. in the 25ft. to your wall and
swing slightly -to the left, If it
is a flat—top; beam, you can
tilt the lamp slightly right to
allow for road camber.

Correctly set lights do mot
dazzle. Dipping is not compulsory
but wise and courteous,

Barrow D. 1 p.m, b
» —L.E.S.



cannot grumble about
being dazzled by approaching
headlights unless you are SURE
your own are not causing dazzle.

To check the setting of your
lights, put the car on level ground
about 25ft. from a wall or your
garage door. It must be truly
square to the wall,

Switch on the lights and see
where the beams strike the wall.
The centre of the illuminated
areas must not be higher than
the centre of the lamp. The two
centres must be the same dis—

doctors — including





“

These were among the improvements



reported ;
| os ON
ouvir © :
s . . e -
. . Less coats =" .
a Fewer Blemishes

By BOURJOIS

LIPSTICK
* HAIR CREAM

» « » « » Fresher, smoother

FACE POWDER + ROUGE + PERFUME

Hee 6 Brighter, clearer



Y

See what this Plan will do for your skin—in only 14 days!

If you would like your complexion to be as lovely as you have always hoped it could be,
try the “ Palmolive Beauty Plan.”. It’s so simple.

This is all you doz

%

>| =

Dw Ao PAST se thet Bmx ee on 3 now, while he sleeps... ’
other 80 sant! To ore you put the jar down, a) ub’s soothing vapours i i :

chase a cold in ble-quick VapoRub starts to relieve the warming pow = 1 Wess Jou fae « with Polmolioe Soap. Fs

time, just rub chest, throat cold in two ways: First, there's keep on fighting the co ae) Weg

and back at bedtime with a glow of warmth and comfort through the night. Bi 2 Massage its rich, olive-oil lather into your skin for one

soothing,
VapoRub. That's all you do! “draws out” congestion like a ;

Then watch VapoRub go to nice, warming poultice. Next, 3 :

work on that pee VapoRub’s medicinal vapours * Rinse. ~

—inhaled with every breath
—clear stuffy nose, soothe sore
throat and calm goughing...

Start now, continue for 14 days. And prove as the
doctors proved—that if you keep your skin cleansed
by Palmoliye’s beautifying olive-oil lather; you are
sure lOass : f

KEEP THAT SCHOOLGIRL COMPLEXION

of

"8
OVER 40 MILLION TIMES A YEAR!
ONE YOUNG MOTHER ¢t aid _anothe

over 40 million jars of Vicks V
colds double-qui h

chances with u
and time-tested .











PAGE EIGHT SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950
@





SL OOCPOOSOO SPOS OOO SOS S FSS |



ies and in respect of goods which in this |
case are obtainable elsewhere. i

oo
,

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown.
Sunday, October 15, 1950

NATURAL GAS
CORPORATION

DURING the time when the British
Union Oi] Company was searching for Oil
in Barbados, a reservoir of Natural Gas
was discovered on the lands of Turner’s
Hall plantation, and in recent years the
Company has distributed Natural Gas to
certain public institutions and to the Bar-
bados Gas Company for supplying private
consumers.

The Petroleum Act, 1950, vested the
property in Natural Gas in the Governor-
in-Executive Committee and provision was
made for compensation to be paid to lessors
and lessees of productive wells. In May
of this year the supply of Natural Gas was
threatened with cessation as a result of the
premature and inopportune proclamation
of the Act. When it was announced that
the Gulf Corporation, an American Oil
Company, had been granted a prospecting
licence over 50% of the island, negotiations
were begun between the Government and
the B.U.O.C, for that Company to take a
lease of the Natural Gas Wells at Turner’s
Hall in lieu 6f cash compensation. These
negotiations were unsuccessful and the
Government have had to seek for ways
and means of ensuring that there be no
interruption of the supply of Natural Gas.

On Tuesday last, a Bill was introduced
into the House of Assembly which seeks
to establish a corporation whose duty it
will be to run the Natural Gas Wells and
to maintain the supply to the public and
to public institutions. The Bill also pro-
vides for the compulsory acquisition of
the pipeline and fittings now the property
of the British Union Oil Co., with compen-
sations to be settled, in default of agree-
ment, by arbitration.





It is necessary for aconsideration of this
Bill that these two objects should be kept
separate. The establishment of a Corpora-
tion and the nationalisation of Natural Gas
is a logical development following on the
passing of the Petroleum Act. Members
of the Legislature may well have some un-
easiness at the thought that compensation
must be paid in cash but in view of the fact
that members have not seen fit to debate
the granting of a licence to an American

. Company even though the Oil resources of

concerned, and all those who ; Mr. Shepherd does not pay you MEN WHO

* tention if only in a negative ; F y'

belong to Corporation, d had concerned themselves with °°" the compliment of reading ‘the ||

should g the Corporation, an aiaediies tes ste bo. eclest a West t the question. Moreover. I gain- Way: He must now realise the newspaper to which he © ites LOVE THE
should be transferred to and vested in the mig Possline to select a West "D: Jed the impression that these *Meully he is up against in try” letters, or he would have read your BEST RUM
j Corporation at the earliest opportunity dian team to tour the Caribbean at the |two gentlemen could help, and I i a toe Whine that aie inevit issue of Wednesday the 28rd of

: ti the visiting Australian team |!00ked forward to their contribu- ahiy and vitally connected, even August last, on the front page of

4 Provision is therefore made for th eoee ae we ber. on : tions. never for one moment it indirectly } thanked him for which you printed’ in bold DEMAND

. 0 e playing each colony and a test match against {thought that it was necessar “ hhis reply to me and I trust that he {%€ Names of the members of the |

the British Commonwealth and Empire are
so scanty may mean that they consider the
resources of this island ‘sufficient to bear
such a burden. The Colonial Office must,
however, have known of this arrangement
for it is inconceivable that the Governor of
Barbados would have signed such a licence
without being authorised by, or having
received the permission of, the Colonial
Office.

Members of both branches of the Legis-
lature should study most carefully the
implications of such a step and should look
back and note how the original interfer-
ence through the Petroleum Act has
created the need for even greater inter-
ference. Those who regarded the Petro-
leum Act as merely an isolated instance of
Governmental interference are now un-
deceived. Each step towards socialism
makes the next step more irresistible or
inescapable. There must surely be some
agreement which the Government could
enter into with the British Union Oil Com-
pany by which their pipeline and equip-
ment could be made available to the use
of the Corporation until such time as the
conditions of sale could be agreed upon or
the Government obtain their equipment
elsewhere. Nor should Barbadians regard
this as a matter in which only the interests
of an English Company are involved. The
principle at stake affects the future secur-
ity of the property of every person living
in this island. In future, at any time when
Government seeks to purchase private
property the threat will overhang that in
the event of a failure to reach agreement
the omnipotent Legislature will be called
in to settle the matter in favour of the Gov-
ernment.

It is well for Barbadians to settle this
issue at an early stage for if this is not done
the force of circumstances and the course
of events will remove their freedom in the
matter.

Those who appeal to the people in the
name of freedom are often decried as
reactionaries. It is up to the people of Bar-
bados to decide whether such Legislation is
not the introduction of “Stalinism” to their
island.



AUSTRALIAN TOUR

THERE is no West Indian that would
not welcome a visit of an Australian cricket
Team to the Caribbean. Lovers of the
game have been nurtured on the names of
the great stars of the Antipodes and the
feats of Bradman, Woodful, Kippax, Mac-
artney in former days and those of Lind-
wall, Morris, Miller and Harvey are high-
ly commended in the Western Hemisphere
as those of our own talented players.

Twenty years ago the West Indies visited
Australia and although they were beaten
they were not disgraced and had the dis-
tinction of winning one test match. There
can. be no question tHerefore that common
courtesy lays an obligation on Australia to
play a return series on West Indian
wickets.

But however much West Indians may
wish to see Australian cricketers in action
yet they will be prepared to do nothing
which is likely to handicap West Indies
cricket now firmly established on the first
rounds of the ladder leading to world

THEY DO IT AGAIN AND AGAIN "weoenece
IN THE CLUB - ON ae

THE FIELD !,

Se

Sitting On The Fence

By NATHANIEL GUBBINS

H®= again are Mrs. Er-rerm-
er and Mrs. Urm-er-rer, who
can never ‘remember Poovey
names, at a political meeting.

Oh, there you are, Mrs. Er. .
Mrs. Er-rerm-er. So glad you've
come to swell the ranks of the
True Blues,

Thank you, Mrs. Um. . . Mrs.
Urm-er-rer. That’s exactly what
that busy little woman, Mrs.
Rerm-er-rer, said when I met her
selling something for something or
other outside the, front door.

Oh, no. That's not Mrs. Rerm-
er-rer. That’s Mrs... . Mrs.
Rumeer-rerm, She's selling home
knitted tea cosies for cannibals,
or rather to buy Bibles for canni-
bals, in the something archipelago.
Such noble work, as the vicar
said, especially as she gets chil-
olains hanging about in the cold.
Who's that very large woman who
was specially invited to occupy
two seats to keep out two heck-
lers?

Oh, that’s Mrs. . . . yes, Mrs.
Um-er-rer-er whose glands have
run amok according to Dr. Rer-
rerm-er-rer,

AD a tiring day, dear?
Hardly a wink of sleep.
It was the same yesterday. And
the day before. You'll have a ner-

- vous breakdown if you go on like

this.

If only they’d leave a guy alone.

I know, dear. That manager
again, I suppose?

Just when you’re dropping off
in he comes with his great flat
feet, shaking the room and taking
temperatures and askin’ how
you’re doin’ and I don’t know
what all. %

ae *

He's nothing but a slave-driver
dear. One of these days I shal
go straight to his office and give
him a piece of my mind.

Only this morning he said he
hoped I'd get lurnbago to see if
his durned blankets would cure it.

Why, Al, the man’s nothing but
a criminal, wishing sickness on
folks. He ought to be prosecuted
or something,

And just wher you're having
the swellest dreams he has to came
in and ask some fool questions or
turn off the hea. .o see if it wakes
you.

But it’s a swell job, sugar. And
the money’s good. And some day
I may get promotion to a double
bed. With you at my side, sweetie
pie. Of course.

Tomorrow you'll quit and find
a man’s job. A job which keeps
“bie awake all day, you great lazy

um.

Forward Glance

the population so that big houses |'
and little houses are in the same

and mufflers can mix freely with ||
chaps who wear bowler hats and | |
carry rolled umbrellas.

Herbert Morrison, hoping the |’

street and chaps who wear caps |

Park will be kept open after the | |
Festival of Britain is over, said, ||
“IT want people to be happy. I
want to hear peopte sing.”

T is 11 p.m. in No Quality-
street in the summer of 1960
The chap who wears his bowler
and carries his rolled umbrella to
eatch the 8.15 every morning is



working at some papers in his |”

study.

Outside, chaps in caps and muff-
lers who have been to the festival
and several other places are sing-

Establishea

RILONEUM

A RUBBER FLOOR COVERING
In 4 BEAUTIFUL PATTERNS
3 FEET WIDE @ $3.32 Yd.
SUITABLE FOR BATHROOM, PASSAGE
Or MOTOR CAR MATS Etc.
CALL AND SECURE YOURS EARLY

T. HERBERT Ltd.

10 & 11 Roebuck Street.

VALOR STOVES



1860



2, 3 and 4 BURNERS, with or without Canopies

64G STOVES

1 and 2 BURNER, with or without Oven Stands

OVENS, Small, Medium, Large
PRESSURE STOVES

at

& HAYNES CO., LTD.,
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

PHONES 4472 & 4687

WILKINSON



Incurporated
1926









models in 5, 12, 30 & 40 gals.
Also

HAIR DRESSING
EQUIPMENT

| DaCOSTA’S
ELECTRICAL DEPT.

=

~~

NOW IN STOCK

RAYPACKA

FOR OFFICE JACKETS

ANTON

WATER HEATERS





. fame : : < awe, ip ‘ ing “Sweet Adeline.” |
The Objects and Reasons of the Bill state Rete ite : : , ee I think you’re mistaken, Mrs. | You have many swell dreams,
’ bias bet: And with this as their main objective it |Er-rerm-er. That was Mrs. Um- Al, while you're working? that the negotiations between the Govern- would be well to examine the pros and |¢f-rer, who changed her doctor Some are pretty swell, I guess.

CLERICAL GOWNS

IN NAVY AND BLACK

54 in. at $192 per Yd.

DaCOSTA & Ce., Ltd.
DRY GOODS DEPT.

ment and the B.U.0.Co., having proved un-
successful, it was considered that the Gov-
ernment should proceed to undertake the
supply of Natural Gas under public owner-
ship. Even those who are opposed on prin-
ciple to nationalisation will be faced with
the fact that they must offer some alterna-
tive if the supply of Natural Gas is not to
be interrupted. Those who warned at the
time of the passing of the Petroleum Act
that the Legislature was introducing a dan-
gerous precedent: by tampering with pri-
vate rights, and ownership have proved
to be justified.

However much the establishment of a
Natural Gas Corporation may be unavoid-
able, in view of the circumstances which
have arisen, the further interference with
the rights of private ownership suggested
in this Bill are unnecessary and contrary
to all the principles which have guided
Legislation in years past. The Objects and
Reasons given for this step are stated as

follows:—“The Government have also °

been conducting negotiations with the
Company with a view to acquiring the
pipeline and other necessary equipment to
enable the recovery, distribution and sup-

ply of Natural Gas to be continued with- -

out interruption. The Company however,
is not willing to sell immediately such
pipeline and equipment. As it is intended
that this commodity should be carried on
as a Nationalised Industry, it is considered
essential that such pipeline and equipment

transfer to the Corporation of the pipeline
‘and equipment of the British Union Oil
Company Ltd,. and the vesting of such
pipeline and equipment in the Corporation
and the payment of compensation therefor.”
The Legislature is thus called upon to

s . ; + a companies should w
force the Company to sell their equipment matches. I had heard that Mr. Smythies need Pit oer _ pte creation of a Publier Uettes |
at a time which may seem to the Company However much West Indians may de- [iis Shot a Canadian, and that ‘be @ monster devouring all that it Sppears inane Cart of uer tains
injudicious and contrary to their best inter- sire to see the Australians in action it seems Mr. Rbepherd wee a retired Soli- comes across in the way of fat 7 must regard it as a misreading I}
‘ 5 . % ; : citor from British Guiana but per- salaries and revelling in its au- of what I wrote.
ests. Once again, the Legislature - taking that if they have the goodwill of cricket haps not a Guianese, ie. not born thority to compel people to do its !
upon itself the heavy responsibility of in the Caribbean at heart they must bow to lin B.G. 2 peld Ben the compli- bidding, without the fear of being Yours, sincerely, y+]
: 3 P x " ; oe ose sereape 4 Ment not only of asking their help held responsible for its actions. I A. E. S. LEWIS
interfering with rights that have been the inevitable and accept the, generous put of saying they enlivened your merely pointed out that the Board Bridgetow: |
recognised and acknowledged for centur- offer from the Antipodes, columns and enlightened your would be no bed of roses for any- 11th October, 1950 :
i
a i | ~ ole

cons of an Australian tour of the West
Indies. Although not necessarily the
principal objective of a tour the question
of financial success cannot be ruled out see-
ing that no type of sport to-day can be
undertaken unless adequate financial back-
ing is at the disposal of the authorities
governing the game. It is no secret that
West Indian grounds are not capable of
accommodating the huge crowds which
flock to Sydney, Adelaide, Brisbane and
Melbourne and it is also well known that
the Australian is financially able to pay
high entrance fees to see the game he
loves.

But financial considerations alone should
not influence the West Indian public. The
chances of success of their team are more
likely to tip the scales for or against a
second visit to Australia.

Cwing to the scattered nature of the
territcries in the West Indies our cricket-
ing talent meets but seldom and it is only
during an overseas tour that the West In-
dies are able to weld a team together that
is truly representative of the Caribbean.
During a tour of Engand or Australia they
have the opportunity of playing together
as a team against counties and states be-
fore meeting the full might of England or
Australia in Tests. Here in the West In-
dies they come together as individuals who
meet, for the most part for the first time in
a test, and it takes no cricket genius to
understand that the best results cannot be

‘ obtained under such conditions.

Australia in each centre, But such an ar-
rangement would reduce the number of
times that the Australians would play and
it is hardly likely that a team from the
Antipodes would be prepared to travel
thousands of miles only to play eight










because he advised her to stop
eating cakes in the cafes instead
of prescribing injections and
special corsets under the National

ealth. Who is the chief speaker
tonight?

I believe it’s Sir Charles
Urm-er . . . yes, it’s Sir Charles
Urm-er-urm something who was
so lucky to get his knighthood be-
fore he was divorced and hounded
out of his club for running off
with a club waitress.

Really? I thought it was Sir
William . . . Sir William some-
thing-urm-something who had
arthritis and ran off with his
nurse. That is, if you can run very
far with arthritis.

Well, we shall soon find out, As
I’m looking after an old Scottish
lady, Mrs. MacEee-er-rerm-ee,
who is stone deaf but likes to
keep in touch, I hope you'll par-
don me if I leave you now Mrs.

r Mrs, Urm-er-er.

Granted as soon as asked, Mrs.
BV: is Mrs. Er-rerm-er.

Earn While You Sleep

Manufacturers of electrically
heated blankets in America are
employing men to sleep in lux-
ury beds for eight hours a day

taken and other reactions noted.

Public Utilities

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—When I elected to solicit
the assistance of Mr. R. E.
Smythies and Mr. C, E. Shepherd
in the matter of developing and
ae the point I made about
wages disputes and the proposed
Public Utilities Board I was most
enuine, because I felt sure the
iscussion would help all those

y to
go into the A.B.C. of details with
them or to give .an al
sketch of the circumstances lead-
ing up to the introduction of the
Bill or the discussion on it and
the way the voting on it went, to
get the best out of them on a point
of view they had apparently over-
looked.

while their temperatures are’

Some ain’t.

What are the svvell ones about?

Why, sometimes I kick the win-
ning goal in a football game.
Sometimes I’m having dinner with
President Truman, putting him
straight on world affairs. And
sometimes I’m on Palm Beach, ly-
ing in the sun with some of the
cutest little dames in America.

Do you ever see me on Palm
Beach, Al?

y, no, honey. I think it’s a
well known fact that a man don’t
dream about his wife. It ain’t
natural,

Why not, Al?

Well, sugar, dreams ain’t real,
are they? And you can’t say a
wife ain’t real. No ma’am., Not on
your life.

* * +

Is there any special dream girl
you see-on Palm Beach, Al?

I'll say there is. And is she a
sweetheart? Soft brown curls.
Honey coloured eyes. And a voice
like a lot of little tinkling bells.
Yeah, Little tinkling bells.

You'll hand in your notice to-
morrow, Al.

Aw, don’t get steamed up about
a dream, sugar. A man’s entitled
to dream about anything.

He ain’t entitled to dream about
a hussy like that.





Cap and Muffler.
I say, don’t you think it’s a bit
ine for this sort of thing?
ue

I mean I can’t concentrate with
all this noise going on. I have
some work to do.

Work? You?

Of course, it’s a different kind
of work. I mean I don’t work with
my hands,

Ark at im, boys. He don’t work
with is ands. Nor does is toffee
nosed old woman,

a *

old woman, ‘
Who can’t soil er ands with th
washin? Mrs. Bowler At. Who gits
my old woman to serub er floors?
Mrs. Bowler At. Who can’t polish
er own front door andle? Old
toffee nosed Mrs. Bowler At.
_ May I remind you that my wife
is in bed trying to get some sleep?
Listen, boys. Old Toffee Nose is
trying to get a bit of sleep after a
long day doin sweet Fanny Adams.
What about a lullaby for old Mrs.
Toffee Nose, boys?
If you don't go away I shall be
obliged to telephone for the police.
A lullaby for old Mrs. Toffee
Nose, boys, Altogether, boys. 1
out the barrel... .

—LES.



OUR READERS SAY

readers, whether or not one agreed
with them. What more could I do
by way of being kind, courteous
and complimentary to two men
presumably older than myself and
who had evinced an interest in
legislation I have the honour to
take a part in shaping, even al-
though I disagree with it in prin-
ciple.

Mr. Smythies replied promptly
and was helpful in proving my

did not mind my little joke of a
play on his name. I have an idea
he will not.

I confess to acute disappoint-
ment in finding that Mr. Shepherd
when faced with the task of de-
fending his case resorted to the
tactics traditional with those

one, as sooner or later the Com-
panies would blame it for restrict-
ing wages by controlling profits
and if adjustment was sought and
granted then the Consumers would
blame it for increasing rates. In
other words, conditions are sure to
arise where it would have the em-
ployees at its throat at one stage
and the consumers or clients in its
throat at another. For this reason
I said the Companies should wel-
come the Board, and it is signifi- |}
cant that none of them has public- |
ly protested against setting it up



House who voted for and against
the second reading of the Bill, to-
gether with your reporter’s ac-
count of the debate. Mr. Shepherd
does not even read carefully
newspaper letters to which he re-
plies, because he starts off his re- ||
ply to me by saying that I asked
“whether the employees of these



Festival Gardens in Battersea |
{
{
\
\
}
)

*
I shall be obliged if you will not
refer to my wife as a toffee nosed

FOR YOUR PLEASURE!

GODDARD'S
‘GOLD BRAID RUM

— AND —

“GOLD
BRAID ”











SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15,

1950



475 Million Chinese
Want Freedom

From
By James

: NEW YORK, Oct.
Vice Admiral Oscar C. Badger,
U.S.N., recognized as an expert
on China, declared to-day that
right now Communist China has
“a choice between peace and war
with its neighbours.”
, in his opinion, is at the
crossroads—facing two paths.
The well-informed, blunt
speaking, 59—year-old Admiral put
it this way in an interview with
International News Service:

“China can maintain an aggres-
sive attitude toward its neighbour
countries in the Far East.

“Or on the other hand, she can
permit Ker neighbour countries to
recover economically, under a
sense of security. China can do
this by properly assessing the
American attitude which is being
directed toward helping these
smaller countries to a freer and
better way of life.”

The attitude of Communist
China toward Formosa and such
countries as Burma, Indo-China,
Tibet, Indonesia and Thailand, can
prove “a vital factor’ involving
world peace, in the Admiral’s
opinion.

Significantly, Admiral Badger
pointed out, the Island of Formosa
with a population of about that of
Australia, is staging a remarkable
ecnomic come-back with the
assistance and co-operation of the
United States.

This news of Formosa’s recov-
ery is seeping back to China. It
is a “seed” that may grow, accord-
ing to the Admiral, and small
countries — such as Korea, after,
unification — could also recover
economically and industrially if
permitted a feeling of security’
against the threat of aggression.

China, with its vast population
of something like 475,000,000 peo-
ple, is anxious to attain economic
security after years of turmoil and
poverty, in his opinion.

He said that great nation is by
no means in full sympathy with
the Mao Tse-Tung regime. He
added that plenty of anti-Com-
munist sentiment exists in China
to-day.

All peoples of the Far East, in

al Badger’s opinion, are
weary of warfare and are yearn-
ing for economic recovery, for
— liom and for a better way of

e,

Quite firmly, the Admiral
declared:

“The answer to peace in the
world is freedom from fear.’

‘ne cause of tear, which stems
from aggression, “must be eradi-
cated” from the peoples of the
world, the Admiral said, and the
drain on governmental expendi-
tures, by countries that fear
present aggression, must be cut
down if the world is to go for-
ward.

“Unless this is accomplished,”
Admiral Badger continued, ‘“we
are likely to see responsible and
friendly governments fail. They
will be subjected to criticism from
within and to propaganda from
without.

“They would be destroyed by
propaganda and the result would
be continued unrest in the world.”

Admiral Badger’s duties today
are far removed from the South
Pacific and the Far East he knows
so well,

He is now commander of the
Eastern Sea Frontier and the
Atlantic reserve fleet, with head-
quarters in New York City.

His responsibility on naval mat-
ters extends from the Rocky
Mountain region to the Atlantic
seaboard and as far south as the
Caribbean. His command involves
1,956 naval activities in seven
naval districts, including off shore
security.

Admiral Badger was one of the
outstanding admirals operating in
the South Pacific during World
War II. He has had numerous
commands and was awarded
practically all the decorations his
government could bestow.

In October, 1944, he served as
tactical commander of heavy
striking forces of the Third Fleet.
On that assignment he command-
ed a_ battleship-cruiser-destroyer
force which, in January, 1945,
attacked Iwo Jima.

Later he participated in the
occupation of Okinawa, and in
strikes against the Japanese home
islands of Kyushu, Shikoku, Hon-
shu, and Hokkaido.

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GOS COS SESS 9095900050000"

Fear

Six Stops
Too Many

By EUNICE SAVOURY
ST. JOHN’S, Antigua.

No sooner up than down is the
latest situation in air travel be-

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

WHEN an American professor
announced that he had adopted a
baby chimpanzee and was bring-
ing it up under exactly the same
conditions as his ten-months-old

Whatever Became Of?

tween Barbados and Antigua. The son just to see how they compared

That was 19 years
Now reader J. I. Eagle, of Lei-

L. Kilgallen same arrangement exists for pas- menially, it mate big news in the
sengers from Trinidad to St. Kitts Daily Express.
and vice versa. Actually the fiight 480.
After the war — in February from Piarco to Golden Rock with

1948—the blunt, bushy-eyebrowed six intermediate stops takes at C°Ster, wants to know what hap-

former task force
reported for duty as commander,
naval forces—Western Pacific.
As the senior naval and mili-
tary officer in that active area, he
was the direct representative of

commander least an hour longer than a hop
although it has
the advantage of being less than

to New York
half the distance.

ve Most people, even bad sailors,
the joint chiefs of staff and was at one time or another enjoy a to

pened. “Did the human infant
tinist up as America’s leading
steeple jack and did the chimp get
through Yale?” he asks.

My inquiries show that the pfc -
fessor Dr. W. N. Kellogg, of
Florida State University, managed
keep the experiment going for

responsible for naval participation sea voyage stopping at the Lee- nine months.
and

in support of national policies in
the China area, Those responsibili-

American citizens and interests
that part of the world.

“I made about 200 flights into
various parts of China,” he casu-
ally remarked.

It is a wonder Admiral Badger
talks so earnestly about China
and her future. His activities

ward Windward

Islands

The chimp, a female called Gua,

I t where in an hour the main streets was dressed in baby clothes, slept
ties included the protection of of their little towns can be scru- in a bed, used the same toys and

in tinized. Somehow the very thought ate practically the same food as
of descending from the heavens on

d, the baby boy. She got

to little man made strips of grey Precisely the same instruction and

pastures, each within a few hours,
holds no appeal to the majority.
It sounds good to be able to say 4;

the same amount of affection.
The professor and his wife

worked in shifts to record the ac-

vities of both babies continuous-

that you have set foot on all of ly from 7 a.m. to 6.30 p.m. every

the isiands, but there are many
were so widespread with the vari- Of Us who have never done so,

day.
Throughout the experiment the

ous Chinese and other officials in 294 are quite content to avoid the chimp was generally in advance

China that he developed an ex:
knowledge of the over-all situation
in that far-flung country.

In September, 1949, he reported
to the Navy Department and
served in a special capacity as
consultant and technical adviser
to the various departments of the
government regarding Far Eastern
affairs. He was regarded by many
as “a second Barney Baruch”
insofar as the high value of his
advice was concerned.

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

1 hope that in answering
inquiries you're making it
quite clear that the whole
thing is entirely sncmiiat and
directly contrary to agreed
policy of the union?”



“The economic recovery of
Formosa is becoming well-known
in China,” Admiral Badger said.
“Tt could be significant in affecting
the political thinking of China and
other countries in the Far East.”

He pointed out that Formosa
was severely damaged during
World War II. But since 1945,
Formosa has been coming back.
In 1945, he said, Formosa’s power
capacity was only 20 per cent of
what it once was, and its rice and
sugar crops had fallen off almost
as much,

The Island’s economic comeback
was due, he said, to American
co-operation and the policies of
General Chiang Kai-Chek in sup-
porting the establishment of a
popular democratic government
under the able leadership of the
highly-respected Governor K. C.
Wu, a graduate of Princeton and
a former mayor of Chung King
and Shanghai.

The result has been that money
the Formosa government used to
spend for defence is now going
for peaceful pursuits and indus-
trial development with the result
the Island is enjoying unusual
prosperity.

“The establishment of popular
and representative government in
Formosa is largely due to the
economic aid provided by _ the
United States under the E.C.A.”
said Admiral Badger. “It is being
applied in a business-like and
effective fashion.

“The fundamental key to peace
is economic. A good economy
makes for a contented people.
Peace and prosperity is the best
way to counteract propaganda.

Admiral Badger lives at quar-
ters at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.
He is the father of two daughters,
and his eyes gleam when he talks
fondly about his six grandchil-
dren. He is much sought after as
speaker at luncheons and dinners
a speaker at luncheons and din-
ners in the New York area.

eo PPS SS SOS

; > 550999 SSSSSSSSSSSSSS9SS SSG OSSOOSOS
y ;
LLLP PLP ELE LPPPPAS

‘

opportunities of such an experi-
ence for a mere twenty minutes.

Businessmen wish to reach their
destination as quickly as possible
and are generally bored with what
they consider wasting a quarter
of an hour at an airport where
there is little or no chance of even
putting through a telephone call
to the city, as the islands involved,
either have no telephone service,

or a very poor one which will -

exhaust anybody’s patience.

Pleasure travellers whether or
not they frequent the air regular-
ly often express the feeling that
they intensely dislike ‘the going
up and the coming down’, more
particularly they dread the ‘com-
ing down’. There are, of course,
many people who get a tremen-
dous thrill out of flying whether
it be smooth or rough and they
are equally capable of deriving
considerable amusement out of
the various actions of passengers
and porters while there is slight
delay at islands; their uncommon
dialects of English’ or French
neither of which are easily un-
derstandable are worth hearing.

Very short flights are no longer
as enjoyable as say, a hop from
Antigua to Barbados, where it is
nearly always possible to attain
a height of nine thousand feet
soaring above the clouds in a nip-
py atmosphere,

Nowadays it is unlikely that an
altitude of more than four thous-
and feet is reached between the
islands of St. Lucia, Martinique
and Gaudeloupe, and the air is
usually warmer. Opportunity of
experiencing a few bumps and a
fallen stomach is always probable.
Vegetation on these three islands is
similarly beautiful with their ups
and downs of green mountains
and valleys but the traveller with
plugged ears has little time to
gaze on their splendour while his
anticipated ups and downs of the
noisy aeroplane plays the leading
role in his imagination.

The atiructive stewardess pro-
ceeds up and down the aisle offer-
ing reading matter which is polite-
ly accepted and nine times out of
ten never read while thoughts
glide back to the persistent hum
or recollections of anxiety cre-
ated by repeated starting and
stopping of engines.

B.O.A.C. Lead
£2,500,000
Race

JOHANNESBURG.
Big redistribution of traffic on
the BOAC South African Airways



of the child both physically and
mentally, When they played to-
gether Gua was nearly always the
leader, | Donald the imitator

& *

The ape put up the better
performance in intelligence tests.
In experiments in which the sub-
ject sat behind a wire screen and
had to manipulate a hoe to drag
an apple within reach Gua was
always brighter. The chimp sel-
dom spilled her food when using
spoon, but Donald often turned
his spoon upside-down when put-
ting it into his mouth.

rofessor Kellogg summed up
the ape’s ability by saying that
when it was one year old it had
the mental power of at least a
one-year-old child, the agility of
a four-year-old, and the strength
of an eight-year-old.

Donald at 20 is now doing ex-
ceptionally well as a medical
student. Gua died of pneumonia
a year after the experiment. But
the insuperable drawback that an
ape’s intelligence stops developing
when it is about three years old
would have prevented it getting
through Yale anyway.



Chapman Pincher



FOR EXAMPLE, the
boy who was to grow
up with an ape...

Is It True?

Another scientific project whieh
caused a great stir when it was
announced and has hardly been
heard of since was Sir Oliver
Loage’s arrangement for proving
the truth of spiritualism by com-
municaung with his friends after
he was dead.

Sir Olver a brilliant scientist
who died in 1940, left a sealed
envelope with the Society for
Psychical Research.

The scientists in charge of the
experiment were forbidden to open
the envelope until some reputable
person came forward with a trust-
vorthy claim to have received a
message from Sir Oliver revealing
what is in the envelope. Opening
the envelope would then show i!
the claim were taue,

In the Society’s view no trust-
worthy claim has yet been made
So after 10 years the envelope
remains unopened,

Blow Me Down
What became of the crop of
pre-war inventors who claimed
they could bring down bombers
just by blowing air at them, a



Mr. Butler
Be “Prime

Says Trinidad

Wants To
Minister”

Correspondent

A NEW ERA in Trinidad’s political life will be ushered
in under the new Constitution when the opening session o1
the Trinidad Legislative Council takes place on October 20,
As compared with 18 members in the old House, twenty-siv

members will form the new

body. Eighteen were elected in

the recent General Elections, in which the voters were

openly bribed,

Some candidates even resorted
to obeah and voagoo practices in
an effort to win! There were 142
candidates, most of them attracted
solely by the salary of $320.00 per
month, Illiterate voters were in
the majority, and for them sym-
bols had to be put on the ballot

papers.
Prominent leaders, and many
of the “common people,” have

since expressed the view that
Trinidad and the West Indies gen-
erally are not nearly ready for the
grant of Adult Suffrage, but it
has been granted, and so, must
stay.

Those electea include, Mr. Tubal
Uriah “Buzz” Butler, notorious
leader of the underprivileged with
five followers; l-stone Hon.
Albert Gomes, who led the sugar
delegation to the United Kingdom
a few months ago. and Mr, Ray-
mond Quevedo, a Port-of-Spain
City Councillor and Calypsonian
known as “Attila the Hun,”

Governor Rance has sent writ-
ten invitations to members of the
Bufler Party to visit him at Gov-
ernment House individually and

Springbok air route will be dis— privately. So far, only Councillor

cussed soon,

It involves huge Ashford Sinanan has paid a call

spending and a clash of interests at Government House, The others

between international airlines.

do not object to going, but held it

A Dutch delegation will visit more desirable that His Excellen-

South Africa in November to dis-
cuss air transport problems,

cy should see them collectively.
Sir Hubert has now nominated
five to the Council, four of them

BOAC SAA want to readjust retiring members, one a woman.
the Springbok route. The Dutch Oil, sugar and commerce are re-

line, KLM, have carried about half presented. With

three official

of the passenger traffic since the members, these will form a solid

war, 80 per cent of it between

Britain and South Africa.

When BOAC SAA had uncom-
petitive aircraft, KLM operated

fast pressurised Constellations.

At one time their two weekly
airplanes carried more passengers

than the Springbok service’s six.
Now SAA _ Constellations

pressurised,

African partnership will

traffic,

Britain.

on international air routes,



04
PSR eee .29 cent. 3
-o8. tins ..... isin bau istareey ¢ .50
JUICE—20-0z. tins 31
Bia See 2.50
.00
00
4.00 annually. If KLM have to give up Mr. Butler
TALE SHERRY—per bot. 4.90
Spat ge BH 1.16 major improvement in
teen .60 balance sheets.—L.E.S.
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TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
ae 3 le @ lb KENZEL ALARM CLOCKS
The Best Clocks Made
$4.00 Each
* 32 COL1 AUTOMATIC
PISTOL ........ $40.00

at
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE



and
BOAC Hermes are wiping’ out the
disparity. They are all fast and
ane ae ignored his “rights” as leader of

November be able to absorb all

In KLM’s case it is felt they would be unworkable,
have right to fly to South Africa Would cost the Governor his job.
for passengers destined only for r le
Holland or beyond, but not for Minister.





Government bloc of eight, which,
together with five or six moder-
ates, should be able to “hold” Mr.
Uriah Butler and the other “wild
men,” and so prevent any irre-
sponsible legislation.

Taking a leaf out of Mr, Alex-
ander Bustamante’s book, Mr.
Butler has already begun to
threaten the Governor, whom he
referred to as “Citizen Rance,”
He said that if the Governor,

the only party returned to power,
he (Mr. Butler) would make the
Government so rancid that it
and it

Mr. Butler wants to be “Prime
His party has an-
nounced that it is in favour of the

Free competition is not allowed ‘ationalisation of the sugar indus~

and try. vo fh 4
certain principles about end-to-
end traffic — such as between October 20, the Speaker will be
Britain and South Africa—are Mr.
involved. As Holland is at neither born ex-judge. By secret ballot,
end, BOAC SAA is likely to re- it will choose five of the elected
strict KLM to what they regard inembers to be members of the
as legitimate traffic—about 20 perExecutive Council, It will be re-

When the new House meets on

William Savary, Trinidad-

called that Mr. Chanka Maharah,
member of the Legislative Coun-

Last year BOAC SAA carried cil, at a meeting on Tuesday night,
7,108 passengers on the Spring- stated that Mr. Butler will be put-
bok service; KLM carried 6,820. ting forward the following candi-
Total traffic is worth £2,500,000 dates for the Executive Council:

himself, Mr. Mitra

a part of this, there would be aSinanan, Mr. Victor Bryan, Mr.

BOAC A. P.T. James and Mr.

Kumar, the last three of whom to the Party.
oe





are not acknowledged members
of the Butler Party.

The Moderates in the Legisla-
tive Council have also had their
meetings and arranged voting
plans, and it is expected that they
will return more than one candi-
date to the Executive Council.
This Cabinet will consist of nine
members—the five mentioned,
three officials (The Colonial Secre-
tary, The Attorney General, and
the Financial Secretary), and one
to be nominated by the Governor
It is almost certain, therefore, that
most of its members will be mod-
erates,

After the Executive Council is
complete, Governor Rance if he
desires, may choose up to five
“Ministers” to take charge of de-
partments, Some “Ministers” may
have more than one department.

This is the set-up for Trinidad’:
next step along the road toward:
self rule. The experiment will be
anxiously watched in the Carib-
bean and indeed throughout the
Empire.

Butlerites
Invited To
Govt. House

For Private Interviews

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN.

His Excellency Governor Rance
has sent written invitations to
members. of the Butler Party
elected to seats in the Legislative
Council to visit him at Govern«
ment House, individually and
privately. They are Mr. Tubal
“Buzz” Butler, Mr, Mitra G,
Sinanan, Mr, Pope McLean, Mr,
Ashford Sinanan, Mr. Stephen
Maharaj. Cre

Members of the Party have not
refused, but held it more desirable
that he should see them collec.
tively. Members of the Party
held a meeting at the office
Mr. Mitra Sinanan, their leg
adviser, an elected member for
Caroni South, Present at this
meeting were Mr, Ranjit Kumar,
Mr. Aubrey James and Mr, Ray-
mond Quevedo.

Mr. Tubal Uriah Butler, Presi
dent of the Home Rule Party,
and member elected for the St,
Patrick West constituency, told
the “Gazette” on Wednesday,
“Mum's the word,” when he was
being quizzed in connection we
the statement made by a membe
of his Party, Mr. Chanka Maharaj,
at a meeting on Tuesday night,

Mr. Maharaj voiced disap,
proval at Mr. Butler’s announce -
ment that he (Mr, Maharaj;
will not be allowed. to in
the Council, but only to véte, and
that: the only two to speak would
be he, Mr. Butler himself, and

Ranjit Mr. Mitra Sinanan, legal adviser





aoe ee ee a ne ee eee nee
PURINA CHOWS

and Livestock

“SEE THE DIFFERENCE PURINA MAKES”

|
| For Poultry



ee eae en ene ee oe

reader asked. After examining
documents only recently brought
off the secret list | find that two
of the inventors managed to in-
terest the German Army sufficient-
ly to get their gadgets built and
tester.

One gadget was a huge bent
tube designed to shoot a high-
speed “plug” of air. It would
break inch-thick boards at a
range of 225 yards, buy’ when
tried against low flying Allien
vircraft it proved useless.

The second ‘ gadget—the brain
ehild of an Austrian called Dr
Zippermeyer—was built to pro-
ject miniature Vornadoes at air-
planes, ‘

When it went off it was ex-
pected to start up a fast-moving
whirlpool of air which would suck
the wings off bombers.

Dr. Zippermeyer managed vo
froduce some whirlpools, But
'o planes came down.

Groundnut Wool

Like seven readers who have
written in, I have lost sight of the
wonderful synthetic woot which
scientists made from groundnuts.

t found that experiments have
fone so well that a £2,000,00¢
facvory has been built near
Dumfries to start producing the
“wool” next spring.

Using only the waste leit af er
the margarine fat has beet
extracted from the groundnuts
he factory will eventually make
30,000 tons of moth-resistant
syuthetic wool every year,

The manufacturers are satisfied
they can market it at about ¢
Gaarter the price of sheep's wool
They are even satisfied they can
gxet the groundnuts,

The Ticking Man

My final readers’-request in
quiry was into the Strange Case
of the Ticking Man which hap-
pened way back in 1938,

According to newspaper cut-
tings 19-year-old Mr. Edwarr
Franklin of Coventry suddenly
developed a ticking noise in hi:
cars. It was so loud that others
eculd’ hear ft “People witting
near-me in the cinema think 1!
im carrying a time-bomb,” he
told reporters, Doctors were

baffled by the noise but could do
nothing to Sop it

Now at 31 Mr. Franklin 4s still
tiecing as leudly as ever and still
avuids going to the pictures
But Vhe doctors

are no longer

baffled by the cause, They say

he has a slight nervous defect in

the throat which makes his soft
palate vibrate rapidly,

This echoes up che tubes leading

to his ears and keeps him ticking
over,



OF INTEREST TO ALL CRICKETERS

WE HAVE
THAT



Mr. EVERTON WEEKES

(The Popular West Indian Cricketer)

WILL BE IN

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PAGE TEN

King

Will Open New

But Can’t Go In

iy THOMAS

LONDON
King George VI will formally
open the re-built House of Com-
mons October 26—but constitu-
tionally he will not be allowed to
set foot within it
The Opening ceremony will be
in the nearby old Westminster
Hall and the King will declane the
chamber open Within a few feet
of the spot where King Charies I
was sentenced to death in 1649 for
a violation of the ancient privi-
leges of the House < mmons.
The old House of Commons was

destroyéd y German bombers
May 10; 1941. The new house has
been constructed as a replica of






SSOT including the

yuate number of seats,
37, tor the 625 members, but with
me modern improvements.

Inte Westminster Hall will be
crowae@d:aitthe leading officers of
state, including the Lord Grand
Chamberlain, the Speaker of, the
House of Commons, the Lord High

Chancellor, peers and prelates
from the House of Lords and the
“honourable and faithful members
of the Commons.”

In addition, there will be a
special portion set aside for the
eakers from the Dominion Pav-

pré

me i




liaments. Speakers from New
Zealand. Australia and Canada ee
already in England for the ceree
mony. ’

When the ceremony is conclud-
the King will leave. The House
Commons mace (“Cromweli's

Rauble”) will pe @roduced and

ithe Speaker will head the stately

procession to the new House of

Commons, to finish off the business

of t session pending -the State

Opening of the new session sche-
dule xr October 31.

‘sual prayer will be offered

th the members, conforming to
turning their faces to

wall The “distinguished
sirangers” —~ ambassadors, peers,
princes and Commonwealth

Speakers. -will then be admitted

together with the Press. Once

again the famed chamber will be
en and functioning,

Equipped very much on the
sare lines as the old chamber, the
new House will retain many of its
old disadvantages, but these will
be partially offset by the installa-
tion of new and scientific lighting,
heating and acoustic apparatus.

The disadvantage that has been
sedulously retained is that the new
chamber will accommodate only
437 out of the 625 elected mem-
bers., Those who have not been
able to snatch a seat will have to
take their informal standing posi-
tions behind the “bar” of the
House. The “bar”, as far as the
chamber is concerned, is a narrow
strip of carpet over which none
but members may step.

Even the King's representative,
“Gentlemen Ushers of the Black
Rod,” must remain outside this
strip. os

One new feature in the House
is the Churchill Arch which forms
the entrance to the members
lobby from tbe public dobby., This
was constructed from” the stones
from the old building and was
placed theré as a memorial to the
wartime Prime Minister.

Goering’s bombers did_ their
destructive task with efficiency.
The old chamber—fortunately not
in use at the time—was completely
burnt out. The old despatch boxes
on the Speaker’s table thumped
with vigour, anger and triumph
by a succession of Prime Minis-
ters from Gladstone onwards,
have been replaced by boxes fron
New Zealand.

In fact, every Dominion and
Colony of the British Empire has
contributed something to the em-
bellishment of the new chamber.
Australia presented the new
Speaker’s chair, while Zanzibar
gave a magnificently decorated ash

i: tray—but this will find a place in

ed

the

the members’ smoking room

~ ‘The new chamber will be higher
than the old one and above iis
ceiling and below its floors will be
rooms for the officers of the House
and for Ministers and their secre-
taries.

In appearance the new chamber
like the old one is cf a Gothic
character, Gothic architecture is
now openly derided by the mod-
erns, but the new chamber had to

nferm to the old, Suggestions
for a chamber on the lines.of the
continental and American pattern

ere reiected,

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Cc. WATSON

There was almost unanimity for
he small chamber rigidly divided
to two sections—the section on
the right hand of the Speaker re-
served for Governmental members
ind left for opposition members.
The benches as in the old house
are of green hide, comfortably
padded

The designers of the old cham-
ber made a great and impressive
show of the heavy oak panelling,
redolent of the Victorian era. Oak
panelling predominates in the new
chamber. Instead of the heavy
unimpressive evenness of the old
chamber the panelling of the new
one is varied with alternating lay-
ers of oak of differing hues.

Most important of all from the
members’ point of view is the air
conditioning of the new building.
Nearly a century ago the air cool-
ing and hing of the chamber
was considered something unique
in building. Then the air was
pumped through the floor and thus
carried with it all the dirt and dust
brought in on the members’ shoes.
The ducts led onto the nearby
Thames.

This once led to a sudden ad-
journment of the House when a
sewage barge’ inadvertently
dumped its refuse near the ter-
‘ace of Parliament. .

in the new chamber clean air
unters frors the sides ‘through
ducts immediately under the gal-
leries and the old air is expelled
through holes in the roof. It is
hoped by this means to produce an
atmosphere of a fine spring day.
The air will be cleaned automati-
eally and the volume of new air
adjusted so as to provide 1,500
cubic feet per hour for every oecu-
pant of the Chamber.

Although Hitler’s Junkers and
Heinkels blasted the old chamber
into eternity, memories are still
alive on the many stirring scenes
enacted within its richly embell-
ished walls. There are still alive
today a few who heard the verbal
duels between Gladstone and Dis-
raeli, There are also many wno
remember the historic battles of
the rebellious Irish members who
relentlessly filibustered the ordin-
ary Parliamentary routine in order
to get their country’s freedom de-
bated,

There is the occasion of Lloyd
George’s budget taxing the land
and inheritances. Thrice it was re-
jected by the House of Lords with
the upshot that the House of Lords
was reformed and their veto lim-
ited to non-financial legislation.

Within the writer's memory
there is pictured’the sombre scene
in August, 1914, when Sir Edward
Grey amid deathly silence an-
nounced that “lights of Europe
were burning low” and then the
inevitable declaration of war on
the Kaiser's Germany.

Twenty-five years later an
equally distraught Prime Minister,
Neville Chamberlain, glowered at
the Labour opposition and uttered
the words, “We are now at war
with Germany,” but only after he
had told the world the dread news
aver the radio,

The day before he had been
taunted by Arthur Greenwood.
then leader of the Labour Party,
with “this tension must cease”
after Chamberlain had declined to
give the House the assurance that
there would be no further appease-
ment with Hitler.

King Edward's abdication scenes
also remain a vivid memory—-
Churchill being howled at and
jeered into silence by the “loyal
and honourable members” when
he merely suggested that “no pre-
cipitate action should be taken‘
without first consulting this
House.”

Then the fateful day when
Premier Stanley Baldwin smirking
in triumph asked the House's
attention with a “message from
the King written in his own
hand,” It was the three paragraph
“instrument of abdication” which
he read to a bewildered House.

Another historic scene occurred
in 1920 when a trim, sedate little
figure, dwarfed on the one side
by long, lean gangling Arthur
Balfour and on the other by
Lloyd George, walked in unison
the length of the gangway to take
her oath as the first woman mem-
ber of Pariiament to take her seat.
Tt was Lady Astor's introduction

eee








Dummy Detector

° 4 s 2
Aids Atom Training

Firemen training for defence
agains’ atom warfare can now
use a “home-made” dummy de-
tegtor. It has been made from
pieces of war surplus equipmen?
by Mr. R. A. Wilson and Mr. A. F
White, both graduates of the
Institution of Fire Engineers.

Iv includes a dummy probe, «
loudspeaker and instrument panet,
mgst of the apparatus being con-
tained in a wooden box,

Two men use the equipment.
While the firemen being trained
pags the probe around a spor
being tested for radio activity,
the instructor regulates a click~
in, noise,

he rate varies from about five
a minuie to almost continuous
clieking.

When the probe passes over a
predetermined ‘‘radio-active” spot
the clicking rate is adjusted to
the same as would be heard on an
actual detector.—L.E'8,



SWEDES SEEK
THEIR FORTUNE

(From Qur Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN,
The seven-ton yacht “Fia” ar-
rived in Trinidad on Monday eve-
ning with 18 persons on board
beund for Venezuela, to start a
“new page in their lives.” “We
are out to seek our fortunes there”,
said a few of them when they
landed, There were three women
and three children, The vessel,
under the command of Mr. Hen-
rick Karem Pentti, who is a Finn,
left Sweden in July, and made
calls at Holland, France, England,
Spain and Portugal, The men
said that they were refugees who
are among a large number, desir-
ous to get out of the country as
they are fed up with the Com-
munist rulers. There is great
suffering in the Baltic countries,
and the people are anxious to get
out so that they may live in
peace. On board are electricians,
clothes manufacturers and me-
chanics.

moments during the World War

II. Particularly intrusive on the
memory was the blackest day of
the war. Narvik had been lost,

the French army cut to ribbons!

Ae

and grave doubts as to whether
the British army could be extrac-
ted from France. Prime Minister
Chamberlain had to take the rap.

odd votes the non-confidence
motion, nonetheless he thought it

expedient to hand over the reins,

of Government to a coalition, and

the only coalition the Labour |®

Party members would serve under
would be one led by Winston
Churchill,

Thereupon Churchill took the!

helm and in his first address

shivered the spines of members |

with his famous speech offering
only “tears, blood and sweat.”

be reliving scenes in their mem-
ory.

to the House,
There were many dramatic
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Although he survived by ninety’

On October 26, some M.P’s will’

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



O
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preMLOrre





Butlerites Face Party Split

(From Our London Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN.
Early in the fight, the But)
Party is already on the “split
point”. Mr. Chanka Maharja. + -
elected member of the Legislative
Couneil for the St. Joseph Cons. -
tueney, vold a large gathering
last night that Mr. Uriah Bux,
Butler does not want him to hay?
any say in the Legislative
Council, in any mater which hi
party — the Butler Party
might move or bring about durin:
the next five years,

Mr. Maharaj said: “Butler hes
decided that vhe only two mem-
bers of the party who should have
any say on the Council were Mr
Mitra G. Sinanan, the Union's
Legal Adviser, and Mr.
himself”. Continuing he told the
crowd: “I do nov’ intend to b>

a

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muzzled by Mr. Butler or any-
body”.

Another question which Mr.
Maharaj said was decided at 4
meeting held at Mr. Sinanan’s
office last Saturday. was, that Mr.
Maharaj should give his vote vo
Mr. Ranjit Kumar in the ballot
for the Executive Council, The
others to be voted for, he said
will be Mr, Butler himself, Mr.
M. G. Sinanan, Mr, Victor Bryan,
and Mr, A. P. T. James. To this
he said he again voiced his stern
disapproval,

«Mr. Maharaj said he called this
meeting: because those present
were the people from various
organisations who helped him in
his campaign and through thern
he promised the elecvorate to do
his best. Mr. Butler, on Saturday,
had all elected members of the
Butler Party at his meeting. Mr.



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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950

PRAISES POLICE

(From Qug Own Correspendent)
PORT-of-SPAIN

All ranks of Police Force in
Trinidad were praised by the
Commissioner, Col. Eric Beadon,
in his 1949 annual report for their
“unstinted co-operation and zeal”.
The Commissioner ted out
that the improvement in serious
crime fi over 1948 was in
no 1 measure due to that
wonderful spirit.

The cost of the Force for that
year (1949) totalled $2,203,748.61
and rewards paid out to members
for that same period amounted to

$2,597.92
‘ : :
Doctors’ Offices Robbed
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-of-SPAIN
Thieves raided the offices of Dr.
L. R. Hutchinson and Dr. Stanley
Littlepage, of Port-of-—Spain,
making off with a quantity of raw
gold, belonging to Dr. Hutchinson
while a _ of spectacles belong-
ing to . Littlepage, was also
stolen,

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PORT-of-SPAIN
Three condemned men were
Port-of-
Spain’s Royal Jail. They were
Johnny Simon and John Moham-
med, for the murder of Lalchan
Dookram a taxi driver, and Brid-
gelalsingh, convicted by a jury at
the same Assizes for the murder
of his wife, Laura.

During the trial, Mohammed is
reported to have told his wife,
“keep your head on girl, I am
losing mine.”

Dies From Wheel Chair
Accident
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-of-SPAIN

Oscar Legall, a wheel chair in-
valid, of Tunapuna, died shortly
after he was knocked down by a
truck on the Eastern Main Road.
It is reported that Legall was at ’
the time in his wheel chair, at-
tempting to overtake a parked ‘

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Maharaj said he would bring the
uesvions to his electorate and get
eir final deliberations on them
The crowd shouted in one
voice: “Don’t do that, you must
speak on the Council.”

P

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1950





“Think because the gas strike’s over they'll return all the oil lamps they Bua

News For The
Over 50’s

LONDON,

HIGH blood pressure and the
troubles that follow in its train are
responsible for about a’quarter of
all the deaths in this country of
people over the age of 50.

The symptoms vary greatly,

In some people morning head-
aches with loss of vision are the
first signs: in others it is kidney
trouble. Others again first dis-
cover that their blood pressure
is too high when they feel pains
in the chest on exertion, or when
they are awakened at night by
attacks of asthma,

To date treatment has been
unsatisfactory.

Rest, combined with an almost
meat-free diet, without any salt,
has been advocated. Later the
“coolie” diet composed almost
entirely of rice was commented
upon favourably. But few pa-
tients could stick the deadly

inonotony.
‘: Apart from this many drugs
have been tried.

New Day

Now a real advance
appear to have been made.

Two doctors working in Paisley
report on eight cases of severe
high blood pressure treated with
a new compound called “hexa-
methonium bromide.”

The patients, selected at random
had all the signs and symptoms of
high blood pressure as well as the
actual mercurial reading.

Treatment with this drug
brought down the pressure and
relieved the symptoms in every
case.

Even more important: once the
blood pressure was reduced it did
not rise again when administration
of the drug was stopped.

It is too early yet to say
‘whether this drug will relieve all
eases of high blood pressure. But
the fact that cases can be
relieved to such an extent is an
advance in treatment such as
has never been made before.

WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED. —L.E.S

RICE WORKERS
CALL OFF STRIKE

MILAN, Oct.

The two weeks strikes of aa
workers threatening the rich rice
crop in Milan Province was called
off today after an agreement be-
tween landowners and _ trade
unions on revised work contracts
providing for medical insurance.

—Reuter.



does





i: b ronmanerl

YESTERDAY’S CRICKET

@ From Page 5.

team yesterday went to L. F. Har-
ris, who topscoreqd with a sound
and patient knock of 73; and T.
Pilgrim who was undefeated with
40 runs to his.credit. S. Lucas
and W. Greenidge were the most
successful bowlers for their team,
taking 3 wickets each for 31 and
50 runs respectively. The out-
field was slow, and runs were not
scored, Cricket fans
seemed disappointed when Clyde
Walcott the biggest attraction, did
not live up to expectation.
Carlton started their second
innings and at the end of the day’s
play had scored 6 runs for the
loss of one wicket.

C. Atkins and S. Griffith opened
Spartan’s innings, against the
attack of fast bowlers Edghill and
Warren. They were off to a bad
start, when Griffith was out to
Edghill with the total at 12. L. F.
Harris partnered Atkins, and they
found it difficult to score ag the
outfield was slow. After forty
five minutes of steady bowling,
the fast bowlers were replaced by
the two off spinners. Lucas and
W. Greenidge. Harris reached
double figures by driving one of
Greenidge’s deliveries to the
boundary. It was the first of the
innings, Atkins was however out
in the next over, and Spartan
had now lost two wickets with 34
runs on the tins. The large crowd
now sent up an uproar, as Clyde
Walcott, left the pavilion. He was
off the mark with a drive through
the covers which earned, him
a_ couple. Hutchinson
now opened hi field for this
hard hitting batsman. Walcott’s
stay was short however for
he was given out leg before
to Lucas for 3 runs in his second
ovér at the crease, and 3 wickets
were down for 37. Skipper Keita
Walcott came in to join Harris,
who then took two fours off
Greenidge’s bowling to send his
individual score to 21 and the
score past the half century. Ten
runs later, skipper Hutchinson
made another bowling change,
bringing on K. Greenidge in place
of Lucas, and Walcott took a
single off a delivery and soon
followed up with a well timed
drive to the cover boundary.

Stollmeyer

Play was held up, as_ Jeff
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player entered the pavilion, and
a large crowd of small boys and
even grown-ups flocked the pavil-
ion, in an effort to catch a glimpse
and refused to go away. Mean-
while Harris who came in at
No. 3 was still there batting con-
fidently with his score at 40. Fast
pager Edghill returned to the
attack and he mate the ball lift
awkwardly and twice struck
Walcott on the body. Spartan
however, lost their fourth wicket
when Keith Walcott was sent
back leg before in the last over
before lunch, and they were stil
156 runs behind with four of their
best batsmen in the pavilion his
contribution being 17. Pilgrim
came in after lunch to carry on
the innings and he took his first
over from Edghill without scor-
ing, but was off the mark with a
single off W. Greenidge’s bowl-
ing, and play again became quict
as the batsmen fought for runs

A “six” by Harris off Green--
idge’s bowling brought his own
score to 52, and the total to 102,
after 135 minutes of play, arid
E. W. Marshall replaced W.
Greenidge, and his first over
yielded a boundary.

Pilgrim who was now well set,
did the bulk of the scoring as
the rate of scoring increased, and
soon 150 runs were sent up.
Without any further addition,
Harris sound innings of 73 came
to a close, when he gave a hot
return to N, Lucas who accepted
it, and half of the team was out.

Did Not Score

Wood who came in next, ws
returned without scoring, and
Bowen partnered Pilgrim, Carl-
ton tried their seventh bowler K.
Hutchinson and Bowen greeted
him with two “sixes” but he wes
later bowled by Warren for a
hurricane 16. The score board
then read 176—7—16. Another
wicket fell when Phillips was
sent back without scoring. The
innings came to a close, when
cleaned bowled; both failing to
Haynes was run out and Morris
score.

In the ten minutes left for play
Carlton opened their second in-
nings with K. Hutchinson and
T. Clarke, but the former was
sent back without |. scoring.
Browne came in and an appeal
for light was upheld by the
umpires and play came to a
close,





We invite you to ins

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; The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lid.

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

AL

PAGE ELEVEN

_| | Gees

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*
Jamaica Defeat
eg? a!

Haiti At Football

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Oct, 14.

Jamaica won vhe first interna-
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PAGE TWELVE



Tennis Team Are We Nearing The End W.1. Rifiemen
Of Big Money Tramsfers? Shoot Well

Back Home

The Barbatos representatives
that attended the quadrangular:
British Caribbean Amateur In-
tereolonial Table Tennis Tourna-
ment, recently held in Trinidad,
returned yesterday morning by
B.W.ILAL. .They are Norman
Gill, Captain, Frank Willoughby
and Harold Corbin.

Skipper Gill told the “Advo-
cate” yesterday that although the

ios players were not suc
cessful in the tournament they had
much experience that

would benefit them at the 195)

He said that Harold Corbin
was very steady but it was neces-
sary that jhe should at least
develop more scoring strokes.

He felt that Frank Willoughby
should develop more footwork

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



By Peter Ditton

£218,800 is a lot of money in any language.
tax-ridden Britain it would allow two or three normal
sized families to live in luxury for life.

about 70 Rolls-Royce cars.

LONDON,

fees of ten professional footballers!

Yes, that is the staggering sum
of money that has been thrown
around in the past couple of years
by ten professional soccer clubs
in England, either in an endeavour
to stave-off relegation or to win
promotion, Getting on for
quarter of a million pounds and
all to obtain the services of ten
footballers. Did someone say
something about food for thought’

begun. Tommy Lawton went
from Everton to Chelsea for
£11,500. That was a real bargain
The same amount changed hands
when Stanley Matthews packed
his bags at Stoke and moved to
Blackpool, Another bargain.
Newcastle forked out £13,000 for
Len Shackleton and the Bradford
bank balance rose accordingly.
Tommy Lawton moved again to

Even in

It would buy pleased
Or it would pay the transfer

At Bisley

Capt. Robert Johnstone, Com-
mandant of the West Indies Rifle
team at Bisley told the Advocate
yesterday that he was very
with the standard of
shooting of the West Indies team
as a whole,

He said that they certainly
showed that they were quite up to
the standard of the best shots at
Bisley as they appeared in the
prize list over 160 times.

Capt. Johnstone who was in
England for the past 44% months,
was intransit on the S.S. “Golfito”
yesterday for Trinidad where he
is partner of the firm of Wilson
and Johnstone, Ltd., Commis-
sion Agents of Port-of-Spain.



SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950



Foot ‘ich Cause
Killed in A Days

Pain and Itching A

Stopped in
7 Minutes






neath drive $? Boca’ en on or these ict infections, as yell as Ring:

on | for these icot fee ; ~

eet creak peel? fee blis- | worm 2. It stops the itch and soothes and

Yore toes aad the soles of | cools the skin in 7 minutes. 3. It makes
yor feet? Do oP b s break and run| the skin soft, clear, and smooth.

rm

t

ngas t.,onsible

pa aan feet get so sore at times that they actually Guaranteed Test

wl would ble him to play te much yoneer will Ses mrs Notts County and Chelsea made He was accompanied by Mrs bee if “you cr from "these | foot att Nixodern from you oe it today.
an easier and better g : re & go on? is a fantastic 4 profit of a clear £8,500. Billy Johnstone : cause is iferm ‘or fungus and that you tremendous improvement in cit morning,
nger we could eventually rea fo join Derby Comal von. get rid of your trouble until you|In 4 days’ time Nixoderm will have

Gill was the oniy local player
to win sets.. He won six matches,
defeating “Willy Estick,” Dann,
O'Connor, Jamaica Champion, and

longer we could eventually reach
the stage when £200,000 would
only obtain the services of four
players. £50,000 just to kick a

to join Derby County and Morton,
his previous club, collecter
£15,500. Len Shackleton left

He said that the team created
a very excellent impression in
the minds of ‘the authorities at
Bisley and the West Indies Shoot-



can not
sites re: msible for| the germs, rasites, and fungus respen-~
oe be ad Rr — sible for vat trowbte, and you can see for
yourself that your skin rapidly is becoming
#” Kills the Cause soft, clear, smooth, and healthy, but con-

ft,
Ordinary ointments and liquids can not tinue it just 3 days longer to make sure

unn, Lear Newcas i tor| that the results are completely satisfac~
“« Peete aaa Newcastle and moved to Sunder- jing Council hoped to send ‘ohne because they do not fight or| that the, Fesults are Complete your
G- Wong and “Len” Brasingon land; net profit on both transae- another team to Bisley in. 1953, Forauaaia sian urls faa | srucigg peng: miserge erty. Nine
of British Guiana Near The End tions, £7,050 to Newcastle, He expressed grateful thanks come these foot troubles und also even the | cracking, ig, blistering

He was presented a Silver Cup
for the best performance given
by a Barbadian player while each
player taking part in the series
was presented with an _ Elite
Shirt.

At a Cocktail Party sponsored
by the Port Services Club, visiting
p! were given a picture al-
bum of Trinidad after a series of
exhibition games.

Best All-Rounder
Gill said that “Danny” O’Con-
nor, the Jamaican Champion, was
extrémely successful throughout
the tour. He was presented with
a Silver Cup for the best all.

. : wadding Meta} Polish is
roufid performance of the tour. ‘ational forward, David Jack. At the time of writing that is SHEPPARD 117 perfect for your brass

O'Connor, he said, convincingly The first five-figure transfer hai still the record transfer fee. It i 2 and copper, and there is
defeated Ronnie Inniss, the 1950 arrived. may be surpassed, If any one of NORTHAM, Western Australia, ase poe
Trinidad .Champion by two Second and Third Division clubs half a dozen top-class English : Oct. 14 eee Ae 708
straight games but was later de- winced as they read the news. Internationals asked for a move The M.CC,, cricket team today Praise sew tah a
feated by Raloh Legall, runner-up £11,000 to them was an amount there would be an immediate rush crew the first match of their ‘muah detica
in the Singles Ch onships. almost beyond understanding. it for cheque books and at least Australian tour, a one-day fixture surfaces, gives

He said that a ‘ge crowd
packed the Drill Hall on Friday
night to witness the games for
the British Caribbean Singles
Championship which was woo
by “Bogart” Griffith of Trinidad

On that night Legall ‘defeate:
O'Connor and Griffith won from
Gomes, placing two Trinidadianr
in the finals. It was a very keen
struggle as Legall won the firs:
game and Griffith the second.
Legall again went into the lead
but Griffith took the last two
games to become British Carib.
bean Champion.

New Rule

He said that during the match
between Jamaica and Trinidad at
San Fernando a new rule was
adopted. It stated that in the
event of play becoming boring
or unenterprising the scorer can
caution the players and then they
are automatically forced . -to
change service alternately instead
o Seite Al

to e Of
ponent oe 12° volleys, ex~
cluding the service volley, geis
the point, This only holds i?
neither player gets the point be
fore 12 volleys.

The match which was _ chiefly
responsible for this rule was
played between Ronnie Inniss, the
patience player of Trinidad and
‘Bunny’ McClean, the Allan Rac
of Jamaica.

While McClean held his racquet
with the pen-holder grip Griffith
held his the orthodox way but
they both stood close to the table
and patted out the point. On
some occasions a point lasted for
several minutes.

Gill said that the Trinidad Table
Tennis officials left nothing to be
and transportation was available
desired. They were well treated
on’ all occasions. y are all
looking forward to the next Brit-
ish Caribbean . Intercoloniat
Tournament.

Somehow I feel that we must
be nearing the end of this big-
money transfer business. English
football is gradually recovering
trom the effects of the war.
Young players are forcing their
way into the limelight and as
more and more managers realise
that the talent they are seeking
.s on their door-step so the
cheque books will be left idle in
the drawer,

But let’s go back a little while;
twenty-two years in fact. It was
in October, 1928, that Arsenal
shocked the football world by
paying Bolton Wanderers nearly
£11,000 for their English Inter-

was more than a fortune; it was
nfinity. Surely, they asked, this
is the limit for a transfer? And as
time went on it began to look
as if they were right. The odd
£10,000 fee cropped up occasion-
ally, as for instance when Peter

y, now player-manager of
Doncaster Rovers, moved from
Blackpool to Manchester City.
But generally the market was
quiet.

Upheaval

Then, in 1938, Arsenal, the
same old free-spending Arsenal,
caused another upheaval, They
wanted Bryn Jones, the brilliant
Wolverhampton Welsh Interna-
tional forward and then went to
the limit to get him. £14,000
changed hands and Bryn Jones
packed his bags and moved south,
but not before the whole soccer
world had been rocked to its
foundations.

One year later, in 1939, the war
brought a full stop to league
soccer as it had been previously
known, and the transfer market
Closed. down, only to re-open im
1945 with even greater activity
and higher prices than before.

Clubs resuming ‘League soccer
after an absence of six years
found that many of their best
players were finished, The
youngsters had not had sufficient
experience to hold their own in
the promotio and relegation
struggle and the only answer was
to buy ready-made players from
other clubs.

Players themselves sensed an
opportunity to make a name.
Requests to be put on the ‘list’ in
order that they could be trans-
ferred to a club in a_ higher
division were plentiful. In addi-
tion, certain clubs found their
financial position so weak that
they had to sell their best men
to keep alive,

Spending Spree

The greatest spending spree

And so the procession contin-
ued: £20,000 here, £18,000 there.
Money became almost meaning-
less as the prices rose higher
and higher towards the climax
in December 1949. Preston North
End, with a blank cheque for an
inside-forward who coulll link
up with their International
winger Tom Finney, decided that
Eddie Quigley of Sheffield
Wednesday was their man,
£26,500 was paid out and Quigley
moved across the border from
Yorkshire to Lancashire.

A Record

one fee of £30,000 would probably
be paid out.

But the mad buying and selling
of the past four or five years
seems almost over, Clubs are now
beginning to settle down, Team
building has been carried out and
while there are still a score of
managers who confess their team
needs strengthening in this or
that position, the majority are
reasonably satisfied, ore and
more they are placing their faith
in the young players who have
now had five years’ grace in
which to mature.

The success of this “encourage
the youngsters” policy can be
judged from the fact that six of
the English International side
that played Ireland in Belfast last
Saturday, Aston, Wright, Chilton.
Dickinson, Mannion, and Baily did
not eost their club more than the
£10 signing-on fee. And even
in these boom days of soccer
there is still en awful difference
between £10 and £20,000.



, SAAB
“Wake up, George—

television’s over for this
evening.”

cn behalf of the ieam to the
Colonial Governments, merchants
and supporters whe had so gen-
erously contributed towards
the funds in order to make the
1950 venture pessitle. He was
also very pleised t:\t the mein-
bers of the team had justified

the confidence which was reposed |-

in them by the Government and
the. public generally

M.C.C. Draw First
Match



against a West Australian country
«even here,

Batting first, the tourists
¢eclared at 329 for 5, and at the
close the Country Eleven were 113
for 7.

The young M.C.C., pair David
Sheppard and Gilbert Parkhouse
laid the basis of their side’s score
with a second wicket partnership
of 175. Sheppard hit 117 with 13
fours, and Parkhouse 87. Byfield
was the most successful Country
Fleven bowler claiming 3 for 68.

Top scorer for the Country
Eleven was G. Jones, 29; white
the M.C.C., captain Freddie
Brown, Bob Berry and Douglas
Wright each claimed two wickets,

—Reuter.



Commonwealth
Dismiss Baroda
For 159

BARODA, Oct. 14,

The Commonwealth touring team
today dismissed Baroda, Ranji
trophy champions in three and a
half hours for 159 after sending
them in to bat first and at the
close of the opening day of their
three day match had replied with
75 for 2.

Spinners Jim Laker of Surrey
and Bruce Dooland of Australia
held mastery on the matting
wicket.

Top scorer for Baroda was D.
K. Gaekwad 30. Laker making
the ball rise disconcertingly or go
through fast and low off the mat-
ting claimed five wickets for 42
and Dooland took three for 31, A
sound unbeaten 40 by Harold
Gimblett of Somerset helped the
Commonwealth score along to 75
at the close, Worrell who cap-
tained the side was the only West
Indian playing, At the close of
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Sailing Dates

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RATES FOR ROUND
BARBADOS
RIP
6th December, 1950
Ist Class ....,. $208.00

17th January, 1951

2nd Class $163.00

28th February, 1951





3rd Class ...... $111.00
11th April, 1951
B.W.I. Currency
30th May, 1951
BARBADOS CIE. GLE. TRANSATLANTIQUE BARBADOS
R. M. JONES & CO., LID.
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Agents
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PAGE FOURTEEN ~ :

CLASSIFIED ADS.







ANNOUNCEMENT

THE Engagement was announced re-
cently of Miss LYNCH of Bush
Hall to MR. HASSIM GAFOOD of Trin

dad rty at her residence
P a 15.10, 50—In.









THANKS

The relatives of Mrs. Constance Mur
rell_ ef Marchfield, St. Philip, who died
on %th of October, 1950, return thanks
to all who prayed and extended hopeful
wishes during her illness and with deep-
est @ppreciation gratefully thank all who

tended the funeral, sent wreaths, cards
jet or any way condoled with them
on occasion of her death.

Archie Bascombe (son); Mrs. Grelinda
Bartlett (daughter), Churvyle (gdandson),
Gerline, Icilma, Patsie, Cynthia, Mau-

Marcille, Pegsy, Trevor (#rand-
children.

15.10.50.—-1n,

The family of Mr. Joseph Leonard

Benfield, late of “Willsbury” Hastings.
with deepest appreciation gratefully re-
turn thanks to all their friends who
attended the funeral, sent wreaths,
Car@s, letters or in any other way ¢x-
pressed sympathy or shown kindness in





th recent and sudden bereavement
Ne Banfield (widow) Leonard.
Lionel, and Tom (Sons), Joyce Mascol!
(Denghter) . 15, 10.50—1n
IN MEMORIAM
joving memory of our dear ENID
) GRIFFITH, who fell asleep in
J on October 15, 1948.

years have passed since that sad
ni we watched her pass away, but we
are sure she has gone to rest, we

h to meet her there Ever to Te-

Ibered by: Margo (daughter(; Elma

G {mother); Ina (sister) and Osbert
‘ er); Alva (Nephew).

15.10.50.



In loving memory of our dear beloved
father ALBERT BLACKETT, who_ quiet-
ly Bppeed to the great beyond on . 35,
1

was loving and kind in all his ways
ht and just to the end of his days

and true in heart and mind

@ wonderful memory he has left

im

behind
WH and smiling, always content
1 and respected, wherever he went
To this beautiful jife, came a noble end
He died as he lived everybody's friend
Winifred Blackett (wife); Ivy & Pearl
(daughters) 15.10.50.—In,

FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

<= ——

CAR — Ford Prefect 1947, good cgn-
ettion. Owner leaving island. No rea-
sonable offer refused. Apply Capt. A
J. Press. 14,10. 50—2n .

CARS — 2 Vauxhall 14 Saloons,
Pargains. 1 Ford V-2 1940, 37,000
ver¥ food condition at reasonable price.
FORT ROYAL GARAGE Ltd. Telephone
4504. 13.10.30—3n







1) 10 BLP. Hillman Car
1 model. Apply Cecil Sampson C/o
Moenning & Co. Lid, Dial 4284























TELEPHONE 2508 |



FOR RENT

BUNGALOW 3-bedroom Bungalow
newly built in ego! locality 2% miles from
town. Available for a period of 12}
months from Ist es Inspection |

. r
by appointment, Phone ‘et :
“BEVERLY — The Garrison. Draw-
ing and Dining room; @ bedrooms; |
with bathroom attached — Play room,
Freakfast room — Modern Kitchen 1
all conveniences. Tennis Lawn. Spacious
yard with fruit — — — ser-
ts’ rooms tec. a
aati 15. 10,50—3n.







a ear

CARPEDIEN—Annex—near Yacht Cluo,
From December lst. All modern conve~
niences. Only Coloured need apply. Apply
Mrs. Gooding on premises, 24.9.



the
Stream, Furnished draw-
ing and dining room. Available for the
month of November only, Dial 2377,





‘¥4, 10, 50—2n

——— set

FURNISHED UPSTAIRS T—From

ist sore. are . eer
L ‘more ock. a
BLA SBANNISTER 15,10.50—O"

FLAT — — A

very large spacious flat on second fioor
at No. 6 Swan St. with gallery. Very,
cool and or — Can be used for a big
ffice or ces. Phone 2466.

5 Fey 10.10.50—2n

ltr
FROM January Ist. 1951, “INenOUT”
Gibb’ Peter

ea every %
je. apply
om” Labaion yg



HOUSE — “ESPERANZA” fully fyr-
ished mone oa on St. J
Sea Coast, me 91-

atin e 14.10.50—én.





\ etd ent — On the orsae Coast.
fas” Mare AS So" Marbert,. Goraober,
Ch, Ch. 10.10 .51+-6n.

ing,
cervants rooms and large
conveniences, Apply Messrs Carrington
& Sealy, Lucas Street or Phone 3619

after 5 p.m. 7.10.50—1in.

NEWHAVEN—Crane Coast, Furnished,
4 bedrooms, Water mill supply, Lighting
Plant. Double Garage, 3 servant rooms,
From November Ist, Dial 4476.

17.9.'50—t.f.n.

“SWANSEA” — Worthing from Ist.
November, A fully furnished Bungalow,
including Refrigerator, Telephone, Radio:
Garnge, Dial 3578 or 2490

13. 10.50—3n,

WINSLOW-—Cattle Wash, St. Joseph
yor we 7 of eee ue Aoely
tion, St, Thomas. ' See i0.80—3n,

PERSONAL



Y VILLE,
dining, sitting, 3









. —

14,10.50-2n. | The Public are hereby warned against

| giving credit to my wife Rita Branch

— Willys in working order | (nee Murrel) as I do not hold myge!f

Li to Bist . Reason tor | re le for her or anyone else con-

sel . owner has new car, Apply C Regting a debt or debts in my name
B. Dial 8432. | unless by a written order

mes, Top Rock Garage.
14,10.50—2n

CAR — Sunbeam Talbot (1941). Good
condition. Apply: 4 Clifton Terr. Bay
St. 14,10.50—t.f.»,

CAR — One Standard 8 H.P. Car m
perfect condition. Apply J, E. Pierce,
C/o James A. Lynch & Co. Ltd,

13.10.50—3n .











