Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


>tracts might be held up later if

» aircraft

Friday
September
19350

we

1,000 Reds Killed
And Wounded

In 24

MaAc ARTHUR’S HEADQUARTERS estimated
the Communis: dead and wounded in the last
with the addition of 202|)~

24-hour period as 1,880
captured.

In Washington, defence officials said they could
not confirm Press reports that United Nations
Forces to-day attempted a landing on the Korean
west coast in the area of Inchon and Seoul.
Yesterday the United Nations Neval Task Force shelled

the Inchon area and to-day
said the shore batteries of

troyers, four landing craft and three other landing craft

were damaged.





Carstairs
Follows |
Blackburne |



eben Ss.

Mr. C. Y. CARSTAIRS

Mr, C. YÂ¥. Carstairs, C.M.G.,
Assistant Secretary in the Colo-
nial Office, is recently re-
turned to” ingdom
from the post of Administrative
Secretary to the Comptroller for
Development and Welfare in the
West Indies, has been appointed
to ipenee. Mr. K. W. Blackburne,
C.M.G., O.B.E., as Director of
Information Services, Colonial
Office. Mr. Carstairs will be
taking up his new duties at the
beginning of 1951. This is the
second time that Mr. Carstairs
has taken up an office left vacant
by Mr. Blackburne. He succeeded
Mr. Blackburne as Administra-
tive Secretary to the Comptroller
for Development and Welfare.



Escher Is On
oa : Y
Swiss Cabinet
ae BERNE, Sept. 14.
Dr. Joseph Escher, President of
the Swiss Catholic Conservative
Party was to-day elected by both
houses of Parliament to the Fed-
eral Council of Switzerland’s

semi-permanent Cabinet of seven
Minis.ers.

He is expected to be given
charge of the Department of Posts
and Highways. He has been in
Parliamentary politics for 25
years, and succeeds another Cath-
olic Conservative Dr. Enrieo
Celio. Dr. Celio, until now Minis-
ter of Posts and Railways, has
been appointed Swiss Minister
in Rome.—Reuter.

15

Hours

TOKYO, Sept. 14,

Pyongyang Communist radio
three “small” American des-

In an official report on the dam-
ege done by Superforts, Major
General Emmett O'Donnell, com-
manding the United States Far
Eastern Air Force, estimated 75
per cent “of the assigned targets”

in the Communist territory had}

been destroyed.

Communist
Korea are cut off from
sources of supply, General
Arthur said to-day.

Surerfort bombing has
ahout completed the job of cutting
ali Communist communication
routes southward, he said.

General Mac Arthur's forces
build'*=* up to offensive strensth
brought heavy cannon into action
to-dav north of Taegu.

A battery of eight-inch Howitz-
ers—the heaviest weapons yet
seen in Korea—lobbed projectiles
into Communist hill pqsitions
flanking the Tabudong-Taegu
highway. Otherwise quiet war
front American troops in this
northwest corner of the 125-mile
lomg defence line fought bitterly
to capture the commanding hilltop
and to keep Communists off the

South
their
Mac

forces in

just)

high ridge just behind the Ameri-|to Lord Baldwin as Governor of |

ean lines.

A gaunt-faced Battalion Com-
mancer whose men have suffered
heavy casualties in this battle told
Reuter: “If the Communists took
this ridge they could almost throw
rocks on Taegu.”

Two miles to the east, American
troops counter-attacked early to-
day to retake hilltops lost during
the night.

Driven Off

Yesterday Americans drove
Communists from a hill 5 miles
southeast of Waegwan, but they
were after driven off by a strong
counter-attack,

South Korean troops have ad-
vanced almost 2 miles on the
northeast sector of the perimeter,
an American Eighth Army Com-
munique announced to-day.

Southerners driving north and











lS es ea

wis

SIR PELHAM WARNER, President of the M.C.C., sits next to John Goddard at a dinner given at the Savoy Hotel in London in honour of

the W.I. cricketers.

New Governor
Flies To
Leewards

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Sept. 14.
Kenneth Blackburne successor

the Leeward Islands left London

unexpectedly in a B.O.A.C. air-
craft this morning. |
The Blackburne family were

preparing for a sea voyage to the}
Leeward Islands about the middle |
of October, and the sudden deci-
sion of the new Governor to fly
was to help to deal with the situ-
ation which has arisen from the}
hurricanes and fires in Antigua.

His Sussex home was the scene
of great activity shortly after
dawn today.

The sun-tanned Mrs. Black-
burne said: “My husband is flying
out a month earlier than he the|





intended in order to give all the
help he can”.

She plans to follow him by air|
on October 2nd with their adopted |
children their six-year-old son
Martin and their two-year-old

east from the road and rail junc-|daughter Jean.

tion of Yongchon tightened their
positions formed after the main
force of the Communist drive
south had been held,

British troops west of Taegu
with the American Second Division
mopped up groups of Communists
in rear areas.

Major General Emmett O’Don-
nell, Junior, commanding the)
United States Far Eastern Air
Force Bomber Command said to-
day that American Superfortresses
now found little left of the North
Korean industry worth bombing,

In an official report reviewing
the first two months of the com-
mand’s operations (from July 13)
he listed the heavy industry and
war plants attacked—these in-
eluded the Songjin chemical in-

dustry and the Tchin-Nampo
chemical and metal producing
works which had been stvuck off
the target list after de tructive
bombing attacks.

“Heavy industry hes been

severely crippled in an estimated
40 percent. destruction of assigned
targets,” Gereral O’Donnell’s re-
port said. —Reuter,



Jordan Threatens

To Use Armed Force

Against Israel

AMMAN, Sept. 14.

JORDAN has told France, Britain and the United States

that she will meet alleged
force unless Israeli troops
sources said here to-day.

violation of her territory by
withdraw, usually reliable

An Israeli force occupied a stretch of territory in the Arab

land, Jordan claimed.

Contract Stands

LONDON, Sept. 14.

British jet plane contracts with
Sweden will not be affected at
present by the Government's de-
cision to Be exports of jet fight-
ers to nations outside the Atlan-
tic Pact a Foreign Office spokes-
man said to-day. Sweden however
has been told that existing con-

the building capacity cf Britain’s
industry is needed for}
Atlantic Pact production, he ad-|
ded.

The supply for the Swedish |
market differs from the normal |
case because Swedish factories |

are themselves producing jet fight- |

ér-engines under licence
’ The British side of the contract!
is limited to building the body of |
the plane around completed
gines

en-

—Reuter

$$ $$$ $5

| ploughed

Israel replied that it had been
allotted to her under United
Nations agreement.

The sources said that Jordan,
which complained to the United
Nations had also invoked Anglo-
Jordan treaty and called for aid

It was understood that she had
also notified France, Britain and
the United States as signatories
of a joint agreement in May
which guaranteed her frontiers
with Israel.

Jordan was believed to have
requested governments te use all
available means to force Israel to
withdraw from the territory.

The American Aide Memoire is
reported to have asked Jordan to
refrain from precipitate action |
pending a full report by the}
United Nations Truce ‘Committee, |
observers said. According to re-}



ports 400 Israeli troops with heavy
armour occupied 100 acres of}
Jordan territory
It as reported that they h id}
the land before with-
drawing most of their troops and
leaving two “symbolic” out-posts
he Jordan gart the






facing

forced



‘ Island in

@ On Page 3.



|

me |

“We'll Miss

You, Molly’’
Says Busta

ll



LADY HUGGINS

SIR JOHN HUGGINS, G.C.M.G.,
Gevernor of Jamaica, left the
island for the last time as its chief
executive, on Saturday morning,
bound for Britain on six months’
leave prior to retirement. He was
accompanied by Lady Huggins,
and two of his daughters.

After two weeks of farewell
functions the Governor and his
family said official farewells to
Jamaican officials and leading
citizens and representatives of the
Press at King’s House on Saturday
morning and to a select group of
Privy and Executive Councillors
at Port Antonio, where he boarded
ship.

Lady Huggins cried as she kiss-
ed the Hon. W. A. Bustamante and
other leading members of the com-
munity, including the leaders of
the Jamaica Federation pf Women
which she founded during the
s€ven years she and her husband
have been in the island.

When the Party left King's
House Lady Huggins and her two
daughters were in tears and she
was declaring that she would he
back some day, while Mr. Busta-
mante said: “We'll miss youcterri-
bly, Molly. There is no one like



you.” |

In the evening the Colonial |
Secretary, the Hon. D.C. Mac;
Gillivray, C.M.G.,

was sworn in|
as Acting Governor by the Hon
My. Justice J. E. D. Carberry,}
Acting Chief Justice. He will act|
until a ceessor to Sir John Hug
Gove arrive the
March or April next year








EISENHOWER MAY LEAD

Learie Constantine and other woll known ancients of the gamo attended.





WEST DEFENCE FORCES

By PAUL

GENERAL

DWIGHT EISENHOWER, who

SCOTT RANKINE~

NEW YORK, Sept. 14.

led the

Western armies to victory against Hitler was being prom-
inently mentioned here to-day for the post of Supreme
Commander of the Western defence forces agreed upon

by the “Big Three” Foreign

Advocate Hurricane

Relief Fund
For Antigua

Previously acknowledged $5,535.30
Canadian Bank of
Commerce :

EHK . 1 20
Barclays Bank :

Roberts Manufacturing

Co., Ltd. 50 00

Advocate Co., Ltd,

Mr. & Mrs, A. C. Bailey 5 00

M.L. 1 00

Capt. & Mrs. G. Russel 5 00

Atom 1 00

Frank B, Armstrong

Ltd. 100 00
Colonial Postmaster &

Staff 79 00
Bajan 10 00
Mr. & Mrs. T. E

McKenzie 50 00
Anon 1 00

W. Sorhaindo 1§

Total

Increase In
German Police
Very Likely

OBSERVERS THINK

By SYLVAN MANEGOT

NEW YORK, Sept, 14.
The “Big Three’ Foreign Min-

isters, Acheson, Bevin and Schu-

man to-day spent the whole
morning session discussing the
vital issues of West German
rearmament and German parti-

cipation in the defence of Western
Europe.

It was understood that no
agreement was reached on major
issues and further discussion was
postponed.

The ministers met this morning
without any advisers other than
the three High Commissioners for
Germany who had been working
overnight to draft the agreed
formula for the expansion of West
Germany’s police forces.

This was quite apart from the
question whether Germany should
have a military force of her own
to contribute to Western defence.

@ On page 3







Ministers last night.

General Eisenhower who is now
President of Columbia University
is believed to have made it clear
privately that he would be willing
fo accel such a position if the
North Atlantic powers decided to
accept the nominee appointed by
the United States,

Speculation segerding. the ap-
oni ene Nort Au tic

up’ ommander has
current in Washington ever since
it was made known last week that
the United States would support
the original French proposal to
create such a command.

It was agreed in principle yes-
terday by Foreign Ministers of
Britain, France and the United
States that they would support the
proposal to appoint a Supreme
Commander at the meeting of the
North Atlantic Foreign Ministers
opening tomorrow.

As the American Chairman of
the Chiefs of Staff of the North
Atlantic powers, such a command-
er could for the present direct the
training of Western European De-
fences. He would assume duties
as commander as soon as forces for
him to command were formed.

According to current thinking in
North ‘Atlantic diplomatic circles,
it would be for Defence Ministers
of the North Atlantic powers and
their Chiefs of Staff who are meet-
ing in Washington in October to
make the final decisions regarding
the composition and the disposition
of these forces.

The points being advanced by
supporters of the appointment of
General Eisenhower are:

Throughout the Allied cam-
paigns in Europe he showed an in-
comparable ability to weld the
forces of many Allied Nations into
one fighting machine, and to re-
solve differences between various
national commands without arous-
ing any fears that he was favour-
ing his own country.



TERRORISM LESSENS

SAIGON, Sept. 14

French author'ties announced
today that there was less Com-
munist terrorism against Chileans
in Indo-China last month than in
all four years of guerilla activity.

They said that in Vietnam,
casualties from grenade throw ng
and the like in such places as
Saigon had fallen by 41 percent.

| from the July figure and sabotage

by 22 percent.
—Reuter.





Host To 700

Argentines

| Portsmouth Is
|

PORTSMOUTH, Sept. 14
The ancient seaport of Ports-
mouth is today playing host to
nearly 700 officers, cadets and

ratings from the training cruiser
La Argentina now berthed there
{on a vis't to Britain

This morning the Lord Mayor
of Portsmouth, Alderman Sir
Denis Daley accompanied by the
Argentine naval attache, Rear
Admiral Victorio Maltesa were
received on board the Argentine

cruiser by her commander, brisk} those Governments represented on
good humoured Captain Ignation|the Far

Chamorro,
The Argentine marine band
mounted on the sunlit quarter

deck played “Rule Britania” as
visitors went on board. Blue and
white Argentine flags fluttered
from her mast head

Tonight the Lord Mayor wa
giving a reception for officers and
cadets in the red carpeted Coun-
cil Chamber. Later visitors will
be guests at the Corporation loc:
theatres and dance kalis and will
ilso be entertained in the Petty
Officers’ mess at Royal Naval
barracks and the Ordinary Off
cers’ mess Whale Island

In sleek grey the British buil
cruiser has visited Teneriffe,
Boulogne, Cherbourg and Copen-
hagen. After a week's stay in
port she will go to New York
Puerto Rico and Rio De Jane'ro
returning to Buenos Aires
November 29

on

—Reuter,

North Korea
Is To Blame

Says U.N. Commission

LAKE SUCCESS, Sept. 14.

The United Nations Commis
sion on Korea today placed the
ent re blame for the Korean situa-

tion on North Korean

It stated that the Communist
government had launched a
carefully planned full seale inva-
sion on June 25, when its efforts
to undermine the Southern re-
public from within had failed

In its official annual report ,to
the General Assemb'y, the Com-
mission said that though the origin
of the conflict was art ficial di-
vision of the country, Nortt
Koreans could have _ avoided
actual war by allowing interna-
tionally supervised elections to be
held throughout the whole of
Korea. —Reuter,

authorities





£800,000 Will Save Butlin’s

From Liquidation

‘From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Sept. 14.

Brigadier Keith Thorburn told
an informal meeting of the
shareholders of Butlin’s Bahamas
that unless the company could
raise £800,000 “within the next
fortnight at the outside I am
perfectly certain that ereditors
in Nassau will apply ‘for liqui-
dation”

One bright spot in the whole
meeting was Mr. “Billy” But-
lin’s promise to put un £1.000,-
000 of his own money, if the sum
required is raised. But he made
one firm proviso—he must then
be allowed to operate the Camp.

Thorburn said £800,000
needed to complete the
pa “Vacation Village”

Jahamas, but an
working capital would still be
required Even if money wa
raised, the Camp could not now
pleted in time to

was
Com-
in the
additional





be corr benefit




ea



The Board made no secret of
their doubts about the Com-
pany’s ability to raise the neces-
sary funds. Thorburn said “I
still believe in this venture, but
I am getting very pessimistic
about getting out of it.”

During the meeting there was
a demand that Butlin be ap-
pointed Managing Director, but
Thorburn said that it was im-
possible as Butlin was prevented
from doing so under the terms
of his contract with Butlin’s
Ltd

After the meeting, Butlin told
your’ correspondent he could be
released from the contract if
necessary, but the Board had
not asked him to become Man-
aging Director

However, he made it clear
that his offer of £1.000,000 stood
only on condition that filled
this post
Courts Can’t Decide
was revealed at the meet-

he

It

ing that the petition had bee
made to the Courts in London t
wind up the Company. This wa
in respect of £140. The Com
pany’s solicitor Kenneth Col
explained that British Court
could not order the winding up
of the Company as it was out
side their jurisdiction

Thorburn said the Company's









creditors in Nassau had held
admirably, but he thought that
unle money was raisec during
the next fortnight, the ruld no
be prevented from applying for
liquidation

There was another encounter
betwe hareholder and the
Board over he Report ict
appeared in the newspaper he
thi I rn t t 1€ ne
in cold storage | Compat
in the Bahama vas to be sol
up. When Thorbur vas unabla
to confirm or der th repor

rehoilder elive

@ On Page 5

y Aduncate -
‘AD WITH STEE

——~. gine aree

AT THE SAVOY





s

o
‘2p
Price

L-



eneral
Eleetions

ay Follow

LONDON, Sept. 14,

PRIME MINISTER CLEMENT ATTLEE to-

night decided to risk the downfall of his Gov-
ernment and immediate General Elections by
announcing in Parliament that he intended to go

ahead with steel nationalisation.
Conservative Leader Winston Churchill immediately rose

to brand the Government’s action as
pushed forward a motion deploring that “at the most

H



“reckless and wanton”.

critical period in our national safety, Britain should be

p’unged

Truman Talks |, .

Of Japanese

Peace Treaty —

WASHINGTON, Sept, 14
sideat Truman said toda;
ha

he |
1 authorised the State Depart

into a fierce political controversy at home.”

Within a few minutes it was
earned the lobbies that the
rnment had decided to accept
Churchill’s challenge, and regard
motion as one of censure
which if carried would mean
labour’s resignation
If the Government were de-
feated on Churehill’s censure
i motion, it would therefore seek a

| fresh mandate from the country
in general elections.

|
nt to initiate informal discus-! The Government threw _ its
sons about a Japanese Peace} bombshell of steel nationalisation
Treaty with other members of the | into the comparative calm of the
Far Eastern Commission Government’s emergency session
The President told his weekly] on defence when Supply Minister
Press Conference that the United | Gocrge Strauss announced. that
States is also exploring the possi- |; ointments to the board to
bility of ending the state of war per ite nationalised steel would
with Germany lhe made on October 2. Loud
Truman said the question Of | aivdns from the Governmeni
ending the state of war with Ger- | sanche sreeted the announce-
many was a subject to be dealt| ' ° "=
with by Foreign Ministers of | ment

Britain, France, Rusgia and the |

United States

Churchill jumped to his feet to

| announce that Conservatives

The President's statement re- | would put forward a_ motion
garding the Peace Treaty with! ‘@-night condemning the Govern-
Tapan, said: “It has long been the | ment’s action. He demanded “&
view of the United States Gevern-| debate on the question” next,

that the
entitled

ment
ere

people
fo a

Peace

Tay
Tree

an

aty |

Tuesday
Herbert Morrison, Leader of the

which would bring them back into! House agreed to this

the family of nations.”

The President's statement added
“I have authorised the Department |

|

Blackburn Against

of the State to initiate informal | Raymond Blackburn, who re-
discussions as to the future pro- jsigned from the Labour Party
cedure, in the first instance, with |hecause it refuses to have the

coalition Government which he

Eastern Commission,
ones most actively
the Pacific War

ecencerned

the
ir

—-Reuter,

10 New Papers
In Two Weeks

ROME, Sept i4

Rome today gave birth to
10th daily newspaper—the secx
new daily to appear in the i

two weeks

‘rhe new paper carr.ed the title

Ih Di Roma’ the
tite as the Fascist morning paj
published during

Popolo

ils
na
ast

same

er



, | considers necessary, spoke against
‘! the Government.

Amid Government protests he
asked the Prime Minister if he
did not consider that the prime
| responsibility to-day was to
nationalise the slums before he
nationalised steel

There was no
remark

answer to this

Steel Nationalisation Act
sd im the last Parliament,
provides for the iron and steel
industry to be taken over by the
State on January 1, 1951, or at
any time within a year from that
date

The
Ass



Mussolini's



edie: The Government has con-
Officials of the paper however sistently declared that it would
lescribed it as an “independent| SPerate end sos ba oe ve eee
eves ; , eo + ne | ible, but many Opposition mem-
paper above party polit-c8,! hers’ believed that it intended
nspired only by considerations of because of its precarious smal!
ational unity.” | yea : r .

"i 5 ma

From its first issue, the paper, tor tims in Parllament,. to’ play
ippeared rightwing, but Anti-- ’
Sovernment —Reuter. —Reuter.

e

Always

Al YOUR: SERVICE



In

your

favourite

of

colours

green and black. With or with-

out dyno hubs and 3 or 4 speed

Sturmgy

Archer

Gears. 22

inch and 24 inch Frames.

RALEIGH

THE ALL-STEEL BICVECLE

Sole distributors:

| 10, 11,

——$————— T

i)
lu

A

CAVE, SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

12 & 13 Broad Street

Wii Asya een ning ui | il tl ui







IS HONOUR E.

smith, C.M.G., Administrator
of Dominica, Mrs. Arrowsmith and
their two daughters Susan and
Jennifer, were arrivals on Tues-
day afternoon by B.G. Airways for
a short holiday and are staying at
the Windsor Hotel.

Mr. and Mrs. Arrowsmith came
up chiefly to see their daughter
Susan off to school and she will be
leaving on Saturday morning by
T.C.A. on her way to England
where she is attending Westonbirt
School in Gloucester.

Professor of Anatomy
| aed eddie to England on the

Golfito on Wednesday were

Dr. and Mrs. R. G, Harrison and

their two children who had spent

three months’ holiday as guests of

Mr. and Mrs. E. H, Gooding of

Fairfield, St. Philip. Mrs. Harrison

is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.

Gooding.

Accompanyin’, them was Miss
Dorothy Gooc who will be
staying on in b .giand indefinitely.

Formerly University Demonstra-
tor in Human Anatomy doing
teaching and research and a Fel-
low of Pembroke College, Oxford,
Dr. Harrison will be taking up a
new appointment on his return to
England as Professor of Anatomy
at the University of Liverpool. He
said that he will have about ten
days before doing so and plans to
spend them in Oxford.

From Paramount Pictures
R. H. D. HUNTER of Para-
mount Pictures, Trinidad, was

an arrival on Tuesday evening by

the Alcoa Byfjord for a holiday.

He was accompanied by his wife

and they are staying at the Ocean

View Hotel.

Honeymoon Couple Leave
R. and Mrs. A. ‘B. Mackie of
Trinidad who were up here

on their honeymoon, returned yes-

terday evening by B.W.I.A. They
had spent 11 days here and were
staying at the Hastings Hotel.

Mr. Mackie is employed
Trinidad Leaseholds Ltd.

After Five Days
R. and Mrs. R. Medealdea and

J! their three children, Ligia,

Beatrice and Gabriel of Caracas,

Venezuela, left by B.W.1.A. for

Trinidad yesterday evening to

spend a further holiday before re-

turning home. Accompanying
them was Mr. Cesar Rodriguez.

They had all spent five days’
holiday here and were staying at
the Windsor Hotel.

For U.K. Holiday
RS. R. R. HEAD. whose hus-
band is engineer of Messrs

Cable and Wireless, Boarded Hall,

left on the Golfito on Wednesday

evening for England where she
will spend a holiday. She was ac-
companied by her two children.
For One Week
RRIVING from Trinidad on
Wednesday afternoon on the

“Golfito” for about a week’s stay

was Mr. L, Grant of J. N, Harri-

man and Co., Ltd. He is staying
at the Ocean View Hotel

P. Arrow-



with



A MAN was boasting to me
4 the other day that he had
one of those new cars in which,
said he, “There is a button for

everything — even for opening
or closing the doors.”
“Is there a button for

trousers?” I asked courteously.
“How do you mean?” he answer-
ed. And I could see that he
was annoyed at the possibility
that his car was not perfect.
“What trousers?” he asked, “Any-
one’s,” said I. “Surely,” I
continued, “among all those but-
tons, there is a spare one for a
trouser or waistcoat emergency.”
“I wasn’t talking of that kind of
button.” he said indignantly.
“Well,” said I, “I wouldn’t be
seen in a car that was designed
without giving thought to peo-
ple’s trousers. A fine fool you’d
look if you couldn’t get out of
the car because all the buttons
were off your breeches, and you
had to sit there with them fall-
ing about your feet.” “Don't be a
fool,” he said coldly, and moved



FORKS, SHOVELS,

SOSSSS

BY THE WAY...



Puisne Judge—Trinidad
R. Kenneth Vincent-Brown,
Puisne Judge of Trinidad, re-

turned home on Wednesday eve-

ning by B.W.1LA. after spending
three weeks’ holiday. He was stay-
ing at the Hote) Royal
On Holiday

RS. KATHLEEN 1 AYLOR of

Antigua, arrived on Wcdnes-
day by B.W.1LA. for a holida¥ and
is staying at the Ucean view ciotel.

She was accompanied by her little

son Robert.

Medical Student Returns
R. BERTIE GRAHAM, son of
the late Capt. George Graham

and Mrs. Graham of Maxwell, re-
turned to England on Wednesday
by the Golfito to resume his
studies at Guy’s Hospital, London,
where he is a medical student.

Bertie had ,spent his summer
vacation here with his mother.

First Visit
RRIVING from Venezuela on
Tuesday by B.W.LA. were

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Santana

and their little son Paul who are

Spending three weeks’ holiday as

guests at the Hotel Royal.

Mr. Santana who is paying his
first visit to the island, is in the
Industrial Safety Department of
the Texas Oil Co. .

Venezuelans Holidaying

Here
R. and Mrs. Alberto Busta-
mante and Mr. and Mrs.
Hector Tosta of Caracas, Vene-

zuela, are now in Barbados for a
holiday. They expect to be here
until Monday and are staying at
the Hotel Royal.

Mr. Bustamante
while Mr, Tosta
Estate business.

Spent Three Weeks

R. ARTHUR de LIMA of

Trinidad, returned home on
Monday evening by B.W.1.A. after
spending three weeks here. He
was a guest of Mrs. C. Goddard of
the Garrison.

Mr. de Lima is Managing Direc-
tor of Y. de Lima and Co., Ltd,
jewellers of Port-of-Spain, San
Fernando and Bridgetown.

16—Not Out

RITISH GUIANA’S Freddie

Grant this year celebrates his
16th anniversary of life in Great
Britain. It is a long time to be
away from one’s own home, but
Freddie seems to enjoy it and has
made good use of his time. A
physiotherapist, he is also the
leader of a seven-piece band which
plays at the London Panama Club.
Any prospect of his returning to
the West Indies? With a wistful
look, Freddie says “Maybe!”

Clever People

If all the good people were clever,

And all clever people were good.

The world would be nicer than ever

We thought that it possibiy could

is
is in

a lawyer

the Real

But somehow, 'tis seldom or never

The two hit it off os they should;
The good are so harsh to the clever,
The clever so rude to the good

Elizabeth Wordsworth.
e«

away. But he was rattled, I'm
glad to say,

The ghost of a horse

CORRESPONDENCE about

the ghosts of dogs recalled
to me Watts-Dunton’s experience
He heard a noise in the night,
came downsta'rs, and saw a horse
carrying its head under its leg.
It walked straight through a wall
and then disappeared with a
sound of clanking harness-chains.
Next day he told Swinburne about
it, “It’s not me that’s seeing
things this time.’ said the poet.
laughingly,

Openecast food

COMMITTEE is

the possibility of making
coal edible, in order to direct
farmers and agricultural workers
away from land which is only
good for growing food. Experi«
ments have already shown that
tinned coal remains fresh for a

examining

We have a Fresh Stock of — —

BEET, CUCUMBERS, CARROTS, CABBAGE,
LETTUCE, TOMATO, BUTTER BEANS

GARDEN

RAKES, WATERING

AT

THE CORNER STORE

SSSGSSSSSSSGFOS SG SOHSSHt

By Beachcomber

STEELE
BRIGGS
SEEDS

THERE IS A REAL
DIFFERENCE WITH

TOOLS

Caub Calling

Off To England
RS. A. MOORE, wife of Canon
P. D. W. Moore, former Rector
of St. John, left on Wednesday
afternoon by he SS. Golfito for
England where she will be re-
maining for a year,
Accompanying her were her
three daughters June who is doing
her second’ year at London Uni-
versity studying Sociology, Nanette
who will be entering London Uni-
versity for the first time and@.will
also study Sociology and Helen
who will be put into Welsh Girls’
School.

Off To St. Vincent

R. JACK CLARKE, Manager

of Clifton Hall Plantation and
Mr. Cecil Dear, Assistant Secre-

tary of the Barbados Turf Club
left on Tuesday by B.G. Airw
for St. Vincent where they will
spend a week’s holiday before
ing on to Grenada for a cuniler
period, ’

Paid Brief Visit

A paying a brief visit to
the island, Mr. N. Karlsbad, a
hat manufacturer of Trinidad, re-
turned home yesterday evening by
B.W.LA. He was staying at the
Hotel Royal.



CROSSWORD





AcTiss
t Luts aWeys s@@ms to De trem
bling (3 4)
8 Altcres card there Means hired
we 10 This has “ body.” (v)
4 Vlie test is Not written, (4)
A At 1S) 18 Charm (6!
th ea there! (6)
18. St. Paul's dominates the city,
20. Came sip aivetes Tw ' e
obseure, (7) - ist | (5)
22. A novel doctur, a
Down
i. Ceremunies In which knights are
made. (9)
4. Exeroises not credited to the
batsman. (5, 4)
%. This is curved. (y)
4. Denotes a current pian. A}
5. There have been some alterations
apparently. (8)
i. Implement, (4)
8. There's no end tu this. (8)
Â¥. This has been taken out, (6)
il Principle, (4) 13. Celebrate, (4)
17. Few or many. (4)
19 Stomach—for the Big Bad Wolt,
verhaps, (3)
Solutian of yesterday 5 pussie,— Acros@
t rafaigar; 6, River. ae: 19, Got; 11
Mavis 15 ‘Motety: 15 @ot: 16, Pug
Urio mots, ly Bottled; 41,
ist 4 $or8, 23. ou Rieko hs)
Down: ‘ r card; A ‘8; |
Avoidable a Bebea: 5 Ar: A Give, 3
Adivose, & Say not so: 12," Strides: 14
rin ten 1K Bolt’ 20 Lum



considerable time, and is a better
body-fuel than meat, since it con-
tains 6 per cent. per hundred-
weight more vitamin G. A spokes-
man said yesterday: “The ch'ld
who tries to eat coal is uncon-
sciously obeying the dictates of
nature. The only reason why so
many people regard coal as un-
eatable is because the idea is un-
fam liar to them. Half of them
eould not even tell you what
coal tastes like. Prejudices die
hard.”

Trombone Lullabye
Nowadays one expects some
misunderstood genius to write a
piece of music for a couple of
trombones. (Article on music.)
HAVE myself set to music a
tender “Lullabye for Four
Trombones,”

If your face is Ag | your fortune
(Blow, my bully boys, blow!)
Here’s a penny, dear Miss Pibble-,

stone,
For the poorest girl I know.
Refrain: Hushabye, etc.

872 and
16¢ per pk.

CANS, SHEARS

2SOCSCSOSSSSSSESE6C00000!

BARBADOS, ADVOCATE



cut up an easy part of the cliff

which brings him ele to
Captain Barnacle’s shack. old
man greets him in surprise.

444 RIGHTS RESERVED



CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it:
AXYDLBAAXR
is LONGFELLOW
One letter simply stands for another. In this example A is used
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc. Single

Rupert and the Castaway —5

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1950









THIS IS THE

INGRID BERGMAN

PICTURE THE WORLD HAS
BEEN WAITING TO SEE!

IT’S A NEW HIGH FOR |

)

VISIT PLAZA’S {
SNACK BAR Xi
Hours : i




8 a.m. te Midnite

TO-DAY



THE UNEXPECTED! 2.30 &

8.30 p.m.





THE UNEXPECT! _|

ET IS iHE MEW INGRID BERGMAN HIT!
“I've been nm in the dumps ile f

lately.” “* "s odd,” replies
the Title bear. “I’m in the dumps,
too, because my friend Bill should
have been here but he’s ill.’’
“Then let’s share our troubles,”
says the old Captain.

INGRID BERGMAN
JOSEPH COTTEN Fm
MICHAEL WILDING ar



letters, apos-



Bech day the Code letiee are aigeren. = “ore* Of &1) Mts ALFRED HICHUULIS
A Quotation mee ae

MH QMF RXXHVHW NMBKVW QMBTM
RCH TFKNCRGBTNFCE BW KFN JH

MHRCG—XRQ

Cryptoquote: HE BRINGS OUT DAINTIES UN-

SOUGHT—HORACE.

EMPIRE

TO-DAY 2.30 & 8.30 and
Continuing

20th C-Fox presents :

“THE BLACK
ROSE”

Starring :

Tyrone Power; Orson Welles

Se
ROXY

TO-DAY to SUN. 4.30 & 8.15
Republic Smashing Double—
Lynn Robe ‘ts; Lloyd Bridges

— in —

SECRET SERVICE
INVESTIGATOR

“THE RED PONY”
Starring :

Myrna Loy; Robert Mitchum









FRIDAY,

643996065: ;

ERROL FLYNN i



bs

Galeered through MLM CLASSICS,



AWETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES

‘R.K.O.-Raaio’s Action Spectacle !
Paul HENREID and Maureen O'HARA in

* SPANISH

Color by Technicolor!
,» SATURDAY, SUNDAY 8.30 P.M. Mat.

| PLAZA sbi: FRI, SAT., SUN. 5 & 8.30 P.M. |

Warner’s Thrill Double!
“THEY DIED WITH THEIR BOOTS ON”

ine Hi} MADAM TIAM FOOK versus DOREEN
‘CHEROKEE STRL For a Purse of one hundred dollars ($100.00)
(Musical Western) Winner to receive $60.00; Loser to receive $40.00

FRIDAY TO MONDAY 8.30 p.m.

MATINEE: FRIDAY and SATURDAY 5 p.m.

This Picture is Suitable for ADULTS Only

FIRST SHOCKING EXPOSE OF .
' CRIMES AGAINST WOMEN!

en

Make Your Cooking a Pleasure

Select a

FALKS KEROSENE COOKER—
1, 2,3 & 4 BURNER MODEL

OVENS — Single & Double.

FOR YOUR BAKING
You Will Need

MIXING BOWLS, PUDDING PANS
MEASURING CUPS and SPOONS
ROLLING PINS, CAKE STANDS
ICING SETS WITH INSTRUCTIONS
BAKING and PASTRY PANS

CAKE BOXES, BREAD BINS

No Parking Problem when you Shop with us.

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
FACTORY LIMITED.

HARDWARE DEPARTMENT Tel. No. 2039








coo

Lint



Fen





ROYAL

TO-DAY at 5 Only
John Wayne; Gail Russell
ode pen

“ANGEL AND
THE BADMAN"

TO-NIGHT at 8.30
Madam O’Lindy & Troupe in

CARACAS NIGHT

Demonstrating a Smashing
RHUMBA Contest

COLOR ‘ he,
|
|

PLAZA THEATRE

BRIDGETOWN
PABA EF PZ LIE ZEAE RRP EAA P }
SPECIAL MATINEE SATURDAY MORNING 9.30 :
RKO-Radio’s Jungle Thriller ! Johnny WEISSMULLER in
TARZAN AND THE AMAZONS
Featuring :

|
Madam Tiam Fook |
|
|

vs. Doreen
PCOS OOPPSOOOPOOS,

GLOBE

OPENING 5 and 8.30 p.m. TO-DAY
and Continuing Matinee and Nite

“STROMBOLI”

PLUS TONITE
LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE
WALTER BURKE “Who do you know in Heaven”












































OLYMPIC

TO-DAY ONLY 4.45 & 8.15
Republic Pictures presents :

“THE RED MENACE”

Starring :
Robert Rockwell,
Hanne Axman

a
Sat. to Mon. 4.30 & 8.15

“OH YOU BEAUTIFUL
DOLL”

“FIGHTING MAN
OF THE PLAINS”

With
Randolph Scott

TO-NIGHT
8.30

DR. J. V. HENSON
CONFIDENTLY PRESENTS

MADAM O’LINDY and her
Unforgettable

CARACAS NIGHTS OF 1950

Reinforced by the Big Guns of her
Allied Troupe

@

{

- 66,4 5%,
POPPPPOP PSPSPS SSS

MAIN”

SUN. 5 P.M.

Rsidkshaasnidenaian’

699998956







DOREEN

A SMASHING INTERNATIONAL RHUMBA
CONTEST

FEATURING :



PRICES: Stalls 24c; House 48c; Balcony 72c.
Boxes $1.00

eerste
P.S.—Persons from Silver Sands please contact, Wilcox
Truck from Pilgrim Road, Thyme Bottom and







-
Foul Bay. TRUCK NO. 135, Jervis Scott. TIAM FOOK

SSE

GPP S SSS SSS SSS SS SSS OSS 99 FOSS 999 9SSSOSOSSSS! APOE

RAGING
RAGING

ISLAND
PASSIONS!

ee

it)
ibaa 3
A





BAM GORDON (05. as evaesdeun: “If I Love You”
HOLMAN RAYSIDB 5.5 of ceeo is “Tl Get By”
KENNETH KENNEDY ........... “Far Away Places”
RUDOLPH HINDS ................. “Lucky Ole Sun”
RII TAMING 6 cle Tune yo sala Say ay ‘My Foolish Heart”



GLOBE
Judges for To-nite’s TALENT CONTEST :
MRS. GEOFFREY MANNING
MRS. NORA EVELYN
MR. M. D. THOMAS

a eee ae bd

£

STRO

aon

a a3

MBOLI

STAR

BERGMAN

UNDER



BY SPECIAL REQUEST
“OLE MAN RIVER”
By RAY NUNES

STAR CROONER
B.G’s. RADIO ZFY

THE INSPIRED DIRECTION OF

ROSSELLINI





And there is LEON ERROL in
“ THE UNINVITED BLONDE”
PRICES: Pit 16; House 30; Balcony 40; Boxes 54

664 ety
S496 CSSSSSSO9SSOFSESSSSSSOS

PLLC LSE PSPS OCCOSESOSSSE 58



ves

”$$69$6999SS SSCS S OCS OS OSS SSSSSSESSSSSSS SESS SESS

+
ry]
A
%
=
e
ao
$
a



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1950

Prices High

German Police All Telephone

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Harbour Log

|



PAGE THREE



ooo

SAAS —

4

*
* 2
Increase Likely Lines ‘Cut Off’ | In Carlisle Bay » Y
7 @ From page 1. ae ‘
Me oo ape mye —_ had — IN ANTIGUA | Laudarpns. oa Burma D “Sen isc ithe Kv
wn pect ussed this 4 Q : » . Cyelorama i‘ »
ced Gas nas Seat tattemen from | morning were the releiag sf the So. cae eee ee ee ‘
chant who bas Just retold the | Vel of German steel production MR. HARVEY SMITH who was | punicia, Sch. Grenville Lass, Sch. K
“7 sit to his — _ ri and the authorisation of increased |im the Leeward and Windward |rnyilis Mark, M.V. La Perle and ?
vocate yesterday that vast Im~-| shipbuilding capacity. Islands from March conducting a | #.M.S. Sparrow K
provements have been made since ; len! ; ARRIVALS Y
he left there 33 years 260. ritain for one, regards anjsurvey for the Colonial Office, | ss. seabroeze, 4,380 tons net, Capt ‘«
Mr. Maffei who left here four | €@tly, decision on Germany’s in- returned home on the “Golfito” | Bide, from Port-au-Prince. . r Mi
months ago also visited Canada, dustrial contribution to Western }on Wednesday evening. $8. CG. Tula, Ene se ae. ,
England, France, and Switzerland. | defence as a priority matter. A Telephone engineering expert | 2's SCotuen ‘Musician, 4022 tons’ net a /
He said that he was surprised to oe es oe that Re gap convenes to ~ —— Office for | capt. Moug, from Trinidad. : Ke
see what good roads. existed in narr on points whi € purpose survey, Mr. ‘ouch With Barbados »
Italy. Where there was the lack still divided the United States,|Smith was in Antigua at the time In T «
ofe , water and schools in} Britain and France in their views|of the hurricane. He returned to Coast Station a
the villages, such a state of affairs}on the future steps towards|Barbados about ten days ago and || CABLE & WIRELESS (West Indies)
no existed. Western German sovereignty and|was staying at “Stafford House.” | b'd: “dvise that they can now conan SS
Born in the village of Bagnone, | the strengthening of the German He said that he was staggered thet Gatates Fi eine through y
for: at the amount of damage done to

Provinee of Massa-Carrara, Mr.
Maffei said that all his family

c i bridge, $.S Myram, S.S. Regent
cluding his father who had been | observers at the present stage of Seceinitn a in the |pinther, SS. C. G. Thai, 8-3.
to P: were there to receive him.}the talks was that things were |were calte fair ex oe ee 8 es 8.8. Turicum,

Ask about conditions in Italy, moving fn the following direction: li Teas one a built se lucia, ss. Goes —s a
he said that the goods were highly} The occupying powers will ae of John" . UP forest, S.S. Golfite, $.S. | Janna,
priced, but everything one wanted| agree to a substantial increase in| ov ree St. s which was |s.s.' Dolabella, $8. Queen of
was available. same thing} Germany’s police force somewhat exaggerated. Bermuda, 5.S. Brazil, $.S. Krusaa,
could be said for France except . ‘After the hurricane he went|5.S- Gulf Merchant, S.S. Akt, 8.8.

that the goods there were a little
cheaper.

The climate was similar to that
in the West Indies and the coun-
try was crowded with tourists
from all over the world, but as
soon as the Korean war started,
the American tourists began to re-



the West German ; he was there because he was able | syros, S.S. S. Mateo, S.S. ss.
ee ene the hotels ; ve re ‘Ito arrange. with the telephone | Esso Cadiliac, S . i. K
He saw the Pope and took a _The American view in par-|fficials for the reconstruction K
snapshot of him just as he came| ticular is that state organisations work to fit in with his new iu
out of his palace to inspect his|COMStitute a valuable guarantee schemes for the island. CAWE. »)
Ri ent which was being. pre- that Western Germany will With regard to his survey, he «
sented with a flag. develop. along democratic lines| said that every island had its dif- ARRIVALS— BY B.W.LA.L. » ,
While in England he saw some] 2nd that it would be a mistake to|ferent conditions, and a different | poiy thompson Mary Gittens, Lionel oe ‘
of the cricket games and wasi| attempt to federalise the entire | scheme was necessary for each Of | Gittens, Meyer Maialon, Dr. Lionel Mapp, ’
pleased with the showing the West| Police forces of the Western} them. Doreen’ Ward, Anna Gillingham, Richard K
ss phy ih 4m Zones. = b He had thoroughly enjoyed his }Giitinsham: Marzaret. Johnson, Charles }
‘aan Si a condi me in s- N 4 visits to the various islands as | Ray, Bruce Brooks, Trina Mendes :
ann SiAPERE Selol + t . ew Governor Flieg | the peopie were most hospitable | kcatuicen Teen, Rebeet Turner, \
upea Slat thet the old aot uel eF P 1 and he had every help from the DEPARTURES—BY B.W.LA.L. ; ;
nai quotations for Swodl, 7 “I couldn’t get everything Gevetarneat abeats, George Kéliense, Bosamee Wickwar, « %
jgoinee_ his last, visit to England | ready in time to go with him at Potter Wiekwer, owns Wiser, Jee ¥
years ago he discovered that the | such short notice” i . ° r a attics
Se geerhes there had hatget ana | latte eer te ey, | eamtigan: Gift Parcels | 33,2277 s,s. conoree s.r srece Oo
the people seemed to be more|the Leeward Islands on Sunda : ; Satt.. Marino Dererie. cote Faces, ’
friendly than before. The British Hed Cross has su ‘ Escape Shipwreck Martin ie re \\
seri £500 for oe :
frurricane Ces und oe THE 34-ton schooner “Princess was Julien, Nicholas Julien, Edna W\
Vacuum Pan colonies have been generous in} Louise,” which left Barbados on For St. Lucia «

Molasses Goes

To London

THE 4,022-ton molasses tanker
“Scottish Musician”, now lying at













ce,
The impression of Conference

That the Bonn Government will
be authorised to increase the total
force, bearing in mind that a
mobile force under a _ central
federal authority is necessary to
meet any emergency in German
security, but also preserving the
essential provincial structure of

offers of assistance.

A gift of £5,000 came from
Jamaica and American Red Cross
is also sending help.

The Weather

TO-DAY







over every inch of the island and
knew what damage had been
done. The telephone poles and
wires were absolutely down and
out and when he left, only 10 lines
had been brought into service.
He said that it was well that



Saturday morning with a cargo

of 700 cartons of biscuits, 180

bags of sugar and three kegs of | Sanche:

screws for Antigua, was wreck-
ed on Five Rocks opposite Church
Bay on the West Coast of Antigua
on Tuesday.

