Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text






Tharsday
October 12

1950



Hacbados







Only W. Germany|
Can Decide On
German Army |
|

|

Britain, France,
U.S. Will Ignore E.

German Elections

FRANKFURT, Oct. 11.
‘THE UNITED STATES, Britain and France
announced today that they had told the
Soviet Union they could not recognise Sunday’s
elections in East Germany as giving the Soviet
Zone regime any legitimacy or claim to represent

the people of East Germany.

The American, the British and the French High Com-
missioners in Germany — John J. McCloy, Sir Ivone Kirk-
patrick and Andre Francois Poncet, all sent similar letters
to General Chuikov the Soviet Commander-in-Chief in
Germany telling him so.

-ADENAUER

BONN, Oct. 11

Dr
tonig't
Allies aniy

West German Chancellor
Konrad Adenauer
that he had
the West German Parliament
could decide whether Germany
was to raise divisions for Westeri
European defence.

That could only..be after the
Allies had made a formal request
for Germany to do so, he

Addressing the German peop.
on both sides of the Iron Curtain
over the radio, the Chancellor
seid: “We are waiting to see
whether the Allies are going
make such a request to us and
when.”

His

day's

said
told the

said

a fis Senet

broadcast followed yeste:
resignaiion of his Minister
j The High Commission here this] of Interior Gustav Heinemana
| afternoon released the text of|over disagreements about the
| McCloy’s letter to General Chui-}German attitude towards remui-
| kov which included the copy of aj terisation.

| letter from West German Chan-j On France, Adenauer said: “We







Rice For

Star . Reds leellor Dr. Konrad Adenauer on]Germans have so often shown
: ving {si German elections and other| and also proveli our soodwitl
freedom. 4 towards France, and our firm dk
TAIPEH, FORMOSA, Oct. 11 McCloy’s letter began by saying:| termination to proceed in comme
Chinese Nationalists said today] “In my letter of May 25, 1950,} with France in future that I be~-
that their transport planes had|I requested you to transmit tej lieve they should not act against
dropped 24 tons of rice in famine-| your Government the proposals} us with mistrust again: mistrust
striken areas on the Communist! agreed on by the Foreign Minis-|never produces confidence on
mainland. ters of the United States, Great] either side, but mistrust produces
A spokesman said that 10| Britain and France for procedure more mistrust.”
American built planes also} which would permit holding free} —Reuter.
dropped six tons of Nationalist} democratic and secret elections; ee
propaganda pamphlets and flags!throughout Germany and would}



for under-counter celebrations! lead to the establishment of al
yesterday of the anniversary of| freely elected and democratic Gov- |
the founding of the Nationalist} ernment for all Germany. I have

Government 3€ years ago.
Planes ranged over Central and AND NOW |
“BLUE” RAIN

South China from Chekiang
province south of Shangai to
DORSET, Oct 11.
For the second time in a

Magloire Tops
The Polls

IN HAITI

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti.
October 11.
Department
‘Interior said today that Col. Paul



Kwangtung, north of the Indo-.
China border.

Nationalist Intelligence reports
published here today claimed

| Officials of of
that 7,000,000 people faced star.-

the

vation along a_ flooded river ns eas See) | Magloire won 99 per cent of the
valley stretching north of Shang- Nortman Darnell driving | votes in Haiti's présidential elec-

hai and Nanking.

i | tion held on Sunday
Communist

his lorry between Wool and



4 Deputy Premier Bovington, Dorset, reported The Electoral Board is sched-
Tung Pei, say these reports, had that the rain left blue uled to meet on October 22 t»
admitted that Communist China splashes like ink on the confirm the result of the
was short of at least 1,000,000 windshield and bodywork | balloting, The Constitutional
tons of foodstuffs and that Earlier this week “blue |!/Committee meets in November
thousands of people were home~ rain” fell at Gracedieu, })to write a new constitution before
less. Leicestershire about 140 to \the inauguration of Magloire and

Nationalist agents reported 150 miles north of here. It | the new Congress.

dissatisfaction in Shanghai. They was thought this was caused |} Magloire 43, had resigned from
alleged that Communists hac by high wind scattering el- || the military junta which ruled

arrested 10,000 people within a der berries. \the island since it ousted Pres:-

month and sent them te labour A weather’ pert. sid 'to- dent Dumarsais Estime trom
camps. day that “blue rain” in Dor- office a year ago. Magloire’s chief
—Reuter. set might be caused by dust || opponent Fenelon Alphonse,

particles carried across the
Atlantic from Central or
North America.

Red rain is fairly common
in Italy, caused by dust par-
ticles being carried from the
Sahara. |

—Reuter,

supporter of Estime charged that
the election was “hokum” and
| did not cast a vote.—C.P.



Frenchmen Drive
Out Guerillas
From Outpost
NORTH OF SAIGON



Meeting Broken
Up With Knives

———
not yet received an answer to this!

letter : VIENNA, Oct. 11.
r oluti The Austrian Socialist (Party
SAIGON, Oct. 11 Resolution | Headquarters here alleged today
French Union forces after a I enclose the text of a letter|that “terror bands” from the
three hour battle of "ase Violence” et to ue fied High| Soviet controlled —_Zistersfdord
ejected Insurgent guerillas from an Chancellor tavidak hentia ot oilfields had broken up a Socialist

: \ meeting with knuckle dusters and
resolution adopted in the Bundes- ree ere ey

tag on the 14th September and now The meeting was being held
endorsed by the Federal Govern-| last night in a cinema in Duerlk-
ment. — This resolution requests’ rut a few miles from the oilfields.
eccupying powers to arrange for, Several people including the
the holding in all four zones of| Mayor and Deputy Mayor of the
occupation, of elections to an all) town were seriously wounded,

German Parliament. ?

outpost only 31 miles north of
Saigon itself, a French military
spokesman here announced today.

Artillery and French King
Cobra fighter planes took part in
the battle and though the full re-
sults were not yet known, at least
130 Vietminh guerillas were killed.



The Insurgents suffered ‘“very} The resolution should be con. er:

- won bs lara aed is sidered in conjunction with a sr may
enerally in Indo-china ©) statement made on the same day '

spokesman added, the French |jn the Bundestag by the Chancellor ARTIE'S HEADLINE

military situation was better than

before last week’s report of in=

creased guerilla activity.
—Reuter.

in the name of the Federal Gov-

ernment, the text of which I also

enclose. You will observe that!
@ On Page 3.

AGCEPT RED ARGUMENT,
AND MAKEU.N. INACTIVE
Says Canadian Delegate |

LAKE SUCCESS, Oct. 11.
Canadian Minister of External Affairs Lester Pearson,










1 area:

I |



to-day told the United Nations Political Committee that if | Atte 4

Russian arguments were accepted the General Assembly | “ Anybody going in the cost |

would be unable to act in the case of aggression. , of living diréction? ”” i
Pearson was answering an at-



tack made yesterday by the Soviet

Foreign Minister Andrei Vyshin- | tc eT Te
sky on “the Acheson plan” to give
the General Assembly authority to
deal with aggression if the Secur-
ity Council failed to act,

Pearson said that Vyshinsky had
overlooked one esséntial point in |
ihe proposal—namely that the}
Assembly was being given powers |
On London Stock Exchange which were not only within the

Charter but which were to be used
LONDON, Oct. 11. only after the Security Council it-

Shares of Lautaro nitrate took | self had failed to take action.

a firm step forward on the London “Acceptance of Vyshinsky’s legal
stock exchange today. At 473] argument would merely mean that
the price recorded advanced.| the United Nations cannot take
Buying reported to be on the over-lany action at all to safeguard
seas account in the Matket was] peace and security if the Security
rather short of shares. ElSewheré! Council is made powerless by any-
Brazilian warrants emerged int0| one of its members,” he said,

the limelight with improvement

Braziliam
Warrants In
Limelight







The Chamber of Commerce
have received no reply from Gov-
ernment about the inquiries they
have made relative to the pro-
osed deep water harbour. “Our
etter has only been acknowledg-
ed”, the Seeretary of the Cham-
ber told Council members at their
monthly meeting yesterday, when
Mr. A. DeL. Inniss brought the
“We do not and cannot believe }matter up. 0

which practically recovered the}that the United Nations Charter| The Chamber had _ written
recent loss which followed the} sanctions any such futility.” Government some weeks ago in-
profit-taking. Pearson said that the Soviet|quiring as to what was being

Great Western Brazil stocks] Minister had argued that the As-|done about the project. Mr. D

were on the market around 153|sembly must refer to the Security|A. Lucie-Smith drew attention to

shillings on the official annoufce-| Council without taking ahy other] the difficulties steamship ware-
ment of the receipt of compen-| action whatever the question on/house operators were having on
sation money. Other Brazil rails; which the action was necessary.|the waterfront. These difficulties

in sympathy and| “He is trying to say that it was f i

illegal under the Charter for the] ping and Mercantile Association

Assembly to recommend that|jhad written Government ask'ng

United Nations troops be sent into!them to set up a Board of Inquirs
The general hesitancy in the} Korea to prevent Communist in+|into the matter

other section was attributed to} vasion but that it is not in the least ¥ r

reports that Communist China had| illegal for the Assembly to recom- Holiday Affair

were harder were ‘such, he said, that the Ship-
showed four per cent debentures,

fractionally better at 91.






told the United States to “keed| mend that United Nations troops! Mr. Lucie-Smith then referred

out of Korea” Prices were; be withdrawn Korea in order |to the letter which the Chamber

mainly slightly lower with| that that country may be at thy jh d written to Government about

British G rnment stocks dull] mercy of Communist forces in the|the public holiday when the West

on profg. by speculators.|northern part of the peninsula Indies cricketers had arrived from
—_ "Reuter Reuter./ the U 1 Kingdon



C.C. Gets No

FIRST CAR

STL



3



ee ets : $2? 0%.



Pay é

MRS. CLARA FORD, 84 year old widow of

F



. GOING



ee Fmt? ae ye |
Te Se

Henry Ford, the car proneci,

here pictured with her husband in taé*fiest Ford car made in 1896, died
at the Ford Hospital in Detroit. When Pord drove his first car through

the streets of Detroit it was Mrs.
the jeers of the crowd.
preferred her role of wife and moth

adjoining the property owned by Hen
old when she first met her husband

Ford who sat by his side and faced
Her public appearances Were infrequent.

She
er,

Mrs. Ford was born on Apfil 11, 1867, an a farm at Redford, Michigan,
Pord’s parents. She was 18 years
4f when they were married.



WILL TRY

TO SETTLE

U.S. POLICY

TRUMAN, MACARTHUR
|
\

LONDON, Oct. 11.

President Truman’s Mid-Pacifie meeting with General

Douglas MacArthur
preted in London =a
to settle critical poli



SPORTS
WINDOW

WATER POLO

K.O Coinpetitior
afrernoon a the
tie Club With two

THE 1950
Legihs th
Barbados Aqu







first-class mat Fiving Fish
drawn ivols th
pper a
and }

ronnere up e de
termined to win the K.O. Com-
petitian so they can bring of
“The Doubie Flying Fish
however 4re all out to win if
themselves

The other mateh between

Swordfish and Barracudgs, prom-
ises to be just os exciting. These
two teams are evenly matched
and in tip-top condition

A Silver Collection wilh be
taken between these two games
0 help in the expenses when the
Trinidad team tours Barbados
next month



W. Berliners Demonstrate
For Free Elections

BERLIN Oct. 11
West Berliners will observe a
two minute silence at noon to-

morrow to demonstrate their de-
termination for a re-united Berlin
on the basis of free and demo-
cratic elections,

At the same time, the Lord May-
or, Professor Efnst Reuter an-
nounced the final results of the
one week East Berlin “shadow
vote.” In this “plebiscite” organ-
ised by fhree Berlin political par-
ties, many East Berlinérs expresséd
their desire for free elections,

He reminded that in their
ter they had pointed out
they were a responsible organised
body representative of
in had

Bridgetown, complained

that they should have been con-
sulted on the holding of an addi-
tional holiday, and of the short

notice that had been given.

Mr. Lucie-Smith said that he

had very good reasons to fee) that
prepared
to take very much notice of the
He really felt that the
attitude of Government was that
the Chamber were not represen-

Government were not

Chamber.

lanned
omatic quarters today as an attempt
ey differences within the American ;
administration through personal encounter, |

let-
that

the ma-
jority of the commercial interests

for next weekend was inter-

The eminence of the advisers |
jwho are accompanying President
| Truman and who include Averill
‘Ilarriman, Dr, Phillip Jessup,
| probably the leading American |
‘expert on the Far East, and}
|General Omar Bradley, is evi-|
jdence, iv was considered here, |
of an attempt to settle completely |

jthe differences which have re-|
cently obscured United Staves’)
Mar Eastern policy.
Four matters, according to}
ally well informed quarters, |

ore likely to figure in the talks:
(1) The conducting of the second |
of the Korean war and the
sequent political unification of |
re Country. It is thought here
| thay President Truman will take
j the opportunity to remind Gen-
;cral MacArthur that he is acting
i the servant nov only of the
United States’ Government, but}
{SR of the United Nations, |
Free Elections |
| In particular, Truman is ex-
pected to discuss the political fu-
ture of Korea after the final vic-
| tory. which according to the res-
{elution of the United Nations!
| General Assembly is to be decided |
by free elections throughout the
jcountry. In the circumstances it
1clear that there can be no aute-|
matic continuity for the Govern-
ment of President Syngman Rhee |
|

+ hase









whose future will be decided at
the polls, and there can be no
identification of the victory of the

United Nations forces with sup-

pert for this Government
(2) The Mid-Pacifie confer-|
ence is expected to discuss:
the. future attitude of the:

United States Government
to Communist China
Other matters for discussion
are

@ On Page 5



earefully with Government, and
come to a definite understanding
with them. They should not
allow Government to get away
with the idea that the Chamber
were only the voicepiece of one
or two big merchants. That he
jthought was the idea they had

got.

Mr. A. de L. Inniss said that he
agreed with Mr. Lucie-Smith’s
vemarks and he thought they

should appoint a small committee
to approach the Colonial Secretary
and get the whole matter cleared
up once and for all

Mr. H. A. C. Thomas said that

tative of the commercial com- the views of the Chamber often
munity, and it was up to them conflicted with minor business
to satisfy government that they bodies and until matters like
were. They had got to work t0- those were straightened out, he
gether for the betterment of the did not see how they were going
colony. If it were necessary to to get the Chamber to appear any
increase their membership or to more important to Government
put their house in order to be- than at present
come more representative set It was finally decided to await
them do so 2 reply from Government to their
letter before taking further action
Responsibility s
He certainly thought they should Welcome For President
follow up this matter of their The Acting President Hon
responsibility and importance vet Vv. ¢ Gale MLL, .€ told the

| of his

Reply To Deep
Water Harbour Inquiries

Aduacat

$$$ $$



Price;

FIVE CENTS

Wear 535



U.N. TROOPS DRIVE TOWARDS PYONGYANG

Reds Ordered “Fight

_ To The Dea

Churchill |
Wants Super
Government

COPENHAGEN, Oct. 11.

Mr, Winston Churchill called
here tonight for rapid creation o/
a world super government with
Russia as one of its pillars. Speak-
ing to 5,000 people at the climax
three-day visit to the
Danish capital he said

“Unless some effective world
super-government can be set up
ahd brought quickly into action,
prospects for peace and humar
progress are dark and doubtful.”

Mr. Churchill said the “fow
main pillars of the world temple
of peace” were the United Stater
with all its dependencies, the Sovi-
et Union, the British Empire anc
Commonwealth and ® united Bu-
rope “with which Great Britain
‘s profoundly blended.

make
the ideas will all bear
weight which will be imposed
ind reposed upon them” he added

Mr. Churchill, leader of the
movement for European unity de-
clared a united Europe was onc
f the indispensable pillars of a
world government. “We do not
of course, pretend that a United
Eurcpe provides the complete
selution to all problems of inter-
national relationships” he said

“Our first task is to unite the
free countries”.

Mr. Churchill asserted, “We
stretch our hand in gratitude and
gocdwill across the ocean to the
other half of the free world whose
wenerous help has assisted our

THE RAINS
QAME

At 8 o'clock last night, the
water which rushed down
trom the country to flow
through the Conatitution
River to the sea, was only
about six inches below the
Constitution Road and the
Gully House Corner,

Rain began to fall from
about 4 p.m. nearly all over
the island. It fell heavily for
about two hours and then
drizzled all night in most
parts of the island.

It fell heaviest in St,
Michael, District “A” re-
cording 3.40 inches up to 6
pm. Rain was still falling
lightly at midnight in the |
city area. j

No damages were record-
ed at any district, but tele-

‘Let us sure that



phone communication — at
Four Roads Police Station,
St. John, was cut off,

The following are the
inches recorded at the vari-
ous stations at 6 p.m,

District “A” . 8.40

* ae ats 2.06
n at hag 16
* ees anit | ea
és ra oad 97
” or i eae

Belleplaine ... . 1.26

Crab Hill ere |

After midnight rain con-

tinued to fall in St, Michael
and St. Philip, but it stopped
just before 11 p.m, in St,
George, 9 p.m. in St. Peter,
6 p.m. in St. Joseph, 11 p.m.
i in St. Andrew and 5,30 p.m,
| in Crab Hill



‘ontinent on the path of recovery”

Mr. Churchill referred to “the
hostility of the Communist party
in every country” to every step
tewards European union,

Then he said
which

“the tyranny upon
Communism is founded,
the hatred from which it draws
its strength and the poverty on
which it thrives would all be
threatened by the establishment

of a united and prosperous Bu+) §

rope”—Reuter,







members that when the French
ship the “‘Colombie” arrive here
on the 25th or 26th of this month,
it will be bringing the President
of the steamship line and two
French senators, The local agents
Messrs, R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd
would like the members of the
Council to welcome them at the
Baggage Warehouse, and to take
lunch aboard the ship later,

The Council agreed,

In aeeordance with the amend-
ed rule of the Chamber that the
Council can appoint a member
of the Chamber to act for any
member of the Council] who may
be granted leave of absence for
one month or more, four appoint-
ments were made yesterday.

Mr. W. K. Atkinson, Senior
Salesman at Messrs H. Jason
Jones & Co. Ltd., was appointed
to act for Mr. D. G. Leacock Jnr
Mr. C. EB. Clarke, Merchant of
Swan Street to act for Mr. G, H
King, Mr Ww H Grannum
Director of Messrs. Robert Thom

Ltd, to act for Mr. A. R. E
King, and Mr. J. O._ Tudor,
provision Merchant of Roebuck

Street to act for Mr. A. S. Bryden

th”?

TOKYO, Oct. 11.

RITISH and Australian troops of the United
Nations forces in Korea to-day took the town
of Paekchon on the west coast road to Pyongyang,

the northern capital.

They were on the west flank of the main thrust.

Their drive took them 4

miles ahead of the Ameri-

can First Cavalry Division to a point 9 miles beyond

the parallel.

Americans attacking Communist defences
straddling Pyongyang road made very little pro-
gress” apainst the resistance of men ordered to

fight to the death..”’

Keep Out

Of North
Korea

RED CHINA TELLS US.

TOKYO, Ort. it



Communist China to-day
arned the United States for the
econd time in 10 days to kee

ut of North Korea

The Communist radio eal) from
Peking today

5 d was made as
United Nations forces were a‘
vancing from the 88th parallel

torder between North and South
Korea in an offensive drive
~gainst Pyongyang, the Commun -
st capital 80 miles to the north

The radio quoted a spokesman
cf the Chinese Communist For-
eign Ministry as saying: “Now
American forces are attempting
to cross the 38th parallel on a
large seale, the Chinese people
cannot stand by idly with regard
to such a serious situation 4s
that created by the invasion of
ae by ~e United States and |
its accomplice countries, and he
regard rw the ‘duhgerode: ren |
‘owards extending the war.” |

ns

The Chinese Foreign Ministry
eccording to the Radio, denounced
*s entirely illegal the United
Nations resolution on Saturday
which gave General Douglas Mac
Arthur the “go ahead” = for
crossing the 38th parallel in
pursuit of North Korean forces.

He said that the eight power
1esolution had been adopted
under manipulation of the United
States and wis avainst an over

|}whelming majority of the pop.
| lation.

The reen'ution e yt"
jthat the U ute iat! on
tuking all opprony et st 5
ensure conditions o1 stability
throughout Korea was in fact,
the spokesman added, designed

to authorise invading troops of the
United States and the other
nations acting as her accomplices
to invade and occupy all Korea
and to expand further the aggres-

An army spokesman here said
they made “no great effort to
move ahead since there are other
plans made for them.”

Major General, Barl E. Part-
vidge, Fifth Air Force Commander
and Letitenant General Walton
H. Walker, American Bighth Arm)
Commander landed at the a'rfield
‘oday sher dy after it was reported
serviceab ¢ The Airfield has a
north-south runway 1,000 yards
and an east-west runway of 1,200
yards both of asphalt and in reas
onably good condition

Far East Aitforce planes will
fly in supplies of fuel and ammu-
ition until the ground = trans-
ort can estch up with the rap'd
nilitary advance along this coast
Tifth Airforce fighter bombers
oday flew 106 sorties in support
f United Nations ground troops
They claimed 300 North Korean
‘asualties and 53 vehicles, 22
buildings, 2° railway coaches and
six gun positions destroyed of
damaged.

North Korean



Prime Minister
Kim Ir Sen sent his soldiers to
“fight to death" according to a
broadcast by the Pyongyang radio.
The ofder—virtual rejéction of
General MacArthur's “final” sur-
render call—said; “Our country ts
facing a grave crisis, Fight des-
perately in spite of all difficulties
until the day of final victory.”
-Reuter

U.N. Troops Killed
700, Women, |
Children In Seoul
CLAIM REDS

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 11,

Counter charges of atrocities
by United Nations forces in
Korea were produced yesterday
by Communist .radio in Peking,

“A despatch from Pyongyang
(North Korean capital) Radio
asserted that more than 700
women and children were slaugh-
tered together at Seoul by troops
of American aggressors ant
Syngman Rhee’s (South Korean)

cliaue alae
TT
TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
Ring $118 Day or Night,
oe «THE ADVOCATE
PAYS FOR NEWS.



sive war in Korea. —Reuter. Nr
OSS r a erePENESSODDHHETD THEO H HIT FO TION II,
+

SOOSF

-




\%

CLASSES OF

|
\é

F
PERSONAL

PUBLIC

APPLICATION TO

‘ Broad
x P.O. Box 227



GUARDIAN
ASSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

Established

FIRE

CONSEQUENTIAL FIRE LOSS
(Including Loss of Profits)

EMPLOYERS’

BURGLARY

CASH INTRANSIT

“ALL RISKS”
BAGGAGE AND PERSONAL EFFECTS



PROSPECTUSES RELATING TO ANY OF THE ABOVE
CLASSES OF BUSINESS MAY BE OBTAINED UPON

4
, 454 +4, 4
6 OOSCVSC OB OV ODOO9 SOO FOO FS FOP OOO FOI GF CO

‘

(628:

COO OOO SOOO OOS

1821



BUSINESS

TRANSACTED INCLUDE—

ACCIDENT
LIABILITY
LIABILITY

LGLLESOEPSECSELLLL LEE LLCS FOSCOOO POO

LOCAL AGENTS—

S.P. MUSSON SON & CO., LTD.

Street
Telephone 4465

3569

S
-





PAGE TWO



LD Harrisonians in Trinidad
‘ held their annual dinner on
Sunday in San Fernando.

Among those present were Mr.
W. D. Isaac, Capt. H. A. Thorne,
Mr. Harold Haskell, Mr. Alistair
Johnson, Mr. W. K. Ferguson, Mr
Tommy Knowles, Dr. Greaves
Ph.D., Comdr. Carlton Goddard,
Mr. Jimmy Cozier, Supt. H. Arm-
strong, Mr. Ralph Eckstein, Mr.
Malby Trimingham, Mr. Lindsay
Yearwood, Mr. W. M. Best, Mr. T
Richards and Mr. E. Jones,

Intransits

NTRANSIT from Grenada yes-
terday by B.W.1.A. on their
way to St. Lucia were Lt. Col.
Eric James, Cornmissioner of Pol-
ice, St. Lucia, and Mr. H. G. Val-
entine who is attached to the

Colonial Office in London.

Col.- Michelin’ is’ at present~in‘
St. Lucia to have discussions with
Col. James when he arrives and
Col. Michelin is expected to re-
turn to Barbados this afternoon.

Mr.-Valentine was here a few
days ago having discussions with
the Post Master, and has since
visited Grenada and now St. Lucia

Old Harrisonian

R, AND MRS. JIMMY Robin-
son reluctantly left Barba-
dos yesterday afternoon by
B.W.LA, after spending ten days’
holiday at the Hotel Royal
Jimmy is an old Harrisonian,
having left school in ’35 to go to
America, A U.S. citizen, he now
lives in Boston where he works
with the Bethlehem Steel Cor-
poration.
Their destination yesterday was
Trinidad, from where they will fly
to the US.

Back From Grenada

ANON W. HARVEY-READ
: returned yesterday by
B.W.LA. from Grenada, where he
has been for the past month.

Barbadian Receives Trophy

E R.A.F. Safety Trophy,

which was presented this year

to the Royal Air Force by General

Gervasio Duncan, Chief of Staff

of the Brazilian Air Force is to be
competed for annually.

It has been won this year by
Norfolk’s “Tiger” Squadron No. 74
Commanding Officer of this Squad-
ron is Squadron Leader A. R. deL.
Inniss, son of Mr. and Mrs. A.
de Lisle Inniss of ‘‘Glenaire’”’, Brit-
tons Hill,

This trophy was accepted by the



BY THE WAY

A® the wearer of one of the

dutlest hats in Europe I am
naturally interested in the activi-
ties of a number of scientists who
are working out a formula for
making hats glow.

I am sure that the idea behind
it is to attract millions of tourists
to England for the Festival. 1
wonder would it be possible to
have a miniature figodlighting ap-
paratus attached to’ every hat. Or
a halo of powerful, neon lights
round the brim. To make my own
hat more interesting. and to bring
it into line with the best contem-
porary thought, I propose to have
a bright yellow band put round it,
bearing the words, in scarlet let-
ters. “Yippee. Suckers!”

Groping In The Dark

SKED by Mrs. Urge how
/ many rhubarb puffs contain-
ing tolderol had been discovered
since the regulations against it,
and in what quantities, a Minis—
try of Food offigial read out 12
pages af figures concerning the
cooling tests carried out on hot
rhubarb puffs, in order to detect
such ingredients as grated cheese,
medicated moss, health globules,
shredded cardboard, vanilla.
string, and fortified sorrel. “I no-
tice that there is no mention of



When night falls Ruper: can think
ot nothing else to do, so he curls
up in the little cabin that Koko has
rigged; while the bird flies on and
on-in a straight line rhrough the
darkness. Atter many hours’ sleep
he sits ur It daylight, the bird

hae d im haar ie racline






ANOTHER

et

Kupert and the Casiawuy

and Continuing DAILY 5 & 8.30 p.m.

TANE WYATT » WAYNE MORRIS «WALTER BRENNAN



London Bxrpress Service

Air Council for annual competit-
ion, between Way fighter aiaurons
of Fighter Command and the
British Air Forces of Occupation,
to be awardéd to the squadron
making the greatest contribution
towards flying with safety in all
weather conditions,

For the presentation, tne entire

Station was drawn up on parade
at the Squadron's H.Q. ai
Horsham, St. Faiths to watch

Squadron Leader Inniss receive
the trophy from the Air Mar-
Shal Sir Basil Embry.

With B.W.1.A. In St. Kitts

fp FTER ABOUT ten days’ holi-
day in Barbados, Mr. and
Mrs. Winston Warren and_ their
baby daughter Andrea returned
to St. Kitts yesterday afternoon
by B.W.LA.

Winston, who is a Barbadian
is with B,W.LA. stationed in St.
Kitts. He told Carib that Derek
Mendes is in St. Kitts acting for
him while he is on holiday; he
still has about a week more
leave. .When he resumes, Derek
will be returning to Trinidad.

Congrats

ONGRATULATIONS to Mr

Pearson Scott (Lodge Schoo1)
of Kingston, St. Philip, who has
been appointed to the post of
parochial treasurer of the parish
of St. Philip. His father will be
remembered as the late headmas-
ter of St. Philip Boys’ School.

Here For Two Weeks
RRIVING from Grenada
yesterday by B.W.1.A. were
Mrs. Eva Sedgley and Miss En:d
Linard. They are here for a
couple of weeks’ holiday and are
staying at Accra, Rockley.

tolderol,” said Cocklecarrot. “That
comes under the Hobbs test,” said
the official. “It’s under a differ-
ent department.” An official of
that department was called, and
Cocklecarrot repeated his ques-
tion. “We keep no separate re-
cords,” said the official. “For offi-
cial purposes tolderol is treated as

traxihedron, . and comes der
grated cheese.” “What ne the
grated cheese statistics then?”

asked Cocklecarrot. ‘After the
Hobbs test,” said the official, “the
figures are sent to a different de-
partment. Grated cheese then
comes under the illegal ingredi-
ents people, who send the figures
back to Q.R. 5741 for verification,”
Cocklecarrot groaned like a beast
in pain,
Discussion Circle

oo philosopher Kant, it will
be remembered (or not—
what care I?) distinguished be-
tween the categories of Quantity
and Quality and those of Relation
and Modality, by saying that the
former concerned objects of per-
ception, pure or empirical whereas
the latter concerned the exist-
ence of those objects in rela-
tion to each other, and to the
mind. Now I should be the first
to deny this, were I not restrained

2y



very geutly in a quiet lagoon and
Koko is busy rolling back the awn-

ing that had covered them. *' Now,
where are we?’ he yawns. ** Why,
of course, this must be Coen Island
where Koko lives."” He stands up
and, sure enough, lots of other litle
coons wave to them while the tide
AeiSe them aently ebassiaes!

MAMMOTH 1



t
= i
Starting TOMORROW 23088300m PLAZA THEATRE



DELMER, DAVES: JE

BARBADOS
eee

Caub Calling

West Indian Fortune

RANCES WINWAR, co-founder
of the Leonardo da Vinci
Art School, has thrown more
light on the much debated
marriage between Elizabeth Bar-
rett and Robert Browning. In her
book, “The Immortal Lovers.”
recently published by Hamish
Hamilton, she has stressed that
the significant thing about the
marriage was not so much its
romanticism but its — practical
advantages. The marriage enabled
Robert Browning to write poetry
in the comfortable shelter of a
West Indian sugar fortune, but it
also saved Elizabeth from her
father and her doctors.

Arriving By The ‘Golfito’
XPECTED to arrive by the
“Golfito”. on Saturday are
Mr, : Jack. Kidney, Manager ot
the victorious West Indies tearn,
Mr. and Mrs, F. A. C. Clairmonte,
(Mr. Clairmonte is Senior Vice
President of the Barbados Cricket
Association), Mr. R. K. Nunes,
President of the West Indies
Cricket Board of Control and Mr
and Mrs. Jeffrey Stollmeyer.

Up For A Month

R. LEE TALMA who arrived

here on Sunday from Trini-
dad to spend a month's holiday,

is Staying with his mother at
“Viamede”, Rockley.
Congrats

ONGRATULATIONS to Miss

Daphne Pilgrim, daughter of
Mr». and Mrs. S. O. Pilgrim of
Bay Street, who in the Oxford and
Cambridge Joint Board Examina-
tions held here in June reached
exhibition standard with Distinc-
tion in History.

Daphne is at present in Jamaica
‘at the West Indies University
College, studying for her Arts
degree.

Carib also extends double con-
gratulations to Miss Gwen Dray-
ton, eldest daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. B. M. Drayton of “Eden
Glen”, Golf Club Road, Rockley,
for in the Oxford and Cambridge
Examination Higher Certificate she
has gained double honours, reach-

ing open scholarship standara
with Distinction in History and
English.

Arrived Yesterday
R. GEORGE DE NOBRIGA,
Managing Director of the
Barbados Telephone Company,
arrived from Trinidad yesterday
afternon by B.W.LA.

by. a conviction that I should not
carry my readers with me whole-
heartedly, Yet who will deny
that all objects are affecting each
other all the time? Not you, Mrs
Rickthorpe. I feel sure. Let us,
then, get on with our drinking.



CROSSWORD



Across
which

1 With
Dompusity, (8)

( Pictures are made tn it
een. 4

ager in another way
Labour. (4)

ube
(4 4)
(5)
Boy in Indian surroundings

(3)

The; initia

always
e. )

re should
something thus,

They are not very

have

5 always @ xve:

(2, 4)

sharp. io
. Used for dressing wounds. (4)

This ts poison. (5)
Describes 9 good holiday

Down

Bulderdash | (y)
Descriptive of 1 Down
Ships boats
than one, (

(w)

(7)
Usually require mur
5)

Reai din makes an Siang. «7)
. Drive on. 44)
» Sign from vemu. (4)
The East tore in for
(6)

Saucy

a change

f fish may we say ti

Po give this listen (3)

Vegetable from the lake

This brings dishonour

i guns lke the place to enter
is

‘4
(5)

Phis ace ts comforting. (3)
Reversed in 2 Down (2)

Solution vl Saturdays vue
} Safety-pin; 6 Uganda
Brine cask; 12
Yedious; 16. Mol}
} So: 22. Session. 23
1 Substance
“tir does; 4
demolish: 9. Assess:
cone 17 [dea; 27 Gin

‘RIUMPH !!



Sewar ¥
Ennut;
1





Produced hy



RRY WALD

SS

{
j
Its full width from the Old World| eq two centuries for the Yankee
to New has served as a proving Clipper ships, the “Dreadnaught, ’
>



ADVOCATE



ATLANTIC POND

WASHINGTON, The Pilgrim

Fathers,
The narrowing Atlantic Ocean,! from Plymouth, England,

sailing
early
frrther reduced to pond size by! in September 1620, took almost
the latest jet-plane flying feats,| as ong as Columbus to span the
never fails to challenge the men ecean, reaching Cape Cod’s tio
who blaze transportation trails.| Movember 9, Fast crossings wail-

ground for man and craft for near-
ly 1,000 years, notes the National
Geographic Society

History’s first non-stop jet pla
flights between Europe and
America, made September 22 b;
two U.S, Air Force flyers, embel
lish a new chapter of Atlantic con
quest opened two years ago. In
mid-July, 1948, six British Vam-
pires, pioneered the jet trail fron,
England to Labrador, making
refueling stops in the Hebrides,
Iceland, and Greeniand.

Columbus and Lindbergh con-
tributed the best known chapters
to the Atlantic conquest record
book. Aerial “firsts”
predominant — since
years before Lindbergh's success
electrified a tensely waiting world.

f.aking a 12-day sailing record
from New York to
59.

First steamship to cross
Wlantie was the “Savannah” in
19. Actually, it moved by wind
ore than by steam, being full-
rigged, Its single steam engine,
lurning side paddles, was usec
only about one-eighth of the time
during vhe 27-day voyage.

It was not until after che Civil
war that propeller-driven steam—
thips began lopping days off the
Yankee Clipper record time. The
ill-fated Lusivania in 1910 was

the first to cross in under five

ao aeen days. Britain’s present day Queen
} Mary has made surface crossing
three times in under four a.
: Ten months prior to nite

A century ago the widely accept- P
ed view was that Columbus wrote potas 3 ee as

Ireland in




























the

Chapter One, Subsequent study
of lestandie sagas ruled that be-} North Sea island of ene
lief. It is now generally agreed| the first cargo submarine k
that the story of Atlantic crossings] ¢™08S. Entering the Chesapeake
goes back at least to the turn of] Bay after a 16-day run, it ex-
the first Christian millenium—A.D,{changed cargoes at Balvimore, and
1,000—nearly five centuries before
Columbus's day, j

Norsemen in undecked bo
using oars and a single square
reached southern Greenland abo
982. From their small colony
there, Leif Ericson and his men
pushed westward to the place they
called Vinland on the New World
coast, somewhere in the region of
Nova Scotia or New England,

Columbus sailed from Palos,
Spain, August 3, 1492, reaching a
landfall in the West Indies October
12. John Cabot, like Columbus, a
Genoese, five years later became
the first since the Norsemen to find
the continent, touching what is
now Nova Scotian soil after a voy-
age of 52 days from Bristol, Eng-
land.

GAIETY ibe
‘TO-DAY

OPENING FRIDAY —
“RIVER’S END” and



PLAZA OJSsTIN

WARNER'S Double—
Paul Henreid in



LAST SHOWING

TO-DAY 5—8.30 p.m in





THEY LIVED
S|
S07. a
SECRET

ame «
ws

> ~
1 CORTE. vw. |

LOUIS De ROCHMONA?
» é
"Lost
BEATRICE PEARSON
MEL FERRER! -
ALFRED L.WERKER |
et ee eae ee



EMPIRE

Last Two Shows To-Day
4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

M-G-M Presents:

“PATHER OF THE
BRIDE ”

Sturring: Spencer TRACY
Joan BENNETT
with

Elizabeth TAYLOR
and Don TAYLOR

ROXxY

: To-Day Only 4.30 & 8.15
M-G-M Big Double







SPECIAL MATINEE
TO-DAY 2 p. nit
(cheap prices)

Leon ERROL, in

oo”



“FIGHTING MAD” 1 yaa ARD
— ee a emnetnererinallll Lena HORNE
Starting To-morrow—2.30 & :
8.30 p.m. in
and Continuing Daily 5 & 8.30 p.m, ”
Gary COOPER in ¥ WORDS AND MUSIC
TASK FORCE and
“NO MINOR VICES”
PLAZA a

Dana ANDREWS
Lili PALMER
Louis JOURDAN

THEATRE

BRIDGETOWN





REASONABLE PRICES in....

HOUSEHOLD ITEMS THAT YOU WILL APPRECIATE
DOUBLE BED SHEETS 90 x 100 @ $5.53
SHEETING BY THE YARD 64-inch wide $1.65 per yard
BEDSPREADS 72 x 78 @ $7.16 each
TABLE DAMASK in WHITE 72” @ $2.72 per yard
TABLE CLOTHS 52 x 52 $2.37 each
DAMASK NAPKINS @ 60c. & 46c, each
KITCHEN TOWELS 47c. each

BROADWAY






DRESS SHOP





BOOK THE DATES

THURSDAY 19th & FRIDAY 20th at 8.30
MATINEE FRIDAY 20th at 5 p.m.

AT EMPIRE THEATRE

“PASSPORT TO HEAVEN”

(REVUEDVILLE 1950)



— By —

Mrs. A. L. STUART'S DANCING CLASS

A WIDE RANGE OF STAGE DANCING FROM THE
STATELY BALLET TO THE MODERN TANGO,
JIVE AND BEEBOP

BOOKINGS:—Open at Empire Theatre Box Office from
Friday 13th between the Hours of 8.30 a.m. and
12 noon, and 1,30 p.m, to 3.30 p.m.

PRICES:— ORCHESTRA and BOXES $1.50; HOUSE $1.00
BALCONY 72c.

ALL SEATS CAN BE RESERVED



M-G-M's JUNGLE THRILLER ! ! !
Johnny WEISSMULLER and Johnny SHEFFIELD in

“TARZAN AND HIS MATE”



“CONSPIRATORS”
Gary Cooper in “CLOAK & DAGGER”

FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY
Paramount Presents BING CROSBY in—

“HERE COMES THE, WAVES”

with The ANDREWS SISTERS













1950
Sa,

12,

OCTOBER

THURSDAY,

AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)
TO-NIGHT at 8.30

HUMPHREY BOGART — LAUREN BACALL
in “DARK PASSAGE’
A Warner Bros. Picture



B.B.C. RADIO
PROGRAMME



‘ op THURSDAY, Oct 73, 1950 . Friday 13th
. ws; a.m News Commencing -
Analysis; 7.15 ‘ on Close Down; 12.00 FEUD ABBOTT and LOU COSTELLO

(noon) The News; 12.10 p.m. News
Analysis; 12.15 p.m. Programme Parade;
12.18 p.m. Listentrs’ Choice; 1.00 p.m
Taxi-ing Around with Herbert Hodge;

in “HOLD THAT GHOST”
A Universal Picture

|
|



Se









Ss
1.156 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 1.30 pom. | =e TASS SS =
Ray’s a Laugh; 2.00 p.m. The News ———

2.10 p.m. Home News From Britan

2.15 p.m Sports Review; 25) p.m

Ring Up the Curtain; 3.30 p.m. Round
Britain; 4.00 p.m. The News; 4.10 p.m
The Daily Service; 4.15 p.m
the Bounty: 4.45 p.m. The Cathedr.
Organs; 5.00 p.m Listeners’ Choice
5.15 p.m. Programme Parade; 5.56 p.u

BBC Variety Orchestra; 6.00 p.m
Adolph Hallis; 6.15 p.m. Merchant Navy
Newsletter; 6.30 p.m, Educating Arctie

GLOBE

IT’S A GAY TIME IN TOWN

OPENING FRIDAY OCT. 13th
with the MUSICAL of Musicals

7.00 p.m The News 7.10 p.m Toge r with

News Analysis; 7.15 p.m We See the:

Britain; 7.45 p.m. Generally Speaking LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE
8.00 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 8.15 pm

United Nations' Report; 820 p.m

ser of the Week; 8.30 p.m. Tax:

ing Around Britain with Herbert Hodge:
45 p.m. Think on These Things; #00
p.m. The Rise of a Party; 10.00 p jn
The News; 16.10 p.m. From the Editor
jails; 1015 p.m. Vanessa Lee; 10.45 p.1)
Special Dispatch; 11.00 p.m. The News

os LE
a ;

pZ

rs





got back safely to Germany after
vutwitting the British blockade
in a 22-day revurn trip.

The transatlantic air para‘e
began in earnest in 1919, employ |
ing aviation advances attributable
to the war then just ended.





M-G-M's MUSICAL
OF YOUR
DREAMS!








Garden) ST. JAMES
8.30 P.M.

Warner’s Double Hit ! ! !
“PRAIRIE THUNDER”






I

|

:








u \ a
starring ;

uf

Esther WALLIAMS
Zan \OUNSON
Johnny...

PAULA RAYMOND

CONNIE HAINES - CLINTON SUNDBERG

and guest stors

LENA HORNE, _,

ELEANOR pf

POWELLZS

TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.









and









5 & 8.30 P.M.




















ROYAL

To-day & Tomorrow
and 8.30
United Artist Double

William BOYD as











4.30






































\,
Hopalong CASSIDY \§ ROBERT z LEONARD
5 DENK: eeniimmesennsann
“UNEXPECTED GUEST” waggle ta
and JOE PASTERNAK
“MR. ACE”
with








George RAFT
Sylvia SYDNEY

OLYMPIC

Last Two Shows
4.30 and 8.15

20th Century Fox Double {

‘Carrole LANDIS
William GARGAN

“BEHIND GREEN
LIGHTS "

and

“THE SHOCKING














LET US HELP
YOU REFIT
YOUR BOAT

To-Day

°

We have - - -
CANVAS — Nos. 6—9
ROPE — All Sizes
COPPER PAINT
ANCHOR CHAINS
WHITE PAINT

{ ‘ SAIL NEEDLES FISHING LINES
MISS PILGRIM GROMMETS DEEP SEA LINES
with \ PALMS FISH HOOKS \

Bet’'y GRABLE }
Dick HAYMES

} THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.




HERE ARE FACTS ABOUT A RECORD BREAKER
UNIVERSAL INTERNATIONAL FILMS

HAMLET

With SIR LAURENCE OLIVIER
HAD A SUCCESSFUL CONSECUTIVE RUN

At This: THEATRE

of 14 DAYS=—28 SHOWS
TO-DAY 1.30, § & 8.30 p. m.

A MASTERPIECE THAT WILL BE A GLORIOUS MEMORY

HAMLET

To ADULTS —




|
|

Your LAST CHANCE To See This Film

SCHOOL CHILDREN 130 p.m. Matinees
To See HAMLET TO-DAY
PRIDAY, SATURDAY and MONDAY 16th

CHILDREN 18 cents ANYWHERE

HEADTEACHERS ARE ADVISED TO CONTACT THE GLOBE
THEATRE FOR TICKETS FOR CHILDREN







THURSDAY, OCTOBER

12,

1956



$15,000 Voted For
Wesley Hall School

The House of Assembly passed
a resolution for $15,000 for the
repair of the Wesley Hall Junior
School

The addendum of the resclu-
tien states that a token sum of
$1 was approved in the Estimates
of Expenditure for 1950—51 under
Part Il—Capital, 1—Public Build-
ings, Item 9 Wesley Hall Junior,
but it was not proposed to proceed
with the building of this school
until the general school building
programme had been reviewed.
In the meantime, the roof cover-
ing of this building has deterior-
ated to such an extent that the
ceilings are now dangerous.

The cost of rehabilitating this
building is estimated to be $15,000
and this amount is requested to
prevent further deterioration and
damage to the walls.

Dr. Cummins (L) who took
charge of the resolution, said that
the school was in a very bad con-
dition. When the rain fell, the
ceiling fell in and fortunately no
chiidren were in the scaool to be
injured.

Mr. Mottley (E) said that he
knew that the school was in a
very bad condition. He hoped that
if the work was to be done de-
partmentally, it would not be the
same case as those monstrous
buildings which were started and
not completed.

Mr. Garner (C) said Uiat |} c was
asking for a secondary school to
be erected in St, Philip. That
school he said, would alse /acili-
tate children from the surround-
ing parishes. A

He compumented the Goyern-
ment on the speedy way in which
they dealt with the bus service
and hoped that they would be
speedy with all necessary re-
quests.

Mn Brancker (C) said that a
walk down Heywoods, St. Peter,
would show a horrible piece of
work. That was the New Coleridge
School which was still being
constructed.

People were wondering whether
or not the Government was erect-
ing a horse stable. It was appar-
ently a memorial to Mr. Crowe.
For the longest time it was there
unfinished. [t was truly an unsuit-
able and unsatisfactory job.

Mr. Ward (E) said that the
Government had promised to build
a school at Half Moon Fort and as
far as he remembered the money
was voted for. The schools around
that vicinity were fairly congest-
ed. He wanted the Government
to start some work in that area.

Mr. Walcott (L) said that it
was not voting for money to build
new schools, but for effecting re-
pairs to a school. In reply to the
Hon. Junior Member for St, Lucy,
he said that he had complete con-
fidence in the Colonial Engineer
to carry out the work on the pro-
vided estimates.

The Colonial Engineer had car-
ried out investigations and in the

near future, supplementary pro-
visions would be made for the
completion of the school. The

figure would be staggering and he
hoped that the hon. members
would find no other alternative
than to vote for the resolution .

Council Clerk Creates
Scene At Meeting

{(Frora Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN.

“You can call the police, I am
not going”, said Mr. Louis Peters
at a Tobago County Council meet~-
ing. Mr. Peters is the Council’s
Clerk, and refused to leave the
meeting to allow the termination
of his services to be discussed.
When he refused to withdraw, the
acting chairman, Councillor John
Edwards, had the meeting ad-
journed. Mr, Peters refused to
leave because he said that he had
been appointed by the Governor
and was not working with the
councillors. His attitude was con-
sidered “high-handed” by another
Councillor, who considered that
the Council’s refusal to suspend
Mr. Peters reflected very badly on
the Council. At the afternoon
meeting, however, a vote was cast



in favour of terminating Mr.
Peter’s services at the end of
December.




BEST TEA —

RED ROSE TEA!

IT IS GOOD TEA.

THE GAM



Builerites
Support Sugar
Nationalisation

(From Our Own Correspondent }
PORT-OF-SPAIN

Recently clected member for
Caroni South, Mr. Mitra Simanagy
commenting on a statement made
by Lord Lyle, said that, as spokes-
man of the Butler Party, he wel-
comed Mr. Morrison’s (“Deputy
Premier”) statement that natione_-
isation of the sugar industry was
still in the Labour Party’s pro-
gramme.

His Party, he said, was com-
mitted to the principles of
nationalisation of the sugar in-
dustry, which was one of the main
planks in their platform at the
last General Elections in Trinidad.
The result of these elections
showed that they had a mandate
to promote the policy of national-
jsation as far as the sugar in-
dustry was concerned.

He rejected Lord Lyle’s message
to the West Indies that the Labour
Party’s plan to nationalise the
sugar industry constituted a threat
to the West Indies or was in any
way consistent with the Labour
Party’s doctrine of freedom and
self-government in the Colonies



B.G. Rice Shipments
To W. L Satisfactory

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Oct. 6.

British Guiana is fast becoming
a granary of the West Indies, It
was learnt to-day that for the
first time since this colony’s con-
tractural agreements with the West
Indies were affected, the Colony
is in a better position of being
able to fulfill contracts 100 per
cent.

Much depends, however, on the
weather of the next few weeks
which will play a vital part on
the results of the 1950 crops, but
preliminary surveys indicate that
the requirements of the West In-
dies will be fully met.

So far Antigua has received her
full requirements to the end otf
October. Montserrat has been
supplied to the end of the year:
St. Kitts to the end of September:
Dominica to the end of the year;
Grenada to October 28; St. Lucia
to October 5; St. Vincent to Octo-
ber 9; Barbados to September 29;
and Trinidad to July 31,

The figures quoted above are
based on the 100 per cent re-
quirements, which for the entire
area amount to 29,123 tons.



B.G. Collected $3,500,000
Income Tax Already

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN.
Income Tax collection this year
in British Guiana is likely to

reach a new high figure, as al-
ready more than $3% million has
been collected to the end of Sep-
tember.

No Excess Profits Tax was col-
lected in 1949, and the total for
that year was $5,068,677.21. Indi-

viduals in 1949 paid $934,225.00
and Companies $4,134,452.00.

WHETHER YOU ARE A :



YOU DESIRE THE

SO

eee nee trae te



Rise In Canadian §
Will Benefit B. W. I.
Tourist Trade
-TRAVEL CONSULTANT

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN.

The rise in the exchange value
of the Canadian dollar will prove
a boon to Trinidad and the other
British Caribbean Colonies as far
as tourism is concerned, said Mr.
Ross H. F. Rudolph, Travel Con-
sultant and Hotel Representative,
attached to the Girvan Travel Ser-
vice of Toronto, Canada, in Port-
of-Spain yesterday .

He added that this would be
made possible to a great extent
if the Colonies concerned woulxi
advertise in Canada, the value of
the Canadian dollar in these parts.
“Let them know that they can
get more out of their dollar here
than elsewhere,” he added. He.
however, admitted that the rise
would have adverse effects on the
economy of the Colony. Mr.
Rudolph is on a tour of the Carib-
bean area.

“Trinidad has everything
necessary for making her a first
class tourist resort, with the ex-
ception of the necessary accommo-
dation, and this should be remedied
as soon as possible, he advised.



Maraj Attacks
Butlerism

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN

Bhadase Sagan Maraj, success-
ful Independent candidate in the
recent elections in Trinidad, has
attacked Butlerism. He says he
will remain an Independent and
denied having relationship with
Mr. Tubal Butler, or his party, “I
won my election as an independent,
and I intend to remain as such,
and will support anyone who is
working for the benefit of the
people”, he said. Mr. Maraj felt
that Mr. Butler’s speech at Wood-
ford Square, recently was ill-
advised, particularly in view of
the fact that Mr. Butler was re-
turned by a big majority for the
East St. Patrick seat, He did not
think he should have criticised the
Governor in the way in which he
did. He also disagreed with Mr.
Mitra Sinanan, who, in a state-
ment published a few days ago,
welcomed the British Labour
Party’s intention to nationalise
the sugar industry.



To Be In Leg. Co.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF SPAIN
General satisfaction was ex-
pressed over the Governor’s choice
of the Nominated members of the
next Legislative Council. Disap-
pointment was expressed, how-
ever, by a trade union leader in
Port-of-Spain, that the Governer
did not think it fit to nominate a

representative of these bodies.

Mr. C. P. Alexander, President
of the Seamen and Waterfront
Workers’ Trade Union, felt that all
elements, with the exception of
the trade unions were represented
by the nominated members. - He
considered it rather unfortunate,
“that the Government, in this en-
lightened age, when the trade
unions were playing such an im-
portant part in the scheme of
things, and especially because of
the new Constitution, did not think
it wise to have a representative
of the trade unions nominated.”

Mr. R. C. Duff Urquhart, Presi-
dent of the Trinidad Chamber of
Commerce, said that the nomina-
tion of Mr, Wight was most wel-
come. Said he, “Mr. Wight is
possessed of sound business ability.
He had a sympathetic understand-
ing of the needs of the people, and
I think the appointment should be
well received by all classes.

a

‘

USE











BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Britain, France, US
Will Ignore
German Elections

@ From page 1.
the Federal Chancellor there
repeats the suggestion originally
made by him on 22nd of March
tor holding free all German
elections on a-democratic basis.

