Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
1950



“* Barbados a Aduncate



——$—$—$_—

KING



Round Table Knights |

Honour W.I. Cricketers
‘Festival Year Of W.I.”’
Says Griffiths

(From Our Own Correspondent) .

"S B





- OFF TO NEW ZEALANY

j
j
|
|
}

j

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|

——$—___—

French Forces

Quit Thatkhe

SAIGON,



Indo-China,
Oct. 13
French forces in northern Indo

|China have begun evacuating the

outpost of Thatkhe usually reliable
sources said here today. Thatkhe
is a fortress near the China
frontier with a tiny airfield.

The survivors of a French col-
umn of about 40,000 men trapped
by Vietminh forees had staggere|





SEAMAN CHARGED WIT:
BURGLARY IN
BUCKINGHAM PALACE

LONDON, Oct. 13.

POLICE to-night charged a man with breaking
into Buckingham Palace, the home of the King,
and stealing a diplomatic despatch box.

’ into the fortress on Monday They named the man as Douglas Monro, 26, a
LONDON, Oct. 13.. |after the biggest battle cf :
ME. JAMES GRIFFITHS Secretary of State a F \rance’s. four sear war awain.:| Scottish seaman. The arrest of Monro followed a

for the Colonies last night bestowed further

praise upon the West Indies cricket team. Speak-| = =

ing at a dinner in London he said: “Next year

may be the Festival of
been the festival of the

Consuls Must

Britain, but this year has
West Indians.

They have been grand ambassa-
dors and have linked us closer
than ever with their islands”

The occasion was a dinner



}

ended on Monday

euerillas in Indo-China.

Only about 500 men from five
battalions in the trapped column
fought their way to safety. The
battle which had lasted five days
with severe
losses to both sides.

French forces covering the
withdrawal of the garrison of the
China border outpost of Caobang
had to fight well trained Vietminh



probe at the Palace by Britain’s to

detectives,

after the Royal despatch box had been found dump-

ed in a London dustbin.
CANADIAN $—£
EXCHANGE RATE

With effect from Monday,
October 16, authorised deal-
ers in foreign exchange will

The box, containing only offi-
cial correspondence was taken
from a Palace room occupied by
the Marshal of the Diplomatic
Corps—a Royal Officer responsible
for personal contacts with For-
eign Ambassadors and Ministers.
His duties are largely confined to

. o er a be allowed to make a market :
i - given by the Knights of the pede 03 outnumbering them ten in Canadian dollars and ||formal and official occasions. os
Use Discretion Round Table in honour of the A French army spokesman said quote rates dependent on Tee oy Ss Sees ber
* : | West Indies. ¥ ss that important elements of the supply and demand. No offi- was stolen, police said they
The Earl of Athlone who has Thatkhe gavtiest érattoops abd cial quotation will thereafter lieve: that the theft =~ ae =
IN GRANTING VISAS recently visited the Caribbean Sideecearnd Sad walehlined the be given. As Exchange Con- nected with any political mo’
i | colonies with his wife, Princess ane trol and Import Control will ment.

WASHINGTON Oct. 13

Alice, presided, Among the guesis
were Admiral Sir Irvine Glennie,





difficult Ingle mountain pass o!
Lunghpai and reached their des





remain in force the supply
of and demand for dollars



Monro will appear in court to--
morrow charged with “Burglari-

n 1 ] tination Nacham to the southeast, will as hitherto be restricted ously breaking and entering Buck-
A State en former Commander-in-Chief _of the first break in the chain|{| to approved transactions, ingham Palace and stealing the
said to-day that United S| the West Indies’ Squadron, Sir of the French frontier — posts despatch box.”
Consuls abroad are empowered) Grattan Bushe, former Govern:r along the Chinese—Tankin:: ne —ann————= | The box—imprinted with the
te use their own discretion in re-! of Barbados,‘ Sir Alan Burns border west of Donfihke on Sep - e Royal initials “G. R.” (George
validating visas of foreigners former Governor of British Hon- tember 18, U K Will Have Rex) and a crown—was found by
coming to America. eee duras and Sir Louis Knuthsen, Withdrawals from several ad = an elderly man early this morn-
decision to suspend temporarily all} the famous physician who was | vanced posts followed, and ° e ing in a dustbin in a road near
visas under the new internal secur-| porn in the Wesv Indies. regrouping of the _ French ationing Of vie EUliO, “As Hepers Sh ware
ity law was taken for two reasons. or Vietnamese forces was planned intact,

1. To prevent further congestion
at Ellis Island where many
aliens are being held for



Russia Objects



—Reuter,



Newsprint

Police said to-night that let-
ters in the stolen box dealt with

i ° visits do the King, It contained
investigation for possible To Trygve Lie — ' Ti Ss LONDON, Oct. 13. | he state seereta.
Fascist connections. MR. FRED BETHELL shak J. H, Wilki t Seawell yesterday while Mr. E. D ruman British newspapers are to

2. To allow officials here to As U.N. Secretary " shakes hands with Mr. J. H, Wilkinson a y y e Mr. E. D.

study the law and issue new

Mottley smiles farewell.





return to the wartime system of

A Scotland Yard spokesman

A ao A t tonnage rationing to conserve |told Reuter nothing but that a

detailed instructions. LAKE SUCCESS, Oct. 13. Mr. Bethell is attending a meeting of the British Empire Parliamentary Association in New Zealand, 7 7 tves their dwindling supplies of news-|diplomatic box seemed to be

4 Soviet Foreign Minister, Andrei in place of Mr. G. H. Adams. int. The Newsprint Supply |missing from the Palace and
Communists have always beeM|y-hinsky told Reuter to-day that | ————____ SR ‘ HA + yf l npany announced today that|there were no signs of forcible

barred from entry to the United] hen the time came Russia would Onotutu stocks were as low today as at | entry.

States. Fascists as a class were

not barred but the new law makes
their exclusion with some ex-
ceptions mandatory.

The State Department admitted

explain her reasons for objecting
te the reappointment of Trygve
Lie as United Nations Secretary
General.

In a jovial mood, the Soviet

Bethell

| AMPHIBIAN LANDING

Leaves For | —YPECTED IN N. KOREA

By NORMA WILSON
_ HONOLULU, Oct, 13
President Truman arrived here’



the worst period of the war and
that a further saving in consump
tion is unavoidable,

News of the incident was sent
to King George who was out with
a shooting party on his Norfolk
Estate.

‘ ; early to-day by air = Wax tr The new ration will be based With no outward signs of the
the order would create great in-|Minister repeated emphatically meet anki Petree ian bas on cireulations at present | Palace having been broken into,
convenience but officials said|that Russia opposed any extension N Z ealand i ; Truman was spending only | tationing level which allows| Police were to-night still puszled
that difficulties should be over-|of Lie’s term of office, Such ex- e U.N. Warshi Pound Coast ain nes oe ep ; e nly most newspapers to publish six |28 to how the box found its way
ension wou e completely con- e e 4 . 3 . ito the dus n.
come soon. ratte Id b pl tel Hy taking off th onolulu' before} jages daily. During the war |tv the dustbi
trary to the Charter, he said. Mr. F. E. C. Bethell, M.C.P aking off on the final stage of his

Instructions amplifying yester-

day’s order have been sent to
Consuls.
In the. meantime,.gfficials said
consuls woukl re-examine all ap-
plicants to whom visas have been
granted.

Visas would be re-validated if

acl.) |i see
3 Killed, 4 Injured

killed and four passengers injured

left yesterday for Trinidad by
B.W.,LA., en route to New Zealand
He ayes, prinided this morning
‘to o Venezuela, from where

will fly to Curacao via Aruba.

In Curacao he will join a ship on
the New Zealand run, which will

By JULIAN BATES

United, Nations ‘
far northeast coast for ti

wprshis

TOKYO, om 13.
ay han er oreans
time-in two See par.

ring rumours that the area was being softened up for a

new amphibious landing.

6,500 mile flight.
The President was taking off
from Hickam air port at mid-
night local time to-day. He ways
expeeted back in Honolulu to-
morrow evening.
Whatever the point



of rendez-
vous, the talks will last no more

when tonnage rationing was in
force, newspapers for a long time
produced only four page editions.

Imports by the Newsprint Sup-
ply from Seandinavia are already
back to pre war level and cannot
be increased in the near future,

There have been at least six
cases of intruders being found
inside the gates of Buckingham
Palace in recent times,

The latest until to-day, was last
August, when aman aft
certified as a mental case was
found in the Royal Mews.

through the P: Canal. America’s biggest warship the 45,000 ton Missouri ‘ S After the British Government's] Palace officials looked on as
aliens were found to have no con-|when a plane crashed at Casa-| P*8* vig veetene Set headed the fleet 66 37 British Auiiralian Ganadian and es “ial icon teat cancellation of newsprint sup-| Police examined: the entrance to
nection either now or in the past}blanca airport shortly after taking} Mr. Bethell, Junior Member for , . an, are the

with Fascist and Nazi organisations



off to-day.

St. John in the House of Assembly

American warships which ranged far north yesterday and



expected to discuss the Korean



{plies from Canadian mills earlier

Marshal’s room—its

rar C 5 ¢ louble doors with glass parti 3.
or subsidiary bodies. The plane on the Casablanca—| witi represent Barbados at a meet-| to-day, close to the Manchurian border. war and other Far East problems caus ‘or quidly saunas their At hight, ‘seane. doce cre ieee
7 Algiers—Perpignan run burst into| jn ithe ‘Empire Parli 7, A Navy announcement | said : ‘ deliveries behind heavy solid gates and police
a nthe of ing of the British Empire Parlia- that they left their target “badly| Truman is tentatively due to : are on duty nearby. —Reuter.
“Airpo ort rescue squads dragged piece ta New Zealand Mex’ wicutee crippled.” Yesterday laid |leave Honolulu for San Francisco It has been decided that a re- t i
Dp. .










In Monday’s

out the four passengers but the

Casablanca Hospital. —Reuter.



‘THINGS WILL CHANGE’

VYSHINSK Y

TELLS U.S.

LAKE SUCCESS, Oct. 13.
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Vyshinsky to-day ap-
pealed to the United States to return to its wartime policy

of co-operation.

Then he promised “things will change”.
Vyshinsky was speaking in the United Nations Poli-
tical Committee during a debate on the seven power plan

to give greater powers to the



2 bly: chon was expected to fall by to- .
Vyshinsky asked: “Is not the coasts of North America. East German Securivy Police | morrow at the latest, despite the Be Drafted
li T root of the evil people’s political today swept into action. again v0 |stiffest opposition the United
Israe Agrees hat eee 2 Bea raaintain 100 per cent. secrecy | Nations forces have encountered Into U.S. Army
incon’ a Wiehe aie “ae ea ARTIE'S HEADLINE blackout over zonal elections fixed | north of the Parallel. Commun-

Force Is Necessary

ie Germans will vove in their first | hold up the drive on Pyongyang to The United States Selective
AGAINST AGGRESSION Fisdes polias” be Sonne ee soviet type elections. jenable northerners to tighten | Service Director General Lewis
LAKE SUCCESS, Oct. 13. Tarlie the American delegate their defences and prepare for @|fershey said in a speech here

Israel to-day accepted in prine
ciple the main objectives of the
proposal to give the United Na-
tions General Assembly power to
use force if necessary against -

gression.

The Israeli delegate Aubrey
Eban said in the resumed debate
in the Assembly’s Political Com-
mittee that Israel gave full sup-
port to the proposed invitation to
member nations to allocate part
of their forces for use by the
United Nations to put down ag-

on. ;

Eban said that “taken together
with the provisions of the seven
power resolution before the Com-
mittee for convening the General
Assembly at 24 hours notice in an
emergency it would enable the
United Nations to act on future
occasions with greater speed and
with a more equitable distribution
of responsibility and sacrifice than
were possible in the Korean
crisis.”

But Eban agreed with those who
had critJcised another feature of
the seven power plan—the pro-
posed establishment by the Secre-

General Assembly.

laboration, to a post war policy

John Foster Dulles had declared
that if the United Nations did
not institute an effective collec-
tive system, nations
nd more
on,military alliances.

The strength of such alliances
would not be subject to law or
to any such representative body
as the United Nations.

Dulles went on; “There can be
no comparable assurance that
aggression from a power outside
this organisation wi be as
responsible to the ove’ welfare
of the peoples of the world.”

Urging acceptance of the seven
power plan to increase the author-
ity of the General Assembly,
Dulles said that if the proposals
were approved, “we will have
opened to all mankind a new vista
of hope’

Dulles declared, “I deny with
all possible vehemence the
proposition that this organisation
is founded upon the principle of
unanimity or permanence of the
Security Council.

At Seawell to see him off were



Coming Fantome

(From Our Own Correspondent)

INDON.
Fantome II, the 700-ton yacht
formerly owned by the Duke of
Westminster, will shortly be seen
in the West Indies, Businessman
Mr. J. B. Kellock, with the full
biessing of the Board of Trade,
is equipping the yacht to tour
dollar markets as a sales ship.
She will leave England at the end
of the year with a crew of 25 and
ten salesmen and the exhibits of
60 British manufacturers. Her
six-month cruise will take in 25
ports in the West Indies and
Mexico, and on the East and West



POLITIC

has resigned from his post
of President of the Political
Progress Group. He is of
the opinion that his position
as President, would not be
consistent with his status as
a Nominatel Member of the
Legislative Council,





E. Germany Wants

Total Secrecy
IN ZONAL ELECTIQNS

BERLIN, Oct. 13.

for Sunday when 14,000,000 East

Today 36 hours before polling
booths open on Sunday morning,
nobody in East Germany except
political leaders knew what the
ballot paper looked like.

Papers printed in strict secrgpy
are being rushed by special mobil 4
squads to towns and villages
throughout the Soviet Zone.

Handpicked “alert groups” mace
eleventh-hour tours of vhe zone
today to juash attempts to
“sabotage” elections by opposi-
tion propaganda.—Reuter,



Portugal Backing Franco Spain

By LUIS TEVES
LISBON, Oct. 13.
Portugal’s Foreign Minister was
meeting his Spanish opposite
number in Granada, Spain, today
in what some observers here re-
arded as one of more moves to get
ranco recognised, and Spain ad-



in ruins the big port Chongjin 35

Nations war planes were sealing
off the coastal strip around Sin-
anju, an Airforce spokesman said.
American B 29 superforts bombed
railways and roads at Namsidong,

only 20 miles from the Manchurian {bombed by the Japanese in 1941.

Border and 60 miles northwest of
the Sinanju_ strip,

In Central Korea, ground forces
including the British Brigade
closed in on thousands of Com-
munists, virtually trapped, but
still stubbornly defending the key

of the 38th Parallel, expected to

| centre of Kumchon, 12 miles north

be the last big Communist stand

| before their capital Pyongyang.



' Kimchon May Fall
Assaulted from all sides, Kim-

ists’ alm was believed to be to

last ditch stand,
The Sinanju strip on the west

| coast north of Pyongyang, is at

mouth of the Chonghon River
on the main road and rail routes
from North Korea to Manchuria
and North China. It is 80 miles
from the Manchurian border and

hicasea 250 miles of the Russian-

leased Port Arthur.

Superforts swung far north to-
day and struck Communists from
coast to coast to prevent supplies



|
\

and reinforcements from reaching
the battlefront.
@ On page 9.

POLITICAL OBSERVERS THINK

cognition of Franco’s regime and
Spain's admission to the Atlantic
Pact.

According to another version,
Portugal would be acting as Unit-

guese Government will soon be
removed.”

The belief that Portuguese-
Spanish ties were growing strong-
er followed General Franco’s visit








on Monday morning. He will

the nation on his conversation with
General MacArthur.

During his stay in Hawaii he
will tour Pearl Harbour by launch
to inspect the hulks of warships

Later he will be taken on a
three-hour tour of military instal-
lations and other points of interest
around Honolulu.

He was expected to confer pri-
vately with his aides this evening
before his midnight take-off.

—Reuter,



18-Year-Olds May

WASHINGTON, Oct. 13,

that the question of asking Con
gress to lower the draft (con—
scription) age to 18 was being
“seriously considered.”

He said that ex-servicemen of
World War Two could be wholly
excepted from service if draft
boards were allowed to tap ‘the
very rich source of meeeerr
represented by 18-year olds,

Under present draft regulations
all men aged 18 to 25 must regia-
ter for drafting but only those
aged 19 or more may be called in.

—Reuter.

ing in September during which-ac-
cording to an official communique
they “examined carefully the pres-
ent international situation in ac-
cordance with the provisions of
the friendship and apne
treaty signed by Spain and Portu-
gal in 1939.”

turn to tonnage rationing will

during the next rationing period.

—Reuter.



Lo






Spani
i>
—



‘ {be for ¢ i 5 ;
‘ ‘ miles south of the border. spend most of the following day a minimum period of six
ADVOCATE pilot, the radio operator, and the members of his family, Mr. J. H. datkadl ili. ‘Qucdl Gossemiedenty — ve they atien ‘Tenchon|working on the Forelgn policy months. TELL —_ ADVOCATE
FULTON OURSLER mechanic were byrnt to death. _ | Wilkinson, MLC-P.. and .Mr, B.D. PORT-OF-SPAIN. marshalling yards, the North|speech he will deliver there on{ It may be that a further cut THE NEWS
writes the First Chapter of A heavy mist over the airport) Mottley M.C.P. Mr, Gerald R. Wight, re- \||Korean supply route, 100 miles|Tuesday night. will be necessary. This will be Ping 3113 Day or Night.
THE GREATES prevented the pilot from making cently nominated member of southwest of Chongjin. On the| ‘The President is expected toj considered by Directors of the ae A'TE
T emergency landin ; i ; ; ia > com in th mR" THE ADVOC
STORY EVER TOLD Wee bn eee ie a the néw Legislative Council, other side of the Peninsula, United |take this opportunity to report to) Company in the light of experience

PAYS FOR NEWS.



GILBEYS |
shWines

These include i

GILBEY’S

PORT

& SHERRY |

mitted to the Atlantic Treaty. ed States intermediary and pre-|to Oporto on September 27. Ob- (2) San Joao De Deus centen-
tary General of a panel of mili- shied ote ee Officially the Portuguese Foreign arranging everything so that if the servers noted that at the end of his | ary 10 days comments niens 2. , \
tary experts.—Reuter. found i withoutean adminis- Minister Dr’ Paulo Cunha was to| United Nations were to recognise | three days meeting with Dr. Sala- | ing which relics of oa en You can enjoy }
a |tcetve hanc. Voanpemy ale eent-|oeth,tig opanien,Fovelen, Minis | Frances, Spatn tole Would be at | ge wmough accompanied, by, Metre” in Spans, were taken
. , a y Spain’s -| Fo n ste: e was e 2 ope ] ;
BRITAIN CAN IMPORT ably, “That would be just too}De Deus centenary commemora-| lantic Pact with the full peninsula | in Oporto by Portugal's ‘Defence | Portugal have just been returned them again in
ARGENTINA WOOL bad. “ tions in Granada. But political ob-| defence plans already prepared. | Minister, Lieut. Colonel Fernando |to Granada. What at first appear-
LONDON, Oct. 13 He added that it would not be/ servers saw the meeting as a com-| Most observers think the second | Santos Costa and not by the Por-{ed to be mere religious celebra~ greater quantity
In future the British Board of rad Sinnity Come resulted in pene to peat Franco-Salazar version the more likely one. They |tuguese Foreign Minister tions turned éut to be the pretext
z meeting and part of a series 0!

Trade, will permit imports from
Argentina of raw sheep’s and
lambs’ wool of any type, the Board

Pressed to explain Soviet ob-
jections to Lie, Vyshinsky was

talks towards unity of action in
the Iberian Peninsula’s defence
and foreign policy.

base this view on the fact that the
Salazar-Franco meeting took place
six days after. Dr. Cunha’s return

Though the greatest official se-
crecy was maintained here over

for repeated demonstrations of
Spanish-Portuguese friendship

This has been constantly em-



>

OX FOUND IN DUSTBIN~

a
tea
&



ene " from the United States where he] today’s meeti an 0 0 g hasized in speeches by high offi- . " .
announced today. Ore ay a asked whether these might be bas- There were two main views of|had attended the Atlantic Pact veer was altatle” sialitical abe Pals of the bn o countries, giving GARDINER AUS TING Co., Lid.
licences granted to individual irm- ed on the Secretary General’s at-|the meeting among political ob-| Council and that on his return he|servers thought that something|the impression that it is aimed to

porters will permit the import of] titude towards the Korean war. servers here said in Lisbon he was convinced | was going on. The chain of events|show the world the friendship Agents

any quantity, although the Board| “I cannot be more precise at this}' First was that Portugal would|that “the prejudices which still] which led them to believe this|and unity of ideas of Spain and

reserve the right to revoke such moment’, the Soviet representa-! be preparing a move to advocate prevent the adoption of a realistic | was: Portugal.

licenees at any time. tive replied.—Reuter. Spain’s case seeking to obtain re- policy



advocated by the Portu-



(1) The Franco-Salazar meet-| @ On page 3





PAGE TWO



Carub Calling




IS ED ENCY. the Gov-
ern ; during the past
week, v the following Ele-
mentar ools, St. Saviour’s
Boys’ Girls’, St. Andrew’s
Boys’ Girls’, Welches Mixed,

The Good Shepherd Boys’ School,
Speightstown Boys’, St. Lawrence
Boys’ and Girls’ and St. Martin's
Boys’ and Girls’

His Excellency
uing his tour
week.

Miss and Mr. Barbados
E DANCE at the Barbados
Aquatic Club to-night,
should be quite a change from
the usual type of dances we have
been having lately.

At midnight, a number of Judg-
es will select Miss and Mr. Barba-
dos, from dancers on the ballroom
Aioor, during one of the dances

Guest Artiste for the evening is
B.G.’s radio star, Miss Marjorie
Dey. Balloons carrying cash
prizes will be released during the
night.

Arrived Yesterday

R. CHARLES THOMAS ar-
: rived from Trinidad yester-
day morning by B.W.1.A. in-
transit from England via Jamaica.

will be contin-
of schools next

Mr. Thomas is here for about two
months, and during his ly, he
will give advice or practical

assistance to any local dramatic
clubs or amateur groups that may
desire it. His visit is under the
auspices of the British Council.
Mr. Thomas has had wide



experience in the theatre world LEAVING for Trinidad yesterday morning by B.W.1I.A. were Mr. Simon

in England, including free lance

Wardell and Mr. John Hammond.

work in the Theatre in London, wy wardell is on a month’s visit to England. Mr. Hammond accom-
panied him to Trinidad, and expects to return to-day,

where he was player, scenic de-
signer, Stage manager and for a
while he was touring as a pioneer

s

Off to the U.K.
R. SIMON WARDELL, whose
god—father is Lord Beaver~
brook, left yesterday by B.W.LA
for Trinidad en route to England.
‘Accompanying. him as far as

*. Trinidad was Mr. John Hammond

. Kidney,

who expects to return today.

Mr. Wardell who has a villa
on The Coast, will spend a month
in England, after which he will
be returning to Barbados.

Fellow Passengérs

R. J. M. KIDNEY, Manager

of the West Indies Crickey
team arrives today by the
“Golfito” together with Mr. and
Mrs. Jeffrey Stollmeyer. Among
their fellow passengers is Mr.
J. M. Campbell, Vice-Chairman
of Booker Brothers, who is
making his annual visit to British
Guiana. I understand that Mr.

3} Campbell will spend one or two
# days in Trinidad.

Will Inspect Site
URING Mr. R. K. Nunes’
. Short stay in Barbados, it is
understood that he will vis
Kensington Oval with Mr. Jac
Skipper John Goddar
and a few other members of the
Barbados Cricket Association, to
inspect the proposed site for a
new pavilion at Kensington,
Mr. Nunes who is President of

| the W.I. Cricket Board of Control

| is an intransit passenger on the

a |
x

MR. CHARLES THOMAS—arrived
yesterday.

member of the Arts League of
Service Travelling Theatre.

In 1931, he became director of
the Little Theatre in Middlebor-
ough, following which, ‘he was
deputy producer and designer of
the Liverpool Repertory. In 1943,
Mr. Thomas took over as Drama
Adviser to the West Riding Edu-
cation Committee, and in 1947,
he joined the British Drama
League as tutor, lecturer and fes-
tival adjudicator.

Mr. Tucker, the sritish Council
representative has arranged for Mr.
Thomas to broadcast over Radio
Distribution on Friday Oct. 20th,
in the British Council programme
and to discuss matters concerning
Dramatic art as applied to Bar-
bados. It is understood also, that
the cast of “Blithe Spirit”, will
give excerpts from this production
on the same programme.

London Rumour

ARIB heard from London
yesterday that Sir Rupert
Briercliffe, Former Medical Ad-
viser to C.D. and W. had been

offered an important post in
Ceylon, Supervising their new
health plan.

On checking the report with
Sir Rupert, who lives in St. Peter,
he was informed that this was
the first time Sir Rupert had
heard anything about it.



CROSSWORD



“Golfito” which arrives here

| to-day.



tries very hard to get
some clue as to why he has been

Rupert

brought such a long way from
home, while the little. coons talk
excitedly among themselves, All at
once they stop chattering. Most of
them run away in a bunch, bat
twe stay behind to take Rupert's

EMPIRE

TODAY 4.45 and 8.30
and Continuing
M-G-M.- Pictures Presents

“THE DOCTOR
AND
THE GIRL”

Starring
Glenn FORD
Charles COBURN
Gloria De HAVEN
Janet LEIGH
with Bruce BENNETT









Across
, M st vet gives candidate:
advice. (4, 3, 2)
& fhey are played on vot “twisted
{9 4)
) Fresh ways. aay we say ? (3, 4)
iy Pulled like an artist. (4)
lo Bir s)
17) Mov 8 Welt Known. (4)
iv a gvod order. (4)
’ Ks here in song. (6)



$

1 $.0 (2 22. Delight. (8)

This is quite correct. (4)

Sherp as in « cider drink. (4)

>ungors. (6)

Down
clear,
make

(9)
sore verse

this alter bathing
4 Sin in error. (3)



> st b U.S.A (2)
uo (3) i, A Moly Man, (6)
» | ew one has no minster. (4)
ot like the enclosed painter ?
12 Softens, (7)
ta If , 6) 16. Satirical, (6)
20. Th ie Paragraph. (3)
43 int ion (3)

Â¥ ie Across
ru ”q

14



Down
ot te

nhete Eight; ¢
Orotund: 8. Berlin
ter 16, Drip: 18, Pat

nance

EXTRA

NEWS REEL:— Charles and
Louis In Training

ROXY

TO-DAY and TOMORROW
4.45 and 8.15
United Artist Presents

“MRS. MIKE”

Starring

Dick POWELI,
Evelyn KEYES
With J. M. KERRIGAN
Angela CLARKE

To Attend Course

RECENT arrival in London

from the West Indies is Mr.
C. T. X. Henriques. He ig the
Resident Magistrate in Kingston,
Jamaica, and has gone to Eng-
land at the invitation of the
British Council to attend a course
on Juvenile Delinquency.

After A Month’s Holiday
FTER one month’s holiday
staying with Miss Lyris

Weatherhead in Bay Street, Mrs.

Dorothy MelIntyre returned to
Grenada yesterday afternoon by

B.W.LA. Mrs. MecIntyre’s hus-

band is the Engineer at the Ford

Service Station in Grenada.

Indefinite Stay
RRIVING by B.W.LA. yes
terday afternoon from B.C,

was Miss Cynthia Lopes, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Reggie Lopes
ot Georgetown. Cynthia is up
for an indefinite stay and is
staying at “Accra”, Rockley, |

Viola Players

FF TO AMERICA last week

on the “Queen Mary” with Sir
Thomas Beecham and the Royal
Philharmonic Orchestra went
Jamaica—born Mr. James Verity.
principal viola, Among the other
members of the orchestra is one
of his fellow Jamaicans Mr.
Patrick Vermont, who is also a
viola player.

Rupert and the Castaway—25

Fi



arms and lead him off the beach.
Up the rocks and through the trees
they go until, near the middle of
the island, he sees a rough wall and

the tops some quéer-looking
see me few ae pe in
shelter and a gorgeous bow! uit
is fore hn. While he eats
hungrily the talking starts again,

ROYAL

TO-DAY and TOMORROW
4.30 and 8.30

Republic Smashing Double

Wild Bill ELLIOTT
Vera RALSTON

“WYOMING”
And

“BANDITS OF
THE BADLAND”

Starring
Sunset CARSON
Peggy STEWART

Aanen SS Mid-Nite

rp xrre: RHOW Toe
Serial :
“KING OF THE
TEXAS RANGERS”

The All Action Serial . . .

TWO PRIZES will be given
away at this Show:—

lst Prize—$6.00

on ~~.

nd Prize—$4.00

So Keep Your Half-Ticket
You may be the Lucky One.

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY To MONDAY
4.30 and 8.15

Republic Big Double

Roy ROBERTS
George COOPER
in

“FLAMING FURY”

And

“THE LAST BANDIT”

with
Wild Bill ELLIOTT

Adrian BOOTH
George (Gabby) HAYES























BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Paris With R. M. MacColl As

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1950




































——

SSS SS (\





Paris Cuteness . . .

MRS. BLOSSOM f NT HISTORY!
nae oe ae PLAZA OiJSTIN tic ENTIRTAINME °
° Louis, Missouri, TODAY To SUNDAY _ 5 and 8.30 p.m.
Your News-(uide mother of 16- PARAMOUNT’S HIT MUSICAL - - - -
year - old Mim. Bing CROSBY with the ANDREWS SISTERS
whose blue eyes ag le dae
ix ¢0tle oe © Lo a ly ne explained Grandma un- caught - ap- ie bs
E ° scar Wilde out expectedly. reciative glance
in the historic Pére Lachaise bf King Farouk HERE COME THE WAVES
cemetery of Paris is in the news. Paris Bluntness .. . in Deauville last With Betty HUTTON and Sonny TUFTS
The other day the wife of an UY POL ROGER, héad of the Month, is wor- eE :
ried by the reaction of St. Louis

FLASH !! MIDNITE MATINEE TO-DAY (SAT) [4TH
Two New Pictures! (A Monogram Double)
JOHNNY MACK BROWN in

“PRAIRIE EXPRESS”

And

American Embassy official, who
completed her education at Lon-
don- University received Hevees

champagne firm, explodes a
myth. He gays that those tales
about experts being able to classify
wines by tl year and even by the
“cru” (vinéyard) are largely non-
sense,

“You might be able to do it oc-

sociéty to the whole thing.

Mrs. Medart used to act oppo-
site cowboy star Buck Jones in
hard-hitting Western ts. Her
husband has an income of nearly
£150,000 a year, derived from
selling steel equipment for child-

from English friends who. been
at the university with her.

The letter said
they had heard
that Wilde’s tomb

—

——



ore casionally with clarets or bur- *®?’s playgrounds. DUNCAN RENALDO as the Cisco Kid
oe gundiés,” says Pol Roger. an ele- “ Santa 9s ”
pm a ere gant, slender man in his thirties, segg OL 0a ae c moder 3° IN OLD NEW MEXICO
tigate, os tetrad champagne I can only Cleopatra. It seems hardly pos-
Out she went be fairly sure of one thing if I sub- cinje somehow. They are still

mit to a blindfold test. With luck
I can tell you what is not my own

wine.” k ,
Of the kingly plumpness, Mrs.
I lunched with Mr. and Mrs. Po! Medart says: “His photographs
Roger at their home in Epernay â„¢ake him out to be much fatter
the other day. Not surprisingly. than he really is. And, honest,
we washed down the mushroom When you bask in his personality
risotto and roast beef with Pol YoU forget all about his | waist-
Roger 1928. line. Such a kindly chap.
Mother and daughter are going
Mrs. Pol Roger before her mar-

to Cairo for Christmas. “How
riage Was a member of the Per- romantic!” cries Mrs. Medart.
rier and Jouet clan. “The perfect “Santa Claus on the banks of the
champagne alliance,” she says. Nile.”

They have seven children.



to the cemetery.
Sure enough the
inscription on the
i ble here and there.
he American woman asked the
cemetery authorities if she might
pay to have the lettering touched
up in gold. Answer: Not unless
the executors of Wilde’s estate
gave their permission first.

in constant communication, you

”



GLOBE

GAILY Continuing Today 5 and 8.30 and Continuing

Senate
== ——

,—=

I went out there my
night. The cemetery is a
ordinary place—a walled city of
the dead with long roadways lined
with thousands of elaborate
mausoleums.

A notice in English : “Vis-
itors to the cemetery are uest-
ed to be decently dressed. No
shorts tolerated.”

7 famous people lie there.
But il



London Express Service.



























M-G-M's MUSICAL

TO-NIGHT OF YOUR



de draws the greatest
number of visitors, out-nosing at 8.15 DREAMS!
Countess Walewska, Napoleon’s ”


. ico
<, TECHWICOLOR |

mistress, in popularity. An aver-
age of 20 to 30 people ask for the

ilde tomb every day, and more
s them are American than Brit-
ish,

Incidentally, the Pére Lachaise
who gave his name @ the ceme-
tery was the father confessor of
King Louis XIV.—“and that job,”
as a cemetery attendant remarked
thoughtfully. “can have been no
sinecure,”

Paris Sprightliness ...

MAURICE al
CHEVALIER,
chipper as ever
at 51. is opening
in a new two-
hour, one-man
show. That_fam-
ous straw hat,
which is his
trade-mark, will
still be on view,
but it will be made of plastic,
which is Tighter on the brow for

a one-man show.
Chevalier has just finished an-

TURN ON YOUR RADIO DISTRIBUTION TO THE

CLUB MORGAN HIT PARADE

Hear Some of the Tunes that will be Played at

CLUB MORGAN

Along with ALICE ARMSTRONG at the Piano
Dial 4000 FOR RESERVATIONS





Jan \OUNSON
John LUND...

PAULA RAYMOND

CONNIE HAINES + CLINTON SUNDBERG

and guest stars






|, AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)
MATINEE: TODAY AT 5 P.
TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT AT 8.30

BUD ABBOTT and LOU COSTELLO

in “HOLD THAT GHOST”










fame as ‘Lady Patatchou.”

No member of the British peer-
age, she runs a Montmartre night
spot, so notorious for its autocratic
rule that any man visitor who re-
fuses to join in the choruses of the
songs has his necktie smartly
snipped off.

Lady Patatchou calculates that
several hundred nds’ worth of
silk ties, ruthlessly cut from their
La nga throats, hang from the
walls.

Paris Lushness . . .

RA PETIT, whose @ermen,
ballet has been a smash hit on
both sides of the Atlantic, has got
advance bookings ten weeks ahead
for his novelty ballet, “The Gob-
bler of Diamonds,” which opens
to-morrow night.

Petit himself and Renee Jean-
maire, his pallid leading ballerina,
who shocked Boston with
Carmenesque caperings, and also
an Englishman, Gordon Hamilton,
all sing as well as dance. —

The story is about a frail lady
of Les Halles, the great Paris mar-
kets, which are a blend of Smith-
fiell, Covent Garden, and Bill-
ingsgate. Petit himself grew up
there. His father still runs a
popular restaurant in the heart of
the market.

Paris Homeliness . . .

LOVELY Grand- re Se
ma Marlene Die- —
trich has found ‘
time, in between

other film, “Ma Fosime (slang LENA HORN /’
roughly translatable as “My With Richard CARLSON J DAVIS Mischa AUER PF
Mug”). Playing opposite him is a oe ae ELEANOR 1a
lady who gained considerable A Universal Picture POWEL tim oe

SSS














A
ROBERT Z. LEQNARD
PRODUCTIO

Writian by OOROTHY COOPER and JERRY DAVIS

x Directed by ROBERT Z, LEONARD,
OO”,

SS JOE PASTERNAK

TOMORROW 8.30 P.M.
“DUCHESS OF IDAHO and
RAY NUNES B.G. SINGING ACE

“LOCAL TALENT AUDITION TOMORROW 9.30 A.M.

FLASH! FLASH!
GLOBE THEATRE

first with the news

GAITETY (the Garden) ST. JAMES

TO-DAY TO SUNDAY — 8.30 P.M.; MAT. SUN.—5 P.M.

James Oliver With
CURWOOD’S “RIVER’S END” Dennis MORGAN
(The Gallant Story of the ew dyal Catiadian Mownties)

DICK FORAN fe





















ia aa
“PRAIRIE THUNDER”










EMPIRE THEATRE

THURSDAY 19th and FRIDAY 20th at 8.30 P.M.
MATINEE: FRIDAY AT 5 P.M.





















MRS. A, L. STUART Presents Her SCHOOL of
DANCING in

“REVUEDEVILLE 1950"

Music by the Policé Band Directed by
Capt. C. E. RAISON, A.R.C.M., M.B.E.
%

BOX OFFICE OPEN DAILY i











Exelusive Motion Picture Shots of

EZZARD CHARLES

AND





















From 8.30 a.m. to 12 nodn and 1.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.
fitti m
Hew ‘viveeste aid JOE LOUIS
making a film, PRICES:— ORCHESTRA and BOXES $1.50; HOUSE $1.00; n mig +h

to buy six dozen
long black can-
dles for her
Hollywood house. TP,

“They give a place such a home-

IN TRAINING
TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 and over the Week-end.










BALCONY 172c. RESERVED.









nnn en
Se SSS
SS

a

SPECIAL MATINEE THIS MORNING 9.30 (CHEAP PRICES)
MONOGRAM’S DOUBLE!!! !





GLOBE







“SILENT WITNESS” — and — “FIGHTING FOOLS”
With Frank ALBERTSON With Leo GORCEY and The
non BOWERY BOYS
TO-DAY & MOND ; ee
FILLING THE SCREEN WITH GLORY

1.30 p.m. Matinees

HAMLET

OHILDREN 18c. Anywhere
ADULTS — USUAL PRICES
YOUR LAST CHANCE

WARNER BROS! FIGHTING SEA-AND-SKY STORY!
KNOW SHOWING 3 & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing DAILY

A SWEEPING CAVALCADE
THAT SWEEPS THE
WORLD'S OCEANS TO

BRING YOU THE

RICH, HUMAN STORY

OF THE MEM WUO
STOOD BY WHAT

THEY BELIEVED 18
AND THE WOMEN -
WHO STOOD”

BY THEIR

Teachers are requested to contact Globe for Tickets

wa

a“ -
ae
-

e

We have - - -
CANVAS — Nos. 6—9
ROPE — ‘
COPPER P.
ANCHOR CHAINS
WHITE PAINT
SAIL NEEDLES
MMETS

GRO!
PALMS

Also

et

je ANE WYATT - WAYNE MORRIS = WALTER BRENNAN
Writhéh and Directed by DELIMER DAVES = prccuces s JERRY WALD: 82

PLA ZA THEATRE —Bridgetown—



RIES oe en

SSS









SATURDAY, OCTOBER

Canada



14,

1950

Wants

Commonwealth Trade
More West Indian Exports

(From Our Own

Correspondent)
LONDON.

CANADA wants to build up its Commonwealth trade,

particularly that with the West Indies.

There is a great

demand for fruits, fresh, processed and eanned; and from
British Guiana there is need for increased supplies of

tropical
veneering.



* »
T’dad Celebrates
2
Discovery
PORT OF SPAIN, Oct. 13.
Celebrations commemorating
the one hundred and niney-
second anniversary of the dis—
covery of the New World by
Christopher Columbus took place
en Thursday morning in Colum-
bus Square, Port of Spain. by
the laying of a wreath at the
foot of the discoverer’s siatue.
The wreath was laid by Lieut.
Brian Gething, the Governor's
Aide De Camp and City Mayor
Alderman Norman Tang.

Disapproval of the ceremony
was indicated by member: of \he
Trinidad-Venezuela _Inter-Rela

tions Committee bearing placards
of protest.

Demonstrators ted by Chris Le

Maitre patrolled around cw
square halting at the foot of the
statue while the Venezuelan

Consul General Fernando Lopez
Convreras read an address to the
gathering.

Among slogans which appeare’’
en the demonstrators’ placayds
were: “You cannot ban us from
your country and enjoy our hos-
pitality.”

Members of the Latin commu-
nity and Lavin American Consuls
witnessed the ceremony.

Boy Scouts formed a cordon
around the statue and the square
was decked with flags for the
occasion. —(C.P.)



Jamaicans Plan
T.B. Fight

KINGSTON, J’ca. Oct, 12

An islandwide campaign against
tuberculosis with x-ray, BCG vac-
cine and tuberculine tests begins
on April 1 next year to spread
over a period of two years, It is
proposed that every person will
be tested so that by the following
campaign, the majority of the
people will have acquired immun-
ity against the disease while its
victims are treated. The cam-
paign which will be prosecuted
jointly by the Government of
Jamaica and the World Health
Organisation a subsidiary United
Nations Organisation, was approv-
ed by the House of Representa-
tives yesterday. The total cost
of £100,000 will be met by a
grant from the Colonial Develop-
ment Welfare of £53,000 and the
United Nations International Chil-
dren’s Emergency Fund of £47,750.
Dr. I. M. Lourie, Regional Tuber-
culosis Adviser of the Pan Ameri-
can Sanitary Bureau, here sur-
veying a field of three units will
be sent to Mexico for training
work.

—Can. Press.



TWO ARRESTED.

TOKYO, Oct.12.

Police arrested two high offic~
ials of the Japanese Communist
party in Osaka today on charges
of obstructing the Allied occu-
pation. The Communists Tome
Ata Tada and Junkichi Shim-
otsuka were said to have distri-

ti occupation leaflets.
buted anti Pp rs i









































Also



A. S$,





Manufacturers:
(Props.: R. J. H.

of --
“PEDIGREE” Implement and Machinery
Enamel

Water Paint
“AQUATITE” Waterproofing Composition

BRYDE

hardwood for industrial applications and for

These facts are revealed by Mr.
M. W. Mackenzie, Deputy Minis-
ter of Trade and Commerce, in an
interview appearing in the cur-

rent edition of “New Common-
wealth.” This is the magazine
that was formerly known as

“Crown Colonist.”

Mr. Mackenzie points out that
Canada cannot build a satisfactory
dollar-sterling trade balance on
United Kingdom imports alone,
particularly as a large proportion
of them are manufactured goods.
Comnetition has to be faced from
the American narket where Can-
ada always has and always will
buy.

Rapid Advance

The rapid advance of Canadian
industrialisalion in recent years
has brought about a great increase
in the volume and variety of
goods bought from other countries.
Raw materials have to be import-
ed to supplement the resources of
the country. Already most Cana-
dian sugar, tin, rubber and mo-
lasses come from the Colonies.

But there are a long list of fur-
ther products of which Canada
requires much more, Coffee is
only one item. Canada used to
import 60 per cent of its coffee
from British territories but now it
ped only a small proportion from

em,



The Dominion utso wants to fos-
ter its West Indies trade, which
Mr. Mackenzie describes as a
“traditional trade”, He says quite
plainly that the difficulty since
then has not been to provide a
market for colonial produce but
to wy and pry out the goods

needed,
Not One-Way

But Canada does not want it to
be all one-way trade. While she
still wants to promote imports, at
the same time she is most anxious
to help her “traditional custom-
ers” to buy more Canadian goods.

The temporary measures such
as the Canadian credit and off-
shore E.R.P. purchases which
were important in maintaining
Canada’s sales overseas since the
war were now a relatively small
factor in the overall trade picture.
If the first aim of the drive to in-
crease imports from the Sterling
Area was to make these temporary
expedients unnecessary, the fur-
ther aim was to increase exports
in order to balance trade at a
high, rather than low, level.

Mr. Mackenzie stressed the
value of having a variety of mer-
chandise entering into trade.
British purchases to-day are lim-
ited by dollars. The loss of trade
to Canada’s secondary industries
has to a certain degree been com-
pensated for by an increase in the
domestic market. But Canada was
hopeful of starting up overseas
trade in such items as dairy pro-
ducts, hand tools and rubber goods
in the near future.

Certain Canadian manufactur-
ers had established subsidiaries in
the Unitdd Kingdom and these
and others might, in tite, be in-
terested in expanding their invest-
ment in Commonwealth countries.

RABBIT-TRAP
SYDNEY.
The Australian Agricultural

Bureau believes that Mr. W. Scott,
of Sydney, may have solved the
rabbit problem which costs Aus-
tralia £150,000,000 a year. Unable
to obtain wire netting, Scott sur-
rounded his vegetable plots with
one length of tarred string six
inches above the ground. The
rabbits refused to pass it. Gov-
ernment tests made in heavily in-
fested areas have been equally
successful and will be continued.
Says Scott: “I don’t know why
they keep away, it must be the
smell of the tar.”

CARE YOUR BUILDINGS!
REPLACEMENTS COST £'s

WHR aah PD moe
| 4 Corrosion costs you £ ? a year

ve

O you know

FERROGENE is

a damp-proof, air

makers

‘o” Oil Bound Washable

Corrugated Iron imported ints
apical souneries i sveey Sis f ‘
gure isastonishingiy high, and
after allowing for ‘
gene represents a heavy forfeit fo:
fack of taking proper precautions.
Protection is easy with

FERROGENE

Anti-Corrosive Paint
for every INCH of metal.

paint designed for the tropics. It clings
closely tc the surface of metal-work, forming

its life elmost indefinitely, In three attractiva
, shadess—Red, Grey and ba

BURRELL’S PAINTS, Mitcham, Burrey
AMER & SONS (Paints)

N & SONS eos)

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PAGE THREE





Great Seott—Pory infiltras
tion} I¢’s R. A. Butler?



French Red Leader
Is Seriously Il

PARIS, Oct. 13.

Paris, mewspapers to-day said
that the political career of the
French Communist leader Maurice
Thorez appears to have come
to an end through illness. A
medical bulletin issued at mid-
night said that “the spasm of high
blood pressure” which caused his
sudden collapse in a Paris street
on_ Tuesday was “passing over’.

The Communist Party news-
paper Humanite made no forecast
about his future, and the Pro-
Communist Liberation
would be bedridden for “several
weeks” .

But the Rightwing Epoque said
that leading doctors concluded
from the guarded medical bulletin
that Therez had cerebral haemor-
rhage. Leftwing Franc Tireur said
that Thorez was “seriously ill,”
and quoted a rumour according
to which his malady was cancer

of the brain.
—Reuter.



Yugoslavia Does
Not Need Help
From Atlantic Powers

help from the Atlantic Pact pow-
ers, The official Yugoslav agency;
Tanju denied authoritatively.

tions between the Yugoslav Gov-
ernment and western powers for
military help.”

The Agency said, “Reports have
been appearing lately in several
Western papers about Yugoslavia
conducting negotiations for “mili-
tary pact” with Atlantic Pact pow-
ers, and that Yugoslavia will re-
ceive military aid from these coun-
tries.

“These reports were jumped at
by the Cominform pers Daily
Worker, and who add-
ed new calumnies to these reports
about the Yugoslav Republic.
Tanju is authorised to deny these
reports as complete inventions.

—Reuter.



One Cop
Price $4.20
LONDON,
London “bobbies” are valued
at $4.20 each “on the hoof” and
eo like the idea.
Poli Federeth h asked os
ce Federation has ed Home
Secretary Chuter Ede to with-
draw the standing offer to
Metropolitan Policemen of $4.20
for each recruit they bring in
The Federation said the plan has
brought “considerable alarepute”
in their ranks. LN:S.



the amount of

new Works the

an anti-corrosive





said he |






Noise In Mysterious Disease Kills
B.G. Coconut Trees

(From Our Own Correspondent)

Panama

, PANAMA
Panama’s National Assembly
has revolted against pressure from
cliques and organised groups of
troble~makers in the galleries of
the Assembly building.
_ Recently—during the first work-
ing session of the new Assembly
session—the members passed a
resolution providing that a police
guard be brought to the chamber
to maintain order in the galleries
The next day, the roll scarcely
had been called when Deputy
Heraclio Barletta asked the Chair
where the policemen were. Assem-
bly President Norberto Zurito re-
plied that it was his und
that police would be ealled only
when such action became neces-

sary.

At this, 21 of the 40 uties
present walked out. ga
ere, the session was adjourn-

Applause or loud criticism from
in the Assembly’s galleries
nm common, alt con—
trary to the rules. Observers re-

that threatened violence
from large erowds in and around
the building caused the Assembly
to reverse its stand and reject the
Filos-Hines Agreement for con-
tinued U.S. occupation of a dozen
defence sites in Panama Territory
—resulting in immediate U.S.
withdrawal of troops and a de
cline in Panama's economy.

At that time—December, 1948—
one Assemblyman commented to a
bystander that no one would be
crazy enough to vote for approval
of the fact “with 10,000 boys
sharpening their knives outside.”
Communists and their sympa-
thizers were charged with having
engineered the aaa 5 “Ay
|

Backing
@ From page 1
(3) The present visit to Portu-
gal of General Francisco Longoria
of the Spanish Air Force. Though
the Portuguese press said he came
here on “a private visit” to Gen-
eral Aldredo Sintra, Portuguese

Air Force Chief, he has also seen
Army Minister Brigadier Abran-

ches Pinto.
q Schunha-Artajo

—

meeting.

The Portuguese press announced
today that the Portuguese Naval
Mission will attend the next Span-
Mediterranean and Atlantic
naval manoeuvres, An invitation
came from Spanish Navy Minister
Admiral Moreno.

—(Reuter.)

EYE OPERATION
SYDNEY.

Melbourne Solicitor Audley Gil-
lespie Jones, who underwent an
eye operation in a local hospital
under Russian instructions trans-
lated in London and transmitted
by radio-telephone, has a chance
of recovery. The bandages are
now removed and he is
dark glasses, but, said the doctors,
it is too soon to say whether a
definite improvement has _ been
effected. The technique was de-
veloped by the Russian surgeon
Filatov to cure a rare disease that
limits vision to a small circular
area immediately before the eye.
The doctors added that so far
“everyone is pleased.”

ADVENTURE WITH BEES

PRETORIA.
Abraham Cronje, 8, and his
friend Charlie Ward, 10, of Pre-
toria, thought they would have
some fun with a bee’s nest. They
started tickling it up with :



sticks. Within a few minutes the
sky was dark with bees and Abra-
ham and Charlie ran for it. But
. When they
cog they

body—

they were badly stu
got Abraham to
counted the stings on
there were 500 of them.

USE ANYTIME, ANYWHERE!

FOUND FLOATING
An Inspector
French Novel




ry
Freeman Wills Crofts
A QUESTION OF
PROOF











by
Nicholas Blake

THE MASK OF
Eric Ambler

DIMITRIOS
by
THE HOLLOW
by
Agatha Christie
BEDELIA
A Psychological
“Thriller

by
Vera Caspary








AT THE

ADVOCATE
STATIONERY





., was dead,





A WIDESPREAD outbreak of disease among coconu
plants in British Guiana is causing coconut
owners and the Department of Agricuture a great deal o/

anxiety.
‘ ye .
Faces Rritain
MEAT ASSOCIATION
LONDON, Oct, 13
The Special Committee 91
Britaim’s Imported Meat Trade
Association warned to-day of “
substanvial meat shortage it:
Britain early next year because
of the breakdown of Argentine
spplies,

e Committee passed a resol
tion at a meeting in Londor
calling for “quick Government
action in solving the present
Argentine meat deadlock,” and

urging the return of meat trading
to free enterprise.—_Reuter





Deny Red Invasion
Of Tibet

NEW DELHI. Oct. 13

Tibet’s Finance Secretary saic!
here to-day he believed reports 0:
Chinese Communist “invasion” o!
Tibet were “beaien account*
brought by traders, of minor in-
cidents ‘which occurred fou
months ago.”

The Finance Secretary who i
leader of the Tibetan delegatio:
which hopes to have talks with
the Peking Government on Tibet's
future said: “We do not believ
reports of a Chimese invasion o
Tibet because we have receive |
no information from our Govern-
ment”, He said he had received
the report of a “minor
incident” from his Governmenty1'
the time but not in detail.

The Tibetan delegation is
New Delhi awaiting a reply from
whe Tibetan Capital Lhasa to a
suggestion by the Chinese ambts
sador here that negotiations migat
be conducted in Peking

“How can there be any invasion
when both China and Tibet ar
hoping vo have peaceful settle-
ment?” the Finance Minister said

—Reuter.

Brothers Killed
By Lightning

(From Our Own Correspondesi:
PORL-Or-SPALN,

ny



The bodies of the two brothers

Percy Danclair and Oscar Vanciaii

of Point Fortin, South Trinidad,

who were kilied instantly by

lightning on Thursday last, were
washed ashore about a mile from
each other at Coco Beach, Cedros

on Saturday morning
It is reported that the two broth-
ers and their half

home on a fishing expedition,

~In the afternoon a loud peal of
thunder was heard followed by a

terrific flash of lightning which
struck the boat.
was as if a thousand bottles
had fallen into the sea”, said
Laker. “I was sitting in the
centre of the boat and when |

turned to speak to Percy at the

end of the boat, I saw that he
and when I looked
around at the other end, I saw
that Oscar was also dead. Death
had occurred instantly. As both
bodies were hanging towards the
sea, I tried to pull them inside,
but the vessel capsized. I then
decided to save my own life and
swam about wo miles to land”

border

brothen
Austin Laker, the survivor, left

“The noise

GEORGETOWN,

plantatio

Veteran planter Mr. Boodhoo,
owner of the 1,000 acre Planta-
tion, hall, East Coast,
Demerera, said that he alone has
lost approximately 1,000 trees
since the disease first launched
its attack.

Mr. Boodhoo disclosed that he
first recognised a slight attack on
his trees about two years ago.
The disease appeared tq have
died out, but it has reappeared
and is now doing much da je.
Conditions at Springhall are ideal
for observation as there is both
sandy and clay soil. The disease
attacks trees in both types of soil
but more disastrous results occur
in clay areas,

First signs of an attack are
noticed, when the coconut palm
leaves begin to change from green
to a deep yellow, and soon enough
nuts, ripé and unripe begin to
crop off the trees, The disease
attack both young and mature
trees. Spraying of the hearts of
the palms has been found ineffec-
tive and elimination of the
disease by fire was also without
success.

A theory that the disease may
be the result of drainage irregu-
lavities have also been discarded
as Pin. Vauxhall boasts almost
perfect drainage

The disease exists only on the
East Coast plantations, Coconut
palms in the Pomeroon area are
also affected, but this has been
diagnosed as one which may be
associated with the “Bronze Leaf
Wilt” which affects palms in
Trinidad also.

Officers of the Department of
Agriculture have visited the
affected areas and samples of snil
were removed for chemical ob-
servation ond testing.

Embraced Police

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN
The owner of a Prince Street
store, Port-of-Spain, collapsed,
when he heard that thieves had
entered his business premises
He recovered, when he found, a
few minutes later, that his safe
containing money and valuables to
the extent of $7,000 was intact. In

delight he embraced the police



"Worm" Imprisoned
(Prom Our Own Correspondent) +
PORT-OF-SPAIN.
Munroe, of Port-
of-Spain, was employed as a
domestic servant for 17 days,
when her mistress started ‘“miss-
ing things”, A trap was soon set
and she was caught stealing a
quantity of articles valued $6.00
from her employer, Said the
Magistrate, “you worm your way
into people’s homes and then
steal”. She was sentenced to six
months imprisonment.

Mencilla

RANGOON,
After 13 years the prize of
£502. 2s, drawn in the Irish

sweepstake by their father, a rice
miller in the Shwebo district of
Upper Burma, is to be paid
three Burmese brothers. The prize
was not claimed all these years
until the LDrish authorities re-
quested the Burmese delegates to
the recent World Parliamentary
Conference in Dublin to get into
touch with the ticket holder on
their return to Burma.



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Electric Whizzer
Mount Peleé
Wembley Cannon Crasher
Spinning Top
Witch’s Cauldron
Torpedo
Mount Vesuvius
Thunder Flash Rockets
Emerald Cascades
Electric Gun
Aerial Bomb Repeater
Spangled Star Bomb
Triangle Wheel
Ultra Violet Ray
Empire Rocket
Broadcast Spangles
Big Terror
Little Terror
Forge Fire
Halley’s Comets
Mine of Fiery Serpents
Thunder Flash Guns—(large)
Thunder Flash Guns—(Small)
Jack-in-the-Box
Radium Dazzler
Devil Amongst the Tailors
Fairy Fountains
Squibbs
Blue Devils
Snakes
Yew Trees
Emerald Shower
Silver Rains
Starlights
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Chinese Drops
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BARBADOS Sb ADVOGATE

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown.
Friday, October 14, 1950

MILK

FOR a period of ten years the Public
Health Authority in this island has been
discussing the removal of dairies from the
City limits in order to improve the sanitary
conditions of the area. The first order
issued in 1933,removed dairies from Bridge-
town and subsequently another order of
the General Board of Health sanctioned by
the Legislature ordered the removal from
the extended city limits.

The last date of removal according to this
Order was October 1949 but in answer to a
petition from dairy keepers the Board
allowed a respite of twelve months which
expired this month.

At a meeting of the General Board of
Health on Thursday the matter was raised
by the Chairman Mr. E. D. Mottley who
said that he had been officially. reminded
by the General Board of Health that the
time for the removal of dairies from the
extended city limits had expired. The Com-
missioners were generally in sympathy
with the plight of the dairy keepers but
felt that it was beyond their power to help
them.

The inexorable dictation of the law was
quoted by Hon. V. C. Gale who pointed out
that the regulations had been passed ten
years ago. The fault was with the dairy
owners who had waited during this long
period before doing anything and now had
waited until the time had expired to ask
for relief. Ten years was sufficient time
for them to comply with the regulations
and they now had only themselves to
blame.

The Commissioners decided to ask the
General Board of Health to meet a small
committee of that body to decide whether
there was not some area within the ex-
tended city limits in which dairies could
be conveniently established.

Once again the important matter of the
production and distribution of an essential
article of diet hangs in the balance.

Despite the clarity of the regulations
which leave no doubt as to their intent,
wartime conditions made it desirable that
for the efficient distribution of food the
dairies might weli have remained in the
city limits. Now that suitable areas on the
outskirts of the City have been built up
it is difficult for dairy keepers to secure
adequate space for removal of their busi-
nesses,

These and other considerations will influ-
ence the minds of those who comprise the
committee who will recommend whether
there should be any relaxation of these
regulations.

POLICE TRAINING

WITHIN recent years efforts have been
made to institute a system of training for
recruits in the Police Forces of Barbados,
the Windward and Leeward Islands. The
necessity for a common training school has
been recognised and to this end Colonel
Michelin has been.exploring various places
in the area. He returned to Barbados during
the week with high hopes for a workable
scheme which will be submitted to the
Governments concerned,

It will be remembered that a scheme was
proposed for the establishment of a police
training school at Beanfield in St. Lucia
but on close examination the scheme was
abandoned. A proposal has now been made
that the old military barracks at The Morne
be reconstructed and used as a training
school.

Tf this scheme is accepted there will be a
school in St. Lucia within easy access of the
Windward and Leeward Islands and Bar-
bados. The school will not merely be for
the training of recruits but will provide
refresher courses for men already passing
through the ranks.

Such a scheme apart from the unification
of the service which it was hoped by this
time would have been achieved will make
for greater efficiency in the forces within
the area. On this efficiency depends the
safety of the populations and the adequate

rotection of property in the area. ntil
Feperation becomes a reality the proper
training of men in St. Lucia is a sound pro-
position and should meet with the approval
of the three governments.





ation
vadio, and films
What grows

passengers,

time.



aan

sians said.

OF war, one

! lows,

with Germany,



OUR READERS SAY



That “Click”
At the Word “England”

Hy Charles Foley

we hate those who preach a new

WHAT do the Russians think
about Britain? What is the picture
their masters paint of her—for
yomember these 200 million people
lave had no source of inform-
outside the Soviet Press,

mind when taey hear the strange
word “England”?

About this, I have interrogated
British and others,
who sailed to London today in
the Soviet steamer Sestroretsk.

For clearly this topic of the atti-
tude of the Russian masses on
whom Stalin must depend is of
the most vital significance at this

The replies to my questions
about the Russians’ view of the
outer world were amusing, heart-
ening, or beyond words depress-
ing, according to how you study

But they betrayed such unani-
mity that of one thing there is no
doubt—Stalin has got his whole

Crowd Gathers

IT IS easy, especially for the
British, to get the Russians talking.
You have only to take a friend
into a Moscow tavern and open a
conversation. Soon a_ neighbour
will turn to you and ask: “Are you
from the lands of the peoples

them.

immense people
same lines.
democracies?”

Don’t say yes to this. It is the
Soviet phrase, popularly accepted,
for East Germany,
the docile Balkans;
last week by a British observer,

countries from which, normally,
they expect a foreigner to come.
Say you are British, and there
is soon a lively and quite friendly
crowd round you.
A typical such tavern conversa~
tion was noted down in Moscow

who, while writing a letter, jotted
down an outline of what the Rus-

He omitted \the British side of
the argument and has not tried to
reconstruct it. I have his notes,
Authenticity is stamped on them,
as much by the naiveté of thought
as by the insistent theme of the
Soviet propaganda machine.

Our Orphans

a railway engineer, spoke as fol-

t to the evident approval

i of his friends at the table:—
“We have not forgotten the war

deprived millions of our people
of life, left a host of orphans and
cripples among us.

ee et

Rent Restriction Needed

To the Editor, The Advocate, _
SIR,—I see so many things in
Barbados, and so many smiles;
but it is good sometimes to see the
serious side of life, so that these

smiles will last.

Bitter draughts are also brew-
ing, and the middle class man or
woman, is being squeezed be-
tween smilers, and the don’t-care-
Harries’.

Over 20 years in Barbados, I
have not seen wrongs righted yet.

Where is this rent-restriction
law, and where is the middle class
man to hang his hat. Over-popula-
tion cannot be an excuse for
profiteering, and sucking in of
money from the middle class,

Better laws must be made for
protection against the wrongs
that need assistance.

} Every house having a roomer
should be made to register. This
also includes Guest Houses.
These places should be checked
up, and exploiting would cease.
The old order of getting rich quick
should be changed.

CONCERNED

Huckster Nuisance

To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—Cannot the hucksters be
warned to behave themselves?
They seem to annoy everywhere
with their remarks and bad lan-
guage. It gives a degraded im-
pression to Bridgetown, and
should have redress, A little
warning would help.

Also I read that even deserts
now are being cultivated, and
certainly vhe large space at Tra-
falgar Square, which some call a
garden, could be utilised, and a
thirsty traveller catered to, or
some sign of life. The lake of
cement is nauseaving.

PROGRESS.

Stand Pipes

To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—Please allow me through
vhe columns of your newspaper to
call to the attention of the autho-
rities the deplorable condition of
vhe stand pipes of St. John.

ZI will mention specially the
pipe which wes newly installed at
the bottom of the Venture Land

THEY DO IT AGAIN

eg ee |

STOCKHOLM.

war,

for a generation.
in the Russian

aim in the new

wounds
hordes,
“What would

already?

Stalin has
again.”

thinking on the

flight all the

with
“Now we have

Poland, and
the only

Stalin has.

and Voronezh.
scrapers, they

us;

of fervour.
of the Russians,

e cruel fight Far above your
man.
better,

That is why

On many instances villagers
have complained abouy the mos-
quitoes which swarm the pipe in
tremendous numbers. Not only do
the mosquitoes swarm, but on
approach to the pipe one is vici-
ously welcomed with vunes and
bites,

Another instance. A lad went
to fetch water from vhe same
pipe; as he attempted to approach,
he found himself heels over head
on the cement as a result of vhe
moss which is growing rapidly
around the pipe.

Would the authorities make
some haste to discontinue this
state of affairs in the parish of
St. John?

H.M.

Imperial?

To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—The writer of the letter
signed “Canadian” voices what
many people—both British and
others who live heré—must think.
Why is it that a British island
does not use imperial pints and
gallons?

Also how is it, that the price of
gasolene keeps on going up and
up. In Venezuela where the cost

of living is the highest in the
world, gasolene is 8c. to 12¢c. a
gallon according to where you

“Britain, France, and Germany
are forming a military alliance.
Such an alliance can only be for
an attack on the U.S.S.R. Why?
Comrade, it is known and proved
that no one from the people’s
democracy of Russia even thinks
about aggression or dreams of fo-
menting war with other nations.

“And it is clear that the first

use German soldiers against us
while we . are still
inflicted by Hitler’s

third world war on top of the
countless sacrifices we have made
Luckily we are strong
enough to bh off any attacker,
sa

A loud murmur of applause

greeted these statements.
Skyscrapers

MUCH more time was spent on
talking about the next five-year
plan, which is to pull Russia
alongside America (it being hap-
pily assumed that America will
be standing still) and thus put to

forces who plot the downfall of
the Communist citadel.