‘AL WIRE
Th Toit. 1052,

c.T.8. LR,
Also Flexible Galvanised Conduit

m
sizes % inch to 1% inch, Saree ao
Tyre Trafalgar Phone f
14.10 .50—t.f.0



LAMPS — 1 or 2 Blectrie Floor Lamps.
Good condition, Phone 4580.
15.10.50—8n.

1O0GRAM—One H.M.V. Radiogram.
Di ‘ole, 3219 or 4264, 15.10.50,—1n,

FURNITURE

— Office juipmen*
po and Doubte Pedestal great Desks,

cap or Letter Size 4 drawer Filing
Cabinets: Steel Stationery Cupboards;
Ccrd Index Cobinets; Steel Office Chairs,
end other office equipment now obtain-
able from stock from T. Geddes Grant







signed by me.
Sad. PERCY BRANCH,

Richmond Gap,
St, Michael.
14.10,50—2n,

The public is hereby warned against
credit to MARTHA WILLIAMS,

ving
as I do not hold myself le for
any debt or debts wr eraek er tae or
anyone else in my name or on the Estate
of Lisford Williams.
. MILLICENT WILLIAMS,
for and on behalf of
LISFORD WILLIAMS,
14.10.50—2n.





EDUCATIONAL



VACANT SCHOLARSHIPS

GIRLS’ FOUNDATION SCHOOL
There are one or more Naceee Sous

Chi
ty a ae mt
Parish of Christ arch a we ‘are in
straitened circumstances.

The ap} its must be ween the
ages of 10 years 6 months 12 years
win 'te la Sy The ebatress oie
sn on Prigay 21th at oat

Forms of application can be obtained
from the Secretary, W. H. Hil-

ton House, Bay * These forens rust
be returned ggcompamted by a aetna!

Ltd., Bolton Lane. Phone 4442, ‘hoe bpoedh 4 x .
15.10 50—6r. cinta eae ody,
undation School.
MECHANICAL .10.80—8n,

hh
School Boy's Kale! jayele, Apply
“geomnon" ¢/o rttode Diy rose
Palmetto Street, City. 10. 50—2n.
el ann nee n
TYPEWRITER — One Portable Under -
wood Typewriter Good condition, Mr









E. Stoute, C/o Bryden & Sons
15.10, 50-24
TYPEWRITER -— One Standard Un-~
derwood ewriter, Excellent condi-
tion. HOLD! Bros, Swan St. Tel.
3819. 13,.10.50—t. f. n.
LIVESTOCK
FEMALE DONKEY — Apply ©. Wil-

son, Shopkeeper,
Philip

Brereton Village, St.
14,10,50—2n.



HORSES — 1 Bay Mare. 1 Chestnut
Mare at Wakefield Pitn. St, John.
14.10, 50—2n.
(agi ada hci barsinpenicmenateenhieenpanentst
PUPPIES Bull Mastiff, One male
and 2 females, excellent breeding, Call
Mrs. K. D. Edwards, 4145.
12.10,50—4n.

MISCELLANEOUS

ANTIQUES — Of eveny description
Gi » old Jewels, fine Silver
Galivocieun: Early books, Maps. Auto-
graphs etc. at g@s Antique Shop

Gorrin;
adjoining Royal Yacht Club.
3.9.50—t.f.n.

"S PREPARATIONS,
Malt 6/-; Cofron 12/-.
& Co., St. Lawrence 15.10.50—Tn

BABY'S CRADLE—Ingood condition
complete with Matress and Casters, Price
$24.00. Dial 2274. 15.10.50,——3n.

BONELESS HAMS IN TINS 9 &.
euch @ $1.21 per th. Secure yours now
as Xmas supplies will be limited

14.10,50—2n









Haliver
Geo. C, Ward









BUCKLEY'S PREPARATIONS. Cough
Mixture 87c.: White Rub 5S5c.; Nezine 55c
Kams lic. Geo. C, Ward & Co,



15,10.50.—7n

BERETS — Angora Berets for dress
wear, Children sizes. Several Shades
Cc gz at only 4%, each, SWAN
s 50 Swan St. 15.10.50-—3n





HORNER'S PREPARATIONS. Maltle-
vol 8/-; Carnol 5/-; Calsol 16/8; Magsol
7/+; Infantol 5/-. Feronol & Feronol F.
Geo, C. Ward & Co, 15,10,50.—7n.

IN’S FRENCH COFFEE fo
da and enjoy this, you should use a
level teas ul to the cup! Exceeding
this you d from its deliciousness!
Sold by your br at S9e, per halt
tb Tin. 14,10.50—2n

MRS. WILK

CRACKERS, CW
NOVELT













has
AS

received
DECORA -
TOYS, for the
Nozaar help the Old
Vowne by making your Christ-
mas pirchoses at the BAZAAR

11.10. 50-3
MOSDA LIGHTERS A Lighter to
suit every teste. Many styles, many

prieés. KNIGHTS DRUG STORES
14.10.50—2n







PIANO — In good condition, reeently
tuned. Splendid tone. No
offer refused. Mrs. D. MOORE, Corner
2nd. Ave: Bank Hall Main Road
14,10, 50.



‘Qn.



Be Wise...

.» - Advertise







reasonable | each





ENTRANCE EXAMIN.
.

A
An "eae tanec
School Year January—July 1981 will
held at the school on Friday 27th October
1950 at 9.30 Applications will be
received up to Friday
ina Paya and

@ baptismal

monial from the
school attended by the pupil.

Applicants must be between the ages
of 8 years and 12 years on the date of

exa:
or Guardians accom
jaughters or wards are hereby -
is no accommodation for
them at the school on the date of
examination and that the examination of
applicants will not start until they leave

‘the premises.
W. H_ ANTROBUS.
Sec. Gov. .
Girls’ Foundation School.
: 8,10.50—8n

ALEXANDRA _ SCHOOL
Examinations for

i

z





to 4 p.m. on Friday, tor oti
oO He . .

pie ay i Ah ig BS

or over, July Sist; 1950; on

4.
cf Parents
the school on
10 a.m,





~~ School Children Rain
Coats, and Young Ladies. Real Engitsh
quality, No Plastic. To clear $2.18 each
SWAN STORE, 50 Swan Street.

| 14,10,50—2n.

ROOLS RAZOR ~ Never been used
a sale, price $10.00. Telephone 2292
“Macrae”

15,10.50—2n.
SQUIBB'S PREPARATIONS Cod Liver







OU O- Sulmefrin Calcium Gluconate
Glycerine Suppositories 3/6 Geo. C.
Ward & Co, 15.10,50.-—7n,

SALE Among other items we sell
Khaki ot 50c. per yd. ROYAL STORE.

14,10, 50—Jn

SHIRTS—2,000 Men’s Shirts of guaran—

teed wearing quality at $2.00 and $2.40
ROYAL STORE, 12.10.50—Tn.
SHIRTS & PYJAMAS Boys’ and

Men’s Shirts and Pyjamas ordered to
Measure can be delivered within four
hours, RELIANCE SHIRT FACTORY.

12.10, 50-—fn
| WEETABIX — Your Grocer has just
| received a fresh supply of this delicious







Cereal, which is more than breakfast
food Price #6c. and 26c,. per package
14,10.50-—-2n

4

Mechanical
\

}

'

WANTED
HELP

A GIRL for Grocery Department.—Geo.
C. Ward & Co., St. Lawrence.
15.10.50,—7n.











A General Servant. Apply Mrs. H. B.
Kinch, Belair, Top Rock 1/.10,50.—1n.

““AN EXPERIENCED CASHIER re-
Please appl: in writing to
Dd. Vv Scott & Ce tad Do not send





| original testimonials unless subsequently

sted.”
ae 10.10.50—T.F.N.

OFFICE CLERK -— Young Lady ex-
perienced general office routine up to
int of entry and balance of custom@rs®
ledgers Cail with written application
om write immediately to Mr. Carter,

T. R. Evans, 27 Broad St. State
experience and schooling. Salary up to

$80 month according to experience.
14.10. 50—2n.

terest
STENO-TYPIST — Experienced Steno-
typist for our Office. $100 po.
Apply with written aj to e
Secretary Dowding Estates & Tra
Co. Ltd., Bay Street.
14.10 .50—3n.

MISCELLANEOUS

cargiensnanieeneecvetemitingedihintinstameivilies
POSITION—Englishman, fully qualified | Pridgetown..
mbust!

Diesel and Internal Co: ion or
Teaving for United Kingdom end lo-
ber, but would prefer appointment m
Barbados. References; Rolls Royce, Gen-
érol Motors Detroit U.S.A. Bristol Aero-
plane Co,, England. Royal Electrical and
Engineers, British Army

c/o Advocate.

8.10.50—4n

Box J. W.



RETIRED MAN — Some experience in
hotel work, Seckr position. Room and
board — moderate salary. Hotel C/o
Advocate. 12.10. 50—-2n.





PUHLIC SALES
AUCTION
UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received from the In-
surance Company, I will sell at Fort
Royal Garage, St. Michael's Row, on
Friday, October 20th

; y qa) 1948 Vaueba
Risk Seeker uae rine date
at 2 pam. Terms e

GRIFFITH,

Auctioneer.
15.10.50.—4n.

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Thursday 19th by order of Mr. H.







SUNDAY ADVOCATE



PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE

THE Tea-Room and Library of the
Women’s Self Help Association wil] pe

om Monday 16th October, Con
ors of cakes and preserves are
asked to send in their goods on the
morning of the 1th. 10. 10,50—6n,

>
NOTICE

Applications tor 4 Vestry Exhibitions.
2 for Girls a¢ St. Michael's Girls’ School,
and 2 for Boys at the Boys’ Foundation
School, will be received by me not
later than 26th October

Parents ©f applicants must be parish-









foners in straightened circurnstances.
Ages of applicants between 11 and 12
years.
W. U. GOODING,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Philip.
11. 10.50—6n,
NOTICE
“SEALED Tenders for the erection

of a Pavilion and Community Hall at
Eilerton Soctal Centre, St. George, will
er by me up to Sist. October,
1950.

Plans and ations can be seen
at Mr. R. B. ider’s Office at Messrs
C. F. HARRISON & Co., Broad St.,

K. MASON,
Clerk, Vestry of St. George.”
12.10.50—4n.

NOTICE
APPLICATIONS (accompanied by bap-
tirmal certificate} will be received at
my office up to 3 p.m. on Friday, 20th
October, 1950, for one or more vacant
Christ Church Vestry Exhibitions tenable
et the Girls’ Foundation School.
Applicants must be daughters of
porishioners in straightened circumstan-
ces, and must not be less than ten
years six months or more than twelve
years on the date of the examination.
Candidates must present themseives
for examination to the Headmistress at
the Girls' Foundation Schoo! on Friday
27th October at 9.30 a.m
Application forms must be obtained

from my office.
WOOD GODDARD
Clerk of the Vestry,
Christ Church.
11.10, 50—5n.





NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. JAMES

App! for Vi Exhibitions of
an Annual value of £5 tenable at a
Girls’ Second Grade School, will be re-
ceived by the undermentioned up to
Thursday, 30th November, 1950.

Applicants must be children of parish-
joners in straitened circumstances, over
the ase of seven years and under thir-
teen years of age.

A Baptismal Certificate must be for-
warded and a Certificate from the Head-

O, Blades, we will sell his Furniture at} mistress of the School of their fitness to

“The River" Estate, St. Philip.

— which includes —
Dining table (seat 10); Wagons, Serving
Table Liquor Case; Card Table; Book
Case (glass doors); Tub Chairs, Work
Table (Brass Claw Feet all in mahogany;
Pine Book Case; Oak; Rattan & Bent-
wood Chairs; Inlaid Cordea Table; Type-



writer; Desk Chair; Cushions; Rugs;
Glass and China; Fruit and T Ser-
vices; Coffee Set; Plated Ware;

Knives and Forks; Spoons; Forks etc.
Mahogany Linen Press; Dressing Tables;
Washstands; Pine Presses; Gun Press;
Brass Floor Lamp _ (oil);
Boiler; Linen including 2 Damask Table
Cloths and Crochet Bedspread; Ferns;
Plants and other items
Sale 11.30 o'clock

BRANCKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers,
15.10,50.—2n.

REAL ESTATE





BE WISE! DON’T BE CAUGH!
NAPPING! Save hundreds and Very
Often thousands of Dollars. Economy its
the Order of the . Even miljionaires
Look Well before ping. DF.
de Abreu, a Trained and Experie
Auctioneer, Real Estate Broker & Valuer,
Sell your Household Furniture, Cars
Etc., at Auction, and (your Properties
by Treaty. No Sale or Sole Right

‘ Voeane Se or Secured by
Me—Nothing to be Paid. Genuine Con-
nections abroad and in the B.W.1,) Com-
mission Very Attractive. Paymerits Mace

enter the School
(Sed.) P. H. TARILTON,
Cierk to the Vestry of St. James.
15.10.50.—3n.



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of ESMIE CRISPIN, of
Diamond Rock, St. Peter, the purchaser

Fish | of Liquor License No, 333 of 1950, granted

to Errol Inniss in respect of the ground

Pictures; Iron Bedsteads and Beds; Old] floor of a two storied wall and wooden
1

buildings situate at Diamnod Rock, St
Peter, and to use the said license at such

Copper Jelly | described premises

Dated this 11th day of October, 1950
(Sed.) ESMIE CRISPIN,
Applicant.

Terms CASH |SYDNEY_H. NURSE, Esq.,

Police Magistrate,
Dist. “E’’.
N.B.—This application will be consider-
ed at a Licensing Court to be held on
Wednesday the 25th October, 1950 ,at 11
o'clock a m, at Police Court District “E",
SYDNEY H. NURSE,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “E”
15.10.50.

OFFICIAL NOTICE





need | BARBADOS.

IN THE ASSISTANT COURT
OF APPEAL

(Equitable Jurisdiction) .
STANLEY NICHOLLS

(Plaintiff) .
LOUISE GRIFFITH (Defendant),
IN pursuance of an Order

within 48 hours after Sales. Satisfactién,|Court in the above action made on the

Straight Deals and Payments Guaranteed .

Rare Bargains Await You! Grasp Them'
Just Imagine—a Spacious 3 Bedroom
Cottage, Good Condition, Modern Con~

veniences, Open Front Concrete Gallery,
Spacious Yard enclosed with Stonewall,
Fine View, Vacant, at Thornbury

lith day of September, 1950, I give
notice to all persons having any estate,
right or interest in or any lien or in-
cumbrance aflecting all that certain
plece or parcel of land situate at
Worthing View in the parsih of Christ

Main Rd,, Going for Under £800.;| py a twenty-two perches
wt New Stonewall | ane ‘HRcen-nunneevis of a perch or
age Sa. ame See *| thereabouts abutting and bound on lands
and Fontabelle (Seaside and Landside),| ° "lorence Rice on lands of the estate

Goi for Under £1,850 and not Above
22,500.5 A Dostrable s (Large)
12 inch Stonewall Bungalow in an Area
with Doctors, Near City, Vacant,

for Under £2,500.; An
New 3 Bedroom 12
Bungalow at Brighton (Near Beach),
over 18,000 sq. ft., Yields $40.00 p.m.,
Going for Under £2,450.; A 3 Bedroom

Sotase by Bank Hall Main R@.; Spacious | buildings and erections on

Yara, $25.00 p.m.,
Under £1,100 One re at Oistins,
Facing Sea, Commercial Area,
for Under 14 cents per square foot
C Me for Almost anything
Estate — to Suit One and All. Good
and Attractive Buys with Assured Re-
Sale Values
only, Inspection jicited—No
or Boasting—No incy or
Prices—No High Pressure Methods.
affords me Pleasure to Deal with Keen

Going
ai imost| there is a
eat ang Newali| Toad cated Worthing

ealise in and Offer! the afternoon,

in thi

HARBOUR 10¢ | SHIPPING NOTICES |

In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Cyclorama ©., Sch. Lechinvar 5
Sch. Emmanuel _C. Gordon; Sch. Cyril
E. smith; Sch. ita Wonita; Sch. Enter-
prise Sch. frances W. Smith, Sch
Wonderful Counseltor, Sch. Lady Noe-

leen; Sch. Everdeme; M.V. Blue Star;

Sen
Sch. Mary B

Franklyn D. R., M. V. Lady Jey.
Caroline; Sch. Molly .N

Jones and Sch. Philip H. Davidson.

Gooding; from Trinidad.

nen Be. 25 tons net
Cook Doles. eS Se a

ARRIVALS
‘Sch. Butma D., 59 tons net, Capt

S.S, Golfito, 4,505 tons net, Capts

DEPARTURES
S.8S, Libreville, 4,365 tone net, Capt
Hassel, for Venezuela.
Sch, Zita Wonita, 69 tons net, Capt
Pe . for St. Vineent.
S.S. Aleoa Partner, 3,991 tons net.
Capt. Pembroke, for Canada.

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

»S Ss. “Hersilia” Sept. 29th: 30th. Oct,















SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13,

1950





ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.

SAILING FROM AM:
ROTTERDAM AND
SAMANG FROM AMSTERDAM

& DOVER
m.s. “Bonaire” September 15th,
SAILING TO TRINIDAD, ARIBO
DEMERARA,

™+s. “Felena” Sept 2ist.
$8.8. “Bonaire” Oct. ard.

m.s, “Will ~ isth,
ms. “Oranjestad” Oct, 17th.
Limited r accommodation

passenge:
available om this Vessel).
8. P. MUSSON, SON @ ©O. UTD.
AGENTS

SOUTHBOUND



M.V. “T. B. RADAR” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. GLacia. St. Vincent, Grenada
and Aruba. Date of departure
to be potshed.

M.V. “CARIBBEE” will accept
Cargo for

Antigua, Montserrat,
St. Kitts. Sailing

“DAERWOOD” will
accept Cargo and Passengers tor
St. Vincent, St. Lucia, Grenada
amd Aruba Sailing Saturday

Asso, (Inc).
Tel. No. 4047







Canadian National Steamships



CABLE & WIRELESS (West Indies) con. ee. SS he
micste with the folowing, chive through | CANADIAN Citazhaedtitith me ape
nicate wit e low ships through ANAD) :
their Barbados Coast Station: LAY MOOMEY St sc Get is OR 10 Gon ee One

S.S. Ranelia, S.S. Fontini, S.s. Peto] CANADIAN CRUISER |” 23 Oct. 27 Oct. ag ;
Brussels, $8.8. ‘Olivebank, 5.5, Fort D®] La’ Boe 1 Nov. 4 Nov ior be Mb on
France, 8.S. Uruguay, S.S. Laind@y> oe . Nov, © Nov, 15 Nev. 16 Nov,
Lane, $.S. Mooncrest, 8.5. Golfito, 5.5.
pense Frederic A. Filers, 3.8.

ida Caracas, S.S. Sea Breeze,|] NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails
8.8. Argentina, S.S: Fort Amherst, 8.5 Murbetee Rematee “Ee, “Ee , a
aon sha er, a a: bs = Montreal St. John

sa, S.S. Geo iat, S.S. en, S.8. NELSO!
Captain John, S.S. Summont, 3.8 | LADY RODNEY - 9 Nov. 11 Név. 20 _Nov. ni — 14 Oct.
Quilmes, S.S. Canadian Challenger, 5.5 28 Nov. @ Nov. T Dec. -_ pare 16 Dee.

Nueva Esparta, S.S. Etna, 8.8. Jegn,
8.8. Esso Cambridge and S.S. Rangiteto



Read the
Evening Advocate

To-morrow





The Weather

TODAY:

Sun Rises: 5.48 a.m.

Sun Sets: 5.44 p.m.

Moon (First Quarter
October 18

Lighting: 6 p.m.

High Water: 6.56 a.m.
6.34 p.m.

YESTERDAY:

‘Rainfall (Codrington) nil

Total for month to yesterday
4.61 ins.

Temperature (Min.) 72.0° F

Wind Direction ( 9 a.m.) E
(ll a.m.) 8.E.

Wind Velocity 7 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29,943
(il a.m.) 29.922





NOTICE



Civic Friendly Society
Scholarships

Applications are invited for two
or more scholarships offered by

the members of The Civic Welfare

Friendly Society beginning 1951 tc
any second grade school in the
island. These scholarships

ypened to members or the child-
ren (boys or grils) of member:

Hill,| Chureh and island aforesaid containing | in straitened circumstances of the

| @bovenamed society, between the

ages of 9 and 12 years. The

scholarships will be awarded on

of D. Griffith (deceased) on lands of| the results of an examination.

Louise Dawe on lands of the estate of
D. Bynoe (deceased) on lands of Mrs.
Marie Layne and on a road over which
right of way to the public
View Road or
however else the same may abut and
bound together with the chattel dwel-

Form of application can be haa

at the Society's Office, Swan &

High Sts. and should be returned

by 4 p.m. on Saturday 28th Octo-

ber, 1950.

linghouse and all and singular other the |

the

and being with the appurtenances to

Going | bring before me an account of their said

claims with their witnesses, documents

in Real| and vouchers, to be examined by me

on any Tuesday, or Friday between the
hours of 12 (noon) and 3 o'clock in
at the Office of the Clerk

B] of the Assistant Court of Appeal ai the
it] Court House, Bridgetown, before the

22nd day of November, 1950, in order

Buyers. A Tip to Sensible Buyers—-The that such claims may be ranked accord-

Senseless may Follow-—-Contact all Agents
—Retognized, Private and jayside,
Compare Properties,
tations for some of the said Properties
wn), Values, re-Sale Values—if any,
then Decide for Yourselves. A Good
Idea is to also take along some of your
Keen and True Friends.
When Tt Suits U. Cali at “Olive Bough",
Near Pavilion Court, Hastings—on—Sea
Look For My Sign Board.

In Half Moon Fort, St

HOUSE
Lacy. 18 x 10 — 8 ins, New, Pine right

. Apply. Charles Skinner, 4
Men's Road. St. Peter.





11,10, 50—3n



| Plymouth, MONTSERRAT, B.W.1
for £3,500,
COCONUT HILL HOTEL Conte
ed

drawing room, dining room, 11



Sines on % on ‘of con |
rooma, ‘con-
ventences ’ and
Rage phoning 2. Bridgetown,
ie, : YO -] hours of 12 (noon) and 2 o'clock in the




Se rhc
Apply to D'Arcy
14.10.50



CHIROPRACTIC

DR, FERREIRA of “Chirovilie’ Upper
Bay St. (Near Esplanade) by Chiropractic
method corrects diseases of eyes, ear.
nose, throat, lungs, stomach, kidneys and
lower organs, Dial 2881

24.09.50,

2DHHDLHOOHGHOHHDOGHSHOHHHGOHOHOOH



vo

at
Ave., b and | piece
“Genecl 3 x1 Worthing View in the parish of Christ
irmenatnctnapremmerbaeresenteramenattneceintnetnssademnesiantamanan,

ing to the nature and priority thereof
respectively; otherwise such persons will

jotations (maybe be precluded from the benefits of the

said Decree, and be deprived of all
claim on or against the said property.
Claimants are also notified that they
must aitend the said Court on Wecnes-

Diai 3141--] day, the B2nd day of November, 1950,

at 210 otlock a.m their said
claims will be ranked.

Given under my hand this llth day of
September 1950,

when

I. V. GILKEs,

Ag. Clerk of the Assistant
Ceurt of Appeal.
13.9.50—3n,

OFFICIAL SALE

BARBADOS
IN THE ASSISTANT COURT
OF APPEAL
(Equitable Jurisdiction)
RICHARD STANLEY: NICHOLLS
(Plaintift)
LOUISE GRIFFITH (Defendant),

NOTICE is hereby given that by virtue
an Order of the Assistant Court of
Appeal dated the llth day of September,
1950 there will be set up for sale to the
highest = at the of the Clerk
of the int Court of A) al at the
Court House, xetween the
afternoon on Friday, the twenty fourth
day of November, 1950 all that certain
or parcel of land

situate at

Church and island aforesaid containing |)

by
and fifteen-hundreths
thereabouts abutting and bounding on
lands of Florence Rice on tonds of the
estate of C. Griffith (deceased) on lands
of Louisa Dawe on lands of the estate
of B. Bynoe (deceased) on lands of
Mrs. Marie Layne and on a road over
which there is a right of way to the
public road called Worthing View Road
or however else the same may abut
and bound together with the chattel
dwellinghouse and all and singular other
the buildings and erections on the said
pareel of land erected and built standing
and being the appurtenances, and if not
then sold the said property will be set
up for sale on every succeeding Friday
between the same hours until the same
is sold for a sum not less than £208.6.8,
Dated this 11th day of September, 1950,
tiv. G
| Ag. Clerk of the Assistant
Court ef Appeal.

13,9.50—n.

of a perch o





GRADUATE TEACHER IN

COMMERCIAL SUBJECTS

Required in April, if possible, but not later than September, 1951, Graduate

Teacher of Commercial Subjects.

Should hold the Degree

of B.Com. or B.Sc.

(Econ). Experience in office routine desirable, and experience in the teaching of

Commercial Subjects essential. A
Caribbean would be an advantage.

knowledge of

industrial conditions in the

Graduate Teacher—$1,728 x $72,00-—$2,160 x $96.00—$2,928 p.a

Hons.)

~$1,920 x $96.00-—$2,880 x $144.00—$3,456 pa

Salary—Barbados Scales, viz—
Graduate Teacher (ist., 2nd
Teacher's Diploma (‘or recog

these scales.
£1, Os. 0d.—$4.80 BW.1



Position on the above Incremental

For a suitably qualified candidate
Salary Scale: $3,600 x $144—$4,320.

Initial appointments on this scale mu
Barbados, not exceeding $960 (B.W.T.)



There is at present no Mave passage scheme in
Applications (m® epecial form) stating age

or single, and enclosing a photograph, to

to the Acting Headmaster, Combermere School, St

whom further particulars may be obtaine



nised equivaleft) $216 p.a. additional to

Currency)
6 subject % adjustment for War Service

possible vatancy may be available on the
st commence at the minimum. Passages to
will be refunded on initial »ppointment

Barbados
qualification, experi« narried
be sent not later than 3lst. October, 1950,
Michael, Barbados, B.W.1., from

a

24.9.50--3n.

said
Going for] Barcel of land erected and built standing



admeasurement twenty-two perches | }



|

l

J. W. MAYNARD,
Secretary, Scholarship
Committee,
Swan & High Sts.




MR. REYNOLD S. WEEKES

(Secretary of the Chiming Bells

Friendly Bociety Unity Social
‘ul

Requests the pleasure ‘of your
company to

A DANCE

(In aid of Scholarships at Second-
ary Schools)

On Monday Night, 23rd Oct, 1950
at The United Social Culb, March-
field, St. Philip
(kindly lent by the management)
Admission :

GENTS 2/- — LADIES 1/6
REFRESHMENTS ON SALE
Music by Mr. C. B. Browne's
Orchestra

15.10,.50.—1n,
























Singing Competition

ie epee oF BOXING DAY,
o: ecember, 1950 at
KENSINGTON OVAL.

Oe (es = or choirmaster desir-
ous of taking part, please get in
touch with Sydney Skinner e¢/c
Churchill Bar, Baxters Road, St.
Michaet










‘Now to God on
Three Dollars,
part of transportation will be given
to every Choir outside of st
Michael taking part.

Please get in touch with me
before 30.10.1950

Officials are : Capt. C. E, Raison,
aie uae and Mr. Gerald
udson, air :
Beckles, O.B E ine yope

Sponsored by—
Mr. SYDNEY SKINNER.

Mr,





SUCCESSFUL

AUCTION
SALES

John 4. Biaden

Low Charges.



















































‘ 15.10.50—6n.














bers. Fares and freizht

S.S. “COLOMBIE”
S.S. “COLOMBIE”

CRICKETERS!

Greet_your fellow ORICKETER
in BLAZ &
send them today to (

RAYMOND JORDAN

in Bay Street, opposite
Combermere

MRS. E. SIMMONS
HOWELL

begs to inform her clients
that the

HASTINGS BEAUTY
PARLOUR

Will be re-opened on
Monday 16vh October

Applications for two or more
exhibitions to any Second Grade
School will be received by the
Secretary not later than Thurs-
day the 26th October 1950.

Candidates must be members
or the children of members, and
must not be less than 10 years
nor more than 12 years of age
on the 3ist July, 1951, to be
proved by a Baptismal certificate
which must accompany the appli-
cation.

The examination will be held
at the St. Philip’s Boys’ School on
Saturday 28th October, 1950, be-
ginning at 10 a.m.








The Committee of Management;
Per,

R. S. WEXKES,, Secretary.
14.10,50—2n



shares, and Subscription
shares, dollar-a-month ma-
turing at $250, both yielding
approximately Five per cent,
Loans on it Mortgage
Security on Real Estate
Contact...
Mr. VICTOR HUNTE,
Secretary,
Barnes Bldg. — Bridge St.





STILLSON

obtainable at......





















$25 Paid-up Investment }))

FOR THAT EXTRA

you need a



—

raves oD

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD. — Agents.

CIE. GLE. TRANSATLANTIQUE
French Line

Sailing to Trinidad and La Guaira on the
25th October 1950, accepting passengers.
Sailing to Plymouth and Le Havre via
Martinique and Guadeloupe on the 29th
October, 1950, ,

For further particulars, apply to:—

R. M. JONES & CO. LTD.—Agents.





FIREWORKS
FIREWORKS

A SELECT ASSORTMENT
Including
SKYROCKETS, CRACKERS,
JACK IN BOX, MATCHES,
ROMAN CANDLES Etc, Ete.

And ‘
SPARKLERS
Also
BALOONS,
Whole Sale And Retail

——$_—_

MODERN HIGH SCHOOL

(Registered and Approved
by Dept. of Education)



















Our waiting list for the
January 1951 term closes
on 30th November. Have
you entered the name of
your child yet? Remember
WE GET RESULTS.

We are offering $4,000 in
free scholarships tenable
from January 1951. Details
appeared in Sunday Advo-
cate of Ist October.

Apply in writing.

L, A. LYNCH,
Principal.
Tel, No, 2846.
8.10.50—4n

PLASTIC PARASOLS
$1.71

PLASTIC RAINCOATS
$3.98

PLASTIC HAIR









BRUSHES ... $1.82
COSTUME
JEWELLERY
SAMPLE SHOES
FASHION HATS

NYLONS!
YES. IT’S

THANIS

Pr. Wm. Hry & Swan Sts.

GRIP
WRENCH

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM.
(CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)

Cnr. of Broad and Tudor Streets.

SIP i





Prompt Payment
PLANTATION BUILDING

Phone 4640





Blenders - - -

Are You “Going Places” or “Doing Things” if so ....

You need a few Bottles of this Blend.

See that you get them in time.

. AL vessels Atted with cold storage cham
to change without notice. <













































TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM

(With the Distinctive Flavour)

TO ENJOY IF.

|












































i







—



NOTICE

The Petite Beauty SALON will
be closed from SATURDAY, OCT
2ist to OCT. 31ST.

ORIENTAL

GOoDs!

(Articulos)
CUROIS, JEWELLERY,
SELKS, (Se Habla Espanol)

THANES

Pr. Wm, Hry. St. DIAL 3466

COLLECTION OF
RENTS.

I beg to notify the
General Public that I
have added to my busi-
ness a Rent Collecting
Department, and shall be

glad to undertakeâ„¢ the
collecting of all rents

whether large or small.
Strict attention will be
paid to all. Commission
only 10%.
D’ARCY A. SCOTT,
Magazine Lane.

Dial 3743.



INDUSTRIAL, COMMERCIAL,
RESIDENTIAL

Telephone 2336

Office : Hastings Hotel Ltd.

FOR SALE

INCH HAVEN, Christ Church.—
Modern Bungalow, built of stone.
All mahogany doors, window |
frames, built-in wardrobes, dress=
ers etc. 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
living/dining room, kitchen, gar- |
age etc. One A.C. Engine Stand
ing im 1 acre land facing sea,

CASABLANCA, Maxwell Coast.

COVE SPRING HOUSE, St. |

James.

BUILDING SITES and ACRE-
AGE on sea coast and inland.

FOR RENT

EN-DAH-WIN, Pine Hill.Ne:
Bungalow (unfurnished) 3 sone,



JOHN

We
BLADON |

AF.S., F.V.A.
| Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE

TOWER GARAGE—St. Matthias
Gap. An almost new pro)
suitable for a large variety of
purposes apart from a garage
business .

NEA DENDRA.—Pine Hill. A
conveniently designed bungalow
of coral stone construction, The
accommodation consists of large
living room with ae winner
oO ing into a spacious cover
gallery, 3 bedrooms with ‘built-in’
wardrobes, a very modern kitchen,
laundry, servant’s quarters and
large garage. A well-recommend-
ed property

SPEIGHTSTOWN — Large prop-
erty in central position of excep-
tional interest as retail store pro-
position, with ample storage and
living, space

HOTEL PROPERTIES & HOTEL
SITES.—Particulars of these op~
portunities may be obtained on
application .

HARTS GAP HASTINGS
Inexpensive bedroom timber cot-
tage in good locality. Enquires

invited.
RAEME HALL TERRACE.—
well constructed and sensibly

lanned properties are available in
this. select and residential area.

1

ROCKLEY. — A modern cora
stone villa with separate eS
and dining rooms, 3 bedrooms. (at
with basins and fitted wate
tiled bathroom, separate .
well fitted kitchen, 2 car eee
servant’s ‘quarters and clever!
laid-out garden, is now ©
for sale at a low figure

INE ROAD,.—Excellent puild-
ae plot of 12,615 sq. ft. flanked
by other good property .

VILLA ROSA—Passage Road,
City. Attractive and centrally
Jocated stone bungalow with
double carriageway. On

mately at Bo ak
Soe gallery, large lounge,

bedrooms,
pantry and kitchen. Good c'
yerd at rear. Very
figure asked.

CRANE VIEW AND CRANE
VILLA — These attractive free-

hold properties wi +

plication. .

FLORES—Kent, Christ ‘Church -
A well built and nicely,
2 bedroomed bungalow,
lounge,
servants’ room and garage.
struction of coral stone.
proximately â„¢% acre ground
ariv: from

vead, Offers wanted.

RENTALS

“SPION KOP”, Maxwetl's Coast
for month, of November:

“FLORES” .— Bungalow
at Little Kent. Unfurnished.

“IN CHANCERY”—Inch Mar-
lew. Modern Furnished Bunga-
lew.

CUMBERLAND HOUSE, Cod-
rington Hill.—With about 2 acres
Unfurnished; available November.

with



REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

PLANTATIONS BUILDING |

Phone 4640

‘

4







SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950 SUNDAY ADVOCATE

: F ° of London’s Underground system |
B.B.C. Radio Programmes and Notes °0i0.°°.°288 SX
This feature programme will be
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950 ‘TREASON ON TRIAL’ detail and as objectively as pos- Droddeast by the BBC at 6.15
Tom: The News; 7.10 a.m. News sible four much publicised trials— P-™- ©" Monday, 16th.
Analysis; 7.15 —
Music: 8 a.m. From the Editorial, @ Phursay Feature Programme those of Bukharin, Mindszenty. New Hutte of Cottimons
. : ; . ?
Tatted Met ie, karede:, 8.15 2m On ‘Thursday next, 19th inst., Fuehs, and Hiss. "The trial of

the Children’s Hour; § am. Close the BBC will broadcast a feature Nikolai Ivanovich Bukharin, Sec- The state Opening of the new
Down; 12 inoon) The News; 12.10 p.m

5 rr retary-General of the Communist , : 7 , .
News Analysis; 12.15 p.m. Take it Programme entitled “Treason on International and a close eseotien® Bee Cancer B H FRESCONE E
from here: 12.45 p.m. London Forurn: al” from which emerges the t Leni R pl , © 26th. by His Majesty the King is . e | l
1.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 1.30 p.m. difference between trials under ° nin, took place in Moscow in of world-wide interest. The BBC

PAGE FIFTEEN




























— SS 899999699"

FOR YOUR WALLS AND CEILINGS Raped STOCK OF
USE



















BYMIN AMARA) HALIBORANGE
LIQUID PARAFFIN SYRUP OF FIGS
and
RUSKS—Baby’s First Solid Pood

Sunday Service; 2 p.m. The News, 5 e tish 1938. Bukharin’s name was first yj) broadcast this State Opening
tr fey oneness esi ae pot gg iw ae the is * = A! bee a, all jot and in the General Overseas Ser-
P.m. Variety Bandbox; 3.30 p.m. The final verdict with the listener. Soviet ‘State a am 2 = ae © vice listeners will be taken behind
410 p.m. inerude: Sis pm Mosc ThE programme considers in were sentenced to death. The trial ;ne, Scenes of the new House, be~

¢; 4.30 p.m. Sunday Half Hour: in H y of Cardi 1 Mi ce fore its official ovening, and in-
4.55 p.m. Epilegue; 5 p.m. Momnia in Hungary o ina indszen

Liter Quartet; 5.15/p.m. Programme 1215 p.m. BBC Midland = Light | } _ troduced not only to the architects N. R Hl Oo Ww L Also a variety of CIGA tS
Parade; 5.30 p.m. From the Children’s eens 1 p.m. Sei@nee Review; 1.15 ty is more recent and well re- and craftsmen who have rebuilt > ° E L
Hour; 6 p.m. Round Britain Quiz; 6.30 Radio Newsreel; 1-30 p.m. Kdu- membered. Klaus Fuchs was tried

1 Eating Archie; 2 p.m. ‘The News; 2.10 3 _\. it but to some of the officials who
ews; 70 - ant oa Aeon Tis Pim. Hioene Mews Soca eyitatn; 3.18 and convicted in Britain early this ensure its smooth functioning,
p.m. Caribbean Voices; 7.45 p.m. p.m. Sports Review; 2.90 p.m. Meet year under the Official Secrets and they will be given an impres-
Rs = Hewuben 8 is "ga Suited the” Commonveeait 3. * ee hier Act, while the trial of Alger Hiss sion of the atmosphere of the de-

. s -â„¢m mn: s : indi te d >
Nitiona Report: 6.30 p.m. English Music of Schubert: (p.m. The News: aa an pent oon took bating chamber, offices and public
Mbgazine; 9 p.m. Southern Serenade’ 4.10 p.m. The Daily Service; 4.15 p.m. Place in the U.S.A. roadeasts and press galleries of one of the
Orchestra; 9.30 p.m. London Forum; Do you remember; 4.30 p.m. Thirty will be given by the BBC on mest fambas, insiiedions inthe

10 p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m. From Minutes at the Piano; 5 p.m. Listeners rsda 1 ni: ,
Tb Wdttorials; 16-18 pita. Aagthing to Cholee: 6.18 p.m. Programe) Parade; oe y, 19th inst. at 9.00 p.m. world. The broadcast will be on

LUMBER AND HARDWARE
Dial 3306 -- Bay Street

oo
=

_ PPSP POSS







otge
OOS POSS OSSSSE SEE IEEE PSE GT















‘
* 10 Semprini at jhe £30 p.m. The Storyteller; 5.45 p.in. and will be repeated on Friday, Saturday, 2ist. inst. at 10.15 p.m. }&
Pier >= "English songs. *"* Overtures; 6 p.m. The Cathedrai 20th inst. at 3.00 p.m. * ‘ i eis
BOSTON Organ; 6.15 p.in. The First ‘Inames “Why Be a Teacher?’ %
Wrul 15.29 Mc Wruw 11.75 Mc Wrux Tunnel; 7 p.m. The News; 7.10 p.m The fi Th T 1 y .
17.75 Mc. News Analysis; 7.15 p.m. The Master e first ames lunne F whee 4
of Bailantrae—Espisode 2; 7.45 p.™. In the third of the current OUR XMAS CARDS AND
—-- ia coesorvetive rary See hy et Another feature programme in series of interviews and discus-
MONDAY, OCTOBER 16, 19) io jewsreel; a, the coming week tells the story of sions on ‘Why Be a Teacher?’ be- > .
R rt: 8.20 . Composer “ : rs a . :
Ashiya: 713 aa Central “Band Sot ante ‘Week. 8.30 p.m. Science Review: & daring engineering feat which, ing broadcast by the BBC specially ; CALENDARS
the Royal Air Force; 7.15 a.m. Con- 8.45 p.m, BBC Northérn Orchestra; over a hundred years ago, aston- for the West Indies on Wedtes- z
sebvetive, Party Conference: 8-825. rim Bee ew th pix. the’ News; 2019 ished and disturbed people in all days listeners will hear John .
gramme Parade; 8.15 a.m, Nights at p.m. From the Editorials; 10.18 p =». Parts of the world. It is the dram- Figueroa interviewing Emrys |. $ ARE NOW AVAILABLE.
the Geers: 9 a.m. Close Down; 12 noon Rav" s a Laugh; 10.45 p.m. Comm .- atised story of the construction of Davies on ‘the situation seen
The News; 12.10 a.m, News ‘Analysis; wealth Survey; 11 p.m, Recital. Brunel’s tunnel, the first tunnel from the inside.’ Emrys Davies,
under the Thames and one of the who has had over twenty year: — Also —
: great engineering achievements of teaching experience and is now
CHI IRCH SERVI the nineteenth century. The work headmaster of a Secondary Mod- ‘ollins
was begun in 1825 amid scenes of ern Boys School in Bast Anglia Collins Desk and Pocket Diaries,
Â¥ yn, Sreat enthusiasm but when six will say why he became 4 teach-
ST. CATHERINE FE, ©. CHURCH ee AN ein. deaths occurred owing to a flood- er, why he believes young men
Dash Gap: 7 p.m Liturgy and Fairfield Road, Black ik Pp e "
Sermon Celebrant, Rev. ©, Ishmael Monday Bible Lecturé, 7.30 p.n ing of the tunnel in 1828 a finan- and women take up this career
Preacher: Evangelist A. Young. Friday Bible Study. Fo ih ied cial panic ensued so that the work and. will discuss the spitit in
me PDenshue, Fear. guaye ’ **~had to be suspended for seven whith they should approach their Lows" Sadun
YOUNG METHODIST SUNDAY CHRISTIAN Si CE f years. The tunnel was_ finally responsibilities. Broadcast will be LOUIS L. BAYLEY
EL : m, Rev. M. bk, _ First Christ, molensity opened in 1843 with great cere- at 7.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 18th see Bolton Lane and Victoria Street Jewellers
Thomas. “m. _. Sunday Schoo. gave u an ae i: m, Wednesdays MOny and to-day it is part both inst.




Re
Speaker, Maier Re eee ve Service which includes

tion Service Testimontes of Christian Science Hea!- tide J a
La nha eerie” er Ps ing. Sunday, October 15, ae ae >
Ce. Sh ee ame Miss DAPHNE WILLENS FAIR DA Y
%
6

semaine de Al lillies trina eineesiocenttnipeiissnillncannannienariaae
PROD SSS PSLESCEESEEEOOESOD TOSS:











This week's Housewife’s reminder!

THE HOME FURNISHING DEPARTMENT
WILLIAM FOGARTY LID.

GIVES A GUIDE TO GOOD BUYS.

PLASTIC TABLE CLOTHS—54 x 54 and 54 x 84—in
refreshingly new designs @ $2.57 and $3.05 each













peaker; . H. C. Payne. 7 invites you to her
ot ae oe JAME® STREET

BELMONT—1l1 a.m. Rev. B. Crosby JAMES STREET DANCE
3 p.m. Sunday School. Speaker: Kev.

; IN AID OF
M. A. E. Thomas. 7 p.m. Rev, Service, Speaker
M.

St. Patrick’s Daily Meals

Thomas. 7 p.m. Rev. F to be held at nd the
sour DISTRiCT—9 a.m. Rev. 4. PAYNES BAY: ) QUEEN’S PARK HOUSE Free Elementary School
Crosby. 7 p.m. Mr. A. St, Hill, Masia, 7 2. Mr. , On Saturday Nicht,
PROVIDENCE—11 a.m, Mr. C. Bést ALL—9.30 a.m. Mr. WILL BE HELD AT
4 p.m. Mr. 1. Blackman. Guin Tee eee Aue October 21st, anne. The URSULINE CONVENT
AUXHALL- s GILL a.m ve MI i 2/-
7 pa. Mr. fi. Grant, Mr. G. Jones. 1. "C. Payne. 17 p.m, Mr. F.. Moore ADMISSION =: / SATURDAY 28th OCTOBER

HOLETOWN — 8.30 a.m, Rev. F. Music by

THE SALVATION ARMY Lawrence. 7 p.m. Mr. McClean. Trinidad’s Hot Shots
ETOW: CENTRAL—11 a.m BANK HALL—9.30 a.m, Rev. rg Refreshments on Sale



From 3 p.m. to 6.30 p.m.
By kind permission of
Col, Michelin & Capt. Raison
the Police Band will be in
Attendance

ADMISSION = :::

Holiness te £. p.m. Company ete 7 p.m. Rev. H.
Meeting. 7 p.m. Ivation eeting .

Preacher: Major Smith. SPEIGHTSTOWN—11 a.m, Rev, ‘F.]{} DANCING 9 p.m.—4 a.m.
WELLINGTON STREET — 11 a.m. Lawrence. 7 p.m. Mr. B. Bannister.

Holiness Meeting. 3 p.m, Company
Meeting. 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting ST. MICHAEL—41 a.m. Bank Hail:

* HARDWARE







SSS















—4 Lovely Priaty e
Preacher: Major Gibb: Rev. M. B. Pretti John To be won by a Lady i BUILDING NEEDS
‘DIAMOND "CORNER 11 aii. Mept- ‘ST. GEORGE—11 a.m. Waverly Cot: BOXING — BOXING Gentleman, Girl and | respectively,
n m mi pe eet-
ing. 7 pm, Salvation Meeting. Cee tain ft CHURCH? p.m, Cox Poad: Boy with the Lucky DAMASCENE—50 inches wide in White and Blue @
Preacher: Lieutenant Moore. Rev. BE. W. Week AT THE Numbers $1, 90 r yd. AND
CHECKER HALL—11 a.m. Holiness ST, ANDREW— 11 a.m, Shorey’s per y





Meeting. 3 p.m. Company Meeting, village: Rev. J. B. Winter, 7 p.m.

7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Preacher: shorey’s Village: Rev. J. B. Winter. YANKEE STADIUM

Lieutenant Reid. ST. /LUCY—11 a.m. Crab Hill: Kev. Sensational Middleweight
PIE CORNER—11 4.m, Holiness a_ Browne. ensa'
Méasttig, & p.m, ‘Company “‘Monme. eee Championship Contest
P.m. Salvation Meeting. Preacher:
jor Hollingsworth MORAVIAN TUESDAY NIGHT
UR ROADS—il1 a.m. Holiness ROEBUCK STREST: 9.30 a.m. Sunday 31st October, 1950

@
There will be a selection of
Fancy & Ornamental Work, }
Useful Household Articles,
Mats, Baskets, Trays, Boxes,
étc., madé by the Arts and
Crafts Departinent of the


























TEA CLOTHS—Large assortment—intriguing designs
from 84c. upwards,

ITALIAN BEDSPREADS—60 x 80, in Gold, Green,
Blue, White and Rose @ $5.50 each.



* QUALITY PAINTS

Pay a_ visit to our NEW PREMISES











z~




Meeting. 3 p.m. Company Meeting. School: 11 oe Morning Service;

























PLSCLELOS PLL LPP LLL PLLC PPP LLL LOL PES:










: at 8.00 p.m. School | * 5
Le ar ane, SSREEMR, oe Pease: (| Poon ak, ee Please enquire carly at - -- at CORNER of SWAN « LUCAS
CARLTON “a.m. Holiness Meet- ACE H a Ae a.m. Morning On wa of Pio ARTISTIC & USEFUL STREETS.
geet Ma EE AEE vs A tt soma ff Totem NUR Wa. FOGARTY LTD
urne. ; a Q
$T. CONTENT LUTHERAN HOUR i is mCi: , ao Meroe Seven . \adiewetaht sheiartn sane ie Attractive Q : . °
2 : ° . l° ew follow - y
CONTENT. St Thomas — 3. p.m by. Holy jCominunion; 7 p.m. Evening Middleweight “Champion Prizes & other Attractions! where there’s Fashion and Hee rages 1
> a ool. .m, vin vice f§ ; < ¥ a} .
a ae ag a | Post Ofice Stacked with Fabries for the Fashionable Lady Picante’ HARDWARE (0. —. S
hy 12 ROUNDS 12 an a Fashionable Home.

eacane Aeon ere ee

P
i er. vice: er: a Reid,
8ST. Di LUTHERAN HOUR—Duke Stik HHL: ¢ Evening Service;
Tenant, fg eee a.m, Song and #reneher: i. ach mith,

















Dolls, Santa Claus with his, § ‘
Vespers and Sermon, The Rev. Win. | DUNSCOMEE: 11 a.m. Moming Ser- saree" presents, Drink, § ad
Subject: vi Preacher: Mr. ©. R. Le’ 4 Sandwiches, Sweet Drin
“The ne fghty of faith . D. pen ate ane bem. Evening. Service: eashor “Mr. KID vs. KING Ices, Hamburgers, Hot Dogs,
Shley, chi ¥v ane

126 126
SIX ROUNDS.

Prices: Ringside $2.00, Bal-
cony 1.50, Cage $1.00
Arena $1.00, Bleachers 48,
P.S. Bassin will be seen at the

Union Hotel from Mondoy, 4.30
p.m,

Refreshments, Sweets, Cakes
etc., will be sold.
Pony Rides etc.

Your Cordial Support is
Solicited,

Please Come, See, Buy and

Help the Cause



GOVERNMENT NOTICES
NOTICE

An Inspection day is being held at the Government Industrial
Schools (Dodds) St. Philip, on Monday, the 30th October, 1950, under
the distinguished patronage of His Excellency the Governor and Mrs.
Savage.

There will be on exhibition articles of furniture, handcraft, needle-
work etc. made by the pupils.

The gardens, grounds and buildings will be open to visitors from
4.30 p.m. to 6 p.m. and the general public. parents of the pupils
and persons interested in Social Welfare are invited to attend.
10th October, 1950, L 16.10.50—2n









WIN $50.00

ENTER THE
BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PHOTO COMPETITION

CHINA DOLL’

NO. 6 MARHILL STREET

BDOS CHINESE RESTAURANT
°

ON THE MENU TO-NITE





Attention is drawn to the Defence (Control of Drug and Patent
and Proprietary Medicine Prices) Order, 1950, No. 8 which will be
published in the Official Gazette of Monday,. 16th October, 1950.

2. Under this Order the maximum retail selling prices of
“Mother Greaves Worm Exterminator” and “Canadian Healing Oil”
are as follows: —



co-operation with the Barbados Museum The

——————————













In
BARBADOS ADVOCATE is running a Photo Competition
ITEM Unit of Sale Maxiumum SHRIMP FRIED RICE and Exhibition to encourage: ist Ze $50.00
selec elie a & ace Price oeoaeee oa arsiate (a) West Indian Photographers

Mother Greaves Worm Exter- M H 4 Be a

witnetae ae i TV eluiat ‘used bok: 40c. SHRIMPS OMELETTE (b) To advertise the West Indies to the West Indies,

” » » ” Large ” ” 76c. | + ag (1) Judging will pe by a panel Sbenpeléii two

3 : , we nown Barbadian photographers and 2 d Pri 2
Canadian Healing Oil . :+ | Bottle 5le. i The Delicacy of Delicacies the Editor of the Barbados Advocate. n ze e
14th October, 1950. 15.10.50—2n ines
i oO YSTER COCKTAIL (2) Prizes will be awarded on a basis of
Air Mail OPEN TONITE 7 P.M.—12 MIDNITE ae agonist tected

|

With effect from 11th October, 1950 the air rate on printed matter |
(ineluding newspapers, commercial papers and books) to Great en
is 12 cents per half ounce.



SOOT OS OOO 555

(b) Originality and Uniqueness of subject, 3rd Prize $15 00
e.g. photos of Mont Pelee, Souffriere, Brim- e

stone Hill, etc, would get special marks for



General Post Office, \ Fireworks !! interest
13th October, 1950, 14.10.50.—-2n | e (3) ee ee ene e the Conan eS
Seer ee obtain a large number of excellent photo-
Fireworks ff graphs for exhibition at the nor peer aT
um, subject rnatter must be confine to
ere Con eee © COR CAR | Fireworks ry scenes or objects of historical or other im-
Tenders are invited for the purchase of one Oldsmobile motor’ portance, oe
ear forfeited under the provisions of The Exports and Imports cRe-| “ONE DAY IN THE YEAR, (4) The exhibition is primarily intended to ad- (ss [WO
striction) Order, 1940. The car is at present in the custody of the WE SHALL ALWAYS REMEMBER, vertise the West Indian Islands and com-
Commissioner of Police and may be inspected by appointment with! YOU HAVE GUESSED IT OF COURSE, es Bey at all times consider this esd worumeeeste eases EWE sree Cee Di aE
hit. IT’S THE 5TH OF NOVEMBER.”
2. Tenders should be forwarded in sealed envelopes addressed ‘i VEMBER. (5) Anyorie of any nationality residing in any
to the Colonial Secretary (and not to any officer by name) so as to MARE IT A GALA NIGHT WITH THE FINEST of the British Territories in the Caribbean or NASR ivte heeen sew ees ae
reach the Colonial Secretary’s Office not later than 4 p.m. on Friday, SELECTION OF in any of the Dutch, Freneh or American

territories, may compete by enclosing the
attached coupon.

(6) Prize money will be paid in B.W.I. dollars

thé 20th of October, 1950. The envelopes should be clearly marked

—*“Tender for Motor Car’,
3. The Government does not bind itself to accept the highest F RE RKS

or any tender.

Re CUOMO iy pute ese TiS alee ao Oe ro di Ne

(7) Photographs must be not less than 8” x 10” PO eee eee rennet erereees
on mat surface,

10.10.60—8n $ Here are just a few of the many we have in Stock:—

ROMAN CANDLES
PART ONE ORDERS JUMPING CRACKERS







% (8) Entries must he received at the Editor's = QW vssseesee PEs een ee ee escapuseeenessbycaasons
Office. 34 Broad Street, Barbados, not later
. : ; CATHERINE WHEEL than Ist. November, 1950.
Major O. F. &.” Walcot, ED., SILVER RAIN x ‘ % : he BP TESESER TA ca keep e nines oesaceteastueseenennaens
. j (9) All photographs submitted will become the :
Issue No. 38 ee eee 13 Oct. 50... SQUIBBS % property of the Barbados Advocate and may ie to the conditions and rules of the Advocate
elements cnlleneeceesilesililiitsiceentisiiniatneneeenentitamethcaonactitnilay LD : . »e exhibited at the Barbados Museum. hoto Competition as advertised above and submit
> Rete wih parade at Regimental Headquarters at 1760 hours on Thursday TEEE tntcaen wet 3 the following entry shown:
19 Oct. 50. Specialist training under the specialist officers will be carried out, GOLDEN RAIN ¥ (10) Any photographs repro-
failures in the A.M.C. under the R.S.M. on the miniature range, and the ¢ duced in the Barbados Ad-
remainder L.M.G. N.C.Os will prepare Lesson 4.—Aiming and Holding. see ETC,, ETC. % cate will be paid for at the
2 RDERLY, OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK FE a. ‘ saa y rate of not less than $2.40 WOMNG 254 55 i HR K eee Cee lies Mas Ri ea ko we
23 0 And the magnificent “SKY ROCKETS” for the Kiddies and not exceeding $5.00
Lieut. E. R. Goddard “i ms £
Order Serjeant 218 L/S Williams, S. D STARLIGHTS” in packets of 12 or singly % B.W.I.
a ra eto faa er ee i a2) 0) SA ge rm Vo gala SR et Sey,” nn ee i TR a aa be UE EGE a
‘Orderly Officer 2/Lt, S. G, Lashley { also BOMBS. %
Orderly Serjeant ons Binckéte, LL. } $ (11) The Barbados Advocate
Me Sy Oe, i 2 reserves the right to ask
aa xe. J ae in al ee ee ee = Dg thee e eb oder eee ee eee ehh eee Sete e eer aceceeee
The Barbados Regiment ai eee > for the loan of the negative
PART I! ORDERS (ermine Obtainable at % or as an alternative, a
THE BARBADOS REGIMENT SERIAL NO. 5 x k ’ . D S L d % glossy ee ee oe any Country Date
13TH OCTOBER, 1950 SHEBT 1 & ONLY t t photo which they are goin Yo ssrveeevecenes +seeees Date.
STRENGTH INCREASE a Boo er S (B DOS) rug ores ° 8 to reproduce { c b
5 Pte Nic N. I A" ¢ Retaken on strength w.ef. 12 Oct. 50 g ai | ALPHA PHARMACY, Hasti | SSS — ——S
% Broad Street anc , Hastings. $ «
M. L. B. SKEWES-COx, Ma % GB BPDPAA ADDON DBD D-D ELEGAESEEESLOGIOSOSS
Te dihak, Gsien’.. Seeenecocossoosessscsossssosssososcsesenesocesces| APAARAGAGS SESE LN SEEESEEEEE YG FEAEASF
j ,





’



PAGE SIXTEEN

WHO WERE BEATEN IN
CUP-FINAL IN 1954
DARLING 9

PORTSMOUTH
MON Ly

ee cl
Empire Aid
Plan Counts
On America

A six-year Commonwealth de-
velopment scheme for raising the
living standards of 570 milion
people in South and South-East
Asia will shortly be announced.

Non-Commonwealth countries
are also to be offered assistance.

The cost is still a secret, but the
U.S. will be asked to help and
informal exchanges Have already
taken place with Washington,

About Britain’s share, Mr, Hugh
Gaitskell, Minister for Economic
Affairs, said yesterday :—

“We shall naturally want to do
the best we can, but it would not
be fair to describe it as an in-
tolerable burden.”

Agriculture

Details of the plan were approv-
ed at a nine-day meeting in Lon-
don of representatives of Britain,
Australia, Canada, Ceylon, India.
New Zealand, and Pakistan.

Economic aid will be given to
any country with a proved need. It
will be financed mainly by
Government loans or grants, but
there will be onenings for private
enterprise.

Non-Commonwealth countries
involved include Indonesia, Burma,
Indo-China, and Siam

Aid funds will be spent mainly
on agriculture, communications,
and developing hydro-electric
power.

Commonwealth Governments
are to contribute to a fund total-
ling not more than £8,000,000 in
the next three years.

The money will finance a bureau
to Spread the “know-how” for
developing backward areas,

The main development plan
begins next July.

—LE.S.

E. Weekes For
C.F. Harrison & Co.

Everton Weekes, West Indies
Cricket all rounder has been ap-
pointed on the staff of Messrs.
C. F. Harrison & Co. Ltd. and
will take charge of the Sports
Department there,





Cameron Tudor
S 2
Resigns
(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, B.G.,
Oct, 14,
Mr, Cameron Tudor tendered his
resignation as master of Queen’s
College today “for personal
reasons,” 5

_—- —___—

Obituary
Mr. J. L. Banfield

The death of Joseph Leonard
Bantield, Head of the Snoe Depart-
ment of the Ideal Store, removed
a well respected figure from the
commerciat life of the city, For
35 years he had been connected
with the firm and his wide
knowledge of the boot and shoe
industry was a byword in all
circles

He spoke Spanish fluently and
this served him in good stead in
jis business activities,

‘He died almost suddenly and
was laid to rest at the Westbury,
Cemetery on Saturday evening

interest however was not
confined to business alone, and
in his capacity as Drill Instructor
of the Volunteer Force his short
and dapper figure was always
outstanding. One of its earliest
and most efficient members, he
earned the Long Service Medal
and Clasp among other decora-
tions.

He was also keenly interested
in the Friendly Society Movement
in Barbados and was one of the
founders of the Clerks’ Union.

He was married in 1915 and is
survived by his widow, and four
children, a daughter Mrs. Joyce
Mascoll in Jamaica, and three
sons Leonard, Thomas, and Lionel
Banfield, to all of whom sympathy
is extended.



‘Fara is very
“SAFETY-
“CONSCIOUS

AROUND THE (“1,2 KNOW



BABY'S
SAKE --- (



Yaey'll Do It Every Sime

/ 1S OUR BEST ey
HOUSE, FOR ( FURNITURE, BUT ¥
THESE SHARP
CORNERS ARE
DANGEROUS
Bar PONG



'WAAT AN AMAZING }
MEMORY YOU HAVE Jp

House Damaged
In Explosion

REPORT of dynamiting at

2.30 o’clock yesterday morn-
ing reached the Police later in the
day. It was made by Stanley
Jordon who said that his wife’s
house at Alleyne’s Gap, Bush Hall,
where they both lived, was dyna-
mited.

Neighbours of the district claim-
ed that they heard the explosion.
Investigations disclosed that the
south eastern side of the shed
roof, a bedstead and other articles
were damaged.

At the time of the explosion the
house was occupied by Jordon,
his wife and two others but no
one was injured. The house is
16x9 feet and not insured.

7 LKANAH GRIFFITH o: Wei-
lington Street reported to wie
volice that he gave a goal vaiueu
939 to a man to take to wir. wiac-
aenzie at Bay Street on ‘inursaay,.
Neither man nor goat has re-
turned and Mr. MacKenzie said
inat the goat was not brought Ww
him,
" HE AMATEUR THEATRE”
is the subject of a lecture to
be given by Mr. Charles Thomas,
producer and adjudicator to the
oritish Drama League, at the
British Council Centre at 8 o'clock
on Tuesday night, October 17.

This is the first of the weekly
series of lectures by Mr. Thomas
who is visiting Barbados at the
invitation of the British Council
to advise and t those inter-
ested in amateur drama.

‘HE Y.W.C.a, Fund has now
risen to $946.89. The amount
previously acknowledged was
9943.89 but $2 came from Mr.
Phelph and a $1 from a Well
Wisher,
Si NEW St. Simon’s Church
will be opened on Sunday,
October 22 at 8.00 am. The Lord
ishop will consecrate the new
altar and sing the {ust mass of
uedication,
JRVIN HARRIS, formerly of the
Combermere Glee Ciub and
at present a member of the
Y.M.C.A. Music Class under Mr.
QO. A. Pilgrim, won the first prize
at the Local Talent Show held at
the Globe Theatre on Friday night.
He played the piano and sang
“Ole Man River” and was loudly
applauded.

Second prize went to Neville
Phillips who sang “Bewitched,
Bothered and Bewildered” while
Gloria Ashby was given a con-
solation prize for singing ‘“Be-
wildered”’.

E MOBILE CINEMA will as

usual give five shows this
week. The first will be a private
show at the Lazaretto on Monday
while it will visit St. Lucy on
Tuesday and give a performance
at the Parry School pasture for the
benefit of residents of the St.
Lucy’s Church area.

A show will be given at Groves
Agricultural Station yard on Wed-
nesday for residents of the Cot-
tage and Groves area of St. George
and one at Lascelles Plantation
yard on Thursday for those of the
Holetown area of St. James.

The. final show for the week
will be a private one at the Bay
Street Boys’ Club room for mem-
bers of this Club.

Man’s Leg Broken

Cleophas Haynes, a carpenter ol
Tudor Bridge got his right ley
broken yesterday evening about
5.25 o’clock when attempting to
board the Diamond motor bus
M—1965 while it was going into
the ‘bus stand, He was taken to
and detained at the General
Hospital.





Polo Practice

No Cyclones and Tornadoes
clashed at the Garrison yesterday
evening when the Barbados Polo
Club played seven Chukkas there.
The games were purely practice
games and were played with mixed
teams, As one player put it,
“everybody beat everybody else”.

Play was slower than usual,
yr cent rains having made the
arounds sticky.





1



Burt you ousHT
TO SEE HOW CAREFULLY!
HE JAYWALKS WITH
THE SON ANDHEIR
IN HIS CARRIAGE*===



SUNDAY ADVOCATF





= YOU DIDN'T REALL

THINK (0 FORGOTTEN Ti

To.



A Teacher
Of Spanish

* With Barbados becoming more
and more Spanish minded, classes
in Spanish now being held by
Mrs. Maria Carlotta Gonsalves
are attracting many people from
all walks of life in the island.

Mrs. Gonsalves arrived § in
Barbados with her family about
24 months ago and is residing
at “Santa Clara,” St, Lawrence
Gap.



MARIA GONSALVES.

Born in Barcelona, Spain, she
has travelled extensively and
speaks several languages includ-
ing Yiddish and is the wife of
a Barbadian who had _ been
living in Venezuela for the past
84 years.

Mrs. Gonsalves told _ the
“Advocate” yesterday that she
has Spanish classes at present
from 3 o’clock in the afternoon
daily and these often go on
until 10 o’clock at night. Some-
times she has as many as 40
pupils in a single day.

Left Spain

A graduate of Philosophy
from the University of Madrid,
she said that after the Spanish
Civil War, she left Spain and
went to France and then to

Ecuador where she remained for
four of which she

seven years,
spent teaching French and Latin
in the schools for the Ecuadorian
Government. She also found
time to teach Art at the Official
Schoo! of Arts.

Her next country was Venez-
uela where she spent 34 years as
Translator for the Republie in
seven languages—English, Italian,
French, Portuguese, Yiddish, Ger-
man, and Spanish.

Mrs, Gonsalves said that her
father who was the Viscount of
Cusso and her sister were killed
during the Spartyh Civil War in
1937 while her mother died when
she, (Mrs. Gonsalves), was but
an infant. Her father, a wealthy
musician, was the owner of the
Piano Fabric, ‘Pianos Cusso” in
Spain.



Results Of School
Certificate

The following candidates passed the
examination :—

HARRISON COLLEGE
Agard C. V.: Asgill D. H.: Busheile
W. de L.: Caddle R, B.: Crane D. A.
Deane K. H, L.; Fastmond H. H. &.°
Ferreira O. F.: Fitzpatrick G O. L
Gooding G. T.; Grannum S. A: Griffith
K.: Hinkson S. R.: Howard BE. A.:

c

Jones H. K. De Q.: King K. D.: Lowe
H. E.: Marshall N. W.: Marshall W
K.: Maynard G. G. O.: Moe H, S. R

Morris C. A.:
Pilgrim K. O
Simmons H
N. S.: Williams C. A.: Belgrave J. S
Chabrol J. G, D.: Clarke M, W.: Clarke
N .: Corbin R. B.: Bmtage G. W..

Morris R. St E. De C.:
: Reid C. E.; Ross D, W4:
M.: Tudor J. L.: Watson

. Every V.: Fields J. A
Gibbs R. A. L.: Hassell J. B.: Hinds
L. K. De C.: Marshall G. A.: Moffett

G. B.; Palmer-Barnes J.: Quintyne L
G.: Raison B. F.: Ramsey H. O.: Reid
E, V.: Reid N. E.: Seale C. C.: Wea-
therhead C. M.:; Weatherhead H. W

LODGE SCHOOL
Alexander J.: Archer A. M.:

D. E.: Clarke

: ghill C, E.; Farah P. M. G.:

Gibson C. B.: Gill C. E.: Goddard P
rd RB. C.: Jordan R. O.; Kawa-

a R. L .; Mackenzie J. D aa

Reefer B, St C.: Rodriguez R. P.: Wil-

kie N. G.





By Jimmy Hatlo
























DAY 13 OUR WEDOING

|




Housing ‘Board
Staff To Be
Increased

fhe Housing Board spent the
most part of yesterday’s meeting
cseussing their Estimates.of Rev-

cnue and Expenditure for the year
iv51—-52. It was decided tc
1commend to the Government
‘hat the Staff of the Board be
increased so as to cope with

increased work.

Meanwhile, the Secretary, Mr.
T. O. Lashley has been author-
ied to advertise fcr applicants to
the temporary post of Clerk of
Works.

The Board approved the selec-
tion of four new tenants at the
Pino, thus allocating the last of the
houses available there for. the
present,

Approved

The Secretary read a_ letter
from the Clerk of the General
Board of Health fcrwarding a
certificate showing that the Board
of Health has approved Section B
of the Bay Estate with the excep-
ticn of Lot No. 1 which is a por-
tion of land on Beckles Road.

The Board discussed a letter
from Mr. S. Barker, a tenant at
Polfield in connection with a
shep on his premises at the same
hovsing area. It was decided that
he would not be allowed t t
the shop there, since’ it
ageinst the Board’s regulations.

When the Board meets again in
two weeks time members will dis-
cuss Capital Estimates,



a





MORNING CousHS

Don't let morning and night cough-
mg, attacks of Bronchilis or Axihma
rah sleep and energy another day
without trying MENDACO. This great
internal medicine works thru tit
plood, thus reaching the broachial
tubes and lungs. Starts helping aature
immediately to remove thick, sticky
raucus, thus alleviating courhing aoc
promoting freer breathing ent more
refreshing sleep. Cet Me NI \Ct
‘rom your chemlet today Quiek «tis
aetlon ar money lark wins









CHIL

PLES SPFFOPOOCO

MODEL

POPS SOS

44,6644

LPO A LEED E PLGPFS EE LA LLL LPC LFSLEP PCCP SSE SESS. PESSSSSSOS SSO
























King “Smiler” invites all mothe
rs to enter their
Babies for THE BARBADOS BONNIEST BABY

The Contest is o
tATE Milk Food, “The Food of Royal Babies.”

—Entries close on 30th September, 1950—
For entry forms and further particulars see an-
nouncements in the “Barbados Advocate”

THEM

Agents—J. B. LESLIE & CO.,,

PPO SSOP PSPSPS OPES POPS S OS POSOS POS POO OOS SSSSSSSSSOO OOS SoTTee

ANOTHER LARGE SHIPMENT OF

HAVE JUST COME IN
We can supply from a pair of BOOTIES to a big size in

ALL COLOURS, ALL SIZES AT A REMARKABLE

Corner Broad and Tudor Streets.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950







LELLPLELEOESEEFEOPESOS EDS SLES PPEOSE PPP DSA AIS:

LOOKING FOR : Just Received ... - S
STEEL : CIGARETTE LIGHTERS %

. CIGARETTE HOLDERS 3

PINKING ‘ BALL POINT PENS 3
* TORCHLIGHTS—BATTERIES & BULBS 3

SHEARS? \* COSMOPOLITAN PHARMACY. §
600 SSD CEO



WE HAVE THEM





7 —$9.89—8 2” —$1L.39
Call early at

YOUR JEWELLERS :

Y. DELIMA & CO., LTD.

’Phone 4644 -0-



20, Broad Street



for your Beauty

Caressa Powder Puffs are noted
for their softness and are the ideal
thing for a tender skin. Each .. 24c., 28c. & 40c.

SUITS

y We have also lately opened a new stock of
Call in To-day and ‘inspect |

Dress Buttons from Czechoslovakia.

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10,





our range of — Tropical

Suiting, Specially Selected

for your comfort in this

11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

warm weather.





REASONABLY PRICED
TAILORED TO PLEASE





POD POEL LOE SOLO EOL OO TE NEL OO ee

‘
coon

| IN...
te ¢

VALUES
¢ “QUALITY” SHIRTS

:

i
P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd.

TOP SCORERS

















IN TAILORING AUSTIN REED ‘with 2 separate

collars) at $7.50

VAN HEUSEN (collar attached)
at $7.63

and

CONSULATE (Sports in 2 shades)
at $7.03
all in stock

bos ee ; =
ee eae) |i} C. B. RICE & CO.
| hae | | BOLTON. LANE

(gay
wwf | +

















CONTEST OF 1950
pen to all Babies fed on COW &

STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS

14" thick, 4’ x 6’, 8’, 10’
@ l4c, per sq. ft.







or write
1 hae

to agents as at fant TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS’

1%" thick, 4.x 12’
@ 30c. per sq. ft.





Tempered Hardboard can be used for exterior work such as
Hoods, Door Panels etc.

Aso TILEBOARD SHEETS
Cream, White & Green
4x 4, 4x 6, @ 52c. sa. ft.














CT) CUM Le
* Ae

\Z :





ENJOY THESE

DREN SHOES

GIRL’S SHOES.

GORGONZOLA, GOUDA, EDAM and AUSTRALIAN CHEESE

FRESH APPLES

PICNIC & SHOULDER HAMS

Fine Assortment of COCKTAIL BISCUITS

PEANUTS—per 1b.

Tins PEACHES, PEARS, FRUIT SALAD, PINEAPPLE in Slices,
Cubes and Pieces.

» GRAPES in 2’s and 1's

» and Bots. of SALTED NUTS







CHEAP PRICE.