The skipper Augustus Mitchell
and its eight-man crew were
saved, but the cargo was totally
lost. All the cargo was insured,

S.S. Esso Knoxville, $.S. Esso Cam-

Georgios F. Andreadis, 5.8. Petros
Nomicos, S.S. Athenic, 8.58.

8.8. Uranienborg, 8.8. Capt.
S.S. Alcoa Corsair,
Dieppe, S.S. California, $.S. Beacon
Street, S.S. Glamorgan i. 8.
Sundial, S.S. Holberg, 8.S, Brott, $.S.
Woensdrecht, S.S Bergeland, 58.S.
Alcoa Pilgrim, 8.S. Castr, S.S. Brazil,
8.S. Casablanca, S.8. Rockside, S.S.

S.S. Askot,

Stella Worrell, Frank Osborn.
For La Guaira
Nestor Sanchez, Odette Sanchez, Oscar
2, Odile Sanchez, Giselle Sanchez,
Rosario Barnola, Maria Aquique, Sandra
Shultze Avel Noelcke, Peter Nerkowitz,
George Schultze, Hattie Schultze, Eva
Schumann, John tSevens, Mary Stevens,
Jean Taylor William Fletcher, Alcira Ruiz
For Guadeloupe
Karel Brown, Phyllis Brown,
Brown
—e0...

For artinique
Maggie a

Felicia











FORD

anchorage in Carlisle Bay, is Sun Rises: 5.50 a.m. »
completing here its loading of Sun Sets: 6.02 p.m. Pte sdknoae tes Antigua were
vacuum pan molasses for London. Moon: (First Quarter) Sep- || prepared at the local Y.M.C.A, for .

The “Musician” arrived in port tember 18. shipment by the “Princess 28 More Packages
fe any evening and began ig 3 rs p.m. on Louise” but fortunately they were QQ
oading e@ same evening. It is Hi ‘ater: 6.14 a.m., 6. sent by the M.V. “Caribbee” in- ‘ 2 a .
expected to leave port on Saturday p.m. stead. i Ready For Antigua KK
direct for London, This is the AY The “Princess Louise” was re- Me
first call at Barbados by a big|] Rainfall (Codrington): nil ported becalmed before it ran , TWENTY-EIGHT packages of is
tanker for vacuum pan molasses Total for month to Yester- aground in four fathoms of food and clothing now remain to
since the war. day: 2.68 ims. water. The skipper could save, be shipped by the YÂ¥.M.C.A.

oF, only documents and the compass. } Relief Committee to Antigua.
Temperature (Max). 87.5 °F

Supplying the “Musician” with Temperature (Min). 74.0 °F. a eateen These have been stowed at the )
the molasses is the 289-ton motor Wind Direction: (9 a.m) E St Vi t Ss d Baggage Warehouse awaiting an (
vessel “Athelbrook” which arrived (3 pm.) E by N. - Yiricent Sends Oppertunity, ; QO
here on Tuesday. The “Athel- : : e e und goes on anc ‘
brook” will transfer three of her ee Sore +, i ae Gift P ‘ackages none totals $770.00. i \
loads into the “Musician’s” tanks. Barometer: am 999 ‘ mount previously acknowl-

The “Athelbrook” supplied one Bg come naan ) s.08 To Antigua edged $616.80. 7
load on Wednesday and yesterday ‘ i 2 ‘ Mrs. R. D. Foster ; $ 1 oe . \ a
returned to her berth in the inner THE Alcoa “Byfjord” which} Me Coie of Mesidents 10 00 « $
basin to reload. Each loading of ; left port last night for Antigua,) tye Misses Smith 000.0000... 5.00 » :
the “Athelbrook” held up_ traffic BATHERS NEED had 17 cases of food and clothing |B aig oR “
twice on the Chamberlain Bridge DANGER NOiJICES = gs of potatoes | ne & Mrs. Gibbons ............6+ 10.00 KC
for about 20 to 30 minutes each ae na 5 Parente — Sympathiser ... 9.90 »
time as the bridge has to be swung} Colonel R. T. Michelin, Com-| tin re coe MAIN. Harley |Brdee Bileses Asnociatiby s-.s 2 5.00 ,
to give the right-a-way to and} missioner of Police, tdld the Advo- Museen 7 Se af pith H. Blair Bannister 5 00 KK
from the inner basin. cate yesterday that although it! s+ Vincent Grammar School eS Mrs. Toppinge 4

The “Musician”, one of the ships] Was a matter for the Parochial] toiq the “Advocate” yesterday. |My. Violet Bowring........ 10 90
of the Athel Line, used to cai] authorities, he would recommend Mr. Moseley has been sent|E, Redman 29 00 \
here before the war. The “Athel-|life saving equipment at all dan-| gown to Antigua by the St. Vin- BS. Fuckerin i ost deares AS
brook” which is also of teat How, fend thing spots around the} cent Government to take charge | Mrs. M. &. O'Neal! 5 1.00 Q
has already made two calls here] *2°..iq that notices should’ also | Of the packages and to find out Totalen ceeds. ess. eed es ere ;
for molaves for Trina On &HS/yasinceg ‘tau apts warting| om. the, AmKigue Government aa
occasion, she will leave po bathers, especially visitors to the Vv Sih coast re POTICK" BLOCKS
ballast for British Guiana. island. from St. Vincent with special r

eee There is 4 Life Saving equip- | £ard to vegetables which St. Vin- THE WAY

Mammee Apple
Kills Fleas

ment at Cattlewash, Bathsheba; it
was the first erected in the island.
Later, after someone was crowned

at Roekley Beach, the same thing
was done there. The Police are

cent could supply and then re-
port back to his Government.

He said that the packages he
was taking down, were collect-
ed within three days as well as

The French Yaw! ‘“Potick” has
been sunk in the inner basin now ,
for the past nine months.

No attempts at salvaging were
made lafely. With part of the bow

oe mammee ane a a ee for hagarwite the -— £500 donated by private sub- seotrosing sane, wens tee ear b
American fruit othe That er ockley boat also took packages}sel is partly a menace >
as the Santo Domingo apricot, is Rae te winds and | som St Lucia for Antigua, but| tion

a favourite fruit among Barba-
di

ans.

The tree is very large with
leathery dotted leaves. | It also
bears white flowers, A bitter rind
encloses the sweet flesh of the
fruit which can either be eaten
raw or im wine or sugar.
Some apples carry from one to
four seeds. ;

In some West Indian islands an
aromatic liqueur, known as eau
de eréole, is distilled from the
flowers. Many years ago West In-
dians made use of the gum to ex-
tract jiggers from their feet and

Cattlewash is made up of a rope
and a life belt. If anyone gets
into difficulties the life belt, with
rope attached, is thrown into the
sea. The person gets hold of the
belt and is hauled ashore.

NR



was forced to leave a quantity
of galvanize. Before arriving in
Antigua, the boat will also eall
at Dominica to collect other

packages.

Yesterday the protruding part
of the bow could not be seen from
the Wharf as it was hidden among
lighters and three motor vessels
which were in the basin.



oYS’ CLUBS

it ig understood that although there ‘
are now modern methods to ex- ‘
tract jiggers, some still prefer to S

use the mammee apple tree gum.

The wood from the mammee
apple tree can be used for build-
ing or fancy work.

recently the effectiveness

of mammee apples, on fleas and
ticks on dogs, was discovered.

In the current issue of Tr
Agriculture (Vol XXVIII, Nos. 1—
3), Mr, H. K. Plank, entomologist

fans and ticks on dogs and fleas
on. cats.

The - Its are oO)
fusion one poun
mammee apples, thinly sliced or
grated, in water to make one gal-
lon, and (b) the powdered mature
seeds, ve,

an in-
ripe

Fence ie pene ot
n e so perma
om per cont yangeacion. of D.D.T.
Chemical analysis has shown the
toxicity to be due to a type of sub-
stance somewhat similar to the
pyrethrine contained in pyren-
thrum flowers.

Lancaster Makes



Three prizes will be given as follows:

Ist Prize: A FORD ANGLIA
2nd Prize: Raleigh 3 speed cycle

3rd Prize: Rolex Tudor Watch 3
























5,000 Pots A Month

ALTHOUGH new machinery has
not been received, due largely to
lack of funds, workers at the Lan-
easter Factory, St. James, still
manage to five to six
thousand flower pots a month, the
Advocate was informed yesterday.

It was said that the experiment
al plant which deals with the
testing of the clay in the island
is still gomg strong and recently
a few important discoveries have
been made concerning the adapta-
bility and strength of the clay. —

Orders for flower pots are still

Drawing to take place not later than Nov. 30th 1950

“FERGUSON FABRICS”

STOCKED BY THE ¥

Auditors: Fitzpatrick Graham & Co. s,

coming in from many people all WS
over the island but the largest or- “
der usually comes from the Agri- «
cultural Department. »
: The hope was ones that f Ss
n the near future the Factory

would be able to take foreign or- iieciieiiciaiiiiaiaiace as LEGEDGOGSODODGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGLGGLGGDGGGGDGDGDGPPA YO

ders.





PAGE FOUR

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St. Bridgetown.



PUBLIC SAFETY

THE regulations to the Road Traffic Act
which were rejected by the House of
Assembly on Tuesday serve to focus public
attention on the necessity for greater
safety to the travelling public. The amend-
ment was rejected because some members
of the House saw in it a disadvantage to
lorry owners while there was still an in-
sufficient number of ’buses to accommodate

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





=e, Rie SS aa

Friday, September 15, 1950



the number of people who now travel.

The regulations sought to make pro-
vision for permission to be granted before
motor lorries could be used for transport-
ing people. The point was also raised dur-
ing the debate as to whether such permis-
sion would be necessary on every occasion
when the vehicle was to be used for this
purpose. This it was thought would create
unnecessary hardships on the lorry owners
and deprive those who needed them from
obtaining as easily as they might other-

wise, the use of such a vehicle.

Another point raised against the regula-
tions was that it would not be in the public
interest to limit the service which motor
lorries now render to the travelling public
when chartered as passenger vehicles,
when the number of ’buses now in use

could not accommodate them.

While members were talking of the con-
venience of the public, the regulations
were aimed at affording the same public
safety on the road. And Mr. Wilkinson
answered completely the criticisms of
shutting out lorry owners when he said
on the contrary,
merely sought to protect the lorry owner
by compelling him to have his vehicle safe
for such work before a permit could be

that

the regulations,

granted to him.

ADVOGATE

With the increase of an already large
number of motor vehicles on the roads of
this island, it is imperative that something
be done to ensure greater safety to those
who travel. It would be folly to wait until

some fearful accident occurred involving
the loss of many lives or injury to a large
number of people, and then to attempt to
impose regulations which would control
the evil. Complaints have been made pub-
licly on several occasions that the use of
lorries as substitutes for buses is a popular
practice fraught with grave danger and
should be discontinued. It seems that the
recognising the
weight of the criticism as to the shortage
of ’buses, desired not to remove motor
lorries from this service but to compel
them to be maintained in safe condition for
carrying large numbers of people on the
This was to be done by amending
the law so that it would be compulsory for
them to apply for a permit before under-

Transport

roads.

Authority

taking such work.

The regulations have been rejected but
something must still be done to ensure the
safety of those who now travel by this
means. The travelling public should not be
denied any form of transport service which
helps to facilitate business and free move-
ment but that movement must be guided
by an understanding of the necessity for
public safety. This is the duty of the Gov-

ernment.



THE BLIND

THE Annual Report of the Canadian
National Institute for the Blind has just
been published and is an interestinig docu-
ment. The report makes reference to the
Trinidad and Tobago Welfare Association
which it points out, has made substantial
progress during the year and is assisted by
the Trinidad Government to the extent of
$15,000 a year. %

What is however of great interest to Bar-
bados is that that Government has voted
$120,000 for building a new school for the
blind in the South Caribbean area. The site
in Santa Cruz valley was donated by Mr.
Conrad Stollmeyer and building operations
will commence shortly.

The Canadian Institute while not being
responsible for the Trinidad Association
has sent its Managing Director Colonel
Baker and its National Consultant, Field
Services, Mr. D. B. Lawley to Trinidad to
advise the Association as regards policy,
practical arrangements and personnel.

This is another of the many services
which Canada either through private en-
terprise or by government is rendering to
the West Indies. It is a service in which
Barbados will want to take part in the
interests of its own blind.

© co

een

Immigration Is Selective | [yf BORSTAL WAY

When. so much is being said and
written about emigration for West
Indians, it might be timely to in-
ject a few comments from the
viewpoint of some of the countries
to which it is considered that emi-
grants could go. I could do this as
a plain Canadian Citizen with no
official status in the matter, and I
believe that, in general, the same
prineiples would apply to Aus-
omg New Zealand and some

r countries. At the present
time these three countries encour-
age immigration on what may be
termed a selective basis, which
means that they welcome new-
comers who comply with certain
rather strict requirements. They
do this. because past experience

has shown that a more liberal opeen

policy is definitely unsatisfactory.

Owing to the extensive use of
labour-saving machinery in Cana-
da, there is very little demand
for unskilled labour, so that pref-
erence is given to those having
some vocational skill or technical
knowledge of a type for which
demand exists. Youth is also an
advantage, because people ‘over,
say 30 or so, are less likely to
adapt themselves readily to new
surroundings. At present old-age
pensions are paid at age 70 by
the Government, and at earlier
ages by many industrial organisa-
tions, and it is eonsidered that
every recipient of a pension should
make his or her contribution to
the economic life of the country
before qualifying for a pension.

Intending immigrants must be
literate, in good health and with
a clear record as to conduct, also
definitely single or having marital
status that conforms with the
laws and accepted customs
Canada. This would rule out any-
one who was a party to a com-
mon-law or ‘reputed’ marriage,
such as is, I believe, still quite
widespread in the West Indies. It
is also necessary to have a sum
of money sufficient to provide
transportation to the proposed
destination in Canada, and cover
living expenses while seeking
employment. Just what sum is
considered necessary now by the
Immigration Authorities I do not
know, and it would I suppose
vary according to circumstances.
n any case it seems likely
that comparatively few West
Indians who could comply witn
these requirements, would want
to emigrate, as they would prob-
ably consider themselves reason-
ably well off at home, _.

With all the publicity the sub-
ject is receiving now, I sometimes
find myself wondering who it is
about, or, in other words, what
class or type of West Indian is



of requirements of

R. E. Smythies

supposed to do the emigrating, if
some country can be found for
him to go to, and what he would
do to earn a living when he had
arrived. A man might be an ex-
perienced agricultural worker on
a sugar plantation but his knowl-
edge and skill would be of little
or no use in Canada, where clim-
ate, soil, and methods are entirely
different,

I do not think Canada or other
countries can be criticised for re-
fusing to accept immigrants who
are illiterate, as that handicap
seriously limits their usefulness
and capacity to adapt themselves,
in a country where education has
compulsory for many
decades. The requirement as to
marital status also seems reason-
able where irregular or informal
unions are either against the law
or at best frowned on as a social
liability, to be severely discour-
aged. It might be said that the
whole structure of society, and
the laws and customs, are based
on legal and binding marriage, and
the family as the unit around
which it all turns,

Where there is so much need for
emigration, and so much talk of
it, I suppose it is merely natural
and human for people generally to
regard it as a fine thing for some-
one else to do. However, it any
emigrating is going to be done,
sooner or later we shall have to
quit talking and be practical about
it, and one of the first steps would
be to decide, who goes and where,
and what he will do when he gets
there. Unless we are talking
about people who comply with the
countries like
Canada, it will not help to dally
with the idea of West Indians
going there, but will rather waste
time in idle speculation, and tend
to befog the real issue,

I have never been to British
Guiana or Honduras and know
very little about them, though I
understand that they both have
vast spaces and undeveloped re-
sources that seem to call for im-
migrants, unless there are some
insurmountable obstacles to any
such project. And few obstacles
are really imsurmountable if
tackled with determination. So
far as I know, the serious differ-
ences in social customs and laws,
and the general attitude of people
toward important matters like
marriage, do not apply to these
countries so it would seem obvious
that attention should be concen-
trated on their possibilities.

I read with interest a number
of references in the Advocate to
the Surinam project, but do not

recall seeing any report on the
reasons for its failure. When first
mooted it seemed to offer possi-
bilities that should certainly be
preferable to-being unemployed in
Barbados, in spite of any minor
drawbacks such as are always
bound to exist.. My recollection is
that the applicants were supposed
to be carefully screened for suit-
ability before being sent, and that
the number was large enough to
offer plenty of scope for selection
of the most promising emigrants.
I believe an investigation after
84% of the families had returned,
disclosed the fact that their ccm-
plaints
ranted

It is a waste of time to dream
of some ready-made Utopia wait-
ing to receive immigrants who are
lacking in edueation, vocational
skill or financial resources of any
kind. If a project comparable to
Surinam were tried in Honduras
or B.G., would the result be any
better? If not, we might as well
discard the idea of transplanting
family units and consider any
practicable alternatives, though
lack of information as to what
went wrong in Surinam is a hin-
drance to clear thinking on the
subject. At present there is much
talk and discussion about emigra-
tion but a dearth of practical sug-
gestions,

were considered unwar-

At the risk of being regarded as
an old fogy I will say that I some-
times wonder if there is any real
prospect of success for projects
that could be called pioneering in
the proper sense of the term.
There seems to be too much evi-
dence that what is so often refer-
red to as a high standard of liv-
ing, might be more accurately
described as a standard of soft
living, which tends to cause fatty
degeneration of the heart, the
muscles and morale. Social secur-
ity is all very well, and fair-
minded people are not opposed to
it in reason, but one cannot help
feeling some doubt as to just how
much of it the average human
being can stand, without going
limp when confronted with condi-
tions that even 50 years ago were
still being taken for granted by
pioneers in Western Canada.

In the West Indies social secur-
ity has not developed to the same
extent as in other countries, but it
is generally accepted that no-one
will lack the actual necessities of
food, clothing and shelter. It is
also true that vocational training
has not been developed to the
point of having an.exportable sur-
plus of artisans of mechanics for
which demand exists in more ad-
vanced countries, It is indeed a
tough problem which can only be
solved by clear thinking and real-
istic discussion and planning.



An Industry Which Builds

CURES BY KINDNESS

Hy John Camsell

Britain’s “cure by kindness” method of
handling juvenile delinquents has won the
commendation of the top United States’
prison officials and may soon be used in

LONDON.

American correctional institutions.

James V. Bennett, U.S. prison commission
chief, said while inspecting the British “Bor-

stal” system:

“The idea of reforming prisoners by Bor-
stal treatment is excellent. We hope to set
up Borstal institutions as soon as the legisla-

tion is through Congress.”

Bennett’s approval of the British system
nas lent extra weight to the statements of
sociologists who have agreed that despite the
expense of running these institutions the

‘xperiment has been well worth while.

Official statistics issued by the Home Office
show that under the system more than 50
per cent. of Borstal “graduates” never have
trouble with the law again. The figure is

considered exceptionally high.

Of those who are brought back for a
second “course,” more than 70 per cent. “go

straight.”

Under the system boys and girls between
16 and 21 years old who commit crimes are
sent to a Borstal institution. These are special

institutions run like army camps.

The underlying theme of the Borstal system
is the “psychological touch and cure by
Flogging and other brutal physi-
cal punishment went out at the turn of the

kindness.”

century.

There are now 3,000 boys and girls in the
Borstals. When a young offender is convicted
by the Court, he is sent to an “allocation
centre” where a Board sits and decides to

which kind of Borstal he should be sent.

Two kinds of. Borstals are provided, The
tough, gangster-like characters, are sent to
institutions where they are locked in at

Better Business
Ry V. Onslow

Business men of 50 years ago

only 90,000 machines.

who built up a world-wide trade
and ofven big fortunes from offices
spartanly equipped and usually
dimly lighted and inconvenient
would view with amazement the
multitudinous aids to efficiency
and comfort used by the modern
office worker.

For today a large and prosper-
ous industry has grown up solely
for vhe service of business man-
agement and practice. Research-
ers, designers and engineers work
unceasingly to produce new
techniques and equipment not
only for the improvement of office
methods but also to raise the
standard of comfory of office work-
ers. In Britain, the office appliance
industry has so expanded that it
now supplies almost every country
in the world. During 1949 the in-
dustry exported £4,000,000 worth
of machinery and £2,250,000 worth
of steel furniture, a record likely
to be broken this year. In the
lirst five months of 1950 machin-
ery worth £2,082,945 and steel
furniture worth £917,055 went
overseas.

For Small Or Large Business

The industry displayed its
latest wares to visitors from
many countries at the Business
Efficiency Exhibition held during
September in the City Hall,
Manchester in the English county
of Lancashire, Organised by the
Office Appliance Trades Associa-
tion of Great Britain and Ireland,
the Exhibition occupied 30,000
square fect and 80 firms exhibit-
ed machinery, the majority of
which was designed to save
labour in large or small business.

A new adding-calculating
machine which gives a three-fold
warning whenever an error is
made was on show. The operator

by a bell-ring as vhe mechanism
locks, and is enabled to see the
mis-operated key as well as feel
the incorrect key depression.

Apart from being equally effi-
cient at all the tasks usually de-
manded of a duplicator, a new
machine has been designed to
enable the selection of items
from a master sheet to be trans-
ferred to separate job cards and
control papers, so as to ensure
accurate planning of the flow of
the work, By enabling the re-
production of part or all of any
master sheet in one operation,
bottlenecks caused by individual
operators sorting out job sheet
information are elim ‘nated.

A man who invented an inter-
locking bomb release gear used
by the Allies in World War I pro-
duced a cash register which, by
a pre-setting device, can be
operated for any amount by two
fingers. One of the most un-
usual devices shown was a short-
hand machine which operates on
the phonetic system, enabling a
stenographer to take down a
verbatim report in a language she
does not understand. The record
is made on a continuous sheet ot
paper which folds away into the
cover of the mach'ne automatical-
ly so that turning of pages is
eliminated and the sequence of
the proceeding assured.

Large Variety Of New
Typewriters

Typewriters were in
variety. This industry has made
great strides in Britain since the
end of World War II. Production
in Britain may be judged by the
fact that one factory alone will
be turning out machines at the
annual rate of 85,000 by the end
of 1950, whereas production for

great ful

those on show will. be models to
take between 90 and 100 different

keyboards for writing in any
commercially " age.
Light-weight = ines

are no novelty today, but one
weighing only 144 lbs. includes a
four-bank 92 characier keyboard,
an inbuilt keyset tabulator, an
adjustable touch control device,
quickset margin and scale appar-
atus and features variable line
spacing, automatic ribbon re-
verse and non-glare keyboard.
For tropical and equatorial
countries there were rust-proof
and insect-proof ledger bindings,
fire-resisting accounting equip-
ment with light-weight, rustless,
stainless aluminium alloy draw= |
ers and portable typewriters
with bonderised steel parts fitting |
vhem for use in humid climates.

Simplification Is The Keynote

Addressing machines with
speeds ranging from 900 to 6,000!
addresses an hour were shown
alongside appliances which open
letters at the rate of 500 a minute
or seal them at the speed of 300
a minute.

In designing the lavest equip-
ment the experts sought not only
to increase labour-saving ca-
pacity of appliances, notably by
electrification, but simplified
operations, made hem less
fatiguing and the appearance of
the machinery and office furni-
ture more attractive and colour-

Down to carbon papers which
do not curl, punches which re-
inforce the holes they make with
self-adhesive vape, and new types
ef paper clips, the Exhibition had
something of interest for every-
one in business . from the
junior

night and the supervision is close and strict.

The more tractable type of offender is sent
to a converted manor house, or perhaps a
Among} hutted eamp, where no window or door is

ever locked.

Patience and tolerance are the keynotes of
the Board’s careful investigation of each indi-
vidual case. And the first question the young-

ster is asked is: “How can we help you?” ,

But nowhere is the emphasis primarily on
There are no “cells” in the
camps and the youths are there to become

punishment.

“good and useful citizens of the future.”

The treatment is not soft. Tough physical
training plays a prominent part in the insti-
Food is adequate but
plain. The training is designed to teach the

‘ tution’s activities.

boys and girls a trade.

A boy can become a painter, decorator,
farmhand,
bricklayer, sheet-metal worker, panel-beater,
blacksmith, carpenter, shoemaker and _ re-

mechanic,

market gardener,

pairer or harness-maker.

The illiterate are encouraged to learn to

read and write.

As a boy learns to “become a useful citi-
zen” he is given marks and promotion. Even-
tually his “housemaster” and a special Board

recommends him for discharge.

The statistics show that the youths like
the Borstal system. Out of 1,333 boys on
home leave (granted for five days during a
sentence) only 67 failed to return and were
rearrested.

is initially warned of the mistake



the whole of Brivain in 1949 was

chrector.

typist to the company

—IN.S.



Sugar: Before And After The Emancipation

Ry Tan Gale

The History of Sugar Vol.

Il, by Noel Deerr (Chapman

& Hall 55/-).

“The first African slaves to ar-
rive in the English West Indies,”
writes Noel Deerr, ‘were seven or
eight captured from a Portuguese
ship in 1627 by the William and
John on the voyage that carried
the first settlers to Barbados, but
regular traffic did not follow till
later.’ As his authority he cites
Harlow’s “History of Barbados,
1625-1685,”

To check the date of the first
settlement, which I had always
thought to have been a few years
before \1627, I consulted Bryan
Edwards’ “History of the West In-
dies.” He writes: “Having engaged
about thirty persons to settle in
the island. .... he (Sir William
Courteen) appointed William
Deane their governor, and sent
them away in a ship called the
William and John, commanded by
John Powell. They arrived safe
in the latter end of year 1624,
and laid the foundations of a
town, which, in honour of the
sovereign, they denominated
James-Town; and thus began the
first English settlement in the
island of Barbadoes.”

To make sure, I then looked at
“Des Deux Indes” by the French
historian Guillaume-Thomas Ray-
nal. He writes of Barbados: “Cette
ile. . . . .ne paroissoit pas avoir
été habitée . . . lorsqu’ en 1627
quelques familles anglaises s'y
transportérent. ay

In desperation, and with no
other reference books to hand, I
referred to the “potted” history «f
Barbados in the “West Indies Year

Book.” According to this book;
“In 1625 Sir William Courteen. . .
fitted out two large ships, only
one of which, the William and
John, arrived at Barbados.”

With this disagreement among
authorities, I am bound to leave
this question where I found it,
and to pass on to other matters.

Sugar And Slaves

The cycle of trade that develop-
ed out of the sugar industry was
of greater value than the sugar
trade itself. England was then
entering upon ;her industrial
career, and for this the slave trade
was an essential link. The ships
which left Bristol and Liverpool,
laden with textiles from Lanca-
shire and hardware from Bir-
mingham, bartered their car-
goes on the African coast for
slaves. After the ordeal of the
Middle Passage, the slaves were
exchanged in the West Indies for
sugar, Which with molasses and
rum formed the homeward freight.
Then with the profit yet more
manufactured goods were bought
and exchanged for slaves to sup-
ply the sugar islands.

With

so many people writing
about the treatment of salves in
the West Indies, and each one
prejudiced either for or against
the institution of slavery, it is
difficult to form a clear opinion
about the treatment of slaves in
being valuable property, one may
presume they were treated as
such No doubt there wére in-
tances of abominable cruelty, but

é

this was the exception and not the
rule,

Besides the slaves, there was in
early days a certain amount of
white labour in the fields of Bar-
bados. The European labour fell
into two classes, the voluntary
bond servant and the prisoner.
The originator of the system of
penal transportation to the West
Indies was Oliver Cromwell, who
began it with what Irish remained
after the sack of Drogheda in 1649,
and followed this up with Scottish
prisoners from Dunbar and Eng-
lish Royalists taken at Worcester.
Later, many of the Monmouth re-
bels .were transported, the last
to artive being the Jacobites taken
in the ‘Fifteen and ‘Forty-five.

The indentured servants and
the bulk of the white working
population of Barbados came at
first from the lower strata of so-
ciety. Sir Josiah Child describes
them as: “. , . . a sarte of loose
vagrant people; vicious and desti-
tute. . . . either unfit for Labour,
or had so misbehaved themselves
by debauchery that none of them
would set to Work. . gathered
up about the streets of London and
other places, cloathed and trans-
ported to be employed upon the
Plantation,”

Their lot, it seems, was fre-
quently worse than that of the
slaves. Writing of Barbados, Ligon
says: “The slaves and their pos-
terity, being subject to their Mas-
ters for ever, are kept and pre-
served with greater care than the
ervants. So that for the time the



servants have worser lives, for
they are put to very hard labour
and ill lodging and their dyet very
slight.” ;

Emancipation And After

Protests against slavery and the
slave trade began almost with its
inception. The first substantial
result of the efforts of the human-
itarian party in England was,
however, not until 1816, when the
Consolidated Slave Law_ of
Jamaica was passed. This legis-
lation was designed to improve
the treatment of the slaves in that
island, It was followed in 1823 by
Canning’s ‘“Melioration Motion,”
which the Barbados Assembly
described as: “The diabolical
falsehoods and infamous aspera-
tions of a few interested and
designing hypocrites moving in a
terrific phalanx to the total anni-
hilation of the whole inhabitants
of the West Indies.”

At last the Emancipation came,
and in 1834 some forty-eight
thousand slaves were freed in
Barbados, It is interesting to
note that while the average an-
nual sugar production in most of
the British West Indies dropped
in the four years after Emaryipa-
tion, in Barbados it went up by
five thousand tons,

All this while the method of
sugar production was constantly
being improved — from cattle
mill to windmill, and finally to
steam. The first use of steam
power in manufacturing sugar was
made at Greenwich plantation,
Jamaica, in 1768. The credit for

@ On page 5

|






















FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1950

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& CO., LTD.

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OF ONION SOUP .... 29

Bottles HEINZ TOMA-
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BARBADOS ADVOCATE

College Wins Three| Wl. Produce

‘ Association
B’dosScholarships| Cetebrates
Lodge School Gets Fourth

Tercentenary Celebration

PAGE FIVE

£800,000 Will Save Butlin’s| Enjoy... pgm

The meeting appointed’ three|
preference shareholders to w atch |{ 3

i -

| SPECIAL
——— —
+

‘FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1950
Sr meneame: meneame en ae eet a eeeenRree te atRnR NNR RNT RRRARRE t



















=.







@ From page 1 \ Small Creditors
ever the interests of their fellow |
hareholders. But Butlin said, “p|
think it would be wrong to put
false hopes in the shareholders

They were in a very bad posi-
tion from that point of view, he
said, and were unable to pay off
small creditors, as they had been

about the Company’s affairs than}
did the Board of Directors
Financial Details










|
|
! |
| Press appeared to know more}
|
j
|



4 ; , orburn outlined the Com-|jngormed by their solicitor that] While negotiations are going on
WHEN: G. A. G. ALLEYNE reached scholarship standard| _THE West Indian Produce Asso-' pany’s history and gave details} this Secnaba’ constitute preteren-| 0° "ising this money, it looks ta
in clessies, J. M. G.M. Adams in mathematics and E. De C.|C@ton, Ltd., which incorporates of its financial state, The Com-] tial treatment. me that if they are going to put

it in the papers, that there is a
winding-up petition being mada
in Nassau and that they are al-




Davison, Newman & Co., and
numbers among its directors Sir
Algernon Aspinall, celebrated the

pany had been hard hit- by the
sterling devaluation and the Lon-

“Ever since I became Chair-
man, we have always been in ef-

Inniss in science, Harrison College added three more names
to the Honours Lists of Barbados Scholars in their school





last moment, but the American
Air Charter firm had “sportingly”
helped them out. They under-

autograph a copy of a photo of
himself surf-riding in the Carib-
He

4 “ jon dock strike which hel! u . ’ ” ‘
hall. R. U. Gooding won the other of the Barbados Schol-|tercentenary of the business on supplies for the Camp Inst year | SyeTOKe. gt ee he ggg tnere| Te84y, Selling our goods, people
arships for Lodge Sehoo) in Modern Studies. July 26th and was honoured by He had no good news to tell/paq alk a leeianhe’ er he een —— os ee meer
Just 10 poets old now Alleyne oe from the Lord Mayor o! the shareholders about his visit] tion of arranging air transport to greens of aubrentidegs stood eat ' F
9 —e ae oa. Certificate Li iakattted Tee ee eet America to try to raise the/ihe Vacation Village. Licensing] discussing the Company’s dilemma. =
New B dos ves hap Aeag Rak pe rickets Pa i Yates cng | Hecessary money, but said that] giticulties had cropped up at the A shareholder asked Butlin to
unusual feat, his Headmaster, Mr. |OCccasion appeared in The Times | one American group was still in-]). pped up z As

on July 27th, and is here quo‘ed.
“Not ashamed to call themselves
grocers, the proprietors are able

Hammond told the Advo-

Hardware cate yesterday. He then obtained
a distinction in Ancient History.

terested, although he did’ not
bold out much hope in that di-

rection wt



did so and remarked







In 1948 when he passed’ the school |t© boast that they still sell over | In view of the publicity the BOG, Aare eee eee BOA.C., had] "You ought to save this. It ny.
O ans Toda certificate, he won the Lynch ra creenae seventeenth-century Company's affairs got ae eee hae te be worth a lot of money one day
: Memorial Prize, a prize which is}Counter, upon which stand a/| given, he did not think it likely/\° °"" wee tee
f presented to the boy with the couple of huge tea canisters each that preteventh aharaneicese mainland to the island e ‘a
Beene BARIWARE LED. best school certificate for his year. capable of holding 190 lb. It was would want to invest further After: the Meeting the Director Swiss Stick Drop In At KNIGHTS se Se
opens business in their new across this counter that the first of the Company told me_ there

large sums in it.

pound of tea was sold in England | The Company had spent to date

building at the Corner of Swan| His father is Mr. would be no new approach to the

To Armed PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN











and Lyzas Streets to-day. Thejrecently appointed Headmaster of |for £10. | Ve sc were| Colonial Development Corpora-
oan Hien Pann > Ace Ll cpa * wing th "a oom “The Lord Mayor was conduct i $600,000 to Sopeabin oariele: oe e een
ern along Swan Street. uring the past year, eyne : : fe A ome sackets "Delica £500,000 Offer Withdrawn
“ ; ed over the spice impregnated | ers, £800.000 to ordinary share- me a —_— =
It is equipped with fluorescent| Played a leading part in the pub- place by Lieut. Col, K. E Peevité, holders, £450,000 and some ac-} In view of the benefit the col- eutra ity —

lighting. The hardware depart- lication of the school newspaper

ment is on the ground floor while |““The Collegian”. Shy would derive from the eatab-

lishment of a Vacation Village ana

acting chairman of the company, | (rued interest on loans from a

and many interesting possessions | City group and £103,000 on bank LAUSANNE, Sept. 14.

Swiss President Max Petiterre
Said to-day that the Korean war

oa - mee room will be waa = ae conn hee a were shown by Mr. Skerritt,|!9ans. They owed in addition ui en ig — —_ NEW SHIPMENT OF
seco! E . ‘ : ; > » other peovleiae eC ation rs
The service in the hardware |his hobbies and in the ring, he is the managing director, who has | £250,000 to various other people|from it, e orporatio: vat l vas the damian sinned Se Ut names

spent a lifetime with the firm. including some £80,000 to people
“Perhaps the most interesting | in Nassau.

document was a framed original |
account of sales dated July, 1773,

Anti-Women Bus Strike
In London

one item being two bills drawn by
Francis Rotch, the master of the
“Dartmouth” one of the ships
LONDON, Sept. 14.
Thousands of Londoners p odded
jthrough a drizze to packed elec-

| sarees to put up £500,000. But

a later offer was withdrawn. tries directly or indirectly threat-

ened to strengthen their national
defences,

Speaking at the official banquet
at a “Comptoir Suisse” trade fair
here.

He added that defence measures
“might change the course of a
country’s economic position,” but
did not develop this hint.

The President strongly reaf-
firmed Swiss “armed neutrality”
policy which is expected to cost

department will be partly “serve|@ determined puncher. It is
yourself”. There are tec show-|Understood that he might study
cases—one to’ Swan Street and|™Medicine.

the others to Lucas Street.

The storeroom to the building ott er Se
is situated in the rear section : asMe G a nd it 19-
which housed Messrs. Da Costa — Veninr at the ams, son
& Co. Electric Department for al Frouse of y a ply Pi, a —
SHOT TOW WILL BE given by|WO® @ Barbados Scholarship in
A ,BE given bY)any sixth form group in which

the Mobile Cinema at the/he’had chosen to specialise. How-

Nightengale Home, Black Rock,
to-night for the benefit. of the|(ver: Ne chose the Mathematical

WINDOW GLASS

Fine Clear Quality in several thicknesses and a wide



range .
involved in the Boston tea party. It ge of sizes

is a tradition that Davison and
Newman shipped the tea which
was thrown into Boston Harbour
on December 16th, 1773—the pre-
lude to the American War of In-
dependence.”

ALSO .-

PLAIN STEM GLASSWARE

The claim is not backed by the
men’s union.
The women said that they were





childten cthete, "The phildten. ‘ele ee ae ~— ltric trams and railway stations to. |8ttiking because of various soot two-thirds more next year
ways take a keen interest in these!of missing much of the summer , day as the strike against recruiting | S™evances. t tan 460,000,000 Swiss france including:—
shows and on many occasions|term due to illness, it was no sur- Sparrow Cadets xt “women” conductors spread to! London Transport has 26,000 vm for 2950, ‘ in ‘ ee
they can be heard discussing vari- brine to ile headitiaster thet hs , over 7,000 motor busmen. a corte Oe neue aaa e@ worst is never inevitable, ‘
Ol dodatietakn oud Diarndaly ees atewd 2 -pcnlaneltin, Bu Sea Shells Gale dr a ee eee cans the President said. “the struggle PM re 15s Geeta kL a cae @ 37 cents each
This will be the last perform- | He hopes to go to Oxford, fol- i A quarter of the total motor {#00 conduc rt cn is take On in which mankind seems to be s fo ;
ance given by the Cinema for)jowing his father, Mr. Grantley SOME of the cadets from the |DUS fleet was off the road, para- yt a a fa as not enough engaged will no. doubt be long CLARETS 00... 66. ee eeee ee eee seen @4 ,, ”
this week. Adams. His mother says he may | H.M.S. Sparrow took the oppor- lysing over 60 of Central London's oy one ite forward nf ane Rar OU A We Salst: Toes LIQUEURS
N ISLAND TEAM will meet|study law, but everything is not | tun ty yesterday to buy souvenirs | 200 routes. Pha eotdo’ T anaports Chair [pa tae Contant to develop tn Q RS eee ce teeter cee, @ 36 ,, ”
A a team from the H.MS.|settled yet. . and “get a look at the sunny isle” “Es Tae ene. ee « appealed | 0!0odshed that armed conflicts—
Sparrow in a football match at|; Young Adams hati a three-year, Some said. 7 20 clippies today jo'ned the man, Lord Lat me eae tol it they break out—can be local- PGEMDURBU ives yes vans be parce res @37 , ”
Combermere School grounds at|period at the Convent before he They bought tortoise shell strike which opposes the engage- to misguided men to ge ized and that the forces of peace CHAMPAGNES
4.15 this evening, entered Harrison College. He is| badges, pins and brooches also a ane dane ile een = — rt garage in East London two w Sent nad darian - ca See eRe So tt ere @s4 , ”
> * C aken é < " Salad owltzerianc nus -
ate Ser seca ete on. 3 Pic- ee shelley, that arivecs wae. busy the men’s claim for a £1 per week |crews out of 450 busmen took) be firm and severe towards those FINGER BOWLS ................005 @ 8 _sC=, i

out their buses but they did not
set a very good reception.
e * . —Reuter.

who try internally to sow mis-
trust and discord and who would
be. temnted to destroy or weaken
Mstitutions.—Reuter.
|
}
\

Inniss—Medicine carrying them to and fro with’n ‘
the City limits. e more inclined

Queen’s Park was also an at-| lower wage.

traction for the Cadets. One guide
Oe,

wage increase as women would
b to accept a

nic which will be given at the
Crane Hotel from 3 p.m.,, until] E. DeC. Inniss was a Primary to
10 o’clock at the night. First Grade Scholar, coming from

There. will be sea-bathing,|5t. Giles’ Boys’ School. He was
dancing and singing, apart from|@warded a Barbados Exhibition to
refreshments. the University College of the West

OUR TRAFFIC OFFENCES| Indies as a result of their Febru-



ALL METAL WHEELBARROWS

STRONGLY MADE-—3 Cubic Ft. CAPACITY



eo
==

NEW STOCK

—





was seen showing a group of
nine the an‘mals’ quarters in the
ark,

The cadets did not get a good






without due care and attention,
one for driving without the ap-
propriate licence and a_ cyclist
for not keeping his cycle on the
left side of the road.

he somehow became aware
the prying eyes.

: : _jary examination. He has now P ; ‘ Suitable. for Builders and Contractors
day's Banca Feeonded in yester-|icltowed it with the Barbados | 100k at the alligator, however.|}} MORE POWER TO THE MINX? AT
i ‘ ; Scholarship in Science. A very e ‘ ae ; , 7
ists were reportect for driving 2 table abe Gpnkie- murky water in the hole. perhere ity 3 GEES BRUCE ONLY $14.40 EACH

y wr ~ Cie
ing the difficulties the School has t .
had recently in providing ade-
quate Science Staff. During his
last School year he had three dif-
ferent Physics masters. He hopes

For Garden purposes and other light work
we have the popular ; :

WEATHERHEADS-

4,000 BAGS OF

EMBERS ATTENDING the | ‘ aaik ; “ "
sane ectne of ihe Board otlot the West Indies ana stuay | CORNMEAL COME suse sets satis GALVANISED “STRONGLITE
Cricket Association, which was Medicine, OVER 4,000 bags’ of cornmea| snes 0nd - TOBAibitiond /~ BARROWS WITH RUBBER

Inniss will be‘20 next week. from U.S.A. arrived in the island

Bottle



held in the George Challenor His father is Mr. G. N. Inniss ait
; » G, N, yesterday by the S.S. Seabreeze. at fet as
Fe verkemmingion °° ot Roebuck Street Tucluded inthis. supply,” were : Aste ABFA le, a8 TYRED WHEEL —
oa : 1,86 ags oO illsbury Yellow a ee MUSTEROLE
Sir Allan Collymore, President, Gooding—Lodge cornmeal and 550 bags of Regal 7? ey, a LE— The Chest ; ae " .
Mr. A. DeL. Inniss, Mr. E. L. G. R, U. Gooding oo got his | Yellow cornmeal. The cornmeal et Sar ye ———— Rub 2/- ONLY $14.32 EACH

CIGARETTE LIGHTERS—
Guaranteed to light every
time —2/9 3/-

SUN GLASSES—made of
Best quality glass will not
injure the eyes: From 2/-

was consigned to Messrs Robert
Thom Ltd., Messrs DaCosta & Co.,
Ltd., and Messrs General Traders
Ltd

Also arriving by the Seabreeze
from U.S.A. were 919 sacks of

Hoad, Mr. W. 8B. Chenery,|scholarship in Modern Studies,
Mr. T. N. Peirce, Mr. E. D. Inniss,} }ives at “Wasons”, St. Philip. His
Mr. S. O’C. Gittens, Mr. E. A.]father is Parochial Treasurer of
V. Williams, Mr. W. K. Atkinson,|that parish. His grand father was
Mr. B.DeL. Inniss, and Mr. W. F.]a Parochial Medical Officer, It is

MEW FULLY-PROVED PLUS-POWER ENGINE
,/Â¥es you MORE Sheed ar THE GETAWAY ..



HARDWARE DEPT.
Tel.

HARRISON

2634

Hoyos, Secretary .

Mr. K. L. Wishart, Secretary
of the British Guiana Cricket
Board of Control, was also pres-
ent to discuss draft rules of the
West Indies Cricket Board of
Control submitted by Jamaica

not yet known what he will study.

SUGAR : Betore and After
the Emancipation

from 4

e page
along with amendments offered|this is due to John Stewart, who

by a Sub-Committee.

in 1766 took out a patent for a

‘T’THE POLICE BAND, under] machine which would: “..,Grind

Capt. C. E. Raison,
give one of their fortnightly Con-
certs at the Hastings Rocks at
8 o’clock to-night.

