Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
aT

ee



Thursd

September 21

1950

_

Harry



ay

Oakes’
Killer Named

MIAMI, = iorida, Sept. 20.
A NASSAU DETECTIV£ left by plane yester-

day for Oakland, California, armed with the
name of the person given him as the murderer of
Sir Harry Oakes seven year ago in his Bahamas
The name of the alleged slayer of the

mansion.

Canadian millionaire miner was supplied by Mrs.

Hildegarde Hamilton, prominent

Florida portrait artist.

ort Lauderdale
Later she told reporters

that she did not want to become too involved in the
investigation “because it may not be safe for me to

visit’’ in Nassau again.

W.I. Lose
Last Match

LONDON, Sept, 20.

The West Indies cricket team
suffered one of their rare defeats
during their tour of England when
they lost their final game to a
scratch team of country players
raised by the firm Elders and
Fyffes yesterday. It was not a
serious encounter, just a_light-
hearted bit of fun. according to
what one could gather to-day from
behind the veil of secrecy which
surrounded the game.

Admittance was refused to the
Press and the public on the
grounds that it was a social occa-
sion.

The West Indies were invited
down to the firm’s ground at New
Malden, just outside London, for
lunch and a game of cricket. As
a result not even a gossip para-
wraph appeared in the London



Press which hitherto has published
ful; details of all’ the games
played by the Tourists.

The scores were not to go down
to" Wisden and of course the match
does not count in the records.

This is what one understands
happened.

he tourists batted first mak-
ing 199 for 6 declared after
batting two and a half hours to
make the runs.

@ On page 8.

B.B.C. Boy
Rare Fish
Meet a new fish. It is the short
nose Bat Fish Ogeocephalus

Radiatus, (for the fish expert).

Shaped like a bat it is nine]
inches long. From the tip of one
fin to the other is eight inches.

The Bat Fish has a_ pointed!
beak. Its mouth is %4 inch wide
and of a bright red colour.

The fish in the picture was
caught yesterday off Needham’s
Point by Wilfred Herbert of Bec-
kles Hili, a member of the Bay
Street Boys’ Club.

The Fisheries Officer Mr. Dud-
ley Wiles yesterday told the Advo-

cate that the specie was identified
by Charles M. Breeder (Jrr.) in





his “Field Book of Marize Yishe7
of the Atlantic Coast.”
It is said to be common f= cer-

tain shallow bays especially where
there are sandy beaches,

--- OR

were ee

















AT. TOP is seen the Bat Fish looking it full in the face—Below, the fins |

\the other way round.

——

‘| Mrs. Hamilton said she repeated

the story told her two years ago
by Edward Majava, 31 year-old
Oakland mechanic. She told the
story on Monday night to Assis-
tant Supt. Augustus Roberts of
the Nassau Police and Police
Chief Roland of Fort Lauderdale

Majava had told Oakland Police
on Monday that he knew the “in-
side story” of the bizarre Oakes
murder case and the identity of
the killer,

Oakes who discovered a rich
gold vein at Kirland, Lake Ontario
was bludgeoned to death in 1943.
Asked by a reporter why she
did not want to become involved
in an Oakes murder investigation,
she replied: “do you remember
the murder of an American woman
last year in Nassau whose body
was found at the bottom of a
well? It is generally believed that
the woman knew something about
the Oakes murder.”

Found Dead

Miss wetty Renner 37-year-old
Washire.c D.C. lawyer was found
dead in a well last winter. The

mysicy, i her death was still un-

solved. Mrs. Homilton said she
met Majava three years ago in

For’ Lauderdale when he came to
purchase a painting of the Morro
Castle. A year later, she told re-
porters, he came back to her
studio and related the story of the
Oakes killing. Majava, she related,
told her that he got his story from
a “blonde women in. Miami.” At
the time, Mrs. Hamilton continued,
he told her the name of a man
who supposedly killed Sir Harry

“I told the police all I knew about
the story Majava told me” Mrs
Hamilton said. Majava arrested
in Oakland on Sunday on a drunk
charge said it was Mrs, Hamilton
who told him the name of the
killer. Mrs. Hamilton said it was
She re-
fused to tell reporters the name

@ On page 8.



SPORTS
WINDOW

WATER POLO
‘This af.erncon, Water Polo
games at tht Barbados Aquatic
Club are Snappers vs. Bonitas and
Police vs Swordfish
These are two very
aiches for Snapp<
(si) because ea must won his
i re if either is to win this
year's league, |

important
1d Sword-








‘the matches begin at 5 p.m.
The Ré€feree will be A. Cla ‘ke



THIS?

and the resemblance to a bat are clearly shown.

|
!
public services such as the Post|
Office and railways there must

Barbadus

TY



}
i




Africa, receatiy.



Will Pur

se
Govt. Ranks |

BONN, Sept. 20. |

Gustav Heinemann, West Ger-|
man Minister of the Interior to-!
day issued instructions to dismiss
all employees of the Federal
Government who belong to any!
of the 13 Communist or neo-Nazi
organisations, |

The Minister acted swiftly on
yesterday’s decision by the West
German Cabinet to intensify tha
anti-Communist offensive in Wes)
yermany. West German
cfficials to-day did not believe
more than a_ handful _ of
administrative civil servants |
would be affected by the purge
They said however that in large,

inevitab'y be “extremist pockets” |

and there would have to be some,

“weeding out’. |
—Reuter.

j

|



Israel Expel ©
4.Thousand |
Bedouins |

FLUSHING MtADOWS, Sept

Major General Willia:. Riley re-
ported today that Israel had ex-
pelled some 4,000 Bedouins and |
1,000 Arab refugees from
last

20

Israel |
seven |
to recent |
that Israel

Into Egypt in the
months. In answer
Egyptian allegations
had embarked “large-scale ,
military operations’ to expel all!

Arab refugees from the demilitar~ |

on

ised zones of Palestine, the United
Nations’ truce chief declared:



“On September 2. 1950, Israeli
military units rounded up some
4,000 Bedouins who have been liv-
ing in and around the demilitar-
ised zone of El] Auha and drove
them out of Israeli controlled ter-
ritory across the Egyptian inter-
national boundary
territory.

into Egyptian

General Riley said that investi-
gation disclosed that
Arabs representing five Bedouin
tribes, all contended that Israeli
had been conducting operations to
clear Bedouins out of Israeli ter-
ritory with armoured cars and
guided by reconnaissance aircraft
After driving the Bedouins across
the border, Israelis burnt
erops and possessions

refugee

their

Israeli denied that they had en-
tered the demilitarised zone, he
stated, and contended that the
Bedouins were “infiltrators” be-
eause they had departed at the be-
ginning of the war and had illeg-
ally returned after to Israeli. Ac-
-ording to Israeli, the Bedouins
were a continuous source of
trouble. They smuggled, fired on
vehicles and laid mines.

In addition to the expulsion of
he Bedouins. General Riley said:
‘Since March, approximately 1,000
Arabs have been expelled by
the Israelis across the demarcation
line to the Gaza strip with a mark-
vd increase in numbers during the
‘ast month.

—Reuter

BERLIN, Sept. 20.

Soviet soldiers and East German
People’s police today seized two
American military police with
their patrol jeep in the American
sector of Berlin, Colonel Marice
W. Daniel reported. The American
patrolmen notified their head-
quarters by radio immediately
after the incident. They said that
they were within the United
States’ sector when they were
apprehended. Radio signals went
| dead.

The American military police
were making a routine patrol. The
police were arrested just beyond
the American sector boundary

After a day in which police on
|both sides of the East-West sector
‘boundary had engaged in a grim



bo YOU KNOW

s% » :
THIS ODD-LOOKING FISH, as yet unidentified, mystified trawlermen in the Cape

Tt was caught among stockfsh in a net a fow days ago 55 miles off Cape Colmabine,
about 125 miles north-west of Cape Town.

fine teeth and is of a dull grey colour

W. Germany | Stre

The specimen, which a

AUSTRALIAN PRIME

first of a series of broadcasts on Defence, to-night said that
the only hope left for worltl peace was to prove to the
potential enemy that putting the Atomic bomb entirely
on one side we are as ready and as strong as he,

Advocate Hurricane
Relief Fund
For Antigua

Amt



previously acknow-



ledged $6,301.40 fF
Canadian Bank of
Commerce
a e aeepert 5.00
" rier ‘ 5th 9
Advocate Co., Lid.
Mr. & Mr.. RR, G 20.00
Mr George C'wham 10.00
a E. Stuman MG
Total

$6,341.58 |

N.B.—-N. B. C. Boyce $6.00 in ||

issue hou'd ret
N. b. U. Boys
This Fund will be closed tomor-
row Friday. |
|
— |



Americans
Round-Up
Red Leaders |

BY ALEX VALENTINE |

With United States Marines on!
the road to Seoul, ©-pt. 2u,
American Intelligence oftjeets
were today rounding up-C6nmmu-
nist party members,in tue Inchon

area, |
An authoritative source dis-j
closed that they were working |

(rom the almost complete lists of
party members which were found
in the shell-ruined Party Head-
quarters in the town.

So far the sources said that the |
Americans had captured more than |
300 known and suspected Commu- j|
nists including about 30 women.

Helping American agents is the!
organisation known as the Korean |
Democratic Youth Association
Group of Rightwingers, suppressed
when the Communists invaded
South Korea





The Americans admit that there
have been some cases of working
off personal grudges by denoune-
ing people not in fact associated
with Communists. All the sus-
pected people however, are screen-
ed by personal acquaintances and
against captured records, they said

Intelligence Officers said that
«hey were hunting for several
necple who had collaborated with
Communists and would turn ther
over to the South Korean authori-
ties

i saw six prisoners in a village
about 2 miles from Inchon, They
had been seized in a lonely hut
in the hills by South Korear
Youths. An American Counter-
Intelligence officer was waiting for
them at the police station.

—Reuter.

:netch—as-snatech—can game of re-
taliation, 76 police were |read)
behind bars as hostages: 50 were
from the Soviet sector and 26 from
the Allied west sector.

Colonel Daniel reported that a
West Berlin policeman who was
with the Americans was also
arrested

The prelude to today’s hostage
war occurred on Monday when
six East sector police were arrest-
ed in the American sector while
acting as an armed guard for a
convoy of ten empty lorries

Soviet People’s police then
seized 26 Western Policemen as
they passed through the Eastern
sector for duty last night.

West Berlin police retaliated
today by pouncing on 44





THIS? FISH ?



ngth
Way To Peace

runs in our favour only if we use
et well.”

| t¢ forces and to create a feeling in



Aduacate

oo,

.N. TROOPS 4 MILES

Acheson Calls
For U.N. Police

TO KEEP WORLD AT
PEACF

FLUSHING MEADOWS, Sept, 20
The United States to-day called

for a Uniled Nations police force
.o keep the world at peace in a
cur pom. plan presented to the



jeneral Assembly by Secretary of
State Dean Achesogp.



|















sae

BB a tae
Town Docks, South

22 inches long, has four flappers,

Express.

Is Only

CANBERRA, Sept. 20.
MINISTER MENZIES in the

“Let us come
delusions,” he said.

out of our sell
“The time

Menzies said that the Australian
policy must be part of the world
deméeratic defence policy. “Do
you think that this Communist
enemy would iesitate Yo ruin
Western civilisation?
tlelusions.”’

He said thay the Communist
urpose was to <.sperse democrat-




the minds of people that as any
one of them might be attacked,
‘hey had -beicr keep all thein
‘Crees at home. If this succeeds,
he continued, international demo-
cratic co-operation breaks down
spd we all become isolationists,

Western Europe and the Middle
East are without adequate defence
snd if the Communists win the
war, we surely know the results,

~-Reuter.,

Dock Strike Talks
Continue In N.Z.

WG TON, N.Z. Sept. 20

Prime nister Sydney Holland
armed with emergency powers
said to-day that talks between
shipowners and dockers to end the
dock strike in New Zealand will
continue to-morrew, .

Ear.ier he said that the Execu-
tive Council had decided on a
state of emergency and he intro-
duced a motion invo the House
seeking the approval and confir-
mation of this step.

The dockers strike started in!
Wellington on September 12 over
the handling of lamp black aboard
a ship.

It spread to all New Zealand
ports on September 15 on the
orders of the Waterside Workers
Unon.



—Reuter





“The debate on defence

»

was opened by.



People’s policemen in buses, trams
and tube trains as they passed
through Western sectors on their
way to work in East Berlin.

East Berlin Police Headquarters
this afternoon charged West Ber-
lin police with unlawfully assum-
ing control of tube and elevator
train stations in West Berlin.

All stations in West and East
Berlin are under Soviet jurisdic-
tion according to the Potsdam
terms and East Police are normal-
ly in charge.

West Berlin police admitted
ordering detachments to carry out
raids,

East Berlin complained that
West Beriin police in strength
patrolled the East-West boundary
and detained and closely examined

| services

Sovie: Delegate Andrei Vyshin-
sky immediately stated that Mr.
é.cheson has “endeavoured to drag
us en to a path that has nothing
in common with the prot lems con-
iraniing the Genera! Assembly,

British Poreign Secretary Ernest
?evin and French Foreign Minis-

ice Robert Schunjoan were both
present when Mr. Acheson sug-
gested (hat units from member
euntries should be © specially

trained and equipped for the force
under the guidance of a United
Nations military advisor

Demanding action to prevent a
“drift to disaster’ Mr. Acheson
also urged that provision should
be made for the Assembly to be
called at 24 hours notice if the
Security Council shou!d be “pre-
vented” from acting in case of ag-
gression Dealing with what he
termed “the root of our trouble
the imperialism” Mr. Acheson
launched a five point attack on
Soviet policies

Mr. Acheson said that ivussia
had raised five barriers io peace
He said she sought the “collapse
of the non-Soviet world,” wrap
ped her people in a “shroud of
se¢recy” built up armaments at
a rate gravely endangering peace
and “manipulated the people ct
other states as pawns of Russian
imperialism.”

inally, he said “the Soviet use

of violence to impose its will and

its political system upon other
pedple is a threat to peace,”
Mr. Vyshinsky followed Mr

Acheson to the rostrum and said
that the Secretary cf State “did
not shrink from rude attacks or
the Soviet Union,”

Mr. Acheson, he said, had en-
deavowred “to drag us on to @
path that has nothing in common
with the problems confronting the

@ On page 7



ee es ener or eee

Strikers Hold
Up 2 Ships |

UN GEORGETOWN

GEORGETOWN, BG., Sept. 19, '

The strike of 400 waterfront
woftkers to-day appeared likely to
lellay the turn round at the port
of Georgetown of the ship Hecuba
of Amsterdam Holland and the
Booker liner Amakura ot Liver-
pow! The strike spread when
Bodkers (Georgetown) refused to
give effect to a decision of the
workers of the waterfront section
of the British Guiana Labour
Union to suspend for a week or
wo “Whitelegs” and the strikers
to-day picketed Bookers, number
a *d Thom and Cameron and

Satdbach Parker and Company
Ltds. wharf entrances. “Down with
brute force” was one of the pla-
cards carried.

The section is also protesting a
request to the Port Labour Com-
mittee by Bookers that seventeen
men be struck off the port labour
register for refusing to work when
requested and a decision of Sand-
bach Parker and Company Limit-
ed to introduce a new employment
system without consulting the
union.—Can, Press.



Deprived Of R.C.
Religious Services

LONDON, Sept. 20

A British Fore gn Office spokes-
nan teday said that the diploma-
i¢ community in Moscow had
2een deprived of Roman Catholic
religious services by the re-
tusal of the Russian au-
thorities allow an American
Priest, Father John Brassard t«
use the Chureh, Saint Louis ‘1
American Ambassador
Moscow, Admiral Alan Kirk
Soviet Deputy Foreign
sinister Andrei Gromyko last
< to allow Father Brassard to
take the place of the French
Priest who had left Moscow, Gro-
myko told Kirk that the Com-
mittee of the Church of St, Louis
had elected a priest to take the

to

Mcscow.
in

—(Reuter.

Red Soldiers Seize U.S. Police

“all vehicles, cyclists and pedes-
trians with brief cases or even
women with market baskets, who

crossed the boundary this morn-
ing.”

East Berlin police this morning
aiso closed vhe bridge which
links the East Sector and the
American Sector.

The six East Berlin Police

arrested on Monday came before
a United States’ Court today but
hearing was adjourned until Fri-

day for them to prepare their
defence. They will be allowed to
choose their own lawyers

The tension between the rival

not extended to
their Soviet

police forces has
Allied troops and
counterpart

—Reuter.



ROM SEOUL |

_|Ready To Recapture City

By JULIAN BATES.

TOKYO, Sept. 20

AMERICAN MARINES pushing on from their

mile and a half deep bridgehead over the Han
River reached a point four miles from Seoul today
as Communist troops were reported rushing north

to defend the key city.

Marines pushing over the

Han in strength at dawn this morning. met stiff
opposition and fanned out for an assault on Seoul

itself, expected within
Mighty Mo.
To The Fray

TOKYO, Sept. 20

The American battleship Mis-
our’, the largest in the world
day, joined the United Nations
vil grovp and supported the
lar River action with her sixteen
ich gunr

This wes announced by Admiral
struble, Commander of naval op-
“retions in Korea

The Tlissowri had sailed right

und the Korean Peninsula for
» week. She helped South Korean

udings on the East coast by
telling enemy concentrations at
‘amchok rorth of Pohang.

\cmiral Strubie also announced
that the British Cruisers \he Kenya
ut Jamaica, both of 8,000 tons,
ok part in the short range bom-
‘rdment of Inchon. The carrier,
‘3.350 tons. was among five en-
aged in the operation,

_ The Japanese surrender was
signed aboard the Missouri in 1945
She has three aircraft and two
helicopters and a normal comple-
ment of 2,700 men.—Reuter.

Brighter B.B.C

| LONDON. |



A 28-year old woman
accused of throwing a brick
through a window at the
London headquarters of the
British Broadcasting Corp-
oration explained she “felt
the BBC needed some liven-



the magistrate court: “I
thought we had been having
some lgusy programmes late -
lg.tt wer £8 be Wo
held for seven days for ex-

| ing up.”
| Fiorence Jean Hardy told
¢mination,—(I.N.S_)

Jamaica Fears

Competition

KINGSTON, Jca,. Sept. 19.

Concerned over the report that
cs.lars wll » released for the
importation of commodities from
“anada and that this will adverse-
ly affect |oeca] industries, the
Council of the Jamaica Manufac-
turers Association at a meeting
yesterday afternoon decided tc
send a memorendum to the Can
adian Government requesting
them not to insist that Jamaica
import from her, goods now
being manufactured locally. Larg
importiton of such goods from
Canada would soon close down
‘ocr! .ndustries. —Can Press,

48 hours.

Reconnaissance pilots operating
from the captured Kimpo airfield
north-west of Seoul spotted Cor
munist troops moving towards the
Southern capital from the south

The Han River crossing met only
light opposition. It was preceded
by a heavy artillery barrage and
supported by powerful air cover

The American battleship Mis-
souri joined in action today

Seoul, Korea’s langest city and
hub of the country’s biggest com-
munications network was captured
by Communists on June 28, three
jays after their invasion of South
Korea

With this city in their hands,
U.N. forces’ believe that they could
block almost all movement be-
tween North and South Korea at

the waist of the Peninsula
Captured North Koreans tole
to-day that

Communists were reinforcing Ja-
panese built defences within th
city. They were also said to be

| Intelligence Officers
digging sur

new defences on
rounding hills.

Defenders of the city have been
identified tentatively as two regi-
ments of the North Korean 18th
Division

American
Communist
taken

10

sources
prisoners
the drive on
yesterday

said 3,000
had been
in Seoul

acm

up
to

‘i mh
Moving Up

On the south, forces were mov-

ing up from which

they captured

Kumchon,

Waegwan
yesterday towards
the next objective in
their drive northwest
main Pusan-Seeul highway.
Among the icremost advance
units were men of the American
24th Infantry Division
General MacArthur's Headquar-
ters announced to-night that the
24th Division units were now
three miles north of Waegwan.
The second Infantry Division
which made another crossing over
the Naktong Kiver
CVRUTIGER Weta ay
| head‘ to-night,
| The marines jumped off from
the south bank, the Han after
one of the most intense artillery
barrages of the war. It lasted for
30 minutes
The first
machinegun
them in micstream,
bombs fell among
craft sending cascades
over crouching marines,
Within a few minutes of their
reach ng the opposite bank, they
had knocked out opposition and
an hour later they reached their
first objective astride the main
road and railway leading south to
Seoul, cutting communications
with Pyongyang
Number Three Platoon of the
assault company was the first to
gain the north bank of the river.
Late reports said that marines
were within four miles of Seoul,

along the

this mornin

WH Visage~

bursts of Communist
fire sprayed around
and mortar
the assault
of water

| @ On page 8



MEET
THE CHALLENGE

OF

UNKNOWN

THE

TO-MORROW

WITH A

POLICY OF

ASSURANCE

WITH

THE BARBADOS

MUTUAL LIFE

ASSURANCE SOCIETY.

J. N. WALCOTT
DENIS ATKINSON $

C. K. BROWNE,



l Canvassing

Representatives.

Secretary



PAGE TWO



Is
smith

of Dominica

their little

HONOUR E Arrow-
C.M.G., Administrator
Mrs. Arrowsmith and
daughter Jennifer
returned home yesterday by B.G
Airways after spending a week's
holiday. They were staying at the
Windsor Hotel.
Took Relief Parcels
R. H. S. L, MOSELEY, Assis-
tant Master of the St Vincent
Grammar School, returned home
vesterday by B.G. Airways after
a short visit here. He arrived on
Monday evening by B.W.1.A. from
Antigua where he had taken down
® number of packages including
clothing and foodstuffs from St
Vincent to the Government of
Antigua for relief purposes.
Barbados Is Best
ENERAL GEORGE VIDMER,
retired U.S. Army and father





ef Colonel Richard Vidmer of
Rockley, has bee ving in Bar-
bados since Dece er last year as
a ‘guest. at the Merine Hotel. He
left last night on the “Fort Towns-
hend” for St. Thomas whence he

will go to all the other West Indian
islands by air before returning to
Barbados in December to retain a
suite of rooms at the Marine for
another year.

General Vidmer told Carib that
he is not visiting the other islands
to get a better place to live, but
he is merely going to con-
firm his opinion that Barbados is
the best.

Sorry To Leave

R. A. S. DUNCAN, retired

Manager of the Barbados
Telephone Company Limited and
Mrs. Duncan, left yesterday by
the S.S. “Williamstadt” for Eng-
land on their way back to Scot-
land where they will reside with
their children who are attending
school there.

Mr. Duncan told Carib that dur-
ing their 15 years in Barbados,
Ly f had a very pleasant life. They

had made many friends and were
very sorry to leave,

Off To U.K.

R. FABIAN HOLDER

for the last year has been
working part-time in the Edi-
torial Department of the “Advo-
cate” and was one of the 1949
Barbados scholars, left the Island
yesterday by the s.s. “William-
stadt” for England where he will
enter Oxford University,

He is the son of Mr.

D. R. Holder
Road,

Trinidad Beauty Queen
ISS MARION HALFIDS
the Trinidad Beauty Queen
for 1950 arrived on Tuesday eve-
ning by B.W.LA. for two weeks’
holiday. She was accompanied by
her mother Mrs. E. Halfide and
they are staying at the Hastings
Hotel.

who

and Mrs.
of Westbury New

Miss Halfide’s visit was made
possible by B.W.1.A. who have
given her this trip and by the

Trinidad Publishing Co. who are
paying hotel expenses as a re-
ward for winning the Beauty
Queen Contest at this year’s Car-
—

federa on PHD OVE E hy HASH on

Port of Spain and her oar Ne
are reading and tennis,

Going To New York
R. and Mrs, Alfred Lazo of
Caracas, Venezuela, arrived
last week by B.W.LA. with their
two children Marianela whom
they have put into school at the
Ursuline Convent and Freddy.
They are staying at the Hastings
Hotel and expect to leave for
Trinidad by B.W.LA. to-day
and then go on to New York for
a month before returning to






of

“Here comes one

those wretched telet
sets butting in again!





Seas

London Express Serv



B.G. Civil Servant

R.

Guiana,

little

day morning by the

ney”

are staying at Maxwell's

MALCOLM FERNANDES,
Civil Servant of Brilish
Mrs. Fernandes and theif
son Philip arrived on Tues-
“Lady Rod-
for four months’ holiday and
Coast

Mrs, Fernandes is an Instruc-
tress in Dressmaking at the Singer

Sewing

Machine Company.

Barbadian Returns Home

the

R. ALONZA HINDS

U.S.A
yesterday
Townshend”
period
relatives at Dash Gap,

Bar
who was residing in
for 3} years, returned
morning on the “Fort
for an _ indefinite
is staying with his
3ank Hall

a
badian

and

Road,
Took Course in Radiology

nm. C,

Street,
Townshend”
from New York after

O Y. LOWE, Missionary

Chiropractor of 3ay
returned on the “Fort
yesterday morning
an absence

and

of 14 months.
His wife and son Charles who
went up with him, have just gone

over

continuing his studies as

to Ireland where Charles is
a medi-

cal student at Queen’s University
in Belfast.

While in the U.S.A,,

Dr. Lowe

told Carib that he took a course

in

Radiology
Medical

at the Manhattan

and Dental Assistance

School and at the Eastern Chiro-

practic

also

the U.S.A.,

morning
for a holiday.

here

guest of Miss Mildred Clarke
Matthias Gap.

St

RS. F. A

owner

Institute, New York.
travelled to various parts
doing missionary work

For One Month

He

of

ISS V. WALLACE of St, Vin-

cent,
by

arrived on Tuesday
the “Lady Rodney”

She expects to be
for about a month and is a
of

After One Week

CASSON of. Si.
Vincent whose husband is
of the Motor Vessel Lady

Patricia returned home yesterday

by

that vessel

after spending a

week's holiday as the guest of Mrs.

Lloyd Hunte of “Leinster Lodge,”
Oey crores TwoeK |

Also

leaving on the Lady

Patricia to spend a holiday in St.

Vincent
Chemist of the
turing Co, and Mr.

were Mr. Keith Hunte,
Roberts Manufac-

Leslie Corbin,

Chief Salesman of Messrs. S. P
Musson, Son & Co., Ltd. 4
Mr. Hunte will be away for 12

days

return home

while Mr, Corbin expects to

on Monday.

Civil Servant Returns

FTER spending three

months’

holiday in the U.S.A., Mr

Telford Hewitt, Civil Servant at-



tached to the Police Magistrate's
ee is a druggist of Court, District “A”, returned yes-
5 : 0 . terday morning by the Fort
Caracas, { Townshend.



BY THE WAY

By Beachcomber

HE sectional weather-chart
it is stated, may revolu-
tionise the science of meteorol-
ogy. The idea is to divide
England into .41 sections, with
five towns in each; the figures
indicate the forecast: 1 means
snow, 2 means rain, 3 means
sunshine, 4 means uncertain
conditions,
Prodnose: Five eights are 40,
Myself: Bravo! And one is 41.
Prodnose: And why is Durham
south of Epping?
Myself: Because you
turn the chart upside down.

‘

didn’t

Let Uncle Heartsease
Tell You

jkZ tdci

hOsSs
amous

seader
covered

Bing Crosby
1ud gave

him his big
chance? (4
8)

What is bee-
keeping








correctly
termed ? (10
From the
skin of whici
animat 1
shagreer
made? (3)



sla
Olivier born
(7)

What was
famous

of abe. enl
Pheni c i
(4)
Which
largeat of
the Canary
Islands % (i)







Came For Health
M*. J.B on ES, Chairman
3anana Association
in Dominica returned home last}
night by the “Lady Rodney” after |
a visit to the island in the inter- |

}
est of his health. He was a guest

t Mr. and Mrs, C. E, Clarke of
Palm Beach, Hastjngs.

Mrs. C. E. Clarke also left last
night by the Lady Rodney for
Dominica where she will spend a
holiday as the guest of Mr,
and Mrs. Charles.

Off To Canada
















































M® & MRS. J. PERCY FOS-

TER of “Strathallan”,
Rockley, ‘eft last night on the
Lady Rodney” for

bere they will spend two months.

the interest of his health, is Sec-
retary and Attorney of Messrs.
Wm. Fogarty Ltd

On Holiday

R

M traffic clerk in the Reserva-
tions Department of B.W.LA, Ltd.,
Trinidad, arrived over the week
end by B.W.LA. for a holiday.
He was accompanied by his wife
and they are staying at Abbeville
Guest House, Worthing.

we om B.G.
M*...” HOWARD who is in
charge of the B.G. branch
ot Messrs. Watkins and Partners,
Architects of London and the West
Indies, arrived on Tuesday morn-
ing by the Lady Rodney from
British Guiana for a holiday, He
was accompanied by his wife and
two daughters and they are stay-
ing at St. Lawrence Hotel,
Hopes To Return
AYING a visit to Barbados and
staying at Leaton-on-Sea, The
Stream, is Miss Doreen Churaman
of Plantation, Port Mourant in
British Guiana. She arrived last
week and expects to leave to-day
by B.W.LA.

Miss Churaman who is Private
Secretary to the Manager of
Port Mourant tells Carib that she
has been enjoying her holiday an,
hopes to return here soon agairi.

To Continue Studies

M* WILLIAM GREEN, a med

ical student at Lynolo Catho-'
lic College in Montreal, returned
to Canada on Saturday by T.C.A.
to continue his studies after
spending the summer holidays
with his relatives. He is the son
of Mrs. Clara Green of “Alexan-

der, Worthing.
For Two Weeks
RS. ROSA CAMACHO whose
husband is employed at
Miller Stores, Port-of-Spain,
Trinidad, arrived over the week
end by B.W.LA. for two weeks’

holiday. She was accompanied by
her daughter Miss Dorothy Cama
cho of the Canadian Bank o
Commerce and they are guests
Mr. and Mrs, Walter Marshall
Aquatic Gardens.
Dressmaker Ends Holiday .
ISS EVELYN LYONS
dressmaker of Tobago, fie
by B.W.I.A. for ‘Trinidad \
Sunday after spending two we les

holkiay as a guest at I *
Worthing,

Bank Manager Goes Home
R. C, A. GILLIATT, re
Manager of the Royal Bank
of. Canada, Mrs, Gilliatt and ae
daughter Miss Evelyn Gilliatt
le ft for Canada last night on t
“Lady Rodney” and will take up
residence in Halifax,
Mr. GiNiatt told Carib that he)

was very happy in Barbados since |! ¥

he came out here 17 years ago
as Manager of .the Bank. The]!
time had come for him to return
home, but he hopes to be back
during the winter months as early
as 1951









el 3. Dat is th
$ Uncle Heartsease of Good-} 3% What, ts the
will Corner I am given many make nay er res rich by m What is the symbo) for stiver ?
human and inhuman problems to .

7 : 16. Who was the great epic poet of ‘ t is the a ‘4
solve. The latest is this: Why Greece ? (5) Ge Phat is che paren ror eworde and
has gq scheme for ‘Festival of} 17. Who stult and mount animals ?/ig. wnat is the capital of Ken 8
Britain Bus Shelters,” been sent) 49 1) °Momas Morton's “Speed the Colony, Britisn East Africa? (
to the Journal of the Royal “Plough.” who was being referrea| 14. Who was the first woman to an
Numismatic Society? hi WL ene phrase “a oP ere AF eee the House of Com:

aetiv« bre ‘ “m- Mrs. say {

As the Festival Office = na 21, What was one of the brutes tn|lo What did 16 across write? (5)
powered to sponsor small build- * Gulliver's Travels"? (5) ig. What is the fifth of twelvey (3)
ing projects, it is perhaps hoped DOWN 18 If reciprocals are multiplied to-
bs are R ne xs Numismatic 1.What have sometimes een gether and one te added, what is

ociety may ask them to sponsor ,, called goobers ¥ (7) ;

a Suitable bus shelter, made of| % WHat {ys of joint allows an
old coins in the waiting room at directions ? (9) Solution of yesterday's puszie.—
thelp peadquarters, The Society] MiMi ag aa he T° Ot) Abbe, Soe ier “Ee
of Antiquaries is already contem- 4. What kind of call couia an Sherry 5 sires t em
plating a neo-Saxon shelter of elephant be expected to make ? poten: 4 :
chromium-plated mud and Which scottish Loch nas peen| [rimidad:'S, Haakou 4 aes uy
wattles outside Burlington House famed for the aileged appear-| Baghdad Pussion: 16, Iteb: 18:
ances of a monster? (4) Peer S rt "1 Ant “& GL
——- —_———

















J&R ENRICHED
BREAD







Figures compiled at the Vienna
Montrea! | International
that
Mr. Foster who has gone up in| @¢ learning to sleep alone. Ap-
parently, th

Joseph Teltscher of Vienna, a
leading bedstead exhibitor at the
Fall Fair, said that since the war
twin

C. RODRIGUEZ-SELJAS| beds by two-to-one.

over the continent.
Emphasizing just how far Euro-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



IN LONDON —A hat in 26 shapes



Side to side

As a handbag

' London Express Service.



Back to front —



A Question Of Beds

air showed today
in Europe married couples

est fad”
between the twin beds.

like it.
to form one of a
“Reports from four

beds have outsold double sales are of the twin models.

in-the-back is passed and it’s

vepoert and the Casiaway —8



about here.






AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)
TO-NIGHT AT 8.30

MONOGRAM Piecsents - - -

16 FATHOMS DEEP”™

in Glorious ANSCO Color
Tanis Chandler — Lon Chaney and Several Others

DREAM

With Arthur Lake —

OPENING FRIDAY — “MY Is YOURS”

VEL LEA’ SSSSEPS

PLAZA — Oistin: MATINEE TODAY — 5

“THANK YOUR LUCKY STARS”

LAST SHOW TONITE — 8.30
“THE JUBILEER QUARTETTE”
in a prosran, of ae — SONG — MELODY !
usical - - -
Along With TT pHANK YOUR LUCKY STARS”

With A Host of Favourites including ~ - -
Dennis Morgan, Ann Sheridan, Alexis Smith,
Jack Carson and others

Humphrey Bogart,

65OCSCSSO%
‘ soe Re eee eee Soe eS

GAIETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES

LAST SHOW TONITE — 8.30
“SEVEN MILES FROM ALCATRAZ” — James Craig And
“TARZAN AND THE AMAZONS”

— 9.40 P.M,

— Johnny Weissmuller



"FRIDAY — SAT. — SU
WARNER'S Action Classic ! !

Errol FLYNN in “CAPTAIN BLOOD”
With Olivia DeHavilland — Lionel Atwill





“MAT. SUN, — 5 P.M.





SOON ! WATCH FOR ! !
Robert Louis LAST 2 SHOWS ‘LOST BOUNDRIES’
Stevenson's TODAY It's Greater Than

“KIDNAPPED” 5 and 8.30 “Pinky”



PLAZA THEATRE
BRIDGETOWN

WARNER'S Action Thriller of The Famous Royal
CANADIAN MOUNTIES !!!
“RIVER’S END”
Starring Dennis MORGAN and Others

“SPECIAL MATINEE TODAY (Thurs.) —2PM.
Monogram’s Thrilling Musical-Action WESTERNS ! ! !
Johnny Mack BROWN in _ Jimmy WAKELY in® =
“SIX GUN GOSPEL” — and — “RAINBOW OVER:
James Oliver CURWOOD’S THE ROCKIES” 4













‘tu WALLS -
ERBERT WILCOX
UL Cednies Oe a ak Wee

FRIDAY 2.30 & 8.30 and Continuing DAILY At 5 & 8.30 P.M.
FLASH ! ! (ON Stage) To-night Only 8.15 to 8.45
HALF HOUR OF POPULAR DANCE MUSIC
By “The Sydney Willcock Quintette”
This Programme will also be carried over Service of
Radio Distribution



OUR PRICES
ARE RIGHT -
CHECK THIS
LIST ~

Pick axes
Axeheads
Chisels

Braces & Bits
Compasses
Clamps

Hand Drills
Files

Planes & Irons
Hammers
Hatchets

Tool Handles
Squares |

Rasps
Spoke
Rules
Tapes
Pliers
Screw
Saws
Levels
Oil Stones

Emery Wheels (complete)
Paint Brushes

Putty Knives

Chalk Lines

Drivers

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
ACTORY LIMITED,

F.
HARDWARE DEPARTMENT Tel. No. 2039

an couples are drifting apart,
itscher disclosed that the “new-
is a night table placed

Traditionally Europeans invari-
ably shoved single beds together
standard size.
countries
reported that 65 per cent of all

“European couples are finished

Teltscher and other exhibitors with bianket-snatching” Telt-
reported the twin bed trend start- seher explained.
ed in France and since has spread “The old game of cold-fect-

a

sure sign of civilisation when the



Rup clamt “9 e rac 4 strange bord gliding
ind smdis the 1 headiay? { wonder if that’s what the old
\ ' t Captain saw 2"' He pushes on and
Nore fit vs and /
; suickly rei. the bird for, just as
’ , wees ve is starting up the next headland,
’ Wicchev ae & mail figure appears over the toy
ty . i stares at him, a figure witl
‘ eb hen ha and a very black face
wr ¢ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ :
eae SSS SSS SS



os
oS

bed-hog is left to suffer alone”.

Among exhibitors the feeling
was that all Europeans should try
‘win beds, They felt it would cut
the continent's skyrocketing di-
vorce rate.

Why? “They'd get more rest at
night—be able to face married life
the next morning with less strain.”

—LN:S.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER *, 1950

7.00 a.m. The News, 7.)0 a.m, News
Analysis,

7.45 a.m Gentralis Speal aoe So
From The Editorials, Ponto Ariat
vramme Parade, 6.15 a.m, rire
Players, 8.30 a.m. Books To Read, 6.45
«am. Film Review, 9.00 a.m, Down,
12.00 (noon) The News, 12.10 p.m. News
Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Programme Parade,
12.18 p,m. Listeners’ Choice, 1.00 p.m.
Taxi+ing Around With Herbert Hodge,
1.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 1.30 p.m. |}
Much Binding In The Marsh, 2.00 p.m.
The News, 2.10 p.m. Home News un fe
Britain, 2.15 p.m. Sports Review, 2.30
p.m. Ring Up The Curtain, 3.30 p.m
Twenty Quéstions, 4.00 p.m, The News,|\
4.10 p.m. The Daily Service, 4.15 p.m.
The War Of The Worlds, 4.45 p.m.
Melody On Strings, 5.00 p.m. Listeners’
Choice, 5.15 p.m, Programme Parade, 5.30
rom. Listeners’ Choice, 5.46 p.m. World
Individual Speedway Championships, 6.00
p.m. Composer Of The Week, 6.15 p.m.
Creatures of Cireumstance, 6.40 p.m.
6.45 p.m Merchant
7.00 p.m. The News,

sis, 7.15 p.m, Jazz Club,

ally Speaking, 8.00 p.m.
Radio News: , 8.15 pum, United Nations
Report, 6.20 p.m. Interlude, 8.30 p.m.
Taxi-ing Around With Herbert
Hodge, 8.45 p.m, Interlude, 8.55 p.m.
From The Editorials, 9.00 p.m. The
Colour Bar, 9.40 p.m, Intérlude, 9.45
p.m. Rhondda Valley Experiment, 10,00
p.m. The News, 19.10 p.m, Interlude,
10.15 p.m. The George Mitehell Glee
Club, 10.45 p.m. Special Dispatch, 11.00
p.m. The Piano Por Pleasure,





Interlude,
Newsletter,
p.m. New
7.45 p.m.

with AN

xid

YOU GET
HIGH POWER RUGGEDNESS





THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1950



To-day, 5.00 p.m. ONLY — A Big Double

“TARZAN and the MERMAIDS"
“THEY WONT “BELIEVE ME”



TO-NITE, 8.30 P.M.

Music in The Modern Manner !

Presenting :

“THE HOT SHOTS’

“Trinidad’s Favourite Orchestra”

Featuring :

ROD CLAVERY—(Vocalist)
MIGHTY TERROR—(Calypso Champ.)

LEAR

2

Our



Last Two

Presents .



EMPIRE

445 & 8.30 p.m.

Ceciele AUBRY
Jack HAWKINS



ROXY

Last Two Shows To-day,
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

Republic Big Double
William HENRY

TE ATWELL—(Sensational Guitarist)

In
HOURS OF SWEET MELODIES

ze =©Doors Open 7.00 p.m.

Pit 20c., House 36c., Balcony 48c., Boxes 60c.



TO KIDDIES

2.00 pm. MATINEE on THURSDAY
is changed to suit you on

SATURDAYS, 9.30 A.M., SATURDAY 23RD
“TARZAN AND THE MERMAIDS”





ROYAL

To-Day, 4.30 and 8.30 p.m.
Friday 4.30 p.m. Only

M.G.M. BIG DOUBLE

Wallace BERRY
Marjorie MAY

Shows To-Day,

20th Century-Fox

: — “BIG re
ROSE”
AND
Starring :
Tyrone POWER as BATHING BEAUTY :
Orson WELLES | with

Ester WILLIAMS
Red SKELTON

Extra To-Nite for Half
Hour before Pictures Joseph
Clemendore along with Char-
lie and Jackson

OLYMPIC.

To-day and To-morrow,
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

20th Century-Fox



Linda STIRLING Double .
FOR FARM MACHINERY IN ANABELLA
|} “THE MYSTERIOUS IN
MR. VALENTINE” =| «43 RUB MADELEINE”
AND AND
¥ “HEART OF VIRGINIA” || “LES MISERABLES”
DEPENDABLE BATTERIES
FOR 61 YEARS! WITH re
on ee Fhazine LAU CEETON
7
; ————
6 *t 9OOSOS0YOOOOOQ’

GLOBE

Opening To-morrow =- 35 & 8.30 p.m.



DAHL

te

$00000000000000

90608

ee ees)

BARRY SULLIVAN -
JAMES WHITMORE - RAMON NOVARRO

Story and Serean Play by IRVING RAVETCH + Directed by ROY ROWLAND + Produced by RICHARD GOLDSTONE

cece St Se Ot A Mk Se het ae me
PLODODESOON

WITH
LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE.

nderee
me willing " edge of
derts ; Know e' of
x0 react P.S. This is the
assurance of ts pe of passenger
put we are carrying
certalts pooded






ane









on current trip.

CLAUDE JARMAN, Jr.

$0990000006505000909095000OOSOSOOS



THURSDAY,



THE PICTURE shows Section B of the Bay Estate where latrines and baths for individual houses are now being erected as part of the Housing Board's re-planning programme.

Mrs. Christian| Houses Replace Cane

Meets The
Century

ANCON, Canal Zone,

An attractive, freckled 26-year
old English speaking woman pa-—
tient in Gorgas Hospital here is
still marvelling over her first
sight of automobiles, motion pic-
tures, and other commonplaces of
modern civilisation.

She is Mrs. Christian of the
isolated Pitcairn Island. She is
married to a direct descendant of
the famed Fletcher Christian, one
of the leaders of the historic
H.M.S. Bounty mutiny that led

to the colonization of the tiny
Pacific island almost 200 years
ago.

Mrs. Christian was brought to
the Canal Zone last month aboard
vine New Zealand’s Line’s “Pangi-
toto” suffering from appendicitis.
The operation was performed
successfully last week in the U.S.
government hospital here, and she
is scheduled to take the “Rangi-
tiki” for home on September 22.

Canal Zone residents have been
kind to the solitary visitor from
the mid-Pacific, piling her bed—
side table with magazines, flow-
ers, and candy. She was taken
for a half-day ride around the
Pacific end of the Canal Zone by
a kind-hearted auto owner befora
her operation.

She said she hoped, before her
departure, to go to the marke?
and buy a_ chicken, a_ coconut,
some tomatoes and other things
for a Pitcairn Island chicken stew
—not that she is not happy with
the Gorgas Hospital fare, but
because she would like to show}
her new friends one of the typical
dishes of her little island. aiiain



MICKY THE BUDGIE

VANCOUVER

Mickey the budgerigar disap-
peared from home recently, but
his owners weren’t worried. If
he’s thirsty, Micky will scream:
“Gimme a drink;” if he’s hungry,
he'll head for a dog’s dish and eat
his fill. If the dog objects, Micky
will peck at him until he gives
up.—(C.P.)

SEPTEMBER 21,

1950

A VILLAGE IN

At Bay Estate

Model Village Growing

Under the care of the Bridge-
town Housing Board a fine hous-
ing centre is springing up at the
Bay Estate where many years ago
fields of cane dominated the
scene, and where, not so long ago
were the houses of humble folk,
all on rented land.

Government purchased the land
sometime ago, and then came the
August 31 flood, and the Bay
Estate was one of the havens for
the homes of people which flood
waters had pushed down.

The complete area of the es-
tate is 116 acres, which for the
purpose of replanning has been
divided into sections (A) and (B).
Section (A) is on the south of
Beckles Road and Section (B) is
on the north. Section (A), ex-
cept for a small area on Chelsea
Road, has already been. replan-
ned, About half a mile of new
road has been built, and eight
main roads now stretch from



The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises : 5.49 a.m.
Sun Sets : 5.58 p.m.
Moon (Full) September 26
Lighting : 6.00 p.m.
High Water : 1.45 p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) nil
Total for Month to Yester-

day : 3.82 ins.
Temperature (Max,) : 86.5° F
Temperature (Min.) : 73.5° F
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.
(3 p.m.) E.
Wind Velocity 10 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.981
(3 p.m.) 29.889





Beckles Road to Chelsea Road.
The roads are intersected by
avenues at various points.

130 Working
About 130 people—carpenters,
masons and labourers — are now



FOR MORE

©





wes
UN Feet ‘
oA hauls

i}
:

&





HARVEST. QUEEN

THE POPULAR BRAND

SUPPLIED BY

LAKE OF THE WOODS MILLING

CoO., LTD.

‘AND BETTER

working on Section (B), where
new roads are being constructed,
and latrines and bathrooms are
being erected. Houses from con-
gested areas are being removed
to that section at the rate of one
a day.