The Federal Government is a
Government freely elected by the
people, and is recognized by my
Government as entitled to speak
for Germany. The documents
transmitted to you with this
letter will therefore commend
them te your attention and
to your government as _ pro-
nouncements of the German peo-
ple in respect of the grave matters
affecting their future and that of
their country.

The letter also said that the
first amd indispensable step to
achieve political and Govern-
mental unity of Germany was a
convocation of the constituent
German National Assembly .

To achieve this, the Federal
Government considered the fol-
lowing requirements necessary
for all German elections: ‘

Freedom of activity for all par-
ties throughout Germany, with
all occupying powers refraining
from hindering the formation of
political parties and their activ-
ities.

Personal safety for all individ-
uals. All newspapers to have
freedom of publication. and
cireulation.—Reuter,

MONEY SNATCHER
GAOLED

(From Our Own Cerrespondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN.
“It was a heartless thing to do
this old lady,” said Mr. B. W.
Celestain, when in Port-of-Spain
he sentenced Hamilton Cox to six
months’ imprisonment for stealing
$44.00 from the person of Eliza
Hussey. The Court heard that Cox
approached the old lady, who was
sitting in the shade of a tree at
Victoria Square, stating that he
could buy a piece of land for her.
Previously, he had seen her with
money in qg bundle. Cox suddenly

snatched her bundle, and ran
away. A watchman, however,
seeing the snatch, gave chase
erying “thief,” and Cox was
caught.

B.G.'s First East Indian
Lady Doctor

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN.

Miss Elsie S. Jaikaran has
gained the distinction of being the
first East Indian lady doctor of
British Guiana.

Dr. Jaikaran entered the Royal
Free Hospital for Women in 1946.
She is the daughter of Mr. J.
Jaikaran, Principal of J. Jaikaran
and Sons, Ltd, Chemists and Drug-
gists of Georgetown.









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PAGE THREE















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PAGE FOUR





2SYesesc 5

Printed by the Adverate Oo.. Lid.. Broad St.. Bridgetown.



Thursday, October i2, 1950



New Commons

THE departure today of the Speaker of
the House of Assembly to attend the re-
opening of the House of Commons is a

reminder of the importance of the Mothe:
Parliament. It was during the blitz of 1940
that the House of Commons was destroyed
by German bombs and during the inter
vening period the Commons sat in the
House of Lords. Now they will return to
the old scene even though under the threat
of another war.

It is fitting that members of Colonie]
Legislatures have been invited to witness
this historic re-opening of the
democratic legislative assembly in
world.

The parliamentary system on which the
democratic freedom of the British is based
is the pattern on which that in the other
countries of the Empire have been founded;
and Colonial peoples are no less unwilling
than the people of Great Britain that there
should be any change in the system.

It is this freedom and this spirit of demo-
cracy where the will of the majority be-
comes the will of the whole that supplied
the unsurmountable difficulty for the Axis.
It was not surprising therefore that the
Luftwaffe should have directed their block-
busters against the one institution which
stood for centuries as the Bastion of that
democratic freedom.

Typical of the spirit which has made
Great Britain respected among her neigh-
bours is that which has, in so short a time
rebuilt and refurnished the House of Com-
mons. Nothing could have been more ap-
propriate than that the furnishings should
have been supplied by the units of the
Empire and that representatives of Colo-
nial legislatures where the doctrine of free
speech and democratic rule are maintained
should be present at this grand re-opening.
It may well be taken as evidence of the
intent of the British people never io lose
their hold on the freedom for whith so
many of their sons have fought and died.



greatest



Remembrance

AS THE years go by Remembrance Day
brings its own message to every commun-
ity in which there are men who fought
against the Forces of Germany in the First
World War. Thirty years after this Day
was instituted the world still trembles on
the brink of the abyss waiting some event
which might throw civilisation back into
the cauldron.

Tt is not suffftient to feel that this must
not happen again. Those who fought and
died have their names and their memory
revered; monuments have been raised to
them. Those who have returned to us are
still in many instances unable to supply
their own needs; disablement and broken
health have taken their toll. It is of them
that we must think.

Poppy Day has been organised and the
Earl Haig Fund has become a national in
stitution in order that the maximum result
should be obtained from the collections tc
defray the cost of helping these men.

In Barbados the work starts in October.
Two dances have been held at the Crane
and a Book Sale in Bridgetown so that
funds could be collected at an early time.
On sale soon will be an Engagement Calen-
dar and after the Poppy Day Collection on
Friday, November 10th, there will be the
usual Dance at the Marine Hotel
November 25th.

A large percentage of the funds collected
are not sent out of the island but are
utilised to help local pensioners whcese
needs become greater each year. Bul the
parent organisation in England is also in
need of contributions.

on



the

|
|
F sa
|
|

RUSSIA
me |
| It Doesn't Happen So Often Now:

That Dreaded Knock
| On The Door.

| THE curtain had just vome
| down on the second act of the
| Romeo and Juliet Ballet at Mos-

ow’s 3olshoi Theatre when

omething happened which I had
een told never happens to any
inglishman in Moscow. A Soviet
iussian leaned across the stalls

id deliberately started a conver-
ition with me.

“I heard you speaking English,”
; .e said. “It is a beautiful language
enjoy

speaking it myself. But
get the opportunity. Just
w,” he said, “I am reading an
nglish book. Do you happen to
now it?” And he held up for me
| » see a copy of one of fellow-

‘avelling J. G, Crowther’s scien-
fie works.







That was the beginning of what,
w” me, became the most inter-
sting contett I made with a Soviet
tussian on any of my trips to
Soviet Russia.

Our acquaintance did not end
rith our conversation at the the-
tre. The professor—he was a pro-
sssor of metallurgy at Moscow
‘niversity—dined with me at my
otel.

I went and dined with him at
is priviligentsia flat. It was a self
mtained but rather crowded two
| nda half room kitehen and bath
| Yair, in which the son had to
feep in an entrance lobby and the
1ughter in the dining-cum-living

; 20m.
;

The professor talked freely of
| ‘s life. He told me of his son and
| jer daughter who were prepar-

g to study medicine. He trans

ted as his wife told me of her

1opping problems,

He told me, too, of the time

hen Stalin had come to inspect
ie way he was packing up a
onsignment of industrial exhibits
w the Paris Exhibition and the

cill the Generalissimo had shown
\ in his precise instructions on how
is do the job.

After the war, the professor had
| gone to Germany to superintend
the dismanvling of machinery
from German factories for Rus-

A =

£-a,

After I left I still heard about
tim through an Australian friend
\who had met the professor with
me, and who spent a week-end

WHAT DO WE WANT?

iy 8. E. SMYTHIES, M. ELEC.

THE
public

discussion on our
still being

current 3
utilities is

issues injected into it by sundry
latest being the
wages and
companies to

participants, the
question of
paid by the
employees. To say
would be limited
mpanies could collect from
their customers is to argue -in
reverse, from effect back to cause
It is no more logical than saying
nat merchants can only pay their
suppliers what they take in from
their own

salaries

their
wages
by what the

that

their customers, less
ost of doing business, which all
merchants will know is a com-
lete fallacy. They must pay the
market price for what they buy,
add whatever margin is necessary
and sell accordingly, or
put of business
It may
that the
wages, to
negotiation







else go



be taken for

utilities

granted
must pay fair
be arrived at by
between employers
and trade unions in the usual
way, with the Department of
Labour keeping an eye on things,
ready to use its influence if neces-
sary to try to avoid strikes. Judg-
ling by the comparative freedom
from serious labour trouble in
the past four years or so, the
} arrangements seem to be working
well, and it would be a mistake
for the Public Utilities Board to
rneddie with matters that do not
lirectly concern it, when doing
so would involve overlapping and
confusion
It would
Board to carry



be the duty of the

on where existing







BARBADOS

+

By Sefton Delmer

ile

»

F i

} Hi
if

| oa




with him and his family in their
country cottage outside Moscow,

Questioned
THÂ¥YN one day the inevitable
happt..ed. The professor, much

embarassed, told my friend their
meetings must stop.

Now why do I tell you this story

about the professor? Jecause
nothing happened to him.
He was not arrested and shot

or put on trial for treason,

He was questioned politely by
the Troika tribunal, told not to
talk to Westerners again, and

sent about his business.

All that is remarkable when
you consider that under the terms
of the absurdly wide new State
Secrets Act, almost everything the
professor said to us, harmless as
it was, could have been construed
as treason

And would have been, had the

wild and arbitrary secret police
of 1937 been handling his case,
instead of the much subtler

M.V.D. of today.

The new secret police, though
as ruthless, as watchful, and as
determined as ever to enforce the

should be a matter of co-opera-
tion with the companies for the
smoother working of their ser-
vices and the benefit of all con-
cerned in the long run, It works
like this in Canada, and while I
know some people say, ‘Barbados
is different’, I find it hard to be-
lieve that the basic laws of
human nature, economics and
sound engineering do not function
here.

I think it is equally mistaken
to regard the Public Utilities Act
as a step toward socialism or
nationalisation, because it should
prove to bea bulwark against
further progress in that direction.
If there is no real cause for griev-
ance or dissatisfaction with the
companies, there is nothing to be
gained by nationalisation. It is
absolutely essential that the utili-
ties be run as efficient business
eoncerns and kept free from poli-
tics, and this is quite feasible
under a Board such as would be
set up in accordance with the Act,

but almost impossible under
nationalisation
These arguments about wages

and other vhings not directly in-
volved in the new Act have the
harmful result of distracting at-




tention from matVers of vital
importance, such as_ planning
for the future. There is little
peint in crying over the spilt
milk of pa mistakes and acci-

dents, but we are al] directly in-
terested in what is being done or

What of they
People ?...2{,



ADVOCATE

Strictest Stalinism, becom
more adult.

They have substituted a policy

have

of careful discrimination fer the
old policy of liquidation,
Where thousands cf men and

women used to be taken off and
shot every month, it is only a
few hundreds doday.
Remember?
THE ordinary Russian in the
street need no longer fear a night-
time call from the police as he

had to in those four years of
indiscriminate terrorism which
followed the assassination of

Stalin’s friend Kirov in 1934

| Then no one was safe. It was
enough to have had the most
distant connection with a suspec!
for the police {to put you on their
execution list.

Provided he keeps his heac
down, does. not talk out of turn
in the factory, or let his wif
start grumbling in the fish queue
and does what the party bosses
tell him, the little man in Russ
need have no fears of Comrade
Beria, head of the M.V.D

But the priviligentsia, and par-
ticularly the intellectuals, must
walk warily. Though even here,
as one of them who has escaped
put it to me the other day, an
attacking newspaper article is
tending to replace that midnight
knock on the door

No Waste

IT is a wise policy. At back of



it is the realisation that:-

1. The old challengers te
S.alin’s authority are now safely
zone.

2. Russia cannot afford the

whoiesale loss of valuable brains
involved in a repetition of the old
mass executions.

3. The fame of the old terror
is still sufficient to bring even the
most recalcitrant to heel quickly.

The professor—warned that he
must stop his English conversa-
tions, or else—is happily preserved
to carry on his valuable researches
on steel alloys,

Novelist Soschenko, warned by
newspaper attacks that his drol-
leries at the expense of the party
are not being appreciated, at once
sits down to knock off a few short

@ On Page §












I Say These Men
Are Scared Of
Women

VIRGINIA GRAHAM
examines CLUBLAND
CLUBS— gathering of
human beings as well as the
weapons—have, it seems, ex-
isted since time was.

ihe

Long before the Greeks had a word for
them (whatever that may be) it appears that
men had an irresistible urge to get away from
women, and it is not improbable that the
troglodyte male, having beaten his wife for
giving him an underdone bearsteak, stamped ||
yut of the cave and went off to play a prim-
itive game of snooker with his cronies.

In a new, well-appointed volume* the
birth, growth and maturity of the club is
traced and
drawings and photographs most felicitously.

But as a woman, and an unsociable woman
‘ that, I find it hard to assess the benefits of

lub

es it were, I could find a resting place for my
luggage and a dignified cloakroom in which
to wash my hands, an armchair between
trains and a quiet a dismally quiet, cup of

tea.

{ never, to my knowledge, spoke to anyone
and I don’t believe any of the other women
who were there drinking tea and looking at
the illustrated papers had ever spoken to
anybody either.
ency rather than pleasure.

Men, however, assure me that in their clubs
everybody is very sociable and that the inter-
change of ideas is extremely stimulating and
revivifying.

I do not, though, believe it. I think they are
willing to pay enormous entrance fees and
huge annual subscriptions for the joy of
being in a place which they know, short of
in earthquake, cannot be penetrated by a
woman. Being in a minority, this makes
them feel safer.

I am speaking, of course, of purposeless
clubs, not clubs designed for cyclists or
philatelists or hockey players but just for
reclining on leather sofas with a whisky at

life.

the elbow,

assured of more reliable service
Those who want electricity but
have not been able to have it at
ell, are of course worse off than
those who have some but would
like to use more. I have seen no
recent announcement of a date
by which the plant will be in full
operation, with adequate reservea
capacity in line with sound en-
gineering practice.

It should be a responsibility of
the Board to try to enlist the co-
operation of the Company in form-
ulating plans to serve the com
munity now and in future as wel
as humanly possible. We have a
right to know that our interest in
these imortant matters are bein
guarded by our representatives,
and only this knowledge can re

store the publie confidence tha‘
has been shattered by recent
events,

If the present trend toward fur-
ther world-wide inflation contin-
ues, as seems quite likely, th«
question of higher rates will soo:
come up, and we have the rig!
to, assurance that any increases j
are necessary and kept to a mini- |
mum, One of the most promising |
ways to keep rates for gas anc}
electricity down is to expand the |
business and sell more, and |
there is reason
past policies had been more far- it
sighted in this respect, we should ;
be better off now and in less dan-



fashion.

illustrated with contemporary (

QUIET, PLEASE

There are, I know, women’s clubs, and
‘nee, when I lived in the country I-belonged | |
to one myself in London, so that intransit,

COFFEE FIRST

Most of the big London clubs in St. James’s
Street and environs started as coffee houses
where the literary lights, the Ben Jonsons,
Boswells, Addisons and Drydens congregated
o dispense wit and learning.

The coffee houses began by being public
establishments, but often the coffee drinkers
were so eminent and appeared so possessive
that an ordinary man desiring nothing but
coffee was daunted by such company.

Some coffee-house keepers desiring to keep
both habitues and droppers-in set aside a
room for the former, and soon this became 2
From there it was an easy step to
the formation of a club.

NO SMOKING

The first working men’s clubs were started
,in England in the middle of the 19th century
by a group of worthy persons imbued with
the longing to elevate the morals of the poor

Neither smoking nor drinking was allowed.
to think tha: it| Sverything was organised splendidly, every-
hing was fine save for one small but import-
int fact—the working man never went near

It was a matter of expedi-

\



pl

years ahead.

anned for better service in the
In the case of the

ger of higher rates before long }
We are entitled to assurance that | them.
no possibility is being overlooked When the working men’s clubs were

allowed to be self-s
exceedingly, and th

Lord Cromwell in a recent letter states
that the drop in revenue last -year makes
even more valuable the increasing support

that Haig’s Fund receives
communities overseas and
who by wearing a

radeship with the fallen.



Poppy each Remem-
brance Day perpetuate the pledge of com-



panies and



The Federation Of Primary

The First

Annual General
Meeting and a Meeting of
the Council of The Federation
of Primary Producers of the
British Caribbean and _ British
Guiana (Limited) were — held
at. Hastings . House, Barbados

on the 4th and 5th October, 1950,

by the kind permission of Sir
George Seel, K.C.M.G., Comp.
troller of the Development and

Welfare Organization
The following member organi-











zations of the Federation were

represented as follows:—

The Central Committee of Primar:
Producers (Jamaica) The Hon
R. L. M, Kirkwood

Dominica Planters’ Association The
Hou, H. D. Shillingf c.BE

Grenada Board of Agric re rhe
Hon. C. A. Ormond Phillip

St. Lucia Agriculturalist Associati
The Hon. H. EF. Be r, O.B.F

West Indian Lime Associatian (1
-—-Mr. Frank Maingot

West Indian Sea Island Cotton Associa
tion iInc.) Mr. HW. F. Alkins
Mr. D, J. Verity of Jamaica,

performed the duties of Secretary

Transport difficulties preventec
the St. Vincent Planters’ Asso-
elation trom sending a represen
tative. Mr. A. del, Inniss was
uneble to 2ftond as t! dele
of the West Indian Sea Island
Sotton Association through il]
ness. The hon. Rudolph Burl
who was to have attended
adviser to the Hon. | I

Kirkwood was kept in Jan

on urgent business. These
absences were much regretted.

Sir George Seel, who was
present throughout the first
session, welcomed the delegates
when the proceedings were
opened on the 4th; and Mr, D, A
Percival, Assistant Econonu*
Adviser and Mr. B. E. Rolfe,
Secretary of the Development and
Welfare Organization also at-
tended.

The Council of the Federation
unanimously elected the Hon
R. L. M. Kirkwood 45 its Chair-
man and Mr, D, J. Verity was
eppointed Secretary. The General
Meeting elected Messrs. Tapley
Bowman & Co. of Jamaica as
Auditors, thanking them for doing
the 1949/50 audit gratuitiously.

After all the formal business
had been taken, the Council dis-
cussed the possible repercussions
of the Torquay Conference on the
General Agreement on Tariffs
and Trade, and unanimously
passed the attached Resolution.

Consideration was also given tuo

the establishment of a Regional

Economic Committee, and of a
B.W.1I. Trade Commissioner Sor
vice in the United Kingdom, with
which is linked a more adequate

funds tor the Trade

provision of
\ Service in Canada
passed



on these



part

exercising
power in dealing with them.

a

The

Chairman

dictator
wielding a big stick over the com-

!
{
i
|
itn with the total cost of pro-
|
arbitrary



'
i , Electric Company the situation _ 75¢ new Act"should be dealt
machinery leaves’ off, and concern ™ pans siiuatl i stl oto eidilin <7 is i
: would be much improved if we baa re rk ~ ae
ducing a unit of electricity or gas, COUld be given some authentic in- WOU d help) to do this if all who
, Be : * formation as to when we may ex. Jin in the dis@ussion will re-
or telephone service, including all formation as to when we may ex ; sent
7 ‘ ‘ ie iil he coms hited frain from injecting extraneous
tems of averhead expense, divi- Pect an end to the occasional . °° ’ ee a :
‘ Nt cere ae ‘load-shedding’ that still afflicts us, SSUe* The alternative to the
dends to shareholders, and pro- 'ad-she , Seren arocmnaurdnitonl naa posed Board is to carry on as
, ae ae aaa 4 I have bee raitine for over ' arc is é i
v ined for panes € mpenattes - eer aekin ce Ay 7 ie fc a over before, with the companies free
, : so s ars ste g lectric
from British oi Secs ae : oe aes seat ctv a = wie to do much as ‘they please and
a: : = \ é s a aS Sto ; 3 he Com- yaise ¢ ; reening
from friends Alling the of is still dis raise yates at will, while keeping

pany couraging custo-
mers from adcing to its business,
and I should think there must be

It many who would like to do so if



us in ‘the dark as to the future
That method of running utilities
is quite outmoded. Is it what we
really want here?



expressed the





AND WHEREAS there is



Producers Of The British Caribbean And B.G. (Ltd.

of England where a man cannot, with a little
effort, avail himself of the pleasures of a
home from home, billiards table, library,
dancing and whist thrown in.

course, is only allowed on sufferance.
—L.ES. ‘

orting they flourished
e is now not a corner

He can even bring his wife, but she, of

thanks o: > derati ia 3 ‘ rea respectfully reques ras

Ger r ~ Sent end tee Seerehoneé fa vasa oy oy apprehend that all these Soot ee aoe aes ae oe ie
and Welfare staff for their ‘ ei Ni ee Anka ok “aed Stances into eerly consideration tii badaete Ae ce commen
: : SeatManhaslastth. ohiitlaw lea and other and to impress on Hi j 's Fi

ows Mphick tes are ee ce Heol gba cA Torquay Confer Goveraeneat Tesckiah tien Bere pny ier e eiste - comet
oot toastine Sin = Shoe further henuctioré oe ie me a tary of State for the Colonics Windward idsnte thee eae
much more difficult. erates of as early as may be possible 7

Resolution on the Torquay Con-
ference on GATT Passed

WHEREAS the President of the of the attempts being onde presentatives of the United AND WHEREAS the establish
Board of Trade made the follow build up agriculture and oi ces Bb cs tie Torquay ment of these two complementary
ing statement in the House 9! dustry in order to improve the onference on GATT. _ organisations is, in the opinion of
Commons on 27th April, 1950: standard of living of ‘nase mM oa nor Economic vhis Council, vitally necessary

‘It is a cardinal feature cf peoples and to relieve unen) and (2) a "Trad O ‘ for the maintenance and expan-

His | Majesty's _ Government's ployment, the possibility of Reres oe eee joner sion of the overseas trade of the

policy to maximise trade with further concessions in the wa: maken, mh U.K. ae Caribbean area and

the Commonwealth and to of reduced Preferences is 1950 bebe ace ae a Pere bee safe
maintain and use Imperia) viewed with the greatest alarm; ‘WHEREAS the Conference on & $a eee ie tntaletomeane

Preference and all other ap- AND WHEREAS such Prefer- ‘er Association of the British Commonwealth conferences:

propriate measures. At the/ences are already dangerously Caribbean | Colonies held in BE IT HEREBY RESOLVED

same time we are prepared, in low, and in some cases insufficient Montego Bay in 1948 passed That the Governments of
concert with the other Com- to prevent dumping of surpluses resolutions Yecommending th: Barbados, British Gui

Sener ee nee nes by ee favoured by large establishinent of a Regiona the Leeward Islands gir He

ed, to negotiate reductions of home markets in the ever vf 4 Lent Li ithe, s r a as 2 =

preference as well as changes currency controls being sand A Sle Comme a f ae ar to give aie
in tariff in return for tari? AND WHEREAS it is under— ¢ e United Kingdom; ee mtanie” Ca Ks ittes Remanal ;

concessions which we consider stood that it may not always be AND WHEREAS those recom Trade Conttniaaioner her vide n

to. the ( fat st. equal valu possible to consult all Colonies mendations were supported and the United Kinga wn their caer i
: AND WHI . it was 3 which may be int rested in any strongly endorsed by resolutions and favourable considertation
emphas zed in ie Touse on “ath concession which might be of a Conference of representatives with a view tc the provision
July that no cha ages in preser sought by other countries; of Governments, Chambers o? of their share of the hacoseaty
Mkt ‘or CG oe ear i ah ya i. Once Commerce and Primary Produc funds as early as may b
Maijes rove nent é e Governments of > > ir ‘bados ir ahruary . . died i {
United except afte several Colonies and Presiden. cx ee eee velthaes con Untelie a pau:

mst] Com cies comprised in the Caribbean AND WHEREAS the Govern organisations may. ‘oe '

alts nm : nea 8 British Guiana be ments of Ja: and British er: . Sines :






the serious





Imperial Preference;
AND WHEREAS in

economic
5th October, 1950. in these Colonies and

g that no further
view of
Situation







the rates of Imperial Preference
should be conceded by the re- the group;

known that they até prepared to
participate, the latter in respect
cf the jour Colonies comprising

reductions of

longer delayed













|

|
|

y

|









THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1950



ool ny

TO-DAYS SPECIAES

& CO., LTD. at t COLONNADE

Usually NOW



Tins S.A. APRICOT
JAM (2 Ibs.)




60 54
Tins OVALTINE (Large) 1.24
Bottles ALLSOPPS BEER .26

1.12



20



MATS

Green and White, Blue — 27” x 16”

Pedestal, Blue, Blue and White — 22” x 21”

Drain-board, Green and White, Red and White,
Blue and White — 22” x 14”

FIBRE

Nos. 1, 2,
Nos. 1, 2
Nos. 1, 2



WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.,,

Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

PHONES 4472 & 4687

LTD,





hy
i

SANTON

WATER HEATERS

models in 5, 12, 30 & 40 gals.
Also

HAIR DRESSING
EQUIPMENT

DaCOSTA’S
ELECTRICAL DEPT.






shy
RECEIVED IN OUR WOOLLEN DEPT. |
°

A Small Shipment of - - -

ALL WOOL BLANKETS

Size 60” x 80” at $8.32 each

in the following Colours:—

ROSE, PINK, SAGE, SKY, SAXE, CAMEL
and PEACH

— Also —

WHITNEY ALL WOOL
WHITE BLANKETS

Size 72” x 90” at $10.22 each

SECURE YOURS NOW FROM
@

DaCOSTA & Ce., Ltd.
DRY GOODS DEPT.





FOODS

Your Children
Serre LIVER

wr

To Keep
in Good Health
at Least Twice a Week

FOR YOUR CAKF.
RAISINS

CHERRIES

ICING SUGAR
COLOURING

GOLD BRAID RUM
ROYAL BAKING POWDER
CAKE DECORATIONS



NOURISHING

|
SPECIALS |

3 oz. Fish Paste @ .06 pr tin

14 oz. Fish Cake ” .12,". ”
16 oz. Steak & Kidney
Pudding @ 42.” ”

1414 oz. Sultana



Pudding ” 48.” ”
FRESH DAILY Headless Cod Fish
SAUSAGES @ .32 per Ib.
HAMBURGER STEAK



EMPIRE COFFEE
APPLES—ORANGES
MARSH MALLOWS

Order Early from







THURSDAY,



Jewish |

Cemetery
Cleaned Up

HE JEWISH vi
F Synagogue -L
cleaned up for the t
many years Darnaged
being repaired
Two walls are being erected on
both sides of thevv@adWaiy lead-
ing to the B.T.C. office. N
that a large amount of thx
growth has been
the ur he dama
to mar f.ihe @'d ten n

some are ¢

tir



remov



even-
nturies-

iated back
tenth and ei
can clearly be : ‘

While a labourer was busy re
moving the bush yesterday 1

|
ren at another part were pl
“Wild Indians” among a qu ¥
of vines still left standing They
were equipped with bow and
errows made from iimbs ef tam-
erind trees neart









yy tetenious stone throwing
is causing worry
residents of Collymore’ Rock.
Some claim that they can sec
the stones and the direction that
they are coming from bit cannot
see the person who is
them
A few told the Advocate yes

among

throwing




ter-

day that they are afraid to walk
the road because they may be
cut by one of these mysterious
stones

_ POLICE BAND under

Cap Cc E. Raison, will
play at the Mental Hospital at
4 o'clock this evening.

HE MAJORITY of elementary
children from all over the
island, as well as students from
first and second grade school:
are attending the “Globe” Thea
tre daily to see the film “Hamlet’ |

“Hamlet” has been running fer
the past 14 days A +boy from
the St. Mary's Boys’ School, who
saw the film yesterday afternoon
told the “Advocate” that at first |
he could not understand the pic |
ture but eventually caught on



He suid thet before he had
left he for school his mother
described the story to him so

|
|
|
|

that he would be able to follow !
the picture
LORRY driver from one of}

the country districts, who
was driving through the City |
yesterday, began to drive along
by the Fountain Gardens through
the area which is only provided
for buses
He did not reach far, The!
shouts of bus passengers brought
his attention to the fact that he}
was committing an offence. |
HARLES J. CHRISTIE of the!
Electric



Company reported |
that an unoceupied house. |
“Sheffield”, which is situated at
Bush Hill, Garrison, was broken |
and entered between Monday and}



Tuesday It is not yet known if}
anything was stolen.

C NEIL DANIEL, assistant}

teacher at Water Street|
Boys’ School, reported that tke
same school was broken and!
entered between Monday and
Tuesday and a quantity of bis-
cuits, sugar and carpenter’s tools

were removed
The total value is $62.55. The
articles belong to the Education
Department }
BICYCLE owned and ridden
by Lionel Greaves of Stur- |
ges, St. Thomas, was extensively |
damaged in ar. accident at Ash-|
ford Road on Tuesday evening.
Greaves was injured j
Also involved in the accident
was motor car T—115, owned an
driven by Theophilus Parris oi
Welchman Hall, St. Thomas.



HE MOBILE CINEMA will
give a show at Warner:

Plantation yard at 8 oclock to-|
night for residents of the Warners |
area of Christ Church, j
RIDGETOWN was dark andj
gloom; again yesterday |
evening and rain fell heavily in|
the late afternoon, The tempera- |
ture was 86 degrees Fahrenheit |
in the shade )
Some people were of the}
opinion that the dark clouds were |
caused by the intense heat. |
'



.

4 , :
What's On Today
Meeting of St. Thomas

Vestry at 1.30 p.m
Police Band Concert at Men-

tal Hospital at 4 p.m.
Water Polo, Aquatic Club at



5 p.m
Mobile Cinema, Warner's
Plantation Yard, Christ

Church at 7.30 p.m.



"HIGH AND LOW"
EXPECTED ON

SATURDAY fa

OCTOBER 12,



one of America’s leading capital-!puilding, on the first floor cf
ists, ae well as by the principal! which the “Advocate” Camera-
{oil companies of Venezuela. jman caught about 20 boys if

1950

ADVOCATE

BARBADOS
™“ @
Sits



HARD

AT WORK

4

and he sits in
Charlies McEnearney & Co.

Alley

nearb*

Spends Day
In Port





night

dos the same day of arrival. On
arrived too late
ansit passengers to see

this occasio i



Barhbadk satisfactorily They,

4 ‘ t permission from

«(i rr York to spend Wednesday
WITH PENS racing across exercise books, boys from Form 3b at the Lodge School are takings n

It brought 56 passengers, 46 of
whom were intransits.

The passengers nad a full day
From 8.30 a.m., launches
and rowboats were landing them

the Baggage Warehouse pier

Groups of them took taxi ride
to beauty spots of the island. Some
lunched and sea-bathed while
others spent the day shopping in
Curio sellers were mak-
‘asional sales

Chemistry notes dictated to them by a Form Mistress yesterday.
the chemical properties of water, and it did not
presence of a small frog in the class room

Venezuela Lodge School Students —
Has Creat Come From All Over The Wi

THE 312 boys and 15 masters of the Lodge School, St. ing
John, were at lunch when the Advocate visited that pictur-
esque set of buildings yesterday. From the big lunch room
came the steady hum of voices, steady chatter, occasional!
laughs and the tinkle of ware.

She had just finished explaining
seem strange when one of the boys pointed ont the





ashore



+} Cit

Mrs. Norman Howell, Actg. Ses-
‘etary of the Barbados Publicity
Committee, told the “Advocat»"
that that office was busy all day

Future

Economically —































| The same sounds, except for the —————-———-— B hake Jerse ae . a
Venezuele is g country with eee eee ea ig er« : f folders. Mrs, Howell was also kept
a tremendous future econom et a yen ae e a a ae ) via Fireworks ; busy giving exchange for Canadi-
ically, Mr Vance Rogers, for | ang shacols can cet “i 7 an and U.S. currency
the past vhree, years Assistant | : os pe rey ; is he Rn: 3i | C ;
General Manager of the Food|; 3.) yy... ee St. John ai O t
Supply Company of the Venez- Sees ca oe Ps i a 3 N ome | u \ mr . ¥
vela Basic Economy Corporation, |. Headmaster o School, Mr. N.Americans Should
told the “Advocate” yesterday.'|W._*., Farmer, told the “Advo-| Guy Fawkes’ Day is only a|
e@ saic ; : as : € cate er was on rm,} couple ol week away The; r
cause vot tnat this was so be-|cne Fifth, one Fourt hiras| majority of City stores nay ha} Be Encouraged To
and potential oil development as ae Seconds, two Firsts and their stocks of fireworks i tore ag rm
well as the tremendous possibili- | Preparatory Forms reoms are now exhibiting them Come l oO Barbados
ties as a result of the recent} To this school : nj
discovery and guaranteed de-|all over the West Indies, the ma-/ At Messrs, Bruce Weatherheai| ‘The best tl ing for Barbados
velopment of the richest exten- {jority from Trinidad. There are|clerks began filling the main!to do is to encourage Nort!
sive iron ore deposits in the ; 80 such boarders in school at}showease with large fireworks |American tourists who wouid
world in the state of Bolivar. | present. {shortly after mid-day yesterday |spend three or four months in th
Mr. Rogers arrived here about | Cricket Season |while the smaller ones wer island, Mr. , James Tilbury of
two weeks ago from Venezuela} The = cricket season is on ntjplaced in interior glass cases |Philadelphia told the “Advocate’
with his wife and family and j present, and naturally the grea- | yesterday.
they are staying at Cacrabank jest interest is now being taken i) were to have their showeage They ‘spend lots of money ar
: that game. Other games in which }filled include all the Knight’s Ltd |that is what Barbados needs '
Technical Help pupiis engage. ere football. and {Storesand Collins, .@bme 6f th ne is what Barbados needs, h
fe 4 . : tennis, plus other fé s ef ath-)fireworks on show were crackers |
akena hes a be tan tutiate letics. It is hoped revive Gower pots, matches, amber ele: Mr. Tilbury, who spent twe
, Inter-American Affairs. ierest in hockey irolights, starlights, dizzle months here, left for home durin
1s Government Corporation Mr. Farm.r> savi the hoc] | aazzles, roman candles aud | the evening, by the s.s, ‘Fort
dedicated to the interchange of |Pe@ds more class PNgae ay Te | bonne | mie dy
technical assistance throughout | Staff ae | Barbados ig a wonderfu:
the world, especially in Latin The buildings that make up the} The majority of local firework | piace he said, “but people from
America, He will be leaving for | Lodge School, with execption|makers went to work early last|North do net know anything
the U.S.A. in a week’s time,|of the Science Laboraiv:y, are o!a | month. Many have’ already |about it.”
but expects to be back here by | indeed, dating back to the tinejiulfilled orders with City firms] Mr. Tilbury said that he hoped
Christmas to join his family who| when the school was under ine|but one told the Advocate yes-—|tco be back early December He
will be remaining until the end |aegis of the Socjety for the Pro-|terday that they are still many |cxpects to settle here when he
of the year jpagation of the Gospel, This in- }more orders coming in returns
He said that the Venezuela| fluence is sti’l obvious from the |
Basic Economy Corporation was!church-like make of il windorys a Se ":
financed by the Venezuela Gov-|of many buildings, no. exceptinys | 2 a Td % © a
ernment and by Mr. Nelson |the pavilion, Z f Aon hi
Rockefeller, one of the grandsons! The Science Lab s only 15 ; r :

of the late John D. Rockefeller,| years old. It is a two-storey



nf
oa” ~\ ‘ei fe
S i & F ; ;
The Corporation was establish-| Porm 3b getting their after-lun h|

> é j
“A ”?
ed a little over three years 420} coaching in Chemistry. eS Lie
—a { =

and during that time, it had |

enjoved substantial success in| INJURED }

developing the agriculture of the | ‘Sarhos’ MaePheran of Tayrell’s

country, in improving the fishing . : Es aga 5

: sty ‘ Road, Christ Church was taken to |

industry and milk distribution. De, Skinner's’ Hospital yesterday

and in establishing wholesale and] | enine Setar te aa Tae Ole in

retail outlets for: food suppliers.) on accident with a Progressive ;
{’bus in the ‘Bus Stand shortly }

j} after 6 p.m,

The ‘bus is M
‘time of the ace
driven by Darnell Yarde of Christ







Your hair will be






532, and at the
nt was being



The Weather



handsomer by far



7. Church. MacPherson’'s leg was in- :

Sun Sor S48 ke i jured nov 4 os ae a when you treat it te

2 : 2 4 wen . ’ . .

. so { . 3 ‘
Miteg (Diet Qaarter) | Wrong Parking Cost 15/- ‘Vaseline’ Hair Tonic.\
Lighting: 6 Dim, 4 Clifford Phiilips of Thorpe’s Just use a few drops
YESTERDAY Cottage, St. George. was crdered

Rainfall _ (Codrington) by Mr. H. A. Talma yesterday a day... then see
07 in. ; to pay a fine of 15/- and 1/- costs ss
Total for month to yesterday for parking the motor car G—69 the difference!
in a4 ro (Max.) 84.0° F in a restricted area, Failing to
pedienthene (Min.) om ‘5e Er pay the fine in 14 days, Phillips Buy a bottle today!

Wind Directi (9 NE will be imprisoned for one month. |
in rection (9 a.m.) N.E



(3 p.m.) N.N.E .
Wind Velocity 5 miles per Truman, MacArthur will e
hour Try to settle U.S. Policy
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.87 @ From page 1.
(3 p.m.) 29,812 (3) The future of Formosa on |
which differences cf view

TRADE MARK
VASELINE ie the registered trade mark
of the Chesebr: d



are known to exist between |
President Truman who |
stands firmly by the policy
of a temporary neutralisa-
tion cf the island through |

ough Mfg. Co., Cons





Fined 15/- For |
Overloading |





| Noel Nicholls, a *bus conducter |
j}of Deane’s Land, My Lord’s Hill, }
|'was also fined 15/- with an alter::-

Japan on which the United |
States has recently started |
informal bilateral talks at}

“SEE THE DIFFERENCE PURINA MAKES”

use of the United States|\§_ 8 @ 88S eoeHeeweeeeeaes
Hilten Tull of Halls Road. St navy, and General Mac-| @ @ BRB @OGOQGSBSaeaeaas Baeaeaas a
Michael, was yesterday fined 15 Arthur who believes For- |}
with an alternative of one month's mosa Should form part cf 7 y 1 ‘
imprisonment with hard labour the United States Pacific | Pp U R I N A Cc Hi oO Ww 8 |
}for overloading the mector bus defence system | >
237 on Roebuck Street. | (4) The peace settlement with ‘or Poultry and Livestock |



The two consolation horses for
the coming November B:T.C
Meeting are expected to arrive
on board the s.s. “Geologist” on
Saturday They are “High an‘
Low” and ‘“Aberford”

Twenty-three series in the 2
Sweep for this meeting hav:
already been sold The next






eries to be sold is X

Thats why

you enjoy

j ative of one month's imprisonment ; Lake Success with interest-



with hard labour when he was} * ed Governments believed | §§ B | i oe | a a a Bases BBa a
! convicted of overloading the mot r| to inelude Asiatic ani} @ SB BEOLKRHBREREEREBEREEBHEA SB a ,
bus M—1332 on Roebuck Street | Pacific states as well 5
Both offences were committed | Britain, and through Jacoh |
on August 26 The cases were! Malik, with the Soviet

}heard by Mr. H. A. Talma, Cit Government,

Police Magistrate






Cod Liver Oil, richest
source of Vitamin A is
recognised as nature’s
finest product to build up
stamina and resistance
to Colds, Coughs, and
other chest and bronchial
ailments. REXALL
EMULSION contains
a very high proportion
(50%) of this valuable
natural oil presented in a
smooth delicious creamy
emulsion.

REXALL EMULSION
for your Child

at
Ra eR f G00) to take
Value for money

Now obtainable from:- KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

a Regular daily ration
of delicious creamy

J

MEASURE THE



INGREDIENTS IN

EVERY LOAF OF

J«R

ENRICHED BREAD

EMULSION

istance &

rowth

| pill build up res
help sturdy g

i

consistent quality at all times

‘Fort Amherst’.



which }

The “Fort Amherst”,
arrived here late on Tuesday eve
ni did not leave port an it:
bound voyage until last

The ship usually leaves Barba- |

With Baby
While Selling Fruit)

CHUBBY FACE LAMBERT is just over a year old |

a small wooden box on the shady side oft

Ltd., munching biscuits as his

mother Dolly Hutson tries to sell her coconuts in Hopes

Dolly is a little, activ woma
and though she does not let any
ene pass without suggesting tha
the sun is hot and a coconut wouk

be refreshing, she still finds timx

} to Keep an eye on her baby

She lives in Westbury Road an
e comes to town to sell She
has been selling at that spot nov
three years. She has tw
children, but they go t
and there is no one wit}
whom she can leave her baby
‘These are trying times,” she
told the Advocate yesterday
“People seem to underestimate th
value of 4 pint of coconut water
When she said this, her fart wa
somewhat anxious, for Lambert’
father is ill
“Bix-bix”
She never turns an
face to Lambert, though.
always a smile for him
one 1s



hool

anxiou
There ir
When ne
passing and she runs to the
box which is about 15 yards away
she says, “Lamb, Lamb,” yor
want “bix-bix" and when Lam!
Lamb gives his mother an answer
ng smile, he gets more “bix-bix.’

Hopes Alley is a crossing fror
juttle Street to Chapel Street
There is seldom much stir. It has
two barber shops, Outside an ol
shack of a building, you will sec



he sign “Ebenezer, Barber, Up-
itairs,” but you would not see
inybody come out whose hair is
trimmed if you stayed there for
ywurs

If you loitered around the
illey's cook shop, however, the
imell speaks for the trade

Besides the ta'lor’s, tinsmith
ind fruit seller's there is an old
weathercock like sign which tells
me there is a blacksmith’s shop
n the area, but there is no fire te
»e Seen nor the sound of the ham-
mer and anvil heard

Two-day Funeral

A hearse, centaining a offin,
‘cached Westbury Cemetery too
ite on Tuesday for the buriai
eremony to be performed

This had to be postponed unti
the following morning and
large crowd of mourners, mostls

connected with a Land Ship, could
be seen ‘,alking through Broad
street on Tuesday Night on their
vay back from the Cemetery

The hearse broke down about
tour times before it was eventually
towed into the Cemetery

Followers had to return to
Westbury yesterday morning for
the burial.

od | ee

uffer any

quick

teliet—treat painful piles with
medicated Dr, Chase Ointment

Soothes as it heals, A safe home
treatment for over 50 years, 33

DR. CHASE’S
Antiseptic OINTMENT





| ASK FOR
| And Demand

S&§
RUM

It is Mild and Mellow

And Bottled
— by

| STUART & SAMPSON

LTD.

Headquarters For Best Rum









yt

| ylow

Fully Fashioned high twist Nylon stockings carefully

examined and sealed to conform to correct Morley

standards,
EACH.





| BUY---



White Park Road. —





PAGE FIVE





|

WHEN CONSTRUCTING

OR REPAIRING A

BUILDING



ALWAYS USE

-EVERITE’

ASBESTOS-CEMFNT
|
|

.
| ‘
} A



SHEETS.”



SOLOS S OOO OL EF

i?

ig

lS

POLPP PPPS PSPS PFSSSOSSOSSS SOP SPS ESD.

BOOK

.
\%
-

ys
CAAOGOCSOOS

ed



‘i: ¥

CAVE SHEPHERD (o., [ td.

10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street

COURTESY

LLLP LLLP LAL LLL SPPED 8
s

66 K”
SHOES |

FOR

Â¥



4

COCCCOUS

4,

+

MEN

IN
and Oxfords)
BLACK BOX CALF AND VICI KID

SMART
BROWN CALF

STYLES

(Brogues



ODODE SESE GOO

| OUR WIDE RANGE OF SIZES

AND FITTINGS ENSURES A

PERFECT FIT. |

ieee neni eee

ASK FOR
“KK” SHOKS
They Last
Longer,
Look Better,
AND

Give Greater
Foot Comfort










HARRISON'S ","""2 |

‘
i : , ,
AAPL PLOO

————

CAS to







fo us ing





DURALIFE

| AUTO BATTERIES witH EBONITE SEPARATORS

GARAGE
(ROBERT THOM. LTD.) — Dial 4391

{

OE ee Ee





PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1950
é ai © > * '*

a

eo SSS

= FIGHT
| INFLUENZA















HENRY

Mentholated pre-war gra:je

(4% Pint Quality)

LIMOLENE

| : : .
Tt rade is especially effective
against FEVER and Feverish
Conditions,



24c. a Bottle at Your DEALER

OO
—

| SUPERB! |








MICKEY MOUSE

hat's what

hey say when

hey see

HE NEW GAS COOKERS

hey are just right
FOR THE HOME THAT PREFERS
THE BEST

ONE ONLY LEFT






eed

ORIENTAL

BS GOODS! (Articulos)
CUROIS, JEWELLERY,
SILKS, (Se Habla Espanol)

THANES

Pr. Wm. Hry. St. DIAL 3466









BARLEY

































NOTICE |
THE AUCTION SALE OF
COOKING BUTTER |

which was to have ;
caken place at DaCosta’s
| Warehouse, Canary St. |





A. §. BRYDEN & SONS warsavos) LTD.

AGENTS.

SEE, THATS HOW I KEPT
My JOB HERE ALL THES!

BY DOING THE RIGHT THING
sq AT THE RIGHT TIME





on Wednesday last will
take place to-morrow ;
Friday Oct, 18th at 12.30 |





BRANKER, TROTMAW & Co
Auctioneers





Ag WHO 16 THIS © Aout wo A
“6. KARRIS GROW Oi





OW, R ‘Dl WE'LL LOSE THE RANCH roth WIMPLE. I CAN'T | BESIDES, WITH WAIT HERE AND LET, ME SEE a
SHOT! {o) 'T PAY THE MORTGAGE P- TH ABK HIM FOR ANOTHER WHAT I CAN DO!
m1 i iC ONORROW! > : (ON. HE'S AL- ATTERED AND

Peanut Butter ..........

S.A. Peach Jam ........ 60
S.A. Fig Jam ........,... 52
S.A. Pineapple Jam .67
Hartley's Straw: Jam_ .60
CIADLES do. Rasp: Jam_.57
AES)

MCMANUS



PRIME
AUSTRALIAN
BEEF

Condiments and Juices and Wines, Liqueurs,
Extracts Squashes Ete.

Letona Tom: Juice .. .34

Silver Leat Pineap- °
Cayenne Pepper ..,... 56 ple fuiee ............. 39 sig ei Dry Fly sei in
Sun on “44 OMY cece cree 4 : i
Pakrika Pepper ....... -57 ‘ang iyine Findlaters Dry Club STE AK
| Ground Mixed Spice Al Fruit Juice ............ 28 Sherry | ....5:.:.5..50 4.00 :
Saut 1942 ........ 4.00
Mortons Curry .........- 47 Grape Fruit Juice... .23 au oe a ROAST
Colery Salt ous. 30 Three Bays Tom: Dreambuie ....00---ore .
PAGO iijsisarsseshesssvess 35 Cotnweca 6.00 etc.
Cerebos Salt ...........- 36 Cox Apple Juice ...... 50 aR ie hd < ie ye
Rose‘s Lime Juice Martini Vermouth . 2.
Bovril eegagiess $1.60, .90, .60 Mee 1.13 ee des ‘30 als o
5 \ Marmite .......... 97, .60, .32 Clayton’s Lemon .
a Bh oc oe 93 Jeffreys Stout .......... 26

Boy Squ
777 @sy, N\SS DORIAN! ) FORGIVE ME, YOU Lf a Wn HM, ;
ip Bs nee pene) LOVELY PEOPLE... GORGEOUS pan SS ea aan HEARTS
COME WITH OH, \HONESTLY, I HAVE (| FOR A SAIL...BUT hans N
S! | DONT BE \ A SPLITTING I'M GLAD I BEGGED
¢

a THAT yeNN, ete .f OFF... THOSE TWO a = a ES. , id 2 ¢ ; fi 3 7 j Milk Foods Biscuits Canned Fish KIDNEYS










Pi $2.21, $1.19 a ane Piet sizo | Maviair Red Salmon .45 TAILS
x Biscuits ........ ‘ :
Millo o.oo Fess 1.07 Jacobs Carnival Asst. Chum Salmon (Talls) .51 LIVER
6

Wane acccctcsesmere 0 uae 1.56 Chum Salmon (4) .... 28

Bourn-Vita ........000: 70 Cheese Biscuits... 1.38 Mackerel ...............-+ 36 and
Cogwierds Chub Pilchards (Talls) 96 sas

Hemo ooeccccccseree 2-20 Cheese Straws ... 94 otis mre F MUTTON
Afternoon Tea Bis- Pil i a1

Lidano Sweet Milk wilt e ccc Recerca 1.40 chards (3) 2... :

es a COCO oo. eseseeeeseseee 98 Jacobs Cream H —
Horlicks Malted Milk 1.14 Crackers... 1.52 ea pein 38



BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

THUNDREDS OF MILES OF JUNGLE, J | MAYBE AN ARMY FR“). °
THEY'RE SKILLED WOODSMEN~= a |COULDN'T-~BUT “¥ i oi
Lee | v ‘ A
















+EVEN THOUGH THEY
THOUGHT RIT’, AND |
WERE DEAD. WEVE
GOT To FIND THEM,








AP, ) ewe â„¢H) SO THOSE THEY LL COVER THEIR TRACKS. | | KNOW ONE MAN

sa) TWO THUGS AN ARMY COULDN'T FIND per

RISKED \ YOU TWO KIDS) GOT THE

YOUR LIFE AGAIN RANSOM><«
| FOR us? wee
\ [

Ee ¥ s

THEM IN THERE ~~

















THURSDAY,

OCTOBER

12,

1950





CLASSIFIED ADS.

Sit etetrepenene

FOR *ALE

AUTOMOTIVE

Fiat
running order
Dial 3067.



Model

S659. Por

CAR
Geod
Farticulars:

0 HP. 166
Price

12.10.50—i1n

CAR — Sunbeam Talbot (194i). Good
condition. Apply: 4 Clifton Terr, Bay
St., After 3.30 p.m 12.10. $¢—1n
ee

CAR Ford V-8 Super Deluxe, in
very good condition Cash or terms
G. W. Hope C/o Water Works Office

jephone 3988. *,





or Tel
4

CAR—Ford Prefect 1947, good con-
dition, Owner leaving island. No
reasonable offer refused. Apply Capt

A. J. Press.
6.10.50—T.F.N

MECHANICAL

ee

One hand operated BACON SLICING
MACHINE. Apply B. V. Scott & Co..
Ltd., Whitepark . 13.9 .50—t.f.n.

ELECTRICAL

WIRE & FITTINGS:—
3:029, 7:029, 7:636, 7:044, 7:052, 7:064,
C.T.8. and V.I.R, in similar sizes
Also cord grip holders, flush snd tumb-
ler switches, joint boxes, wood blocks
and many other items. Enquire Auto
Tyre Co, Trafalgar St. Phone 2606

12,.10.50—t.f.n

10.10 .50-—5n







ELECTRICAL









REFRIGERATOR -— One (1) 9 Cubic
ft. Crosley Shelvador Refrigerator
(American). One (1) Year oid in per-
fect condition, Four (4) years still re
maining on guarantee. Phone 4447.

12.10,50—2n

LIVESTOCK -

Bull Mastiff, One male
excellent breeding, Call

PUPPIES
and 2 females,



Mrs. K. D. Edwards. 4145 E
12.10.50—2n
MISCELLANEOUS



FIRE-WOOD in stove lengths at 90c.
per 100 Ibs., and Cord-Wood, at $16.00.
Apply — Dover. 8131. 6.10.50—3n.
use “Ster-
as it cleans and

Price 1/6 tube
KNIGHT'S Ltd.
‘ 11.10.50—3n

For that bright
ia” Tooth Paste
polishes your Teeth

smile —

Ferrodic Iron Granules a choco-
late-flavoured Iron Tonic. The gran-
ules may be taken dry or they may

is

be made into a sandwich, with thin

slices of bread and butter. Price 3/6

bot. KNIGHT'S Ltd.
11.10 .50—3n



Owing to an overstock of ‘‘Anzora”

Viola we have reduced the large size
from 68c to §4c and the small from
46c to 36c, so buy now.

KNIGHT'S Ltd.
11.10,50—2n.





SHTRTS—2,000 Men's Shirts of guaran
feed wearing quality at $2.00 and $2.4)





each. ROYAL STORE 12.10.50-—7n.
“SHIRTS & PYJAMAS — Boys’ and
Men's Shirts and “yjamas ordered to
Measure can be delivered within four
hours, RELIANCE SHIRT FACTORY
12,16, 50—Tn

We have in s ock “Selto" "Dental

Salts which ensures sound Teeth and
heaithy gums. Price 47c hot.
KNIGHT'S Ltd.
11.10.50—3n
24 G. GALVANIZED. CORRUGATED
SHEETS — Prime quality 7 ft. $3.21 ~-







8 ft $3.60 — 9 ft. sheet, Ob- Provost Marshal.
tainable from HA IN’'S HARDWARE 28.9.50—?n
Store, Broad St. 11.10.50—4n ———
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE,
‘The application of G $. Millar,
trading as G. S. Millar & Co. holder
FOR RENT of Liquor License No. 875 of 1950 grant-
ed to Gwendolyn Harris in respect of 4
Se double roofed board’ and shingle shop
APARTMENT — At Coral Sands! at Weston, St. James for permission to
Worthing, one fully furnished apart-| Use said Liquo: License ,at a) wall build-

ment, 3 bedrooms, silver and linen. For

further particulars. Dial 8134, Alma

Lashley. 0,10 .50—t.f.n-
1951

FROM January Ist. “TNanQUT”
Gibb’s Beach, St. Peter. Fully furnish-
ed with every comfort. Suitable for a
couple. Particulars apply Wesley Bay-
ley. Telephone 2818, 12. 10,50—2n.







