Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
Sunday
September i7
1930



FALL OF



‘THe

new Constitution. ‘

There are 141 candidates for the 18 contested seats. Of
these, 90. are Independents. ;

forward 18 candidates;

two.

Paddled 550
Miles To Rome

ROME, Sept, 16.
Twelve Spanish Univefsity stu-
dents paddled up the river Tiber

Carrying their three canoes on
their shoulders, the 12 bronzed
young athletes were being re-
ceived in audience by Pope Pius
ye tonight in Saint Peter’s Bas-

ca.

Later they will have a private
audience with the Pope to pres-
ent him with miniature silver
oars in memory of their Holy
voyage which started just a month
ago at Palma Di Maiorca, Spain.

' —Keuter



Volcano Eruptions
Kill 62; 17 Injured

MANILA, Philippines, Sept. 16.
A Red Cross worker reported
to-day that 62 people were dead,
17 critically injured and many
missing from increasingly violent
voleanic eruptions on Namiguin
Island, north of Mindanao.

Eruptions from Hiboksibok vol-
eano started last week but were
te-day increasing in intensity.

A pai priest and the Jesuit
Father “Arthur Shea were lead-
ing emergency workers.

Father Shea of New York has
been in the Mindanao area over
10. years. He spent the Japanese
occupation years with guerilla
bands.—Reuter.

Czechs Sentence
3 More To Death

PRAGUE, Sept. 16.

Czechoslovakia’s Supreme Court,
rejecting appeals lodged by 30
defendants in the mass spy trial
held in July, to-day passed three
new death sentences on people
previously sentenced to life im-
prisonment.

Other sentences passed by less-
er State Courts in July were con-
firmed or increased.

Sentences passed to-day by the
Supreme Court in Prague to ap-
pellants after four days of pro-
ceedings, ranged from 18 months
to 20 years hard labour.

Another mass spy trial of 27
Czechoslovaks which began
on September 12, is expected to
end on Monday.—Reuter.





(FRENCH SHIP SINKS
IN THREE MINUTES

ST. MALO, France, Sept. 16.
FORTY-NINE MEN were still un-accounted for this after-
noon, nearly 17 hours after the French weather-ship
Laplace struck a magnetic mine and sank in three minutes

off Brittany.



. ‘ed
Ban On Catholic
BERLIN, Sept. 16.
The East German Ministry of
Information has refused a 2,000,~
000 Soviet Zone Roman Catholics
permission to have their own

Catholic printing press in Leipzig,
West Berlin Catholic sources re-

rt.

Perhere had been a ban on Catho-
lic establishments in the Zone for
five years. Original negotiations
to obtain a licence for the “Ben-
no” Catholic printing works in
Leipzig were carried on by the
Berlin Bishopric at first with
Soviet authorities and later with
German officials.

They were discontinued because
the Bishop’s seat is in West Ber-
lin, Further talks between Catho-
lic. officials and the East German
Government failed.

At. present, distribution of any
Catholic organ is

Soviet Zone. i
A few leaflets and journals are

Gistributed personally by messen-

ger or individual priests. -Reuter.

Will Scatter Smuts
Ashes On Farm

PRETORIA, Sept. 16

The ashes of General Smuts
whose body was cremated in Jo-'tReir dead

hannesburg yesterday,
scattered at a small

will

- 90 Independents

-. In Trinidad’s

Elections Tomorrow
141 Contest 18 Seats

‘(From Our Own Correspondent)
COLONY of Trinidad and Tobago will make an
nt step forward in its political history, when

raw (Monday, September '8)), polling will take
place in the vital General Eleciicns to be held under the

‘war the Caribbean Socialist Party 13;
the Trinidad Labour Party 12; the Trade Union Council 6;
and the Political Progress Group (a business organisation)

by canoe to-day at the end of a |f-Spain,) and Mr. Edwin Duval,
550- pilgrim voyage to Rome.|® businessman (St. George West),

__—--—-_ Fishing boats and pleasure craft

forbidden in the

PORT-OF-SPAIN,

‘Tuc Butler Party has put

Mr. Tubal U. Butle; leads his
cwn party. The Caribbean Social-
ist Party is ably led by Dr. Pat-
rick Solomon, an outgoing mem-
ber of the Legislat ve Council
while the Trinidad Labour Parts
is headed by Mr. Raymond Hamel

Smith, a young Port-of-Spain
Barristerbat-law. The Political
Progress Group are_ supporting

Mr. Albert Gomes, (North Porte

The campaign has been carried
on with great intensity and heat.
There have been many disorderly
meetings, and candidates have!
been rttacked, in many cases be-
ing pelted with rotten eggs. Rven
Mr. Butler himself has not
escaped, and a number of his
mee‘ings met with very strong
cppocition particu:arly in North
Trinidad. Even steel bands were
employed by certain of the can-
didates, to “drown” the voices of
t’eir opponents. This led to an
announcement by the Steel Band
Ass-_ciation calling on their mem-
bers to desist from such practices.
Since then, steel bands have been
empicyed less frequently.
Will Gomes Get In?

Am» st the more interesting
conme.is are those of North Port-
of-Spain, where Gomes is being
opposed by Labour Party Leader,
Hamel-Smith and several others;
San Fernando, where the Mayor,
Mr. Roy Joseph, is being seriously
challenged by Dr. E. A. Lee, of
the Socialist Party, and others;
faces stsong oppasition. drom. Me
aces s ?
Ralph Mentor (T.U.C. Gandidate
and well Known Trade 3
and Port-ot-Spain South, where
the Mayor, derman Tang op-

ses Dr. Solomon. Party politics

Trinidad are still in
infancy. It is believed that no.
one party will be able to dominate
the new Legislature. The set-up
in the new Council will be as
follows:
There will be 26 members

and the Speaker (Mr. W. L. J.

Savary). There will

be a solid bloc

eight members — five to he

nominated by the Governor,
and three official members.

It is believed that many of the
18 contested seats will be won
by Independents, and that none of
the parties will return sufficient
members to take the lead in the
House, so. to speak, Therefore,
in all likelihood, Trinidad’s new
Legislative Council will be com-
posed of the solid Government
bloe of eight, which will probably
be supported in all important
matters by several of the elected
members, and the others, who will
form the Opposition.

@ on page 5



{bad picked up the 43 men while
iplanes hovered above scouring the
sea for other rafts and survivors.
Unconfirmed reports said that
13 bodies had been recovered. The
Navy Ministry in Paris said that
there were 92 men on board the
Laplace including the crew and
officers and officials of the French
Meteorological Institute.

The Laplace was returning from
a 21-day match in the thick of a
mid-Atlantic storm when Captain
Remusat decided last night on
arriving before St. Malo that it
was too late to enter the harbour.

He dropped anchor a few miles
out and treated his crew to a
cinema show on board,

Quarter-Master Celton told the
rescuers when picked up by a
St. Malo tugboat this morning
after drifting all night on a raft
that the whole of the crew except
the watch had gone to bed when
the ship was rocked by a “terrible
stroke of thunder.”

When he came on deck the
bridge was already under watet
\A wave washed him into the sea.

Celton said: “I found myself
swimming in black oil. Two rafts
had been thrown from deck and
|I took charge of one,
| The wind pushed us out to sea.
The waves were getting higher
jand higher. The raft capsized at
least 10 times

There were 12 men on it.

“The sailors kept the bodies of
comrades until] they

be! were rescued by the tugboat. But
informal} the tugboat was already overload-

gathering on their farm at Irene} ed. Three bodies had to be left on

near Pretoria, his son Jannie, said’ the
‘

to-day .—Reuter,

raft which drifted out again.”
—Reuter

tenes etnanemrnee








































Sunday

a






~ POLO AT THE GARRISON |






° £m ——

A MEMBER of the Barbados Polo Club has the ball for himself at the Garrison as Cyclones and Tor-

nadoes met in the usual Saturday

evening pratice chukkas.



16,500 Strike|S

In London

BUSES HELD UP

LONDON, Sept. 16.

Over half of Londons motor
buses were today ted up by tic
unoffidfal’ “strike ~ winch’ Labour
Minister George Isaacs aescribea
yesterday as Communist-led ana
part of a plot to disrupt the na-
tion’s industries .

About 16,500 drivers and con-
cuctors were on strike, keeping
over 3,600 vehicles idle, but the
men at 24 of London’s 52 bus
garages voted to stay at work.

Arthur Deakin, Secretary of the
1,300,000 member Transport
Workers’ Union, was meeting
workers’ delegates to-day.

Electric tram men became in-
volved at midnight. Over 1,000
decided to join the strike.

Workers’ representatives yester-
day elected a strike committee to
press claims for better pay and
no more recruitment. of women
conductors.

The strikers also demanded a
meeting with their Union’s Fin-
ance Committee on Monday to
consider their appli-ation for a
#1 per week increase in pay.
This claim, which was made last
year, has been refused by the
Union executive, The present
weekly wages are between £5
and £7.

About 600 maintenance engin-
eers at five gas works in the Lon
don area stonned work to-day to
nress wage claims

Gas suvplies were not exnected
to he affected during the week -|
ond.—Reuter.

Pope Ordered
To Be Silent

CASTEL GANDOLFO,
ITALY, Sept. 16.

Pope Pius XII. who has prob-
ably spoken to more of the public
than any other sovereign in the
world, was today ordered by his
doctors to keep absolute silence
for the next few days

He was suffering from a vhroat
infection brought on by a cold

All audiences at Castel Gan-
dulfo were temporarily cancelled

The Pope received only officials
of vhe Vatican this morning re-
viewing the business of the day
with them witout speaking.

Av tonight’s Mass to an audi-
ence of 5,000 pilgrims in Saint
Peter’s Basilica in Rome, the Pope
will not give his usual address,
but will simply make the sign of
the Cross from his throne over



the crowds in a silent blessing.
Reuter,

“— And there | was, just
digging a hole for my
bone . ’



Shaw Is
““Comfortable”’

LUTON, Bedfordshire, Sept. 16.

George Bernard Shaw (94) suf-
fering from a broken thigh bone,
was today stated to be ‘“comfort-
able and cheerful.” The hospital
where he is;+detained here said
that there had been no deterio-
jration in the playwright’s condi-
tion. since yesterday.

Doctors were issuing bulletins
as Shaw insists on listening to
news broadcasts

Shaw broke his thigh when he
fell in his garden,—Reuter.

pain Will Mobilise

44 Divisions To
Defend W. Europe

Against Russian Attack

A GROUP of high-ranking Spanish Army officers declared
here to-night that Spain was prepared: to mobilise 44

divisions within 36 hours
Western Europe against the

They said Spain now had 22 divisions under arms, bu
not all were up to strength and Spain was short of military

equipment.



Advocate Hurricane
Relief Fund
For Antigua ~~

Previously acknowledged $6,004 06
Canadian Bank of
Commerce



Arthur T. Skeete 20 00
Royal Bank of Canada
Mr. & Mrs, L. Harold

Haynes 15 00 |i
Mr. & Mrs. A. D.

Macgillivray 10 00
Cc, A. Brathwaite 20 00
Mr, & Mrs. L. A. King 5 00
Barclays Bank (D.C.&.0.)
Mr. & Mrs, W. S. S 10 00
Mr. & Mrs. J. A, Mahon 20 00
Mr. & Mrs. W. T

Gooding 5 00
Advocate Co,, Ltd.
Miss V. Gittens 1 50
Miss J. Gittens 1 50
The Misses: Sealy 10 00
Mrs, J. J. Bullen 5 00
H. Hutson Inniss 25 00
Mrs. A. E. J. Carter 10 00
P. M_ .Crichlow 5 00
Mr. & Mrs. Vernon

Knight 5 00
Mrs. C. S. Daniel 1 00
Mr. L, A. Williams 20 00
M. K. B. Ince 200

TOTAL $6,195 00



£800,000 Still
Wanted forButlin’s

(From Our Own Correspondent:
LONDON, Sept. 16.
It is understood that the threa
preference shareholders who were
appointed at a recent informal
meeting of Butlin’s (Bahamas) to
examine the possibility of raising
the £800,000 needed to prevent
the company going into liquida-
tion, held their first meeting yes-
terday but failed to reach any
satisfaetory conclusien.

General Protests Against
Expulsion Of Reds

BERLIN, Sept. 16.
The Chief of the Soviet Control
Commission in Germany, General
Vassily Chuikov, has protested to
the French High Commissioner in
Germany, Andre Francois-Poncet,
against the expulsion from France
of a number of foreign nationals,
including 16 Soviet citizens, and
their dispatch to the Soviet Zone
of Germany, the West German

News Agency reported today.
—Reuter.

Foreign Ministers




































‘HEIDELBERG, Sept. 16.

for the common defence oi
Russian attack.

“Our training is good and the
only thing we need is equipment,”
the officers said.

The officers, who are here to
wateh the United States Army's
autumn manoeuvres, Exercise
Rambo, consist of General fesus
Aguirre. Deputy Chief of the
Spanish Army’s General _ Staff,

eutenant Colonel Lesar Martin
Alonso, Lieutenant Colonel Luis
Garcia Rollain (who acted as in-
terpreter), and Major Tomas De
Liniers Pidal.

Emphasising that they were
speaking purely as military men
and were not attempting to fore-
cast the trend of political develop-
ments involving Spain and other
Western European countries, the
officers declared that if Spain be
came a member of the Atlantic
Pact it would “strictly observe its
obligations under the Pact.”

Spain would like very much to
have some military equipment
from the United States, they said

They declared that the fear of
Communism and the Soviet Union
was very great in Spain and they
seoffed at the notion that Spain
felt secure “behind the Pyrenees.”

Reuter,

675,000 Watch
Air Force
Display

LONDON, Sept. 16

A total of 675,000 people visited
68 Royal Air Force stations which
were “at home” to mark the Tenth
Anniversary of the battle of Bri-
tain,

The weather at many stations
was unfavourable with blustery
winds and rain, but only in a few
instances did this interfere with
the flying programmes

—Reuter.

Election Candidate
Injures Collar Bone

(From Our Own Correspondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN.

Mr. Sararn Teelucksingh, prom-
inent Indian proprietor, and a
member of the Legislative Coun-
cil for many years, suffered injury
to his right collar bone, after a
fall, and had to be taken to hos-
pital at Couva. Mr. Teelucksingh
is contesting the South Caroni
seat for the forthtoming elections.



tt

EOUL BECOMES

“Surrender

Or Die” |

MACARTHUR TELIS REDS |

|
WASHINGTON, Sept, 16
General Douglas MacArthur has
calleaay-North Koreans “to
Surrender or die,” according to an
army spokesman here
The spoke man told reporters a;
1 Defence department briefing to-
day that 3,000,000 leaflets calling
m North Korean Soldiers to
surrender or die had been droppe |!
thiourhout the Communist—held
portion of South Korea
Meanwhile United
Marines under cover of rocke:-
iring Corsair aireraft were
night on the outskirts of tle Com-

States

to-

nunist Leld South Korean capital,
Seoul.

They had pushed aimost 19 miles
ip the road from the Port of



head, fighter bombers heavily at- Australian,



Price:

SIX CENTS lepgy 0

Aduncate -s “"

t *





IMMINENT
| Reds Will Be Cut

In Two

TOKYO, Sept. 16.

GEOUL is expecied to fall over the week-end to

powerful United Nations forces quickly fan-
ning out and exploring the Inchon bridgehead.

With the recapture of the South Korean
capital, the U.N. Forces will have the death-grip on
Communist’ communications between ttc battle
front and the rear. é

At the same time. the newly launched offen
sive out of the Pusan defence square—which swept
forward up to three miles today towards Waegwan
threatens to slice Communist armies in halt.

The United Nations’ Spearhead from Inchon heach-
head pushed into the outskirts of Seoul today, the South
Korean General Staff announced.

Despatches from the front said they were over a rile
from the centre of the South Korean capital which was

overrun by Communist forces more than two months ago
Just in advance of the spear- |can, British, French,” Canadian
New Zealand

and

Inchon where they landed yester- tacked Communist reinforcements South Korean warships tqok_ the
tay from the largest invasion fleet |trying to stem the rush on the }Communists by surprise They
since World War II City were trying desperately to get

But on the flanks of this spear- The South Korean General of |their forces into the area from

head on Wolmi Island and in |Staff said the Kimpo Airfield and north and south, but fighter planes
Inchon itself, there was heavy ~ v were ee and » mauling
fighting The rt was z : them severely :

7 ‘i mS vee See - Massed American artillery

furiously late tonight as marines
fanned out in sustained assaults
on Communist forces rushed froin
10orth and south

At the same time British, Ameri.
ran and South Korean troops why
rave been closely boxed up .n
the southeast corner of the penin-
sula began a big new offensive of
their own and made gains two i
three miles on all fronts

Striking northward from Taegu,
the primary objective of the Brit
ish backed offensive out of the
“defence box” was to cross the
Naktong rive: and ultimately to
reach Seoul-—145 air miles to the
north

General MacArthur, briefing
correspondents on his way wu
Inchon where he is directing opet-
ations said that he chose Seoul
because it was the heart of the
Communist war effort. Cut out this
heart — he explained — and the
Communist armies on the Naktong
river would be completely cut off
(yom their supply stream from the
aa

i



town which is 9 miles from Seoui
was also taken and United Nations
fighter planes were already oper-
ating from there,

on the Communist
north of the em-
while tank con
for the drive

rained shells
Division to the
battled Taegu,
centration stood by
tewards Waegwan

U.S. Armada
Attacks

In the South, United States 25th
Division started another attack,
also under cover of artillery bar-
rage. Bad weather made air sup-
port impossible

Reinforcements for yesterday's
“clock-work-like’ American
marine and infantry landings at
Inchon went ashore at the west
‘| coast beach on the early morning
tide to-day from the invasion of
an armada of 260 ships,

Today’s drive northwest of
Taegu was made in three thrusts
headed toward Waegwan,

United Nations troops have oc- American eight - inch guns
cupied the Yongtonpo, ward of! blasted away at the Communist
Seoul at 5 p.m. local time on eints for ten minutes be-

strong

seu cout bo” seagate [Rabaedhy. econo stp ne tnt amy been,
North Korean forces would “soon- communique broadcast by Pusan Americans and reans
er or later disintegrate.” Seoul is fradie, . Joined forces for the to break
expected to fall over the week- Other United Nations troops had through the Communists’ grip on
end. ‘i crossed the Han River, advancing] ‘"¢ defence perimeter

@ on page 5



U.S. Has File
Of Pro-Red

pushed on from the beachhead

established yesterday at Inchon,

ther United Nations troops
Germans smashed their way out of their
constricted defence) box on the

HEIDELBERG, Sept, 16

United Si'ates Army har
its plan to arrest al)
Communist sympathizers among
the German civilian population
in the American occupation zone

The
completed

tewards the heart
communique added,

Landing At Inchon

As General

southeast tip of the peninsula

Reuter’s
Hudson
spokesman on the Taegu front as
saying ‘‘we will cross the Naktong
and we are going north.”

of Seoul, the

MacArthur's forces

Lionel
Americar

correspondent
quoted’ the



Heavy rains falling throughout

should Russia invade Wester Their objective was also Seoul, the battle area made advance
Germany, a Civil Affairs Staff}to link up with the Inchon offen-; difficult on slippery roads and
Officer disclosed here voday when [sive ; hillsides, but American com-

discussing the American army’s
“Exercise Rainbow".

The officer added: “We have 8
pretty good file on all these peo-
ple, and they could be rounded
up quickly.’

He disclosed that ever since
American occupation in Germany
began, local military government
efficia! and thet uccessors
American High Commission re‘l

jer hed been compiling
ile ‘ords on every German su
pected of “subversive ¥ sndencies”
in the American Zone,

The file was built up on the

investigation
American

personal
rvations

basis of

mad obs by

officials

The Army’s Civil Affairs se
tion has plans to evacuate German
political leaders and technicians
regarded as valuable to Western
Allied occupation forces it was

plso disclosed

The aim would be to re-estab
lish these officials in important
Governmenval technical jobs after
lost territory had been recaptured {

Officers said that the Unite
States had evidence that Russia:
authorities and East Zone Com
munist leaders had compiled @'
extensive dossier on thousand
of Western Germans from Gov-
ernmental figures to officials it
the smallest villages

“These Western German leat-
ers would be the first persons t
disappear were the tussians

invade,” he added,—Reuver

Discuss

Defence of Western Europe

NEW YORK, Sept. 16.

The 12 Fore gu Ministers of the
North Atlantic Council discussed
for more than two hours this
morning the problem of the de-
fence of Western Europe

The meeting was dominated by
a long French statement on West-
ern defence and Germany's par
ticipat on in it

Robert Schuman _ French
Foreign Minister was understood
to ha given a comprehensive
reply to an equally detailed re-
view of the subiect yesterday by
Dean Acheson, United States Sec-
retary of State

Schuman w
reve aled cl
French point

ve

believed to have
the duality of the

view which in





€

varying degrees is held by other
European members of the Coun-
cil.

This duality consists of a de-
sire to see the lines of defence in
Western Europe extended as far
east as possible, wh ch would in-
volve the employment of as much
manpower as can be available

On the other hand, there is
the psychological reluctance of
European countries to a revival
of German military power

Schuman was understood t
have stressed that the integration
of German forces would in
ease first involve consultatior
with the German Government

The review of Western European

any,

defence by ministers yesterd

of Western Europe as possible, ‘t
is necessary to mobilise a maxi-

and to-day, according to source |
close to the delegations, clost
followed the pattern outlined
Acheson in his opening surv:+|
yesterday.

His main argument was |
lieved to have been that
order to defend as large an ar
mum of manpower and equipme |
without delay

The integration of Weste
German forces on honoural
terms, would mean that a greater
area could be included in the
strategic defence plan of
proposec nified Nortt Atlant |
Command.—Reuter

General
quarters here said that the Inchon
landings under the guns of Ameri- lack of air support. —Reuter.

—
SSeS

Mac Arthur's Head- | manders declared the push would

ecntinue as planned, despite the









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.
we





PAGE TWO







PLAZA sa Olatin ‘ : ABT 2 snows TODAY

“THEY DIED WITH THEIR BOOTS ON” with Err
and “CHEROKEE STRIP” -






FLYNN |
|

with Dick FORAN }



A WARNER BROS. DOUBLE
i MOXDAY AND TUESDAY 5 and 8.3.0 P.M }
WARNER'S THRiLL DOUBLE Edward G. ROBINSON in |
with Ben LYON }

“G . MEN” and “DARK TOWER” —

OO?

‘ GAIETY

: ’
(The Garden) ST, J/(MES “TH HOTS ".
r 2 SHOWS TODAY — 5 & 8.40 P.M. } it
RKO RADIO'S THRILLER ! ! ;
“SPANISH MAIN” % Featuring :
Color By Technicolor a s} * i Vv li 4
————SIONDAY AND TUESDAY — 8.20 P.M. } ROD CLAVERY (Vocalist)
RKO RADIO PO TLADMAN'S. TERRITORY” % MIGHTY TERROR (Calypso Champion)
with RANDOLBA “SOGWE and. % LEARIE ATWELL (Sengational Guitarist)
“BEDLAM” — with Boris KARLOFF 8
OOOO LLL EEO 09

rn



| GLOBE
Presents the Sweet Music of Trinfdad’s Favourite

Dance Orchestra

On
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 218T, AT 8.30 P.M. ¥

SUNDAY ADVOCATE




























i
ANOTHER MASTERPIECE FROM
ALFRED HITCHCOCK !










Rey AVDI.2 © ena Amica

eres ALFRED HITCHOOCK rst # WARNER BROS.

Serger Pay oy James Bridie. Aeoetaon 1 vipma Conny + Masada Pay by date Collen ond Margaret Linden » Fram tne Bent ta Vieien Semgugm,




ROYAL THEATRE

Special Entertainment Drive

FOR ONE’ WEEK

} HOUR _STAGE ENTERTAINMENT —
MADAM TIAM FOOK and SÂ¥YD VANDEK LYDE in

A GRAND VARIETY ENTERTAINMENT of the high-
est order along with M.G.M’s SUPER DOUBLE:

“THEY PASS THIS WAY"

Starring :
JOEL MACREA — FRANCIS DEE

— AND —

TO-DAY & Continuing Daily
5 and 8.30 p.m.

PLAZA THEATRE








GLOBE THEATRE

Under the Distinguished Patronage of His Excellency
The Governor and Mrs, A. W. L, Savage

Opening FRIDAY. Sept. 29th 6.45 p.m.





The Most Acclaimed Film in All Motion Picture History!








































Academy
Award
Winner! ge

eRe a

Cy

By WIELIAM SHAKESPEARE

y-%

redeaistictaate iis alae

Release

SUSTAINS
AND

REFRESHES

DEMAND
MURRAY'S
Milk Stout

From your
GROCER



& CO..

MANNING





“JOHNNY EAGER"
Starring :
ROBERT TAYLOR

— LANA TURNER

Watch This Space For fyrther PROGRAMMES

co FOIL SN oc EDF,
AQUATICCLUBCIN EMA (Members Only)

TODAY AND MON

Vey e?

r EN inthe
. ) y Nn " e NR i
Turse’, Tile”

EMPIRE

TO-DAY 445 & 8.45
and Continuing

20th C-Fox presents :

“THE BLACK
ROSE”

Starring :

Tyrone Power;
Orson WELLES

ROXY

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY
4.30 & 8.15

Republic Double . .

SECRET SERVICE
INVESTIGATOR



With
Lynn ROBERTS
Lloyd BRIDGES
AND
“THE RED PONY"
with
Myrna LOY

Robert MITCHUM



Mon, & Tues. 4.30 & 8.15
Republic Whole Serial .. .

“JESSE JAMES
RIDES AGAIN”

With
Clayton MOORE
Linda STERLING



CHECK THIS
LIsT -

Pick axes
Axeheads
Chisels

Braces & Bits
Compasses
Clamps

Hand Drills
Files

Planes & Irons
Hammers
Hatchets

Tool Handles
Squares

FACTORY

HARDWARE DEPARTMENT

(This is Suitable for ADULTS only)

XPOSE OF
nad CniMes "AGAINST WOMEN!

Releored through FM CLASSICS, las. !

. 8.30 PL
DEEP" —_

TOOLS?

OUR PRICES
ARE RIGHT — \



THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON

ad
R. R. M, S. CHARLES, Medical
Officer of Health, . Arima,
Trinidad, and Mrs. Charles will be
returning to Trinidad by B.W.LA.
teday after a short holiday as
guests of Mr, and Mrs. C. E. Clarke
of Palm Beach, Hastings. Mrs.
Charles is the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Clarke

Aftended Prison
Officer’s Course
R. E. C. ARRINDELL, As
Dr. Charles came over principal- sistant Superintendent of

ly to see his father Mr. J. B. Prisons, Trinidad was intransit
Charles of Dominica who arrived on Friday morning on the “Gas-

last Tuesday for reasons of health. ” nd after end-
Mr. Charles is an ex-member of SO8"° pro Eons getend

the Legislative Council of Dom- ing a fqur-mapths Priggn Ciicesp

Course. He was cgcompsnied by
inica, and Chairman of the Banana ,; 5
jation. He is also a guest of his wife who had been jn England
Tr. and Mrs. C. E. ClaF and

fer 15 months. ;
hopes to return home during the Mr. Arrindell told. Carib that
week.

the the course was sponsored by
the Colonial Office and was the
Mec i ; first of its kind since the war.
bechanic From Grenade | Nineteen officers from all over
day * Setheden ral his the British Empire —— peas

2 ich w
duties as mechanic of the Elec- conven, se puree oS lines of
tric Company in Grenada, is Mr. English Driocns nae.
Tommy Wells. He arrived last 8 a rs ‘ ind
week by B.W.I.A. and is stay- 100% “Dammouth, Wormwood

‘rvetal Wate i in artm .
ing at Crystal Waters, Worthing. peace Midst and Borstal
i ; camps for young offenders. e
Medico Takes Time Out chief camp was the training school
e a rrived here a Wed at Waketeld, Vornenire Wiare
sae, & ; . as been pu .
nesday by B.W.I.A., for q holi- fect: he Oe ae "ta
Guest eo - Indramer Work without guards in an open
‘. : camp.

Dr. Mapp is physican for the Mr Avrindell said that they also

Forres Park Sugar Estate in South |.” ay, a prison
Trinidad. yisited Om where there
Spent Summer Holidays js a farm for agricultural training

leav- modern lines.
MONG the passengers lea one ere, UN cd the aman
was. well looked after by the
Colonial Office and on the whole,

ing by T.C.A., yesterday
morning for Canada after apenes
ing their summer vacation wer ,
Miss Margaret Clarke who is doing they had a most interesting time.
her second year at MeDona Revuedeville 1950
College in Home Economics and Dre in last night at
Mr. Gerald Tryhane who is taking “Norham” the home of Dr.
his fourth year pS, in Engin- and Mrs. A. L, Stuart at, Tweed-
eering at Mc Gill University. side Road and saw a caste of sev-
Miss Clarke is the daughter Of enty lovelies going through their
Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Clarke of paces_tor the 19) Revuedeville
“Henbury”, Pine Hill, and Mr. that will be presented at the Em-
Tryhane is the son of Mrs. Iris pire Theatre on October 19 and 20.
Tryhane of Bagatelle Plantation, Mrs. Stuart hes puccens ded Ln
St. Thomas. h producing, musica a -
i wises a theme with a local set-
For Trinidad Elections - ting skilfully intertwined in a
R. J. M. HEWITT of the Bar v .
on BE, programme of dancing that ranges
bades Reporder and at ' Mg from the ballet to the modern Bee
Bee, MCT ee BWA. for Bop and Se cumperenvey mod-
‘Trinidad to attend the General Oe Nae ee nes — . eal
Elections beginning tomorrow. for the young ladies and gentle-
The purpose of their visit is to fen whe would break into ama-
observe the setup in the siocsions teur theatricals and on the other
been given ’ in the Revuedeville
‘They are expected to return On| -+.56 daffcers to show their wares.
“8 One looks forward to a pro-
} gramme that promises to be both
novel and entertaining when the
show comes off next month.

ce
| Visitors From U,K,

R. AND MRS. Robert Ozanne,

were arrivals on Friday
morning from England on the
“Gascogne’. They have come for
a holiday and are staying at Ber-
wick Guest House,

Back To School

, ISS SUSAN ARROWSMITH,
, daughter of the Adminis-
trator of Dominica and Mrs, Ar-
rowsmith, left by T.C.A. yester-
day morning for Canada on her
way back to Westonbirt School in
Gloucestershire, England. She
came in from Dominica with her
parents on Tuesday and was stay-
ing with them at the Windsor
Hotel.



DAY — 8.30 P.M.

Wh




— MAT. WED, — 5 P.M.
Color By Ansco Color

ROYAL

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY
" 30 & 8.30
M-G-M's Master Double...

“THEY PASS THIS WAY” ORGUIENNE! Ventre gui-
— ) : pune ! Palsaguienne! What is

escri $4 leadi
“6 JOHNNY E AGER * world raciontits”” Seomertan "te





that grotesque gadget Unesco, has
startled the nations with the dis-
covery that there is no justifica-

os a Half Hour

EXTRA — At 8.30 for Ha jou

Joseph CLEMENDORE and His

Dancing Partner CINDERELLA
in “DANCING LUNATICS’



CROSSWORD.

cee lt Pens
eT | Te
CL bul

Mon. & Tues. 4.30 & 8.30
M-G-M’s Doe es ‘
Richard BASE

e E Audrey TOTTER






“TENSION”

And

“THE STRATTON STORY”

Starring
4 s STEWART
roe June ALLYSON
EXTRA !!

Mon, Nite at 8.30 for Half Hour
COFFEE & The PROWLER
tnalng helt Pita Calypsoes

3 =~ = Across
OLYMPIC pen rude differentiy tn: orave
TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.15
Tomorrow 4.30 & 8.15
20th C-Fox Double. . .
June HAVER
Mark STEVENS

-

Enliven partner at the en! (7)

To strike in Scotiand (i)
i iit

rt | cond

(9) |

Associated with diteraat fuel (4)

pris from a lemon /%,



tion,



ie. }
. The hands, .4) |
range # couree uf

t ore. (
. as. Watch. (4)
& wedit for a good one

artion, (4)

SProeseF Spree -

Vi KeRK Ree

“OH YOU BEAUTIFUL
DOLL"

AND
“FIGHTING MAN
OF THE PLAINS”

— With —
Randolph SCOTT
Jane NIGH

———
Tues. & Wed. 4.30 & 8.15
20th C-Fox Double. . .

. BUFFALO BILL”
“THE PURPLE HEART”

(b>
Down
. Vehicle, ox and relative com
e 2 lena: (
Ee. * . )
his ts not cultivated, (8)
is oye verlety is a gentie

man.

The great one’s a dog! (4)
Enter differently w
for ever. (}) 7. Make good (5)

|
(
Hoa trieno
Up at the end means the same |
10. Proceed to go (5)

SP & oP sex pr

(3, 4)

It" es trom coconuts. (5)

. For what reason is this clue? (J!
lution of qeeterday’s puzzle.—Across.
+7. Reflector: 11 t; 12
VASSCS

; se; 8. Lovable: 9
10 Respects; 14, aaker: 16
. Menal.

Valse; A

Amp; 19, ‘coke: 20. Lin

ane ny . Bats: 24, A

Precipice’s%, Rear seat; ¢
eva; t; 6. Lose;
asion;



Rasps
Spoke Shaves
1



Caub

~ BY THE WAY..,



SUNDAY,

4



“Do your children know
; that you read these sort
of books?”



‘

London Express Service.

Engagement
T a party given at “Grey-
dene,” Upper Collymore
Rock, last night, the engagement
et Miss Janet McDavid, cashier of
Messrs, Goddards’ Restaurant, and
daughter of Mrs, Buzanne McDavid
of Sea View House, Bay Street,
to Mr. Gordon Wilson, son of Mr.
and Mrs’ Harry Wilson of Upper
Collymore Rock, was announce.
Gordon is a clerk of Messrs. C, S.
Pitcher & Co.

Confidential Secretary

RS. ALICIA PUY ARENA,

Confidential Secretary to
the Venezuelan Consul-General at
Trinidad. is spending a holiday in
Barbados at “Ashton-on-Sea”,
Maxwell Coast, with Mr. and Mrs.
F. Franchesei of Trinidad.

Mr. Franchesci is Manager of
the Hi Lo grocery of Port+of-Spain
and he is also holidaying here
with his family. ,

Entertained To Dinner

R. and Mrs. Del Castillo and

Mr. and Mrs. Coen of Cara-
cas, Venezuela, who are spending
a holiday here as guests at the
Ocean View Hotel, entertained
Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Knight to
dinner at the Hotel on Friday
night.

r. Del Castillo is Director of
the Surveys and Geodetic Depart-
ment of the Government of Cara-
cas while Mr, Coen is with the
Venezuelan Petroleum Company.
Trinidadians Return Home

RS. GERALD ALEXIS of

Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, re-
turned home on Friday evening
by B.W.1.A. after spending about
ten days holiday. She was ac-
companied by her two children
Gerald and Jacqueline, and they
were staying at Crystal Waters,
Worthing.

Back Again

R. A. B. MITCHELL, Cashier

' of Mason’s Ltd., of Port-of-
Spain, Trinidad, is now back in
Barbados for another holiday. He
first came here in September last
year when he spent three weeks,
He arrived on ‘Thursday by
B.W.LA. and is staying at “Crystal
Waters”, Worthing.



eee
tion for discriminating again
man because of his cleat ot hk
race.

Their next earth-shaking dis-
covery will be that eyery man—
white, yellow, brown or black—
has an immortal soul, and that
all are equal in the sight of God.
This announcement may be some-
what delayed, as they are still
trying to locate the soul. The
latest theory is that it is under the
rutilatory haulm of the left elbow.

The Strabismus Six

D*; STRABISMUS (Whom God
Preserve) of Utrecht has in-
vented a motor-car which bids
fair to etc., etc, etc. It will cost
£375,000 to build, will have four
engines and nine wheels (one un-
der the gridget-valve). It will be
so delicate in its mechanism that it
will have to be flown to its des-
tination, and will probably not go
at all in cloudy weather. But
when it does go, it will move
beautifully, and will have four
wheels instead of two to take the
corners at a speed so frightful that

| ane will almost wish it had never
started. Oh—and what cylinders! B

Better Than Real Dew
“Z7ES, she’s nice enough, but
she doesn't look dewy.”

——

SEPTEMBER 17, 1950
€

Off To Trinidad
R. DAN F. BLACKETT, Editor
of “The Torch”, left yesterday
evening by B.W.I.A. for Trinidad
on a short visit as the guest of
Hon'ble Roy Joseph. Mayor of San
Fernando whe is seeking re-eiec-
tion to the Legislative Council.
White in {rumaad Mr. slackett
hopes to assist My, Joseph in the
winding up of nig eampaign for
(ne Geperal Bue@yons woicn tage
piace tomorrow. He also hopes to
gel a view or how the elections are
veing carried on due to tne change
of the consucuuon ana general sey
Up of machinery for voung,
Passed School Certiticate
R. William ‘Bill’ Mallalieu,
formerly a pupil of the Lodge
School and for the past three years
of St. John’s School, Leathernead,
ingland, has got his School Cer-
tificate with Matriculation Exemp-
tion, He passed with distinction
in geography and got five eredits
and one failure.
Bill is now looking forward to
coming home for Christmas.

American Contralto
ORLD famous American con-
tralto, Marian Anderson
passed through Trinidad last
week, accompanied by her hus-
band Mr. Orpheus Fisher, after a
four-months singing tour in most’
of the capitals in South America.
‘They are returning to America
Miss Anderson hopes to return to

Trinidad on a short holiday.

After Three Years
M*" and Mrs, Clifton Good-
ridge, two Barbadians who
were residing in Canada for the
past three years, returned yester-
day morning by T.C A. from
Montreal to spend a holiday with
their relatives at Bank Hall.
Formerly of the Parts Depart-
ment of Messrs McEnearney and
Co., Ltd., Mr. Goodridge was em-
ployed as Chief Clerk in the Re-
ceiving and Checking Department
of the Toronto Motor Co.
Intransit
R. GEOFFREY CHAMBERS,
Civil Servant attzched to
the Customs, Trinidad. arrived
here on Friday morning on the
“Gascogne’” as an intransit pas-
senger from England and left
later in the evening
Mr. Chambers was sent up to
England by the Trinidad Amateur
Football Association on a two
months football training course
for the benefit of elementary
school boys.

For Health Reasons
RS. MERCEDES PLIMMER
of Trinidad who arrived
here a week ago for reasons of
health is at present a patient at
Dr. Scott’s Nursing Home and is
expected to be up and about soon.
Her daughter Mercedes who came
up with her is staying at “Beach
House”, St. Lawrence and will
be returning home on Wednesday.
A keen Water Polo fah, Mer-
cedes tells Carib that along with
the Trinidad Water Polo team
which is expected to tour Bar-
bados in November, a girls team
is also hoping to make the trip.

By Beachcomber

How often one hears that said.
Very well. I have before me a
cutting which tells women how
to look dewy. Pointing out that
flowers glistening with dewdrops
are a lovely sight, it says that
a real or artificial flower, worn
on the dress, should have one or
two pearls of different sizes stuck
tc it. Then “a minute touch of
nail varnish.”

Another good trick is to buy
blobs of sham candle-grease and
stick them on your cheeks. It
you wear a hat like a lamp-shade
yeur friends will say, “How she
glows !”

Priority Gramarye

ILITY Glamour. The words
, caught my eye in a head-
line, _ I suppose now that the
beautiful old word “glamour” has
been rubbed in the filthy mud of
film jargon, it cannot be further
dishonoured by association with
the fashionable word “utility.”

yt a sense of humour, which is
a sense of p jon, might have
prevented the juxtaposition of the
two words.



CRYPTOQUOTE-—Here’s how to work if:
AXYDLBAAXR
is LONGFELLOW

One letter simply stands for anoth

for the three L/’s,

X for the two O's,
trophies, the length and formation of
Each day the code letters are different.

er, In this example A is used
ete. Single letters, apos-
the words are all hints.

A Cryptogram Quotation

PATN RJ

ORIU’IJ ERUURIK,

QAQONIQNU

sv VDN

EFV RJ IAV @sJjV

ABB EM RV—GFEPRPRFJ JIMLPY.

WHICH ARE on toquote;



First Grade English

WOOLLEN SUITINGS

HE WHO ALLEGES THIN
RADICTORY 'S8 NOT TO BE HEARD—LAW.
eee

$3-7° yd.

plain Shades, Pinheads, Pencil Stripes

TROPICALS $6-5° 2. 7-91 ya.
All Wool
WORSTED FLANNELS $8-57 ya.

Rules Nayy Blue
Tapes Herringbone
Pliers Rl
Screw Drivers SERGE $7-95 yd.
oor. 2 Shades Grey
ee s WORSTED
fl Stones FLANNEL
Emery mpeeis (complete) 57
Paint Brushes °
Putty Knives $3 yd.

Chalk Lines



LIMITED.
203

Tel. No. 9




EVANS ana .
WHITFIELDS

“Your Shoe Store”

2 Shades Grey

LONDON “STAR”

EDITOR
REPORTS:

Monday Sept, 4.
72, Cheapside, BC2.

ORKSHIRE woollen

manufacturers’ worst
fears were realised at the
opening of the new sea-
son’s wool sales in Sydney
to-day when prices soared
by as much as 50 pe.

Dest Wait For “JORIN WHITE nccccnccccccceee



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1950

EVE

aa eae
HOLLYWOOD



HOLLYWOOD, Sunday,

Blackeloth and soundtrack

Ls PALM TREES

and mist, shops
“that look like
beach bungalows,
offices that look
like holiday-
camp chalets,
churches that
look like cinemas, and a new
picture-house which has a steeple.

Geraniums, known as California
weeds, growing wild, morticians’
‘vernacular for undertakers) ad-
vertisements on the backs of all
the street benches; a group of
cafés specialising in ice cream and
pastries; which look like Egyptian
mosques but which are neverthe-
less named The Pig ’n Whistle....

Cowboys, booted and spurred,
sitting around super-shiny cock-
tail lounges amid the chromium,

boss

satin drapes and peach glass, a
predominance of waitresses and
shop assistants who look like
Jane Wyman — and lots of

Hired searchlights yaking the
sky every time (a nightly event)
a new hamburger stand is opened;
drive-in cinemas, restaurants and
even boot repairers; Spanish
stucco houses with flat roofs
(which leak and which the earlier
settlers sell to the newcomers).

Sirens screaming (Hollywood is
the place where everything goes
on wheels but where the pedes-
trian officially has the right of
way — perhaps that is why an
ambulance making a noise like
our old friend the air-raid siren
passes by my hotel every four
minutes); Dixieland bands; and
talk, talk, talk and more talk.

Wisecrackers without wisecracks

HOLLYWOOD is also the place
where the highest-paid comedians
live—so I started a search for a
wisecrack. And they said:—

Jimmy Durante: “I got a million
of ’em, but right now I can’t
think of one.”

Danny “nomas: “=m no quick-
'y

off-the-mark gagster — remem-
ber?”
Jack Benny: “You know me—

I’m the guy who is funny without
saying anything, so they tell me.”

Bob Hope: “You'd better ask
my gag-writer. Hey, Barney, say
something funny to the lady.”

And frum Barney: “The things
I write aren’t really funny. Bob
just makes them sound that way.”

Postscript: Example of the
Hope humour heard at a charity
show he compéred: “Bing Crosby
was sorry he couldn’t get along
tonight, but he had a nasty ac-
cident; he fell off his wallet.”

It’s people, people, people

HUMPHR EY
BOGART, cur-
rently on the side
of law and order
saying: “The old-
style film gang-
ster is out. Now-
adays gangsters
are big-business
men who may pay income tax. Not
many of them even get shot
Oba it 053

Elia Kazan, a small, ugly man,
now the dictatorial director on
the “Streetcar” film at Warner's,
living down the days when he
used to be a small-par! actor
specalising in gangster roles.

Marcia Lewis, the girl who
holds a thousand secrets—balding
actors go to her for scalp treat-
ment; Al Jolson explaining why
he will not play at the London
Palladium: “Everyone’s a sensa-
tion there. I like to set records.”

Joan Crawford, pleased about
her current film, “Goodbye, My
Fancy”: It’s a break from the
traditional Crawford story; you
don’t see me washing dishes in



the first reel, I’m a full-fledged
Congresswoman right from the
beginning.”

Bing Crosby’s latest commercial
venture — the manufacture of a
new kind of deodorant, a pill
which is taken internally.

Betty Grable is as blonde bub-
bly, bright, and beautiful in the
flesh as she is in glorious Techni-
color... - ‘ i

The Jack Warner party for the
Oliviers where the guests—the
Gary Coopers, the Joseph Cottens
were there too—were entertained
by an after-dinner discussion on
dianetics, the new form of self-
psychoanalysis, which is the
current craze in California......

The Oliviers, escaping from all
the formality, eating hot dogs
with Claudette Colbert and hus-
band at one of the outdoor
stands......

And amid all these people,
people, people, here’s how you can
tell the actors who are not work-
ing—by their tan (bronzed beauty
does not photograph well, so the
stars must de-tan for picture-
making)......

Fashion. Department

ADRIAN, the local Dior (but his
clothes are even more expensive),
inspired by a recent inspection of
the Duke of Alba’s hat collection,
putting on a fabulous rose-and-
champagne affair to show off his
new Spanish-influenced styles
(tassels, fringed sashes, velvet
turbans from which a single jewel
drops over the centre of the fore-
head)......

Sarah Churchill’s English ceil-
ing-price grey fiwne! suit being



.

One










Pond's Creams have done for my o

protect my skin”

NGLISH OR

AMERICAN — society’s loveliest
women use the same beauty care. They use
Pond’s, and it is thanks to Pond’s two Creams that
their complexions keep so radiantly lovely always.
Why not let Pond’s keep your skin lovely, too?
Every night, before you go to betl, cleanse the skin
thoroughly of dirt and stale make-up with delightful
Pond’s Cold Cream. Then “rinse”’ with more Cold

occupied by M.-G.-M.’s head de-
signer for her to wear
TAM: 45.

Susan Hayward’s | silent-film
hair-do—very long and fluffed out
over one eye..... ‘

Gorgeous Gussie Moran, re-
volting from all the femininity,
dining out in a severely tailored
bracer-skirt of quilted satin and
mannish shirt......

Latest colour for cooking stoves:
bright scariet.



. #3 ages
LADY MAUREEN COOPER,” ;
English society woman, entrusts in mand es ¢
complexion to Pond’. “It is simply ae rohat

lexion,
says Lady Maureen, “I use Pond’s Cold Cream
for cleansing and Pond's Vanishing Cream to

Cream for extra-cleansing, exira-softness.
In the morning, before putting on your make-up,
smooth in a thin film of Pond’s Vanishing Cream.

It makes an ideal powder hbase because it holds
powder matt for hours. It protects the skin, too.
Use Pond’s beauty care regularly and in a short
while you will notice that your skin is clearer, softer,

smoother. It. will glow with new radiance, new

loveliness. Pond’s Creams are
@ = yet they are used by society's
both sides of the Atlantic.
all the best beauty counters,

inexpensive to buy,
loveliest women on

You can buy Pond’s at

in the |

finer cream anyv

says Mrs. Vanderbilt.
especially soft and smooth and clear — brings up a
becoming glow of colour in the cheeks"

~
POND’S





Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

The Cultivation
Of Gladioli

GLADIOLI are among the most
beautiful of flowers. As they
have been grown here so widely,
and so successfully this year
(Corms now being obtainable in
the island) a few tips on their
cultivation may be of interest to
these gardeners who have not
yet tried their hand at growing
them.

Gladioli can be grown from
seed, but when this is done they
do not as a rule flower the first
year. The usual practice is to grow
them from imported ‘Corms’ or
as more generally termed Bulbs
and the best time to plant these
Corms is during the month of
January, when they can be ex-
pected to flower in three months’
t'me, or sometime in April.

For a succession of flowers last-
ing over a period of weeks, plant
the Corms. gradually, spacing
them a week apart, which is a
better plan than having all
flowers at the same time.

Preparation of the Bed

Gladioli like an open sunny
position. Prepare the bed by
forking deeply, turning in plenty
of leaf-mould and ol@ dry man-
ure (Gladioli abhor fresh animal
manure).

The bed must be rich but light
and well drained, a soggy bed
will most likely rot the Corms
and result in failure. Lighten the

soil if necessary with the addi-
tion of somte coarse sand and
charcoal.

Plant the Corms in clumps of
rows as you fancy, putting them
three inches deep in the ground,
and eight inches apart. If you
have a double row, let the rows
be eighteen inches apart.

When the first two leaves are
well up, give the plants a light
application of G.V.M. (Garden
Vegetable Manure) and at all
times keep them well watered.

When the plants are nearly
full grown it may be found
necessary to put in a small neat

stake to keep them in a good
upright position. This is a job
which must be most carefully

done, as on no account must the
Corm be injured. Manure again
just before flowering.
Treatment of Corms After
Flowering

After the Gladioli have finish-
ed flowering the leaves will dry
off. When this happens, lift the
Corm, and after separating the
little Bulbils that will be found
attached to every healthy Corm,
store the Corm in some dry earth
and leave unwatered and undis-
turbed until next January when
it ean be planted out again. If
you want to increase your stock
pick out the largest of the Bulbils
(about the size of a pea) Dry
these and store in the same way as
the Mother Corm. In January
plant them out one inch apart,
and keep them watered just enough
to ensure steady growth, Repeat
this process each year, and in
the third Season your Bulbils will
have become Corms and _ will
give you flowers.

SUNDAY
AT THE CINEMA:

ADVOCATE

Three Of A Kind

Hy G. B.

WITH SUCH an impressive list of titles as “The Black
Rose,” “Under Capricorn” and “Stromboli,” all of which
have been highly advertised and played up as outstanding
tilms, the public of Barbados should be justified in thinking
that these pictures, with their plethora of famous stars and
directors would add up to some outstanding entertainment,
but unfortunately, the sum total is vastly disappointing.

The fact that two of them are
in Technicolor, which is getting
finer all the time—is one point
in their favour, but apart from
this, they all left this reviewer
with an intense feeling of dissatis-
faction. Let’s take them in turn.

“The Black Rose”

“THE BLACK ROSE”, playing
at the Empire is based on Costain’s
historical romance of the same
name and tells of the peregrin-
ations of a young Saxon, Walter of
Gurnie, during the 13th century.
Having been willed by his father
for life in the service of England’s
Norman king, Walter decides to
seek his fortune further afield.
With him goes his friend Tris-
tram, who is no mean bowman,
and though you don’t know how
they get there, their first stop is
Antioch. There they join a cara-
van that traipses across Mongolia
with gifts and women for Kublai
Khan, under the protection of a
murderous Mongol by name of
Bayan. There are interminable
scenes of the caravan, varied by
Arab sports, pillaging of cities and
the torture of Walter being made
to “walk the rope”, a quaint old
Mongolian custom! Eventually,
after many feet of film, the boys
with the Black Rose, who by now
has joined them, end up in the
Palace of the Chinese Empress.
After Walter has learned about
printing, gunpowder and the com-
pass from his captors, he decides
it is time to go home. In their
escape, Tristram is killed—the
Black Rose recaptured, but Walter
turns up safe and sound in Eng-
land, looking fit as a fiddle and
not one wit older for all his ad-
ventures and the passage of time.
Oh, yes—the Black Rose also turns
up in England at the same time—
a gift from Bayan—presumably
having been delivered air express.

There are gaps throughout the
whole of this unconvincing tale.
The action is not sustained an¢
the tempo uneven. Tyrone Power
plays Walter with ease and looks
well in the various outfits he
wears, As Tristram, Jack Haw-
kins, English actor of Shakespear-
ian fame, gives a competent per-
forance and Cecile Aubry as the
Black Rose, is a petite, charming
French gamine. Her acting is de-
lightful and her contribution to
the film no small one, Orson Welles
as the murderous Bayan, with a
soft spot for our hero, is adequate
and his make-up precludes the
usual ocular gymnastics to which
this actor so often resorts.

The costumes and scenery leave
nothing to be desired in this lavish
production ang the musical back-
ground is satisfactory.

“Under Capricorn”

In “UNDER CAPRICORN”, we
have Miss Ingrid Bergman as a
member of the Irish aristocracy



Sports Supplement

I WENT to a
football game
with Jane Rus-
Sell, whose hus-
band, Bob Water-
field, is the star
of the local team.
The game I
found both slow and boring. But
not so Miss Russell.

The young lady who is known,
among other things, for her
poker-faced acting technique,
jumped up and down yelling,
“Murder him, you bum,” and



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other similar expressions. Then,
as the coach spoke to her hus-
band, shouted, “Leave him alone.”

Only once did the more familiar
film-star Russell emerge from the
frenzied footballer’s wife. That
was when some men behind, the
way sports spectators the world
over always do, started making
cude remarks about Waterfield’s
playing, his character, and prob-
#ble future.

Mrs. Waterfield silenced the
critics with a look which was
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who follows her stable-husband
to Australia where he is spending
seven years as a guest of the
government. Playing at the New
Plaza, the film opens in Australia
in 1831, with Mr. Cotton now a
free man and no questions asked
aS to his past. This would appear
to apply to Miss Bergman too,
who by now is a blowzy dipso-
maniac with a tendency to D.T’s.
Into this happy household comes
an old friend, Mr. Wilding, from
Ireland, who, with her husband’s
permission, undertakes to re-
habilitate Miss Bergman. To do
this entails his staying in the
house which is run by a scheming
housekeeper, who puts two and two
together and makes four and a
half. .The change in Miss Berg-
man is remarkable, due no doubt
to thegodd bits of lovemaking on
the part of Mr. Wilding, though
She is still devoted to her husband.
Eventually, the housekeeper de-
cides it is time to get her mistress
back on the tipple again, and tells

Mr. Cotton her version of the
goings-on. There is a peach of
a row in which Mr. Wilding is

shot and Mr. Cotton is accused of
trying to murder him. This means
a second offense for Mr. Cotton
and that’s pretty serious, so Miss
Bergman confesses to the crime
for which her husband originally
was sent to Australia. Thig
doesn’t help matters any, as she
then has to be sent home to stand
trial. All very complicated and
adding up to precisely nothing,
and certainly not up to Alfred
Hitchcock’s usual standard,

The performances of Ingrid
Bergman, Joseph Cotton and
Michael Wilding are good enough,
I suppose, but certainly nothing
memorable. The characters they
portray are not well rounded or
real, and lack the depth necessary
in a drama of this kind. ‘The in-
terior settings are attractive but
the exterior are obviously artifi-
cial; and very much so.

“Strumboli”

Without a doubt, this is one of
the bleakest picttifes. and though
it may be under the “inspired
direction” of the famous. Ros-
sellini, I am afraid his inspira-
tion would appear to be stillborn.
Apparently the original version of
this. film, which didn’t even
reach New York, has been hacked
ty pieces, and I doubt if the
director would recognize the milk-
and-water picture being served
up at the Globe Theatre,

Once again, we have Ingrid
Bergman. This time as a Dis-
placed Person in a camp outside
Rome. To get away from it all,
she marries an Italian fisherman
and they go to his homie, or what’s
left of it, in Stromboli, Conditions
here aren’t much better and the
fact she has nothing to do and
her husband can only understand
English in words of one syllable
doesn’t help mattets. The light-
house-keeper obviously knows
more English, and creates a diver-
sion for Miss Bergman, which
is left to the imagination. How-
ever, something must have hap-
pened, as she gets a good beating
up from the fisherman when she
comes home! Eventually, th
simple life is too much and with
the help of the lighthouse-keeper,
she leaves home and starts around
the voleano to get somewhere on
the other side. On the way, there
is a partial eruption which entails
her spending the night on a nice
het bed of lava.

@ On Page 16






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“LOBE
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COMPLEXION







PAGE FOUR





HE WEST INDIES have concluded their tour in England, as far
as first class matches are concerned and they have finished with

the record of 18 matches won.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Good Scores Returned
In First Class Games -

RAIN intermittenly interrupted play yesterday as the
Fourth series of First Division games opened. Batsmen
however had the best of the day play, and some good

When they drew the final first class fixture with H. D, Leveson scores were returned.
Gower’s XI, they had concluded their official tour of England. This , COLLEGE v. SPARTAN. Pilgrim was caught. He only made
meant that they had won 18 games. drawn 12 and lost three. SDAFOAN o.oo sete nesses: 238 11, but they were well made.

For the first time in the history of West Indian cricket,
members of the team have completed 1,000 runs.

The spin bowlers Alf Valentine of Jamaica and Sonny Ramadhin
of Trinidad, have carved their own niche in the hall of international
Ramadhin completed the tour with 135 wickets taken

cricket fame.
at a cost of 14.88 runs each and
the Jamaican, Valentine, 123 at a
cost of 17.95 runs each.

This 1950 West Indies tour is
a landmark in the history of the
West Indies great struggle in
the international arena even now
less than 25 years ago.

CELEBRATED EFFORT

EARY CONSTANTINE’S cele-

brated effort of 107 wickets in
the 1928 West Indies tour of Eng-
land has been equalled and pass-
ed on this tour. No fewer than 34
first class centuries have been
recorded by the West Indies team
and Weekes and Walcott head
the list with seven three figure
innings each.

I am pleased that the general
averages have shown that Gerry
Gomez is a first class all rounder
on the West Indies team. For
in addition to scoring 1,000 runs
he has taptured 55 wickets at
a very low cost,

B.W.I. TABLE TENNIS TOURNAMENT
‘HE first B.W.I. Table Tennis Championship tourney featuring

teams representative of the strength of Jamaica, British Guiana,
Barbados and Trinidad will take place in Trinidad during September-
October,

The Colonies will each be represented by 3 players and not only
will the leading Colony in table tennis be decided, but also the Singles
Champion of the 4 Colonies. So far Trinidad have played both
British Guiana and Barbados. They ran British Guiana in 1948 and
wop against Barbados in 1949.



GERRY GOMEZ

Programme for the four-cornered intercolonial tournament calls
for return matches with 12 Colony games being played all told, and

towards the end the Singles Championship will begin:—

September 28 Jamaica vs, British Guiana
29 Trinidad vs. Barbados

30 British Guiana vs. Barbados at San Fernando and

Trinidad vs. Jamaica at Arima.
The Barbados team is as follows:
ILL:—Plays a strong fore-hand game with plenty of punch.

matches.

WILLOUGHBY:—The best spin player in Barbados today. Chops
In the open

end drives delightfully. Toured British Guiana in 1948.
championship (1950) went to finals. Lost to Stoute.

‘CORBIN:—After a lapse of 5 years won the “B” Championship
His club won

over 40 players. Won all his games in the inter-club,
the Division 2 Cup. Has a good defense and flicks the ball well
Always fit. Should profit tremendously from this tour,

POLO TEAM AT PRACTICE

IRNADOES met Cyclones at the Garrison yesterday as members

of the Barbados Polo Team continued to get into form to meet

the Venezuelan Team expected to arrive later this year, Three chukkas

were played.
In the first chukka Cyclones beat Tornadoes 2—0, In the second
chukka, Tornadoes were successful, registering a 1—0 win over
Cyclones. In the third game, Tornadoes came back to win by two
goals.
Mr. Keith Deane scored the three goals for Tornadoes and Col.
Michelin shot two for Cyclones.

LT. NEBLETT HEADS SHOTT

The practice shoot of the Barbados Rifle Association took place
at the Government Range yesterday, and Lieut. C. E. Neblett was

applauded for scoring a possible at 200 yards.
Seven rounds were fired at the 200, 500 and 600 yards ranges

Conditions were reasonbly good, but the light was difficult at 500

yards.

The following are the eight best scores, with 105 set as the

highest possible:—
Lt, C. E. Neblett

AV Mag Cha M a ea CRATE es 97



Mo. M.D) TROMAS. i i ee ENA yee tees 96
Mr, M, De. Verteull... 5. ieee eee etes sean 96
Capt. Ci-By Warner... elias vee eee ec ees 95
Mo, GiB. PSP. ss ie eis eee sew evades 95
Mr. GiB. Martin. . ccc cenit een wians 94
Ma MA OTRO a a i vase eed era da sees 93
Cpl. V. Walcott....... ASAT aT ORE ERC: uy ee 91
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eight College yesterday to score

Had
a good season in the inter-club games winning nearly all his

SPARTAN batted all day at K. Walcott was the next Spar-
238 for tan bat tobe sent back to the
all when they met College in their pavilion. In his short Stay he
First Division cricket fixture. made a brisk 19. The fifth wicket
Play began 20 minutes late and had fallen for 161 runs. Walcott
heavy rain and clouds stopped the was completely beaten and bowled
game when there was yet half an by |Smith. That was Smith's
“ee = time to play. third wicket.
1e wicket was firm at the start, Spar urth isaste!
but intermittent showers affectea 40 tons late eae ‘Wood = fon
it soon afterwards. : e
out when he had reached 10. It
Only one batsman, E. Smith—o, WS obviously a ball off which no
did not reach double figures, All TU could be scored with safety,
the other bats made good scores, “ut Bowen called for a run and
but College kept up an unflagging Wood did not reach his crease
attack and that, with some prilli- 1 time,
ant fielding, prevented Spartan Another five runs were scored
from scoring more runs. before Smith gained his fourth
Spartan’s opening pair, A. Atkins wicket. He got Bowen making an
and S. Griffith got over = roles uncertain stroke to one of his
bowling in a way whic boded spinners and Bowen
ill for College. During an unruffled He had waned 10, erate
stay of an hour at 44 wicket, the Haynes and Smith took the
two of them gave their team 4 score from 182 to 205
good start of 57. Griffith was the the eighth wicket fell Wie
first to get out after he had played after a spell of 17 runs fell a
a ane eye of roe on aek victim to the wiles of spinner
went on to topscore wi - HIS Sn.ith who was having all his

was not a flashy, but a confident
interval. «5 aw way. Haynes was adjudged
Shell” Harris who went one Philips and Gittens put ae

down, played an easy innings of : *
44. L. Phillips was the number £004 ninth wicket stand for 33.
Gittens was given out Lb.w., to

nine batsman and his wicket was ¢
still intact after he had made a ® fast ball from Williams, when
chanceless 22 in stylish batting. the score was 238. His individual
College’s C. Smith negotiated Score was 15. Smith was bowled
the impaired wicket well during 1 the same over without making
his 26 overs and he often had the @ny additional runs.
batsmen playing fidgety. He cap-
tured five wickets for 94 runs. 1 EE PeRERS vs. CARLTON
pacer Williams took three for 46, WANDE 239
but two of them were tail bats. NDERERS scored 239 runs
in their first innings yesterday,
Spartan won the toss and the first day of their first division
decided to bat on the good wicket. cricket match with Carlton at the
A. Atkins and S, Griffith went Bay. Intercolonial player Norman
to the wicket to open their innings Marshall knocked up a chanceless
against fast bowlers J. Williams 89 and Denis Atkinson, West In-
and J. Corbin who began the dian all rounder also hit a breezy
College attack, Williams and Cor- ‘
bin quickly caught their length. K, Greenidge the Carlton
but the Spartan opening pair went medium pacer took seven of Wan-
after runs with evident ease. derers’ wickets for 60 runs after
The pacers could not pierce the bowling 20.1 overs in which he
confident batting and after only a had all batsmen playing cautious-
few overs C. Smith and Mr. S. ly. W. Greenidge took three for
Headley replaced them to continue 106. He was not so steady.
the attack. With only fifteen minutes before
Spartan lost their first wicket the end of play Carlton opened
when the score had reached 57. their first innings with Hutchinso’
Griffith sent a ball from spinner and Marshall but a dark cl
Headley, through the covers and which had settled above brought
Smith in a splendid piece of field- an end to play as both batsmen
ing took the difficult catch. complained of the bad In
Griffith made 29. He was the reply to Wanderers’ 239, Carlton
faster scorer while at the wicket are now no runs for the loss of

and he executed many flashy no wicket.
strokes.
“Shell” Harris joined Atkins The Start

_ Winning the toss Carlton sent
in Wanderers on a wicket which
was apparently easy. Marshall
and Eric Atkinson opened the
innings for Wanderers to the bowl-
ing of Warren and K. Greenidge.
Marshall took the first ball from
Warren and the fourth he pushed
to mid off for a single, -

who was then 20. A short spell
ef rain stopped play for a few
minutes soon after. Fifty-eight
runs were made during an hour’s
play.
, 100 Up
A hundred went up on the score
board after Spartan had been at

the wicket for just over 100 min- K, Greenidge was beautifull

y 4 . A y
re ta : oe pp A gga on-driven for four by Marshall in
ng ae inte abe cures. the fifth ball of his third over.
Atetie wns then 48 and Harris 20. Avr bowling Sour overs Some Se

Atkins only added two more OW. G end ore was replaced
runs to his score before he got ee tae — nan, Se ent ae
caught off Smith when he edged stage the score was 36 with Mar-
one to the weenie aM shall 26 and Atkinson 10. Atkin-
did not put much brilliance is e
batting but he batted in a sound, i" Greenidge ‘and. secasioualiy
confident manner which for long gdgedq through the slip, The i
did not admit of balls penetrat- | owling of Greenid. sine had hin
ing to his stumps. He only scored caught by Lucas oh seuman slip
ied eee during his stay at when the score was 60.

1e : 5.

Pilgrim went to the wicket and py.» Sneath on — eee
faced cpie ball before lunch. At the over. Marshall continued to
7 cnt ae moving off pat confidently but Proverbs was

Harris and Pilgrim scored 31 Siti le te ee
runs together for the third wick- and the partnership between M
¢t partnership before Harris hit Shall and. himself was broken
2 ball from Smith high overhead when W. Greenidge got him leg
te be caught by Simmons. The before.
fall of the third wicket was not Denis Atkinson next man in
through any marked skill of got off the mark with a single
spinner Smith, but Harris’ waS a off K, Greenidge. Marshall struck
too eager attempt. In his compari- his first six off W. Greenidge in
tively short period at the wicket, his 11th over. His score was
Harris’ innings was spiced with then 70 and the scoreboard read
runs getting in an easy style, 110—2—6. K. Greenidge after

Good Fielding bowling 15 overs was replaced by

Seven runs later, Spartan lost N. Lucas from the screen end and
their fourth wicket through a this was the last over before lunch
masterpiece of fielding by Mr. With the score at 128 for the loss
Headley at slips. Pacer Williams of two wickets, Marshall 76 and

as bow] Denis Atkinson 19. While at the
had been brought back to bow .
and it was off his bowling that Wicket, during that time Marshall














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COMBERMERE vs. LODGE

Combermere es ‘ «.

Lodge (for © wicket)
COMBERMERE 18T INNINGS

©. Knight b Brookes 8
Mr. Sealey c Outram b Hutchinsan 90
G. Grant ¢ Outram b McComie 4
H. Wilkinson c Deane b Wilkie 29
R. Norville b McComie 41
R Quarless b McComie ‘ ‘ “4
E. Toppin ¢ McComie b Wilkie 8
S. Smith ¢ Brookes b McComie 6
L. Harris b McComie “s 3
M. Murrell Lb.w. b Wilkie . 3
C. Beckles not out 0
Extras o 23
BORE oncsecer sen deevgevsspvens 233
Fall of wickets: 1—29, 2—79, 3—129,
4—152, 5—195, 6—212, 7—223.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R w
Brookes 8 i. ae 1
Gill 4 1 14 oO
Outram 7 1 28 0
Hutchinson 9 0 48 1
Wilkie 16 3 44 2
Mr. McComie 55 3 49 6
Inniss 1 1 0 0
LODGE’S 18ST INNINGS
L. Murray not out oa 6
Deane not out 0
Total (for 0 w'cket) 6
o mM R w
Mr. Smith 1 9 1 0
M. Murrell 1 a 5 0
EMPIRE vs. POLICE
POLICE'S 1ST INNING
C, Blackman _b Barker ws 0
F. Taylor b Barker Sas oA 2
H. Wiltshire c Williams b Alleyne 32
Capt. Farmer b Millington 63
J. Byer c¢ Robinson b Williams 18
I. Warner b Millington ’ 5
G. Cheltenham not out 36
E. Brewster run out 22
B. D, Morris not out s 10
Extras (b. 5, Ib. 5, n.b. 3) 13
Total (for 7 wkts.) 201

Fall of wickets: 1—0, 2—10, 3—82, 4—113,
5—for 125, 6—131, 7—179.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO

M R Ww
H. Barker 15 3 40 2
E. A. V, Williams 18 2 56 1
Cc. G. Alleyne 9 0 33 1
E. Millington 20 5 48 2
O, M. Robinson 2 1 il 0
SPARTAN vs, COLLEGE
Spartan : eotasencen ss ay ee
SPARTAN IST INNINGS
A. Atkins ¢ wkpr. b Smith 47
S. Griffith c Smith b Headley 29



SCOREBOARD

17, 1950

SEPTEMBER

SUNDAY,



Rain Interferes With Cricket





L. Harris ¢ Simmons b Smith “4
T. Pilgrim ec Headley b Willi ll
K. Walcott b Smith See 19
N. Wood run out 10
K. Bowen stpd. (wkpr.) b Smith 10
A. Haynes 1.b.w. b Smith Ww
L. Phillips not out .. 22
Cc. O. Gittens 1.b.w. b Williams 15
E. Smith b Williams 0
Extras 14
Total 238
Fall of wickets: 1—57, 2-105, 3—136,
= 5—161, 6~—177, 7—182, 8—205,
BOWLING ANALYSIS
ee ae:
J. Williams 65 3 4 3
J. Corbin 4 0 12 0
Cc. Smith 26 2 a4 5
S. Headley 15 2 36 1
K. King 12 2 21 0
Cc. Blackman 3 0 15 0
WANDERERS vs. CARLTON
Wanderers : 239
WANDERERS 18ST INNINGS
E. Atkinson c N. Lucas

b K. Greenidge..........-++++++ a
N. Marshall c Warren

b W. Greenidge..... ‘ wks Oe
G. Proverbs lbw. b K, Greenidge €
D. Atkinson e Marshall

b K. Greenidge........ 13
G. Wilkes c Warren

bh W. Greenidge..............5+ 1
A. Siuncee ¢ wkpr. (Clarke)

b K. Greenidg@.........-++.+++ 18
L. St. Hill b K. Greenidge..... 1
D. Davies l.b.w. b K, Greenidge.. 9
C. Packer c Cox b K. Greenidge.... 0
T. Pierce c Sub b W. Greenidge.. 5
L. Greenidge not ou s/t

Extras thas sedertnecees 8
WD aces faa sik cakeb se dandan ek 239

Fall of wickets: 1 for 60, 2 for B80, 3
for 156, 4 for 167, 5 for 215, 6 for 217,
7 for 220, 8 for 220, 9 for 226.