The atom bomb was dismissed
superficial

there was almost deliberate ob-
livion of the fact that American
atomic plant and st
generally accepted
measurably greater than anything

The Russians were eager to ex-
tol achievements such as the re-
building from rubble of Stalingrad

going up in Moscow.
‘Happy
WHEN they talked of Britain
it was of a coun
slums, and food sho:
papers print little other news of
by contrast, the way of life
in Russia glows brighter,
A tractor-plant foreman took
over the conversation in a burst

“How can we describe our sor~
row for the British toilers? Here,
our workers, all without exception,
are short of nothing, neither food
nor clothing. The worst live well.

Soon they will be living,

“T do not know whether you are

BARBADOS ADVOCATE









im

live still better,

mented :—
“It is evident

war would be to

healing the

be the cost of a

pape

so again and

belong?”

dark reactionary

nonchalance— %

got it, too,” and the

to hg ne own pockets,

And then:—

“We know there are honest
men in Britain, progressive people
who know and love vheir country.
but who are fighting like us for a

ix new sky- shining future.
point out, were
, regime condemns

of strikes,
ges. News-

average English-

are—this with literally hundreds
of miles of pipe ine which have
to be laid to carry it. Admittedly,
Venezuela is an oil country, but
Trinidad is also supposed to be
an oil producer and what is more
it is part of the West Indies, it is
British so therefore there is no
question of U.S. dollars being in-
volved and the cost of production
nothing like that of Venezuela.
If the price of gas and oil has
to go up, the government or who-
ever is responsible, might, as
“Canadian” suggests let the
ordinary motorist who has to pay
out and pay out, know the whys
and wherefores and to whom the

money is going or be they
want to discourage us using
cars—perhaps they'd to see
us back riding burros.
BROKE MOTORIST.
Thanks

To the Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—Kindly grant me space in your
valuable columns to congratulate’ the
Department of Highways and Transport
on the fine work being done on jhe
cross roads at Harts Gap, it is a pity
that the main road could not be done
at the same time, but I am told that
the main road belongs to the Parish
of Christ Church, and the cross roads
are being dome under the head of
Tenantry Roads, so let me say again
to the Director, Well done, congratula-

tions, keep the good werk uz
A. Raeibaaer.

AND AGAIN
et |

the Min

capable of understanding what I
feel when I say that soon I shall

It means that I can devote all my
strength and skill to my work.
“T detest everything that hin-

ders, slows down, or depraves] | ’ 4 i se F
our faith, I have known nec] fertile fields’—but this, too, is catered for
aa you can never! under the heading of Dance—Classical.
The Teacher— They could build a barge, or weave a
A WOMAN who - said she

was a third-form teacher apd not
a party member—only one Rus-
sian in 85 is so privileged—com-

you British talk vhat you know
nothing about us, and have n¢
desire to learn about our spiritual
qualities, our literary and politica’
interesis and aspirations.

“You quote your
rs, We know they are full of
blackguardly blunders about us
They pronounce
cynical style about our beloved
land. How dare British news-
papers and politicians — I know
the people are not vo blame—poke
their snouts where

Is there then no hope
Britain? No kind word for our
Socialist Government?

Said a vractor man; “ We have
long seen through the so-called
Socialists in Britain who
posed as our friends. We laugh
the parliamentary
comedy of your Government and
nationalisavion
and its spurious concern for the
workers’ welfare while it lines its

British Communists and although
—or even because—your present

Britons to unemployment
beggary, the Communists’
will come soon.”

‘We Trust It’

NEED we go on? A
engineer sums it up:—

“Whatever you may
believe that the Soviet Govern-
ment is our own Government, the} learn to stain glass, but having perused the
Government of Russia.

“It enjoys undispuved autho-
rity and unlimited trust.

“It tells its people the truth
and vhe truth alone.

We have mever been’ deceived; can accuse us of having no desire to broaden

@ On Page 5



LET'S ALL BE WRESTLERS.

\OrA Guide to Further Education for Adults|
By JOAN ERSKINE (who studies Arabic)

The L.C.C., which governs London as a whole, offers
toe start a course on any subject im the world, if about
a dozen people want it. So, about this time of year,
the L.C.C. publishes its guide te all the classes

IN YOUR heart of hearts, have you ever
secretly yearned to keep bees or lift weights?
|Have you toyed with the thought of the

fascinating hobbies you would indulge in, if
jit were not for the ever necessary grind of
|daily work?

About this time each year, Londoners be-
come afflicted with a passionate desire to
“further their education”. This mass hysteria
may take several forms. They may decide
that the one thing missing from their lives is
a knowledge of modern languages. (It is
noticeable that first year language classes are
filled completely on the first day of enrolment
—and truly pathetic it.is to hear latecomers
plaintively demanding to be let in to one of
the more popular ones.)

Law and accountancy, journalism and ad-
vertising are subjects that attract a fair
number of people. No-one is surprised to
hear of a friend deciding to study banking or
book-keeping, civil engineering or dressmak-
ing, photography or statistics. Possibly a
little sympathy is felt, but no surprise. After
.'1, the summer is over and gone, the rains
are about to commence, and the voice of the
L.C.C, authorities is heard in our land.

But in a small compact book, issued yearly,
»nd bearing the inspiring title “Floodlight”,
is revelation indeed. On the flyleaf we are
reproved gently in these terms: “Love
labour; for if thou does not want it for food,
thou mayest for physic. It is wholesome for
thy body, and good for thy mind.” (W, Penn).

It goes on to show the novice how he may
labour to advantage each and every evening
»f winter and spring, and here the casual
reader finds himself abashed and awed by
the astonishing number of subjects available
for his edification and uplift.

The ignorant may wonder for a while what
species of human studies Aquaria or Assay-

ng. He may indeed wonder what they are.
inspired by the peerless Fonteyn, gazed at
from the roof of the Covent Garden Opera
House, many unlikely young women take to
3allet at the various Literary Institutes. It
is a sad sight to see them rise upon a waver-
ng toe and execute a ragged entrechat, but
joubtless they are happy. One feels they
would be even happier studying the Isadora
Dunean type of movement, and “hie away to














It is wonderful.

basket, make biscuits or study boiler-house
oractice. Presumably there is nothing to
orevent a young secretary from becoming a
spare-time boiler-maker. She would, at all
»vents, be possessed of a never-ending topic
of conversation. Boxing and bricklaying,
-artography and cellulose spraying seem dull
when compared with the delights of Chrome-
Lithography and the intricacies of Corset
Making. /

A most misleading heading is “Stammer-
ing”. What, can we really learn to stammer?
and do we want to do so?

Housewifery and Hygiene are very worthy
subjects, but what could Grain mean? We
are still not certain about Histology and
Hydraulics, but thoroughly approve of Logic.
We do not believe it can be taught, but that
is by the way. Manicure comes directly
above Meat and Food Inspectors, which may
not, of course, mean a thing. What about,
Microbiology and Millinery, so much more
appealing than Mosaic and Motor Vehicle
Servicing. Philosophy would go well with
Picture-Frame Making, since one could then
be philosophic about the unhappy results of
our wood-work.

As subjects for conversation at deadly

: i cocktail parties, these classes have no parallel
time|"Ve would muse with pleasureable contem-
plation on the thought of a young lady
sipping a martini, sucking the cheery reflec-
railway| tively, and saying, “I do Plumbing, Servo-
Mechanisms and Sewage. What do you do?”
We can have our speech trained, or we can

from the way

free news-

judgement in

they don’t

for

once
puppet

campaign,

There are the

millions

say, Ww?

| book carefully, and considered the thing
from all possible angles, we like the following
combination; Wrestling, Zoology, Mastic
| Asphalt, and Plastering. This way, no-one

| our outlook on life.



— ~—




Prices And Profits

To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR.—Thanks very much for
publishing my question to Mr.
A. E. S. Lewis on October 5, in
your daily news. It was nov a
very hard question, but Mr.
Lewis found it very hard to an-
swer because he failed to do s9,
but has written in his reply on
October 8, (if it is a reply) “if
L.E.S, will supply such dava as
prices,
shall do my best to help him.”

I did not ask Mr. Lewis for
help, I simply asked him a ques-

© Sales

Ttem Weight Dealing Price
Rice , 204pts. 204 12 24
Meal 98 Ib, 9% 08
Flour 98 95 6 65
Sugar w/e 100 99 743
ditto y.c, 224 220 14 30
Peas 98 106 12 72
Bread 2 Cartons (1840) 613
Milk 48 48 12 00
Oats 160 156 11.70
Feed TS 72 4 68
Salt 180 178 445
Soap 20 20 10 00
Salmon ‘is ve 94 24 44
Salmon 1s 4a 48 23 04
Beef—tins 4 48 18 24
Fish 112 110Ib 19 80
Heads 106 92 7 00
Ribs 100 96 21 12
Bones 100 96 11 92
Snouts 100 96 23 04
f 100 96 40 32
Oil—ck ipt Te pts 1 86
Butter Ib. 5 Ib 430

quantities and wages. I:

tion demanding of him a reply
being a representative of the
people and shop keepers also.
Below is the data asked for by
Mr. Lewis, which shows a maxi-
mum gross profit of 7% without
tuking into consideration pieces of
meat, broken biscuits etc, take an
average turn over of $400 per
week having to pay tWo atvend-
ants at $3.84 per week and one
job hand on Saturdays at $1.04
per day. Mr. Lewis can easily see
the net profit left for the smaller
retailers, not forgetting lighting,
taxes, wear and tear of imple-
menis, bad debts. LES.

Total Cost Gross cent-
Pr

Cost Paper Freight Price efit Age
11 62 * 32 12 «11 96 2 2%
729 16 07 752 56 73
6 16 16 06 6 38 27 42
6 90 16 o7 7.13 30 41
13 55 36 13 14 04 26 18
11 71 16 12 11 99 73 6
5.70 16 06 5 92 21 3.8
11 04 2 11 16 84 32
10 54 26 10 10 90 80 «7.3
423 16 04 443 25, 6
3 90 24 04 418 27 62
9.30 09 9 39 61 65
23 36 23 23 §9 8 36
21 44 21 21 65 139 #68
16 70 17 16 87 137 #81
17.00 20 18 17 38 2.42 155
16 00 20 16 16 36 14 1%
20 00 20 20 20 40 72 36
10 00 20 10 10 30 1.62 157
22 00 20 22 22.42 62 28
38.00 20 38 38 58 174 45
1 76 02 1 78 08 4
3.90 04 394 36 g
Average around 7% the maximum |



SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1950



D. V. SCOTT

TO-DAY'S. SPECIALS

&CO.,LTD. at the COLONNADE







Usually NOW
Tins S.A. APRICOT

JAM (2 Ibs.) 60

Tins OVALTINE (Large) 1.24

-54
1.12




26 .20

VALOR STOVES

Bottles ALLSOPPS BEER





| 2, 3 and 4 BURNERS, with or without Canopies

64G STOVES

1 and 2 BURNER, with or without Oven Stands ~
OVENS, Small, Medium, Large

PRESSURE STOVES

at

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

PHONES 4472 & 4687















SANTON
WATER HEATERS

models in 5, 12, 30 & 40 gals.

HAIR DRESSING
EQUIPMENT

DaCOSTA’S
ELECTRICAL DEPT.







NOW IN STOCK

RAYPACKA

FOR OFFICE JACKETS







\
yj
| — AND —
\
'

CLERICAL GOWNS

IN NAVY AND BLACK

04 in. at $1.92 per Yd.
e

DaCOSTA & Ce., Lid.

DRY GOODS DEPT.

NOURISHING
FOODS

Yo Keep Your Children
in Good Health Serce LIVER
at Least Twice a Week

FOR YOUR CAKE



RAISINS

CHERRIES SPECIALS |

ICING SUGAR

coLouatna 3 oz. Fish Paste @ .06 pr tin ;

14 oz. Fish Cake ” .12.

16 oz. Steak & Kidney
Pudding @ .42.

141% oz. Sultana
-Pudding ” 48.”

Headless Cod Fish
@ .32 per Ib.

GOLD BRAID RUM
ROYAL BAKING POWDER
CAKE DECORATIONS

FRESH DAILY

SAUSAGES

HAMBURGER STEAK

EMPIRE COFFEE
APPLES—ORANGES
MARSH MALLOAVS

Order Early from GODDARD'S









SATURDAY, OCTOBER

14,

1950



Gardener
Arrested
Kor Theft

INETEEN-YEAR-OLD
Geraid Lovell, a gardener
of St. Matthias Gap, Christ
Church, was arrested by P.C. 373
Murphy at about 8 o’clock yester-
day morning at Gun Site Road,
Brittons Hil! in connection with
thefis which occurred at the flats
of Mr. D. Worme and Mr. W.
Atkinson at Blue Waters Terrace,
Rockley .

He appeared before Police Mag-
istrate Mr. H. A, Tagima and was
remanded until October 20.

The Advocate was told yester-
day that the Police are looking for
other suspects. All the arviclc:
missing have been recovered.

RIDGETOWN was bright after

10 o’clock yesterday morn-

ing. The dark clouds of the

previous day had been forgotten

until at 3.30 yesterday evening
when the day became gloomy.

At midday the temperature

was 84 degrees Fahrenheit in the

shade but by 4.00 p.m. this had

dropped two deprees.

Fitz

The rainfall returns up to 6
o'clock yesterday morning were
as follows: City 14 parts, Station
Hill district eight parts, St. George
19 parts, St. Philip one inch and
34 parts, St. Thomas 20 parts, St.
Peter 55 parts, St. Joseph 53
parts, St. James nine parts, St.
Lucy 26 paris and St. John 70
parts.

HILE ONE THIEF went

under the cellar of Janie
Sylvester at Crichlow’s Alley on
Thursday and stole two fowls
another broke the storeroom of
the British Union Oil Company
between Wednesday night and

Thursday morning, but. stole

nothing.

EVEN TRAFFIC offences wera
reported in the Polica

Reports yesterday. They were for
driving recklessly, riding a bicycla
without a lighted lamp to tha
front, not keeping a motor vehicle
on the left side of the road, driv-
ing in a dangerous manner, neg-
ligent riding, parking in a restrict-
ed area and not having a reis-
tration card on a car. No
motorists were reported for
exceeding the speed limit.

LARENCE CLARKE of Para-
dise Village, Christ Church,
reported that his fishing boat,
which is valued $100, was mal-
iciously damaged between 9.30
a.m. on Wednesday and 5.30

a.m. on Thursday while it was
hauled up at Dovers Beach,
Christ Church.

LREADY 10,000 children

representing 63 schools have
attended the Globe Theatre to
see the film ‘Hamlet’ which has
been running for the past 16 days.

Special matinees at reduced
prices were provided for the
children.

Mr. Maurice Jones, Manager of
the Globe Theatre, told the
Advocate yesterday that they will
hold two more matinees. He said
that at the time the last showing
of this film over 12,000 school-
children, representing 83 schools
‘would have seen it.

IX EX-R.A.F. servicemen ure
at present employed at
Seawell Airport. under the super-
vison of Squadron Leader Hen-
vision of Squadron Leader Hen-
as fire fighters.

They are:— Rawle Forde, S.
Nicholls V. Jones, Conrad Carter,
Noel Seale, Secretary of the
R.A.F, Association and H. Reece.

These boys have all gained
their fire fighting experience from
the R.A.F. where they did many
fire picquets.

RTHUR MOTTLEY, a pedes-

trian, of Jackson, St. Michael,
told the Police that he was
struck on his right leg by motor
car X-13 while on James Street
yesterday.

The motor car was owned and
driven by Archibald Toppin of
Gall Hill, Christ Church.

BOYS’ CLUB may soon be
opened at Oistins, Colonel
R. T. Michelin, Commissioner of
Police, told the Advocate yester-
day that they expected to get a
building at Oistins and the Club
will be opened as soon as possible.
The next Club to be opened
will be the one at District “C”
Station, St. Philip. The building
for this was renovated and decor-
ated by the boys themselves. It
‘will be opened at the end of next
week.

fC thens POLICE BAND will play

at the St. Bartholomew's
Church Fair at Christ Church at
3.30 o’clock this evening,

HE ROCK HALL ROAD, St.
Andrew, which was dam-
aged by heavy rains earlier this
year, is now being repaired. Work
‘started on Wednesday. The
repairs are being carried out by
a gang of labourers under the
supervision of Mr. F. Smith.

Blacksmith Mends
“Spiders” Now

AT the corner of two back al-
leys of Suttle Street, Conch’s and
Cook's Alleys, you will hear the
clank-clank of Oscar Browne’s
blacksmith’s hammer as it strikes
home on the heavy anvil.

Old Philip Brown, his father,
used to wield that same hammer
tor 30 years on the same _ spot.
Oscar took over from his father
four years ago and he told the
Advocate yesterday that there are
young Brownes coming on to take
over from him,

Oscar Browne is now about 30
years old. He is not much above
average height, but he is of mas-
sive build. When you see him
blowing the bellows, see the fire
spark and the other blacksmith
hands around him, you ‘would
think he was very much at home
in the grime. 7

The building is obviously old,
but with pieces of iron strapped
at all angles on the wooden parts
it seems secure for many more
years.

Rests in the Loft

Heavy pieces of iron lay about
the yard and big heaps of coal
dust. Barrels and barrel hoops
are thrown about and on nails are
hung pieces of wire and other like
material.

Browne does not. live at the
blacksmith shop, but he has built
a sort of loft above the building
where he can _ rest off between'
whiles, To allow for access to
the loft there is a long flight of
stairs, built partly of iron.

When the trade is good, Brown
employs six hands. He mostly re-
pairs “spiders” and hand carts
these days. Asked if he does not
like shoeing horses, he said that
after a time one came to dislike
horses’ kicks.

Below the sign which tells one
that the business belongs to
Browne, Blacksmith, there are
the words “No Idlers”, but with-
out the sign, idlers would scarcely
think of loitering around such a
busy man as Browne.

Wills Admitted
To Probate

The petitien of Revd. Carl Wes-
ley Curry, of St. Patrick’s, Christ
Church for letters of administra-
tion to the estate of Lila Curry his
wife who died in 1940 was granted
by His Honour the Chief Judge in
the Court of Ordinary yesterday.

The petitioner was represented
by Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., in-
structed by Mr. L. E. R. Gill of
Messrs. Cottle Catford & Co.

The Chief Judge admitted to
Probate the wills of Eustace Fitz-
Herbert Skeene, late of St.
Michael, Edith Irene Stoute and
James Seale, late of St. George,
and Bertina Stuart, late of Christ
Church.

FINE REDUCED

Judges G. L. Taylor and J; W. B.
Chenery yesterday varied a de-
cision of Police Magistrate, Mr.
E, A. MeLeod. Mr. McLeod had
fined Charles Farley of Orange
Hill, St. James, £5 when he found
him guilty of having driven witl-
out due care and attention along
Barbarees Road on May 27.

Their Honours reduced the fine
to £4. The charge arose out of
an accident between the bus M-280
which Farley was driving and a
lorry.

Corporal W. E. Best was in the
bus at the time of the accident
and he told the Court how Farley
did not lessen his speed when he
attempted to overtake the cart.









What’s On Today

Meeting of Housing Board
at 10.30 a.m,

First, Intermediate and
Second Divisions Cricket
1,30 p.m.

Police Band at St. Barthol-
omew’s Church Fair at
3.30 p.m.



Case Dismissed

Their Honours of the Assistant
Court of Appeal Mr. G. L. Taylor
and Mr. J. W. B. Chenery yes-
terday dismissed on its merits a
case which Arnold Worrell
brought against Evelyn Lynch,
accusing him of having damaged
his fig tree and figs on June 20.

In dismissing the case, the
judges reversed a decision of His
Worship Mr. H. A. Talma who
had fined Lynch £1 and three
shillings costs and had also order-
ed him to pay Worrell 6/- as cost
of damages to the figs and fig tree.

Worrell did not prove ‘that the
land was his.



2,000 BAGS
OF RICE COME

Two thousand bags of rice ar-
rived in the island from British
Guiana on Thursday evening by
the schooner “Philip H. Davidson.”

The “Davidson” also brought
600 bays of charcoal, 336 wallaba
posts, and 26 tons of firewood.

7” soe ee

PURINA
For Poultry

CcCHOWS
and Livestock

“SEE THE DIFFERENCE PURINA MAKES”

q Christian Science
Kivading Room )

iST FLOOR, BOWEN & «ONS
(Broad Street) }

Hours: 10 a.m.—2 p.m.
Tuesdays, Wednesdays,

Fridays.
10 a.m.—12 o'clock.
Saturdays
At this Room the Bible and
the Christian Science text-book,

Science and Heait) wito Key te

th* Scriptures by MARY BAL FLD

EDDY may de read, borrows,
or purhased

Visitors Are Welcome
Gay

wer a “a “Gey

)

sents en ee ne ee ee



nS











FOR
STII Le




rer. =
CVs isa inten

| ADVOCATE CO., LTD.

5 |

Ad

SSS



PAHS.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
HAMLET

SAW





SCHOOL CHILDREN crowd Roebuck Street in front of the Globe Theatre, They have just seen
Hamlet. Children from primary, secondary and elementary schools all over the island went to the

Globe Theatre during the week to see the picture.

theatre and they liked seeing the picture.

300 Boys Absent A Shirt In
From School



COMO ESTA USTED? asked a teacher of the
Street Boys’ School yesterday,

Bay
and he got the reply “Muy

bien gracias, Senor” from one of the boys of his class.
It was the Senior Stream “A” pupils getting their

daily coaching in Spanish while the Advocate”

ing a visit to the school.

Goods Plentiful,
Buyers Few
YESTERDAY

With the sun shining brightly
yesterday after two days of raili,
shoppers were out again in the
City, although not in the numbers
that they were in at the begin-
ning of the week. When the
“Advocate” visited Fogarty’s
about 1.15 p.m., the picture was
about the same as was seen at
some of the other stores previous.
ly visited.

At that hour, the counters
where women’s cloth is sold were
doing the most business. In the
men’s suiting department it was
largely a question of window
shcpping from the inside. In the
women’s hat department a cus-
tomer was making i; purchase, In
the shoe department, business
was slow,



Near one of the entrances of
the store a few workmen were
doing minor repairs. Clerks in
various departments were getting
the chance to re-arrange the
contents of shelves anid cases.

On the whcele it was a case ol
the goods being plentiful, but
the buyers few, although that
will hardly be the case today,
unless the rain begins from early

t fall “buckets a drop.”



Better Training
Facilities Needed
For Police

Col, R. T. Michelin, Commis—
sioner of Police told the “Advo—
cate” yesterday that better
training facilities were needed in
the Police Forces in the Wind-
wards, Leewards and Barbados
than those existing in their re..
spective islands at present,

Col, Michelin has just returned
from St. Lucia where he had gone
to confer with Lt. Col. Eric
James, Chief of Police of that
colony in connection with another
‘training scheme.

This scheme he said, is for the
setting up of a Police Training
School for the Windwards, Lee-
wards and Barbados,

It was first proposed to set up
a scheme at Beanefield, the ex
Army Airbase, but this has since
been found unsuitable and the
new one will now be in the old
Military barracks at the Morne
in Castries.

The site is an admirable one
and with a certain amount of
money being spent on the
repairs and redecoration of the
old barracks, the building could
be made very suitable for «
training school,

Having seen the building and
gone into the cost and pros and
cons, he is now going into the
matter and will, in due course,
submit his report to the Barbados
Government,

TRY THIS
fo hele you"

Regular daily ration
* of delicious creamy



EMULSION

ill build up resistance
an sturdy grow th

help

+

was pay-

Mr. C. D, Cuffley, Headmaster
of the school, told the reporter
that he thought it a good thing
for Spanish to be taught to the
seniors of elementary schools.

The boys were catching on
quickly and in case any of them
wanted to carry on studies of the
language after leaving school, he
would have had a good founda—
tion, he said.

Early showers during the morn-
ing seemed to have had effect on
the attendance. Out of a roll cal!
of 365, only 65 boys turned out
for the first half of the day.

Art Class

Each class, however, with many
a desk unoccupied, was hard at
work. The juniors amused them-
selves with counting and writing
numbers While the seniors did art,
reading and arithmetic.

Some of the boys were working
on the outside. They were plant-
ing in the garden and mowing the
green grass which covered the
grounds of the school.

In the workshop, some were
busy at work making a master's
desk, toys and completing a map
of Barbados which they made of
pulp paper. . ‘

The Bay Street Boys’ School was
built in 1913 and opened by
H.R.H. Princess Marie Louise
It was erected as a central school
to accommodate the children from
St. Ambrose, St. Paul’s, Dalkeith
and Bethel which were all closed
down,

The school has quite enough
room to accommodate the 365 on
the roll. Mr. Cuffley said that he
lost quite a number of pupils
through the removal of children
from the St. Michael’s Infirmary
to the Nightengale Home. Those
children used to attend school
daily.

He said that with the develop-
ment of the Bay Estate Housing
Scheme, there would obviously
be a corresponding increase in the
attendance.

Looking around the school, one
could see many wall paintings

and decorations done by the boys. ,

Most of the pictures were for
studying purposes. They were
painted during the war when
there was a scarcity of pictures,

In one of the classes, a project
of housing in Barbados was dis
played. This showed a compar'son
between the most primitive of
Barbadian houses and the most
modern,

The boys looked comfortable
and seemed to have been enjoy-
ing their lessons.





Decision Confirmed

A decision of Mr. E. A. McLeod,
Police Magistrate of District “A”
was yesterday confirmed by Their
Honours of the Assistant Court of
Appeal, Mr. G. cL. Taylor and Mr,
J. W. B. Chenery. Mr. McLeod
fined Arthur Clarke of Bay Land
£1 when he was found guilty of
having assaulted and beaten
Ilene Da Costa on July 30.

Clarke cuffed Da Costa in her
eye, threw his bicycle on her and
kicked her according to the evi-
dence.



peigent WO tus

sia ro





ailments. REXALL
EMULSION contains
a very high proportion
(50%) of this valuable
natural oil presented in a
smooth delicious creamy
emulsion.

REXALL EMULSION

for your Child
B00) take
Valuefor money

Now obtainable from:- KNIGHTS DRUG STORES



edress «from

It is not every day that these children visit the



Two Hours
By Local Factory

In Spry Street overlooking
the grounds of St. Michael :
Cathedral, a Shirt Factory started
at High Street in March this year
by Madame Gilkes of Antigua and
Mr, Archer MacKenzie, Auction-
eer, is daily turning out shirts,
underwear, and pyjamas, made
in Barbados,

Eight girls—all Barbadians have
produced aS many as 168 shirts
in one week.

Madame Gilkes, who supervises
both shirt and dress departments,
told the Advocate that they take
individual orders as well as sup-
ply many City stores with shirts.

They also export. shirts and
dresses to other West Indian
islands,

Anyone placing an order for a
single shirt can have it in two
hours if it is urgently needed.
They make both dress and sports
shirts and tuck-bosom shirts is a
specialty,

For Tourists Too

In the dress department they
take orders from the general pub-
lic but Special attention is paid
to tourists who are spending a
short time in the island.

Madame Gilkes said that she has
already made a great quantity of
dresses for Venezuelans. When
a tourist liner arrives in the
island for a one-day stay Madame
Gilkes can take an order for a
any passenger and
produce the dress by evening
when the vessel is ready to sail
This includes shopping arrange
ments and fitting

In the shirt department, a cer-
tain number of girls make the
shirts, except for putting on the
collars. It then goes to the collar
maker who already has the collars
made. She attaches the collars
and afterwards passes it to the
button hole maker. From here
it goes to the presser and the shirt
is completed.

Madame Gilkes first started her
Dress Depot at Victoria Street
when she arrived in the island in
1947, She afterwards went to
High Street and is now in Spry
Street.

T’dad Parcel
Past Congested

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN.
Present arrangement of the Par-
cel Post service at the General
Post Office in Port-of-Spain is con-
sidered highly unsatisfactory, both
from the state of congestion and
from the point of view of a fire
hazard. The Post Office Advisory
Committee is taking up with Gov-
ernment the question of structural
alterations to the Post Office and
the provision of the necessary
finance. ;

° * ° F ss
Missing Girl Found

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN.
Gloria Jules of Arouca, one of
the “missing girls’ was found by
the police “living comfortably” in
an unoccupied but furnished house
in another part of the district. The
police, inquiring into the matter,
discovered that a quantity of ar-
ticles of clothing and jewellery
were missing from that house,
Gloria, with tears in her eyes de-
niea a charge of theft, and was
alleged to have offered no account
for her presence in the house
met by the police. She wag re-
manded to the Belmont Industrial
Sehool, Port-of-Spain,

mm







most by KLM.



That “Click” In The
Mind At The Word

by our Government
believe implicitly its every word.”

Knock
hative pride
foreigner about
deduct what you will for che crue!
Lardships and oppression in many
parts of Stalin’s realm—there is
Still a great residue of faith in
Russia’s greatness and her deter-
mination to ward off the jealous
invaders of whose existence the
people have been all too success-
fully convinced.

Yes, it is a mountain for Mr.
Bevin to meet or move,

B’dians Invited To
Jnveiling Ceremony

(From Our Own Correspondent)

Mr. M
and Managing Director
Barbados Co-Operative Bank, Ltd,
and Mr. John Beckles, M.B.E., an
Executive of the Bank, were in-

“England”

@ From page 4
For this, we

off a

|
'
. {
percentage for
in

speaking to a
one’s country,

London Express Service



IN T'DAD



PORT-of-SPAIN
D. Symmonds, founder
of the

vited to attend the uaveiling of
a bust of the late Dr. A. H. Mc-
Shine, founder and first president

of

the Trinidad Co-Operative

Bank,

Dr

McShine, Mr, Symmonds

said, could be referred to as th:
greatest and most inspired worker
on behalf of the thrift movement
in the British West Indies within

living memory.
McShine would live long after the
monuments of human skill would
have perished. He clothed
naked and fed the
only was his name prevalent in
every household in Barbados, but
those away from home asgfwell”
added Mr.

Speaking
Branch, which was incorporated in
1938,
“Little
considerable
particular from that section of the
community which ordinarily would
not think of banking. He pointed
out that the
operated a home
which hundreds of poor per-
sons were assisted annually in ob-
taining their own homes by mak-
ing monthly payments from small
amounts which they would ordin-
arily pay as house rates, Through
that
persons who
of owning their own homes, were
now property owners in Barbados.

by

chat
terprising
interest in the people, they would

be in a better position to help
themselves. We must have lead-
ers, honest leaders, and persons
who would guide the people
right”.

Matrimonial Causes yesterday, His
Honour
Allan Collymore, pronounced de-
eree nisi in the suit of A. S, Hay-
ling (Petitioner) and A
(Respondent).

Mr.
by Mr. H. L. Thomas of Messrs
Carrington & Sealy appeared for
the petitioner.

in

Mr, Beckles said: “I think
if there were more en-
persons who take an

Decree nisi was also pronounced

the suit of I.
(Petitioner) and A.
(Respondent).
were Mr. W. W. Reece K.C. in-
structed by Messrs. Hutchinson &
Ganfleld for the petitioner,

rs



“The name of

00
ere,
v

the

hungry; not

Symmonds

of

the Barbados
said in
received
support, in

Mr. Symmonds
England” they
public

Bank in Barbados

purchase plan,

numbers of
think

large
would

system
never



Decree Nisi



Pronounced

the Court fer Divoree and

the Chief

Sir

oe

Judge,

Hayling

J. S. B. Dear instructed

C,. Brewster
F. Brewster
Legal appearances

dieanesenpeeneastnnsnrtrerrenensahenerettdetasstaepeasssaeiesseebilsintiseosuitinreenenseni ——<——— — OO

~ eee er
EAL AGS SSS ELS FF FSF

‘
<

——

To make sure of unequalled flavour,
creaminess,
certain your eustard is Bird's.
as long as you ..

. can remember the name Bird’s
has been an assurance of unvarying



quality.
So when you ask for Custard, it’s wise
to ask for Bird's !

6 K ”
They Last
Longer,

Look Better,
AND

Give Greater
Foot Comfort

HARRISON'S, esnsioe

Broad St.





. be
For
. or your mother

smoothness



PAGE FIVE



Every sweet is
more delicious with

am
BIRD:

CUSTAR. PB



MEN

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PAGE SIX



BARBADOS



A West African Watches
A New Colonial Spirit

Ry E. B. Timothy

LONDON.
It is encouraging to watch the
th of the new Colonial spirit.
apparently minor but never-
theless significant manifestation
of this spirit, is the way Govern-
7 and other official spokesmen,
in official and unofficial functions,
identify themselves with the
I s and aspirations and
suié@cesses of the peoples over
whom they rule by the use of the
un “our”. It is now “our
”, “our constitution”, “our
”, “our achievem. *, “our
future”, etc., and not the imper-
sonal and Olympian “your” which
e the impression that those
wi made the speeches or gave
the addresses belonged entirely to
another world.

Perspective
In Ja recently published bro-
chure which attempts to give the
British people an idea of what
on in the Colonies, the whole
is put into perspective.
Answering the question “What
does Britain gain from her link
with the Colonies?” the pamphlet
gays: “. . . the Commonwealth
is an association of peoples on a
world-wide scale. By leading
the Colonies to full partnership
in the Commonwealth, Britain is
strengthening the whole _ by
strengthening the parts. ae
But the difficulties confronting
all who are anxious to achieve
the new spirit are immense. They
are evidenced in a resolution to
domme before the National Unior
of Conservative and Unionist As-
sociations at their Blackpoo] con-
ference this month, Mr, C, J. M-
Alport will then move: “That
Conference views with grave
alarm the continued unrest a
the declining standards of order-
€d administration in the Colonial
Empire, and urges the Conserya~
tive Party to: every
to restore the co

nial people in 's
and will to fulfil her oe































































E. B. TIMOTHY: A West African journalist from Sierra Leone who
writes from the office of our London Correspondent.





urne, as Director of Information

rvices, observed in his evidence
before the Select Committee on
nee inet a costs £6,500
Lasting and productive racial’¢for eight Colonial journalists to
cae. can cay a assuredg@attend the Journalists’ Course at
when the average Briton in thejthe London Polytechnic . .
Colonies becomes an ambassador gWhen these people go back, their
of goodwill and of the new Colo- - Market value, after having spent
‘nial irit in the office, in the & year in md, will be such
Seekshop, in the hospital, in the that they will leave journalism
playing fields or wherever work @Md become high-class clerks or
or ‘a brings him into contact ikers.










have applied for them. As East
Germany is behind the Iren Cur-
tain, there is the fear that institu-
tions there would offer only
indoctrination in an unwholesome
political belief. But it is ible
to angue otherwise, For Colonial
students in British universities,
being trained as engineers, agri-
culturists of scientists, do not
absorb the principles of Imperial-
ism! Why should it be different
with Colonial students in Bastern




mission .









with onials, e trouble appears to be that 9
Posi t Ch roe pe a og newspapers cannol Goppany?
‘osition of Chiefs afford to be first-class. This is a B a hi ci
Of the making of constitutions point largely missed in recent dis-- es Go Bet) Sole shes ee

ment is worth listening to—even
if some Nigerians can get free
education by going to Communist
countries. 1 am personally opposed
to Colonial students studying in
Eastern Germany because of the

in West Africa there seems to be
end. Discussion of the subject
becoming a weary business to
fest African politicians. One of
difficult problems confronting

est Africans to-day is the posi-
thon Chiefs should occupy in the
new constitutional set-ups. What
isto be the role of Chiefs vis-a-
‘vis the people and the Govern-
ment? Since the introduction of
thé system of Indirect Rule in
West Africa, there has been a ten-
dency fer Chiefs to drift away
from the pose This drift has
been accelerated by the = of
the ated elements. They are
irked at leaden steps taken
-by “aes who found com-

fort in smug onagrvatian, . The
nets have d in gome cases
‘ar

‘ the people in
Rate "Ey ane “tegardel
“someone as “an

1 part of machinery of

cussion in London of the Colonial
Press. Two issues have become
confused, There are critics con-
cerned about what Colonial news-
a omg say and critics concerned
about how they say it. However, . rinati

the remedies suggested by the one threat of polities! indect 8.

: Experience has proved the Com-
group do not of necessity meet the

troubles noted by the other. A munis 50 be mare subee, | ene
violent critic of Britain is likely
to be more effective if fortified by
a university education. A Colonial
sub-editor will not learn to spell
through a better understanding of
Mr. Attlee’s policies. It should be
clear that the political attitudes in
a minority of West can news—
papers which worry British critics,
reflect, rather than create, attitudés
among politicians and their fol—
lowers, and will not be funda-
mentally altered by raising the
technical standards of the Press
as a whole.

Recently, I discussed this with an
African Local Government Officer
on holiday in London. He depre-
cated the very idea of Colonial
students receiving higher educa-
tion in Eastern G and
added — “We don’t want Com-
munismy cannibalism or rheuma-
tism in the Colonies; what we
want is democracy.”

If more West Africans spoke
like that, the phantom agents of
Moscow would soon contract poli-
tical paralysis!

rr Iti rthel portant th Trade U a ;
oe s, nevertheless im int that
Uncertain of the of the these standards should be raised. nvon
educated elemen' gp Mad el this ge wy! Mr. Officials To
premier posit! ey urne has toone of :
among their people, Chiefs have the dangers of offering courses in

tended to lean more and

ie st me more Britain to Colonial
strong arms of the -
ties. se: is frat tiets

journalists.

Visit B. W.L

th Sah University. Collages

e can ver

and intelli a often pull in out of the questiiun, since they ndent
Westin “A Chict in. would ‘almost’ certainly fa to) 1° OM See ere RIN.

Gold Coast has even gone to obtain staff, and since the reost Top ranking international Trade

the “unc ’ length of found- jmportant part of a journalist's officials are pec

ing a political = FO bine tralning—work on re vialt "Deimddiad and the British West !
goes pecu- newspaper—would not easily

liar label ‘National Labour gyailable. Visits of Colonial Indies soon. So writes the Hon.

“Party”, and is seeking the alli-
nce of Labour. In its elaborate
two page Blueprint, the Party's
aims and objects are set out anc

journalists to Britain and other + — of the
countries are very valuable, but I Union to th Trad rer we
believe more would be achieved . e Presid e
include the foll ssage: DY such visits if these journalists semen ir Watectemnt Berea
“" . . We believe that tbe control came, not to study journalist ier. me a r. C. P. re:
and direction of the next Govern- techniques, but to secure a com- || Tring aaa aw urged a nion
ment should be handed to the mand of the English language. % r. to prepare well in ad-
Chiefs and workers, but not to a _ The unfortunate fact remains | ma Oe _— or aspect of trade
ew educated place-seeking poli- that when Colonials have gained a , uncti ens 08 which it was
cians who may be looking out ‘this wider knowledge, they are felt the delegagion might be of
er opportunity to amass wealth less likely to remain journalists, help. The Trinidad President ex-
their own interests.” There is because of the uncertainty of pressed delight at the communi-
“yery little open conflict now be- journalism asa means of livelihood cation. He thought it would be of
tween the Emirs and their people in the Colonies. interest to all responsible Trade
an Northern Nigeria; but the : Union organisations in the British
-rumb'ings are heard there also. Educational Menace West Indies.
Some scholarships have been

The Colonial Press

Before he left the Colonial offered to the people of Nigeria by
Office for the governorship of the schools and universities in Eastern
Leeward Islands, Mr. K, Black- Germany and naturally many



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LAIN DOs,
1.CCEN way at W.8 Teporeeqa iui
Jomaica ial We Sugar wiciusily
Was s€eKing permission to manu-
tacture annyarous aiconoi tor use
«s Motor fuel. ‘Lois in itself would
ce no new aevelopment. In South
alica @armg the first world war
«= movr spirat Keown as Natalite
wilnen Was produced from sugar
molasses Was used extenswely a:
a substacute for petrol.

But the Jamaican situavion wae
brought about by the need to
weduce rum sales to the United
Kin _.«m owing to the high im-
port duty; and the desire to make
profitable use of all molasses so

could

be

that the sugar industry
operate at maximum efficiency
Idea

The idea has now been suppcrt-
ed by an article in this ines
issue of the “Times Review of
Industry”. The writer says that,
while in eireumstances it
seems unlikely power alcohoi
produced from sugar could find
au export market, there appears
to be several opportunities for
disposing of it locally. This
would enable cuts to be made
in petrol ignports and would be
of considerable financial benefit
to the country concerned “pro
vided the necessary official en-
couragement and action are
forthcoming to remove thx

| obstacles new hindering progress”

Tracing the history of powe:
alcohol production, the write:
points out the South African pro-
duct of the first world war wa
composed of 55—60 per cent.
alcohol, 40—45 per cent. ether
and a smal] amount of ammonia
Efforts were made to promotc
the use of it in the United King-
dom and the Chancellor of the
Exchequer in those days reduced
the duty on imported and home-
produced power and industrial
alcohol in order to encourage this
new ind ;

Then in 1922 the Imperial
Motor Transport Council sub-
committee made a _ favourable
report on the suitability of this
type of fuel for use in motor
vehicles. About the same time,
a United States firm found tha?
by use of an additional process,
the power alcohol could be suit-
ably employed for tractors.

Difficulties

Difficulties of distribution then
srose, coupled with a fall in the
price of petrol, and these two
factors together with other influ-
ences, gradually brought about
a loss of interest in the project.

Economie circumstances fol-
lowing the second world war
have now brought about the
revival of interest and last

year the Mauritius Government
appoint a committee to consider
ity of using anhydrous
aleohol in the eglony. Its con-
clusions were that the spirit could
be made locally at a price that
would compare favourably with
the c.i.f. cost of imported petrol.

the o1 probable outlet would be
interes with a ceiling production
figure of 3m litres annually, if

all local owners of motor vehicles |
ed to make use of!

were co
it in the proportion of 25 per cent
alcohol to 75 per cent. petrol.
Later the ceiling production figure
might rise to 5m litres. In addi-
tion, the committee suggested
that distillers should be invited
t) submit a scheme for the pro-
duction of 3m litres a year.
To Be Overcome

But
ties which will have to be over-
come before the recommendation:
are acted upon.
abolition of petrol rationing whic
virtually stopped the sales of
power alcohol made in the colony

In 1948—49 Mauritius produce:
2,800,000 litres of industria
alcohol and the changed condition
have placed the distillcrs in a:
awkward situation. The Chambe:
of Agriculture has supporte:
tthe request put forward by dis-
tillers that the excise duty o
nearly 144d. a litre on industria
alcohol should be removed. Thi:
‘would allow the selling price «
alcohol to be lowered. For un'es
sales can be encouraged the
distillers, whose stocks ar
oceupying all the available stor
age, will have to incur consicer
able expense disposing of the
surplus molasses from the curren!
sugar crop.








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It did, however, point out that|

} WHEN SOMEONE SPRAYS

there are several difficul: |

One is th |

i






ADVOCATE

Booker Bros. Expect
Sugar Increase

U.K. Rum Demand Still Falling

(From Our Own Correspondent)



|
|

LONDON. |

A 25‘ INCREASE in their sugar production is expect-|

éd in 1950 by Booker Brothers McConnell and Co.

This'

was stated at the 50th Annual General Meeting of the}

pany in London.

spring crop this year was
35 cent. above that of 1949,
but on the whole their sugar con-
cerms made a somewhat meagre
contribution to profits, said the
Chairman, a < . McConnell.

This was ma jue to the in-
evitable dislocation of
in factories and on plantations
where considerable modernization
work has been going on during
the crop year” he added.

The financial ition is fairly
good. “Unless the economic en-
vironment in which we operate
is completely upset—as it well
may be—we do not expect to be
short of funds for our needs” said
the Chairman, Their liquid posi-~
tion has been greatly improved
by the recent issue of new capi-
tal, and a new bout of inflation
is the form which an economic
upheaval. seems most likely to
take,

The Problems

“Inflation is ful] of financial
problems for us” continued the
Chairman “For instance, the
price of sugar is some four times
what it was before 1939; there-
jere four times as much money
must now be laid out to produce
the same tonnage of sugar. We
co not receive payment for our
sugar until it arrives in this coun-~
try or in Canada, and it is by no
means unusua] for the crop to
have more than 20,000 tons manu-
factured but not paid for. At the
present price this means the use
of over £600,000 merely to finance
a normal quantity of unsold pro-
duce which before 1939 would
only have needed about £150,000.

“We must finance not only pro-
Cuce but also the general stock
end stores for our sugar interests
and the stocks of merchandise in
our shops in Barbados, British
Guiana, Northern Rhodesia, Ny-
asaland and Trinidad. The con-
sclidated balance-sheet shows that
in all four million pounds are re-
quired to finance these; moreover
we are sure that in the light of
“he very large turnover achieved
by our operating units we are not
overstocked.”

On the business side, Stephens
Limited, of Trinidad, produced
ratisfactory returns, but the sales
of wholesale and retail businesses
n British Guiana were disappoint-
ing, owing to low controlled pro-
*t-margins coupled with heavy
overhead charges.

Responsibility }
“West Indian shops should ma-
terially benefit by the amalgama-'
tion of the West Indian buying
departments in London and Liver- |
poo] with Campbell Bros. Carter;
and Co, Limited, who have great
knowledge and experience in the
buying field. They will be res) -
sible for all the West Indian
keeping businesses of Bookers,—
as they are already the parent of
those in Africa. This is part of

SATURDAY,

1958

ee

OCTOBER 14,

Sir William
Ramsay

vas the discoverer of a whole
new family of elements— an
uhievement smparalleled in the
entire history of chemistry. The
first of his discoveries was made
in 18qqivhen,with LordRayleigh,
he isolated argon, a rare gas
chat exists in small quantities in
the air. Later, Ramsay and
his assistants succeeded in
isolating helium, neon, krypton
dud xenon, which are also present
in the atmosphere but in even smaller amounts. Ax first these gases were mere chemical
casviosities, but now, half a century later, they are of the first industrial importance, Argon




=

the general reorganization scheme. is the gas used in the modern gas-filled electric light bulb. The electric discharge lamp

The recession in the demand

depends on neon to such an extent that few recognise it today by any other name than that

for rum in the United Kingdom ef“ neon sign”. Helium is also employed in these lamps, in addition to its well-known

continues, but the Chairman said:

“United Rum Merchants Li
our newly acquired subsidiary,
had a most encouraging. year in
1949—indeed their profits, in the
face of a sharp recession in the
demand for rum. ..were far great-
er than we had any reason to
hope for at the time of the amal-
gamation. I am afraid. ..we must
count upon a reduction in United
Rum Merchants’ profits (due to
continuation of recession), Rum
is a magnificent drink, our brands
have a world-wide reputation, and
both at home and in our valuable
export markets United Rum Mer-
chants are well equipped to sell
them.”

The retiring directors, Mr. A.
E. V. Barton, C.B.E., and Mr. N.
P. Sherlock, were re-elected.

E
ALEXANDRIA.

A WRAF telephonist 20-year-
old Joyce Taylor, of Kings Norton,
Birmingham, swam the Great Bit-
ter Lake from the Sinai Desert to
Fayid, 74 miles, in eight hours 27
minutes. She is the only woman
ever to do so. Two other com-
petitors nearly had to give up
following the efforts of a well-
meaning Egyptian fisherman to
rescue them. Speaking no English,
he did not understand that the
swimmers were competing in a
race, and tried his hardest to take
them out of the water.

QUOTE
NEW YORK.
Back from entertaining troops
in battle areas in Korea, Holly-
wood’s Al Jolson was asked what
he did upon coming home. His
reply: “I looked up my Income-
tax to see if I had paid enough.”



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Ramsaywas born in Glasgow in 1852. Hewas a first-class athlete, musician, and linguist, as
well as being professor of chemistry at Bristol and later at University Col-
lege, London. He was knighted in 1902, and awarded she Nobel Prize in
1904. In 1913 he presided over the Internationa! Association of Chemical
Societies, where his flair for languages enabled him to address his cos-
mopolitan audience inEnglish, French,German and [talian, He died in 1916.



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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1950



News From Britain
Ry David Temple Roberts

LONDON, Oct. 6

The Navy has always saved Brit-
ain. Once again we are in debt to
them. For the navy has delivered | larly sensitive to television—which
gas supplies to London. The car-_ has its odd aspects, you will agree.
toonists are delighted with the’ Mr. Percy Cudlipp, editor of the
chances to draw imaginary char-| “Daily Herald”, gave tongue. He
acters called “Admiral Therm”.| found the play reactionary and
Mr. Therm is the fiery little sprite | full of snobbish bias. Now, of
that appears on the advertisements} course, he has every right to his
for gas fires, and gas cookers.) views, - There have been Tory
While the London workers at the} M.P’s_ like Waldron Smithers
furnaces are on strike the stokers} building up steam pressure until
of the navy are doing the job. they almost exploded at the al-

This is a peculiarly aggravated| leged Left slant of the B.B.C. In
and troublesome strike. Itdemon-| fact you might say the Tories
Strates some of the weaknesses the| Started this. But Mr. J. B. Priest-
Government and the Trade Unions} ley, the left-minded dramatist
have been accused of. For in-| 2ave up his personal talks in war-
stance the strikers are “unofficial” | time after whisperings behind the
—their Unions tell them to go/ Scenes rather than trumpetings in,
back to wrk. Mr. Isaacs, the little} Say the “Daily Mail”. What seems

their pomposities—appeared on
television. Then came the storm.
It seems that Labour is particu-



man we have as Minister of Lab-}59 odd is that the head of
our, broadcast ineffectively warn- : ; a
ing the workers they were being|‘'° 5-B., Si William Haley,

should have banned further radio-
productions — or television — (f
this inoffensive playlet that had
got under the tender skins of a few
Labour publicists. One point I
am sure o@s that the editor of
the “Daily Herald” did not expect
the B.B.C. to cave in! A few
weeks ago various socialists got
together to discuss how to coun-

manoeuvred and used by the
Communists. The workers them-
selves are not—most of them—
Communists. But they are «still
on strike. The government has
delayed for weeks the two crucial
steps—and at last, this week, has
acted, Ten of the strikers have
been brought before magistrates
and sentenced to one month of

| teract an organisation — the

area: ig tg tye Listeners’ Association — which
k ; be is a ; ;

ed. a to’ tile caukworks, 1 S mainly Conservative in out-

look, and sends streams of letters
to the B.B.c. every time they
detect the timid colour of pale
,pink in a broadcast. The decis_
jons taken were to put out
Propaganda to leftwingers to
“write to the B.B.C.”— and a
little office was set up to co-
ordinate the stream. The “New
Statesman” asked its readers to
send copies of their protests in
this office. Fair enough, but a
little pompous one might say.
Even the “New Statesman”
thought so, as it printed next
week, in the “This England”
column, (usually reserved for
items of surprisingly English self-
righteousness), a little quotation
from its own serious injunction!
Then came the television
performance, Imagine the search
for pen or typewriter Then the
leaier on the “Daily Herald”.
Then the B.B.C, banned the
broadcast. O terror! O horror
Vast publicity for a few light-
hearted gibes at vhe Party
Manners; millions will read it;
another example of the new
censorship will have been per-
petrated. Which all goes to show
how disastrous it is to have an
easy, pliable B.B.C. Why did
Sir William Haley not stand up
for himself and his Corporation?
Did some Minister telephone
from Margate in exuberant
triumph at his Party Conference?
The little incident will be soon
forgotten; we shall never know;
but what a lesson in how the ban
can boomerang !

Londen paused to see how the
mavy men would succeed with the
Strange task. . This morning the
pressure of gas went up. Now we
can boil a kettle, again, without
waiting for hours. Such are the
triumphs, the belateq triumphs, of
good government. The strike will]
probably end quite quickly.
the ten men were sentenced
they seemed to have a jaunty,
self-satisfied air—a kind of bold
defiance. But there is no doubt
that respect for the law is still
overwhelming—no amount of de-
lay and muddling can destroy it.
But even if the strike ends there
is still one question to be settled,
What of Mr. Isaacs? He has a
big job—especially if we are com-
led by re-armament to retrace
our steps down the road by auster-
ity. He has not proved up to the
job even in easy times. He is Mr.
Bevin’s nominee, certainly, and
the colossus of the Labour Party
would not like to see his little
an swept out and a bigger man
replace him. But Mr. Bevin has
not time for everything.



Party Manners

Perhaps you have already read
this little play. Certainly it has
achieved strange fame overnight.
It was written by Val Gielgud as
the most light-hearted piece of
nonsense. He, for one, never
meant it to be taken seriously.
It is peopled with Cabinet Minis-
ters with red ties, with comical
peers and Old Etonian socialist
gentlemen as controllers of our

nationalised industries. The play Bowler Hats
ran for a couple of months at an! qt was a good excuse for a’
gut of the way London theatre. party. The Bowler hat is a|

Then it was given on the radio.

hundred years old. It was first
Incidentally Mr. Val Gielgud was e ‘

made for a man called Williaya
Coke by a certain Mr. Bowler,
So the firm that made the first
bowler, a hundred years ago,

plays fifteen years ago, as a spe-
cial technique. Now he is in tele-

| rather unfortunately.
| with,
|made for aâ„¢building at one end |

| Square.

| Students should be encouraged to

| This is a sad end to the story, as

BARBADOS



dregsed in the cost e of 100







years agc certainly stole the
lime—light And th young
officers of the Regin yF
Guards turned out ir to



demonstrate the
worn about town

bowler
in

i
| days
| Perhaps they did not expect to be
photographed. Perhaps it

these

is

]
|
|
|
|
|} cruel to record their aghast looks
as the press turned cameras, and
| newsreel cameras on them.
| Perhaps it was not quite regi
| mental !
| Lord Mayor’s Thanksgiving
The idea was good. The Lord
Mayor of London would launch
a fund to build home and hostel
for students from Commonwealth
and Colonies who come to Lon—
|don. It would express Britain's
| gratitude for aid and food from
| overseas. But it has turneti out
To begin
a grandiose design was|
of an eighteenth century London
The preservers of our
| ancient buildings protested. Ani,
more seriously, the complaint)
arose that London is not Britain;



|go to other places as well. Had |
the Lord Mayor’s advisers !
thought out their scheme very
carefully? Did they appreciate
how they were tying generations
of students yet unborn to life in
one corner of London? Might not
students prefer to live among
British people? Many questions.
But the Lord Mayor’s Committee
rode the storm. Now we hear
that the response has been Cisap—
pointing. To give a fillip to the
fund -various parties are being
given in its aid. The Overseas
Club is helping; and this week }
called at a remarkable exhibition
of paintings by Rubens, (admis—
sion 2/6, catalogue 2/6), also in
aid of the Thanksgiving Fund.
But something has gone wrong.

f

A RECORD catch of king fish caught by the crew of the “Investigator” yesterday is seen above, mem-

bers of the crew looking on.

RECORD CATCH
OF KING FISH

NINE king fish totalling about
280 pounds were caught by the
“Investigator” and marketed here
yesterday. |

Five of the fish weighed about |
140 pounds each and the other fou
about 20 pounds each!

A catch of this kind is consid-

As I overheard one lady at this | ered lovely, Mr. D. W. Wile:
exhibition, “Thanksgiving for |\the Fisheries Officer told the
what?” she asked her friend. I | “Advocate”

suspect that is what is wrong Mr. Wiles said that he wanted
Placards announce the Thanks-/to announce to fishermen and
giving Fund, but there is not|sportsmen that king fish were on

enough explanation of the value
to Commonwealth and Colonies
of students coming to Britain.

the run at the Middle Shallow and
the London Shallow.

Those shallows were in the}
South East part of the island
the slow response gives the im
pression that Britain has forgot
ten the food parcels. Not 350,
I assure you, but we do need
reminding what the Lord Mayor
wants to say “Thank you” for.
The.last great consignment of
Empire food is due in Britain in
the next weeks. We hope, indeed,
there will be no need, again, to
feed Britain with generosity.

CALYPSOES FOR
CARNEGIE !

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN.
Mr. D, C. Yannopoulos, Stage
Director of the Metropolitan
Opera Company of New York, told
the “Gazette” yesterday that much
has been heard in the United
States of the calypso and the steel
band, the folk music of this
Colony. In view of the policy to
encourage this development
throughout the world, and to en-
courage talent, there was every
possibility that “with a little
touching up here and there, a
show centred around the calypso
and steel band musie of Trinidad
could be put on at Carnegie Hall,
New York, if proper arrangements
are made.” r. Yannopoulos is

= {

°
56 Grapefruit: $1 |
(From Our Own Correspondent) |
PORT-OF-SPAIN.
a Fyzabad woman,
told the Siparia Court that she
was a mother of nine children
Their father would not work, so
she had to steal to support them.
She pleaded guilty to the larceny
of 56 grapefruit, valued $1.00, the
property of Kern Trinidad Oil-
fields, She was put on a bond
for one year.

Jamoine,

Discovery Day
Celebrations Marred |

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN.
The 192nd anniversary of the
discovery of the New World by
Christopher Columbus was com-
memorated in Trinidad this morn-
ing, with the “laying of a wreath”
at the foot of the discoverer’s
statue at Columbus Square, Port-
of-Spain, The occasion was mar-
red bythe disapproval of the cere-

|
|

epee ett aang erie one

bers of the Trinidad—Venezuela



the fellow who developed radio |

vision. So his little play—full of| joined’ in a celebration. The

barbed shafts at our rulers and | young man in _ side-whiskers,
_*



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”



returning to New York following
an @pgagement at the Colon
Theatre, Buenos Aires,

Inter-Relations Committee
bore placards of protest.



ADVOCATE



North west Trinidad was struck

by

Toursday morning, bringing tor-
rential showers that caused con
siderable
places,
clothing



| Bridges Damaged
In T’dad’s Storm

‘he

the

covering a fairly large area, which
developed over Venezuela yester-

ing
streets. to become tributaries.
Port-of-Spain’s East End Foun

dy

was inundated by the floods, and
as a result employees were unable

at

| River overflowed
| snother river at St. James, West
Port-of-Spain,

7

y



TICKET TALK.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN.

A_ report in a newspaper re-
garding the new Jamaica sweep-
stakes, which aims at paying a
first prize of $100,000, caused a
Couva agent to send a clipping
to the Company and to ask for
n explanation

A letter received by him from
Knutsford Park, Limited, Kings

(From Our Owr Correspondent)

a thunderstorm — early

en

damage to various

and loss of poultry and

It was disclosed through | Mr, R McConnell, Secretary ot
Weather Bureau at Piargo ton, Jamaica, read in part; “We
an isolated thunderstorm

beg to advise that you need have
flear

no selling the ticket

which you have received, as all

in

day, drifted slowly northeast | the tickets are perfectly genuine
over Trinidad. We printed two sets of tickets

Maraval area received the} some single at 4/— and some
| worse of the storm, The Maraval iouble at 8 By this you wili

its banks and | understand that the tickets are

all good and none are forgeries

The Weather

TODAY:
Sun Rises: 5.48 a.m.
Sun Sets: 5.44 p.m.

overflowed, caus-

many of the surrounding





the Eastern Main Road

on



to work on Thursday morning Moon (First Quarter)
Many bridges were damaged, October 18
trains ran lave, and workmei Lighting: 6 p.m.
from the Works and Hydraulics High Water: 5.57 a.m
Department were kept busy !5 5.45 p.m,
clearing debris and landslide YESTERDAY:
along several roads, Rainfall (Codrington)
-18 in.
‘Total for month to yesterday
4.61 ins.

College Principal
Returns To T’dad

(From Our Own Correspondent)

Mr.
jthe Imperial College of Tropical |
| Agriculture, St. Augustine, Trini-
| dad, arrived from the United King-

mony of what it stood for by mem-' rangements for the celebration of

Temperature (Max,) 84.0° F

‘Temperature (Min,) 72.0° F

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E
(3 p.m.) E.S.E.

Wind Velocity 8 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.958

| (3 p.m.) 29,868,

STOLE A PENNY

PORT-OF-SPAIN

Harold Page, Principal of

| dom last night, via Jamaica. Mr. | (From Our Own Correspondent)
Page was on long leave He | PORT-—OF-SPAIN.
Ygiten Norway, Africa and India. A thief broke into a Port—of-
While dn England, preliminary ar- | Spain parlour, found one penny

m the drawer and took it. On a

the Royal Charter Silver Jubilee | second thought, he turned to the

who| of the LC.T.A,, to be held next shelves and stole aerated drinks
January, were made.

and sweets to the value of $2.00.



for a
wonderful cup

of coffee

TRY THE IMPROVED
CHASE & SANBORN



YES, the new, improved Chase and

Sanborn is really superlatively good coffee. Whether

’
you are a connoisseur or not, you can’t fail to
appreciate that fine mellow flavour, that rich and

PAN AMERICAN STANDARD BRANDS INC.
P.O. Box 259

tantalizing aroma. And Chase and Sanborn is

vacuum-packed, so it comes to you



as fresh as the day it left the factory.
Treat yourself and your friends
to this delicious coffee. Get a tin

from your grocer today.

Barbados, Bridgetown

Cecil B. DeMilles Masterpie

ce!







This is the
GLUCOSE

which wins Test Matches,* supplies immediate
energy to athletes, restores and sustains in
fdtigue and tension. It is most valuable too in
infant feeding in cases of acidosis, malnutrition
and feverish conditions.

Always ask for the Cow & Gate brand.




RENAN LS SIN NWI

yee wee
GLUCOSE

A
NN PAR ll ee

\ ANO,.cALCIUM | 3S




CLYCEROPHOSPH ATE Se





FRUIT SUGAR FOOD




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FOR SUPPLYING
IMMEDIATE ENERGY
AND NOURISHMENT
WITH THE ADDITION
OF A CALCIUM AND
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AULT UAL LANA





GUILDFORD

ENCLAND
SRN aie

MANO VAN






_

COW & GATE

LUCOSE



—_
Used by the West Indies Cricket team durin:
their victorious 1950 tour of the U.K,

Agents—J. B. LESLIE & ©O., LTD.





the 1951 British Industries

PAGE SEVEN

Out



Barbados
Again

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON.
JUST OVER a week ago a cable arrived in London
from the Barbados Gevernment informing the West India
Committee of the island’s decision not to participate in’
Fair.
The news came as no surprise,

‘

-~w

Barbados had no part in the Fair

last year. But at the same t .
W.L Gover nor Ss; BWI ‘civelie hare reagneh. thie "der

cision is again in the negative

They are asking themselves why
Barbados should see fit to by-pass
this mighty exhibition of “The
3ritish Empire Can Make rt”,
when Jamaica, Windward Islands,
Trinidad and Tobago, British Gui-
ana and the Sea Island Cotton
Association have all agreed to
play their part again

Invited To
Opening «

OF T'DAD LEG. CO.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN The Dominion and Colonial see-
tion is always one of the show-

His Excellency the Governor of | pieces of the B.I.F. and receives



British Guiana, Sir Charles | @8 many visitors as any other part
Woolley, has accepted an invita-| Of the exhibition. Last year was
tion from the Trinidad Govern-| Pe of the best for a long time
}ment to attend the inaugural and the West Indies stand com-
jopening of Trinidad’s new Legis- | P&t¢d Most favourably with those
jlative Council on October 20.|°% Pakistan, East Africa, Malaya
Other Governors of the West|°" Mong Kong

| Indies are also invited;
| Cammander in Chief, America and
| West Indies station.
| Seel, Comptroller for Development
|}and Welfare ha,
| and will be accompanied by Lady
| Seel,

|
|

well,
Commons,

m

various Colonées within the Brit-
ish Caribbean and their wives, to

w

the guests of the Government for

a
al



also the T recall that several foreign
visitors ta whom I spoke were par-
ticularly impressed with the pro-
ducts of the West Indies, .Their
one complaint—to which attention
was drawn at the time—was the
lack of direct representation at
each of the stands. But that did
Governor has invited, as}not mean that buyers went away
representatives from the| without taking careful nete of the
the Colonial Office, | various goods on display
of the Legislatures of But it did mean

them went away
had seen

Sir George

also accepted,

The

embers
that most. .of
believing they
the entire production
range of all the West Indies
|Colonies, I don't suppose more
}than one in ten even thought ~for

itness the ceremony and to be

few days. Certain Caqjcnies have
ready replied. It is unlikely that

thos ited fr he United one moment that Barbados .alsa
Kingd ava eit) rom a rhe United) formed part of the British Carib
Vinge om wi attenc Captain ! pean and also had its own par-
S. J. S. Boord, R.N., Commanding ticular products.

H
se
A
ar

‘MS. “Sparrow”, will be repre-| ‘That was unfortunate enough
‘nting the Commander in Chief, | from a trade point of view. But
merica and West Indies > or iat next year it is going to assume

id his ship is expected to be in| even greater importance because

port in Port-of-Spain for three or! the 1951 B.I.F. will coincide with

four days.

$480,000 Promised |
|For Road Making

fe

on
United Kingdom,
guest
Windward Islands for two or three
days in Grenada before going on
to St.
| te

| Spain in an interview on Thursday |

| the Festival of Britain,



Arrangements are well in hand
to make the 1951 B.1.F. the great—
est of all and judging by the
popularity of the Fair in’ recent
years that will not be difficult

Hundreds of thousands of visi-
tors from the United States, South
| America, the Continent, Africa,
(From. Our Own Cotweensnéenti } and the Middle and Far East will

, | be coming to England for the cen
PORT-of-SPAIN tenary celebrations of the great
Hon, J. M. Stow, Administrator | Festival of 185)

or St. Lucia arrived in Trinidad | 4, ,
ahs sa : : For these visitors the B.1.F.
woneaiay — fe ae will be the yardstick by which
steal of the| they can, for themselves, judge the
| British Empire’s post war recovery
| effort, Their visit to the Common:
| wealth section will probably be
their first first-hand contact with
the Colonies and the Dominions.