Whenever these Concerts
given people travel from various
parts of Christ Church, St. Philip
and St. Michael in ‘buses, cars and

will] more than a Wind-Mill and cattle-

mill usually do, without any Ex-
pense of Fuel, more than is con-
sumed in boiling the Sugars. . .”

The Barbadian planters seem to

arelhave been rather sceptical about

this new machine, for the steam
engine did not arrive here until
1846, when there was but one

Quaker Golden Maize, consigned
to Messrs R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd.
From Jamaica it brought 200 cases
of cheese, 150 bags congo peas,
50 bags of coffee beans and con-
fectionery.

and reliability . .
costs are as low as ever!



What’s on Today

Court of Ordinary at 11.00

a.m.

Mobile Cinema, Nightengale
Home, St. Michael.

Police Band at Hastings
Rocks at 8.00 p.m.

SALOON

COLE & CO.,



en



SHIPMENTS EXPECTED

mone Sawes ON THE HILLS..

Phe Hillman Minx... a fullsize family car famous for its comfort
. gives you still better performance, yet Tuning

THE HILLMAN

MINX MAGNIFICENT

CONVERTIBLE COUPE -

ESTATE CAR

A PRODUCT OF THE ROOTES GROU
SHORTLY

= AGENTS.

LTD.

to $10.00 each.

WRIST WATCHES—Excel-
lent quality $9.00 to $17.00
KODAK CAMERAS— $5.00;
$10.00; $12.00; $16.00; $20.00
$25.00; $35; $50.00; $80.00;
$200.00.

KODAK FILMS—To fit all
Cameras—

MIGH CLASS PIPES—Dun-
hill, Parker, Comoy, Every-
man, Grand Slam and Ban-
tam.
Pipes that are especially
made fer us at 2/6 each,

The working man’s pipe.
CADBURY'S CHOCOLATES



Red Rose 4lb. 1 Ib,
Hazel Nuts } lb 1 Ib.
Milk Tray $1.48
Princess 1 lb 4 Ib,
Assortment

lorries as well as on bicycles and’ steam engine and 506 windmills.
motorcycles to listen to the music.}As late as 1911 there were 226

Between 8 and 9 o’clock both| windmills and 109 steam engines.
the enclosure and around the| [ have only been able to refer
Rocks are .crowded. to a few of the interesting matters

rae SM

AGAIN IN STOCK ...

NO QUORUM:
NO VESTRY























; . A ; A MEETING of the Vestry of pw ROUND TREE'S CHOCO-
The programme is as follows:—|discussed in this, the second f 7 ,
nwa 'shANISH, PASODOBLES volume of the “History of Sugar.”| St. Michael which was scheduled K i N A LATE—Black Magic $3.85;
(a) Sol A. Sevilla Jose Franco | Among other things, there are| for yesterday was not held for $1.88; $1.08.
a piel panera woe i ye chapters on Asiatic Labour, the| want of a quorum. Only seven RAISINS IN PACKAGES—
. —Rossini Trade in Sugar, Refining and Beet | members attended. Their names ape Of excellent quality at 62e.
gar, is ‘
Morning—The Storm—Pastoral Move-| Sugar. I cannot speak too highly | follow: Mr. Bruce Weatherhead H ( ) W per pkege.
spent aay : aaeeee ae hacer of this work. All those interested | (Churchwarden); Mr. E._ D. Perfume from France and
and Obofl be taken by Bandsman |in the history of the West Indies | Mottley M.C.P.; Mr. Fred God- Jamaica—
R. Alleyne and Band Cadet Holloway. |in general, and that of the sugar|dard M.C.P.; Mr. F. E. C. ANIMALS & POULTRY ae MY SIN PERFUME ., $6.00
OPERATIC rat Laaeavatis industry in particular, will find} Bethell M.C.P.; Mr. Fis > = $10.00 and $14.00.
anit caren” it an absorbing study. Tudor; Mr. Victor Chase; Mr. DISTRIBUTORS. CARON PERFUME—French
peticieatine Waldeufel (*On sale at the Advocate) T. W. Miller. H. Jason Jones 8] Co, [id Can Can; Bellodgia; Rock
© iN r : Garden; Black Narcissus;
doliers.........+ Sulll Shy yi Mi . i
Played a honour of the passing of — Christmas Night; Soloman’s CT evety
the late Charles L. Elder. The 7 Khus Khus at 1/- 3/9,

Musie of the Gilbert and Sullivan
Operas were among his favourite
band selections, and the “Gondo- =
liers’ in particular. Tonight's ex-
e@rpts include the well known song
“Take a Pair of Sparkling Eyes.”





Just Received..

FOR LADIES | occasion
—_— =





of every colour—




AT
“pave in Talenese. Allan Magbeth It cleans, preserves—and how it STERLING VALUES | BRUCE on sale at the
NC il lishes! Ask ailer for Propert’s. “<
a 2 ira a Wowie Art ) WEATHERHEAD |
Reing a light diversion from the escriptions.

Southern Plantations.

“Get up an’ start, th! dan-cin
Go hon an’ do th’ prancin’

T’se got mah ha-bits on fur fair.
Hon-ey now doan git funny,

I know you'se got de money
Raisor’s are in th’ air;"

the difference it makes to your shoes!



Limited

= ee Oe

leading Stores

y






BROADWAY DRESS SHOP.

—













SON Datather's Choice.. Selected COLLOVLLLLOV EPPO LELOLLLRS, vebbsbecoeoosee’
FILM MUSIC “
The Road to Morocco Heusen ‘

DANCE MEDIEY
You were never Lovelier
—Jerome Kern |
EPILC GUE
C orale
“Jesu Joy of Man’s Desiring”
—J. S. Bach
This beautiful chorale was well!
beloved by our late brother muisi-
clan, Charles Luther Elder, and ends
tonight’s programme in fitting musi-





Make sure you ask for Sloan’s Liniment
—apply it to your rheumatism —then—







cal tribute to his memory by the 7 J P
members of the Barbados Police KRAFT ICE CHEAM MIX 1.08 ae FH a acl $2.74 & $3.95
Band, many of whom received AGHETTI in Tomato Sauce Small 18 MATTING RUGS 27 ins. x 54 ins. each - $2. :
Sin oer ee ae fete Catecu ee” edie z h
m durin nINZ {GE .E SAL, ; 54 Ot] BAe d0UdUlcllt—“‘“‘“‘COCSs*sS™SCSC“‘“(“SSNSC OQ ws. x 72 ims. each........
instrumentalists. HEINZ OXTAIL, Mullicatawny 36 ins. x 72 ins. eac
i "i king of Heaven OcKk TLE, Scotch Broth Soups ... 39
age soul the ng i % HEINZ TOMA1O Bee ects ’ Fi
E. RAISON, ¥ z Per tin 40
Captain Meat Soup e 30

BEDROOM RUGS 26 ins, x 54 ins. each....



SYRUP

3 ft. x 6 ft. each.







BROAD STREET?

“T like your Transport system
—it is so orderly and efficient. But
I am sometimes alarmed— every-

You cannot get anything better
for your muscular pains than
Sloan's Liniment. Simply apply it
lightly — don’t rub — and relief is

DRAWING ROOM CARP=ZTS 17% ft. x 9 ft...







PPPOE OSS SOE POFFO SS













.. $4.79 & $5.33
FIBRE MATS for Doorways, etc., various sizes........ $1.52 to $6.21

thing goes so fast. In pauneee 2 quick and certain.
z ‘ee
vakuse we y Piaf on Fay ar LOOK FOR THE PICTURE OF DR. SLOAN ON THE PACKET % CAVE \HEPHERD & (0. LTD.
— stop to talk, but aoe nobédy % ’
nows even their neighbours.” | % ; i y ab ee
Mr. Tsewang Pétifba, a medi- ik SF re a b $ 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET
cal student from Tibet speak- { STA NSFELPD, SC OT & | LTD. ¥ |
ing in a BBC Ov@seas Pro- . : i¢ 3 | bs
rom all chemists and swres tee %



gramme

e

pot 04,004 i
FFOOCOL AOA A htt '
PPP PLPPSPSPSG SPSS DE SS PPSPPOOCS FSSC EPPO: '

/ i





%







PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1950










BY



CARL ANDERSON. By | TS BABY LOVES





(~ SST x MOMENT,
10 il X 4 GHNESS..
di és T THINK YOUR
‘JESTER’ IS DOING
A LITTLE
SPY WORK!

\/ YOURE ASPY FOR THE
26 GREENIES! I ALWAYS
~ SUSPECTED IT! GIVE

1 \

1 \\y me-—— ME THAT!
ar) L$ m->
i t) NO! NO!

<5( PLEASE
. SS Ce)
ye 3x7) ' F \




I HAVE A PLANT
LIQUIPATE THE “*~
“GREENIES"... NOW AT



ee y



|
YOU KNOW re | RUBBER
LITTLE BOK TH Ar |
SAYS * Ars y|
a,
4 CUPS" YES-- NEXT TO IT
; WAY + IS A BOX LABELED )>.
| a ee OUP KEYS” -* KEYS”

'
52
ay ry





SPECIFY

BURRELL'S |










| WHERE oO
YOU HiDE








THEY'RE IN
THE LITTLE BOX
THAT SAYS
“STAMPS”









«. with ingredients of Vicks VapoRuk

oe
=e





JOINT AND
MUSCLE PAINS #-Â¥

may mean kidney trouble

A function of the kidneys is to eliminate
We oe ceca thot taeda
kidneys grow sluggi ese im:

or ee Lerell aelic atasemin end
settle, and become a cause of pain and
suffering in joints and muscles.

‘Tha eeeae De teaeins Sie vont of the tenis
is to help the kidneys. ey should be
tne pith De Wat Pil tne medline

made specially for ‘a
Pills have bg g, cleansing po
ic action on idneys that
trinet thon back to perform their 4
natural function properly.

< Pe Witt's Pills are a very well-tried

THE GUARDS THOUGHT 1 WAS AFTER \ NOW BIG DEKE Y1
THE GOLD. THEY WERE GOING TO, GANG STEAL Jr COME ON,SI
SHOOT ME ! FOLLOW ME, TONTO! GOLD! p—-7.|

T'D HAVE GONE OVER THE FALLS
iF IT HADN'T BEEN FOR
You, TONTO!














HEALTHIBENEFITS

te TONES UP DIGESTION
te ENRICHES THE BLOOD

‘dk RESTORES NERVOUS ENERGY
Â¥& BUILDS UP THE BODY

YZ

4



De Witt’s Pills
remedy. They are sold ail over over the world are made specially for

K. 0. CANNON... . . . . THE RIDDLE OF THE ROME REBELS telling’ of Tellet gained, after yeas of BACKACHE

onffering after taking De Witt’s Pill joiNT PAINS











' 1T WAS VERY KIND OF YOU TO COME TO ; j ' os eg I They act on the kidneys quickly. Why
VENICE My FRIENDS, MAKES DISPOSING OF x ‘ WOULD YOU LIKE : a A i not them for your trouble? Go to RWEUMATIC PAINS
YOU SO MUCH EASIER... 1 IMAGINE THERE ) | ~ TO ENTERTAIN i 1 : eS Het j i your chemist and obtain a supply today. {LUMBAGO
ARE MORE MURDERS COMMITTED IN VENICE OUR GUESTS WHILE a 5 Y ' SCIATICA
THAN ANYWHERE ELSE IN THE WORLD- Me) | SEE TO THEIR
JUST A SPLASH } FUNERAL 9 an +
\ IN ZE nee : ARRANGEMENTS OUR GUARANTEE
A , - :

BYNIN AMARA

7 TT $ J TK ‘Wade by ALLEN O HAWOERYS TO. LONDON

wa.

for Kidney and Bladder Troubles ”

AS NIGHT FALLS, TRAEEIC
OWINDOLES ON THE CANALS.
AbL (S$ QUIET IN THE CASA DEL FALCO.







Only one soap gives your
skin this exciting Bouquet








(CASHMERE Bouquet leaves an

enchanting fragrance about you
that will haunt all his dreams. Its
exquisite bouquet comes from a
secret wedding of 21 rare perfumes.
Bathe with Cashmere Bouquet Soap
daily so you'll always be dainty,
desirable, exquisitely feminine.



‘a
© ‘Re

RIP KIRBY —s_ BY ALEX RAYMOND





I'M AFRAID SO, DESMOND... gi ws. | [DESMONO, CALL MR, ANOREWS, THE BAI BANKER...
IT'S FROM HONEY...SHE SAYS HE'S THE TRUSTEE OF MARGIE PELHAM'S
MO ar THE MANGLER !$ ABOARD AAUCH IN IT;.. UT HER MBANING ESTATE... WANT AN APPOINTMENT WITH
RADICSGRAM THE VESUVIA...AND SHE Is UNDETACABLA HONEY 1S HIM... TELL
CEEVS TO Have \ WANTS tc TO COME TO HIM IT'S
DinruazED you kh. HER. eget URGENT!
MR. IRB re . , 5
BO TS
WRONG F



‘HORNIMAN S”
PURE

IT’S QUALITY
AT ITS
BEST

HEN you feel listless, tired and depressed,
the reason is that your blood is thin and
pale — without enough red blood- -corpuscles —

and your nerves are weak and undernourished.

ARES AT THE GRIM, DEADLY
Caey WHO FACES THE HEAB-HUNTER|

<7 WHAT HAG 6
HARPENED 10 |
eb
WwW |
|

OBTAINABLE FROM YOUR GROCER :

New red blood-corpuscles

What you need is a course of ‘Sanatogen’ Nerve
Tonic Food. ‘Sanatogen* combines the two
great body-building foods—organic phosphorus



PRICES %-lb - 40c.

and protein—which build up new red corpuscles / 2-02. sgn! 20.
in your blood and feed your weakened nerves
thus day by day filing your body with mar / 1-0z, a 10c,
vellous new vitality, health and Wappiness, Start
25.000 docedin tee: tecsten on & course of ‘Sunatogen’ today 4 %-o2. — 5e.
to the wonderful effects of b :
‘Sanatogen’ 5
On sale at good chemists and dr ugeiste JAMES A. LYNCH & C0 LTD we %
— eT " % o =
"SANATOGEN? 0" '
se sBi.ds ; Bs. roop af SOLE AGENTS.
restores health, youth and vitality Lf













FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15,

‘CLASSIFIED ADS. | PUBLIC NOTICES

1950









TELEPHONE 2508
tED ‘
coopaor —PlEQ er avcusrus.| PUBLIC SALES

POwner Of Plemsarnt Vale PAri tat, | rete

Saint Thomas) The funeral leaves CTI

from the Parlour of MINDS & ro AU ON

Tweedside Road, at 4 o'clock is

evening for the Nazarene Church, UNDER THE SILVER

Hall's Road, and thence to the West- HAMMER

bury Cemetery. Friends are invited.

Agnes (Wife) Hilda, Amn, Grace, On Tuesday 19th by order of Mrs.
Muriel, Williem, Norma Nicholls, Alice | Fred Harford we will sell her Furniture
St. John (CKildren) Ivor (Grandson}.| at ‘JAlexander” 7th Ave Belleville

a which includes
MEMORIAM Berbice, Morris and Upright Chairs,

‘cee IN Bookshelf; Ornament Tables, Corner

IN loving memory of MILLICENT| Cupboard: all in Mahogany, Pine
HUSBANDS (Nurse) who fell asieep| Ditiné Table; Glass Ware; Crockery.
on the 18th of September, 1947. Brass Warp, Frigidaire in working

Though years have gone I can't forget

That voice I love, I hear it yet.

Ever to be remembered by U. S.
Bruee, Maxwell Rd. 15.9.50—In.

In loving memory of BERESFORD
WILLIAM HOLDER who died on
September 15th, 1946.

wears off the edge of grief,

But memory turns back every leaf,

Thoughts drift on to by-gone days,

Life moves on, but memory stays.

Ever to be remembered by Constance
Holder (wife) Darcy Holder (son)
Horace Barker (step-son).

FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

CAR — Ford—(1) 1935 Model with









paint, tyres and engine in excellent
condition. Price $400. Phone Lawless
4315. 15.9.50—2n



OPEL KADETT CAR — M. 649 in

perfect working order, always owner
driven. Apply O. S. Smith, Kensing-
ton New Road, Fontabelle, or Registrar's
Office. 15.9.50—2n,



VAN—10 horse power Austin Van

in
ect working order. Apply D. V.
2.



& Co., Whitepari. Dial 3403;
ELECTRICAL



peste

ELECTRIC WASHING MACHINES
with Spindrier. Made by Mayfair of
Canada We have only 2 of these
remaining and the price is $280 each.
A number of thes are in use locally,
all giving 100% satisfaction, John F.
Ifutson, Ltd. 14.9.50—2n,

Sah come thet cp eonracstierticieeiietiammansttohatanibnicsaininis 15

REFRIGERATOR—One (1) 6 cub. ft.
model two years old in excellent con-
aition. Apply Electric Sales & Services
Ltd. 15.9,.50—2n.



POULTRY

POULTRY—White Leghorns, trios_con-
sisting 8-month Cockerel, 8-month Pullet
and 18-month Hen, @ $14 per trio; also
MAMMOTH BRONZE TURKEYS — 8&-
months old in trios. Price according to
size. Also a few pairs of good Modenas.
All Aa “tS et ta Stock.
SHEARN, Garrison. a. .

9.9."50.—3n.

MISCELLANEOUS

BUS & TRUCK TYRES made by
Henley of England We have a few
32 x 6 remaining which cannot be re-
placed to be sold at today's price.
There is no better tyre made in the



world John F, Hutson Ltd.
14.9,.50—2n,

CORN! CORN! CORN! Give your

poultry a Treat. Fresh Dried Indian

Corn Ready Shelled. Griffith's Rockley,
Christ Church. 13.9.50—4n.

DEMIJOHNS — Thirty (30) Covered
Clear Glass Demijohns 12% Gals. Capa-
city. Rum Dealers should be interes-
ted.

Eckstein Bros. 10.9.50—6n.

GALVANISRD SHHETS—24 gauge. In

7, 8 9 and 10 feet lengths. Enquire
AUTO TYRE COMPANY, Trafalgar
Street. Phone 2696. 15.9.50—t.f.n.



MODERN BATHANETTE — Collapsible
with Tray and Stand for dressing child.
Apply Mrs. Lb. A. Williams. Dial
Dial 95-275. 15.9.50—5n.



PRAM-—Large twin pram with fold-
tng hood. Apply Mrs. L. A. Williams
95-275. 15.9.50—5n.

One hand operated BACON SLICING
MACHINE. Apply B. V. Scott & Co.,
Lid., Whitepark. 13.9 .50—t.f.n,

PEAS~-LIN CAN Fresh Garden Peas
Fresh supplies may now be had from
your grocer. 14.9.50—2n,

RECORD ALBUMS for 10-inch and for
12-inch and carrying ne eee
records, and we have the records too

i A. BARNES & CO., LTD.
10.8.50—t.f.n.





water Tanks holding
300 gallons. Can be seen at Central
Foundry Dock Yard. 15.9.50—in.

YACHT — Centreboard Yacht ‘'Con-
dor.”” Length 17 feet, beam 6 feet. Newly
fitted out. Apply ae: Mecsrise

, Bay Street. lephone ‘

Serer ee 10.9.50—3n

YAWL—‘“Frapida” approx. 37% feet
long with Gray engine. Good
condition $3.000 — a bargain. Apply

. Phone 2520.
2) Becomes 15.8.50—T.F U1.

FOR RENT
HOUSES

“EVANTON” Top Rock. Unfurnished.
2 Bedrooms, Dining Romi, Lounge,
Tiled Baths, Two Servants’ Rooms.
Available from ist of October on
Monthly Basis or Long Lease. Dial
4683 or 2328. 13,8.50—5n.

FURNISHED UPSTAIRS FLAT—From |
lst November, 1950, at “BRIARFIELD’
Lower Collymore Rock. Phone 372.
H. BLAIR BANNISTER. 15.9.50—3n

TANKS—-6















SE — Ashton-on-Sea. Maxwell
cn Church. Fully Furnished. Con-
taining Four Bedrooms, Drawing and
Dining Rooms, Verandah Overlooking
the sea and all modern conveniences.
Dial 3607. 10.9,50—5n,

RGE HOUSE & APARTMENT—On
nex St. Lawrence, fully furnished.
Phone 8357. 8.9.50—t.f.n.

“MARISTOW" Maxwell Coast, Fully
Furnished. All modern conveniences.
Available from Ist November, Dial 468%
or 2328. 13.9.50-—5n.

——$—$—=—_——

OFFICES—Two very Spacious Offices
upstairs to No. 6 Swan Street Apply
to R. Spencer, Tudor Street Dial
2361. 15.9. 50—3n.

acentiteepinteindi

MOORINGS—Marine Gardens, Apart-

ment now ready for occupancy. Apply
. Gibson, Marine Hotel.

nie . 15.9.50—2n











“SUNNY SIDE”"—A 3 Bedroom Bunga-
low at Gibbs’ St. Peter, Good Bathing.
For months of October and November.

Bruce Weatherhead. Telephone 3144
or 2165. 13.9, 50—3n.

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife FSTHER
INNISS (nee SANDEFORD) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one @lse contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order

signed by me.
ERROL INNISS,
St, Lawrence,
Christ Church.
15.9.50—2n
——
The public are hereby warred against
giving credit to my wife GERTRUDE
YARD ‘nee WILLIAMS) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or
anyone else contracting any debt or
debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me.
EDWIN YARDE,
St. Martin,
St. Philip.
15.9.530—2n







NOTICE

OWING to repairs at present being
effected to the Christ Church Bovs’
Foundation School, next term will begin
on Tuesday 26th Septembér, instead of
the 19th of September. ~

No new pupils will be
w.H
Bod



admitted
ANTROBUS.,
Boys’ Fourndatior
School, Ch

Sects Gov

Ch

order; Single Mahogany Bedstead with
Vono Spring and Deep Sitep Mattress;
Double and Single Iron Bedsteads,
Springs and Mattresses; Press; Larder,
Kitchen Utensils; Oil Stove and other

items.
Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms CASH.
BRANKER, & ©O.,
A
15.9.50-—2n



CARS—By instructions of the Attor-
ney of the estate of Mr. Edwards
(dec’d) I will sell on FRIDAY 15th st
1 p.m. COLE'S GARAGE, BAY STREET.
1 Humber Saloon Car in good working
order also 1 Chevrolet Saloon Car. in
geod working order and 1 Ships Sex-
fant. Thems Cash. R. Archer Mc.
Kenzie, Auctioneer. 12.9.50—4n.
$$,

Amongst the items which will be set
up for sale at my office on Friday next
at 1 p.m,, will be one (1) Horse &
Cart, One (1) Pair of Counter Scales
& Weights, One (1) Lady's 21 Jewel
Gold Wrist Watch, and One (1) Cow
heavy in Calf. Gave 36 points with last

calf. D’Aray A. Scott, Auctioneer.
13.9.50—2n
By instructions received from the

General Hospital. 1 will set up for sale
by public Auction at their yard, on
Thursday 2ist, beginning at 12.20 p.m.
the following articles:—

(3) Iron Kettles, (1) Gas Stove, Lot
of Horse Hair, (5) Glass-door cupboards,

(8) Iron Cradles, (29) Iron Bedsteads,
(4) Gas Ranges, (1) Electric Mixer,
(30) Assorted Mattresses, (1) Bakelite

Container, (1) Gardener’s Hlut, Lot Taps
and W. C. Balls’ (1) Electric Sterilizer,
(1) Vegetable Steamer, (2) Iron Chairs,
(1) Box X-Ray Parts, (1) Gas Sterilizer.
(12) Soda Water Syphon Bottles, (1)
Bacterol Cask, (1) X-Ray Tube, (9)
Galvd. Iron Ventilators, Bags of Surgi-
cal Instruments, (2) Steam Kettles,
(1) Dressing Trolley, (1) Small Glass-
door Cupboard, Lots of Doors and
Windows, (7) Trolley Feeding Tables,
(1) Wheel Chair and several other
items of interest.
D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Govt. Auctioneer .
15.9.50—5n
a |

REAL ESTATE
NS
The undersigned will be set up for sale
at their Office No: 17 High Street,

CANE VALE and. MAXWELLS, Christ
Church, containing together by estima-
tion 195 ACRES.

ACREAGE in Plant Canes — 4%

es.
ACREAGE in Ratoons — 25 Acres.
ACREAGE in Preparation

cres.

There will also be sold with the said
Plantations One Dodge Motor Lorry, 2
Milch Cows, I Mule and 1 small 2-wheel-
ed Cart.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to the undersigned:—

ert
SHARES with Accruing Dividends:—
50 Shares in Barbados Shipping & Trad-
i. Co., Ltd. 10 Shares in Plantations
The above will be set up for sale by
Publie Competition at our Office, James
Street, wn, on Friday the 15th
of September at 2 p.m.
G. L., W. CLARKE & CO.,
Solicitors.
13.9.50—8n.
——
£900 Barbados Government Debentures
made up as follows:—
1 @ #100 bearing interest at 5%
due 1964.
@ £200 bearing interest at 3%%
due 1954
@ £100 bearing interest at 3%%
due 1954
@ £100 bearing interest at 3%%
due 1968.
The above debentures will be set up
at public competition at the office of
the undersigned on Friday next the -

~~ — ow

15th instant at 2.00 p.m. Carrington &«

Sealy, Lucas Street. 13.9.50—3n .

EDUCATIONAL |
HARBISON COLLEGE

The next term at Harrison College
will begin on Tuesday, the 19th Septem-
ber, 1950, and the school will be in
session from 9.15 a.m, — 11,30 a.m,

D. E. M, MALONE,
Seere@tary, Governing Body,
Harrison College.
Department of Education,
15th September, 1950.





15,.9.50—2n

QUEEN'S COLLEGE

The next term at Queen’s College
will begin on Tuesday the 19th Sep-
tember, 1950, at 9.20 a.m. and the
schpol will be in session for the
entire day.



D. E. M, MALONE,
Secretany, Governing Body,
Queen’s College.
Department of Education,
15th September, 1960.
15.9.50—2n



GOVERNMENT



VACANT POST OF ASSISTANT
DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE
BARBADOS.

Applications are invited for the post of Assistant Livestock Officer,

DepartmentDepartment of Science
applicants who are experienced in
sidered. The post is pensionable
$2,160 x $120—-$2,880. The holder

ters provided at the Central Livestock Station.

Applications, mentioning the names of two referees, should
be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, Bridgetown, and should
reach him not later than 23rd September, 1950.

Further details will be supplied on request.



CHANCE

Boa undermentioned property will be

Public Buildings, Bridgetown between 12 noon and 2 p.m, for the sum and on the date
If not then sold, it will be set up
at the same place and during the same hours until

specified below.
application to me.

ROBERT CLIFFORD CHAPMAN
vs.
JASMINE GILL; FRANCES EUGENIE STUART & VICTORIA ISABEL BLACKMAN

or parce] of land situate in the parish of
of Barbados containing by
and four Pyne face thereabouts butting and

PROPERTY: ALL iT certai
Saint Fann and Teena

three acres
now or late of F.
of Fee

is Husbands, on
F Cogtington and H.

:

&
2

and buildings

Bree. PRICE: ‘zen °
BA OF SALE: 29th September, 1950,



REMEMBER ..

When you order from . .

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

‘ve deliver by Motor Van
Corne.~ of Broad and Tudor Streets.

deceased, on iands of Todds Plantation, on lands now or late of

3, Holder and on the Public
. Ho a on e

ise the same may butt and

thereon called “Stuartville” and all other the erections
thereon erected and built standing and being with the

NOTICE

Re Estate of
JOSEPH WIGGINS

(Deceased)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claims against
the Estate of Joseph Wiggins deceagd,
late of Flat Rock, in the of Saint
George in this Island who died mm this
Island on the 27th day of March
requested to send in particulars of their
claims duly attested to the undersigned
G. Seymour Alleyne of Mason Hall Street,
Bridgetown, on or before the 23nd
_ peepee, eg after =
shall proceed to distribute
the deceased













had notice and I will not be liable for
the assets or any part 0 a
ted to any person of whose or

T shall not then have notice.
Soe co piensa be



BARBADOS GENERAL
HOSPITAL

SEALED TENDERS will be re-
ceived at the Hospital up to 12
o’elock noon on Wednesday, 20th
September, 1950, for supplying
articles in the following lines for
a period of six months from Ist
October, 1950:—

(1) FRESH BREAD.

(2) ALCOHOL. ;

(3) COFFINS, and providing
HEARSE for the burial of
the dead at the Westbury
SOs he

(4) PURE ESH MILK.

Forms for the respective ten-
ders will be supplied on applica-
tion to the Secretary of the Gen-
eral Hospital and tenders will not
be entertained except they are on
forms supplied by the General
Hospital.

All articles furnished shall be
of the best quality and be subject
to the approval of the Medical
Superintendent whose decision
shall be final in regard thereto.

Persons tendering must submit
at the time of tendering letters

from two other persons known to| |)

bound as
sureties for the fulfilment of the]
contract.
Terms of contract and any fur-
ther particulars, may be ned
on application at the General

Hospital. .
W. GOODMAN,

Secretary.
14.9.50—8n.

Public Official Sale

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1904
1904-6) No. 30).

ON Friday the 29th day of September,
1950 at the hour of 2 o’clock in the
afternoon will be sold at my office to
the highest bidder for any sum not
under the appraised value. ‘

All that certain piece of Land con-
taining about 2 Roods, 19 Perches at
Armstrong Village situate in the Parish
ef St. Michael butting and bounding
hon lands of John Lewis, of John Cal-
lender (dec’d) of James Holder (dec'd)
of one Manning, of Jostph Maycock,
end on a road in common leading to
the public road together with the
messuage or Dwelling Houses, Buildings,
&c., appraised as follows:—

The whole ir appraised to
THREE HUN AND EIGHTY-
THREE DOLLARS AND ‘THIRTY-
CENTS ($383.33).

Attached from EUGENE ST. CLAIR
dg for and towards satisfaction
Cc

N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day

of purchase,
T. T, HEADLEY,
Provost Marshal.
Provost Marshal's Office,
13th September, 1950.



15.9.50—3n
———$ $$

WANTED

HELP

LADY—Used to writing up accounts
and Keeping books. If able to type
an advantage. Interesting and pleasant
work. Apply by letter in first instance
K. F. K. ¢/o Advocate. 13.9 .50—3n.

MAN WANTED—To assist in our
Cutting Room. Some experience es-
sential. Apply by letter.

Cc. B. RICE & CO.,
Bolton Lane,
13,9.50——@n

SALES GIRL who ‘speaks Spanish,
Apply Bata Shoe Store Broad St.
14.9, 50—Sn.

er riener areca eapsimalininant nineties shill
TAILOR—A Tailor for Pants & Shirt
Making.
STANWAY STORE, Lucas Street.
15.9.50—in

MISCELLANEOUS

lll
HOUSE—English Family requires House
to rent, one or two years, St. John, St.
Josept, St. George, St. Philip. Write

Box 33, ¢/o Advocate Co.
10.9.50—6n.





NOTICE

LIVESTOCK OFFICER,
AND AGRICULTURE,

and Agriculture, Barbados. Only
livestock management will be con-
and carries salary on the seale of
will be required to reside in quar-

14.9.50—3n,

RY SALE

set up for sale at the Registration Office,

on each succeeding Friday
sold. Full particulars on

admeasurement
bounding on
, on lands now or late of the estate

lands now or late of
Road or however
bound Together with the messuage or

aeig as

wistrar-in- ncery,
Sth Septernber, 1950,
12.9,50,—4n.





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ARE YOU JUSTA Gums Bleed?

PLAYTHING-NATURE?





JOHN





NOTICE TO CHAIRMEN.
COMMISSIONERS
HIGHWAYS AND OTHERS

WANTED TO RENT. wit operators:—

TWO OR THREE ROAD ROLLERS
FROM 4 TONS TO 8 TONS FOR
A PERIOD OF AT LEAST ONE MONTH




M. HLADON

| for attractive terms and efficient service
Phone 4640 —

Plantations Building




OF








PHONE 8292

ROYAL THEATRE

Special Entertainment Drive

ONE WEEK OF GAIETY

FRIDAY at 8.30 p.m.

Madame O’LINDY and her Unforgettable

CABACAS NIGHTS

With Smashing originations 3 Hours of Solid
Entertainment

SATURDAY NIGHT at 8.30
} HOUR STAGE ENTERTAINMENT
MADAM TIAM FOOK and SYD VANDEK LYDE in

A GRAND VARIETY ENTERTAINMENT of the high-
est order along with M.G.M’s SUPER DOUBLE:

“THEY PASS THIS WAY"



BARBADOS

consequence had
commission and,

oe

20th June, 1950.

JOEL MACREA — FRANCIS DEE
— AND —

“JOHNNY EAGER”

ROBERT TAYLOR — LANA TURNER

Watch This Space For further PROGRAMMES

Starring :

Starring :

ELECTRIC = SUPPLY

CORPORATION LTD.

‘NOTICE



As the Manufacturers have decided that repairs to one of
our Engines can no longer be delayed, the Comyany has in
this Generating Set (900 K-W.) out of
to the reduction of standby Plant now
available as a result, may find it necessary to shed load at
intervals during the next few months,

Our Consumers are asked to co-operate by exercising the
utmost economy in the use of Electricity, particularly during
the Peak period between 6.30 and 8.30 p.m. until further notice.

Vv. SMITH,
General Manager.

AUCTION
with





















| Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose
|\Teeth mean that

| Trench Mouth or pe:
| that will sooner or later cause your teeth

|
| to fall ont and may also cause Rheumatism
|and Heart Trouble, Amosan stops gum SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM | The MV "Desreind*
dleeding the first day, ends sore mouth ROTTERDAM AND ANTWER. } I
and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad] . .) “frersilia® Sept. 29th: 30th. Oct
| guarantee. Amosan must make your aed will accept Cargo and Pas-

mouth well and save your teet





mon SATLING FROM AMSTERDAM i
Nature may endow you with cee act tmeken Neat voce takai & DOVER sengers for St. Lucia, St
breathtaking beauty, a lovely y. guar- m.s. “Bonaire” September 15th
curvaceous figure. She may be- | osan oa Protects) saiLING To ae ee Vincent, Grenada and Aru-
Sete. mean rhee—Trench eee ee paren lag:
a actress, a leader in for Pyor seme Meme) ms. ‘Helens’ Sevt tet. . ba. Sailing Sunday 17th.
reer ak dhe ee neiae SAILING TQ MADEIRA, PLYMOUTH,
wife ana mother. ADVER ae a B.W.L, Schooner Owners
° m.s. jemet: . .
and E T S . “Oranjestad” Oct. 27th. Asso, (Inc).
Yes, Nature do all this. ISE wa lT PAYS. Sal oe 1 secommedation | 1] rei. Nu, 4047
aval on ve ;
slapped if aie a lable this ry a
os - 8 P. MUSSON, SON & CO. ; resteepe
une Ge cnaeeaieetucate BARBADOS ARTS AND CRAFTS AGENTA
a SOCIETY
Girls and women do.
‘issinaay ea NOTICE : :
The Sixth Annual Meeting of the e l St h
Nabeul | forget —Pinikham’s Compound | general Atenniy ot wenses “se | Canadian National Steamships
Not Joke About! bors MORE than relieve such Ghove Society will be neld st Wakefield,
female functional month! monthly pain. is great medi- | Gritish © il Representative Fri- ils Sail Satis Arrives Sails
oun are causing you to | Cie samo relieves accompanying | day, 29th September at 8 p.m, to con SOVEESOORD Giedues: | ‘Welttcx Becton Gachases Masbedce
firm the Annual Report and to elect the
from pain, nervous dis- nervous tension, irritability, Officers and Committee of Management | cAN r RUISE: ol Aug € Sept - 16 Sept 16 Sept
tress and feel weak, restless, so those tired-out, mean ‘pick-on- | for te ensuing pear CANADIAN CRU TSER se, See Ly cei ee
and irritable that you — everyone’ feelings—when due to M. P. MERRICK, CANADIAN CHALLENGER | 27 Sept. 30 Sept 10 Oct
turn into a ‘she-devil'— this cause, Taken regularly | Asst. Hog, Secretary LADY RODNEY .... .. 13 Oct 16 Oct. 18 Oct, 27 et.
on such days—THIs Is SOMETHING thruout the month—Pinkham's | 8.9.60--Sn CANADIAN Sean wee. Ge Sin Row ia ee
een tee ae tem ean ee aoe a dinnlin geen dee
right away-try Lydia E. Pink- tance against such distress—a
bam Compound sensi 9 N Arrty Balls Artives Arrives Arrives Arrives
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‘And don’t benefit! All drugstores. ee LAY RODNEY .. 19 Sept. 21 Sept. 20 Sept. 1 Oct 5 Oct
Seo Owing to structural alterations, LADY NEE, 8 Ock. ® on 8 ast ee ae ie
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aan v4 ¥, VEGETABLE entire ‘ryot of ant bullaing at Nos. LADY NELSON 28 Nov. 30 Nov 9 Dee - -- 16 Dec
&. 'e COMPOUND - aff Reebuck St., ee ence
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PAGE SEVEN

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Association

All postmen, messengers,
house keepers, public
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T's, Publie Works, Mental Hos-
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are summoned to a special Gen-
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1éth at 1.30 p.m

(Inc. in Br. Guiana)

Light
market
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" PAGE EIGHT








OVER THE BAR

|
|

TiiE PICTURE shows Paul Foster, skipper-goalkeeper of Flying Fish, pushing a hard shot from Geoffrey

Foster, one of the Swordfish forwards, over the cross bar.

ot

Tour Australia
From Oct. 1951—Jan. 1952

SYDNEY, Sept. 14.

THE Australian Cricket Board of Control to-day decided

to invite the West Indies to
season.

{t was found impossible to send an Australian team to the
r commitments.

West Indies because of other

W.I. Win |
1-Day Game |

MARSHALL HITS 6 SIXES

CARLISLE, Sept. 14.

The West Indies won their one-
day match with the combined
Cumberland and Westmoreland
team here today by 159 runs, scor-
ing 244 before dismissing the
combined side for 85. The West
Indies batted a second time and
scored 110 for four but the match
was decided on the first innings.

From the start of play, the West ;
Indies hit freely and they had 228!
runs on the board at luneh-time |
for the loss of 6 wickets

Marshall and Christiani gave
them an excellent start with a
century opening stand but then in
typical one-day cricket style the
wickets tumbled as batsmen hit
out and Marshall 82 and Chris-
tiani 46 remained top scorers.

Marshall's total included six
sixes and four fours, evidence of
the hitting. The West Indies in-
nings closed in 20 minutes after
lunch, two wickets falling as a re-
sult of splendid throws by Elwood
which ran out Rae and Valentine.

That opening stand of 101 took
only 47 minutes and the crowd
which had gathered to welcome
the tourists on their first visit to
Carlisle were quick to show their
appreciation of the play.

Newall with medium pace bowl-
ing had the well deserved figures
of five for 86 during the innings.

The county batsmen found the
bowling of Valentine and Gomez
difficult to play and only Wood
and Newall showed confidence.

Valentine and Gomez each took
four wickets in dismissing the local
side for 85 which left them 159
behind, and the remaining hour
and a quarter's play was occupied
by further good batting from the
West Indies









—Reuter.



Lamotta
Retains Title |

DETROIT, Sept, 14,
Jake Lamotta, World Middle-
weight Champion last night

knocked out Laurent Dauthuille
(France) in a 15-round fight here.
Lamotta came up with a blister-
ing attack in the last minute of
the fifteenth round to knock out
Dauthuille and retain his cham-

pionship
Reuter.



Trinidad Beat
British Guiana
(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Sept, 14,

In the Caribbean Lawn Tennis
Tournament now being played at
the Georgetown Cricket Club
grounds, Trinidad today won both
singles matches against B.G. when
Jin Ho beat Edwin Redwin 6—4,
6—3, 7-5; and McDonald beat
Ivan Philips.





tour Australia in the 1951—52



The tour to Australia’ will
extend from October to January,
with five tests, an interstate game
in each ot the states, and several
provincial fixtures.

The tour is subject to the
ipproval of the Imperial Cricket
‘onference in London.

The arrangements would enable
Aurtralia to meet its commit-
ments to send its best team to
New Zealand in the same season.

The Board increased the allow-
ance of Australian test players
from £50 Australian currency
(£40 sterling) to £60 Australian
currency, (£48 sterling) per
match plus expenses.—Reuter.



Colony Football
Team Plays
“Sparrow”

A football match between a
team from H.M.S. “Sparrow” and
a Colony XI will take place at
Combermere this afternoon. The
match begins at 4,30 o’clock.

Representing the Colony will
he:

Smith (Empire); Gibbons, Bow-
cn (Spartan); Haynes, Cadogan,
Gittens (Spartan); MeCollin (Bm-
pire), Blades (Everton), F. Tay-
jor (Empire), Drayton (Empire)
and Harper (Empire).



Island Cricket XI
Defeat “Sparrow”

The island easily defeated
team form the H.M.S. Sparrow
in a ercket match yesterday at
Combermere. The island won by
an innings and 84 runs. F. Ings
was the only batsman to reach
double figures, for the Sparrow
in their first innings. He scored
15 out of 51. Bowling for the
island Denis Atkinson took four
wickets for 14 runs, Norman
Marshal] two for four and Alleyne
two for 10.

a

The island then replied with
205 runs for four wickets de-
clared, Norman Marshall and

Goddard h'tting breezy knocks to
seore 58 and 47 respectively.

In their second turn.at the
wicket the Sparrow team was dis-
missed for 70 runs, Ings again top-
scoring with 30.



Tomorrow's Cricket

The fourth series of First Divi-
sion Cricket games opens _to-
morrow, and the fixtures with
grounds and umpires are as fol-
lows: —

FIRST & INTERMEDIATE SERIES AND
UMPIRES OFFICIATING

Date; s; Grounds & Umpires

Sept. 16, ao

Combermere vs. Lodge at Combermere
I

E. King & G. Forde.

2





College vs. Spartan at College. F. L
Walcott & L. Spellos.

Wanderers vs. Carlton at Bay. S. C
Foster & H, B, Jordan

Empire vs. Police, at Bank Hall, C. St

C, Cumberbaten & D. Roachford,

INTERMEDIATE
Sept. 16, 28, 30
Cable & Wireless vs. YÂ¥.MeP.C., ai

Boarded Hall, J Hall & W. Bayley.
Mental Hospital vs. Empire, at Black

Rock, W. Harewood & W. Archer.
Spartan vs. Wanderers, at Park.

Hinds & C. Batson,
Pickwick vs. Windward at

S. Gilkes & C. Collymore
N.B. Play commences at 1 P.M. and
umps drawn at 6 P.M,

J.

the Oval






ce
\F;

lO HIS MISSUS
TOOK THE CUE
AND GOT ONE
FOR HERSELF:
BROTHER! THAT'S
DIFFERENT!

THANX TO
MRS.F.S.SCHWARZE,



3035 EISENHOWER AVE,
ARCADIA, CALIF.



ee an
c








Swordfish however defeated Flying Fish 2—0.

W.I. Invited To

Swordfish Win
From Flying Fish
At Water Polo

SWORDFISH, by scoring a two-
love defeat over Flying Fish in
their Water Polo match at the
Aquatic Club yesterday evening.
have placed themselves in a good
position to win the Cup. The
struggle for supremacy now lies
between Swordfish and Snappers

The game between these two
teams was fast and interesting
and even in the last minutes the
Flying Fish players did not give

p.

Albert Yearwoo1, Skipper-goal-
keeper of Swordfish, did some
excellent work in the nets! and
on many occasions saved what
looked like certain goals. Paul
Foster, the Flying Fish skipper-
goalie, was many times c¢
upon to save some hard tries from
Geoffrey Foster in the Swordfisi
forward line.

The goals for Swordfish
scored by Geoffrey Foster and
Billy Gilkes. The game began
with Flying Fish defending the
goal at the Harbour end. Soon after
Geoffrey Foster opened his team’s
account with a hard shot from in
the goal area, which although it
touched Paul Foster’s outstretched
hand, found its way into the nets.

Swordfish Lead

At half time Swordfish were
Still in the lead. Soon after the
second half began Geoffrey Fos-
ter swam down and took another
hard shot which Foster pushed
over the cross-bar,

Mickey Jordon had a golden
opportunity to put Swordtich
further in the lead but although
he was unmarked in the goal
area, he sent the ball inches over
the cross-bar.