After the 1949 flood 210 houses

were removed from the flooded
areas of Martindales Road and
Halls Road to Section (A) of the
Bay, which originally had 235
houses. In the replanning of the
estate the minimum house spot
will be 2,400 square feet. It is
expected that when the replan-
ning of the estate is completed
there will be about 600 houses
from congested areas.

In section (A), 13 street lamps

have been installed, and four
) public stand-pipes and fire
hydrants have been put down.

The water mains which were
laid down in consequence, will
enable many tenants to get in-
dividual water supply if they
desire. It is hoped that at some
future date water mains will
cover the estate. It is also possi-
ble now for tenants to apply for
the installation of electricity for
their homes, provided the Elec-
tric Company can supply it.

Fly Proof

The latrines and bathrooms
which are being built in section
(B) will be for individual houses.
They are made of stone, and the
latrines are so constructed as to
cause a sliding panel to close the
seat when the door is -closed,
This makes the seat fly proof.

Kitchen gardens are springing
up around many tenants’ homes

| and they are being encouraged to
practise this form of self help
It is anticipated that steps will
be taken to provide the area with
a playing field

Up to the present, the estate
has been used as a site for the
removal of houses from conges-
ted areas, but there is a_possi-
bility that the Board will also
erect some new houses there.








|

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THE MAKING



Russia Will
Attack A Desert

RUSSIA will begin to reclaim next year most of the
110,000 square miles of the Kara Kum desert with an irri-
gation system fed by a 650-mile-long “Grand Turkmenian”
canal running eastward from the Caspian Sea to the ae

Darya river.

Moscow radio, reporting | the
official announcement of the pto-|
ject, said it would be ready »by
1958 to supply water to 3,160,
acres of cotton, and 15 million
acres of pasture land over what}
is now literally “the Black)
Desert.”

The scheme also calls for three
large’ dams with a total hydro- |
electric capacity of 100,000 kilo—
watts and the creation of forest

belts.
The Object

The object of the project is to
“ensure the supply of water for |
industrial enterprises, the irriga—
tion of new lands, mainly for the|
development of cotton growing,
the supply of water for pastures
and the further development of
the fodder base for stockbreeding
in the southern areas of the
Caspian plains of Western Turi
menia, the lower reaches of. thé
river Amu Darya and the western
part of the Kara Kum desert, and
the supply of hydro~electric
power for industry and agricul-
ture in these areas.

The announcement follows
shortly after .decisions to
the world’s largest power stations
along the Volga river—the Kuiby—
shevy and Stalingrad power sta—
tions-zand is part of the Stalin
post-war program to reshape the
nation’s landscape,

The newspaper Pravda said of}
the project: |

“A blossoming
orchards and



{
of|

carpet
will!

meadows

clothe areas hitherto scourged| has made Huntley and Paimers fayous the

by hot shifting dunes, bright! whole world over. So many ‘hrilling

electric light will illuminate vate Maras :

the deserts where formerly varieties to choose from—luccious'!-filled

even the bonfires of Nomads | ‘ Custard Creams’ and ‘ Reading (/rcams’
5 g ’

were rare. Artificial seas, ans meltingly-delicious ‘ Shortoake’... all

and pipe-lines will bring life e é ;

to vast tracts of arid land oven-fresh, sealed in tins and } Ib. Areshpaks

where the people used to die Roe

of thirst and heat along the

ancient caravan routes.” « iS

of sandstorms and hot, dry winds

The Kara Kur is now a cradle
lands of the

devastating crop
lower Volga basin.

“It was for ages,” the newspa-
per said, “that the peoples of the
Orient had been cherishing the
dream o1 crystal-clear rivers and
flourishing orchards in the desert,
the dream of a fairyland of hap~
piness. Now only a few years
separate us from the time when
the desert of black sands will be
converted into a golden valley of
fertility.”

Farmer Calls
Up Plane To
Save His Land

BRITISH farmers whose land
ig being attacked by soil erosion
may call up air support by whicn
bombs of super-phosphate and
other fertilisers will be dropped

The farmer could direct opera-
tions from the ground, by radio

This system may be come an
important factor in fighving soil
erosion in areas either inaccessi-
ble to, or difficult for, the plough.

It may brihg new areas under
cultivation. The bombs would be
dropped from 400 ft,



Reports of recent experimer
by the Bristol Aeroplane Co, and
cthers are under consideration

The land chosen for one experi-
ment is farmed by Captain G. L.
Bennett-Evans at Plynlimmon, on
the berders of Cardiganshire and
Montgomeryshire, near whe source
cf the River Wye

It is used for grazing sheep and
Welsh black cattle, and is very
hilly.

A Bristol Freighter dropped 40
tons of phosphate, lime and nitro-
chalk in two days
4 the airplane
was picked p
equipment
> experiment was

i pokesmar yf

Er LerToL ne

A 107m) As came

ange i’

success~

Company T

accurate.”—L.E.S

erect},





eon amma mamma ee a

Bunicia, Seh
H. Davidson, Sch
pha
Whittaker,
Seh

Schooner
Capt
s.S
Capt
Schooner Timothy A. H. Vansluytman,
76 tons from British
Guiana

Schooner Henry D

{ Massiah,
dez,
Stone, Erik Hanson
Thomas Miller,
Nichols,
Theresea
Bravo, Maria Bravo
From Gronmada:
Sheila Hadley
From &t.
Norma Beaubrun

Phyllis Mark, Sch
Emeline, Sch
Lochinvar S., Sch
Sch. Emmanuel C

Sch

ARRIVALS
Zita Wonita, 69
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Fort Townshend,
Henrikson, from Grenada
net, Capt. Stoll,
DEPARTURES
Wallace,



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From Trinidad:
Elizabeth Bireh, Shirley Chandler, Olea
Margot Bermu-

Wilbert. Jones,
Bernardo Bermudez, Mary
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John Goldie, Barbara

Alfonza Delima, Audrey

Kenneth Tucker

Grant,
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Etc., Etc., Ete. L/Heure Bleue
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Sch. D'Ortac

1,943 tons net,

t

Helen
Hyacinth Yawehing,
Harold
Theresa Molinos, Mrs.

Le

DEPARTURES — BY B.WLAL
For TRINIDAD
Thomas Knowles
Griffith,
ad Young, Grace Young, Parl He
pel,
Ronnie Gittens,

Eva Trotman, O'dell
Goldie,



Lawrence Bannister, Joseph Drakes.
For ST
Mr
Mr
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For GRENADA
Everard Corbin
Por SAN
Louise
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lack Cocineame Gh, beh, Caria, Mensiettn makes a
Seh Mary E Caroline, Sch Ww l

ons

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net, Capt. Wallace, for British Guiana

S.S. Lady Rddney, 4.907 tons net, Capt
LeBlanc, for St. Lucia

Passengers leaving by the S.S. “Fort
Townshend” were for Antigua
General George Vidmer For New
york Hon. and Mrs. M. D. Guiness
Mrs. Ruth R. Weatherley, Mr. Edmund
Blanche, Mrs Vera Field, Miss Vera
Gertrude Field, Miss Florence E. Field,
Master James H Field, Mr Rachel
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Passengers leaving by the §.S. “Lad BOVRIL PUTS
Rodney” were for Dominica Mr
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Bermuda Mr. E. R. Rollocks Por
Boston Mr. and Mrs F. T. Wood
Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Freake, Mr. and
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| PAGE FOUR





Emer eee Powe AT

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St, Bridgetown



Thursday, September 21, 1950

_ MR. MARSHALL

THE announcement that Mr. George
Cattlet Marshall has come out of retire-
ment to take over the office of Secretary
of Defence in America is an indication
of the seriousness with which Americans
view the international situation. Few men
haye the great international prestige which
Mr. Marshall has gathered around himself
in a lifetime of service on behalf of his
country.

As Chief of Staff during World War II,
Mr. Marshall was one of the principal
architects of victory but the more real and
more lasting fame which he gained was
during his tenure of office at the Depart-
ment of State. Inaygurating a bold new
policy of aid to impoverished Europe the
“Marshall Plan” has proved as important
a bulwark against the inroads of Com-
munism as the armies of the Western
European powers.

After seeing his great experiment receive
the approval of Congress and well on the
way to success, Mr. Marshall retired to
enjoy the evening of his days in the peace
which he had so well earned. Then came
the Korean conflict with the fear of even
worse to come. American unpreparedness
after the vast sums which had been spent
on defence in the post-war years was a
great shock to the American people and
there was a revulsion of feeling against the
then Secretary of Defence who was re-
garded as responsible.





Under American law the Secretary of
Defence could not be a man who for the
previous ten years had held an appoint-
ment in the armed forces butsso great were
Marshall’s abilities and prestige that the
President decided to make an exception
and ask Congress to pass enabling leg't-
lation to allow Mr. Marshall to take over.
| George Marshall has once again given
up his hopes of a quiet and peaceful life
and has again undertaken one of the most
responsible jobs which his country has to
offer. It will be his task to bring the Korean
conflict to a speedy and successful conclu-
sion and to make all preparations so that
if the world should again be forced into
another world war the United States of
America will enter the arena with the best
chances of victory.
~ For over a hundred years the main. re-
sponsibility for maintaining the peace of
the world lay with Britain and her Empire.
Today two world wars have bled Britain
and the mantle of responsibility has fallen
on the U.S.A. All the signs point to the
fact that that country is shouldering her
great duties with resolution and patient
courage.

The people of America may rest assured
that in their great fight they have the sup-
port and prayers of all the freedom-loving
countries of the world. Those peoples know
the sterling worth of George Cattlet Mar-
shall and rejoice that he should once again
be in a position of great trust and respons-
ibility.



Concerning Wigs

SAMUEL PEPYS records somewhere in
his diary that he parted with his own hair
and “paid £3 for a periwig”. This, notes
the Encyclopaedia Brittanica was cheap,
adding that the author of Plocacosmos says

that “when they first were wore, the price
was usually one hundred guineas”.

The word wig is an abbreviated form of

“periwig” which is an artificial head of hair
4worn as a personal adornment, disguise or
symbol of office.
' Wigs are worn as part of official costume
only in the United Kingdom and countries
which used to or still depend on the
United Kingdom. Their use is confined
except in the case of the Speaker of the
House of Commons and the Clerks of Par-
liament, to the Lord Chancellor, the judges
and members of the bar. Many people still
wear wigs to make up for natural deficien-
cies and on the stage wigs are indispens-
able. Many stage wigs are made of jute.

The custom of wearing wigs dates back
into antiquity. One discovery of a prehis-
toric carving suggests that they were worn
at least 100,000 years ago.

-In Roman times women wore them, some
for unsavoury purposes. Faustina, wife of
Marcus Aurelius is said to have had several
hundred.

. Queen Elizabeth had eighty attires of
false hair. But it was not until the 17th
century that the “peruke” another form of
“periwig” was worn as a distinctive feature
of costume. Under Charles II the wearing
of the peruke became general. Under
Queen Anne the wig reached its maximum
es lopment, covering the back and
shoulders and floating down to the chest.
Even coachmen wore wigs. When early in
the reign of the Third George popular wig-
wearing began to wane, it persisted among
professional men.

Only by slow degrees was it given \
doctors, soldiers and clergymen

"
pb

ADVOCATE.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



The King’s Money

Poorer than any British Monarch for 100 years.

| BRITAILN’S BILL for the Mon-
jarchy this year will be just over
| £1,000,000 after the last mainven-
repair is completed at the
royal residences and after the most
junior chambermaid at Bucking-
ham Palace has received her
wages.

The £1,000,000 enables the King
to carry out the biggest job in
the world as the man who binds
together 560 million people in the
British Commonwealth.

The bill has not varied
during three reigns.

How does it compare

ance



much

with the

cost of the Presidency of the
United States?
Although the Presidency is

embellished with nothing like the
ceremonial of the Crown, it does
not work out so much cheaper.
It costs £700,000.

President Truman's salary today
is £35,700 a year, following a rise
last year of £8,928. Of this he
pays back about £21,400 in taxes.
3ut he receives in addition tax-
free expenses amounting to
£32,130

Running the White House with
its staff of 30 cost £95,000 last
year, White House offices required
another £535,710.

Nine Palaces

HOW simple it sounds compared
with the book-keeping necessi-
tated by the pomp of monarchy.

In Britain nine royal palaces
must be kept in structural repair
by the State at a cost this year
of £410,000.

Salaries and pensions for the
royal household cost £134,000.
Buckingham Palace alone has 260
domestic servants, and there are
scores at the other residences.

To pay the living expenses of
the household the King gets
£152,800.

Five Grants

The burden of monarchy is
shared by other members of the
Royal Family besides the King
and Queen, and to five of them
Parliament grants annuities totall-
ing £161,000:—

Queen Mary 70.000
Princess Elizabeth 40,000
Duke of Edinburgh 10,000
Duke of Gloucester... 35,000
Princess Royal 6,000
The King himself receives a
salary— his Privy Purse— of

£110,000. It is the same as that
paid to Edward VIII, and George
We

Unlike President Truman’s the
King’s salary is tax free. But
this year all but £36,054 of it
really came from the King’s
pocket because he surrenders the
revenue from his Duchy of Corn-
wall to help reduce the contribu-
tion from the Exchequer.

£693 A Week

PRESIDENT TRUMAN'S
monetary reward for guiding the
destinies of ‘134 million people
works out at £275 a week after
tax is paid.

For a job nearly four times

the size, extendimg over an

empire infinitely more co: ex,

the King is pald by us £693 a

week.

But the comparison is not as
favourable to the King as it
sounds.

For the Sovereign is forced

own pocket to sustain the
splendour of his exalted office.

Almost every year since the war
charges for labour and materials
have risen steeply. Yet, except
for a £33,000 annual grant vote
to him in 1948 towards the care
‘of the family’s private suites at
the palaces, no additional help
has come from the Treasury.

Paying Bills

THE KING must defray out of

his £152,800 household expense



MISSING FIGURES

PERCY G. DONALD, head

Colonial Trade, contends that the
provide adequate information for British Exporters.

COMMERCIAL circles, wishing

to plan an extension of their
trade to the . British Colonies,
would seek advance information

as to present and past conditions.
Their natural source of informa-
tion is—or should be—the Colonial
Annual Reports. These reports,
presumably designed to serve some
economic purpose, are issued one
to three years late and consist of
“dead” statistical information,
whilst’ the unco-ordinated nature
of the general information renders
them of little value. Eight 1948
returns were not) even issued by
May, 1950.

I was recently asked by a
Colony how their administrative
costs, which were approximately
half the revenue, compared with
other Colonies, The information
was so sparsely available that
reply was impossible,

Pre-war, an annual “Economic
survey of the Colonial Empjre”
was published with much valuable
information in comparative tabu-
lar form. Today this is succeeded
by a retrograde annual “Colonial
Office List.”

“The Colonial Territories”
(1949), issued by the Colonial
Office, admits that many figures
are “Estimates,” that Grants in
Aid are variously dealt with, and
that the date of closing accounts
in Colonies are not identical.

A Monthly Report?

Many existing Colonial publica-
tions could advantageously be
combined in one interim monthly
report, supplemented by un annual
|report issued not later than the
first quarter of the year, on the
lines of the “Economic Survey.”

An analysis I have made, cover-
ing 10 Colonies (N. Rhodesia, Br.





|Guiana, St Vincent, Barbados,
| Seychelles, St, Lucia, Dominica,
| Antigua Br Honduras and
|Uganda), shows an absence of
much vital information under the
headings of Revenue, Expenditure,
| Education and Roads. It may be

{taken that all other report head-
ings are equally incomplete and
out-of-date by the time they are

d every heading has

1 ition t« ej

iy

allotment all the decorating
plumbing, turnishing, and interior
repair biils which accumulate for
that part of the palaces reserveu
exclusively for the use of royalty.

At Buckingham Paiace_ the
King pays for all electricity, gas,
and water except that used for
lighting and washing down the
courtyards.

At Windsor Castle the State
pays for all the water—even the
royal bath water—and since 1947
at both the Palace and Windsor
for all electric lamps.

Taxpayers pay for cleaning
the outside of the windows at
beth places, but the King pays
for cleaning them imside.

High Cost

THE KING has fought the battle
of soaring costs by drawing on
savings made in his Civil List
during the war and, with those
savings now nearing exhaustion,
by using his own funds.

The bill for Monerehy
therefore must be well in excess
of the account settleqd by the
nation. ‘

Largely as a result of this,
and because the King pays the
full rate of tax (up to 19s. 6d.
im the £) om all investment
income, his personal fortune is
believed to have shrunk so that
he is far worse off than any of
his predecessors since Victoria
came to the Throne.
He has made heavy financial

sacrifices. His father, George V.,
so economised during the i914
War that he gave to the Exchequer
£100,000 and made equal contribu-
tions to war charities.

He became So short of cash to
meet expenses in 1921 that Parlia-
ment authorised the realisation
of £100,000 from the Duchy of
Lancaster — part of the King’s
hereditary estates.

Again, in the 1931 crisis, George
V. voluntarily cut his Civil List
by £50,000.

Given Back

AT THE end of the last war
the present King handed back
£20,000 and has given another
£100,000 of war-time Civil List
savings to pay for four years the
increment in Princess Elizabeth's
allowance granted by Parliament
on her marriage.

The King is hard pressed to
conserve his personal wealth.
Perhaps his most paying possession
is the Sandringh estate, in-
creased recently 17,000 acres
and valued locally at £ 1,000,000.
The 15 farms are Mun on a sound
commercial basis

Similarly the
caster, produci
about £90,000
London and t
replenish the r

Sidney Rodin

tha
we






















uchy of Lan-
a revenue of
om property in
North, helps to
al coffers,

OF COURS, if the King could
sell his heirlo}Mms he would stand
high in the lit of Britain’s multi-
millionaires, e owns Balmoral,
an 80,000 cre estate worth
£500,000.

He has the world’s finest private
stures, 506 of them

upwards of £50

The King is ¥pwner of Ascot
racecourse, but Wtakes no profil
from it. More an 50 “grace
and favour" resfMences ranging
from = mansions ike Clarence

House to small |
the Sovereign’s, bft he lets them
cu’ rent free to §public servants
and their depend§nts.
Nothing Free
HE HOLDS, tod, the title deeds
the Crown ands, but the

k lodges, are

of

of a leadin
lonial Annual

A commercial organisation rely-
ing on stale returns with varying
stocktaking dates would invite
bankruptcy. A business such as
Woolworths has a turnover ex~
ceeding by millions of pounds that
of many Colonies. Numberless
branches carry immense stocks.
Administratively, such a company
calls for co-ordinated fact and
progress returns of a standardised
form to be with them during the
first month of the year, thus per-
mitting assimilation into the
March balance sheet. Failure by
any executive to enforce such
policy would involve dismissal.

From many economie angles the
Colonies are branch establisn—
ments, with the Secretary of State
for the Colonies as administrative
head, supported by an executive
—in each Colony and at home—
appointed by and responsible to
him, It is reasonable, therefore,
to compare this aspect of their
administration with the commer-
cial undertaking mentioned above.

The traditional excuse of “staff
shortage” cannot hold water.
Delayed returns call for increased
staff work. Commercial organisa-
tions have severe staff shortage,
but notwithstanding that handi-
cap balance sheets are produced
to a date. Failure to so produce
involves severe penalties,

“Colonial Regulations,” origi-
nated in 1837, set out the nature

of the returns—but they are
generally disregarded. For in-
stance, Regulation 155 states: —

“All returns, reports. ...must be
punctually forwarded to the
proper Department.” For such

omissions the Colonial Office is
administratively responsible.

In these “Regulations,” statisti-
cal return forms are given for
“Staff Appoinments” and Altera-
tion of Navigation Lights,” but in
regard to the following, para. 160
merely calls for “Information
under each head, without guid-
ance as to the form:—

Population. Wages and Labour
Services. Production Commerce Cur
rency and Banking. History. Justic:
and Police. Administration Educ
Legislation. Geogr and Clir
Communications, Fina Pub W
Little wonder that returns are
r way comparable. Moreover,

,

Socia



ation









London Merchant House and expert on

revenues were long ago surren-
dered to the State.

The King and Queen pay for
2imos! everything they require,
they may accept nothing tree.
About the only transport that
doesn't cost them. money is a
naval vessel or a plane of tne
King’s Flight.

The King has ¢tuy down his
personal expenditure very con-
siderably.

Racing Pays

HE is an enthusiastic racehorse
owner, but he makes racing pay,
From 1946 to 1949 his prize-money
was £37,150, Even his shooting at
Sandringham has netted a profit
by the part sale of the bag.

Is there any member of the
family who has more ready casn
than the King?

It is widely believed that Queen
Mary is very rich. Pre-war her
fortune was assessed at £2,000,000.
much of it left by Queen Victoria
and willed to her by George V.

Since 1936 her annuities drawn
from the State have totalled
£980,000.

The Treasury will take a huge
sum from her in death duties, for
these are paid by all royalty,
except the Sovereign.

The Duke

THE DUKE of Windsor enjoyed
the income from the Duchy of
Cornwall for 25 years as Prince
of Wales, when taxes were low.

In 1927, for example, the duchy
yielded £72,917. When he left
Britain his personal wealth must
have totalled some hundreds of
thousands of pounds.

He gained nothing when he
renounced the throne, Because he
held that Sandringham and Bal-
moral were an inseparable part of
the Monarchy in the eyes of the
people he voluntarily gave them
to his brother.

Publication of his memoirs
throughout the world has so far
brought him nearly £180,000,

The Duchess

ONE OF vhe worst-off among
royalty is the Duchess of Kent.
Although carrying out a heavy
routine of public duties she gets
no money from the Stave other
than her £398 pension as the
widow of an air commodore with
three children,

When the Duke died in this
rank on active R.A.F. service in
1942 he left £157,735. Most of

this is in trusi for his elder son,
now agd 14.

Pictures and antiques which
belonged to her husband were
sold by the Duchess in 1947 for
£92,341. The following year she
scld books for £1,022.

The most important possessions
remaining to her are Coppins,
her house in Buckinghamshire,
which she is not selling, and some
magnificent jewellery





Princesses
SINCE THEIR marriage Prin-
cess Elizabeth and fe Duke of
Edinburgh have been receiving
from Parliament £50,000 a year—
all but £6,000 tax free, But it is
deubtful if they are able to save.

The department of the Privy
Purse asked on the Princess's
behalf for, anovher £5,000 a year
as the minimum on which she can

run her household.
The Duchess of Gloucester came

from a wealthy family. Her
father, the Duke of Buccleuch,
left £974,482 in 19387.

But the poor little rich girl
among royalty is Princess Mar-
garet. She has no money for

herself until nexy August, when
she becomes 21. Then the State
will give her £6,000 a year.

Reports are failing to

these headings are out of step with

modern requirements, Some
Colonies of their own volition
have added; —

Civil Reabsorption. Lands and Surveys.

Public Relations. Research. Touring and
Exhibitions Cultural Development
Newspapers and Periodicals. Religion

Science and Art

Some Colonies give tabular
appendices, but many create a
jumble of figures in no related
order.

The Facts—From US Sources

Much of the missing informa-
tion, supplied in other publications
must be secured from ‘ official
sources, Its omissien or delay in
publication is a Colonial Office
administrative and executive
failure. One organisation, much
connected, with Colonial issues
find that they secure British
Colonial details more readily from
American official sources,

Here are other points arising
from a close study of the reports:-

Customs. Of the ten Colonies
whose reports I have analysed,
only three show how the Customs
total is made up.

Currency. Some returns are in
£’s, others in $’s. In these days of
fluctuating values it is surely
necessary to have all figures in
£'s. Why should Dominica give the
figures in £’s and St. Lucia in $’s,
both operating on the West Indies
dollar? British Guiana, helpfully,
provides both.

Vital Statistics, Why should
infant mortality and birth rate
returns be ommitted by half of
the ten Colonies?

Population, British Guiana gives
a clear race classification in 2 per
cent, of report space used. St.
Lucia fails to do so in 10 per cent.

Communications. Why should
only two out of the ten give the
road mileage?

Finance. Northern Rhodesia in
6 per cent, of space gives ample
and clear information. St, Helena
in 15 per cent, does not.

Revenue. Para. 198 of the
Colonial Regulations calls for the
returns to be made “on comprehen-—

sive heads” without giving
aetailed guidance
Expenditure. Northern
@ on page 5

THE SOLDIERS STAND |

IN PRAYER

By Frank Owen

KOREAN FRONT,

THE sky was scowling and a mist cape hid
half the mountain as the padre set up his
Table, an old cookhouse box. it had a little
wooden cross on it and two little candle-
sticks. He glanced anxiously upwards and
said firmly: “We will begin by singing Hymn
28, ‘Fight the good fight.’”

With a nervous cough or two and a bit
waveringly the congregation joined him.
Che padre was young, almost boyish, Captain
ihe Rev. William Edward Benjamin Jones, of
Raheny, Dublin, Over his jungle-green jacket
and shorts he wore a brighter green stole.

His congregation—a dozen or so soldiers
of the Middlesex headquarters company, one
(reshly returned from a sniping patrol, and
three or four officers.

The soldiers had rifles slung on their shoul-
ders. Their clothes were grimy, but their
weapons were clean, The officers wore re-
volvers at their belts.

The church was a muddy, mucky little
farmyard behind company H.Q. Straw litter,
broken farm tools, an upturned oxen man-
ger, and a manure heap made up our furni-
ture.

In the ruined, deserted, half roofless mud
and thatch huts which are the trace and
track of war upon this countryside, a rat
rustled in the rubbish on the floor when the
padre paused. There was no music in our
church, except the sound of running water
in the brook,

‘MAKE US WISER’

“LET us pray,” said the padre. So the con-
gregation prayed for the King and his family,
the Government, our Allies’ Governments,
too (“Make us all wiser, so that all may strive
better and more strongly for peace and the
welfare of all peoples upon earth.”)

There echoed the boom-boom of a distant
gun,

The congregation prayed for their families,
their loved ones, their friends, their wounded.

Next they recited the 23rd Psalm: “The
Lord is my Shepherd. . .”

Colonel Mann, field-glasses slung about his
neck, read the brief lesson. It was about
Jesus meeting Matthew on the seashore and
telling him to follow.

The padre made his sermon on it.
Matthew he said, was a tax collector, and
for a foreign Government at that. Only yes-
terday the padre had received his own tax
demand, from his own Government.

PLACE FOR HIM

TAX-GATHERERS were not anywhere
popular—yet there was a place for Matthew,
as there is for all men in this faith who
would serve in it.

Again the sound of mortar fire. Then he
reminded his hearers of the comradeship of
battle, which alone made their task possible;
the care and responsibility of the leaders;
the vigilance of the guards; the sharing of
danger and comfort. We all muck in. “We
eat from the same dixie, sleep often beneath
the same blanket, may endure pain or death
from the same fire.

They sang another hymn, and then the
padre gave the Blessing.

The last words were crowned by the roar
of a bomber flight way up in the mist. But
as the padre packed his case and went off
down the gully track to the road to his next
service, the sun began to break through like
a spear.—L.E.S.

JACK COMES TO LIFE—
WITH BEANSTALK

PITTSBURGH

A PITTSBURGH horticulture enthusiast
knows how Jack of “Jack and the Beanstalk”
fame must have felt.

He is Otto Scheu, who planted some seeds
sent to him last spring by friends in the Near
East.

The seeds, which his friends said were
taken from the tomb of an ancient Egyptian
king, sprouted king-sized “prehistoric beans”
up to three feet long and weighing as much
as 31 pounds.

The vine, as thick as two thumbs and which
has spread out over a 300 square foot area,
has already pulled down two peach trees and
is engulfing a poplar tree.

Scheu said friends told him that the Bible
mentioned such a bean, one of which was
supposed to feed 40 soldiers,

He took one of the beans to a restauranteur
acquaintance, Mike Brunetti. He, being an
enterprising chef, baked the thing with a
stuffing of meat and egg. ’ any

One bean was enough to feed 22 guests.

How does it taste?

Some said it tasted like mushrooms, others
said like oysters. When eaten raw it has the
flavour of cucumbers.’ At any rate, all agreed
it was a dish fit for Pharaohs.

Scheu said he intends to trim the vine back
this year, and next year he hopes to harvest
beans three times as large.

He said he believes the fruit is a member
of the coleocynth family, which is described

et j
Rhodesia) as a “Mediterranean and African herbaceous | ¢
| vine allied to watermelon.—I.N,S.





THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21,








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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1950 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE

Another Salt Fish Lord Tweedsmuir| 9p P Pry
Shortage Wishes He Too | @sAGAIN IN STOCK ...

hii FOOD SITUATION in- Figures Had Been M.P. P U R i N A

Stead of getting easier is
continuing to get harder, a promi- ore ee ¢
nent merchant of Bridgetown told
the Advocate yesterday. Com-
menting on the shortage of salt!
rish he said that every two or three,
months there is an acute shortage |
and wh a shipment comes it 1s;
not cufficient to meet the needs
Shortage of imported corn has
also been a headache for house-
wives and the local product is far
from sufficient. This had =











)

Missing

Ou Ow Correspondent
presents this in full five-year tabu- LONDON, Sept. 18
lar detail. Their *form, if adopted Among others specially inter- ( ; H O W
by all Colonies, covering the years) “°'®¢ in the refusal last week of
1913, 1939, and the last three| ‘®¢ Prime Minister to take action

years, would give comparative: Which would allow Lord Hailsham ANIMALS & POULTRY

Statistical information of value. Quintin Hogg) to keep his seat

m aod
Education. Why should eight! as MP. for Oxford is Lord| ‘ORS.
cut of the ten Colonies be silent | Tweedsmuir, who takes a fore-! W DISTRIBUT *
on illiteracy, five fail to give the; Most interest in Colonial affairs. | Jason Jones & Co, Ud.

number of trained and untrained Although Lord Tweedsmuit
teachers, and three omit _the) does not feel os Sabiihe: os Lord
schools attendance? British) trailsham that the “hereditary
Guiana gives -_ oy per cent, of principle denying him a place in
space, more than Sarawak does M/ the Commons. seriously affects his










hens and their egg production.
HE CHURCH LADS and Girls’



Brigade of the Cathedral held




3 9 per cent. ;
a Parents Meeting on Tuesday The Minister should ce political interests, he has _ been
night at the Cathedral Church that all reports shou ; be heard to say regretfully: “I wish



House. Parents turned out in
full force to hear reports on the
progress made by the Brigade

i had had a period in the House
ot Commons.”



uniform date and be finalised for
him immediately after the New}
Year. Only by this can } De-



“RIPPINGILLES”
BLUE - FLAME



since it was formed. = : : u 7 . Perhaps | any anxieties Lord
s 4 si 5 partment demonstrate an ffi- | .. -
Father Ripper told the parents a $e : ws . ‘ aS ciency comparabie Tie. ¢ m-| Tweedsmuir has had over this



of = — 7 or — ; 3 * merce. Clear presentation in tabu- Sear a. ras ee by Rea _

worship and urg em to place Pa : lar forms, created in association} *@t at least his wife sits in the

emphasis on the discipline of theit ae THE HOUSE . Tax PAYER. with competent outside sources,}| Lower House as the representa-

children in the home. — os would result in many times the| Uve of an Aberdeen constituency,
|

resent informatio i ha h
AN ACCIDENT took place on eaae PRS mt hen : Following zealously in the
Tuesday about 9 am. on The Caribbean Commission io}/ Commonwealth interests of _ his
Bay Street between the motor car which Great Britain has sub-| Moted father, the first Lord
T--10 owned by William Tryhane scribed £138,141 since 1946, sum-| Tweedsmuir (who became Gov-
of St. Thomas and driven by marises the situation in regard to} ernor-General of Canada), this
Louise Eckstein of White Park Dutch, USA, French and British| 39-year-old Peer was a membei
St. Michael and the motor car X— returns as “lacking uniformity in| of H.M. Colonial Service, From
930 owned by Fitz William Lewis the heads, sub-heads and present-| 1934 to 1936 he was an assistant
of Maxwell, Christ Church. ation of data, also with failure to} District Commissioner in Uganda
The right bumper of the motor identify the origin and destin Protectorate, A year later he
car T—10 was damaged.

or to distinguish between demes-| joined the Hudson Bay Company
CASE BROUGHT by the

tic and total exports.” Variations} ard in 1948 visited Jamaica. He
in returns of foreign countries are} succeede ris father in 1940,
Police charging Elsie Rowe of natural, but had the Commission sytesganmcate
Bullens Alley, Dalkeith, with the directed their attention solely to
Jarceny of a wallet valued at the British Colonies, they must ‘
17s. 10d. from Cyril Lovell was have levelled the same adverse UP TWICE
dismissed by His Worship Mr. criticism
Cc. L. Walwyn yesterday Delayed Colonial returns must
The prosecution submitted that be regarded as harmful to the LONDON.
Rowe visited Lovell’s place and Colony concerned. When Colonial Britain’s volunteer Civil De-
while there took away his wallet. matters come up for debate in| fense Corps has been nearly
Rowe in her defence admitted the House of Commons, if inform-| doubled since the start of vhe
visiting Lovell’s place but left him ation is not on record for M.P.’s.| Korean war
=_— in company with another coe criticism becomes im- Tie, Slane -OMies. akneimaed

Colonial Annual Reports are| that there have been 20,206
HE POLICE BAND under standard at 5% in. by 84 recruits since the end of June,
- Capt. C. E. Raison will give

rene asing the corps strength to
a moonlight concert at Silver

cept four, which are 6 in. by 94} 12°ree ; ' a
in. Their costs, to the public, are} 22,015 as of August 31. The
Sands, Christ Church, on Friday,
September 22 beginning at 8 p.m.

intriguing rate of enlistments before the
Much appreciation has been ex-
























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pressed about the moonlight Zanzibar, 110 pages . a rial elie tial ate
conceris and the last one held at od Cameroons, 360 pawes 8 of a
St .George’s Church pasture was ra, 136 pages : 1}
well attended, ee a : SSS Hong Ke cae 186 pa 0 i
Today the Band will be visiting 7 ’ er ae 7 ? DIET IS AN IMPORTANT PART
Bathsheba, St. Joseph where they “LOOK HERE, UPON THIS PICTURE, AND ON THIS... .” Is the importance of a Colon : IN SCHOOL LIFE
will hold a concert. —Hamlet ; Act HI, Scene IV. |Telative to the number of pages| .
IRE . aR in their annual report, or thet
Te DOT ee ot ; . J ; amount charged for it” y
“geese PUBLIC OPINION CAN | First Wig Fo | ac
seared a large crowd yesterday , 4 Irs ig or 6 aetabe

afternoon when afver a brawl with c a | \
; . ’ : «6 2 99 e | a
another man in the Court yard, he P ABOUR PROBI EM Mr k Col W hss
began to run up and down weary: ; El 4 L Ve) . pea er ‘om bie all | |
ing and calling for his two gir ee ” }
ieee aie sis aie! a Visit Barbados |
After determined efforts by two Says Commissioner hen His Honour the Speake: F
France Afloat”, another name} |

eff ny | of the House of Assembly, Mi
policemen Dottin was subdued and K. N. R. Husbands, dons his wiz|for the luxury liner “Colombie”’
Compagnie Generale}

taken to the Charge Room in a THE FACT that Barbadians were refusing offers of|at the ceremony of the opening of the
agricultural employment locally is a matter that only pub-]of the new Chamber of Parlia- { rransatlantique French Line, wil! |

helpless condition.

PPARENTLY affected by the lic opinion can influence, the Labour Commissioner, Mr. dees dunia Gnetae ee be the/ be making its first postwar trip

warm weather yesterday, an id at a press conference yesterday. | ,,’; Speaker ever to wear a) to Barbados on October 25,,

old man who was walking along A. E..S. Burrowes, said P % y wae mee past dozen people!, Sailing from Le Havre on|
Nelson Street began to strip off} People were registering at the, The conditions under which they Ride ne ay the Advocate”! October 12, the “Colombie” wili
his clothing Tearing off his shirt|Labour Office as unemployed and|would have had ‘to work were he peakyyd if they had ever seen) start on its journey to Barbados
and kicking off his old boots, he}were being called in and ques-|those generally agreed upon for} ® local Speaker in a wig, and they| via Southampton, Vigo in Spain,
was checked in the act of taking/tioned. When offered local agri-| agricultural workers in the colony. |All said no. Among them were’ Guadeloupe and Martinique. It
off a pair of short white pants by |cultural work, they said that they |The majority refused saying that | Hon'ble G. B. Evelyn, M.L C., a} yi) be leaving Barbados the sam

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a young man. would be interested in that work}they were not interested in that|former Speaker, and Mr. E. M.|night for Trinidad ;
The pains was 88 degrees|outside of Barbados, but not in|kind of work in this colony. Shilstone, M.A. oe on a Susi” ind then go TD
in the shade and about midday Barbados, They are worn by some of the} e9 | 4 e

The rates o1 pay offered them z : a oa Its itinerary back home will be!
said that the p Speakers of the Assemblies of! Trinidad, Barbados, Martinique.

Guadeloupe, Plymouth and Le
Havre.
After this trip, the “Colombie”

the majority of men were walkin Mr. Burrowes e ;
around the town without their number of persons who were;were 19 cents per hour for an |other British Colonies.

i “A” class man and 13 cents per rie an dae :

coats. Snow ball carts parked on} Placed in employment locally by 7 Wigs were widely worn by peo-

ae Sea a ton ment Agenc were | hour for a woman. The workers : z whats a sant
the waterfront did a brisk trade as ihe, Rmnploymeny Agency Were who did piece work were given [ple otlier than professional people)?
thirsty labourers rushed to them In 1948, the Agency placed 171 | higher wages. k nant aeitiy 6"! will be extending its voyages to
to quench their thirst, persons in employment; in 1949, wee Sure ad et im ie Wigs dre not made in Barbados ; other West Indian Islands. From! nner

f = ; to U. . for]... oe oe arpaco’-| ta Guaira, it will ti te S=—=—===== SSS

ITA SMALL himborazo,|279 were placed and up to the} *¥) men who wen mi uecnie hel ee ‘nels , it w continue
R St ‘Diab Bly ses na half of 1950 329 had been placed. | °mploymyent on August 14, three They are imported from Engl ne Curacao, Cartagena and Jamaica }!

: asf returnedâ„¢on September 5. before starting o Sead telly sores
Chin.borazo Road lying in an un- 2.000 Registered He had not got a return from | Sefore starting on its return voy
conscious condition yesterday) + ihe’ end of June 1950, how-



10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET


























é ot age to Europe. A call at Barbados
the Chief Liaison Officer, but the 7 ee Shes, : }
United States Sugar Co-operation More Par cels For i scheduled for every five









abouv 7 a.m, She was taken by

the Police van to St. Joseph's Ten codister of tee tous, 23 claimed that the three men made ae Rek-s09 "Colombie” can. ace

Almshouse where she was detained | “workers who registered at the |up their minds that they were Antigua inte BBS Bassehaneth Le, 440 tet

te Cpers Run: Agency, had to renew their reg- | Mrysically unfit. ; class, 124 second class’ and 193. W or
istrations every month. If this Thirty packages of hurricane |i “Gase The Seiifd alk

ae sui (Mma, Soom tL Samaeraediee celle! Sepde for, Antigua WSr accommodation is divided up’ int
c a - s 3 ‘ ‘ ;

Barbados Scholars Saad cenananiiens digins the in= 88 New Boys “Lady Rodney.” These packages |.) 14 cabin class and 84 dormitary p EK A ¢ EK

terval. . were sent by the Y.M,C.A +|. The minimum fares of passage :





Leave For U.K. A total of 29 eo Noch to At Harrison Hurricane Relief Committee. jto England from Barbados are

registered during the The “Lady Rodney” was 1h} ¢93 first class, £63 second class,

Mr. Edward @rathwaithe ana/June quarter and 25 were placed port since Tuesday loading a cargo} £50 cabin class and £45 dor-|





i i i | s >» crucial questo: ) ay

Mr. Fabian Holder, the last two ae oe tee ee” on a} Colle e of 145 puncheons, 21 barrels, 19} mitary class. | : aa hee eae ve yp iy
of the 1949 Barbados Scholars About half the persons on the g £ half—barrels and 50 cartons of Special fares have been quoted | the very existence of each of us.
left for England yesterday on the})i 1. register hawt registered as molasses along with 2,350 cartons}by the agents for voyages from | ‘chn Foster Dulles here. issues a
S.S. “Willemstadt.” labourers. Some 300 registered 6 New Teachers of rum for Canada. Barbados to Jamaica. Buying a} larion call: “Let us mobilize for
Mr. Brathwaithe will enter}; carpenters, 100 as masons, 100 It is returning home via., the]return ticket, a passenger will | peace!” Peace, he says, requires
Cambridge University to take as chauffeurs and 90 as clerks. British Northern Islands. have to pay $208 for a first class | strategic planning, willingness to
his degree ‘n History and Ditplgma| there were also 80 registrations| Harrison College has 88 new passage, $163 for a second) cla sacrifice, and the impulsion of a
in meer Hone a en ben det} as domestic servarts, pupils this term and their tota! Jand $111 for either of the third righteous faith. If we uetaene
will enter Oxford University ‘to i ts now 575, an increase of 41 on} class opportunities, Without a these qualities now, rather than
read Modern Greats. The Aiea eaeneed quite a last term’s total. FARMERS EXPECT return ticket, the passenger will| reserve their use for a *" oa gen-~
eration can accomplish what no

The other two Ba ‘eee. few requests for domestic servants} The ro'l call at Combermere is; GOOD CANE CROPS | be buying his ticket comparative-|
Raeoiers were Mr. ee but it was not able to fill all the [now 570. ah ; ly dearer

illiams who left last week for] ( cancies successfully. The rea- Harrison College has four new Farmers rub their hands in Formerly a two-funnel ship}
England on the “Golfito” to = son for that was, that there were| masters, one mistress and an | satisfaction when they look at|the “Colombie” had a brief run
Law at Oxford Un ae anc/not sufficient “Grade A” servants] acting master. The newcomers are | their cane crop: in the West Indies Service before |
Mr. S. H, Watson who waS|i, ‘ail the vacancies. The same|Miss E, Weston, Mr. J. W. Rice | All the fields are green and the] peing converted into a hospital |

already in Canada when the! situation existed with the “Grade|Mr. R. R. M. Gendall, Mr. E. | canes are big, a marked ‘contrast | ship for war service,

other has the establishment of
lasting peace

On the basis of his wide experi-
*nee and intimate first-hand know-
ledge, John Foster Dulles analyse













1
results arrived here. A” mechanics. S. Brewster and Rev. Sinclair| to the look of the can A eg pot beg oe ae
The Agency also found great |, a, Of last year about the same Since the war, one of the fun~ | intone Gr vaxciition nvenith
CHILD BURNT difficulty in fijling requests for period, a farmer told the Advocate} nels was removed to give more | Soa nay Lee a pee amine
diesel operators and mechanics yesterday. He said that the crop] deck space to passengers for “hares biboat f g th
An 18-month old child, son of ate En rata Fee What’s ou Today would last somewhat longer than | games - relaxation ual
Joan Hoyte of Burke’s Village, | 85 Glese! o Ca ? it did this year if the rain con-] The “Colombie” now provides
St. Joseph, was ‘badly burnt by Bee artes tararinuted, thse tc Meeting of Christ Church tinues to fall as regularly as it vamengers with the comforts of | to discuss with authority the en:
hot water about 10 a.m. yesterday. the jack of proper facilities for Vestry at 3.00 p.m. is doing now. modern public rooms, gymnasium, | re range of issues that must bi
He was injured on his right le8|¢aining, which were found lack- Water Polo, Aquatic Club, ~ children’s _aneeey arene tome cette swe Soe Oaney
He was attended by Dr. John- ing in practically all trades. There , at 5.00 p.m. AMPHIBIAN PLANE pool with cubicles, lounge — i pee ce age Be retecsee Escalon
son and detained at the St. Joseph | was jittle difficulty, he said, in Mobile Cinema, Bay Pas- promenade deck with a winter | foreign policy, as a delegate to
nshouse indi - arden. | Y, ass pa
Alm shouse. Coane work for first class work ture at 7,30 p.m, VISITS & Aliccdh: Winles: 4 peengee the United Nations, and as, U nited
‘ i states Senator, ne has participate
On Mondiy tha: Agoney ire- An American amphibian plane|liner, a certain amount of freight i oye ananiaie Sanches Fe
CUT TING GRASS ceived requests for 35 agricul-} Tuqor, Mr. S H. Headley is| arrived at Seawell Airport yes-|is carried. Loading is electrically thts book you “will find his dam
H . wing the| ‘ural workers—15 men and 20} acting for the West Indies cric-| terday morning. It had a crew of controlled = and consequently, | Hienite. on tnpartant-5 Go lihion
Groundsmen are mow!né stice| Women. Fifty labourers were) yeter, Mr. C. B. Williams who is] ten. It left in the afternoon winches and derricks are not used. | figures, accounts of his work
ori ne “The gress covers aed ne ne, vee foemey remaining on study leave in the various conferences, his share in
Playing Fie 2 ss . e employment, ’

s } ; A rit the U.N. Charte
the cricket pitch which is on th€} 35 were asked and three again — a a Ae ee writing the rarter
grcunds and ihe many school rs accepted. Yesterday, 40 were baisknsl Gicle on aie os ae

who go there to play cricket find asked and five took employ- H. St.c. Tudor.

it inconvenient. ment.

SN




Straightforward and_informa-
tive, free from both prejudice and
illusion, realistic yet appealing to
the highest moral values



PREPARE YOUR
STOCK FOR THE











bt 1 f SEE THIS BOOK AND OTHERS AT THE .. .