BOWLING ANALYSIS

o M R w

Warren 8 2 28 0

K. Greenidge 201 3 60 7

W. Greenidge 25 2 106 3

N. Lucas 12 1 37 0
CARLTON FIRST INNINGS

F. Hutchinson not out 0

W. Marshall not out 0

Extras : 0

Total (for no wicket) 0



had struck eight fours and one
six. After lunch Warren bowling
the first over sent down a maiden
to Denis Atkinson, On hitting out
Marshall was caught by Warren
off the bowling of W. Greenidge
after hitting up a chanceless 89
which included 11 fours and one
six, three of the fours scored after
the luncheon interval,
Skinner Ovt

Wilkes then joined Atkinson and
he scored a single but did not stay
long and was caught by Warren
off W. Greenidge. Skinner then
went in and was off with a brace.
D. Atkinson now 44 had a life
when W. Greenidge failed to hold
a catch from him. Skinner’s end
came when he was caught by
wicket-keeper Clarke in attempt-
ing to force a ball from K. Green-
idge away. The scoreboard read
214—5—18. St. Hill next man in
after scoring one played a ball
from K. Greenidge on to his
stumps. Davies then joined At-
kinson but before he could settle
down Atkinson was out caught by
Marshall off of K. Greenidge for
73. Packer only survived two balls
from K. Gr and was*caught
overhead by .

Peirce then went in and he and
Packer batted well until Peirce
was nicely caught by the sub for
five runs. R, Greenidge followed
and then the end came when
Davies was given out leg before
from a ball from K. Greenidge and
Wanderers closed their first in-
nings at 239.

ith only 15 minutes play Carl-
ton opened their first innings with
F. Hutchinson and W. Marshall,
but after Norman Marshall bowled
the first ball Marshall appealed for
light and this appeal was upheld.
EMPIRE vs. POLICE
Police 201 for 7 wickets

POLICE occupied the wicket
for the whole day to pile up 201
runs for 7 wickets against Empire
at Bank Hall yesterday.

Rain interrupted play three
times during the day for short
periods and finally brought play
to an end about 10 minutes be-
fore the scheduled time of call.

Captain Farmer batted well to
score 63 in about 130 minutes.
Other good scorers were G. Chel-
tenham, 36 not out, H, Wiltshire
32 and E, Brewster 22.

Police won the toss on a per-
fect wicket and decided to bat.
C. Blackman and F, Taylor open-
ed Police’s innings to the bowling
of Empire’s pacers H, Barker from
the Bank Hall end and “Foffie”
Williams from the Southern end.

Barker began by getting a lot
of pace off the wicket and the
fourth ball of his first over claim-
ed the first Police wicket before
any runs were on the tins.

He left Blackman playing for-



... the sharpest edge in the world!

Trade Enquiries to

rt.

ward to a good length outswinger
and clean bowled him for nought

H. Wiltshire joined Taylor and
took 2 off the last ball of that over
to open his and his team’s score.

Police lost their second wicket
with only 10 runs scored and
Barker was again responsible for
the damage.

Barker sent down a maiden for
his second over and came back
the first ball of his third over to
york Taylor when he had scored
2. Police were now 10 runs for 2
wickets and Barker had taken the
2 wickets for 2 runs.

Bowling Change

With the score at 26, Skipper
Alleyne brought on himself from
the Southern end and Millington
in place of Barker.

Captain Farmer and Wiltshire
quickly got their eye on the slow
stuff and improved, considerably,
the rate of scoring.

A light shower of rain fell when
the score was 46, holding up play
about 6 minutes, Farmer was
then 20 and Wiltshire 20,

The shower made the wicket
responsive to spin and few balls
also rose awkwardly. Wicket-
keeper Maurice Jones got strucic
on his chin by one which rose up
from Millington and could not
continue to play. He was depu-
tized for by O. M. Robinson. The
50 went up in the next over after
74 minutes of play,

Jones did not rest long. He was
back out two overs later wearing
a plaster under his chin.

Police lost their third wicket
with the score at 82. Wiltshire
was caught by Williams at long off
aktempting a big hit off Alleyne’s
bowling.

Williams’ was a lovely catch.
He ran back about 10 yards then
to stick his right hand up and be-
hind his head to hold the catch.
The scoreboard read 82 for 3.
Farmer 43 not out.

“Johnnie” Byer, next man in,
played the next over ‘rom Milling-
ton and lunch was taken.

Williams and Barker continued
the Empire attack after lunch.
Farmer got his 50 in Barker’s first
over of that spell. He made them
in 119 minutes.

Another light shower sent the
players to the pavilion for 5 min-
utes. Farmer, immediately as he
came back out, edged one from
Barker dangerously through the
slips to the boundary. The second
ball he drove Barker to the long-
off boundary for three. The next
ball was driven _ powerfully
through the covers for another
three, sending the 100 up in 130
minutes. .

Millington was brought back to
replace Barker. Farmer drove

@ On page 5.



Geddes Grant Limited

au



A FRESH INFLUX of horses arrived last Sunday from England
to swell the ranks of the many thoroughbreds already in the Island.
In fact the paddock is now completely full and those stables which
are empty are all reserved for candidates for the next November
meeting. This I find most interesting because some years ago when
I suggested that we should have a paddock with at least 75 stalls at
our disposal and additional room for building more to accommodate
the rising number of thoroughbreds, | was told by a leading authority
of the B.T.C, that the day would never come when we would ‘need
more than fifty stalls.

Well there are now 74 stalls in the paddock, all full. The day
has arrived when we need a paddock of 100 stalls with additional
room for expansion. Clearly this cannot be accomplished at the
Garrison.

Nevertheless, we are still left to wonder when, if ever, the authori-
ties of the B.T.C. will seriously consider looking for a new track. Or
are they going to allow racing to remain cramped up in the little
two by four at the Garrison?

The new arrivals were four in number and the first that I saw
was Nan Tudor. A filly by Owen Tudor out of Glenfinnan she is
very much on the small side with decided light bone all around.
Nevertheless, it is never good to judge solely by first impressions and
ora, so when a horse has just spent about two weeks in a horse
ox at sea,

With regard to Nan Tudor’s pedigree her dam is by King Salmon
out of Grandissima, by Clarissimus out of Groat, by Junior. In the bot-
tom line Nan Tudor therefore has a string of three dams of winners
behind her name, and although Glenfinnan so far has only one winner
of a small race to her credit. both Grandissima and Groat threw two
very good horses. Grandissima produced Patriot King, who dead-
heated for the Irish Derby in 1934. In addition to Patriot King she
is also the dam of three other winners. To Groat goes the distinction
of being dam of the famous Plack, winner of the One Thousand
Guineas in 1924 for Lord Rosebery and although Groat produced no
other winners she did well enough by this single one who credited
her with £11,467. Her pedigree must also have been well thought of
for her to find her way into Lord Rosebery’s stud. Nan Tudor is not
a winner but has a few places to her name.

Next I had a look at Arunda. In contrast to the above filly she
appeared to be a very large filly and well set up om her legs. She is
more or less black going to grey in parts. She was imported privately
by Mr. M. E. R. Bourne, who also bought Nan Tudor from the ticket
holders, and her sire is Pampass Grass and her dam Link Lady. Link
Lady is by Link Boy out of Mintern, the latter a dam of one winner.
Mintern is by Blandford, Arunda has also run a few times in England
this season gaining one or two places. At first glance I liked her looks
a lot.

We then moved onto the paddock across the road where Mr.
F. E. C. Bethel’s yearling importation was on show. A well grown
youngster by Valdavian out of Match Play I was also impressed with
his first appearances. I should say he has what the critics call “good
bone”. His owner informs me he is already nearly fifteen hands so
that he is well on the way to becoming a big one at two, Valdavian,
his sire, is by Tiberius out of Haintonette the mare who produced
those two famous routers Valerius and Valerian and was herself the
winner of the Oaks. Match Play, his dam, is by Taj-Ud-din out of
Aquitania. Neither of the last two mentioned mares are dams of
winners. The line is therefore a little obscure to me.

Harroween, who has been purchased by Mr. Rupert Mayers on
behalf of a syndicate is another good looking filly. By Harroway out
of Thyine Wood, she is grey and looked very racy at first sight. She
has also run in England this season but I have not got her form handy.
Her dam, Thyine, is by Thyestes out of Madder, a mare with a rather
unusual name. Although Thyine was not a winner yet First Thyme,
another of her foals by Thyestes was a useful winner of three races
valued £1,638. Madder also threw four other winners of 7 races
including The Mad Mullah, by Mieuxce, just to show that her owners
were quite serious about her name. Madder was by Pomme-de-terre
out of Dynamic, another dam of three winners of small races.

Well, that’s the lot and now time will tell what they will turn
out to be. No doubt, when I see them again in a few weeks time IL
will not recognise them. At least those who will be put in training.

ANOTHER NEW JOCKEY

Not long ago a new jockey, young Wilder, arrived from England
to ride under contract for Messrs. Walcott and Chase. Most of us will
remember he rode his first winner at his first meeting in the W.1.
only week before last at Arima.

Now the expected arrival of another youngster from England has
been announced by Mr. M. E. R. Bourne who has been successful in
contracting for the services of Arthur Baldwin. This jockey had the
distinction, last season, of riding a winner the very first time he ap-

eared in public when he landed a horse called Colomboy in the
Aoocentios Handicap at Newmarket. Previous to this Colomboy, al-
though four years old, had not won a race. However, it is said that
he went very well for Baldwin who had been riding him in home
allops.
* Baldwin was first apprenticed to trainer Jack Colling and then
A. Copper, but his indentures were afterwards-transferred to George
Allden. I expect he will be out in time for the November meeting.

I am very glad to see that we are getting in some new blood among
our riders. Now that a number of the top-ranking Venezuelan jockeys
have been encouraged to stay at home we can certainly do with a few
more riders to infuse outside influence. It seems that we shall never
produce local riders of much promise in great quantities. Just a little
success always goes such a long way to making them complete failures.

IMPRESSIONS OF ANOTHER

A turfite who recently returned from Trinidad informs me that
he was not impressed with the performances of any of the three-year-
olds with classic engagements. Which means those still entered in
the Trinidad Derby next Christmas. I was not impressed myself just
listening to the Radio, but I am glad to have an eye-witness account
to go on. '

This being the case. the only unknown quantity in Trinidad at
present who may have a good chance in the Derby is Wavecrest. For
him the question is whether he can return to complete fitness in time.
Meanwhile, the chances of the Barbados contingent will be enhanced
and this list will include such as Watercress, Bow Bells and Mary Ann.
But there are still others who I would like to see in November first
before we complete that list.

Meanwhile, if the Jamaican champion Footmark comes aown for
the classic as well, he will be an even hotter favourite. Our most
recent racing authority from that island informed me that this horse
could easily give Blue Streak (at his best) at least 14 lbs. and beat
him easily. In that. case, I asked him what they were waiting for.
He has only to hobble out on to the Queen’s Park Savannah next
Boxing Day and pick up about $5,000 for the asking. Is there anyone
here who would like to buy the horse?





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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1950

FIRST ELEVEN CRICKET



@ from page 4
Kim for two the first ball but was
clean bowled three balls later by
a quick off-break at 63. The
seoreboard read 113 for 4.

Byer and Warner came together
and took the score to 125 when
Byer was caught at first slip by
Robinson off Williams. Byer
scored 18.

The next batsman in, G. Chel-
tenham, saw his partner Warner
beaten and bowled by Millington
for 5.

With the score at 131 for 6,
left-hander E. Brewster partnerea
Cheltenham. Rain interrupted
again for another 6 minutes.

While Skipper Alleyne was
ringing bowling changes, the
Police pair were playing their
hands in. They sent the 150 up
in _ 178 minutes.

Brewster was unfortunately run
out for 22 and the seventh
Police wicket fell for 179.

COMBERMERE vs. LODGE

Combermere ............,.,
Lodge (for 0 wkts.) â„¢

A gallant knock of 90 runs by

Mr, H. Sealey, helped Combermere
to raise the grand total of 234
runs when they met in their
three-day fixture against Lodge
at Combermere yesterday,
_ Winning the toss Skipper
Knight decided to bat. This deci-
sion proved fruitful, for almost
all the boys made a §00d contri-
bution. Of these, Norville who
collected 41, Wilkinson 29 and
Quarless 14 were good perform-
ances. Bowling for Lodge Mr.
McComie was their best bowler,
when he took 6 wickets for 49
runs,

Skipper Knight and Mr. Sealey
opened the School’s innings against
the fast attack of Brookes and
Gill. The wicket was perfect,
and these two batsmen found n»
difficulty in scoring and 20 runs
were knocked up in as many min-
utes. Lodge struck their first
blow, when Brookes cleaned bow]l-
ed Knight with the score at 29,
his contribution being 8. Dimin-
utive Grant partnered Mr. Sealey,
who was then batting confidently,
and they continued to play their
Opponent’s attack easily, O utram
replaced Gill, and Mr, Sealey
greeted him with a glide to the
leg boundary to hoist his individ-
val score to 29 and the total 50.
Hutchinson one of their slow
bowlers, came on in place of
Brookes, but the score went on to
63, when rain drove the players
to the pavilion for about fifteen
minutes.

Combermere lost their second
wicket, when Mr. McComie who
replaced Hutchinson, had Grant
caught when attempting hook
shot. Wilkinson joined Mr, Sealey
and was immediately off the mark
with a single past second slip, and
in the same over Mr, Sealey com-
pleted his fifty with a leg 2

for 4 runs,

Play became quiet, as the bats- |
men were contented to play the |
ball, but was enlivened when Wit-
kinson beautifully cover - drove
and square cut Mr, McComie in
successive balls for boundaries to
send 100 runs on the tins for the
loss of only two wickets. This
was their best stand for the season
so far, |

The lunch interval was taken |
with these two batsmen still at |
the wicket. Wilkinson and Mr. |
Sealey being 27 and 69 not out re- |
spectively and Combermere’s total |






Ma

Agents EA

~~

BENJAMIN LTD.,

to 124 runs for 2 wickets.

Light showers continued to fall,
but play went on, and Outram
who opened their attack was now
brought on and succeeded in get-
ting the ball to nip off the wicket.
This did not worry the batsmen.
and they continued in their easy
style of batting. Occasional quick
pick ups, by Hutchinson saved
quite a mumber of runs, but
Outram came in for some punish-
ment, when Mr, Sealey on-droy
and glided him to the boundary
to make his total 83 and the score
to 139. Without any further addi-
tion Wilkie had Wilkinson caught
at square leg for a painstaking 29.

Next man .n wa, C. k, Norville
and he was soon off the mark
with a glance for 4 off Outram’s
bowling, and in Wilkie’s next over
Mr. Sealey stole a single to send
150 up on the board, Four
wickets were soon down, when
Mr. Sealey who was the main-
stay for the school, fell to a dolly
catch after a fine knock of 90.

No, 6 batsman was Quarless and

6 he along with Norville took the

score to 173. During this period
Quarless made two beautiful
strokes on the leg side which
earned him boundaries, but half

the side was out at 195 when
Quarless was bowled by Mr.
McComie after contributing 14
useful runs.

Toppin joined Norville who was
well set by this time and the.
carried the score to 200 whicn
came from a boundary by the
latter. Combermere lost their
sixth wicket when Norville fell a
victim to Mr, McComie, after he
had made 4. The seore board
then read 210—6—41. In came
Mr. Smith and he was off the
mark with a snick through slips
for four runs.

The remaining batsmen did not
stay long at the wickets, and Mr
McComie quickly claimed the
wickets of Smith, Toppin and
Norville, and the score had moved
up to 230 for 8. An additional
three runs brought the school’s
innings to a close,

Murray and Deane opened
the Lodge School innings, but
after five minutes’ play, a heavy
shower drove the players in, and
play was finished for the day.

90 Independents
* * .
In Trinidad’s
+ .
EKlectiona
@ from page 1
This, it is anticipated will put
an effective curb on the “Wild
men It is believed that a num-
ber of East Indians will be vicio-
mous at the Polls, and this also
will add to the complexity of the
pohtical situation
It is not outsics of

possibility, however, that some,
or all, of the parties may coalesce,

and, probably with a few inde-
pendents, form a strong “opposi-
tion bloc” in the new House

However, all that is of the future,
as, with the huyve number of can
didates standing, it is extremely
difficult to forecast the complexion
of the new Legislature

Butler Trouble

Polling will take place Trom 7
am. to 5 pm rhe police are
taking al! measures to cope with
possible disorder, particularly in
certain Southern areas where the
Butler party has a strong follow-
ing. Mounted police have already
been dispatched to these and other
districts Many Butlerites com-
plain that their names are not on
the Electoral list. The authorities
say that this is their own fault,
as they kept putting off action
until the return of Mr. Butler
from England By the time he
returned, however, it was too late
to have the matter rectified

This sense of grievance of the
Butlerites, and indeed, of many
hundreds of other electors whose
names are not on the list, may,
it is felt, lead to trouble on polling
day

Governor’s Powers

Under the new Constitution,
power is placed largely in the
hands of the people, but the Gov-
ernor has certain reserved pow-
ers. In the new set-up, the elected
members will have a majority of
one in the Executive Council. The
choice of the five representatives)
of the people will be made by the|
whole Legislative Council, which}
will inelude the solid Government
blee of eight. This bloe will prob-
ubly dominate the voting for

MEN I el

=~

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Lower

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

“SURRENDER OR DIE’’

@ from page 1

Tokyo confirmed late today that
the spearhead of the Amefiean
marine Was at Tanirinai in ihe
suburbs of Seoul little more than
a mile from the city

T) jwuth Korean genera! stafi
also cinimed that Kimpo, 10 miles
northwest of Seoul had faMen arid
that fighter planes were already
operating from its airfield

Carrier based Marine Corsai
ranged over the whole beachhea.
area and knocked out 230 of an



estimated 280 Communist lorrie

ishing trocps southweres toward
inchon

Reuter’s Correspondent Re
Macf artney reported from Inchon
Executive membership, and this
could easily lead te early ais
agreement and disunity among

the people’s representatives, Ty 1
this is likely, can be assumect
from the fact, that from the

Executive position
plums attaching to ministerial ap
pointments, of which there will
be five

All in all, ‘iritiaad and
face a testing five years. wiatiy
leaders from the people them
selves have expressed grave fears
that not a few unworthy candi-
dates may be returned, Optimists
however, are hoping that
sener elements among those seek
ing office, including most of
cutgoing members, will he
torious to-morrow.

LUudage

the

vic-

Shou'd this prove to be the case
observers feel that Trinidad will
aavance in tranquillity and pros-
perity, towards the goal of com-
plete independence, and towards
a happy era, following Federation
with her sister Colonies in the
British Caribbean

lat

m

vecsels
yom bardment
> said
destroyers

He

mhunist
water f

will come the ¢

He

'

mo

h

ent

ro

rep
ele

I
re

Wor

the *

Under cover of their guns Gen

nes !

ad

tr



OW

laid

rat



have

down

five
and four



a

cruisers,

rocket
rained a shower of steel on Com- |
~iehments

ao

and smashed

rtea

t

lan

hi oke turned day
3 inarines struggled forward |



"The
Die

dt
nh

€

alf

felt

CoH

heur
umble of reverberating exr
ever ceased

og

open
Jagged path for attacking marines, |

rile
The

firm

|
ootheld in the port on which naval |
heavy

shir

uss on

into |

The Topic
of
Last Week

ix|
>s |

th

a

net
|
|



the sea wall from the ‘ant
t They encountered only |
resistance’. |
ven nations took part in the
( landings—America, Brit—] Wl! boys somethings do happe
: eo = To mak us stop and think
Australia, New Zealand, | por wren « chains et nueae
.la, France and South Korea. There is the broken jink
h °®2 snips, it was the larg-,! = "
amphibious operation — since} aya,
ld War II ly «





ANNOUNCING



THE OPENING



CASABLANCA

Opposite St.

Lawre ie



Pwr
Going home

women

» pourty







eral MacArthur sent reinforce- Charlie Eide
ments and shock txoops ashore i
this morning to bolster the initial
marine assault Goma janet eorenne
Agreed ‘twas sterii fy
R % ‘ Humanity then came next
To throw the Communists To such it was & cures
further off-balance, South Korean
oops were landed yesterday at| And Tuesday bright and early
; ant a pints plone the peo There was another fus
t aah ane ares i I Up in the ancient Chamber
insula coast To stop the lorry bu
South Koreans north of Yon re boys there are some people
Chon advanced two te three miles sg ghies an Cee oe
over a 25-mile front aren 1uad ab (he
The Arnerican Second Divisio
n the central section of the Nak re nen et
Seta Ve nnd And to the seaside too
tong river, the “west wall” anc MN Soe and Lasu ana owe
the 25th American Division on Use “M. Tw wenty twe
the south coast advanced up t :
two rifles Phe Buses In Barbado:
R te my suffice a few
—Keuter. Tie lorry on a Sunday
Is there for Joe and Lor
memset cn nn gente tninanaiichiaies
eS
And when the crop time “come 1
yes boys through sun and
OF They send for us by lorrie
To reap the “Massa“ cane
ere politicians
rhe t hing we wo
° ‘i the Dus owne
Theiv buses are too few
, eu see they get ufflctent
Gap, Worthing We don't mean two or three

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SEPT. 17 — NO. 137






PAGE FIVE
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J

PAGE SIX

Lord





Alfred

Tennyson

(1809-

By AUGUSTUS

: sy tas long lifetime, Lord
Dessiyour Was acxnowledged to
poet of the Vic-
was not only Poet
Jester“ Was tne most dis-

wic most widely ac-
a4giasu poet of the nine-
» and his personal-
ime imagination of

sbeaS bee

sat



+ eeolury

Ay cuprdceu

ine cutire Engusn-speaking
worla rus lau =commanding
igure, his bearaed face with its
Levie ieutures, ne

melancholy
400K in lis aeep eyes—tnese made
& romanuc picture and helped to
form | ine Lennyson iegena. He
Was regarded by the public as
wuo aloof trom his
feliowmen, brooding upon life and
ume and eternity, and dreaming
his magnificent areams. But look-
ing back upon the Lord Tennyson,
we are apt to forget that his great
triumphs were achieved after
years of struggle and bitter dis-
appointment. Indeed, perhaps the
most interésting part of his life-
story is to be found among those
early years when he was quite
unknown and only a few intimate
friends had-faith in his future as
a poet,

one Stood

Poetry seemea to run in

; his
family.

His father had been a
writer ol verse; so were two of
his brothers. Alfred Tennyson
first ventured to publish some of
his work ‘When he was a mere
boy of seventeen, not yet entered
upon his studies at Cambridge
University. Many poets, as they
pass through the fiery years of
youth and enter upon menhood,
are filled with all kinds of revol-
utionary ideals, and are anxious

to turn the world upside-down
and put everything right; but
Tennyson had a very different

temperament. He pondered deep-
ly upon the unhappiness that he
Saw in the world, but it was in
the solemn march of progress
that he had hopes of better things.
He distristed fanaticism and easy
remedies for social ills, His faith
in the future was founded upon
the great traditions of the past.

Even_as & student at Cambridge
University;; he was known as a
vather aloof figure. But those to
whom he gave his friendship had
a great Joye and respect for him.
First =-tmong his friends was









Arthur Hallam, son of the great
English rian, The two young
men inseperable; their
intimacy*fhad deep spiritual

foundations; and each believed in
the futuré=greatness of the other.

Hallam was both the inspirer and
the kindly=eritic of the volume of
poems T yson published when
he was $Â¥enty-one and of his
next book: of poems issued a
couple of ¥ears later, The recep-
tion of these works by the pro-
fessional critics—and by the pub-
Jic—was a grievous disappoint-
ment to the young poet. And then
came an event that was to darken
all his days.





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MUIR

News reacii€u i...
or Ute
saAliasut, Aone wed 6
With SOFPOW, itie very soe
of tus iile
UUs CApiepomwi se tede “6
elUZy ME Vegas ww was. cetee
Ap wh€moriaan, Uiie Vi bie Be barron
pueitis—ai OL Wie greawwet Ol al,
4t as cerlaimy oOue vl ute
Clepies iff ihe Laigiioii iatiguage,
oul many years were 10 pass De-
fore it was compie.ea.

bPeagiC Utes Ua came as ares

Wad diiimecs.

basatoe

“At the same ume as he begui
this work, he setuea uown to un-
prove some of his earier poets
and to write oiners. Me was de-
termined to strive without ceasing
to develop his poetic powers, rvr
a whole decade he Japoured, and
then decided w pubiisn nis next
volume. It contains some of the
best-known of his shorter pieces,
among them The Lotos Eaters and
A Dream of Fair Women and
Locksley Hall.

But we must not forget another
great event in his life; he fell in
iove, and became engaged to be
married to a beautiful girl called
Emily Sellwood. And once again
it was his fate to suffer disappoint-
ment. Alfred Tennyson was poor;
his father had died and he felt
he had family responsibilities; so
the engagement had to be broken
off, From the time of his falling
in love with Emily to the day
when it became possible for them
to marry, fourteen long years had
gune by and Tennyson was a man
ot forty-one. By this time he had
written The Princess, a long poem
in blank verse which contains
some of the loveliest lyrics he ever
wrote, for example the song be-
ginning:

“Tears, idle tears, | know not what they

mean,

Tears from the depth of some divine

despair

Rise in the heart, and gather to the

eyes,
In looking at the happy Autumn fields,

And thinking of the dave that are no
more,”

Tennyson was made Poet Lau-
reate in succession to Wordsworth,
und wrote his famous Ode on the
Death of the Duke of Wellington,
which was followed by Maud, a
he began his series of Idylls of
jong poem of love and war, And
the King, which told of the chiv-
ulrous deeds of King Arthur, an
uncient English monarch, and his
nights of the Round Table.
‘Tennyson's career was now well
advanced, although he had thirty-
three years still to live—years of
triumph and of honour. On his
marriage he had said that his wife
“brought the peace of God into
his life,” and that peace remained
‘with him into his old age. All
his later work shows his mastery
of the English language, and his
est poetry had been compared
‘9 the music of a great orchestra.

‘fis fellow countrymen respected
lim for his loftiness of purpose
ind the nobility of his mind. And

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SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



West Indian More of this and—

Prints At



The Museum HEMINGW AY
HAS HAD IT

SIR Edward Cunard’s collection
of West Indian prints and litho-
graphs is on special exhibition
at the Museum for two weeks
only. These prints formed part
of the collection of West Indian
prints which was exhibited in the
Art Gallery after its opening by
H.E., the Governor in July. As

‘ the result of repeated requests by
* those who were unable to visit

the exhibition, Sir Edward’s col-

* lection has again been hung in the

Art Gallery. With this fine col-
lection of prints are shown a num-
ber of water colours from the
Lucy Carrington Wertheim col-
lection presented to the Museum
last year.

The Museum has recently been
presented with two showcases,
one by Messrs Da Costa & Co
Ltd. and the other by Dr. H.
Harcourt Carter. These welcome
gifts by no means satisfy the
Museum’s need of more show-
cases, for it still has in its store-
rooms much material which it has
been unable to place on exhibi-
tion owing to this shortage.
Among the gifts received recently
by the Museum have been a col-
lection of 18th and early 19th
century spectacles presented by
Dr. H. Harcourt Carter, an exam-
ple of black Wedgwood pottery
and samples of volcanic dust
from Miss B. Parkinson, and a
self portrait by Geoffrey Holder
the Trinidadian artist.



when Queen Victoria honoured
him with a peerage it was emid
the applause of the whole British
nation.

As he matured, his faith grew
stronger; he believed in the spir-
itual evolution of a world that
moved onward to some divine
destination. The deep sincerity of
his mind shines as clearly through
his work as his sensitiveness and
strength. Many people are to-day
returning to the poetry of Tenny-
son and finding pleasure in its
melodic beauty and in his many
lovely portraits of the English
countryside—a countryside seen
through his eyes in all the magic
of dawn or the freshness of an
April shower, in the Ylory of an
Autumn sunset or the silver
beauty of winter moonlight .. .
And he will always remain a great
figure in the history of the Vic-
torian era—a poet who praised all
that was finest in the England
that he knew.



SHOPPING THE EASY WAY

GENEVA: A_ Geneva green-
grocer is feeling on top of the
world. He bought £11 1s. 6d
tickets in a lottery and went on
holiday. On his return, he found
vhat he had won a Stand 4-seater
saloon, an_ electric washing
machine and a large-size refrigera-
tor, Going to collect his prizes he
was handed a registered letter by
the . His wife had in-
herited £4,000 from an aunt. He is
now looking for a lottery with a
villa as first prize.









DIAL 3676.




i

: CECE AUBRY~JACK HAWKINS.

>| oe HENRY HATHAWAY -




9

If any wr ter might have been
expected to create the great novel
of World War II, it is Ernest Hem-
ingway, whose “Across the River
and into the Trees’* is published
simultaneously n Britain and
America.

The world has awaited it avidly,
believing that it m ght be worth
setting on the shelf beside Tol-

stoy’s “War and _ Peace” and
Zola’s “La Debacle.”

For Hemingway is the most
famous livng writer, and the

highest paid. (Hollywood gave
£25,000 for one short story.) He
worked five years on this book,
his first for ten years.

He was equipped
both as man
World War II.

for the job,
and writer. In
he was far more
than a reporter. He saw action on
land, sea, and n the air.

In the Caribbean he chased
U boats in his 40ft. cabin cruiser,
armed with high explosives and
be zookas. He flew on R. A. F. ops.

In Normandy the huge, bearded
novelist’s Jeep roared 60 miles
~nead of the Amerjan Army
His aggressive soldiering with the
Maquis in occupied Paris led to
a formal charge of misconduct—
and the Bronze Star.

VIOLENCE

“IT am and always have been
a soldier,” he once said. It is
true. All his books are first-hand
reports on brutal action and
volent death: “A Farewell to
Arms” on his World War I, ser-
vice in Italy (he still wears an
aluminium kneecap as a result);
“Wor whom the Bell Tolls,” on
civil war guerrilla days in Spain.

‘To report on this age of carnage,
EF emingway invented a_ harsh,
clipped, aggressive style, strictly
superv sed by early Montparnasse
feiends Gertrude Stein and Ezra
Pound.

Admirers called it the hardest-
hitting prose of the century.
Critics sniffed at hs swaggering
amid a welter of drink, lust, and
blood, at characters who talked
like sub-normal orang-outangs.

They suspected q soft, senti-
mental centre. “Come out from
behind the hairs on your chest,
Hem‘ngway! We know you.”

And now what should have been
the explos'on of a literary howit-
zer goes off with q dismal phut.

His new book is about as bad
as it could be.
Hemingway takes as hero a

war-battered colonel, and wr tes
him into a petrified and utterly
unreal love story which looks like
an embarrassing ‘hunk of wishful
thinking.

War only gets into the book at
second-hand, when this sour bear



_OM TH
i \

\



en Pley by Talbo mn
¥ bot denn een Play “by Taleet Seonines = Raped Su the Novel Oy THOMA’



__ EMPIRE

at AC TUDOR

naar OVEL IS

Filmed along the fobled + route of Kublai Khan ..sa-
vast spectacle of multitucles and thundering caravans
world afire with conquest- ablaze with discovery!

Based on the Novel by THOMAS B.

CARIBBEAN PREMIERE—TO-DAY and Continuing

THEA TRE





Star Book

of
the Day
by
WILLIAM
GRACE



works off his rage against the
British and the brass-hats of all
nations, while grumbling in bea
with his mistress.

The scene is Venice,
colonel fought here in 1918, re-
turned after the second war,
having helped to liberate Paris
and cross the Rhine. He is just
over 50, has had several wives,
one a “warco”, but no daughter.

1946. The

Only drugs and dr.nk keep the
colonel going. At life’s fag-end
he wants to die here with his
three loves: Venice, duck-shoot-
ing in the marshes, and his g rl.
She is a wealthy 18-year-ola
contessa, “shining in her youth
and tall striding beauty.”

DUMMY

K'ss me once again, and make
the buttons of your uniform hurt
me, but not too much”, says this
dream dummy.

‘I wish we could ke married
< have five sons.’ the colonel
said,

“ ‘So do I,’ the girl said. And
send them to the five corners of
the world.’

“ ‘Are there five corners to the
world?’

“ ‘IT don’t know,’ she said. ‘It
sounded as though there were
when I said it. And now we are
having fun again, aren't we?’

“ ‘Yes, Daugater,’ the colonel
said.” (He had always wanted a
daughter.)

This sleazy couple maudlin
back and forth between Harry’s
Bar and the Gritti Hotel, she
hang:ng on his opinions of “our
British cousins, who could not
fight their way out of gq wet
tissue-towel.”

Of Montgomery, spat upon as
a tardy show-off. Bedell Smith
is a high-pressure salesman,”
Leclerc “another jerk of the third
or fourth water,” the U. S, Gov-
ernment “the dregs....you find
‘n the bottom of beer-glasses.”

Only Rommet! is admired. And
the P. B.I., sent in thousands to
needless death by ignorant brutes

MBE



ee PORE

Sobmggeesneatees



es

ratwns sy LOUIS Dy LIGHT,



29D9O99SOO 2












miles behind the lines. With
asterisks to mark obscen ties
Having shot his mouth,
colonel kisses his girl and
ff to shoot duck, He

fter

the
goes

ACRID WIT

There are glimpses of merit
“he eleg ac loveliness of Venice
wihier. A hint of the hideous

s:ze and din of war, and the pity |

and anger the author felt. A
touch of acrid wit
“Almost any | ar writes more

convincingly than the man who
was there,” says the colonel.
Hemingway was there, with his
alert senses and dare-all ccurage
But instead of recreating what
he saw—the savage impact of
battle on the brain and s new of
living character—he has lazily
settled for a man in a desolate
girl-hungry mood, eking it out
with h’s old dumb-ox philosophy,
and some of the worst writing he

has ever signed.
The field is wide open for that

great war novel.
London Express Service



**We must face facts, men,
is Ava worth the increase—
or do we admit the cinema
encourages delinquency and
take musyc lessons.”’



J’can Gets
Police Medal

LONDON Sept. 15.

Sgt. Rudolph Brown (i®) of the
Jamaican police has been award-
‘ed the Colonial Police Medal for
gallantry, for disarming a
dangerous man armed with a re-
volver, it was announced in the
Official London Gazette tonight.

On May 30, Hawker who
quarrelled with another man in
Kingston, Jamaica, fired five shots
wildly in all directions from the
revolver, the citation said. One
man was killed and sx people
were injured.

Hawker was reloading his re-
volver when Sergeant Brown
succeeded in disarming him, The
p sto] was later found to contain
three live rounds,

—Reuter.

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1950

| | Write Direct or Airmail for ae Advice—Free

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1956







The | Colour
Bar

B.B.C, Discussion Thursday

Learie Constantine will intro-
duce “Why are There Colour Bars
Today?” a broadcast in the BBC’s
General Overseas Service on
Thursday next. The programme
is,described as ‘an informal sym-
posium on some factors that
make for. the continuance of
colour bars.’ Taking part in the
broadcast will be Elspeth Hux-
ley, author of many books on
African problems, who will speak
on economic and administrative
questions; Dr. E. J. Dingwell,
anthrepolog st and author of
‘Racial Pride and Prejudice,’ who
will discuss the psychology of
race prejudice, and Professor L. S.
Penrose, Galton Professor of
Eugenics at University College,
London, who will talk about some
biological considerations. Broad-
cast wil] be at 9.00 p.m. on Thurs-
day, 2ist. inst. and will be re-
peated on the following day. Fri-
day 22nd. at 3.00 p.m.

United Nations Report

The BBC has arranged a ser-
vice of radio reports to cover the
fifth General Assembly of the
United Nations, which begins at
Flushing Meadows, New York, on
September 19th. A crack team of
reporters will furnish a _ five-
minute report on the previous
day’s proceedings at 8.15 p.m, on
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thurs-
days and Fridays and from Sun-
day, 24th. inst, there will be a
fiftteen-minute review of the most



Two hats from a
Paris collection; Above.
satin
roses
right is a large boater in white
Turkish towelling edged in navy

current
a grey
evening cloche with pink
and aigrette. On the

crosgrain—with
veil,

a mMavy cage

London Express Service,

Rose Cuttings Sent
By Air Eearn
Dollars



i . important developments during
ben UBANDS of dollars are it Goeoeting week to be broad-
ing earned by a new British cast at this same time each Sun-

export—rose cuttings.
From London's airports,
liners are

_, day. In addition to these re-
C aim ports, vocal and cable contribu-
taking them to hard- tions from the BBC's correspon-

currency countries all gyer the dents at United Nations will be
world. : heard in the daily news broad-

British cuttings have now cas and in ‘Radio Newsreel’
rt their highest popularity which is on the air daily at 8.00

Inch+long cuttings are p.m.

being flown daily, in large and En i i
small consignments, to stock parks, ane ee Ge Berries of Man
street flower beds and private tury meeting at Birmingham of
gardens of more than 30 nations. the British Association for the
Speed Essential - Advancement of Science the BBC
The director of a company ex-j will broadcast a discussion pro-
porting the cuttings said:. “Ourfigramme called “The British As-
first necessity, is speed, . The cut-MSopiation Meets: in Birmingham.
tings—or rose-budding eyes, as™In’ this programme scientists will
they are known commercially— talk over one of the main sub-
die a fortnight after being taken. jects discussed at the meeting,
Air transport is the only solu- which was the theme of the
tion. . President’s address — ‘Energy in
“We are now dealing with the Service of Man.’ The speak-.
countries as far apart as Australia ers will include Sir John Cock-|
and Canada. Our overseas trade croft and Professor R. E. Peierls,

SUNDAY

Four Royal
Names

By FRED DOERFLINGER

LONDON

F






neéss Anne Elizabeth Alice
Louise of Edinburgh has much
bo live up to
She has beer i regally-
im the great trac hames
have a r.ng ubout
them, beiliting ’ is
th rd in succ > throne
of England and 10 May vne

day be queen

Close friend of Princess
Elizabeth and Prince Philip
have known for some time of
their fondness for reintro-
ducing names whch though

notable in English history, have

passed out of Royal usage in
recent times.
Stuart names like Charles,

which they gave ther first-born,
and Anne have not been popular
with English royalty since Jaco-
bite days.

200 Years Ago—Queen Anne

It is more than two and a halt
centuries since g Charles reigned
and more than two centuries
S.nce there was a Queen Anne on
the British throne.

Anne, a Hebrew name mean-
ing “grace,” has its origins in
remote antiquity. It was a
favourite name in the Byzan-
tine Empire which existed from
A.D. 395 to 1453. It first came
into use in England -at the be-
ginning of the 13th century, but
was rare unt] the beginning
of the 14th century.

It then came into more gen-
eral use, perhaps because of the
influence of Anne of Bohemia,
consort of Richard II. By the
beginning of the 17th century ‘it
was one of the commonest Eng-
lish names, and remained so for
at least two centur-es.

Six queens of England have
borne the name of Anne, Near-
ly six centuries ago, the first of
the two queens of Richard Il,
son of Edward the Black Prince,
was Anne of Bohemia, sister of
the Emperor Wencelaus of Ger-
many. She died in 1394, six years
before her husband is said to
have been murdered at Pomfret
Castle.

Poisoned

Another Anne was the wife of
Richard III (slain at Bosworth,
1485), wha is said to have been
poisoned by Richard to make way
for his intended marriage with
Princess Elizabeth of York.

Anne Boleyn, second queen of
Henry VIII and mother of Queen
Elizabeth, was beheaded at the
Tower of London in 1536. Anne
of Cleves, Henry’s fourth w.fe,
was divorced in 1540.

James I of England and VI
of Scotland, son of Mary,
Queen of Scots, who succeeded
to the throne in 1603, was mar-
ried to Anne, Princess of Den-
mark, daughter of Frederick
II.

The last Queen Anne in Eng-
lish history (1702-1714) was the
wife of George, Prince of Den-

ark, She was known as ‘Good

een Anne,” an extremely re-
ligious woman whose short reign
was marked by internal poiit.-
cal wrangles between Whigs and
Tories, Anne had 17 children, ali
of which died young.
Not “The” Prinvess

The young Princess Anne will

é “The Princess
has spread to places we had not F.R.S., both of whom are knowr! et oat iy neeasaa Hamad is eae
even «ontemplated, when we for their work on the atom bomb. fr corved for children of sovereigns

Broadcast will be at 6.30 p.m.
on Friday, next, 22nd. inst.
George Orwell

started exporting in 1946.”
London Express Service.



Women In Bosnia Claim ,
. of ‘The Contemporary Englis

BELG mareenee novel’ the novelist to be discussed
RADE: Moslem women of wij; pe George Orwell, whose

Bosnia are discarding the veil, (ea: tg as suct loss;
their centuries old symbol of male peak Fes raat wee BCS ,
superiority. Meetings are going on
throughout this predominantly {jcagi writer and satirist with his
Moslem Republic — supporting prijliant ‘Animal Farm’ and ‘1984
demands for the veil to be pro- which have made his name a
hibited by law. Moslem men of household word may overshadow
some areas are supporting the his achievement as an English
campaign for a new law, but there novelist and the speaker, T. R-
are others who oppose it,
the women that to drop the veil ly upon the earlier novels,
is heresy and a mark of pecially ‘Burmese Days’

immorality. ‘Coming Up for Air, which made

es-,













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ASHBY & MEDFORD Ltd.,

STUART & SAMPSON,
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E. R. BROWNE, M. L. SEALE & Co.,
8S. E. COLE & Co., Ltd., D. VV. SCOTT & Co., Lid.,
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SSS

to English letters. The success in,
recent years of Orwell as a poli-;

Fyvel, will therefore dwell large-!

and,

M1 SOW

f¥and is not used as a prefix to the

a

In the coming week’s editionfit, the throne any of her four

title of her brother, Prince
Charles. But should she succeed

ynames may be used as a Sov-
ereigh’s title.

There was no surprise either
about the choice of Elizabetn
as second name for the new
Princess. It has been borne by
four Queens of England — the
consorts of Edward IV and of








Henry VII, by “Good Queen
Bess,” and by the_ present
Queen. It means “God hath
sworn,”

There has never been a Queen
Alice in Britain. It is an old Nor-



Orwell's name among a small
Zcircle of readers, This talk on
* Orwell will be broadcast on Wed-
‘nesday next, 20th. inst, at 7.45
p.m. d



H.R.H. Princess Elizabeth

man French name and means
“noble cheer.” Tt is the name of
Prince ,Philip’s mother, Princes:
Andrew of Greece, is one of the
names of the Princess Royal, the

Duchess of Gloucester and the
Countess of Athlone
Fearless
Louise is a Teutonic name,
meaning “fearless warrior.” It
last appeared in the English
Roya] House when the eldest
daughter of Edward VII was
christened Louise.
She died in 1931. Before that

Queen Victoria named one of het

daughters Louise. She was
Princess Louise, Duchess, of
Argyll, who died in 1989 at the

age of 91.—ILN.S.

What The Well
Dressed Dog
Should Wear

PARIS, Friday.—Off the Champs
Elysees, near the salons of exclu-
sive dressmaker Balmain and one
of the most expensive shirtmakers
in Paris is a shop called Au Chien
Elegant (At the Elegant Dog).

When I called, two tiny York-
shire terriers, owned by the wife
of a French composer, were on the



counter being fitted with yellow
knitted sweaters, at £1 12s. 6d
each

Said the manager: “For the
winter, an elegant dog needs at

least three items for his wardrobe:
the sweater, of course, for sports;

a smart coat, perhaps made of
plaid, and a waterproof coat.
Inder wm tmecanel

Under the waterproof, on cold

days he will wear the sweater.
At A Glance
“Just as you can tell by looking
at a Woman whether she is dressed
by Dior or Fath, so it is easy to
tell by looking at a dog’s jacket

that he is dressed by Chein
Elegant.’
To “tailor” a dog the owner

pays according to dimensions, but
for a full+sized poodle—far the
most fashionable breed in Paris—
the price is £3 3s. for a made-
to-measure coat.
Four winter leather
a terrier cost 25s.
WingCollars
For collars, top fashion, I was
told. is a shining white patent
leather winged collar (£3 3s.) a
worn with a man’s dress shirt.
The collars are attached to bright-
ly coloured leather straps
Beds for dogs are of coloured
canvas stretched on tubular metal
framework, which collapses for
packing in the holiday luggage
Pantastic varieties of toys were
on show. A favourite is a large,

boots for





grey rubber mouse which squeaks. |

The shop has a beauty parlous
where, for slightly less than £1,
an average sized dog gets a sham-
poo, trim, manicure and brush-up
Appointments have to be booked

London Express Serviec



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ADVOCATE



consonants
being

ford”,

c

MIND a
iy "his

Mazeograph for J



a

EMMA C MCKEAN

J EMEMBER the n ursery

* rhyme that begins, “Pussy
at, pussy cat, where have you
been”? Our junior readers can
Tetermine whom he saw and how
he got there from this maze-

SECRET WRITING JUMBLED MEN

7 HAT

proverbial saying that
ill odd digits being replaced by
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replaced by vowels:
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255

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the following figures—

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PEN PALS

Cumberbatch,
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PERFORMING DOG

ao msuy

Betty “Water-

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CALCUTTA: Four months ago
Russian-born Mrs. Marie Sandaros
an animal trainer, found a mongrej

iog with a broken leg outside her

home here. The dog’s leg healed
and she started to teach it circus
tricks and was astonished one day
to hear the dog say “Mama”. Pluto
also blew several rapid blasts on

| toy trumpet and walked on his

forefeet with his hind legs in the
air, Pluto’s next task, according
to Mrs. Sandaros, is to say “Papa”
nd after that “a simple sentence

such as ‘I love Mama and Papa







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NEW YORK: Unpleasant sur-
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and collected it from the £5 they
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LS

almost daily injure them-
| selyes, often cut themselves,
| injure their knees or elbows
| by falling; they often catch
| skin-injuries when sporting
| and playing, by a kick or
| a fall, A wise mother there-
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PUROL ready, because she
oot TN knows only
too well how
helpful this
remedy is ig
all such cases.



4
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asked her husband this morning

tell
dewn
quickly produced the following:

aback by what she read, She was:
used
her puzzlist
had gone she went to work witn!

a

wanted for dinner. Do you know? !
ajd edde usip dead

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hot if the Hottentot tot hoot and |
toot at the Hottentot tutor?

JOHN CROSBY,

If a Hottentot tot taught a
Hottentot tot to talk e’er the ot)
could totter, ought the Hottentot |
tot be taught to say aught, or
















PAGE SEVEN



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Mrs. Sharpe was not taken
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PAGE EIGHT





Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bruigetown.





Sunday, September 17, 1950





TO-MORROW

TO-MORROW Trinidad goes to the pol's
to elcet anew Legislative Council. The new
Council will be the first to be elected under
the new constitution and because of this
fact the elections are of interest to all West
Indians. Under the new constitution, Trini-
dad will have a majority of elected mem-
bers in the Legislative Council and will
embark for the first time on the experi-
ment of ministerial responsibility.

Other colonies look forward to being
entrusted with ministerial responsibility
and it can safely be assumed that the eyes
of the Colonial Office are on Trinidad to see
how that country shapes up to its new re-
sponsibilities. On the measure of success
that attends the Trinidad experiment may
well depend the hopes of other West In-
dian islands.

The election campaign which has pre-
ceded the voting which will take place to-
morrow has been one of the fiercest in that
island’s history. To place one’s policy and
principles strongly before the electorate is
the right of every candidate for the Legis-
lature but in Trinidad it appears that the
legitimate means have been exceeded and
that there have been occurrences which
have been the source for grave misgiving
by many persons,

More than a hundred persons have
offered themselves for election to eighteen
seats. In many cases it has been difficult if
not impossible to decide for what many of
the candidates stand. There is a body
calling itself the Caribbean Socialist Party
which represents the usual ideals of social-
ism, There are in addition a host of other
parties, and an even greater number of
persons who owe allegiance to no party,
which seek the votes of the electorate.

Barbadians who clamour for ministerial
responsibility may well study the lessons
of the Trinidad elections, Ministerial re-
sponsibility implies many things which
are not yet apparent in these islands. It
requires men who are fit and able to take
upon themselves the burden and responsi-
bility of directing the affairs of govern-
mental departments. It has usually been
taken to mean that a sufficient number of
persons representing the same point of
view can be found who are willing to work
together. Equally important, it demands
the sense of loyalty which is exemplified
by the doctrine of collective responsibility.
By that doctrine the whole party in power
resigns when the government receives a
vote of censure even if that vote of cen-
sure is directed at only one minister.

The evils of coalition governments have
already been apparent in the hesitant and
precarious lives of so many French gov-
ernments. Such governments provide none
of the conditions in which ministerial re-
sponsibility can flourish. Such conditions
are the ideal setting in which opportunism
and demagogy flourish. They are not the
conditions in which stable and energetic
government can function.

For more than fifty years Barbados
evolved and worked a system by which
men of different views could contribute
their best in the service of their island
home. Those who to-day may decry that
system may well ponder on the success
which attended it.

In small countries of mixed races the
temptation to appeal to racial prides and
prejudices seems to be irresistible. In
Trinidad it appears to be enough in the
eyes of some candidates to state their
membership of some racial group and to
expect that the members of that group will
forthwith give their support.

Never before in the varied and at times
stormy history of these West Indies has
there been such a crying need for states-
manlike leadership of the unemotional
type. Such leadership has not yet been
forthcoming. Trinidad, as the proposed
seat of the Federal Government, is looked
to provide much of that leadership.

~- —
To-morrow it will be known whether the
Trinidad electorate has been able to over-
come the spate of oratory with which it
has been deluged in recent months and to
choose those men and women who will be
able to provide that which is needed. The
best wishes of the people of Barbados go
out to the people of Trinidad at this his-
toric moment for in their fate lies very
largely the destiny of their own political
institutions.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE

WHAT Queen’s College lost by the resig-
nation of Mrs. E. J. D. Corbin, who had
successfully held the post of Headmistress
for the last 13 years, can only be measured
by the success or failure of those who take
her place, to maintain the high standards
of scholarship to which she has brought
Queen's College.

In 1937 when she first came to the school
she found dingy, antiquated buildings,
nestling close to the equally time-worn
Combermere, desperately wrestling with
the educational needs of 178 pupils. Its
Sixth Form numbered two.

It says much for her untiring zeal and
determination that only a decade after,
there should be a Queen’s College whose
resemblance to the old was only basic.

Modernised and comfortable, if not yet
entirely adequate buildings catered to a
flourishing school and healthy Sixth Form
whose Higher Certificate results and exo-
das of students to Universities were begin-
ning to show impressiveness. .

And with all this came the brightest
feather in her cap—the securing of the
1946 Barbados Scholarship by one of her
students, Elsie Pilgrim.

Moreover, every effort has been made to
cure specialist mistresses for the staff—
“orts which begin to show clear signs of
aition, and the new, well-equipped block
voted to Science and Domestic Science
ids great promise for that branch of
udy.

tn

» oO

ym Ae

Mrs. Corbin was an Honours Graduate
of Glasgow University, and held the
Teachers’ Diploma of Cambridge.

She started teaching in Government
Secondary Schools in 1923, and by her
l cenness and ambition rose to the post of
fenior Mistress of one of them.

In 1937 she came to Barbados and Queen’s
College, the outstanding success of her
past teaching career being primarily re-
:ponsible for this appointment.

The fact that during her 13 years of
teaching her favourite subject, French, at
Queen’s College, she has never had a fail-
ure, is a vivid testament of the effective-
ness of her teaching technique. So effective
is it, in fact, that many other schools in the
island have adopted it.

She brought to her task a sympathetic
and tolerant outlook, and a bright friendli-
ness which won the affection of all.

It is unfortunate that ill-health has
occasioned her retirement, a loss to the
educational system of the island that Bar-
bados and Queen’s College cannot well
afford.



Dangerous Bathing

SEABATHING is one of the great past-
times of all Barbadians and is the chief
attraction that draws tourists to these
shores. The enjoyment is, however, marred
each year by tragedies which occur to per-
sons bathing in the sea around the coast.
Other tragedies are only averted by the
fact that many Barbadians are strong
swimmers and willing to go to the rescue
of those in difficulties.

At many bathing spots in the island
there is no provision for rescue work, and
indeed it is only at Cattlewash and Rock-
ley that the most elementary steps are
taken to provide help for those who may
find themselves in difficulties. It is time
that a greater forethought is exhibited by
those in authority.

The Commissioner of Police has rightly
pointed out that the matter is one for the
attention of the Parochial authorities. Cer-
tain simple and inexpensive precautions
could be taken. Danger notices should be
put up to warn visitors of those parts
where the sea is known to be dangerous.
This would apply mainly to the coast along
the Eastern side of the island where unfor-
tunate incidents have taken place on more
than one occasion.

All those beaches which are popular with
bathers should have easily available a line
which could be thrown or fired to persons
in distress. In time it might be able to pro-
vide a proper life guard service but a start
should be made with those precautions
which are as efficient as they are cheap.

A fatal accident in the sea is a bad adver-
tisement for the charms of Barbados. When
everything is being done to encourage
tourists, steps should also be taken to en-
sure that they can enjoy the amenities
that the island has to offer without risk to
themselves,

Above all those who bathe in the sea
must exercise their discretion, Shooting
waves is a most enjoyable game but those
who attempt to play that game in waters
where the current is strong are asking for
trouble if they go too far from the shore
The Parochial Authorities must move to
provide the means of rescue. The bathers
must by the exercise of caution make cer-
tain that the means of rescue need never be
used,

4

SUNDAY

“, . . But listen—my
mark this — *REQUI

ADVOCATE



of which he may stand in need’ ”





Sitting On The Fence

Hy Nathaniel Gubbins

A worried girl writes to a
woman columnist: —

“I am 21 and was quite
happy at my work until the
manager made advances to
me. For some time I evaded
them, but now he has changed
his lunch hour to be alone in
the office with me. He is
married and over 40. How
ean I discourage him?

If you care to chance your arm
on the sack. dear, you could try
this method.

ALONE at last.
lucky?
We?

Aren’t we

Well, I am then. But you may
be lucky too. I don’t suppose
you’d say no to a fur coat this
autumn?

I always say no to fur coats.
Not only do I consider them
vulgar, but they are also obtain-
ed by torturing animals in traps.

Oh, come off it, sweetheart.

And it’s no good offering me a
diamond ring either. Jewels are
also worn mainly by the rich and
vulgar. Gold and diamonds are
obtained by slave Negro labour
in South Africa,

* * *

Well well, Quite a little Red,
aren’t you?

Nor will I accept a champagne
dinner, Alcohol not ony be-
fuddles the brain and distorts
the mind; it weakens the will to
resist evil.
it immoral to eat more than one
requires at a high cost. while
millions go hungry in Asia. Shall
I sit on your knee?

Why, of course, sweetheart.
You don't have to ask.

I asked because most men of
your age have rheumatisn, Are
you very old?

Me? No. They say the middle
forties is the prime of life.

* * *

I expect it’s your muddy, pur-
plish complexion and _ large
stomach which give one the im-
pression of senility, though I sup-
pose your appearance is largely
due to over-indulgence. Is your
wife hideous too?

ou can leave my wife out of
this.

Little fat men like you always
marry hideous women and spend
the rest of their lives pestering
youth and beauty, Am I hurting
your knee?

You couldn’t hurt me, beau-
tiful. I say, let’s talk about
something nice. I’ve got a pro-
position to make to you.

And I have a proposition to



Moreover, I consider”

make to you. Will you marry
me?
You know I can't do_ that,
sweetheart. There’s iny wife.
You can poison her.

Really, sweetheart you're
joking.
No, I’m not. You want love.

I want money. Don’t let indi-
viduals stand in the way of our
mutual happiness. Are you rich?

Oh. cut it out.

When you have disposed of
your wife you can make a new
will in my favour. Then I will
marry you.

THANKS FOR NOTHING

But as you are too unhealthy to
live long, I shall soon be a happy
and contented widow. Shall we
finish those letters we started
this morning?

Home Doctor

Mrs. Maureen A. McGuire,
of Seattle, U.S.. has been
granted a divorce because her
husband “made her life un-
bearable by continually
psycho-analysing her.”

KNOW why these beans are

underdone?
Because I took ‘em out of the
water too soon, I guess. What

else?

Oh no. That’s not the real
reason. The real reason is be-
cause when you were a little
girl (you were jealous of your
baby brother.

For cryin’ out loud,
crazy?

No. I’m not crazy. I’m learnin
you somp'n about psycho-analysis.
Think right back to your child-
hood.’ Didn’t you want to boil
your little brother alive?

No, I didn’t want to boil my
little brother alive. So there.

* * *

You don’t think so now because
you’ve forgotten. It’s a hateful
memory buried way back in the
sub-conscious.

What the heck’s that got to do
with underdone beans. anyways?

Because when you were boiling
the beans you were symbolically
boiling your little brother.

Leave my little brother out of
this will ya? bia ‘

At the last moment you had a
fit of remorse. So you took the
beans out of the water before
they were properly boiled. Just
as you would have taken your
little brother out of the water
before he was properly boiled.

Is that so?

It was the same with the burn-
ed bacon for breakfast. You

Are you



Our Readers Say :

Electricity

The Editor, the Advocate
_ SIR,—Lt. Commander Smytiies
is, I am happy to avow, a friend
for whom I have a real regard,
whose opinions on machines and
electricity are, in my estimation,
valuable, whose intentions are
excellent, while his industry and
tenacity has my envious admira-
tion. :
For years the home of C.S. (may
I be forgiven if, for brevity, I use
initials) has been in Canada. In
that vast Dominion great areas
have been highly electrified, with
ample and cheap current genera-
led by waterpower. It would
seem very difficult for CS..
unw/ttingly, not to judge the
island electric supply against that
background. A comparison that
would not be reasonable. For in-
stance, the charge of 22c. per unit
would seem to him extremely
high, and I too would like to see
't reduced, but in Cornwall in
England, I paid only a penny less
for current from the Grid. Again
in Canada, there are, no doubt,
many men of high ability, retired
comparatively early from full
tme active business, who are
prepared to shoulder heavy pub-
lic responsibilities, from a sense
of civic duty and to keep the rust
away. Here numbers are small
and the slower pace of life leads
to different results, To find three
just men with the knowledge to
understand and the capacity to
judge between conflicting techni-
cal opinions, the ability to take
over and manage all or any of the
three companies if that came to
pass, with the requisite le'sure
and the willingness to serve,
would be mighty difficult, C.S.
himself bears witness. to what
happens when statutory powers
outrun available capacity to ad-
minister. If wisdom prevails,
nothing is done. If great powers

are exercised without knowledge
it is like a blind man driving a
motor car

C.S. sets out to show the bene-




fit that would result from the pro-
posed Board, but the o con-
crete advantage adduce the
reassurance of those who are








doubtful whether they are get-
ting a square deal. But, judging
by the numbers who want the
company’s service as soon as they
can get it, there is no deep_or
widespread dissatisfaction. of
course, we all grouse like the
dickens when things go wrong
or when we cannot get all the
service we want, but it does not
go deep. It certainly does not
seem to me to warrant setting
up a ponderous and expensive
establ’shment, the ‘cost of which
will fall on the company’s custo-
mers.

C.S. would like the choice of
the machinery to be bought and
operated by the company, to be
in the hands of the Board, who
however need no qualification, He
considers that the People of Bar-
bados should have a voice in the
companies’ decisions and policies
and so would place them, along
with the Companies, completely
under the thumb of the Board,
who would be answerable to
neither. It seems a pretty far
muddle to me. Incidentally,
though “the people of Barbados”
is a fine sounding phrase, in fact
the consumers, actual and poten-
tial, of electricity and of the other
utilities. are no large fractions of
the population.

But at the root of C.S.’s criti-
cism of the Elect#ec Company lies
something more understandable.
Yu his opinion steam turbines are
more reliable generating units
than the diesels the Company has
installed, and there is much to be
said for this view. On the other
hand, though diesels need more
attention, it is claimed that they
should be more economical in
fuel; fuel is expensive here and,
as the Company’s customers have
reason to know, it bulks largely
in their costs. It is a complicated
quest'on involving many factors.
But I think we can be sure that

the Directors, in coming to a de-
cision, would not act on their own
whims and fancies, but on the ad-
vice of experienced consulting en-
gineers for that is the ordinary
bus inference



iness practice Ne
can be draw rom the rect
breakages in new machines. De-

ort clearly says: ‘We, Ernest Bevin . . . request and’ —
RE that the bearer should be afforded EVERY assistance



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1956
tacts eneruneiinasaanttat tonne Sata



_







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STERLING VALUES

in Wearing Apparel

of all Descriptions.

BROADWAY DRESS SHOP.

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PHONES: “t+
























4472 & 4687
—London Express Service.



WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.
Successors to

C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD.

"Phones 4472 & 4687









burned the bacon because you
hated your father.

Am I supposed to have fried my
father alive now?

* * *

Not at all.
as that.

IP’ul say it isn’t, seein he weighs
all of 2501b.

What happened in your sub-
conscious mind this time is that
you transferred your hate fixation
from your father to me.

That wouldn’t be difficult,

eee

PRINCESS
REFRIGERATORS ~

° 3 eub ft

° 3 year guarantee

It’s not as simple

You thought you were cooking
his breakfast, not mine. So, until
you let me cure you, I shall
always have to eat undone beans
and burned bacon.

You certainly will. And what’s
more, the pot roast for dinner to-
night will be burned up, too.
Itll be your dear mother I’ve
roasted alive.

PRICE $425.00

Just arrived at-- «

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.
ELECTRICAL DEPT.

Magnetic Men

A Mr. A. E. Rose, writing
to The National Funny Morn-
ing Newspaper, says that when
he was in the Navy it was
noticed that his head always
swung to the north as he sat
in the barber’s chair. When
the captain heard about it he
had Mr. Rose slung horizon-
tally from the deckhead. The
ship was then turned through
360 degrees, and, as Mr. Rose
always swung to the north,
“the possibilities of a human
compass needle became at
once apparent to the captain.”
“No doubt you will hear
more of this scheme,” Mr.
Rose adds, “though when sus-
pended in alcohol the human
needle is not too accurate.”



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FOR QUALITY AND BEAUTY

so CHINTZ

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. * *

YOU will hear more about it
now.

When I was in The Home Guard
much the same sort of thing
happened.

Off duty. sentries slept in the
hall of the golf club and, as we
were usually suspended (to some
extent) in alcohol, we swung
wildly in all directions, though
the general tendency was towards
the bar, which was north of the
hall.

Sentries returning to the club
after two hours at the observation
post were not quite so suspended
in alcohol, and were therefore
more accurate as human compass
needles.

The moment they entered, their
heads swung north towards the
bar. The magnetic pull was so
strong that they were inside be-
fore you could say Heil Schickel-
gruber.—London Express Service.

fects in mater.a] should not occur,
but if they do, damage will re-
sult, whatever the type of ma-
chine. I understand that last crop
trouble due to faulty material oc-
curred with new sugar machinery.

Now, whatever one thinks of
this, and I, for my part, lean to
steam, the fact remans that this|~
company operates diesels. To]
change over to steam turbines. & mt
If it were possible, would, T am|*%

at present prices cost about halt | ¢
a million pounds, a burden quite

DaCOSTA & Co., Lid.
DRY GOODS DEPT.

told, take about four years and ¥ “
* When You're Out
eet of aS 8. = the elec- F .
re supply in Barbados. m
I can only hope that C.S. will Or Enjoy ent at

declare peace and join me in
praying that his previous persis-
tent proddings wil] not result in
electricity and the other utilities
costing more.

Cc. E. SHEPHERD.
Colleton House,
Pa

Your Favourite Club

St, Peter. the moments
are always
the happier

if

Farewell Message To
Queen’s College

To_The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—Would you please allow
me to send a message to the
Parents and Friends of Queen’s
College, past and present. Last
October I went away with the
hope that I would soon return but
this, I deeply regret, is not now
possible, My message is one of
sincere thanks for the loyal sup-
port given to me, on all occasions.
as Headmistress of the School and
for the many kindnesses shown to
me personally by Parents and
Friends.

Ma y Queen’s College, for which
I will always cherish a great affec-

GODDARD'S
GOLD BRAID

RUM



tion, continue to flourish and play 1S Served. $
a Teading part in the education of 3
girls in Barbados,
If ever, at any time, I can be of * x
help to a Queen’s College girl %
coming to England, this , . . +
me pleasure. . err x The Secret a 2 =
With many thanks, %; S
T am, ‘ ‘ Ps
Yours sincerely, s - the Sip. >
E. J. D, CORBIN > %
Arundel! Gardens ¢ %

London, W 11.

is ‘
LLLPDEESLLLLCCSFESESSSSOSSSS ESSE SOS SSO SS SOS SOD

Rom
-

iA



ae RRR NRNRRRNUR MBAR eH

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1950



Hurricane Pictures From Barbuda

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





NEW STOCK ||







Pictures on the left depict some scenes from







PAGE NINE





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i
{
it
. |
the stricken area. i AT
iy . )
n ay a . ; { ie BAY ‘puP
lop-—-A collapsed building, in which people ; BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
are still living. i AMOSAM—For Making a
; ve ot 2 ; mouthwash, Cures b -
Second—What's left of Codrington village. | rhea and Tonsillitis oh HARRISON'S
Pitt ‘ j . : \ Bottle
Thirc Warden's Home: Refugees collecting BAYER'S ASPIRIN in. 25's
rations. and 100’s BROAD ST.
: Bottom—Pigeon House:.. In this Reservoir ay tg Pye a ance LOCAL AGENTS
i slaves used to draw water for master, CIGAKETTE LIGHTERS—
i mistress, and their families. Guaranteed | to light every DIAL 2364
time —2/9 3/-
To - ' SUN GLASSES—made of ie "
p (Right) What's left of three houses. Sent Guality siase will’ not FULL RANGE OF STYLES AND
injure the eyes: From 2/- 4
to $10.00 each, SIZES IN STOCK.
WRIST WATCHES—Excel-
e lent quality $9.00 to $17.00
KODAK CAMERAS— $5.00,
| ore a ri ean $10.00; $12.00; $16.00; $20.00
$25.00; $35; $50.00; $80.00;
»200,00.
St D WODAK FILMS—'o fit all
i Or AL) am Cameras t
age HIGH CLASS PIPES~-Dun (4 my
hill, Parker, Comoy, Every
BARBUDA a dependency of The “Pigeon House” another man, Grand Slam and Bah-
Antigua was badly hit by the famous piece of slave work has tam. .
hucrleane, which devastated the been damaged. In the past this Pipes that are especially
arger island. structure was used to conserve made for us at 2/6 each
The pictures on this page taken water, Slaves were made to fetch ) The working man’s pipe T E N N | S
exclusively for the _ “Barbados water and throw it in at the top }|| CADBURY'S CHOCOLATES }
Advocate” give some idea of the for their owners to draw when |\\\ Red Rose jlb. 1 lb 1
suffering which has been experi- they pleased. i Hazel Nuts } lb 1 Ib '
enced by the Barbudans, / } Milk Tray $1.48 | {
Peasants have lost over four Years ago a Dutch ship “Paul ])) Princess 1 Jb 4 ib
hundred head of small stock. Most Rosa” was wrecked on the eastern Assortment )
of their small boats which were reef off Barbuda and has always ROUND TREE'S CHOCO-~ }, {
at anchor during the hurricane been visible about four feet spove| LATE—Black Magic $3.85; {{
have been destroyed or beached. sea level. Boisterous seas of Sep- $1.88; $1.08 AND
Barbuda is noied for its gorgeous tember 1, washed the wreck higher RAISINS IN PACKAGES— :
pink beaches, and quantities of on the reef and it now stands fully Of excellent quality at, G2e,. }) :
blush pink sand combined with 20 ieet above sea level. per pkge. J vt .
shell from the eastern side of the Holy Trinity church had its Perfume from France and n
island was carried a mile inland belfry torn away and the bell is Jamaica \ & TABLE-TENNIS
by the sea which encroached the reposing with rope and all in some \; MY SIN PERFUME $6.00 KR
land, nearby trees. } $10.00 and $14.00, im”
Mathilda Tower on the southern Destruction of Mathilda ‘Tower { CARON PERFUME—-French { |
side of the island has been badly and the Pigeon House are a great}}!} Can Can; Bellodgia: Rock { |
damaged. All the woodwork has loss to Barbudans because they|{{ Garden; Black Narcissus; )!
been blown off while only vhe have always cheristied the work Christmas Night; Soloman’s {
tone slave work remains, of their ancestors, Khus Khus at 1/- 3/9 |
; Just Received.. .
Motor Cyclist | VENDOR WINS $14,004 ARE THE CHOICE
| (From Our Own Correspondent) AT
re PORT-OF-SPAJN, Trinidad;
Killed In Crash September 17
| A vendor from San Fernando, B UCE OF
j (From Our Own Correspondent | Miss Janie Frederick is the lucky J
i |holder of ticket MM7537, which
GEORGETOWN, BG ;arew Mist Maid at the Arima . 1
| Frederick Wharton (22) an ém-| Races. She will receive $14,004, WEATHERHEAD
| ployee of Booker’s Drug Stores,| She carries on a small roadside dat 4
i Georgetown, met a tragic and sud-| business including the selling of
den death at about 1.45 p.m. on{ matches, bananas etc. She is the LIMITED
Sunday afternoon on the West| mother of two children, one of
Coast, Demerara, Public Road,! ‘nem being unempioyed for a

when it is reported, he lost con- |
trol of the motor-cycle he was
riding and crashed into a con-j
crete bridge, spanning the side-
line trench at Pin. Cirnelia Ida

Wharton's skull was fractured
when his body was dasheq against
the bridge. He died 25 minutes
later. |

Two other persons riding on the
pillion seat—Bertram Stewart [
(37), a Postal Clerk at the G.P.O.,
and Louis Calder (21) a labora-
tory sampler at the Mackenzie
Pauxite Mines, escaped with bone
f-actures and contusions, The
party were on a week-end outing
across the Demerara River.