HIGH-ROCK,—Bathsheba, St. Joseph
for months of November and December,



Phone-4048. 11.10.50—4n.

HOUSE LASACETA — Brighton, On
Sea. From Ist. Oct, 1950, $40.00 per
month. Apply to JAS, A. TUDOR Ltd,
Roebuck St. 10. 10.50—6n.

HEATHFIELD — On the Crane Coast.
Fully furnished, from December. Phone
8385. Mrs. A, D. Herbert. Cordober,
Ch. Ch. 10.10. 51+—-6n .

“WINDY WOLD" Hindsbury Road.
Drawing and Dining Rooms, 2 Bed-
rooms, W.C., Bath = and Kitchen,
Furnished or unfurnished,. Apply to
Mrs. Z. Daniel, Shopkeeper, nearby.

10.10 .50-—3n



PERSONAL



The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my Wife OLGA DOREEN
ASHBY (nee Yearwood) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order
signed by me,

Signed SAMUEL V. ASHBY,
14 Swan Street.

Bridgetown, Barbados.
10,10,50—3n



THE public are hereby warned against
giving any credit to my wife GWEN-
DOLYN MEDFORD (nee Williams) as*1
do not hold myself responsible for her
or anyone else contracting amy debt or
debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me

Sgd. SYLVESTER MEDFORD
Kew Land,
Tudor Bridge
St. Michael.
11.10, 50—2n



The public are hereby warned against
giving any credit to my wife ERNES-
TINE ROACH (nee Depeiza) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order
signed by me.

Sed. MARTIN lL. ROACH,
Military Road
Bush Hall.
11.10.50—2n.
———

The public are hereby warned ageinst
giving any credit to my husband EDWLW
OSWIN KNIGHT, as I. do not hold
myself responsible for him or anyone
else contracting any debt or debts in
my name unless by a written order
signed by me.

Signed
BEATRICE KNIGHT (nee Sayers)
East Point,
St. Philip
11.10.50—2

LOSI & FOUND

LOST

ARMY DISCHARGED CERTIFICATE
~-Lost between Colonia) Secretary's
Office-Steps and Bus terminal, Probyn
Street, Pinder suitably rewarded on
returning to Advocate Advig Dept
Neme—CHESTERFIELD CLAIRMONTE
BOYCE, Army. No. L/S CA_ 6320,

12.10.50—








GOVERNMENT NOTICE

TELEPHONE 2508



PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE

THE Tea-Room and Library of the
Women's Self Help Association wil! ve
opening on Monday l6th October. Con
signors of cakes and preserves are
asked to send im their goods on the
morning of the 16th, 10.10, 50—6n.

NOTICE
“The COTTAGE GIFT SHOP — Are}

having their CHRISTMAS opening on

Friday, 13th October next from be
a.m, to 6.30 p.m. Crackers, Xmas tree
Secorations, children’s annuals, an?

teys. Also a very good selection of at-
tractive and useful gifts.”
1.10,50—-Gn

NOTICE

“SEALED Tenders for the erection
of a Pavilion and Communit, Hall
Ellerton Sociai Centre, St. George, will
be received by me up to 3st. October,
1950

Fians arfd Specifications can be seen
at Mr, R. B. Moulder’s Office at Messrs
Cc. F. HARRISON & Co., Broad St.,

Bridgetown.
K. MASON,
Clerk, Vestry of St. George.”
12.10 50—4n

NOTICE

Applications for 4 Vestry Exhibitions
2 for Girls at St. Michael's Girls’ Schoo!
and 2 for Boys at the Boys’ Foundation
School, will be received by me not
later than 20th October.

Parents of applicants must be parish-
ioners in straightened circumstances
Ages of applicants between 11 and 12

years,
W. U. GOODING,
Parochial Treasurer,
St, Philip

|
|

‘

|

|
|
|



|

at

}

EDU
rDw



ATIONAL





QUEEN'S COLLEGE
ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS
1950

The Waiting List for Queen's
College Entrance Examination will
be ciosed om the 13th of October,
1950. No applications wil] be
recerved after this date.

Forms can be obiained from the
Secretary, Queen's College.
The Entrance Exeminations for
Queen's, College will be held on
the 13th November, 1950, at 9.50
a.m. Candidates must present
themselves at Queen's College by
9 a.m., weccompanied by Testi-

monials+from their former Hi
mistresses, 5.10 .50—yn.,

1.



ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

GIRLS’ FOUNDATION SCHOOL
An Entrance Examination for the
School Year January—July 1951 will be
held at the school on Friday 27th October
1950 at 9.30 a.m. Applications will be
received up to Friday 20th October by
the Headmistress and must be accompan-
fed by a baptismal and a testi-
monial from the Headmistress of the last
school attended by the pupil.

Applicants must be between the ages
of 8 years and 12 years on the date of
the examination.

Parents or Guardians accompanying

| their daughters or wards are hereby noti-
| fied that there is no accommodation for

}

them at the school on the date of the
examination and that the examination of

‘applicants will not start until they leave

|
{
{

the premises.
H. ANTROBUS
Sec. Gov. i
Girls’ Foundation School.
8.10.50—8n

é

11.10.50—6n.| VACANT SCHOLARSHIPS

NOTICE

APPLICATIONS (accompanied by bap-
tismal certificate) will be received ai
my office up to 3 p.m. on Friday, 20th
October, 1950, for one or more vacant
Christ Church Vestry Exhibitions tenable
et the Girls’ Foundation School.

Applicants must be daughters
perishioners in straightened circumstan-
ces, and must not be less than ten
years six months or’ more than twely
years on the date of the examination.

Candidates must present themselves
for examination to the Headmistress 1
the Girls’ Foundation School on Frida)
27th October at 9.30 a.m





from my office.
WOOD GODDARD
Clerk of the Vestry,
Christ Church.
11.10.50—5Sn

Public Official Sale

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1904
(1904-6) 30)

}
|
|
|

1950, at the hour of 2 o'clock in the
afternoon will be sold at my Office 10
the highest bidder for any sum not under
the appraised value—All that certain
piece of Land containing by admeasure-
ment 8400 Square Feet situate in the
parish of Christ Church at NAVY
GARDENS butting and bounding on
lands of Egbert elch, of Mrs. Carol
on a private road called Nelson Road,
and on another private road calied/
Ventnor Road together with the mes-
sunge or Dwelling House thereon called
“Radcourt” Buildings, &c., appraised as |
follows:—The whole property appraised
to THREE THOUSAND AND FIFTY
PCUNDS (£3,050.0.0.) Attached from
WHEYMAN ARNETT GRIFFITH tor
and towards satisfaction &c.

N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on oT

of purchase.
T. T. HEADLEY,



ing with kitehén attached in Suttle St.
City din snim Pdi 2 -
“Dated this 11th ‘of October 1950.
Toi— H, A. Ti +
Police Magistrate Dist. “A’.
Signed W. DYALL,
for Applicant

ON FRIDAY the 13th day of October, ;

|

of}



N.B,—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “A" on Monday
the 23rd day of
o’clock, a.m,

H. A, TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “A
12.10.50-—8n

PUHLICG SALES
AUCTION

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

BUTTER

By recommendations of Lioyds Agents
we will sell on FRIDAY 13th Oct. at
Da Costa & Co. Lid. Warehouse Canary
Street

500 x 5 tbs Tins Cooking Butter.

370 x 1 Ibs Tins Cooking Butter ana
€0 x 25 Ibs Tins Cooking Butter. Sate
12.30 o'clock. Terms Cash

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.

Auctioneers.
10.10.50—2n

REAL ESTATE

FOR SALE OR RENT













large reception rooms,
bathrooms etc, Standing on some 12 acre»
mahogany timber lands. Apply te
Bradshaw & Company 10,10, 50—3n

IN Plymouth, MONTSERRAT, B.W.1
for £3,500.

COCONUT HILL HOTEL containing
drawing room, dining room, 11 bed-
rooms, 4 bathrooms, kitchen, pantry
servants’ quarters and garage. Full
furnished, and with linen, china, cutlery
etc, Situated in own grounds of 2 acres

For further particulars apply Paut)
Hollender, Montserrat.

10,10.50—tin

KENMORE — Strathclyde, a Bungalow
standing on 9,704 sq. feet of land, corr
teining verandah, Drawing and Dining |
rooms, 4 Bedrooms and all modern con~-
veniences including garage, Lawn and



October 1950 at aly



spacious yard surrounded by well kept



hedges. Inspection by phoning 2756
12.10,50-4n.

LAND — A spot of Land in King’s
Village, St. Michael. Approx. 3,000 Sq

Ft. Apply to Mrs, A.
Cot, Whitepark Road.

Olton, Vesper







269 Preference Shares of £1 each in
Searles Co-Operative Factory Ltd.

125 Barbados Fire.

The above will
public competition on Friday, the 13th
instant, at 2 p.m., at our Office in Lucas

Street.
CARRINGTON & SEALY.
6.10.60,—5n.

The undersigned will set up for sale
tat their Office, No. High Street.
| Bridgetown, on Friday the 13th day of
| October, at 2 p.m
: The Messuage o
og





r Dwellinghouse stand-

on. of land at

1,373 square feet
vian Chapel.
| Inspection

i Dre
!



on application to Mr.
neh, at the Joiner's Shop opposite,
any day except Sunday.

For further particulars and conditions |

} of sale apply to:—
{ COTTLE CATFORD & CO.
| 5.10.50 —8n.



Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
ment) Order, 1950, No. 33 which will be published irr the Official

Gazette of Thursday
2.
prices of “Oats” (Feed) are as fo



12th October,
Under this order the maximum wholesale and retail sellin;

, 1950.

lows: —





ARTICLE WHOLESALE PRICN) RETAIL PRICE
‘not more than) (not more than)
Oats (Feed) $11.32 per bag ;
cf 160 Ibs. 8c. per ib.
Lith Octobe 1950 - Ne : :

|
be set up for sale to

| Upper Roebuck Street, above the Mora- |



GIRLS’ FOUNDATION SCHOOL

There are one or more vacant Founda-
tion Scholarships at the Christ Church
Girls’ Foundation School. Applicants must
be children of Parents residi in the
Parish of Christ Church and who are in
straitened circumstances.

The applicants must be between the
ages of 10 years 6 months and 12 years
on the day of the examination, which
will be held by the Headmistress at the

© School on Friday 27th October at 9.30

am ,
Forms of application can be obtained

| from the Secretary, W. H. Antrobus, Hil-
/ ton House, Bay Street.

These forms must
be returned accompanied by a baptismal

1
Application forms must be obtained | certificate to the Secretary not later than
| 4 p.m, on Friday 20th October.

W. H. ANTROBUS,
Sec. Gov. Body,
Girls’ Foundation School,
8.10.50—8n,





“AN EXPERIENCED CASHIER re-
quired. Please apply in wriling to
D. V. Seott & Co. Ltd. Do not send
original testimonials unless subsequently

requested."
10,10.50—T.F.N,

MISCELLANEOUS

WOULD Lady that
tisement ind lives in
Send address ‘Reliable’





answered adver-
Constitution
Cfo Advocate.

12. 10.50—In .





MAN — Some experience in
position. Room and
salany, Hotel Cyc
12,10. 50—2n,

hotel
board
Advocate.

mâ„¢





—————

Aden
Alaska (U
Algeria
Antigua
Angola
Argentina
Aruba
Ascension ..
Australia
do.
Azores



(to Panama)

Bahamas *

Basutoland
Bechauanaland
Belgian Congo
Bermuda
Bolivia
Brazil

Br. Guiana
3r. Honduras

yr. North Borneo
Burma

Chile
Cameroons
Canada via T’dad
do. via Bermuda
Canal Zone
Canary Island
Cape Verde Is.
Ceylon
China
Colombia Rep.
Costa Rico
Cuba
Curacao
Cyprus
Cyrenaica

Dominica
Dominican Rep.
Dutch E. Indies -
Dutch Guiana

Ecuador
Eire (Ireland)
Egypt ba a
Ethiopia (Abyssinia)
Europe (except Gt.
Britain & Lire)

Falkland Is.
Fiji
Fr.' West A
Fr. Guiana

frica

Gambia
Germany
Gibraltar
Gold Coast Ks
Gt. Britain & Treland
Grenada
Guadeloupe
Cinuam
Guatemala

(B.A.O.R.)

Haiti
Hawaii Is.
Honduras
Hong Kong
India :
Indonesia
Indo-China
fran



T

10th October

sarbados.



Country of Destination



!
i
}

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

POST OFFICE NOTICE

AIR MAILS



Effective 8rd October, 1950, AIR MAILS will be closed at the General Post Office as follows: —



DESTINATION



Antigua

.

Australia
(all air)

Australia

*

(to Panama only)

Argentine

.

Africa

Aruba

Bahamas

Bermuda

Brazil

Br. Guiana .
Br. Honduras
Canada

Canal Zone.
Colombia Rep.
Curacao

Cuba

China

Dominica .

Dutch Guiana

Dom. Republic

Europe

Fr. Guiana
Gt. Britain



.





one > sass
TIME DAY | DESTINATION TIME } DAY
s :
| rs
8.30 a.m, | Wednesday Grenada * ..| 9.00 a.m. | Monday
9.00 a.m. | Saturday 9.00 a.m. | Thursday
11.45 a.m, | Monday Guadeloupe 8.30a.m. | Wednesday
11.45 a.m, | Priday | 9.00 a.m. | Saturday
Haiti ; .+| 2.00 p.m. | Monday
11.45 a.m. | Wednesday 2.00 p.m. | Friday
} 9.00 a.m, Saturday Hong Kong ..}11.45 am. | Monday
4 11.45 a.m, | Friday

11145 am, |Monday India rsh ++ | 2.00 p.m. Monday

|11.45 am, | Wednesday 2.00 p.m. ‘| Friday

/1145 am. |Â¥riday

2.00 p.m, |Monday Jamaica : ++|2.00 pm. | Monday

| 2.00 p.m. | Friday 2.00 p.m. Friday

|

141.48 a. Tuesday Japan .. 11.45 am. | Monday
9.00 nin | Saturday 11.45 a.m, | Friday
2.00 p.m. Monday Martinique .. | 8.30 a.m. Wednesday

| Friday 9.00 a.m. Saturday

opke es 9 Mexico ; 11.45 a.m. | Menday

‘2.00 p.m. | Monday 11.45 a.m. | Friday
2.00 p.m. Friday Montserrat i .. | 8.30 am. Wednesday

T (via Antigua) 9.00 a.m. Saturday

/11.45 a.m, {Monday

'1145 a.m. | Wednesday New Zealand .. --}1145 am, |Monday

11145 am. |Bxiday (all air) 11.45 a.m. |Fridey

BA eng ‘Thussday New Zealand .. _., |11.45a.m. | Wednesday
2.00 p.m Monday (to Panama only) 9.00 am. {Saturday

111.45 a.m, {Tuesday | Puerto Rice... .. {2.00 p.m. | Monday
2.00 p.m Friday 2.00 p.m. Friday

|11.45 a.m, | Wednesday
9.00 a.m Saturday St. Lucia .. [8.30 am, Wednesday

'11.45 a.m, | Monday 9.00a.m. | Saturday

/ 11.45 a.m.

1143 ain | Tuesday St. Kitts 8.30 a.m. | Wednesday
9.00 a.m. Saturday 9.00 a.m. Saturday
11.45 a.m, | Monday :

111.45 a.m Wednesday St. Thomas, V.I. ..| 1145 a.m. | Monday
11.45 a.m. (via Trinidad) 11.45 a.m. Friday
2.00 p.m. | Monday i

St. V t ..; 10,00 a.m. | Tuesday
2.00 p.m. | Friday oe 9.00 a.m, | Thursday
2.00 p.m. | Monday ' Tortola ‘ ., | 8.30 am, Wednesday
9.00 oe Saturday (via Antigua) 9.00 a.m. Saturday
11.45 a.m | hacer
11, ‘ |

‘ Py ting | Mantas Trinidad , Ks er

| i oO

13.00 p.m. ae Friday

2.00 p.m. _ | Monday Saturday

00 p.m, ~

| 2.00 Pay Eo U.S.AY ‘8 : a Monday

11.45 a.m. | Monday Friday

| 11,45 a.m Friday
2.00 p.m, M

| 2.00 Fei rae Venezuela “ . Wednesday

| Saturday

| |

| 1









Registered Mail is closed an hour before ordinary mail.
All previous Schedules should be cancelled.

General Post Office,

Barbados,

30th Sept., 1950.

EFFECTIVE FROM 11TH OCTOBER,



SCHEDULE
POST OFFICE NOTICE—AIR MAIL RATES



1950




















































Letter Post Air Letter Post Air
Rate per Cards —Rorms} Country jof Destination | Rate per Cards Forms
Vy oz. % oz. .
cents cents cents cents cents cents
: 66 32 12) | Iraq e ae 80 40 oe
on 20 10 8
. 44 22 — {Jamaica . = os 12 6 4
. 6 4 4 |Japan at ei +. 64 32 i
? 72 36 — Java “i »- 1 1.00 50 Saas
“4 40 20 12
" 12 6 8 | Kenya ‘9 +" i 16 36 12
ee 84 42 12
o* 96 48 12 Liberia ‘ 3 ak 16 26 1
+1 20 10 as: Tlbyg oy Soe nee eee 30 ra
e488 24 oe
Madagascar ‘a 84 | 42 a
.* 16 8 8 Maderia .. ee “ 44 20 Be
. 84 42 12 Malaya States... “ 84 42 12
. 84 42 12 Malta a +s a 44 20 12
+ 72 36 16 Manila -a ek a 80 40 16
+ 16 8 8 | Martinique i ts 8 4 ee
. 36 18 — |Manritius ie oy 84 42 12
aa 40 20 — |Mexieo os a 30 15 denis
as 6 4 4 |Montserrat (via Antigua) 6 4 4
* 16 8 8 |Moroeco .. rae sy 60 30 ane
ite 96 48. 12
Pe 84 42 12 |Newfoundland (via
T’dad.. oe . 30 15 8
on 44 22 _ Newfoundland (via
aa 60 3 12 Bermuda) oa a 20 10 8
‘s 30 15 8 |New Guinea a a 72 36 12
20 10 8 |New Zealand (all air) .. 80 40 12
i 20 10 12 do. (to Panama) 20 10 —_
; 48 24 = Nicaragua .. ses ‘ 24 12 ao
i 48 24 — Nigeria ie “F 60 30 12
i 84 2 12. | Nyasaland ne vi 84 42 12
get 1.28 60 _—
as 30 15 — {Pakistan .. j a 76 36 12
“7 24 12 — |Palestine .. A : 66 32 12
a 24 12 — |Panama Rep. ? + 20 10 --
ie 12 6 8 |Paraguay j es 42 20 —
ms 48 24 12) | Persia bs v5 ra 66 32 ~
S 60 30 12) Peru ay ; ; 30 15 —
Puerto Rico ss vs 12 6 8
: 6 4 4 |Portuguese Africa Ms 84 42 —
a 12 6 — | Phillippines a ‘ 34 42 «16
‘lh be 50 —_ !
w 12 6 8 thodesia .. da ; 84 42 12
San Domingo on ‘ 12 6 _—
a 24 12 -~ {San Salvador ag 24 12 —
es 38 18 12) {st. Helena ei a 84 42 2
zs 54 27 12 jst. Kitts .. $4 i 6 4 4
: 78 36 a st. Lucia om ne 6 4 4
4t. Thomas, V.T. .. “ 44 20 16 | st, Vincent zs es 6 4 4
Seychelles ‘a te 84 42 12
e) 84 42 12) | siam 3 Ry u 84 42 --
~ 72 36 12 |Sierra Leone ke ia 54 27 12
ae 72 36 — |Solomon fs. +? 1 72 36 12
i. 12 6 —— | Somaliland a4 s 16 36 12
south Africa re ; 84 42 12
80 30 12 |4outh W. Africa .. ; 84 42 12
oe 20 12 | straits Settlements =... 84 42 12
Pe 40 20 12 | sudan (Anglo-Egyptian) 72 36 12
ey 60 30 12° | Syria es a a 60 30 —
; 38 18 12 :
BS 6 4 4 | Tanganyika es vi 165 Be 12
ite 8 4 -—— |Togoland a a 60 30 _—
oy 80 0 16 «|ortola, BVI... ee 6 4 4
: 24 12 — 1|Trans-Jordan 54 27 —
Trinidad ‘ 6 4 4
vs 12 6 — | Tunisia ©... 48 24 --
bsg 84 42 --
ee 24 12 — |Uganda , 4 i 76 36 12
fi 80 40 12 ULS.A. Uruguay ‘ ; 42 20 —
xi 34 42 12
.| 1.00 5O Venezuela j ; 12 6 —
1.00 50 Zanzibar 76 36 12
66 32 Zululand 84 2 12







Previous schedules should be



cancelled.



HARBOUR LOG

In Carlisle Bay

Sch Cyciorama O., Lochlrg ar
Sch. Emmanuel © Gordon
E. Smith, Sch. Zita Wonita
prise. Sch Frances W
Wonderful Counsellor, Ser Lady
ieen, Sch. Mandalay U., Sch, Everdene
M.V. Blue Star, Sch. Franklyn DR
and M.V. Lady Jo

s
Cy
Enter
Sen



Smith



ARRIVALS

S.S. Moemerest, 3.087 ton
Hagiand, from St, Vincent

Sehooner Mary E. Caroline, 4
nett, Capt. Joseph from Dominica

S.S. Aleoa Partner, 3,931 tons
Capt. Pembroke, from British Guiens

S.8. Fort Amherst, 1.946 tons nett
Capt, Kean, from St. John’s

DEPARTURES
S.S. Byford, 1,109 tons
Tharaldsen, for Antigua
S.S. Fort Amherst
Capt. Kean

nett, Cavt

1.946 tons ne

tt



In Touch With Barbados
Coast Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies)
advise that they can now
with the following ships
Barbados Coast Station;

Ltd
communicate
through their

Aniherst, 5.5. Alcoa Partner, 8.8, Fotini,
8.S. Folke Bernadotte, 5.8. Lady Nelson,
M.S. Raunala, SS. Moonerest,. SS.
Argentina, S.S. Uruguay, S.S. Elizabeth,
$8.8. Here S.S. Frixos, S.S. Portumal,
M.S, Barfrost, S.S. Biographer, 8.5.
Alcoa Pennant, S.S. Belita, M.V.
pector, S.S. Randford, S.S. Norlys, 8.5.
Captain John, S.S. A. Mitchel Palmer
SS. Pont Audemer, 5.S. Planter, S.S
Brajara, S.S._ Liberville,
S.S. Elizabeth Aeanigan, 8.8. Dolores
S.S. Edvard Greig, §.S. Salinas,
Boskoop, S.S. Baron Ramsay, 8.8. Sun
prince, S.S. Oregon Express, §.S. Ponce.
S.S. Marine Leader,
D. P., S.S. Granadero, S.S. S. Rosa, 8.S
Trajanus, S.S. Sonate, S.S. Robert C
Tuttle, S.S. S. Larium, 8.8, Flandres, §.S.
Yamhill, SS. Nerina







$.S. Carolyn, S.S, Cypria, SS. Fort



tons

j
}
}




nett,

Pros-

SS. Taigete,

8.8.

8.8. Captain John



t

PAGE SEVEN

Seawell

BWIAL



ARRIVALS— By
om TRINIDAD
Esrain Pigg-Perez, Trina Pirbe, Lesbia

r, Newman Wilson, Leotta Harding,

Alma McAlester, Charies Mc-
Hughes, Doris Cansfield, Hannah
Efien Kelshall, Percy Seale, ivy

p, Joseph Roberts, Enrique Lopez,

Mergaret Corbin, J.ohn Adamson, Winston







arren, Alfred /strill, Grey Bergman,
en Forrester, .\uion Lissone and
ard Morrey,
vom ST. LUCIA:
Colin Knight, Frances Knight and
He'cnan Jules
From DOMINICA:
Cannock Potter, Alice Hilaire, Lee
Edwards and Mevtile Edwards
DEPARTURES—P, B.W.T.A.L.
for TRINIDAD:
Ruth Inglefield, Harry Inglefleld,

Katherine Inglefield, Katherirte Inglefieid
Jv., Jennifer Inglefield, Ruth Rabanit,
domes Whiting, Daniel Hay, Willan
Ferguson, Toni Tayler, John Coull, Louis
Wiliams, Dora Rameheran and Winston
Warren

For JAMAICA:

Nellie EXxmtage Mary Perrin, Joam
Stephens, Arthur Murtock, Muriel
Pleger, Robert Radnitz and Fred Radnitz.
For DOMINICA:

EBustace DeAbreu, Muriel Band, David
Mount and Terrence Hawkins.

For ST. VINCENT:

Thomas Davis,
Lionel Paul,
Vincent Sprott.
For ST, LUCIA:

Reginald Michelin

Edward Elliott,
Emmeline Riisseit

Doris
and



MAIL NOTICES

Maiis for Trinidad by the 8.5. Golfito
will be closed at the General Post Office
48 under:
Parcel Mail at 4 p.m. on the 13th of

October, Registered Mail at 8.30 a.m.,
end Ordinary Mail at 9.00 a.m. on the
l4th of Ovtuber, 1960

Mails for St. Lucia by the M.V. Lady

Joy will be closed at the General Post
Office as under:—

Pacrel, Registered and Ordinary Mail
at 2.30 p.m. on the 13th October, 1950.



SHIPPING NOTICES

MONTREAL AUSTRALIA NEW ZEA-
LAND LINE LIMITED

(MLA.N.Z. LENE)

8. “Gloucester”

s ails
Septeraber 7th, ta
19th,

Adelaide

Freemantle
September

Melbourne September 28th, Devon-

rt October Ist, Sydney October
risbane October 14th, arriving
Barbados November Lith
These vessels have ampie space
chilled, hard frozen and general cargo

7th

at

for





—



M.V. TT. B. Radar
Lucia, St
Aruba
Notified.

For St

Vincent, Grenada and

Date of Sailing to be
‘

M.V. Caribbee For Dominica:
Antigua; St. Kitts Nevis an?
Montserrat, Sailing on the 20th
October 1950





Cargo accepted on through bills of M.V. Daerwood For St. Vin-
lading with transhipment at Trinidad cent; St. Lucia; Grenada and
for Barbados, Britigh Guiana, Windward Aruba. Date of Sailing to .be
and Leeward Is.ands, Notified, ;

For further particulars apply:

FURNESS, WITHY & Co. Ltd, B.W.L, Schooner Owners’
TRINIDAD,
BWI Asso, (Inc),
DA COSTA & Co. Ltd, Tel, No, 4047
BARBADOS,
B.W.I Nee espero }
o
Co.
NEW ORLEANS SER,ICE
sal Arr.
Ki N.O, B'dos
$8.8. “LIBERVILLA” 28th Sept 12th Oct. :
f
| NEW YORK 8SRVICE
salle Arr.
som N.Y. B’dos
8.8 “BYFIORD" 29th Sept.
$8. “C. G, THULIN" 13th Oct. a ot



CANADIAN) SPRVICE

\ SOUTHBOUND
! Sails Sails Arrives
"ss WNaine of Ship Montreal Hialitay Barbados
S.S. "ALCOA PIONEER” October 7th October (10th Oct
3.8. “ALCOA PARTNER" Oetober 27th October oth woverites toth
NORTHBOUND ‘i
Arrives
Barbados
| $.8 “ALCOA PARTNER" October 10th For St. JOHN, St. Lawrence
| River Ports,
8.8. "ALCOA PEGASUS” October 21st For St. Lawrence River Ports,
$.8. “ALGOA POLARIS" October 31st For St, Lawrence River Ports.
These vessels have limited passengers accommodation.



Apply: DACOSTA & CO,,

LTD. Canadian Service,

ROBERT THOM LTD.—New York and Gulf Service,









TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Plastic Drinking Glasses for
School Children
Boxing Gloves $15.00
—Set of 4
House Construction Sets
Locks, Hasps, Staples

at
JUMNSON’S STATIONERY
And HARDWARE >



OF QUALITY &
HIGH CLASS

WOOLLENS

VISIT TO-DAY

THANI'S |

Pr. Wm. Hry & Swan Sts. |

(CENTRAL

OAS OEE APE PDOSGSES
in fi
> »
: NEW ARRIVALS &
% oS
® x
%
% BROOKS SADDLES %
ss EIMPEX LAMPS ~
3 SHAW STRAPS :
PRAM STRAP ,
* SANDOW’S DEVELOPERS %
x ENAMEL CUPS, %
a SAUCEPANS %
> x
‘, $
NEWSAM & CO. 3
y
AMA









Ir YOUR HOME IS NOT WELL

FURNISHED

it is NOT OUR FAULT
IMPROVE It NOWE

SUPERIOR China Cabinet in
Big, ain bec Mahogany
and Cedar, ‘eral more China,
Bedroom and Kitchen Cabinets,
Each = different Sideboards,
Waggons, Buffet, Larders; Trol-

leys.

BEDROOM BEAUTY in Bed-
steads, Beds, Vanities in Mahog-
any, Birch or Deal-Wardrobes,
Linen Presses Body-height
Cheval and smaller . framed
Mirrors, $1 up

DINING, Launch; Cocktail;
Radio and kitehen Tables; small
to Big Upright Chairs in
tredsured Mahogany; Birch; Oak
and Rush,

(DRAWING ROOM Suites
separate things Berbice
other Easy Chairs; $3.50
Desks; Book Racks,
ALL AT MONEY SAVING
PRICES

L.S. WILSON

TRAFALGAR ST. DIAL 4069

or
and
up

Real Estate
|

Before Buying or Selling
Good Class Property: it

Pays to see

JOHN
v4.
BLADON

AFS. F.V.AS
Phone 4640


Plantations Building

For Hardware of every Description
T's
THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)
Cnr. of Broad and Tudor Streets.





PAGE EIGHT

Polo Players Drink [RUSSIA what of the People?)

Russian “Vodka”

“HORSESHOE COTTAGE” the Garrison, made history
when it became the first home in Barbados to brew Vodka.
Early on Saturday last Count Tolstoi was observed buying
various fruit from the trays that line up the City alleys,
and no’ doubt he was then gathering some of the many
ingredients for the Russian “Special” which he made in
the afternoon with the assistance of overproof alcohol, dis-
tilled water, sugar, pepper, lime, etc., etc., etc. that were
set to boil in an electric kettle from the kitchen of “Horse-
shoe Cottage.”



















= +, Brewing started at about 2 p.m.
c or j but it was not until after Polo
WORRELL GETS’ that the Count decided that his
Vodka was ready to provide that
renewed energy and happy feel-
FIRST VICTORY | {0 rich Vodka is famous.
So anxious was the Count about
RAJKAT, Oct. 11. |the perfection of his national
Frank Worrell skippered the | ‘rink, that during the middle of
Commonwealth cricket team to Polo he left the spectators’ en-
the first victoryt of their tour to- closure to check up on his work
day when they defeated Saurash- which at that time was undergoing
tra by nine wickets with a day % process in a jacket of ice. His
to spare. satisfied expression when he re
Saurashtra were all Olit in their turned to the grounds clearly
first innings for 139 to which indicated that all was well, and
the Corimonwealth replied with indeed this was definitely proved
199. by the players when they finally
The home side were dismissed gathered at the Cottage for the
in their second knock for 116 usual Cokes, Ginger Ales, etc
and the Commonwealth made 57 that are happily enjoyed after the
for 1 for victory. trenuous chukkas.
The Australian pair Ken Grieves | Back At Play

and George Tribe added 114 in 10T! Philip Mayrard was back in
minutes for the Commonwealth’s play again afier an absence ot
fifth wicket, Tribe getting 77 in- some weeks, and iis accident

cluding nine fours and one six
Grieves, more sedate scored 29
India’s fast bowler Nyalchand
claimed six for 88 in 30 successive
overs.

doés not appear to have slowed
down any of his determined dash
frrie Deane had only been in the
island a few hours since his ar
rival from Canada where he had
Wickets tumbled fast in Saur- heen engaged with the Molasses
ashtra’s second innings. Sohny Commission, and like the rest of
Ramadhin took 4 for 26; Tribe 3 his brothers was on top form.
for 43 and Worrell 2 for 25. ‘John Marsh piayed an excellent.
—Reuter. (game on Mr, Parker’s BELL, hit-

‘iing a ball skywards from the

middle of the field to the goal
Hutton Looseis Up | post, Col, Michelin as usual)

straits inever lost an opportunity to
PERTH, West Australia, iforce his obligation as No, 2 tv



Len Hiitton caused ¢ Givecles get to the goal, but his shooting
here to-day by joining other WS not as accurate as usual and

many a ball went out that could

membets of the MCC party ir ave been a goal, Nick Parra-

their first practice since arrivin BV
two days deo and after a state-. “icino again proved that with a
ment from the team manager that etter horse he would soon rise to
Hutton’s injured finger needec |# top rank player, so it is hoped

rest. Hutton spent several min- that this promising young player
utes hitting catches around th will soon find a mount worthy ol
field , his skill and keenness,

A New Horse
“Bertie” Bradshaw’s new horse
confined | gave a lot of trouble and appears
in the morning to mainly|to be somewhat timid about en-
hitting and fielding on grass, |tering a skirmish — backing away
and in the afternoon to the bowl-!from a crowd, but he has plenty
ers loosening up on a wicket usec jof speed and will no doubt soon
recently in a State trial game |jedapt himself.
Denis Compton hit the bali] O, H. Johnson seemed more at
around, took running catches and/home on his Rascal, and can
loosened up with the ball. certainly get more speed out of
—Reuter him than it is possible to get our

STANDARD BRIDGE of his Montey. The new Pavilion

is nearly completed and will be
By M. Harrison-Gray

of great convenience to members

Overnight rain prevented the
team from using the net wicket
and practice was

Dealer : South, and visitors alike.
Game all It is interesting to note that 1t
N. is being considered changing the
3 A853 Club from three teams to two
643 teams due to the fact that this
3 3 i, 3 will give members an opportunity
w. gE of playing in one position all the
2 39664 time without having to constani-
; E z £ 52 > aie 2 ly substitute for other players
who are unable to turn up.
rare s. i a Competitions
@K Q107 With two teams it would be
Â¥aQs possible for the Club to have
Aiss keener competitions, as each team
would then have about three

AD example of at me players for each position so that

from match play.

South players opened One on every evening of play a lot
Spade and rebid Three of confusion would be saved in
noes ove on org finding substitutes for particular

jumped to Four Spades on positions, and also playing some

nee

the strength of his Diamond of the men in a team to which

honours. they do not Lelong.

ot hoch rooms West led Wednesdays and Saturdays are

; s Team afternoons for the men,
en Roe’. 34 while the ladies have Monday
S led to @® A at trick 3. an afternoons to practice, Unfor-
2 the finesse of ® Q lost to tunately there are not enough
2 West who ‘

returned ® 2. lady players to make up a com-
6 ag yn ty god blag plete match, so some of the men
, by picking up East’s @ J. A bring out their untrained horses
‘ Club atuack defeats the con- on Mondays to help make up an

> tract _, ig paee nis Bight.

2 partner on the biddin: N iefinite fe ae eae
2 o definite news as

; g trick '3. ee 7 received from the Venezuelans

» In.Room 2 East made the re their intended visit which was

¢ prelays tise care ty fal expected this month, but it is
when South | . " 5 >» private atches
; ing West with 36 4 2, hoped that some private me at

» South continued with @ Q can be arranged with some of

and Bast’s @ J had to make. their Polo players who mey
Leas ~ shortly be in Barbados on
London éxpress Service, holiday.

a

RACING RESULTS ard. Flower Path (Naidoo) 116 tbs

Time: 1 min, 32 1/5 sees
MEMBERS HANDIOAP, | MILE,
100 YARDS, E. CLASS

Sun Watch (Sunich) 114 tbs. |

2nd. China Doll tlutchman) 119 Ibs)

ard, Just Reward (WJoseph) 114 lbs,

Time: 1 min. 53 4/5_ sees

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Oct. 11. Ist

The third day of the D.T.C.

races took place to-day. Follow-

ing are the results: OWNERS AND TRAINERS HANDICAP,
“HANDICAP, 6 FURLONGS, CLASS F 1 MILE, 100 YARDS, CLASS A
ist. Toy Bomb (A. Joseph) 132 Ibs lst. Lady Pink (Sunieh) 138 Ibs
2nd. Pensive (Gonsalez) 168 Ibs. 2nd. Brawn Jack (Reid) 120 ibs

Grd. (Dead Heat) Goblin (Lutchman) 3rd. Fandhurst (Wilder) 115 tbs

120 Ibs Time: 1 min. 52 2/5 sees S
Millionaire (O'Neill) 122 ibs.] AUTUMN HANDICAP, 7 FURLONGS
Time; 1 min. 18 secs CLASS G
HANDICAP, Ist. Jolly Miller (Joseph) 150 Ibs

MERCHANTS

7 FURLONGS, CLASS C 2nd. Black Shadow (Gobin) 122 Ibs
ist. Way Home (Joseph) 120 ibs Srd. Black Eagle (Naidoo) 11¢ Ib_
2nd. Miss Shirley (O'Neill) 123 Ibs Time: 1 min. Jl 1/5 secs
3rd. Waverley (Singh) 118 Ibs DIRECTORS HANDICAP, CLASS D,
4th. Tuckers Kitty (Latchman, 114 1 MILE, 100 YARDS

Ine. lst. Waverley (O'Neill) 125 Ibs
Time: 1 min, 2/5 becs @nd. Millionmire (Claitchman) 104 lbs
JUVENILE HANDICAP, 7 FURLONGS, Grd. Pensive (Gonsalez) 123 Ibs

CLASS H 4th. Sunny Jim. (Persaud) 109 Ibs
ist. Just By Chance (Persaud) 126 Ibs Time: 1 min, 52 3/5 sevs
?na Goldnie (O'Neill) 126 Ibs The meeting concludes on Saturday















LESSONS! I WANT TO
PLAY THE DRUMS OR

Le! I DONT / BUT IF YOU'LL
aaa STUDY THE PIANO



BE ABLE To PLAY





stories with a good Stalinist moral

_The Do It Every Time ‘isons saith By Jimmy, Hatlo

YF ITCHY KNOWS
THAT IF HE HOLPS
OUT LONG ENOUGH, /-

POP WILL. COME
FIRST, THEN YOU'LL | THROUGH WiTH

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



@ From page 4 gories is still applied, as the Krem-

lin makes room for new settlers

who have learned not to grumble.
What would the chief grum-

bles of the Soviet people be if

» end them
When I come to think over what





STOP THAT G

COUGH ©) *











Very High-ups have been spirited| they dared to voice them? I ; isk po | VENO’S wr =

away during the past five years, am in a good position to tell ' saick! oe ee '

I can only think of one : Voznesen- you. Fer I have been study- < wend eee Proce.

ski the brilliant young economist] ing reports of many Soviet remedy soothes away hootee-

planner of the Politburo who sent citizens who have fled to the | ness and soreness; eases

economist Varga into the jungle West men and women breathing, and protects the

for declaring that the United} from every walk of Mife who | chest and lungs

States and the Western world gen- have made their way into the

erally showed no sign of imminent Western zones of Germany

collapse. and Austria, into Persia and esc tithe

Varga recanted most humbly Turkey, and even into Japan ra ahead”

and elegantly, and stayed. So and India. These are their—

senski, triumphant, has vanishec |

to nowhere. GRUMELES cai seme for i
Trainloads... * COLDS - BRONCHITIS, |

. res * CATARRHAL ASTHMA '
MIND you, this subtle gloving|] @ YEASANTS and FARMERS 7

of the terror does not mean that (who still form 60 per cent. of s

the police have given up theirjthe Soviet population ).—Collec-

hated system of informers, Or | tive farms, they complain, are run

that the forced labour camps are|chiefly by outsiders, with chair-

running short of m:npower. men appointed by the district

committees of the Communist

Party.

They are still being filled up by
trainload after trainload from the
newly annexed regions, from the Party members monopolise the
Baltic States, from the Polish and|best paid administrative jobs,
Czechoslovak Ukraine, and even|credit themselves on pay-sheets
from the newly won Mongolian|with workdays they have not
provinces worked, have first call on new

Here the old system of supplies at the village stores. _
criminate deportation by Collective farms break up family
life, because man and wife seldom
have the same free days,

@ WOMEN PEASANTS com-
plain that they have to do the;
heaviest wo-k, for the army and
factories clairn all the men who
are not invalias. |
@ WORKERS complain of inade-
quate pay, shortage and dear-
ness of food, and bad housing
They grumble about many com-
pulsory deductions from pay—the |
obligatory State loans, trade union
dues, the subscriptions to this
organisation and that, whith no
one dares refuse for fear of being
thought politically unsound,

They complain of the inflation
of administrative staffs in the}

|

indis-
cate-



Olympic Plans

Underway

BUENOS AIRES.

Plans for the 1951 Pan Ameri-
can Olympic Games to be held in
Buenos Aires next February are
progressing rapidly, according to
the Argentine Sports Confedera-
tion.

Over 4,000 athletes from the 21
American republics and Canada
will participate in track and field


















































events, boxing, skiing, rowing. | factories.
swimming and other sports, to- The Stakhanovite movement, |
talling 19. under which workers compete for

All expenses will be borne by
the Argentine .government. Ali
Argentine sport stadiums and
clubs are being prepared to house
the visiting athletes. Special
attention is being paid to food
problems in an effort to satisfy
the regional demands of foreign
delegations.

Special Argentine sports dele-
gate Gregorio Espinar is currently
in the United States conferring
with Avery Brundage, president of
the U.S. Olympic Committee on
American participation and will
later tour South and Central
American countries.

The United States has

a championship in the highest in-
dividual output, they denoufice as
a disguised speed-up device for
forcing workers to produce more
for less pay.
@ CIVIL SERVANTS complain
of the same insecurity. “We
care not take any initiative; the
penalties are too drastic.”
@ INTELLECTUALS express the
same fears. But doctors ahd
engineers show less apprehension
than schoolteachers, college pro-
tessors, journalists, and those in
artistic pursuits.

One young scientist speaks of
what he calls the “inner migra-
tion” among young intellectuals—
the effort to transfer from politi-
cally dangerous to politically less-
dangerous fields, He himself had
transferred to microbiology.. But
even that had become politically
infected.

@ OFFICERS resent the en-
croachment of the Zampolit et
political commissar. They say they
are constantly watched by the in-
formers of the secret police.
@ SOLDIERS from the ranks
complain of poor food; enforced |
isolation from the local population |
if they are in an army of occupa-
tion; the special privileges of the
officers.
London Express Service. .



report-
edly assured the participation of
150 athletes for the different
events,

—LN.S.

% Board Wins
|



i. :

Cesarewitch

L -
Handicap
NEW MARKET, Oct. 11.
The King’s three-year old filly
Above Board, on Wednesday won
the Cesarewitch Handicap over ¢
2} mile course, Ridden by E,
Smith who captured the race last
year, Above Board strode to the
front two furlongs
and outlasted a strong stretch
challenge from Lord = Astor’s
French Squadron Mount of cham-
pion Jockey Gordon Richards.
Above Board shouldering 108

pounds started at 18—1 in a 38
Horse Field and French Squadron
with 118 pounds at 100-8. Mrs. E.
Williams’ Harlech ridden by
Charlie Elliott was third at 22—1,



FLOWERS, BOOKS
& MAGAZINES

In Aid of Poppy Funds, #.30 to
3 p.m. on Friday, October 13th
at Emtage Electrical Co

from home





BOXING — BOXING



also carrying 118, The favourite
was Mrs. Z. Lambert's 10—1
Specialty which was unplaced AT THE

The King was not present.

(C.P.)

14 Nations At
Basketball

BUENOS AIRES.

Fourteen nations were expected
to participate in the First World
Basketball championship opening
October 23 in Buenos Aires’ fam-
ed Luna Park Stadium.

The Argentine Basketball Con-
federation has announced that
Chile, Egypt, Spain, the United
States, Brazil, France, Peru and
Uruguay have definitely confirm-
ed their participation. Tentative
acceptances have been received
from Canada, Ecuador, Italy and
Yugoslavia. No reply has yet
been received from Cuba, although
officials here believed that a
Havana team would come. The
fourteenth participant was Argen-
tina. —LN.E

YANKEE STADIUM

Sensational Middleweight
Championship Contest

TUESDAY NIGHT
17th October, 1950
at 8.00 p.m.

YOUNG

BASSIN

Middleweight
Middleweight Champion
Champion French
160 West Indies
12 ROUNDS 12

Semi-finals

BELFIELD
KID vs. KING
126 126

SIX ROUNDS.

Prices; Ringside $2.00, Bal-
cony $1.50, Cage $1.00
Arena $1.00, Bleachers 48.
P.S.

Union



KID

vs.

Barbados

Bassin will be seen at the
Hotel from Mondoy, 4.30

OOO

Rugby League Results

LONDON, Oct. 11
Tuesday’s Rugby

BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB

Here are
League results:

Yorkshire Cup Semi-final Bat-
ley 2, Castleford 2 (tie).

Lancashire Cup Semi-Final.
Oldham 0, Warrington 5. +C.P.

-—~ PRESENTS —
EVENING IN PARIS

NEXT SATURDAY
14th OCT.

at 9 p.m

The BIG SHOW &
DANCE OF 1950

SELECTING

MISS & MR. BARBADOS

All members local and

visiting are asked to join

the Fun, not a_ dull
moment is expected.

OTHER ATTRACTIONS

@ A CASH BALLOON
DANCE

@ PARADE OF GENTS IN
LADIES DISGUISE. A
Prize for the funniest.

@ GUEST ARTISTE FOR
THE NIGHT B.G’s Radic
Star Miss Marjorie Dey

@ Music for Dancing by
Mr. Meanwell’s full Ork

Admission to Ballroom 2/-
Be Early to Secure a Table

SOPHO NS



7 SEEMS LIKE
YESTERDAY I WAS
4% GNING SHUMACK
THE SAME TALK-—







OCGOSS



A E





MUSICAL. GENIUS IN
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Let your Baby, too, join this joyous company
and march to Health and Happiness on
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From all over the world they come — a growing
army saved from sickness and disease —
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Full Text






Tharsday
October 12

1950



Hacbados







Only W. Germany|
Can Decide On
German Army |
|

|

Britain, France,
U.S. Will Ignore E.

German Elections

FRANKFURT, Oct. 11.
‘THE UNITED STATES, Britain and France
announced today that they had told the
Soviet Union they could not recognise Sunday’s
elections in East Germany as giving the Soviet
Zone regime any legitimacy or claim to represent

the people of East Germany.

The American, the British and the French High Com-
missioners in Germany — John J. McCloy, Sir Ivone Kirk-
patrick and Andre Francois Poncet, all sent similar letters
to General Chuikov the Soviet Commander-in-Chief in
Germany telling him so.

-ADENAUER

BONN, Oct. 11

Dr
tonig't
Allies aniy

West German Chancellor
Konrad Adenauer
that he had
the West German Parliament
could decide whether Germany
was to raise divisions for Westeri
European defence.

That could only..be after the
Allies had made a formal request
for Germany to do so, he

Addressing the German peop.
on both sides of the Iron Curtain
over the radio, the Chancellor
seid: “We are waiting to see
whether the Allies are going
make such a request to us and
when.”

His

day's

said
told the

said

a fis Senet

broadcast followed yeste:
resignaiion of his Minister
j The High Commission here this] of Interior Gustav Heinemana
| afternoon released the text of|over disagreements about the
| McCloy’s letter to General Chui-}German attitude towards remui-
| kov which included the copy of aj terisation.

| letter from West German Chan-j On France, Adenauer said: “We







Rice For

Star . Reds leellor Dr. Konrad Adenauer on]Germans have so often shown
: ving {si German elections and other| and also proveli our soodwitl
freedom. 4 towards France, and our firm dk
TAIPEH, FORMOSA, Oct. 11 McCloy’s letter began by saying:| termination to proceed in comme
Chinese Nationalists said today] “In my letter of May 25, 1950,} with France in future that I be~-
that their transport planes had|I requested you to transmit tej lieve they should not act against
dropped 24 tons of rice in famine-| your Government the proposals} us with mistrust again: mistrust
striken areas on the Communist! agreed on by the Foreign Minis-|never produces confidence on
mainland. ters of the United States, Great] either side, but mistrust produces
A spokesman said that 10| Britain and France for procedure more mistrust.”
American built planes also} which would permit holding free} —Reuter.
dropped six tons of Nationalist} democratic and secret elections; ee
propaganda pamphlets and flags!throughout Germany and would}



for under-counter celebrations! lead to the establishment of al
yesterday of the anniversary of| freely elected and democratic Gov- |
the founding of the Nationalist} ernment for all Germany. I have

Government 3€ years ago.
Planes ranged over Central and AND NOW |
“BLUE” RAIN

South China from Chekiang
province south of Shangai to
DORSET, Oct 11.
For the second time in a

Magloire Tops
The Polls

IN HAITI

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti.
October 11.
Department
‘Interior said today that Col. Paul



Kwangtung, north of the Indo-.
China border.

Nationalist Intelligence reports
published here today claimed

| Officials of of
that 7,000,000 people faced star.-

the

vation along a_ flooded river ns eas See) | Magloire won 99 per cent of the
valley stretching north of Shang- Nortman Darnell driving | votes in Haiti's présidential elec-

hai and Nanking.

i | tion held on Sunday
Communist

his lorry between Wool and



4 Deputy Premier Bovington, Dorset, reported The Electoral Board is sched-
Tung Pei, say these reports, had that the rain left blue uled to meet on October 22 t»
admitted that Communist China splashes like ink on the confirm the result of the
was short of at least 1,000,000 windshield and bodywork | balloting, The Constitutional
tons of foodstuffs and that Earlier this week “blue |!/Committee meets in November
thousands of people were home~ rain” fell at Gracedieu, })to write a new constitution before
less. Leicestershire about 140 to \the inauguration of Magloire and

Nationalist agents reported 150 miles north of here. It | the new Congress.

dissatisfaction in Shanghai. They was thought this was caused |} Magloire 43, had resigned from
alleged that Communists hac by high wind scattering el- || the military junta which ruled

arrested 10,000 people within a der berries. \the island since it ousted Pres:-

month and sent them te labour A weather’ pert. sid 'to- dent Dumarsais Estime trom
camps. day that “blue rain” in Dor- office a year ago. Magloire’s chief
—Reuter. set might be caused by dust || opponent Fenelon Alphonse,

particles carried across the
Atlantic from Central or
North America.

Red rain is fairly common
in Italy, caused by dust par-
ticles being carried from the
Sahara. |

—Reuter,

supporter of Estime charged that
the election was “hokum” and
| did not cast a vote.—C.P.



Frenchmen Drive
Out Guerillas
From Outpost
NORTH OF SAIGON



Meeting Broken
Up With Knives

———
not yet received an answer to this!

letter : VIENNA, Oct. 11.
r oluti The Austrian Socialist (Party
SAIGON, Oct. 11 Resolution | Headquarters here alleged today
French Union forces after a I enclose the text of a letter|that “terror bands” from the
three hour battle of "ase Violence” et to ue fied High| Soviet controlled —_Zistersfdord
ejected Insurgent guerillas from an Chancellor tavidak hentia ot oilfields had broken up a Socialist

: \ meeting with knuckle dusters and
resolution adopted in the Bundes- ree ere ey

tag on the 14th September and now The meeting was being held
endorsed by the Federal Govern-| last night in a cinema in Duerlk-
ment. — This resolution requests’ rut a few miles from the oilfields.
eccupying powers to arrange for, Several people including the
the holding in all four zones of| Mayor and Deputy Mayor of the
occupation, of elections to an all) town were seriously wounded,

German Parliament. ?

outpost only 31 miles north of
Saigon itself, a French military
spokesman here announced today.

Artillery and French King
Cobra fighter planes took part in
the battle and though the full re-
sults were not yet known, at least
130 Vietminh guerillas were killed.



The Insurgents suffered ‘“very} The resolution should be con. er:

- won bs lara aed is sidered in conjunction with a sr may
enerally in Indo-china ©) statement made on the same day '

spokesman added, the French |jn the Bundestag by the Chancellor ARTIE'S HEADLINE

military situation was better than

before last week’s report of in=

creased guerilla activity.
—Reuter.

in the name of the Federal Gov-

ernment, the text of which I also

enclose. You will observe that!
@ On Page 3.