Mr. Dulles is uniquely qualified
to discuss with authority the en-

























HARPIC . ‘
ING CLEANS IT ENMIBITION N-s~ Y
U | FOR YOU _,, : ¢ -/ pes
AGAIN? : sine |
° “ a ag
T'S TIME YOU TOOK SOME KOSSOLIAN BLOOD SALTS — 4/- lb. Mt : ’
VENO’S/ A Highly Concentrated Blood Tonic and Conditioner for HW
Lightening COUGH Se Oy ee ree Anaemia, Skin Disorders, Poor Condition. Increases and y | Our List includes such Authors as:
Fi ILY cough medicine whicki has been relied upon Enriches the Milk Supply and strongly recommended { Ri ’
VENO'S ends that iritation in the throat, southes deck We cod hae | ERNEST HEMINGWAY : “Across the River and Into The Trees
the soreness away, conquers hoarseness and brings preparing animais tor show or sale. 2)
7 2 : td
Catsome TOA! a, Also: KOSSOLIAN POULTRY TONIC .. 3/- 1b. |), CHAPMAN PINCHER, B.Sc.: “Evolution”—Reason Why Seri
pe Just sprinkle some ‘Harpic’ into the lava- Kf f
= SRONCHITIS-CATARRN pc aes 3 Sos peo re oe tar co i} WINSTON S. CHURCHILL: “Europe Unite’—Speeches 1947-1948
CATARRHALASTuna Y// | so cin dines oe ins » _ RACEHORSE TONIC 5/- 1b. |}
GNHTNING Silent coven? ¥ x i P. G. WODEHOUSE: “Nothing Serious”—Bingo |
l / ? , y , Ez , ry ¥ np ’ * it |
IXTURE een Sane HARPIC 1 KNIGHTS DRUG STORES |
CcOUG H M ¥47)/1 | THE SPECIAL LAVATORY CLEANSER /{/}) i | |
i ‘7 ar —— anspcros it ” - - -





THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1950

FOR BEST RESULTS

PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE















FOR

daiwa

OB

ADVOCATE CO., LTD.

BY CARL ANDERSON



PUBLIC
LIBRARY
















Pkgs. Icing Sugar,
» Brown & Polson
Blanemange
» Birds Jeilos
Tins Patent Barley
» Seed Barley











[CAN'T \/MAYBE YOUR YNO!

Wc


» Peanuts
Duffs Custard Powder
Pineapple Jam
Pineapple Juice
» ‘Tomato Soup
Slabs of Bacon
Tins Oxtail Soup.
Eschalot per Ib

STUART & SAMPSON
LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum.



PROCEED
CUTION!

THE EXECUTI
TILL Meee

READY MIXED







<
$B cop: 1930, wh Dw
7 —— World

Raghts Reserve



APPRECIATED
GIFT

FLORALENE

It possesses a fragrance that
everybody likes.

YEAH, HE |S! AN’ BIG DEKE'LL PAY
ME PLENTY FOR KILLIN’ Him!



AN L.CKr. PRODUCD

“ALS. BRYDEN & SONS 0s) LD.

AGENTS.



Ask your dealer for it, ov
phone 2938.

THE BORNN BAY
RUM (0.









oR
- - o « THE RIDDLE OF THE ROME REBELS

l=( LUIGI // ATTENTO!! STOP HIM. HOLD Him!
STOP HIM !! és YOU BLUNDERERsS !!






MEAT DEPT.

Australian Prime Beef,
Steak, Roast and Stew
Beef
Mutton
Chops and Legs
Ox Liver—Kidneys



nnn"





=H

a
=

Make BETTER Students

BISCUITS
























e e
Peek Frean Twiglets................0000- $1.17 qu & W
Peek Frean Playbox Biscuits .............. 1,20 Li curs ines Ete.
7 pap » » Martini Cracker .............. 1.64 Célinbbatias
“ORE DO "You 6i2-T PRIDE aioe Lee el LARGRE Carrs British Assorted Biscuits ............ Meter Ee tg oe ee eo sl ee ere mT eat SE PETA SE
SHE PAID EVER MYSELF ON THE DON'T THINK » Glamour Biscuits ................... 2.34 Li
Seat Ses | Laer 1M Gone » Amber Biscuits 000.220... 2.0. 2.36 Berne ene eis =
BUTLER -His, MUCH / » Springtine Biscuits.................. 1.60 . .
eifpamdaton ” Shepherd Biscuits ............0c0... 1.92 Wincarnis ........ 2.88, 1.38























nd Buckfast Tonic Wine .. 2.90
PEANUT BUTTER & JAMS Phosferine Tonic
’ Wine .......... 2.40, 1.32
Peanut Butter ................. lg 53, 35 i
S.A. Peach Jam (2 Ib.) ...... .60 Pimm’s No. 1 Cup.... 3.38
S.A. Apricot Jam (2 Ib.) ........ ... 60 ‘
S.A. Fig Jam (2-1). 0.0... 0.00.0 ce eee ees 52 Martini Vermouth (Dry
S.A. Pineapple Jam (2 Ib.) ................ 67 4
Hartley’s Strawberry Jam.................. 60 and, Sweety.) .< a+ +s. 228
” Raspberry POD Kies 'esk agian tbs os ees 57 Gorlions Gin es. 2.50
” Apricot Jam .... .......6..c.ees 45

CONDIMENTS & EXTRACTS




Colman’s Mustard ............. 0.5000 s eves 57

i, French Mustard ...... ti Ales AHR Ve 33
Kraft Prepared Mustard ................... 17
TMCERR MORES a ici vey ee Uie co eines -16
Mortons Curry ........... cece e cece ees AT

‘s Ground Spice ...............-.55 Al ARR eR
MOOV EU rib ices sites via eee eee 1.60, 90, 60 : aes v7
TREMETRNG oak be asec ee OTC ER a eevee 97, 60, 32








CEREALS

Are a MUST on your List






BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES








ER. NO~ YUS | FEEL BRAVER-AND SRM WiCou) JIE] SOARS weer ee cece cede eee enc ereseeeteneens
OF SCREAMING SAFER = WITH HiM THAN i ce CO AR "iia eee ee
HEADHUNTERS! ITS | | WAIT HERE WITHOUT HIM, EVEN iN Apricots .... 1... esee eee center eeenees -62
SUICIDE TOGO THERE? 1 OUNE COIN 6 3 Sor Fe cde bss beat EWe eRe + 87



screenees gn REE GC TE,







Letona Peaches ...... . 4 5'Â¥ 37
Tropical Fruit Salad .........

An
Cocktail Cherries .................0055 1.36, .54



Wafer Corn Flakes .---

















CANNED VEGETABLES ne
Dutch Carrots .......... Epo ea ke ite has 36
SE SOON odie oh sc ss RCC Cel adie wen 48, .35 Pearl Barley ..----"°"
Dutch Asparagus .......... 2.2.20... cece 63 .
* - Cauliflower .....5....... 0.00. c cece -60 Robinson’s Patent 93, 51 ¥
Pe MMPUPMONN 35 0s 5s cae is 3 5s Mood Magers 28 Barley ..--::-°°7 7" ’

Peas and Carrots ..................



? {\F | EVERGET HOME ALIVE,
| PROMISE TO BE A GOOD
—~. GIRL AND BRUSH MV

THE HANU SENTRIES 253
SPOT THE APPROACHING Y=
PHANTOM.
TEETH TWICEA DAY? | S== :
Aa

Pa




THATS THE HANU VILLAGE. STAY
BEHIND ME. THIS 1S A TOUGH CROWD.
THEIR FATHERS WERE HEADHUNTERS,



mA "a - 4 ‘ x
EEE a LLL







THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER



21, 1950

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

a

THANKS





Mrs. Agnes Goodridge and family grate -
fully returt) thanks to all those who at-
tended thé *tmeral, sent wreaths or cards
or in an’ other way showed their sym-
pathy on ‘the occasion of the death of
MR. ALEENT A. GOODRIDGE, late of
Pleasant Vule, Saint Thomas.

21.9.50—In

The Goddard Family desire to thank
all those who in various ways expressed
sympathy with them in the passing of
the late ELLIOTT SIMMONS GODDARD.

21.9.50—1n



We the undersigned take this oppor-
tunity of thanking all those who so kind-
ly sent flowers, attended the funeral and
in any other way expressed their s;m-
pathy in our recent bereavement caused
by the death of ESTELLE B. SMALL.

James A. Small (Husband) and Family.







21,9.50.—1n,
FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE
CAR—An ARMSTRONG SIDDELEY
4—5 Seater Sedan. For _ inspection,

particulars and price apphy to Messrs.
Redman & Taylor's Garage Limited,
Church Street,

21,9. 50—65



CAR—1934 model Chevrolet Car Engine
in perfect order New battery, 4 new

tyres. No reasonable offer refused.
Apply J. H. N. Jemmott, Good Intent,
St. George. 20.9.50—4n.



DODGE CAR—M-—161, Offers in writing
to the Secretary, Barbados Telephone
Ca., Ltd. 16.9.50—6n.



TRUCK—Ford V8 Truck in good work-
ing order. Offers in writing to the Secre-
tary, Barbados Telephone Co., Ltd.

16 9. 50—6n

ELECTRICAL

DEEP FREEZER-—For sale or rent on
@ monthly basis one Marquette Deep
Freezer Dial 4683 or 2328.

21.9.50—43n,







ae “

REFRIGERATOR—One (1) Super-fex
Oil burning Refrigerator in good condi-
tion immediate delivery. Apply Miss
Massiah Taitt’s Plantation, St. James.
Phone 91-30. 17.9.50—t ,f.n.



Stewart Warner
any time. Dial 4683
21.9.50—3n.

WASHING MACHINE—One (1) Cana-
dian Eaay Spindrier with Automatic
Spin-rinser, this Machine is new, Apply
W. B. Hutchinson & Co. Dial 4484.

17.9.50—t.f£.n.

RADIO—One (1)
Radio can be seen
or 23







LIVESTOCK

HORSE—One thoroughbred yearling
Gelding, by O. T. C. out of Biretta.

Apply:—J. W. Chandler, Todds Estate,
St. John 21.9.50—3n

MECHANICAL
One hand operated BACON SLICING
MACHINE. Apply B. V. Scott & Co.,
Ltd., Whitepark. 13.9.50—tf.n.

MISCELLANEOUS

Fresh Stocks of SEROCALCIN for the
prevention and treatment of COLDS.
COLLINS LIMITED.

19.9.50—7n.







GALVANISED SHHETS—24 gauge. In
7, 8 9 and 10 feet lengths. Enquire
AUTO TYRE COMPANY, Trafalgar
Street. Phone 2696. 15.9.50—+.f.n.

PUMP—One % h.p. Pressure Pump
Automatic 20—40 lbs. In good order.
Apply J. Lamming, c/o Manning & Co.
Ltd., Electrical Dept. 20.9.500—2n

PHOTO ALBUMS—Preserve your snap-
shots by sticking them in an Album.
We have the Albums and the Corners
as well. KNIGHT'S PHOENIX.

20.9.50—2n

oe te

PRAM--Large twin pram with fold-
ing hood. Apply Mrs. L. A. Williams.
95-275. 15.9.50—5n.

RECORD ALBUMS for 10-inch and for
12-inch and carrying cases for 10-inch
records, and we have the records too.

A. & CO., LTD.
10.8.50—t.f.n.









ROAD MAPS—You can now get these
from KNIGHT'S PHOENIX.





20.9.50—2n

SAFE-Extra large Iron Safe Apply
to Mrs. Nellie Belmar, Winona, Maxwell
Coast. Tel. 8135. 20.9.50-—5n





SHADES—Protect your eyes from the

glare, by using Good Shades—a large
assortment just received. KNIGHT'S
PHOENIX. 20,.9.50—2n

TANKS—6 water tanks holding 300 |
gallons. Can be seen at Central}
Foundry Dock Yard, 15.9,50—5n
———_—

VEGETABLE SREDS—To get the best
results use YATES or LANDRETH Seeds
It pays. Buy them from us. KNIGHT'S
DRUG STORE, 20,9.50—2n

YAWL—"Frapida” approx. 37%
long with Gray Marine engine. Good
condition $3,000 — a bargain. Apply
J. R. Edwards. Phone 2520.

15.8.50—T.¥F M1.

PUBLIC NOTICES

feet



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that a Meet-
ing of the Clerks’ Division of the Carib-
bean Workers’ Union, will be held at
Union headquarters, Synagogue

on Thursday night Sept. 21st

at 7.30 sharp.
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
General Secretary.
19.9.50—3n.





LOST & FOUND





LOST

ONE pair of Turtle Shell Glasses in
Cose between Public Treasury, . Public
Buildings and (Broad Street Lower)
Case marked ?, B. O'neal Finder return
to.W. St. C, Browne, C/o Customs.

19.9. 50—2n







FOR RENT
HOUSES

LARGE HOUSB & APARTMENT—On
Sea, St. Lawrence, fully furnished.
Phone 8357 8.9.50—t.f.n

VILLA CELESTA-—9th Avenue Belle-
ville Phone 3962









21.9.50—3n



PUBLIC SALES



AUCTION

(nt iyrncttcimasateinneelisiangaenmeneinatians eset sealieila

I will offer for sale on FRIDAY 22ND,
at my office Victoria Street 2,126 square
of land with the chattel dwelling house
standing thereon, house contains draw-
ing, dining, 3 bedrooms usual out offices,
enclosed with G. I. palings. At Chatter-
ton Road. Belmont District. For inspec-
tion and terms of sale apply to R.
Areher Mc. Kenzie. Dial 2947. Victoria
Street. 17.9.50—4n.
eS

UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By Instructions received
Insurance Co., I will
Sept. 22nd at 1 p.m.
Garage, White Park.
Mode! Hillman Saloon Car.
Also One (1)

Terms Cash.

from the
sell on

(Damaged:
1938 Model Morris Ca



REAL ESTATE
“BELVOIR—Bt, James on Seaside, Three

bedrooms, usual conveniences, Garage
Apply H. E. Me Kar or Dial 4048.
21.9.50—3n

Bei eee. mH be set up for sale
a e! ice No: High Street,
Bridgetown, on Friday, the 22nd day of
September 1950 at 2 p.m. the Sugar Works
Plantations:—
hare, containing: jouer ‘tienes
lurch, con’ er an
ton 195 ‘ACRES. © vd



AACREAGE in Plant Canes — 4%
res.

ACREAGE in Ratoons — 25 Acres.
ACREAGE in Preparation — 3%

Acres.

There will also be sold with the said
Plantations One Dodge Motor Lorry, 2
Milch Cows, I Mule and 1 small 2-wheel-
ed Cart.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to the un ed :—

COTTLE, CA



ENTERPRISE HOUSE and outbuildings
standing on 1% acres of land in Christ
Church, and

G HOUS®P standing on 7
acres of land at Enterprise, Christ
Church, and adjoining the abovemen-

tioned premises.

The abovementioned properties will be
set up for sale by Public Auction at
our Office, No. 14 James Street, Bridge-

town, on Friday 29th September, 1950
at 2 p.m.
Inspection on application to Mts.

Lucas on the premises.
YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors.

By instructions received from the Gen-
eral Hospital, I will set up for sale by
public Auction at toate yard, on Th:
2ist, beginning at 12.30 p.m. the follow-
ing articles:—



(3) Iron Kettles, (1) Gas Stove, Lot of
Horse Hair, (5) Glass-door Cupboards,
(8) Iron Cradles, (29) Iron Bedsteads,
(4) Gas Ranges, (1) Electric Mixer, (30)
Assorted Mattresses, (1) Bakelite
tainer, (1) Gardener's Hut, Lot
and W. C. Balls, (1) Electric see
(1) Vegetable Steamer, (2) Iron a
()) Box X-Ray Parts, (1) Gas Sterilizer,
(12) Soda_ Water Syphon Bottles, (1)
Bacterol Cask, (1) -Ray , (9)
Galvd. Iron Ven
Instruments, (2) Steam
ing Trolley, (1) Small
board, Lot of Doors and Windows. (7)
Trolley Feeding Tables, (1) Wheel Chair,
and several other items of interest.

D'ARCY A >
Govt. Auctioneer,
15.9.50.—6n.

WANTED









HELP

A GIRL to do Book Work



Apply in

erson and writing. Watkins & Co.,
oebuck Street. 20.9.60—4n.
COOK—Assistant Cook wanted for

large household. Experience and good
references required Apply P. OQ. Box

22 c/o Advocate Co. 20,.9.50—6n.

JUNIOR CLERK for our Lumber Yard
and Hardware at Six Mens, St. Peter,
Apply in writing and in person.

R. & G. CHALLENOR, LTD.,
Bridgetown.
19.9.50.—6n.

SERVANT—Apply at Hindu Store Swan
Street. 21.9.50—2n











MISCELLANEOUS

INDIVIDUAL COACHING by English
University Graduate. School Certificate
and Commercial. Proof-Reading, Typing
and Stencilling efficiently and quickly
executed.





MIMI GOODING — Tel. 8538.
19.9.50.—16n.
WANTED TO RENT
HOUSE—Furnished or unfurnished,

Rev. Wheeler C/o Rev, Hansen, “Milton”,
Two Mile Hill. Dial 2214.
21.9.50—in.



TO-DAY’S

NEWS FLASH

CRAYONS
EDUCATIONAL TOYS *
BOTTLE

CHEAP
OPENERS
FLIT GUNS

Just Arrived To - - -

‘JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
‘And HARDWARE

I



GOVERNMENT NOTICES



Appointment of Cotton Inspectors

APPLICATIONS are invited

for the post of Cotton Inspector

under the Sale of Cotton (Amendment) Act, 1950 (1950-36) in each
of the undermentioned six areas for a period of nine months in the
first instance, from 1st October, 1950, to 30th June, 1951:—

(1) Parishes of St. Philip and St. John

(2) Parishes of St. James

and St. Thomas

(3) Parishes of St. Peter and St. Lucy
(4) Parish of Christ Church

(5) Parish of St. Michael
(6) Parish of St. George.
2

Applications should be addressed in writing to the Director

of Agriculture, Bridgetown, and should reach him not later than 23rd

September, 1950,
3.

Further details will be supplied on request. °



VACANT POST OF ASSISTANT LIVESTOCK OFFICER,
DEPARTMENT OF wisnioen AGRICULTURE,

Applications are invited for the post of Assistant Livestock Officer,

DepartmentDepartment of Science
applicants who are experienced in
sidered. The post is pensionable
$2,160 x $120—$2,880. The holder

and Agriculture, Barbados. Only
livestock management will be con-
and carries salary on the scale of
will be required to reside in quar-

ters provided at the Central Livestock Station.

2.

Applications, mentioning the names of two referees, should | The

be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, Bridgetown, and should
reach him not later than 23rd September, 1950.

2
3

Further details will be supplied on request.

14.9,.50—3n



—on. suggested

Acheson Calls
For U.N. Police

@ from page 1.
General Assembly. The Soviet
delegation will not take the path
on to which the Secretary of State
tried to push. the General Assem-j
bly.”

Mr. Vyshinsky said that the pro-
blems before the Assembly re-
quired responsible action in words
and deeds. He said Mr. Acheson
had tried to divert the Assembly
from tackling the vitally impor-
tant problems before it.

The Soviet Union would have
further opportunity to dwell upon
the rude attacks made on it by
Mr. Acheson.

The Soviet Union asked the
Assembly to deal separately with
the alleged American aggression
against China, :

Dean Acheson also submitted
two proposed items for the agenda
based on his speech today. The
items were: “United
action for peace” and “The ques-
tion of Formosa,” Acheson in-
formed the Secretary General that
“explanatory memoranda on both
items will be submitted shortly.”

First speaker in the general
debate was Brazil who supported
the United States. in asking for
consideration of plans for an in-

ternational force and for common |'

mobilisation of United Nations
resources against further aggres-
sion.

But while ¢oncedirig that the
Korean war had made such moves
imperative, the Brazilian spokes-
man Doctor Cyro De Freitas Halle
said he opposed suggestions that
the General Assembly should
usurp some of the Security Coun-
cil’s powers.

A Brazilian delegate criticised
the abuse of the veto in the Secur-
ity Council by the Soviet Union
and said that this had been the
cause of keeping the “noble Ital-
ian nation from becoming a mem-
ber of the United Nations?

“Is it not true that new Italy
was given the assurance that she
would come to work with us on
an equal footing once the Peace
Treaty she signed with her former
enemies was ratified?” he asked.

“Have we not seen, are we not
still seeing as a consequence of
the veto, fundamental decisions
affecting Italy being taken with-
out her participation therein?” he
asked.

—Reuter.

IMPORTED ACCENTS
WELLINGTON, N.Z.

A “standard” English voice
without accent or mannerisms is
almost an assurance of a job as a
radio announcer in New Zealand,
The biggest headache of the Na-
tional Broadcasting Service is to
find announcers whose voices do
not offend listeners. Out of 140 who
applied when the latest appeal
fcr announcers was made, only
seven reached anywhere near a
setisfactory standard.—(C.P.)

MAIL NOTICE

Mails for Dominica by Sch. Mary E.
Caroline will be closed at the General
Post Office as under:

Parcel Mail at 12.15 p.m.,
Mail at 12.15 p.m.,



Registered
Ordinary Mail at

1 p.m. on the 21st September, 1950,






















WANTED

We require the followiig per-
sonnel for our office:—

MALE CLERK: with previous
Plantation or Factory Book-
keeping experience.

STENO-TYPIST: fully qualified
with previous experience.

FEMALE CLERK: with previous
Book-keeping experience.

Salaries for the above positions
will depend on qualifications and
experience. No person will be
considered who has not the re-
quired qualifications. Applicants
to apply in person with written
application to the Secretary:—

DOWDING ESTATES &
TRADING CO., LTD.,
ECKSTEIN BROS.,
BAY STREET.
19.9.50.—6n.



Your Every Day

17.9.50.—3n.| Toilet Lotion ...

uMoLENE

“Cooling and Refreshing as a
Breath of Spring”

Manufacture of Limolene,

finds work for Fellow Barbadians

18 to 67c. at Your Dealer



BARBADOS



“Who'd be a soldier—and have all your pockets cluttered up with this stuff?”

U.K. Exports Up
By 10 Per Cent

LONDON, Sept. 20.
Prices were buoyant on the
London Stock Exchange today.
Markets were stimulated by the
removal of the prospect of an
early General Election following
the Government’s overnight vic—

tory on the question of steel
nationalisation

Advancing prices in most sec—
tions produced several features

and gave a good start to vhe new
trading period,

British Government stocks were
widely one sixteenth to three six-
teenth up on small support while
a moderave investment demand
created useful improvements in
jeading industrials,

Oils quickly moved ahead under
Anglo-Iranian lead and closed
very firm. Final prices showed
little alteration on the day after
being sharply lower on the Par-
liamentary statemen doubting the
possibility of an early resumption
of the debt service.

German and other Europeans
were firm. Kaffirs developed,
opened higher and made steady
progress to close among the best.
The coppers and diamonds were
in some demand.

—Renter,

MLS JUMP

LONDON, Sept. 20.

Britain’s exports in August
reached the new figure of
£189,500,000 and were 10 per cent
sbove the average for the first
steven months of the year, the
Board of Trade announced to-day,
In August 1949 the figure was
£14,130,000,

Final figures for August show
imports were £215,200,000. This,
while slightly above average for
the first seven months was about
ten millions less vhan July.

—Reuter .













JOHN M.



COOK BOOKS by Eliz. Craig
also —
BIRTHDAY BOOKS

ROBERTS & CO.—DIAL 3301—High Street

———

AUCTION |
with

for attractive terms and efficient service
Phone 4640. — Plantations Building

ADVOCATE



London Express Gagwice

CIVILISATION

GISBORNE, N.Z

The Maoris still use their tra-
ditional cooking methods for cere-
monial occasions, The system is
much like the modern clam-bake.
Bigkest problem today is digging
the large pit that is necessary. But
the Maoris hire a bulldozer oper-
ator as assistant cook and borrow

: E. Berlin Will Cut
Power Supplies
!

BERLIN, Sept. 20,
East Berlin will cut off power-
supplies to the three western sec-
tors of the city at midnight tonight
it was officially announced here
today.

r 7 | The surplus pewer will go
Sanne dae ~— sere towards the economy of the Soviet
; P o Sector and Zone the announce-

—(C.P) ment stated

This powe1
take place



the second io
three months

cut,
within

was enforced upon East Berlin
DEMOCRATS WANT * see authorities because West
erlin Magistrates refused mini-

RESTRICTIONS LIFTED

BONN Sept. 20.

West German Social Democrats West Berlin power otheials this
haye tabled a motion asking Gov-] afternoon stated that they were
ernment to negotiate with thel trying “to clarify” the situation.
Allied High Commissioner to end} The cut is not expected to inter-
demilitarisation, dismantling and') fere seriously with current sup-
restrictions on productions, plies to three Western Sectors.

—Reuter. —Reuter.

mum
said.

price offers, the statement

AVOID COLDS“FLU

Specialized Medication
Prevent Many

drops of Vicks Va-tro-nol up each
to help prevent the cold from
ing hold.

YOU CAN FEEL IT WORK!
Thi specialized medication works
fast) right where the trouble is, and
youlcan feel it. That stuffy, sneezy
feelijig vanishes, your head clears,
irritation is soothed, and many a
cold is stopped right then and there.
Va-tro-nol is expressly designed to
Stimulate Nature's own defences
ayainst colds. Use it in time!

VA-TRO-NOL

NOSE DROPS



Colds are doubly dangerous now ;
may lead to “flu” or worse! So
take every precaution, and

at the FIRST warning snifle WICKS

or sneeze, quick !—put a few





MANY PEOPLE
are buying the

“Unbreakable Pots”’

(old iron meter cases)
Tran¢planting their

Anthurium Lilies

Get a few before
they are all sold
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PAGE SEVEN

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for Dominica, Antigua, Mont-
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Sailing Friday 22nd.

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|

" PAGE EIGHT







Middleweight

Fight Next
February

(By LAWTON CARVER)

NEW YORK
The world middleweight cham-
pionship will change hands in
February unless Jake LaMotta
contrives somehow to sidestep

Ray Robinson, and there seems to
be no way now for Jake to escape.

The National Boxing Association
has ordered him to defend his
title against Robinson, leaving
Jake no choice in the matter but
to comply or lose it by default in
NBA territory.

While the beating which La
Motta wili absorb is something
less than pleasant to contemplate,
that is better than to be shorn of
the crown without the day

pay



that will accompany that beating.
Jake loves money.
A Date

The New York Commission un-
doubtedly feels the samq way
about the situation and will get
around eventually to setting a date
for the match.

Whether the whimsical New
York Board does or does not force
the issue is not of paramount im-
portance now. for Jake and Ray
actually are signed by the Inter-
national Boxing Club and the fight
is scheduled for Chicago.

There still are some angles to
be ironed out to clinch the fight,
a these are not vitally impor-
ant.

The fact is that there is no other
opponent around for LaMotta
and he must now meet the man
who whipped him four out of five
times before Jake was champion
and is a cinch to do it again.

Robinson will be forced to give
up his welter title in order to
challenge in the heavier division,
but there is no problem involved
in. that respect. Robinson has
trouble making the welter limit
cf 147 pounds and he wants to
move up.

No Problem.

Jake is about through and would
be no problem for Robinson whi
beat the 160 pound boss when thi
latter was at his best. Robinsor
is about as good as ever. Assum
ing that he has slipped a little he
stil’ is the best fighter in the
bh siness to-day.

LaMotta was no big bargain in
knocking out Laurent Dauthille
at Detroit Wednesday night. He

They'll Do It Ev



e
Festival
Matches

LONDON, Sept. 20

International matches to be
played in
Festival of Britain next May were
approved today at the Football
Association Council meeting here.

International matches sanction-
‘d were England versus the Argen-
tine at Wembley May 9, England
versus Portugal at Liverpool May
19, England versus Spain in
Madrid May 27, England versus
Norway B (Amateur) at Middle-
oorough May 15, England vs. Fin-
land at Sunderland May 10, Eng-
land vs. France (Amateur) in
France May 20.

Provisional fixtures with France
ind Belgium were not approved
but it is likely that France will
visit Scotland and Belgium will
play Ireland in the Festival of
Britain games.

—Reuter.

Cricketers
Due Oct.3

The s.s, “Matina” will be arriv-
ing at Barbados on 3rd October at
approximately 12 o'clock noon
and will be sailing for Trinidad
later in the evening.

The Committee appointed tu
make arrangements for the recep-
tion of the West Indian Team wiil
hold another meeting on Saturday
at 10.15 a.m.

Trinidad Win
Championships

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Sept. 20
Trinidad won the Caribbean
vawn Tennis Championship to-
night as the Tournament closed
with reversed singles, lan McDon-
ud, Trinidad, beat Nunes, Jamai-
ca, 6—4, 6—1 and 6—4, Ron
Sturdy, Jamaica, beat Jin Ho,
Trinidad, 3—6, 6—3, 6—3 and 6—





~~



wes on the verge of losing his
‘itle when in the closing seconds
of the 15-rounder he stopped the
*renchman,

Dauthille, something less than
he best fighter sent out of France
whipped LaMotta previously,
Carelessness kept him from dong
it again,

No such accident will befall
Robinson. LaMotta cannot whip
he welter champion either by
accident or on purpose.

Yet it will be a big
match. Jake has never been
knocked off his feet and has a
following despite his occasional
losses.

He is actually a pretty good
ighter in a seuffling sort of way,
xut not entirely dependable. He
was suspended because of the
technical knockout he suffered
igainst Billy Fox, a fifth rater.

However, he has grown rich as

money

a fighter and will be remembered!

is one of the smartest business
nen ever to infest the ring. He
vas. proved this by avoidng a

iefence against Robinson up to
Low.
—LN.S.

Time



connection with the] tor.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

CE ORT

Russians Move
Boundary Mark

BERLIN, Sept. 20.
British Troop reinforcements to-
day guarded Potsdam, south of
West Berlin following the incident
last night when Soviet troops
moved their boundary check-point
several yards into the British sec-



'.
British military police armed
with tommyguns uprooted the
barrier and returned it to its
former position.

Today according to German
eyewitnesses over 200 Red Army
troops were stationed in the
immediate area of the boundary
check-point on the East German
side.

Today a British Military spokes-
man stated that on Tuesday
Soviet soldiers erected a barrier
at the Berlin-Potsdamer-Chausse
inside the British. Sector.

Following protests British infan-
try were posted to demonstrate
the sector boundary

The barrier was opened and the
Soviet troops withdrew from the
crossroads. — Reuter.

West Indies Lose
Last Match

@ From page 1.



Top scorer was Trestrail with

70, while Rae made 42,

The players were Gomez, who
skippered the team, Marshall,
‘Irestrail; Walcotty Wil¥iams.
Christiani, Johnson, Pierre, Valen-
tine, Rae,

\
Williams and Gomez ran them-}

selves out, so it is gathered.

Gubby Allen who is well known,
in the West Indies, captained the

Elders and Fyffes team.

In spite of the West Indies
bowling attack they went for the
runs and some spirited batting by
Holmes the former Surrey cap-
tain, who made 56, enavlea the
Elders and Fyffes team to win the
match. The tourists return home
on Friday.—Reuter.

STANDARD RIDGE
By M. Harriy 1-Geay
Dealer: —vuth
North-South game



N.
@1073
PVAITRES
@1052
@37
w. gE
$3? eases
1097 95
@Al93 0764
@#Qo95 &K8422
s.

South was just short of a
Two No-Trumps bid on this
uplicate paifs
t and opened One
Heart, rebidding Three No-
Trumps over North’s single
raise. At most tables North
returned to Four Hearts,
although he might have
reasoned that the nine-trick
contract was more likely to
succeed. South in each case
was held to 9 tricks,

A Spade, Diamond or Club
lead presents South with
Three No-Trumps. At one
table, however, West made
the “safe” lead of 910 and
Played well in refusing to
take South's @K at trick 4
Declarer cashed two more
Hearts and led Diamonc:
pean » this gave West three
tricks. but he now had to

‘ lead a black suit. The con-

tract fails if South is in u
hurry to cash all the Hearts. ;

London Express Service.

Fi nian anon ame hap tare bees
E
a
9
3
5
e

RAR ARR RAR AAR A RRA ARO ern



| Killer Named’

@ From page 1.
but said “he does live in Nassau
j and is a prominent man.”

In New York meanwhile, Count
Alfred De Marigny tried and
acquitted on a charge of slaying
Sir Harry said he

“fervently | striking

—_—————

‘
+ goimeg to have « national cay made with their pennies, what else can you expect?”



U.N. TROOPS 4 MILES
FROM SEOUL”

@ Krem page 1

down from the north

hopes” the mystery can be solved.! while a second big force of mar-
in an interview, De Marigny said | ines assigned to the assault on the
that until the murderer of the|city was about the same distance
Canadian millionaire is found, his| away to the south but still on the

life will “continue to be a hell”.

beachhead side of the Han River.

People still believe I murdered, ern battle front >

Sir Harry although I did not and
was found innocent, Finding his
killer is my only chance for
1 per cent clear bill.

Earlier, Air Keconnaissance had

aj indicated that Communists were

making a desperate bid to pack

e Marigny formerly a resident! defenges around Seoul and to the

of {Montreal was Sir Harry’s son-|

in4law at the time the latter was
slajn in the Bahamas. His wife
Naaecy Oakes stood by him during
the\ trial but later obtained an
annulment of their marriage. De
Marigny said he had been living
in jseclusion here for two years,
denied of a steady job “because
evéryone thinks I’m _ wrong.”

Seyeral pertinent facts about the]

celébrated slaying never

be revealed he said,

tha the murderer “could be found:
in fhe Bahamas, Palm Beach areal
if {hey wanted to find him”. He
wuld not elaborate on whom he
(mant by they.—Can Pvexs.

¢

G

n at the expense of the south-

American military quarters anti-
¢ipated a stiffening of resistance
east of the Han river. United
Nations fortes breaking out of
their box in South Korea reported
a slackening of opposition today.

Resistance was Still stiff in some
sectors but an Army spokesman
said that there were signs that

have! the Communists were continuing
adding| their withdrawal

Northerners had still not thrown
in a counter-attack against Ameri-
can troops advancing in the
northwest corner of the former

PLLA ES POLES CLOSES

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SEPTEMBER 21, 1956

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‘THURSDAY,
















|
Just in timo for the re-opening of
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} school we have a new stock of Boys’

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defence box after the capture of
the Waegwan stronghold.

Many North Koreans have pull- |.
ed out of the Waegwan area, mov-
ing towards Kumchon to the
northwest and Kinwi.

West of the box, Communists
were digging in west of the Nak-
tong River forming a strong de-
fence line against troops of the

American 24th Division who
crossed the river yesterday.
—Reuter.

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The Barbados Aquatic Club

NOTICE TO MEMBERS

Notice is hereby given that in accord-
ance with Rule 8, the Club will be
closed to Members on Sunday, September
24th, from 4 ».m, to 6.30 p.m., for Police
Band Concert i+ aid of Charity.

This does not include the Bathing
Cubicles, which will be open to Members
of the Club - sone it

By order of the Committee.

k H. P. SPENCER,
Secretary.
19.9.50.—6n,

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OPENING SATURDAY, SEPT. 23rd 3: i" thick, 4’ x 6’, 8, 10

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8
7 p.m. | x





“DATE THE DOLL FOR DAINTIES”
HELEN B.MSNARY, DATE THE

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| WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.

————

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THANX TO
>

SSS SSS SOOO OSD







Full Text
aT

ee



Thursd

September 21

1950

_

Harry



ay

Oakes’
Killer Named

MIAMI, = iorida, Sept. 20.
A NASSAU DETECTIV£ left by plane yester-

day for Oakland, California, armed with the
name of the person given him as the murderer of
Sir Harry Oakes seven year ago in his Bahamas
The name of the alleged slayer of the

mansion.

Canadian millionaire miner was supplied by Mrs.

Hildegarde Hamilton, prominent

Florida portrait artist.

ort Lauderdale
Later she told reporters

that she did not want to become too involved in the
investigation “because it may not be safe for me to

visit’’ in Nassau again.

W.I. Lose
Last Match

LONDON, Sept, 20.

The West Indies cricket team
suffered one of their rare defeats
during their tour of England when
they lost their final game to a
scratch team of country players
raised by the firm Elders and
Fyffes yesterday. It was not a
serious encounter, just a_light-
hearted bit of fun. according to
what one could gather to-day from
behind the veil of secrecy which
surrounded the game.

Admittance was refused to the
Press and the public on the
grounds that it was a social occa-
sion.

The West Indies were invited
down to the firm’s ground at New
Malden, just outside London, for
lunch and a game of cricket. As
a result not even a gossip para-
wraph appeared in the London



Press which hitherto has published
ful; details of all’ the games
played by the Tourists.

The scores were not to go down
to" Wisden and of course the match
does not count in the records.

This is what one understands
happened.

he tourists batted first mak-
ing 199 for 6 declared after
batting two and a half hours to
make the runs.

@ On page 8.

B.B.C. Boy
Rare Fish
Meet a new fish. It is the short
nose Bat Fish Ogeocephalus

Radiatus, (for the fish expert).

Shaped like a bat it is nine]
inches long. From the tip of one
fin to the other is eight inches.

The Bat Fish has a_ pointed!
beak. Its mouth is %4 inch wide
and of a bright red colour.

The fish in the picture was
caught yesterday off Needham’s
Point by Wilfred Herbert of Bec-
kles Hili, a member of the Bay
Street Boys’ Club.

The Fisheries Officer Mr. Dud-
ley Wiles yesterday told the Advo-

cate that the specie was identified
by Charles M. Breeder (Jrr.) in





his “Field Book of Marize Yishe7
of the Atlantic Coast.”
It is said to be common f= cer-

tain shallow bays especially where
there are sandy beaches,

--- OR

were ee

















AT. TOP is seen the Bat Fish looking it full in the face—Below, the fins |

\the other way round.

——

‘| Mrs. Hamilton said she repeated

the story told her two years ago
by Edward Majava, 31 year-old
Oakland mechanic. She told the
story on Monday night to Assis-
tant Supt. Augustus Roberts of
the Nassau Police and Police
Chief Roland of Fort Lauderdale

Majava had told Oakland Police
on Monday that he knew the “in-
side story” of the bizarre Oakes
murder case and the identity of
the killer,

Oakes who discovered a rich
gold vein at Kirland, Lake Ontario
was bludgeoned to death in 1943.
Asked by a reporter why she
did not want to become involved
in an Oakes murder investigation,
she replied: “do you remember
the murder of an American woman
last year in Nassau whose body
was found at the bottom of a
well? It is generally believed that
the woman knew something about
the Oakes murder.”

Found Dead

Miss wetty Renner 37-year-old
Washire.c D.C. lawyer was found
dead in a well last winter. The

mysicy, i her death was still un-

solved. Mrs. Homilton said she
met Majava three years ago in

For’ Lauderdale when he came to
purchase a painting of the Morro
Castle. A year later, she told re-
porters, he came back to her
studio and related the story of the
Oakes killing. Majava, she related,
told her that he got his story from
a “blonde women in. Miami.” At
the time, Mrs. Hamilton continued,
he told her the name of a man
who supposedly killed Sir Harry

“I told the police all I knew about
the story Majava told me” Mrs
Hamilton said. Majava arrested
in Oakland on Sunday on a drunk
charge said it was Mrs, Hamilton
who told him the name of the
killer. Mrs. Hamilton said it was
She re-
fused to tell reporters the name

@ On page 8.



SPORTS
WINDOW

WATER POLO
‘This af.erncon, Water Polo
games at tht Barbados Aquatic
Club are Snappers vs. Bonitas and
Police vs Swordfish
These are two very
aiches for Snapp<
(si) because ea must won his
i re if either is to win this
year's league, |

important
1d Sword-








‘the matches begin at 5 p.m.
The Ré€feree will be A. Cla ‘ke



THIS?

and the resemblance to a bat are clearly shown.

|
!
public services such as the Post|
Office and railways there must

Barbadus

TY



}
i




Africa, receatiy.



Will Pur

se
Govt. Ranks |

BONN, Sept. 20. |

Gustav Heinemann, West Ger-|
man Minister of the Interior to-!
day issued instructions to dismiss
all employees of the Federal
Government who belong to any!
of the 13 Communist or neo-Nazi
organisations, |

The Minister acted swiftly on
yesterday’s decision by the West
German Cabinet to intensify tha
anti-Communist offensive in Wes)
yermany. West German
cfficials to-day did not believe
more than a_ handful _ of
administrative civil servants |
would be affected by the purge
They said however that in large,

inevitab'y be “extremist pockets” |

and there would have to be some,

“weeding out’. |
—Reuter.

j

|



Israel Expel ©
4.Thousand |
Bedouins |

FLUSHING MtADOWS, Sept

Major General Willia:. Riley re-
ported today that Israel had ex-
pelled some 4,000 Bedouins and |
1,000 Arab refugees from
last

20

Israel |
seven |
to recent |
that Israel

Into Egypt in the
months. In answer
Egyptian allegations
had embarked “large-scale ,
military operations’ to expel all!

Arab refugees from the demilitar~ |

on

ised zones of Palestine, the United
Nations’ truce chief declared:



“On September 2. 1950, Israeli
military units rounded up some
4,000 Bedouins who have been liv-
ing in and around the demilitar-
ised zone of El] Auha and drove
them out of Israeli controlled ter-
ritory across the Egyptian inter-
national boundary
territory.

into Egyptian

General Riley said that investi-
gation disclosed that
Arabs representing five Bedouin
tribes, all contended that Israeli
had been conducting operations to
clear Bedouins out of Israeli ter-
ritory with armoured cars and
guided by reconnaissance aircraft
After driving the Bedouins across
the border, Israelis burnt
erops and possessions

refugee

their

Israeli denied that they had en-
tered the demilitarised zone, he
stated, and contended that the
Bedouins were “infiltrators” be-
eause they had departed at the be-
ginning of the war and had illeg-
ally returned after to Israeli. Ac-
-ording to Israeli, the Bedouins
were a continuous source of
trouble. They smuggled, fired on
vehicles and laid mines.

In addition to the expulsion of
he Bedouins. General Riley said:
‘Since March, approximately 1,000
Arabs have been expelled by
the Israelis across the demarcation
line to the Gaza strip with a mark-
vd increase in numbers during the
‘ast month.

—Reuter

BERLIN, Sept. 20.

Soviet soldiers and East German
People’s police today seized two
American military police with
their patrol jeep in the American
sector of Berlin, Colonel Marice
W. Daniel reported. The American
patrolmen notified their head-
quarters by radio immediately
after the incident. They said that
they were within the United
States’ sector when they were
apprehended. Radio signals went
| dead.

The American military police
were making a routine patrol. The
police were arrested just beyond
the American sector boundary

After a day in which police on
|both sides of the East-West sector
‘boundary had engaged in a grim



bo YOU KNOW

s% » :
THIS ODD-LOOKING FISH, as yet unidentified, mystified trawlermen in the Cape

Tt was caught among stockfsh in a net a fow days ago 55 miles off Cape Colmabine,
about 125 miles north-west of Cape Town.

fine teeth and is of a dull grey colour

W. Germany | Stre

The specimen, which a

AUSTRALIAN PRIME

first of a series of broadcasts on Defence, to-night said that
the only hope left for worltl peace was to prove to the
potential enemy that putting the Atomic bomb entirely
on one side we are as ready and as strong as he,

Advocate Hurricane
Relief Fund
For Antigua

Amt



previously acknow-



ledged $6,301.40 fF
Canadian Bank of
Commerce
a e aeepert 5.00
" rier ‘ 5th 9
Advocate Co., Lid.
Mr. & Mr.. RR, G 20.00
Mr George C'wham 10.00
a E. Stuman MG
Total

$6,341.58 |

N.B.—-N. B. C. Boyce $6.00 in ||

issue hou'd ret
N. b. U. Boys
This Fund will be closed tomor-
row Friday. |
|
— |



Americans
Round-Up
Red Leaders |

BY ALEX VALENTINE |

With United States Marines on!
the road to Seoul, ©-pt. 2u,
American Intelligence oftjeets
were today rounding up-C6nmmu-
nist party members,in tue Inchon

area, |
An authoritative source dis-j
closed that they were working |

(rom the almost complete lists of
party members which were found
in the shell-ruined Party Head-
quarters in the town.

So far the sources said that the |
Americans had captured more than |
300 known and suspected Commu- j|
nists including about 30 women.

Helping American agents is the!
organisation known as the Korean |
Democratic Youth Association
Group of Rightwingers, suppressed
when the Communists invaded
South Korea





The Americans admit that there
have been some cases of working
off personal grudges by denoune-
ing people not in fact associated
with Communists. All the sus-
pected people however, are screen-
ed by personal acquaintances and
against captured records, they said

Intelligence Officers said that
«hey were hunting for several
necple who had collaborated with
Communists and would turn ther
over to the South Korean authori-
ties

i saw six prisoners in a village
about 2 miles from Inchon, They
had been seized in a lonely hut
in the hills by South Korear
Youths. An American Counter-
Intelligence officer was waiting for
them at the police station.

—Reuter.

:netch—as-snatech—can game of re-
taliation, 76 police were |read)
behind bars as hostages: 50 were
from the Soviet sector and 26 from
the Allied west sector.

Colonel Daniel reported that a
West Berlin policeman who was
with the Americans was also
arrested

The prelude to today’s hostage
war occurred on Monday when
six East sector police were arrest-
ed in the American sector while
acting as an armed guard for a
convoy of ten empty lorries

Soviet People’s police then
seized 26 Western Policemen as
they passed through the Eastern
sector for duty last night.

West Berlin police retaliated
today by pouncing on 44





THIS? FISH ?



ngth
Way To Peace

runs in our favour only if we use
et well.”

| t¢ forces and to create a feeling in



Aduacate

oo,

.N. TROOPS 4 MILES

Acheson Calls
For U.N. Police

TO KEEP WORLD AT
PEACF

FLUSHING MEADOWS, Sept, 20
The United States to-day called

for a Uniled Nations police force
.o keep the world at peace in a
cur pom. plan presented to the



jeneral Assembly by Secretary of
State Dean Achesogp.



|















sae

BB a tae
Town Docks, South

22 inches long, has four flappers,

Express.

Is Only

CANBERRA, Sept. 20.
MINISTER MENZIES in the

“Let us come
delusions,” he said.

out of our sell
“The time

Menzies said that the Australian
policy must be part of the world
deméeratic defence policy. “Do
you think that this Communist
enemy would iesitate Yo ruin
Western civilisation?
tlelusions.”’