A few minutes later Billy Gilkes,
who was also unmarked in the goal
area, placed the ball in the right
corner of the goal, out of the reach
of Foster, to put his team two
goals in the lead. The end found
the score unchanged.

In the other game of the evening
Barracudas met Bonitas and de-
feated them one love. Herbert
Portillo scored the goal for Bar-
racudas in the first half.

Some good saving was witness-
ed by Henri Perez in the Barra-
cudas’ goal, Maurice Foster,
skipper — goalkeeper, was also
called upon to save some difficult
shots sent in by the Barracudas
forwards

were

|

Owing to unforeseen circum-
stances the game between the
team from the H.M.S, “Sperrow”
and a combined Snapper -Police
team, had to be postponed.

The teams were:

Bonitas; M. Foster (Capt.), A.
Patterson, J, Grace, O. Johnson,
T., Yearwood, I. Inniss and A,
Taylor.

Barracudas: H. Perez, B. Brooks
(Capt.), B, Armstrong, H. Portil-
lo, C, Evelyn, P. Fletcher and E.
Johnson.

Flying Fish: P. Foster (Capt.),
T. Yearwood, J, Knight, le
Malone, H, Weatherhead, © P.
Potter and D. Davies.

Swordfish A. Weatherhe rd
(Capt.), M. Jordon, N, Portillo,
H. Jones, M, Fitzgerald, G. Fos-
ter and B. Gilkes.

Referee: Mr. W. Gibbs.

Rifle Shooting
To-morrow

There will be practice shoot at
The Government Rifle Range for
members of the B.R.A. tomorrow
at 1.30 p.m. ;

The shoot will be from the 200,
500, and 600 yards banks.

It is hoped there will be a good
turn-out of the Club fo afford a
welcome to the members of the
Bisley Team,





SSeS eee

| They'll Do It Every Time Weds Soon B
<= i ———
OH, BOY! RIGHT OUT

OF THE FASHION A
MMMH-MMMH





Woo-Wool!
!

















Jimmy Hatlo

RMIN WENT
ALL OUT IN
HIS ADMIRATION
FOR SUN SUITS
AS WORN BY LA
BLONDE CUTIE

WELL, OF
ALL THE! TAKE 4
IT OFF! SEND IT BACK,
I LEAVE FoR Goop!
Tor mais Wy wre
NOT
EVERY







BARBADOS ADVOCATE
|b. B.C. Radio Programme

FRIDAY,

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1950

LEGS OE OSS POOOOSSS SS Soo

GLOBE



OS



oe





SEPTEMBER 15,
7 00 a.m. The News, 7.10 a.m. News

Lone

4

oe NONE EEL LL LTELE LEI TM



























































Analysis; 7.15 a.m The Unbeatable + ‘ %
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Dn New Records 00 nit the|® THE DELIGHTFUL VOICE OF BRITISH GUIANA'S
Debate Co:tinues; 1.15 p.m. Raclio| ¢ SINGING STAR.
Newsreel, 1.36 m a Hi ard; |
Sab p.m. eg) Maen: 210 a Bome |% SUNDAY, RATED %
News From Britain; 2.15 p.m. Sports .
Review; 2.30 p.m. Henry’ Wood Rom- ON THE ;
nade Coneamtty, 2.90 Esters. | , SEPT 17 S| ;
4.10 pm € Serv: : mm. | ’ '
Nights At The Opera; 3.00 p.m. John |§ SWEETEST . '
Madin at the Theatre Organ; 5.15 p.m 8.30 P.M. x | i
Programme Pe aay 5 se tare, VOICE
Magazine, 3 m. e J
Ramtaaien, Ss aa Pipes and Drums, | ¢ HALF HOUR :
6.30 p.m. Sir Robert Peel; 7.00 p.m. |¢ IN
Pe ha" i cia gman |g OF THE otion i
be Ms a. n=
dies; 2 ‘p.m Radio. Newsreel, 8.15 y LATEST THE :
lp ebat tii Bi ‘
Phil Tate; 855 p.m. From The Edi: TUNES CARIBBEAN ‘
torials, 9.00 p.m. From The Promenade | ¥ p |
concerts, 10.00 p.m. The News, 10.10 AND HIT 0 Ins
Ee ati 10.15 oe, oe STAR D
os’ . * m oO} airs; A
11.00 p.m. The Rraeraes New Clothes x PARADE %
een ~ SPECIALS t In Cream, Fawn,
9 DIE IN CRASH , RADIO Biscuit and Bei
Nin as dios ioe te ge ; 54 i on
iné people ere today in} M. a ns. wide
— of an Iranian Airways | ae ed F Y x Per yd q :
is ‘ . ) &
The machine crashed as it took | $ STROMBOLI 1 % $2.30 & 2.61 E
off a oud Arabia, with. spare | ¥ Mr. RAY NUNES. . ‘
parts for another Iranian Airways | ¢ PROGRAMME: ¢
plane grounded at Jidda. , : ‘ :
The British pilot was killed, The | % (1) Again; (2) Foolish Heart;(3) Maybe its’ Because % The weil known '
others dead were all Airways per- (4) Ole Man River; (5) If I Love You; (6) Stormy Weather. % |
sonnel and included five Persians, eS oe $5 or MOYGOSHELL t
« enetenan, a Greek and a South ' )*#ORG9OG6S SEO SSS SOSLOSSOSSO > PSOOSS - Soo ° oan
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Full Text


>tracts might be held up later if

» aircraft

Friday
September
19350

we

1,000 Reds Killed
And Wounded

In 24

MaAc ARTHUR’S HEADQUARTERS estimated
the Communis: dead and wounded in the last
with the addition of 202|)~

24-hour period as 1,880
captured.

In Washington, defence officials said they could
not confirm Press reports that United Nations
Forces to-day attempted a landing on the Korean
west coast in the area of Inchon and Seoul.
Yesterday the United Nations Neval Task Force shelled

the Inchon area and to-day
said the shore batteries of

troyers, four landing craft and three other landing craft

were damaged.





Carstairs
Follows |
Blackburne |



eben Ss.

Mr. C. Y. CARSTAIRS

Mr, C. YÂ¥. Carstairs, C.M.G.,
Assistant Secretary in the Colo-
nial Office, is recently re-
turned to” ingdom
from the post of Administrative
Secretary to the Comptroller for
Development and Welfare in the
West Indies, has been appointed
to ipenee. Mr. K. W. Blackburne,
C.M.G., O.B.E., as Director of
Information Services, Colonial
Office. Mr. Carstairs will be
taking up his new duties at the
beginning of 1951. This is the
second time that Mr. Carstairs
has taken up an office left vacant
by Mr. Blackburne. He succeeded
Mr. Blackburne as Administra-
tive Secretary to the Comptroller
for Development and Welfare.



Escher Is On
oa : Y
Swiss Cabinet
ae BERNE, Sept. 14.
Dr. Joseph Escher, President of
the Swiss Catholic Conservative
Party was to-day elected by both
houses of Parliament to the Fed-
eral Council of Switzerland’s

semi-permanent Cabinet of seven
Minis.ers.

He is expected to be given
charge of the Department of Posts
and Highways. He has been in
Parliamentary politics for 25
years, and succeeds another Cath-
olic Conservative Dr. Enrieo
Celio. Dr. Celio, until now Minis-
ter of Posts and Railways, has
been appointed Swiss Minister
in Rome.—Reuter.

15

Hours

TOKYO, Sept. 14,

Pyongyang Communist radio
three “small” American des-

In an official report on the dam-
ege done by Superforts, Major
General Emmett O'Donnell, com-
manding the United States Far
Eastern Air Force, estimated 75
per cent “of the assigned targets”

in the Communist territory had}

been destroyed.

Communist
Korea are cut off from
sources of supply, General
Arthur said to-day.

Surerfort bombing has
ahout completed the job of cutting
ali Communist communication
routes southward, he said.

General Mac Arthur's forces
build'*=* up to offensive strensth
brought heavy cannon into action
to-dav north of Taegu.

A battery of eight-inch Howitz-
ers—the heaviest weapons yet
seen in Korea—lobbed projectiles
into Communist hill pqsitions
flanking the Tabudong-Taegu
highway. Otherwise quiet war
front American troops in this
northwest corner of the 125-mile
lomg defence line fought bitterly
to capture the commanding hilltop
and to keep Communists off the

South
their
Mac

forces in

just)

high ridge just behind the Ameri-|to Lord Baldwin as Governor of |

ean lines.

A gaunt-faced Battalion Com-
mancer whose men have suffered
heavy casualties in this battle told
Reuter: “If the Communists took
this ridge they could almost throw
rocks on Taegu.”

Two miles to the east, American
troops counter-attacked early to-
day to retake hilltops lost during
the night.

Driven Off

Yesterday Americans drove
Communists from a hill 5 miles
southeast of Waegwan, but they
were after driven off by a strong
counter-attack,

South Korean troops have ad-
vanced almost 2 miles on the
northeast sector of the perimeter,
an American Eighth Army Com-
munique announced to-day.

Southerners driving north and











lS es ea

wis

SIR PELHAM WARNER, President of the M.C.C., sits next to John Goddard at a dinner given at the Savoy Hotel in London in honour of

the W.I. cricketers.

New Governor
Flies To
Leewards

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Sept. 14.
Kenneth Blackburne successor

the Leeward Islands left London

unexpectedly in a B.O.A.C. air-
craft this morning. |
The Blackburne family were

preparing for a sea voyage to the}
Leeward Islands about the middle |
of October, and the sudden deci-
sion of the new Governor to fly
was to help to deal with the situ-
ation which has arisen from the}
hurricanes and fires in Antigua.

His Sussex home was the scene
of great activity shortly after
dawn today.

The sun-tanned Mrs. Black-
burne said: “My husband is flying
out a month earlier than he the|





intended in order to give all the
help he can”.

She plans to follow him by air|
on October 2nd with their adopted |
children their six-year-old son
Martin and their two-year-old

east from the road and rail junc-|daughter Jean.

tion of Yongchon tightened their
positions formed after the main
force of the Communist drive
south had been held,

British troops west of Taegu
with the American Second Division
mopped up groups of Communists
in rear areas.

Major General Emmett O’Don-
nell, Junior, commanding the)
United States Far Eastern Air
Force Bomber Command said to-
day that American Superfortresses
now found little left of the North
Korean industry worth bombing,

In an official report reviewing
the first two months of the com-
mand’s operations (from July 13)
he listed the heavy industry and
war plants attacked—these in-
eluded the Songjin chemical in-

dustry and the Tchin-Nampo
chemical and metal producing
works which had been stvuck off
the target list after de tructive
bombing attacks.

“Heavy industry hes been

severely crippled in an estimated
40 percent. destruction of assigned
targets,” Gereral O’Donnell’s re-
port said. —Reuter,



Jordan Threatens

To Use Armed Force

Against Israel

AMMAN, Sept. 14.

JORDAN has told France, Britain and the United States

that she will meet alleged
force unless Israeli troops
sources said here to-day.

violation of her territory by
withdraw, usually reliable

An Israeli force occupied a stretch of territory in the Arab

land, Jordan claimed.

Contract Stands

LONDON, Sept. 14.

British jet plane contracts with
Sweden will not be affected at
present by the Government's de-
cision to Be exports of jet fight-
ers to nations outside the Atlan-
tic Pact a Foreign Office spokes-
man said to-day. Sweden however
has been told that existing con-

the building capacity cf Britain’s
industry is needed for}
Atlantic Pact production, he ad-|
ded.

The supply for the Swedish |
market differs from the normal |
case because Swedish factories |

are themselves producing jet fight- |

ér-engines under licence
’ The British side of the contract!
is limited to building the body of |
the plane around completed
gines

en-

—Reuter

$$ $$$ $5

| ploughed

Israel replied that it had been
allotted to her under United
Nations agreement.

The sources said that Jordan,
which complained to the United
Nations had also invoked Anglo-
Jordan treaty and called for aid

It was understood that she had
also notified France, Britain and
the United States as signatories
of a joint agreement in May
which guaranteed her frontiers
with Israel.

Jordan was believed to have
requested governments te use all
available means to force Israel to
withdraw from the territory.

The American Aide Memoire is
reported to have asked Jordan to
refrain from precipitate action |
pending a full report by the}
United Nations Truce ‘Committee, |
observers said. According to re-}



ports 400 Israeli troops with heavy
armour occupied 100 acres of}
Jordan territory
It as reported that they h id}
the land before with-
drawing most of their troops and
leaving two “symbolic” out-posts
he Jordan gart the






facing

forced



‘ Island in

@ On Page 3.



|

me |

“We'll Miss

You, Molly’’
Says Busta

ll



LADY HUGGINS

SIR JOHN HUGGINS, G.C.M.G.,
Gevernor of Jamaica, left the
island for the last time as its chief
executive, on Saturday morning,
bound for Britain on six months’
leave prior to retirement. He was
accompanied by Lady Huggins,
and two of his daughters.

After two weeks of farewell
functions the Governor and his
family said official farewells to
Jamaican officials and leading
citizens and representatives of the
Press at King’s House on Saturday
morning and to a select group of
Privy and Executive Councillors
at Port Antonio, where he boarded
ship.

Lady Huggins cried as she kiss-
ed the Hon. W. A. Bustamante and
other leading members of the com-
munity, including the leaders of
the Jamaica Federation pf Women
which she founded during the
s€ven years she and her husband
have been in the island.

When the Party left King's
House Lady Huggins and her two
daughters were in tears and she
was declaring that she would he
back some day, while Mr. Busta-
mante said: “We'll miss youcterri-
bly, Molly. There is no one like



you.” |

In the evening the Colonial |
Secretary, the Hon. D.C. Mac;
Gillivray, C.M.G.,

was sworn in|
as Acting Governor by the Hon
My. Justice J. E. D. Carberry,}
Acting Chief Justice. He will act|
until a ceessor to Sir John Hug
Gove arrive the
March or April next year








EISENHOWER MAY LEAD

Learie Constantine and other woll known ancients of the gamo attended.





WEST DEFENCE FORCES

By PAUL

GENERAL

DWIGHT EISENHOWER, who

SCOTT RANKINE~

NEW YORK, Sept. 14.

led the

Western armies to victory against Hitler was being prom-
inently mentioned here to-day for the post of Supreme
Commander of the Western defence forces agreed upon

by the “Big Three” Foreign

Advocate Hurricane

Relief Fund
For Antigua

Previously acknowledged $5,535.30
Canadian Bank of
Commerce :

EHK . 1 20
Barclays Bank :

Roberts Manufacturing

Co., Ltd. 50 00

Advocate Co., Ltd,

Mr. & Mrs, A. C. Bailey 5 00

M.L. 1 00

Capt. & Mrs. G. Russel 5 00

Atom 1 00

Frank B, Armstrong

Ltd. 100 00
Colonial Postmaster &

Staff 79 00
Bajan 10 00
Mr. & Mrs. T. E

McKenzie 50 00
Anon 1 00

W. Sorhaindo 1§

Total

Increase In
German Police
Very Likely

OBSERVERS THINK

By SYLVAN MANEGOT

NEW YORK, Sept, 14.
The “Big Three’ Foreign Min-

isters, Acheson, Bevin and Schu-

man to-day spent the whole
morning session discussing the
vital issues of West German
rearmament and German parti-

cipation in the defence of Western
Europe.

It was understood that no
agreement was reached on major
issues and further discussion was
postponed.

The ministers met this morning
without any advisers other than
the three High Commissioners for
Germany who had been working
overnight to draft the agreed
formula for the expansion of West
Germany’s police forces.

This was quite apart from the
question whether Germany should
have a military force of her own
to contribute to Western defence.

@ On page 3







Ministers last night.

General Eisenhower who is now
President of Columbia University
is believed to have made it clear
privately that he would be willing
fo accel such a position if the
North Atlantic powers decided to
accept the nominee appointed by
the United States,

Speculation segerding. the ap-
oni ene Nort Au tic

up’ ommander has
current in Washington ever since
it was made known last week that
the United States would support
the original French proposal to
create such a command.

It was agreed in principle yes-
terday by Foreign Ministers of
Britain, France and the United
States that they would support the
proposal to appoint a Supreme
Commander at the meeting of the
North Atlantic Foreign Ministers
opening tomorrow.

As the American Chairman of
the Chiefs of Staff of the North
Atlantic powers, such a command-
er could for the present direct the
training of Western European De-
fences. He would assume duties
as commander as soon as forces for
him to command were formed.

According to current thinking in
North ‘Atlantic diplomatic circles,
it would be for Defence Ministers
of the North Atlantic powers and
their Chiefs of Staff who are meet-
ing in Washington in October to
make the final decisions regarding
the composition and the disposition
of these forces.

The points being advanced by
supporters of the appointment of
General Eisenhower are:

Throughout the Allied cam-
paigns in Europe he showed an in-
comparable ability to weld the
forces of many Allied Nations into
one fighting machine, and to re-
solve differences between various
national commands without arous-
ing any fears that he was favour-
ing his own country.



TERRORISM LESSENS

SAIGON, Sept. 14

French author'ties announced
today that there was less Com-
munist terrorism against Chileans
in Indo-China last month than in
all four years of guerilla activity.

They said that in Vietnam,
casualties from grenade throw ng
and the like in such places as
Saigon had fallen by 41 percent.

| from the July figure and sabotage

by 22 percent.
—Reuter.





Host To 700

Argentines

| Portsmouth Is
|

PORTSMOUTH, Sept. 14
The ancient seaport of Ports-
mouth is today playing host to
nearly 700 officers, cadets and

ratings from the training cruiser
La Argentina now berthed there
{on a vis't to Britain

This morning the Lord Mayor
of Portsmouth, Alderman Sir
Denis Daley accompanied by the
Argentine naval attache, Rear
Admiral Victorio Maltesa were
received on board the Argentine

cruiser by her commander, brisk} those Governments represented on
good humoured Captain Ignation|the Far

Chamorro,
The Argentine marine band
mounted on the sunlit quarter

deck played “Rule Britania” as
visitors went on board. Blue and
white Argentine flags fluttered
from her mast head

Tonight the Lord Mayor wa
giving a reception for officers and
cadets in the red carpeted Coun-
cil Chamber. Later visitors will
be guests at the Corporation loc:
theatres and dance kalis and will
ilso be entertained in the Petty
Officers’ mess at Royal Naval
barracks and the Ordinary Off
cers’ mess Whale Island

In sleek grey the British buil
cruiser has visited Teneriffe,
Boulogne, Cherbourg and Copen-
hagen. After a week's stay in
port she will go to New York
Puerto Rico and Rio De Jane'ro
returning to Buenos Aires
November 29

on

—Reuter,

North Korea
Is To Blame

Says U.N. Commission

LAKE SUCCESS, Sept. 14.

The United Nations Commis
sion on Korea today placed the
ent re blame for the Korean situa-

tion on North Korean

It stated that the Communist
government had launched a
carefully planned full seale inva-
sion on June 25, when its efforts
to undermine the Southern re-
public from within had failed

In its official annual report ,to
the General Assemb'y, the Com-
mission said that though the origin
of the conflict was art ficial di-
vision of the country, Nortt
Koreans could have _ avoided
actual war by allowing interna-
tionally supervised elections to be
held throughout the whole of
Korea. —Reuter,

authorities





£800,000 Will Save Butlin’s

From Liquidation

‘From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Sept. 14.

Brigadier Keith Thorburn told
an informal meeting of the
shareholders of Butlin’s Bahamas
that unless the company could
raise £800,000 “within the next
fortnight at the outside I am
perfectly certain that ereditors
in Nassau will apply ‘for liqui-
dation”

One bright spot in the whole
meeting was Mr. “Billy” But-
lin’s promise to put un £1.000,-
000 of his own money, if the sum
required is raised. But he made
one firm proviso—he must then
be allowed to operate the Camp.

Thorburn said £800,000
needed to complete the
pa “Vacation Village”

Jahamas, but an
working capital would still be
required Even if money wa
raised, the Camp could not now
pleted in time to

was
Com-
in the
additional





be corr benefit




ea



The Board made no secret of
their doubts about the Com-
pany’s ability to raise the neces-
sary funds. Thorburn said “I
still believe in this venture, but
I am getting very pessimistic
about getting out of it.”

During the meeting there was
a demand that Butlin be ap-
pointed Managing Director, but
Thorburn said that it was im-
possible as Butlin was prevented
from doing so under the terms
of his contract with Butlin’s
Ltd

After the meeting, Butlin told
your’ correspondent he could be
released from the contract if
necessary, but the Board had
not asked him to become Man-
aging Director

However, he made it clear
that his offer of £1.000,000 stood
only on condition that filled
this post
Courts Can’t Decide
was revealed at the meet-

he

It

ing that the petition had bee
made to the Courts in London t
wind up the Company. This wa
in respect of £140. The Com
pany’s solicitor Kenneth Col
explained that British Court
could not order the winding up
of the Company as it was out
side their jurisdiction

Thorburn said the Company's









creditors in Nassau had held
admirably, but he thought that
unle money was raisec during
the next fortnight, the ruld no
be prevented from applying for
liquidation

There was another encounter
betwe hareholder and the
Board over he Report ict
appeared in the newspaper he
thi I rn t t 1€ ne
in cold storage | Compat
in the Bahama vas to be sol
up. When Thorbur vas unabla
to confirm or der th repor

rehoilder elive

@ On Page 5

y Aduncate -
‘AD WITH STEE

——~. gine aree

AT THE SAVOY





s

o
‘2p
Price

L-



eneral
Eleetions

ay Follow

LONDON, Sept. 14,

PRIME MINISTER CLEMENT ATTLEE to-

night decided to risk the downfall of his Gov-
ernment and immediate General Elections by
announcing in Parliament that he intended to go

ahead with steel nationalisation.
Conservative Leader Winston Churchill immediately rose

to brand the Government’s action as
pushed forward a motion deploring that “at the most

H



“reckless and wanton”.

critical period in our national safety, Britain should be

p’unged

Truman Talks |, .

Of Japanese

Peace Treaty —

WASHINGTON, Sept, 14
sideat Truman said toda;
ha

he |
1 authorised the State Depart

into a fierce political controversy at home.”

Within a few minutes it was
earned the lobbies that the
rnment had decided to accept
Churchill’s challenge, and regard
motion as one of censure
which if carried would mean
labour’s resignation
If the Government were de-
feated on Churehill’s censure
i motion, it would therefore seek a

| fresh mandate from the country
in general elections.

|
nt to initiate informal discus-! The Government threw _ its
sons about a Japanese Peace} bombshell of steel nationalisation
Treaty with other members of the | into the comparative calm of the
Far Eastern Commission Government’s emergency session
The President told his weekly] on defence when Supply Minister
Press Conference that the United | Gocrge Strauss announced. that
States is also exploring the possi- |; ointments to the board to
bility of ending the state of war per ite nationalised steel would
with Germany lhe made on October 2. Loud
Truman said the question Of | aivdns from the Governmeni
ending the state of war with Ger- | sanche sreeted the announce-
many was a subject to be dealt| ' ° "=
with by Foreign Ministers of | ment

Britain, France, Rusgia and the |

United States

Churchill jumped to his feet to

| announce that Conservatives

The President's statement re- | would put forward a_ motion
garding the Peace Treaty with! ‘@-night condemning the Govern-
Tapan, said: “It has long been the | ment’s action. He demanded “&
view of the United States Gevern-| debate on the question” next,

that the
entitled

ment
ere

people
fo a

Peace

Tay
Tree

an

aty |

Tuesday
Herbert Morrison, Leader of the

which would bring them back into! House agreed to this

the family of nations.”

The President's statement added
“I have authorised the Department |

|

Blackburn Against

of the State to initiate informal | Raymond Blackburn, who re-
discussions as to the future pro- jsigned from the Labour Party
cedure, in the first instance, with |hecause it refuses to have the

coalition Government which he

Eastern Commission,
ones most actively
the Pacific War

ecencerned

the
ir

—-Reuter,

10 New Papers
In Two Weeks

ROME, Sept i4

Rome today gave birth to
10th daily newspaper—the secx
new daily to appear in the i

two weeks

‘rhe new paper carr.ed the title

Ih Di Roma’ the
tite as the Fascist morning paj
published during

Popolo

ils
na
ast

same

er



, | considers necessary, spoke against
‘! the Government.

Amid Government protests he
asked the Prime Minister if he
did not consider that the prime
| responsibility to-day was to
nationalise the slums before he
nationalised steel

There was no
remark

answer to this

Steel Nationalisation Act
sd im the last Parliament,
provides for the iron and steel
industry to be taken over by the
State on January 1, 1951, or at
any time within a year from that
date

The
Ass



Mussolini's



edie: The Government has con-
Officials of the paper however sistently declared that it would
lescribed it as an “independent| SPerate end sos ba oe ve eee
eves ; , eo + ne | ible, but many Opposition mem-
paper above party polit-c8,! hers’ believed that it intended
nspired only by considerations of because of its precarious smal!
ational unity.” | yea : r .

"i 5 ma

From its first issue, the paper, tor tims in Parllament,. to’ play
ippeared rightwing, but Anti-- ’
Sovernment —Reuter. —Reuter.

e

Always

Al YOUR: SERVICE



In

your

favourite

of

colours

green and black. With or with-

out dyno hubs and 3 or 4 speed

Sturmgy

Archer

Gears. 22

inch and 24 inch Frames.

RALEIGH

THE ALL-STEEL BICVECLE

Sole distributors:

| 10, 11,

——$————— T

i)
lu

A

CAVE, SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

12 & 13 Broad Street

Wii Asya een ning ui | il tl ui




IS HONOUR E.

smith, C.M.G., Administrator
of Dominica, Mrs. Arrowsmith and
their two daughters Susan and
Jennifer, were arrivals on Tues-
day afternoon by B.G. Airways for
a short holiday and are staying at
the Windsor Hotel.

Mr. and Mrs. Arrowsmith came
up chiefly to see their daughter
Susan off to school and she will be
leaving on Saturday morning by
T.C.A. on her way to England
where she is attending Westonbirt
School in Gloucester.

Professor of Anatomy
| aed eddie to England on the

Golfito on Wednesday were

Dr. and Mrs. R. G, Harrison and

their two children who had spent

three months’ holiday as guests of

Mr. and Mrs. E. H, Gooding of

Fairfield, St. Philip. Mrs. Harrison

is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.

Gooding.

Accompanyin’, them was Miss
Dorothy Gooc who will be
staying on in b .giand indefinitely.

Formerly University Demonstra-
tor in Human Anatomy doing
teaching and research and a Fel-
low of Pembroke College, Oxford,
Dr. Harrison will be taking up a
new appointment on his return to
England as Professor of Anatomy
at the University of Liverpool. He
said that he will have about ten
days before doing so and plans to
spend them in Oxford.

From Paramount Pictures
R. H. D. HUNTER of Para-
mount Pictures, Trinidad, was

an arrival on Tuesday evening by

the Alcoa Byfjord for a holiday.

He was accompanied by his wife

and they are staying at the Ocean

View Hotel.

Honeymoon Couple Leave
R. and Mrs. A. ‘B. Mackie of
Trinidad who were up here

on their honeymoon, returned yes-

terday evening by B.W.I.A. They
had spent 11 days here and were
staying at the Hastings Hotel.

Mr. Mackie is employed
Trinidad Leaseholds Ltd.

After Five Days
R. and Mrs. R. Medealdea and

J! their three children, Ligia,

Beatrice and Gabriel of Caracas,

Venezuela, left by B.W.1.A. for

Trinidad yesterday evening to

spend a further holiday before re-

turning home. Accompanying
them was Mr. Cesar Rodriguez.

They had all spent five days’
holiday here and were staying at
the Windsor Hotel.

For U.K. Holiday
RS. R. R. HEAD. whose hus-
band is engineer of Messrs

Cable and Wireless, Boarded Hall,

left on the Golfito on Wednesday

evening for England where she
will spend a holiday. She was ac-
companied by her two children.
For One Week
RRIVING from Trinidad on
Wednesday afternoon on the

“Golfito” for about a week’s stay

was Mr. L, Grant of J. N, Harri-

man and Co., Ltd. He is staying
at the Ocean View Hotel

P. Arrow-



with



A MAN was boasting to me
4 the other day that he had
one of those new cars in which,
said he, “There is a button for

everything — even for opening
or closing the doors.”
“Is there a button for

trousers?” I asked courteously.
“How do you mean?” he answer-
ed. And I could see that he
was annoyed at the possibility
that his car was not perfect.
“What trousers?” he asked, “Any-
one’s,” said I. “Surely,” I
continued, “among all those but-
tons, there is a spare one for a
trouser or waistcoat emergency.”
“I wasn’t talking of that kind of
button.” he said indignantly.
“Well,” said I, “I wouldn’t be
seen in a car that was designed
without giving thought to peo-
ple’s trousers. A fine fool you’d
look if you couldn’t get out of
the car because all the buttons
were off your breeches, and you
had to sit there with them fall-
ing about your feet.” “Don't be a
fool,” he said coldly, and moved



FORKS, SHOVELS,

SOSSSS

BY THE WAY...



Puisne Judge—Trinidad
R. Kenneth Vincent-Brown,
Puisne Judge of Trinidad, re-

turned home on Wednesday eve-

ning by B.W.1LA. after spending
three weeks’ holiday. He was stay-
ing at the Hote) Royal
On Holiday

RS. KATHLEEN 1 AYLOR of

Antigua, arrived on Wcdnes-
day by B.W.1LA. for a holida¥ and
is staying at the Ucean view ciotel.

She was accompanied by her little

son Robert.

Medical Student Returns
R. BERTIE GRAHAM, son of
the late Capt. George Graham

and Mrs. Graham of Maxwell, re-
turned to England on Wednesday
by the Golfito to resume his
studies at Guy’s Hospital, London,
where he is a medical student.

Bertie had ,spent his summer
vacation here with his mother.

First Visit
RRIVING from Venezuela on
Tuesday by B.W.LA. were

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Santana

and their little son Paul who are

Spending three weeks’ holiday as

guests at the Hotel Royal.

Mr. Santana who is paying his
first visit to the island, is in the
Industrial Safety Department of
the Texas Oil Co. .

Venezuelans Holidaying

Here
R. and Mrs. Alberto Busta-
mante and Mr. and Mrs.
Hector Tosta of Caracas, Vene-

zuela, are now in Barbados for a
holiday. They expect to be here
until Monday and are staying at
the Hotel Royal.

Mr. Bustamante
while Mr, Tosta
Estate business.

Spent Three Weeks

R. ARTHUR de LIMA of

Trinidad, returned home on
Monday evening by B.W.1.A. after
spending three weeks here. He
was a guest of Mrs. C. Goddard of
the Garrison.

Mr. de Lima is Managing Direc-
tor of Y. de Lima and Co., Ltd,
jewellers of Port-of-Spain, San
Fernando and Bridgetown.

16—Not Out

RITISH GUIANA’S Freddie

Grant this year celebrates his
16th anniversary of life in Great
Britain. It is a long time to be
away from one’s own home, but
Freddie seems to enjoy it and has
made good use of his time. A
physiotherapist, he is also the
leader of a seven-piece band which
plays at the London Panama Club.
Any prospect of his returning to
the West Indies? With a wistful
look, Freddie says “Maybe!”

Clever People

If all the good people were clever,

And all clever people were good.

The world would be nicer than ever

We thought that it possibiy could

is
is in

a lawyer

the Real

But somehow, 'tis seldom or never

The two hit it off os they should;
The good are so harsh to the clever,
The clever so rude to the good

Elizabeth Wordsworth.
e«

away. But he was rattled, I'm
glad to say,

The ghost of a horse

CORRESPONDENCE about

the ghosts of dogs recalled
to me Watts-Dunton’s experience
He heard a noise in the night,
came downsta'rs, and saw a horse
carrying its head under its leg.
It walked straight through a wall
and then disappeared with a
sound of clanking harness-chains.
Next day he told Swinburne about
it, “It’s not me that’s seeing
things this time.’ said the poet.
laughingly,

Openecast food

COMMITTEE is

the possibility of making
coal edible, in order to direct
farmers and agricultural workers
away from land which is only
good for growing food. Experi«
ments have already shown that
tinned coal remains fresh for a

examining

We have a Fresh Stock of — —

BEET, CUCUMBERS, CARROTS, CABBAGE,
LETTUCE, TOMATO, BUTTER BEANS

GARDEN

RAKES, WATERING

AT

THE CORNER STORE

SSSGSSSSSSSGFOS SG SOHSSHt

By Beachcomber

STEELE
BRIGGS
SEEDS

THERE IS A REAL
DIFFERENCE WITH

TOOLS

Caub Calling

Off To England
RS. A. MOORE, wife of Canon
P. D. W. Moore, former Rector
of St. John, left on Wednesday
afternoon by he SS. Golfito for
England where she will be re-
maining for a year,
Accompanying her were her
three daughters June who is doing
her second’ year at London Uni-
versity studying Sociology, Nanette
who will be entering London Uni-
versity for the first time and@.will
also study Sociology and Helen
who will be put into Welsh Girls’
School.

Off To St. Vincent

R. JACK CLARKE, Manager

of Clifton Hall Plantation and
Mr. Cecil Dear, Assistant Secre-

tary of the Barbados Turf Club
left on Tuesday by B.G. Airw
for St. Vincent where they will
spend a week’s holiday before
ing on to Grenada for a cuniler
period, ’

Paid Brief Visit

A paying a brief visit to
the island, Mr. N. Karlsbad, a
hat manufacturer of Trinidad, re-
turned home yesterday evening by
B.W.LA. He was staying at the
Hotel Royal.



CROSSWORD





AcTiss
t Luts aWeys s@@ms to De trem
bling (3 4)
8 Altcres card there Means hired
we 10 This has “ body.” (v)
4 Vlie test is Not written, (4)
A At 1S) 18 Charm (6!
th ea there! (6)
18. St. Paul's dominates the city,
20. Came sip aivetes Tw ' e
obseure, (7) - ist | (5)
22. A novel doctur, a
Down
i. Ceremunies In which knights are
made. (9)
4. Exeroises not credited to the
batsman. (5, 4)
%. This is curved. (y)
4. Denotes a current pian. A}
5. There have been some alterations
apparently. (8)
i. Implement, (4)
8. There's no end tu this. (8)
Â¥. This has been taken out, (6)
il Principle, (4) 13. Celebrate, (4)
17. Few or many. (4)
19 Stomach—for the Big Bad Wolt,
verhaps, (3)
Solutian of yesterday 5 pussie,— Acros@
t rafaigar; 6, River. ae: 19, Got; 11
Mavis 15 ‘Motety: 15 @ot: 16, Pug
Urio mots, ly Bottled; 41,
ist 4 $or8, 23. ou Rieko hs)
Down: ‘ r card; A ‘8; |
Avoidable a Bebea: 5 Ar: A Give, 3
Adivose, & Say not so: 12," Strides: 14
rin ten 1K Bolt’ 20 Lum



considerable time, and is a better
body-fuel than meat, since it con-
tains 6 per cent. per hundred-
weight more vitamin G. A spokes-
man said yesterday: “The ch'ld
who tries to eat coal is uncon-
sciously obeying the dictates of
nature. The only reason why so
many people regard coal as un-
eatable is because the idea is un-
fam liar to them. Half of them
eould not even tell you what
coal tastes like. Prejudices die
hard.”

Trombone Lullabye
Nowadays one expects some
misunderstood genius to write a
piece of music for a couple of
trombones. (Article on music.)
HAVE myself set to music a
tender “Lullabye for Four
Trombones,”

If your face is Ag | your fortune
(Blow, my bully boys, blow!)
Here’s a penny, dear Miss Pibble-,

stone,
For the poorest girl I know.
Refrain: Hushabye, etc.

872 and
16¢ per pk.

CANS, SHEARS

2SOCSCSOSSSSSSESE6C00000!

BARBADOS, ADVOCATE



cut up an easy part of the cliff

which brings him ele to
Captain Barnacle’s shack. old
man greets him in surprise.

444 RIGHTS RESERVED



CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it:
AXYDLBAAXR
is LONGFELLOW
One letter simply stands for another. In this example A is used
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc. Single

Rupert and the Castaway —5

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1950









THIS IS THE

INGRID BERGMAN

PICTURE THE WORLD HAS
BEEN WAITING TO SEE!

IT’S A NEW HIGH FOR |

)

VISIT PLAZA’S {
SNACK BAR Xi
Hours : i




8 a.m. te Midnite

TO-DAY



THE UNEXPECTED! 2.30 &

8.30 p.m.





THE UNEXPECT! _|

ET IS iHE MEW INGRID BERGMAN HIT!
“I've been nm in the dumps ile f

lately.” “* "s odd,” replies
the Title bear. “I’m in the dumps,
too, because my friend Bill should
have been here but he’s ill.’’
“Then let’s share our troubles,”
says the old Captain.

INGRID BERGMAN
JOSEPH COTTEN Fm
MICHAEL WILDING ar



letters, apos-



Bech day the Code letiee are aigeren. = “ore* Of &1) Mts ALFRED HICHUULIS
A Quotation mee ae

MH QMF RXXHVHW NMBKVW QMBTM
RCH TFKNCRGBTNFCE BW KFN JH

MHRCG—XRQ

Cryptoquote: HE BRINGS OUT DAINTIES UN-

SOUGHT—HORACE.

EMPIRE

TO-DAY 2.30 & 8.30 and
Continuing

20th C-Fox presents :

“THE BLACK
ROSE”

Starring :

Tyrone Power; Orson Welles

Se
ROXY

TO-DAY to SUN. 4.30 & 8.15
Republic Smashing Double—
Lynn Robe ‘ts; Lloyd Bridges

— in —

SECRET SERVICE
INVESTIGATOR

“THE RED PONY”
Starring :

Myrna Loy; Robert Mitchum









FRIDAY,

643996065: ;

ERROL FLYNN i



bs

Galeered through MLM CLASSICS,



AWETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES

‘R.K.O.-Raaio’s Action Spectacle !
Paul HENREID and Maureen O'HARA in

* SPANISH

Color by Technicolor!
,» SATURDAY, SUNDAY 8.30 P.M. Mat.

| PLAZA sbi: FRI, SAT., SUN. 5 & 8.30 P.M. |

Warner’s Thrill Double!
“THEY DIED WITH THEIR BOOTS ON”

ine Hi} MADAM TIAM FOOK versus DOREEN
‘CHEROKEE STRL For a Purse of one hundred dollars ($100.00)
(Musical Western) Winner to receive $60.00; Loser to receive $40.00

FRIDAY TO MONDAY 8.30 p.m.

MATINEE: FRIDAY and SATURDAY 5 p.m.

This Picture is Suitable for ADULTS Only

FIRST SHOCKING EXPOSE OF .
' CRIMES AGAINST WOMEN!

en

Make Your Cooking a Pleasure

Select a

FALKS KEROSENE COOKER—
1, 2,3 & 4 BURNER MODEL

OVENS — Single & Double.

FOR YOUR BAKING
You Will Need

MIXING BOWLS, PUDDING PANS
MEASURING CUPS and SPOONS
ROLLING PINS, CAKE STANDS
ICING SETS WITH INSTRUCTIONS
BAKING and PASTRY PANS

CAKE BOXES, BREAD BINS

No Parking Problem when you Shop with us.

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
FACTORY LIMITED.

HARDWARE DEPARTMENT Tel. No. 2039








coo

Lint



Fen





ROYAL

TO-DAY at 5 Only
John Wayne; Gail Russell
ode pen

“ANGEL AND
THE BADMAN"

TO-NIGHT at 8.30
Madam O’Lindy & Troupe in

CARACAS NIGHT

Demonstrating a Smashing
RHUMBA Contest

COLOR ‘ he,
|
|

PLAZA THEATRE

BRIDGETOWN
PABA EF PZ LIE ZEAE RRP EAA P }
SPECIAL MATINEE SATURDAY MORNING 9.30 :
RKO-Radio’s Jungle Thriller ! Johnny WEISSMULLER in
TARZAN AND THE AMAZONS
Featuring :

|
Madam Tiam Fook |
|
|

vs. Doreen
PCOS OOPPSOOOPOOS,

GLOBE

OPENING 5 and 8.30 p.m. TO-DAY
and Continuing Matinee and Nite

“STROMBOLI”

PLUS TONITE
LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE
WALTER BURKE “Who do you know in Heaven”












































OLYMPIC

TO-DAY ONLY 4.45 & 8.15
Republic Pictures presents :

“THE RED MENACE”

Starring :
Robert Rockwell,
Hanne Axman

a
Sat. to Mon. 4.30 & 8.15

“OH YOU BEAUTIFUL
DOLL”

“FIGHTING MAN
OF THE PLAINS”

With
Randolph Scott

TO-NIGHT
8.30

DR. J. V. HENSON
CONFIDENTLY PRESENTS

MADAM O’LINDY and her
Unforgettable

CARACAS NIGHTS OF 1950

Reinforced by the Big Guns of her
Allied Troupe

@

{

- 66,4 5%,
POPPPPOP PSPSPS SSS

MAIN”

SUN. 5 P.M.

Rsidkshaasnidenaian’

699998956







DOREEN

A SMASHING INTERNATIONAL RHUMBA
CONTEST

FEATURING :



PRICES: Stalls 24c; House 48c; Balcony 72c.
Boxes $1.00

eerste
P.S.—Persons from Silver Sands please contact, Wilcox
Truck from Pilgrim Road, Thyme Bottom and







-
Foul Bay. TRUCK NO. 135, Jervis Scott. TIAM FOOK

SSE

GPP S SSS SSS SSS SS SSS OSS 99 FOSS 999 9SSSOSOSSSS! APOE

RAGING
RAGING

ISLAND
PASSIONS!

ee

it)
ibaa 3
A





BAM GORDON (05. as evaesdeun: “If I Love You”
HOLMAN RAYSIDB 5.5 of ceeo is “Tl Get By”
KENNETH KENNEDY ........... “Far Away Places”
RUDOLPH HINDS ................. “Lucky Ole Sun”
RII TAMING 6 cle Tune yo sala Say ay ‘My Foolish Heart”



GLOBE
Judges for To-nite’s TALENT CONTEST :
MRS. GEOFFREY MANNING
MRS. NORA EVELYN
MR. M. D. THOMAS

a eee ae bd

£

STRO

aon

a a3

MBOLI

STAR

BERGMAN

UNDER



BY SPECIAL REQUEST
“OLE MAN RIVER”
By RAY NUNES

STAR CROONER
B.G’s. RADIO ZFY

THE INSPIRED DIRECTION OF

ROSSELLINI





And there is LEON ERROL in
“ THE UNINVITED BLONDE”
PRICES: Pit 16; House 30; Balcony 40; Boxes 54

664 ety
S496 CSSSSSSO9SSOFSESSSSSSOS

PLLC LSE PSPS OCCOSESOSSSE 58



ves

”$$69$6999SS SSCS S OCS OS OSS SSSSSSESSSSSSS SESS SESS

+
ry]
A
%
=
e
ao
$
a
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1950

Prices High

German Police All Telephone

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Harbour Log

|



PAGE THREE



ooo

SAAS —

4

*
* 2
Increase Likely Lines ‘Cut Off’ | In Carlisle Bay » Y
7 @ From page 1. ae ‘
Me oo ape mye —_ had — IN ANTIGUA | Laudarpns. oa Burma D “Sen isc ithe Kv
wn pect ussed this 4 Q : » . Cyelorama i‘ »
ced Gas nas Seat tattemen from | morning were the releiag sf the So. cae eee ee ee ‘
chant who bas Just retold the | Vel of German steel production MR. HARVEY SMITH who was | punicia, Sch. Grenville Lass, Sch. K
“7 sit to his — _ ri and the authorisation of increased |im the Leeward and Windward |rnyilis Mark, M.V. La Perle and ?
vocate yesterday that vast Im~-| shipbuilding capacity. Islands from March conducting a | #.M.S. Sparrow K
provements have been made since ; len! ; ARRIVALS Y
he left there 33 years 260. ritain for one, regards anjsurvey for the Colonial Office, | ss. seabroeze, 4,380 tons net, Capt ‘«
Mr. Maffei who left here four | €@tly, decision on Germany’s in- returned home on the “Golfito” | Bide, from Port-au-Prince. . r Mi
months ago also visited Canada, dustrial contribution to Western }on Wednesday evening. $8. CG. Tula, Ene se ae. ,
England, France, and Switzerland. | defence as a priority matter. A Telephone engineering expert | 2's SCotuen ‘Musician, 4022 tons’ net a /
He said that he was surprised to oe es oe that Re gap convenes to ~ —— Office for | capt. Moug, from Trinidad. : Ke
see what good roads. existed in narr on points whi € purpose survey, Mr. ‘ouch With Barbados »
Italy. Where there was the lack still divided the United States,|Smith was in Antigua at the time In T «
ofe , water and schools in} Britain and France in their views|of the hurricane. He returned to Coast Station a
the villages, such a state of affairs}on the future steps towards|Barbados about ten days ago and || CABLE & WIRELESS (West Indies)
no existed. Western German sovereignty and|was staying at “Stafford House.” | b'd: “dvise that they can now conan SS
Born in the village of Bagnone, | the strengthening of the German He said that he was staggered thet Gatates Fi eine through y
for: at the amount of damage done to

Provinee of Massa-Carrara, Mr.
Maffei said that all his family

c i bridge, $.S Myram, S.S. Regent
cluding his father who had been | observers at the present stage of Seceinitn a in the |pinther, SS. C. G. Thai, 8-3.
to P: were there to receive him.}the talks was that things were |were calte fair ex oe ee 8 es 8.8. Turicum,

Ask about conditions in Italy, moving fn the following direction: li Teas one a built se lucia, ss. Goes —s a
he said that the goods were highly} The occupying powers will ae of John" . UP forest, S.S. Golfite, $.S. | Janna,
priced, but everything one wanted| agree to a substantial increase in| ov ree St. s which was |s.s.' Dolabella, $8. Queen of
was available. same thing} Germany’s police force somewhat exaggerated. Bermuda, 5.S. Brazil, $.S. Krusaa,
could be said for France except . ‘After the hurricane he went|5.S- Gulf Merchant, S.S. Akt, 8.8.

that the goods there were a little
cheaper.