STORE— DIAL 3131

99905594469 S999 | EB





Full Text

PAGE 1

SUNDAY. OCTOBER 15. 1*M STNTMY ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE Yesterdays' Cricket • rrmm Pace i last ball, for 18 run*. The total was now 18 runs for tha los.< of f<.ur wickets H. King filled th-breach. King was only on* when IKgul a chance off Willis !" Kuiiuv carried hla total to for 7 wickets and bowled out Police In their 1st innings for 218. two runs before Police had saved the follow on. Police, were sent back and lost 2 wickets for only 3 runs Batting for Police. Capt. Farmer and H. Wiltshire gave fine displays. ._ t Farmer in an enjoyable knock of 80. hit seven fours and five sixes. Wiltshire.'* 55 included lira fours and four sixes Both b.it.sincn hit six sixes off Ncrmun Marshall. Both Wiltshire and Farmer gave chances while they were engaged in a partnership which yielded 9i Pla, Police opened their first innings with C Blackman and F Taylor to the Wanderers' attack led bv N Marshall and D Atkinson Both Marshall and Atkinson were getting the ball to move a lot, and war* getting a little nip off the wicket. Blackman and Taylor started quietly, taking a single now and again in the gaps. The score was taken on to 24 Iwfore the pair was separated. Blackman was deceived while playing forward to a well flighted off-break from Norman Marshall and he was cleaned bowled for tV Taylor was then II not out H. Wiltshire Joined Taylor Ro> Marshall was brought on in Atkinson's place. Two overs later, Norman Marshall, whose figures were at that time 8 . 10 1. gave place to L. St. Hill. The rate of scoring increased and 50 runs were on the tins after S3 minutas of play. Police lost their second wicket in Taylor with the score at 70 Atkinson, who was brought back from th Northern end, got one to lift at good length. Taylor made an uppish stroke and the ball came off the outside edge of the bat to C. Proverbs at gully Taylor mad* 28. A "UlV Capt. W. A. Farmer was next in and was given a chance off Atkinson before he scored. He drove hard and straight to Skinner standing at Billy mid-of! Skipper Skinner was ringing bowling changes while runs came freely for the Police. Farmer and Wiltshire were having a "go" at the hall. Farmer hit Norman Marshall for two sixes in succession white Wiltshire hit St Hill OB the pavilion for another The 100 went up in 105 minutes Farmer 34 not out and Wiltshire 37 not out. Farmer and Wiltshire were in a race for 50 and Farmer beat Wiltshire to It. Farmer took an over from Greenidgc. who was brought on from the Northern end. He hit u four in the first ball and three, balls later pulled Grecnidge overhead for two successive sixes to give him his 50. Wiltshire's score was then 37. In the 50, Farmer had made four sixes and five fours. Four fours and two sixes were consecu tive scoring strokes. The luncheon interval wan taken with the score at 148 for 2 wickets, Farmer 58 not out ami Wiltshire 38 not out. After Lunch Norman Marshall bowled the first over ifter resumption to Farmer who pulled the fifth bull SCOREBOARD i (OI.LMiL •r • DfiMftt | .lleae—let I....|. c mm i'- M r*.r i i. Hot* b X KM** 5 Bteekmaai a M Kins Mi Hasdav aw sen. •* HM* B illtTlw i i run out r Willia— b Hess J William, r HaM. k Ooddard S TVr. U HgM SlMDMMM *lpd Mfl Wnad, li Heed t Caraaa e iuk b Qeedard Kins IMX e-i BOWLING ANALYSIS a %  i H Kins l| II at rm a i x I Haas is a at J r..*Mard II* SB a lnn4 S S IS T BlrkeH III* Plehwlrk —tad laal-ei O Woudlbw.bJ William V. fM.ara. c Thorp., b J William* T fllrkatt b J Will lama B. Innm J William., b Blmwnaw II KHIri-v not ml II KIM l< William. C Tsrlni ant out %  ovuMa w M \ r K.tre. I'.li,, Mr. Kidney Proud Of W.I. Team Tie winning of three TtaB stchaa In addition to the all* und performaneeby the mem. laaJere %  > Qrlffltn r W tlreeiildee to (Msnili 1. Il.rna c & b Uaraa C Waltoll lb. b Luraa ... K Walr-.tt ll>. I, W Oreawiaa* r rtlCTMi sat oat Wood .(pd T.k|H i b la M l-m-a. lliit.-hinaun i wkpr b Ptlllli Clara* not SM Shooting Competition In November The Barbados Rifle AasociaUon an holding their aniiu.il Rifle Mettintc ISftO from Saturdav 18th to Saturday 25th November inters of the 1950 West Indies elusive The qualifying s^ig* for which had just completed its tour the "Trumpeter Cup" will take of England is something which pace on Saturday the !8th arid must be regarded as a vei\ jfrr.it the Final stage on Saturday 25 th .nhievement for West Indies after which the trophies and priie* cricket. Mr J. M. KMiney. Manager will be presented o? the team, told the "Advocate." There will be competitions for Mr Kidney returned from Engthe Barbados Regiment and th. lam! yesterday morning on the Police and it Is proposed this year S S "Golflto." hi M*| .i competition for the CaHe said that the boys played as det Fore* There will also be a a team and there was never an Falling Plate Competition beoccasion when some particular twaen the Reg ment. Police. Camember who was expected to dets and the B R A A detailed main runs or get wickets failed. 1 programme wk'l be published •"> aom* other member did not later Members are asked to no* moept the responsibility and rise that closing date lor Kntn Saturday 4lh November Heporting First To Cricket Board LODC.r y FMPIRE i-. i a-a is l.lir-IU aa* (lar • wkta.) M I r.o,,i,i lnr.lr.aa O M Rnblnaun c Drkn. b MrC.>mlr M Jonoa run out B Bourn* b Brooke E W Cavo c Olaasuw b Btookn F W Otant. hll wkt., b Wilrr, r. Miiliiunon b UrComir r n.tf, • din b wiikM<) PirVtt b Drookaa r Alu-vn. r Oam. b Broobao H Kins c A I. Wllkir V M Bark.r nol out I Fall of wicaott: I-4, S-IS. Ji. 5—11. s-a. i--w. %  ion. i BOWUNO ANAIY-1W O. H. W.lch II 1 Brooke* SO 3 IT Mr^.mlr II 4 cm t a LaSaa Sthaal—S> lanl> a Choounan 1 b-W b Millmaton Waled c Allryn* b Barkror Hnirhiiu-m b |Urkor Ir MeConiia b Barkrr Tarah b Bsrkar E GUI not o,n : Hrookn b Mi;linft,.M Glaosow >lpd Janoa b Kins O Willinm. In! wkt b Kim i wiikir cab Miihtanon 1 DMOP b Milllnfton Ertra. fatal Tbtol list I -tckrt. bOWl INC, ANW.VfK rinllipi a %  it I 0 0 WANDERFRS v POLICE M "" <'•' Wlrkau li-. %  •*-. il.l t„ ,,!„.. r* Blaknton b f* Manholl F Taylor c Pr..*nh. b D Atkmaor 1 t jpl W A Parmor b D A'km—, | HaBIre c R Marahall. VI.|_,l b N Bvr. %  Chrltri %  m %  Marain %¡ v. vrtha i> Atkiru Wantor %  a Morru b t Mulllm r P id ,.i-> m | Clr-a .b Total lj.ll ..f arMaSs I for k I f for iaa. (or in. % i m ,, 1 h>. Ml I.., lit tor II for lit BOWLING ANALYSIS i Alkiiiaon Mi 11 I Manh.ll at 4 7 Packar | | I MiMh.ll u i • W Hlil i 1 I To PI ,|„ t , (irorr.ldsiJ • %  %  Br.d.n. r ;"^rr *"'*" • Brr-.tar c SI Hill b D Alkliv.!.! Mullina run out I rhetlrnhaiti .ml out Total I wkt* overhead for six to send up !>u luns in about 135 minutes Wiltshire followed suit In Norman Mamhall"a next over. I: hit the fifth bbll for six. D. Atkinson surceeded breaking the valuable partnership worked Former at 68. Tlie score 213 for 7 and tht eighth wicket fell at 214. B Moms was cleaned bowled h' U Atkincn lor 'dutk". He at' tempted tr cut a good length in swinger. Police wanted 6 runs to savi the follow-on with 2 wickets In The scoreboard then read 1C5 for hand. C. Mulllns and C. BrewIndies Cricket i the occasion \> an instance he gave Gerry 1*7 against Kent when Una were very badly needed Wonderful Not having seen Valentine or R-'iriadhin in action before the • LII. he said it was a wonderful sprricnce to have seen those two I have Uic happiest recollection* Kraal bowlers who were successul three glorious weeks which 1 nil :i>u>ugh sheer ability spent playing cricket in Barbados '" Valantlna, the Weal Indies ii ltti$ as Captain of the "<"! •*•' spinner with consistent team agauial Barbados length and full of determlnstion Mr It. K Nuncs. l'ra-.dei>t of the J" 1 ^ ven o* 1 occasions when he West indies Cricket Board ol Conh '"' ,on %  P*-"* * bowling he li. l told Hie Advocate". > u %  *" t even with sore He arrived by the "OaUU." from "UK * ind ^ nin mb ,.. ^ England yesterday inlranslt for ^'* ^'" th mB he said could be TTUldad where he wul be at^'"J ' ' m ^ h T "2 m W lending a meeting ol the Wast Jfi"'*"! !" V*, £*£* am0n, rS. Cricket BoaTd of Control on ' n ^ E nSii^ ^ ** sat i isu m jn^ x3* sSt: Xt !" '* !" Mr Nunes said that his las. JKJ? [*. H "J7 r f* g* -* vU.ttoB.rb-.o.w.m 1B28w hen ^ V^^tSfa'*"* ne spent a few Jours heron his Ktr lt prlvl ,, ge „ ni plv „ utt t0 ^ .v..y to England with the IBM nss^ciated with the I&50 West West Indies tea,,, .nd was unfori n( t leg lcam „, amv leil b Joh ^ lunate not lo have come back G.-ldard especially when making comparisons with other W.I teams Nothing To Say of whirh he had the honour to A*kcd his views as to whether m*n-*!e in 1933 und 1939. There or not the West Indies could afford 'eic also great players then such to send a team to Australia, he ** CJeorge Headley. but on this said that as President of the o-vasion. they had the "W" formaCrteJBM Board of Control he wUhed ' be was clean bo.vlcd by D Atkinson. He played over %  %-tcr were at the wicket with Biewstcr 6 not out. At 2 IS for 8 Mulllns was caught for nought by Proverb. at gully off I) Atkinson C. Bradshaw and Brewstcr, the last pair in. were to make 3 runs to save the follow-on. N Marshall and D Atkinson were kept on the ball. They could not do It N. Marshall cleaned bowled Brews ter with the total score at 213, giving Wanderers a lead of 151. Brcwster made 7 snd Bradshaw was 0 not out Follow-On Wanderers forced the follow on and Police started on their second Innings at 5.M p.m. Police's 2nd innings was opened by C. Bradshaw and C llrewstcr. Cricket Match At GarrisoD The annual cricket match beeen the Owners and Tratncri ith West and th e Grooms will take place to-day at the Garrison. The team will be picked from ——— the following : Argentinian loses O.TSHE ?.£& ffl' Boxing Bout Gale J. Messiah, J. B Marsh. NEW YORK, Oct. 1* PB Wslker. J. B. Goddard E. Manourk Markarlan of the Evelyn, D. Wilkle. P Fletcher. Argentine lost on point* In an D Inniss and Hon. V C Gale eignt-rouiKl bout nare againsi The Grooms team will be: Joe Carkido of Youtigstown. Ohio. M Bynoe (Capt.), S. Clarke. G. Thel refeiee took two rounds Hollingsworth. C. Applewhite, C. away from the Argentine boxei Watkins, C. Grandtaon. C. Durante. J Young, r. Alleyne. D. flatls. T. Stsnton and G. Blackman for low blows —I Racing Results fjxoRurrowN. io. oet i IIIIM.I "VNiimr-1 Sara. Chaaa ..: am. no iba. I pitched well up between his bat Nornwin Marshall and D. Atkmsor, and pads i,,,^ Hi.iiKe of tlie third new bail With the irmit 181 for %  o. u; „| fl(1 tht da> ^ Wanderers. I Warner Joined Byer. Rov Atkitmm a Rnt over claimed Marshall was given another spell )t ( ))|>( p„| KO wicket from the No: them end and L SPARTAN n not Warner for 8 in the first ovei £ ( u ( |j 0| of that spell. Fine Catch Warner tried to hit Marshall cverhead but Marshall stuck out his right hand above his head to take a lovely return catch. The score read 191 for 6. C Brewster lollowed. This p "i saw the 200 p.o up in about 1J minutes. The now ball was take i at 207 when 66 overs wen bowled. Norman Mar*h,.ll bowled ll .•ud immedi.it. I> be) bsxj yei ID difficulty. Byer was beaten in IM third lull and drove the fourth pasthe bowler for 1. Tlie next ball he was caught at mi Skinner for 23 C Brews silly mid-on by Brawstar playcu rward lanly to one pitched %  ell up on his pads C. Mulllns was next in. He was run out without scoruut. Q. Cheltenham Joined Bradshaw and tho score was 3 for 2 at time af caU. 1-KIHIItlNTS MANtlHMF— Sari ( |M| I lilac* Shadow. NakSoo. IIS Iba. 1 11 |d> llatlrrj. Paraa-Hl. IM Iba t t-.-.t*. Joarph. 1J1 lb. 1 Jeus Mine. Vtann. IM Iba Tuna I nun. 11 1/S asoa H \MHfAf-l MUa, iaa t4*. i uu c CARI.TON wkt ) I .i lion 238 and i had dismissed Carlton ft* *-^^ is In the o|x>ning day of neA.ioa. sn>i II'. O!" IHM.|.'\ atlltHi lasers, N"irt'"> IBS Iba Ma, 1)1 Iba r—i i ar, i i.„ r On Fase II Al NANDII Ar—a r I laaa llama. Joarph. ISO Iba I Shirley, •> N..l US lb* dlnia. (i-.n'ah f IIS Iba IMIU1AIHIS BOYS' CLUBS Three Prizes will be given as follows : lsl Prin: A FORD ANGUA 2nd Priie : IIM.IU.II 3 SPEED CYCLE 3rd Priie : Hull \ TL'DOR WATCH Drnwing lo take piece not later than Nov. 30th. r<;,'> Auditors t FITZPATRICK GRAHAM & CO. England Defeats Wales 22-4 ABERTIIJ-K. Oct 14 Fniilund beat Wales by 22 polnt> to four in the seasons tlr-i Rugb> League International game played here to-day They're covtr* mu*,ww Csdbury*! fsmoui Milk Tra/ Chotolates. covered / OCT. 15 — MO. 141 The Topic of Last Week We heard a Una war* cr. r-n law and Ji>* and Shattert Tra> larnlar.ii> |vaatra| by The "ahii> waa im tlie dad marrh The cmard waa hsnaj and loud Aa the> appcuaclvM l*rd NrtatHi The Admiral rrted "Bra. risbt In ranour of a hwo Who itrara fouah< tbe |owd nsi Joe aalrt my dee' *lth plaa.ni AH amp-ill aall thai da.. Th trio DuRa. thr -OaHh. Will .team In CarllJe B-v Aad turn niy da*i III thai.K <: Far riildlne !" of pa"' Add I ".mild plead Ihl* one II %  a Luu waitt Kama -l**i Mated %  And in ilva dead .1 malt Hub in %  [rot. i.l ah hi lean. Tu make a blarS fttra wMle i... -..a. IH lima tv tvaar i.e. Sa • 'It wun'l change poor me" Twaa than Jar aald tny dear Uou Ynuve kial the boundary Well Tlmradm i>i 'l.e eteiona Bel>t .tied molt it.la (bins Tall Joe and Uu and rVtbril The CaWreh belli atari la rln AiM Relay in all awdi.e.. Crted eul a ilvtrn. ahad Whatiete. >ixi Haw a rhurch ball Thari what Ihe radio aald llnl boya l| waa a waddlna I'll. I il*. were In their flee It war a dins-dan* party The old 'inn aloorf the terra -'"--• Mhr tha rrr plruira Thr brlda waa aleafwd m llirllli BUI 'ha oM man tn Iba arm chair Dsfivct or Airmail for Fatherly Advice—Free A KEY POSIT ON. WAI FOR YOU FIRST CHOOSE TOUIOVUIB asa"""" Stan training \'0'.v\ There U itill room it the 100 %  •< tha lul'r qutlrf-ed man who li flttetf er the |e YOU aa Be %  *• rhan iwcceiatfril. prefperout. ten* ntri kHMta assar—J by (tiedylri| af hor.te in .o-.r *pi'r itme. MkM by ihe penonal tuition of Tha Banaect CollegeDwuma msset no siHerence WE MILL HELP YOU TO ACHIEVE YOUR AMBITION Get your lea Writ, oat your %  •*< on ma icoa> oi-auii i^u Wrlta to Tha aWnnait Collega and learn thoutand) of people |uii MM >OU hara rest the top with the right guidance. A well* |ea can be rour*—Hart e>i* i'mrt iparei study NOW Direct Mail to DEPT. TO-OAT r" hew • -..had -paid laa'a tinta 188 Ihe B?nn?tl SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND Colle AND e i.e.i Twaa man Joe -aid lo RobeM sponsored by JAR BAKERIES maker* of ENRICHED BREAD nnd the blenders of JAR RUM 0/ is a triumph It'i the only pen with the NEW -IATUU! NEW pftiauoN NEW glAUTT Tin PABBIM "51" hsi arways baea th workl'i ITKHI pcrfni prn. Now^ in n e if lumph wMh ihe gresi new Acio-tneiiH. Ink System, the NHW I'aikci "SI !" 11 even hnet. raore %  ii MI.I'IC than ever hefurr rhe Aniwnttnc Ink SysMm ie tac sn-aieat MI tlevtaed Its wraotty new, Kieoiinc im ihixl of Jrawlog in. atorins. ufegtMiiling snd BSSSSSBBJ iak K'-ei ihe mmi lantlaciury pen peraaawaauaua ,„„ mna ,„, kno „ .a..nowoo !" .~o. HH H .n*.n..bu.rol ,... %  * • i.....^.n,.. UF j-rj n %  %  liauiiwni 1 lua,ioinmoo .. lad %  • OBI, BMt attraSraaaaJaa i u a IDKUI prawu. >-uwUdJ m.*it toatUed' p*n Prie wit li Rolled Gold Cap .. BB.fl I.UHtraloy Cap \.V\r, A M HKYIIRV SON'S (llarba.li.ai 1,1.1. I'll Bui JIKI. Ilriilitvtmvn POWER PLUS WITH MOTOR GASOLINE AND SHELL X-100 MOTOR OIL



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PARE TWO SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. OCTOBER 15, 1MB AOI VIM l.liB CINEMA (M.mb Only; TOHIUHT te TUESDAY NIC1HT at %  30 BUD .V'UOTT and LOU COSTELLO iii "HOLD THAT GHOST" Rich;Joan DAVIS Mis. % A Universal Pietara i EMPIRE To-d4 41 4H.1 B 43 and • oilimnuc UP tted 4 45 •Ml 1 M "THE DOCTOR AND THF filll" i %  %  %  Glorie DcHaven. Janet Leigh, with Bruce Bennett. . AIK TV iTke Garden) ST. JAMES Lasl 2 Show* TODAY 5 .nd 8 SO p.m 'RlVEK'S END" PRAIRIE THfcNDER" MONDAY and n.'KSDAY 6 30 P M GIRL FROM JONES Hr. \( II with Virginia MAYO -mi Ronald REAGAN H is BXCR3 i.tNcY THF.GOV: and Mr*. Savagu Iha opening I.I Mrs A I Stuart's 'Passport to nw HB", (Revuedcvillc 150> sang dt the Empire Theatre on Thursday. Arrived Safely M R EDDIE BRATIIWAITEand Mr. Fabian Holder. Barbados Scholars of 1949. who jefl n.n %  bOOl tat. days ago by thr Hille-n %  stad. hm arrived safely in tngndOn their arnvnl In En.:, were met by British Council rtoreacntative*. who were n"'kind to them. Eddie is at Pembroke College, Cambridge, and Fabian i' at ihe I'm,, i !..,.. Two Sisters M iss HETTY MARSHAL!*baa i OH.pl Stall her two-year court* m England nt M and Wc-'mlnstrr Eye Hospital and has no* none to Middlesex Hospital to do h*r General Course. Her sister Pan-:., who went ISP to England last ;.enr. has m w completed her first year at Moorflelds She has recently returned to England from a short holiday %  "ranee. Bern .Hid Pansy, are daughters of Mr and Mrs A H Marshall of "Orafton". Black Rock Holiday Over M ISS ELAINE WOOD, who is arftt Hart lay* Branch here, returned from Trtnidnd by 1IVVIA. F.lnn.r Spent her long leave hi the UM Humming Bird, but it's back to i -I k ri Monday Back from U.K. Visit \ FTER three months England. Mr. and airs. R. I* IfesMa i.r "Edgecumbe," St Philip returned yesterday morn tna; via Canada by T.C.A. Their daughter Elizabeth has remained In the U.K.; at school. Their other daughter Pat who nrrof"panied them aa far a! Canada remained o\-er for a week She will he arriving on Oct. 21 T.C.A. Arrivals A M'tNG thpassengers arriving by T.C.A.. yesterday morn injt were Mrs. Agatha MeGlveni who lives in Vancouver Island She is here for about six months staying at the Marine Hotel. Another arrival was Miss Mat v Greaves Irom Montreal. She it* staying with l>er good friend MrAlexander. Radiographer ai the a acdtal Here For A Month M RS JESSIE FTNDT who arrived yesterday morning bf B.W.I.A., plans to Spend I month's holiday in Barbados. She is staymc with icr son Mr. Harold Webster who ir at present siayin.; ir. one ul the bungalows on the St. Peter coast. Trinidad Solicitor M R. ARNOLD KELSHALL. Solicitor of Trinidad arrive*. • ester Ha v morning by B.W.I.A t > spend a couple of weeks' holiday at the Si Lawrence Hotel. Arnold's brother Phil. U a Pilo; with B.W.I A. Returned Yesterday M R. JOHN HAMMOND, who accompanied Mr. Simon Wardcll to Trinidad on Friday morning returned yesterday nv B.W.I.A. Mr. Wat-dell la on h.* way to England for .i month s Traffic Supt. B.W.I.A M R. CHARLIE MAYNAKD. Traffic Supt B.W.I A., in Port-Cf-Spaln arrived ycslerdav by B.W.I.A., on a flying visit, returning to Trinidad yesterd.y afternoon Short Visit W ING. COMMANDEr. LAWES Df International Aerarlio Ltd.. arrived 1rom Trinidad yeterday by BW.IA, ami will be here for about live or six davs. Mr. and Miss Barbados A T the dunce at the Barbados Aquatic Club last night thtitle of Miss Barbados went to Miss Ha/el Carrmgton and Mr. Michael Lynch was chosen as Mr. Barbados. QaJuh Qalihtq HlliSiJiLRfflUJiiiHil* AND MBS. JEFFREY STOLLMEYER who England on the "Ool/ito" yesterday Back From Cricket R ETURNING by the "GotAto" yesteiday from England were Mr j. M Kidney. Manager of the victorious West Indies team. Mr. F. A. C. Clairmonte. vicePresident of the Barbados Cricket Association and Mrs Clairmonte. Mr. R K Nunes. President of the West Indies Cricket Board of ('intml who was intransit for Mr, Jeffrey a member of ihe West In and Mrs. Slollmevit who win also intransit for Trinidad. Many people were at the Bangage Warehouse to meet them including members of the Barbados Cricket Association, cricketer:, from various clubs, relatives, friends and well wishers. intransit from U.K. Journalists 'TX.URING the West Indies l %  do ;i special issue on the British Colonies for "Pictuie Post", England's largest Weekly Illustrated ore Mr. F. H. Man. Chief Photographer and Journalist, and Mrs. L. Henderson-Begg. Journalist. They arrived on the Golfita ;. csterday intransit for Trinidad. and might probably visit,' British Guiana before returning to Barbados. Mr. Man told tat rib that he was in the newspaper business for 25 years, and was connected with 'Picture Foal" from its inceptio" in 1938. Prior to that, he said that he was in Germany whh uio Berlin.. Illustrated where he spen" EMPIRE THEATRE THURSDAY ISth and FRIDAY 20lh at K.:m P.M. MATINEE: FRIDAY AT 5 P.M. MRS. A. L. STUART Presents Her SCHOOL of DANCING IB 'REVUEDEVILLE 1950' Millie by Ihe Pulice Hand Directed by Capl. C. E. BAISON, A.K ( M MAE. Ill* Excellency the Governor and Party will be uttendini First Night BOX OFFICE OPEN DAILY From 8.30 a.m. to 12 noon and I JO p.m. to 3.34 pjn. RICES:— ciiu III sun ut BOXES SI SO; HOUSE 11.M; BALCONY 7c. RE8EEVED. IJHUi Mil It YOVB i.\iiiu:\ and /.1I1V.7 we offer • S.81 63c. I l.tl I.S From 13c. le. S8c. irUli of V*f .ubl.s a Dower Oard.ni THK H \Kir\IMr\ 0 OIM II 1 I IVI rorro^ i\nHv LTD. Had Nice Trip A FTER a pleasant stay In England and a very nice trip down on the "Golflto", Lady Violet Stow returned to Barbados yesterday and has taken up residence at Hlghgate. Upper Collymore Rock. During her six months In the UK. she visited her daughter Mrs. Collyer. wife of Brigadier Collyer who is stationed in England. Her son Mr. J. M Stow, the Administrator of St. Lucia and his wife and little Son Mark were also spending some time In England Mr Stow returned to St Lucia by air last Wednesday but his wife who was ill is staving in for a further period and will he joining him soon. Gorernor'b Daughter M ISS E M. RANCE. daughter of His Excellency th Governor and Lady Ranee of Trintaadwas Intransit from England OB the nafflto yesterday ib spe.-d about six months with her parents. For Five Weeks UOLIDAYING In Barbados J 01 £_ v weoks re Mrs. A R. Davis and her two daughters Ir.et and Dorothy <>f British Gulnna They arrived <>n Monday morning by the "Lady Nelson and are staying ,,i "Leaton-on-Sea". The Stream. Mrs. Davis whose husband ia the proprietor of Davis' Sadi, !' %  <<. i and Blind Manufactory in Georgetown, is paying her second visit to the island, while It Is the first lime for her daufehter* who are .imply thrilled with the Island and aie enjoying every moment of It Entertained lo Luncheon S IR ALLAN COLLYMORE, President of the Barbados Cricket Association entertained to luncheon yesterday at the Marine Hotel, Mr. R. K. Nuncs, •President of the West IndieCricket Board of Control, Mr. J Bfl Kidney. Manager of the West Indies Cricket Team. Mr. John Goddard. Captain of the team. Mr. Jeffrey Stollmeyer, a member of the team, and Mr. F. A. C. Clairmonte. Vice Presboth before and after luncheon and will depart after issuing a ident of the Barbados Cricket Association, Reluming To B.G. L EAVING yesterday evening for Trinidad on their way to British Guiana ou the ''Golfito' were Mr. and Mrs. J. Baxter and their little daughter Jane They arrived here earlier in the day on the same vessel from England where they had spent four months' holiday. Mr. Baxter is Manager of Rose Hall Plantation in British Ouiana. After Eight Months A FTER AN absence of eight months in England. Mrs. W. M. Lambert whose husband was formerly Private Secretary to His Excellency the Governor, returned on the Golflto yesterday morning to re-Joln her husband who is staying at Abbeville Guest House. To See His Family M ISS HETTY CHAUJENOI! who was working in England as a Secretary with the British Motor Trade Asaociatlda, arrived jesVerday by the GoMU to SM her family. She is the daughter of Mrs (hallcnor of Vallery, Collymon' Hock, and the late Mr. Georg Challenor To Take Up Appointment M R. E. B. MARTYN wh arrived here yesterday morn ing on the Golflto frem Englani lift the same evening by the sam,. oppor.unlty for Trinidad to tak<' vp an appointment ns Plant Pathologist of the Department <•< Agriculture. Mr. Martyn held a similar Pf"'' >n Jamaica prior to going to stnitland on leave some months age Back From U.K. Holiday R ETURNING on the 'C.olflti.' from England yesterday after spending three months' holiday were Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Haynes of Parks, St. Joseph. While In England, they visited their son Anthony who is dolnj; his last year in Economies nt Cambridge University. On Annual Leave M R. PITER KINO arrived from Trinidad yesterday morning by B.W.I.A., to spend his annual leave in Barbados Peter is with the Royal Bank of Canada in Port-Of-Spa in. When he was stationed in Barbados, Peter used to be the goal getter in the rnrword line of Ihe Flying Fish Water Polo Club. No doubt the Flying Fish team will be pleased to hear of his arrival.


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SUNDAY. OCTOBER 13, ISM SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGF. THIRTEEN HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MISS STSPP'S DAWCIN& SCHOOL MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY PLEASE 361 ^-"OiOW A FEW OUVS| DON T MUST, Ml JOUTSOe ABF AP""Ett (MB <3 ^^ ^ %  ; \ BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER fwniTf BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC.MANUS VQU4BMU* ABtxn etTTtKG XXJI7POTW§B %  JtMHV WTO •OCflTV TWAI*M 'NQT04.V TMAT-He AT ja&OS'f, OCPICE-AWD MC& M ;. M H TM ND v. Als 5CO*lLFADEC i6&Ok l O'OCAUON wfiCT MV BtCTXB AJJOI KMOwir WLL DCVCL.C*' WTO A LOVE MATO-i-i'M SO I DiOJ'T GfcT A CMANCB TO 1-JTfcOOUCfi T-feM-TX.V I u v vi'ABACH mmft! &MSPAWTEP-AMD TM6 LAST I SAW OP MM M£ .'. ;.'-%  ..... • %  -. STBGCT ^.TMOLTT HAT CA_M YOLRSELVTO, LADIES!/ 1 BUT I ''tf' AND I 'M M3U ARE HYSTERICAL! /TELL, v^j T SAW TV BY ALEX RAYMOND -'BE '' %  %  ..; j %  |i .=Lc... AAWMJNiTiCN... ft. OTHBR TKiM3fi.„TMeY THE PHANTOM —Z.-iVi...,%  BY LEE FALK & RAY "MOORES %  £//V//t iTBEAMESTHEFOfiBIOOEN PEEPWOOPS -JHEHCHEOf WE iW W, mPmtV POttOM KO PtE* j e*~. THE.'LIN51t S I Al'.lHlS Sif; • AllVE WTTH -^liCVSHftt: S2' r "i -.t?*.'*ai ; j rr %  V^ Gordons 5IIS1 GIAM COOLING ^% C ^ T assurance Tfc* "Caterpillar" provides posiii\control of both oil and watt-i porature by thf i-x.-lusiw dual radiator design. '] hi' imtK liidialor regulates upper engine ti-mp--ratlire. And the air-cooled oil radiator prevents excessive crank-caso tampan ture . to control oil VtacOBlty and film strength and tfcui DfOtaol tin performance of vital paits >>..|. "Caterpillar" provtdci iln. extravalue feature. ELECTRIC SALES 6c SERVICE LTD. T<-f-ditir Hoad. ft. MM IMI, — Phonr W2 III7I fin 9 dual 'Holiday. A Caribbean Cruise on the LUXURY LINER "COLOMBIEBARBADOS — JAMAICA — BARBADOS Ten Days of Incomparable Enjoyment. Sailing Dale* From BARBADOS Blh December. ItSO l'lli January, I'J.'il MN Frbruar.v. 1*51 Mill April, lli.'il 30lh May. 1051 BARBADOS TRINIDAr. Clfi OLK TRANSATLANTIC)!^: IC. M JONES CO., LTD. Aenl RATES FOR ROUND TRIP IM Claw J208.0II 2nd Clau $10.1.00 MCkn ,... si n.oo B.W.I. Currency BARBADOS I.A O.VAIRA CURACAO CARTEGENA JAMAICA **>*sss.:'.','.'.::::; -,-.-----.'.-::'.'.%::: v.v, -.-,-.".-. :'.:'. TRINIDAD CURACAO VW/


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PACE SIX SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. OCTOBER I^IW The PRIEST from MOSCOW Tells How the Russian People Live To-day No Benin Teeth—and an Injection costs JO/. . Women queue /or shoes and take what they are given iron. EVELYN II-OVS VCSOUL. Haute-Saone. task—atone-breaklnsj. barrowlng France, loads on building Biles, navvies' FATHER Jean De Math.t jobs of all klndi. "Many of them Thomas, the French priest who smoked Pipes like the men. and was father confessor to thousand, broke off their work to eat a of Russian Catholics in Moscow, labourer's hunk of black bread and If berk in '"ranee and has Ju*t raw onion. given me a frank and revealing "The young ones were gay in account of life under Stalin In spite of it all. Rut the faces of 1950. the women around forty were For three years and ihr.e i,i Pa it an d sad. I saw no signs of n onlhs he had opporlunitu I HeK&ncv amonu the Moscow given to few JBf*i*jB*l lo see woirlc n. how the Russian people really Sot even." he added with a live. He went into Moscow ,i, uc kle. "a dash of nail colour • homes to visit the sick and ady^ or iace powder to keep them minister last rites lo the dyunj ppttiy." As cure of the church of S>. When a Moscow housewife Units. Catholic perish for the w;nU a broken window whole of the diplomatic corps i Moscow, he ministered to 2*1 liiplomau of alt nations. Then abruptly, a month ago he was expelled from Moscow 1J^ urder of the Soviet admlnuIte *nu told when he raked why. faulty light-switch repaired, shi cannot go direct to the glazier r electrician. The I>.MIII; Woman %  Kverythlng must go through g| channels, and application nJai be made ts> the houseb dustrial organiaali suia Father Thomas. "My own p.ublem was n bathroom door which would not open properly. I met the silver-haired beardej SUiM j aTrivfd ln i M 7 i wrote priest aa he strode from the ^ p e 30 lcttcra BDOUt it Finally, Church of the Secre Cocur after flil JanuJirv workmwl came and saying the seven o clock mass in shooy n) hra<) Qver t his native town. And later we talked in bis quiet study. "There is ro room for Incur ables In Moscow hospitals." he said "One woman 1 vinted war. dying of tuberculosis In her one small room. A neighbour brought her a glass of water or some bread occasionally. Because sh. had no relatives or friends • care for her, she had lo die in corner. No hospital would tain her. And there were many similar cases. Four To A Room "Utah of privacy was the ****** feature ol the homes 1 en'ered" Father Thomas said. "In spite of the new apartment blocks go in ( up, people ai* still strictly rationed for living space. Unle-'-, of course, the* are In the upper grades af society and are allowed flats or houses suitable for their rank. "Many of the houses 1 visited still had rooms divided into four with one person living in each. "Then he said. If you g' „* The division was made by a .wo roubles (about £45), 1 will wardrobe or some other piece of arrange if The door was put furniture, or by a piece of curtight at once. TNI MAN THIY CXPILUD, Queues continue to waste thou•ids of woman-hours a week at e Moscow shops. 1.50 A I';m tain. Outside in the passage was a stove on which these close neighbours took turns to cook Teeth A Luxury For those Who could get admttHundreds ol women wailed aion to Moscow hospital* .treatouUWe lh biggest Moscow dement was free. "But only for use iar[ment fclore every day," Father ln „ gnment or ^^ had A-BSS' vtf •; S%K53IfaiV luxury beyond Ihe dream, ol thry wore dear—ajwut £M Mo-cow EnjIUh money Ihe .ame • %  for "A denltBl will draw teem man's suit. But when a woman free." he told me. "But If the reached the head of the queue she patient wants an injection, he must pay about 10*. If he ejlss Aboriginal Children's Art May lie Televised in-mti Our LOI-4M. Cori-w"mtHn.l LONDON. October A small book is shortly lo be B oduccd in London called "Uttle lack Fingers." It is written by Mrs. Florence Rutter who was %  sponsible for Introducing the artistic effoiY* of young aboriginal %  i.ildren to Londoners a short i while ago. Tn# book is made up ot extract* from a larger book, u be published ln the New Year, and ill contain seven reproductions the children's work I.' wltl deal with many aspects o' boriginal life ln Australia, showing their implements and weapon^ and way of life, and will contal.i a catalogue of 100 pictures painted by Ihe children. Six of the most attract'.' pictures are to be made ini ChrisVmas cards and prints foi framing. When the pictures were first shown In London, many eniine.it all eiltics and ai.thropo.oa>' ere puzzled by the extreme*!. high quality of the work, and many doubted that it was po-i-ible 'or young chiMr.-n produce such finished works ol arts. Owing V0 the great Intere*' still being displayed in them. Mrs. Rutter Intends exhibits | rl] over the country and In few weeks they will be shown the Rochdale Gallery an-i Museum. In the Midlands. "From November to Deeemc-e.we hope to have them on show again in London", said Mrs Rutter to-day. "At this exhibi iSon, we may run a short colour film, taken by a friend, of the aboriginal boys in their settlement, when I visited them. W< also think it may InteroeV ui" publlc to be able to buy cards, prints and the book at the sam'time." Mrs RutVer is tho proud poa5ossor of 24 letters from aboriginal children. One. which in I received only this week, is froir, Barry Loo. now 16-yeurs old He Is working, and has no BOM for .minting, but tells her In ItM letter how they gav e up snail playtimes and week-ends ln< three years in order to altai I the degree of perfection In Ihe.' I an 1 which has been remarke i upon by so many AH honour. says the child, must go lo the teacher who used to take them on rambles, and then tell thn i to draw what they had ^ %  eon limn memory One of the point* raised in London was that the rhiUii". Might grow i.ut of this urtisti'."hi I it y. and that they might lOH their virtuoalty as Ihey grew up, Mrs. Rutter is not Inclined "> Ih's view. "They have liMe opportunity pursue their studies whin BU] m older", she told me, nd my greatest ambition is to return m Australia and found at* art school for them, with perhaps scholarships to Europe ull%  mately." Sir OSBERT brings out the family gems ... i.ioiii.i by . MALCOLM THOMSO.V NOBI.K KSSI.M i s B> (l*bcrt th t hooded, tragic eye*. Listen to %  Itwell Maemlllan. tl 324 this snatch of oonversa.'ion patgea "What ore pou poinp lo be lahen IT is impossible to refrain from uou orou> up? applau-e M the mnclusion. with "A gtntiu." this tifth volume, of so grandiose s UC h privileged occasions a project as Hie Sitwell auloblo, lo t be of long duration. graphy—or from the suspicion Unlike St. Sebastian, SacheIhat it might, with .dvaiitage, verell is hot-tempered: "1 aerai have been shorter by one vci.ume. \Q^ m y temper unless somwonf Osbert Sitwell sr>eks of the docs something to annoy me." "design" as If no departure from %  **,„, hm will reho,, ^ eat. In was pohs.hie In fact, ihe "da.mniar clrcumaUnces his brother E wa V? n l,, ,lv u %  ruur wlU smash 24 cheap plates put lume book l/t ^ fQj. | ne purpose by his houseK6 harm at allJC a writer finds kt ^ n ** eminent critic SI ^J2l^ m n*. t a. v^ l !" Jlt" Bdniund Gosse brings the new peeled. But Noble Essences has ^p^ edlrton of Swinburne different character from its hff hj|fJ ^^ „ u ^n^^ ^^ predecessors and only with n^ou^,., that Sacheverelf exclaims: "How delightful to have %  ftort elbows lui way Into l any , .., ^, them at last in a cheap ednSon' It is a series of biographical g^m.*, that St Sebastian can articles. The main performance I* tho0t arrow ,s well as be their over. After the last chords of Ihe iargci <-„„. retorta: NoC 10 ar heap as all !heitlnale have died away iinpiMiile in Hie boxes. Am* lively prattle It is, sprinkled with anecdote and spiced wilh malice Now and again some minor poet Of the iwenlies Is dragged out from under the leaves where those Wicked Uncles the yean have buried him. he. chivvied. Yet the displeasure did not lasl long. The Sltwells were of distinguished birth: Oosse. a snob who found hia perfect niche a! librarian of the Houseof Lord*. T..-rr. g .rrRonald Firbank, rich, invalid mat ne may u|nor ^ precl0U8 novels. leaves fainter Impression. As the Of Sir George Sitwell. the auwriter of a postcard: "To-morrow •hor. fatlicr-vKtun. we are alas. I So to Haiti. They say the iITorded only a fleeting glimpse. President is a perfect dear AbOW fiiaLKteiistK' Having ihe owner of a palm-tree whicv tvicted some peasants from his he carried from one London nai Julian palace. Sir George typical?o another. It was watered twici 1. misunderstands their sullen a day by a gardener whose greet look. "You see, I can always make baize apron pleased Firbank— :.'.pular won 1 w> to!" "Just like being in the country.' Dug i* nt lu lex howev r ihat Walter Slckert. the artist, sell: the public Is denied a fn-'s.i in.. litter of pictures for 140. and :.pection of the Sitweil (amU* when Slvwell expostulates, replies treasurei. fn from ii As if he "Happly and Demand. The mexasat* the (mini-turned-curator arable laws of Supply am jf a property handed over to thv TJemand. The young man wantet National Trust, the author point.m y pictures and I wanted Wi ->ut to the conducted party his money." troth*)] Sacheverell at a time when, although an officer in the But It would be wrong to sup, Grenadier Guards, he united pose that Noble Essences Is i tag of the Gothic .saint compilation of stories. It is rich tj Seixistian perhaps with somein detailed yet vivid description.' .hing of the young Bacchus" Note Q f scenes and people, ihe product tiie "untidy grace", which tho Q f an astonishing memory. It i sergeant major has overlooked closes In a passage of sombre elothe "faunal faroucheness.' the quence touched with self-approvai mind "brilliantly coloured as n And are w e to have no mort : tropical bird." Osbert Sltwells? There is hint ot Respectfully sidling away from a new "design"—"ii I am allowed this prodigy (hat In hand and the lime." avoiding the priceles carpets), the in such matters there need be I party is iust in time to see tha.' no undue haste. Aa Lyttoi I sister Kdith (aged four) has swept Strachey replied to the younR into the room and "seems lo fill man who said. "Do you realise hj with her personality it's five years since we met""— Observe, whispers our guide. "Rather a nice Interval, don't the Byxantine or Sieneee profile, you think?"—L.E.S. STORY OF THE OIL PIPELINE LONDON What led to the modernisation nf pipe-lines fur oil transport'' It was the establishment of the international oil industry m Pennsylvania in IISS The really successful line was a cast Iron. 5-milelong, 2 ins-diameter pipe-line, laid' In 1865 About 7,000 years ago. the m-| %  ventlve Chinese were using bam-[ boo pipe-lines to carry tho "natural gas" given off from their brine wells to the stills, where it %  erved as fuel to distil the salt from the brine solution. The ancient Assyrians. Egyptians. Greeks and Romans built pipe-lines off clay or hollowed rock as watermains, while Cambyses. King of Persia, used a pipe-line of sawn oxhide to supply water to his. troops when invading Egypt in f>25 B.C • Since thai time, a continued process of evolution !....taken place. To-day. America possesses) a nation-wide network of pipelines, some of which carry natural %  gas, some finished petroleum pro-, ducts and others, crude oil. Indeed. she has over 190.000 miles it pipei.-iefor transport of crude oil I Formidable The construction of pipe-lines in the many areas in which the oil Industry operates is, of course, a formidable operation. Generally, the lines arc buried, although sometimes It is more convenient to lay them above ground. Construction Is complicated by such considerations as securing a right way %  cress developed land and by 1 'iatural barriers such as mountains nvUni. swamps and rivers. Somelimes, the oil flows through gravitational force alone, but normally. 1 it requires pumping "boosting" to *cep it moving. The great trunk pipe-lines ef f America, (as intricate as any j freight railway network I are serviced by pumping stations whose controls are as numerous as those of Ihe main-line signal box. Owing to the efficiency of the patrol men and repair squads. losses through leakages are genetnlly negligible. Life of a pipe-line under nor mal conditions is around 23 years, and should a line become redund-i ant, it Is sometimes economical to! lake it up for UN elsewhere. I Manufacture oi oil pipe ISJ among the most important activities of the British petroleum tquipment Industry, and already I < ne firm has reported sales of. pipe, worth the dollar equivalent ol several million pounds, to U-S ( ompanles this year. If Is also worth while remembering that It was a British firm who made the | 12diameter pipe for the first Iraq pipe-lines, nearlv 20 years ago, Hi well as supplying 16" pipe for the post-war Iraq pipe-lines, one of which is already In operation. BLUg HYACINTH • Elastoplast AID FIRST DRESSING 0c0^i!!^f wRaS carnalf fr—dom ot mov*m*rrt For I safety's sake say tlimgaail' I1ASTIC • COMFOITAtlt • A VAftllTV OF M m for dentures, or prefers a crown or a stopping, ihe dentist demands ihe rouble rate for tho Job. In the case of a good worker who is worthy of Mich consideration, tha industrial worker's own organisation will give him the teeth." Women Navvies Life in Moscow Is hardest for reports Father Thomas. "1 saw them doing the toughest ould not choose her slyle. Shi gave her size and was handed the shoes. If she wanted another shape or colour she could do nothing about It." The housewife's choice of food '-Plentiful." said Father Thornac %  omvially it is unralioiicd. Bui with meal coating 25. a pound mad butter E2 10s rationing Ln force—by price." WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED —I,E.H. Mrs. K.mer broadcast recently \ In a i.ullo series called "Mo the Commonwealth." She gav.three talks on the aboriginal children's art, and In a WW months television viewers In Britain may see this art for ihemselvea. 'The letter I had from Barrv". she said, "will do a lot to convince the many sceptics that % %  • • work Is really ihcir own." ONE DOSERelieves INDIGESTION M.P. "Chieftain" LONDON A. Feoner Brockway, labour M.P., stepped from a plane here wearing the silk-lined fur robe of a chlefuUn In the Klkuyu tribe He had lust returned from a twomonth visit to Africa where Kenya tribesmen made him an hon orary chieftain. p rf ** %  " % %  !oi yourself bow ONI iKlSli ol Maclean Brand Stomach 1'owdcr will relieve the distreiaina ,vi7.p.Ktm oi piunlul INDIGESTION .Hlt'rmsot DIGESTIVE TROUM.B i .1.10111. HtASTBultg. NAUSEA, (UIOUNCfc. ST0MAOI PAIN, BIL10USNIS! This %  XOKI.D Union, rciiKd> l.rings qaiJ. anJ definite relief b> cause U is %  PERI BCTLT BALA> BD formula. Hut Kuirc MvJ( for MACLEAN HltAND STOMACH POWDER which ii only genuine it ugnr.1 "Ales. C. Mad When PAIN strikes.. remember Phensic MACLEANX Brand Stomach/ !" wder In Monday's ADVOCATE FULTON OURSLER writes the Flret Chapter of THE GREATEST STORY EVER TOLD The sooner you take Phensic. the sooocr rou'll fed better, fee Pheosic's quick, safe action will bring relief, lift away pain-caused fatigue, and remove weariness in a muter of minute*. Pbensic neither | harms the heart, nor upsets the stomach. Be prepared for pain — keep %  supply of Pnf mff handv Vusttake\ 2 Jabletsj (Phensic %  for quick, safe relief I MOM HEDCHES, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMMiO, ( f NERVE PAINS, NEURLDI, INFLUENZA, COLDS A CHIOS j For my type of work says the cane cutter NFW A truck can be a 1 powerful JHJ stroog a* VJJ like —but ii can only work as hard a*, he driver. The new Austin Loadstar is buili lo take care of ihat. The cab makes the driver*! work Bier, safer and more comfortable, and all lie 'trutgth and p rm vou look for in an Austin is there in the cuav>i* and engine. % AMI. AMD %  .' %  VICI AUUI .!. %  r-.'>t*4-i liitf at I '


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15. 1K0 SUNDAY ADVOCATE IWf.l suVr'N Life with Suiilul Hub Fatlier-3AlrVlceMarrtal TRAIN—JUST LIK BeMMtt'f daughter tayt Jets' S CHOOL rvotidaya are the ost times for me. Dec a us* men I'm at home and lather and I he fueh good fun toitttwr. But sometimes wnen 1 come down to creak last, ne ian't mere I ask where he la. and mother says ne has flown ofl io, say. Karachi, at ball-past lour that morning He may be Met In a week 1'hen ofl hell go abroad somi •here else We never Know uheu sere going to see bun But when we an togetner uir Become* modi eaeltinf TWO year* ago he laughr me how to dn?. • car and a minim tar* motor Dike Sometimes 1 drive him In >ur trap when we're fet'ling Ilk. tomm motion Bu; we both love •peed bast of ah We nave lovelv noliaavi in •wnierland which is mv mother.Home countrycspeciallv in ihe winter when we ski I *unt my life to Da as hill or 'brills as my father's, so when I am older 1 aould like ui u> Uti-ing instrueroT In Swti/rrlaii' during thr winter, and in i! summer a nding Instructor Australia. ARSENAL STARS: ow L a ? 1 tn T, & '.* i' luU trBl >" wn lo become su. rootoaiiers And can a small team— school tarn-Qiu -f .^^ Sco S l club ,or 'Mtance-hope to do anything at all In that line ? Tht answer : y* AH leading footballers aava Improvised their own equipment. Perhaps they once played in back alleys instead of on playing fields, and when dribbling along tiie pavemeni they probably used 'he wall to deflect ir.e oa.t around ir imagtrarv nimnnent Espen df CROSSWORD ^~ r ~j£~i t ,fc ~ r x $'-T-K r Z J^ -It r rt.-i J :_ : "Ki • r*l '.MI i OWlone speed For I'll ,' %  ov te*.|.iii j iiv fatner Th is one i t wrong Can you spot ivh\ in*. ia|i ., i %  uile lull'.m rte rgur r* take tu between am' N if fat m> It ggv IKWU orwuJaa 11. HUIIOVM part H %  loan tmc* so W Niea riata.ui -— iSi U pah. (it las ba aoue Jiti-i SSd g**M UM same a* m acru> il. Ull.lrr UUI (J. I >erw mi the-e %  Quel. Ui • iillallj part of tne BiDic i* ',iruD colour (i I ate oB. (II I lime bopan.u\. IJ tuu WWII IOU iX 11 uo I.VHJ. it) ia FruS TIWII iu Ureuubi*, (. %  last in. se.ii l No l t %  I roMl I8I Nut 'Km unu not iiir.tfiui. wlw. IS) Ilia UtiiB i" % %  So. lutld mukea or. ll*ili-t (* i ri. Carelage. it I t ^ AN you spot the mii take on this stamp It coals sixpenceami D cause of the mistake it soon be worth more Stamps with Errors Bought bv collectors all ovai i| Thu one. olive, was iai IM% cokiu i\>Vorlasni Hemispttere and re siippeo by i-Wing M lie looked north e.nl ! -u'uracin* Motice til.dodo mo? anicB inog livail 'inMiiuriiiu* .nil could 101 lly and was killed of! Perforauofl U 13* nv u, ^ia e taee value ol vi .-en's u 'mil 21d.-J. % P8. I shall deal wim another '•ror stamp next week-end A rigiu-nuiia t.trwara Oesda la ^r'STZ^r* TT* """ Jl um < wnu ?i t %  iltijg jliivers i 'Naldrefr Press lOiJ. WHA.'S NEW? Don't Call The BOSH A Liar Pen Pals A Nice Cup Of Tea By MILTON KAPLAN LONDON When boiling water ha* been So you want a "nice cuppa tea." poured Into the teapot, allow four Americans are drinking more to six minutes for "infusion"— tea than ever, according to reports reaching the tea-dnnklngcst land in the world, and an American in England would be abjectly remiss if he did not warn that tea-making Is not as cany ax it looks. What Americans regard as teamaking is about as far from the real thing as a cup of British coffee is froan drinkable Just pour eoraa boiling water In a teapot. add some tea leavoa? That won't do. No. Mrrloe To follow tha rules prescribed to-day by the British Tea Centre, gather around you the following materials: Supply of tea leaves (a more or less essential ingredient). One kettle for boiling water. nv teapot. One stop-watch. Milk (or cream) Ready now? First, the teapot should be warmed and rinsed thoroughly with boiling water before inserting the dry leaf. Next, boll "freshly-drawn" wat in the kettle—water goes stale, and once boiled ahould never be John Crosby. Bethel Mission House. Bay Street, St. Michael Hobbles are Stamp collecting. Reading, and playing encket Hi is also a Wolf Cub nnd likes swimming. LONDON. Judge John Blagden. 49. at Franklyn Belgrave. St. i n.u .< %  Westminster County Court ruled Village, South Naparima. Sac that to call a boss a liar justifies Fernando, St. John's P.O. TRINIf-ummary dismissal. DAD. Hobbles are stamp collecting. The judge refused damages for cinemas, dancing, photography wrongful dismissal to Mrs. KathWants pen pals between the age leen Perira, former stenographer of 14 and SO. (Boys and girls) of Sidney Lawis. managing director of a London manufacturing tlrm. Mrs. Perira. then a Miss Wood, was alleged to have said: "You're a liar" during an argument with Lewis over office instructions She contended that she said "It's a lie"—but only after she had been fired. Giving judgment for the firm with costs, the judge commented "In duelling days, to call a man ip %  i I a U i .i t Ul i Ja-H. ntves M tin. %  re-a I coniiing•ower As. 1 Id. <>od OU.VS '-llraprl era ino| .., i W robot 160. lid ... All L" jn *£i c s '"""' on*'bet *T\. K9VS Y 1 V 11 ln# ,,|,,f • rr Rupert and the Castaway — 26 the larger the pot, the harder the %  mi the more time should be llowed for the tea leaves and i-atcr to get together. If the American has gone this far, he is ready for the last big • "*f was enough to Justify the hurdle. That is, to use milk (or cream) with the tea. This is not particularly Inviting to Americans, for reasons which tend to i>ecome obscured after the practice has been followed for ,. while. But without milk (or cream)— ^ one-quarter or one-third of cup— i JMI'! tcu. Or so the British say, and they should know. One last word of warning: don't be found dead (at least by a meticulous Briton) pouring fresh tea Into a cup containing dregs of a previous tea bout. It just Isn't done, old boy?—INS drawing of his rapier by any man of honour. "Zven in these days It seams to me that for Mrs. Perira to call her employer a liar or to say 'It is lie* was an act of indiscipline hich justified summary dismia"It was a statement calculated to rouse most Intense Indignation in any man who had any aelfit-sped al all. "Some element of discipline containing the mug ^nj =J| n evpry £*,„_ tion between master and ar\ ant,"—I.N.*. .. When Rupstt hat h*d meal hi is given ne nmc > ITM lath dsrkwi •urrMina he. tn4 urge him sol of the villige %  .1 bjck into the feres'. When that rvich %  hill ihiy pull him ind pmh him. iivd he hn to go iun where thav kid fher* mu br %  oine They sll Mem ro know HIM whkvAre You A DAZZLER? tance apart as the lamp centres. By taking a Una to the wait from the side of the car you can check that they are truly ahead and not pointing to one aide Finally make sure that the dipYOU cannot grumble about ping device works. used again. When the water "has being dazzled by uppeoachnv. Spot or pass lamps must be reached the point of bubbling headlights unless you are SURE by law 2ft. ebove the ground. fiercely," as the book says, snatch your own are not causing dazzle. And the beam should be checked the pot off the fire. Don't waste To check the setting of your in the same way to drop about a second. lights, put the car on level ground 6in. In the 25ft. to your wall and Now comes the really imporabout 25ft. from a wall or your swing slightly to the left. If It tant principle of tea-making— garage door It must be truly is u flat-topped beam, you can what Is known as "the short pour" square to the wall. tilt the lamp slightly right |o .ind reads as follows: Switch on the lights and see allow for road camber. "Take the teapot to kettle and where the beams strike the well. Correctly set lights do not not kettle to teapot." This is funThe centre of the illuminate 1 dazzle. Dipping is not ecmpulsory damcntal because water should areas must not be higher than but wise and courteous. reach the tea leaves ait near boilthe centre of the lamp. The two Barrow D. 1 pin. b lug point as possible. centres must be the same dls_ —I..F.S &w+i*a HCYO*** TALC io intimately yours BOURJOIS ARE \0U JUST A PU.YTHING NATURE? CUTE. Sparkling, fadeless, magic-wear CUTEX, brings your hands new admiration ... easy to apply • • • dries faster, too. The polish that wears longer. — resists peeling god chipping . and comes in such bnllunc shades. CUTEX OH! MOTHEIl Nature may end<ireas and feel weak, resile*-, no cranky and Irritable lha' you almost turn into a *h<-o<>il on such days—rsua is smsrrHtwi YOO BltOVLPNT JOM ABOUT BtSTt right away—try Lydla E. Pinkbam'a Vegetable Compound ' relieve such ayrnpliwM. H' larnuus for this puriK.-HAnd donl l.irge; Ptnkhamn Compound jua oz haii ntteee such niniitiuv paztl Tin Brent medtine •[ to latggveg accompanjing tension, Irritability. trume tired-out. mean plrk-onaeayyggw leelmgs—when due to this cause. Taken regularly tluuout the month—Pmkliams Compound helps build up reaulaitce against such dsstresa—a very sensible thins: to do Just MXI ll you, loo. donl remarka b ly benefit' All drugstores afy&a. €.(PhtM#mb llVX^l So beautifully easy. . And She Applies i SA4IIOOI ; Because Kacreei Conguerg \ ; PAIN On Sale at KNIGHTS DRUG STORES ? so easily beautiful btCaUSe Brylfmm lesniei to thoroughly yet so groUv, your hair (infused with new radiance, oew sparkle. Let B mirror tell the story—the story of glowing, glorious hairihl And h.>w wonderfully manageable Brylfoam makes your hair; how comomical it Is, too. Remember UM iptedy, creamy lather *nt* every type of hair — dry or greasy, dark or Mr. Aik tor Hrylfoam and sec how beautiful your base caa be! la lubes, die km4y and the /ergs ete-nswy agge. there's more foam in BRYLFOAM THi OBIGINAL H.-JM SHAMPOO IN A IUM LOVELIER SKIN IN 14 DAYS FOR 2 WOMEN OUT OF ll \i\ P/ALMOLIVE BEAUTY PLAN Thirty-nine doctors—IfH leading ikin .'[MI i.ili-l-h.i\no\. pgwtct] 14-day tntt "i ill'" Phusiiollvc Itcauty Plan" on I.(HJ ivonsea of all ages and rv ry type Of aWn. Thry rr|H>n a deflnUe, noticeable Improve* meni in the complexion oi 1 women out of { (lupported Ivj lignerj -t.itementH liy llvWHIietl i!" BW IVt These wenanmim tin Improvement] FACE POWDKR %  lOUbP. • PKRIUUK • LIPSTICK XLD CREAM • VAMSIUNO CREAM • HRIl.I.tAMINK • IIAlk I RJLAU a %  f J IT'S Af IAIY ss that. Mother: And to pbrsaant! To 11 last a cokl In Jouble-qukk tlmt, just rub chesr. throat and back at bedtime with soothing, cormecting Vtcks VjpoKob Thai* all you Jo: Then watch VapoRuo go 10 work on that cou .. to or JlAlK AtOUT FAST I F before \ou pur tlie jar down, VapoRub starts to relieve the cotdinfu.>.ivPlnvi,there's a glow ol a-armth and comfort In the oungster (eel* hrlght as a button—yoo chased Ma cold overnight 1 OVER 40 MRIION TIMES A YIARI ONE YOUNG MOTHER I! am . vl no*. In 7 over 4Uriii lw ,, chances with unliied remed and time-tested ... for children and gro-vn• ~&&* i***~ %  ->?> %  irpuiied: saw) V.e>* \.e e/M .r* e Co* Btm''* he Few*"Frathar, imoothtr Br, hter, cl. irer un. t|W 'oofc/ "g See what ikia Plan will do (or your (1(111—111 only 14 dayi! Ifyou would likp your complexion lo be as lovely at you have alwayi liopcU i( cuulj be, try the Palmolive Beauty I'Uu." II'I M liaple. ThU ll all you dot 1 ItVuA jour/ox ind Pctmotat Suit. 2 Maiuii ik rit^ oJipMil dulrr itUjam ikbfor am fidl mimiU. l*Sb Start now, cootiQue for 14 dtys. And prove as the doctors proved — that _if you keep your skin cleansed by Palmou've's beautifying o.ivc*>il lather, you are M to . • KEEP THAT SCHOOLGIRL COMPLEXION >



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SUNDAY, OCTOBUl IS, %  •* SUNDAY ADVOCATE PACE THBEG PUZZLE: FIND THE STARS Gardening Hints For Amateurs \l ill! < III. III.I Big names. £30,000 pay i %  In-'|u''-. ha>e vanished from British films. And audiences like it that way . H' Harold (oiii Orlobrr Is S. •l-ll,.v Tim.History Of The "Flattops 9 it. Hy G. The til le of "TASK FORCE" vwTth oil that IhC words Imply niu*t. of necessity, have mote than .. those 01 us who schievwl mai.aHty prjoe ta World but remember something of Wi rid 1 an.. Of it. lai amt Kuppum mi • .11 TBa 1 chat ax tail in this %  ..v showing at Ihe Naw yieture are almost not only the biator] fa I nowaere due, tiniilm la.-k great war weapon, but also a picpersonal realism Mil : t' ,d > ;. b> .!!? v nbcrw '" cb "^ i"""! cnronomala. mcnmi the Km u composed Iride. .< proiiina an ariasequence. release,! lor the tint Now that October Is her* tt u time to route out those Seedboxes from laM .,..>. and begin preparing them for the new an nun) seeds. It may seem very Bail this but these preparations take time and if October Is set as a tariret 11 will be found that at pj^V least some of the bos,— will be leady by Ni planting tin Look over y repair Ml that Seed-boxes ..II. — . ANDRES LIVER SALT The Girl They far art: STU.l A ANK1II M Hera, tl.cn. is a new, lnvlgoratof only tuns, by m e t] s Nu I twenty years. This picture la eorar Pearl Harbour. HI ing and discard, those that are 100 "'""sUy the biography of in, An, Terhiucolor. the Okinawa o'd and shaky to mend. Do not "aft Can.. leriKaudly „ mp lp ,. T^ m ..„,. be tempted to use any old broken Nataal Officers and „,,. „„„! p ,„, „, down ones, lor that so often .'^ifr !" ?' !" ,"£TC. •"' conalu. suits in the box collapsing and %  sad sttuaftod test 10 bring it , uctko T ,„. sp.lllng the seedlings just baton %  bwng and then to p.. , )lut „ „, hp ^ „„.,, they are ready to bo planled out, ! the superb weapon win, ,,. and so weeks of patient ears lacart*oii ss AwtoUm „,,„ „, lost Aircraft Cam,. ,,r -Hatlop. the ,„ mndarn earrlara Have the boxscrubbed and ... in ll„PacUV would have coal T „££ ^^uTth. fuYl^o-operadncd in the sun. Sec that tliev minutely more in loss of life and ti0Il f Iht us Nill y ,,.|i,.,u hava several holea bored in the human suffering than I, did. and „ c intelligent' plot, with bottom, and after covering the even with the Flattops U'osssl ,„„„,„ ,,„,„.„ ,,. ..—a wat. 1 h ..f Interesting Naval and on a rather desolate sandpit m e %  me-noi-able picture Instead of "Here we The soil that is used to fill the aerodrome waltfelfl fog their WaftTHItuiri/ttw rum IIAAHIV under ecmcroet and boxes should be a mixture of mandmg omeer to land He •yenniw pUyiii at !" Glo^ ThemFOR jean. British studios h-. been trying to ouild up new idm in* '!imcnt in British film proholea with a layer f it alarm on the Hollywood model— ductlon. Producers can now say: drainage, your boxes are reads LUmouriaed and over pubuciaevj -* h . A"* glOT Vi wf i? u "* be filled z* i> SSJm 4 a> r p*c-'<*; a s tT ?j, or *!,*J* m Z: 1 ,„,.--s— |^ ri mo role. Instead ot rier ue iLT SSLS-!i t mlM .urt*. ,nrt hare Min X under conlrort and boxe should be a mixtun inSJX^ ££ ^S£wh!lS <*o*e noiMno ; wr must find some mould, dry cow manure. - %  '" tuaUy lands his rraple biplane. Is he ,yp,of !^!L K ^Ls Ih ST %  eff ? rtfc Jtory with a b* V star role for her." charcoal. Combine this t.uxtu..and inform!, them thai th.US .Ut hiTo < pr !^ t," 1 lod y ^^ ^ The new wav promiaw a much well, and Mil it through a garden Navy has rank most of her capital 'Jl^ *£ r {' V" %  ?*"lf r J*^'J; ptacttcally no genuine fllm aUrs higher tanoa f d ^ of picture, to ,ive once or twice before using ahlpa and heavy cruiaer. fMa, ig!£?g^.'?? J 'S^ !^?-g -' %  %  „ come and at a more economical H l0 nil out the boxes Place of course, actually happened IB ,,, h „ ., „,;" ' ..,.,," L.3S ^i,. We have rare t,tr-appeaninces rog £2 0.000jo £30.000 a year four brlr i„ lor stones) under the 1920 or imi and was considered Vhie U d'erived f m by Margaret Lockwood and Phyllis M i a ries—like the stars who 1 llld Calvert. by artist* like Olivier and onc demand Celia Johnson. We have periodic |ghcd. returns of Hollywood-based Britsome of the stars may not like ish actors, and many dne perit. But this change of policy will formaiices of star standing. help them in the long run; for It But where are the regular, should prove the savins of the inproved stars whose names will dustry. draw the public to any iilm Their value has been tuasipatsxl Exit Harrison 1 too many bad scripts, too many ONE ACTOR who could make wanderings off into other enterhimself the biggest draw In Brittainment fields, too much iwrvish. films Is Rex Harrison. uus hiding of their pictures from the West End. Above all, there has been disastrously cheap publicity for some 1 premising youngsters at too early a stage In their careers. (In (his discussion we will disregard, not overlook, Anna iVeaole. who is on exception to anv rule.) But here is the signiflcant point ;ire British Alms suATeilng beci %  coiners of the box. whattME the fjmou' them—have vanit u „ „ p i an i stand or But Mr. Harrison does not stay here long enough to help the industry After a long interval, he has finished making a murder story here with his wife, 1J11I PalmerThe laong Dark Hall It hns been a quick, and what looks like an expert jol)—seven weeks on a budget of £15*1.000. split between this country and America. Now the Harrisons are off again before the film is shown—to coJohn van Bell, Book this star-policy has collapsed? Not at a!i—they are doing excellently without the big names. Thev Made Money THINX of some of the best money-makers: Whisky Galore, They Were Not Divided. The Blue c* rwt Lamp. The Wooden Morse, The (,orillUHS SeilQ I.OV8 Happiest Day* of Your Ufc—-and •* star on Broad Druten's new play and Candle. WORLD COPYRIGHT RtSUVCO —US In your bathroom 1 (in of Purolpondtr always ought m he reidv. when powderiag voumlf afitr the baih. you make ^-**^ nd cool again; 1 .. pi futoi pt rfluou. penpi iniR and alum f 1I'urolpowiS^lfc^' d*i ilio hash Str'g? " amds of HI. I (rouble., si ^^^ ecscsu. pru-klr he... cu $I$W! IMPROVED ODEXSOAP O M> sMn mlly tlwn O Bnltka penpinthia odour leim M| nttt iid dilil) AVOID OFFENDING-USE ODEX |-J,'l:H!iHB'M:l A' all I .,,,, dr, £..„..n.iaf Ol 11 P riic, fju now'9e\'en Days to Noon. No topline atar name In any of them; audiences have been flocking in because they want to sec good stories and direction, not stars. To put truth before gallantry. if is a number of tinii'oducrlotu, urtth star iMunn u'hich hare he. by the entire nation .. a litnng Id.h„ „V ,he ae^ianeeholoraiiM of IS14-I0 h.irt. by Its ,,, n r ib,,t,., t„ ,1 group "l fliers mnlntaincd for punly experimental purposes, who wore uniforms more suitable for Cavalry Officers than for Aviators In this sequence, the Com % %  landing Officer informs his fliers that the Navy has kept n coal lander, the rss. T aj.ajlas" with which it Intends to experiment as a earner of sea-boine aircraft. accoidingly, they commence mnkIng practice landings and takeoffs on • section of the aerodrome, the site of the fhaht deck of the U.S.S. 'Umgler." The story quickly unfolds, of mit her" graceful aqutit. those early days of struggle for oeuvres. The art tin*, foi thta ballel recognition not only of abUity, ,, rat hr nlulM ,..| (Ill | the lightbut also of ideas and foresight, j. .. i,i K hh cdective when the airplane was atill eonTh 0 story eMcerni ail In prat sidered to be purely an ancilliary iletwbla, ,., whousssl weapon. Lead by their Command( , t Hl s aAr ea sssntssry to get him Ing Ofnear. Lt.-Corn, Pete nu o( V aru>us romantic entangleRichards, played by Waller Bran„.. nt* Bein,: in love with hit i ."an, Gary Cooper as U. Scott a.id i u i^.clf. l>ut n>eetmg with no studu original Naval Air Servlc c ^ 5 | ie and her glrl-ti : %  %  I pilots are transferred to the ,-y,.. „ p| ari( which, if succesaful. 1-anKley ;.IK are greeted by w m „ **,. dim realise where hi* ike quite certain that unts Capt. Reeves (Jink Holt), later real happiness llea. leeds and this i lo becomp Admiral Reeves, a seaEsther Williams and Paula Uay/ f/i.n* tce've j wires someiohaT* — we've pot Morgan Phiium ditevnstna tlie dale ot l>ic next General I wtth Lora H'< picture of this kind, the story b always aecondary '.. ihr ,|-i '. % %  I Filmed in Tcrhnicn(or, the In i.-ts .ind thiMfi-thes worn by the various female members n* I the east are luxurious to put i; i mildb/ Tinmil" America's famous playground. Sir., \ Valley, are beautiful, particular)-' tinwinter as^uanoai TsWra I spectacular ski-Ing, and the Torch | .1 nmhl is Uke .n fairyland Christmas. Tha %  .-'< h.dlet. which is the main feature Is most colourful, wtth the eassssjtl lowing Miss William:; throughBR1TISH and German toys art • -^ p^ war. Thousands of pounds are *i tt"ng soggj at stake and British mamifactur>>> ITS are determined to w n. Jhe "cause of maiiy Taihires, pul dot of tha old school, whoac~crjp. mond"piMv "the"VwiTgirii'smd -•-They ballevc that since Certhe feet of Ute plant stand In '.no of the h..ttle of Jutland U n active girts ihcv arc too, ivbila • .Soi.iu poor buainess in Hie man toys went off the market .(„,, of water or lie Hoo-doo tai>e consldesred a classic, and who IS Van Johnaoii sod sVohn Lund iriv. Mat year. they have been able to dig mem aroun d eueh box. frequently %  al'ed the father f.| plenty of nmiai Pictures like The Third Man and selves In and will be able to keep Naval Came/ Aviation. Then .lohimon loes a SPOl of slnsjUlJ State Secret have certainly conthe business. If it is possible to have soim ( 0 llows their initial training, tIu i dancing and ^•••^ %  dance tained some blggl^h names, mostly "We welcome the chance of sort of shelter lor your Seed %  vnien wtfJ v „ y nuij ,, _, 1; i-| ,,, ^J hi ,. ,..,, lltf|nB „„ imported. That sraa a box-offlce competing with the Germans bam in case of ""^Jj"-. of trial ana .utended dam.-le: • lo kaoi Ni.r'li laitiHun makstr of %  >.haitne An rnu.i. us-rnndah IS a.... —.. -a. _, "i .. l r. *"' safeguard for the American marsaid ket. But I guarantee that these mechanical toys. thrillers would have been equally "We a successful without any star tnfufore the 1 Morisdifferent now tents that mv forever Williams, while Mr Umd Is CHYITOQroTt^lervS hew to worfc h: AXVDI. 6 A A X R h. L U \ U I' E L L O W f simply i-la'-Js for another. In this example A is used X for the two O's. etc Single Inters, apoa* trophies. ;hf 1 •: .* t fOftsia tl g the words ar? all hints Each day the cot. l> "a are d.. ^i.^;,tnK> poiniciun,, the latter mon n, | ,.,..,k .I,.,,,, a. One %  r three L'l whleh A Cryre-or'a^ yoetalloa TZHYAKX. PIHTAKX. KHPPKX OP 01*1 Z H Y r X K i im -j '_ .„ r.iri hriY poiiiicians, uio iiuiiT m'-re tna'i Eleanor Powell i. i>a< h ag.nn P "" I. 1 V.„^i nlaeSl m \ne aw." abetted bv „ "' h "' "?„}*, "IS te h' • i lr """* The film then Wo uprights forrnlni a ver th< ,„„ .^^np^^, ^ c Jlm „„ „„ .„ „,,„„.. ^^ to *u, T !" t !" .he tssVii earner., from the ,-srlv iru.k.-*lft lo hare Mifteicl Ughtl, In th, case of he.w eatner ( ; ^ r ,. nude, of thosl All this preparation tutu %  i ,.f Nnv.^l At la Hk i here I80 It la lust as well to Stan earl> nan, between the two wan earefrve aalety. I It may aaam a lot of tus, % %  ,,,,.,.., .,|nhetie treatment thoroughly relaa unneessssry trouble to lake, sad .^ some people do plant their see.! lust anywhere and anyhow .mcl 10 away with It. But many also ha%. (allures, due not to bad seeds although they always get blame, but to the ncgleetol prop" care and preparation taken belore hand. Safety-first girls use M urn Safer for charm • Safer for (kin Safer for clothes QOOU* . rreatetl lo k**•( yu cuol and elegant all through the day YARDLEY fS'^./yiAVINDIIl mi'Iht luxury loop of Iht world' V ,•!. IT %  • OLD lOlli UHllt :->si>aal "ft*"* -.---'" Is* 1 "' Sfiawpoo IfcHOt-'' GLOBE TOMTK 8.10 and CONTINl'INC. 5 and 8.30 SEA VIEW (.LIST HOUSE IIAKT1NOK. AllAIMH IXtU.I.KNT i I hINK ULI.V RO0BBD BAR KATES: S5.M per Itay upwards f Indeslvr) Apply— Mrs. W & HUWKI.i. Jkfcfjf N olhr HtmipoM ii.au you iK • BBM m|i.-.blend of letfet r,jcedienu plui fentle lanohn. ^^^^Ttj^-^ So rich-lathering m hard--.i water. Leaves hair fragrantly clean, shining, and to iTiarMge-ible. try Luvlre-Creme I Now on sale everywhere in the rvindtome bine and white ,ir. NOT A SO*!* 1 NOT A OOUlO' BUT A WONOfAIUl NfW C'SCOVfaY— A C"l VM SKAI-ieOO WTTM LANOLIN lOa SOII IU.TDCUI OLAelOSOUi WM. FOGARTY LTD. TAILORING DEPT. RED ROSE TEA! IT IS GOOD TEA. I'M S H.'lf Hour of 9wect Songs by RAY NUNES B. G's ACE Hear T*if %  r % %  '. mi'ite(11 Rose%  < %  *—fS) Out of Nowhrr "' Moo< -f j) Nltv haa a 1.000 •yva—(61 Pnsone ni 1-i'V" Make your personal selection now. from among the Extensive Range of WOCM.UMS. WORSTID, TROI'IfAI. MITINtiS, OautY AND IX-SKIN FI-ANNBLS. SERGES. HARRIS AND SPOUTS TWEEDS, now on display In our WOOLLENS DEPARTMENT SHOP AT FOGARTY'S