(Inc. in Br. Guiana)

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PAGE TEN





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SUNDAY ADVOCATE



SUNDAY,

SEPTEMBER 17, 1950

Romantic British Painting Of The XiX And

XX Centuries ~>>=

By PATRICK HERON

The word “Romantic” has
many vague meanings and [cw
precise ones. The critic who
employs it-—-and it occurs very
frequently in critical writings—

should do his utmost to define it
before he allows it to creep intu
his sentences. Yet attempts at
such a definition are often un-
satigfactory. Here is Mr. John
Piper, a distinguished modern
painter who is among those
British contemporaries widely
referred to nowadays as our
Modern Romantic Painters, open-
ing an essay with the following
words:

“Romantic ari deals with the
particular, The particularization
of Bewick about a bird’s wing,
of Turner about a waterfall or a
hill town, of Rossetti about
Elizabeth Siddall, is the result of
a vision that cat see in these
things something significant he-
yond ordinary significance: some-
thing that for a moment seems
to contain the whole world.” He
goes on to say that: “Abiding
also in the Romantic painting of

this country (Britain) is the
sense of drama in atmosphere, in
the weather and the seasons,”

Obviously Mr. Piper means quite
a number of things by “Romantic
art”. Indeed, artists who think
of themselves as Classical or Sur-
realist or Constructivist might
reasonably claim for their work
that it reveals “something signifi-
cant beyond ordinary significance:
something that seems to contain
the whole world.”

Personal

is much more to be said
for the idea that the Romantic
artist “particularizes”; for those
painters and poets who are known
historically as Romantics certainly
expressed personal reactions to

There

specific situations, events or
objects. Yet the implication of
Mr. Piper’s statement is that

other kinds of art do not celebrate
“the particular’: and this is
nonsense. For Classical art also
contains the results of particular
reactions to particular experiences:
where it makes an addition to
the activity of the Romantic is in
setting the intense “Romantic”
experience within a wider frame.
The experience of a_ particular
stimulant is stated in terms of the
widest possible validity, by the
Classical artist. Cezanne’s ex-
citement at the sight of Mont
St. Vietoire was for Cezanne not
an end but a beginning: to com-
municate the particular thrill was
not enough for him: he had to
translate it into a form which
both contained it and transcended
it; he had to transmute the par-
ticular emotion aroused by a par-
ticular subject into the architec-
tural form of great painting. Bu‘
this process of transmutation can
only come about where the artist
in question has—as his point of
departure—the strongest feelings,
the most intense creative passion:
for this passionate feeling is itself
the material to be changed, trans-
muted.

Vital Element

In other words, the vita!
element which makes a work of
art a Classieal work is a far
deeper thing than the element of
mere ‘style’; it is perhaps to be
found in ‘the evidence which a
work supplies of the artist’s
desire to reveal the universal in
the particular, to produce order
out of chaos. But he has to be
great enough to submit himself
to the chaos (which is the chaos
of his sensations) in the first









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place. Only in this way cun the
order he finally acniey be new
and, because it is new, of vital
significance. The artist whose
insivcence upon order pr-cedes his

willingness to submit celf to
the natural chaos cl exper.cace
will merely become Classicist, not
Classical. His art will, at best,
be a repetition of the orderly
results of an earlier artist’s tussel
with reality; in a word. it will
be Academic. The true signifi-
cance and the true relation of
these often ambiguous words,
Romantic and Classical, was sug-
gested by Mr. T. S Eliot in his
remark that the proper progres-



sion for the individual ertist js
from the Romantic tawards the
Classical.
:
Pioneers

When Mr. Piner mentions.the
English Romantic painter's nse
of drama in atmosphere, in the

weather and the seasons”, we can
at any rate recognize a reference
to the works of those early Nine-
teenth Century painters who have
come to be known historically as
the Romantic Landscape Painters
Certainly Constable, Turner and
Girtin all conveyed the time of
day, the kind of day, and the stage
of the season in their landscape
paintings. And in doing this they
were pioneers. Painters of what
we might call “landscape subjects,”
such as Claude or Prussin, had
employed landscape ; a setting
for something else: their pictures
illustrated scenes from Classical
literature: “landscape” was only
one of the pictorial insred'ents.
along with the stage furniture of
ruins and the stage characters, But
with Tirner and Constable the

landscape itself became the sub-
ject. They were thus the first
artists to become aware of the

actual appearance of a thousand
different particular effects in the
outdoor world. This new awak-
ening of the senses was also re-
Bree in the poetry of the time:

ordsworth, Coleridge, Kes s,
Shelley, Byron, Cowper and Blake
were in many respects the poetic
counterparts of the painters,

urner, Constable, Girtin, Crome.
Cotman and Bonington. With all
these poets and painters, sensuous
perception of the world of Nature
rose to a pitch of intensity unsur-
passed anywhere else in history:
and in English history it is rivalled
—as a poetic renaissance—only by
the period of the Elizabethan
dramatists.

A Vision

The external results of this in-
terlor revolution in the mode of
perception. and fecling were that
for the first time a vision of Eng-
land itself began to appear—upon
the penvegs of Turner and Con-
stable. ichard Wilson, thei;
forerunner, had imported Italian
light in order to illumine the

ountains of Wales. Turner and

onstable abolished this eternal
summer, this constant, even, pow-
erful, Mediterranean light. It re-
presented a _ climatic condition
which England experiences only in
one or two exceptional weeks of
midsummer. Turner's and Con-
stable’s awareness of the play of
changing light in the atmosphere
itself; and of the uneven distribu-
tion of accents of glittering sun-
shine and shadow over the sur-
faces of the countryside was
purely English in origin, and it
was responsible for their great
contribution to the main Europeaa
tradition. In a sense this was pre-
eminently a technical contribu-
tion: it was an immensely signiii-
cant innovation in the technique
of seeing—and the greatest paint-
ers are innovators in precisely



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JOHN CONSTABLE:

this respect: they discover new
ways of seeing everything and
anything. They change the ap-
pearance of the world.

Brighter

Turner’s and Constable’s new
awareness of appearances led
them to the use of lighter and
brighter colours and tones than
any used before. Of course bril-
liant patches of colour had been
used from early times to repre-
sent bright local colours; scarlet
pigment for a scarlet dress; em-
erald green for the leaves of a
tree. But in order to describe the
three-dimensional forms of their
subjects painters had relied en-
tirely on subtle graduations of
their colour mixtures. Titian or
Velasquez, Raphael or Rubens; all
gradated thei: pinky greys or their
golden browns where the flesh of
their models showed naked, and
switehed to gradations of quite
another colour or colours for the
garments and for the other ob-
jects depicted. They thought in
terms of one dominant colour-tone
serving for the depiction of dne
object. It was left to Constable
and Turner to discover that a
shadow cast on a whitewashed
wall might be a stronger blue than
the surface of a lake in sunlight or
eyen of a blue hat, It was also
left to these English painters to
discover that accents of very strong
colour might be seen distributed
throghout, the visual scene. Such
discoveries, of course, directly in-
spired the final phase of the Euro-
pean painters’ conquest of natural
appearances; the French Im-
pressionists could never have ar-
rived at their results, half a cen-
tury. later, if Turner and Con-
stable had not preceded them

Two Well Known

But these two painters, known to
all the world, made their impact
upon the painters of France at
‘east eighty years ago: their in-
fluence upon the mainstream of
European painting was thus long
since absorbed. It was perhaps the
only instance of a decisive inter-



“A Study for “The Haywain”

vention in the development of
European art by English artists
until the present moment, with the
rise to world fame of the modern
English sculptor, Mr. Henry
Moore. But to arrive at the sec-
ond part of my subject, which is
the present school of Romantic
painters in Britain, it is necessary
to recall two other painte; of the
early years of the Nineteenth
Century who, unlike Turner and
Constable, have had to wait till
the present time for their keen~-
est admirers and, we might say,
their most significant following.
William Blake, the great English
poet, mystic and prophet, is still
almost unknown outside Great
Britain as a painter. Yet he and
his follower Samuel Palmer are
the main English source of our
modern Romantics: the other in-
spirer of their movement was
Picasso.

One Aspect

There is not space here to dis-
vuss the numerous imaginative
pursuits of William Blake: we
must be content to mention one
aspect of his pictorial art—namely,
those small woodcuts, the pastoral
fantasies, in which, perhaps, a
twilit landscape of low, .undulat-
ing, wavelike hills recede towards
a setting sun or a crescent moon.
In the foreground a shepherd or
“a poet” might be found reclining
against the trunk of a tree. But
here there is none of the broad
vision of a Constable, a Girtin or
a Turner, based, as such vision
always was, upon great powers of
visual observation of the external
daylight world. Blake and Pal-
mer were not capable of that
disinterested visual observation
which is the one indispensable
gift of all great painters. They
were not, in fact, “great” painters
at all—by the highest European
standards. Their woodcuts, water-
colours and drawings of a fan-
tastic yet gentle and _ benign
landscape were in reality projec-
tions in graphic form of a vision
that was essentially a poet's, not
a painter’s vision. The kind of
imagination which they expressed

had an inner, a visionary quality:
such poet-painters remind us that,
on the whole, poetry has domin-
ated painting in England.

Yet Blake (the Blake of the
pastoral woodcuts) and Palmer
express something very sacred
to the inhabitants of our dreamy,
tree-covered island, with its

soft light, its misty and hazy
distances, its dramatic, majestic
skies, its endlessly subtle variety
of gently flowing hills and
valleys. However, the imagina-
tion of the true painter must
always be anchored in externa)
reality: it begins with the purely
visual, even when it ends up
on a highly imaginative plane.
But this necessary study of the
outward appearances of Nature
is induced more naturally in
lands where light is constant
and strong: the Mediterranean
was perfectly “equipped”, as it
were, to become the cradle of
the visual art of painting. Eng-
land, her very beautiful land-
scape being full of suggestive
but indefinite, subtle forms, and
of endless nuances of tone, was
equally well “equipped” for
breeding vhe more subjective art
of poetry. Painting of course
has its own poetry: but it is
poetry which operates through
a purely formal configuration.
Pictorial poetry is not an ex-
ternal addition to a picture; it
is not something injected into
the design from outside. On
the contrary, it springs out of
the design itself, out of the
realized harmonies of colour and
form. Such is the nature of the
poetry of Constable, Turner,
Girtin or Crome—or of Cezanne.
But Blake and Palmer by-
passed the world of everyday
reality—from which true paint-
ers extract their colours and
forms—and they proceeded di-
rectly to the illustration of their
poetic visions (a kind of vision
quite different of course, from
the sense perceptions of our
eves). And now perhaps we
might say that Romantic paint-
ing is opposed to Classical



—Medium Oil Painting.

painting in the following
respect; its imaginative content
is so much stronger than the
formal structure of the d
that the one is often quite dis-
tinct from the other, Thus
Romantic art invites us to dis-
tinguish form from content; in
Classical art the two things are
fused into a perfect unity.
Blake and Palmer are Roman-
tics in this sense; but Constable
and Turner (despite their his-
torical label) are Classical. Mr.
Piper quotes something Palmer
said of Blake, and hecause it
well reveals the Romantic
attitude, I will give it here.
Palmer of Blake’s woodcuts as
“visions of little dells and nooks
and corners of Paradise; models
of the exquisitest pitch of
intense poetry. I thought of
their light and shade, and look-
ing on them found no word to
describe it. Intense depth,
solemnity, and vivid brilliancy
only coldly and partially
describe them. There is in all
such a misty and dreamy glim-
mer as penetrates and kindles
the inmost soul and gives com-
plete and unreserved delight,
unlike the gaudy daylight of this
world.” Emotive words, evoking
a profound subjectivity.

Present Day

And now to the present day.
Graham Sutherland is the most
powerful of the Modern Roman-
tics.. His is an exceedingly ori-
ginal vision which combines the
naturalistic composition and lay-
out of Palmer’s landscape designs
with an element of abstraction,
and a spiky method of brushwork,
beth suggested by Picasso. But
whereas the element of abstrac-
tion in Cubism was geometric in
flavour, Sutherland’s abstraction
is based upon the organic forms
of the biological or, even more,
the botanical world. A flat net-
work of harsh (and often black)
lines reveals the unfolding forms

(Continued on page 11)







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SAMUEL PALMER: “Harvest

of h‘'s landscapes These forms
have the look of tongues of fork-
ed flame; or of sharp molehills
Sliced into crescent shapes oy
Super-imposed lines of drawing
indicating con‘ours. But this flat
aspect of his design dissolves be-
fore our gaze and there looms
through it all a recognizable
vision of, say, a bleak landscape
of black hills. Perhaps some
ragged bushes of gorse, on the
near slopes, will be rendered as

a tangle of black scribbled lines,
resembling roots rather than
branches. Yet, these do not

remain flat scribbles, there on
the paper; they are felt to
be growing upwards, to be wav-
ing in an invisible wind ana
flaring out in space. Perhaps
Sutherland’s picture of this wild,
moorland scene will have a sky
consisting of a flat wash of ali-
zarin crimson, spotted here and
there with black dots and scratch-
es or of little blobs of scarlet.

NEXT year the moon will be on
the telephone. Visitors to the
South Bank Exhibition in Lon-
don—the main centre of the Fes-
tival of Britain 1951—will be able
to send a message there and back
across 477,720 miles of space in
just two and a half seconds, And
it will be as simple as making a
local cali in a telephone booth.

Contact with the moon will be
made from the Dome of Discov-
ery. The caller will press a but-
ton and send a radio pulse of
high frequency flashing into space.
It will have a wavelength of one
and a half metres and it will be
passed from ‘a giant saucer made
of a network of aluminium which
is to be built on the top of a
tower in the grounds of the Ex-
hibition on the south bank of
the Thames.

The visitor who sends the sig-
nal will watch its progress in a
large cathode ray tube, like those
used in television, in the Dome of
Discovery. When the signal comes
bouncing back from the moon
the image in the tube will give a
little “kick”. A supplementary
tube will enable this echo to be
magnified. Those who ring up the
moon will not have to fumble for
coins. It will be a free call.

Usable Night and Day

The radio telescope now being
built for the Exhibition will be
uSable at any time, astronomers
will not have to wait until it is
dark before they train this tele-
scope on the heavenly body they
wish to study. Even when that
body is invisible the radio tele-
scope will still receive these
echoes reflected from outer space,
and by studying them astronomers
believe they will be able to learn

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1950

Moon”

Somehow the whole thing, though
exceedingly suggestive of the
western, Celtic fringe of this
country (the wild coastal regions
of Wales or Cornwall) is also sug-
gestive of a sort of intellectual
shorthand. The form of the hills,
or of the loose boulders lying here
and there on the reaeen surface
of the moor or the half-cultivated
fields, is somehow too general-
ized. We feel that the hill in the
picture has become a mere symbol
for hillyness: the particular hill
in the painting has no scale and
no conviction of a particular scene.
It might be Everest; it might be
a molehill: it must, apparently, be
read as a sort of microcosm. This
uncertainty I regard as a defect.
But again, a rough hill path may
be seen (in the imaginary Suth-
erland picture I am constructing
here) winding up and ae
ing into the nearest fold in the ris-
ing ground. This disappearing path
will be simplified into the form of
a large slice of melon, or a cres-







—Medium Oil Painting on panel.

cent. Then the big, roundish
boulders I mentioned, being lit
brightly from one’side or the other,
will closely resemble the moon in
having a shadowed side and a
bright side. Thus shapes possessing
symbolic significance are incor-
porated in the texture of the pic-
ture, by accident, as it were.

Moons

Now, moons are almost the
stock in trade of this English
Romantic tradition. But whereas
Blake or Palmer have their moon
in the sky, Sutherland's crescents
are, as I have just shown. just part
of his pictorial description of solid
forms. But he shares more than
this with Palmer: in its flatness, its
black-and-white character, Suth-
erland’s design is very close indeed
to Palmer’s. Though Picasso re-
leased in Sutherland a capacity to
state his themes in a pretty ab-
stract manner, the sort of rhythms

Ringing Up The Moon

Hy GEOFFREY MURRAY

new facts about the composition
ef stars and planets and meteors.

I gave up a morning recently
to walking over the Exhibition
site. Thrilling new patterns
formed by ribbons of steel are
now criss-crossed against the sky.
These buildings, nearly 40 of
them, by the time they are com-
pleted next May will burst upon
our eyes as strangely, I believe
as a lunar landscape.

The Dome of Discovery is one
of these structures, Its frame-
work is almost in place. A ring of
girders, 365 feet in diameter, now
hangs in the air 90 feet above
one’s head. This ring rests on
temporary towers of metal scaf-
folding, but already lattices of
steel ribs, surprisingly slender,
are tying it to the concrete fins
that are eventually to take the
weight. Soon the work of roofing
with aluminium will begin. In
this building the story will be
told of those Britons who have
mapped the globe, studied the sky
and investigated the structure of
the universe.

Spinning Steel Webs

Few acrobats can put on an act
half so thrilling as the spider-
men clambering in and out of
the steel webs they are spinning
scores of feet above the 27-acre
site. A chalk mark scrawled on a
steel plank, is all the direction
they need. And lying on the
ground is something that looks
like part of a prefabricated stair-

case. Presently someone will
come. along and move it into
place.

A coal mine is being built on
this site. A miniature of the
Exhibition’s predecessor, the
1851 venture, is being created.
An aquarium is being installed,
and a new concert hall for Lon-
don, to hold audiences of 3,450,
is nearing its final shape.

Fronting the site is the
River Wall which will be

new
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fish-shaped rhythms of Palmer’s
and Blake's hills, or their sword-
shaped leaves... And we feel that
Sutherland has Palmer's limita-

he uses are very much akin to |
|
tions. Neither of them has a com- |
j
'

mand of plastic form: both are
naturalistic in that they reproduce |
the landscape in, very much. the!

same sequence of proportions in!
which it is observed by the eyes. |
That is to say, the foreground is
near, its objects large; the middle- |
distance is indicated by objects of |
diminished scale and definiteness;
the background is remote and its
forms generalized, There is an ab-
sence of that equal emphasis which
a Bonnard or a Cezanne gave to)
everything within the visual field.



Interesting |
\

Yet in spite of plastic weakness- |
es Sutherland is one of the most
interesting painters now living.
And in England his influence has
been considerable—especialy upon
such able (but, younger) painters
as John Minton, Keith Vaughan,
John Craxton ang Bryan Wynter.
Sutherland's contemporary, John
Piper (extensively quoted above),
is equally a Romantic painter; in
his case Turner has provided
more inspiration than Palmer,

But I think it is clear now that
the younger members of this group
are tending to diseard the linear
methods of Palmer and Suther-
jand for the more plastic approach

of the modern French masters.

These young Romantics (Minvon,
Vaughan, Wynter, Craxton)
average age 32 perhaps, are thus
tending to fall more into line with
those of their exact contempora-
ries (MacBryde, Colquhoun,
Ryan) who were never lured by
Palmer, and who never wavered
in their allegiance to the great
contemporary painters of France.

Nevertheless this does not mean!
that the young School of London
is likely to lose its flavour, Though
we derive much of our idiom from
Paris, it is likely tha’ our own
flavour will become more and
more pronounced. And, of course,
cur characteristic preoccupation |
with landscape continues, even
among those whose debt to |
Braque of Picasso is obvious. j



out next spring as a garden walk.;
Fast this the lively pageantry of
London’s river parades endlessly.
The 1951 Festival is not plan-
ned to be a trade fair. It is
neither an abridgement nor an
extension of the British Industries
Fair, a motor show with trim-
mings, nor a fun-fair version of
the British Museum, It will tell
the story of every Briton—the
work they do, the way they think,
and even the games they play.
Nine million pounds sterling is
being spent on this venture. Of
this sum £2,000,000 is earmarked
for the new concert-hall the one
building which it is intended
shall be a permanent structure.

The Story of Britain

The Exhibition sets out to tell
the story of Britain—of her farm-
ing and the countryside, of the
sea and her ships, of power and
production, science and transport,
radar and gardening,

Soon there will begin to arise
amid the cluster of buildings on
the site some of those strange new
ebjects I mentioned earlier. For
instance, hung on frames will be
spheres like flying saucers caught
in a net. And pointing skywards,
like a colossal rocket about to be
fired, will be the metal pencil
called the Vertical Feature. The
purpose of these things is to
break up the horizontal planes of
the other structures and so diver-
sify their distant view. Some vis-
itors may think, at first, that they
are being transported to the moon
as well as invited to ring it up.

But in these modernistic build-
ings the visitor will see the
achievements of British science,
technology, farming and industry.



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

a

SPOTS





| RUM SHOPS CLOSE
ON ELECTION DAY

From Our Own Correspondent



To Study Social
Welfare

as PORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad; GEORGETOWN, B.G.

The Information Office, Port- The Sugar Producers’ Associa-
of-Spain has issued a notice to tion has selected two young mén,
the effecy that all clubs, and Messrs. Abdool Ali and Clement
rumshops will be closed to the D. Padavavion to study Social
public on Election Day, Septem- Welfare in the U.K. They will
ber 18, from 7 am. to 5 p.m. be leaving by the O.N.S, Lady
One hour must be allowed in Rodney for Trinidad where they

addition to the normal midday
meal hour by every business
place to every elector, who is en-
titled to vote. The penalty for
any such breach is a fine of
$500.00 or imprisonment for life

will join the 8.8. Gaseogne. In
the U.K. they will spend a year
it King’s College and the London
School of Eeonomics pursuing
courses in Y.M.C.A. and Social
velfare work,





SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1950



|
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From Our Own Correspondent)




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inner harbour was taken from a car driving along the front.
a Maria Inxury hotel outside the capital of Grenada sheep graze in country reminiscent of England.

LEFT: This view of St..Geor
RIGHT: Not far from the Sen

NADA—The Land —
Of Spice 22225

|

THe first

cannot fail to be a pleasant
one whether it is reached by sea
or air. If one arrives by sea, the
beduty of the red brick town witt

impression of Grenada
talance to the advantage of that
immunity, suffers, all round the
coastal belt, from malaria, so that

most of the houses are situated





its fine Georgian architecture i high up — oo ~ the 4 A fiN
striking. TI ecnage-is-an ele % , nen ‘i nountain, ount St, Catherine, i:
volc nic crater into which. the sea My G. CUNLIFFE OWEN an old Volcano, has no sign of =
has entered, forming ‘a’ sh@ltered — joes yu dip ; ivan fr " = : activity left except some hot ~ +
harbour and the town of St: Mee Cy at and drives from the jiying in the neighbourhood of the springs . and rarely makes its =

irport over the Gran Dang road Grand Etang.

to St. George's. The road climbs The beaches, though not so
to 1,700 feet, with magnificent cunerh as those in Antigua, are
views over valley and hill, passing nevertheless, it must be admitted,
cn route the crater lake in IS fner than those in Barbados,
etting of tree ferns and Taln Grand Anse, with its smooth clear

o

wan)
PQ’
Fo

presence felt in a not very violent
earthquake.

Oysters

No one visiting Grenada shoul¢

George's climbs the steep walls oi
the crater hick with vegeta-
tion, in streets that are in: ‘some
places s0 steep a8 to become stair-
cases. On the edge of the crater
forms the of the Morne on



now



ridge



forest t Marc when Immor- si . ; i
which are situated the five old , Ne oo hey 0 ae ail water and magnificent view across omit tv tnclude the Grenadines in
te s are wer, V e 7 > , , por iti . i chai

French forts, Governmen: if sides are Wentlet with blossom. the bay to St. Georges, Fontenoy, fheir itinerary. This chain oi

(a beautiful building dating from with its silk cotton trees, so large peautiful islands stretching fifty

1801,) and several private Ti that bathing cabins have been miles north of St .Vincent, is aj

residences. On a subsidiary spur, rees contrived inside the trunk, Levera, little known paradise, Hunting, |

nearer the water level, is the new Grenada has many aspects. on the windward coast, with its shooting, fishing, and the tree-

luxury hotel, the Santa Maria. .~,, periinsula of Poin’ Salines romantic outlook up the chain of oysters of Carriacou may be had ©

the Grenadines, are the best. in abundanee.. There are sheltered
harbours for yachtmen and a
hospitable welcome from the in-
dependent and energetic inhabi-
tants many of them boat buiiders.
lle De Ronde, Kick Em Jinny,
Petty Martinique, Moustique,
Cannouan, Bequia, the names
alone should be a romantic in-
ducement to visit them.

The brickwork of the houses and
ehurches is very beautiful. Much
of it is London brick brought as
ballast by the schooners in the
old days and left behind for build-
ing purposes when they returned
to England with sugar—for it
only comparatively recently that
Grenada has become a cocoa ar
nutmeg producing island

resembles the deserts of Arizona,
with hardy scrub and giant cacti.
Fontenoy Beach reminds one of
an old dapanese painting of the
Inland Sea of Japan. The bay of
Gouyave resembles the sea coast
Italy But the predominant
aracteristic of the island is of
vast plantations of cocoa and nut-
eg with rain forest above; trees,

French

At Sauteurs the old Church
clock has the name of its French
maker and the town of Auxerre
stamped upon its face, reminding
one that Grenada was for a long
time French, The way of life is

aa
Px
im 7
So beautifully easy... #
so easily beautiful,

YES, it’s true..
8 out of 10 American baila

. rees in every direction, mile oo begs tebng. And “ noe B , becduae ae shocobpily dthsSemsial. vol
7 j ; ', the pee 8 8 a Frenc ‘ylfoa 4 5
Mountains noon mile EY a patois, the majority of the pepula- UBS. hair is infused with new radiance, new sparkle. Let say—IPANA dental care promotes

our taster tell the story—the story of glowi

» glorious hair-
ealth! And how wonderfully manageable

I emphasise the beauty of the tion is Catholic, there is a tradi- ‘The story of Grenada is studded e


















vads it rarely possible to see





town of St. George's, because it wre than a few yards in every ‘on of good food, the estates have with names of Grenadians whose Can hii: hoe Becineahical it 44. 00, * Raw ;
8 almost all that Grenada has to cia ‘Beautiful and thrill- French names and the whole at- fame has extended far beyond reat Tacbet sults every ty, ‘ Ti+ ded leew, Gee healthier gums — brightens teeth
offer in the way of architectural j,,9-a¢ first, this tends-after a time. Mosphere of the island has a their little island. There is fair. Ask for Brylfoam and see how beautiful hair ae

ouoyancy and gaiety lacking in

Henri Christophe, the only negro
those islands colonised by the

Emperor, there are de Freitas,

beauty (though it is a great deal

: : ‘o become monotonous and to in-
as there is no other town in the

duce a sense of claustrophobia, so

be! In tubes, the handy and the large economy size.

seri 3 ij 4 , :
Antilles so beautiful except jit one longs for the wide spaces More austere and serious minded there is Mr. Marryshow the Trades there’s more foam in
Charlestown in Nevis). For ae distant en that an icland =ritish. Union leader, Dr. Morgan, present fe

member of Parliament in England,
and—hush!—Uriah Butler!

Grenada can boast no fine old
estate houses like Barbados. All
were burnt in the Fedon rebellion,
as I described in. the Advocate



like Barbados provides. Grenada boasts the only tunnel
in this part of the Caribbean. It
Beasts arives right under the town of

Thar ; aha. ; St. George’s and connects the
some weeks ago, and the smailér (here are more beasts and birds %*: Me és cts P Grena¢
towns of Grenville, Victoria, Grenada than in Barbados, Careenage with the esplanade so near (only 45 minutes by air)
Gouyave and Sauteurs, are Iguana, snakes (though no poison- facing the open sea. It was the yet so far, could not be more
miserable affairs ous ones) Manicou, sucriers are work of Governor Sendall and is striking, and if variety be the

The chief beauty of Grenada is of common occurrence and there hey ie Se eae sae ov is gage ar alloc nie
its ains, well seen if one ig a very pretty species of monkey '"US Saved a tong detour, of | S t
ee z oe Grenada lies outside the while,



As a contrast to Barbados, the
life and appearance of Grenada,

SRYLFOAM |

ORIGINAL CREAM SHAMPOO IN A TUBE ~~ |

eecene
AMAR

ee







hur-



PL LPLELPPELOCESP OL ESLEFEDLPEL AEE LLL LAL LPS LELAP AA

















vy
% ¥
’ ‘ 1 x
¢ QUAST-ARC) =-WELDING EQUIPMENT AND
s, my)
S ELECTRODES. 5
s *
% Your enquiries for WELDING PLANTS and equipment x
x will receive prompt attention from our experienced ¥
* Staff. All types of Ferrous and Non-Ferrous ELEC- }
% ‘TRODES available ex stock.
% “BRITISH OXYGEN” WELDING AND CUTTING
% EQUIPMENT
Alka-Seltzer brings pleasant relief s~ We invite you to inspect our stock of standard items.
When a busy day and a hurried $ Special enquiries will receive our immediate advice

% and attention,

STAINLESS STEEL FABRICATIONS—“FIRTH
. BROWN”
» WE have now in stock STAINLESS STEEL SHEETS
* and are fully equipped to handle fabrications to your
% design in this modern, acid resisting steel.

lunch add up to well-known acid
indigestion, you want quick relief.
Fortunately, First Aid for acid in-
digestion is just as well known.
Drop one or two tablets of Alka-
Seltzer in a glass of water. Watch
it fizz, then drink it down. Spark-
ling, refreshing, brings you quick
relief. Not a laxative.

Tubes of
12 & 30 tablets.



_

: The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lud.



rs





£566066056656669666906+66896000%—05

2 Ss i ] ‘ White Park Road, St. Michael.
i $ Dial: 4546 or 4650.
Alka-Seltzer §
mic epUABORATORIES. INC, Pre Nt oa ae eS ise 5.1, SS GS8CCOGCCS0C0ESOOS"













| Bes? ¢,,°.~7------ Names Synonymous
Since ‘ANT TiRES ‘ : WITH
That's why tng QUALITY & DURABILITY.
more tons, the world over, are Give °

i
{

Hallie’ on Goodyear giant tires a

iiiail On any Other make! vu

For performance—mileage—value, Goodyear win
giant tires are best. They are extra-tough —
last longest—give lowest cost-per-mile. a Ford

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SPECIALLOID PISTONS

PERFECT CIRCLE PISTONS RINGS
LODGE SPARKING PLUGS
FERODO BRAKE & CLUTCH LININGS
ATLAS FORD & CHEVROLET PARTS
ZENITH CARBURETTERS & PARTS
FRAM OIL FILTERS

PYRENE FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
TUNGSTONE BATTERIES

SMITH ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
WINGARD AUTO ACCESSORIES

OXFORD ¢
LONDON






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Other super-samina Goodyear an DUNLOP AUTO & CYCLE TYRES ns Wi

work tires are: Hard Rock Lag eidibcl |
— Road Lug — Studded Sure - Estiniom of the Arn |
Grip ~ 1li-Miler Xara Tred. help the (Large Shipment Expected Shortly)



LSE LISEA PELL ELSES AA SPSS LAA PS



|
}
(UG ,
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WN ASX, W
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ey NG NORWICH
WS worcesterg STRATFORD-ON-AVON +
S a $4 ALDEBURGHE
> XK ui
Y.GRY YIN 4
|
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’ YOUR CAR DESERVES THE BEST—INSIST ON ; ie Festival Summer from May to September 1451
BARBATINS BOYS CLUBS REPLACEMENTS OF QUALITY S ‘ the visitor to Great Britain will find something of interest
baa { going on everywhere. In addition to the centres shown
Three Prizes will be given as follows: We Carry Stocks of the Above for Popular § here, cities, towns and villages all over the country will
; ¥ Cars and Trucks. $I take part in thi§ great national event. With exhibitions, arts
ist Prize: A FORD ANGLIA ¥ tH festivals, carnivals, pageants and sporting events of all kinds,
; uhh eer bi anne nS ae is ii there will be something for everyone to see, to enjoy, and to
2nd Prize: RALEIGH 3 SPEED C YC LE 1 @ | remenibes i}
3rd Prize: ROLEX TUDOR WATCH 3 ECKSTEIN BROT] ik RS rl If
1§ } ey rn gent for fi or details
jrawing to take place not later than Nov. 30th, 1950 x ; - " ne tL } } penne ann tant fo DN CR Ht
| E Hoi. 9 \ ;
i Auditors: FITZPATRICK GRAHAM & CO i x BAY STREET DIAL 4269 VIL ;
. j } M .
TRADING CO l oe . ane cares =! SOSGOSGO9GSS SO VS9611GUO CT OSL. OG 0668 SO SOO6G6CSOSSE645

CITY GARAGE







SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1956 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN















BY CARL ANDERSON

Cam 0
Anpenvon 4









Fic

673i,

< Fp. Ss Z 2 Ye
ay sv





rere














GOOD MORNING! THIS WHERE /
77 I GET A STREET

Ny
ANS:

! YOUR
HIGHNESS







YI DIDN'T HEAR ANYTHING

ME
aly a

BLONDIE
ae TT

a
a









sgn

PT
+} —~s
Caat's i

( SURWING? )

a s
an
|







BLONDIE, |
SOMETHING'S
BURN




TURNER DIESEL ENGINES
INDUSTRIAL, MARINE & GENERATOR SETS











SINGLE, TWIN FOUR CYLINDER MODELS






BY FRANK STRIKER

[HIS TIME I'M GOING TO TRY
A DIFFERENT PLAN! :



From 8—32 B.H.P. Continuous












BEHIND THOSE
ROCKS!



ROBBERY NEAR THE HILLTOP }








B.E.N. AIR COMPRESSORS



PORTABLE © STATIONARY MODELS






SPRAY PAINTING EQUIPMENT |
>

ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LTD.

Tweedside Road, = St. Michael, = Phone 4629 - 4371



THE RIDDLE OF THE ROME REBEL

1 AM GRIEVED THAT YOU MuST GO \y =f ON TO THE DEEP WATERS ~
SO SOON,MY FRIENDS! HOWEVER MAKE THEM [JR - MY DAUGHTER, Goooewe, Fi es
THE WATER AT THiS TIME OF fi LIE DOWN. i SiIGNOR CANNON!
YEAR 1S WARM... LUIGI, PRESTO }
. PRESTO!











MANE Ad i

THE MOTOR LAUNEH DIS AP %: \
THE NIGHT, MAKING FOR TE OPTS

WOW-IIM GLAD I_ GOT uP HERE'S YOUR ean H iors a
EARLY AN! GOT TH! PAPER/! T FROM || HOW MANY TIMES WELL= VE TOLD TH’ POST
} HERE'S THE ARTICLE ON D --GIT HAVE I TOLD MAN NOT TO DELIVER
| DINTY'S CHOWDER PARTY THERE EARLY! |} DINTY NOT TO ANY MAIL / I'VE CLOSED
"LL TE ; SEND ANY THING MAGGIE
AN' BURN IT! | & TO THE HOUSE ? WON'T HEAR ABO!
4 a TJ AW)
(yy , * 5 a
ay 5 Seer Gite
oH y iF
co BY



ERE“

ICKETS

INTY
ERE

aa



Mira §=|LOOK, HONEY...A\ I WISH I WERE ON IT! EVER SINCE |
TRANSATLANTIC / I ENCOUNTERED THE MANGLER, I'VE
PLANE! < HAD A FEELING OF DREAD.,.AS IF I
A”. WERE BEING
SE FOLLOWED
Sb)

RIP _ KIRBY, ie _ BY ALEX RAYMOND

Pi SEE iT? , , : M






THAT'S THE
VES VIA, DIRECTLY
BELOW



@ ANO
2) WATCHED!

THE PHANTOM
or See Se
phos ge 5 ei i. a a. AMP

AGENTS= E. A. BENJAMIN LTD.

306 Plantations Building
Lower road Street, Barbados





> aca ARI a SAE



PAGE SIXTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE



, SEPTEMBER 17, 1950 ~

—

























I 5 Tenan ts C ivil Service Bu i l dd. ing = | BO LAL LOLOL LLLP AOOPE LEAMA EK LLVPEFC sop ae TE
Chosen For Employees Society mg tenn ee ene Kt :
: soma FON AE CIGARETTE LIGHTERS 3}; A U S TIN R t ED

Pine Estate

CONSIDERING further recom-
mendations of the Committee for
new tenants ihe Pine, the

Hold Meeting

Government Subordinate Em-
vloyees, a division of the Barbados
Civil Service Association, held a

Formed

A Society has been formed and
registered un‘er the name of The
Jarbados Building Society, with



HASTINGS ROCK
on Saturday 30th Septemver from
3 to6 p.m

STALLS. "Ne‘dlework, Vegeta
bies and Preserves, Cakes, Noveli



OC OOP OPO POOF OEE LE

TORCHLIGHTS —



CIGARETTE HOLDERS
BALL POINT PENS
BATTERIES & BULBS

SHIRTS

LOSES

= d Toys, Bock
Housing Board at yesterday’s special General Meeting at ihe Mr. Douglas Alleyne, Mr. F. D. Sowers, ° Lady “Dip Wheel
meeting selected 15 new tenants Town Hall yesterday and passed. Burnes, Mr. W. T. Barnes, Mr ve, Sweets, Ices and Hot —
ior that Housing Estate Resolutions to be forwarded to G. D. Bynoe, Mr. Briggs Collins, D4 Iced Cofite Grape Fruit [4 COSMOPOLITAN PHARMACY. i E
_. The Secretary of the Board Mr. the. proper authorities. Among Mr. Stanley Edghill, Dr. H. Sum- eh ee ee oe ; | in
T. O. Lashley, told members that them are: ner Moore and Mr. A. R. Top- Games and Pony Rides eset ttt DALE ELSPA |
the survey _work in conneetion Forty per cent bonus on certa n pin ac Directors The Police Band, by kind per frend - ~ $$ ————<——_—__—__————- —_—————— |
wth the existing layout for the salaries graduated to 25 per cent The Secretary of the Society is cision of Cor R. T. Michelin. (8) gece Swear See

Bay Estate which was essential
before the replanning of the re-
mainder of the estate could be
undertaken, was completed, and
that he had advised the Director
of Highways and Transport that
Mv. Harris, Engineer of the High-
ways and Transport Department,
would be yveturning to his sub
tantive post on Sentember 18

The Secretary added that he
ind thanked the Director o1 Higs-
ways ana Lransport ior making
wai. Harr.s’ services available for
tne survey work at the Bay.

ihe Board aecided to refer to
the Government a letter
Janetha Sealy,

'

a tenant at —

on salaries up to and inclusive
of £300,

Uniform for Pumping Station
employees; Mental Hospital cooks

Proper travelling allowances to
Postmen; Department Marshalls
wid other subordinate employees.

The subordinate employees were
from the Post Office, Mental
Hospital, Leper Hospital, Depart-
ment of Highways and Transport,
Waterworks Department, Public
Works Department, Provost Mar-
shal’s Office, Government Indus-
*tria} School, Water Boats, Light-
house keepers and others from

from ‘other Government Departments.



Mr. Victor Hunte, and the Office
of The Barbados Building Society
is on the top floor of the Barnes
Bui'ding in Bridge Street

It is proposed that this Society
should be eventually affiliated
with The Building Societies As-
soc ation, London, England,

There has been a crying need
for some solution to the problem
of the average man who cannot
afford to build a home for lack of
ready cash, or to repair the house
he owns because of the difficulty
of borrowing money

What was needed was a Build









Commissioner of Police under
Capt. C. E. Raison, A.R.C
will be in attendance fror
oom



Admission
Children and

Adult
Nurses 6d

2.9.50—5n



ATTENTION
PARENTS

+















We are pleased to announce the arrival of

STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS

Tempered Hardboard can be used for exterior work such as

TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS

14” thick, 4 x 6’, 8’, 10’

@ i4e. per sq. ft.

1” thick, 4’ x 12’
@ 30. per sq. ft.







Fine Stripes
with

Neat

SEPARATE TRUBENISED
COLLARS

ALL SIZES AT $7.00

RCL OCEL EOL CO? CLP CFECFE PAPE EY



Pine, applying for a spot of land e ing Society, a Mutual Association, Hoods, Door Panels etc 7 r ’ ny.” z

al aie. Bay ate a eoMichi. tote ourists fron — mens —— a HAVE’ you a child to send NOW IN Ss 7 Od yo ;
amove a ft se in St, Philip that row repay by instalments t sat > a aaah

cay ili ore a . i a 6 over a period of years, and at the heer hool Then a st find ALSO TILEBOARD SHEETS ‘

had been given her by her mother : } a gee all fit out the following facts about

Sealy stated in her letter that she Pe. own same t.me share in all profits the school to which you in- Cream, White & Green 4 bs

found it difficult to pay the $1.50 pede ay ned see i: ve tend entrusting the future 4 Kes Ces * tig %

d-taiciale ve ; » Pine . " os interest paic ould ev aly of vour child x 4, . 52e. . ft. 7

asada coe ie vce RIDGETOWN was again con- yeturned in the form of dividends. , 8 %
The Secretary during discussion gested yesterday morning as Such a Society would enable 1. Is there 10 square feet Phone 4267. e e Q e %

on the letter told the Board that busy shoppers pushed their way the average man to own a home of space for each child ,

from store to store in search of and the payments to the society attending the school? 3

Sealy had been one of the victim:
of the flood in 1949, and that she
was a single woman, occupying a
two-bedroom house at the Pine
He recommended to the Board that
her request be favourably con-
sidered

In connection with the case of
Fitz Murray-Cole, one of the ten-
ants at the Pine, who will be
moving shortly as a result of a
Court Order, the Secretary recom-—
mended that he be allowed to
tuke the furniture given to him
afer he lost his in the 1949 flood.

On Tuesday, September 19, the cent and Subscription Pare ,
This matter was also referred © Cinema will’ be at Lammings $250 each which may be paid for be registered nor approved i
the Government. Pasture, St. Thomas; Wednesday at a rate of as little as One Dol- y gieta eee ee \ |

The Secretary recommended @9 Black Bess School Pasture, St. lar a month, yielding the same nubhorities ane nd bebe a i
emendment to the Plan, Section peter, Thursday Bay Pasture in dividend. blind all tog ae 4 =
P at the Bay. He made the re- Beckles Road, St. Michael and on Moraes Wrap uM
commendation in order to Friday St. Catherine’s School If you send your child to | 1 Ture,
four croS8s roads occurring at two Pasture, St. Philip. ° a school that cannot con- i
separate points in Beckles Road, LECTURE RECITAL which At The Cinema form to these requirements {tt | SUITS Salmon,
which he considered bad plan- is headed “Descriptive Music” you are failing in your duty | Blue,
ning. will be given by Miss Enid Rich- @ From Page 3. as a parent.

‘After some discussion, the Board ardson at the British Councij During this rugged experience Rose,
decided not to accept the Secre- tomorrow at 8.15 p.m. Everyone —for no apparent reason—she L, A. LYNCH, ( Belie
tary’s recommendation in this is invited to attend. ery, — eae ete Principal. | my
connection, and he was instructed HE bicycle M-5772 owned and tion, and decides tha 1e simple ‘ alas agate Maize,
to have the roads built through to ridden by Adolphus Holder /ife is best after all, , | Call in To-day and inspect
Peckles Road, of Jacksons Road, was damaged _ With the exception of Miss|* NEG Light Green,



{ 000 Bags OF Rice. on Friday about 12.15 p.m. with \ wy ig BARBADOS REAL Dark Brown
the Motor car %-456 owned by in front of the camera and it is »
Arrive Donald Edghill of Rockley and nearly impossible to understand ESTATE AGENCY for your cotnfort in this Black,

A thousand bags of-rice from
British Guiana arrived in the
island yesterday by the 72 - ton
achooner “Emeline.” Arriving tne
day before were 2,000 bags by the
“Philip H. Davidson,” making a
total of 3,000 bags of rice to arrive
here during the week.

bergains, The weather was ideal
and many tourists took the oppor-
tunity to walk through the city
and have a look at it
Along the waterfront there
was also congestion as mule
carts and trucks moved to and
fro with loads of fruit and coals.
PRIVATE show at St. James
Almshouse on Monday, Sep-
‘tember 18, is included in the
programme of the Mobile Cinema
for the week beginning September
18 to Friday September 22.

when it was involved in an
accident along White Park Road

driven by Geoffrey
Christ Church.

No one was hurt.
HILE trying te get on the
bus X-214 which is owned

by Centra) Motor Bus Co., and
was driven at that time by Elicin
Broomes of Passage Road, R.
Fletcher, a labourer had his left

Edghill of

would be no more than rent for
another man’s house.

The idea is not new; there are
Building Societies all over the
world, even in the smaller West
Indian Islands.

The first requirement for the
steady growth of such a society
is money to lend: the nucleus
from a limited number of Found-
ing Shares, the bulk from Invest-
ment Shares of $25 each, yielding
a dividend of approximately 5 per
Shares of

Bergman, the entire cast is made
up of the Villagers of Stromboli,
who don’t seem too much at home

the dialogue spoken in English
that is completely shattered.

The action is slow, and with
the exception of a first-rate
eruption of Stromboli and the
sequence showing the yearly
catch of tuna fish, which is docu-
mentary in its presentation, the























2. Has every teacher on
the Staff the minimum quali-
fication of a School Certifi-
cate?

3. Is there one teacher
in the school for every 30
children?

4. Has the: school obtain-
ed any worth-while results
at public examinations dur-
ing the last three years?

N.B. If the school
not conform to the
requirements, it will neither



does
above





Residential
Telephone 2336
Office Hastings Hotel Ltd.

FOR SALE

INCH HAVEN, Christ
Church, New bungalow.
Built of stone. Living/Din-:

ILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LTD.

eee

ain

oe
Sawa = =>

Â¥ Me
he op

our range





of

Suiting, Specially Selected

warm weather.
REASONABLY PRICED

TAILORED TO PLEASE

Pee . hand injured and was taken to film is hum-drum and even ing room, 3 bedrooms, 2
The “Emeline” brought other 11. General Hospital. Bergman’s characterization — of bathrooms. 1 kitchen. All
cargo comprised of 400 bags ot eee rennin the selfish, fretful wife lacks mahogany doors, window e

charcoal, 91 tons of firewood aad
50 drums of cocoanut oil.



\
It has taken berth in the Car- The dri : ; rae a d vants’ room, own A.C. En- . ey ‘
3 i 4 eT rive for funds for the criptive and on the whole, good, rae r \ aoa i
eenage and ao to oer 8e its establishment of a Y.W.C.A. goes though it occasionally becomes gine: aes in one acre < ave e er 0 {
naman ia naan $043" 89 the total figure is now monotonous. "EN-DAH-WIN, Pine Hill. P. Ci; S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd. % r
ia New Bungalow.
The last amount collected was BBEVILLE GUEST 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay



Y.W.C.A. FUND GOES UP

$5.48 bv Mrs. A. A. Gibbons

The Weather

lepth and interest. at st
The background music is des-



MAIL NOTICES

Mails for ST. VINCENT and QUEBEC
by the $.S. “Aleoa Pioneer” will be closed
at . Cenervai Post Office as uncer






















wardrobes,
ser-

built-in
etc., ‘garage,

frames,
dressers,

HOUSE. Worthing, Furnish-
ed
DOVER, Christ Chure!
Building sites and acre
ROCKLEY. Near G





IN TAILORING

Tropical

S BOLTON LANE









pacar ay fae Seana MaDe era ee AER hme RT RT EES TIE EER
; 2
oe

Lime,

Sand,

Navy,

Pale Pink,

36 ins. wide. Per yd.

$I.



Sch. Frances W. Smith, M.V. Blue Star TO-DAY Parcel Mail at 6 a.m, Registered Mail at Course. Building sites
Se te ren, Sch, Laudalpha, Sch yer eahinis Mail at 830 a.m . < * 27 @e
Burin, De Sek, Lucile M. Smith, Sch Sun Rises: 5.50 a.m, § aim, uid Ordinary Mar _COVE SPRING HOUSE o °
Cyelorama a. Sch Gionia Menvietia, Sc. Sun Sets: 6.01 p.m. Mails £ CENT and TRINIDAD A Bh a
Mary E, Caroline, Sch. * ‘ cla, Moon (First Quarter): by the Patricia’ wt € 3, 00—
Sch. Phyllis Mark, H.M.S. Sparrow, Sch, . 4 | Post Office as un
Rosarene, M.V. Lady Patricia, 8.8. Alcoa September 18 a varcel Mail at.! 0p a Rigisterec:
Pioneer, M.V. Daerwood, Sch, Philip H Lighting: 6.00 p.m. Mail at 13 p.m. and Ordinary Mail at oe
Seyeeos ARRIVALS High Water: 8.00 a.m, | 2 p.m on the 19th September, 1950 a @Drereg
S.S. Canadian Cruiser, 3,935 tons net, 7.45 p.m, ier AMATEUR Able tit est a CY |
Capt. O'Hara, from Dominica, a aa aaa =~ 15.7 aN .
Schooner Emeline, 72 tons net, Capt YESTERDAY ASSOCi: LON
Clarke, from British Guiana Rainfall (Codrington) 13 of

BOXING — BOXING



In Touch With Barbados Matal £68 MOWAT 40; Yeater- BARD: i or 193502
Coast Station day: 2.93 ins, AT THE Prese

CABLE & WineL aes (West Indies) Temperature (Min,) 75.5 DIUM A BIG

Ltd, advise that they can now commu- deg. F. YANKEE STA i < Marke . a .
Neate with the following sbips through ; z INTERCOLONIAL , . .

thats Baruedoe Cosm, Siti Wind Direction (9 a.m.) acres Brera i The pores for Barbados’ Bonniest Baby of 1950 is
M.V. Prospector, SS. S icap, 8.8. E. a.m.) E.S.E. § ni “ i all * ‘

sagiust ve Svatanids eb. dusoe, ss Wind Velocity: 10 miles Championship Contest Cycle & Athlevic on, and mothers are-invited- to enter their babies for

Ranger, 8.S. Monte Ayala, S.S. Sp€cial-
, &.S. Junecrest S. Casablanca,
S. Buena Vista, S.S, Fortstephenson,





per hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.996



TUESDAY NIGHT
17th October, 1959

Sports Meeting



Barbados’ Bonniest Baby Contest of 1950.' Barbados’
Bonniest Babies are of course Cow & Gate Babies and

§ Britamsea, § Esso mie (11 a.m.) 29.995. at 8.00 p.m. At

8.8. Estero, S.S. Gascogne, S58 ro La : See . 7" e

bella, “MT, Barendrocht,” §.5. hate | Pe eS KENSINGTON OVAL}! this competition is open t6 all babies fed on Cow &
Fawley, SS. Lakonia, 5.8, Gulflight, nore - | . ‘

$8. Son Vieille, Mv. Aruba, 8.8 1.C.A. Service | RALPH BASSIN On Gate Milk Food, the Food of Royal Babies and the
Sionglen, S.S. Viggo Hansteen, §.5S. . ° e i Barbados Middleweight oO tober 2nd and 5th | i 7

Byfiord, S.S. Hecuba, §.S, Lady Rodney, Middleweight Champion ¢ ’ | Best Milk for Babies when Natural Feeding fails

S.8. Appalache, SS. Brazil/Wsbw. S.S S d a | Champion _ French ———_ °

Esso Avila, 8.8. Rockside, §.8,_ Sea uspende 160 West Indies Parnurm & Co. in action

» SS. Guifkey, 8.8. John Si












Thulin, SS. Sunwatt, SS
Ragnhild Brovig

Golfito

bound voyage to Montreal

12 ROUNDS 12













The twelve (12) leading babies will be selected by a Board of Judges for final juds-
ing.




The names of the selected twelve will appear in the “Sunday Advocate” of

‘San Mateo, $.S. Hestia, S.8 SATURDAY, September 23, will Semi-finals against Trinidad and

rickaree S. Capity Paul Lemerie, ; TO 7 ba . 8 F ja ‘
Se ie eia De Larinaga, $3. Dunstan, PE the last day T.C.A. will be) BELFIELD SAM British Guiana Aces. ENTRIES CLOSE ON SEPTEMBER 30. 1950
S.S. Christen Smith, §.S. Athenic/Gbls, operating ee eeroneey un- KID vs. i ening pinks)
S.S. Gerona, S/S. Montana/Ligs, S.S. til the completion of the new run- 126 6 : Saws FIRST PRIZE—The Cow and Gate Silver ¢

f 7 4 . Ss ; “ oe : “ : ss : . f Challenge Bowl to keep for one (1) year,
Alcos Pilgrim, 3.8. Bit ee an way at Seawell, Mr. Bill Stuart, Preliminaries Prices of maentesion | ’ a Silver Cup, and $2.00 in cash, presented by Cow & Gate, Lid. :
Poe sik cate a ik” Reaktion eda the Company’s Station Manager, VICTOR LEWIS 3/-, 2/6, 2/-, 1/- per day SECOND PRIZE—S10.00 and a Plated Silver Cup, presented by Cow & Gate, Ltd.
Langleegale, S.S. Scottish Musician, a Pp ;
Regent Leopard, 8.8. Rufina,S.8, Rinco told the “Advocate” yesterday . eee a pe a ah ae r ey ea : 5.00 and a Plated Silver Cup, presented by Cow & Gate and (9)
Gold Ranger, 8.8. Norse King, SS He said that arrangements had rices: Ringside $2.00, Bal- Contact | f RULES:
Eee Leo d 5.8 ang ee. Bin been made with British West In-| cony Sieh cage ne J. W. MAYNARD | 1 Au babive ment he under 2 yen of ase on October Sist, 1950,
Cadilinc, $.S. Georgios F. Andreadis, S.8, dian Airlines to carry T.C.A. Arena $1.00, Bleachers 48 Seeks Cavie Bodlaty, | A. postenrd See phatticaptt ot baby must be sent in together with 24 lids from
Schie, SS. Fort Townshend, §.S. Ciudad passengers to Trinidad for con- Promoter: pee aos th ‘ | & Parents agree to abide by the selections of the Special CoMmittee and the
De Caracas, S'S. Agatha, 8.8. C. G- jeetions with the T.C.A. north-| Mr, LUTHER FIELDS. | final judges.

|

They'll Do It Every Time wren tre By Jimmy Hatlo

Burt wuo is ir THAT THROWS THE?
MONKEY WRENCH EVERY TIME ©
BIGDOME! BIGDOME! BIGDOME! rau!radra:

= g=—, HOLDIT SWE !

Boss-o's PEP
TALKS STRESS
ONE THING
KNOW WHAT

YOU'RE GOING
TO DO—AND
Do iT!”
















COORD|








TRAVELING SALESMEN
MY FOOT! YOU DON'T

THINKING! TOO MUCH
WASTED EFFORT! PLAN
YOUR WORK, AND WORK
YOUR PLAN! MAKE A
SYSTEMATIC SCHEDULE
AND STICK TO IT! YOU,



NATE YOUR

aw Va liie

mena

Pa aes)
CLEVELAND
ee

ar ; =)
4 cHicAGo
al ee!



BEEN SOME CHANGES!
CANCEL YOUR TICKETS! |
BIGDOME'S GOT ANOTHER
, BRAIN STORM! HE ,
KX, WANTS YOU TO GO TO}

G







A's |
SCHOOL
TIME

PANAMA HATS
LINENS for UNIFORMS

Nevember 5th and the fimal judging will take place on Saturday, 18th November,

1950,

ENTRY FORM

J. B. LESLIE & CO,, LTD., Representative COW & GATE LTD.,
P.O, Box 216, Collins’ Building, Bridgetown,

I hereby enter my baby for Barbados’

nosteard size picture.

I certify that

enclose

COW & GATE Milk Food,

lids taken from

tee and Judzes

Baby's

Born on

Name



Bonniest Baby Contest, 1950, and enclose

is a Cow & Gate Baby, and I



tins of

THE COW & GATE SILVER CHALLENGE BOWL

If you are not yet using Cow & Gate for your Baby, don't

I agree to abide by the decision of the Special Commit-

delay. Get a tin from your nearest dealer and put baby on
COW & GATE Milk Food, the Best Milk for babies when

A \ | | Natural Fee@ing Fails. Cow & Gate Milk Pe
Ws NOME, AN cuT BACK I | MGR RCT ‘ ate od is free from
| 0 2 Bis SPeEsey ui iyr te ky 1s Weigh’
hh , ATH VALLEY UNDERWEAR - . . * WP pee eee all disease germs, including tubercle, dipthé?ia and typhoid.
~ encice ‘ ae PONS 6. ks eee eens
ANKLE SOCKS, Etc., Etc 3 Cow & Gate Food is safe because Cow & Gite roller process
Address



BOYS’ CAPS \
SHOES

SHIRTS

UNDERWEAR, Etc.

THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Hny. St Dial 3466



Signature

Date

{ Parent of Guardian



THIS IS YOUR ENTRY FORM—CUT IT OUT '



ensures that all disease germs are utterly destroyed whilst
the essential vitamins and valuable mineral salts which baby

needs to stow straight bones and develop strong teeth remain

intact.