The climate was similar to that
in the West Indies and the coun-
try was crowded with tourists
from all over the world, but as
soon as the Korean war started,
the American tourists began to re-



the West German ; he was there because he was able | syros, S.S. S. Mateo, S.S. ss.
ee ene the hotels ; ve re ‘Ito arrange. with the telephone | Esso Cadiliac, S . i. K
He saw the Pope and took a _The American view in par-|fficials for the reconstruction K
snapshot of him just as he came| ticular is that state organisations work to fit in with his new iu
out of his palace to inspect his|COMStitute a valuable guarantee schemes for the island. CAWE. »)
Ri ent which was being. pre- that Western Germany will With regard to his survey, he «
sented with a flag. develop. along democratic lines| said that every island had its dif- ARRIVALS— BY B.W.LA.L. » ,
While in England he saw some] 2nd that it would be a mistake to|ferent conditions, and a different | poiy thompson Mary Gittens, Lionel oe ‘
of the cricket games and wasi| attempt to federalise the entire | scheme was necessary for each Of | Gittens, Meyer Maialon, Dr. Lionel Mapp, ’
pleased with the showing the West| Police forces of the Western} them. Doreen’ Ward, Anna Gillingham, Richard K
ss phy ih 4m Zones. = b He had thoroughly enjoyed his }Giitinsham: Marzaret. Johnson, Charles }
‘aan Si a condi me in s- N 4 visits to the various islands as | Ray, Bruce Brooks, Trina Mendes :
ann SiAPERE Selol + t . ew Governor Flieg | the peopie were most hospitable | kcatuicen Teen, Rebeet Turner, \
upea Slat thet the old aot uel eF P 1 and he had every help from the DEPARTURES—BY B.W.LA.L. ; ;
nai quotations for Swodl, 7 “I couldn’t get everything Gevetarneat abeats, George Kéliense, Bosamee Wickwar, « %
jgoinee_ his last, visit to England | ready in time to go with him at Potter Wiekwer, owns Wiser, Jee ¥
years ago he discovered that the | such short notice” i . ° r a attics
Se geerhes there had hatget ana | latte eer te ey, | eamtigan: Gift Parcels | 33,2277 s,s. conoree s.r srece Oo
the people seemed to be more|the Leeward Islands on Sunda : ; Satt.. Marino Dererie. cote Faces, ’
friendly than before. The British Hed Cross has su ‘ Escape Shipwreck Martin ie re \\
seri £500 for oe :
frurricane Ces und oe THE 34-ton schooner “Princess was Julien, Nicholas Julien, Edna W\
Vacuum Pan colonies have been generous in} Louise,” which left Barbados on For St. Lucia «

Molasses Goes

To London

THE 4,022-ton molasses tanker
“Scottish Musician”, now lying at













ce,
The impression of Conference

That the Bonn Government will
be authorised to increase the total
force, bearing in mind that a
mobile force under a _ central
federal authority is necessary to
meet any emergency in German
security, but also preserving the
essential provincial structure of

offers of assistance.

A gift of £5,000 came from
Jamaica and American Red Cross
is also sending help.

The Weather

TO-DAY







over every inch of the island and
knew what damage had been
done. The telephone poles and
wires were absolutely down and
out and when he left, only 10 lines
had been brought into service.
He said that it was well that



Saturday morning with a cargo

of 700 cartons of biscuits, 180

bags of sugar and three kegs of | Sanche:

screws for Antigua, was wreck-
ed on Five Rocks opposite Church
Bay on the West Coast of Antigua
on Tuesday.

The skipper Augustus Mitchell
and its eight-man crew were
saved, but the cargo was totally
lost. All the cargo was insured,

S.S. Esso Knoxville, $.S. Esso Cam-

Georgios F. Andreadis, 5.8. Petros
Nomicos, S.S. Athenic, 8.58.

8.8. Uranienborg, 8.8. Capt.
S.S. Alcoa Corsair,
Dieppe, S.S. California, $.S. Beacon
Street, S.S. Glamorgan i. 8.
Sundial, S.S. Holberg, 8.S, Brott, $.S.
Woensdrecht, S.S Bergeland, 58.S.
Alcoa Pilgrim, 8.S. Castr, S.S. Brazil,
8.S. Casablanca, S.8. Rockside, S.S.

S.S. Askot,

Stella Worrell, Frank Osborn.
For La Guaira
Nestor Sanchez, Odette Sanchez, Oscar
2, Odile Sanchez, Giselle Sanchez,
Rosario Barnola, Maria Aquique, Sandra
Shultze Avel Noelcke, Peter Nerkowitz,
George Schultze, Hattie Schultze, Eva
Schumann, John tSevens, Mary Stevens,
Jean Taylor William Fletcher, Alcira Ruiz
For Guadeloupe
Karel Brown, Phyllis Brown,
Brown
—e0...

For artinique
Maggie a

Felicia











FORD

anchorage in Carlisle Bay, is Sun Rises: 5.50 a.m. »
completing here its loading of Sun Sets: 6.02 p.m. Pte sdknoae tes Antigua were
vacuum pan molasses for London. Moon: (First Quarter) Sep- || prepared at the local Y.M.C.A, for .

The “Musician” arrived in port tember 18. shipment by the “Princess 28 More Packages
fe any evening and began ig 3 rs p.m. on Louise” but fortunately they were QQ
oading e@ same evening. It is Hi ‘ater: 6.14 a.m., 6. sent by the M.V. “Caribbee” in- ‘ 2 a .
expected to leave port on Saturday p.m. stead. i Ready For Antigua KK
direct for London, This is the AY The “Princess Louise” was re- Me
first call at Barbados by a big|] Rainfall (Codrington): nil ported becalmed before it ran , TWENTY-EIGHT packages of is
tanker for vacuum pan molasses Total for month to Yester- aground in four fathoms of food and clothing now remain to
since the war. day: 2.68 ims. water. The skipper could save, be shipped by the YÂ¥.M.C.A.

oF, only documents and the compass. } Relief Committee to Antigua.
Temperature (Max). 87.5 °F

Supplying the “Musician” with Temperature (Min). 74.0 °F. a eateen These have been stowed at the )
the molasses is the 289-ton motor Wind Direction: (9 a.m) E St Vi t Ss d Baggage Warehouse awaiting an (
vessel “Athelbrook” which arrived (3 pm.) E by N. - Yiricent Sends Oppertunity, ; QO
here on Tuesday. The “Athel- : : e e und goes on anc ‘
brook” will transfer three of her ee Sore +, i ae Gift P ‘ackages none totals $770.00. i \
loads into the “Musician’s” tanks. Barometer: am 999 ‘ mount previously acknowl-

The “Athelbrook” supplied one Bg come naan ) s.08 To Antigua edged $616.80. 7
load on Wednesday and yesterday ‘ i 2 ‘ Mrs. R. D. Foster ; $ 1 oe . \ a
returned to her berth in the inner THE Alcoa “Byfjord” which} Me Coie of Mesidents 10 00 « $
basin to reload. Each loading of ; left port last night for Antigua,) tye Misses Smith 000.0000... 5.00 » :
the “Athelbrook” held up_ traffic BATHERS NEED had 17 cases of food and clothing |B aig oR “
twice on the Chamberlain Bridge DANGER NOiJICES = gs of potatoes | ne & Mrs. Gibbons ............6+ 10.00 KC
for about 20 to 30 minutes each ae na 5 Parente — Sympathiser ... 9.90 »
time as the bridge has to be swung} Colonel R. T. Michelin, Com-| tin re coe MAIN. Harley |Brdee Bileses Asnociatiby s-.s 2 5.00 ,
to give the right-a-way to and} missioner of Police, tdld the Advo- Museen 7 Se af pith H. Blair Bannister 5 00 KK
from the inner basin. cate yesterday that although it! s+ Vincent Grammar School eS Mrs. Toppinge 4

The “Musician”, one of the ships] Was a matter for the Parochial] toiq the “Advocate” yesterday. |My. Violet Bowring........ 10 90
of the Athel Line, used to cai] authorities, he would recommend Mr. Moseley has been sent|E, Redman 29 00 \
here before the war. The “Athel-|life saving equipment at all dan-| gown to Antigua by the St. Vin- BS. Fuckerin i ost deares AS
brook” which is also of teat How, fend thing spots around the} cent Government to take charge | Mrs. M. &. O'Neal! 5 1.00 Q
has already made two calls here] *2°..iq that notices should’ also | Of the packages and to find out Totalen ceeds. ess. eed es ere ;
for molaves for Trina On &HS/yasinceg ‘tau apts warting| om. the, AmKigue Government aa
occasion, she will leave po bathers, especially visitors to the Vv Sih coast re POTICK" BLOCKS
ballast for British Guiana. island. from St. Vincent with special r

eee There is 4 Life Saving equip- | £ard to vegetables which St. Vin- THE WAY

Mammee Apple
Kills Fleas

ment at Cattlewash, Bathsheba; it
was the first erected in the island.
Later, after someone was crowned

at Roekley Beach, the same thing
was done there. The Police are

cent could supply and then re-
port back to his Government.

He said that the packages he
was taking down, were collect-
ed within three days as well as

The French Yaw! ‘“Potick” has
been sunk in the inner basin now ,
for the past nine months.

No attempts at salvaging were
made lafely. With part of the bow

oe mammee ane a a ee for hagarwite the -— £500 donated by private sub- seotrosing sane, wens tee ear b
American fruit othe That er ockley boat also took packages}sel is partly a menace >
as the Santo Domingo apricot, is Rae te winds and | som St Lucia for Antigua, but| tion

a favourite fruit among Barba-
di

ans.

The tree is very large with
leathery dotted leaves. | It also
bears white flowers, A bitter rind
encloses the sweet flesh of the
fruit which can either be eaten
raw or im wine or sugar.
Some apples carry from one to
four seeds. ;

In some West Indian islands an
aromatic liqueur, known as eau
de eréole, is distilled from the
flowers. Many years ago West In-
dians made use of the gum to ex-
tract jiggers from their feet and

Cattlewash is made up of a rope
and a life belt. If anyone gets
into difficulties the life belt, with
rope attached, is thrown into the
sea. The person gets hold of the
belt and is hauled ashore.

NR



was forced to leave a quantity
of galvanize. Before arriving in
Antigua, the boat will also eall
at Dominica to collect other

packages.

Yesterday the protruding part
of the bow could not be seen from
the Wharf as it was hidden among
lighters and three motor vessels
which were in the basin.



oYS’ CLUBS

it ig understood that although there ‘
are now modern methods to ex- ‘
tract jiggers, some still prefer to S

use the mammee apple tree gum.

The wood from the mammee
apple tree can be used for build-
ing or fancy work.

recently the effectiveness

of mammee apples, on fleas and
ticks on dogs, was discovered.

In the current issue of Tr
Agriculture (Vol XXVIII, Nos. 1—
3), Mr, H. K. Plank, entomologist

fans and ticks on dogs and fleas
on. cats.

The - Its are oO)
fusion one poun
mammee apples, thinly sliced or
grated, in water to make one gal-
lon, and (b) the powdered mature
seeds, ve,

an in-
ripe

Fence ie pene ot
n e so perma
om per cont yangeacion. of D.D.T.
Chemical analysis has shown the
toxicity to be due to a type of sub-
stance somewhat similar to the
pyrethrine contained in pyren-
thrum flowers.

Lancaster Makes



Three prizes will be given as follows:

Ist Prize: A FORD ANGLIA
2nd Prize: Raleigh 3 speed cycle

3rd Prize: Rolex Tudor Watch 3
























5,000 Pots A Month

ALTHOUGH new machinery has
not been received, due largely to
lack of funds, workers at the Lan-
easter Factory, St. James, still
manage to five to six
thousand flower pots a month, the
Advocate was informed yesterday.

It was said that the experiment
al plant which deals with the
testing of the clay in the island
is still gomg strong and recently
a few important discoveries have
been made concerning the adapta-
bility and strength of the clay. —

Orders for flower pots are still

Drawing to take place not later than Nov. 30th 1950

“FERGUSON FABRICS”

STOCKED BY THE ¥

Auditors: Fitzpatrick Graham & Co. s,

coming in from many people all WS
over the island but the largest or- “
der usually comes from the Agri- «
cultural Department. »
: The hope was ones that f Ss
n the near future the Factory

would be able to take foreign or- iieciieiiciaiiiiaiaiace as LEGEDGOGSODODGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGLGGLGGDGGGGDGDGDGPPA YO

ders.


PAGE FOUR

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St. Bridgetown.



PUBLIC SAFETY

THE regulations to the Road Traffic Act
which were rejected by the House of
Assembly on Tuesday serve to focus public
attention on the necessity for greater
safety to the travelling public. The amend-
ment was rejected because some members
of the House saw in it a disadvantage to
lorry owners while there was still an in-
sufficient number of ’buses to accommodate

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





=e, Rie SS aa

Friday, September 15, 1950



the number of people who now travel.

The regulations sought to make pro-
vision for permission to be granted before
motor lorries could be used for transport-
ing people. The point was also raised dur-
ing the debate as to whether such permis-
sion would be necessary on every occasion
when the vehicle was to be used for this
purpose. This it was thought would create
unnecessary hardships on the lorry owners
and deprive those who needed them from
obtaining as easily as they might other-

wise, the use of such a vehicle.

Another point raised against the regula-
tions was that it would not be in the public
interest to limit the service which motor
lorries now render to the travelling public
when chartered as passenger vehicles,
when the number of ’buses now in use

could not accommodate them.

While members were talking of the con-
venience of the public, the regulations
were aimed at affording the same public
safety on the road. And Mr. Wilkinson
answered completely the criticisms of
shutting out lorry owners when he said
on the contrary,
merely sought to protect the lorry owner
by compelling him to have his vehicle safe
for such work before a permit could be

that

the regulations,

granted to him.

ADVOGATE

With the increase of an already large
number of motor vehicles on the roads of
this island, it is imperative that something
be done to ensure greater safety to those
who travel. It would be folly to wait until

some fearful accident occurred involving
the loss of many lives or injury to a large
number of people, and then to attempt to
impose regulations which would control
the evil. Complaints have been made pub-
licly on several occasions that the use of
lorries as substitutes for buses is a popular
practice fraught with grave danger and
should be discontinued. It seems that the
recognising the
weight of the criticism as to the shortage
of ’buses, desired not to remove motor
lorries from this service but to compel
them to be maintained in safe condition for
carrying large numbers of people on the
This was to be done by amending
the law so that it would be compulsory for
them to apply for a permit before under-

Transport

roads.

Authority

taking such work.

The regulations have been rejected but
something must still be done to ensure the
safety of those who now travel by this
means. The travelling public should not be
denied any form of transport service which
helps to facilitate business and free move-
ment but that movement must be guided
by an understanding of the necessity for
public safety. This is the duty of the Gov-

ernment.



THE BLIND

THE Annual Report of the Canadian
National Institute for the Blind has just
been published and is an interestinig docu-
ment. The report makes reference to the
Trinidad and Tobago Welfare Association
which it points out, has made substantial
progress during the year and is assisted by
the Trinidad Government to the extent of
$15,000 a year. %

What is however of great interest to Bar-
bados is that that Government has voted
$120,000 for building a new school for the
blind in the South Caribbean area. The site
in Santa Cruz valley was donated by Mr.
Conrad Stollmeyer and building operations
will commence shortly.

The Canadian Institute while not being
responsible for the Trinidad Association
has sent its Managing Director Colonel
Baker and its National Consultant, Field
Services, Mr. D. B. Lawley to Trinidad to
advise the Association as regards policy,
practical arrangements and personnel.

This is another of the many services
which Canada either through private en-
terprise or by government is rendering to
the West Indies. It is a service in which
Barbados will want to take part in the
interests of its own blind.

© co

een

Immigration Is Selective | [yf BORSTAL WAY

When. so much is being said and
written about emigration for West
Indians, it might be timely to in-
ject a few comments from the
viewpoint of some of the countries
to which it is considered that emi-
grants could go. I could do this as
a plain Canadian Citizen with no
official status in the matter, and I
believe that, in general, the same
prineiples would apply to Aus-
omg New Zealand and some

r countries. At the present
time these three countries encour-
age immigration on what may be
termed a selective basis, which
means that they welcome new-
comers who comply with certain
rather strict requirements. They
do this. because past experience

has shown that a more liberal opeen

policy is definitely unsatisfactory.

Owing to the extensive use of
labour-saving machinery in Cana-
da, there is very little demand
for unskilled labour, so that pref-
erence is given to those having
some vocational skill or technical
knowledge of a type for which
demand exists. Youth is also an
advantage, because people ‘over,
say 30 or so, are less likely to
adapt themselves readily to new
surroundings. At present old-age
pensions are paid at age 70 by
the Government, and at earlier
ages by many industrial organisa-
tions, and it is eonsidered that
every recipient of a pension should
make his or her contribution to
the economic life of the country
before qualifying for a pension.

Intending immigrants must be
literate, in good health and with
a clear record as to conduct, also
definitely single or having marital
status that conforms with the
laws and accepted customs
Canada. This would rule out any-
one who was a party to a com-
mon-law or ‘reputed’ marriage,
such as is, I believe, still quite
widespread in the West Indies. It
is also necessary to have a sum
of money sufficient to provide
transportation to the proposed
destination in Canada, and cover
living expenses while seeking
employment. Just what sum is
considered necessary now by the
Immigration Authorities I do not
know, and it would I suppose
vary according to circumstances.
n any case it seems likely
that comparatively few West
Indians who could comply witn
these requirements, would want
to emigrate, as they would prob-
ably consider themselves reason-
ably well off at home, _.

With all the publicity the sub-
ject is receiving now, I sometimes
find myself wondering who it is
about, or, in other words, what
class or type of West Indian is



of requirements of

R. E. Smythies

supposed to do the emigrating, if
some country can be found for
him to go to, and what he would
do to earn a living when he had
arrived. A man might be an ex-
perienced agricultural worker on
a sugar plantation but his knowl-
edge and skill would be of little
or no use in Canada, where clim-
ate, soil, and methods are entirely
different,

I do not think Canada or other
countries can be criticised for re-
fusing to accept immigrants who
are illiterate, as that handicap
seriously limits their usefulness
and capacity to adapt themselves,
in a country where education has
compulsory for many
decades. The requirement as to
marital status also seems reason-
able where irregular or informal
unions are either against the law
or at best frowned on as a social
liability, to be severely discour-
aged. It might be said that the
whole structure of society, and
the laws and customs, are based
on legal and binding marriage, and
the family as the unit around
which it all turns,

Where there is so much need for
emigration, and so much talk of
it, I suppose it is merely natural
and human for people generally to
regard it as a fine thing for some-
one else to do. However, it any
emigrating is going to be done,
sooner or later we shall have to
quit talking and be practical about
it, and one of the first steps would
be to decide, who goes and where,
and what he will do when he gets
there. Unless we are talking
about people who comply with the
countries like
Canada, it will not help to dally
with the idea of West Indians
going there, but will rather waste
time in idle speculation, and tend
to befog the real issue,

I have never been to British
Guiana or Honduras and know
very little about them, though I
understand that they both have
vast spaces and undeveloped re-
sources that seem to call for im-
migrants, unless there are some
insurmountable obstacles to any
such project. And few obstacles
are really imsurmountable if
tackled with determination. So
far as I know, the serious differ-
ences in social customs and laws,
and the general attitude of people
toward important matters like
marriage, do not apply to these
countries so it would seem obvious
that attention should be concen-
trated on their possibilities.

I read with interest a number
of references in the Advocate to
the Surinam project, but do not

recall seeing any report on the
reasons for its failure. When first
mooted it seemed to offer possi-
bilities that should certainly be
preferable to-being unemployed in
Barbados, in spite of any minor
drawbacks such as are always
bound to exist.. My recollection is
that the applicants were supposed
to be carefully screened for suit-
ability before being sent, and that
the number was large enough to
offer plenty of scope for selection
of the most promising emigrants.
I believe an investigation after
84% of the families had returned,
disclosed the fact that their ccm-
plaints
ranted

It is a waste of time to dream
of some ready-made Utopia wait-
ing to receive immigrants who are
lacking in edueation, vocational
skill or financial resources of any
kind. If a project comparable to
Surinam were tried in Honduras
or B.G., would the result be any
better? If not, we might as well
discard the idea of transplanting
family units and consider any
practicable alternatives, though
lack of information as to what
went wrong in Surinam is a hin-
drance to clear thinking on the
subject. At present there is much
talk and discussion about emigra-
tion but a dearth of practical sug-
gestions,

were considered unwar-

At the risk of being regarded as
an old fogy I will say that I some-
times wonder if there is any real
prospect of success for projects
that could be called pioneering in
the proper sense of the term.
There seems to be too much evi-
dence that what is so often refer-
red to as a high standard of liv-
ing, might be more accurately
described as a standard of soft
living, which tends to cause fatty
degeneration of the heart, the
muscles and morale. Social secur-
ity is all very well, and fair-
minded people are not opposed to
it in reason, but one cannot help
feeling some doubt as to just how
much of it the average human
being can stand, without going
limp when confronted with condi-
tions that even 50 years ago were
still being taken for granted by
pioneers in Western Canada.

In the West Indies social secur-
ity has not developed to the same
extent as in other countries, but it
is generally accepted that no-one
will lack the actual necessities of
food, clothing and shelter. It is
also true that vocational training
has not been developed to the
point of having an.exportable sur-
plus of artisans of mechanics for
which demand exists in more ad-
vanced countries, It is indeed a
tough problem which can only be
solved by clear thinking and real-
istic discussion and planning.



An Industry Which Builds

CURES BY KINDNESS

Hy John Camsell

Britain’s “cure by kindness” method of
handling juvenile delinquents has won the
commendation of the top United States’
prison officials and may soon be used in

LONDON.

American correctional institutions.

James V. Bennett, U.S. prison commission
chief, said while inspecting the British “Bor-

stal” system:

“The idea of reforming prisoners by Bor-
stal treatment is excellent. We hope to set
up Borstal institutions as soon as the legisla-

tion is through Congress.”

Bennett’s approval of the British system
nas lent extra weight to the statements of
sociologists who have agreed that despite the
expense of running these institutions the

‘xperiment has been well worth while.

Official statistics issued by the Home Office
show that under the system more than 50
per cent. of Borstal “graduates” never have
trouble with the law again. The figure is

considered exceptionally high.

Of those who are brought back for a
second “course,” more than 70 per cent. “go

straight.”

Under the system boys and girls between
16 and 21 years old who commit crimes are
sent to a Borstal institution. These are special

institutions run like army camps.

The underlying theme of the Borstal system
is the “psychological touch and cure by
Flogging and other brutal physi-
cal punishment went out at the turn of the

kindness.”

century.

There are now 3,000 boys and girls in the
Borstals. When a young offender is convicted
by the Court, he is sent to an “allocation
centre” where a Board sits and decides to

which kind of Borstal he should be sent.

Two kinds of. Borstals are provided, The
tough, gangster-like characters, are sent to
institutions where they are locked in at

Better Business
Ry V. Onslow

Business men of 50 years ago

only 90,000 machines.

who built up a world-wide trade
and ofven big fortunes from offices
spartanly equipped and usually
dimly lighted and inconvenient
would view with amazement the
multitudinous aids to efficiency
and comfort used by the modern
office worker.

For today a large and prosper-
ous industry has grown up solely
for vhe service of business man-
agement and practice. Research-
ers, designers and engineers work
unceasingly to produce new
techniques and equipment not
only for the improvement of office
methods but also to raise the
standard of comfory of office work-
ers. In Britain, the office appliance
industry has so expanded that it
now supplies almost every country
in the world. During 1949 the in-
dustry exported £4,000,000 worth
of machinery and £2,250,000 worth
of steel furniture, a record likely
to be broken this year. In the
lirst five months of 1950 machin-
ery worth £2,082,945 and steel
furniture worth £917,055 went
overseas.

For Small Or Large Business

The industry displayed its
latest wares to visitors from
many countries at the Business
Efficiency Exhibition held during
September in the City Hall,
Manchester in the English county
of Lancashire, Organised by the
Office Appliance Trades Associa-
tion of Great Britain and Ireland,
the Exhibition occupied 30,000
square fect and 80 firms exhibit-
ed machinery, the majority of
which was designed to save
labour in large or small business.

A new adding-calculating
machine which gives a three-fold
warning whenever an error is
made was on show. The operator

by a bell-ring as vhe mechanism
locks, and is enabled to see the
mis-operated key as well as feel
the incorrect key depression.

Apart from being equally effi-
cient at all the tasks usually de-
manded of a duplicator, a new
machine has been designed to
enable the selection of items
from a master sheet to be trans-
ferred to separate job cards and
control papers, so as to ensure
accurate planning of the flow of
the work, By enabling the re-
production of part or all of any
master sheet in one operation,
bottlenecks caused by individual
operators sorting out job sheet
information are elim ‘nated.

A man who invented an inter-
locking bomb release gear used
by the Allies in World War I pro-
duced a cash register which, by
a pre-setting device, can be
operated for any amount by two
fingers. One of the most un-
usual devices shown was a short-
hand machine which operates on
the phonetic system, enabling a
stenographer to take down a
verbatim report in a language she
does not understand. The record
is made on a continuous sheet ot
paper which folds away into the
cover of the mach'ne automatical-
ly so that turning of pages is
eliminated and the sequence of
the proceeding assured.

Large Variety Of New
Typewriters

Typewriters were in
variety. This industry has made
great strides in Britain since the
end of World War II. Production
in Britain may be judged by the
fact that one factory alone will
be turning out machines at the
annual rate of 85,000 by the end
of 1950, whereas production for

great ful

those on show will. be models to
take between 90 and 100 different

keyboards for writing in any
commercially " age.
Light-weight = ines

are no novelty today, but one
weighing only 144 lbs. includes a
four-bank 92 characier keyboard,
an inbuilt keyset tabulator, an
adjustable touch control device,
quickset margin and scale appar-
atus and features variable line
spacing, automatic ribbon re-
verse and non-glare keyboard.
For tropical and equatorial
countries there were rust-proof
and insect-proof ledger bindings,
fire-resisting accounting equip-
ment with light-weight, rustless,
stainless aluminium alloy draw= |
ers and portable typewriters
with bonderised steel parts fitting |
vhem for use in humid climates.

Simplification Is The Keynote

Addressing machines with
speeds ranging from 900 to 6,000!
addresses an hour were shown
alongside appliances which open
letters at the rate of 500 a minute
or seal them at the speed of 300
a minute.

In designing the lavest equip-
ment the experts sought not only
to increase labour-saving ca-
pacity of appliances, notably by
electrification, but simplified
operations, made hem less
fatiguing and the appearance of
the machinery and office furni-
ture more attractive and colour-

Down to carbon papers which
do not curl, punches which re-
inforce the holes they make with
self-adhesive vape, and new types
ef paper clips, the Exhibition had
something of interest for every-
one in business . from the
junior

night and the supervision is close and strict.

The more tractable type of offender is sent
to a converted manor house, or perhaps a
Among} hutted eamp, where no window or door is

ever locked.

Patience and tolerance are the keynotes of
the Board’s careful investigation of each indi-
vidual case. And the first question the young-

ster is asked is: “How can we help you?” ,

But nowhere is the emphasis primarily on
There are no “cells” in the
camps and the youths are there to become

punishment.

“good and useful citizens of the future.”

The treatment is not soft. Tough physical
training plays a prominent part in the insti-
Food is adequate but
plain. The training is designed to teach the

‘ tution’s activities.

boys and girls a trade.

A boy can become a painter, decorator,
farmhand,
bricklayer, sheet-metal worker, panel-beater,
blacksmith, carpenter, shoemaker and _ re-

mechanic,

market gardener,

pairer or harness-maker.

The illiterate are encouraged to learn to

read and write.

As a boy learns to “become a useful citi-
zen” he is given marks and promotion. Even-
tually his “housemaster” and a special Board

recommends him for discharge.

The statistics show that the youths like
the Borstal system. Out of 1,333 boys on
home leave (granted for five days during a
sentence) only 67 failed to return and were
rearrested.

is initially warned of the mistake



the whole of Brivain in 1949 was

chrector.

typist to the company

—IN.S.



Sugar: Before And After The Emancipation

Ry Tan Gale

The History of Sugar Vol.

Il, by Noel Deerr (Chapman

& Hall 55/-).

“The first African slaves to ar-
rive in the English West Indies,”
writes Noel Deerr, ‘were seven or
eight captured from a Portuguese
ship in 1627 by the William and
John on the voyage that carried
the first settlers to Barbados, but
regular traffic did not follow till
later.’ As his authority he cites
Harlow’s “History of Barbados,
1625-1685,”

To check the date of the first
settlement, which I had always
thought to have been a few years
before \1627, I consulted Bryan
Edwards’ “History of the West In-
dies.” He writes: “Having engaged
about thirty persons to settle in
the island. .... he (Sir William
Courteen) appointed William
Deane their governor, and sent
them away in a ship called the
William and John, commanded by
John Powell. They arrived safe
in the latter end of year 1624,
and laid the foundations of a
town, which, in honour of the
sovereign, they denominated
James-Town; and thus began the
first English settlement in the
island of Barbadoes.”

To make sure, I then looked at
“Des Deux Indes” by the French
historian Guillaume-Thomas Ray-
nal. He writes of Barbados: “Cette
ile. . . . .ne paroissoit pas avoir
été habitée . . . lorsqu’ en 1627
quelques familles anglaises s'y
transportérent. ay

In desperation, and with no
other reference books to hand, I
referred to the “potted” history «f
Barbados in the “West Indies Year

Book.” According to this book;
“In 1625 Sir William Courteen. . .
fitted out two large ships, only
one of which, the William and
John, arrived at Barbados.”

With this disagreement among
authorities, I am bound to leave
this question where I found it,
and to pass on to other matters.

Sugar And Slaves

The cycle of trade that develop-
ed out of the sugar industry was
of greater value than the sugar
trade itself. England was then
entering upon ;her industrial
career, and for this the slave trade
was an essential link. The ships
which left Bristol and Liverpool,
laden with textiles from Lanca-
shire and hardware from Bir-
mingham, bartered their car-
goes on the African coast for
slaves. After the ordeal of the
Middle Passage, the slaves were
exchanged in the West Indies for
sugar, Which with molasses and
rum formed the homeward freight.
Then with the profit yet more
manufactured goods were bought
and exchanged for slaves to sup-
ply the sugar islands.

With

so many people writing
about the treatment of salves in
the West Indies, and each one
prejudiced either for or against
the institution of slavery, it is
difficult to form a clear opinion
about the treatment of slaves in
being valuable property, one may
presume they were treated as
such No doubt there wére in-
tances of abominable cruelty, but

é

this was the exception and not the
rule,

Besides the slaves, there was in
early days a certain amount of
white labour in the fields of Bar-
bados. The European labour fell
into two classes, the voluntary
bond servant and the prisoner.
The originator of the system of
penal transportation to the West
Indies was Oliver Cromwell, who
began it with what Irish remained
after the sack of Drogheda in 1649,
and followed this up with Scottish
prisoners from Dunbar and Eng-
lish Royalists taken at Worcester.
Later, many of the Monmouth re-
bels .were transported, the last
to artive being the Jacobites taken
in the ‘Fifteen and ‘Forty-five.

The indentured servants and
the bulk of the white working
population of Barbados came at
first from the lower strata of so-
ciety. Sir Josiah Child describes
them as: “. , . . a sarte of loose
vagrant people; vicious and desti-
tute. . . . either unfit for Labour,
or had so misbehaved themselves
by debauchery that none of them
would set to Work. . gathered
up about the streets of London and
other places, cloathed and trans-
ported to be employed upon the
Plantation,”

Their lot, it seems, was fre-
quently worse than that of the
slaves. Writing of Barbados, Ligon
says: “The slaves and their pos-
terity, being subject to their Mas-
ters for ever, are kept and pre-
served with greater care than the
ervants. So that for the time the



servants have worser lives, for
they are put to very hard labour
and ill lodging and their dyet very
slight.” ;

Emancipation And After

Protests against slavery and the
slave trade began almost with its
inception. The first substantial
result of the efforts of the human-
itarian party in England was,
however, not until 1816, when the
Consolidated Slave Law_ of
Jamaica was passed. This legis-
lation was designed to improve
the treatment of the slaves in that
island, It was followed in 1823 by
Canning’s ‘“Melioration Motion,”
which the Barbados Assembly
described as: “The diabolical
falsehoods and infamous aspera-
tions of a few interested and
designing hypocrites moving in a
terrific phalanx to the total anni-
hilation of the whole inhabitants
of the West Indies.”

At last the Emancipation came,
and in 1834 some forty-eight
thousand slaves were freed in
Barbados, It is interesting to
note that while the average an-
nual sugar production in most of
the British West Indies dropped
in the four years after Emaryipa-
tion, in Barbados it went up by
five thousand tons,

All this while the method of
sugar production was constantly
being improved — from cattle
mill to windmill, and finally to
steam. The first use of steam
power in manufacturing sugar was
made at Greenwich plantation,
Jamaica, in 1768. The credit for

@ On page 5

|






















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‘ CARRS’ BISCUITS

a nee

rete A ORONO RNAP NASIR MNES
BARBADOS ADVOCATE

College Wins Three| Wl. Produce

‘ Association
B’dosScholarships| Cetebrates
Lodge School Gets Fourth

Tercentenary Celebration

PAGE FIVE

£800,000 Will Save Butlin’s| Enjoy... pgm

The meeting appointed’ three|
preference shareholders to w atch |{ 3

i -

| SPECIAL
——— —
+

‘FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1950
Sr meneame: meneame en ae eet a eeeenRree te atRnR NNR RNT RRRARRE t



















=.







@ From page 1 \ Small Creditors
ever the interests of their fellow |
hareholders. But Butlin said, “p|
think it would be wrong to put
false hopes in the shareholders

They were in a very bad posi-
tion from that point of view, he
said, and were unable to pay off
small creditors, as they had been

about the Company’s affairs than}
did the Board of Directors
Financial Details










|
|
! |
| Press appeared to know more}
|
j
|



4 ; , orburn outlined the Com-|jngormed by their solicitor that] While negotiations are going on
WHEN: G. A. G. ALLEYNE reached scholarship standard| _THE West Indian Produce Asso-' pany’s history and gave details} this Secnaba’ constitute preteren-| 0° "ising this money, it looks ta
in clessies, J. M. G.M. Adams in mathematics and E. De C.|C@ton, Ltd., which incorporates of its financial state, The Com-] tial treatment. me that if they are going to put

it in the papers, that there is a
winding-up petition being mada
in Nassau and that they are al-




Davison, Newman & Co., and
numbers among its directors Sir
Algernon Aspinall, celebrated the

pany had been hard hit- by the
sterling devaluation and the Lon-

“Ever since I became Chair-
man, we have always been in ef-

Inniss in science, Harrison College added three more names
to the Honours Lists of Barbados Scholars in their school





last moment, but the American
Air Charter firm had “sportingly”
helped them out. They under-

autograph a copy of a photo of
himself surf-riding in the Carib-
He

4 “ jon dock strike which hel! u . ’ ” ‘
hall. R. U. Gooding won the other of the Barbados Schol-|tercentenary of the business on supplies for the Camp Inst year | SyeTOKe. gt ee he ggg tnere| Te84y, Selling our goods, people
arships for Lodge Sehoo) in Modern Studies. July 26th and was honoured by He had no good news to tell/paq alk a leeianhe’ er he een —— os ee meer
Just 10 poets old now Alleyne oe from the Lord Mayor o! the shareholders about his visit] tion of arranging air transport to greens of aubrentidegs stood eat ' F
9 —e ae oa. Certificate Li iakattted Tee ee eet America to try to raise the/ihe Vacation Village. Licensing] discussing the Company’s dilemma. =
New B dos ves hap Aeag Rak pe rickets Pa i Yates cng | Hecessary money, but said that] giticulties had cropped up at the A shareholder asked Butlin to
unusual feat, his Headmaster, Mr. |OCccasion appeared in The Times | one American group was still in-]). pped up z As

on July 27th, and is here quo‘ed.
“Not ashamed to call themselves
grocers, the proprietors are able

Hammond told the Advo-

Hardware cate yesterday. He then obtained
a distinction in Ancient History.

terested, although he did’ not
bold out much hope in that di-

rection wt



did so and remarked







In 1948 when he passed’ the school |t© boast that they still sell over | In view of the publicity the BOG, Aare eee eee BOA.C., had] "You ought to save this. It ny.
O ans Toda certificate, he won the Lynch ra creenae seventeenth-century Company's affairs got ae eee hae te be worth a lot of money one day
: Memorial Prize, a prize which is}Counter, upon which stand a/| given, he did not think it likely/\° °"" wee tee
f presented to the boy with the couple of huge tea canisters each that preteventh aharaneicese mainland to the island e ‘a
Beene BARIWARE LED. best school certificate for his year. capable of holding 190 lb. It was would want to invest further After: the Meeting the Director Swiss Stick Drop In At KNIGHTS se Se
opens business in their new across this counter that the first of the Company told me_ there

large sums in it.

pound of tea was sold in England | The Company had spent to date

building at the Corner of Swan| His father is Mr. would be no new approach to the

To Armed PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN











and Lyzas Streets to-day. Thejrecently appointed Headmaster of |for £10. | Ve sc were| Colonial Development Corpora-
oan Hien Pann > Ace Ll cpa * wing th "a oom “The Lord Mayor was conduct i $600,000 to Sopeabin oariele: oe e een
ern along Swan Street. uring the past year, eyne : : fe A ome sackets "Delica £500,000 Offer Withdrawn
“ ; ed over the spice impregnated | ers, £800.000 to ordinary share- me a —_— =
It is equipped with fluorescent| Played a leading part in the pub- place by Lieut. Col, K. E Peevité, holders, £450,000 and some ac-} In view of the benefit the col- eutra ity —

lighting. The hardware depart- lication of the school newspaper

ment is on the ground floor while |““The Collegian”. Shy would derive from the eatab-

lishment of a Vacation Village ana

acting chairman of the company, | (rued interest on loans from a

and many interesting possessions | City group and £103,000 on bank LAUSANNE, Sept. 14.

Swiss President Max Petiterre
Said to-day that the Korean war

oa - mee room will be waa = ae conn hee a were shown by Mr. Skerritt,|!9ans. They owed in addition ui en ig — —_ NEW SHIPMENT OF
seco! E . ‘ : ; > » other peovleiae eC ation rs
The service in the hardware |his hobbies and in the ring, he is the managing director, who has | £250,000 to various other people|from it, e orporatio: vat l vas the damian sinned Se Ut names

spent a lifetime with the firm. including some £80,000 to people
“Perhaps the most interesting | in Nassau.

document was a framed original |
account of sales dated July, 1773,

Anti-Women Bus Strike
In London

one item being two bills drawn by
Francis Rotch, the master of the
“Dartmouth” one of the ships
LONDON, Sept. 14.
Thousands of Londoners p odded
jthrough a drizze to packed elec-

| sarees to put up £500,000. But

a later offer was withdrawn. tries directly or indirectly threat-

ened to strengthen their national
defences,

Speaking at the official banquet
at a “Comptoir Suisse” trade fair
here.

He added that defence measures
“might change the course of a
country’s economic position,” but
did not develop this hint.

The President strongly reaf-
firmed Swiss “armed neutrality”
policy which is expected to cost

department will be partly “serve|@ determined puncher. It is
yourself”. There are tec show-|Understood that he might study
cases—one to’ Swan Street and|™Medicine.

the others to Lucas Street.

The storeroom to the building ott er Se
is situated in the rear section : asMe G a nd it 19-
which housed Messrs. Da Costa — Veninr at the ams, son
& Co. Electric Department for al Frouse of y a ply Pi, a —
SHOT TOW WILL BE given by|WO® @ Barbados Scholarship in
A ,BE given bY)any sixth form group in which

the Mobile Cinema at the/he’had chosen to specialise. How-

Nightengale Home, Black Rock,
to-night for the benefit. of the|(ver: Ne chose the Mathematical

WINDOW GLASS

Fine Clear Quality in several thicknesses and a wide



range .
involved in the Boston tea party. It ge of sizes

is a tradition that Davison and
Newman shipped the tea which
was thrown into Boston Harbour
on December 16th, 1773—the pre-
lude to the American War of In-
dependence.”

ALSO .-

PLAIN STEM GLASSWARE

The claim is not backed by the
men’s union.
The women said that they were





childten cthete, "The phildten. ‘ele ee ae ~— ltric trams and railway stations to. |8ttiking because of various soot two-thirds more next year
ways take a keen interest in these!of missing much of the summer , day as the strike against recruiting | S™evances. t tan 460,000,000 Swiss france including:—
shows and on many occasions|term due to illness, it was no sur- Sparrow Cadets xt “women” conductors spread to! London Transport has 26,000 vm for 2950, ‘ in ‘ ee
they can be heard discussing vari- brine to ile headitiaster thet hs , over 7,000 motor busmen. a corte Oe neue aaa e@ worst is never inevitable, ‘
Ol dodatietakn oud Diarndaly ees atewd 2 -pcnlaneltin, Bu Sea Shells Gale dr a ee eee cans the President said. “the struggle PM re 15s Geeta kL a cae @ 37 cents each
This will be the last perform- | He hopes to go to Oxford, fol- i A quarter of the total motor {#00 conduc rt cn is take On in which mankind seems to be s fo ;
ance given by the Cinema for)jowing his father, Mr. Grantley SOME of the cadets from the |DUS fleet was off the road, para- yt a a fa as not enough engaged will no. doubt be long CLARETS 00... 66. ee eeee ee eee seen @4 ,, ”
this week. Adams. His mother says he may | H.M.S. Sparrow took the oppor- lysing over 60 of Central London's oy one ite forward nf ane Rar OU A We Salst: Toes LIQUEURS
N ISLAND TEAM will meet|study law, but everything is not | tun ty yesterday to buy souvenirs | 200 routes. Pha eotdo’ T anaports Chair [pa tae Contant to develop tn Q RS eee ce teeter cee, @ 36 ,, ”
A a team from the H.MS.|settled yet. . and “get a look at the sunny isle” “Es Tae ene. ee « appealed | 0!0odshed that armed conflicts—
Sparrow in a football match at|; Young Adams hati a three-year, Some said. 7 20 clippies today jo'ned the man, Lord Lat me eae tol it they break out—can be local- PGEMDURBU ives yes vans be parce res @37 , ”
Combermere School grounds at|period at the Convent before he They bought tortoise shell strike which opposes the engage- to misguided men to ge ized and that the forces of peace CHAMPAGNES
4.15 this evening, entered Harrison College. He is| badges, pins and brooches also a ane dane ile een = — rt garage in East London two w Sent nad darian - ca See eRe So tt ere @s4 , ”
> * C aken é < " Salad owltzerianc nus -
ate Ser seca ete on. 3 Pic- ee shelley, that arivecs wae. busy the men’s claim for a £1 per week |crews out of 450 busmen took) be firm and severe towards those FINGER BOWLS ................005 @ 8 _sC=, i

out their buses but they did not
set a very good reception.
e * . —Reuter.

who try internally to sow mis-
trust and discord and who would
be. temnted to destroy or weaken
Mstitutions.—Reuter.
|
}
\

Inniss—Medicine carrying them to and fro with’n ‘
the City limits. e more inclined

Queen’s Park was also an at-| lower wage.

traction for the Cadets. One guide
Oe,

wage increase as women would
b to accept a

nic which will be given at the
Crane Hotel from 3 p.m.,, until] E. DeC. Inniss was a Primary to
10 o’clock at the night. First Grade Scholar, coming from

There. will be sea-bathing,|5t. Giles’ Boys’ School. He was
dancing and singing, apart from|@warded a Barbados Exhibition to
refreshments. the University College of the West

OUR TRAFFIC OFFENCES| Indies as a result of their Febru-



ALL METAL WHEELBARROWS

STRONGLY MADE-—3 Cubic Ft. CAPACITY



eo
==

NEW STOCK

—





was seen showing a group of
nine the an‘mals’ quarters in the
ark,

The cadets did not get a good






without due care and attention,
one for driving without the ap-
propriate licence and a_ cyclist
for not keeping his cycle on the
left side of the road.

he somehow became aware
the prying eyes.