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SUNDAY. OCTOBER 15, 1*66 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PACE FIFTI I N B.B.C Radio Programmes and Notes -i \im >. mm M 11. | • m Tha Nawa. T t am ysta; 7 IS am *trlka %  ftisar; Bam r-m ihe Eu'oru "•nui PuNr 111 Unirsd Nation* Maaert; a SO a v iht ( i a m tri i Th* Nmi. II in n Anilv.l.. 13 IB TRKASON ON TRIAL Mean fraai heea; 1146 pm Lnnalan 1.11 p IT i RadM Nm>n %  unda> Vivw.. J p m Th* R*1 10 p an %  •ana Nawa fmn Btttali III P m CUannupMn in Praclir*. I of l-ondon' Underground atjMttn %  tram. Thu 1-aiutr prograinrr will be detail .nd .. objecuvrt, a, p... ??**" ., h \*' .S"* 1 riS — i %  — %  .. gfc-g gigr&dE '•' (A Oo Thursday next. 19th init'. E 1 ** 1 "-, nd HIM The triJ of the BBC will tooadcast %  feature Mr^ JWWj* Bukhan... Secj^ Suw Qp^,^ of xhe B programme entitled "Treason on ,*£,.> .S?^*? *?,£ 0mmuni !i Htwoe ol Comrnofie New HtHafte of Commons Nn>t Trialfrom which emerge, the J?T^""^ a "? c loa f, arit w J*h by His Majesu ,"he King difference between trials under "_* nUSfLS?* ^ t <* wM-wtde mlpmi Th r BUT i? Foviet law and under British '*."""j !" ?.. 1 ^"* """W will broadcast this State Opening • and American law, leaving the on %  "**.* T* !" mcn "" ." f and in the General Ovcraaa* Serverdict with the ltatener ilom ha d held h. 1 ** P lw '" <"e ii-ii i The programme considers in Man .. BalUnUa*. 4 It p n. Imni idf 4 I! M a— al l*. 4 JO p m Bund 4.H p m EpOcgue; S Uur Ou-.w3 II p m Pinp.nu-.* 11 IS p m BBC HMUnd fag*; S Jo p m finm In* Childretvt rt t l eW i 1 D m Sriemc* to Ma*ii. • p m H. lu nd Britain Outi. • JO p m Radio Ne.-reel. I 3D p m 11 Sk Bundav Sarvtc*: I p m. Th* tillni Archie 1pm Th* N*<; NaSvv. 7 10 p m Nawa Anil--) 111 p m Home Nr.. lrom Britain. %  Rk C-ribbaan Vole**. 1W f> m pm Sport. Rcv.ew 3 pm Mael M aajarn Man I^oha .1 J-aui Nation* Repaut Mriiiinf; Oechealra; B.30 pin Inndon Port 10 p m Th* Km; ID t* p m Fm.i. ThF EdKoilali. 10 IS p m An ll.niii 10 Declare; 10 43 p.m. Semprini at : %  S^ono, I! pm Engllah Sorafa no -ION Wrul IS Mtc of lohvil—r *Mmthnn Sarvnadv' 4 10 i Trc , !" crt ,od~lh .Thcn.1 £^tr*; n ?,. , he „~„T„" 0 rd t in Hungary of Cardinal Mlndsien* %  nn %  — J H 'roduced not only r^ the arctUtarti UaST*srv££ wi",rK ifLrss?. %  rs.sa.r'S" Onpui. AnalvtU: Til a m. Crnirmi Band th* Royal Air Frf* ; II) im C -cn-nlii" Part Con f>iwn<*; I s from th a>lllorlala. 1 10 a m. V |IHI ParMdr. B IS a m MhU .-. m ih Hpni; t m Cloar Down; II noon M.v Th* N>; II 10 a.m. Na%>a Anaii >.. arnM Do >ou remamber; Minn IT. % %  tlta Piano; S p in U*tmrr> ChoWr. Ill p m ProaBanunr Par., iCM pin Th^ *oryt41aT 5 45 p m OvMtuMi. fl pm TruCathrdr >l TI. Tfca Pint I*. !" Th NHrtj 5 10 p m Nna Analviu; 1 IS pm Th* Mlfr of BalluitrarEaplanda I 7 49 p • Conwnaiiv* Parly Conlnnc: p n KMM N**ar**l; SIS p • D Notion* praorl S SO p m Coanpoarr t( th* Wrak; %  S p m Scienca Rr-— a 46 p III BBC North*!-* l> JO p m Book, to R**d. 0 41 Film Rnira. 10 p m Th* ensure us smooth functioning. mdictment for pcrjurv lock „,,(„, chi ,mber. omces and public Thursday. ISHhlnst. .I9.00p.rn litutioi Id. The broadcast will be on Saturday, 21st inst. at 10.15 p.m Why Be a Teacher?' In the third Of Qsl cum-!.; a>ries ol interviews nd diseu-• lavww. 10 p m Th* I From tha CrfnonaU. I IS P CHURCH SERVICES IT. CATHmiNF. r-Mii Gap1 D aermon Ct IT*ach*r rt A Younj M 1 pm Siindsy School %  pajakar: Major Moffatt 7 pm. H*v B Croaliy lUondav 7.at p m B*c*plton iwvvie* Ol Nw M*mb*r>< DAlJCiaTM-B am R*v MA Thotui 3 pm Sundaj BchOOl Spa>k r r R*v 11 C Payna. 7pm Hr. O Br*w,tri %  JXHONT-II • m. Rav B Croaby 3 p.m. Sunday Sfhool Sppaker H*v H. A. E. Thomai. 7 p.m. runr. H. A T. Thomu SOUTH DUrnULT • a m B*v. •- Croaby 7pm Mr A 8 Hm PrWVIDtatCaV-ll am Mi C II*.7 p.m Mr I IIUcKmaiv VAUX1TAL1--1I a m Mi G Jona* • p.m. Mr H Oronl TBIK BALVATTON ARMr sBttrocrrowN CTTWTRAI.H • m Hollnaaa M**tlr, 3pm Cmnp-it .Vartlni 7pm Salvation Mrrtino Pr*.rh-i Malor Smith WBUJNGTON ftTRrarr — nan lloUnwa Mt*Un B 3pm Company Morllng 7pm SaUatlon Medina: Fraarnn Malm QQiha DIAMOND COKNF.K I r*a* Mretlnaj HonCompany M**linc 1 pm Salvation Mrr-mm Pr*och*i iJrutinaiil Moor* CHECKILK HAM. i; .. i-, It,..!,.. %  MoMlna; 1 pin C.mpaiiy Mprtinu 1 p.m. SalVituni Martlnf Pr*atHf-: Llcntan^nl Knil PfK O-rKNEHII %  m Holln< Mootlns 3 p m Company Meet inn 7 p.m Salvation Meeting Preacher Major Halllnsaui'ith FOUR ROADS— ll a m Ilollnas* M*etlii( I p i! Companv Meetin* 7 pm Salvation Meeting Preach*. Uoutanani Hind. CABI.TON—11 om Holln*>. Sleeting. 1 p.m. Companv Mwllng 1 n m Falvatlon Meellna. Praaeher Bourne FdirHeld Road. Black RockT p n Stondav Btbl* l^ctur*. l-SO p n t'rIda*' autHa Study. Tha Rev Wn Otkratohue. apa-ker Th* publwr ..< IrrpttH l thU mble Study CHRISTIAN .StV-NCC rirst Church of Ctirm. ScienliBrldsetnan. Uppar Bay Strad % %  days II am. and 7 p.m. Wod W aoB H a P m A aorvkto which mciu.iTeauraanlea of Chrlatlan Srl*nr* II-' ing Sunday. Ortobar IS. ISS0 Subj ot Laaaon-Barmon; Doctrlna of aim tnanl JIMrITUIT JAMR* STItEin—II a m Rev R McCullough Ipi •Wnt.*, Spaaker Rev R T p m Rev PAYNES BAY—0 30 am. Mr T pm Mr J lA-ne WHITE MA1J,0 30 „ m Mr J (iiimth 7pm Mr O McA!ll"et GHX MEMORIAL II H r Payn* 7pm Mr. F MO> iluurroWN BBS am R*v Uawianc* 1pm Mr MrClaan BANK IT All : McCullough. 7 p.m Rav Payna sr^JOHTWTOW?.—II a m Rav. V Lowranee 1 pm Mr E Bannlatar. ST MlrltAEl. II a Rav M B PratU John ST GEORGE 11 a m. Kev E. W Weakea CTtRlST CHURCH7 |i and will be repeated Mth Inst. at 3.00 p m The first Thames Tunnel Another feature programme i the coming week tells the story of sions on Whv Bfl %  Tawchor*. daring engineering feat which, ing broadcast by the Bin over a hundred years ago. astonfor the WoM IndiM < ished and disturbed people in all dirjri li.-u-irers will hi parts of the world. It is the dramFigueron mten-iewing Rmii otised story of the construction of Davtoo on 'the Situation seei Brunei's tunnel, the first tunnel from the lnlde Emrys Davle. under the Thames und one of the who has had vei twenty year great engineering achievements of teaching experience ami th,nineteenth century The work headmoster of a Secondary Modwas begun in 1825 umid scenes of ern Bovs School in East Anglka .ihusia-.ni but when six will say why he becitme n PPOCIIcleaths occurred owing to a fltwder. why he believe* voting m. i ing of the tunnel in IBS* a flnanand women take up II cial panic ensued so that the work and will discuss the spirit In had to be OUOpO Bl dod f > i v.n which thty should approach then years. The tunnel was finally n-ih.nsibilities. Broadcast will 1 -<• opened In 1843 with great cereat 7.15 p.m on Wednesday. IBth and to-day it Is part both Inst. Captal ST. CONTENT LUTHERAN HOUR CONTENT. Si. Thomai 3pm Sundav School 4 p in Divine Saatn— and Veapan. Mr. fltg Q. Pfoacol. Praachar Tenai Vaaperi .O'Dor. Song < %  nd Sermon Tha Rrv Vv'm e. Dlnkan. Sp-aker Sub)*cl or l-'it. IP". Mr. aont GOVERNMENT NOTICES NOTICE An Inspection day Is being held at the Government Industrial Schools (Dodds) St. Philip, on Monday, the 30th October. I960, under the distinguished patronage of His Kxeelleiny the Governor and Mi Stvage. There will he on exhibition articles of furniture, hnndrraft. needlework etc. made bv the pupil.s. The gunk-its. grounds and buildings will be open to visitors from 4.30 p.m. to 0 p.m. and the general public, parents of the pupils and persons interested In Social Welfare are Invited to attend. 10th October. 1950. 16.10.50—2: Attention is drawn to the Defence (Control of Drug and Patent and Proprietary Medicine Prices) Order, 1950. No. 8 which will be published in the Offlclol Gazette of Monday. 16th October. 1950. 2. Under thlfl Order the maximum retail selling prices ol" 'Mother Greaves Worm Exterminator" and "Canadian Mealing Oil" ore as follows: — ITEM Mother Greaves Won minator Canadian Healing Oil Small sized hot. Large 14th October, 1950. Air Mail With effect from Ilth October. 1950 the air rate on printed matter, (including newspapers, commercial papers and books) to Great Britain Is 12 cents per half ounce. General Post Office. k 13th October. 1950. 14.10.50.—Sn. ST ANDREW II am Shore Village Rev J, 11 Winter 1 p Village Rav J B. Win' ST I.UCY—11 a m Crab Hill .\ R Hi nut i* MORAVIAN ROEBUCK STRhCT 9 30 a m Shoo I. II a m riomlrkf .'raoehat Rav E R New •undnv flrnool; 7 p tn EVaning GRACE lllt.1 11 a m Mom iw*: Preacher: Mr D Culpepper ( i> in. Evening Service; Praachar; M. T Ra.ker rui-NECK Bam. Morning Service. Praachar; Rav E E. Naw itoiiow-n i'v Holy Communion: 7 pm Evening Sarvtc*. Praachar: Mr. Havnos. MOf nOoai JDRY: 1 p.m. Evening SecfaHOP HOJ. t p an Bvaning rteaehar: Mr Smith Evening Sei I FAIR DAY IN AID OF St FatrirkN Bally M.iland the Free Elementary School WILL Bl HaXO AT The 1'RSULINE (."ONVENT NATITRIIAV %  MI, HI Uimi: From 3 p.m to 0 SO p m By kim! Col Mlchelin & Capt Ralsot. (he Police Band will be in AHendance ADMISSION ::: Id —4 Levrly I'rlaeo I To be won by a Lady. GenUemun, Girl and Boy with the Ink, Numbers • There will be a selection of Fancy eV Ornamental Work. I'seful Household Articles, Mats, Baskets, Troys, Boxes, etc.. made by the Arts and Crafts Department of tho School • ARTISTIC as I Ml I I. HOI MHi III) (lOODH Wheel of Fortune. Iloop-Ls "ili IU Attractive I'M/-.. \ other AttrsrUons! Post Offlee Stacked with Parcels and Letters Bolls, sam.i Claus W |th his present*. Sandwiches, Sweet Drink. Ices. Humburgers, Hot Dogs, Itefreshmenta, Sweets, Cakes etc.. will be sold. Pony Rides etc. Your Cordial Support is Solicited. Please Come. See. Buy and Help the Cause FOR YOUR WALLS AND CEILINGS USE B. H. FRESCONETTE ONE COAT FINISH. IV. B. IHMVI II I I Mill I. AMI II Mil.W II J " "• BM %  ...,.! ;.-.-.-.-.-.-.•.-.-.-...-,.,.,.....,........,...,.,.,.....,.,....... ..... ...... IFLASH— OUR XMAS CARDS AND CALENDARS ARE NOW AVAILABLE. — ftko CaDka Disk ami paSaH Dtarir.. ^ NSW NT04 K OF BVM1N AMARA II Al LIQUID PARAFFIN SYHI P i and HUSKS— Baby. Firl -S I I I AUII a variety al 00 US ROBERTS & CO. DIAL MM "" ""•. '"' -.mtaj.' %  m iiiMaaaaaaiaaaaaa I his 11 .-•* •* II MMM .' !' %  \ n ill in Kin r Thnndt. *mpt %  • % %  and the Almlni and M-ldlna AST roa RFfR FsmrNr. I M S G LjHhlay 111 Blacken t l M. L D. RKgWB-COX. Malor. s,i i. |, AfUotar.* Tha Barbados Re*)" I "i i.i I-IBfeOB on itrangth we I 11 Ort W L D SKEWES-COX. Malor. JOLf ft A*JuUi! cjv Regtmanl f •>"#•' r-or A .v It I'iri'wi-itrtis tl 1'irfiitn-lis !! "ONE DAY IM THE YEAR, WE SHALL ALWAYS REMEMBER. YOU HAVE GUESSED IT OF COURSE, ITS THE CTH OF NOVEMBER." MAKE IT A GALA NIGHT WITH THE UNFST SELECTION OF FIREWORKS Here are just a few ol the many we have In Stock :ROMAN CANDLES JUMPING CRACKERS CATHERINE WHEEL SILVER RAIN SQU1BBS GOLDEN GERB JACK IN THE BOX GOLDEN RAIN ETC., ETC. And the magnificent "SKY ROCKETS" for the Kiddie "STARLIGHTS'" in packets ol 12 or singh also BOMBS. I Obtainable al Booker's < lil)( ; Drug Stores Ltd. ( Broad Street and ALPHA PHARMACY, Ha-!. %  v LOCI* 1. BAVLEV Rnllon l.anr and VlrUtrla Slrrrt ••.'.::'s.vs, HARDWARE • BUILDING NEEDS AND &f QUALITY PAINTS Pay a visit to our NLW PREMISES at CORNER ol SWAN & LUCAS STREETS. RARBAaiOS HARDWARE (ft. LTD. IIAIUIAIJOS ADVOCATE Is running a Pluto CompetlUon hotographrt and the F-dltor ->t the Barbados Advocate. (2) Prizes will be awarded on a basis of (a) Excellent,i,f photograph?. (b> em.iina.Hy and Uniqueness of • .1.,..1 e.g. photoof Mont Pelee. Soultnere. Brimstone Mill, etc. would get special marks for intereat <3> Since the intention of the Competition Is to obtain a large nunilnr ol excellent photographs lor exhibition wt the Barbados Museum, subject matter must be connned tu scenes or objects of historical or other Importance. 1st Prize $50.00 2nd Prize $25*00 3,rd Prize $15-00 'sv,;','.'.'.;'.*.'>



PAGE 1

PACE EIGHT SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, IKTOBIU IV I Mo BARBADOS fi| A D\'(MWf I rf .1 Sunday. October 15, ItSO NATURAL U\S roiii'oit vno\ DURING the time when the British Union Oil Company was searching for Oil in Barbados, a reservoir of Natural Gas was discovered on the lands of Turner's Hall plantation, and in recent years the Company has distributed Natural Gas to certain public institutions and to the Barbados Gas Company for supplying private consumers. The Petroleum Act, 150, vested the property in Natural Gas in the Governorin-Executive Committee and provision was made for compensation to be paid to lessors and lessees of productive wells. In May of this year the supply of Natural Gas was threatened with cessation as a result of the premature and inopportune proclamation of the Act When it was announced that the Gulf Corporation, an American Oil Company, had been granted a prospecting licence over 50% of the island, negotiations were begun between the Government and the B.U.O.C. for that Company to take a lease of the Natural Gas Wells at Turner's Hall in lieu of cash compensation. These negotiations were unsuccessful and the Government have had to seek for ways and means of ensuring that there be no interruption of the supply of Natural Gas. On Tuesday last, a Bill was introduced into the House of Assembly which seeks to establish a corporation whose duty it will be to run the Natural Gas Wells and to maintain the supply to the public and to public institutions. The Bill also provides for the compulsory acquisition of the pipeline and littings now the property of the British Union Oil Co., with compensations to be settled, in default of agreement, by arbitration. It is necessary ll a consideration of this Bill that these two objects should be kept separate. The establishment of a Corporation and the nationalisation of Natural Gas is a logical development following on the passing of the Petroleum Act. Members of the Legislature may well have some uneasiness at the thought that compensation must be paid in cash but in view of the fact that members have not seen fit to debate the granting of a licence to an American Company even though the Oil resources of the British Commonwealth and Empire are so scanty may mean that they consider the resources of this island sufficient to bear such a burden. The Colonial Office must, however, have known of this arrangement for it is inconceivable that the Governor of Barbados would have signed such a licence without being authorised by, or having received the permission of, the Colonial Office. The Objects and Reasons of the Bill state that the negotiations between the Government and the B.U.O.Co., having proved unsuccessful, it was considered that the Government should proceed to undertake the supply o! Natural Gas under public ownership. Even those who are opposed on principle to nationalisation will be faced with the fact that they must offer some alternative if the supply of Natural Gas is not to be interrupted. Those who warned at the time of the passing of the Petroleum Act that the Legislature was introducing a dangerous precedent-by tampering with private rights, and ownership have proved to be Justified. However much the establishment of a Natural Gas Corporation may be unavoidable, in view of the circumstances which have arisen, the further interference with the rights of private ownership suggested in this Bill are unnecessary and contrary to all the principles which have guided Legislation in years past. The Objects and Reasons given for this step are stated as follows: —"The Government have also been conducting negotiations with the Company with a view to acquiring the pipeline and other necessary equipment to enable the recovery, distribution and supply of Natural Gas to be continued without interruption. The Company however, is not willing to sell immediately such pipeline and equipment. As it is intended that this commodity should be carried on as a Nationalised Industry, it is considered essential that such pipeline and equipment should belong to the Corporation, and should be transferred to and vested in the Corporation at the earliest opportunity. Provision is therefore made for the transfer to the Corporation of the pipeline and equipment of the British Union Oil Company Ltd,, and the vesting of such pipeline and equipment In the Corporation and the payment of compensation therefor." The Legislature is thus called upon to force the Company to sell their equipment at a time which may seem to the Company injudicious and contrary to their best interests. Once again, the Legislature is taking upon itself the heavy responsibility of interfering with rights that have been recognised and acknowledged for centuries and in respect of goods which in this case are obtainable elsewhere Members ul both branches of the Legislature should study most carefully the implications of such a step and should look back and note how the original interference through the Petroleum Act hat created the need for even greater interference. Those who regarded the Petroleum Act as merely an isolated instance of Governmental interference are now undeceived. Each step towards socialism makes the next step more irresistible or inescapable. There must surely be some agreement which the Government could enter into with the British Union Oil Company by which their pipeline and equipment could be made available to the use of the Corporation until such time as the conditions of sale could be agreed upon or the Government obtain their equipment elsewhere. Nor should Barbadians regard this as a matter in which only the interests of an English Company are involved. The principle at stake affects the future security of the property of every person living m this island. In future, at any time when Government seeks to purchase private property the threat will overhang that In the event of a failure to reach agreement the omnipotent Legislature will be called m to settle the matter in favour of the Government. It is well for Barbadians to settle this issue at an early stage for if this is not dona the force of circumstances and the course of events will remove their freedom in the ;natter. Those who appeal to the people in the lame of freedom are often decried as 1 eactionaries. It Is up to the people of Barbados to decide whether such Legislation is oot the introduction of "Stalinism" to their island THEY IMI IT A.AI\ AMI A.\l\ IN 77/£ CUU& ON 1HE. F/£MO 11 i i V I i > i A RUBBER FLOOR COVERING la 4 BEAUTIFUL PATTERNS 3 RET WIDC 9 U.3> VJ SUITABLE FOR BATHROOM. PASSAGE Or MOTOR CAR MATS Etc CALL AND SECURE YOURS EARLY r 1r* LOOK yy.t >^— i S ; =w,e i yoo-! I. IIHlliUil Ltd. 1936 10 Si 11 Roebuck Street. VALOR STOVES 2. 3 and 4 BURNERS, with or without Canopies 64G STOVES I and 2 BURNER, with or without Oven Stands OVENS. Small, Medium. Large PRESSURE STOVES WILKINSON & IIAYNES CO., LTD. Successors To C.S. PITCHER & CO. PHONES 4472 & 4687 NW "*> AUSTRALIAN TOI'H THERE is no West Indian that would ;iot welcome a visit of an Australian cricket Team to the Caribbean. Lovers of the %  mihave been nurtured on the names of the great stars of the Antipodes and the feats of Brad man, Woodful, Kippax, Macartney in former days and those of l.indwall. Morris, Miller and Harvey are highly commended in the Western Hemisphere ;is those of our own talented players. Twenty years ago the West Indies visited Australia and although they were beaten they were not disgraced and had the distinction of winning one lest match. There can be no queslios. therefore that common courtesy lays an obligation on Australia to play a return series on West Indian wickets. But however much West Indians may wish to see Australian cricketers in action yet they will be prepared to do nothing which is likely to handicap West Indies cricket now firmly established on the first rounds of the ladder leading to world fame. And with this as their main objective it would be well to examine the pros and cons of an Australian tour of the West Indies. Although not necessarily the principal objective of a tour the question of financial success cannot be ruled out seeing that no type of sport to-day can be undertaken unless adequate financial backing is at the disposal of the authorities governing the game. It is no secret that West Indian grounds are not capable of accommodating the huge crowds which flock to Sydney, Adelaide, Brisbane and Melbourne and it is also well known that the Australian is financially able to pay high entrance fees to see the game he loves. But financial considerations alone should not influence the West rndian public. The chances of success of their team are more likely to tip the scales for or against a second visit to Australia. Cwing to the scattered nature of the territories in the West Indies our cricketing talent meets but seldom and it is only during an overseas tour that the West Indies are able to weld a team together that is truly representative of the Caribbean. During a tour of Engand or Australia they have the opportunity of playing together as a team against counties and states before meeting the full might of England or Australia In Tests. Here in the West Indies they come together as individuals who meet, for the most part for the first time in a test, and it takes no cricket genius to understand that the best results cannot be obtained under such conditions. It might be possible to select a West Indian team to tour the Caribbean at the same time as the visiting Australian team playing each colony and a test match against Australia in each centre. But such an arrangement would reduce the number of times that the Australians would play and it is hardly likely that a team from the Antipodes would be prepared to travel thousands of miles only to play eight matches. However much West Indians may desire to see the Australians in action it seems that if they have the goodwill of cricket in the Caribbean at heart they must bow to the inevitable and accept the generous offer from the Antipodes. Sitting On The Fence II. > VIIIAMI I. (.1 IflllAS H ERE igaln are Mrs F.r-rermand Mrs. Urm-or-rer, who >cvcr remember people's names, at a political meeting. Oh, there you jire, Mrs. Er. . Mrs. Er-rerm-er. So glad you've ome to swell the ranks of the True Blues. Thank you. Mn, I/m . Mrt. Irm-er-rrr That's exactly what hat busy Unitwoman, Mrs H£' Rmtn-rr-rer, said when I met her temperatures and srlltnp so m.'till up for somethlno t other outside the front door. tiring day, dear? But it's a swell Job. sugar. And dly a wink <>f sleep. Ibe money's good. And some day It was the same yesterday. And | m *>'Jf?\ promotion to a double the day before You'll have a nerl>ed _ llh >" a < m > de. sweeti. vous breakdown If vou go on like this If only they'd |e iva a guy alone 1 know, dear That manager again, I suppose'' Just when you're dropping off In he comes with his great flat feet, shaking Ihe rooSB and taking doin md askin' I don't how Oh, no. Thai's not Mrs. Rermer-rer That's Mrs . Mrs Ilum-rr -rrrm She's selling home knilted tea costs* for cannibal*, or rather to buy Bibles for cannibals, in the something archipelago. Such noble work, as the vicar said, especially as she gets chilulaius hanging about in the cold. Who's that very large woman wh<> was specially Invited to occupy two seats to keep out two hecklers? Oh, thafi Mrs. . yes. Mrs Um-er-rer-er whose ulandi hai He's nothinit but dear. One of HUM go kfrnight (o liihim a piece of mOnly this morn) slave-driver, days I shall %  flic and give mind. he said he pie. or Tomorrow you'll quit and find a man's Job. A Job which keeps you awake all day, you great lazy bum. Forward (Hancc Nye Bevan wants to shuffle (he population so that big house iind little houses are in the same street and chaps who wear caps %  nd mufflers can mix freely with .haps who wear bowler hats and carry rolled umbrellas. Mi ibert Morrison, hoping the Festival Garden! In B Park will be kept open after the Festival of Britain Is over. said. "I want people to be happy I want to hear peopTe sing." hoped I'd gel lumbago to tee If his durned blankr's would cure It. Why. Al, the mi is nothing but | T is 11 p.m. In No Qualityii criminal, wishing sickness on X street in the summer of 1960 folks. He ought la lie prosecuted The chap who wear* his bowler or something. and carries his rolled umbrella to And just whei you're having catch the 8. IS every morning is the swollest drearri he has to come working at some papers In his in and run amolc according to Dr. Rerturn off thi you. ik some I hca. • 1 think you're mistaken. Mrs Er-rerm-er. That was Mrs. Umer-rcr, who changed her doctor because he advised her to stop eating cakes in the cafes Instead of prescribing injections and special corsets under the National ning goal Health. Who la the chief speaker Sometimes I'm hi tonight? You have many swell dreams, Al. while you're \-orklng? Some are prett' swell. I .fuess Some ain't. What ore the r ''II ones about: 1 Why. sometime? I kick the winfootball game ng dinner with President Truman. straight on wt I believe it's Sir Charles sometimes I'm c Urm-er . yes, it's Sir Charles mg in the sun 1'rm-er-nrm something who was cutest little dai to lucky to get his knighthood bDo you ever /ore he was divorced and hounded Beach, Al? out of his club for running off Why. no. hone> with a club waitress. Really? I thought It was Sir William ... Sir William something-urm •something who had arthritis and ran off with his nurse. That is, if you can run veryfar with arthritis. Well, wt shall soon find out. As ii looking after an old Scottish lady. Mrs. Mar£ee-rr-rerw*e. who Is stone deaf but Ukes to keep in touch, f hope you'll pardon tinIf f leave you now Mrs. Er Mrt. Vrm-er-er. Granted as soon as asked, Mrs B> . Mrs. Er-rerm-er. Kara While You Sleep Manufacturers of electrically heated blankets in America are employing men to sleep In luxa dream, sugar ury beds for eight hours a day to dream about any) hit.' their temperatures are He ain't entitled t putting him affairs. And Palm Beach, lyith some of s in Ameri p me on Palm study. Outside, chaps in caps and mufflers who have been to the festival and several other places arc singing "Sweet Adeline." Bowler Hat opens his study window to plead with the nearest Cap and Muffler. I say. donl you think late for this sort of thing? I mean I can't concentrate with all this noise going on. I have some work to do. Work? You? ,i Of course, it's a different kind S,„ o( wt, rk I mean I don't work with I think It's a well known fact that a man don't dream about his wife. It aint natural. Why not, Al? Well, sugar, dreams ain't real. %  re they? And y..u can't say a u-ashfn wife ain't real. No ma'am. Not on your life hands. Ark af iiii, boy*. He with is ands. Nor do nosed old don't work •s is toffee taken and other reactions noted, a hussy like that. I shall be obliged if you will not re rer tb my wife as a toffee nosed old woman. Win, can't soil er ands with In* Mrs. Bou'lrr Af. Who ait, y old woman to scrub er floortl Mrs. Bowler Al. Who can't polish er own front door andle? Old Is there any special dream girl toffee nosed Mrt Bowler At you see-on Palm Beach, Al? May I remind you that my wife III say there is And Is she n i, in lied trying to get some sleep" sweetheart? Soft brown curls. Listen, boys. Old Toffee Note it Honey coloured ,•>. % %  And a voice lr f ,i'io t„ oof a bit ol sleep after a like a lot of little tinkling bells, i.mu dem d.n meet Fannu Adam*. Yeah Little tinkling bells. What about a It.llabu for old Mr You 11 hand in vuur notice toToffee Nose, boys? morrow Al ff yu „ don't go away 1 shall I*' dont get st.-amed up about obliged to telephone for Ihc police man's entitled A lullaby for old Mn. Toffee ning. Nose. boys. Affnnclhor, bout Roll %  dream about out the barrel. —L.E-S. Oil! HEADERS SAY Public I till!w* • Editor. The .tdvocale— SANTON WATER HEATERS motkh in 5. 12. .01 & 40 pfe HAIR DRESSING EQUIPMENT DatOSTA'S I I 11 Mill \l DEFT. NOW IN STOCK RAYPACKA FOR OFFICE JACKETS — AND — CLERICAL GOWNS IN NAVY AND BLACK 54 in. at $1.92 per Yd. Da• gainst pta,r on hi; name I have an Ide. „e,^wh'"y' 0 "" "' "" B ^ *" .•ill not. loofe**; reporter's account of the debate Mr. Shepherd 2Va J. "~r .oTt'er, .?M?S rts off his refending his case resorted to the f^hlth^Vh.; ^J!.l2? \ m &** tactics traditional with those J^a^U s^ V *? Pf th T learned In the law His idea of the !" ZticshouM * leom 0 proposed P.U. Board is that it will n,, ar ,j •fspsta the cmrHivess -hould welcoi of a Public Utilities rw such thing part of my latter I had heard that Mr Smythie was a retired Engineer from Can, ada but not a Canadian, and that **J monster ""otiring UwU* Mr Shepherd was a retired Soliccme acro m ,he wa >' vt M 1 must regard it as a ml*>cdin B citor from British Guiana but persalaries and reveling in its auof what I wrote. haps not a Gulanese. i e. not born thorlty to compel ioop]e to do Its In B.G. I paid them Ibe com pitbidding, without the fear of being Your?, slDCtrely ment not only of asking their help held responsible for its actions I but of saying they enlivenod your merely pointed out that the Board Brldfj I columns arid enngbtaoad yoor would be no bed of roars for anylllh October, 1950 FOR YOUR PLEASURE! GODDARD'S GOLD BRAID RUM — AND — MEN WHO LOVE THE BEST RUM DEMAND "GOLD BRAID



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1 S %  J J Otlikrr I.", lje ^un^an Atarorote V CHURCHILL CONDEMNS PARTY POLITICS The Greatest Story Ever Told By FULTON OUHSLER ThU is u*e -.ury „l Jru. II begins in lite \ ..nd Joseph Ui the din utK-r tinResurrection and idt episode* we Ultra fr,>m J.e lour ( .': .)f. Itat writing nrw tlic M ..iHlrrml Ufe of Jesus, the %  -'" ""i %  -%  had but ..r> thought in mind. and tliai wan to Induce reader, to g a to the Gospel* mnd he*.History at firsthand II was Rabbi siii'.mo.i B. *: %  <:•• %  '. mi %  great Jewish tempi.1 I'mI.N: v. ho said to me •I dlmi< r on* rvcnlnc thai the IKK" .1 -n x .nul.l cf our timer RH thr hftiin %  • l that HiMi-illnhad li.-fn larpatj ifvaa vr In Anfrira Later a* • U-aroui iii..1. %  .!.,[• %  aid talked to oui.i .i.tle..u kii.b -.: urn Jim wamr 1 — fellow passenger* In Pullman an-, day conch, aleitograpliei .. lecture committee chnirmen —1 made raauai allusion ... conversation to biblical passage.'. I soon di* -overe-i that reference* which In my boyhood M-cr•*. after twenty-five yean •f eartonted aanoswst—*. I WM stirred np again. I began to read various chronologies by which Catholic and Protestant theologian* had hoosht to straighten out the apparent confusions and contradictions In the Gospel*. This book follows none of the established time ••* sequence formulae bul draw, from several. In what seem ed to the writer the moil natural and probable in This book i> not uhrred *> an explanation or an interpretation. It is rather aa attempt to tell, laituiuily, ju-. wisst toe lour /kpoaueo. Matthew. Mark. Luke, ana John, assert .n**e "-'" pened in those Uurtylhtve years of the Ufe of Jesus. li la, further, an eiivrt n state the believing Christians understanding of the meaning of those years. There la no intention Here to rationalise or to hunt out a aymbousm While seeaeUmes dramatised, the story is completely faithful to the literal statements of tlic text. With much help and counsel 1 have told here the (real story once morr — Uie story of the greatest event In human hiatory. For encr upon a time s.id Ions ago i> actually happened, accordant' to the faithful true believers among; which the author count* himself. God. who had fashioned time and space in a clockwork of billions of suns and slant and moons, in the form of His beloved Son became a human being like ourselves On this microscopic mule,it planet He remained for thirty-three years'. He became a real man, and the mil> perfect one. While ni. turning to be the true God, He was born In a stable and lived aa a working man and died on a cross. He came to show u how to live, not far a few years but eternally. He explained truths that would make our souls Joyous and free. Tliis is Ihe story of Jeatu — the creates! story ever told. UJN. Prisoners Murdered ON DBATH MARCH n* WILLIAM PAKKOTT aKOUL, oct 14 At least .wo or three thousano %  > l-ii.ed in Seoul by North %  wire "disposed of" between the Inchon landing on September 15 ant! iht utcupaliun ol the City jt n,e end ol Si I OfMal Investigators including Americans staled today that a luige propoiuoii were muraen.', either in the City or on the death march northward when they were. ( withdrawn ns Hostage I The> aaJd many bo* 1 > had be. I found and they exped to ,lis %  igrave* of other, j I Unite J tJzliOns Por.*i puJi-f 1 -IIT to Pyongyang. 1 The South Korean Governmen has also tcgun inve-:Ration t< I llnd those icsixinilb]: Villagecs ,u*i north of Scout •aw groups totalling up to 10.(HM1 people trudging wearily along the road on two succcsaiv S : 1 .Urn unable t' 1 kei-p met with the hasty Cosnmuatal with <.r.w.i| wvrt -not. At Jlhotiiu 1 • miles north of Seoul a mass grav. which '..-as found cor .1. botth 1 Slaughter eontiiuuM .is • 11. stragglers dropped rx-!i. an 1 • ansg the progrsslv • ovef a four day period— Seplender 2" to SO—of about Bin. South Koreans who were coiiecie I in YangponK on the Han Rivci31 miles east of Seoul, inveeiig.-* -; ton said. Investigators said Communist* during three months of the occupuiion of S'.-oul had killed on 1 therwii e disposed of a largol additional number of poUttoll! p| .-iitii 1 Thi alaa shot many othe L -| Squill Koie.m who showed Dnirfl symp<>thies prematurely duringj the period from September 27 to I |1 hCfora the United Nations had [ Utnsd control of the South %  Capital.—atoaatr. Warns "Danger In Europe 9 BACK FkOM ENOLAND Mr. I". A. OlunnonU (I'tit Mi i chatting M they imJ ,t Bibdo ronotdky from Emjlind >;• > %  y had WBieatd Uio wt Indian bant Eniland at cricket at Lord.. Trpr,: !l : r ;r ..-id tlic OTCMbl a>, Freedom Of j Press To Be Upheld ; Plane Door Ripped Off During Flight MICHIGAN. Oct. 14 n an Amer.held door was ripped 1 ^ French Nun Beatified TODAY ROMK, Oct. 14. I j Pope Pius XII will to-morrow j proclaim the beatlncatlon of tho French nun who died 99 years ago I Siler Anne Marie Javouhey whom 1 King Louia Philippe once called a "great man" because she had more than the strength of an ordinary' woman. The solemn bealincation cere' monv in Saint Peter's Basilica will be the seventh of this holy year. Anne Mane Javouhey, foundress |o( the Institute of Sisters of Saint r!iveiiH-in.M'i Board Directors was chosen ycstcr• %  the conference after a long deb..ie in which • onleiuled 1 li.t the .1 ntcrence w;is not repres e ntative of the Wester.. Hemisphere press ivecaUM 111 newspapers had not been n.vited —(Keutnr > CHURCH BREAKS FROM MOSCOW SPRING FIELD. Massachusetts, Oct. 14. The Russian Orthodox Chinch in America announced here that it was breaking all ties with Moscow and would In future function independently of Russia. Laa da r t of the church meeting for the flrst time on their own initiative named MatoopoHtw Bishop Joseph Krimmuv. N.1 Springfield as Patriarch of the Church In the United States Metropolitan DbShop Knnstnntin Jroshevlch waa Chosen Patriarch of the church In nil foreign countries— Reater. Kumchon Falls To U.N. Forces Drive On To Red Capital By JUL1AHHAII S TOKYO. Oi .SPEARHEADSacroan lhe3ttt,i parallel tn day Into solid wedges all uimr i ;.t the cnpit.il Kumrhon "little Stalingrad"—12 miles north of ihe parallel whic> held up tlio advance un P '>u:..fell despite ilubborn td '" houac to htiiiM' Hghlinp, In it.s streets last night. j I Rrltath nnd Australiai ti a rtw Brltfab Commonwealth brigade and Ih. 1 airy regiment %  .u 1 hon and from this diI mil CavAnother Bonaparte French Leave Thatkhe aiMOON Oet 14 1 1 i., 1 lo-dai UM1 th*l Virlnuiih Kad tanlia'ton agreed to thi 1 bi .HI from Thatkln1wotaaded li : tag fronatar lialtle. The message said that the I I uninh Ited (^ms -li Ihe 1'i.u u.ili.ir of ihe French n U ndcl i prsasnt under treatment at an 1 Thatkhi will .urTered losses men and e<|iiif.menf Rruler BLACK.'OC,, 0c( 14. \|R WINSTON CHDRCHILL at the final session of the Conservative Party's annual Confer euce at Blackpool to day warned againai .lie dangur of party politics "at this grave time." It is not good for our society or for our survival as a leading power that we should continue for long poriods to be dominated by party politics and that two halves of a nation who have to sink or swim together should have to face each other all the time in the boxing ring," he said. V u when everyone could see that everything hud become more grave w taund ourselvei I Hi 1 i" party strife, bnpendini elections iul unceri a*, to wh.':l Ihe peltiii I v >uld IH fix<: year &RO. Churchill sju.l Yet it i, M. m% i-.iinty and proItussians Are Anxious For Peace THINKS TRUMAN HONOLULU. Oct. U Vaati laj ai Honolulu. Tnimon l: 1 1 thai Ih* ai'hii'vement ef %  wan his only ami 1Iha* the : !'. at Ken. ral heal luni t.'o %  %  l 1 •..: ' %  1 I __, fro Rut traltcpropelled rtiUcry or antl tanl birth of thenetUld cp* ted In rlilli rj few dayI I | It bad boon & r< 1 .11 re,gnu,g famlllai -nd u idrav 1 ra axllod froi %  %  ipdni. years ago. ABTIE'S HEADLINE n £r B*—I 0"' M The exile la 1 naparte will be Kinper 1 1 i.l the I A'U 1 l-cfiiot,, was arrested 1 f lUKht lab troop! on the .thine i -I the "fparded bin th. 1 OlHRl Raw I nil. %  • I Stales Him Spy Riflg In Asia Accuses Red China POMUAV. Ott H. Coflununli bo I • %  %  ati ttffi < MI An.1 Ihe new China and IndLv I UM India com %  a Peklnj Daily • the pclnd %  tinenean IntelllfMire ianan, Formosa. 1 Uancko*. runs, large nil former J.ipanene Army Intel) f.ence men "Iri.vndcd to ineatt Another .ittlclal K-klna new* KwnngminR DalK' urged tn > pooplo to tak'* autton .icainst Aincrlr.-. 1 %  —Reater 1 %  I 'I.'.-, INK In u westward UM BCSOM North Korea drove towards tho (Jomnmnait capital ol Pyongyani The line ran almost stiaiMht from H BAfflMI. fCat-soiiK north north eaal lo Won. .''1 mi the east coast .'• %  ions' drives were raining momentum evel I v Isan Uoht line, reports snld. ami British CornfnOO* wealth troop* pUssstd "li imm Kunachon the keystone C muni: defence sv^leTll which fell lo day. South Korean tn Mrlklnc. nirth weal from Inchon reaened which m le-' I I :i" front the CapHal Othei outhern troops advam I from Wcrtisan to-dr.y npfurod Yonup4>rl 18 miles away OK the Jm|ortanl rood acroi K.iren to 1 PyirtiayenB K.ice for Pvimi;y.Hic American 'Tatk Fore* I j 1 %  a crack com'un.ittOfl tai I wtjuh carried infantry *a% ex%  tane be raci fof Pyimayanji aiiei Mm rail of Kumchon Three "urrows" are now aimed %  t the Communist Capital. The tot mod iry American and 1 ritish Commoiiv. .-alih troo|.s m da Kunichon areu the seooivl b, South Korean troops strlkinK towards the city from Inchoa and the third by South Korean troops on . %  ,,,.%  OpfN) liUI', mK.vani, Thilart force w— to-day rei.orled to be ttrll ('•aching a joint 18 miles west Of This puts It little more than 70 miles from Pyongyang —Hester Triiii.aii;i\facArtiiifr Will Talk On Wak Jesaup. W Aveul' Hani nan r.pe id Presidential Aulstant for Foreign Affairs. Oean lluak. Assistanl Secretary -,f Stut.fur th Far K < .,nd Charlea Murphy, the President's principal si>occh writer It will h<' the flrst face to face 4 tog Prea dam and the Arnerlf.ili Con d" I 1, h Bag! They will confei eosnmunloM -(CM U.N. Genwai Assembly Meeting Postponed I-AKE SUCCESS, Oct. 14. The political Committee debate 011 Ihe American plan to make the Uni'.rd Nations Genera! Assembl. Live weapon agaliwt agitTcsnlon has beta postporK-d from IOe*V until Monday Offlelali said that sponnora o' itlon required more time 10 complete Its doru mentation —neuter I ti. n 1 he %  ai Hire "i> a>pl 1 hanmd Lhe Iron eurtaJn'* were as nxii M to avoid war as he was Since lie left Washington <"' 1 ay, the Prim lent h-* nemed .urious and preoccupied He diapenaed arlth .11 but the necessary foimahtles when he arrived at San Franclico and al Honolulu he refused a native Hawaiian welcome In MondU he IB due to leave Honoluui on his way back to San >vhere he is to make a tpeectl M Tuesday night in which ne is expeete\. II Prompt Action Chui tun eafd thai the United ndei Truman'i 1. and with Uie Im %  : %  1 ing .iffgresslon by Conununlati In1 by Mogeou There maj I .1 Ume though no one < 1 :l.s wl„ ,,. „„ Uiought or aim but to in. In peace and who al present an i>i iMeeBd from Soviet Communist ambltloni only by America's vast superiority of the %  totnli IMHIIII ( •iiiliuuing Churchill said:— "The Soviet onslaught upon South Korea hai madi many people regjUaa lla* evils whh 1 uandllH thnt is left ,,f European •ion He said"We mav all rejoice at the favourable turn the war ha taken In Korea We admire the ikllftil condii't of the < ampiilirii bv thai areal oldlei General MacArthur. %  W. ill %  ion free p ooU world will no* beconM too deeply Involve in lhe Far Ea thf dai 'i' ihi 1 small smle compa'cd tu Iboaa which tower up agnlnst uj on the coal "< % %  0 R irni Churehill mt'nii I —Beater. TstM. THE ADVOCATE THK NBWfj Ring 3113 Day or Nijht W1~ TIIE ADVOCATE I'tVS FOR NEWS TRUMAN WILL ASK FOR VOTE OF CONFIDENCE j confirmed the British figure obIt.-ined m 1947 which displaced tha the door. It wants to determine line is offering $100 reward for the cause of the accu'int —Reeter. J parsengen in an Atner.1 ^ esUbli.hed bv the"Amertcn wi'cn P de3r 5Sf ^"^^ "**" ^^ Mi < !" 0ff i ,tt Jll! lie! < 2 rt L t efi I 0 *" ,M271 miles per second. It U now JSSSffiA&TB'S Steu5r ,M 2tt mUtt ^ yards above Ihe ground^ne air\ second *"* %  •• Seeding His Brother ATHENS. Oct. 14 Lodovieo Brunetti. a younger the Brarilian •'u.l-n*. wi-o disarpc.red on October 2 from ABCII Island, does not helr\-e his hrother committed suicide He .-rrlved at Athens yeslerdav from Sao Paolo. After contacting the Brazllim Leratlon and the Qffoel %  Vtlwrllaaa. Brunetti was sailing to M\kono to conduct a personal into his liinthei'i Argentina Wants %I2S,000.000 WASHINGTON. Oct. 14. Argentina has completed preliminary talks with the United %  port-Import Bank on the •las.OOO.OOO credit to help her settle rlebiT lo American exporters. according lo a man;.. '^tigation Argentine Central Bank — Beater, disappearance By SCOTT RANKIM WASHINGTON. Oct 14 President Truman goes to United States citizens next month for a virtual vote of confidence Votes can give him two rule or two years "hard labour" under the Republic." thumb This is the essence of Congressional c-1• < *. on November 7 About 50 million Americana will vote for the 3d seats in the Senate and all 435 scats In the House of Representatives. Republicans want a change over of only 54 seats in their favour— 47 In the House and seven in the mination of bo'ri Houses Then for iwn > % %  '-ntrol all business and debates in Congress 2. Put a Republican majority in ai tush havi day to day handling oi Presl.111,111'Progra I Have their own Spmkci Mouse. 4. Raise tie ti 111 in.cmational affairs by virChairman ,-u Heed | • gyessional Foreign Affairs Com• Veteran Itelirrs Truman could expect lHtle spite. Senator Vunfletiberg. a \-CTeran Republican Foreign Af%  Iped him %  1 ign Aid Pro%  \ this yeair. !• no one else Ol 'j^ standing in the Republican Partl -ys attack on the weakened dlptoni errunent. but the best thought pa hi .'resident Truman .will re cant rol nf Congress with I redue. 11 'v public 0pu1n.11 I...' iwung more towards him since Ml •'gamble' Ifl -ending American troops Into %  "ff Tnis i agrunst Ihe Trui ( oun'ryV %  appouit< Marshall a national hero to replace Loun Johnson .. I Defence %  as also regarded as a successful pro-Trumai nil have Trade 1 %  %  %  %  ft 11.'iv to woo mule mlndetl people. man seems to b l.it-ht Vole Republican* in their turn can count on the traditionally U*hl vote of these pnld-term 1 The Korean War has prevent*Truman stumping the couniV thli summer and many nonvoleri who were a p ttrarted by his dramatic villa-fe 1 1 gnvpalgn In the npiesidentlal election will probably not vote th Republicans %  pro-Coinmunis," eharges against the Democrat ** %  rsrty are probably their best vote catching weepon Th>r argument la I Governmen'souriisU and pro-(""mmunists t I Infiltrate and give away secie" ib Russia and soften the nolle" Itussia. A lot of peoplhave been impressed.—e>nsBr. K. W. V. PURE WINES! I 111 III IS A K.W.V. WINE FOR l.VKKV IM \--ltr.' I"..r \M I il >l M ,s BIRTHDAY PASTaSS. a d Ilur CKI.EBKATIONS K w.V. SPARKI.INI; 1 (While) K.W.V. SPASKUNG R00DEBBRG (Bad) KWV. WEMMERSHOEK •O 1 A Dolici'nis BautHIM FOR IIISMR IMRT" li. h.rr Dinntr, .is in ippi xi/w uid with Soup K W.V. SHERRY NO Y dry KWV OLD BROWN SHERRY WITH CAKE. FRUIT. CBKESS KWV PAARI TAWNY KWV. CORONATION UINF. FOR COCKTAIL PARTII* KWV. PAARLITA COCKTAIL KWV SWEET VERMOUTH KWV DRY VERMOUTH "THERE ARE NO~~BETTER WINES THAN K.W.V.



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FACE SIXT![EN SUNDAY ADYOf ATI' SUNDAY. OCTOBER 15. 1*M THEaAMBOL? f-i 6aAA*f &afi titty-. !L Empire Aid Plan Counts On America House Damaged In Explosion A A Teacher Of Spanish iiv A sn-jr CuininunwoMlUi d< %  %  tHKlwdi at KtpoRT uf dynamltuii at 230 o'clock yesterday moil.• With Barb i| mora :iig reached Uie Police later in the ir id more B| v [i was made by Stanley m Spanish now b*-.ii,t hclii t Jordon who said thai his wife's Mrs. Maria Carlott lain* the house at Alleyne's Gap. Bush Hall, are attracting many people from 570 mUlton where they both lived, was dynaall walks of life In the island people in South and Suuth-Easi mited. Asm will shortly be uinounced. Neighbours of the district claimNor-Commonwealth counlne %  that they heard the explosion are also to be offered assistance, u. veal nations disclosed thai the The cost is stiU a secret, but the south eastern side of the shed %  ill be asked to help and roof, a bedstead and other articles informal exchanges have already were damaged. laken place with Washington. At the time of the explosion the About Briton,., tan .lugh house was occupied by Jordon, Ga-.Ukcll. Minister for fcroimmkhis wife and two others but no Affair*. r.uid yesterday on* was injured. The houe I" "We shall naturally warn to do Ifix9 feet and not Insured *£?£*<£*?" %  '" oiMMium nmmwnH Mi %  (.. %  Barbados with he/ family about ,| ., the SI:t11 ol U Housing Board Staff /<> Be Increased .. pant the I part McussiriK <•' Kev%  %  Banditti .. ... %  months iago and at 'Santa Clam, Si Gap. %  ii' tolerable burden" Agriculture Details ol um plan wan ed at u ah ng in Lou don of rapraaentatrVQS en I ...tain. Australia. Canada. Ceylon, inrilii %  %  Economic aid will IMniver. to „—-— any country with a proved neod. Il I will be flnanreii mainly by Governnn -rants, but therr will be openings for private .nwe;ilth < "untrlr* IncJuda Indonaala Hnrm;i ntdo-Chlna, and Siam Aid funds will be spent mainly on agriculture, communications. and developln K hydro-electric power lington bueet rcyuiu-u ;o uw t'olicu thai ho gave a goal wiuu.i ...> to a inaa to take to atr. niaci .ipprtrt, fcCUZle al Qty street on tuunusj. Neither man nor goat has iuirned and Mr. Maits.cn/ie sum UMS uie goal was out brought i turn. AMATfci i; noufBar the subject of a lecture to be given by Mr. Charles Thomas, I roducer and adjudicator lo the .•ritish Drama League, at the iirltish Council Centre at 8 o'clock on Tuesday night, October 17. This Is the first of the wecklv .series of lectures by Mr. Thomas who is visiting Barbados at the invitation of the Uriush Council 10 advise and assist those Interred in amateur drama. • ii. for the %  Mrs. MARIA t.ONSALVES icreased so as to cope with increased work. vhlta, tha Secretary, Mi T O. Lasbiaj has been avfenor%  tha temporal*) post of rierk works. Hi.. Board %  < %  '' ""' I '.i r 'I fOW ft ..ting the %  • available there AppniMil The Sacnrtan rsnd from the CMvrk of tha GcoaM Board of Health f< rwarding ni4 thai the Boar : of the Ba) Bttata with the excer. tun cf Lot No I wtilol : i on Backli The Board diicus-ed | letti lr. 8 i tanarri %  Ittcld In connection With I n mlses at the It wa %  %  there aoa it w tha Boord's regulathais. '.' hen the Board meets again %  ID time nieinberi wUJ d IUU Capital Kutimalw. Born la Bai has travi-lled eUma. Spain extensively developing backward % %  The mam devalop m snl plan baflini next July —L.K.8. E. Weekes for CF. Harrison & Co. Coinmonwcalth Governments .->re to contribute to a funi total' I *"* % %  *-*• *""<> has now speA kii several languages ling not more than £8,000.000 In risen to MC.8. The amount ,„ Yiddish and is the wife the next thiee years. previously acknowledged was a Barbadian who hud bee The moncv will finance a bureau &f a*>8 but fl came from Mr. living in Venezuela for the pa '•• spread the "know-how" fci i'helph and a $1 from u Well 3i years. .Visiier. Mrs Goiuuilves told 'pHE NEW St. Simons church "Advocate" yesterday that s* M. will be opened on Sunday hM Spanish classes at presei October 22 at 8.00 am. The Lord f ro i m 3 ' clo f* "' "jf atternw iiunop wiU coruK-crate the new £fil ,-"< th p ( "gS Utar and sing th.e Ural mass of ,,m l lie.iLion. 1 RVIN HAKRIFt. rornieiiy Of Of Conibermeie Glee ClUo UBd at present a member of the Evertnn Wcekcs. West Indie^ V.M.C.A. Music Class under Mr Cricket all rounder has been ap A l''l*-rim. won the llrst priie ualnted on in.. i n rr .f U M "' ">c Local Talent Show held at limes pupils pointed on the staff of Measf> % { Talt nl ^^ hcld C F Harrison & Co. Ltd. and '^e Globe Theatre on Friday night will take charge of the Sport-. Department there. Cameron Tudor Resigns iFtum Our Own Currnponilvni i GEORGETOWN, B.G., Oct. 14. Mr. Cameron Tudor tendered, his resignation as mastei of Queen" College raaaoni Somemany ns 40 in | -innle da) Left Spain graduute of Philosophy the University of Madrid, lid that after the Spanish War, she left Spain ami He played the piano and sang w*"t to France and then to Ole Man River" and was loudly Ecuador where she rernalned lor % %  j'plauded "' w '" "•• tl -BOW Ol wttleb KM Second prize went to Neville P_nt teaching French and Latl" Phillips who sang "Bewitched. A from i he M Civil ent liothcred and l^ewildered" w hll< Gloria Ashby wa solution prize fo .ildered". E "ill MOBILE CINEMA will singing "Belullai I;. C.l Ohiluarj/ Mr. J. L. ttaiifield ... the schools for the Ecuador! Government. She also found time to tench Art at the Official *" .^: Sch>l of Arts Her next country was Vcnraiela where she spent :t' % %  >i %  :s usual give five shows this Translator for the Republic i-ek. The llrst will be a private seven languages—'-' Ow at the La/.iretto on Monday French. Porti m-n. and Spanish Mrs Gonsalves said that hifather who was the Visc.imi Cun am' her si"te T were kllh"' lurlnj ho So r%h Civil Wai Ii 1937 while her mother died ' y i ;. ; ...is hut fjnl Her father. • W llthl mustrlaiv U i %  I'uu .i PSbrk Piano-, Cusso" In %  uuuika ol aranehUji %  ruin tlnp utd .-ir "> % %  %  J wlUMutUrlu HKNIlAi-o l"i InltflMU m*.)"M.. ...,.< ir.i nlood. Uiua Mwhim lh* t*i vim BIHI iui hiii* hnnt iMMdi-l-lf %  %  >v. i: 1ICUI Ihu *l]**lnn* %  >• -l..i. %  ..txnolln fr —• l"" 1 •rreahtai •'• %  J***t llrrriiyd .... CIGARETTE LIGHTERS CIGARETTE HOLDERS | BALL POINT PENS | TORCHUGHTSj-BATTERIES & BULBS 1 COSMOPOLITAN PHARMACY. for your Beauty Caressa Powder Puffs are noted (or their soflneaa and are the ideal ihim; for a tender skin. Each 24c., 28c. & 40c. We have also lately opened a new itock of liie-s Buttons from Czechoslovakia. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, 11, 12 A 13 Broad Street '->•.*',•*-**-••****>-*'*'*'**•>'***• personal bile it will visit St. Lucy on Tuesday and Kivo a porformunco at the Parry School pasture for the benefit of residents of the St. 1-icy's Church ana A show will be given nt Groves '{"' Agricultural Station yard on Wed *„ \ nesday for residents of the Cot Leonard ti>e and Groves area of St. GeorK 1 The death ui juwpi: llanticid, lleud of Uie^noelJepartand one at Lascelles Plantation Spain. mvnt of the ldcul Store, removed yard on Thursday for those of Uua well respcctixi njurc from the Holctown area of St. James, commercial hie ui trio city. For The, Anal show for the week 35 years he had been connected will be a private one nt the Bav wjln uie turn and his wide Street Boys' Club room for memKi.owieUjie of tin boot and shoe bers of this Club. industry was a byword in all circles He spoke Spanish fluently and this served him in good stead in his business activities. He died almost suddenly aim was laid to rest at the Westbur; Cenatar) on Saturday evening His interest however wa.' not Results Of School Certificate Man's Leg Broken .,.,11,1.'.. pass* Cleophas Hayncs, a carpenter Tudor Bridge got In: oken yesterday evening about 25 o'clock when attempting t > confined to business alone, and board the Diamond motor bu* m his capacity as Drill Instructor M—1865 while It was going into of the Volunteer Force his short the 'bus stand. He was taken tn and dapper figure was always and detained at the General cuUtanding. One of its earliest Hospital, and most efficient members, h^ earned the Long Service Medal g. £—-——#* and Clasp among other decora JrOJ "rOCttCe IOI He was also keenly interested No J C >' C,0 " %  "*" Tornadoes m the Fne.dly Society Movement ^^^ at he ^"^l ^"v ? in Barlaidos and wa* one of the v" n B wh n lh ' ar ^t d,i5 J founders of the Clerks' Union £"" '*"* 1ST Chu f kah JE; He was married in 19P* ^>nd i> Thl purely practice *urvivcl by his widow, and four Kames and were played with mixed children, a daughter Mrs Joyce teams. As one player put it, Mascoll In Jamaica, and three sons Leonard. Thomas, and Lionel Banncld, to all of whom sympathy 1 II vxaiHov iniuoi Aau-rt c: v • A>ni n <',>ddlr it n > ii i ii %  % %  *dlnf n i itns OfMWium %  A Orim IOI> 8 H Howard B. Joan Ii K It.o Ki-.' K O U>" 'I g M.rnlmil N W Mar.ti11 W K | M.vn*rd U O O %  Mc P R M.rrJ. C A MorTb B SI %  • C T Inw K O : ll-kl C K Ko D W' lupmon. H M Tnd,.i J :. Wl. N. a : Williams C A.Bvlarsve J Cli^roU O D rl.rk.MW CUrkr N A Corbtn n O %  ml**. Cyttm n. p enry v rin r.iU>R A L : lUwll J I I. K !)•(' Manhsll G A O B : Palmar-Barn** J Q O RaHon %  F IUIUN. II O : Kali t: V Hnd N B Swila c C : Wn lltarhaad C U Wf.*frh.l II 1 Barn* J C3UM P D E ; CUrki body boat everybody else", oibaon c n ouic 1'lny was slower than usual, n uosnard R c cent rains having made the JfJjL Jr Q extended unind-i Micky hi* N o. DaaeaM t lurd^i It O : Kw Marhaiula J D "4 Rodrllun II P Wll They'll Do It Every Yime *$PA IS VERy SAFETyCONSCIOUS AROL.W9 T*E HOUSE,=CR / FJRNmjRS(ar BABys } THESE St-ft^ SA. !" %  Bbw. (ed on COW OATE Milk Food. 'The Pood ol Roynl nabln." —* %  ''! 'oi on 30lh Hrptenkir. 150— entry form, and lurlhrr particular* nouncemeiit. In the "Barbados Advocate" to aiesti M M MS VALUES MX . "QUALITY" SHIRTS AUSTIN REED (with 2 separate collars) at $7.50 VAN HEUSEN (collar attached) at $7.63 and CONSULATE (Sports in 2 shades) at $7.03 all in stock AT C. B. RICE & CO. BOLTON LANE VAT YOU WANT


PAGE 1

SUNDAY, OCTOBER II 1930 SUNDAY ADVOCATE 475 Million Chinese Want Freedom From Fear llj Jm I.. Kilitullr., PACE NINE Six Stops Too Many Whatever Became Of? WHEN an American prolvi announced thai he had adopse haby chimpanzee and wu brti tnjt ii up under exactly the aa millions aa his trn-n HEW YOKK. Ot, Vic* Admiral Oscar C. Badger. U.S.N., recognized an an expert on China, declared lo-d.iv th-u right now Communist China has "a choice between peace and war with Its neighbours" China, in hi* opinion. Is at the crossroads—racing two pot hi. The well-informed, blunt speaking. 59-year-old Admiral put It this way in an Marvin wrM International News S-1 "China can maintain an aggressive attitude toward its neighbour countries in the Far Cast. "Or on the other hand, she can permit her rtsjgnhwii < recover uconomicjlh sense of security China can do this by properly assessdng the American attitude which is being directed to-vard helping these smaller countries to a freer and better way of life." The attitude of Communist China toward Formosa countries as Burma. Indo-Chlna. Tibet, Indonesia and Thailand, can prove "a vital factor' involving world peace, in the Admiral's opinion. Significantly. Admiral Badger pointed out. the Island of Formosa with a population of about that of Australia. Is staging a remarkable ecnomic come-back with the assistance and co-operation of the United State*. This news of Formosa's recovery is seeping bnek to China. It is a "seed" that may grow, according to the Admiral, and small countries — such as Korea, after uniflcDtlon — could also recover economically and industrially if permitted a feeling of security' against the threat of aggression China, with ils vast population of something like 47S.OOO.OOO people. Is anxious to attain economic security aft** >i*aiof turmoil ami poverty, in his opinion. He said that great nation is by no meam. in full sympattty with the Mao Tse-Tung reinme Be added that plenty of anti-Commumsl sentiment exists in China to-day. All peoples of the Far East, In Admiral Badger's opinion, are weary of warfare and are yearning for economic nxonrf. far freedom and for a better way of life. Quite firmly, the Admiral declared: "The answer to peace in the world Is freedom from fear.' After the war — in February 1948—the blunt, bushy-eyebiowed former task force commander reported for duty as commander naval forces—Western Pacific As the senior naval and milltary officer in that active area, he was the direct r e p r ese n tative of the joint chiefs of staff and was responsible for naval participation in support of national policies in the China area. Thos* responsibilities included the protection of American citizens and interests In that part of the world. %  '! made about 200 flights into various parts of China.'' he casually remarked. IT is .1 wonder Admiral Badger talks so earnestly about China future. His aiiivitu were so widespread with the various Chinese and other officials in China that he developed an expert knowledge of the over-all situation in that far-flung countrv In September. 1949. he reported to the Navy Department and served In a special. capacity ai consultant and technical adviser lo the various departments of the government regarding Far Eastern affairs. He was regarded by many as "a second Barney Baruch" insofar as the high value of his advice was loncerned By EINIlt SAVOl'RV ST. JOHN'S. Antigua No sooner up than iM latest situation in air travel between Barbados and Antigua. The son ju< to see how they comp same arrangement exists for pasnii-iually. it made bik *engers from Trinidad to St. KlttJ Ooii|( fc-rpeess. That and vice versa Actually the flight ago a from Plarco to Golden Rock with : six intermediate stops takes al least an hour longer than hop to New York although it has the advantage of being leu than half the distance m < liwpMun Hinrlirr Moat people, even bad sailors. at one time or another enjoy a sea voyage stopping at the Leeward and Windward Islandr where HI an hour the main streets of their little towns can be scrutinized. Somehow the very thought ate practically of descending from the heavens on ~" to little man made strips of grey pastures, each within J n holds no appeal to the majority It sounds good to be able to say •hat you have set foot on all of the islands, but there tH many of us who have never done so. iid are quite content to avoid ihi Now reader J 1 Eagle, of Leicester, wants U know what happenatl. "Did the human nifdiil nnislt up as Americas leading steeple jack and did the chimp set through Yale?" he asks. My inquiries show that the pr< i,s.-or llr W. N. Kellogg, of rlortda State University, managed to keep the experiment going for nine months. The chimp, a female called Gua. was dressed in baby clothes, slept bed. used the same toys and the same food as Donald, the baby boy. She *> %  • %  precisely the same instruction and the same amount of affection. The professor and bis wife worked in mines ly from 7 a.m. to 6 30 p day Throughout the experiment l chimp was generally in advar FOR EXAMPLE, lh of ^tS^SSsJS: boy who *w * g !" up with an ape ... opportunities of such an expertof the child both physically and ence for a mere twenty minutes. mentally. When Un-> pi.. K lhcr Gua was nearly always the ider, Donald the imitsu.' destination as quickly as possible • • %  d are generally bored with what The ape put up the better .lonooii hearu Lougc Is It True? %  kiCjiUUt pTUJi great slu when it was i and has hardly been since was Sir OUvei airungeinent for provm.. the truth of spiritualism by comPOCKET CARTOON h, OSBERT LANCASTER lope that in aanrerino iitouvirs you re inuXniu u quite < Mat Uuxl fie whole thing u entirely unofficial and directly contrary to ta* agreed poflcv ol the MMon t' 'hey consider wasting a quarter performance in intelligence tests, municatitig wi'ih his friends aftei of an hour at an airport where I" experiments in which the sub* there is little or no chance of even ject sat behind a wire screen and nutting through a telephone call haU lo manipulate a hoe to drag lo the city, as the islands involved. ? apple within reach Ow was either have no telephone set vice. rt lwa > n "? h ,cr T> J? J^'? 1 ^'. „__._, iTi-v m iloni spilled her rood when using or a very poor one which w.ll bu ^^ ofu n ," %  exhaust anybody, patience ma SD(1(m upiid e-down when putPleasure travellers whether or n J *\ lntu *$ „ ,i ih H r... M .i,.. =ir !" ..,i<„-_ Professor Kellogg ith. lne rouse of icar. which stems from aggression, "must be eradicated" from the peoples of th.* world, the Admiral said, and the drain on governmental expenditures, by countries that fear present aggression, must be cut down if the world Is to go forward. "Unless this is accomplished." Admiral Under continued, "we are likely to sec rrsitonaible and friendly governments fail. Thcv will be subjected (0 criticism from within and to propaganda from without. "They would be destroyed by K ropaganda and the result would %  continued unrest In the world." Admiral Badger's duties today are far removed from the South Pacific and the Far East he knows so well He Is now commander of the Eastern Sea Frontier and tinAtlantic reserve fleet, with headquarters in New York City. His responsibility on naval matters extends from the Rocky Mountain region to the Atlantic seaboard and as far south as the Caribbean. His command Involves 1,956 naval activities in seven naval districts. Including off shore security. Admiral Badger was one of the outstanding admirals operating In the South Pacific during World War IIHe has had numerous commands and was awarded practically all the decorations his government could bestow. In October. 1944, he served as tactical commander of heavy sinking forces of the Third Fleet. On that assignment he (ommanded a battleship-cruiser-destroyer force which, in January. 1945, attacked Io JUrM Later he participated in the occupation of Okinawa, and in strikes against the Japanese home islands of Kyushu. Shlkoku. Honshu, and Hokkaido. 31M economic recovery of Formosa Is becoming well-known in China," Admiral Badger said. "It could be significant In affecting the political thinking of China and other countries in the Far East." He pointed out that Formosa was severely damaged during World War II. But since 1945. Formosa has been coming back. In 1945. ho said. Formosa's power capacity was only 20 per cent of what 11 once was. and its rice and sugar crops had fallen off almost as much. The Island's economic comeback was due. he said, to American co-operation and the policies of Geneml Chiang Kni-Chek in supporting the establishment of a popular democratic government under the able leadership of the highly-respected Governor K. C. Wu. a graduate of Princeton and a former mayor of Chung King and Shanghai. The result has been that money the Formosa government used) to spend for defence Is now going for peaceful pursuits and industrial development with the result the Island Is enjoying unusual prosperity. "The establishment of popular and representative government In Formosa is largely due to the economic aid provided by the United States under the E.CA." said Admiral Badger. "It Is being applied In a business-like and effective fashion. "The fundamental key to peace is economic A good economy makes for a contented people. Peace and prosperity Is the best way to counteract propaganda. Admiral Badger lives at quarters at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. He is the father of two daughters, and his eyes* gleam when he talks fondly about his six grandchildren He is much sought after us speaker at luncheons and dinners a speaker at luncheons and dinners in the New York area. —INS. not they frequent the air regul. ly often express the feeling that they intensely dislike 'the going up and the coming down', more particularly they dread the 'comII g down'. There are, of course. many people who get a tremendous thrill out of flying whether it be smooth or rough and they are equally capable of deriving a yci considerable amusement out of the 1 the various actions of passengers uuo and porters while there is slight Celay at islands; their uncommon dialects of English or French neither of which are easily understandable are worth hearing. Very short flights are no longer as enjoyable as say. a hop from Antigua to Barbados, where it is rearly always possible to attain a height o' nine thousand feet soaring above the clouds In n nippy atmosphere. Nowadays it is unlikely that an altitude of more than (our thousand feet is reached between the Islands of St. Lucia, Martinique and Gaudeloupe. and the air is usually warmer Opportunity of experiencing a few bumps and a fallen stomach is always probable. Vegetation on these three islands is similarly beautiful with their up* and downs of green mountains and valleys but the traveller with plugged ears has little time to gaze on their splendour while h' ITLI-,1 he was dead Sir Oliver a brilliant .sciential who died in 1940. left a sealed envelope with tiuSociety for PsMhtcml Kesearch. Tinscientists iu charge of the experiment were foi bidden to open UU envelope until some reputable person came forward with a trustworth) claim to nave received a IT isUBB from Sii Oliver revealing what %  > in the envelope. Open inn the envelope would then show n the ape's ability by saving thai when It was one year old it had the mental power of at least %  %  >iie->eat -old child, the agility of a four-year-old. and the strength the claun were tsue. of an eight-year-old In the Society's view no truMDouald at 20 is now doing extvorthv claim has yet been made: ceptionally well as a medical So after 10 years the envelope student. Gua died of pneumonia remains unopened. ^sarssssrLre Wl . M. D.„ ntelhgenc* stops developing Wh; '' became of the crop Of It is about three veurs old pre-war inventors who claimed would have prevented it getting they could bring down bombers through Yale anyway. Just by blowing air at them, %  leader asked After examining document* only recently brought off die secret list l tind that two %  l the inventors managed to ini-iesi the German ARa) lv to get their gadgetidgel was a )iug r bent k'iie.1 to shoot ,i highspeed "plug" of air 'ch-thick boards at a rjiige of 225 yards, buv when load against low flymg Ailtcn aircraft it proved useless. The second gadget -the brain fihUdj of M Aiivtrun, L.llci |>i 1 Ippermcyrr w%$ built to profit miniature %  lasji When it went off It was exI ected to start up a ';•• w hlrlpool of air which would suck lh* wings off bombers. Dr Zippermeyer managed reduce some whirlpools But %  came down. Groundnut Wool I.Ike written in, I have lost sight of tlu wonderful synthetic wool which rtontJ J found that experiments have line so well that a C2.000.nw i.icory has been built Mai • %  marries to start producing tin %  wool" next spring Using onh tinwaste left nf.er I HI margarine nit nns beei xtTBcted train the groundnuts he factory will tVttrUtally maku -t.ooo tons of moth n >VI.UMUC wool every year. The. manufacturers in. 'hey can inutkft it .it %  I mrtex the p. %  . %  %  it the groundnuts. Mr. Butler Wants To Be "Prime Minister" \nv" Trimidatt Cormponiivnt A NEW ERA in Trinidad s political lib will bfl iifjfttrad in under the new Constitution when the opening MttkMl << %  the Trinidad Legislative Council lakes place on October 20. As compared with 18 membeiii in the old House, twenty-siv members will form the new body. Eighteen were elected In the recent General Elections, in which the voters wen openly bribed. Some candidates even resorted to obeah and voodoo practices in an effort to win! There were 142 'undidates.snost of them attracted me not acknowledged member* <>f the Butler Party. The Moderates In the LegislnCouncll have also had the litr matediaraaV anT down* of the Iely by the salary or J320.0U per mating, and arrang.*d voting iTv aeroolam. ol-vU, lead ns mo,uh %  voters were In plans, and it U expected that th.-> noisy role in his Imagination. bob had to be pu The am active stewardess propapers, ceeds up and down the aisle offerProminent leaders, and ing reading matter which It politeof the "common people," ly accepted and nine timei out of since expressed the view that Uiry. The Attorney General ten never read while thoughts Trinidad and the Wot Indies genthe Financial Secretary), and glide back to the persistent hum erally are not nearly ready for the to be nominated by the Governoi or recollections of anxiety eregrant ot Adult Suffrage, but it ted by repeated starting and has been granted, and so, must the ballot date to Ihe Executive Council This Cabinet wilt consist of nln. member*, the live mentioned, three officials (The Colonial Secrestopplng of engines. B.O.A.C. Lead £2,500,000 Race f'av. Those electee Include, Mr. Tubul Uriah "BUM" Butler, notorious almost certain, therefore, that lost ot its members will bo modrates. After the Executive Council 1: impletc, Governor Kance If hi L'slrea, may choose up to ftvt Hon. |, irtmenta. Some "Ministers" may Albert Gomes, who led the sugar hllV0 more „„, „„ department JOHANNESBURG. Big redistribution of traffic ,r//.v.*.V/V.*,v.v.',',v.v.*.v- >vw*..'-v'.'< .*,','.--*,*-'*****''* Here's a List of.... Psscll. MAr.8HMALI.OW8 4 lb. tins Pasc.il. BARLEY SUOAB—> ,-lb. Una p-i.^il;. BARLEY 8UOAB 1 lb UM SEEDLESS ORAPE8 1 lh. tin* HEEDLESS DRAPES W-oz. Un Australian PINEAPPLE JUICE 20 as. UnCoatao PLYMOUTH OIN per dot. .... FlndUtcr •> DRY FLY SHERRY per hot FlndUu-r'. DRY CLUB SHERRY per bot. FlndloUr < MARCH BBOWN SHERRY per bot. FlndJaln %  A WINTERS TALE SHERRY per bot. COCKADE FINE RUM—per bot FALERNUM pet bot Britain and South Africa. When BOAC SAA had I petltlve aircraft, KL.M operated last pressurised Constellations. At one time their two weekly airplanes carried more passenger: I nan the Springbok servlce'i six Now SAA Constellations anu BOAC Hermes ore wiping out the disparity. They are all fast ann pressurised, and British-South African partnership will November be able to traffic. This is the set-up for Trinidad'. cxl step along the road toward; n-lf rule. The experiment will tx %  naasMariy watched In the Caribbean and Indeed throughout th< Empire. Butlerites Invited To Govt. House For Private Interviews .From Our Own Con*i|>" PORT-OF SPAIN His Excellency Governor Itaiuu written Invitations to of the Butler Par-.y its In the Lagtslativij 50 31 2.50 | too 4.00 4.00 4 00 1 10 :lolegntion to the United Klngdi a few months ago. and Mr. Kayii..>in! Qucvvdo. a Port-of-Spain City Councillor and Calypsonl known at "Attila the Hun. 1 Governor Ranee has sent written invitations lo members of the Butler Parly to visit him at Qovthe BOAC South Africcn Airways ernment House individually and Springbok air route will be dlsprivately. So far, only Councillor rusiied soon. It involves huge Ash ford Sknanan has paid a call spending and a clash of interests at Government Hou&e. The other* between international airlines. do not object to going, but held It A Dutch delegation will visit more desirable that His ExcelU-nSouth Africa in November to discy should see them collectlvrK cuss air transport problemi. Sir Hubert has now nominated nn >n r. ,ivp lo lnc Council, four of them BOAC SAA want to readjust retiring members, one a woman. y iLW "* roule Tl,e Dulc b Oil, sugar and commerce arc reline.KLM. have carried aboui half presented. With three official of the passenger tram, since th* members, these will form a solid per cent of It between Government bloc of eight, which. |.„ together with five or six moder,, embers utes, should be able to "hold" Mr elected to Uriah Butler and the other "wild Council to vint him ot Governmen." and so prevent ;in y irrement House. Individually and sponsible legislation. privately. They ore Mr. Tubul Taking a leaf out of Mr. Alex-Huzz" Butler. Mr. Mitra G. amter Butamante' book. Mr Ninanaii. Mr Pope McLean. Mr. Duller ha-s already begun to Ashford Sin a nan, Mr. Stephen threaten the Governor, whom he MaharaJ to B "Citizen Ranee." Meinbwof the Party have not He said that if the. Governor, refused, but held it morr drsunble Ignored his "rights" as leader of that he should see thera colln* hsorh all 1,ie ""'^ P* rt y returned to power, lively. Mem ben of the Purtw he (Mr. Butler) would make the held a meeting at the office %  •* Government so rancid that it Mr Mitia Suianan. their legal In KLM's case it Is felt they would be unworkable, and it adviser, an elected member lor have right to flv to South Africa would co't the Governor his Job. Carom South. Preaent at this for passengers destined only for Mr. Butler wants to be "Prime meeting were Mr. Ranjit Kumar, Holland or beyond, but not for Minister" Ills party hai anMr Aubrey J^mes and Mr. RayBritain, nounced that It Is in favour of the mend (juevedo. free competltirn Is not allowed i.ationallsation of the sugar IndusMr. Tubal Uriah Butler, Preston international air routes, and try. dent of the Home Rule Part". certain principles about end-toWhen ihe new House meets on and member elected for the St. end traffic — such as between October 20, the Speaker will he Patrick Wrst coiuHltuency, told Britain and South Africa—are Mr. William Savary. Trinidadthe "Gasette" on WednoarLij. involved. As Holland is at neither horn ex-)"dge By secret ballot, "Mum's the word." when he wii end, BOAC SAA i like!* to reit will choose live of the elected being quizzed in connection Wl'rt strict KLM to what they regard members to be membeis of thr k %  as legitimate traffic—about 20 perExecutlvc Council. It will be re cent. r called that Mr. Chanka Maharah. member of the Legislative CounLast year BOAC SAA carried cil. at a meeting on Tuesday night 7.108 passengers on the Springstated that Mr Butler will lie putbok service, KLM carried 8,820 tin* forward the following candiTotal traffic is worth £2,500.000 dates for the Executive Council annually If KLM have to g've upMr. Butler himself. Mr. Mitra a part of this, there would be afiinanan. Mr Victor Bryan. Mr bs major improvement in BOAC A. P. T. James and Mr Ranjit M balance sheets L E S Kumar, Ihe laat three of whom le The Ticking Man My lin.i) rv.iiii i i. ..uiry WU Into ih. Si, r the Ticking Man which hapl>cned wi] According to new.s|>,ip<'i >it: ngs ld-yeai old Mi Ed wan lYaokln >>r c ivenh \ rtassalOMd J> UesUn| not II was H loud that other"iiltl het-r II rV.clr SlttuiK %  %  ma I.I the i %  %  ma think I m carrying n Imw-bomb,' he Wad rep. I %  N> I i.filed by the IU n ithing to lAsp it Now ot 21 Mr Franklin I* sill Uf i'g ls Iciiolv ftg iwrr .unl still avoids goint to id,, pletun !lut ttia doctors arc Do lortftl b.iffliil by i' lie has n slight ntrvou he throat which makes his soli .fail" vibrate rajNdly This actuM i| .i" tub* o his ears anil keeps, him ticking >var. DOT. ntdicaicJ hecauoc of Mip-fiutwin.M'^i-ll. -Ice ..1 i -.suh tinct c*u trti Mihition Ol Sodium tilyc need for Vinian i tell, and lor youl ODBVa* lrwrntpatirniH.il it .iicn pU-aisnt and %  tuetahk %  pfsssMiptaM Winesrnii ii often l>f.i^(riir Wincami* is made from • t BJB hiHively hlrndcd lor Wuuanm Ivct nJ mall sod containing i.?*. Tophorl HP*Vou %  ) well fed ihr OF INTEREST TO ALL CRICKETERS WE HAM PLSASURB IN ANNOUNCING IIIAT MIUM MONDAY. Ilil'll OCTOBER l#r. EVERTOW 11/7A#\ (Th. 1'iipular ttru Indian Crirkrlcrl WII.I. FIE IN \TTENDANCE IN OUR SPORTS GOODS DEI-AMI V NT FROM A.M. TO 4 P.M. DAILY MR WEEKK.S IS. ADMITTEDLY. AN AUTHORITY ON CRICKET AND EVKRYTII1NC PER!.,ININn TO IT IF YOU ARE INTERESTED DROP IN AND SEE H'.M "F. WII.I. BE (ILAD TO ADVISE YOU REOARD1N(, THE CHOICE Ol A HAT OK (.EAR OF ANY KIND. INCIDENT,! .I.Y WK NOW HAVE IN STOCK I..' 100 "EVEKTOiN H'EEKLS" AITOCKAPH BATS BVKSl ONI Of WHICH WAS PERSONALLY SELECTED IN THE FACTORY BY HIMSELF. UNDER THESE CIRI MSTANCES ANY COMMENT BY US KKOAKDINO THE QUALITY WOl'l.l) BE SI'I'EKI l.UOUS. -^z HARRISON'S SPORTS GOODS TELEPHONE DEPARTMENT 10 2352. the statement made by u memb* of his Party. Mr. Chankn Maharn,, nt a rnerejng on Tuesday night. Mr. Mahara) voiced dlaai liroval at Mr. Butler's announo ment tlul he printed < olUm Canibrir in prrlly patterns Miiluhle for making dainty shopping dresses. < •ii.ii'.intreri tast colours, lit* inches wide per yard W* "\ CAVE SHEPHERD Co, Ltd. 10, 11. 12. & 13 Broad Street



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srvn.w. orTonr.R is, i.*o sr\i.\v ADVOCVTE PACE ELEVEN Think bocause (he ga* strikes over they'll return all the oil lamps thy bouq News For The YESTERDAYS CRICKET Over 50s LONDON. HIGH blood pressure and Uw trouble* that follow in Its train are responsible for about a "quarter of all the deaths in this country of people over the age of SO. The symptoms vary greatly. In some people morning headaches with loss of vision are the lirst signs: in others It Is kidney trouble. Others again flrst discover Ihat their blood pressure is too high when they feel pains in the chest on exertion, or when they are awakened at night by attacks of asthma. To date treatment has been unsatisfactory. Rest, combined with an almost meat-free diet, without any sail, has been advocated Later the "coolie" diet composed almost entirely of rice was commented upon favourably But few patients could *Uck the deadly monotony Apart from thin many drug* have been tried. New Day Now a real advance does appear to have been made Two doctors working In Pnisley report on eight cases of severe high blood pressure treated with a new compound called "hexamethonium bromide." The patients, selected at random had all the signs and symptom*; of high blood pressure as well as the actual mercurial reading. Treatment with this drug brought down the pressure and relieved th.c symptoms in every Even more Important: CSscs ihe blood pressure was reduced it did not rise again when administration of the drug was stopped. It is too early yet to say Whether this drug will relieve nil cases of high blood pressure. But the fact that cases can be relieved to such an extent is an advance in treatment such ns has never been made before WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED -I.I 8 RICE WORKERS CALL OFF STRIKE MILAN. Oct. 14. The two weeks strikes of land workers threatening the rich rice crop In Milan Province was railed off today after an agreement between landowners and trade unions on revised work contracts providing for medical Insurance —Beater. • From Page 5. team yesterday went to L. T. Harris, who topscored with a sound and patient knock of 73; and T. Pilgrim who waa undefeated with 40 runs to his credit. S. Lucas and W. Greenidge were the most s ucce ssful bowlers for their tsejn, taking 3 wickets each for 31 and SO runs respectively. The outfield was slow, and runs were not easily scored. Cricket fans seemed disappointed when Clyde Walcott the biggest attraction, did not live up to expectation Carlton started their second innings and at the end of the day's play had scored 6 runs for the loss of one wicket. C. Atkins and S. UrUhth opened Spartan's innings, against the attack of fast bowlers Edghill and Warren. They were off to a bad start, when Griffith was out to Edghill with the total at 13. I. F. Harris partnered Atkins, and they found It d'WniH to score as the duUleld was slow. After forty live minutes of steady bowling. Die fast bowlers were replaced by ihe two off spinners. Lucas and W. Greenidge. Harris reached double figures by driving one of Ureenidge's deliveries to the boundary. It was the first of the innings, Atkins was however out in the next over, and Spsrtan had now lost two wickets with 31 runs on the tins. The large crowd now sent up an uproar, as Clyde Walcott, left the pavilion. He was off the mark with a drive through the covers which earned him a couple. Skipper Hutchtnium now opened "his field for this hard hitting batsman. Walcott's stay waa short however for he was given out leg before to Lucas for 3 runs in his second ever at the >*rease, and 3 wickets were down for 37. Skipper Keit-i Walcott came in to Join Hamt. who then took two fours otT Grcenldge's bowling to send hi-: individual score to 21 and the score past the half century. Ten runs laser, skipper Hutchinson made another bowling change. bringing on K. Greenidge in plaee of Lucas, and Walcott took a single off a delivery and soon followed up with a well Umel drive to the cover boundary. Sfollmeyer Play was held up. as Jeff Stollmeyer another international player entered the pavilion, and a large crowd of small boys and even grown-ups flocked the pavilion, in an effort to catch a glimpsand refused to go away. Mean while Harris who came m No 3 was still there batting con Adultly with his srorv at 40 Fasrl paor-r Edghill returned to the attack an-1 he made the ball HI', awkwardly and twice strut.; Walcott on the body Spartan however, lost their fourth wicket "hen K.-.tli W..U.,!t back leg before in the last over before lunch, and than %  rasa :i..l 156 runs beninc with four of tlu lr best batsmen in the pavilion his contribution being 17. merit" came Ln ;ifter lunch to can? on the innings and he took his first in EtiKhill without sco ing, but was off the mark with .< single off W. Greenidge. bowline, ana play again became quiet .is the batsmen fought for runs A six" by Harris off Green idges bowling brought ins awn score to 52, and tlie total lo 102, after US minutes of play, arid E W. Marshall replaced W. Greenidge, and his first over yielded a bounda r y. Pilgrim who was now well set. did the bulk of the scoring as the rate of scoring increased, an-1 sunn 150 runs m sent up. Without any furlhei addition. Harris sound innings of 73 came to a close, when he nave a hot return to N Lucas who accepted It, and half of the team was 0U1 Did Not Score Wood who came In next, wss returned without scoring, mid K llowen partnered Pilgrim. Carlton tried their seventh bowler K Hutchinson and Bowen greeted him with two "sixes" but he wt> later bowled by Warren for a hurricane 16. The score board then read 176—7—16. Another wicket fell when Phillips way sent back without scoring. The innings came to a close, when cleaned bowled; both falling: to Haynes was run out and Moriv score. In the ten minutes left for play CarlOon opened their second In mints with K. Hutchinson an I N. T. Clarke, but tha former was sent back without scoring. Browne came in and an appeal tor tight was upheld by the umpires and play came to .i 'Saucepam Radios For Tribes 'They Wag Their /leads' THOUSANDS of n.< lorl tl A firm i '.ii hirers bate pi batter} MI lor them, kr .he -Saucepan Special." It is so called becaui large saucepai %  bandk painted blue, ibout which A 34-pano diiitni %  •< %  I i the oinrj no Ii IIM->. II. I J ^c^c^o' J o^^cesa*^^0tCC. First Aid \\U Siltfir kiliii iliis-it rill! Whan you ossd First AM fast far rh. pains of s assdarhi. take Alka-SaltasIts imbbUng, sfawssat actsoa help* Alka-Saltssr'i psSB-raUeriag agant te so to week fast Net a uurattr-*—yos nan ink* Alka-Sahsar at ANT dan*. Drop i latilrti In a ftaai sf nsSs*. Watch It Bss and dissolve Into a %  parfehng. plHMni itmni drink. STOP Arrest That Cough A COUGH THAT CLINGS ON IS A MENACE TO THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND A DISTURBER OF THE PEACE —YOUR PEACE I Do noi allow it to get the better of you. FERROL COMPOUND is your protection against a stubborn cough. Within a very short time you will be surprised to see your cough routed completely by the double action that i;iki-s place when you take FERROL COMPOUND, because it not only cures your cough, but does it by restoring your ItftHlgttl nt the siiine time. It has proved effeclivc with thousands of coughs before. Why not let it have a chance to work on yours! 1 of#71 will nvrvr rvgrvt Uikiny FERROL COMPOUND 'THE IOXH COUGH Ml\lt It I THAT III 11.It* AS IT HEALS' s 11 IKES & BVNOE LTD.— AKII* ug Why everyone feels so SAFE In a MHIman MINX. Ml Si-1 imilary r.mlruction. Imieaa'il rigksa — utter timing liiilepenclrni fntnl ">(! apnng suapeasioo — %  rafSSI Rats an|>inng. .1 you'll be delighted with its roomy. i.lv-iw boJy. its large luggage spsoa sad • %  nnnOsf of operation. Hillossn Mini for yourself — ste it .r lUrttSsal a*o*roos9. HILLMAN MINX U/uk TlMh fi nm $ Hf i n& COLE & CO., LTD.