THEY WILL BE WHAT YOU WANT THEM TO BE FED ON

|COW & GAT

THE BEST MILK FOR BABIES WHEN



MILK
FOOD

WHEN NATURAL FEEDING FAILS





-



S664 . 3
LOLI LOL LCCC PEL LESS






















——



Full Text

PAGE 1

SUNDAY. S1PTKMRF.R 17. IK* TOMMY ADVOCATE PAGE THREE HOU.YWOOD. Sunday. ltlackcloth and soundtrack Gardening Hints For Amateurs I li i ullivuliou Of Maclieali GLADIOU are among the most r-esutilul of flowers. As they have been grown here so widely. and so successfully this year iCorma now being obtainable in the island) a few tips on then < ulilvation may be of interest to those gardeners who have not yet tried their hand at growing AT III! IIM1I1: Three Of A Kind II* .. II. WITH SUCH an impressive list of titles as "The Black Kose," "Under Capricorn" and Stromboli," all of which have been highly advertised and played up as outsiandm tiims, the publiv'uf Barbados should be justiiied in thinklnfl that these pictures, with their plethora of famous stars and directors would add up to some outstanding entertainment. but unfortunately, the sum total is vastly disappointing. Gladioli can PALM T1KE.1 satin drapes and peach glass, and mist, shops predominance of waitresses and ,,|fm n^" 1 imported 'Conns a-. that look like shop assistants who look l.ke J mon gni*rally termed Bulbs (f%y*gW beach bungalows, Jane Wyman — and lots of an d the b** 1 xime * P lan < hfw *ffi>lTG oAccs that look blondes Corms la during the month of holidayHired searchlights Viking the January, when they can be excamp chalets, sky every time (a nightly event) l**tcd to flower In three months' churches t h a l a new hamburger stand %  opened; %  "• % %  or sometime in April look like cinemas, and a new unve-in cinemas, restaurants and r"r a succession „f BOW) picture-house which has a steeple, even boot repairers; Spanish mg over a period of weeks, plant Geraniums, known as California stucco houses with fiat roofs < hc Corms gradually, spacing Norm weeds, growing wild, mortician* (which leak and which the earlier '"em a week apart, which is ~ -vernacular for undertakers) adsctUars sell to the newcomers). better plan than having vertisements on the backs of all Sirens screaming (Hollywood is flower? at the same time the street benches; a group of the place where everything got Th fact that two ot them arc who follows her stable-husband in I it-hnicoior, which is getting to Australia where he liner all the time—la one point .,,. V i Q year* aa a guest of the grown iron. ,,, IIW ,r uvwir, but apart irom t „ v rn.in.-nl Placing at th.NVw ^eed. but when this is do-ic ihty mis thcy aU left this reviewer Rfc. hc mm opens in Australia do not aa a rule itown gfeg faaUnsj „i dJsaattsflj iA3l with Mr Cotton now a year. The usual praetiep is to grow tssAon. Let's take them in turn, free man and no questions asked "The Black Boat-" ..* to his past. This would uopear THK HLACK HOSE", playing to apply to Miss Bergman too, u t trie Empire is based on Custain's who by now is a blowzy dipsolistoncal rotiidiice of the same mam.ic with a tendency to D.Ts. ranie and tells of the peregrinInto this happy household comes .mon of a young Saxon, Walter of on old friend. Mr Wilding, from luring the 13th century. JreLmd. who, with her husband': ..led by his father pernisslon, undertakes to rente in the service of England's habslltata Miss Bergman. To do Walur decides to ' entails his staying in the !" hu foriune further an eld. house which is run by a scheming With him goes his friend Trlshousekeeper, who puts two and t t'am, who Is no mean bowman, together and nukes four and and though you don't know how half The change in Mis* Bergmosques but which are nevertheway — perhaps that is why an s^t. ,,„„,.,,._„._„ -" V aii that uau ffespaelaUsing in Icecream" and on whcels^but where the pedes(ji a Aiib.|1i v illiii| t r ilil "•"*" !" j* •!* | Wisecrackers without wisecracks 3^n^iaMij. t'^\?^'-\^L?\t,' „ l,on of sorde coarse sand and Mongolian custom! Eventually. HOLLYWOOD is also the place Dob Hope: "You d better ask chtrMtl after many feet of film, the boys where the highest-paid comedians my gag-writer. Hey, Barney, say p|(|nt h Corms in t i um ps of with the Black Rose, who by now live—so I started a search for a tumething funny to the lady." roW8 M f putting them ^s joined them, end up In thi wisecrack. And they said:— Jimmy Durante: "I got a million .if 'em, but right now I can't ihink of one" of the Chinese Empress. trying to murder him. This means a second offense for Mi Cotton .md th.'it's pretty serious, so Miss Bergman confesses t o the rrime for which her husband originally sent Australia. This And truui Barney"The things three inches deep In the ground. Pal. write aren't really funnv. Bob and eight inches apart. If you After Walter has learned "bou' dOMrt help matters any. as she st makes them sound tha't wav." have a double row, let the ran 1 nntiiig, gunpowder and the com[hen h „, ^ ^ gntt nomr 0 frt]lrii be eighteen imiies apart. I""s from his captors, he decides ,,.,.,, A|| verv complicated and Danny inomas; tin no quickPoatseript: Example of the When the first two leaves are '= m K home In their aMin ^ lip .„ pr^isely nothing. olT-the-mark gagster rcmemHope humour heard at a charity well up, give the plants a light escape. Tristram U killed—the )nd rtr a i n v „„, ll|( (o Mtrvti ber?" show he compered: "Bing Crosby applicaUon of G V.M. (Garden lUack Ro.c recapiured. but Walter iiltchcock'" usual standard. Jack Benny: "You know mi— was sorry he couldn't get along Vegetable Manure! and at all -urns up safe and sound In Engyh ( paffOrmaoctS) ->f ln".ud I'm the guy who is funny without trnight, but he had a nasty actimes keep them well watered. '-'nd, '""^'"K t "t at a ", !" h* and He,gmn. Jnaeph Cotton and saying anything, so they tell me." cldcnt: he fell off hii ; wallet." It's people, people, people m well watered l-'nd, looking flt When Ihe plant-, i.ie nearly "ot one wit older for all his adMichael Wilding are good enough, full grown it may bo found ventures and the passage of time. 1 tuppose, hut rertalnly nothing necessary to put In a smnll neat Oh. yes—the Blsck Rose also turns memorable The charm 1. ... !.ie> stake to keep Ihem in a good up in England ;it the same time portray ate not well minuted or upright position. This Is a Job a gift from Bayan—presumably t -pal, and lack the depth necessary full-fledged which must be most carefully having been delivered air exnress. in a drama of thin kind 1 Rj Infrom the done, as on no account must th* Thwe -r ^^ uuyu^yui Iha tfft-gf^, ,r Vff?^^ rM 7| t the exterior are obvlou.ly arllfl* ei.il. and very much so III MPIIK EY die first reel. I'm a BtK.ART. curCongresswoman right from the oonc, as on no account most " There are gaps thi rently on the side beginning." Corm be Injured. Manure again wno i c 0 ( mis unconvincing tale, of law and order Bfng Crosby's latest commercial Just before flowering QM action is not sustained am? laying: "The oldventure — the manufacture of a T real men I of Corms After the tempo uneven. Tyrone Power "Stromboli" style film gangnew kind of deodorant, a pill Flowering (days Walter with ease and looks Wlthmil 0 doubt this i* one of ster is out. Nowwhich Is taken internally. After the Gladioli have finishwell in the various outilts he u ,bleakest pictures and though adays gangsters Betty Grable is as blonde bube j flowering the leaves will dry wears As Tristram. Jack Haw„ mny 1^ undrr the "inspirci arc big-busmess bly. bright and beautiful In the o|T When ^is happens, lift Uic kins. English actor of Shakespeard liecti.V.0? Uu fawwui Ihmen who may pay income tax. Not nesh^ as she Is m glorious TechnlComit ^ after separating the lan fame, gives a competent pers cllinl. 1 urn afraid his iMptrahe sUllb>rn many of Ihcm even get shot color. at." Ella Kazan. ..11. ugly Ol h Thi.i an lr Wnm^r a Hv for the liule Bulbils that will be found foraiicc and Ceclle Aubry as the u„ n would appear to fc !" rs where the guwts^thc ,Uche '? evrry h *" n, v Corm lll ck Rosc '. "* a ^ t,lc banning Apparently the origin,. now the dictatorial director the "Streetcar" lilm at Warne. -. living down the days when he ^ v used to be a small-par: actor specalising in gangster roles. ia] version if snSlcn didn't even r.arv Cnnners th* Joseph Cottens • s,or th r "n In some dry eartn rrench gamine Her acting is dcthis film, which didn't even " were S?Voo--wcrc cnterSined !" ve unwalered and UOdlslighthjl and her contribution to „ M h Nc w York, has lii hacked "> h^! -fUrldm^r.^ ^iZ LaassaTdn "hed until next January when the film no small one. Orson Welles t pieces, and I douM 3 K an after-dir discussion on pieces and !'*ianetira'The U 'nc^' %  Sfln^JsTtltT " b* planted out again. II a the murderous Bayan, with a director would recognize the milk'ivriu WZMEUM whelT Is the y want to increase your stock soft spot for our hero. Is adequate ami-water picture being served current raVe in CaUfornla P'* f" 1 Uie l*rteil of the Bulbils and his make-up precludes the up at the Globe Theatre. Marcia Lewis, the girl who The Ollvicrs. escaping from all '• bout lhe sl e of a pea) Dry usual ocular grmnastics lo which Once again, we have IiurrlH holds a thousand secrets-balding 0) V formality, eating hot dogs ^ese and store In the same way as this actor often resorts. r^Tgn an. ttt ll tun a as lj actors go to her for scalp treatwith Claudette Colbert and husthe Mother Corm. n January The costumes and scenery leave .laced l^son in a .jsmp outside mcnl: Al Jolson explaining why bBml al one of the outdoor plant them out one inch apart, i.othmg to be desired in this lavish Home. To get away nnm .11 he will not play at the L-mdof. ,?££&.. ., and keep them watered Just enougl. production and Af musical back*e marries an Italian % %  .MlJIty Falladium: "Everyone's a sensaAnd amid all these people. >o, isure steady growth. Repeat aroundI is satisfactory. .-nd they go to hi* liunV %  "r lM **' tlon there. I like to set records." people, people, here's how you can <">ls process each year, and In "Under Capricorn ,-(l of It. In s, '7^ "''" Joan Crawford, pleased about tell the actors who are not workthe third Season your Bulbils Still r„ UNDER CAPHICORN". we l*" 1 aren t much bette, her current tllm. "Goodbye, My Ing—by their tan (bromed beauty >'ave become Corms and will have Miss Ingnd Bergman as a "", ""T "V 'J' ..1. Fancy": It's a break from the does not photograph well, so the five you flowers. member of the Insh aristocracy ^^f^JSimVt^^M traditional Crawford story; you stars must de-lai don't see me washing dishes in making). Fashion. Department for plctureSporia Supplement ADRIAN, Ihe local Dior (but his occupied by M -G.-M.'s head deelothes ore even more expensive), signer for her to wear in the inspired by • recent inspection of film the Duke of Alba's hat collection, Susan Hayward's silent-film putting on a fabulous rose-andhair-do—very long and fluffed out champagne affair to show off his over one eye new Spanish-influenced styles Gorgeou* Gussle Mortm. re>und both slow and boring. < tassels, fringed sashes, velvet volting from all the femininity. '-<> I WENT to a other similar expressions. Then, football game ;.•, the coach ipoke to her huswlth Jane ltu; 1 h Uted, u Lava hbtl ill | sell, whose husband, Bob Walerfleld. Is the star of the local team was wlv-n some men behind, tin Tho game I way sports spectators the world But over always do. started making rude remarks about Walerfleld doesn't help matters The llgnthouse-keeper obviously knows more English, and creates a diversion for Miss Bergman, which Is left to the Imagination. However, something must have napLand shouted, "L-evehlm alone Sned M^ StaT good beating Onjj OK* did the n „ w iumiUmr *"'%^£ c e f nh „ m n when she film-star RuaseU .:,,,. from ihe 'L" h ome! Ev.,.luai:v. th fooiballer's wife That T_Se ^ u ,„, milch ani wlU gkopia life the help of the lighlhouse-keepei, *he leaves home and starts around the volcano to get somewhere on — the other side. On the way. there turbans from which a single Jewel dining out in a severely tailored The young lady who Is known, playing, oil character, and prob., ., partial eruption which eniatlCrops over the centre of the forebracer-skirt of quilted satin and among other things, for her 1 ble future. mending the night on .. mci mannish shirt. '^jf*^ ^^•J^lSK' J& * %  —g -l"*nced die b c i^of lava. l>oker-faced acting technique. Sarah Churchill's English ceilLatest colour for cooking stoves: jumped up and down yelling riti Ing-prlce grey flume! suit being bright scarlet. Murder him. you bum. and -nea with moody, and magnificent. On 1'age 16 One is English, one American Beauty Care the same LIIH OH vMSaiGAB— I nwnrii UM ihe '..UKItaut) 1 arc Tnty i-xi..m keep "> rsxHanth tovd) ahnqtt. Why not In Pond's keep.*"* diiii ssvely, i"*)' Every night, before VOU go M bM '-'lHfimi .'.-. i-.-.*r tu> /'-.*/'1 '.'U --1".. My. Mt,. VamAtttO. ••!! t**l Iht (fan t-tl—€ •ifmll\ mfl md rmotih ami tUm tn*f up %  ktia^-g flow a/ Mm> 1v %  *•** %  *• POND'S DattriaMtan [ w n %  : % % %  > %  I '"-*•. Pitt •> '"' B'• lubbcj "ii 1 HMI OUT rst, I 1111 %  Hi• liihioi" ir i a „,l ,niJ • > l %  ,onge*ta-< VapoH %  flat" vK •£^n^; SSTrar Pailmolive Keouty IMmi proved by doctors brings lovelier skin to 2 women out of 3—in 14 days! After i<-Ion 1,384 srotnen tor 11 dflyt, 99 li I'liii-ml 1'iOft IIIIK iciir skin Jin ll full "ii/Hili. 3 KM Ii. ilnfur I! diyi HI. I plan for ) MI tit llm il... •• I'.il h.. Ii. %  : %  %  Pun it the ura .iv in k. %  -[. thai si i : -Mi i offlpl ikw. KEEP THAT SCHOOLGIRL COMPLEXION C



PAGE 1

PACI -IMKEV SfNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. SUMIMBEK 15 Tenants Chosen For Pine Estate Civil Service Employees Hold Meeting Building Society Formed MilNc further neamGovernment Subordinate Bit.formed %  '*ee, division of the Barbados %  name of T*e %  ict\ with UTdav" P*' C '*' General Mr..:. DOMUI Alle>i,e. Mr F D temuHa Tow K 11 *esrdm r "<> 1' Resolutions in be brwi ded u. <; i> B] I ih f K..rd Mr the proper MlUwHUw %manj B ml Ugdull Di H Sim.m them are: T. O I %  %  w th the ex i ling layout for Use i the ii • estate could be %  %  oi Higu. • | I HMtr -if she iii R h Transporl :i %  i his nib %  moor IN Forty | %  %  i tin %  alaries graduated i" IB pa ceni '.''' S* on salarle.up In and Hunte sAd (he Office of £300 Uniform foi I'lmipmn Station ,,, i, 1( top floci of the Burner Hof.pit;.I cooks. Bui'ding in I Proper travelling allowances to -"tp,,!, poead thai the...( ..tin i ubordinau emptoyw %  luallj ainiiated The subordinate employes weir with The Building Societies Asfrom the I'o-t Ofnre lUon, London. England. Hospital. W-pcr Hospital. DepartThere h*l been I rving need ; . %  %  i Department, I*ublftt ntB BVhfl calico' Works Department. 1'tovue.t Marafford to >>uild a home for lack of vatlablc lor "' %  %  eminent Indusready rash or to repair ihehouse that ritt Oil .i %  mp i %  %  |bfl I. UO lelci lo ^hOUfB krepei ., letter Ironi'' l lenant at the, I in* Buy. trial School, WJIIT Iio.it*. Liictii .Kid others I of boiii found il diflU-uli to pay • week rent for tinPin* Tourists See Town IV KIDGKTOUN v.arted yen o.i. .. , ... i.. Irom M %  bargains. The weathei and nuny tourMti took the %  intb lo ".'it* throuffi the %  %  look at It %  %  ILI the Hoard Ihat Sealy bad '"-' victims" ..i in IWtt. and thai lb* wai a tingle woman, room house el it i*"<' %  • %  ft Bid I %  • her requeel DO favoinahiv eon %  llhBCUon Witll M i of the leu %  %  .. will be fl HUll UiOrdi -•• ary rccomprogramme of Ihl iIU*d I [,„ the week begin the furnllure given lo Mr* lost his tn the HMO flow Thin matlcr was also referred i %  Bi retar; n romri Rll to HaI'lan. Seel 0 %  %  | F:.,. B> node UM n ..(ion in order to avoid Fr>day fi viv crow rosd< occurring at two .... hirh he considered bad planVThal was needed was a BuiloV U lual Aafodat %  ild bar%  period of .. %  .,. and at UM ame t me share m all prulUs Ihi: ntereat paid would eventual > in%  fumed Iha form Of dividend*, ornjng as Such a SoeJatj MMMlU • the average man lo own a home search of „„,) the payment! lo the ocietj wu ideal „,...! %  than rant 'or PPOT;ii.o'lier nUOl'l bOOM t> The MM IS not new, there arc Buildli %  %  %  !! P* ,hv th>. an rid, mn hi the mule |, Along iiie araMrfroni wai alo congestion as carU and trm kDM ed fro with loads of fruit and coals. The Ant remiireneni foi the A PKIVATr. how -i Si Jame, t „b giowth of gueti a society Almshouse on Mon.i.... S | %  10 lend: the nucleus tembcr 1H. iblCnldad U tbfl from I HmftOd nuniher "f FoundMobUa Cinema ma Bharei the imik f.om In Blnfl Septembei ment Shares of *M each, yielding 18 lo Friday September 22. a dlvldcnrl of approimnlcl\ I per On Tuesday. September 19. the jent and Suhscriplloti Shares ( Inertia will he at lemmings $250 each which may '•* %  P* lri Pasture. St Thoniaa; Wednesday at a rate of as lllt'e as One m Black lie-.s BctlOOl PMtUlf, Si. lar a month vwldlnl UM Peter, Thursday Bay Putura m dividend. Mecldt* Koa From Page 1 During this rugged expert to. no apparent reason—she ited to altee.i Liddenly feels the need of salvaIII: ha>, I.M-:,VT;' owned ai d ''"" %  nd dectdes that \ Idden by Adolphus Holder ,lf '* '* betl of Jacstaona Itmid, da ma Red With 1,000 Bap* Or Rice rive Arri A thousand bags islano 'ONlerday by %  Kmeline' ol i.ee frm i ived In thy the 72 tn.i Arriving WET, day before *erc 2.000 bags by the •philii) H Davidson." making .. I ll.-e I.. 'II'M hero during tl> Brneltne" iraight otnet ipriscd of 400 bags Ol charcoal, 81 tons of firewood a.i I :.u drums of cocoonut oil. It has taken t*rth in the Cm %  d began to discharge iti ,.,;.. %  %  %  M'-val Harbour Log In Carlisle Bay %  *(h IlrlqvifPH n ach. i ma O. *.li "OT t ,%  %  ..line, s.i. .ill. BltB, g> b KMlHtU. Sr-h IJ t Liiwiiir, mn. W. 1CunU'l". vurK. II MS ffimmw. H*h. Kuuinir. M V l-"t' l'lticl. BS A""i pasrwasi •• IMai 't \aaivti* an i lu n-t ; '.'' %  %  In Touch With Barbados Coaat Station CABIX '.Ul.'ll.'1 "' %  hU.— i.m wi.iw nwi UMi %  at aea sseamn %  iag BHP Uamigi I .'! %  CIMI SlaUirn l-H-tnt. SS Hirvna/Hwp. H Hwintrl C. Luveland. 8.8. Junta I %  %  T g c sssa a a nw ai I | r...utphan">n -. ^ r-i IVHurlirm. SS t>>U•.8. %  *• i. k. s s uuuitam. %  %  ttl WhW. f S s.a !* %  •• . QuinuF) s js* etaes : s sir U % % % %  I %  Resm %  I \i .. %  ..' I s Dunrtan. S <* AllH-rilT Obli. %  .. IJBi. a DrtMI. 88. Oln. HuattMii. Hi" R*t*nl leopard. .1.8 RuSw.SS. KlMoo ,, s s No. Kins. 8 .. S.8. HinI %  Btaall S|ql. II Eae A Irssass, * (U..I.. ..i Aaatha, sac : 2.3 Ins IVinperaturr iMIn) 75 5 drg. F Wind Dlrerllon <9 a.m ) t;. 411 ami I I I Wind Yrlori!) I 10 miles per hour Haromrler Uiml 29.99fi 'l "< '" %  Villagers of Stromboll.|: on Friday ubout 12.15 p.m. with *ho donl aaan too much ai the Molor car y-t5fl owned In Ul fnait of the canieia UJII Donald Btfghlll of Roeklej iitd teirb bnpoawUe to iiiKierauuiii 1 driven by Geollnv Kdghill of the dialogue spoken in English Cbrlal Church that is completely shattered. No one was hurt trying to gat on the The action is slow, and1 wiU. bus X-214 which is owned the exception of .. 11 '*-""' I Central Motor Bus Co.. and eruption of •jnmboU and t ran n: that time by EUi-> ^**f net %  of Passage Road. R. Fletcher, a labourer had Ms left I hand Injured and a %  tral Hospital Y.W.CA. FUND GOES UP Thr (Irivo tor fini.ls for the MtabUjrdlMlll of i, Y w C A BOM un find Ihr Intal IIKUH I1K The 1ml umoiint 4R bv Mr* A / BUT WHO IS IT THAT THROWS Twe" MONKEY WPENCH EVERY TIME ? B6POME.' BISDOME! BI6D0ME! v-:**l*t, % S7 HOLD rr SweAaEY! •^ ( BEEN SOME C1MN6ES! / CANCEL YOUR TICKETS! >j ( BIME'S SOT^NOTHER 1 BRAIN STORM.' HE WANTS you TOSOTO %  GUATEMALA, THEN NOME, AN'CUT BACK TO PEATH VALLEVITS SCHOOL TIME ; PANAMA HATS LINENS tot UNDERWEAR ANKLE SOCKS. Etc. Vu BOYS' CAPS SHOES SHIKTS 1 MnllWFAB. Etc THANIS Pr Wm llnr SI Dial Tlfa6 twrar roast J i.rHLir co.. P.O. Uo* LTD. n*prr*nlaliv am. Osttfne' BrntJi g i. 1 a OATC LTD. 'fl->tl. t hrnso %  1 baby lor BarbSSW %  HMSSS* Baby C.rilM. IBM. arid rnckMa I rwiUty Ihsl u • Cew a ii*la Babr ...5 I M :.. r 11. toirti I ajai tlrss ol Food. I asm to abide b iha .1... aa of m Srl>l Commlt•• and : %  ,1 1 Dora on W*hi 1 % %  P sTeeasI A.'.'lr ol Guardian Dan IriE COW &GATE SILVER CHALLENGE BOWL II iiiii \tn it IMI;. MH;M .II n oil Ml wi ,..,,, c*w a Gala far roar Babr. a' .U). Cl a oIr.m ran asaieal aSSSSS sad aal babr as COW a i. Ml. Milk laad, Uir lira Milh lar bablra asvas Nalaral t-r1w>, ValU. Caw Oal* Mllh INUd la lra Iran all dlaaaaa |.t B> larladlnc labarrl*. dlstbTHa and Irnbald. *'•* a Oala r..-d 1. aafa feSSSSSM Caw a (in. rathe sraavaa a.ar (hat all iBSkSSi >aM at* alUrlr SnU.Ttd wall** il* ruaimal viiamuia and valuable nunaral aalu wblab bsbr assei ia gam ssmigai baa> ( and attslse asrsee i**ib rrasi> laU.l THEY WILL BE WHAT YOU WANT THEM TO BE FED ON COW & GATES THE BEST MILK FOR BABIES WHEN WHEN NATURAL FEEDING FAILS



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SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER U, IMO SCNDAY ADVCM.AU PAGE SBVIK Four Royal Names By FRED DOfRFl/NGfft MazeograDh for Junior Readers A %  I The Colour Bar • %  in rd in %  %  of Pi .nidno* during ItlOUfit) dory, h.. passed out oj i recent l Una*. WHI Ilka Charles. which th> ....,:.. md Anne i.-. %  ..opular B.B.C. DlMu^ion Thurd. ( , ;: : : gf* *> ; ** %  1K .JT^^IffiSc&IBi. *" V "" *•—*—. *- Today?" a broadcast in the BBC':; (1 i than two i tk-i ul Ov Bar .. Cbarii ibaa !.. i halt Thursday next The prouramnie fll S 01 Uum rt ,wo ** l, un poahim on some factor* that make (or the continuance of colour bars.' Taking part in tho broadcast will be Elspeth Huxley, aulbor of many books ... African problem*, who will speak on economic and administrative question.-.; Dr. E J. Dingwell. amhrepoloR* and author of 'Racial Pride and Prejudice' who will discuss the psychology of rure prejudice, and Professor L. S. S^?".*:. . a l, lon f""^X of Influence 0? AJBna 01 Bohemia. Eugenie* at University College. cc D Uie Brantine Empire which existed front AD 395 to I4SS It first came into UH In England at the beginning of th t 13lh century, but was rare unt I Unbeginning of the 14th century. It then came into more general use, perhaps because of the Tw hala fr M %  cq Park .11-. 1KIII Abo* P. a iir •,11m mine r •.Inw.lh al 1 and Off It*. On i H'll h ih %  Turk 1 -,l,.,l ,., n—Hith raE By Rose Cuttings Sent Air Eearn Dollars THOUSANDS of doUars an batag earned by a new British export—rose cuttings. From London's airports, aii*> liners are taking them to hardcurranc] countries all over the world. British cuttings have now reached their highest populariiv abroad. Inch-long cuttings are being flown daily, m large and small consignments, to stock parks, street flower beds and pnvatt gardens of more than 30 nations. Speed Essential The director of a company exporting the cuttings said: "Ou; first necessity. >* aptvd. Tinc il lings —or roso-buddlng eyes. as' they are known eomrai die u forinight after being taken. Air transport is the only solution "U .,i,now dealing with countries as far apart as Australia and Canada. Our overseas trade liaa spread to places we had not even uontem plated, when we ttartod exporting m 1946." London Express Service. H omvn In llo-niti Claim inilepeatifnt'i* BELGRADE: Moslem women of Bosnia are discarding the veil, their centuries old symbol of male superiority. Meetings are going on t hroughuut this predominantly Moslem Republic supporting demands for the veil to be prohibited by law. Moslem men of some areas are supporting the campaign for a new law. but there are others who oppose it. telling the woman that to drop the veil is heresy and a mark of immorality. day, 21st inst. and will be repeated on the following day. Friday 32nd at 300 p.m. United -Nations Kepuri The BBC has arranged a service of radio reports to cover the fifth General Assembly of tho United Nations, which begins at Flushing Meadows, New York, on September I tun. A crack learn of reporters will furnish a fivejiuiiuie report on the previous day's proceed.ngs at 8.IS p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thurs•nd JVKtoy, and l.om Sun'J'';'"' i two centur Six queens of England have borne the name of Anne. Nearly six eenturie*. ago. the first of the two queens of Richard 11. son of Edward the Black Prinre. was Anne of B the Emperor Weucelaus of Gei many. She died n 1394. six year* before her lui-1... murdan Castle I'oisoncil AnoUier Anne was the wif< II.1MI. Princes. | :,,..!.. ill "noble chgj nc of Un names of U of AthU'iic Will— .. Teutonic name -.... i i last ..PIHMI.,1 Royal House when U> daugftti i VII was christened Louise. i In 1911. B Wueen vlctoi •laughters 1. Princess Louise. Dud Argyll, who died in IH39 at the age of 91. IN S ttBCR the nursery %  N rhyme that begins. 'Pussy •it. pussy cat. where have you Our junior readers can %  "hum ho saw and how 'IF got thenfrom this max*-lotogiapli. Starting at the top. j ) . U V'""^ 1 *** heard in the daily news broadasts and In 'Radio Ncwsrcel' which is on the air daily at 8.00 p.m. Kncrjjy in the Service ol Man With the end of the mid-cenhUrjr meeting at Birm:ngham of the British Association for tin: was divorced in 1540 James I of Englatul .md VI of Scotland, son ol Mary, Quevn of Scots, who n i to the throne In 16U3. was marrtad io Anne. Prlnceai of Denmark. liiiiighter of Fn 11 The ia.s! Queen Aoiie in BogAdvnneeinont of Science the BBC hHl | 1;(tor y (1702-1714) was the will broadcast discussion proWl( of George, Prince Ol D.gramine called 'The British Aslk Sh( w>1 known as "Good •oclation Maeu In Blrminglmro 3^,, A,,^.,an wtremely raIfn th s programme scientists will ||-,„ u womon WHO* (.hurt rahm talk over one of the main suhW11S | Iiar kcd by intcnial polit.jects discussed at the meeting, cilJ wangles between Whigs and which was the theme of the T&IQ. Anne had 11 ChU nt a addreu "Energy in of whu h dll (i youngi Hi. service of Man. The peak-J K —PK-" Princess F.R.S.. both of whom arc knowi.w. „ rtl ,.i,. The" is reon Friday, next, 22nd inst. fl t(l(c (l( her brot |Tti FrbUM ( %  cwrce Orwell ^Charles. But should she In the coming weeks editionH^ Ul# dirone any ol her lour Ol Tnt Contemporary Englisbta nairivs mLIV be us ,.,i B a Sovnovel' the novelist to be discussed orf ,ip,._ s ,,,),. will be George OrweB. whosell Thei death th i year was such a loss to English letters. The success recent years of Orwell us a polilical writer and satirist with brilliant Animal Fai id iw4 wh ch have made his name household word may overshadow! his achievement as an English! novelist and the speaker. T. R. S 'yvel, will therefore dwell large-. y upon the earlier novels, especially "Burmese Days' and 'Coming Up for A r.* which madi icre was no lurpr se eithei about the chOlC* ol Eliiabcln as second name for the row p] U %  | It hai been b four Queena of England — the of K.iwaril IV ami of Henry vn. by c,<*,<\ ymen Bess," and by the present Queen II means "God hnth \n i ii Alia* Britain It is an old NorOrwell ^circle name among a small readers. This talk on Orwell will be broadcast on Wednesday next, 20th. inst. at 7.45 pjn. i What The Wei] Dressed Dog Should Wear PAWS, Frtdeo -Ofl Elyaoes. near the salons of excluki i till 'maker.in Pans is a shop called An CbJCa %  i %  ailed, two U %  '""liter l-eing Btl kmlted sweaters. |t £1 Ij U ;.. h Said the mmi,ii-i Pol ||M in alagani dog naadi at least thu. %  irdrobethe swcatei of coursa), (or sporU, %  I plaid, and u waterproof coat. %  a waterproof, j i III waai tha At A Qtancc "Just as you ran tell l>, lookin | 1 is dreaaetl Of Fath. SO II tell by looking al that h*. is dressod I Elegant I',. il.,i i ding to dimensions, but ir a full-sin'-l pcxxll' most fashionable breed : %  the price is £3 3s. for Four winter Igataar IHIOIS for WnutolLn, told iv ,i %  hinlni while., tin I v. 0 I worn with .. n U The coll.n lo brightly coloured leather "traps Beds fn i ,... which collapse* fog packing in the holiday luggage varieties of • on show A favourite I grej rubbat gnrnan wmch squeak*. The shop has a beauty parlour where, for slightly less than £1, Ii a shampoo, trim, manicure and brush-up Appointments have lo i London Express Service ...I saying ilia lie following figures odd digits being replaced I > ei en digit12.S5 2 97234 2 97234 IWM IIHII m n i apsSJi %  a .—v PEN PALS nberbateh. "Watei Viou. st Peter PERFORMING DOG CAIX:UTTA: Four month* age Russian-born Mrs. Marie Sandaros an animal trainer, found a mongrt; nog with ;. broken leg outside hei home here Tho dog's leg healed and *he started to teach It circus tricks and was astonished one day to hear the dog say "Mama". Pluto several rapid blasts on %  toy trumpet and walked on his forefeet with his hind legs in the air. Pluto's next task, according lo Mrs. Sandarus, ia to say "Papa" nd after that "a simple sentence such as 'I love Mama and Pane' IMPORT DUTY NEW YORK Unpleasant surprise ff.r British visitors arriving V %  fort immigration officials told them the) .u'e now subject h %  head tax of $8 (£2 17s 1y.d ) %  pd i .IN.uxl it from the 15 fluff are allowed tu bring out from WHMiH'.l W HAT wouiu >on dun.. Sharpe adtad hei haaband tins mominx "Give me a moment, aim I'll tell yon. he ieplii->1 Si. n, down wHfl paper Md p.iu il. Iqttfekla producad the Inflowing: Mgki araeamatmu %  HacpiiK lucttithelchenfrn Alepet-pkdsiheppit Fei'idi%  Mrs Sharpe was nol taker iii.uk by what she rend She wn j u|ed to this sort of thing from j her puwliM raaabgod Aftci hi had gone she went to work with! ti pencil and found what h< i wanted for dinnei Do you kno* aaysM B*JI I ,m •.HUI*'I 4.~ii|ti un< iTONGUE TWISTER S EE if you can read this gloudf s/UhOUl Hipping If A Hottentot lot taught u Hottentot tot lo talk f/Cf the "ot' i Mild totter, wiuht the Hottentot uil be UMIIM to am* sushi, ..i ii.ui'-lu or wlial ouihl to be i.11 J >:311 li-i If to hunt and to loot a HotI i-ntiil lot be Uughl b| a Hot-' lenlot tutor, ahuuld the Wtor gel hot If the Hottentot lot html •• % %  > > loot at the Iloltrntot lutor? NEW MEMBERS i YVONNE CUMIIKHIIATCH ""•' JOHN CHOKBY "Soaping" dulls hair HALO f/oirffestt/ Vea •"soaping'* your lun with ftgg flneti liquid or cream thampooa hides ii i liixtr wlih dulling soap filmHalo ..nuini im III||I IMUicky oih UulUing in dull yiiut Kair's ualural luMc Viidi \IIOI rar) '"*< laassBBtai Halo b>lng* Ml ihinidaf h-i/hti H lui. lu fragrant lail-r riasrs sway quiikly in .m> kual ul water — nerdi n aftrr-rlmr For Kan thai i luuroui, use Halo. 0,.,*.0i"4f-ral •i r**.' tweariaj << f Aiurt inn "i have or.rtcd only Halo gtvei hair well naiuial ladiapce. HALO rrvtils Ih•hidden benlv ul voir hair jlmoii dady s' of the month female functional inonihl) disturbances are causlmi you to aufler from pain, nervous dlstrras and feel so tired, cranki. IUU anap at your children and husband—(hen do try lydla E Plnkham's Vegetable Compound to relieve such symptom* II fam-m* for thi purpose HAVE YOU GOT A COLD or COUGH IF SO TRY BROWNE'S CERTAIN COUGH The Unique R*n,ad>far r.,uaha, CoUU. BroneblUa. bit TWoa*. t HoarvmMi. aVwrvchlal AaOtsaa. w looping Cough. IMaaata of UM %  %  < % %  tail Lunga. ate ata. M.d. ESPECIALLY F.r G..I. i id Moman | :. nggHI JST Or STOCKISTS ITNg. AaiHI R A I ... %  i MturoRU ria I. lill-IWM tOLf a e-.. Lia. IHMII. I nil STONE Call il OBBM \ mnioiDt Ca-II i a HAMrsoN. a. I_ SCALE a c •i i -r MM a <• n. V. "un a it na % %  i VM i i ii - orr. i u J. A. TI IIOK A I %  i II T4Y1.0R MWI I W. N. tORMI < KIM. BAKKBV I IB a>inkbam's Compound DOES UOPI ucli monthly pnin I' i pa:i>uui nervous u nslon. untabiiitv and weak. hlghstrunc feellnss when wlieo due to the f unctlonul middle-sue perl'si peculiar to women. C. CARLTON BROWNE %  Hheieaal* A Re4all llraieail 136. Boeboch 8t. Dial U1S Plnkham's t;ompound U "ytng, o&6a£(P<*UAai 3 SACROOL IN VOUfl ;! MEDICINE CHEST. SAt IIOOL roNoi ius PAUM OB Sals at KM',in -. IUU (. ITOBI I



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PACT FOUR STJNDAY ADVOCATF SUVDAY. SEPTEMBER IT. 1M Rain Interferes With Cricket Good Scores Returned mm* .,„.,...„ In First Class Games *T*HE WEST INDIES have concluded ihm tnur in Knulanu. as far RAIN intcrmiiU'iily inierrupted play yesterday a* the as first class matches arc concerned and they have finished with fourth series of First Division names opened. Batsmen the record of 18 matches won. however had the best of the day play, and %  OB When they drew the final first class fixture with H. D. Lcvcson scores were returned. Oowrr's XI. Ihey had concluded their official lour ..f Enalsnd. This OLUOB v. .SPARTAN Pilgrim w caught. He only nude meant thai Ihey had won 18 games drawn 12 and lost three THS-iasi „ *" "^ b V?\ My WW **" milde %  v.* IK. to „„,„ „£ for Ian bol Q ^ nem Mck ** members of the team have completed 1.000 runs „H when they met CoUagM In IbSil partasOU, In his short stay he The spin bowlers Alf Valentine of Jamaica and Sonny Ramadhin First Division cricket fixture, made a brisk 19. The llfth wicket of Trinidad, have carved their own niche in the hall of international Play tx-gan 20 minutes late and had fallen for 161 runs. Walcoit cricket fame Ramadhin completed the tour with 135 wickets taken nrt,v >" !" n *• clouds stopped the was completely beaten and bowled .!"• !" h %  ffr,:^ n ,:^*js.r %  """"• ^s£ T h w Sra h '" th.J.nj.lc.n. V.l.nt.„,. ,23 M T ,„. „ ,,„,., w „ „£ „„. sUr "" s !" J*"^, urlh „ aiMeI cost of 1795 run, each, but mu-rrri.lt.nt shinvers ofletln, ,r, run ,„„ when W(KKl This 1S.10 W..I Indus luur Is H !" altrnvards ou when „, had „. chtd ,„ „ %  landmark In tha history ot th. 0n|v ,,„,, „,„,„,.,„ aSrnllh „ n obviously u ball oft which as •^.IKBLIn did no t l(iacn double ngum All run c u'd •* scored with safely the inU-rniilional .in-lij even now Hie olher Imls nMdt -."-I BOOTH '"' a 5f? call 1 for %  run and lut ttw but fol cue kepi uii ..n iinllatttnK Wood did not peach his crease nnrDDiTrn rrvnuT attack and Hint, with some brllli "> '"<"' FU,v,msiTINIS ,1, ; "" %  "*•. P"-v.-i.'"l Spartan Anolhe, Ike run, were scored F.AI1Y (ONbrANTINES eilctnm „.„„„, more run i„.,„„. smilh gained his fourth *-' brute.) effort (if 107 wirkets In Spartan's opening pair. A Atkuiv wiefcal Ha sol Bowen making an the 1928 West Indies tout nf Ennand S QrlflHh got je unrerlaln stroke lo one of his • %  a. ~TJJS land has been equalled and paw'p"''"" <" *"f "'"" :h >*? olnnen and Bowen was stufnped eH „n ihi. i„..r No fewer than 1* '" ,or CoUn*. During an unruffled lie had acored 10. ed on ihi. lour No fewer lhan34 oI nr h „ ur ,, lne wlcke lnc Haynaa and Smith took the first class cnturkti ban baa ,„„ „, .„„„ Eave h ,. ir ,„,„, Mrmr rni "' LTO j M Barbados and Trinidad will take place in Truiidad during September!^. r "''.' I .* n n ','.,,.', ,'iV'b it'.' WANnEHERS scored 2J runs October. tn their first Innings yesterday. The Colonies will each be represented by 3 players and not only Spartan won the toas and the.first ,fay of their first .livislou win the leading Colon, In tab.. . be d. 1m "%£?£ ?£&£%£> ^uSSt^^i&Z Champion of the 4 Colonies. So far Trinidad luivc ..l-ivcd lK ,Ui t ( the wicket to open their iiminns Marshall knocked up a chancelesi British Guiana and Barbados. They ran British Guiana in 1948 and against fast bowlers J. William* 89 and Denis Atkinson, West inwon against Barbados In 1649. "•$ J. Corbin who began thclian all rounder also hit a breezy • Cnll'Ke attack. Witltams and Cor 73. bin quickly caught their length. K. GreenldRe the Carlton Programme for the four-cornered intercolonial tournatneut .alb uu t the Spartan opening pair went medium pacer took seven of Wan.•or return matches with 12 Colony game, being ,„ ,,T"ouM noM, !" !" .he no'wIing^oY'overs In which'h" •owarda the end the Singles Championship will begin:— nildenl batting and after only a had all babanen playing cautiousl. A .\.i(' Smith and Mr S. ly W. Greenldge took three for Sepleml-r 28 Junaica v.. Briush Guiana "•"Ug %  %  '" %  %  '"•'"' "• •'""""'" "t,, "'""' n ' * M ?" \._ „„ , lie attack. • Wilh only nfteen minules before 29 Trinidad vs. Barbados .Spartan lost the* llrst wicket the end of play Carlton opened 30 British Guiana vs. Barbados al San Feinaiiil., anil W 'hen the score had reached 57. their drat innings with Hutchinson Trinidad vs. Jamaica al Arima QrttBttl ""t %  ball from Manner and Marshall hut a dark cloud T Ln-a.^ !" ,__ m i c „. fmnpiM, lleadley. through the covers and which had settled above brought G Tho Barbados learn 1 as loll !" Sn|llh |n ^d.d pigea of MMon end to play aa both batsmen IIJ.:_Playa a strong fore-hand game wilh plan ,,f punch Had , <|ok ,„,. dlfncult catch. complained of the bad light. In a good season In the Inter-club came, wnimim m-aily ..II his Grlltllli made 29. He was the reply lo Wanderers' 239, Carlton matches faster scoiw while al iho wicket are now no runs for the Ions of WILLOUGHBY:-Th.best spin player In Hail 1 todaj Chop. %  KLj* mmm """* 0ul "" lckrt .nd drives delightfully Touied Brtoafc Guiai... %  > IM In the onta S | lr |VHarris Joined Atkins Wlnnlrig llu'tos's'carlton sent ihamploiiship (1950) went lo finals larsl lo Malta, who was then 20. A short spell ln u/anderera on a wicket which .,1 rain slopped play for %  i few wa apparently easy. Mnrshall CORBlN:-AfUr a l. ol 6 ya.r. won th. 11" Cb.,.,pl„,h,p SS^eri^raWc during aniuiuTa " ^ ,""!,"*"" "P 8 "" 1 *, over 40 player.. Won all hb, game, in ,he „„er-c„.l, His Cub wot, J-. — ~ "" &F1f^Si^£S: the Division 2 Cup. Has a good defense and flicks the ball well. 100 Up Marshall took the first ball from Alw.'ivs lit Should profit tremendously from this tour. A hundred went up on the MOM Warren and the fourth he pushed I i %  fttf Spartan hnd been at to mid off for a alngle. POLO TEAM AT PRACTICE ft WKWlNEftj mZmSSSXXS "-h^'l'n B l a cbm a nl bowling which sent the mh ,„„ of hlj Mlhll| 26 and ^sji^,,,, 10 Atkbi. chukka. Tornadoes were successful, registering a 1—0 win ove. ;"d ""' I'"' "'"''""''' ,*""',l.!,„d !" wn no1 comforUble against Cyciones. In the third game, Tornado., came back ,„ win l.v ,w„ piniu'r Smith, but Harris" was a oil K. GreenldRe. Marshall struck nignesi possioie. ^ pagpr altempti n Ms co m parlhis first six off W. Greenulge in Lt C E Ncblett M tively short periotl t the wicket, his 11th over. His score was u. si r. fi, QO ,,, Harris" innings was spiced with then 70 and the scoreboard read Mr. M D Thomas ^ ^JJ n -n ea9y B|y c |0 2 6 K Greenldge aftor Mr M le Vertcuil l GtM.d Fieldiltff Imwling 15 overs was replaced by Capt C E. Warner Seven run* later. Spartan lost N. Lucas from the screen end and Mr. G. F. Pilgrim * .i.elr fourth wlckel through a this was the last over before lun:h Mr. G. E. Martin M :,,, of tleldmtf by Mr wtji the score nt 128 for the loss •s-ii %  Uuih.'b.c. fe zsr^ssi?" -!.",s CH. V. Walcoit 91 a J d 5r w r or,* 1 .^olln,Ta! wlcket. dunng that time M^all SCOREBOARD M.-IIIMII:I •• IOW1 roMianr IST INMIMOS II Kntahl b BrooKa* Mr S*l-y tUutiain b HuKhlnun %  c Oum.ni b McCom H Wil.ii.von D : I i UfitM Na N. Wood rui oui K Buwan upd ttvkpf • b SmlUl A Hai I bw b Smith 1 I'tiillipa. not out C '(-iltrni I b w. b WllUaSM t Smith b Willlama •ftf^ xA iianki' BOWMNC; ANALYSIS Fall l araekvt. l-. 1—Tt, IM. J-1BS, • 111. 1 -SB BOWUNT. ANALYSIS J. Wtfifcuna S—IS. J Corbin C. almlUi 1 Ha-adlry W K Kins i c. BMBSSSS, Mtitchinion WH It laMr MrComir T.-I..I (for 0 >k "MR Ir Smith t • | I Murntll I • S EMIM.tr * roLH f-'l I' • HIT l*.NIN(.a lllackiiujti b Ilaikfi Taylor b Bark.-. WHUhlra c William, b Ailrym apt rarnivr 0 Milllnston B>r e Roblnaoti b Wllliat,Warnar b Milllnston rin-in>iiii.tti. i. WafkaS M lbl i i Brtwitirr i the VACATOR ^ !" WATERPROOF. NON-SKID. "CROUNO-GRIP'FLfSSYfOOT SOLE . Clark* introduce ihe new tlitte. IWtSn*M Pui.yfoot loling to cuihion the ImfMt between leet nd floor. Mide toaietret ferrnull ol Clsrkiof En|lj,nd — the quality ihoe firm with US yeara' sxpertente—Puiayfoot •• considered tc be the ideal hot-weather loinig — light as rubber, cool si leather towgh a* you'l Thii it the Puiirfoot Soh . t'ltotr titan IrcO". tveari fonfrr than feather' 5. lb S, n.b. )> rail ol wlrkr>t. I (.1-10.3 S3. J f.i IJ3. 8—111, 7lTf. BOWl.lNCi ANALYSIS <> M R II It.,.., 11 3 40 F A. V. Wllham. in 3 SS t (J Allrvn-' n XI K Milllna-ion 30 1 48 M ItuMrWHi 3 1 11 •PAITAN . COLLIOC •P.ifn „ (SB %  l-ARTAN lT INMM.1 A Atkmc whoI. Smith s Orlffth c Smltn b HaadUv had itnick eight fours and one six. Alter lunch Warren bowline the first over sent down a maiden to Denis Atkinson. On hitting oir. Marshall was caught by Warren off Ihe bowling of W. GreenicUe after hitting up a chaneeless 81* which included 11 fours and one six, three of the fours scored after the luncheon Interval. Skinner Out Will.es then joined Atkinson and he scored a slnn.e but did not stay long and w;.s caught by Warren iff W rirfwnUige. Skinner then went in and wa off with a brace. D. Atkinson now 44 had a Life when W. Greenulge failed to hold a catch from hint. Skinner's end tame when he was caught by wicket-keeper Clarke in attempting to force a ball from K. Greenldge away The scoreboard read 214 -5—IB. SI. Hill next man ln after scoring one played a ball from K. Greenldge on to his stumps. Davie* then joined Atkinson but before he could settle down Atkinson was out caught bv Marshall off of K. Greenldge for 73 Packer only survived two balls from K. GroAOidga and waaTaught overhead by Marshall. Pdrce then went In and he and Parker batted well until Peirce was nicely cauKht bv the sub for live runs. R. Greenldge followed and then the end came when Havir-s was given out leg before from a ball from K. Greenldge and Wanderers closed their first Innings at 239. With only 15 minutes play Carlton opened their first Innings with F. Hutchinson and W. Marshall. but after Norman Marshall bowled the first ball Marshall appealed for light and this appeal was upheld EMPIRE vs. POLICE Pollc* Zffl far 7 wickets POLICE occupied the wicket for the whole day to pile up 201 runs for 7 wickets against Emplnat Bank Hall yesterday. Rain interrupted play three times during the day for abort periods and finally brought play to an end about 10 minutes before the scheduled lime of call. Captain Farmer batted well to score 63 In about 130 minutes. Other good scorers were G. Cheltenham. 36 not out, H. Wlltshir• 32 and E. Brewster 22. Police won the toss on a perfect wicket and deckled to bat. C. Blackman and F. Taylor opened Police s innings to the bowlliw df Empire's pacers H. Barker from the Bank Hall end and "Foffle*' Williams from the Southern end Barker began by getting n lot of pace off the wicket and the fourth ball of his first over claimed the first Police wicket before any runs were on Ihe tins. He left Blackman playing for%  ANBlllll 1ST INNIMO* AihinxMi c N LUVM l> K fiwuili' Marohall r Wurni Clrrmm-jt' .Si* -*""*• Wiikvo v Wai-wi *> W Qreenlilf* %  aj— e wkor. (Clarke, b K Ortrwnlda* Si Hill b K Oroenldse. Oevleo l.b.W. b K aremlds Packer c Cex b K. Gt*ntdie Pmcr C Sub b W Orrt-nldtlP (.rtTtiidso tint oul Extrai Fall ol wicket. I I lor Its. 4 for Ifl, I I I for no. I for 130. 1 HOWLING ANALYSIS A rMSH INFLUX of horses arrived last Sunday from England to swell the ranks of the many thoroughbreds ahead., in the Island. In fact the paddock is now completely full and those stables which arc empty are all reserved for candidates for the next November meeting This I find most interesting because some years ago when I suggested that we should have a paddock with at least 73 stalls at our disposal -uid additional room for building more to accommodate the rising number of thoroughbreds, I was told b) a lending authority of the B.T.C. that the day would ii.vn ionic when we would need more than fifty stalls. Well there arc now 74 stall' in 0M padduck, all full. The day has arrived when we need a paddock of 100 stalls with additional room for expansion. Clearly this cannot be accomplished at the Garrison. > Nevertheless, we are still left to wonder v J,' ..ulhuritics of the B.T.C. will seriously consider looking for a new track. Or arc they going to allow racing lo leinain cramped up in the little two by four at the Garrison? The new arrivals were four in number and the first that J sawwas Nan Tudor. A Ally by Owen Tudor out of Glcntlnnan she is very much on the small side with decided light bone all around. Novoril-olauu. II is never good to judge solely by first impressions and especially so when a horse has just spent about two weeks in a horse box at sea, With regard lo Nan Tudor's pedigree her dam is by King Salmon out of Grandissima. by Clarissimus oul of Croat, by Junior. In the bottom line Nan Tudor therefore has a string of three dams of winner-, behind her name, and although Glcntlnnan so far has only one winner of a small race to her credit, both Grandissima and Groat threw two very good horses. Grandissima produced Patriot King, who deadheated for the Irish Derby in 1934. in addition to Patriot King she is also the dam of three other winners. To Groat goes the distinction of being dam of the famous Plack, winner of the One Thousand 1 Guineas in 1824 for Lord Kosebery and although Groat produced no 1 olher winners she did well enough b> this single one who credited her wilh 1111,467. Her pedigree must also have been well thought of for her to find her way into Lord Rosebery's stud. Nan Tudor is not Warren K Uiwnldfr ID I 3 10 Wrjr*nld* n 3 100 i xiir HIS i in. i INNINOS r Hutrninaon not oul W Manhall no! oul I Extra* Total (for no wicket. M n w a winner but has a few places to her name. ward to a good length outswinger and clean bowled him for nought H. Wiltshire joined Taylor and took 2 off the last ball of that over to open his and his team's eoix\ Police lost their second WICKI. with only 10 runs scored and Barker was again responsible for the damage. Barker sent down a maiden for his second over and came back the first ball of his third over i %  york Taylor when he had scored 2. Police were now 10 runs for 2 w ickets and Barker had taken Ihe 2 wirkets for 2 runs. Bowling Change Wilh the score a I 26, Skipper AI ley inbrought on himself from the Southern end and Millingtoi. in place of Barker. Captain Farmer and Wiltshire quickly got their eye on the slow stuff and improved, considerably, the rate of scoring. A light shower of rain fell when the score was 46. holding up play about 6 minutes. Farmer was then 20 and Wiltshire 20. The shower made thu wicket responsive to spin and few balls also rose awkwardly. Wickelkceper Maurice Jones got sLrucic on his chin by one which rose up from Millington and could not (•t.iitinue to play. He was deputized for by O. M. Robinson. The 50 went up in the next over after 74 minutes of play. Jones did not rest long. He was back out two overs later wearing a plaster under his chin. Police lost their third wicket with the score at 82. Wiltshire was caught by Williams at long off aitempling a big hit off Allcyne's bowling. Williams' was a lovely catch. He ran back about 10 yards then to stick his right hand up and behind his head to hold the catch. The scoreboard read 82 for 3 Farmer 43 not out. "Johnnie" Byer, next man In. played the next ove. om MillingIon and lunch was takaDWilliams and Barker continued the Empire attack after lunch. Farmer got his SO in Barker s first over of that spelt He made them in 119 minutes. Another light shower sent the players to the pavilion for 5 minutes. Farmer, immediately as he eame back out. edged one from Barker dangerously through the slips lo the boundary. The second ball he drove Barker to the long. .1 : .1 v foi three File next ball was driven powerfully through the covers for another three, sending the 100 up in 130 irdnuteBIMillington was brought back to replace Barker Farmer drove • On page 5. Next I had a look at Arunda. In contrast lu the above filly she appeared to be a very large filly and well sel up on her legs. She is more or less black going to grey in par'. Bl portM privately by Mr. M. E. R. Bourne, who also bought Nan Tmi.n fron the ticket holders, and hei *ire in Pampas* OrSSI and hei ii.mi lank Lady. Link Lady Is by Link Boy nut of Mlntern. Ihe latter %  dajn of one winner. Mintern is Dy Blandlord. Arunda has also run %  u n limes In En gla n d this season gaming one or two places. At first fiance 1 liked her looks a lot. W" then moved onto the paddock across the road where Mr. F. E. C. Bethel 1 !, yearling importation was on show, A well grown youngster by Valdavian out of Match Play Iwi %  l d with his firsl appearances. I should say he has what the critics call "good bone". His owner informs ma he is already nearly fifteen hands so that he is well on the way lo becoming a big one al two. Valdavian, his sire, is by Tiberius out of Haintonettc the mare who produced those two famous routers Valerius and Valerian and was herself the winner of the Oaks. Match Play, his dam, is by Taj-Ud-din out of Aquilanlu. Neither of the last two mentioned mares are dams of winners The line Is therefore a little obscure to me. Harroween, who has m 0 %  d Bad by Mr Rupert Mayers on behalf of a syndicate is another good looking lllly. By Harroway oul of Thyine Wood, she Is grey and looked very racy at first sight. She has also run in England this season but I have not got her form handy. Her dam, Thyine, is by Thyestes out of Madder, a mare with a rather unusual name. Although Thyine was nut a winner yet First Thyme, another of her foals by Thyestes was a useful winner of three races valued £1,638. Mml.ter jlso threw lour other winners of 7 races including The Mad Mullah, by MieuxLc. t|ta| lo show that her owners were quite serious about her name. Madder was by Pomme-dc-terre out of Dynamic, another dam of three winners of small races. Well', that's the lot and now time will lell what they will lutn out to be. No doubt, when I see ihem again in a few weeks time 1 will not recognise them. At least those who will be put in training. ANOTHER NEW JOCKEY Not long ago | new jockey, young Wilder. stTivrd from England to ride under contract for Messrs. Wnlcott and Cheasa. Moat of us will remember he rode his llrsl winner at his (Tral meeting n 'he W.I. only week before last at Arima. Now the expected arrival of another youn^ici from attlgland has been announced by Mr. M. E. R. Bourne Wh %  'n' %  contracting for Ihe services of Arthur Baldwin Ptl nad the distinction, last season, of riding a winner the vtTS tint turnhe apf i-ared in public when he landed u %  in the pprentice Handicap J' Newmarket. Previous to this Colonibny. although four year.* old, had nol won a race However, it is said that he went very well for Baldwin who had been lidinu him in home gallops. Baldwin was first apprenticed ; %  > trainei : -I then A. Copper, but his indentures were afterward* UaiiM< md t George Alldcn. 1 expect he will be out In time for Ihe Nov. i %  ling I am very glad to see that we are gelling in some new hlood among our rider.' Now that a number of Ihe lop-ranking Venezuelan jockeys have been encouraged to stay at home we can certainly do with a few more riders lo infuse outside influence. It seems thai ... hall nevi r produce local riders of much promise in great quantities. Just a little Mi..-' llwaj I ;'"' I Ml b I Mil .'• I] l0 B BUI BsM OB pitta lnliaorma.ufc-£ejj>adiy lUriiU—titlcJ in a utfy )cBoos Pen and Ink-I'enol air amiable in am., i. %  C. L. PITT, G.P.O Bos 246, Bridgetown, Barbed**. r


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PAGE 1

STXIWT. SEPTEMBER IT, IK* SfXDAY ADVOCATE PACE THIRTEEN" HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON K. . I UNOX -,^-v "--,[ i *M SBtlVIO 'MAI YOU MUST CO ir;} -jr* so 4DON.M* tRiiNo* : MO*vtvi "* Vtf^^"\ !" l V.*'lO A' 1-ib TiMf 0 THE RIDOLE OF THE ROME REBELS ^e^JV %  k-H '•—*• VI Gordons TURNER DIESEL ENGINES INDUSTRIAL, MARINE & GENERATOR SETS SINGLE, TWIN FOUR CYLINDER MODELS From 8~*32 B.H.P. Continuous B.E.N. AIR COMPRESSORS PORTABLE & STATIONARY MODELS SPRAY PAINTING EQUIPMENT &f ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LTD. I .. iUi.1. Il<.d. SI. Mi, In.. I. Plioii.I2tt I.'I71 *"*i. w*s £l* f|4** Stocked by all leading stores %  DON B. A. HHKKJAMIK 1.TB. :io PlntfadMM Wuildimt l.uwrr lhI Slrrrl. HarbadtM i


Sunday
September i7
1930



FALL OF



‘THe

new Constitution. ‘

There are 141 candidates for the 18 contested seats. Of
these, 90. are Independents. ;

forward 18 candidates;

two.

Paddled 550
Miles To Rome

ROME, Sept, 16.
Twelve Spanish Univefsity stu-
dents paddled up the river Tiber

Carrying their three canoes on
their shoulders, the 12 bronzed
young athletes were being re-
ceived in audience by Pope Pius
ye tonight in Saint Peter’s Bas-

ca.

Later they will have a private
audience with the Pope to pres-
ent him with miniature silver
oars in memory of their Holy
voyage which started just a month
ago at Palma Di Maiorca, Spain.

' —Keuter



Volcano Eruptions
Kill 62; 17 Injured

MANILA, Philippines, Sept. 16.
A Red Cross worker reported
to-day that 62 people were dead,
17 critically injured and many
missing from increasingly violent
voleanic eruptions on Namiguin
Island, north of Mindanao.

Eruptions from Hiboksibok vol-
eano started last week but were
te-day increasing in intensity.

A pai priest and the Jesuit
Father “Arthur Shea were lead-
ing emergency workers.

Father Shea of New York has
been in the Mindanao area over
10. years. He spent the Japanese
occupation years with guerilla
bands.—Reuter.

Czechs Sentence
3 More To Death

PRAGUE, Sept. 16.

Czechoslovakia’s Supreme Court,
rejecting appeals lodged by 30
defendants in the mass spy trial
held in July, to-day passed three
new death sentences on people
previously sentenced to life im-
prisonment.

Other sentences passed by less-
er State Courts in July were con-
firmed or increased.

Sentences passed to-day by the
Supreme Court in Prague to ap-
pellants after four days of pro-
ceedings, ranged from 18 months
to 20 years hard labour.

Another mass spy trial of 27
Czechoslovaks which began
on September 12, is expected to
end on Monday.—Reuter.





(FRENCH SHIP SINKS
IN THREE MINUTES

ST. MALO, France, Sept. 16.
FORTY-NINE MEN were still un-accounted for this after-
noon, nearly 17 hours after the French weather-ship
Laplace struck a magnetic mine and sank in three minutes

off Brittany.



. ‘ed
Ban On Catholic
BERLIN, Sept. 16.
The East German Ministry of
Information has refused a 2,000,~
000 Soviet Zone Roman Catholics
permission to have their own

Catholic printing press in Leipzig,
West Berlin Catholic sources re-

rt.

Perhere had been a ban on Catho-
lic establishments in the Zone for
five years. Original negotiations
to obtain a licence for the “Ben-
no” Catholic printing works in
Leipzig were carried on by the
Berlin Bishopric at first with
Soviet authorities and later with
German officials.

They were discontinued because
the Bishop’s seat is in West Ber-
lin, Further talks between Catho-
lic. officials and the East German
Government failed.

At. present, distribution of any
Catholic organ is

Soviet Zone. i
A few leaflets and journals are

Gistributed personally by messen-

ger or individual priests. -Reuter.

Will Scatter Smuts
Ashes On Farm

PRETORIA, Sept. 16

The ashes of General Smuts
whose body was cremated in Jo-'tReir dead

hannesburg yesterday,
scattered at a small

will

- 90 Independents

-. In Trinidad’s

Elections Tomorrow
141 Contest 18 Seats

‘(From Our Own Correspondent)
COLONY of Trinidad and Tobago will make an
nt step forward in its political history, when

raw (Monday, September '8)), polling will take
place in the vital General Eleciicns to be held under the

‘war the Caribbean Socialist Party 13;
the Trinidad Labour Party 12; the Trade Union Council 6;
and the Political Progress Group (a business organisation)

by canoe to-day at the end of a |f-Spain,) and Mr. Edwin Duval,
550- pilgrim voyage to Rome.|® businessman (St. George West),

__—--—-_ Fishing boats and pleasure craft

forbidden in the

PORT-OF-SPAIN,

‘Tuc Butler Party has put

Mr. Tubal U. Butle; leads his
cwn party. The Caribbean Social-
ist Party is ably led by Dr. Pat-
rick Solomon, an outgoing mem-
ber of the Legislat ve Council
while the Trinidad Labour Parts
is headed by Mr. Raymond Hamel

Smith, a young Port-of-Spain
Barristerbat-law. The Political
Progress Group are_ supporting

Mr. Albert Gomes, (North Porte

The campaign has been carried
on with great intensity and heat.
There have been many disorderly
meetings, and candidates have!
been rttacked, in many cases be-
ing pelted with rotten eggs. Rven
Mr. Butler himself has not
escaped, and a number of his
mee‘ings met with very strong
cppocition particu:arly in North
Trinidad. Even steel bands were
employed by certain of the can-
didates, to “drown” the voices of
t’eir opponents. This led to an
announcement by the Steel Band
Ass-_ciation calling on their mem-
bers to desist from such practices.
Since then, steel bands have been
empicyed less frequently.
Will Gomes Get In?

Am» st the more interesting
conme.is are those of North Port-
of-Spain, where Gomes is being
opposed by Labour Party Leader,
Hamel-Smith and several others;
San Fernando, where the Mayor,
Mr. Roy Joseph, is being seriously
challenged by Dr. E. A. Lee, of
the Socialist Party, and others;
faces stsong oppasition. drom. Me
aces s ?
Ralph Mentor (T.U.C. Gandidate
and well Known Trade 3
and Port-ot-Spain South, where
the Mayor, derman Tang op-

ses Dr. Solomon. Party politics

Trinidad are still in
infancy. It is believed that no.
one party will be able to dominate
the new Legislature. The set-up
in the new Council will be as
follows:
There will be 26 members

and the Speaker (Mr. W. L. J.

Savary). There will

be a solid bloc

eight members — five to he

nominated by the Governor,
and three official members.

It is believed that many of the
18 contested seats will be won
by Independents, and that none of
the parties will return sufficient
members to take the lead in the
House, so. to speak, Therefore,
in all likelihood, Trinidad’s new
Legislative Council will be com-
posed of the solid Government
bloe of eight, which will probably
be supported in all important
matters by several of the elected
members, and the others, who will
form the Opposition.

@ on page 5



{bad picked up the 43 men while
iplanes hovered above scouring the
sea for other rafts and survivors.
Unconfirmed reports said that
13 bodies had been recovered. The
Navy Ministry in Paris said that
there were 92 men on board the
Laplace including the crew and
officers and officials of the French
Meteorological Institute.

The Laplace was returning from
a 21-day match in the thick of a
mid-Atlantic storm when Captain
Remusat decided last night on
arriving before St. Malo that it
was too late to enter the harbour.

He dropped anchor a few miles
out and treated his crew to a
cinema show on board,

Quarter-Master Celton told the
rescuers when picked up by a
St. Malo tugboat this morning
after drifting all night on a raft
that the whole of the crew except
the watch had gone to bed when
the ship was rocked by a “terrible
stroke of thunder.”

When he came on deck the
bridge was already under watet
\A wave washed him into the sea.

Celton said: “I found myself
swimming in black oil. Two rafts
had been thrown from deck and
|I took charge of one,
| The wind pushed us out to sea.
The waves were getting higher
jand higher. The raft capsized at
least 10 times

There were 12 men on it.

“The sailors kept the bodies of
comrades until] they

be! were rescued by the tugboat. But
informal} the tugboat was already overload-

gathering on their farm at Irene} ed. Three bodies had to be left on

near Pretoria, his son Jannie, said’ the
‘

to-day .—Reuter,

raft which drifted out again.”
—Reuter

tenes etnanemrnee








































Sunday

a






~ POLO AT THE GARRISON |






° £m ——

A MEMBER of the Barbados Polo Club has the ball for himself at the Garrison as Cyclones and Tor-

nadoes met in the usual Saturday

evening pratice chukkas.



16,500 Strike|S

In London

BUSES HELD UP

LONDON, Sept. 16.

Over half of Londons motor
buses were today ted up by tic
unoffidfal’ “strike ~ winch’ Labour
Minister George Isaacs aescribea
yesterday as Communist-led ana
part of a plot to disrupt the na-
tion’s industries .

About 16,500 drivers and con-
cuctors were on strike, keeping
over 3,600 vehicles idle, but the
men at 24 of London’s 52 bus
garages voted to stay at work.

Arthur Deakin, Secretary of the
1,300,000 member Transport
Workers’ Union, was meeting
workers’ delegates to-day.

Electric tram men became in-
volved at midnight. Over 1,000
decided to join the strike.

Workers’ representatives yester-
day elected a strike committee to
press claims for better pay and
no more recruitment. of women
conductors.

The strikers also demanded a
meeting with their Union’s Fin-
ance Committee on Monday to
consider their appli-ation for a
#1 per week increase in pay.
This claim, which was made last
year, has been refused by the
Union executive, The present
weekly wages are between £5
and £7.

About 600 maintenance engin-
eers at five gas works in the Lon
don area stonned work to-day to
nress wage claims

Gas suvplies were not exnected
to he affected during the week -|
ond.—Reuter.

Pope Ordered
To Be Silent

CASTEL GANDOLFO,
ITALY, Sept. 16.

Pope Pius XII. who has prob-
ably spoken to more of the public
than any other sovereign in the
world, was today ordered by his
doctors to keep absolute silence
for the next few days

He was suffering from a vhroat
infection brought on by a cold

All audiences at Castel Gan-
dulfo were temporarily cancelled

The Pope received only officials
of vhe Vatican this morning re-
viewing the business of the day
with them witout speaking.

Av tonight’s Mass to an audi-
ence of 5,000 pilgrims in Saint
Peter’s Basilica in Rome, the Pope
will not give his usual address,
but will simply make the sign of
the Cross from his throne over



the crowds in a silent blessing.
Reuter,

“— And there | was, just
digging a hole for my
bone . ’



Shaw Is
““Comfortable”’

LUTON, Bedfordshire, Sept. 16.

George Bernard Shaw (94) suf-
fering from a broken thigh bone,
was today stated to be ‘“comfort-
able and cheerful.” The hospital
where he is;+detained here said
that there had been no deterio-
jration in the playwright’s condi-
tion. since yesterday.

Doctors were issuing bulletins
as Shaw insists on listening to
news broadcasts

Shaw broke his thigh when he
fell in his garden,—Reuter.

pain Will Mobilise

44 Divisions To
Defend W. Europe

Against Russian Attack

A GROUP of high-ranking Spanish Army officers declared
here to-night that Spain was prepared: to mobilise 44

divisions within 36 hours
Western Europe against the

They said Spain now had 22 divisions under arms, bu
not all were up to strength and Spain was short of military

equipment.



Advocate Hurricane
Relief Fund
For Antigua ~~

Previously acknowledged $6,004 06
Canadian Bank of
Commerce



Arthur T. Skeete 20 00
Royal Bank of Canada
Mr. & Mrs, L. Harold

Haynes 15 00 |i
Mr. & Mrs. A. D.

Macgillivray 10 00
Cc, A. Brathwaite 20 00
Mr, & Mrs. L. A. King 5 00
Barclays Bank (D.C.&.0.)
Mr. & Mrs, W. S. S 10 00
Mr. & Mrs. J. A, Mahon 20 00
Mr. & Mrs. W. T

Gooding 5 00
Advocate Co,, Ltd.
Miss V. Gittens 1 50
Miss J. Gittens 1 50
The Misses: Sealy 10 00
Mrs, J. J. Bullen 5 00
H. Hutson Inniss 25 00
Mrs. A. E. J. Carter 10 00
P. M_ .Crichlow 5 00
Mr. & Mrs. Vernon

Knight 5 00
Mrs. C. S. Daniel 1 00
Mr. L, A. Williams 20 00
M. K. B. Ince 200

TOTAL $6,195 00



£800,000 Still
Wanted forButlin’s

(From Our Own Correspondent:
LONDON, Sept. 16.
It is understood that the threa
preference shareholders who were
appointed at a recent informal
meeting of Butlin’s (Bahamas) to
examine the possibility of raising
the £800,000 needed to prevent
the company going into liquida-
tion, held their first meeting yes-
terday but failed to reach any
satisfaetory conclusien.

General Protests Against
Expulsion Of Reds

BERLIN, Sept. 16.
The Chief of the Soviet Control
Commission in Germany, General
Vassily Chuikov, has protested to
the French High Commissioner in
Germany, Andre Francois-Poncet,
against the expulsion from France
of a number of foreign nationals,
including 16 Soviet citizens, and
their dispatch to the Soviet Zone
of Germany, the West German

News Agency reported today.
—Reuter.

Foreign Ministers




































‘HEIDELBERG, Sept. 16.

for the common defence oi
Russian attack.

“Our training is good and the
only thing we need is equipment,”
the officers said.

The officers, who are here to
wateh the United States Army's
autumn manoeuvres, Exercise
Rambo, consist of General fesus
Aguirre. Deputy Chief of the
Spanish Army’s General _ Staff,

eutenant Colonel Lesar Martin
Alonso, Lieutenant Colonel Luis
Garcia Rollain (who acted as in-
terpreter), and Major Tomas De
Liniers Pidal.

Emphasising that they were
speaking purely as military men
and were not attempting to fore-
cast the trend of political develop-
ments involving Spain and other
Western European countries, the
officers declared that if Spain be
came a member of the Atlantic
Pact it would “strictly observe its
obligations under the Pact.”

Spain would like very much to
have some military equipment
from the United States, they said

They declared that the fear of
Communism and the Soviet Union
was very great in Spain and they
seoffed at the notion that Spain
felt secure “behind the Pyrenees.”

Reuter,

675,000 Watch
Air Force
Display

LONDON, Sept. 16

A total of 675,000 people visited
68 Royal Air Force stations which
were “at home” to mark the Tenth
Anniversary of the battle of Bri-
tain,

The weather at many stations
was unfavourable with blustery
winds and rain, but only in a few
instances did this interfere with
the flying programmes

—Reuter.

Election Candidate
Injures Collar Bone

(From Our Own Correspondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN.

Mr. Sararn Teelucksingh, prom-
inent Indian proprietor, and a
member of the Legislative Coun-
cil for many years, suffered injury
to his right collar bone, after a
fall, and had to be taken to hos-
pital at Couva. Mr. Teelucksingh
is contesting the South Caroni
seat for the forthtoming elections.



tt

EOUL BECOMES

“Surrender

Or Die” |

MACARTHUR TELIS REDS |

|
WASHINGTON, Sept, 16
General Douglas MacArthur has
calleaay-North Koreans “to
Surrender or die,” according to an
army spokesman here
The spoke man told reporters a;
1 Defence department briefing to-
day that 3,000,000 leaflets calling
m North Korean Soldiers to
surrender or die had been droppe |!
thiourhout the Communist—held
portion of South Korea
Meanwhile United
Marines under cover of rocke:-
iring Corsair aireraft were
night on the outskirts of tle Com-

States

to-

nunist Leld South Korean capital,
Seoul.

They had pushed aimost 19 miles
ip the road from the Port of



head, fighter bombers heavily at- Australian,



Price:

SIX CENTS lepgy 0

Aduncate -s “"

t *





IMMINENT
| Reds Will Be Cut

In Two

TOKYO, Sept. 16.

GEOUL is expecied to fall over the week-end to

powerful United Nations forces quickly fan-
ning out and exploring the Inchon bridgehead.

With the recapture of the South Korean
capital, the U.N. Forces will have the death-grip on
Communist’ communications between ttc battle
front and the rear. é

At the same time. the newly launched offen
sive out of the Pusan defence square—which swept
forward up to three miles today towards Waegwan
threatens to slice Communist armies in halt.

The United Nations’ Spearhead from Inchon heach-
head pushed into the outskirts of Seoul today, the South
Korean General Staff announced.

Despatches from the front said they were over a rile
from the centre of the South Korean capital which was

overrun by Communist forces more than two months ago
Just in advance of the spear- |can, British, French,” Canadian
New Zealand

and

Inchon where they landed yester- tacked Communist reinforcements South Korean warships tqok_ the
tay from the largest invasion fleet |trying to stem the rush on the }Communists by surprise They
since World War II City were trying desperately to get

But on the flanks of this spear- The South Korean General of |their forces into the area from

head on Wolmi Island and in |Staff said the Kimpo Airfield and north and south, but fighter planes
Inchon itself, there was heavy ~ v were ee and » mauling
fighting The rt was z : them severely :

7 ‘i mS vee See - Massed American artillery

furiously late tonight as marines
fanned out in sustained assaults
on Communist forces rushed froin
10orth and south

At the same time British, Ameri.
ran and South Korean troops why
rave been closely boxed up .n
the southeast corner of the penin-
sula began a big new offensive of
their own and made gains two i
three miles on all fronts

Striking northward from Taegu,
the primary objective of the Brit
ish backed offensive out of the
“defence box” was to cross the
Naktong rive: and ultimately to
reach Seoul-—145 air miles to the
north

General MacArthur, briefing
correspondents on his way wu
Inchon where he is directing opet-
ations said that he chose Seoul
because it was the heart of the
Communist war effort. Cut out this
heart — he explained — and the
Communist armies on the Naktong
river would be completely cut off
(yom their supply stream from the
aa

i



town which is 9 miles from Seoui
was also taken and United Nations
fighter planes were already oper-
ating from there,

on the Communist
north of the em-
while tank con
for the drive

rained shells
Division to the
battled Taegu,
centration stood by
tewards Waegwan

U.S. Armada
Attacks

In the South, United States 25th
Division started another attack,
also under cover of artillery bar-
rage. Bad weather made air sup-
port impossible

Reinforcements for yesterday's
“clock-work-like’ American
marine and infantry landings at
Inchon went ashore at the west
‘| coast beach on the early morning
tide to-day from the invasion of
an armada of 260 ships,

Today’s drive northwest of
Taegu was made in three thrusts
headed toward Waegwan,

United Nations troops have oc- American eight - inch guns
cupied the Yongtonpo, ward of! blasted away at the Communist
Seoul at 5 p.m. local time on eints for ten minutes be-

strong

seu cout bo” seagate [Rabaedhy. econo stp ne tnt amy been,
North Korean forces would “soon- communique broadcast by Pusan Americans and reans
er or later disintegrate.” Seoul is fradie, . Joined forces for the to break
expected to fall over the week- Other United Nations troops had through the Communists’ grip on
end. ‘i crossed the Han River, advancing] ‘"¢ defence perimeter

@ on page 5



U.S. Has File
Of Pro-Red

pushed on from the beachhead

established yesterday at Inchon,

ther United Nations troops
Germans smashed their way out of their
constricted defence) box on the

HEIDELBERG, Sept, 16

United Si'ates Army har
its plan to arrest al)
Communist sympathizers among
the German civilian population
in the American occupation zone

The
completed

tewards the heart
communique added,

Landing At Inchon

As General

southeast tip of the peninsula

Reuter’s
Hudson
spokesman on the Taegu front as
saying ‘‘we will cross the Naktong
and we are going north.”

of Seoul, the

MacArthur's forces

Lionel
Americar

correspondent
quoted’ the



Heavy rains falling throughout

should Russia invade Wester Their objective was also Seoul, the battle area made advance
Germany, a Civil Affairs Staff}to link up with the Inchon offen-; difficult on slippery roads and
Officer disclosed here voday when [sive ; hillsides, but American com-

discussing the American army’s
“Exercise Rainbow".

The officer added: “We have 8
pretty good file on all these peo-
ple, and they could be rounded
up quickly.’

He disclosed that ever since
American occupation in Germany
began, local military government
efficia! and thet uccessors
American High Commission re‘l

jer hed been compiling
ile ‘ords on every German su
pected of “subversive ¥ sndencies”
in the American Zone,

The file was built up on the

investigation
American

personal
rvations

basis of

mad obs by

officials

The Army’s Civil Affairs se
tion has plans to evacuate German
political leaders and technicians
regarded as valuable to Western
Allied occupation forces it was

plso disclosed

The aim would be to re-estab
lish these officials in important
Governmenval technical jobs after
lost territory had been recaptured {

Officers said that the Unite
States had evidence that Russia:
authorities and East Zone Com
munist leaders had compiled @'
extensive dossier on thousand
of Western Germans from Gov-
ernmental figures to officials it
the smallest villages

“These Western German leat-
ers would be the first persons t
disappear were the tussians

invade,” he added,—Reuver

Discuss

Defence of Western Europe

NEW YORK, Sept. 16.

The 12 Fore gu Ministers of the
North Atlantic Council discussed
for more than two hours this
morning the problem of the de-
fence of Western Europe

The meeting was dominated by
a long French statement on West-
ern defence and Germany's par
ticipat on in it

Robert Schuman _ French
Foreign Minister was understood
to ha given a comprehensive
reply to an equally detailed re-
view of the subiect yesterday by
Dean Acheson, United States Sec-
retary of State

Schuman w
reve aled cl
French point

ve

believed to have
the duality of the

view which in





€

varying degrees is held by other
European members of the Coun-
cil.