AGCEPT RED ARGUMENT,
AND MAKEU.N. INACTIVE
Says Canadian Delegate |

LAKE SUCCESS, Oct. 11.
Canadian Minister of External Affairs Lester Pearson,










1 area:

I |



to-day told the United Nations Political Committee that if | Atte 4

Russian arguments were accepted the General Assembly | “ Anybody going in the cost |

would be unable to act in the case of aggression. , of living diréction? ”” i
Pearson was answering an at-



tack made yesterday by the Soviet

Foreign Minister Andrei Vyshin- | tc eT Te
sky on “the Acheson plan” to give
the General Assembly authority to
deal with aggression if the Secur-
ity Council failed to act,

Pearson said that Vyshinsky had
overlooked one esséntial point in |
ihe proposal—namely that the}
Assembly was being given powers |
On London Stock Exchange which were not only within the

Charter but which were to be used
LONDON, Oct. 11. only after the Security Council it-

Shares of Lautaro nitrate took | self had failed to take action.

a firm step forward on the London “Acceptance of Vyshinsky’s legal
stock exchange today. At 473] argument would merely mean that
the price recorded advanced.| the United Nations cannot take
Buying reported to be on the over-lany action at all to safeguard
seas account in the Matket was] peace and security if the Security
rather short of shares. ElSewheré! Council is made powerless by any-
Brazilian warrants emerged int0| one of its members,” he said,

the limelight with improvement

Braziliam
Warrants In
Limelight







The Chamber of Commerce
have received no reply from Gov-
ernment about the inquiries they
have made relative to the pro-
osed deep water harbour. “Our
etter has only been acknowledg-
ed”, the Seeretary of the Cham-
ber told Council members at their
monthly meeting yesterday, when
Mr. A. DeL. Inniss brought the
“We do not and cannot believe }matter up. 0

which practically recovered the}that the United Nations Charter| The Chamber had _ written
recent loss which followed the} sanctions any such futility.” Government some weeks ago in-
profit-taking. Pearson said that the Soviet|quiring as to what was being

Great Western Brazil stocks] Minister had argued that the As-|done about the project. Mr. D

were on the market around 153|sembly must refer to the Security|A. Lucie-Smith drew attention to

shillings on the official annoufce-| Council without taking ahy other] the difficulties steamship ware-
ment of the receipt of compen-| action whatever the question on/house operators were having on
sation money. Other Brazil rails; which the action was necessary.|the waterfront. These difficulties

in sympathy and| “He is trying to say that it was f i

illegal under the Charter for the] ping and Mercantile Association

Assembly to recommend that|jhad written Government ask'ng

United Nations troops be sent into!them to set up a Board of Inquirs
The general hesitancy in the} Korea to prevent Communist in+|into the matter

other section was attributed to} vasion but that it is not in the least ¥ r

reports that Communist China had| illegal for the Assembly to recom- Holiday Affair

were harder were ‘such, he said, that the Ship-
showed four per cent debentures,

fractionally better at 91.






told the United States to “keed| mend that United Nations troops! Mr. Lucie-Smith then referred

out of Korea” Prices were; be withdrawn Korea in order |to the letter which the Chamber

mainly slightly lower with| that that country may be at thy jh d written to Government about

British G rnment stocks dull] mercy of Communist forces in the|the public holiday when the West

on profg. by speculators.|northern part of the peninsula Indies cricketers had arrived from
—_ "Reuter Reuter./ the U 1 Kingdon



C.C. Gets No

FIRST CAR

STL



3



ee ets : $2? 0%.



Pay é

MRS. CLARA FORD, 84 year old widow of

F



. GOING



ee Fmt? ae ye |
Te Se

Henry Ford, the car proneci,

here pictured with her husband in taé*fiest Ford car made in 1896, died
at the Ford Hospital in Detroit. When Pord drove his first car through

the streets of Detroit it was Mrs.
the jeers of the crowd.
preferred her role of wife and moth

adjoining the property owned by Hen
old when she first met her husband

Ford who sat by his side and faced
Her public appearances Were infrequent.

She
er,

Mrs. Ford was born on Apfil 11, 1867, an a farm at Redford, Michigan,
Pord’s parents. She was 18 years
4f when they were married.



WILL TRY

TO SETTLE

U.S. POLICY

TRUMAN, MACARTHUR
|
\

LONDON, Oct. 11.

President Truman’s Mid-Pacifie meeting with General

Douglas MacArthur
preted in London =a
to settle critical poli



SPORTS
WINDOW

WATER POLO

K.O Coinpetitior
afrernoon a the
tie Club With two

THE 1950
Legihs th
Barbados Aqu







first-class mat Fiving Fish
drawn ivols th
pper a
and }

ronnere up e de
termined to win the K.O. Com-
petitian so they can bring of
“The Doubie Flying Fish
however 4re all out to win if
themselves

The other mateh between

Swordfish and Barracudgs, prom-
ises to be just os exciting. These
two teams are evenly matched
and in tip-top condition

A Silver Collection wilh be
taken between these two games
0 help in the expenses when the
Trinidad team tours Barbados
next month



W. Berliners Demonstrate
For Free Elections

BERLIN Oct. 11
West Berliners will observe a
two minute silence at noon to-

morrow to demonstrate their de-
termination for a re-united Berlin
on the basis of free and demo-
cratic elections,

At the same time, the Lord May-
or, Professor Efnst Reuter an-
nounced the final results of the
one week East Berlin “shadow
vote.” In this “plebiscite” organ-
ised by fhree Berlin political par-
ties, many East Berlinérs expresséd
their desire for free elections,

He reminded that in their
ter they had pointed out
they were a responsible organised
body representative of
in had

Bridgetown, complained

that they should have been con-
sulted on the holding of an addi-
tional holiday, and of the short

notice that had been given.

Mr. Lucie-Smith said that he

had very good reasons to fee) that
prepared
to take very much notice of the
He really felt that the
attitude of Government was that
the Chamber were not represen-

Government were not

Chamber.

lanned
omatic quarters today as an attempt
ey differences within the American ;
administration through personal encounter, |

let-
that

the ma-
jority of the commercial interests

for next weekend was inter-

The eminence of the advisers |
jwho are accompanying President
| Truman and who include Averill
‘Ilarriman, Dr, Phillip Jessup,
| probably the leading American |
‘expert on the Far East, and}
|General Omar Bradley, is evi-|
jdence, iv was considered here, |
of an attempt to settle completely |

jthe differences which have re-|
cently obscured United Staves’)
Mar Eastern policy.
Four matters, according to}
ally well informed quarters, |

ore likely to figure in the talks:
(1) The conducting of the second |
of the Korean war and the
sequent political unification of |
re Country. It is thought here
| thay President Truman will take
j the opportunity to remind Gen-
;cral MacArthur that he is acting
i the servant nov only of the
United States’ Government, but}
{SR of the United Nations, |
Free Elections |
| In particular, Truman is ex-
pected to discuss the political fu-
ture of Korea after the final vic-
| tory. which according to the res-
{elution of the United Nations!
| General Assembly is to be decided |
by free elections throughout the
jcountry. In the circumstances it
1clear that there can be no aute-|
matic continuity for the Govern-
ment of President Syngman Rhee |
|

+ hase









whose future will be decided at
the polls, and there can be no
identification of the victory of the

United Nations forces with sup-

pert for this Government
(2) The Mid-Pacifie confer-|
ence is expected to discuss:
the. future attitude of the:

United States Government
to Communist China
Other matters for discussion
are

@ On Page 5



earefully with Government, and
come to a definite understanding
with them. They should not
allow Government to get away
with the idea that the Chamber
were only the voicepiece of one
or two big merchants. That he
jthought was the idea they had

got.

Mr. A. de L. Inniss said that he
agreed with Mr. Lucie-Smith’s
vemarks and he thought they

should appoint a small committee
to approach the Colonial Secretary
and get the whole matter cleared
up once and for all

Mr. H. A. C. Thomas said that

tative of the commercial com- the views of the Chamber often
munity, and it was up to them conflicted with minor business
to satisfy government that they bodies and until matters like
were. They had got to work t0- those were straightened out, he
gether for the betterment of the did not see how they were going
colony. If it were necessary to to get the Chamber to appear any
increase their membership or to more important to Government
put their house in order to be- than at present
come more representative set It was finally decided to await
them do so 2 reply from Government to their
letter before taking further action
Responsibility s
He certainly thought they should Welcome For President
follow up this matter of their The Acting President Hon
responsibility and importance vet Vv. ¢ Gale MLL, .€ told the

| of his

Reply To Deep
Water Harbour Inquiries

Aduacat

$$$ $$



Price;

FIVE CENTS

Wear 535



U.N. TROOPS DRIVE TOWARDS PYONGYANG

Reds Ordered “Fight

_ To The Dea

Churchill |
Wants Super
Government

COPENHAGEN, Oct. 11.

Mr, Winston Churchill called
here tonight for rapid creation o/
a world super government with
Russia as one of its pillars. Speak-
ing to 5,000 people at the climax
three-day visit to the
Danish capital he said

“Unless some effective world
super-government can be set up
ahd brought quickly into action,
prospects for peace and humar
progress are dark and doubtful.”

Mr. Churchill said the “fow
main pillars of the world temple
of peace” were the United Stater
with all its dependencies, the Sovi-
et Union, the British Empire anc
Commonwealth and ® united Bu-
rope “with which Great Britain
‘s profoundly blended.

make
the ideas will all bear
weight which will be imposed
ind reposed upon them” he added

Mr. Churchill, leader of the
movement for European unity de-
clared a united Europe was onc
f the indispensable pillars of a
world government. “We do not
of course, pretend that a United
Eurcpe provides the complete
selution to all problems of inter-
national relationships” he said

“Our first task is to unite the
free countries”.

Mr. Churchill asserted, “We
stretch our hand in gratitude and
gocdwill across the ocean to the
other half of the free world whose
wenerous help has assisted our

THE RAINS
QAME

At 8 o'clock last night, the
water which rushed down
trom the country to flow
through the Conatitution
River to the sea, was only
about six inches below the
Constitution Road and the
Gully House Corner,

Rain began to fall from
about 4 p.m. nearly all over
the island. It fell heavily for
about two hours and then
drizzled all night in most
parts of the island.

It fell heaviest in St,
Michael, District “A” re-
cording 3.40 inches up to 6
pm. Rain was still falling
lightly at midnight in the |
city area. j

No damages were record-
ed at any district, but tele-

‘Let us sure that



phone communication — at
Four Roads Police Station,
St. John, was cut off,

The following are the
inches recorded at the vari-
ous stations at 6 p.m,

District “A” . 8.40

* ae ats 2.06
n at hag 16
* ees anit | ea
és ra oad 97
” or i eae

Belleplaine ... . 1.26

Crab Hill ere |

After midnight rain con-

tinued to fall in St, Michael
and St. Philip, but it stopped
just before 11 p.m, in St,
George, 9 p.m. in St. Peter,
6 p.m. in St. Joseph, 11 p.m.
i in St. Andrew and 5,30 p.m,
| in Crab Hill



‘ontinent on the path of recovery”

Mr. Churchill referred to “the
hostility of the Communist party
in every country” to every step
tewards European union,

Then he said
which

“the tyranny upon
Communism is founded,
the hatred from which it draws
its strength and the poverty on
which it thrives would all be
threatened by the establishment

of a united and prosperous Bu+) §

rope”—Reuter,







members that when the French
ship the “‘Colombie” arrive here
on the 25th or 26th of this month,
it will be bringing the President
of the steamship line and two
French senators, The local agents
Messrs, R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd
would like the members of the
Council to welcome them at the
Baggage Warehouse, and to take
lunch aboard the ship later,

The Council agreed,

In aeeordance with the amend-
ed rule of the Chamber that the
Council can appoint a member
of the Chamber to act for any
member of the Council] who may
be granted leave of absence for
one month or more, four appoint-
ments were made yesterday.

Mr. W. K. Atkinson, Senior
Salesman at Messrs H. Jason
Jones & Co. Ltd., was appointed
to act for Mr. D. G. Leacock Jnr
Mr. C. EB. Clarke, Merchant of
Swan Street to act for Mr. G, H
King, Mr Ww H Grannum
Director of Messrs. Robert Thom

Ltd, to act for Mr. A. R. E
King, and Mr. J. O._ Tudor,
provision Merchant of Roebuck

Street to act for Mr. A. S. Bryden

th”?

TOKYO, Oct. 11.

RITISH and Australian troops of the United
Nations forces in Korea to-day took the town
of Paekchon on the west coast road to Pyongyang,

the northern capital.

They were on the west flank of the main thrust.

Their drive took them 4

miles ahead of the Ameri-

can First Cavalry Division to a point 9 miles beyond

the parallel.

Americans attacking Communist defences
straddling Pyongyang road made very little pro-
gress” apainst the resistance of men ordered to

fight to the death..”’

Keep Out

Of North
Korea

RED CHINA TELLS US.

TOKYO, Ort. it



Communist China to-day
arned the United States for the
econd time in 10 days to kee

ut of North Korea

The Communist radio eal) from
Peking today

5 d was made as
United Nations forces were a‘
vancing from the 88th parallel

torder between North and South
Korea in an offensive drive
~gainst Pyongyang, the Commun -
st capital 80 miles to the north

The radio quoted a spokesman
cf the Chinese Communist For-
eign Ministry as saying: “Now
American forces are attempting
to cross the 38th parallel on a
large seale, the Chinese people
cannot stand by idly with regard
to such a serious situation 4s
that created by the invasion of
ae by ~e United States and |
its accomplice countries, and he
regard rw the ‘duhgerode: ren |
‘owards extending the war.” |

ns

The Chinese Foreign Ministry
eccording to the Radio, denounced
*s entirely illegal the United
Nations resolution on Saturday
which gave General Douglas Mac
Arthur the “go ahead” = for
crossing the 38th parallel in
pursuit of North Korean forces.

He said that the eight power
1esolution had been adopted
under manipulation of the United
States and wis avainst an over

|}whelming majority of the pop.
| lation.

The reen'ution e yt"
jthat the U ute iat! on
tuking all opprony et st 5
ensure conditions o1 stability
throughout Korea was in fact,
the spokesman added, designed

to authorise invading troops of the
United States and the other
nations acting as her accomplices
to invade and occupy all Korea
and to expand further the aggres-

An army spokesman here said
they made “no great effort to
move ahead since there are other
plans made for them.”

Major General, Barl E. Part-
vidge, Fifth Air Force Commander
and Letitenant General Walton
H. Walker, American Bighth Arm)
Commander landed at the a'rfield
‘oday sher dy after it was reported
serviceab ¢ The Airfield has a
north-south runway 1,000 yards
and an east-west runway of 1,200
yards both of asphalt and in reas
onably good condition

Far East Aitforce planes will
fly in supplies of fuel and ammu-
ition until the ground = trans-
ort can estch up with the rap'd
nilitary advance along this coast
Tifth Airforce fighter bombers
oday flew 106 sorties in support
f United Nations ground troops
They claimed 300 North Korean
‘asualties and 53 vehicles, 22
buildings, 2° railway coaches and
six gun positions destroyed of
damaged.

North Korean



Prime Minister
Kim Ir Sen sent his soldiers to
“fight to death" according to a
broadcast by the Pyongyang radio.
The ofder—virtual rejéction of
General MacArthur's “final” sur-
render call—said; “Our country ts
facing a grave crisis, Fight des-
perately in spite of all difficulties
until the day of final victory.”
-Reuter

U.N. Troops Killed
700, Women, |
Children In Seoul
CLAIM REDS

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 11,

Counter charges of atrocities
by United Nations forces in
Korea were produced yesterday
by Communist .radio in Peking,

“A despatch from Pyongyang
(North Korean capital) Radio
asserted that more than 700
women and children were slaugh-
tered together at Seoul by troops
of American aggressors ant
Syngman Rhee’s (South Korean)

cliaue alae
TT
TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
Ring $118 Day or Night,
oe «THE ADVOCATE
PAYS FOR NEWS.



sive war in Korea. —Reuter. Nr
OSS r a erePENESSODDHHETD THEO H HIT FO TION II,
+

SOOSF

-




\%

CLASSES OF

|
\é

F
PERSONAL

PUBLIC

APPLICATION TO

‘ Broad
x P.O. Box 227



GUARDIAN
ASSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

Established

FIRE

CONSEQUENTIAL FIRE LOSS
(Including Loss of Profits)

EMPLOYERS’

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CASH INTRANSIT

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PROSPECTUSES RELATING TO ANY OF THE ABOVE
CLASSES OF BUSINESS MAY BE OBTAINED UPON

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(628:

COO OOO SOOO OOS

1821



BUSINESS

TRANSACTED INCLUDE—

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LOCAL AGENTS—

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Telephone 4465

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S
-


PAGE TWO



LD Harrisonians in Trinidad
‘ held their annual dinner on
Sunday in San Fernando.

Among those present were Mr.
W. D. Isaac, Capt. H. A. Thorne,
Mr. Harold Haskell, Mr. Alistair
Johnson, Mr. W. K. Ferguson, Mr
Tommy Knowles, Dr. Greaves
Ph.D., Comdr. Carlton Goddard,
Mr. Jimmy Cozier, Supt. H. Arm-
strong, Mr. Ralph Eckstein, Mr.
Malby Trimingham, Mr. Lindsay
Yearwood, Mr. W. M. Best, Mr. T
Richards and Mr. E. Jones,

Intransits

NTRANSIT from Grenada yes-
terday by B.W.1.A. on their
way to St. Lucia were Lt. Col.
Eric James, Cornmissioner of Pol-
ice, St. Lucia, and Mr. H. G. Val-
entine who is attached to the

Colonial Office in London.

Col.- Michelin’ is’ at present~in‘
St. Lucia to have discussions with
Col. James when he arrives and
Col. Michelin is expected to re-
turn to Barbados this afternoon.

Mr.-Valentine was here a few
days ago having discussions with
the Post Master, and has since
visited Grenada and now St. Lucia

Old Harrisonian

R, AND MRS. JIMMY Robin-
son reluctantly left Barba-
dos yesterday afternoon by
B.W.LA, after spending ten days’
holiday at the Hotel Royal
Jimmy is an old Harrisonian,
having left school in ’35 to go to
America, A U.S. citizen, he now
lives in Boston where he works
with the Bethlehem Steel Cor-
poration.
Their destination yesterday was
Trinidad, from where they will fly
to the US.

Back From Grenada

ANON W. HARVEY-READ
: returned yesterday by
B.W.LA. from Grenada, where he
has been for the past month.

Barbadian Receives Trophy

E R.A.F. Safety Trophy,

which was presented this year

to the Royal Air Force by General

Gervasio Duncan, Chief of Staff

of the Brazilian Air Force is to be
competed for annually.

It has been won this year by
Norfolk’s “Tiger” Squadron No. 74
Commanding Officer of this Squad-
ron is Squadron Leader A. R. deL.
Inniss, son of Mr. and Mrs. A.
de Lisle Inniss of ‘‘Glenaire’”’, Brit-
tons Hill,

This trophy was accepted by the



BY THE WAY

A® the wearer of one of the

dutlest hats in Europe I am
naturally interested in the activi-
ties of a number of scientists who
are working out a formula for
making hats glow.

I am sure that the idea behind
it is to attract millions of tourists
to England for the Festival. 1
wonder would it be possible to
have a miniature figodlighting ap-
paratus attached to’ every hat. Or
a halo of powerful, neon lights
round the brim. To make my own
hat more interesting. and to bring
it into line with the best contem-
porary thought, I propose to have
a bright yellow band put round it,
bearing the words, in scarlet let-
ters. “Yippee. Suckers!”

Groping In The Dark

SKED by Mrs. Urge how
/ many rhubarb puffs contain-
ing tolderol had been discovered
since the regulations against it,
and in what quantities, a Minis—
try of Food offigial read out 12
pages af figures concerning the
cooling tests carried out on hot
rhubarb puffs, in order to detect
such ingredients as grated cheese,
medicated moss, health globules,
shredded cardboard, vanilla.
string, and fortified sorrel. “I no-
tice that there is no mention of



When night falls Ruper: can think
ot nothing else to do, so he curls
up in the little cabin that Koko has
rigged; while the bird flies on and
on-in a straight line rhrough the
darkness. Atter many hours’ sleep
he sits ur It daylight, the bird

hae d im haar ie racline






ANOTHER

et

Kupert and the Casiawuy

and Continuing DAILY 5 & 8.30 p.m.

TANE WYATT » WAYNE MORRIS «WALTER BRENNAN



London Bxrpress Service

Air Council for annual competit-
ion, between Way fighter aiaurons
of Fighter Command and the
British Air Forces of Occupation,
to be awardéd to the squadron
making the greatest contribution
towards flying with safety in all
weather conditions,

For the presentation, tne entire

Station was drawn up on parade
at the Squadron's H.Q. ai
Horsham, St. Faiths to watch

Squadron Leader Inniss receive
the trophy from the Air Mar-
Shal Sir Basil Embry.

With B.W.1.A. In St. Kitts

fp FTER ABOUT ten days’ holi-
day in Barbados, Mr. and
Mrs. Winston Warren and_ their
baby daughter Andrea returned
to St. Kitts yesterday afternoon
by B.W.LA.

Winston, who is a Barbadian
is with B,W.LA. stationed in St.
Kitts. He told Carib that Derek
Mendes is in St. Kitts acting for
him while he is on holiday; he
still has about a week more
leave. .When he resumes, Derek
will be returning to Trinidad.

Congrats

ONGRATULATIONS to Mr

Pearson Scott (Lodge Schoo1)
of Kingston, St. Philip, who has
been appointed to the post of
parochial treasurer of the parish
of St. Philip. His father will be
remembered as the late headmas-
ter of St. Philip Boys’ School.

Here For Two Weeks
RRIVING from Grenada
yesterday by B.W.1.A. were
Mrs. Eva Sedgley and Miss En:d
Linard. They are here for a
couple of weeks’ holiday and are
staying at Accra, Rockley.

tolderol,” said Cocklecarrot. “That
comes under the Hobbs test,” said
the official. “It’s under a differ-
ent department.” An official of
that department was called, and
Cocklecarrot repeated his ques-
tion. “We keep no separate re-
cords,” said the official. “For offi-
cial purposes tolderol is treated as

traxihedron, . and comes der
grated cheese.” “What ne the
grated cheese statistics then?”

asked Cocklecarrot. ‘After the
Hobbs test,” said the official, “the
figures are sent to a different de-
partment. Grated cheese then
comes under the illegal ingredi-
ents people, who send the figures
back to Q.R. 5741 for verification,”
Cocklecarrot groaned like a beast
in pain,
Discussion Circle

oo philosopher Kant, it will
be remembered (or not—
what care I?) distinguished be-
tween the categories of Quantity
and Quality and those of Relation
and Modality, by saying that the
former concerned objects of per-
ception, pure or empirical whereas
the latter concerned the exist-
ence of those objects in rela-
tion to each other, and to the
mind. Now I should be the first
to deny this, were I not restrained

2y



very geutly in a quiet lagoon and
Koko is busy rolling back the awn-

ing that had covered them. *' Now,
where are we?’ he yawns. ** Why,
of course, this must be Coen Island
where Koko lives."” He stands up
and, sure enough, lots of other litle
coons wave to them while the tide
AeiSe them aently ebassiaes!

MAMMOTH 1



t
= i
Starting TOMORROW 23088300m PLAZA THEATRE



DELMER, DAVES: JE

BARBADOS
eee

Caub Calling

West Indian Fortune

RANCES WINWAR, co-founder
of the Leonardo da Vinci
Art School, has thrown more
light on the much debated
marriage between Elizabeth Bar-
rett and Robert Browning. In her
book, “The Immortal Lovers.”
recently published by Hamish
Hamilton, she has stressed that
the significant thing about the
marriage was not so much its
romanticism but its — practical
advantages. The marriage enabled
Robert Browning to write poetry
in the comfortable shelter of a
West Indian sugar fortune, but it
also saved Elizabeth from her
father and her doctors.

Arriving By The ‘Golfito’
XPECTED to arrive by the
“Golfito”. on Saturday are
Mr, : Jack. Kidney, Manager ot
the victorious West Indies tearn,
Mr. and Mrs, F. A. C. Clairmonte,
(Mr. Clairmonte is Senior Vice
President of the Barbados Cricket
Association), Mr. R. K. Nunes,
President of the West Indies
Cricket Board of Control and Mr
and Mrs. Jeffrey Stollmeyer.

Up For A Month

R. LEE TALMA who arrived

here on Sunday from Trini-
dad to spend a month's holiday,

is Staying with his mother at
“Viamede”, Rockley.
Congrats

ONGRATULATIONS to Miss

Daphne Pilgrim, daughter of
Mr». and Mrs. S. O. Pilgrim of
Bay Street, who in the Oxford and
Cambridge Joint Board Examina-
tions held here in June reached
exhibition standard with Distinc-
tion in History.

Daphne is at present in Jamaica
‘at the West Indies University
College, studying for her Arts
degree.

Carib also extends double con-
gratulations to Miss Gwen Dray-
ton, eldest daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. B. M. Drayton of “Eden
Glen”, Golf Club Road, Rockley,
for in the Oxford and Cambridge
Examination Higher Certificate she
has gained double honours, reach-

ing open scholarship standara
with Distinction in History and
English.

Arrived Yesterday
R. GEORGE DE NOBRIGA,
Managing Director of the
Barbados Telephone Company,
arrived from Trinidad yesterday
afternon by B.W.LA.

by. a conviction that I should not
carry my readers with me whole-
heartedly, Yet who will deny
that all objects are affecting each
other all the time? Not you, Mrs
Rickthorpe. I feel sure. Let us,
then, get on with our drinking.



CROSSWORD



Across
which

1 With
Dompusity, (8)

( Pictures are made tn it
een. 4

ager in another way
Labour. (4)

ube
(4 4)
(5)
Boy in Indian surroundings

(3)

The; initia

always
e. )

re should
something thus,

They are not very

have

5 always @ xve:

(2, 4)

sharp. io
. Used for dressing wounds. (4)

This ts poison. (5)
Describes 9 good holiday

Down

Bulderdash | (y)
Descriptive of 1 Down
Ships boats
than one, (

(w)

(7)
Usually require mur
5)

Reai din makes an Siang. «7)
. Drive on. 44)
» Sign from vemu. (4)
The East tore in for
(6)

Saucy

a change

f fish may we say ti

Po give this listen (3)

Vegetable from the lake

This brings dishonour

i guns lke the place to enter
is

‘4
(5)

Phis ace ts comforting. (3)
Reversed in 2 Down (2)

Solution vl Saturdays vue
} Safety-pin; 6 Uganda
Brine cask; 12
Yedious; 16. Mol}
} So: 22. Session. 23
1 Substance
“tir does; 4
demolish: 9. Assess:
cone 17 [dea; 27 Gin

‘RIUMPH !!



Sewar ¥
Ennut;
1





Produced hy



RRY WALD

SS

{
j
Its full width from the Old World| eq two centuries for the Yankee
to New has served as a proving Clipper ships, the “Dreadnaught, ’
>



ADVOCATE



ATLANTIC POND

WASHINGTON, The Pilgrim

Fathers,
The narrowing Atlantic Ocean,! from Plymouth, England,

sailing
early
frrther reduced to pond size by! in September 1620, took almost
the latest jet-plane flying feats,| as ong as Columbus to span the
never fails to challenge the men ecean, reaching Cape Cod’s tio
who blaze transportation trails.| Movember 9, Fast crossings wail-

ground for man and craft for near-
ly 1,000 years, notes the National
Geographic Society

History’s first non-stop jet pla
flights between Europe and
America, made September 22 b;
two U.S, Air Force flyers, embel
lish a new chapter of Atlantic con
quest opened two years ago. In
mid-July, 1948, six British Vam-
pires, pioneered the jet trail fron,
England to Labrador, making
refueling stops in the Hebrides,
Iceland, and Greeniand.

Columbus and Lindbergh con-
tributed the best known chapters
to the Atlantic conquest record
book. Aerial “firsts”
predominant — since
years before Lindbergh's success
electrified a tensely waiting world.

f.aking a 12-day sailing record
from New York to
59.

First steamship to cross
Wlantie was the “Savannah” in
19. Actually, it moved by wind
ore than by steam, being full-
rigged, Its single steam engine,
lurning side paddles, was usec
only about one-eighth of the time
during vhe 27-day voyage.

It was not until after che Civil
war that propeller-driven steam—
thips began lopping days off the
Yankee Clipper record time. The
ill-fated Lusivania in 1910 was

the first to cross in under five

ao aeen days. Britain’s present day Queen
} Mary has made surface crossing
three times in under four a.
: Ten months prior to nite

A century ago the widely accept- P
ed view was that Columbus wrote potas 3 ee as

Ireland in




























the

Chapter One, Subsequent study
of lestandie sagas ruled that be-} North Sea island of ene
lief. It is now generally agreed| the first cargo submarine k
that the story of Atlantic crossings] ¢™08S. Entering the Chesapeake
goes back at least to the turn of] Bay after a 16-day run, it ex-
the first Christian millenium—A.D,{changed cargoes at Balvimore, and
1,000—nearly five centuries before
Columbus's day, j

Norsemen in undecked bo
using oars and a single square
reached southern Greenland abo
982. From their small colony
there, Leif Ericson and his men
pushed westward to the place they
called Vinland on the New World
coast, somewhere in the region of
Nova Scotia or New England,

Columbus sailed from Palos,
Spain, August 3, 1492, reaching a
landfall in the West Indies October
12. John Cabot, like Columbus, a
Genoese, five years later became
the first since the Norsemen to find
the continent, touching what is
now Nova Scotian soil after a voy-
age of 52 days from Bristol, Eng-
land.

GAIETY ibe
‘TO-DAY

OPENING FRIDAY —
“RIVER’S END” and



PLAZA OJSsTIN

WARNER'S Double—
Paul Henreid in



LAST SHOWING

TO-DAY 5—8.30 p.m in





THEY LIVED
S|
S07. a
SECRET

ame «
ws

> ~
1 CORTE. vw. |

LOUIS De ROCHMONA?
» é
"Lost
BEATRICE PEARSON
MEL FERRER! -
ALFRED L.WERKER |
et ee eae ee



EMPIRE

Last Two Shows To-Day
4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

M-G-M Presents:

“PATHER OF THE
BRIDE ”

Sturring: Spencer TRACY
Joan BENNETT
with

Elizabeth TAYLOR
and Don TAYLOR

ROXxY

: To-Day Only 4.30 & 8.15
M-G-M Big Double







SPECIAL MATINEE
TO-DAY 2 p. nit
(cheap prices)

Leon ERROL, in

oo”



“FIGHTING MAD” 1 yaa ARD
— ee a emnetnererinallll Lena HORNE
Starting To-morrow—2.30 & :
8.30 p.m. in
and Continuing Daily 5 & 8.30 p.m, ”
Gary COOPER in ¥ WORDS AND MUSIC
TASK FORCE and
“NO MINOR VICES”
PLAZA a

Dana ANDREWS
Lili PALMER
Louis JOURDAN

THEATRE

BRIDGETOWN





REASONABLE PRICES in....

HOUSEHOLD ITEMS THAT YOU WILL APPRECIATE
DOUBLE BED SHEETS 90 x 100 @ $5.53
SHEETING BY THE YARD 64-inch wide $1.65 per yard
BEDSPREADS 72 x 78 @ $7.16 each
TABLE DAMASK in WHITE 72” @ $2.72 per yard
TABLE CLOTHS 52 x 52 $2.37 each
DAMASK NAPKINS @ 60c. & 46c, each
KITCHEN TOWELS 47c. each

BROADWAY






DRESS SHOP





BOOK THE DATES

THURSDAY 19th & FRIDAY 20th at 8.30
MATINEE FRIDAY 20th at 5 p.m.

AT EMPIRE THEATRE

“PASSPORT TO HEAVEN”

(REVUEDVILLE 1950)



— By —

Mrs. A. L. STUART'S DANCING CLASS

A WIDE RANGE OF STAGE DANCING FROM THE
STATELY BALLET TO THE MODERN TANGO,
JIVE AND BEEBOP

BOOKINGS:—Open at Empire Theatre Box Office from
Friday 13th between the Hours of 8.30 a.m. and
12 noon, and 1,30 p.m, to 3.30 p.m.

PRICES:— ORCHESTRA and BOXES $1.50; HOUSE $1.00
BALCONY 72c.

ALL SEATS CAN BE RESERVED



M-G-M's JUNGLE THRILLER ! ! !
Johnny WEISSMULLER and Johnny SHEFFIELD in

“TARZAN AND HIS MATE”



“CONSPIRATORS”
Gary Cooper in “CLOAK & DAGGER”

FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY
Paramount Presents BING CROSBY in—

“HERE COMES THE, WAVES”

with The ANDREWS SISTERS













1950
Sa,

12,

OCTOBER

THURSDAY,

AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)
TO-NIGHT at 8.30

HUMPHREY BOGART — LAUREN BACALL
in “DARK PASSAGE’
A Warner Bros. Picture



B.B.C. RADIO
PROGRAMME



‘ op THURSDAY, Oct 73, 1950 . Friday 13th
. ws; a.m News Commencing -
Analysis; 7.15 ‘ on Close Down; 12.00 FEUD ABBOTT and LOU COSTELLO

(noon) The News; 12.10 p.m. News
Analysis; 12.15 p.m. Programme Parade;
12.18 p.m. Listentrs’ Choice; 1.00 p.m
Taxi-ing Around with Herbert Hodge;

in “HOLD THAT GHOST”
A Universal Picture

|
|



Se









Ss
1.156 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 1.30 pom. | =e TASS SS =
Ray’s a Laugh; 2.00 p.m. The News ———

2.10 p.m. Home News From Britan

2.15 p.m Sports Review; 25) p.m

Ring Up the Curtain; 3.30 p.m. Round
Britain; 4.00 p.m. The News; 4.10 p.m
The Daily Service; 4.15 p.m
the Bounty: 4.45 p.m. The Cathedr.
Organs; 5.00 p.m Listeners’ Choice
5.15 p.m. Programme Parade; 5.56 p.u

BBC Variety Orchestra; 6.00 p.m
Adolph Hallis; 6.15 p.m. Merchant Navy
Newsletter; 6.30 p.m, Educating Arctie

GLOBE

IT’S A GAY TIME IN TOWN

OPENING FRIDAY OCT. 13th
with the MUSICAL of Musicals

7.00 p.m The News 7.10 p.m Toge r with

News Analysis; 7.15 p.m We See the:

Britain; 7.45 p.m. Generally Speaking LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE
8.00 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 8.15 pm

United Nations' Report; 820 p.m

ser of the Week; 8.30 p.m. Tax:

ing Around Britain with Herbert Hodge:
45 p.m. Think on These Things; #00
p.m. The Rise of a Party; 10.00 p jn
The News; 16.10 p.m. From the Editor
jails; 1015 p.m. Vanessa Lee; 10.45 p.1)
Special Dispatch; 11.00 p.m. The News

os LE
a ;

pZ

rs





got back safely to Germany after
vutwitting the British blockade
in a 22-day revurn trip.

The transatlantic air para‘e
began in earnest in 1919, employ |
ing aviation advances attributable
to the war then just ended.





M-G-M's MUSICAL
OF YOUR
DREAMS!








Garden) ST. JAMES
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THURSDAY, OCTOBER

12,

1956



$15,000 Voted For
Wesley Hall School

The House of Assembly passed
a resolution for $15,000 for the
repair of the Wesley Hall Junior
School

The addendum of the resclu-
tien states that a token sum of
$1 was approved in the Estimates
of Expenditure for 1950—51 under
Part Il—Capital, 1—Public Build-
ings, Item 9 Wesley Hall Junior,
but it was not proposed to proceed
with the building of this school
until the general school building
programme had been reviewed.
In the meantime, the roof cover-
ing of this building has deterior-
ated to such an extent that the
ceilings are now dangerous.

The cost of rehabilitating this
building is estimated to be $15,000
and this amount is requested to
prevent further deterioration and
damage to the walls.

Dr. Cummins (L) who took
charge of the resolution, said that
the school was in a very bad con-
dition. When the rain fell, the
ceiling fell in and fortunately no
chiidren were in the scaool to be
injured.

Mr. Mottley (E) said that he
knew that the school was in a
very bad condition. He hoped that
if the work was to be done de-
partmentally, it would not be the
same case as those monstrous
buildings which were started and
not completed.

Mr. Garner (C) said Uiat |} c was
asking for a secondary school to
be erected in St, Philip. That
school he said, would alse /acili-
tate children from the surround-
ing parishes. A

He compumented the Goyern-
ment on the speedy way in which
they dealt with the bus service
and hoped that they would be
speedy with all necessary re-
quests.

Mn Brancker (C) said that a
walk down Heywoods, St. Peter,
would show a horrible piece of
work. That was the New Coleridge
School which was still being
constructed.

People were wondering whether
or not the Government was erect-
ing a horse stable. It was appar-
ently a memorial to Mr. Crowe.
For the longest time it was there
unfinished. [t was truly an unsuit-
able and unsatisfactory job.

Mr. Ward (E) said that the
Government had promised to build
a school at Half Moon Fort and as
far as he remembered the money
was voted for. The schools around
that vicinity were fairly congest-
ed. He wanted the Government
to start some work in that area.

Mr. Walcott (L) said that it
was not voting for money to build
new schools, but for effecting re-
pairs to a school. In reply to the
Hon. Junior Member for St, Lucy,
he said that he had complete con-
fidence in the Colonial Engineer
to carry out the work on the pro-
vided estimates.

The Colonial Engineer had car-
ried out investigations and in the

near future, supplementary pro-
visions would be made for the
completion of the school. The

figure would be staggering and he
hoped that the hon. members
would find no other alternative
than to vote for the resolution .

Council Clerk Creates
Scene At Meeting

{(Frora Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN.

“You can call the police, I am
not going”, said Mr. Louis Peters
at a Tobago County Council meet~-
ing. Mr. Peters is the Council’s
Clerk, and refused to leave the
meeting to allow the termination
of his services to be discussed.
When he refused to withdraw, the
acting chairman, Councillor John
Edwards, had the meeting ad-
journed. Mr, Peters refused to
leave because he said that he had
been appointed by the Governor
and was not working with the
councillors. His attitude was con-
sidered “high-handed” by another
Councillor, who considered that
the Council’s refusal to suspend
Mr. Peters reflected very badly on
the Council. At the afternoon
meeting, however, a vote was cast



in favour of terminating Mr.
Peter’s services at the end of
December.




BEST TEA —

RED ROSE TEA!

IT IS GOOD TEA.

THE GAM



Builerites
Support Sugar
Nationalisation

(From Our Own Correspondent }
PORT-OF-SPAIN

Recently clected member for
Caroni South, Mr. Mitra Simanagy
commenting on a statement made
by Lord Lyle, said that, as spokes-
man of the Butler Party, he wel-
comed Mr. Morrison’s (“Deputy
Premier”) statement that natione_-
isation of the sugar industry was
still in the Labour Party’s pro-
gramme.

His Party, he said, was com-
mitted to the principles of
nationalisation of the sugar in-
dustry, which was one of the main
planks in their platform at the
last General Elections in Trinidad.
The result of these elections
showed that they had a mandate
to promote the policy of national-
jsation as far as the sugar in-
dustry was concerned.

He rejected Lord Lyle’s message
to the West Indies that the Labour
Party’s plan to nationalise the
sugar industry constituted a threat
to the West Indies or was in any
way consistent with the Labour
Party’s doctrine of freedom and
self-government in the Colonies



B.G. Rice Shipments
To W. L Satisfactory

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Oct. 6.

British Guiana is fast becoming
a granary of the West Indies, It
was learnt to-day that for the
first time since this colony’s con-
tractural agreements with the West
Indies were affected, the Colony
is in a better position of being
able to fulfill contracts 100 per
cent.

Much depends, however, on the
weather of the next few weeks
which will play a vital part on
the results of the 1950 crops, but
preliminary surveys indicate that
the requirements of the West In-
dies will be fully met.

So far Antigua has received her
full requirements to the end otf
October. Montserrat has been
supplied to the end of the year:
St. Kitts to the end of September:
Dominica to the end of the year;
Grenada to October 28; St. Lucia
to October 5; St. Vincent to Octo-
ber 9; Barbados to September 29;
and Trinidad to July 31,

The figures quoted above are
based on the 100 per cent re-
quirements, which for the entire
area amount to 29,123 tons.



B.G. Collected $3,500,000
Income Tax Already

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN.
Income Tax collection this year
in British Guiana is likely to

reach a new high figure, as al-
ready more than $3% million has
been collected to the end of Sep-
tember.

No Excess Profits Tax was col-
lected in 1949, and the total for
that year was $5,068,677.21. Indi-

viduals in 1949 paid $934,225.00
and Companies $4,134,452.00.

WHETHER YOU ARE A :



YOU DESIRE THE

SO

eee nee trae te



Rise In Canadian §
Will Benefit B. W. I.
Tourist Trade
-TRAVEL CONSULTANT

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN.

The rise in the exchange value
of the Canadian dollar will prove
a boon to Trinidad and the other
British Caribbean Colonies as far
as tourism is concerned, said Mr.
Ross H. F. Rudolph, Travel Con-
sultant and Hotel Representative,
attached to the Girvan Travel Ser-
vice of Toronto, Canada, in Port-
of-Spain yesterday .

He added that this would be
made possible to a great extent
if the Colonies concerned woulxi
advertise in Canada, the value of
the Canadian dollar in these parts.
“Let them know that they can
get more out of their dollar here
than elsewhere,” he added. He.
however, admitted that the rise
would have adverse effects on the
economy of the Colony. Mr.
Rudolph is on a tour of the Carib-
bean area.

“Trinidad has everything
necessary for making her a first
class tourist resort, with the ex-
ception of the necessary accommo-
dation, and this should be remedied
as soon as possible, he advised.



Maraj Attacks
Butlerism

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN

Bhadase Sagan Maraj, success-
ful Independent candidate in the
recent elections in Trinidad, has
attacked Butlerism. He says he
will remain an Independent and
denied having relationship with
Mr. Tubal Butler, or his party, “I
won my election as an independent,
and I intend to remain as such,
and will support anyone who is
working for the benefit of the
people”, he said. Mr. Maraj felt
that Mr. Butler’s speech at Wood-
ford Square, recently was ill-
advised, particularly in view of
the fact that Mr. Butler was re-
turned by a big majority for the
East St. Patrick seat, He did not
think he should have criticised the
Governor in the way in which he
did. He also disagreed with Mr.
Mitra Sinanan, who, in a state-
ment published a few days ago,
welcomed the British Labour
Party’s intention to nationalise
the sugar industry.



To Be In Leg. Co.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF SPAIN
General satisfaction was ex-
pressed over the Governor’s choice
of the Nominated members of the
next Legislative Council. Disap-
pointment was expressed, how-
ever, by a trade union leader in
Port-of-Spain, that the Governer
did not think it fit to nominate a

representative of these bodies.

Mr. C. P. Alexander, President
of the Seamen and Waterfront
Workers’ Trade Union, felt that all
elements, with the exception of
the trade unions were represented
by the nominated members. - He
considered it rather unfortunate,
“that the Government, in this en-
lightened age, when the trade
unions were playing such an im-
portant part in the scheme of
things, and especially because of
the new Constitution, did not think
it wise to have a representative
of the trade unions nominated.”

Mr. R. C. Duff Urquhart, Presi-
dent of the Trinidad Chamber of
Commerce, said that the nomina-
tion of Mr, Wight was most wel-
come. Said he, “Mr. Wight is
possessed of sound business ability.
He had a sympathetic understand-
ing of the needs of the people, and
I think the appointment should be
well received by all classes.

a

‘

USE











BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Britain, France, US
Will Ignore
German Elections

@ From page 1.
the Federal Chancellor there
repeats the suggestion originally
made by him on 22nd of March
tor holding free all German
elections on a-democratic basis.

The Federal Government is a
Government freely elected by the
people, and is recognized by my
Government as entitled to speak
for Germany. The documents
transmitted to you with this
letter will therefore commend
them te your attention and
to your government as _ pro-
nouncements of the German peo-
ple in respect of the grave matters
affecting their future and that of
their country.

The letter also said that the
first amd indispensable step to
achieve political and Govern-
mental unity of Germany was a
convocation of the constituent
German National Assembly .

To achieve this, the Federal
Government considered the fol-
lowing requirements necessary
for all German elections: ‘

Freedom of activity for all par-
ties throughout Germany, with
all occupying powers refraining
from hindering the formation of
political parties and their activ-
ities.

Personal safety for all individ-
uals. All newspapers to have
freedom of publication. and
cireulation.—Reuter,

MONEY SNATCHER
GAOLED

(From Our Own Cerrespondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN.
“It was a heartless thing to do
this old lady,” said Mr. B. W.
Celestain, when in Port-of-Spain
he sentenced Hamilton Cox to six
months’ imprisonment for stealing
$44.00 from the person of Eliza
Hussey. The Court heard that Cox
approached the old lady, who was
sitting in the shade of a tree at
Victoria Square, stating that he
could buy a piece of land for her.
Previously, he had seen her with
money in qg bundle. Cox suddenly

snatched her bundle, and ran
away. A watchman, however,
seeing the snatch, gave chase
erying “thief,” and Cox was
caught.

B.G.'s First East Indian
Lady Doctor

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN.

Miss Elsie S. Jaikaran has
gained the distinction of being the
first East Indian lady doctor of
British Guiana.

Dr. Jaikaran entered the Royal
Free Hospital for Women in 1946.
She is the daughter of Mr. J.
Jaikaran, Principal of J. Jaikaran
and Sons, Ltd, Chemists and Drug-
gists of Georgetown.









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PAGE THREE















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PAGE FOUR





2SYesesc 5

Printed by the Adverate Oo.. Lid.. Broad St.. Bridgetown.



Thursday, October i2, 1950



New Commons

THE departure today of the Speaker of
the House of Assembly to attend the re-
opening of the House of Commons is a

reminder of the importance of the Mothe:
Parliament. It was during the blitz of 1940
that the House of Commons was destroyed
by German bombs and during the inter
vening period the Commons sat in the
House of Lords. Now they will return to
the old scene even though under the threat
of another war.

It is fitting that members of Colonie]
Legislatures have been invited to witness
this historic re-opening of the
democratic legislative assembly in
world.

The parliamentary system on which the
democratic freedom of the British is based
is the pattern on which that in the other
countries of the Empire have been founded;
and Colonial peoples are no less unwilling
than the people of Great Britain that there
should be any change in the system.

It is this freedom and this spirit of demo-
cracy where the will of the majority be-
comes the will of the whole that supplied
the unsurmountable difficulty for the Axis.
It was not surprising therefore that the
Luftwaffe should have directed their block-
busters against the one institution which
stood for centuries as the Bastion of that
democratic freedom.

Typical of the spirit which has made
Great Britain respected among her neigh-
bours is that which has, in so short a time
rebuilt and refurnished the House of Com-
mons. Nothing could have been more ap-
propriate than that the furnishings should
have been supplied by the units of the
Empire and that representatives of Colo-
nial legislatures where the doctrine of free
speech and democratic rule are maintained
should be present at this grand re-opening.
It may well be taken as evidence of the
intent of the British people never io lose
their hold on the freedom for whith so
many of their sons have fought and died.



greatest



Remembrance

AS THE years go by Remembrance Day
brings its own message to every commun-
ity in which there are men who fought
against the Forces of Germany in the First
World War. Thirty years after this Day
was instituted the world still trembles on
the brink of the abyss waiting some event
which might throw civilisation back into
the cauldron.

Tt is not suffftient to feel that this must
not happen again. Those who fought and
died have their names and their memory
revered; monuments have been raised to
them. Those who have returned to us are
still in many instances unable to supply
their own needs; disablement and broken
health have taken their toll. It is of them
that we must think.

Poppy Day has been organised and the
Earl Haig Fund has become a national in
stitution in order that the maximum result
should be obtained from the collections tc
defray the cost of helping these men.

In Barbados the work starts in October.
Two dances have been held at the Crane
and a Book Sale in Bridgetown so that
funds could be collected at an early time.
On sale soon will be an Engagement Calen-
dar and after the Poppy Day Collection on
Friday, November 10th, there will be the
usual Dance at the Marine Hotel
November 25th.

A large percentage of the funds collected
are not sent out of the island but are
utilised to help local pensioners whcese
needs become greater each year. Bul the
parent organisation in England is also in
need of contributions.

on



the

|
|
F sa
|
|

RUSSIA
me |
| It Doesn't Happen So Often Now:

That Dreaded Knock
| On The Door.

| THE curtain had just vome
| down on the second act of the
| Romeo and Juliet Ballet at Mos-

ow’s 3olshoi Theatre when

omething happened which I had
een told never happens to any
inglishman in Moscow. A Soviet
iussian leaned across the stalls

id deliberately started a conver-
ition with me.

“I heard you speaking English,”
; .e said. “It is a beautiful language
enjoy

speaking it myself. But
get the opportunity. Just
w,” he said, “I am reading an
nglish book. Do you happen to
now it?” And he held up for me
| » see a copy of one of fellow-

‘avelling J. G, Crowther’s scien-
fie works.







That was the beginning of what,
w” me, became the most inter-
sting contett I made with a Soviet
tussian on any of my trips to
Soviet Russia.

Our acquaintance did not end
rith our conversation at the the-
tre. The professor—he was a pro-
sssor of metallurgy at Moscow
‘niversity—dined with me at my
otel.

I went and dined with him at
is priviligentsia flat. It was a self
mtained but rather crowded two
| nda half room kitehen and bath
| Yair, in which the son had to
feep in an entrance lobby and the
1ughter in the dining-cum-living

; 20m.
;

The professor talked freely of
| ‘s life. He told me of his son and
| jer daughter who were prepar-

g to study medicine. He trans

ted as his wife told me of her

1opping problems,

He told me, too, of the time

hen Stalin had come to inspect
ie way he was packing up a
onsignment of industrial exhibits
w the Paris Exhibition and the

cill the Generalissimo had shown
\ in his precise instructions on how
is do the job.

After the war, the professor had
| gone to Germany to superintend
the dismanvling of machinery
from German factories for Rus-

A =

£-a,

After I left I still heard about
tim through an Australian friend
\who had met the professor with
me, and who spent a week-end

WHAT DO WE WANT?

iy 8. E. SMYTHIES, M. ELEC.

THE
public

discussion on our
still being

current 3
utilities is

issues injected into it by sundry
latest being the
wages and
companies to

participants, the
question of
paid by the
employees. To say
would be limited
mpanies could collect from
their customers is to argue -in
reverse, from effect back to cause
It is no more logical than saying
nat merchants can only pay their
suppliers what they take in from
their own

salaries

their
wages
by what the

that

their customers, less
ost of doing business, which all
merchants will know is a com-
lete fallacy. They must pay the
market price for what they buy,
add whatever margin is necessary
and sell accordingly, or
put of business
It may
that the
wages, to
negotiation







else go



be taken for

utilities

granted
must pay fair
be arrived at by
between employers
and trade unions in the usual
way, with the Department of
Labour keeping an eye on things,
ready to use its influence if neces-
sary to try to avoid strikes. Judg-
ling by the comparative freedom
from serious labour trouble in
the past four years or so, the
} arrangements seem to be working
well, and it would be a mistake
for the Public Utilities Board to
rneddie with matters that do not
lirectly concern it, when doing
so would involve overlapping and
confusion
It would
Board to carry



be the duty of the

on where existing







BARBADOS

+

By Sefton Delmer

ile

»

F i

} Hi
if

| oa




with him and his family in their
country cottage outside Moscow,

Questioned
THÂ¥YN one day the inevitable
happt..ed. The professor, much

embarassed, told my friend their
meetings must stop.

Now why do I tell you this story

about the professor? Jecause
nothing happened to him.
He was not arrested and shot

or put on trial for treason,

He was questioned politely by
the Troika tribunal, told not to
talk to Westerners again, and

sent about his business.

All that is remarkable when
you consider that under the terms
of the absurdly wide new State
Secrets Act, almost everything the
professor said to us, harmless as
it was, could have been construed
as treason

And would have been, had the

wild and arbitrary secret police
of 1937 been handling his case,
instead of the much subtler

M.V.D. of today.

The new secret police, though
as ruthless, as watchful, and as
determined as ever to enforce the

should be a matter of co-opera-
tion with the companies for the
smoother working of their ser-
vices and the benefit of all con-
cerned in the long run, It works
like this in Canada, and while I
know some people say, ‘Barbados
is different’, I find it hard to be-
lieve that the basic laws of
human nature, economics and
sound engineering do not function
here.

I think it is equally mistaken
to regard the Public Utilities Act
as a step toward socialism or
nationalisation, because it should
prove to bea bulwark against
further progress in that direction.
If there is no real cause for griev-
ance or dissatisfaction with the
companies, there is nothing to be
gained by nationalisation. It is
absolutely essential that the utili-
ties be run as efficient business
eoncerns and kept free from poli-
tics, and this is quite feasible
under a Board such as would be
set up in accordance with the Act,

but almost impossible under
nationalisation
These arguments about wages

and other vhings not directly in-
volved in the new Act have the
harmful result of distracting at-




tention from matVers of vital
importance, such as_ planning
for the future. There is little
peint in crying over the spilt
milk of pa mistakes and acci-

dents, but we are al] directly in-
terested in what is being done or

What of they
People ?...2{,



ADVOCATE

Strictest Stalinism, becom
more adult.