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PACE FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY OCTOBER 15 CLASSIFIED ADS. TCIEPHONE 2 SOS ANNOUNCEMENT t En8**menl < a to MR %  t • | %  Mi .Mil ..( iw.n H QAFOOD of T>i Archie Raw-enl. THANKS %  end Wl i areUfuli' man*. ..*„ ...-.< %  .i i ol her OMUI fSS ssv,.r IS 10 * >w* family of Mr JoMfh LeoneM B.a-.ld. *Bto of "Wlllabury" ltaB wNo. •**! appreciation T^" %  *lurn thank, to all their frhrnda W Alton *f IM funeral. i othci wreath. •ympelhv AT W*r went Mid wUi bnnvitiiii le BenAeld '•*"! Leonai-. IN MEMORIAM It loving raamoO ol out door ENID <-Y*lL GRIFFITH who fell a*awt JHW o OdoMi II. IBM. TWO veor* ha** in.-fl ""— Mat nigh* we watched her pa-away, bu are Mil* "he !'•• gone tn let aM hoff* lo meet her there I rnagftawred bl Matiu (daughter.; OrSRlh .mother.; Ida -.uteri and Oabert -*"' *"• """"• .MM la hi. in. Map helm.. J Al BERT BIACKETT. who Ji*! IvjiuN fa OH aieat hoiid an Of* *B\ lfiri.li' and )u*t to IIand %  a II andiru. vSit • w-MMw-WI MPH, he ha. tor behind tla> Mi-l BBtfllrai %  )•. -iinil H >l ier>rcted. wherever he wrn To ihi. boaullful III. cama noble am If* died * h lived rvervbndv. IririKl Winifred Blarkett -wileIv* Ar Pea. .daughter.' 11 10 M In FOfl SALE AirrOMOTIVK CAR Ford r, .•• %  % %  iMi %  --• egr 'lion Own leaving '-<-nH M. %  • enable nflrr refu-ed Apply Cap! A 14 10 B3-0. CAR* 1 V ,,,,t„ll |l Saloon. Moth Pargain. 1 Furd V-l If** SUM mllee %  -.* Bond (mi.ittuM at rnwjW,.lc JOITT RoYAl. OARAGE U4 Tetophotv aSt — Hi 10 M 9. Hlllm.n O modal Apply COHI Bempaou C Ltd Dtol OM It I" !-> Si lH llr \ T .ALOW 1-bedrooeri B unaMl rl W Ma* in coal locelily l"a mile* IroW. A.aiUMe lot a pe.iod ol IS fiom tot December ln.pM*h>i ."•W-Phone •ft" „ WAITED HELP „iin fc-inr.—i Modem KRarrtan ind iv L*w BBM*M i reea tttflBM • ARpmiEN Anno.-nea. Yochl Ctua. rnm December St All mod-m - %  irnce. Only Cotoueed need opply..* %  •**' Ira. Goading ln premlaaa 1..^*. DIAMOHU Vll-Ut Stream rumlahaii ig and dining room lotiih of Novonlm l-i'r^ 'liAv.ll-bla lor IM i.l) DM! a-TI M 10 W m lrk Fhona point nl anlr, and balanc* todHwa Call %  riih -rill i.il'r imiMdlMitoir * T R Evan.. Rroad I aapaiirnca and *rhoollng tm monlh arcordlng lo •• Mr Carlf*. < ntato td* aaWT up lo igptoito* %  10 M tn STiWO.TYPIST FJ.PWH lypM lor out OdBca PJW-fy W Apl wilh wrlitoo addrkwltof> twrturr Di n llii g OEB Co. Ud ttoy atrwn. H I* g| i IM UI.II aVOTICKS NOTICE THK Tto -l wai and Library of UM WorMD-l Soil llrlp A—o.iaU.x> oil) M agagdOKJ gat Honda) lilh Orlobor Con %  Iznora ol catoa. and praaa.voa an CJkad lo arnd In thair good, on IM %  Mining ol IM Oi. !• I. soru i AUraMMu ia> I Voaliv EahH 1 lei Olrta M Wi MulwW %  '"ia' d I i... "toy. al IM m> roai ScMoi win M ra*alwJ b* n law* in-.. Mih octobar •arwiK ad "PV" Ofk* n-a.. II and It W. U. OOOD1NO, Parochial Traaauin. SI Pnlllf) II 10 M-da, HARBOUR LOd (a CartM* Bay Oooabig, Irom Trtn.dad %  S. Oolflto. I.SOt wau from rraWch %  >. l.*BMu*ddn, %  MM -*•. 'tmt Dun*m. In". U rMtorialia MlKCKLlJiNKOL'S (ICIC %  '. I I>oiTI<>N F.ngiiihinan. lull* qualMlaai ir, NOTICE SXAIXD Tattdrra lor IM ntioi< •t a Pavilion wd Coaamunit.Hall -t Cllorioii Social Canlra. 81 Oaorga. *lll b* irreivod by ma up lo SUt Oclobai. iWN Man* and %  parlfk-ilon. can ba aaan Mr R. B. Mdvudar %  Oftico al Mari I HARRISON Co Bxiad M. BrltSM-W K MASON. Ctork. "l>y ol %  "! aaorga." 11 10 Mn BMo rW aa aaator. A a., l .*do. n-l-rtn.raa Rolto Row. Oonflat on wennd Boat | „, *iot 0 ,. Ddroil U R A Briah.l A*mwirk gallary Vary |„ a na 00 England RUoxl Vtorlrlral and d any Can M uaad for a big j Marhankwl tngiwaa n Brilb* Army f oOkdO. •< 3*di t Box J W. c .. Advoaato 10 It W-tn I I 10 W-4n nniRED MAN — Boraa aaplinr %  iotal work savna ooatlton Rm* no Mard — toodwaW. aalar* rla4M C Advocai* II W *>-!' t rwmfart nultabto tw .| warn apply waaiay Bav • Mil 11 10 P-In j S H Ubroailla. 4JBt kM % %  . Zlla Wonlto. m It: IVi.idW hw aM VMaaati SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. • AII.IMO —Trial ^g. %  •li..ruSag* Stth: RRft. OR. %  AMXXt, FROM AJBSTBBDAM • DOVER l %  "Banalr. Waplainbtr Ihh AILaW TO TIIMDAD. rARAMAURO BCMKRABA. BTC. wia -vtel-n^Sap* llal. %  • "Coi..i!" Oct Jrd "IUXO TO -AU.IK. riTMUITU. AMTWFSr AMR AMBTRRRAJg m a. %  WIOrrta R gaawpt ith. m %  "OranjrMadl" Oct. ITIh ilin ilrd paaaaaaWr aaooiT.modauon avallabla an ihi. v*a-Mi %  r KluON SON at OB. w>. Mini "DABrTWOODwill 4 Puaei Tel No. 404? In Touch With Barbados Coastal Station Wator mill an. %  aar___ :.i Dtol .;.. iTd-ft— lln. HOUaB %  RHPRRANZA %  fRDy *i" -tol Ira*. IM tot *to*. on m JadjrKCoaal Pruma 01-13 14 10 H—do IM III.II >AI.IS AUCTION HRATIimaJ) — On lh Ctl a ci io i i Coaat 'MA RYVlLLi:."—Black ig. dining. illllng. 1 %  rvanlt rooma and lai Mivantoncra A i Saaly. Lucaa aflar p m irga g-vrac. uai Ma-ri Cartlngli rl a* Pnona M1F "SWANRBAWonMiif Irom 1 Nuvrmbar A lull> furnlahad BWnghtoW. intliKling H.lrigpraloc. Trlaphona. RaOI'i ... i-go. Dial lira or MM II 10 JO-In UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER %  uranca Company. I will aall at Ton Royal Garaga. SI Michaala Row. on Friday. Otlnbrr *Jlh 111 IBM Vaunhall Rl* rVaBRH THmatad hv 'ftra R>> I 1 p.n. Tarma CASH VINCTNT oRirrrrn. AuMlonaar UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER On Thuraday Itth by ordar ol Mr. H. i RUd-a. at will aall hi. Purnltura al "Tha Rlvrr" Batala. Si Philip wRMR Iwcludaa ng lablr laaal 101. Wag.m.. Serving Tablr Liquor Caaa. Card Tabl. Book Caar iglaaa doom; Tub Chain. Work Tabla 'Draaa Claw Faal all in inar...an>. W1NS1UW—Callla Waah. 81 Joaaph Km Ul' imnlh ol Novambar IBM) Apply Mr*. V. T. QQORUM, siiimg Hop* PlantaIMA. BL Thomaa i 10 90In PFIISOWI P pSRoa, Top lloch Oaragrr CAR KimtM-.ni Talbol I IMI %  G—H .^H..... Appl. I CHIlon Tan IV. Rl I* 10 B> I f .. CAR — Ona SiaMard %  BTT Car n parvart .nndlti..., Apply J R Ptorc. C O Jan,'A l.jmrh A CD Ud U 10 m in CyckFar panicui. Charwiuui. C/o Royal II It 00-*" MOTOH C H R. Motm Apply to J A Baak of Canad,. giving iradll lo my Wll raiponalbla tar Mr or anyona alar ron it... ii" any dabt o> .Irbi. In my nam< unlaw by a wnlian order alaned by ma Sad IT-RCY nRANlll Blrhmond Oap. SI Mkharl U 10 W-ili IM pwbBiU haiahff wamad ag>l< giving credll lo MARTHA WUJJAMS. at I do noi hold myooU riaao w t n i l t Rw any dabt or debta ronlra* WILIJAMB. 14 IB 60—BB ELECTKICAL NOTICE Alt'l-ICATUtSS .accompantod by I m.ial cntlfkalawill br i my oBRn p lo 1 p m on Friday. BRn OcloMr. MM. lor one o. I DBPMCBOHWI V. r-. r %  • iM-.i. % %  %  i.jbia a* tha atria' Foundation School AppUanma nmu M .la %  parHhtonara In aUalflhlana.1 raa. and mual nol be Ir-. y.ra atk moathi or more iran iwa|ra yaara on the da'a ol HM a.ammaiian Candid a lea mual pvaaanl thcni.rlve* IM Onia' Poundalton Srhool on Fridaur yllh October al 0 30 a m Applaraiion forma mual M obUlntd BaBpBBM i BBM RRBBB S RaitoU... S B Ponttnl. aatai, as (iMvabon*. H t %  Ml %  BBMH I C_ I Z %  • I t,..l'H--. S %  Fllara, R.R s„ Btaoaa Do ORn Argentina. %  S Port I AI< t 8. BMo C aw abridda and S %  > Rangit'X WOOD OODUAHli Clark ol the Veetr>. Chrtai Church 11 10 0 Sn Evening Advocate Canadian National Steamships ORIENTAL I GOODS! i \rU<-uloM) I C'l'ROIS. JEWELLERY. I -II K-. iv,. | U bU EP*noJ)| TII\.M* | Pr. Ui.i Hr> St. DIAL 344*1 oi iiimn MI CAVADIAN CHAJ LAi)Y HODNEY i ANAtMAN emir l^DY NBXBON tl Oct 1 Nov. II Ne* Ballrea Maalrral BL Jaba ; Fare* and fraiabi i Book wood Chaj ll-ii i it.-, i Inlaid Conlea Table. Typoueaa Chair; Cuahioni. Rug'. ind China. Frull and Tag BarCnfleo Bat. Plalad Ware, f -h and Forka. Spoon.; Forki ale Picture*. lion Fled.leon. ai.il Red.. Old Mahoaany Linen Preaa; Dmaing Table*; Waahilandi; Plna Praaaea. Oun Pre.,. Roller; Linen including 1 DamaaK Tablr Cli.th. and CrocMt Radapread. Fam-. Hair II 10 e'etocb Trrma H-H m: \ M Kl it TROTMAN a. CO.. Am 1IIIII.IT-BEAL ESTATE EDUCATIONAL ^TRNITl'KK VACANT SCHOLARSHIPS i.im H FOUNDATION BCBOOL [ Their are one or rnora vacant Found*| Uun Scholaratilpa al tbt Chilli Church OH l>' Foui-.iiauon BrlaooL Ap-WcanB rauat ua children of Parana reaMing In 0M Parian of Chrlat Churah and who are to rT-'RNITWnat OBka Kqinpni — f Sinfl+r • Do'ihle Pedeetol Stoel De.k. Fona..p "r 1-etler 8lrr 4 drawer Pilini CaOdnai. Steel StulMmrrv Cupbo-rd r.rd liMWa Ci>blnat*. Slret Offlca Chad ind o'hrr olWe equipment now ootai.i able (torn alack from T (ilde. Orai^ Ltd Rolton l-iuPrione 444) MECHANICAL Palanetl.1 TTPEWRITFat Ualrlcl. m. .il. Appl: Nu Mode Dry Cleaner' CH> II H —a. 19 Ponabla Undo od condition Mi A Son. The appllcanta mm got oi io yaara t m day of IM I He between thf ht and II >c.r* ruination, which Form, of application can be obtained from the Sacratary, W. 11 Anlrobwa, III! Ion Itouaa, Bay SBeal. Thaaa ffnraaa mu.i be relumed accompanied by a b a>t la mal rartMtoato to MM BecreUry Bot lator than 4 p m. OB Frtday RMh OetoMr W. H. AMROr.ll. Sec. Oov body. Olrla' mundatlon Bebool. lit to *.i DE WISE' DONT BE CAUO*1 NAPPING' Save hundied* and V.Oflan thuuianda of Dollar. Breeidmy tha Order ol Ota Day. Even mlllkonair Look Well before Leaping Lo< D I da Abreu. a Trained and EperlrtKi Aui-tionare. Heal Eklate Broker 4a Valm Ball your llnuaahold Purnltiire carEtc.. at Aucllon, and 00 p m naa-h. al Navy Oardaau. na lor Under Cl.tM and not Abor 100 A Deolrable I Bedrootn '1-iiT" i.eh Stonewall Bungalow in an Area I Doctor., Near City, Vacant. Ooing Under X1.M0 i An [drat and AimoM New 3 Bedroom IS Inch SVmrwi.U U.000 aq. It Ylalda M0 Ou p m Going, for Under fltW ; A S Baditm... Collage by Hank Mall Main IM Spaclou Y^rd Yield. BUM pm. Oolng for Under R I.IM One Acre at OUima, NOTICE PARIKR OF BT. JAM8B Applteart i awa lor Veatry lahibaitonof n Annual value ol CI tenable at %  Hrb' Second Qrada School, will be reelved by tha undermentioned up lo ftiuiadav. 30th November. ltM. Appliii.nta limit M children of paiuh *nrrt In atraltrned clrcunutancei. over he age ol aeven year* and under Ihlrren yaara of aft. A Rapli.mol Certincale mu.t M f ol .aided and a Ceniftcete (I-.TI. Iha Head nlitrea. of the School of thilr fltnena lo %  %  iSfld P II TARlt.TON Clark to the Vaalry ol BL Jama* IB.H.SS—SB, I.K>l'()lt LICENSE NOTICE The application ol ESMIE CRISPIN, of Diamond Hock. 81 Peter, the purcnaaci il l.i.:u..r I.icenae No HI ol IBM. granlerl lo Errol InniL* In ieaied 11.ililh day .,f Oclnbrr. It-'O C Ion Village. II 10 *> PVII'IBS Hull MaMlff. One male and 1 Irmali. m.-llni I.I.I i Mrt K D Edw-Md* 4141 MISCELLANEOUS ANTIQUES Of avenv daarrlpt*.. Glaaa. China, old Jewel* Una Sllvr Wa'trcolour* Early book*. Mapa. Autograph. BM at Oorrlnge* Anliqua Shop adjoining Royal Yachl Club I %  B-ll.n. Haltver BABY S ('I'AI)I K llngood condltlor r.iinplet.. with Matreaa and Ca*ter* Price DIM Ha. H-i4 II Htla fej RONE1ISS MAM lag* *. 'i n ..e, M Xnui %  Min.ii. i I IN TINS • \i Senirr inin* nna ill lie limited 14.10 MIH'CKI.FYS I'HEI-AIIATIONS CouBl M.attire M. While Hoh ^"., K.m. lit Oca < W.tri A Cq Ii I0M -?n BBRET*. A -ear. Ciilldin. aliea Several Shade* i Learmit al only 4tc each SWAT MOM. 10 Swan St 15 10 90-Sn turPM R I PHEPARA MONS Malik i %  / rtiENCil roFrW. I d u-e BSful In IM up! I... ..In II 10 M 1.. leva. Ir-M-W—i.. Hit. you .1-1 ml sold by r-ii C nTln MBIMIKIRBWIN ha. recetvec '-RArrtrn; rtlRBtTMArl KR-ORA TIOMB. NOVIlllRB. TMYK. In, lb. %  naar I'leaaa iiei,i iha ON Chrl.l MOSDA HTIITRRH \ % %  %  prlena KNIGHTS linT'<; KTYRW-S ll BtM 3> PIANn I" %  rORBnl IUIMMI Spl.-'i'i..i tone N.. irunaaU %  -1 Mr* D MOORE. Coat* Hank Hall Mai. > ENTRANCE KXAM1NATION t.llll.ktOt -NIlATFON •CBB4M. An Entrance Eiamlnatlnr. for tha School Year January-July IMI will M held al IM -lio.il on Friday nth OcloMr 10M al BIO am Application, will M %  -celled up to Friday Mth OetoMr by tha Hcadmi.troaa and BMiat W aeewmpeav to4 ky a bipttaaaaJ aaeiBVato and a t. en imlal from the HeaekwMlraaa of 0M Mat l.i-il attended by the pupil. Aoiilicant* mual M Mtween the age* .f II I %  aa i .-MnaWon. PantnN or auaritiam *eir XanaMen or ward, a 14 ,.., • date eorompaeiylng t herahy norcomm-Klatlon for I tha data ol UM> la examine lion ol t unit tMy leavr W Fl ANTRORtTS Sec Oov Body. Olrla* Foundation School ALEXANDRA SCHOOL NoHca re Entrance FAai-inanon* fo I KM and Kiammatton* for IVniOar.htr-i i %  ud Vealry Bahnnikoeai I TM rttamlnatkan. far entrance in IBM. aa won % %  for B IM IMBMM. and I I.Mhmona. eetll M Mid from t M a m %  ..4 pm on Pnday. Nov K*h fwr aai I ......Hdatea who wee* It yawn of arr oi over, on Jult Hat. IBM. and an Bat. unl-y. Nov 11*. al IM aa"* Ikwe far! inter candidate. 1 Paeon ta and Ceuardlana arM wM tMtr aanMBMaro or wee-da to ah rkaa -...atoaOton. and Meo not all IBB| ftftoa iirnaat to BM Heaahnaatraaa MA late* .1. Wadaaadoi Nov let aetd aaaeat M ... !" a—.led by • Mr*. r MBaBaaMl i.HIVale. and a ehort toaMmamlal fi—v ii. Hood of the arho-l M gtrl hoi %  I attended, etaliraf Mr aa*. preapiaa a TM Hat of aurriafel candidate* III M pwbi h aMd In I hi. newapapei an 11.lay. Doe. tat Pwia.e>i or Qiiafala.o of aorrt M *r*Maal on Thwradav Dae law. II MSBinytblna %  1 Batala ~ to Bull One and All C and Attractive Buy. with Aaaured Sale ValuaaI Bpeali.r In ami cnly Inipactton Bolarlled No llnoBtmg or Boaailng—ceo Pnncy or 1-nd.il I'rirr* No High P i t—u re Method* afford, mPleomirc lo ni wlin K ee Buyer. A Tip lo Ftonalble HUM I Ml Seiiirlea* may Pnllow nUk<-| all Agrnl Kecogni'crl. Privata and Weyaldi Compor* Proporliaa. atioialion. n.,1.. tfnolalken. tor aome of the aoM Pioperlle. ehowni. Value.. le-Salr Valuaa— II any. Uun Darkle lor Youraalvaa A Good Kaon and True Frlonda DkM 1111 Wlnm Fl SURa U Cotl at "Oil*. BooB-h 1 Near Pavilion Court. Rtotttvga Look For My Sign Board llKl'si: Lucy II %  ru-oua ... |..n .' m, PWta rtiibi Bklnna* •! Civic Friendly Society Scholarships Appl ten ttuns are invited for two or more scholar-thips offerer! b-> llin mrttilMrrs of Tha Crtic Wflfarr? Plieiidly Society br-Rlnnlna 1951 I< Btiy st'eond RTadc school tn the %  Slund. Theia? vcholarahipa arc upened lo members or the child .1,-1 M parcel ol ia.ri.t ..uiair % %  Worthing View In the par.ih of Chfltt ** %  ( l "v Or fril>) of member Church .ind it land aforoaald containing Ml blraiterted circuni5lanccs of thf. laveniy-iw.. poroM. abovtNismr.l society, between the IMTJ %  g?.y.. 9 -vs. it > :^ cd T1 1 : nfleott.mmdreth. GARDINER AUSTIN 4% CO., LTD— A f ents. €IE. CLE. TRAKSATLANTIQli: iTBtich Line COLrOMBlE" •COLOMIUF:" R. M. Sailing to Trinidad and La Guatra on tlio 2.'th Ortobrr ltoO, aceeptlng rr5imperii. Siiiliuu lo Plymouth and Le Havre via Martinique ant. Cluadeloupe on the 29tn October. 190. For further paniculara, appa* to:— JONES & CO.. LTD.-Agants. CRICKETERS! md Ihem today lo RAYMOND JORDAN In Bay Street, opposite Combei >, ihei, —i „ Corninittee, heir wllne--... documapti Swltl & IlifJ ,.i.'.. .. I ... — ol 11 i no Cleat af tha Atalataiii Court of Court llouae. Brtdgelown. bwfoce the Mud day of November. IMO. In order that auch elaima may M ranked according lo Ihe nature and priority tMrrwl -. oihrrwiae auch poraoM will be precluded from the benefit, of the •ant Decree, and M deprived of all claim on oi agaiiut IM aald propeily Cltiimaiila are ak notified that thay .1 Iha aald Court on WednaaBB>. tb. land dav of N.iven.bcr. IfdO. at io ..'ck*k m wi.cn tMlr a*Jd claim, will M ranked Given under mv hard (hi. Ilth day of SepternMr IBM I V OU RRB Ag cicik oi lie AM MONTSERHAT. HOTEL coi kfteMn. il 11 1 rape bin. fiimneied. and with linen Me B11 oat i d B> awn |">.u. or %  For fur-Mr paiMralBM apply For Safe-ConM MISCELLANEOUS (LAIN COATS School Children Kan Coat., and Young 1-dlea Bowl Kngatw .l.i.ilitv No Pla.li. Tn clear S? tn rath SWAN BTUflE. Ri Swan Street 14 10 M-)n HOIllJl NA711R Never Men u--.l For aalr. price 110 On TrleplimuMB-' "Macrae" n 1 M In SQUIRB'S I'HII'VMATUIN'I I 'dl B Solinelriii ( ... OryrarlM * pp.* Hone, an Ooa IIII Ml In Among other Itema wo aall par yd nOYAl. HTUHK II it as-xn He Wi8P a a a . Advertise -M11ITS l.om Men". Shlrta ol BU* !" 1 lc-d wr-arliig qiuMHy at 81 M and M ...h ROYAL BTOftX II IMS SB. SlllltTS & PYJAMAS Boya' Man'* Slilrti and H<|amaa iirdoroi. Maaeure can be delliered within fout Mtir.. RXIJANeE SH1HT FACTO KY II IB,M In Yonr Giu., food. PrK-e Mr ana BV DPI •SfSX: el and mg on B .PM aq toot M Land PT T %  SB * I Pl .l ^ %  < A. *"?t_ %  ** OFFICIAL SALE %KDADOtt IN THE ASSUiTANl t'OVRT OF A-l'EAl lEqulub!Ji.rl.dlcn Bl RICHARD STANI KY Ml 1 OCISF IfOTKR M Ih-lciioaiiH %  ii thai b> vii i r jeal dated IM lilh day or Boptambat. W.0 there will M -I up for Mile lo thiiineat bidder at the Offlca of IM Clerk il IM Aaatetent Court ol A'.peal at the \>urt llouae. Bridgetown, Mtween th? lour* ol II .noon> and 1 o'clock In the IH MBO0B1 ..n FYna). IM twenty fourth lar ol NovomMr. IBM all that certain nece or parcel ol land altuale al HiirthiiiK View In the parl-b ol Chrl.l Thurch and Bland aloreoald i..nlainiii> ind fifteen-hiindrrlli. ,i i-,.h v Barwce BwWfA. Upper mmtowui A BMBL Ma# I IIIIIOPHVI III DB rEHREIRA ol "Chlionlle UBRI i Bay Bt iNoar BBpl4W*Bdi by Chuopiactlc i.iethod cnrrect* dlaaaaiw of eye*, ran. iKr. throat, lung*. Moniach. kldnc)i atut I IJI Florence Hlc* i r c orimth '.:e, i Dawe on lam i St*. 15.10.80—en NOTICE AppMaftona for two or mo exhibition, to any Reoond Ora Bchool will b* received by < Sac rptarv not iBter lhan Tnui day tha Mth October IMO. DM u.*r Hum II yeare ol Bfo on tha >l*t July. IMI. to M inovrd by a Baptlamal certificate which muat accompany tha appMcallon. The examlnallon wl M Mid at tha St Philip'. Boya' School on Saturday 18th October, in), Doglnning at 10 am. FIREWORKS FIREWORKS %  -T ASSORTMENT Including SKYROCKETS. CRACKERS. JACK IN BOX. MATCHER. ROMAN CANDLES Etc. EM. And SPARKLERS Alas C. CARLT0N BROWNE Wb4MeapBaalaaaaBB>t>S>a.^ Ovr waiting list for the January 1951 term closes on 30th November. Have vou entered the name of vour child yet? Remember \VK OET RESULTS. We are offeriiiK $4,000 in free seholflrshlps tenable from January 1951. Detail* upward tn Sunday Advocate of 1st October. Applv in writing. L. A. LYNCH. Principal. Tel. No. 2846 8.1050—4n Invrs.ni.'iii Opportunity! %  y lo Hi %  lew Root may abut chattel B II). Mra Mail* I a)ne and on I which their l* a right nl public road called WerthJ | %  n Im-Twi elae Ihe aamr and bou'id timether With twrlllnghouae and all and dngular other the building, and ercclloiu on Ihe aald parcel ol land erected and b..llt .Undtng .ind being Ihe aBf u i ri i wc ea. and II n..i llrni aold tha aaM properly will M act up lor oakon every aiiccecding tlkl.iv Ml ween IM aanv* hotir. until Iha aama M aold for a turn not irna than EMB t i Dated thla Ilth dav Ag I V QU ggaj t.i: \m \ I I. i i \i III I. IN ll poaalbla. toil ml sullied.. Shot umce rouUne d> .•• %  allal. A km n advantage (OMMKHl IA1. S1IBJR4JT8 I BJ.1IWJ 1 %  W.BR1 p PafotMB pa t Salary Scale. W.raw %  1141 MJR Initial appolntmanta on thM arale | Rarbadoo, not e.ceootnaj tf*> iB.W I %  %  ltM nniiNo %  iiM.00 u.4Mp> Diploma tor rerognleed equlralafeJl NU pa. a.i.litlonal i Od. MM IW.li to adl..*l„..l law W.r w. >Aed %  0MMai bit . M -Vl AppRcallon. |ge 1 i .Ingle anil enclooto. %  net e lattog ;. %  qualiflcation, aaipciirtMSBB B aatMBg-Oph. to be >ent not later than ll*t idniarMT. ComMrmerr Srhoal, St whom further particular! may M obtained. SUCCESSFUL AUCTION SALES I-*.M. Btoao*. Low f'harcev I'rnmpl Payment PLANT ATION Bl'ILDINf. I'honr 4640 Si BUf *2.'i 1'jid-up Invegtment shares, and Subscription shares, dollar-a-month maturing at $250. both ykeldiiiK approximately Five per eent. Loans on Firt Moitgige s.-.nniy on Real btale < onu.t . Mr. VICTOR IILNTE. Seeretary, Baniea Hid.-. — Hrldge si Phone 4476. LADIES! m PLASTIC PARASOLS $1 71 PLASTIC RAINCOATS 13.(11 PLASTIC HAIR BRCSHES COSTUME $1.82 JEWELLERY SAMPLE SHOES FASHION HATS NYLONS! YES ITS THANI'S Pr. Wa lit > a Swao su I bei! lo notify the General Public that 1 hae. added to my business a Rent Collecting Department, and shall be glad to undertake* (he collecting of all rents whether large or small. Strict attention will be paid to all. Commission only 10%. D'ARCY A. SCOTT, Magazine Lane. Dial 3143. 14.10.50.—3n. Rarliins Seal Agency butt INrit'STBHAl.. COMMERCIAL.. ll l wWRPtTlAI T H i Mf e 2336 ofBro : llii.ltng. Metal Ltd. FOR SALE INCH HAtTN, Chrhi Church — il>dcin Uunaalow, built of lion*. U inaliogany door*. wimtow (tame*, built.in wardrobea. drooB•r. etc. 3 bedroom*. 1 bath rooma, living'dining room, kitchen, BMngc etc One A C Enflne SMrafl ing m 1 acre land lacing aaa. FOR RENT FN-DART-WIN, line Mill — Nt w Hungaii.w i unf tirnrahedi I bed* roaan.. Living'dining room; both. k lichen All modern i ri i ml in raa i..,'..w. encloaed yard. QuaM antt you need a VI II i so> win \i II obtainable at.. THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM (OBMTBAL FOUND.V LTD.—Pnwrlrlur*. Cnr. or Bra>* nil Tuaot StnrU. TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM Are You "aoing Places" or "Doing. Thing*" You need a few Bottles of this Blend. See that you get them in time. IP IT — %  %  S |' Blender* JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD. REAL ESTATE JOHN rVfl. III ADOS AJ.8-. F.V.A. Formerly Dlxon & Blaooa FOR SALE TOWER aARAOE-RL Matthla* Gap. An almo.t now proporty -unable for J lame variety of purpoaea apart from t goroaa buiinao* NBA DENDHA -Pine Hill. A conveniently deigned rninSalow ol coitl "tone comuuclton. The accommodation conilau of jarao opening in' gallery. 3 b wardrobe*, a very |undr>, wivanf: I llHKi. tan>. ..,,. .vcred ii, with %  li.illl-ln' kitchen. MU*> garage. -. j ed property ( ppEIOHTSTOWN — Large prop&f Tty In central poatHon of riceptlonal intcrrat a. retail "tore proaoaltton. with ample storage and living apBOB HOTEL PROPERTIES At HOTEL BTTE5 — Particular, of roM npiH.itunlttoa may be obUlned oa %  application ll.VRTS GAP IIASTINGB lne3ue"vc bedroom llmUer ctr> iagr M good locality. B-MrtUTM Invited. OIIAEME HALL TJRBACR.u'.iit !" .intruded and •en*ioiy pllnnerp^rl- !" S M"g ln ItaT^olVt^md rctdentua .... KOCKLEY. — A rnoS.em coral %  ton* villa wllh aaporaie k.unge Inddlnm. room. J bedrwomataU with ba-lna and flitnS wwioJea***" Utod bathroom, —oorala toltot. W el. SfMo kitchen. 1 car BfMi aeivani'a quartera and clevoriy told-out gallon. • now ofi-red fnr *ale at a low figure jaysgggaigt. ^ood propeity VILLA rtOBA-r^BBaft Raa* rite Attractive ana aortirBiinr totaled atone bu"?J !" „ w i?' Bcuble canlageway. Onaiiedrnrtniately 14.000 aquara f#M T !" Rgura oakott. CRANE VTEW ANO^ 0 *^?^ VILLA Th"' "" K !" II ^ cT^nd"ner*th. ftV ^he Hotel' ara oed lor MM at o whole or wparatelr TdR IM !" X. may bo obtainodl on w#aBRRBBRB. a r tsnjrytife OodronmtW bMUBFow. "Tin hmt.lt. aJlttiB and gallery. .r-vant.' room and garage Coflttruciion ol coral Mono Apirollmalol' acre grmiii d w ^" cnerewwy aoWanwch •••* oaMn road. OftVra wontefl. RENTALS fflOK KOP Btaawtat. OMBt lor oawaSK of HBI-MBM. -n/)8BW-\--.Worn laanowJow at Uttie Kent Urrt\irntohoa TR aiANCSBlVInch Btoe;< w Modern rurnlihed BonoTBh-w. CTMBEHI-AND BOUSE. CodrlnaTton H.ll -Wllh about 3 aeiwa UnfumWhed. available W OTM n BB r REAL ESTATE AGENT M II'. PLAI*TATTON8 BUILDING





PAGE 1

FAGS TWELVE SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. OCTOBEK IS. HSO Tennis Team Are We Wearing The End WX Riflemen Back Home Of Big Money Transfers? Shoot Well At Bisley TW Barbados representative' that attended the quadtangula.' British Caribbean Amateur In.1 T.ible Tennis Tounwmeat, recently held in Trinidad. ivtianruxi yrasterda) morning b. Ii W.I A I. They are Norman Gill, r.,piain. Frank WUlougfebj H mid CorUn. Skipi*i GUI told th* • Advotnter" \.-ster\lay ihat although the liartawU** players were not iuc *f.aful in the (iHirnament they hau aaiMti much cxpanence lhu: would bcoafll them at the 1951 tournament. Ha said that Harold Corbln was \apry steady but it wan n*x*n> aary that .ie should at lea-t devalop more scoring stroke*. Ms tell that frank Willoughl.v should develop mure footwork wtuatt would enable him to pi", an easier and better game ll> Peter Milton LONDON <'*pt Robert Johnston*, ComJJ2LH.800 is a lot of money in any language. Kven m g^^^J !" .* *! lax-ridden Britain il would allow two Of thrif nomwl JSSrdaji that he WHS ^TrJ sized families to live in luxury for life. It would buy piassed with the standard of about 70 Rolls-Royce cars. Or it would pay the transfer shooting of the West Indies team fees of ten professional footballers' thai >s the utaggt-ring sum of money that has been thrown around In the past couple of years by ten professional soccer club* m England, either In an endeavour 10 stave-off laiegaUon or to win promotion. Getting on for quarter of a million pounds and NOW __ II to obtain the servicee of ten L*„ "shacklcton and th begun. Tommy from Everton to Chelsea for £11.500. That was a real bargai'i The same amount changed bands Stanley Malthws packeri Ha said thai U*} %  | showed that they were quite up to the standard of the best sijot;at flisley as thev appearr. prize list over 100 timer Capt Johnston* who was his bag* at Stoke and moved to England for the past %  months, BlarkpooL Another bargain WM mtratisit on Ihe S-S • Golfllo" stle forked out. 11J.00O for y „terday for Trinidad where ho Brauforj u partner of the firm of Wilson footballers. DM someone say bmk planes, roe* accordingly. something about food for thought %  Tommy Utwton moved again lo .lor How much longer will this sort Nolu county and Chelae* mad* He > Mm •hought. but 11 it continues mucn SleH ,. anvo aown from SccHand QiU waa uw only local player lunger we could eventually reach ,„.,, v^rby County and Morton, \o win sets He won six matches defeating Willy KaUck." Dann-. O'Connor, Jamaica Champion, ano "Bunny Mil*\m i.i Jumaica and straight games but waa later defeated by Ralnh Logail, runnor-ui in the Singles Championships. He said that a large crow paehed the Drill Hall on Frtd;. night lo witnesa the games tot the British Caribbean SingleChampionship which was won by "Bogart" Gnfflth ol TrWIdn.' On that night Lagall defeat* O'Connor and Griffith won troni Gomes, placing two Trinidadlan: in the finals. It was a very keer struggle us Legall won the firs' game and Griffith the second Legall again went into the lead but Griffith took the last two games to become British Carib bean Champion. Near The End Somehow I (*el that we mu-i > noaring the end o! this biz money transfer business. English the series ioolbull is ^mdually recovering Elite lrum the efTix-l* of the war Voung player-, am fnrcln : their way into the lunelixh! 'tiore aim %  hat the talent they are seeking .s on Uieir door-atep so the cheque books will be left idle m *IS!S:, tadl a WO. wh„o; ?*• !" jja twenty-two years in fact. It was in October, 1028. that Arsenal shocked the football world bv raying Bolton Wanderers nearlv L 11.000 for their English International forward, David Jack The first flva-llgure transfer ha-1 .'nhnstons He said that the teem created a very excellent impressii the minds of the authorlt Bisley and the West Indies Shouting Council hoped to send another team to Blfley In 1BS3. He sarpraaasjd grateful i n behalf of the .earn to the Colonial Govi rnmanta, %  .nil suppoi'ters \l, li.m %  .. IHi trtbui towards the fundh araci *'• mah" tbe i|0 ventus pe-i''e ft w*S also very pit s d ( i the mm iliers of the team bad ci-tiiie.' Foot :t(h Cause Killed in 4 Days Pain and Itching Stopped in 7 Minutes '—s*. ., their International the i-mtldtncf which an the Government ano asgQanj winger Tom Kinney. decided that Eddls Wuigley of Shemeld Wvdneaday was their man t and Qulgley ivetl across the border from Vorkshire to Lancashire. A Record i them r public M.C.C. Draw First Match SHEPPAkD /.7 At the time of writing that is :\A\ the record transfer fee. It may be surpasssd. If any one of r.OHTHAM. Western Australia. Second and Thud Division clubs half a dezen top-class English Oct. 14. winced J \vi} r.ad the news Internationals asked for a move The MC C.. cricket U-am today {11,000 to them was an amount there would be an immediate rush crew the nrst match of their almost beyond understandtng II f-r chenu. tnokafkl at Ul AustralianJoui.a one-day fixture was more than a fortune; it was OOa fee of {30.000 would probably ar-unst a West Australian country nflnlty. Surely, they asked, this be paid out even here. at the limit for a Uaimfer* Ami as But the mad buying and telling time went on it began to look "f the past four or flv* years as if they were right. The od i seems almost over Clubs are now <)oae £10.000 fee cropped up occasion l*ginnlng to settle down. Team tor >. ..--, „ ally, as for instance when Peter bulMlng ha. been carried out,and The young MC.^ P !" 0 DafaartS now player manager ol while there are sttll a score of Sheppard and Gilbert ParknoIkmcastar Rovers, moved from managers who confess their team I dd the baata of their side s score Blackpool to Manchester City, needs slrenaihanlng In thla or with a second wicket partnership But generally the market Batting first, the tourist* ceclared at .126 for 5. and at the • Country Eleven were 113 quiet Upheaval Then, in 1938, Arsenal, the same old free-spending Arsenal, caused another upheaval. They wanted Bryn Jones, the brilliant New Rule WolvwrhampOon Welsh Interns He said, that duringlhe natch 5"?^JS rw !f l *? si? 1 !" !$W Ihe^EngUsh" International that position, the majority are ol 175. Sheppard hit 117 with 13 reasonably satisfied. More and fours, ^nd Pirkhouse 87 ByflcM more they are placing their faith was the moat successlul Country m the young players who hare Eleven bowler claiming 3 for 68. now had five years' grace in Top scorer for the Country which to mature lleven was G. Jones. 29; whl'e The success of this •encourage the M.C.C captain Freddie the youngsters'' policv can be Brown. Bob Berry and Douglas udged frcANA dental care promotes heoSMer gums—brightens teeth_ Da jogt '•• lleh •• h*l* the] HsH srtS*5JrJKi.? s.'?t.s';,a in SMWSM riwr MM uwil* sebM at IKir fM' Da thew bit ft. br-k t\t:4 PM • iid (> raerr *llMt lo lorm> Do i;> imMH ssrs si ia n-i xittf actwur ss5-. u B rwtf -^r;,,:^ a klD tbt Cfinu or pnui mpomibl* fir in* trMi&. Kills the Causa O'dUisrr MoMMM" srd luuid cn sst do much ood WIUH l do n<* "f nl P* kill Uw unSftlrlnf cu ot jfat Ima* PattanatvlT "* '" IWMBMe *• '""tmr lh*r lool iroubtM iid BIM trtto Ui Otoat MuMtorn rlit|oii<. lulxllon wllhillt asfwrt ptwi.i'itoi. NISM '-'i inr pt(Krip inw uot %  r.ti..ni. % %  MI •• RIDC1 Ii Mopi th. iieb sod MMUM sad t)M ULID In 1 IBIII ills*. 1 II " in son, clsr. ssd tasoatn. Guaranteed Tost .... HuBt—m tiom rour etwmlit lodm Applj il lonlfhi and row •in iwiicj %  S a... um# N *..<-IN n." ki"e [•rmi prll*. iwl tunfu*. muon. for tour lrombl, snd row csn M* tor mil thai TOUT skin rapid;* u b. ( ..in Sasr, as.oMa. snd balin. bM too. II lull 3 daja loner U> mass u* lb* raauKa • ttX traaaiw*. Ili.ii akl romptrtdr iai. Now.,lo uw i-.l <-' 1 ".v. ..d Uwe^11 -^ im..a., -i.d yo-i n.uiy i*i-i Ni*ea*fr— mpi*uiT rBraia ........ wosi. fke Liitukr pnita. j. cjura-cf.it for a brilliant polish s aaaal Maiai rNut par*— SjrnMrbnwa JTmSTl a. Sa ^^^ SS& iSaa between Jamaica and Triiudad :it the San Fernando adopted. It stated that i.. the pscKsa nuio^g. a^o njev --. ~~—• M anriloni and BaUy did event of play bccorrongboi-.w hi* no t Be fore i^he whoej ^^ ^ c|ub morf lhon tf|or unenturprlsing the scorer can *<>"d %  Dorn IWKen w 1W .„ E BnHU |_ on fee. And even caution the players and. then they '<^iona Ma ,_„ f^^eS'boom days of aoccc thara is still en awful difference soccer as it had been previously between HO and £20.000 known, and the transfer market %  rinsed down, only to re-open in 1D4S wiUi even greater actlvit. and hudier prices than before. Clubs resuming League soccer after an absence of six years found that many of their best; players were finished. The youngsters had not had sufficient m,I experience to hold their own —Reuler. on automatically forced to One year later, in l39. the wachange aervice alternately Instead brought s ft of every five point*. According to this rule, the ponent resuming 12 volley*, eluding the service volley. th* point. This only holds II neither player gets the point bofore 12 volleys. The match which w chief!, responsible for this rule wt played between Ronnie Iiuuss. thpatience player of Trinidad ; Bunny" McClcan, the Allan Ra of Jamaica. While McClcan held his rucqin-l with the pen-holder grip Griffifi held his the orthodox smjf but they both stood close to laa tabst and patted out the point. On aorne occasions a point lasted lor several minutes Gill said that the Trinidad Table Tennis officials left nothing to be imd transportation was avatlabV the promotion and relegation struggle and the only answer WJI to buy ready-made players fro n other clubs. Players themselves sensed an opportunity to make n name. Request* to be put on the ilsf in older that they could be transferred to a club in a higher division were plentiful. In audi lion, certain clubs found ther financial position so weak that to sell their tiest men desired. They were well treated Wiey had on all occasions. They are all to keep amc looking forward to the next BrHSpending Spree The greatest spending tab Caribbean intercoloni.i Tournament. that football has ever kiv Warc television' eveninur up, Qeorae — i over lor this Commoiiwealth Dismiss Baroda For 159 BARODA. Oct. 14. The Common wealth touring lcai< today dismissed Baroda, Ran) trophy champions in three and i half hours for 159 after sending them in to bat first and at the dose of the opening day of their three day match had replied wilh 75 for 2. Spinners Jim Laker of Surrey and Bruce Dooland of Australia held mastery on the matting wicket. Top scorer for Baroda was D. K. Oaekwad 30. Laker making Ihe ball rise disconcertingly ol through fast and low off the matting claimed five wickets for 42 und Dooland took three for 31. A sound unbeaten 40 by Harold Glmblett of Somerset helped the Commonwealth scor* along to 75 nt the close. Worrell who captained the side was the only West Indian playing. At the close of play he was eight not out. —Renter. MM--. i> af. B. afarses *> t . Ltd., P.O. AW ITi, J THE §fecfcf It's OkMa-toraiDear's Garage Ltd 127 Roebuck Street. Bridgetown J.3I. DENHAM srocnfo y *u UAOING sroufs tUXNTBm LA. IH\.I\HIV i in. 30( riiii.liili.Mis IfuildiniC Innrr ISroail Slrffl. Harbad-M YES! WE HAVE THEM! EARTHENWARE SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS LOW DOWN SUITES PORCELAIN SINKS &f THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM (Central Foundry Lid.. Proprietors) Cornor ol BROAD and TUDOR STREETS Phone E!5 H. P. CHEESMAN A CO., LTD.—Distributors. DUI 3382 Nurse says— that for the quick and sure relief from Head and Chest Colds. Bronchitis, Coughs.. Catarrh. Sore Throat. Rheumatism. Lumbago. Sciatica, Neuritis. Neuralgia, Toothache. Muscular Pains and Strains. Bruises. Scratches. 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I'M.IIK\ SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15. IM4> King Will Open New Commons^ But Can't Go In l THOMAS . WtlMN There was almost unanimity foi .he small chamber rigidly divided MCttOfU Ihe aecUon on the light nand of thr Sffeaker reHiLfiitiU member* : < <> opposition members fn i M in itw i>Id house of iireen hide. eoiiiiortabl* I nen of iho old < iBde a (real and Impressive ;tn fr.i aho of the heavy oak panelliriK LONDON. King George VI will formally <>pwi Lb. "* Commons October 26—but conatlluuonaltj be Will not t** allowed lo It The apeoing ceremony will I old Wesimlnstt-r Hall ..o4 ihi King arlll dcelaae Hie thamber ope*) .-Iihin a fe feet of Ihe spot where King Charles 1 to death In 1MB f %  ? reaver ii.thitilng the era (1 f oak of differing hues. m\ Moat important of all from I he .. era, but a/lth < nb i otitf conditioning of the new buililiiiK !,,. Hall will he Nearly a ceiUury ago Ihe air coolleading officers of tug and homing of the ehamber eluding the Lord (irai.d ils mnstdcrert soinolhiiig unique Mkei Of tha building. Then Ihe otr was House of Commons, the I-ord Hli.h ^.mped through the floor and thus Chancel ; %  ptatej > ..nried with it all the curt and dust l HOUM of lrds and the brought In on the members' shoes. "honourable and faithful membe s ihe ducts led onto the nearby Of the Commons." Thames In addition, there will be a This once led lo a sudden adportlon set aside for tiie journment of the House when n i r..inion Pa %  sewage barge inadvertently Speakers from N dumped its refuse near the terZealand. Australia and Canada a arc of Parliament. already In England for the cer •• mony. • All COMMISSIONER PRAMS POLICE lo.,, ou. U-o t. .,. %  ,,,,. i PORT-o<-SPAIN of IN>IK Poi Trinulad were pralsod by _. Coinrruasiooor, Col. Kric Beadon, in his 1048 annual report for their *'unstinted co-operation aim Ml Tne Comiiuaeioi ter poinledi out that the improvement in serious crime llgure* over 1944 was in no small measure due to that wonderful spirit. The cost of the Force for thai year (1949) totalled $2,203,74811 and rewards paid out to member* for that same period amounted to S2.39792 Doctors' Offices Robbed 1 F)on Our Own C<"—P<""*•*'' > PORT-of-SPAIN Thieves raided th offices of Dr. I. R Hutchinson and Or Stanley Lntlepage. of Port-of-Spalii, making off with a quantity of raw gold, belonging to Dr. Hutch insor. while a pair of spectacles belonging to Dr. l.tttlepage. was i" stolen. Dummy Detector A ids A torn Training Butlerites Face Party Split Firemen training for deieii"POHT-t In the new chamber clean air Jgaunsv atom warfare can now Early ,n the nghl. the But; enters fror* the sides :hrough use a "home-made" dummy deParty is already on the "spllni When Iha ceremony Is concUMducU Immediately under the galteetor. It has been made from point" Mr. Chanka Maharja. I will leave. The Hou te lenes and the old air is expelled places of war surplus equipment elected member of the Legislati ninont mace fCromwel's .hrough holes in the roof It Is by Mr. R. A. Wilson and Mr A. F Itauule") will oe produced and hoped by this means to produce an liter will head the state:v atmosphere of a fine spring day to the new House of The air will be cleaned automati* i finish off the business rally and the volume of new air ._ *esston pending the State adjusted so us to provide 1.500 ni# 1 „f tnc %  new session acherubir feet per hour for every oecumined In • I hBtol i pant of the Chamber ill be offered Although Hitler, Junken am nicmbers, conforming to Heinkcls blasted the old chatnbe •Liming their faces to into eternity, rnamorlca are still frfV ,r_.ff Tne "distinguished alive on the many stirring scene* ut strangei*' ambassadors, peers, enacted within Its richly embellJ and Commonwealth ished walls. There are still alive will then be admitted today a few who heard the verbal with the Press. Once duels between Gladstone and Dis.-..-! % %  the famed chamber will be reli. There are also many woo ml functioning. remember the historic ball Council for the St Joaepn Con. Whit*, both graduates of the money, iold a large gothorii ; Institution of Fire Engineers. last night that Mr. Uriah BL,. ft includes a dummy probe.. butler does not want him to ha. i UdBpeaker and instrument panel. a „ y say in the legislati e ipparatus being conCouncil. In any matter which hi fooden box. party — the Butler Party Two men use the equipment, might move or bring about durin : While the firemen being tralneu the next nve years pass the probe around a spu.' for radio activity. Mr. Maharaj said Butlti h: %  clickdecided that .tie only two members of the party who in %  I muzzled by Mr. Butler or anyiKKly". Another question which Mr Mnharo) snld was decided at i meeting held at Mr. Sinanan'office last Saturday, was, that Mi Maharaj should give his vote Mr. Ranjit Kumar in the ballot ior thrExecutive Council. The others to be voted for. he said will be Mr. Butler himself, hi'. M. O. Sinanan. Mr. Victor Bryan, and Mr. A. P. T. James. To this he said he diaapprovaL 3 EXtCUTCD < From Our Own Cormponaetii i PORT-of-SPA IN Three condemned men were executed yesterday at Port-ofSpaln's Royal Jail. They were Johnny Simon and John Mohammed, for the murder of Lalchan Dookrram n taxi driver, and Brldtfrlnlslngh. convicted by a Jury nt the same Asslses for the murder of his wife. Laura. During the trial, Mohammed Is reported to have told his wife, "keep your head on girl. I am losing mine." Dies From Wheel Chair Accident • From Our Own Corrra|>n ;mm | deathly Mleiiee oner ned. U a narrow nouiiced that "Ughta of Europe arpct over which none wer e burning low" and then the Inevitable declaration of but members mav step. Kings representative iho Kaiser's Germany. <; ntlemen Ushers of the Black lit! remain outside this strip. One new'feature in the Hou*e urrhill Arch which forr %  only-five years equally distraught Prime Minister, ,Wville Chamberlain, glowered the Lai PORT-OF-SPAIN, The seven-ton yacht "Fia" arrived m Trinidad on Monday evening with 18 persons on board beund for Venezuela, to start 'new page in their lives." "We are out to seek our fortunes then -said a few of them when thoy %  r on landed. There were three women and three children. The vea r %  >> under the command of Mr. H> rick Karem Penttl. who la a Finn left Sweden In July, and made %  the i : %  from the old building and u IN The day placed there as a memorial to the taunted by %  %  JlT^SS 1 wl,ri Oermw,"' hut only aft a public lobby. Tl.is hmi „ lld m ^ (n ln lhr rtrMd lea from tin' atonai ovei tiuradio, ODDOSlUon and uttered -{ u ^HoUand. FrtWfc.W We are now at war Rnnm nH EaMrtneil TK., ZZ after he man before be had Arthur tH say on"the Council were Mi Mltra O. Sinanan. the I nm Legal Adviser, and Mr. Butl:r himaeir'. Continuing he told tl crowd: "I do not* Intend to ti Mr. Maharaj said he called this die lime in his wheel chair meeting, because those present WmpUni to overtake a parked were the people from various V# **|5J wn n ,ne accident <**organisations who helped him in curred. his campaign and through them he promised the electorate to do his beet. Mr. Butler, on Saturday, had all elected members of the Ftutler Party at his meeting. Mr. wire, flex and cables been time Prime Minister. then leader of thc^jr^'u^Pa'rty'. ^dVermJ^TIh.. Goering's bombers did _th.tr with "this tension must cease" Spain and Portugal. The *ald that they were refugees who arc among a large number, desirous to get out of the country as %  hey are fed up with the CornThere is great Baltic countries. id the people are anxious to get -• Si" 8?£7^U&£ clothes manufacturers and mechanics. live task with efficiency, after Chamberlain had declined to The old chamber -fortunately n it give the House in use at the time —was complete y there would be no further appeaseburnt out The old despatch boa's men! with Hitler, on the Speaker's table thumped King Edward's abdication scenes with vigour, anger and triumph also remain a vivid memory-mom enl durinu tht. World W,iby a succession of Prim.Mini Churchill being howled at and Jf pTtticularl^^nVruslvo on thil.dslone onwards, jeered into silence by the "loyal m-rnorv was the hlaekeS Sv of have been replaced by boxes fro n and honourable members" when SJT r M-rliE hS; KL biS i and he """"y ufK-*'cd that "no pre.£ J^L; ( h Na r !" ^ t ? IKS In fact, every Dominion ard Hpitate acUon should be laken* 2S ^! ch /TTi ribbons Colony of the British Empire h:is without first consulting contributed something to the en;House." belllshmetiT of the new chamber Then the fateful day when Australia presented Ihe ne* Premier Stanley Baldwin smlrVlng Speaker's (hair, while Zanzibar in triumph asked the House's gave a magnineently decorated aa h attention with a "message from the King written in his own hand." It was the three paragraph "Instrument of abdication' tray — but Ihia will llnd a place & M the members' smoking room. %  The new chamber will be bight r than the old one and above Is ceiling and below its floors will be rooms for the officers of the Hou. e and for Ministers and their secrc"irTipiK-arance the new chamber K.J3* ^A*" '"^""L/' 'ke the old one Is cf a Oothlc Pf if l Md • ,J n h r "> .haracter. Gothic architecture is tJv George, walked In unison row oi by the mod' h * l !" 1 of the gangway to tak^ I !, ;i ,l to her oath as the first woman mem. Suggestion* '* r f,( Pi,p tnnnenl to take her sent i on the linosnf the It was Lady Astor'a introduction %  r: in pnMein 1" WW HOUSO. There Were many dramoti' and grave doubts as lo whether !" the British army could be extracted from France. Prime Minister Chamberlain had to bike the rap Although he survived by ninety odd votes the non-confidence motion, nonetheless ho thought It expedient to hand over the reins hich * Government to a coalition, an 1 ead to a bewildered House. the only coalition the Labour Another historic scene occurred P"^ members would serve under In 1930 when a trim, sedate little would be one led by Winston figure, dwarfed on the one side Churchill by lone, lean gangling Arthur Thereupon Churchill took the helm and in his flnt adores* shivered the spines of member-with his famous speech offering onlv "tears, blood and sweat." On October 26. some M.P** will be reliving scene* In their mem • ory. You cam put your trust in G.B.C cables, wires and flex. And you will find them easy to use, with a type to suit every job. Try them—and sac for younclf. Maharaj said he would bring the S jcartons to his electorate and get lelr final deliberations on them The crowd shouted in one voice: "Don't do that, you must speak on the Council." IN CASES it* Headache. Neuralgia and ail Nerve Pains. P.R. Tablets are doubly beeeftoel They not onl> relieve ihe pain, but help to remove its rauar. Quick, sure, safe P.R. does not upset tr* heart or siom*.n (>biainable from your Chcmivi or Drugstore. PR to .-.*. B'.< — WONDER WHEELS N 4Why Hercules CYCLES arrive in Barbados in perfect condition The special Hercules pocking methods — the result of 30 year-, study of packing for countries overseas ensure this. The wellwrapped part* arc placed carefully in strong cases so thai they can be simply, safely and correctly assembled on arrival at destination. — (I.N.S.) %  -. •//.V.v^/// J t 6 • •.-.-.•.-.-.-.-.-,-.-.•.•,-.-.•.-, ONLY A FEW DAYS NOW THE CMV GAKA51 TRADING CO. LTD. BRIDGfcTCWl \. h BARBAD05 WflgSINTn ft] • CTtaC CO LTD.. Of £HGl*M> viiw o Hiacuift BACKING ANO OH'ATCH OtrAftmfNr Hercules SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS ajftfstfrTinTfi T. CEDDFS GRANT LTD., BRIDGETOWN Charles Mdnearney & Co., Ltd. •.%-,-, .V.V////AW/ uo oo M c e ftooa The Best STOVE to own Is a FLORENCE OIL STOVE 0.i:i \ ani0 EfOXOMlVAL t: Vou will be very pleased with your new FLORENCE STOVE and OVEN CITY GARAGE TRADING CO., LTD. Virlitrin Strt;-I — 0lriilt,.'l„tin \ (rWvV/AV,' .***y^********#*****-V*W^-,'-W**1^X.'.; CONCRETE PRODUCTS CO. Dial 2798 LODGE HILL Dial 2798 MAKERS OF III IMUM. Ill Fallow Ihrse Inatrnrtlon* and ou will have a good Job KCONOMY IN LABOUR will Surprise you. USK OIIR BLOCKS anil you will like them, they arc Simple, yet Perfect. i'l.-.iM tell Mm Friends. We have hundreds of Satutfied Customers. TESTS IN MIAMI HAVE SHOWN that Concrete Block Buildings withstood Hurricane Damage better than any other type of Building. T "^^ Wm would appreciate a Viait to our Factory bVJ's'SSS/'s.



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|t VMil. M-i I SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15. 15 me CASHMERE BOUQUET After the wonderful evening is over, * %  will the fragrant memory of you haunt his every drcim' Of course it will, if you bathe with Cashmere Bouquet Soap. Cashmere Bouquet gently caresses your skin leaving it with the frafrtmt mm Uvt. This tantal izing bouquet comes from a secret wedding of twenty-one rare perfumes, far more cottly than you'd expect to find in any soap. Be forever sweet and dainty with Cashmere Bouquet Soap . forever alluring with Cashmere / Bouquet toiletries! —m I oc Wl-Australian Tour EMPIRE DEFEAT >•(an Wr Finar.tr K? By O. S. COPP1N A WEST INDIES lour \u Australia or an Australian lour tu Ihe i ** West Indies — Urn is the burning question that Is iv I'inj. the greatest interest and speculation ever in a hair century of organ.111 kn mm re-establishmc-m of Test cricket after World War II. thencan be no denial of the fact that thia has been the means of the establishing of a firm hold on all peoples throughout the British Empire and Commonwealth W.I. HAVE GONE A LONG WAY *-pHE West Indies have travelled all the way to the Far Bast to -1 lav down the gauntlet to India, the M.CC. has visited The West Indies and South Africa. India has fought strenuous Tests with Australia, and both Australia and New Zealand have paid their visits to tha M-.thcr Country. leigi — 17 and 78 More recent of all. the West Indies have Just concluded a tour of Empire — 123 and (foe it wku.) It England with signal success, carrying off the rubber In a manner Empire gained >ix points from so praixrworthy and convincing that it l* the concensus of opinion Lod ? e School in (he second day thai bj virtu* of this perform LODGE Three Other Games At Interesting Stages BREEDING What is Our Policy in Tfcf W.I. By BOOKIE MY ARTICLE last Sunday on lion J. U Chandler's Burns M-wns to have aroused some local interval in the question of the breeding of thoroughbred horses in the West Indies. It Is not the hrsi time that I have mentioned the subject in this column and 1 0 not intend to repeat my views on what I think the scl-up should be, But with the recent influx of quite a number of high class the fifth MTUS of First Division Cricket games, entered stai^on* mU> the Wee* Indies perhaps we should make some examits second day. Ination of what we we have on hand to breed from and wtiat we Wanderers are leading Police in their game at the Bay might expect them to produce. Last Sunday I ssdd the accent was on speed and so it Ifc One cnlv hat to look at the pedigrees of the new stallions and couple this with Whs those who have been with us for many years have alread. rotatedat* *JpV of race horses on the track. Briefly let us "*,lScgr the best produced in the last twelve years Th.*^£*ed tor weed only: seawell. War Lord, Nylon, War l*thT Front £2f, S^o?sFuSGrc e nwood. Ocean Pearl, bow Bells, EMPIRE defeated Lodge yesterday by ten wickets as whileCailton dismissed Spartan to secure a 61 run lead at the Park, College and Pickwick are fighting keenly at Ken&mgton. These games end on Saturday next. LODGE vs. EMPIRE BVCCBSS EBBS AND FLOWS E ADMIT a* once that mccen > %  > these Homeric contests in the penal cricket fields ebbs and flows lute the tide nut still the W<'i Indies have won their chance and it Is up to the cricket powf rrs-th.it-l>e to exploit it la the full advantage of future West Indict i M< k.-l pluce at the followin, .heir vlcurlw over "f,,?** "" !" ""> f !" B' IXKlgWSchools'I E Gill played fly, a splendid innings when lrup with 41 not W t. ADMIT ;* once that mcMM Lfl these Homeric contests in the •'"If of the team' In merlal .iirkw hnlila uli>i> an** flniu. Mm •!— SUB*, k..* -.Ill .u. Valiant effort dlil from defeat. Lodge made 07 and 78 and Empire 123 and for no wickets, 2h After Empire had bowled out Like im-i people, the prospect of seeing Arthur Morns. Keith Lodge for 67 In thhe end of the hoi and cold with excitement and anticipation. it !" .. nni., ia_ ,, Errol Miuingto.'i. besides taking ON SOBER REFLECTION nve wickets for 22 runs then. DUT on sobei reflection and on the examination of what the flnana a ^ lot [ "P M /T hl "" %  • came in next. Both brothers %  i plications of an Australian visit to the West Indies would Z tiJtrffJU. *??*' „_" ployed confidently and at lunch -s thei 16 not out and yesterday f he tolal wa 137 for y^ loia o) Mike Foster was brought _. from the southern end Smith Will O' the Wisp n. played the first three balls but Those noted for speed plus enough sUmma for ^'*"^J* !" was out leg before in the fourth Gleneagle. Maid of Honour, Bdledune Pippin, Sundial Oun S.te. UM.B. The Gambler. Atomic II, Fwpper ?S?..? "LlwRass Bliickman filled the breach but Those capable of staying beyond a wben tha total was only eign: he Taflare and , lean bowled by KiiiR for That's just the point "and who elsel nlle and a Iraki >" ut, more than Iaken by Mr Headley Both Mr score, but bis Headlcy and Hope appeared to be not save them getnm, settled down but at 31 Hope was bowled by King for 11 N. Harrison partnered Mr. Hcadley WMO was later caught by Birkett oft the bowling of E L G Hoad jnr also for 11 Run Out well o might add to tha last list the names of Creoles who took part in a few races of lfc miles but they could not by any %  nuns be called stayers. However there were so few mile ana a half laces that even those who might have proved good stayers were nut really given the chance to develop. Hence I think the racing authorities out here were really putUng the cart before the hors. when they used the argument that we had no true stayers msnon Of their move in abolishing all mile-and-a-hall races. Now we shall never know which are the potenUal stayers among our Creoles. It isnot surprising therefore to find that those in authority cut nportiug stallions who are not likely Pride of India is per. Australian visit are negligible rneelk, I think that the chances of i "inent. Bui I BfouM not attempt to dismiss this important question at lhal Here arc mme of the facts that have fortified me in my view %  hid the tour to the West Indies is not practical. The Australians although they play the finest brand of cricket one he went on to tcpscore for Empire with 30 ions King look lour Arst innings Lodge wickets for 33 runs. K. Brookes, Lodge School pace bowler claimed four wickets for Yet his best efforts miles he was also one hundred per cent efficient on the business 25 runs during his 20 ii %  • %  Their players each received a bonus of £800 at the conclusion i!H8 tour of England and by simple arithmetic this figure. nulUplied by sixteen amounts to £12.800. and MCC WAS CHEAPER BY HALF The M.CC professional cricketers that toured the West Indies in 1M7-48 received £325 each and If we multiply this by sixteen we get C 5.20H j. l.ii try from £12,800. But let us assume that the Australian figure per man were reduced ix hundred pounds in view of the fact that the tour to the West ""^ respectively. Indies would necessarily be shorter then an English tour. Even th*n t ,U M 1 Roblnion "/ ld B Bournc the figures would be almost twice the amount paid the English pro,, e ^^^'i^^IISTILtfcJ and thU would be only a part of the financial commitment. UnS? !" *' b0 n l "^ 0r he West Indies cricket authorities. Brookes can quickly attai; mumtain a slcuir sid day victory. PICKWICK vs. COLLEGE t'irkwlrk tfwr 9 wkta.) 323 and tree I wata.) a Cllrr — 182 Williams, brother Place th III togctliei. tho new and the old. and 1 aea a picture 'Tsimmon,. who was next to ^ft* ^r'tu^^u^nl^kPh'oon 3 &££ at. got off the mark with a .inl>P~d w !" V>< !" "'"'"•„,f I'ta,,, !" supply us with th. middle n .load He scored ,!. J !" A\£ oJ.C^ZV^nJvoJfc *25 &lK^ATJ^SA^TmTpS$3yKSt : •• i-. a_ ...i._. . , .. ii.ii %  i<;iiL'e£& EJ, W... and UT: S were added Sinunon, wen. ^I'^ouT".?."'.,-"'! ftTS 'fSHA A ^ Crlckeu-r gave an e<•"! to one ol Head's dellverte.-. f""!^^,"^ „,.„, ,„'which the Turt Club .taUionl are lubcellei.t all-i: h ^ P '"M '"^ There was no space to give the lorm and breeding of Q0MB Cleke, Berd and then back to Australia would reach prodigious *ipper-a I!" top-scoring foe '" c ; ad "^ TS Colh- !" ur.?C '••< Sunday. This Is the ally now on her way out lor Mr.Norman ....... %  II one attempted to compar. them with any other uguri in CuU "" m "•"* ""J Uuimg. with h !'.j; c !" m i 1 !" rSTli !" ! Inn "nvo'lvell" " """" Cr Ck B rd C "" r01 "" "— —* 2-*? SiS^wl^ ,, Sr W '20 oo , T "? h SE FAVOl,K ruEiH toM1N C fEm?JS£2&*JSmS. ^j muci. lor inc cons and now for the pros I have heard from Albert Williams was the best for those who think that the tour can be mad.. In the first Instance 1 e a y i !" they .lain, that In view of the pret high rating of the We Indies l0 2 C lS'^ f „" u ^' n S ?£ Edwarn.,. world cricket circles that the Australians should come since we [,m hiv, riv .eV !" d mines ""' ,or Colle. Six runs wori_a, eI however, he did not win again. Her dam Serenity has not V'\,:XZXl^Z^LZ !" r Mnt !" "" d %  ^£%& 1'T SSS. f^Z^XJ* ^^J^£F<$t^l^&£8 Iffl 3 i Our prestige is well worth this they state. Th. Kensington team declared )_,„ ,„ m h „ „„u,em end but !" ",~., ih. ~^ h„rse Sir Edward (b, Rhodes Scholar) who won slakes. Divine Lady's dam was Most Bcuutlful PLANTATIONS LTD. ARE YOU CONSIDERING RENOVATING YOUR CAK? WE CAN ASSIST WITH THE FOLLOWING .. A Kllllilll Kl HI.] I: MATTING m GRKV t|R BKO.VN CARPET • FAWN OR BROWN INNER HOOD LINING • UOH>, VVMIM IMITATION LEATHKR B> UNIVERSAL CAR MATS as FEN?|R TAPE Mt BONNET uiliMi; RIHIRERS • "I'.11 AMI LOW TENSION CABLES as IN "HMII CHALK FOR TYRES tf> 1' FST Ol'AI.ITV CHAMOIS LEATHERS • ''OLIsnES AM) ( HEFSE (LOTH t IMKIR LOCK SPRINGS • KIN(; PIN SETS S> i\il'.SIZE PISTON SETS m FLEX1HI.I t, \s AND OIL LINES • HVI1RAITJC BRAKE KITS Cs LOIIGE SPARK PUGS B>. lH.t ARBONTZINO GASKET SETS m OCR PAINT SHOP CAN GIVE YOI'K CAR A FACTORY FINISHING IIIKI -I'KW l(l IN \ \\I(IET\ (It SHADES WITH I'INt'HIN JOHNSON I \l OI'ERS OR I N AMI is ECKSTEIN UKOTIIEItS not out They saved the follow on by iiie runs. Pickwick Baltine Pickwick opened their secorri ,-ith G. Wood and E. F.dwards. J. Williams opened the By WyndhHin out <>f Serenity, she ran six times tn **y**[; ce and third three time.. In her llit live riitsngesnanU. } Jie ran in small races but m her sixth her connections "<"* %  •" fancied her when they sent her out in the Princess Mary N"W at Doneastsr, a race worth £U83. In HfUl of 22 she i. rcportsd lo have rinished sixth with the llrst six or seven runners fairly close at the finish. Her hire Wvndham was better known as the Bossover t Ott who long with Mahmoud was one i^f the best two-year-olds Others think that a good many ol our key players uuld The Kensington team (toelarad over fjon, t h southern end but produced the good horse J __ ^ at their overu-eek toUl of 323 for ni||lrt onIv U( U ver one ball. He i 5 races and £4.287 in sla).„. allubk* here but would decUne tn maku the uio lo Australia s.. ,ne ,OBS ** nine wickets. toUego up y,, ^11 because of an winner of the Nassau Stakes at Goodwood and later dsm of four Ml after the tours to India and England ropUed with *? 3 Sfff" ^S. 1 0 1 '"Jured shoulder. winners including Divine Lady and Osiris, winner of six races and *^ scorers were J Williams 64, A. j VfllUahis came on again an 1 E 4.649 in Stakes. W.I. CAN ONLY WIN AT HOME lothcr school of thought subscribes to the view that we Williams 45 an Jn25h.7JRWJ.i2i SSS2S. com !" ,;_ -MJS ^ %£ &£?*£,&. A .TS 1 "' abouU aat about ol one looking for aom. laal mm to train. They 5^, r riSfinning. with C. W Slrady Bowline: Dead at lut two good one. as It la definite that they could not expert Smith and E. Hope. Both Williams and Simmon* Johnson to grow younger from hla fortieth birthday, and although Smith faced the bowling of II „. on Krcv ing good lengths. In ,„n,, ,•„.,,„ or Jone. might b. c^ied upon In an emergency ,et gS".^^ 'Sffi?A. !" ToZ*"Zl ST-itfff'tK the quest mus. be on for three really fast young men to train In time ball and Hope played out the refor the visit to Australia if it materialises. malnder of the over. • On Page 5 this filly appeared for the second time at the meeting and won again. This, announced Mr. Luckhoo, was her fourth straight win In as many starts. She had already won twice at a small meeting In the country districts of B.G. Of course the class of horse which Brown Ruby was racing against in B.G. was probably not very high. However It must be considered that she was racing against horses of all ages, as was the case yesterday, ami she beat them handsomely. I am therefore hoping that we will see her racing at Christmas with the other twoyear-olds of Barbados and Trinidad. It is a long time that we have not had any contestants in our classic races from B.C. and the additional intercolonial rivalry will be heartening. HV the VACATOR ^^ !" HAY STREET WATfftPftOOf. NON-SKID. "CfiOUND-GRIP" PUSSYFOOT SOLE ., Clsrtu ln.roa.Ke the new flexible, renl'ent rSmyfoot •olini 10 cuihkK. iht "vpt between fact sod floor. HM to %  *-tret torni.il* ol Clsrhi ei EnglsM — the quaUty ahos firm with 125 vasts' txper ,nce—Pussyfoot a conalotrM K be ihe Ideal rooweather tollng— light at rubber, cool si anther. teugti ss you'll



Sunday

Octeber
19350





The Greatest
Story Ever Told
By FULTON OURSLER

This is uw story of Jesus.
It begins in the “Advocate”
on Monday.

it is a chronology of events
from the betrothal of Mary
and Joseph to the days afier
the Resurrection, and the
episodes are taken from ihe
four Gospels.