IN ST. LUCIA



of the

Lucia, He leaves Trinidad
“morrow morning.

His Honour said in Port-of-

For this reason aioné it would

that a British Government promise| be worth the while of Barbados to



ei

"Color by TECHNICOL



| of $480,000 to $720,000 (B.W.1 )|be represented by a member of
was made for a road programme
in $t. Lucia, provided it was in-
tegrated with approved economic
development projects, He also said
that the question of establishnig a
Police Training school in St

the tourist board. But it would be

\ better still if the Government
reconsidered their decision and
Barbados joined the other Carib--
bean colonies in showing the world
that “the West Indies can make
2.”



Lu-
a was under consideration











pes 7 wee SH ny ne emt
OO ixehplok doa w kOe eae eet W S00 ag

YOU SAVE 3 WAYS

‘ when you operate these low-cost
Morris-Commercial 25/30 cwt. wucks

se WP sete




FUEL CONSUMPTION IS LOWER due to high-efficiency,
economy engine which develops 42 b.h.p

MAINTENANCE COSTS LESS rugged cohstruction of chassis, ~ «
gearbox and engine withstands hardest working conditions, means *’ ™
fewer overhauls,
REPLACEMENT COSTS
ARE LOWER ~ because Morris-
Commercial trucks are built to
stay on the job longer.

25/30 cwt. van

Reduce delivery costs with this
Asmart, economical 25/30 cwt. van.
Over-size capacity 245 cub. (6.93
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cab

MORRIS-COMMERCIAt

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.

Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504

OR *A Paramount Picture °

oy

tw

rts

u

~e

ont

“

seed



PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS | ADVOCATE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1950

a







TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

KENZEL ALARM CLOCKS

MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY








HURRY, BOYS! YOUR / ER,
INAUGURATION ER...
Tz








BANQUET tow od






5 The Bes* Clocks Made
inet li nies aa fa
. 7 | c q ‘ 7.

: 22 COL1 AUTOMATIC
| ; LUXURY PISTOL ........ $40.00



Contains
er

POLLE'P SOAPS D.D.T.



| at

i} JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE

|





BUSINESS
OR

PLEASURE



NOT UNLESS

iF I TAKE BABS 2 | You TAKE VERA PLY
SKATING FOR YOU, ) TO THE MOVIES,
WILL coe GOTO < ray INSTEAD OF t
THE DANCE WITH )> WHAT ALVit Nees
No EMILY? ZC SAYS, FIRST . ee T i SPEAKING
. oN ele el DY

~

is




































To
Cope 1980, fg Rtg ree md reser SS T AD
See ee eel a i Single ........ $ 32.00
Return ........ $ 57.60
THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER DAILY FLIGHTS
asa WITH HIS CATTLE ALL Gone, © 'LL GET THE CASH i MIKE, THAT MASKED MAN IAS A LOT OF CARN 96.00
Ta © ONT Winit YOU TO M-M, WITH HIS CATTLE,ALL GONE, }t TLL GET THE CASH F MIKE, THAT ingle ......:. "
EXTEND FARES HORTNEE TWAT SOUg ‘HE'S A'BIG Rom OAT ang ~~ LOT OF Mt SAFE HONEY NWS POCKET HG VENDING Bete te 3172.80
TO tEND : M THE CASH TD jg =< UNDER OBLIGATION TO YOU. onic . FREQUENT FLIGHTS
: = A AMBUSH HIM! ST. LUCIA
i atetass 18.00
ps good looks tell you they’re just right. ince nee Sigh a ; 32.40
You know, too, when you look at the price FREQUENT FLIGHTS
: tag, that you ean’t get finer value. Illustrated MARTINIQUE
~~ (D is a Two-tone Brogue, Tied to every pair is Single ........ ; pf
‘ the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign FREQUENT FLIGHTS
7 p/ C7>=- which means ‘just right’! Look for it in JAMAICA
I I co leading stores in Barbados. Single ........ $190.00
salir 00
FREQUENT FLIGHTS
taped Bade ec hogs i om PUERTO RICO
a YOU WANT TO FORECLOSE THE LONE RANGER ASKED GET RID OF THAT MASKED Ff LEAVE IT TO}. | eULLETS WOULD MAKE THEIR DEATHS | | Single ........ $ 93.00
ON RED FARISH'S RANCH, WHY'D YOU LEND RED JM ME To. T'M ORLIGATED TO MAN AND ae AND “ et LOOK LIKE W DER. THIS ROCK'LL 5) Return ........ $167.40
[Re ISN 8 OF oe — ge (Meee, (aionrest/| | 02 eee FREQUENT FLIGHTS






Single ......... 4.00
Return ........ ee
FREQUENT FLIGHTS
weak,

See
19TH ANNIVERSARY



BRITISH WES T INDIAN AIRWAYS
Airways House, P.O.S.

Lower Broad Street,

BY ALEX’ RAYMOND








ANT HER WING OF THE VILLA BENARES : er daee , M , . es Bridgetown.
FB ah assey APPA | ver sss
fr [a7 is * Pig! lastiai
- (42 B.HLP.) nt
Also available with Steel Wheels and Half Tracks (For Ploughing) FIREWORKS

A SELECT ASSORTMENT
Including
sack” at. bon Seem
COURTESY GARAGE ROMAN CANDLES Etc, Etc.

White Park Road, — (ROBERT THOM. LTD.) — Dial 4391 patecune
Also
j Whole tee dn Retail

@@ ADDITIONAL SHIPMENT DUE SHORTLY.





BRUNO! WAKE UP! THERE e ’ Pee tak
ARE STRANGE NOISES LAW 's sone if













C. CARLTON BROWNE
Wholesste & Retail Druggist

WM. FOGARTY LTD. || ssemzers
TAILORING DEPT. i rceaanneaaaaech

e | sea |||] ASK FOR
SILVER ANNIVERSARY ; ry" RN
YEAR s&5§
RUM

It is Mild and Mellow
And Bottled

yi|| STUART & SAMPSON
LTD.

Headquarters For Best Rum



ores



gt Rs

NOW WILL YOU ALL BE
QUIET, PLEASE? | ag
HAVE TO _
CONCENTRATE,

—¥,

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

YOURE MADDENING! EVERY a
MINUTE YOU WASTE HERE, <
THE KIDNAPPERS ARE RIDING-) =
FARTHER AWAY!










| RoE SL 23.
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Yao RERST BANG To NE")

















PLASTIC PARASOLS
$1.71

IC RAINCOATS
PLASTIC pone.



Ry

WHATS THAT )SOME KINDA NATIVE




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PLASTIC HAIR
*TRIBE AFTER TRIBE HEARS THE










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ey BRUSHES ... $1.82,

oN eM DANTON |] [REIMER el | RACE 9. WHO aE COSTUME |
RE Aieo~ “Bring TONE ad |e oe oo JEWELLERY |
. , Geet |
Ry en peas Ne ae SAMPLE SHOES

A Quarter century

of satisfaction to value-wise sh ors er n ; FASHION HATS
and’ Men who are particular about Cut, Style and ‘Finish | “GIVE A THOUGHT

of their Suits, TO QUALITY” NYLONS!

SHOP YES. IT’S

ms
rocartys ||| THANIS |

Pr. Wm. Hry & Swan Sts.

Make your personal selection now, from among the Extensive
Range of WOOLLENS, WORSTED, TROPICAL SUITINGS,
GREY AND DOE-SKIN FLANNELS, SERGES, HARRIS AND
SPORTS TWEEDS, now on display in our WOOLLENS
DEPARTMENT.



riscensdigiiahincmeetniein a ee
ST So aN































IN MEMORIAM

IN loving memory of our
sister and Aunt Mrs Ada
who fell asleep on October 14,



A dear one from our home is g0he

A Voice we loved is still
A _ place is vaeant in our home
Which we can néver fill.
= in Jesus Blessed
m which none ever wakes to weep
Ever to be remembered
Hewitt:
(Nieces) :
» (Nephews)

UTO



Gordon and

vile

EEE
aition, Oyner teaving selon “Ne "eq: | , IGE ROCK.

14.10.

CAR — (1) 10 HP.

8 model. Apply a
ing & Co. Ltd.

nn

CAR — Willys in g6od
License to 3ist May 1941.

14.10.50—4.f.n.

CAR — One Standard 8 H.P. Car in

perfect condition. Apply J. E.
/o James A. Lynch & . Lita














w.
Telephone 3988,



= MOTOR CYCLE — One Matchless, 5
.P. Motor Cycle, For particulars:

pply to J. A. Cheesman, C/o ‘al
ink of Canada. 9.10 soe

Ic. & FITTINGS:
7:029, 7:036, 7:044, 7:052, 7:
. in similar sizes.
Galvanised Conduit
s % inch to 1% inch. Enquire Auto
‘e Co, Trafalgar St. Phone 2606.
14.10,50—t.f.n.

REFRIGERATOR — One (1) 9 Cubic
. Crosley Shelvador Refrigerato:
). One (1) Year old in per-

t condition, Four (4) years still re-
ining on guarantee. Phone 4447.

le. Apply

A School Boy’s leigh
Nu Made Cleaners,
-10.50—2n,

Solomon" ¢/o
almetto Street, City. 14

-— One Standard Un-
. Excellent er
os. Swan St. ‘

13.10.50—t, f. n.

LIVESTOCK

FEMALE DONKEY — Apply C. Wil-
» Shopkeeper, Brereton Village, St.
lip. 14.10.50—2n.,

rwood T
on.

19.

.



HORSES — 1 Mare. 1 Chestnut
Mare at Wakeliela Pits st. J hn. :
4

HAMS IN TINS — 9 *
e yours now

BONELESS
each @ $1.0 pee th. Secur
as Xmas supplies will be limited.
14,10.50—2n.

BERETS —
wear,

Clearing at only 4%. each.
STORE, 50 Swan St. 15.10.50—3n .
FIRE-WOoD lengths at 9c.
per 100 Ibs., and, Gord-Wood at “haps.
Apply — Dover, . 6.10. .
‘Seater RN tol oie Shireen
LIPTON" —- ©
drink and 0;
Jevel

enjoy this, you should use a
teaspoonful to the cup! Exceeding
et, from its delle t

18 WANTED

it every tame, Many sytney
suit every i 'y_ styles, many
prices. KNIGHTS DRU! : HELP

14.10,50—2n.

PIANO — In good condition, ub “AN TRRABTENCED CASHIER re-
tuned. Splendid tone. No. reasonable| dulred. Please apply in writing to
offer r . Mrs. D. ne, er| D. V. Scott & Co. Ltd. Do not send
2nd. Ave: Bank Hall Main Road, original testimonials unless subsequently

14.10.50—2n, | Tequested.”

iin einai

RAIN COATS — School Children Rain
Coats, and Young Ladies. Real English
quality. No Plastic. To clear $2.18 each
SWAN STORE, 50 Swan Street

14,10.50—2n. |

SALE — Among other items we séil
Khaki at 50c. per yd. ROYAL STORE.
14,10, 50—Zn.

SHIRTS—2,000 Men’s Shirts of guaran—
teed wearing quality at $2.00 and $2.40
each. ROYAL STORE. 12.10.50—7n,
et

SHIRTS & PYJAMAS — Boys’ and
Men’s Shirts and Pyjamas ordered to
Measure can be delivered within four

RELIANCE FACTORY.
12.10, 50—7n.

hours.
eee ereenennprrereuenneshmasainstieliniesnemiitipeadents
ate GALVANIZED CO!
— Prime 7 ft. $3.21 —
$3.60 — 9 ft. per Ob-
inable from Si. ARE

ee
Store, Broad St. 11.10,50—4n,

WEETABIX — Your Grocer has just
Teceived a fresh supply of this delicious
Cereal, which is more than breakfast
food. Price 46c. and Bé. Tae a:

14.10. mn.

PUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE

THE Tea-Room and Library of the
Women’s Self Help Association will be

opening om Monday 16th October. Con-

ors of cakes and preserves are

asked to send in eir goods on the

morning of the 16th. 10.10, 50—6n.
NOTICE

Applications for 4 Vestry Exhibitions.
2 for Girls at St. Michael’s Girls’ School,
and 2 for Boys at the Boys’ Foundation
School, will be received by me not
jJater than 20th October.

Parents of applicants must be parish-

in straightened circumstances.
of applicants between 11 and 12

W. U. GOODING,
Parochial Treasurer,

St. Philip.
11.10.50—6n.
CE

NOTI
“SEALED Tenders for the erection
of a Pavilion and Community Hall at



K. MASON,
Clerk, Vestry of St. George."
12.10,50—4n.

—

NO CREDIT NOTICE

K. R. HUNTER & ; ., Agents.
13.10.50—3n.
PERSONAL

—$—$—————————————
The Public are heréby warned against
giving credit to my wife Rita Branch

(nee Murrel) as I do not hold mygelf
responsible for her or anyone else con-
ae or debt or di Aiea ge
unless by a written ic.
Sed. DERCY BRANCH,
Richmond Gap,
St. Michael
14.10. 50—2n



The public is hereby warned against
giving credit to MARTHA WILLIAMS,
as I do not hold myself responsible for
any debt or debts contraesed by her or
anyone else in my name or on the Estate
of Lisford Williams

Se jot and_oe pent
for ani alf of
LISFORD WILLIAMS,
14.10,50—2n

beloved
Downes,
18.

by Louisé} “raat 1LLE
(sister) Rita and Beryl Hewitt} Stream "ae

Donald Downes
14.10.50—In.







r | Parish

Ai Berets for dress eir daughters
Children eae, Several Shades. ed that thi

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1950
erent

CLASSIFIED ADS.| Juenites wiu

TELEPHONE 2508










Coral Sands

— At
furnished apart-
\ 81¢é@, Alma
Eig ee ASE







-



Furnished 3 be@room, dra
ing and dining room Avene for t
month of November only 2377

14.10. 50—2n






e
flat

Ho? SH oan Ps,

10.10, 50—2n




Furnished infurnished, Appl:

or w .

Mrs. Z. Daniel, Shopkeeper, ads:
10.10.50—3n

EDUCATIONAL

VACANT SCHOLARSHIPS

GIRLS’ FOUNDATION SCHOOL
There até one or re vacant Founda-
tion | at the Christ Church
Girls’ Foundation School. Applicants must
be chaser, St, nts residing in the
o nh and
straitened circumsta’ 7a eee

inces.
The applicants must be perraee the

Hi at the
1 on Friday 27th October at 9.30

.m.
Forms of applicatio
from the Betrorase, Ww. Se tee
= House, Bay Lh
urned accompan
vs ate to the

GIRLS’ FOUNDATION 58
An_ Entrance Soon ee
School Year January—July
1 on Friday 27th

held at the
received u fe idee atte tal ber pe
the Headrilvtress and Faust be acco’ i
fed by a baptismal certificate and a tant
tchool attended’ By te caren of the lant
school by the pupil.
oat ears Jae be between
eal

the ‘examination. eee sont ey Seen ee

Parents

isi ‘witt ‘be
ber




























10.10.50—T.F.N.

OFFICE CLERK — Young Lady ex-
perienced general office routine up to
point of entry and bal; of customers’
ledgers. Call. with written application
or write im ately to Mr. Carter,
T. R. Evans, Broad St. State ege,
experience and schooling. Salary up to
$80 month according to experience.

14.10,50—2n.

STENO-TYPIST — Experienced Si
ist for our Office. Salary $1 .
Seereiary Dowding. Estates & ‘Trading
wt
Co. Ltd., Bay Street.
14.10,50—3n,



LOSI & FOUND





LOST
WATCH — (1) Ladies Gold Watch
with indi. Gold Band, Enamet
spun J i with 4 ¢rack, On Sunday
Oct. ‘ween Roebuck

Staple Groves and Bishop's Court Hil,

Finder will be suitably rewarded on
returning same to ivocate .
Dept. 11,10,.50—2n.

ol epee

DOG — One Dark-Grey Wire hayed
dog answers to Name Tom. Chancery
Lane — Silver Sands area, Finder wilt
be rewarded. Notify Mrs. E. Russell,
Chance View; Chancery Lane: Ch, Ch

14,10.50—In

eerie ifeetpened abelian rnen-noeceeeninae

SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS — Series U.

1. Fi please urn same to

orm ve C/o Frank Wood
lloden House, Culloden Road.

14.10 .50—1n.

PUHLKt SALES
REAL ESTATE

ae rh In Fae | Moon Fort,
Lucy. x 10 —

through. poly.
Men's Road, St.

lew, Pine righ
Skinner,

11,10. 50—n.

IN Plymouth, MONTSERRAT, ,B.W.1.
for £3,500.

=e
pi apa ie ot 2 eee

St
ins, Ni it
Charles 6
er.





4-0 | GOVERNMENT INDUSTRIAT sCROOr, SUMMERVALE—

14.10.50—3n

Gates a mee
ahy ‘day except es by tment
Dial 3983. ‘ 10: ,



MAIL NOTICE

Mails for St. Vincent, Grenada, Trini-
dad, and British Guiana by the S.S
Canadian C will be closed at the
pana Post Office as ee tf

‘arcel Mail and Register Mail @
9 a.m., Ordinary Mail at 10.15 a.m.’

E' THOMPSOR 630" p.m. £1994

.10.56-—t.f.n.
the

we
he




i
T _ A
floor

. Very

for a big

bs inate

11.10.50—4n.

HOUSE — SESPBRANZA” fully fyr-
Geres from the 2 Nov. on, St. ages
Coast. 14,10. /.

Â¥ Yan y
Drawing and Dining 2
W.Cc,, Bath and Kitchen.






'
The post is temporary and terminable by a month’s notice on
either side. Remuneration will be in accordance with the Key Scale

a ‘
«| Matron, Government Industrial School, particularly from women in

BARBADO:
Amphibian
Landing

@ From page 1.
Intelligence officers in Tokyo
estimated that the South Korean
lightning drive up the east coast
had isolated 6,000 to %,000 Com-
munists in wild mountainous coun-

Be Included
m ° *

In Credit Unions

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN,
Suggestion by Noel P. Bowen
Registrar of Co-operatives in
Trinidad, | at_a meeting is that
the Credit Union Societies’ Or-

ae will soon be a

7 stated
in ene the Credit Union.

01 ad teachers of ci!
schools attended, with a view *
atranging that school children
Bhould take part in the credit
union movement. The Registrar
assured that all details of the
seheme would be placed before
them at an early date, and that
his department would at all
times be willing to give inform-
ation and advice.

Exit Tramp

LONDON.
Frederick Francis Fincher, 60,
in court on a charge of stealing
(three watches from a house, was
described by defense counsel as
a tramp. He interrupted to say:

“Excuse me, sir. ey do not
eall us tramps now. We are

wayfarers.” ‘iia
He received 2a ni sen-

strip is Kimpo near Seoul.

A large Communist force h
been reported in Mokpo in the ex-
treme south-west corner of t
peninsula. Fifteen thousand re<
armed troops and 2,000 with small
arms were said to be in a 25
square mile district around the

General MacArthur's headquart-
ers announced to-day that 60,000
North Koreans had been captured
since the campaign began 1,400 of
them in the past 24 hours.

Reuter.

FRANCE ASKS AID

WASHINGTON, Oct. 18.
France to-day urgently asked
America to rush military Equip-
ment to Indo-China where French
troops are retreating in the face
of a heavy pressure from Viet-
nam troops .—Reuter.





tence,



GOVERNMENT

S ADVOCATE








In Carlisle Bay

Cyclorama O., Sch. Lochinvar S .
Gord

Seh. 1c. ion, Séh. Cyril
Sch, Zita Wonita, Sch. En.er-
- Frances W. Smith, Sen

Lady Joy,
. E. Caroline and Seh. Molly
Jones

Schooner Philip be idson, 87 tons
, Capt. ish Guiana

Schooner rise S., 66 tons nett
Copt. MeQuilkin, for Trinidad.

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

CABLE & WIRELESS (West
Lid. advise that they can now commu-
nicate with the following ships through
their Barbados Coast Station:

S.S. Fort Amherst, S.S. Golfito, s.8
Peth Finder, SS Geologist, ss
Hudsonfirth, S.S. Orestes, S.S. Moon
Captain
ss

Indies;

dotte, S.S. Blue Master, S.S. Nerina
S.S. Neuva Andalucia, §.S. Frontenac
Alcoa Pennant, S. Montana,

Granadero, S.S Ana, S.5
San Prince, S.S. Sundial, $.S. Cleve
land, S.S. Trocas, S.S. Elizabeth,
S.S. Thomas W. Gregory, S.S. Sunreti,
S.S. Canadian Challenger, 8.8. Uruguay,
s.s in L. ake, SS. Rosa,



Seawell

ARRIVALS—By B.W LAL.

~ From TRINIDAD;

Chuma Averboukh, Veronics Winzey

Ramon Odreman, Guillermina Odreman.
yee en Fred Odreman,

erick \ Mpgron Sym-
monds, Samuel Bennett, Jo! kles,
Edmund Gwyn and Charles Th :
From. MAI ‘

Hedda . Elias Rodrigue.
and Lelano Rider.

From pace ieee GUTANA:
J lover, E. Glover, M. Thomas,

and ©. Lofes.

ne ST EFT:
enneth Bartier and Albert Myron.
From ST. LUCIA: "sg ;

~ Li :
Reginald Michelin
From ANTIGUA;
Allan King.
ARTURES—ty B.W.1.A.L
For D:

Marjorie Walker, Boon, Davia
Boon, Dian Cox, Mary Kinkead, Albelston
Best, Isolene Husbands, Kenmore Hus
bands, Floreta Prescod, Ernest Evelyn
Courtney Richards, Stella Walker, Pete
Vollmer and John Donovan.

For BRITISH GUIANA;

Clarence Galloway, Rose Galloway,
Viola Galloway, Dolores Kennedy, Vane
Gullin, Beresford Gilkes, Horace Waiton,
Elsa Rodrigues, Amélia Texeira, Jotn
Trim and Kenneth Grannum.

For ADA:

S'8..Onivevank. eens , K, Annétte Reek, Dorotny

NOTICES





Air Mail

With effect from 11th October, 1950 the air rate on printed matter
(ineluding newspapers, comméfcial papers and books) to Great Britain
is 12 cents per half ounce.

Genéral Post Office,
13th October, 1950.
14.10.50,—2n.



Diesel Mechanic—Seawell Airport

APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Grade “A” Diesel
Mechanic at Seawell Airport.

Applicants should have a thorough knowledge of Diesel Engines
and will be required to pass a test.

rates fixed for Grade “A” Mechanics.

Applicants stating age and qualifications should be submitted
to the Manager, Seawell Airport, from whom further information may
be obtained, not later than the 21st October, 1950.

14.10.50.3n.



VACANCY FOR POLICE MEDICAL OFFICER

Applications are invited for the office of Police Medical Officer
District “E”. Candidates must be registéréd medical practitioners.
Post is part-time and non—perisionable with salary at the rate of $240.00
per annum. An allowance of $48.00 per annum is paid for medicine
supplied.

2. The appointment will be terminable by thréé months notice
on eithér sidé. The suécessful applicant will be required to reside
in the District. \ '

3. Applications stating age, qualifications and practical experi-
ence, should be addressed to the Colonial Secretary, and must reach
the Secretariat not later than the 21st of October, 1950.

’ x 14.10,50-—2n.

Se eEREEREEEEeeeeeeeee

APPOINTMENT OF KEEPER OF CLOTHING,

GENERAL HOSPITAL.

Applications are invited for the pensionable post of Keeper of
Clothing, General Hospital at a salary of $1.056 rising by annual
increments of $48 to $1,200,

2. Applicants shoyld not be over 40 years of age, should have
attained a satisfactory standard of education and should be compe-
tent dressmakers with expérience in the supervision of the work of
a large staff of seamstresses and washers. They should be compe-
tent to keep records of the work done in the Department, and will
be responsible for the maintenance of stocks. Appointment will be
on probation for two years in the first instance.

3. Applications on forms obtainable from the Secretary, Gen-
eral Hospital. should be forwarded to him not later than the 31st of
October, 1950.

30.9.50—3n



VACANCIES FOR AN _ ASSISTANT MECHANICAL
ENGINEER (LOCOMOTIVE) AND AN ASSISTANT
MECHANICAL ENGINEER (MARINE) IN THE
BRITISH GUIANA TRANSPORT AND
HARBOURS DEPARTMENT

VACANCIES exist for an Assistant Mechanical Engineer (Loco-|
motive) and an Assistant Mechanical Engineer (Marine) in the British |
Guiana Transport and Harbours Department. The posts are permas |
nent and pensionable and the salary of each is in the scale £750 x £30!
—#£900 per annum. ;

The Assistant Mechanical Engineer (Locomotive) is required to|
assist the Chief Mechanical Engineer and take charge of Locomotives, |
Carriage and Wagon maintenance and operation.

The Assistant Mechanical Engineer (Marine) is required to assist
the Chief Mechanical Engineer and take charge of the maintenance
of Marine craft, hulls, boilers and engines.

Candidates for either post should be under 40 years of age, cor-
porate members of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers or (in the
case of the Assistant Mechanical Engineer (Locomotive) ) hold ex-
empting qualifications with experience of Steam, Diesel-electric and
Petrol Locomotives, and carriage and wagon maintenance or, (in the
case of the Assistant Mechanic Engineer (Marine) hold other
technical qualifications covering the field of a Marine Engineer. The
holders of each of these offices should be capable of acting for the
Chief Mechani¢al Engineer.

In each case, free passages to British Guiana will be provided for
the officer, his wife and children under 18 years not exceeding five
persons in all. On leave after completion of a minimum tour free
return passages (not exceeding a total of £200) will be provided for
the officer only subject to the provision of funds annually by the Leg-
islative Council. Five days’ leave for each completed month of rési-
dent service, up to a maximum of six months of leave, may be granted
after a minimum tour of two years. Freé quartérs are not provided.

Intending candidates should make application (or write for any
further particulars desired) to the General Manager, Transport and
Harbours Department, British Guiana, giving brief details of age,
qualifications and experience as soon as possible.

10.10.50.—3n.
Seana EEEReEEEEmeEEeenet

APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Assistartt to the Chief

the service of the Government. .

2. Salary will be in accordance with the rates fixed under the
Civil Establishment (Teachers) Order, 1949; entry into the incre-
mental scales $732 to $1,344, $1,056 to $1,776 and $1,446 to $2,352
will be determined by academic qualifications. In addition an allow-
ance is payable atthe rate of 25% of the salary.

3. Candidates must be between the ages of 25 and 35 years and
be prepared to live in thé quarters provided (unfurnished).

4. Application forms, obtainable from the Superintendent of
the Government Industrial Schools, St. Philip, or the Social Welfare
Office, the Garrison (from whom further details may be obtained),
must be complétéa@ ahd returned to the Social Wélfate Office by
Tuesday, 3lst October, 1950.
12th October, 1950.



14.10.50—2n

Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
ment) Order, 1950, No. 33 which will be published in the Official
jazette of Thursday 12th October, 1950.

2. Under this order the maximum wholesale and retail selling
prices of “Oats” (Feed) are as follows: —



ARTICLE WHOLESALE PRICE | RETAIL PRICE
(not more than) (not more than)
Oats (Feed) $11.32 per bag
of 160 lbs. 8c. per Ib.





Lith October, 1950



VACANCIES FOR INSTRUCTORS IN THE GOVERNMENT
TECHNICAL INSTITUTE, BRITISH GUIANA

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons, includ—
ing officers already in the Government Service, far appointment to
any of the four vacancies for Technical Instructors in the under-
mentioned trades required for the Technical Institute, British
Guiana: —

Mechanical engineering, including machine shop experience and
some experience of blacksmithing and ‘possibly foundry
work;

Building trades, including a general knowledge of plastering,
painting and decorating;

Gas and electric welding, with a general knowledge of plumbing
and pipe-fitting or sheet metal work;

Hand shoemaking and leather work,

Qualifications:

Recognised apprenticeship in modern industrial concern; City
and Guilds or equivalent Trade Certificate necessary and National
or Higher National Certificate highly desirable. Must have had
experience in trade and in instruction.

Emoluments:

The salaries attached to these appointments are at the rate
of £600 x £25 — £750 per annum éach. In addition, the appointee
will be provided with free furnished quarters or an allowance of
£100 per annum in lieu,

General Conditions of Service:

The appointments will be on a contractual basis for a period
of two years, in the first instance, following which consideration will
be given to the question of re-engaging the persons concerned on
similar terms or of appointing them on a permanent and pensionable
basis.

The general conditions of service will be the same as those
applicable to other officers in the British Guiana Civil Service.
Applications:

Applications giving name in full, age, family, if any, qualifica-~
tions, and experience, and supported by copies of testimonials from
three persons to whom reference could be made concerning the
applicant’s character and professional ability, should be addressed
to the Principal of the Technical Institute, Georgetown, British
Guiana, not later than the 31st of October, 1950.

_10,10,50——8n



VACANT POST

First Mate, Trinidad Government Coastal Steamers,
Port Services Department

APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Ist Mate, Trinidad
Government Coastal Steamer Service, Port Services Department.

Candidates must be in possession of a Certificate of Competency
as Home Trade Master Mariner issued by the Government of Trini-
dad or by the Marine Board of Jamaica, or a certificate of equal or
superior value issued by a competent authority in the United King-
dom or in any British Dominion or Colony.

The salary of the post is in the scale of $1,920-—120—$2,400 per
annum, A commuted overtime allowance of $25 per mensem is pay-
able. A messing allowance of $1.20 per diem is also payable in lieu
of food,

Shore quarters are not provided but in the case of officers recruit-
ed overseas an allowance equal to difference between 10 per cent of

ary and rent paid, is payable to an officer who rents unfurnished
‘quarters and an allowarice equal to difference between 10 per cent
of salary and 5 per cent of the annual value of furniture supplied in
Government furnished quarters, is payable to an officer who rents
furnished quarters. Allowances in both cases are subject to a maxi-
mum of $50 per ménsém for a married officer whose family is not
residing with him and $20 per mensem for a single officer.

Free second class passages will be provided on first appointment
for the ‘officer and his family not exceeding five persons in all. Sub-
ject to review at any time and not as a permanent right of the officer,
free passage on leave after a minimum tour, not exceeding the cost
of normal sea passages to the place of recruitment will be provided
for the officer, his wife and children subjeet to a maximum of three
adult fares.

The successful candidate will be appointed on probation for two
years in the first instance, subject to his passing a medical examina-
tion, and will be required to contribute towards the Provident Fund.

Applications giving full particulars of qualifications and experi-
ence, together with certificates and testimonials should be addressed
to the Honourable the Colonial Secretary, Trinidad, to reach him not
later than 22nd October, 1950.
12th October, 1950.

13.10.50,—3n.

Kidney Trouble Cause
Backache, Geffing Up Nights

If you're feeling out o-sorts, Get Up
Nights, or suffer from Dizziness, Nervous-
Ness, Backache, Leg Pains, Swollen Ankles,
Rheumatism, Burning Passages, Excess
Acidity, or Loss of Energy and feel old be-
fore your time, Kidney Trouble is the true





Doctors’ records prove t

No Benefit—No Pay @
The very first dose of Cystex goes yet
to work helping your Kidneys remove ex-
cess acids. Quickly, this makes you feet
like new again. And so certain are the
makers that Cystex will satisfy you com-
pletely they ask you to try it under a money
ck guarantee, You be the judge. If not
entirely satis‘ied just return the empty

Wrong foods and drinks, worry, colds or
overwork muy create an excess of acids

id. Dilace a heavy strain on your kidneys
= parle fonesion pocpty and need help
health and mas ood and maintain package and get your money back,
oe (Siss-tex) costs little at chemist

@ Help Kidneys Doctor's Way ® and the money back guarantee protects

you, so buy your treatment today.

‘tors have discovered by sclen- or
tests and in actual Practice Kt Jn o $s
t and sure wep to help the kid-
peys Out excess poisons and acids is BLADDER
With @ scientifically prepared prescription ! The GUARANTEED Remedy RHEUMATISND

| MRS. FE. SIMMONS

called Cystex. gumrnent hundreds of )



PAGE NINE



'SHIPPING NOTICES

MONTREAL AUSTRALIA NEW ZEA- —_
LAND LINE LIMITED



(MLA.N.Z. LINE) uv. T. B Radar For St
ile om , Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada and
s "Gloucester" ls fr . Dat satling to be

September 7th, Adelaide Septem Notined ee ee ete
19th, Melbourne September 28th, Devon-

pert October Ist, Sydney October 7th, M.V. Carihbéee For Dominica:
Brisbane October i. arriving at a: St. Kitts Nevis and

Barbados November 11th

at. Sailing on the 20th
These vessels have ampie Space for 1980.
chilled, hard frozen and general cargo.
tea accepted on through bills of M.V. Daerwood For St. Vin-
ae Sine, Teaehipenant at Trinidad cent: St. Lucia; renada and
foc, Bares tish Guiana, Windward . Date of Salling to be

B.WL, Schooner Owners’
Asso. (Inc),
Tel. No. 4047

Isla
For further rticulars apply: —
FURNESS, WITHY ;
te AD, & Co. Ltd.,

®



= ORLEANS 4a. 108
; 0. -
8S. “LIBERVILL#«” 28th Sept 12th Oct.
NEW YORK S*RVICE
wails Arr.
N.Y. B'dos
8.S “BYFIORD" 29th Se
a 3 29th Sept ot
8.8. “C. G. THULIN 13th Oct. ara ‘Set
CANADIAN sg yi
SOUTHBOUND rt }
Sails
oe ieee Sows Montres! Halifax werbedee
3S, “ATS ER" October 7th Octover 10 Oct
S.S. “ALCOA PARTNER” October 27th Oetaber 30th Nevettner ins
NORTHBOUND
Arrives
Ss Barbac ds
3.8 ALCOA PARTNER” October 10th For St. JOHN, St. Lawrence
8.S. “ALCOA PEGASUS” October 2st For si i
3.5. b | 2le
Sa “ALAA erie: ir or St. Lawrence River Ports,

October Sist For St. Lawrence River Ports.

These vessels have limited passengers accommodation





ABB AMS Sly, WER aor eae See
HARRISON LINE
4
OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
Vessel From Leaves Due
B
8.8. “GEOLOGIST” Liverpool 30th Sept. ‘ak oct
S.S. “LLOYDCREST"” London. 10th Oct. 27th Oct.
it “OREGON STAR” .._ Liverpool 20th Oct. 5th Nov.
8.S. “BEDFORD EARL”. London, 26th Oct. 16th Nov.
S.S. “SETTLER” .. .. Liverpool &
Glasgow. 28th Oct. 11th Nov.

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

Vessel For Closes in Barbados
3.8. “MOONCREST” . London 10th October.

For further information apply to—

DACOSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents

) SS
SUPERB!

hat's what
hey say when



HOWELL
begs to infotm her clients
see
that the HE NEW GAS COOKERS
hey are just right
FOR THE HOME THAT PREFERS
THE BEST
ONE ONLY LEFT

HASTINGS BEAUTY
PARLOUR

Will be re-opened on









Pe ee

ORIENTAL

§ GOODS! (Articulos)
CUROIS, JEWELLERY,
SILKS, (Se Habla Espanol)

THANTS

Pr. Wm, Hry, St. DIAL 3466



Monday 16vh October ,










HAIRDRESSING

MISS MacPHAIL’S
HAIRDRESSING SALON
Will be CLOSED from
SATURDAY 14TH

Re-opening - - -
MONDAY 23RD
10,10.50,—2n,

JOHN
M4.
BLADON

will

SELL

YOUR PROPERTY

Phone 4640
Plantations Buildings

TH SEP ONG. BELLS”
Â¥Y SOCIETY
Applications for two or more

exhibitions to any Second ners












Secretary not late
day the 26th October 1950

Candidates must be members
or the children of members, and
must not be less than 10 years
nor more than 12 years of %#®
on the Sist July, 1961, to be
proved by a Baptismal certificate
which must accompany the appli-
cation



The examination will be held
at the St. Philip's Boys’ School on
Saturday 28th October, 1950, oe-

THE FOUR CORNER STONES
ginning at 10 aim. 0

Ly
The Committes of Management: GOOD
Per,
R. S. WEEKES, Secretaty

ei FURNITURE
ARE
BRAUTY COMFORT

COLLECTION
RENTS.

LASTING and STRENGTH
THIS FURNITURE HAS IT

SUPERIOR China Cabinet in



Big, Glow-polished Mahogany
and Cedar, Several more China,
Bedroom and | Kitchen. Cabinets, |
i ach different - id ards,
I beg to notify the Waggons, Buffet, Larders; Trol-
, ; © les 3
General Public that I ry

BEDROOM BEAUTY in Bed-
steads, Beds, Vanities in Mahog-

g my busi-
have added to my any, Birch or Dealb—-Wardrobes,

4 Linen Presses — Body-height
Ree ic Rent Collecting Cheval and smaller fram
Department, and shall be Mirrors, $1 up

DINING, L h, Cocktail, Radio

glad to undertake the & Kitenen Tables Upright iat
i any, Bentwood, Birch,
collecting of all rents Hoi Bedetabul aarved and

mirrored Mahogany Side Table on
castors, size 4 x 2 feet Metal

whether large or small.

Strict attention will be Coslerator a ae

i i WING RGOM Suites or
paid to all. Commission esate pieces in Mirrors, *per-
only 10% gere Tub, or Fancy Uphoistered

ALL AT MONEY-SAVING
PRIOBS

L.S. WILSON

TRAFALGAR ST DIAL 4069

D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Magazine Lane.

Dial 3743.

14.10.50.—3n.

For Hardware of every Description

IT’S
THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

ENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)
* Cnr. of Broad and Tudor Streets.

PEA IDE



PAGE TEN BARBADOS ADVOCATE __ saguspay, ocresss 4 =
a

————













, f
‘ These Honoured W. I. Cricketers FIGHT rgarl Trouble








od .
i INFLUENZ tood Pressure
IN su have around the hex
= stton, headaches +
«rd Deck and above eye
IN with Me.t)sliicd pre-war grad + (eee of breath, fee) nervy, or eu
M from peer lose of Mem:
= (% Pint Quality) | en ._ ind! ar

nystertous disease ‘chat esuses
‘esthes than cancer, because i)
‘ymptoms are so common and usuc!
nistaken for some allment
ou suffer from an: these «>
’ \ endangered

This grace is especially effective neat the tert first ose of Nox.














Only Dunlop make seamless rubber
boots. And how much better they are! Dipping in best
quality natural rubber makes Danlop rubber boots absolutely
leak proof AND ensures the greatest reinforcement where





























































against FIVER and Feverist (formerly known as Hynox). a new most needed—i.e. the lower half of the boot. Furthermore,
Conditions eae ee cee ee ne ae the increased resilience of the seamless leg gives far more
Perens younger in a few Get Noxc 1 pi e additionally reinforced
° ee your chemist ¢ . It te a a bares Tan Danio “Rubber Boots last longer,
— 24c. a Bottle at Your DEALER | gnteed to rake you, feel welli.o¢ to make quite sure that Dunlop
Goer wo hy E SE ee eed
| Saturday, October 14, 1950 | BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB
i AN ENTERTAINMENT (Members Only)
fGRICKE der tie di
WW if ICKET TEAM was honoured at a dinner in London rer at which the above were presen’. Left to Right: THE BARL OF aan oun — PRESENTS ~
‘ ATHLONE who presided; MR. JAMES GRIFFITHS, Secretary of State for the Colonies, SIR GRATTAN BUSHE, a former Governor of Barba- leney the Governor and
dos, and SIR ALAN BURNS, another retired Colonial Governor. (Story on p. 1.) Mrs. Savage EVENING IN PARIS
gaa 5 . will be held at the
1 4’
Replay Water 1-44" Cricket WOC_ Australia Seemer Seer mere CSL MALL ————
« etpacutaeneiancapameetit ES
Fixtures by kind permission of at 9 p.m. ms
P Will Pla WEW RULE WILL BEAT || = f,. Adjutant, Barbados TRUS
To-day is the secoad day of y Regiment BIG SHOW & ; 1 fe a
olo Match the fifth series of first ana In- SNOOKER CHEATERS from 5.00 p..m. to 7.00 p.m The ; Wrap Weer. ehs
iermediate cricket games and 6 D T Y diagram snows 4 nasty snooker ” (ee - oe 4
AT a Council meeting held at iue unai day of the séventh ser.e. ae ay ests N trick.» With only Wty fet In sid of the Girls DANCE OF 1950
the Barbados Aquatic Club yester- in the Second Division games. be Sa Ree, on the red over right Friendly Society
day afternoon it was decided that Following are the mxtures; Six days have been allowed for arg UOUIK pocket. PROGRAM STOKES & BYNOE LTD.,—Agents.
the Water Polo K.O. match be- Taina 7 each of the first four Test Match-| [SEO geet Soe Ore ” . SELECTING
- tween Snappers and Flying Fish FIRST DIVISION. es between England and Australia| | j) fit. the chances | “THE SUN
which was played on Thursday Second ay in Australia, and the last test at| | }; are that striker U ADOS
would be re-played on Thursdsy Wanderers vs s’olice at the Bay. Melbourne, will be played to al | OPIN TRE aie oak | MISS & MR. BARB.
October 19. Lodge vs Empire at Lodge. finish, | Ii with biack to | GOES DOWN”
This Council meeting was held xickwick vS Harrison College — The fixture card is as follows: | LF . OR Ow | All members local and
EX after a general meeting of (hy &t Aensington, | ,. OCTOBER 13—17:—One two day @aLack Di arth Sha: eaten: by isiting are asked to join i ‘ i
Te Barbados Water Polo Association | Spartan vs. Carlton at Queen’s match and a one-day match in ster, so he ELEANOR FITZGERALD the "ee not a dull This might
at which the new rules of Waver Park. z . Western Australia; 20—24 West BLUE ; accidentally |” with - ees
Polo were read. _. INTERMEDIATE Australia (Perth) '27—31 South | yeuwow, || ‘oses four. but Sik: demeaeaeae: oh aeevanaie PF we 1
, ; : i Y.M.P.C. vs Empire at Bec- » Australia (Adelaide) . Gh ee LAMBERT, June KNIGHT, Her- OTHER ATTRACTIONS be you!
The Snappers — Flying Fis. kles Road, NOVEMBER 383—8: Victoria ‘Lees coomown) QPS. Poni bert CHEESMAN, Jean EDGHILL,
match on Thursday was nut Windward vs Wanderers at (Melbourne); 10—14: New END 5 rsDe!, ind Sorry old vohn BURT, Ann RAISQN, @ A CASH BALLOON :
finished. for due vo bad light tue Congo Road. South Wales (Sydney); 17—1g| Se SRae: Se, Tees ache ee DANCE ina
referee had to blow off before ihe Cable & Wireless vs Pickwick New South Wales country match over the problem D h t oppor wt, Seseiasbick: his tial Divine Marke
a extra time was compleved. at Boarded Hail. (Newcastle); 21—22 New South | ¢xperimental ruse, the op; ! dos Dramatic Club. @ PARADE OF GENTS IN }
Along with this re-play maich Mental Hospital vs Spartan at Wales country match (Lisnore insist upon the pluyer of a fou LADIES DISGUISE. A
: a aaa 5 s trying his shot ga Veith m Piano Interlude. iest
or Thursday there will be @ Black Rock. 24—28: Queensland (Brisbane) diagram leave, it Siculd pay to ms.ert Prize for the funniest.
ladies oe game, ent imp.re vs Police at Bank Hall. pnpcEMBER 1—7: First Test} 7°" “°° FILMS @ GUEST ARTISTE FOR eS
teams Ww e announced later fe Me (Brisbane) ; 8—9 Queensland THE NIGHT B.G’s Radic
The following 14 players have SECOND DIVISION. oe SSS “ ” .G’s
heen asked to turn ou’ on Tues- Combermere vs Pickwick at ta -18 Federal Canitel Tercitory TO-NITE TO-NITE OPEN HOUSE Star Miss Marjorie Dey
day, for a practice match in pre- Combermere, ; ae peares” THE REID BRO The Story of the G.F.S. i ;
yervion “tor the Tynidad” duc. “Gollge vs" Centra ot Cougs, (Canberra): 1B Aunt “eb RP BERR © Se rar on |
G. MacLean, B. Patterson, ‘3. Foundation vs Y.M.P.C, at (Melbourne) 30—January 4: (Both known as Moose) ane 5 ?
Poster, K, Ince. D, Bannister, 6. Foundation New South Wales (Sydney). Invite you to their Shorts, Cartoons, Etc. Admission to Ballroom 2/- %
Manning, T. Yearwood, P. Fosve:, Regiment. vs Lodge at the january 5—11: Third Test D Oe ee P RTS JACKET
M. Foster, A, Weatherhead, 1}. Gurrison. (aydney); ‘13 ‘os 160: Taeeaanis ANCE ADMISSION — 2/- Be Early to Secure a Table
Manning, H. Weatherhead, ( Carlton vs Leeward at Carlton. y' ’ ur : x ee :
a in ye ; (Hobart) 19—22: Combined To-nite, October 14th, 1950
Evelyn, T. Grace, D, Atkinson and Pannen 24.25 South ncaniaitvndiiiieiiin cite cites il ED ie ER OE at Nag AE
Sa ey Australia country match (Den- At Queen's Park House
- } Fi mark) ; Pia South Austra- Music by Mr. PERCY GREEN'S these smart London tailored
rec / d tralia (Adelaide) . Aamerenestta
Cricket At Bank Hall F; x (or e FEBRUARY 2—8; Fourth Test Bi My ee his OPENING coats bearing the famous
e r l (Adelaide), 10—14 Victoria Br Solid Refreshments on Sale b d I H a’.
yy > Ii (Melbourne); 16—17 Victorian 14,10, 50—1n ’ ran name, n ound’s
Tomorrow Wire Cycle see eer ne



—20 Victorian country mate

eta ere will be ploved Mr. Fred Forde, of Baxter's (Euroa) 23. Fifth Test (Mel- |(%0%%G~6ss0%9sGGnsoooor
at the Empire Grounds Ban SI! Road, holder of Ticket 2468 in pourne). Pw) - N I T
to-morrow commencing at 1 p.m. the B.C.L,. Prize Drawing is the There will be no play on De- 3 IT S TO-NIGHT FOLKS | =

and will be concluded on Sunday winner of the Bicycle offered as A .
cember 24 and 25.
THE DANCE

next. the Prize. Mr. Forde satisfied the
You've been Waiting for Given py THE

Mr. C. Jackman’s XI will op- B.C.L. Representative Council at
Mr. WILFRED COPPIN 7
GREEN DRAGON

ose a team of Prison Qfficers, 4 meeting on Thursday that the °
oan the teams are as Gasca ticket was purchased before the Australia Should

At His Residence, Hil) Road,
Bank Hall

Mr. Jackman'’s XI— C. Jack- Daw took place.
Musie by Mr. SYDNEY NILES
Ork

Tooth, Check, and Plaid
patterns,

Ea. $35.92 & $37.04







Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

man (Capt.), N. Holder, G. Mer- A. check after the Draw dis- Wigit West Indies
ritt, G. Phillips, L. Francis, w. closed that the book with the
, f eo : ’ counterfoil had not been returned.

Drayton, F, Haynes, L. Craig, C. It however was brought in later (From Our Own Correspondent)

LA LEGEOVSS



LS OPSSSSSSOSSSSSS OSS SS




















p Goria, 1. Bynoe, D. Trotman, ¥ by one of the esliere, and eeeent> PORT-OF-SPAIN, be An up-to-date Chinese Restaurant catering to those 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street
i re **** ing to advice given by the Police, The West Indian Cricket Board Ay Gantarale oe j j i i
Warders XIE. Bisnop, (Capt) the B.C.L, was responsible for er Control are being urged. to Gents 2/- , Ladies 1/6 wee like the best in Oriental dishes at reasonable
uc V. Bradshaw, L. Clarke, R. its agents’ carelessness, and that jnvite the Ausvralians to visit tae Saas : prices,
s Murrell, St.C. Haynes, L. Alleyne, a es - views = he oo West Indies in 1951, There have = LOC PESOS SOOO OCS
M. Bridgeman, C. Lewis, S. Kir- fie e B.C.L. he purchased the been much talk on this question, |{}/~ ~~~ — inese SSS.
se) ton, H. Wiltshire, F, Davis, M. ticket before the Draw. — and much has appeared in the Don't Miss the Prepared by a first class came Chet who knows
Evelyn, B. Warner. Consolation Prizes of five dol- gaily papers. ANN 1 aS onions, EE:
oe lars each were won by Tickets At vhe moment, writes Mr UAL DANCE 5;
fi \ G2 wit Gee eRe No, 81 and 1595, er ane —— Philip Thompson, “the followin ted tate NO. 9 BROAD STREET 3 T !
Sy hf } abs Cricket Club, and rT. , #ppears obvious: “That the vast PAS ARS OF 3 i
By NM. Plarrison-Gray coenee PN» Tg Doll aay of cricket-loving West eee Officers and Members 01 For Reservations we Dial 3896 °
iain $ S . ndians want an Australian vee » FARADIC®. HEGAINML
a wctusiertamt. — } | MGkergement have gen, made mein want an utraan Sean SO SSB. i
x North nae game, to. hand over the Bleycle to Mr. ou, Board of Control have but to Children’s Goodwill League
ir hsa a _ this morning. meet and the Australian invita- Monday Nine! lath “Bet
#54 tion to tour that country in at 9pm, ,
‘ om « Ae nen Ute eer Ree qt. B. GRREN'S on. This week's Housewife’sreminder! 66
4 s W ‘I have foun hat on more then dents 2/- .. Ladies 1/6
| ¢y Bailey Aud imt ene occasion: on mentioning th: Metreshinente;on Sale

K
10
9

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U°* Ror New Zealand 22" wes tous to varus - esse eee|l| THE HOME ee DEPARTMENT CHINA DOLL”
| WILLIAM FOGARTY LD.

LONDON. ing community, that any possible
GIVES A GUIDE TO GOOD BUYS. B Os AUTHENTIC

Arrangements have now been argument in favour of it is imme-
completed for McDonald Bailey diately squashed by the words
x PLASTIC TABLE CLOTHS—54 x 54 and 54 x ‘84—in CHINES r
refreshingly new designs @ $2.57 and $3.05 each E RESTAURANT








Ss.
Qs
K 8542
a

t

K 3978 and Arthur Wint to travel to New ‘We can’t afford it.”

Zealand with Roger Bannister at

te

FOUR WINDS
CLUB

na! contract was a
gut the cards lay

gc ,
badly
South Twe
Two Heart
Two .§
Three



“He bid One Heart ie op ot: Deceribte ie reqrenent SS uEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE piu
‘wo Clubs and West sthe AA, in the entennia ie
rts e East now tried Games being held at Canterbury B. B. (. Radio Programme

South bid from December 27th to January SATURDAY,







RRR AA
sc nienpetipecna Ae uktapn cigs
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and West 3 : ; : Oct, 14, 1950
twas strong 2nd, Bannister, who is Britain’s 7 a.m. The News; 7.10 a.m. News
h second try with crack miler, will also act as team Analysis; 7.15 a.m. Close Down; 12

oe es Pyar .°** Analysis; 12.15 p.m Solitude; 12.45
&! Pepe Ue poe cee —L.E.S. p.m. Overseas Quiz; 1 p.m. Interlude;
1 sr four Hea ft — 1.10 p.m, Racing Results; 1.15 p.m
our ; ane by! . mS, eet 1,30 p.m Anything
a a N ‘0 eclare; p.m, The News; 2.10
age ‘L S and A. East 3 B.W.I. Table Tennis p.m. Home News From Britain: 2.15

dum

~

Will

























































» Diamonds. suggesting manager. noon The (News; 12,10 p.m. News Re-open .
OCTOBER 16TH eenpentrnet: : No. 6, MARHILL STREET
) } ‘ . ‘ ‘
DAMASCENE—50. inches wide in White and Blue @
$1.90 per yd.
v dq led Y6 to LN Fed ati M B F d p.m. What The Londoner Doesn't We are - $ ‘ ; ivT.
Summ ve Port won't ‘ eration May be Forme Know; 2.90 p.m. | Music Parade; | 3.30 cern TEA CLOTHS—Large assortment—intriguing designs ON THE MENU TODAY {
vurnel £ Y p.m. Sports Review; m e ews; asec é OY
y and the Di umond Ginesse (From Our Own Correspondent) 4 10 p m The Daily Service; 4.15 Bon a er ee ne from 84c. upwards.
lost, to South who shifted to trike Up The Music; 5 p.m. Listeners e€ appointment of
@0. Fis: could now discard _. . PORT-OF-SPAIN. — Choice;_ 5.15 p.m. Programme Parade; a ITALIAN BEDSPREADS—60 x 80, in Gold, Green, A Limited Quantity of
4 a Spade in dummy on @A ', Preliminary discussions with 5-30 p.m. Music For Dancing; 6.15 Mr. & Mrs, BI Whi d Ro: 5.50 h
7 and cross-ruff the hand for; » view to forming a British West Hie’ pounty, tT p.m~ The Newest 7.10 | C. 8S. HAMILTON ue 7” “oo a
] beaten {i South leads 4 av. | Indian Table Tennis Federation p.m. News Analysis; 7.18 p.m. Behind | a Please enquire early at - - - TRINIDAD’S FRESH SHRIMPS And The Famous
trick 2, a3 he can play @ A‘ ' are now underway between the he News ,7.48 pm. Weekly Sports | as Managers a y 5
after winning with @¢K and Trinidad Table Tennis Associa— g.15 p.m. Do You Remember; 8.30 Sea Food
North discard @ 7. > § ‘ttion, and the touring Barbados, p,m, Radio Theatre: 10 Pio hee Meet MARTIN GRIFFITH M ea Food — OYSTERS
Rete ae Jamaica and British Guiana ten— 1:0? Bithelors: 10.45 p.m. Songs For | Proprietor, ° °

inis players, You; 11 p.m. Close Down ‘

t Every ‘Time SES RSET

You have not Tasted Food — if You Miss Our












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|{ IMEXPECTING THAT _ }, CELL | LITTLE WART FROM THE. G See re HEAR HIM SNORT IN THE ig THE BARBADOS DRAMATIC CLUB
| @ INTERNAL REVENUE 2 <= NEXT “COUNTY::>- | 1% Under The Distinguished Patronage of His Excellency The Governor
BUREAU TELL HIM I THIS IS THE GREATEST Yeo x Presents
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eee ee) SINCE JOHN THE HANES PLOYEE'S TESTIMONY | % “MATINTO” FLAT PAINT
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Full Text

PAGE 1

M" SATURDAY. OCTOBER H 1S50 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE FIVE Gardener Arrested For Theft N INKTMN-VI VIE ui l> O or oJd LoveU, %  gardener of Si Matthias Gap CfarM Cntireh, a srrested by P.C. J7J Murphy at about 8 o'clock yestcrday morning at Gun Site Road. Brit tons Hil! in 00BD0> theft* which occurred at the flats of Mr. D Worm*and Mr W. Atkinson at Blue Water* Terrace. Bock ley He appoaicd before Police Magistrate Mr. II A. Talma anu was remanded until October 2t>. The Advocate was to day that the Felice are looking for other suspect> All th* missing have been recovered. B RID.ifcTUWN was bright after 10 o'clock yesterday mornirg. The dark dn previous day hau been forgotten until of 3.30 yesterday evening %  when the day t*xame gloomy. At nlddaj tin* temperature was 84 degrees Fahrenheit m the shade but by 4 00 p.m this had dropped two do] The rainfall returns up to •; o clock yesterday morning were as follows: Cily 14 par! Hill district eight parts. St. George IB parts, St PhiUp one Inch and 34 parts. St. Thonu.. 20 parts. St Peter M parts. Si Joseph 33 parts, St. James nine parts. St. Lucy 20 p..:...ml SI John 7(1 pMrts, W IIILtl ONI THIEF went under the cellar of Janlo Sylvester ;it Cnchlow's Alley < •• Thursday and stole two fowls another broke the storeroom of the British Union Oil Company between Wednesday night and Thursday morning, but stole nothing S EVEN TRAFFIC nil. reported in tinReports yesterday. They were to' .. riding a McyeJ i %  without a lighted lamp to the front, not keeping ;i motor vehicle on the left ride of the road, driving in i dansjeroui mannar, negligent riding, parking m a restricted area and not having a ngdstration card on a car No motorist;. wore reported for exceeding the speed limit C LARENCE CLARKE of Paradise Village. Christ Church, reported that his fishing boat. which is valued $100, was maliciously damaged between 9. 3<> a.m. on Wednesday and 5.30 a.m. on Thursday while it was hauled up at Dover* Beach, Christ Church. A LREADY IO.OIKJ chBdran representing ttt ... li attended the. Globe Theatre to MIthe aim "Hamlet" which bM been running foi the past 16 days. Hpecial matinees at reduced prices were provided for the children Mr. Maurice Jones, Manager of the Globe Theatre, told the Advocate yesterday that they will hold two more matinees He said thai at the time the last showlna of this lllm over 12.000 -ehoolchildren. representing B3 schools would hiive soon it S ix KX-K A t ssrvlceman are at prese .*. wnplftjUd of Seawell Airport undoc UM suporvlson of Squadron Louder 11mvision of Squadron Lender Hnas lire lighters. They are:— Rawle Kordc, S Nicholls V. Jones, Conrad Carter. Noel Scale. Secretary of tho M.A.F. Association and H. Reece. These boys have all gained their lire fighting experience from the R.A.F. where they did many Are plcquets. A KTIll R MOTTLEY. a pedestrian, of Jackson. St. Michs.el, told the Police that he was struck on his right leg by motor car X-13 while on JameStreet yesterday. The motor car was owned and driven by Archibald Toppin of Gall Hill. Christ Church. A BUYS' CLl'B may soon bo opened at Oistlns Colonel R. T. Mtchelin, Commissioner of Police, told the Advocate yesterday that they expected to get a building at oistins and the Club will be opened as soon as possible The next Club to be opened will be the one at District "C" Station, St. Philip. The building for this was renovated and decorated by the boys themselves. It will be opened at the end of next week. T HE POLICE BAM) will play at the St. Bartholomew Church Fall at Christ Church at 3 30 oVMCh this evening. T HE HOCK HALL ROAD, St Andrew, which W aged bv nvavy rains earlier Hits \er. Is now being repaired Work started on Wednesday. The repair* are being carried out by n gang of labourers under tho supervision of Mr. F. Smith Hltfcksmith Mends "Spiders" J\ow • : t two back alleys of Suttle Street. Conch's and Cook's Alleys, you will hear the clank-clank of Oscar Browne's blacksmith's hammer as It strikes noma on th.heavy anvil IUB Brown, his father .eld that same hammer lor 30 years on the same spot Oscar took over from his father four years ago and he told the Advocate yesterday that there are young Browne* coming on to take nver from hnn Oscar Browne is now about 30 years old. He Is not much above average height, but he Is of massive build When you see him Mowing the bellows, see the Ore spark and the other blacksmith hands around him, you would think he was very much at home In the grime. The building is obviously old, but with pieces of iron strapped at all angles on the wooden parts it seams secure for many more %  .ii %  Rests in the Loft Heavy pieces of iron lay about the yard and big heaps of coal dust. Barrels and barrel hoov* are thrown about and on nails am hung pieces of wire and other like material Browne does not live at the blacksmith shop, but he has built a sort of loft above the building v. ban he can rest off between' whilrs. To allow for access to the loci there Is a long flight of stairs, built partly of Iron. When the trade is good. Bpown employs six hands. He mostk reins'" and hand carts IhSM days. Asked if he does not like shoeing horses, he said that after a time one came to dislike horses' kicks Below the sign which tells one that the business belongs to Blacksmith, thin an the words "No Idlers' 1 but without the sign, idler* would scarcely think of loitering around such a busy man as Browne THEY SAW II \MI I I 1 % 1 I gsjsj i u **£ ft*. fl>i* ^ Q rn •VMaatthl mm U "— a2 Lt mj Thai "Click" In TinHlad At The \\ ord "England" Knock .ff %  pride in about Frees paar 4 % %  i this, I. avM v word %  one's country, eill for .he ci %  pa and oppression in man parts of Stalin's realm iherr i. still a great residue of faith ii Kusslas greatness and her determination to ward off th* lealou* invaders of whose existence the people have been all tin. ane w fully Win Yes. it is a mountain for Mr matt or men l-ondon Expres> Sc.vn SCHOOL CHILDREN crowd Roebuck Street in front of the Glob. 1 Hamlet. Children from primary, aeondry and eltiuentary schools a] Olobt Thatra during the week to M th* picture. It I* not every d^y taeatre and tbey Ukad Meing the picture. i*y have Jast **n inland went to the children visit the Wills Admitted To Probate The petltien of Revd. Carl W.-Ie> Curry, of St. Patrick's, Christ Church for letters of administration to the estate of Lila Curry his wife who died in 1940 was grunted by His Honour the Chief Judge in the Court of Ordinary yesterday The petitioner was represented bv Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C.. Instructed by Mr. L E R Gill of Cottie Calford & Co. The Chief Judge admitted to Probate the wills of Eustace FitzHerbert Skcvnc, late of St. Michael. Edith Irene Stoute and James Seale. late of St. George. and Bertina Stuart, late of Christ Church. 300 Boys Absent From School COMO ESTA USTED'' asked a teacher ol the Da* Street Boys' School yesterday, and he got the reply "Muy bicn gradat, Senor" from one of the boys of his ollgfl It was the Senior Stream "A" pupils Kcttinu their daily coaching in Spanish while tho Advocair' was paving a visit to the school. FINE REDUCED Judges G. L. Taylor and J. W. B. Oiencry yesterday varied a decision of Police Magistrate, Mr E A. MeLewl. Mr MeLeod had ftned Charles Farley of Orange Hill, St. James. £5 when he found bun Kutlty of having driven without due care and attention along Barbaras! Road on May 21. Their Honours reduced the fine to £4. The charge arose out of an accident between ihe bus M-280 which Farky wasdriving and a lorrj W K l'e-t was in the %  g lime i>| Ihe an i-lrnl and he told the Court how Fsrley did not lessen his speed when he %  ttCOipted 10 overtake the cart. Mr C. D Cufney, ll.-.uimaslei of the school, told the nporttt Ihat he thought it | good thing for Spanish U) be taught to the seniors of elemenlury school* The boys were catching on quickly and in case anv f HUM wanted to carry on fttudaM ol U> language after leaving school, he would have had a good founds tlon, he said Early showers during the morning seemed to have had effect on the attendance. Out of a roll call of 365. only 65 boys turned out for the first half of the day Art Clas* Each class, however, with many a desk unoccupied, was hard at work. The Juniors amused themselves with counting and writing numbers while the seniors did art. reading and arithmetic. Some of the boys were working ... on the outside. They were plantwomen's hat department a assm m lh gsrden and mowing the lomer was making purchase. In Kreen grain which covered the the shoe department, business grounds of the school. was slow. In the workshop, some were busy at work making a masterNear one of the entrances of desk, toys and completing a map the store a fiw workmen were of Barbados which they made of uoing minor repairs. Clerks i;i P"'P paper arlous departments were gettiny The Rny Street Boys'School Goods Plentiful. Buyers Fen YESTERDAY With the sun shining brightly yesterday after two days of raiii. shoppers were out again m HiCity, although not in the numbeithat they were In at the beginning of the week. When hV> "Advocate" visited Fogartv'* about 1.18 p.m.. the picture was about the same as was seen at some of the other stores previous ly visited. At that hour, the eowittn where women's cloth is sold were doing the most business. In tlu men's suiting department it wa;i largely a question of window shopping from Ihe inside. In the A Shirt In Two Hours By Local Factory In Spry Street overlooking the grounds of St. Cathedral, u Shirt Factory started at High Street In March this year by Madame Gilkes of Antigua and Mr Archer M.uKenyie. Auctioneer. Is dally turning out shirts. underweai In Barbados. Eight girls -a! i: produced as many as 168 shut' Madame dikes, who supervises both shirt and dress departments. told the Advocate that they take Individual orders as well is supply many City stores with shirts. They also export shirts and drosses to other West Indian islands. Anyone placing an order for %  single shirt can have It in two hours If It i* urgently needed lliey make both dress and sports shirts and tuck-bosom ihlrti is g -pet ,1H Ihe ili.innu> re-nrrange contents of shelves ami cases. On the whole II was a case ol the goods being plentiful, but rhe buyers few. although IhM bum in ii.*i and opened II R II. Princess Marie Lnu-se ll w.r i-itt (•• I ,i ., .. ntral M'houl to accommodate the children from Ambrose. St Paul's, n.ilkiiih ill hardly be the case today. a,1 " BelhH which were all k-ss the rain begins from Mrf* down fall "bucketi a drop." oml What's OnToday Meetliut of llouslns Board at 10 30 a.m. First. Intermediate and Second Divisions Cricket 1 30 p.m 1'ollce Band at St Bartholomew a Church Fair at 3 3U p m Better Training Facilities Needed For Police The room ti the lost oil hool has t|uite enough ireommodate the 365 on Mr. Cuffley said that be her of pupil Case Dismissed Their Honours of the Assistant Court of Appeal Mr. G. L. Taylor and Mr. ,t W. B. Chenery yesterday dismissed on Its merits a case which Arnold Worrell brought against Evelyn Lynch. accusing him of having damaged his ng tree and figs on June 20. In dismissing the case, the judges reversed a decision of His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma who had fined Lynch £1 and three shillings costs and had also ordered him to pay Wom-U /as cost of damages to the ngs and ng tree. Worrell did not prove *that the land was his. 2,000 BAC.S OF RICE COME Two thousand bags of rice arrlVSd HI the island from Briti'h Guiana on Thursday evening by the schooner "Philip H. Davidson." The "Davidson" also brought P00 bags uf charcoal. 336 wallaba posts, and 20 tons of firewood through the removal of chUdrei from the St. Michael's Inflrmar;. 10 the Nightengale Home Those children used to attend school dally He said that with the developCol. R. T Mlchclln. Commisme m of Ihe Bay Estate Housin. sioner of Police told the "AdvoScheme, there would obvlousl. cate" yesterday that better be a corresponding increase In the training facilities were needed in attendance. the Polios Forces in the WindLooking around the school, one wards, Leewards and Barbados 0O uld see many wall painting, than those exisung in their re and decorations done by the boys M*ctive islands at present. Most of the pictures were for Col. Michelin has just returned studying purposes They were from St. Lucia where he had gone painted during the war when to confer with Lt. Col. Eric there was a scarcity of pictures James, Chief ol Police of that | n one of the class's. .. prop-colony in connection with anotln-i ,,f housing In Barbados • % %  training scheme played. This showed a comparison This scheme he said, is for the between the most primitive ol setting up of a Police Training Barbadian houses and the inns'. School for the Windwards. Leemodern, wards and Barbados, The boys looked comfortabh' It was first proposed to sat up and seemed to have been enjoya scheme at Bennelield, the ex big their Ii Army Airbase, but this has since been found unsuitable and the new one will now be in the old Military barracks at the Morne ln Castries. The site is an adi and with a certain amount ot money being spent on the repairs and redrcoration of th* old barracks, the building coul % %  lie made veiy suitable for i •.raining school. Having seen the building lor Tourists Tmi In the dress department they take orders from the general public but spiial attention Is paid lo tourists who are spending g dwM time in Ihe island. Madame OIUDM said that she has already made a great quantity ol messes for Venezuelans. When a tourist liner arrives In th" i-land for a one-day stay Madame liilkes can lake an order for .i dSOBf from any passenger '•"" pioduce UM draat l>y eveiiin;' when Ihe vessel is ready to sail This include-; shopping .ni.,ii.i mintand In Ihe shirt departrntnt, .. cw lam numbei of drll make tinihlRs, OXCOpt fm putting on lhti. ll.iiv It thin K,*-to the tollai tnaher who aliead> has the mll.n nuidi' She attaches the collars and afterwards passes it to the I niton hole maker. From here il goes to the prosaar and the shir: !• completed Madame Gilkes first started her Hi.. Depot al Victoria Stre-1 when she arrived in the island In 19-17 She afterwards went to High Street and is now In Spry Street. T*dad Parcel Post Congested PORf-OF-aPAlN Present urrnngement of Ihe I'ai >t structural alterations to the Post Office and the provision of the necessary B'diaiis Invited To iiwiliii^<]rrt'iiinii\ IN T'DAD IH'Hr i.| SIM N Mr. M l> Syramonds. founder IMM-II.,1 ,.( n,.Harbadoa Co-operative Bank. Ltd. -'id Mr. John Heckles, M B B an secuUve of the Bank, were inMU-d to attend the Levelling of > bust of the late Dr A H. McShlne. founder and ftrM >•! the Trinidad Co-Operniiv.' BSfist Dr MeShlne, Mr Sw;inii.n,lsaad, could be referred to as th mvatoat and mOM inspm-i) wurkat on behalf of the thrift movement II the British West indies within living memory. "The name ol MeShlne would live long after the onuments of human -kill would hava perlshe,!. He clothwl lhi iked and fed the hungry; not %  nly was his name prevnli*nt in every household in Barbados, but those away from honu .nldecl Mr. Svmmonds Speuklng or the Haibiulo, Braneb, which was Incorporated in IWS8, Mr Svni-.H.niis said in UttM mgUnd" the) wotifad considerable public support. In li.irth'UUir frmn Ihat section nf III. rotnmunlty which ordinarily would not think of banking He pointer ml that the Bank m Barbado 1 ase plan, in wbieta hundra 11 ol pool pot %  ona wenI lib in obtaining their own homes by making monthly payments fi amounts which then would ordui .irily pay as hiiu-i raM I'" • that system large niimhri' Ol persons who would (MTW Utlnl of owning Ihelr u*n homes, were now pn>ierty ownt-rs in BarbadOl Mr BOSklai gftU "I think .li.it if thruAiHmon entake U IntoroM i" ii o peoplo ""' v *•" no in a Ueti.i position to hasp HiMiWiroo WO mual havo laatl ;> iionest laadtrs, ind pacaonj wbo would guldo th.poopM rupV. Every swert is more delicious with BIRD To mkw •! nncgualWil flavour. crcssnbMss, tntootlUHaa be cerB*B n aagard b BfthV loi .is h>ng a* >oi "ii mother .can remember the nj ha K-cn an js.ui.o.c of ( mvar>'nB quaint So when pM 0 f* C*Urd. "' *be I., ask for Bird's Decree /Visi Pronounewl ui In Decision Confirmed Missing Girl Fourtd A decision of Mr. E. A. MeLeod. rabla one Pohce Magistrate of District "A" was yesterday confirmed by Their Honours ol the Assistant Court of Appeal. Mr C. L Tayloi and Mr, J W. B. Chencrv Mi. JgeLO O O lined Arthur Clarke of Bay Land K 1 when he was found guilty of having assaulted and beaten Ltaar into the cost and pnw an I Hene Da Costa on July 30 ion* he Is now going Into the Clarke ruffed Da Costa in her matter and will, in due course, .ye. threw his bicycle on her and ;ubmil his report to the Barbados kicked her according to the vi(Jovemment. dence. V.V.V.V.V.V.Vs'i'i'f i• I it i \ A CHOWS For Poultry and Lirvulotk "SEE THE DIFFERENCE FUWNA MAKES' .VeV. -r I Christian Scien T | ss** 5 ^ lifiiilinij liililli Hours: 10 a.m— 2 pa Tueada'.s. Weinesd*ys. M ujya 10 a.m.—Uo'clocr < Saturdays \t thai Aoofa i* n"-' ChrKllan Keimna 1 > I \ FOR -f > ;>)Mrr ADVOCATE CO., LTD. J VUitora Are Welcome | R-ulir oa>nti POHT-OF-SPAIN Gloria Julev of Arouca. one of the 'missing girls" was found l>> ihe polirc "living comfortably" In plod but furnished house In another part of the district The lulling into the mutter, discovered that a uuantlty of articleof eWrthllUJ .ind Jewelleiy were missing from that house. Gloria, with tears hi her eyea denleo a rharge of theft, and wan alleged to have offered no account for her presence in the house when met by the police. She was remanded to the Belmont Industrial School. Port-of-Spain. ; | i % % %  i.i., i Hli Konou tho Chief Ju \n,in CoUymore pronoui