This duality consists of a de-
sire to see the lines of defence in
Western Europe extended as far
east as possible, wh ch would in-
volve the employment of as much
manpower as can be available

On the other hand, there is
the psychological reluctance of
European countries to a revival
of German military power

Schuman was understood t
have stressed that the integration
of German forces would in
ease first involve consultatior
with the German Government

The review of Western European

any,

defence by ministers yesterd

of Western Europe as possible, ‘t
is necessary to mobilise a maxi-

and to-day, according to source |
close to the delegations, clost
followed the pattern outlined
Acheson in his opening surv:+|
yesterday.

His main argument was |
lieved to have been that
order to defend as large an ar
mum of manpower and equipme |
without delay

The integration of Weste
German forces on honoural
terms, would mean that a greater
area could be included in the
strategic defence plan of
proposec nified Nortt Atlant |
Command.—Reuter

General
quarters here said that the Inchon
landings under the guns of Ameri- lack of air support. —Reuter.

—
SSeS

Mac Arthur's Head- | manders declared the push would

ecntinue as planned, despite the









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GET THE BEST FOR LESS



.
we


PAGE TWO







PLAZA sa Olatin ‘ : ABT 2 snows TODAY

“THEY DIED WITH THEIR BOOTS ON” with Err
and “CHEROKEE STRIP” -






FLYNN |
|

with Dick FORAN }



A WARNER BROS. DOUBLE
i MOXDAY AND TUESDAY 5 and 8.3.0 P.M }
WARNER'S THRiLL DOUBLE Edward G. ROBINSON in |
with Ben LYON }

“G . MEN” and “DARK TOWER” —

OO?

‘ GAIETY

: ’
(The Garden) ST, J/(MES “TH HOTS ".
r 2 SHOWS TODAY — 5 & 8.40 P.M. } it
RKO RADIO'S THRILLER ! ! ;
“SPANISH MAIN” % Featuring :
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————SIONDAY AND TUESDAY — 8.20 P.M. } ROD CLAVERY (Vocalist)
RKO RADIO PO TLADMAN'S. TERRITORY” % MIGHTY TERROR (Calypso Champion)
with RANDOLBA “SOGWE and. % LEARIE ATWELL (Sengational Guitarist)
“BEDLAM” — with Boris KARLOFF 8
OOOO LLL EEO 09

rn



| GLOBE
Presents the Sweet Music of Trinfdad’s Favourite

Dance Orchestra

On
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 218T, AT 8.30 P.M. ¥

SUNDAY ADVOCATE




























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ANOTHER MASTERPIECE FROM
ALFRED HITCHCOCK !










Rey AVDI.2 © ena Amica

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ROXY

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY
4.30 & 8.15

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Lloyd BRIDGES
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with
Myrna LOY

Robert MITCHUM



Mon, & Tues. 4.30 & 8.15
Republic Whole Serial .. .

“JESSE JAMES
RIDES AGAIN”

With
Clayton MOORE
Linda STERLING



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Axeheads
Chisels

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Hand Drills
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Planes & Irons
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Tool Handles
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FACTORY

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THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON

ad
R. R. M, S. CHARLES, Medical
Officer of Health, . Arima,
Trinidad, and Mrs. Charles will be
returning to Trinidad by B.W.LA.
teday after a short holiday as
guests of Mr, and Mrs. C. E. Clarke
of Palm Beach, Hastings. Mrs.
Charles is the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Clarke

Aftended Prison
Officer’s Course
R. E. C. ARRINDELL, As
Dr. Charles came over principal- sistant Superintendent of

ly to see his father Mr. J. B. Prisons, Trinidad was intransit
Charles of Dominica who arrived on Friday morning on the “Gas-

last Tuesday for reasons of health. ” nd after end-
Mr. Charles is an ex-member of SO8"° pro Eons getend

the Legislative Council of Dom- ing a fqur-mapths Priggn Ciicesp

Course. He was cgcompsnied by
inica, and Chairman of the Banana ,; 5
jation. He is also a guest of his wife who had been jn England
Tr. and Mrs. C. E. ClaF and

fer 15 months. ;
hopes to return home during the Mr. Arrindell told. Carib that
week.

the the course was sponsored by
the Colonial Office and was the
Mec i ; first of its kind since the war.
bechanic From Grenade | Nineteen officers from all over
day * Setheden ral his the British Empire —— peas

2 ich w
duties as mechanic of the Elec- conven, se puree oS lines of
tric Company in Grenada, is Mr. English Driocns nae.
Tommy Wells. He arrived last 8 a rs ‘ ind
week by B.W.I.A. and is stay- 100% “Dammouth, Wormwood

‘rvetal Wate i in artm .
ing at Crystal Waters, Worthing. peace Midst and Borstal
i ; camps for young offenders. e
Medico Takes Time Out chief camp was the training school
e a rrived here a Wed at Waketeld, Vornenire Wiare
sae, & ; . as been pu .
nesday by B.W.I.A., for q holi- fect: he Oe ae "ta
Guest eo - Indramer Work without guards in an open
‘. : camp.

Dr. Mapp is physican for the Mr Avrindell said that they also

Forres Park Sugar Estate in South |.” ay, a prison
Trinidad. yisited Om where there
Spent Summer Holidays js a farm for agricultural training

leav- modern lines.
MONG the passengers lea one ere, UN cd the aman
was. well looked after by the
Colonial Office and on the whole,

ing by T.C.A., yesterday
morning for Canada after apenes
ing their summer vacation wer ,
Miss Margaret Clarke who is doing they had a most interesting time.
her second year at MeDona Revuedeville 1950
College in Home Economics and Dre in last night at
Mr. Gerald Tryhane who is taking “Norham” the home of Dr.
his fourth year pS, in Engin- and Mrs. A. L, Stuart at, Tweed-
eering at Mc Gill University. side Road and saw a caste of sev-
Miss Clarke is the daughter Of enty lovelies going through their
Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Clarke of paces_tor the 19) Revuedeville
“Henbury”, Pine Hill, and Mr. that will be presented at the Em-
Tryhane is the son of Mrs. Iris pire Theatre on October 19 and 20.
Tryhane of Bagatelle Plantation, Mrs. Stuart hes puccens ded Ln
St. Thomas. h producing, musica a -
i wises a theme with a local set-
For Trinidad Elections - ting skilfully intertwined in a
R. J. M. HEWITT of the Bar v .
on BE, programme of dancing that ranges
bades Reporder and at ' Mg from the ballet to the modern Bee
Bee, MCT ee BWA. for Bop and Se cumperenvey mod-
‘Trinidad to attend the General Oe Nae ee nes — . eal
Elections beginning tomorrow. for the young ladies and gentle-
The purpose of their visit is to fen whe would break into ama-
observe the setup in the siocsions teur theatricals and on the other
been given ’ in the Revuedeville
‘They are expected to return On| -+.56 daffcers to show their wares.
“8 One looks forward to a pro-
} gramme that promises to be both
novel and entertaining when the
show comes off next month.

ce
| Visitors From U,K,

R. AND MRS. Robert Ozanne,

were arrivals on Friday
morning from England on the
“Gascogne’. They have come for
a holiday and are staying at Ber-
wick Guest House,

Back To School

, ISS SUSAN ARROWSMITH,
, daughter of the Adminis-
trator of Dominica and Mrs, Ar-
rowsmith, left by T.C.A. yester-
day morning for Canada on her
way back to Westonbirt School in
Gloucestershire, England. She
came in from Dominica with her
parents on Tuesday and was stay-
ing with them at the Windsor
Hotel.



DAY — 8.30 P.M.

Wh




— MAT. WED, — 5 P.M.
Color By Ansco Color

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“THEY PASS THIS WAY” ORGUIENNE! Ventre gui-
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that grotesque gadget Unesco, has
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EXTRA — At 8.30 for Ha jou

Joseph CLEMENDORE and His

Dancing Partner CINDERELLA
in “DANCING LUNATICS’



CROSSWORD.

cee lt Pens
eT | Te
CL bul

Mon. & Tues. 4.30 & 8.30
M-G-M’s Doe es ‘
Richard BASE

e E Audrey TOTTER






“TENSION”

And

“THE STRATTON STORY”

Starring
4 s STEWART
roe June ALLYSON
EXTRA !!

Mon, Nite at 8.30 for Half Hour
COFFEE & The PROWLER
tnalng helt Pita Calypsoes

3 =~ = Across
OLYMPIC pen rude differentiy tn: orave
TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.15
Tomorrow 4.30 & 8.15
20th C-Fox Double. . .
June HAVER
Mark STEVENS

-

Enliven partner at the en! (7)

To strike in Scotiand (i)
i iit

rt | cond

(9) |

Associated with diteraat fuel (4)

pris from a lemon /%,



tion,



ie. }
. The hands, .4) |
range # couree uf

t ore. (
. as. Watch. (4)
& wedit for a good one

artion, (4)

SProeseF Spree -

Vi KeRK Ree

“OH YOU BEAUTIFUL
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AND
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— With —
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Jane NIGH

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Tues. & Wed. 4.30 & 8.15
20th C-Fox Double. . .

. BUFFALO BILL”
“THE PURPLE HEART”

(b>
Down
. Vehicle, ox and relative com
e 2 lena: (
Ee. * . )
his ts not cultivated, (8)
is oye verlety is a gentie

man.

The great one’s a dog! (4)
Enter differently w
for ever. (}) 7. Make good (5)

|
(
Hoa trieno
Up at the end means the same |
10. Proceed to go (5)

SP & oP sex pr

(3, 4)

It" es trom coconuts. (5)

. For what reason is this clue? (J!
lution of qeeterday’s puzzle.—Across.
+7. Reflector: 11 t; 12
VASSCS

; se; 8. Lovable: 9
10 Respects; 14, aaker: 16
. Menal.

Valse; A

Amp; 19, ‘coke: 20. Lin

ane ny . Bats: 24, A

Precipice’s%, Rear seat; ¢
eva; t; 6. Lose;
asion;



Rasps
Spoke Shaves
1



Caub

~ BY THE WAY..,



SUNDAY,

4



“Do your children know
; that you read these sort
of books?”



‘

London Express Service.

Engagement
T a party given at “Grey-
dene,” Upper Collymore
Rock, last night, the engagement
et Miss Janet McDavid, cashier of
Messrs, Goddards’ Restaurant, and
daughter of Mrs, Buzanne McDavid
of Sea View House, Bay Street,
to Mr. Gordon Wilson, son of Mr.
and Mrs’ Harry Wilson of Upper
Collymore Rock, was announce.
Gordon is a clerk of Messrs. C, S.
Pitcher & Co.

Confidential Secretary

RS. ALICIA PUY ARENA,

Confidential Secretary to
the Venezuelan Consul-General at
Trinidad. is spending a holiday in
Barbados at “Ashton-on-Sea”,
Maxwell Coast, with Mr. and Mrs.
F. Franchesei of Trinidad.

Mr. Franchesci is Manager of
the Hi Lo grocery of Port+of-Spain
and he is also holidaying here
with his family. ,

Entertained To Dinner

R. and Mrs. Del Castillo and

Mr. and Mrs. Coen of Cara-
cas, Venezuela, who are spending
a holiday here as guests at the
Ocean View Hotel, entertained
Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Knight to
dinner at the Hotel on Friday
night.

r. Del Castillo is Director of
the Surveys and Geodetic Depart-
ment of the Government of Cara-
cas while Mr, Coen is with the
Venezuelan Petroleum Company.
Trinidadians Return Home

RS. GERALD ALEXIS of

Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, re-
turned home on Friday evening
by B.W.1.A. after spending about
ten days holiday. She was ac-
companied by her two children
Gerald and Jacqueline, and they
were staying at Crystal Waters,
Worthing.

Back Again

R. A. B. MITCHELL, Cashier

' of Mason’s Ltd., of Port-of-
Spain, Trinidad, is now back in
Barbados for another holiday. He
first came here in September last
year when he spent three weeks,
He arrived on ‘Thursday by
B.W.LA. and is staying at “Crystal
Waters”, Worthing.



eee
tion for discriminating again
man because of his cleat ot hk
race.

Their next earth-shaking dis-
covery will be that eyery man—
white, yellow, brown or black—
has an immortal soul, and that
all are equal in the sight of God.
This announcement may be some-
what delayed, as they are still
trying to locate the soul. The
latest theory is that it is under the
rutilatory haulm of the left elbow.

The Strabismus Six

D*; STRABISMUS (Whom God
Preserve) of Utrecht has in-
vented a motor-car which bids
fair to etc., etc, etc. It will cost
£375,000 to build, will have four
engines and nine wheels (one un-
der the gridget-valve). It will be
so delicate in its mechanism that it
will have to be flown to its des-
tination, and will probably not go
at all in cloudy weather. But
when it does go, it will move
beautifully, and will have four
wheels instead of two to take the
corners at a speed so frightful that

| ane will almost wish it had never
started. Oh—and what cylinders! B

Better Than Real Dew
“Z7ES, she’s nice enough, but
she doesn't look dewy.”

——

SEPTEMBER 17, 1950
€

Off To Trinidad
R. DAN F. BLACKETT, Editor
of “The Torch”, left yesterday
evening by B.W.I.A. for Trinidad
on a short visit as the guest of
Hon'ble Roy Joseph. Mayor of San
Fernando whe is seeking re-eiec-
tion to the Legislative Council.
White in {rumaad Mr. slackett
hopes to assist My, Joseph in the
winding up of nig eampaign for
(ne Geperal Bue@yons woicn tage
piace tomorrow. He also hopes to
gel a view or how the elections are
veing carried on due to tne change
of the consucuuon ana general sey
Up of machinery for voung,
Passed School Certiticate
R. William ‘Bill’ Mallalieu,
formerly a pupil of the Lodge
School and for the past three years
of St. John’s School, Leathernead,
ingland, has got his School Cer-
tificate with Matriculation Exemp-
tion, He passed with distinction
in geography and got five eredits
and one failure.
Bill is now looking forward to
coming home for Christmas.

American Contralto
ORLD famous American con-
tralto, Marian Anderson
passed through Trinidad last
week, accompanied by her hus-
band Mr. Orpheus Fisher, after a
four-months singing tour in most’
of the capitals in South America.
‘They are returning to America
Miss Anderson hopes to return to

Trinidad on a short holiday.

After Three Years
M*" and Mrs, Clifton Good-
ridge, two Barbadians who
were residing in Canada for the
past three years, returned yester-
day morning by T.C A. from
Montreal to spend a holiday with
their relatives at Bank Hall.
Formerly of the Parts Depart-
ment of Messrs McEnearney and
Co., Ltd., Mr. Goodridge was em-
ployed as Chief Clerk in the Re-
ceiving and Checking Department
of the Toronto Motor Co.
Intransit
R. GEOFFREY CHAMBERS,
Civil Servant attzched to
the Customs, Trinidad. arrived
here on Friday morning on the
“Gascogne’” as an intransit pas-
senger from England and left
later in the evening
Mr. Chambers was sent up to
England by the Trinidad Amateur
Football Association on a two
months football training course
for the benefit of elementary
school boys.

For Health Reasons
RS. MERCEDES PLIMMER
of Trinidad who arrived
here a week ago for reasons of
health is at present a patient at
Dr. Scott’s Nursing Home and is
expected to be up and about soon.
Her daughter Mercedes who came
up with her is staying at “Beach
House”, St. Lawrence and will
be returning home on Wednesday.
A keen Water Polo fah, Mer-
cedes tells Carib that along with
the Trinidad Water Polo team
which is expected to tour Bar-
bados in November, a girls team
is also hoping to make the trip.

By Beachcomber

How often one hears that said.
Very well. I have before me a
cutting which tells women how
to look dewy. Pointing out that
flowers glistening with dewdrops
are a lovely sight, it says that
a real or artificial flower, worn
on the dress, should have one or
two pearls of different sizes stuck
tc it. Then “a minute touch of
nail varnish.”

Another good trick is to buy
blobs of sham candle-grease and
stick them on your cheeks. It
you wear a hat like a lamp-shade
yeur friends will say, “How she
glows !”

Priority Gramarye

ILITY Glamour. The words
, caught my eye in a head-
line, _ I suppose now that the
beautiful old word “glamour” has
been rubbed in the filthy mud of
film jargon, it cannot be further
dishonoured by association with
the fashionable word “utility.”

yt a sense of humour, which is
a sense of p jon, might have
prevented the juxtaposition of the
two words.



CRYPTOQUOTE-—Here’s how to work if:
AXYDLBAAXR
is LONGFELLOW

One letter simply stands for anoth

for the three L/’s,

X for the two O's,
trophies, the length and formation of
Each day the code letters are different.

er, In this example A is used
ete. Single letters, apos-
the words are all hints.

A Cryptogram Quotation

PATN RJ

ORIU’IJ ERUURIK,

QAQONIQNU

sv VDN

EFV RJ IAV @sJjV

ABB EM RV—GFEPRPRFJ JIMLPY.

WHICH ARE on toquote;



First Grade English

WOOLLEN SUITINGS

HE WHO ALLEGES THIN
RADICTORY 'S8 NOT TO BE HEARD—LAW.
eee

$3-7° yd.

plain Shades, Pinheads, Pencil Stripes

TROPICALS $6-5° 2. 7-91 ya.
All Wool
WORSTED FLANNELS $8-57 ya.

Rules Nayy Blue
Tapes Herringbone
Pliers Rl
Screw Drivers SERGE $7-95 yd.
oor. 2 Shades Grey
ee s WORSTED
fl Stones FLANNEL
Emery mpeeis (complete) 57
Paint Brushes °
Putty Knives $3 yd.

Chalk Lines



LIMITED.
203

Tel. No. 9




EVANS ana .
WHITFIELDS

“Your Shoe Store”

2 Shades Grey

LONDON “STAR”

EDITOR
REPORTS:

Monday Sept, 4.
72, Cheapside, BC2.

ORKSHIRE woollen

manufacturers’ worst
fears were realised at the
opening of the new sea-
son’s wool sales in Sydney
to-day when prices soared
by as much as 50 pe.

Dest Wait For “JORIN WHITE nccccnccccccceee
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1950

EVE

aa eae
HOLLYWOOD



HOLLYWOOD, Sunday,

Blackeloth and soundtrack

Ls PALM TREES

and mist, shops
“that look like
beach bungalows,
offices that look
like holiday-
camp chalets,
churches that
look like cinemas, and a new
picture-house which has a steeple.

Geraniums, known as California
weeds, growing wild, morticians’
‘vernacular for undertakers) ad-
vertisements on the backs of all
the street benches; a group of
cafés specialising in ice cream and
pastries; which look like Egyptian
mosques but which are neverthe-
less named The Pig ’n Whistle....

Cowboys, booted and spurred,
sitting around super-shiny cock-
tail lounges amid the chromium,

boss

satin drapes and peach glass, a
predominance of waitresses and
shop assistants who look like
Jane Wyman — and lots of

Hired searchlights yaking the
sky every time (a nightly event)
a new hamburger stand is opened;
drive-in cinemas, restaurants and
even boot repairers; Spanish
stucco houses with flat roofs
(which leak and which the earlier
settlers sell to the newcomers).

Sirens screaming (Hollywood is
the place where everything goes
on wheels but where the pedes-
trian officially has the right of
way — perhaps that is why an
ambulance making a noise like
our old friend the air-raid siren
passes by my hotel every four
minutes); Dixieland bands; and
talk, talk, talk and more talk.

Wisecrackers without wisecracks

HOLLYWOOD is also the place
where the highest-paid comedians
live—so I started a search for a
wisecrack. And they said:—

Jimmy Durante: “I got a million
of ’em, but right now I can’t
think of one.”

Danny “nomas: “=m no quick-
'y

off-the-mark gagster — remem-
ber?”
Jack Benny: “You know me—

I’m the guy who is funny without
saying anything, so they tell me.”

Bob Hope: “You'd better ask
my gag-writer. Hey, Barney, say
something funny to the lady.”

And frum Barney: “The things
I write aren’t really funny. Bob
just makes them sound that way.”

Postscript: Example of the
Hope humour heard at a charity
show he compéred: “Bing Crosby
was sorry he couldn’t get along
tonight, but he had a nasty ac-
cident; he fell off his wallet.”

It’s people, people, people

HUMPHR EY
BOGART, cur-
rently on the side
of law and order
saying: “The old-
style film gang-
ster is out. Now-
adays gangsters
are big-business
men who may pay income tax. Not
many of them even get shot
Oba it 053

Elia Kazan, a small, ugly man,
now the dictatorial director on
the “Streetcar” film at Warner's,
living down the days when he
used to be a small-par! actor
specalising in gangster roles.

Marcia Lewis, the girl who
holds a thousand secrets—balding
actors go to her for scalp treat-
ment; Al Jolson explaining why
he will not play at the London
Palladium: “Everyone’s a sensa-
tion there. I like to set records.”

Joan Crawford, pleased about
her current film, “Goodbye, My
Fancy”: It’s a break from the
traditional Crawford story; you
don’t see me washing dishes in



the first reel, I’m a full-fledged
Congresswoman right from the
beginning.”

Bing Crosby’s latest commercial
venture — the manufacture of a
new kind of deodorant, a pill
which is taken internally.

Betty Grable is as blonde bub-
bly, bright, and beautiful in the
flesh as she is in glorious Techni-
color... - ‘ i

The Jack Warner party for the
Oliviers where the guests—the
Gary Coopers, the Joseph Cottens
were there too—were entertained
by an after-dinner discussion on
dianetics, the new form of self-
psychoanalysis, which is the
current craze in California......

The Oliviers, escaping from all
the formality, eating hot dogs
with Claudette Colbert and hus-
band at one of the outdoor
stands......

And amid all these people,
people, people, here’s how you can
tell the actors who are not work-
ing—by their tan (bronzed beauty
does not photograph well, so the
stars must de-tan for picture-
making)......

Fashion. Department

ADRIAN, the local Dior (but his
clothes are even more expensive),
inspired by a recent inspection of
the Duke of Alba’s hat collection,
putting on a fabulous rose-and-
champagne affair to show off his
new Spanish-influenced styles
(tassels, fringed sashes, velvet
turbans from which a single jewel
drops over the centre of the fore-
head)......

Sarah Churchill’s English ceil-
ing-price grey fiwne! suit being



.

One










Pond's Creams have done for my o

protect my skin”

NGLISH OR

AMERICAN — society’s loveliest
women use the same beauty care. They use
Pond’s, and it is thanks to Pond’s two Creams that
their complexions keep so radiantly lovely always.
Why not let Pond’s keep your skin lovely, too?
Every night, before you go to betl, cleanse the skin
thoroughly of dirt and stale make-up with delightful
Pond’s Cold Cream. Then “rinse”’ with more Cold

occupied by M.-G.-M.’s head de-
signer for her to wear
TAM: 45.

Susan Hayward’s | silent-film
hair-do—very long and fluffed out
over one eye..... ‘

Gorgeous Gussie Moran, re-
volting from all the femininity,
dining out in a severely tailored
bracer-skirt of quilted satin and
mannish shirt......

Latest colour for cooking stoves:
bright scariet.



. #3 ages
LADY MAUREEN COOPER,” ;
English society woman, entrusts in mand es ¢
complexion to Pond’. “It is simply ae rohat

lexion,
says Lady Maureen, “I use Pond’s Cold Cream
for cleansing and Pond's Vanishing Cream to

Cream for extra-cleansing, exira-softness.
In the morning, before putting on your make-up,
smooth in a thin film of Pond’s Vanishing Cream.

It makes an ideal powder hbase because it holds
powder matt for hours. It protects the skin, too.
Use Pond’s beauty care regularly and in a short
while you will notice that your skin is clearer, softer,

smoother. It. will glow with new radiance, new

loveliness. Pond’s Creams are
@ = yet they are used by society's
both sides of the Atlantic.
all the best beauty counters,

inexpensive to buy,
loveliest women on

You can buy Pond’s at

in the |

finer cream anyv

says Mrs. Vanderbilt.
especially soft and smooth and clear — brings up a
becoming glow of colour in the cheeks"

~
POND’S





Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

The Cultivation
Of Gladioli

GLADIOLI are among the most
beautiful of flowers. As they
have been grown here so widely,
and so successfully this year
(Corms now being obtainable in
the island) a few tips on their
cultivation may be of interest to
these gardeners who have not
yet tried their hand at growing
them.

Gladioli can be grown from
seed, but when this is done they
do not as a rule flower the first
year. The usual practice is to grow
them from imported ‘Corms’ or
as more generally termed Bulbs
and the best time to plant these
Corms is during the month of
January, when they can be ex-
pected to flower in three months’
t'me, or sometime in April.

For a succession of flowers last-
ing over a period of weeks, plant
the Corms. gradually, spacing
them a week apart, which is a
better plan than having all
flowers at the same time.

Preparation of the Bed

Gladioli like an open sunny
position. Prepare the bed by
forking deeply, turning in plenty
of leaf-mould and ol@ dry man-
ure (Gladioli abhor fresh animal
manure).

The bed must be rich but light
and well drained, a soggy bed
will most likely rot the Corms
and result in failure. Lighten the

soil if necessary with the addi-
tion of somte coarse sand and
charcoal.

Plant the Corms in clumps of
rows as you fancy, putting them
three inches deep in the ground,
and eight inches apart. If you
have a double row, let the rows
be eighteen inches apart.

When the first two leaves are
well up, give the plants a light
application of G.V.M. (Garden
Vegetable Manure) and at all
times keep them well watered.

When the plants are nearly
full grown it may be found
necessary to put in a small neat

stake to keep them in a good
upright position. This is a job
which must be most carefully

done, as on no account must the
Corm be injured. Manure again
just before flowering.
Treatment of Corms After
Flowering

After the Gladioli have finish-
ed flowering the leaves will dry
off. When this happens, lift the
Corm, and after separating the
little Bulbils that will be found
attached to every healthy Corm,
store the Corm in some dry earth
and leave unwatered and undis-
turbed until next January when
it ean be planted out again. If
you want to increase your stock
pick out the largest of the Bulbils
(about the size of a pea) Dry
these and store in the same way as
the Mother Corm. In January
plant them out one inch apart,
and keep them watered just enough
to ensure steady growth, Repeat
this process each year, and in
the third Season your Bulbils will
have become Corms and _ will
give you flowers.

SUNDAY
AT THE CINEMA:

ADVOCATE

Three Of A Kind

Hy G. B.

WITH SUCH an impressive list of titles as “The Black
Rose,” “Under Capricorn” and “Stromboli,” all of which
have been highly advertised and played up as outstanding
tilms, the public of Barbados should be justified in thinking
that these pictures, with their plethora of famous stars and
directors would add up to some outstanding entertainment,
but unfortunately, the sum total is vastly disappointing.

The fact that two of them are
in Technicolor, which is getting
finer all the time—is one point
in their favour, but apart from
this, they all left this reviewer
with an intense feeling of dissatis-
faction. Let’s take them in turn.

“The Black Rose”

“THE BLACK ROSE”, playing
at the Empire is based on Costain’s
historical romance of the same
name and tells of the peregrin-
ations of a young Saxon, Walter of
Gurnie, during the 13th century.
Having been willed by his father
for life in the service of England’s
Norman king, Walter decides to
seek his fortune further afield.
With him goes his friend Tris-
tram, who is no mean bowman,
and though you don’t know how
they get there, their first stop is
Antioch. There they join a cara-
van that traipses across Mongolia
with gifts and women for Kublai
Khan, under the protection of a
murderous Mongol by name of
Bayan. There are interminable
scenes of the caravan, varied by
Arab sports, pillaging of cities and
the torture of Walter being made
to “walk the rope”, a quaint old
Mongolian custom! Eventually,
after many feet of film, the boys
with the Black Rose, who by now
has joined them, end up in the
Palace of the Chinese Empress.
After Walter has learned about
printing, gunpowder and the com-
pass from his captors, he decides
it is time to go home. In their
escape, Tristram is killed—the
Black Rose recaptured, but Walter
turns up safe and sound in Eng-
land, looking fit as a fiddle and
not one wit older for all his ad-
ventures and the passage of time.
Oh, yes—the Black Rose also turns
up in England at the same time—
a gift from Bayan—presumably
having been delivered air express.

There are gaps throughout the
whole of this unconvincing tale.
The action is not sustained an¢
the tempo uneven. Tyrone Power
plays Walter with ease and looks
well in the various outfits he
wears, As Tristram, Jack Haw-
kins, English actor of Shakespear-
ian fame, gives a competent per-
forance and Cecile Aubry as the
Black Rose, is a petite, charming
French gamine. Her acting is de-
lightful and her contribution to
the film no small one, Orson Welles
as the murderous Bayan, with a
soft spot for our hero, is adequate
and his make-up precludes the
usual ocular gymnastics to which
this actor so often resorts.

The costumes and scenery leave
nothing to be desired in this lavish
production ang the musical back-
ground is satisfactory.

“Under Capricorn”

In “UNDER CAPRICORN”, we
have Miss Ingrid Bergman as a
member of the Irish aristocracy



Sports Supplement

I WENT to a
football game
with Jane Rus-
Sell, whose hus-
band, Bob Water-
field, is the star
of the local team.
The game I
found both slow and boring. But
not so Miss Russell.

The young lady who is known,
among other things, for her
poker-faced acting technique,
jumped up and down yelling,
“Murder him, you bum,” and



is English, one American

yet their Beauty Care
1s the same

Co

MRS. CORNELIUS VANDERBILT, ‘ Jr.,

charming young New Yorker, is one of the many

society beauties whouse Pond’s.‘‘ You won't find a
“It

ee Pond’s Cold Cream,”
“Tt leaves the shin feeling



other similar expressions. Then,
as the coach spoke to her hus-
band, shouted, “Leave him alone.”

Only once did the more familiar
film-star Russell emerge from the
frenzied footballer’s wife. That
was when some men behind, the
way sports spectators the world
over always do, started making
cude remarks about Waterfield’s
playing, his character, and prob-
#ble future.

Mrs. Waterfield silenced the
critics with a look which was
mean, moody, and magnificent.

the loveliest

Match your perfume to

wear . .

Goya's lovely perfurn«

between looking



for lilting

everyday occasions . wearing them 45

That you may dise«

the time Goya pre

a handbag

Made in Englont by

et eel

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Distributors L. M. B, Meyer

about you

. use it on your finger tips, a trace on
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into the front of your dres

“your best
Goya fragrances
ou fecl—and are—alluring.
er the glamour of wearing good perfumes all

enn

who follows her stable-husband
to Australia where he is spending
seven years as a guest of the
government. Playing at the New
Plaza, the film opens in Australia
in 1831, with Mr. Cotton now a
free man and no questions asked
aS to his past. This would appear
to apply to Miss Bergman too,
who by now is a blowzy dipso-
maniac with a tendency to D.T’s.
Into this happy household comes
an old friend, Mr. Wilding, from
Ireland, who, with her husband’s
permission, undertakes to re-
habilitate Miss Bergman. To do
this entails his staying in the
house which is run by a scheming
housekeeper, who puts two and two
together and makes four and a
half. .The change in Miss Berg-
man is remarkable, due no doubt
to thegodd bits of lovemaking on
the part of Mr. Wilding, though
She is still devoted to her husband.
Eventually, the housekeeper de-
cides it is time to get her mistress
back on the tipple again, and tells

Mr. Cotton her version of the
goings-on. There is a peach of
a row in which Mr. Wilding is

shot and Mr. Cotton is accused of
trying to murder him. This means
a second offense for Mr. Cotton
and that’s pretty serious, so Miss
Bergman confesses to the crime
for which her husband originally
was sent to Australia. Thig
doesn’t help matters any, as she
then has to be sent home to stand
trial. All very complicated and
adding up to precisely nothing,
and certainly not up to Alfred
Hitchcock’s usual standard,

The performances of Ingrid
Bergman, Joseph Cotton and
Michael Wilding are good enough,
I suppose, but certainly nothing
memorable. The characters they
portray are not well rounded or
real, and lack the depth necessary
in a drama of this kind. ‘The in-
terior settings are attractive but
the exterior are obviously artifi-
cial; and very much so.

“Strumboli”

Without a doubt, this is one of
the bleakest picttifes. and though
it may be under the “inspired
direction” of the famous. Ros-
sellini, I am afraid his inspira-
tion would appear to be stillborn.
Apparently the original version of
this. film, which didn’t even
reach New York, has been hacked
ty pieces, and I doubt if the
director would recognize the milk-
and-water picture being served
up at the Globe Theatre,

Once again, we have Ingrid
Bergman. This time as a Dis-
placed Person in a camp outside
Rome. To get away from it all,
she marries an Italian fisherman
and they go to his homie, or what’s
left of it, in Stromboli, Conditions
here aren’t much better and the
fact she has nothing to do and
her husband can only understand
English in words of one syllable
doesn’t help mattets. The light-
house-keeper obviously knows
more English, and creates a diver-
sion for Miss Bergman, which
is left to the imagination. How-
ever, something must have hap-
pened, as she gets a good beating
up from the fisherman when she
comes home! Eventually, th
simple life is too much and with
the help of the lighthouse-keeper,
she leaves home and starts around
the voleano to get somewhere on
the other side. On the way, there
is a partial eruption which entails
her spending the night on a nice
het bed of lava.

@ On Page 16






thing











your mood or to what you

make the subtle difference
and being beautiful
lend enchantment to

ents his fragrances in tiny
phials at only 1/9 and ina
Gift size at £2.8.1.

ReRET

Co.. Ltd., P.O.

LONDON * wr

Box 171, Bridgetown





TONITE 8.30 P.M. 1
PRESENTS WITH PRIDE BRITISH ‘
FULANA’S RADIO STAR
Featured
RATED ae !
Singer |
THE YW r
; GYPSY =
Safety-first ilies eye !
e — CARAVAN |
oe vorce PROGRAM
y
M is RADIO |
THE ,
am ' STATION
* Safer for charm sme ceca ZRY
* Safer for skin Mr. RAY NUNES.
PROGRAMME:
* Safer for clothes (1) MY FOOLISH HEART
| (2) AGAIN
(3) MAYBE IT’S BECAUSE
(4) OLE MAN RIVER
(5) IF I HAVE YOU
(6) STORMY WEATHER



What other COLD remedy —

EASES ACH

1 your little patient gets so muc

ASé

laces and ways » »» ‘ hen ple
rubbed on at bedtime ~

WORKS OUTsi0

|
His chest, back and
x throat all at once feel

relaxed and comly as
VapoRub s deep-res ching
poultice action enti 86 :
tightness and helps br | up
congestion Feels so gcoe

This double action works

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PAGE FOUR





HE WEST INDIES have concluded their tour in England, as far
as first class matches are concerned and they have finished with

the record of 18 matches won.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Good Scores Returned
In First Class Games -

RAIN intermittenly interrupted play yesterday as the
Fourth series of First Division games opened. Batsmen
however had the best of the day play, and some good

When they drew the final first class fixture with H. D, Leveson scores were returned.
Gower’s XI, they had concluded their official tour of England. This , COLLEGE v. SPARTAN. Pilgrim was caught. He only made
meant that they had won 18 games. drawn 12 and lost three. SDAFOAN o.oo sete nesses: 238 11, but they were well made.

For the first time in the history of West Indian cricket,
members of the team have completed 1,000 runs.

The spin bowlers Alf Valentine of Jamaica and Sonny Ramadhin
of Trinidad, have carved their own niche in the hall of international
Ramadhin completed the tour with 135 wickets taken

cricket fame.
at a cost of 14.88 runs each and
the Jamaican, Valentine, 123 at a
cost of 17.95 runs each.

This 1950 West Indies tour is
a landmark in the history of the
West Indies great struggle in
the international arena even now
less than 25 years ago.

CELEBRATED EFFORT

EARY CONSTANTINE’S cele-

brated effort of 107 wickets in
the 1928 West Indies tour of Eng-
land has been equalled and pass-
ed on this tour. No fewer than 34
first class centuries have been
recorded by the West Indies team
and Weekes and Walcott head
the list with seven three figure
innings each.

I am pleased that the general
averages have shown that Gerry
Gomez is a first class all rounder
on the West Indies team. For
in addition to scoring 1,000 runs
he has taptured 55 wickets at
a very low cost,

B.W.I. TABLE TENNIS TOURNAMENT
‘HE first B.W.I. Table Tennis Championship tourney featuring

teams representative of the strength of Jamaica, British Guiana,
Barbados and Trinidad will take place in Trinidad during September-
October,

The Colonies will each be represented by 3 players and not only
will the leading Colony in table tennis be decided, but also the Singles
Champion of the 4 Colonies. So far Trinidad have played both
British Guiana and Barbados. They ran British Guiana in 1948 and
wop against Barbados in 1949.



GERRY GOMEZ

Programme for the four-cornered intercolonial tournament calls
for return matches with 12 Colony games being played all told, and

towards the end the Singles Championship will begin:—

September 28 Jamaica vs, British Guiana
29 Trinidad vs. Barbados

30 British Guiana vs. Barbados at San Fernando and

Trinidad vs. Jamaica at Arima.
The Barbados team is as follows:
ILL:—Plays a strong fore-hand game with plenty of punch.

matches.

WILLOUGHBY:—The best spin player in Barbados today. Chops
In the open

end drives delightfully. Toured British Guiana in 1948.
championship (1950) went to finals. Lost to Stoute.

‘CORBIN:—After a lapse of 5 years won the “B” Championship
His club won

over 40 players. Won all his games in the inter-club,
the Division 2 Cup. Has a good defense and flicks the ball well
Always fit. Should profit tremendously from this tour,

POLO TEAM AT PRACTICE

IRNADOES met Cyclones at the Garrison yesterday as members

of the Barbados Polo Team continued to get into form to meet

the Venezuelan Team expected to arrive later this year, Three chukkas

were played.
In the first chukka Cyclones beat Tornadoes 2—0, In the second
chukka, Tornadoes were successful, registering a 1—0 win over
Cyclones. In the third game, Tornadoes came back to win by two
goals.
Mr. Keith Deane scored the three goals for Tornadoes and Col.
Michelin shot two for Cyclones.

LT. NEBLETT HEADS SHOTT

The practice shoot of the Barbados Rifle Association took place
at the Government Range yesterday, and Lieut. C. E. Neblett was

applauded for scoring a possible at 200 yards.
Seven rounds were fired at the 200, 500 and 600 yards ranges

Conditions were reasonbly good, but the light was difficult at 500

yards.

The following are the eight best scores, with 105 set as the

highest possible:—
Lt, C. E. Neblett

AV Mag Cha M a ea CRATE es 97



Mo. M.D) TROMAS. i i ee ENA yee tees 96
Mr, M, De. Verteull... 5. ieee eee etes sean 96
Capt. Ci-By Warner... elias vee eee ec ees 95
Mo, GiB. PSP. ss ie eis eee sew evades 95
Mr. GiB. Martin. . ccc cenit een wians 94
Ma MA OTRO a a i vase eed era da sees 93
Cpl. V. Walcott....... ASAT aT ORE ERC: uy ee 91
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eight College yesterday to score

Had
a good season in the inter-club games winning nearly all his

SPARTAN batted all day at K. Walcott was the next Spar-
238 for tan bat tobe sent back to the
all when they met College in their pavilion. In his short Stay he
First Division cricket fixture. made a brisk 19. The fifth wicket
Play began 20 minutes late and had fallen for 161 runs. Walcott
heavy rain and clouds stopped the was completely beaten and bowled
game when there was yet half an by |Smith. That was Smith's
“ee = time to play. third wicket.
1e wicket was firm at the start, Spar urth isaste!
but intermittent showers affectea 40 tons late eae ‘Wood = fon
it soon afterwards. : e
out when he had reached 10. It
Only one batsman, E. Smith—o, WS obviously a ball off which no
did not reach double figures, All TU could be scored with safety,
the other bats made good scores, “ut Bowen called for a run and
but College kept up an unflagging Wood did not reach his crease
attack and that, with some prilli- 1 time,
ant fielding, prevented Spartan Another five runs were scored
from scoring more runs. before Smith gained his fourth
Spartan’s opening pair, A. Atkins wicket. He got Bowen making an
and S. Griffith got over = roles uncertain stroke to one of his
bowling in a way whic boded spinners and Bowen
ill for College. During an unruffled He had waned 10, erate
stay of an hour at 44 wicket, the Haynes and Smith took the
two of them gave their team 4 score from 182 to 205
good start of 57. Griffith was the the eighth wicket fell Wie
first to get out after he had played after a spell of 17 runs fell a
a ane eye of roe on aek victim to the wiles of spinner
went on to topscore wi - HIS Sn.ith who was having all his

was not a flashy, but a confident
interval. «5 aw way. Haynes was adjudged
Shell” Harris who went one Philips and Gittens put ae

down, played an easy innings of : *
44. L. Phillips was the number £004 ninth wicket stand for 33.
Gittens was given out Lb.w., to

nine batsman and his wicket was ¢
still intact after he had made a ® fast ball from Williams, when
chanceless 22 in stylish batting. the score was 238. His individual
College’s C. Smith negotiated Score was 15. Smith was bowled
the impaired wicket well during 1 the same over without making
his 26 overs and he often had the @ny additional runs.
batsmen playing fidgety. He cap-
tured five wickets for 94 runs. 1 EE PeRERS vs. CARLTON
pacer Williams took three for 46, WANDE 239
but two of them were tail bats. NDERERS scored 239 runs
in their first innings yesterday,
Spartan won the toss and the first day of their first division
decided to bat on the good wicket. cricket match with Carlton at the
A. Atkins and S, Griffith went Bay. Intercolonial player Norman
to the wicket to open their innings Marshall knocked up a chanceless
against fast bowlers J. Williams 89 and Denis Atkinson, West In-
and J. Corbin who began the dian all rounder also hit a breezy
College attack, Williams and Cor- ‘
bin quickly caught their length. K, Greenidge the Carlton
but the Spartan opening pair went medium pacer took seven of Wan-
after runs with evident ease. derers’ wickets for 60 runs after
The pacers could not pierce the bowling 20.1 overs in which he
confident batting and after only a had all batsmen playing cautious-
few overs C. Smith and Mr. S. ly. W. Greenidge took three for
Headley replaced them to continue 106. He was not so steady.
the attack. With only fifteen minutes before
Spartan lost their first wicket the end of play Carlton opened
when the score had reached 57. their first innings with Hutchinso’
Griffith sent a ball from spinner and Marshall but a dark cl
Headley, through the covers and which had settled above brought
Smith in a splendid piece of field- an end to play as both batsmen
ing took the difficult catch. complained of the bad In
Griffith made 29. He was the reply to Wanderers’ 239, Carlton
faster scorer while at the wicket are now no runs for the loss of

and he executed many flashy no wicket.
strokes.
“Shell” Harris joined Atkins The Start

_ Winning the toss Carlton sent
in Wanderers on a wicket which
was apparently easy. Marshall
and Eric Atkinson opened the
innings for Wanderers to the bowl-
ing of Warren and K. Greenidge.
Marshall took the first ball from
Warren and the fourth he pushed
to mid off for a single, -

who was then 20. A short spell
ef rain stopped play for a few
minutes soon after. Fifty-eight
runs were made during an hour’s
play.
, 100 Up
A hundred went up on the score
board after Spartan had been at

the wicket for just over 100 min- K, Greenidge was beautifull

y 4 . A y
re ta : oe pp A gga on-driven for four by Marshall in
ng ae inte abe cures. the fifth ball of his third over.
Atetie wns then 48 and Harris 20. Avr bowling Sour overs Some Se

Atkins only added two more OW. G end ore was replaced
runs to his score before he got ee tae — nan, Se ent ae
caught off Smith when he edged stage the score was 36 with Mar-
one to the weenie aM shall 26 and Atkinson 10. Atkin-
did not put much brilliance is e
batting but he batted in a sound, i" Greenidge ‘and. secasioualiy
confident manner which for long gdgedq through the slip, The i
did not admit of balls penetrat- | owling of Greenid. sine had hin
ing to his stumps. He only scored caught by Lucas oh seuman slip
ied eee during his stay at when the score was 60.

1e : 5.

Pilgrim went to the wicket and py.» Sneath on — eee
faced cpie ball before lunch. At the over. Marshall continued to
7 cnt ae moving off pat confidently but Proverbs was

Harris and Pilgrim scored 31 Siti le te ee
runs together for the third wick- and the partnership between M
¢t partnership before Harris hit Shall and. himself was broken
2 ball from Smith high overhead when W. Greenidge got him leg
te be caught by Simmons. The before.
fall of the third wicket was not Denis Atkinson next man in
through any marked skill of got off the mark with a single
spinner Smith, but Harris’ waS a off K, Greenidge. Marshall struck
too eager attempt. In his compari- his first six off W. Greenidge in
tively short period at the wicket, his 11th over. His score was
Harris’ innings was spiced with then 70 and the scoreboard read
runs getting in an easy style, 110—2—6. K. Greenidge after

Good Fielding bowling 15 overs was replaced by

Seven runs later, Spartan lost N. Lucas from the screen end and
their fourth wicket through a this was the last over before lunch
masterpiece of fielding by Mr. With the score at 128 for the loss
Headley at slips. Pacer Williams of two wickets, Marshall 76 and

as bow] Denis Atkinson 19. While at the
had been brought back to bow .
and it was off his bowling that Wicket, during that time Marshall














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COMBERMERE vs. LODGE

Combermere es ‘ «.

Lodge (for © wicket)
COMBERMERE 18T INNINGS

©. Knight b Brookes 8
Mr. Sealey c Outram b Hutchinsan 90
G. Grant ¢ Outram b McComie 4
H. Wilkinson c Deane b Wilkie 29
R. Norville b McComie 41
R Quarless b McComie ‘ ‘ “4
E. Toppin ¢ McComie b Wilkie 8
S. Smith ¢ Brookes b McComie 6
L. Harris b McComie “s 3
M. Murrell Lb.w. b Wilkie . 3
C. Beckles not out 0
Extras o 23
BORE oncsecer sen deevgevsspvens 233
Fall of wickets: 1—29, 2—79, 3—129,
4—152, 5—195, 6—212, 7—223.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R w
Brookes 8 i. ae 1
Gill 4 1 14 oO
Outram 7 1 28 0
Hutchinson 9 0 48 1
Wilkie 16 3 44 2
Mr. McComie 55 3 49 6
Inniss 1 1 0 0
LODGE’S 18ST INNINGS
L. Murray not out oa 6
Deane not out 0
Total (for 0 w'cket) 6
o mM R w
Mr. Smith 1 9 1 0
M. Murrell 1 a 5 0
EMPIRE vs. POLICE
POLICE'S 1ST INNING
C, Blackman _b Barker ws 0
F. Taylor b Barker Sas oA 2
H. Wiltshire c Williams b Alleyne 32
Capt. Farmer b Millington 63
J. Byer c¢ Robinson b Williams 18
I. Warner b Millington ’ 5
G. Cheltenham not out 36
E. Brewster run out 22
B. D, Morris not out s 10
Extras (b. 5, Ib. 5, n.b. 3) 13
Total (for 7 wkts.) 201

Fall of wickets: 1—0, 2—10, 3—82, 4—113,
5—for 125, 6—131, 7—179.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO

M R Ww
H. Barker 15 3 40 2
E. A. V, Williams 18 2 56 1
Cc. G. Alleyne 9 0 33 1
E. Millington 20 5 48 2
O, M. Robinson 2 1 il 0
SPARTAN vs, COLLEGE
Spartan : eotasencen ss ay ee
SPARTAN IST INNINGS
A. Atkins ¢ wkpr. b Smith 47
S. Griffith c Smith b Headley 29



SCOREBOARD

17, 1950

SEPTEMBER

SUNDAY,



Rain Interferes With Cricket





L. Harris ¢ Simmons b Smith “4
T. Pilgrim ec Headley b Willi ll
K. Walcott b Smith See 19
N. Wood run out 10
K. Bowen stpd. (wkpr.) b Smith 10
A. Haynes 1.b.w. b Smith Ww
L. Phillips not out .. 22
Cc. O. Gittens 1.b.w. b Williams 15
E. Smith b Williams 0
Extras 14
Total 238
Fall of wickets: 1—57, 2-105, 3—136,
= 5—161, 6~—177, 7—182, 8—205,
BOWLING ANALYSIS
ee ae:
J. Williams 65 3 4 3
J. Corbin 4 0 12 0
Cc. Smith 26 2 a4 5
S. Headley 15 2 36 1
K. King 12 2 21 0
Cc. Blackman 3 0 15 0
WANDERERS vs. CARLTON
Wanderers : 239
WANDERERS 18ST INNINGS
E. Atkinson c N. Lucas

b K. Greenidge..........-++++++ a
N. Marshall c Warren

b W. Greenidge..... ‘ wks Oe
G. Proverbs lbw. b K, Greenidge €
D. Atkinson e Marshall

b K. Greenidge........ 13
G. Wilkes c Warren

bh W. Greenidge..............5+ 1
A. Siuncee ¢ wkpr. (Clarke)

b K. Greenidg@.........-++.+++ 18
L. St. Hill b K. Greenidge..... 1
D. Davies l.b.w. b K, Greenidge.. 9
C. Packer c Cox b K. Greenidge.... 0
T. Pierce c Sub b W. Greenidge.. 5
L. Greenidge not ou s/t

Extras thas sedertnecees 8
WD aces faa sik cakeb se dandan ek 239

Fall of wickets: 1 for 60, 2 for B80, 3
for 156, 4 for 167, 5 for 215, 6 for 217,
7 for 220, 8 for 220, 9 for 226.

BOWLING ANALYSIS

o M R w

Warren 8 2 28 0

K. Greenidge 201 3 60 7

W. Greenidge 25 2 106 3

N. Lucas 12 1 37 0
CARLTON FIRST INNINGS

F. Hutchinson not out 0

W. Marshall not out 0

Extras : 0

Total (for no wicket) 0



had struck eight fours and one
six. After lunch Warren bowling
the first over sent down a maiden
to Denis Atkinson, On hitting out
Marshall was caught by Warren
off the bowling of W. Greenidge
after hitting up a chanceless 89
which included 11 fours and one
six, three of the fours scored after
the luncheon interval,
Skinner Ovt

Wilkes then joined Atkinson and
he scored a single but did not stay
long and was caught by Warren
off W. Greenidge. Skinner then
went in and was off with a brace.
D. Atkinson now 44 had a life
when W. Greenidge failed to hold
a catch from him. Skinner’s end
came when he was caught by
wicket-keeper Clarke in attempt-
ing to force a ball from K. Green-
idge away. The scoreboard read
214—5—18. St. Hill next man in
after scoring one played a ball
from K. Greenidge on to his
stumps. Davies then joined At-
kinson but before he could settle
down Atkinson was out caught by
Marshall off of K. Greenidge for
73. Packer only survived two balls
from K. Gr and was*caught
overhead by .

Peirce then went in and he and
Packer batted well until Peirce
was nicely caught by the sub for
five runs. R, Greenidge followed
and then the end came when
Davies was given out leg before
from a ball from K. Greenidge and
Wanderers closed their first in-
nings at 239.

ith only 15 minutes play Carl-
ton opened their first innings with
F. Hutchinson and W. Marshall,
but after Norman Marshall bowled
the first ball Marshall appealed for
light and this appeal was upheld.
EMPIRE vs. POLICE
Police 201 for 7 wickets

POLICE occupied the wicket
for the whole day to pile up 201
runs for 7 wickets against Empire
at Bank Hall yesterday.

Rain interrupted play three
times during the day for short
periods and finally brought play
to an end about 10 minutes be-
fore the scheduled time of call.

Captain Farmer batted well to
score 63 in about 130 minutes.
Other good scorers were G. Chel-
tenham, 36 not out, H, Wiltshire
32 and E, Brewster 22.

Police won the toss on a per-
fect wicket and decided to bat.
C. Blackman and F, Taylor open-
ed Police’s innings to the bowling
of Empire’s pacers H, Barker from
the Bank Hall end and “Foffie”
Williams from the Southern end.

Barker began by getting a lot
of pace off the wicket and the
fourth ball of his first over claim-
ed the first Police wicket before
any runs were on the tins.

He left Blackman playing for-



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ward to a good length outswinger
and clean bowled him for nought

H. Wiltshire joined Taylor and
took 2 off the last ball of that over
to open his and his team’s score.

Police lost their second wicket
with only 10 runs scored and
Barker was again responsible for
the damage.

Barker sent down a maiden for
his second over and came back
the first ball of his third over to
york Taylor when he had scored
2. Police were now 10 runs for 2
wickets and Barker had taken the
2 wickets for 2 runs.

Bowling Change

With the score at 26, Skipper
Alleyne brought on himself from
the Southern end and Millington
in place of Barker.

Captain Farmer and Wiltshire
quickly got their eye on the slow
stuff and improved, considerably,
the rate of scoring.

A light shower of rain fell when
the score was 46, holding up play
about 6 minutes, Farmer was
then 20 and Wiltshire 20,

The shower made the wicket
responsive to spin and few balls
also rose awkwardly. Wicket-
keeper Maurice Jones got strucic
on his chin by one which rose up
from Millington and could not
continue to play. He was depu-
tized for by O. M. Robinson. The
50 went up in the next over after
74 minutes of play,

Jones did not rest long. He was
back out two overs later wearing
a plaster under his chin.

Police lost their third wicket
with the score at 82. Wiltshire
was caught by Williams at long off
aktempting a big hit off Alleyne’s
bowling.

Williams’ was a lovely catch.
He ran back about 10 yards then
to stick his right hand up and be-
hind his head to hold the catch.
The scoreboard read 82 for 3.
Farmer 43 not out.

“Johnnie” Byer, next man in,
played the next over ‘rom Milling-
ton and lunch was taken.

Williams and Barker continued
the Empire attack after lunch.
Farmer got his 50 in Barker’s first
over of that spell. He made them
in 119 minutes.

Another light shower sent the
players to the pavilion for 5 min-
utes. Farmer, immediately as he
came back out, edged one from
Barker dangerously through the
slips to the boundary. The second
ball he drove Barker to the long-
off boundary for three. The next
ball was driven _ powerfully
through the covers for another
three, sending the 100 up in 130
minutes. .

Millington was brought back to
replace Barker. Farmer drove

@ On page 5.



Geddes Grant Limited

au



A FRESH INFLUX of horses arrived last Sunday from England
to swell the ranks of the many thoroughbreds already in the Island.
In fact the paddock is now completely full and those stables which
are empty are all reserved for candidates for the next November
meeting. This I find most interesting because some years ago when
I suggested that we should have a paddock with at least 75 stalls at
our disposal and additional room for building more to accommodate
the rising number of thoroughbreds, | was told by a leading authority
of the B.T.C, that the day would never come when we would ‘need
more than fifty stalls.

Well there are now 74 stalls in the paddock, all full. The day
has arrived when we need a paddock of 100 stalls with additional
room for expansion. Clearly this cannot be accomplished at the
Garrison.

Nevertheless, we are still left to wonder when, if ever, the authori-
ties of the B.T.C. will seriously consider looking for a new track. Or
are they going to allow racing to remain cramped up in the little
two by four at the Garrison?

The new arrivals were four in number and the first that I saw
was Nan Tudor. A filly by Owen Tudor out of Glenfinnan she is
very much on the small side with decided light bone all around.
Nevertheless, it is never good to judge solely by first impressions and
ora, so when a horse has just spent about two weeks in a horse
ox at sea,

With regard to Nan Tudor’s pedigree her dam is by King Salmon
out of Grandissima, by Clarissimus out of Groat, by Junior. In the bot-
tom line Nan Tudor therefore has a string of three dams of winners
behind her name, and although Glenfinnan so far has only one winner
of a small race to her credit. both Grandissima and Groat threw two
very good horses. Grandissima produced Patriot King, who dead-
heated for the Irish Derby in 1934. In addition to Patriot King she
is also the dam of three other winners. To Groat goes the distinction
of being dam of the famous Plack, winner of the One Thousand
Guineas in 1924 for Lord Rosebery and although Groat produced no
other winners she did well enough by this single one who credited
her with £11,467. Her pedigree must also have been well thought of
for her to find her way into Lord Rosebery’s stud. Nan Tudor is not
a winner but has a few places to her name.

Next I had a look at Arunda. In contrast to the above filly she
appeared to be a very large filly and well set up om her legs. She is
more or less black going to grey in parts. She was imported privately
by Mr. M. E. R. Bourne, who also bought Nan Tudor from the ticket
holders, and her sire is Pampass Grass and her dam Link Lady. Link
Lady is by Link Boy out of Mintern, the latter a dam of one winner.
Mintern is by Blandford, Arunda has also run a few times in England
this season gaining one or two places. At first glance I liked her looks
a lot.

We then moved onto the paddock across the road where Mr.
F. E. C. Bethel’s yearling importation was on show. A well grown
youngster by Valdavian out of Match Play I was also impressed with
his first appearances. I should say he has what the critics call “good
bone”. His owner informs me he is already nearly fifteen hands so
that he is well on the way to becoming a big one at two, Valdavian,
his sire, is by Tiberius out of Haintonette the mare who produced
those two famous routers Valerius and Valerian and was herself the
winner of the Oaks. Match Play, his dam, is by Taj-Ud-din out of
Aquitania. Neither of the last two mentioned mares are dams of
winners. The line is therefore a little obscure to me.

Harroween, who has been purchased by Mr. Rupert Mayers on
behalf of a syndicate is another good looking filly. By Harroway out
of Thyine Wood, she is grey and looked very racy at first sight. She
has also run in England this season but I have not got her form handy.
Her dam, Thyine, is by Thyestes out of Madder, a mare with a rather
unusual name. Although Thyine was not a winner yet First Thyme,
another of her foals by Thyestes was a useful winner of three races
valued £1,638. Madder also threw four other winners of 7 races
including The Mad Mullah, by Mieuxce, just to show that her owners
were quite serious about her name. Madder was by Pomme-de-terre
out of Dynamic, another dam of three winners of small races.

Well, that’s the lot and now time will tell what they will turn
out to be. No doubt, when I see them again in a few weeks time IL
will not recognise them. At least those who will be put in training.

ANOTHER NEW JOCKEY

Not long ago a new jockey, young Wilder, arrived from England
to ride under contract for Messrs. Walcott and Chase. Most of us will
remember he rode his first winner at his first meeting in the W.1.
only week before last at Arima.

Now the expected arrival of another youngster from England has
been announced by Mr. M. E. R. Bourne who has been successful in
contracting for the services of Arthur Baldwin. This jockey had the
distinction, last season, of riding a winner the very first time he ap-

eared in public when he landed a horse called Colomboy in the
Aoocentios Handicap at Newmarket. Previous to this Colomboy, al-
though four years old, had not won a race. However, it is said that
he went very well for Baldwin who had been riding him in home
allops.
* Baldwin was first apprenticed to trainer Jack Colling and then
A. Copper, but his indentures were afterwards-transferred to George
Allden. I expect he will be out in time for the November meeting.

I am very glad to see that we are getting in some new blood among
our riders. Now that a number of the top-ranking Venezuelan jockeys
have been encouraged to stay at home we can certainly do with a few
more riders to infuse outside influence. It seems that we shall never
produce local riders of much promise in great quantities. Just a little
success always goes such a long way to making them complete failures.

IMPRESSIONS OF ANOTHER

A turfite who recently returned from Trinidad informs me that
he was not impressed with the performances of any of the three-year-
olds with classic engagements. Which means those still entered in
the Trinidad Derby next Christmas. I was not impressed myself just
listening to the Radio, but I am glad to have an eye-witness account
to go on. '

This being the case. the only unknown quantity in Trinidad at
present who may have a good chance in the Derby is Wavecrest. For
him the question is whether he can return to complete fitness in time.
Meanwhile, the chances of the Barbados contingent will be enhanced
and this list will include such as Watercress, Bow Bells and Mary Ann.
But there are still others who I would like to see in November first
before we complete that list.

Meanwhile, if the Jamaican champion Footmark comes aown for
the classic as well, he will be an even hotter favourite. Our most
recent racing authority from that island informed me that this horse
could easily give Blue Streak (at his best) at least 14 lbs. and beat
him easily. In that. case, I asked him what they were waiting for.
He has only to hobble out on to the Queen’s Park Savannah next
Boxing Day and pick up about $5,000 for the asking. Is there anyone
here who would like to buy the horse?





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FIRST ELEVEN CRICKET



@ from page 4
Kim for two the first ball but was
clean bowled three balls later by
a quick off-break at 63. The
seoreboard read 113 for 4.

Byer and Warner came together
and took the score to 125 when
Byer was caught at first slip by
Robinson off Williams. Byer
scored 18.

The next batsman in, G. Chel-
tenham, saw his partner Warner
beaten and bowled by Millington
for 5.

With the score at 131 for 6,
left-hander E. Brewster partnerea
Cheltenham. Rain interrupted
again for another 6 minutes.

While Skipper Alleyne was
ringing bowling changes, the
Police pair were playing their
hands in. They sent the 150 up
in _ 178 minutes.

Brewster was unfortunately run
out for 22 and the seventh
Police wicket fell for 179.

COMBERMERE vs. LODGE

Combermere ............,.,
Lodge (for 0 wkts.) â„¢

A gallant knock of 90 runs by

Mr, H. Sealey, helped Combermere
to raise the grand total of 234
runs when they met in their
three-day fixture against Lodge
at Combermere yesterday,
_ Winning the toss Skipper
Knight decided to bat. This deci-
sion proved fruitful, for almost
all the boys made a §00d contri-
bution. Of these, Norville who
collected 41, Wilkinson 29 and
Quarless 14 were good perform-
ances. Bowling for Lodge Mr.
McComie was their best bowler,
when he took 6 wickets for 49
runs,

Skipper Knight and Mr. Sealey
opened the School’s innings against
the fast attack of Brookes and
Gill. The wicket was perfect,
and these two batsmen found n»
difficulty in scoring and 20 runs
were knocked up in as many min-
utes. Lodge struck their first
blow, when Brookes cleaned bow]l-
ed Knight with the score at 29,
his contribution being 8. Dimin-
utive Grant partnered Mr. Sealey,
who was then batting confidently,
and they continued to play their
Opponent’s attack easily, O utram
replaced Gill, and Mr, Sealey
greeted him with a glide to the
leg boundary to hoist his individ-
val score to 29 and the total 50.
Hutchinson one of their slow
bowlers, came on in place of
Brookes, but the score went on to
63, when rain drove the players
to the pavilion for about fifteen
minutes.

Combermere lost their second
wicket, when Mr. McComie who
replaced Hutchinson, had Grant
caught when attempting hook
shot. Wilkinson joined Mr, Sealey
and was immediately off the mark
with a single past second slip, and
in the same over Mr, Sealey com-
pleted his fifty with a leg 2

for 4 runs,

Play became quiet, as the bats- |
men were contented to play the |
ball, but was enlivened when Wit-
kinson beautifully cover - drove
and square cut Mr, McComie in
successive balls for boundaries to
send 100 runs on the tins for the
loss of only two wickets. This
was their best stand for the season
so far, |

The lunch interval was taken |
with these two batsmen still at |
the wicket. Wilkinson and Mr. |
Sealey being 27 and 69 not out re- |
spectively and Combermere’s total |






Ma

Agents EA

~~

BENJAMIN LTD.,

to 124 runs for 2 wickets.

Light showers continued to fall,
but play went on, and Outram
who opened their attack was now
brought on and succeeded in get-
ting the ball to nip off the wicket.
This did not worry the batsmen.
and they continued in their easy
style of batting. Occasional quick
pick ups, by Hutchinson saved
quite a mumber of runs, but
Outram came in for some punish-
ment, when Mr, Sealey on-droy
and glided him to the boundary
to make his total 83 and the score
to 139. Without any further addi-
tion Wilkie had Wilkinson caught
at square leg for a painstaking 29.

Next man .n wa, C. k, Norville
and he was soon off the mark
with a glance for 4 off Outram’s
bowling, and in Wilkie’s next over
Mr. Sealey stole a single to send
150 up on the board, Four
wickets were soon down, when
Mr. Sealey who was the main-
stay for the school, fell to a dolly
catch after a fine knock of 90.

No, 6 batsman was Quarless and

6 he along with Norville took the

score to 173. During this period
Quarless made two beautiful
strokes on the leg side which
earned him boundaries, but half

the side was out at 195 when
Quarless was bowled by Mr.
McComie after contributing 14
useful runs.

Toppin joined Norville who was
well set by this time and the.
carried the score to 200 whicn
came from a boundary by the
latter. Combermere lost their
sixth wicket when Norville fell a
victim to Mr, McComie, after he
had made 4. The seore board
then read 210—6—41. In came
Mr. Smith and he was off the
mark with a snick through slips
for four runs.

The remaining batsmen did not
stay long at the wickets, and Mr
McComie quickly claimed the
wickets of Smith, Toppin and
Norville, and the score had moved
up to 230 for 8. An additional
three runs brought the school’s
innings to a close,

Murray and Deane opened
the Lodge School innings, but
after five minutes’ play, a heavy
shower drove the players in, and
play was finished for the day.

90 Independents
* * .
In Trinidad’s
+ .
EKlectiona
@ from page 1
This, it is anticipated will put
an effective curb on the “Wild
men It is believed that a num-
ber of East Indians will be vicio-
mous at the Polls, and this also
will add to the complexity of the
pohtical situation
It is not outsics of

possibility, however, that some,
or all, of the parties may coalesce,

and, probably with a few inde-
pendents, form a strong “opposi-
tion bloc” in the new House

However, all that is of the future,
as, with the huyve number of can
didates standing, it is extremely
difficult to forecast the complexion
of the new Legislature

Butler Trouble

Polling will take place Trom 7
am. to 5 pm rhe police are
taking al! measures to cope with
possible disorder, particularly in
certain Southern areas where the
Butler party has a strong follow-
ing. Mounted police have already
been dispatched to these and other
districts Many Butlerites com-
plain that their names are not on
the Electoral list. The authorities
say that this is their own fault,
as they kept putting off action
until the return of Mr. Butler
from England By the time he
returned, however, it was too late
to have the matter rectified

This sense of grievance of the
Butlerites, and indeed, of many
hundreds of other electors whose
names are not on the list, may,
it is felt, lead to trouble on polling
day

Governor’s Powers

Under the new Constitution,
power is placed largely in the
hands of the people, but the Gov-
ernor has certain reserved pow-
ers. In the new set-up, the elected
members will have a majority of
one in the Executive Council. The
choice of the five representatives)
of the people will be made by the|
whole Legislative Council, which}
will inelude the solid Government
blee of eight. This bloe will prob-
ubly dominate the voting for

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

“SURRENDER OR DIE’’

@ from page 1

Tokyo confirmed late today that
the spearhead of the Amefiean
marine Was at Tanirinai in ihe
suburbs of Seoul little more than
a mile from the city

T) jwuth Korean genera! stafi
also cinimed that Kimpo, 10 miles
northwest of Seoul had faMen arid
that fighter planes were already
operating from its airfield

Carrier based Marine Corsai
ranged over the whole beachhea.
area and knocked out 230 of an



estimated 280 Communist lorrie

ishing trocps southweres toward
inchon

Reuter’s Correspondent Re
Macf artney reported from Inchon
Executive membership, and this
could easily lead te early ais
agreement and disunity among

the people’s representatives, Ty 1
this is likely, can be assumect
from the fact, that from the

Executive position
plums attaching to ministerial ap
pointments, of which there will
be five

All in all, ‘iritiaad and
face a testing five years. wiatiy
leaders from the people them
selves have expressed grave fears
that not a few unworthy candi-
dates may be returned, Optimists
however, are hoping that
sener elements among those seek
ing office, including most of
cutgoing members, will he
torious to-morrow.

LUudage

the

vic-

Shou'd this prove to be the case
observers feel that Trinidad will
aavance in tranquillity and pros-
perity, towards the goal of com-
plete independence, and towards
a happy era, following Federation
with her sister Colonies in the
British Caribbean

lat

m

vecsels
yom bardment
> said
destroyers

He

mhunist
water f

will come the ¢

He

'

mo

h

ent

ro

rep
ele

I
re

Wor

the *

Under cover of their guns Gen

nes !

ad

tr



OW

laid

rat



have

down

five
and four



a

cruisers,

rocket
rained a shower of steel on Com- |
~iehments

ao

and smashed

rtea

t

lan

hi oke turned day
3 inarines struggled forward |



"The
Die

dt
nh

€

alf

felt

CoH

heur
umble of reverberating exr
ever ceased

og

open
Jagged path for attacking marines, |

rile
The

firm

|
ootheld in the port on which naval |
heavy

shir

uss on

into |

The Topic
of
Last Week

ix|
>s |

th

a

net
|
|



the sea wall from the ‘ant
t They encountered only |
resistance’. |
ven nations took part in the
( landings—America, Brit—] Wl! boys somethings do happe
: eo = To mak us stop and think
Australia, New Zealand, | por wren « chains et nueae
.la, France and South Korea. There is the broken jink
h °®2 snips, it was the larg-,! = "
amphibious operation — since} aya,
ld War II ly «





ANNOUNCING



THE OPENING



CASABLANCA

Opposite St.