In writing anew the
wonderful life of Jesus, the
author has had but one
thought in mind, and that
was to induce readers to g9
to the Gospels and hear the
story at firsthand. It was
Rabbi Solomon B. Frechot,
of a great Jewish temple in
Pittsburgh, who said to me
at dinner oné¢ evening that
the unspoken scandal cf our
times was the hidden fact
that Bible-reading had been
larrely given up in America.

Later, as 4 tfaviteu
arour] the country and taik-
ed to many d.tfeceat kiss of
men ana wome, — fellow
Passengers in Pullman ana
day coach, stenographers,
lecture committee chairmen
—I made casuai allusions im
conversation to biblical
passages. I soon discovereu
that references which in my
boyhood were cliches of
front porch talk had no
meaning whatever for these
later companions. Even such
obvious phrases as “Thirty
pieces of silver” or “The
talent buried in a napkin”
or “The angel that troubled
the waters” left many listen-
ers with blank stares. Yet
when I explained the mean-
ing, their interest was clear,
a sample from the great
history invariably roused the
appetite for more.

These experiments helped
me to come to a long-con-
sidered resolution. Ever
since my first visit to Pales-
tine im 1935, I had been
tempted. A tour of Galilee,
Samaria, Judea, and Trans-

in me a deep interest in
Christianity which had filled
me up when I was young.
on hrenty fare reers
was Stirred up again. I be-
gan to read various chrono-
logies by which Catholic and
Protestgnt theologians had
sought to straighten out the
apparent confusions and con-
tradictions in the Gospels.
This book follows none of
the established time .w4
Sequence formulae but draws
from several, in what seem-
ed to the writer the most
natural and probable lir.
This book ts not offered as
an explanation or an iuter-
pretation. It is rather an at-
tempt to tell, faitnruily, yus.
what the four Apusues,
Matthew, Mark, Luke, ana
John, assert to lave uap-
pened in those thirty-three
years of the life of Jesus.
It is, further, an eifort iw
state the believiag Chris-
tian’s understanding of the
meaning of those years.
There is no intention here to
rationalise or to hunt out a
bymbolism. While some-
times dramatised, the story
is completely faithful to the
literal statements of the text.

With much help and coun-
sel I have told here the great
story once more — the svory
of the greatest event in
human history. For once
upon a time aad long ago 1
actually happened, accord-
ing to the faithful true
believers among which the
author counts himself.

God, who had fashioned
time and space in a clock-
work of billions of suns and
stars and moons, in the form
of His beloved Son became a
human being like ourselves.
On this microscopic midge vt
planet He remained for
thirty-three years. He be-
came a real man, and the
only perfect one. While
coutinuing to be the true
God, He was born in a stable
and lived as a working man
and died on a cross.

He came to show us how
to live, not for a few years
but eternally. He explained

truths that would make our
souls joyous and free.

This is the story of Jesus
— the greatest story ever
told.



Plane Door ys rey Off
During Flight
MICHIGAN, Oct. 14.

The 52 passengers in an Ameri-
ean A‘rlines plene held their
breaths when a door was ripped
off its hinges over this town.

No one was nurt. Suction swept
coats and hats out into space 3,400
yards above the ground. The air-
the door. It wants to determine
line is offering $100 reward for
the cause of the accident.—Reuter.

Argentina Wants
$125,000,000

WASHINGTON, Oct. 14.
Argentina has completed pre-
liminary talks with the United



States Export-Import Bank on the}
$125,000,000 credit to help her set- |

tle debts

accor'di

to American exporters,

to a manager of the



rgentine Central Bank.—Reuter.



| pation
| ctherwise disposed

| prisoners.

jordania had evoked again

15

Murdered

ON DEATH MARCH

| By WILLIAM PARROTT
| SEOUL, Oct. 14.
| At least iwo or three thousand
, People detained in Seoul by North
Koreans were “disposed of” be-
tween the. Inchon landing on Sep-
; tember 15 and the occupation of
| the City at the end of September,
| Official investigators includin;,
|Americans stated today that a
jlarge proportion were murderec
| either in the City or on the death
| March northward when they were
withdrawn as hostage:

They said many bod:e ; had bex
found and they expec'ed to dis-
cover the graves of others a:
| Unite’ Nations Forests pushed
j hearer to Pyongyang.
| The South Korean Governmen
has also begun investigation t
find those responsible.

Villagers just north of Seou}
Saw groups totalling up to 10,000
people trudging wearily along the
read on two successive days

Stragglers unable to keep -pace
with the hasty Communist with
cGrawal were shot. At Uikonju 1+
miles north of Seoul a mass grav:




which was found contained 51
bodies.

Slaughter continued as mor:
stragglers dropped behind. Eve

worse was the progressive
massacre over a four day period —
September 27 to 30—of about 806
South Koreans who were collected
‘in Yangpong on the Han River
31 miles east of Seoul, investiga-|
, tors said. |

Investigators said Communists
curing three months of the ceys|
of Seoul had killed or
of a |
number of

large
additional political !

They also shot many other
South Koreans who showed their
sympathies prematurely sett



‘the period from September 27 to

2) before the United Nations had};
fully assumed control of the South;
Korean Capital.—Reuter.

French Nun
Beatified
TO-DAY

ROMY, Oct. 14.

_ Pius XII will to-morrow
proclaim the beatification of the
French nun who died 99 years ago
Sister Anne Marie Javouhey whom
King Louis Philippe once called a
“great man” because she had more |
than the strength of an ordinary |
woman, |

The solemn beatification cere- |
mony in Saint Peter’s Basilica will ;
be the seventh of this holy year.

Anne Marie Javouhey, foundress |
df the Institute of Sisters of Saint
Joseph of Cluny, was born at Jal- |
langes De Suerre on November 10, |
1779. She took a vow of chastity
at the age of 19 and founded her
first institution at Chalmon for



| aiding the old and infirm and edu-

cating poor children. Later she
established her main hospital at
Cluny.

From humble beginnings the
‘work of the Sisters of Saint Joseph |
spread throughout the world. To-|
day the sisters have 269 hospitals,
schools and charitable institutions.

Anne Marie herself travelled!
widely, especially in French Afri-
can and West Indian colonies. She
was in the vanguard of the move-
ment to abolish slavery. She died
in Paris aged 71, in 1851, after 45
years of unremitting lcbour.

Sabo



sabotage ‘Plot
Investigated

NEWCASTLE, New South Wales
Oct. 14
Special Commonwealth Security
offcers have started investigation
here into reports of an alleged
Communist inspired plot to sabo-
tage the Australian steel industry.
A senior investigation officer
said that the move followed a
confidential report on recent mine
stoppages and a ship hold-up.
One widely experienced officer
said today that it had been sus-
pected for some time that there,
was a “master plan directed by
alien interests aimed at under-
mining Australia’s materials need-
led for defence purpose.” ?
! The present investigation is
believed to be the first of a series
throughout Australia. —Reuter.

LIGHT TRAVELS FASTER









The generally accepted figure of
the speed of light has been wrong
by eleven miles per second, the
British National Physical Labora-



‘tory, claimed to-day.
| The announcement said the
Laboratory's latest experiment

jconfirmed the British figure ob-
| toined in 1947 which displaced the
| figure established by the American
; scientist Albert Abraham Michel-
son who had set the speed at
186,271 miles per second. It is now
i claimed to be 186,282 miles per
| second.—Reuter.

‘ Seeking His Brother
ATHENS, Oct. 14.
Ledovico Brunetti, a younger
; brother of the Brazilian student
‘who disappeared on October 2
|from Agen Island, does not be-
lieve his brother committed sui-
l cide He errived at Athens yes-
jlerday from Sao Paolo
| After cortacting the Brazilian
Legation and the Greek Police
authorities. Brunetti was sailing to
Mykonos to conduct a personal
investigation into his brother's
disappearance.—Reuter



UN. Prisoness|



LONDON, Oct. 14. |





BACK FROM ENGLAND—Mr.

chatting as they arrived at Barbados yosterday from England whe

Indies beat England at cricket

Freedom Of
Press To

Be Upheld

NEW YORK, Oct. 14,

The Inter-American pr con-|
fcrence has decided to establish a
tribunal to investigate complaints
of the violation of the freedom
of the ‘Press’ in the Western}
Hemisphere,

The tribunal upon receiving a
complaint wovld appoint a three
member investigating commission
from countries not contiguous to
the nation from which the com-
plaint originated.

The Commission would make a!
direct investigation on the spot. |
If a Government denied permis...
sion for inquiry, the tribunai
would notify all members of the
Inter-American Press Association: |







and give full publicity to the
n.atter. |
A fortyfive.member Board |

Directors was chosen yesterday by |
the conference after a long debate |
in which some Argentine delegates
contended that the conference was
not representative of the Westerr, |
Hemisphere press because all
newspapers had not been invited. |
—(Reutee.) |

CHURCH BREAKS |
FROM MOSCOW
SPRINGFIELD,
Massachusetts, Oct. 14.

The Russian Orthodox Church
in America announced here that it
was breaking all ties with Moscow
and would in future function in-
dependently of Russia.

Leaders of the church meeting
for the first time on their own
initiative named Metropolitan
Bishop Joseph Krimmowicz of
Springfield as Patriarch of the
Church in the United States.

Metropolitan Bishop Konstantin
Jroshevich was chosen Patriarch
of the church in all foreign coun-
tries.—Reuter.

eens est veinioninienaltin
ARTIE'S HEADLINE

|



ee =





Er. when | sai my
nad amore
Yorialisis |

donkey
SCHSE than the
fidn'?t re
‘Te one”





By SCOTT RANKINE
WASHINGTON, Oct. 14 |
President Truman goes to United |
States citizens next month for a}
| virtual vote of confidence. Votes
can give him two years’ unfettered
tule or two years “hard labour”
under the Republican Party’s
thumb. This is the essence of
Congressional elections to be held
on November 7. About 50 mil-
lion Americans will vote for the
36 seats in the Senate and all 435
seats in the House of Representa-
tives.
Republicans want a change over
}of only 54 seats in their favour—
| 47 in the House and seven in the
|Senate—to secure the domination
| of both Houses

j Then for two year they
| could
i 1 Control all busines id
| debates in Congress

2. Put a Republica







|

F. A. Clairmonte (left), Mr. 7. Kidney (centre) and Mr. K. Nunes

they had watched the West
(See Carib)

at Lords, Trent Bridge and tho-Ovai



Kumchon Falls

To U.N. Forces
Drive On To Red Capital

By JULIAN’ BATES
TOKYO, Oct, 14

SPEARHEADS across the 38th parallel were broadenin;
to-day into solid wedges all aimed at the capital. Kumchon
“little Stalingrad”—12 miles north of the parallel whicS
held up the advance on Pyongyang, fell despite stubborn
Communist resistance whick led to house to house fighting
in its streets last night, ©

Another
Bonaparte

5 Wi. surrounded yesterday by
ithe American First Cavalry divis-
‘ion and British and Australiat
' troops The British Common-
| wealth brigade and the Fifth Cav-
;alry regiment seized Yongadong
| east of Kumchon and from this di-

rection elements of the Fifth Cav-
alry Division closed in on the town

PARIS, Get, 14. | under storm fire from flat trajec-

Prince Louis Napoleon and his}tory guns either self propelled
wife have arrived here for the | artillery or anti tank guns used a
birth of their child expected in a! artillery
few days. It will be the first | It had been defended fanatical-
Bonaparte to be borm on French|ly. Observers here considered its
soil since the head of the former] defence an attempt to cover a mass
reigning families and their eldest; northern withdrawal to new lines
sons were exiled from France 64! south of the Communist capital
years ago.

The exile law was t
May.

The new Bonaparte
direct descendant of » Emperor

Princess Louis mother. of the
Belgian Prince was g Bourboreâ„¢

Prince Louis néw 33 fought in
the Foreign Legion, was arrested
by Germans and escaped. He raining momentum everywhere
fought with French Alpine] aleng the front line, reports said,
troops on the Rhine and the Re-!Americans and British Common-
public awarded him the Croix Ds| wealth troops pushed on from
Guerre Kumehon the keystone Commun-
jist defence system which fell to-
day. South Korean troops were
striking north west from Inchon
In the centre front they reached
Miudong, which is less than 60
miles from the Capital, Other
southern troops advancing west
from Wonsan to-day captured
Yongpori 18 miles away on the
j important road across Korea to
Pyongyang.

Race for Pyongyang



United Nations Forces stretch-
ing in a westward line across
North Korea drove towards the
Communist capital of Pyongyang.
The line ran almost straight trom
Kaesong north north east to Won-
san on the east coast.

The United Nations’ drives were

pealed last

will be a

later

~Reuter



United States Have
Spy Ring In Asia
Accuses Red China

BOMBAY, Oct. 14,
Communist China today charged}
he United States with operating
an espionage net-work in Asia American “Task Force Lynch”
“encircling the new China fandia crack combination of tanks
reaching from Korea to India’| Which carried infantry was ex-
Press Trust India correspondent| peeted to turn northwards and re
reported from Peking. sume the race for Pyongyang after
the-fall of Kurmchon,
Three “arrows” are now aimed
at the Communist Capital. The

pal Chinese Mcvement newspaper
, Sa first is formed by American and

Said “American Intelligence
centres” in Japan, Formosa,
Hong Kong, Saigon and Bangko«
were training large numbers of

‘
The “Peoples Daily” the spuber|

the Kumchon area: the second by
South Korean troops striking to-
former Kuomintang officers and} wards the city from Inchon and the
former Japanese Army Intell'-| third by South Korean troops on
gence men “invended to sneak} the east coast front almost direct-
into China,” | ly opposite Pyongyang

Another official Peking news-| This last force was to-day re-
paper the Kwangming Daily"! ported to be striking hard inland
urged the Chinese people to take |
every precaution against America, | Wonsan,
espionage activities. jthan 70





miles from Pyongyang.

—Reuter. —Reuter.

here is
ewill

ty in all committees which have ; political quarters
day to day handling of Presi-| President Truman
dent Truman's Programme,

british Commonwealth troops in j*

reaching a point 18 miles west of |
This puts it little more

thav
retain Conservative minded people.

| control of Congress with a reduces |

F. rench
Leave

canepeshtinisiaiiniaasiatia: smeaials

SAIGON, Oct. 14.
» French Red Cross to-day |
ted that the Vietminh Red |
s Organisation agreed to the |
ation by air from Thatkhe, |
rench soldiers wounded mi
the recent big frontier battle, }
The message said _ that fe
French and Vietminh Red Cross
‘had agreed on the evacuation |
conditions of the French wounded
1 present under treatment at an
emergency post in Thatkhe.”
“The evacuation will take place |
from Thatkhe airfleld beginning |
at 10 o’clock on October 18. A}
light plane will veconnoitre the |
round and make the first evac- |
uation which will be con:inued b> |
teavior planes under fixed cond:






ions The planes will bear the
Red Cre insignia and will no
be armed.”

The bulk of the French gar. |
rison which evacuated the joi
ress at Thatkhe on the Chines»!
frontier fought their way to safet j
at Nacham, 30 milos to the south |
east, French Army Headquariers |
reported to-day French rear-
guards were withdrawn from
Thatkhe on Tuesday night. |
Sporadic actions took pace along | :
the border highway, the Head- |

quarters statement added

Irench forees engaged in
vattle bad totalled 3,500

Thatkhe could now be
be comp! otely
spo’sesrnan added Red Cross
contacts were continuing with}
Vie-nam officia's for the evacua-
tion of th rounded

the |
men

said to.

evacuated, a



“Mopping up” by the French
\rmy wes going on 75 miles fur- |
ther sou-h of the Toa'dn delta |
where 100 Vietnam guerillas

were killed in a local battle near
the port of Haiphong,

Several 100 Vietnam soldiers
were killed in each of the three
“violent assaults” the spokesman
stated

French troops captured mortars
and smali arms,

Strong French patrols encoun-
tered Vietnam. forces in the
Tonkin delta, nine miles south-
west of Hanoi, the delta capital
a French spokesman said.

The enemy suffered losses in
men and equipment.--Reuter

’

‘Truman, MacArthur
Will Talk
On Wake Island

HONOLULU, Oct. 14
Pre sident Truman left on Satur-|
day for tiny Wake Island where a



will confer with General Mac-
Arthur on measures to combat the!
threat of Communism in the Far)
East MacArthur already had
arrived at Wake Island from
Tokyo. The United Nations com-
mander’s plane landed on the
little mid Pacifie atoll Friday night.

Trumen and the General will
meet for a brief but historic con-
ference, The site is the pinpoint
of coral, which a battalion of U.S.
Marines and 1,000 civilian work-
men defended for 16 days in the
second world war before its cap-
ture by Japanese

The Presidentia] party will ar-
rive at Wake about 6.30 a.m. on
Sunday, Wake time, after q hop
of 2,300 miles. In Truman's party
are General Omar Bradley, Chair -
man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
Army Secretary Frank Pace, Am -
bagsador at Large, Phill'p Jessup,
W. Averil' Harriman special Pre-
sidential Assistant for Foreign
Affairs, Dean Rusk, Assistant
Secretary of State for the Far
East and Charles Murphy, the
President’s principal speech writer

It will be the first face to face
meeting of the President and the
Supreme American Commander ir
the Far East. They will confer
communique.—(C.P-)

U.N. General Assembly

Meeting Postponed

LAKE SUCCESS, Oct, 14.

The Political Committee debate
jon the American plan to make the
| United Nations Genera! Assembly
jan effective weapon against aggres-
‘sion has been postponed from
| todey until Monday.

Officials said that sponsors of
the resolution required more time
to complete its documentation.

1 —Reuter.

i





TRUMAN WILL ASK FOR VOTE OF CONFIDENCE

his way recently to woo mare

Light Vote

3. Have their own Speaker majority. Public opinion has | 5 en
he House. " S swung more towards him since} eens in bp en oe
4. Raise their voice higher! his “gamble” in sending American | count on e traditionally hg

in invernational affairs by vir- troops into Korea came off. Taois









tue of installing their own, has largely offsev the blast rene Truman stumping the count
Chairman as Head of the Con-) the iruman sone Meee odd this summer and many non-
gressional Foreign Affairs Com- | Coun ry s mi or oe ¥ ‘a ra partisan voters who were at-
mittee: nee eee Neh Febet Y | tracted by his /ramatic village |
the Korean War ¢
ns , | Village campaign in the 19
Veteran Retires President Truman's appoint-' | acidential elect will pro-
we ment of General George Marshall presidential ele ae ; P

Truman ‘could expect little) - national hero to replace Louis | Dably not vote this time .
spite Se : or al‘ . - . . _ icans “ -Communist’
eee een Vener: 6 Johnson as Secretary of Defence pay Ulan wea ariavcatta
veteran Republican Foreign ~| was also regarded as a successful | eres egains A oe thain’ Deal
er wk Oo. helped him trategic move | ’ y are proba sly veir va t

ugh Y he Marshall Plar Finally pro-Truman Democrats| Vote catching weapon a 7
other Foreign Aid Pro-| ti}; have Trade Unior big city} 4Tgument is that Democrati
ammes, retires this year olitical machine ' evroes | Governments allowed Cem
There is no one else of is) colidly behind ther There i ng | Munists and pro-Communists t
standing i e Republican Party Henry Wallace Party tl time to | infiltrate and give away secre |
Pp attack t Ne dD Left ' vo Russia and soften the policy

he eakened ple ic G A t fre D T wards Russia A lot of peopl



vote of these mid-term elections
The Korean War has prevente:

»ssed.—Reuter



have been imp:

| Mander.

’ Price;

SIX CENTS



Warns ‘‘Danger In Europe”

BLACK? OGL, Oct. 14.
ME. WINSTON CHURCHILL ai the final session
of the Conservative Party’s annual Confer-
ence at Blackpool to-day warned against the danger
of party politics “at this grave time.’’

It is not good for our society or for our survival
as a leading power that we should continue for lorig
periods to be dominated by party politics and that
two halves of a nation who have to sink or swim
together should have to face each other all the time
in the boxing ring,” he said.

Now when everyone could see that everything had
become more grave we found ourselves in the same posi-
tie. ot party strife, impending elections and uncertainty
as.to when the polling day would be fixed as we did a
year ago, Churchill said.

“Yet it is Mr. Atilee’s policy to
‘eeravate the uncertainty and pro-

| long the svrain” he added, Chureh-
| ill said that the Liberal Party who

;}won only vine seats at the last
| general election had done “great

Russians Are
Anxious [feist (loa! ierat
For Peace | |sauig "es Fee
THINKS TRUMAN

HONOLULU, Oct,

con-

In lls first
“ea
tion |

}
| appearance at the
| t

l4 | be Rov?

‘onference, the Oppo-
ader declared: “I do not
that war {ts inovitable, On



Yesterday at Honolulu, Truman} %* co>.vavy I belteve that hopes
stressed that the achievement of | of reaching a peacetul settlement
Jaxiing peace was his only ambi-| with Russia have beon impr ved
tion by wha’ has happened in Korea.

He said he was sure “psoply
behind the iron curtain” were as
nxious to avoid war as he was

Since he left Washington on
Wednesday, the President has
Seemed serious and preoccupied.
He dispensed with «all but the
necessary formalities when he
arrived at San Francisco and at
Honolulu he refused a native
Hawaiian welcome,

On Monday he is due to leave
Honolulu on his way back to San
l’ranciseo where he is to make a
speech on Tuesday night in which
fe is expected to report on his
meéting with the United Nations
Commander in Korea

General Omar Bradley, Chair-
man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,
Army Secretary Frank Pace,
Averill Harriman Special Adviser
on Foreign Affairs, Phillip Jessup
Var Eastern Expert and Dean
Rusk, Assistant Secretary of State
for Far Eastern Affairs are with
Truman.
~ MacArthur left Haneda Airport
in Japan yesterday, John Muchio,
American representative to the
South Korean Government flew
with him in the General's new
gleaming silver Constellation
plane recently brought from the
United States.

“che Conference was expected }
by Washington observers to be a
straight talking session with the
President giving little ground to
the United Nations Supreme Com-
The two have frequently
crossed swords at a distance on
military and diplomatic problems,
particularly on Formosa.

Prompt Action

Churchill said that the United
States under Truman's leadership
and with the formal and moral
sanction and support of the United
fations Organisation, acted with
‘ourage and promptness in resist-
ing aggression by Communists in-
pired by Moscow ‘

“There may be a time—though
no one can quarantee it—to build
uv a European army with strong
eid from Britain, the United States
and Canady for the defence of
famous and 9+ ient states and the
peoples who have no thought or
aim but to dwel' in peace and who
at present are protected from So-
viet Communist ambitions only by
America’s vast superiority of the
atomic bomb.

Continuing Churchill said: —
“The Soviet onslaught upon
South Korea has made many peo-

civilisation.”

He said; ‘We may all rejoice at
the favourable turn the war has
taken in Korea. We admire the
skilful conduct of the campaign by
that great soldier General Mac-
Arthur,

“We all mus’ hone that the
forces of the free poovles of the
world will not become too deeply
involved in the Far East because
the dangers there are on a very
small scale compared to those
which tower up against us on the
continent of Europe’ Churchill
continus |
MacArthur has made no secret —-Reuter.
of his feelings that the United
States should take a stronger line
against Communism in the Far
Fast, The State Department in
Washington has laid down a more
subtle approach,

Truman has often said that it
was he who made the final decis-
ions on American policy,

—Reuter.



TELL

THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
Ring 3113 Day or Night.

me THE ADVOCATE
PAYS FOR NEWS.





hoicost



' Nat ! ,
Gifts

e
K. W. V.
PURE WINES!

THERE IS A K.W.V, WINE FOR EVERY OCCASION!
For WEDDINGS, BIRTHDAY PARTIES, aod «ther

CELEBRATIONS
K.W.V,. SPARKLING FRANSCHHOEK
(White)
K.W.V. SPARKLING ROODEBERG
(Red)
K.W.V. WEMMERSHOEK NO. 1

A Delicious Sauterne

FOR DINNER PARTI®S

Before Dinner, as an appetizer and with
Soup

K.W.V. SHERRY NO. 1
dry

K.W.V. OLD BROWN SHERRY

Very old extra

WITIL CAKE, FRUIT, CIIKESE
K.W.V. PAARL. TAWNY
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FOR COCKTAIL PARTIES



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sitll
PAGE TWO

A












CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT to TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30







TIC



presents

BUD ABBOTT and LOU COSTELLO

]
in “HOLD THAT GHOST”

with Richard CARLSON - Joan DAVIS - Mischa AUER
A Universal Picture.

ROYAL

Last 2 Shows To-day—
4.30 and 8.30

EMPIRE

To-day 4.45 and 8.45 and
continuing to Wed. 4.45





and 8.30 Republic Action Double.
M.G.M. Pictures Presents | Wild Bill Elliott, Vera Ral- Sad TO-D A Y sh tisiiiaa as
“THE DOCTOR .* WYOMING” 8.30 p.m. DAILY
— and — -
AND ey MAMMOTH EW WARNER BROS
«BANDITS OF r . TRIUMPH!
os ‘s
THE GIRL” THE BADLANDS” pee
wring . Starring
Sunsét Carson, Peggy
Gienn Ford, Charles Coburn, Stewart.

Gloria DeHaven, Janet
Leigh, with Bruce
Bennett.

Extra:

Mon. and Tues. 4.30 & 8.30.
Republic Big Double .
Sufset Carson, Peggy






Newsreel Showing:— Stewart in. .
Charles and Louis in Train-
ing * DAYS OF
; OLYMP Cc BUFFALO BILL”
YMPIC are
To-day 4.30 pm. & 8 45 pm
Mon, 4.30 p.m. & 8.15 p.m, ng SONG OF
Republic Smashing Double
pastD.om ARsOW BUREAU ete ee MEKIC AY
fg — With —
Adele Mara.
Wed. & Thurs. 4.30 and
8.30.
Fri. 4.30 only.

All Action Double.
Roberts, George Cooper
—in —

++ FLAMING
Fury °°
— and —
“WHE LAST
BANDIT”

— Starring
Wild Bill Elliott, Adrian
Booth, George (Gabby)

Hayes.

ROBERTS, Jackie] Roy

Starring: Roy
COOPER & David WOLFE

And





Friday Night at 8,30
Madam O’Lindy and Troupe



=—>in —
—— | CARACAS NIGHT’
Tues. First Instalment ;
445 pm. & 815 pm Introducing the “Flying

Saucer.

ROXY

Last 2 Shows To-day—
4.45 and 8.15.

United Artist Presents .
*+hdRS. MIKE °°

— Starring —
Dick Powell, Evelyn Keyes,
With J. M. Kerrigan, Angela
Clarke.

“Monday 4.30 & 8.15
Tues. 4.30 only.

Groucho MARX & Carmen
MIRANDA in—

** COPACABANA ””

— and —

«MR. ACE”



Wed. Final Instalment
4.45 pm. & 8 15 p m
Republic Serial _

THEATRE,










— With —
George Raft, Sylvia Sidney.

Tues. Nite at 8.30
Madam O’Lindy and Troupe
M,

Dm L a




CMa Rea eed ty

- *CARACAS NICHT:

We are in a position to=-

WIRE OR REWIRE YOUR HOUSE

with the LARGEST and BEST STOCK of

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

We also have ELECTRIC MOTORS all Sizes

ESTIMATES GLADLY SUBMITTED

GALETY

“RIVER'S END”

with Virginia MAYO
“GOD IS MY CO-PILOT





(The Gard





MONDAY and TUESDAY 8.30 P.M.
“GIRL FROM JONES’ BEACH”

and Ronald REAGAN
Dennis MORGAN

Special Matinee ursday at 2. p.m.
(Cheap ces)

MONOGRAM'’S EXCITING MUSICAL —

Action Double!
Governor JIMMY DAVIS in

“LOUISIANA

with Margaret LINDSAY—The Sunshine Serenaders

and

Johnny Mack BROWN — Raymond HATTON

“PRAIRIE EXPRESS”

SPECIAL MATINEE SATURDAY 21ST

MORNING 9.30 (Cheap Prices)
BIG WESTERN DOUBLE!

(Pictures to be Announced)

















— SPECIAL NOTICE —

Bridgetown, as soon as possible



TO SEE

HAMLET

: ON :

ADULTS — USUAL PRICES

“Local Talent Audition This Morning 9.30 am.

ALL ARE _ INVITED.

Capt.



GARDEN TROWELS
SECATEURS ......
HOSE NOZZLES ....
MENDERS .....
UNIONS .«...



en) ST. JAMES
Last 2 Shows TODAY 5 and 8.30 p.tn.
“PRAIRIE THUNDER”









——=- BRIDGETOWN —



Headmasters and Headmistresses of Private Schools are re-
quested to get in touch with the Manager
Positively Your Last Chance

MONDAY OCT. 1601.30 p.m.
CHILDREN 18 ANYWHERE



EMPIRE THEATRE

THURSDAY 19th and FRIDAY 20th at 830 P.M.
MATINEE: FRIDAY AT 5 P.M.

MRS. A. L. STUART Presents Her SCHOOL of
DANCING in

‘REVUEDEVILLE 1950’

Music by the Poli
C. E. RAI

His Excellency the Governor and Party will be attending
First Night

BOX OFFICE OPEN DAILY
From 8.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 1.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.

PRICES:— ORCHESTRA and BOXES $1.50; HOUSE $1.00;
BALCONY 72c. RESERVED.

we offer

also V.G.M.—for manuring of Vegetables & Flower Gardens a t















































LOOK AFTER
YOUR GARDEN
and LAWN

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

IS EXCELLENCY THE GOV-
ERNOR and Mrs. Savage
attend the opening of Mrs.

|

} | will

|A. L. Stuart’s “Passport to
| Heaven”, (Revuedeville 1950)
} which opens at the Empire

Theatre on Thursday.

Arrived Safely
M*â„¢ EDDIE BRATHWAITE and
Mr, Fabian Holder, Barba-
dos Scholars of 1949, who left here
about ten days ago by the Will¢m-
stad, have arrived safely in Eng-
land.

On their arrival in England, they
were met by British Countil
representatives, who were most
kind to them.

Eddie is at Pembroke College,
Cambridge, and Fabian is at the
University College, Oxford

Two Sisters
ISS BETTY MARSHALL, has
completed her two-year
course in England at Moorfields
and Westminster Eye Hospital and
has now gone to Middlesex Hos-

pital to do her General Course.

Her sister Pansy, who went up
to England last year, has now
completed her first year at Moor-
fields. She has recently returned
to England from a short holiday

in the South of France.
Betty and Pansy, are daughters
of Mr. and Mrs, A. H. Marshall of

“Grafton”, Black Rock.

Holiday Over

ISS ELAINE WOOD, who is

with Barclays Branch here, re-
turned from Trinidad by B.W.TA.
yesterday morning, Elaine spent
her long leave in the Land of the
Humming Bird, but it’s back to
work on Monday

Back from U.K. Visit

FTER vhree months in
England, Mr. and Mrs, R. PB.
Skeete of “Edgecumbe,” St

Philip returned yesterday mori -
ing via Canada by T.C.A.

Their daughter Elizabeth has
remained in the U.K., at school.
Their other daughter Pat who
accompanied them as far as
Canada remained over for a week.
She will be arriving on Oct. 21.

T.C.A. Arrivals

MONG the passengers arriving
| by T.C.A., yesterday morn—
|ing were Mrs. Agatha McGivern
}who lives in Vancouver Island
| $he is here for about six months
{staying at the Marine Hotel,

} Another arrival was Miss Mary
|Greaves from Montreal. She is
staying with her good friend M1's
Alexander, Radiographer at the
Gen®tral Hospital

Here For A Month

RS. JESSIE FENDT who

arrived yesterday morning
by B.W.LA., plans to Spend a
month’s holiday in Barbados. She
is staying with her son Mr. Harola
Webster who is at present staying
|in one of the bungalows on the
St. Peter coast,

Trinidad Solicitor

R. ARNOLD KELSHALL,

Solicitor of Trinidad arriveu
| yesterday morning by B.W.1.A., to
{spend a couple of weeks’ holiday
at the St. Lawrence Hotel.

Arnold’s brother Phil, is a Pilot

with B.W.LA,

Returned Yesterday

R. JOHN HAMMOND, whv

accompanied Mr. Simon
Wardell to Trinidad on Friday
morning returned yesterday by
|B.W.LA. Mr. Wardell is on his
| way to England for a months
| visit.

Traffic Supt. B.W.LA.

R. CHARLIE MAYNARD,

Traffic Supt. B.W.LA., in
Port-Cf-Spain arrived yesterday
by B.W.1A., on a flying visit, re—
turning to Trinidad yesterday
afternoon.

Short Visit

ING, COMMANDER LAWES

of International Aeradio
| Ltd., arrived from Trinidad yes-
terday by B.W.LA., and will be
| here for about five or six days,

Mr. and Miss Barbados

T the dance at the Barbados
| Aquatic Club last night the
title of Miss Barbados went to Miss
| Hazel Carrington and Mr. Michael
| Lynch was chosen as Mr. Barba-
















Band Directed by
IN, A.R.C.M., M.B.E,



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i
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COTTON FACTORY LTD.





}
#1 {

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15,





MR, AND MRS. JEFFREY STOLLMEYER who were intransit from
England on the “Golfito” yesterday.

Back From Cricket U.K. Journalists

* URING the West Indies to

Roo esate - do a_ special issue on the
rday from England were jiritis loni ft “Picture
Mr. J. M. Kidney, Manager of Gritish Colonies or Picture

Post”, England’s largest Weekly
Ilustrated are Mr. F. H. Man,
Chief Photographer and Journal-
ist, and Mrs. L, Henderson-Begy,
Journalist,

They arrived on the Golfite
yesterday intransit for Trinidad.
and might probably visiv British
Guiana before returning to Bar-
bados.

» Mr. Man told Carib that he was
in the newspaper business for 25
years, and was connected with
“Picture Post” from its inception
in 1938. Prior to that, he said

the victorious West Indies team,
Mr. F. A. C, Clairmonte, vice-
President of the Barbados Cricket
Association and Mrs. Clairmonte,
Mr. R. K. Nunés, President of
the West Indies Cricket Board of
Control who was intransit for
Trinidad, Mr. Jeffrey Stollmeyer
a member of the West Indies team
and Mrs. Stollmeyer, who were
also intransit for Trinidad.

Many people were at the Bag-
gage Warehouse to meet them
including members of the Barba-
dos Cricket Association, cricketers
from various clubs, _ relatives,
friends and well wishers.

that he was in Germany with the
Berlino Hiustrated where he spent
six years.



cde Di tal

MR, F. H. MAN and Mrs. L. Henderson-Begg two U.K. Journalists who
are doing a special issue on the British colonies for “Picture Post’.

PLAZA OISTIN

PARAMOUNTS MUSICAL ! ! 1!
Bing CROSBY in “HERE COME THE WAVES”

MONDAY and TUESDAY—5 & 8.30 P.M. (Paramount Double)
“SEVEN WERE SAVED”
With Richard DENNING — and
“THE ACCUSED”
With Loretta YOUNG and Robert CUMMINGS









LAST TWO SHOWS TODAY
5 and 8.30 P.M,



NEWLY
OPENED

mS)

EVANS and
WHITKFIELDS

Shoe Stores

i

Your









JOHN WHIT

1950
Hadi Nice Trip

FTER a pleasant stay in Eng-
land anda_ very nice trip
down oh the “Golfito”, Lady Violet
Stow returned to Barbados yes-
terday and has taken up residence
Highgate, Upper Collymore
Rock. ”

During her six months in the
U.K. she visited her daughter
Mrs. Collyer, wife of Brigadier
Collyer who is stationed in Eng-
land.

Her son Mr. J. M. Stow, the
Administrator of St. Lucia and
his wife and little son Mark wére
also Spending someé time in Efig-
land. Mr. Stow returned to St.
Lucia by air last Wednesday but
his wife who was ill is stayi
on for a further period and wil
be joining him soon.

Governor’s Daughter
Mess E. M. RANCE, daughter
of His Excellency the Gov-
einor and Lady Rance of Trini-
dad. was intransit from England
on thé Golfito yesterday vo spend
about six months with her parents,

For Five Weeks
OLIDAYING in Barbados
’ for five weeks are Mrs,
A. R. Davis and her two
daughters Inez and Dorothy
of British Guiana. They arrived
on Monday morning by the “Lady
Nelson and are staying at
“Leaton-on-Sea”, The Stream.
Mrs. Davis whose husband is
the proprietor of Davis’ Sash,
Door and Blind Manufactory in
Georgetown, is paying her second
visit to the island, while it is
the first time for her daughters
who are simply thrilied with the
island and are enjoying every
moment of it.

Entertained To Luncheon

TR ALLAN COLLYMORE,
President of the Barbados
Cricket Association entertained
to luncheon yesterday at the
Marine Hotel, Mr. R. K. Nunes,
President of the West Indies
Cricket Board of Control, Mr.
J. M. Kidney, Manager of the
West Indies Cricket Team, Mr.
John, Goddard, Captain of the
team, Mr. Jeffrey Stollmeyer, a
member of the team, and Mr.,
F. A. C. Clairmonte, Vice Pres-
both before and after luncheon
and will depart after issuing a
ident of the Barbados Cricket
Association.

Returning To B.G.
EAVING yesterday evening for
Trinidad on their way to
British Guiana on the “Golfito’
were Mr. and Mrs. J. Baxter
and _ their little daughter Jane.
They arrived here earlier in. the
day on the same vessel from
England where they had spent
four months’ holiday.
Mr. Baxter is Manager of Rose

aver.

Hall Plantation in British Guiana.

After Eight Months

FTER AN absence of eight

months in England, Mrs.
W. M. Lambert whose husband
was formerly Private Secretary
to His Excellency the Governor,
returned on the Golfite yesterday
morning to re-join her husband
who is staying at Abbeville Guest
House.

To See His Family

ISS HETTY CHALLENOR.

who was working in England
as a with the British
Motor Trade Associatiom, arrived
yesverday by the Golfito to see
her family.

She is the daughter of Mrs.
Challenor of Vallery, Collymore
Rock, and the late Mr. Georg:

hallenor,

o Take Up Appointment
R. E. B. MARTYN. who
arrived here yesterday morn.-

ing on the Golfito from England
left the same @vening by the same
opporwunity for Trinidad to take
vp an appointment as Plant
Pathologist of the Department of
Agriculture,

Mr. Martyn held a similar pos’
*n Jamaica prior to going to g-
land on leave some months ago.

Back From U.K. Holiday
ETURNING on the “Golfito”
from England yesterday af-
ter spending three months’ holiday
were Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Haynes
of Parks, St. Joseph.

While in England, they visited
their son Anthony who is doing
his last year in Economits at
Cambridge University.

On Annual Leave

R. PETER KING artived

from ‘Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.1LA., to spend his
annual leave in Barbados, Peter
is with the Royal Bank of Cattada
in Port-Of-Spain.

When. he was stationed in Bar-
bados, Péter used to be the goal
getter in the forward line of the
Flying Fish Water Polo Club. No
doubt the Flying Fish team will
be pleased to hear of his arrival,





a small shipment of
DE LUXE HOT PLATES
— Table Models —

G a PAN
Super finish Green mel,
See them at your

GAS SH
and buy before they are all sold



MENS and
YOUTHS SHicies

\


SUNDAY, OCTOBER | 15,

1950



SUNDAY



PUZALE: FIND THE STARS Gardening Hin

Big names, »
£30,000 pay
cheques, have
vanished from
British films.
And audiene-
es like it that
way...

om “i

Fale

The Girl They Forget:

FOR years British studios have
been trying to build up new film
stars on the Hollywood model—
glamourised and over publicised
as an insurance against the pic-
tures being bad.

So inconsistent, misguided and
ineffective have these efforts
proved that today Britain has
practically no genuine film stars
at all.

We have rare star-appearances
by Margaret Lockwood and Phyllis
Calvert, by artists like Olivier and
Celia Johnson. We have periodic
returns of Hollywood-based Brit-
ish actors, and many fine per-
formances of star standing.

But where are the regular,
proved stars whose names will
draw the public to any film?
Their value has been dissipated
in too many bad scripts, too many
wanderings off into other enter-
tainment fields, too much nerv-
ous hiding of their pictures from
the West End.

Above all, there has been disas-
trously cheap publicity for some
promising youngsters at too early
a stage in their careers.

(In this discussion we will
disregard, not overlook, Anna
Neagle, who is an exception to
any rule.)

But here is the significant point:
are British films suffering because
this starpolicy has collapsed? Not
at allthey are doing excellently
without the big names.

They Made Money

THINK of some of the best
money-makers: Whisky Galore,
They Were Not Divided, The Blue
Lamp, The Wooden Horse, The
Happiest Days of Your Life—and
now Seven Days to Noon. No top-
line star name in any of them;
audiences have been flocking in
because they want to see good

stories and direction, not stars.
To put truth before gallantry,
ét is a number of the productions
with star names which have
been doing poor business in the

ir.
Sean like The Third Man and

State Secret have certainly con-
tained some biggish names, mostly
imported. That was a box-office
safeguard for the American mar-
ket. But I guarantee that these
thrillers would have been equally
successful without any star infu-
sions. :

Panos ¥









STELLA ANRDEW

Here, then, is a new, invigorat-
ing element in British film pro-
duction. Producers can now say:
“This is a fine story; who is
most suitable actress for the lead-
ing Tole?” Instead of: “Here we
have Miss X under contract and
doing nothing; we must find some
story with a big star role for her.”

The new way promises a much
higher standard of pictures to
come and at a more economical
cost. £20,000 to £30,000 a year
salaries—like fhe stars who could
ence demand them—have van-
ished. ‘

Some of the stars may not like
it. But this change of policy will
help them in the long run; for it
should prove the saving of the in-
dustry.

rp

Exit Harrison

ONE ACTOR who could make
himself the biggest draw in Brit-
ish films is Rex Harrison,

But Mr. Harrison does not stay
here long @nough to help the in-
dustry.

After a long interval, he has
finished making a murder story
here with his wife, Lilli Palmer—
The Long Dark Hall. It has been
a quick, and what looks like an
expert job—seven weeks on a
budget of £156,000, split between
this country and America.

Now the Harrisons are off again
before the film is shown—to co-—
star on Broadway in John van

Druten’s new play: Bell, Book
and Candle.
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—LES.



Germans Send Toys

BRITISH and German toys are
competing for the Christmas mar-
ket for the first time since the
war. Thousands of pounds are
at stake and British manufactur-
ers are determined to win.

They ‘believe that since Ger-
man toys went off

they have been able to dig them-
selves in and will be able to keep
the_business,

“We welcome the chance of
competing with the Germans,”
said a North London maker of
mechanical toys.

“We competed with them be-
fore the war, but things are much
different now.”



. CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it:
AXYDLBAAKR
is LONGFELLOW

One letter simply stands for another.

In this example A is used

for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc. Single letters, apos-

trophies,
Each day the cod: ‘otiots



nm of the words are all hints.

are different.

A Cryptograra Quotation

PZHYAKX,

DMZ H Z2MYFXKN



PZHYAK

ZDCP

“ KHPPKXK QPCN!
IML CN XK —



KEEP OUT FRO?
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pen cee noite nema moan

For Amateurs

October Is Seed-Box
Time

_ Now that October is here it is
time to route out those Seed-
boxes from last year, and begin
preparing them for the new an-
nual seeds. :

It may seem very early to do
this but these preparations take
time and if October is set as a
target it will be found that at
least some of the boxes will be
ready by November which is seed
planting time. .

Look over your Seed—boxes well,
repair any that can stand repair—
ing and discard those that are too
old and shaky to mend. Do not
be tempted to use any old broken
down ones, for that so often re
sults in the box collapsing and
spilling the seedlings just before
they are ready to be planted out,
and so weeks of patient care is
lost.

Have thé boxes scrubbed and
dried in the sun. See that they
have several holes bored in the
bottom, and after covering the
holes with a layer of stones for
drainage, your boxes are ready to
be filled.

The soil that is used to fill the
boxes should be a mixture of
mould, dry cow manure, and
charcoal, Combine this mixture
well, and sift it through a garden
seive once or twice before using
it to fill out the boxes Place
four bricks (or stones) under the
four corners of the box, whether
it is on a plant stand or on the

Wy

“1 think we've crossed }
the wires somewhere —
we've got Morgan Phillips

discussing the date of the §

next General Election
with Lord Woolton !’



London. Express Service
PUP pr
ground, as this
drainage and prevents the
from getting soggy. _

To make quite certain that

soil pilots



At the Cinema:

History

‘‘Flattops”

By G. B.

The title of “TASK FORCE”
must, of necessity, have more than a vague meaning to
those of us who achieved matusity prior to World War LI,
but remember something of World I and the years immedi-

ately following it.

This vital and gripping motion
picture, now showing at the New
Plaza, is not only the history of a
great war weapon, but also a pic-
torial chronometer measuring the
rapid strides of progress in avia-
tion during the span of only
twenty years. This picture is
virtually the biography of the Air-
craft Carrier, and is impersonally
dedicated to the Naval Officers and
Architects who foresaw its necess-
ity and struggled first to bring it
into being and then to prefect it in-
to the superb weapon which it
eventually became. For withou; the
Aircraft Carrier or “Flattop,” the
war in the Pacific would have cost
infinitely more in loss of life and
human suffering than it did, and
even with the “Flattops” the losses
were staggering.

The picture opens with a hand-
ful of post War I Naval Aviators
on a rather desolate sandpit
aerodrome waiting for their com-
manding officer to land. He even-
tually lands his fragile biplane,
and informs them that the U.S.
Navy has sunk most of her capital
ships and heavy cruisers. is,
of course, actually happened in
1920 or 1921 and was considered
by the entire nation as a fitting
expression of their belief that the
holocaust of 1914-1918 had, by its
mere occurrence, and by the even-
tual triumph of Right over Might
and the subsequent peace treaty,
banished all chances of future
wars. In 1921, the Naval Air Ser-
vice of the U.S.N. consisted of a
group of fliers, maintained for
purely experimental purposes,
who wore uniforms more suitable
for Cavalry Officers than for Avia-
tors. In this sequence, the Com
manding Officer informs his fliers
that the Navy has kept a coal
tender, the U.S.S. “Langley” with
which it intends to experiment as
a carrier of sea-borne aircraft.
accordingly, they commence mak-
ing practice landings and take-
offs on 4 section of the aerodrome,
the size of the flight deck of the
U.S.S. “Langley,”

The story quickly unfolds, of out

ADVOCATE

Of The |

wth all that the words imply

The main characters in this
picture are almost perfectiy cast,
and nowhere does the film lack
personal realism Much of the
film is cOmposed of actual battle
sequences released for the first
time by the U.S. Navy, which
cover Pearl Harbour, Midway, and
in Technicolor, the Okinawa
campaign. They are woven into
the general plot of the film and

add considerable authenticity to
production, The actual carrier
ceck shots.of the cast in their
respective roles were made on

board the. U.S.S. Antietam, one of
the most modern carriers.

Filmed with the full co-opera-
tion of the U.S. Navy, excellent
acting, an intelligent plot, with
just enough human interest, and a
w@tith of interesting Naval and
Aeronautical detail are combined
to make a memorable picture.

“THE DUCHESS OF IDAHO”
now playing at the Globe Theatre
is the type of musical extravaganza
that has a wide popular appeal,
particularly having such stars as
Esther Williams and Van Johnson
in the leading romantic roles. Its
title is derived from the famous
Idaho potato, the appearance of
which is short but impressive and
contributes to the general amuse-
ment, However Idaho also pro-
duces corn, and I’m afraid that
some of this has been allowed to
filter into the plot and the devel-
opment thereof. Anyway—in a
picture of this kind, the story is
always secondary to the spectacle.

Filmed in Technicolor, the in- |

terior settings and the clothes worn
by the various female members of
the cast are luxurious to put it
mildly. The outdoor scenes of
America’s famous playground, Sun
Valley, are beautiful, particularly
the winter sequences There is
spectacular ski-ing, and the Toreh
Parade of skiers at night is like
a fairyland Christmas. The water
ballet, which is the main feature
is most colourful, with the camera
following Miss Williams through-
her graceful aquatic man-

those early days of struggle for oeuvres, The setting for this ballet

recognition, not only of ability,

but also of ideas and foresight,
when the airplane was still con-

is rather unusual and the light-
ing highly effective.
The story concerns an impres-

sidered to be purely an ancilliary sjonable, rich young man, who uses

weapon.

ing Officer, Lt.-Com,

are
“Langley”

transferred
and

Lead by their Command-

his attractive secretary to get him

y Pete out of various romantic entangle-
Richards, played by Walter Bren- ments 1

aan, Gary Cooper as Lt, Scott aad herself, but meeting with no sake?
ensures good 4iS original Naval Air Service ¢ess, she and her girl-friend con
to the gect a plan, which, if successful,
are greeted by will make him realise where his
ants Capt. Reeves (Jack Holt), later yeal happiness lies.

do not get your seeds and this is to become Admiral Reeves, a sea-

Being in love with him

Esther Williams and Paula Ray-

the cause of. many failures) put dog of the old school, whose criti, .mond play the two girls, and at-

the feet of the plant stand

around each box.

If it is possible to have sOMme fojjows
sort of shelter for your gee which was very
boxes in case of heavy rain, all o¢ tria) and error anid was attende

the better.

An open verandah is }

an excellent place for them, But
if they have to be outside, nail

four short uprights to the four

corners of the box, and have

in que of the battle of Jutland is “tractive girls they are too, while
the market tins of water or tie Hoo-doo tape considered a classic, and who is ‘Van Johnson and John Lund givi

frequently called the father cf plenty of romantic support. Mr

Naval Carrier Aviation. Then johnson does a spot of singing

their initial training, and dancing and leads a dance

much a matter }pand, when he is not doing his

d darnedest to keep up with Miss

y tragic accidents that are forever Williams, while Mr. Limd is an

the lot of tke pioneer, There enthusiastic though amateur cook
follows the historic battle between —for all his million.

; Navy fliers and penny pinching Lena Horne sings a number and

piece of ply-wood, or an old box politicians, the latter more than Eleanor Powell is back again—as

cover that can be placed on the
uprights forming a cover to th
box above the seeds.

e Sighted
This can Portrays

ably abetted by a stubborn short
The film then
development of

press.
the

herself—to show that she is still
nimble when it comes to tap dan-
cing—though her technique seems

quickly be used on the boxes in carriers, from the early makeshift to have suffered slightly in the

case of heavy weather.

All this preparation takes time, early enthusiasts of Naval Avia- the whole
so it is just as well to start early. tion,

“Langley” to the mighty ships ct
today. The vicissitudes of those

between the two wars

It may seem a lot of fuss and receive sympathetic treatment,

unnecessary trouble to take, and
some people do plant their seeds
just anywhere and anyhow and get
away with it. But many also have
failures, due not to bad seeds,
although they always get the
blame, but to the neglect of proper
care and preparation taken pefore
hand. .






SER





passing years,

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Can We Finanee It?

Ye ’ By O. S. COPPIN

WEST INDIES tour to Australia or an Australian tour to the

West Indies — this is the burning question that is exciting

the greatest interest and speculation ever in a half century of organ-
ised West Indies cricket.

Since the re-establishment of Test cricket after World War Il,
there can be no denial of the fact that this has been the means éf
the éstablishing of a firm hold on all peoples throughout the British
Empire and Commonwealth. :

W.I. HAVE GONE A LONG WAY

HE West Indies have travelled all the way to the Far East to

lay down the gauntlet to India, the M.C.C. has visited The West
Indies and South Africa; India has fought strenuous Tests with Aus-
tralia. and both Australia and New Zealand have paid their visits to
the Mother Country,

More recent of all, the West Indies have just concluded a tour of
England with signal success, carrying off the rubber in a manner
so praiseworthy and convincing that it is the concensus of opinion
that by virtue of this performance, following their victories over
India and the M.C.C. in Tests in consecutive years, they have earn-

ed the right to challenge Australia for present world cricket suprem-
acy.

SUCCESS EBBS AND FLOWS
E ADMIT at once that success in these Homeric contests in the
Imperial cricket fields ebbs and flows like the tide but still the
West Indies have won their chance and it is up to the cricket pow
ers-that-be to exploit it to the full advantage of future West Indie
cricket,

Like most people, the prospect of seeing Arthur Morris, Keith
Miller, Neils Harvey, Ray Lindwall and company do battle on the
Kensington turf, to say nothing of the picturesque Queen’s Park Oval
at Port-of-Spain or historic Sabina Park of Kingston, renders me
alternately hot and cold with excitement and anticipation,

ON SOBER REFLECTION

B’" on sober reflection and on the examination of what the finan-

cial implications of an Australian visit to the West Indies would
mean, I think that the chances of an Australian visit are negligible
it the present moment,

But | would not attempt to, dismiss this important question at
that. Here are some of the facts that have fortified me in my view
‘hat the tour to the West Indies is not practical.

The Australians although they play the finest brand of cricket one
could ask for, are also one hundred per cent efficient on the business
side, Their players each received a bonus of £800 at the conclusion
of their 1948 tour of England and by simple arithmetic this figure
multiplied by sixteen amounts to £12,800, ;

MCC WAS CHEAPER BY HALF
The M.C.C, professional cricketers that toured the West Indies in
1947-48 received £325 each and if we multiply this by sixteen we get
£5,200—a far cry from £12,800. .

But let us assume that the Australian figure per man were reduced
to six hundred pounds in view of the fact that the tour to the West
Indies would necessarily be shorter than an English tour. Even then
the figures would be almost twice the amount paid the English pro-

fessionals and this would be only a part of the financial commitments
of the West Indies cricket authorities.

COULD HIGHER CHARGES HELP?

Some have expressed the viéw that considerably higher charges
could be made for admission to the games. I agree with this, if at
any time it is possible to stage the games here. One however could
hardly take the peak figures of 7,000 a day at the Tests at Barbados,
15,000 a day at the Tests at Trinidad and compare them with the
933,513 who watched the five Test matches between England and Aus<
tralia in 1936-37, the 863,608 persons who paid £75,324. 16s to watch
the five Test matches between England and Australia in 1928-29.

The cost of transporting them from the Antipodes to the West

Indies, through the islands of the member colonies of th
Cricket Board and then back to Australia Fearn Petite

figures if one attempted to compare them with a

ny other figures ii
Nam _ West Indies Cricket Board of Control has been angie
nvolved,

THESE FAVOUR THEIR MIN

S° much for the cons and now for the a I ioe heard from

those who think that the tour can be made. In the first instance
they claim that in view of the present high rating of the West Indies
in world cricket circles that the Australians should come since we
could now afford to drop £5,000 but our world rating would still
remain. Our prestige is well worth this they state.

Others think that a good many of our key players would be
availabke here but would decline to make the trip to Australia so
soon after the tours to India and England.

W.I. CAN ONLY WIN AT HOME
Another school of thought subscribes to the view that we are sure

of beating Australia only if we play them in the West Indies on our
own wickets.

I have already given my views and I cannot find anything in
the pros to persuade me otherwise.
ei To sum up, it seems to me that the West Indies should accept the
invitation of the Australian Cricket Board of Control if and when it
comes. They should go forward resolved to do their best to bring
back the “ r. ;

After this tour, they should have gathered together sufficient
funds, sufficient laurels and sufficient prestige to undertake any reason-
able scheme in the attractive and charming drama of cricket.

WHAT OF SOME PACE BOWLERS
One final thought is that the West Indies Cricket Board of Control

should set about at once looking for some fast men to train. They

}| need at least two good ones as it is definite that they could not expect

tl





Johnson to grow younger from his fortieth birthday, and although
either Pierre or Jones might be called upon in an emergency yet
the quest mus¢ be on for three really fast young men to train in time
for the visit to Australia if it materialises.













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4

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ADVOCATE

-

W.L-Australian Tour EMPIRE DEFEAT

LODGE

. Three Other Games At
Interesting Stages

EMPIRE defeated Lodge yesterday by ten wickets as
the fifth series of First Division Cricket games, entered

its second day.

Wanderers are leading Police in their game at the Bay
while Cariton dismissed Spartan to secure a 61 run lead
at the Park. College and Pickwick are fighting keenly at

Kensington.

These games end: on Saturday next.
E

LODGE vs. EMPIR
Lodge — 67 and 78
Empire — 123 and (for 0 wkts.) 26

Empire gained six points from
Lodge School in the second day
of their three day First Division
cricket match at Lodge School
yesterday when they defeated the
school team by 10 wickets.

Lodge Schools’ C. E. Gill played
a splendid innings when he ended
up with 41 not .out, more than
half of the team’s score, but his
valiant effort did not save them
from defeat.

Lodge made 67 and 78 and Em-
pire 123 and for no wickets, 26

After Empire had bowled out
Lodge for 67 in the first over after
the luncheon interval on the first
day, Empire put up 71 for the ioss
es five wickets by the end of the
lay.
Errol Millington, besides taking
five wickets for 22 runs then,
dashed up 25 for his, team at a
critical stage of the game. Grant
was the 16 not out and yesterday
he went on to topscore for Empire
with 30 iuns

King took tour first innings
Lodge wickets for 33 runs.

K. Brookes, Lodge School pace
bowler claimed four wickets for
25 runs during his 20 overs.
Brookes can quickly attain and
maintain « steady length.

In their second innings, be-
sides Gill 41 not out, the only
other Lodge bat who entered
double figures was Glasgow who
scored 13.

Errol Millington and-H. Barker
each took four Lodge School sec-
ond innings wickets for 16 and 15
runs respectively.

O. M. Robinson and B. Bourne
the Empire opening batsmen made
12 and 11 runs, both not out, for
Empire in their second innings
to help their side win the two
day victory.

PICKWICK vs. COLLEGE

Pickwick (for 9 wkts.) 323
and (for 5 wkts.) 48
College — 182

James Williams, brother of
“Boogles” Williams, W.I. and In-
tercolonial Cricketer gave an ex-
cellent all-round performance for
Harrison College in their match
against Pickwick at Kensington
Oval yesterday. He played a real

ipper’s game, top-scoring for

ollége in their first innings with
64 and capturing four Pickwick
second innings wickets for 20
runs. A partnership of 93 runs
between James and his brother Mr.
Albert Williams was the best for
the day.

Pickwick so far has given Col-
lege 189 runs for victory but they
still have five second innings
wickets in hand,

The Kensington team declared
at their overweek total of 323 for
the loss of nine wickets. College
replied with 182 runs. The best
scorers were J. Williams 64, A.
Williams 45 and N. Harrison 21.

E. L. G. Hoad, the Pickwick slow
right arm bowler, gave the best
bowling performance for his team,
taking four for 61. Skipper John
Goddard and H. King took two
éach

'Pickwick got off to a very bad
start in their second innings and
at one stage they were 15 runs
for the loss of three wickets. At
close of play they were however
48 for five. J. Williams took four
for 20 and the other wickets went
to Simmons.

The Game

Pickwick declared at their
over week total of 323 for 9 wic-
kets. Harrison College opened
their first innings with C. W.
Smith and E. Hope.

Smith faced the bowling of H.

. King from the northern end,

e scored a single off the fourth
ball and Hope played out the re-
mainder of the over.

yo A moor

a“









Mike Foster was brought on
from the southern end. Smith
played the first three balls but
was out leg before in the fourth
ball.

Blackman filled the breach but
when the total was only eight he

was clean bowled by King for
five.
His place at the wicket was

taken by Mr. Headley. Both Mr.
Headley and Hope appeared to be
getting settled down but at 31
Hope was bow!ed by King for 11.
N. Harrison partnered Mr.
Headley wno was later caught by
Birkett off the bowling of E. L.
G. Hoad jnr also for 11.

Run Out

Mr. Albert Williams went
in to bat with N. Harrison. At 62
Harrison was unfortunately run
out for 21. James Witliams,
brother of Mr Albert Williams,
came in next. Both brothers
played confidently and at lunch
the total was 137 for the loss of
five wickets, each 40 not out.

On resumption J. Williams
erashed the fourth delivery of
Birkett's third over from the
southern end to the boundary for
four to make his score 51 and
the total 152.

Soon after Mr. A. Williams
gave Hoad an easy return. His
score of 45 included six fours.

C,. Thorpe playing his first
match in this Division, partnered
J. Williams at 154 for six.
Thorpe had a chance at two when
Gerald Wood, the Pickwick wic-
ket-keeper failed to take an easy
catch off the third ball of Hoad’s
sixth over. In the following ball
he was however clean bowled by
Hoad.

H. Simmons, who was next to
bat, got off the mark with a single
off Hoad. He scored two twos off
the next over from John Goddard
at the southern end.

At 178 J. Williams gave Hoad
at mid-on an easy catch off the
bowling of John Goddard. Wil-
liams made a valuable 64 which
included nine fours, J. Corbin
replaced Williams but before any
runs were added Simmons went
out to one of Hoad’s deliveries,
missed and was stumped by wic-
ket-keeper Wood for seven.

K. King partnered Corbin wh?
was later caught by the substitute
off Goddard before he could open
his account. The College first in-
nings closed at 182 with King
three not out

They saved the follow on by
nine runs.

Pickwick Batting

Pickwick opened their second
innings with G. Wood and E.
Edwards. J. Williams opened the
attack for College. Six runs were
scored off this over by Wood. J.
Corbin started to bowl the next
over from the southern end but
could only deliver one ball. He
gave up the ball because of an
injured shoulder.

J. Williams came on again an‘?
in the last ball of this over he
had Edwards caught at second
slip by Thorpe for two runs.

Simmons was brought on at the
southern end in place of Corbin.
B, Inniss who had partnered
Wood, edged the third delivery of
Simmons’ first over and J. Willi-
ams at second slip took a brilliant
catch.

The total was 12 runs for the
loss of two wickets when T Bir-
kett went in to. bat. With only
three runs added to the total
“Theo” Birkett was returned to
the Pavilion after being clean
bowled by one of J. Williams
fast in-swingers which kept low.
He did not open his account.
Harold Kidney was next to bat.

Steady Bowling

Both Williams and Simmons
were keeping good lengths. In
Williams’ next over, his sixth, he
got Wood out leg before in the

@ On Page 5

7

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PHOSFERINE.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950

. BREEDING

What is Our Policy in The W.1.
By BOOKIE

last Sunday on Hon. J. D. Chandler’s Burns
seems to have aroused some local interest in the question of the
breeding of thoroughbred horses in the West Indies. It is not the
first time that I have mentioned the subject in this column and 1
do not intend to repeat my views on what I think the set-up should
be. But with the recent influx of quite a number of high class
stallions into the West Indies perhaps we should make some exam-
ination of what we we have on hand to breed from and what we
might expect them to produce.

Last Sunday I said the accent was on speed
t the pedigrees of the new stallions and couple this
with wae ee who have been with us for many years have already
produced in the shape of race horses on the track. Briefly let us
look at some of the best
noted for speed only: Seawell,
Pek, Beant Bell, Sailor’s Fun, Greenwood, Ocean Pearl, Bow Bells
by Binge is speed plus enough stamina for mile races: Jetsam,
Gleneagle, Maid of Honour, Belledune, Pippin, Sundial, Gun Site,
Ligan, The Gambler, Il, Pepper “ee om Hill,
Those capable of staying beyond a mile and a quarter: Rass
Taffare and. ...+-+-s
That's just the point “and who else?”
a might add to the last list the names of creoles who
‘ook Dae tae & few races of 1% miles but they could not by any
means be called stayers. However there were so few mile and a half
races that even those who might have proved good stayers were
not really given the chance to develop. Hence I think the racing
authorities out here were really putting the cart before the horse
when they used the argument that we had no true stayers in support
of their move in abolishing all er ee aaa races, te we shall
hich are the ers among our creoles.
abe Ay vg anes hcadiee to find that those in authority cut
their suit to fit their cloth by importing stallions who are not likely
to produce anything more than good milers. Pride of India is * gl
haps the most high class horse ever to be imported to the West Indies.
But his limitations were strictly a mile and within, and both his sire.
Colombo, and his dam, The Bud (by Diophon) are bred for middle
distances.

Next we have Sunstroke and Timar II imported by the T.T.C.
I am not conversant with the latter’s pedigree but Sunstroke, by
Hyperion out of Grass Widow, by Son-in-Law_ appears ~
strong stamina lines through both sire and dam. Yet his best effor
were over a mile and alinough he did win over 1% miles he was
subsequently put back to mile races before terminating his career.
Obviously his connections thought this to be his limit.

Tha. cecMpr.ses the importations by the ‘Lurf Clubs. Now -
come to privately owned ions. We find Burning Bow already
showing us his type with Bow Bells and seeing that he was a
champion sprinter it indicates that he will transmit more speed than
anything else. Then we have the recent arrival Head Worker and
the expected Burns. By Rhodes Scholar out of Berette (by Felstead),
Headworker it seems must play the part of infusing in our stock
the much needed stamina. For although he is no better bred for
stamina on his sire’s side than the above mentioned, on his dam’s
side, he is well fortified with stayers in nearly every line. What is
more he gave definite proof on the race course that he was at his
best at a mile and a half.

Place them all together, the new and the old, and I see a picture
like this: Burning ew, Battle Front and Burns to give us all the
speed we require; Flotsam, Zollas, Sunshaft, Rockphoon, Sunstroke,
Timar IJ, Pride of India and Jetsam to supply us with Se —
distance type; O.T.C., Mont Agel, Restigouche, ‘Brown Bomber,
Cracker-Jack and Head Worker to provide us with the — plus.

Incidentally I learn from John Goddard that Headwor er will
not be racing and his stud duties are expected to begin next season.
His fee, which I understand will be $100, although it may seem og 4
out here, is well within what might have been charged for him
England. Being the last remaining Rhodes Scholar of any ee
in England it is probable that it might have been mere ng en
£75 upwards. Dependent on his success or failure it migh
gone up or down but hardly, I think, below £50. Again this gt
to emphasize the extent to which the Turf Club stallions are su
sidized,

and so it is. One

FORM OF DOLDRUM AND LUNWAYS

There was no space to give the form and breeding of Doldrum
last Sunday. This is the filly now on her way out for Mr. Norman
Inniss. By Wyndham out of Serenity, she ran six times this year,
was second once and third three times, In her first five engagements
she ran in small races but in her sixth her connections must have
fancied her when they sent her out in the Princess Mary Nursery
at Doncaster, a race worth £1,383. In a field of 22 she is reported
to have finished sixth with the first six or seven runners fairly

1 the finish.

nee sire Wyndham was better known as the Bossover Colt who
along with Mahmoud was one of the best two-year-olds of 1935.
Later however, he did not win again, Her dam Serenity has not
thrown any winners yet but won one race. The next dam is Divine
Lady who dead-heated in the Quarndon Plate, her only win, but
produced the good horse Sir Edward (by Rhodes Scholar) who won
15 races and £4,287 in stakes. Divine Lady’s dam was Most Beautiful
winner of the Nassau Stakes at Goodwood and later dam of four
winners including Divine Lady and Osiris, winner of six races and
£4,649 in Stakes.

Mr. Tommy Edwards’ filly Lunways, who has already arrived,
raced four times this season and incidentally was once in the same
race as Harroween, the consolation filly bought by Mr. Rupert Mayers
and syndicate. Lunways was once second and_once third her best
effort being in the Sunbury Stakes at Kempton Park. Here she was
second to Sally Rose in a field of nine, Sally Rose was a winner of
six races this season. .

Lunways is by the Thousand Guineas winner Kingsway out of
Lundy by Bala Hissar and no doubt she will be beginning her racing
in the West Indies at our March meeting next year.

BROWN RUBY AGAIN

It certainly looks as if the possibility which I mentioned last
Sunday about Brown Ruby becoming another Whitsun Folly, may
come true, Yesterday as the B.G. October meeting came to a close
this filly appeared for the second time at the meeting and won
This, announced Mr. Luckhoo, was her fourth straight win in as many
starts, She had already won twice at a small meeting in the country -
districts of B.G.

Of course the class of horse which Brown Ruby was racing
against in B.G. was probably not very high. However it must be
considered that she was racing against horses of all ages, as was the
case yesterday, and she beat them handsomely. I am therefore
hoping that we will see her racing at Christmas with the other two-
year-olds of Barbados and Trinidad. It is a long time that we have
not had any contestants in our classic races from B.G. and the addi-
tional intercolonial rivalry will be heartening.

a

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950



Yesterdays’

@ From Page 4
last ball, for 16 Wee. 7 total
was now 18 runs for loss of
four wickets. H. King ited the
breach, ie Se. was : ston
he got a chance illiams.

Kidney carried his Nate] to five
with a beautiful glide to the
boundary off the last ball of Wil-
liams’ seventh over.

In the next over H_ King got
another chance in slips at five
off the bowling of Simmons.

The total soon onnene reached
the quarter King
was later Ar Pox ‘Williams
for 20. Charlie Taylor re
nered Kidney. At the close of
play the total was 48 for five

wickets; Kidney and Taylor 10
and 0 not out respectively.

WANDERERS ys. POLICE
Wanderers (for 7 wkts. dec.) a
Police 218, and (for 2 wkts.) ..

On a wicket which gave ine
bowlers a little help yesterday,
Dennis Atkinson and Norman
Marshall of Wanderers bowled
out Police to enforce a follow on.

Atkinson returned the excel-
lent figures of 20 overs, 12 maidens,
24 runs, 5 wickets while Marshall
got 4 wickets for 80 runs in 23.4
overs.

Wanderers declared at the over-
week score of 369 for 7 wickets
and bowled out Police in their Ist
innings for 218, two runs before
Police had saved the follow on.
Police were sent back and lost 2
wickets for only 3 runs.

Batting for Police, Capt. Farmer
and H. Wiltshire gave fine dis-
plays.

Farmer in an enjoyable knock
of 69, hit seven fours and five
sixes, Wiltshire’s 55 included two
fours and four sixes. Both
batsmen hit six sixes off Norman
Marshall.

Both Wiltshire and Farmer gave
chances while they were engaged
in a partnership which yielded 95

runs.
Play

Police opened their first innings
with C. Blackman and F. Taylor
to the Wanderers’ attack led by
N. Marshall and D. Atkinson.

Both Marshall and Atkinson
were getting the ball to move a
lot, and were getting a little nip
off the wicket.

Blackman and Taylor
quietly, ing a single now and
again in the gaps.

The score was taken on to 24
before the pair was separated.

Blackman was deceived while
playing forward to a well flighted
off-break from Norman Marshall
and he was cleaned bowled for 9.
Taylor was then 11 not out.

H. Wiltshire joined Taylor. Roy
Marshall was brought on in Atkin-
son’s place. Two overs later,
Norman Marshall, whose ipo
were at that time 6. 3. 10. 1,
gave place to L. St. Hill.

The vate of scoring increased
and 50 runs were on the tins after
55 minutes of play.

Police lost their second wicket
in Taylor with the score at 70.

Atkinson, who was brought back
from the Northern end, got one to
lift at good length. Taylor made

started

an upp stroke and the
came off the outside edge of the
bat to C. Proverbs at gully.

Taylor made 28,

“Life”
Capt. W. A. Farmer was next
in and was. given a_ chance off

Atkinson before he scored. He
drove hard and straight to Skin-
ner standing at silly mid-off.

Skipper Skinner was ringing
bowling changes while runs came
freely for the Police. Farmer and
Wiltshire were having a “go” at
the ball. Farmer hit Norman
Marshall for two sixes in succes-
sion while Wiltshire hit St. Hill
on the pavilion for another.

The 100 went up in 105 minutes
-—Farmer 34 not out and Wiltshire
37 not out.

Farmer and Wiltshire were in a
race for 50 and Farmer beat Wilt-
shire to it.
| Farmer took an over from
Greenidge, who was brought on
from the Northern end. He hit
a four in the first ball and three
balls later pulled Greenidge over-
head for two successive sixes to
give him his 50. Wiltshire’s
score was then 37.

In the 50, Farmer had made
four sixes and five fours, Four
fours and two sixes were consecu-—
tive scoring strokes.

The luncheon interval was
taken with the score at 148 for 2
wickets, Farmer 58 not out and
Wiltshire 38 not out.

After Lunch
Norman Marshall bowled the
first over after resumption to

Farmer who pulled the fifth ball

a Ford

ball six. At 52



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

PAGE FIVE



SCOREBOARD

PICKWICK vy. COLLEGE.
Pickwick—ist Innings (For 9 Deetared





$ 1
b H ll
. b& ove 6
fe
f DO GR swe casen- gas
Mr. “Willtans ce b Hoad 8
J. Williams ¢ Hoad, b Goddard 64
Â¥ e b Hoad a aga arn 2
tt. 5
. not out 3
Extras rn
Total 182
my of a —1, , &—45,
6—~155, win, $178: oie.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
O. Ee By. @.
H. King ll 4 2 2
M. Foster os
EB. Hoad 18 5 35 2
J. Goddard 75 0 35 2
3 Inniss .. ea. 2
. Birkett 2 4 6 6
G. 16
Â¥ 2
f 0
B. 0
Hu. 10
H. 20
C. Taylor not out 0

Total (for & wickets)

Fall of wickets: 1—9, 2—12, 3—15,

BOWLING aoe
. Williams
. Corbin . Wis °
8 3

erosg altel

ames
a
Hf
B

* wer

Lodgse—67 a
Empire—123 and (Fer 7 5 aemattaeg

Empire—ist

M. Robinson c Deane D MeComle
Jones run out
Bourne b a ae os
W. Cave c b Brookes
W. Grant, fits wee % Welch
Millington b McComie
Harper c Gill b Wilkie
Fields b Brookes
Alleyne ¢ Deane b Brookes’
King ¢ & b Wilkie
Barker not out
Extras

Total *
Fall of wickets: oa 2—16, 3—22,
36, 5—71, ‘sowes 8—1

105,
WLING Al ANALYSIS

geil Set

Scom



eae

Erlel

comuungs
BN
=
=
Freon wovears

Cheesman 1.b.w., b Millington

vr. MeComie b Barker

_oneene nee
2
3
8
2
=

7 ee, b Millington ....

|

Bl wemohe

Total

Fall of wickets: 1—8, 2—38, 3—13, 4
~16, 5—27, 6—28, 7-—61, 8—61, 9—64,



overhead for six to send up 150
runs in about 135 minutes.

Wiltshire followed suit. In
Norman Marshall’s next over, he
hit the fifth ball for six.

D. Atkinson succeeded break-
ing the valuable partnership,
He yorked Farmer at 69.
The scoreboard then read 165 for
3 with Wiltshire 44 not out.

Johnnie Byer partnered Wil‘
shire and played the last ball
from Atkinson

Wiltshire made himself 50 ov
Norman Marshall’s next over by
pulling him overhead for another

he attempted another
big hit off Marshall’s bowling.
The ball skied, but Marshall failed
te take his own catch,

Wiltshire cid nov last much
longer. He was caught over-
head by Roy Marshall off Norman
Marshall. Wiltshire scored 55
and the scoreboard read 177 for
4.

This brought G. Cheltenham
and Byer together.

Cheltenham got 2 runs before
he was clean bowled by D.
Atkinson. He played over one
pitched well vp between his bat
and pads.

With the score at 181 for 5,
I. Warner joined Byer. Roy
Marshall was given another spell
from the Northern end and he
got Warner for 8 in the first over
of that spell.

Fine Catch

Warner tried to hit Marshall
everhead but Marshall stuck out
his right hand above his head
to take a lovely return catch.
The score read 191 for 6.

C. Brewster followed. This pair
saw the 200 go up in about 190
minutes. The new ball was taken

at 207 when 66 overs were
bowled, :

Norman Marshall bowled it
and immediately he had Byer in
difficulty.

Byer was beaten in the third
ball and drove the fourth pas:
the bowler for 4. The next ball
he was caught at mid-off by
Skinner for 25.

BARBADOS BOYS CLUBS

Three Prizes will be given as follows :

1st Prize:
2nd Prize :
3rd Prize:

A FORD ANGLIA
RALEIGH 3 SPEED CYCLE
ROLEX TUDOR WATCH

Drawing to take place not later than Nov. 30th, 1950

Auditors :





FITZPATRICK GRAHAM & CO.