PAGE 1

TAOI: TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY. OCTOBER 14. 1M gwrib Callinq ICY the c %  dm mg the past the followtnic ElctooU, St Saviour"-. r C.irl\ Si Andrew's Mixed, The f>od 31 l' School. Sp*.ghUto.vn Boys*, Si LwTen> %  ^.• Boys' and Girl-' ..na St Martini Beys' ami i His Kxvrllrr., %  > will be ennliiiulng his tour of schools next week. MiM and Mr. Barbados ^|-HP DANCE at the Barbodo M. Aquatu Club to-ni,h,. should be quit.a change from the usual typo of dancs* we have been having lately. At midnight, a number of Judfea will select Miss and Mr. Barbados, from dancers on the ballroom floor, during DM ofl tindMM Quest Artiste fat ihr v.-nmg %  • B.C.'a radio Ma Miss Marjonr IJev LMkMSM jrrylng cash prizes will be relewed during the nlfjfat. Arrived Yrtterday M R CHAHLKS THOMAS arrived from Trinidad yesterday morning by B W 1 A lniratslH from England via Jamaica Mr. Thoniar is hne for •ikourl 1< month-, ind d\inng his fUy, he wtll give advice or practical assistance to any local dramatic cluba or amateur groups thai may desire it H's visit la under the auspice* <>f the Hrltlsh Council. Mr. TIK has the men I had vide Paris With R. .M. MatColl As Your News-Guide PA HIS 3 champagne yth. H tin *T*HE TOMB of Oscar Wilde OUT 1 in the historic Pere Lachalsc cemetery of Paris is in the new* The other day the wile of an American Embassy ofrkitl who completed her education at Lonon .'diversity received* letter from English friends who Ad been at the university with rtCT The letter said they had heard that Wilde's tomb was In bad re[palr, and would i 'he please invwUgate Out she went to the cemetery Sure enough the irlptlon on the lomb is illegible l The American woman asked the R 0|C r ., httr ho|m emetery authorities if she might •,. %  othei pay to have the lettering touched wc waahed Paris Cgrrene-.. MILS Ul.OSSO* MEDART. uf St Louis. M mother of Ityear old Miml. whoae blue eyes ook.' explained Orandma uncaught the apnledl> preciative glance Of King Farouk Paris Blunlneu ... in DesuvHIe last UY POL ROOEH, head of the fE% ls explodes rted by the reaction of St Lou. aays that thoee tales opg. Id I.EAVfKO for Trinidad yt*rday morning by B W I.A were Mr. Mm in England. Including free lance Wardell and Mr. John Hammond. work in the Theatre in London, where he tmi player, scenic designer Stage manager and for a while he WHS tnurtnir as a pioneer Mr. Wardell Is on a month's visit to England Mr. Hammond accom panted him to Trinidad, and eipecta to return to-day. Off to the U.K. To Attend Course M R SIMON WARDELL. whuwe A RECENT arrival in Londor god-father Is Lord Beaver i\ from the West Indies la Mr brook, left yesterday by H.W.I.A C T. X. Henrique*. H> ie the for Trinidad en route to England. l.esldenl Magistrate in Kingston. AccompnnylnB him ;ii far :i. .T.imanji. .mcl has gone to EngTrinidad was Mr John Hammond land at the invitation of th who expects to return today. British Council to attend a course Mr. Wardell who has a villa on Juvenile Delinqun.i on The Coaat. will sitend a month in England, after which he will be returoiruj to Barbados. Fellow PsWienferi XTL staying with Miss Lyr M R J M KIDNEY. Manac-'r Weatherhead In Bay Street. Mrs. of tho Weal indies Crlcko*. Dorothy Mclntyre returned 10 turn arrives today bv the Grenada yesterday afternoon bv ••Qolnto %  • tngcthor wtth Mr and H.W.I A. Mm Mclntyre'a husMrs. Jeffrey StoHmeyer. Among land Is the Engineer at the Ford their fellow passengers is Mr. Service Station in Grenada. J M. Campbell, Vice-Cli.in DM of Booker Brothers, who making his annual visit to lint i h ('•ukana. I understand that Mr. Campbell will spend one or twu -lays in Trinidad. Will Inspect Site D URING Mr. R. K. NuneV 'or short stay In Barbados, it is 'laying at 'Accra-. Rockley understood that he will visit aja ... Kensington Oval with Mr. Jaci Viola riayers Kidney. Skipper John Goddarf f^T TO AMERICA last week and u few other members of the V/ on the "Queen Mary" with Sir Barbados Cricket Association, to Thomas Beecnam and the Royal inspect the proposer! site for a Philharmonic Orchestra went new pavilion at Kensington. Jamaica-born Mr. James Verity. Mr. Nlines who Is l*re-ident of principal viola. Among the other the W.I. Cricket Board of Control members of the orchestra at one is an uitransit passenger on the of his fellow Jamaicans Mr 1 "OoHlto" which arrives here Patrick Vermont, who la also %  to-day. viola player. Alter A Month's Holiday A FTER one months holiday staying Indefinite Stay A RRIVING by B.W.I A. yesten tcrnoon from B.G was Miss Cynthia Lopes, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Reggie Lopes • •t Georgetown. Cynthia is up indennias stay and here and there ring 1 fTo gold Answer. Not unless risotto and roast beef the executors of Wildes estate Roger 1928 their permission first. society to the whole thing about experts being able to classify ^Vown.w'^'ia't'^uHs *£> !? ft >'"' SftSi b 'in* SdKttSf W^terT Skits. He, cm (vineyard) ar largely nonhusl>linrt hfl8 .„ tncome & ^^^ wr ae. £150,000 a year, derived from You might be able to do It oc^lfn rteel equipment for childcasionallv with clarets or burran s playgrounds. gundles," says Pol Roger an tie.j,,^ lWr ik,*' says Mrs. Medart, ^. My little Mirm as a modern raIt seems hardly posiomehow They are still In constant communication, you hat is not my own Know Of the klngl> plumpness. Mr; 1 lunched with Mr and Mrs Pol Medart says 'His photographmake him out IO be much fatter r day rfct" lurprtafngTy. ,n n • rea,l > '* AnQ |j" n .*f ltd down the mushroom when you bask in his personalit in, sicnaer man in nis cnirues. ,. M ,,, , at with champagne I can only J£* ''"'* ,. M fairly mre of one thing if I rub^S pa 0 men I to a blindfold test With luck ?"* %  ££?"£ rith Pol I went out there my* lajj Unary place—a walled city of the dead with long roadways linen with thousands of elaborate mausoleums. A notice in English sakf: "Visitors to the cemetery arerrequested to be decently dressed. No shorts tolerated." Many famous people lie there But Wilde draws the greatest number of visitors, out-noting Countess Walewska, Napoleon's mistress, in popularity. An average of 20 to 30 people ask for the Wilde tomb every day. and more of them are American than Britten. Incidentally, the Pere Lachais who gave his name So the cem lery was the father confessor c King Louis Xiv .mcl that job, AS n cemetery attendant remarked thoughtfully "can have beei sinecure" Parks SpriicMliness . MAURICE [•HEVALIER, as chipper a at 51. is o| MS. CHARLES THOMAS, armed yesterday. member of the Aru. League of Service Travelling Theatre In 1931. he became; dire* lot i' the Little Theatre in Middleborough, following which, he was deputy producer and designer of the Liverpool Repertory. In 194*. Mr. Thomas took over as Drama Adviser to the West Riding Education Committee, and in 1M47, he Joined the British Drama League as tutor, lecturer and festival adiudicator. Mr. Tucker, the British Council representative has arranged for Mr I'lii. n... | to hroactcaf.1 • ver U-dn> Distribution on Friday Oct. SOth. in the British Council programme and to discuss matters concerning Dramatic art as applied to Barbados. It Is unclemtood also, that the cast of "Blithe Spirit", will give excerpts from this production on the samp programme. London Rumour C ARIB heard from London yesterday that Sir Rupert Briercllffe. Former Medical Adviser to CD. and W. had been offered an Important pott in Ceylon, Supervising their new health plan. On checking the report with Sir Rupert, who lives in St. Peaei he was informed that this was the first time Sir Rupert had heard anything about It. Rupert and the Castaway — 25 EPS I been Run#n '" 'V tome f' J* ii io why brought such %  long *y horn home. whiU lbs link caoni talk ocrtedly among ilumwUo. All U once ihsy nop o S atH ri at. Mosi ot ihm mn aay in itruh. bui %  *• viy l.-h.fi,t to i.k' Huptrl's armi ind lead him oil the beach. Up ih* rockt and through th* tre*> they go until, near die middle ot 'Sc :IUMI. he -'*i %  rough wall and the tops o* sosw qawr-lookiti In a •hkr an* is before hungrily i gatgaouj bowl ol sot li .v. Wml< h* tti %  lalkiag mi again. HD09SWOIO i driD> ill ii HI •( u.a.a ii, A n U i> mai %  i .. H IHIM'HUJ %  1 EMPIRE TODAY 4.45 and 8.30 and Continuing M-G-MPiclures Presents "THE DIMTOK AND THE GIRL" Starring Glenn FORD Chrl*s COBUBN Gloria Dr HAVEN Jn LEIGH M Brurt BENNETT EXTRA NKWS REr.l.:— < lurln >M Lrl> 1TrubUni ROW TO-DAY and TOMliKKOW United Artist Presents HIS. MIKE %  tssTltag TMck POWELtEvelvn KEYES With J. M KERRIGAN Angela CLARKE ROYAL TO-DAY ni TOMORROW 4.30 and 8.31 Rrpubllr Snuuhlnj Double Wild Bill ELLIOTT Vorn IIALSTON WYOMIITS And BANDITS OE THE IIA III. \ Ml Starring Sunset CARSON Peggy STEWART Action At Mid-Nile Speciul •1111 Ml I n-llOW r.l-NTTF Ri-mibllr Whole Aetaaa serial "UNG OF THE TEXAS IIAMiHIS" The All Action Serial . TWO PRIZES will be given away at thla show :— 1st Prise—|6.ee 2ad""Pr la tS-W So Keep Year Half-Ticket You may be the Lucky One OLYMPIC TO-DAY To MONDAY 4.30 and S.15 Republic Big Double Roy ROBERTS Ueorge COOPER •FLAMING FURY" And 'THE LAST BANDIT" srtth Wild Bill ELLIOTT Adrian BOOTH George (Oabby) HAYES pening m a new twohour, one-man show. That^ famous straw hat. which Is his trade-mark, will still be on view, but It will bt i which is Tighter I ore-mnn show. Chevalier has )ust finished another lllm, "Ma Pomme" (slang roughly translatable ai "My Mug"). Playing opposite him is a lady who gained lonsidcraDlc fame as "Lady I'atatchou." No member of the British peerage, she runs a Montmartre night spot, so notorious for Its uutocratic rule that any m;in visitor who re fust* to join in the choruses of the songs has his necktie smartly snipped off. Lady Patatchou calculates that several hundred pounds' worth of silk Ute. ruthlessly cut from iheir wcarcrs' throats, hang frorr walls. I'.iris Lushneas . R OLAND PETIT, whose •semen ballet has been a smash hit on both sides of the Atlantic, has got advance bookings ten weeks ahead for his novelty ballet, 'The Gobbler of Diamonds." which opens to-morrow night. Petit himself and Renee Jeanmalre, his pallid leading bnlleri who shocked Boston with her (.'armenesque ciiperings. an Englishman. Gordon Hamilton, nil ting us well as dance Th* story is about a frail lady of Lrs H.lles. the great Puris markets which are a blend of Smith'ii-li. Covtnt Garden, and Hillingsgiite Petit himself grew up there. His father still runs a popular restaurant in the heart of the n.iirkel. Paris MIHIK'IIIK"" . 1X3VELY Grandma Maricne Dietrich has found time, in between fitting on some new dresses and naking a rllm. to buy six dozen long black candles for her Hollywood house. "They give a pla> Mr Pol Roger before her marriage was it member of the Perier and Jouet clan The perfect %  hampagne alliance." she says They have seven children. vou forget all about his waistline. Such a kindly chap" Mother and daughter are goinx to Cairo for Christmas. "How romantic'" cries Mrs Medart "Santa Claus on the banks of the Nile." London Expr.ss Service. PLAZA OISTIH lie wtatAiNMf.Ni HISTORY! TODAY To SUNDAY 5 and 8.M pjn. PARAMOUNT S HIT MUSICAL Bint (H1INI1V uilli Ihr AMIKIWS SISTKRS — in — "HERE COME With Btllv MUTTON THE WAVES' and Sonny TUFTS FLASH ! MIDMTK MATINEE TO-DAY (SAT) 14TH Two N> Piclures! (A Monogram Double) JOHNNY MACK BROWN in PRAIRIE EXPRESS DUNCAN "IN OLD And KKNALDO as the Cisco Kid NEW MEXICO' GLOBE UL1 4 uiitliiuint Todav S and 83t and (tmUnumi TO-Mt.HT •t K.15 Tl'RN ON YOUR RADIO DISTRIBUTION TO THE FIRST CLUB MORGAN HIT PARADE Hear Some of the Times thai will be Played al (i.ni >im.A.\ Alone with ALICE ARMSTRONG al the Piano Dial liimi FOR RESERVATIONS AQUATIC (111 i'UVEMA [Members Only) MAMNKI TODAY AT 5 PJW. TONIGHT TO rrrs-nxv NIOIIT AT .W M-G-M's MUSICAL OF YOUR DREAMS! .__. BUD ABBOTT and LOU COSTELLO HOLD THAT GHOST hard CARLSON — Joan DAVIS — Mucha Al A I iilursil flctorr GAIETY .The Garden) ST. JAMES TO-IrAY TO Hl'NDAV •. P.M.: MAT. RUN—I P.M. Jamea Ohser WITh CURWOOD'S "RIVER'S END" Dennla MORGAN iTfce OalUnl Starr of the Famoua Haral Canadian Moanlie.) — AND — DICK FORAN In "PRAIRIE THUNDER" DUCHESS IPAHO' Esther WILLIAMS Van JOHNSON c/*MUND.,a PAULA RAYMOND COflNlE HAINES-CLINTONSUNDBERa LENAH0RNE /^ POWELL, sV ROBERT I ItUflABO rlWDUCTlON \tS8fi3hto TOMORKOW i.SO P.M. "DUCHESS Or IDA1HI and %  AV NCNEK BO. 8INC11NG ACE EMPIRE THEATRE LOCAL TALKNT At'DITION lOHOaBOW 9.30 A.M. THURSDAY 19th and FRIDAY Mlh at 8.30 WM MATINEE: FMDAY AT 5 P.M. MRS. A. L. STUART Preaents Her SCHOOL of DANCING In 'REVUEDEVILLE 1950' Music hy the Police Bana Directed hy CaL C. E. RAISON. A.R.C.M., M.B.E. BOX OFFICE OPEN DAILY From x :l!i a.m. to It noen and I J* p.m. to 3.30 p.m. rRICES:— ORCHESTRA iM BOXES Sl.M: HOCSI |1.H: BALCONY IJe. Ill SFHVtn FLASH! FLASH! GLOBE THEATRE first with the news ftulMsYi Hotfen Pioton Batata of EZZARD CHARLES JOE LOUIS l\ TRAINING TO DAY 5 A 830 nnd over the Week-end m i o it i TO DAY 4 MONDAY 1.30 p.m. Matmeei HAMLET OHILDRSN 18c. SPECIAL MATINEE THIS MONOGRAM'S DOUBLE : "SILENT WITNESS" Wilh Frank ALBERTSON MORNING 9.30 (CHEAP PRICES) — and — "FIGHTING FOOLS" With Leo GORCEY and The BOWERY BOYS HII.IM. Illl MIIKIK.X WITH I.MIIIi — Hiiimi /tints' j < it.nuxu SEA-AXO-SKY STOHY! NOW MlliniM. .' A 8..10 |. in. .....II inuit.il IIAII. "Z. JANE WYAn • WAYNE MORRIS • WALTER BRENNAr .., DELMER DAVES • ~~-.JERRY WALP PLAZA THE A THE —*•.•#./•—


1950



“* Barbados a Aduncate



——$—$—$_—

KING



Round Table Knights |

Honour W.I. Cricketers
‘Festival Year Of W.I.”’
Says Griffiths

(From Our Own Correspondent) .

"S B





- OFF TO NEW ZEALANY

j
j
|
|
}

j

!
|

——$—___—

French Forces

Quit Thatkhe

SAIGON,



Indo-China,
Oct. 13
French forces in northern Indo

|China have begun evacuating the

outpost of Thatkhe usually reliable
sources said here today. Thatkhe
is a fortress near the China
frontier with a tiny airfield.

The survivors of a French col-
umn of about 40,000 men trapped
by Vietminh forees had staggere|





SEAMAN CHARGED WIT:
BURGLARY IN
BUCKINGHAM PALACE

LONDON, Oct. 13.

POLICE to-night charged a man with breaking
into Buckingham Palace, the home of the King,
and stealing a diplomatic despatch box.

’ into the fortress on Monday They named the man as Douglas Monro, 26, a
LONDON, Oct. 13.. |after the biggest battle cf :
ME. JAMES GRIFFITHS Secretary of State a F \rance’s. four sear war awain.:| Scottish seaman. The arrest of Monro followed a

for the Colonies last night bestowed further

praise upon the West Indies cricket team. Speak-| = =

ing at a dinner in London he said: “Next year

may be the Festival of
been the festival of the

Consuls Must

Britain, but this year has
West Indians.

They have been grand ambassa-
dors and have linked us closer
than ever with their islands”

The occasion was a dinner



}

ended on Monday

euerillas in Indo-China.

Only about 500 men from five
battalions in the trapped column
fought their way to safety. The
battle which had lasted five days
with severe
losses to both sides.

French forces covering the
withdrawal of the garrison of the
China border outpost of Caobang
had to fight well trained Vietminh



probe at the Palace by Britain’s to

detectives,

after the Royal despatch box had been found dump-

ed in a London dustbin.
CANADIAN $—£
EXCHANGE RATE

With effect from Monday,
October 16, authorised deal-
ers in foreign exchange will

The box, containing only offi-
cial correspondence was taken
from a Palace room occupied by
the Marshal of the Diplomatic
Corps—a Royal Officer responsible
for personal contacts with For-
eign Ambassadors and Ministers.
His duties are largely confined to

. o er a be allowed to make a market :
i - given by the Knights of the pede 03 outnumbering them ten in Canadian dollars and ||formal and official occasions. os
Use Discretion Round Table in honour of the A French army spokesman said quote rates dependent on Tee oy Ss Sees ber
* : | West Indies. ¥ ss that important elements of the supply and demand. No offi- was stolen, police said they
The Earl of Athlone who has Thatkhe gavtiest érattoops abd cial quotation will thereafter lieve: that the theft =~ ae =
IN GRANTING VISAS recently visited the Caribbean Sideecearnd Sad walehlined the be given. As Exchange Con- nected with any political mo’
i | colonies with his wife, Princess ane trol and Import Control will ment.

WASHINGTON Oct. 13

Alice, presided, Among the guesis
were Admiral Sir Irvine Glennie,





difficult Ingle mountain pass o!
Lunghpai and reached their des





remain in force the supply
of and demand for dollars



Monro will appear in court to--
morrow charged with “Burglari-

n 1 ] tination Nacham to the southeast, will as hitherto be restricted ously breaking and entering Buck-
A State en former Commander-in-Chief _of the first break in the chain|{| to approved transactions, ingham Palace and stealing the
said to-day that United S| the West Indies’ Squadron, Sir of the French frontier — posts despatch box.”
Consuls abroad are empowered) Grattan Bushe, former Govern:r along the Chinese—Tankin:: ne —ann————= | The box—imprinted with the
te use their own discretion in re-! of Barbados,‘ Sir Alan Burns border west of Donfihke on Sep - e Royal initials “G. R.” (George
validating visas of foreigners former Governor of British Hon- tember 18, U K Will Have Rex) and a crown—was found by
coming to America. eee duras and Sir Louis Knuthsen, Withdrawals from several ad = an elderly man early this morn-
decision to suspend temporarily all} the famous physician who was | vanced posts followed, and ° e ing in a dustbin in a road near
visas under the new internal secur-| porn in the Wesv Indies. regrouping of the _ French ationing Of vie EUliO, “As Hepers Sh ware
ity law was taken for two reasons. or Vietnamese forces was planned intact,

1. To prevent further congestion
at Ellis Island where many
aliens are being held for



Russia Objects



—Reuter,



Newsprint

Police said to-night that let-
ters in the stolen box dealt with

i ° visits do the King, It contained
investigation for possible To Trygve Lie — ' Ti Ss LONDON, Oct. 13. | he state seereta.
Fascist connections. MR. FRED BETHELL shak J. H, Wilki t Seawell yesterday while Mr. E. D ruman British newspapers are to

2. To allow officials here to As U.N. Secretary " shakes hands with Mr. J. H, Wilkinson a y y e Mr. E. D.

study the law and issue new

Mottley smiles farewell.





return to the wartime system of

A Scotland Yard spokesman

A ao A t tonnage rationing to conserve |told Reuter nothing but that a

detailed instructions. LAKE SUCCESS, Oct. 13. Mr. Bethell is attending a meeting of the British Empire Parliamentary Association in New Zealand, 7 7 tves their dwindling supplies of news-|diplomatic box seemed to be

4 Soviet Foreign Minister, Andrei in place of Mr. G. H. Adams. int. The Newsprint Supply |missing from the Palace and
Communists have always beeM|y-hinsky told Reuter to-day that | ————____ SR ‘ HA + yf l npany announced today that|there were no signs of forcible

barred from entry to the United] hen the time came Russia would Onotutu stocks were as low today as at | entry.

States. Fascists as a class were

not barred but the new law makes
their exclusion with some ex-
ceptions mandatory.

The State Department admitted

explain her reasons for objecting
te the reappointment of Trygve
Lie as United Nations Secretary
General.

In a jovial mood, the Soviet

Bethell

| AMPHIBIAN LANDING

Leaves For | —YPECTED IN N. KOREA

By NORMA WILSON
_ HONOLULU, Oct, 13
President Truman arrived here’



the worst period of the war and
that a further saving in consump
tion is unavoidable,

News of the incident was sent
to King George who was out with
a shooting party on his Norfolk
Estate.

‘ ; early to-day by air = Wax tr The new ration will be based With no outward signs of the
the order would create great in-|Minister repeated emphatically meet anki Petree ian bas on cireulations at present | Palace having been broken into,
convenience but officials said|that Russia opposed any extension N Z ealand i ; Truman was spending only | tationing level which allows| Police were to-night still puszled
that difficulties should be over-|of Lie’s term of office, Such ex- e U.N. Warshi Pound Coast ain nes oe ep ; e nly most newspapers to publish six |28 to how the box found its way
ension wou e completely con- e e 4 . 3 . ito the dus n.
come soon. ratte Id b pl tel Hy taking off th onolulu' before} jages daily. During the war |tv the dustbi
trary to the Charter, he said. Mr. F. E. C. Bethell, M.C.P aking off on the final stage of his

Instructions amplifying yester-

day’s order have been sent to
Consuls.
In the. meantime,.gfficials said
consuls woukl re-examine all ap-
plicants to whom visas have been
granted.

Visas would be re-validated if

acl.) |i see
3 Killed, 4 Injured

killed and four passengers injured

left yesterday for Trinidad by
B.W.,LA., en route to New Zealand
He ayes, prinided this morning
‘to o Venezuela, from where

will fly to Curacao via Aruba.

In Curacao he will join a ship on
the New Zealand run, which will

By JULIAN BATES

United, Nations ‘
far northeast coast for ti

wprshis

TOKYO, om 13.
ay han er oreans
time-in two See par.

ring rumours that the area was being softened up for a

new amphibious landing.

6,500 mile flight.
The President was taking off
from Hickam air port at mid-
night local time to-day. He ways
expeeted back in Honolulu to-
morrow evening.
Whatever the point



of rendez-
vous, the talks will last no more

when tonnage rationing was in
force, newspapers for a long time
produced only four page editions.

Imports by the Newsprint Sup-
ply from Seandinavia are already
back to pre war level and cannot
be increased in the near future,

There have been at least six
cases of intruders being found
inside the gates of Buckingham
Palace in recent times,

The latest until to-day, was last
August, when aman aft
certified as a mental case was
found in the Royal Mews.

through the P: Canal. America’s biggest warship the 45,000 ton Missouri ‘ S After the British Government's] Palace officials looked on as
aliens were found to have no con-|when a plane crashed at Casa-| P*8* vig veetene Set headed the fleet 66 37 British Auiiralian Ganadian and es “ial icon teat cancellation of newsprint sup-| Police examined: the entrance to
nection either now or in the past}blanca airport shortly after taking} Mr. Bethell, Junior Member for , . an, are the

with Fascist and Nazi organisations



off to-day.

St. John in the House of Assembly

American warships which ranged far north yesterday and



expected to discuss the Korean



{plies from Canadian mills earlier

Marshal’s room—its

rar C 5 ¢ louble doors with glass parti 3.
or subsidiary bodies. The plane on the Casablanca—| witi represent Barbados at a meet-| to-day, close to the Manchurian border. war and other Far East problems caus ‘or quidly saunas their At hight, ‘seane. doce cre ieee
7 Algiers—Perpignan run burst into| jn ithe ‘Empire Parli 7, A Navy announcement | said : ‘ deliveries behind heavy solid gates and police
a nthe of ing of the British Empire Parlia- that they left their target “badly| Truman is tentatively due to : are on duty nearby. —Reuter.
“Airpo ort rescue squads dragged piece ta New Zealand Mex’ wicutee crippled.” Yesterday laid |leave Honolulu for San Francisco It has been decided that a re- t i
Dp. .










In Monday’s

out the four passengers but the

Casablanca Hospital. —Reuter.



‘THINGS WILL CHANGE’

VYSHINSK Y

TELLS U.S.

LAKE SUCCESS, Oct. 13.
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Vyshinsky to-day ap-
pealed to the United States to return to its wartime policy

of co-operation.

Then he promised “things will change”.
Vyshinsky was speaking in the United Nations Poli-
tical Committee during a debate on the seven power plan

to give greater powers to the



2 bly: chon was expected to fall by to- .
Vyshinsky asked: “Is not the coasts of North America. East German Securivy Police | morrow at the latest, despite the Be Drafted
li T root of the evil people’s political today swept into action. again v0 |stiffest opposition the United
Israe Agrees hat eee 2 Bea raaintain 100 per cent. secrecy | Nations forces have encountered Into U.S. Army
incon’ a Wiehe aie “ae ea ARTIE'S HEADLINE blackout over zonal elections fixed | north of the Parallel. Commun-

Force Is Necessary

ie Germans will vove in their first | hold up the drive on Pyongyang to The United States Selective
AGAINST AGGRESSION Fisdes polias” be Sonne ee soviet type elections. jenable northerners to tighten | Service Director General Lewis
LAKE SUCCESS, Oct. 13. Tarlie the American delegate their defences and prepare for @|fershey said in a speech here

Israel to-day accepted in prine
ciple the main objectives of the
proposal to give the United Na-
tions General Assembly power to
use force if necessary against -

gression.

The Israeli delegate Aubrey
Eban said in the resumed debate
in the Assembly’s Political Com-
mittee that Israel gave full sup-
port to the proposed invitation to
member nations to allocate part
of their forces for use by the
United Nations to put down ag-

on. ;

Eban said that “taken together
with the provisions of the seven
power resolution before the Com-
mittee for convening the General
Assembly at 24 hours notice in an
emergency it would enable the
United Nations to act on future
occasions with greater speed and
with a more equitable distribution
of responsibility and sacrifice than
were possible in the Korean
crisis.”

But Eban agreed with those who
had critJcised another feature of
the seven power plan—the pro-
posed establishment by the Secre-

General Assembly.

laboration, to a post war policy

John Foster Dulles had declared
that if the United Nations did
not institute an effective collec-
tive system, nations
nd more
on,military alliances.

The strength of such alliances
would not be subject to law or
to any such representative body
as the United Nations.

Dulles went on; “There can be
no comparable assurance that
aggression from a power outside
this organisation wi be as
responsible to the ove’ welfare
of the peoples of the world.”

Urging acceptance of the seven
power plan to increase the author-
ity of the General Assembly,
Dulles said that if the proposals
were approved, “we will have
opened to all mankind a new vista
of hope’

Dulles declared, “I deny with
all possible vehemence the
proposition that this organisation
is founded upon the principle of
unanimity or permanence of the
Security Council.

At Seawell to see him off were



Coming Fantome

(From Our Own Correspondent)

INDON.
Fantome II, the 700-ton yacht
formerly owned by the Duke of
Westminster, will shortly be seen
in the West Indies, Businessman
Mr. J. B. Kellock, with the full
biessing of the Board of Trade,
is equipping the yacht to tour
dollar markets as a sales ship.
She will leave England at the end
of the year with a crew of 25 and
ten salesmen and the exhibits of
60 British manufacturers. Her
six-month cruise will take in 25
ports in the West Indies and
Mexico, and on the East and West



POLITIC

has resigned from his post
of President of the Political
Progress Group. He is of
the opinion that his position
as President, would not be
consistent with his status as
a Nominatel Member of the
Legislative Council,





E. Germany Wants

Total Secrecy
IN ZONAL ELECTIQNS

BERLIN, Oct. 13.

for Sunday when 14,000,000 East

Today 36 hours before polling
booths open on Sunday morning,
nobody in East Germany except
political leaders knew what the
ballot paper looked like.

Papers printed in strict secrgpy
are being rushed by special mobil 4
squads to towns and villages
throughout the Soviet Zone.

Handpicked “alert groups” mace
eleventh-hour tours of vhe zone
today to juash attempts to
“sabotage” elections by opposi-
tion propaganda.—Reuter,



Portugal Backing Franco Spain

By LUIS TEVES
LISBON, Oct. 13.
Portugal’s Foreign Minister was
meeting his Spanish opposite
number in Granada, Spain, today
in what some observers here re-
arded as one of more moves to get
ranco recognised, and Spain ad-



in ruins the big port Chongjin 35

Nations war planes were sealing
off the coastal strip around Sin-
anju, an Airforce spokesman said.
American B 29 superforts bombed
railways and roads at Namsidong,

only 20 miles from the Manchurian {bombed by the Japanese in 1941.

Border and 60 miles northwest of
the Sinanju_ strip,

In Central Korea, ground forces
including the British Brigade
closed in on thousands of Com-
munists, virtually trapped, but
still stubbornly defending the key

of the 38th Parallel, expected to

| centre of Kumchon, 12 miles north

be the last big Communist stand

| before their capital Pyongyang.



' Kimchon May Fall
Assaulted from all sides, Kim-

ists’ alm was believed to be to

last ditch stand,
The Sinanju strip on the west

| coast north of Pyongyang, is at

mouth of the Chonghon River
on the main road and rail routes
from North Korea to Manchuria
and North China. It is 80 miles
from the Manchurian border and

hicasea 250 miles of the Russian-

leased Port Arthur.

Superforts swung far north to-
day and struck Communists from
coast to coast to prevent supplies



|
\

and reinforcements from reaching
the battlefront.
@ On page 9.

POLITICAL OBSERVERS THINK

cognition of Franco’s regime and
Spain's admission to the Atlantic
Pact.

According to another version,
Portugal would be acting as Unit-

guese Government will soon be
removed.”

The belief that Portuguese-
Spanish ties were growing strong-
er followed General Franco’s visit








on Monday morning. He will

the nation on his conversation with
General MacArthur.

During his stay in Hawaii he
will tour Pearl Harbour by launch
to inspect the hulks of warships

Later he will be taken on a
three-hour tour of military instal-
lations and other points of interest
around Honolulu.

He was expected to confer pri-
vately with his aides this evening
before his midnight take-off.

—Reuter,



18-Year-Olds May

WASHINGTON, Oct. 13,

that the question of asking Con
gress to lower the draft (con—
scription) age to 18 was being
“seriously considered.”

He said that ex-servicemen of
World War Two could be wholly
excepted from service if draft
boards were allowed to tap ‘the
very rich source of meeeerr
represented by 18-year olds,

Under present draft regulations
all men aged 18 to 25 must regia-
ter for drafting but only those
aged 19 or more may be called in.

—Reuter.

ing in September during which-ac-
cording to an official communique
they “examined carefully the pres-
ent international situation in ac-
cordance with the provisions of
the friendship and apne
treaty signed by Spain and Portu-
gal in 1939.”

turn to tonnage rationing will

during the next rationing period.

—Reuter.



Lo






Spani
i>
—



‘ {be for ¢ i 5 ;
‘ ‘ miles south of the border. spend most of the following day a minimum period of six
ADVOCATE pilot, the radio operator, and the members of his family, Mr. J. H. datkadl ili. ‘Qucdl Gossemiedenty — ve they atien ‘Tenchon|working on the Forelgn policy months. TELL —_ ADVOCATE
FULTON OURSLER mechanic were byrnt to death. _ | Wilkinson, MLC-P.. and .Mr, B.D. PORT-OF-SPAIN. marshalling yards, the North|speech he will deliver there on{ It may be that a further cut THE NEWS
writes the First Chapter of A heavy mist over the airport) Mottley M.C.P. Mr, Gerald R. Wight, re- \||Korean supply route, 100 miles|Tuesday night. will be necessary. This will be Ping 3113 Day or Night.
THE GREATES prevented the pilot from making cently nominated member of southwest of Chongjin. On the| ‘The President is expected toj considered by Directors of the ae A'TE
T emergency landin ; i ; ; ia > com in th mR" THE ADVOC
STORY EVER TOLD Wee bn eee ie a the néw Legislative Council, other side of the Peninsula, United |take this opportunity to report to) Company in the light of experience

PAYS FOR NEWS.



GILBEYS |
shWines

These include i

GILBEY’S

PORT

& SHERRY |

mitted to the Atlantic Treaty. ed States intermediary and pre-|to Oporto on September 27. Ob- (2) San Joao De Deus centen-
tary General of a panel of mili- shied ote ee Officially the Portuguese Foreign arranging everything so that if the servers noted that at the end of his | ary 10 days comments niens 2. , \
tary experts.—Reuter. found i withoutean adminis- Minister Dr’ Paulo Cunha was to| United Nations were to recognise | three days meeting with Dr. Sala- | ing which relics of oa en You can enjoy }
a |tcetve hanc. Voanpemy ale eent-|oeth,tig opanien,Fovelen, Minis | Frances, Spatn tole Would be at | ge wmough accompanied, by, Metre” in Spans, were taken
. , a y Spain’s -| Fo n ste: e was e 2 ope ] ;
BRITAIN CAN IMPORT ably, “That would be just too}De Deus centenary commemora-| lantic Pact with the full peninsula | in Oporto by Portugal's ‘Defence | Portugal have just been returned them again in
ARGENTINA WOOL bad. “ tions in Granada. But political ob-| defence plans already prepared. | Minister, Lieut. Colonel Fernando |to Granada. What at first appear-
LONDON, Oct. 13 He added that it would not be/ servers saw the meeting as a com-| Most observers think the second | Santos Costa and not by the Por-{ed to be mere religious celebra~ greater quantity
In future the British Board of rad Sinnity Come resulted in pene to peat Franco-Salazar version the more likely one. They |tuguese Foreign Minister tions turned éut to be the pretext
z meeting and part of a series 0!

Trade, will permit imports from
Argentina of raw sheep’s and
lambs’ wool of any type, the Board

Pressed to explain Soviet ob-
jections to Lie, Vyshinsky was

talks towards unity of action in
the Iberian Peninsula’s defence
and foreign policy.

base this view on the fact that the
Salazar-Franco meeting took place
six days after. Dr. Cunha’s return

Though the greatest official se-
crecy was maintained here over

for repeated demonstrations of
Spanish-Portuguese friendship

This has been constantly em-



>

OX FOUND IN DUSTBIN~

a
tea
&



ene " from the United States where he] today’s meeti an 0 0 g hasized in speeches by high offi- . " .
announced today. Ore ay a asked whether these might be bas- There were two main views of|had attended the Atlantic Pact veer was altatle” sialitical abe Pals of the bn o countries, giving GARDINER AUS TING Co., Lid.
licences granted to individual irm- ed on the Secretary General’s at-|the meeting among political ob-| Council and that on his return he|servers thought that something|the impression that it is aimed to

porters will permit the import of] titude towards the Korean war. servers here said in Lisbon he was convinced | was going on. The chain of events|show the world the friendship Agents

any quantity, although the Board| “I cannot be more precise at this}' First was that Portugal would|that “the prejudices which still] which led them to believe this|and unity of ideas of Spain and

reserve the right to revoke such moment’, the Soviet representa-! be preparing a move to advocate prevent the adoption of a realistic | was: Portugal.

licenees at any time. tive replied.—Reuter. Spain’s case seeking to obtain re- policy



advocated by the Portu-



(1) The Franco-Salazar meet-| @ On page 3


PAGE TWO



Carub Calling




IS ED ENCY. the Gov-
ern ; during the past
week, v the following Ele-
mentar ools, St. Saviour’s
Boys’ Girls’, St. Andrew’s
Boys’ Girls’, Welches Mixed,

The Good Shepherd Boys’ School,
Speightstown Boys’, St. Lawrence
Boys’ and Girls’ and St. Martin's
Boys’ and Girls’

His Excellency
uing his tour
week.

Miss and Mr. Barbados
E DANCE at the Barbados
Aquatic Club to-night,
should be quite a change from
the usual type of dances we have
been having lately.

At midnight, a number of Judg-
es will select Miss and Mr. Barba-
dos, from dancers on the ballroom
Aioor, during one of the dances

Guest Artiste for the evening is
B.G.’s radio star, Miss Marjorie
Dey. Balloons carrying cash
prizes will be released during the
night.

Arrived Yesterday

R. CHARLES THOMAS ar-
: rived from Trinidad yester-
day morning by B.W.1.A. in-
transit from England via Jamaica.

will be contin-
of schools next

Mr. Thomas is here for about two
months, and during his ly, he
will give advice or practical

assistance to any local dramatic
clubs or amateur groups that may
desire it. His visit is under the
auspices of the British Council.
Mr. Thomas has had wide



experience in the theatre world LEAVING for Trinidad yesterday morning by B.W.1I.A. were Mr. Simon

in England, including free lance

Wardell and Mr. John Hammond.

work in the Theatre in London, wy wardell is on a month’s visit to England. Mr. Hammond accom-
panied him to Trinidad, and expects to return to-day,

where he was player, scenic de-
signer, Stage manager and for a
while he was touring as a pioneer

s

Off to the U.K.
R. SIMON WARDELL, whose
god—father is Lord Beaver~
brook, left yesterday by B.W.LA
for Trinidad en route to England.
‘Accompanying. him as far as

*. Trinidad was Mr. John Hammond

. Kidney,

who expects to return today.

Mr. Wardell who has a villa
on The Coast, will spend a month
in England, after which he will
be returning to Barbados.

Fellow Passengérs

R. J. M. KIDNEY, Manager

of the West Indies Crickey
team arrives today by the
“Golfito” together with Mr. and
Mrs. Jeffrey Stollmeyer. Among
their fellow passengers is Mr.
J. M. Campbell, Vice-Chairman
of Booker Brothers, who is
making his annual visit to British
Guiana. I understand that Mr.

3} Campbell will spend one or two
# days in Trinidad.

Will Inspect Site
URING Mr. R. K. Nunes’
. Short stay in Barbados, it is
understood that he will vis
Kensington Oval with Mr. Jac
Skipper John Goddar
and a few other members of the
Barbados Cricket Association, to
inspect the proposed site for a
new pavilion at Kensington,
Mr. Nunes who is President of

| the W.I. Cricket Board of Control

| is an intransit passenger on the

a |
x

MR. CHARLES THOMAS—arrived
yesterday.

member of the Arts League of
Service Travelling Theatre.

In 1931, he became director of
the Little Theatre in Middlebor-
ough, following which, ‘he was
deputy producer and designer of
the Liverpool Repertory. In 1943,
Mr. Thomas took over as Drama
Adviser to the West Riding Edu-
cation Committee, and in 1947,
he joined the British Drama
League as tutor, lecturer and fes-
tival adjudicator.

Mr. Tucker, the sritish Council
representative has arranged for Mr.
Thomas to broadcast over Radio
Distribution on Friday Oct. 20th,
in the British Council programme
and to discuss matters concerning
Dramatic art as applied to Bar-
bados. It is understood also, that
the cast of “Blithe Spirit”, will
give excerpts from this production
on the same programme.

London Rumour

ARIB heard from London
yesterday that Sir Rupert
Briercliffe, Former Medical Ad-
viser to C.D. and W. had been

offered an important post in
Ceylon, Supervising their new
health plan.

On checking the report with
Sir Rupert, who lives in St. Peter,
he was informed that this was
the first time Sir Rupert had
heard anything about it.



CROSSWORD



“Golfito” which arrives here

| to-day.



tries very hard to get
some clue as to why he has been

Rupert

brought such a long way from
home, while the little. coons talk
excitedly among themselves, All at
once they stop chattering. Most of
them run away in a bunch, bat
twe stay behind to take Rupert's

EMPIRE

TODAY 4.45 and 8.30
and Continuing
M-G-M.- Pictures Presents

“THE DOCTOR
AND
THE GIRL”

Starring
Glenn FORD
Charles COBURN
Gloria De HAVEN
Janet LEIGH
with Bruce BENNETT









Across
, M st vet gives candidate:
advice. (4, 3, 2)
& fhey are played on vot “twisted
{9 4)
) Fresh ways. aay we say ? (3, 4)
iy Pulled like an artist. (4)
lo Bir s)
17) Mov 8 Welt Known. (4)
iv a gvod order. (4)
’ Ks here in song. (6)



$

1 $.0 (2 22. Delight. (8)

This is quite correct. (4)

Sherp as in « cider drink. (4)

>ungors. (6)

Down
clear,
make

(9)
sore verse

this alter bathing
4 Sin in error. (3)



> st b U.S.A (2)
uo (3) i, A Moly Man, (6)
» | ew one has no minster. (4)
ot like the enclosed painter ?
12 Softens, (7)
ta If , 6) 16. Satirical, (6)
20. Th ie Paragraph. (3)
43 int ion (3)

Â¥ ie Across
ru ”q

14



Down
ot te

nhete Eight; ¢
Orotund: 8. Berlin
ter 16, Drip: 18, Pat

nance

EXTRA

NEWS REEL:— Charles and
Louis In Training

ROXY

TO-DAY and TOMORROW
4.45 and 8.15
United Artist Presents

“MRS. MIKE”

Starring

Dick POWELI,
Evelyn KEYES
With J. M. KERRIGAN
Angela CLARKE

To Attend Course

RECENT arrival in London

from the West Indies is Mr.
C. T. X. Henriques. He ig the
Resident Magistrate in Kingston,
Jamaica, and has gone to Eng-
land at the invitation of the
British Council to attend a course
on Juvenile Delinquency.

After A Month’s Holiday
FTER one month’s holiday
staying with Miss Lyris

Weatherhead in Bay Street, Mrs.

Dorothy MelIntyre returned to
Grenada yesterday afternoon by

B.W.LA. Mrs. MecIntyre’s hus-

band is the Engineer at the Ford

Service Station in Grenada.

Indefinite Stay
RRIVING by B.W.LA. yes
terday afternoon from B.C,

was Miss Cynthia Lopes, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Reggie Lopes
ot Georgetown. Cynthia is up
for an indefinite stay and is
staying at “Accra”, Rockley, |

Viola Players

FF TO AMERICA last week

on the “Queen Mary” with Sir
Thomas Beecham and the Royal
Philharmonic Orchestra went
Jamaica—born Mr. James Verity.
principal viola, Among the other
members of the orchestra is one
of his fellow Jamaicans Mr.
Patrick Vermont, who is also a
viola player.

Rupert and the Castaway—25

Fi



arms and lead him off the beach.
Up the rocks and through the trees
they go until, near the middle of
the island, he sees a rough wall and

the tops some quéer-looking
see me few ae pe in
shelter and a gorgeous bow! uit
is fore hn. While he eats
hungrily the talking starts again,

ROYAL

TO-DAY and TOMORROW
4.30 and 8.30

Republic Smashing Double

Wild Bill ELLIOTT
Vera RALSTON

“WYOMING”
And

“BANDITS OF
THE BADLAND”

Starring
Sunset CARSON
Peggy STEWART

Aanen SS Mid-Nite

rp xrre: RHOW Toe
Serial :
“KING OF THE
TEXAS RANGERS”

The All Action Serial . . .

TWO PRIZES will be given
away at this Show:—

lst Prize—$6.00

on ~~.

nd Prize—$4.00

So Keep Your Half-Ticket
You may be the Lucky One.

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY To MONDAY
4.30 and 8.15

Republic Big Double

Roy ROBERTS
George COOPER
in

“FLAMING FURY”

And

“THE LAST BANDIT”

with
Wild Bill ELLIOTT

Adrian BOOTH
George (Gabby) HAYES























BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Paris With R. M. MacColl As

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1950




































——

SSS SS (\





Paris Cuteness . . .

MRS. BLOSSOM f NT HISTORY!
nae oe ae PLAZA OiJSTIN tic ENTIRTAINME °
° Louis, Missouri, TODAY To SUNDAY _ 5 and 8.30 p.m.
Your News-(uide mother of 16- PARAMOUNT’S HIT MUSICAL - - - -
year - old Mim. Bing CROSBY with the ANDREWS SISTERS
whose blue eyes ag le dae
ix ¢0tle oe © Lo a ly ne explained Grandma un- caught - ap- ie bs
E ° scar Wilde out expectedly. reciative glance
in the historic Pére Lachaise bf King Farouk HERE COME THE WAVES
cemetery of Paris is in the news. Paris Bluntness .. . in Deauville last With Betty HUTTON and Sonny TUFTS
The other day the wife of an UY POL ROGER, héad of the Month, is wor- eE :
ried by the reaction of St. Louis

FLASH !! MIDNITE MATINEE TO-DAY (SAT) [4TH
Two New Pictures! (A Monogram Double)
JOHNNY MACK BROWN in

“PRAIRIE EXPRESS”

And

American Embassy official, who
completed her education at Lon-
don- University received Hevees

champagne firm, explodes a
myth. He gays that those tales
about experts being able to classify
wines by tl year and even by the
“cru” (vinéyard) are largely non-
sense,

“You might be able to do it oc-

sociéty to the whole thing.

Mrs. Medart used to act oppo-
site cowboy star Buck Jones in
hard-hitting Western ts. Her
husband has an income of nearly
£150,000 a year, derived from
selling steel equipment for child-

from English friends who. been
at the university with her.

The letter said
they had heard
that Wilde’s tomb

—

——



ore casionally with clarets or bur- *®?’s playgrounds. DUNCAN RENALDO as the Cisco Kid
oe gundiés,” says Pol Roger. an ele- “ Santa 9s ”
pm a ere gant, slender man in his thirties, segg OL 0a ae c moder 3° IN OLD NEW MEXICO
tigate, os tetrad champagne I can only Cleopatra. It seems hardly pos-
Out she went be fairly sure of one thing if I sub- cinje somehow. They are still

mit to a blindfold test. With luck
I can tell you what is not my own

wine.” k ,
Of the kingly plumpness, Mrs.
I lunched with Mr. and Mrs. Po! Medart says: “His photographs
Roger at their home in Epernay â„¢ake him out to be much fatter
the other day. Not surprisingly. than he really is. And, honest,
we washed down the mushroom When you bask in his personality
risotto and roast beef with Pol YoU forget all about his | waist-
Roger 1928. line. Such a kindly chap.
Mother and daughter are going
Mrs. Pol Roger before her mar-

to Cairo for Christmas. “How
riage Was a member of the Per- romantic!” cries Mrs. Medart.
rier and Jouet clan. “The perfect “Santa Claus on the banks of the
champagne alliance,” she says. Nile.”

They have seven children.



to the cemetery.
Sure enough the
inscription on the
i ble here and there.
he American woman asked the
cemetery authorities if she might
pay to have the lettering touched
up in gold. Answer: Not unless
the executors of Wilde’s estate
gave their permission first.

in constant communication, you

”



GLOBE

GAILY Continuing Today 5 and 8.30 and Continuing

Senate
== ——

,—=

I went out there my
night. The cemetery is a
ordinary place—a walled city of
the dead with long roadways lined
with thousands of elaborate
mausoleums.

A notice in English : “Vis-
itors to the cemetery are uest-
ed to be decently dressed. No
shorts tolerated.”

7 famous people lie there.
But il



London Express Service.



























M-G-M's MUSICAL

TO-NIGHT OF YOUR



de draws the greatest
number of visitors, out-nosing at 8.15 DREAMS!
Countess Walewska, Napoleon’s ”


. ico
<, TECHWICOLOR |

mistress, in popularity. An aver-
age of 20 to 30 people ask for the

ilde tomb every day, and more
s them are American than Brit-
ish,

Incidentally, the Pére Lachaise
who gave his name @ the ceme-
tery was the father confessor of
King Louis XIV.—“and that job,”
as a cemetery attendant remarked
thoughtfully. “can have been no
sinecure,”

Paris Sprightliness ...

MAURICE al
CHEVALIER,
chipper as ever
at 51. is opening
in a new two-
hour, one-man
show. That_fam-
ous straw hat,
which is his
trade-mark, will
still be on view,
but it will be made of plastic,
which is Tighter on the brow for

a one-man show.
Chevalier has just finished an-

TURN ON YOUR RADIO DISTRIBUTION TO THE

CLUB MORGAN HIT PARADE

Hear Some of the Tunes that will be Played at

CLUB MORGAN

Along with ALICE ARMSTRONG at the Piano
Dial 4000 FOR RESERVATIONS





Jan \OUNSON
John LUND...

PAULA RAYMOND

CONNIE HAINES + CLINTON SUNDBERG

and guest stars






|, AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)
MATINEE: TODAY AT 5 P.
TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT AT 8.30

BUD ABBOTT and LOU COSTELLO

in “HOLD THAT GHOST”










fame as ‘Lady Patatchou.”

No member of the British peer-
age, she runs a Montmartre night
spot, so notorious for its autocratic
rule that any man visitor who re-
fuses to join in the choruses of the
songs has his necktie smartly
snipped off.

Lady Patatchou calculates that
several hundred nds’ worth of
silk ties, ruthlessly cut from their
La nga throats, hang from the
walls.

Paris Lushness . . .

RA PETIT, whose @ermen,
ballet has been a smash hit on
both sides of the Atlantic, has got
advance bookings ten weeks ahead
for his novelty ballet, “The Gob-
bler of Diamonds,” which opens
to-morrow night.

Petit himself and Renee Jean-
maire, his pallid leading ballerina,
who shocked Boston with
Carmenesque caperings, and also
an Englishman, Gordon Hamilton,
all sing as well as dance. —

The story is about a frail lady
of Les Halles, the great Paris mar-
kets, which are a blend of Smith-
fiell, Covent Garden, and Bill-
ingsgate. Petit himself grew up
there. His father still runs a
popular restaurant in the heart of
the market.

Paris Homeliness . . .

LOVELY Grand- re Se
ma Marlene Die- —
trich has found ‘
time, in between

other film, “Ma Fosime (slang LENA HORN /’
roughly translatable as “My With Richard CARLSON J DAVIS Mischa AUER PF
Mug”). Playing opposite him is a oe ae ELEANOR 1a
lady who gained considerable A Universal Picture POWEL tim oe

SSS














A
ROBERT Z. LEQNARD
PRODUCTIO

Writian by OOROTHY COOPER and JERRY DAVIS

x Directed by ROBERT Z, LEONARD,
OO”,

SS JOE PASTERNAK

TOMORROW 8.30 P.M.
“DUCHESS OF IDAHO and
RAY NUNES B.G. SINGING ACE

“LOCAL TALENT AUDITION TOMORROW 9.30 A.M.

FLASH! FLASH!
GLOBE THEATRE

first with the news

GAITETY (the Garden) ST. JAMES

TO-DAY TO SUNDAY — 8.30 P.M.; MAT. SUN.—5 P.M.

James Oliver With
CURWOOD’S “RIVER’S END” Dennis MORGAN
(The Gallant Story of the ew dyal Catiadian Mownties)

DICK FORAN fe





















ia aa
“PRAIRIE THUNDER”










EMPIRE THEATRE

THURSDAY 19th and FRIDAY 20th at 8.30 P.M.
MATINEE: FRIDAY AT 5 P.M.





















MRS. A, L. STUART Presents Her SCHOOL of
DANCING in

“REVUEDEVILLE 1950"

Music by the Policé Band Directed by
Capt. C. E. RAISON, A.R.C.M., M.B.E.
%

BOX OFFICE OPEN DAILY i











Exelusive Motion Picture Shots of

EZZARD CHARLES

AND





















From 8.30 a.m. to 12 nodn and 1.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.
fitti m
Hew ‘viveeste aid JOE LOUIS
making a film, PRICES:— ORCHESTRA and BOXES $1.50; HOUSE $1.00; n mig +h

to buy six dozen
long black can-
dles for her
Hollywood house. TP,

“They give a place such a home-

IN TRAINING
TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 and over the Week-end.










BALCONY 172c. RESERVED.









nnn en
Se SSS
SS

a

SPECIAL MATINEE THIS MORNING 9.30 (CHEAP PRICES)
MONOGRAM’S DOUBLE!!! !





GLOBE







“SILENT WITNESS” — and — “FIGHTING FOOLS”
With Frank ALBERTSON With Leo GORCEY and The
non BOWERY BOYS
TO-DAY & MOND ; ee
FILLING THE SCREEN WITH GLORY

1.30 p.m. Matinees

HAMLET

OHILDREN 18c. Anywhere
ADULTS — USUAL PRICES
YOUR LAST CHANCE

WARNER BROS! FIGHTING SEA-AND-SKY STORY!
KNOW SHOWING 3 & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing DAILY

A SWEEPING CAVALCADE
THAT SWEEPS THE
WORLD'S OCEANS TO

BRING YOU THE

RICH, HUMAN STORY

OF THE MEM WUO
STOOD BY WHAT

THEY BELIEVED 18
AND THE WOMEN -
WHO STOOD”

BY THEIR

Teachers are requested to contact Globe for Tickets

wa

a“ -
ae
-

e

We have - - -
CANVAS — Nos. 6—9
ROPE — ‘
COPPER P.
ANCHOR CHAINS
WHITE PAINT
SAIL NEEDLES
MMETS

GRO!
PALMS

Also

et

je ANE WYATT - WAYNE MORRIS = WALTER BRENNAN
Writhéh and Directed by DELIMER DAVES = prccuces s JERRY WALD: 82

PLA ZA THEATRE —Bridgetown—



RIES oe en

SSS






SATURDAY, OCTOBER

Canada



14,

1950

Wants

Commonwealth Trade
More West Indian Exports

(From Our Own

Correspondent)
LONDON.

CANADA wants to build up its Commonwealth trade,

particularly that with the West Indies.

There is a great

demand for fruits, fresh, processed and eanned; and from
British Guiana there is need for increased supplies of

tropical
veneering.



* »
T’dad Celebrates
2
Discovery
PORT OF SPAIN, Oct. 13.
Celebrations commemorating
the one hundred and niney-
second anniversary of the dis—
covery of the New World by
Christopher Columbus took place
en Thursday morning in Colum-
bus Square, Port of Spain. by
the laying of a wreath at the
foot of the discoverer’s siatue.
The wreath was laid by Lieut.
Brian Gething, the Governor's
Aide De Camp and City Mayor
Alderman Norman Tang.

Disapproval of the ceremony
was indicated by member: of \he
Trinidad-Venezuela _Inter-Rela

tions Committee bearing placards
of protest.

Demonstrators ted by Chris Le

Maitre patrolled around cw
square halting at the foot of the
statue while the Venezuelan

Consul General Fernando Lopez
Convreras read an address to the
gathering.

Among slogans which appeare’’
en the demonstrators’ placayds
were: “You cannot ban us from
your country and enjoy our hos-
pitality.”

Members of the Latin commu-
nity and Lavin American Consuls
witnessed the ceremony.

Boy Scouts formed a cordon
around the statue and the square
was decked with flags for the
occasion. —(C.P.)



Jamaicans Plan
T.B. Fight

KINGSTON, J’ca. Oct, 12

An islandwide campaign against
tuberculosis with x-ray, BCG vac-
cine and tuberculine tests begins
on April 1 next year to spread
over a period of two years, It is
proposed that every person will
be tested so that by the following
campaign, the majority of the
people will have acquired immun-
ity against the disease while its
victims are treated. The cam-
paign which will be prosecuted
jointly by the Government of
Jamaica and the World Health
Organisation a subsidiary United
Nations Organisation, was approv-
ed by the House of Representa-
tives yesterday. The total cost
of £100,000 will be met by a
grant from the Colonial Develop-
ment Welfare of £53,000 and the
United Nations International Chil-
dren’s Emergency Fund of £47,750.
Dr. I. M. Lourie, Regional Tuber-
culosis Adviser of the Pan Ameri-
can Sanitary Bureau, here sur-
veying a field of three units will
be sent to Mexico for training
work.

—Can. Press.



TWO ARRESTED.

TOKYO, Oct.12.