: : _jary examination. He has now P ; ‘ Suitable. for Builders and Contractors
day's Banca Feeonded in yester-|icltowed it with the Barbados | 100k at the alligator, however.|}} MORE POWER TO THE MINX? AT
i ‘ ; Scholarship in Science. A very e ‘ ae ; , 7
ists were reportect for driving 2 table abe Gpnkie- murky water in the hole. perhere ity 3 GEES BRUCE ONLY $14.40 EACH

y wr ~ Cie
ing the difficulties the School has t .
had recently in providing ade-
quate Science Staff. During his
last School year he had three dif-
ferent Physics masters. He hopes

For Garden purposes and other light work
we have the popular ; :

WEATHERHEADS-

4,000 BAGS OF

EMBERS ATTENDING the | ‘ aaik ; “ "
sane ectne of ihe Board otlot the West Indies ana stuay | CORNMEAL COME suse sets satis GALVANISED “STRONGLITE
Cricket Association, which was Medicine, OVER 4,000 bags’ of cornmea| snes 0nd - TOBAibitiond /~ BARROWS WITH RUBBER

Inniss will be‘20 next week. from U.S.A. arrived in the island

Bottle



held in the George Challenor His father is Mr. G. N. Inniss ait
; » G, N, yesterday by the S.S. Seabreeze. at fet as
Fe verkemmingion °° ot Roebuck Street Tucluded inthis. supply,” were : Aste ABFA le, a8 TYRED WHEEL —
oa : 1,86 ags oO illsbury Yellow a ee MUSTEROLE
Sir Allan Collymore, President, Gooding—Lodge cornmeal and 550 bags of Regal 7? ey, a LE— The Chest ; ae " .
Mr. A. DeL. Inniss, Mr. E. L. G. R, U. Gooding oo got his | Yellow cornmeal. The cornmeal et Sar ye ———— Rub 2/- ONLY $14.32 EACH

CIGARETTE LIGHTERS—
Guaranteed to light every
time —2/9 3/-

SUN GLASSES—made of
Best quality glass will not
injure the eyes: From 2/-

was consigned to Messrs Robert
Thom Ltd., Messrs DaCosta & Co.,
Ltd., and Messrs General Traders
Ltd

Also arriving by the Seabreeze
from U.S.A. were 919 sacks of

Hoad, Mr. W. 8B. Chenery,|scholarship in Modern Studies,
Mr. T. N. Peirce, Mr. E. D. Inniss,} }ives at “Wasons”, St. Philip. His
Mr. S. O’C. Gittens, Mr. E. A.]father is Parochial Treasurer of
V. Williams, Mr. W. K. Atkinson,|that parish. His grand father was
Mr. B.DeL. Inniss, and Mr. W. F.]a Parochial Medical Officer, It is

MEW FULLY-PROVED PLUS-POWER ENGINE
,/Â¥es you MORE Sheed ar THE GETAWAY ..



HARDWARE DEPT.
Tel.

HARRISON

2634

Hoyos, Secretary .

Mr. K. L. Wishart, Secretary
of the British Guiana Cricket
Board of Control, was also pres-
ent to discuss draft rules of the
West Indies Cricket Board of
Control submitted by Jamaica

not yet known what he will study.

SUGAR : Betore and After
the Emancipation

from 4

e page
along with amendments offered|this is due to John Stewart, who

by a Sub-Committee.

in 1766 took out a patent for a

‘T’THE POLICE BAND, under] machine which would: “..,Grind

Capt. C. E. Raison,
give one of their fortnightly Con-
certs at the Hastings Rocks at
8 o’clock to-night.

Whenever these Concerts
given people travel from various
parts of Christ Church, St. Philip
and St. Michael in ‘buses, cars and

will] more than a Wind-Mill and cattle-

mill usually do, without any Ex-
pense of Fuel, more than is con-
sumed in boiling the Sugars. . .”

The Barbadian planters seem to

arelhave been rather sceptical about

this new machine, for the steam
engine did not arrive here until
1846, when there was but one

Quaker Golden Maize, consigned
to Messrs R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd.
From Jamaica it brought 200 cases
of cheese, 150 bags congo peas,
50 bags of coffee beans and con-
fectionery.

and reliability . .
costs are as low as ever!



What’s on Today

Court of Ordinary at 11.00

a.m.

Mobile Cinema, Nightengale
Home, St. Michael.

Police Band at Hastings
Rocks at 8.00 p.m.

SALOON

COLE & CO.,



en



SHIPMENTS EXPECTED

mone Sawes ON THE HILLS..

Phe Hillman Minx... a fullsize family car famous for its comfort
. gives you still better performance, yet Tuning

THE HILLMAN

MINX MAGNIFICENT

CONVERTIBLE COUPE -

ESTATE CAR

A PRODUCT OF THE ROOTES GROU
SHORTLY

= AGENTS.

LTD.

to $10.00 each.

WRIST WATCHES—Excel-
lent quality $9.00 to $17.00
KODAK CAMERAS— $5.00;
$10.00; $12.00; $16.00; $20.00
$25.00; $35; $50.00; $80.00;
$200.00.

KODAK FILMS—To fit all
Cameras—

MIGH CLASS PIPES—Dun-
hill, Parker, Comoy, Every-
man, Grand Slam and Ban-
tam.
Pipes that are especially
made fer us at 2/6 each,

The working man’s pipe.
CADBURY'S CHOCOLATES



Red Rose 4lb. 1 Ib,
Hazel Nuts } lb 1 Ib.
Milk Tray $1.48
Princess 1 lb 4 Ib,
Assortment

lorries as well as on bicycles and’ steam engine and 506 windmills.
motorcycles to listen to the music.}As late as 1911 there were 226

Between 8 and 9 o’clock both| windmills and 109 steam engines.
the enclosure and around the| [ have only been able to refer
Rocks are .crowded. to a few of the interesting matters

rae SM

AGAIN IN STOCK ...

NO QUORUM:
NO VESTRY























; . A ; A MEETING of the Vestry of pw ROUND TREE'S CHOCO-
The programme is as follows:—|discussed in this, the second f 7 ,
nwa 'shANISH, PASODOBLES volume of the “History of Sugar.”| St. Michael which was scheduled K i N A LATE—Black Magic $3.85;
(a) Sol A. Sevilla Jose Franco | Among other things, there are| for yesterday was not held for $1.88; $1.08.
a piel panera woe i ye chapters on Asiatic Labour, the| want of a quorum. Only seven RAISINS IN PACKAGES—
. —Rossini Trade in Sugar, Refining and Beet | members attended. Their names ape Of excellent quality at 62e.
gar, is ‘
Morning—The Storm—Pastoral Move-| Sugar. I cannot speak too highly | follow: Mr. Bruce Weatherhead H ( ) W per pkege.
spent aay : aaeeee ae hacer of this work. All those interested | (Churchwarden); Mr. E._ D. Perfume from France and
and Obofl be taken by Bandsman |in the history of the West Indies | Mottley M.C.P.; Mr. Fred God- Jamaica—
R. Alleyne and Band Cadet Holloway. |in general, and that of the sugar|dard M.C.P.; Mr. F. E. C. ANIMALS & POULTRY ae MY SIN PERFUME ., $6.00
OPERATIC rat Laaeavatis industry in particular, will find} Bethell M.C.P.; Mr. Fis > = $10.00 and $14.00.
anit caren” it an absorbing study. Tudor; Mr. Victor Chase; Mr. DISTRIBUTORS. CARON PERFUME—French
peticieatine Waldeufel (*On sale at the Advocate) T. W. Miller. H. Jason Jones 8] Co, [id Can Can; Bellodgia; Rock
© iN r : Garden; Black Narcissus;
doliers.........+ Sulll Shy yi Mi . i
Played a honour of the passing of — Christmas Night; Soloman’s CT evety
the late Charles L. Elder. The 7 Khus Khus at 1/- 3/9,

Musie of the Gilbert and Sullivan
Operas were among his favourite
band selections, and the “Gondo- =
liers’ in particular. Tonight's ex-
e@rpts include the well known song
“Take a Pair of Sparkling Eyes.”





Just Received..

FOR LADIES | occasion
—_— =





of every colour—




AT
“pave in Talenese. Allan Magbeth It cleans, preserves—and how it STERLING VALUES | BRUCE on sale at the
NC il lishes! Ask ailer for Propert’s. “<
a 2 ira a Wowie Art ) WEATHERHEAD |
Reing a light diversion from the escriptions.

Southern Plantations.

“Get up an’ start, th! dan-cin
Go hon an’ do th’ prancin’

T’se got mah ha-bits on fur fair.
Hon-ey now doan git funny,

I know you'se got de money
Raisor’s are in th’ air;"

the difference it makes to your shoes!



Limited

= ee Oe

leading Stores

y






BROADWAY DRESS SHOP.

—













SON Datather's Choice.. Selected COLLOVLLLLOV EPPO LELOLLLRS, vebbsbecoeoosee’
FILM MUSIC “
The Road to Morocco Heusen ‘

DANCE MEDIEY
You were never Lovelier
—Jerome Kern |
EPILC GUE
C orale
“Jesu Joy of Man’s Desiring”
—J. S. Bach
This beautiful chorale was well!
beloved by our late brother muisi-
clan, Charles Luther Elder, and ends
tonight’s programme in fitting musi-





Make sure you ask for Sloan’s Liniment
—apply it to your rheumatism —then—







cal tribute to his memory by the 7 J P
members of the Barbados Police KRAFT ICE CHEAM MIX 1.08 ae FH a acl $2.74 & $3.95
Band, many of whom received AGHETTI in Tomato Sauce Small 18 MATTING RUGS 27 ins. x 54 ins. each - $2. :
Sin oer ee ae fete Catecu ee” edie z h
m durin nINZ {GE .E SAL, ; 54 Ot] BAe d0UdUlcllt—“‘“‘“‘COCSs*sS™SCSC“‘“(“SSNSC OQ ws. x 72 ims. each........
instrumentalists. HEINZ OXTAIL, Mullicatawny 36 ins. x 72 ins. eac
i "i king of Heaven OcKk TLE, Scotch Broth Soups ... 39
age soul the ng i % HEINZ TOMA1O Bee ects ’ Fi
E. RAISON, ¥ z Per tin 40
Captain Meat Soup e 30

BEDROOM RUGS 26 ins, x 54 ins. each....



SYRUP

3 ft. x 6 ft. each.







BROAD STREET?

“T like your Transport system
—it is so orderly and efficient. But
I am sometimes alarmed— every-

You cannot get anything better
for your muscular pains than
Sloan's Liniment. Simply apply it
lightly — don’t rub — and relief is

DRAWING ROOM CARP=ZTS 17% ft. x 9 ft...







PPPOE OSS SOE POFFO SS













.. $4.79 & $5.33
FIBRE MATS for Doorways, etc., various sizes........ $1.52 to $6.21

thing goes so fast. In pauneee 2 quick and certain.
z ‘ee
vakuse we y Piaf on Fay ar LOOK FOR THE PICTURE OF DR. SLOAN ON THE PACKET % CAVE \HEPHERD & (0. LTD.
— stop to talk, but aoe nobédy % ’
nows even their neighbours.” | % ; i y ab ee
Mr. Tsewang Pétifba, a medi- ik SF re a b $ 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET
cal student from Tibet speak- { STA NSFELPD, SC OT & | LTD. ¥ |
ing in a BBC Ov@seas Pro- . : i¢ 3 | bs
rom all chemists and swres tee %



gramme

e

pot 04,004 i
FFOOCOL AOA A htt '
PPP PLPPSPSPSG SPSS DE SS PPSPPOOCS FSSC EPPO: '

/ i





%




PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1950










BY



CARL ANDERSON. By | TS BABY LOVES





(~ SST x MOMENT,
10 il X 4 GHNESS..
di és T THINK YOUR
‘JESTER’ IS DOING
A LITTLE
SPY WORK!

\/ YOURE ASPY FOR THE
26 GREENIES! I ALWAYS
~ SUSPECTED IT! GIVE

1 \

1 \\y me-—— ME THAT!
ar) L$ m->
i t) NO! NO!

<5( PLEASE
. SS Ce)
ye 3x7) ' F \




I HAVE A PLANT
LIQUIPATE THE “*~
“GREENIES"... NOW AT



ee y



|
YOU KNOW re | RUBBER
LITTLE BOK TH Ar |
SAYS * Ars y|
a,
4 CUPS" YES-- NEXT TO IT
; WAY + IS A BOX LABELED )>.
| a ee OUP KEYS” -* KEYS”

'
52
ay ry





SPECIFY

BURRELL'S |










| WHERE oO
YOU HiDE








THEY'RE IN
THE LITTLE BOX
THAT SAYS
“STAMPS”









«. with ingredients of Vicks VapoRuk

oe
=e





JOINT AND
MUSCLE PAINS #-Â¥

may mean kidney trouble

A function of the kidneys is to eliminate
We oe ceca thot taeda
kidneys grow sluggi ese im:

or ee Lerell aelic atasemin end
settle, and become a cause of pain and
suffering in joints and muscles.

‘Tha eeeae De teaeins Sie vont of the tenis
is to help the kidneys. ey should be
tne pith De Wat Pil tne medline

made specially for ‘a
Pills have bg g, cleansing po
ic action on idneys that
trinet thon back to perform their 4
natural function properly.

< Pe Witt's Pills are a very well-tried

THE GUARDS THOUGHT 1 WAS AFTER \ NOW BIG DEKE Y1
THE GOLD. THEY WERE GOING TO, GANG STEAL Jr COME ON,SI
SHOOT ME ! FOLLOW ME, TONTO! GOLD! p—-7.|

T'D HAVE GONE OVER THE FALLS
iF IT HADN'T BEEN FOR
You, TONTO!














HEALTHIBENEFITS

te TONES UP DIGESTION
te ENRICHES THE BLOOD

‘dk RESTORES NERVOUS ENERGY
Â¥& BUILDS UP THE BODY

YZ

4



De Witt’s Pills
remedy. They are sold ail over over the world are made specially for

K. 0. CANNON... . . . . THE RIDDLE OF THE ROME REBELS telling’ of Tellet gained, after yeas of BACKACHE

onffering after taking De Witt’s Pill joiNT PAINS











' 1T WAS VERY KIND OF YOU TO COME TO ; j ' os eg I They act on the kidneys quickly. Why
VENICE My FRIENDS, MAKES DISPOSING OF x ‘ WOULD YOU LIKE : a A i not them for your trouble? Go to RWEUMATIC PAINS
YOU SO MUCH EASIER... 1 IMAGINE THERE ) | ~ TO ENTERTAIN i 1 : eS Het j i your chemist and obtain a supply today. {LUMBAGO
ARE MORE MURDERS COMMITTED IN VENICE OUR GUESTS WHILE a 5 Y ' SCIATICA
THAN ANYWHERE ELSE IN THE WORLD- Me) | SEE TO THEIR
JUST A SPLASH } FUNERAL 9 an +
\ IN ZE nee : ARRANGEMENTS OUR GUARANTEE
A , - :

BYNIN AMARA

7 TT $ J TK ‘Wade by ALLEN O HAWOERYS TO. LONDON

wa.

for Kidney and Bladder Troubles ”

AS NIGHT FALLS, TRAEEIC
OWINDOLES ON THE CANALS.
AbL (S$ QUIET IN THE CASA DEL FALCO.







Only one soap gives your
skin this exciting Bouquet








(CASHMERE Bouquet leaves an

enchanting fragrance about you
that will haunt all his dreams. Its
exquisite bouquet comes from a
secret wedding of 21 rare perfumes.
Bathe with Cashmere Bouquet Soap
daily so you'll always be dainty,
desirable, exquisitely feminine.



‘a
© ‘Re

RIP KIRBY —s_ BY ALEX RAYMOND





I'M AFRAID SO, DESMOND... gi ws. | [DESMONO, CALL MR, ANOREWS, THE BAI BANKER...
IT'S FROM HONEY...SHE SAYS HE'S THE TRUSTEE OF MARGIE PELHAM'S
MO ar THE MANGLER !$ ABOARD AAUCH IN IT;.. UT HER MBANING ESTATE... WANT AN APPOINTMENT WITH
RADICSGRAM THE VESUVIA...AND SHE Is UNDETACABLA HONEY 1S HIM... TELL
CEEVS TO Have \ WANTS tc TO COME TO HIM IT'S
DinruazED you kh. HER. eget URGENT!
MR. IRB re . , 5
BO TS
WRONG F



‘HORNIMAN S”
PURE

IT’S QUALITY
AT ITS
BEST

HEN you feel listless, tired and depressed,
the reason is that your blood is thin and
pale — without enough red blood- -corpuscles —

and your nerves are weak and undernourished.

ARES AT THE GRIM, DEADLY
Caey WHO FACES THE HEAB-HUNTER|

<7 WHAT HAG 6
HARPENED 10 |
eb
WwW |
|

OBTAINABLE FROM YOUR GROCER :

New red blood-corpuscles

What you need is a course of ‘Sanatogen’ Nerve
Tonic Food. ‘Sanatogen* combines the two
great body-building foods—organic phosphorus



PRICES %-lb - 40c.

and protein—which build up new red corpuscles / 2-02. sgn! 20.
in your blood and feed your weakened nerves
thus day by day filing your body with mar / 1-0z, a 10c,
vellous new vitality, health and Wappiness, Start
25.000 docedin tee: tecsten on & course of ‘Sunatogen’ today 4 %-o2. — 5e.
to the wonderful effects of b :
‘Sanatogen’ 5
On sale at good chemists and dr ugeiste JAMES A. LYNCH & C0 LTD we %
— eT " % o =
"SANATOGEN? 0" '
se sBi.ds ; Bs. roop af SOLE AGENTS.
restores health, youth and vitality Lf










FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15,

‘CLASSIFIED ADS. | PUBLIC NOTICES

1950









TELEPHONE 2508
tED ‘
coopaor —PlEQ er avcusrus.| PUBLIC SALES

POwner Of Plemsarnt Vale PAri tat, | rete

Saint Thomas) The funeral leaves CTI

from the Parlour of MINDS & ro AU ON

Tweedside Road, at 4 o'clock is

evening for the Nazarene Church, UNDER THE SILVER

Hall's Road, and thence to the West- HAMMER

bury Cemetery. Friends are invited.

Agnes (Wife) Hilda, Amn, Grace, On Tuesday 19th by order of Mrs.
Muriel, Williem, Norma Nicholls, Alice | Fred Harford we will sell her Furniture
St. John (CKildren) Ivor (Grandson}.| at ‘JAlexander” 7th Ave Belleville

a which includes
MEMORIAM Berbice, Morris and Upright Chairs,

‘cee IN Bookshelf; Ornament Tables, Corner

IN loving memory of MILLICENT| Cupboard: all in Mahogany, Pine
HUSBANDS (Nurse) who fell asieep| Ditiné Table; Glass Ware; Crockery.
on the 18th of September, 1947. Brass Warp, Frigidaire in working

Though years have gone I can't forget

That voice I love, I hear it yet.

Ever to be remembered by U. S.
Bruee, Maxwell Rd. 15.9.50—In.

In loving memory of BERESFORD
WILLIAM HOLDER who died on
September 15th, 1946.

wears off the edge of grief,

But memory turns back every leaf,

Thoughts drift on to by-gone days,

Life moves on, but memory stays.

Ever to be remembered by Constance
Holder (wife) Darcy Holder (son)
Horace Barker (step-son).

FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

CAR — Ford—(1) 1935 Model with









paint, tyres and engine in excellent
condition. Price $400. Phone Lawless
4315. 15.9.50—2n



OPEL KADETT CAR — M. 649 in

perfect working order, always owner
driven. Apply O. S. Smith, Kensing-
ton New Road, Fontabelle, or Registrar's
Office. 15.9.50—2n,



VAN—10 horse power Austin Van

in
ect working order. Apply D. V.
2.



& Co., Whitepari. Dial 3403;
ELECTRICAL



peste

ELECTRIC WASHING MACHINES
with Spindrier. Made by Mayfair of
Canada We have only 2 of these
remaining and the price is $280 each.
A number of thes are in use locally,
all giving 100% satisfaction, John F.
Ifutson, Ltd. 14.9.50—2n,

Sah come thet cp eonracstierticieeiietiammansttohatanibnicsaininis 15

REFRIGERATOR—One (1) 6 cub. ft.
model two years old in excellent con-
aition. Apply Electric Sales & Services
Ltd. 15.9,.50—2n.



POULTRY

POULTRY—White Leghorns, trios_con-
sisting 8-month Cockerel, 8-month Pullet
and 18-month Hen, @ $14 per trio; also
MAMMOTH BRONZE TURKEYS — 8&-
months old in trios. Price according to
size. Also a few pairs of good Modenas.
All Aa “tS et ta Stock.
SHEARN, Garrison. a. .

9.9."50.—3n.

MISCELLANEOUS

BUS & TRUCK TYRES made by
Henley of England We have a few
32 x 6 remaining which cannot be re-
placed to be sold at today's price.
There is no better tyre made in the



world John F, Hutson Ltd.
14.9,.50—2n,

CORN! CORN! CORN! Give your

poultry a Treat. Fresh Dried Indian

Corn Ready Shelled. Griffith's Rockley,
Christ Church. 13.9.50—4n.

DEMIJOHNS — Thirty (30) Covered
Clear Glass Demijohns 12% Gals. Capa-
city. Rum Dealers should be interes-
ted.

Eckstein Bros. 10.9.50—6n.

GALVANISRD SHHETS—24 gauge. In

7, 8 9 and 10 feet lengths. Enquire
AUTO TYRE COMPANY, Trafalgar
Street. Phone 2696. 15.9.50—t.f.n.



MODERN BATHANETTE — Collapsible
with Tray and Stand for dressing child.
Apply Mrs. Lb. A. Williams. Dial
Dial 95-275. 15.9.50—5n.



PRAM-—Large twin pram with fold-
tng hood. Apply Mrs. L. A. Williams
95-275. 15.9.50—5n.

One hand operated BACON SLICING
MACHINE. Apply B. V. Scott & Co.,
Lid., Whitepark. 13.9 .50—t.f.n,

PEAS~-LIN CAN Fresh Garden Peas
Fresh supplies may now be had from
your grocer. 14.9.50—2n,

RECORD ALBUMS for 10-inch and for
12-inch and carrying ne eee
records, and we have the records too

i A. BARNES & CO., LTD.
10.8.50—t.f.n.





water Tanks holding
300 gallons. Can be seen at Central
Foundry Dock Yard. 15.9.50—in.

YACHT — Centreboard Yacht ‘'Con-
dor.”” Length 17 feet, beam 6 feet. Newly
fitted out. Apply ae: Mecsrise

, Bay Street. lephone ‘

Serer ee 10.9.50—3n

YAWL—‘“Frapida” approx. 37% feet
long with Gray engine. Good
condition $3.000 — a bargain. Apply

. Phone 2520.
2) Becomes 15.8.50—T.F U1.

FOR RENT
HOUSES

“EVANTON” Top Rock. Unfurnished.
2 Bedrooms, Dining Romi, Lounge,
Tiled Baths, Two Servants’ Rooms.
Available from ist of October on
Monthly Basis or Long Lease. Dial
4683 or 2328. 13,8.50—5n.

FURNISHED UPSTAIRS FLAT—From |
lst November, 1950, at “BRIARFIELD’
Lower Collymore Rock. Phone 372.
H. BLAIR BANNISTER. 15.9.50—3n

TANKS—-6















SE — Ashton-on-Sea. Maxwell
cn Church. Fully Furnished. Con-
taining Four Bedrooms, Drawing and
Dining Rooms, Verandah Overlooking
the sea and all modern conveniences.
Dial 3607. 10.9,50—5n,

RGE HOUSE & APARTMENT—On
nex St. Lawrence, fully furnished.
Phone 8357. 8.9.50—t.f.n.

“MARISTOW" Maxwell Coast, Fully
Furnished. All modern conveniences.
Available from Ist November, Dial 468%
or 2328. 13.9.50-—5n.

——$—$—=—_——

OFFICES—Two very Spacious Offices
upstairs to No. 6 Swan Street Apply
to R. Spencer, Tudor Street Dial
2361. 15.9. 50—3n.

acentiteepinteindi

MOORINGS—Marine Gardens, Apart-

ment now ready for occupancy. Apply
. Gibson, Marine Hotel.

nie . 15.9.50—2n











“SUNNY SIDE”"—A 3 Bedroom Bunga-
low at Gibbs’ St. Peter, Good Bathing.
For months of October and November.

Bruce Weatherhead. Telephone 3144
or 2165. 13.9, 50—3n.

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife FSTHER
INNISS (nee SANDEFORD) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one @lse contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order

signed by me.
ERROL INNISS,
St, Lawrence,
Christ Church.
15.9.50—2n
——
The public are hereby warred against
giving credit to my wife GERTRUDE
YARD ‘nee WILLIAMS) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or
anyone else contracting any debt or
debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me.
EDWIN YARDE,
St. Martin,
St. Philip.
15.9.530—2n







NOTICE

OWING to repairs at present being
effected to the Christ Church Bovs’
Foundation School, next term will begin
on Tuesday 26th Septembér, instead of
the 19th of September. ~

No new pupils will be
w.H
Bod



admitted
ANTROBUS.,
Boys’ Fourndatior
School, Ch

Sects Gov

Ch

order; Single Mahogany Bedstead with
Vono Spring and Deep Sitep Mattress;
Double and Single Iron Bedsteads,
Springs and Mattresses; Press; Larder,
Kitchen Utensils; Oil Stove and other

items.
Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms CASH.
BRANKER, & ©O.,
A
15.9.50-—2n



CARS—By instructions of the Attor-
ney of the estate of Mr. Edwards
(dec’d) I will sell on FRIDAY 15th st
1 p.m. COLE'S GARAGE, BAY STREET.
1 Humber Saloon Car in good working
order also 1 Chevrolet Saloon Car. in
geod working order and 1 Ships Sex-
fant. Thems Cash. R. Archer Mc.
Kenzie, Auctioneer. 12.9.50—4n.
$$,

Amongst the items which will be set
up for sale at my office on Friday next
at 1 p.m,, will be one (1) Horse &
Cart, One (1) Pair of Counter Scales
& Weights, One (1) Lady's 21 Jewel
Gold Wrist Watch, and One (1) Cow
heavy in Calf. Gave 36 points with last

calf. D’Aray A. Scott, Auctioneer.
13.9.50—2n
By instructions received from the

General Hospital. 1 will set up for sale
by public Auction at their yard, on
Thursday 2ist, beginning at 12.20 p.m.
the following articles:—

(3) Iron Kettles, (1) Gas Stove, Lot
of Horse Hair, (5) Glass-door cupboards,

(8) Iron Cradles, (29) Iron Bedsteads,
(4) Gas Ranges, (1) Electric Mixer,
(30) Assorted Mattresses, (1) Bakelite

Container, (1) Gardener’s Hlut, Lot Taps
and W. C. Balls’ (1) Electric Sterilizer,
(1) Vegetable Steamer, (2) Iron Chairs,
(1) Box X-Ray Parts, (1) Gas Sterilizer.
(12) Soda Water Syphon Bottles, (1)
Bacterol Cask, (1) X-Ray Tube, (9)
Galvd. Iron Ventilators, Bags of Surgi-
cal Instruments, (2) Steam Kettles,
(1) Dressing Trolley, (1) Small Glass-
door Cupboard, Lots of Doors and
Windows, (7) Trolley Feeding Tables,
(1) Wheel Chair and several other
items of interest.
D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Govt. Auctioneer .
15.9.50—5n
a |

REAL ESTATE
NS
The undersigned will be set up for sale
at their Office No: 17 High Street,

CANE VALE and. MAXWELLS, Christ
Church, containing together by estima-
tion 195 ACRES.

ACREAGE in Plant Canes — 4%

es.
ACREAGE in Ratoons — 25 Acres.
ACREAGE in Preparation

cres.

There will also be sold with the said
Plantations One Dodge Motor Lorry, 2
Milch Cows, I Mule and 1 small 2-wheel-
ed Cart.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to the undersigned:—

ert
SHARES with Accruing Dividends:—
50 Shares in Barbados Shipping & Trad-
i. Co., Ltd. 10 Shares in Plantations
The above will be set up for sale by
Publie Competition at our Office, James
Street, wn, on Friday the 15th
of September at 2 p.m.
G. L., W. CLARKE & CO.,
Solicitors.
13.9.50—8n.
——
£900 Barbados Government Debentures
made up as follows:—
1 @ #100 bearing interest at 5%
due 1964.
@ £200 bearing interest at 3%%
due 1954
@ £100 bearing interest at 3%%
due 1954
@ £100 bearing interest at 3%%
due 1968.
The above debentures will be set up
at public competition at the office of
the undersigned on Friday next the -

~~ — ow

15th instant at 2.00 p.m. Carrington &«

Sealy, Lucas Street. 13.9.50—3n .

EDUCATIONAL |
HARBISON COLLEGE

The next term at Harrison College
will begin on Tuesday, the 19th Septem-
ber, 1950, and the school will be in
session from 9.15 a.m, — 11,30 a.m,

D. E. M, MALONE,
Seere@tary, Governing Body,
Harrison College.
Department of Education,
15th September, 1950.





15,.9.50—2n

QUEEN'S COLLEGE

The next term at Queen’s College
will begin on Tuesday the 19th Sep-
tember, 1950, at 9.20 a.m. and the
schpol will be in session for the
entire day.



D. E. M, MALONE,
Secretany, Governing Body,
Queen’s College.
Department of Education,
15th September, 1960.
15.9.50—2n



GOVERNMENT



VACANT POST OF ASSISTANT
DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE
BARBADOS.

Applications are invited for the post of Assistant Livestock Officer,

DepartmentDepartment of Science
applicants who are experienced in
sidered. The post is pensionable
$2,160 x $120—-$2,880. The holder

ters provided at the Central Livestock Station.

Applications, mentioning the names of two referees, should
be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, Bridgetown, and should
reach him not later than 23rd September, 1950.

Further details will be supplied on request.



CHANCE

Boa undermentioned property will be

Public Buildings, Bridgetown between 12 noon and 2 p.m, for the sum and on the date
If not then sold, it will be set up
at the same place and during the same hours until

specified below.
application to me.

ROBERT CLIFFORD CHAPMAN
vs.
JASMINE GILL; FRANCES EUGENIE STUART & VICTORIA ISABEL BLACKMAN

or parce] of land situate in the parish of
of Barbados containing by
and four Pyne face thereabouts butting and

PROPERTY: ALL iT certai
Saint Fann and Teena

three acres
now or late of F.
of Fee

is Husbands, on
F Cogtington and H.

:

&
2

and buildings

Bree. PRICE: ‘zen °
BA OF SALE: 29th September, 1950,



REMEMBER ..

When you order from . .

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

‘ve deliver by Motor Van
Corne.~ of Broad and Tudor Streets.

deceased, on iands of Todds Plantation, on lands now or late of

3, Holder and on the Public
. Ho a on e

ise the same may butt and

thereon called “Stuartville” and all other the erections
thereon erected and built standing and being with the

NOTICE

Re Estate of
JOSEPH WIGGINS

(Deceased)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claims against
the Estate of Joseph Wiggins deceagd,
late of Flat Rock, in the of Saint
George in this Island who died mm this
Island on the 27th day of March
requested to send in particulars of their
claims duly attested to the undersigned
G. Seymour Alleyne of Mason Hall Street,
Bridgetown, on or before the 23nd
_ peepee, eg after =
shall proceed to distribute
the deceased













had notice and I will not be liable for
the assets or any part 0 a
ted to any person of whose or

T shall not then have notice.
Soe co piensa be



BARBADOS GENERAL
HOSPITAL

SEALED TENDERS will be re-
ceived at the Hospital up to 12
o’elock noon on Wednesday, 20th
September, 1950, for supplying
articles in the following lines for
a period of six months from Ist
October, 1950:—

(1) FRESH BREAD.

(2) ALCOHOL. ;

(3) COFFINS, and providing
HEARSE for the burial of
the dead at the Westbury
SOs he

(4) PURE ESH MILK.

Forms for the respective ten-
ders will be supplied on applica-
tion to the Secretary of the Gen-
eral Hospital and tenders will not
be entertained except they are on
forms supplied by the General
Hospital.

All articles furnished shall be
of the best quality and be subject
to the approval of the Medical
Superintendent whose decision
shall be final in regard thereto.

Persons tendering must submit
at the time of tendering letters

from two other persons known to| |)

bound as
sureties for the fulfilment of the]
contract.
Terms of contract and any fur-
ther particulars, may be ned
on application at the General

Hospital. .
W. GOODMAN,

Secretary.
14.9.50—8n.

Public Official Sale

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1904
1904-6) No. 30).

ON Friday the 29th day of September,
1950 at the hour of 2 o’clock in the
afternoon will be sold at my office to
the highest bidder for any sum not
under the appraised value. ‘

All that certain piece of Land con-
taining about 2 Roods, 19 Perches at
Armstrong Village situate in the Parish
ef St. Michael butting and bounding
hon lands of John Lewis, of John Cal-
lender (dec’d) of James Holder (dec'd)
of one Manning, of Jostph Maycock,
end on a road in common leading to
the public road together with the
messuage or Dwelling Houses, Buildings,
&c., appraised as follows:—

The whole ir appraised to
THREE HUN AND EIGHTY-
THREE DOLLARS AND ‘THIRTY-
CENTS ($383.33).

Attached from EUGENE ST. CLAIR
dg for and towards satisfaction
Cc

N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day

of purchase,
T. T, HEADLEY,
Provost Marshal.
Provost Marshal's Office,
13th September, 1950.



15.9.50—3n
———$ $$

WANTED

HELP

LADY—Used to writing up accounts
and Keeping books. If able to type
an advantage. Interesting and pleasant
work. Apply by letter in first instance
K. F. K. ¢/o Advocate. 13.9 .50—3n.

MAN WANTED—To assist in our
Cutting Room. Some experience es-
sential. Apply by letter.

Cc. B. RICE & CO.,
Bolton Lane,
13,9.50——@n

SALES GIRL who ‘speaks Spanish,
Apply Bata Shoe Store Broad St.
14.9, 50—Sn.

er riener areca eapsimalininant nineties shill
TAILOR—A Tailor for Pants & Shirt
Making.
STANWAY STORE, Lucas Street.
15.9.50—in

MISCELLANEOUS

lll
HOUSE—English Family requires House
to rent, one or two years, St. John, St.
Josept, St. George, St. Philip. Write

Box 33, ¢/o Advocate Co.
10.9.50—6n.





NOTICE

LIVESTOCK OFFICER,
AND AGRICULTURE,

and Agriculture, Barbados. Only
livestock management will be con-
and carries salary on the seale of
will be required to reside in quar-

14.9.50—3n,

RY SALE

set up for sale at the Registration Office,

on each succeeding Friday
sold. Full particulars on

admeasurement
bounding on
, on lands now or late of the estate

lands now or late of
Road or however
bound Together with the messuage or

aeig as

wistrar-in- ncery,
Sth Septernber, 1950,
12.9,50,—4n.





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ARE YOU JUSTA Gums Bleed?

PLAYTHING-NATURE?





JOHN





NOTICE TO CHAIRMEN.
COMMISSIONERS
HIGHWAYS AND OTHERS

WANTED TO RENT. wit operators:—

TWO OR THREE ROAD ROLLERS
FROM 4 TONS TO 8 TONS FOR
A PERIOD OF AT LEAST ONE MONTH




M. HLADON

| for attractive terms and efficient service
Phone 4640 —

Plantations Building




OF








PHONE 8292

ROYAL THEATRE

Special Entertainment Drive

ONE WEEK OF GAIETY

FRIDAY at 8.30 p.m.

Madame O’LINDY and her Unforgettable

CABACAS NIGHTS

With Smashing originations 3 Hours of Solid
Entertainment

SATURDAY NIGHT at 8.30
} HOUR STAGE ENTERTAINMENT
MADAM TIAM FOOK and SYD VANDEK LYDE in

A GRAND VARIETY ENTERTAINMENT of the high-
est order along with M.G.M’s SUPER DOUBLE:

“THEY PASS THIS WAY"



BARBADOS

consequence had
commission and,

oe

20th June, 1950.

JOEL MACREA — FRANCIS DEE
— AND —

“JOHNNY EAGER”

ROBERT TAYLOR — LANA TURNER

Watch This Space For further PROGRAMMES

Starring :

Starring :

ELECTRIC = SUPPLY

CORPORATION LTD.

‘NOTICE



As the Manufacturers have decided that repairs to one of
our Engines can no longer be delayed, the Comyany has in
this Generating Set (900 K-W.) out of
to the reduction of standby Plant now
available as a result, may find it necessary to shed load at
intervals during the next few months,

Our Consumers are asked to co-operate by exercising the
utmost economy in the use of Electricity, particularly during
the Peak period between 6.30 and 8.30 p.m. until further notice.

Vv. SMITH,
General Manager.

AUCTION
with





















| Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose
|\Teeth mean that

| Trench Mouth or pe:
| that will sooner or later cause your teeth

|
| to fall ont and may also cause Rheumatism
|and Heart Trouble, Amosan stops gum SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM | The MV "Desreind*
dleeding the first day, ends sore mouth ROTTERDAM AND ANTWER. } I
and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad] . .) “frersilia® Sept. 29th: 30th. Oct
| guarantee. Amosan must make your aed will accept Cargo and Pas-

mouth well and save your teet





mon SATLING FROM AMSTERDAM i
Nature may endow you with cee act tmeken Neat voce takai & DOVER sengers for St. Lucia, St
breathtaking beauty, a lovely y. guar- m.s. “Bonaire” September 15th
curvaceous figure. She may be- | osan oa Protects) saiLING To ae ee Vincent, Grenada and Aru-
Sete. mean rhee—Trench eee ee paren lag:
a actress, a leader in for Pyor seme Meme) ms. ‘Helens’ Sevt tet. . ba. Sailing Sunday 17th.
reer ak dhe ee neiae SAILING TQ MADEIRA, PLYMOUTH,
wife ana mother. ADVER ae a B.W.L, Schooner Owners
° m.s. jemet: . .
and E T S . “Oranjestad” Oct. 27th. Asso, (Inc).
Yes, Nature do all this. ISE wa lT PAYS. Sal oe 1 secommedation | 1] rei. Nu, 4047
aval on ve ;
slapped if aie a lable this ry a
os - 8 P. MUSSON, SON & CO. ; resteepe
une Ge cnaeeaieetucate BARBADOS ARTS AND CRAFTS AGENTA
a SOCIETY
Girls and women do.
‘issinaay ea NOTICE : :
The Sixth Annual Meeting of the e l St h
Nabeul | forget —Pinikham’s Compound | general Atenniy ot wenses “se | Canadian National Steamships
Not Joke About! bors MORE than relieve such Ghove Society will be neld st Wakefield,
female functional month! monthly pain. is great medi- | Gritish © il Representative Fri- ils Sail Satis Arrives Sails
oun are causing you to | Cie samo relieves accompanying | day, 29th September at 8 p.m, to con SOVEESOORD Giedues: | ‘Welttcx Becton Gachases Masbedce
firm the Annual Report and to elect the
from pain, nervous dis- nervous tension, irritability, Officers and Committee of Management | cAN r RUISE: ol Aug € Sept - 16 Sept 16 Sept
tress and feel weak, restless, so those tired-out, mean ‘pick-on- | for te ensuing pear CANADIAN CRU TSER se, See Ly cei ee
and irritable that you — everyone’ feelings—when due to M. P. MERRICK, CANADIAN CHALLENGER | 27 Sept. 30 Sept 10 Oct
turn into a ‘she-devil'— this cause, Taken regularly | Asst. Hog, Secretary LADY RODNEY .... .. 13 Oct 16 Oct. 18 Oct, 27 et.
on such days—THIs Is SOMETHING thruout the month—Pinkham's | 8.9.60--Sn CANADIAN Sean wee. Ge Sin Row ia ee
een tee ae tem ean ee aoe a dinnlin geen dee
right away-try Lydia E. Pink- tance against such distress—a
bam Compound sensi 9 N Arrty Balls Artives Arrives Arrives Arrives
“ on guptene It's ae noe tt og al “Sontt seeevkahiy FOR SALE. ee Barbados Barbados Boston Halifax Montreal St, John
‘And don’t benefit! All drugstores. ee LAY RODNEY .. 19 Sept. 21 Sept. 20 Sept. 1 Oct 5 Oct
Seo Owing to structural alterations, LADY NEE, 8 Ock. ® on 8 ast ee ae ie
a we are offering f sale the LADY RODNEY . 9 Nov. Vv 20 Nov - - % Nov
aan v4 ¥, VEGETABLE entire ‘ryot of ant bullaing at Nos. LADY NELSON 28 Nov. 30 Nov 9 Dee - -- 16 Dec
&. 'e COMPOUND - aff Reebuck St., ee ence
ad z of a large quantity of woodwor



























and approximately 1,000 sheets of

PAGE SEVEN

SHIPPING NOTICES









ROYAL NETHERLANDS,
STEAMSHIP CO.

ou have Pyeorrhea,
chaps some bad disease

or






















haw
galvanised Lron. N.B.—Subject to change without es caren, fitted with on ney cham-
For full particulars apply to A ts
Cc. EB. KINCH, _
c/o General ‘Traders Ltd GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. gents.

|
|









~ a . NIUE? ce
TO-DAY’S RILONEUM 3

+54, 4,
! [ RELONEUY POOOOS











Or MOTOR CAR MATS Ete.

| %
NEWS F LASH | A RUBBER FLOOR COVERING B
AUTIFUL PATTERNS .
SE RARBADOS EMBLEM "ty FEET WIDE @ $3.32 Yd. >
> ae 7 ASSAGE
Ideal for Souvenir Gifts. | SUITABLE FOR BATHROOM, P. f 2
|



§




FLOWER PATTERN | CALL AND SECURE YOURS EARLY %
GLASS x

For Front Doors, ed cee x

AT 1b: ® Established T HERBERT Ltd Incorporated = &
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY | 1860 o TLE . 1926 x








10 & 11 Roebuck Street.

and HARDWARE

a



NOTICE

Barbados Civil Service





Association

All postmen, messengers,
house keepers, public
Constables, Water Works’,
T's, Publie Works, Mental Hos-
pitals’, Lazeretto’s, G, 1. Schools’,
Water Boat's, and General Hos
pital's Employees, Deputy Mar-
shals and Library Attendants
are summoned to a special Gen-
eral Meeting of Gov't Subor-
dinate Employees to be held at
the Town Hall on Saturday Sept
1éth at 1.30 p.m

(Inc. in Br. Guiana)

Light
market
H &



Attention Ladies

JUST RECEIVED

By S.S. Brookhurst—Moon Crest & June Crest
Huge shipment of TEXTILES,
Tremendous Bargains in SILKS, ART SILKS
& CREPES





Agenda: General Business



A. E. LEWIS,
Divisional Secretary









100 pieces of VARIOUS CREPES all different

colours and designs 36” wide .. $1.87 yd.