Lawre ie



Pwr
Going home

women

» pourty







eral MacArthur sent reinforce- Charlie Eide
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this morning to bolster the initial
marine assault Goma janet eorenne
Agreed ‘twas sterii fy
R % ‘ Humanity then came next
To throw the Communists To such it was & cures
further off-balance, South Korean
oops were landed yesterday at| And Tuesday bright and early
; ant a pints plone the peo There was another fus
t aah ane ares i I Up in the ancient Chamber
insula coast To stop the lorry bu
South Koreans north of Yon re boys there are some people
Chon advanced two te three miles sg ghies an Cee oe
over a 25-mile front aren 1uad ab (he
The Arnerican Second Divisio
n the central section of the Nak re nen et
Seta Ve nnd And to the seaside too
tong river, the “west wall” anc MN Soe and Lasu ana owe
the 25th American Division on Use “M. Tw wenty twe
the south coast advanced up t :
two rifles Phe Buses In Barbado:
R te my suffice a few
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memset cn nn gente tninanaiichiaies
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ere politicians
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PAGE FIVE
NE ZIQHE
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J

PAGE SIX

Lord





Alfred

Tennyson

(1809-

By AUGUSTUS

: sy tas long lifetime, Lord
Dessiyour Was acxnowledged to
poet of the Vic-
was not only Poet
Jester“ Was tne most dis-

wic most widely ac-
a4giasu poet of the nine-
» and his personal-
ime imagination of

sbeaS bee

sat



+ eeolury

Ay cuprdceu

ine cutire Engusn-speaking
worla rus lau =commanding
igure, his bearaed face with its
Levie ieutures, ne

melancholy
400K in lis aeep eyes—tnese made
& romanuc picture and helped to
form | ine Lennyson iegena. He
Was regarded by the public as
wuo aloof trom his
feliowmen, brooding upon life and
ume and eternity, and dreaming
his magnificent areams. But look-
ing back upon the Lord Tennyson,
we are apt to forget that his great
triumphs were achieved after
years of struggle and bitter dis-
appointment. Indeed, perhaps the
most interésting part of his life-
story is to be found among those
early years when he was quite
unknown and only a few intimate
friends had-faith in his future as
a poet,

one Stood

Poetry seemea to run in

; his
family.

His father had been a
writer ol verse; so were two of
his brothers. Alfred Tennyson
first ventured to publish some of
his work ‘When he was a mere
boy of seventeen, not yet entered
upon his studies at Cambridge
University. Many poets, as they
pass through the fiery years of
youth and enter upon menhood,
are filled with all kinds of revol-
utionary ideals, and are anxious

to turn the world upside-down
and put everything right; but
Tennyson had a very different

temperament. He pondered deep-
ly upon the unhappiness that he
Saw in the world, but it was in
the solemn march of progress
that he had hopes of better things.
He distristed fanaticism and easy
remedies for social ills, His faith
in the future was founded upon
the great traditions of the past.

Even_as & student at Cambridge
University;; he was known as a
vather aloof figure. But those to
whom he gave his friendship had
a great Joye and respect for him.
First =-tmong his friends was









Arthur Hallam, son of the great
English rian, The two young
men inseperable; their
intimacy*fhad deep spiritual

foundations; and each believed in
the futuré=greatness of the other.

Hallam was both the inspirer and
the kindly=eritic of the volume of
poems T yson published when
he was $Â¥enty-one and of his
next book: of poems issued a
couple of ¥ears later, The recep-
tion of these works by the pro-
fessional critics—and by the pub-
Jic—was a grievous disappoint-
ment to the young poet. And then
came an event that was to darken
all his days.





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News reacii€u i...
or Ute
saAliasut, Aone wed 6
With SOFPOW, itie very soe
of tus iile
UUs CApiepomwi se tede “6
elUZy ME Vegas ww was. cetee
Ap wh€moriaan, Uiie Vi bie Be barron
pueitis—ai OL Wie greawwet Ol al,
4t as cerlaimy oOue vl ute
Clepies iff ihe Laigiioii iatiguage,
oul many years were 10 pass De-
fore it was compie.ea.

bPeagiC Utes Ua came as ares

Wad diiimecs.

basatoe

“At the same ume as he begui
this work, he setuea uown to un-
prove some of his earier poets
and to write oiners. Me was de-
termined to strive without ceasing
to develop his poetic powers, rvr
a whole decade he Japoured, and
then decided w pubiisn nis next
volume. It contains some of the
best-known of his shorter pieces,
among them The Lotos Eaters and
A Dream of Fair Women and
Locksley Hall.

But we must not forget another
great event in his life; he fell in
iove, and became engaged to be
married to a beautiful girl called
Emily Sellwood. And once again
it was his fate to suffer disappoint-
ment. Alfred Tennyson was poor;
his father had died and he felt
he had family responsibilities; so
the engagement had to be broken
off, From the time of his falling
in love with Emily to the day
when it became possible for them
to marry, fourteen long years had
gune by and Tennyson was a man
ot forty-one. By this time he had
written The Princess, a long poem
in blank verse which contains
some of the loveliest lyrics he ever
wrote, for example the song be-
ginning:

“Tears, idle tears, | know not what they

mean,

Tears from the depth of some divine

despair

Rise in the heart, and gather to the

eyes,
In looking at the happy Autumn fields,

And thinking of the dave that are no
more,”

Tennyson was made Poet Lau-
reate in succession to Wordsworth,
und wrote his famous Ode on the
Death of the Duke of Wellington,
which was followed by Maud, a
he began his series of Idylls of
jong poem of love and war, And
the King, which told of the chiv-
ulrous deeds of King Arthur, an
uncient English monarch, and his
nights of the Round Table.
‘Tennyson's career was now well
advanced, although he had thirty-
three years still to live—years of
triumph and of honour. On his
marriage he had said that his wife
“brought the peace of God into
his life,” and that peace remained
‘with him into his old age. All
his later work shows his mastery
of the English language, and his
est poetry had been compared
‘9 the music of a great orchestra.

‘fis fellow countrymen respected
lim for his loftiness of purpose
ind the nobility of his mind. And

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SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



West Indian More of this and—

Prints At



The Museum HEMINGW AY
HAS HAD IT

SIR Edward Cunard’s collection
of West Indian prints and litho-
graphs is on special exhibition
at the Museum for two weeks
only. These prints formed part
of the collection of West Indian
prints which was exhibited in the
Art Gallery after its opening by
H.E., the Governor in July. As

‘ the result of repeated requests by
* those who were unable to visit

the exhibition, Sir Edward’s col-

* lection has again been hung in the

Art Gallery. With this fine col-
lection of prints are shown a num-
ber of water colours from the
Lucy Carrington Wertheim col-
lection presented to the Museum
last year.

The Museum has recently been
presented with two showcases,
one by Messrs Da Costa & Co
Ltd. and the other by Dr. H.
Harcourt Carter. These welcome
gifts by no means satisfy the
Museum’s need of more show-
cases, for it still has in its store-
rooms much material which it has
been unable to place on exhibi-
tion owing to this shortage.
Among the gifts received recently
by the Museum have been a col-
lection of 18th and early 19th
century spectacles presented by
Dr. H. Harcourt Carter, an exam-
ple of black Wedgwood pottery
and samples of volcanic dust
from Miss B. Parkinson, and a
self portrait by Geoffrey Holder
the Trinidadian artist.



when Queen Victoria honoured
him with a peerage it was emid
the applause of the whole British
nation.

As he matured, his faith grew
stronger; he believed in the spir-
itual evolution of a world that
moved onward to some divine
destination. The deep sincerity of
his mind shines as clearly through
his work as his sensitiveness and
strength. Many people are to-day
returning to the poetry of Tenny-
son and finding pleasure in its
melodic beauty and in his many
lovely portraits of the English
countryside—a countryside seen
through his eyes in all the magic
of dawn or the freshness of an
April shower, in the Ylory of an
Autumn sunset or the silver
beauty of winter moonlight .. .
And he will always remain a great
figure in the history of the Vic-
torian era—a poet who praised all
that was finest in the England
that he knew.



SHOPPING THE EASY WAY

GENEVA: A_ Geneva green-
grocer is feeling on top of the
world. He bought £11 1s. 6d
tickets in a lottery and went on
holiday. On his return, he found
vhat he had won a Stand 4-seater
saloon, an_ electric washing
machine and a large-size refrigera-
tor, Going to collect his prizes he
was handed a registered letter by
the . His wife had in-
herited £4,000 from an aunt. He is
now looking for a lottery with a
villa as first prize.









DIAL 3676.




i

: CECE AUBRY~JACK HAWKINS.

>| oe HENRY HATHAWAY -




9

If any wr ter might have been
expected to create the great novel
of World War II, it is Ernest Hem-
ingway, whose “Across the River
and into the Trees’* is published
simultaneously n Britain and
America.

The world has awaited it avidly,
believing that it m ght be worth
setting on the shelf beside Tol-

stoy’s “War and _ Peace” and
Zola’s “La Debacle.”

For Hemingway is the most
famous livng writer, and the

highest paid. (Hollywood gave
£25,000 for one short story.) He
worked five years on this book,
his first for ten years.

He was equipped
both as man
World War II.

for the job,
and writer. In
he was far more
than a reporter. He saw action on
land, sea, and n the air.

In the Caribbean he chased
U boats in his 40ft. cabin cruiser,
armed with high explosives and
be zookas. He flew on R. A. F. ops.

In Normandy the huge, bearded
novelist’s Jeep roared 60 miles
~nead of the Amerjan Army
His aggressive soldiering with the
Maquis in occupied Paris led to
a formal charge of misconduct—
and the Bronze Star.

VIOLENCE

“IT am and always have been
a soldier,” he once said. It is
true. All his books are first-hand
reports on brutal action and
volent death: “A Farewell to
Arms” on his World War I, ser-
vice in Italy (he still wears an
aluminium kneecap as a result);
“Wor whom the Bell Tolls,” on
civil war guerrilla days in Spain.

‘To report on this age of carnage,
EF emingway invented a_ harsh,
clipped, aggressive style, strictly
superv sed by early Montparnasse
feiends Gertrude Stein and Ezra
Pound.

Admirers called it the hardest-
hitting prose of the century.
Critics sniffed at hs swaggering
amid a welter of drink, lust, and
blood, at characters who talked
like sub-normal orang-outangs.

They suspected q soft, senti-
mental centre. “Come out from
behind the hairs on your chest,
Hem‘ngway! We know you.”

And now what should have been
the explos'on of a literary howit-
zer goes off with q dismal phut.

His new book is about as bad
as it could be.
Hemingway takes as hero a

war-battered colonel, and wr tes
him into a petrified and utterly
unreal love story which looks like
an embarrassing ‘hunk of wishful
thinking.

War only gets into the book at
second-hand, when this sour bear



_OM TH
i \

\



en Pley by Talbo mn
¥ bot denn een Play “by Taleet Seonines = Raped Su the Novel Oy THOMA’



__ EMPIRE

at AC TUDOR

naar OVEL IS

Filmed along the fobled + route of Kublai Khan ..sa-
vast spectacle of multitucles and thundering caravans
world afire with conquest- ablaze with discovery!

Based on the Novel by THOMAS B.

CARIBBEAN PREMIERE—TO-DAY and Continuing

THEA TRE





Star Book

of
the Day
by
WILLIAM
GRACE



works off his rage against the
British and the brass-hats of all
nations, while grumbling in bea
with his mistress.

The scene is Venice,
colonel fought here in 1918, re-
turned after the second war,
having helped to liberate Paris
and cross the Rhine. He is just
over 50, has had several wives,
one a “warco”, but no daughter.

1946. The

Only drugs and dr.nk keep the
colonel going. At life’s fag-end
he wants to die here with his
three loves: Venice, duck-shoot-
ing in the marshes, and his g rl.
She is a wealthy 18-year-ola
contessa, “shining in her youth
and tall striding beauty.”

DUMMY

K'ss me once again, and make
the buttons of your uniform hurt
me, but not too much”, says this
dream dummy.

‘I wish we could ke married
< have five sons.’ the colonel
said,

“ ‘So do I,’ the girl said. And
send them to the five corners of
the world.’

“ ‘Are there five corners to the
world?’

“ ‘IT don’t know,’ she said. ‘It
sounded as though there were
when I said it. And now we are
having fun again, aren't we?’

“ ‘Yes, Daugater,’ the colonel
said.” (He had always wanted a
daughter.)

This sleazy couple maudlin
back and forth between Harry’s
Bar and the Gritti Hotel, she
hang:ng on his opinions of “our
British cousins, who could not
fight their way out of gq wet
tissue-towel.”

Of Montgomery, spat upon as
a tardy show-off. Bedell Smith
is a high-pressure salesman,”
Leclerc “another jerk of the third
or fourth water,” the U. S, Gov-
ernment “the dregs....you find
‘n the bottom of beer-glasses.”

Only Rommet! is admired. And
the P. B.I., sent in thousands to
needless death by ignorant brutes

MBE



ee PORE

Sobmggeesneatees



es

ratwns sy LOUIS Dy LIGHT,



29D9O99SOO 2












miles behind the lines. With
asterisks to mark obscen ties
Having shot his mouth,
colonel kisses his girl and
ff to shoot duck, He

fter

the
goes

ACRID WIT

There are glimpses of merit
“he eleg ac loveliness of Venice
wihier. A hint of the hideous

s:ze and din of war, and the pity |

and anger the author felt. A
touch of acrid wit
“Almost any | ar writes more

convincingly than the man who
was there,” says the colonel.
Hemingway was there, with his
alert senses and dare-all ccurage
But instead of recreating what
he saw—the savage impact of
battle on the brain and s new of
living character—he has lazily
settled for a man in a desolate
girl-hungry mood, eking it out
with h’s old dumb-ox philosophy,
and some of the worst writing he

has ever signed.
The field is wide open for that

great war novel.
London Express Service



**We must face facts, men,
is Ava worth the increase—
or do we admit the cinema
encourages delinquency and
take musyc lessons.”’



J’can Gets
Police Medal

LONDON Sept. 15.

Sgt. Rudolph Brown (i®) of the
Jamaican police has been award-
‘ed the Colonial Police Medal for
gallantry, for disarming a
dangerous man armed with a re-
volver, it was announced in the
Official London Gazette tonight.

On May 30, Hawker who
quarrelled with another man in
Kingston, Jamaica, fired five shots
wildly in all directions from the
revolver, the citation said. One
man was killed and sx people
were injured.

Hawker was reloading his re-
volver when Sergeant Brown
succeeded in disarming him, The
p sto] was later found to contain
three live rounds,

—Reuter.

you bay

Gusrantee
le

lasting service
in the material,

eost imeurred in

Take

ol satisfaction



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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1950

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TRADE Mane


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1956







The | Colour
Bar

B.B.C, Discussion Thursday

Learie Constantine will intro-
duce “Why are There Colour Bars
Today?” a broadcast in the BBC’s
General Overseas Service on
Thursday next. The programme
is,described as ‘an informal sym-
posium on some factors that
make for. the continuance of
colour bars.’ Taking part in the
broadcast will be Elspeth Hux-
ley, author of many books on
African problems, who will speak
on economic and administrative
questions; Dr. E. J. Dingwell,
anthrepolog st and author of
‘Racial Pride and Prejudice,’ who
will discuss the psychology of
race prejudice, and Professor L. S.
Penrose, Galton Professor of
Eugenics at University College,
London, who will talk about some
biological considerations. Broad-
cast wil] be at 9.00 p.m. on Thurs-
day, 2ist. inst. and will be re-
peated on the following day. Fri-
day 22nd. at 3.00 p.m.

United Nations Report

The BBC has arranged a ser-
vice of radio reports to cover the
fifth General Assembly of the
United Nations, which begins at
Flushing Meadows, New York, on
September 19th. A crack team of
reporters will furnish a _ five-
minute report on the previous
day’s proceedings at 8.15 p.m, on
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thurs-
days and Fridays and from Sun-
day, 24th. inst, there will be a
fiftteen-minute review of the most



Two hats from a
Paris collection; Above.
satin
roses
right is a large boater in white
Turkish towelling edged in navy

current
a grey
evening cloche with pink
and aigrette. On the

crosgrain—with
veil,

a mMavy cage

London Express Service,

Rose Cuttings Sent
By Air Eearn
Dollars



i . important developments during
ben UBANDS of dollars are it Goeoeting week to be broad-
ing earned by a new British cast at this same time each Sun-

export—rose cuttings.
From London's airports,
liners are

_, day. In addition to these re-
C aim ports, vocal and cable contribu-
taking them to hard- tions from the BBC's correspon-

currency countries all gyer the dents at United Nations will be
world. : heard in the daily news broad-

British cuttings have now cas and in ‘Radio Newsreel’
rt their highest popularity which is on the air daily at 8.00

Inch+long cuttings are p.m.

being flown daily, in large and En i i
small consignments, to stock parks, ane ee Ge Berries of Man
street flower beds and private tury meeting at Birmingham of
gardens of more than 30 nations. the British Association for the
Speed Essential - Advancement of Science the BBC
The director of a company ex-j will broadcast a discussion pro-
porting the cuttings said:. “Ourfigramme called “The British As-
first necessity, is speed, . The cut-MSopiation Meets: in Birmingham.
tings—or rose-budding eyes, as™In’ this programme scientists will
they are known commercially— talk over one of the main sub-
die a fortnight after being taken. jects discussed at the meeting,
Air transport is the only solu- which was the theme of the
tion. . President’s address — ‘Energy in
“We are now dealing with the Service of Man.’ The speak-.
countries as far apart as Australia ers will include Sir John Cock-|
and Canada. Our overseas trade croft and Professor R. E. Peierls,

SUNDAY

Four Royal
Names

By FRED DOERFLINGER

LONDON

F






neéss Anne Elizabeth Alice
Louise of Edinburgh has much
bo live up to
She has beer i regally-
im the great trac hames
have a r.ng ubout
them, beiliting ’ is
th rd in succ > throne
of England and 10 May vne

day be queen

Close friend of Princess
Elizabeth and Prince Philip
have known for some time of
their fondness for reintro-
ducing names whch though

notable in English history, have

passed out of Royal usage in
recent times.
Stuart names like Charles,

which they gave ther first-born,
and Anne have not been popular
with English royalty since Jaco-
bite days.

200 Years Ago—Queen Anne

It is more than two and a halt
centuries since g Charles reigned
and more than two centuries
S.nce there was a Queen Anne on
the British throne.

Anne, a Hebrew name mean-
ing “grace,” has its origins in
remote antiquity. It was a
favourite name in the Byzan-
tine Empire which existed from
A.D. 395 to 1453. It first came
into use in England -at the be-
ginning of the 13th century, but
was rare unt] the beginning
of the 14th century.

It then came into more gen-
eral use, perhaps because of the
influence of Anne of Bohemia,
consort of Richard II. By the
beginning of the 17th century ‘it
was one of the commonest Eng-
lish names, and remained so for
at least two centur-es.

Six queens of England have
borne the name of Anne, Near-
ly six centuries ago, the first of
the two queens of Richard Il,
son of Edward the Black Prince,
was Anne of Bohemia, sister of
the Emperor Wencelaus of Ger-
many. She died in 1394, six years
before her husband is said to
have been murdered at Pomfret
Castle.

Poisoned

Another Anne was the wife of
Richard III (slain at Bosworth,
1485), wha is said to have been
poisoned by Richard to make way
for his intended marriage with
Princess Elizabeth of York.

Anne Boleyn, second queen of
Henry VIII and mother of Queen
Elizabeth, was beheaded at the
Tower of London in 1536. Anne
of Cleves, Henry’s fourth w.fe,
was divorced in 1540.

James I of England and VI
of Scotland, son of Mary,
Queen of Scots, who succeeded
to the throne in 1603, was mar-
ried to Anne, Princess of Den-
mark, daughter of Frederick
II.

The last Queen Anne in Eng-
lish history (1702-1714) was the
wife of George, Prince of Den-

ark, She was known as ‘Good

een Anne,” an extremely re-
ligious woman whose short reign
was marked by internal poiit.-
cal wrangles between Whigs and
Tories, Anne had 17 children, ali
of which died young.
Not “The” Prinvess

The young Princess Anne will

é “The Princess
has spread to places we had not F.R.S., both of whom are knowr! et oat iy neeasaa Hamad is eae
even «ontemplated, when we for their work on the atom bomb. fr corved for children of sovereigns

Broadcast will be at 6.30 p.m.
on Friday, next, 22nd. inst.
George Orwell

started exporting in 1946.”
London Express Service.



Women In Bosnia Claim ,
. of ‘The Contemporary Englis

BELG mareenee novel’ the novelist to be discussed
RADE: Moslem women of wij; pe George Orwell, whose

Bosnia are discarding the veil, (ea: tg as suct loss;
their centuries old symbol of male peak Fes raat wee BCS ,
superiority. Meetings are going on
throughout this predominantly {jcagi writer and satirist with his
Moslem Republic — supporting prijliant ‘Animal Farm’ and ‘1984
demands for the veil to be pro- which have made his name a
hibited by law. Moslem men of household word may overshadow
some areas are supporting the his achievement as an English
campaign for a new law, but there novelist and the speaker, T. R-
are others who oppose it,
the women that to drop the veil ly upon the earlier novels,
is heresy and a mark of pecially ‘Burmese Days’

immorality. ‘Coming Up for Air, which made

es-,













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LIST OF STOCKISTS




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om

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ASHBY & MEDFORD Ltd.,

STUART & SAMPSON,
R. L. SEALE & Co.,

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F. A. DANIEL, STANFELD SCOTT, Ltd.,
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SSS

to English letters. The success in,
recent years of Orwell as a poli-;

Fyvel, will therefore dwell large-!

and,

M1 SOW

f¥and is not used as a prefix to the

a

In the coming week’s editionfit, the throne any of her four

title of her brother, Prince
Charles. But should she succeed

ynames may be used as a Sov-
ereigh’s title.

There was no surprise either
about the choice of Elizabetn
as second name for the new
Princess. It has been borne by
four Queens of England — the
consorts of Edward IV and of








Henry VII, by “Good Queen
Bess,” and by the_ present
Queen. It means “God hath
sworn,”

There has never been a Queen
Alice in Britain. It is an old Nor-



Orwell's name among a small
Zcircle of readers, This talk on
* Orwell will be broadcast on Wed-
‘nesday next, 20th. inst, at 7.45
p.m. d



H.R.H. Princess Elizabeth

man French name and means
“noble cheer.” Tt is the name of
Prince ,Philip’s mother, Princes:
Andrew of Greece, is one of the
names of the Princess Royal, the

Duchess of Gloucester and the
Countess of Athlone
Fearless
Louise is a Teutonic name,
meaning “fearless warrior.” It
last appeared in the English
Roya] House when the eldest
daughter of Edward VII was
christened Louise.
She died in 1931. Before that

Queen Victoria named one of het

daughters Louise. She was
Princess Louise, Duchess, of
Argyll, who died in 1989 at the

age of 91.—ILN.S.

What The Well
Dressed Dog
Should Wear

PARIS, Friday.—Off the Champs
Elysees, near the salons of exclu-
sive dressmaker Balmain and one
of the most expensive shirtmakers
in Paris is a shop called Au Chien
Elegant (At the Elegant Dog).

When I called, two tiny York-
shire terriers, owned by the wife
of a French composer, were on the



counter being fitted with yellow
knitted sweaters, at £1 12s. 6d
each

Said the manager: “For the
winter, an elegant dog needs at

least three items for his wardrobe:
the sweater, of course, for sports;

a smart coat, perhaps made of
plaid, and a waterproof coat.
Inder wm tmecanel

Under the waterproof, on cold

days he will wear the sweater.
At A Glance
“Just as you can tell by looking
at a Woman whether she is dressed
by Dior or Fath, so it is easy to
tell by looking at a dog’s jacket

that he is dressed by Chein
Elegant.’
To “tailor” a dog the owner

pays according to dimensions, but
for a full+sized poodle—far the
most fashionable breed in Paris—
the price is £3 3s. for a made-
to-measure coat.
Four winter leather
a terrier cost 25s.
WingCollars
For collars, top fashion, I was
told. is a shining white patent
leather winged collar (£3 3s.) a
worn with a man’s dress shirt.
The collars are attached to bright-
ly coloured leather straps
Beds for dogs are of coloured
canvas stretched on tubular metal
framework, which collapses for
packing in the holiday luggage
Pantastic varieties of toys were
on show. A favourite is a large,

boots for





grey rubber mouse which squeaks. |

The shop has a beauty parlous
where, for slightly less than £1,
an average sized dog gets a sham-
poo, trim, manicure and brush-up
Appointments have to be booked

London Express Serviec



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“No”—claim medical authorities

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ADVOCATE



consonants
being

ford”,

c

MIND a
iy "his

Mazeograph for J



a

EMMA C MCKEAN

J EMEMBER the n ursery

* rhyme that begins, “Pussy
at, pussy cat, where have you
been”? Our junior readers can
Tetermine whom he saw and how
he got there from this maze-

SECRET WRITING JUMBLED MEN

7 HAT

proverbial saying that
ill odd digits being replaced by
and the even digits
replaced by vowels:
1255 2 97234 2 97234

255

ce :
are ce ye | VARDLEY e744 LAVENDER
.

28> ° . and the ‘ luxury soap of the world’
dotograph, Starting at the top, |
find pussy’s path with your pen- | YARDLEY 33 OLD BOND STREET LONDON
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the following figures—

SyusWaITNDas ayy sary

apuds # epeds e& [TeD.,

PEN PALS

Cumberbatch,
Road View, St.

PERFORMING DOG

ao msuy

Betty “Water-

Peter.



CALCUTTA: Four months ago
Russian-born Mrs. Marie Sandaros
an animal trainer, found a mongrej

iog with a broken leg outside her

home here. The dog’s leg healed
and she started to teach it circus
tricks and was astonished one day
to hear the dog say “Mama”. Pluto
also blew several rapid blasts on

| toy trumpet and walked on his

forefeet with his hind legs in the
air, Pluto’s next task, according
to Mrs. Sandaros, is to say “Papa”
nd after that “a simple sentence

such as ‘I love Mama and Papa







SONS LTD. |):

‘IMPORT DUTY

NEW YORK: Unpleasant sur-
prise for British visitors arriving
in New York: immigration officials
told them they are now subject ta
a head tax of $8 (£2 17s, 14d.)
and collected it from the £5 they
are allowed to bring out from
Englandig









LS

almost daily injure them-
| selyes, often cut themselves,
| injure their knees or elbows
| by falling; they often catch
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asked her husband this morning

tell
dewn
quickly produced the following:

aback by what she read, She was:
used
her puzzlist
had gone she went to work witn!

a

wanted for dinner. Do you know? !
ajd edde usip dead

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hot if the Hottentot tot hoot and |
toot at the Hottentot tutor?

JOHN CROSBY,

If a Hottentot tot taught a
Hottentot tot to talk e’er the ot)
could totter, ought the Hottentot |
tot be taught to say aught, or
















PAGE SEVEN



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Mrs. Sharpe was not taken
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PAGE EIGHT





Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bruigetown.





Sunday, September 17, 1950





TO-MORROW

TO-MORROW Trinidad goes to the pol's
to elcet anew Legislative Council. The new
Council will be the first to be elected under
the new constitution and because of this
fact the elections are of interest to all West
Indians. Under the new constitution, Trini-
dad will have a majority of elected mem-
bers in the Legislative Council and will
embark for the first time on the experi-
ment of ministerial responsibility.

Other colonies look forward to being
entrusted with ministerial responsibility
and it can safely be assumed that the eyes
of the Colonial Office are on Trinidad to see
how that country shapes up to its new re-
sponsibilities. On the measure of success
that attends the Trinidad experiment may
well depend the hopes of other West In-
dian islands.

The election campaign which has pre-
ceded the voting which will take place to-
morrow has been one of the fiercest in that
island’s history. To place one’s policy and
principles strongly before the electorate is
the right of every candidate for the Legis-
lature but in Trinidad it appears that the
legitimate means have been exceeded and
that there have been occurrences which
have been the source for grave misgiving
by many persons,

More than a hundred persons have
offered themselves for election to eighteen
seats. In many cases it has been difficult if
not impossible to decide for what many of
the candidates stand. There is a body
calling itself the Caribbean Socialist Party
which represents the usual ideals of social-
ism, There are in addition a host of other
parties, and an even greater number of
persons who owe allegiance to no party,
which seek the votes of the electorate.

Barbadians who clamour for ministerial
responsibility may well study the lessons
of the Trinidad elections, Ministerial re-
sponsibility implies many things which
are not yet apparent in these islands. It
requires men who are fit and able to take
upon themselves the burden and responsi-
bility of directing the affairs of govern-
mental departments. It has usually been
taken to mean that a sufficient number of
persons representing the same point of
view can be found who are willing to work
together. Equally important, it demands
the sense of loyalty which is exemplified
by the doctrine of collective responsibility.
By that doctrine the whole party in power
resigns when the government receives a
vote of censure even if that vote of cen-
sure is directed at only one minister.

The evils of coalition governments have
already been apparent in the hesitant and
precarious lives of so many French gov-
ernments. Such governments provide none
of the conditions in which ministerial re-
sponsibility can flourish. Such conditions
are the ideal setting in which opportunism
and demagogy flourish. They are not the
conditions in which stable and energetic
government can function.

For more than fifty years Barbados
evolved and worked a system by which
men of different views could contribute
their best in the service of their island
home. Those who to-day may decry that
system may well ponder on the success
which attended it.

In small countries of mixed races the
temptation to appeal to racial prides and
prejudices seems to be irresistible. In
Trinidad it appears to be enough in the
eyes of some candidates to state their
membership of some racial group and to
expect that the members of that group will
forthwith give their support.

Never before in the varied and at times
stormy history of these West Indies has
there been such a crying need for states-
manlike leadership of the unemotional
type. Such leadership has not yet been
forthcoming. Trinidad, as the proposed
seat of the Federal Government, is looked
to provide much of that leadership.

~- —
To-morrow it will be known whether the
Trinidad electorate has been able to over-
come the spate of oratory with which it
has been deluged in recent months and to
choose those men and women who will be
able to provide that which is needed. The
best wishes of the people of Barbados go
out to the people of Trinidad at this his-
toric moment for in their fate lies very
largely the destiny of their own political
institutions.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE

WHAT Queen’s College lost by the resig-
nation of Mrs. E. J. D. Corbin, who had
successfully held the post of Headmistress
for the last 13 years, can only be measured
by the success or failure of those who take
her place, to maintain the high standards
of scholarship to which she has brought
Queen's College.

In 1937 when she first came to the school
she found dingy, antiquated buildings,
nestling close to the equally time-worn
Combermere, desperately wrestling with
the educational needs of 178 pupils. Its
Sixth Form numbered two.

It says much for her untiring zeal and
determination that only a decade after,
there should be a Queen’s College whose
resemblance to the old was only basic.

Modernised and comfortable, if not yet
entirely adequate buildings catered to a
flourishing school and healthy Sixth Form
whose Higher Certificate results and exo-
das of students to Universities were begin-
ning to show impressiveness. .

And with all this came the brightest
feather in her cap—the securing of the
1946 Barbados Scholarship by one of her
students, Elsie Pilgrim.

Moreover, every effort has been made to
cure specialist mistresses for the staff—
“orts which begin to show clear signs of
aition, and the new, well-equipped block
voted to Science and Domestic Science
ids great promise for that branch of
udy.

tn

» oO

ym Ae

Mrs. Corbin was an Honours Graduate
of Glasgow University, and held the
Teachers’ Diploma of Cambridge.

She started teaching in Government
Secondary Schools in 1923, and by her
l cenness and ambition rose to the post of
fenior Mistress of one of them.

In 1937 she came to Barbados and Queen’s
College, the outstanding success of her
past teaching career being primarily re-
:ponsible for this appointment.

The fact that during her 13 years of
teaching her favourite subject, French, at
Queen’s College, she has never had a fail-
ure, is a vivid testament of the effective-
ness of her teaching technique. So effective
is it, in fact, that many other schools in the
island have adopted it.

She brought to her task a sympathetic
and tolerant outlook, and a bright friendli-
ness which won the affection of all.

It is unfortunate that ill-health has
occasioned her retirement, a loss to the
educational system of the island that Bar-
bados and Queen’s College cannot well
afford.



Dangerous Bathing

SEABATHING is one of the great past-
times of all Barbadians and is the chief
attraction that draws tourists to these
shores. The enjoyment is, however, marred
each year by tragedies which occur to per-
sons bathing in the sea around the coast.
Other tragedies are only averted by the
fact that many Barbadians are strong
swimmers and willing to go to the rescue
of those in difficulties.

At many bathing spots in the island
there is no provision for rescue work, and
indeed it is only at Cattlewash and Rock-
ley that the most elementary steps are
taken to provide help for those who may
find themselves in difficulties. It is time
that a greater forethought is exhibited by
those in authority.

The Commissioner of Police has rightly
pointed out that the matter is one for the
attention of the Parochial authorities. Cer-
tain simple and inexpensive precautions
could be taken. Danger notices should be
put up to warn visitors of those parts
where the sea is known to be dangerous.
This would apply mainly to the coast along
the Eastern side of the island where unfor-
tunate incidents have taken place on more
than one occasion.

All those beaches which are popular with
bathers should have easily available a line
which could be thrown or fired to persons
in distress. In time it might be able to pro-
vide a proper life guard service but a start
should be made with those precautions
which are as efficient as they are cheap.

A fatal accident in the sea is a bad adver-
tisement for the charms of Barbados. When
everything is being done to encourage
tourists, steps should also be taken to en-
sure that they can enjoy the amenities
that the island has to offer without risk to
themselves,

Above all those who bathe in the sea
must exercise their discretion, Shooting
waves is a most enjoyable game but those
who attempt to play that game in waters
where the current is strong are asking for
trouble if they go too far from the shore
The Parochial Authorities must move to
provide the means of rescue. The bathers
must by the exercise of caution make cer-
tain that the means of rescue need never be
used,

4

SUNDAY

“, . . But listen—my
mark this — *REQUI

ADVOCATE



of which he may stand in need’ ”





Sitting On The Fence

Hy Nathaniel Gubbins

A worried girl writes to a
woman columnist: —

“I am 21 and was quite
happy at my work until the
manager made advances to
me. For some time I evaded
them, but now he has changed
his lunch hour to be alone in
the office with me. He is
married and over 40. How
ean I discourage him?

If you care to chance your arm
on the sack. dear, you could try
this method.

ALONE at last.
lucky?
We?

Aren’t we

Well, I am then. But you may
be lucky too. I don’t suppose
you’d say no to a fur coat this
autumn?

I always say no to fur coats.
Not only do I consider them
vulgar, but they are also obtain-
ed by torturing animals in traps.

Oh, come off it, sweetheart.

And it’s no good offering me a
diamond ring either. Jewels are
also worn mainly by the rich and
vulgar. Gold and diamonds are
obtained by slave Negro labour
in South Africa,

* * *

Well well, Quite a little Red,
aren’t you?

Nor will I accept a champagne
dinner, Alcohol not ony be-
fuddles the brain and distorts
the mind; it weakens the will to
resist evil.
it immoral to eat more than one
requires at a high cost. while
millions go hungry in Asia. Shall
I sit on your knee?

Why, of course, sweetheart.
You don't have to ask.

I asked because most men of
your age have rheumatisn, Are
you very old?

Me? No. They say the middle
forties is the prime of life.

* * *

I expect it’s your muddy, pur-
plish complexion and _ large
stomach which give one the im-
pression of senility, though I sup-
pose your appearance is largely
due to over-indulgence. Is your
wife hideous too?

ou can leave my wife out of
this.

Little fat men like you always
marry hideous women and spend
the rest of their lives pestering
youth and beauty, Am I hurting
your knee?

You couldn’t hurt me, beau-
tiful. I say, let’s talk about
something nice. I’ve got a pro-
position to make to you.

And I have a proposition to



Moreover, I consider”

make to you. Will you marry
me?
You know I can't do_ that,
sweetheart. There’s iny wife.
You can poison her.

Really, sweetheart you're
joking.
No, I’m not. You want love.

I want money. Don’t let indi-
viduals stand in the way of our
mutual happiness. Are you rich?

Oh. cut it out.

When you have disposed of
your wife you can make a new
will in my favour. Then I will
marry you.

THANKS FOR NOTHING

But as you are too unhealthy to
live long, I shall soon be a happy
and contented widow. Shall we
finish those letters we started
this morning?

Home Doctor

Mrs. Maureen A. McGuire,
of Seattle, U.S.. has been
granted a divorce because her
husband “made her life un-
bearable by continually
psycho-analysing her.”

KNOW why these beans are

underdone?
Because I took ‘em out of the
water too soon, I guess. What

else?

Oh no. That’s not the real
reason. The real reason is be-
cause when you were a little
girl (you were jealous of your
baby brother.

For cryin’ out loud,
crazy?

No. I’m not crazy. I’m learnin
you somp'n about psycho-analysis.
Think right back to your child-
hood.’ Didn’t you want to boil
your little brother alive?

No, I didn’t want to boil my
little brother alive. So there.

* * *

You don’t think so now because
you’ve forgotten. It’s a hateful
memory buried way back in the
sub-conscious.

What the heck’s that got to do
with underdone beans. anyways?

Because when you were boiling
the beans you were symbolically
boiling your little brother.

Leave my little brother out of
this will ya? bia ‘

At the last moment you had a
fit of remorse. So you took the
beans out of the water before
they were properly boiled. Just
as you would have taken your
little brother out of the water
before he was properly boiled.

Is that so?

It was the same with the burn-
ed bacon for breakfast. You

Are you



Our Readers Say :

Electricity

The Editor, the Advocate
_ SIR,—Lt. Commander Smytiies
is, I am happy to avow, a friend
for whom I have a real regard,
whose opinions on machines and
electricity are, in my estimation,
valuable, whose intentions are
excellent, while his industry and
tenacity has my envious admira-
tion. :
For years the home of C.S. (may
I be forgiven if, for brevity, I use
initials) has been in Canada. In
that vast Dominion great areas
have been highly electrified, with
ample and cheap current genera-
led by waterpower. It would
seem very difficult for CS..
unw/ttingly, not to judge the
island electric supply against that
background. A comparison that
would not be reasonable. For in-
stance, the charge of 22c. per unit
would seem to him extremely
high, and I too would like to see
't reduced, but in Cornwall in
England, I paid only a penny less
for current from the Grid. Again
in Canada, there are, no doubt,
many men of high ability, retired
comparatively early from full
tme active business, who are
prepared to shoulder heavy pub-
lic responsibilities, from a sense
of civic duty and to keep the rust
away. Here numbers are small
and the slower pace of life leads
to different results, To find three
just men with the knowledge to
understand and the capacity to
judge between conflicting techni-
cal opinions, the ability to take
over and manage all or any of the
three companies if that came to
pass, with the requisite le'sure
and the willingness to serve,
would be mighty difficult, C.S.
himself bears witness. to what
happens when statutory powers
outrun available capacity to ad-
minister. If wisdom prevails,
nothing is done. If great powers

are exercised without knowledge
it is like a blind man driving a
motor car

C.S. sets out to show the bene-




fit that would result from the pro-
posed Board, but the o con-
crete advantage adduce the
reassurance of those who are








doubtful whether they are get-
ting a square deal. But, judging
by the numbers who want the
company’s service as soon as they
can get it, there is no deep_or
widespread dissatisfaction. of
course, we all grouse like the
dickens when things go wrong
or when we cannot get all the
service we want, but it does not
go deep. It certainly does not
seem to me to warrant setting
up a ponderous and expensive
establ’shment, the ‘cost of which
will fall on the company’s custo-
mers.

C.S. would like the choice of
the machinery to be bought and
operated by the company, to be
in the hands of the Board, who
however need no qualification, He
considers that the People of Bar-
bados should have a voice in the
companies’ decisions and policies
and so would place them, along
with the Companies, completely
under the thumb of the Board,
who would be answerable to
neither. It seems a pretty far
muddle to me. Incidentally,
though “the people of Barbados”
is a fine sounding phrase, in fact
the consumers, actual and poten-
tial, of electricity and of the other
utilities. are no large fractions of
the population.

But at the root of C.S.’s criti-
cism of the Elect#ec Company lies
something more understandable.
Yu his opinion steam turbines are
more reliable generating units
than the diesels the Company has
installed, and there is much to be
said for this view. On the other
hand, though diesels need more
attention, it is claimed that they
should be more economical in
fuel; fuel is expensive here and,
as the Company’s customers have
reason to know, it bulks largely
in their costs. It is a complicated
quest'on involving many factors.
But I think we can be sure that

the Directors, in coming to a de-
cision, would not act on their own
whims and fancies, but on the ad-
vice of experienced consulting en-
gineers for that is the ordinary
bus inference



iness practice Ne
can be draw rom the rect
breakages in new machines. De-

ort clearly says: ‘We, Ernest Bevin . . . request and’ —
RE that the bearer should be afforded EVERY assistance



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1956
tacts eneruneiinasaanttat tonne Sata



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Successors to

C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD.

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burned the bacon because you
hated your father.

Am I supposed to have fried my
father alive now?

* * *

Not at all.
as that.

IP’ul say it isn’t, seein he weighs
all of 2501b.

What happened in your sub-
conscious mind this time is that
you transferred your hate fixation
from your father to me.

That wouldn’t be difficult,

eee

PRINCESS
REFRIGERATORS ~

° 3 eub ft

° 3 year guarantee

It’s not as simple

You thought you were cooking
his breakfast, not mine. So, until
you let me cure you, I shall
always have to eat undone beans
and burned bacon.

You certainly will. And what’s
more, the pot roast for dinner to-
night will be burned up, too.
Itll be your dear mother I’ve
roasted alive.

PRICE $425.00

Just arrived at-- «

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.
ELECTRICAL DEPT.

Magnetic Men

A Mr. A. E. Rose, writing
to The National Funny Morn-
ing Newspaper, says that when
he was in the Navy it was
noticed that his head always
swung to the north as he sat
in the barber’s chair. When
the captain heard about it he
had Mr. Rose slung horizon-
tally from the deckhead. The
ship was then turned through
360 degrees, and, as Mr. Rose
always swung to the north,
“the possibilities of a human
compass needle became at
once apparent to the captain.”
“No doubt you will hear
more of this scheme,” Mr.
Rose adds, “though when sus-
pended in alcohol the human
needle is not too accurate.”



: Now In Stock

SANDERSONS
CRETONNES

KNOWN THE WORLD OVER
FOR QUALITY AND BEAUTY

so CHINTZ

See our display and make
your selection

. * *

YOU will hear more about it
now.

When I was in The Home Guard
much the same sort of thing
happened.

Off duty. sentries slept in the
hall of the golf club and, as we
were usually suspended (to some
extent) in alcohol, we swung
wildly in all directions, though
the general tendency was towards
the bar, which was north of the
hall.

Sentries returning to the club
after two hours at the observation
post were not quite so suspended
in alcohol, and were therefore
more accurate as human compass
needles.

The moment they entered, their
heads swung north towards the
bar. The magnetic pull was so
strong that they were inside be-
fore you could say Heil Schickel-
gruber.—London Express Service.

fects in mater.a] should not occur,
but if they do, damage will re-
sult, whatever the type of ma-
chine. I understand that last crop
trouble due to faulty material oc-
curred with new sugar machinery.

Now, whatever one thinks of
this, and I, for my part, lean to
steam, the fact remans that this|~
company operates diesels. To]
change over to steam turbines. & mt
If it were possible, would, T am|*%

at present prices cost about halt | ¢
a million pounds, a burden quite

DaCOSTA & Co., Lid.
DRY GOODS DEPT.

told, take about four years and ¥ “
* When You're Out
eet of aS 8. = the elec- F .
re supply in Barbados. m
I can only hope that C.S. will Or Enjoy ent at

declare peace and join me in
praying that his previous persis-
tent proddings wil] not result in
electricity and the other utilities
costing more.

Cc. E. SHEPHERD.
Colleton House,
Pa

Your Favourite Club

St, Peter. the moments
are always
the happier

if

Farewell Message To
Queen’s College

To_The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—Would you please allow
me to send a message to the
Parents and Friends of Queen’s
College, past and present. Last
October I went away with the
hope that I would soon return but
this, I deeply regret, is not now
possible, My message is one of
sincere thanks for the loyal sup-
port given to me, on all occasions.
as Headmistress of the School and
for the many kindnesses shown to
me personally by Parents and
Friends.

Ma y Queen’s College, for which
I will always cherish a great affec-

GODDARD'S
GOLD BRAID

RUM



tion, continue to flourish and play 1S Served. $
a Teading part in the education of 3
girls in Barbados,
If ever, at any time, I can be of * x
help to a Queen’s College girl %
coming to England, this , . . +
me pleasure. . err x The Secret a 2 =
With many thanks, %; S
T am, ‘ ‘ Ps
Yours sincerely, s - the Sip. >
E. J. D, CORBIN > %
Arundel! Gardens ¢ %

London, W 11.

is ‘
LLLPDEESLLLLCCSFESESSSSOSSSS ESSE SOS SSO SS SOS SOD

Rom
-

iA
ae RRR NRNRRRNUR MBAR eH

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1950



Hurricane Pictures From Barbuda

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





NEW STOCK ||







Pictures on the left depict some scenes from







PAGE NINE





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i
{
it
. |
the stricken area. i AT
iy . )
n ay a . ; { ie BAY ‘puP
lop-—-A collapsed building, in which people ; BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
are still living. i AMOSAM—For Making a
; ve ot 2 ; mouthwash, Cures b -
Second—What's left of Codrington village. | rhea and Tonsillitis oh HARRISON'S
Pitt ‘ j . : \ Bottle
Thirc Warden's Home: Refugees collecting BAYER'S ASPIRIN in. 25's
rations. and 100’s BROAD ST.
: Bottom—Pigeon House:.. In this Reservoir ay tg Pye a ance LOCAL AGENTS
i slaves used to draw water for master, CIGAKETTE LIGHTERS—
i mistress, and their families. Guaranteed | to light every DIAL 2364
time —2/9 3/-
To - ' SUN GLASSES—made of ie "
p (Right) What's left of three houses. Sent Guality siase will’ not FULL RANGE OF STYLES AND
injure the eyes: From 2/- 4
to $10.00 each, SIZES IN STOCK.
WRIST WATCHES—Excel-
e lent quality $9.00 to $17.00
KODAK CAMERAS— $5.00,
| ore a ri ean $10.00; $12.00; $16.00; $20.00
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i Or AL) am Cameras t
age HIGH CLASS PIPES~-Dun (4 my
hill, Parker, Comoy, Every
BARBUDA a dependency of The “Pigeon House” another man, Grand Slam and Bah-
Antigua was badly hit by the famous piece of slave work has tam. .
hucrleane, which devastated the been damaged. In the past this Pipes that are especially
arger island. structure was used to conserve made for us at 2/6 each
The pictures on this page taken water, Slaves were made to fetch ) The working man’s pipe T E N N | S
exclusively for the _ “Barbados water and throw it in at the top }|| CADBURY'S CHOCOLATES }
Advocate” give some idea of the for their owners to draw when |\\\ Red Rose jlb. 1 lb 1
suffering which has been experi- they pleased. i Hazel Nuts } lb 1 Ib '
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Peasants have lost over four Years ago a Dutch ship “Paul ])) Princess 1 Jb 4 ib
hundred head of small stock. Most Rosa” was wrecked on the eastern Assortment )
of their small boats which were reef off Barbuda and has always ROUND TREE'S CHOCO-~ }, {
at anchor during the hurricane been visible about four feet spove| LATE—Black Magic $3.85; {{
have been destroyed or beached. sea level. Boisterous seas of Sep- $1.88; $1.08 AND
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pink beaches, and quantities of on the reef and it now stands fully Of excellent quality at, G2e,. }) :
blush pink sand combined with 20 ieet above sea level. per pkge. J vt .
shell from the eastern side of the Holy Trinity church had its Perfume from France and n
island was carried a mile inland belfry torn away and the bell is Jamaica \ & TABLE-TENNIS
by the sea which encroached the reposing with rope and all in some \; MY SIN PERFUME $6.00 KR
land, nearby trees. } $10.00 and $14.00, im”
Mathilda Tower on the southern Destruction of Mathilda ‘Tower { CARON PERFUME—-French { |
side of the island has been badly and the Pigeon House are a great}}!} Can Can; Bellodgia: Rock { |
damaged. All the woodwork has loss to Barbudans because they|{{ Garden; Black Narcissus; )!
been blown off while only vhe have always cheristied the work Christmas Night; Soloman’s {
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Motor Cyclist | VENDOR WINS $14,004 ARE THE CHOICE
| (From Our Own Correspondent) AT
re PORT-OF-SPAJN, Trinidad;
Killed In Crash September 17
| A vendor from San Fernando, B UCE OF
j (From Our Own Correspondent | Miss Janie Frederick is the lucky J
i |holder of ticket MM7537, which
GEORGETOWN, BG ;arew Mist Maid at the Arima . 1
| Frederick Wharton (22) an ém-| Races. She will receive $14,004, WEATHERHEAD
| ployee of Booker’s Drug Stores,| She carries on a small roadside dat 4
i Georgetown, met a tragic and sud-| business including the selling of
den death at about 1.45 p.m. on{ matches, bananas etc. She is the LIMITED
Sunday afternoon on the West| mother of two children, one of
Coast, Demerara, Public Road,! ‘nem being unempioyed for a

when it is reported, he lost con- |
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Wharton's skull was fractured
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Two other persons riding on the
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(37), a Postal Clerk at the G.P.O.,
and Louis Calder (21) a labora-
tory sampler at the Mackenzie
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SUNDAY ADVOCATE



SUNDAY,

SEPTEMBER 17, 1950

Romantic British Painting Of The XiX And

XX Centuries ~>>=

By PATRICK HERON

The word “Romantic” has
many vague meanings and [cw
precise ones. The critic who
employs it-—-and it occurs very
frequently in critical writings—

should do his utmost to define it
before he allows it to creep intu
his sentences. Yet attempts at
such a definition are often un-
satigfactory. Here is Mr. John
Piper, a distinguished modern
painter who is among those
British contemporaries widely
referred to nowadays as our
Modern Romantic Painters, open-
ing an essay with the following
words:

“Romantic ari deals with the
particular, The particularization
of Bewick about a bird’s wing,
of Turner about a waterfall or a
hill town, of Rossetti about
Elizabeth Siddall, is the result of
a vision that cat see in these
things something significant he-
yond ordinary significance: some-
thing that for a moment seems
to contain the whole world.” He
goes on to say that: “Abiding
also in the Romantic painting of

this country (Britain) is the
sense of drama in atmosphere, in
the weather and the seasons,”

Obviously Mr. Piper means quite
a number of things by “Romantic
art”. Indeed, artists who think
of themselves as Classical or Sur-
realist or Constructivist might
reasonably claim for their work
that it reveals “something signifi-
cant beyond ordinary significance:
something that seems to contain
the whole world.”

Personal

is much more to be said
for the idea that the Romantic
artist “particularizes”; for those
painters and poets who are known
historically as Romantics certainly
expressed personal reactions to

There

specific situations, events or
objects. Yet the implication of
Mr. Piper’s statement is that

other kinds of art do not celebrate
“the particular’: and this is
nonsense. For Classical art also
contains the results of particular
reactions to particular experiences:
where it makes an addition to
the activity of the Romantic is in
setting the intense “Romantic”
experience within a wider frame.
The experience of a_ particular
stimulant is stated in terms of the
widest possible validity, by the
Classical artist. Cezanne’s ex-
citement at the sight of Mont
St. Vietoire was for Cezanne not
an end but a beginning: to com-
municate the particular thrill was
not enough for him: he had to
translate it into a form which
both contained it and transcended
it; he had to transmute the par-
ticular emotion aroused by a par-
ticular subject into the architec-
tural form of great painting. Bu‘
this process of transmutation can
only come about where the artist
in question has—as his point of
departure—the strongest feelings,
the most intense creative passion:
for this passionate feeling is itself
the material to be changed, trans-
muted.

Vital Element

In other words, the vita!
element which makes a work of
art a Classieal work is a far
deeper thing than the element of
mere ‘style’; it is perhaps to be
found in ‘the evidence which a
work supplies of the artist’s
desire to reveal the universal in
the particular, to produce order
out of chaos. But he has to be
great enough to submit himself
to the chaos (which is the chaos
of his sensations) in the first









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place. Only in this way cun the
order he finally acniey be new
and, because it is new, of vital
significance. The artist whose
insivcence upon order pr-cedes his

willingness to submit celf to
the natural chaos cl exper.cace
will merely become Classicist, not
Classical. His art will, at best,
be a repetition of the orderly
results of an earlier artist’s tussel
with reality; in a word. it will
be Academic. The true signifi-
cance and the true relation of
these often ambiguous words,
Romantic and Classical, was sug-
gested by Mr. T. S Eliot in his
remark that the proper progres-



sion for the individual ertist js
from the Romantic tawards the
Classical.
:
Pioneers

When Mr. Piner mentions.the
English Romantic painter's nse
of drama in atmosphere, in the

weather and the seasons”, we can
at any rate recognize a reference
to the works of those early Nine-
teenth Century painters who have
come to be known historically as
the Romantic Landscape Painters
Certainly Constable, Turner and
Girtin all conveyed the time of
day, the kind of day, and the stage
of the season in their landscape
paintings. And in doing this they
were pioneers. Painters of what
we might call “landscape subjects,”
such as Claude or Prussin, had
employed landscape ; a setting
for something else: their pictures
illustrated scenes from Classical
literature: “landscape” was only
one of the pictorial insred'ents.
along with the stage furniture of
ruins and the stage characters, But
with Tirner and Constable the

landscape itself became the sub-
ject. They were thus the first
artists to become aware of the

actual appearance of a thousand
different particular effects in the
outdoor world. This new awak-
ening of the senses was also re-
Bree in the poetry of the time:

ordsworth, Coleridge, Kes s,
Shelley, Byron, Cowper and Blake
were in many respects the poetic
counterparts of the painters,

urner, Constable, Girtin, Crome.
Cotman and Bonington. With all
these poets and painters, sensuous
perception of the world of Nature
rose to a pitch of intensity unsur-
passed anywhere else in history:
and in English history it is rivalled
—as a poetic renaissance—only by
the period of the Elizabethan
dramatists.

A Vision

The external results of this in-
terlor revolution in the mode of
perception. and fecling were that
for the first time a vision of Eng-
land itself began to appear—upon
the penvegs of Turner and Con-
stable. ichard Wilson, thei;
forerunner, had imported Italian
light in order to illumine the

ountains of Wales. Turner and

onstable abolished this eternal
summer, this constant, even, pow-
erful, Mediterranean light. It re-
presented a _ climatic condition
which England experiences only in
one or two exceptional weeks of
midsummer. Turner's and Con-
stable’s awareness of the play of
changing light in the atmosphere
itself; and of the uneven distribu-
tion of accents of glittering sun-
shine and shadow over the sur-
faces of the countryside was
purely English in origin, and it
was responsible for their great
contribution to the main Europeaa
tradition. In a sense this was pre-
eminently a technical contribu-
tion: it was an immensely signiii-
cant innovation in the technique
of seeing—and the greatest paint-
ers are innovators in precisely



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T. HERBERT, | }

JOHN CONSTABLE:

this respect: they discover new
ways of seeing everything and
anything. They change the ap-
pearance of the world.

Brighter

Turner’s and Constable’s new
awareness of appearances led
them to the use of lighter and
brighter colours and tones than
any used before. Of course bril-
liant patches of colour had been
used from early times to repre-
sent bright local colours; scarlet
pigment for a scarlet dress; em-
erald green for the leaves of a
tree. But in order to describe the
three-dimensional forms of their
subjects painters had relied en-
tirely on subtle graduations of
their colour mixtures. Titian or
Velasquez, Raphael or Rubens; all
gradated thei: pinky greys or their
golden browns where the flesh of
their models showed naked, and
switehed to gradations of quite
another colour or colours for the
garments and for the other ob-
jects depicted. They thought in
terms of one dominant colour-tone
serving for the depiction of dne
object. It was left to Constable
and Turner to discover that a
shadow cast on a whitewashed
wall might be a stronger blue than
the surface of a lake in sunlight or
eyen of a blue hat, It was also
left to these English painters to
discover that accents of very strong
colour might be seen distributed
throghout, the visual scene. Such
discoveries, of course, directly in-
spired the final phase of the Euro-
pean painters’ conquest of natural
appearances; the French Im-
pressionists could never have ar-
rived at their results, half a cen-
tury. later, if Turner and Con-
stable had not preceded them

Two Well Known

But these two painters, known to
all the world, made their impact
upon the painters of France at
‘east eighty years ago: their in-
fluence upon the mainstream of
European painting was thus long
since absorbed. It was perhaps the
only instance of a decisive inter-



“A Study for “The Haywain”

vention in the development of
European art by English artists
until the present moment, with the
rise to world fame of the modern
English sculptor, Mr. Henry
Moore. But to arrive at the sec-
ond part of my subject, which is
the present school of Romantic
painters in Britain, it is necessary
to recall two other painte; of the
early years of the Nineteenth
Century who, unlike Turner and
Constable, have had to wait till
the present time for their keen~-
est admirers and, we might say,
their most significant following.
William Blake, the great English
poet, mystic and prophet, is still
almost unknown outside Great
Britain as a painter. Yet he and
his follower Samuel Palmer are
the main English source of our
modern Romantics: the other in-
spirer of their movement was
Picasso.

One Aspect

There is not space here to dis-
vuss the numerous imaginative
pursuits of William Blake: we
must be content to mention one
aspect of his pictorial art—namely,
those small woodcuts, the pastoral
fantasies, in which, perhaps, a
twilit landscape of low, .undulat-
ing, wavelike hills recede towards
a setting sun or a crescent moon.
In the foreground a shepherd or
“a poet” might be found reclining
against the trunk of a tree. But
here there is none of the broad
vision of a Constable, a Girtin or
a Turner, based, as such vision
always was, upon great powers of
visual observation of the external
daylight world. Blake and Pal-
mer were not capable of that
disinterested visual observation
which is the one indispensable
gift of all great painters. They
were not, in fact, “great” painters
at all—by the highest European
standards. Their woodcuts, water-
colours and drawings of a fan-
tastic yet gentle and _ benign
landscape were in reality projec-
tions in graphic form of a vision
that was essentially a poet's, not
a painter’s vision. The kind of
imagination which they expressed

had an inner, a visionary quality:
such poet-painters remind us that,
on the whole, poetry has domin-
ated painting in England.

Yet Blake (the Blake of the
pastoral woodcuts) and Palmer
express something very sacred
to the inhabitants of our dreamy,
tree-covered island, with its

soft light, its misty and hazy
distances, its dramatic, majestic
skies, its endlessly subtle variety
of gently flowing hills and
valleys. However, the imagina-
tion of the true painter must
always be anchored in externa)
reality: it begins with the purely
visual, even when it ends up
on a highly imaginative plane.
But this necessary study of the
outward appearances of Nature
is induced more naturally in
lands where light is constant
and strong: the Mediterranean
was perfectly “equipped”, as it
were, to become the cradle of
the visual art of painting. Eng-
land, her very beautiful land-
scape being full of suggestive
but indefinite, subtle forms, and
of endless nuances of tone, was
equally well “equipped” for
breeding vhe more subjective art
of poetry. Painting of course
has its own poetry: but it is
poetry which operates through
a purely formal configuration.
Pictorial poetry is not an ex-
ternal addition to a picture; it
is not something injected into
the design from outside. On
the contrary, it springs out of
the design itself, out of the
realized harmonies of colour and
form. Such is the nature of the
poetry of Constable, Turner,
Girtin or Crome—or of Cezanne.
But Blake and Palmer by-
passed the world of everyday
reality—from which true paint-
ers extract their colours and
forms—and they proceeded di-
rectly to the illustration of their
poetic visions (a kind of vision
quite different of course, from
the sense perceptions of our
eves). And now perhaps we
might say that Romantic paint-
ing is opposed to Classical



—Medium Oil Painting.

painting in the following
respect; its imaginative content
is so much stronger than the
formal structure of the d
that the one is often quite dis-
tinct from the other, Thus
Romantic art invites us to dis-
tinguish form from content; in
Classical art the two things are
fused into a perfect unity.
Blake and Palmer are Roman-
tics in this sense; but Constable
and Turner (despite their his-
torical label) are Classical. Mr.
Piper quotes something Palmer
said of Blake, and hecause it
well reveals the Romantic
attitude, I will give it here.
Palmer of Blake’s woodcuts as
“visions of little dells and nooks
and corners of Paradise; models
of the exquisitest pitch of
intense poetry. I thought of
their light and shade, and look-
ing on them found no word to
describe it. Intense depth,
solemnity, and vivid brilliancy
only coldly and partially
describe them. There is in all
such a misty and dreamy glim-
mer as penetrates and kindles
the inmost soul and gives com-
plete and unreserved delight,
unlike the gaudy daylight of this
world.” Emotive words, evoking
a profound subjectivity.

Present Day

And now to the present day.
Graham Sutherland is the most
powerful of the Modern Roman-
tics.. His is an exceedingly ori-
ginal vision which combines the
naturalistic composition and lay-
out of Palmer’s landscape designs
with an element of abstraction,
and a spiky method of brushwork,
beth suggested by Picasso. But
whereas the element of abstrac-
tion in Cubism was geometric in
flavour, Sutherland’s abstraction
is based upon the organic forms
of the biological or, even more,
the botanical world. A flat net-
work of harsh (and often black)
lines reveals the unfolding forms

(Continued on page 11)







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SAMUEL PALMER: “Harvest

of h‘'s landscapes These forms
have the look of tongues of fork-
ed flame; or of sharp molehills
Sliced into crescent shapes oy
Super-imposed lines of drawing
indicating con‘ours. But this flat
aspect of his design dissolves be-
fore our gaze and there looms
through it all a recognizable
vision of, say, a bleak landscape
of black hills. Perhaps some
ragged bushes of gorse, on the
near slopes, will be rendered as

a tangle of black scribbled lines,
resembling roots rather than
branches. Yet, these do not

remain flat scribbles, there on
the paper; they are felt to
be growing upwards, to be wav-
ing in an invisible wind ana
flaring out in space. Perhaps
Sutherland’s picture of this wild,
moorland scene will have a sky
consisting of a flat wash of ali-
zarin crimson, spotted here and
there with black dots and scratch-
es or of little blobs of scarlet.

NEXT year the moon will be on
the telephone. Visitors to the
South Bank Exhibition in Lon-
don—the main centre of the Fes-
tival of Britain 1951—will be able
to send a message there and back
across 477,720 miles of space in
just two and a half seconds, And
it will be as simple as making a
local cali in a telephone booth.

Contact with the moon will be
made from the Dome of Discov-
ery. The caller will press a but-
ton and send a radio pulse of
high frequency flashing into space.
It will have a wavelength of one
and a half metres and it will be
passed from ‘a giant saucer made
of a network of aluminium which
is to be built on the top of a
tower in the grounds of the Ex-
hibition on the south bank of
the Thames.

The visitor who sends the sig-
nal will watch its progress in a
large cathode ray tube, like those
used in television, in the Dome of
Discovery. When the signal comes
bouncing back from the moon
the image in the tube will give a
little “kick”. A supplementary
tube will enable this echo to be
magnified. Those who ring up the
moon will not have to fumble for
coins. It will be a free call.

Usable Night and Day

The radio telescope now being
built for the Exhibition will be
uSable at any time, astronomers
will not have to wait until it is
dark before they train this tele-
scope on the heavenly body they
wish to study. Even when that
body is invisible the radio tele-
scope will still receive these
echoes reflected from outer space,
and by studying them astronomers
believe they will be able to learn

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1950

Moon”

Somehow the whole thing, though
exceedingly suggestive of the
western, Celtic fringe of this
country (the wild coastal regions
of Wales or Cornwall) is also sug-
gestive of a sort of intellectual
shorthand. The form of the hills,
or of the loose boulders lying here
and there on the reaeen surface
of the moor or the half-cultivated
fields, is somehow too general-
ized. We feel that the hill in the
picture has become a mere symbol
for hillyness: the particular hill
in the painting has no scale and
no conviction of a particular scene.
It might be Everest; it might be
a molehill: it must, apparently, be
read as a sort of microcosm. This
uncertainty I regard as a defect.
But again, a rough hill path may
be seen (in the imaginary Suth-
erland picture I am constructing
here) winding up and ae
ing into the nearest fold in the ris-
ing ground. This disappearing path
will be simplified into the form of
a large slice of melon, or a cres-







—Medium Oil Painting on panel.

cent. Then the big, roundish
boulders I mentioned, being lit
brightly from one’side or the other,
will closely resemble the moon in
having a shadowed side and a
bright side. Thus shapes possessing
symbolic significance are incor-
porated in the texture of the pic-
ture, by accident, as it were.

Moons

Now, moons are almost the
stock in trade of this English
Romantic tradition. But whereas
Blake or Palmer have their moon
in the sky, Sutherland's crescents
are, as I have just shown. just part
of his pictorial description of solid
forms. But he shares more than
this with Palmer: in its flatness, its
black-and-white character, Suth-
erland’s design is very close indeed
to Palmer’s. Though Picasso re-
leased in Sutherland a capacity to
state his themes in a pretty ab-
stract manner, the sort of rhythms

Ringing Up The Moon

Hy GEOFFREY MURRAY

new facts about the composition
ef stars and planets and meteors.

I gave up a morning recently
to walking over the Exhibition
site. Thrilling new patterns
formed by ribbons of steel are
now criss-crossed against the sky.
These buildings, nearly 40 of
them, by the time they are com-
pleted next May will burst upon
our eyes as strangely, I believe
as a lunar landscape.

The Dome of Discovery is one
of these structures, Its frame-
work is almost in place. A ring of
girders, 365 feet in diameter, now
hangs in the air 90 feet above
one’s head. This ring rests on
temporary towers of metal scaf-
folding, but already lattices of
steel ribs, surprisingly slender,
are tying it to the concrete fins
that are eventually to take the
weight. Soon the work of roofing
with aluminium will begin. In
this building the story will be
told of those Britons who have
mapped the globe, studied the sky
and investigated the structure of
the universe.

Spinning Steel Webs

Few acrobats can put on an act
half so thrilling as the spider-
men clambering in and out of
the steel webs they are spinning
scores of feet above the 27-acre
site. A chalk mark scrawled on a
steel plank, is all the direction
they need. And lying on the
ground is something that looks
like part of a prefabricated stair-

case. Presently someone will
come. along and move it into
place.

A coal mine is being built on
this site. A miniature of the
Exhibition’s predecessor, the
1851 venture, is being created.
An aquarium is being installed,
and a new concert hall for Lon-
don, to hold audiences of 3,450,
is nearing its final shape.

Fronting the site is the
River Wall which will be

new
laid








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fish-shaped rhythms of Palmer’s
and Blake's hills, or their sword-
shaped leaves... And we feel that
Sutherland has Palmer's limita-

he uses are very much akin to |
|
tions. Neither of them has a com- |
j
'

mand of plastic form: both are
naturalistic in that they reproduce |
the landscape in, very much. the!

same sequence of proportions in!
which it is observed by the eyes. |
That is to say, the foreground is
near, its objects large; the middle- |
distance is indicated by objects of |
diminished scale and definiteness;
the background is remote and its
forms generalized, There is an ab-
sence of that equal emphasis which
a Bonnard or a Cezanne gave to)
everything within the visual field.



Interesting |
\

Yet in spite of plastic weakness- |
es Sutherland is one of the most
interesting painters now living.
And in England his influence has
been considerable—especialy upon
such able (but, younger) painters
as John Minton, Keith Vaughan,
John Craxton ang Bryan Wynter.
Sutherland's contemporary, John
Piper (extensively quoted above),
is equally a Romantic painter; in
his case Turner has provided
more inspiration than Palmer,

But I think it is clear now that
the younger members of this group
are tending to diseard the linear
methods of Palmer and Suther-
jand for the more plastic approach

of the modern French masters.

These young Romantics (Minvon,
Vaughan, Wynter, Craxton)
average age 32 perhaps, are thus
tending to fall more into line with
those of their exact contempora-
ries (MacBryde, Colquhoun,
Ryan) who were never lured by
Palmer, and who never wavered
in their allegiance to the great
contemporary painters of France.

Nevertheless this does not mean!
that the young School of London
is likely to lose its flavour, Though
we derive much of our idiom from
Paris, it is likely tha’ our own
flavour will become more and
more pronounced. And, of course,
cur characteristic preoccupation |
with landscape continues, even
among those whose debt to |
Braque of Picasso is obvious. j



out next spring as a garden walk.;
Fast this the lively pageantry of
London’s river parades endlessly.
The 1951 Festival is not plan-
ned to be a trade fair. It is
neither an abridgement nor an
extension of the British Industries
Fair, a motor show with trim-
mings, nor a fun-fair version of
the British Museum, It will tell
the story of every Briton—the
work they do, the way they think,
and even the games they play.
Nine million pounds sterling is
being spent on this venture. Of
this sum £2,000,000 is earmarked
for the new concert-hall the one
building which it is intended
shall be a permanent structure.

The Story of Britain

The Exhibition sets out to tell
the story of Britain—of her farm-
ing and the countryside, of the
sea and her ships, of power and
production, science and transport,
radar and gardening,

Soon there will begin to arise
amid the cluster of buildings on
the site some of those strange new
ebjects I mentioned earlier. For
instance, hung on frames will be
spheres like flying saucers caught
in a net. And pointing skywards,
like a colossal rocket about to be
fired, will be the metal pencil
called the Vertical Feature. The
purpose of these things is to
break up the horizontal planes of
the other structures and so diver-
sify their distant view. Some vis-
itors may think, at first, that they
are being transported to the moon
as well as invited to ring it up.