Police arrested two high offic~
ials of the Japanese Communist
party in Osaka today on charges
of obstructing the Allied occu-
pation. The Communists Tome
Ata Tada and Junkichi Shim-
otsuka were said to have distri-

ti occupation leaflets.
buted anti Pp rs i









































Also



A. S$,





Manufacturers:
(Props.: R. J. H.

of --
“PEDIGREE” Implement and Machinery
Enamel

Water Paint
“AQUATITE” Waterproofing Composition

BRYDE

hardwood for industrial applications and for

These facts are revealed by Mr.
M. W. Mackenzie, Deputy Minis-
ter of Trade and Commerce, in an
interview appearing in the cur-

rent edition of “New Common-
wealth.” This is the magazine
that was formerly known as

“Crown Colonist.”

Mr. Mackenzie points out that
Canada cannot build a satisfactory
dollar-sterling trade balance on
United Kingdom imports alone,
particularly as a large proportion
of them are manufactured goods.
Comnetition has to be faced from
the American narket where Can-
ada always has and always will
buy.

Rapid Advance

The rapid advance of Canadian
industrialisalion in recent years
has brought about a great increase
in the volume and variety of
goods bought from other countries.
Raw materials have to be import-
ed to supplement the resources of
the country. Already most Cana-
dian sugar, tin, rubber and mo-
lasses come from the Colonies.

But there are a long list of fur-
ther products of which Canada
requires much more, Coffee is
only one item. Canada used to
import 60 per cent of its coffee
from British territories but now it
ped only a small proportion from

em,



The Dominion utso wants to fos-
ter its West Indies trade, which
Mr. Mackenzie describes as a
“traditional trade”, He says quite
plainly that the difficulty since
then has not been to provide a
market for colonial produce but
to wy and pry out the goods

needed,
Not One-Way

But Canada does not want it to
be all one-way trade. While she
still wants to promote imports, at
the same time she is most anxious
to help her “traditional custom-
ers” to buy more Canadian goods.

The temporary measures such
as the Canadian credit and off-
shore E.R.P. purchases which
were important in maintaining
Canada’s sales overseas since the
war were now a relatively small
factor in the overall trade picture.
If the first aim of the drive to in-
crease imports from the Sterling
Area was to make these temporary
expedients unnecessary, the fur-
ther aim was to increase exports
in order to balance trade at a
high, rather than low, level.

Mr. Mackenzie stressed the
value of having a variety of mer-
chandise entering into trade.
British purchases to-day are lim-
ited by dollars. The loss of trade
to Canada’s secondary industries
has to a certain degree been com-
pensated for by an increase in the
domestic market. But Canada was
hopeful of starting up overseas
trade in such items as dairy pro-
ducts, hand tools and rubber goods
in the near future.

Certain Canadian manufactur-
ers had established subsidiaries in
the Unitdd Kingdom and these
and others might, in tite, be in-
terested in expanding their invest-
ment in Commonwealth countries.

RABBIT-TRAP
SYDNEY.
The Australian Agricultural

Bureau believes that Mr. W. Scott,
of Sydney, may have solved the
rabbit problem which costs Aus-
tralia £150,000,000 a year. Unable
to obtain wire netting, Scott sur-
rounded his vegetable plots with
one length of tarred string six
inches above the ground. The
rabbits refused to pass it. Gov-
ernment tests made in heavily in-
fested areas have been equally
successful and will be continued.
Says Scott: “I don’t know why
they keep away, it must be the
smell of the tar.”

CARE YOUR BUILDINGS!
REPLACEMENTS COST £'s

WHR aah PD moe
| 4 Corrosion costs you £ ? a year

ve

O you know

FERROGENE is

a damp-proof, air

makers

‘o” Oil Bound Washable

Corrugated Iron imported ints
apical souneries i sveey Sis f ‘
gure isastonishingiy high, and
after allowing for ‘
gene represents a heavy forfeit fo:
fack of taking proper precautions.
Protection is easy with

FERROGENE

Anti-Corrosive Paint
for every INCH of metal.

paint designed for the tropics. It clings
closely tc the surface of metal-work, forming

its life elmost indefinitely, In three attractiva
, shadess—Red, Grey and ba

BURRELL’S PAINTS, Mitcham, Burrey
AMER & SONS (Paints)

N & SONS eos)

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PAGE THREE





Great Seott—Pory infiltras
tion} I¢’s R. A. Butler?



French Red Leader
Is Seriously Il

PARIS, Oct. 13.

Paris, mewspapers to-day said
that the political career of the
French Communist leader Maurice
Thorez appears to have come
to an end through illness. A
medical bulletin issued at mid-
night said that “the spasm of high
blood pressure” which caused his
sudden collapse in a Paris street
on_ Tuesday was “passing over’.

The Communist Party news-
paper Humanite made no forecast
about his future, and the Pro-
Communist Liberation
would be bedridden for “several
weeks” .

But the Rightwing Epoque said
that leading doctors concluded
from the guarded medical bulletin
that Therez had cerebral haemor-
rhage. Leftwing Franc Tireur said
that Thorez was “seriously ill,”
and quoted a rumour according
to which his malady was cancer

of the brain.
—Reuter.



Yugoslavia Does
Not Need Help
From Atlantic Powers

help from the Atlantic Pact pow-
ers, The official Yugoslav agency;
Tanju denied authoritatively.

tions between the Yugoslav Gov-
ernment and western powers for
military help.”

The Agency said, “Reports have
been appearing lately in several
Western papers about Yugoslavia
conducting negotiations for “mili-
tary pact” with Atlantic Pact pow-
ers, and that Yugoslavia will re-
ceive military aid from these coun-
tries.

“These reports were jumped at
by the Cominform pers Daily
Worker, and who add-
ed new calumnies to these reports
about the Yugoslav Republic.
Tanju is authorised to deny these
reports as complete inventions.

—Reuter.



One Cop
Price $4.20
LONDON,
London “bobbies” are valued
at $4.20 each “on the hoof” and
eo like the idea.
Poli Federeth h asked os
ce Federation has ed Home
Secretary Chuter Ede to with-
draw the standing offer to
Metropolitan Policemen of $4.20
for each recruit they bring in
The Federation said the plan has
brought “considerable alarepute”
in their ranks. LN:S.



the amount of

new Works the

an anti-corrosive





said he |






Noise In Mysterious Disease Kills
B.G. Coconut Trees

(From Our Own Correspondent)

Panama

, PANAMA
Panama’s National Assembly
has revolted against pressure from
cliques and organised groups of
troble~makers in the galleries of
the Assembly building.
_ Recently—during the first work-
ing session of the new Assembly
session—the members passed a
resolution providing that a police
guard be brought to the chamber
to maintain order in the galleries
The next day, the roll scarcely
had been called when Deputy
Heraclio Barletta asked the Chair
where the policemen were. Assem-
bly President Norberto Zurito re-
plied that it was his und
that police would be ealled only
when such action became neces-

sary.

At this, 21 of the 40 uties
present walked out. ga
ere, the session was adjourn-

Applause or loud criticism from
in the Assembly’s galleries
nm common, alt con—
trary to the rules. Observers re-

that threatened violence
from large erowds in and around
the building caused the Assembly
to reverse its stand and reject the
Filos-Hines Agreement for con-
tinued U.S. occupation of a dozen
defence sites in Panama Territory
—resulting in immediate U.S.
withdrawal of troops and a de
cline in Panama's economy.

At that time—December, 1948—
one Assemblyman commented to a
bystander that no one would be
crazy enough to vote for approval
of the fact “with 10,000 boys
sharpening their knives outside.”
Communists and their sympa-
thizers were charged with having
engineered the aaa 5 “Ay
|

Backing
@ From page 1
(3) The present visit to Portu-
gal of General Francisco Longoria
of the Spanish Air Force. Though
the Portuguese press said he came
here on “a private visit” to Gen-
eral Aldredo Sintra, Portuguese

Air Force Chief, he has also seen
Army Minister Brigadier Abran-

ches Pinto.
q Schunha-Artajo

—

meeting.

The Portuguese press announced
today that the Portuguese Naval
Mission will attend the next Span-
Mediterranean and Atlantic
naval manoeuvres, An invitation
came from Spanish Navy Minister
Admiral Moreno.

—(Reuter.)

EYE OPERATION
SYDNEY.

Melbourne Solicitor Audley Gil-
lespie Jones, who underwent an
eye operation in a local hospital
under Russian instructions trans-
lated in London and transmitted
by radio-telephone, has a chance
of recovery. The bandages are
now removed and he is
dark glasses, but, said the doctors,
it is too soon to say whether a
definite improvement has _ been
effected. The technique was de-
veloped by the Russian surgeon
Filatov to cure a rare disease that
limits vision to a small circular
area immediately before the eye.
The doctors added that so far
“everyone is pleased.”

ADVENTURE WITH BEES

PRETORIA.
Abraham Cronje, 8, and his
friend Charlie Ward, 10, of Pre-
toria, thought they would have
some fun with a bee’s nest. They
started tickling it up with :



sticks. Within a few minutes the
sky was dark with bees and Abra-
ham and Charlie ran for it. But
. When they
cog they

body—

they were badly stu
got Abraham to
counted the stings on
there were 500 of them.

USE ANYTIME, ANYWHERE!

FOUND FLOATING
An Inspector
French Novel




ry
Freeman Wills Crofts
A QUESTION OF
PROOF











by
Nicholas Blake

THE MASK OF
Eric Ambler

DIMITRIOS
by
THE HOLLOW
by
Agatha Christie
BEDELIA
A Psychological
“Thriller

by
Vera Caspary








AT THE

ADVOCATE
STATIONERY





., was dead,





A WIDESPREAD outbreak of disease among coconu
plants in British Guiana is causing coconut
owners and the Department of Agricuture a great deal o/

anxiety.
‘ ye .
Faces Rritain
MEAT ASSOCIATION
LONDON, Oct, 13
The Special Committee 91
Britaim’s Imported Meat Trade
Association warned to-day of “
substanvial meat shortage it:
Britain early next year because
of the breakdown of Argentine
spplies,

e Committee passed a resol
tion at a meeting in Londor
calling for “quick Government
action in solving the present
Argentine meat deadlock,” and

urging the return of meat trading
to free enterprise.—_Reuter





Deny Red Invasion
Of Tibet

NEW DELHI. Oct. 13

Tibet’s Finance Secretary saic!
here to-day he believed reports 0:
Chinese Communist “invasion” o!
Tibet were “beaien account*
brought by traders, of minor in-
cidents ‘which occurred fou
months ago.”

The Finance Secretary who i
leader of the Tibetan delegatio:
which hopes to have talks with
the Peking Government on Tibet's
future said: “We do not believ
reports of a Chimese invasion o
Tibet because we have receive |
no information from our Govern-
ment”, He said he had received
the report of a “minor
incident” from his Governmenty1'
the time but not in detail.

The Tibetan delegation is
New Delhi awaiting a reply from
whe Tibetan Capital Lhasa to a
suggestion by the Chinese ambts
sador here that negotiations migat
be conducted in Peking

“How can there be any invasion
when both China and Tibet ar
hoping vo have peaceful settle-
ment?” the Finance Minister said

—Reuter.

Brothers Killed
By Lightning

(From Our Own Correspondesi:
PORL-Or-SPALN,

ny



The bodies of the two brothers

Percy Danclair and Oscar Vanciaii

of Point Fortin, South Trinidad,

who were kilied instantly by

lightning on Thursday last, were
washed ashore about a mile from
each other at Coco Beach, Cedros

on Saturday morning
It is reported that the two broth-
ers and their half

home on a fishing expedition,

~In the afternoon a loud peal of
thunder was heard followed by a

terrific flash of lightning which
struck the boat.
was as if a thousand bottles
had fallen into the sea”, said
Laker. “I was sitting in the
centre of the boat and when |

turned to speak to Percy at the

end of the boat, I saw that he
and when I looked
around at the other end, I saw
that Oscar was also dead. Death
had occurred instantly. As both
bodies were hanging towards the
sea, I tried to pull them inside,
but the vessel capsized. I then
decided to save my own life and
swam about wo miles to land”

border

brothen
Austin Laker, the survivor, left

“The noise

GEORGETOWN,

plantatio

Veteran planter Mr. Boodhoo,
owner of the 1,000 acre Planta-
tion, hall, East Coast,
Demerera, said that he alone has
lost approximately 1,000 trees
since the disease first launched
its attack.

Mr. Boodhoo disclosed that he
first recognised a slight attack on
his trees about two years ago.
The disease appeared tq have
died out, but it has reappeared
and is now doing much da je.
Conditions at Springhall are ideal
for observation as there is both
sandy and clay soil. The disease
attacks trees in both types of soil
but more disastrous results occur
in clay areas,

First signs of an attack are
noticed, when the coconut palm
leaves begin to change from green
to a deep yellow, and soon enough
nuts, ripé and unripe begin to
crop off the trees, The disease
attack both young and mature
trees. Spraying of the hearts of
the palms has been found ineffec-
tive and elimination of the
disease by fire was also without
success.

A theory that the disease may
be the result of drainage irregu-
lavities have also been discarded
as Pin. Vauxhall boasts almost
perfect drainage

The disease exists only on the
East Coast plantations, Coconut
palms in the Pomeroon area are
also affected, but this has been
diagnosed as one which may be
associated with the “Bronze Leaf
Wilt” which affects palms in
Trinidad also.

Officers of the Department of
Agriculture have visited the
affected areas and samples of snil
were removed for chemical ob-
servation ond testing.

Embraced Police

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN
The owner of a Prince Street
store, Port-of-Spain, collapsed,
when he heard that thieves had
entered his business premises
He recovered, when he found, a
few minutes later, that his safe
containing money and valuables to
the extent of $7,000 was intact. In

delight he embraced the police



"Worm" Imprisoned
(Prom Our Own Correspondent) +
PORT-OF-SPAIN.
Munroe, of Port-
of-Spain, was employed as a
domestic servant for 17 days,
when her mistress started ‘“miss-
ing things”, A trap was soon set
and she was caught stealing a
quantity of articles valued $6.00
from her employer, Said the
Magistrate, “you worm your way
into people’s homes and then
steal”. She was sentenced to six
months imprisonment.

Mencilla

RANGOON,
After 13 years the prize of
£502. 2s, drawn in the Irish

sweepstake by their father, a rice
miller in the Shwebo district of
Upper Burma, is to be paid
three Burmese brothers. The prize
was not claimed all these years
until the LDrish authorities re-
quested the Burmese delegates to
the recent World Parliamentary
Conference in Dublin to get into
touch with the ticket holder on
their return to Burma.



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Electric Whizzer
Mount Peleé
Wembley Cannon Crasher
Spinning Top
Witch’s Cauldron
Torpedo
Mount Vesuvius
Thunder Flash Rockets
Emerald Cascades
Electric Gun
Aerial Bomb Repeater
Spangled Star Bomb
Triangle Wheel
Ultra Violet Ray
Empire Rocket
Broadcast Spangles
Big Terror
Little Terror
Forge Fire
Halley’s Comets
Mine of Fiery Serpents
Thunder Flash Guns—(large)
Thunder Flash Guns—(Small)
Jack-in-the-Box
Radium Dazzler
Devil Amongst the Tailors
Fairy Fountains
Squibbs
Blue Devils
Snakes
Yew Trees
Emerald Shower
Silver Rains
Starlights
Blue Lights
Chinese Drops
Golden Rains
Flower Pots
Serpents
Crimson Rambler
Roman Candles

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ath
BARBADOS Sb ADVOGATE

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown.
Friday, October 14, 1950

MILK

FOR a period of ten years the Public
Health Authority in this island has been
discussing the removal of dairies from the
City limits in order to improve the sanitary
conditions of the area. The first order
issued in 1933,removed dairies from Bridge-
town and subsequently another order of
the General Board of Health sanctioned by
the Legislature ordered the removal from
the extended city limits.

The last date of removal according to this
Order was October 1949 but in answer to a
petition from dairy keepers the Board
allowed a respite of twelve months which
expired this month.

At a meeting of the General Board of
Health on Thursday the matter was raised
by the Chairman Mr. E. D. Mottley who
said that he had been officially. reminded
by the General Board of Health that the
time for the removal of dairies from the
extended city limits had expired. The Com-
missioners were generally in sympathy
with the plight of the dairy keepers but
felt that it was beyond their power to help
them.

The inexorable dictation of the law was
quoted by Hon. V. C. Gale who pointed out
that the regulations had been passed ten
years ago. The fault was with the dairy
owners who had waited during this long
period before doing anything and now had
waited until the time had expired to ask
for relief. Ten years was sufficient time
for them to comply with the regulations
and they now had only themselves to
blame.

The Commissioners decided to ask the
General Board of Health to meet a small
committee of that body to decide whether
there was not some area within the ex-
tended city limits in which dairies could
be conveniently established.

Once again the important matter of the
production and distribution of an essential
article of diet hangs in the balance.

Despite the clarity of the regulations
which leave no doubt as to their intent,
wartime conditions made it desirable that
for the efficient distribution of food the
dairies might weli have remained in the
city limits. Now that suitable areas on the
outskirts of the City have been built up
it is difficult for dairy keepers to secure
adequate space for removal of their busi-
nesses,

These and other considerations will influ-
ence the minds of those who comprise the
committee who will recommend whether
there should be any relaxation of these
regulations.

POLICE TRAINING

WITHIN recent years efforts have been
made to institute a system of training for
recruits in the Police Forces of Barbados,
the Windward and Leeward Islands. The
necessity for a common training school has
been recognised and to this end Colonel
Michelin has been.exploring various places
in the area. He returned to Barbados during
the week with high hopes for a workable
scheme which will be submitted to the
Governments concerned,

It will be remembered that a scheme was
proposed for the establishment of a police
training school at Beanfield in St. Lucia
but on close examination the scheme was
abandoned. A proposal has now been made
that the old military barracks at The Morne
be reconstructed and used as a training
school.

Tf this scheme is accepted there will be a
school in St. Lucia within easy access of the
Windward and Leeward Islands and Bar-
bados. The school will not merely be for
the training of recruits but will provide
refresher courses for men already passing
through the ranks.

Such a scheme apart from the unification
of the service which it was hoped by this
time would have been achieved will make
for greater efficiency in the forces within
the area. On this efficiency depends the
safety of the populations and the adequate

rotection of property in the area. ntil
Feperation becomes a reality the proper
training of men in St. Lucia is a sound pro-
position and should meet with the approval
of the three governments.





ation
vadio, and films
What grows

passengers,

time.



aan

sians said.

OF war, one

! lows,

with Germany,



OUR READERS SAY



That “Click”
At the Word “England”

Hy Charles Foley

we hate those who preach a new

WHAT do the Russians think
about Britain? What is the picture
their masters paint of her—for
yomember these 200 million people
lave had no source of inform-
outside the Soviet Press,

mind when taey hear the strange
word “England”?

About this, I have interrogated
British and others,
who sailed to London today in
the Soviet steamer Sestroretsk.

For clearly this topic of the atti-
tude of the Russian masses on
whom Stalin must depend is of
the most vital significance at this

The replies to my questions
about the Russians’ view of the
outer world were amusing, heart-
ening, or beyond words depress-
ing, according to how you study

But they betrayed such unani-
mity that of one thing there is no
doubt—Stalin has got his whole

Crowd Gathers

IT IS easy, especially for the
British, to get the Russians talking.
You have only to take a friend
into a Moscow tavern and open a
conversation. Soon a_ neighbour
will turn to you and ask: “Are you
from the lands of the peoples

them.

immense people
same lines.
democracies?”

Don’t say yes to this. It is the
Soviet phrase, popularly accepted,
for East Germany,
the docile Balkans;
last week by a British observer,

countries from which, normally,
they expect a foreigner to come.
Say you are British, and there
is soon a lively and quite friendly
crowd round you.
A typical such tavern conversa~
tion was noted down in Moscow

who, while writing a letter, jotted
down an outline of what the Rus-

He omitted \the British side of
the argument and has not tried to
reconstruct it. I have his notes,
Authenticity is stamped on them,
as much by the naiveté of thought
as by the insistent theme of the
Soviet propaganda machine.

Our Orphans

a railway engineer, spoke as fol-

t to the evident approval

i of his friends at the table:—
“We have not forgotten the war

deprived millions of our people
of life, left a host of orphans and
cripples among us.

ee et

Rent Restriction Needed

To the Editor, The Advocate, _
SIR,—I see so many things in
Barbados, and so many smiles;
but it is good sometimes to see the
serious side of life, so that these

smiles will last.

Bitter draughts are also brew-
ing, and the middle class man or
woman, is being squeezed be-
tween smilers, and the don’t-care-
Harries’.

Over 20 years in Barbados, I
have not seen wrongs righted yet.

Where is this rent-restriction
law, and where is the middle class
man to hang his hat. Over-popula-
tion cannot be an excuse for
profiteering, and sucking in of
money from the middle class,

Better laws must be made for
protection against the wrongs
that need assistance.

} Every house having a roomer
should be made to register. This
also includes Guest Houses.
These places should be checked
up, and exploiting would cease.
The old order of getting rich quick
should be changed.

CONCERNED

Huckster Nuisance

To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—Cannot the hucksters be
warned to behave themselves?
They seem to annoy everywhere
with their remarks and bad lan-
guage. It gives a degraded im-
pression to Bridgetown, and
should have redress, A little
warning would help.

Also I read that even deserts
now are being cultivated, and
certainly vhe large space at Tra-
falgar Square, which some call a
garden, could be utilised, and a
thirsty traveller catered to, or
some sign of life. The lake of
cement is nauseaving.

PROGRESS.

Stand Pipes

To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—Please allow me through
vhe columns of your newspaper to
call to the attention of the autho-
rities the deplorable condition of
vhe stand pipes of St. John.

ZI will mention specially the
pipe which wes newly installed at
the bottom of the Venture Land

THEY DO IT AGAIN

eg ee |

STOCKHOLM.

war,

for a generation.
in the Russian

aim in the new

wounds
hordes,
“What would

already?

Stalin has
again.”

thinking on the

flight all the

with
“Now we have

Poland, and
the only

Stalin has.

and Voronezh.
scrapers, they

us;

of fervour.
of the Russians,

e cruel fight Far above your
man.
better,

That is why

On many instances villagers
have complained abouy the mos-
quitoes which swarm the pipe in
tremendous numbers. Not only do
the mosquitoes swarm, but on
approach to the pipe one is vici-
ously welcomed with vunes and
bites,

Another instance. A lad went
to fetch water from vhe same
pipe; as he attempted to approach,
he found himself heels over head
on the cement as a result of vhe
moss which is growing rapidly
around the pipe.

Would the authorities make
some haste to discontinue this
state of affairs in the parish of
St. John?

H.M.

Imperial?

To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—The writer of the letter
signed “Canadian” voices what
many people—both British and
others who live heré—must think.
Why is it that a British island
does not use imperial pints and
gallons?

Also how is it, that the price of
gasolene keeps on going up and
up. In Venezuela where the cost

of living is the highest in the
world, gasolene is 8c. to 12¢c. a
gallon according to where you

“Britain, France, and Germany
are forming a military alliance.
Such an alliance can only be for
an attack on the U.S.S.R. Why?
Comrade, it is known and proved
that no one from the people’s
democracy of Russia even thinks
about aggression or dreams of fo-
menting war with other nations.

“And it is clear that the first

use German soldiers against us
while we . are still
inflicted by Hitler’s

third world war on top of the
countless sacrifices we have made
Luckily we are strong
enough to bh off any attacker,
sa

A loud murmur of applause

greeted these statements.
Skyscrapers

MUCH more time was spent on
talking about the next five-year
plan, which is to pull Russia
alongside America (it being hap-
pily assumed that America will
be standing still) and thus put to

forces who plot the downfall of
the Communist citadel.

The atom bomb was dismissed
superficial

there was almost deliberate ob-
livion of the fact that American
atomic plant and st
generally accepted
measurably greater than anything

The Russians were eager to ex-
tol achievements such as the re-
building from rubble of Stalingrad

going up in Moscow.
‘Happy
WHEN they talked of Britain
it was of a coun
slums, and food sho:
papers print little other news of
by contrast, the way of life
in Russia glows brighter,
A tractor-plant foreman took
over the conversation in a burst

“How can we describe our sor~
row for the British toilers? Here,
our workers, all without exception,
are short of nothing, neither food
nor clothing. The worst live well.

Soon they will be living,

“T do not know whether you are

BARBADOS ADVOCATE









im

live still better,

mented :—
“It is evident

war would be to

healing the

be the cost of a

pape

so again and

belong?”

dark reactionary

nonchalance— %

got it, too,” and the

to hg ne own pockets,

And then:—

“We know there are honest
men in Britain, progressive people
who know and love vheir country.
but who are fighting like us for a

ix new sky- shining future.
point out, were
, regime condemns

of strikes,
ges. News-

average English-

are—this with literally hundreds
of miles of pipe ine which have
to be laid to carry it. Admittedly,
Venezuela is an oil country, but
Trinidad is also supposed to be
an oil producer and what is more
it is part of the West Indies, it is
British so therefore there is no
question of U.S. dollars being in-
volved and the cost of production
nothing like that of Venezuela.
If the price of gas and oil has
to go up, the government or who-
ever is responsible, might, as
“Canadian” suggests let the
ordinary motorist who has to pay
out and pay out, know the whys
and wherefores and to whom the

money is going or be they
want to discourage us using
cars—perhaps they'd to see
us back riding burros.
BROKE MOTORIST.
Thanks

To the Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—Kindly grant me space in your
valuable columns to congratulate’ the
Department of Highways and Transport
on the fine work being done on jhe
cross roads at Harts Gap, it is a pity
that the main road could not be done
at the same time, but I am told that
the main road belongs to the Parish
of Christ Church, and the cross roads
are being dome under the head of
Tenantry Roads, so let me say again
to the Director, Well done, congratula-

tions, keep the good werk uz
A. Raeibaaer.

AND AGAIN
et |

the Min

capable of understanding what I
feel when I say that soon I shall

It means that I can devote all my
strength and skill to my work.
“T detest everything that hin-

ders, slows down, or depraves] | ’ 4 i se F
our faith, I have known nec] fertile fields’—but this, too, is catered for
aa you can never! under the heading of Dance—Classical.
The Teacher— They could build a barge, or weave a
A WOMAN who - said she

was a third-form teacher apd not
a party member—only one Rus-
sian in 85 is so privileged—com-

you British talk vhat you know
nothing about us, and have n¢
desire to learn about our spiritual
qualities, our literary and politica’
interesis and aspirations.

“You quote your
rs, We know they are full of
blackguardly blunders about us
They pronounce
cynical style about our beloved
land. How dare British news-
papers and politicians — I know
the people are not vo blame—poke
their snouts where

Is there then no hope
Britain? No kind word for our
Socialist Government?

Said a vractor man; “ We have
long seen through the so-called
Socialists in Britain who
posed as our friends. We laugh
the parliamentary
comedy of your Government and
nationalisavion
and its spurious concern for the
workers’ welfare while it lines its

British Communists and although
—or even because—your present

Britons to unemployment
beggary, the Communists’
will come soon.”

‘We Trust It’

NEED we go on? A
engineer sums it up:—

“Whatever you may
believe that the Soviet Govern-
ment is our own Government, the} learn to stain glass, but having perused the
Government of Russia.

“It enjoys undispuved autho-
rity and unlimited trust.

“It tells its people the truth
and vhe truth alone.

We have mever been’ deceived; can accuse us of having no desire to broaden

@ On Page 5



LET'S ALL BE WRESTLERS.

\OrA Guide to Further Education for Adults|
By JOAN ERSKINE (who studies Arabic)

The L.C.C., which governs London as a whole, offers
toe start a course on any subject im the world, if about
a dozen people want it. So, about this time of year,
the L.C.C. publishes its guide te all the classes

IN YOUR heart of hearts, have you ever
secretly yearned to keep bees or lift weights?
|Have you toyed with the thought of the

fascinating hobbies you would indulge in, if
jit were not for the ever necessary grind of
|daily work?

About this time each year, Londoners be-
come afflicted with a passionate desire to
“further their education”. This mass hysteria
may take several forms. They may decide
that the one thing missing from their lives is
a knowledge of modern languages. (It is
noticeable that first year language classes are
filled completely on the first day of enrolment
—and truly pathetic it.is to hear latecomers
plaintively demanding to be let in to one of
the more popular ones.)

Law and accountancy, journalism and ad-
vertising are subjects that attract a fair
number of people. No-one is surprised to
hear of a friend deciding to study banking or
book-keeping, civil engineering or dressmak-
ing, photography or statistics. Possibly a
little sympathy is felt, but no surprise. After
.'1, the summer is over and gone, the rains
are about to commence, and the voice of the
L.C.C, authorities is heard in our land.

But in a small compact book, issued yearly,
»nd bearing the inspiring title “Floodlight”,
is revelation indeed. On the flyleaf we are
reproved gently in these terms: “Love
labour; for if thou does not want it for food,
thou mayest for physic. It is wholesome for
thy body, and good for thy mind.” (W, Penn).

It goes on to show the novice how he may
labour to advantage each and every evening
»f winter and spring, and here the casual
reader finds himself abashed and awed by
the astonishing number of subjects available
for his edification and uplift.

The ignorant may wonder for a while what
species of human studies Aquaria or Assay-

ng. He may indeed wonder what they are.
inspired by the peerless Fonteyn, gazed at
from the roof of the Covent Garden Opera
House, many unlikely young women take to
3allet at the various Literary Institutes. It
is a sad sight to see them rise upon a waver-
ng toe and execute a ragged entrechat, but
joubtless they are happy. One feels they
would be even happier studying the Isadora
Dunean type of movement, and “hie away to














It is wonderful.

basket, make biscuits or study boiler-house
oractice. Presumably there is nothing to
orevent a young secretary from becoming a
spare-time boiler-maker. She would, at all
»vents, be possessed of a never-ending topic
of conversation. Boxing and bricklaying,
-artography and cellulose spraying seem dull
when compared with the delights of Chrome-
Lithography and the intricacies of Corset
Making. /

A most misleading heading is “Stammer-
ing”. What, can we really learn to stammer?
and do we want to do so?

Housewifery and Hygiene are very worthy
subjects, but what could Grain mean? We
are still not certain about Histology and
Hydraulics, but thoroughly approve of Logic.
We do not believe it can be taught, but that
is by the way. Manicure comes directly
above Meat and Food Inspectors, which may
not, of course, mean a thing. What about,
Microbiology and Millinery, so much more
appealing than Mosaic and Motor Vehicle
Servicing. Philosophy would go well with
Picture-Frame Making, since one could then
be philosophic about the unhappy results of
our wood-work.

As subjects for conversation at deadly

: i cocktail parties, these classes have no parallel
time|"Ve would muse with pleasureable contem-
plation on the thought of a young lady
sipping a martini, sucking the cheery reflec-
railway| tively, and saying, “I do Plumbing, Servo-
Mechanisms and Sewage. What do you do?”
We can have our speech trained, or we can

from the way

free news-

judgement in

they don’t

for

once
puppet

campaign,

There are the

millions

say, Ww?

| book carefully, and considered the thing
from all possible angles, we like the following
combination; Wrestling, Zoology, Mastic
| Asphalt, and Plastering. This way, no-one

| our outlook on life.



— ~—




Prices And Profits

To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR.—Thanks very much for
publishing my question to Mr.
A. E. S. Lewis on October 5, in
your daily news. It was nov a
very hard question, but Mr.
Lewis found it very hard to an-
swer because he failed to do s9,
but has written in his reply on
October 8, (if it is a reply) “if
L.E.S, will supply such dava as
prices,
shall do my best to help him.”

I did not ask Mr. Lewis for
help, I simply asked him a ques-

© Sales

Ttem Weight Dealing Price
Rice , 204pts. 204 12 24
Meal 98 Ib, 9% 08
Flour 98 95 6 65
Sugar w/e 100 99 743
ditto y.c, 224 220 14 30
Peas 98 106 12 72
Bread 2 Cartons (1840) 613
Milk 48 48 12 00
Oats 160 156 11.70
Feed TS 72 4 68
Salt 180 178 445
Soap 20 20 10 00
Salmon ‘is ve 94 24 44
Salmon 1s 4a 48 23 04
Beef—tins 4 48 18 24
Fish 112 110Ib 19 80
Heads 106 92 7 00
Ribs 100 96 21 12
Bones 100 96 11 92
Snouts 100 96 23 04
f 100 96 40 32
Oil—ck ipt Te pts 1 86
Butter Ib. 5 Ib 430

quantities and wages. I:

tion demanding of him a reply
being a representative of the
people and shop keepers also.
Below is the data asked for by
Mr. Lewis, which shows a maxi-
mum gross profit of 7% without
tuking into consideration pieces of
meat, broken biscuits etc, take an
average turn over of $400 per
week having to pay tWo atvend-
ants at $3.84 per week and one
job hand on Saturdays at $1.04
per day. Mr. Lewis can easily see
the net profit left for the smaller
retailers, not forgetting lighting,
taxes, wear and tear of imple-
menis, bad debts. LES.

Total Cost Gross cent-
Pr

Cost Paper Freight Price efit Age
11 62 * 32 12 «11 96 2 2%
729 16 07 752 56 73
6 16 16 06 6 38 27 42
6 90 16 o7 7.13 30 41
13 55 36 13 14 04 26 18
11 71 16 12 11 99 73 6
5.70 16 06 5 92 21 3.8
11 04 2 11 16 84 32
10 54 26 10 10 90 80 «7.3
423 16 04 443 25, 6
3 90 24 04 418 27 62
9.30 09 9 39 61 65
23 36 23 23 §9 8 36
21 44 21 21 65 139 #68
16 70 17 16 87 137 #81
17.00 20 18 17 38 2.42 155
16 00 20 16 16 36 14 1%
20 00 20 20 20 40 72 36
10 00 20 10 10 30 1.62 157
22 00 20 22 22.42 62 28
38.00 20 38 38 58 174 45
1 76 02 1 78 08 4
3.90 04 394 36 g
Average around 7% the maximum |



SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1950



D. V. SCOTT

TO-DAY'S. SPECIALS

&CO.,LTD. at the COLONNADE







Usually NOW
Tins S.A. APRICOT

JAM (2 Ibs.) 60

Tins OVALTINE (Large) 1.24

-54
1.12




26 .20

VALOR STOVES

Bottles ALLSOPPS BEER





| 2, 3 and 4 BURNERS, with or without Canopies

64G STOVES

1 and 2 BURNER, with or without Oven Stands ~
OVENS, Small, Medium, Large

PRESSURE STOVES

at

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

PHONES 4472 & 4687















SANTON
WATER HEATERS

models in 5, 12, 30 & 40 gals.

HAIR DRESSING
EQUIPMENT

DaCOSTA’S
ELECTRICAL DEPT.







NOW IN STOCK

RAYPACKA

FOR OFFICE JACKETS







\
yj
| — AND —
\
'

CLERICAL GOWNS

IN NAVY AND BLACK

04 in. at $1.92 per Yd.
e

DaCOSTA & Ce., Lid.

DRY GOODS DEPT.

NOURISHING
FOODS

Yo Keep Your Children
in Good Health Serce LIVER
at Least Twice a Week

FOR YOUR CAKE



RAISINS

CHERRIES SPECIALS |

ICING SUGAR

coLouatna 3 oz. Fish Paste @ .06 pr tin ;

14 oz. Fish Cake ” .12.

16 oz. Steak & Kidney
Pudding @ .42.

141% oz. Sultana
-Pudding ” 48.”

Headless Cod Fish
@ .32 per Ib.

GOLD BRAID RUM
ROYAL BAKING POWDER
CAKE DECORATIONS

FRESH DAILY

SAUSAGES

HAMBURGER STEAK

EMPIRE COFFEE
APPLES—ORANGES
MARSH MALLOAVS

Order Early from GODDARD'S






SATURDAY, OCTOBER

14,

1950



Gardener
Arrested
Kor Theft

INETEEN-YEAR-OLD
Geraid Lovell, a gardener
of St. Matthias Gap, Christ
Church, was arrested by P.C. 373
Murphy at about 8 o’clock yester-
day morning at Gun Site Road,
Brittons Hil! in connection with
thefis which occurred at the flats
of Mr. D. Worme and Mr. W.
Atkinson at Blue Waters Terrace,
Rockley .

He appeared before Police Mag-
istrate Mr. H. A, Tagima and was
remanded until October 20.

The Advocate was told yester-
day that the Police are looking for
other suspects. All the arviclc:
missing have been recovered.

RIDGETOWN was bright after

10 o’clock yesterday morn-

ing. The dark clouds of the

previous day had been forgotten

until at 3.30 yesterday evening
when the day became gloomy.

At midday the temperature

was 84 degrees Fahrenheit in the

shade but by 4.00 p.m. this had

dropped two deprees.

Fitz

The rainfall returns up to 6
o'clock yesterday morning were
as follows: City 14 parts, Station
Hill district eight parts, St. George
19 parts, St. Philip one inch and
34 parts, St. Thomas 20 parts, St.
Peter 55 parts, St. Joseph 53
parts, St. James nine parts, St.
Lucy 26 paris and St. John 70
parts.

HILE ONE THIEF went

under the cellar of Janie
Sylvester at Crichlow’s Alley on
Thursday and stole two fowls
another broke the storeroom of
the British Union Oil Company
between Wednesday night and

Thursday morning, but. stole

nothing.

EVEN TRAFFIC offences wera
reported in the Polica

Reports yesterday. They were for
driving recklessly, riding a bicycla
without a lighted lamp to tha
front, not keeping a motor vehicle
on the left side of the road, driv-
ing in a dangerous manner, neg-
ligent riding, parking in a restrict-
ed area and not having a reis-
tration card on a car. No
motorists were reported for
exceeding the speed limit.

LARENCE CLARKE of Para-
dise Village, Christ Church,
reported that his fishing boat,
which is valued $100, was mal-
iciously damaged between 9.30
a.m. on Wednesday and 5.30

a.m. on Thursday while it was
hauled up at Dovers Beach,
Christ Church.

LREADY 10,000 children

representing 63 schools have
attended the Globe Theatre to
see the film ‘Hamlet’ which has
been running for the past 16 days.

Special matinees at reduced
prices were provided for the
children.

Mr. Maurice Jones, Manager of
the Globe Theatre, told the
Advocate yesterday that they will
hold two more matinees. He said
that at the time the last showing
of this film over 12,000 school-
children, representing 83 schools
‘would have seen it.

IX EX-R.A.F. servicemen ure
at present employed at
Seawell Airport. under the super-
vison of Squadron Leader Hen-
vision of Squadron Leader Hen-
as fire fighters.

They are:— Rawle Forde, S.
Nicholls V. Jones, Conrad Carter,
Noel Seale, Secretary of the
R.A.F, Association and H. Reece.

These boys have all gained
their fire fighting experience from
the R.A.F. where they did many
fire picquets.

RTHUR MOTTLEY, a pedes-

trian, of Jackson, St. Michael,
told the Police that he was
struck on his right leg by motor
car X-13 while on James Street
yesterday.

The motor car was owned and
driven by Archibald Toppin of
Gall Hill, Christ Church.

BOYS’ CLUB may soon be
opened at Oistins, Colonel
R. T. Michelin, Commissioner of
Police, told the Advocate yester-
day that they expected to get a
building at Oistins and the Club
will be opened as soon as possible.
The next Club to be opened
will be the one at District “C”
Station, St. Philip. The building
for this was renovated and decor-
ated by the boys themselves. It
‘will be opened at the end of next
week.

fC thens POLICE BAND will play

at the St. Bartholomew's
Church Fair at Christ Church at
3.30 o’clock this evening,

HE ROCK HALL ROAD, St.
Andrew, which was dam-
aged by heavy rains earlier this
year, is now being repaired. Work
‘started on Wednesday. The
repairs are being carried out by
a gang of labourers under the
supervision of Mr. F. Smith.

Blacksmith Mends
“Spiders” Now

AT the corner of two back al-
leys of Suttle Street, Conch’s and
Cook's Alleys, you will hear the
clank-clank of Oscar Browne’s
blacksmith’s hammer as it strikes
home on the heavy anvil.

Old Philip Brown, his father,
used to wield that same hammer
tor 30 years on the same _ spot.
Oscar took over from his father
four years ago and he told the
Advocate yesterday that there are
young Brownes coming on to take
over from him,

Oscar Browne is now about 30
years old. He is not much above
average height, but he is of mas-
sive build. When you see him
blowing the bellows, see the fire
spark and the other blacksmith
hands around him, you ‘would
think he was very much at home
in the grime. 7

The building is obviously old,
but with pieces of iron strapped
at all angles on the wooden parts
it seems secure for many more
years.

Rests in the Loft

Heavy pieces of iron lay about
the yard and big heaps of coal
dust. Barrels and barrel hoops
are thrown about and on nails are
hung pieces of wire and other like
material.

Browne does not. live at the
blacksmith shop, but he has built
a sort of loft above the building
where he can _ rest off between'
whiles, To allow for access to
the loft there is a long flight of
stairs, built partly of iron.

When the trade is good, Brown
employs six hands. He mostly re-
pairs “spiders” and hand carts
these days. Asked if he does not
like shoeing horses, he said that
after a time one came to dislike
horses’ kicks.

Below the sign which tells one
that the business belongs to
Browne, Blacksmith, there are
the words “No Idlers”, but with-
out the sign, idlers would scarcely
think of loitering around such a
busy man as Browne.

Wills Admitted
To Probate

The petitien of Revd. Carl Wes-
ley Curry, of St. Patrick’s, Christ
Church for letters of administra-
tion to the estate of Lila Curry his
wife who died in 1940 was granted
by His Honour the Chief Judge in
the Court of Ordinary yesterday.

The petitioner was represented
by Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., in-
structed by Mr. L. E. R. Gill of
Messrs. Cottle Catford & Co.

The Chief Judge admitted to
Probate the wills of Eustace Fitz-
Herbert Skeene, late of St.
Michael, Edith Irene Stoute and
James Seale, late of St. George,
and Bertina Stuart, late of Christ
Church.

FINE REDUCED

Judges G. L. Taylor and J; W. B.
Chenery yesterday varied a de-
cision of Police Magistrate, Mr.
E, A. MeLeod. Mr. McLeod had
fined Charles Farley of Orange
Hill, St. James, £5 when he found
him guilty of having driven witl-
out due care and attention along
Barbarees Road on May 27.

Their Honours reduced the fine
to £4. The charge arose out of
an accident between the bus M-280
which Farley was driving and a
lorry.

Corporal W. E. Best was in the
bus at the time of the accident
and he told the Court how Farley
did not lessen his speed when he
attempted to overtake the cart.









What’s On Today

Meeting of Housing Board
at 10.30 a.m,

First, Intermediate and
Second Divisions Cricket
1,30 p.m.

Police Band at St. Barthol-
omew’s Church Fair at
3.30 p.m.



Case Dismissed

Their Honours of the Assistant
Court of Appeal Mr. G. L. Taylor
and Mr. J. W. B. Chenery yes-
terday dismissed on its merits a
case which Arnold Worrell
brought against Evelyn Lynch,
accusing him of having damaged
his fig tree and figs on June 20.

In dismissing the case, the
judges reversed a decision of His
Worship Mr. H. A. Talma who
had fined Lynch £1 and three
shillings costs and had also order-
ed him to pay Worrell 6/- as cost
of damages to the figs and fig tree.

Worrell did not prove ‘that the
land was his.



2,000 BAGS
OF RICE COME

Two thousand bags of rice ar-
rived in the island from British
Guiana on Thursday evening by
the schooner “Philip H. Davidson.”

The “Davidson” also brought
600 bays of charcoal, 336 wallaba
posts, and 26 tons of firewood.

7” soe ee

PURINA
For Poultry

CcCHOWS
and Livestock

“SEE THE DIFFERENCE PURINA MAKES”

q Christian Science
Kivading Room )

iST FLOOR, BOWEN & «ONS
(Broad Street) }

Hours: 10 a.m.—2 p.m.
Tuesdays, Wednesdays,

Fridays.
10 a.m.—12 o'clock.
Saturdays
At this Room the Bible and
the Christian Science text-book,

Science and Heait) wito Key te

th* Scriptures by MARY BAL FLD

EDDY may de read, borrows,
or purhased

Visitors Are Welcome
Gay

wer a “a “Gey

)

sents en ee ne ee ee



nS











FOR
STII Le




rer. =
CVs isa inten

| ADVOCATE CO., LTD.

5 |

Ad

SSS



PAHS.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
HAMLET

SAW





SCHOOL CHILDREN crowd Roebuck Street in front of the Globe Theatre, They have just seen
Hamlet. Children from primary, secondary and elementary schools all over the island went to the

Globe Theatre during the week to see the picture.

theatre and they liked seeing the picture.

300 Boys Absent A Shirt In
From School



COMO ESTA USTED? asked a teacher of the
Street Boys’ School yesterday,

Bay
and he got the reply “Muy

bien gracias, Senor” from one of the boys of his class.
It was the Senior Stream “A” pupils getting their

daily coaching in Spanish while the Advocate”

ing a visit to the school.

Goods Plentiful,
Buyers Few
YESTERDAY

With the sun shining brightly
yesterday after two days of raili,
shoppers were out again in the
City, although not in the numbers
that they were in at the begin-
ning of the week. When the
“Advocate” visited Fogarty’s
about 1.15 p.m., the picture was
about the same as was seen at
some of the other stores previous.
ly visited.

At that hour, the counters
where women’s cloth is sold were
doing the most business. In the
men’s suiting department it was
largely a question of window
shcpping from the inside. In the
women’s hat department a cus-
tomer was making i; purchase, In
the shoe department, business
was slow,



Near one of the entrances of
the store a few workmen were
doing minor repairs. Clerks in
various departments were getting
the chance to re-arrange the
contents of shelves anid cases.

On the whcele it was a case ol
the goods being plentiful, but
the buyers few, although that
will hardly be the case today,
unless the rain begins from early

t fall “buckets a drop.”



Better Training
Facilities Needed
For Police

Col, R. T. Michelin, Commis—
sioner of Police told the “Advo—
cate” yesterday that better
training facilities were needed in
the Police Forces in the Wind-
wards, Leewards and Barbados
than those existing in their re..
spective islands at present,

Col, Michelin has just returned
from St. Lucia where he had gone
to confer with Lt. Col. Eric
James, Chief of Police of that
colony in connection with another
‘training scheme.

This scheme he said, is for the
setting up of a Police Training
School for the Windwards, Lee-
wards and Barbados,

It was first proposed to set up
a scheme at Beanefield, the ex
Army Airbase, but this has since
been found unsuitable and the
new one will now be in the old
Military barracks at the Morne
in Castries.

The site is an admirable one
and with a certain amount of
money being spent on the
repairs and redecoration of the
old barracks, the building could
be made very suitable for «
training school,

Having seen the building and
gone into the cost and pros and
cons, he is now going into the
matter and will, in due course,
submit his report to the Barbados
Government,

TRY THIS
fo hele you"

Regular daily ration
* of delicious creamy



EMULSION

ill build up resistance
an sturdy grow th

help

+

was pay-

Mr. C. D, Cuffley, Headmaster
of the school, told the reporter
that he thought it a good thing
for Spanish to be taught to the
seniors of elementary schools.

The boys were catching on
quickly and in case any of them
wanted to carry on studies of the
language after leaving school, he
would have had a good founda—
tion, he said.

Early showers during the morn-
ing seemed to have had effect on
the attendance. Out of a roll cal!
of 365, only 65 boys turned out
for the first half of the day.

Art Class

Each class, however, with many
a desk unoccupied, was hard at
work. The juniors amused them-
selves with counting and writing
numbers While the seniors did art,
reading and arithmetic.

Some of the boys were working
on the outside. They were plant-
ing in the garden and mowing the
green grass which covered the
grounds of the school.

In the workshop, some were
busy at work making a master's
desk, toys and completing a map
of Barbados which they made of
pulp paper. . ‘

The Bay Street Boys’ School was
built in 1913 and opened by
H.R.H. Princess Marie Louise
It was erected as a central school
to accommodate the children from
St. Ambrose, St. Paul’s, Dalkeith
and Bethel which were all closed
down,

The school has quite enough
room to accommodate the 365 on
the roll. Mr. Cuffley said that he
lost quite a number of pupils
through the removal of children
from the St. Michael’s Infirmary
to the Nightengale Home. Those
children used to attend school
daily.

He said that with the develop-
ment of the Bay Estate Housing
Scheme, there would obviously
be a corresponding increase in the
attendance.

Looking around the school, one
could see many wall paintings

and decorations done by the boys. ,

Most of the pictures were for
studying purposes. They were
painted during the war when
there was a scarcity of pictures,

In one of the classes, a project
of housing in Barbados was dis
played. This showed a compar'son
between the most primitive of
Barbadian houses and the most
modern,

The boys looked comfortable
and seemed to have been enjoy-
ing their lessons.





Decision Confirmed

A decision of Mr. E. A. McLeod,
Police Magistrate of District “A”
was yesterday confirmed by Their
Honours of the Assistant Court of
Appeal, Mr. G. cL. Taylor and Mr,
J. W. B. Chenery. Mr. McLeod
fined Arthur Clarke of Bay Land
£1 when he was found guilty of
having assaulted and beaten
Ilene Da Costa on July 30.

Clarke cuffed Da Costa in her
eye, threw his bicycle on her and
kicked her according to the evi-
dence.



peigent WO tus

sia ro





ailments. REXALL
EMULSION contains
a very high proportion
(50%) of this valuable
natural oil presented in a
smooth delicious creamy
emulsion.

REXALL EMULSION

for your Child
B00) take
Valuefor money

Now obtainable from:- KNIGHTS DRUG STORES



edress «from

It is not every day that these children visit the



Two Hours
By Local Factory

In Spry Street overlooking
the grounds of St. Michael :
Cathedral, a Shirt Factory started
at High Street in March this year
by Madame Gilkes of Antigua and
Mr, Archer MacKenzie, Auction-
eer, is daily turning out shirts,
underwear, and pyjamas, made
in Barbados,

Eight girls—all Barbadians have
produced aS many as 168 shirts
in one week.

Madame Gilkes, who supervises
both shirt and dress departments,
told the Advocate that they take
individual orders as well as sup-
ply many City stores with shirts.

They also export. shirts and
dresses to other West Indian
islands,

Anyone placing an order for a
single shirt can have it in two
hours if it is urgently needed.
They make both dress and sports
shirts and tuck-bosom shirts is a
specialty,

For Tourists Too

In the dress department they
take orders from the general pub-
lic but Special attention is paid
to tourists who are spending a
short time in the island.

Madame Gilkes said that she has
already made a great quantity of
dresses for Venezuelans. When
a tourist liner arrives in the
island for a one-day stay Madame
Gilkes can take an order for a
any passenger and
produce the dress by evening
when the vessel is ready to sail
This includes shopping arrange
ments and fitting

In the shirt department, a cer-
tain number of girls make the
shirts, except for putting on the
collars. It then goes to the collar
maker who already has the collars
made. She attaches the collars
and afterwards passes it to the
button hole maker. From here
it goes to the presser and the shirt
is completed.

Madame Gilkes first started her
Dress Depot at Victoria Street
when she arrived in the island in
1947, She afterwards went to
High Street and is now in Spry
Street.

T’dad Parcel
Past Congested

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN.
Present arrangement of the Par-
cel Post service at the General
Post Office in Port-of-Spain is con-
sidered highly unsatisfactory, both
from the state of congestion and
from the point of view of a fire
hazard. The Post Office Advisory
Committee is taking up with Gov-
ernment the question of structural
alterations to the Post Office and
the provision of the necessary
finance. ;

° * ° F ss
Missing Girl Found

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN.
Gloria Jules of Arouca, one of
the “missing girls’ was found by
the police “living comfortably” in
an unoccupied but furnished house
in another part of the district. The
police, inquiring into the matter,
discovered that a quantity of ar-
ticles of clothing and jewellery
were missing from that house,
Gloria, with tears in her eyes de-
niea a charge of theft, and was
alleged to have offered no account
for her presence in the house
met by the police. She wag re-
manded to the Belmont Industrial
Sehool, Port-of-Spain,

mm







most by KLM.



That “Click” In The
Mind At The Word

by our Government
believe implicitly its every word.”

Knock
hative pride
foreigner about
deduct what you will for che crue!
Lardships and oppression in many
parts of Stalin’s realm—there is
Still a great residue of faith in
Russia’s greatness and her deter-
mination to ward off the jealous
invaders of whose existence the
people have been all too success-
fully convinced.

Yes, it is a mountain for Mr.
Bevin to meet or move,

B’dians Invited To
Jnveiling Ceremony

(From Our Own Correspondent)

Mr. M
and Managing Director
Barbados Co-Operative Bank, Ltd,
and Mr. John Beckles, M.B.E., an
Executive of the Bank, were in-

“England”

@ From page 4
For this, we

off a

|
'
. {
percentage for
in

speaking to a
one’s country,

London Express Service



IN T'DAD



PORT-of-SPAIN
D. Symmonds, founder
of the

vited to attend the uaveiling of
a bust of the late Dr. A. H. Mc-
Shine, founder and first president

of

the Trinidad Co-Operative

Bank,

Dr

McShine, Mr, Symmonds

said, could be referred to as th:
greatest and most inspired worker
on behalf of the thrift movement
in the British West Indies within

living memory.
McShine would live long after the
monuments of human skill would
have perished. He clothed
naked and fed the
only was his name prevalent in
every household in Barbados, but
those away from home asgfwell”
added Mr.

Speaking
Branch, which was incorporated in
1938,
“Little
considerable
particular from that section of the
community which ordinarily would
not think of banking. He pointed
out that the
operated a home
which hundreds of poor per-
sons were assisted annually in ob-
taining their own homes by mak-
ing monthly payments from small
amounts which they would ordin-
arily pay as house rates, Through
that
persons who
of owning their own homes, were
now property owners in Barbados.

by

chat
terprising
interest in the people, they would

be in a better position to help
themselves. We must have lead-
ers, honest leaders, and persons
who would guide the people
right”.

Matrimonial Causes yesterday, His
Honour
Allan Collymore, pronounced de-
eree nisi in the suit of A. S, Hay-
ling (Petitioner) and A
(Respondent).

Mr.
by Mr. H. L. Thomas of Messrs
Carrington & Sealy appeared for
the petitioner.

in

Mr, Beckles said: “I think
if there were more en-
persons who take an

Decree nisi was also pronounced

the suit of I.
(Petitioner) and A.
(Respondent).
were Mr. W. W. Reece K.C. in-
structed by Messrs. Hutchinson &
Ganfleld for the petitioner,

rs



“The name of

00
ere,
v

the

hungry; not

Symmonds

of

the Barbados
said in
received
support, in

Mr. Symmonds
England” they
public

Bank in Barbados

purchase plan,

numbers of
think

large
would

system
never



Decree Nisi



Pronounced

the Court fer Divoree and

the Chief

Sir

oe

Judge,

Hayling

J. S. B. Dear instructed

C,. Brewster
F. Brewster
Legal appearances

dieanesenpeeneastnnsnrtrerrenensahenerettdetasstaepeasssaeiesseebilsintiseosuitinreenenseni ——<——— — OO

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‘
<

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AND

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HARRISON'S, esnsioe

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. be
For
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PAGE FIVE



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PAGE SIX



BARBADOS



A West African Watches
A New Colonial Spirit

Ry E. B. Timothy

LONDON.
It is encouraging to watch the
th of the new Colonial spirit.
apparently minor but never-
theless significant manifestation
of this spirit, is the way Govern-
7 and other official spokesmen,
in official and unofficial functions,
identify themselves with the
I s and aspirations and
suié@cesses of the peoples over
whom they rule by the use of the
un “our”. It is now “our
”, “our constitution”, “our
”, “our achievem. *, “our
future”, etc., and not the imper-
sonal and Olympian “your” which
e the impression that those
wi made the speeches or gave
the addresses belonged entirely to
another world.

Perspective
In Ja recently published bro-
chure which attempts to give the
British people an idea of what
on in the Colonies, the whole
is put into perspective.
Answering the question “What
does Britain gain from her link
with the Colonies?” the pamphlet
gays: “. . . the Commonwealth
is an association of peoples on a
world-wide scale. By leading
the Colonies to full partnership
in the Commonwealth, Britain is
strengthening the whole _ by
strengthening the parts. ae
But the difficulties confronting
all who are anxious to achieve
the new spirit are immense. They
are evidenced in a resolution to
domme before the National Unior
of Conservative and Unionist As-
sociations at their Blackpoo] con-
ference this month, Mr, C, J. M-
Alport will then move: “That
Conference views with grave
alarm the continued unrest a
the declining standards of order-
€d administration in the Colonial
Empire, and urges the Conserya~
tive Party to: every
to restore the co

nial people in 's
and will to fulfil her oe































































E. B. TIMOTHY: A West African journalist from Sierra Leone who
writes from the office of our London Correspondent.





urne, as Director of Information

rvices, observed in his evidence
before the Select Committee on
nee inet a costs £6,500
Lasting and productive racial’¢for eight Colonial journalists to
cae. can cay a assuredg@attend the Journalists’ Course at
when the average Briton in thejthe London Polytechnic . .
Colonies becomes an ambassador gWhen these people go back, their
of goodwill and of the new Colo- - Market value, after having spent
‘nial irit in the office, in the & year in md, will be such
Seekshop, in the hospital, in the that they will leave journalism
playing fields or wherever work @Md become high-class clerks or
or ‘a brings him into contact ikers.










have applied for them. As East
Germany is behind the Iren Cur-
tain, there is the fear that institu-
tions there would offer only
indoctrination in an unwholesome
political belief. But it is ible
to angue otherwise, For Colonial
students in British universities,
being trained as engineers, agri-
culturists of scientists, do not
absorb the principles of Imperial-
ism! Why should it be different
with Colonial students in Bastern




mission .









with onials, e trouble appears to be that 9
Posi t Ch roe pe a og newspapers cannol Goppany?
‘osition of Chiefs afford to be first-class. This is a B a hi ci
Of the making of constitutions point largely missed in recent dis-- es Go Bet) Sole shes ee

ment is worth listening to—even
if some Nigerians can get free
education by going to Communist
countries. 1 am personally opposed
to Colonial students studying in
Eastern Germany because of the

in West Africa there seems to be
end. Discussion of the subject
becoming a weary business to
fest African politicians. One of
difficult problems confronting

est Africans to-day is the posi-
thon Chiefs should occupy in the
new constitutional set-ups. What
isto be the role of Chiefs vis-a-
‘vis the people and the Govern-
ment? Since the introduction of
thé system of Indirect Rule in
West Africa, there has been a ten-
dency fer Chiefs to drift away
from the pose This drift has
been accelerated by the = of
the ated elements. They are
irked at leaden steps taken
-by “aes who found com-

fort in smug onagrvatian, . The
nets have d in gome cases
‘ar

‘ the people in
Rate "Ey ane “tegardel
“someone as “an

1 part of machinery of

cussion in London of the Colonial
Press. Two issues have become
confused, There are critics con-
cerned about what Colonial news-
a omg say and critics concerned
about how they say it. However, . rinati

the remedies suggested by the one threat of polities! indect 8.

: Experience has proved the Com-
group do not of necessity meet the

troubles noted by the other. A munis 50 be mare subee, | ene
violent critic of Britain is likely
to be more effective if fortified by
a university education. A Colonial
sub-editor will not learn to spell
through a better understanding of
Mr. Attlee’s policies. It should be
clear that the political attitudes in
a minority of West can news—
papers which worry British critics,
reflect, rather than create, attitudés
among politicians and their fol—
lowers, and will not be funda-
mentally altered by raising the
technical standards of the Press
as a whole.

Recently, I discussed this with an
African Local Government Officer
on holiday in London. He depre-
cated the very idea of Colonial
students receiving higher educa-
tion in Eastern G and
added — “We don’t want Com-
munismy cannibalism or rheuma-
tism in the Colonies; what we
want is democracy.”

If more West Africans spoke
like that, the phantom agents of
Moscow would soon contract poli-
tical paralysis!

rr Iti rthel portant th Trade U a ;
oe s, nevertheless im int that
Uncertain of the of the these standards should be raised. nvon
educated elemen' gp Mad el this ge wy! Mr. Officials To
premier posit! ey urne has toone of :
among their people, Chiefs have the dangers of offering courses in

tended to lean more and

ie st me more Britain to Colonial
strong arms of the -
ties. se: is frat tiets

journalists.

Visit B. W.L

th Sah University. Collages

e can ver

and intelli a often pull in out of the questiiun, since they ndent
Westin “A Chict in. would ‘almost’ certainly fa to) 1° OM See ere RIN.

Gold Coast has even gone to obtain staff, and since the reost Top ranking international Trade

the “unc ’ length of found- jmportant part of a journalist's officials are pec

ing a political = FO bine tralning—work on re vialt "Deimddiad and the British West !
goes pecu- newspaper—would not easily

liar label ‘National Labour gyailable. Visits of Colonial Indies soon. So writes the Hon.

“Party”, and is seeking the alli-
nce of Labour. In its elaborate
two page Blueprint, the Party's
aims and objects are set out anc

journalists to Britain and other + — of the
countries are very valuable, but I Union to th Trad rer we
believe more would be achieved . e Presid e
include the foll ssage: DY such visits if these journalists semen ir Watectemnt Berea
“" . . We believe that tbe control came, not to study journalist ier. me a r. C. P. re:
and direction of the next Govern- techniques, but to secure a com- || Tring aaa aw urged a nion
ment should be handed to the mand of the English language. % r. to prepare well in ad-
Chiefs and workers, but not to a _ The unfortunate fact remains | ma Oe _— or aspect of trade
ew educated place-seeking poli- that when Colonials have gained a , uncti ens 08 which it was
cians who may be looking out ‘this wider knowledge, they are felt the delegagion might be of
er opportunity to amass wealth less likely to remain journalists, help. The Trinidad President ex-
their own interests.” There is because of the uncertainty of pressed delight at the communi-
“yery little open conflict now be- journalism asa means of livelihood cation. He thought it would be of
tween the Emirs and their people in the Colonies. interest to all responsible Trade
an Northern Nigeria; but the : Union organisations in the British
-rumb'ings are heard there also. Educational Menace West Indies.
Some scholarships have been

The Colonial Press

Before he left the Colonial offered to the people of Nigeria by
Office for the governorship of the schools and universities in Eastern
Leeward Islands, Mr. K, Black- Germany and naturally many



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LAIN DOs,
1.CCEN way at W.8 Teporeeqa iui
Jomaica ial We Sugar wiciusily
Was s€eKing permission to manu-
tacture annyarous aiconoi tor use
«s Motor fuel. ‘Lois in itself would
ce no new aevelopment. In South
alica @armg the first world war
«= movr spirat Keown as Natalite
wilnen Was produced from sugar
molasses Was used extenswely a:
a substacute for petrol.

But the Jamaican situavion wae
brought about by the need to
weduce rum sales to the United
Kin _.«m owing to the high im-
port duty; and the desire to make
profitable use of all molasses so

could

be

that the sugar industry
operate at maximum efficiency
Idea

The idea has now been suppcrt-
ed by an article in this ines
issue of the “Times Review of
Industry”. The writer says that,
while in eireumstances it
seems unlikely power alcohoi
produced from sugar could find
au export market, there appears
to be several opportunities for
disposing of it locally. This
would enable cuts to be made
in petrol ignports and would be
of considerable financial benefit
to the country concerned “pro
vided the necessary official en-
couragement and action are
forthcoming to remove thx

| obstacles new hindering progress”

Tracing the history of powe:
alcohol production, the write:
points out the South African pro-
duct of the first world war wa
composed of 55—60 per cent.
alcohol, 40—45 per cent. ether
and a smal] amount of ammonia
Efforts were made to promotc
the use of it in the United King-
dom and the Chancellor of the
Exchequer in those days reduced
the duty on imported and home-
produced power and industrial
alcohol in order to encourage this
new ind ;

Then in 1922 the Imperial
Motor Transport Council sub-
committee made a _ favourable
report on the suitability of this
type of fuel for use in motor
vehicles. About the same time,
a United States firm found tha?
by use of an additional process,
the power alcohol could be suit-
ably employed for tractors.

Difficulties

Difficulties of distribution then
srose, coupled with a fall in the
price of petrol, and these two
factors together with other influ-
ences, gradually brought about
a loss of interest in the project.

Economie circumstances fol-
lowing the second world war
have now brought about the
revival of interest and last

year the Mauritius Government
appoint a committee to consider
ity of using anhydrous
aleohol in the eglony. Its con-
clusions were that the spirit could
be made locally at a price that
would compare favourably with
the c.i.f. cost of imported petrol.

the o1 probable outlet would be
interes with a ceiling production
figure of 3m litres annually, if

all local owners of motor vehicles |
ed to make use of!

were co
it in the proportion of 25 per cent
alcohol to 75 per cent. petrol.
Later the ceiling production figure
might rise to 5m litres. In addi-
tion, the committee suggested
that distillers should be invited
t) submit a scheme for the pro-
duction of 3m litres a year.
To Be Overcome

But
ties which will have to be over-
come before the recommendation:
are acted upon.
abolition of petrol rationing whic
virtually stopped the sales of
power alcohol made in the colony

In 1948—49 Mauritius produce:
2,800,000 litres of industria
alcohol and the changed condition
have placed the distillcrs in a:
awkward situation. The Chambe:
of Agriculture has supporte:
tthe request put forward by dis-
tillers that the excise duty o
nearly 144d. a litre on industria
alcohol should be removed. Thi:
‘would allow the selling price «
alcohol to be lowered. For un'es
sales can be encouraged the
distillers, whose stocks ar
oceupying all the available stor
age, will have to incur consicer
able expense disposing of the
surplus molasses from the curren!
sugar crop.