He said thay the Communist
urpose was to <.sperse democrat-




the minds of people that as any
one of them might be attacked,
‘hey had -beicr keep all thein
‘Crees at home. If this succeeds,
he continued, international demo-
cratic co-operation breaks down
spd we all become isolationists,

Western Europe and the Middle
East are without adequate defence
snd if the Communists win the
war, we surely know the results,

~-Reuter.,

Dock Strike Talks
Continue In N.Z.

WG TON, N.Z. Sept. 20

Prime nister Sydney Holland
armed with emergency powers
said to-day that talks between
shipowners and dockers to end the
dock strike in New Zealand will
continue to-morrew, .

Ear.ier he said that the Execu-
tive Council had decided on a
state of emergency and he intro-
duced a motion invo the House
seeking the approval and confir-
mation of this step.

The dockers strike started in!
Wellington on September 12 over
the handling of lamp black aboard
a ship.

It spread to all New Zealand
ports on September 15 on the
orders of the Waterside Workers
Unon.



—Reuter





“The debate on defence

»

was opened by.



People’s policemen in buses, trams
and tube trains as they passed
through Western sectors on their
way to work in East Berlin.

East Berlin Police Headquarters
this afternoon charged West Ber-
lin police with unlawfully assum-
ing control of tube and elevator
train stations in West Berlin.

All stations in West and East
Berlin are under Soviet jurisdic-
tion according to the Potsdam
terms and East Police are normal-
ly in charge.

West Berlin police admitted
ordering detachments to carry out
raids,

East Berlin complained that
West Beriin police in strength
patrolled the East-West boundary
and detained and closely examined

| services

Sovie: Delegate Andrei Vyshin-
sky immediately stated that Mr.
é.cheson has “endeavoured to drag
us en to a path that has nothing
in common with the prot lems con-
iraniing the Genera! Assembly,

British Poreign Secretary Ernest
?evin and French Foreign Minis-

ice Robert Schunjoan were both
present when Mr. Acheson sug-
gested (hat units from member
euntries should be © specially

trained and equipped for the force
under the guidance of a United
Nations military advisor

Demanding action to prevent a
“drift to disaster’ Mr. Acheson
also urged that provision should
be made for the Assembly to be
called at 24 hours notice if the
Security Council shou!d be “pre-
vented” from acting in case of ag-
gression Dealing with what he
termed “the root of our trouble
the imperialism” Mr. Acheson
launched a five point attack on
Soviet policies

Mr. Acheson said that ivussia
had raised five barriers io peace
He said she sought the “collapse
of the non-Soviet world,” wrap
ped her people in a “shroud of
se¢recy” built up armaments at
a rate gravely endangering peace
and “manipulated the people ct
other states as pawns of Russian
imperialism.”

inally, he said “the Soviet use

of violence to impose its will and

its political system upon other
pedple is a threat to peace,”
Mr. Vyshinsky followed Mr

Acheson to the rostrum and said
that the Secretary cf State “did
not shrink from rude attacks or
the Soviet Union,”

Mr. Acheson, he said, had en-
deavowred “to drag us on to @
path that has nothing in common
with the problems confronting the

@ On page 7



ee es ener or eee

Strikers Hold
Up 2 Ships |

UN GEORGETOWN

GEORGETOWN, BG., Sept. 19, '

The strike of 400 waterfront
woftkers to-day appeared likely to
lellay the turn round at the port
of Georgetown of the ship Hecuba
of Amsterdam Holland and the
Booker liner Amakura ot Liver-
pow! The strike spread when
Bodkers (Georgetown) refused to
give effect to a decision of the
workers of the waterfront section
of the British Guiana Labour
Union to suspend for a week or
wo “Whitelegs” and the strikers
to-day picketed Bookers, number
a *d Thom and Cameron and

Satdbach Parker and Company
Ltds. wharf entrances. “Down with
brute force” was one of the pla-
cards carried.

The section is also protesting a
request to the Port Labour Com-
mittee by Bookers that seventeen
men be struck off the port labour
register for refusing to work when
requested and a decision of Sand-
bach Parker and Company Limit-
ed to introduce a new employment
system without consulting the
union.—Can, Press.



Deprived Of R.C.
Religious Services

LONDON, Sept. 20

A British Fore gn Office spokes-
nan teday said that the diploma-
i¢ community in Moscow had
2een deprived of Roman Catholic
religious services by the re-
tusal of the Russian au-
thorities allow an American
Priest, Father John Brassard t«
use the Chureh, Saint Louis ‘1
American Ambassador
Moscow, Admiral Alan Kirk
Soviet Deputy Foreign
sinister Andrei Gromyko last
< to allow Father Brassard to
take the place of the French
Priest who had left Moscow, Gro-
myko told Kirk that the Com-
mittee of the Church of St, Louis
had elected a priest to take the

to

Mcscow.
in

—(Reuter.

Red Soldiers Seize U.S. Police

“all vehicles, cyclists and pedes-
trians with brief cases or even
women with market baskets, who

crossed the boundary this morn-
ing.”

East Berlin police this morning
aiso closed vhe bridge which
links the East Sector and the
American Sector.

The six East Berlin Police

arrested on Monday came before
a United States’ Court today but
hearing was adjourned until Fri-

day for them to prepare their
defence. They will be allowed to
choose their own lawyers

The tension between the rival

not extended to
their Soviet

police forces has
Allied troops and
counterpart

—Reuter.



ROM SEOUL |

_|Ready To Recapture City

By JULIAN BATES.

TOKYO, Sept. 20

AMERICAN MARINES pushing on from their

mile and a half deep bridgehead over the Han
River reached a point four miles from Seoul today
as Communist troops were reported rushing north

to defend the key city.

Marines pushing over the

Han in strength at dawn this morning. met stiff
opposition and fanned out for an assault on Seoul

itself, expected within
Mighty Mo.
To The Fray

TOKYO, Sept. 20

The American battleship Mis-
our’, the largest in the world
day, joined the United Nations
vil grovp and supported the
lar River action with her sixteen
ich gunr

This wes announced by Admiral
struble, Commander of naval op-
“retions in Korea

The Tlissowri had sailed right

und the Korean Peninsula for
» week. She helped South Korean

udings on the East coast by
telling enemy concentrations at
‘amchok rorth of Pohang.

\cmiral Strubie also announced
that the British Cruisers \he Kenya
ut Jamaica, both of 8,000 tons,
ok part in the short range bom-
‘rdment of Inchon. The carrier,
‘3.350 tons. was among five en-
aged in the operation,

_ The Japanese surrender was
signed aboard the Missouri in 1945
She has three aircraft and two
helicopters and a normal comple-
ment of 2,700 men.—Reuter.

Brighter B.B.C

| LONDON. |



A 28-year old woman
accused of throwing a brick
through a window at the
London headquarters of the
British Broadcasting Corp-
oration explained she “felt
the BBC needed some liven-



the magistrate court: “I
thought we had been having
some lgusy programmes late -
lg.tt wer £8 be Wo
held for seven days for ex-

| ing up.”
| Fiorence Jean Hardy told
¢mination,—(I.N.S_)

Jamaica Fears

Competition

KINGSTON, Jca,. Sept. 19.

Concerned over the report that
cs.lars wll » released for the
importation of commodities from
“anada and that this will adverse-
ly affect |oeca] industries, the
Council of the Jamaica Manufac-
turers Association at a meeting
yesterday afternoon decided tc
send a memorendum to the Can
adian Government requesting
them not to insist that Jamaica
import from her, goods now
being manufactured locally. Larg
importiton of such goods from
Canada would soon close down
‘ocr! .ndustries. —Can Press,

48 hours.

Reconnaissance pilots operating
from the captured Kimpo airfield
north-west of Seoul spotted Cor
munist troops moving towards the
Southern capital from the south

The Han River crossing met only
light opposition. It was preceded
by a heavy artillery barrage and
supported by powerful air cover

The American battleship Mis-
souri joined in action today

Seoul, Korea’s langest city and
hub of the country’s biggest com-
munications network was captured
by Communists on June 28, three
jays after their invasion of South
Korea

With this city in their hands,
U.N. forces’ believe that they could
block almost all movement be-
tween North and South Korea at

the waist of the Peninsula
Captured North Koreans tole
to-day that

Communists were reinforcing Ja-
panese built defences within th
city. They were also said to be

| Intelligence Officers
digging sur

new defences on
rounding hills.

Defenders of the city have been
identified tentatively as two regi-
ments of the North Korean 18th
Division

American
Communist
taken

10

sources
prisoners
the drive on
yesterday

said 3,000
had been
in Seoul

acm

up
to

‘i mh
Moving Up

On the south, forces were mov-

ing up from which

they captured

Kumchon,

Waegwan
yesterday towards
the next objective in
their drive northwest
main Pusan-Seeul highway.
Among the icremost advance
units were men of the American
24th Infantry Division
General MacArthur's Headquar-
ters announced to-night that the
24th Division units were now
three miles north of Waegwan.
The second Infantry Division
which made another crossing over
the Naktong Kiver
CVRUTIGER Weta ay
| head‘ to-night,
| The marines jumped off from
the south bank, the Han after
one of the most intense artillery
barrages of the war. It lasted for
30 minutes
The first
machinegun
them in micstream,
bombs fell among
craft sending cascades
over crouching marines,
Within a few minutes of their
reach ng the opposite bank, they
had knocked out opposition and
an hour later they reached their
first objective astride the main
road and railway leading south to
Seoul, cutting communications
with Pyongyang
Number Three Platoon of the
assault company was the first to
gain the north bank of the river.
Late reports said that marines
were within four miles of Seoul,

along the

this mornin

WH Visage~

bursts of Communist
fire sprayed around
and mortar
the assault
of water

| @ On page 8



MEET
THE CHALLENGE

OF

UNKNOWN

THE

TO-MORROW

WITH A

POLICY OF

ASSURANCE

WITH

THE BARBADOS

MUTUAL LIFE

ASSURANCE SOCIETY.

J. N. WALCOTT
DENIS ATKINSON $

C. K. BROWNE,



l Canvassing

Representatives.

Secretary
PAGE TWO



Is
smith

of Dominica

their little

HONOUR E Arrow-
C.M.G., Administrator
Mrs. Arrowsmith and
daughter Jennifer
returned home yesterday by B.G
Airways after spending a week's
holiday. They were staying at the
Windsor Hotel.
Took Relief Parcels
R. H. S. L, MOSELEY, Assis-
tant Master of the St Vincent
Grammar School, returned home
vesterday by B.G. Airways after
a short visit here. He arrived on
Monday evening by B.W.1.A. from
Antigua where he had taken down
® number of packages including
clothing and foodstuffs from St
Vincent to the Government of
Antigua for relief purposes.
Barbados Is Best
ENERAL GEORGE VIDMER,
retired U.S. Army and father





ef Colonel Richard Vidmer of
Rockley, has bee ving in Bar-
bados since Dece er last year as
a ‘guest. at the Merine Hotel. He
left last night on the “Fort Towns-
hend” for St. Thomas whence he

will go to all the other West Indian
islands by air before returning to
Barbados in December to retain a
suite of rooms at the Marine for
another year.

General Vidmer told Carib that
he is not visiting the other islands
to get a better place to live, but
he is merely going to con-
firm his opinion that Barbados is
the best.

Sorry To Leave

R. A. S. DUNCAN, retired

Manager of the Barbados
Telephone Company Limited and
Mrs. Duncan, left yesterday by
the S.S. “Williamstadt” for Eng-
land on their way back to Scot-
land where they will reside with
their children who are attending
school there.

Mr. Duncan told Carib that dur-
ing their 15 years in Barbados,
Ly f had a very pleasant life. They

had made many friends and were
very sorry to leave,

Off To U.K.

R. FABIAN HOLDER

for the last year has been
working part-time in the Edi-
torial Department of the “Advo-
cate” and was one of the 1949
Barbados scholars, left the Island
yesterday by the s.s. “William-
stadt” for England where he will
enter Oxford University,

He is the son of Mr.

D. R. Holder
Road,

Trinidad Beauty Queen
ISS MARION HALFIDS
the Trinidad Beauty Queen
for 1950 arrived on Tuesday eve-
ning by B.W.LA. for two weeks’
holiday. She was accompanied by
her mother Mrs. E. Halfide and
they are staying at the Hastings
Hotel.

who

and Mrs.
of Westbury New

Miss Halfide’s visit was made
possible by B.W.1.A. who have
given her this trip and by the

Trinidad Publishing Co. who are
paying hotel expenses as a re-
ward for winning the Beauty
Queen Contest at this year’s Car-
—

federa on PHD OVE E hy HASH on

Port of Spain and her oar Ne
are reading and tennis,

Going To New York
R. and Mrs, Alfred Lazo of
Caracas, Venezuela, arrived
last week by B.W.LA. with their
two children Marianela whom
they have put into school at the
Ursuline Convent and Freddy.
They are staying at the Hastings
Hotel and expect to leave for
Trinidad by B.W.LA. to-day
and then go on to New York for
a month before returning to






of

“Here comes one

those wretched telet
sets butting in again!





Seas

London Express Serv



B.G. Civil Servant

R.

Guiana,

little

day morning by the

ney”

are staying at Maxwell's

MALCOLM FERNANDES,
Civil Servant of Brilish
Mrs. Fernandes and theif
son Philip arrived on Tues-
“Lady Rod-
for four months’ holiday and
Coast

Mrs, Fernandes is an Instruc-
tress in Dressmaking at the Singer

Sewing

Machine Company.

Barbadian Returns Home

the

R. ALONZA HINDS

U.S.A
yesterday
Townshend”
period
relatives at Dash Gap,

Bar
who was residing in
for 3} years, returned
morning on the “Fort
for an _ indefinite
is staying with his
3ank Hall

a
badian

and

Road,
Took Course in Radiology

nm. C,

Street,
Townshend”
from New York after

O Y. LOWE, Missionary

Chiropractor of 3ay
returned on the “Fort
yesterday morning
an absence

and

of 14 months.
His wife and son Charles who
went up with him, have just gone

over

continuing his studies as

to Ireland where Charles is
a medi-

cal student at Queen’s University
in Belfast.

While in the U.S.A,,

Dr. Lowe

told Carib that he took a course

in

Radiology
Medical

at the Manhattan

and Dental Assistance

School and at the Eastern Chiro-

practic

also

the U.S.A.,

morning
for a holiday.

here

guest of Miss Mildred Clarke
Matthias Gap.

St

RS. F. A

owner

Institute, New York.
travelled to various parts
doing missionary work

For One Month

He

of

ISS V. WALLACE of St, Vin-

cent,
by

arrived on Tuesday
the “Lady Rodney”

She expects to be
for about a month and is a
of

After One Week

CASSON of. Si.
Vincent whose husband is
of the Motor Vessel Lady

Patricia returned home yesterday

by

that vessel

after spending a

week's holiday as the guest of Mrs.

Lloyd Hunte of “Leinster Lodge,”
Oey crores TwoeK |

Also

leaving on the Lady

Patricia to spend a holiday in St.

Vincent
Chemist of the
turing Co, and Mr.

were Mr. Keith Hunte,
Roberts Manufac-

Leslie Corbin,

Chief Salesman of Messrs. S. P
Musson, Son & Co., Ltd. 4
Mr. Hunte will be away for 12

days

return home

while Mr, Corbin expects to

on Monday.

Civil Servant Returns

FTER spending three

months’

holiday in the U.S.A., Mr

Telford Hewitt, Civil Servant at-



tached to the Police Magistrate's
ee is a druggist of Court, District “A”, returned yes-
5 : 0 . terday morning by the Fort
Caracas, { Townshend.



BY THE WAY

By Beachcomber

HE sectional weather-chart
it is stated, may revolu-
tionise the science of meteorol-
ogy. The idea is to divide
England into .41 sections, with
five towns in each; the figures
indicate the forecast: 1 means
snow, 2 means rain, 3 means
sunshine, 4 means uncertain
conditions,
Prodnose: Five eights are 40,
Myself: Bravo! And one is 41.
Prodnose: And why is Durham
south of Epping?
Myself: Because you
turn the chart upside down.

‘

didn’t

Let Uncle Heartsease
Tell You

jkZ tdci

hOsSs
amous

seader
covered

Bing Crosby
1ud gave

him his big
chance? (4
8)

What is bee-
keeping








correctly
termed ? (10
From the
skin of whici
animat 1
shagreer
made? (3)



sla
Olivier born
(7)

What was
famous

of abe. enl
Pheni c i
(4)
Which
largeat of
the Canary
Islands % (i)







Came For Health
M*. J.B on ES, Chairman
3anana Association
in Dominica returned home last}
night by the “Lady Rodney” after |
a visit to the island in the inter- |

}
est of his health. He was a guest

t Mr. and Mrs, C. E, Clarke of
Palm Beach, Hastjngs.

Mrs. C. E. Clarke also left last
night by the Lady Rodney for
Dominica where she will spend a
holiday as the guest of Mr,
and Mrs. Charles.

Off To Canada
















































M® & MRS. J. PERCY FOS-

TER of “Strathallan”,
Rockley, ‘eft last night on the
Lady Rodney” for

bere they will spend two months.

the interest of his health, is Sec-
retary and Attorney of Messrs.
Wm. Fogarty Ltd

On Holiday

R

M traffic clerk in the Reserva-
tions Department of B.W.LA, Ltd.,
Trinidad, arrived over the week
end by B.W.LA. for a holiday.
He was accompanied by his wife
and they are staying at Abbeville
Guest House, Worthing.

we om B.G.
M*...” HOWARD who is in
charge of the B.G. branch
ot Messrs. Watkins and Partners,
Architects of London and the West
Indies, arrived on Tuesday morn-
ing by the Lady Rodney from
British Guiana for a holiday, He
was accompanied by his wife and
two daughters and they are stay-
ing at St. Lawrence Hotel,
Hopes To Return
AYING a visit to Barbados and
staying at Leaton-on-Sea, The
Stream, is Miss Doreen Churaman
of Plantation, Port Mourant in
British Guiana. She arrived last
week and expects to leave to-day
by B.W.LA.

Miss Churaman who is Private
Secretary to the Manager of
Port Mourant tells Carib that she
has been enjoying her holiday an,
hopes to return here soon agairi.

To Continue Studies

M* WILLIAM GREEN, a med

ical student at Lynolo Catho-'
lic College in Montreal, returned
to Canada on Saturday by T.C.A.
to continue his studies after
spending the summer holidays
with his relatives. He is the son
of Mrs. Clara Green of “Alexan-

der, Worthing.
For Two Weeks
RS. ROSA CAMACHO whose
husband is employed at
Miller Stores, Port-of-Spain,
Trinidad, arrived over the week
end by B.W.LA. for two weeks’

holiday. She was accompanied by
her daughter Miss Dorothy Cama
cho of the Canadian Bank o
Commerce and they are guests
Mr. and Mrs, Walter Marshall
Aquatic Gardens.
Dressmaker Ends Holiday .
ISS EVELYN LYONS
dressmaker of Tobago, fie
by B.W.I.A. for ‘Trinidad \
Sunday after spending two we les

holkiay as a guest at I *
Worthing,

Bank Manager Goes Home
R. C, A. GILLIATT, re
Manager of the Royal Bank
of. Canada, Mrs, Gilliatt and ae
daughter Miss Evelyn Gilliatt
le ft for Canada last night on t
“Lady Rodney” and will take up
residence in Halifax,
Mr. GiNiatt told Carib that he)

was very happy in Barbados since |! ¥

he came out here 17 years ago
as Manager of .the Bank. The]!
time had come for him to return
home, but he hopes to be back
during the winter months as early
as 1951









el 3. Dat is th
$ Uncle Heartsease of Good-} 3% What, ts the
will Corner I am given many make nay er res rich by m What is the symbo) for stiver ?
human and inhuman problems to .

7 : 16. Who was the great epic poet of ‘ t is the a ‘4
solve. The latest is this: Why Greece ? (5) Ge Phat is che paren ror eworde and
has gq scheme for ‘Festival of} 17. Who stult and mount animals ?/ig. wnat is the capital of Ken 8
Britain Bus Shelters,” been sent) 49 1) °Momas Morton's “Speed the Colony, Britisn East Africa? (
to the Journal of the Royal “Plough.” who was being referrea| 14. Who was the first woman to an
Numismatic Society? hi WL ene phrase “a oP ere AF eee the House of Com:

aetiv« bre ‘ “m- Mrs. say {

As the Festival Office = na 21, What was one of the brutes tn|lo What did 16 across write? (5)
powered to sponsor small build- * Gulliver's Travels"? (5) ig. What is the fifth of twelvey (3)
ing projects, it is perhaps hoped DOWN 18 If reciprocals are multiplied to-
bs are R ne xs Numismatic 1.What have sometimes een gether and one te added, what is

ociety may ask them to sponsor ,, called goobers ¥ (7) ;

a Suitable bus shelter, made of| % WHat {ys of joint allows an
old coins in the waiting room at directions ? (9) Solution of yesterday's puszie.—
thelp peadquarters, The Society] MiMi ag aa he T° Ot) Abbe, Soe ier “Ee
of Antiquaries is already contem- 4. What kind of call couia an Sherry 5 sires t em
plating a neo-Saxon shelter of elephant be expected to make ? poten: 4 :
chromium-plated mud and Which scottish Loch nas peen| [rimidad:'S, Haakou 4 aes uy
wattles outside Burlington House famed for the aileged appear-| Baghdad Pussion: 16, Iteb: 18:
ances of a monster? (4) Peer S rt "1 Ant “& GL
——- —_———

















J&R ENRICHED
BREAD







Figures compiled at the Vienna
Montrea! | International
that
Mr. Foster who has gone up in| @¢ learning to sleep alone. Ap-
parently, th

Joseph Teltscher of Vienna, a
leading bedstead exhibitor at the
Fall Fair, said that since the war
twin

C. RODRIGUEZ-SELJAS| beds by two-to-one.

over the continent.
Emphasizing just how far Euro-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



IN LONDON —A hat in 26 shapes



Side to side

As a handbag

' London Express Service.



Back to front —



A Question Of Beds

air showed today
in Europe married couples

est fad”
between the twin beds.

like it.
to form one of a
“Reports from four

beds have outsold double sales are of the twin models.

in-the-back is passed and it’s

vepoert and the Casiaway —8



about here.






AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)
TO-NIGHT AT 8.30

MONOGRAM Piecsents - - -

16 FATHOMS DEEP”™

in Glorious ANSCO Color
Tanis Chandler — Lon Chaney and Several Others

DREAM

With Arthur Lake —

OPENING FRIDAY — “MY Is YOURS”

VEL LEA’ SSSSEPS

PLAZA — Oistin: MATINEE TODAY — 5

“THANK YOUR LUCKY STARS”

LAST SHOW TONITE — 8.30
“THE JUBILEER QUARTETTE”
in a prosran, of ae — SONG — MELODY !
usical - - -
Along With TT pHANK YOUR LUCKY STARS”

With A Host of Favourites including ~ - -
Dennis Morgan, Ann Sheridan, Alexis Smith,
Jack Carson and others

Humphrey Bogart,

65OCSCSSO%
‘ soe Re eee eee Soe eS

GAIETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES

LAST SHOW TONITE — 8.30
“SEVEN MILES FROM ALCATRAZ” — James Craig And
“TARZAN AND THE AMAZONS”

— 9.40 P.M,

— Johnny Weissmuller



"FRIDAY — SAT. — SU
WARNER'S Action Classic ! !

Errol FLYNN in “CAPTAIN BLOOD”
With Olivia DeHavilland — Lionel Atwill





“MAT. SUN, — 5 P.M.





SOON ! WATCH FOR ! !
Robert Louis LAST 2 SHOWS ‘LOST BOUNDRIES’
Stevenson's TODAY It's Greater Than

“KIDNAPPED” 5 and 8.30 “Pinky”



PLAZA THEATRE
BRIDGETOWN

WARNER'S Action Thriller of The Famous Royal
CANADIAN MOUNTIES !!!
“RIVER’S END”
Starring Dennis MORGAN and Others

“SPECIAL MATINEE TODAY (Thurs.) —2PM.
Monogram’s Thrilling Musical-Action WESTERNS ! ! !
Johnny Mack BROWN in _ Jimmy WAKELY in® =
“SIX GUN GOSPEL” — and — “RAINBOW OVER:
James Oliver CURWOOD’S THE ROCKIES” 4













‘tu WALLS -
ERBERT WILCOX
UL Cednies Oe a ak Wee

FRIDAY 2.30 & 8.30 and Continuing DAILY At 5 & 8.30 P.M.
FLASH ! ! (ON Stage) To-night Only 8.15 to 8.45
HALF HOUR OF POPULAR DANCE MUSIC
By “The Sydney Willcock Quintette”
This Programme will also be carried over Service of
Radio Distribution



OUR PRICES
ARE RIGHT -
CHECK THIS
LIST ~

Pick axes
Axeheads
Chisels

Braces & Bits
Compasses
Clamps

Hand Drills
Files

Planes & Irons
Hammers
Hatchets

Tool Handles
Squares |

Rasps
Spoke
Rules
Tapes
Pliers
Screw
Saws
Levels
Oil Stones

Emery Wheels (complete)
Paint Brushes

Putty Knives

Chalk Lines

Drivers

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
ACTORY LIMITED,

F.
HARDWARE DEPARTMENT Tel. No. 2039

an couples are drifting apart,
itscher disclosed that the “new-
is a night table placed

Traditionally Europeans invari-
ably shoved single beds together
standard size.
countries
reported that 65 per cent of all

“European couples are finished

Teltscher and other exhibitors with bianket-snatching” Telt-
reported the twin bed trend start- seher explained.
ed in France and since has spread “The old game of cold-fect-

a

sure sign of civilisation when the



Rup clamt “9 e rac 4 strange bord gliding
ind smdis the 1 headiay? { wonder if that’s what the old
\ ' t Captain saw 2"' He pushes on and
Nore fit vs and /
; suickly rei. the bird for, just as
’ , wees ve is starting up the next headland,
’ Wicchev ae & mail figure appears over the toy
ty . i stares at him, a figure witl
‘ eb hen ha and a very black face
wr ¢ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ :
eae SSS SSS SS



os
oS

bed-hog is left to suffer alone”.

Among exhibitors the feeling
was that all Europeans should try
‘win beds, They felt it would cut
the continent's skyrocketing di-
vorce rate.

Why? “They'd get more rest at
night—be able to face married life
the next morning with less strain.”

—LN:S.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER *, 1950

7.00 a.m. The News, 7.)0 a.m, News
Analysis,

7.45 a.m Gentralis Speal aoe So
From The Editorials, Ponto Ariat
vramme Parade, 6.15 a.m, rire
Players, 8.30 a.m. Books To Read, 6.45
«am. Film Review, 9.00 a.m, Down,
12.00 (noon) The News, 12.10 p.m. News
Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Programme Parade,
12.18 p,m. Listeners’ Choice, 1.00 p.m.
Taxi+ing Around With Herbert Hodge,
1.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 1.30 p.m. |}
Much Binding In The Marsh, 2.00 p.m.
The News, 2.10 p.m. Home News un fe
Britain, 2.15 p.m. Sports Review, 2.30
p.m. Ring Up The Curtain, 3.30 p.m
Twenty Quéstions, 4.00 p.m, The News,|\
4.10 p.m. The Daily Service, 4.15 p.m.
The War Of The Worlds, 4.45 p.m.
Melody On Strings, 5.00 p.m. Listeners’
Choice, 5.15 p.m, Programme Parade, 5.30
rom. Listeners’ Choice, 5.46 p.m. World
Individual Speedway Championships, 6.00
p.m. Composer Of The Week, 6.15 p.m.
Creatures of Cireumstance, 6.40 p.m.
6.45 p.m Merchant
7.00 p.m. The News,

sis, 7.15 p.m, Jazz Club,

ally Speaking, 8.00 p.m.
Radio News: , 8.15 pum, United Nations
Report, 6.20 p.m. Interlude, 8.30 p.m.
Taxi-ing Around With Herbert
Hodge, 8.45 p.m, Interlude, 8.55 p.m.
From The Editorials, 9.00 p.m. The
Colour Bar, 9.40 p.m, Intérlude, 9.45
p.m. Rhondda Valley Experiment, 10,00
p.m. The News, 19.10 p.m, Interlude,
10.15 p.m. The George Mitehell Glee
Club, 10.45 p.m. Special Dispatch, 11.00
p.m. The Piano Por Pleasure,





Interlude,
Newsletter,
p.m. New
7.45 p.m.

with AN

xid

YOU GET
HIGH POWER RUGGEDNESS





THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1950



To-day, 5.00 p.m. ONLY — A Big Double

“TARZAN and the MERMAIDS"
“THEY WONT “BELIEVE ME”



TO-NITE, 8.30 P.M.

Music in The Modern Manner !

Presenting :

“THE HOT SHOTS’

“Trinidad’s Favourite Orchestra”

Featuring :

ROD CLAVERY—(Vocalist)
MIGHTY TERROR—(Calypso Champ.)

LEAR

2

Our



Last Two

Presents .



EMPIRE

445 & 8.30 p.m.

Ceciele AUBRY
Jack HAWKINS



ROXY

Last Two Shows To-day,
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

Republic Big Double
William HENRY

TE ATWELL—(Sensational Guitarist)

In
HOURS OF SWEET MELODIES

ze =©Doors Open 7.00 p.m.

Pit 20c., House 36c., Balcony 48c., Boxes 60c.



TO KIDDIES

2.00 pm. MATINEE on THURSDAY
is changed to suit you on

SATURDAYS, 9.30 A.M., SATURDAY 23RD
“TARZAN AND THE MERMAIDS”





ROYAL

To-Day, 4.30 and 8.30 p.m.
Friday 4.30 p.m. Only

M.G.M. BIG DOUBLE

Wallace BERRY
Marjorie MAY

Shows To-Day,

20th Century-Fox

: — “BIG re
ROSE”
AND
Starring :
Tyrone POWER as BATHING BEAUTY :
Orson WELLES | with

Ester WILLIAMS
Red SKELTON

Extra To-Nite for Half
Hour before Pictures Joseph
Clemendore along with Char-
lie and Jackson

OLYMPIC.

To-day and To-morrow,
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

20th Century-Fox



Linda STIRLING Double .
FOR FARM MACHINERY IN ANABELLA
|} “THE MYSTERIOUS IN
MR. VALENTINE” =| «43 RUB MADELEINE”
AND AND
¥ “HEART OF VIRGINIA” || “LES MISERABLES”
DEPENDABLE BATTERIES
FOR 61 YEARS! WITH re
on ee Fhazine LAU CEETON
7
; ————
6 *t 9OOSOS0YOOOOOQ’

GLOBE

Opening To-morrow =- 35 & 8.30 p.m.



DAHL

te

$00000000000000

90608

ee ees)

BARRY SULLIVAN -
JAMES WHITMORE - RAMON NOVARRO

Story and Serean Play by IRVING RAVETCH + Directed by ROY ROWLAND + Produced by RICHARD GOLDSTONE

cece St Se Ot A Mk Se het ae me
PLODODESOON

WITH
LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE.

nderee
me willing " edge of
derts ; Know e' of
x0 react P.S. This is the
assurance of ts pe of passenger
put we are carrying
certalts pooded






ane









on current trip.

CLAUDE JARMAN, Jr.

$0990000006505000909095000OOSOSOOS
THURSDAY,



THE PICTURE shows Section B of the Bay Estate where latrines and baths for individual houses are now being erected as part of the Housing Board's re-planning programme.

Mrs. Christian| Houses Replace Cane

Meets The
Century

ANCON, Canal Zone,

An attractive, freckled 26-year
old English speaking woman pa-—
tient in Gorgas Hospital here is
still marvelling over her first
sight of automobiles, motion pic-
tures, and other commonplaces of
modern civilisation.

She is Mrs. Christian of the
isolated Pitcairn Island. She is
married to a direct descendant of
the famed Fletcher Christian, one
of the leaders of the historic
H.M.S. Bounty mutiny that led

to the colonization of the tiny
Pacific island almost 200 years
ago.

Mrs. Christian was brought to
the Canal Zone last month aboard
vine New Zealand’s Line’s “Pangi-
toto” suffering from appendicitis.
The operation was performed
successfully last week in the U.S.
government hospital here, and she
is scheduled to take the “Rangi-
tiki” for home on September 22.

Canal Zone residents have been
kind to the solitary visitor from
the mid-Pacific, piling her bed—
side table with magazines, flow-
ers, and candy. She was taken
for a half-day ride around the
Pacific end of the Canal Zone by
a kind-hearted auto owner befora
her operation.

She said she hoped, before her
departure, to go to the marke?
and buy a_ chicken, a_ coconut,
some tomatoes and other things
for a Pitcairn Island chicken stew
—not that she is not happy with
the Gorgas Hospital fare, but
because she would like to show}
her new friends one of the typical
dishes of her little island. aiiain



MICKY THE BUDGIE

VANCOUVER

Mickey the budgerigar disap-
peared from home recently, but
his owners weren’t worried. If
he’s thirsty, Micky will scream:
“Gimme a drink;” if he’s hungry,
he'll head for a dog’s dish and eat
his fill. If the dog objects, Micky
will peck at him until he gives
up.—(C.P.)

SEPTEMBER 21,

1950

A VILLAGE IN

At Bay Estate

Model Village Growing

Under the care of the Bridge-
town Housing Board a fine hous-
ing centre is springing up at the
Bay Estate where many years ago
fields of cane dominated the
scene, and where, not so long ago
were the houses of humble folk,
all on rented land.

Government purchased the land
sometime ago, and then came the
August 31 flood, and the Bay
Estate was one of the havens for
the homes of people which flood
waters had pushed down.

The complete area of the es-
tate is 116 acres, which for the
purpose of replanning has been
divided into sections (A) and (B).
Section (A) is on the south of
Beckles Road and Section (B) is
on the north. Section (A), ex-
cept for a small area on Chelsea
Road, has already been. replan-
ned, About half a mile of new
road has been built, and eight
main roads now stretch from



The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises : 5.49 a.m.
Sun Sets : 5.58 p.m.
Moon (Full) September 26
Lighting : 6.00 p.m.
High Water : 1.45 p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) nil
Total for Month to Yester-

day : 3.82 ins.
Temperature (Max,) : 86.5° F
Temperature (Min.) : 73.5° F
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.
(3 p.m.) E.
Wind Velocity 10 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.981
(3 p.m.) 29.889





Beckles Road to Chelsea Road.
The roads are intersected by
avenues at various points.

130 Working
About 130 people—carpenters,
masons and labourers — are now



FOR MORE

©





wes
UN Feet ‘
oA hauls

i}
:

&





HARVEST. QUEEN

THE POPULAR BRAND

SUPPLIED BY

LAKE OF THE WOODS MILLING

CoO., LTD.

‘AND BETTER

working on Section (B), where
new roads are being constructed,
and latrines and bathrooms are
being erected. Houses from con-
gested areas are being removed
to that section at the rate of one
a day.

After the 1949 flood 210 houses

were removed from the flooded
areas of Martindales Road and
Halls Road to Section (A) of the
Bay, which originally had 235
houses. In the replanning of the
estate the minimum house spot
will be 2,400 square feet. It is
expected that when the replan-
ning of the estate is completed
there will be about 600 houses
from congested areas.

In section (A), 13 street lamps

have been installed, and four
) public stand-pipes and fire
hydrants have been put down.

The water mains which were
laid down in consequence, will
enable many tenants to get in-
dividual water supply if they
desire. It is hoped that at some
future date water mains will
cover the estate. It is also possi-
ble now for tenants to apply for
the installation of electricity for
their homes, provided the Elec-
tric Company can supply it.

Fly Proof

The latrines and bathrooms
which are being built in section
(B) will be for individual houses.
They are made of stone, and the
latrines are so constructed as to
cause a sliding panel to close the
seat when the door is -closed,
This makes the seat fly proof.

Kitchen gardens are springing
up around many tenants’ homes

| and they are being encouraged to
practise this form of self help
It is anticipated that steps will
be taken to provide the area with
a playing field

Up to the present, the estate
has been used as a site for the
removal of houses from conges-
ted areas, but there is a_possi-
bility that the Board will also
erect some new houses there.








|

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THE MAKING



Russia Will
Attack A Desert

RUSSIA will begin to reclaim next year most of the
110,000 square miles of the Kara Kum desert with an irri-
gation system fed by a 650-mile-long “Grand Turkmenian”
canal running eastward from the Caspian Sea to the ae

Darya river.

Moscow radio, reporting | the
official announcement of the pto-|
ject, said it would be ready »by
1958 to supply water to 3,160,
acres of cotton, and 15 million
acres of pasture land over what}
is now literally “the Black)
Desert.”

The scheme also calls for three
large’ dams with a total hydro- |
electric capacity of 100,000 kilo—
watts and the creation of forest

belts.
The Object

The object of the project is to
“ensure the supply of water for |
industrial enterprises, the irriga—
tion of new lands, mainly for the|
development of cotton growing,
the supply of water for pastures
and the further development of
the fodder base for stockbreeding
in the southern areas of the
Caspian plains of Western Turi
menia, the lower reaches of. thé
river Amu Darya and the western
part of the Kara Kum desert, and
the supply of hydro~electric
power for industry and agricul-
ture in these areas.

The announcement follows
shortly after .decisions to
the world’s largest power stations
along the Volga river—the Kuiby—
shevy and Stalingrad power sta—
tions-zand is part of the Stalin
post-war program to reshape the
nation’s landscape,

The newspaper Pravda said of}
the project: |

“A blossoming
orchards and



{
of|

carpet
will!

meadows

clothe areas hitherto scourged| has made Huntley and Paimers fayous the

by hot shifting dunes, bright! whole world over. So many ‘hrilling

electric light will illuminate vate Maras :

the deserts where formerly varieties to choose from—luccious'!-filled

even the bonfires of Nomads | ‘ Custard Creams’ and ‘ Reading (/rcams’
5 g ’

were rare. Artificial seas, ans meltingly-delicious ‘ Shortoake’... all

and pipe-lines will bring life e é ;

to vast tracts of arid land oven-fresh, sealed in tins and } Ib. Areshpaks

where the people used to die Roe

of thirst and heat along the

ancient caravan routes.” « iS

of sandstorms and hot, dry winds

The Kara Kur is now a cradle
lands of the

devastating crop
lower Volga basin.

“It was for ages,” the newspa-
per said, “that the peoples of the
Orient had been cherishing the
dream o1 crystal-clear rivers and
flourishing orchards in the desert,
the dream of a fairyland of hap~
piness. Now only a few years
separate us from the time when
the desert of black sands will be
converted into a golden valley of
fertility.”

Farmer Calls
Up Plane To
Save His Land

BRITISH farmers whose land
ig being attacked by soil erosion
may call up air support by whicn
bombs of super-phosphate and
other fertilisers will be dropped

The farmer could direct opera-
tions from the ground, by radio

This system may be come an
important factor in fighving soil
erosion in areas either inaccessi-
ble to, or difficult for, the plough.

It may brihg new areas under
cultivation. The bombs would be
dropped from 400 ft,



Reports of recent experimer
by the Bristol Aeroplane Co, and
cthers are under consideration

The land chosen for one experi-
ment is farmed by Captain G. L.
Bennett-Evans at Plynlimmon, on
the berders of Cardiganshire and
Montgomeryshire, near whe source
cf the River Wye

It is used for grazing sheep and
Welsh black cattle, and is very
hilly.

A Bristol Freighter dropped 40
tons of phosphate, lime and nitro-
chalk in two days
4 the airplane
was picked p
equipment
> experiment was

i pokesmar yf

Er LerToL ne

A 107m) As came

ange i’

success~

Company T

accurate.”—L.E.S

erect},





eon amma mamma ee a

Bunicia, Seh
H. Davidson, Sch
pha
Whittaker,
Seh

Schooner
Capt
s.S
Capt
Schooner Timothy A. H. Vansluytman,
76 tons from British
Guiana

Schooner Henry D

{ Massiah,
dez,
Stone, Erik Hanson
Thomas Miller,
Nichols,
Theresea
Bravo, Maria Bravo
From Gronmada:
Sheila Hadley
From &t.
Norma Beaubrun

Phyllis Mark, Sch
Emeline, Sch
Lochinvar S., Sch
Sch. Emmanuel C

Sch

ARRIVALS
Zita Wonita, 69
Penniston, from Trinidad
Fort Townshend,
Henrikson, from Grenada
net, Capt. Stoll,
DEPARTURES
Wallace,



Seawell

ARRIVALS BY B.W.LA.L.

From Trinidad:
Elizabeth Bireh, Shirley Chandler, Olea
Margot Bermu-

Wilbert. Jones,
Bernardo Bermudez, Mary
Frederick Miller,
A, Mille
Muller,



Albert) Muller

Lucia

John Goldie, Barbara

Alfonza Delima, Audrey

Kenneth Tucker

Grant,
Yor JAMAICA

LONDON,




IMPERIAL. LEATHER °

wide

in the flavour

And what goes in? Why, pore
sugar, wheat, fresh eggs ai} butter
together with the experienc: that

8+ APP teet nee
PReUHT maNUTAETUALES 10 HM dine GHoRet oF

HUNTLEY & PALMERS

English
BISCUITS

AGENT: 3. 8. LESKIG & CO.LTD.,



1 AY LET
oh it
LINDEN BLOSSOM °

Whai GOCE ben Ci OVON,
© 5 |

P.O. BOX 216, QRIDGETOWR



LUCIA
William Lewis, Mr. Roy
Mortimer Worrell Mr

JUAN

Seott, Frank Sheldon

LUXURY
te

delicious \
wholesome
and nutritious

SROCONt %

NEW STOCK 0O

BYMIN AMARA

and

RUSKS—Baby’s First Solid Food
Also a variety of CIGARS

Lo



COLLINS



(ACO

HALIBORANGE
LIQUID PARAFFIN SYRUP OF FIGS.

DRUG STORES
; yt GOOG GOL 560 ', eee

“EXQUISITE PERFUMES”

BY THE BEST MAKERS AT -—

HOOKER’S

CARON’S :— GEURLAIN’S :—
Fleur de Rocoille Shalimar
Bellodgia * Jicky
Nuit de Noel Lui
Narcisse Noir, Vega
Etc., Etc., Ete. L/Heure Bleue
Mitsouko, Etc., Etc
LANVIN’S :— MILLOT’S :—
My Sin Crepe de Chine
Scandal Altitude, Etc., Etc.
WORTH'’S :—
Dans la Nuit Je Reviens

tons

117

Lionel Worrel

Del
Lewis





Philip
Laudal-
Harriet
Gordon,
Cyril BE, Smith, Sch, Gardenia W
Sch. D'Ortac

1,943 tons net,

t

Helen
Hyacinth Yawehing,
Harold
Theresa Molinos, Mrs.

Le

DEPARTURES — BY B.WLAL
For TRINIDAD
Thomas Knowles
Griffith,
ad Young, Grace Young, Parl He
pel,
Ronnie Gittens,

Eva Trotman, O'dell
Goldie,



Lawrence Bannister, Joseph Drakes.
For ST
Mr
Mr
Parchment
For GRENADA
Everard Corbin
Por SAN
Louise
&heldon, Godfrey Haynes.

Hughes,

By

Mary

PS

BLUE HYACINTH





54

YOU ARE SURE TO FIND YOUR FAVOURITE PERFUME
a AT

Booker's «'00s) Drug Stores Ltd.

Bridgetown and Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY)
FO LOSSES OGLE

PSs









1 eae
|\Harbour Log
|- sce : oi

In Carlisle Bay
lack Cocineame Gh, beh, Caria, Mensiettn makes a
Seh Mary E Caroline, Sch Ww l

ons

—_KKKKK moO -

net, Capt. Wallace, for British Guiana

S.S. Lady Rddney, 4.907 tons net, Capt
LeBlanc, for St. Lucia

Passengers leaving by the S.S. “Fort
Townshend” were for Antigua
General George Vidmer For New
york Hon. and Mrs. M. D. Guiness
Mrs. Ruth R. Weatherley, Mr. Edmund
Blanche, Mrs Vera Field, Miss Vera
Gertrude Field, Miss Florence E. Field,
Master James H Field, Mr Rachel
Prescott. Mrs. Frances EB. Webb, Miss
Kathleen Lyoch, Mr. Herman Blackmen

Passengers leaving by the §.S. “Lad BOVRIL PUTS
Rodney” were for Dominica Mr
J. B. Charles, Mrs. C, B. Clarke Yor
Bermuda Mr. E. R. Rollocks Por
Boston Mr. and Mrs F. T. Wood
Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Freake, Mr. and
Mrs. C. ¢ King, Mr. and Mrs. A. B
Andersor, Mrs. BE J. Oliver

ar)

}




\

Jos

poh

a

CYCLES

Ladies’, Gents’

BA'TERIES

DIAL 4391

|
}



Names

QUALITY



CCE SEESESS SSS ESSE SSSOSSSSESSSSSD



(PHILLIPS &

Pliers, screw drivers,

DURALIFE FOR CAR/TRUCK
BATTERY HYDROMETERS

TYRES—CAR/TRUCK
4.50 x 17, 4.50/550 x 18, 4.50 x 19 30 x 5, etc., ete.

COURTESY GARAGE
ROBERT THOM LIMITED

BAY REET
3060066006056 696556595595600606069009005000

PAGE THREE

a

BOVRIL

good spread !




Everyone enjoys delicious
sandwiches made with Bovril.
They’re tasty, economical and
just right for every occasion,

BEEF INTO YOU

BRITAINS
LEADING
AMERICAN-TYPE
CIGARETTE

CHECK UP
and SEE WHAT
VOU NEED ==

HERCULES)
Standard and Sports

CYCLE ACCESSORIES —
Saddles, bells, pumps, wheels, spokes, etc., ete,
Cycle covers and tubes.
TORCH LIGHT AND BATTERIES
ELECTRIC HOT PLATES
HORNS, TRICO AIR OPERATED—Cars and Trucks

single and double

GAS TANK LOCKING CAPS—ENGLISH AND
U.S. CARS/TRUCKS
REVERSING LAMPS
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TROLLEY JACKS (EPCO HYDRAULIC) 1) TON
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| PAGE FOUR





Emer eee Powe AT

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St, Bridgetown



Thursday, September 21, 1950

_ MR. MARSHALL

THE announcement that Mr. George
Cattlet Marshall has come out of retire-
ment to take over the office of Secretary
of Defence in America is an indication
of the seriousness with which Americans
view the international situation. Few men
haye the great international prestige which
Mr. Marshall has gathered around himself
in a lifetime of service on behalf of his
country.