FOR THE UP-TO-DATE




MAHOGANY, CEDAR, BIRCH
AND DEAL



100 pieces ART SILKS, various colours and




























Streamlined and Straightlined designs 36” wide hse a es $1.80 yd.
Morris Suites and separate piece
a Tub ane other Caned Chairs I 5
Settees and Rockeys Berbice 26” "PE i
petiree 2, Deeese Berens | Oe ee ar Tenn eer reee 28 yd
up=-Vanities and similar Dresser | WOOD Shi eeu. FV ates cede $2.28 yd.
in 40 designs, sizes, and finighe i
and Vanity Stooly—Dining, Office '
eee: Kitchen and Law: We have only mentioned these, but they

SPECIAL BARGAIN i are several others to select from.

Garden or Beach Seat—§ feet |

long, on Lren Supports—$10.00 +
—— | Remember these are Bargains, take advan-

L. S$ WILSON tage of the prices offered.

Trafalgar Street Dial 4069









WM. FOGARTY LTD. |

TAILORS THAT
“FIT TO PLEASE”



Aastha



OUR TAILORING DEPARTMENT:—

We have just opened a large assortment of beautiful TROPICAL
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" PAGE EIGHT








OVER THE BAR

|
|

TiiE PICTURE shows Paul Foster, skipper-goalkeeper of Flying Fish, pushing a hard shot from Geoffrey

Foster, one of the Swordfish forwards, over the cross bar.

ot

Tour Australia
From Oct. 1951—Jan. 1952

SYDNEY, Sept. 14.

THE Australian Cricket Board of Control to-day decided

to invite the West Indies to
season.

{t was found impossible to send an Australian team to the
r commitments.

West Indies because of other

W.I. Win |
1-Day Game |

MARSHALL HITS 6 SIXES

CARLISLE, Sept. 14.

The West Indies won their one-
day match with the combined
Cumberland and Westmoreland
team here today by 159 runs, scor-
ing 244 before dismissing the
combined side for 85. The West
Indies batted a second time and
scored 110 for four but the match
was decided on the first innings.

From the start of play, the West ;
Indies hit freely and they had 228!
runs on the board at luneh-time |
for the loss of 6 wickets

Marshall and Christiani gave
them an excellent start with a
century opening stand but then in
typical one-day cricket style the
wickets tumbled as batsmen hit
out and Marshall 82 and Chris-
tiani 46 remained top scorers.

Marshall's total included six
sixes and four fours, evidence of
the hitting. The West Indies in-
nings closed in 20 minutes after
lunch, two wickets falling as a re-
sult of splendid throws by Elwood
which ran out Rae and Valentine.

That opening stand of 101 took
only 47 minutes and the crowd
which had gathered to welcome
the tourists on their first visit to
Carlisle were quick to show their
appreciation of the play.

Newall with medium pace bowl-
ing had the well deserved figures
of five for 86 during the innings.

The county batsmen found the
bowling of Valentine and Gomez
difficult to play and only Wood
and Newall showed confidence.

Valentine and Gomez each took
four wickets in dismissing the local
side for 85 which left them 159
behind, and the remaining hour
and a quarter's play was occupied
by further good batting from the
West Indies









—Reuter.



Lamotta
Retains Title |

DETROIT, Sept, 14,
Jake Lamotta, World Middle-
weight Champion last night

knocked out Laurent Dauthuille
(France) in a 15-round fight here.
Lamotta came up with a blister-
ing attack in the last minute of
the fifteenth round to knock out
Dauthuille and retain his cham-

pionship
Reuter.



Trinidad Beat
British Guiana
(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Sept, 14,

In the Caribbean Lawn Tennis
Tournament now being played at
the Georgetown Cricket Club
grounds, Trinidad today won both
singles matches against B.G. when
Jin Ho beat Edwin Redwin 6—4,
6—3, 7-5; and McDonald beat
Ivan Philips.





tour Australia in the 1951—52



The tour to Australia’ will
extend from October to January,
with five tests, an interstate game
in each ot the states, and several
provincial fixtures.

The tour is subject to the
ipproval of the Imperial Cricket
‘onference in London.

The arrangements would enable
Aurtralia to meet its commit-
ments to send its best team to
New Zealand in the same season.

The Board increased the allow-
ance of Australian test players
from £50 Australian currency
(£40 sterling) to £60 Australian
currency, (£48 sterling) per
match plus expenses.—Reuter.



Colony Football
Team Plays
“Sparrow”

A football match between a
team from H.M.S. “Sparrow” and
a Colony XI will take place at
Combermere this afternoon. The
match begins at 4,30 o’clock.

Representing the Colony will
he:

Smith (Empire); Gibbons, Bow-
cn (Spartan); Haynes, Cadogan,
Gittens (Spartan); MeCollin (Bm-
pire), Blades (Everton), F. Tay-
jor (Empire), Drayton (Empire)
and Harper (Empire).



Island Cricket XI
Defeat “Sparrow”

The island easily defeated
team form the H.M.S. Sparrow
in a ercket match yesterday at
Combermere. The island won by
an innings and 84 runs. F. Ings
was the only batsman to reach
double figures, for the Sparrow
in their first innings. He scored
15 out of 51. Bowling for the
island Denis Atkinson took four
wickets for 14 runs, Norman
Marshal] two for four and Alleyne
two for 10.

a

The island then replied with
205 runs for four wickets de-
clared, Norman Marshall and

Goddard h'tting breezy knocks to
seore 58 and 47 respectively.

In their second turn.at the
wicket the Sparrow team was dis-
missed for 70 runs, Ings again top-
scoring with 30.



Tomorrow's Cricket

The fourth series of First Divi-
sion Cricket games opens _to-
morrow, and the fixtures with
grounds and umpires are as fol-
lows: —

FIRST & INTERMEDIATE SERIES AND
UMPIRES OFFICIATING

Date; s; Grounds & Umpires

Sept. 16, ao

Combermere vs. Lodge at Combermere
I

E. King & G. Forde.

2





College vs. Spartan at College. F. L
Walcott & L. Spellos.

Wanderers vs. Carlton at Bay. S. C
Foster & H, B, Jordan

Empire vs. Police, at Bank Hall, C. St

C, Cumberbaten & D. Roachford,

INTERMEDIATE
Sept. 16, 28, 30
Cable & Wireless vs. YÂ¥.MeP.C., ai

Boarded Hall, J Hall & W. Bayley.
Mental Hospital vs. Empire, at Black

Rock, W. Harewood & W. Archer.
Spartan vs. Wanderers, at Park.

Hinds & C. Batson,
Pickwick vs. Windward at

S. Gilkes & C. Collymore
N.B. Play commences at 1 P.M. and
umps drawn at 6 P.M,

J.

the Oval






ce
\F;

lO HIS MISSUS
TOOK THE CUE
AND GOT ONE
FOR HERSELF:
BROTHER! THAT'S
DIFFERENT!

THANX TO
MRS.F.S.SCHWARZE,



3035 EISENHOWER AVE,
ARCADIA, CALIF.



ee an
c








Swordfish however defeated Flying Fish 2—0.

W.I. Invited To

Swordfish Win
From Flying Fish
At Water Polo

SWORDFISH, by scoring a two-
love defeat over Flying Fish in
their Water Polo match at the
Aquatic Club yesterday evening.
have placed themselves in a good
position to win the Cup. The
struggle for supremacy now lies
between Swordfish and Snappers

The game between these two
teams was fast and interesting
and even in the last minutes the
Flying Fish players did not give

p.

Albert Yearwoo1, Skipper-goal-
keeper of Swordfish, did some
excellent work in the nets! and
on many occasions saved what
looked like certain goals. Paul
Foster, the Flying Fish skipper-
goalie, was many times c¢
upon to save some hard tries from
Geoffrey Foster in the Swordfisi
forward line.

The goals for Swordfish
scored by Geoffrey Foster and
Billy Gilkes. The game began
with Flying Fish defending the
goal at the Harbour end. Soon after
Geoffrey Foster opened his team’s
account with a hard shot from in
the goal area, which although it
touched Paul Foster’s outstretched
hand, found its way into the nets.

Swordfish Lead

At half time Swordfish were
Still in the lead. Soon after the
second half began Geoffrey Fos-
ter swam down and took another
hard shot which Foster pushed
over the cross-bar,

Mickey Jordon had a golden
opportunity to put Swordtich
further in the lead but although
he was unmarked in the goal
area, he sent the ball inches over
the cross-bar.

A few minutes later Billy Gilkes,
who was also unmarked in the goal
area, placed the ball in the right
corner of the goal, out of the reach
of Foster, to put his team two
goals in the lead. The end found
the score unchanged.

In the other game of the evening
Barracudas met Bonitas and de-
feated them one love. Herbert
Portillo scored the goal for Bar-
racudas in the first half.

Some good saving was witness-
ed by Henri Perez in the Barra-
cudas’ goal, Maurice Foster,
skipper — goalkeeper, was also
called upon to save some difficult
shots sent in by the Barracudas
forwards

were

|

Owing to unforeseen circum-
stances the game between the
team from the H.M.S, “Sperrow”
and a combined Snapper -Police
team, had to be postponed.

The teams were:

Bonitas; M. Foster (Capt.), A.
Patterson, J, Grace, O. Johnson,
T., Yearwood, I. Inniss and A,
Taylor.

Barracudas: H. Perez, B. Brooks
(Capt.), B, Armstrong, H. Portil-
lo, C, Evelyn, P. Fletcher and E.
Johnson.

Flying Fish: P. Foster (Capt.),
T. Yearwood, J, Knight, le
Malone, H, Weatherhead, © P.
Potter and D. Davies.

Swordfish A. Weatherhe rd
(Capt.), M. Jordon, N, Portillo,
H. Jones, M, Fitzgerald, G. Fos-
ter and B. Gilkes.

Referee: Mr. W. Gibbs.

Rifle Shooting
To-morrow

There will be practice shoot at
The Government Rifle Range for
members of the B.R.A. tomorrow
at 1.30 p.m. ;

The shoot will be from the 200,
500, and 600 yards banks.

It is hoped there will be a good
turn-out of the Club fo afford a
welcome to the members of the
Bisley Team,





SSeS eee

| They'll Do It Every Time Weds Soon B
<= i ———
OH, BOY! RIGHT OUT

OF THE FASHION A
MMMH-MMMH





Woo-Wool!
!

















Jimmy Hatlo

RMIN WENT
ALL OUT IN
HIS ADMIRATION
FOR SUN SUITS
AS WORN BY LA
BLONDE CUTIE

WELL, OF
ALL THE! TAKE 4
IT OFF! SEND IT BACK,
I LEAVE FoR Goop!
Tor mais Wy wre
NOT
EVERY







BARBADOS ADVOCATE
|b. B.C. Radio Programme

FRIDAY,

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1950

LEGS OE OSS POOOOSSS SS Soo

GLOBE



OS



oe





SEPTEMBER 15,
7 00 a.m. The News, 7.10 a.m. News

Lone

4

oe NONE EEL LL LTELE LEI TM



























































Analysis; 7.15 a.m The Unbeatable + ‘ %
ee eam” the "Sucre, on THE MANAGEMENT presenis ”
BBC Scottish "Variety Orchestra, "9.00 |% j id
am. Close Down: | i2.00 (noon) The " with pride
Dn New Records 00 nit the|® THE DELIGHTFUL VOICE OF BRITISH GUIANA'S
Debate Co:tinues; 1.15 p.m. Raclio| ¢ SINGING STAR.
Newsreel, 1.36 m a Hi ard; |
Sab p.m. eg) Maen: 210 a Bome |% SUNDAY, RATED %
News From Britain; 2.15 p.m. Sports .
Review; 2.30 p.m. Henry’ Wood Rom- ON THE ;
nade Coneamtty, 2.90 Esters. | , SEPT 17 S| ;
4.10 pm € Serv: : mm. | ’ '
Nights At The Opera; 3.00 p.m. John |§ SWEETEST . '
Madin at the Theatre Organ; 5.15 p.m 8.30 P.M. x | i
Programme Pe aay 5 se tare, VOICE
Magazine, 3 m. e J
Ramtaaien, Ss aa Pipes and Drums, | ¢ HALF HOUR :
6.30 p.m. Sir Robert Peel; 7.00 p.m. |¢ IN
Pe ha" i cia gman |g OF THE otion i
be Ms a. n=
dies; 2 ‘p.m Radio. Newsreel, 8.15 y LATEST THE :
lp ebat tii Bi ‘
Phil Tate; 855 p.m. From The Edi: TUNES CARIBBEAN ‘
torials, 9.00 p.m. From The Promenade | ¥ p |
concerts, 10.00 p.m. The News, 10.10 AND HIT 0 Ins
Ee ati 10.15 oe, oe STAR D
os’ . * m oO} airs; A
11.00 p.m. The Rraeraes New Clothes x PARADE %
een ~ SPECIALS t In Cream, Fawn,
9 DIE IN CRASH , RADIO Biscuit and Bei
Nin as dios ioe te ge ; 54 i on
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— of an Iranian Airways | ae ed F Y x Per yd q :
is ‘ . ) &
The machine crashed as it took | $ STROMBOLI 1 % $2.30 & 2.61 E
off a oud Arabia, with. spare | ¥ Mr. RAY NUNES. . ‘
parts for another Iranian Airways | ¢ PROGRAMME: ¢
plane grounded at Jidda. , : ‘ :
The British pilot was killed, The | % (1) Again; (2) Foolish Heart;(3) Maybe its’ Because % The weil known '
others dead were all Airways per- (4) Ole Man River; (5) If I Love You; (6) Stormy Weather. % |
sonnel and included five Persians, eS oe $5 or MOYGOSHELL t
« enetenan, a Greek and a South ' )*#ORG9OG6S SEO SSS SOSLOSSOSSO > PSOOSS - Soo ° oan
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PAGE 1

FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 15, IN* BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE THREE Prices High In Italy MR. P C S MAFTEI.cU> •*chant who ha* just returned from a visit to his native Italy told the Adeocate yesterday lh.it vast ImE rovements have been made line* e left there S3 yean ago. Mr. MaiTci who Ml here four months ago also visited Canada. England. France and Switzerland He said that he was surprised lo see what good roads existed In Italy. Where there was the lack of electricity, water and schools m the villages, such a state of affairs no longer existed. Born In the village of Bagnone. Province of Massa -Carrara, Mr. Maflei said that all his family Including his father who had bean to Paris, were there to receive him. Asked about condition* In Italy, he said that the goods were highly priced, but everything one wanted was available The name thing could be said for rrance except that the goods there wore a little cheaper. The climate was similar to that in the West Indies and the country was crowded with tourists from all over the world, but as soon as the Korean war started, the American tourists began to return home and many of the hotels were practically empty. He saw Ihe Pope and took a snapshot of him just as he came out of his palace to Inspect his Regiment which was being presented with a flag. While in England he saw some of the cricket games and was pleased with the showing the West Indies had put up. He said that conditions in England were still very bud and the woollen market prices had gone up so high that they could not get any quotations for wool. Since his last visit to England 13 years ago he discovered that the atmosphere there had changed and ihe people seemed to be more friendly than before. Vacuum Pan Molasses Goes To London THE 4,022-ton molasses tanker "Scottish Musician", now lying at anchorage in Carlisle Bay. is completing here its loading of vacuum pan molasses for London. The "Musician" arrived m port on Wednesday evening and began loading the same evening. It is expected to leave port on Saturday direct for London. This is tho flrft call at Barbados by a big tanker for vacuum pan mola: since the war. Supplying the tha molasses is the 289-ton motor vessel "A the l brook." which arrived here on Tuesday. The "Athelbrook" will transfer three of her loads into the "Musician's" tanks. The "Mthelbrook" supplied on load on Wednesday and yesterday returned to her berth In the inner basin to reload. Each loading of the "Athe thi-oot" held up traffic twice on the Chamberlain Bridie for about 20 to 30 minutes eacl time as the bridge has lo be swung to give the right-a-way to and from the Inner basin. The "Musician", one of the ships of the Athel Line, used to Mil here before the war The "Athclbrook" which is also of that line, has already made two calls here for molasses for Trinidad On U" occasion, she will leave port under ballast for British Guiana. Mammee Apple Kills Fleas THE mammee apple, a South American fruit otherwise known as the Santo Domingo apricot. Is a favourite fruit among Barba*fc ug v,,, to*, with leathery doited leaves. H also bears white Itaen A bitter rind eneloses the sweel flesh ol tht Irult which ran either be eaten %  aw or awmed In • or sugar. Some apples carry from one to (our seeds. In some West Indian islands an aromatic liqueur, known as cau de Creole. Is dlslllled from the flowers. Many years ago West Indians made use of the gum to extract jiggers from their feet and It la understood that although there are now modem methods to extract Jiggers, some still prefer to uaa the mammee applo tree gum. The wood from the mammee apple tree can be used for building or fancy work. Only raeently the effacUveneu of mammee apples, on fleas ana ticks on dogs, was discovered. In the current Issue of Tropical Agriculture (Vol XXVTI. Nos. 131 Mr. II K. Plank, aBtomnlogist at the Federal Experiment Station in Puerto Rico, gives.-—| and fleas Herman Police Increase Likely • Press ,:< %  1 Two queaUona which had been expected To be discussed this ere the raising of the level of German steel product:.' and tha authorisation of increa*>shipbuilding capacit> Britain for one, regards a early decision on Germany's industrial contribution to West defence as a priority matter. The signs were that the gap was narrowing on points which still divided the United States, Britain and Prance lh their vn on the future steps towards Western German sovereignty and the strength*iing of the German police force. The bnprenson of Confer t observcrs at the present nuige of tho talks w.is that ihings wen moving m the following direction The occupying powers will agree to a substantial Increase lit Germany'-: police force. That the Bonn Government will be authorised to increase the tottl force, bearing in mind that mobile force) under a central federal authority is necessary to meet any emergency in German security, but also preserving the essential provincial structure of the West German pollee The American view in particular is that stale organisation consiiiute a valuable guarantee that Western Germany will develop along democratic lines and that it would be a mistake to attempt to federaJise the eniirt police forces of the Westerr Zones. —Beater. New Governor Flies • From Page 1. "I couldn't get everything ready in time to go with him at such short notice" she explained. Blackburnc expects to reach the Leeward Islands on Sunda; Th British Red Cross has sul arribed £500 for the relief hurricane victims, and other colonies have been generous In offers of assistance. A gift of CV.OOO came from and American Red Cross Iso sending help. The Weather TO-DAY San Rises: 5.5u ajn. Sun Sets: 6.0Z p.m. Moon: f the hurricane. He returned to Barbados about ten days sgo and was staying at "Stafford How* He said that be was staggered al the amount of sople were most hospitable and he had every help from the Government officials, it OlarfS It-irteua. Sch alary X CaraliD* U V !--*> Pxitna. lW w L mi. IB. VI) CrvnvrDe t %  —. Sf* via* Hun. W V. La Part* *4 MS •parro* APUUVAIaS S SiMbrcn*. *M* taaa net, Cap. KK.from Port-au-PTO llwettart Ss.-a.tuaa Uuarun. mm Capl M..s fro... T>n ida.1 In Touch With Ba t s p o Tkulin. finuc Coart Station •Vas* lnaliaa IH12.CS-> lhat Ih*y tan ill. ID* lolkowtaf iM|n U.roufti xlaaH CMS Statta*.. Ksfejo Knovlll > %  Kaae CambrUlf* S S ft4>-ai. a lWSant Pa-ntrirr. S S CO Tho till, !* Surr.a. S H tMnbvtiale*. S B TUrtctam. a a tMmoathan**. S S Mtaava Anaf lucia. S B MormaclarB, a S Junrrraat. %  S OotSM. II Jaattu, a a DoutMiia. a a. (fuean of I'armiMU, S S Brail). S J Knwa. S S Ouli Masrhanl. 8 8 Akll. %  %  Ofdir,-. P AnTt>adU. 8 S. PMroa I -i'l A 111 K BBSS) l • S 1'ranlrftborS. g| • I i Cgraair. IS Atkol a B IMppax BS CaJHornia. BS HMDII Strr-i S S ClUnionnri Savm. • S rundial. S B. Hollar, B. B S Bnrtl. S B WoenadrKhi. 9 S Batfaiaivs. S B Alfa nigrun. as Castr, HU 8 8 CaaaManca. S 8 RnrkaM*. 8 8 >"... B8 8. MalrD. S a Quvrry. 9 S %  MO i'—llll ... S S Ollntpla Seawell n—rrsig ir I*IAL %  ram I ...t..i : Brllv Thaaajasa. Mary CIMcra.. LlttMl .-:i-i... H>yal MaHalon. Dr. l.toni-l SIai>|>. norrrn Walrt.Anna dlllina-han.. M*r M rri Jnhi.aMi. Chaii-laa H., Hi ...•• BTefea rnna aaVmtam I.I i \u i i Uit-a I Tun Barometer: (3 p.m.1 (9 a-m.) 29.901 29.999 AaUgua Gift Parls Escape Shipwreck THE 34-ton schooner "Princess Louise," which left Barbad Saturday morning with .. cargo of 700 cartons of biscuits, 180 bags of sugar and three kegs screws for AnUgu... WM wreined on Five Rocks oppo*ila. Church Jj^',^. Bay on the Wast Coast on Tuesday. *sea i The skipper Augustus Mitchell KMF, and Its eight-man evnw wire Brows saved, but the cargo was totally lost. All the cargo was Insured, but not the vessel. Gut packages for Antigua were prepared at the local Y.M.C A for shipment by the "Princess Laoulse" but fortunately Ihev were •ant by the M.V. ••CanlilH^ 1 Instead. The "Princess Louise" was reported berairne Karl Pieolt. ll.tifv.. D.!'*!.!.Padr.) PBCIU-CU. Ma^url BafiiB I.iiriaiaa CaiDi'ant. D. W. i llBTtln. In 81. KHIa Vllma JulMii. Nichlaa Julian. Idai I ... StI a>-ia BtdU W..ir.ll. Fiank 0>bam lar l Oaalra BJ—Hnl Baitthax, iHHI. S*nrh*i. Oacar Sancnei. Ortilr Sar-ch-i Ola-ll. Saiobei. II-^IK BaiTM.la. M.ii.a Aajuiq.ir. SaBdni Nfwirka. Patar NarHowlli. ulbtr, IlallHSrhuJUr, Eva svi-iia. Mary "I-.:. Fl.trlW. Aklr. B,i., Brown. 1 ii>1li 1 ... M.tlllllHU. Mum ij.inwrlnf K. Had man II V I'lirherin Jm— A. Lj.vrh A Co Ild. MM M E O'Nxal I! u hag "POTICK" BLOCKS THE WAY The French Yawl "Potlck" been sunk in the ir.ner basin now (or the past nine months. No attempts al salvaging were made )..'ely. With part of the bow protruding above water, the vessel Is partly n menace to navlga-. ttonYesterday the protruding part of the bow could not be seen from the Wharf HS it wii hidden among lighters and three motor vessels which were In the basin. Pretty pretties in fleas nd ttcks on dogs n Thc U ra>iKs are that, (a) an Infusion of one pound of hall ripe mammee apples, thinly •"•* crated, In water to make one gallon, and (b) the f3g*!aC£E seeds, are both equally effective, but not quite so permanent 01 a one per cent luspensiun of D.ii.i. Chemical analysis has shown the tanicity to be due to a type of subSSi lomevhm similar to the pyrethrine contained In pyrenihrum fto wers. Lancaster Makes 5,000 Pobf A Month ALTHOUGH new macriinery has not been received, due largely to lack of funds, workers at the I-ancaster Factory, s James, still manage to produce five to six tbousand flower pots a month, tne Aarvaease was informed yeaterriBy. It was said that the expennienial plasH which deals with the testing of the clay in the island is still going a4xong and recenti> a few Important discoveries navo been made concerning the adaptability and strength of the clay Orders for flower pots arc stiii coming! in from many people all over the island but the largest or dor usually comes from the Agn cultural Department. The hope was UAUieaeru 1 that In the near future the Factory would be able to take foreign orders. "FERGUSON FABRICS STOCKED BY THE LEADING STORES. 99 a dollar WIN A FORD and HELP THE BARBADOS BOYS' CLUBS Three prizes will be given as follows: 1st Prize: A FORD AXI.L1 A 2nd Prize: Raleigh 3 speed eyele •3rd Prize: Rolex Tudor Watch Drawing to take place not later than Nov. 30th 1950 Auditor*.: Fitzpatriek Urn ham V


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V. Friday Seplt-mbrr 15 IS JS Bmrbantis luuacate I'rir. FIVE ri;>.s i<-*r SJI branjJjJ ATTLEE GOES AHEAD WITH STEEK r 1,000 Reds Killed And Wounded In 24 Hours TOKYO Sept. 14, MAC ABTHUB'S HEADQUARTERS estimated the Communis' dead and wounded in the last 24 hour period as 1,880 with tfca addition of 202 captured. In Washington, defence officials said they could not confirm Press reports that United Nations, Forces today attempted a landing on the Korean west coast in the area of Inchon and Seoul. Yesterday the United Nation-. Nsval M ask farce iheUtd the Inchon area and to-day Pyi.nttyang Communist radio said the shore battcni's of three "small" American destroyers, four landing craft and three other landing cral! were damaged. lal wpoi MNNUI AT THK ftAVOY Carstaits Follows Mlackbuftte OABSTABI Mr. C Y, Carats in. CMC Assistant Secretary in the Cc4ojin.1 OB), who ha* recently returned 10 the Vnlted Kingdom from Ihe post of Admin.*trailviSecretary lo the Comptroller for Development and Welfare in the West Indies, has been appointed to succeed Mr. K. W. BUickbunic, C.M.G., O.B.E., as Director of Informut on Services. Colonial Office. Mr. Carstairs will be taking up his new duties at the beginning of 1981 This Is the second time that Mr. Carstalrs has taken up an office left vacant by Mr. Blackburnc. He succeeded Mr Blackburne as Administrative Secretary lo the Comptroller for Development and Welfare Etcher Is On Swiss Cabinet BERNE. Sept. 14. Dr. Joseph Escher. president of the Swiss Catholic Conservative Party was to-day elected by both houses of Parliament to the Fed* eral Council of Switzerland's senii-peiman*"". Cabinet of seven Minis.I rs. He if expected to be given 11 targe of the L>epartment of Posts nnd Highways. He has been in Parliamentary politics for 25 years, and succeeds another Catholic Conservative Dr Enriao Cello. Dr. Cello, until now Minister of Post* and Railways, has been appointed Swiss Minister in Rome.—Beater. BM done by Superforts. Manor < %  Kmmcit O'Dunm-ll. ,omnipnding the United Suites Far E;..stern Air Force, estimated .5 pei cent "of the assigned target*" in the Communist ten-It ut> had hen destroyed. Communist forces In I iffe Ron I an DUl off from their sources of supply. OfSMral M.c Anhur •eld (o-d a Sii"orfort hombine I ahotit completed the job of coition all Communist communlcatior routes southward, he said General Mac Arthur'* fore— i ill lip U i ttmut ive %  tren tdh hroiieht heavy cannon Into action to-d-v north of Taegu. A battery of eight-inch Howtta* an lha heaviest weapons yet I seen In Korea—lobbed projectiles i .i Communist hill positions I flanking the Tabudong-Taegu • ,. • i> Otherwise quiet wni fi> American troops In tinr.orUiwest corner of the 125-mtlc loi defence line fought bitterl* to capture the commanding hilltop and I" keep Communists off the high nice just behind the American lines. A gaunt-faced Battalion Cornman. •whose men have suffered heavy casualties in this battle told Reuler: If the Communists took this ridge they could almost throw rocks on Taegu." Two mile* to the east. American troops counter-attacked early today to retake hilltops lost durlni the nigh? Driven Off Ycstcrdaj American* drov Coininumsu from a bill 5 miles southeast of Waegwan. but they were after unven off by a strong counter-attack. South Korean troops have advanced almost 2 miles ou the northeast sector of the perimeter, an American Eighth Army Communique announced to-day. Southerners driving north and east from the road and rail junction of Yongchon tightened Iheir positions formed after the main force of the Communist drive south had been held. British troops west of Taegu with the American Second Division mopped up groups of Communists Major General Emmett 0"Donnell. Junior, commanding the United States Far Eastern Air Force Bomber Command said today that American Sup er for t resses now found little left of the North Korean Industry worth bombing. In an official report reviewing the first two months of the command's operations (from July 11) he listed the heavy industry and war plants attacked—these included the Songjin chemical industry and the Tchin-Nampo ehemlcsl and metal producing works which had been si IMfe "tT the target list after de tructive bombing attacks "Heavy industry hi'* been severely crippled in nn estimated 40 percent, destruction of asdgned targets." Gereral CDonncll's report said —Renter Savoy Hotel l Londoi New Governor Flies To Leewards < Prrxn Our OH n LONDON. Sept 14 Kenneth Black burnt' successoi to Lord Baldw'n as Governor of the Leeward Islands left U-ndon lcxpvrtcdly In a BO AC airaft thu morning The Blackburnc family were preparing for a see voyage to the Leeward Islands about the middle of October, and the sudden decilion of the new Governor to fly was to help to deal with the situation which has arisen from the hurricanes and fires in Antigua His Sussex home was the acene of great activity shortly after dawn today. The sun-tanned Mrs Black burne said: "My husband is flying out a month earlier than he had intended in order to give all the help he can". She p'ans to follow htm by aii on October 2nd with their adopted children their six-year-old son Martin and their two-yeur-olil daughter Jean. • On I'..i i 1. EISENHOWER MA YLEAD WEST DEFENCE FORCES By PAUL SCOTT KANKINF. NEW YORK. Sept 14 GENERAL IMIl.HT EISENHOWER, who l"i the Western armies to victory aKatnsi Hitler was heinn prominently mentioned here to-day (or the post ol SvpNnM Commander of the Western defence forces agreed upon by the "Bin Three" Foreign Ministers last night Portsmouth Is Host To 700 Q> : I BsMDlit win Advocate Hurricane Relief Fund For Antigua "We7/ Miss You, Molly" Says Busta •Mi* m < MU. II...I < .IKKIIr ( l: K 1 so Harris*. Hank Co Ltd M SO > %  ><" .14 Ml St Mr. 1 C Usihry > SO ML 1 OS cap< A MT-^ U IM-.rl B OS 1 00 Lid 100 00 ('ohmMl !*• 1 TS on uslan H i Mr ft MiI I MiKriuir I SB W ti.xh.IMMl. 1 so Total %  SSO0SD Jordan Threatens To Use Armed Force Against Israel AMMAN. Sept. 14 JORDAN has told France. Britain and the United Stan I that she will meet aliened violation of her territory by force unless Israeli troops withdraw, usually reliable sources said here to-day. An Israeli force occupied a stretch <>t territory in the Arab land, Jordan claimed. Jet Plane Contract Stands LONDON. Sept 14 British Jet plane Contract! with Sweden will not be affected at present by the Government's decision to ban exports of jet fighters to nations outside the Atlantic Paet a Foreign Office spokesman said to-day. Sweden however has been laid that existing contracts might be held up later i: the building capacity Of Britain's aircraft Industry Is nesded for Atlantic Pact prodjction. he added The supply for thf market differs from U ease because Swedish factor ici sre themselves producing ]et fighter-engines under lice-. The British side of the contract is limited to bulldlnit the bo.lv of the plane around completed engines —touter Israel replied that it bad inn Plotted to bar under United Nation? ugrcem.-nt The sourcsa said that Jordan. srhkh mwlalned to the United Nations had also Invoked AngloJordan treaty and called for aid. 1: in %  .. < i -mod that she had also notified France. Bril^ii the United States as signatories of a Joint agreement in May which guaranteed her frontii with Israel Jordan was believed to have rvquasted governments 10 use all available means to Bore* rrom the territory The Amprican Aide Memnirr reported to have asked Jordan TO r**ram from precipitate action pending a full report I | ihe United Nations Truce -Committe?. obser\'Vrs said. According to reports 400 Israeli irooot with heavy armour occupied 100 acres of Jordan territory. r'-ported that thry hid ploughed the land bef spent the whole %  asjloa dlgetstJlni the %  ol wool Grrman nt and German parti* i the defence of Western understood that no was reached on major i further di-cusslon was DM ministers met this morning %  rRboOt .my advisers other than the three High Commissioners for Germany who had been working overnight to draft the agreed formula for the expansion of West Germany's police forces. This was i.uite apart from ihe question whether Germany should have a military force of her own tO contribute to Western defence. On pace 3 President of Columbia Uiuversity ir believed to have made It clear privately that he would be willing i accept such a position If the North Atlantic powers decided to t nominee appointed by United States. Speculation regarding lh ap. v tmmt of. Use North AUunttc Supreme Commander has been i-urrcnt m Washington evrr since it was made known last week that the United States would support the original French proposal to create surh %  command It wa agreed in principle yesterday by Foreign Ministers of Britain. France and the 1'mled States that they would support the proposal lo appoint a WprDM Commander at the meeting of the North Atlantic Foreign Ministers opening tomorrow Ab the American Chairman of the Chiefs of Stuff Of the North Ati.mtie powers, such %  coranumd* ? %  lould fur tin prc-i'll' ili'iit tl'.i' training of Western European Dafences. He would assume duUes as commander as soon as forces for him lo command were ttstmad According In curn-nl Ihinking In North Atlantic dkplomntu uring his own country TERRORISM LESSENS SAIGON. Sept 14 French author ties aooounca > today that there was H munist terrorism against Chileans in looVChina last month than in all raur years of guerilli JH tivity They said that in Vietnam. casualUes from grenade throw and the like in such places as Saigon had fallen by 41 percei from the July figure and sabutii by 22 percent —Router General Elections May Follow LONDON, Sept 14, pRIME MINISTER CLEMENT ATTLEE to night decided to risk the downfall of his Gov r-rnment and immediate General llections by announcing in Parliament that lie intended to go ahead with steel nationalisation %  :vaiivc u-adi-r Winston Churchill Imn to bran.i the Gownuiwiit's sction ;s "reckk M snd wsnlon H pushed forward • notion dtploiing that ".*! the fawal period i" "HI national Mftt) Britain should bs Into .1 fierce polltlosj eonlruwrs] 'i home." Truman Talks Of Japanese Peace TVcaty Will.il Argentines POB ISMiMTH Sept 14 The Bja oiilh iv i rarly ffM tdsU and ratings from the traminii cruiser La Aroftifna now berthtd theni a vis t to Britain This morning the Lord Mayor Portsmouth. Alderman Sir IX'ius Daley accompanied by the iilflllllO naval atiaehi Baai Admiral Vlctorio Maltesa were received on DOW erulser by Iwi eonunander, brlsH good humoured Captain lgnaliou < ii.iti 'a H The Argentine marine band mounted on the sunlit quarter dock played "Rula Bl iSltors wenl ll'ue and ,hlte Argentln.Hagran her mast head O) giving a rocopUofi ni i eadttl m the red carpeted Council Chamber Lsll be guests at UM Col %  %  noil al Boyal Naval ceismess Whale Island In %  le*k grey |h Bftl Cnittir has visiteil 'I'%  %  i fi Bswlogn*, Cherbourg and Copenhagen Altai .i '< k*i stay In port BM will go to No* yora Puerto RtCO ion! Rhl IV JatieK returning to Btiena November 2S — Reuler. ". 18HING :< IN, Repi 14 I %  %  I srl luthoi %  -it to • ntlM BbOU Ith othtt momberi of UM Far Easteiti CcsnnUgglon i weekly i the United %  I lilt) Of eiiilum t • man) i %  ., idlng the stati ol vai tvtth <:<> %  i-iany WSj with b] ParaitT Mini Prai and il %  I %  %  i li ntl %  totarnenl rei anting Ihi i' I.in it) ith mi it bu imu: i^.. ti the %  i.ii ni thai tii" p i-. ould bring thorn bs* k Into i nf nations" The I'* %  dent snt added i .-. f UM St.Mr lo Initiate Informal ..s to the future pro tdure. In it"ftrsl Ini tan %  %  itv, vernments repn the Pal BsBSti (he Psrifle Wat —Reut-c 10 New Paperfl In Two WMIU ROIsI, pi i. lava bulb U IU ....! %  : | are. oak %  pOI i td '.be ti'l.' II flon.lo 1)1 ffOMg t: | | utle as Ihe KascUt monni puUiahod during M %  %  %  Ofllclal described II as an "Iwtspejodonl ttpoi gbovi party Doltl pin national in.lb Ttam Itl lln-l issue, tno paper • PI'.ir. I nghtwlng hut AntiWV0I i rnatit — Keuter. North Korea Is To Blame Says U.N. Commission LAKES!'* (I The Cmb Conunlssinii ou Korea today placed the t-iii re blame for UM Kort tum on North Korean %  uthorlt it atatfW th.it tin CoshmulUsi meat had bmncned carefully planned full scale Inrjsinn on June ?''. •rhon its effortj %  i %  Bouthern ropubllc from within had < In its offlcial %  mission said that i %  vision oil too i imtry, North R rould h a v %  Mtual ".II by iJlowIni intarni tionaiiy %  upanrised !' %  h*lil Ihi-ougtiout II %  Ptorea, —ReuW. a few minute* it wss %  i that thi regard .i i %  i i .i [ton, if the Oesrentfi 11 (Mltd on nun,hill motion, u would therefore seek a fresh man.l.itr U in aanara] ikk U The Oo*SanUBBaa| IbTCII it~ Itombshell of steel nationalisation Into the comparative calm of Ihe (Mivi'riumnt's %  inoraoncy session when Supplj %  n aoupoad lhal *n. board to MI to iMttonalussd %  taol would gda on Oototoei 2 Loud %  ,. eta 'i UM innounoamint Churchill mniped to hu Not lo nnouneo Uial ruorvoUvM null) put forward a motion lemtung the doveraII debate on Uie %  Mtotl nesit t I Ul-il... HorbOti Mt-;-|i Nader of the Uouap agreed to this. III.H klnirn Againsl d Itla.-kbuin. who re%  lfned ham the Labour Party hts-ause it refuses u> have the ^ iinMil which he locewary. spoke again?! i ovarnaaaal Amid Government protests he ,-k..l tinPrune Minister If he did not consider that the prime i.-H"iimili||lly l.wlnv was to nationalise the slums before be %  • ittonallsad itaol There was no RMWOr to this n-rnark The Rtaol Nationalisation Act %  e.i m ihe last llrliameni. i ili fin the iron and steel Induaary to he taken over by the Sl..t. on January 1, 1951. or nt UU tiire within %  raai from that date 'o'vernment has con-lsi.-ntly declared that It would •tIK-ratr this act as soon as pos%  Ibis, DUl III.IT I Ml" IWOO n.''in %  vi ,i that it hotsndod '% %  ii.' nf its precarious -mal' mijorlty in Parllsment, to play for time. —Reuter LONDON. Sept 14 BrtsjadMr Keith Thorburn told an informal meeting of the shareholders of Butlin's Bahama. that unless the company could raise IBoo.oou -within the neat fortnight at the outside I am perfectly certain that creditor* In Nassau will apply for liquidation" One bright spot in the whole meeting was Mr Hilly" Butlin's promise to put l 11.000.000 of his own mm ay, II UM KMa required is raised Hut he mad? one llrm proviso^—he must then be allowed to opers'e Thorbern said 1800.000 was needed to complete the Company's "Vacation Villa Bl 1 Bahamas, but an additional working capital would still be required Even if upraised, the Camp rouH I be completed in time b from the peak holiday season next year. The Board made no secret of their doubts about the Company's ability to raise UM sary funds. Thorburn said "I still believe in IhirOB I am getting very iicssimmtic about getting out of it During the meeting there anM a demand that Butlin be apManaglng Director, but Thorburn said that II was Impossible ss Bullln was prevented from doing so under the terms Of Ms eontmet with Hullin's Ltd. After the meeting. Butlin told your correspondent he i released from the contract If necessary, but the Hoard had not asked him I aging Director However, he made It clear that his offer of £1 000,000 *1ood only on condition ihat he filled thu,->st Courts Can't Deckle It wag revealed at the meeting that Lsorsdon to wind op tin Cotnponj 1 I of £1411 n pany's solicitor Kattttl %  stnsalnad that British Courts roul.i not ordtr the WII. of the Company as it was outside their jurisdiction Thorium kanpany*! 1 %  %  %  %  I %  I ;md the Board ovi %  i (>e sold up wiin; rborl t<. confirm or deal) th %  s> On Page 5 Always AT YOUR SERVICE In your favOUliU GohNlfl of %  %  .ICI n and black. With 01 arithout dyno hubaaod :t"i I SlurrnA'v Anl. inch and 24 incli KIUIIK-S RALEIGH THE ALL-STEEL BICYCLE Ma diilribulon.: CAVE, IBEFBEKD 4 CO.. LTD. 10, 11. 12 c 13 Broad Slrrrl