DISTRIBUTORS

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CO., 7D.

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ONTO

It did, however, point out that|

} WHEN SOMEONE SPRAYS

there are several difficul: |

One is th |

i






ADVOCATE

Booker Bros. Expect
Sugar Increase

U.K. Rum Demand Still Falling

(From Our Own Correspondent)



|
|

LONDON. |

A 25‘ INCREASE in their sugar production is expect-|

éd in 1950 by Booker Brothers McConnell and Co.

This'

was stated at the 50th Annual General Meeting of the}

pany in London.

spring crop this year was
35 cent. above that of 1949,
but on the whole their sugar con-
cerms made a somewhat meagre
contribution to profits, said the
Chairman, a < . McConnell.

This was ma jue to the in-
evitable dislocation of
in factories and on plantations
where considerable modernization
work has been going on during
the crop year” he added.

The financial ition is fairly
good. “Unless the economic en-
vironment in which we operate
is completely upset—as it well
may be—we do not expect to be
short of funds for our needs” said
the Chairman, Their liquid posi-~
tion has been greatly improved
by the recent issue of new capi-
tal, and a new bout of inflation
is the form which an economic
upheaval. seems most likely to
take,

The Problems

“Inflation is ful] of financial
problems for us” continued the
Chairman “For instance, the
price of sugar is some four times
what it was before 1939; there-
jere four times as much money
must now be laid out to produce
the same tonnage of sugar. We
co not receive payment for our
sugar until it arrives in this coun-~
try or in Canada, and it is by no
means unusua] for the crop to
have more than 20,000 tons manu-
factured but not paid for. At the
present price this means the use
of over £600,000 merely to finance
a normal quantity of unsold pro-
duce which before 1939 would
only have needed about £150,000.

“We must finance not only pro-
Cuce but also the general stock
end stores for our sugar interests
and the stocks of merchandise in
our shops in Barbados, British
Guiana, Northern Rhodesia, Ny-
asaland and Trinidad. The con-
sclidated balance-sheet shows that
in all four million pounds are re-
quired to finance these; moreover
we are sure that in the light of
“he very large turnover achieved
by our operating units we are not
overstocked.”

On the business side, Stephens
Limited, of Trinidad, produced
ratisfactory returns, but the sales
of wholesale and retail businesses
n British Guiana were disappoint-
ing, owing to low controlled pro-
*t-margins coupled with heavy
overhead charges.

Responsibility }
“West Indian shops should ma-
terially benefit by the amalgama-'
tion of the West Indian buying
departments in London and Liver- |
poo] with Campbell Bros. Carter;
and Co, Limited, who have great
knowledge and experience in the
buying field. They will be res) -
sible for all the West Indian
keeping businesses of Bookers,—
as they are already the parent of
those in Africa. This is part of

SATURDAY,

1958

ee

OCTOBER 14,

Sir William
Ramsay

vas the discoverer of a whole
new family of elements— an
uhievement smparalleled in the
entire history of chemistry. The
first of his discoveries was made
in 18qqivhen,with LordRayleigh,
he isolated argon, a rare gas
chat exists in small quantities in
the air. Later, Ramsay and
his assistants succeeded in
isolating helium, neon, krypton
dud xenon, which are also present
in the atmosphere but in even smaller amounts. Ax first these gases were mere chemical
casviosities, but now, half a century later, they are of the first industrial importance, Argon




=

the general reorganization scheme. is the gas used in the modern gas-filled electric light bulb. The electric discharge lamp

The recession in the demand

depends on neon to such an extent that few recognise it today by any other name than that

for rum in the United Kingdom ef“ neon sign”. Helium is also employed in these lamps, in addition to its well-known

continues, but the Chairman said:

“United Rum Merchants Li
our newly acquired subsidiary,
had a most encouraging. year in
1949—indeed their profits, in the
face of a sharp recession in the
demand for rum. ..were far great-
er than we had any reason to
hope for at the time of the amal-
gamation. I am afraid. ..we must
count upon a reduction in United
Rum Merchants’ profits (due to
continuation of recession), Rum
is a magnificent drink, our brands
have a world-wide reputation, and
both at home and in our valuable
export markets United Rum Mer-
chants are well equipped to sell
them.”

The retiring directors, Mr. A.
E. V. Barton, C.B.E., and Mr. N.
P. Sherlock, were re-elected.

E
ALEXANDRIA.

A WRAF telephonist 20-year-
old Joyce Taylor, of Kings Norton,
Birmingham, swam the Great Bit-
ter Lake from the Sinai Desert to
Fayid, 74 miles, in eight hours 27
minutes. She is the only woman
ever to do so. Two other com-
petitors nearly had to give up
following the efforts of a well-
meaning Egyptian fisherman to
rescue them. Speaking no English,
he did not understand that the
swimmers were competing in a
race, and tried his hardest to take
them out of the water.

QUOTE
NEW YORK.
Back from entertaining troops
in battle areas in Korea, Holly-
wood’s Al Jolson was asked what
he did upon coming home. His
reply: “I looked up my Income-
tax to see if I had paid enough.”



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Ramsaywas born in Glasgow in 1852. Hewas a first-class athlete, musician, and linguist, as
well as being professor of chemistry at Bristol and later at University Col-
lege, London. He was knighted in 1902, and awarded she Nobel Prize in
1904. In 1913 he presided over the Internationa! Association of Chemical
Societies, where his flair for languages enabled him to address his cos-
mopolitan audience inEnglish, French,German and [talian, He died in 1916.



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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1950



News From Britain
Ry David Temple Roberts

LONDON, Oct. 6

The Navy has always saved Brit-
ain. Once again we are in debt to
them. For the navy has delivered | larly sensitive to television—which
gas supplies to London. The car-_ has its odd aspects, you will agree.
toonists are delighted with the’ Mr. Percy Cudlipp, editor of the
chances to draw imaginary char-| “Daily Herald”, gave tongue. He
acters called “Admiral Therm”.| found the play reactionary and
Mr. Therm is the fiery little sprite | full of snobbish bias. Now, of
that appears on the advertisements} course, he has every right to his
for gas fires, and gas cookers.) views, - There have been Tory
While the London workers at the} M.P’s_ like Waldron Smithers
furnaces are on strike the stokers} building up steam pressure until
of the navy are doing the job. they almost exploded at the al-

This is a peculiarly aggravated| leged Left slant of the B.B.C. In
and troublesome strike. Itdemon-| fact you might say the Tories
Strates some of the weaknesses the| Started this. But Mr. J. B. Priest-
Government and the Trade Unions} ley, the left-minded dramatist
have been accused of. For in-| 2ave up his personal talks in war-
stance the strikers are “unofficial” | time after whisperings behind the
—their Unions tell them to go/ Scenes rather than trumpetings in,
back to wrk. Mr. Isaacs, the little} Say the “Daily Mail”. What seems

their pomposities—appeared on
television. Then came the storm.
It seems that Labour is particu-



man we have as Minister of Lab-}59 odd is that the head of
our, broadcast ineffectively warn- : ; a
ing the workers they were being|‘'° 5-B., Si William Haley,

should have banned further radio-
productions — or television — (f
this inoffensive playlet that had
got under the tender skins of a few
Labour publicists. One point I
am sure o@s that the editor of
the “Daily Herald” did not expect
the B.B.C. to cave in! A few
weeks ago various socialists got
together to discuss how to coun-

manoeuvred and used by the
Communists. The workers them-
selves are not—most of them—
Communists. But they are «still
on strike. The government has
delayed for weeks the two crucial
steps—and at last, this week, has
acted, Ten of the strikers have
been brought before magistrates
and sentenced to one month of

| teract an organisation — the

area: ig tg tye Listeners’ Association — which
k ; be is a ; ;

ed. a to’ tile caukworks, 1 S mainly Conservative in out-

look, and sends streams of letters
to the B.B.c. every time they
detect the timid colour of pale
,pink in a broadcast. The decis_
jons taken were to put out
Propaganda to leftwingers to
“write to the B.B.C.”— and a
little office was set up to co-
ordinate the stream. The “New
Statesman” asked its readers to
send copies of their protests in
this office. Fair enough, but a
little pompous one might say.
Even the “New Statesman”
thought so, as it printed next
week, in the “This England”
column, (usually reserved for
items of surprisingly English self-
righteousness), a little quotation
from its own serious injunction!
Then came the television
performance, Imagine the search
for pen or typewriter Then the
leaier on the “Daily Herald”.
Then the B.B.C, banned the
broadcast. O terror! O horror
Vast publicity for a few light-
hearted gibes at vhe Party
Manners; millions will read it;
another example of the new
censorship will have been per-
petrated. Which all goes to show
how disastrous it is to have an
easy, pliable B.B.C. Why did
Sir William Haley not stand up
for himself and his Corporation?
Did some Minister telephone
from Margate in exuberant
triumph at his Party Conference?
The little incident will be soon
forgotten; we shall never know;
but what a lesson in how the ban
can boomerang !

Londen paused to see how the
mavy men would succeed with the
Strange task. . This morning the
pressure of gas went up. Now we
can boil a kettle, again, without
waiting for hours. Such are the
triumphs, the belateq triumphs, of
good government. The strike will]
probably end quite quickly.
the ten men were sentenced
they seemed to have a jaunty,
self-satisfied air—a kind of bold
defiance. But there is no doubt
that respect for the law is still
overwhelming—no amount of de-
lay and muddling can destroy it.
But even if the strike ends there
is still one question to be settled,
What of Mr. Isaacs? He has a
big job—especially if we are com-
led by re-armament to retrace
our steps down the road by auster-
ity. He has not proved up to the
job even in easy times. He is Mr.
Bevin’s nominee, certainly, and
the colossus of the Labour Party
would not like to see his little
an swept out and a bigger man
replace him. But Mr. Bevin has
not time for everything.



Party Manners

Perhaps you have already read
this little play. Certainly it has
achieved strange fame overnight.
It was written by Val Gielgud as
the most light-hearted piece of
nonsense. He, for one, never
meant it to be taken seriously.
It is peopled with Cabinet Minis-
ters with red ties, with comical
peers and Old Etonian socialist
gentlemen as controllers of our

nationalised industries. The play Bowler Hats
ran for a couple of months at an! qt was a good excuse for a’
gut of the way London theatre. party. The Bowler hat is a|

Then it was given on the radio.

hundred years old. It was first
Incidentally Mr. Val Gielgud was e ‘

made for a man called Williaya
Coke by a certain Mr. Bowler,
So the firm that made the first
bowler, a hundred years ago,

plays fifteen years ago, as a spe-
cial technique. Now he is in tele-

| rather unfortunately.
| with,
|made for aâ„¢building at one end |

| Square.

| Students should be encouraged to

| This is a sad end to the story, as

BARBADOS



dregsed in the cost e of 100







years agc certainly stole the
lime—light And th young
officers of the Regin yF
Guards turned out ir to



demonstrate the
worn about town

bowler
in

i
| days
| Perhaps they did not expect to be
photographed. Perhaps it

these

is

]
|
|
|
|
|} cruel to record their aghast looks
as the press turned cameras, and
| newsreel cameras on them.
| Perhaps it was not quite regi
| mental !
| Lord Mayor’s Thanksgiving
The idea was good. The Lord
Mayor of London would launch
a fund to build home and hostel
for students from Commonwealth
and Colonies who come to Lon—
|don. It would express Britain's
| gratitude for aid and food from
| overseas. But it has turneti out
To begin
a grandiose design was|
of an eighteenth century London
The preservers of our
| ancient buildings protested. Ani,
more seriously, the complaint)
arose that London is not Britain;



|go to other places as well. Had |
the Lord Mayor’s advisers !
thought out their scheme very
carefully? Did they appreciate
how they were tying generations
of students yet unborn to life in
one corner of London? Might not
students prefer to live among
British people? Many questions.
But the Lord Mayor’s Committee
rode the storm. Now we hear
that the response has been Cisap—
pointing. To give a fillip to the
fund -various parties are being
given in its aid. The Overseas
Club is helping; and this week }
called at a remarkable exhibition
of paintings by Rubens, (admis—
sion 2/6, catalogue 2/6), also in
aid of the Thanksgiving Fund.
But something has gone wrong.

f

A RECORD catch of king fish caught by the crew of the “Investigator” yesterday is seen above, mem-

bers of the crew looking on.

RECORD CATCH
OF KING FISH

NINE king fish totalling about
280 pounds were caught by the
“Investigator” and marketed here
yesterday. |

Five of the fish weighed about |
140 pounds each and the other fou
about 20 pounds each!

A catch of this kind is consid-

As I overheard one lady at this | ered lovely, Mr. D. W. Wile:
exhibition, “Thanksgiving for |\the Fisheries Officer told the
what?” she asked her friend. I | “Advocate”

suspect that is what is wrong Mr. Wiles said that he wanted
Placards announce the Thanks-/to announce to fishermen and
giving Fund, but there is not|sportsmen that king fish were on

enough explanation of the value
to Commonwealth and Colonies
of students coming to Britain.

the run at the Middle Shallow and
the London Shallow.

Those shallows were in the}
South East part of the island
the slow response gives the im
pression that Britain has forgot
ten the food parcels. Not 350,
I assure you, but we do need
reminding what the Lord Mayor
wants to say “Thank you” for.
The.last great consignment of
Empire food is due in Britain in
the next weeks. We hope, indeed,
there will be no need, again, to
feed Britain with generosity.

CALYPSOES FOR
CARNEGIE !

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN.
Mr. D, C. Yannopoulos, Stage
Director of the Metropolitan
Opera Company of New York, told
the “Gazette” yesterday that much
has been heard in the United
States of the calypso and the steel
band, the folk music of this
Colony. In view of the policy to
encourage this development
throughout the world, and to en-
courage talent, there was every
possibility that “with a little
touching up here and there, a
show centred around the calypso
and steel band musie of Trinidad
could be put on at Carnegie Hall,
New York, if proper arrangements
are made.” r. Yannopoulos is

= {

°
56 Grapefruit: $1 |
(From Our Own Correspondent) |
PORT-OF-SPAIN.
a Fyzabad woman,
told the Siparia Court that she
was a mother of nine children
Their father would not work, so
she had to steal to support them.
She pleaded guilty to the larceny
of 56 grapefruit, valued $1.00, the
property of Kern Trinidad Oil-
fields, She was put on a bond
for one year.

Jamoine,

Discovery Day
Celebrations Marred |

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN.
The 192nd anniversary of the
discovery of the New World by
Christopher Columbus was com-
memorated in Trinidad this morn-
ing, with the “laying of a wreath”
at the foot of the discoverer’s
statue at Columbus Square, Port-
of-Spain, The occasion was mar-
red bythe disapproval of the cere-

|
|

epee ett aang erie one

bers of the Trinidad—Venezuela



the fellow who developed radio |

vision. So his little play—full of| joined’ in a celebration. The

barbed shafts at our rulers and | young man in _ side-whiskers,
_*



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”



returning to New York following
an @pgagement at the Colon
Theatre, Buenos Aires,

Inter-Relations Committee
bore placards of protest.



ADVOCATE



North west Trinidad was struck

by

Toursday morning, bringing tor-
rential showers that caused con
siderable
places,
clothing



| Bridges Damaged
In T’dad’s Storm

‘he

the

covering a fairly large area, which
developed over Venezuela yester-

ing
streets. to become tributaries.
Port-of-Spain’s East End Foun

dy

was inundated by the floods, and
as a result employees were unable

at

| River overflowed
| snother river at St. James, West
Port-of-Spain,

7

y



TICKET TALK.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN.

A_ report in a newspaper re-
garding the new Jamaica sweep-
stakes, which aims at paying a
first prize of $100,000, caused a
Couva agent to send a clipping
to the Company and to ask for
n explanation

A letter received by him from
Knutsford Park, Limited, Kings

(From Our Owr Correspondent)

a thunderstorm — early

en

damage to various

and loss of poultry and

It was disclosed through | Mr, R McConnell, Secretary ot
Weather Bureau at Piargo ton, Jamaica, read in part; “We
an isolated thunderstorm

beg to advise that you need have
flear

no selling the ticket

which you have received, as all

in

day, drifted slowly northeast | the tickets are perfectly genuine
over Trinidad. We printed two sets of tickets

Maraval area received the} some single at 4/— and some
| worse of the storm, The Maraval iouble at 8 By this you wili

its banks and | understand that the tickets are

all good and none are forgeries

The Weather

TODAY:
Sun Rises: 5.48 a.m.
Sun Sets: 5.44 p.m.

overflowed, caus-

many of the surrounding





the Eastern Main Road

on



to work on Thursday morning Moon (First Quarter)
Many bridges were damaged, October 18
trains ran lave, and workmei Lighting: 6 p.m.
from the Works and Hydraulics High Water: 5.57 a.m
Department were kept busy !5 5.45 p.m,
clearing debris and landslide YESTERDAY:
along several roads, Rainfall (Codrington)
-18 in.
‘Total for month to yesterday
4.61 ins.

College Principal
Returns To T’dad

(From Our Own Correspondent)

Mr.
jthe Imperial College of Tropical |
| Agriculture, St. Augustine, Trini-
| dad, arrived from the United King-

mony of what it stood for by mem-' rangements for the celebration of

Temperature (Max,) 84.0° F

‘Temperature (Min,) 72.0° F

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E
(3 p.m.) E.S.E.

Wind Velocity 8 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.958

| (3 p.m.) 29,868,

STOLE A PENNY

PORT-OF-SPAIN

Harold Page, Principal of

| dom last night, via Jamaica. Mr. | (From Our Own Correspondent)
Page was on long leave He | PORT-—OF-SPAIN.
Ygiten Norway, Africa and India. A thief broke into a Port—of-
While dn England, preliminary ar- | Spain parlour, found one penny

m the drawer and took it. On a

the Royal Charter Silver Jubilee | second thought, he turned to the

who| of the LC.T.A,, to be held next shelves and stole aerated drinks
January, were made.

and sweets to the value of $2.00.



for a
wonderful cup

of coffee

TRY THE IMPROVED
CHASE & SANBORN



YES, the new, improved Chase and

Sanborn is really superlatively good coffee. Whether

’
you are a connoisseur or not, you can’t fail to
appreciate that fine mellow flavour, that rich and

PAN AMERICAN STANDARD BRANDS INC.
P.O. Box 259

tantalizing aroma. And Chase and Sanborn is

vacuum-packed, so it comes to you



as fresh as the day it left the factory.
Treat yourself and your friends
to this delicious coffee. Get a tin

from your grocer today.

Barbados, Bridgetown

Cecil B. DeMilles Masterpie

ce!







This is the
GLUCOSE

which wins Test Matches,* supplies immediate
energy to athletes, restores and sustains in
fdtigue and tension. It is most valuable too in
infant feeding in cases of acidosis, malnutrition
and feverish conditions.

Always ask for the Cow & Gate brand.




RENAN LS SIN NWI

yee wee
GLUCOSE

A
NN PAR ll ee

\ ANO,.cALCIUM | 3S




CLYCEROPHOSPH ATE Se





FRUIT SUGAR FOOD




LAAN



FOR SUPPLYING
IMMEDIATE ENERGY
AND NOURISHMENT
WITH THE ADDITION
OF A CALCIUM AND
PHOSPHORUS SALT





AULT UAL LANA





GUILDFORD

ENCLAND
SRN aie

MANO VAN






_

COW & GATE

LUCOSE



—_
Used by the West Indies Cricket team durin:
their victorious 1950 tour of the U.K,

Agents—J. B. LESLIE & ©O., LTD.





the 1951 British Industries

PAGE SEVEN

Out



Barbados
Again

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON.
JUST OVER a week ago a cable arrived in London
from the Barbados Gevernment informing the West India
Committee of the island’s decision not to participate in’
Fair.
The news came as no surprise,

‘

-~w

Barbados had no part in the Fair

last year. But at the same t .
W.L Gover nor Ss; BWI ‘civelie hare reagneh. thie "der

cision is again in the negative

They are asking themselves why
Barbados should see fit to by-pass
this mighty exhibition of “The
3ritish Empire Can Make rt”,
when Jamaica, Windward Islands,
Trinidad and Tobago, British Gui-
ana and the Sea Island Cotton
Association have all agreed to
play their part again

Invited To
Opening «

OF T'DAD LEG. CO.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN The Dominion and Colonial see-
tion is always one of the show-

His Excellency the Governor of | pieces of the B.I.F. and receives



British Guiana, Sir Charles | @8 many visitors as any other part
Woolley, has accepted an invita-| Of the exhibition. Last year was
tion from the Trinidad Govern-| Pe of the best for a long time
}ment to attend the inaugural and the West Indies stand com-
jopening of Trinidad’s new Legis- | P&t¢d Most favourably with those
jlative Council on October 20.|°% Pakistan, East Africa, Malaya
Other Governors of the West|°" Mong Kong

| Indies are also invited;
| Cammander in Chief, America and
| West Indies station.
| Seel, Comptroller for Development
|}and Welfare ha,
| and will be accompanied by Lady
| Seel,

|
|

well,
Commons,

m

various Colonées within the Brit-
ish Caribbean and their wives, to

w

the guests of the Government for

a
al



also the T recall that several foreign
visitors ta whom I spoke were par-
ticularly impressed with the pro-
ducts of the West Indies, .Their
one complaint—to which attention
was drawn at the time—was the
lack of direct representation at
each of the stands. But that did
Governor has invited, as}not mean that buyers went away
representatives from the| without taking careful nete of the
the Colonial Office, | various goods on display
of the Legislatures of But it did mean

them went away
had seen

Sir George

also accepted,

The

embers
that most. .of
believing they
the entire production
range of all the West Indies
|Colonies, I don't suppose more
}than one in ten even thought ~for

itness the ceremony and to be

few days. Certain Caqjcnies have
ready replied. It is unlikely that

thos ited fr he United one moment that Barbados .alsa
Kingd ava eit) rom a rhe United) formed part of the British Carib
Vinge om wi attenc Captain ! pean and also had its own par-
S. J. S. Boord, R.N., Commanding ticular products.

H
se
A
ar

‘MS. “Sparrow”, will be repre-| ‘That was unfortunate enough
‘nting the Commander in Chief, | from a trade point of view. But
merica and West Indies > or iat next year it is going to assume

id his ship is expected to be in| even greater importance because

port in Port-of-Spain for three or! the 1951 B.I.F. will coincide with

four days.

$480,000 Promised |
|For Road Making

fe

on
United Kingdom,
guest
Windward Islands for two or three
days in Grenada before going on
to St.
| te

| Spain in an interview on Thursday |

| the Festival of Britain,



Arrangements are well in hand
to make the 1951 B.1.F. the great—
est of all and judging by the
popularity of the Fair in’ recent
years that will not be difficult

Hundreds of thousands of visi-
tors from the United States, South
| America, the Continent, Africa,
(From. Our Own Cotweensnéenti } and the Middle and Far East will

, | be coming to England for the cen
PORT-of-SPAIN tenary celebrations of the great
Hon, J. M. Stow, Administrator | Festival of 185)

or St. Lucia arrived in Trinidad | 4, ,
ahs sa : : For these visitors the B.1.F.
woneaiay — fe ae will be the yardstick by which
steal of the| they can, for themselves, judge the
| British Empire’s post war recovery
| effort, Their visit to the Common:
| wealth section will probably be
their first first-hand contact with
the Colonies and the Dominions.

IN ST. LUCIA



of the

Lucia, He leaves Trinidad
“morrow morning.

His Honour said in Port-of-

For this reason aioné it would

that a British Government promise| be worth the while of Barbados to



ei

"Color by TECHNICOL



| of $480,000 to $720,000 (B.W.1 )|be represented by a member of
was made for a road programme
in $t. Lucia, provided it was in-
tegrated with approved economic
development projects, He also said
that the question of establishnig a
Police Training school in St

the tourist board. But it would be

\ better still if the Government
reconsidered their decision and
Barbados joined the other Carib--
bean colonies in showing the world
that “the West Indies can make
2.”



Lu-
a was under consideration











pes 7 wee SH ny ne emt
OO ixehplok doa w kOe eae eet W S00 ag

YOU SAVE 3 WAYS

‘ when you operate these low-cost
Morris-Commercial 25/30 cwt. wucks

se WP sete




FUEL CONSUMPTION IS LOWER due to high-efficiency,
economy engine which develops 42 b.h.p

MAINTENANCE COSTS LESS rugged cohstruction of chassis, ~ «
gearbox and engine withstands hardest working conditions, means *’ ™
fewer overhauls,
REPLACEMENT COSTS
ARE LOWER ~ because Morris-
Commercial trucks are built to
stay on the job longer.

25/30 cwt. van

Reduce delivery costs with this
Asmart, economical 25/30 cwt. van.
Over-size capacity 245 cub. (6.93
cu.m.) solidly built for hard work,
sliding cab doors, full-width rear
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cab

MORRIS-COMMERCIAt

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.

Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504

OR *A Paramount Picture °

oy

tw

rts

u

~e

ont

“

seed
PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS | ADVOCATE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1950

a







TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

KENZEL ALARM CLOCKS

MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY








HURRY, BOYS! YOUR / ER,
INAUGURATION ER...
Tz








BANQUET tow od






5 The Bes* Clocks Made
inet li nies aa fa
. 7 | c q ‘ 7.

: 22 COL1 AUTOMATIC
| ; LUXURY PISTOL ........ $40.00



Contains
er

POLLE'P SOAPS D.D.T.



| at

i} JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE

|





BUSINESS
OR

PLEASURE



NOT UNLESS

iF I TAKE BABS 2 | You TAKE VERA PLY
SKATING FOR YOU, ) TO THE MOVIES,
WILL coe GOTO < ray INSTEAD OF t
THE DANCE WITH )> WHAT ALVit Nees
No EMILY? ZC SAYS, FIRST . ee T i SPEAKING
. oN ele el DY

~

is




































To
Cope 1980, fg Rtg ree md reser SS T AD
See ee eel a i Single ........ $ 32.00
Return ........ $ 57.60
THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER DAILY FLIGHTS
asa WITH HIS CATTLE ALL Gone, © 'LL GET THE CASH i MIKE, THAT MASKED MAN IAS A LOT OF CARN 96.00
Ta © ONT Winit YOU TO M-M, WITH HIS CATTLE,ALL GONE, }t TLL GET THE CASH F MIKE, THAT ingle ......:. "
EXTEND FARES HORTNEE TWAT SOUg ‘HE'S A'BIG Rom OAT ang ~~ LOT OF Mt SAFE HONEY NWS POCKET HG VENDING Bete te 3172.80
TO tEND : M THE CASH TD jg =< UNDER OBLIGATION TO YOU. onic . FREQUENT FLIGHTS
: = A AMBUSH HIM! ST. LUCIA
i atetass 18.00
ps good looks tell you they’re just right. ince nee Sigh a ; 32.40
You know, too, when you look at the price FREQUENT FLIGHTS
: tag, that you ean’t get finer value. Illustrated MARTINIQUE
~~ (D is a Two-tone Brogue, Tied to every pair is Single ........ ; pf
‘ the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign FREQUENT FLIGHTS
7 p/ C7>=- which means ‘just right’! Look for it in JAMAICA
I I co leading stores in Barbados. Single ........ $190.00
salir 00
FREQUENT FLIGHTS
taped Bade ec hogs i om PUERTO RICO
a YOU WANT TO FORECLOSE THE LONE RANGER ASKED GET RID OF THAT MASKED Ff LEAVE IT TO}. | eULLETS WOULD MAKE THEIR DEATHS | | Single ........ $ 93.00
ON RED FARISH'S RANCH, WHY'D YOU LEND RED JM ME To. T'M ORLIGATED TO MAN AND ae AND “ et LOOK LIKE W DER. THIS ROCK'LL 5) Return ........ $167.40
[Re ISN 8 OF oe — ge (Meee, (aionrest/| | 02 eee FREQUENT FLIGHTS






Single ......... 4.00
Return ........ ee
FREQUENT FLIGHTS
weak,

See
19TH ANNIVERSARY



BRITISH WES T INDIAN AIRWAYS
Airways House, P.O.S.

Lower Broad Street,

BY ALEX’ RAYMOND








ANT HER WING OF THE VILLA BENARES : er daee , M , . es Bridgetown.
FB ah assey APPA | ver sss
fr [a7 is * Pig! lastiai
- (42 B.HLP.) nt
Also available with Steel Wheels and Half Tracks (For Ploughing) FIREWORKS

A SELECT ASSORTMENT
Including
sack” at. bon Seem
COURTESY GARAGE ROMAN CANDLES Etc, Etc.

White Park Road, — (ROBERT THOM. LTD.) — Dial 4391 patecune
Also
j Whole tee dn Retail

@@ ADDITIONAL SHIPMENT DUE SHORTLY.





BRUNO! WAKE UP! THERE e ’ Pee tak
ARE STRANGE NOISES LAW 's sone if













C. CARLTON BROWNE
Wholesste & Retail Druggist

WM. FOGARTY LTD. || ssemzers
TAILORING DEPT. i rceaanneaaaaech

e | sea |||] ASK FOR
SILVER ANNIVERSARY ; ry" RN
YEAR s&5§
RUM

It is Mild and Mellow
And Bottled

yi|| STUART & SAMPSON
LTD.

Headquarters For Best Rum



ores



gt Rs

NOW WILL YOU ALL BE
QUIET, PLEASE? | ag
HAVE TO _
CONCENTRATE,

—¥,

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

YOURE MADDENING! EVERY a
MINUTE YOU WASTE HERE, <
THE KIDNAPPERS ARE RIDING-) =
FARTHER AWAY!










| RoE SL 23.
wie VEX TRE | 5
Yao RERST BANG To NE")

















PLASTIC PARASOLS
$1.71

IC RAINCOATS
PLASTIC pone.



Ry

WHATS THAT )SOME KINDA NATIVE




** SPREADS THRU THE JUNGLE «+





PLASTIC HAIR
*TRIBE AFTER TRIBE HEARS THE










(E PHANTOM,
THROBS THRU










ey BRUSHES ... $1.82,

oN eM DANTON |] [REIMER el | RACE 9. WHO aE COSTUME |
RE Aieo~ “Bring TONE ad |e oe oo JEWELLERY |
. , Geet |
Ry en peas Ne ae SAMPLE SHOES

A Quarter century

of satisfaction to value-wise sh ors er n ; FASHION HATS
and’ Men who are particular about Cut, Style and ‘Finish | “GIVE A THOUGHT

of their Suits, TO QUALITY” NYLONS!

SHOP YES. IT’S

ms
rocartys ||| THANIS |

Pr. Wm. Hry & Swan Sts.

Make your personal selection now, from among the Extensive
Range of WOOLLENS, WORSTED, TROPICAL SUITINGS,
GREY AND DOE-SKIN FLANNELS, SERGES, HARRIS AND
SPORTS TWEEDS, now on display in our WOOLLENS
DEPARTMENT.



riscensdigiiahincmeetniein a ee
ST So aN




























IN MEMORIAM

IN loving memory of our
sister and Aunt Mrs Ada
who fell asleep on October 14,



A dear one from our home is g0he

A Voice we loved is still
A _ place is vaeant in our home
Which we can néver fill.
= in Jesus Blessed
m which none ever wakes to weep
Ever to be remembered
Hewitt:
(Nieces) :
» (Nephews)

UTO



Gordon and

vile

EEE
aition, Oyner teaving selon “Ne "eq: | , IGE ROCK.

14.10.

CAR — (1) 10 HP.

8 model. Apply a
ing & Co. Ltd.

nn

CAR — Willys in g6od
License to 3ist May 1941.

14.10.50—4.f.n.

CAR — One Standard 8 H.P. Car in

perfect condition. Apply J. E.
/o James A. Lynch & . Lita














w.
Telephone 3988,



= MOTOR CYCLE — One Matchless, 5
.P. Motor Cycle, For particulars:

pply to J. A. Cheesman, C/o ‘al
ink of Canada. 9.10 soe

Ic. & FITTINGS:
7:029, 7:036, 7:044, 7:052, 7:
. in similar sizes.
Galvanised Conduit
s % inch to 1% inch. Enquire Auto
‘e Co, Trafalgar St. Phone 2606.
14.10,50—t.f.n.

REFRIGERATOR — One (1) 9 Cubic
. Crosley Shelvador Refrigerato:
). One (1) Year old in per-

t condition, Four (4) years still re-
ining on guarantee. Phone 4447.

le. Apply

A School Boy’s leigh
Nu Made Cleaners,
-10.50—2n,

Solomon" ¢/o
almetto Street, City. 14

-— One Standard Un-
. Excellent er
os. Swan St. ‘

13.10.50—t, f. n.

LIVESTOCK

FEMALE DONKEY — Apply C. Wil-
» Shopkeeper, Brereton Village, St.
lip. 14.10.50—2n.,

rwood T
on.

19.

.



HORSES — 1 Mare. 1 Chestnut
Mare at Wakeliela Pits st. J hn. :
4

HAMS IN TINS — 9 *
e yours now

BONELESS
each @ $1.0 pee th. Secur
as Xmas supplies will be limited.
14,10.50—2n.

BERETS —
wear,

Clearing at only 4%. each.
STORE, 50 Swan St. 15.10.50—3n .
FIRE-WOoD lengths at 9c.
per 100 Ibs., and, Gord-Wood at “haps.
Apply — Dover, . 6.10. .
‘Seater RN tol oie Shireen
LIPTON" —- ©
drink and 0;
Jevel

enjoy this, you should use a
teaspoonful to the cup! Exceeding
et, from its delle t

18 WANTED

it every tame, Many sytney
suit every i 'y_ styles, many
prices. KNIGHTS DRU! : HELP

14.10,50—2n.

PIANO — In good condition, ub “AN TRRABTENCED CASHIER re-
tuned. Splendid tone. No. reasonable| dulred. Please apply in writing to
offer r . Mrs. D. ne, er| D. V. Scott & Co. Ltd. Do not send
2nd. Ave: Bank Hall Main Road, original testimonials unless subsequently

14.10.50—2n, | Tequested.”

iin einai

RAIN COATS — School Children Rain
Coats, and Young Ladies. Real English
quality. No Plastic. To clear $2.18 each
SWAN STORE, 50 Swan Street

14,10.50—2n. |

SALE — Among other items we séil
Khaki at 50c. per yd. ROYAL STORE.
14,10, 50—Zn.

SHIRTS—2,000 Men’s Shirts of guaran—
teed wearing quality at $2.00 and $2.40
each. ROYAL STORE. 12.10.50—7n,
et

SHIRTS & PYJAMAS — Boys’ and
Men’s Shirts and Pyjamas ordered to
Measure can be delivered within four

RELIANCE FACTORY.
12.10, 50—7n.

hours.
eee ereenennprrereuenneshmasainstieliniesnemiitipeadents
ate GALVANIZED CO!
— Prime 7 ft. $3.21 —
$3.60 — 9 ft. per Ob-
inable from Si. ARE

ee
Store, Broad St. 11.10,50—4n,

WEETABIX — Your Grocer has just
Teceived a fresh supply of this delicious
Cereal, which is more than breakfast
food. Price 46c. and Bé. Tae a:

14.10. mn.

PUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE

THE Tea-Room and Library of the
Women’s Self Help Association will be

opening om Monday 16th October. Con-

ors of cakes and preserves are

asked to send in eir goods on the

morning of the 16th. 10.10, 50—6n.
NOTICE

Applications for 4 Vestry Exhibitions.
2 for Girls at St. Michael’s Girls’ School,
and 2 for Boys at the Boys’ Foundation
School, will be received by me not
jJater than 20th October.

Parents of applicants must be parish-

in straightened circumstances.
of applicants between 11 and 12

W. U. GOODING,
Parochial Treasurer,

St. Philip.
11.10.50—6n.
CE

NOTI
“SEALED Tenders for the erection
of a Pavilion and Community Hall at



K. MASON,
Clerk, Vestry of St. George."
12.10,50—4n.

—

NO CREDIT NOTICE

K. R. HUNTER & ; ., Agents.
13.10.50—3n.
PERSONAL

—$—$—————————————
The Public are heréby warned against
giving credit to my wife Rita Branch

(nee Murrel) as I do not hold mygelf
responsible for her or anyone else con-
ae or debt or di Aiea ge
unless by a written ic.
Sed. DERCY BRANCH,
Richmond Gap,
St. Michael
14.10. 50—2n



The public is hereby warned against
giving credit to MARTHA WILLIAMS,
as I do not hold myself responsible for
any debt or debts contraesed by her or
anyone else in my name or on the Estate
of Lisford Williams

Se jot and_oe pent
for ani alf of
LISFORD WILLIAMS,
14.10,50—2n

beloved
Downes,
18.

by Louisé} “raat 1LLE
(sister) Rita and Beryl Hewitt} Stream "ae

Donald Downes
14.10.50—In.







r | Parish

Ai Berets for dress eir daughters
Children eae, Several Shades. ed that thi

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1950
erent

CLASSIFIED ADS.| Juenites wiu

TELEPHONE 2508










Coral Sands

— At
furnished apart-
\ 81¢é@, Alma
Eig ee ASE







-



Furnished 3 be@room, dra
ing and dining room Avene for t
month of November only 2377

14.10. 50—2n






e
flat

Ho? SH oan Ps,

10.10, 50—2n




Furnished infurnished, Appl:

or w .

Mrs. Z. Daniel, Shopkeeper, ads:
10.10.50—3n

EDUCATIONAL

VACANT SCHOLARSHIPS

GIRLS’ FOUNDATION SCHOOL
There até one or re vacant Founda-
tion | at the Christ Church
Girls’ Foundation School. Applicants must
be chaser, St, nts residing in the
o nh and
straitened circumsta’ 7a eee

inces.
The applicants must be perraee the

Hi at the
1 on Friday 27th October at 9.30

.m.
Forms of applicatio
from the Betrorase, Ww. Se tee
= House, Bay Lh
urned accompan
vs ate to the

GIRLS’ FOUNDATION 58
An_ Entrance Soon ee
School Year January—July
1 on Friday 27th

held at the
received u fe idee atte tal ber pe
the Headrilvtress and Faust be acco’ i
fed by a baptismal certificate and a tant
tchool attended’ By te caren of the lant
school by the pupil.
oat ears Jae be between
eal

the ‘examination. eee sont ey Seen ee

Parents

isi ‘witt ‘be
ber




























10.10.50—T.F.N.

OFFICE CLERK — Young Lady ex-
perienced general office routine up to
point of entry and bal; of customers’
ledgers. Call. with written application
or write im ately to Mr. Carter,
T. R. Evans, Broad St. State ege,
experience and schooling. Salary up to
$80 month according to experience.

14.10,50—2n.

STENO-TYPIST — Experienced Si
ist for our Office. Salary $1 .
Seereiary Dowding. Estates & ‘Trading
wt
Co. Ltd., Bay Street.
14.10,50—3n,



LOSI & FOUND





LOST
WATCH — (1) Ladies Gold Watch
with indi. Gold Band, Enamet
spun J i with 4 ¢rack, On Sunday
Oct. ‘ween Roebuck

Staple Groves and Bishop's Court Hil,

Finder will be suitably rewarded on
returning same to ivocate .
Dept. 11,10,.50—2n.

ol epee

DOG — One Dark-Grey Wire hayed
dog answers to Name Tom. Chancery
Lane — Silver Sands area, Finder wilt
be rewarded. Notify Mrs. E. Russell,
Chance View; Chancery Lane: Ch, Ch

14,10.50—In

eerie ifeetpened abelian rnen-noeceeeninae

SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS — Series U.

1. Fi please urn same to

orm ve C/o Frank Wood
lloden House, Culloden Road.

14.10 .50—1n.

PUHLKt SALES
REAL ESTATE

ae rh In Fae | Moon Fort,
Lucy. x 10 —

through. poly.
Men's Road, St.

lew, Pine righ
Skinner,

11,10. 50—n.

IN Plymouth, MONTSERRAT, ,B.W.1.
for £3,500.

=e
pi apa ie ot 2 eee

St
ins, Ni it
Charles 6
er.





4-0 | GOVERNMENT INDUSTRIAT sCROOr, SUMMERVALE—

14.10.50—3n

Gates a mee
ahy ‘day except es by tment
Dial 3983. ‘ 10: ,



MAIL NOTICE

Mails for St. Vincent, Grenada, Trini-
dad, and British Guiana by the S.S
Canadian C will be closed at the
pana Post Office as ee tf

‘arcel Mail and Register Mail @
9 a.m., Ordinary Mail at 10.15 a.m.’

E' THOMPSOR 630" p.m. £1994

.10.56-—t.f.n.
the

we
he




i
T _ A
floor

. Very

for a big

bs inate

11.10.50—4n.

HOUSE — SESPBRANZA” fully fyr-
Geres from the 2 Nov. on, St. ages
Coast. 14,10. /.

Â¥ Yan y
Drawing and Dining 2
W.Cc,, Bath and Kitchen.






'
The post is temporary and terminable by a month’s notice on
either side. Remuneration will be in accordance with the Key Scale

a ‘
«| Matron, Government Industrial School, particularly from women in

BARBADO:
Amphibian
Landing

@ From page 1.
Intelligence officers in Tokyo
estimated that the South Korean
lightning drive up the east coast
had isolated 6,000 to %,000 Com-
munists in wild mountainous coun-

Be Included
m ° *

In Credit Unions

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN,
Suggestion by Noel P. Bowen
Registrar of Co-operatives in
Trinidad, | at_a meeting is that
the Credit Union Societies’ Or-

ae will soon be a

7 stated
in ene the Credit Union.

01 ad teachers of ci!
schools attended, with a view *
atranging that school children
Bhould take part in the credit
union movement. The Registrar
assured that all details of the
seheme would be placed before
them at an early date, and that
his department would at all
times be willing to give inform-
ation and advice.

Exit Tramp

LONDON.
Frederick Francis Fincher, 60,
in court on a charge of stealing
(three watches from a house, was
described by defense counsel as
a tramp. He interrupted to say:

“Excuse me, sir. ey do not
eall us tramps now. We are

wayfarers.” ‘iia
He received 2a ni sen-

strip is Kimpo near Seoul.

A large Communist force h
been reported in Mokpo in the ex-
treme south-west corner of t
peninsula. Fifteen thousand re<
armed troops and 2,000 with small
arms were said to be in a 25
square mile district around the

General MacArthur's headquart-
ers announced to-day that 60,000
North Koreans had been captured
since the campaign began 1,400 of
them in the past 24 hours.

Reuter.

FRANCE ASKS AID

WASHINGTON, Oct. 18.
France to-day urgently asked
America to rush military Equip-
ment to Indo-China where French
troops are retreating in the face
of a heavy pressure from Viet-
nam troops .—Reuter.





tence,



GOVERNMENT

S ADVOCATE








In Carlisle Bay

Cyclorama O., Sch. Lochinvar S .
Gord

Seh. 1c. ion, Séh. Cyril
Sch, Zita Wonita, Sch. En.er-
- Frances W. Smith, Sen

Lady Joy,
. E. Caroline and Seh. Molly
Jones

Schooner Philip be idson, 87 tons
, Capt. ish Guiana

Schooner rise S., 66 tons nett
Copt. MeQuilkin, for Trinidad.

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

CABLE & WIRELESS (West
Lid. advise that they can now commu-
nicate with the following ships through
their Barbados Coast Station:

S.S. Fort Amherst, S.S. Golfito, s.8
Peth Finder, SS Geologist, ss
Hudsonfirth, S.S. Orestes, S.S. Moon
Captain
ss

Indies;

dotte, S.S. Blue Master, S.S. Nerina
S.S. Neuva Andalucia, §.S. Frontenac
Alcoa Pennant, S. Montana,

Granadero, S.S Ana, S.5
San Prince, S.S. Sundial, $.S. Cleve
land, S.S. Trocas, S.S. Elizabeth,
S.S. Thomas W. Gregory, S.S. Sunreti,
S.S. Canadian Challenger, 8.8. Uruguay,
s.s in L. ake, SS. Rosa,



Seawell

ARRIVALS—By B.W LAL.

~ From TRINIDAD;

Chuma Averboukh, Veronics Winzey

Ramon Odreman, Guillermina Odreman.
yee en Fred Odreman,

erick \ Mpgron Sym-
monds, Samuel Bennett, Jo! kles,
Edmund Gwyn and Charles Th :
From. MAI ‘

Hedda . Elias Rodrigue.
and Lelano Rider.

From pace ieee GUTANA:
J lover, E. Glover, M. Thomas,

and ©. Lofes.

ne ST EFT:
enneth Bartier and Albert Myron.
From ST. LUCIA: "sg ;

~ Li :
Reginald Michelin
From ANTIGUA;
Allan King.
ARTURES—ty B.W.1.A.L
For D:

Marjorie Walker, Boon, Davia
Boon, Dian Cox, Mary Kinkead, Albelston
Best, Isolene Husbands, Kenmore Hus
bands, Floreta Prescod, Ernest Evelyn
Courtney Richards, Stella Walker, Pete
Vollmer and John Donovan.

For BRITISH GUIANA;

Clarence Galloway, Rose Galloway,
Viola Galloway, Dolores Kennedy, Vane
Gullin, Beresford Gilkes, Horace Waiton,
Elsa Rodrigues, Amélia Texeira, Jotn
Trim and Kenneth Grannum.

For ADA:

S'8..Onivevank. eens , K, Annétte Reek, Dorotny

NOTICES





Air Mail

With effect from 11th October, 1950 the air rate on printed matter
(ineluding newspapers, comméfcial papers and books) to Great Britain
is 12 cents per half ounce.

Genéral Post Office,
13th October, 1950.
14.10.50,—2n.



Diesel Mechanic—Seawell Airport

APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Grade “A” Diesel
Mechanic at Seawell Airport.

Applicants should have a thorough knowledge of Diesel Engines
and will be required to pass a test.

rates fixed for Grade “A” Mechanics.

Applicants stating age and qualifications should be submitted
to the Manager, Seawell Airport, from whom further information may
be obtained, not later than the 21st October, 1950.

14.10.50.3n.



VACANCY FOR POLICE MEDICAL OFFICER

Applications are invited for the office of Police Medical Officer
District “E”. Candidates must be registéréd medical practitioners.
Post is part-time and non—perisionable with salary at the rate of $240.00
per annum. An allowance of $48.00 per annum is paid for medicine
supplied.

2. The appointment will be terminable by thréé months notice
on eithér sidé. The suécessful applicant will be required to reside
in the District. \ '

3. Applications stating age, qualifications and practical experi-
ence, should be addressed to the Colonial Secretary, and must reach
the Secretariat not later than the 21st of October, 1950.

’ x 14.10,50-—2n.

Se eEREEREEEEeeeeeeeee

APPOINTMENT OF KEEPER OF CLOTHING,

GENERAL HOSPITAL.

Applications are invited for the pensionable post of Keeper of
Clothing, General Hospital at a salary of $1.056 rising by annual
increments of $48 to $1,200,

2. Applicants shoyld not be over 40 years of age, should have
attained a satisfactory standard of education and should be compe-
tent dressmakers with expérience in the supervision of the work of
a large staff of seamstresses and washers. They should be compe-
tent to keep records of the work done in the Department, and will
be responsible for the maintenance of stocks. Appointment will be
on probation for two years in the first instance.

3. Applications on forms obtainable from the Secretary, Gen-
eral Hospital. should be forwarded to him not later than the 31st of
October, 1950.

30.9.50—3n



VACANCIES FOR AN _ ASSISTANT MECHANICAL
ENGINEER (LOCOMOTIVE) AND AN ASSISTANT
MECHANICAL ENGINEER (MARINE) IN THE
BRITISH GUIANA TRANSPORT AND
HARBOURS DEPARTMENT

VACANCIES exist for an Assistant Mechanical Engineer (Loco-|
motive) and an Assistant Mechanical Engineer (Marine) in the British |
Guiana Transport and Harbours Department. The posts are permas |
nent and pensionable and the salary of each is in the scale £750 x £30!
—#£900 per annum. ;

The Assistant Mechanical Engineer (Locomotive) is required to|
assist the Chief Mechanical Engineer and take charge of Locomotives, |
Carriage and Wagon maintenance and operation.

The Assistant Mechanical Engineer (Marine) is required to assist
the Chief Mechanical Engineer and take charge of the maintenance
of Marine craft, hulls, boilers and engines.

Candidates for either post should be under 40 years of age, cor-
porate members of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers or (in the
case of the Assistant Mechanical Engineer (Locomotive) ) hold ex-
empting qualifications with experience of Steam, Diesel-electric and
Petrol Locomotives, and carriage and wagon maintenance or, (in the
case of the Assistant Mechanic Engineer (Marine) hold other
technical qualifications covering the field of a Marine Engineer. The
holders of each of these offices should be capable of acting for the
Chief Mechani¢al Engineer.

In each case, free passages to British Guiana will be provided for
the officer, his wife and children under 18 years not exceeding five
persons in all. On leave after completion of a minimum tour free
return passages (not exceeding a total of £200) will be provided for
the officer only subject to the provision of funds annually by the Leg-
islative Council. Five days’ leave for each completed month of rési-
dent service, up to a maximum of six months of leave, may be granted
after a minimum tour of two years. Freé quartérs are not provided.

Intending candidates should make application (or write for any
further particulars desired) to the General Manager, Transport and
Harbours Department, British Guiana, giving brief details of age,
qualifications and experience as soon as possible.

10.10.50.—3n.
Seana EEEReEEEEmeEEeenet

APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Assistartt to the Chief

the service of the Government. .

2. Salary will be in accordance with the rates fixed under the
Civil Establishment (Teachers) Order, 1949; entry into the incre-
mental scales $732 to $1,344, $1,056 to $1,776 and $1,446 to $2,352
will be determined by academic qualifications. In addition an allow-
ance is payable atthe rate of 25% of the salary.

3. Candidates must be between the ages of 25 and 35 years and
be prepared to live in thé quarters provided (unfurnished).

4. Application forms, obtainable from the Superintendent of
the Government Industrial Schools, St. Philip, or the Social Welfare
Office, the Garrison (from whom further details may be obtained),
must be complétéa@ ahd returned to the Social Wélfate Office by
Tuesday, 3lst October, 1950.
12th October, 1950.



14.10.50—2n

Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
ment) Order, 1950, No. 33 which will be published in the Official
jazette of Thursday 12th October, 1950.

2. Under this order the maximum wholesale and retail selling
prices of “Oats” (Feed) are as follows: —



ARTICLE WHOLESALE PRICE | RETAIL PRICE
(not more than) (not more than)
Oats (Feed) $11.32 per bag
of 160 lbs. 8c. per Ib.





Lith October, 1950



VACANCIES FOR INSTRUCTORS IN THE GOVERNMENT
TECHNICAL INSTITUTE, BRITISH GUIANA

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons, includ—
ing officers already in the Government Service, far appointment to
any of the four vacancies for Technical Instructors in the under-
mentioned trades required for the Technical Institute, British
Guiana: —

Mechanical engineering, including machine shop experience and
some experience of blacksmithing and ‘possibly foundry
work;

Building trades, including a general knowledge of plastering,
painting and decorating;

Gas and electric welding, with a general knowledge of plumbing
and pipe-fitting or sheet metal work;

Hand shoemaking and leather work,

Qualifications:

Recognised apprenticeship in modern industrial concern; City
and Guilds or equivalent Trade Certificate necessary and National
or Higher National Certificate highly desirable. Must have had
experience in trade and in instruction.

Emoluments:

The salaries attached to these appointments are at the rate
of £600 x £25 — £750 per annum éach. In addition, the appointee
will be provided with free furnished quarters or an allowance of
£100 per annum in lieu,

General Conditions of Service:

The appointments will be on a contractual basis for a period
of two years, in the first instance, following which consideration will
be given to the question of re-engaging the persons concerned on
similar terms or of appointing them on a permanent and pensionable
basis.

The general conditions of service will be the same as those
applicable to other officers in the British Guiana Civil Service.
Applications:

Applications giving name in full, age, family, if any, qualifica-~
tions, and experience, and supported by copies of testimonials from
three persons to whom reference could be made concerning the
applicant’s character and professional ability, should be addressed
to the Principal of the Technical Institute, Georgetown, British
Guiana, not later than the 31st of October, 1950.

_10,10,50——8n



VACANT POST

First Mate, Trinidad Government Coastal Steamers,
Port Services Department

APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Ist Mate, Trinidad
Government Coastal Steamer Service, Port Services Department.

Candidates must be in possession of a Certificate of Competency
as Home Trade Master Mariner issued by the Government of Trini-
dad or by the Marine Board of Jamaica, or a certificate of equal or
superior value issued by a competent authority in the United King-
dom or in any British Dominion or Colony.

The salary of the post is in the scale of $1,920-—120—$2,400 per
annum, A commuted overtime allowance of $25 per mensem is pay-
able. A messing allowance of $1.20 per diem is also payable in lieu
of food,

Shore quarters are not provided but in the case of officers recruit-
ed overseas an allowance equal to difference between 10 per cent of

ary and rent paid, is payable to an officer who rents unfurnished
‘quarters and an allowarice equal to difference between 10 per cent
of salary and 5 per cent of the annual value of furniture supplied in
Government furnished quarters, is payable to an officer who rents
furnished quarters. Allowances in both cases are subject to a maxi-
mum of $50 per ménsém for a married officer whose family is not
residing with him and $20 per mensem for a single officer.

Free second class passages will be provided on first appointment
for the ‘officer and his family not exceeding five persons in all. Sub-
ject to review at any time and not as a permanent right of the officer,
free passage on leave after a minimum tour, not exceeding the cost
of normal sea passages to the place of recruitment will be provided
for the officer, his wife and children subjeet to a maximum of three
adult fares.

The successful candidate will be appointed on probation for two
years in the first instance, subject to his passing a medical examina-
tion, and will be required to contribute towards the Provident Fund.

Applications giving full particulars of qualifications and experi-
ence, together with certificates and testimonials should be addressed
to the Honourable the Colonial Secretary, Trinidad, to reach him not
later than 22nd October, 1950.
12th October, 1950.

13.10.50,—3n.

Kidney Trouble Cause
Backache, Geffing Up Nights

If you're feeling out o-sorts, Get Up
Nights, or suffer from Dizziness, Nervous-
Ness, Backache, Leg Pains, Swollen Ankles,
Rheumatism, Burning Passages, Excess
Acidity, or Loss of Energy and feel old be-
fore your time, Kidney Trouble is the true





Doctors’ records prove t

No Benefit—No Pay @
The very first dose of Cystex goes yet
to work helping your Kidneys remove ex-
cess acids. Quickly, this makes you feet
like new again. And so certain are the
makers that Cystex will satisfy you com-
pletely they ask you to try it under a money
ck guarantee, You be the judge. If not
entirely satis‘ied just return the empty

Wrong foods and drinks, worry, colds or
overwork muy create an excess of acids

id. Dilace a heavy strain on your kidneys
= parle fonesion pocpty and need help
health and mas ood and maintain package and get your money back,
oe (Siss-tex) costs little at chemist

@ Help Kidneys Doctor's Way ® and the money back guarantee protects

you, so buy your treatment today.

‘tors have discovered by sclen- or
tests and in actual Practice Kt Jn o $s
t and sure wep to help the kid-
peys Out excess poisons and acids is BLADDER
With @ scientifically prepared prescription ! The GUARANTEED Remedy RHEUMATISND

| MRS. FE. SIMMONS

called Cystex. gumrnent hundreds of )



PAGE NINE



'SHIPPING NOTICES

MONTREAL AUSTRALIA NEW ZEA- —_
LAND LINE LIMITED



(MLA.N.Z. LINE) uv. T. B Radar For St
ile om , Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada and
s "Gloucester" ls fr . Dat satling to be

September 7th, Adelaide Septem Notined ee ee ete
19th, Melbourne September 28th, Devon-

pert October Ist, Sydney October 7th, M.V. Carihbéee For Dominica:
Brisbane October i. arriving at a: St. Kitts Nevis and

Barbados November 11th

at. Sailing on the 20th
These vessels have ampie Space for 1980.
chilled, hard frozen and general cargo.
tea accepted on through bills of M.V. Daerwood For St. Vin-
ae Sine, Teaehipenant at Trinidad cent: St. Lucia; renada and
foc, Bares tish Guiana, Windward . Date of Salling to be

B.WL, Schooner Owners’
Asso. (Inc),
Tel. No. 4047

Isla
For further rticulars apply: —
FURNESS, WITHY ;
te AD, & Co. Ltd.,

®



= ORLEANS 4a. 108
; 0. -
8S. “LIBERVILL#«” 28th Sept 12th Oct.
NEW YORK S*RVICE
wails Arr.
N.Y. B'dos
8.S “BYFIORD" 29th Se
a 3 29th Sept ot
8.8. “C. G. THULIN 13th Oct. ara ‘Set
CANADIAN sg yi
SOUTHBOUND rt }
Sails
oe ieee Sows Montres! Halifax werbedee
3S, “ATS ER" October 7th Octover 10 Oct
S.S. “ALCOA PARTNER” October 27th Oetaber 30th Nevettner ins
NORTHBOUND
Arrives
Ss Barbac ds
3.8 ALCOA PARTNER” October 10th For St. JOHN, St. Lawrence
8.S. “ALCOA PEGASUS” October 2st For si i
3.5. b | 2le
Sa “ALAA erie: ir or St. Lawrence River Ports,

October Sist For St. Lawrence River Ports.

These vessels have limited passengers accommodation





ABB AMS Sly, WER aor eae See
HARRISON LINE
4
OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
Vessel From Leaves Due
B
8.8. “GEOLOGIST” Liverpool 30th Sept. ‘ak oct
S.S. “LLOYDCREST"” London. 10th Oct. 27th Oct.
it “OREGON STAR” .._ Liverpool 20th Oct. 5th Nov.
8.S. “BEDFORD EARL”. London, 26th Oct. 16th Nov.
S.S. “SETTLER” .. .. Liverpool &
Glasgow. 28th Oct. 11th Nov.

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

Vessel For Closes in Barbados
3.8. “MOONCREST” . London 10th October.

For further information apply to—

DACOSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents

) SS
SUPERB!

hat's what
hey say when



HOWELL
begs to infotm her clients
see
that the HE NEW GAS COOKERS
hey are just right
FOR THE HOME THAT PREFERS
THE BEST
ONE ONLY LEFT

HASTINGS BEAUTY
PARLOUR

Will be re-opened on









Pe ee

ORIENTAL

§ GOODS! (Articulos)
CUROIS, JEWELLERY,
SILKS, (Se Habla Espanol)

THANTS

Pr. Wm, Hry, St. DIAL 3466



Monday 16vh October ,










HAIRDRESSING

MISS MacPHAIL’S
HAIRDRESSING SALON
Will be CLOSED from
SATURDAY 14TH

Re-opening - - -
MONDAY 23RD
10,10.50,—2n,

JOHN
M4.
BLADON

will

SELL

YOUR PROPERTY

Phone 4640
Plantations Buildings

TH SEP ONG. BELLS”
Â¥Y SOCIETY
Applications for two or more

exhibitions to any Second ners












Secretary not late
day the 26th October 1950

Candidates must be members
or the children of members, and
must not be less than 10 years
nor more than 12 years of %#®
on the Sist July, 1961, to be
proved by a Baptismal certificate
which must accompany the appli-
cation



The examination will be held
at the St. Philip's Boys’ School on
Saturday 28th October, 1950, oe-

THE FOUR CORNER STONES
ginning at 10 aim. 0

Ly
The Committes of Management: GOOD
Per,
R. S. WEEKES, Secretaty

ei FURNITURE
ARE
BRAUTY COMFORT

COLLECTION
RENTS.

LASTING and STRENGTH
THIS FURNITURE HAS IT

SUPERIOR China Cabinet in



Big, Glow-polished Mahogany
and Cedar, Several more China,
Bedroom and | Kitchen. Cabinets, |
i ach different - id ards,
I beg to notify the Waggons, Buffet, Larders; Trol-
, ; © les 3
General Public that I ry

BEDROOM BEAUTY in Bed-
steads, Beds, Vanities in Mahog-

g my busi-
have added to my any, Birch or Dealb—-Wardrobes,

4 Linen Presses — Body-height
Ree ic Rent Collecting Cheval and smaller fram
Department, and shall be Mirrors, $1 up

DINING, L h, Cocktail, Radio

glad to undertake the & Kitenen Tables Upright iat
i any, Bentwood, Birch,
collecting of all rents Hoi Bedetabul aarved and

mirrored Mahogany Side Table on
castors, size 4 x 2 feet Metal

whether large or small.