But in these modernistic build-
ings the visitor will see the
achievements of British science,
technology, farming and industry.



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



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PAGE TWELVI





REAUTY





: ag; 3

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

a

SPOTS





| RUM SHOPS CLOSE
ON ELECTION DAY

From Our Own Correspondent



To Study Social
Welfare

as PORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad; GEORGETOWN, B.G.

The Information Office, Port- The Sugar Producers’ Associa-
of-Spain has issued a notice to tion has selected two young mén,
the effecy that all clubs, and Messrs. Abdool Ali and Clement
rumshops will be closed to the D. Padavavion to study Social
public on Election Day, Septem- Welfare in the U.K. They will
ber 18, from 7 am. to 5 p.m. be leaving by the O.N.S, Lady
One hour must be allowed in Rodney for Trinidad where they

addition to the normal midday
meal hour by every business
place to every elector, who is en-
titled to vote. The penalty for
any such breach is a fine of
$500.00 or imprisonment for life

will join the 8.8. Gaseogne. In
the U.K. they will spend a year
it King’s College and the London
School of Eeonomics pursuing
courses in Y.M.C.A. and Social
velfare work,





SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1950



|
{
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From Our Own Correspondent)




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inner harbour was taken from a car driving along the front.
a Maria Inxury hotel outside the capital of Grenada sheep graze in country reminiscent of England.

LEFT: This view of St..Geor
RIGHT: Not far from the Sen

NADA—The Land —
Of Spice 22225

|

THe first

cannot fail to be a pleasant
one whether it is reached by sea
or air. If one arrives by sea, the
beduty of the red brick town witt

impression of Grenada
talance to the advantage of that
immunity, suffers, all round the
coastal belt, from malaria, so that

most of the houses are situated





its fine Georgian architecture i high up — oo ~ the 4 A fiN
striking. TI ecnage-is-an ele % , nen ‘i nountain, ount St, Catherine, i:
volc nic crater into which. the sea My G. CUNLIFFE OWEN an old Volcano, has no sign of =
has entered, forming ‘a’ sh@ltered — joes yu dip ; ivan fr " = : activity left except some hot ~ +
harbour and the town of St: Mee Cy at and drives from the jiying in the neighbourhood of the springs . and rarely makes its =

irport over the Gran Dang road Grand Etang.

to St. George's. The road climbs The beaches, though not so
to 1,700 feet, with magnificent cunerh as those in Antigua, are
views over valley and hill, passing nevertheless, it must be admitted,
cn route the crater lake in IS fner than those in Barbados,
etting of tree ferns and Taln Grand Anse, with its smooth clear

o

wan)
PQ’
Fo

presence felt in a not very violent
earthquake.

Oysters

No one visiting Grenada shoul¢

George's climbs the steep walls oi
the crater hick with vegeta-
tion, in streets that are in: ‘some
places s0 steep a8 to become stair-
cases. On the edge of the crater
forms the of the Morne on



now



ridge



forest t Marc when Immor- si . ; i
which are situated the five old , Ne oo hey 0 ae ail water and magnificent view across omit tv tnclude the Grenadines in
te s are wer, V e 7 > , , por iti . i chai

French forts, Governmen: if sides are Wentlet with blossom. the bay to St. Georges, Fontenoy, fheir itinerary. This chain oi

(a beautiful building dating from with its silk cotton trees, so large peautiful islands stretching fifty

1801,) and several private Ti that bathing cabins have been miles north of St .Vincent, is aj

residences. On a subsidiary spur, rees contrived inside the trunk, Levera, little known paradise, Hunting, |

nearer the water level, is the new Grenada has many aspects. on the windward coast, with its shooting, fishing, and the tree-

luxury hotel, the Santa Maria. .~,, periinsula of Poin’ Salines romantic outlook up the chain of oysters of Carriacou may be had ©

the Grenadines, are the best. in abundanee.. There are sheltered
harbours for yachtmen and a
hospitable welcome from the in-
dependent and energetic inhabi-
tants many of them boat buiiders.
lle De Ronde, Kick Em Jinny,
Petty Martinique, Moustique,
Cannouan, Bequia, the names
alone should be a romantic in-
ducement to visit them.

The brickwork of the houses and
ehurches is very beautiful. Much
of it is London brick brought as
ballast by the schooners in the
old days and left behind for build-
ing purposes when they returned
to England with sugar—for it
only comparatively recently that
Grenada has become a cocoa ar
nutmeg producing island

resembles the deserts of Arizona,
with hardy scrub and giant cacti.
Fontenoy Beach reminds one of
an old dapanese painting of the
Inland Sea of Japan. The bay of
Gouyave resembles the sea coast
Italy But the predominant
aracteristic of the island is of
vast plantations of cocoa and nut-
eg with rain forest above; trees,

French

At Sauteurs the old Church
clock has the name of its French
maker and the town of Auxerre
stamped upon its face, reminding
one that Grenada was for a long
time French, The way of life is

aa
Px
im 7
So beautifully easy... #
so easily beautiful,

YES, it’s true..
8 out of 10 American baila

. rees in every direction, mile oo begs tebng. And “ noe B , becduae ae shocobpily dthsSemsial. vol
7 j ; ', the pee 8 8 a Frenc ‘ylfoa 4 5
Mountains noon mile EY a patois, the majority of the pepula- UBS. hair is infused with new radiance, new sparkle. Let say—IPANA dental care promotes

our taster tell the story—the story of glowi

» glorious hair-
ealth! And how wonderfully manageable

I emphasise the beauty of the tion is Catholic, there is a tradi- ‘The story of Grenada is studded e


















vads it rarely possible to see





town of St. George's, because it wre than a few yards in every ‘on of good food, the estates have with names of Grenadians whose Can hii: hoe Becineahical it 44. 00, * Raw ;
8 almost all that Grenada has to cia ‘Beautiful and thrill- French names and the whole at- fame has extended far beyond reat Tacbet sults every ty, ‘ Ti+ ded leew, Gee healthier gums — brightens teeth
offer in the way of architectural j,,9-a¢ first, this tends-after a time. Mosphere of the island has a their little island. There is fair. Ask for Brylfoam and see how beautiful hair ae

ouoyancy and gaiety lacking in

Henri Christophe, the only negro
those islands colonised by the

Emperor, there are de Freitas,

beauty (though it is a great deal

: : ‘o become monotonous and to in-
as there is no other town in the

duce a sense of claustrophobia, so

be! In tubes, the handy and the large economy size.

seri 3 ij 4 , :
Antilles so beautiful except jit one longs for the wide spaces More austere and serious minded there is Mr. Marryshow the Trades there’s more foam in
Charlestown in Nevis). For ae distant en that an icland =ritish. Union leader, Dr. Morgan, present fe

member of Parliament in England,
and—hush!—Uriah Butler!

Grenada can boast no fine old
estate houses like Barbados. All
were burnt in the Fedon rebellion,
as I described in. the Advocate



like Barbados provides. Grenada boasts the only tunnel
in this part of the Caribbean. It
Beasts arives right under the town of

Thar ; aha. ; St. George’s and connects the
some weeks ago, and the smailér (here are more beasts and birds %*: Me és cts P Grena¢
towns of Grenville, Victoria, Grenada than in Barbados, Careenage with the esplanade so near (only 45 minutes by air)
Gouyave and Sauteurs, are Iguana, snakes (though no poison- facing the open sea. It was the yet so far, could not be more
miserable affairs ous ones) Manicou, sucriers are work of Governor Sendall and is striking, and if variety be the

The chief beauty of Grenada is of common occurrence and there hey ie Se eae sae ov is gage ar alloc nie
its ains, well seen if one ig a very pretty species of monkey '"US Saved a tong detour, of | S t
ee z oe Grenada lies outside the while,



As a contrast to Barbados, the
life and appearance of Grenada,

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’ YOUR CAR DESERVES THE BEST—INSIST ON ; ie Festival Summer from May to September 1451
BARBATINS BOYS CLUBS REPLACEMENTS OF QUALITY S ‘ the visitor to Great Britain will find something of interest
baa { going on everywhere. In addition to the centres shown
Three Prizes will be given as follows: We Carry Stocks of the Above for Popular § here, cities, towns and villages all over the country will
; ¥ Cars and Trucks. $I take part in thi§ great national event. With exhibitions, arts
ist Prize: A FORD ANGLIA ¥ tH festivals, carnivals, pageants and sporting events of all kinds,
; uhh eer bi anne nS ae is ii there will be something for everyone to see, to enjoy, and to
2nd Prize: RALEIGH 3 SPEED C YC LE 1 @ | remenibes i}
3rd Prize: ROLEX TUDOR WATCH 3 ECKSTEIN BROT] ik RS rl If
1§ } ey rn gent for fi or details
jrawing to take place not later than Nov. 30th, 1950 x ; - " ne tL } } penne ann tant fo DN CR Ht
| E Hoi. 9 \ ;
i Auditors: FITZPATRICK GRAHAM & CO i x BAY STREET DIAL 4269 VIL ;
. j } M .
TRADING CO l oe . ane cares =! SOSGOSGO9GSS SO VS9611GUO CT OSL. OG 0668 SO SOO6G6CSOSSE645

CITY GARAGE




SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1956 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN















BY CARL ANDERSON

Cam 0
Anpenvon 4









Fic

673i,

< Fp. Ss Z 2 Ye
ay sv





rere














GOOD MORNING! THIS WHERE /
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ME
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SPRAY PAINTING EQUIPMENT |
>

ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LTD.

Tweedside Road, = St. Michael, = Phone 4629 - 4371



THE RIDDLE OF THE ROME REBEL

1 AM GRIEVED THAT YOU MuST GO \y =f ON TO THE DEEP WATERS ~
SO SOON,MY FRIENDS! HOWEVER MAKE THEM [JR - MY DAUGHTER, Goooewe, Fi es
THE WATER AT THiS TIME OF fi LIE DOWN. i SiIGNOR CANNON!
YEAR 1S WARM... LUIGI, PRESTO }
. PRESTO!











MANE Ad i

THE MOTOR LAUNEH DIS AP %: \
THE NIGHT, MAKING FOR TE OPTS

WOW-IIM GLAD I_ GOT uP HERE'S YOUR ean H iors a
EARLY AN! GOT TH! PAPER/! T FROM || HOW MANY TIMES WELL= VE TOLD TH’ POST
} HERE'S THE ARTICLE ON D --GIT HAVE I TOLD MAN NOT TO DELIVER
| DINTY'S CHOWDER PARTY THERE EARLY! |} DINTY NOT TO ANY MAIL / I'VE CLOSED
"LL TE ; SEND ANY THING MAGGIE
AN' BURN IT! | & TO THE HOUSE ? WON'T HEAR ABO!
4 a TJ AW)
(yy , * 5 a
ay 5 Seer Gite
oH y iF
co BY



ERE“

ICKETS

INTY
ERE

aa



Mira §=|LOOK, HONEY...A\ I WISH I WERE ON IT! EVER SINCE |
TRANSATLANTIC / I ENCOUNTERED THE MANGLER, I'VE
PLANE! < HAD A FEELING OF DREAD.,.AS IF I
A”. WERE BEING
SE FOLLOWED
Sb)

RIP _ KIRBY, ie _ BY ALEX RAYMOND

Pi SEE iT? , , : M






THAT'S THE
VES VIA, DIRECTLY
BELOW



@ ANO
2) WATCHED!

THE PHANTOM
or See Se
phos ge 5 ei i. a a. AMP

AGENTS= E. A. BENJAMIN LTD.

306 Plantations Building
Lower road Street, Barbados





> aca ARI a SAE
PAGE SIXTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE



, SEPTEMBER 17, 1950 ~

—

























I 5 Tenan ts C ivil Service Bu i l dd. ing = | BO LAL LOLOL LLLP AOOPE LEAMA EK LLVPEFC sop ae TE
Chosen For Employees Society mg tenn ee ene Kt :
: soma FON AE CIGARETTE LIGHTERS 3}; A U S TIN R t ED

Pine Estate

CONSIDERING further recom-
mendations of the Committee for
new tenants ihe Pine, the

Hold Meeting

Government Subordinate Em-
vloyees, a division of the Barbados
Civil Service Association, held a

Formed

A Society has been formed and
registered un‘er the name of The
Jarbados Building Society, with



HASTINGS ROCK
on Saturday 30th Septemver from
3 to6 p.m

STALLS. "Ne‘dlework, Vegeta
bies and Preserves, Cakes, Noveli



OC OOP OPO POOF OEE LE

TORCHLIGHTS —



CIGARETTE HOLDERS
BALL POINT PENS
BATTERIES & BULBS

SHIRTS

LOSES

= d Toys, Bock
Housing Board at yesterday’s special General Meeting at ihe Mr. Douglas Alleyne, Mr. F. D. Sowers, ° Lady “Dip Wheel
meeting selected 15 new tenants Town Hall yesterday and passed. Burnes, Mr. W. T. Barnes, Mr ve, Sweets, Ices and Hot —
ior that Housing Estate Resolutions to be forwarded to G. D. Bynoe, Mr. Briggs Collins, D4 Iced Cofite Grape Fruit [4 COSMOPOLITAN PHARMACY. i E
_. The Secretary of the Board Mr. the. proper authorities. Among Mr. Stanley Edghill, Dr. H. Sum- eh ee ee oe ; | in
T. O. Lashley, told members that them are: ner Moore and Mr. A. R. Top- Games and Pony Rides eset ttt DALE ELSPA |
the survey _work in conneetion Forty per cent bonus on certa n pin ac Directors The Police Band, by kind per frend - ~ $$ ————<——_—__—__————- —_—————— |
wth the existing layout for the salaries graduated to 25 per cent The Secretary of the Society is cision of Cor R. T. Michelin. (8) gece Swear See

Bay Estate which was essential
before the replanning of the re-
mainder of the estate could be
undertaken, was completed, and
that he had advised the Director
of Highways and Transport that
Mv. Harris, Engineer of the High-
ways and Transport Department,
would be yveturning to his sub
tantive post on Sentember 18

The Secretary added that he
ind thanked the Director o1 Higs-
ways ana Lransport ior making
wai. Harr.s’ services available for
tne survey work at the Bay.

ihe Board aecided to refer to
the Government a letter
Janetha Sealy,

'

a tenant at —

on salaries up to and inclusive
of £300,

Uniform for Pumping Station
employees; Mental Hospital cooks

Proper travelling allowances to
Postmen; Department Marshalls
wid other subordinate employees.

The subordinate employees were
from the Post Office, Mental
Hospital, Leper Hospital, Depart-
ment of Highways and Transport,
Waterworks Department, Public
Works Department, Provost Mar-
shal’s Office, Government Indus-
*tria} School, Water Boats, Light-
house keepers and others from

from ‘other Government Departments.



Mr. Victor Hunte, and the Office
of The Barbados Building Society
is on the top floor of the Barnes
Bui'ding in Bridge Street

It is proposed that this Society
should be eventually affiliated
with The Building Societies As-
soc ation, London, England,

There has been a crying need
for some solution to the problem
of the average man who cannot
afford to build a home for lack of
ready cash, or to repair the house
he owns because of the difficulty
of borrowing money

What was needed was a Build









Commissioner of Police under
Capt. C. E. Raison, A.R.C
will be in attendance fror
oom



Admission
Children and

Adult
Nurses 6d

2.9.50—5n



ATTENTION
PARENTS

+















We are pleased to announce the arrival of

STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS

Tempered Hardboard can be used for exterior work such as

TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS

14” thick, 4 x 6’, 8’, 10’

@ i4e. per sq. ft.

1” thick, 4’ x 12’
@ 30. per sq. ft.







Fine Stripes
with

Neat

SEPARATE TRUBENISED
COLLARS

ALL SIZES AT $7.00

RCL OCEL EOL CO? CLP CFECFE PAPE EY



Pine, applying for a spot of land e ing Society, a Mutual Association, Hoods, Door Panels etc 7 r ’ ny.” z

al aie. Bay ate a eoMichi. tote ourists fron — mens —— a HAVE’ you a child to send NOW IN Ss 7 Od yo ;
amove a ft se in St, Philip that row repay by instalments t sat > a aaah

cay ili ore a . i a 6 over a period of years, and at the heer hool Then a st find ALSO TILEBOARD SHEETS ‘

had been given her by her mother : } a gee all fit out the following facts about

Sealy stated in her letter that she Pe. own same t.me share in all profits the school to which you in- Cream, White & Green 4 bs

found it difficult to pay the $1.50 pede ay ned see i: ve tend entrusting the future 4 Kes Ces * tig %

d-taiciale ve ; » Pine . " os interest paic ould ev aly of vour child x 4, . 52e. . ft. 7

asada coe ie vce RIDGETOWN was again con- yeturned in the form of dividends. , 8 %
The Secretary during discussion gested yesterday morning as Such a Society would enable 1. Is there 10 square feet Phone 4267. e e Q e %

on the letter told the Board that busy shoppers pushed their way the average man to own a home of space for each child ,

from store to store in search of and the payments to the society attending the school? 3

Sealy had been one of the victim:
of the flood in 1949, and that she
was a single woman, occupying a
two-bedroom house at the Pine
He recommended to the Board that
her request be favourably con-
sidered

In connection with the case of
Fitz Murray-Cole, one of the ten-
ants at the Pine, who will be
moving shortly as a result of a
Court Order, the Secretary recom-—
mended that he be allowed to
tuke the furniture given to him
afer he lost his in the 1949 flood.

On Tuesday, September 19, the cent and Subscription Pare ,
This matter was also referred © Cinema will’ be at Lammings $250 each which may be paid for be registered nor approved i
the Government. Pasture, St. Thomas; Wednesday at a rate of as little as One Dol- y gieta eee ee \ |

The Secretary recommended @9 Black Bess School Pasture, St. lar a month, yielding the same nubhorities ane nd bebe a i
emendment to the Plan, Section peter, Thursday Bay Pasture in dividend. blind all tog ae 4 =
P at the Bay. He made the re- Beckles Road, St. Michael and on Moraes Wrap uM
commendation in order to Friday St. Catherine’s School If you send your child to | 1 Ture,
four croS8s roads occurring at two Pasture, St. Philip. ° a school that cannot con- i
separate points in Beckles Road, LECTURE RECITAL which At The Cinema form to these requirements {tt | SUITS Salmon,
which he considered bad plan- is headed “Descriptive Music” you are failing in your duty | Blue,
ning. will be given by Miss Enid Rich- @ From Page 3. as a parent.

‘After some discussion, the Board ardson at the British Councij During this rugged experience Rose,
decided not to accept the Secre- tomorrow at 8.15 p.m. Everyone —for no apparent reason—she L, A. LYNCH, ( Belie
tary’s recommendation in this is invited to attend. ery, — eae ete Principal. | my
connection, and he was instructed HE bicycle M-5772 owned and tion, and decides tha 1e simple ‘ alas agate Maize,
to have the roads built through to ridden by Adolphus Holder /ife is best after all, , | Call in To-day and inspect
Peckles Road, of Jacksons Road, was damaged _ With the exception of Miss|* NEG Light Green,



{ 000 Bags OF Rice. on Friday about 12.15 p.m. with \ wy ig BARBADOS REAL Dark Brown
the Motor car %-456 owned by in front of the camera and it is »
Arrive Donald Edghill of Rockley and nearly impossible to understand ESTATE AGENCY for your cotnfort in this Black,

A thousand bags of-rice from
British Guiana arrived in the
island yesterday by the 72 - ton
achooner “Emeline.” Arriving tne
day before were 2,000 bags by the
“Philip H. Davidson,” making a
total of 3,000 bags of rice to arrive
here during the week.

bergains, The weather was ideal
and many tourists took the oppor-
tunity to walk through the city
and have a look at it
Along the waterfront there
was also congestion as mule
carts and trucks moved to and
fro with loads of fruit and coals.
PRIVATE show at St. James
Almshouse on Monday, Sep-
‘tember 18, is included in the
programme of the Mobile Cinema
for the week beginning September
18 to Friday September 22.

when it was involved in an
accident along White Park Road

driven by Geoffrey
Christ Church.

No one was hurt.
HILE trying te get on the
bus X-214 which is owned

by Centra) Motor Bus Co., and
was driven at that time by Elicin
Broomes of Passage Road, R.
Fletcher, a labourer had his left

Edghill of

would be no more than rent for
another man’s house.

The idea is not new; there are
Building Societies all over the
world, even in the smaller West
Indian Islands.

The first requirement for the
steady growth of such a society
is money to lend: the nucleus
from a limited number of Found-
ing Shares, the bulk from Invest-
ment Shares of $25 each, yielding
a dividend of approximately 5 per
Shares of

Bergman, the entire cast is made
up of the Villagers of Stromboli,
who don’t seem too much at home

the dialogue spoken in English
that is completely shattered.

The action is slow, and with
the exception of a first-rate
eruption of Stromboli and the
sequence showing the yearly
catch of tuna fish, which is docu-
mentary in its presentation, the























2. Has every teacher on
the Staff the minimum quali-
fication of a School Certifi-
cate?

3. Is there one teacher
in the school for every 30
children?

4. Has the: school obtain-
ed any worth-while results
at public examinations dur-
ing the last three years?

N.B. If the school
not conform to the
requirements, it will neither



does
above





Residential
Telephone 2336
Office Hastings Hotel Ltd.

FOR SALE

INCH HAVEN, Christ
Church, New bungalow.
Built of stone. Living/Din-:

ILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LTD.

eee

ain

oe
Sawa = =>

Â¥ Me
he op

our range





of

Suiting, Specially Selected

warm weather.
REASONABLY PRICED

TAILORED TO PLEASE

Pee . hand injured and was taken to film is hum-drum and even ing room, 3 bedrooms, 2
The “Emeline” brought other 11. General Hospital. Bergman’s characterization — of bathrooms. 1 kitchen. All
cargo comprised of 400 bags ot eee rennin the selfish, fretful wife lacks mahogany doors, window e

charcoal, 91 tons of firewood aad
50 drums of cocoanut oil.



\
It has taken berth in the Car- The dri : ; rae a d vants’ room, own A.C. En- . ey ‘
3 i 4 eT rive for funds for the criptive and on the whole, good, rae r \ aoa i
eenage and ao to oer 8e its establishment of a Y.W.C.A. goes though it occasionally becomes gine: aes in one acre < ave e er 0 {
naman ia naan $043" 89 the total figure is now monotonous. "EN-DAH-WIN, Pine Hill. P. Ci; S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd. % r
ia New Bungalow.
The last amount collected was BBEVILLE GUEST 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay



Y.W.C.A. FUND GOES UP

$5.48 bv Mrs. A. A. Gibbons

The Weather

lepth and interest. at st
The background music is des-



MAIL NOTICES

Mails for ST. VINCENT and QUEBEC
by the $.S. “Aleoa Pioneer” will be closed
at . Cenervai Post Office as uncer






















wardrobes,
ser-

built-in
etc., ‘garage,

frames,
dressers,

HOUSE. Worthing, Furnish-
ed
DOVER, Christ Chure!
Building sites and acre
ROCKLEY. Near G





IN TAILORING

Tropical

S BOLTON LANE









pacar ay fae Seana MaDe era ee AER hme RT RT EES TIE EER
; 2
oe

Lime,

Sand,

Navy,

Pale Pink,

36 ins. wide. Per yd.

$I.



Sch. Frances W. Smith, M.V. Blue Star TO-DAY Parcel Mail at 6 a.m, Registered Mail at Course. Building sites
Se te ren, Sch, Laudalpha, Sch yer eahinis Mail at 830 a.m . < * 27 @e
Burin, De Sek, Lucile M. Smith, Sch Sun Rises: 5.50 a.m, § aim, uid Ordinary Mar _COVE SPRING HOUSE o °
Cyelorama a. Sch Gionia Menvietia, Sc. Sun Sets: 6.01 p.m. Mails £ CENT and TRINIDAD A Bh a
Mary E, Caroline, Sch. * ‘ cla, Moon (First Quarter): by the Patricia’ wt € 3, 00—
Sch. Phyllis Mark, H.M.S. Sparrow, Sch, . 4 | Post Office as un
Rosarene, M.V. Lady Patricia, 8.8. Alcoa September 18 a varcel Mail at.! 0p a Rigisterec:
Pioneer, M.V. Daerwood, Sch, Philip H Lighting: 6.00 p.m. Mail at 13 p.m. and Ordinary Mail at oe
Seyeeos ARRIVALS High Water: 8.00 a.m, | 2 p.m on the 19th September, 1950 a @Drereg
S.S. Canadian Cruiser, 3,935 tons net, 7.45 p.m, ier AMATEUR Able tit est a CY |
Capt. O'Hara, from Dominica, a aa aaa =~ 15.7 aN .
Schooner Emeline, 72 tons net, Capt YESTERDAY ASSOCi: LON
Clarke, from British Guiana Rainfall (Codrington) 13 of

BOXING — BOXING



In Touch With Barbados Matal £68 MOWAT 40; Yeater- BARD: i or 193502
Coast Station day: 2.93 ins, AT THE Prese

CABLE & WineL aes (West Indies) Temperature (Min,) 75.5 DIUM A BIG

Ltd, advise that they can now commu- deg. F. YANKEE STA i < Marke . a .
Neate with the following sbips through ; z INTERCOLONIAL , . .

thats Baruedoe Cosm, Siti Wind Direction (9 a.m.) acres Brera i The pores for Barbados’ Bonniest Baby of 1950 is
M.V. Prospector, SS. S icap, 8.8. E. a.m.) E.S.E. § ni “ i all * ‘

sagiust ve Svatanids eb. dusoe, ss Wind Velocity: 10 miles Championship Contest Cycle & Athlevic on, and mothers are-invited- to enter their babies for

Ranger, 8.S. Monte Ayala, S.S. Sp€cial-
, &.S. Junecrest S. Casablanca,
S. Buena Vista, S.S, Fortstephenson,





per hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.996



TUESDAY NIGHT
17th October, 1959

Sports Meeting



Barbados’ Bonniest Baby Contest of 1950.' Barbados’
Bonniest Babies are of course Cow & Gate Babies and

§ Britamsea, § Esso mie (11 a.m.) 29.995. at 8.00 p.m. At

8.8. Estero, S.S. Gascogne, S58 ro La : See . 7" e

bella, “MT, Barendrocht,” §.5. hate | Pe eS KENSINGTON OVAL}! this competition is open t6 all babies fed on Cow &
Fawley, SS. Lakonia, 5.8, Gulflight, nore - | . ‘

$8. Son Vieille, Mv. Aruba, 8.8 1.C.A. Service | RALPH BASSIN On Gate Milk Food, the Food of Royal Babies and the
Sionglen, S.S. Viggo Hansteen, §.5S. . ° e i Barbados Middleweight oO tober 2nd and 5th | i 7

Byfiord, S.S. Hecuba, §.S, Lady Rodney, Middleweight Champion ¢ ’ | Best Milk for Babies when Natural Feeding fails

S.8. Appalache, SS. Brazil/Wsbw. S.S S d a | Champion _ French ———_ °

Esso Avila, 8.8. Rockside, §.8,_ Sea uspende 160 West Indies Parnurm & Co. in action

» SS. Guifkey, 8.8. John Si












Thulin, SS. Sunwatt, SS
Ragnhild Brovig

Golfito

bound voyage to Montreal

12 ROUNDS 12













The twelve (12) leading babies will be selected by a Board of Judges for final juds-
ing.




The names of the selected twelve will appear in the “Sunday Advocate” of

‘San Mateo, $.S. Hestia, S.8 SATURDAY, September 23, will Semi-finals against Trinidad and

rickaree S. Capity Paul Lemerie, ; TO 7 ba . 8 F ja ‘
Se ie eia De Larinaga, $3. Dunstan, PE the last day T.C.A. will be) BELFIELD SAM British Guiana Aces. ENTRIES CLOSE ON SEPTEMBER 30. 1950
S.S. Christen Smith, §.S. Athenic/Gbls, operating ee eeroneey un- KID vs. i ening pinks)
S.S. Gerona, S/S. Montana/Ligs, S.S. til the completion of the new run- 126 6 : Saws FIRST PRIZE—The Cow and Gate Silver ¢

f 7 4 . Ss ; “ oe : “ : ss : . f Challenge Bowl to keep for one (1) year,
Alcos Pilgrim, 3.8. Bit ee an way at Seawell, Mr. Bill Stuart, Preliminaries Prices of maentesion | ’ a Silver Cup, and $2.00 in cash, presented by Cow & Gate, Lid. :
Poe sik cate a ik” Reaktion eda the Company’s Station Manager, VICTOR LEWIS 3/-, 2/6, 2/-, 1/- per day SECOND PRIZE—S10.00 and a Plated Silver Cup, presented by Cow & Gate, Ltd.
Langleegale, S.S. Scottish Musician, a Pp ;
Regent Leopard, 8.8. Rufina,S.8, Rinco told the “Advocate” yesterday . eee a pe a ah ae r ey ea : 5.00 and a Plated Silver Cup, presented by Cow & Gate and (9)
Gold Ranger, 8.8. Norse King, SS He said that arrangements had rices: Ringside $2.00, Bal- Contact | f RULES:
Eee Leo d 5.8 ang ee. Bin been made with British West In-| cony Sieh cage ne J. W. MAYNARD | 1 Au babive ment he under 2 yen of ase on October Sist, 1950,
Cadilinc, $.S. Georgios F. Andreadis, S.8, dian Airlines to carry T.C.A. Arena $1.00, Bleachers 48 Seeks Cavie Bodlaty, | A. postenrd See phatticaptt ot baby must be sent in together with 24 lids from
Schie, SS. Fort Townshend, §.S. Ciudad passengers to Trinidad for con- Promoter: pee aos th ‘ | & Parents agree to abide by the selections of the Special CoMmittee and the
De Caracas, S'S. Agatha, 8.8. C. G- jeetions with the T.C.A. north-| Mr, LUTHER FIELDS. | final judges.

|

They'll Do It Every Time wren tre By Jimmy Hatlo

Burt wuo is ir THAT THROWS THE?
MONKEY WRENCH EVERY TIME ©
BIGDOME! BIGDOME! BIGDOME! rau!radra:

= g=—, HOLDIT SWE !

Boss-o's PEP
TALKS STRESS
ONE THING
KNOW WHAT

YOU'RE GOING
TO DO—AND
Do iT!”
















COORD|








TRAVELING SALESMEN
MY FOOT! YOU DON'T

THINKING! TOO MUCH
WASTED EFFORT! PLAN
YOUR WORK, AND WORK
YOUR PLAN! MAKE A
SYSTEMATIC SCHEDULE
AND STICK TO IT! YOU,



NATE YOUR

aw Va liie

mena

Pa aes)
CLEVELAND
ee

ar ; =)
4 cHicAGo
al ee!



BEEN SOME CHANGES!
CANCEL YOUR TICKETS! |
BIGDOME'S GOT ANOTHER
, BRAIN STORM! HE ,
KX, WANTS YOU TO GO TO}

G







A's |
SCHOOL
TIME

PANAMA HATS
LINENS for UNIFORMS

Nevember 5th and the fimal judging will take place on Saturday, 18th November,

1950,

ENTRY FORM

J. B. LESLIE & CO,, LTD., Representative COW & GATE LTD.,
P.O, Box 216, Collins’ Building, Bridgetown,

I hereby enter my baby for Barbados’

nosteard size picture.

I certify that

enclose

COW & GATE Milk Food,

lids taken from

tee and Judzes

Baby's

Born on

Name



Bonniest Baby Contest, 1950, and enclose

is a Cow & Gate Baby, and I



tins of

THE COW & GATE SILVER CHALLENGE BOWL

If you are not yet using Cow & Gate for your Baby, don't

I agree to abide by the decision of the Special Commit-

delay. Get a tin from your nearest dealer and put baby on
COW & GATE Milk Food, the Best Milk for babies when

A \ | | Natural Fee@ing Fails. Cow & Gate Milk Pe
Ws NOME, AN cuT BACK I | MGR RCT ‘ ate od is free from
| 0 2 Bis SPeEsey ui iyr te ky 1s Weigh’
hh , ATH VALLEY UNDERWEAR - . . * WP pee eee all disease germs, including tubercle, dipthé?ia and typhoid.
~ encice ‘ ae PONS 6. ks eee eens
ANKLE SOCKS, Etc., Etc 3 Cow & Gate Food is safe because Cow & Gite roller process
Address



BOYS’ CAPS \
SHOES

SHIRTS

UNDERWEAR, Etc.

THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Hny. St Dial 3466



Signature

Date

{ Parent of Guardian



THIS IS YOUR ENTRY FORM—CUT IT OUT '



ensures that all disease germs are utterly destroyed whilst
the essential vitamins and valuable mineral salts which baby

needs to stow straight bones and develop strong teeth remain

intact.

THEY WILL BE WHAT YOU WANT THEM TO BE FED ON

|COW & GAT

THE BEST MILK FOR BABIES WHEN



MILK
FOOD

WHEN NATURAL FEEDING FAILS





-



S664 . 3
LOLI LOL LCCC PEL LESS






















——




PAGE 1

I'M.I. 1UII \! Sl'NDAV ADVOCATE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, lM III \i ri SPOTS miilry rcmiiitM^ut of EnRtuml GRENADA—The Land T HE I l I .. %  .. or air. Jf one arrives Of ten. Kit' .; %  % % %  %  < .-i.iu* %  %  Ml wall: Of Spice ii. .. (iMini oi:> places .10 teep ..* to bad of die MoriKOB %  (a beautiful building in 1801,) 'ii pewaw 'lory |Air %  luxury Ll l.i M:aln %  churrh'i il Muct from the livlll|{ m nf neighbourhood of ihe I .rand Etasg. Imuitii not in Antiicua, are erllielesi, it must be admitt**!, liner than those In Barbadov >;r. ( nd Arise, with Its Mnouth rlc *; eor *! • ">' %  to SI Oaf*.*!. The road .limb. T1 '. ,^* h ... ltl I" cr a %  > MM teet. with iiiamiiilienl UU T1 %  Tthoaa (a i can* KM, but in counter1 dance to the advantage of that immunity. sunVrs. all round the (.•astal belt, from malaria, no that mom of the houses are situated l.ijth up on the "lopes of the Mountain. Mount St Catherine, an old Volcano, has no left except some hot -nrlnie* and rarely makes it* l re.tence felt In a not very violent i irihqiiake md hill, pausing %  • tlini! i>f tree hm and Oysters *atcr :.,„1 nwilllcm vie* cro, with Us MIK cotton trees, to lura;'' T 'iit bathing cabins have been i utttriwd insultthe Hunk, Lcveru. OB the oniuntl Trees RUM SHOPS CLOSE ON ELECTION DAY I . n The Ii UW elfrumshop. will i public on Dectleri liar ber l. from 7 IJB ID I One 'Mitir imari gsMsUan to the nonngJ meal hour by • ftm %  >• business place to %  \ %  titled !u vol. The .anr such breach Ll $500 00 n To Studv Social Welfare rum Our Own Cfr n porn H a n t. GEORGETOWN. B.C Die Sukar Producers' Associalion ha:. self-cled nvo young me-i. I DClaol All and Clement D Pudm %  i. ..lv Social j W.'liare jn ihe U K They will I l.e leaving by th* C.N.S. Lady Kadney [,.r Trinidad where they i %  l] jmn the S."S Gaaeave. In he U K OH f wQ\ *pend a year Knur i ollete and the London School of Economics pursuing DUi*M in Y MCA and Social] welfare work O Hets skin ratify elcin O Banishes perspiration odour a -' lam body sweet and dainty S ._-\ 7 /^ Ou>makeniWp.lraiiiiiil.iirirrihai %£ fl/Z&it tAjm L g % SEYHS I CO. ITO. I ha* many aspects. Thi> ptltltUWll "I 1'" i.-semblw The n o)d Jap n „ e painting ol the old days and let! behind for build, :|! j ,.,.,.. fhg ttt) of ing purposes %  .. %  %  ... ; urnibles the M .. gggg4 (tab Hut the pndoiBlngJ only COTi f „,e island is of I Mountain* 1 emphasis,| town i.f :• ... la has t" offer in ; beauty (though it is a gi .lions of cocoa and nutr eg with rain forest ah' i awry direction, mile i>jon mHe of greenery so that twUlingi inountalnou3 Iblp to see i %  HlUlUl Mid thrillM ;it limt. this lends tt.-i %  dSBy .ii.i There are sheltered harbours for yachUnen and a trench rospitable welcome from the In: %  pendent and energetic inhabtAt Sauteurs the old Church unta manv of them boat builders i lock has the name of Its Franch rie De Ronde. Kick Em Jinny. %  ml the town ui Auxerre petty Martinique. Mousilque, remtndiim Cannouan, Bequta. the names one that Grenada was for a long ,ione should be a romantic innine French The way of l"e Is -t.ll 1'MIIIII Thacg l" no colour bar, the pcaBanl* speak patois, the maioiity of Ilia population Is Catholic, there Is a tradition of good food, the estate* have lYaaeb name* and the whole atoosphcru of the island has •inent to visit them Buzz! • story of Grenada is studded lumes of Grenadlans whose !us extended far beyond little Island. There is Chnstophe, th# only negro EutS SSjUi^S?* Emperor, tl 0 bedutilul l k fa, u>e wMa -i ...I...uatara and serwus minded ihera is Mr. Marryshow the Ti jdev .1 tfitanl viewthn! pro\'*'*ei. Charlestown in Nevisi. For Grenada can boast no BM Old uses like Barbados. All were burnt in the i tdon rebalUOD, i %  i , uttai tai i b sgOi add tha smaiiei . AMMII Union leader. Dr Morgan, present member of Parliament in England, Dnd -hush' Uriah Butler' Grenada boasts the only tunnel IB this part of the Caribbean. It rival right under the town of As a contrast to Barbados, the There are more be-sl. aim „ ... M George's and conDfctl the life and appearance of Grenada. [Tareanasss with the psplanaile H near (only 45 minutes by alrj r.uana, snakes (though no poison'^"'k the open •>. It was the >r t so far could not be more .,„n, .u. MHi.e, ,,I -rk Of Governor Send a II and s diking and B Wet, be the god there '"'" lo motor traffic which is plce of life, a visit to the IslaqsJ in mountains, well if one hj a very pielty s ( > tuMiikcv lnus ••"•d long detour arenadg Uei outside the < i Spices urvhile. ihould be well ww FIRST AID %  Av,v/rtv/.v.v//<*i vv*v/v*v/^.r.v>vv/'' L Acid Indigestion Alti Siltzif bungs iliasait nliat When a buss dnv and a hurried lunch add up to well-known acid indigestion, you want quick relief. Fortunately, First Aid for acid indigestion is just as well known. Drop one or two tablets of AlkaSeltter In a glnss of water. Watch it fixi. then drink it down. Sparkling, refreshing, brings you quick relief. Not a laxative. -Seltzer |. INC. Jljl *•<* %  !. INO U. V That's why — ""~"~———.^. / moro tons, the world over, are hauled on Goodyear giant tires ,i on any other make!' Fntion from our cxufrlvnci'ii Stud All Ivpes ol r'.iriius and Non-Ferrous FI.FCritODBfl %  vallUste vx stock "iiitrrisii OXYGEN" WFUHNCI AND CUTTING FQL'IPMFNT Wa inviiiyou to inapeet our slock of standard itrms. enquirtei will icceivr our immediate advice and attenlton. STAINI.FSS STEFL FABRICATIONS—"FIRTH BROWN" WE bava now In itoek STAINLESS STEEL SHUTS und are fully equipped to h mdle f:ibncjli> : Isi l'rl,c-t A FORD AMOLM 2nd MM I KAl.lir.n I SPEED ( v.'l.i: :r.i M| BOUH Tl DOS \r< H Drawlnji ta tak* plMt not lain ihan \n\ Mth ( IMO Xnclii....: mZPATRICK GRAHAM I I" Names Synonymous QUALITY & DURABILITY. M'l.t I.M.l.oll) PISTUNS I'KKKKCT CIRCLE PISTONS RINGS I.OIX.l: SPARKINC PLUGS I I Ki PI II i KHAKi: & CLUTCH LININGS ATLAS FORD & CHEVROLET PARTS ZENITH CARBURETTERS & PARTS FRAM OIL FILTERS I'VRENE FIRE EXTINGUISHERS TUNGSTONE BATTERIES SMITH ELECTRICAL I c|l II'MIN I WINGARD AUTO ACCESSORIES PEACOCK & BUCHANS PAINTS Ul'NLOr AUTO & CYCLE TYRES (Large Shipmriit Expected Shortly) >OUR CAR DESERVES THE BEST—INSIST ON REPLACEMENTS OK QUALITY We Carry Stocks of the Above for Popular Cars and Trucks. ECKSTEIN BROTHERS HAY SRKFT DIAL 4269 Vieeiwatieot^v^'Av.'-v. w-t-tt 'X^CAOM,I



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PAC.I 3D SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17. 1M Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809-1892) H> w (.1 >n > Mim .-IIMIOHL Lord Nc H-II >>ieugad U> "* •-" 1 -*' 1 i"-... <-• cv*i ul me Vk BM au> i*uei 1Ui •OsTOw, %  .. UM must dlsoI ,u "** rt *" n w*oljr a*%  -" • %  Ua ... |NM I nl mc IIl 1 "*LM 4D '"-' ***•" %  i .inu hi* uersoual* %  ^mwn'm. I ...i VMUII i.<.£iiii-*uvakiiig *l %  cci — DUJ He lull lOiiunanaUlg eiefciea HI .t.i%  Win taaM with lU noose laauuraa, UU, me^T lM?** loon in i.is OMp eve*—Uitw made 1 H um -'I'd naipvd u .-on n-*onu. H* UM yubhias •' irom hxa %  ni'K upon life and ..: ,. mo i.i araanss, uui lookW f?*. rnd i an More of this and— n.*— HEMINGWAY HAS HAD IT %  %  %  BIB BdwMd Cunaid's colle of Wat Indian prinu and litho*raphs is on special exhibition .i i the Museum for two weeks only These print* formed part of the collection of West Indian print! which was exhibited in the Art Gallery after its opening by H E., the Governor in July A* expected to creutthr result of repeated requests by of World War II. it it Erne M those woo were unable i„ vi-ii • the exhlbiUon. Sir Edward's collection has again been hung in the Art Gallery. With this fine collection of prints are shown a number of water colours from tin Carrington Wertheim col%  "*'£ %  J trig way, whose "Across the River and Into the TrW simultaneously n Hi America. The •rorld ha%  Waited : uviuly. believing that it m ght be wortr the *!iell beside TolWar and l "Ij Deborle" fore it com. I**** 0 V^mnied to the Museum last year. ^t the same .it:.' M bageui The Museum has recently been this WO*K. inanuM uOWD to mipresented with two showcases, prove gome ot hu •ariaw puMus one by Messtrs Da Costa & Co and u> write oincrs. lie was ucLtd.. and the other by Dr. II. itriniiHxl to strive witnuui ceasing llarcourt Carter. The** wasMaw to develop his poetic powers, ro, gm, ^ „,, means satisfy the hi* first for ten years "Hole decade he Uuuuieu, and Museum's need of more show" 1 cases, for it UII has in Ha store,u w u d rooms much material which it has "* Mill the most For Hemingway in lUndtM liv ng writei highest paid. (Hollywood gave 125.000 for one short -b.iv | Hi, i ken \ Iyean '. this l>oiik. tipped ">P job. nu and wriwr. '-In i Book of the Day kf WILLIAM i.ll.U I. miles behmd the Unas. With %  start ka la BBarti on eta t,i %  Hav.ng shot his mouth, the colonel Usssa his scirl and goes •ff to shoot duck He dies soon ACRID WIT There are glimpses of merit h .• eleg ac loveliness of Venter w.tucr A hint of the hideous • / % %  nd dm of war. and the pitv ; id anger the author felt A ti UCfl of send wii "Almost any I ar arrltl convincingly than the in m Who was there." says the colonel. Hemingway was there, with hi* alert senses and dare-all courage But instead of recreating what ::.,. %  aTVagi impact of buttle on the brain and I Ma Of living character-he baa I."'.' .settled for a man in a desolate girl-hungry mood, eking it out with h s old dumb-ox philosophy, and some of the worst writing he h:is ever signed. The Held Is wide open for that gieat war novel. London Express Service we arc apt to lotgtt that hal aieai J ulumw ll '"n^""* *"" "> "" rooms much material wnlcn it has, 0-orlri Wi.r II he" was far more !fS t^^^i^l^Si^^ T n U J!!. ble ,0 P a ^ on hlbl man. reporter. V-waSioTS ysj| M sUu ggle and Utter disTVSF*\ Taar^taSa. and U< cr ^ ng J *** •hortage lundi ^J^na n h e ail uppoiiitmeiit. Indeed, perhaps the ,-SM „^ "osssm asaa Arn ong the gifts received recently n ^p Caribbean he chasea i.waste? Hall most inlcgeting part of his ufe*^ r B **' %  "*" by the Museum have bee: story Is to be found uinoug thow: But m BOal pot forget another lotion of 18th and earl. early years when lie was quite MU *t av*tU in h UXe, h*; fell lu century spectacles presented uiutnown and only a few intimate lOV e, and became engaged u> be %  H Harcourr Carter, friends hsjd;.falth in his fulure a* married to a beautiful girl called P'* of black Wedgwood pottery it poet. fcioily Seilwood. And once again and samples of volcanic dust it was his fate io sullcr disappointfrom Miss B. Parkinson, and •* loetry seamad u. run m his man t. Alfred Tennyson was poor, self portrait by (Geoffrey Holder family. HAS father had been n is father had died and he fell the Trinidadian artist. S nler 0 ? 1 /er c *..! 0 wer i lwo ^ l*l-u '*nuii responsibuMtlea: his brothers*""— %  "*Alfred Tennyson ^ engagement had to be broken first ventured to publish some ol ufl From the lima of hu falling when Queen Victoria honoured BU worK when he was a mero „, i ove w nh Emily to the day him with a peerage it was emid .-venteen. not yet entere.i „|. efl „ becama possible for them the applause Of the whole British at CSmbridgp) lo marry, fourteen long years had nation. tty. Many poets, as they BO ie by and Tennyson was a man As he matured, his faith grew pass through i.v :n-i> ...u ,.,.,. | ly lnls ,„„,. n ),, M ^trollger. he liclieved in the spiryouth and enter upon mi-nhooti, v iiM.-n The rrlaresB, a long poein iiual evolution of a world thnt are filled with all kinds of i-evolin blank verse which rontalns moved onward to some divine %  Meals, and aie anxious f0 me of the loveliest lyrics he ever destination The deep sincerity of his mind shines as clearly through '*I' boats in his 40ft. cabin cruiser, lBtb aimed with high explosives and by b: zookas He flew on R A. T. ops. exom:.. Ho imvelsl's Jeep roared 60 miles ; %  lead of the ArrstTiun Army His aggressive loldieniiK with tin Maquis in occupied Paris led to a formal charge of msKi and the Bronze Star VIOLENCE works off his rage against the British and the brau-hau of all nations, while grumbling it) ben with his mistress. The scene is Venice. 1948 The colonel fought here in 1918, returnril afler UM aacOBd war h.-.vmg helped to liberate Paris and cross the Film.. rka ll |**t over 50, has had several wives, or.e a "warco", but no daughtei. Only drugs and dr nk keep the colonel going. At life's fag-end he wanLs to die here with his three loves: Venice, duck-shooting in the marshes, and Ins g rl. Sh*is a wealthy 18-year-olti conteesa, "shining in her youth and tall striding beauty 1 'I id ihv h.i beer Id. It is B rat-hand DUMMY i'. turn Uie world upside-down WTrtPi f„ r example the song he and put everytlunR right; but u.iininii Tannyst-N had a very different temperamentHe tendered deep"!*. .ui i** asl wiuit ihr: tne unhappiiiosji that ho %  mw in the world, but it was in BU in.itth uf progress tn-t h<>nad hopes of better things. He distrusted fanaticism and easy remedies for social ills. HU faith in iha ftttura vraa ff^nmltd upon the great traditions of the past Tan in..i MM >: ildler." he once t true. All his books ar r tvorts on brutal .iction i v olent death: 'A Farewell Arms" on his World War I. service In Italy (he still wears an aluminium kneecap as a result), •'••or whom the Bell Tolls." on c /il war guerrilla days In Spain. Kamc once again, nnd make nd the buttons of your uniform hurt me, but not too much", says this dream dummy. Writs Wrtet or Airmail for Fatherly Advice-Free A KEY POSITION.. FIRST CHOOSE YOUR CAREER FOR YOU Start training for it NOW! Thert it Hill 'oo' t the top lor tne lull* miaMed mst -so a fined for the ,o. YOU can be that man— &f awetslO!. ?roip#r. -h* your future uwwl—by studyrng it horae la yo-' P' '""•• S ided by tn psnonal ultHin ol The fenoea 'eje Dlune -il"* no di*l*'nca. WE MILL HELP YOU TO ACHIEVE YOU:? AMBITION Get r our Wt on tnt Itd4so* ueten TO-OAY. Write to Tne Bennett i o.llge and learn hew thouundi o( y e'pi HStl U ,<>•> •**• r ch ^ the top —in ths ri|hi juldi.'te A wsli-psld lob csn be your* -M*tt th. pssoaM *ere-tiin study NOW Direct Mail to DE^T. 188 The Bennett College SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 9 Even tu CsMdant u, ainbtidsjs Unueraiiy. ha waa known aa .. lather aloof figure. But those to %  i 'in he Are his friendship hud *'<> began his series of IdylU of n great lova and respect for him. ""U! P"c'm of love uiul war. And i tnoag his friends was the King, which lold ol the chivHaflum, Ban of the greut .iln.us deeds of King Arthur, an 1 in. The two young %  noeiit Kngltsh monarch, and hi* men hUrafcc niseperable; tiielc -'ught-s of the Round Table miimucyjgSad deep spiritual Tennyson's career was now wel fr.undati h believed in his work as his seniiltlveness and strength. Many people are to-day returning to the poetry of Tennyson and finding pleasure In iM melodic beauty and In his many thr haart, •* asutei to in< lrjVely portraits of the EmiiH ..... .i ih* hpp* Aut-nu, neid. countryside—a countryside seen And umikm* <>( the ds— uwi >r> no through his eyes In all the magu sson." 0 f dawn or the freshness of on Tcu.,.0,, . rn.de.Poe. L.UJJ^'f'TSJ? 'or' ^e" SAr SS heauty of winter moonlight Admirers called It lha hardestAnd he will ntwayri remain a great hitting prose of the centuryfigure in the history of the VicCritics sniffed at h a swaggennp torian era-a poet who praised all amid a welter of drink, lust, and that WM finest In the England b'ood. at characters who talked that he knew l "' sub-normal orang-outangs 1'hiv • %  %  i'i %  %  SHOPPING THE EASY WAi ,en,a i 'entre reate in succession to Wordi mid wrote his famous Ode on thr Death of the Dake of Welliaston. tin h was followed by Maud. GENEVA: A Oenva greendvanced. although he hud thirtyg mcer ^ feeling on top of the lie tiie fUtutBraatni of the other, three years atlll to live—years of Ii.illain vrn)boUi the uuplrar and triumph and of honour. On his the kliidlyyrilic nr the volume of marriage he had said that his wife poems Tasfa.vson published when "brought the peace of Ood into flinty-one and of his his life." and that peace *"" next boast ..f |MM*IHS hsued .. '•' Ith him into hU old age. Ait couple of years later. The recepM* later work shows his mastery lion of these works by lha prool the English Unguage. and his !" • haiXd\"iW^^ y fessltmal Critic*—and by the pub' c*t poelrv hri he*n uliai iaril ^ tmnn „,, wlfm^ i„. O WM a grievous disappoint the music of a great wuBsaiim • He ,_, man) t, the young poet. And then iis fellow countrymen respected [''^Xmg fnrT bought fll tickets in n lottery and went on holiday. On his return, he found that he had won a Stand 4-seater saloon. an electric washing machine and a large-size refrigerator. Going to collect his prizes he 'I wish we could be married and have five sons' the colonel said. 'So do I,' the girl said. And To report on this age of carnage, >wn( tnpfn tQ th€ nve cornera of I mingway invented a harah. the world/ nipped, aggressive style, strictly -4^ lhere flve corne rs to the iperv setl by early Mnntparnassr WO rld" f lends Gertrude Stein and B ., ,,,,„., kn0Wi ^ h e ta:d. It sounded as though there weixwhen I said It. And now we are having fun again, aren't we?' 'Yes, Daughter.' the colonel said." (He had always wanted a daughter > This sleazy couple maudlin back and forth between Harry's Bar and the Grlltl Hotel, she hang ng on his opinions of "our British cousins, who could not light their way out of g wet tissue-towel." Of Montgomery, spat upon us a tardy show-off. Bedell Smith is a high-pressure talesman," Leclcrc -another Jerk of the third or fourth water." the U. S Government "the dregs you find n the bottom of beer-glasses." Ordy Rommel is admired. And %  \\t mull '.1.. focti, men, 11 Ava wsrth tin increase— IT do "< admit ins cinema i->i. tiuruur t drtlnauctwv onj J'can Gets Police Medal h.-hind the hairs on your chest. Hem ngway! We know you" And now what should have been tho explo-i'->n Of a literary howitzer goes off with a dismal phut His new book Is about as bad a: it could be. i|. .ti'way takes as hero a war-battered colonel, and wr tes him Into a petrified and utterly unreal love story which looks like nn embarrass In 11 hu-ik of wishful thinking. tame an ,-vent that "was to darken im for his loftiness of purpose (VS .l.d the nnhiltly of his mind. And villa as flrat prlw. looking for a lottery with a War only gets nto the book at the P. B.I., sent in thousand: second-hand, when this sour bear needless death by ignorant brutes LONDON Sept. 15 Sgt Rudolph Brown (III) s are all preparing to give them-a heart? welcome In OAY FASHION PARAIli: The Hey* ga)ffl CMHI account of themselves In the Mothei (UUIIUI; 1 ml nr mad in show our apprrrl spleadht performance by greeting them t the Eayest and most attractive ontftt N. E. WII SOS A Co. .Anticipated IhK bla romlns. event and ordered the di inileti.il .tint •lute*., ti.iiidlni:-. .ind ntlier .uirnsorirs lu h on lime. Wr are prend to tell you that they are here, and now on display In oar store. POI LADBSl Wandersllk plaids in 30 rilRrrrnl rolsur Im 36" wldr si SI 46 per >ard and a bis variety of irther 1 aniertal irom m t SZ.25 per yard Amerti-an and tsnsdian Khoes m ail rolours Includlua udd, silver and llsard-skin with handbaas to match Itli: (ilNlllMFN: He offer salting S* 1 wldi SJ.IS In SI0.00 per yard and shirts of sll drsriiplloai IIKIUIIIIIK GAY sports shlrU Flashy ties and shoes by the besl makem In the world Inrludkni the popular Mwrruln. JOIll in the tier line lo !N JaL. V% ll.%iP.^ The In.ii-r well known for new aoodn. II SWAN STREET. :o: For my type of work ELSWICK CYCLES NOW IN STOCK GENTS' ROADSTERS GENTS' SPORTS < ISi# ar TERMS. CHARLES Mr ENEARNEY & CO., LTD. says the cane cutter CECILE AUBRY JACK HAWKINS • HATHAWAY .-... i OUISD. Ll G HTON j. CARlBBhAIS PREMIERE—TO-DAY and ContinuinA EMPIRE THEATRE &f •• &f&f&f •• aaoaaaaaaaaaaaa . I've ben wearing TUTsJU -Irill for years now, and I kmm from experienei' there'nothing like il for real hard wear. It stands up lo anyIIHIILv.i-ln MI!I ami keep, il-mart appearance. nitki 1a Toulul product — that's why it's so reliuble. W hen you bat HHKA, you buy a cloth that rarries the famnuTtMttal t.n 1. nter i.t ait laetion . proof tint it will give you full \alue ami last 11. kcrvieC *-!.<>uld di--ati*fartiun arise through any defect v hot soever in the im.l.fiiil. 1'o:al will replace it or refund the price and pay the ci>*t iiiiut.il in milking trn. rfc 01) %  dviM and tr> TfTAEA for yourself. You'll need 09 I" 1 1 %  %  >: t" rhooaa it a second time %  %  .** TUTAKA



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* %  aatay Srplrnbrr 1SJ0 ^unibau a&uwate six s vrs Trjg J Vrnr ,, FALL OF SEOUL BECOMES IMMINENT 90 Independents In Trinidad's Elections Tomorrow 141 Contest 18 Seats (From Our Own Correspondent) PORT-OF-SPA1N. 'pill COLONY nf Trinidad and Tobago will make an iflUtortant step forward in its political history, when tonwawW (Monday. September X)). polling will lake place bj the vital (ieneral Klei •.:. ns lo be held under the new Const I tut Ion. There are 141 candidates for the 18 confuted seals. Of these, 90 are Independents. !;,. Butler Party has put forward 18 candidates: the Ca-'LVean Socialist Party 13; the Trinidad Labour Party 12; ths Trade Union Ccunctl 6; and the Political Progress Group (a business organisation) Mr Tubal U Butle. leads hi* wn party. The Caribbean SocialPaddled 550 Miles To Rome ROME, Sept. 14. Twelve Spanish University students paddled up the river Tiber by canoe to-day at the end of i SM^nik pilgrim voyage to Rome, Carrying the.r three canoes on their shoulders, the 12 bronied young athlete* were being rei-ehred in audience by Pope Pius XII tonight in Sain! Peters Basilica. Later they will have a private audience with the Pope to present Mm with miniature sUver oars In memory of their Holy voyage which started Just a month ago at Palm;. Di Maiorca, Spain. —Kculrr Volcano Eruptions Kill 62; 17 Injured MANILA. Philippines, Sept 16 A Red Croat worker reported to-day that 62 people were dead, 17 critically injured and many missing from increasingly violent volcanic eruptions on Namlguln %  aland, north of Mindanao. Eruptions from Hibokslbok volcano started last week but were tc-day increasing In intensity A parish piles, and the Jesuit father Arthur Shea were leading emergency workers. Father Shea of New York has been in the Mindanao area over 10 years. He spent the Japanese occupation years with guerilla 1 bi*nds. Czechs Sentence 3 More To Death PRAGUE, Sapt. 16 Czechoslovakia's Supreme Court rejecting appeals lodged by SO defendants in the mass spy trial : eld in July, to-day passed three new death sentences on people I reviously sentenced to life im priaonment. Other sentences passed by lesser State Courts in July were confirmed or increasedSentences passed to-dav by the Supreme Court in Prague to appellant* alter four days of prot endings, ranged from 18 months to 20 years hard labour. Another mass spy trial of 27 Czechoslovaks which began on September 12. is expected to end on Monday —Renter. cK Solomon, an outgoing member i>t the Lrgislat ve Council while t'te Trinidad Labour Part* la headed by Mr. Raymond Hamcl Smith, a young Port-of-Spa in iat-law The Political Progress Group are supporting Mr. A'bert Gomes. (North Portof-Spain.) and Mr Edwin Duval, businessman (St. George West). The campaign has been carried illi great Intensity and heat. There have been snao > disorderly meetings, and candidates have been t tucked, in many caaes beig pelted with rotten eggs. awan Mr ttutler himself has not escaped, and a number of his maa/lntl met with very strong pat Itian particu arly in North Trin-dad. Even steel band.* were <:ipl< .d by certain of the candkutcg to "drown" the voices of t elr opponents. This led to an announcement by the Steel Band ation calling on their mem* bers to desist from such practices. Si-ire then, steel bands have been npuvrd less frequently. Will Gome* Get In? Am •• st the more interesting n.< U are those of North Portof-Spain. where Gomes la being opposed by Labour Party Leadu. Hamel-Smith and several others; San Fernando, where the Mayur, Mr. Roy Joseph, i. being seriously haUenged by Dr. E. A. Lee, of he Socialist Party, and others; St. Patrick WosL, wheie Mr. Butler laces strong opposition from Mr Ralph Mentor (T.U.C. Candidate and well known Trade Uaionlsl; id PorV-of-Spain South, where the Mayoi, Alderman Tang opposes Dr Solomon. Party politics in Trinidad are still in their infancy. It is believed that no one party will be able to dominate the new Legislature. The set-up In the new Council will be as follows There will be 26 members and the Speaker (Mr. W. L. J. Savary). There will probably be a soud Oovammant bloc of eight members — five to bo nominated by the Governor, and three official members. It is believed that many of the IP contested seats will be won by Independents, and that none of the parties will return sufficient member* to take the lead In th House, so to speak. Therefore. In all likelihood. Trinidad's new Legislative Council will be composed of the solid Government bloc of eight, which will probably be supported in all important matters by several of the elected members, and the others, who will lorm the Opposition. a> nn pise S %  OM AT TIIK %  : %  XIIIIISO-N Reds Will Be Cut A MEMBER of th Barbados Pole Club baa tlic bail for blaiself nadoes met in the initial Saturday evening praties chnkk**. t the Oarrlsen * Cyclo-iei and Toi FRENCH SHIP SINKS IN THREE MINUTES ST MALO. France. Sept 16. FORTY-NINE MEN were still un-accounted for this afternoon nearly 17 hours after the French weather-ship Laplace struck a magnetic mine and sank in three minutes off Brittany. f ^hing bo-ta and pleature craft lad picked up the 43 men while Ban On Catholic Printing Press BERLIN, Sept. 16 The East German Ministry of Information has refused a Mao,000 Soviet Zone Roman Catholics permission to have their own Catholic printing press in Leipzig. West Berlin Catholic sources re^There had been I ban on Catholic establishments in the Zone for live years Original negotiations to obtain a licence for the Benno" Catholic printing works in Leipzig were earned on by tnc Berlin Bishopric at first w th Soviet authoriUes and later with German officials. They were discontinued baeaUM Bishops seat is in West B*rFurther talks betweeniCWjsj%  Ijnjgg hovered above scouring the sea for other rafts and survivor* Unconfirmed reporta aald that 13 bodies hnd been recovered The Navv Ministry in Paris said that there were 92 men on board the Laplace including the crew and officers and officials of the French Meteorological Institute. The Laplaie was returning from a 21-day match in the thick of a mid-Atlantic storm when Captain Remusat decided last night on arriving before St. Malo that it was too late to enter the harbour He dropped anchor a few miles out and treated his crew to a cinema show on board. Quarter-Master Celton told the rescuers when picked up by a St. Malo tugboat this morning *rter drifting all night on a raft f-at the whole of the crew except ,-nlthe watch had gone to bed when We officials and the East C-erman ^ ^^ a .. lrrrlhI „ A, r m"nt distribution of any stroke of thunder Al !^ „?/,',Tfftrhidden In the When he came on deck the 76,500 Strike In London BUSIS HELD UP LONlXJN. Sept lb Over half of Lonuoi. s inoloi buse* were today ited up by Uio unofficial -strike which Labour Minister George Isaacaeacrlbaa yesterday as Communmt-lcd aim part of a plot to disrupt ihu nation's Industrie* About 16.500 drivers and conductors were on strike, keeping over 3.000 vehicles Idle, but tho men at 24 of London's 52 bus garages voted to stay at work. Arthur Deakin. Secretary of the 1.300.000 member Transport Workers' Union, was meeting workers' delegates to-day Electric tram men became involved at midnight Over l.ooo decided to join the strike Workers' representatives yesterday elected a btrtke committee to prea* claims for belter pay ami no more recruitment of women conductors. The strikers also demanded a meeting with their Union'* Fln'ince Committee on Moodaj I 'consider their appli ation for a *l per week increase in pay. This claim, which was made last vear. has been refused by the Union executive The nre-^n' weeklv wages are between Ci and £7 About flOO maintenance engineers at Ove ess works In the Lon Ion area stonned work to-.in tl n-e wan* claim* P,M sunnlte* were nn* cx-ictc' <<* he affected during the weekend Reoter. Pope Ordered To Be Silent CASTXL GANDOLFO. ITALY. Sept 16 Pope Pius XII. who has probably spoken lo more of the public than any other sovereign in the world, was today ordered by his doctors to keep absolute silence for the next few days He wa> suffering from a rhroal infection brought on by a cold All audiences at Castcl GanPulfo were temporarily cancelled The Pope receh ed only officials of ihe Vatican this morning reviewing the business of the dav with them without speaking. A; tonight's Mass to an audience of 3.000 pilgrims In Saint Peter's Basilica in Rome, the Pope will not give his usual address. but will *imply make the sign of the Cross from his throne over the crowds In a silent blessing Reuler Spain Will Mobilise 44 Divisions To Defend W. Europe Against Russian Attack HE1DELBBKU, Sept. 16 A GROUP ol high-ranking Spanish Army oAoeri declared here to-night that Spain was prepared lo mobilise M divisions within Mi hours for the common defence ol Western Europe ftgainsi the Russian attack They said Spain now had 22 division;, under ;.i ing, bi not all were up to strength and Spain was short "I mi mar J equipment, "Our tiainlng Is good and the [only thing wr nMfl i* nk .ina.o Mr S. Mr. M. a Mr. J A Hake* A Mm. W. T. 1.14. • %  \J>. -i> Ca %  • %  MiJ OIIUiu %  r„. Missal lj|) M. i J Huil-n II HirtMsn InnlM Mr v | J CarHr i' M end Mr % MrVarnon KnlgM Hi I g, DanWI %  I i A William. M K II I..-. alch the United States Arms'* ju'umn manoeuvrts, Bsierelac %  '111 .'"SUK Dapuly thief of the Spanish Army'* Concrnl StJilT. Ueutanant CoaotMl Leaar Martin Alonso. Ucutenanl Colonel Luis Qarcla Itollain (who acted as interpreter), and Ma)m Tom.* I> Llniers Pldal Kmphatuaing that i h %  j "" %  prnklug purely as tin it ajai were not attrmntinR to fnrc%  ii'i the trend tf poUttcal developments involving St>:iln and othal Buropeau count nV lb> offlceis declared that il • can • %  i memU'i of the Atlniitu Pat t it would "s-i 'i ril %  • oblittatinns ur.der the Pact" £800,000 Stiil WantedforButlin's LONDON. Sept 1 It iunderstood that the threo [.reference shareholders who wei api>oiiited at a n-cent inform meeting of Butlin's (Bahamas* to examine the possibility of raising the £ 800,00(1 needed to prev the company going into liquidation, held their drat meeting yesterday but failed to rench •nti'fartory conclusion thi athoiic organ is forbidden in the A?#irSn* and joumaU are ,istributed personally by intiaamsaar or Individual prte*tr Wheit bridge v H % %  ..'.. %  came is already .ashed hn< under water into the se^. -Heuter Celton said: "1 found myself swimming in black oil Two rafts had been thrown from derk and 1 took charge of one. The wind pushed us out to sea. The waves were getting higher and higher The raft capsized at least 10 times. The..were 12 men on it "The sailors kept the bodies cf whose body was cremated in Jotfleir dead comrades until they htnnrsburg yesterday, will be were rescued by the tugboat Bu'%  d at a small informal j the tugboat was already overloadgathering on their farm at Irene) ed. Three bodies had to be left on near Pretoria, till son Jannle, said the raft which drifted out again." to-day — Keater — Renter Will Scatter Smuts* Aghet? On Farm PRETORIA. Sept Hi The a.hei of General BgnUtl "Surrender Or Die" MACARTHUR TELLS RED5 WASR1NG1 hept Ifl %  oallao uu North Kor. surrender o> die," aecofdaag to i '.. %  %  i"irters a. • %  ling tuMOIMNKI K .>:!< %  •* calling i N rtj] K, reai SoMtan '• ill I Cl-ll druppaI th*. Commu ist m on .ill fronts km* northward U at lha Brit ish baeke I otti naive out <>f lha tc orOM the Naktii'ifc llva ,im! ultininloly M .. s to the aorth 0 MaeArt.uir. brioflnt, Ua way a Inanon where he u dUcuogop*ratlous J-aid that he i hose Seoul botauac It was ttie heart great In Spain and the> .joffed at the notion thai Spall felt i*ecure "Iwhind the Pyn w Reuler 675,000 Watch Aii* Force Display LOMXiN, Sepl 16 A total of 675.000 people visited 6B Koyal Air Force stations which %  ir,mc" to nark lha Tenth ry of the hattlc of Urttain. The weatlu-r at many stations was unfavourable with blustery wind* and rain, bttl b ii'Stancea did this Inlerfen with |he riving programme* lte.lt. Election Candidutt Injured Collar Bone POltT-dr-SPAIN Mr larmrn T—luehatngh, prominent Indian proprietor, and a; mt-mber of the Legislative Council for many years, suffered injury to his right collar bone, after a fall, and had to lie taken to hospital at Couva. Mr Teeluckm'h .testing the South Carrml U.S. Has File Of Pro-Red Germans BERG aap" 1" •i (1 i nil ^'"y h *' rompletad H pl" to arrest •<< .1 •rmpathjiara among lha •,.: nan civilian pnpuiatiot In the Amw /. %  i.i Civil Affairs Stan" Uv Amaru n %  ^. i %  i %  The officer added We I prettv g-ood i n aU these peoaj iniinde-l up QUlt kly r i ver since Ition m Germain I iwrnmant iffli.i 1 ,itt th< H ,, iplltni I i nrin su %  •..len.-i' "'" The Mi wa built %  %  .., Afnatw %  > %  The Armv'i Civil Affairs ae •vacua oeruw I l< am I* hntetai i %  i.med. arould i>h i onVtala In importa i Lost ttnh rjrl ipwred naid that the Unite %  • Ril I %  ulhortdoa and lul /-one Communisl ladari i axteti ive dopier on U* i ri Germann from Governmental figures to nhlclala %  '' the smallest vlllage nan lend. inwaani I disappetii ware %  Husslana In Two TOKYO. 8*pt 16. VJEOUL IS expeciod to fall over the week end to powerful United Nations forces quickly fan ninit out and exploring the Inchon bridgehead. With the recapture of the South K capital, the U.N. Forces will have the death grip on Communist communications between the battle front and the re*r. At the same time the newly launched often sie out of the Pusan defence square which swept forward up to three niiks today tOWSTdl Waegwan %  threatens to slice Communist armies in hall. The United Netlone' Spearheed from Ineho head pushed into the outskirts of Seoul today, INKorean General Staff announced. DamtlebM from the front said they were OVet .. from the centre ol the South 'Korean capital wWel run to Communist lorcei more than t %  „ .dv.m-e ,.. Ik. .pearcan. tl, m-i, I %  Othfl i Just I head, lighter i.mil .*i hea\ iK .tl 'ked Comtniims' n mf stem the rush on the \i \' i lit It town which IS miles from Seit tas also taken and Uinti Ightei planes were alicady opetiUng from th.-i. united Nations troop* have oeupicd the Viuigtonpo, wanl "I Seoul il :> n in Ineiil time an SaUuU>. *.-idiiui to tertaUi Korean t lenei at lleRdtniarter.conununlujue broadcast by PHU radirr i itni i United Nations troops had iiiMtcd the Han Rivet, advancing U wards the heart of Seoul. I ho ri>iiiimiiil<|iit added Landing At Inchon ACcnti.d M.icAitliui lorre. punhed on from the beachhead i. 'day tii Iraahon, .tier United N..it-ins troops -ii.ashed their way out of their onattietod defanea boa on the OUthaast tin eninsula iteuti'i' arn f> lanl Lionel i:tid-i.n quotad lha Arnarleai %  pofcaaman on the Tnofu tronl M saving "We will CTOai the Naktnnu ;md we are KoinR north Then objective wan %  lea Beoul l link up win. Ihe In hon oflensive. Oenaral Mac Arthur* MeadQuarters here said that the Inchon landings under the guns of AmeriAqatrallan, New Eaalai South Korean warships t'*k the Communlati by surpn %  to act then fonts Into Ihe an north and south, but tlichtwere intercept mt; and rnaullng ihem several) Ma wd American .irtillciv rained shells on the I'nmmum-t Division to the north p| tattled T.ieiiu. while tank con %  otntraUan d I nj lha drtva IH %  ...van. U.S. Armada Attacks in th. South, United M Dnftaion Marted anothai l.-l J bjl%  I' port unpawlbla Relaforcei ienta clock-work-like' American marine and Infantry landings al Inchon went ashore at the west toast beach on nee early m a iadn g tide to-day from the Invasion of an armada of 260 ships. Today's drive northwest of Taegu was made in three thrusts headed toward W.u Anu'iiciii atafht inch guns blasted away at the CotnmunM %  •trong points lor ten minute* beInai "• %  l"K* W-man An ti aif Soath X jelned forces for the Wa to break through the Communist 1 grip on •lie defence (iei-i meter Heavy ruins fallm.: Ihroujhout the battle area mad*. difficult on slippery roads and hillsides, IHII Americ.ii %  << ntiime an pi an mm. despite the !-'k of .di support —Restrr. fat for the forthfomlng eleetn Foreign Ministers Discuss Defence of Western Europe Shaw Is "Comfortable" LUTON, Bedfordshire. Sept It. George Bernard Shaw {94 > suflenn* from a broken thigh bone, was today stated to be "comfortable and cheerful The hospital where he is detained here said that there had been i ration in the playwright's condi lion since yesterday Doctors were issuing bulletins us Shtw Insbits on listening to news broadcasts Shaw broke his thigh when he fell in his garden. NEW YORK. Sept lfl %  -arylng degrees is held by other defence by niters yesterd The 12 Foregu Mintstera of th" European members of thCounand '-day. •^'<'>'^ •* •, ur North Atlantic Cou> 1 llks. laSM c *< !" n ,nc ^ lr '" Smo^ffn^ houn^I Thi* duality ooa-J followed th. patter., morning the problem of the daure to see the lines of defence In Acheson In his opening sun Mnoa Of Western Europe Western Europe extended as f-ir yeneniay. The meeting was dominated by east as possible, ah ch would InMis main argum-volve the employment of as much lieved to LtavO l*-n tnat manpower as can be available orHer to defend as large an ar Ol W.stern Europe as possible. On the other hand, there is u necessary to mobilise a msi Minister was" understood the psychological relucta n ce Of mum of manpower ai .anErehcnslve European countries to a revival without delay a long; French statement on Western defence and Germany's par %  tiripat on in tt it..h.ti Schumin French Foreign to havi tally detailed re0* German inlilaM The Integration ol view of tin Sehuman was understood t, H OI1 honoural't Dean Ach.-sun 'tmtert States Sechave stressed that the integration terms, would mean that a greatci f Slate W German forc->. would In any, arra could he Included In UM Sehuman was believed to have ease first Involve %  | Ian of Ira revealed clearlv *he duality of the with the German Q ..ropoed unified North AtlanjiPTenoh point ol view which In The review of Western European Command — heater K. W. V. WINES TO-DAV, as a result of expert scientific cultivation Of I In(.rape, by employriirnl of nmdern DWtl caro and by scrutiny exercised by the (iuvernmen! COOcerned, K.W.V. Wines rank with UM Unosi thai Buropa can prmluce An imptirtant puint to ri'member is that because of Preferential Duty rales K W V. Wines enter the Colony at a lower duty ttwts is imposed on foreign winea—You pay much less., therefore for K W V. Wines -an advantage in Ihese day; of High Coals— K W V. PAARL TAWNY, a delicious |Krl type win. K W.V Cape Dry Red (Claret). I wonderful tonfc also K.W.V. Dry and Swael VMniOUttM K W V Slicrry No I. Very old. extra Dry KWV Amontillado Sherry K W.V. Kimberlcy Club Sherry K.W.V SAUV1CNON BLANC, a table wine you will enjoy K.W.V. Paarlita Cocktail, ready-mixed, raayj serving if chilled itniwn K. u. v. . % %  :r THE III SI FOII I I ss