They have substituted a policy

have

of careful discrimination fer the
old policy of liquidation,
Where thousands cf men and

women used to be taken off and
shot every month, it is only a
few hundreds doday.
Remember?
THE ordinary Russian in the
street need no longer fear a night-
time call from the police as he

had to in those four years of
indiscriminate terrorism which
followed the assassination of

Stalin’s friend Kirov in 1934

| Then no one was safe. It was
enough to have had the most
distant connection with a suspec!
for the police {to put you on their
execution list.

Provided he keeps his heac
down, does. not talk out of turn
in the factory, or let his wif
start grumbling in the fish queue
and does what the party bosses
tell him, the little man in Russ
need have no fears of Comrade
Beria, head of the M.V.D

But the priviligentsia, and par-
ticularly the intellectuals, must
walk warily. Though even here,
as one of them who has escaped
put it to me the other day, an
attacking newspaper article is
tending to replace that midnight
knock on the door

No Waste

IT is a wise policy. At back of



it is the realisation that:-

1. The old challengers te
S.alin’s authority are now safely
zone.

2. Russia cannot afford the

whoiesale loss of valuable brains
involved in a repetition of the old
mass executions.

3. The fame of the old terror
is still sufficient to bring even the
most recalcitrant to heel quickly.

The professor—warned that he
must stop his English conversa-
tions, or else—is happily preserved
to carry on his valuable researches
on steel alloys,

Novelist Soschenko, warned by
newspaper attacks that his drol-
leries at the expense of the party
are not being appreciated, at once
sits down to knock off a few short

@ On Page §












I Say These Men
Are Scared Of
Women

VIRGINIA GRAHAM
examines CLUBLAND
CLUBS— gathering of
human beings as well as the
weapons—have, it seems, ex-
isted since time was.

ihe

Long before the Greeks had a word for
them (whatever that may be) it appears that
men had an irresistible urge to get away from
women, and it is not improbable that the
troglodyte male, having beaten his wife for
giving him an underdone bearsteak, stamped ||
yut of the cave and went off to play a prim-
itive game of snooker with his cronies.

In a new, well-appointed volume* the
birth, growth and maturity of the club is
traced and
drawings and photographs most felicitously.

But as a woman, and an unsociable woman
‘ that, I find it hard to assess the benefits of

lub

es it were, I could find a resting place for my
luggage and a dignified cloakroom in which
to wash my hands, an armchair between
trains and a quiet a dismally quiet, cup of

tea.

{ never, to my knowledge, spoke to anyone
and I don’t believe any of the other women
who were there drinking tea and looking at
the illustrated papers had ever spoken to
anybody either.
ency rather than pleasure.

Men, however, assure me that in their clubs
everybody is very sociable and that the inter-
change of ideas is extremely stimulating and
revivifying.

I do not, though, believe it. I think they are
willing to pay enormous entrance fees and
huge annual subscriptions for the joy of
being in a place which they know, short of
in earthquake, cannot be penetrated by a
woman. Being in a minority, this makes
them feel safer.

I am speaking, of course, of purposeless
clubs, not clubs designed for cyclists or
philatelists or hockey players but just for
reclining on leather sofas with a whisky at

life.

the elbow,

assured of more reliable service
Those who want electricity but
have not been able to have it at
ell, are of course worse off than
those who have some but would
like to use more. I have seen no
recent announcement of a date
by which the plant will be in full
operation, with adequate reservea
capacity in line with sound en-
gineering practice.

It should be a responsibility of
the Board to try to enlist the co-
operation of the Company in form-
ulating plans to serve the com
munity now and in future as wel
as humanly possible. We have a
right to know that our interest in
these imortant matters are bein
guarded by our representatives,
and only this knowledge can re

store the publie confidence tha‘
has been shattered by recent
events,

If the present trend toward fur-
ther world-wide inflation contin-
ues, as seems quite likely, th«
question of higher rates will soo:
come up, and we have the rig!
to, assurance that any increases j
are necessary and kept to a mini- |
mum, One of the most promising |
ways to keep rates for gas anc}
electricity down is to expand the |
business and sell more, and |
there is reason
past policies had been more far- it
sighted in this respect, we should ;
be better off now and in less dan-



fashion.

illustrated with contemporary (

QUIET, PLEASE

There are, I know, women’s clubs, and
‘nee, when I lived in the country I-belonged | |
to one myself in London, so that intransit,

COFFEE FIRST

Most of the big London clubs in St. James’s
Street and environs started as coffee houses
where the literary lights, the Ben Jonsons,
Boswells, Addisons and Drydens congregated
o dispense wit and learning.

The coffee houses began by being public
establishments, but often the coffee drinkers
were so eminent and appeared so possessive
that an ordinary man desiring nothing but
coffee was daunted by such company.

Some coffee-house keepers desiring to keep
both habitues and droppers-in set aside a
room for the former, and soon this became 2
From there it was an easy step to
the formation of a club.

NO SMOKING

The first working men’s clubs were started
,in England in the middle of the 19th century
by a group of worthy persons imbued with
the longing to elevate the morals of the poor

Neither smoking nor drinking was allowed.
to think tha: it| Sverything was organised splendidly, every-
hing was fine save for one small but import-
int fact—the working man never went near

It was a matter of expedi-

\



pl

years ahead.

anned for better service in the
In the case of the

ger of higher rates before long }
We are entitled to assurance that | them.
no possibility is being overlooked When the working men’s clubs were

allowed to be self-s
exceedingly, and th

Lord Cromwell in a recent letter states
that the drop in revenue last -year makes
even more valuable the increasing support

that Haig’s Fund receives
communities overseas and
who by wearing a

radeship with the fallen.



Poppy each Remem-
brance Day perpetuate the pledge of com-



panies and



The Federation Of Primary

The First

Annual General
Meeting and a Meeting of
the Council of The Federation
of Primary Producers of the
British Caribbean and _ British
Guiana (Limited) were — held
at. Hastings . House, Barbados

on the 4th and 5th October, 1950,

by the kind permission of Sir
George Seel, K.C.M.G., Comp.
troller of the Development and

Welfare Organization
The following member organi-











zations of the Federation were

represented as follows:—

The Central Committee of Primar:
Producers (Jamaica) The Hon
R. L. M, Kirkwood

Dominica Planters’ Association The
Hou, H. D. Shillingf c.BE

Grenada Board of Agric re rhe
Hon. C. A. Ormond Phillip

St. Lucia Agriculturalist Associati
The Hon. H. EF. Be r, O.B.F

West Indian Lime Associatian (1
-—-Mr. Frank Maingot

West Indian Sea Island Cotton Associa
tion iInc.) Mr. HW. F. Alkins
Mr. D, J. Verity of Jamaica,

performed the duties of Secretary

Transport difficulties preventec
the St. Vincent Planters’ Asso-
elation trom sending a represen
tative. Mr. A. del, Inniss was
uneble to 2ftond as t! dele
of the West Indian Sea Island
Sotton Association through il]
ness. The hon. Rudolph Burl
who was to have attended
adviser to the Hon. | I

Kirkwood was kept in Jan

on urgent business. These
absences were much regretted.

Sir George Seel, who was
present throughout the first
session, welcomed the delegates
when the proceedings were
opened on the 4th; and Mr, D, A
Percival, Assistant Econonu*
Adviser and Mr. B. E. Rolfe,
Secretary of the Development and
Welfare Organization also at-
tended.

The Council of the Federation
unanimously elected the Hon
R. L. M. Kirkwood 45 its Chair-
man and Mr, D, J. Verity was
eppointed Secretary. The General
Meeting elected Messrs. Tapley
Bowman & Co. of Jamaica as
Auditors, thanking them for doing
the 1949/50 audit gratuitiously.

After all the formal business
had been taken, the Council dis-
cussed the possible repercussions
of the Torquay Conference on the
General Agreement on Tariffs
and Trade, and unanimously
passed the attached Resolution.

Consideration was also given tuo

the establishment of a Regional

Economic Committee, and of a
B.W.1I. Trade Commissioner Sor
vice in the United Kingdom, with
which is linked a more adequate

funds tor the Trade

provision of
\ Service in Canada
passed



on these



part

exercising
power in dealing with them.

a

The

Chairman

dictator
wielding a big stick over the com-

!
{
i
|
itn with the total cost of pro-
|
arbitrary



'
i , Electric Company the situation _ 75¢ new Act"should be dealt
machinery leaves’ off, and concern ™ pans siiuatl i stl oto eidilin <7 is i
: would be much improved if we baa re rk ~ ae
ducing a unit of electricity or gas, COUld be given some authentic in- WOU d help) to do this if all who
, Be : * formation as to when we may ex. Jin in the dis@ussion will re-
or telephone service, including all formation as to when we may ex ; sent
7 ‘ ‘ ie iil he coms hited frain from injecting extraneous
tems of averhead expense, divi- Pect an end to the occasional . °° ’ ee a :
‘ Nt cere ae ‘load-shedding’ that still afflicts us, SSUe* The alternative to the
dends to shareholders, and pro- 'ad-she , Seren arocmnaurdnitonl naa posed Board is to carry on as
, ae ae aaa 4 I have bee raitine for over ' arc is é i
v ined for panes € mpenattes - eer aekin ce Ay 7 ie fc a over before, with the companies free
, : so s ars ste g lectric
from British oi Secs ae : oe aes seat ctv a = wie to do much as ‘they please and
a: : = \ é s a aS Sto ; 3 he Com- yaise ¢ ; reening
from friends Alling the of is still dis raise yates at will, while keeping

pany couraging custo-
mers from adcing to its business,
and I should think there must be

It many who would like to do so if



us in ‘the dark as to the future
That method of running utilities
is quite outmoded. Is it what we
really want here?



expressed the





AND WHEREAS there is



Producers Of The British Caribbean And B.G. (Ltd.

of England where a man cannot, with a little
effort, avail himself of the pleasures of a
home from home, billiards table, library,
dancing and whist thrown in.

course, is only allowed on sufferance.
—L.ES. ‘

orting they flourished
e is now not a corner

He can even bring his wife, but she, of

thanks o: > derati ia 3 ‘ rea respectfully reques ras

Ger r ~ Sent end tee Seerehoneé fa vasa oy oy apprehend that all these Soot ee aoe aes ae oe ie
and Welfare staff for their ‘ ei Ni ee Anka ok “aed Stances into eerly consideration tii badaete Ae ce commen
: : SeatManhaslastth. ohiitlaw lea and other and to impress on Hi j 's Fi

ows Mphick tes are ee ce Heol gba cA Torquay Confer Goveraeneat Tesckiah tien Bere pny ier e eiste - comet
oot toastine Sin = Shoe further henuctioré oe ie me a tary of State for the Colonics Windward idsnte thee eae
much more difficult. erates of as early as may be possible 7

Resolution on the Torquay Con-
ference on GATT Passed

WHEREAS the President of the of the attempts being onde presentatives of the United AND WHEREAS the establish
Board of Trade made the follow build up agriculture and oi ces Bb cs tie Torquay ment of these two complementary
ing statement in the House 9! dustry in order to improve the onference on GATT. _ organisations is, in the opinion of
Commons on 27th April, 1950: standard of living of ‘nase mM oa nor Economic vhis Council, vitally necessary

‘It is a cardinal feature cf peoples and to relieve unen) and (2) a "Trad O ‘ for the maintenance and expan-

His | Majesty's _ Government's ployment, the possibility of Reres oe eee joner sion of the overseas trade of the

policy to maximise trade with further concessions in the wa: maken, mh U.K. ae Caribbean area and

the Commonwealth and to of reduced Preferences is 1950 bebe ace ae a Pere bee safe
maintain and use Imperia) viewed with the greatest alarm; ‘WHEREAS the Conference on & $a eee ie tntaletomeane

Preference and all other ap- AND WHEREAS such Prefer- ‘er Association of the British Commonwealth conferences:

propriate measures. At the/ences are already dangerously Caribbean | Colonies held in BE IT HEREBY RESOLVED

same time we are prepared, in low, and in some cases insufficient Montego Bay in 1948 passed That the Governments of
concert with the other Com- to prevent dumping of surpluses resolutions Yecommending th: Barbados, British Gui

Sener ee nee nes by ee favoured by large establishinent of a Regiona the Leeward Islands gir He

ed, to negotiate reductions of home markets in the ever vf 4 Lent Li ithe, s r a as 2 =

preference as well as changes currency controls being sand A Sle Comme a f ae ar to give aie
in tariff in return for tari? AND WHEREAS it is under— ¢ e United Kingdom; ee mtanie” Ca Ks ittes Remanal ;

concessions which we consider stood that it may not always be AND WHEREAS those recom Trade Conttniaaioner her vide n

to. the ( fat st. equal valu possible to consult all Colonies mendations were supported and the United Kinga wn their caer i
: AND WHI . it was 3 which may be int rested in any strongly endorsed by resolutions and favourable considertation
emphas zed in ie Touse on “ath concession which might be of a Conference of representatives with a view tc the provision
July that no cha ages in preser sought by other countries; of Governments, Chambers o? of their share of the hacoseaty
Mkt ‘or CG oe ear i ah ya i. Once Commerce and Primary Produc funds as early as may b
Maijes rove nent é e Governments of > > ir ‘bados ir ahruary . . died i {
United except afte several Colonies and Presiden. cx ee eee velthaes con Untelie a pau:

mst] Com cies comprised in the Caribbean AND WHEREAS the Govern organisations may. ‘oe '

alts nm : nea 8 British Guiana be ments of Ja: and British er: . Sines :






the serious





Imperial Preference;
AND WHEREAS in

economic
5th October, 1950. in these Colonies and

g that no further
view of
Situation







the rates of Imperial Preference
should be conceded by the re- the group;

known that they até prepared to
participate, the latter in respect
cf the jour Colonies comprising

reductions of

longer delayed













|

|
|

y

|









THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1950



ool ny

TO-DAYS SPECIAES

& CO., LTD. at t COLONNADE

Usually NOW



Tins S.A. APRICOT
JAM (2 Ibs.)




60 54
Tins OVALTINE (Large) 1.24
Bottles ALLSOPPS BEER .26

1.12



20



MATS

Green and White, Blue — 27” x 16”

Pedestal, Blue, Blue and White — 22” x 21”

Drain-board, Green and White, Red and White,
Blue and White — 22” x 14”

FIBRE

Nos. 1, 2,
Nos. 1, 2
Nos. 1, 2



WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.,,

Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

PHONES 4472 & 4687

LTD,





hy
i

SANTON

WATER HEATERS

models in 5, 12, 30 & 40 gals.
Also

HAIR DRESSING
EQUIPMENT

DaCOSTA’S
ELECTRICAL DEPT.






shy
RECEIVED IN OUR WOOLLEN DEPT. |
°

A Small Shipment of - - -

ALL WOOL BLANKETS

Size 60” x 80” at $8.32 each

in the following Colours:—

ROSE, PINK, SAGE, SKY, SAXE, CAMEL
and PEACH

— Also —

WHITNEY ALL WOOL
WHITE BLANKETS

Size 72” x 90” at $10.22 each

SECURE YOURS NOW FROM
@

DaCOSTA & Ce., Ltd.
DRY GOODS DEPT.





FOODS

Your Children
Serre LIVER

wr

To Keep
in Good Health
at Least Twice a Week

FOR YOUR CAKF.
RAISINS

CHERRIES

ICING SUGAR
COLOURING

GOLD BRAID RUM
ROYAL BAKING POWDER
CAKE DECORATIONS



NOURISHING

|
SPECIALS |

3 oz. Fish Paste @ .06 pr tin

14 oz. Fish Cake ” .12,". ”
16 oz. Steak & Kidney
Pudding @ 42.” ”

1414 oz. Sultana



Pudding ” 48.” ”
FRESH DAILY Headless Cod Fish
SAUSAGES @ .32 per Ib.
HAMBURGER STEAK



EMPIRE COFFEE
APPLES—ORANGES
MARSH MALLOWS

Order Early from




THURSDAY,



Jewish |

Cemetery
Cleaned Up

HE JEWISH vi
F Synagogue -L
cleaned up for the t
many years Darnaged
being repaired
Two walls are being erected on
both sides of thevv@adWaiy lead-
ing to the B.T.C. office. N
that a large amount of thx
growth has been
the ur he dama
to mar f.ihe @'d ten n

some are ¢

tir



remov



even-
nturies-

iated back
tenth and ei
can clearly be : ‘

While a labourer was busy re
moving the bush yesterday 1

|
ren at another part were pl
“Wild Indians” among a qu ¥
of vines still left standing They
were equipped with bow and
errows made from iimbs ef tam-
erind trees neart









yy tetenious stone throwing
is causing worry
residents of Collymore’ Rock.
Some claim that they can sec
the stones and the direction that
they are coming from bit cannot
see the person who is
them
A few told the Advocate yes

among

throwing




ter-

day that they are afraid to walk
the road because they may be
cut by one of these mysterious
stones

_ POLICE BAND under

Cap Cc E. Raison, will
play at the Mental Hospital at
4 o'clock this evening.

HE MAJORITY of elementary
children from all over the
island, as well as students from
first and second grade school:
are attending the “Globe” Thea
tre daily to see the film “Hamlet’ |

“Hamlet” has been running fer
the past 14 days A +boy from
the St. Mary's Boys’ School, who
saw the film yesterday afternoon
told the “Advocate” that at first |
he could not understand the pic |
ture but eventually caught on



He suid thet before he had
left he for school his mother
described the story to him so

|
|
|
|

that he would be able to follow !
the picture
LORRY driver from one of}

the country districts, who
was driving through the City |
yesterday, began to drive along
by the Fountain Gardens through
the area which is only provided
for buses
He did not reach far, The!
shouts of bus passengers brought
his attention to the fact that he}
was committing an offence. |
HARLES J. CHRISTIE of the!
Electric



Company reported |
that an unoceupied house. |
“Sheffield”, which is situated at
Bush Hill, Garrison, was broken |
and entered between Monday and}



Tuesday It is not yet known if}
anything was stolen.

C NEIL DANIEL, assistant}

teacher at Water Street|
Boys’ School, reported that tke
same school was broken and!
entered between Monday and
Tuesday and a quantity of bis-
cuits, sugar and carpenter’s tools

were removed
The total value is $62.55. The
articles belong to the Education
Department }
BICYCLE owned and ridden
by Lionel Greaves of Stur- |
ges, St. Thomas, was extensively |
damaged in ar. accident at Ash-|
ford Road on Tuesday evening.
Greaves was injured j
Also involved in the accident
was motor car T—115, owned an
driven by Theophilus Parris oi
Welchman Hall, St. Thomas.



HE MOBILE CINEMA will
give a show at Warner:

Plantation yard at 8 oclock to-|
night for residents of the Warners |
area of Christ Church, j
RIDGETOWN was dark andj
gloom; again yesterday |
evening and rain fell heavily in|
the late afternoon, The tempera- |
ture was 86 degrees Fahrenheit |
in the shade )
Some people were of the}
opinion that the dark clouds were |
caused by the intense heat. |
'



.

4 , :
What's On Today
Meeting of St. Thomas

Vestry at 1.30 p.m
Police Band Concert at Men-

tal Hospital at 4 p.m.
Water Polo, Aquatic Club at



5 p.m
Mobile Cinema, Warner's
Plantation Yard, Christ

Church at 7.30 p.m.



"HIGH AND LOW"
EXPECTED ON

SATURDAY fa

OCTOBER 12,



one of America’s leading capital-!puilding, on the first floor cf
ists, ae well as by the principal! which the “Advocate” Camera-
{oil companies of Venezuela. jman caught about 20 boys if

1950

ADVOCATE

BARBADOS
™“ @
Sits



HARD

AT WORK

4

and he sits in
Charlies McEnearney & Co.

Alley

nearb*

Spends Day
In Port





night

dos the same day of arrival. On
arrived too late
ansit passengers to see

this occasio i



Barhbadk satisfactorily They,

4 ‘ t permission from

«(i rr York to spend Wednesday
WITH PENS racing across exercise books, boys from Form 3b at the Lodge School are takings n

It brought 56 passengers, 46 of
whom were intransits.

The passengers nad a full day
From 8.30 a.m., launches
and rowboats were landing them

the Baggage Warehouse pier

Groups of them took taxi ride
to beauty spots of the island. Some
lunched and sea-bathed while
others spent the day shopping in
Curio sellers were mak-
‘asional sales

Chemistry notes dictated to them by a Form Mistress yesterday.
the chemical properties of water, and it did not
presence of a small frog in the class room

Venezuela Lodge School Students —
Has Creat Come From All Over The Wi

THE 312 boys and 15 masters of the Lodge School, St. ing
John, were at lunch when the Advocate visited that pictur-
esque set of buildings yesterday. From the big lunch room
came the steady hum of voices, steady chatter, occasional!
laughs and the tinkle of ware.

She had just finished explaining
seem strange when one of the boys pointed ont the





ashore



+} Cit

Mrs. Norman Howell, Actg. Ses-
‘etary of the Barbados Publicity
Committee, told the “Advocat»"
that that office was busy all day

Future

Economically —































| The same sounds, except for the —————-———-— B hake Jerse ae . a
Venezuele is g country with eee eee ea ig er« : f folders. Mrs, Howell was also kept
a tremendous future econom et a yen ae e a a ae ) via Fireworks ; busy giving exchange for Canadi-
ically, Mr Vance Rogers, for | ang shacols can cet “i 7 an and U.S. currency
the past vhree, years Assistant | : os pe rey ; is he Rn: 3i | C ;
General Manager of the Food|; 3.) yy... ee St. John ai O t
Supply Company of the Venez- Sees ca oe Ps i a 3 N ome | u \ mr . ¥
vela Basic Economy Corporation, |. Headmaster o School, Mr. N.Americans Should
told the “Advocate” yesterday.'|W._*., Farmer, told the “Advo-| Guy Fawkes’ Day is only a|
e@ saic ; : as : € cate er was on rm,} couple ol week away The; r
cause vot tnat this was so be-|cne Fifth, one Fourt hiras| majority of City stores nay ha} Be Encouraged To
and potential oil development as ae Seconds, two Firsts and their stocks of fireworks i tore ag rm
well as the tremendous possibili- | Preparatory Forms reoms are now exhibiting them Come l oO Barbados
ties as a result of the recent} To this school : nj
discovery and guaranteed de-|all over the West Indies, the ma-/ At Messrs, Bruce Weatherheai| ‘The best tl ing for Barbados
velopment of the richest exten- {jority from Trinidad. There are|clerks began filling the main!to do is to encourage Nort!
sive iron ore deposits in the ; 80 such boarders in school at}showease with large fireworks |American tourists who wouid
world in the state of Bolivar. | present. {shortly after mid-day yesterday |spend three or four months in th
Mr. Rogers arrived here about | Cricket Season |while the smaller ones wer island, Mr. , James Tilbury of
two weeks ago from Venezuela} The = cricket season is on ntjplaced in interior glass cases |Philadelphia told the “Advocate’
with his wife and family and j present, and naturally the grea- | yesterday.
they are staying at Cacrabank jest interest is now being taken i) were to have their showeage They ‘spend lots of money ar
: that game. Other games in which }filled include all the Knight’s Ltd |that is what Barbados needs '
Technical Help pupiis engage. ere football. and {Storesand Collins, .@bme 6f th ne is what Barbados needs, h
fe 4 . : tennis, plus other fé s ef ath-)fireworks on show were crackers |
akena hes a be tan tutiate letics. It is hoped revive Gower pots, matches, amber ele: Mr. Tilbury, who spent twe
, Inter-American Affairs. ierest in hockey irolights, starlights, dizzle months here, left for home durin
1s Government Corporation Mr. Farm.r> savi the hoc] | aazzles, roman candles aud | the evening, by the s.s, ‘Fort
dedicated to the interchange of |Pe@ds more class PNgae ay Te | bonne | mie dy
technical assistance throughout | Staff ae | Barbados ig a wonderfu:
the world, especially in Latin The buildings that make up the} The majority of local firework | piace he said, “but people from
America, He will be leaving for | Lodge School, with execption|makers went to work early last|North do net know anything
the U.S.A. in a week’s time,|of the Science Laboraiv:y, are o!a | month. Many have’ already |about it.”
but expects to be back here by | indeed, dating back to the tinejiulfilled orders with City firms] Mr. Tilbury said that he hoped
Christmas to join his family who| when the school was under ine|but one told the Advocate yes-—|tco be back early December He
will be remaining until the end |aegis of the Socjety for the Pro-|terday that they are still many |cxpects to settle here when he
of the year jpagation of the Gospel, This in- }more orders coming in returns
He said that the Venezuela| fluence is sti’l obvious from the |
Basic Economy Corporation was!church-like make of il windorys a Se ":
financed by the Venezuela Gov-|of many buildings, no. exceptinys | 2 a Td % © a
ernment and by Mr. Nelson |the pavilion, Z f Aon hi
Rockefeller, one of the grandsons! The Science Lab s only 15 ; r :

of the late John D. Rockefeller,| years old. It is a two-storey



nf
oa” ~\ ‘ei fe
S i & F ; ;
The Corporation was establish-| Porm 3b getting their after-lun h|

> é j
“A ”?
ed a little over three years 420} coaching in Chemistry. eS Lie
—a { =

and during that time, it had |

enjoved substantial success in| INJURED }

developing the agriculture of the | ‘Sarhos’ MaePheran of Tayrell’s

country, in improving the fishing . : Es aga 5

: sty ‘ Road, Christ Church was taken to |

industry and milk distribution. De, Skinner's’ Hospital yesterday

and in establishing wholesale and] | enine Setar te aa Tae Ole in

retail outlets for: food suppliers.) on accident with a Progressive ;
{’bus in the ‘Bus Stand shortly }

j} after 6 p.m,

The ‘bus is M
‘time of the ace
driven by Darnell Yarde of Christ







Your hair will be






532, and at the
nt was being



The Weather



handsomer by far



7. Church. MacPherson’'s leg was in- :

Sun Sor S48 ke i jured nov 4 os ae a when you treat it te

2 : 2 4 wen . ’ . .

. so { . 3 ‘
Miteg (Diet Qaarter) | Wrong Parking Cost 15/- ‘Vaseline’ Hair Tonic.\
Lighting: 6 Dim, 4 Clifford Phiilips of Thorpe’s Just use a few drops
YESTERDAY Cottage, St. George. was crdered

Rainfall _ (Codrington) by Mr. H. A. Talma yesterday a day... then see
07 in. ; to pay a fine of 15/- and 1/- costs ss
Total for month to yesterday for parking the motor car G—69 the difference!
in a4 ro (Max.) 84.0° F in a restricted area, Failing to
pedienthene (Min.) om ‘5e Er pay the fine in 14 days, Phillips Buy a bottle today!

Wind Directi (9 NE will be imprisoned for one month. |
in rection (9 a.m.) N.E



(3 p.m.) N.N.E .
Wind Velocity 5 miles per Truman, MacArthur will e
hour Try to settle U.S. Policy
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.87 @ From page 1.
(3 p.m.) 29,812 (3) The future of Formosa on |
which differences cf view

TRADE MARK
VASELINE ie the registered trade mark
of the Chesebr: d



are known to exist between |
President Truman who |
stands firmly by the policy
of a temporary neutralisa-
tion cf the island through |

ough Mfg. Co., Cons





Fined 15/- For |
Overloading |





| Noel Nicholls, a *bus conducter |
j}of Deane’s Land, My Lord’s Hill, }
|'was also fined 15/- with an alter::-

Japan on which the United |
States has recently started |
informal bilateral talks at}

“SEE THE DIFFERENCE PURINA MAKES”

use of the United States|\§_ 8 @ 88S eoeHeeweeeeeaes
Hilten Tull of Halls Road. St navy, and General Mac-| @ @ BRB @OGOQGSBSaeaeaas Baeaeaas a
Michael, was yesterday fined 15 Arthur who believes For- |}
with an alternative of one month's mosa Should form part cf 7 y 1 ‘
imprisonment with hard labour the United States Pacific | Pp U R I N A Cc Hi oO Ww 8 |
}for overloading the mector bus defence system | >
237 on Roebuck Street. | (4) The peace settlement with ‘or Poultry and Livestock |



The two consolation horses for
the coming November B:T.C
Meeting are expected to arrive
on board the s.s. “Geologist” on
Saturday They are “High an‘
Low” and ‘“Aberford”

Twenty-three series in the 2
Sweep for this meeting hav:
already been sold The next






eries to be sold is X

Thats why

you enjoy

j ative of one month's imprisonment ; Lake Success with interest-



with hard labour when he was} * ed Governments believed | §§ B | i oe | a a a Bases BBa a
! convicted of overloading the mot r| to inelude Asiatic ani} @ SB BEOLKRHBREREEREBEREEBHEA SB a ,
bus M—1332 on Roebuck Street | Pacific states as well 5
Both offences were committed | Britain, and through Jacoh |
on August 26 The cases were! Malik, with the Soviet

}heard by Mr. H. A. Talma, Cit Government,

Police Magistrate






Cod Liver Oil, richest
source of Vitamin A is
recognised as nature’s
finest product to build up
stamina and resistance
to Colds, Coughs, and
other chest and bronchial
ailments. REXALL
EMULSION contains
a very high proportion
(50%) of this valuable
natural oil presented in a
smooth delicious creamy
emulsion.

REXALL EMULSION
for your Child

at
Ra eR f G00) to take
Value for money

Now obtainable from:- KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

a Regular daily ration
of delicious creamy

J

MEASURE THE



INGREDIENTS IN

EVERY LOAF OF

J«R

ENRICHED BREAD

EMULSION

istance &

rowth

| pill build up res
help sturdy g

i

consistent quality at all times

‘Fort Amherst’.



which }

The “Fort Amherst”,
arrived here late on Tuesday eve
ni did not leave port an it:
bound voyage until last

The ship usually leaves Barba- |

With Baby
While Selling Fruit)

CHUBBY FACE LAMBERT is just over a year old |

a small wooden box on the shady side oft

Ltd., munching biscuits as his

mother Dolly Hutson tries to sell her coconuts in Hopes

Dolly is a little, activ woma
and though she does not let any
ene pass without suggesting tha
the sun is hot and a coconut wouk

be refreshing, she still finds timx

} to Keep an eye on her baby

She lives in Westbury Road an
e comes to town to sell She
has been selling at that spot nov
three years. She has tw
children, but they go t
and there is no one wit}
whom she can leave her baby
‘These are trying times,” she
told the Advocate yesterday
“People seem to underestimate th
value of 4 pint of coconut water
When she said this, her fart wa
somewhat anxious, for Lambert’
father is ill
“Bix-bix”
She never turns an
face to Lambert, though.
always a smile for him
one 1s



hool

anxiou
There ir
When ne
passing and she runs to the
box which is about 15 yards away
she says, “Lamb, Lamb,” yor
want “bix-bix" and when Lam!
Lamb gives his mother an answer
ng smile, he gets more “bix-bix.’

Hopes Alley is a crossing fror
juttle Street to Chapel Street
There is seldom much stir. It has
two barber shops, Outside an ol
shack of a building, you will sec



he sign “Ebenezer, Barber, Up-
itairs,” but you would not see
inybody come out whose hair is
trimmed if you stayed there for
ywurs

If you loitered around the
illey's cook shop, however, the
imell speaks for the trade

Besides the ta'lor’s, tinsmith
ind fruit seller's there is an old
weathercock like sign which tells
me there is a blacksmith’s shop
n the area, but there is no fire te
»e Seen nor the sound of the ham-
mer and anvil heard

Two-day Funeral

A hearse, centaining a offin,
‘cached Westbury Cemetery too
ite on Tuesday for the buriai
eremony to be performed

This had to be postponed unti
the following morning and
large crowd of mourners, mostls

connected with a Land Ship, could
be seen ‘,alking through Broad
street on Tuesday Night on their
vay back from the Cemetery

The hearse broke down about
tour times before it was eventually
towed into the Cemetery

Followers had to return to
Westbury yesterday morning for
the burial.

od | ee

uffer any

quick

teliet—treat painful piles with
medicated Dr, Chase Ointment

Soothes as it heals, A safe home
treatment for over 50 years, 33

DR. CHASE’S
Antiseptic OINTMENT





| ASK FOR
| And Demand

S&§
RUM

It is Mild and Mellow

And Bottled
— by

| STUART & SAMPSON

LTD.

Headquarters For Best Rum









yt

| ylow

Fully Fashioned high twist Nylon stockings carefully

examined and sealed to conform to correct Morley

standards,
EACH.





| BUY---



White Park Road. —





PAGE FIVE





|

WHEN CONSTRUCTING

OR REPAIRING A

BUILDING



ALWAYS USE

-EVERITE’

ASBESTOS-CEMFNT
|
|

.
| ‘
} A



SHEETS.”



SOLOS S OOO OL EF

i?

ig

lS

POLPP PPPS PSPS PFSSSOSSOSSS SOP SPS ESD.

BOOK

.
\%
-

ys
CAAOGOCSOOS

ed



‘i: ¥

CAVE SHEPHERD (o., [ td.

10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street

COURTESY

LLLP LLLP LAL LLL SPPED 8
s

66 K”
SHOES |

FOR

Â¥



4

COCCCOUS

4,

+

MEN

IN
and Oxfords)
BLACK BOX CALF AND VICI KID

SMART
BROWN CALF

STYLES

(Brogues



ODODE SESE GOO

| OUR WIDE RANGE OF SIZES

AND FITTINGS ENSURES A

PERFECT FIT. |

ieee neni eee

ASK FOR
“KK” SHOKS
They Last
Longer,
Look Better,
AND

Give Greater
Foot Comfort










HARRISON'S ","""2 |

‘
i : , ,
AAPL PLOO

————

CAS to







fo us ing





DURALIFE

| AUTO BATTERIES witH EBONITE SEPARATORS

GARAGE
(ROBERT THOM. LTD.) — Dial 4391

{

OE ee Ee


PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1950
é ai © > * '*

a

eo SSS

= FIGHT
| INFLUENZA















HENRY

Mentholated pre-war gra:je

(4% Pint Quality)

LIMOLENE

| : : .
Tt rade is especially effective
against FEVER and Feverish
Conditions,



24c. a Bottle at Your DEALER

OO
—

| SUPERB! |








MICKEY MOUSE

hat's what

hey say when

hey see

HE NEW GAS COOKERS

hey are just right
FOR THE HOME THAT PREFERS
THE BEST

ONE ONLY LEFT






eed

ORIENTAL

BS GOODS! (Articulos)
CUROIS, JEWELLERY,
SILKS, (Se Habla Espanol)

THANES

Pr. Wm. Hry. St. DIAL 3466









BARLEY

































NOTICE |
THE AUCTION SALE OF
COOKING BUTTER |

which was to have ;
caken place at DaCosta’s
| Warehouse, Canary St. |





A. §. BRYDEN & SONS warsavos) LTD.

AGENTS.

SEE, THATS HOW I KEPT
My JOB HERE ALL THES!

BY DOING THE RIGHT THING
sq AT THE RIGHT TIME





on Wednesday last will
take place to-morrow ;
Friday Oct, 18th at 12.30 |





BRANKER, TROTMAW & Co
Auctioneers





Ag WHO 16 THIS © Aout wo A
“6. KARRIS GROW Oi





OW, R ‘Dl WE'LL LOSE THE RANCH roth WIMPLE. I CAN'T | BESIDES, WITH WAIT HERE AND LET, ME SEE a
SHOT! {o) 'T PAY THE MORTGAGE P- TH ABK HIM FOR ANOTHER WHAT I CAN DO!
m1 i iC ONORROW! > : (ON. HE'S AL- ATTERED AND

Peanut Butter ..........

S.A. Peach Jam ........ 60
S.A. Fig Jam ........,... 52
S.A. Pineapple Jam .67
Hartley's Straw: Jam_ .60
CIADLES do. Rasp: Jam_.57
AES)

MCMANUS



PRIME
AUSTRALIAN
BEEF

Condiments and Juices and Wines, Liqueurs,
Extracts Squashes Ete.

Letona Tom: Juice .. .34

Silver Leat Pineap- °
Cayenne Pepper ..,... 56 ple fuiee ............. 39 sig ei Dry Fly sei in
Sun on “44 OMY cece cree 4 : i
Pakrika Pepper ....... -57 ‘ang iyine Findlaters Dry Club STE AK
| Ground Mixed Spice Al Fruit Juice ............ 28 Sherry | ....5:.:.5..50 4.00 :
Saut 1942 ........ 4.00
Mortons Curry .........- 47 Grape Fruit Juice... .23 au oe a ROAST
Colery Salt ous. 30 Three Bays Tom: Dreambuie ....00---ore .
PAGO iijsisarsseshesssvess 35 Cotnweca 6.00 etc.
Cerebos Salt ...........- 36 Cox Apple Juice ...... 50 aR ie hd < ie ye
Rose‘s Lime Juice Martini Vermouth . 2.
Bovril eegagiess $1.60, .90, .60 Mee 1.13 ee des ‘30 als o
5 \ Marmite .......... 97, .60, .32 Clayton’s Lemon .
a Bh oc oe 93 Jeffreys Stout .......... 26

Boy Squ
777 @sy, N\SS DORIAN! ) FORGIVE ME, YOU Lf a Wn HM, ;
ip Bs nee pene) LOVELY PEOPLE... GORGEOUS pan SS ea aan HEARTS
COME WITH OH, \HONESTLY, I HAVE (| FOR A SAIL...BUT hans N
S! | DONT BE \ A SPLITTING I'M GLAD I BEGGED
¢

a THAT yeNN, ete .f OFF... THOSE TWO a = a ES. , id 2 ¢ ; fi 3 7 j Milk Foods Biscuits Canned Fish KIDNEYS










Pi $2.21, $1.19 a ane Piet sizo | Maviair Red Salmon .45 TAILS
x Biscuits ........ ‘ :
Millo o.oo Fess 1.07 Jacobs Carnival Asst. Chum Salmon (Talls) .51 LIVER
6

Wane acccctcsesmere 0 uae 1.56 Chum Salmon (4) .... 28

Bourn-Vita ........000: 70 Cheese Biscuits... 1.38 Mackerel ...............-+ 36 and
Cogwierds Chub Pilchards (Talls) 96 sas

Hemo ooeccccccseree 2-20 Cheese Straws ... 94 otis mre F MUTTON
Afternoon Tea Bis- Pil i a1

Lidano Sweet Milk wilt e ccc Recerca 1.40 chards (3) 2... :

es a COCO oo. eseseeeeseseee 98 Jacobs Cream H —
Horlicks Malted Milk 1.14 Crackers... 1.52 ea pein 38



BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

THUNDREDS OF MILES OF JUNGLE, J | MAYBE AN ARMY FR“). °
THEY'RE SKILLED WOODSMEN~= a |COULDN'T-~BUT “¥ i oi
Lee | v ‘ A
















+EVEN THOUGH THEY
THOUGHT RIT’, AND |
WERE DEAD. WEVE
GOT To FIND THEM,








AP, ) ewe â„¢H) SO THOSE THEY LL COVER THEIR TRACKS. | | KNOW ONE MAN

sa) TWO THUGS AN ARMY COULDN'T FIND per

RISKED \ YOU TWO KIDS) GOT THE

YOUR LIFE AGAIN RANSOM><«
| FOR us? wee
\ [

Ee ¥ s

THEM IN THERE ~~














THURSDAY,

OCTOBER

12,

1950





CLASSIFIED ADS.

Sit etetrepenene

FOR *ALE

AUTOMOTIVE

Fiat
running order
Dial 3067.



Model

S659. Por

CAR
Geod
Farticulars:

0 HP. 166
Price

12.10.50—i1n

CAR — Sunbeam Talbot (194i). Good
condition. Apply: 4 Clifton Terr, Bay
St., After 3.30 p.m 12.10. $¢—1n
ee

CAR Ford V-8 Super Deluxe, in
very good condition Cash or terms
G. W. Hope C/o Water Works Office

jephone 3988. *,





or Tel
4

CAR—Ford Prefect 1947, good con-
dition, Owner leaving island. No
reasonable offer refused. Apply Capt

A. J. Press.
6.10.50—T.F.N

MECHANICAL

ee

One hand operated BACON SLICING
MACHINE. Apply B. V. Scott & Co..
Ltd., Whitepark . 13.9 .50—t.f.n.

ELECTRICAL

WIRE & FITTINGS:—
3:029, 7:029, 7:636, 7:044, 7:052, 7:064,
C.T.8. and V.I.R, in similar sizes
Also cord grip holders, flush snd tumb-
ler switches, joint boxes, wood blocks
and many other items. Enquire Auto
Tyre Co, Trafalgar St. Phone 2606

12,.10.50—t.f.n

10.10 .50-—5n







ELECTRICAL









REFRIGERATOR -— One (1) 9 Cubic
ft. Crosley Shelvador Refrigerator
(American). One (1) Year oid in per-
fect condition, Four (4) years still re
maining on guarantee. Phone 4447.

12.10,50—2n

LIVESTOCK -

Bull Mastiff, One male
excellent breeding, Call

PUPPIES
and 2 females,



Mrs. K. D. Edwards. 4145 E
12.10.50—2n
MISCELLANEOUS



FIRE-WOOD in stove lengths at 90c.
per 100 Ibs., and Cord-Wood, at $16.00.
Apply — Dover. 8131. 6.10.50—3n.
use “Ster-
as it cleans and

Price 1/6 tube
KNIGHT'S Ltd.
‘ 11.10.50—3n

For that bright
ia” Tooth Paste
polishes your Teeth

smile —

Ferrodic Iron Granules a choco-
late-flavoured Iron Tonic. The gran-
ules may be taken dry or they may

is

be made into a sandwich, with thin

slices of bread and butter. Price 3/6

bot. KNIGHT'S Ltd.
11.10 .50—3n



Owing to an overstock of ‘‘Anzora”

Viola we have reduced the large size
from 68c to §4c and the small from
46c to 36c, so buy now.

KNIGHT'S Ltd.
11.10,50—2n.





SHTRTS—2,000 Men's Shirts of guaran
feed wearing quality at $2.00 and $2.4)





each. ROYAL STORE 12.10.50-—7n.
“SHIRTS & PYJAMAS — Boys’ and
Men's Shirts and “yjamas ordered to
Measure can be delivered within four
hours, RELIANCE SHIRT FACTORY
12,16, 50—Tn

We have in s ock “Selto" "Dental

Salts which ensures sound Teeth and
heaithy gums. Price 47c hot.
KNIGHT'S Ltd.
11.10.50—3n
24 G. GALVANIZED. CORRUGATED
SHEETS — Prime quality 7 ft. $3.21 ~-







8 ft $3.60 — 9 ft. sheet, Ob- Provost Marshal.
tainable from HA IN’'S HARDWARE 28.9.50—?n
Store, Broad St. 11.10.50—4n ———
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE,
‘The application of G $. Millar,
trading as G. S. Millar & Co. holder
FOR RENT of Liquor License No. 875 of 1950 grant-
ed to Gwendolyn Harris in respect of 4
Se double roofed board’ and shingle shop
APARTMENT — At Coral Sands! at Weston, St. James for permission to
Worthing, one fully furnished apart-| Use said Liquo: License ,at a) wall build-

ment, 3 bedrooms, silver and linen. For

further particulars. Dial 8134, Alma

Lashley. 0,10 .50—t.f.n-
1951

FROM January Ist. “TNanQUT”
Gibb’s Beach, St. Peter. Fully furnish-
ed with every comfort. Suitable for a
couple. Particulars apply Wesley Bay-
ley. Telephone 2818, 12. 10,50—2n.







HIGH-ROCK,—Bathsheba, St. Joseph
for months of November and December,



Phone-4048. 11.10.50—4n.

HOUSE LASACETA — Brighton, On
Sea. From Ist. Oct, 1950, $40.00 per
month. Apply to JAS, A. TUDOR Ltd,
Roebuck St. 10. 10.50—6n.

HEATHFIELD — On the Crane Coast.
Fully furnished, from December. Phone
8385. Mrs. A, D. Herbert. Cordober,
Ch. Ch. 10.10. 51+—-6n .

“WINDY WOLD" Hindsbury Road.
Drawing and Dining Rooms, 2 Bed-
rooms, W.C., Bath = and Kitchen,
Furnished or unfurnished,. Apply to
Mrs. Z. Daniel, Shopkeeper, nearby.

10.10 .50-—3n



PERSONAL



The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my Wife OLGA DOREEN
ASHBY (nee Yearwood) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order
signed by me,

Signed SAMUEL V. ASHBY,
14 Swan Street.

Bridgetown, Barbados.
10,10,50—3n



THE public are hereby warned against
giving any credit to my wife GWEN-
DOLYN MEDFORD (nee Williams) as*1
do not hold myself responsible for her
or anyone else contracting amy debt or
debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me

Sgd. SYLVESTER MEDFORD
Kew Land,
Tudor Bridge
St. Michael.
11.10, 50—2n



The public are hereby warned against
giving any credit to my wife ERNES-
TINE ROACH (nee Depeiza) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order
signed by me.

Sed. MARTIN lL. ROACH,
Military Road
Bush Hall.
11.10.50—2n.
———

The public are hereby warned ageinst
giving any credit to my husband EDWLW
OSWIN KNIGHT, as I. do not hold
myself responsible for him or anyone
else contracting any debt or debts in
my name unless by a written order
signed by me.

Signed
BEATRICE KNIGHT (nee Sayers)
East Point,
St. Philip
11.10.50—2

LOSI & FOUND

LOST

ARMY DISCHARGED CERTIFICATE
~-Lost between Colonia) Secretary's
Office-Steps and Bus terminal, Probyn
Street, Pinder suitably rewarded on
returning to Advocate Advig Dept
Neme—CHESTERFIELD CLAIRMONTE
BOYCE, Army. No. L/S CA_ 6320,

12.10.50—








GOVERNMENT NOTICE

TELEPHONE 2508



PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE

THE Tea-Room and Library of the
Women's Self Help Association wil! ve
opening on Monday l6th October. Con
signors of cakes and preserves are
asked to send im their goods on the
morning of the 16th, 10.10, 50—6n.

NOTICE
“The COTTAGE GIFT SHOP — Are}

having their CHRISTMAS opening on

Friday, 13th October next from be
a.m, to 6.30 p.m. Crackers, Xmas tree
Secorations, children’s annuals, an?

teys. Also a very good selection of at-
tractive and useful gifts.”
1.10,50—-Gn

NOTICE

“SEALED Tenders for the erection
of a Pavilion and Communit, Hall
Ellerton Sociai Centre, St. George, will
be received by me up to 3st. October,
1950

Fians arfd Specifications can be seen
at Mr, R. B. Moulder’s Office at Messrs
Cc. F. HARRISON & Co., Broad St.,

Bridgetown.
K. MASON,
Clerk, Vestry of St. George.”
12.10 50—4n

NOTICE

Applications for 4 Vestry Exhibitions
2 for Girls at St. Michael's Girls’ Schoo!
and 2 for Boys at the Boys’ Foundation
School, will be received by me not
later than 20th October.

Parents of applicants must be parish-
ioners in straightened circumstances
Ages of applicants between 11 and 12

years,
W. U. GOODING,
Parochial Treasurer,
St, Philip

|
|

‘

|

|
|
|



|

at

}

EDU
rDw



ATIONAL





QUEEN'S COLLEGE
ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS
1950

The Waiting List for Queen's
College Entrance Examination will
be ciosed om the 13th of October,
1950. No applications wil] be
recerved after this date.

Forms can be obiained from the
Secretary, Queen's College.
The Entrance Exeminations for
Queen's, College will be held on
the 13th November, 1950, at 9.50
a.m. Candidates must present
themselves at Queen's College by
9 a.m., weccompanied by Testi-

monials+from their former Hi
mistresses, 5.10 .50—yn.,

1.



ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

GIRLS’ FOUNDATION SCHOOL
An Entrance Examination for the
School Year January—July 1951 will be
held at the school on Friday 27th October
1950 at 9.30 a.m. Applications will be
received up to Friday 20th October by
the Headmistress and must be accompan-
fed by a baptismal and a testi-
monial from the Headmistress of the last
school attended by the pupil.

Applicants must be between the ages
of 8 years and 12 years on the date of
the examination.

Parents or Guardians accompanying

| their daughters or wards are hereby noti-
| fied that there is no accommodation for

}

them at the school on the date of the
examination and that the examination of

‘applicants will not start until they leave

|
{
{

the premises.
H. ANTROBUS
Sec. Gov. i
Girls’ Foundation School.
8.10.50—8n

é

11.10.50—6n.| VACANT SCHOLARSHIPS

NOTICE

APPLICATIONS (accompanied by bap-
tismal certificate) will be received ai
my office up to 3 p.m. on Friday, 20th
October, 1950, for one or more vacant
Christ Church Vestry Exhibitions tenable
et the Girls’ Foundation School.

Applicants must be daughters
perishioners in straightened circumstan-
ces, and must not be less than ten
years six months or’ more than twely
years on the date of the examination.

Candidates must present themselves
for examination to the Headmistress 1
the Girls’ Foundation School on Frida)
27th October at 9.30 a.m





from my office.
WOOD GODDARD
Clerk of the Vestry,
Christ Church.
11.10.50—5Sn

Public Official Sale

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1904
(1904-6) 30)

}
|
|
|

1950, at the hour of 2 o'clock in the
afternoon will be sold at my Office 10
the highest bidder for any sum not under
the appraised value—All that certain
piece of Land containing by admeasure-
ment 8400 Square Feet situate in the
parish of Christ Church at NAVY
GARDENS butting and bounding on
lands of Egbert elch, of Mrs. Carol
on a private road called Nelson Road,
and on another private road calied/
Ventnor Road together with the mes-
sunge or Dwelling House thereon called
“Radcourt” Buildings, &c., appraised as |
follows:—The whole property appraised
to THREE THOUSAND AND FIFTY
PCUNDS (£3,050.0.0.) Attached from
WHEYMAN ARNETT GRIFFITH tor
and towards satisfaction &c.

N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on oT

of purchase.
T. T. HEADLEY,



ing with kitehén attached in Suttle St.
City din snim Pdi 2 -
“Dated this 11th ‘of October 1950.
Toi— H, A. Ti +
Police Magistrate Dist. “A’.
Signed W. DYALL,
for Applicant

ON FRIDAY the 13th day of October, ;

|

of}



N.B,—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “A" on Monday
the 23rd day of
o’clock, a.m,

H. A, TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “A
12.10.50-—8n

PUHLICG SALES
AUCTION

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

BUTTER

By recommendations of Lioyds Agents
we will sell on FRIDAY 13th Oct. at
Da Costa & Co. Lid. Warehouse Canary
Street

500 x 5 tbs Tins Cooking Butter.

370 x 1 Ibs Tins Cooking Butter ana
€0 x 25 Ibs Tins Cooking Butter. Sate
12.30 o'clock. Terms Cash

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.

Auctioneers.
10.10.50—2n

REAL ESTATE

FOR SALE OR RENT













large reception rooms,
bathrooms etc, Standing on some 12 acre»
mahogany timber lands. Apply te
Bradshaw & Company 10,10, 50—3n

IN Plymouth, MONTSERRAT, B.W.1
for £3,500.

COCONUT HILL HOTEL containing
drawing room, dining room, 11 bed-
rooms, 4 bathrooms, kitchen, pantry
servants’ quarters and garage. Full
furnished, and with linen, china, cutlery
etc, Situated in own grounds of 2 acres

For further particulars apply Paut)
Hollender, Montserrat.

10,10.50—tin

KENMORE — Strathclyde, a Bungalow
standing on 9,704 sq. feet of land, corr
teining verandah, Drawing and Dining |
rooms, 4 Bedrooms and all modern con~-
veniences including garage, Lawn and



October 1950 at aly



spacious yard surrounded by well kept



hedges. Inspection by phoning 2756
12.10,50-4n.

LAND — A spot of Land in King’s
Village, St. Michael. Approx. 3,000 Sq

Ft. Apply to Mrs, A.
Cot, Whitepark Road.

Olton, Vesper







269 Preference Shares of £1 each in
Searles Co-Operative Factory Ltd.

125 Barbados Fire.

The above will
public competition on Friday, the 13th
instant, at 2 p.m., at our Office in Lucas

Street.
CARRINGTON & SEALY.
6.10.60,—5n.

The undersigned will set up for sale
tat their Office, No. High Street.
| Bridgetown, on Friday the 13th day of
| October, at 2 p.m
: The Messuage o
og





r Dwellinghouse stand-

on. of land at

1,373 square feet
vian Chapel.
| Inspection

i Dre
!



on application to Mr.
neh, at the Joiner's Shop opposite,
any day except Sunday.