Strict attention will be Coslerator a ae

i i WING RGOM Suites or
paid to all. Commission esate pieces in Mirrors, *per-
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PEA IDE
PAGE TEN BARBADOS ADVOCATE __ saguspay, ocresss 4 =
a

————













, f
‘ These Honoured W. I. Cricketers FIGHT rgarl Trouble








od .
i INFLUENZ tood Pressure
IN su have around the hex
= stton, headaches +
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IN with Me.t)sliicd pre-war grad + (eee of breath, fee) nervy, or eu
M from peer lose of Mem:
= (% Pint Quality) | en ._ ind! ar

nystertous disease ‘chat esuses
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nistaken for some allment
ou suffer from an: these «>
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Goer wo hy E SE ee eed
| Saturday, October 14, 1950 | BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB
i AN ENTERTAINMENT (Members Only)
fGRICKE der tie di
WW if ICKET TEAM was honoured at a dinner in London rer at which the above were presen’. Left to Right: THE BARL OF aan oun — PRESENTS ~
‘ ATHLONE who presided; MR. JAMES GRIFFITHS, Secretary of State for the Colonies, SIR GRATTAN BUSHE, a former Governor of Barba- leney the Governor and
dos, and SIR ALAN BURNS, another retired Colonial Governor. (Story on p. 1.) Mrs. Savage EVENING IN PARIS
gaa 5 . will be held at the
1 4’
Replay Water 1-44" Cricket WOC_ Australia Seemer Seer mere CSL MALL ————
« etpacutaeneiancapameetit ES
Fixtures by kind permission of at 9 p.m. ms
P Will Pla WEW RULE WILL BEAT || = f,. Adjutant, Barbados TRUS
To-day is the secoad day of y Regiment BIG SHOW & ; 1 fe a
olo Match the fifth series of first ana In- SNOOKER CHEATERS from 5.00 p..m. to 7.00 p.m The ; Wrap Weer. ehs
iermediate cricket games and 6 D T Y diagram snows 4 nasty snooker ” (ee - oe 4
AT a Council meeting held at iue unai day of the séventh ser.e. ae ay ests N trick.» With only Wty fet In sid of the Girls DANCE OF 1950
the Barbados Aquatic Club yester- in the Second Division games. be Sa Ree, on the red over right Friendly Society
day afternoon it was decided that Following are the mxtures; Six days have been allowed for arg UOUIK pocket. PROGRAM STOKES & BYNOE LTD.,—Agents.
the Water Polo K.O. match be- Taina 7 each of the first four Test Match-| [SEO geet Soe Ore ” . SELECTING
- tween Snappers and Flying Fish FIRST DIVISION. es between England and Australia| | j) fit. the chances | “THE SUN
which was played on Thursday Second ay in Australia, and the last test at| | }; are that striker U ADOS
would be re-played on Thursdsy Wanderers vs s’olice at the Bay. Melbourne, will be played to al | OPIN TRE aie oak | MISS & MR. BARB.
October 19. Lodge vs Empire at Lodge. finish, | Ii with biack to | GOES DOWN”
This Council meeting was held xickwick vS Harrison College — The fixture card is as follows: | LF . OR Ow | All members local and
EX after a general meeting of (hy &t Aensington, | ,. OCTOBER 13—17:—One two day @aLack Di arth Sha: eaten: by isiting are asked to join i ‘ i
Te Barbados Water Polo Association | Spartan vs. Carlton at Queen’s match and a one-day match in ster, so he ELEANOR FITZGERALD the "ee not a dull This might
at which the new rules of Waver Park. z . Western Australia; 20—24 West BLUE ; accidentally |” with - ees
Polo were read. _. INTERMEDIATE Australia (Perth) '27—31 South | yeuwow, || ‘oses four. but Sik: demeaeaeae: oh aeevanaie PF we 1
, ; : i Y.M.P.C. vs Empire at Bec- » Australia (Adelaide) . Gh ee LAMBERT, June KNIGHT, Her- OTHER ATTRACTIONS be you!
The Snappers — Flying Fis. kles Road, NOVEMBER 383—8: Victoria ‘Lees coomown) QPS. Poni bert CHEESMAN, Jean EDGHILL,
match on Thursday was nut Windward vs Wanderers at (Melbourne); 10—14: New END 5 rsDe!, ind Sorry old vohn BURT, Ann RAISQN, @ A CASH BALLOON :
finished. for due vo bad light tue Congo Road. South Wales (Sydney); 17—1g| Se SRae: Se, Tees ache ee DANCE ina
referee had to blow off before ihe Cable & Wireless vs Pickwick New South Wales country match over the problem D h t oppor wt, Seseiasbick: his tial Divine Marke
a extra time was compleved. at Boarded Hail. (Newcastle); 21—22 New South | ¢xperimental ruse, the op; ! dos Dramatic Club. @ PARADE OF GENTS IN }
Along with this re-play maich Mental Hospital vs Spartan at Wales country match (Lisnore insist upon the pluyer of a fou LADIES DISGUISE. A
: a aaa 5 s trying his shot ga Veith m Piano Interlude. iest
or Thursday there will be @ Black Rock. 24—28: Queensland (Brisbane) diagram leave, it Siculd pay to ms.ert Prize for the funniest.
ladies oe game, ent imp.re vs Police at Bank Hall. pnpcEMBER 1—7: First Test} 7°" “°° FILMS @ GUEST ARTISTE FOR eS
teams Ww e announced later fe Me (Brisbane) ; 8—9 Queensland THE NIGHT B.G’s Radic
The following 14 players have SECOND DIVISION. oe SSS “ ” .G’s
heen asked to turn ou’ on Tues- Combermere vs Pickwick at ta -18 Federal Canitel Tercitory TO-NITE TO-NITE OPEN HOUSE Star Miss Marjorie Dey
day, for a practice match in pre- Combermere, ; ae peares” THE REID BRO The Story of the G.F.S. i ;
yervion “tor the Tynidad” duc. “Gollge vs" Centra ot Cougs, (Canberra): 1B Aunt “eb RP BERR © Se rar on |
G. MacLean, B. Patterson, ‘3. Foundation vs Y.M.P.C, at (Melbourne) 30—January 4: (Both known as Moose) ane 5 ?
Poster, K, Ince. D, Bannister, 6. Foundation New South Wales (Sydney). Invite you to their Shorts, Cartoons, Etc. Admission to Ballroom 2/- %
Manning, T. Yearwood, P. Fosve:, Regiment. vs Lodge at the january 5—11: Third Test D Oe ee P RTS JACKET
M. Foster, A, Weatherhead, 1}. Gurrison. (aydney); ‘13 ‘os 160: Taeeaanis ANCE ADMISSION — 2/- Be Early to Secure a Table
Manning, H. Weatherhead, ( Carlton vs Leeward at Carlton. y' ’ ur : x ee :
a in ye ; (Hobart) 19—22: Combined To-nite, October 14th, 1950
Evelyn, T. Grace, D, Atkinson and Pannen 24.25 South ncaniaitvndiiiieiiin cite cites il ED ie ER OE at Nag AE
Sa ey Australia country match (Den- At Queen's Park House
- } Fi mark) ; Pia South Austra- Music by Mr. PERCY GREEN'S these smart London tailored
rec / d tralia (Adelaide) . Aamerenestta
Cricket At Bank Hall F; x (or e FEBRUARY 2—8; Fourth Test Bi My ee his OPENING coats bearing the famous
e r l (Adelaide), 10—14 Victoria Br Solid Refreshments on Sale b d I H a’.
yy > Ii (Melbourne); 16—17 Victorian 14,10, 50—1n ’ ran name, n ound’s
Tomorrow Wire Cycle see eer ne



—20 Victorian country mate

eta ere will be ploved Mr. Fred Forde, of Baxter's (Euroa) 23. Fifth Test (Mel- |(%0%%G~6ss0%9sGGnsoooor
at the Empire Grounds Ban SI! Road, holder of Ticket 2468 in pourne). Pw) - N I T
to-morrow commencing at 1 p.m. the B.C.L,. Prize Drawing is the There will be no play on De- 3 IT S TO-NIGHT FOLKS | =

and will be concluded on Sunday winner of the Bicycle offered as A .
cember 24 and 25.
THE DANCE

next. the Prize. Mr. Forde satisfied the
You've been Waiting for Given py THE

Mr. C. Jackman’s XI will op- B.C.L. Representative Council at
Mr. WILFRED COPPIN 7
GREEN DRAGON

ose a team of Prison Qfficers, 4 meeting on Thursday that the °
oan the teams are as Gasca ticket was purchased before the Australia Should

At His Residence, Hil) Road,
Bank Hall

Mr. Jackman'’s XI— C. Jack- Daw took place.
Musie by Mr. SYDNEY NILES
Ork

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man (Capt.), N. Holder, G. Mer- A. check after the Draw dis- Wigit West Indies
ritt, G. Phillips, L. Francis, w. closed that the book with the
, f eo : ’ counterfoil had not been returned.

Drayton, F, Haynes, L. Craig, C. It however was brought in later (From Our Own Correspondent)

LA LEGEOVSS



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p Goria, 1. Bynoe, D. Trotman, ¥ by one of the esliere, and eeeent> PORT-OF-SPAIN, be An up-to-date Chinese Restaurant catering to those 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street
i re **** ing to advice given by the Police, The West Indian Cricket Board Ay Gantarale oe j j i i
Warders XIE. Bisnop, (Capt) the B.C.L, was responsible for er Control are being urged. to Gents 2/- , Ladies 1/6 wee like the best in Oriental dishes at reasonable
uc V. Bradshaw, L. Clarke, R. its agents’ carelessness, and that jnvite the Ausvralians to visit tae Saas : prices,
s Murrell, St.C. Haynes, L. Alleyne, a es - views = he oo West Indies in 1951, There have = LOC PESOS SOOO OCS
M. Bridgeman, C. Lewis, S. Kir- fie e B.C.L. he purchased the been much talk on this question, |{}/~ ~~~ — inese SSS.
se) ton, H. Wiltshire, F, Davis, M. ticket before the Draw. — and much has appeared in the Don't Miss the Prepared by a first class came Chet who knows
Evelyn, B. Warner. Consolation Prizes of five dol- gaily papers. ANN 1 aS onions, EE:
oe lars each were won by Tickets At vhe moment, writes Mr UAL DANCE 5;
fi \ G2 wit Gee eRe No, 81 and 1595, er ane —— Philip Thompson, “the followin ted tate NO. 9 BROAD STREET 3 T !
Sy hf } abs Cricket Club, and rT. , #ppears obvious: “That the vast PAS ARS OF 3 i
By NM. Plarrison-Gray coenee PN» Tg Doll aay of cricket-loving West eee Officers and Members 01 For Reservations we Dial 3896 °
iain $ S . ndians want an Australian vee » FARADIC®. HEGAINML
a wctusiertamt. — } | MGkergement have gen, made mein want an utraan Sean SO SSB. i
x North nae game, to. hand over the Bleycle to Mr. ou, Board of Control have but to Children’s Goodwill League
ir hsa a _ this morning. meet and the Australian invita- Monday Nine! lath “Bet
#54 tion to tour that country in at 9pm, ,
‘ om « Ae nen Ute eer Ree qt. B. GRREN'S on. This week's Housewife’sreminder! 66
4 s W ‘I have foun hat on more then dents 2/- .. Ladies 1/6
| ¢y Bailey Aud imt ene occasion: on mentioning th: Metreshinente;on Sale

K
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| WILLIAM FOGARTY LD.

LONDON. ing community, that any possible
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Arrangements have now been argument in favour of it is imme-
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x PLASTIC TABLE CLOTHS—54 x 54 and 54 x ‘84—in CHINES r
refreshingly new designs @ $2.57 and $3.05 each E RESTAURANT








Ss.
Qs
K 8542
a

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K 3978 and Arthur Wint to travel to New ‘We can’t afford it.”

Zealand with Roger Bannister at

te

FOUR WINDS
CLUB

na! contract was a
gut the cards lay

gc ,
badly
South Twe
Two Heart
Two .§
Three



“He bid One Heart ie op ot: Deceribte ie reqrenent SS uEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE piu
‘wo Clubs and West sthe AA, in the entennia ie
rts e East now tried Games being held at Canterbury B. B. (. Radio Programme

South bid from December 27th to January SATURDAY,







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sc nienpetipecna Ae uktapn cigs
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and West 3 : ; : Oct, 14, 1950
twas strong 2nd, Bannister, who is Britain’s 7 a.m. The News; 7.10 a.m. News
h second try with crack miler, will also act as team Analysis; 7.15 a.m. Close Down; 12

oe es Pyar .°** Analysis; 12.15 p.m Solitude; 12.45
&! Pepe Ue poe cee —L.E.S. p.m. Overseas Quiz; 1 p.m. Interlude;
1 sr four Hea ft — 1.10 p.m, Racing Results; 1.15 p.m
our ; ane by! . mS, eet 1,30 p.m Anything
a a N ‘0 eclare; p.m, The News; 2.10
age ‘L S and A. East 3 B.W.I. Table Tennis p.m. Home News From Britain: 2.15

dum

~

Will

























































» Diamonds. suggesting manager. noon The (News; 12,10 p.m. News Re-open .
OCTOBER 16TH eenpentrnet: : No. 6, MARHILL STREET
) } ‘ . ‘ ‘
DAMASCENE—50. inches wide in White and Blue @
$1.90 per yd.
v dq led Y6 to LN Fed ati M B F d p.m. What The Londoner Doesn't We are - $ ‘ ; ivT.
Summ ve Port won't ‘ eration May be Forme Know; 2.90 p.m. | Music Parade; | 3.30 cern TEA CLOTHS—Large assortment—intriguing designs ON THE MENU TODAY {
vurnel £ Y p.m. Sports Review; m e ews; asec é OY
y and the Di umond Ginesse (From Our Own Correspondent) 4 10 p m The Daily Service; 4.15 Bon a er ee ne from 84c. upwards.
lost, to South who shifted to trike Up The Music; 5 p.m. Listeners e€ appointment of
@0. Fis: could now discard _. . PORT-OF-SPAIN. — Choice;_ 5.15 p.m. Programme Parade; a ITALIAN BEDSPREADS—60 x 80, in Gold, Green, A Limited Quantity of
4 a Spade in dummy on @A ', Preliminary discussions with 5-30 p.m. Music For Dancing; 6.15 Mr. & Mrs, BI Whi d Ro: 5.50 h
7 and cross-ruff the hand for; » view to forming a British West Hie’ pounty, tT p.m~ The Newest 7.10 | C. 8S. HAMILTON ue 7” “oo a
] beaten {i South leads 4 av. | Indian Table Tennis Federation p.m. News Analysis; 7.18 p.m. Behind | a Please enquire early at - - - TRINIDAD’S FRESH SHRIMPS And The Famous
trick 2, a3 he can play @ A‘ ' are now underway between the he News ,7.48 pm. Weekly Sports | as Managers a y 5
after winning with @¢K and Trinidad Table Tennis Associa— g.15 p.m. Do You Remember; 8.30 Sea Food
North discard @ 7. > § ‘ttion, and the touring Barbados, p,m, Radio Theatre: 10 Pio hee Meet MARTIN GRIFFITH M ea Food — OYSTERS
Rete ae Jamaica and British Guiana ten— 1:0? Bithelors: 10.45 p.m. Songs For | Proprietor, ° °

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PAGE 1

PACK EIGHT MICKEY MOUSE ~7BARBADOS ADVOCATE WALT DISNEY SATVBDAY, OCTOBEB 14, 1*50 T-X^ I£ g=T-££ SEE ;\-T5 l ~ J —^ -E 7 N **Trif \E.s PCC5.0BMT ANO %  y ONDIE IF I TAKE ABS SKATO*; FOP xx, WILL AAI GO TO < ( LET ME SI 'He oftnce win i> *VVT A*.yi' eMlLVJp^XJ SATS, FIRS' ,_| BY CHIC Yp iiMr. THE LONE RANGER 1 0O#T \W*HT **X TOY/ UM-tf, ww us cnLe>ti GONE. EXTEND HRS.PS "OHTGA6F. I Mr*: jl HE'S BM5 RISK, B*TI Mt^ 1OIJI.0 y.1 ~; (* ID ^ -^""T, l*OERU6nON TO U >C F. a n ^ ^aaai N 'HE PHANTOM %  >'*•-> % % %  BY LEE FALK A RAY MOORES mass wv ru t i/e^—-^^T'^ T*> WHIIt v le|( ^ c^ i.i \t in 1 Oil. II SOAPS IWUUAL IXArHIJI %  UMM-N HIUMOM • BLLk M1AC1XI1I KEATJNGS KILLS itari irmiiiiuTlM TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH KIN/H ALARM CLOCKS rhf Bn~ Clwkt Ms*ir $4 m L**h .3-' COM AITOM \IH PISTOL H* JOIINKON S KTAf IONLKY UMi HARDWARE made by I ..u I hrv'rf juM rifkl. You know, loo, when you look at Ibe price lag, tin! you mni get finer value. Illu.truted ia a Two-tone Brogue. Tied to eer\ Baft itlie John White Guarantee Shield—the eign wfckh III.UII-juu rigkl'l Look for it ia lending .lore, in Barbados JOHN WHITE means made just right J The Answer to your Transport Problem Massey Harris WHEEL TRACTORS Also available uith Steel Wheel, and Half Tracks (For Ploughing) %  V ADDITIONAL SHIPMENT DUE SHORTLY. COURTESY (.AIIV.I WfciU Park Road. — (ROBERT THOM. LTD.) — Dial 4391 WM. FOGARTY LTD. TAILORING DEPT. SILVER ANNIVERSARY YEAR '*-* ^p.^r'Sr? u r'S,;^^S UEPARTMENT* "" " *"""•> %  ,n !" WOOLLENS %  CUE A THOUGHT TO QUALITISHOP AT FOGARTY'S BUSINESS OR PLEASURE FLY BWIA To TBJN1DAD Single $ 3io I Betora S S7.M DAILY FUGHTS CARACAS Single $ K.N Satan S172JM) FREQUENT FUGHTS ST. LUCIA Single $ 18-tMI Return $ 32.40 FREQUENT FLIGHTS MARTINIQUE >••*• 127.00 Be4urn $ 48.60 FREQUENT FUGH TS JAMAICA Single flM.MI Return 1342.HI FREQUENT FU GHTS PUERTO BICO Single 3.M Return 2U7.4U FREQUENT F UGHTS MIAMI Si"gh 1274.00 Return $4*3.20 FREQUENT F LIGHTS See IftTH ANNIVI KSARV BWIA • MirismmimaAMAimr. Airways House, P.O.S. Brlcartmn. Phone 4S8S ivuaat FIREWORKS FIREWORKS A SELECT ABSOBTMENT Irtcludlni SKVHOCKPTS. CRACKIM JACK IN BOX. HATCHES. ROMAN CANDUCS lie. luAnd SPARKLERS C. CARLTON BROWNE Wtwlami* Rrta'i Umtrlai 1M. KMbtMk fit. DUI UU ASK FOR And Demand s & s RUM It is Mild and Mellow And Bottled — by — STUART & SAMPSON LTD. lleadquartera Ft Bet Rum LADIES! >• PLASTIC PARASOLS I.7I PLASTIC RAINCOATS In PLASTIC HAIR HKI SHI.S . f 142 COSTUME JEWELLERY SAMPLE SHOES FASHION HATS NYLONS! YES ITS THANIS Pr. Was. Hrr a) Swan Sk. 'l



PAGE 1

, SATURDAY. (KTlllllli II. ISSfl HARRAnOS ADVOCATS PAC'.I i News From Britain ll> lMi(l Temple lloln ris LONDON. Oil 6 their pomposities—appeared on Th Navy has always saved Lrit< television Then cam* the storm. •in Once again we are in debt to' It m mi that Labour is particuthern. For the navy has delivered larljr sensitive to television—which gas supplies to London. The carhas its odd aspects, you wilt agree toonlsts are delighted with the Mr Percy Cudlipp, editor of the chances to draw imaginary charDaily Herald", gave tongue He found the play reactionary and full of snobbish bias Now. of course, he has every right to his views. There have been Tory HP's like Waldron Smlthers building up steam pressure until they almost exploded al leged Left slam of the B.B.C In fact you might >ay the Tori.siarted this. But Mr. J B Priestley, thp lcft-mlnded dramatist, gave up his personal talks in war-, time after whisperings behind the scenes rather than trumpeting* in say the -'Daily Mall" What seems, so odd is that the head of 1 IfceB^.v... Si WUUam Haley should have banned further radipnt<' that appears on th* advertisements tor gas fires, and gas cookers. While the London workers at the furnaces are on strike the stokers of the navy are doing the Job. This u a peculiarly aggravated and troublesome strike. It demonstrates some of the weaknesses th Government and the Trade Unions have been accused of For instance the strikers are ''unofficial" —their Unions tell them to go back to w Tk. Mr. Isaacs, the ItHItman we have as Minister of Labour, broadcast ineffectively warning the worker* they were being manoeuvred and used by the Communists The workers them{J?"*JJC ~ <* television s inoffensive playlet that %  elves are not—most of them— '."'J? ,,, f* nen lv *' playlet that hud Communists But they arc.till , u,lder !" f tender skins of a few on strike. The government has:" mr P^'cists. One point I delayed for weeks the two crucial i,,.. it^. "W* 7^ 1 th cdilor ,,f •tepa-and at las., this week, has j£ S^ W d,d not VXi n •cted. Ten of th* striker* have ^1L, B B C < !" ve in A few been brought before magistratos J£2L£ J22. 0 1 *** %  "•" %  • and sentenced to one month of! ££1, IO d,BCU "** to *oun Imprisonment Thcv have appeal,,.Til n ."W""" — the .,< *~i h __„.. w Listeners' Association — which e-d. And the lavy has been i drafted into the"gswork*. All i !* k "^ ^ nj rvaUve *n"otiU a i. — .. %  IOC *. fl nd sends streams of totters Londo paused navy men would rucceai S £ | i^ .S, 8 ^,!^ ,,me *? triumphs, the belated triumphs, of. i*u" offlee gpod government. The strike will ordinal.. probably end quite quickly £ •'. '" As the ten men were sentenced they aeemed to have a Jaunty, self-satisfied air—a kind of bold defiance But there is no doubt that respect for the law Is still overwhelming—no amount of delay and muddling can destroy It Bat even if the strike ends there is still one question to be settled. What of Mr. Isaacs* He has a big Job—especially if we are compelled by re-armament to retrace our steps down the road by austerity. He has not proved up to the Job even In easy times. He Is Mr. Bavin's nominee, certainly, and the colossus of the Labour Party would not like to see his little rnfrT swept out and a bigger man replace him. But Mr, Bevin has not time for everything. Party Manners Perhaps you have already read this litUe play Certainly It has achieved strange fame overnight. II was written by Val Gielgud a* the most light-hearted piece of nonsense. He. for one, never meant It to be taken seriously. It is peopled with Cabinet Ministers with red ties, with comical peers and Old Etonian socialist gentlemen as controllers of our nationalised industries. The play ran for a couple of months at an out of the way London theatre. Then it was given on the radio. Incidentally Mr Val Gidgud was the fellow who developed radio I Coke play* fifteen yean ago, as %  apego tfie vial technique. Now he n in teleI bowler vision. So bis little play—full of joined ir barbed shafts at our rulers and I young man set up to cothe stream. The "New i asked its readers "o send copies of their protests to this office. Pair enough, but .1 Jittle pompous one might say. Even the "New Statesman" thought so, as It printed next week, i D the -This England" column, (usually reserved far Items of surprisingly English self' righteousness), a little quotation, from Its own serious injunction! i Then came the television performance. Imagine the search' for pen or typewriter Then the leader on the "Daily Herald* Then the B.B.C. banned the] broadcast. O terror! O horror Vast publicity for a few light-1 hearted gibes at the Party I Manners; millions will read it; another example of the new censorship will have been i>er ut.-tn.Usd. Which all goes to show how disastrous It is to have an easy, pliable B.B C Why did Sir William Halo not stand up for himself and his Corporation? Did some Minister telephone from Margate in exuberant triumph at his Party Conference' The little incident will be soon forgotten; wc shall never know; but what o lesson in how the ban can boomerang! Bowler lint* It was a good excuse for a" party. The Bowler hat is a hundred years old it w as first made for ailed William certain Mr. Bowler. that made the first hundred years ago, celebration. Tile in side-whiskers, dressed in the costume of 100 yeare ago. certain! v lime-light And three young OBtoars of the Regiment o' C.uards turned out m mufti to demonstrato the bowler as it hi worn about town in these days. Perhaps they did not expect to be photographed. Perhaps it 1, cruel to record thenaghast looks *s the press turned cameras, ani iiewsreel cameras on them. Perhaps it was not quite regi; mental torsi Mayor's Thanksgiving j The idea was good. The LorJ Mayor of London would launcn I a fund to build home and hostel for students from Commonwealth and Colonies who come to London It would express Britain's gratitude for aid and food from overseas But it has turned out rather unfortunately. To begin with, a grandiose design was made for abounding at one end of an eighteenth century London Square. The preservers of our ancient buildings protested. Anl. more seriously, the complaint arose that London Is not Britain. students should be encouraged lo go to other places as well Ha;l the Lord Mayor's advisers thought d parcels Not SO, I assure you, but we do need reminding what the Lord Majoi wants to say "Thank you" lor 1 The hist great consignment of Empire food is due in Britain In the next weeks. We hope, Indeed there will be no need, again. |o feed Britain with generosity. CALYPSOES FOR CARNEGIE! .Flam Our Own Correaponaetil • PORT-OF-SPAIN Mr. I). C. Yannopoulos, Stage Director of the Metropolitan Opera Company of New York, told the "Gazette" yesterday thai much has been heard in the United States of the calypso and the steel band, the folk music of this Colony. In view of the policy lo encourage this development throughout the world, and lo encourage talent, there waa every possibility that "with a little touching up here and there, a show centred around the calypso and steel band music of Trinidad could be put on at Carnegie HalL New York, if proper arrangemenU are made" Mr Yannopoulo* Is returning to New York following an engagement gt the Colon Theatre. Buenos Aires. A RECORD catch of kiug flub caagbt by the crew of tke %  I^lv•Ug %  tor'• ysnterday in %  ber* of the crew looking on RECORD CATCH OF KING FISH N1NF. king ll*h totalling about 280 pounds were caugL Investigator" and marketed" here yesterday > Five of the fish weighed about! : pounds each and the othei foui 1.bout 20 pounds each' A catch of this kind is considered lovely. Mr [1 W Willthe Fisheries OihVei told UN "Adv.* at) Mr Wltol Bald thai he wanted to %  nnouneo to Bar* 1 ... the run it I the London Shallow. Those shallows wenIn the Soulh East part of the Island 56 Grapefruit: $1 iFron I POrTT-Or-SPATN. J.imolnc „ Fyzabad woman, told the Siparia Court that she was a mother of nine children Their father would not work, so she had to steal to support them She pleaded guilty lo (hi H of r >(i gropi I $1 oo. the property of Kern Trinidad Oilfields. She was put %  Bridges Damaged in Toad's Storm Discovery Day CilrE>ratioiis Marred ffssa i gssMtanti POH i I l| -SPAIN The ISSnd .iiiiiiveis.try of the I -New World by Christopher Columbus was comsnesnoratod in Trinidad this morn, ing. with the "laying ot a wrealh" at the foot of the dak Matue at Columbus Square, porlol Spain The '><-( n ,, marred by the •k*apn>vul or th. .rerheny of what It jttootl for by members ot the Trinidad—Venezuela U %  Ki Litmus Committee who bore placards of protest North west Trinidad was struck by it thunderstorm early in Tnurwlay morning, bringing tyi rvntial showers that ogu siderabl.damage i.> VartOul I laces, and toss of poultry* s<* II was disclosed through ha Weathor Bureau I that an isolated thunderstorm ..•v. iiii, .. fairly uuta artn, •rnlch : M>tei day, drifted slowly over Trinidad. Maravnl area received lh< wui-ve "! (he -toi*m. TIM 1 Mar.ival River overflowed Its banks niul another river at St. James. Wes; Port-of-Spain, overflowed, caun%  ng many of the surrounding %  le.-ts lo become tributaries Pori-Of Spain's East End Fmin '•i> Die F^istern Main Road ..::, %  %  . • .i BMUll employees were unable U' work on Thursday morningMany bridgewere damaged, trains ran lart-. and "uikn.i from the Works and Hvdiauln I Departnieiit were kept busy | clearing debris and li along several roads. College Principal Returns To T'dad I Piean Oar OtSS PORT-OF-SPAIN Mi Harold Page. I'niuJpal of Iba unparial College of Tropical Agricullure, St. AuguMme. Trinidad, arrived from the United Kingdom last night, via Jamaica Mr. Page was on long lM*l Ht vialt ati, Norway. Africa and India. wml* I.. Rngland. preliminary arrangements ..r tha cssOonUan "f ll< Hnviil t'hurter Silver Jubilee 1 of the I.CTA.. to b> held DOXl January, were made TICKET TALK • rrom Our Own lnnpiniStnii PORT-OF-SPAIN A report in a newspaper re i-aniing the ^ew Jamaica sweep NUkes. which aims at paying %  fnrt prize of $100,000. caused a Couva agent to send a clipping •he Company and to ask for n explanation A letter received by him from Hiiulsford Park. Umited. Kings -ir R Met'..nnfll. gs Hf i lT j %  %  lea, read in part; "We eg to advise thut you nee.1 lia\e no Bear in seUirui the tickei srhieh you have rentived, gg .il i %  • Itakata an pssffoe U a genuine We printed two sets of tickets BOOM single at 4 and som> ioiible at H By this you will understand that the tickets ar.-II good and none are forgeries The Weather TOIMY: Sun Rises: 5 41 a.m -MI SeU: .'. tl (. m Moon i First quarter) Orlnber 111 Llihtlm: g p in Mi. I, Water: S S7 a m 5 45 p m HMIRDAY: %  -x.l.,11 < ,.dn..,:!,.oi IR In Total for month to yeaterda* 4 41 Ins Temperalure (Mas.) M.*" P Temperature (Hln.1 1t.9 P Wind DlreeUon II i m ) li E.8 K Wind Veloell> 8 miles per hour Bsroineter (Ham ) tt H ( %  p.m.) 19 KM STOLE A PENNY PORT OF SPAIN. A thief broke, into a Port-of Spain parlour, found one penny in the drawer and d>ok it On a recond though!, he lurried to the 'helves and stole aerated drinks and sweets to the value of $2.00 Barbados Out Again (From Our Own Correspondent) „ LONDON. JUST OVEK a week ago a Irom the Barbados Qe/vernmerit informing th.' West India iftbM oi the ukjJBld'l d wi siop not to pi the 1US1 British Industrie Fair AS came as no %  r. --, liarbados had no part In the Fair W .1. Governors" n ttJZS. %£.. cislon is again in the negative %  hnibadoa igtouM sea &i to b*-paai this mighty exhibition Britiaa Baptra Can Make if, fjlaniaf. Trinidad and Tobagn, British Guiana and the Sea Island Cotton Association have all agraaf at ptay their part again The Don. ;.., llB | g^.. tlon is always on e of usj qsg pieces of the B IF. and receMg of the exhibition La*t year was one of the bail (Of .i King tune and tto w. %  t Instlai ..ind compared atokt favourably with ttios %  %  f Priktstan. Eaal Africa, Malaya and Mong Kong reeaU inai aval a] foreign whom 1 spoke were partlcularly Impressad will ducts ot the West Indies. Their one complaint -to which attention was drawn at the lime—was the lack of dtrori representation at aacll of the dands But that did not mean that burers went awa> without tnkiiK earafu nota of the irious goods on display. Hut it did mean that them went had wn the entire produetiort raiin.of all tluW. ,t Indies don't suppose mora than ona in ten avan moufhft*gai one moment that Barbados also formed part of the Hrltmh Cstrrb bean arid aUo had Its own pei tlrulai products. That was unfortunate enough from a trade |olnt of vie* But it is going to assume even greater importance because the 1951 B I F will coincide arlth the Faallvnl of Britain Aftanmnanai are vsan in hand lo make the IDS I HI F the great. al ill and Judging by the popularity of Ota Kan in racaw years that will not he difficult HunOaradl of thousands of visl tors Inwti the Umt,-d States, South % %  .• i %  .. bi tlnanl Africa and the lauVldk and Par East will be <<>i>iing to Rnglond for iho ecu tenary celebrations of the great Festival ..f 1851 For thoaa nation tha B.I.F. will I-the yard-slick bg %  ln> h the* can. for ihemselv.-s. )udgo th. British Empire's post war recovery effort Their visit to the Commonwealth section will jirobnhly be their first llrst hand contact with the Colonies and the Don For toth reason aionu it would be worth the while of Uiirbado* to he represented by a B> the t.Hirlst board. But It would Ubetter Mtill if the 0 reconsidered Ihelr deciMon and Barbados Joined tinother CsUW been poloauaa in showing th.world that the West Indies can muk also and will be accompanied by 1-ady Seel. The Oovenior has invited, ga well. irpieseiltativcN • %  CoaomonSi the Ooionlal unVe, HoU'gislatures of various Colonies within the British Caribbean and their wives, to witness the cera ns OOj and to be ilia guests of the liiiveritnient fot i raw daei Otrtain Coj) n Iraad] renUed II la unlikely that ihose invited from the United Kingdom will attend Captain S. J S. H.x.rd. HN, Commandlni HMS. -Sparrow", will be renra. xntlng (ho Commander in chief. AiTicrn.i and West Indies Station, and his ship is cspatted lo be Ul port In Port-of Spam fot %  i i n I.M S UtlUMM, IVomisifl For Road Making IN ST. LUCIA lOKT Of SI'AIN j Hun J M Stow, Administrator lf>r St Lu.ia arnvid in Trinidad on Wedmwlay night from the United Kingdom II.il be UM | guest of the Governor of the Windward Islands DM tarooi Ihrai daya In Giuiada before going on to SI Lucia He leav.-v I lad lo-uuiriowinornlng. His Honour said In PorUgf I Spain In an interview on Thureday | lhat a lliltn.li (iovemnicnt prasnua) of S4R().0IH) lo 1720.000 ( It W I I WMmsot for a road proajanune i in ^l. Uicbi. pnrvKted tt was In* tegrated with anoroved •cooornk
  • new. Ac method of drawing in. storing uicguarding and releasing ink. to goc (h most UMIKUM| pen performance eser known Ser il.ii floe pen admire its sum ITBCC . experience lu ailky writing ... for youneil. or u s gill, here U perfection made finer' Hipan alone It designed for tauafa.Liry uae •'ti Parker SupsrchrooM — the tuper-bnlliasi. ijpei-psnnaaent drr-wnuog Ink. -uM^dJ mM£ uKvn&d pen -uAtficd cfaf urttA* (OetiaiA, Price with Rolled Gold Cip 22." „ Lmtraloy Cap W1.18 A. S. BBTDBN 4 SONS ,Brbdoi) Ltd, P.O. Boi 403, Bridgetown. For a wonderful cup of coffee ^^ TRY THE IMPROVED f*y CHi m IASE S SANBORN This is the GLUCOSE whkh wim Teit Mitchas,* luppliei immedut' enerfy lo ithleiei. reiiore* ind lutiami in fingwe *• i taseoa It <* most vilmble (oo In inlant lee'l< -g m L AN0 CAKIUM jj i ctycja.oPHon-M*r( J HH MN0VI>1HMIH* MOINI UM'iON o a CAicit r-o i ggai .1 r ia %  ^.*2r E£5oi ""v" Saul fe 7 COW t GATE Wm. CONMIMPTKW IS LOWE* doc to high--ikmg v.mduiuin. mesnt " I ihault. Ill II \l i Ml .NT COSTS . AKHI.OWHR betetaMMonav%  ial iruik* are built to ''" %  tOe) kmger. • • 25/30 cwt. van Raduoi aalh"s r s coats stt ihi lH,tM/e,pa,.iir J4* cub. ivi ca "• IsaHdll r-uili for hard work. \hJing .at. di-*', lull-width rear doors, access to kJ ln>in asSSB/l aalUn t> UHIC 'g^w -—-^ IJLUCOSE MORRIS-CDMMERCIAL %  .' %  kill' DOW %  4 % it i %  %  II Arrnu-J %  LULU CO. LTD. I FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Pbon* 2385 Sole Diitributon Phone 4504



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    SatarSay. • claber 14 1*50 SarbaJms fccicate KING'S BOX FOUND IN DUSTBIN French Forces! SEAMAN CHARGED WITI^ -.r Round Table Knights Honour W.I. Cricketers "Festival Year Of W.I. Says Griffiths (From Our Own Correspondent) LONDON, Oct 13 MR. JAMES GRIFFITHS Secretary of Slate for the Colonies last night bestowed further praise upon the West Indies cricket team. Speaking at a dinner in London he said: "Next year may be the Festival of Britain, but this year has been the festival of the West Indians —— ———^— Thty have bcn grand ambasqf Consuls Must Use Discretion IN GRANTING VISAS dinner of Hie of 'h' WASHINGTON Oct. 13 A Slate Department spokesman said to-day that United State* Consuls abroad are empowered tc use their own discretion in invalidating visa* of foreigners coming to America. Yesterday's decision to suspend temporarily all visas under the new Internal security law was taken for two reason-' I. To prevent further congestion at Ellis Island where many aliens are being held for investigation for possible Fascist connection*. 2 To allow officials here to study the law and Issue new detailed instructions. Communists have always been bund from entry to the United States. Fascists us a class were not barred but the new law makes Ihttr exclusion with some exceptions mandatory. The State Department admitted the order would create great inconvenience but officials said that difficulties should be overcome soon. Instructions amplifying yesterday's order have been sent to Consuls. In the meo".')""i^Jfflc als said eotumls would re-examine all applicants to whom visas have been granted. Visas would be re-vaUdated it aliens were found to have no connection either now or in the past with Fascist and Nazi organisation or subsidiary bodies. been grand dors and have linked than ever with their islai The occasion was a given by the Knights Round Table in hnnoui West Indira. The Earl of Athlon* who hai recently visited the Carihbeni colonies with his wife, Princes. AltO*, presided. Among the guesn were Admiral Sir Irvine GlennR Urnier Commander-m-Chief of tl.e West Indies' Squadron. ST Crattan Bushe. former Govern r of Barbados, Sir Alan Bum. former Governor of British Honduras and Sir Louis Knulh the famous physician who born in the Wesv Indies OFF TO XF.HF.FAI.AXir In Monday's ADVOCATE FTLTOV OfJRSLFR write* the First Chanter of THE GRrATEttT STORY EVER TOLD Russia Objects To Trygve Lie As U.N. Secretary LAKE SUCCESS. Oct. 13. Soviet Foreign Minister, Andrei 'yshinsky told Keurer to-day that fhen the time came Russia would y plain her reasons for objecting 0 i M reappointment of Trygve itH United Nations Secretary OetwraL In a Jovial mood, the Soviet Minister repeated emphatically that Russia opixised any extension of IJe's term of office. Such extension would be completely contrary to the Charter, he said. —Renter 3 Killed, 4 Injured CASABLANCA, Oct. 13 Three members of the crew were killed and four passengers Injured when a plane crashed at Casablanca airport shortly after taking off to-day. The plane on the CasablancaAlgiers—Perpignan run burst into flames in the air. Airport rescue squads dragged out the four passengers but the pilot, the radio operator, and the mechanic were burnt to death. A heavy mist over the airport prevented the pilot from making an emergency landing. Four passengers were taken to 'Casablanca Hospital Quit Thatkhe EAtSON do I'hina. Oat, 13 rYonrfc forces in northern lml.> evaluating tlie :•. usually n'lul'le %  i ,ThalUi i a fortreea near the China rontier with ,. tiny airfield. vtffon of %  IYM ll OUt 40,000 mei. %  Viciimnh 'orees had Maggerc i i.to the i< Tires* on Mondm tlm lluIvgsjest buttle %  tour >ewr war again.-. U.-MI!..* III hido-Chlna Only about 500 men from BVC taUaJfoM in tlie trapped column •tight their way to safety. The %  tttO which had tasted live daw tideo on MondOJ with severe IM to boUi sides French forces covering tlie |1 of the garrison of lie IIJI Imrdei outpost of Caobang had to fight will trained Vu'tmn %  utimititwrmg them ten in one A French arm.spokesman sm>l that tmptatant utunootl ol th i Thatkhe garrison, paratroops and Moroccans had negotiated the difficult Ingle mountain pass ol l.iui#rhiai and reached then do tination Nacham ao IhO the first break IB lag BBMn of the French frontier post .>lr the fourth time in two days—spurfin northeast cast for* the'fourTh time in two days—spur ring rumours thai the area was being softened up for a new amphibious landing. America's biggest warship the 45,000 ton Missouri. headed the Meet of 37 British. Australian, Canadian and American worships which ranged far north yesterday and to-dav, close t<> the Manchurian border. Navy BB n ou n o ame nt said that POLITIC • From Our Own Onraatondeni I 1'OKT-OK SPAIN. Mr. Gerald It Wight, recent)) pom I naiad membor nf tin rarw Ix>gislnli\c Council, has resigned from his post of Pre!dn' of "<• Political In UP. He la of the opinion that is i>o; ttlnn as President, Would not be consistent with his status as a Nominate) Member of the Legislative Council. E. Germany Worth Total Secrecy IN ZONAL BLECT4QNS 13 Pi BURGLARY IN BUCKINGHAM PALACE LONDON, Oct. 13. POLICE to night charged a man with breaking into Buckingham Palace, the home of the King, and stealing a diplomatic despatch box They named the man as Douglas Honro, 26, a Scottish seaman The arrest of Monro followed a probe at the Palace by Br.taln's top detectives, alter the Royal despatch box had been found dumped In a London dustbin I'll.* hor. containing <*ily offll-nul.'ii.,'.*•. taki'ii \ CANADIAN S—£ EXCHANGE RATE With effect from Monday, OetoW 16, iiuthortsed dealers IB foreign exchange will B*d l.. make a market in Canadian dollars and nuoti rates dc|iendin' on supply and doniand No official quotation will thereafter be given A* Exchange Control and Import Control will remnln in force the supply of and demand for Aouan .-il! i. hitherto Inrestricted to approved transactions. BRITAIN CAN IMPORT ARGENTINA WOOL LONDON. Oct 13 In future the British Board of| |* "JJJ Trade, will permit Imports from, aid that If the propos;il were approved, "we will hav opened to all mankind a new vi of hope' Dulle* declared "I deny with all possible vehemence the pioposition that this organisation Is founded upon the principle uf unanimity or permanence of the Security Council. Asked what would happen if the United Nations organisation found Itself without an administrative head Vyshinsky said amijblv. "That would be just too badHe added that it would not be deadlock resulted In ARTIE'S HEADLINE that they left their target "badly crippled." Yesterday %  io laid in nuns the big port Chongjm 35 miles south of the border. Today they shelled Tanclum marshalling yards, the North Korean supply route, 100 miles southwost nf chongjm On the other side of the Peninsula, United Natlont war planes were sealing off m coastal strip around Sinan;u. an Alrforce spokesman said Aineritan H 29 super forts bombed railways and roads at Numsldong, only 20 miles from the Manchurlan Border and 60 miles northwest of the Smnnju .strip. In Central Koicu, ground forces unhiding the British Rrlgade clnsod in on thousands of Communists, virtually trapped, but still stubbornly defending the key Kumchon. 12 miles north of the 38th Parallel, expected to be the last big Communist stand i before their capital Pyongyang. Kimchon May Fall Aaauullod fioo> all sides, KunIIFJII.IN, Oct 13. chon was expected to fall by toEast German Security Police J morrow tit the latest, despite the today swept into action again to.sUffeat opposition the United maintain 100 per cent, •ecrec;Nations forces have encountered blackout over zonal elections flxedllni: supplies ot new* nriiit The Newsprint Buppl] Vmnptiny .iniiiinn.Nl Uiday th.it stocks %  ...s km n-ly as -it the worst period of the war and that a further saving In tlon i urwivoidable The new ration will i circulations at Honing level sfhli iwit ncws,|*opers hi p t-sgen dully. DuHiig i is,.-, i |.ii-1 ui i allows iiihsh six the hen totinage rationing was in force, newsp.ipeis fnr a long time produced only four pg' editions loi|>..|t l>v th,N<'tviplinf %  •• ply fn>m SCIIIKIIIUIVIM are a I rend bani ui pro war level ami -.111111.1 iDonand in the near future. Aftm the British Govenuneiit'1 cHiicellslicm of newsprint sup plie from Cimiidian mills earlier Una >iMr Canadian* could not ly or qulekly resume ll*euHelivertcs It DM boon derided thai 1 pj rn to tomuge nitionmj£ will be for H minmium ia or Night ." THR ADVOCATE PAVS FOR NEWH nobody In East Germany excep |io!itic;il leader* knew what th 1 ballot paper looked like. are being rushed by special mob! squads lo towns and village. 1 thro ighout the Soviet Zone. nked "alert groups" ma< %  > *ieventh-hnur tours of ibe IOIH* I today to quash attempts to 'sabotage" elections by oppoM"i'i!i propaganda.—Renter I coast sorth of Pyongyang, |g at t the mouth of the Chonghon Hlver 1 en the main road and rail routes 1 from North Korea to Manchuria and North China. It lo BO miles from the Manchurlan border and .'IIII. 2&0 miles of the Russianritased Port Arthur. Superforts swung far north today and struck Communists from j coast to coast to prevent supplies and reinforcements from reaching the batllefront. • On page 9 18-Year-OldH May Be Drafted Into U.S. Array WASHINGTON, Oct. M Tlie United Slates Selective BarVicf l Meet or C.cneral I*vn Hershey said In a speech htn lhat the quest'oti of asking Con %  to lower the draft (conacription) age to IB was betng nerioualy conslderod He said that ex-servicemen of World War Two could be wholly excepUxl from aervlce If draft boaxda were allowed to tap the very rich source of manpower' mToaMitrxl by 18-year aids. Under present draft regulatii all men aged 18 to 25 must register for drafting but only those aged IB or mow may be called -Rriilef Portugal Backing Franco Spain Argentina of raw sheep's and Inmbs' wool of any type, the Board announced today Open individual licences granted to Individual importers will permit the Import of any cfuanrlty. although the Board roaerve the right to revoke such licences at any time. Pressed to explain Soviet objections to Lie, Vyshinsky was asked whether these might be based on the Secretary Generals attitude towards the Korean war. "I cannot be more precise at thi: By LUIS miLISBON. Oct IS Portugal's Foreign Minister wa* meeting his Spanish opposite number In Granada. Spain, today In what some observer* here reF irded as one of more moves to get ranco recognised, and Spain admitted to the Atlantic Treaty. Officially the Portuguese Foreign Minister Dr. Paulo Cunha was to meet the Spanish ForciKii Mlr.;ter !>r Martin Artn)o for S..n Joao De Deua cenlenar> commemorations in Granada. But political observers saw the meeting as a complement to recent FrancoSal azer meeting and part of .. series of talks towards unity of action In the Iberian Pen and foreign policy There were two main viewi of the meeting among poW servers here F\nt was that Porto* moment", the Soviet represents-'be preparing s move to advocate tlvt replied.—Boater. Spain's case soaking to obtain rePOLITICAL OBSERVERS THINK \; of Franco'* regime and admission to the Atlantic SpotD'l Pact According to another version, Portugal would lie acting as United States Intermediary and prearranglnf everything so that if the United Nation* were to recognise Franco's Spain this would be followed hv Spall joining the Atlantic Pact with the full peninsula defence nj Kpared. Most observers think the second version the more likely one They base thle rl %  I that the Salawir-Frar.co meeting look place lx : aftei l*r. Cunha's return from the United States where he had attended the Atlantic Pact Council and th.t on his return he *ald in Lisbon he was convinced that "the prejudice* which still prevent the adoption of a realistic policy advocated by the PortuGnvernment red % %  m on be The belief that Port Spanish lies were growing stronger followed General Francos visit to Oporto on September 27. Observers noted that at the end of his three days meeting with Dr. Sala%  ar, ll-'iugh accompanied by his Foreign Minister, he wan received in Oporto by Portugal'! Dafobca Minister. Lieut Colonel Fernando Santos Costa and nor hv The Portuguese Foreign M Though the greatest official seU maintained here over today's meeting and no official view was obtainable, political ob•ervafi thought that something was going on The ehaln of events which led tbon to bsiHeva this (1) Tho Franco-Selaxar meeting in September during which I cording to an official communique they "ekamined carefully the present international situation in accordance with the provisions of the friendship and non-aggression .,...-.. ggnod i"' liw %  '"' , '' '' gal in 1839 (2) Ssn Joao De Deus centenary 10 days commemorations during which lelirs of thl> Portugal bora BatBl who lived most of In. life in Spam were taken to Portugal havo just been returned to Granada What at trat appeal cd to be mere religious celebrations turned out to be the pretext *or repealed demonstrations of Spanish-Portuguese friendship This has lieen constantly em phasJzed In "peechen by high offl rials of the two .ountrles. givinj tinImproastoa that It Is aimed t< •how the arorld tha frlendshit> and uniU of ideas of Spain am Portugal. # Oat aoco l



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    PAGE TEN BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY. OCTOBER 14, 1*6* Those Honoured W. L Cricketers W I tttlCKCT TEAM was honoured It a dinnar In London yesterday at which the above were %  )*•>. Loft to Right THE EARL Or ATHLOKE who pn I dad MB JAMES GRIFFITHS. Secretary of BUU tot u,, colonle*. SIR ORATTAN R JHIIE. %  former Governor of Rsrba dot, sad SIR ALAN BURNS, Another retired Colonial Governor. < %  .„, v Replay Water 'okay's Cricket MCC Au8tralia Will Play Polo Match AT .< Cunt i the Barbados Aquatic Ch. moot i I ween Snapper* Jtncl ITyi I which was played on Thurstl;.y Mould be re-playeo tm Ttiurwtr-v Oclouvr IB. was h-IJ ilter u evnvral meeting of >hoj Barb,id.^. W..t i I'-In \ at which the new rates of W^fr Mo wars read The Snitpixrs Flying Fib 1 match on Thursday was nut finished for due vo bad light Lie referee bad xuluw off before the extra time wa A)*ij( with ihw re-plej mi i i OJ Thurnday there will be %  ladies practice game. The Ladici teams will be announced la* I the follow Ins. n pi... Ken asked to IUIH out! on I day. for M practice mn l*ration for the Trii.i (1. Mat-Lean, HI' -i. i. K im-c i) Bannister, it M.tiu.tiitc. T. Yearwood. P To I n-r A. Weatherhenii. F Manning. 11 Weatherhcad. t Rvelyn, T. Grace, 1). Atkinson and G Jordan. ..ii day of sciiea of nrsi unu Int-ncket games and OSJ ul tlie K'veitlli M c in iiic InMUnd LiiviAiun gam^a. ,nn are the fixture HKST DlVlalO.N heeesM I#J en n ruimsi lbs Uay. iHXlge v* tin put MI LoOgtf. 'i.nwlik vs Harrison faStajfa •I IV • tiMllgtull. apuiunt vi. Carlton el Qus i .> Pent. INTERMEDIATE Y.M.P.C. vs Empire al Heckles Hoad. Windward vs Wuiitiereis al (lingo Ifoad. cable Wireless vs Pickwick at Boarded Hall. .Ucni.il Hospital vs Spartan at Blsek Hock. fcmjkre vs Police at Bank Hail **" SECOND D1VDUON. rmere vs Pickwick at mare. College vs Central ul College Foundation vs Y M.P.C. al K. tmdulion tent, vs Lodge al the Garrison. Carlton VI Leeward at Carlton. Cricket AtBankUafl Tomorrow A cricket mstcti will b< i Bank Hall % %  M,| U| and will bS •onclucleil on Sunday next Mr. c Jaokmsn'i NI will oppose a team of Prison QflaOen, and the teams are as follows:— Mr. Jsefcman'a XI— C Jackman (Cipl ). N Holder, G. Mernil. C, Phillip*, I. Friincis. W. Draylon. F Baynes, i. Craig. C. Carter, L Bynoe, l> Trotman. F f Douglas. .... Warders XI K Hthiiop, (Ceptl V Biadshaw. L Clarke. R Murrell. SIC Haynes.L. Allcync. M Brldxeman. C. Lewis, S. Kirton, H. Wiltshire. F. Davis. M Evelyn. II Warner FfedForde Wins Cycle Mi Prod Form-. of Baxter^ Hoad, holder of Ticket 2468 in the H C I. Prize Drawing is the u inner of the Bicycle offered as the Prise. Mr. Fordv satisfied Iho B.C.L. Representative Ooonsll al .1 mSSllltg. on Thursday that the OelDH was purchased before tho Draw took place. A check after the Draw disclosed that the book with the counterfoil had not been returned, it however wai brought in later by one of the sellers and according to advice given by the Police, the B.C.L. was responsible for its agents' carelessness, and that FOrde would be winner if he sails.. tied the B.C.L. he purchased the i,.,, ticket before the Draw gad 6-Day Tests Six days have been allowed I SSJCh of the first four Test Match%  -n England and in Australia, and the lust test at Melbourne, will be played (• %  .1 lluish. The iixturc card is as follows: OCTOBER 15—17:—One two dav match and a one-day match in Western Australia: 20—24 West Australia (Perth) 27—31 South Australia (Adelaide) NOVEMBER 3—8. Victoria (Melbourne); 10—14: Neis South Wales (Sydney); 17—18 New South Wales country match (Newcastle); 21—22 New South Wiles country match (Liamnrv 24—28: Queensland (Brisbane) DECEMBER 1—7: First Test (Brisbane); 8—9 Queensland country match (Toowoonib.i. 12—13 Federal Capital Terrtloiv (Canberra); lo—19: Australia XI (Sydney) 22—29 Second T si (Melbourne) 30— January t New South Wolcs (Sydney) JANUARY 5—11: Third Tort (Sydney); 13 — 16 Tasmania (Hobart) 19—22: Combined Launceston); 24—25 South Australia country match (Denmark); 27—31: South Austiatralla (Adelaide) FEBRUARY 2-8: Fourth T (Adelaide), 10—14 V (Melbourne); 16—17 Victorian eountrj match (Q* : —20 Victorian country mat 1 (Euroat 23 Fifth Tl bourne). There will t' no piny on December 24 and 25. Australia Should Visit Weal IildiYs F our Own Corn-* PORT-OF-SPAIN. Tho West Indian Cricket It.. ( Control arc lieiii'. urged nvite the Australians 1 f he satisWest In/lies In 1051 Ther muck talk on this much has appear* Consolation Prizes of five del, .,j > IDan M. H in^an-Crsy r 1 East. %  Mlh KSDM. I I ; . 4. t) •< lars each were won by TickeU No. 81 and 1595, sold by Shell Cricket Club, and Mi W Cbeesemsn of the China Doll Restaurant respectively. Arrangements have been made to hand over the Bicycle lo Mr. this morning. *> Oil ft ill 4 . ft O S J t \ K •' % %  (| to 7 )• ? e \ 9 i S KII4I I K J t 1 I : %  Hi D 1 0M ntaan D Cnl> and Wast I % % %  .... Two Sp-MrSouth itid I ulv anil Wait 1 1 enough io, eond ,r v m n Clul %  1 %  /<: 1 Mirage 1" %  11 1 I 4 A. Easl rufiod und led fl to d a>f ,-.) 1 nnnp to e/J sad 11.p t>; anondnnease i.iho % %  hiiu'd !< %  *> < > p &f nsnd lor D The contract u ni A. A 11 *fc and North dlsemrd &f 7. Bailey And Wint For New Zealand LONDON Arrangements have now been : for McDonald Bailey and Arthur Wint to travel to Nc,w Zealand with Roger Bannister %  t the end of December to represent .the A.A.A. in the Centcnm. I Games being held at Canterbury from December 27th to January 2nd. Bannister, who is Britain's crack mller. will nlso act as team manager >. —L.E S At -he moment. Philip Thompson, "the eppears obviou l b 1 n uorily of 'i lekat-le Iiuliamwant ..n AuStrail in the West battles/ 1 end "thai our Board of Control have but u. ini'i and iii,. Ahsv.iii.ni Invitation to tour that country "1 1951-62 will be formally cccepte 1 %  'I have found that on more thin one occasion, on mentioning :in poasfblUtai of an Australian lout to 1 he West Indies to van..us 1. yponsiblo members of our cricke: 'ng community, that any possible urgument in favour of it is immc %  clately squaslied by the wopH • We can't afford it." B. I. C. Radio Progranar >,-. Thr New> : 10 7 IS a m CUMW ie Wei Ii... Ni 11 IS |> in Solitude. 11 V p m IIVH-M. Quii. 1 p m inlorludr. 1 10 p m Racing Ho.uH-. I 14 ,, 1, h-lin ritwirwl; I JO p m An^hlug To Drclarr, 1pm The N*sn| I M p m Homa Nrw* rroni llnijin. i || U II, What Th* Londoner DMIIII now; 190 p m STu.ic faradr; 3 *• p m Sport. Inlt*. 4pm Th N.: 4 It r m The Dally Sarvlc* 4 11pm MUike t'p Th Minn. p m Ll>trnrr> PORT-OF-SPAIN Choice. S IS p m Pro*i>>mm Petarfe Pieliminary discussions wiUl B %  PJZ) ** U C F r """cins. :' %  .. VIM lo formln, Briltah Wl C %  CR.rT'i i"lClJK? :'.. Indian Table Tennis Federation p m N. Analysis; u B.W.I. Table Tennis Federation May Be Formed IHI.IH Our Own Co r r—ponormt LoSoi underway between the Trinidad Table Twin is Assochv%  '."tion, nnd the touring Barbados, IM British Guiana teni.'yers. Weekly S|-iii. mary; n p m Radio Nr*. .. p m Do You Rememher; I SO Radio Thoalre; 10 p m Tho e*.. ) v m rtom The EdlUilili; 10 II Bachelor.; 10 a p m Sons* F... I II i> in Ckwa Down The y'll Do It Every lime .,: %  ••-'-"-:,'.,''' SALENA—LISTEN— A 11/ EXPECTING THAT : UTTLE WART FR3M TWE< /" ? INTERNAL REVENUE I %  &JREAU -TEU. HIM I V WAS CALLED OLIT OF / TOWN—LAV IT ON _y THICK— I SOTTA /if STALL FOF? TIMEBUTTER HIM DPCAN you HEAR ME, GALENA--? CAN SALENA HEAR HIM? THEy CAN HEAR HIM IN ATLANTA—THEVRE SWEEPING OUT A CELL FOR HIM RI6HT NOW — TWS IS THE GREATEST THING THAT'S HAPPENEP SINCE JOHN TIE HANPYMAN PROP^EP A BM.ON, 9S50-.IES SKULL— -> By Jimmy H.itlo : .. ..LV \ -. • .-. \ VWV B^GMOUTH rtANTfDj THAT INTERCCT=.CE HOLLER-eOX---10U CAN HEAR HIM SNORT IN THE NEXT COUNTY— ALL I HOPE IS THEV 'CALL ME AS A W'-NESS — •CMPIOVEE'S TESTIMONY SENPS BOSS UP FOR TWENTY pfcni YEARS\L-i') .1 IOI II Ml MIS 0 I I It win RP'OPrn IK'TOBEIt IBTI1 We arc pleased lo announce Ihe appointment of Mr. A Mrs. C. 8. HAMILTON as Manager. MAKTIN ..nil I I I II Prupncl. i THE HOME FURNISHING DEPARTMENT WILLIAM FOGARTY LTD. GIVES A GUIDE TO GOOD BUYS. •V PLASTIC I Mil.I CLOTHS-54 x 54 ..ml 54 x 84—in refreshingly new designs hi $2.57 und S:t.U5 eurh respectively. DAMASCENE—50 inches wide in While und Blue Q tl.M per yd. TEA CLOTHS— Laa*J ussorlmenl—intriguing designs from 84c. upwards. ITALIAN BEDSPREADS—M x 80, in Gold. Green, Blue. White und Rose (u> $5.50 each. Please enquire early al • WM. FOGARTY LTD. where there's Fashion and Furnishing Fabrics for the Fashionable Lady with a Fashionable Home, I'ndrr The liUUNiulaked Patron*fc of Ills EareUeacr The Guvermer PreaeaH mm iiLiniE snmr A.HP THE ACOUSTICS WERE NEVER BETTER I THAN TOBAV — THANs. TO HI POWERTV \50 WBST 55 !" ST, | NEW \OHK crry. M.y. —BY — NOIL I i.u 11(11 THE I Ml'I It I llll Mill \OV: *2~D. & 3RD "THE CHINA DOLL" BARBADOS AUTHENTIC CHINESE RESTAURANT Nu. S. MARUU.I, STREET ON THE MENU TODAY A Limited Quantity of TRINIDAD'S FRESH SHRIMPS And The Famous Sea Food — OYSTERS You have not Tastt?d Food — if You Miss Our SHRIMPS CURRY AND OYSTER COCKTAILS RED HAND PAIVr* FOR ALL PURPOSES "MATINTO'" FLAT PAINT White. Cream and rireen For Interior Decoration of Walls and Woodwork "V ENAMEL FINISH PAINT White and Cream TROPICAL WHITE PAINT Will not discolour with ..*.PERMANENT GREEN PAINT For Exterior and Interior I'se. RED ROOF PAINT For Galv. Iron or Shincl**. PAINT REMOVER For Ike easy removal of old paiai. PHONE: 42>i. 445C WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.