BOWLING — ALYSIS

4 Bem.
E. Millington B 4 6 a
H. Barker * 2 ee. oe
Cc. G,. Alleyne 0 10 0
H. King é oO 30 2
Empire—fnd Innings
0. M. Robinson not out 12
B. Bourne not out 11
Extras 3
Total (for 0 wkts.) 26
SPARTAN y. CARLTON
Cariton—238
Spartan—Ist Innings
A. Atkins b W. Greenidge 0
L, Harris c & b Luc
C. Walcott l.b.w. b Lucas . 3
K. Walcott l.b.w. b W. Greenidge 17
C. Pilgrim not out. ar
Vv. Wood “e" (wkpr. ) b Laveas 0
K. Bowen b Warren 16
F. Phillips c & b % Warrant 0
A. Haynes run out, 0
B. Morris b Greenidge v
Extras ¥
Total 197
Fell of wickets; 1 for 12. 2 for .%..
3 for 37, @ for 8, 5 fcr 153. 6 for 1:3,
7 for 176, 8 for 176 and 8 for 177
BOWLING Aa AX ¥Sis
M R w
G. Edghill 9 5 2 !
eer 6 2 1 a
N. S. Lucas 4 5 3} 4
W. Greenidge. 4.5 1 30
K. Greenidge 9 2 9 0
E. Marshall ; 3 6 19 0
K. Hutechinson.... ee L. u v
Cariton—2nd Innings
K. Hutchinson c wkpr. b Philips 0
A not out. %
N. Clarke not out * ”
Extras, ; v
Total ifor 1 wicket) i ”
BOWLING ae
: M R. w
Phillips es S o : 1
Walcott 1 0 9
WANDERERS vy. POLICE.
Wanderers (For 7 Wickets Dec.) 369
Police—ist Innings
C. Blackman b N. Marshall. \9
F. Taylor ¢ Proverbs b D. Atkinson 28
Capt. W. A. Farmer b D. Atkinson 69
Wiltshire c R. Marshall,
b N. Marshall. - &
J. Byer ¢ Skinner, b N. Marshall. 2
G. Cheltenham b D. Atkinson S
C. Brewster b N. Marshall 7
I. Warner c & b R. Marshail 3
B. Morris b Atkinson 0
C. Mullins c Proverbs b Atkinson 0
C. Bradshaw not out 0
Extras (b. 10 1b, 4w. 1)..." 15
Total ‘ coeees 218
Fall of wickets: 1 for 24, 2 for 70

165, 4 for 177, 5 for 181, 6 for
191, 7 for 213, 8 for 214, 9 for 218 ana
10 for 218

BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M

R w

D Atkinson 20 12 24 5

N. Marshall 3.4 7 80 4

Cc. Packer ‘ 2 1 3 0

R. Marshall 12 1 43 1

L. St. Ain 6 1 16 9

H. Toppin ; 1 8 0

L. Greenidge 0 29 0

Police—2nd iinet z

C. Bradshaw not out.... mn 0
C. Brewster c St. Hill

b D. Atkinson... 2

C. Mullins run out... 0

G. Cheltenham not out. 1

Total (for 2 wkts.)



The score was 213 for 7 and the
eighth wicket fell at 214. B.
Morris was cleaned bowled by
D. Atkinson for “duck”. He at-
tempted to cut a good length in--
swinger,

Police wanted 6 runs to save
the follow-on with 2 wickets in
hand. C. Mullins and C. Brew-—
ster were at the wicket with
Brewster 6 not out.

At 218 for 8 Mullins was
caught for nought by Proverbs
at gully off D. Atkinson.

C. Bradshaw and _ Brewster,
‘the last pair in, were to make
2 runs to save the follow-on, N.
Marshall and D. Atkinson were
kept on the ball.

They could not do it. N.
Marshall cleaned bowled Brews-
ter with the total score at 212,
giving Wanderers a lead of 15}.

Brewster made 7 and Bradshaw
was 0 not out

Follow-On

Wanderers forced the follow-
on and Police started on their
second innings at 5.30 p.m.

Police’s 2nd innings was opened
by C, Bradshaw and C. Brewster,
Norman Marshall and D. Atkinson
took charge of the third new ball
used for the day by Wanderers,

Atkinson's first over claimed
the first Police wicket. C. Brews-
ter was caught at silly mid-on by
St. Hill for 2. Brewster played
‘orward lazily to one pitched
well up on his pads.

C. Mullins was next in, He
was run out without scoring. C.
Cheltenham ~ joined Bradshaw
and the score was 3 for 2 at time
of call.

SPARTAN vs. CARLTON

Carlton 238 and (for 1 wkt.).. 6
Spartan 17

Carlton dismisseqd Spartan at
Queen’s Park yesterday for 177
runs to lead them by 61 runs on
the first innings. The Queen's
Park team had dismissed Carlton
for 238 runs in the opening day of
the match,

Batting honours for

@ On Page 11.

the home

contac tieiatliatan ts tlaenestiaat innocent cemanieheteniocientpens nice ia ih tat anata Lt neo

rd a

Shooting
Competition

Mr. Kidne
Proud O

OCT. 15 — NO. 141

In November W.1. Team | The Topic

The Barbados Rifle Association
are holding their annual Rifle
Meeting 1950 from Saturday 18th
to Saturday 25th November in-
elusive. The qualifying stage for
the “Trumpeter Cup” will take
place on Saturday the 18th and
the Final stage on Saturday 25th
after which the trophies and prizes
will be presented.

. There will be competitions for
the Barbados Regiment and the
Police and it is proposed this year
to have a competition for the Ca-
det Force. There will also be a
Falling Plate Competition be-

tween the Regiment, Police, Ca-~
dets and the B.R.A. A detailed
programme wi'l be published

later. Members are asked to not
that closing date for Entrie- ‘s
Saturday 4th November.



Reporting First To
Cricket Board

I have the happiest recollections
ot three glorious weeks which I
spent pkaying cricket in Barbados
early im 1925 aS Captain of the
Jamaica team against Barbados
Mr. R. K. Nunes, President of the
West Indies Cricket Board of Con-
trol told the “Advocate”.

He arrived by the “Golfite” from
England yesterday intransit for
Trinidad where he will be at-
tending a meeting of the West
fnaies Cricket Board of Control on
Octeber 19 and 20 before fiying
home to Jamaica two days later.

Mr. Nunes said that his last
visit to Barbados was in 1928 when
he spent a few hours here on his
way to England with the 1928
West Indies team and was unfor-
tunate not to have come back
before.

Nothing To Say

Asked his views as to whether
or not the West Indies could afford
to send a team to Australia, he
said that as President of the
Cricket Board of Control he wished
to give the public all the informa-
tion which was possible, but he
must refer the matter to the Board
for their discussion and decision
before any statement could be
made.

He said that any imformation to
be given concerning the West
Indies cricket, must be released
to the different colonies simul-
taneously.

He lived in Jamaica and the
Jamaica papers never got any
information before any of the
other islands.

He said that apart from at-
tending the games in England he
had gone over to arrange other
matters in connection with West
Indies Cricket.



Argentinian Loses
Boxing Bout
NEW YORK, Oct. 14.
Markarian

Manourk the
Argentine lost on points “* an
eight-round bout nere against
Joe Carkido of are, Ohio,

The| referee took two rounds
away from the Argentine boxe:
for low blows Reuter.

Racing Results

GEORGETOWN, BG., Oct. 14.
LODGE HANDICAP—@ Furs., Class 6
Genno, Gonsalez, 116 Ibs, cae
Goldnie, Campbell, 126 Wa cassis
Flower Path, Na » 112 Fg
Just-By-Chanee, mereend. Ibs,
Time: 1 min.

PRESIDENT'S WAN aia

Class F
Liack Shadow, Naidoo, 115 Ibs.
Ormondes Battery, eneates 104 ibs.
‘Toybomk, Joseph, 135 I . 4

Jolly Miller, Yvonet, ies lbs.





euke

Sede

Time: 1 min, 17 2/5 secs,
LADIES BANSNNr ow Mile, 100 Yds,
Class C
Swiss Roll, Singh, 120 Ibs. .....-.65« 1
Miss Shirley, O'Neil, 122 Ibs, vee

Sunny Jim, Persaud, 106 lbs.
ES Yvonet, 116 Ibs.

DU RUAN Ln eae soe Furs, Chose
Lady Pink, Sunich, 145 Ibs,
115 Ibs
118 Ibs.
ig ibe

Vindima, Gonsal ez,
Sandhurst, Wilder,
Galectt Joseph,
Time; 1 min. 30
OCTOBER HANDICAPS ‘Furs,
Brown Ruby, Joseph, 115 Ibs.
Indusval 105 Ibs.
Blackshadow, Gobin, bs.
Mont Pelier, O'Neil,
Time: 1 min. 32/5 secs.
STEWARDS HANDIOAP—7 Furs, Class
Millionaire, Naidoo, 108 -
Just Reward, Beckles, 1)7 Ibs.
Pensive, Gonsalez, 126 Ibs,
Dedision, Singh, 122 ia ‘
Time: 1 min, 31
FINAL HANDICAP “a ‘Furs.,
Way Home, Jose; 130 Ibs.
Miss Shirley, ONeill, 112 Ibs.
Vindima, Gonsalez, 116 Ibs.
Waverley, Singh, 114° MEME \snidbaks she

Class





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The winning of ‘three Test
matches in addition to the all-
reund performances by the mem-
bers of the 1950 West Indies team
which had just completed its tour
of England is something which
must be regarded as a very great
achievement for West Indies
cricket, Mr J, M, Kidney, Manager
of the team, told the “Advocate.”

Mr. — returned from Eng-
land yesterday morning on the
S.S. “Golfito.”

He said that the boys played as
a team and there was never an
occasion when some particular
member who was expected to
make runs or get wickets failed,
and some other member did not
pooame the responsibility and rise

to the occasion.

As an instance he gave Gerry
Gomez’s 147 against Kent when
runs were very badly needed.

Wonderful

Not having seen Valentine or
Ramadhin in action before the
tour, he said it was a wonderful
experience to have seen those two
great bowlers who were
ful through sheer ability.

In Valentine,
had a real spinner with consistent
—_e and full of determination
and even on occasions when he
had long spells of bowling he
just went on even with sore
fingers and aching limbs,

The same thing he said could be
applied to Ramadhin whom he
considered must be classed among
the best spin bowlers ever t6 be
seen in England,

Both these bowlers on occasions
had to be treated for the soreness
which resulted from their efforts.

Mr. Kictney said that it was a
great privilege and pleasure to be
associated with the 1950 West
Indies team so ably led by John
Goddard especially when making
comparisons with other W.1. teams
of which he had the honour to
manage in 1933 and 1939, There
were also great players then such
as George Headley, but on this
oceasion, they had the “W”" forma-
tion Worrell, Weekes and Walcott;
Jeffrey Stollmeyer, Gomez, Rae
7: Christiani, not forgetting Mar-
sna

Altogether he said |that they
had a fine combination of sports-
men and gentlemen and he was
very proud of their achievement
which would live long in the mem-
ory of West Indies cricket.

.

Cricket Match
‘ s

At Garrison

The annual cricket match be-
tween the Owners and Trainers
and the Grooms will take place
to-day at the Garrison.

The team will be picked from
the following :—

Messrs, T. N, Peirce (Capt.),
G. A. Lewis, V. E. Cox, T. A, D
Gale, J. Massiah, J. B. Meri,
P. B. Walker, J. R. Goddard, E.
Evelyn, D, Wilkie, P. Fletcher,
D. Inniss and Hon. V. C. Gale.

The Grooms team will be:
M. Bynoe (Capt.), S. Clarke, G.
Hollingsworth, C. Applewhite, Cc.
Watkins, C, Grandison, C, Durante,
J. Young, F, Alleyne, D. Flatts,
T. Stanton and G. Blackman.

England Defeats
Wales 22—4

ABERTILLE, Oct, 14.
England beat Wales by 22
points to four in the season's first
Rugby League International game
played here to-day.





the West nines

of
Last Week



iT wane last Tuesday evening

We heard a low voice cry

Tell Lou and Joe and Robert
The landship passing by |

We ran across the ene. bridge

The crowd was |

As they idiiehchad take Nelson
The Admiral — vives right"
In honour a her
"Who once fouant the good fight

Well women love commotion
Suppose that's why Lou said

“lL want a landship funeral
Please! Joe; when Tam dead”

Joe said my dear; with pleasure
Al ships will sail that ay
The “Iron Duke, the “Deli
Will steam in Carlisle Bay
. * °

Lou my dear, Pi thank God
For ridding vou of pain
And I would plead this one thing
We never meet again

Bo Lou went home “bewildered”
And in the dead of night

Rub in six pots of skin cream
To make a black face white

Joe woke in time to hear her
Say “It won't change poor me”
‘Twas then Joe said my dear Lou
You've “lost the. boundary"

. ;

You've tried to fool poor Robert
That you could pass for white
But girl you could not fool Joe
Not even at midnight
. °

Well Thursday in the evening
Betsy cried, look this thing
Tell Joe and Lou and Robert
The Church bells start to, ring
. .

And Betsy in all goodness
Cried out a storm ahéad
Whenever you hear a church bell
That's what the fadio ond

But boys it was a wedding
The folks were in their glee
It was a ding-dong party
The old man stood the spree
. ‘

Just like the very pieture
The bride was steeped in thrills
But the old man in the arm chair
Sa counting up the bille
. *. -
‘.ou_ turned and said to Betsy
“Hamlet” I want to see
I want to see if Shakespeare
Can put something on me
When Lou said this to Betsy
Betsy's face shone with glee
And then she said my dear Lou
Bring some the “Ham” for me
. .
Lou, Joe and Robert all three
Heard classies at the best

‘Twas then Joe sald to Robert
J & R can do the rest

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PAGE SIX

The PRIEST from!

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



MOSCOW

Tells How the Russian People Live To-day

No Bevan Teeth—and an Injection costs 10|- ... .
Women queue for shoes and take what they are given



from EVELYN IRONS |



VESOUL, Haute—Saone.

Se France.
FATHER Jean De Matha
Thomas, the French priest who
was father confessor to thousands
of Russian~ Catholics in Moscow,
is back in France and kas just
given me a frank and revealing
account of life under Stalin in

1950.
For three years and three
months he had _ opportunities

given to few foreigners to see
how the Russian people really
live. He went into Moscow
homes to visit the sick and ad-
minister last rites to the dying.

As cure of the church of St. »

Louis, Catholic parish for the
whole of the diplomatic corps m
Moscow, he ministered to 200
diplomats of all nations,

Then abruptly, a month ago
he was expelled from Moscow
“By order of the Soviet adminis -
traticn,” he was told when he
asked why.

The Dying Woman

I met the silver-haired, beardeJ
priest ashe strode from the
Church of. the Sacre Coeur after
saying the™seven o’clock mass in
his native town,

And later we talked
quiet study.

“There is no room for incur
ables in Moscow hospitals,” he
said. “One woman I visited was
dying of tuberculosis in her oue
small room. A neighbour brought
her a glass of water or some
bread occasionally, Because she
bad no relatives or friends +.
eare for her, she had to die in :
corner. No hospital would take
her. And there were many
similar cases.” '

Four To A Room

“Lack of privacy was the wors'
feature of the homes I entered.”
Father Thomas said. “In spite
of the new apartment blocks going
up, people are still strictly
rationed for living space. Unless,
of course, they are in the upper
grades ef society and are allowed
flats or houses suitable for their
rank.

“Many of the houses I visited
stil] had rooms divided into four
with one person living in each.
The division was made by a

ardrobe or some other piece of

ture, or by a piece of cur-
tain. Outside in the passage was
a stove on which these close
neighbours took turns to cook.”

Teeth A Luxury

For those who could get admis-
sion to Moscow hospitals, treat-
ment was free, “But only for the
basic necessities," said Father
Thomas. “Any special diet or
other amenity had to be paid
for.”

And according to Father
Thomas, Bevan teeth are a
luxury beyond the dreams of
Mescow,

in bs

“A dentist will draw teeth
free,” he told me. “But if the
patient wants an_ injection, he

must pay about 10s. If he asks
for dentures, or prefers a crown
or a stopping, the dentist demands
the rouble rate for the job. In
the case of a good worker who
is worthy of such consideration,
the industrial worker's own or-
ganisation will give him the
teeth.”

Women Navvies
Life in Moscow is hardest for

women, reports Father Thomas.
“I saw them doing the toughest



tne COMOSTAR works narder...

eee Decause the



task—-stone-breaking, barrowing
loads on building sites, navvies’
jobs of all kinds. .““Many of them
smoked Pipes like the men, and
broke off their work to eat a
labourer’s hunk of black bread and
a raw onion.

“The young ones were gay in
spite of it all. But the faces of
the women around forty were
bleak and sad, I saw no signs of
elegance among the Moscow
women,

“Not even,” he added with a

chuckle, “a dash of nail colour-
ing or face powder to keep them
retty.”
When a Moscow housewife
wants a broken window or a
faulty’ light-switch repaired, she
cannot go direct to the glazier
or electrician.

“Everything must go through
official channels, and application
nust be made to the house-
holder’s industrial organisation,”
said Father Thomas. “My own
problem was a bathroom door
which would not open properly.
Since I arrived in 1947 I wrote
sume 30 letters about it. Finally,
last January, a workman came and
shook his head over it.



THE MAN THEY EXPELLED,
Father Themes

“Then he said, ‘If you give me
00 roubles (about £45), I will
arrange it, The door was put
right at once,”

Queues continue to waste thou-
sands of woman-hours a week at
the Moscow shops.

£50 A Pair

“Hundreds of women waited
outside the biggest Moscow de-
partment store every day,” Father
Thomas said, ‘Queues were long-
est when the news went around
that a consignment of shoes had
arrived, for shoes were scarce and
although they were of poor quality
they were dear—about £50 in
English money the same as for a
man’s suit. But when a woman
reached the head of the queue she
could not choose her style. She
gave her size and was handed the
shoes. If she wanted another
shape or colour she could do
nothing about it.”

The housewife’s choice of food?
“Plentiful,” said Father Thomas.
“Officially it is unrationed, But
with meat costing 25s. a pound
and butter £2 10s. rationing is
in foree—by price.”

WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED
—LES.




































high quality of the work, and

driver’s work is easier!

Aboriginal |
Children’s Art |
May Be Televised |

(From Our Londen Correspondent)

Sir OSBERT
brings out the
family gems...

by .. . . GEORGE

‘MALCOLM THOMSON

LONDON, October. |

A small book is shorily to be|
produced in London called “Little |
Black Fingers.” It is written by;
Mrs. Florence Rutter. who was|
responsible for introducing the
artistic efforts of young aboriginal
children to Londoners a_ short!
while ago. The book is made up}
of extracts from a larger book, to
be published in the New Year, and






























NOBLE ESSENCES. By the hooded, tragic eyes. Listen,to

will reese an Sitwell Macmillan. 21s. $24 this snatch of conversavion:

of the children’s work. Iv wil Pages. “What are joing to be when
deal with many aspects of IT is impossible to refrain from you grow wT ace

aboriginal life in Australia, show-| applause at the conclusion, with “A genius.”

ing their implements and weapons

this fifth volume, of so grandiose
end way of life, and will contaia

a project as the ‘Sitwell autobio- pan eee ere ee

not be of long duration.

a catalogue of 100 pictures painted | yraphy—or from the suspicion Unlik: t. i “5
by the children. that it might, with advantage, verell ie nottterineneas #) aloe
Six of the most attractive | have been shorter by one volume.

lose my temper unless sqmeone
does something to annoy me.”
Then he will refuse Yo eat, In
similar circumstances his brother
will smash 24 cheap plates put
‘nat for the purpose by his house-
keeper. 7

When the eminent critic Sir
Edmund Gosse brings the new
complete edivion of Swinburne
he has edited, it is through sheer,
nervousness that Sachevere’
exclaims: “How delightful to have
them at last in a cheap edition!”

Startled that St. Sebastian can
shoot arrows as well as be their
target, Gosse retorts: “Not so
cheap as all that!”

pictures are to be made into
Christmas cards and prints for
framing.

Osbert Sitwell speaks of the
“design” as if no departure from
it was possible, In fact, the “‘de-
sign” was originally for a four-
volume book.

When the pictures were first
shown in London, many eminent
art critics and anthropologists

No harm at all if a writer finds
were puzzled by the extremely

he has more to say than he had
expected. But Noble Essences has
a different character from, its
four predecessors and only with
some effort elbows its way into
their company.

It isa series of biographical
articles. The main performance is
over. After the last chords of the
finale have died away we hear
the prattle in the boxes. An¢
lively prattle it is, sprinkled with
anecdote and spiced with malice
Now and again some minor poet
of the twenties is dragged out
from under the leayes where
those Wicked Uncles the vears
have buried him, so that he may
be chivvied.

many doubted that it was por~
sible for young children to
produce such finished works ©!
arts. Owing Vo the great interest
still being displayed in them,
Mrs. Rutter imtends exhibiting
ell over the country, and in ’
few weeks they will be shown at
the Rochdale Gallery and
Museum, in the Midlands.

“From November to December
we hope to have them on show
again in London”, said Mrs,
Rutter to-day. “At this exhib:-
vion, we may run a short colour
film, taken by a friend, of the
aboriginal boys in their settle-
ment, when I visited them. We
also think it may interesy the
public to be able to buy carts,
prints and the book at the same
time.”

Yet the displeasure did not lasi
long. The Sitwells were of dis-
tinguished birth; Giosse, a snob
who found his perfect niche as
librarian of the House of Lords.

Ronald Firbank, rich, invalid
author of precious novels, leaves
a fainter impression. As ‘he
writer of a postcard: “To-morrow
I go to Haiti. They say the
President is a perfect dear.” As
the owner of a palm-tree which
ke carried from one London flat
to another. It was watered twice
a day by a gardener whose greer
baize apron pleased Firbank—
‘just like being in the country.’

Walter Sickert, the artist, Sells
a litter of pictures for £40, and

Of Sir George Sitwell, the au-
thor's father-victim, we are alas,
ifforded only a fleeting glimpse.
But how characteristic! Having
evicted some peasants from his
Italian palace. Sir George typical-
ly misunderstands their sullen
look, ‘You see, I can always make
myself popular when I waui to!”

This is not to say, however, that
the public is denied a fresh in-

Mrs. Rutver is the proud pos~
sessor of 24 letters from aborigi-
children, One, which si:
received only this week, is from
Barry now 16-years-old
He is working, and has no time

for painting, but tells her in his|spection of the Sitwell family when Sivwell expostulates, replies
letter how they gave up heir] treasures, Far from it. As if he “Supply and Demand. The inex-
playtimes and week-ends forjwere the owner-turned-curator orable laws of Supply ano

three years in order to attai:
the degree of perfection in the:

of a property handed over to the

the “Demand. The young man wantec
‘National Trust, the author points

my pictures and I wanted his

art which has been remarked |out to the conducted party his money.”

upon by so many. All honowr,|orother Sacheverell at a time

says the child, must go to the'r|when, although an officer in the But it would be wrong to sup-
teacher who used to take them |Grenadier Guards, he united pose that Noble Essences is. i

on rambles, and then tell ther! |“something of the Gothic saint.

1 compilation of stories. It is rich
Yo draw what they had seen from |St, Sebastian perhaps with some~

in devailed yet vivid descriptions

memory. thing of the young Bacchus”. Note of scenes and people, the product

Gne of the points raised m|the “untidy grace”, which the of an astonishing memory, | I!
London was that the children | sergeant - major has overlooked closes in a passage of sombre elo-
raight grow cut of this artistic the “faunal faroucheness,” the quence touched with self-approval.

ebility, and vhat they might iose mind “brilliantly coloured as a
their virtuosity as they grew up.{ tropical bird.”
Mrs. Rutter is not inclined ‘9} Respectfully sidling away from
this view. this prodigy {hat in hand and
“They have litvle opportunity | avoiding the priceles carpets), the
to pursue their studies when| party is just in time to see thay
they are older”, she told me,| sister Edith (aged four) has swept
end my greatest ambition is to| into the room and “seems to fill
return vo Australia and found an| it with her personality. . it’s five years since we met?”—
art school for them, with perhaps| | Observe, whispers our guide, “Rather a nice interval, don’t
scholarships to Europe ult| the Byzantine or Sienese profile, you think?”—LE.S.° —- :
mately.” ae “

And are we to have no More
Osbert Sitwells? There is hirit ot
a new “design”—“if I am allowed
the vime.” :

In such matters there need be
no undue haste. As Lytton
Strachey replied to the young
man who said, “Do you realise

i. ~
a ee



Mrs. Rutter broadcast recently









in a radio series called “Mee\! ‘

the Commonwealth.” She gave; ae

bona talks on the aboriginal | | |
children’s art, and in a few °

months television viewers in | Relieves ”

Britain may see this art for | |
themselves,

“The letter I had from Barry”,
she said, “will do a lot to con-
vince the many sceptics that the
work is really their own,”



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M.P. "Chieftain”

LONDON

A. Fenner Brockway, labour
M.P., stepped from a plane here ,
wearing the silk-lined fur robe of ; BM
a chieftain in the Kikuyu tribe.
He had just returned from a two-
month visit to Africa where Ken-
ya tribesmen made him an hon
orary chieftain.

Brand
Stomach y

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she has over 160,000 miles cf pipe-
lines for transport of crude oil.

keep it moving.

of which is already in operation.



SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950

STORY OF
THE OIL
PIPELINE

(From Our Own Correspondent’

LONDON. |

What led to the modernisation
of pipe-lines for oil transport? It
was the establishment of the inter-
national oil industry in Pennsyl-
vania in 1859. The really success-
ful line was a cast iron, 5-mile-
long, 2 ins-diameter pipe-line, laid |
in 1865.

About 7,000 yeurs ago, the in-
ventive Chinese were using bam-
boo pipe-lines to carry the “na-.
tural gas” given off from their
brine wells to the stills, where it
served as fuel to distil the salt
from the brine solution. The an-;
cient Assyrians, Egyptians, Greeks
and Romans built pipe-lines of#
clay or hollowed rock as water-
mains, while Cambyses, King of
Persia, used a pipe-line of sewn
oxhide to supply water to his.
troops when invading Egypt in
525 B.C. '

Since that time, a

one oe
SOAPS

elemoe

continued
taken‘



Formidable

nn
ELASTIC - COMFORTABLE - A VARIETY OF StZES
The construction of pipe-lines in



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Generally,

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tational force alone, but normally,
it requires pumping “boosting” to





The great trunk pipe-lines of
America, (as intricate as any
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Life of a pipe-line under nor--
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TUTAKA

Teada wae




PAGE SEVEN

gm = | ARE YOU JUSTA

© PLAYTHING-NATURE?.

you with
a lovely

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950 SUNDAY ADVOCATE





Life with | rr

Kather-3 ar vicemarsna TRAIN—JUST LIK

bagels duct saps - det’) ARSENAL STARS:
|





\ Nature may endow
| breathtaking beauty,

CHOOL holidays are the pest times for me, because
S: at home and fatherand I have such good "ee OW do the big clubs traim their men to become sta: Seeue ca'Yen tah aces 300










































together. footballers? And can a small team—a school turn-out } stow gifts on you that make you
But sometimes when 1 come down to breakfast, he isn't or a Boy Scout club for instance—hope to do anything j @ brilliant actress, a leader in
there. I ask where he is, and mother says he has flown off | 9 ail in that tine? your class at college, sought
to, say, at half-past four that morning. > aad answer is Yes. Ali ieading footballers nave after at dances, or a charming
ws, noe wes ieBaaktege ated SOP Being aah a Phat ae rn |. Mae and mote:
he’ll go abroad some- e! and when
where else. We never know when along the pavement they probably used’ the wall to d ect \ Siamee, glown -ecoredug oF ane roe © = yo
we're going to see him the ball around an imaginary opponent . @ Ourerent stone tor assauit. ye you may yo
pent when wp ae tomaner, tite comes trom I Past veel ten ditierentine 7) these distressing symptoms,
n . en erently. 7) s ;
ago ae How to drive jAlex Wilson® fe Ba ie which so many unfortunate
a car and @ miniature motor- ; jktainer for 19. bad’ back Es” tc "anion girls and women do.
bike. Sometimes 1 drive him in esos eee o. . 3)
dower teorten Dut we bee ion | ball eens 3 i was, * (0) ee Something een forget — Pinkham's Compound
— Rese of all. iildats “in wut two Kind - Loe be dope ditferentiy * shor Not Joke Abo ors more than relieve such
Switzerland, which is my mother's eguipmen: oe" | $0 if female functional monthly — monthly pain. This great medi-
home country, e: tally in the to develop tHe i . ees Down | disturbances are causing you to cine aLso relieves accompanying
winter when we ski : the skiii ol ki i DEURBLINE FLAGS; Be sure to practise \. Much the same as 19 Across Sparkling fadel suffer from pain, nervous dis- nervous tension, irritability,
I want my life to be as full of young players ‘icmina with both tet You will soon be expert 4 Ones sou a gc ro 8» mses, tress and feel weak, restless, so those tired-out, mean ‘pick-on-
thrills as my father's, so when NOREEN PPNNETI sai x UO CARS See x equal, e : cranky and irritable that you everyone’ feelings—when due to
i ant Ones ous like wo be a ‘We bojh love speed.” fine. “paveoee WAN 4 (nitially part of tne Bible (2 magic-wear CUTEX, almost turn into a ‘she-devil’ this cause. Taken regularly
poe ae vy lg oat oon ae Dractice “sew i; he or oe brings your hands on such days—THIs 1s SOMETHING «= thruout the month—Pinkham’s
summer a@ riding ‘instructor | : age Hi aut iet distances worry | grounds \ Sti, i These boys are spivs. (&) Bs y' YOU SHOULDN'T JOKE ABOUT, Start Compound helps build up resis-
or LU go by jet-plane just ¥ : t ‘i 4 You want lots it on holiday . right awa: Lydia E. Pink- tance against such distress—a
Australia. my father ou can rg 2 a 8 BAe new admiration ight away—try Ly
7 these up your re ba Aee ink iene 1s ee ham’s Vegetable Compound to very sensible thing to do. Just
ser. > 14. Black the Scot? ‘No! Hes .« easy to a 1 relieve such symptoms. It’s fa- see if you, too, don’t remarkably
Says Alex,— the road. (6 y PP+Y:-- | mous for this purpose. And don't benefit! All drugstores,
. 1a ee fa siete canet! big 16 oe tn mot necessari:, dries faster too. | >
‘ é fauritius, «a sritish jelubs have 4 . . \
r “olany 8. The littl - 6 e e Z, TA
This one i \ sg sunrnins inden tide vee ting — \____ g Belntins, 4, | lydia E. Pinkhama tsnvesns
, . Animal to flatter (@)
Pak ve Sik the ¥ fastened to a 22! Carriage. (3) The polish that }
wron f , utitude,” nalfway up the right: pole mounted on !4% HMEAD-PENNIS; Yuu can set up this ring on “ Yous bie Mie centre ie ,
& ° rand side Sa bape base any pieee of ground , “glutton of yesterday's puesic, Across weats longer — re- }
Phe figure reuds~ 217 10 3S le Canno: vor ; 8. ivory keys O, New
oe - jeasily be knockee ver. ” ‘ fonds: 35. Orem; 2, Sit; 17. isle, ih ; ; /
Can you spot why 3)"segiass' eget UR ot theve ut six: omit" from” wend the mek ee BiMirue! $5 Noid ue Gritch Bees, sists peeling and
Ser) sibutes south vard interval» | Diagram 1 and over the net and into the opposit: Eres OR & hone dvste eg vore chipping... and
ne were. But it should bared Seat re {m court, and it may be rewurned b) Lv atiract 1% Bemvers hier | pp1ng
read j As ) ’ B : onic: 20 AA : |
Pridatoe Othe i Coles cone as fe i art, me. tHe An Pe aie comes in such |
ist parallel of eres ‘ark out the court. only, please.” Seas |
atitude runs stretch a (ws: over two cross ——————— rilliant shades.
0 fallen oe Supports of sod and pee down. * Writing in the Football Asso- b CA bi
4) Mauritius, Says Alex Arsenal plays this ciation’s Book for Boys, 1950-51
How did the game, with four plavers aside ‘Naldrett Press, 10s.). WH
nistake come — Ay ?
to be made s NEW?
Vall, the stamp 9 L win fw talest water Love |
lesigner may D t Call Jack-itt-w- Bu nd World's most popular
rave been used Here's the on Pen Pals we contro) submarine i. et sald pote. |
chart { ynd rows itself ucross 2
jhe Nortnern ore The B John Crosby, Bethel Mission i)" i? °° phe Satis |
A Wiriechote "adh mavibiecsd: by e Oss House, Bay Street, St. Michael. dives und has @ Sate esi 4
you spot the mis idding as’ he looked’ orth Hobbies are Stamp collecting, a real conning- RFOCSSOOSOOR OS OOF GOS
take on this stamp’? Ut nsiead of subtracting ; Li . Reading, and playing cricket. He / on “ tower, 68, 11d. , ‘|
costs sixpence and be NbiOde thie’ sae lar is also a Wolf Cub and likes 3 / Sit kone OH! MOTHER |
cause of the mistake it w) sion ti epee, bit. which swimint Genet US... cheaper ‘ ‘
soon be worth more. nog lived on Mauritius out could ng. (¢ carpenters’ tool . |
‘ ot Hy and was killed off LONDON. sels at 185, und =| It’s a SPRAIN !! "
Stam; with “Errors wt! Perforation is 13} by ; 25s rob ‘ |
ught. We Getlambrd kl ver th hae fopation Is 13) by 144, una Judge John Blagden, 49, at’ Franklyn Belgrave, St, Charles ae Ray eeoline. Ts
world, Nout 2d. yu, 1? cents 18 | Westminster County Court ruled Village, South Naparima, Sax 16s, 6d... . anc
; Fernando, $t. John’s P.O. TRINI- {or anyone's young bro:her ‘who

e, a 12 t, colouré

y in a se

P.S.
‘rror stamp next week-end

I shal! dea) witn another

4,

8k tt hat «0 eet eee
OO LALO POLAR AOL OE SAA LAPP SIGS T FFP TGS F SY

‘that to call a boss a liar justifies
dismissal.

summary

The judge refused damages for
wrongful dismissal to Mrs. Kath-
leen Perira, former stenographer
of Sidney Lewis, managing di-
rector of a London manufacturing

| Ly

| So beautifully easy...”

| so easily beautiful
|

cannot YET tell the time, id
and-black plastic. clock * with
removable numerals 15s

This on
Olive, was issued im J

DAD. Hobbies are stamp collecting,
cinemas, dancing, photography
Wants pen pals between the ages
of 14 and 20, (Boys and girls).



Goadon



A Nice Cup Of Tea

By MILTON KAPLAN ss, is o> Savane dMy gy dot wt Rupert and the because Brylfoam cleanses so thoroughly yet so gently, your
was alle, .< MFT, 80 thoro
a liar” ating 2 ‘argument with m4 hair is infused with new reahele new Gane. Let

LONDON.

So you want a ‘‘nice cuppa tea.”

Americans are drinking more
tea than ever, according to re-
ports reaching the tea-drinkingest
land in the world, and an Ameri-
can in England would be abjectly
remiss if he did mot warn that
tea-making is not as easy as it
looks. as

What Americans regard as tea-

When boiling water has been
poured into the teapot, allow four
to six minutes for “infusion”—
the larger the pot, the harder the
water, the more time should be
allowed for the tea leaves and
water to get together.

If the American has gone this
far, he is ready for the last big
hurdle. That is, to use milk (or
cream) with the tea, This is not of



Lewis over office instructions.

She contended that she said
“It’s a lie’—but only .after she
had been fired.

Giving judgment for the firm
with costs, the judge commented:

“In duelling days, to call a man
a liar was enough to justify the
drawing of his rapier by any man

honour.

our mirror tell the story-=the story of glow: hair-
health! And how wonderfully er 9 ge ee oes
| your hap how economical it vie. Popeyes the 5 ls
creamy lather suits ev oO} _- or greasy, or
fair, “Ask for Brylfoam and see how beautiful your hair can
be! In tubes, the handy and the Jarge economy size,

there’s more foam in

_BRYLFOAM

And She Applies - - -

SACROOL

Because Sacrool Conquers
PAIN



PS ee
SLES SOS IIOP IP ALGO IIE IIE Ew







malding is about as ct pritish cor Particularly inviting to Ameri- «gven in these days it seems to ent See a On Sale at - - -
D ~ cans, for reasong which tend to that for Mrs, Per all When Rupert.has had agood reason § his.’ h
foo is from drinkable. Just POU become obscured after the Drac- Cmaloyer a iar or to sey At de a real he ie Gi Gs timeies test. They Wert to know jus win |) NU SOEs THE ORIGINAL CREAM SHAMPOO IN A TUBE
add some tea leaves? That won’t P-gp been followed for @ ligt was an act of indliscipline bp Pleas a ete hin ie sth they ; nn ae Aad COCBCBEEAOESOOEN EA SCBOEOE WEE con —
} . : : 7 ;
do. No, sirriee. But without milk (or cream)— a justified summary dismis- and urge him out of the village and 9y'8\) * Rand cast ea este resertnaiatenteacenpeecenesinta srr seiconipraresinaidhinbiapieesteba scacens eeeceeseiaieia tetera teleshesiaciascudbe race dassdaciay

To follow thé'rules prescribed ©M€-quarter or one-third of cup— back into the forest. When they “Across the water Rupert can see

’ LOVELIER SKIN IN 14 DAYS
ror 2 WOMEN OUT oF

4 he Paecs PALMOLIVE BEAUTY PLAN
aes -aoctonu purove tt!

so intimately yours
Thirty-nine

leading skin specialists have now com-
pleted 14-day tests of the “ Palmolive
Beauty Plan” on 1,384 women of all
ages and every type of skin. They _
report a definite, noticeable improve-
ment in the complexions of 2 women
out of 3 (supported by signed state-
ments by the women themselyes),

one-q' h a hill they pull him and push more island d f
to-day by the British Tea Centre, it isn’t tea. Or so the British say, 1 was a statement calculated fim, and he Rishi gaan Pian ethie monet wat G
gather around you the following Md they should know. to rouse most intense indignation they lead. There must be some Haig basse 1s tea Me oe :

One last word of warning: don’t
be found dead (at least by a
meticulous Briton) pouring fresh
tea into a cup containing the
dregs of a previous tea bout.

It just isn’t done, old boy?-~INS

—

Are You A

DAZZLER?

YOU

ma :
Supply of tea leaves (a more or
less essential ingredient).

One kettle for boiling water.

Ofe teapot.

One stop-watch,

Milk (or cream)

Ready now?

First, the teapot should be
warmed and rinsed thoroughly
with boiling water before insert-
ing the dry leaf.

Next, boil “freshly-drawn” water
in the kettle—water goes stale,
and once boiled should never be
used again. When the water “has
reached the point of bubbling
fiercely,” as the book says, snatch
the pot off the fire. Don’t waste
&@ second.

Now comes the really impor-
tant principle of tea-making—
what is known as “the short pour”
and reads as follows:

“Take the teapot to kettle and
not kettle to teapot.” This is fun-
damental because water should
reach the tea leaves as near boil-
ing point as possible.

in any man who had any self-
respect at all.

“Some element of discipline
must still prevail in every rela-
tion between master and ser-
vant,”"—ILN.S. ..



ib



tance apart as the lamp centres,

By taking a line to the wall
from the side of the car you can
check that they are truly ahead
and not pointing to one side.
Finally make sure that the dip-
ping device works, _

Spot or pass lamps must be
by law 2ft. above the ground,
And the beam should be checked
in the same way to di about
6in. in the 25ft. to your wall and
swing slightly -to the left, If it
is a flat—top; beam, you can
tilt the lamp slightly right to
allow for road camber.

Correctly set lights do mot
dazzle. Dipping is not compulsory
but wise and courteous,

Barrow D. 1 p.m, b
» —L.E.S.



cannot grumble about
being dazzled by approaching
headlights unless you are SURE
your own are not causing dazzle.

To check the setting of your
lights, put the car on level ground
about 25ft. from a wall or your
garage door. It must be truly
square to the wall,

Switch on the lights and see
where the beams strike the wall.
The centre of the illuminated
areas must not be higher than
the centre of the lamp. The two
centres must be the same dis—

doctors — including





“

These were among the improvements



reported ;
| os ON
ouvir © :
s . . e -
. . Less coats =" .
a Fewer Blemishes

By BOURJOIS

LIPSTICK
* HAIR CREAM

» « » « » Fresher, smoother

FACE POWDER + ROUGE + PERFUME

Hee 6 Brighter, clearer



Y

See what this Plan will do for your skin—in only 14 days!

If you would like your complexion to be as lovely as you have always hoped it could be,
try the “ Palmolive Beauty Plan.”. It’s so simple.

This is all you doz

%

>| =

Dw Ao PAST se thet Bmx ee on 3 now, while he sleeps... ’
other 80 sant! To ore you put the jar down, a) ub’s soothing vapours i i :

chase a cold in ble-quick VapoRub starts to relieve the warming pow = 1 Wess Jou fae « with Polmolioe Soap. Fs

time, just rub chest, throat cold in two ways: First, there's keep on fighting the co ae) Weg

and back at bedtime with a glow of warmth and comfort through the night. Bi 2 Massage its rich, olive-oil lather into your skin for one

soothing,
VapoRub. That's all you do! “draws out” congestion like a ;

Then watch VapoRub go to nice, warming poultice. Next, 3 :

work on that pee VapoRub’s medicinal vapours * Rinse. ~

—inhaled with every breath
—clear stuffy nose, soothe sore
throat and calm goughing...

Start now, continue for 14 days. And prove as the
doctors proved—that if you keep your skin cleansed
by Palmoliye’s beautifying olive-oil lather; you are
sure lOass : f

KEEP THAT SCHOOLGIRL COMPLEXION

of

"8
OVER 40 MILLION TIMES A YEAR!
ONE YOUNG MOTHER ¢t aid _anothe

over 40 million jars of Vicks V
colds double-qui h

chances with u
and time-tested .








PAGE EIGHT SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950
@





SL OOCPOOSOO SPOS OOO SOS S FSS |



ies and in respect of goods which in this |
case are obtainable elsewhere. i

oo
,

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown.
Sunday, October 15, 1950

NATURAL GAS
CORPORATION

DURING the time when the British
Union Oi] Company was searching for Oil
in Barbados, a reservoir of Natural Gas
was discovered on the lands of Turner’s
Hall plantation, and in recent years the
Company has distributed Natural Gas to
certain public institutions and to the Bar-
bados Gas Company for supplying private
consumers.

The Petroleum Act, 1950, vested the
property in Natural Gas in the Governor-
in-Executive Committee and provision was
made for compensation to be paid to lessors
and lessees of productive wells. In May
of this year the supply of Natural Gas was
threatened with cessation as a result of the
premature and inopportune proclamation
of the Act. When it was announced that
the Gulf Corporation, an American Oil
Company, had been granted a prospecting
licence over 50% of the island, negotiations
were begun between the Government and
the B.U.O.C, for that Company to take a
lease of the Natural Gas Wells at Turner’s
Hall in lieu 6f cash compensation. These
negotiations were unsuccessful and the
Government have had to seek for ways
and means of ensuring that there be no
interruption of the supply of Natural Gas.

On Tuesday last, a Bill was introduced
into the House of Assembly which seeks
to establish a corporation whose duty it
will be to run the Natural Gas Wells and
to maintain the supply to the public and
to public institutions. The Bill also pro-
vides for the compulsory acquisition of
the pipeline and fittings now the property
of the British Union Oil Co., with compen-
sations to be settled, in default of agree-
ment, by arbitration.





It is necessary for aconsideration of this
Bill that these two objects should be kept
separate. The establishment of a Corpora-
tion and the nationalisation of Natural Gas
is a logical development following on the
passing of the Petroleum Act. Members
of the Legislature may well have some un-
easiness at the thought that compensation
must be paid in cash but in view of the fact
that members have not seen fit to debate
the granting of a licence to an American

. Company even though the Oil resources of

concerned, and all those who ; Mr. Shepherd does not pay you MEN WHO

* tention if only in a negative ; F y'

belong to Corporation, d had concerned themselves with °°" the compliment of reading ‘the ||

should g the Corporation, an aiaediies tes ste bo. eclest a West t the question. Moreover. I gain- Way: He must now realise the newspaper to which he © ites LOVE THE
should be transferred to and vested in the mig Possline to select a West "D: Jed the impression that these *Meully he is up against in try” letters, or he would have read your BEST RUM
j Corporation at the earliest opportunity dian team to tour the Caribbean at the |two gentlemen could help, and I i a toe Whine that aie inevit issue of Wednesday the 28rd of

: ti the visiting Australian team |!00ked forward to their contribu- ahiy and vitally connected, even August last, on the front page of

4 Provision is therefore made for th eoee ae we ber. on : tions. never for one moment it indirectly } thanked him for which you printed’ in bold DEMAND

. 0 e playing each colony and a test match against {thought that it was necessar “ hhis reply to me and I trust that he {%€ Names of the members of the |

the British Commonwealth and Empire are
so scanty may mean that they consider the
resources of this island ‘sufficient to bear
such a burden. The Colonial Office must,
however, have known of this arrangement
for it is inconceivable that the Governor of
Barbados would have signed such a licence
without being authorised by, or having
received the permission of, the Colonial
Office.

Members of both branches of the Legis-
lature should study most carefully the
implications of such a step and should look
back and note how the original interfer-
ence through the Petroleum Act has
created the need for even greater inter-
ference. Those who regarded the Petro-
leum Act as merely an isolated instance of
Governmental interference are now un-
deceived. Each step towards socialism
makes the next step more irresistible or
inescapable. There must surely be some
agreement which the Government could
enter into with the British Union Oil Com-
pany by which their pipeline and equip-
ment could be made available to the use
of the Corporation until such time as the
conditions of sale could be agreed upon or
the Government obtain their equipment
elsewhere. Nor should Barbadians regard
this as a matter in which only the interests
of an English Company are involved. The
principle at stake affects the future secur-
ity of the property of every person living
in this island. In future, at any time when
Government seeks to purchase private
property the threat will overhang that in
the event of a failure to reach agreement
the omnipotent Legislature will be called
in to settle the matter in favour of the Gov-
ernment.

It is well for Barbadians to settle this
issue at an early stage for if this is not done
the force of circumstances and the course
of events will remove their freedom in the
matter.

Those who appeal to the people in the
name of freedom are often decried as
reactionaries. It is up to the people of Bar-
bados to decide whether such Legislation is
not the introduction of “Stalinism” to their
island.



AUSTRALIAN TOUR

THERE is no West Indian that would
not welcome a visit of an Australian cricket
Team to the Caribbean. Lovers of the
game have been nurtured on the names of
the great stars of the Antipodes and the
feats of Bradman, Woodful, Kippax, Mac-
artney in former days and those of Lind-
wall, Morris, Miller and Harvey are high-
ly commended in the Western Hemisphere
as those of our own talented players.

Twenty years ago the West Indies visited
Australia and although they were beaten
they were not disgraced and had the dis-
tinction of winning one test match. There
can. be no question tHerefore that common
courtesy lays an obligation on Australia to
play a return series on West Indian
wickets.

But however much West Indians may
wish to see Australian cricketers in action
yet they will be prepared to do nothing
which is likely to handicap West Indies
cricket now firmly established on the first
rounds of the ladder leading to world

THEY DO IT AGAIN AND AGAIN "weoenece
IN THE CLUB - ON ae

THE FIELD !,

Se

Sitting On The Fence

By NATHANIEL GUBBINS

H®= again are Mrs. Er-rerm-
er and Mrs. Urm-er-rer, who
can never ‘remember Poovey
names, at a political meeting.

Oh, there you are, Mrs. Er. .
Mrs. Er-rerm-er. So glad you've
come to swell the ranks of the
True Blues,

Thank you, Mrs. Um. . . Mrs.
Urm-er-rer. That’s exactly what
that busy little woman, Mrs.
Rerm-er-rer, said when I met her
selling something for something or
other outside the, front door.

Oh, no. That's not Mrs. Rerm-
er-rer. That’s Mrs... . Mrs.
Rumeer-rerm, She's selling home
knitted tea cosies for cannibals,
or rather to buy Bibles for canni-
bals, in the something archipelago.
Such noble work, as the vicar
said, especially as she gets chil-
olains hanging about in the cold.
Who's that very large woman who
was specially invited to occupy
two seats to keep out two heck-
lers?

Oh, that’s Mrs. . . . yes, Mrs.
Um-er-rer-er whose glands have
run amok according to Dr. Rer-
rerm-er-rer,

AD a tiring day, dear?
Hardly a wink of sleep.
It was the same yesterday. And
the day before. You'll have a ner-

- vous breakdown if you go on like

this.

If only they’d leave a guy alone.

I know, dear. That manager
again, I suppose?

Just when you’re dropping off
in he comes with his great flat
feet, shaking the room and taking
temperatures and askin’ how
you’re doin’ and I don’t know
what all. %

ae *

He's nothing but a slave-driver
dear. One of these days I shal
go straight to his office and give
him a piece of my mind.

Only this morning he said he
hoped I'd get lurnbago to see if
his durned blankets would cure it.

Why, Al, the man’s nothing but
a criminal, wishing sickness on
folks. He ought to be prosecuted
or something,

And just wher you're having
the swellest dreams he has to came
in and ask some fool questions or
turn off the hea. .o see if it wakes
you.

But it’s a swell job, sugar. And
the money’s good. And some day
I may get promotion to a double
bed. With you at my side, sweetie
pie. Of course.

Tomorrow you'll quit and find
a man’s job. A job which keeps
“bie awake all day, you great lazy

um.

Forward Glance

the population so that big houses |'
and little houses are in the same

and mufflers can mix freely with ||
chaps who wear bowler hats and | |
carry rolled umbrellas.

Herbert Morrison, hoping the |’

street and chaps who wear caps |

Park will be kept open after the | |
Festival of Britain is over, said, ||
“IT want people to be happy. I
want to hear peopte sing.”

T is 11 p.m. in No Quality-
street in the summer of 1960
The chap who wears his bowler
and carries his rolled umbrella to
eatch the 8.15 every morning is



working at some papers in his |”

study.

Outside, chaps in caps and muff-
lers who have been to the festival
and several other places are sing-

Establishea

RILONEUM

A RUBBER FLOOR COVERING
In 4 BEAUTIFUL PATTERNS
3 FEET WIDE @ $3.32 Yd.
SUITABLE FOR BATHROOM, PASSAGE
Or MOTOR CAR MATS Etc.
CALL AND SECURE YOURS EARLY

T. HERBERT Ltd.

10 & 11 Roebuck Street.

VALOR STOVES



1860



2, 3 and 4 BURNERS, with or without Canopies

64G STOVES

1 and 2 BURNER, with or without Oven Stands

OVENS, Small, Medium, Large
PRESSURE STOVES

at

& HAYNES CO., LTD.,
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

PHONES 4472 & 4687

WILKINSON



Incurporated
1926









models in 5, 12, 30 & 40 gals.
Also

HAIR DRESSING
EQUIPMENT

| DaCOSTA’S
ELECTRICAL DEPT.

=

~~

NOW IN STOCK

RAYPACKA

FOR OFFICE JACKETS

ANTON

WATER HEATERS





. fame : : < awe, ip ‘ ing “Sweet Adeline.” |
The Objects and Reasons of the Bill state Rete ite : : , ee I think you’re mistaken, Mrs. | You have many swell dreams,
’ bias bet: And with this as their main objective it |Er-rerm-er. That was Mrs. Um- Al, while you're working? that the negotiations between the Govern- would be well to examine the pros and |¢f-rer, who changed her doctor Some are pretty swell, I guess.

CLERICAL GOWNS

IN NAVY AND BLACK

54 in. at $192 per Yd.

DaCOSTA & Ce., Ltd.
DRY GOODS DEPT.

ment and the B.U.0.Co., having proved un-
successful, it was considered that the Gov-
ernment should proceed to undertake the
supply of Natural Gas under public owner-
ship. Even those who are opposed on prin-
ciple to nationalisation will be faced with
the fact that they must offer some alterna-
tive if the supply of Natural Gas is not to
be interrupted. Those who warned at the
time of the passing of the Petroleum Act
that the Legislature was introducing a dan-
gerous precedent: by tampering with pri-
vate rights, and ownership have proved
to be justified.

However much the establishment of a
Natural Gas Corporation may be unavoid-
able, in view of the circumstances which
have arisen, the further interference with
the rights of private ownership suggested
in this Bill are unnecessary and contrary
to all the principles which have guided
Legislation in years past. The Objects and
Reasons given for this step are stated as

follows:—“The Government have also °

been conducting negotiations with the
Company with a view to acquiring the
pipeline and other necessary equipment to
enable the recovery, distribution and sup-

ply of Natural Gas to be continued with- -

out interruption. The Company however,
is not willing to sell immediately such
pipeline and equipment. As it is intended
that this commodity should be carried on
as a Nationalised Industry, it is considered
essential that such pipeline and equipment

transfer to the Corporation of the pipeline
‘and equipment of the British Union Oil
Company Ltd,. and the vesting of such
pipeline and equipment in the Corporation
and the payment of compensation therefor.”
The Legislature is thus called upon to

s . ; + a companies should w
force the Company to sell their equipment matches. I had heard that Mr. Smythies need Pit oer _ pte creation of a Publier Uettes |
at a time which may seem to the Company However much West Indians may de- [iis Shot a Canadian, and that ‘be @ monster devouring all that it Sppears inane Cart of uer tains
injudicious and contrary to their best inter- sire to see the Australians in action it seems Mr. Rbepherd wee a retired Soli- comes across in the way of fat 7 must regard it as a misreading I}
‘ 5 . % ; : citor from British Guiana but per- salaries and revelling in its au- of what I wrote.
ests. Once again, the Legislature - taking that if they have the goodwill of cricket haps not a Guianese, ie. not born thority to compel people to do its !
upon itself the heavy responsibility of in the Caribbean at heart they must bow to lin B.G. 2 peld Ben the compli- bidding, without the fear of being Yours, sincerely, y+]
: 3 P x " ; oe ose sereape 4 Ment not only of asking their help held responsible for its actions. I A. E. S. LEWIS
interfering with rights that have been the inevitable and accept the, generous put of saying they enlivened your merely pointed out that the Board Bridgetow: |
recognised and acknowledged for centur- offer from the Antipodes, columns and enlightened your would be no bed of roses for any- 11th October, 1950 :
i
a i | ~ ole

cons of an Australian tour of the West
Indies. Although not necessarily the
principal objective of a tour the question
of financial success cannot be ruled out see-
ing that no type of sport to-day can be
undertaken unless adequate financial back-
ing is at the disposal of the authorities
governing the game. It is no secret that
West Indian grounds are not capable of
accommodating the huge crowds which
flock to Sydney, Adelaide, Brisbane and
Melbourne and it is also well known that
the Australian is financially able to pay
high entrance fees to see the game he
loves.

But financial considerations alone should
not influence the West Indian public. The
chances of success of their team are more
likely to tip the scales for or against a
second visit to Australia.

Cwing to the scattered nature of the
territcries in the West Indies our cricket-
ing talent meets but seldom and it is only
during an overseas tour that the West In-
dies are able to weld a team together that
is truly representative of the Caribbean.
During a tour of Engand or Australia they
have the opportunity of playing together
as a team against counties and states be-
fore meeting the full might of England or
Australia in Tests. Here in the West In-
dies they come together as individuals who
meet, for the most part for the first time in
a test, and it takes no cricket genius to
understand that the best results cannot be

‘ obtained under such conditions.

Australia in each centre, But such an ar-
rangement would reduce the number of
times that the Australians would play and
it is hardly likely that a team from the
Antipodes would be prepared to travel
thousands of miles only to play eight










because he advised her to stop
eating cakes in the cafes instead
of prescribing injections and
special corsets under the National

ealth. Who is the chief speaker
tonight?

I believe it’s Sir Charles
Urm-er . . . yes, it’s Sir Charles
Urm-er-urm something who was
so lucky to get his knighthood be-
fore he was divorced and hounded
out of his club for running off
with a club waitress.

Really? I thought it was Sir
William . . . Sir William some-
thing-urm-something who had
arthritis and ran off with his
nurse. That is, if you can run very
far with arthritis.

Well, we shall soon find out, As
I’m looking after an old Scottish
lady, Mrs. MacEee-er-rerm-ee,
who is stone deaf but likes to
keep in touch, I hope you'll par-
don me if I leave you now Mrs.

r Mrs, Urm-er-er.

Granted as soon as asked, Mrs.
BV: is Mrs. Er-rerm-er.

Earn While You Sleep

Manufacturers of electrically
heated blankets in America are
employing men to sleep in lux-
ury beds for eight hours a day

taken and other reactions noted.

Public Utilities

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—When I elected to solicit
the assistance of Mr. R. E.
Smythies and Mr. C, E. Shepherd
in the matter of developing and
ae the point I made about
wages disputes and the proposed
Public Utilities Board I was most
enuine, because I felt sure the
iscussion would help all those

y to
go into the A.B.C. of details with
them or to give .an al
sketch of the circumstances lead-
ing up to the introduction of the
Bill or the discussion on it and
the way the voting on it went, to
get the best out of them on a point
of view they had apparently over-
looked.

while their temperatures are’

Some ain’t.

What are the svvell ones about?

Why, sometimes I kick the win-
ning goal in a football game.
Sometimes I’m having dinner with
President Truman, putting him
straight on world affairs. And
sometimes I’m on Palm Beach, ly-
ing in the sun with some of the
cutest little dames in America.

Do you ever see me on Palm
Beach, Al?

y, no, honey. I think it’s a
well known fact that a man don’t
dream about his wife. It ain’t
natural,

Why not, Al?

Well, sugar, dreams ain’t real,
are they? And you can’t say a
wife ain’t real. No ma’am., Not on
your life.

* * +

Is there any special dream girl
you see-on Palm Beach, Al?

I'll say there is. And is she a
sweetheart? Soft brown curls.
Honey coloured eyes. And a voice
like a lot of little tinkling bells.
Yeah, Little tinkling bells.

You'll hand in your notice to-
morrow, Al.

Aw, don’t get steamed up about
a dream, sugar. A man’s entitled
to dream about anything.

He ain’t entitled to dream about
a hussy like that.





Cap and Muffler.
I say, don’t you think it’s a bit
ine for this sort of thing?
ue

I mean I can’t concentrate with
all this noise going on. I have
some work to do.

Work? You?

Of course, it’s a different kind
of work. I mean I don’t work with
my hands,

Ark at im, boys. He don’t work
with is ands. Nor does is toffee
nosed old woman,

a *

old woman, ‘
Who can’t soil er ands with th
washin? Mrs. Bowler At. Who gits
my old woman to serub er floors?
Mrs. Bowler At. Who can’t polish
er own front door andle? Old
toffee nosed Mrs. Bowler At.
_ May I remind you that my wife
is in bed trying to get some sleep?
Listen, boys. Old Toffee Nose is
trying to get a bit of sleep after a
long day doin sweet Fanny Adams.
What about a lullaby for old Mrs.
Toffee Nose, boys?
If you don't go away I shall be
obliged to telephone for the police.
A lullaby for old Mrs. Toffee
Nose, boys, Altogether, boys. 1
out the barrel... .

—LES.



OUR READERS SAY

readers, whether or not one agreed
with them. What more could I do
by way of being kind, courteous
and complimentary to two men
presumably older than myself and
who had evinced an interest in
legislation I have the honour to
take a part in shaping, even al-
though I disagree with it in prin-
ciple.

Mr. Smythies replied promptly
and was helpful in proving my

did not mind my little joke of a
play on his name. I have an idea
he will not.

I confess to acute disappoint-
ment in finding that Mr. Shepherd
when faced with the task of de-
fending his case resorted to the
tactics traditional with those

one, as sooner or later the Com-
panies would blame it for restrict-
ing wages by controlling profits
and if adjustment was sought and
granted then the Consumers would
blame it for increasing rates. In
other words, conditions are sure to
arise where it would have the em-
ployees at its throat at one stage
and the consumers or clients in its
throat at another. For this reason
I said the Companies should wel-
come the Board, and it is signifi- |}
cant that none of them has public- |
ly protested against setting it up



House who voted for and against
the second reading of the Bill, to-
gether with your reporter’s ac-
count of the debate. Mr. Shepherd
does not even read carefully
newspaper letters to which he re-
plies, because he starts off his re- ||
ply to me by saying that I asked
“whether the employees of these



Festival Gardens in Battersea |
{
{
\
\
}
)

*
I shall be obliged if you will not
refer to my wife as a toffee nosed

FOR YOUR PLEASURE!

GODDARD'S
‘GOLD BRAID RUM

— AND —

“GOLD
BRAID ”








SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15,

1950



475 Million Chinese
Want Freedom

From
By James

: NEW YORK, Oct.
Vice Admiral Oscar C. Badger,
U.S.N., recognized as an expert
on China, declared to-day that
right now Communist China has
“a choice between peace and war
with its neighbours.”
, in his opinion, is at the
crossroads—facing two paths.
The well-informed, blunt
speaking, 59—year-old Admiral put
it this way in an interview with
International News Service:

“China can maintain an aggres-
sive attitude toward its neighbour
countries in the Far East.

“Or on the other hand, she can
permit Ker neighbour countries to
recover economically, under a
sense of security. China can do
this by properly assessing the
American attitude which is being
directed toward helping these
smaller countries to a freer and
better way of life.”

The attitude of Communist
China toward Formosa and such
countries as Burma, Indo-China,
Tibet, Indonesia and Thailand, can
prove “a vital factor’ involving
world peace, in the Admiral’s
opinion.

Significantly, Admiral Badger
pointed out, the Island of Formosa
with a population of about that of
Australia, is staging a remarkable
ecnomic come-back with the
assistance and co-operation of the
United States.

This news of Formosa’s recov-
ery is seeping back to China. It
is a “seed” that may grow, accord-
ing to the Admiral, and small
countries — such as Korea, after,
unification — could also recover
economically and industrially if
permitted a feeling of security’
against the threat of aggression.

China, with its vast population
of something like 475,000,000 peo-
ple, is anxious to attain economic
security after years of turmoil and
poverty, in his opinion.

He said that great nation is by
no means in full sympathy with
the Mao Tse-Tung regime. He
added that plenty of anti-Com-
munist sentiment exists in China
to-day.

All peoples of the Far East, in

al Badger’s opinion, are
weary of warfare and are yearn-
ing for economic recovery, for
— liom and for a better way of

e,

Quite firmly, the Admiral
declared:

“The answer to peace in the
world is freedom from fear.’

‘ne cause of tear, which stems
from aggression, “must be eradi-
cated” from the peoples of the
world, the Admiral said, and the
drain on governmental expendi-
tures, by countries that fear
present aggression, must be cut
down if the world is to go for-
ward.

“Unless this is accomplished,”
Admiral Badger continued, ‘“we
are likely to see responsible and
friendly governments fail. They
will be subjected to criticism from
within and to propaganda from
without.

“They would be destroyed by
propaganda and the result would
be continued unrest in the world.”

Admiral Badger’s duties today
are far removed from the South
Pacific and the Far East he knows
so well,

He is now commander of the
Eastern Sea Frontier and the
Atlantic reserve fleet, with head-
quarters in New York City.

His responsibility on naval mat-
ters extends from the Rocky
Mountain region to the Atlantic
seaboard and as far south as the
Caribbean. His command involves
1,956 naval activities in seven
naval districts, including off shore
security.

Admiral Badger was one of the
outstanding admirals operating in
the South Pacific during World
War II. He has had numerous
commands and was awarded
practically all the decorations his
government could bestow.

In October, 1944, he served as
tactical commander of heavy
striking forces of the Third Fleet.
On that assignment he command-
ed a_ battleship-cruiser-destroyer
force which, in January, 1945,
attacked Iwo Jima.

Later he participated in the
occupation of Okinawa, and in
strikes against the Japanese home
islands of Kyushu, Shikoku, Hon-
shu, and Hokkaido.

ooenrerrâ„¢ SOCOPOSS OSS OO POO SOPOT.
+

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GOS COS SESS 9095900050000"

Fear

Six Stops
Too Many

By EUNICE SAVOURY
ST. JOHN’S, Antigua.

No sooner up than down is the
latest situation in air travel be-

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

WHEN an American professor
announced that he had adopted a
baby chimpanzee and was bring-
ing it up under exactly the same
conditions as his ten-months-old

Whatever Became Of?

tween Barbados and Antigua. The son just to see how they compared

That was 19 years
Now reader J. I. Eagle, of Lei-

L. Kilgallen same arrangement exists for pas- menially, it mate big news in the
sengers from Trinidad to St. Kitts Daily Express.
and vice versa. Actually the fiight 480.
After the war — in February from Piarco to Golden Rock with

1948—the blunt, bushy-eyebrowed six intermediate stops takes at C°Ster, wants to know what hap-

former task force
reported for duty as commander,
naval forces—Western Pacific.
As the senior naval and mili-
tary officer in that active area, he
was the direct representative of

commander least an hour longer than a hop
although it has
the advantage of being less than

to New York
half the distance.

ve Most people, even bad sailors,
the joint chiefs of staff and was at one time or another enjoy a to

pened. “Did the human infant
tinist up as America’s leading
steeple jack and did the chimp get
through Yale?” he asks.

My inquiries show that the pfc -
fessor Dr. W. N. Kellogg, of
Florida State University, managed
keep the experiment going for

responsible for naval participation sea voyage stopping at the Lee- nine months.
and

in support of national policies in
the China area, Those responsibili-

American citizens and interests
that part of the world.

“I made about 200 flights into
various parts of China,” he casu-
ally remarked.

It is a wonder Admiral Badger
talks so earnestly about China
and her future. His activities

ward Windward

Islands

The chimp, a female called Gua,

I t where in an hour the main streets was dressed in baby clothes, slept
ties included the protection of of their little towns can be scru- in a bed, used the same toys and

in tinized. Somehow the very thought ate practically the same food as
of descending from the heavens on

d, the baby boy. She got

to little man made strips of grey Precisely the same instruction and

pastures, each within a few hours,
holds no appeal to the majority.
It sounds good to be able to say 4;

the same amount of affection.
The professor and his wife

worked in shifts to record the ac-

vities of both babies continuous-

that you have set foot on all of ly from 7 a.m. to 6.30 p.m. every

the isiands, but there are many
were so widespread with the vari- Of Us who have never done so,

day.
Throughout the experiment the

ous Chinese and other officials in 294 are quite content to avoid the chimp was generally in advance

China that he developed an ex:
knowledge of the over-all situation
in that far-flung country.

In September, 1949, he reported
to the Navy Department and
served in a special capacity as
consultant and technical adviser
to the various departments of the
government regarding Far Eastern
affairs. He was regarded by many
as “a second Barney Baruch”
insofar as the high value of his
advice was concerned.

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

1 hope that in answering
inquiries you're making it
quite clear that the whole
thing is entirely sncmiiat and
directly contrary to agreed
policy of the union?”



“The economic recovery of
Formosa is becoming well-known
in China,” Admiral Badger said.
“Tt could be significant in affecting
the political thinking of China and
other countries in the Far East.”

He pointed out that Formosa
was severely damaged during
World War II. But since 1945,
Formosa has been coming back.
In 1945, he said, Formosa’s power
capacity was only 20 per cent of
what it once was, and its rice and
sugar crops had fallen off almost
as much,

The Island’s economic comeback
was due, he said, to American
co-operation and the policies of
General Chiang Kai-Chek in sup-
porting the establishment of a
popular democratic government
under the able leadership of the
highly-respected Governor K. C.
Wu, a graduate of Princeton and
a former mayor of Chung King
and Shanghai.

The result has been that money
the Formosa government used to
spend for defence is now going
for peaceful pursuits and indus-
trial development with the result
the Island is enjoying unusual
prosperity.

“The establishment of popular
and representative government in
Formosa is largely due to the
economic aid provided by _ the
United States under the E.C.A.”
said Admiral Badger. “It is being
applied in a business-like and
effective fashion.

“The fundamental key to peace
is economic. A good economy
makes for a contented people.
Peace and prosperity is the best
way to counteract propaganda.

Admiral Badger lives at quar-
ters at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.
He is the father of two daughters,
and his eyes gleam when he talks
fondly about his six grandchil-
dren. He is much sought after as
speaker at luncheons and dinners
a speaker at luncheons and din-
ners in the New York area.

eo PPS SS SOS

; > 550999 SSSSSSSSSSSSSS9SS SSG OSSOOSOS
y ;
LLLP PLP ELE LPPPPAS

‘

opportunities of such an experi-
ence for a mere twenty minutes.

Businessmen wish to reach their
destination as quickly as possible
and are generally bored with what
they consider wasting a quarter
of an hour at an airport where
there is little or no chance of even
putting through a telephone call
to the city, as the islands involved,
either have no telephone service,

or a very poor one which will -

exhaust anybody’s patience.

Pleasure travellers whether or
not they frequent the air regular-
ly often express the feeling that
they intensely dislike ‘the going
up and the coming down’, more
particularly they dread the ‘com-
ing down’. There are, of course,
many people who get a tremen-
dous thrill out of flying whether
it be smooth or rough and they
are equally capable of deriving
considerable amusement out of
the various actions of passengers
and porters while there is slight
delay at islands; their uncommon
dialects of English’ or French
neither of which are easily un-
derstandable are worth hearing.

Very short flights are no longer
as enjoyable as say, a hop from
Antigua to Barbados, where it is
nearly always possible to attain
a height of nine thousand feet
soaring above the clouds in a nip-
py atmosphere,

Nowadays it is unlikely that an
altitude of more than four thous-
and feet is reached between the
islands of St. Lucia, Martinique
and Gaudeloupe, and the air is
usually warmer. Opportunity of
experiencing a few bumps and a
fallen stomach is always probable.
Vegetation on these three islands is
similarly beautiful with their ups
and downs of green mountains
and valleys but the traveller with
plugged ears has little time to
gaze on their splendour while his
anticipated ups and downs of the
noisy aeroplane plays the leading
role in his imagination.

The atiructive stewardess pro-
ceeds up and down the aisle offer-
ing reading matter which is polite-
ly accepted and nine times out of
ten never read while thoughts
glide back to the persistent hum
or recollections of anxiety cre-
ated by repeated starting and
stopping of engines.

B.O.A.C. Lead
£2,500,000
Race

JOHANNESBURG.
Big redistribution of traffic on
the BOAC South African Airways



of the child both physically and
mentally, When they played to-
gether Gua was nearly always the
leader, | Donald the imitator

& *

The ape put up the better
performance in intelligence tests.
In experiments in which the sub-
ject sat behind a wire screen and
had to manipulate a hoe to drag
an apple within reach Gua was
always brighter. The chimp sel-
dom spilled her food when using
spoon, but Donald often turned
his spoon upside-down when put-
ting it into his mouth.

rofessor Kellogg summed up
the ape’s ability by saying that
when it was one year old it had
the mental power of at least a
one-year-old child, the agility of
a four-year-old, and the strength
of an eight-year-old.

Donald at 20 is now doing ex-
ceptionally well as a medical
student. Gua died of pneumonia
a year after the experiment. But
the insuperable drawback that an
ape’s intelligence stops developing
when it is about three years old
would have prevented it getting
through Yale anyway.



Chapman Pincher



FOR EXAMPLE, the
boy who was to grow
up with an ape...

Is It True?

Another scientific project whieh
caused a great stir when it was
announced and has hardly been
heard of since was Sir Oliver
Loage’s arrangement for proving
the truth of spiritualism by com-
municaung with his friends after
he was dead.

Sir Olver a brilliant scientist
who died in 1940, left a sealed
envelope with the Society for
Psychical Research.

The scientists in charge of the
experiment were forbidden to open
the envelope until some reputable
person came forward with a trust-
vorthy claim to have received a
message from Sir Oliver revealing
what is in the envelope. Opening
the envelope would then show i!
the claim were taue,

In the Society’s view no trust-
worthy claim has yet been made
So after 10 years the envelope
remains unopened,

Blow Me Down
What became of the crop of
pre-war inventors who claimed
they could bring down bombers
just by blowing air at them, a



Mr. Butler
Be “Prime

Says Trinidad

Wants To
Minister”

Correspondent

A NEW ERA in Trinidad’s political life will be ushered
in under the new Constitution when the opening session o1
the Trinidad Legislative Council takes place on October 20,
As compared with 18 members in the old House, twenty-siv

members will form the new

body. Eighteen were elected in

the recent General Elections, in which the voters were

openly bribed,

Some candidates even resorted
to obeah and voagoo practices in
an effort to win! There were 142
candidates, most of them attracted
solely by the salary of $320.00 per
month, Illiterate voters were in
the majority, and for them sym-
bols had to be put on the ballot

papers.
Prominent leaders, and many
of the “common people,” have

since expressed the view that
Trinidad and the West Indies gen-
erally are not nearly ready for the
grant of Adult Suffrage, but it
has been granted, and so, must
stay.

Those electea include, Mr. Tubal
Uriah “Buzz” Butler, notorious
leader of the underprivileged with
five followers; l-stone Hon.
Albert Gomes, who led the sugar
delegation to the United Kingdom
a few months ago. and Mr, Ray-
mond Quevedo, a Port-of-Spain
City Councillor and Calypsonian
known as “Attila the Hun,”

Governor Rance has sent writ-
ten invitations to members of the
Bufler Party to visit him at Gov-
ernment House individually and

Springbok air route will be dis— privately. So far, only Councillor

cussed soon,

It involves huge Ashford Sinanan has paid a call

spending and a clash of interests at Government House, The others

between international airlines.

do not object to going, but held it

A Dutch delegation will visit more desirable that His Excellen-

South Africa in November to dis-
cuss air transport problems,

cy should see them collectively.
Sir Hubert has now nominated
five to the Council, four of them

BOAC SAA want to readjust retiring members, one a woman.
the Springbok route. The Dutch Oil, sugar and commerce are re-

line, KLM, have carried about half presented. With

three official

of the passenger traffic since the members, these will form a solid

war, 80 per cent of it between

Britain and South Africa.

When BOAC SAA had uncom-
petitive aircraft, KLM operated

fast pressurised Constellations.

At one time their two weekly
airplanes carried more passengers

than the Springbok service’s six.
Now SAA _ Constellations

pressurised,

African partnership will

traffic,

Britain.

on international air routes,



04
PSR eee .29 cent. 3
-o8. tins ..... isin bau istareey ¢ .50
JUICE—20-0z. tins 31
Bia See 2.50
.00
00
4.00 annually. If KLM have to give up Mr. Butler
TALE SHERRY—per bot. 4.90
Spat ge BH 1.16 major improvement in
teen .60 balance sheets.—L.E.S.
Sd
TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
ae 3 le @ lb KENZEL ALARM CLOCKS
The Best Clocks Made
$4.00 Each
* 32 COL1 AUTOMATIC
PISTOL ........ $40.00

at
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE



and
BOAC Hermes are wiping’ out the
disparity. They are all fast and
ane ae ignored his “rights” as leader of

November be able to absorb all

In KLM’s case it is felt they would be unworkable,
have right to fly to South Africa Would cost the Governor his job.
for passengers destined only for r le
Holland or beyond, but not for Minister.





Government bloc of eight, which,
together with five or six moder-
ates, should be able to “hold” Mr.
Uriah Butler and the other “wild
men,” and so prevent any irre-
sponsible legislation.

Taking a leaf out of Mr, Alex-
ander Bustamante’s book, Mr.
Butler has already begun to
threaten the Governor, whom he
referred to as “Citizen Rance,”
He said that if the Governor,

the only party returned to power,
he (Mr. Butler) would make the
Government so rancid that it
and it

Mr. Butler wants to be “Prime
His party has an-
nounced that it is in favour of the

Free competition is not allowed ‘ationalisation of the sugar indus~

and try. vo fh 4
certain principles about end-to-
end traffic — such as between October 20, the Speaker will be
Britain and South Africa—are Mr.
involved. As Holland is at neither born ex-judge. By secret ballot,
end, BOAC SAA is likely to re- it will choose five of the elected
strict KLM to what they regard inembers to be members of the
as legitimate traffic—about 20 perExecutive Council, It will be re-

When the new House meets on

William Savary, Trinidad-

called that Mr. Chanka Maharah,
member of the Legislative Coun-

Last year BOAC SAA carried cil, at a meeting on Tuesday night,
7,108 passengers on the Spring- stated that Mr. Butler will be put-
bok service; KLM carried 6,820. ting forward the following candi-
Total traffic is worth £2,500,000 dates for the Executive Council:

himself, Mr. Mitra

a part of this, there would be aSinanan, Mr. Victor Bryan, Mr.

BOAC A. P.T. James and Mr.

Kumar, the last three of whom to the Party.
oe





are not acknowledged members
of the Butler Party.

The Moderates in the Legisla-
tive Council have also had their
meetings and arranged voting
plans, and it is expected that they
will return more than one candi-
date to the Executive Council.
This Cabinet will consist of nine
members—the five mentioned,
three officials (The Colonial Secre-
tary, The Attorney General, and
the Financial Secretary), and one
to be nominated by the Governor
It is almost certain, therefore, that
most of its members will be mod-
erates,

After the Executive Council is
complete, Governor Rance if he
desires, may choose up to five
“Ministers” to take charge of de-
partments, Some “Ministers” may
have more than one department.

This is the set-up for Trinidad’:
next step along the road toward:
self rule. The experiment will be
anxiously watched in the Carib-
bean and indeed throughout the
Empire.

Butlerites
Invited To
Govt. House

For Private Interviews

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN.

His Excellency Governor Rance
has sent written invitations to
members. of the Butler Party
elected to seats in the Legislative
Council to visit him at Govern«
ment House, individually and
privately. They are Mr. Tubal
“Buzz” Butler, Mr, Mitra G,
Sinanan, Mr, Pope McLean, Mr,
Ashford Sinanan, Mr. Stephen
Maharaj. Cre

Members of the Party have not
refused, but held it more desirable
that he should see them collec.
tively. Members of the Party
held a meeting at the office
Mr. Mitra Sinanan, their leg
adviser, an elected member for
Caroni South, Present at this
meeting were Mr, Ranjit Kumar,
Mr. Aubrey James and Mr, Ray-
mond Quevedo.