For further particulars and conditions |

} of sale apply to:—
{ COTTLE CATFORD & CO.
| 5.10.50 —8n.



Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
ment) Order, 1950, No. 33 which will be published irr the Official

Gazette of Thursday
2.
prices of “Oats” (Feed) are as fo



12th October,
Under this order the maximum wholesale and retail sellin;

, 1950.

lows: —





ARTICLE WHOLESALE PRICN) RETAIL PRICE
‘not more than) (not more than)
Oats (Feed) $11.32 per bag ;
cf 160 Ibs. 8c. per ib.
Lith Octobe 1950 - Ne : :

|
be set up for sale to

| Upper Roebuck Street, above the Mora- |



GIRLS’ FOUNDATION SCHOOL

There are one or more vacant Founda-
tion Scholarships at the Christ Church
Girls’ Foundation School. Applicants must
be children of Parents residi in the
Parish of Christ Church and who are in
straitened circumstances.

The applicants must be between the
ages of 10 years 6 months and 12 years
on the day of the examination, which
will be held by the Headmistress at the

© School on Friday 27th October at 9.30

am ,
Forms of application can be obtained

| from the Secretary, W. H. Antrobus, Hil-
/ ton House, Bay Street.

These forms must
be returned accompanied by a baptismal

1
Application forms must be obtained | certificate to the Secretary not later than
| 4 p.m, on Friday 20th October.

W. H. ANTROBUS,
Sec. Gov. Body,
Girls’ Foundation School,
8.10.50—8n,





“AN EXPERIENCED CASHIER re-
quired. Please apply in wriling to
D. V. Seott & Co. Ltd. Do not send
original testimonials unless subsequently

requested."
10,10.50—T.F.N,

MISCELLANEOUS

WOULD Lady that
tisement ind lives in
Send address ‘Reliable’





answered adver-
Constitution
Cfo Advocate.

12. 10.50—In .





MAN — Some experience in
position. Room and
salany, Hotel Cyc
12,10. 50—2n,

hotel
board
Advocate.

mâ„¢





—————

Aden
Alaska (U
Algeria
Antigua
Angola
Argentina
Aruba
Ascension ..
Australia
do.
Azores



(to Panama)

Bahamas *

Basutoland
Bechauanaland
Belgian Congo
Bermuda
Bolivia
Brazil

Br. Guiana
3r. Honduras

yr. North Borneo
Burma

Chile
Cameroons
Canada via T’dad
do. via Bermuda
Canal Zone
Canary Island
Cape Verde Is.
Ceylon
China
Colombia Rep.
Costa Rico
Cuba
Curacao
Cyprus
Cyrenaica

Dominica
Dominican Rep.
Dutch E. Indies -
Dutch Guiana

Ecuador
Eire (Ireland)
Egypt ba a
Ethiopia (Abyssinia)
Europe (except Gt.
Britain & Lire)

Falkland Is.
Fiji
Fr.' West A
Fr. Guiana

frica

Gambia
Germany
Gibraltar
Gold Coast Ks
Gt. Britain & Treland
Grenada
Guadeloupe
Cinuam
Guatemala

(B.A.O.R.)

Haiti
Hawaii Is.
Honduras
Hong Kong
India :
Indonesia
Indo-China
fran



T

10th October

sarbados.



Country of Destination



!
i
}

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

POST OFFICE NOTICE

AIR MAILS



Effective 8rd October, 1950, AIR MAILS will be closed at the General Post Office as follows: —



DESTINATION



Antigua

.

Australia
(all air)

Australia

*

(to Panama only)

Argentine

.

Africa

Aruba

Bahamas

Bermuda

Brazil

Br. Guiana .
Br. Honduras
Canada

Canal Zone.
Colombia Rep.
Curacao

Cuba

China

Dominica .

Dutch Guiana

Dom. Republic

Europe

Fr. Guiana
Gt. Britain



.





one > sass
TIME DAY | DESTINATION TIME } DAY
s :
| rs
8.30 a.m, | Wednesday Grenada * ..| 9.00 a.m. | Monday
9.00 a.m. | Saturday 9.00 a.m. | Thursday
11.45 a.m, | Monday Guadeloupe 8.30a.m. | Wednesday
11.45 a.m, | Priday | 9.00 a.m. | Saturday
Haiti ; .+| 2.00 p.m. | Monday
11.45 a.m. | Wednesday 2.00 p.m. | Friday
} 9.00 a.m, Saturday Hong Kong ..}11.45 am. | Monday
4 11.45 a.m, | Friday

11145 am, |Monday India rsh ++ | 2.00 p.m. Monday

|11.45 am, | Wednesday 2.00 p.m. ‘| Friday

/1145 am. |Â¥riday

2.00 p.m, |Monday Jamaica : ++|2.00 pm. | Monday

| 2.00 p.m. | Friday 2.00 p.m. Friday

|

141.48 a. Tuesday Japan .. 11.45 am. | Monday
9.00 nin | Saturday 11.45 a.m, | Friday
2.00 p.m. Monday Martinique .. | 8.30 a.m. Wednesday

| Friday 9.00 a.m. Saturday

opke es 9 Mexico ; 11.45 a.m. | Menday

‘2.00 p.m. | Monday 11.45 a.m. | Friday
2.00 p.m. Friday Montserrat i .. | 8.30 am. Wednesday

T (via Antigua) 9.00 a.m. Saturday

/11.45 a.m, {Monday

'1145 a.m. | Wednesday New Zealand .. --}1145 am, |Monday

11145 am. |Bxiday (all air) 11.45 a.m. |Fridey

BA eng ‘Thussday New Zealand .. _., |11.45a.m. | Wednesday
2.00 p.m Monday (to Panama only) 9.00 am. {Saturday

111.45 a.m, {Tuesday | Puerto Rice... .. {2.00 p.m. | Monday
2.00 p.m Friday 2.00 p.m. Friday

|11.45 a.m, | Wednesday
9.00 a.m Saturday St. Lucia .. [8.30 am, Wednesday

'11.45 a.m, | Monday 9.00a.m. | Saturday

/ 11.45 a.m.

1143 ain | Tuesday St. Kitts 8.30 a.m. | Wednesday
9.00 a.m. Saturday 9.00 a.m. Saturday
11.45 a.m, | Monday :

111.45 a.m Wednesday St. Thomas, V.I. ..| 1145 a.m. | Monday
11.45 a.m. (via Trinidad) 11.45 a.m. Friday
2.00 p.m. | Monday i

St. V t ..; 10,00 a.m. | Tuesday
2.00 p.m. | Friday oe 9.00 a.m, | Thursday
2.00 p.m. | Monday ' Tortola ‘ ., | 8.30 am, Wednesday
9.00 oe Saturday (via Antigua) 9.00 a.m. Saturday
11.45 a.m | hacer
11, ‘ |

‘ Py ting | Mantas Trinidad , Ks er

| i oO

13.00 p.m. ae Friday

2.00 p.m. _ | Monday Saturday

00 p.m, ~

| 2.00 Pay Eo U.S.AY ‘8 : a Monday

11.45 a.m. | Monday Friday

| 11,45 a.m Friday
2.00 p.m, M

| 2.00 Fei rae Venezuela “ . Wednesday

| Saturday

| |

| 1









Registered Mail is closed an hour before ordinary mail.
All previous Schedules should be cancelled.

General Post Office,

Barbados,

30th Sept., 1950.

EFFECTIVE FROM 11TH OCTOBER,



SCHEDULE
POST OFFICE NOTICE—AIR MAIL RATES



1950




















































Letter Post Air Letter Post Air
Rate per Cards —Rorms} Country jof Destination | Rate per Cards Forms
Vy oz. % oz. .
cents cents cents cents cents cents
: 66 32 12) | Iraq e ae 80 40 oe
on 20 10 8
. 44 22 — {Jamaica . = os 12 6 4
. 6 4 4 |Japan at ei +. 64 32 i
? 72 36 — Java “i »- 1 1.00 50 Saas
“4 40 20 12
" 12 6 8 | Kenya ‘9 +" i 16 36 12
ee 84 42 12
o* 96 48 12 Liberia ‘ 3 ak 16 26 1
+1 20 10 as: Tlbyg oy Soe nee eee 30 ra
e488 24 oe
Madagascar ‘a 84 | 42 a
.* 16 8 8 Maderia .. ee “ 44 20 Be
. 84 42 12 Malaya States... “ 84 42 12
. 84 42 12 Malta a +s a 44 20 12
+ 72 36 16 Manila -a ek a 80 40 16
+ 16 8 8 | Martinique i ts 8 4 ee
. 36 18 — |Manritius ie oy 84 42 12
aa 40 20 — |Mexieo os a 30 15 denis
as 6 4 4 |Montserrat (via Antigua) 6 4 4
* 16 8 8 |Moroeco .. rae sy 60 30 ane
ite 96 48. 12
Pe 84 42 12 |Newfoundland (via
T’dad.. oe . 30 15 8
on 44 22 _ Newfoundland (via
aa 60 3 12 Bermuda) oa a 20 10 8
‘s 30 15 8 |New Guinea a a 72 36 12
20 10 8 |New Zealand (all air) .. 80 40 12
i 20 10 12 do. (to Panama) 20 10 —_
; 48 24 = Nicaragua .. ses ‘ 24 12 ao
i 48 24 — Nigeria ie “F 60 30 12
i 84 2 12. | Nyasaland ne vi 84 42 12
get 1.28 60 _—
as 30 15 — {Pakistan .. j a 76 36 12
“7 24 12 — |Palestine .. A : 66 32 12
a 24 12 — |Panama Rep. ? + 20 10 --
ie 12 6 8 |Paraguay j es 42 20 —
ms 48 24 12) | Persia bs v5 ra 66 32 ~
S 60 30 12) Peru ay ; ; 30 15 —
Puerto Rico ss vs 12 6 8
: 6 4 4 |Portuguese Africa Ms 84 42 —
a 12 6 — | Phillippines a ‘ 34 42 «16
‘lh be 50 —_ !
w 12 6 8 thodesia .. da ; 84 42 12
San Domingo on ‘ 12 6 _—
a 24 12 -~ {San Salvador ag 24 12 —
es 38 18 12) {st. Helena ei a 84 42 2
zs 54 27 12 jst. Kitts .. $4 i 6 4 4
: 78 36 a st. Lucia om ne 6 4 4
4t. Thomas, V.T. .. “ 44 20 16 | st, Vincent zs es 6 4 4
Seychelles ‘a te 84 42 12
e) 84 42 12) | siam 3 Ry u 84 42 --
~ 72 36 12 |Sierra Leone ke ia 54 27 12
ae 72 36 — |Solomon fs. +? 1 72 36 12
i. 12 6 —— | Somaliland a4 s 16 36 12
south Africa re ; 84 42 12
80 30 12 |4outh W. Africa .. ; 84 42 12
oe 20 12 | straits Settlements =... 84 42 12
Pe 40 20 12 | sudan (Anglo-Egyptian) 72 36 12
ey 60 30 12° | Syria es a a 60 30 —
; 38 18 12 :
BS 6 4 4 | Tanganyika es vi 165 Be 12
ite 8 4 -—— |Togoland a a 60 30 _—
oy 80 0 16 «|ortola, BVI... ee 6 4 4
: 24 12 — 1|Trans-Jordan 54 27 —
Trinidad ‘ 6 4 4
vs 12 6 — | Tunisia ©... 48 24 --
bsg 84 42 --
ee 24 12 — |Uganda , 4 i 76 36 12
fi 80 40 12 ULS.A. Uruguay ‘ ; 42 20 —
xi 34 42 12
.| 1.00 5O Venezuela j ; 12 6 —
1.00 50 Zanzibar 76 36 12
66 32 Zululand 84 2 12







Previous schedules should be



cancelled.



HARBOUR LOG

In Carlisle Bay

Sch Cyciorama O., Lochlrg ar
Sch. Emmanuel © Gordon
E. Smith, Sch. Zita Wonita
prise. Sch Frances W
Wonderful Counsellor, Ser Lady
ieen, Sch. Mandalay U., Sch, Everdene
M.V. Blue Star, Sch. Franklyn DR
and M.V. Lady Jo

s
Cy
Enter
Sen



Smith



ARRIVALS

S.S. Moemerest, 3.087 ton
Hagiand, from St, Vincent

Sehooner Mary E. Caroline, 4
nett, Capt. Joseph from Dominica

S.S. Aleoa Partner, 3,931 tons
Capt. Pembroke, from British Guiens

S.8. Fort Amherst, 1.946 tons nett
Capt, Kean, from St. John’s

DEPARTURES
S.S. Byford, 1,109 tons
Tharaldsen, for Antigua
S.S. Fort Amherst
Capt. Kean

nett, Cavt

1.946 tons ne

tt



In Touch With Barbados
Coast Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies)
advise that they can now
with the following ships
Barbados Coast Station;

Ltd
communicate
through their

Aniherst, 5.5. Alcoa Partner, 8.8, Fotini,
8.S. Folke Bernadotte, 5.8. Lady Nelson,
M.S. Raunala, SS. Moonerest,. SS.
Argentina, S.S. Uruguay, S.S. Elizabeth,
$8.8. Here S.S. Frixos, S.S. Portumal,
M.S, Barfrost, S.S. Biographer, 8.5.
Alcoa Pennant, S.S. Belita, M.V.
pector, S.S. Randford, S.S. Norlys, 8.5.
Captain John, S.S. A. Mitchel Palmer
SS. Pont Audemer, 5.S. Planter, S.S
Brajara, S.S._ Liberville,
S.S. Elizabeth Aeanigan, 8.8. Dolores
S.S. Edvard Greig, §.S. Salinas,
Boskoop, S.S. Baron Ramsay, 8.8. Sun
prince, S.S. Oregon Express, §.S. Ponce.
S.S. Marine Leader,
D. P., S.S. Granadero, S.S. S. Rosa, 8.S
Trajanus, S.S. Sonate, S.S. Robert C
Tuttle, S.S. S. Larium, 8.8, Flandres, §.S.
Yamhill, SS. Nerina







$.S. Carolyn, S.S, Cypria, SS. Fort



tons

j
}
}




nett,

Pros-

SS. Taigete,

8.8.

8.8. Captain John



t

PAGE SEVEN

Seawell

BWIAL



ARRIVALS— By
om TRINIDAD
Esrain Pigg-Perez, Trina Pirbe, Lesbia

r, Newman Wilson, Leotta Harding,

Alma McAlester, Charies Mc-
Hughes, Doris Cansfield, Hannah
Efien Kelshall, Percy Seale, ivy

p, Joseph Roberts, Enrique Lopez,

Mergaret Corbin, J.ohn Adamson, Winston







arren, Alfred /strill, Grey Bergman,
en Forrester, .\uion Lissone and
ard Morrey,
vom ST. LUCIA:
Colin Knight, Frances Knight and
He'cnan Jules
From DOMINICA:
Cannock Potter, Alice Hilaire, Lee
Edwards and Mevtile Edwards
DEPARTURES—P, B.W.T.A.L.
for TRINIDAD:
Ruth Inglefield, Harry Inglefleld,

Katherine Inglefield, Katherirte Inglefieid
Jv., Jennifer Inglefield, Ruth Rabanit,
domes Whiting, Daniel Hay, Willan
Ferguson, Toni Tayler, John Coull, Louis
Wiliams, Dora Rameheran and Winston
Warren

For JAMAICA:

Nellie EXxmtage Mary Perrin, Joam
Stephens, Arthur Murtock, Muriel
Pleger, Robert Radnitz and Fred Radnitz.
For DOMINICA:

EBustace DeAbreu, Muriel Band, David
Mount and Terrence Hawkins.

For ST. VINCENT:

Thomas Davis,
Lionel Paul,
Vincent Sprott.
For ST, LUCIA:

Reginald Michelin

Edward Elliott,
Emmeline Riisseit

Doris
and



MAIL NOTICES

Maiis for Trinidad by the 8.5. Golfito
will be closed at the General Post Office
48 under:
Parcel Mail at 4 p.m. on the 13th of

October, Registered Mail at 8.30 a.m.,
end Ordinary Mail at 9.00 a.m. on the
l4th of Ovtuber, 1960

Mails for St. Lucia by the M.V. Lady

Joy will be closed at the General Post
Office as under:—

Pacrel, Registered and Ordinary Mail
at 2.30 p.m. on the 13th October, 1950.



SHIPPING NOTICES

MONTREAL AUSTRALIA NEW ZEA-
LAND LINE LIMITED

(MLA.N.Z. LENE)

8. “Gloucester”

s ails
Septeraber 7th, ta
19th,

Adelaide

Freemantle
September

Melbourne September 28th, Devon-

rt October Ist, Sydney October
risbane October 14th, arriving
Barbados November Lith
These vessels have ampie space
chilled, hard frozen and general cargo

7th

at

for





—



M.V. TT. B. Radar
Lucia, St
Aruba
Notified.

For St

Vincent, Grenada and

Date of Sailing to be
‘

M.V. Caribbee For Dominica:
Antigua; St. Kitts Nevis an?
Montserrat, Sailing on the 20th
October 1950





Cargo accepted on through bills of M.V. Daerwood For St. Vin-
lading with transhipment at Trinidad cent; St. Lucia; Grenada and
for Barbados, Britigh Guiana, Windward Aruba. Date of Sailing to .be
and Leeward Is.ands, Notified, ;

For further particulars apply:

FURNESS, WITHY & Co. Ltd, B.W.L, Schooner Owners’
TRINIDAD,
BWI Asso, (Inc),
DA COSTA & Co. Ltd, Tel, No, 4047
BARBADOS,
B.W.I Nee espero }
o
Co.
NEW ORLEANS SER,ICE
sal Arr.
Ki N.O, B'dos
$8.8. “LIBERVILLA” 28th Sept 12th Oct. :
f
| NEW YORK 8SRVICE
salle Arr.
som N.Y. B’dos
8.8 “BYFIORD" 29th Sept.
$8. “C. G, THULIN" 13th Oct. a ot



CANADIAN) SPRVICE

\ SOUTHBOUND
! Sails Sails Arrives
"ss WNaine of Ship Montreal Hialitay Barbados
S.S. "ALCOA PIONEER” October 7th October (10th Oct
3.8. “ALCOA PARTNER" Oetober 27th October oth woverites toth
NORTHBOUND ‘i
Arrives
Barbados
| $.8 “ALCOA PARTNER" October 10th For St. JOHN, St. Lawrence
| River Ports,
8.8. "ALCOA PEGASUS” October 21st For St. Lawrence River Ports,
$.8. “ALGOA POLARIS" October 31st For St, Lawrence River Ports.
These vessels have limited passengers accommodation.



Apply: DACOSTA & CO,,

LTD. Canadian Service,

ROBERT THOM LTD.—New York and Gulf Service,









TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Plastic Drinking Glasses for
School Children
Boxing Gloves $15.00
—Set of 4
House Construction Sets
Locks, Hasps, Staples

at
JUMNSON’S STATIONERY
And HARDWARE >



OF QUALITY &
HIGH CLASS

WOOLLENS

VISIT TO-DAY

THANI'S |

Pr. Wm. Hry & Swan Sts. |

(CENTRAL

OAS OEE APE PDOSGSES
in fi
> »
: NEW ARRIVALS &
% oS
® x
%
% BROOKS SADDLES %
ss EIMPEX LAMPS ~
3 SHAW STRAPS :
PRAM STRAP ,
* SANDOW’S DEVELOPERS %
x ENAMEL CUPS, %
a SAUCEPANS %
> x
‘, $
NEWSAM & CO. 3
y
AMA









Ir YOUR HOME IS NOT WELL

FURNISHED

it is NOT OUR FAULT
IMPROVE It NOWE

SUPERIOR China Cabinet in
Big, ain bec Mahogany
and Cedar, ‘eral more China,
Bedroom and Kitchen Cabinets,
Each = different Sideboards,
Waggons, Buffet, Larders; Trol-

leys.

BEDROOM BEAUTY in Bed-
steads, Beds, Vanities in Mahog-
any, Birch or Deal-Wardrobes,
Linen Presses Body-height
Cheval and smaller . framed
Mirrors, $1 up

DINING, Launch; Cocktail;
Radio and kitehen Tables; small
to Big Upright Chairs in
tredsured Mahogany; Birch; Oak
and Rush,

(DRAWING ROOM Suites
separate things Berbice
other Easy Chairs; $3.50
Desks; Book Racks,
ALL AT MONEY SAVING
PRICES

L.S. WILSON

TRAFALGAR ST. DIAL 4069

or
and
up

Real Estate
|

Before Buying or Selling
Good Class Property: it

Pays to see

JOHN
v4.
BLADON

AFS. F.V.AS
Phone 4640


Plantations Building

For Hardware of every Description
T's
THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)
Cnr. of Broad and Tudor Streets.


PAGE EIGHT

Polo Players Drink [RUSSIA what of the People?)

Russian “Vodka”

“HORSESHOE COTTAGE” the Garrison, made history
when it became the first home in Barbados to brew Vodka.
Early on Saturday last Count Tolstoi was observed buying
various fruit from the trays that line up the City alleys,
and no’ doubt he was then gathering some of the many
ingredients for the Russian “Special” which he made in
the afternoon with the assistance of overproof alcohol, dis-
tilled water, sugar, pepper, lime, etc., etc., etc. that were
set to boil in an electric kettle from the kitchen of “Horse-
shoe Cottage.”



















= +, Brewing started at about 2 p.m.
c or j but it was not until after Polo
WORRELL GETS’ that the Count decided that his
Vodka was ready to provide that
renewed energy and happy feel-
FIRST VICTORY | {0 rich Vodka is famous.
So anxious was the Count about
RAJKAT, Oct. 11. |the perfection of his national
Frank Worrell skippered the | ‘rink, that during the middle of
Commonwealth cricket team to Polo he left the spectators’ en-
the first victoryt of their tour to- closure to check up on his work
day when they defeated Saurash- which at that time was undergoing
tra by nine wickets with a day % process in a jacket of ice. His
to spare. satisfied expression when he re
Saurashtra were all Olit in their turned to the grounds clearly
first innings for 139 to which indicated that all was well, and
the Corimonwealth replied with indeed this was definitely proved
199. by the players when they finally
The home side were dismissed gathered at the Cottage for the
in their second knock for 116 usual Cokes, Ginger Ales, etc
and the Commonwealth made 57 that are happily enjoyed after the
for 1 for victory. trenuous chukkas.
The Australian pair Ken Grieves | Back At Play

and George Tribe added 114 in 10T! Philip Mayrard was back in
minutes for the Commonwealth’s play again afier an absence ot
fifth wicket, Tribe getting 77 in- some weeks, and iis accident

cluding nine fours and one six
Grieves, more sedate scored 29
India’s fast bowler Nyalchand
claimed six for 88 in 30 successive
overs.

doés not appear to have slowed
down any of his determined dash
frrie Deane had only been in the
island a few hours since his ar
rival from Canada where he had
Wickets tumbled fast in Saur- heen engaged with the Molasses
ashtra’s second innings. Sohny Commission, and like the rest of
Ramadhin took 4 for 26; Tribe 3 his brothers was on top form.
for 43 and Worrell 2 for 25. ‘John Marsh piayed an excellent.
—Reuter. (game on Mr, Parker’s BELL, hit-

‘iing a ball skywards from the

middle of the field to the goal
Hutton Looseis Up | post, Col, Michelin as usual)

straits inever lost an opportunity to
PERTH, West Australia, iforce his obligation as No, 2 tv



Len Hiitton caused ¢ Givecles get to the goal, but his shooting
here to-day by joining other WS not as accurate as usual and

many a ball went out that could

membets of the MCC party ir ave been a goal, Nick Parra-

their first practice since arrivin BV
two days deo and after a state-. “icino again proved that with a
ment from the team manager that etter horse he would soon rise to
Hutton’s injured finger needec |# top rank player, so it is hoped

rest. Hutton spent several min- that this promising young player
utes hitting catches around th will soon find a mount worthy ol
field , his skill and keenness,

A New Horse
“Bertie” Bradshaw’s new horse
confined | gave a lot of trouble and appears
in the morning to mainly|to be somewhat timid about en-
hitting and fielding on grass, |tering a skirmish — backing away
and in the afternoon to the bowl-!from a crowd, but he has plenty
ers loosening up on a wicket usec jof speed and will no doubt soon
recently in a State trial game |jedapt himself.
Denis Compton hit the bali] O, H. Johnson seemed more at
around, took running catches and/home on his Rascal, and can
loosened up with the ball. certainly get more speed out of
—Reuter him than it is possible to get our

STANDARD BRIDGE of his Montey. The new Pavilion

is nearly completed and will be
By M. Harrison-Gray

of great convenience to members

Overnight rain prevented the
team from using the net wicket
and practice was

Dealer : South, and visitors alike.
Game all It is interesting to note that 1t
N. is being considered changing the
3 A853 Club from three teams to two
643 teams due to the fact that this
3 3 i, 3 will give members an opportunity
w. gE of playing in one position all the
2 39664 time without having to constani-
; E z £ 52 > aie 2 ly substitute for other players
who are unable to turn up.
rare s. i a Competitions
@K Q107 With two teams it would be
Â¥aQs possible for the Club to have
Aiss keener competitions, as each team
would then have about three

AD example of at me players for each position so that

from match play.

South players opened One on every evening of play a lot
Spade and rebid Three of confusion would be saved in
noes ove on org finding substitutes for particular

jumped to Four Spades on positions, and also playing some

nee

the strength of his Diamond of the men in a team to which

honours. they do not Lelong.

ot hoch rooms West led Wednesdays and Saturdays are

; s Team afternoons for the men,
en Roe’. 34 while the ladies have Monday
S led to @® A at trick 3. an afternoons to practice, Unfor-
2 the finesse of ® Q lost to tunately there are not enough
2 West who ‘

returned ® 2. lady players to make up a com-
6 ag yn ty god blag plete match, so some of the men
, by picking up East’s @ J. A bring out their untrained horses
‘ Club atuack defeats the con- on Mondays to help make up an

> tract _, ig paee nis Bight.

2 partner on the biddin: N iefinite fe ae eae
2 o definite news as

; g trick '3. ee 7 received from the Venezuelans

» In.Room 2 East made the re their intended visit which was

¢ prelays tise care ty fal expected this month, but it is
when South | . " 5 >» private atches
; ing West with 36 4 2, hoped that some private me at

» South continued with @ Q can be arranged with some of

and Bast’s @ J had to make. their Polo players who mey
Leas ~ shortly be in Barbados on
London éxpress Service, holiday.

a

RACING RESULTS ard. Flower Path (Naidoo) 116 tbs

Time: 1 min, 32 1/5 sees
MEMBERS HANDIOAP, | MILE,
100 YARDS, E. CLASS

Sun Watch (Sunich) 114 tbs. |

2nd. China Doll tlutchman) 119 Ibs)

ard, Just Reward (WJoseph) 114 lbs,

Time: 1 min. 53 4/5_ sees

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Oct. 11. Ist

The third day of the D.T.C.

races took place to-day. Follow-

ing are the results: OWNERS AND TRAINERS HANDICAP,
“HANDICAP, 6 FURLONGS, CLASS F 1 MILE, 100 YARDS, CLASS A
ist. Toy Bomb (A. Joseph) 132 Ibs lst. Lady Pink (Sunieh) 138 Ibs
2nd. Pensive (Gonsalez) 168 Ibs. 2nd. Brawn Jack (Reid) 120 ibs

Grd. (Dead Heat) Goblin (Lutchman) 3rd. Fandhurst (Wilder) 115 tbs

120 Ibs Time: 1 min. 52 2/5 sees S
Millionaire (O'Neill) 122 ibs.] AUTUMN HANDICAP, 7 FURLONGS
Time; 1 min. 18 secs CLASS G
HANDICAP, Ist. Jolly Miller (Joseph) 150 Ibs

MERCHANTS

7 FURLONGS, CLASS C 2nd. Black Shadow (Gobin) 122 Ibs
ist. Way Home (Joseph) 120 ibs Srd. Black Eagle (Naidoo) 11¢ Ib_
2nd. Miss Shirley (O'Neill) 123 Ibs Time: 1 min. Jl 1/5 secs
3rd. Waverley (Singh) 118 Ibs DIRECTORS HANDICAP, CLASS D,
4th. Tuckers Kitty (Latchman, 114 1 MILE, 100 YARDS

Ine. lst. Waverley (O'Neill) 125 Ibs
Time: 1 min, 2/5 becs @nd. Millionmire (Claitchman) 104 lbs
JUVENILE HANDICAP, 7 FURLONGS, Grd. Pensive (Gonsalez) 123 Ibs

CLASS H 4th. Sunny Jim. (Persaud) 109 Ibs
ist. Just By Chance (Persaud) 126 Ibs Time: 1 min, 52 3/5 sevs
?na Goldnie (O'Neill) 126 Ibs The meeting concludes on Saturday















LESSONS! I WANT TO
PLAY THE DRUMS OR

Le! I DONT / BUT IF YOU'LL
aaa STUDY THE PIANO



BE ABLE To PLAY





stories with a good Stalinist moral

_The Do It Every Time ‘isons saith By Jimmy, Hatlo

YF ITCHY KNOWS
THAT IF HE HOLPS
OUT LONG ENOUGH, /-

POP WILL. COME
FIRST, THEN YOU'LL | THROUGH WiTH

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



@ From page 4 gories is still applied, as the Krem-

lin makes room for new settlers

who have learned not to grumble.
What would the chief grum-

bles of the Soviet people be if

» end them
When I come to think over what





STOP THAT G

COUGH ©) *











Very High-ups have been spirited| they dared to voice them? I ; isk po | VENO’S wr =

away during the past five years, am in a good position to tell ' saick! oe ee '

I can only think of one : Voznesen- you. Fer I have been study- < wend eee Proce.

ski the brilliant young economist] ing reports of many Soviet remedy soothes away hootee-

planner of the Politburo who sent citizens who have fled to the | ness and soreness; eases

economist Varga into the jungle West men and women breathing, and protects the

for declaring that the United} from every walk of Mife who | chest and lungs

States and the Western world gen- have made their way into the

erally showed no sign of imminent Western zones of Germany

collapse. and Austria, into Persia and esc tithe

Varga recanted most humbly Turkey, and even into Japan ra ahead”

and elegantly, and stayed. So and India. These are their—

senski, triumphant, has vanishec |

to nowhere. GRUMELES cai seme for i
Trainloads... * COLDS - BRONCHITIS, |

. res * CATARRHAL ASTHMA '
MIND you, this subtle gloving|] @ YEASANTS and FARMERS 7

of the terror does not mean that (who still form 60 per cent. of s

the police have given up theirjthe Soviet population ).—Collec-

hated system of informers, Or | tive farms, they complain, are run

that the forced labour camps are|chiefly by outsiders, with chair-

running short of m:npower. men appointed by the district

committees of the Communist

Party.

They are still being filled up by
trainload after trainload from the
newly annexed regions, from the Party members monopolise the
Baltic States, from the Polish and|best paid administrative jobs,
Czechoslovak Ukraine, and even|credit themselves on pay-sheets
from the newly won Mongolian|with workdays they have not
provinces worked, have first call on new

Here the old system of supplies at the village stores. _
criminate deportation by Collective farms break up family
life, because man and wife seldom
have the same free days,

@ WOMEN PEASANTS com-
plain that they have to do the;
heaviest wo-k, for the army and
factories clairn all the men who
are not invalias. |
@ WORKERS complain of inade-
quate pay, shortage and dear-
ness of food, and bad housing
They grumble about many com-
pulsory deductions from pay—the |
obligatory State loans, trade union
dues, the subscriptions to this
organisation and that, whith no
one dares refuse for fear of being
thought politically unsound,

They complain of the inflation
of administrative staffs in the}

|

indis-
cate-



Olympic Plans

Underway

BUENOS AIRES.

Plans for the 1951 Pan Ameri-
can Olympic Games to be held in
Buenos Aires next February are
progressing rapidly, according to
the Argentine Sports Confedera-
tion.

Over 4,000 athletes from the 21
American republics and Canada
will participate in track and field


















































events, boxing, skiing, rowing. | factories.
swimming and other sports, to- The Stakhanovite movement, |
talling 19. under which workers compete for

All expenses will be borne by
the Argentine .government. Ali
Argentine sport stadiums and
clubs are being prepared to house
the visiting athletes. Special
attention is being paid to food
problems in an effort to satisfy
the regional demands of foreign
delegations.

Special Argentine sports dele-
gate Gregorio Espinar is currently
in the United States conferring
with Avery Brundage, president of
the U.S. Olympic Committee on
American participation and will
later tour South and Central
American countries.

The United States has

a championship in the highest in-
dividual output, they denoufice as
a disguised speed-up device for
forcing workers to produce more
for less pay.
@ CIVIL SERVANTS complain
of the same insecurity. “We
care not take any initiative; the
penalties are too drastic.”
@ INTELLECTUALS express the
same fears. But doctors ahd
engineers show less apprehension
than schoolteachers, college pro-
tessors, journalists, and those in
artistic pursuits.

One young scientist speaks of
what he calls the “inner migra-
tion” among young intellectuals—
the effort to transfer from politi-
cally dangerous to politically less-
dangerous fields, He himself had
transferred to microbiology.. But
even that had become politically
infected.

@ OFFICERS resent the en-
croachment of the Zampolit et
political commissar. They say they
are constantly watched by the in-
formers of the secret police.
@ SOLDIERS from the ranks
complain of poor food; enforced |
isolation from the local population |
if they are in an army of occupa-
tion; the special privileges of the
officers.
London Express Service. .



report-
edly assured the participation of
150 athletes for the different
events,

—LN.S.

% Board Wins
|



i. :

Cesarewitch

L -
Handicap
NEW MARKET, Oct. 11.
The King’s three-year old filly
Above Board, on Wednesday won
the Cesarewitch Handicap over ¢
2} mile course, Ridden by E,
Smith who captured the race last
year, Above Board strode to the
front two furlongs
and outlasted a strong stretch
challenge from Lord = Astor’s
French Squadron Mount of cham-
pion Jockey Gordon Richards.
Above Board shouldering 108

pounds started at 18—1 in a 38
Horse Field and French Squadron
with 118 pounds at 100-8. Mrs. E.
Williams’ Harlech ridden by
Charlie Elliott was third at 22—1,



FLOWERS, BOOKS
& MAGAZINES

In Aid of Poppy Funds, #.30 to
3 p.m. on Friday, October 13th
at Emtage Electrical Co

from home





BOXING — BOXING



also carrying 118, The favourite
was Mrs. Z. Lambert's 10—1
Specialty which was unplaced AT THE

The King was not present.

(C.P.)

14 Nations At
Basketball

BUENOS AIRES.

Fourteen nations were expected
to participate in the First World
Basketball championship opening
October 23 in Buenos Aires’ fam-
ed Luna Park Stadium.

The Argentine Basketball Con-
federation has announced that
Chile, Egypt, Spain, the United
States, Brazil, France, Peru and
Uruguay have definitely confirm-
ed their participation. Tentative
acceptances have been received
from Canada, Ecuador, Italy and
Yugoslavia. No reply has yet
been received from Cuba, although
officials here believed that a
Havana team would come. The
fourteenth participant was Argen-
tina. —LN.E

YANKEE STADIUM

Sensational Middleweight
Championship Contest

TUESDAY NIGHT
17th October, 1950
at 8.00 p.m.

YOUNG

BASSIN

Middleweight
Middleweight Champion
Champion French
160 West Indies
12 ROUNDS 12

Semi-finals

BELFIELD
KID vs. KING
126 126

SIX ROUNDS.

Prices; Ringside $2.00, Bal-
cony $1.50, Cage $1.00
Arena $1.00, Bleachers 48.
P.S.

Union



KID

vs.

Barbados

Bassin will be seen at the
Hotel from Mondoy, 4.30

OOO

Rugby League Results

LONDON, Oct. 11
Tuesday’s Rugby

BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB

Here are
League results:

Yorkshire Cup Semi-final Bat-
ley 2, Castleford 2 (tie).

Lancashire Cup Semi-Final.
Oldham 0, Warrington 5. +C.P.

-—~ PRESENTS —
EVENING IN PARIS

NEXT SATURDAY
14th OCT.

at 9 p.m

The BIG SHOW &
DANCE OF 1950

SELECTING

MISS & MR. BARBADOS

All members local and

visiting are asked to join

the Fun, not a_ dull
moment is expected.

OTHER ATTRACTIONS

@ A CASH BALLOON
DANCE

@ PARADE OF GENTS IN
LADIES DISGUISE. A
Prize for the funniest.

@ GUEST ARTISTE FOR
THE NIGHT B.G’s Radic
Star Miss Marjorie Dey

@ Music for Dancing by
Mr. Meanwell’s full Ork

Admission to Ballroom 2/-
Be Early to Secure a Table

SOPHO NS



7 SEEMS LIKE
YESTERDAY I WAS
4% GNING SHUMACK
THE SAME TALK-—







OCGOSS



A E





MUSICAL. GENIUS IN
THE FAMILY, AGAINST
HIS WILL +++

| THANX TO “MOM, JO AND ELS

CINCINNATI, On/O

COSSSESOIOOOOSSO

SVCSSCCS$S0SSHSSS590064

gm

G
i



wy for the

whole family
with nourishing








MORE ENERGY. 800"
STRENGTH.--

Wipe STAMINA --+ ca
ENJOYMENT: ae wet
EN
B








salt, Wh Hy minutes.

_e

THE MARCH
OF THE
CHILDREN



Let your Baby, too, join this joyous company
and march to Health and Happiness on
cow & GATE!

From all over the world they come — a growing
army saved from sickness and disease —
sometimes saved from death!

And happy Mothers everywhere are saying :—
“There is nothing quite like this Food—
there is nothing so good when natural feeding

White clothes are whiter —coloureds are
brighter, with the rich lather of Rinso!
Easy and gentle, Rinso washes thoroughly
— it floats out dirt in record time ! Dishes
take on a new sparkle too, when washed
inRinso. So ifyouwanteasier,quickerand
better washing results — use only Rinso !

RINSO for all your wash!”

X°R_ 238-800-568



} For Reservations —_

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1950

















OPENING

SATURDAY
OCT. Mth
THE
GREEN DRAGON

POSSESSES EASES LSSSOPSSSCSSOOVIS SOSH,
5 4
{NEW STOCK OF
x
x
‘
! +
BYMIN AMARA HALIBORANGE
LIQUID PARAFFIN SYRUP OF FIGS
and
RUSKS—Baby’s First Solid Food
Also a variety of CIGARS
% a ts
$ COLLINS DRUG STORIES
»
6546606". SESS OS AAPA ©





An up-to-date Chinese Restaurant catering to those
who like the best in Oriental dishes at reasonable

prices.

Prepared by a first class Chinese Chef who knows
his onions.

NO. 9 BROAD STREET

Dial 3896





Liberty Voils

In lovely floral designs.
suitable for making cool
evening or afternoon

dresses 36” wide. Per yd,

$1.68
Liberty

Sungleam Crepe

in pretty designs
36” wide. Per yd.

$2.33



Ne



Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street












POOOSSOO OSS SSSSSSOSSO0° .
%

% RED HAND PAINTS
FOR ALL PURPOSES

“MATINTO” FLAT PAINT
White, Cream and Green

For Interior Decoration of Walls and
Woodwork.

ENAMEL FINISH PAINT
White and Cream

TROPICAL WHITE PAINT
Will not discolour with age

PERMANENT GREEN PAINT
For Exterior and Interior Use.

RED ROOF PAINT
For Galv. Iron or Shingles.

PAINT REMOVER
For the easy removal of old paint.

4456









«“g”

The Sign of
QUALITY

PHONE: 4267,

USEFUL
ITEMS

RUBBER BATH MATS
in attractive colours, cut to fit around Toilet
or Pedestal Basin.

PLASTIC SHEETING
for bright Bath Curtains.

CHROMIUM BATH FITTINGS

| PLANTATIONS. LTD.

pee se = ne



COLOOOS

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k,

2
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PAGE 1

%  PACK SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE Tin RSI> \v OCTOUIR U. MW HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON r MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY %  ( .w*p I SAN TO > %  :--" ft : ,*>^% i % %  ; Mfcj FIGHT BY CHIC YOUNG (1 i %  "% %  '-:' •S-yMy dfle fc ^^"* IT IIOMLY ftACtD OM OO0 Of BMT QUAUTIf %  Jlwatpaskfoe MORTON PEARL BARLEY INFLUENZA MrntholaU-tl pr*-war I" •• Pint Q'l LIMOLENE T I U ll C*peci-llv rTec1.v( i VKK and Fevwuh %  %  uone. i.e. a Settle at 1MB DEAIE SUPERB! .9 I OOKLHft FOB THE HOMI THAT I'REFFJtS THE UEST UNI ONLT llll A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS, LTD. AGENTS. ORIENTAL I GOODS! (ArUcuJea) I CUROIH, JEWELLERY. | MIKs ISr lUbla KapenolJ IIJWI s I IT Bin lir> SI DIAL | NOTICE THE AfCTtON SALE OF COOKING BUTTER which was lo have ukrn place at Di(tU Warehouse. Canary si on Wertnewlay last will ill*.pi .., %  to-morrow Friday O.t 13th at i 0 RHANKER. TPOTMAN A Co THE LONE RANGER r,i I -J an I I rK[ Tir. >d| U*0 MIDSi /SHORTY Wl01t.l CWlBE6rCJ&IH S\ofew %  mrw KSBSJ / *w.8BJK F -!LS 1 !K BY FRANK STRIKER BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MCMANUS 0** 1 •>fHO U< A*' BY ALEX RAYMOND Peanut Butter and Jams Peanut Butler 55. 35 S.A. Poach Jam .60 S.A. Fig lam 52 S.A. Pineapple lam .67 Hartley'. Straw: lam .60 do. Ra.p: lam .57 Condiments and Extracts Cayenne P.ppei ... .56 Pakrika P.ppr -57 Grcund Mixed Sole* .41 Mortons Curry 47 Ml Sail 30 Cer.bos Salt -36 Bovril S1.60, .90, .60 Marmit* . (0. .3 Juices and Squashes .34 fee iFORSi-JB ">\B. VOU %  LQ/ILX PSGPLft... ,-3NCSTLV, I M*/B A SPVITTiNO WAV I kCAOACHE.. THE PHAVIM EVEN THOU*!" IHEY f ITS A TnOD6HT BIT AND I HOPELEW WERE MAP"EVE .* JOB, MB. 60T TO UNO THEM. CAPTAIN. BY LEE FALK a RAY MOORES MAYBE AM AEMV K 1 -* aULPin-BC 'JtV. i KIICW OYE vi. %  :ii *< •MUNPKM Of MllESOFJuSGLE. THEY'RE SKIUE0 V.0004HEN — TMEVU COYER THEIR TRACKS. AN ARMY COOlPrlT FIND THEM IN THEM Milk Foods Taao MUo Vttacup Bourn-Vita Himo Lidano *w Cocoa $2.21. $1-19 1.07 Milk oiled Milk Letona Tom: Juice Silver Lecrf PLneap pie Juice .39 Orange Juice .44 Orange & Grape Fruit Julc* .28 Grape Fruit Julc* -23 Throe Bays Tom: Juice .35 Cox Apple Juice .SO Rose'. Lime Juice Cordial 1-13 Clayton's Lemon Squash .93 Biscuits Pk Freann Play. box BUcuiU £1.20 Jacob. Carnival AMI. BIKUH* 1-96 Crawford. Club CkMH BlKUlt. 1.38 Crawlords Club Chma Straw. .94 Afternoon Too Butcult. 140 Jacob* Cream Cracker. 1.52 lack Straw. .73 Wines, Liqueurs, Etc. flndlat.r. Dry Fly Sherry S4.00 Findlater. Dry Club Sherry 4.00 Saulenay 1(42 4.00 Drambul. .6.00 Cointreau . 6.00 Mar lr.i Vermouth 2.88 Vi Stout 30 I.Hroy. Stout 26 (aimed Fish Maylair Red Salmon .45 Chum Salmon (Tallt) .51 Chum Salmon (il 28 Mackerel .36 Pilchard. (Tall.] .36 Pilchard. 01 .(1 Herring, in Tom: Sauce -38 Frn.h H.rring> (Trail .36 PRIME AUSTRALIAN BEEF HEARTS KIDNEYS TAILS LIVER and MUTTON VEAL TRIPE fl .' '%  m&m



PAGE 1

PACE FOfR n XRR ADOS \nvor \TF. THURSDAY. OfTOBFB 12. 195"! BARBADOS . 1— ADVOCATE Tananday, Octet* I \*M loiBIIIIOHS tht Hou remind*) Parliam. thai the H %  %  %  I by Gfrman bon veiling p House of Lords Won turn lo the old m of another war. It is fitting that w Letnaslatures have been Invited t< tins hittork i dMnoeratic legislative ammbly in thworld The parliamentary hifh the democratic Ir* is the pattern on which that m th( countries of the Empire have bWD i and Colonial p nwlUing than the peopl. ,'.iun that there should be any chat i It is thi.s betdopl and tin cracy where the will iity U>be will f the whok the unsurmoun table drlhculty for the Axis. It was not MII : Luftwaffe chould have %  lr block busters against the one institution which stood f %  -i oentu i oj thai democratic freedom Typical Of the ipiril whkh ha Great Britain reapected %  mot hours is that which has. in %  %  rebuilt and refurniahi I -t <.* %  m moni Nothing could proprlate than thai thi fun I nga should have been supplied by the units of thu Empire and thai rep nial legislatures win speech and democrat. should be present at tl U may well be tain ce of the intent of the British people never to lose their hold on the free d om for winch so many of then nd died. Ill'lUI-lll 1*1 .1111 < AS THE years go by Ren %  brings its own i tn rj community in which :i %  a who (OU| hi against the Forces of i htrmany In the firal World War. Tl sfter tin.Da} was Instituted the world still treml the brink of the abyss waiting soft* which might throw civilisation back into the cauldron. It Is not suMhrient t< IIS must not happi hose who foughl and diod have theli names and their memory revered; roottiurjents have them. Thi i irned to us are still in many Instances unable to supply their own needs; disablement and broken health have taken then toll. It I lhat we must think. Poppy Day has been organised and the Earl Hai| Fund has beco m e a national In Sttttttion in order that the in should be obtained from Qv defray the cost "f helping In Barbados the work stai Iwo dances ha 1 I it •). Crane and a Book Sale m Bridgetown so the i Duld be colli eti d t1 sn early time. OJ sle soon will be dar and after the Poppy 11 Friday, November 18th, there will bfl the usual Dance at the Marine Hotel on November 25th. A large percentage of the funds collected are not sent out of the Island bul ere utibsed in help boal whose needs beccnii But the p Oi n\ In England : need of contributions, Lord Cromwell In I t States that the drop in revenue last year makes even mote valuable the incn that Haig'fl Fund ree commin. erseas and from friends who b> v brance I radeship witl HI T I!I1IA Whato/ihe ll li'iisii i llap|M ii So Often \on: Thai Dr-r.itl-rifi Knock On The Door tk-J THI i iiruun had town on I SI al Monr %  .. %  %  %  rou ipeakins I .lUtiful language enjoy speaking nhy. Jusl i sn retattna. an DO -u happen U> \> %  > w a i' F. G. I i"s Bc'*n\\r works. That wa* the beginning of what. %  r me, bocssno I %  .. oviel Russia. 0 nice did no) end ilh "in i • 'he Ihe* ;n lassoi hs t Mwcnw i .i dined with him at Lb privlUgsntala tint It was a sell |d t mi a half room kttetw n fair, m addon fee >on bad to i | ind ins iiigssar Is HM dli U St-ffoii llrluicr with him md bat family in their ountn cottaae %  ntskh I.-M.I [;ilki n •^ life I HH d ai'J't.'i M*ha %  #" %  % %  %  %  M. :. toe. the %  %  I .r the I' 'i and the in. > I. % %  tu on how Aftri •: H I ma to Oen uperlnlend rnjuns of fol Rut%  h i IK,, i net tha prats me, and ((iu'viiutied THFN on" inevitabta embarasseti. told m) h %  bout I tu him %  %  %  %  %  %  i.i II. .i to tall, in W %  %  AH that you cotuadar thai under I bsurdu wk* i %  thing the %  %  as treason 1 ; bean handling %  M ruthie-.-., H watchrui. and • %  %  %  more adult. I'M % h I a i>oiic n r< r ." %  ihiiiisaiMli I n oil nnd |l only ; %  %  Krmemhrr? THE ordlnar) ft" wan In the a niahlii had to in thoM' (• ur yaai which I Liaaaatoattoo Stalin11 Thin no one wiu laP onough io hem distant aaaaecUoii with Bor lha poUoe^hi put you on iheir esaouUoa ii^i Provided hk,-*-i>•ulk out ol turn lha fad L "" •tart Brumbling and dots what the party boavur all him. II m i a have no i ot Comradi vn Hut tha 11 % %  %  %  ""* P" r_ Ucularlj tin* II \ m d sttecking newspaper article u tandbia U replace that nudnichi knock 00 the door. No Waste IT is ., it ithe rasllaatmi I Tluold .> alii suttm %  onot affoi'i lha -hnuxlc loaa I vahi;ihl.hiam %  %  %  3. The lame of UM Old terroi i* stilt sumcieai in brine avao the moat rccalcitrai • to hod quickly. Thipgotessoi worntd thai h. Ip his Cngluh convaraalions, or afaH ii. earn on ins %  : labls %  It sOBchenko. i las drol. f the party arc not being appreciated, ut once %  ,'., %  f) Hi! 1MB. WHAT DO WE WANT? ic II. K. S>IVIIIII:V at. K. LC THE cum Ion on our iblic utUIUea i* still 'wing fl Hirurrii Iw a li'K <• %  •nu*aous ,., ,, i ted Into It I .1' %  dug the %  mi by 11 I ould >" %  Umltl 'I b) what thi' eoU< d froat argua In Dm aCfed bach to cause I. Is no more logical than saying nt Vnerrhants can onb DBJ 'hen -, in from !>ielr customers, less t'%  huh all a comI) must pay the they buy. idd whatever margin is neceasary ..TI.I Ball Mconttnsb/i o* else go II nuq ba lakan (t granted bat the utUlttOa must pay fair wages, to be ;nnv.il at bf nogotlaUon betv % %  tintoni In u ,;i\. with the t'ip.iitti„'MT of %  pins si i %  %  "ti tiniigB. ready to usa Its influarw i .ii | to tn to avoid suiki ing by ti ibour troubls In foui yesra . ivelL and H would !* %  %  • mfttaka for the l Hoard lo %  it do not -.' %  < u3 concern It, hi io would n ipirtng and i onfualon it irould he the dutj of tha Vnntd to earn on whet %  taclf with the total cod of prot) oi gms. Ice. including all tenu ol %  I fl wrong to regard such a Board as %  i sxen lalns sr bltrsrr with them. It ., matter "' tion with lha oo m pa n l o i rot UM %  moothar working of \ nefll of ,.!l conII works i while I pcoph sa]. 'Barbadoi herd to bclaws of i IUITO, acononu sound angli function : think II tutuea Act as a stop toward socialism or nattonalli at l it should I ulwarh agslaat %  r %  ance or dissatisfaction with the Ming to IKnaUofutUaatton It i> absolutely essenlitil that the utili.tit business lies, and UUl qtdts feasible LIIUUI %  ilounl such as would be sat up In h the Act. but nln %  Iblc under iiit wage* end other .'rims not diracuy in. harmful result of distracting ntlenuon fl %  i fbr the %  %  denu, but wa are all dbracu) Inks being done or i %  service In KM %  %  Ituatton %  much improvi %  %  may sx* na* thai i %  I 'i adding to Its i %  SO would like %  assured of mop Those who went electricity bu' been able v I it wouM hke to oss me a %  bj wnJcfl tha p w I be in full %  %  %  in line with sound i giueering practice. It should be a riMtoiisibilily ol the Board to try 'o enl' X ration of the Company in fom ling plans to munlty now ami In tutu %  as humanly possible \\ right tiki tii.. n guarded by off repr< i and onl> %  i can re put rn %  %  has licen shattercl b; events. If the prasi %  ard tm ther world-wide InfUUon COOtll uca, as % %  Ikely, tin i come up. ami . %  %  Sate thi! ..n> .mum. One of the mot'. ways to keep rak %  business and ill mon H.-n ireason lo think tha: ir past policies had been mine farsighted in the TI ba lietter off n" A %  K'r of higl We are entith I i eursnee that no possibility b U-nuf ow n Ac*should u .,., would help |o do thll f ,.11 who loin in tn 8U will iv%  orcpoacd Bojird Is to earr I the) pktaec and raise rates at 11. wh %  to the future, 1 lunning utllltlc is unite outmoded la It inl here" %  a-^I Nay These Men i Are Scared Of Women \ IKI.IM | (.KAIIAM examines I 1 BLAND h.miaii betagi " well as the weapons—have, it seems, existed since tune wa*. -lore the Creeks had a word for i i it appears that get away from end it is not lmpmbable that the te male, having beaten his wife for ij.viii(! him an underdone bearsteak. stamped ,ut f the cave and went oft* to play a primitive game of snuoker with his cronies. In a new, well-appointed volume* the rth. growth and maturity of the club ll • accd and illustrated with contemporary *srlngi "ml photographs most felicitously But as a woman, and an unsociable woman : that. I Hrnl it hard to assess the benefits of ub life. QUIET, PI-EASE There are. I know, women's clubs, and ice. when I lived in the country I belonged i one myself in London, so that intransit. M it were, I could tind a resting place for my '-.iggage and a dignified cloakroom in which %  • wash my hands, an armchair between 'rains and a quiet a dismally quiet, cup of to my knowledge, spoke to anyone and I don't believe any of the other women %  /ho were there drinking tea and looking at the illustrated papers had ever spoken to anybody either. It was a matter of expediency rather than pleasure. Men. however, assure me that in their clubs Ever y bod y is very sociable and that the interchangej of ideas is exlremely stimulating and revivifying. I do not. though, believe it. I think they are %  Tilling to pay enormous entrance fees and mine annual subscriptions for the joy of sing in a place which they know, short of quake, cannot be penetrated by a ..-nmun. Being in a minority, this makes cm feel safer. 1 am speaking, of course, of purposeless tot clubs designed fur cyclists or philatelists or hockey players but just for reclining on leather sofas with a whisky at •he elbow. COFFEE F1KST Most of the big London clubs in St. James's iteet and environs started as coffee houses where the literary lights, the Ben Jonsons, Bosv/ella, Addisons and Drydens congregated l M Wit tJbd learning. The coffee houses began by being publie establishments, but often the coffee drinker*were s<> eminent and appeared so possessive rdtnary man desiring nothing but •is daunted by Mich company. Some coffee-house keepers desiring to keep ">tli habitues and dn.ppcrs-in set aside a 'in I'd the IMI met. end soon this becam* a i From there it was an easy step to i mation ol a club. NO SMOKING • The Brit working men's clubs were started i I in the middle of the 19th century raup of worthy persons imbued with the longing to elevate the morals of the poor Neither smoking nor drinking was allowed. was organised splendidly, everyi thing was tine save for one small but import the working man never went near them. When the working men's clubs w D. v. SCOTT TO-DAY'S SPECIALS a co.. LTD. at the COLONNADE Isu.lly NOW Tins S A APKICOT JAM 12 DM.) .611 VI Tins OVAI.TINL U-ariic) 1.24 1.12 Blllc AI.I.SOITS BKKIl .26 .20 M IhK is |ly. and thffe is now nol a come if England when a man cannot, with a little effort, avail himself of the pleasures of a rom home, billiards table, library dancing and whist thrown in. even bring his wife, but she, of la onlv allowed on sufferance. -I.I..S MATS Rl'RBKK Green and White. Blur — 27" x 16" Pedestal. Blue. Blue and White — 22" x 21" Drain-board. Green and While. Red and White. Blue and White — 22" x 14" FIBRE Nos. 1, 2. & 3, Plain No. 1. 2 & 3, Figured Nos. 1. 2 & 3. C.L.S. WILKINSON & IIAYNES CO.. LTD. Successors To C. S. PITCHER & CO. PHONES 4472 & 4687 SANTON WATER HEATERS models in 5, 12. 30 & 4(1 gals. Aho HAIR DRESSING EQUIPMENT DaCOSTA'S ELECTRICAL llll'l. RECEIVED IN OUR WOOLLEN DEPT. A Small Shipment of ALL WOOL BLANKETS Siie 60" x 80" at 18.32 each S. in the following Colours:— ROSE, PINK, SAGE. SKV, SAXE. CAMEL and PEACH WHITNEY ALL WOOL WHITE BLANKETS Size 72" x 90" at *10.22 each SECURE YOURS NOW FROM • Da COST A & < •.. I M DRY GOODS DEPT. The Fd,m.i„.. OI Primary Praiacan m The Mitel (aria**.. % m | B ii. (Lte.l The >n MeatUu) %  of Primary !' %  .1 % %  Outana (Limited) m nt Hahliiig-> H mi the
pment nnd Welfare Orgei The feOowtrii n m bei %  represented ;IN follows:— •n,* Oaatral I Prudurt-ra. Ulania % %  H L. at Kin %  %  -, I. ajoa C A i at i %  i i %  Mr. D performed Ihe d %  %  %  ml ion tron tatsve. Mr A of the W i %  neaa. Tl* S vtoer %  Kent bnsine. Thr rare much regret led. Sir Georc Svx-t. who was present throutfiout the first ..eleomed the dele^itea when the prt-eeedlasjs wefi %  ; Mr. B E Itolfr Devi Doment snd %  leo el %  0 ihe Koo R L. M. 1 \n Its Chn M> I) 1 V. S Messrs Tap* v ., Co <>f Jamaica as ^ thanking them fur duni£ Ml audit gratu After all the formal business i ..a been like i, the o tu vusaod Iho possible repemunlora rquay (Nmierence on lha i menl W I %  %  %  f a Conference ol representatives tibers o! Ci mmeree and llimsry Produc ei held Februsrv ISIS; %  Honduras have Included thnsfceasary provision of funds Ln their buditeu f. r the current Financial Year, and the Governments of Trinidad and the > Island, have mad<* It known thai they are prepared l" participate, the latter In respect i f the IOUT Colonies coniprtslnw 'he group; AND WHEItFAS the establish thess two cimplementnrorganisations Is, in the opinion n .his Council, viiallv nece**i.r> tor the maintenance and exran: ion iif the overseas trade of thi llrin*h Caribbean area an BrlUsh Ouians, and to the sate Kuardlng of the trading Interest of the area it %  it**rnattonal an wealth conference*; HE IT HEREBY RESOLVssD That the Governments < Harbadns. British Oulana an the Leeu'ard Islands be re.-•pectfully requested to ghre lh establishment of a Region JI nitee and Trade < Service their aan %  tod havourabes ^msidsasitlor t^e provtsloi I %  hart of the necessn' funds as early as may b possible, m order that setlin up these two urgently neeess.': orfanisations may ba n longer delayed. LOOK AT THESE NOURISHING FOODS fm aatap Ynur i'hihlrvn in 40Maf HvttUh Svrr*' MVEtt at r-s. sTaVafsM HWIf FOR YOUR CAKE KAISINS < HF-RRIES HINti SI OM t 1)1 ill I. IM. GOLD BKA1I. KIM ROVAI. RAKING POWDEK CAMS I>HOK\III'SFRESH DAILY SAI'SAfil | II \MII1 1M.I It -I I \K I MriRI < oi in \i-i-i i -. on MOI 1 MARSH MAI I n 14 os. Fish Cske I? 16 os Sink A Kidney Pudding .4* " 11 1 i.' *>uliana %  -I.II.L.UK 4S Bssaeaass CM !% %  I