As Chief of Staff during World War II,
Mr. Marshall was one of the principal
architects of victory but the more real and
more lasting fame which he gained was
during his tenure of office at the Depart-
ment of State. Inaygurating a bold new
policy of aid to impoverished Europe the
“Marshall Plan” has proved as important
a bulwark against the inroads of Com-
munism as the armies of the Western
European powers.

After seeing his great experiment receive
the approval of Congress and well on the
way to success, Mr. Marshall retired to
enjoy the evening of his days in the peace
which he had so well earned. Then came
the Korean conflict with the fear of even
worse to come. American unpreparedness
after the vast sums which had been spent
on defence in the post-war years was a
great shock to the American people and
there was a revulsion of feeling against the
then Secretary of Defence who was re-
garded as responsible.





Under American law the Secretary of
Defence could not be a man who for the
previous ten years had held an appoint-
ment in the armed forces butsso great were
Marshall’s abilities and prestige that the
President decided to make an exception
and ask Congress to pass enabling leg't-
lation to allow Mr. Marshall to take over.
| George Marshall has once again given
up his hopes of a quiet and peaceful life
and has again undertaken one of the most
responsible jobs which his country has to
offer. It will be his task to bring the Korean
conflict to a speedy and successful conclu-
sion and to make all preparations so that
if the world should again be forced into
another world war the United States of
America will enter the arena with the best
chances of victory.
~ For over a hundred years the main. re-
sponsibility for maintaining the peace of
the world lay with Britain and her Empire.
Today two world wars have bled Britain
and the mantle of responsibility has fallen
on the U.S.A. All the signs point to the
fact that that country is shouldering her
great duties with resolution and patient
courage.

The people of America may rest assured
that in their great fight they have the sup-
port and prayers of all the freedom-loving
countries of the world. Those peoples know
the sterling worth of George Cattlet Mar-
shall and rejoice that he should once again
be in a position of great trust and respons-
ibility.



Concerning Wigs

SAMUEL PEPYS records somewhere in
his diary that he parted with his own hair
and “paid £3 for a periwig”. This, notes
the Encyclopaedia Brittanica was cheap,
adding that the author of Plocacosmos says

that “when they first were wore, the price
was usually one hundred guineas”.

The word wig is an abbreviated form of

“periwig” which is an artificial head of hair
4worn as a personal adornment, disguise or
symbol of office.
' Wigs are worn as part of official costume
only in the United Kingdom and countries
which used to or still depend on the
United Kingdom. Their use is confined
except in the case of the Speaker of the
House of Commons and the Clerks of Par-
liament, to the Lord Chancellor, the judges
and members of the bar. Many people still
wear wigs to make up for natural deficien-
cies and on the stage wigs are indispens-
able. Many stage wigs are made of jute.

The custom of wearing wigs dates back
into antiquity. One discovery of a prehis-
toric carving suggests that they were worn
at least 100,000 years ago.

-In Roman times women wore them, some
for unsavoury purposes. Faustina, wife of
Marcus Aurelius is said to have had several
hundred.

. Queen Elizabeth had eighty attires of
false hair. But it was not until the 17th
century that the “peruke” another form of
“periwig” was worn as a distinctive feature
of costume. Under Charles II the wearing
of the peruke became general. Under
Queen Anne the wig reached its maximum
es lopment, covering the back and
shoulders and floating down to the chest.
Even coachmen wore wigs. When early in
the reign of the Third George popular wig-
wearing began to wane, it persisted among
professional men.

Only by slow degrees was it given \
doctors, soldiers and clergymen

"
pb

ADVOCATE.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



The King’s Money

Poorer than any British Monarch for 100 years.

| BRITAILN’S BILL for the Mon-
jarchy this year will be just over
| £1,000,000 after the last mainven-
repair is completed at the
royal residences and after the most
junior chambermaid at Bucking-
ham Palace has received her
wages.

The £1,000,000 enables the King
to carry out the biggest job in
the world as the man who binds
together 560 million people in the
British Commonwealth.

The bill has not varied
during three reigns.

How does it compare

ance



much

with the

cost of the Presidency of the
United States?
Although the Presidency is

embellished with nothing like the
ceremonial of the Crown, it does
not work out so much cheaper.
It costs £700,000.

President Truman's salary today
is £35,700 a year, following a rise
last year of £8,928. Of this he
pays back about £21,400 in taxes.
3ut he receives in addition tax-
free expenses amounting to
£32,130

Running the White House with
its staff of 30 cost £95,000 last
year, White House offices required
another £535,710.

Nine Palaces

HOW simple it sounds compared
with the book-keeping necessi-
tated by the pomp of monarchy.

In Britain nine royal palaces
must be kept in structural repair
by the State at a cost this year
of £410,000.

Salaries and pensions for the
royal household cost £134,000.
Buckingham Palace alone has 260
domestic servants, and there are
scores at the other residences.

To pay the living expenses of
the household the King gets
£152,800.

Five Grants

The burden of monarchy is
shared by other members of the
Royal Family besides the King
and Queen, and to five of them
Parliament grants annuities totall-
ing £161,000:—

Queen Mary 70.000
Princess Elizabeth 40,000
Duke of Edinburgh 10,000
Duke of Gloucester... 35,000
Princess Royal 6,000
The King himself receives a
salary— his Privy Purse— of

£110,000. It is the same as that
paid to Edward VIII, and George
We

Unlike President Truman’s the
King’s salary is tax free. But
this year all but £36,054 of it
really came from the King’s
pocket because he surrenders the
revenue from his Duchy of Corn-
wall to help reduce the contribu-
tion from the Exchequer.

£693 A Week

PRESIDENT TRUMAN'S
monetary reward for guiding the
destinies of ‘134 million people
works out at £275 a week after
tax is paid.

For a job nearly four times

the size, extendimg over an

empire infinitely more co: ex,

the King is pald by us £693 a

week.

But the comparison is not as
favourable to the King as it
sounds.

For the Sovereign is forced

own pocket to sustain the
splendour of his exalted office.

Almost every year since the war
charges for labour and materials
have risen steeply. Yet, except
for a £33,000 annual grant vote
to him in 1948 towards the care
‘of the family’s private suites at
the palaces, no additional help
has come from the Treasury.

Paying Bills

THE KING must defray out of

his £152,800 household expense



MISSING FIGURES

PERCY G. DONALD, head

Colonial Trade, contends that the
provide adequate information for British Exporters.

COMMERCIAL circles, wishing

to plan an extension of their
trade to the . British Colonies,
would seek advance information

as to present and past conditions.
Their natural source of informa-
tion is—or should be—the Colonial
Annual Reports. These reports,
presumably designed to serve some
economic purpose, are issued one
to three years late and consist of
“dead” statistical information,
whilst’ the unco-ordinated nature
of the general information renders
them of little value. Eight 1948
returns were not) even issued by
May, 1950.

I was recently asked by a
Colony how their administrative
costs, which were approximately
half the revenue, compared with
other Colonies, The information
was so sparsely available that
reply was impossible,

Pre-war, an annual “Economic
survey of the Colonial Empjre”
was published with much valuable
information in comparative tabu-
lar form. Today this is succeeded
by a retrograde annual “Colonial
Office List.”

“The Colonial Territories”
(1949), issued by the Colonial
Office, admits that many figures
are “Estimates,” that Grants in
Aid are variously dealt with, and
that the date of closing accounts
in Colonies are not identical.

A Monthly Report?

Many existing Colonial publica-
tions could advantageously be
combined in one interim monthly
report, supplemented by un annual
|report issued not later than the
first quarter of the year, on the
lines of the “Economic Survey.”

An analysis I have made, cover-
ing 10 Colonies (N. Rhodesia, Br.





|Guiana, St Vincent, Barbados,
| Seychelles, St, Lucia, Dominica,
| Antigua Br Honduras and
|Uganda), shows an absence of
much vital information under the
headings of Revenue, Expenditure,
| Education and Roads. It may be

{taken that all other report head-
ings are equally incomplete and
out-of-date by the time they are

d every heading has

1 ition t« ej

iy

allotment all the decorating
plumbing, turnishing, and interior
repair biils which accumulate for
that part of the palaces reserveu
exclusively for the use of royalty.

At Buckingham Paiace_ the
King pays for all electricity, gas,
and water except that used for
lighting and washing down the
courtyards.

At Windsor Castle the State
pays for all the water—even the
royal bath water—and since 1947
at both the Palace and Windsor
for all electric lamps.

Taxpayers pay for cleaning
the outside of the windows at
beth places, but the King pays
for cleaning them imside.

High Cost

THE KING has fought the battle
of soaring costs by drawing on
savings made in his Civil List
during the war and, with those
savings now nearing exhaustion,
by using his own funds.

The bill for Monerehy
therefore must be well in excess
of the account settleqd by the
nation. ‘

Largely as a result of this,
and because the King pays the
full rate of tax (up to 19s. 6d.
im the £) om all investment
income, his personal fortune is
believed to have shrunk so that
he is far worse off than any of
his predecessors since Victoria
came to the Throne.
He has made heavy financial

sacrifices. His father, George V.,
so economised during the i914
War that he gave to the Exchequer
£100,000 and made equal contribu-
tions to war charities.

He became So short of cash to
meet expenses in 1921 that Parlia-
ment authorised the realisation
of £100,000 from the Duchy of
Lancaster — part of the King’s
hereditary estates.

Again, in the 1931 crisis, George
V. voluntarily cut his Civil List
by £50,000.

Given Back

AT THE end of the last war
the present King handed back
£20,000 and has given another
£100,000 of war-time Civil List
savings to pay for four years the
increment in Princess Elizabeth's
allowance granted by Parliament
on her marriage.

The King is hard pressed to
conserve his personal wealth.
Perhaps his most paying possession
is the Sandringh estate, in-
creased recently 17,000 acres
and valued locally at £ 1,000,000.
The 15 farms are Mun on a sound
commercial basis

Similarly the
caster, produci
about £90,000
London and t
replenish the r

Sidney Rodin

tha
we






















uchy of Lan-
a revenue of
om property in
North, helps to
al coffers,

OF COURS, if the King could
sell his heirlo}Mms he would stand
high in the lit of Britain’s multi-
millionaires, e owns Balmoral,
an 80,000 cre estate worth
£500,000.

He has the world’s finest private
stures, 506 of them

upwards of £50

The King is ¥pwner of Ascot
racecourse, but Wtakes no profil
from it. More an 50 “grace
and favour" resfMences ranging
from = mansions ike Clarence

House to small |
the Sovereign’s, bft he lets them
cu’ rent free to §public servants
and their depend§nts.
Nothing Free
HE HOLDS, tod, the title deeds
the Crown ands, but the

k lodges, are

of

of a leadin
lonial Annual

A commercial organisation rely-
ing on stale returns with varying
stocktaking dates would invite
bankruptcy. A business such as
Woolworths has a turnover ex~
ceeding by millions of pounds that
of many Colonies. Numberless
branches carry immense stocks.
Administratively, such a company
calls for co-ordinated fact and
progress returns of a standardised
form to be with them during the
first month of the year, thus per-
mitting assimilation into the
March balance sheet. Failure by
any executive to enforce such
policy would involve dismissal.

From many economie angles the
Colonies are branch establisn—
ments, with the Secretary of State
for the Colonies as administrative
head, supported by an executive
—in each Colony and at home—
appointed by and responsible to
him, It is reasonable, therefore,
to compare this aspect of their
administration with the commer-
cial undertaking mentioned above.

The traditional excuse of “staff
shortage” cannot hold water.
Delayed returns call for increased
staff work. Commercial organisa-
tions have severe staff shortage,
but notwithstanding that handi-
cap balance sheets are produced
to a date. Failure to so produce
involves severe penalties,

“Colonial Regulations,” origi-
nated in 1837, set out the nature

of the returns—but they are
generally disregarded. For in-
stance, Regulation 155 states: —

“All returns, reports. ...must be
punctually forwarded to the
proper Department.” For such

omissions the Colonial Office is
administratively responsible.

In these “Regulations,” statisti-
cal return forms are given for
“Staff Appoinments” and Altera-
tion of Navigation Lights,” but in
regard to the following, para. 160
merely calls for “Information
under each head, without guid-
ance as to the form:—

Population. Wages and Labour
Services. Production Commerce Cur
rency and Banking. History. Justic:
and Police. Administration Educ
Legislation. Geogr and Clir
Communications, Fina Pub W
Little wonder that returns are
r way comparable. Moreover,

,

Socia



ation









London Merchant House and expert on

revenues were long ago surren-
dered to the State.

The King and Queen pay for
2imos! everything they require,
they may accept nothing tree.
About the only transport that
doesn't cost them. money is a
naval vessel or a plane of tne
King’s Flight.

The King has ¢tuy down his
personal expenditure very con-
siderably.

Racing Pays

HE is an enthusiastic racehorse
owner, but he makes racing pay,
From 1946 to 1949 his prize-money
was £37,150, Even his shooting at
Sandringham has netted a profit
by the part sale of the bag.

Is there any member of the
family who has more ready casn
than the King?

It is widely believed that Queen
Mary is very rich. Pre-war her
fortune was assessed at £2,000,000.
much of it left by Queen Victoria
and willed to her by George V.

Since 1936 her annuities drawn
from the State have totalled
£980,000.

The Treasury will take a huge
sum from her in death duties, for
these are paid by all royalty,
except the Sovereign.

The Duke

THE DUKE of Windsor enjoyed
the income from the Duchy of
Cornwall for 25 years as Prince
of Wales, when taxes were low.

In 1927, for example, the duchy
yielded £72,917. When he left
Britain his personal wealth must
have totalled some hundreds of
thousands of pounds.

He gained nothing when he
renounced the throne, Because he
held that Sandringham and Bal-
moral were an inseparable part of
the Monarchy in the eyes of the
people he voluntarily gave them
to his brother.

Publication of his memoirs
throughout the world has so far
brought him nearly £180,000,

The Duchess

ONE OF vhe worst-off among
royalty is the Duchess of Kent.
Although carrying out a heavy
routine of public duties she gets
no money from the Stave other
than her £398 pension as the
widow of an air commodore with
three children,

When the Duke died in this
rank on active R.A.F. service in
1942 he left £157,735. Most of

this is in trusi for his elder son,
now agd 14.

Pictures and antiques which
belonged to her husband were
sold by the Duchess in 1947 for
£92,341. The following year she
scld books for £1,022.

The most important possessions
remaining to her are Coppins,
her house in Buckinghamshire,
which she is not selling, and some
magnificent jewellery





Princesses
SINCE THEIR marriage Prin-
cess Elizabeth and fe Duke of
Edinburgh have been receiving
from Parliament £50,000 a year—
all but £6,000 tax free, But it is
deubtful if they are able to save.

The department of the Privy
Purse asked on the Princess's
behalf for, anovher £5,000 a year
as the minimum on which she can

run her household.
The Duchess of Gloucester came

from a wealthy family. Her
father, the Duke of Buccleuch,
left £974,482 in 19387.

But the poor little rich girl
among royalty is Princess Mar-
garet. She has no money for

herself until nexy August, when
she becomes 21. Then the State
will give her £6,000 a year.

Reports are failing to

these headings are out of step with

modern requirements, Some
Colonies of their own volition
have added; —

Civil Reabsorption. Lands and Surveys.

Public Relations. Research. Touring and
Exhibitions Cultural Development
Newspapers and Periodicals. Religion

Science and Art

Some Colonies give tabular
appendices, but many create a
jumble of figures in no related
order.

The Facts—From US Sources

Much of the missing informa-
tion, supplied in other publications
must be secured from ‘ official
sources, Its omissien or delay in
publication is a Colonial Office
administrative and executive
failure. One organisation, much
connected, with Colonial issues
find that they secure British
Colonial details more readily from
American official sources,

Here are other points arising
from a close study of the reports:-

Customs. Of the ten Colonies
whose reports I have analysed,
only three show how the Customs
total is made up.

Currency. Some returns are in
£’s, others in $’s. In these days of
fluctuating values it is surely
necessary to have all figures in
£'s. Why should Dominica give the
figures in £’s and St. Lucia in $’s,
both operating on the West Indies
dollar? British Guiana, helpfully,
provides both.

Vital Statistics, Why should
infant mortality and birth rate
returns be ommitted by half of
the ten Colonies?

Population, British Guiana gives
a clear race classification in 2 per
cent, of report space used. St.
Lucia fails to do so in 10 per cent.

Communications. Why should
only two out of the ten give the
road mileage?

Finance. Northern Rhodesia in
6 per cent, of space gives ample
and clear information. St, Helena
in 15 per cent, does not.

Revenue. Para. 198 of the
Colonial Regulations calls for the
returns to be made “on comprehen-—

sive heads” without giving
aetailed guidance
Expenditure. Northern
@ on page 5

THE SOLDIERS STAND |

IN PRAYER

By Frank Owen

KOREAN FRONT,

THE sky was scowling and a mist cape hid
half the mountain as the padre set up his
Table, an old cookhouse box. it had a little
wooden cross on it and two little candle-
sticks. He glanced anxiously upwards and
said firmly: “We will begin by singing Hymn
28, ‘Fight the good fight.’”

With a nervous cough or two and a bit
waveringly the congregation joined him.
Che padre was young, almost boyish, Captain
ihe Rev. William Edward Benjamin Jones, of
Raheny, Dublin, Over his jungle-green jacket
and shorts he wore a brighter green stole.

His congregation—a dozen or so soldiers
of the Middlesex headquarters company, one
(reshly returned from a sniping patrol, and
three or four officers.

The soldiers had rifles slung on their shoul-
ders. Their clothes were grimy, but their
weapons were clean, The officers wore re-
volvers at their belts.

The church was a muddy, mucky little
farmyard behind company H.Q. Straw litter,
broken farm tools, an upturned oxen man-
ger, and a manure heap made up our furni-
ture.

In the ruined, deserted, half roofless mud
and thatch huts which are the trace and
track of war upon this countryside, a rat
rustled in the rubbish on the floor when the
padre paused. There was no music in our
church, except the sound of running water
in the brook,

‘MAKE US WISER’

“LET us pray,” said the padre. So the con-
gregation prayed for the King and his family,
the Government, our Allies’ Governments,
too (“Make us all wiser, so that all may strive
better and more strongly for peace and the
welfare of all peoples upon earth.”)

There echoed the boom-boom of a distant
gun,

The congregation prayed for their families,
their loved ones, their friends, their wounded.

Next they recited the 23rd Psalm: “The
Lord is my Shepherd. . .”

Colonel Mann, field-glasses slung about his
neck, read the brief lesson. It was about
Jesus meeting Matthew on the seashore and
telling him to follow.

The padre made his sermon on it.
Matthew he said, was a tax collector, and
for a foreign Government at that. Only yes-
terday the padre had received his own tax
demand, from his own Government.

PLACE FOR HIM

TAX-GATHERERS were not anywhere
popular—yet there was a place for Matthew,
as there is for all men in this faith who
would serve in it.

Again the sound of mortar fire. Then he
reminded his hearers of the comradeship of
battle, which alone made their task possible;
the care and responsibility of the leaders;
the vigilance of the guards; the sharing of
danger and comfort. We all muck in. “We
eat from the same dixie, sleep often beneath
the same blanket, may endure pain or death
from the same fire.

They sang another hymn, and then the
padre gave the Blessing.

The last words were crowned by the roar
of a bomber flight way up in the mist. But
as the padre packed his case and went off
down the gully track to the road to his next
service, the sun began to break through like
a spear.—L.E.S.

JACK COMES TO LIFE—
WITH BEANSTALK

PITTSBURGH

A PITTSBURGH horticulture enthusiast
knows how Jack of “Jack and the Beanstalk”
fame must have felt.

He is Otto Scheu, who planted some seeds
sent to him last spring by friends in the Near
East.

The seeds, which his friends said were
taken from the tomb of an ancient Egyptian
king, sprouted king-sized “prehistoric beans”
up to three feet long and weighing as much
as 31 pounds.

The vine, as thick as two thumbs and which
has spread out over a 300 square foot area,
has already pulled down two peach trees and
is engulfing a poplar tree.

Scheu said friends told him that the Bible
mentioned such a bean, one of which was
supposed to feed 40 soldiers,

He took one of the beans to a restauranteur
acquaintance, Mike Brunetti. He, being an
enterprising chef, baked the thing with a
stuffing of meat and egg. ’ any

One bean was enough to feed 22 guests.

How does it taste?

Some said it tasted like mushrooms, others
said like oysters. When eaten raw it has the
flavour of cucumbers.’ At any rate, all agreed
it was a dish fit for Pharaohs.

Scheu said he intends to trim the vine back
this year, and next year he hopes to harvest
beans three times as large.

He said he believes the fruit is a member
of the coleocynth family, which is described

et j
Rhodesia) as a “Mediterranean and African herbaceous | ¢
| vine allied to watermelon.—I.N,S.





THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21,








oa



4” SAW FILES
PHONES:

TUESDAY,

\99999996999959466 1000:

ow



’

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GRAPE NUTS
CEREBOS SALT

FIGS

BACON in Tins
CANADIAN EGGS

COD FISH, SOLE,

SCOTT
& CO., LTD.

Tins CORNED BEEF
with Cereal

Tins OVALTINE

FILES

6” 8” 10” 12” HALF ROUND BASTARD FILES

6” 8” 12” 2ND CUT HALF ROUND BASTARD FILES
6” 8” 10” 12” FLAT BASTARD FILES

6” 8” 12” 2ND CUT FLAT BASTARD FILES

4” KNIFE FILES

4” WARDING FILES

4” 6” 8” 10” 12” ROUND 2ND CUT FILES

8” 10” CABINET RASP

12” FARRIERS RASP

OUR DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT

STOCK - TAKING

REOPENING TO BUSINESS

FRIDAY, 29TH SEPTEMBER

@e- Our Customers are asked to take note

of the above and arrange ‘their shopping
accordingly.

DaCOSTA & Ce., Lid.
DRY GOODS DEPT.

PEARL BARLEY in Tins

os
si) a De tek
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PICKLED WALNUTS



SHARP'S TOFFEES



1956





TO-DAY'S SPECIALS
at the COLONNADE
Se attrcr cen tease

Usually NOW





























$ .28





4472 & 4687

ote

_

WELKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.

Successors to

C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD.

"Phones 4472 & 4687

$4.64 Per U.S.
Gallon.

Packed in Tins of

Imperial Measure.

+

DA COSTA & CO. LTD. i
or DIAL 4689.



WILL BE CLOSED

on

26TH — WEDNESDAY, 27TH

And
THURSDAY, 28TH

on






’ jor Heopetigzing M4 SMeabs
nd

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KIPPERS in Tins
BLACK PEPPER
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MILK FED CHICKENS le x
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4

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1950 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE

Another Salt Fish Lord Tweedsmuir| 9p P Pry
Shortage Wishes He Too | @sAGAIN IN STOCK ...

hii FOOD SITUATION in- Figures Had Been M.P. P U R i N A

Stead of getting easier is
continuing to get harder, a promi- ore ee ¢
nent merchant of Bridgetown told
the Advocate yesterday. Com-
menting on the shortage of salt!
rish he said that every two or three,
months there is an acute shortage |
and wh a shipment comes it 1s;
not cufficient to meet the needs
Shortage of imported corn has
also been a headache for house-
wives and the local product is far
from sufficient. This had =











)

Missing

Ou Ow Correspondent
presents this in full five-year tabu- LONDON, Sept. 18
lar detail. Their *form, if adopted Among others specially inter- ( ; H O W
by all Colonies, covering the years) “°'®¢ in the refusal last week of
1913, 1939, and the last three| ‘®¢ Prime Minister to take action

years, would give comparative: Which would allow Lord Hailsham ANIMALS & POULTRY

Statistical information of value. Quintin Hogg) to keep his seat

m aod
Education. Why should eight! as MP. for Oxford is Lord| ‘ORS.
cut of the ten Colonies be silent | Tweedsmuir, who takes a fore-! W DISTRIBUT *
on illiteracy, five fail to give the; Most interest in Colonial affairs. | Jason Jones & Co, Ud.

number of trained and untrained Although Lord Tweedsmuit
teachers, and three omit _the) does not feel os Sabiihe: os Lord
schools attendance? British) trailsham that the “hereditary
Guiana gives -_ oy per cent, of principle denying him a place in
space, more than Sarawak does M/ the Commons. seriously affects his










hens and their egg production.
HE CHURCH LADS and Girls’



Brigade of the Cathedral held




3 9 per cent. ;
a Parents Meeting on Tuesday The Minister should ce political interests, he has _ been
night at the Cathedral Church that all reports shou ; be heard to say regretfully: “I wish



House. Parents turned out in
full force to hear reports on the
progress made by the Brigade

i had had a period in the House
ot Commons.”



uniform date and be finalised for
him immediately after the New}
Year. Only by this can } De-



“RIPPINGILLES”
BLUE - FLAME



since it was formed. = : : u 7 . Perhaps | any anxieties Lord
s 4 si 5 partment demonstrate an ffi- | .. -
Father Ripper told the parents a $e : ws . ‘ aS ciency comparabie Tie. ¢ m-| Tweedsmuir has had over this



of = — 7 or — ; 3 * merce. Clear presentation in tabu- Sear a. ras ee by Rea _

worship and urg em to place Pa : lar forms, created in association} *@t at least his wife sits in the

emphasis on the discipline of theit ae THE HOUSE . Tax PAYER. with competent outside sources,}| Lower House as the representa-

children in the home. — os would result in many times the| Uve of an Aberdeen constituency,
|

resent informatio i ha h
AN ACCIDENT took place on eaae PRS mt hen : Following zealously in the
Tuesday about 9 am. on The Caribbean Commission io}/ Commonwealth interests of _ his
Bay Street between the motor car which Great Britain has sub-| Moted father, the first Lord
T--10 owned by William Tryhane scribed £138,141 since 1946, sum-| Tweedsmuir (who became Gov-
of St. Thomas and driven by marises the situation in regard to} ernor-General of Canada), this
Louise Eckstein of White Park Dutch, USA, French and British| 39-year-old Peer was a membei
St. Michael and the motor car X— returns as “lacking uniformity in| of H.M. Colonial Service, From
930 owned by Fitz William Lewis the heads, sub-heads and present-| 1934 to 1936 he was an assistant
of Maxwell, Christ Church. ation of data, also with failure to} District Commissioner in Uganda
The right bumper of the motor identify the origin and destin Protectorate, A year later he
car T—10 was damaged.

or to distinguish between demes-| joined the Hudson Bay Company
CASE BROUGHT by the

tic and total exports.” Variations} ard in 1948 visited Jamaica. He
in returns of foreign countries are} succeede ris father in 1940,
Police charging Elsie Rowe of natural, but had the Commission sytesganmcate
Bullens Alley, Dalkeith, with the directed their attention solely to
Jarceny of a wallet valued at the British Colonies, they must ‘
17s. 10d. from Cyril Lovell was have levelled the same adverse UP TWICE
dismissed by His Worship Mr. criticism
Cc. L. Walwyn yesterday Delayed Colonial returns must
The prosecution submitted that be regarded as harmful to the LONDON.
Rowe visited Lovell’s place and Colony concerned. When Colonial Britain’s volunteer Civil De-
while there took away his wallet. matters come up for debate in| fense Corps has been nearly
Rowe in her defence admitted the House of Commons, if inform-| doubled since the start of vhe
visiting Lovell’s place but left him ation is not on record for M.P.’s.| Korean war
=_— in company with another coe criticism becomes im- Tie, Slane -OMies. akneimaed

Colonial Annual Reports are| that there have been 20,206
HE POLICE BAND under standard at 5% in. by 84 recruits since the end of June,
- Capt. C. E. Raison will give

rene asing the corps strength to
a moonlight concert at Silver

cept four, which are 6 in. by 94} 12°ree ; ' a
in. Their costs, to the public, are} 22,015 as of August 31. The
Sands, Christ Church, on Friday,
September 22 beginning at 8 p.m.

intriguing rate of enlistments before the
Much appreciation has been ex-
























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conceris and the last one held at od Cameroons, 360 pawes 8 of a
St .George’s Church pasture was ra, 136 pages : 1}
well attended, ee a : SSS Hong Ke cae 186 pa 0 i
Today the Band will be visiting 7 ’ er ae 7 ? DIET IS AN IMPORTANT PART
Bathsheba, St. Joseph where they “LOOK HERE, UPON THIS PICTURE, AND ON THIS... .” Is the importance of a Colon : IN SCHOOL LIFE
will hold a concert. —Hamlet ; Act HI, Scene IV. |Telative to the number of pages| .
IRE . aR in their annual report, or thet
Te DOT ee ot ; . J ; amount charged for it” y
“geese PUBLIC OPINION CAN | First Wig Fo | ac
seared a large crowd yesterday , 4 Irs ig or 6 aetabe

afternoon when afver a brawl with c a | \
; . ’ : «6 2 99 e | a
another man in the Court yard, he P ABOUR PROBI EM Mr k Col W hss
began to run up and down weary: ; El 4 L Ve) . pea er ‘om bie all | |
ing and calling for his two gir ee ” }
ieee aie sis aie! a Visit Barbados |
After determined efforts by two Says Commissioner hen His Honour the Speake: F
France Afloat”, another name} |

eff ny | of the House of Assembly, Mi
policemen Dottin was subdued and K. N. R. Husbands, dons his wiz|for the luxury liner “Colombie”’
Compagnie Generale}

taken to the Charge Room in a THE FACT that Barbadians were refusing offers of|at the ceremony of the opening of the
agricultural employment locally is a matter that only pub-]of the new Chamber of Parlia- { rransatlantique French Line, wil! |

helpless condition.

PPARENTLY affected by the lic opinion can influence, the Labour Commissioner, Mr. dees dunia Gnetae ee be the/ be making its first postwar trip

warm weather yesterday, an id at a press conference yesterday. | ,,’; Speaker ever to wear a) to Barbados on October 25,,

old man who was walking along A. E..S. Burrowes, said P % y wae mee past dozen people!, Sailing from Le Havre on|
Nelson Street began to strip off} People were registering at the, The conditions under which they Ride ne ay the Advocate”! October 12, the “Colombie” wili
his clothing Tearing off his shirt|Labour Office as unemployed and|would have had ‘to work were he peakyyd if they had ever seen) start on its journey to Barbados
and kicking off his old boots, he}were being called in and ques-|those generally agreed upon for} ® local Speaker in a wig, and they| via Southampton, Vigo in Spain,
was checked in the act of taking/tioned. When offered local agri-| agricultural workers in the colony. |All said no. Among them were’ Guadeloupe and Martinique. It
off a pair of short white pants by |cultural work, they said that they |The majority refused saying that | Hon'ble G. B. Evelyn, M.L C., a} yi) be leaving Barbados the sam

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a young man. would be interested in that work}they were not interested in that|former Speaker, and Mr. E. M.|night for Trinidad ;
The pains was 88 degrees|outside of Barbados, but not in|kind of work in this colony. Shilstone, M.A. oe on a Susi” ind then go TD
in the shade and about midday Barbados, They are worn by some of the} e9 | 4 e

The rates o1 pay offered them z : a oa Its itinerary back home will be!
said that the p Speakers of the Assemblies of! Trinidad, Barbados, Martinique.

Guadeloupe, Plymouth and Le
Havre.
After this trip, the “Colombie”

the majority of men were walkin Mr. Burrowes e ;
around the town without their number of persons who were;were 19 cents per hour for an |other British Colonies.

i “A” class man and 13 cents per rie an dae :

coats. Snow ball carts parked on} Placed in employment locally by 7 Wigs were widely worn by peo-

ae Sea a ton ment Agenc were | hour for a woman. The workers : z whats a sant
the waterfront did a brisk trade as ihe, Rmnploymeny Agency Were who did piece work were given [ple otlier than professional people)?
thirsty labourers rushed to them In 1948, the Agency placed 171 | higher wages. k nant aeitiy 6"! will be extending its voyages to
to quench their thirst, persons in employment; in 1949, wee Sure ad et im ie Wigs dre not made in Barbados ; other West Indian Islands. From! nner

f = ; to U. . for]... oe oe arpaco’-| ta Guaira, it will ti te S=—=—===== SSS

ITA SMALL himborazo,|279 were placed and up to the} *¥) men who wen mi uecnie hel ee ‘nels , it w continue
R St ‘Diab Bly ses na half of 1950 329 had been placed. | °mploymyent on August 14, three They are imported from Engl ne Curacao, Cartagena and Jamaica }!

: asf returnedâ„¢on September 5. before starting o Sead telly sores
Chin.borazo Road lying in an un- 2.000 Registered He had not got a return from | Sefore starting on its return voy
conscious condition yesterday) + ihe’ end of June 1950, how-



10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET


























é ot age to Europe. A call at Barbados
the Chief Liaison Officer, but the 7 ee Shes, : }
United States Sugar Co-operation More Par cels For i scheduled for every five









abouv 7 a.m, She was taken by

the Police van to St. Joseph's Ten codister of tee tous, 23 claimed that the three men made ae Rek-s09 "Colombie” can. ace

Almshouse where she was detained | “workers who registered at the |up their minds that they were Antigua inte BBS Bassehaneth Le, 440 tet

te Cpers Run: Agency, had to renew their reg- | Mrysically unfit. ; class, 124 second class’ and 193. W or
istrations every month. If this Thirty packages of hurricane |i “Gase The Seiifd alk

ae sui (Mma, Soom tL Samaeraediee celle! Sepde for, Antigua WSr accommodation is divided up’ int
c a - s 3 ‘ ‘ ;

Barbados Scholars Saad cenananiiens digins the in= 88 New Boys “Lady Rodney.” These packages |.) 14 cabin class and 84 dormitary p EK A ¢ EK

terval. . were sent by the Y.M,C.A +|. The minimum fares of passage :





Leave For U.K. A total of 29 eo Noch to At Harrison Hurricane Relief Committee. jto England from Barbados are

registered during the The “Lady Rodney” was 1h} ¢93 first class, £63 second class,

Mr. Edward @rathwaithe ana/June quarter and 25 were placed port since Tuesday loading a cargo} £50 cabin class and £45 dor-|





i i i | s >» crucial questo: ) ay

Mr. Fabian Holder, the last two ae oe tee ee” on a} Colle e of 145 puncheons, 21 barrels, 19} mitary class. | : aa hee eae ve yp iy
of the 1949 Barbados Scholars About half the persons on the g £ half—barrels and 50 cartons of Special fares have been quoted | the very existence of each of us.
left for England yesterday on the})i 1. register hawt registered as molasses along with 2,350 cartons}by the agents for voyages from | ‘chn Foster Dulles here. issues a
S.S. “Willemstadt.” labourers. Some 300 registered 6 New Teachers of rum for Canada. Barbados to Jamaica. Buying a} larion call: “Let us mobilize for
Mr. Brathwaithe will enter}; carpenters, 100 as masons, 100 It is returning home via., the]return ticket, a passenger will | peace!” Peace, he says, requires
Cambridge University to take as chauffeurs and 90 as clerks. British Northern Islands. have to pay $208 for a first class | strategic planning, willingness to
his degree ‘n History and Ditplgma| there were also 80 registrations| Harrison College has 88 new passage, $163 for a second) cla sacrifice, and the impulsion of a
in meer Hone a en ben det} as domestic servarts, pupils this term and their tota! Jand $111 for either of the third righteous faith. If we uetaene
will enter Oxford University ‘to i ts now 575, an increase of 41 on} class opportunities, Without a these qualities now, rather than
read Modern Greats. The Aiea eaeneed quite a last term’s total. FARMERS EXPECT return ticket, the passenger will| reserve their use for a *" oa gen-~
eration can accomplish what no

The other two Ba ‘eee. few requests for domestic servants} The ro'l call at Combermere is; GOOD CANE CROPS | be buying his ticket comparative-|
Raeoiers were Mr. ee but it was not able to fill all the [now 570. ah ; ly dearer

illiams who left last week for] ( cancies successfully. The rea- Harrison College has four new Farmers rub their hands in Formerly a two-funnel ship}
England on the “Golfito” to = son for that was, that there were| masters, one mistress and an | satisfaction when they look at|the “Colombie” had a brief run
Law at Oxford Un ae anc/not sufficient “Grade A” servants] acting master. The newcomers are | their cane crop: in the West Indies Service before |
Mr. S. H, Watson who waS|i, ‘ail the vacancies. The same|Miss E, Weston, Mr. J. W. Rice | All the fields are green and the] peing converted into a hospital |

already in Canada when the! situation existed with the “Grade|Mr. R. R. M. Gendall, Mr. E. | canes are big, a marked ‘contrast | ship for war service,

other has the establishment of
lasting peace

On the basis of his wide experi-
*nee and intimate first-hand know-
ledge, John Foster Dulles analyse













1
results arrived here. A” mechanics. S. Brewster and Rev. Sinclair| to the look of the can A eg pot beg oe ae
The Agency also found great |, a, Of last year about the same Since the war, one of the fun~ | intone Gr vaxciition nvenith
CHILD BURNT difficulty in fijling requests for period, a farmer told the Advocate} nels was removed to give more | Soa nay Lee a pee amine
diesel operators and mechanics yesterday. He said that the crop] deck space to passengers for “hares biboat f g th
An 18-month old child, son of ate En rata Fee What’s ou Today would last somewhat longer than | games - relaxation ual
Joan Hoyte of Burke’s Village, | 85 Glese! o Ca ? it did this year if the rain con-] The “Colombie” now provides
St. Joseph, was ‘badly burnt by Bee artes tararinuted, thse tc Meeting of Christ Church tinues to fall as regularly as it vamengers with the comforts of | to discuss with authority the en:
hot water about 10 a.m. yesterday. the jack of proper facilities for Vestry at 3.00 p.m. is doing now. modern public rooms, gymnasium, | re range of issues that must bi
He was injured on his right le8|¢aining, which were found lack- Water Polo, Aquatic Club, ~ children’s _aneeey arene tome cette swe Soe Oaney
He was attended by Dr. John- ing in practically all trades. There , at 5.00 p.m. AMPHIBIAN PLANE pool with cubicles, lounge — i pee ce age Be retecsee Escalon
son and detained at the St. Joseph | was jittle difficulty, he said, in Mobile Cinema, Bay Pas- promenade deck with a winter | foreign policy, as a delegate to
nshouse indi - arden. | Y, ass pa
Alm shouse. Coane work for first class work ture at 7,30 p.m, VISITS & Aliccdh: Winles: 4 peengee the United Nations, and as, U nited
‘ i states Senator, ne has participate
On Mondiy tha: Agoney ire- An American amphibian plane|liner, a certain amount of freight i oye ananiaie Sanches Fe
CUT TING GRASS ceived requests for 35 agricul-} Tuqor, Mr. S H. Headley is| arrived at Seawell Airport yes-|is carried. Loading is electrically thts book you “will find his dam
H . wing the| ‘ural workers—15 men and 20} acting for the West Indies cric-| terday morning. It had a crew of controlled = and consequently, | Hienite. on tnpartant-5 Go lihion
Groundsmen are mow!né stice| Women. Fifty labourers were) yeter, Mr. C. B. Williams who is] ten. It left in the afternoon winches and derricks are not used. | figures, accounts of his work
ori ne “The gress covers aed ne ne, vee foemey remaining on study leave in the various conferences, his share in
Playing Fie 2 ss . e employment, ’

s } ; A rit the U.N. Charte
the cricket pitch which is on th€} 35 were asked and three again — a a Ae ee writing the rarter
grcunds and ihe many school rs accepted. Yesterday, 40 were baisknsl Gicle on aie os ae

who go there to play cricket find asked and five took employ- H. St.c. Tudor.

it inconvenient. ment.

SN




Straightforward and_informa-
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1950

FOR BEST RESULTS

PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE















FOR

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BY CARL ANDERSON



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Peanut Butter ................. lg 53, 35 i
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? {\F | EVERGET HOME ALIVE,
| PROMISE TO BE A GOOD
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THE HANU SENTRIES 253
SPOT THE APPROACHING Y=
PHANTOM.
TEETH TWICEA DAY? | S== :
Aa

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THATS THE HANU VILLAGE. STAY
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THEIR FATHERS WERE HEADHUNTERS,



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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER



21, 1950

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

a

THANKS





Mrs. Agnes Goodridge and family grate -
fully returt) thanks to all those who at-
tended thé *tmeral, sent wreaths or cards
or in an’ other way showed their sym-
pathy on ‘the occasion of the death of
MR. ALEENT A. GOODRIDGE, late of
Pleasant Vule, Saint Thomas.

21.9.50—In

The Goddard Family desire to thank
all those who in various ways expressed
sympathy with them in the passing of
the late ELLIOTT SIMMONS GODDARD.

21.9.50—1n



We the undersigned take this oppor-
tunity of thanking all those who so kind-
ly sent flowers, attended the funeral and
in any other way expressed their s;m-
pathy in our recent bereavement caused
by the death of ESTELLE B. SMALL.

James A. Small (Husband) and Family.







21,9.50.—1n,
FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE
CAR—An ARMSTRONG SIDDELEY
4—5 Seater Sedan. For _ inspection,

particulars and price apphy to Messrs.
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21,9. 50—65



CAR—1934 model Chevrolet Car Engine
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tyres. No reasonable offer refused.
Apply J. H. N. Jemmott, Good Intent,
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DODGE CAR—M-—161, Offers in writing
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TRUCK—Ford V8 Truck in good work-
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16 9. 50—6n

ELECTRICAL

DEEP FREEZER-—For sale or rent on
@ monthly basis one Marquette Deep
Freezer Dial 4683 or 2328.

21.9.50—43n,







ae “

REFRIGERATOR—One (1) Super-fex
Oil burning Refrigerator in good condi-
tion immediate delivery. Apply Miss
Massiah Taitt’s Plantation, St. James.
Phone 91-30. 17.9.50—t ,f.n.



Stewart Warner
any time. Dial 4683
21.9.50—3n.

WASHING MACHINE—One (1) Cana-
dian Eaay Spindrier with Automatic
Spin-rinser, this Machine is new, Apply
W. B. Hutchinson & Co. Dial 4484.

17.9.50—t.f£.n.

RADIO—One (1)
Radio can be seen
or 23







LIVESTOCK

HORSE—One thoroughbred yearling
Gelding, by O. T. C. out of Biretta.

Apply:—J. W. Chandler, Todds Estate,
St. John 21.9.50—3n

MECHANICAL
One hand operated BACON SLICING
MACHINE. Apply B. V. Scott & Co.,
Ltd., Whitepark. 13.9.50—tf.n.

MISCELLANEOUS

Fresh Stocks of SEROCALCIN for the
prevention and treatment of COLDS.
COLLINS LIMITED.

19.9.50—7n.







GALVANISED SHHETS—24 gauge. In
7, 8 9 and 10 feet lengths. Enquire
AUTO TYRE COMPANY, Trafalgar
Street. Phone 2696. 15.9.50—+.f.n.

PUMP—One % h.p. Pressure Pump
Automatic 20—40 lbs. In good order.
Apply J. Lamming, c/o Manning & Co.
Ltd., Electrical Dept. 20.9.500—2n

PHOTO ALBUMS—Preserve your snap-
shots by sticking them in an Album.
We have the Albums and the Corners
as well. KNIGHT'S PHOENIX.

20.9.50—2n

oe te

PRAM--Large twin pram with fold-
ing hood. Apply Mrs. L. A. Williams.
95-275. 15.9.50—5n.

RECORD ALBUMS for 10-inch and for
12-inch and carrying cases for 10-inch
records, and we have the records too.

A. & CO., LTD.
10.8.50—t.f.n.









ROAD MAPS—You can now get these
from KNIGHT'S PHOENIX.





20.9.50—2n

SAFE-Extra large Iron Safe Apply
to Mrs. Nellie Belmar, Winona, Maxwell
Coast. Tel. 8135. 20.9.50-—5n





SHADES—Protect your eyes from the

glare, by using Good Shades—a large
assortment just received. KNIGHT'S
PHOENIX. 20,.9.50—2n

TANKS—6 water tanks holding 300 |
gallons. Can be seen at Central}
Foundry Dock Yard, 15.9,50—5n
———_—

VEGETABLE SREDS—To get the best
results use YATES or LANDRETH Seeds
It pays. Buy them from us. KNIGHT'S
DRUG STORE, 20,9.50—2n

YAWL—"Frapida” approx. 37%
long with Gray Marine engine. Good
condition $3,000 — a bargain. Apply
J. R. Edwards. Phone 2520.

15.8.50—T.¥F M1.

PUBLIC NOTICES

feet



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that a Meet-
ing of the Clerks’ Division of the Carib-
bean Workers’ Union, will be held at
Union headquarters, Synagogue

on Thursday night Sept. 21st

at 7.30 sharp.
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
General Secretary.
19.9.50—3n.





LOST & FOUND





LOST

ONE pair of Turtle Shell Glasses in
Cose between Public Treasury, . Public
Buildings and (Broad Street Lower)
Case marked ?, B. O'neal Finder return
to.W. St. C, Browne, C/o Customs.