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SVVDAY. SEPTEMBER IT, IN* SUNDAY ADVOCATE PACE III \i \ SAMUEL PALMER HirvMt Moon" IMhm (hi I'aintinv 01 panel. ut h I..: i iavc the look of loimues of fork%  pBMj "i Ol sharp molehill* Into cnuM ihapM u. uper-imposed lines of dra*dn Indicating conuurs. But this flat aspect of his , the foreground Is Ejects large; the middledistance is indicated by objects of diminished scale and deflnitencss: the background is remote and its forms generalized. There is an abitnea of that euual emphasis whu-h a Bonnnrd or a Cezanne gave to everything within the visual Arid Interesting Yet in spite of plastic weaknesses Sutherland is one of the most interesting painters now living And In England his influence ha-, been considerahh' especially upon siK'h able (hut youiujar) painters as John Minion. Keith Viiughan. Joan Craxtmi any Bryan Wynlei Sutherland's contemporary. John Piper (extei -IH'IN Quoted above). 1. equally a Romantic painter; in his case Turner has provided more Inspiration than Palmer But I think It is clear now that the younger members of this group aie tending to discard the linear methods of Palmer and Sutherland for the more plastic approach of the modern French masters. These young Romantics (Mintbn. Vaughan, Wynter. Craxton) average ngc 32 perhaps, are thus tending to fall more Into line Srttil tl.ose of their exact contemporBi>es (MaeBryde. Colquhouo, ityan) who were never lured by Palmer, and who never WttWM in their allegiance to the great contemporary painters of France. Nevertheless this does not mean that the young School of London is likely to lose its flavour. Though v-c derive much of our idiom from Paris, it is likely thav our own flavour will become more and more pronounced. And. of course, i ur characteristic preoccupation uith landscape continues, even among those whose debt to Jtraque of Picasso is obvious. ONE DOSE Relieves PAIN After Meals If yoe. suffer from In.l.gwaoor. with IU pain. discomfort, flatulence. nausea sod beanburn — let ooe dote of \i V I I \N BRAND STOMACH POWDER bring you rcbefl But be sure you fc* genuine MACLKAN BRAND slOMACH POWDER hcaitng the *ignalu(r • .M-fcX. C MACXhAN\ of this famous remedy For rt-lity from %  %  ASTHMA one small tablet acts t/ukk/v and effectively Klastoplast lllll AID oimiNOi j Vti' \ S 'T'HE Hphasonc ircauneni lor Atthni y^a'i'/ simple, so qui k, su effective All >ou du U \N; %  \ / iwsllow ooc anal! iiblrt. sod relief suns almost ^^^jS unim-JiaicIv Kp! MM contaBis several IK. ling Tr/ agents which arc released on reaching the siccuach and iiuri n JiMtilvr the genn-Udi'i aorumulalMMU whi.h tuir.cu the brumhial lubes ITm scientifically balanced pecs**! ikm brings the bo>m of .—> breathing, and has the additional Jvamage of laleguardnig (he mind finm ihc dread of those Bad ten nctvo-racking onslaught! I H N %  nothing lo lest when Hpli zone tablcli are l hand There %  MCM|| o iniect. no h -g lo inhale liphasone his MHM in cases of Asilinu, Bl MBSMJ -"id Hi..ulnal Catarrh %  uuli SMVastat* wemed Ih-pelc What u has done for others. u SJSJ d-K>r JOB: FOR ASTHMA ANO BR XHITIS TAKE CDGEF. H>. NEXT year the moon will be on the telephone. Visitors to the South Bank Exhibition in London—the main centre of the Festival of lintain 1951—will be able to send a message there and back across 477,720 miles of space in Jut two and a half seconds. And It will be as simple as making a local call In a telephone booth. Contact with the moon will be made from the Dome of Discoveiy. The caller will press a button and send a radio pulse of high frequency flashing into space. It will have a wavelength of one and a half metres and It will be passed from 'a giant saucer made of a network of aluminium which Is to be built on the top of a tower in the grounds of the Exhibition on the south bank of the Thames. The visitor who sends .the signal will watch Its progress In a large cathode ray tube, like those used in television, In the Dome of Discovery. When the signal comes bouncing back from the moon the Image In the tube will give a little "kick". A supplementary tube will enable this echo to be magnified Those who ring up the moon will not have to fumble for coins It will be a free call. Usable Night and Day The radio telescope now being built for the Exhibition will be usable at any time, astronomers will not have to wait until it is dark before they train this telescope on the heavenly body they wish to study. Even when that body Is invisible the radio telescope will still receive these echoes reflected from outer space, and by studying them astronomers believe they will be able to learn Ringing Up The Moon 0 7 UEOI I III \ Ml IIIIAY THEeAMBOJg DOW facts about the composition cf stars and planets and meteors. I gave up a morning recently to walking over the Exhibition site Thrilling new patterns formed by ribbons of steel are row criss-crossed against the sky. These buildings, nearly 40 of them, by the time they are completed next May will burst upon our eyes as strangely, I believe M a lunar landscape. The Dome of Discovery is one of these structures, its framework is almost In place. A ring of girders, 303 feet in diameter, now hangs In the air Bo feet above one's head. This ring rests on temporary towers of metal scaffolding, but already lattices of steel ribs, surprisingly slender, are tying It to the concrete flns that are eventually to take the weight. Soon the work of roofing with aluminium will begin. In this building the story will be told of those Britons who have mapped the globe, studied the sky and investigated the structure of the universe. Spinning Steel Webs Few acrobats can put on an act half so thrilling as the spidermen clambering in and out of tiic steel webs they are spinning scores of feel above the 27-acre Mte A chalk mark scrawled on a steel plank. Is all the direction they need. And lying on the K round is something that looks like part of a prefabricated stalrTWT MAKES tls ANO war PH*: twoomm. OHR I K>*w iOU ssuUMT WIN 30 MWT ffOCT fOoa COUPON case. Presently someone will come, along and move It into place. A coal mine is being built on this site. A miniature of the Exhibition's predecessor, the UiSl venture, is being created. An aquarium Is being Installed, and a new concert hall for London, to hold audiences of 3,450, rniK its final shape. Fronting the site is the new River Wall which will be kikl out next spring as a garden walk, last this the lively pageantry of London's river parades endlessly The 1951 Festival is not planned to be a trade fair. It Is neither an abridgement nor an extension of the British Industries Fair, a motor show with trimmings, nor a fun-fair version of the British Museum. It will tell Die story of every Briton—the work they do, the way they think, and even the games they play. Nine million pounds sterling being spent on this venture Of this sum £2,000,000 Is earmarked for the new concert-hall the one building which It is Intended shall be a permanent structure The Story of Britain The Exhibition sets out to tell tiie story of Britain—of her farming and the countryside, of the sea and her ships, of power and production, science and transport, radar and gardening. Soon there will begin to arise amid the cluster of buildings on the site some of those strange new objects I mentioned earlier. For Instance, hung on frames will be spheres like flying saucers caught in a net. And pointing skywards, like a colossal rocket about to be f,red, will be the metal pencil called the Vertical Feature The purpose of these things is to break up the horizontal planes of the other structures and so diversify their distant view. Some iiors may think, at first, that they are being transported to the moon as well as invited to ring it up. Hut in these modernistic buildings the visitor will see the achievements of British aci< technology, farming and Industry 'My fever's gone ... I took GENASPRIN" 'GsNAsniM'—the sale brand of aspirin — aaifi/y helps to break a revet, and a*r*<> checks Headaches. NeuialsSa, T.xHhaeaa, Nerve and Rheumatic Paast, Colds sod 'Hit At aev iiros of tarsia or pain. *Oanasprin' an you ta/ougfa I SsUby m* ChtmUu. Drug* iUM. #fr rt4aaaftarf> Ht.iui\, WH /i/frJ up my ileepmg ryes, n,i Jill14 mv MVl wifi bfljtlfj wif* .1 lock." JOHN MASEFIMLD $ttcrf} / )o B.O.A.C. TAKKS GOOD C4HK Or YOU Rook ihr. nyh tmur local BO.AC. Appointed -tn.-'if u'ho mokes no chart),for advice, information or bookinos bu "SpeedWrd" lo ol' six ''onlinenls ir ,-*~ IFLY-BOAC BRI TISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORP. BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIMITED Bride KM ICE CBEAM — MIX—Tin, I'KAKR I'KAC 1IE9 PINE APPLE SPAHIIETTI CHERRIES —Bow. KETCHl'P MANOOECHUTNEY ( IK'KTAIL ONIONS TOMATO SAfTCK CHICKEN HADDIES —Tin, ASTD. BISCtTTS HAH ach. and the man who is wise in the ways of hurricanes can interpret them easily. These signs, together with radio warnings are ample notice of coming danger. "There are also signs that Nature sends out to man to warn him of the approach of ill health, and when these are Ignored the results are often very serious. The man falls ill. and has to suffer not only the illness but its after-effects. And the tragic thing is that frequently he could have avoided the illness in the first place by taking the precaution of heeding Nature's warning, and taking steps to renew his strength and raise hi.s resistance. If you are tun-down and over tired, have lost your appetite and are in a generally




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51 M1AY. MP'II MI1KK 17, IK* SUNDAY ADVOCATP PAGE FIVE FIRST ELEVEN CRICKET <*> independents "SURRENDER OR DIE" SEPT 7 — NO. 137 Kim for two the first ball but was clean bowled three balls liter by a quick off-break at 61. The scoreboard read 113 for A. fiver and Warner came together and took the score to 125 when %  caught dt fii' : Kntjinson oh" William*. Byer scored 18. The i tenham beaten for 5 With t baUman tn. I : %  tad by MiHington ihe to make his total 8J aad the MOM to 139 Without any lurther aad:Uon Wilkie r.a.i Wilkinson caugh: at square leg for a painotattekj aj Nex* man .r wa C, fa, .JorvilKand he was oon off the mark with a glance for 4 oh* Outrun'.bowling, and ui Wilkie's next over Mr Sealey stole a single to send ISO up on the board. Four wickets were soon down, whei. Mr Sealey who was the mainstay for the school, fell to a doll, catch after a fin* knock of 90 No. 6 batsman was Qua/less aim he along with Norville took the score to I73 During this perio.: Queries* made two beautiful strokes on the leg side which earned him boundaries, but half the side was out at I95 when (tfuarless was bowled bv Mi McComie after contributing 14 useful runs. Toppin Joined Norville who was well set by this time and the carried the score to 200 whicn came from a boundary by the latter. Combermere lost their sixth wicket when Norville fell a Victim to Mr. McComW. after he had made 4. The score boam then read 210 — %  41 in came Mr. Smith and ho was off the mark with a snick through .-lips for tour runs. The remaining batsmen did not stay long at the wickets, and Mr McCotnie quickly claimed the wickets of Smith. Toppin ami Norville. and the score had moved up to 230 for 8. An additional three runs brought the school's innings to a close. Murray and Deane opened the Lodge School innings, but after five minutes' play, a heavy shower drove the players in. and play was finished for the day In Trinidad *& Election* • Iron page I This, it g| anticipated will put in effective Clark on the Wild %  ber of E.' be vtcta id this also lit add to the i %  i or all. of the parties rnav eoalesre and. protoablwith a few inde-tro.ig 'opposi tion bloc" MI the new House However. ill thai w H the future as. with th awsji number of ran didatcs ilahdmf, it is extremel> dtffltult to f>reca*t the complex ton o' the new Lack B.iller Trimble I'uUiug *u! |ggj| pita tl a.m. to aeeaee ate taking all measures to cope Wltn possible iilai l> in Kltharn areas where the Bull parti has. i itracaj ruliouing Mounted polka have already been dispel %  g rf ud other Bulleiites complain lh:.: local iijft Tha say that ,n fault, %  %  %  kept | itttngj on action until the raturn ( Mr Butler B 'i i lame h. i %  wever. it was too late v< r recMtad This sense of grievance of Hi BuUeHtaa, and indeed, of many hundreds of other electors whov names are not on the list. ma\ it is felt, lead lo trouble on polling %  Qtrvariior'l Tower* Umi't tin or* CdogUtuuon, power U placed largely in the liands of the people, but UM Qot amor has catwi it' [nth mambara win have a in in UM Executive <.' nf Ihg five rep if I'.e people will be n Whole Legislative C will include tlw Mihd Govariunanl IghL This blue will probably domiiiale the voting for Tota from p+tr 1 nhr ka late i die r--rhead f th, marine was .il Tamrmai in ,h Ceeamuii itirhon on which naval dowi I Ms %  irtne-. .'v.i hey BxecuUt .mo inu coulu easily htad le aej giXTincnt aiiu d.sunity BHrf t the propl< I, this Is likely, from the fan. that Horn tha poaii plums attaching to nniii.teti.il ap point mem*, of which the I All in al.. i tuna %  %  face a testing Qve selves have expressed grave f-i that not a fe l-e returned OpUnusb ."Mi. an hoping mat the MI %  eeeaetlll .mmu those seek ing office, including mo*i of the utgoiiiK Baanhafa, will *• vui. nous in mitrum Shoe i ILM prove to '*• lha eeei i %  %  (eel in.iIrtotdad HI •dVanea la trannuillity and prosi'ii'' lowarde the K*'-I of eom• peaMaoea, and krwarda a happy era. roUowtng Iwith bar *istt-i i .... i t|w ixH-i • r eb had laid >r iiHidment He said thai v 1 T I ,f1 *?T of steel on Com-1 lJU l I (as %  mashed oo'n i %  %  i i aiera ihan naif in -umble ol reverbtraiini • • %  aaad day into .<: -:ruggied foiwai-l *ca wall from the red I he> eneounterad "niy "'nrc' i. look pait in the %  Prance and South Korea iit enw th> laxg opei idon sine* War II %  %  red Ma.Ai thin tarsi reaafoet %  lOCk t>">i ashore thai pnorniog to IMIISII-I the in n .tion' a • %  ->. ,.%  I, ... %  along tlie i** .i detrlh K> ream nortt %  X %  Lit, m.h %  1 lllMMI ir.d igettBn of ihe Nak reel %  %  chraneed up H II -Heater sponiored bv J R BAKERIES makers of ENRICHED BREAD and the blenders of J & R RUM SPECIALLY T... \ fo the / NgaMMfpOCM .a.i bapvc % %  : -l M %  %  BHkr lb Id ih* l..i S-^". Am %  %  M ig Am A.id TtsaakU brishl and m>l< %  Up lit Ui* •nrMat Cfcawfcw %  Who %  %  -mi* nvi> %  psr ,n. n-1 .• i'-k.ua %  1 And to 1 %  1*1 1 B.JH%  %  1 % %  i"r "Ma.-. %  %  %  %  %  i in um araaaaai \r -11 •• glad to m> %  >l—fcH %  -.:% %  Muc, maraeo oa boa silvciv a :.-. Bgnaaaj akrej trva lira > %  >< ntcans of ritiii|t at an^ t. %  %  : Hmviic ha 1 akaaar} BBM %  -iov-c ir lacrM aotnikjcliOa Youi lhro r the t IlinKttr and le ^ pplv ,en 8 Prict$2.40 Refill! 50c. iho&tte a pen planned lor a purpose SMOOTH — iaw An Eaajwaeq Not only an able huiac> man, nui mnHh, ,jfjft/r-l Froai tarly morning to laic e\ akaj he keg Ihr MIM he*n aad ugir •ppesrancel Much of it ce BM lh


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PACE TWO SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, l*0_ ANOTHER MASTERPIECE FROM ALFPED HITCHCOCK I 1NGR1P BERGMAN JOSEPH COHEN MICHAEL WILDING [ UNDER CAPRICORN ciou ...... WARNER BROS_ _/ J.'^l'^J" XO-DAY & Continuing Daily 5 and 830 p.m. PLAZA THEATRE BHiDGETO II A ROYAL THEATRE Sp-rhil 1 lnl,Tt,th,m-nl Oritf FOR ONE WEEK TO-XiGHT at 8.3% j HOU R ST ACE KNTJRTAINMBNT MADAM TIAM FOOK and SYD VANDEK LYDE in A GRAND VARIETY ENTERTAINMENT of lh hindesl order along with M.G.M'h SUPER DOUBLE I "THEY PASS THIS WAY" Starring : JOEL MACREA FRANCIS DEE — AND — "JOHNNY EAGER" Sun i'inn : ROBERT TAYLOR — LANA TURNER Watch This Space For ftirlher PROGRAMMES D R R M S CHARLES, HPHKII Officer of Health. Arima. I"i midad. and Mis Charles, will b.returning to Trinidad i K W I A today after a short holi guests of Mr. and Mrs, C E. Clarke of Palm Beach. Mailing' MrCharles Is the daughter of Mr a.iu Clarke Charles came over principally to aae his father Mr J H if Dominica who arrived last Tuesday for reason* of health Mi Charles i* an ex-meaaber of the Legislative Council of Dojni. and Chairman of the Banana AJiaociation. He is also a gu.M of Wi I; I ''lrV Mid return home durinjt the week. Mechanic Front Crenadu S PENDING three weeks holiday in Barbados from his duties as mechanic of the Electric Company in Grenada, is Mr Tonwn) WYlb lie ,n rived last wk by H W I A and is stay inn at Cital Waters. Worthing Medico Takes Time Out D R LIONEL MAPP of Trinidad, arrived haw on Wednesday by U W I.A for a holigaj and H slaying at Indramcr Guest House, Worthing Dr Maup is physican for the Forms Park Sugar Estate in South Trinidad Spent Summer Holidays A MONG the passen*. ing b> T C A yesiarda) morning for Canada after spending their summer vacation |M Mis*. Margaret Clarke who Is doing her second r at McDonald College in Home Economics and Mr Gerald Tryhane who Is taking his fourth year B Sc. in Engintrnnff at Mr Gill University Miss Clarke i* the daughter of Mi. and Mrs If. W Clarke of %  Hanbury". PUW Mil 1 *nrt ' Tryhane is the sun of Mr. Ins Tryhane of Bagatelle Plantation. St Thomas For Trinidad Elections M R J M HEWITT of the Barbmdos Recorder and Mr F E Miller M C P. left the colony yesWrday' evening by llWIA for Trinidad to attend the General Elections beginning tomorrow The purpose ..f their visit is to Ob*, vc the setup u. ^f elections there now that adult sufTra I teen given the colony. I They are expected to rali Thursday Cahib Qallinq Altcn..d Prison Officer's Course M R E C ARRINDELL. Aa sistant Superintendent of Trinidad was intrsnsit on Friday morning on the *'Gaseggasa" from England after attending a faiif monthI'riian Officers" Course He wa.•ci-osnpanuMl •> ••is *ifc -ho ka" _j modem 1' ... la) side of lh well looked after by the Goddards' Restaurant, and P 08 ^ through Trinidad last daughter of Mrs. Uiuannc McDavi.l week, com pan led by her "" %  of Sea View House, Bay Street. ^ nd Mr. Orpheus Fisher, after .. BH i .11 " l uw-ni^ii n u-iui, ami 1 I'll Colonial Ofllce and on Ilia WWW. nd Mr? Hurpj Wilson ol Uppci ihu had a moal interesting time Revuedevllle 1950 D HOPPED in laat nlhl at '•Norham'' the home ol Dr. and alri A L. Stuan atTwaed>KII. Road and taw a caste of eev~ t> luveliea going through theii Gordon Wilacai, ton o> Ml '";-nionths singing lour In i ol the capitals in South America Collymor. Rock, was announce.! "'> A 'SLf" u !" ^ to Amwica is %  clerk ol Messrs. C. S 7SZ,£"' !" ? USSf h to ui ,lurn '" .. r>^ irinidad on a short holiday. M H After Tkree Years M R. and Mrs. Clifton Goodndge. iwo Barbadians who uding in Canada foi Gordi Pitcher O Confidential Secretary RS. ALICIA PUY ARENA Confidential Secretary b Mrs Stuart has succeeded in F Franchesci of Trinidad S !" .^^."'il. producing a muslcale that comMr Franchesci is Manager of Formerly of the parts Departirtises a Iheme with a local setthe Hi Lo grocery of PorNof-Spain meni ' Messrs McEnoarney and tiiiK skilfully intertwined In :i and he is also holidaying here Co Ltd %  • Mr Ooodrldgo was eml.nigraiiiiiaoi d.u'ing that raWSM with his family. from the ballet to the modem Bee. Entertained To Dinner Bop and the comparatively mod-_„ Bnd Mrs Dcl Casinio B em tap dancing and tango n^ ployed as Chief Clerk in the Reeiving and Checking Department f the Toronto Motor Co lr. and Mrs. Coen of Carai pending guests at the %  hag GLOBE THEATRE Under the DiatinRuiaht-d Patronage of His Excellency The Governor and Mrs. A. W. L S4vue Opvninti I HUH Y. Sopt. 29$k 9.43 p.m. AOI'ATMX'M;SH'IMK!H.S(^nie On/y) NMT SHMIIII* se jjL if. MURRAY'S MILK STOUT SUSTAINS AND REFRESHES DEMAND MIIIIHAV'N .Hilk Stool From your GROCER MA.WIM, A IO.. I.TI.-.\Ui-nO> I >l I* I 111 TO-DAV 4 1,'. A H4H and CiMiiiiiu.i'..: 20th C-Fox presents : "THE BLACK ROSE" Starring: 'yrone Power; Orson WELLES ROXY Last 2 Shews TO-DAV 4.3* e. 8.IS Republic Double . SECRET SERVICE INVESTIGATOR With Lynn ROBERTS Lloyd BRIDGES AND THE RED PONY with Myrna LOY Ilober MITCHUM Mon %  Tuea. I ,n w g.lS Republlo Whole Serial . "JE8SE JAMES RIDES AGAIN" With Clayton MOORE Linda STERLING ROYAL ..,.-.( 2 Hbow TO-DAV 439 4k HI M-G-M's Master Double •THEY PASS THIS WAY (Western) •JOHNNY 1MB" (Drama I IXTBA — Ai S.ss far Ball Stair jDMOh CUtr.NDOnr anil III. D*neln Prl..rr t'lNDKHH-LA In DANriNO LI NATI< Men. Tvea. 4.M %  M-G-M\ Double . I KII.I.I BASEHART Audrey TOTTER •TOWN" And •THE STRATTON STORY SUrrlng James STEWART June ALLYSON i v.:v..i..—.... ••• u>a t'urrK \ TII, I'HOWIJII Sinnins Th.Lr I-t. Cslyp**OLYMPIC TO-DAV .U g.15 Tomorrow 4 3* A 8.15 20th C-Fox Double . June HAVER Mark STEVENS •OH YOU BEAUTIFUL DOLL" 'FIGHTING MAN OF THE PLAINS" — With — Randolph SCOTT Jane NIGH Tuea. a Wed. 4 SS & 8 IS 20lh C-Fox Double . •BUFFALO BILL" And -1HE PURPLE HEART" Intransit M R. GEOPFREY CHAMBERS. Civil Servant attJ-.-hed to Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Knight lo the Customs. Trinidad, arrived dinner at the Hotel on Friday "oro on Friday morning on the night. "Gaacognu"' as an intransit pasMr. Del Castillo is Director of senaer from England and left tho Surveys nnd Geodetic Departlater In the evening nient of the Government oLXaraMr. Chambers was sent up to eas while Mr. Coen is with the England by ihe Trinidad Amateur Veiiecuelan Petroleum Company Football Association on a two Trinidadians Return Home months football training course RS. GERALD ALEXIS of * the benefit of elementary Port-of-Spaln. Trinidad, re^hool boy it hjocna on Friday There is ample scope Prided Cll| Venezuela, lor the youiui ladle* and gentlea holiday hei men who winild break into amteur theatricals and on the other Jutnd every opportunity Is offeretl in the Revuedeville for the best stage dat*cers to show their wares. One looks forward to a programme that promises to be both novel .uid cnterUiininx when thshow comes off next month. Visitor. From UJC M R. AND MRS. Robert Oian were arrivals on Friday morning from England on the i, v B W I A after spending about "Gascogne''. They have come for tun days holida.v. She was aca liulnUty and are staying at Bcii-ompanied by her two child M R M nk QUMl House. Back To School icrald and Jacqueline, and thev ..(•it staying at Crystal Waters, M ISS SUSAN ARROWSM1TH. daughter of the Administrator of Dominion nnri Mrs. Arrowsmith. left by T.C.A. yesterday morning for Canada tin hei way back to Weslonblrt School In For Health Reasons RS MERCEDES PLIMMER Tn HI* i. ul who arrived here a week ago for reasons of health is at present a patient at Dr. Scott's Nursing Home and is expected to be up and about soon Her daughter Mercedes who came ith her Is staying at "Beach Back Again M"A. It. MITCHELL. Cashic. w ., n ncr ,„ 8Uylng ,. .., 1 "'J*** !" '? LU1 • f t' 01 ^'House", St. Lawrence and wtu S p !!i n, J lr Bd '.* now blck in bo returning home on Wednesday B l ?" do f ^ r anoth ho"d-y. He A keen Water Polo fan. MerGloucestershire, England, She "rat came here in September last cedes tells Carlb thai along with ame in from Dominica with her year when he spent three weeks, . e Trinidad Water Polo team i w a'" 1 ^ 0 1 Thl ""*< l y by which is expected to tour Barw! H 1 f u > ln al "CrysUI badoa in November, a girt* team Worthing y al90 hoptni[ lo mak€ the trlp parents on Tuesday and was stayHe .irrlvcd ing with them at the Wind Hotel Waters' BY THE WAY... By Beaeheomber RGl'IENNE! Venlreaallion for rt.„i n ..i . described as "a group of leading nice. Very well. I have before me a world sehntSltS, supported by Their next earth-shaking discutting which tells women how ;Wgrotesqus radgel Unsseo, has aiHwrj wl bs Owl srsn man ID look dewy Potnttni out thai CROSSWORD T^ 1 i f 0 r^ 1 7 8~ *~ L -*" r* r-JP %  — has an Immortal soul, and that a all are equal In the sight of God. a fnis announcement may be someu what delayed, an they are still trying to locate the soul. Th,. lutest theoiy is that II Is under the lulllatory haulm ol the left elbow ith dewdrops a lovely sight, it says that real or artificial flower, worn Ihe dress, should have one oi ) pearls of different sizes stuck at it. Then "a minute touch ol nail varnish." r* Slnibhmiu Six f-\H. STRABISMUS (Whom Gel ",'"? ?! Hjr=S-J*S?lfr rwiar !" 0 ' Ur *•" %  Another good trick is to buy uiobs of sham candle-grease and — hat like a lamp-shado friends will say, "How she ird iJism i kniiven p i To ilrllir DITSN u. %  er*< VI Km %  < ibcwi i IT. i i .i l£ About In a it. Sieel bud in.. lioo. lll I*. Associatm eitn at-..*,: La, Uriiil from %  i-.noo JS..I.I If %  .1, %  is**—" it. 61 IS aii c.t'ilvaiea. >u. atisK*. renetf ' %  ' %  %  % %  ass. l"( C I'D tar a;2tiiiily will) %  Iri.uo f ersr. MI T Ua.r .IMI ib. at thread DIMD. uic •am* 4) 10. Proceed to ao ,ai >. it come* uum CCKUDUU. ISI IB For wliat rcaaon ii tint clue V <4> luUoo al * %  •: S. Uvutilr 4 "-.-... 14 attar. ,. vented a motor-car wh"lch~Vlds 't'L !S eIC • c e,c ll wi cost ii £375,000 lo build, will have four engines and nine wheels (one under the grldget-valve). it will be Priority Grumurvf so delicate In its mechanism that u will have to be flown to its des TTir ITV nt !" %  Inatlon, and will probably not go IV 1 Glamour. The words at all in cloudy weather But nil c u ghl "^ v > e in a head when It does go, It will move I %  ""P 0 ^ "w that the beautifully, and will have fou. Si, 0 *? WOrd "*****"*" has Wheels Instead of two to ke the ^ n ruboed in f 8"" yd. Shades Grey $7 * yd. Shades Grey WOK8TED FLANNEL 9S" yd. EVANS -• WIIITI III IIS "Your Shoe Store' Just Right For JOHN WH1I I: LONDON EDITOR IM I'III: I %  Monday Sept. 4. 72. Cbeapside, EC2. Y ORKS H IRE w o ol 1 e n manufacturers' worst fears were realised at the opening of the new season's wool sales in Sydney to-day when prices soared by as much as 50 uc I



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PACE EIGHT SLNDAY ADVOCATE •ilMl.W. si Ml MISER 17, IK* BARBADOS ^ Am'OftTTE *..—_1 P-~— T-r-r -1 I kr •• A**U r#.. LMMM* SL. Sunday. September 1". 150 TO-MORROW TO-MORROW Trinidad goes to the polU to elcet a new Legislative Council. The new Council will be the first to be elected under •he new constitution and because of this fact the elections are of interest to all West Indians. Under the new constitution, Trinidad will have a majority of elected members in the Legislative Council and will embark (or the first tune on the experiment of ministerial responsibility. Other colonies look forward to being entrusted with ministerial responsibility and it can safely be assumed that the eyes of the Colonial Office are on Trinidad to see how that country shapes up to its new responsibilities. On the measure of success that attends the Trinidad experiment may well depend the hopes of other West Indian islands. The election campaign which has preceded the voting which will take place tomorrow has been one of the fiercest in that island's history. To place one's policy and principles strongly before the electorate is the right of every candidate for the Legislature but in Trinidad it appears that the legitimate means have been exceeded and that there have been occurrences which have been the source for grave misgiving by many persons. More than a hundred persons have offered themselves for election to eighteen seats. In many cases it has been difficult if not impossible to decide for what many of the candidates stand. There is a body calling itself the Caribbean Socialist Party which represents the usual ideals of socialism. There are in addition a host of other partits, and an even greater number of persons who owe allegiance to no party, which seek the votes of the electorate. Barbadians who clamour for ministerial responsibility may well study the lessons of the Trinidad elections. Ministerial responsibility implies many things which are not yet apparent in these islands. It requires men who are fit and able to take upon themselves the burden and responsibility of directing the affairs of governmental departments. It has usually been taken to mean that a sufficient number of persons representing the same point of view can be found who are willing to work together. Equally important, it demands the sense of loyalty which is exemplified by the doctrine of collective responsibility. By that doctrine the whole party in power resigns when the government receives a vote of censure even if that vote of censure is directed at only one minister. The evils of coalition governments have already been apparent in the hesitant and precarious lives of so many French governments. Such governments provide none of the conditions in which ministerial responsibility can flourish. Such conditions are the ideal setting in which opportunism and demagogy flourish. They are not the conditions in which stable and energetic government can function. For more than fifty years Barbados evolved and worked a system by which men of different views could contribute their best in the service of their island home Those who to-day may decry that system may well ponder on the success which attended it. In small countries of mixed races the temptation to appeal to racial prides and prejudices seems to be irresistible. In Trinidad it appears to be enough in the eyes of some candidates to state their membership of some racial group and to expect that the members of that group will forthwith give their support. Never before in the varied and at times stormy history of these West Indies has there been sucli a crying need for statesmanlike leadership of the unemotional typt. Such leadership has not yet been forthcoming. Trinidad, as the proposed seat of the Federal Government, is looked to provide much of that leadership. To-morrow it will be known whether the Trinidad electorate has been able to overcome the spate of oratory with which it has been deluged in recent months and to choose those men and women who will be able to provide that which Is needed. The best wishes of the people of Barbados go out to tiie people of Trinidad at this Historic moment for in their fate lies very largely the destiny of their own political institutions. QIEEIV'S COLLEGE WHAT Queen's College lost by the resignation of Mrs E. J D. Corbin. who had successfully held the post of Headmistress for the last IH years, can only be measured by the success or failure of those who take her place, to maintain the high standards of scholarship to which she has brought Queen's College. In 1937 when she first came to the school she found dingy, antiquated buildings, nestling close to the equally time-worn Combermere. desperately wrestling with the educational needs of 178 pupils. Its Sixth Form numbered two. It says much for her untiring zeal and determination that only a decade after. then should be a Queen's College whose resemblance to the old was only basic. Modernised and comfortable, if not yet eitirely adequate buildings catered to a f >urishing school and healthy Sixth Form whose Higher Certificate results and eaorj is of students to Universities were beginP ng to show impressiveness. And with all this came the brightest feather in her cap—the securing of the 1*16 Barbados Scholarship by one of her s'-idents. Elsie Pilgrim. Moreover, every effort has been made to ; :ure specialist mistresses for the staff— i orts which begin to show clear signs of ; aition. and the new. well-equipped block t voted to Science and Domestic Science Ids great promise for that branch uf : .dy. Mrs. Corbin was an Honours Graduate DJ Glasgow University, and held the Teachers' Diploma of Cambridge. She started teaching in Government Secondary Schools in 1923, and by her : enness and ambition rose to the post of nior Mistress of one of them. In 1937 she came to Barbados and Queen's College, the outstanding success of her ; .ist teaching career being primarily rei-onsible for this appointment. The fact that during her 13 years of teaching her favourite subject. French, at Queen's College, she has never had a failure, is a vivid testament of the effectiveness of her teaching technique. So effective is it, in fact, that many other schools in the island have adopted it. She brought to her task u sympathetic and tolerant outlook, and a bright friendliness which won the affection of all. It is unfortunate that ill-health has occasioned her retirement, a loss to the educational system of the island that Barbados and Queen's College cannot well afford. But listen—my paaap ort clearly say: We, Ernest Bevin . request and — mark this — 'REQUIRE lhat the bearer should be afforded r.*RK\ assistance of which he may stand in need' -l>e.don fcapeeService. Sitting On The Fence H> Vill.in.irl l.ul.im.s A worried girl write* to a oman columnist: — •"I m 21 and was quite happy at my work until the manager made advances to me. For some time I evaded them, but now he has changed his lunin hour to be alone in the office with mc. He is married and over 40. How can I discourage him? If you care to chance your arm i the sack dear, you could try this method ALONE at last. Aren't we lucky? Wit W.il I am then But you may be lucky too. I don't suppose vou'd say no to a fur coat this .iutumn? I aliray* say no to fur coals. Ynt i.nly do I consider them vuhiar. but they are aI*o obtained by forturina animals in trip* Oh, come off n, sweetheart And it's no oood bfjeniiy me a diamond nnu ftUttr. Jewels ore alto worn mainly by (he rich and ifitltfar. Cold and diamond* BT obtained by stave Negro labour IN Smth Africa. '..u V u know I c weetheart There y-m run poison h you. Wi?l vu marry burned the bacon because haled your father, do that, Atn I supposed to have fried my wife lather alive now? It's not as simple w w w Not at all. Really. eSftet .cart you're a* that. joking ''" ia V ft **'*. eein he weighs NO, I'm nor. Y-<> "t lef IndlWhat happened in your subndualf stand In IHf way of our conscious mind this time is that ••Mima) ham*""*%  '"•' WO" rich? you tinnsferrcd your hale fixation Oh. cut It out. from your father to me. When you have disposed of That wouldn't br difficult v V fSVQttr "hen / trill You thought you were cooking *marri< trt.ii nl breakfast, not mine. So. until you let mc cure you. I shall THANKS FOlt NOTHING always have to eat undone beans But as you are too unhealthy to and burned bacon. lire long, I shall soon be a happy You certainly will. And what's and contented widow. Shall we more, the pot roast for dinner fofinlrh those letters we Started nfaht will be burned up, too. FILES 8" 10" 12" HALF KOl'ND BASTARD FILES 8" 12" 2ND CL'T HALF ROUND BASTARD FILES 8" 10" 12" FLAT BASTARD FILES 8" 12" 2ND CUT FLAT BASTARD FILES KNIFE FILES WARDING FILES 6" 8" 10" 12" tin \M 2ND CUT FILES 10" CABINET RASP FARRIERS RASP SAW FILES PHONES: 4472 & 4687 WILKINSON HUMCO. LTD. SurcMMn to C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD. Phanes 4472 4617 Ail %  %  -' %  mi," IliumDoctor Mrs. Mauret-n A. McGulre, ML L'.S has been granted a divorce because her husband "made her life unbearable b. continually -analysing her." KNOW why these beans are underdone? little Red. Because I toofc > m out of the voter too soon, I guess. What else? Oh no. That's not the real reason. The real reason Is belUM when you were a little M^ve^r.rconsider Wrl you were Jealous of your bariy brother For cryin' our loud. Are you llaniferou*. Ilailiiiii* SEABATHING is one of the great pasttimes of all Barbadians and is the chief attraction that draws tourists to these shores. The enjoyment is, however, marred each year by tragedies which occur to persons bathing in the sea around the coast. Other tragedies are only averted by the fact that many Barbadians are strong swimmers and willing to go to the rescue of those in difficulties. At many bathing spots in the island there is no provision for rescue work, and indeed it is only at Cattlewash and Rockley that the most elementary steps are taken to provide help for those who may lind themselves in difficulties. It is time that a greater forethought is exhibited by those in authority. The Commissioner of Police has rightly pointed out that the matter is one for the attention of the Parochial authorities. Certain simple and inexpensive precautions could be taken Danger notices should be put up to warn visitors of those parts where the sea is known to be dangerous. This would apply mainly to the coast along the Eastern side of the island where unfortunate incidents have taken place on more than one occasion. All those beaches which are popular with bathers should have easily available a line which could be thrown or fired to persons in distress. In time it might be able to provide a proper life huard service but a start should be made with those precautions which are as efficient as they are cheap. A fatal accident in the sea is a bad advertisement for the charms of Barbados. When everything is being done to encourage tourists, steps should also be taken to ensure that they can enjoy the amenities that the island has to offer without risk to themselves. Above all those who bathe in the sea must exercise their discretion. Shooting waves is a most enjoyable game but those who attempt to play that game in waters where the current is strong are asking for trouble if they go too far from the shore The Parochial Authorities must move to provide the means of rescue. The bathers must by the exercise of caution make certain that the means of rescue need never be used. Well well. Quite aren't you? Not will I accept a champoanc dinner Alcohol not only befuddles tli-' brunt ami distorts the mind, u weakens Hie will to resist rrfl U timiK.riit t i leave my wife out of expert it's your muddy, purplish complexion and large stomach which give one the Impression of senility, though I pose your appearance Is largely due to over-Indulgence. wile hideous too? this. Little fat men Ufca you marry hideous iromen and spend tit of remorse. So you took the In alcohol, and were therefore the rest of their lives pesfertfia heans out of the water before more accurate as human compass youth and beauty. Am I l.urtintf they were properly bulled. Just needles, your knee? as you would have taken your The moment they entered, thel: You couldn't hurt me, beaulittle brother out of the water heads swung north towards the tifnl. I say. let's talk about before he was pn.jicrly boiled. bar The magnetic pull w •ot.tething nice. I've got a proIt that so? strong that they were Inside bepoMtion to make to you. It was the *am with UM bumtonyou could say Hell Srhlckel.Ind / have a proposition to ed bacon for brcakf.ist You gruber.—London Express Servict l $ uyuT the beans you were symbolical! boiling your little brother. Leave my little brother out of this u'ill ya? ^ ^ fc At the last moment you bad a the bar, which was north of the hull Sentries returning to the club %  ftar two hours at the observation post were not quite so suspended Our Hrader* Say : Electricity doubtful whether they are getfeeU in mater a| should not .._ tin*; a square deal. But. Judging but if they do. damage will rerhe Editor itu> itdtwnte y lhc numbers who wunt the suit, whatever the type of ma SIK.-Lt' Commander Smyrna company's service as soon as Ihey chme I understand that last .crop I am haouv to avow a bind ; 1 "' "• ,her '" '* no n the company's custoa million pounds, a burden quite IU' %  '.'. ha rLS5m £!2T .—" men. ut of the question for the elecl question for the electr c supply in Barbados. CS would like lh. choice of i can only hope that C.S the machinery to be bought and declare peace and Join m e in operated by the company, to be praying that his previous persisIn the hands of th* Board, who i Pn t prodding* will not result however need no q.inline*.tion. He electricity nnd the other utilities considers that the People of Barcosting more. C. E SHEPHERD House, Collet St. Petei Furvuvll Message To Queen's College that vast Dominion great have been highly electrified, with ample and cheap current generaled by waterpower. It wou' I seem very difficult for CS unw ttingly. not to judge tin Island electric supply again;! t:... v background^ A comparison that ^^^ ghoiiul have a voice In th would not be reasonable. For Incompanies' decisions and policies • lance, the charge of 22c. per unit ^^ sn wou id p l -C e them, along would seem to him extremely wl(h ne companies, completely h.gh. and I too would like to se.UIldcr ne lhumb of the Board, t reduced, but In Cornwall In wno wou | d be answerable to Kngland. I paid only a penny less nether. n t^ms a pretty fa r f.n current from the Grid. Again muddle to me Incident .lly in Canada, there are no doubt, though "the people of Barbados" T„ The Fdifnr Th. „ „, many men of hign ability, retired „ .Xie sounding phr.se. in fact SIR -Would Jou rtLia7?lla. c.mparatlvely early from full lhc con(U mers. actual and potennie to ser^d -, mesiffe Irt SL I me active business who are tia |. of electricity and of the other 'paWn-. tnd FnSSTS £ Si prepared to shoulder heavy pubutl i ltlM are no large frr.ctions of r^vl' '" ^ !" *J,$ TH 1 e respoiiMbiliiie-. from a sense h vulll i ation X* 7 P^ d l*"* 6 1 *** of civic duty and to keep the rust ,ho "P uUtl0n October I went away with ths awav Here numbers are small But at the root of CS.'s criti""}* J nal w uld wn return bu'. and the slower pace of life lead* clsni of the Electric Company lie-. Itl '*' deeply regret, U not now tO different results. To find three something more understandable P"'le. My message is one of Just men with the knowledce to i,, n is opinion steam turbines are * thanks for the loyal aupundcrstand and the capacity 'o more reliable generating un bj l*rt given to me, on all occasions judge between conflicting technlthan the dlesels the Company has a Headmistress of the School and eal opinions, the ability to take installed, and there I* much to be rot" BM inanv kindnesses shown to over and manage all or any of the M td for this view. On the other me personally byParents and three companies If that came to hand, though diesels need more Friends. pass, with the requisite le sure attent on, it is claimed that they May Queen's College, for which and the willingness to serve, should be more economical In 1 will always cherish a great affecWOUM l>e mighty difficult CM Uw\ ratal is expenarn here am). t l „n. continue to flourish and pluy Ml to what M the Company's customers have a Tending part in the education of happens when statutory powers reason to know, it bulks largel dos. outrun available capacity to n.,„ i think wc can be sure that ( ^ ml E ^uTnd tnU WW aSre are exercised w -hmit knowledge m c Directors. In coming to u de\ n "'",' n IIT * lS *"* %  "* %  %  blind man driving I eatsOtt, would Dot act on their own motor car whims and fam IfaX but on the ad" iron* east that % %  i posed Board, but the only conbv crete advantage adduced is t h • can be drawi from the recent of those who are breakages in i.ew machines. DePRINCESS REFRIGERATORS 3 % %  •!. ft J year guarantee PRICE $425.00 .lusi arrived ill DA COSTA & CO., LTD ELECTRICAL DEPT. Now In Stock SANDERSONS CRETONNES KNOWN THE WORLD OVER FOR QUALITY AND BEAUTY ALSO CHINTZ See our display and make your selection Da COSTA A. (.. Ltd. DRY GOODS DEPT. P V Wild many Lhanla. I nm. Voun KlicTly. E J. D. CORBIN 17 ArunaV! Qfl London, W 11. o——a laMjia>a> a a iat aa i#ata i a>aM)ata>i annv When You're Out For Enjoyment at Your Favourite Club the moments are always the happier if GODDARD'S GOLD BRAID RUM is Served. &f The Secret's in the Sip.



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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1K0 SUNDAY ADVOCATI PAGE NINE Hurricane Pictures From Barbuda r In every part of llie world .. this is the surest sign of excellence in a bicycle The liumhct trademark: ii your guarsnier of lmg ^ualnv. AD* ippunna and unrivalled rircngth. The World* i leading fMbt] !'i-N.lr **ffi ihii mirk of dtointtiort Pictures on the left depict some scenes from the stricken area. "/--A collapsed building, in which people are still living. Second —What's left ol Codrington village. Third —Warden's Home: Refugees collecting rations. fiottom —Pigeon House:.. In this Reservoir slaves used to draw water lor master, mistress, and their families. /'<>/> (Right) What s left of three houses. More Caribbean Storm Damage BARBt'lM .. lll|iatiHlH I „t Ml by the I < uted the larger Wind lii.' DtOtum on this page taken exclusively fur the "llarbadna Advocate" give some idea of |h> %  iillerinu which has been expci • need by the Itarhudans. / iv ".i! t h.ivc lost 'ver four hundred head of small stock. Hun -:n..li IK,JU which were %  '' in.i %  >, during the hurricane. I aw baan OaMtnvttl or beached. Barbuda u i lorga I'tnk beaches, and quantities ol Hush pink sand combined with shell from the eastern side of the island was carried a mile Inland by the sea which encroached the and. Mathilda Tower on the southern Mdc of tie island has been badly abmtgad, All the woodwork ha* tMMn blown oB while only * %  •i>i,.> itava work, rama The "Plieon House" another famous piece of slave work has bean damaged In the past tlm structure was used to conserve wattr. Slaves were made to fetch water and throw it in at the top for their owners to draw when they pleased Ycirs ago %  Dutch ship "Paul Rosa" was wrecked on In.eastern %  I off Barbuda and has always baan visible about lour leet above KM I' v.'l Boisterous seas of Sepi-iiiU'i I. ii hed llu%  reck bighei >n tin* reel and it now stands fully JO let* .ilxiv,aeai level. Holy Trinity ch-irch had Its *!fi id the bell 'poslrut with rope %  mi all In some nearby trees. Destruction of Mathilda Tower and the Pigeon House an' % %  real lugs to Barbudans because they tiava always cherished the work Of their ancestors. Motor Cyclisl VENDOR WINS il 4.004 Killed In Crash i ( %  OROBTOWN \\n Frederick Wharton (•£) anTr i.loyee of Booker's Drug Store*. ( %  eorgetown. met a tragic and sudi.en death at about 1.45 p.m. on Sunday afternoon on the West ( IJM, Deincrara, Public Road. when It is reported, he lost control of the motor-cycle he riding and trashed into .1 eon erete bridge, spa fining the sideline trench .it Pin (nnelia Ida PORT-OF-SPAIM, Trti Baptambai 11 lot Drom San parnaodo, • Kii'iiii itk b holder ol UcJurt MM7537. which M.I id at di.' Arima Hacaa Bha wll She uiiH'N mi a small roadside %  in 1 1 matches, bananaaftC mother ol two children, one ol mem being lUvamplOjad UK I long while. AM. isAM—F-1.1 Haklcuj a muutliwBsh Cures PyOI rhea and ToOBaViU UlUe HAVr.RS ASPIRIN in U<| and lUO's Mli8TKKOI.K— The Uu-si Rub. i t. t'KiAkcrit: i.u. 111 i.Ks Oua ranw ad k> ligbi avarj Hint 2/9 1/UN fl* fttfffaTl milTlOl BN H qualllj giaft will noi IlljUM till" 1 •> I nun la >IU.UO each UKISI %  PATCHll Kneellent quality *0 to JI7.B0 KODAK 4'AMKkAS— 55.00 *l(l Sl Nil >l .'II I"! 125 0. *:ts. vtoo* saoeu. :uo.oa UODAK PIIJIH—Ti lit all nit. 11 1 sa nm DunbUI, Parker, t mi %  blvco mail, Oi and 1 lam. Plata iii.it i:t aapaoHsll] mada foi ui al l/l aach The 1 plpa t'AHKI RV S IKK UI.AI I s i;,.1 Roac lib 1 lb II.,/--I Nuts I lb 1 It. Milk Tniv SH8 Princaai i lb t ib. AaaorKiHi.t KOt Nl> T KICK'S < IKM O I.Air!—HI.1. k Mafic S3SS. kl.HM: SI.OH RAISINS l\ I'M K\l.l S Of an 'iii-iit mi duv .ii ast. !>•' phge. PaaffUma hi m I Jamalef m --IN 1'inii Mi; 111 flu anil fit 0 (A RON I'l RKI'MI 1 i. t %  Can Can: Ballodgla; Rook 1 %  1. Night: Bdoman'i I;I, Kb 1 -1 1 :t'*i Jus I ttiwiw-ftt.. AT Itli'KI Wr,AillH!llr\l> IIMIIHl HARRISON'S BROAD ST. LOCAL ACIfJIS DIAL 2344 I'li.i. iva: OF STYLES 1A' SlZSa) l.\ SltHK. ir" i SPALDINGS TENNIS RACQUETS AND TABLE-TENNIS BATS & BALLS ARE THE CHOICE OF CHAMPIONS



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PAGE TEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE StMlAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1*> m%. Romantic British Painting Of The XIX And double-action %  d oaMMeX far tha mmmm of Hood m* cw-t Colds, BroocfcKU, Co.rhi. 'Jitarrh. Sore Throat. NtawmUsn. Lisaae-ego, Sdatka. "luscular Pains and Stralm. Bruises, cratches. Influeiua, Neuritis. Neuralgia, toothache. Insect Bites and other Aches Pains. Healing! Soothing! Relieving 7ry It —vou will tax It Is a reel blonlnf | THERMOGENE MEDICATED RUB In ]m% a This new PARKER ~5f is a triumph It's the only pen with the NEW FIATUHE 1 NEW PRECISION NEW eEAUTT • M %  poro-ftix nuts • HIW INK-'IOW GOVIANO*. • Mtw PH-CLASS rHF"vO • Kir. VllllLI INK UlfPLY Pid 4 vlher great admncti XX Centuries II. I'Vlllllh III HO> T HM word RomaatM" many vague meanings ami | employ.II" ami II >' %  frequently in (ritual *. lat %  Dob in ft ... %  and, Lvcausc It u .ic, of vital significance The •lilfl a up.' ordai u ihould dc hi utmost to tuiiin' it wIlUnsntM to *uh. i Ion ) %  > allowa : to % %  %  I in:, .i.ut.t.Vti aittnipti .. ail nerd] frtrfnm H asit r le i, nol such a definition are often nr.Classical Hal art will, at bait. satisfactory Her* ii Mr. John be a repetition of the orderly Piper, a distinguished modern result* of an earlier artist 1 tussel pamtei Hhu i: aoaonf those w.ih reality, la • Itritish contemporaries widely | %  Aradt ink The tm referred ii> nowaday* at. our cance and the true rein' Modem Romantic Painters, openthese oftan ambiguou* v ords mg an assay with the follow-in, rtatnantit ind Cla words' nested by Mr T S E 1 ot In hi. retnurk that lb* prop) "Romantic an deal, witn ihe *ion for the indu particular. The partlcularization ri-.m, %  Roman) i nwr. die of BtWtek ul-out a bird's wing. Classical ol Turner about a wateilall or .1 hdl (own. ot Rossati; about Flizibeth Siddnll. Is the result of I'llt/H't'l'.H s vision that ca*i see 1.1 these thing* aometiUni usuQcanl i when Mi PUHU roenUi grand ordinary almlneance some' English Romantic palnlei thliut that lor a imansnt seem?. „f drama In atmosphere. I 1 the to contain the whole world He weather and the eeasooa", wo can goes on to say that "Abiding at any rate recount also In the Romantic painting of to the * Ai.d in doing this thev rmablv claim for then Work *fre 5" *f* Pf" 11 *** "' na1 %  ••-.•a "•" ,.. —,,..1,1 ,..,11 "Inn, tf^iv i:itllii 1 that it reveals "something signifiw *'"'*'"'; ill 'land* L*iitit beyond ordii significant %  such as Claude employed lands* aubje I* ussln. had -ting something that seem* .0 „.,„„„ ^SSuSlSr their picture the whole world. iffirtrated scenes fruin Classical JOHN CON1TABLE: A Study far "The Hsywsln" Personal li" l'-HK "91" has always baaa Ihc fPnVl mo*l pefffc' pen Now— hcrt'i a triumph—*lih Ihe great new Acro-mciric Ink Syiion. Ihe NEW Parker "51" is even Doer, more desirable than ever before. The \cru-inctiiL Ink System is the greatest ever devised. Ill wholly new. Kk-niific method of drawing in. atoring. ufeguarUing and rckasiaf ink give* the mwt saurfaaory pan parCumtaiKB ever koown. IL: ilkthis beautiful pen... enjoy iu RKXHII xltJirtg action . yuu'D long to own one .. and give oos, too, as a special present. fifcralure lind %  is onl; one of 'he pictorial Hialpng wl:h ibi said nuns and II %  M%  fur the idea that Die Romantic with Turner ana Conn lit. arti-t pjrtiiulariiej"; for those landscape itself bteam* 'he ubpainters ami poets who are known lect They ware thus historically as Romantics certainly %  < r l > u > v| ..-..-,: t, achi.il appearance of a thom.iml apeciflc situations, event* m dtfTcrr.nt particular eiie;.. 1. objects. Yet the implicaiion of outdoor world This new i-wiikMr. Piper's Malement is that nl n ?' >*• "MJ 1 *?, "1*. ^ •thee k.nds of art do n.t celcbrat, V.^"' 1 "I. ln J^ lr i M l"" J" ; ,' contains the results of partkulai l)Unleipirls o( T h e paintara. reactions to particular experience* f urnor ^ C on.taUe. GlrUn, Croma. where it makes ail addition to Column and Ilonington With all Ihe activity of the Romantic is in lnefe pp^ Hn ^ painters, semuous setting the intense "Romantic" P orceilioii of the world of Nature MQMrtonoa within a wider frame rose to a pit< h ol The experience of a particular pawid anywhere ulse it) liisUjry; stimulant Is slated in terms of the grid In English history It 1 widest possible validity, by the or a poetic renaissance only bv Classical artist. Cezanne's exthe Period of the Elizabethan inmaol m the sight of Mont dramatists. st VH tuire was for Cezanne nut an end but a beginning: to com4 I/i'*-* n munieate the particular thrill was /I V <0lt>r| not enough for him: he had to translate It into a form which T h external results of thil mboth conUtnvd IV and trarweended Wt ^ M ravolullun In Uie mode of It: he had to trim-mute the parP W ^ Irtlan '"" f,,u '"' wp| ,h 1 Ocular emotion aroused by a par* ur '" H* Xl ">" %  Vlfdu "' tn licular suhiect Into the architec'i* tul "* clf bt *** l, J" ""*"' X"' tura. form of great painting Bu< S^tULf^tl tl.i new vention in the development of __ .espect: they ujKover ays of aeeinu everything nything. They change the ap(•arance of the world. Brighter Turners and ConiUble's "*w pa of appearances led J^ tll ,„,„,.„,, ...i,.,^. ,.f ..... European art by English artists until the present moment, with the rise to world fame of the modern English sculptor. Mr. Henri Moor*. But to arrive at the second part of my subject, which is the present school of Romanth iwurvness of appearam them to the use of lighter and t Tighter colours and lono than any used before Of course brilliant patches of colour had been __all two other piilnlettS of thi early vcars of the Nineteenth Century who. unlike Turner and stable, have had to wait till S ; ', !" Cih |S7; William Bl.ke. the Kn-at EnnUsh •nuonal tumuol their Brluln „ B lnlel Y et he and BMeeu P"";'> l "i,, Si!l. !" i hl follower Lemuel Palmer are then .,.l..ur nuwurej. TlUen or mod R om „„i„: the other intradatctl theli pinky greys noldcn browns whore the flesh of their models showed naked, and switched to gradations of quite .motln 1 colour or colours for the garments and for the other objects depicted. They thought In One Aspect rnara < rusa the ut space here to dlsnaginaUvi -uftA^d mat uxwtfidfien, Pi,11 with Rolled Gold Cap .. .. .. J25.77 ,. Lustraloy Cap .. .. $21.18 A. S BRYDEN & SONS (Barbados) Ltd.. P.O. Box 403, Bridgetown. terms of one dominant colour-tone piir!llllu o( William Ulakc: wa Jl* sS* *£? SSP&TmSLSS* mu ** ~ntont to mention one t to Constable a siect of his pictorial art..a.ucb Ihoaa small woodcuts, tha pastoral utijeci and Turner to dim-over that a shadow cast on a '"hitewashad stable. Richard Wllsoti, then £ ''Sr^^T" "" 8LS! f 'nounuL"uf ^ales. "TTrner an'i departure--he strongest feelings. Constable nboUehed this eternal the moat Intense creative passion: u mmer, this constant, even, pow for this passionate feeling Is Itself „tta, Mediterranean light It re the material tn be changed, transpresented eltmali. concBtloii mu '*d which England experiences only in One or two exceptional weeks of midsummer. Turner's and Coi. %  stable's awareness of the play of changing light in the aTtrnospheru ibvlf. and of the uneven distribution of accents of glittering sunsiiine and shadow over the surfaces of the countrywide was purely English In origin, and it was responsible for their grc.it iadow east on a '"llltawashed r m t a ,i(,> i n which rwrhan* %  3 Stabl be. ..row. blue than ViXftiXc^-TlowTunou-l. .^^iii'SLt^Sfis .^s'ii.! "" %  ,cc de ,o "" rd loft to theae Enidiah painter, lo ,; ,J"" *"'' rtbi.MVer that accents of very ilroiig ... !" ..!,ER Vital Element It wa. alao „ or OKal m00n jround a shepherd ,^ ai.i^ji.V.,".i r a poet" might be found reclinina gjWafiS < !" '^ r —'"' £s k^wjwtt r^SrS? ssm£hs& pean painters cotiQuestof natural lUw>VB WUBi u t rs (|( appi-arancn; ihe French Imvlsuil i observation of the external pre-Monists coultf never hove arday Ug hl world. Blake and Palrived at their. ults. half : In other words, the element whicfi makes a v art a f'liunical work is deeper thing than the eler 'style'It is perhaps vita! ork of a far icnt of bo were not capable of that ... OUT U Tujjjr^ Con^SolSSUi-riSr^^ stable had not preceded them Two Well Known **!L Up £ lei , 0 th W cowubuiioiilo the main Ku.upe. desire to reveal the universal In tradition. In a sense Oils was pr • the particular, to produce order eminently a technical conlrlbuout of chaos, glut ha has to be> UonIt was an Immense^ great enough to submit himself cant innovation in the icchnk) u to the chaos (which Is the chaos of n-c.riu and the greatest painof his sensations) In the first ers are Innovators in precis* 1 which is the one indispensable gift of all great painters. They wera not, in fact, "great" paiatan at all—by the highest European H.„ these two painters, known to ^C^and^w,^'"f" 7lS, a.l Ihe world, made their impact f o1 '" and ""* mR ' ? f 8 1 upoa tha painters of Franco at \*^ > ct • %  £• u bl I f i i*' .et eight," years ago; the.r in?ndacape Were in i-e.l,ty projecthitiwe upnn the mainstream of oni In raphic form of a visio-i Earopean painting was thus long that was essentially a poet's, nol %  .in.. ..i,vnimi (t was perhaps the a painter's vision The kind of only Instance of a decisive interimagination which they expressed had an inner, a visionary qualit>. such poet-painters remind us that, on the whole, poetry has dominated painting in England. Yu Ulakc lUie Blake of toepastoral woodcutaj and l'almci lipitii Mjn.c.ii.ug very sacred i .Habitants of our diwamy. tit-c-Lovered island, with its soft light, iu mist> and hazy distances, Itl drUDaUe. inajesUi skies, its endlessly subtle variety of gently flowing hills and valleys. However, the tion of the true painter must always be anchored In external reality: it begins with the purely visual, even when It ends up on a highly imaginative plane. But this necessary study of the outward appearances of Nature ..i a more naturally in lands whan light is raoatani and strong: the Mediterranean was perfectly "equipped", as it were, to become the cradle of the visual art of painting. England, her very beautiful land%  eapa being full of suggestive but Indefinite, subtle forms, and of endless nuances of tone, was equally well "equipped" for breeding ihc more subjective art of poetry. Painting of course has Its own poetry: but ii Is poetry which operates through a purely formal configuration. Pictorial poetry Is not on external addition to a picture; it is not something injected Into *.ln design from outside. On tht contrary, It springs out of the design Itself, out of th %  realized hnrmonles of colour and form. Such la the nature of the poetry of Constable, Turner. (".irtui or Crumt' -or of Cezanne. But Blf.kr and Palmer bypassed the world o' at reality —from which true paint' :lan colours and forms—and they proceeded directly to the illustration of their poetic visions (a kind of vision S ilte different of course, from a aerse perceptions of OUT eves). And now perhaps we might say that Romantic painting %  opposed to Classical painting in tne following respect: its imaginative coolant is so much stronger than tho formal structure of the design that the one Is oftan quite distinct from the other. Tin.; Romantic art invites us to distinguish form from content. In Classical art the two things are fused Into a perfect unity. Blake and Palmer are Romantics in this sense, but Constable and Turner (despite their historical Label) arc Classical. Mr. Piper quotes something Palmer said of Blake, and because It wall reveals the RomanUc attltude. I will give It hart. Palmer of Blake's woodcuta as "visions of little dells and nooks and corners of Paradise; models of the exquisiteat pitch of intense poetry. 1 thought of their light and shade, and looking on them found no word to describe it Intense depth, solemnity, and vivid brilliancy only coldly and partial ry (leerribc them There is In all such a misty and dreamy glimmer as penetrates and kindles the inmost soul and gives complete and unreserved delight. unlike the gaudy daylight of this world Emotive words, evoking ;i profound subjectivity Present Day And now to the present day. Graham Sutherland Is the most powerful of the Modern RutuanUca. Hi is an exceedingly original vis-ion which combines the naturalistic composition and layout of Palmer's landscape dasigns with an element of abstraction, and a spiky method of brushwork. both suggested by Picasso But whereas the clement of abstraction in Cubism was geometric in flavour. Sutherland's abstraction is based upon the organic forms of the biological or, even more, the botanical world. A flat network of harsh (and often black) linen reveals the unfolding forms (Continued on page 11) the ***"' • ****** fh „ie* YOUR HOME ami YOUR FACTORY NEED SNOWCEMNOW!! FERGUSSON RADIOS Ai#:' lli fm at . IHE CENTRAL EMPORIUM CINTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Prop, ie tor. C'lTact of Broad & Tudor Street. Phone 4200 SNOWCEM DECORATIVE WATERPROOF COATING Snowcem protects tne outside of your home and buildings against rain and moisture and improves Its appearance. Its clean matt finish used on Inside walls and ceilings increases their light-reflection value by at least 20 par cent Snowcem Is hygienic sine* Its washable surfa.,promgtflf maximum cleanliness and prevents the harbouring or aiin SNOWCEM lobtainable ID : While cream, pink, silver-grey, green, Has lellow & terra-calls i — A. BARNES St CO. LTD—PLAR f ATMN C. S. 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