PAGE 1

TiirRSD.w. OfTonrn 12, 1950 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN I CLASSIFIED ADS. '"* !" !" "fLfPHCNE ISM roit V%Lfi U lOMOTlVK CAB Good ni'niv( i' km Dial SoB7 CAII til I* I hi AflM 3 p m %  Terr Bay II 10 In CAM For.1 SlOaeSI 1-47. good con,. diiit'ti Ownei leaving "Und. N IW.4UI4* offer refoeed Apply Cap. A J Preaa • 10 SO—T r N MKOIAMCAI, m& MM 1 paw tcniNE Apply I ) . WAllCPTK 1 scon a> Co 1] a SO l.f.n IXECTKICAL %  XfXTHU'AI wutr. %  30M T <>. I MO. 7 0M. IW, 7:BB. era. gad ... Alao cord gun hoinvra ft. -f nnd lumbbteclu Tyre Co 1 %  ., %  La KnuocnATOR — on. fl Croalev Shelvador %  American. ON 1 Yeai fee COMHU V roaming nn pmnlM Phone **4l tl 10 5A—?n LIVriSTOlK MIS( El I AMOI'S FIR*.WOOD ; par 100 lb. ai Apply — Dover 8131 length., ai SOc %  Wood at 11400 10 50 in For thai bright -mile (MO "*. Ilia" Tooth Peate aa It clean* a poli.he. your Teeth Price I • tut, KNIC.HTS LM 11 10 -s 1*1 HI.H NOTICES NOTICE W 1 SaV-On NOTM I • The <*' am SHOP — *.rc h-ving their LIIKlnlMA* opening o" Fr.da... Ih '" iij.1011 *. . Oaarajt -HI 1 received by ror up to 31*1 October. ; I Una arid Spwlrlctriioi-. can 1* M" HARRISON I ENTRANCE EXAMINATION 'I IOLNUATION M IU111I A Entrance Examination foe the fidiooi Voor Jonuoiy-July Itsi will u lie., al the school on Friday 31th Oetobct ttO al t0 a.m. Application. *HI be Friday SOUi October by ii ami mint bo ncmirow Iko Haadmn %  bo U 1 NOTICE %  % %  %  %  .. %  ml 1 for Fka at Ihe Boy Sc'nol, will be inrivnl I UttOt than JOlh October P-ront. of oppllcatn. mu.l b porUtiiin.tr in n:raigntmcd clrcunulancoa entrant! M>m II and It W U momal from tha HradmUtroM of o IMI ~ ttt*>l attrndnl by the pupil Applicant, rniul bo botwoon tho .1 roan i>d 11 roan on th? date of %  %  motion. I'nicnt* or Ouordiam arcompanyino Iholf rtauoMvii or WMOO aro hnaby notiM-i that thrro Ii no >rcodatioa for mom al th Mlvool on tho data of tha • rniinnation and thai tha aiamlnatlon i Mill not ilart until they laav W H AKTROBUS. / *c. Oov. Body. Olrl. 1 roundotlon Bchool •.kUa) in 1 so--on l> n .11. Iron Grtiniilai li a chocorad Iron Tonic The gran be taken dry or Ihev may into > Mndorlea a-tfa ti.in brood and buiter Price 16 KNIGHT* I.dl II 10 SO-Sn NOTICE .-.-ompanlad by b-Pllm-.i1 lertlfic.te. will b.received %  Irldoy. 2011 OcUJiar. IW. for one or more vaoon* <\ Vootry E*hibtint |onab>c 1 >.,i..tion School muM be daughters ol porlohMnor* In ' raiahlonu Mtinlaa or more than twelve yeara on tha date of lha tirn*itlmi n.uai pieaent 1 (. luuiidatmn School on Frlda. H\n Uctober al 0 30 J m muat be obtained from mr ofllce. WIMH> lionnAiti) Clarh of tho VMlry. VACANT SCHOLARSHIPS ( IKIOI. 11:1 I H In tion Scholanthlpa at Ihe Cfirl.t Church Bchool AppllconU p br childrrn of Parent* rraMlna In Chrwt Church and wfio an %  traitened Clrcunulancea. %  The applicant* mutt be between :aoe> of 10 yaori S month, and 1 v_on the da, of the examination, which will be hold by ihe Head: lag nth Form* of application can be obtained from the Secretary. W II Antrotm.. [lition Hun* Bay Street Theae form, mutl be returned accompanied by a haptlxmal nroflcate t the Secretary not later Ih.n I • p m. on Friday SOth October W II ANTKOBITS. Sac O." P.-I Girl." Fovindat:on Sch I 10 50Publif Official Sale on ovorotock of Antora %  -J the lame alra !Uc ond the "mBll from .„ bans BOM KKKlfTT-S I,M II Li '. ~-. U AMI II NKtrTT* 2im Olan-a Shlrta ( i !" i MOarlnd Quality at ra cm each ROYAL STOBX I? S A PY-IA hlrt. and .".Jamaordered t-i ... U ili-li.ered rUXIANCI rttBT FACTOHV In atock ••a>ato•* IV mauroo amir-d Teeth hot KNICHT'S 1 M Act ISO* lay of Ortobei. o'clock In the I my offlca "i %  um not undc. ( aertoin %  %  %  inn IIIM iTho Proyoal M.nah.< UBOt-Oi ON FRIDAY tha ISth IMX at the %  OUT Of 1 afternoon will bo told Hihll e't bidder for an thi appraUed valW II. -ii coi'l.ilnliin by lamiaiKuntil fl,*** Houare Feel aJIUOtO Ma ISO paulob of Chrlat Church at NAVY OAJLMMS buttlm and boundlm on lando ol Fobart Welch, of Mra Carol on a private road colled Not* ami on another private road called VfitnOC Hoil tonelher uilh the im%  11 sc or Dwrthna MOUM thereon called -'Rjdcourl" Buildlruxa, arc. apprai-e.1 a> folowa— The whole property appt olMd H nun -m..us AMI AND nrn POt*NM ifMMII.i Atla.he.1 fTOaO aVHBVIIAM AKNETT OHIFTITH lor ... 1 toward* Mt if atttaai ^^ If B -, Depoaii to be paid on day HELP FXPFHITtNCFD CASIIT'lt r PIOOM nppi* la ani KH ti BMXI <" % %  I lllH.I Dutch Guiana iJom. I{>inu.li, Bufopt ft ciuiana Gt. Britain 830 am MM .1 11.45 a.m IKS am 11.45 a.m I I IMS un, 11.43 a.l.i. 11.45 a.m. I 2 00 p.m : 200 pjn : II 45 am i o.OO a.m %  2 00 p.m 2.00 pin. 2 00 pm. lt.M p.m 11.43 a.m II .43 a.m 11 45 a m 11.45 a.m. 9 00 a.m 2 00pm 11 M 11 m 2 00 p.m 11.45 a.m. 900 a m. 1145 ,1 in 11 45 a m II tl .1 in 9 00 %  m 11.45 am. :1145am I 11.45 am. 200 p in 200 p.m. 2 00 p.m. 100 i. in 1143a in %  1 2.00 p.m. 2 00 p m. ItrSTlNATION %  MB ttm SaturtUv' Monday Friday Wediu-tdj> Satui-da\y Monday wMMtaVa) Friday Monday Friday TudMday Monday Maaa]M| Friday Monday WMim-MA-y Friday Monday rburadaj M.....1.0 Tuesday Friday Wedncsday Saturday Monday Friday Tuesday Saturday Monday Woxinetday Friday Monday Friday Monday Saturday Monday Friday Monday rriday Monday Grenada Guadeloupe Haiti %  HUHK Kon 1 IndM Martinique Mexico Montserrat tvia Antifttiut New Zealand (all air i I New Zealand I Mo Pananm only) St Thomaa. VI. (via Timdi I) Tortola (via Antimi 1) 1 2 00 pm. Friday 11.45 a.m 11.45 a.m. 2.00 p m. 2 00 p.m. M ai day Friday Monday Friday 'lim.tr. I.M ajn Thursd^ IN am W % %  1 %  %  %  0.00 .in Saturday 100 pm Mondav 200 p ... Friday 1145am. Mondav 1145am Friday 2.00 pm. Monday 2.00 p.m Friday Monday 2.00 pm. Friday 11.43 am Monday 1145am Friday SO a.m. 9.00 a m. 11.45 am 11.45 am B 30 a m. 9 00 am. 11.43 am 9.00 am 2 00pm 2 00 p ir 8 30 a 11 9 00 a r, 8.30 1 1 9 00 a r 11.45 a.m. 11 45 a.m. 10.00 a.m 9 00 a m. I.SO a 111. 9.00 am. 0.00 am. 2.00 p.m. 2 00 pm. 200 p.m. 9.00 am. We*ln..da* Saturday Mcnday Friday w. %  -] %  ,.ad .1 Saturday Monday Frtdoy Wednesday Saturdav Monday Friday Wednesday Saturday Wrrineftday Saturdav 1 Mondav I Friday I Tuesday Tliui'-iLi* Wednesday SaturdayFriday Saturda.v Monday Friday Wednesday Saturday ttj an hour u-rorr ordinary* mail. All previous Stliediiles should be r-ncelled I .. :il Post Office. Darbadoa. 30th Sept. 1050. T T HE. rahol. APArtTMFKT At Coral S.itn Worthing, one fully fun 1 I ment. ) bedroom*, allver ond linen ioi niriaiaj paruealan Dial 'M MM FROM January lt. %  -li. St Pel ed with %  % %  K.uple Parlirutaia a. T'letihone Mm n ..on FV.IIv furnlnliBuitob .hsr v W~alev Bay11 10 W p. moil ROCK rl for moniha nf Nay CM her *i Phone-aOU Jneaph er ana iMcembor :i in M M HOUSE -LASACBTA HrHhton. On Se From I rl Of' lM 0 On j>rr month Ar-plv lo JAS. A. TUDOR Ltd. Roebuck Kt 10 10 30—an. IIKATMHI:! 1 %  fl m Decem OSS Mra A. D Ch Ch m 10 -p^-Bn roomi. "* C rSuntial M sir*, t Dam. I.lylllndabury Road >lnlnB Roomi, 1 Bed Both and Kitchen nifiirnl.tied Apply tl I, Shopkeeper, nearby %  .1 (I %  PIIISOV Al The inblic ore hereby warned o|atn*t BlVln ,IIII to 111, Wife (HJiA rX!Hl.N ASIIBY 1 nee Yeorwood' aa I do not hold myaelf leiponalble for her or anyone eUe controctlnd luvv debt or debtIn my name unlooo by 4 written order alined by ma. Sia-ned 8AMURL V AS1IBY. THE public are hereby warned aH-in* %  11114 -ry ireilit to nt* Wlfl Oefa* DOLYN MBDFOKD inee Wllltama. m* do not hold myaelf reoponalble for nei or anvnne elae conlractuir .< debt* in my name unlca. by a wrlf.er •'I by me Sfd SYLVESTEIl MKDFOHU K.w Land Tudor Brld*e Si Mlehjei II 10 SO-lii Tho public are hereby won d Hiving an. credit to my wife FBNra.. TINE POACH 'nee D-peua. n. I do n<' hold myaelf reaponalble lui her or an) DIM rltr contractingany dabl or fldi 1 in my name union by a written order -fned by me Sfd MAMTTN I. HOAC1T U Tha public jre horobr womod aaoinal USWIN KNICIIT. a> I do not %  H in yi .1. LI0.COR LICENSE NOTICE Tho anplioallon of o 9 Millar. 1 li.dlm aG S M1IU1 A CO H!l of 1*M n-anli ...I) 11 ll.irna In rt 1 .11 .imle ahoi> I .1 ,„:, ( %  pen uoo -."> Liquoa Ucenaw al 0 woll ln>ii'l 1 mi: with kitaJ-.rn attached In SuUlc St Dalad thla 11th day of t> TOI II A TAIJdA. Xau l-ollte MaoiMrato DIOI -nSimed W DVAI I for ApplK.nl K B -Thy .pplKotlon will be cen.MI leenaini Court to be hal'i %  t..t. IMplrtcl -A" on Monday t Bird U..y ol Oriober I0S0 at li lock, .1 in II A TALMA. Policf M.ufl.tr.I. 1)11 'A" If 10 Ml In SCHEDULE POST OFFICE NOTICE—AIR MAIL RATES EFFECTIVE FROM 11TH OCTOBER, 1950 PI III.I WALKS All TKIN UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER Bl i 1 1 11 ono of Uo>rta A.emwe will aril on FRIDAY 19th Ocl al Warahouaa Canar800 X 5 Iba Tina Cooking. Butm Cookng BottM .1-1 Ul X l.i Iba TinCooking II > I 1? o'eloi I BRANKtlR. TROTMAN St CO. AurUooeerv 10 10.SO— li KEAL ESTATE 11.1. -Ml UK lit \ f FAHLEY HHJ-. Bl. Pater Contaontnt mbvT londi Appw to Hi. id ah >w A Company 10 10 UK-li. •uth. MONTSEHHAT. .B W I HOTEL contaliin 1 IN Ply mi for C1.W0 COCONtT IIII.I. dr.uum room, dining root niirr.i. 4 balhrooma. kitchen, panlry %  ervianta' quarter* and garafO. Full furnbdvod. and with linen, china. CUIIMJ Jof 1 acre* Ihor partlculaiB apply Pun lor, UoniMrral. 10.10 W *n KFT.MOI1E Slr1hcl)de. I I .tending on W 70* -q feat ol land, eon mdoh Oiavtinn 1 uroom* and all modern eon %  pocMua y-nd lurroundod by wall kepi hedge. Intpactlon by phoning rl 1 AM! A apol Vlliaqe. SI Michael Cot. Whitepark Road. if Land 10 Kim Appti MM %  -( OI1011. Veopo 11 in so %  I.OSI A MM Mil B Profarance Shar of *l each Searle. CoOnetativc Factory Ltd 1 1 a Ftra Thabove will be act up for aale fe) I ClBMea on Friday, tha llih inatant. at t pm at our Office In LucoCARRINQTON SEALY. 6 10.80.—on ARMY DiaCIIAPt.F %  % %  %  %  (A 1J0 Trie underalgned will -et up for MhIT High Ktreet II.Maetown. on Friday tie Ifth day of nplahar. II I in. cllinhouae alandfeel of land at %  Bl •>•" Muri UT3 ,1S Upper Roebuck Vfan Chapel Inspection on application to Mr *li>-ich, at the Jolner'a Shop oppOOBO. my day except Bunday. partlcuUn ami condition. • IM ipplv lo: COTTLE CATTORD A CO GOVERNMENT NOTICE Attention Is drawn <> %  • %  Control of Prices (Iwffnrci ItMl, BfO. H3 v.hi-h will be published, irr the Offlclnl 'o( Thursday ISth October. 1950. 2. Under thi. order the maximum wholesale and retail aelli"' (Feed) are as follows: — (not more thani tluiii %  <1 160 lbs. 8c per lb. —-—. %  I...11.T I'nal Air Letter I'nsl Air t'..Hiiir.\ ol uratuialion Rate per 1 .../ Card. % %  i ..laiirv H.I BMttnaOaa Hate per j II* OaMl Kr-rms uenta eenta eanti I.IIK .ent. .-nts Ad.-u I.I. :I2 12 Iraa 80 40 — Uiulu 1 S A.) .. BO 10 8 Algaria 44 22 I.IIIUII. .1 12 f 4 Autigua 1 4 4 lh|.all 04 32 — Aiigola ~'J ;ir, — la\a 1.00 M —• .\r<'iilin:i . III 2(1 12 Ariiha 12 li 8 i.'iiva 7li H 12 Aaceaaioa .. S4 12 12 Austrulia '.Hi 4 12 .ib'-ria 70 ii, do, ii I'unniuii ) 2" in — 42 211 — Cyprni 48 24 12 'ilsia I.I. 12 — i.n :i 12 Vril 30 It — I'll, It.. llll'O 12 II 8 4 4 Portngueec Africa 84 42 — Dominican Hep. .. 12 6 — Phillippraea 84 42 If Dutch K India.... 1.00 Till — Dutch i Iuiana 12 t 8 84 42 12 Mm Doaoagi 19 II — i idor 21 12 -an Snlvail'.r 24 12 — IJI Ireland] (8 ii 12 t Halaaa 84 42 12 Bgypl r.4 2. 12 %  i Kills li 4 4 Btniopla Abyaalnla) T^ M — -i Lucia C 4 4 Ruropr (eaeepl (It .t. Thonias. V.I 12 8 8 Britain & Eir.-i 11 20 16 -i Yit nt li 4 4 teyehellea 84 42 12 Palklan.i Is -1 12 12 4iaai 84 42 — Piji T2 M 12 41erra LaoM 54 27 12 Pi W. M AMI I .. 72 M — .uli.tlioll Is. K 30 12 Kr. Onlaha 12 ii — ...nialilaliil 76 36 12 loutfa Afri.-a M 42 If .i (0 in 12 lonlb w Africa .. 84 12 12 -: \ %  • I: i 4420 12 traiti Bettlemaota M 12 12 Qibraltar 4U 2" 12 aadan AaguvBgyptlaa 72 311 12 OoW Coaal III! 0 12 -i ria till 30 — LI Britain a Ireland %  12 II Irenada II 4 I I'aiilfniiv ika 7li 36 12 %  loupe 1 — TogoUnd 60 30 — %  llani go 4" If To-lola. II.V.I li 4 4 nata 21 12 — 1 I.IIIH. Ionian at 27 — Triniilail 0 4 4 Haiti 12 ii — funMa 4 24 — Hawaii In .-1 1' Ilciii.l 21 12 70 36 12 Kong H in 12 A 20 HI 8 ( rug.iay It 20 — In.lia M 12 12 .. i oil -.11 \ iif/iii-la 12 li — • i.mri 1 . BS %  ARRIVAI" H-gl.i.1 u %  WfvoonM MM • r. %  i .ei l. C.pt 8 %  Akoa Partivar. l.Hl let. i > 1.0*0 tor. %  %  %  Tliaraldaeti. fc.r Ai U IE I AMlaOTM, I Mat Inn. Ki In Touch With Barbados Coast Station SHIM. P. s Folmi. %  Folk, i'. %  %  s %  %  i s Ram .!. %  s s >.t.. Argentina. S Utugtuay. RJ Eluabeth, s II-...' %  > Hl.igrraphar. >2 y i Rclita. ilV Pro.Nan.1li.l H Norlya. I. Captain John. * A Mit.hal ralmrt B.rt r-.nt Audi-I.I 5S I'lantei. S R Hralar* S S I ihi-ry ille, %  H Talgele ~ ibeth AcaniM". %  Doloiea %  ft 1 -. SII",,, s \t,,,„r lra.li D P. UM C.raiiad Tialanu. US S.i i %  %  B.S. S. lrt SH Halmav i Hamaa. MS Bui Riprea*. 1S Pone M "t Ca|.(."i J.,1 on i^i>tia U ordma. %  %  %  l j -r Ixtper. I.egaret Corbln. 1 .< %  • %  .\damaon. Wmalon ... i < t 1A Fr.uice. Knight and %  N LI'A • .i-..i i y|~. Edward. B W I A I. %  Kuth IngieKeid, Harry Inaiefloitf. • Inglafleld %  J-ntoo Whllmg Darnel II... Wlllltvn %  .1 ttitioion %  Per rin. JOB* Il>rr.' -: .-. BkAajl IIkt b I I PMfl f aWB > i.lMINk \ :>r-Atwi Muriel Rand. David rorroawo llawkma For BT VINi I H Thomaa Dam. Edward niir.ti Do-K Lionel Paul Emmalave RuaaMI ana i r<-iA I MAIL NOTICES t tho Oetyeral PoM Office i*e. IM0 Mail, for Mt Lucia by Ihe M V l.-nJo. will biiUa.nl at Ihe f> Ofncay a* under kiatered and Onflnarv Mail SHIPPING NOTICES MUNTRgAI. AI'gTaAl.lA -law SKA. LAND UNI LIMIT!* IM.A.N.E. i IN. %  a "Olnuce*^' paOg Freemantl. Srpleinliei Tth. Adrlalda aeptembei nine "en ten liter ]gth Devon port October lot, Sydney OeMM i nil BrlaDaiie Ottolier Mlh. .titling a narbadoa No. em her lllli Theae rOOaMfg line .m|ir aoaoo (Ol chllbxl hard lii-ren ami gOB tamo accepted n tlimngh h.ll. ol lading -ilh ii..i-.lu|ai>i<-i" al Trliila.ol for narhodi^. II. HI .1, and l.re..d hangM or furtha %  tirilei-. ipplt I'l'HM" WITHV c. i.i.t TRINIDAD. II W 1 HA co*n y %  %  i-i nmi\i'II Ef t M I. .I.hee I i Uaatau I St Kltla Ni •aallliuj on iklobei tW 1 M V Daeiwood For IIIV I Sehuonvr > %  *. (Inr). tot E B. LJJUaiVll 1-: NEW OBLgAMg .IK.III K SM Se,,l An. llth Orl VOBH avii %  NT 'OITNaot ND Nam* i I %  AldCOA I'tONEEICANADIAN %  all. %  %  Otiotfi itn Botaa Arrive. Hallfak ii.rt,„,),.. (htoUer 'loth Oclobar Itith Octobor 'Mlh Noiamoc, loin ror Bl JOHN. S River Furta For Bl Lwranco ltlvn port. For St t^wrence Km. l-u-t. .'.'.••'.vs.'. NEW ARRIVALS BKatOKs stlHIll > IMI I y I.\Mls ( Illl.ltS KIINS 1'RAH HTIIW'S BANDOW'I in M I .on R-KNAMII. cinM. \ s\i OftTANI ,' ;. NtWSAM & CO. TO-DAYS NEWS FLASH riaatle Drinking (alaaae* for Hrhnol Children Honing filovri f15.00 —Het of Mi ni-' t ini-ii in tin" Heta l.ocko. Ilaapa. HUplea at JUHNSON'8 HTATIONKIIT And M \I:I.U Mil ** FURNISHED IT IB Nl"T iiVH FAUL.IIBU'HIIM IT NUM! xupiHu-H .um. Cabinet in Ulg. Olowpoll.hed M.H.ig.... and Cedar. Several naOTO Cl Mp Kll. .,.!, |--h|,:, %  .i ilaboaru* liMiKiK.M nAUTV In Had%  le*l.. Red.. Vanltlea In Mahogany. Birch or Deal Wardrobea. Itnon P riMff Rod>-l-eight Chaval and .mallei fraaaed Mirrora, II IB DININt; l.ni.,1, QglMglll Radio and kitchen Tablea; amall to niat Upright Chaira In treiaurad olahcigany; llirrh; Oafe and H..JI l'l(AU".N<; ROOU Sultca or < i _ttbaOt SB aa upf SAVINU L.S. WILSON DRESS GOODS OF QL'AIJTV a. IIICII ll.ASS WOOLLENS visrr TO-IIAY THANIS rr. Wm. Hrr 8wa IU. Ha>Ml I %.,eBsffJCSjU.yiiik ur ScllniH Good Claaa Pioperly it Pays to sea JOHN Si. KI AHOS AKS, F V A Phone 4G40 PtanUiaOOS Buildlni For itardware of every Description MT'S THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM (CENTRA!. FOl'N'DatY LTD.—Froprlelorg) Cur. of Broad and Tudor Street*.



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FACE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. OCTOBER 12. '• Polo Players Drink RUSSIA what of the People? Russian "Vodka "HORSESHOE COTTACir the Qarriton, made history when it became the lirst home in Barbados u> bim Vodka. Early on Satuiday last Count Tolstoi was observed I various Iruit from the trays that line up the I and no'doubt he was then gathering gome td the many ingredients for the Russian "Special" which he made in the afternoon with the assistance of overproof alcohol, distilled water. .siii;ar. pepper, lime. etc.. etc.. etc. that gfcra set ti> boil in .in electric kettle from the kitchen of "Horseshoe Cottage." %  i, Brewing started at obout 2 p m. but it was m>i until utter !" k that the Count deei.leit that '>* Vodka waa ready to provide it"-'' jnd happy feeing lot which Vodka U fagooue. %  % % %  .at about RAJKAT Oct. 11 t'hr perfoetlea el his national Frank Worrell skippered the' 'i* that dm in* the nlddta i Common^alth cricket team to ''"1 He left the speeUi(he first vlctorv rt their tour te~ leOHN t Cherft Up <>n hi* work i-hich ndicated that all was well, am with ndeed thm WfeS definite.. s ihe player* when 'hey Anally The home nide were dismissed h-thered at tie Cottage tor the their iieeond knock for 116 usual Cokes, (linger Ales, etc WORRELL GETS FIRST VICTORY by nine wickets with hi gaggg Saurashtra were all out in flrtt inning!, for 130 to the. Common wraith replied IM From P4ie .111 a good Staiir than), think oeei what k-Upa have been spirited jag the past five year*. I can only dunk ot One > i th 1'i.litbiiro who sent • Varga Into the jungle irftjaj that Bat S: itM and the Western world genn.illv showed n<> MgO) of imminent collapse dumbly .m.I elegantly, and stayed. VozneBsnakl, triumphant, has vanished to no i Trainloads... %  of the terror does not mean that %  have given up their tern nf informers Or thiit the forced labour camps are running short of r-'npower They are still brine filled up by trsinload after trainload from the nnexed regions, from the Baltic States, from the 1' CseehOtlOVeh Ukraine, from the newly won ftaonfjoilan nrovinces Here the old system uf indiscriminate deportation by cate:*ao^^^o^> > y^oo>as>oaeoi*sesoe nnri the Commonwealth made 57 for I for victory The Australian pair Kand George Tribe added 114 in 101 minute* for the Commettwealth\ llfth wicket. Tribe getting 77 in. BtdBag nine fours and hat are happily enjoyed utter the Bark At Play PhfHp Mi' nerd wee r*nr week.< ft] l hla accMe* oes not appeal to have sUwe> Grieves, more sedate scored 29 down India's fast bowler Nyalchai nly been in the claimed sin for 68 in 30 successive [gland • %  iwe I oven hrgJ from Canoae i i Wickets tumble.! fast in Sauri.een engage,l with the Molasses ashtra's second innings. Sohnv Commission, and like the rest of Ramadhin took 4 tor 21: Tribe 3 1)5 brothers was un lop for for 48 and Worrell 2 for 25. John Marsh i ayod an exceUen; —Renter potjj. col Mlehehn as u lost an opportunity FKHTII. West Australia. Oct. II Len Hutton rnused a eofp ri f l here to-day by MalDJ othei members of the MCC party n their first practice since arrivu two days ago und after a statemem from the tram manager tha' Mutton's Injured finger neeue rest. Hutton spent BWOnal minutes hitting catches around th held. Overnight rain prevented the team from using the < i and practice was confined In the morning to mainl;. hitting .i nrl fielding on grass, and in the afternoon to the bowl era loosening up on a wicket UM o recent hin a State trial game DenU Cumpton hit the bail around, took running < —Renter By M. Harmon Cray &f A B 9 1 fltl • 4 11 4ltl . %  : %  %  > : i I I Kit • R M 1 f 41)1 • 4JII • ies An example of a trial bid t from match play. Both South players opened Una > Soaoe and re&ta Thra* Uimiiunds over a single rasas • irom North who then lumped '.. Poui Spndt* on ; thr Mrength ot hU Duunond In Doih rooms West ant V S to Ea*i' > R and VMJUIS t a, and &f R fa*• •*rd In Room 1 a> l was ii-o .i 4 it tnrk l. and < me tlnraae Ot *t lost to ] who returned *. < Dumm} *u> eniereO wtU) j a III nnO Smi'.Ii made nmr (IhC UD Eart'* a> J. A j flub attack defeats the con. tract Wet ran olaee his j in the tuddlng with ^ 4> K .1.1 -tirtnid lead 4> J 1 St TKH ft < In Room 3 Bart made tha < in. • aid of a> t J riouth led o> R Piae; oniitiui-o with 0> * | ai.d ta-u'i t_ US 1 had to make. ) RACING RESULTS iriem Our 0*n Cirandfit. GEORGETOWN. Oct. II The third day of the D.T.C r a ce s took place to-day rOUewing are the results: I(.\>UH:AP. s pvexoaraa, ci^ss Iff TO* BonU> tn IVnM*< Jrd iDnd l lbs Mllllnoairr 'O Vrill IB lb Timr 1 mill IS %  • MIK-tlAKTH HAN IMC AJ' 1 IUIU^)NC- CI-Mie c IM Wr Horn* h* ISO lb* and MIM anoia, torNu. its ib. Sm Wavarlry iHlngTi US ll Ui Tuckr Km. .1.,,' %  omb ID i"' r lOenaimi IS* IOB I Hwi' onoiii, iLdtafwaat TAP T I never tnree hla obUgation as No. 2 lget to the goal, bill hi *i not as nceurnte as usu.il and many a ball went out ih.it could ,v. l-eeii .i inal Nick P.MI.. .•icino again pro\*ed that with .i I M he would soon rise to .. top tank player, so it Is hoped that this promising young playtr will soon Bod %  mount srorthj ol Ids skill and keenne>s A New Horse •Bertie' Rradshaw's new nOCM tave a lot oi trouble and appear* to be some*hiit timid .ibout en. tering a skirmish DBCktBg awn;. from a crowd, but he has plenty .peed and will DO doubt soon tdapl himself H. Johnson seemed 00*0 %  ) home on his Rascal, end 00) %  ertalnly get more SIMIII out um than it is possible to get ou 1 : utev Tlie new Pavilioi • nearly compli'tiI ind orUI M I great coim meiuc to member. ud visitor It is interesting to note that i • being considered changing lh> Club from three teams to two teams due to the fact that this ill givt aaaanban an apportunita oi playing In e tune without having to constan:y substitute for other plnyei be art unable t<> turn up. Competitions With two Kama it would be %  ossible lor the Club to have keener cumiM't'tioi would then have nbnut threo players for aoefa position so that II every evenng of play a lo' f confusion wOUM be saved in nding substitutes for particular poaltlooe, end aleo playinj eorn< f the men m .i baatn to which they do not lelong. Wedneaalayi und S.it\irdays arc Team %  fterhoons for the men. hile the ladlQg h:ive IfOOaa) Unlurtunateiy their ,ne not enough lady players to mike Up %  COBI plele match, BO aOKOe >t the pnai Lung out thin untrained horses ah atondayi li help make up an Eight No dOBnlta news has bee. from the Wiie/uel.iiire then Intended triatl winch %  th nunth. lint i hoped that some private mni can be arranged with some of their Polo players wh( hortly be in Bar badholiday. Olympic Plans Underway I I'KNOS AIRES. Plans for the IH5I Han American Olympic Games to be held in Buonog Aire^i next February are progicssing rapidly, according t. the Argentine Sports Confederation Over 4.000 athlatas from the 21 American republics .ind Canada will participate m track and field events, boxing, skiing, rowing swimming and other sports, totalling 19. All exiiensrs will IH I the Argentine government Al Argentine sport stadium* and clubs are being prepared to hOtMe the visiting athli attention Is being paid to fooc aroblerai m an effort | the regional demands of fon-igr inns. Special Argentine sports deleKate Gregorio Esplnar is currently United SMI.-S eonlerrlnj with Avcry Brundage. pre li al ll.r I'S Olvi i nn itte.' on American purticipatiun and will later tour South and Central American countries. The United States has reportedly assured the partmu.it ..f 15(1 athletes for the different gories is still npi>l %  lin makes room for new settlers who have learned not to grumble. What HOU the chief grabbles of Ihe |BBM praole be II the* dared to vatee then? I am In a ineri position lo tell I tuu Far I ha\e been stud>I Ins report' ot man* So\ lei rltisens who h**e lied to the Weal men -ud Hm-n r>am eer> walk of Hie *ht lave made their a> iiit Ihe Weierti tartes of firman J ..I \j-in.i. Inlo Persia an* Turkey, and rvrn inlo Japan and India. These *rr Ihrlr— I.HI MHI.IS I t-EASAMS and FARMER* (who still form GO per cent, of the Soviet population) Collective farms, they complain, are run .ih chairmen appointed by the district committees of the Communist Party. Party members monopolise tha id administrative lobs. credit themselves on pay-sheets with workdays they have not worked, have first call on new supplies at the village stores. Collective farms brerik up family lite, because man and wife eldom ..me free days. a> HOMF.N l-EASANTS complai STOP THAT C* COUGH St.n liking tlMT* COtt.H MI\H Hr .< once, and ace how Quickly your tough will nop Thn worid aanoea <..x*jh remedy KIUjaiy huanrhrcaihing. uul protects the chest and luagi XEW STOCK OF YENO'S COUGH MATURE i BVMIN AMARA HAUBOKANISi: I LIQUID PARAFFIN SYRIT Of PHM mi | BL'SKb— Baby'i Firsl Soliil 1'ml Also u varivty of OlGAitS (OIIIXS IMtl U S3 ours ,'--.-.'>,',--','-,-. ---,.-,.--• AeMNM cuts —I.S s. Above Hoard Wins Cesarewilch Handicap NF.W MARKET. Oct. II. the King's thrwe-yeur old flllv 1 ara. on Wednrswlny won the Cesarewitch Handicap ovor I -'I 'i lie H Ridden by E. Ih iiN9s lii Joli* Mlll >IW ItANIMtV —if m ihat Ukt) .< %  Rl ' >he k. fur tii...im .uil Q IB -I 0 %  not InvaUas WORKERS complain of insdequate pay. shortage and dearness of food, and had housing lot) giumble -bout many compulsory deductions from pay—the obligatory State loans, trade union dues, the subscriptions to this. organisation and that, which no one dares refuse for fear of being I thought imlitii • 11 > unsound. They complain of the inflation of administrative staffs in the I t. loriej The Stukhiinovite movement. I undei arhsch workers comprtr foi a championship in the highest InHWe ia disguised speed-up device for foicing workers to produce more l*ay. U CIVIL SERVANTS complain of the same insecurity. **We •' ire not take any initiative; the penalties are too drastic." • l\ 1 KLLECTIALS express the same fears. But doctors and e.igineers show less .ipurehenslon H.lteachers, college protessors, journalists, and those in rtutic pursuits. One young scientist speaks of i.hat he calls tha "inner nugiiilon" among young intellectuals— he effort lo transfer from politics dangajroue m politically lessIangerous Held* lie himself had transferred to microbiology. But rVOB that hud become politically nfeeted • OFFICERS resent the enL-hment of the Zampolit or politicul commissar. They say they sre constantly watched by the informers of the secret police. • SOLDIERS from the ranks complain of poor food; enforced Isolation from the local population If they are in an army of occupation; the special privileges ol the o dicers. London Express Service whole family with nourishing ilAKER OATS 14 Nations At Itaskt-tlmll I rfoa AIKKS Fourteen nation i were < to perticipote In the First Worlo chaVnpMnehlp oiremng October 23 in lluenos Aires' famed lAinu Park SUdium The Argentine Basketball Confederation has announced that Chile. Egypt, Spurn, the United Stales. Brazil, i i UltutHu hove dennitel) confirmed their participation Tentative iieeeptanns have been l oce l vod from Canada. Ecuador. Italy and YtOoalavlB No repb hen yet .. i %  !. Cud,' iiithoiigh in*,, believe i nei Havana team wuul.i corno. The fourteenth participant was Argentina — IN s Rugby League Results LONDON Ori li Hi M in 1 i.e.itiuc icsulls: VurkshUe CUP Semi-tinal lll I %  M. bard 2 (tie). LancashuiCup Baml-Flnal Oldhani o. Wi rrtngton s -C P M lv<: lv .i r IT.— ixl. 1M li.Tim* I %  H i S •• t Hilluim O, W, HtllRton 3. —C ^(V.M^| iprKnll. 1 lb. TW % %  .. % %  ni.s .t^l.,.la> #n fca-tBO They'll Do It Every Time — By Jim my c Hatlo %  — —z&>UL A. iUll\ 'ffi7/PAVirt IS A •"AlSrVATEO \7 TD HEAR FOP -rei_iT IT upi ^ J///777fVl.mri IS A FRUSTRATED ^7 TO HEAR POP TELL IT, MB \ 'tin UPE OF TUB PHRTy...so M CAN SELL ANyrjINS—BUT ) HE WANTS LI'LTCHABOP 1 WBS *NO SALE"WIT-I TD MAKE UPR3R IT-At ITC My• •• S^ircwy oows^r^^V" '*TH/ST IF hE HOLPS ) ( >ESTERDAV I *AS OtT LONfl BSOJfiW.y }. SiViNS SMUW/tCK Ft* WU.COWE ), '* I 1-E SAVE TAL<1V50LSH WITH < SJ*-". AV r SOT JUSTI A BRiBE./iBivX^wX J6DUTAS FAC, | ike BIG SHOW & DANCE in IM T*ViWG TO HAVE A MUSICAL GEN.US IN THE FAMILV A&AINST MS WILL-TMANX TO *MOM JO is? EL; SELECTING MISS & MR. BARHAllllS All member* local and visiting are asked to 10111 the Fun. not a dull moment is expected. OTHER ATHtACTlONS f> PAItADE OF CENTS IN LA1JIES DISCU1SF. Priie for the naOTda # GUEST ARTISTE TOR THt: NIOH i Star Miss Merjarle Dei • Mualc tor Uanelm \\\ Mr Heanwell % full Orh Admksalon to Ballreoaa t/Be Early u> Secure a Table aotf III M^H—" fSllMHOtit %  *£?£**•**• .^lOTH"" .. mil""..^ 1 "*.. OPENING SATURDAY OCT. 14th THE GREEN DRAGON An up-tcwlauChinesi' itestaurant catering lo those who like the best in Oriental dishes at reasonable prices. Prepared by a first cln-s Chinese Chef who knows his onions. NO. 9 BKOAD STREET For Kiservntions — Dial ilhlHi THE MARCH OF THE CHILDREN Let your Baby, too, join this joyous company and march lo Health and Happiness on (UW & GATE From all over ihe world they come — a growing army saved from sickness and disease — sometimes saved from death And happy Mother* cwryuherc are saying:— "There is nothing quite like this haul — there is nothing so good when natural feeding fairs." fUAP&4*Ato We*elfc*U Liberty Voils In lovely floral designs -uii .hie for Kinking eool evening or afterniMin drtsses 3B" wide. Per yd. $1.68 Liberty Sungleam Crepe in prrlty d'>i|>ns 36" wide. Per yd. $2.33 Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street III II HAND I'AIMS FOR ALL PURPOSES White clothes ire whiter —coloured* are brighter, with the rich auher of Rinof Easy and gentle, Rioso washes thoroughly —it floats out dirt in record time I Dishes take on a new sparkle too, when washed inRmso. Soifyouwanteasier.quickerand better washing results — use only Rinso I RIM SO for ail your mash /