19.9. 50—2n







FOR RENT
HOUSES

LARGE HOUSB & APARTMENT—On
Sea, St. Lawrence, fully furnished.
Phone 8357 8.9.50—t.f.n

VILLA CELESTA-—9th Avenue Belle-
ville Phone 3962









21.9.50—3n



PUBLIC SALES



AUCTION

(nt iyrncttcimasateinneelisiangaenmeneinatians eset sealieila

I will offer for sale on FRIDAY 22ND,
at my office Victoria Street 2,126 square
of land with the chattel dwelling house
standing thereon, house contains draw-
ing, dining, 3 bedrooms usual out offices,
enclosed with G. I. palings. At Chatter-
ton Road. Belmont District. For inspec-
tion and terms of sale apply to R.
Areher Mc. Kenzie. Dial 2947. Victoria
Street. 17.9.50—4n.
eS

UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By Instructions received
Insurance Co., I will
Sept. 22nd at 1 p.m.
Garage, White Park.
Mode! Hillman Saloon Car.
Also One (1)

Terms Cash.

from the
sell on

(Damaged:
1938 Model Morris Ca



REAL ESTATE
“BELVOIR—Bt, James on Seaside, Three

bedrooms, usual conveniences, Garage
Apply H. E. Me Kar or Dial 4048.
21.9.50—3n

Bei eee. mH be set up for sale
a e! ice No: High Street,
Bridgetown, on Friday, the 22nd day of
September 1950 at 2 p.m. the Sugar Works
Plantations:—
hare, containing: jouer ‘tienes
lurch, con’ er an
ton 195 ‘ACRES. © vd



AACREAGE in Plant Canes — 4%
res.

ACREAGE in Ratoons — 25 Acres.
ACREAGE in Preparation — 3%

Acres.

There will also be sold with the said
Plantations One Dodge Motor Lorry, 2
Milch Cows, I Mule and 1 small 2-wheel-
ed Cart.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to the un ed :—

COTTLE, CA



ENTERPRISE HOUSE and outbuildings
standing on 1% acres of land in Christ
Church, and

G HOUS®P standing on 7
acres of land at Enterprise, Christ
Church, and adjoining the abovemen-

tioned premises.

The abovementioned properties will be
set up for sale by Public Auction at
our Office, No. 14 James Street, Bridge-

town, on Friday 29th September, 1950
at 2 p.m.
Inspection on application to Mts.

Lucas on the premises.
YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors.

By instructions received from the Gen-
eral Hospital, I will set up for sale by
public Auction at toate yard, on Th:
2ist, beginning at 12.30 p.m. the follow-
ing articles:—



(3) Iron Kettles, (1) Gas Stove, Lot of
Horse Hair, (5) Glass-door Cupboards,
(8) Iron Cradles, (29) Iron Bedsteads,
(4) Gas Ranges, (1) Electric Mixer, (30)
Assorted Mattresses, (1) Bakelite
tainer, (1) Gardener's Hut, Lot
and W. C. Balls, (1) Electric see
(1) Vegetable Steamer, (2) Iron a
()) Box X-Ray Parts, (1) Gas Sterilizer,
(12) Soda_ Water Syphon Bottles, (1)
Bacterol Cask, (1) -Ray , (9)
Galvd. Iron Ven
Instruments, (2) Steam
ing Trolley, (1) Small
board, Lot of Doors and Windows. (7)
Trolley Feeding Tables, (1) Wheel Chair,
and several other items of interest.

D'ARCY A >
Govt. Auctioneer,
15.9.50.—6n.

WANTED









HELP

A GIRL to do Book Work



Apply in

erson and writing. Watkins & Co.,
oebuck Street. 20.9.60—4n.
COOK—Assistant Cook wanted for

large household. Experience and good
references required Apply P. OQ. Box

22 c/o Advocate Co. 20,.9.50—6n.

JUNIOR CLERK for our Lumber Yard
and Hardware at Six Mens, St. Peter,
Apply in writing and in person.

R. & G. CHALLENOR, LTD.,
Bridgetown.
19.9.50.—6n.

SERVANT—Apply at Hindu Store Swan
Street. 21.9.50—2n











MISCELLANEOUS

INDIVIDUAL COACHING by English
University Graduate. School Certificate
and Commercial. Proof-Reading, Typing
and Stencilling efficiently and quickly
executed.





MIMI GOODING — Tel. 8538.
19.9.50.—16n.
WANTED TO RENT
HOUSE—Furnished or unfurnished,

Rev. Wheeler C/o Rev, Hansen, “Milton”,
Two Mile Hill. Dial 2214.
21.9.50—in.



TO-DAY’S

NEWS FLASH

CRAYONS
EDUCATIONAL TOYS *
BOTTLE

CHEAP
OPENERS
FLIT GUNS

Just Arrived To - - -

‘JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
‘And HARDWARE

I



GOVERNMENT NOTICES



Appointment of Cotton Inspectors

APPLICATIONS are invited

for the post of Cotton Inspector

under the Sale of Cotton (Amendment) Act, 1950 (1950-36) in each
of the undermentioned six areas for a period of nine months in the
first instance, from 1st October, 1950, to 30th June, 1951:—

(1) Parishes of St. Philip and St. John

(2) Parishes of St. James

and St. Thomas

(3) Parishes of St. Peter and St. Lucy
(4) Parish of Christ Church

(5) Parish of St. Michael
(6) Parish of St. George.
2

Applications should be addressed in writing to the Director

of Agriculture, Bridgetown, and should reach him not later than 23rd

September, 1950,
3.

Further details will be supplied on request. °



VACANT POST OF ASSISTANT LIVESTOCK OFFICER,
DEPARTMENT OF wisnioen AGRICULTURE,

Applications are invited for the post of Assistant Livestock Officer,

DepartmentDepartment of Science
applicants who are experienced in
sidered. The post is pensionable
$2,160 x $120—$2,880. The holder

and Agriculture, Barbados. Only
livestock management will be con-
and carries salary on the scale of
will be required to reside in quar-

ters provided at the Central Livestock Station.

2.

Applications, mentioning the names of two referees, should | The

be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, Bridgetown, and should
reach him not later than 23rd September, 1950.

2
3

Further details will be supplied on request.

14.9,.50—3n



—on. suggested

Acheson Calls
For U.N. Police

@ from page 1.
General Assembly. The Soviet
delegation will not take the path
on to which the Secretary of State
tried to push. the General Assem-j
bly.”

Mr. Vyshinsky said that the pro-
blems before the Assembly re-
quired responsible action in words
and deeds. He said Mr. Acheson
had tried to divert the Assembly
from tackling the vitally impor-
tant problems before it.

The Soviet Union would have
further opportunity to dwell upon
the rude attacks made on it by
Mr. Acheson.

The Soviet Union asked the
Assembly to deal separately with
the alleged American aggression
against China, :

Dean Acheson also submitted
two proposed items for the agenda
based on his speech today. The
items were: “United
action for peace” and “The ques-
tion of Formosa,” Acheson in-
formed the Secretary General that
“explanatory memoranda on both
items will be submitted shortly.”

First speaker in the general
debate was Brazil who supported
the United States. in asking for
consideration of plans for an in-

ternational force and for common |'

mobilisation of United Nations
resources against further aggres-
sion.

But while ¢oncedirig that the
Korean war had made such moves
imperative, the Brazilian spokes-
man Doctor Cyro De Freitas Halle
said he opposed suggestions that
the General Assembly should
usurp some of the Security Coun-
cil’s powers.

A Brazilian delegate criticised
the abuse of the veto in the Secur-
ity Council by the Soviet Union
and said that this had been the
cause of keeping the “noble Ital-
ian nation from becoming a mem-
ber of the United Nations?

“Is it not true that new Italy
was given the assurance that she
would come to work with us on
an equal footing once the Peace
Treaty she signed with her former
enemies was ratified?” he asked.

“Have we not seen, are we not
still seeing as a consequence of
the veto, fundamental decisions
affecting Italy being taken with-
out her participation therein?” he
asked.

—Reuter.

IMPORTED ACCENTS
WELLINGTON, N.Z.

A “standard” English voice
without accent or mannerisms is
almost an assurance of a job as a
radio announcer in New Zealand,
The biggest headache of the Na-
tional Broadcasting Service is to
find announcers whose voices do
not offend listeners. Out of 140 who
applied when the latest appeal
fcr announcers was made, only
seven reached anywhere near a
setisfactory standard.—(C.P.)

MAIL NOTICE

Mails for Dominica by Sch. Mary E.
Caroline will be closed at the General
Post Office as under:

Parcel Mail at 12.15 p.m.,
Mail at 12.15 p.m.,



Registered
Ordinary Mail at

1 p.m. on the 21st September, 1950,






















WANTED

We require the followiig per-
sonnel for our office:—

MALE CLERK: with previous
Plantation or Factory Book-
keeping experience.

STENO-TYPIST: fully qualified
with previous experience.

FEMALE CLERK: with previous
Book-keeping experience.

Salaries for the above positions
will depend on qualifications and
experience. No person will be
considered who has not the re-
quired qualifications. Applicants
to apply in person with written
application to the Secretary:—

DOWDING ESTATES &
TRADING CO., LTD.,
ECKSTEIN BROS.,
BAY STREET.
19.9.50.—6n.



Your Every Day

17.9.50.—3n.| Toilet Lotion ...

uMoLENE

“Cooling and Refreshing as a
Breath of Spring”

Manufacture of Limolene,

finds work for Fellow Barbadians

18 to 67c. at Your Dealer



BARBADOS



“Who'd be a soldier—and have all your pockets cluttered up with this stuff?”

U.K. Exports Up
By 10 Per Cent

LONDON, Sept. 20.
Prices were buoyant on the
London Stock Exchange today.
Markets were stimulated by the
removal of the prospect of an
early General Election following
the Government’s overnight vic—

tory on the question of steel
nationalisation

Advancing prices in most sec—
tions produced several features

and gave a good start to vhe new
trading period,

British Government stocks were
widely one sixteenth to three six-
teenth up on small support while
a moderave investment demand
created useful improvements in
jeading industrials,

Oils quickly moved ahead under
Anglo-Iranian lead and closed
very firm. Final prices showed
little alteration on the day after
being sharply lower on the Par-
liamentary statemen doubting the
possibility of an early resumption
of the debt service.

German and other Europeans
were firm. Kaffirs developed,
opened higher and made steady
progress to close among the best.
The coppers and diamonds were
in some demand.

—Renter,

MLS JUMP

LONDON, Sept. 20.

Britain’s exports in August
reached the new figure of
£189,500,000 and were 10 per cent
sbove the average for the first
steven months of the year, the
Board of Trade announced to-day,
In August 1949 the figure was
£14,130,000,

Final figures for August show
imports were £215,200,000. This,
while slightly above average for
the first seven months was about
ten millions less vhan July.

—Reuter .













JOHN M.



COOK BOOKS by Eliz. Craig
also —
BIRTHDAY BOOKS

ROBERTS & CO.—DIAL 3301—High Street

———

AUCTION |
with

for attractive terms and efficient service
Phone 4640. — Plantations Building

ADVOCATE



London Express Gagwice

CIVILISATION

GISBORNE, N.Z

The Maoris still use their tra-
ditional cooking methods for cere-
monial occasions, The system is
much like the modern clam-bake.
Bigkest problem today is digging
the large pit that is necessary. But
the Maoris hire a bulldozer oper-
ator as assistant cook and borrow

: E. Berlin Will Cut
Power Supplies
!

BERLIN, Sept. 20,
East Berlin will cut off power-
supplies to the three western sec-
tors of the city at midnight tonight
it was officially announced here
today.

r 7 | The surplus pewer will go
Sanne dae ~— sere towards the economy of the Soviet
; P o Sector and Zone the announce-

—(C.P) ment stated

This powe1
take place



the second io
three months

cut,
within

was enforced upon East Berlin
DEMOCRATS WANT * see authorities because West
erlin Magistrates refused mini-

RESTRICTIONS LIFTED

BONN Sept. 20.

West German Social Democrats West Berlin power otheials this
haye tabled a motion asking Gov-] afternoon stated that they were
ernment to negotiate with thel trying “to clarify” the situation.
Allied High Commissioner to end} The cut is not expected to inter-
demilitarisation, dismantling and') fere seriously with current sup-
restrictions on productions, plies to three Western Sectors.

—Reuter. —Reuter.

mum
said.

price offers, the statement

AVOID COLDS“FLU

Specialized Medication
Prevent Many

drops of Vicks Va-tro-nol up each
to help prevent the cold from
ing hold.

YOU CAN FEEL IT WORK!
Thi specialized medication works
fast) right where the trouble is, and
youlcan feel it. That stuffy, sneezy
feelijig vanishes, your head clears,
irritation is soothed, and many a
cold is stopped right then and there.
Va-tro-nol is expressly designed to
Stimulate Nature's own defences
ayainst colds. Use it in time!

VA-TRO-NOL

NOSE DROPS



Colds are doubly dangerous now ;
may lead to “flu” or worse! So
take every precaution, and

at the FIRST warning snifle WICKS

or sneeze, quick !—put a few





MANY PEOPLE
are buying the

“Unbreakable Pots”’

(old iron meter cases)
Tran¢planting their

Anthurium Lilies

Get a few before
they are all sold
your Gasworks, Bay 8t
1/3, 2/6 and 4s. each



From
Prices





KBLADON











| MONTREAL

=

CLOSING

It is regretted the: ve must Suspend Our Service to You for a



SHIPPING

AUSTRALIA NEW
LAND LINE LIMITED
(M.A.N.Z, LINE)
PORT WELLINGTON”
t Berbados September 27th
5 GLOUCESTER” sails Freeman-

ZERA-

arriving

| tle August Sist, Adelaide September 11th,

Devonport September 15th, Melbourne
September 23rd, Sydney 30th September,
Brisbane October 4th, arriving at Bar-
tbados November 4th.
These vessels have ample space for
led, hard frozen and general cargo.
Cergo accepted on through bills of
1 with transhipment at Trinidad
for Porbades, British Guiana, Wind-
ward ond Leeward Islands.
for further particulars apply:—
FURNESS WITHY & CO. LTD.,
Trinidad, B.W.L
and

DA COSTA & CO. LiD.,
Barbados, B.W.1.

aing



“Cc. G, THULIN"
“BYPJORD" .



SOUTHBOUND



Apply: DACOSTA & CO., LTD

ROBERT THOM LTD.—New

RE MEMBE,

When you order from... .

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

we deliver by Motor Van
Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets.

THE



These vessels have limited pass nger

PAGE SEVEN

NOTICES











The M.V. “Caribbee”
for Dominica, Antigua, Mont-
serrat, Nevis and St. Kitts.
Sailing Friday 22nd.

B.W.L, Schooner Ownere

Asso. (Inc).
Tel. No. 4047

will
accept Cargo and Passengers



NEW OBLEANMS SERVICE
sar Arr.

N.O, Bidos
NEW YOUK SSRVICE
ails Arr.
NV Rdeosw
lst September 12th September
2ist September 3rd October

V————_—
CANADIAN SPRVICE

Sails Sails Arrivés
Name of Ship Montreal Halitax Barbados
S.S. “ALCOA PARTNER” September Ath, September 11th. September 2
S.S. “ALCOA PEGASUS" September 22nd.September 25th Getobe Y ith Bx
et
NORTHBOUND
Arrives
Barbad ><
8 “ALCOA PIONEER" September iith For St. Lawrenee River Ports
“4 Steamer October 7th For St. Lawrence River Ports
‘A" Steamer October 2ist For St. Lawrence River Port
A” Steamer October S3ist For St. Lawrence River Ports

accommodation



Canadian Service

York and Gulf Service



OWALITY

PLUS

ECONOMY

°

“M YNAH”
TEA

Blended

Grown,

and packaged

in Ceylon.

sd

Obtainable in the following sizes :

1 ounce





Ce ee, ae 59996996954 SOOPOO 4) ‘

ss FOR SALE %

x The following English Thoroughbred Race Horses ;

: landed in Barbados % bees

§ GLAD EYES —LICHGATE—ENTRANCING 3 ee rae
$ Each £650

“4,



Supplieo
in a choice of
attractive colours
including
IVORY and BLACK
CREAM and GREEN

Chi ssae anos
8 Burner (Table Model)
3 Burner
Single Ovens

PLANTATIONS

tj det nadisainvcodetandbanboaesaeesabiess

BALLY MISTIC — GREAT EASTERN Each £600
Apply O. P, BENNETT, Southern Dairy - Cross - Trinidad

Ks
LPP PPL PEPPER LLE



%
3 We will then be
>
)
4

‘5
eo
s

WILL BE ON

BURNS WITH
A PLUE
FLAME OF
GREAT
INTENSITY



$31.03

$57.69
$14.03

LTD.

| Rickett Street,
$ (|i aR.

MARKET FOR YOUR

These up as usual when we resume Production.

Sa





Period of approximately THREE WEEKS for the Installation of an

RE-OPENING

WITH A COMPLETELY NEW PLANT AND A FINER PRODUCT
THE

ENJOYMENT.

Bottles and Cases can be Returned to us or our Trucks will Pick

CHOWN MINERAL
WATER Lo, Ltd.

Bridgetown.
|

" PAGE EIGHT







Middleweight

Fight Next
February

(By LAWTON CARVER)

NEW YORK
The world middleweight cham-
pionship will change hands in
February unless Jake LaMotta
contrives somehow to sidestep

Ray Robinson, and there seems to
be no way now for Jake to escape.

The National Boxing Association
has ordered him to defend his
title against Robinson, leaving
Jake no choice in the matter but
to comply or lose it by default in
NBA territory.

While the beating which La
Motta wili absorb is something
less than pleasant to contemplate,
that is better than to be shorn of
the crown without the day

pay



that will accompany that beating.
Jake loves money.
A Date

The New York Commission un-
doubtedly feels the samq way
about the situation and will get
around eventually to setting a date
for the match.

Whether the whimsical New
York Board does or does not force
the issue is not of paramount im-
portance now. for Jake and Ray
actually are signed by the Inter-
national Boxing Club and the fight
is scheduled for Chicago.

There still are some angles to
be ironed out to clinch the fight,
a these are not vitally impor-
ant.

The fact is that there is no other
opponent around for LaMotta
and he must now meet the man
who whipped him four out of five
times before Jake was champion
and is a cinch to do it again.

Robinson will be forced to give
up his welter title in order to
challenge in the heavier division,
but there is no problem involved
in. that respect. Robinson has
trouble making the welter limit
cf 147 pounds and he wants to
move up.

No Problem.

Jake is about through and would
be no problem for Robinson whi
beat the 160 pound boss when thi
latter was at his best. Robinsor
is about as good as ever. Assum
ing that he has slipped a little he
stil’ is the best fighter in the
bh siness to-day.

LaMotta was no big bargain in
knocking out Laurent Dauthille
at Detroit Wednesday night. He

They'll Do It Ev



e
Festival
Matches

LONDON, Sept. 20

International matches to be
played in
Festival of Britain next May were
approved today at the Football
Association Council meeting here.

International matches sanction-
‘d were England versus the Argen-
tine at Wembley May 9, England
versus Portugal at Liverpool May
19, England versus Spain in
Madrid May 27, England versus
Norway B (Amateur) at Middle-
oorough May 15, England vs. Fin-
land at Sunderland May 10, Eng-
land vs. France (Amateur) in
France May 20.

Provisional fixtures with France
ind Belgium were not approved
but it is likely that France will
visit Scotland and Belgium will
play Ireland in the Festival of
Britain games.

—Reuter.

Cricketers
Due Oct.3

The s.s, “Matina” will be arriv-
ing at Barbados on 3rd October at
approximately 12 o'clock noon
and will be sailing for Trinidad
later in the evening.

The Committee appointed tu
make arrangements for the recep-
tion of the West Indian Team wiil
hold another meeting on Saturday
at 10.15 a.m.

Trinidad Win
Championships

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Sept. 20
Trinidad won the Caribbean
vawn Tennis Championship to-
night as the Tournament closed
with reversed singles, lan McDon-
ud, Trinidad, beat Nunes, Jamai-
ca, 6—4, 6—1 and 6—4, Ron
Sturdy, Jamaica, beat Jin Ho,
Trinidad, 3—6, 6—3, 6—3 and 6—





~~



wes on the verge of losing his
‘itle when in the closing seconds
of the 15-rounder he stopped the
*renchman,

Dauthille, something less than
he best fighter sent out of France
whipped LaMotta previously,
Carelessness kept him from dong
it again,

No such accident will befall
Robinson. LaMotta cannot whip
he welter champion either by
accident or on purpose.

Yet it will be a big
match. Jake has never been
knocked off his feet and has a
following despite his occasional
losses.

He is actually a pretty good
ighter in a seuffling sort of way,
xut not entirely dependable. He
was suspended because of the
technical knockout he suffered
igainst Billy Fox, a fifth rater.

However, he has grown rich as

money

a fighter and will be remembered!

is one of the smartest business
nen ever to infest the ring. He
vas. proved this by avoidng a

iefence against Robinson up to
Low.
—LN.S.

Time



connection with the] tor.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

CE ORT

Russians Move
Boundary Mark

BERLIN, Sept. 20.
British Troop reinforcements to-
day guarded Potsdam, south of
West Berlin following the incident
last night when Soviet troops
moved their boundary check-point
several yards into the British sec-



'.
British military police armed
with tommyguns uprooted the
barrier and returned it to its
former position.

Today according to German
eyewitnesses over 200 Red Army
troops were stationed in the
immediate area of the boundary
check-point on the East German
side.

Today a British Military spokes-
man stated that on Tuesday
Soviet soldiers erected a barrier
at the Berlin-Potsdamer-Chausse
inside the British. Sector.

Following protests British infan-
try were posted to demonstrate
the sector boundary

The barrier was opened and the
Soviet troops withdrew from the
crossroads. — Reuter.

West Indies Lose
Last Match

@ From page 1.



Top scorer was Trestrail with

70, while Rae made 42,

The players were Gomez, who
skippered the team, Marshall,
‘Irestrail; Walcotty Wil¥iams.
Christiani, Johnson, Pierre, Valen-
tine, Rae,

\
Williams and Gomez ran them-}

selves out, so it is gathered.

Gubby Allen who is well known,
in the West Indies, captained the

Elders and Fyffes team.

In spite of the West Indies
bowling attack they went for the
runs and some spirited batting by
Holmes the former Surrey cap-
tain, who made 56, enavlea the
Elders and Fyffes team to win the
match. The tourists return home
on Friday.—Reuter.

STANDARD RIDGE
By M. Harriy 1-Geay
Dealer: —vuth
North-South game



N.
@1073
PVAITRES
@1052
@37
w. gE
$3? eases
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South was just short of a
Two No-Trumps bid on this
uplicate paifs
t and opened One
Heart, rebidding Three No-
Trumps over North’s single
raise. At most tables North
returned to Four Hearts,
although he might have
reasoned that the nine-trick
contract was more likely to
succeed. South in each case
was held to 9 tricks,

A Spade, Diamond or Club
lead presents South with
Three No-Trumps. At one
table, however, West made
the “safe” lead of 910 and
Played well in refusing to
take South's @K at trick 4
Declarer cashed two more
Hearts and led Diamonc:
pean » this gave West three
tricks. but he now had to

‘ lead a black suit. The con-

tract fails if South is in u
hurry to cash all the Hearts. ;

London Express Service.

Fi nian anon ame hap tare bees
E
a
9
3
5
e

RAR ARR RAR AAR A RRA ARO ern



| Killer Named’

@ From page 1.
but said “he does live in Nassau
j and is a prominent man.”

In New York meanwhile, Count
Alfred De Marigny tried and
acquitted on a charge of slaying
Sir Harry said he

“fervently | striking

—_—————

‘
+ goimeg to have « national cay made with their pennies, what else can you expect?”



U.N. TROOPS 4 MILES
FROM SEOUL”

@ Krem page 1

down from the north

hopes” the mystery can be solved.! while a second big force of mar-
in an interview, De Marigny said | ines assigned to the assault on the
that until the murderer of the|city was about the same distance
Canadian millionaire is found, his| away to the south but still on the

life will “continue to be a hell”.

beachhead side of the Han River.

People still believe I murdered, ern battle front >

Sir Harry although I did not and
was found innocent, Finding his
killer is my only chance for
1 per cent clear bill.

Earlier, Air Keconnaissance had

aj indicated that Communists were

making a desperate bid to pack

e Marigny formerly a resident! defenges around Seoul and to the

of {Montreal was Sir Harry’s son-|

in4law at the time the latter was
slajn in the Bahamas. His wife
Naaecy Oakes stood by him during
the\ trial but later obtained an
annulment of their marriage. De
Marigny said he had been living
in jseclusion here for two years,
denied of a steady job “because
evéryone thinks I’m _ wrong.”

Seyeral pertinent facts about the]

celébrated slaying never

be revealed he said,

tha the murderer “could be found:
in fhe Bahamas, Palm Beach areal
if {hey wanted to find him”. He
wuld not elaborate on whom he
(mant by they.—Can Pvexs.

¢

G

n at the expense of the south-

American military quarters anti-
¢ipated a stiffening of resistance
east of the Han river. United
Nations fortes breaking out of
their box in South Korea reported
a slackening of opposition today.

Resistance was Still stiff in some
sectors but an Army spokesman
said that there were signs that

have! the Communists were continuing
adding| their withdrawal

Northerners had still not thrown
in a counter-attack against Ameri-
can troops advancing in the
northwest corner of the former

PLLA ES POLES CLOSES

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defence box after the capture of
the Waegwan stronghold.

Many North Koreans have pull- |.
ed out of the Waegwan area, mov-
ing towards Kumchon to the
northwest and Kinwi.

West of the box, Communists
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PAGE 1

N %  | %  I < 11 %  I • • r '2 1 1 &f JBarbaflns Quorate U o < %  FIVE ^XTS U.N. TROOPS 4 MILES FROM SEOUL Harry Oakes 9 Killer Named MIAMI. %  1..1.1 Sept. 20 \ NASSAU DETECTIVE lett by plane yester day for Oakland, Caliloinia, armed with the name of the person given him a£ the murderer of Sir Harry Oakes seven yeai.. ago in his Bahamas mansion The name of the alleged slayer of the Canadian millionaire minor was supplied by Mrs Hildegarde Hamilton, prominent Port Lauderdale Florida portrait artist Later she told reporters that she did not want to bet o..i • too involved in the investigation "because it may not be safe for me to visit" in Nassau again. Mr* Hamilton said the repealed >he itorj I'M in'i Wro year* ago by Edward Majuva. 31 year-old Cikl.nid mechanic She told the story on Monday nlKht to Assistant S ipt. AUKUfttu. Roberts of the Nassau Police and Police t:hlef Roland ot Fort Uuderdale IIO VOI KNOW I HIS I ISII y W.I. Lose Last Match lX>NDON. Sept. 20 The West Indies rrickct team MirTcrcd one of their Ml fltfaall during iheir tour of England when thev ICMrt their final game to .1 scratch team nf country players inised bv the firm Elders and FuB" yisterday. ll wriou. encounter. Jtut a liRhthcirled I'll of fun. according so what one rould cat her to-day from behind the veil of secrecy which mrrounded the game. Admittance was refused to the Press niid the public on the Kimiiuls that It was a racial oceanic Weal Indies were Invited down to the firm's ground at New Maiden, tin! MrtstlsS I^ondon, for lunch and a same of ertckCf A. ,1 rftwH not even %  Bassta parajtraph appeared In the Inndnn Press which hitherto has published ful, details of all the games SSyad by the Tourists. The scores were not to go down to Wisden and of course the match does not count in the records This is wh..t one understands happened The tourists batted first makinK 199 for 6 declared alter batting two and a half hours to make the runs. • On pf B.B.C. Boy Catches Rare Fish Meet a new llsh. Bat Fish I the short OtcoephalHi Majava had told Oakland Police bu thai he knew the "inside story" of the bizarre Oakes murder case and the identity of the kilter. 11 who (Use wtrad a rid. mM .|.. at Ksriand, L ike Ontario WHS bludgeoned to lietith In 1943 Asked by a reporter why she did not want to become involved in an Oakes murder investigation. she replied: "do you remember the murder of an American woman last year in Nassau whose body was found at the bottom of %  well" It is generally believedthat the woman knew something about the Oakes murder" found Dead MU -i-tl> Rcnner 37-ycar-oki ,<, 0 1 lawyer was found daad ui %  nil Ian wtutai Th ,, t \*. . her death was still ItDlU ii. milton said sW met Itaiava Ihree years ajo In For* Laudcrdalv when he ca me to purchase a painting of the Merra Castle A rear later, she told reportara, he came back to her studio and related the "ory of the Oakes killing. Majava. she related. told her thai he got his story from a blondwotjesui in Miami At the time. Mrs. Hamilton continued, he told her the name of a man who supi-'sedly killed Sir Harry %  I told the police all I knew about the aton Majava told me Mrs. Hamllton said. Vajava nrresteri in Oakland on Sunday on B iliunk charge -.nut ll wai Mrs, Hamilton who told him the nnmc of the killer Mrs Hamilton said it ai the other way round. She rci fused lo toll reporters the nan* Ready To Recapture City Tim ODD LOOKING FISH. *. y..t unidentified. mystifi-a trswlarssen In th Cape Town Doc*.. Binth .if..*, recant*! It ** SSSgal ..mon* -totkaah in a net few days s|r> ,* miles off Cape CeluMbtn*. about ier. mil', north west of Ope Town. The pecim"n. which *• -.' niches long, ba four flappers, flue taatli and Is of a dull irsi coloui |,,,,. ,, unde w. Germany Strength Is Only Will Purge o J Govt. Ranks Way 1 o Peace BONN. Sept 20. I Gustav Heinemann. Wes; Ger-. ...an Minister of the Interior lo-' day issued Instructions to dismiss a) cnipiovres l( f iha Federal wrnment who belong to any of the 13 Communist <.\ irganisat*>.ns. The Minister acted swiftly on yesterday's decision by the We.i German Cabinet to intensity tin. ..nit Conflanadti offensive hi w %  Qermailx, Wcsi German :idls 10-day did not tx'licvc re than a handful of administrative civil servant.ild be afTeelcd by the purge They said however that In larir public services such as the Post Office and railways there must rltal % %  ba "exirenn-t poi keti and there would have to be sonu'weeding out". Says Menzies lUdiataa. (for the tlsh expert) Shaped like a bat it i nine inehai long, rrom the tip of one I tin to the other is eiitlit Incbaa I 31M I. it Fish h as a pointed 1 beak. Its mouth is * iruli aftdfl and of a bright ied colour. The hsh in the ait-tun was caught yesterday off V Point by Wilfred Herbert of Heckles Hili, a member of the Bay Strati i; flub. The Fisheries Olhcer Mi Dudley Wiles yesterday told tl 1 '.d>. eie that the specie was irtentined by Charles M. Breeder (Jcr.) In his -Field Bok of Mai: Fllhai of the AUfiidit It is said to lie common !r? certdin shallow bays especially where t^ere are sandy bea< h> On page B SPORTS WINDOW Thu Aqui < lull -> %  Snapuvl* v* Bonilu and Thr— -itpcrlani n.aicna for fapnn nt far*mat lire ll *lll.ir'a leti/ur I, m*t(hfc. Uop" "1 •III b A. Ihl. ... OH I II IS V A d vocate 1111 r r i ( %  11 r 11 %  Relief Fund For Antigua Israel Expel 4 Thousand Bedouins FLUSHING MF.ADOWS, Sept 20 Major General Willl.1,.1 HiU v reported today that Israel had cvpelled some 4.000 Bedouins .ml 1.000 Arab relugfrORI l-ii<: into Egypt In the last seven K1.JW! *• 1 1 ... ..ll.. 1 I. .1 i' 1 V* l — l. ... LM \.. • M II a MM 10 a* 1 a aaa %  a MI a N H N a St M in 1 1 1 T "' "i w ,.*i>a u... raw Friday CANBEhHA, Sept. 20 AUSTRALIAN PR1HK MINISTER MENZIXS In the linrt of a series of broadcasts on Defence, to-night said that the only hope left for world peace was to prove to the potential enemy thai putting the Atomic bomb entirely on one side we are as ready and as strong as hv l-rl uODBM out of our sell delusions." he said "The time %  Una in our favour only if we us* ft wall." Menilex said thai the Australian policy must be part of the world democratic defence policy "Do think that this Communist enemy would ocaitate 10 ruin Wes-erri civilUailoir lk> you believe thai when he bombs he will cast them tnlu -^ %  TJ In retne mil *•' mil the Communist ,-inpe.ie was to Jisperse democrat :c forces and to create a feeling In The nnnd.. of people thai us any %  ne of them might be attacked. I !>• 'n k-ep ill ih irces at home If tlm succeeds. M conunuad, 1*16 raattonaj demo i-ratie 0O-OParaUon In-eaks down %  rd we nil heeutne isolationist*. U in Bufopa and the Middle l-Jist are wiitiout Ldeipinic defence nd r Ihs Coinnusnuti win tha war. we surely know (he TCMIIIS Heater. ne; I Wi-i fcr Sariu Acheson Gills For I .N. Police TO KEEP WORLD AT PEACE FLU8H1KG MEADOWS The %  dS> called II .1 l'r: rorld at pi ntad lo the %  State Deal u %  B 1 in lesate .M'diei \ \-tuii> 1.1 .;, .iiui.-l.. dated 'hai Mr %  vouretj to drat a 1 I.. i ath turn ha nun -> ui. 1 %  .in.ina the General Aaaembb %  •in and French Foreicn MimsRoooV Schurrj n . ri Imth hen Mi A. M led mil., should ba It.lined imd equipped fm tha fOTOS th" guidance of a United it.ions ml|.lar> advisor paananduig action 10 provanl rift in disaster" Mr Acheson %  urged that piovision ihinild be miide fm the Ainemblv b) I* Called al 1!4 IHIUIS notice it the S.iuritv Council should l' prenteii" from acting in cast of aaaalnu Dealing with what he fanned "the. rool ol out tmuble the Imparlaliaat" Mr. I % %  % %  urn launched %  llva pOOTl attass on Soviet policies Mi AchewHi said thi'i ..tisiia ha i>d hei poopfi in .1 "ahroud at %  e*recy" built up .unininenu .it %  Vale gravely endangering BtaOl and "manipulated the pcoplr ul other 'inles as pawns or Russian rtallam.' 1 ally, he said Oh kdefica In Impost us will and its political nystem upon other ., ..11I1 is %  threat so in-ace" Mr Vyshinsky toll, an M Acleson lo the rostrum that the Secretary if Stall rinl not ihrink from rude attach 01 Ihe Stovie 1 Union Mr Acheson. be said, had eniravomwi "to drag ua oa lo .oath Hint h.11 nolhiiic in common with the problem* confrontlni the a> On pse 1 Americans Round-Up Red Leaders M 11 In In Egyptian allegations thai hud embarked on "larasj ajegfa niiin.iiv opasaUons'* to expel all Arab refugees from the demllltarzones of Palestine, the United Nations" truce chief daclaiad "On September 2. IBS0. Israeli military units rounded up some 4.TO0 Bedouins who have been living In and nmund the damllltarsed one of El Auha and drove them out of Israeli controlled Icrrltory across the ERyptiiin internntionBl boundary into BfypUan territory Gencr.il Riley said that invpstition .iiscloscd t h .11 refugee :abs rcpresenlini! live Bedouin tribes, all contended that Israeli hed been conducting operations to -lear Bedouins out of Israeli territory with armoured tars and %  mlded by reconnaissance aircraft Alter dnvlng the Bedouins across the border. Israelis burnt their crops and possessions Israeli denied that the;, had entered the demilitarised /one. he -tided, and contended that the Bedouins were "infiltrators" !*•"ause they had departed nt the beginning of the war and had illegibly returned after to Israeli Aeording to Israeli, the Dedi .v* re ii continuous source of trouble. Thev smuggled, nred on vehicles and laid mines In addition to the expulsi hBedouins Oensral Hiley ice March, approximately 1,000 Arabs have been expelled by .he Israelis across the demarcation line to the Gara strip with it mgrkjd increase in numhers during the month. —R-liter BV AI.KX VALENTINE With United Suiai Mar. 1 <• the road to Seoul, .: -pi 2,1. j Angara in Inialugenc* "(iiaeT' era um..* rounoing uj1 n.st party membtrs in '...lnclion aroa. An authoritative source Jls-1 cioHcd thai they were working %  >II, UM almost comp l ete lists of part] members which were found UM 'iiell-rulned Pany Head-j larters In the town. So far the sources said that tl Americans h.nt captured more than I 300 known and suspected Comrnuist* Including about 30 women. Helping American agents is the organisation known as the Korean Youth Association roup of Right wingers, suppressed hen the Communists uvaded South Korea The Americans admit that there have bSSn some cases ol working off personal grudges by denouncing people not In fact associated with Communists, All the uspecte.l people however, are s cr eened by j>er*'jnal acquaintances and %  gainst raptured records, they said Intelligence Officers said that 0M %  > %  asm hunting for asttra] > imd collaborated with Ccaamunlftl and would turn then over to the South Korean authorities 1 saw six prlsoneis in a village about 'l miles from Inchon. They bSSn seized in a lonely hut In Ihe hills by South Coraar Youths An American tViuiiierIntelllgenee officer was waiting for them at the police ptatlon —B enter Dmk Strike Taiu Continue In N.Z. WEl-UWGTON, NZ Sepl 20 IVime Min.Her Sydney Holland anpad with emergency power-i -aid Ui-duy that talk* ihlpowners and dockers to and tin dork strike la New Zealand will continue lo-morssna Eaner he said that the BXOCU live Council had dix-ldad on a .late of osnergeno and he latroduoed a motion ln.r> the House seeking the approval and 1 Ossl I malion t-f Ihll titep. dutkirs strike started in Wellngton on September 12 over he handling of lamp black aboard ship It spread to all New Zealand oorH on September 15 on orders of the Waterside WorkerUnon. Keuter By JULIAN BATES TOKYO, aept. 'Al AMERICAN MARINES pushing on from their mile and a half deep bridgehead over the Han River reached a point four miles from Seoul today as Communist troops were reported rushing north to defend the key city. Marines pushing over the Han in strength at dawn this morning met stiff opposition and fanned out for an assault on Seoul itself, expected within 48 houra T. rcniialaance pilots opTrallng 'in Ih. ciii>luri>.l .iin ..t'l-Ulv' of i >: toward, ih-' ""K Mighty Mo. To The Fray TOKYO. SCy> 20 : batUaaup mu in largest in the Mfld dai i' IfM l ihe fjl del Nation-i i and rop por ta d the kg '!" i acttmi with her sixteen le" sun• announced by Admiral itruble. Commander of navnl opTl Uona MI Kfrei lisaouri li.nl s.nled riiiht I thi Lb aan Pasdaaula nr eak She hcl|>ed South Korean OH the East coast by ) i Ulna encin* concentrations al jmchok rorth tf Pohang. IIIII.I1 Strubie ulso anmninceil M H %  Ilnhsli Cnilsen .he Krn.i I Jamaica. l>oth of 8.000 ton-.. •ik part in the -hort range bomi't Inchon The carrier, 3 3.10 tons, WJS II monu *'ve en.iKC-l Ul the operation The Jupanese surrender was i'\iied aboard the Masaoarl h, 1945 She has three aircraft and two licvpters and a normal cmnpler-nt of 2.7IHI men Reuter. Brighter B.B.C I LONDON A w-.i 0 |d „,,,-.,, | .. %  ..I •! (hl.iuln : a In. Ihruuah s windww al Uie London haadouarlers of Ihr Hrltlah Broadrasllni < mi. oration explained she "fell Ihr RN4 needed ximr llvrnln ap." 1 I.. i.iu. Jean 11.1,1-. i.,|. Ihe m.11 1.Ii il. 1 ..,,, I ; *'| UiMiiKhi we had been havlm *""*'lp) prn tnmm n lateI held far .evrn day. fae rs I 1 Ti.nsttan— 11 S.H \ Sti-ikers Hold Up 2 Ships JamaiVu ,, Vars Competition Southern capital fi..m the south Tha Han fiver crossing; mat onlj l.h'hl oppositien It was j>rcnlHfi in ti, IN GEORGETOWN wKOKCKTOWN. HO, Sept 19. 1 i.,ke ol 40" watarfroni to-day appeired likely to JaBay the turn round al the por 1 ..town of the ship lleeeba ot Amstardam itoii.nid and the Hoi-kei liner Amakura ot Liverpool The luiko .spread when HoOHer(Oouiaatewn) refused to .iv, 'it to a decision of the woi'ki'D ol (he watarftOOl section ;,/ the British (iuiana ljibour rni-ii. t" suspand (Off a week or wo '*Whltele r ;s ,, mni the strikers %  o ii.i. pailtslad Bookafa, numbei %  ne a -d Thorn and Cameron und SjsViltach Parker and Company t.tdk wharf entrances "Down with orule force" was one of the placards carried. lit. section IK also protesting a reifuest to the fort 1-ilmiir Comta Uaa b] Hookers thai seventeen men be truck off Ihe port labour %  Sgister for refusing to work when requested nnd u decision ol Sandbach Parker and Company I.muled to Introduce a new emphiwTicrit lystem without lon-oilting the Deprived Of F.C. KcM;'ioiiServfotf I ONI JON S |it 2\ BrlUsh I--I-' gn Onl • nan ti day said thai the diplomaIi %  .in nunltj %  Most •-. %  had 1 irsd of Roman Cathula religious services liv I Inre'toal of t h e Ituss auto allow im An Moat) Priest, fatai i John urassard ti uai .in Church, Baud Lnula i American Ambassadoi In Moscow. Admiral Alan Klfa sajsgd Bovitt f>eputy rnrelgn |J.iiniBtcr Andrei Cromyko last week to allow Father Brasssr'l ti lak.the place of ttie Frcuei Pm,t e/hO had left HOBCOW OrO mvki. told Kirk that the COW rnilt.e of the Church of St I ...1 ti.ke UV services —(Hrutrr Red Soldiers Seize U.S. Police AT TOP U seen the and the resemblance Bat Fish looking It full in the face to a bat are clearly shown. BEttl.IN. Sept 20 Soviet soldiers and East German People's police today seized two American military police with their patrol jeep in the American sector of Berlin, Colonel Martce W Daniel reported. The American patrolmen notified their headquarters by radio immediately ifter the incident. Thev aid that thay were within the United States' sector when the. apprehended Radio signals went The American military police were making a routine patrol The %  asBSBssal [ police were arrested Just beyond 'the American tarto* i" Below, the Sns I AftST %  day in which police on 1 both sid"s of the Eant-Wosf sector 'boun'^i i, gaged in a grim natch tssnatcu -can game of retaliation. 76 police were r %  :,!. behind bars as hostages 30 were from the Soviet sector and 26 from %  i weat sector. Colonel Daniel reported that a West Berlin policeman who was with tha Americans was also an* '< %  • The prelude to today's hostage war occurred on Monday when six East sector police were arrestel in the American sector while acting as an armed guard for a convoy of ten empty lorries People's police ther I Western Policemen athey passed through the Eastern sector for duty last night West Berlin police retaliated early today by pouncing on * People's policc*.en in buses, trams and tube trains as they passed through Western sectors on theii way to work in East Berlin F.asl Berlin Police Headquarters this afternoon charged West Berlin BatbM with unlawfully assuming control of tube and elevatoi train stations in West Berlin. All stations in West and Eaal Bei Sin i.re under Soviet mrisdictlon according to the Potsdam terms and East Police are normally In charge. Wast Berlin police admitted ordering detachment* to carry out raids. Bast Berlin complained that Weat Benin nollcf n strength patrolled the East-West boundaryend detained and closely examined KINCSTON. Jca. Sept ]<• cemsd ovei the report that .l .1 v II i nli.i I for Hi* npt rtatlon of commiiti. I annda and that this will adverse/ iitTect local industries, ihr i iincil ol the Jamaica Maiiufac%  rers Association at a meeting %  i • afteinoon deeded ti eii't a mcmoi nduni to 'he Cm idian tiovei nineiit raquesUnt i • to insist Unit lamalsa mpo.t from her, goods now being manufactured locally. I.aig .inport it on of such gioils from Canada would soon close down oc. I iidusUir 4 Can Press Kiurees said 3.00.1 riisonert had been drive on Seoul up 10 a m yesterday Moving Up <>n the south, lomrvi'n inovK up from Waasjwan ..iu.ii ihej csptu i towards Kiimchon. thi next objecUve In II drive northwest along th* in Puasn-Scoul Highway. \mong the Inamost advance %  •nits arara man of tha American I4lh Infanto Wvtston General MacArthur's llvadquartors announced to-night that the 24'h Division units were now three miles north of Wacgwnn. The -.c.io.l In.'untry Division which made another crossing over the Naktong lliver this morning %  head to-night The marines jumped off from the south Iwik, al the Han after %  me of the most intense artillery barrages of the a/BI It lasted for 30 minutes i ti. Brat bum of o m.iehlnegim hie sprayed mound them m inn lieiini. nnd mortar iMimbs fell among the assault craft mting enseades of water over ciouclniig marines. Within a tew minute reach ug the opposite bank, thev had kicked out opposition and nil hour lutei they le.ohe.t their "'I %  ..ti-.. ,e.ti i-tr tin mum road and rail vav leading south to BaOlll. cutting communications i -i>i|{yang TBTM Ptal i of the ussault company was the first to gain thfl north bank of the river Late reports said that marines were within four MUSS ..f BaOUl • On pair R 'all vehicles, .ychsts and pede*trinns with brief cases or even women with market huskel-. wh crossed the boundary this mornEast Berlin iiolice this morning Lfg which links the Easl Sector and the American Sector. The six East Berlin Police un Monday came before a United States' Court today but hearing was adjourned until Friday for them to prepare the! defence They ill be allowed to choose then own lawyers The tension between the rival aces n