Mr. Tubal Uriah Butler, Presi
dent of the Home Rule Party,
and member elected for the St,
Patrick West constituency, told
the “Gazette” on Wednesday,
“Mum's the word,” when he was
being quizzed in connection we
the statement made by a membe
of his Party, Mr. Chanka Maharaj,
at a meeting on Tuesday night,

Mr. Maharaj voiced disap,
proval at Mr. Butler’s announce -
ment that he (Mr, Maharaj;
will not be allowed. to in
the Council, but only to véte, and
that: the only two to speak would
be he, Mr. Butler himself, and

Ranjit Mr. Mitra Sinanan, legal adviser





aoe ee ee a ne ee eee nee
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reader asked. After examining
documents only recently brought
off the secret list | find that two
of the inventors managed to in-
terest the German Army sufficient-
ly to get their gadgets built and
tester.

One gadget was a huge bent
tube designed to shoot a high-
speed “plug” of air. It would
break inch-thick boards at a
range of 225 yards, buy’ when
tried against low flying Allien
vircraft it proved useless.

The second ‘ gadget—the brain
ehild of an Austrian called Dr
Zippermeyer—was built to pro-
ject miniature Vornadoes at air-
planes, ‘

When it went off it was ex-
pected to start up a fast-moving
whirlpool of air which would suck
the wings off bombers.

Dr. Zippermeyer managed vo
froduce some whirlpools, But
'o planes came down.

Groundnut Wool

Like seven readers who have
written in, I have lost sight of the
wonderful synthetic woot which
scientists made from groundnuts.

t found that experiments have
fone so well that a £2,000,00¢
facvory has been built near
Dumfries to start producing the
“wool” next spring.

Using only the waste leit af er
the margarine fat has beet
extracted from the groundnuts
he factory will eventually make
30,000 tons of moth-resistant
syuthetic wool every year,

The manufacturers are satisfied
they can market it at about ¢
Gaarter the price of sheep's wool
They are even satisfied they can
gxet the groundnuts,

The Ticking Man

My final readers’-request in
quiry was into the Strange Case
of the Ticking Man which hap-
pened way back in 1938,

According to newspaper cut-
tings 19-year-old Mr. Edwarr
Franklin of Coventry suddenly
developed a ticking noise in hi:
cars. It was so loud that others
eculd’ hear ft “People witting
near-me in the cinema think 1!
im carrying a time-bomb,” he
told reporters, Doctors were

baffled by the noise but could do
nothing to Sop it

Now at 31 Mr. Franklin 4s still
tiecing as leudly as ever and still
avuids going to the pictures
But Vhe doctors

are no longer

baffled by the cause, They say

he has a slight nervous defect in

the throat which makes his soft
palate vibrate rapidly,

This echoes up che tubes leading

to his ears and keeps him ticking
over,



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PAGE TEN

King

Will Open New

But Can’t Go In

iy THOMAS

LONDON
King George VI will formally
open the re-built House of Com-
mons October 26—but constitu-
tionally he will not be allowed to
set foot within it
The Opening ceremony will be
in the nearby old Westminster
Hall and the King will declane the
chamber open Within a few feet
of the spot where King Charies I
was sentenced to death in 1649 for
a violation of the ancient privi-
leges of the House < mmons.
The old House of Commons was

destroyéd y German bombers
May 10; 1941. The new house has
been constructed as a replica of






SSOT including the

yuate number of seats,
37, tor the 625 members, but with
me modern improvements.

Inte Westminster Hall will be
crowae@d:aitthe leading officers of
state, including the Lord Grand
Chamberlain, the Speaker of, the
House of Commons, the Lord High

Chancellor, peers and prelates
from the House of Lords and the
“honourable and faithful members
of the Commons.”

In addition, there will be a
special portion set aside for the
eakers from the Dominion Pav-

pré

me i




liaments. Speakers from New
Zealand. Australia and Canada ee
already in England for the ceree
mony. ’

When the ceremony is conclud-
the King will leave. The House
Commons mace (“Cromweli's

Rauble”) will pe @roduced and

ithe Speaker will head the stately

procession to the new House of

Commons, to finish off the business

of t session pending -the State

Opening of the new session sche-
dule xr October 31.

‘sual prayer will be offered

th the members, conforming to
turning their faces to

wall The “distinguished
sirangers” —~ ambassadors, peers,
princes and Commonwealth

Speakers. -will then be admitted

together with the Press. Once

again the famed chamber will be
en and functioning,

Equipped very much on the
sare lines as the old chamber, the
new House will retain many of its
old disadvantages, but these will
be partially offset by the installa-
tion of new and scientific lighting,
heating and acoustic apparatus.

The disadvantage that has been
sedulously retained is that the new
chamber will accommodate only
437 out of the 625 elected mem-
bers., Those who have not been
able to snatch a seat will have to
take their informal standing posi-
tions behind the “bar” of the
House. The “bar”, as far as the
chamber is concerned, is a narrow
strip of carpet over which none
but members may step.

Even the King's representative,
“Gentlemen Ushers of the Black
Rod,” must remain outside this
strip. os

One new feature in the House
is the Churchill Arch which forms
the entrance to the members
lobby from tbe public dobby., This
was constructed from” the stones
from the old building and was
placed theré as a memorial to the
wartime Prime Minister.

Goering’s bombers did_ their
destructive task with efficiency.
The old chamber—fortunately not
in use at the time—was completely
burnt out. The old despatch boxes
on the Speaker’s table thumped
with vigour, anger and triumph
by a succession of Prime Minis-
ters from Gladstone onwards,
have been replaced by boxes fron
New Zealand.

In fact, every Dominion and
Colony of the British Empire has
contributed something to the em-
bellishment of the new chamber.
Australia presented the new
Speaker’s chair, while Zanzibar
gave a magnificently decorated ash

i: tray—but this will find a place in

ed

the

the members’ smoking room

~ ‘The new chamber will be higher
than the old one and above iis
ceiling and below its floors will be
rooms for the officers of the House
and for Ministers and their secre-
taries.

In appearance the new chamber
like the old one is cf a Gothic
character, Gothic architecture is
now openly derided by the mod-
erns, but the new chamber had to

nferm to the old, Suggestions
for a chamber on the lines.of the
continental and American pattern

ere reiected,

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Cc. WATSON

There was almost unanimity for
he small chamber rigidly divided
to two sections—the section on
the right hand of the Speaker re-
served for Governmental members
ind left for opposition members.
The benches as in the old house
are of green hide, comfortably
padded

The designers of the old cham-
ber made a great and impressive
show of the heavy oak panelling,
redolent of the Victorian era. Oak
panelling predominates in the new
chamber. Instead of the heavy
unimpressive evenness of the old
chamber the panelling of the new
one is varied with alternating lay-
ers of oak of differing hues.

Most important of all from the
members’ point of view is the air
conditioning of the new building.
Nearly a century ago the air cool-
ing and hing of the chamber
was considered something unique
in building. Then the air was
pumped through the floor and thus
carried with it all the dirt and dust
brought in on the members’ shoes.
The ducts led onto the nearby
Thames.

This once led to a sudden ad-
journment of the House when a
sewage barge’ inadvertently
dumped its refuse near the ter-
‘ace of Parliament. .

in the new chamber clean air
unters frors the sides ‘through
ducts immediately under the gal-
leries and the old air is expelled
through holes in the roof. It is
hoped by this means to produce an
atmosphere of a fine spring day.
The air will be cleaned automati-
eally and the volume of new air
adjusted so as to provide 1,500
cubic feet per hour for every oecu-
pant of the Chamber.

Although Hitler’s Junkers and
Heinkels blasted the old chamber
into eternity, memories are still
alive on the many stirring scenes
enacted within its richly embell-
ished walls. There are still alive
today a few who heard the verbal
duels between Gladstone and Dis-
raeli, There are also many wno
remember the historic battles of
the rebellious Irish members who
relentlessly filibustered the ordin-
ary Parliamentary routine in order
to get their country’s freedom de-
bated,

There is the occasion of Lloyd
George’s budget taxing the land
and inheritances. Thrice it was re-
jected by the House of Lords with
the upshot that the House of Lords
was reformed and their veto lim-
ited to non-financial legislation.

Within the writer's memory
there is pictured’the sombre scene
in August, 1914, when Sir Edward
Grey amid deathly silence an-
nounced that “lights of Europe
were burning low” and then the
inevitable declaration of war on
the Kaiser's Germany.

Twenty-five years later an
equally distraught Prime Minister,
Neville Chamberlain, glowered at
the Labour opposition and uttered
the words, “We are now at war
with Germany,” but only after he
had told the world the dread news
aver the radio,

The day before he had been
taunted by Arthur Greenwood.
then leader of the Labour Party,
with “this tension must cease”
after Chamberlain had declined to
give the House the assurance that
there would be no further appease-
ment with Hitler.

King Edward's abdication scenes
also remain a vivid memory—-
Churchill being howled at and
jeered into silence by the “loyal
and honourable members” when
he merely suggested that “no pre-
cipitate action should be taken‘
without first consulting this
House.”

Then the fateful day when
Premier Stanley Baldwin smirking
in triumph asked the House's
attention with a “message from
the King written in his own
hand,” It was the three paragraph
“instrument of abdication” which
he read to a bewildered House.

Another historic scene occurred
in 1920 when a trim, sedate little
figure, dwarfed on the one side
by long, lean gangling Arthur
Balfour and on the other by
Lloyd George, walked in unison
the length of the gangway to take
her oath as the first woman mem-
ber of Pariiament to take her seat.
Tt was Lady Astor's introduction

eee








Dummy Detector

° 4 s 2
Aids Atom Training

Firemen training for defence
agains’ atom warfare can now
use a “home-made” dummy de-
tegtor. It has been made from
pieces of war surplus equipmen?
by Mr. R. A. Wilson and Mr. A. F
White, both graduates of the
Institution of Fire Engineers.

Iv includes a dummy probe, «
loudspeaker and instrument panet,
mgst of the apparatus being con-
tained in a wooden box,

Two men use the equipment.
While the firemen being trained
pags the probe around a spor
being tested for radio activity,
the instructor regulates a click~
in, noise,

he rate varies from about five
a minuie to almost continuous
clieking.

When the probe passes over a
predetermined ‘‘radio-active” spot
the clicking rate is adjusted to
the same as would be heard on an
actual detector.—L.E'8,



SWEDES SEEK
THEIR FORTUNE

(From Qur Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN,
The seven-ton yacht “Fia” ar-
rived in Trinidad on Monday eve-
ning with 18 persons on board
beund for Venezuela, to start a
“new page in their lives.” “We
are out to seek our fortunes there”,
said a few of them when they
landed, There were three women
and three children, The vessel,
under the command of Mr. Hen-
rick Karem Pentti, who is a Finn,
left Sweden in July, and made
calls at Holland, France, England,
Spain and Portugal, The men
said that they were refugees who
are among a large number, desir-
ous to get out of the country as
they are fed up with the Com-
munist rulers. There is great
suffering in the Baltic countries,
and the people are anxious to get
out so that they may live in
peace. On board are electricians,
clothes manufacturers and me-
chanics.

moments during the World War

II. Particularly intrusive on the
memory was the blackest day of
the war. Narvik had been lost,

the French army cut to ribbons!

Ae

and grave doubts as to whether
the British army could be extrac-
ted from France. Prime Minister
Chamberlain had to take the rap.

odd votes the non-confidence
motion, nonetheless he thought it

expedient to hand over the reins,

of Government to a coalition, and

the only coalition the Labour |®

Party members would serve under
would be one led by Winston
Churchill,

Thereupon Churchill took the!

helm and in his first address

shivered the spines of members |

with his famous speech offering
only “tears, blood and sweat.”

be reliving scenes in their mem-
ory.

to the House,
There were many dramatic
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Although he survived by ninety’

On October 26, some M.P’s will’

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



O
a



preMLOrre





Butlerites Face Party Split

(From Our London Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN.
Early in the fight, the But)
Party is already on the “split
point”. Mr. Chanka Maharja. + -
elected member of the Legislative
Couneil for the St. Joseph Cons. -
tueney, vold a large gathering
last night that Mr. Uriah Bux,
Butler does not want him to hay?
any say in the Legislative
Council, in any mater which hi
party — the Butler Party
might move or bring about durin:
the next five years,

Mr. Maharaj said: “Butler hes
decided that vhe only two mem-
bers of the party who should have
any say on the Council were Mr
Mitra G. Sinanan, the Union's
Legal Adviser, and Mr.
himself”. Continuing he told the
crowd: “I do nov’ intend to b>

a

ALAN NMI):
iG

Re

i i
SVR EAN tS
AR WAL Sy
AN
Wier i Psi apo aay

———
——
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muzzled by Mr. Butler or any-
body”.

Another question which Mr.
Maharaj said was decided at 4
meeting held at Mr. Sinanan’s
office last Saturday. was, that Mr.
Maharaj should give his vote vo
Mr. Ranjit Kumar in the ballot
for the Executive Council, The
others to be voted for, he said
will be Mr, Butler himself, Mr.
M. G. Sinanan, Mr, Victor Bryan,
and Mr, A. P. T. James. To this
he said he again voiced his stern
disapproval,

«Mr. Maharaj said he called this
meeting: because those present
were the people from various
organisations who helped him in
his campaign and through thern
he promised the elecvorate to do
his best. Mr. Butler, on Saturday,
had all elected members of the
Butler Party at his meeting. Mr.



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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950

PRAISES POLICE

(From Qug Own Correspendent)
PORT-of-SPAIN

All ranks of Police Force in
Trinidad were praised by the
Commissioner, Col. Eric Beadon,
in his 1949 annual report for their
“unstinted co-operation and zeal”.
The Commissioner ted out
that the improvement in serious
crime fi over 1948 was in
no 1 measure due to that
wonderful spirit.

The cost of the Force for that
year (1949) totalled $2,203,748.61
and rewards paid out to members
for that same period amounted to

$2,597.92
‘ : :
Doctors’ Offices Robbed
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-of-SPAIN
Thieves raided the offices of Dr.
L. R. Hutchinson and Dr. Stanley
Littlepage, of Port-of-—Spain,
making off with a quantity of raw
gold, belonging to Dr. Hutchinson
while a _ of spectacles belong-
ing to . Littlepage, was also
stolen,

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(From Our Own Co: mdent)

PORT-of-SPAIN
Three condemned men were
Port-of-
Spain’s Royal Jail. They were
Johnny Simon and John Moham-
med, for the murder of Lalchan
Dookram a taxi driver, and Brid-
gelalsingh, convicted by a jury at
the same Assizes for the murder
of his wife, Laura.

During the trial, Mohammed is
reported to have told his wife,
“keep your head on girl, I am
losing mine.”

Dies From Wheel Chair
Accident
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-of-SPAIN

Oscar Legall, a wheel chair in-
valid, of Tunapuna, died shortly
after he was knocked down by a
truck on the Eastern Main Road.
It is reported that Legall was at ’
the time in his wheel chair, at-
tempting to overtake a parked ‘

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Maharaj said he would bring the
uesvions to his electorate and get
eir final deliberations on them
The crowd shouted in one
voice: “Don’t do that, you must
speak on the Council.”

P

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1950





“Think because the gas strike’s over they'll return all the oil lamps they Bua

News For The
Over 50’s

LONDON,

HIGH blood pressure and the
troubles that follow in its train are
responsible for about a’quarter of
all the deaths in this country of
people over the age of 50.

The symptoms vary greatly,

In some people morning head-
aches with loss of vision are the
first signs: in others it is kidney
trouble. Others again first dis-
cover that their blood pressure
is too high when they feel pains
in the chest on exertion, or when
they are awakened at night by
attacks of asthma,

To date treatment has been
unsatisfactory.

Rest, combined with an almost
meat-free diet, without any salt,
has been advocated. Later the
“coolie” diet composed almost
entirely of rice was commented
upon favourably. But few pa-
tients could stick the deadly

inonotony.
‘: Apart from this many drugs
have been tried.

New Day

Now a real advance
appear to have been made.

Two doctors working in Paisley
report on eight cases of severe
high blood pressure treated with
a new compound called “hexa-
methonium bromide.”

The patients, selected at random
had all the signs and symptoms of
high blood pressure as well as the
actual mercurial reading.

Treatment with this drug
brought down the pressure and
relieved the symptoms in every
case.

Even more important: once the
blood pressure was reduced it did
not rise again when administration
of the drug was stopped.

It is too early yet to say
‘whether this drug will relieve all
eases of high blood pressure. But
the fact that cases can be
relieved to such an extent is an
advance in treatment such as
has never been made before.

WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED. —L.E.S

RICE WORKERS
CALL OFF STRIKE

MILAN, Oct.

The two weeks strikes of aa
workers threatening the rich rice
crop in Milan Province was called
off today after an agreement be-
tween landowners and _ trade
unions on revised work contracts
providing for medical insurance.

—Reuter.



does





i: b ronmanerl

YESTERDAY’S CRICKET

@ From Page 5.

team yesterday went to L. F. Har-
ris, who topscoreqd with a sound
and patient knock of 73; and T.
Pilgrim who was undefeated with
40 runs to his.credit. S. Lucas
and W. Greenidge were the most
successful bowlers for their team,
taking 3 wickets each for 31 and
50 runs respectively. The out-
field was slow, and runs were not
scored, Cricket fans
seemed disappointed when Clyde
Walcott the biggest attraction, did
not live up to expectation.
Carlton started their second
innings and at the end of the day’s
play had scored 6 runs for the
loss of one wicket.

C. Atkins and S. Griffith opened
Spartan’s innings, against the
attack of fast bowlers Edghill and
Warren. They were off to a bad
start, when Griffith was out to
Edghill with the total at 12. L. F.
Harris partnered Atkins, and they
found it difficult to score ag the
outfield was slow. After forty
five minutes of steady bowling,
the fast bowlers were replaced by
the two off spinners. Lucas and
W. Greenidge. Harris reached
double figures by driving one of
Greenidge’s deliveries to the
boundary. It was the first of the
innings, Atkins was however out
in the next over, and Spartan
had now lost two wickets with 34
runs on the tins. The large crowd
now sent up an uproar, as Clyde
Walcott, left the pavilion. He was
off the mark with a drive through
the covers which earned, him
a_ couple. Hutchinson
now opened hi field for this
hard hitting batsman. Walcott’s
stay was short however for
he was given out leg before
to Lucas for 3 runs in his second
ovér at the crease, and 3 wickets
were down for 37. Skipper Keita
Walcott came in to join Harris,
who then took two fours off
Greenidge’s bowling to send his
individual score to 21 and the
score past the half century. Ten
runs later, skipper Hutchinson
made another bowling change,
bringing on K. Greenidge in place
of Lucas, and Walcott took a
single off a delivery and soon
followed up with a well timed
drive to the cover boundary.

Stollmeyer

Play was held up, as_ Jeff
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player entered the pavilion, and
a large crowd of small boys and
even grown-ups flocked the pavil-
ion, in an effort to catch a glimpse
and refused to go away. Mean-
while Harris who came in at
No. 3 was still there batting con-
fidently with his score at 40. Fast
pager Edghill returned to the
attack and he mate the ball lift
awkwardly and twice struck
Walcott on the body. Spartan
however, lost their fourth wicket
when Keith Walcott was sent
back leg before in the last over
before lunch, and they were stil
156 runs behind with four of their
best batsmen in the pavilion his
contribution being 17. Pilgrim
came in after lunch to carry on
the innings and he took his first
over from Edghill without scor-
ing, but was off the mark with a
single off W. Greenidge’s bowl-
ing, and play again became quict
as the batsmen fought for runs

A “six” by Harris off Green--
idge’s bowling brought his own
score to 52, and the total to 102,
after 135 minutes of play, arid
E. W. Marshall replaced W.
Greenidge, and his first over
yielded a boundary.

Pilgrim who was now well set,
did the bulk of the scoring as
the rate of scoring increased, and
soon 150 runs were sent up.
Without any further addition,
Harris sound innings of 73 came
to a close, when he gave a hot
return to N, Lucas who accepted
it, and half of the team was out.

Did Not Score

Wood who came in next, ws
returned without scoring, and
Bowen partnered Pilgrim, Carl-
ton tried their seventh bowler K.
Hutchinson and Bowen greeted
him with two “sixes” but he wes
later bowled by Warren for a
hurricane 16. The score board
then read 176—7—16. Another
wicket fell when Phillips was
sent back without scoring. The
innings came to a close, when
cleaned bowled; both failing to
Haynes was run out and Morris
score.

In the ten minutes left for play
Carlton opened their second in-
nings with K. Hutchinson and
T. Clarke, but the former was
sent back without |. scoring.
Browne came in and an appeal
for light was upheld by the
umpires and play came to a
close,





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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

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PAGE ELEVEN

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London Express Service.
*
Jamaica Defeat
eg? a!

Haiti At Football

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Oct, 14.

Jamaica won vhe first interna-
tional football game with Haiti this
afternoon at Sabina Park, King-
ston, by two goals to one, The
game which was played during
slight rain was fast, Haiti scoring
one minute after the first pass.
Jamaica scored towards the end
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PAGE TWELVE



Tennis Team Are We Nearing The End W.1. Rifiemen
Of Big Money Tramsfers? Shoot Well

Back Home

The Barbatos representatives
that attended the quadrangular:
British Caribbean Amateur In-
tereolonial Table Tennis Tourna-
ment, recently held in Trinidad,
returned yesterday morning by
B.W.ILAL. .They are Norman
Gill, Captain, Frank Willoughby
and Harold Corbin.

Skipper Gill told the “Advo-
cate” yesterday that although the

ios players were not suc
cessful in the tournament they had
much experience that

would benefit them at the 195)

He said that Harold Corbin
was very steady but it was neces-
sary that jhe should at least
develop more scoring strokes.

He felt that Frank Willoughby
should develop more footwork

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



By Peter Ditton

£218,800 is a lot of money in any language.
tax-ridden Britain it would allow two or three normal
sized families to live in luxury for life.

about 70 Rolls-Royce cars.

LONDON,

fees of ten professional footballers!

Yes, that is the staggering sum
of money that has been thrown
around in the past couple of years
by ten professional soccer clubs
in England, either in an endeavour
to stave-off relegation or to win
promotion, Getting on for
quarter of a million pounds and
all to obtain the services of ten
footballers. Did someone say
something about food for thought’

begun. Tommy Lawton went
from Everton to Chelsea for
£11,500. That was a real bargain
The same amount changed hands
when Stanley Matthews packed
his bags at Stoke and moved to
Blackpool, Another bargain.
Newcastle forked out £13,000 for
Len Shackleton and the Bradford
bank balance rose accordingly.
Tommy Lawton moved again to

Even in

It would buy pleased
Or it would pay the transfer

At Bisley

Capt. Robert Johnstone, Com-
mandant of the West Indies Rifle
team at Bisley told the Advocate
yesterday that he was very
with the standard of
shooting of the West Indies team
as a whole,

He said that they certainly
showed that they were quite up to
the standard of the best shots at
Bisley as they appeared in the
prize list over 160 times.

Capt. Johnstone who was in
England for the past 44% months,
was intransit on the S.S. “Golfito”
yesterday for Trinidad where he
is partner of the firm of Wilson
and Johnstone, Ltd., Commis-
sion Agents of Port-of-Spain.



SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950



Foot ‘ich Cause
Killed in A Days

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neath drive $? Boca’ en on or these ict infections, as yell as Ring:

on | for these icot fee ; ~

eet creak peel? fee blis- | worm 2. It stops the itch and soothes and

Yore toes aad the soles of | cools the skin in 7 minutes. 3. It makes
yor feet? Do oP b s break and run| the skin soft, clear, and smooth.

rm

t

ngas t.,onsible

pa aan feet get so sore at times that they actually Guaranteed Test

wl would ble him to play te much yoneer will Ses mrs Notts County and Chelsea made He was accompanied by Mrs bee if “you cr from "these | foot att Nixodern from you oe it today.
an easier and better g : re & go on? is a fantastic 4 profit of a clear £8,500. Billy Johnstone : cause is iferm ‘or fungus and that you tremendous improvement in cit morning,
nger we could eventually rea fo join Derby Comal von. get rid of your trouble until you|In 4 days’ time Nixoderm will have

Gill was the oniy local player
to win sets.. He won six matches,
defeating “Willy Estick,” Dann,
O'Connor, Jamaica Champion, and

longer we could eventually reach
the stage when £200,000 would
only obtain the services of four
players. £50,000 just to kick a

to join Derby County and Morton,
his previous club, collecter
£15,500. Len Shackleton left

He said that the team created
a very excellent impression in
the minds of ‘the authorities at
Bisley and the West Indies Shoot-



can not
sites re: msible for| the germs, rasites, and fungus respen-~
oe be ad Rr — sible for vat trowbte, and you can see for
yourself that your skin rapidly is becoming
#” Kills the Cause soft, clear, smooth, and healthy, but con-

ft,
Ordinary ointments and liquids can not tinue it just 3 days longer to make sure

unn, Lear Newcas i tor| that the results are completely satisfac~
“« Peete aaa Newcastle and moved to Sunder- jing Council hoped to send ‘ohne because they do not fight or| that the, Fesults are Complete your
G- Wong and “Len” Brasingon land; net profit on both transae- another team to Bisley in. 1953, Forauaaia sian urls faa | srucigg peng: miserge erty. Nine
of British Guiana Near The End tions, £7,050 to Newcastle, He expressed grateful thanks come these foot troubles und also even the | cracking, ig, blistering

He was presented a Silver Cup
for the best performance given
by a Barbadian player while each
player taking part in the series
was presented with an _ Elite
Shirt.

At a Cocktail Party sponsored
by the Port Services Club, visiting
p! were given a picture al-
bum of Trinidad after a series of
exhibition games.

Best All-Rounder
Gill said that “Danny” O’Con-
nor, the Jamaican Champion, was
extrémely successful throughout
the tour. He was presented with
a Silver Cup for the best all.

. : wadding Meta} Polish is
roufid performance of the tour. ‘ational forward, David Jack. At the time of writing that is SHEPPARD 117 perfect for your brass

O'Connor, he said, convincingly The first five-figure transfer hai still the record transfer fee. It i 2 and copper, and there is
defeated Ronnie Inniss, the 1950 arrived. may be surpassed, If any one of NORTHAM, Western Australia, ase poe
Trinidad .Champion by two Second and Third Division clubs half a dozen top-class English : Oct. 14 eee Ae 708
straight games but was later de- winced as they read the news. Internationals asked for a move The M.CC,, cricket team today Praise sew tah a
feated by Raloh Legall, runner-up £11,000 to them was an amount there would be an immediate rush crew the first match of their ‘muah detica
in the Singles Ch onships. almost beyond understanding. it for cheque books and at least Australian tour, a one-day fixture surfaces, gives

He said that a ‘ge crowd
packed the Drill Hall on Friday
night to witness the games for
the British Caribbean Singles
Championship which was woo
by “Bogart” Griffith of Trinidad

On that night Legall ‘defeate:
O'Connor and Griffith won from
Gomes, placing two Trinidadianr
in the finals. It was a very keen
struggle as Legall won the firs:
game and Griffith the second.
Legall again went into the lead
but Griffith took the last two
games to become British Carib.
bean Champion.

New Rule

He said that during the match
between Jamaica and Trinidad at
San Fernando a new rule was
adopted. It stated that in the
event of play becoming boring
or unenterprising the scorer can
caution the players and then they
are automatically forced . -to
change service alternately instead
o Seite Al

to e Of
ponent oe 12° volleys, ex~
cluding the service volley, geis
the point, This only holds i?
neither player gets the point be
fore 12 volleys.

The match which was _ chiefly
responsible for this rule was
played between Ronnie Inniss, the
patience player of Trinidad and
‘Bunny’ McClean, the Allan Rac
of Jamaica.

While McClean held his racquet
with the pen-holder grip Griffith
held his the orthodox way but
they both stood close to the table
and patted out the point. On
some occasions a point lasted for
several minutes.

Gill said that the Trinidad Table
Tennis officials left nothing to be
and transportation was available
desired. They were well treated
on’ all occasions. y are all
looking forward to the next Brit-
ish Caribbean . Intercoloniat
Tournament.

Somehow I feel that we must
be nearing the end of this big-
money transfer business. English
football is gradually recovering
trom the effects of the war.
Young players are forcing their
way into the limelight and as
more and more managers realise
that the talent they are seeking
.s on their door-step so the
cheque books will be left idle in
the drawer,

But let’s go back a little while;
twenty-two years in fact. It was
in October, 1928, that Arsenal
shocked the football world by
paying Bolton Wanderers nearly
£11,000 for their English Inter-

was more than a fortune; it was
nfinity. Surely, they asked, this
is the limit for a transfer? And as
time went on it began to look
as if they were right. The odd
£10,000 fee cropped up occasion-
ally, as for instance when Peter

y, now player-manager of
Doncaster Rovers, moved from
Blackpool to Manchester City.
But generally the market was
quiet.

Upheaval

Then, in 1938, Arsenal, the
same old free-spending Arsenal,
caused another upheaval, They
wanted Bryn Jones, the brilliant
Wolverhampton Welsh Interna-
tional forward and then went to
the limit to get him. £14,000
changed hands and Bryn Jones
packed his bags and moved south,
but not before the whole soccer
world had been rocked to its
foundations.

One year later, in 1939, the war
brought a full stop to league
soccer as it had been previously
known, and the transfer market
Closed. down, only to re-open im
1945 with even greater activity
and higher prices than before.

Clubs resuming ‘League soccer
after an absence of six years
found that many of their best
players were finished, The
youngsters had not had sufficient
experience to hold their own in
the promotio and relegation
struggle and the only answer was
to buy ready-made players from
other clubs.

Players themselves sensed an
opportunity to make a name.
Requests to be put on the ‘list’ in
order that they could be trans-
ferred to a club in a_ higher
division were plentiful. In addi-
tion, certain clubs found their
financial position so weak that
they had to sell their best men
to keep alive,

Spending Spree

The greatest spending spree

And so the procession contin-
ued: £20,000 here, £18,000 there.
Money became almost meaning-
less as the prices rose higher
and higher towards the climax
in December 1949. Preston North
End, with a blank cheque for an
inside-forward who coulll link
up with their International
winger Tom Finney, decided that
Eddie Quigley of Sheffield
Wednesday was their man,
£26,500 was paid out and Quigley
moved across the border from
Yorkshire to Lancashire.

A Record

one fee of £30,000 would probably
be paid out.

But the mad buying and selling
of the past four or five years
seems almost over, Clubs are now
beginning to settle down, Team
building has been carried out and
while there are still a score of
managers who confess their team
needs strengthening in this or
that position, the majority are
reasonably satisfied, ore and
more they are placing their faith
in the young players who have
now had five years’ grace in
which to mature.

The success of this “encourage
the youngsters” policy can be
judged from the fact that six of
the English International side
that played Ireland in Belfast last
Saturday, Aston, Wright, Chilton.
Dickinson, Mannion, and Baily did
not eost their club more than the
£10 signing-on fee. And even
in these boom days of soccer
there is still en awful difference
between £10 and £20,000.



, SAAB
“Wake up, George—

television’s over for this
evening.”

cn behalf of the ieam to the
Colonial Governments, merchants
and supporters whe had so gen-
erously contributed towards
the funds in order to make the
1950 venture pessitle. He was
also very pleised t:\t the mein-
bers of the team had justified

the confidence which was reposed |-

in them by the Government and
the. public generally

M.C.C. Draw First
Match



against a West Australian country
«even here,

Batting first, the tourists
¢eclared at 329 for 5, and at the
close the Country Eleven were 113
for 7.

The young M.C.C., pair David
Sheppard and Gilbert Parkhouse
laid the basis of their side’s score
with a second wicket partnership
of 175. Sheppard hit 117 with 13
fours, and Parkhouse 87. Byfield
was the most successful Country
Fleven bowler claiming 3 for 68.

Top scorer for the Country
Eleven was G. Jones, 29; white
the M.C.C., captain Freddie
Brown, Bob Berry and Douglas
Wright each claimed two wickets,

—Reuter.



Commonwealth
Dismiss Baroda
For 159

BARODA, Oct. 14,

The Commonwealth touring team
today dismissed Baroda, Ranji
trophy champions in three and a
half hours for 159 after sending
them in to bat first and at the
close of the opening day of their
three day match had replied with
75 for 2.

Spinners Jim Laker of Surrey
and Bruce Dooland of Australia
held mastery on the matting
wicket.

Top scorer for Baroda was D.
K. Gaekwad 30. Laker making
the ball rise disconcertingly or go
through fast and low off the mat-
ting claimed five wickets for 42
and Dooland took three for 31, A
sound unbeaten 40 by Harold
Gimblett of Somerset helped the
Commonwealth score along to 75
at the close, Worrell who cap-
tained the side was the only West
Indian playing, At the close of
play he was eight not out,





















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London .. ,. ee |? Day - 2 $ 342,00
104 Hrs. 8 1,467.00

PORCELAIN SINKS





Also Regular Speedbird Services to Europe and South America
B.O,A.C. TAKES GOOD G4RE OF YOU
Bo through your local

ok _
BO.A.C. Appointed Agent
who makes no charge for
advice, information or book- Y- B-0-A-
ings by “Speedbird” to all

six continents.

°

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(Central Foundry Ltd., Proprietors)

gruelling
conditions.

(
DENHAM

STOCKED BY ALL LEADING STORES.
e

iA. BENJAMIN LTD.

306 Plantations HMuilding
Lower Wroad Street, Barbados

Distributors:— Dear's Garage Ltd.

Corner of BROAD and TUDOR STREETS
127 Roebuck Street, Bridgetown.

AGENTS-= Phone 4235
BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIMITED

Lower Broad Steet us
Phone 4585



Bridgetown

§
*
PPPS S GGG POLL LCL LLL PSF SPE PP SCP PLP LISA

ALEC FOP OSSOSOSSEBSSS





SSS





!





,



‘ ‘ :






SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1950

BY CARL ANDERSON




L HOPE
SHE GETS A

STOMACH -ACHE! )«

DH, BOY; I'M

FOR THE

THAT
r



















Take
Men it

RIKER



BY FRANK ST"

e' Cwait!

eo

o>





BY GEORGE MC.MANUS


















THAT IAM /NOT ONLY,
THAT-HE'S AT JIGGSS
OFFICE-AND MRS.
BELLERS THE WIDOW
AND SOCIAL LEADER
1S GOING TO CALL ON
JIGGS











HERE COMES JIGGS -
I'M ALL A-DITHER TO
HEAR THE NEWS//

T DIDN'T GET A CHANCE TO
INTRODUCE THEM - THEY

LOOKED AT EACH OTHER- I=
SHE FAINTED-AND THE
LAST I SAW OF HIM=- HE
WUZ RUNNIN’ DOWN MAIN
STREET WITHOUT
HIS HAT 4




MRS BELLERS WILL
MEET MY BROTHER -
AND I KNOW IT WILL
DEVELOP INTO A
LOVE MATCH-I'M SO
IAPPY.”































CALM YOURSELVES, LADIES!
YOU ARE HYSTERICAL!



OTHER THINGS... THEY
ARE GONE!



57 SDSSSSSSSSSF | S555 SSTOSSISS

OT tee Be olen PP

ry

\ "alge athe



*UNIIL 17 REACHES THE FORBIDDEN
DEEP WOODS “THE HOME OF THE
BANDAR, THE PYSMY POISON PEOPLES







PHANTOM
THE JUNGLE, PASSED FROM VILLAGE TO
VILAGE BY Tol -ToM=~
= 0 Sout
para FN ane \
~ wes ee
ener


























SUDDENLY, AMIDST THE TOM-TOM
BARRAGE, HE HEARS WHAT HES
BEEN WAITING FOR+ THE BANDAR.





WE HAVE SOME. gga
LUNCH NOW? <

1 THE
NAPPERS?

oe
c





oe |

~

%

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

< ‘

Y POODSGS SSG POSS 9OODOOD GO OOP OPOVOO OOS









*

¢ A

ome iS &: P48 BOL
assurance

% “Caterpillar” provides positive
control of both oil and water tem
perature by the exclusive dual radia
tor design. The water radiator
regulates upper engine temperature.
And the air-cooled oil radiator pre-
ve@is excessive crank-case tempera-
ture . . to control oil viscosity and
film strength and thus protect the
performance of vital parts. Only
“Caterpillar” provides this extra-
value feature.

ert i tiie Tee eee

MT ete

ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LTD.

Tweedside Road, = St. Michael, =— Phone 4629 - 4371










.
*

<

pty (pt e%

SESS F 45446

PPPOE

456,44, OSS

An Ydeal Hol
A Caribbean Cruise on the LUXURY LINER

“COLOMBIE”
BARBADOS — JAMAICA — BARBADOS

oF







Ten Days of Incomparable Enjoyment.

Sailing Dates

From
RATES FOR ROUND
BARBADOS
RIP
6th December, 1950
Ist Class ....,. $208.00

17th January, 1951

2nd Class $163.00

28th February, 1951





3rd Class ...... $111.00
11th April, 1951
B.W.I. Currency
30th May, 1951
BARBADOS CIE. GLE. TRANSATLANTIQUE BARBADOS
R. M. JONES & CO., LID.
TRINIDAD

Agents
GUAIRA
CURACAO

CURACAO
CARTEGENA

fe ile
Bee. JAMAICA

FO A yt 6 68



Py OSt tt 48.

PPPSOFFSPD SPSS FPP POOF OPA

EEA EAA A A AAA At A tet ttt t Ott At At AOA CAO $5253¢566, BOOS SSSSSSSS*
PPE E PEPE IFES EPI GD

6565636, t65¢ ¢
< PLPSS SSS SSS FSS FSS FF

PPPS

655694

654 yes
PLGSS SF FF SFO


PAGE FOURTEEN ~ :

CLASSIFIED ADS.







ANNOUNCEMENT

THE Engagement was announced re-
cently of Miss LYNCH of Bush
Hall to MR. HASSIM GAFOOD of Trin

dad rty at her residence
P a 15.10, 50—In.









THANKS

The relatives of Mrs. Constance Mur
rell_ ef Marchfield, St. Philip, who died
on %th of October, 1950, return thanks
to all who prayed and extended hopeful
wishes during her illness and with deep-
est @ppreciation gratefully thank all who

tended the funeral, sent wreaths, cards
jet or any way condoled with them
on occasion of her death.

Archie Bascombe (son); Mrs. Grelinda
Bartlett (daughter), Churvyle (gdandson),
Gerline, Icilma, Patsie, Cynthia, Mau-

Marcille, Pegsy, Trevor (#rand-
children.

15.10.50.—-1n,

The family of Mr. Joseph Leonard

Benfield, late of “Willsbury” Hastings.
with deepest appreciation gratefully re-
turn thanks to all their friends who
attended the funeral, sent wreaths,
Car@s, letters or in any other way ¢x-
pressed sympathy or shown kindness in





th recent and sudden bereavement
Ne Banfield (widow) Leonard.
Lionel, and Tom (Sons), Joyce Mascol!
(Denghter) . 15, 10.50—1n
IN MEMORIAM
joving memory of our dear ENID
) GRIFFITH, who fell asleep in
J on October 15, 1948.

years have passed since that sad
ni we watched her pass away, but we
are sure she has gone to rest, we

h to meet her there Ever to Te-

Ibered by: Margo (daughter(; Elma

G {mother); Ina (sister) and Osbert
‘ er); Alva (Nephew).

15.10.50.



In loving memory of our dear beloved
father ALBERT BLACKETT, who_ quiet-
ly Bppeed to the great beyond on . 35,
1

was loving and kind in all his ways
ht and just to the end of his days

and true in heart and mind

@ wonderful memory he has left

im

behind
WH and smiling, always content
1 and respected, wherever he went
To this beautiful jife, came a noble end
He died as he lived everybody's friend
Winifred Blackett (wife); Ivy & Pearl
(daughters) 15.10.50.—In,

FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

<= ——

CAR — Ford Prefect 1947, good cgn-
ettion. Owner leaving island. No rea-
sonable offer refused. Apply Capt. A
J. Press. 14,10. 50—2n .

CARS — 2 Vauxhall 14 Saloons,
Pargains. 1 Ford V-2 1940, 37,000
ver¥ food condition at reasonable price.
FORT ROYAL GARAGE Ltd. Telephone
4504. 13.10.30—3n







1) 10 BLP. Hillman Car
1 model. Apply Cecil Sampson C/o
Moenning & Co. Lid, Dial 4284























TELEPHONE 2508 |



FOR RENT

BUNGALOW 3-bedroom Bungalow
newly built in ego! locality 2% miles from
town. Available for a period of 12}
months from Ist es Inspection |

. r
by appointment, Phone ‘et :
“BEVERLY — The Garrison. Draw-
ing and Dining room; @ bedrooms; |
with bathroom attached — Play room,
Freakfast room — Modern Kitchen 1
all conveniences. Tennis Lawn. Spacious
yard with fruit — — — ser-
ts’ rooms tec. a
aati 15. 10,50—3n.







a ear

CARPEDIEN—Annex—near Yacht Cluo,
From December lst. All modern conve~
niences. Only Coloured need apply. Apply
Mrs. Gooding on premises, 24.9.



the
Stream, Furnished draw-
ing and dining room. Available for the
month of November only, Dial 2377,





‘¥4, 10, 50—2n

——— set

FURNISHED UPSTAIRS T—From

ist sore. are . eer
L ‘more ock. a
BLA SBANNISTER 15,10.50—O"

FLAT — — A

very large spacious flat on second fioor
at No. 6 Swan St. with gallery. Very,
cool and or — Can be used for a big
ffice or ces. Phone 2466.

5 Fey 10.10.50—2n

ltr
FROM January Ist. 1951, “INenOUT”
Gibb’ Peter

ea every %
je. apply
om” Labaion yg



HOUSE — “ESPERANZA” fully fyr-
ished mone oa on St. J
Sea Coast, me 91-

atin e 14.10.50—én.





\ etd ent — On the orsae Coast.
fas” Mare AS So" Marbert,. Goraober,
Ch, Ch. 10.10 .51+-6n.

ing,
cervants rooms and large
conveniences, Apply Messrs Carrington
& Sealy, Lucas Street or Phone 3619

after 5 p.m. 7.10.50—1in.

NEWHAVEN—Crane Coast, Furnished,
4 bedrooms, Water mill supply, Lighting
Plant. Double Garage, 3 servant rooms,
From November Ist, Dial 4476.

17.9.'50—t.f.n.

“SWANSEA” — Worthing from Ist.
November, A fully furnished Bungalow,
including Refrigerator, Telephone, Radio:
Garnge, Dial 3578 or 2490

13. 10.50—3n,

WINSLOW-—Cattle Wash, St. Joseph
yor we 7 of eee ue Aoely
tion, St, Thomas. ' See i0.80—3n,

PERSONAL



Y VILLE,
dining, sitting, 3









. —

14,10.50-2n. | The Public are hereby warned against

| giving credit to my wife Rita Branch

— Willys in working order | (nee Murrel) as I do not hold myge!f

Li to Bist . Reason tor | re le for her or anyone else con-

sel . owner has new car, Apply C Regting a debt or debts in my name
B. Dial 8432. | unless by a written order

mes, Top Rock Garage.
14,10.50—2n

CAR — Sunbeam Talbot (1941). Good
condition. Apply: 4 Clifton Terr. Bay
St. 14,10.50—t.f.»,

CAR — One Standard 8 H.P. Car m
perfect condition. Apply J, E. Pierce,
C/o James A. Lynch & Co. Ltd,

13.10.50—3n .











‘AL WIRE
Th Toit. 1052,

c.T.8. LR,
Also Flexible Galvanised Conduit

m
sizes % inch to 1% inch, Saree ao
Tyre Trafalgar Phone f
14.10 .50—t.f.0



LAMPS — 1 or 2 Blectrie Floor Lamps.
Good condition, Phone 4580.
15.10.50—8n.

1O0GRAM—One H.M.V. Radiogram.
Di ‘ole, 3219 or 4264, 15.10.50,—1n,

FURNITURE

— Office juipmen*
po and Doubte Pedestal great Desks,

cap or Letter Size 4 drawer Filing
Cabinets: Steel Stationery Cupboards;
Ccrd Index Cobinets; Steel Office Chairs,
end other office equipment now obtain-
able from stock from T. Geddes Grant







signed by me.
Sad. PERCY BRANCH,

Richmond Gap,
St, Michael.
14.10,50—2n,

The public is hereby warned against
credit to MARTHA WILLIAMS,

ving
as I do not hold myself le for
any debt or debts wr eraek er tae or
anyone else in my name or on the Estate
of Lisford Williams.
. MILLICENT WILLIAMS,
for and on behalf of
LISFORD WILLIAMS,
14.10.50—2n.





EDUCATIONAL



VACANT SCHOLARSHIPS

GIRLS’ FOUNDATION SCHOOL
There are one or more Naceee Sous

Chi
ty a ae mt
Parish of Christ arch a we ‘are in
straitened circumstances.

The ap} its must be ween the
ages of 10 years 6 months 12 years
win 'te la Sy The ebatress oie
sn on Prigay 21th at oat

Forms of application can be obtained
from the Secretary, W. H. Hil-

ton House, Bay * These forens rust
be returned ggcompamted by a aetna!

Ltd., Bolton Lane. Phone 4442, ‘hoe bpoedh 4 x .
15.10 50—6r. cinta eae ody,
undation School.
MECHANICAL .10.80—8n,

hh
School Boy's Kale! jayele, Apply
“geomnon" ¢/o rttode Diy rose
Palmetto Street, City. 10. 50—2n.
el ann nee n
TYPEWRITER — One Portable Under -
wood Typewriter Good condition, Mr









E. Stoute, C/o Bryden & Sons
15.10, 50-24
TYPEWRITER -— One Standard Un-~
derwood ewriter, Excellent condi-
tion. HOLD! Bros, Swan St. Tel.
3819. 13,.10.50—t. f. n.
LIVESTOCK
FEMALE DONKEY — Apply ©. Wil-

son, Shopkeeper,
Philip

Brereton Village, St.
14,10,50—2n.



HORSES — 1 Bay Mare. 1 Chestnut
Mare at Wakefield Pitn. St, John.
14.10, 50—2n.
(agi ada hci barsinpenicmenateenhieenpanentst
PUPPIES Bull Mastiff, One male
and 2 females, excellent breeding, Call
Mrs. K. D. Edwards, 4145.
12.10,50—4n.

MISCELLANEOUS

ANTIQUES — Of eveny description
Gi » old Jewels, fine Silver
Galivocieun: Early books, Maps. Auto-
graphs etc. at g@s Antique Shop

Gorrin;
adjoining Royal Yacht Club.
3.9.50—t.f.n.

"S PREPARATIONS,
Malt 6/-; Cofron 12/-.
& Co., St. Lawrence 15.10.50—Tn

BABY'S CRADLE—Ingood condition
complete with Matress and Casters, Price
$24.00. Dial 2274. 15.10.50,——3n.

BONELESS HAMS IN TINS 9 &.
euch @ $1.21 per th. Secure yours now
as Xmas supplies will be limited

14.10,50—2n









Haliver
Geo. C, Ward









BUCKLEY'S PREPARATIONS. Cough
Mixture 87c.: White Rub 5S5c.; Nezine 55c
Kams lic. Geo. C, Ward & Co,



15,10.50.—7n

BERETS — Angora Berets for dress
wear, Children sizes. Several Shades
Cc gz at only 4%, each, SWAN
s 50 Swan St. 15.10.50-—3n





HORNER'S PREPARATIONS. Maltle-
vol 8/-; Carnol 5/-; Calsol 16/8; Magsol
7/+; Infantol 5/-. Feronol & Feronol F.
Geo, C. Ward & Co, 15,10,50.—7n.

IN’S FRENCH COFFEE fo
da and enjoy this, you should use a
level teas ul to the cup! Exceeding
this you d from its deliciousness!
Sold by your br at S9e, per halt
tb Tin. 14,10.50—2n

MRS. WILK

CRACKERS, CW
NOVELT













has
AS

received
DECORA -
TOYS, for the
Nozaar help the Old
Vowne by making your Christ-
mas pirchoses at the BAZAAR

11.10. 50-3
MOSDA LIGHTERS A Lighter to
suit every teste. Many styles, many

prieés. KNIGHTS DRUG STORES
14.10.50—2n







PIANO — In good condition, reeently
tuned. Splendid tone. No
offer refused. Mrs. D. MOORE, Corner
2nd. Ave: Bank Hall Main Road
14,10, 50.



‘Qn.



Be Wise...

.» - Advertise







reasonable | each





ENTRANCE EXAMIN.
.

A
An "eae tanec
School Year January—July 1981 will
held at the school on Friday 27th October
1950 at 9.30 Applications will be
received up to Friday
ina Paya and

@ baptismal

monial from the
school attended by the pupil.

Applicants must be between the ages
of 8 years and 12 years on the date of

exa:
or Guardians accom
jaughters or wards are hereby -
is no accommodation for
them at the school on the date of
examination and that the examination of
applicants will not start until they leave

‘the premises.
W. H_ ANTROBUS.
Sec. Gov. .
Girls’ Foundation School.
: 8,10.50—8n

ALEXANDRA _ SCHOOL
Examinations for

i

z





to 4 p.m. on Friday, tor oti
oO He . .

pie ay i Ah ig BS

or over, July Sist; 1950; on

4.
cf Parents
the school on
10 a.m,





~~ School Children Rain
Coats, and Young Ladies. Real Engitsh
quality, No Plastic. To clear $2.18 each
SWAN STORE, 50 Swan Street.

| 14,10,50—2n.

ROOLS RAZOR ~ Never been used
a sale, price $10.00. Telephone 2292
“Macrae”

15,10.50—2n.
SQUIBB'S PREPARATIONS Cod Liver







OU O- Sulmefrin Calcium Gluconate
Glycerine Suppositories 3/6 Geo. C.
Ward & Co, 15.10,50.-—7n,

SALE Among other items we sell
Khaki ot 50c. per yd. ROYAL STORE.

14,10, 50—Jn

SHIRTS—2,000 Men’s Shirts of guaran—

teed wearing quality at $2.00 and $2.40
ROYAL STORE, 12.10.50—Tn.
SHIRTS & PYJAMAS Boys’ and

Men’s Shirts and Pyjamas ordered to
Measure can be delivered within four
hours, RELIANCE SHIRT FACTORY.

12.10, 50-—fn
| WEETABIX — Your Grocer has just
| received a fresh supply of this delicious







Cereal, which is more than breakfast
food Price #6c. and 26c,. per package
14,10.50-—-2n

4

Mechanical
\

}

'

WANTED
HELP

A GIRL for Grocery Department.—Geo.
C. Ward & Co., St. Lawrence.
15.10.50,—7n.











A General Servant. Apply Mrs. H. B.
Kinch, Belair, Top Rock 1/.10,50.—1n.

““AN EXPERIENCED CASHIER re-
Please appl: in writing to
Dd. Vv Scott & Ce tad Do not send





| original testimonials unless subsequently

sted.”
ae 10.10.50—T.F.N.

OFFICE CLERK -— Young Lady ex-
perienced general office routine up to
int of entry and balance of custom@rs®
ledgers Cail with written application
om write immediately to Mr. Carter,

T. R. Evans, 27 Broad St. State
experience and schooling. Salary up to

$80 month according to experience.
14.10. 50—2n.

terest
STENO-TYPIST — Experienced Steno-
typist for our Office. $100 po.
Apply with written aj to e
Secretary Dowding Estates & Tra
Co. Ltd., Bay Street.
14.10 .50—3n.

MISCELLANEOUS

cargiensnanieeneecvetemitingedihintinstameivilies
POSITION—Englishman, fully qualified | Pridgetown..
mbust!

Diesel and Internal Co: ion or
Teaving for United Kingdom end lo-
ber, but would prefer appointment m
Barbados. References; Rolls Royce, Gen-
érol Motors Detroit U.S.A. Bristol Aero-
plane Co,, England. Royal Electrical and
Engineers, British Army

c/o Advocate.

8.10.50—4n

Box J. W.



RETIRED MAN — Some experience in
hotel work, Seckr position. Room and
board — moderate salary. Hotel C/o
Advocate. 12.10. 50—-2n.





PUHLIC SALES
AUCTION
UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received from the In-
surance Company, I will sell at Fort
Royal Garage, St. Michael's Row, on
Friday, October 20th

; y qa) 1948 Vaueba
Risk Seeker uae rine date
at 2 pam. Terms e

GRIFFITH,

Auctioneer.
15.10.50.—4n.

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Thursday 19th by order of Mr. H.







SUNDAY ADVOCATE



PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE

THE Tea-Room and Library of the
Women’s Self Help Association wil] pe

om Monday 16th October, Con
ors of cakes and preserves are
asked to send in their goods on the
morning of the 1th. 10. 10,50—6n,

>
NOTICE

Applications tor 4 Vestry Exhibitions.
2 for Girls a¢ St. Michael's Girls’ School,
and 2 for Boys at the Boys’ Foundation
School, will be received by me not
later than 26th October

Parents ©f applicants must be parish-









foners in straightened circurnstances.
Ages of applicants between 11 and 12
years.
W. U. GOODING,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Philip.
11. 10.50—6n,
NOTICE
“SEALED Tenders for the erection

of a Pavilion and Community Hall at
Eilerton Soctal Centre, St. George, will
er by me up to Sist. October,
1950.

Plans and ations can be seen
at Mr. R. B. ider’s Office at Messrs
C. F. HARRISON & Co., Broad St.,

K. MASON,
Clerk, Vestry of St. George.”
12.10.50—4n.

NOTICE
APPLICATIONS (accompanied by bap-
tirmal certificate} will be received at
my office up to 3 p.m. on Friday, 20th
October, 1950, for one or more vacant
Christ Church Vestry Exhibitions tenable
et the Girls’ Foundation School.
Applicants must be daughters of
porishioners in straightened circumstan-
ces, and must not be less than ten
years six months or more than twelve
years on the date of the examination.
Candidates must present themseives
for examination to the Headmistress at
the Girls' Foundation Schoo! on Friday
27th October at 9.30 a.m
Application forms must be obtained

from my office.
WOOD GODDARD
Clerk of the Vestry,
Christ Church.
11.10, 50—5n.





NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. JAMES

App! for Vi Exhibitions of
an Annual value of £5 tenable at a
Girls’ Second Grade School, will be re-
ceived by the undermentioned up to
Thursday, 30th November, 1950.

Applicants must be children of parish-
joners in straitened circumstances, over
the ase of seven years and under thir-
teen years of age.

A Baptismal Certificate must be for-
warded and a Certificate from the Head-

O, Blades, we will sell his Furniture at} mistress of the School of their fitness to

“The River" Estate, St. Philip.

— which includes —
Dining table (seat 10); Wagons, Serving
Table Liquor Case; Card Table; Book
Case (glass doors); Tub Chairs, Work
Table (Brass Claw Feet all in mahogany;
Pine Book Case; Oak; Rattan & Bent-
wood Chairs; Inlaid Cordea Table; Type-



writer; Desk Chair; Cushions; Rugs;
Glass and China; Fruit and T Ser-
vices; Coffee Set; Plated Ware;

Knives and Forks; Spoons; Forks etc.
Mahogany Linen Press; Dressing Tables;
Washstands; Pine Presses; Gun Press;
Brass Floor Lamp _ (oil);
Boiler; Linen including 2 Damask Table
Cloths and Crochet Bedspread; Ferns;
Plants and other items
Sale 11.30 o'clock

BRANCKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers,
15.10,50.—2n.

REAL ESTATE





BE WISE! DON’T BE CAUGH!
NAPPING! Save hundreds and Very
Often thousands of Dollars. Economy its
the Order of the . Even miljionaires
Look Well before ping. DF.
de Abreu, a Trained and Experie
Auctioneer, Real Estate Broker & Valuer,
Sell your Household Furniture, Cars
Etc., at Auction, and (your Properties
by Treaty. No Sale or Sole Right

‘ Voeane Se or Secured by
Me—Nothing to be Paid. Genuine Con-
nections abroad and in the B.W.1,) Com-
mission Very Attractive. Paymerits Mace

enter the School
(Sed.) P. H. TARILTON,
Cierk to the Vestry of St. James.
15.10.50.—3n.



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of ESMIE CRISPIN, of
Diamond Rock, St. Peter, the purchaser

Fish | of Liquor License No, 333 of 1950, granted

to Errol Inniss in respect of the ground

Pictures; Iron Bedsteads and Beds; Old] floor of a two storied wall and wooden
1

buildings situate at Diamnod Rock, St
Peter, and to use the said license at such

Copper Jelly | described premises

Dated this 11th day of October, 1950
(Sed.) ESMIE CRISPIN,
Applicant.

Terms CASH |SYDNEY_H. NURSE, Esq.,

Police Magistrate,
Dist. “E’’.
N.B.—This application will be consider-
ed at a Licensing Court to be held on
Wednesday the 25th October, 1950 ,at 11
o'clock a m, at Police Court District “E",
SYDNEY H. NURSE,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “E”
15.10.50.

OFFICIAL NOTICE





need | BARBADOS.

IN THE ASSISTANT COURT
OF APPEAL

(Equitable Jurisdiction) .
STANLEY NICHOLLS

(Plaintiff) .
LOUISE GRIFFITH (Defendant),
IN pursuance of an Order

within 48 hours after Sales. Satisfactién,|Court in the above action made on the

Straight Deals and Payments Guaranteed .

Rare Bargains Await You! Grasp Them'
Just Imagine—a Spacious 3 Bedroom
Cottage, Good Condition, Modern Con~

veniences, Open Front Concrete Gallery,
Spacious Yard enclosed with Stonewall,
Fine View, Vacant, at Thornbury

lith day of September, 1950, I give
notice to all persons having any estate,
right or interest in or any lien or in-
cumbrance aflecting all that certain
plece or parcel of land situate at
Worthing View in the parsih of Christ

Main Rd,, Going for Under £800.;| py a twenty-two perches
wt New Stonewall | ane ‘HRcen-nunneevis of a perch or
age Sa. ame See *| thereabouts abutting and bound on lands
and Fontabelle (Seaside and Landside),| ° "lorence Rice on lands of the estate

Goi for Under £1,850 and not Above
22,500.5 A Dostrable s (Large)
12 inch Stonewall Bungalow in an Area
with Doctors, Near City, Vacant,

for Under £2,500.; An
New 3 Bedroom 12
Bungalow at Brighton (Near Beach),
over 18,000 sq. ft., Yields $40.00 p.m.,
Going for Under £2,450.; A 3 Bedroom

Sotase by Bank Hall Main R@.; Spacious | buildings and erections on

Yara, $25.00 p.m.,
Under £1,100 One re at Oistins,
Facing Sea, Commercial Area,
for Under 14 cents per square foot
C Me for Almost anything
Estate — to Suit One and All. Good
and Attractive Buys with Assured Re-
Sale Values
only, Inspection jicited—No
or Boasting—No incy or
Prices—No High Pressure Methods.
affords me Pleasure to Deal with Keen

Going
ai imost| there is a
eat ang Newali| Toad cated Worthing

ealise in and Offer! the afternoon,

in thi

HARBOUR 10¢ | SHIPPING NOTICES |

In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Cyclorama ©., Sch. Lechinvar 5
Sch. Emmanuel _C. Gordon; Sch. Cyril
E. smith; Sch. ita Wonita; Sch. Enter-
prise Sch. frances W. Smith, Sch
Wonderful Counseltor, Sch. Lady Noe-

leen; Sch. Everdeme; M.V. Blue Star;

Sen
Sch. Mary B

Franklyn D. R., M. V. Lady Jey.
Caroline; Sch. Molly .N

Jones and Sch. Philip H. Davidson.

Gooding; from Trinidad.

nen Be. 25 tons net
Cook Doles. eS Se a

ARRIVALS
‘Sch. Butma D., 59 tons net, Capt

S.S, Golfito, 4,505 tons net, Capts

DEPARTURES
S.8S, Libreville, 4,365 tone net, Capt
Hassel, for Venezuela.
Sch, Zita Wonita, 69 tons net, Capt
Pe . for St. Vineent.
S.S. Aleoa Partner, 3,991 tons net.
Capt. Pembroke, for Canada.

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

»S Ss. “Hersilia” Sept. 29th: 30th. Oct,















SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13,

1950





ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.

SAILING FROM AM:
ROTTERDAM AND
SAMANG FROM AMSTERDAM

& DOVER
m.s. “Bonaire” September 15th,
SAILING TO TRINIDAD, ARIBO
DEMERARA,

™+s. “Felena” Sept 2ist.
$8.8. “Bonaire” Oct. ard.

m.s, “Will ~ isth,
ms. “Oranjestad” Oct, 17th.
Limited r accommodation

passenge:
available om this Vessel).
8. P. MUSSON, SON @ ©O. UTD.
AGENTS

SOUTHBOUND



M.V. “T. B. RADAR” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. GLacia. St. Vincent, Grenada
and Aruba. Date of departure
to be potshed.

M.V. “CARIBBEE” will accept
Cargo for

Antigua, Montserrat,
St. Kitts. Sailing

“DAERWOOD” will
accept Cargo and Passengers tor
St. Vincent, St. Lucia, Grenada
amd Aruba Sailing Saturday

Asso, (Inc).
Tel. No. 4047







Canadian National Steamships



CABLE & WIRELESS (West Indies) con. ee. SS he
micste with the folowing, chive through | CANADIAN Citazhaedtitith me ape
nicate wit e low ships through ANAD) :
their Barbados Coast Station: LAY MOOMEY St sc Get is OR 10 Gon ee One

S.S. Ranelia, S.S. Fontini, S.s. Peto] CANADIAN CRUISER |” 23 Oct. 27 Oct. ag ;
Brussels, $8.8. ‘Olivebank, 5.5, Fort D®] La’ Boe 1 Nov. 4 Nov ior be Mb on
France, 8.S. Uruguay, S.S. Laind@y> oe . Nov, © Nov, 15 Nev. 16 Nov,
Lane, $.S. Mooncrest, 8.5. Golfito, 5.5.
pense Frederic A. Filers, 3.8.

ida Caracas, S.S. Sea Breeze,|] NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails
8.8. Argentina, S.S: Fort Amherst, 8.5 Murbetee Rematee “Ee, “Ee , a
aon sha er, a a: bs = Montreal St. John

sa, S.S. Geo iat, S.S. en, S.8. NELSO!
Captain John, S.S. Summont, 3.8 | LADY RODNEY - 9 Nov. 11 Név. 20 _Nov. ni — 14 Oct.
Quilmes, S.S. Canadian Challenger, 5.5 28 Nov. @ Nov. T Dec. -_ pare 16 Dee.

Nueva Esparta, S.S. Etna, 8.8. Jegn,
8.8. Esso Cambridge and S.S. Rangiteto



Read the
Evening Advocate

To-morrow





The Weather

TODAY:

Sun Rises: 5.48 a.m.

Sun Sets: 5.44 p.m.

Moon (First Quarter
October 18

Lighting: 6 p.m.

High Water: 6.56 a.m.
6.34 p.m.

YESTERDAY:

‘Rainfall (Codrington) nil

Total for month to yesterday
4.61 ins.

Temperature (Min.) 72.0° F

Wind Direction ( 9 a.m.) E
(ll a.m.) 8.E.

Wind Velocity 7 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29,943
(il a.m.) 29.922





NOTICE



Civic Friendly Society
Scholarships

Applications are invited for two
or more scholarships offered by

the members of The Civic Welfare

Friendly Society beginning 1951 tc
any second grade school in the
island. These scholarships

ypened to members or the child-
ren (boys or grils) of member:

Hill,| Chureh and island aforesaid containing | in straitened circumstances of the

| @bovenamed society, between the

ages of 9 and 12 years. The

scholarships will be awarded on

of D. Griffith (deceased) on lands of| the results of an examination.

Louise Dawe on lands of the estate of
D. Bynoe (deceased) on lands of Mrs.
Marie Layne and on a road over which
right of way to the public
View Road or
however else the same may abut and
bound together with the chattel dwel-

Form of application can be haa

at the Society's Office, Swan &

High Sts. and should be returned

by 4 p.m. on Saturday 28th Octo-

ber, 1950.

linghouse and all and singular other the |

the

and being with the appurtenances to

Going | bring before me an account of their said

claims with their witnesses, documents

in Real| and vouchers, to be examined by me

on any Tuesday, or Friday between the
hours of 12 (noon) and 3 o'clock in
at the Office of the Clerk

B] of the Assistant Court of Appeal ai the
it] Court House, Bridgetown, before the

22nd day of November, 1950, in order

Buyers. A Tip to Sensible Buyers—-The that such claims may be ranked accord-

Senseless may Follow-—-Contact all Agents
—Retognized, Private and jayside,
Compare Properties,
tations for some of the said Properties
wn), Values, re-Sale Values—if any,
then Decide for Yourselves. A Good
Idea is to also take along some of your
Keen and True Friends.
When Tt Suits U. Cali at “Olive Bough",
Near Pavilion Court, Hastings—on—Sea
Look For My Sign Board.

In Half Moon Fort, St

HOUSE
Lacy. 18 x 10 — 8 ins, New, Pine right

. Apply. Charles Skinner, 4
Men's Road. St. Peter.





11,10, 50—3n



| Plymouth, MONTSERRAT, B.W.1
for £3,500,
COCONUT HILL HOTEL Conte
ed

drawing room, dining room, 11



Sines on % on ‘of con |
rooma, ‘con-
ventences ’ and
Rage phoning 2. Bridgetown,
ie, : YO -] hours of 12 (noon) and 2 o'clock in the




Se rhc
Apply to D'Arcy
14.10.50



CHIROPRACTIC

DR, FERREIRA of “Chirovilie’ Upper
Bay St. (Near Esplanade) by Chiropractic
method corrects diseases of eyes, ear.
nose, throat, lungs, stomach, kidneys and
lower organs, Dial 2881

24.09.50,

2DHHDLHOOHGHOHHDOGHSHOHHHGOHOHOOH



vo

at
Ave., b and | piece
“Genecl 3 x1 Worthing View in the parish of Christ
irmenatnctnapremmerbaeresenteramenattneceintnetnssademnesiantamanan,

ing to the nature and priority thereof
respectively; otherwise such persons will

jotations (maybe be precluded from the benefits of the

said Decree, and be deprived of all
claim on or against the said property.
Claimants are also notified that they
must aitend the said Court on Wecnes-

Diai 3141--] day, the B2nd day of November, 1950,

at 210 otlock a.m their said
claims will be ranked.

Given under my hand this llth day of
September 1950,

when

I. V. GILKEs,

Ag. Clerk of the Assistant
Ceurt of Appeal.
13.9.50—3n,

OFFICIAL SALE

BARBADOS
IN THE ASSISTANT COURT
OF APPEAL
(Equitable Jurisdiction)
RICHARD STANLEY: NICHOLLS
(Plaintift)
LOUISE GRIFFITH (Defendant),

NOTICE is hereby given that by virtue
an Order of the Assistant Court of
Appeal dated the llth day of September,
1950 there will be set up for sale to the
highest = at the of the Clerk
of the int Court of A) al at the
Court House, xetween the
afternoon on Friday, the twenty fourth
day of November, 1950 all that certain
or parcel of land

situate at

Church and island aforesaid containing |)

by
and fifteen-hundreths
thereabouts abutting and bounding on
lands of Florence Rice on tonds of the
estate of C. Griffith (deceased) on lands
of Louisa Dawe on lands of the estate
of B. Bynoe (deceased) on lands of
Mrs. Marie Layne and on a road over
which there is a right of way to the
public road called Worthing View Road
or however else the same may abut
and bound together with the chattel
dwellinghouse and all and singular other
the buildings and erections on the said
pareel of land erected and built standing
and being the appurtenances, and if not
then sold the said property will be set
up for sale on every succeeding Friday
between the same hours until the same
is sold for a sum not less than £208.6.8,
Dated this 11th day of September, 1950,
tiv. G
| Ag. Clerk of the Assistant
Court ef Appeal.

13,9.50—n.

of a perch o





GRADUATE TEACHER IN

COMMERCIAL SUBJECTS

Required in April, if possible, but not later than September, 1951, Graduate

Teacher of Commercial Subjects.

Should hold the Degree

of B.Com. or B.Sc.

(Econ). Experience in office routine desirable, and experience in the teaching of

Commercial Subjects essential. A
Caribbean would be an advantage.

knowledge of

industrial conditions in the

Graduate Teacher—$1,728 x $72,00-—$2,160 x $96.00—$2,928 p.a

Hons.)

~$1,920 x $96.00-—$2,880 x $144.00—$3,456 pa

Salary—Barbados Scales, viz—
Graduate Teacher (ist., 2nd
Teacher's Diploma (‘or recog

these scales.
£1, Os. 0d.—$4.80 BW.1



Position on the above Incremental

For a suitably qualified candidate
Salary Scale: $3,600 x $144—$4,320.

Initial appointments on this scale mu
Barbados, not exceeding $960 (B.W.T.)



There is at present no Mave passage scheme in
Applications (m® epecial form) stating age

or single, and enclosing a photograph, to

to the Acting Headmaster, Combermere School, St

whom further particulars may be obtaine



nised equivaleft) $216 p.a. additional to

Currency)
6 subject % adjustment for War Service

possible vatancy may be available on the
st commence at the minimum. Passages to
will be refunded on initial »ppointment

Barbados
qualification, experi« narried
be sent not later than 3lst. October, 1950,
Michael, Barbados, B.W.1., from

a

24.9.50--3n.

said
Going for] Barcel of land erected and built standing



admeasurement twenty-two perches | }



|

l

J. W. MAYNARD,
Secretary, Scholarship
Committee,
Swan & High Sts.




MR. REYNOLD S. WEEKES

(Secretary of the Chiming Bells

Friendly Bociety Unity Social
‘ul

Requests the pleasure ‘of your
company to

A DANCE

(In aid of Scholarships at Second-
ary Schools)

On Monday Night, 23rd Oct, 1950
at The United Social Culb, March-
field, St. Philip
(kindly lent by the management)
Admission :

GENTS 2/- — LADIES 1/6
REFRESHMENTS ON SALE
Music by Mr. C. B. Browne's
Orchestra

15.10,.50.—1n,
























Singing Competition

ie epee oF BOXING DAY,
o: ecember, 1950 at
KENSINGTON OVAL.

Oe (es = or choirmaster desir-
ous of taking part, please get in
touch with Sydney Skinner e¢/c
Churchill Bar, Baxters Road, St.
Michaet










‘Now to God on
Three Dollars,
part of transportation will be given
to every Choir outside of st
Michael taking part.

Please get in touch with me
before 30.10.1950

Officials are : Capt. C. E, Raison,
aie uae and Mr. Gerald
udson, air :
Beckles, O.B E ine yope

Sponsored by—
Mr. SYDNEY SKINNER.

Mr,





SUCCESSFUL

AUCTION
SALES

John 4. Biaden

Low Charges.



















































‘ 15.10.50—6n.














bers. Fares and freizht

S.S. “COLOMBIE”
S.S. “COLOMBIE”

CRICKETERS!

Greet_your fellow ORICKETER
in BLAZ &
send them today to (

RAYMOND JORDAN

in Bay Street, opposite
Combermere

MRS. E. SIMMONS
HOWELL

begs to inform her clients
that the

HASTINGS BEAUTY
PARLOUR

Will be re-opened on
Monday 16vh October

Applications for two or more
exhibitions to any Second Grade
School will be received by the
Secretary not later than Thurs-
day the 26th October 1950.

Candidates must be members
or the children of members, and
must not be less than 10 years
nor more than 12 years of age
on the 3ist July, 1951, to be
proved by a Baptismal certificate
which must accompany the appli-
cation.

The examination will be held
at the St. Philip’s Boys’ School on
Saturday 28th October, 1950, be-
ginning at 10 a.m.








The Committee of Management;
Per,

R. S. WEXKES,, Secretary.
14.10,50—2n



shares, and Subscription
shares, dollar-a-month ma-
turing at $250, both yielding
approximately Five per cent,
Loans on it Mortgage
Security on Real Estate
Contact...
Mr. VICTOR HUNTE,
Secretary,
Barnes Bldg. — Bridge St.





STILLSON

obtainable at......





















$25 Paid-up Investment }))

FOR THAT EXTRA

you need a



—

raves oD

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD. — Agents.

CIE. GLE. TRANSATLANTIQUE
French Line

Sailing to Trinidad and La Guaira on the
25th October 1950, accepting passengers.
Sailing to Plymouth and Le Havre via
Martinique and Guadeloupe on the 29th
October, 1950, ,

For further particulars, apply to:—

R. M. JONES & CO. LTD.—Agents.





FIREWORKS
FIREWORKS

A SELECT ASSORTMENT
Including
SKYROCKETS, CRACKERS,
JACK IN BOX, MATCHES,
ROMAN CANDLES Etc, Ete.

And ‘
SPARKLERS
Also
BALOONS,
Whole Sale And Retail

——$_—_

MODERN HIGH SCHOOL

(Registered and Approved
by Dept. of Education)



















Our waiting list for the
January 1951 term closes
on 30th November. Have
you entered the name of
your child yet? Remember
WE GET RESULTS.

We are offering $4,000 in
free scholarships tenable
from January 1951. Details
appeared in Sunday Advo-
cate of Ist October.

Apply in writing.

L, A. LYNCH,
Principal.
Tel, No, 2846.
8.10.50—4n

PLASTIC PARASOLS
$1.71

PLASTIC RAINCOATS
$3.98

PLASTIC HAIR









BRUSHES ... $1.82
COSTUME
JEWELLERY
SAMPLE SHOES
FASHION HATS

NYLONS!
YES. IT’S

THANIS

Pr. Wm. Hry & Swan Sts.

GRIP
WRENCH

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM.
(CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)

Cnr. of Broad and Tudor Streets.

SIP i





Prompt Payment
PLANTATION BUILDING

Phone 4640





Blenders - - -

Are You “Going Places” or “Doing Things” if so ....

You need a few Bottles of this Blend.

See that you get them in time.

. AL vessels Atted with cold storage cham
to change without notice. <













































TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM

(With the Distinctive Flavour)

TO ENJOY IF.

|












































i







—



NOTICE

The Petite Beauty SALON will
be closed from SATURDAY, OCT
2ist to OCT. 31ST.

ORIENTAL

GOoDs!

(Articulos)
CUROIS, JEWELLERY,
SELKS, (Se Habla Espanol)

THANES

Pr. Wm, Hry. St. DIAL 3466

COLLECTION OF
RENTS.

I beg to notify the
General Public that I
have added to my busi-
ness a Rent Collecting
Department, and shall be

glad to undertakeâ„¢ the
collecting of all rents

whether large or small.
Strict attention will be
paid to all. Commission
only 10%.
D’ARCY A. SCOTT,
Magazine Lane.

Dial 3743.



INDUSTRIAL, COMMERCIAL,
RESIDENTIAL

Telephone 2336

Office : Hastings Hotel Ltd.

FOR SALE

INCH HAVEN, Christ Church.—
Modern Bungalow, built of stone.
All mahogany doors, window |
frames, built-in wardrobes, dress=
ers etc. 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
living/dining room, kitchen, gar- |
age etc. One A.C. Engine Stand
ing im 1 acre land facing sea,

CASABLANCA, Maxwell Coast.

COVE SPRING HOUSE, St. |

James.

BUILDING SITES and ACRE-
AGE on sea coast and inland.

FOR RENT

EN-DAH-WIN, Pine Hill.Ne:
Bungalow (unfurnished) 3 sone,



JOHN

We
BLADON |

AF.S., F.V.A.
| Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE

TOWER GARAGE—St. Matthias
Gap. An almost new pro)
suitable for a large variety of
purposes apart from a garage
business .

NEA DENDRA.—Pine Hill. A
conveniently designed bungalow
of coral stone construction, The
accommodation consists of large
living room with ae winner
oO ing into a spacious cover
gallery, 3 bedrooms with ‘built-in’
wardrobes, a very modern kitchen,
laundry, servant’s quarters and
large garage. A well-recommend-
ed property

SPEIGHTSTOWN — Large prop-
erty in central position of excep-
tional interest as retail store pro-
position, with ample storage and
living, space

HOTEL PROPERTIES & HOTEL
SITES.—Particulars of these op~
portunities may be obtained on
application .

HARTS GAP HASTINGS
Inexpensive bedroom timber cot-
tage in good locality. Enquires

invited.
RAEME HALL TERRACE.—
well constructed and sensibly

lanned properties are available in
this. select and residential area.

1

ROCKLEY. — A modern cora
stone villa with separate eS
and dining rooms, 3 bedrooms. (at
with basins and fitted wate
tiled bathroom, separate .
well fitted kitchen, 2 car eee
servant’s ‘quarters and clever!
laid-out garden, is now ©
for sale at a low figure

INE ROAD,.—Excellent puild-
ae plot of 12,615 sq. ft. flanked
by other good property .

VILLA ROSA—Passage Road,
City. Attractive and centrally
Jocated stone bungalow with
double carriageway. On

mately at Bo ak
Soe gallery, large lounge,

bedrooms,
pantry and kitchen. Good c'
yerd at rear. Very
figure asked.

CRANE VIEW AND CRANE
VILLA — These attractive free-

hold properties wi +

plication. .

FLORES—Kent, Christ ‘Church -
A well built and nicely,
2 bedroomed bungalow,
lounge,
servants’ room and garage.
struction of coral stone.
proximately â„¢% acre ground
ariv: from

vead, Offers wanted.

RENTALS

“SPION KOP”, Maxwetl's Coast
for month, of November:

“FLORES” .— Bungalow
at Little Kent. Unfurnished.

“IN CHANCERY”—Inch Mar-
lew. Modern Furnished Bunga-
lew.

CUMBERLAND HOUSE, Cod-
rington Hill.—With about