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Tlll'RSnW. OCTOBER 12, 15 BARBADOS ADVOO \TT. PAOI TIIRFE 815.000 Voted For V ester Hall School TrtfcGAMBOL? Rla In Can dian ttri,tii !!< ^'^nce., L'S SZT/j^ MJMM PICK Ttt Tt/UB mauWT c* cauo tfow KM coiipunev K TO DM WtPtWraHt THtM \ ill Benefit B. W. I. Tourist Trade -TRAVEL CONSULTANT Frwm Our Own Con*fmMtf*n< The House of Assembly %  resolution for I1S.0W) for the repair of the Wolev Hall Junior School The addendum of the reailuhM that a token >um of SI was approved in the Estimate* of Expenditure for I95lt—51 under Part II-Capital. I—Public Buildings. Hem 9 Wesley Hall Junior, but It was not proposed to PVVMM ui'h the building of tr. general tchoi 1 programme had been reviewed In the meantime, the roof covering of this building ha* deteriorated to such an extent that the ceilings arc now dangerouThe cost of rehabilitating thi*. building is estimated to be $15,000 ann this amount is requested to pi eve nt further deterioration and damage to the w;illv Dr. Cummin* who took charge of the resolution, said that the school was tn a very bad condttkm When the rain '*'ll. HM ccillnc fell In and fortunately no children were in tbi v.-iool to oe injured. Mr Mettle? (El said that he knew that the school was in a very bad condition. He hoped that if the work was to be done departmentally. it would not be the Carom South Mr. Mit; Ri !" ngTwhlu. were ttettd %  SoS, aid ihis shouldI "be MW npiatari man oi wei %  aooo as poswRi-*, he advised. Mr. Garaer (C> said OH i BOBMd Mr. Morrison's ("D-puty asking for a secondary scnool to rVetnui > statement that nation*-.be erected in St. Pn'llir That 'satlon or the nugar industry waf school he said, would a5< ac.hs'tll in the labour Partj Ildran from the surroundgramme. Hi* Party, he said, was toinHc complimented ihe Qoirernmilled to the principle* or ment on the speedy wa'* ii which nationalisation of the sugar in%  ill with the bur nrvica duMry, which was one of the main iuld ie planks in their platform at th< Wilt Ignort* German Elections Bullerites Support Sugar Nationalisation the Federal Chancellor there %  epeats the tuigajaatlon originally made by htm or. 22nd of March tor holding free all German elections on a democratic basis PORT-OF-SPAIN. 1^, Te&nl G*vemmem is The rise in the exchange value Government freely elected bs ihe LI the Canadian dollar will prove people, and u recognised t> my a boon to Trinidad and the other Government as entitled to speak HritiM, Caribbean Colonies as far | or Germany The docur n ii concerned, said Mr transmitted W you ' %  %  this T^ F Budoiph. Travel Con„„. wlU therefore asaaa-MBd "VS'SLT".^^ Rep ^r n l^ VV -* !" %  *<" attention and Wc ^-r l !" t Oirvan Travel Serto government as pro^Sae-SJ^SSi^" 1 1 *' '" P rt "ouneemenu of the Germo,. pc.of-Spain yesterday ^ m wmm of hv ^^ ,. He added that this would b> effecting their future and that ol made possible to a great extent their country. If the Colonies concerned wouU. The letter also *aid thai in.advertise in Canada, the value of nr and indispensable step to the Canadian dollar In these parts achieve political and Govern"U-t them know that they can mental unity of Germany was a get more out of their dollar hen convocation of the constituent than elsewhere." he added He German National Assembly however, admitted that the rise To achieve this, the Federal would have adverse effects on the Government considered the folcconomy of the Colony. Mr. lowing; requirements neeessa I let en My I JBT-OK-SPAIS II .eti member lor %  %  tu m Rudolph ii on a tour of the Caribbean area. "Trinidad has everything necessary for making her a first class tourist resort, With ption of the necessary aceommoMaraj Attacks Butlerism ir'rotn Our Own CorieaBOtsttOO VICKS VA TRO NOL Pont let iun*v nose due to a head-cold or catarrh rob jou of shep! A few drops af Va-tfO'aoi up e*.'i nostril case* brr attains, almost instantlyShrinks iwollen branei. soothe, irritation. clears stuffy nose! Try ill %£* Just a It* droei Z^^ up SKh POSt'il ^WM aiU tA<&t€lAM MILK for all German elections Freedom of activity for all parlias throughout Germany, with all occupying powets retraining from hindi-ring lht> fortii.Hu.,, ol political parties and then ;u-iiv%  l Personiil >afciv for nil todrvid-uals. All tMrwspapeni to have freedom uf publication and circulation Kruter MONEY SNATCHER GAOLED trm and hoped V pccdv with all "lest General Elections in Trinidad. The result of these elections a showed that they had a mandate Own cwrsapondMii PORT-OF-SPAIN it was n hearilefs thing to do This old lady.' said Mr B W Celestaln. when in Port-of-Spain he sentenced Hamilton Cox t PORT-OF-SPAIN Bhadaae Sagan Mara], successful Independent candidate in the rerem elections in Trinidad, has months' imprisonment for stealUu attacked Butlerism He says he t no from the otrson of Klira 'o promote the policy of nationalwill remain an Independent and Hussev The Court heard that Co bWUOn us Ctr M the sugar indenied having relationship with appmached the old lady, who was dustry was concerned. Mr. Tubal Butler, or his parly I silling in the shade of .. bm jt He rejected IiOrd Lyle's message won m> election as an inde[>endent, Victoria Square, ttatlng that he to the West Indies that the Labour and I intend to remain as such, could buy a piece of land for nor Party's plan to nationalise the nn d will support anyone who is Previously, he had seen her with l^hlT.S TwuiDM. n *** industry constituted a threat working for the benefit P f the money in bundle Cox suddenly •%? armorial to Mr Crowe ' ** Wcsl lnd es or wa ,n an ^ people", he said. Mr. Maraj felt snatched her bundle, and rat For the 5S-St time 11Twas there way comlstenl with the Labour that Mr Butler's speech at Woodaway. A watchman, however unfinished It was truly an unsuitParty's doctrine of freedom and f or d Square, recently was IIIseeing able and unsatisfactory Job. wlf-govwrnment in the Colonic* advised, particularly in view of crying Mr. Ward said that the t he fad that Mr Bull' Government had promised to build _ turned by a big majority for the aaSool ; .l Half Moon Fort end M U Q D ( ... Sll 111 lilt'Ilts EaM 8t Pa,riek "'• e ** "jf E t*.\*. nn i oiii|i||ifl lllh h i nk hc ,i,ould have crlticUed ihe hicli he %  ith Mr. ... a staleto start some work in thai area. '"?? % %  ?!??!RE f,S fgf' ??!**" J Mr Waleett (VI -Md that i' GEORGETOWN. Oct I HtitisJi Guiana is fast Ijeconiiiw Mr Braneker (Cl walk down Hay w OOdg. S'. Pwhrr, would show a horrible p.ece of work Tha* was the New Coleridge ..inch was still being constructed. People were wondering whether • not the Government was erectfar as he remembered the p %  rag voted tor. The schools ground rp •*•I W2 i* f s Governor in the way in thai rklnrrj were (wMy COaafagU 1(1 V> I. ^HIISiat'IOr> ,,„|. He also disagreed He wanted the Government Mitra Slnanon, who. ii ecaught the snatch thief." and was not voting for money to build new schools, but for effecting repairs to a school In rcplv to the JM lenrnt to-day that Hon. Junior Member 101 St Lucy, '"* l ll,r > si" !" lhl colony s conhe Hid that he had complete contrarturnl agreement*with the West fldence in the Colonial F-npineer Indies wece afrected. the Colony GEORGETOWN ..,ent published a few days ago. Miss Elsie S Jaikaran has welcomed the British Labour gained the distinction iof being ihe granary of the West indies. V Pity's intenlion to nationalise rtrst East Ind.an lady doc,, for the ,h su ' Br Industry. ul the work on tlic proThe Colonial Engineeihad cm %  lied out investigations nnd In Ihe near future, supplementary provisions would be made for the completion of the school. The figure would be staggering end he hoped that the hon. better position of being able to fulfill asntractl 100 per cant Much depends, however, on the weather ol ihe next few weeks which will play a vital part on the results of the IBM crops, but ..ry surveys Indicate that he requirements uf the West Into.. uld find no other alternative dies will be fully met. •o ute for ihe resolution Council Clerk Creates Scene At Meeting IFYOM our Own OonwaponOan" PORT-OF-SPAIN "You can call the police. I i nol going", said Mr. Louis Peterat i So far Antigua has received hei mil requirements lo the end <•' October. Montscrrot has beei lupplsad '" trw end of the year St Kitts to the end of September noiuinici to the end of ihe year. t0 October 28; St. Lucia of Ihe Seamen and to October 5; St. Vincent to OctoWorkers' Trade LTo Be In Leg. Co. PORT-OF SPAIN General satisfaction was expressed over ihe Governor* choice of the Nominated members of the next Legislative Council. Disappointment was expressed, however, by a trade union leader in Port-of-Spain, that in* Governor did not think it tit to nominate a representative of the** Oodles P Alexander. President Water! rout felt Uuil all Mr bar 9: Barbados to September 29: elements, with the exceptir. The figures quoted abova arc by the based on tht 100 per cent requirements, which for the entii area amount to 29.125 tons. ninated memberMr. Peters is the Council's Clerk, and refused to leave th<> meeting to allow the termlnalioii of his services lo be discussed When he refused to withdraw, the acting chairman. Councillor Johii _-.., ., f nnn /. portant pan in me %  aaaanai Edwards, had the meeting ad8.G. Collected *J,OUU,VUU things, and especially because lie urned Mr Peters refused lo leave because he said that he had been appointed by the Governor and was not working with the councillors. His attitude was con-Hercl "high-handed" by another Councillor, who considered Income Tax Already QlORaEfOWrl Income Tax collection this year in British Guiana Is likely to reach a new high figure, as nlMr. Peters reflected very badly the Council At the afternoon meeting, however, a vote was cast lected In favour of terminating Mr th.-u eeai Peter's services at the end of virtual.* in 1949 paid December and Companies $4,134,452.00 insldered it rather unfortunate, "that the Government, in this enlightened age. when the trade unions were playing such an important part in the scheme of and especially because of he new Constitution, did not think it wise to have a representative of ihe trade unions nominated." Mr. R. C. Duff Urquhart, President of the Trinidad Chamber of Commerce, said that the nomination of Mr Wighl was most welcome. Said he, "Mr. Wight ^ possessed of sound business abimy :c- Pron., T.x wu colg—~ „,„ "'^^TunTeniund. %  j„"Si''StfwH5 K & -V *• %  j*f-ir2..'^ u,d • well m*ivM by oil dm" WHETHER YOU ARE A LARGE USER OR A REDROSE TEA *rir SMALL USER B.G's First East Indian Lady Doctor British (l.naiv Dr. Jaikaran entered the Royal Tree Hospital for Women in 194U She is the daughter off Mr J. .taikaran. Principal of J. Jaikaran and Sons. Ltd. Cliemtets and Druggists of Georgetown. / use LIFEBUOy TOILET SOAP Morning, noon or night — you'll glways feel fresh when you wash with Lifebuoy Toilet Soap. Its deep-cleansing lather really frees }-ou of weariness, keeps you fresher so much longer. So keen a tablet of Lifebuoy handy —for all-day freshness! FOR l'ERSU\'AL FRFSIIMtSS 11.11 l)S WAW/////// *',-.','.-.*.-.-.-.*.-. YOU DESIRE THE BEST TEA SO USE RED ROSE TEA! IT IS GOOD TEA CONCRETE PRODUCTS CO. Dill 278 LOTOS HILL %  > %  "• 2" 1 M.IKI IIS OF III II.IHM. IIIOI HS g a g \ 16 Za>. each Jaank or (wrner a0e. rack 4 a 4 x 18 (PartHlon) He. ., Halvr.... lee. „ Itanble fcnda 3ue. each (All Prices ex Factory) Certified Pressure 10 Tons without rupture. HOMItn MIMIIIMII WITH VrilK.MiTII is Iht Ordr o( the D.v! HOW TO III II II WITH THtM 1. PLACE EACH BLOCK IN WATKK FOR A FEtl MIMTES llhl. I. nM) 1 DO NOT HLL HOLIAW FABT8 3. L'SB ^i" MORTAR ON TOP 8CRFACE AND S1DEK • A DEFINITE F.COSOMV 4. STRENGTH OF MORTAR SHOULD BE — 1 pin cawM I MR* LU: < pu SUMI — Ml Umr ..1 Sind hr%< lhr (> %  • I, ALWAYS I ••! PLCMB AND LEVEL gay I •HUHIbM^ DiilmrUooi and you U1 hvr %  lowl Job : ECONOMY IN I. M'.i. i'. will SurpriK' you. VST. OVR BLOCKS a' (1 you will like them, they anSimple-, yc-t Perfect Ptanc IHI vou Friend*. We have hundred* of Saliafird C'usloiiirr.. TESTS IN MIAMI HAVE SHOWN that Concrete Block Builiii.II %  4thstood Hurricane l)am>Ke better than any other type of BinlilinK IRON NEEDS PROTECTION HUBBUCK'S METZINK PREVENTS COROSION. HUBBUCK'S MCTZINK has sn.-h great olttcunng potrfj that •O '.iry. Can lir used as an undereoat tu any good finishing paint. tOri will bold H i*x. pti. tbi r-J..t -II ..I 'if Tlnl hi IwWltfe is greater than that of the colours. • .II gf exposure on Sugar Centrals in the tiii|ii without Hu.-lighten! sign nt deterioration. Costs leas per sqiian raid per year than any OwMT metalpreserving paint Is tin' %  i orroalvi paint which "strikes into" Ihe metal Instead of forming | .kin owf it under which rust can fniiii I. i tins of 1 gallon and under FRANK B. rUwBRMN LTD.-A.tnh. | ARE YOU CONSIDERING RENOVATING YOUR CAR? WE CAN ASSIST WITH THE FOLLOWING It I ItUU > III BIIIH MATTING ft OBEY (III 1IHOWN i \I:III jjj | MIS oil ItllliUA iwill lionn IIMMi 0 BBOWN "VYMIDE" IMITATION LFATHFst • IMVI -RSAI, CAR MATH JJJ I I \lr R TAPE ft HIIWH CO It NKK lilllllli:A IIH. II WU IlltV IINSION ( Altl.FS 4% IN*ri.\TINf. TAR IRINtll I'HAI.K FOR TYRES %  > BEAT OlMiTY CIIAMOIH i l Mill i:a, i*oi isms AMI run-si ci^>Tn gk IMHIK I.OC K SPRINGS gt KIN'. PIN' SUT-l '/W////*W SET Ol K PAIM SHOP CAN ClIVE VOI.'K CAR A FACTORY IIM-HIM. FUMT SPRAY JOB IN A VARIETY OF SMAItE* WITH PINCHIN JOHNSON LACQIERS OR INAMELS. ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAY mi I I "I*'* '





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PAC.F TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. OCTOBER I-'. UH C^odb £aUiw} \ ATLANTIC POND O LD Hamsoniaiu In Trinidad held their anrunl .'inner on Sunday in San Fernando. Among those present were Mr W D I*ajr. dpi H A Thornc. Mr Harold Haskrll. Mr Altstair Johnson. Mi W K 1 Tommy Know lea. Dr. Greaves Ph.D. Comdr. Carllon Gnriri.n.1. Mr Jimmy Cozier. Supl. H Annitronk. Mr Ralph Bekstetii, Mr. Malby lYimingham. Mi Undsat) Yearu-ood. Mr W M test, Mr T Richards and Ml r. Intraniiti I NTRANS1T from Grenad.. terday by BWIA on Uwll way to Si Lucia were LI BoJ Eric James. Commissioner of Puller, st LucU, and Mr H G. Valentine who is attached In ituColonial Office in London Col. Michelln is al present In St. Lucia to have discussions with Col. James when he arrives and Col Mlchelin is expected to return to Uarhadoj this afternoon Mr. Valentine was here a few days ago having discussions with the Post Master, and has since visited Grenada and now St. Lucia Old Harrison ian M L(. AND MRS. JIMMY Robinson reluctantly left Barbados yesterday afternoon by I'WIA. after spending ton davs' holiday al the Hotel Royal Jimmy U an old Harrlsoman. having lef! school in '35 to go to America. A U.S. citizen, he now lives in Boston where he works with the Bethlehem Steel Corporation Their destination yesterday was Trinidad, from where they will flv to the US Back From Grenada C ANON W HARVEY-READ returned yesterday by B.W.I.A. from Grenada, where he has been for the past month Barbadian Receives Trophy 1IE RAF. Safety Trophy, whu-h was presented this year to the Royal Air Forte by OSsTSial Gervasio Duncan. Chief of Staff of the Brazilian Air Force Is to be competed for annually. It has been won this year by Norfolk's "Tiger" Squadron No. "4 Commanding Officer of this Squadron Is Squadron leader A. R. delInniss. son of Mr. and Mrs. A de Lisle Inniss of "Glenairc", Britlons Hill. This trophy was accepted by the ,•>LoMoa *„ %  -„, s-r. All Council for annual compel,!ten, I*etwef-n 'day Dghier squaoron.. of Fighter Command and the British Air Forces of Occupation. to be awarded to Ihe squadron making the greatest contribution towards flying with safety In all weather conditions. For the presentation, Un enlm laoon was drawn up on parade %  I the Squadron's HO a. Horsham. St Faiths to watch Squadron Leader Inniss receive Uw trophy from the Air Marshal Sir Basil Emory Wit* B.W.I.A. | n St Kitu A FTER ABOUT ten days' holl* day in Barbados, Mr. and Mrs Winston Warren and their baby daughter Andrea returned to SI. Kills jesterday afternoon by BWIA Winston, who is a Barbadian ll with B W.I A stationed in St Kltts. He told Carlb that Derek Mendes is in St. Kitts acting for him while he is on holiday; he stilt has about a week more leave. When he resumes. Derek will be returning to Trinidad. Congrats C ONGRATULATIONS to Mr Pearnun ScOtt < Lodge School) of Kingston, st Philip, who ha> basj) ..ppuinted to the post of nai.K i.i.ii troaaori i 4 the ,..,,,.,. of St. Philip. His father will be remembered as the late headmno ter of St Philip Boys' School Here For Two Weeks A RRIVING from Grenada yesterday by B.W.I.A. were Mrs. Eva Sedglcy and Miss En:d Linard. They are here for a couple of weeks' holiday and are staying at Accra, Rockley. West Indian Fortune F RANCES WINWAR. o-foundei of the Leonardo 1 Art School, has thrown more light on Ihe much debate! marriage between Dual rett and Robert Browning In her book, "The Immortal Lovei recently published by Harr Hamilton, ahe has stressed thai the significant thing about Ihe marriage was not so much its %  bam bill it* practical advantages The marriage enabled Robert Browning to write poetri in the comfortable shelter of I WCM Indian sugar fortune, but it also saved Elizabeth from her father and her doctors Arriving By The 'Colfito' pXPECTED to arrive by the C* (feints' on Saturday ai > ate. Jack Kidney, Manager . BH victorious West Indies team, Mr and Mrs F. A. C. Clalrmoote, (Mr. Clairmonte is Senior Vice President of the Barbados CMtttfiH Association), Mr R. K. Nunes, President of the West Indies Cricket Board of Control and Mi and Mrs Jeffrey SU.Ili Up For A Month \i K l -EE TALMA who arnvd lsl here on Sunday from Trmtdad lo spend a month\ (ml.,lay is staying with his mother al %  Vlamede". Rockley Congrats C ONGRATULATIONS to Mis h Daphne Pilgrim, daughter oi S:and Mrs. S. O Pilgrim of Bay Street, who in the Oxford and Cambridge Joint Board Examinations held here in June reached exhibition standard with Distinetion in History. Daphne is at present in Jamaica sft the West Indies Univen-ity College, studying for her Aru degree. Carib also extends double oon* gratulatlons to Miss Gwen Drayton, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. M. Draylon of "Eden Glen". Golf Club Hoad, Ruckle*. lor In the Oxford and Cambridge Examination Higher Certificate she has gained double honours, reaching open scholarship standard with Distinction in History and English Arrived Yesterday M R. GEORGE DE NOBRIGA, Managing Director of the Barbados Telephone Compan.v. arrived from Trinidad yesterdu aftcrnon by BWIA. WASHIN -TON. The narrowing Atlantic Ocean, f'.rther reduced to pond size ks/ the I a lev 1 mg feats, never fails In challenge the men bla/< trails iih from the Old World to New has served as a proving ground for man and craft for nearly 1.000 years, notes the National l first non-stop )et plain-. flights between Euiup. andl \ made September 22 brf hn is An Force Brest, embelJ Of Atlantic con-J quest opened two years ago In T'u Pilgrim Fathers, sailing from Plymouth, England, early in September ltJO. took almos* as ong as Columbus to span th%  %  ..hlng Cape Cod's tlo N. ember 9. Fust crossings waited two centuries foe the Yankee J,ipper ships, the "Dreadnaught, .King a 12-day sailing record fi-m New York to Ireland in First steamship lo cross the (•antic was the "Savannah" in 119 Actually, it moved by wine" ore than by steam, being fullggad. Its single steam engine. user 1 ghth of the time nuring ihe 27-day voyage. It wa not until after *he Civil war that propeller-driven steam thlps began lopping days off the Yankee Clipper record lime The ill-fated Lusirtinia in 1910 was ihe first to cross in under flv 9—eight **&< Britain's present day Queen years before Lindbergh's success) Mar > hM n*** 1 surfacf electrified a tensely waiting world. '" pioneered the ,et tiail fro../ 0 ibwM • %  •* %  * England to I-ibrador. making fueling stops in the Hebrides, ('"iiiiitbus and Lindbergh contributed the best known chapters to the Atlantic conquest record book Aerial "llrsts" have been predominant since 1919—eight; A century ago the widely accepted view was that Columbus wrote Chapter One Subsequent study of Ic el andic sagas revised that belief It is now generally agreed that the Story of Atlantic crossings goes beck at least to Ihe turn of the first Christian millenium—A.D. 1.000—nearly five centimes before Columbia's day. Norsemen in undecked boi using oars and a single squai reached southern Greenland about] 982 Kiom Iheir Mnall colony* there. Leif Erlrson and his pushed westward to the place thev called Vinland on the New World %  oa-t. sornesrhore in the region of Nova Scotia or New Bug) Columbus sailed from Palos, Spam. AUKUM 3. ilf>?, rr.i'-Iiing a landfall in the West Indie October II John Cabot, like Columbus, n Genoese, five vearr. later became the first since the Norsemen lo And the continent, touching what is low Nova Scot ian soil after a voyagjB of 52 days from Bristol. England LAST SBIOMXG TO-DAY 3—8 30 p m l-irep times m under four days. Ten months prior to United Siates" entry into world War I, Germany dispatched from the N. I'd Sea Island of Heligoland the lirst cargo submarine l e-oss. Entering the Chesapeake Bay after a 16-day run. It ex (changed cargoes at Baltimore, and B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME THUSaSDAT, Ori 1 1. 1*40 T at %  m The Now*, I HI m •*•%.. Anal.dk. 11 %  ni Cloi. '-•' Th* % % %  11 is p m .<•.. Aiwlyn*. II II p in Prorar>im Pkrjdr, IS IS p m LutVnSX' CboK*. I OQ i> n> Taal-ina A>ind wlUi Mm>t-: H.-H1 IS P ni RMIM) N>"< Sbor'a a Lauati. 1 s p.m T) %  Kiwi SIS pm Hom Newi rmm Otil*.n S U p m Spore llmra tuns Vp 'K Curi.in. 1 W p HI llouil a*ll.in • > pm Tk N... < 10 o ii. The Daily Srrvicr. IS |> m lh Hoimtv. I 4ft p TII Tri. Orsana; IK um UsStiil S IB p ni Piocramm* Patu> I Z£ p i, nnc v.rt*i) HI. imi'i s at a — Adolph Halll. Il)p M M-, !*"">wi ikpni sasH.i' ; ta p m Th, Nr>n 7 10 p n> N. AnalVkl. 7 IS p in *r •-%  .HrlUln. 7 44 p HI Genarall? SpMMIi>| IN pm Hadlu Nc->crrl %  It p i.. t'niird Nadom' Kafn't I M p in Compowr ol In. WrvS, I SO p n. tarn Ins Around BTHatn wllh llrrben Hodar IS pn Think un Thaw Tun^-' •• p m Th* HIM of a Party. It SO p p Th Nn>. It II p rrom In. fed it.'. •al. ISIS %  < (i. Van*Na I*. 10 44 p . Spaaial DUpaUh. II OS p in Th* N*t* got back safely to Germany afte* -lutwitting Ihe British btocfcadS In a 22-day revtirn trip. The transatlantic air para'lr began in earnest in 1S19. employ ing aviation advances attributable to the *ar then just ended. GAIETY (The Garden) ST. JAMF.S TO-DAY 8.30 P.M. M-l'.-M JUNGLE THRILLER ! Johnny WEISSMULLER and Johnny SHEFFIELD in "TARZAN AND HIS MATE" OPENING 1 Kill VI — Wsrarr'. |>,.,H.!,. Hit ! "KlVER'S END" and "PRAlKIE THUNDER" I HI I .IVIII rVIIH A SIRANdl l)>Rh SICkl BY THE WAY By Beachcomber A S the wearer of one of the * dullest hats In Europe I am naturally interested in the activities of a number of scientists who are working out a formula for making hats glow. I am sure that the idea behind ii is to attract millions of tourlsb to England for the Festival. I wonder would it be possible to hav • nm.Un. IVajflMtnM apparatus attached to every hat. Or fl halo of powerful neon lights round thv brim To make my own hot more Interesting, and to bring it into line with Ihe bOSi porary thought, I propose to hove • bright yellow band put round it. bearing the words, in scarlet letters. "Yippee. Suckers'" Groping la Thv Dtirk ASKED b> Mrs Urge how •* many rhubarb puffs containing tolderol had lieen discovered Mnce the regulations n..nusl it. and in whol quantities, J Minisiry of Foud ofnotal read out 12 pages u,r Bfures ...nrerning the cooling tests carried out un hot rhubarb puffs, in order to delect such ingredient ., grated hsjgge medicated moss, health globules shredded eardlmard, vanillasiring, and (ortihcd SOtTeL "| nc>ticethat there is no mention of tolderol." said Cocklecarrot. "That team under the Hobbs test." said the official "Its under a different department." An official of ihnl department was called, and Cocklecarrot repeated his question. "We keep no separate records." said the official. "For official purposes tolderol is treated as IruXlhedron. uml comes under srMrd rheese" "What are' the grated cheese statistics then'" asked Cocklecarrot 'After the Hobbs test," said the official, "ine figures are sent t. :i different department Grated cheese then comes under the illegal ingredients people, who send the figure* hack to G R 5741 for verification." loekicvarrot groaned like a beast in pain. OiHi-unnion Circle "put philosopher Kant, it will A be remembered (or not whal care I ?) distinguished between the categories of Quantity V£> afeMi? and lno8e ol Helatwn and Modality, by saying that the former concerned objects of perception, pure or empirical whereas the latter concerned the existence of those objects in relation to each other, and to the mmd Now I should be the first lodcny this, were I not restrained Rupert and the Castawuy—23 • d dirt h,. u> oo. *, he .uiu r.e. ,. i„,, „n,„ „., s „,. At I "If ..bin th Koko KM '!'hit hidcov*r r J,l,. m ^^.. I. %  k, b ,d Han on ind "I 1 "" '" ** > >'*• *hv. %  -., %  iha . co 1 ^( %  ri m.nv hour." ijcrp tp. BO J.l:,l,:. ihr bird KJii* u>h ih. .hr-'Koko'livTv" rr hour, ikep ,„d. .or. .r u ,h. •jvr I,I ihnn nrhra by a convHtmn laal I .shi.nl,i m carry my readers vrllli me whok hcarlcdly. Ycl who will rlcn that all olJe?ctii arc afT,-. nthrr all Ihe llmr' Not ou, Mn Rickthorpr. I fed -in,I.' u then, got on wilh our drinking IIOSSWOIIII £ • J U 'L V r J 'LJ — f r f— .' ^qn— ." r ...n.— *^j Iff •Teiuras ant made in it i II lio\ iii'lnd'iin %  . rti.y tivta,, hB -. ,„,,,„ ' rnr, .,. (lul ,„ t M *• Used for dit-tsing -*ound-. is. ti rnis i* orn-o., i|| De-enae. ., aw ,„, ho'te ife. Desr e !. Ui.uiiUMli i |H| Oeaeiiptlvr 01 | uX-wn (7l S? u .ir>" w iouisairo q i>aa BEATRICE 'PEARSON MEl FERRER' • AiFREoVwiincw SPKL! m-DAV 2 |. io. '* irheap prireal "II EIMUM. Il: %  riCHUNt. mnSt Ittlng Tn-iimrrnu— 2.30 t 8 30 p m. mill Continuing Dally HB 31) pin Gary COOPER in %  4H lllllll PLAZA THEATRE BRIDGETOWN PLAZA OISTIN ro-DAY WAIINER'S DoublePaul Henreid in "CONSP1RATOBS" and Gary Cooper in "CLOAK A DAGGER" 1 KIM IV SATURDAY. SUNDAY I a I III n| ramount Presents BING CROSBY In— "HERE COMES THE, WAVES" wllh The ANilREWS SISTERS E.MPIRK „isl Two Shown To-Day 4.45 and 8.30 p.m M-G-M Presents: FATHER OF THE BRIDE" Sl.rring: Spencer TRACY Joan BENNETT Elizabeth TAYLOR and Don TAYLOR HOW r.>-Uy t>nly 4 30 St 1.18 M-f. M Big Double Perry COMO Judy GARLAND Lena HORNE WORDS AND MUSIC NO MINOR VICES" Darin ANDREWS Lili PALMER Louis JOURDAN HOVAI. To-day & Tomorrow 4 30 United Artist Double William BOYD %  Ilopalong CASSIDY in •UNEXPECTED Gl'EST "MR. ACE" C.eorge RAFT Sylvia SYDNEY OLYMPIC Laal Two Shows Tn-Dty 430 and 8 15 20th Century Fox Double Oirrole LANDIS William GARGAN "BEHIND GREEN UGHTS" THE SHOCKING PILGRIM Heti'y GHAIILE Dick HAYMES AOI A 1 II CLU C11\'KMA (Members Onlyj I i <• Nu.iii -i s.se III Ml'IIKH BOGAKT — LAI KIN H\t ALL in "DARK PASSAGE" A Warner Brw Phrturr LET L'S HELP •**• III l ll VOI It BOAT We have CANVAS — Nos. 6— HOPE — All Sizes COPPER PAINT ANCHOR CHAINS WHITE PAINT AlWI SAIL NEEDLES GROMMKTS PALMS FISHING LINKS DEEP SEA LINES FISH HOOKS THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE rOTTOIV FACTORY LTD. • Masai %  •(.IP lllllll Pi, Tliu bnitfdialionnin 11 ^"" 'IS.' HiDlactoinw. J riu% i m:\sox ABLE nun is ... Hill -.1 IIOI.Il MiMTHAT YOl' WILL APPRECIATE OOl BLr BED SHEETS H x IN 0 11-53 suit list. B^ THE YARD 64-inrh wide $1.65 per yard HI lisl-Kr *Ds 72 x 7 fii 7.1 eaeh I All!.I HAM ASK in WHITE 72" Si Vl.'.Z per yard TABLE < LOTUS 32 x 52 ft.37 eaeh DAMASK NAPKINS <& 6tc. A 46. r arh KITCHEN TOWELS 47c. fetch RIIOADHMV IHIISS SIMM" IMWHK i isS ..•Ii. I 7 lM. SfT btB A A I III it M.XMMOTII TBil 3iRHltT Stalling IO MORROW i30J 8 30 B rr, P Lt A Z A THEATRE %  miiin.i ion vmd Continuing DAIIV 5 a 8 30 p NOTHING EVER & OTHINC You \ BM* LIKED MORI WARNER BROS. ; GARY COOPER i)*)M MORRIS -WALTER BRENNAN radM i-. ^.DAVES-JERRY WALD MM Hi THE DATES THURSDAY 19th & FRIDAY 20th at 8.30 MATINEE FRIDAY 20th at 5 pm AT EMPIRE THEATRE "PASSPORT TO HEAVEN" (REVUEDVILLE 1950) -ByMrs. A. L. STUART'S DANCING CLASS A WIDE RANGE OF STAGE DANCING FROM THE STATELY BALLET TO THE MODERN TANGO, JIVE AND BEEBOP BOOKINGS:— Open at Empire Theatre Box Office from Friday 13th hetween the Hours of 8.111 a.m. and 12 noon, and 1.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m. 11:111OKI IH'.STItA and BOXES IIH: HOBS ll.M BALCONY TJc. ALL SEATS CAN BE RESERVED GLOBE HERE AHE FACTS ABOUT A RECORD BREAKER UNIVERSAL INTERNATIONAL FILMS HAMLET With SIR I.Al'RENCE OLIVIER HAD A SUCCESSFUL CONSECUTIVE RUN At This THEATRE of 14 DAYS-28 SHOWS TO-DAY 1.30, 5 €r 8.30 p.m. A MASTERI'IECK THAT WILL BE A GLORIOUS MEMORY HAMLET To ADULTS — Your LAST CHANCE To See This Film SCHOOL CHILDREN 1.30 p.m. Matinees To See BAMLET TO-DAY FRIDAY. SATURDAY and MONDAY 16th i mi nit i \ in rt ..,is A.wnuEBE HEADTEACHERS ARE ADVISED TO CONTACT THE GLOBE THEATRE FOR TICKETS FOR CHILDREN



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Till KM) \Y (KTOBFR 12. 193(1 BARBADOS \nvOCATIPAC.I 1 l\ I Jo wish (k>nwt<'ry Cleaned Lip 1 A iu IIWI-:, . %  many ye.,o being n Two walla are being %  both side* ..! u* raainaiv leaa Ing to Us %  growth h.is U'. 1 %  %  While %  lilmunr m moving %  Wiui in %  were equipped with fLMXmmXH N .... throwtnt 'c Rock Some claim that thev can nee M and the dli. eornliuj (mm b sea the penon who is throwhi^j them A few told tli,. Advoc.it> aay that they are afraid to walk %  '" % %  'in-, ri:i\ I.• ut b) %  MM %  TB POLICE BAND umlei I play ;.! 4 o clock this evening T *"' % \HHIITV Dl el. > dom ftU island, as well eg itudentl from %  UM oiol tie d.nl> Io see the film "Hamlet' l-eoti running f. %  S> hool. wh" %  aw the n iftamoor that at flr*t i the pi) He said ihrt baton %  %  : %  I bin thai B* WOUM b.dhle to fnll.ev Ine picture A u)Ri:i no one ,,.the i Ing through the Citj \ be ..ii to drive alona Gardena through wntch is only provided for 'buses. ranch far. The i 't>upassengers brought MR attention to the r., : ,,ii i :liim C BAULKS I CHRISTIE of the i. Company n hf.i; • %  %  -hut, la situated at Duih Hill, Oarrkno, m bsta k asi i i b not >'t known H •town M C M II. DANIEL ff ifa %  Stn n Hoys' School, repotted thai the same school wan hroki n end entered between Monday and .rid quantity of bis were rei The total value Ii $62.55. Tne %  K I I' A BUVlLi: owned and ridden bj Lionel Greaves at Btw %  .11 :n accident at Ashf< id Road on Tuceda) < %  Also involved in the accident tor car T—115. a %  iphlbu Pains o* Welchman Hall. St. Thomas. *-T"Mii. MOMM: t IMM \ i J five t Warn yard al H ...lock tonight for Wai ii" area of Christ Church. B RIDGETOWN gloomy ajjaln yesterriin ind rain (ell hi the late afternoon. The lemperaHfi degress Fabrenbg I : tie Some people were of the opinion that the dark clouds were caused by the intense, heat. Sils Wilh Baby While Selling Frail I 1.1 BBV PAGI LAMBEHT LI )ug| ..-.,, i the I I Ltd munch)nu biscuit %  %  WITH PENS restgfj ..iw eaeeesw book!., i-oy* rron rrj notdtcbtod M ggsas y a Porn M the chemical proportie.. uf water, and it did of a small frog In the clan-, room. Form 3b at the Lodge School aro taki.it yot-rday. SItr had feel finished agpl ••trangr when omol the hoys pa Venezuela Has Great Future Economically Lodge School Students Come From A11 Oi*>r Tim Wl THE 312 boys and 15 masters of the Lodjn School, Si John, were it lunch when the Advocate visit* esque set ol inuhli %  i I i big lunch room ttM steady hum of voices, Steady ilmtln. oCCMUons I afi'l the tinkle of ware. ni for tie %  — — — — %  • 'Fort Anthers!' Spends Day In Port v whh h ning. ilid not leave |mtil lau night The -hip usually leav %  at arrival (m .%  ... i i % %  1 (actoril) They, p 'i ml unon from T rpgeid • Ujht M passengers. 4ft of ere intranaMa %  ,. in-d n lull da> Prom :i" .< m launel • %  Vera l.mding ther w %  %  lunched and Bea-batbad enul %  ni the tbu d i Ho Venesueli %  % %  %  ; Supply t told the : th.it till.-was so bepre enl well „>. the tremendoui %  reautl ol the I and guai.i. i t i gtenIta In the worlrl in the state of Bolivar. Mr Itogera arrived ben ago from v. with his wile .tnd fan they are it ivlna ..: C n of ware came fn... 1 cconom b> inch! '"' nd .,. ..iv. ] Si John al I W A 1 i (']. p irgtoi Funns. Weal Indies, the ma %  KhOOl ;i Fireworks Come Out %  the Barbados Pubuc h Committee, told the "Advorat %  that tho' .all day. %  %  bus) living i ., Technicid Help %  theli rv.onu arc now exhlbltln N.Ainerirans Shtuilrl Be Kncoitra^cil To Gome To Iturbutlos %  Mid though aha docs not U %  %  n*. -he atlll (indl tim, %  %  : gf g 1 %  ,-..[ She %  %  % %  there ,s M one will %  beby. are Irylna times," sh> told the Advocate yester.la> Umata tli %  at i.i'i w.i' Lsullbei : ll .11 itix-Wx" %  nglo imbert. though There n •nlla for htm When gg %  :.. she runs i>> UM 1 >k about is yards awav ainb," v." %  IMX" and when Lami %  hi.. DMsthsi an answer | -mile, lie gets imne "but-bui Hopes Allej la %  crea i Cbapel Btreel til li tut %  .hack of ii budding, tou will aw M>eiie*er. Rarlwr I %  mtnr but ou arouM MM gp unybodj come oui whoae hatr u :i ii ihere foi I 1 O'li lot bared arm anil tin %  lshop, howev.i. |hl I i tintrade I the tn lor'* Ad frmt sjuer'a there is an old %  k like sign which tell%  : the arc. but there hi n.. Are b ound of the ham d anvt] hggcrd WHEN CONSTRUCTING OR REPAIRING A BUILDING ALtt'AY." USE EVEKITE ASllKSTOS-CEMFNT CORRUGATED * %  ii %  %  : %  •: i s. Trinidad. SO such board) is U %  ant Cricket Season The erlckel saaeon li on thi grco %  i to Have iin ii OuV led Include u the Knit and Si Some at 1 30 p m Pollcr Hand Concert al Menl ii llniint.il il t |i in Water PStl Aiiiutic Club at 5pm Mahllr Ciucm.i. Warner^ PI. HI I m... ^ ml i hri-t Chiir.h : %  |. in The Weather TODAY Sun Rises: 5 48 am Sun Bean 5.45 p m Moon i First quarter) October 18 l.ightinc: II p m VE0TEBSAT Rainfall (Codrlnglon) 84 •* F t.mi.....i.n. MMl 71 5' F Wind lUreetl.m <9 a.m N I 13 p m ) V \ I Wind VeliMll* 5 mllei per hour ll.iremeli-r M (l m ) -"• S""> (S p m ) 19 81? %  nd, M 1 blla.ielphi %  %  i The nuiM'iil\ of local flrewoi K, to aroi t "ii %  month If a have alreadi ndfused o-rdei with City firm but one told the lii>,.i'f .. tarday that they are -tin RUM more order* coming In OGK YQIJR BEST INJURED I taken t. 1). Skiin,. | l .. ni with a Pri •bus in I id %  hortl) i-tn %  %  %  Darnell Yarde of Christ Church MacrTwraon'a leg was In%  Wrong Parking Cost 151Phillips of Thorpe's CotUUB, Bl < %  • oifi %  rdi red by Mr II A Talm.i Io pay a fine of 11/ %  an. 1 | the motn in a restricted area pay the line In 14 prisoned foi OM month HIGH AhlD LOW EXPECTED ON SATURDAY laUot %  the commg Noveanber BTI Meeting are expected (;• oiogisf o" %  i ford". Twenty three aeries Sweep lor this meeting hav %  | Fined 15/For Overloading HIM t! Tull ol Halls 1 %  %  %  .. 'admg the rt M jrtT Noel KaOhoUa, a In. <-oohii : i : %  .; : was also fined l.V a lh with hard utrjour when he was bus M—1332 on Rot Both :'• ommiued on Auin ' Mi li A X i %  Police Magistrate Truman, MacArthur Will Try to settle U.S. Policy a Frem page 1 (3) The future of Fort M wh* n rxssTi raateai i f view l %  %  ni who %  of J temporary w i through i navy, and Ocneral MILArthur who believe I mosa should form part >f the U Bl Pacific iiefencsvstem. (4i The peace settlement with Japan on which the Suites has rt.. ni UN b %  informal lulaternl talks at Intareat• ed '. %  iielieved to ai srall Britain, arm I with th, %  Reader. WE MEASURE THE INGREDIENTS EVERY LOAF J & ENRICHED BREAD IN OF R Vour hair will be handsomer by far when you treat it u, Vaseline' Hair Tonic. 1 Just use a tew drops a day... then see the difference! Buy a bottle todayl Vasellneffi v.\v.v.\v.\v.v.v. I' I It I \ \ C II (I H S for Poultry anil l.irt-slitrk "SE£ DlfFERlNCt %  %  %  % % % % % % % % % % %  %  %  %  %  Regular daily of delicious creamy C M build u, twtaoce & help Omtdy g"'"" 1 • Cod Liter Oil. ndicM tourot of Viismla A to iNoaatosd M aatsn'i BJMM produt I bi build up Mssslna sad rrUMsaor io Cold., Couahi, aaJ oiher cheat and hroadUal %  llmcnti KhXALL EMULSION ceautas a very hifh pmporlioc DBM valuable natural ol pn*entrd in i %  mooth drUdoui cnany esnulBon. SfXALl IHU11I0N nnnn' 0 '""' C f-W G00D ,o tf That's why you enjoy consistent quality at all times T Now obtainable from:KNIGHTS DRUG STORES BtvF-.. DURALIFE AI'TO ll.\TTi;illi:S-WITH EBONITE SEPARATORS


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Tkaraday October 13 195* Barbaras Ilwoca U.N. TROOPS DRIVE TOWARDS PYONGYANG \\Reds Ordered "Fight To The Death Britain, France, U.S. Will Ignore E. German Elections FRANKFURT, Oct. 11. THE UNITED STATES, Britain and France announced today that they had told the Soviet Union they could not recognise Sunday's elections in East Germany as giving the Soviet Zone regime any legitimacy or claim to represent the people of East Germany. The American, the British and the French Hinli Commissioners in German) John J McCloy. Sir Ivone Kirkl>;itrick and Andre Francois Poncet, all sent similar letter to General Chuikov the Soviet Commander-in-Chiet in Germany telling him so. Rice For Starving Reds The High Curnmbsion here this : afternoon 'released Ilk McCloy*!! letter to 0O I kov which included ihe ropy of letter from West Gem < .Ll.-. 1>I Konrad Adei I ah German elections and other I freedom TAIPCH.rORM06A.Oct 11 j McCloy'i. letter began by sayln Chinese Nationalists said today l-In my lettei <>( A1a> 25. 1950. that their transport plane* had! I requested you to tnu dropped 24 tons of nee in famine. I your Government thi strtkr-n areas on the Communist'agreed on by the FOI.I^ mainland ton of the United States. GrM A spokesman said Ohat 101 Britain and France for proecduir American built planes also j which would permit holding free dropped six tons of Nationalist democratic and propaganda pamphlets und flag:'throughout Germany an for under-counter celebrations lead to the eslai'li-hmfreely e|i Only W. Germany ( mi DecUle On Gerntan Army -ADENAUER '/ \\ (Jet 11 %  Kout.id Adenauer said toing n %  that he hint lold the Waal QtlBU pMibameai could decide whether Germanwas to raise dn tf 9 %  Allies had he san Addressing the German peo-j*' on both -i' I radio, the l' 1 m Id Wa iwatting to **J whether the Allies an %  %  when." Hi broad egg*, lollowcd yesU (lay %  l.-s.nu... nil Q| hU M.I, ll of Interior Custav Hi over cuaafratinanta il German uttitude towar) %  On France. Adenauei have so oft* i .mil also ptovdb Out OOBrWUl towards Franei. and out Arm d I in i-omm I with Fral ''at I bact against us with mistrust again: mistrust i induces confidence Hi produce) more mi' VIHON yesterday of the anniversary of Ihe founding ot the Nationalist Government St years ago Planes ranged over Central and South China from Chekmng province south of Shangai to Kwangtung. north of the Indo-, China border. Nationalist Intelligence reports published here todav clalmei that 7.000.000 people faced stai vatlon along a flooded river valley stretching north of Shanghai and Nanking. Communist Deputy Premier Tung Pei. say these reports, had admitted that Communist China was short of at least 1.000,000 tons of fooostuffs and nut thousands of people were home less. Nationalist agents reported .'issntisfactiou in Shanghai. They alleged thai Communists ha Nortman Darnell driving his lorry patweatl W.wl and Bnvington. i toratt reported thai the rain Mfl blue splashes like Ink on the windshieiit end bodywork Earlier this week i.m' fell terthlre about i*o to iso miles north ol here II was thought this was. i by high wind scattering elder berries. A weather as perl MIS'Wday that "blue rain" In Dor•el might be caused I particles carried icTbJ I Atlantic from C'entrnl or North An i Bed ram is (girl) common in Italy, caused bg dual tide-. Mln| carrwd from the S.I ll 111.! —Rculrr %  not vel il cen H tj letter. Resolution I enclose the text addressed lo the Allied Magloire Tops The Polls IN HAIT4 PORT-AU-PHINCE. Haiti. OcttW ii Officials Of the 1)ciJ.u1nic:it .: Interior said lodu th.it Col. Paul Magloire wn>i 90 \*tr rent of tho rotoi m Haitl'i presidential site tion held on Summ\ Tlie Electoral Board i> %  cbacVllM ti' IBM on October 22 ". confirm the result of the balloting. The Constitutional Commlttei meats m November ofM cm gUtuI the inauguration of Maglmrc and the new Courasfl Magloire 43. had resigiu-1 ffom the military Junta which rul-d tho island since it m-.-u i ovm DwmarMli Kefime fi odk-e o year ago. Magloire's chief opponent Fenelon Alphonse. supporter of Estime charged that : -n WHS "hnkuin' and did rot cast a vote —C.P. Meeting Broken Up With Knives VIENNA. Oct. 11. The Austrian Socialist Party Headquarters here alleged today tenor bands'* from the High* Soviet controller 7,,-.. tdnid (ommiwoii JJ\ Hi. I %  :,. Ids had lruii up a SocioUa: MRU CLAKA I'OItb. *l *cai old .vide* al Henry 1 out. Uir MI I ben p.cuuod -*''ii *iein I %  %  > m Itutfl. died at the Ford Huspiul in Detroit When Ford drove bis art car threiigb the atreeta of Detroit .1 was Mr> Foul wbo -at b* his tide and faced Uie jeers or tho crowd Her public evpearan. n. +*** inireriiifnt She preferred In i role uf wife mid awl Mr. ford wsbom on April ll. l67, on .i fsrin at ftodford. Michigan. adjoining the propf-rty owned by Hour* fard'n parents, aba was 11 years old when -Inln-l isei ber DHsb*nd HM t wlirn thes wi>rp m*irlrrt Chancellor Inviting attention to %  resolution adopted In the Uundes. lag on the lith Sej.temliCr and now endorsed bar the Federal Government. This rcrolutioi nnip>ing powers to arrange foi the holding in all four zones of occupation, of elections to an all German Parliament The resolution should be con fciderwi in conjunction with a statement made im the same dnv In the Bundestag by the Ch.mcelloi In th* name of the Federal Government, the text of which I also enclose You will observe thai • On Page 3. celing with knurkle dust knives. The meeting was bOi h.t night in n etMBoa in Duartt itit a few mUoa (rom the otlfleaoa. Several people including Ihe Mayor and Danrt) Mayor of the town were seriously wounded —ftevter AGCEPT RED ARGUMENT\ AND MAKE U.N. INACTIVE] Says Canadian Delegate LAKE SUCCESS, Ocl. 11. Canadian Minister of External Affairs Lester Pearson. I to-day told the United Nations Political Committee thai if Russian arguments were accepted the General Assembly would be unable to act in the case of aggression. — — %  — Pearson was answering an at-1 :,irk made yesterday by th. sky on "the Aeheson plan' to gtvl the General Aasemhlv authority to | deal with aggression if the Security Council failed tn aj I Pearson said ihei V>-ahin-Ky hai overlooked one essential poim In .he proposal—namely that the Assembly was being given powers which wan not i n'.v within the Charter but which were only after the Security Council itself had failed to take action ARTIES HEADLINL I (Wfr TRUMAN, MACARTHUR WILL TRY TO SETTLE U.S. POLICY LONDON. Oct. 11. 1 In ident Truman's Mid-Pacific meeting with General! Uuutilaa MacArthu *n'iir*Kl weekend w Inter: in London diplomatic quarters tf • %  arorld rnvfininent W. $m MM pretend -1..-t .. I.'nilesl •i i the complcti solution to all problems of Inter national relationships" he said "Our first task Is to unite thi five countries". Mr Churchill asseitvd W. utagak our hand in gratitude and % %  i ('Mil ••> the ocean to i'" %  Othef hah of the flee wmld afflOa* hein haa Hi SPORTS WINDOW WATER POLO das rwi i M ihK %  %  i*> Drul'ii%  i"i.....I-I. '-ouionxi .nb i i' M J'i'l iPUCHIHK ni<*r %  %  di*l In lip-nip cunOIUon .•.. 1 .,ll*rtt..„ will -N> Ijhrti WI.-.-H Ili.-„ aTlkr .o hdp in US'* fiW'n-i when lh'oar, BMM>• %  Lord Maj tsot Emsl lt %  the Anai r-satirl one week Baal Berlin "shadow ised by three Berlin political parties, many East Berliners expressed their desire for free elections. THE RAINS' GAME Al 8 o i lock last night, the wain which rushed down Iron. Hi* sounlry to no* through the C*neU-.<-.U gainst Pyong aug. the Cotnmu-i %  i up Inl Hi) ml* •,. the aortri i quotad BaUcpla Crab Hill .. r Pn i nun Truman will tak M.I opporluntty to rtsnlnd Oan era] MacArthur lliat he is MtUBg is the se.vnni not only "t th** moot, but als. <>f the United Nations Free Flection* In particular. Truman is expected to discuss the |>"li'ir*nl futurt -if Kona aftai thi Anal tit* lot-) hich according t the resInn n of Ihl i'nil-.i Nations (Jenernl A i il* Government uf Presldf-iit Syngman Khc whose future will bs MI %  .HI be m ry of the l.'niterl NaUM I H B With -upri for this Oovernjnanl (2) The Mld-PuclHc contol wnlen (.omnium M.ifutun alUtudg '" ''' m United St-tc <;..v. t MM rt • trongtli and iniinist China it thriveOther matu-rs for discussionI Mn.-.in-m-i t>\ 3 *li • ii 76 2 no B7 2 7S 1 2fl 2 Ha The lath i the Chfnaac OoaMstihfaH For i ign Minlstiv as saying -Ni" American forces are atBMwUng to cntoa Uie 3llh parallel large scale (he Chinese peuphM.nnot stand l,,v idly wild regarl l( such | in..iiMluaiiim that created by Ihe Invasion .-( Knreii by the Unilr.l Stan..> its accontplne tuuiUriee. and with i % %  garrt to Ihe dangeroustreft I •owarda extending the war The Chines,foreign Minl-tiv n-onlmg to the Radio denounced ra etiiirel.v illegal the United Nations rrsoluHon on Saturday which gave (irnenil Ihmglas Mi Arthur ihe "go ahead" for noMing the Sflth par.llrl in pursuit ol North Korean forces He said thai the eighi .-.w.r lesolutum had been i.ndei manipuhitlon of 'In Btatag gn a I m v heliniiiii n,.,nmt, o| the i n latin Tin An army spokesman here said Ihey made "no great effort to riove ahead sime there are other plans made for them Major OaneraL Url I Part%  ir.d LcAltenani 'lenetal Walton H Walkir. A rrTn Kgh'Jl Alm^ i i Innded at th. %  %  iv aftai it waa %  riviiCBb. The Airt'eld has a : nut an sail iwasl lunw.i* of 1.1W Mirda h.ith "f asphalt and in reas'inably giM-ii t*ondltlon Tar Kit Airfoi.,plansta will fly In mpplle-. of ftiel and ammuilloii nni I the ground trajmi" ItW i.m I %  iilii.ii. .. IfUl \ 11 ..iinh'i. | usjfjorj ( United Natlona ground mKips no) rlalmed ion North K.*eai. asualUes and M vehicles. 2? iiullding*. 2" rail A MS gun pOgtaoni iU"lroved ol tamaged North Korean Prime Minl'tei Kim Ir S.i. BSBl his luldiers to •fight to iii.id ...failing to a broaalcasl i ihe Pyongyang radio nig rjtdof virtual rsjfjnaM m 'lenernl MnAilhiu '"llnal" sur' mi rountrv H facing a grave crlall PuTfJH desperately In iplte of 'll iiimculties until the dr- and ."i 30 p m Hill nUnaffH Of) ihe path of recovery" Mr Churchill icferred lo the hostility of ttM 'oniniunial party i | |o I-\I i % '0*p ti uards F.urnin-an union the Iviii „;i On -Tage a lol a rope' inj UVM founded. whiih il dra the poveity would all the establishment uniTi-i and i.c-i-*"!" q m iraler l'l i uon thrOUghoul Koie* wa, in d'. the spokesman added, dcsignc I lUthorise invading tn-ip* nj tha United States und the other itiona acting as her accomplice*! invade and occupy all Km. and to expand further the aggre nve war in Korea —Healer UN. rrr>ofw Killed 700 Wonwn* ChiUtren In Seoul CLAIM REDS SAN mANCISCO. Oct 11 Countag charges of alriK-ihe* by Hnltetl Nalu.iis tOI Knii'ii WIMI prod1.1. .1 w-t. r".iv by CoaaenuauM rtid pi'knn \ j I nl. h from Pyongyang (North Koftan eupitali Padlo laairtglj ihnt more than .<"> votnM and rhlldran were siaugliMUT al Seoul by troops of American lore nors mm Bynayiuui Waw'i (oWitn Koresni i limn —Reuter. T.l.t. THK AIIVOCATK Titr. NBWI King llll ""•> r Nlsht. %  JgfTIU: ADVOCATE PAYS FOB man l 'S,'S*~+*' r ''SS*WW, C.C. Gets No Reply To Deep Water Harbour Inquiries GUARDIAN ASSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED Kjl.bli.hed 1821 %  Acceptance of Vysiunsky'i legal argument would merelv mean that the United Nations cannot take any action ut all to safeguard peace and atturity if the Security Council is made powerless by one of its member*;." he said. • %  We do not and cannot believe that the United Nation-, rrumer fauction* amr such futility Pearson said that the Soviet Minister had argued that the Assembly must refer to the S.-cunlv Council without taking %  action wlulever the question on which thr action waa necessary. %  mg to say th ll illegal under the Charter for the A-emhl. to recommend that United Nations troo The general hesitancy m the Korea to prevent Cornans other section was attributed tn vasinn hut that It is not In I reports that Communist China had. illegal for the AL < told the United States tr> "keep ; mend) that United Nations troops out of Korea" l'i m order tnainlv slightly lower wlthlthat that country may be at thi Brtiuh Gaye*r-an-cnt stocks dull mercy of Communist forces in the by speculators 1 northern pert of the peninsula Reuter Reutae. The Chamber of Commerce He reminded that in UlMl let.aretully wiu. uoyernnient a i. the> had pointed out th. f come to a derlnilc understanding lhajj they were a lesponslbie ..rgam*. i WtUl them Thaj all ade lelativi u> tne probody n p r esen ts tit tarnnsmt to get awav posed deep water % %  ttH BOB* ll the Chamber • oniv b acknowledfWl llndgetown. had < omplaine-J wen 081 %  ot one .should have been ron-T two big meichanu. Thai he t>er told Couii'-il member J -l theii sulti-d on the holding of an addi.thought was the idea thc> hail monthly moating atonal h'-iiday. and of the sho.' got. Mr A DeC Inni" tnoughl the notice that had been given Mi A de L. Inniss aak matter up Mr. I.. tgiraad WHh Mr l.ucie-Smith a The Chamber had wrlttan had very good reasons to feel tlu.t aemarks and he thjnight thev Government son-e weekago mGovernment were not preprerl -houTd apthtta -rnall rommlttee o^iirlng M to wfcgt was being to take very much iUc of the to approach the < olon.al Se.reta-So IboS So project Mi Ii Chaml*r He really felt that the and get the whole matter lea,, Smith drevs attSSlttoil to attitude granted leave of absence for i munlty. and it was up to them cot flic ted with mirior^ business one month or more, four appc %  h. i said, that the Shipto satisfy government • ng and Mercantile Association were Thev bail gi> >> *** '"' id writ'%  • hem to set up a Board of Inquire colony. If M B*n Into the i Incroase their membersi put their bse in rvder ;o iJlloliduv AfTair come more repres-ntative. .e" Mr I.i. • do so nffh the Chamber „..,„,,, %  men! about Kespimsihillt\ the puhiithe West He certainly th< u.i indies cricketers had arrived from folk) MU the United Kingdon. responsibility and import and until matterlike menta were made yesterday those were straightened out. he Mr W K Atkinson. Senior did not see bos 0 "g Salesman at Messrs H Jason ippear any Jones & Co Ltd.. was appointed %  to Government i, act for Mr. n G Leacork Jnr tnan at present Mr C C Clarke. Merchant of It was finall> I ah Swan Stren't to act for Mr G. H. %  'it to thru King. Mr W H Grannurn tfore taking fiirth.i action DlrecU.r of Messrs Robert Thoir. Ltd ti. ael for Mr A R. C Welcniiie FOT l*re-.icient King, and Mr. J ') Tudor Tho Acting Preaident Hon nrovlsion Merchant of Roebuck V C Gale MLC told lha Street to act for Mr. A S Bryden. TKANs\i:mi BUSliSESS INCUIUE— FIRE CONSEQUENTIAL FIRE LOSS (Including Loss of Profits) PERSONAL ACCIDENT EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY PUBLIC LIABILITY BURGLARY CASH INTRANSIT "ALL RISKS" BAGGAGE AND PERSONAL EFFECTS IT.II-I'M i i -.1 -. RELATING TO ANY OF TUT AaVUVL CLAMSr.S OF BUSINFSS MAY Bl OBTAINED InIS APPLICATION Tl LOCAL AGENTS— S.P. MUSSON SON & CO.. LTD. Broad Street P.O. Box 227 Telephone 4465 % %  .•SSM*v*%'.v.

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