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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER II. 1SS0 HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER 1 fX WMKW^ YEAH! AN'I GOT S FOR BIG J7* MIS JOB AS GJWO DEKE ?) [SO I COIXO HEIP BIG WITH WE UXOfP 'li. t r.ixs :; THE RIDILE OF THE ROME REVELS m IN THi a^ or ink LAUNCH, C*HHOHStKi,Clitli /HANIICAUV 10 Air*ACTAIJtHIIONASHt HIARS r BRINGING UP FATHER %  AMV c*&^-: TPW JCWWJW %  .. %  --. %  .-'% %  %  CM IDCUI l/TLP-l %  lV VaA-XX*.' %  fl %  • } .90 v XJ CA05O' ^ BY GEORGE MC.MANUS RIP KIRBY mo BAD PAV MtM VA_. -* T PON ; A LAC*JEC •I CQJLDA WON MOM BY ALEX RAYMOND THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES ; I rEl WAVEfc-AUP SA=EP-WlTMMir/lHAMl wimour H:M.ETEMN. AMLLft6E0t^t-rrr, HEAD\, %  % % % %  ::, rig j. <# ] A '.i* #> ; ; -r ',% %  •-' %  •', FIEVEOGET HCKE WIVE. rSOMIOETBSEAeoC* HAV •*-, GIRl ANP MUSH MV AT I'.'M TEETH TWICE A Wit FOR BEST RESULTS USE READY MIXED PAINTS AiX I.V.I. PRODUCE FOR [322222331 ADVOCATE CO., LTD. WE CAN SUPPLY Pk| Cornflake* Puffed thNL Rolled OBII Tim HOIiad U*i. Hkf.. Icing S.or. Mion Poison Pliirappla JUH-a Tomato Soup lab*, of Baton in. Oalall Soup ichmkn por lb STUART & SAMPSON LTD. A. S. BRYDEN & SONS am LTD. AGENTS. A MOST APPRECIATED GIFT FLORALENE It PMMMM a fncrance that everybody like*. A-k your dealer foe It. o* phono 293B. THE BORNN BAV RUM CO. tEZjg dwdtfarts % fake BETTC* Siuditd* BISCUITS Peek Frean Twiglet* 11.17 Peek I i ..MI Play box Biscuit* 1J* Martini Cracker 1J4 Cam Brrtish Assorted Biscuits 2.34 Glamour Biscuits U4 Amber Biscuits S.M „ Springtlne, Biscuits 1.M .. Shepherd Biscuits 1.92 PEANUT BUTTER & JAMS Pcamrt Butter S3, 35 S.A. Peach Jam (2 lb.) 6* S.A. Apricot Jam (2 lb.) .• S.A. Fig Jam (2-lb) St S^. Pineapple Jam (2 lb.) 47 Hartley's Strawberry Jam CO n Raspberry Jam A1 n Apricot Jam ,4S CONDIMENTS & EXTRACTS Oilman's Mustard 57 ., French Mustanl 33 Kraft Prepared Mustard 17 Madras Curry 7S Mortons Curry .47 Ground Spice. .41 Bovril 1. till, 90, 00 Marmite 7, 00. 32 MEAT Mir. Australian Prime Beef.| Steak, Roast and SievJ Beef Mutton Chops and Leg* Ox Liver—Kidneys I Liqueurs & Wines Etc. Cointreau 6.00 Liqueur Brandy 12.011 Wincarnis 2.88. 1.38 Buckfast Tonic Wine 2.00 Photferine Tonic Wine 2.40. 1.32 Pimm's No. 1 Cup 3.38 Martini Vermouth (Dry and Sweet) ......... 2.28 Gordons Gin 2.50 CANNED FRUIT ETC. Pears 42 Peaches .SO Apricots -SI Fruit Salad SI Letona Peaches .37 Tropical Fruit Salad SS Cocktail Cherrlei 1.3S, .S4 CANNED VEGETABLES Dutch Carrots 3f Sweet Corn 48, .35 Dutch Asparagus S3 „ Cauliflower M Spinach 2S Peas and Carrots .30 Mushrooms 54 Tomato Puree II Quaker Pulled Wheat Quaker Com Flakes Ketlofis Com Flakes Waler Com Flakes • • • Alison* Ro Ued Oat... Farex Pearl Barley Robinsons Patent 5 Barley < %  , , > \.,,J mm



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i PACE row BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER tl, MM ..#-* The Kii. Money Thiirsdin September 21. 111311 .HH. >l AIIMI \i I THE announcement thai Mi Cattlei Marshall has come out ment to take over the office of Secretary of Defence in America ib an indualiut: of the seriousness with which Americans view the international situation. Few men have the great international preetlgv which Mr. Marshall has gathered %  round himM.it in a lifetime of service on behalf of his country. As Chief of Staff during World War II. Mr. Marshall was one of the principal architects of victory but the more real and more lasting fame which he gained was during his tenure of office at the Department of Slate. Inaugurating a bold i- policy of aid to impoverished Europe the "Marshall Plan" has proved as important a bulwark against the innmds ot Communism as the armies of (ha Western European powers. After seeing his great experiment receive the approval of Congress and well on the way to success, Mr. Marshall retired to enjoy the evening of his days m lbs peace which ho had so well earned. TinH the Korean conflict with the '''nt "I f I I worse to come. American unpn-i. after the vast sums which had been .-.pent on defence in the post-war years was a greet shock to the American |Ki>ple and there was a revulsion of feeling %  gaJnM tin then Secretary of Defence who was regarded as responsible. Under American law the Secretary of Defence could not be a man who for the previous ten years had held an appointment in the armed forces but-so great were Marshall's abilities and prestige that the President decided to make and ask Congress to pass enabUn I latlon to allow Mr. Marshall to take ovei George Marshall has once agafa up his hopes of a quiet and peaceful life and has again undertaken one of the motl responsible jobs which his country hai to offer. It will be his task to bring Uw conflict to a speedy and successful conclusion and to make all prepaiations to that if the world should again be forced into another world war the United States of America will enter the arena with the l'si chances of victory. For oiaaa a hundred years the mavn responsibility for maintaining the peace of the world lay with Britain and her Empire, Today two world wars have bled Britain and the mantle of responsibility has fallen on the U.S.A. All the signs [joint to the fact that that country is shouldering her great duties with resolution and patient courage. The people of America may rest assured that in their great fight they have the sup 1 port and prayers of all the freedom-loviiu: countries of the world. Those peoples know the sterling worth of George Cattlei Marshall and rejoice that he should once again be in a position of great trust and responsibility. Poorer than any British Monarch for 100 years Concerning \Vis SAMUEL PEPYS records somewhere in his diary that he parted with his own hair and "paid £3 for a periwig". This, notes the Encyclopaedia Bnttanica was cheap, adding that the author of Plocacosnios says that "when they first were wore, the price was usually one hundred guineas". The word wig is an abbreviated form of '.'periwig" which is an artificial head of hair worn as a personal adornment, disguise or symbol of office. Wigs are worn as part of official costume only in the United Kingdom and countries which used to or still depend on the United Kingdom. Their use is confined except in the case of the Speaker of the House of Commons and the Clerks of Parliament, to the Lord Chancellor, the judges and members of the bar. Many people itill wear wigs to make up for natural d< BCMM cies and on the stage wigs are indispensable. Many stage wigs are made of jute The custom of wearing wigs dates back into antiquity. One discovery of a prehistoric carving suggests that they were worn at least 100.000 years ago. In Roman times women wore them, some for unsavoury purposes. Faustina, wife of Marcus Aarelius is said to have had several hundred. Queen Elizabeth had eighty altirs of false hair. But it wa not until the 17th century that the "peruke" another form of "periwig" was worn as a distinctive of costume. Under Charles II the wearing of the peruke became general. Under Queen Anne the wig reached its maximum development, covering the back and shoulders and floating down to the chest. Even coachmen wore wigs. Whei the reign of the Third George popular wigwearing began to wane, it persisted among professional men. Only by slow degnen up by doctors, soldiers and clergymen. . b JUSt over n.uuu.ouu uiu-i Hie UM mumr. B| %  i ihe most %  klaea lito received her WHflM. %  uu.trtMJ enable* Uie Kins lu caiTj uut the higjfcM job in man who bind* >>d Queen, and to five of them grants annuities totalling £161,000:— W,irj, 70 000 Princess F.i, oewh 40.0011 Duke of Edlnburuh 10,000 puJuuf Gloucester. 35.000 PrfWcess Roual 6.000 The King himself receives a •alary— his Privy Purse— of (110,000 It is the same as that paid U) Bdward VIII. and George V. Unlike President Truman's the King's sal,ir> Is tax free. But ail but £36,054 of ll ffOn BBS King'* rocket because he surrenders UM •II. I II lUl II. uf Coil: wall to help reduce the contribution from the Exchequer. BM \ Week PRESIDENT TRUMAN'S monetary reward for guiding Uie SSdnk Of 134 million people WOrkS out lit £275 11 week after Ft a "•! %  nesrlv four lime tin* siie, exIensUBig over an % %  mm. laiiiiilt lv ini-nIM.IUI" the Klnv is p*M by us tWn .. week. But lb* comparison 1not u favourable to the King us It sounds. For Ihe Sovereign is forced II to ense u. Sanaa* Kmlin iccoraliag plumbing. luroktbiag, and interim %  epair bull which .iccumulate lui that part of the palaces reservea 1 ) for the us*1 I Al BuckingJirfm r>ntB0S UM King pays for ail elri trieity, gas, aud water except that used foi lighting and washing down the courtyards. At Windsor Castle the State pays for all the watei 1 royal bath water—and since 11H7 at both the Palace and Windsor lor all electric, lumps. Taxpayers m> fur rleanin* the i.uUuiiof ii.i windowh it both places, but the Km. pay* for 1 ii-.niii* them anaidr. High Coal Tilt: KING has fought the battle of soaring costs by drawing on savings made in his Civil List during the war and. with those savings now nearlng eRhauetlen by using his own I a fan tharefer* musi tw m %  bo sscsa ot the account settled h> the nation. • Largely as a result ol IhU. and i %  • n—• the Kins pay* th*" full rslr of tax lap to IS* 6d. Jn the (1 "o all Investment income, his personal fortune i* believed to have shrunk 11 that he la far wor*e off than *n l his |irc.ece*Mr ; since Victoria came U> the Throne. He has made bSOl nn.n.. ...! sacrifices. His father. George V., so economised during the !!M4 War that he gave to the Exchequer 1100,000 and made equal contributions to war rfaai Ho become *o short of cash to meet expenses in 1921 that Parliament authorised Uie realisation of £100,000 from the Duchy of Lancaster — port of the Kin'hcreditary estates Again. In the 1031 crisis, George v' voluntarily cut his Civil List by £50.000. (iiven Hack AT THE end of the last war the present King handed back £70,000 and has given another £100.000 of war-time Civil List savings to pay for four years the increment in Princess Elizabeth allowance granted by Parliament on her marriage. The King is hard ]>i< >M :.i conserve his personal wealth Perhaps his most paying possession is the Sandringham estate. Increased recently ID 17.000 acres nd valued loeallsVit £1.000.000. The 15 farms are %  Tun on a *ou>iil commercial basis Similarly the l %  PH product: about £90.000 London and isnisnlsli Hie 1 m iii servants Free I. the title dessk inds. but the leVeimeTi oic long .-. % %  n'rthe State. The King and Queen pay (01 U They m-y accept nothing iree. i1 that duean't coat the naval vessel or a plane of tne Ki/iK.Flight. The Km ha* cu.' down I11S -iituro very considerably. ftUcinuj Pays Ml .HI enthusiastic raoottoiM owner, but he make.racing pay From 1V46 to I94B hU> priie-mnnej was £37,150. Even h.s shooting si Sandringham has netted a profit by the part sale of the bag. '" %  any mem tier of the family who has more ready casn than the Kin*' It is widely believed that Queen Mary is very rich. ITe-war her fiTtutu war. assessed St £2.000.000 much of it left by Queen Victoria and willed to her by George V Since 1936 her annuities dra 1 from UV State bare totalled l liHo.noo The Treasury will tnke a huge sum from her in death duties, foi these are paid by all royalty, except the Sovereign. The Ihike THE DUKE of Windsor enjoyed UM IfsOOBM from the Duchy of Cornwall for 35 years as Prince when taxc. were low. In 1027. for example, the duchy MeH.-d £72.917 Irnea he left Britain his personal wealth must have totalled some hundreds of thousand* of pounds. He gained nothing when ho renounced the throne Because he held that Sandringhani and Balmoral were un inseparable part of tnc Monarchy in the syssj >r the '.11 1save them to hi* brother Publication of kls memoirs throughout the world has so far bimtnin him nearly £|KO,000. The Duchess ONE OF die worst-off aim.ng royally is Ihe Duche^ Although carrying out a heavy routine of public duties she geU no money from the Sti.* other than her £398 pen-ion as the widow o' :in mi eon doii .. ith thras %  h When the Duke died in tfafcl rank on acUvs it.A 1 m rkn in 1942 he left CI.V7.73.. Most of Ibkl is in trus, f 1 1 now agd 14. and ant ques which beiotiflod to ksn i> sold by the Duchess in 1947 for CM-MI The followii year she Sold books for £1.022 The most important iiossess.ons j.nuiiT.uig lo her are Coppins, her house in Buck ;namshlre, which ihe is not sellli and %  % %  magniflci'iit j<'weller> PriiiceaiKs IINI 1 1'iiKiif rnaniasn Prlneeas Elizabeth and "Wle Duke ol Edinburgh have bttin receiv Irom Parliament £M\00n a yearall but ffi.COO Ux free. But it i >i B left CH74.4B2 in 1937. But the poor little rub girl among royalty hi Prince Mar* %  Bret She lias no m %  herself until next' Augu.-l. when .she becomes 21. Then the State will give her £6.00(1 a nar l.KS MISSING FIGURES PERCY G. DONALD, head of a leading London Merchant House and expert on Colonial Trade, contends that the Cploniat Annual Reports are failing to provide adequate information for British Exporters. THE SOLDIERS STAND IN PRAYER ItS I rank Owea KOREAN FRONT, THE sky was scowling and a mist cape hid half the mountain as the padre set up his .'able, an old cookhouse box. it had a little wooden cross on it and two little candlesticks. Hu glanced anxiously upwards and said firmly: "We will begin by singing Hymn :!H, 'Fight the good fight.' With a nervous cough or two and a bit vavenngly the congregation joined hum. The padre was young, almost boyish. Captain he Re-v. William Edward Benjamin Jones, of it-iheny, Dublin. Over his jungle-green jacket r 'l shorts he wore a brighter green stole. His congregation—a dozen or so soldiers of the Middlesex headquarters company, one reshly returned from a sniping patrol, and ihree or four officers. The soldiers had rules slung on their shoulders. Their clothes were grimy, but their weapons were clean. The officers wore revolvers at their belts. Th church was a muddy, mucky little larmyard behind company H Q Straw litter, iirukcn farm tools, an upturned oxen manner, and a manure heap made up our furniture. In the ruined, deserted, half roofless mud and thatch huts which are the trace and track of war upon this countryside, a rat stled in the rubbish on the floor when the padre paused. There was no music in our church, except the sound of running water the brook. MAKE US WISER' 'JJB1 us pray," said the padre. So the congregation prayed for the King and his family, the (Mivernment, our Allies' Governments, too ("Make us all wiser, so thai all may strive belter and more strongly for peace and the welfare of all peoples upon earth.") There echoed the boom-boom of a distant pin, The congregation prayed for their families, the:r loved ones, their friends, their wounded. Next they recited the 23rd Psalm: "The Lord kj my Shepherd . ." Colonel Mann, field-glasses slung about his nsjok, read the brief lesson. It was about Jesus meeting Matthew on the seashore and telling him to follow. The padre made his sermon on it. Matthew he said, was a tax collector, and for a foreign Government at that. Only yesterday the padre had received his own tax demand, from his own Government. PLACE FOR HIM TAX-GATHERERS were not anywhere popular—yet there was a place for Matthew. DS there is for all men in this faith who would serve in it. Again the sound of mortar fire. Then he reminded his hearers of the comradeship of battle, which alone made their task possible; the care and responsibility of the leaders; lite vigilance of the guards; the sharing of danger and comfort. We all muck in. "We eat from Ihe same dixie, sleep often beneath Ihe same blanket, may endure pain or death 11 "in ihe same fire. They sang another hymn, and then the padre gave the Blessing. The last words were crowned by the roar of a bomber flight way up in the mist. But as the padre packed his case and went oft down the gully track lo the road to his next I'lvii-o. ihe sun began to break through like a spear, L.E.S. COMMERCIAL ssreksB, wishinn to plan an extension of their trade to the.Brttuih Colonies, 1 k tdvarsce tofai rosiuon Dd oust condiUons. Nfce of information || -.1 ahouU l>-the Colon',il Annu.il Rssporta These reports, prasutnabl) designed to serve some economic purpose, are Issued one to three years late and consist of "dead'* stalisUral inlomuttton. Whilst UM I.N>> nr.liii.ileci nature of the general Intomatioa reihdsn thorn of little value Eight 1948 .. %  1 11 y. 1950 I was naoantty a*kc:am.satloti relying on stale PDtUrni with varying stocktaking dates would invite bankruptcy A lniMiiess such as WoolworUis has a turnover exceeding by millions of pouiuls that of many ColonUs. Numberless branches carry immense stocks. Administratively, such u company calls for co-ordinated fact and progress returns of 1 standardised form to lie with them during the tirst month of the year, thus permitting assimilation into tinMarch balance sheet. Failure by anj executive to enforce such policy would inv. From many economic angles the Colonies ,irc branch wtahllsnsnsnts, iiii iiuBeeteuu? of state Bar UM Colonies as .iitiiunistialiv.' head, supported by an executive IN each Colony and at home— appointed by and responsible 10 him. It is reasonable, ih.r.1,.,.. to compare this aspect of thcir udministrntion with the commercial niKl.Ttakiinr meniioiied above. The traditional 1 \ni r ,.| % % %  **,irT shortage" cunnol hold waterDelayed aeturns call for increased stafT work Coimneivi.il organisations have severe stalf shortage, but notwithstanding that handicap balance sheets are produced to a date Failure to so produce involves severe penalties. "Colonial Regulations," originated in 1837. set out the nature ot the returns—but they are .enerally disregarded For tn%  taaot, Regulation 155 states: — "All returns, reports .must be punctually forwarded to the proper Department." For such omissions that Colonial Office is administratively responsible. In these 'Regulations." statistical return forms are given for "Staff Appoinmcnts" and Alteration of Navigation Lights," but in regard to the following, para. 160 merely calls for "Information" I Eh head. WlthOUt gUidl the form: — Popailalitii % %  %  anil labour Social s*rvK-ak li .-re* Cur. trr.tr and B>kh Adminlnr^'iKu IfSlBlallun Onicr.i[< %  'via Plnaikcr I' 1 Little wonder that returns are In 110 wsy comparable Moreover, these I lings are out of step with niuurrn requirements. Somr Colonies of their own volition have added: — 1 '-'otplluK Uindi Jiid HiinrsP.:lii. H. ilium Hi-H-)I |. y 1 Exhibition* Clillutal Dr\rli>t>tntT.il \c-wpri. MM) siiHnSlatas. Kallglon i1 Alt Some Colonies give tabular} %  jms w dlea s, but many create a jumble of Figures In no related order The Facts—From US Sources Much of the missing Information, supplied In othtr publications must bo secured from offlciil sources. Its omission or delay In publication is a Colonlnl Office ..ilminlstralive out} executive failure OfM' organisation, much GOUnKted, wilh Colonial issues find thai they .-.ecure British Colonial details more readily from American official sources. Here are other points arising from a close study of the reports:Customs. Of the ten Colonies whose reports I have analysed, only three show how the Customs total is made up. Currency. Some returns are in £"s, others In $s In these days of fluctuating values li is tmrety necessary to have all figures in ts Whj -hould Dominica give the nskxrts in ts and si. LucU ID $* both operating on the West Indies dollar' British Guiann. I.elpfully provides both. Vital Statistics. Why should infant mortality and birth rate relums be ommltted by half of the ten Colonies? Population. Ilritisli Guiana gives u clear race classification In 2 per cent, of report space used. StI-ueia fails to do so Ui 10 per cent. Communications. Why should only two out of the ten give th toad mileage? Finance. Northern Rhodesia 1 SOt of space gives ampl< and clear information. St. Helena in 15 par 1 Revenue. Par.. 18 of the KetruUtioni calls for tfa< jeturns to be made 'on comprehenMdc* without grvtBg oetailcd gl • un pa S e 5 JACK COMES TO LIFE— WITH BEANSTALK PITTSBURGH A PITTSBURGH horticulture enthusiast knows how Jack of "Jack and the Beanstalk" fame must have felt. He is Otto Seheu, who planted some seeds sent to him last spring by friends In the Near East. The seeds, which his friends said were taken from the tomb of an ancient Egyptian king, sprouted king-sized "prehistoric beans" up to three feet long and weighing as much as;tl pounds. The vine, as thick as two thumbs and which has spread out over a 300 square foot area, has already pulled down two peach trees and is tngtllflng a poplar tree. Seheu said friends told him that the Bible mentioned such a bean, one of which was supposed to feed 40 soldiers. He took one of the beans to a restauranteur acquaintance, Mike Brunetti. He, being an i-nu-rprising chef, baked the 'him: with a stuffing of meat and egg. One bean was enough to feed 2E guests. How does it taste? Some said it tasted like mushrooms, others said like oysters. When eaten raw it has the flavour of cucumbers. At any rate, all agreed it was a dish fit for Pharaohs. Scheu said he intends to trim the vine back this rear, and next year he hopes to harvest beans three times as large. He said he believes the fruit is a member of the colcocynth family, which is described hterranean and African herbaceous vine allied to watermelon —I.N.S. FILES 8" 10" 12" HALK ROl'NU BASTARD FILES 8" 12" 2ND CUT HALF ROl'NU BASTARU FILES 8" 10" 12" FLAT BASTARU FILES 8" 12" 2ND CUT FLAT BASTARU FILES KNIFE FILES WARDING Mils 6" 8" 10" 12" ROUND 2ND CUT FILES 10" CABINET RASP FARRIERS RASP SAW FILES PHONES: 4472 & 1G87 "Il KINSON A II \ YM %  CO. LTD. SucrMori lo C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD. Thonr. 44.7*. a 4417 \ % PAIXTC / PAINTS RED SHINGLE PAINT $4.64 Per U.S. Gallon. Packed in Tim of Imperial Measure. DA COSTA & CO. LTD. or DIAL 4689. NOTICE OUR DM GOODS DEPARTMENT MILL BE CLOSED /or STOCK TAKING on TUESDAY. 2HTII — WEONESDAY. 27TH And THURSDAY. 28TH REOPENING TO BUSINESS on FRIDAY. 20TII SEPTEMBER • 1^" Our Cwtamaif air .iskiil to lake nolc of Ihe above and arrange Iheir shopping! accordingly. Da COSTA & C*. Ltd. DRV GOODS DEPT. U II 1 Mil \ CWAPI NUTS < IK) in is SALT ri \i:i BAULKY In Tin FIGS I BACON In Tins CANADIAN EGGS HERRINGS In Tins KIPPERS In Tins BLACK PKPPF.R PURE VINEGAR B1STO GRAVY POWDER PICKLED WALNUTS Z33Z333J MILK FED C'HICKF.NS 1 MILK FED DUCKS l.lll'l % % %  COB FISH. SOLE. 1 1 KI -II VI 1.1 1 Mil 1 5-tli Tin PASTEURISED CHEESE — $3.25 Per Tin RAISIN'S Hie. per lb SHARP'S TOFFEES 1 \l:l: s SHEET BISCUITS PLAYER'S 1 II, \r.l 111 s TLAYER'S TOBACCO J R BREAD CAKES CROWN DRINKS TOP NOTCH RUM i;OLO BRAID RUM OI-.I.T l,„l..,, tram HOUnAHIfS \ %  .:: %  -:: •--.-.-.-.-.-^oc* t c %  JX4.MA.VA::'.: •



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PACE TWO gahib gatlwg BARBADOS ADVOCATE • IN LONDON—A hat in 26 shapes THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21. 1H0 "Here cv"i> l those wrttchtd I *eti butting m aoaln ' H IS Hi ArrowArrowsmtth and %  turned home yesterday by B C> v after spending a week's bottdaj They MN 'laying at the I Hotel. Took Relief Parcels M R II | I. M06EUEY, Amount Master or the St Viiucn firammHr School, r*tun •estcrday by BC An way* after .. short visit her* He iRiMd m A 1 A from Antigua where he had taken down %  i of package* Including < lothlng and foMuffs from St. %  nimeru nl i< i relief purposes Barbados Is Bst G U, GEORGE V1DMEH. s Armi mi falfaar f Colonel Rlchm-H V. Kocklcy. hj> be' ving in Barbados since Dec* *T l-> I %  Hotel He Port TuwruiThonas when, i %  %  ill llu-.rther West Indian Guiana. Mrs. Fernando* ami thenInlands by air before returning to little SOD Philip arimti i Barbados m Decenbei to retain .1 day moming by |h "Lady KudA the Marine (Or ney'' (or lour month*' holiday and year. are staying at Maxwell's Coast si Vldmer told Carib that Mrs. Fernanda* is sn Inetrut h( Is not visiting the oihi king ,11 ihe Sing*i s lo live, bul Sewing Machine Company. Inn h\. n ^ Iy SUfrj £ .'""" Barbadian Returns Home c T I i*X badian who M a r y ,?.v ?-' "* LSA for 3 R A B IH M AN. PS ^.stcrday morning on the "Fort ManagT of the Barbados Towiuhend' for an imieniuu10 Company Limited an.( i>criod and u staying with hi' Mrs. Duncan, left yesterday by 1. . %  G*D Bank Hall the SS. "Williamstadt" for EnsRoad Came For Health M R .1 It CHARLES I of u % % %  soelatlogi in ih.11 mics nlghi b) the 1 -dv Rodney after in* island In ih. inter Mllth lit wai a *ue-: 1 Mr and Mrs. C C. Clark* of I'.iim Beach, li.stlnxi. F. CUA* al*. I*f| lax tin /.udp Rodney for 1 where she will spend a holiday a* the guest of Mr. and Mrs Charles. Off To Canada M R A MRS J PERCY FOSTER of "Strathallan". 'eft last night on the *. %  for Montreal • %  ere the v ..ill spend two months Mr Postal who has gone up In lab sal of hihealth. Is Secretary and Attorney of Messrs. Bfn Pogart) ud. B.G. Civil Servant M H. MAIXJOLM ntill Civil St 11 On Holiday 1.. IB Ibatr children who are attending TV* c: Y LOW!, M school there a-' and Chiropractor of Mr. Duncan lold Carib that durStreet, relumed on the -Fort ing their 15 year* in Barbados. Townshrwd" *WJt*rd*y rnornlnj l a very pleasant life Thev Itom New York a'lei u Itdl and wern of 14 months. rtrj sorry to leave. His wile and tga Charles who Off To U.K. WtUt tip with htm. bav* just SJOSM M R FABIAN' HOLDER Who "*'' '" '"''""d whST* for the last year ha* been ,onlmu "'* hi* studti pan-time In the IcU % %  %  •"< %  ' • Quean's I B..ihado s.hoiars, bati the [stand \, 22 veaterday bv the s I. William." H|>oloBy siadf for England where he will "' i-ity He is the son of Ml I) H Holder of w**thH 1 % %  Road. Trinidad Beauty Queen )W ISS MARION If A L r 1 D L •t Ihe M Dental Assistance School and at the Eastern Chiropractic Institute. New York FT* also travelled to rarlou U I I S A dotog miss %  1950 ning by Trinidad Beat For One Month WISS V WAU-ACE of St Vinr. t .-..' 1 B.W.I.A. for two *•*' ,.,. ZauL v h „ '... of Spain and nai h..i ,,•''', for a holiday. Bhl ntp) ban ("i about a month and Is a *u**i of MI>S MOdrM Ctark* of v' Uatthlas Gap After One Week M RS I A t'ASSON of St. Vincent whose husband Ii ewmai of lb* Motor v***aal L*dv tHcia returned boms ya at arda; ftar -jiendlng k 1 holiday aB the guatl ol Ml Lloyd Hunle of "Leinsti 1 % %  holidaj-. 81 her mother Mrs E Halride and they are staying at th. I! Hotel. Miss Halndc'* visit was made possible by B.W.I.A. who bav* iMven her this trip ami by lbs Trinidad Publishing Co. who are paying hotel expenses as a reward for winning th* I' Queen Contest at this year's CarSLKfLE!!?? redera'.Lfl .->.!" *.....,, ni ... Port of Spun and he. IIOUH, „',!'", ,"'' 1v n i, on "" '",''" cudluv and teiml* {lriet fO spend %  hoHda) in S ftSfifSI v L v '""-' war* Mi Keith Hunte, UOinp IO New York OMmlsl Of the Rntierts M M R, and Mrs Alfred Lazu ol hlling Co, anil Mr Leslie Corbin, Caracas, Venezuela, arrived Chlaf S*J**nuui of Messrs. S. P last week by It W I A with their Musson. Son 4 Co. Ltd two children Marianela whom Ml u 11 ':,*'"' ,H ,,w "> fu H they have i u t into school ul the %  £ %  !" M ( '" hl ," '-xneets to Ursuline Convent and WtMAr. nbtM """^ % %  laa**r. They are staying 11 the HastlnKS Civ'\\ Srvan p..,.*.. Hold and expect to leave for \ !" Servant Returns Trinidad by BW.IA to-day A KPendlng three months' ..nd then do "on to Now York for h "i'^yjn the U S.A.. Mr month before returning to !" !?!?" !" 1 "-' i..i h.'.t in tin 1 I'nin-e Magh trail 1 ,,,,,,,,,,. 1(f Court, Disinct A', returndruggist "Edgy morning b* U I Ton %  M R. C RODHIGUEZ-SEUAS traffic clerk Ir. the Reserva110.1s Department of B.W.I.A. Ltd., lined over the week end by B.W I A. for a holiday. He was accompanied by his anvl and they are ataying at Abbeville finest House. Worthing. From B.G. M R W. HOWARD who charge of th* B.G I rant h W.'tkins and Partners, Ol London and the West 1 nved on Tuesday morning by the Lady Rodney from British Guiana for a holiday. He l" Ins wife and i 1 11.. 'i T r..l th('> .ill' t.l Ving at St Lawrane* iint.i. Hopes To Return DAYING a visit to Barbados and staying at Lealon-oii-Se*. The Miss Doreen Churaman or Plantation, Port Mourant 1: British Guiana She arrived last week and experts lo leave to-day by B.W.I A Miss Churaman who is Private lo the Manager I art Mourai.l tell* Carib that she has been enjoying her holiday and hoC4J lo return here soon agalq. To Continue Studies M R WILLIAM GREEN, a metii leal student at Lynnlo Catholic College 111 Montreal, returned to Canada on Saturday by T.C.A ti continue his studies after spending Ihe summer holiday: with lus relatives. He is the son of Mrs. Clara Green ..r "Alexander. Worthing. For Two Weeks M RS. ROSA CAMACHO whose husband is employed at Miller Stores, Porl-of-Spain Trinidad, iirnved over the week end by H W I.A. lor two weeks' holiday. She was accompanied by, 1 er daughtci KaM Dorothy Cams cho of the Canadian Bank c Commerce and they are guests < Mr. and Mrs Walter Marshall j Aquatic Gardens Dressmaker Ends HolidaA/ M ISS EVELYN LYpNS/^ dressmaker of Tobago, left by BW.IA. for Trinidad Sunday atlvi spending two ( olhl.iy as ; (fursi lt i nd r| Wortliliiif. VIENNA Figures compiled al the Vienna ;ernaUonal Pair showed today 1 .' in Europe marneo couples are learning to sleep alone Ap parcntly. they lika It. Joseph Teltarher of Vienna, a adlnj bedstead exhibitor at tho Fall Fair, aid that since the war win beds have outsold double icd* by two-to-one. Teltscher and other exhlbitoreported the twin bed trend startd m France and since has spread iver the continent. Emphasizing just how far EuroA Question Of Beds ptiin couples are drifting apart. uicloed that the "newest fad" is a night table placed Del ween (he twtn beds Tradltioi.au> Europeans invariable shoved single beds together to form oh" of a standard sue Reports from four reported that 65 per cent of alt Bales arc of th* twin model* %  Kurope.in couple-; are finished with blanket-snatching" Telt%  The old gain. in-1 he-back is passed and It's a sure sign of civilisation when the bed-hog 1* left lo suffer alone". Among exhibitors t h e feeling was that all Europeans should try ,'#tn beds. They telt It would cut the continent's skyrocketing divorce rate. Why? "They'd get more reel al night—be able to face married life the next morning with less strain "' -KM 1 upci t and thq Lcxiaway —8 ^--M HrSM ->•< Slidinn i ihn't -hjt iht old ... %  H (.,!• on *nd .'. iSr bud (or. IUM *• . iha s*ai h*idi*nd. iBpNn ovn the top it H I IN with ..li fsat 11)1 ATM M.I'H i 'I>!•;.> %  A (Msmbars Only) TO-NIGHT AT 8.30 MONlKitlAM fm Venezuelu. Mr I.,/. 1 Csviwaaf. Bank Manager Goes Horfic M H C. A GILUATT, retirM Manager of Uie Royal Bank '" %  'i la Ml GIUloll nnd Ihel Mis* Evelyn GllbaM, 1 n hi Canads Uitl night on thS* "Ijdy Rodney" and will take uu n Idea** In Halifax. Mr. GiHiatl u.ld Carib lhat he happy in Barbados slnee b* %  MM mil here 17 years ago %  S Manager of the Bank The com* for him to return henne. but he hopes to be back 'Hiring the winter months as earlv %  BY THE WAYi By Brtivhmmbrr T HE sectional weather-chart it Ls Btat*d, may i-evolut ion we th,. 'iirmr of meteorology, The idea is tO dlvidl Englund into .41 secUi live towns 111 •ach; th* iigure* indicate the forecast: 1 ntosns snow. 2 means rain, 3 means mi..'It.', i 11 'litions. Prodnoae: Five eights are 40. Myself: Bruvo' And one is 4'. Prndnnse: And why is Durham south of E|,| Ingr Mpaslf: Bccaus* you didn't turn he chart upside down Lot L'nrU' fleaVsawhsMi Toll )UN A S Uncle Heartsease of Goodwill Corner I an) given manj human and Inhuman problems lo solve. The latest is this: Why has a scheme for 'Festival of Britain I to the Journal of tl Num ., %  As the Festival Office is empowered to sp onsor small building projects, n if perhaps hoped that tho Royal Numismatic Society may ask them lo sponsor a SU;table bus shelter, mid* old coins In the waiting room at their headquarters. The Society of AnUojuariflS is already contcrnplatmg a neo-Saxon chromium-plated m u NG MILODV Atau w„„ IkjgfaV^ginL , KY STAR!" /////AV-VAV/*'//''''.'//'.'//.'/.'. B.B.C. Radio Programme nt a m New. Ai..l*l. Ul tm Cbi a po— T 1 The W- T Su rr. Th* Pi.iu, For Plavi" %  m 0"> SpMkln*. SS* am n Tn> BdltorUli • in am Pro !"!" % %  ***. • I* • %  S*fllJ"'tn ri..ani. S JO am BooU To *a I Pirn IUYWW. • %  T" CMM D" Ma'.fZ. il>.n lilt p m Progmmma Pi U is p.m Uiiarrt* Chok-a. 1*0 0 i Tl-lng Around Wlih Harbarl -> III pn **** Hawaf^i. I * MliCh nirnJln* In Ti Marih. r Th* New* 1 10 p m Koma Ni -Hi B*la, 2 JO I.SB Tha %  i> n, Th* Daily Sssrvkra, 4 IB p m. • Wai Of Ttia Worl*. 4 4S p m 'lodr On Btrinn. s 00 p ai Uatan.rQM, t IS p.m Pinaiamina ftiRdr. S JO n Lit rnari' Ctnlea. > *) p tn World 1ivl.li.„i S|il>.y Champlonahll-R BO" Corapoft-r CM Tna Wra* t li p.m laiuro* o( cirruntaiane*. • 40 p.m. larlnda f 4S p in Harchanl Navy Nawalaltcr, 7 00 p m Th* N*w, T IV MI N...Aiul..i.llli" Jan Cluo 41 p.m. G*n*rnll Spn.ltins. %  00 p m Radio N*wir**l • II p m. Unit. Report. IS p m. Inirilud*. Tul-lnf Around Wllh lli.lif. %  41 p in InlarUnlt rram Tl.* KAitnlaU. BM pin TM Colour B.r. fl *S p> p m Rhondda Valla* P in Th* hm. 10 10 p m Intai'ucli.. in li p rr> Tho OYoifr MlUfhall Olc* thii> I" 41 p n. *r*rial OUpalch. II no tf m Th* Piano Pot PlsaautO. GLOBE To-day. 5.00 p.m. ONLY — A Big Double TARZAN and the MERMAIDS "THEY WONT BELIEVE ME TO-NITE, 8.M P.M. Music in The Modern Manner Presenting "THE HOT SHOTS' "Trinidad's Favourite Orchestra" Featuring : ROD CLAVERY—(Vocalist) MIGHTY TERROR—(Calypao Champ.) LEAR5E ATWELI^fSensational Guitarist) In 2 HOURS OF SWEET MELOD1RN agfT Doors Open 7.00 p.m. Pit 20c.. House 36c.. Balcony 48c., Boxes tin, TO KIDDIES Our 2.00 p.m. MATINEE on THURSDAY Is changed to suit you on SATURDAYS. 9.30 A.M.. SATURDAY 23RI) TARZAN AND THE MERMAIDS." • IUII Mid BSOUlll PCIKl Ol ItllmaL | rlougii. wiio %  > ben. lo in mo pi.i**•-but "itat win Vl, ut "• iSl wnm • %  i i i • ii LI -OUIll.il 1 ,...IMIHN What n. I'dllril BiKitirl | .. Mini ftJIOWS — •I" ID III i |S| A H r.tPialKl on in* t f unt* ni i Wnai hiiui it I*II .i hi p*Derr.) in make 7 '31 lllsii IUCII naa aoan 1 7. Wli II l> Wbai LI MI. ti Uiwiot. v IBi 111 Wlial la Ih* c-pimi ui K*U*I> Coianr. Bullan Baal Alr.o' <7i It Who *a Hi* nr-i wumao lo lake h*i -*.i' in Ui* lloua* ol Com mono* (Si in wiiai dio IP ocrua* aiiutr isi n fl .i I. '.he ruin ul iw*iv. I.I i .ki II reciprocal! n* uiuiiipiiau tola added what la arilier null ont i* tea muii' \j) a •>. Cut...r— •( %  Nrit li .-.I..in.d |j. Mi'"' 1 •! n '| 4 r* * in* **v* SERVE J & R ENRICHED BREAD VITAMIN LOAF GAIETY iThe GRrden) ST. JAMES LAST SHOH "8EVKN MILKS FROM A1X ATRAZ" — James Craig Arid "TARZAN AND THF. AMAZDNR" — Johnny Welshmuller %  in m MM -IN — %  '* Bl. "CAPTAIN BLOOD" IKIIIAV — SAT. — SIN. WARNrilS An.,* Claaai. ' I Errol FLYNN in SOON B*k* SU. 1 l.aali hinv \frni JPLAZA THEATRE BHMnGETOWN WAKNER'S Action Thriller ol The Famous Royal < ANAOIAN MdtNTlES ! "RIVER'S I:M> Slainm: DrnaU MOROAN and Others si-i I n MATINFK TODAY (Thars.1 — 1 f.M. Monogram's Thrilluitf Musleal-A.llon WESTERNS 1 1 JI.OIII %  Mack BROWN in — Jimmy WAKFXY in "SIX 1UN GOSPEL" — and — "RAINBOW OVER*' James Oliver CHRWOOD'S THE ROCKIES" A MtAClfWIUMHP 'Tffm HERBERT WILC0X / I-R1D.VY t.19 1.3* and ronllnuiiig DAILY MS* S.30 I* M. FLASH ! (ON Rlafe) To-nlshi Onl> 8.15 to S.45 MALT UOI'R OF POPl'l.AR DANCE Mt'SIC Bj "The Sydney Willeock Qalntette" This Programme wUI also br rarrled over Servlee of Radio Dlstnbullon TOOLS? in H rimis i HI: IIH. II I ri HI %  : A i ms LIST Pick axes Axeheads ChlseU Brsces & Bits Compass** Clamps Hand Drills Files Plane* *r Iron.' Hammer* Hatchets Tool Handles SgniiuTHE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LIMITED. HARDWARE DEPARTMENT Tel. No 2oJ Spoke Shaves Rules T-1.-IPll Screw Drivers Saws Levels Oil Stones Emery Wheels ( Paint Brushes Putty Kn Chalk Lines I



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PACE ElfifTT BARBADOS ADVOCATE TliX'RSDAY SEPTEMBER 21. 19M Middleweight Fight Next February (By LAWTON CARVER) The VI pionshij. PMiniao Iiiilnv NEW YORK >rld middleweight chain"ill CSSMLf* h,mbout the situation and will get around eventually to setting a dale for the snatch Whether the whimsical New York Board does or does not force the Issue is not of paramount importance DMA for Jake and Ray actually -i.< iigat6 by the Internattona] Boxing Club and the fight ll scheduled for Chicago. Thara still arc some angle* to be ironed out to clinch the fight, but (hear are not vltallv nnimrtaal la Ihaf there is no other opponent around for LaMotta and he must now meet the man ho whlpjied him four out of five times before Jake was champion and is a cinch lo do It again. Robinson will ba forced to give up his welter title in order to challenge in the heavier division. rut there is no problem involved In that respect Robinson has tioubla m.ikina the wetter limit 01 147 pounds and he want* to move up No Problem Jake is about through and woulc M no problem foi Robinson wh. tMM tha 180 pound boss when ll., lattai was at fui best Robtnaoi i* about as so...! rvei Aanrni ing thai he has slipped a little h< *!• is the best lighter in the h 1 .-IIH-VS to-day LaMotta was no bin bargain lr knock mi; out Laurent OauthlUc n( IXiioit Wednesdav m e ht Cricketers Due Oct. 3 The it "Matin*" will be an ing at Barbados on 3rd October at approximately 12 o'clock noon and will be sailing for Trinidad later in the evening. The Committee appointed t> make arrangements for Ihc recep tkM of Ihc West Indian Team wu hold another meeting on Saturda' t I0.1S a.m. Trinidad Win Championships %  From our own Cattea* GEORGETOWN. Sept 21 Trinidad won the Ciir.bhr.i -awn Tennis Championship t" %  lUht as the Tuurnumciit close %  vith reversed singles. Ian Mi-lfcinkld, Trinidad, beat Nunes, JamaiM, 6—4, 6—1 and 6—4 Ron Sturdy. Jamaica, beat Jin Ho, Trinidad, 3—6, 6—3. (J—3 and 6-1. Russians Mov* Boundary Mark HKHI.IN. S.pl M, British Troop reinforcements toly guarded Potsdam, south of West Berlin following the Incident night when Soviet troops moved their boundary check-point several yards into the Brit, b M tor. mllltao polk i iimed ith Uimmyguns uprooted lb barrier and returned it to its former position Today according to German eyewitnesses over 200 Red Army troops were stationed in the I1M "f the boundary check-point on the East German side Today a British Military spokesman stated that on Tuesday Soviet soldiers erected a barrier at the Berlin-Potsdamer-Chausse British Sector Following protests British infantr> ware POtted to demonstrate the sector boundary The burner was opened and the Bovtal troo|M arHbdrew been tha H il— Renter. Killer Nomad WPS on the verge of losing hi> •Itlr when in the closing seconds f the 15-rmindcr he sloppi-d the si nchman. Dauthille. something less than he best fighter sent out of France whipped IjiMotta previously Caieaaraneai kept him from do'rip t again No such accident will befall Robinson. I.aMotta cannot whip he welter champion either by iccident or on purpose Vei it will be a big money natch. Jake has never been SIKH kill off his feet and has despite his occasional following losses lie I iRht %  t! %  % %  I > a prelty gootl scuffling sort of way, %  nt not entirely dependable. He *as suspended because of thr • finical knockout he suffered igalnat BUly FWt, a firth rater hTowevar, he has grown rich MI I tighter and will be remeinbeied is one of the smallest busines nan ever to infest the ring Hi %  as proved this by avoid ng i lefenee against Robinson up to —IN.K. W?st IndieLose Lasl Match • From page 1 Top scorer was Treslrall with 70, while Rae made 42. The players were Gomez, i dcippered the team, Marshall. TVestrail. WaLcf>t1„ WUiini Christianl. Johnson. Plane, Valentine. Rae Williams and Gomez run them-ijt. so it is gathered. Ciuhbv Allen who is well known in tbo Wftl Indies, Captained the Elders and Fyffes team. In spite of the Waal India bowltnit attack they went for the inns .mil aoma laarnat) battingj brj Motin-s tin former Stiney c tain, who madt 5o. enaulcn Elders and fvffti team to win match The tourtatl return hi , I.,.!... Kcuter %  y M. Harm i day Ikealw : Mia North-Houth gaasa N. ? un J a 64 ill J 7 W E, t KIl *() %  •• t iu i %  e t SAJai • : i i QH illtll a, 4JI KUU • IQI 4> A la* Bouui was lust short of a Two No-Trumps bid oo this riaod from a duDllcau ivtlrs con tost and opened Uor Hi-art rroMdlmt TlirNoTrumpft iiver North's singlr raise At most, tables North return-*! lo Pour Hearts althO'igh lie might have reasoned thai Uie ninc-im k ion Iran was more likely to succeed. Mouth :n each rase waa held to 9 tricks A Spade. Diamond or Club lead presents South wtui Three No-Trumps. Al one table however. West mad. the safe lead of e>i ami played well tn refusing to ake South. K at tn.k I Declarer caslied t*o inoiHearts mid led Diamon. again, this gave West Hirer 'ricks but he now had to i lead a black suit. T7ie con' tract falls If South U In a hurry to caah all tin Hearts i page l • From paga 1 but said *ne does live in Nas*n.i wud is a prominent man." i New York meanwhile. COUDI Alfred i>e Marigny tried and m , acquitted on a charge of slaying! Sir Harry said he "fervently striking down from the north hopes" the mystery can be solved. I while a second big force of marin an interview. De Marigny said I tnes assigned | the assault on the ihat until the murderer of the|sity waa about the same distance I'anadian millionaire Is found, hlsj away to tha so ith but still on the life will "continue lo be a hell", beachhead side of the Han River. People still believe I nvirriar?d| cm battle from Sir Harry although I did not and was found innocent. Find U.N. TROOPS 4 MILES FROM SEOUL fur Earlier. Air kacM macatad that Coinimm jalng a desp-rate %  %  %  li .in fit were lo pack tiller is my only chi to per cent clear bill, pe Marigny formerly .. resident rniontredl was Sir Harry's aonn-law .it the time the latter was lain In the Bahamas [Its wife Na^cy Oakes stood hv bindniinc The/ trial but later obtained :.n iiu.uliiienl of their marriage. De Marigny said he had been liv %  a aecluslon here for two vei 'erlied of a steady job "becai ^vflj-yone thinks I'm wrung" %  1 pertinent facts about the 'ltbratcd slaying uev H*t revealed he said, ihaf the murderer "could be found e Bahamas. Palm Beach area I Northerners had still not th ey wanted to find him" Helln a countge-attaek against Ameriild not elaborate on whom he J ran iroopa advancing tn the ant by they -Can P*f. northwest corner of the fonm GLOBE THEATRE have .,,. adding | lhelr deftuaes around Seoul and to the north, nt the expense of the southAmtnuan military quarters anticipated a* stiffening of resistance anal %  thai Han river United Nations fortes breaking out of I in South Koreo reported a slackening of opposition today. Resj -unce was still stiff in some sectors but an Army spokesman Id Ihat than were signs that 'inmunlsts were continuing vlthdhW %  defence box after the capture of the Waegwan stronghold Many North Koreans have pulled out of the Waegwan area, mov,g towards Kumchon to the northwest and Klnwi West of the box. Com-nunists ere digging in west of the Nakt"iig River forming a strong deience line against troops of the American 24th Division who crossed the river yesterday —Reutei Gve Shepherd & Co.' Ltd. 10, 11, 12 4 13 BROAD STREET LOOK YOUR BEST Ihr Barbados Aqua lie flub N.HK I thai ,.ul... Club will cloaed to Miribt> on Bunday. Krptrmter Hlh, from l-m n> SSO p.m for Pullc* Band Cnc*rl . aid ot ClMfily Thi d<*. Ml Incl.idthiUathlns Cviblflc. *hKh will bo open to Meinhws „l th* Club %  uiusl B* ord ol th* CommlUaa, 11 V SPINCEM. %  s a rst a nj IIIM-*i. the Distinguished Patron;^ The Governor and Mr of His Savage FRIDAY, NFPTKMHkR ttTII. 8.41 r.M They'll Do It Every Time -*—..—— "y LISTEN TO THIS-MERES ANOT-iER / THIK6 I BET VOU PIPWT K>(OW" -i OF THE 2,000,000 POPUUTION -\OF MX460NM 328,729 WEN, VWOMEN A^4P MILPREN (•ARE LEFT-HAWCEP A J. ARTHVt RANK INTIRMISt V/>rV//'/////'V//iV/ /A | GENTS! WE OFrER YOW WOOLLENS! QUALITIES! PINSTRIPED Your hair will ba handsomer by far when you treat it tt Vaseline' Hair Tonici Just use a tew drops a day ...then sea the difference! Bay a bottle today I ras&linfi HA,R ANOTHER MILESTONE THIS TIME IT'S Barbados First Chinese Restaurant I Etc Etc Etc. PRICES RANOINO rROM $2.00 to $7.98 I: THANI'S Pr. Wat. Ilny SI Dial 344* CHINA DOLL No. A. MAKIHI.I. sllil l l. llllMM.I lciN OPENING SATURDAY. SEPT. 23rd 7 p.m. [BUT LATER WWBM THEV LIKE TO CHATHE WON'T TALK, EVEW THROUew HIS • A.M. — II C4ffV£S£ CHEFS! MIIINITt: 1 FOODS( BAR Dial Our ReeepliomM MRS. CHAN al 4692 For TABLE RESERVATIONS "DATE THE DOLL FOR DAINTIES' Lat Rinso make your coloured clothea brifhtcr -your whites whiter I For Ruuo is to gentle aad thorough, and easier 10 use, too Its richer lather floats out din in record time I Rinso gives your dishes extra sparkle, too. With Ruuo you get easier, quicker and better results -why not start using it today I RINSO for off your wash We art pleased to announce the arrival of STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS W thick, 4 x '. 1. 10' 9 14c. per se ft TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS W tttok. 4* a It' @ ttc. per aq. ft Tempered Hardboard can bo used for exterior work uch as Hood*, Door Panels etc. ALSO TILEB0ARD SHEETS Cream. White Grean 4 a 4. 4 x . @ Ste. aq ft. WILKINSON & BAYNES CO., ITD. t, •