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    PAGE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATIKIIAV. OCTOBER II, 1*50 BARBADOS ti|A0VD6XT£ %ND At.AIN *.T— .. .... -f •1 aia.nl kr at. • Ma O,.. Ui. %  Ml *4. M|< Friday. October II 1950 MILK FOR a period ol ten yean the Public Health Authority m this island has been discussing the removal of dairies from the City limits in order to improve the sanitary conditions of the area. The first order issued in )933.removed dairies from Bridgetown and subsequently another order of the General Board of Health sanctioned by the Legislature ordered the removal from the extended city limits. The last date of removal according to this Order was October 1949 but in answer to a petition from dairy keepers the Board allowed a respite of twelve months which expired this month. At a meeting of the General Board of Health on Thursday the matter was raised by the Chairman Mr. E. D. Mottley who said that he had been officially reminded by the General Board of Health that the time for the removal of dairies from the extended city limits had expired The Commissioners were generally in sympathy with Die plight of the dairy keepers but felt that it was beyond their power to help them. The inexorable dictation of the law was quoted by Hon. V. C. Gale who pointed out that the regulations had been passed ten years ago. The fault was with the dairy owners who had waited during this long period before doing anything and now had waited until the time had expired to ask for relief. Ten years was sufficient time for them to comply with the regulations and they now had only themselves to blame. The Commissioners decided to ask the General Board of Health to meet a small committee of that body to decide whether there was not some area within the extended city limits in which dairies could be conveniently established. Once again the important matter of the production and distribution of an essential article of diet hangs in the balance. Despite the clarity of the regulations which leave nn doubt as to their intent, wartime conditions made it desirable that for the efficient distribution of food the dairies might well have remained in the city limits. Now that suitable areas on the outskirts of the City have been built up it is difficult for dairy keepers to secure adequate space for removal of their busiThese and other considerations will influence the minds of those who comprise the committee who will recommend whether ther.should be any relaxation of these regulations. POI.HI; IIIAI.MM. WITHIN recent years efforts have been made to institute a system of training for recruits in the Police Forces of Barbados, the Windward and Leeward Islands. The necessity for a common training school has been recognised and to this end Colonel Michelin has been exploring various places in the area. He returned to Barbados during the week with high hopes for a workable scheme which will be submitted to the Governments concerned. It will be remembered that a scheme was proposed for the establishment of a police training school at Beanfleld in St. Lucia but on close examination the scheme was abandoned. A proposal has now been made that the old military barracks at The Morne be reconstructed and used as a training school. If this scheme is accepted there will be a school in St. Lucia within easy access of the Windward and Leeward Islands and Barbados. The school will not merely be for the training of recruits but will provide refresher courses for men already passing through the ranks. Such a scheme apart from the unification of the service which it was hoped by thi.s time would have been achieved will make for greater efficiency in the forces within the area. On this efficiency depends the safety of the populations and the adequate protection of property in the area. Until federation becomes a reality the proper training of men in St. Lucia is a sound proposition and should meet with the approval of the three governrtitnts. That "Click* 9 in the Mind At the Word "England" II* l'kirle* l-'oLV> 8TOCKHOLM WHAT do the Russians think Boom Britain'' What is UN picture their must* !" paint of her—for we hale Ihtwv who preach u new I nwmbat 1 QMM 2W million people war. I IVa had M BOUTM of Inform"Britain, France, and Germany atlun outilde the Soviet Press, are forming u military alliance i.idlo, and films for a generation Such an alliance can only be (or What growi in the Kusnian an attack on the U.S.S.R. Why? i.iind when I ley hear the strange Comrade, it is known and proved word "England"? ,h at no one from the people's About this, I have interrogated democracy of Russia even thinks passengers, British and others, "bout aggression or dreams of foho sailed to London today :itc Soviet steamer Seslroretsk. For clearly this topic of the attitude of the Russian masses on whom St.il u must depend is of %  lie most vital significance at this wounds • !" hordes. iting war with other nations. "And it U clear that the first aim In the new war would be to use German soldiers against us Ink' we are still healing the ted by Hitler's The replies to my question ibout the Russians' view of th "What would be the cost of a third world war on top of the NT world were amusing, heartcountless sacrifices we have made ing. or beyond words depressal !" -£ ? Luckily we are strong enough to drive off any attacker. Stalin has said so again and again." g. according to how you study them. ,i„ul,l-SUn ha
      •"!• •• %  II •>• ataal UlM %  •' T*a>. IN* YOUR heart <>1 hearts, have you over i rttl] warned i.. keep bees or lift weights? Have you toyed with ihe thought of the fascinating hobbies you would indulge in. if n were not for Ihe evi ) grind of daily work? About this tune each year, Londoners beDma afflicted with a passionate desire to further their education'. This mass hysteria may take several forms. They may decide that the one thing missing front their lives ir. knowledge of modern languages. (It is ticeable that first year language classes are rilled completely on the first day of enrolment and truly pathetic it is to hear latecomers plaintively demanding to be lei in to one of the more popular ones.) Law and accountancy, journalism and advertising are subjects that attract a fair n'imber of people. No-one is surprised to bear of a friend deciding to study banking or l).)k-keeping. civil engineering or dressmaking, photography or statistics. Possibly a little sympathy is felt, but no surprise. After >'!. the summer is over and gone, the rains %  : e about to commence, and the voice of the i.CC. authorities is heard in our land. But in a small compact book, issued yearly, "d bearing the inspiring title "Floodlight". Fa revelation indeed. On the flyleaf we are reproved gently in these terms: "Love labour; for if thou does not want it for food. thou mayest for physic. It is wholesome for thy body, and good for thy mind." (W. Penn). It goes on to show the novice how he may labour to advantage each and every evening if winter and spring, and here the casual %  oader finds himself abashed and awed by %  he astonishing number of subjects available for his edification and uplift. The ignorant may wonder for a while whal sjiecies of human studies Aquaria or Assayng. He may indeed wonder what they are. inspired by the peerless Fonteyn, gazed at from the roof of the Covent Garden Opera %  louse, many unlikely young women take to Jallet at the various Literary Institutes. It is a sad sight to see them rise upon a waveriig toe and execute a ragged entrechat, but loubtless they are happy. One feels they Aould be even happier studying Ihe Isadora him an type of movement, and "hie away to fitlle tields"—but this, too, is catered for under the heading of Dance—Classical. They could build a barge, or weave a basket, make biscuits or study boiler-house practice. Presumably there is nothing to •revent a young secretary from becoming a ipare-time boiler-maker. She would, at all •vents, be possessed of a never-ending topic if conversation. Boxing and bricklaying, %  artography and cellulose spraying seem dull A-hen compared with the delights of ChromeLithography and the intricacies of Corsel Making. A most misleading heading is "Stammering". What, can we really learn to stammer? and do we want to do so? Housewifery and Hygiene are very worthy subjects, but what could Grain mean? We .ire still not certain about Histology and Hydraulics, but thoroughly approve of Logic. We do not believe it can be taught, but that is by the way. Manicure comes directly above Meat and Food Inspectors, which may not. of course, mean a thing. What about Microbiology and Millinery, so much more .lppealing than Mosaic and Motor Vehicle Servicing. Philosophy would go well with Picture-Frame Making, since one could then be philosophic about the unhappy results of our wood-work. As subjects for conversation at deadly cocktail parties, these classes have no parallel •We would muse with pleasureable contemplation on the thought of a young lady sipping a martini, sucking the cheery reflectively, and saying, "I do Plumbing, ServoMechanisms and Sewage. What do you do?" We can have our speech trained, or we can learn to stain glass, but having perused the hook carefully, and considered the thing from all possible angles, we like the following combination; Wrestling, Zoology. Mastic Asphalt, and Plastering. This way. no-one can accuse us of having no desire to broaden our outlook on life. D.V.SCOTT TODAYS SPECIALS ft CO.. LTD. ~ at the COLONNADE Usually NOW I ins S A Al'KICOT JAM (2 lbs.) .... M .S4 Tins OVALT1NK (Lariir) LM 1.12 Bullies aJUUMMrTC BOD .26 .20 VALOR STOVES 2. 3 and 4 BURNERS, wilh or wilhoul Canopirs 64G STOVES 1 and 2 BURNER, wilh or without Oven Stands OVENS. Small. Mrdium. Large PRESSURE STOVES at WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.. LTD. Suecesaors To C. S. PITCHER & CO. PHONES 4472 & 4687 SANTON WATER HEATERS models in 5. 12. .10 & -In nils. HAIR DRESSING EQUIPMENT DaCOSTA'S I IK III l VI III IM. NOW IN STOCK RAYPACKA FOH OFFit'E JACKETS — AND — CLERICAL GOWNS IN NAVY AND BLACK 54 in. at $1.92 per Yd. Da COSTA & <•.. hid. DRY GOODS DEPT. Oil! III AMI IIS SAY Kent Ke$triction N it M To in* Editor. The Adi-ocoir, SIR.—I see BO many ihiims m Barbados, and o man> smiles; but it Is food sometime* to tee the serious lde of life. *o lhat these bmilM will last. Bitter draughts are also brewing, and the middle class man or woman. 1* bring squeezed between umilers, and Ihe don't-careHarries'. Over 20 years in Barbados. 1 have not seen wrongs righted yet Where U this rent-restrict.on law. and where is the middle class man to hang his hat Over-population cannot be an excuse for profiteering, and sucking in of money from the middle dais. Better laws must bo made for protection against the wrongs (hat need assistance. Every house having a roomer ahnuld be made lo register. This also Includes Guest Houses. These places should Ut hocked up, and exploiting would cease. The old order of getting rich quirk should lw changed. OONCEKNEO lfuck$tt>r l\ui*ancr To the Editor, The Advocate. SIR.—Cannot the hucksters bo warned to behave themselves? They seem to annoy everywhere with their remark* and bad language. It gives a degraded iniI restion to Bridgetown, and ohould have redress. A little warning would help. Also 1 read that even deserts now are being cultivnted. and certainly the large space at Trafalgar Square, which soimMil I garden, could be utilised, and a Uursty traveller catered to. or tome sign of lite. The lake of cement Is nauseating PROGRESS Stand Pipe* To the Editor. The Advocate, SIR,—Please allow DM thiough i1ucolumns of your newspaper to cull to the attention oi the authoi ities the deplorable condition ol in* Stand pipes of St. John. 1 will mention specially ihe pipe which wes newly installed ai i I bottom of tha Venture l.and On many Instances villagers have complained abour the mosquitoes which swarm the pipe In tremendous numbers Not only do the mosquitoes swarm, but on approach to the pipe one Is viciously welcomed with nines and bttsi. Another Instance. A lad went to fetch water from Hhe sanw pipe; as he attempted to approach. he found himself heels over head on the cement as a result o' *• moss which is growing rapldl* around the pipe. Would the authorities make some haste to discontinue ihis state of affairs in the parish oi StJ hn? H-M. Imperial? To the Editor, Th* Advocate, SIR.—The writer of the letter signed "Canadian" voi< vftkH many people—both British and others who live hen*—must think. Why is it that a British MLUMMJ does not use Imperial pints and gallons? Also how h it. that ihe price, of gasolene keeps on going up ana up. In Wru'/urla where the cost of living is the highest In the world, gasolene is Be. to 12c %  gallon according to where you are—this with literally hundredof miles of pipe lne which have to b* laid to carry it. A Venezuela Is an oil country, but Trinidad Is also supposed to ban oil producer and what Is more it is part of the West Indies, it is British so therefore there is no question of U.S. dollar* being involved and the cost of productio:i nothUig like that of Vfnenala: If the price of gas and oil has to go up, the government or whoever Is responsible, might, as "Canadian" suggests let the ordinary motorist who has to pay cut and pay out. know ihe wh\ and wherefores and to whom tinmoney l< going or maybe they want to discourage us ssom using cars—perhaps they'd UM to .-.<•.l>ilaUt n t Ikpurln, !" of lll|li..v, n rt Tfan.po.t on lit* flxar work twin* dang an InriuM rocl. at Hart* Gap. it |a %  pity lhat UM main road could nr>i be dour ! th* umc lima, but 1 am told thai "t ChrlM Church, and th* ,oaroad. US being dona undc. Hit head oi sss 13 U II II M St 44 33 M 4S 33 M II 44 100 SS IS 34 loTb IB an 17 00 II 13 Tenantry Roadi. ao let mo my asaUt 1 lo the Dirert.0 Well done, taBSvatulai 100 SS 40 1 10 SB 33 4f 3S SS LOOK AT THESE NOURISHING FOODS To Is*-*-/* Your 1 Itihlrt'it in &f %*.*/ Health Smrmm LMVEtt tit l.ftist I it-iff a II i' fit FOR YOUR CAKE RAISINS (HtRRltS ICING 81'GAR COLOURING GOLD BRAID RCM ROYAL BAKING POWDER CAKE DECORATIONS FRESH DAILY SAUSAGES HAMBt'RGER STKAK IMPIRE corns APPLET Olt \\<.| -, HARSH M\CE(MVS SPECIALS i os. Fish Paste y 86 pr Hn 14 os. Fish Cake Jt. " IS oi. Steak A Kidney Pudding HI t? " 14',. oi. Sultana %  Pml.lim: 48 Headless Co* Fish & .3! per In. Order E.rl, from GOODARD'S



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      smRD.W, OCTOBER 14, 1M0 CLASSIFIED ADS BARBADOS ADVOCATE TELEPHONE 250S IN MKMORIAM IN Wnml m**B**ry of "" b-lov*,i uaier and AUlf M* Ada IMw -ho f*0 eat**? on Octcaaer 1*. 11 A dear on* from our IWM U A V**ee w* lovm i. Kill A pear* Ii VHMI in out hewn* Watch we can .*->* in J* i i. hich i. in be V*K BENT wlU: -uslvr 1 Bit* and Brryl H* **• %  Qordon and Donald Do* FOB SALS AUTOMOTIVE -5TT i pi*r*n let? rM cgn I -mUlr.. cut Ml '-. %  f.n car Apply C h Jon**. Top Rock Oarage Dial MS* CAB — Sunbeam Talent HMK Qon Apply 4 Ctl fieri Tet fter J J0 p m | CAR — On* Standard I H P Car U rfert condition. Apply t B Placet ; o Jimr* A l.vnch Co. Ue II 10 se— m — Pord V-i Sup*r Delun*. in rood condition Cadi or H-rm. "/ Hop* Co Water Work* Offie* r Telephone 3PM [MOTOH CVCI.F On* Mjlolil*. I ~ Molar Cycle, Por pcmirulaM: _-/ lo J A fan* of Canada ELECTRICAL aSLBCTRICAL Win* A FlTTWliS MsS. ?% %  . ISM. 7 9M. I OBI. TOM. p.T.8. and V I B In similar iiae* r.inl* Galvanised Conduit ii Inch to I', inch Enquire Amo I Co Trafalgar SI Phone MM 14.10 M1 .1 n I RJ*mi<;PJUTOK On* Hi t Cubic ifdaley Shelvador BaHrlgeretor |Am*rloani One til Year old In per•be 1 condition. Tour i4 pear* dill reSbeinlng on gMarante* Pnone 4447 II 10 -In MECHANICAL [A School Bov %  Raleigh Biov. ^finW.m** e o nTu Mod* Drv palmetto Street. City. 1 TYpRWfurW %  -On* Standard i,'n Jftuood Typewriter ffwelleni i-nruli ^fcr. HOUJBB Bm. Swan St !" 1 •" U.Ht.M—l. f n LIVESTOCK FESTAI r. DONKKY iroRSHi i Bay Mar* | Che-tim War* %  • WafceAeM PHn Si John 14 io so—*n n*^ > niMllSBMi MIMr and linen Foi — particular* Ohif SIM AHna DIAMOND VUJX SBream Pum.cned ; ing and dining room %  "•"in of M ieaa ntm AvalbaW I r>l> Bail X gallery ... eaed and atfy — Can b* aard lot • b onV* of office* Phon* MM 10 10 —* rTIOB-BOCK-BathiAafM. St Joan*. for inearth* of MM ecnba* and Dacaakb** HOUSE -aVPrJBANZA' full, tu.PM from Ih* lot Nov on St Jart-. %  M Coaal. | 10 50-5*. BXATliFTJEX) On th. Crana CO**! fuBy fumldhad. from D*mb*r f-hon* •MS Mi, A D Htb*n CordoMr. Cb Cn io 10 *--*• %  'MABYVII.I. lr. Ktoi r*rvanla room, Mi*nMBc*a Apply A SMly, l. ur i Siren aft** %  p %  an* TAMOI.1M Baacbmont. Bninalir... OMoh*r onwarda. monthly or oth*r/i*. J douMd badrooma with alna;i* Kimmpni lMdM*ad*. rhluron'. room. dn.i; ,.&m loun**. B*frlrr.lnr. IMjM, BB>*"P> %  " Apply How*, iflnir M W I.M— f n Juveniles Will Be Included In Credit Unions Pram Our Own Cormpoodmti PORT-OF-SPAIN. SuKfMion by Noel P Bowen 5*2 of Co-operstives In rrinidart, at a m c mtncfs will soon be amended to provide for the inclusion of i^'"'.! 1 ^. 0 .? ny •* %  ""bJ'ct lo ih* llmiUltonB exprenlv slated in Ihe rule* of the Credit Union. Forty head teachers of etty schools attended, with „ vte-w to arranging that school children should take part in the crodit union movement. The Re^Ktrar assured that all details of the scheme would be placed before them at an early date, and that hi' department would at all times be willing to give Information and advice MISCELLANEOUS KJNKI.FSS HAMS TO TINS • gM h t< 41 SI par Ih Semir your* now Xma* Mippll*a will bo limlird 14 10.U—an Anfora "\ cliaa. 1J.I0 30— Sn FIRE-WOOD in ftova l*nnha par loo lb-, and CMd-Wood Apply Dovar. Bill. S.IO.M-Jn' UFTOM'B PSEOCCff CO PFEE fi drink and *oJoy Uil*. you ihould u— Mwal t*a*poonlul lo Ih* cup: Eatrtdma • hi* roll detract from Ita dalu louin*!'. y^r —' ~f. %  faJK 1 MOSDA LIGHTERS — A LUhUr <" •ult m*r.v laal*. Many alylaa. many price*. KNlOirm OftUG STaiotB. 14 10 n~2i> PIANO — In food coiHllllon, ,ni M, limed Splendid tone. No raaaonabte oHer refuaed Mr. D MOOSE Corner Snd. Art: Bank IUII Main Road 14.10 JO-Jn RAIN COATS — School Children Ram Coata. imd Voum L*dlea Baal Bhujliui guallty N.i Pl*tic To clear SS 1| each SWAN s n n.i Swan Stteel 14 10 Mi -n SALX Among olher item* we aen Khaki at Mr per yd ROYAL STOMI. 14 10 X" SHmTB—1.000 Mrn'a Shirt, of ^uararT teed wearlna* MUM at S3 00 and %  at each ROYAL STOBX It. IS SS-Tn. SIIDITS A PYJAMAS — BOT* and M*n-a Shirt, and J*y]amaa ordared M MaaauP* can ba delivered wtthUi four houra. RJ3JANCE SHIRT FAdOKY 11 10.10 In ,Tcn M. Q. OAIA'ANTEED COHBUOAT SHSBrrB P-rtmr quality i n Mil S ft SS SO S fl M SS_per alarat, Obtalnabl* from HAPSirSOrfS II ABnWARy Slore. Broad St 11 10 SO-n WEETABIX Your Orocar haa luai r*lvf,l a f.eah aupply of Ihia dellcloix Cereal, which la mor* than hreakfa.i food. Prlea Sic. „,* %  p., *•* %  * PrHLIC NOTICES NOTICE THE T*a-Rooni and Library ol IM Women*. Sail H*lp AaaoclaUon will b* opaning on Monday ISUi Oclober Coo NOTICE Application* for Vertry Exhibition* J for Qlrl. .' St Michael'* OJIrl. School and 3 for Boy* at the Hoy.* Foundation School, will be received b.. m* not later than Mth OrMbar Paraaitof applicant* imut be partahvHal|ht*n*d ASM of applicant* batwam II aad IS year*. W U. OOODiNO. Parochial Tr*a*uf*r, st Philip 11 10 SO An NOTICE -SEALED Tender, for the ararUon of a Pavilion and Communit.Hall at Ellecton Social Centre. St G*orfe, w,U ha BSSMSl by m* tip to 31*t oewber. 1M0 Plan* and Specification, can b* **cn at Mr R B Mould**'* OnW al Meaar. C. P HAHRlnON A C* Broad M Brldaetown K MASON. Clerk. Veatry of St. Oearse.'* II 10 M 4n NO CREDIT NOTICE ''CITHER Ui* Captain nor the A in ta will b*> raaponalbla for any debt '*l* lncurr*d by any M V. Mary Hw**na,v COOPBt (CapH HUNTE A CO Lad Aajant* PEKSO.VAI Th* Public %  Tlvlna cradll ire* Murr*l' a* I do not rruHinaibie for har or anvoi I an* debt odatota I nine mil . i,. craw-Baa.' Tha p .1.!. hereAw warned asain MABTHA WlliJAM cnyaetf reaponilble 1 aa I Oht i SI %  BBS> %  myon* riie in my name or on tne Mm -t Uaford William* Bad MILXJOE3CT W1LUAMR. for nd am WLISXIBD wnujA %  WINDY WOLDHMdabury ffemd Drawing and DIninc Room*. 1 B*a). %  W C Bath and Kit*** lahed or unfurmhed Apply iq Z Daniel. Shopk*rp*r. nearbv lIMIVriOMi Exit Tramp LONDON Frederick Fmnci. Fincher. 60. in court on s charge of stealing three v.itches from a house, was described by defense counsel as a tramp. He interrupted to say: Excuse me, sir. They do not call us tramps now. Wr are wayfarers.'* He received a suspended sentenca. —V.rf.8. PAC1 MM Amphibian landing • Frasn pace I Intelligence officer*; in Tuk. estimated that the South Korei lightning drive up tho east coast had isolated 6.000 to 6.000 Communists in wild mountainous country just north of the 38th parallel. American supply planes and re— K ir squads have been preparing; iiW""a*i onsan airstrip, the second beat fcondrfu in Korc.i for United Nation* lijihfP"* J^LuJSZTn !" *' S v id bombers The first airR %£%" c^r5.;* M ^ ai-**^ strip U Kimpo near Seoul. A large Communist force haa been reported in Mokpo in the ex-mn. treme south-west corner of the peninsula Fifteen thousand reied troops and 2,000 with small arms were said to be in a tt square mile district around tratj port. General MacArthur's headquartan announced to-day that 60,000 North Koreans had been captured since the campaign began 1.400 of them in the past 24 hours | outer. |T*BMM, ABRtVAija Philip H David**... ST Capt S**ly. fi DBPAPSchooner Enierpri** > rpf MrqMilKin *or TTInMlad FRANCE ASKS AID WASHINGTON. Oct 13 Fran.e to-day urgently asked America lo rush military Equipent to Indo-China where Frenih troops are retreating in the face a heavy pressure from V at \ troops —Reuter In Carlisle Bay ta^Cydoraroa O Sri, Seawell ARBIVAIA By B W I lion, TRLNIIlAn Chuma Aterhoukh. Venin : Bamon Odreinaii. Gtiillermni JowiMilna iMitmiii, •*-* Fted*r>ck Syntmond*. maeidv Samuel B*nn*li. „ Edanund Owrn and Charle* tJS," rrean MAIQITTIA K**l. aWaad*. and letano B.dei Ella* ii"^'In Touch With Barbados Coastal Station CABLB hav laBWRBl ^. atrviaa that they can now with th* (oliowlna; %  hiplUrbad.f CMM SI-H,.„ 4 Potl AmnerD rtnAar. S S onnilh '. s a a a s s | s OMBM i' .'.I-I, i.,. s -, i %  _) *d*r*iA lalerv N J**r. i-i a* more. SI Oakhill. %  IbarvlH*. B B Jean. *j a Folk* Bet,,. mi* SS Blue Haaln. IS N*II.M S Nauva Andalucla, S 8 n WIMIHI S Akoa P*nnanl. SS Montaii, Prli ra land. S S S S II : ... a %  Qari ..11, S Bdwtn I > s.., .11I I ,1 'I . %  S Pom ST KITT5 K*nn*il. Il.rtin anal Albert Myn.n From ST LUC1 i BaaBnaM Mlehrli, From ANTMit'A Allan Xing ^SEJiKX'" "• •'* %  Mar>Dci* Walker. Kay Boon. |)ati Boo**, Dun Co.. Mary Klnkaad, Alpci.t.. Mrrt. iwlcne llmbaiid*. Keimu.. 11... banda Floral* Preecod. Ern**t E\TIM Courtnay Richard. Sl.lla Walk-r •.<. Vollmer and John Donovan l... UHITCMI GUIANA I larrncr Qallok.%. Ho** (liluan l> %  %  '* %  K*nnrat, V.n <.ull,-n*,„ioMt Ollke*. K...... dV.it... r-lM ffotliim,*.. AmOlla Te.eira, j.,t, rrtm and KTannetli tlnnnim, Pat onrMAikA ataa Rock. A>ir,*i* Bark Oorotti MaBSijli VACANT SCHOLARSHIPS OIBUr rOtNDATlvN SCHOOL Ii-irtn one D mor* vacant FoundaOM scholarahlpa at Ihe ChrUl ChuK Oirl Foundation Scho.il AppllcaiU mut IT l ^ ^' ld :' n • 1 Pfif !" 1 realdlna In the Paruh of Chrlat Chu.ck and who an in :raiten*d circum.Unce. Tne applicant* mu.t be between the Ma of 10 year* S month, and 11 year* ,„' !" %  '• v ' >t yaora on the data of Parent* or Guardian, accompanylna their danuhtar* or ward* ar* h*rby noil •led that there I* no accommodation for S-TSnfu*? ""i 10 ?' A h d W * ,-li? !"_,!, ,n t •"* examination of *h* D i *^ UnlU ,iW7 %  %  • N ANTROlUS. *e. f3o. Body, Qlrla' Foundation Brhael. %  amSK.Mj WAVrnsn HELP AN RXPERIKNCED CAHtHP.K required Pleaie apply In writing to D. V. Been a Co. Ltd. Do not *m4 original t**tlmonlala unl*a* .ubwquently 'equeMM '* IS.lS.Nv-T.FN. rnxiABM. 14 10 SO-Vr OFFICE CLERK Young Lady **p*il*nc*d gvneral office roullne up Id point of enlr, and halance of cuctomern' leogera. Coif wllh wrltlen applicpfion nwrite hnm*tHai*iy to Mr Carter, T. it Evai... ft Br*a>4 St. State 4f>. experiencr and u-hoollng Salary up to M0 month according lo eiperlcnce 14 10 SO Sr> STENO-TYPIST EapetlPiimi sino tvplft for our Offer Salary I0S Apply wllh written appllcatton Secretory Dowding Eatale* A Co Hd Bay Str*^ nrgcBBg LBSI FBVNl LOST WATCH Hi Ladle* Gold Watc-i I'llh eipartdlnc Gold Band Fnamel round Dial with a crack On Sundav Ih* SIh Oet Between Roebuck St Staple Grovei and BUIuip'. Court Bill Finder will bo lultablv rewarded SO tetumlrag earn* to Advocal* Arlvtg Dept. || |D M l n DOG One Dark-Orey Wire hatted ti U Nam* Tom Chaneary Silver Sand* area Plnd*r will vardad Notify Mr* I Huaaell. %  Vl**>. Chancry Lane Ch Ch !lWKrr-*TARE TICKETS •031 FlnaWr plena* return Norman BOIaYav* CA| Fri Ciilloden ITouw Culloden H.. PI RI.M %.AIJ;H' REAL ESTATE HOUSfC — In Half Moon Fort. M Lucy IS 10 S in* New. Pine right throusri Apply Charle. Skinner, n Men*. Road St Petrr IN Plymouth. furnished, and with llnap. •"i< ate sitataled in own grousd* n Far further partleula** t MONTSERRAT. B.W.I COCONUT HTLE, BOTBL cantaintns lng room, dining room. II H4i. 4 taUwoa m i, kitchen. paaWryi quarter* and garag* FBI** .. china, cutka-y • of 1 ear**. _. apply Paul Hoiiender. stantaarrat LAND-ApprokitneMtr 1. acre at land enable for MSaSMg M Ho %  *> new Road .near Ooi Owl Apply Sydney luiiey. | aflinr' Llmltni f IS M—n fnoP E BT l la aV J 0r>0 IS > IS heuc with %  had at H..I.1M'. Land. Brendan %  • '"' On* IB io keu-as at me] Airamia-Eclat*. B*--kU>* Bead MM SO ma 1.1 h*a* pvar* can h* paid dm-n lana* nnkl. Tfk*r*u *r af kuh| %  Aapar to DA" M It SS—an *nd t On* prop*rty ._ Spruce Stre**, 4JWS aa Cpp*r Hlnd*ury Hoed A A Scott. M..,.-m* l*ne GOVERNMENT NOTICES RFST HAVEN Oeamf* Straet Belle %  111*. Oppu.it* TIN Arena* In*p*cUa< any day *e*pt Rundbry ST a*apo(*tm*tit Dial MS3 EaBBB I MAIL NOTICE Mail* for Si Vincent Grenada. Trsal. dad. and B.mui Ouiana by th. II Canaalian Chalamgahr will n* cloaed at the Oveeral Poal Office a* under Parcel Mail ang B*)gt*weaa) Mail St Sam Ordinary ktai at IS II Air M...1 With effect from 11th October. 19S0 the air rote on printed niattrr (Including newspaper*, commercial papers and books) to Great Britain is 13 cents per half ounce. General Post Office, 13th October. 1950 I4.10.ft0—2n. Diesel Diesel Mechanic—Seawell Airport APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Orsde Mechanic at Seawell Airport. Appllcsnts should have a thorough knowledge of Diesel Engine', and will be required to pass a test. The post is temporary and terminable by a month's notice on either side. Remuneration will be in accordance with the Key Scale rates fixed for Grade "A" Mechanics. Applicant*: stating age and qualifications should be submCavt to the Manager, Seawell Airport, from whom further information may be obtained, not inter than the 21st October, 1930 I4.10.8W.CBB, VACANCY I i i: POLICE MEDICAL OtTlCK Applications arc Invited for the office of Police Medical Officer District "E". Candidates must be rwsjtatered medical practitioners. Post is part-time and non-pensionable with salary at the rote of $240 00 per annum. An allowance of S4rf.(>0 per annum is paid fur medicine supplied. 2. Tho appointment will ba terminable by three months nolle IJI\ either side The successful applicant wilt bo required to reside in the District. 3 Applications stating age, qualifications and practical experii nee. should be addressed to th-a Colonial Secretary, and must reach the Secretariat not later than the 2lst of October, 1930. 14 10 50—2n APPOINTMENT OP KEEPER OP OLOTHINO, GENERAL HOSPITAL. Applications ore invited for the pensloniible post of Keeper oi Clothing. General Hospital at a salary of $1,056 rising by annual increments of $48 to $1,200. 2. Applicants should not be over 40 years of age, should haviattalned a satisfactory standard of education and should be competent dressmakers with experience In the supervision of the work of a large staff of seomstresses and washers. They should be competent to keep records of the work done In the Department, and will be responsible for the maintenance of stock". Appointment will be on probation for two years in the first instance. 3. Application' on forms obtainable from the Secretary. General Hospital, should be forwarded to him not later than the 31st of October, 1930. 30.9.30— Sn VACANCIES FOR AN ASSISTANT MECHANICAL ENGINEER (LOCOMOTIVE) AND AN ASSISTANT MECHANICAL ENGINEER (MARINE) IN i ill BRITISH GUIANA TRANSPORT AND HARBOURS DEPARTMENT VACANCIES exist for an Assistant Mechanical Engineer (Locomotive) and an Assistant Mechanical Engineer (Marine) in the British Guiana Transport and Harbours Department The posts are permanent and pensionable and the salary of each is in the scale £ 760 x £ 30 --£900 per annum. The Assistant Mechanical Engineer (Locomotive) Is required to ..sslst the Chief Mechanical Engineer and take charge of Locomotives Carriage and Wagon maintenance and operation. The Assistant Mechanical Engineer (Marine) Is required to assist the Chief Mechanical Engineer and take charge of the maintenance of Marine craft, hulls, boilers and engines. Candidates for either post should be under 40 years of age, corporate members of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers or (in the case of ihe Assistant Mechanical Engineer (Locomotive) ) hold exempting (,un II lit at Ions with experience of Steam, Diesel-electrir and Petrol Locomotives, and carriage and wagon maintenance or. 'in the case of the Assistant Mechanic Engineer (Marine) hold oih. r technical qualiflcatlons rvvsring ihe Held of a Marine Engineer The holders of each of these office* should be capable of acting for the Chief Mechanical Engineer. In each case, free pa s sages to British Guiana will be provided for tha officer, his wife and children under 18 years not exceeding five i-ers'ins in all On leave after completion of a minimum tour free return passages (not exceeding a total of £200) will be provided for the officer only subject to the provision of funds annually by the Legislative Council. Five days' leave for each completed month of resident service, up to a maximum of six months of leave, may be granted after a minimum tour of two Tears Free quartara are not provided Intending candidates should make application (or write for any further particulars desired) to the General Manager, Tranaport and Harbours Department, British Guiana, giving brief details of age, qualifications and experience as soon as possible. 10 10 30 —In Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend, inent) Order, 1930, No 33 which will be published in the Official QcaMUt of Thursday 12th October. 1950. 2. Under this order the maximum wholesale and retail selling prices of "Oats" (Feed) are as follows: — WHOLESALE PRICK (not more than) Oats (Feed) $11.32 per bag of ICO lbs RETAIL PRICE (not more lhan) •c. per lb n tli October, 1930 VACANCIES FOR INSTRUCTORS IN THE GOVERNMENT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE, BRITISH GUIANA Applications are invited from suitably qualified person-. Including ofneers already in the Government Service, for appointment ti any of the four vacancies for Technical Instructors in the undermentioned trades required tor the Technical Institute British Guiana: — Mechanical eiigineerinu. including machine shop experience and some experience Of blarksmithlng and possibly fOundr-. work; Building trades, including g general knowledge of plasterinc painting and decorating; Gas and electric welding, with a general knowledge of plumbing and pips-fitting or sheet metal work; Hand shoemaklng and leather work. < ( UBlifirat ions: Recognised apprenticeship in modem industrial concern: City I ..nil Guilds or equivalent Trade Certificate necessary and Natumil or Higher National CertlAcate highly desirable. Musi have hadj experience in trade and in instruction. Emoluments: The salaries attached l<> these appointment* are ut the late ol £600 x £25 — 1730 per annum #aeh. In addition, th* appointee will be provided with free furnished quarters or an allowance of f 100 per annum In lieu. (MH.I.II Con.itions of Service: The appointment* will be on B cnnlrurtii'il II.ISIS Cn.i |.rn..<> %  >f tw<> years, ,,i the IIml instance, following which consideration will be given to tlu question ut i-v-cngaglng tho person^, concerned on similar tearing IT in* ap|>oiiitiii|{ them on a permanent and poiifionabl* basis The general conditions of tervice will be the same as thonc applicable to olher oftiiers in tin1'ntish Guiana Civil Service. Application.: Applications giving numc in full, uge, family, if .my, qualillia tions, and experience, ami •uipporit.i by rupies of le<'lmionials from three persons to whom reference could be made lonrcrning the applicant's character and professional ubilil}. should be adilii->Mti to llio Principal of the Technical Institute. Georgetown, BrHI*h Guiana, not later thun tho 3)sl of October. 1950. 10.10.30—3n VACANT POST First Mate, Trinidad Government Coastal Steamers. Port Services Department APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of 1st Mote. Trinidad • %  overnment Coastal Steamer Service. Port Services Department. Candidates must be In possession of a Certificate of Competency as Home Trade Master Mariner Issued by the Government of Trinlt*t4 or by the Marine Board of Jumalca, or a certiflcote of equal oi superior value issued by a competent authority In the United Kingdom or in any British Dominion or Colony The salary of the post is In the scale of $1,920—120—92,400 per ..nnuin. A commuted overtime allowance of $23 per mensem Is payable. A messing allowance of $1 20 i>er diem is also payable In lieu of food. Shore quarters are not provided hut in ihe case of officers recruited overseas an allowance equal to difference between 10 per cent of salary and rent paid, is payable to un officer who rents unfurnished Quarters and an allowance equal to difference between 10 per cent of salary and 5 per cent of the annual value of furniture -mpplied Government furnished quarters, is payable to an rrfrVrer who rents furnished quarters. Allowances in both rases are subject to a maximum of $90 per mensem for a mnmed oflleer whose family is not residing with him and $20 per mensem for a single officer Free second class passage* will be provided on first appointment for tho tjfncer and his family not exceeding five persons in all. Subject to review at any time and not as a permanent right of the oftlci free passage on leave after a minimum tour, not ex.erding the c< of normal sea passages to thr plnre of recruitment will be provided for the officer, his wife and children subject to a maximum of (fares) adult fares. The successful candidate will lie appointed on probation for two vears In the first instance, subject to his passing a medical examination, and will be required to contribute towards the Provident Fund Applications giving full particulars of qualifications and experience, together with certificates and testimonials should be addressed to the Honourable the Colonial Secretary. Trinidad, to reach him not later than 22nd October. 1950 12th October. 1930. 13.10.90—Sn. SHIPPING NOTICES GOVERNMENT rNDUflTRlAt 80*001, SUafstERVALE— GIRLS APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Assintaitt to the Chief Matron. Government Industrial School, particularly from women i r the service of the Government 2 Salary will be in accordance with the rates fixed under Uncivil Establishment (Teachers) Order, 1949; entry Into the Incremento) scales $732 to $1,344.. II.050 to $1,776 and $1,446 to $2,352 will he determined by academic qualifications In addition an allowance is payable at-the rate of 25-*. of the salary. 3 Candidates must be between the age* of 23 and 35 years and be prepared to live in the quarters provided (urrfurnlshecl). 4. Application forms, obtainable from the Superintendent of the Government Industrial Schools, St Philip, or the Social W.lf.u. Office, the Garrison (from whom further details may be obtained) must be completed arid returned to the Social Welfare Office by Tuesday. 31st October. MM 12th October, 1930. 14 1050—2n Kidney Trouble Causes Backache, Gelling Up Nighls .,— t-.tir.. ..„,. HJafi.t*. •J' • U f.r rrom MIIIM... Nervi a**.. Itarka< he L.*. I'aln. Kwoll-n Atil riruun.atl.rti Horning pan Ill M Us*Mg*THVn *r, I*** .uur lint*. KMno Tr*ul Wrong f-l. a i*f*. '.-laaar r* of arid* i ,, %  i aa* fi JBHI cla-r a h. %  •oOial i 2*wr, Kg/"" ^——— r Help Kidneys Dae tee's Way ra dleecn-*r*e by aclanand in actual pwadl e gSfffiH-: •era asSan out ar;: n-lltUall/ prepared j,r. No •ene.it—No Pay • Th. •tn-OM a,m* of Cyita* .— right la w.rk: helping rout kldi.->. .. mov* * j*** ana* yuieliic on. make* %  f*i liknow again And *o certain are Ih "''"" %  '*' Cyita. -ill >.t|.i r rou eotn Metri, Hirraakiouiuirr Ii undararnen* baca guarantee. T.-i b* th,.!,. if „„ •nllr.lv Mlla' 1 ** )n*l r.turn ih-mui V""' '"'a* t'.i -tI. % %  % %  .f h-mlat aajaj th%  aaj i„. , ..,,„,, l ,.,:,, for W K I D N I r S %  LADBia raa <-i iS.Tfio BeSMSf SHIUMATlBaf Cystex;; MOS TRIAL AISTBAUA —.. %  ll ir D i AD BaaV ri, s> m V D*rw>d Par at -*titst Aruba Data of Icatiin* ModNed W Aicoo, ShuunAhipCo. %  ? -atSAwa asa.ani %  Fa. *•*• aa %. *a*gl airis aalli • t Ham* *f Bkip %  At-<1A M.i-.i -AlA-iiA PABTNI H %  %  I Ili'.H Ml 9 S 'AirOA PABTN'TJl%  H -AlfOA Plt-ASL'S HARRISON LINE OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KrNGDOM GEOLOGIST" I.l.dVlM'REST" OREGON STAR" % %  HEDFORP EARL" !^FTTLER %  l^ndoii Uverpoo) l->ndon. I.iwrpnol Glasgow Leaves Due Barbado* .10th Sept 14th Oct 10th Oct 27th Oct. ?0th Oct Mh Nov 23th Or10th Nov 28th Oct llth Nov H0M1WARD FOR THE dCITED EIKODOal v "- 1 For Closes In Bnrbado* S. "MOONCRIST.Ix,ndon loth CVtober For further Infotmatloi apply to— DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—A f .nU For Hardware of every Description Mrs THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM i l Mil n FOCND*r LTD.—rraprittocal Cnr. of Brw* and TudM strt*u.



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      SATl'RDAY. OCTOBER 14. Iftfi* BARBADOS ADVOCATF PAC.I IHRIT Canada Wants Commonwealth Trade More West Indian Exports (From Our Own Correspondent) LONDON CANADA wants to build up Mi Commonwealth trade, particularly that with the West Indies. There li a great demand for fruits, fresh, processed and canned: and bom British Guiana there is need for increased Mippln I tropical hardwood for industrial applications and for veneering. :'i an *• %  u ire I-M'-K\ ii\ Mi U W ala*kaauie, IJep*t> Minister <.f Trade and Commerce, in an .pi-'niiim in the curtan "f "Nfw CommonTins 1* the magazine formerls known as Crown Cotonist." Mr. Vackeniie point* out that nrnil build a satisfactory T'dad Celebrate Diseoverv artuul.nl PORT OF SPAJN. Oct. 11. Celebration* commfmorili" : the one hundred and rinc.vCanada cannot tuild a tat second anniversary of the dbvaoiiar-sUrliuit trade bal eovery of the Now World I. "oiled Kingdom import! Christopher Columbus took place ir. Thursday morning in Columbus Square. Port of Spain b\ the laying of a wreath at thfoot of the discoverer's siUue The wreath was laid by Lieut Brian Gething. the Governor". Aide De Camp and City Mayor Alderman Norman Tung. Noise In Mysterious Disease Kills Pan ama B.G. Coconut Trees PANAMA Panama.' National Assembh has revoked agam,l pressure from clioues and ornnitrd groups wf trrrbte-maker* in ihe gallerV, „f the Assembly building Recently—during the first work ing session of the new Assembly •esstoo—ihe member* passed a resolution providing that a police guard be brought to the i-lmmbcr to maintain order in the galleries The next day. the roll scarcely had been called when Deputy Hermclio Barlett* asked the Ckeir where the policemen were Assssnbly President Norberlo Zur|u> replied that it was his uiK.wstar.diii* that police would be eaaled unl' when such action became nerea aary. At this. 21 erf the • deput:. Moat Shortage races Britain MEAT ASSOCIATION alone, a large pioportion mar.u-'actund goods, nettuon hat to be faced from r .rket where CanHa* -I s will "Qrraw Jssw-Tsey MreV Meal kVl R. A. BntUr." I.ONDON. Oct. 13 The Special Com nut uv i Lriuurs Imported Meat Trade AssociaMaii warned to-day of substantial meat shortage present walked out Lacking a ^^ gfj? %  **" v ^ quorum, the session was adjourn* JJ e br,ak,losen „f Argent. ad. Applause or loud criticism from group* in Use Assembly's gallerie.has been common, although con trary to the rules. Observers re called that threatened vioierv Rapid Advance lapti h.iDisapproval of the ceremony wag Indicated by meji<'>I '. Trinidad-Venezuela Inn. i:. 1 lions Committee bearing placard* the of protest Uh olu f Canadian in | -it year* .. KH.ll and variety French Rod Lead?!* fr>m Urge"iifowds"in and'aroui Is S-riousk HI the building caused the Assembly to reverse its stand and reject the FUos-Hines Agreeruent for con tinucd U.S. occupation of a dozen -XZSLflU, d **5stS"* tssss^rv political career of the Demonstrators led by ( 'hr U Muitre patrolled art i :>quare halting at the foot of 'he : tatue while the '.' %  Consul Qanggsj) lemu lathering. %  ] II. us from our bus %  Among slogans which cu the demonstrator:.' were: "You cannot ban your country ;-nd enjoy pltsjtt*." Members of the Latin I'ity and Larln American Consuls witnessed the carvmouy. Boy Scouts formed a cordon around the statue and the square was decked with flag* for the occasion. —(C.P.) ..li.. i countries, th* "y^. Hut thenas* I leng DM of fur"" ,l ~' d ^ ,,""* spasm of high (her pffMucH of which Canada blo !' proure' which caused hb Dtac re. Coffee Is uui !i" >-llap. in u Paris street .ml. on* Item Canada used to on Tuesday wu. • passing over*' BO per < UEOKUFTOWN A WIDESPREAD outbreak of disease taVong cucon.. plant*, in British Guiana u causing; coconut pig c-ayncrs and the Department of Agricuture a great deal o M :,. %  %  %  Veteran planter Mr Boudh. ewsssr \A *e 1.U00 acre Plant.Uuu, Sismiglu.ll. East Coa-i. Dcsnaran. said that be alone h. loat .iupro'iiuaU-ly l.OtO tree* since UM dasrase first launchc i iU attack. Mr Boodhoo diaciosad that he first recogniaed a slight attack nn his trees i.bout two years sg<> The dlMa pi and unripe begin 1> drop off lb. trees The dtsess attack both STOUng .out matiiitrees Spraying of the hearts of UM palaM ba% beaa found tagstae•tPplio: The Committee paiaed a reeoln tton nt a meeting in Londot callmg foi -quick Govcninn-r action it: solving the psesetrl Argentine meal deadlock.I t* I at tradi descrittes Jamaicans Plan T.B. tight KINGSTON. J'ca Oct. 12 An Islandwku* eampaigu against tubarculosll with x-ray. BCG vaccine and tuberculine test* begins on April I next year to spread over a period of two yearn. It is proposed that every person will be lasted so that by the foUosrixuj campaign, the majority of the people will have acquired Immunity against the disea-f grhUfl W vlrtbns are treated. lb. cam paign which will be prosecuted Mr. Mackenzl > gnd ptf out the goods etdM No! One-Way Hut Canada does not want it to be all one-way trade. While she •'.ill wants to promote imports, at the same time she is most anxious to help her "traditional customers" to buy more Canadian goods. The temporary measures such ns the Canadian credit and ofTgoors KJt.P, purchases which wore important in maintaining Canada's sales overseas since the Ml arsra now a relatively small factor in the overall trade picture u the am .i crease imports from the Sterling Aiea Uut the Rightwiug £poque said that leuding doctors concluded dloVuffi since '"*" the njuPdod medical bulletin s mco tliat TJaarOS bad oacatel haemorrhage. I-eftwlng Franc Tirrur said that Thorez wa* "seriously 111." and quoted a rumour according to which his malady was cancer of the brain. — %  gag* Portugal Backing Franco Yugoslavia Does Not Need Help From Atlantic Powers BELGRADK Oct 13. Yugoslavia to-day domed tba Of tbc drive to inshe was negotiating for military from the Sterling help from the Atlantic Pact pow, as to make these temporary era* The official Yugoalav agesicy !" £ im authoritatively %  on of negotiaYugoalav Govu in powers foi gji From gage 1 (8) The present flatt to Portugal of General Francisco I-ougoti.i of the Spanish Air Force. Thougb the Portuguese press said he came here on "a private viaU" to General Aldredo Sintro. Portuguese Air Force" Chief, he has also Army Minister Hngadi. has Pinto. (4) Today's Schunba-Artajo meeting The Portuguese press announced Uxlav that the Portuguese Naval :lon will attend the next SpanMediterranean and Atlantic jeuvres. An invitation ?ame from Spanish Navy Minister Admiral Moreno — UBBBBBV.) to free %  erprise Reuler Den} Ked Invasion Of Tibet NEW DEUtl Oct. 13 Tibet's Fir an.e S.-, i • here to-day he beuvwtl reporb. i ChincMCommunist "invasion" o ie tor approval Tibet wart 'iaaalbn account' lO.Ootl boybrought by trader; off nUnor miHiniu .•ititii aer iM iod i months ago." Tbe Finance Saenatary who %  lender of 'he Tibetan BMCSjatli sfbiofa bopaa to basai uik* with ll e I'lkir. i n I'IIH • fi.turr said *'We 00 DM bgian %  ••ports Of a ChaMgg invasion Tibet because are no inform..lion from at r 0 Bl nient". He saul lie ban nOBiVg gsf ropoii of a "minor borde u.cident" from hi: i i the time but not in tlelail The Tibetan desegaUen li %  New Delhi awmting %  reply fro %  .he Tibetan Capital Lhasa to < suggestion by Ihe Ctuncv,uubV sador here that negotiations mig.i*. be conducted in Peking "How can there i-. oj when bO'J) China anj Tibet ai Abrari" hoping it) have peacaffl nient?" the Finance Y mister said KValrr nl i are llm^" appearing latel, m aaveral JamJea and the Worl.l Health ;''d by dollar,. The Ion ot trade Watern paper, about Yugoalavla Organisation a S ub.ldiar, UntUd ^J-.'r^tl^Ti"' ndu "* "^""'''.K negoti.tiotu, lor millUDdcr H ,.„ ,„„ MaTfaMia ramntetaon wa tuurov. has tu a certain degree been comtary pact* with Atlantic Fad po— Lr,i Si HmASSrSa P""l '•>' by an increase In the era, and that Yugoslavia wilTi ed by the Ilouar or Rr|,ra.la, lolM llf markK Bu c ^ wa5 ; „„ , __ ii !" ". XS' e !" y ,„ ^ total coat hopatul of starting up overseaj |rl 01 CIOO.OOO will be met by a i rild( Ir U ch Hem?a. dairy pm"TheM grant from the Colonial Developuucts, hand tools and rubber good. bI „,. Comlnform p.p^D-1, Worliar. and aaaasaauafia who -U.1 alumnics to these report' lo Yugoslav Republic thorised to deny Uasse BYE OPERATION SYDNEY Melbourne Solicitor Audley G>1lespie Jones, who underwent an eye o^.-lioi. in a local hospital *%£** lated In London and transmitted l.eml.lUiry.idJromU^eoun. J SS^^ffi' ZZ££ !" POrtl-Oa ffssraUH, The bouics ol the two brotbei I'ercy Da .. Uaii. Ui ol Point Fefltln, boutb Tiiniuao. who wage killed iiistaully by lightning on Tluusday last, were washvil asiiore about a mile from ico lleach. Cedri^ Saturday looriung It is repoiteu Uiat tne two brothers and iiien half broUnr merit Welfare of £53.0O0 and tl>* | n ihe near future United Nations International ChllCertain Canadian manufacturdren'f Emergency Fund of 1H7.7SO. ers had established subsidiaries in Dr I. M. Lourie. Regional TuberIhe United 'Kingdom and these culoeis Adviser of the Pan Ameri!" £_ !" ? _"!!! !" i.' n H*! 0 .** in about tl Tanju is can SL veylng a field of three unit* will be sent to Mexico for training work. nitary Bureau leld here eurterested in expanding their investre P rtfl TWO ARRESTED TOKYO. Oct 12. Police arrested two high officials of the Japanese Communist party in Osaka today on charges of obstnicting the Allied Commonwealth countri. RABBIT-TRAP SYDNEY. The Australian Agxicultur.il bureau believes that Mr. W Scott. of Sydney, may have solved the rabbit problem which coats Australia £150.000.000 a year. Unable to obtain wire netting, Scoll surrounded his vegetable plots with cne length of tarred string six %  m removed and be is wearing It is too soon to sgy whether a definite improvement has been effected. The technique was developed by the Russian surgeon Filatov to cure a rare disease that limit* vision to a email circular area immediately before the eye. The doctors added that so far everyone is pleased." Austin Lake home ti&huig eKpesHt-V Worm" Imprisoned .no" Our own Otseassa PORT-OF-SPAIN Mencillu Muur..ed as a >loiiie.-in servant fur 17 dayv when her nustruss stalled "mining things'' A trap waa soon set and aha was caught stealing quantity of articles valued ** > *tx REWARD Of PATIENCE complete inventions Ttrul-r One Cop Price $4.20 thunder war. heard followed by lerriilc dash of lightning which struck the boat. "The l-OlM was as if a thousand boftfa had fallen into the sea", said 1-akar. "1 wa* sitting in the centre of the l>ot and when I turned to hpoak to Percy at Ihe end of the boat, I saw thai bj was dead, aod when I looked "Jppor Hurma. is around at the other end, I saw ihrce liurmeae brot KANW n iN After 13 years t h e pi 12c of tSOZ 2s drawn in the Irish sweepstake by their father, a rice uller m the Shweho district of (apeM eg prlie AI %  i.i "i i i; %  IX^NDON „. UM 1 "^ ble *.'i, a L e X"*"^ t**** Charlie Ward. To. of" P^eSsaSiassabfiS lh Vl e h0 r Dd loria. thought they would have G v Secretary Chuter Ede to with•**• %  w hui a few mmulcs ll the standing offer lo k y w ** d k ADVENTURE WITH BffSilhat Oscar wa> also" dead' Death was not claimed all, these %  had occurred instantly As both ""*" u,c "'* n *>*>' %  bodies were hanging toward* the quested the bum• WUi, I tried lo pull them inside, tbg recent World P but the vessel capsize.) 1 then onference in Dublin t. get decided to save my own life and touch with the ticket holdei swam about wo miles to land' their return to Burma PRETORIA Cronje, 8, and his rabbits refused to pass It. ernmeot tests made in heavily indraw^uie^'rtandinjT offer'""^ k > f WftB d-rk with %  ** and Ab ^ 8 patlon Th* Communists Tome iMted area* have been equally Metropolitan Policemen of S4.2C ham and Charlie ran for it But At Tads and Junkichi Shimsuccessful and will be continued f or each recruit they bring in they were badly stung When they oUuka were said to have dlslriSays Scott"I dont know why The Federation said the plan has got Abraham to hoapiui they huted anti occupation leaflets they keep away, it must be the brought "considerable disrepute 1 counted the stings on hi* bodysmell of the tar." in their ranks. INS. CARE YOUR BUILDINGS!! REPLACEMENTS COST £'s (• %  HSM „ 0 taiT OMo/i costs i fou L .' ft if cur D O you knww the amount o* C^rrufjaggd Iron imp.-n.-J int ctopusl couratrics even' %  %  The figure is astonish'.ngtv high, an aiter allowing tot new AVorks the balance rcperaessts a heavy forfeit fe> Uck of Uiung rr. per rrcciati ui Protection is corny with Anii-Corrot. ice Point for every INCH of metal. TEPROGENE is an anti-corrosiTt paint designed for the trogficaV It clings closely tc the -turlace of metsl-wcek, forming a rUmp-prvx'f, air-proof kin which preserTes rtslnfjrn^st mdciinrurW. kthree gttractrri thsdes i — Red, Grer and *~ -UttSsW ^t J5 w %  Jet* St cool and kind In the thro*I. lueir eslra uiiadii. make* a U ut .l.ll. I ..,,.. lo one > i i I h, Imrgnl-i*,!/ iMiniiiii %  I ... J ,;,; %  .,/ Clgmrttf m Ihr World mM LMQWNi IM.I\MI A. S. BRYDEN & SONS




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      TAClt. SIX It VIWAKOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY. OCTOBER U, I A West African Watches A New Colonial Spirit By K. II. limo.lo LONDON. It U encouraging to witch the growth ol the ww Colorual spirit One apparently minor but neverthelff significant manifestation of ihu pml. i* the way Governon and other official spokesmen In official and unofficial function*. trttr'"' ihrmselves with the problem* and asplraUons and succes*e< of the people* over whom they rule by the use of the pronwun "our". It is now "our culture "our constitution", 'our •Boris", 'our achieve "our future", etc and not the impersonal and Olympian "your" whitd gave the impresdon that those who made the speeches or gave the addresses belonged entirely to another world. Perspective In 'a recently published brochure which attempts to give the British people an idea of what %  pee on in the Colonies, the whole thing is put Into perspective Answering the question "What dots Britain gain from her link wtlh ihe Colonies?" the pamphlet says. the Commonwealth Li an association of peoples on a world-wide scale By leading the Colonies to full partnership In the Commonwealth. Britain it Hrenglhenin* the whole b> aureng.hr mrig the parts Bui the difficulties confrontinji til who are .inxlous to achieve the new ipini are immense. Thc> arc r .deuced in a resolution t m u substitute tor petrol. But the Jamaican ntua.ion wai brought about t>y me need iedu. "iig U> the high unn uuty; and the desire to make .fi table use tf all molllfl sc it the sugar inouatrj eujWt ?rate at maximum efficiency Idea Supported ["he Usew ha:, IM-W been supp* It" b) an .-itu-le u> ibu moiuh'i nc ol the "TUTU* Review gf luslry" The writer says tliat. ile |a existing circumstance Booker Bros. Expect Sugar Increase U.K. Rum Demand Still falling (From Our Own Correspondent> LONDON A 26S INCREASE in their sugar production is expected in 1950 by Booker Brothers McConnell and Co Thia' was stated at the 50th Annual General Meeting of the Company in London. Responsibility West Indian shops should materially benefit by the amalgamation of the Wot IvxUaa Luyini. departments In London and Liverpool with Campbell Bros. Carter and Co. Limited, who have great knowledge and experience in the buying field. They will be responsible for all the Wast Indian shopduring k^pmg businesses of Bookers.— as they are already the parent of those In Africa This i part of the general reorganization schasne. Their spring crop this year was 33 ate cant, above that of 1849. but on the whole their sugar con** !" !" f somewhat meagre rum .ales to the United cnntrlhutlon to prollti. said the Chairman, Mr. A F. McConnell "This was mainly due to the inevitable dislocation of production in factories and on plantation* where considerable modernization work has been going oi the crop year" he added The financial position is fairly good. "Unles* the economic environment In which wc operate is completely upset—as It well may be—we do not expect to be unlikely that power alcohoi short of fut.dj. for our needs" (aid need from sugar could IInd the Chairman. Their liquid poslport nuu-ket. there appear* tion has been greatly btspreeaal by the recent Issue of new capital, and a new bout of inflation the form which an eionoml. Sir William Ramsay BOOM The recession in the d em a nd lor rum in the United Kingdom .ontlnues. but the Chairman said: "United Rum Merchants Ltdnur newly acquired subsidiary, had a most encouraging year m 1949—indeed their profits, in the face of a sharp recession in the upheaval seems most likely to demand for rum. were far greatlake, er than we had any reason to hope for at the time of the amalThe Problems gamation. I am afraid. we must Inflation Is full of financial tount upon a reduction in United problems for us" continued the Ttum Merchant** profits (due to chairman For instance. th, oniinuataon of recession). Rum price of sugar Is some four time.u a magnificent drink, our brands what it was bt'fort 1939; therehave a world-wide reputation, and points out the laovUs African pro'* %  iour i'mes as much money ^y, m \ home and in our valuable duct of the fj-ai world war w IBU,t nnw * laid oul to P roducP export market* Uoiied Ttum Mercomposed of 55—60 per cent. '*• same tonnage of sugar we ,.„,,.. „,. wall equipped to sell alcohol; 40—45 par cent. ttftW •" not receive^payment for our lhm _.. and a small amount of ammonia *r unUl it arrives in this counThe_ retiring directors, F.fToru were made to promo*. srvei-al upportui of it locally Thu. :uabie cuts kit M g*% in petrol itnporu and would l of lunsuuwubsw Aiutncial benefit to the country concerned "provided the necessary ofTmal en louragcment and acttOO tf forthcoming to Rspon lea uDstaclas nssw hiadurtng progress" Tuning th. luetory of powe. ukohnl pnulmtioj.. tin' trrltt fl ar Jix*rtn #/ s M-aelr -v fmrnfty 9J rkmnu—m a* e,an. ( a^faiaW is BtJ %  %  /.•.hutwy fft l wm kt ry. Tfcr hi of his Sitrntrirt was stasV k r^4ii4,ieiiai>r'Ra)*r^, *v iWaira* stfm, t rarr far at i gtaj vi rmJl qumuuti as tj air. Low, tOmusy mi in atifafBtm suiitededim uWaiity Utuum, num. krjftom mJxrwoH.whdi s eae psraaW at im Mmtphe* but m tvm p**U*t asarn. V>M aWsr easr. utn mitt Amxd \mt now, IrJ/a ttntury Uirr. At, *n t/4mfim mdnmnd tmptnma. Arpm m ti* : ;*s**4m fa awaVra g^lki swrmV %tV t>Jb. The ck.:> /..asnjr lamp aaarsab cm mm w sadi m extnt ikstjrw Mgat* st isaay by my mm* assar Jtaa diaf •/" ares Urn ". fiWiasi u dw tnyk-ytJ tJ it** limy*. i tM'tim w iO wtlUkncwn r, insum 1 *f kydnfta, for prtwUax kwrymtj fr" ||>]MntAgHt> '"fiRmuaywmbom aiG/aajm*'M ttSt IUu gj lrw la st **i-e,MBkatl. mi Issfsssr, m urll os kHngptofeaor ofAmust^ at Biistot mi bW %  M Uniwuty Cdlegc, Lrnom He a-ai lm#luei m ;ow, mi BytoW gtf r^fcW P>w "• 1904. In 1913 se pmiiti over Ar rnarmaiastaf *, .-ui vfOmmtol Soixtkt, uhttt hsjloirfir /a.ijar( mttUhm to oU>xs% his nh mcfolilmouammamBitl^.rmA.Germm*^l< '9'* Mr. TIMOTHY A W*at African lonmatist from aUerrs Lsooe who Fvchequer In those days reduceu Iwritas from the ofBce of onr Laoaan Correspondnrl and sfill mission lurne, as Director of Information have applied for them. As East ,^,^rfl'iai Servlce . observed in his evidence Germany Is behind the Iron CurunptnaJrl bcfore lhe s, lecl Commiltce on tnm, there Is the fear thai InstiturlEstlmatcs that "It coats £0,500 tions there would offer only t .dinv nnd nroducUvLiaciar' fur el nl Colonial luunwlfsls to indoctrination in an unwholesome t-ifielnt ran onlvbe assured 1" "end the Journailsuf Course m poliUcal belief But it is possible SSSfthe average* Briton in thefthe London Polytechnic .0 angne otherwise. For Colon is! Colon^s becomes an ambassador> w *"" ,"> *o back, their „udents in British universities, OlatoSwiU and of the new Coloma 5 k ' VB, _>' **" hav m ***"> ** trained as engineers agrtmai rpint in the office. In the • v e ln El U ? d w,u •*• *" ch culUirirts of scientists, do not •ksbi'u in the hospital, in the thBt th *>' w l }**"* Jmirnallsm absorb the principles of Imperlalnlaylng fields or wherever work and become high-class clerks or or play brings him into contact bankers with Colonials. acujred but not paid for. At the rj.,ncMuer in <"£ wv* rrooc^ ^^ prlce thls me ans the use the duty on imported and horne','*"' jVooo merely to finance produced power and Industrial alcohol In order to encourage this ^The %  istnl Whv should il be different wish Colonial students In Eastern ppeara u, l>e that GerMany? %  .lewspapeis cannot rosilion of Chiefs tdTortl to Infirst class This Is a But 1 do n*f think lhal arguOf the making of constitutions P* nf rgri> IIIKMHI In K.eni dis inPO lg wor th listening to—even In West Africa there seems to be cusslon in London yf the Colonial lf wn* Nigerians can get free no end. Discussion of the subject Press Two issues have become education by going to Communist is becoming 0 weary business to confused There are critic* concountries. I am personally opposed West African politicians One of cerned aboul u'Juu Colonial newe(0 Colonial students studying in the uiffkuli probiexns ennfronting papers say and West Afrli-ans to-day is the poslabout liou' thev tion Chief* should occupy Ihthe the remedies new i-on-titutional set-ups What group d<> not ... C'.noda and 11 I. by no E v~Barton. C B E."."and Mr. N RACE ALEXANDRIA. A WRAF wlephonul ao-j*ear.1 normal qunnniy o— 'Sh^Ji' C n-dl n 0 aboui 1150 000BirmB.nn. !" n me u !" o..3eW3Sffl*ssa rnrstorcs for our s3gar Interests minutes. She ,s the only w -man rnd the stocks of merchandise in rv er to do so. Two other com"ur -hops In Barbados. British petltors nearly had to give up flulnnn. Northern Rhodesia, Nyfollowing the efforts of a astlaad sad Trinidad. The conm eaj,ing Egyptian fisherm %  lidated balanc**-*heet shows thai „ Kul them. Speaking no English. n all four million pounds are rehr d d nol un derstand that the quired to finance these; moreover swimme „ weTe competing In a we arsure that Mat "ff.*fl racPw and tried his hardest to take them out of the water Is ti. V' the rple of Chief: nd the people and the Ooverntaent? Since the introduction of tht VStem of Indirect Rule In West Africa, there has been a tendency for Chiefs to drift awaj from the people This drift har been accelerated by the growth ol the educated elements. They are irked at the leaden steps taken by those Chiefs who found comfort in sraaig Conservatism The Chiefs has* drifted lu aeme c^se^ st far fntsa the passslt thai. U Nigeria, they are regarded a someone wrote recently as "ai. Integral part of the machinery 0 Qovcmmcst." critics c^mcrrned %  v say it. However uggestod by tlie on< of nneaaily meet tin n.iiblrs noted by the other. MJI< ut critic of Britain Is likely j be more effective If fortified by university education A Colonial industry Then In 1922 the Imperial Motor Transport Council subcommittee msde a favourable report on the suitability of this type of fuel for use in motor vehicles About the some time, a United States firm found tha: by use of an additional process. the power alcohol could be suitably employed for tractors. Difficulties Difficulties cf distribution th. i-rusc, coupled with a fall 11 price of petrol, and Ihttt IWO factors together with other Influences, gradually brought abou. a loss of Interest In the project Economic circumstances following the second world war Eastern Germany" because" "of the buve now brought about the IhreM of political indoctrination revival of interest ami las Kxpwicn.e lias proved the Comyear the Mauritius GovarruneiU .r,unists to be more subtle, and appointed a coiiuniUee to considei pvrsiitent, Uian the Imperlailstal * possibdiVy of USU.K J nllydrou^ Hectntly, I discussed this with an alcohol In the colony Its conAfrican Local Government Officer elusions were that the spun could holiday In London He deprebe made locally at a price that ry large turnover achieved thi. by our operating units wc are not two overs' On iht Bit] i. ii" Limlted. ai Trinidad, produce. I at&sftctory returns, but the sales of wholesale and retail oui British Guiana QUOTE NKW YORK Back from entertaining troops battle areas in Korea. HollymSSSmwood !, A1 Jol,on *" "•"" wh *' U l.a xli^l i.,wiii JIAV U> loir conlrollid p,o1 did upon cooilm home .,!,„" .ouplW W.U. h.y ."Ply: 2 'rJf V ?? Hl income.111. HUb-cdllor will not learn to spell rated the very Idea of Colonial would compare favourably with l..— -e. . %  technical standards as a whole. of the Press lct | par alys It is, nevertheless important that Uncertain of the support of the these standards should be raised edinati-.i elements, and jealous at the grcmier positieo they enjoj amort* 'heir people. Chiefs havt tended to lean more and more OB the strong arms of the author! ties The result Is that Chiefand iBtelligentsia often pull In opposite dtftetions. A Chief in the Gold Coast has even gone t tha "uiu'hieflv" length or found lng a poliUcal party This blue blooded party goes by the pec< Trade Union Officials To Visit B.W.L liar label of "National Labou Party", and Is seeking the alii anc* of Labour In its elaborattwo page Blueprint, the Party' alms and objects are set out an< include the following passage and direction of the next Government should Ire handed to th > and workers, but not to n Bow Is this to be done? M Blarkhurnc has pointed 1o one of the dangers of offering courses In Britain to Colonial Journalists Training at the West Indian or Waal African University Colleges Is out of the queanun. ftnee •Sky would almost certainly fail to obtain staff, and since the rsoat important part training—work on an up-Ms-eams v | Ml Trinidad and the British newspaper-would not easily be |, lulM goon, jjo wr itea the Hon. available Vlaita of Colonial ( L Bradshaw. Pnssldent of the journaliBts 1< BrlUin and other Sl Kjtts-Nevls Trades and Labour countries are very valuable. r,ut i union, to the President of the believe more waiWbf f^L^ S^men and Waterfront Workers' ,y such vWtt^lf toeae )^|^ Trade Union. Mr. C. P Alex.mdcr techniques, but to secure a command of the English langua^i The unfortunate It did. however, point out that | the only probable outlet would b.* Internal with a celling production figure of 3m litres annually, if all local owners of motor vehicle', were compelled to make use of' l In the proportion of 25 per cent alcohol to ~i per cent petrol Later the ceiling production njpir< might rise to Sra litres In addition, the commlttei?.ugges'o. that distillers should Ire invilei 1 ; 1 submit n scheme for the production of 3m litres a year. To Be Overcome But there are several difflcul Oat which will have to be overcome be/ore the reccinmoiuiation. are acted upon One is thi abolition of petrol rationing whu irtually stopped tlie sales rf^irl !" ilata tf^S. rSf, lnlmallonal ,'f r ** power alcohol made In the colony of a journalist s union ofuciab. are expected W 1 1M8 w Meuritiu* proauce %  n u P-*^d r e visit Triaddad and the British Wtat ,aiooo litre, of Induttrlt 240O.OOO litres of Industrii alcohol and the changed condition have placed the dtstiU awkward situation The Chamlx of Agriculture has supporuthe request put forward by dlrtiliers that tha excise duly o nearly lVja a litre on industno alcohol should be removed. Th. LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC AS SOON AS YOU CAN 1 1 :c Mr. Bradshaw urged the Union in Trinidad to prepare well In ad... %  t' remains ***• ""^ c * e • %  • of "tde would aUo* the selling prtc *om r-nlnnials have ealncd uaion '""rtlons on which It was t |cohol lo b> lowered For un'es tew educated place-seeking poll'hat lun *gawattJr*gF! fc %  ddVon might be of „.„ can be encouraged th. bclao* who may be looking out this wider *~*J~ e -^.HIJI help. The Trinidad President exlllinissn whose tor opportunity to amass wtglth l*ss likely to remain journalists, in their own interests." There 1% because of the uncertain^ very little open conflict now bejournalism as twecn the Emirs and their peoplo In the Colonies 'Northern Nigeria; but the Educational Menace Some scholarships have been offered to the people of Nigeria by schools and universities in Eastern Germany and naturally many of pressed delight at the communi' meana'nf Uvellhocd rumb"''"Ts are heard there also. The Colonial Press Before he left the Colonial Office for the governorship of tht.* Lerwfcid lilands. Mr K Blark%  ccupying all the avi cation He thought it would be of age. will have to incur consicei interest to all responsible Trade able expense disposing of th> Union organisations in the British surplus molasses from the eurmi West Indies. • i.gur crop. DUNLOPFORT CAR TYRES for greater mileage LISIUINE AMisapli<. lull itreagth. kills millions of germs on rhtoai surface. It attacki these germs aisociated with colds beiore the)' attack you . keeps them from scarring serious trouble. Take the sensible precaution against cold complitaiions-farglc with LISTERINE Ami aeptic. full strength! IN TESTS OVER A 12-YEAR PERIOD, DAILY USERS OP USTERINE ANTISEPTIC HAD FEWER COIDSI J ... .A -.Ltu.I FOR FOR MEN •CtUneie bpons ihirt* are popular lor both work and play because they look and feel good and are economical. Midc from Celaneie Jersey, they are obtainable in various .hades and sue.. SPOUTS SHIRTS ATHLETIC UNDERWEAR 3 GOOD REASONS FOR DRINKING W'RRAY'8 MILK STOUT it refreshes it sustains it's the best! SOLD BY LEADING ESTABLISHMENTS EVERYWHERE IMKMTfD IT MANNING & OO. LTD. ••JDOaTOWN BREWED AND BOTTLED ST WM. MURRAY & Co. LTD. CRAIGMILLAR BREWERIES EDINBURGH SCOTLAND