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THURSDAY, si I'll Mill i; 21. ISM BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAf.F FIVE Another Salt Fish Shortage T'" WOB -in IIION m1 lm ot gatting easier M i cntinuuig to .fct harder, a prominent merchant of Bridgetown told \d'orate yesterday. Comnientim, on the shortage of tall • wo or three month* there i* an acute shortage .. shipment comes it i .ctenl to meet the need: ^ : tag* of imported corn haj also been a headache for housei '-cal product is d from sufficient This had affected hens and their eu production *THt: < in i;t n LADS and Girl*' %  I Brigade of the Cathedral held a Parents Meeting on Tuesday night at the Cathedral Church House. Parents turned out full force to hear reports on the progress made by t h e Brigade ilnce it was formed. Father Ripper told the parent* of the greater need for family worship and urged them to place emphasis on tho discipline of their chll iren in the home A N ACCIDENT took place on Tuesday about 9 a.m. on Ba> Street between the motor car T Hi owned by William Tryhane of St. Thomas and driven by Louise Eckstein of White Park St. Michael and the motor car X— 080 owned hy Fit* William lywis ol Maxwell, Christ Church. The right bumper of the motor car T—10 was damaged. A t ASK BROUGHT by the Petal tlmrging Elsie Howe of Uullri Allay, JJalkeith, with the larceny of a wallet valued at 17s. lOd. from Cyril LoveU was dismissed by His Worship Mr C. L. Walwyn yesterday The prosecution submitted that. Howe visited Lo veil's place and while their took away his wallet. Rowe in her defence admitted visiting Lovell's place but left h thenin company with another *T*IIE POLICE BAND under %  Capt. C, E. Raison will give :i moonlight concert at SI! Sands, Christ Church, on Friday. September 22 beginning at 8 p.m. Much appreciation lias been expressed about II* moonlight concerts and the last one held at nth pasture was well attended •ne Baml will be v.siting BathsMba, St. Joseph where they will hold a concert. \< II Hl.N IIOTTIN d lal>ourer of Passage Road. St. Michael. scared a larfa crowd yesterday .ifternoon wnen auttftr a brawl with another man in the Court yard, he i*gan to run up und down shoiit, IK and calling t"i liis Iwo girl children. After d.-lcrmiucd ellorts by two %  n Uoltiii was subdued and taken to the Charge Boom in a helpless Condition, A PPARENTLY uflected by the warm weather yesterday, an old man who was walking along Nelson Street began to atrip oft his clothing Tearing off his shirt and kicking off his old boots, he was checked in the act of taking nff a pair of short white pants by a young man. The temperature was 88 degrees in the shade and about midday the majority of men were walking around the town without their coats. Snow ball carts parked on the waterfront did a brisk trade as UHtnrtj lal HIS rushed lo them to quench '.heir thirst. R ITA SMALL of Chlmborazo. St. Joseph was found on Chin.borazo Road lying in an uncondttlon yesterday about' 7 a.m. She was taken by the Police van to St. Joseph's A Imshotise where she was detained for observation. Barbados Scholars Leave For U.K. Mr Edward Eirathwa.the ami Mr Fabian Holder, the last two ol the lit49 Barbados Scholars left for England yesterday on tbo S.S. -Willi-mstadt ." Mr. Braihwaithe will enter CMnbfidga University to take his degree n History and Dlpluivi in Education while Mr Holder will enter Oxford University tfl read Modern Greats. The other two Barbados Scholars were Mi. Deny* Williams who left last week for England M the "Oollito" to study Law at Oxford Un versity and Mr S. II Watton who was in Canada when the arrived here. %  THE HOC'SC. Missing Figures • lrn !" asc 1 Lord Ticwdsmuir II ishes He Too Had liven M.P. TAuPWfcK Hlb HONOUR THr". PCAKCR I is in full five-year tab'.; n adopted %  . %  913. 1M. and Uie last thn %  I cal information ol value. "^"inlin Education. Why should ut of tin ten CoienieB be silent 1 ONDON. s,.pi. it %  I week ot to take action Jill allow Local Hallsham Hogg) to keep his teat I 'xford is Lord takes a foreVAV^rWAW lllltfacj, tive fail to give thoj m,tft interest m ODIOJBUBBI aAV ,*M.*I.\ i\ twoa ... PURINA CHOW IV/'/l/.N Ml I.IK) *rfwvw,svyvv DISTIIUTO*S OI"-., 1 Co. Sarawak docs in "LOOK HERE. UPON THIS PICTL'RK. AND ON THIS PUBLIC OPINION CAN HELP LABOUR PROBLEM Says Commissioner THE FACT that Barbadians were refusing otters of agricultural employment locally is a matter that only public opinion can influence, the Labour Commissioner, Mr. A. E. S. Burrowes. said at a press conference yesterday. People were registering at the Labour Office as unempluyed and being called In and questioned When offered local agricultural work, they said thai they would be Interested in that work outside of Barbados, but not in Barbados Mr. Burrowes said that the number of persons who were placed in employment locally by Ihe Employment Agency were ill but growing, i 1848, the Agency placed 171 S trsoni in employment: In 1949, 79 were placed and up to the half of 1950 329 bad been placed 2, u critKisiii Delayed ColoniaJ retui be regarded as hatrr.ft. Colony concawaad Whan mattcn coma up for the Houac of Cornmoni atton is nui on racord foi U P.V Colonial Annii standard it cept four, which ara •' In l>\ -i. in. Their costv B0 the public, ata intriguing Banaaoasi is Bag** • us K".Lr. 1M paara is the intnortaooa of a o %  Uvaj to the numbai ol pag th'-ir anni lounl cJaajna -i i. ; llailsham that the heredlrary prtnclpla dajnyini him a place in ..ffects his ne has been %  > %  v -tiuiiy i arlan led in the li ..i Con %  anj .un,die* Loid baja and I ajjewd i'> the fail anal his wife siu in the i owoi Houar as the raiisraajantah I %  dan %  xiatituatu-.v. ig zealously in the wajaOUl inteivsU of h Bihar, the ilmt Lord nr (srbo becaiii.' GOT11 4 Panaula). Ihla oad Paar was u memb-'i •i li M i\ii.m.,.i Banrloa Proas i36 liiwas an assista'it CnannUaaionor In Uganda A year later M.HKil tho Hudsini llay Company ard .n IV4I visil.il .TumaiCJ ItCCaadad big lather in 1940 UP TWICE IXN: BrttauVa volun t aat Civil Deorpi has l'.-n nearly tart el >he war. Tin. Home Office (innoini.ed . TI 20,206 Btnca tha and ol June. %  the corpa strength to S2.015 as of August .tl The i nil tan ata ba-Cora ttM led a> iliout 2.30O .] %  —IN S. USE A RIPPINGILLES BLUE-FLAME STOVE FOR EASY & CLEAN COOKING A.S.BRYDEN& SONS (B DOS) III). AGENTS. "Colombie" Kill Visit HarlMftloH "France Afloat", another name fOI the luxury liner T..h.„ihic i>f the Compagnle Generah* i i ..... %  %  When His Honour ihe Speak.; of the House of Assembly. Mi K N i; Husbands, dona his wi | at the ,ii.inonv oi the opantni the new Chambei „f Partla . sKmsss* h p vin ^ th, i '"' m k, " '* %  nt pwtwa. w? D a i r?u *J er to Weur ,"' '" '""-badoa on October 25. wig. About half dOten peopl,Sailinir frm.i 71 li • ki by ihe i OtSSni, l2 1 start on its Journey tn Barblos n a wig. and they via Southampton. Vigo in Spain. Guadeloupe and Martinique. It will be li I night Tor IMnldad and then go to Iai Gualrn It) I'hiV a lot al ipeahai all said no Among tnem Hon'ble G B. Evelyn, M L C former Speaker, and Mr E. M Shiletone. M.A. Thev are worn by some of Speakers of the Assemblies nther British Col< Wigs were widely worn by ieoi-ie other than praCenrional pe iple up to the latter half of the Kighteenth Century Wigs annot made 111 Barbados. l | More Parcels For Antigua Thirty packages of hurncanc relief goods for Antigua weic shipped Ian night by the S S "Lady Rodney." These pa were sent by the V M 0. A lliirin ana Rcltei Committed The "Lady Rodney" WBS m po.-t since Tuesday loading a eai ga of 145 puncheons, 21 barrels. 10 half barn I i .rtons of n.olaisej! along with J.350 egrlona of rum for Canada. It la returning home British Northern Islands me wi'i IK %  j lYlrUdad. Barbados, Martinique Guadeloupe. Plymouth and L> Havre. After thin trip, the "Colombie' will be extending Its voyages to other West Indian Islands. From Ui Gualra. it will continu lartagenn and Jamaica iting !. itit-tuin v,i\ ago to Europe A mil at F ischedul") for every QTO aiaajki The "Colon,hi..<;, ri .icenmmodata 584 paaasnajora, uv. 262 Ural • lass. 121 „nd 108 third class. The third chawj iiccommodatiim i. %  Off. /S AN IMPORTANT IN SCHOOL LIFE VKLBCT TIIK KK;IIT LUN< II KOK rouB t iiiu) WholeMiine IIIIHHI MM, .im v %  • %  tsui III II M< %  III I I I I! lire excellent foods lor LIMHMIII: children IIOMrl l>Kmi!('TS IIU'AUTMKXT CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET What's on Today Meetlni of Chriil Church Veslry al 3.00 p m Water Polo. Aquatic Club. al 5.0U p in Mobile Cinema. Bay I'a*ture at f 30 p m Tudor Mr S 11. He acting for the West Indies cricketer. Mi C B Will:,i!ii '.sin. i' remaining on study leave m tm United Kingdom One new mistress ol the SMichael Girls' School staff is Mrs H. SIC. Tudor. co 6 i£ IT'S TIME YOU TOOK SOME VENO'S.' Mop UMt coagWai QUKRLT by ttonf iomeeBje/l L.i*tnina COUCH HIXTUU .. tha World-Famow (AM IL T'ougb ntadasaa wUcb has baaa n^jrd u i> II %  -o uatl —i nunUo of hamm l ovar jo yaan I VEHf/S ads I bat iinui.n in tha throat. aootbM tlieaofaBaaaway.oaaquanboanMiMaasdbeiBes r*pld ish>i from tb-m coughiag attacks. TO-OAT -VINOS* LI C H r N I N 0 COUGH MIXTURE %  H-n'i %  nd daodarW t it* S-bnd HARPIC rill SHCUl Ut0 (llNl(> FARMERS EXPECT GOOD CANE CROPS V.nn en rub thaii si.tislactiiui when t::e>hn.k at tneir earnI All UV gedda ire Ereew and tha i %  to the look of tl.. B) i-l last year about the same period, a farmer told the Advocate yesterday. He said that th> crop would last somewhat longer th,n It did thai >ear if thnjJJn WI tinues to fall as regulail> i now. AMPHIBIAN PLANE VISITS amphibian pla ell An; i It had | arrived at Sea' •:ornlng ten ]t led in "' minimum fares of imsaage lo Eiigloin! fru-n It.nbadoe are tn %  t fati cabin class and I mitar.v class. Bpecl eon quoted by the Bfjanta RM v.iyages from Bnrbad -* to Jamaica. Buying a ii'lurn luk.-t I rva hi i % %  > %  J2MH tor a Orst class passagi*. $163 for a second ila-s Sill tor either oi claaa opportunities. Without a return ticket, the passenger will he buyimr gi iiaratlvo-i I) daairt i Formeilv a two funnel sliBp the %  ii.mibn-" had a brief run in tha w.st Indiea Bervlco beforo l>eing ronvuited Into a hospital %  i|> %  Since tne war, one of tho fun rela was removal to gfva BMra deck space to passengers for games and relaxation The 'Colombie'' now provide|.asion of a %  'I'., i ither than reserve th< irauon %  %  %  i it-hand knoa leda> Johi tl. I i| iii. im%  M.|l md cool ludsym "I In I Husalari tl Mr Dull* to discuss with a I %  rs thai 'i i\ %  i' %  I %  %  foreien poll< the unit d Mat* Btataa Benal my momenb ] i ; %  NMUa on Important pollttoal •sasrii. i work at vanau* conferen aa, I ". %  ci..,rt. Btralgbiioi ward and from both F 1 "' illusion, i< | %  ili'iK to SHE THIS RIHIK AND OTIIKKS AT TIIK ADVOCATE STATIONERY Our I *>i includes Mirh /Vuthurs as : T HF.MINGWA .' "Across Ihe River and tola Th,I '•HAPMAN PINCHER. B.Sc : 'Evnliitii,ii Rl WINSTON & CHURCHILL: %  'Europe I mt. P i; WODEHOUSS 'Nnihini; gii toW Bin


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THURSDAY'. SEPTEMBER 21. l5u BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE A VILLAGE l.\ nil MAKIX. Harbour Log I. C.rK.1. Bay .< D S-rh Lucille H Samih. %  ,, ,, i, 1 a*t\ rhiiip k' Inwlliw *ch t*vanlKb&L' THE PICTURE -howSection 8 of tha Bay E*tate whcrf latrhip* and bath* for individual hoii*e* i i part of the HoiialDc Board* ii>K pi our a mm*. Mrs. Christian Meets The Century ANCON, Canal Zone, An attractive, freckled M-ytU old English speakinK woman patient In Gorgas Hospital bat* 1| Mill morvellintf over her rtrsi sight of automobiles, motion piclures, and other commonplaces of modern civilisation. She is Mrs Christian of the isolated Pitcairn Island UM married to a direct descendant of the famed Fletcher Christian, one of the leaders of the historic H.M.S. Bounty mutiny that led to the colonization of the lay Pacific island almost 200 years ago. Mr. Christian was brought to the Canal Zone last month aboard V'.M New Zealand's Line's "Panitoto" suffering from appendicitis. Th* operation was |>ertormed successfully last week In the US government hospital here, and she Is scheduled to take the "Rangitlld" for home on September 22 Canal Zone resident* have been kind to the solitary visitor from the mid-Pacific, piling her bedside table with magazines, Rowera, and candy. She Wal taken for a half-day ride around the Pacific end of the Canal Zone by ,i kind hearted auto owner baton hor operation. She said -*he hoped, before her departure, to go to the marke? and buy a chicken, a coconut, some tomatoes and other things for a Pitcairn Island chicken stew —not that she is not happy with th Gorgas Hospital fare, hut because she would like to show her new friends one of the typical dishes of her little island. Houses Replace Cane At Bay Estate Model Village Growing Under the care of the Bridgetown Housing Board a line housing centre Is springing up at the Bay Estate where many years ago fields of cane dominated tne scene, and where, not so long ago were the houses of humble folk, all on rented land. Government purchased the land sometime ago, and then came the August 31 flood, and the Bay Estate was one of lite havens foi the homes of people which flood waters had pushed down. The complete area of the es:..uis 1 :ti .,, I.--. .l.i. h for the purpose of replannlng has been divided into sections (A) and (B). Section (A) U on the south or Heckles Road and Section tB> is on the north. Section 1A). except for a small area on Chelsea Road, has already been rcplanned. About half a mile of new road has been built, and eight main roads now stretch from MICKY THE BUDGIE VANCOUVER Mickey the budgerigar disappeared from home recently, but hif owners weren't worried. IT he's thirsty, Micky will scream: "Qimme a drink." if he's hungry, he'll head for a dog's dish and ea*. his All. If the dog objects. Micky will peck at him until he givos up.—(C.P ) The Weather TO-DAY Sun i: i-. ; 5.49 a HI. Sun Sets I a %  P-m Moon i Full) Seplrmbw 26 Lighting : B.te am. High Water : 1 43 pn YESTERDAY Rainfall (C'ndrington) nil Total for Month to Yesterday : 3 HZ Inn. Temperalare (Max ) : S6.5 I Temperature (Mia.) : 73.3 F Wind Direction (tarn IF (Is %  ) I Wind Velocity 10 miles per hour Barometer t a.m.) 29 981 Up m ) ; %  • BW Heckles Road to Chelsea Road The roads are intersected by avenues at various points. 13" Working 130 people—ca working on Section (ft., sffeaan new roads are being constructed, and latrines and bathrooms are being erected. Houses from congested areas arc belnij removed to that section at the rate of one daj\ After the 1949 flood 210 houses were removed from the flooded areas of Martlndales Road and Halls Road to Section of the Bay, which originally had 23S houses. In th e replannlng of the estate the minimum house spot will be 2.400 square feet. It is expected that when the replannlng of the estate Is completed there will be about 600 houses from congested areas. In section (A), 13 s'reet lamp: have been Installed. nd four S ublic stand-pipes and Hi *i ydrant* have been put down The water mains which .i. laid down in consequence, will enable many tenants to get i. dividual water supply If Oiaj desire. It Is hoped that at some future date water mains will cover the estate. It Is also possible now tor tenants to apply (or the installation at electricity for their hornet, provided the Electric Company cat' v will bo lor individual ).. u They are made of stone, and the latrines arc so constructed as w cause a sliding panel to close the seat when the door is closed This makes *e teat fly proof. Kitchen gardens are ap rln ajni up around many tenants' home 1 and they are being encouraged U practise this form of self help It Is anticipated that steps will be taken to provide the area a playing field Up to the present, the estate has been used as a site for the removal of houses from congested areas, but there is a po bilkty that the Board will ; erect some new houses there. FOR MORE AND BETTER BREAD USE GUABaMTCCD THE PURE PRQDOCT* WtBTCRtt HARVEST QlfBI FLOUR tOOlBS. HMvtST outhi no* Russia Will Attack A Desert LONDON, RUSS IA will ben in to reclaim next vrat mrwi of thi 110.000 square miles of the Kara Kum descrl with an urination s>.si in ted by a 850-mile-long "Grand Turkma-nian" canal running c tttward from the Caspian Sea to ihe Amu Darya river. S*h Oantonu W s. % %  II 11 I-. SM-nanPt 211Wuflll*. a* •>• twi, %  %  I. Fort TWn.hr !" .. 1.MJ urn. **. I ml Hr-inl-in (n-n (IT matt* achoofver nasatag A M v...it..imn IS ion. not Co pi atoll, from Briuah DBJ-AKn*ai* it-..,, n W.ll.rr, IIT lona %  PMaanfcn iMvlns > tin %  'Fait t.nmt*"' Ai.Ulua Q"l C:*.r#. VUm ..... II i M M %  M<< Itulh It ft'-nhrrkv M % %  • \%  rtw-t. MI. v* i;i)i Thai >*• i Hi" i. f R I'lulr % % %  > i ii a Aaetas F<- m*i-m MI i ,i aln r r w—i Mr. ana Mi A W rrm-. Mr and MrC Kilt* Mr ar>4 kin A II Mi. 1 J Seawell atona. Erik Hanxiii mfn-"i Tnomai M llei fr.-Hr i, 1 Ulllrl. Haicl.t N-crwU. A V V un." Mr. f %  %  -. M %  : I M .ii.. !*., llm... M.rm PNw i—.,. Qriaaaa snnla (-.ii. Ir.n Mi lao. mm SIMSTIStt m\ MM I A I .. n-iN IA[. Tlw-* K^awle. K.a Tn>lmaii. 0*n O'llTllh J..hn Oold %  <;r.rf Imm t*i. I %  • %  % %  %  AIKIM-. .• ... ,'\V M,-.. "•"•". ragMrtltMj to. 1 iont r>i the pre it would be reudy L. j • %  m.i.,1 Ject. s, 1958 to supply water to 3.100, acres of cotton, and in -nib. of pastura land oVCl wh.r y*f literally "the Blac-Desert.'' Tle BBsMPOPja atao calls for three large* dams with a tot.il iiydroatactrle oatateltj f 100.000 kilo watts and the creation of forest belU. The Oliject The ob)ect of the project is to "ensure the supply of water for. imiustriul enterprises, the lrrlga| ttgn %  >i new lands, mainly for the development of ceitltt grnwln,;.1 the supply <.f water for |Wi.-tureai und the lui Ihciilevf>lopntent ol tin (i-liler base for stockliMi-oinu in the southern areaa of ttw ij uuna or Western Tunamenui. the lowci teaches u( die river Amu Darya and the western part of the Kara Kum desert, .md the supply of hydro-elect He power tor Industry and ugritultuic In these The announcement follows shortly after decisions to elect the world's largest power stations along the Vnlgn river—the Kuibyshev und St.ilinar.nl | %  %  i tlims~and is part of the StallB post-war program to reshape the nation's landscape. The newspaper Pravda said the project: "A blossoming carpet of orchards and meadows a H cloche areas hitherto scourged by hot shifting dunelectric light will illuminate the deserts where formerly even the bontlres of Nomads ware rare. Artificial aaaa, canals! and pipe-llnca will bring life to vast tracts of arid land where the people used to dM| of tiurat and heat along the ancient caravan routes" The Karu Kum is now a cradle r panosRenn a and hot, drj devastating croji lands of the lower Volga basin. "It was for ages," the newspa per said, "that the peoples of Ui Orient had been cherishing the dream oi crysUil-clear rivers mi llnuriohing orchards In RM deaert, the dream of B tairyland of b-p plneaa. Now only I few raw sciriirate us from the time wne the desert of black sands Will be converted Into n golden valley cl lertility.BOVRIL makes a good spread fcWx* w i W l d— MBMcfcn nadohh They're ttiy, Juu right for cwry BOVRIL rUT> BEEF INTO TOO **3*4fip>^' comes out in the flavour! Ami v.f..u goei In ? Wnj %  sugar. wLcol. frr.sli L belt* together with ana aapulaii -ha-t has made Iluntlry and Pain < n f whole world over. So many ihrlUh t vuriotics to ehooajb Cron lu ni BUad Cssatard Crr*niH and hYa iing [i .ins'. metllngl* delJ.iou* saaagliailta nil Ovas.-irWil.,aeie.l In finBad J lb. />., -A/xic HARVEST QUEEN THE POPULAR BRAND SUPPLIED BY LAKE OF THE WOODS MILLING CO., LTD. Farmer Calls Up Plane To Save His Land BRITISH farmers whose Ian lr being attacked by soil erosioi. may call up air support by whirbombs ef super-phosphate at other tertlllaara win be aroepei The farmer could direct opera t*n from the ground, by radlr. This system may be come a; important factor in flghVing BOl erosion in areas either inaccessi iiifUcult for. the plougt Tt may brlha new areas unde cultivation. The bombs would be dropped from 400 ft. Reports of recent experimer by the Bristol Aeroplane Co. ai-d : fibers are undn < The laud cliosen for one experiment Is farmed by Captain O. L Bennett-Evans at Plynllmmon. on the borders of Cardiganshire and Montgomeryshire, near die source U the River Wye i 'i tor graring sheep and Welsh black cattle, and || eert hilly. i %  Jw ayaal W oaphate, lime and mtn :. two days. As soon as the airplane cat a % %  H P i %  -\y.u •t^uiimient. The experiment was sucter-s%  Company. "The accurate "—L I HUNTLEYi PALMERS dtlicious 61S C UI' S "' ; '' """""*" AOINTi 1. I. I..... 4 Jit. MiDCIIOWr NEW STOCK OF BYMIN AMAKA II.M Mini! \\(,l 1.11)111) PARAFFIN SVRCP OF FIGS Mi RLSKS—B.by Fir.I Solid Food Alt* a variety of CICARS ni i i\s inn . s i OIII s %  i :\Viism PEHFiriMES" BY THK BEST MAKERS AT — HOOkl its CARON'K :— Fleur de Rocoillr Bellodgla Null do Noel Narciase Nolr. Etc., Etc, Etc. I ;riKi,AIN 'M :— Shalimai .Inky Lad Vega I/lleure Mleu lin Crepe de ( Scandal Altitude. Eti. Etc. WUIITH'S :— Dans la Nuit Je Itevlana TOf ARF • I Itl TO FIND VOL'K fAVOt'KlTt: TERKt Ml. — AT — Booker's (B-DOSI Brldietown uid lla-lina Drug Stores Ltd. (ALPHA FIIAKMACV) MM4W///.W/.V//AV* (Ol mi SSI GABAGE DIAL 4391 ROBERT THOM LIMITED Names Synonymous wrra QUALITY & DVRAHILITY. SPECIALIXND PISTONS PERFhCT CIRCI.K PISTONS RINGS I i.l".I SPARKING PLUGS I I IK il II • KKAKK & CLUTCH LININGS ATI.AS I OKI) 4i LIIKVROI.ET PARTS ZENITH C.AKIH RETTEBS 4 PARTS FRAM OIL FILTERS PYRF.NK FIRE EXTINGIISHKRS Tl NGSTONK RATTKRIES SMITH i:i.K< TKIC'AL EQUIPMENT WING\KI> AUTO At ('ESSORlES PEACIK'K & HUCHANS PAINTS IIL'NLOP AUTO & CYCLE TYRES (Laruc Shipment Expected Slmrtl>) YOUR CAR DESERVES THK BEST INSIST ON REPLACEMENTS (JF QUALITY We Carry Slocka ol Ihe Above lor Populur < .i r.. and True kv KCKSTEIN* BROTHEKS BAY STREET aoiocnc c c.



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TIIIRSDW SEPTEMBER U. I*** CLASSIFIED ADS. BARBADOS ADVOCATE l'\(.| SF.VKN TELCPMOSt 2MB THANKS lull* return *•". to >u iho— w 'rrtcMtf Ihe '*na**i. ami .TI"I or i a* in an -.r.e* wet U.uwtd UIMI t—ih) ... . fiiVin Of th tnanx •II On—* ho m VBTHMII way* ins* aaaa J %  mf.m> -un Um in i** RHMI <* 1h*Ul' UJJOTT SIMMONS tiuOOAKl) II t i*V iWe th t,nder*igne4 take 1KI1 .w-.r lunll) <•( inanHIM all Uvc* IV *•*!• Bower*, alter**** In an> uti ***) e*p path* in out i*c by lit* de-m oi KSTS1JX B "J*AU. Jeme* A -i.-b*li Husband > and Famib Cam—ii ion sin; AUTOMOTIVE CAB—An ARHSnUlNfi SinnSJjrv 4-* Beater IMiti l-Wr inapedlon. K rllr iUri and price appl to Meter*. dm.in Taylor • Oan.gr Limited, dMK tor • i CAH IKM model (Tievrolet Cr Fjigiri* %  n par fret order No. battery. 4 new I-re*. No i*-miMlf ofler refuaed Apply J H N Jriimiott. Good Intent. M O-BBJt. SO.S SB—*•>. DODOr. CAM—H—Mfl. Otfrr. in writing to the *rturj. Barbados Telephone Os. nt i • as %  "THL'CK-Ponl Va Tiwk In food fNkIr.s MJt Oflar* in min* to the Saere. larj. BarLja— Telephone Co Lid ELECTRICAL DBE1' FiaezU FW sal* or rent on monthiy (Mali •• SUrquetl* Deep merer Diar esss .., on 21 • SO JB ia:ntiGWtATiii—Ona (It super I an Oil burning Hefricrrator In Hood condition Immediate delivery Apply Mian Ma ad ah Tilt fa Plantation. St Jama* Ptaone SI-JO 17 • 3—t l.n. 31 > WASHING MACHINE—Ona II) Canadian bar Spindlier wllh Automatic Kplti-rlnaar. thl* Maihlnr la new. Apply W. B Hutchinaon Co. Dial MM 11 • SO—tin. LIVESTOCK Ihoroughlinct v 0.lrti.i|. bv O T cout of ntrrtla Apply;-J W. Chandler. Todda MECHANICAL One hand operated BACON SIJCING MACHINE. Apply B. V. Scott ft Co LidWhltepara: 13 V BO 11 n. MISCELLANEOUS I SL'ltOCALCIN for th tiealmenl ol COLDS COI.UNS LIMITED IB t 10—In UALVAN1BED SHaVTS—M cause. In 7. B. B and 10 feet length* Enquire AUTO TVIUE COMPANY. Trafalgar Street Phona BBM. 15 0 SO t f n PUMP—One '. h p Automatic 9B—40 Lb* Apply J. Laimrnirig. Ltd Elacirt.al Dapi. PHOTO AIJUfMS ITaatnp your anOpahota by illrklng Ihem In ait Album W# havthe Album* and Ihe Corner. •• well KNIGHTS pKOatNIX — Large l*ln pram avllh laidIng hood. Apply Mr* IA William* •O-JIl IS B *>—on .r 10-Inch and for raaaa lot 10-lncb re hava the recorda too BABNK8 ft CO.. LTD 1ATII lln Urge Iron Bate Apply to Mra Nellie Belm.i. Wlnona. Maaoeil Coaat Tel. 1115 SB B St. your aye* from ihe glare, by uaing Good Shade*—a iare aortment Jtiat received KNIGHTS I'HOVMN 20 O.SO-In holding atm at Central III SO—Stt Foundry Dock Yard VBGrrTAIilJi SBtl>S Tn get the ba1 l-riull* UN YATTC "i l^NDBETH Seed. It pay* Buy them from ui KNIGHT rl DRUG %  TORE W 0 SO-In YAWL—"rVapldaappro* J3-, faat long with Gray Marina angina Good condition BSMO a bargain Apply J. B. Edward* Phone 1090 ii %  •-T.r PI PUBLIC Minus NOT ret bean Worker.' Union, will be held j IS* Union h*dc,uarlee-. Synagogn Lane on Thiuadny night Sept III al 1 90 .harp VINCTJNT GRIFFITH. General Becretai) I OSI A I III Ml FOR Ri:.M HOUSES lAPGt llul'SB (.11. furnUtw^ PIVLU SALES AUCTION I will offer for aale on FRIDAY UNI) ; at any office Victoria Street 1.1*1 aquare I M land with the .-ha tie I dwelling houae I %  . dining. 1 bedroom* uaual mil onVe*. excaoeed wllh G I paling* At ChatterIon Hoad Belmonl Dlatrlct For inapct lion ard larma of gala apply lo B Archer Mc Ken.le Dial BH7 Vi.toil* Street 11 • so—an UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Uy Inatruellon. raceKed from lha I-iaurance Co I will *al| on Friday. Bepl Band al I p m at the Couilray Garage. While Park One 111 in" Model Hlllman Saloon Car '-Dam-gen Alao One •!• 1B3B Model Morn* Ca Termi Ca*h VINCENT GRIFFITH Aucliom it B.ao—.; i REAL ESTATE Cl.Voirt -St. Jar bedraomi. uuutl Apply || | M. Kl The underilgn*d will be aet up (or pal' at their CfTi.e No: IT High Xr— aBraBIwIoorri. on Friday, the ttnd day ^1 September IBSO iilpm the Sugar Worn. PlsnUIMn* CANE VALB and MAXWDJJt. Chrl.' Church, containing together by eatli'i >t.on IBB ACREB ACKEAGE In Plant Cane. — M', Acrea ACHEAOE ACREAGE Acre* There will alao be told with the aaia Planlatlon* One Dodge Motor Lorry, f Milch Cow*. I Mule and I email 1-wheelad Cart. For further particular* and condition, of aale apply lo ihe undarvldnad:— COTTLE. CATFORD ft CO IWTKhJ'HUBe HOUSE *nd outbuilding. •landing on 1'* acrea of land In Chriai Church, god DWELLING HOUSE .landing on 1 -in* of Und at kVilecprlee. Chtut Church. *nd adjoining the abovementloried premlaea Tha ahovementioned propertia* will be art up for aale by Public Auction al our OfRee. No 14 Jantoe Street. Beldgetnwn. on dm.. Jim, Beplamber. 1B00 ni 1 p m InapactiKii an application to Mr* VEAIWOOII v mm L aoltcltnr. >. SO ki r yard, o ^1 a I a rlk-le. H> Iron Kelt lei

  • Iron I*r4i1rad>. H> Ga* rlancaa. cli Elect.* Miner. tBOl A-orted Miltmae., •!• Battens* Container. IK Gardener'. Hut. lot Tdpa and W. C Hall., ill Electric s'eriMari. ili Vegetable Steamer. <1> Iron Chgrta. H> Bo* X-Ray Part*, -1 > Ga. Sterilizer. Mil Soda Water Syphon Bottle*. Ill Paeterol Ca.l, ||| X-Ray Tube. Ifl. aalvd li.m V.nltlatoaj. Bag of Sucgiaal In.lrumenta. .]. Steam Ketllea. HI Drea*lug Trolley. Hi Small Otan-doM Cupboard. Lol of Dimr* and Window* 'Tt Tmllav Feeding Table* HI Wheel Chan. D ARCY A SCOTT. Oovt. Auctioneer 18 B SO.—Sn. CM. Bgft .. Ci>ae between puildliaca Caoj %  MtuRl 'II S! 1.1 Straet 1 il Firmer o Cuetonw WANTED HELP A OIRL lo do Book Wot :r*on and writing. Wa Roebuck S.ieet COOK A-.i.loiit Cook large bouaehold EKpertenc cea required Apply Advocate Co and good '. O. Bo* I %  ao—*' JI'NIOR CLERK lor our Lumber Yard ind Hardware at Bl Man*. Bl Peter Apply m writing and In person B. ft O CHALLEMOR. LTD, Bridgetown IBB SO —an. MISCELLANEOUS INDIVIDUAL COACHING by Engllah Cnlvcr.itv Graduate. School Certincate Commercial Pmof-Readina. Typing and Stancilllng eBlcMntly and quickly WANTED TO BENT HUirSE-Fiirnlaried or unfurnished ley Wheeler C o Key Hanaen. "Milton" wo Mile Hill Dial HI. TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH CRAYONS EDUCATIONAL TOXS CHEAT BOTTLE OPENER. PUT GUNS in.i Arrlvrd T JOHNSON'S STATIONERY And HARDWARE GOVERNMENT NOTICES SHIPPING NOTICES >i .1 MM •.1.1*. NIW /! i v.ii us? i iMrrtn MJLMM, LDTBI %  Bl I MOffQsl *;T | Septembar FTih Gl.ol't EBTEBt -an. iTeemaiU.t. Adelaide a*^plarr-.m*er Urd. Sydney SRh Srutgmbar. I Biatbane Oraabar *th, arrlytog at B-rI pfg*ag| :• %  :, a*J | Tn— ve*B>i. have ample mare tag %  I Irnaen and general cargo. •< %  • %  ... i.. ..| %  i-i.-hi,., .nit at Trtnldal %  >.. RallMri Guiana. Windward and Leeward latand* For rurthdr partacuLara •** %  %  >— • SB WITHY ft CO LTD. Trinidad. Ill BBB Thr M.V "Cstrbbs*" will *KCpt Cargo and Pasteiigfi forDominlcii.An1i.ua. MVntBBTTBI. Ntvia nnd SI Kitl. Ssilliif Friday 22nd B.W.I.. rtcKadBcr OunrtABBs. (toe). TBI. *• 4: "WrrPd bo a iofdi.r-.nd haw. aJI yowr pockots ckittared up wrth this stuff ?" lUaUuOII Ka^Mwd Acheaorv Calls For U.N. Police # r.. %  i. page 1. Grncral Asafmbly. The Sovi.'' 0awaf)BtaBt> will not lake the path on to which the Secretary of Stat* tried to puih the General Assembly." Mr Vynhlnaky said that the problems before the Assembly required responsible action m words and deed*. He ssld Mr Acheson had tried to divert the Assembly from tackling the vitally Important problems before It The Soviet Union would have further opportunity lo dwell upon the rude attacks made on It by "Mr. Acheson The Soviet Union asked Ihe Assembly to deal separately with ihe alleged Amcrk-an lajgression against China. MM Acheson also submitted |rv prapOsEll items for the agencbi based on his speech today. Th* %  .uggested Hems wre: "United action for peace" and "The question of Formosa" Acheson Informed the Secretary Gei.rnil Ida. explanatory memoranda on both Una "111 be submitted shortly."' First speaker in the gn*rsl lel.iti was Mi.i/il who supiKtrte.1 ht Unite! States in asking for consideration of plans foi an fcitrrnatlonal force and for common mobilisation of United Nfltl resourieagainst further aggression. But while conceriirtg that th 10 Per Cent LONDON, Sept 20. Prices were buoyant on the London Stock Exchange today Markets were stimulated by the emoval of the prospect rx an early General Election following the Governmem's overnight vie toi-y on the question of steel nationalisation Advancing prices in most sec lions produced several features and gave i good start to the new adlng period British Government stocks were widely one sixteenth to Uiic six leenth up on small support whne a inoderatV investment demand created useful improvements in leading industrials. Oils quickly moved ahead undei Anglo-human lead and closed -•cry Arm. Final prices showc-l .itlle alteration on the day after being sharply loWftr on the Par liamentary statemeni' doubting the possibility of an early resumption p| the debt service. German and other Europeans r-cre firm. Kaffirs developed. ipened higher and made steady irogress to close among the best The coppers and diamonds were In some demand CIVILISATION GISBOSNE. NZ The Maoris still use then traditional cooking methods for ceremonlsl occasions. The system Is much like the modem clam-bake beat I robletn today is digging the large pit that Is necessary. Bui the Maoris hire a bulldojer operator as assistant cook and borrow i %  bulldozer from s constnicHi' gang to scoop out the hole -irn OILS JUMP LONDON. Sept 20. Britain's exports in August reached the new figure or CI89.500.000 and were 10 0tl "'it i>bove the average for the flrp Keen months of the year, the Board of Trade announced to-day In August 1949 the figure was 114.130,000. Final figures for August shirw imports were C215.2O0.00O. This. while slightly aoove average for the first seven months was about lei. millions less itian July. —Kearter DEMOCRATS WANT RESTRICTIONS LIFTED BONN Se.pl 20 Vast Owrni. Soiial Dcmuciati have tabled a motion asking Government to negotiate with the Allie-I llirfli Coimiu-sioini to end demilitarisation, dismantling ami itrictlons on productions. E. Berlbi Will Cut Power Supplies HUlil.lN. Sept. 20. East itdiliu will cul off powersupplie io the three western seetors of tl.e city at midnight tonight it ai oAciolly announced here l.nlay. 'rue aurplui pewet sriU no %  tnacoocaTL) of the Soviet Sector and Zone the nnnounce%  %  laled. This pOV/Ol CUti Uie second lo %  iik.place within QirM months tfas enfoiced upon East Berlin pouei authorities lieeause West JBerlin Magistrates lefused minimum prior offers, the statement laid. West Iteilm powel oiiieials this stated lhat thn sren tiymg "to eaBrlfy" the situation %  %  •. !>!• %  ted to interfere seriouslv wilh i tn rent supSectors. iter. B.TCB B'aa* NSH .. %  •* i-avi. %  CANADIAN 1FJIVK-T Name oi BIU il*-iA I'AKTXI* %  % %  U i IMI.H Mil il.tlA I'll 1MB llarha.' Sf*>l-il>< r OctaBe. tlh CXtnbei ll.i The** veaaela have llmltad Baaw itger Far li ". For Bl l^iarerre llivrr For St La%r*eic* River III ill. tilll II When you order from .... THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM wa deliver by Motor Van Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets. AVOID COLDS-FLU SpMlolltad Madlcation Holp. EmiM Maay Coldi frao D.y.l.fi-,1 drops of Vlcks Va-tm-nol up each noguil to IKI|> preMiil the cold from lakjiiy hol-.l YOU CAN Ffll IT WOttl Thaf | mulalt Salute's own ile/rn* i %  limf o>Ui Utt it in ttme' Cold* are doubly dangerous may lead to "flu" or worse I So lake every precaution, and Busa* ** %  ***** % % %  *. %  .„„.,.,<-., .„„.,„„„, VICKS VA-TR0-N0L t.r ^'.-^.-. nunk '-pm M f fw N0S[ QHOPS COOK BOOKS lo Elll. C !" | alK — BIRTHDAY BOOKS ROBERTS & CO.-D1AL 3301—High Street AUCTION with JOHN M. Ill \IM>\ for attractive terms and efficient service Phone 4640 — Plantations Building VACAMT POST OF ASSISTANT LIVESTOCK OFFICER. DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND AGRICULTURE BARBADOS Applications are Invited for the post of Assistant Livestock Officer. Department Department of Science and Agriculture. Barbados. Only applicants who are experienced in livestock management will be considered The post Is pensionable and carries salary on the scale of •2.160 x $120—2.8BO The holder will be required to reside in quarters provided at the Central Livestock Station 2 Applications, mentioning the names of two referees, should be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, Bridgetown, and should reach him not later than 23rd September. 1050. 3. Further details will be supplied on request 14.0.50—3n FOR SALE Tne following English Thoroughbred Rare HotMHt landed in Barbado. GLAD EYES — UCHGATE — ENTRANCING Each E6S0 BALLY MISTIC GREAT EASTERN Each £800 ;• Apply O. P. BENNETT. Southern Dairy %  Crow Trinidad ^ MANY PEOPLE "Unbreakable Poti" Anthurium Lilies QkVAMJTV 1 PLUS j ECONOMY MYNA H" TEA •Vrotf'M. Illfinlfil mtil fniflitif/fil in t %  i/lim. &f j Obtainable in Ihe following 4ii*e : 1 ounce 10c. 2 ounces ||c. 1 i pound 35c. •i pound 69c. &f&f •* &f &f&f&f %  >• &f > %  > &f • &f&f o^**Ja**B*B*W -'. %  HI'S II1H I PIUI uim oi cam 3 Burner {Table Model) $31.03 3 Burner $57.69 Single Ovens $14.03 PLANTATIONS LTD. CLOSING It is r.-n ih-il thr ',e must Suspend Our Service to You lor n I'eriod of appro*,m.,!.lv TMKKK YVICEKS for the Insiallutiim of un Kntirelv New Plan!. We will 'hen be RE-OPENING WITH A COMPLETELY NEW PLANT AND A FINKK PRODUCT WILL BE ON THE MAKKET TOR YOUR ENJOYMENT Hollies anil (use-. < .1 be Relumed to us or our Trucks will Pick These up as utuul when we resume Produclion. CRDW1V MI1VERAL WATER Co., Ltd. Rickett Street, Bridgetown.