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PAGfc FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIIt.VV. SKITKMBKR 15, l5ll BARBADOS . September IS. 195(1 ll HI 11 SAFETY THE regulations to the Road Traffic Act which were rejected by the House of Assembly on Tuesday serve to focus public attention on the necessity for greater safety to the travelling public. The amendment was rejected because some members "f the House saw in it a disadvantage 10 lorry owners while there was still an insufficient number of 'buses to accommodate the number of people who now travel. The regulations sought to make provision for permission to be granted before motor lorries could be used for transporting people. The point was also raised during the debate as to whether such permission would be necessary on every occasion when the vehicle was to be used for this purpose. This il was 'bought would create unnecessary hardships on the lorry owners and deprive those who needed them from obtaining as easily as they might otherwise, the use of such a vehicle. Another point raised against the regulations was that it would not be in the public interest to limit the service which motor lurries now render to the travelling public when chartered as passenger vehicles, when the number uf 'buses now in use could not accommodate them. Wliile members were talking of the convenience of the public, the regulations were aimed at affording the same public safety on the road. And Mr. Wilkinson answered completely the criticisms of shutting out lorry owners when he said that the regulations, on the contrary, merely sought to protect the lorry owner by compelling him to have his vehicle safe for such work before a permit could be granted to him. With the increase of an already large number of motor vehicles on the roads of this island, it is imperative that something be done to ensure greater safety to those who travel. It would be folly to wait until some fearful accident occurred involving the loss of many lives or injury to a large number of people, and then to attempt to impose regulations which would control the evil. Complaints have been made publicly on several occasions that the use of lorries as substitutes for 'buses is a popular practice fraught with grave danger and should be discontinued. It seems that the Transport Authority recognising the weight of the criticism as to the shortage of 'buses, desired not to remove motor lorries from this service but to compel them to be maintained in safe condition for carrying large numbers of people on the roads. This was to be done by amending the law so that it would be compulsory for them to apply for a permit before undertaking such work. The regulations have been rejected but something must still be done to ensure the safety of those who now travel by this means. The travelling public should not be denied any form of transport service which helps to facilitate business and free movement but that movement must be guided by an understanding of the necessity for public safety. This is the duty of the Government, I in m %  £ %  *< %  I ion 9 s SflWf iv< When so much is bring aaid and written about emigration for West Indiana, it might be timely to inject a few comments from the viewpoint of some of the countrie* 10 which it is considered that emigrant! could go. 1 could do this as a plain Canadian Citizen with BO official status in the matter, and I believe thai, in general, the same principles would apply to AusS lia. New Zealand and some er countries At the present lime these three, countries encourage Immigration on what may be termed a selective basis, which means that they welcome newcomers who comply with certain rather strict requirements Thc> do this because past experience bas shown that a more liberal policy Is definitely unsatisfactory. Owing to the extensive use of labour-saving machinery in Canada, there is very little demand foi unskilled labour, so thai preference is given to those having some vocational skill or technical knowledge of a type for which demand exists. Youth Is also an advantage, because people over, say 30 or so, are less likely to adapt themselves readily to new surroundings. At present old-age pensions are paid at age 70 by the Government, and at earlier ages by many industrial organisatMflBB, and it is considered thai every recipient of a pension should make his or her contribution to the economic life of the country before qualifying for a pension. Intending immigrants must be literate, In good health and with a clear record as to conduct, also definitely single or having marital stalus that conforms with the laws and accepted customs of Canada. This would rule out anyone who was a party to a comi-law or 'reputed' marriage, such as is, I believe, still quite widespread in the West Indies It ilso necessary to have a sum of money sufficient to provide transportation to the proposed destination In Canada, and cover living expenses while seeking employment. Just wha| sum is sldered necessary now by '.ho nigration Authorities I do not know, and it would I suppose vary according to circumstance any case It seems likely that comparatively few West Indians who could comply witn these requirements, would want to emigrate, as they would probably consider themselves reasinbly well off at home. With all the publicity the subject is receiving now. I sometime* nil myself wondering who it is about, or, in other words, what class or type of West Indian is Till III.IMI THE Annual Report of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind has just been published and is an interesting document. The report makes reference to the Trinidad and Tobago Welfare Association which it points out, has made substantial progress during the year and is assisted by the Trinidad Government to the extent of $15,000 a year. ^ What is however of great interest to Barbados is that that Government has voted $120,000 for building a new school for the blind in the South Caribbean area. The site in Santa Cruz valley was donated by Mr. Conrad Stollmeyer and building operations will commence shortly. The Canadian Institute while not being rtjpnnilhk for the Trinidad Association has sent its Managing Director Colonel Baker ami its National Consultant. Field Services, Mr. D. B. Lawlcy to Trinidad to advise the Association as regards policy, practical arrangements and personnel. This is another of the many services which Canada either through private enterprise or by government is rendering to the West Indies. It is a service in which KM will want to take part in the interests of its own blind. r—^. H. I Sll.llll N supposed to do the emigrating, if some country can be found for bim to go to, and what he would do to earn a living when he had arrived A man might be an ex%  a sugar plantation but his knowledge and skill would be of little or no use in Canada, where climate, soil, and methods arc entirely different I do not think Canada or other countries ran be criticised for refusing to accept immigrants who arc illiterate, as that handicap seriously limits their usefulness and capacity to adapt themselves, in a country where education haa 'been compulsory for many decades. The requirement as to marital status also seems reasonable where irregular or Informal unions are either against the law or at best frowned on as a social liability, to be severely discourage'l It might be said that the whole structure of society, and the laws and customs, are based on legal and binding mai I as the unit around which it -II turns. Where there is so much need for emigration, and to much talk of it. I suppose it is m -rely natural and human for people generally to regard it as a fine thing for someone else to do. HOWCMT. n .,!.. emigrating is going to be done. sooner or later we shall have to quil talking and be practical about it, and one of the first steps would be to decide, who goes and where, and what be will do when he gets there. Unless we are talking about people who comply with the requirement* of countries like Canada, it will not help to dally with the idea of West Indians going there, but will rather waste time in idle speculation, and tend to befog the real Issue I hove never been to British Guiana or Honduras and know very little about them, though I understand that they both have vast spaces and undeveloped resources that seem to call for Immigrants, unless there are some insurmountable obstacles to any such project And few obstacles are really insurmountable if tackled with determination. So far as I know, the serious differences in social customs and laws, and the general attitude of people toward important matters like marriage, do not apply to these countries so il would seem obvious that attention should be concentrated* on their possibilities. 1 read with Interest a number of references In the Advocate to the Surinam project, but do not eting any report or. tne lot Its lailure Wtun first %  eemed to offei posst: .. %  preferable to being until | Barbados, in spite of any minor l such as ore always My i ihat the applicants were supposed to be carefully screened for suitore being MM, and that the number "c large ajnauga Lo emigrant*. I beUeva an investigation ifta* nr. of tha iiiintnwl. the fact that r • plain t> were considered unwarranted Il Is a waste of time to draem of some ready-made Utopia waiting to receive Immigrants who are lacking in education, vocational skill or financial resources of any kind. If a project comparable to Surinam were tried in Honduras or B G would the result be any Utter? If not, we might as well discard the Idea of transplanting family units and consider any practicable alternatives, though lack of information as to what went wrong In Surinam is a hindrance to clear thinking on the. subject. At present there Is much talk and discussion about emigration but a dearth of practical suggestions. At the risk of being regarded as sn old fogy I will say that I someiimes wonder if there is any real prospect of success for projects that could be called pioneering In the proper sense of the term. There seems to be too much evidence that what is so often referred to as a high standard of llvItlg, might be more accurately described as a standard of soft living, which tends to cause fatty degeneration of the heart, the muscles and morale. Social security is all very well, and fairOpti are not opposed to I i, but one cannot help feeling some doubt as to just how much of It the average human being ran stund, without going limp when confronted with conditions that even SO years ago were still being taken for granted by plOQWI in Western Canada. In the Watt Indies social security has not developed to the same extent ns in other countries, but It is generally accepted that no-one will lack the actual necessities of food, clothing and shelter. It Is tin true that vocational training hu not been developed to the point of having an exportable surplus of artisans or mechanics for wbuh demand exiits in more adnnci . designers and engineers work unceasingly to produce new lechnlques and equipment not only for the improvement of office methods but also to raise the .standard of comfort" of office worktrs In Britain, the office appliance industry has so expanded that it \ow suppl.es almost every country in the world. During 1949 the industry exported £4.000.000 worth Of machinery and C2.250.000 worth ,'f steel furniture, a record likely to be broken this year. In the lirst five months of 1930 machinery worth r2.O02.04S and steel furniture worth 1917.055 went overseas For Small Or Large Business The industry displayed its latest wares to visitors from many countries at the BusinesM Efficiency Exhibition held during September In the City Hall. Manchester m the English county 3* Lancashire, Organised b) the Office Appliance Trades Association of Great Britain and Ireland. the Exhibition occupied 30.000 square feet and 80 firms exhibited machinery, the majority of which WON designed to save Libour In large or small business. A new addlng-calculating machine which gives a throe-fold amlng whenever an error Is made was on show. The operator initially warned of the mistake by a bell-ring as Ac mechanism locks, and is enabled to see tho mis-operated key as well as feel the incorrect key depression. Apar! from being equally effluent ni all the tasks usually demanded of a duplicator, a new machine has been designed to enable the selection of items from a master sheet to be transferred to separate Job curds anil control papers, so as to ensuro accurate planning of the How of the work. By enabling the reproduction of part or -ill of any master sheet in one opcrot.on. bottlenecks caused by individual operators sorting out Job sheet Information are eliminated. A man who invented an interlocking bomb release gear used by the Allies in World War I produced a cash reg.ster which, by a pre-settlng device, can IK* operated for any amount by two fingers. One of the most unusual devices shown was a shorthand machine which operate* on the phonetic system, en abli n g .. stenographer to take down a verbatim report in a language she does not understand The record is made on a continuous sheet ot paper which folds away into the cover of the mach ne autom.itie.illy so that turning of pageis eliminated and the sequence M the proceeding assured. Large Variety Of New Typewriters Typewriters were in great variety. This industry has mad %  great strides in Britain since tho end of World War II. ProHurttnn in Britain may be judged by itie fact that one factory alone will be turning out machines at the annual rate of 85,000 by the end of 1950, whereas production for the whole of Brlttnn in 1949 was only 00,000 machines. Among those on show will be models t" take between 00 und 100 different keyboards for writing in any commercially uaad uuiguatje Light wei KM pomM* rrmrhinr* .ne DO novelty today, but oi dily 14, lbs. includes tour-bank 2 character keyboard. an inbuilt keyset tabulator, adjustable touch control device, Quickset margin and scale apparj tus and features variable lin spacing, automatic ribbon reverse and non-glara keyboard. For tropical and equatorial countries there were rust-proof and Insect-proof ledger bindings, lire-resisting accounting equipment with light-weight, rusVless. %  lainless aluminium alloy draw. r and portable typewriters with botuicrised steel parts tilt inn Aem for use in humid climates. Simplification Is The Keynote Addressing machines with speeds ranging frm BOO lo 6,000 addresses an houi were shown alongside appliances which open Isttatl at the rate of 500 a minute or seal them at the speed of 300 n minute. In designing the latvst equipment the experts sought not only to increase labour-saving capacity of appliances, notably by electrification. but simplified operations. matte tfiem less fatiguing and the appearance of tne machinery and office furniture more attractive and colourful. Down to carbon papers which do not curl, punches which reinforce the holes they make with %  elf-adhesive rtipe, and new types i f paper clips, the Exhibition had something of interact for everyDM in business . from the junior typist to the company director. THE BORSTAL WAY CURES BY KINDNESS II* John I is ins. II LONDON. Britain's "cure by kindness" method of hauttdttng juvenile delinquents has won the commendation of the top United States' prison officials and may soon be used in I American correctional institutions. James V. Bennett, U.S. prison commission %  hief. said while inspecting the British "Borstal" system: "The idea of reforming prisoners by Borstal treatment is excellent. We hope to get up Borstal institutions as soon as the legisla' ion is through Congress." Bennett's approval of the British system IM lent extra weight to the statements of .biologists who have agreed that despite the I'xpensc of running these institutions the xpenmt'iil has been well worth while. Official statistics issued by the Home Office show that under the system more than 50 per cent, of Borstal "graduates" never have .rouble with the law again. The figure is ,-onsidered exceptionally high. Of those who are brought back for a second "course," more than 70 per cent, "go straight." Under the system boys and girls between 11! and 21 years old who commit crimes are sent to a Borstal institution. These are special institutions run like army camps. The underlying theme of the Borstal system is the "psychological touch and cure by kindness." Flogging and other brutal physical punishment went out at the turn of the century. There are now 3,000 boys and girls in the Borstals. When a young offender is convicted by the Court, he is sent to an "allocation centre" where a Board sits and decides to which kind of Borstal he should be sent. Two kinds of Borstals are provided. The tough, gangster-like characters, are sent to institutions where they are locked in at night arid the supervision is close and strict. The more tractable type of offender is sent to a converted manor house, or perhaps a hutted camp, where no window or door is ever locked. Patience and tolerance are the keynotes ot' the Board's careful investigation of each individual case. And the first question the youngster is asked is: "How can we help you?" But nowhere is the emphasis primarily on punishment. There are no "cells" in the camps and the youths are there to become "good and useful citizens of the future." The treatment is not soft. Tough physical training plays a prominent part in the institution's activities. Food is adequate but plain. The training is designed to teach the boys and girls a trade. A boy can become a painter, decorator, mechanic, market gardener, farmhand, bricklayer, sheet-metai worker, panel-beater, blacksmith, carpenter, shoemaker and repairer or harness-maker. The illiterate are encouraged to learn to read and write. As a boy learns to "become a useful citizen" he is given marks and promotion. Eventually his "housemaster" and a special Board recommends him for discharge. The statistics show that the youths like the Borstal system. Out of 1,333 boys on home leave (granted for five days during a sentence) only 67 failed to return and were rear rested. —I.N.S. D.v.scoTT TO-DAYS SPECIALS & CO.. LTD. at the COLONNADE Csuallv Tins MY LADY CREAM OF ONION SOUP .... 29 Bollle. HEINZ TOMATOE KETCHUP Now 26 FILES H" 111' 12" HALF ROUND BASTARD FILES J" 12" 2ND CUT HALF BOUND BASTARD FILES S 10" 12" FLAT BASTARD FILES 8 12 2ND CUT FLAT BASTARD FILES KNIFE FILES WARDING FILES 6" 8" 10" 12" ROUND 2ND CUT FILES IM CABINET HASP FARRIERS RASP SAW FILES PHONES: .:. H72 & 4M7 WILKINSON HUMCO. LTD. Succeuoni lo C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD. I'honc 4171 1487 PRINCESS REFRIGERATORS X rub h 5 jear i(uuranl<- Sir William Courteen. . lilted out two large ships, only one of which, the William and John, arrived at Barbados." With this disagreement amonii authorities. I am bound to lea\e this question where I found It, and to pass on to other mallei*. Sugar And Slaves The cycle of trade that developed out of the sugar industry v<.. of greater value than the sugtr trade itself. England was then entering upon her Industrial career, and for thl the slave trade was an essential link. The ships which left Bristol und IJverpool, laden with textiles from LsUMXs*hire and hardware from Birmingham, bartered their cargoes on the African const for slaves. After the ordeal of tho Middle Pasage. the Maves were amsWDgad In In* Waal Indlaa foi sugar, which with molasses and rum formed the homeward freight Then wilh u> profll jral n.unmanufactured goods were bought and exchanged for slavi ply the sugar islands. With n many MOpfc ..Unit the treatment of salves in II W, t Indies, and I prejudiced either for or against %  difficult to form a clear opinion about the treatment of slaves in DM nagg such. No doubt there ware Instances of .elty. but this was the exception and not the rule. Besides the slnves. there was in early days a certain amount of while labour in the fields of Barbados. The European labour fell irfto two clnsse-;, the voluntary bond servant and the prisoner. The originator of the system of penal transportation to the West indies was Oliver Cromwell, who with what Irish remained after the sack of Droghcda in 1649, and followed this tip with Scottish prisoners from nunbar and EngIlsh Royalists taken ,>t Worcester Later, many of the Monmouth rebels were transported, the last n rtve lying the Jacobites taken in the 'Fifteen and 'Forty-five. Tho Indentured servants and the bulk of the white working population of Barbados came at first from the lower strata of soSir Josiah Child describes them as: ". . .a sarte of loose vagrant people; vicious and destihile either unfit for Labour, %  >r had so niisWhaved themselves ii. k'haucherv that Dona Of. them would set to Work. gathered up about the streets of London and other places, cloathed and trana(Hiited to be employed upon the Plantation." Tlielr kit, it seems, was frerjuentiy worse than that of the Writing of Barbados, Ligon %  Tin davas and their posterity, being subject to their Masleri for ever, are kept and preserved with greater care than the AM v ants. So that for the time the servants have worser Uves. for ihey are put to very hard labour and ill lodging and their dyet verv slight." Emancipation And After Protests against slavery and the slave trade began almost with its Inception. The first substantial result of the effort* of the humanitarian party in England was. however, not until 1816, when the Consolidated Slave Law of Jamaica was passed. This legislation was designed to improve the treatment of the slaves in that island. It was followed in 1823 by Canning's "Melioration Motion." which the Barbados Assembly described as: "The diabolical falsehoods and infamous asperatlons of a few interested and designing hypocrites moving in a ferriflc phalanx to the total annihilation of the whole inhabitants of the West Indies." At last the Emancipation came, and In 1834 some forty-eight thousand slaves were freed in Barbados. It is interesting to note that while the average annual sugar production in most of the British West Indies dropped In the four years after Emancipation, in Barbados it went up by five thousand tons. All this while the method of sugar production was constantly balni improved — from cattle null to windmill, and finally to steam. The first use of steam power in manufacturing sugar was made at (ireenwleh plantation. Jamaica, in 1768 The credit for • Oa page S BUY SNAPPER TODAY 4 to 8 lbs. Also .... COD KISH FKOZEN COD FROZEN. SOLE SMOKED HADDOCK SMOKED KIPPERS OX TONGUES—OX TAILS-OX KIDNEYS SWEET BREADS SWEFTS FOR THE CIIII.IIREN 5 BAHLEY SUGAR SWEETS MAR8H CARRS' lilSCUITS DESSERTS KOVAL I'lDDINOS CARAMEL. CHOCOLATE. VANILLA. SAGO PRUNES, CRUSHED PINEAPPLE Select from — GODDARDS : 'AWS* AW/.M* MOCS>ccC'.M' v > > .' f V, *,-.



PAGE 1

FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER |g 1IM BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE 9TV1 v CLASSIFIED ADS. TIUPMOMI UM i.oonaiin.i \i MCHT AVOfsTU** iOn*e .1 PMuni V.I* Plantation %  Vnl Tlronw Th. funeral legrVge (rum the Hailour or KINDS %  I'_.JL! M • e'clecli Uu %  %  NMHtM Church Hal. Rend .."d lliHTf u th* tt>#. Friend, ere United Agn. 1WW.1 Hilda. Ann. Grace Muriel WiHw-i. Norm* Narholle, Alice g* John .Children! Ivor 'Gr.iw. IN MEMORIAM IN loving memory of Mlt-U(-r_NT HUSBANDS iHureei who Ml M or. ihe lath of September. IMt Though years have gone I can't forget Thai voice I lev*. 1 hear It re*. Ever M be r.mi.bf^ t> II Drue*. Muwrll ltd IM* III %  -v I %  •" % %  IV WILiJAM HOLDER who s* !" bff IMh. IMt. Time ncir off the N( i Bui mmory turn* Mc> ev. Thoughts drift on lo "< -g>lit* moves on. but mrmor Ever to bo i Mtsmbei sd by Ci Hold** iwif*. Dwiy KoMoi FOR SALE AUTOMOTIVE CAR — rord-il> IN6 tSodel e/R paint, lyt and engine in **.-*Uer ror.dltl.wi. Mee MOO rhor.r Lawless 4311. IB SO-tn .nin. KAIirn CAR M M In Othc* ll.S.se—ah. %  %  'III. II MIIS AUCTION UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER On Tueada itu> b order of Mra Fred Harford we mill **11 her Furniture -I .AlexanderIth Ava n*41*>'IIl* which Include* BVrbice. Monia and Upright ChairlaDoBinrK. Ornament TableCDesser Cupboard. all tn Uahofinr. Pest Dining Table. QUas War*. Crockery, Braaa Ws:, Fflgrdstre In wore** order: Slnll* Mahogan* Bodatead wRh Vono Spring and Doap Sloop Mattress Double and Single Iron Fledcraoi Springs and Mattress*. Pre*.. laid** Kitchen Utensils. OU Stove and othes Sal* 1130 oclock Term! CASH BKANUS. nOTMXS 00. IB • 1 CARS By intruction* of the Alter n*> of th* eetale of Mr Idwardi idar'dl I will aell on FSIIDAY lath It I D m COLTS GAR ACT.. RAY STRKatT i dumber Saloon Car In (food *ortn| "rder alao 1 Chevrolet Saloon Car In l*.-oo working nrdi'T and I ships. Hex Archer Mc t-T.I Thome Cash Kendo. Aurtion*. 11 t 3 -non.it th* item, which will I lor tale -I my office on Ftld... I p.m will be und Hi H<" J. One .1. Pur of Caunlri | Wrights. One Hi Laaty'a 11 Gold Wri.t watoh, and One Hi •y In Calf Oar* M po.nl. HJ D-Anw A Scot I. Auction.. VAN-IO none power Austin Von perfect working order Apply D 1 •tott Co.. Whllepark Dial MM ELECTRICAL BJaCTtUC WASHING MACHIKEX with Spindlier Madby M-vfalr of Careda We nave only 1 of thee* irmalnlng and the price la SSSB each. A number of three ale in uae locally, nil |iM"| 100-. saUaaartkm John Hulao Lid %  4 t eoft r> %  m REf-l* IG FAATOR—On model iwo yrara old i union. Apply Electric Ltd ii i • cub i excellent Sales Sen IJ 9 SO POULTRY POULTRY Whit* leghorns, tfloe consia*l*tg t-month Cockerel, s-mor.lh Pullet and U-month lien, fi lit per trio; alao MAMMOTH RRONZFi TURKEYS Smonths old In trio*. Price accordina to rite. Alao a few palra of (nod Modma* All P>ire-Rr*d from prirewlnnlr.g Stock SHEARS, Garrbon. Dial MST. B 9 -SB.-J* MISCELLANEOUS TRUCK TYRER made bv Fneiand We have a few mnlnlni which cannot br r*. be *old at todena price : .> better tyre made in lh I'n. F Hutaon Lid 14 • SO—ln CORN Ct'KN' CORN' Give your BMIH Tieal rreeh Dried Indian Corn Ready Shelled Griffith-* Bocklev. Chnn Church U.t.se-eav DF.MUOIIN* Thirl, II Covered Clear Glaii Demljohii. IK, Oali Capiclt;Rum Dealer* should be Inleresled Eckstein Bros. 10 9 BO -on GALVASIsfcD SHTDBTS—34 *ue. In T, B. 9 and 10 feel leniphe Enquire AUTO TYRE COMPANY. Trafalfar Street. Jtion* IBM IS SO—t f n MOIlfHN I1ATHANETTF — Coluiu.tbls Mlh Ti..v and Stand for dieaauia" child Apply Mrs i. A Williams Dtnl mi ea-m IS • BO-" By Instruction* received from IBM General Hospital. I will eat up (or *—*~ by pubiw Auction at their yard, eat Thursday llil. beatlnnln*; at 11:* pm the f"l lowing art Ml eat— Iron Brd.t.ade, <*' Oai Ranflsm. Mi Klein, Muer. '*" Amrt*d Maitresaes. il> B> kettle Container. %  I Gardener* HJut. L>'I Tapi and W C Bella' III Electric Si.-rinte. Hi Vrwriablr Slaamer. <1> iron Ch|r. '\'. *? XlUy PBrU '" Qml Stmnaer UJi Soda Water Syphon Bottle.. f|. Barterol Cask. Ill X-Ray Tube. ak| Oalvd Iron Venlilatori. atafa of KurVrjl lrretrument*. >li Stoem Ki-tttet ill DreaMn Ttollerf. Ill Small 0laloer Cupboard, Lots o Doors and Windows. (7i Trolley FVwdln*T.iblos. Mi Wheel Chair and several other PIHLH .MM'MI.S NOTICE N.'TK I I ani < ha>n Ra trial* %  BSS-H WKJGU4B* r>. seaed BBJBJBBBJI an %  * <•* %  > i Wiee,ns decreed the Part**, of Sa inl Fataie .. late of Ftai Rock. Geort* In this 1.1. d ho died tfi ihn Island on the ITth dav of March are imjuwrted lo s en d in partH-ulara of Uief i-Juris duly attested la the underMCned G Se-.iio.ir Alle>ne of Maaen Mail Street nndfetown. on or before the Send dev of Sepiemfcer. 19*0. afwe which da** the deceased emene the parties entiyed thereto, ha vine %  i dsrrl only to eisrh claims of which I shall then have had notice and I will net bo liable for the aaa— or any pert fatareas • sMetrlbuted to any person of wbosje dewt or etajm I shall not then have hast notice. And all penons indaaMed Be Use aid estate are -*q ie-t*d to settle thetr in'rMrdr.ees without debar Lasted rhle Bth day of Astfiart. 1SW O aWiafOUm ALLasYHT REAL ESTATE The undsestsyi'd will he eet up far sal* a* their OfSre No: IT Hi-rh Street. B.,di-Mown en fridav. Ihe aSnd day of Prpiember IBW the Suffer Work. PlantatktM;CAN VAI1 and MAXWaCLLS, Chrlst Church. c-mtainina; lofether by setlmaon It* ACSJDB ATRXAOt: in PUnl Cane* — *V. Acre*. ACREAOE In Ratoons IS Acre* ACHEAne in Preparation — M-, Acres. lere will also be aold with Ihe ssld Plan la lion* One Dndie Motor I Milch Cows. I Mule and I an.all I-wheeld Carl For further particulars and condition. I isle apply lo the underelffned:-COTTIX, CATFORD at CO., %  B SO—IBn BARBADOS GENERAL HOSPITAL SLALKU TENDERS will incelved St Ihe Hospilal up to 12 o'clock noou on Wednesday. 20th Stulember, 195U. for supplytnn iirtlclcs in the following lines for period of six months from lit October, IMC: (1) FRESH BREAD (2) AIXOHOL (31 COJT1NS, and providing HEARSE for the burial of the dead at the Westbury Cemetery. (4) PURE FRESH MILK. Forms for tho respective tenders will be supplied on application io the Secretary of the General Hospital and tenders will not he entertained except they are on forms supplied by the General Hospital All articles furnished shall bo nf the best quality and be subject to the approval of the Medical .Superintendent whose decision shall be final in regard thereto IVnona tendrrlns; must submit at the time of tendering letter* from !w other persona known to pnsjar-s*) property, exprra-iina; thH wiHIncnrsM to beeaase bound a* suretlns for the fultllmmt of the contract Terms of contract and any further particulars, mav be obtained on application at the General Hospital W GOODMAN. M 9 50-on S CMar7 Publir Offirial Sale iThe Avvost Marshals f r-IidaNo. MM SHAIIES with Acrrulnff Dlvldenda:— SC Share* at Barbados Shipping t, Treden Unds 10 Sharer m PUntali Ltd The above will be set up for sale by Public Compeutlon al our Ofrice. James Street. Brtdfleiown. on Friday Ihe lath .f Seplember illpn O L W c.MiKf. a, CO SoUcllors IBS SO-fffi. • %  —> sadtaMMI PRAM |nl hood pram wllh fohtl L A Williams IBS BO--On One hand operated BACON SIJCLNO MACHINE Apply B V Scott Co.. Ltd Whllepark 13 S SO-t.f n. paw , ..,14 S BO— Hi RECORD ALBUMS for 10-lnch and for It-Inch and carrylnd cases for 10-Inch records, and we bare th* record, too A. BARNES St CO. LTD is s so i.i.n, TANKS-ft -lr. 3041 gallon. Can Foundry Dock Yard IB B t "Con. YACHT Cenu-ebo-rd Yacht dor.'' Length II feel, beam B f**i newiy fitted out Apply Wlcka. Woodalde Gardens. Bay Simrt Telephone* list. !•• SO—Sn YAWL— St* feel Harm* *nair a. Oood eondtUon t>ASB a bataal Apply J. B. Idwards Pbone ISM it s so—T.r n. FOB RENT Hill 'SI S "KVANTON" Top Rock tJnlurnlslied. I Bedroom i. Din in f Itooi.t. Lounfe, Tiled Balh*. Two ServanU' Rooms Available Irom 1st ol October on Munthly Basis or Lone Leas* Dial WN or SUB. U.S.BO-on H FVR.VISHED UPSTAIB-S FLAT— From 1 November. IB*", at "BRIAJWUD.D' fw*r Collvmoie Hock Phon* S4TI Ill-MH BANNISTER IS t Bftv-an HOUSE — Ashton-on-Seo. MMW*II Christ Church fully TurnUhed Contalnlnsi Four Bedroom*. DrawlnS and Dlnlnf Room*. Verandah OVOTtoofcini Ihe sea and all modern rnnyenirnc*. Dial 3BOT iS.S.as-on. LARGE HOUSE 4. APARTMRcIT—Ot Sea. St. Lewrence. fully Mmisned PVono 8357 t.t.SO--t f "MARISTOW" M:i*ll Coart. FullF rurnlahod All modem cot.ciUeni Available from lal November mal *M] ci IK" 11 • %  iFT"it i.-> r. i.petafrs to He (lJ R -ipencrr very Spartou. Ofaci i Swan Strr-I AppIV Tiulnr Street Dial I (olio. 1 ixrmiture* I 4J at 100 bearlnff Inlerest al S'l due ISM 1 .( CSB0 beerlnff Interest at 3**. du* 1BS4 I if £100 bi.nni Interest al 3>,t due IBM 1 4 C100 bearing Interest al 3V,1 due IBM The above debenture* will be set up I public rompetillon at Ihe office of '.* undaolgned on Frldav next the Mb instant at 100 pm C*rnn*ton at '.ib lucaa Street. 13 a SO—dn Stth day of Septa en hs j • no.ir of I o'clock in Hi* imoon will be sold al my ofBce lo hlarheal bidder for sny sum not "' me appraised value II that certain pier* of Land conBBS about t Roods. IS Perches al irons' Village situate In Ihe Perish St Michael bulllna; and bo.indin John Lewis. ..i John CalHM of one Manning, of Joseph Mapeork. end on • road in common leading to the public road losjether with the mesuage oe Dwelling Houeea. Bulidingi, etc :ippriJ*en a* folio-. The whole property appralsrd to I M li r* HUHOftSK) AND anGIITY TlUtaV: DOfJARB AND THIPTYTI1UFK CK**TH 'SMJ XI' Allnched liom rtfOFNK ST CLAIR LEWIS for and to.aid* a-u.f.c.lot! *r 1 be paid • T T il-.MiMV . E M MALONE. Secreiary. Oovvrnlng Body. Harrison College. Department of Education. ISth Septeniber. IBM IS B BO—in w liars COLLEGE The next term at Queen* College ill begin on Tuesday the IVth Seplember. IM0. at S.M a m. end Ihe %  rhaol IU be in s a ee lon for Ihe DEM. MALONE. BjSBnrtBaU. Oovernlng Bod v. Queen. College Department of Education. ISth Septeniber. IBM IS • SO—ln WANTED HELP LADY-Uard to writ In* up uccountl ai .1 Keeping books. If able to ivpe an adiaatage In I* resting and pleasant work Apply by tetter In Srst (n*lantc K F. K. Co Advocate IS B SO—to. MAN WANTED—To assist in OS) Culling Room Some experience e. senile! Apply bv letter C. B BICE *> CO.. Bolton Lone. II.B RALES ODM. who speaks SoanM. Appiv Baia Shoe Store Brood St. 14 S SO—SB TAILOR—A TaUor fur PanUj , Shirt Making STANWAY STORet. Lucaa gtreet. IS.S.SO-tn MISCELLANEOUS HOUSEEnglish Family requires House to rent, one or iwo years. St John. St. Josepi. ai oeorge. SI Philip. Write BMM SB. e'o Acrretate Co. 10B.SO—On .OVI:II.VHI:M NOTICE MOORINGS—alarm* Garden*. Apart men! now read' for oecupanci Apply Mrs Gibson Marln* Hulet IB B SB—In VACANT P01T OF ASSISTANT LIVESTOCK OFFICER DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND AGRICULTURE, BARBADOS. Applications arc invited for the post of Assistant Livestock Officer, LV-partmcntDepartment of Science and Agriculture, Barbados. Only applicants who are experienced in livestock management will be c sldered The post is peflslonnbli. and carrier salary on the scale of $2,160 x $120—93,880. The holder will be required Ui reside in quarters provided at the Central Livestock Station I. Applications, menUoning the names of two referee*, should be addressed to the Director of Agriculture. Bridgetown, and should reach him not later than 2Srd September, 1950. 3 Further details wtU be supplied on request. 14.0.SOID, • SVTCVY SIDE" A 3 Bsdroom Bungalow at Olbbs' St Peter Gaod Belhtng For month* ol October and November Bruce Wealherheod Telephone SIM or SIM >B • SO-Sn PERSONA L The public are hereby warned against -ivlng credit lo my wife FBTHWI INNtSB Hire SANDlPOW>> a* I do not 'old rnyiell mpon.ible for her or any,n* Mae contracting any debt or debts In my name unlees by a written oro>i r i meal b me ERROL INNISS Si Lawrerie* ChrlM Crturrh IS B BS—tn a EDWIN YAWir. St. Martin. St Ptillip IB • SO—fn Chun being I begi' NOTICE OWING u, repair. tin dsriSar ISSaMl un T —sday Mth Ihe ISth of Septcrrber No nee. p iptu will be .dmittetf W H ANTROBJUB. Secty Oar Body. Bore' Fe goBkin Schonl. Ol Ch CHANCERY SALE The under mention <-J proueif Public S'lildbun. Bridgetown bad •peclfled h*Iow U not ihen K st Ihe same place and dulli.a application lo me ROBERT CLIFFORD CHAPMAN JASafDff OILL. FrtANCBB EUOBNH STUART at VICTORIA ISABEL BLACKMAB i art up for sale al We Registration Ofrce, won and B p m for the mm end on Ihe da's III be set up on each succeeding Fr.dar M hours until sold. Full particular! ARE YOU JUST A Gums Bleed! PLAYTHINGNATURE? Nsturs may endow you with aWSSglBtSitrit beautr. a lotwty StBIBaMUtM figure. She may Dtatow gtfts on you that make you g, sgrUjiaat Ktrgos. a leader In your cases at college, sought after at ssgoxos. or a charming Wile SsSd another. Tas, Nature ma y do all tbu I feu may find your face r slapped If you suffer strrs'lng symptom* •atlea ge> many unfortuns?* I wonMO du. inf You Should r*t Joko About! HUeging Hiss Sor* Mouth sal Loeoe r*al i." Ihal ree Mit P*rrh.a. mat -ill soeer <•< SUM cause >Jw r teelh io fall eet aed mar ala-.-aua* HK*mati*o. and MeaM Tro^bs. Amesaa *io*e gani Meedi-g th. first Oar, enda eaee metith sad q& %  *.! lighl.ns ih* ilh Iron > ARTS AND h %  .rltBah Coutwil Rrprewnlallve. on FVI day. SS*h September al B p m to eon Irm the Annual Rrporl and lu eleel tl" iMNceea end Commit! !" .>f Maruigeinriv %  %  aMBBSJ frm, M P MraiRICK. Asst lloa Se.ni.ii' s S Be—. SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. reM aeirtlDis Sept AIL1XQ TO MADURA. PLTMOt TH ANTWISP AMtl AMSTBRDAM n* "Wlllemalad ""pi ISth m a ~Oftin]aatad" Oct Itth [ united paesengrr accommodation available en Ihla v-eeaMi • P. MvaeoN, SON a co ni> AOSNTS The U V Ueerwood' SSRtBjSjHJ for St Vincent, tirenada and Aruba Sailing Sund^> 17'h MX sehi ASBB). (law) Tel. Mo. 4047 inoner Owner* Canadian National Steamships -Ot TSPOI \D M( IIO\ with JOHIN SI. Ill \IKI\ for attractive terra* and efficient .ervice Phone 4640 — Plantation! Building FOR SALE" e are ..tf.rlng fur sale Ihe enure rwuf of our building al No* 13 14 Roebuck, Si conss.llng i>( a large qtianiiiv „f < %  <*-<*a-d approsimaleli I OSn sheets of galvanised Iron For full pertlrular* apply lo C ft KIN. H c ii General Traders Ltd TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH l.rATHIR (lOODS with HARHAIHIS KMR1.FM Ideal for Souvenir tilfte. r'l.OWKR PATTHtN ueeAU For Fronl limn. AT JOHNSON'S STATIONERY IIARnWARK A\ MrlAII rsursFJi 31 Aur g Sepi ! Sept 1 AtlV MU-MIN 11 Sep II ,.: IB Sepi M Sept %  Bjgfjl AN.MIIAN fllALIJ"-Nt;KR sT Sept i Bs| • n OtL M 0t. ,-ANAIIIAN fllUISlIt 33 tict 11 Oct ? Htt t Nov i AD, HBAKftl I Nf %  N Nnv 15 Hoe IS Nov XtiaTIIROISK l..\' V ROUNEY l_*lY NEUBON LAI'V RODNIV LAny NKIJJON N M itenleet I a oj It IK,' GARDINER AUSTIN A CO.. LTD. AfenU. IIIMIM Ml A RUBBER FIXVOR COVRRINfl In 4 MAliriFlII, PATTERNS 3 FEET WIDE & JS.S2 Yd. sriTAIII.E FOR BATHRtlOM. I'AS-iAHJ Or MOTOR CAR MATS Etc CALL AND SECURE YOURS EARLY VT T. HERBERT Ltd. ""TST | 10 A 11 Roebuck Street ROYAL THEATRE V"'""' 0.iilt'tltiitiiiii-iil /'/lie ONE WEEK OF GAIETY FRIDAY al v.lu p.m. Madmne O'LINDY mil hrr Unforui'llublr f lHI> MIGHTS With Smashing nri|;u .iiions 3 Hours nf Solid Encerl.inmenl SATURDAY NIGHT al S.30 1 HOUR STAC;E ENTERTAINMENT MADAM TIAM FOOK and SYD VANDEK LYDE in A GRAND VARIETY F.NTF.RTAINMF.NT of Ihe hiithesl order along wilh M.G.M'i. SL'PER DOUBLE: "THEY PASS THIS WAY" Starring: JOEL MACREA — FRANCIS DEE AND "JOHNNY EAGER" Starring: ROBERT TAYLOR LANA TURNER Wateh Thin Space For (urlher PROGRAMMES BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY CORPORATION LTD. seam WIILIAM FOGACTY LTD (Inc. in Br. Guiana) Attention Ladies JUST RECEIVED By S.S. BriNifchiirsl— MIBUII Crest & June (rcvi Huge shipment of TKXTIl.KS, Tremendous Bun-Bins in SILKS. ART SILKS *t CKUPKK 100 piece-, ol VAKlOt S CHKPKS nil tlilferrnl t-nluiirs mill tit-silt 1 is :i" wide *IK7 >tl. 100 pieces ART SILKS. Ysrimi* nilnurs and % % %  li— :i" wide SI.MU yd. W TAFTseTA PL.\II>S in sevenil rnlmirs *2.2R yd. We have only iiifntimieil Ihete. Inil ihey are several others lo st-lt-rl frtiin. Remember ihese are Bartialns. lake udviintBRe of the priren offered. "OTHrT ALL THAT certain piece or parrel ol land situate In the peri.r *sint Joftn ana Island ol Herkada* containing br dmeaetir*i T loree acres and (our pan-tie* or th*r*abouti butting snd Hounding .and. no. or late ef F Miller, en land, now let* of the m let dsteaaed. u.i lands of Todd. PUnistlon. on IBIM i •. or. land, ol Bowmsmlun. on landt _, F Coflrlngton and H J Holder and on the F-ubllc Sued *ii* ihsame may bull and bound Together with thawellingheija., theraw d biilUlnar* thereo. ffrjnsCTEIS. \lll %ll Mill It When you order from .... THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM re deliver by Motor Van Come. of Broad and Tudor Streets. NOTICE As the Msnufjiturcr* b*v* d.elded tkat repairs U sne of our Englner ran ne lunger br delated, the (0101*0, baa In %  u11.c4u.-11.1had to set ihis t.rneratlnc ftel i00 K W. out of mm minion and, owing to th" reduction of standby Pleat noee available aa a reaaJt. soar And II nceeseary to abed load at Internals during the nest few month*. our Censwners are asked te co-epefat* by esgreaiuig the utmost economy In the ese of Eleettlelty. iiartlrularly daring the Peak e*r[*d between (It and 111 g.ea. until further netl-e V. SMIIII. General Manager. WM. FOGARTY LTD. TAILORS THAT "FIT TO PLEASE OL'R TAlI.ORl\(* DEPARTMENT:— We hare jusf openeei n larye atsoriment of beautiful TROPICAL WORSTEDS, FIBRO tc WOOL mialurcs in numerous shades at prires that defy rompetition. If you wuiil (he perfect fit see us. we guarantee satisfai'tii>n--Miii u select any style you like—we ran supply it. WE GUARANTEE PERFECT SATISFACTION



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' VAtit: I.IC.HT BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY SKPTEMBCK 15 1850 Ot I II THE HAH li. B. i. Radw I'rojjriBBf Rattan Pal. m From th. fc.io.ui. %  II iTuarwnaw faraSa. %  U %  m lllo S...11IM. Vu>y OrrSaati•• Clow Down. It M IDpil II 10 pm Nfwi Analyaia; 111) Na* ..rt ftonV li. I M p III Th N. i bail) svk. 4 u |> ... %  Opal-. IN pin J..h the %  of other commitments. The tour to Australia anil •Stand from Odober to J.m WJ. Win 1-Day Game MARSHALL HITS 6 S/X5S CARLISLE. Sept. 14 The W. ihatr oneday match with the combined I'ii moorland and Westmoreland e todaj b> lf9 i i ing 244 before dismissing the roi 8V The West Indies Lulled .1 second scored 1)0 for four bid tl was decided on tl"' first timings From 1 Indie, hit (re. l> and they hiid 228 rung on the board .it lunch-time 1 %  Lianl nave %  i with .. century opening stand but then in typical one-da> cricket style the tumbled as batsmen hll out and Marshall 82 and Christian. 4" I I total included six Sixes and foui f Kin, evidence ot The West Indies Innings closed in 20 minutes after lunch, tv.<> wicketa '.iiimg as a re! throws by El wood which ran out Raa and Valentine That opening stand of 101 look only 4? minutes and the crowd which had fathered to arelcorne the tourists on their first visit to Carlisle were quick to show their appreciation of the play. U with medium pare bowling had the well deserted fleurei of five F Hti during the innings. The coil found the l."lim, *.f Valentine and Comer. %  to play and only Wood nildcnce. I each took four wickets in dismissing the local side for :> which left then 15V behind, and the remaining hour 'is occupied by further good batting from the w. t [ndksj —Reuter. ilh five tests, an interstate game n • ech oi the states, and in 'Vincial fixtures. The tour i> subject to the ipproval %  1 r the imperial Cricket Conference in London Til %  arrangements would enable %  '. % %  trails To meet its commitment* to send Its best team to %  land in the mm Th" Board increased the alli-w%  ii.i %  • of Australian lest players ft 01 £S0 Australian currency (£41* sterling) to £00 Australian currency. (£48 sterling) per mated plus expenses .—Renter. Colony Football Team Plays "Sparrow" A football match between ti ,-in from II.MS "Sparrow ani a Colony XI will take place a ( • niU-rmerc this afternoon. Thi 1 li.tch begins at 4.30 o'clock nting the Colony wil le Smith (Empire); Gibbons, How%  Sp. 1'.. 1 I! %  . McCollIn (Empire). Blades (Everton). F. Taylor (Empire), Drayton (Empire and Hnrper (Empire 1. Island Cricket XI Defeat "Sparrow" Tho Lamotta Retains Title DETROIT. Sept. 14. Jake Lamotta, World MlddleI ..st night knocked oul Laurent Dauthinue 1 France) In a 15-round fight here. Lamuttu cine up with a blistering attack in the last minute uf the fifteenth round to knock out Datrtbulilt and retain his ehamI kinship Realer. islaiKl easily defeated a form the HM s Sparrow ket match yesterday al CoinlKTineie The island won b> an Innings and 84 runs. F Ings was the only batsman to reach double llgurcs, for the SpafTOW in their iirst innings He scored IK out of SI. Bowling for the island Denis Atkinson I'-ok four wickets for 14 runs. Norman Marshal) two for four and Alleyne two for 10. The Island then replied with MS runs for four wicki's declared* Norman Marshall and Goddard h Ming breezy knocks to Ib.'ore 58 and 47 respectively In tltelr second turn at the wicket the Sparrow team was dismissed for 70 runs, Ings again tflp: coring with 30 Swordfish Win From Flying Fish At Watei Polo SWORDFISH. by scoring a twolove defeat over Flying Fish in their Water P..|o match at th* Aquatic Club yt-de. ov evening have pin %  1 In a good 1 to win the Oup The struggle for supremacy now lies between Swordfish and Snapper; The game between these two M fast and Interesting and 1 VIII 111 the last mil Flying Fish players did not give up. Albert Vearwnol. Skip: ir-ajofll keeper of Swordfish, did some excellent work in the net-J a.'t en many occasions saved what looked like certain goats Paul Foster, the Flying Fish skippergoalie, was many timci called upon to gave >ome hard t tit Geoffrey Foster in Ihe Swordfls. forward Uni The goals for SwordiMi wen scored by Geoffrey Foster and Billy Gilkes The game began with Flying Fish defending llv goal at the Harbour end Soon after Geoffrey Foster opened his tea account with a hard shot from 1 the goal area, which although touched Paul Poster's outstretched hard, found Its wav Into He nets. Swordfish l %  .,.! At half time Swordlis.li were Mill 111 The lead S-0:1 after the second half uigtni Geoffrey fc ler swam down and took anothi hard shot which Foster pushed over the cross-bar. Mickey Jordon had a golden opportunity to put s vordri h lurther in Uic lead but ii^hough he was unmarked in the goal area, he eent the ball Inches over ihe cross-bar. A few minutes latei Hilly Gilkes, who was also unmarked in the goal placed tho ball In the right r of the goal, out of the rt of Foster, to put his taisn goals tn the lend. The end found the score unchanged. the other game of the evening Barracudas met Bonltas and defeated them one love. Herbert Portillo scored the goal for Barracudas in the first half. Some good saving was vrftneesed by Henri Pere/ in the ll.nr.icudas' goal Maurice Foster skipper nMlke.-|-M .il illed upon to save %  onM dMkUl shots sent in liy the B I foewafi 9 DIE IN CRASH TEHEKAN. Sept li Nine people died here today in the crash of an Iran.an Airways 1 plane The machine crashed as it took fT for Saudi-Arabia, with spare I parts for another Iranian Airways 1 plane grounded at Jidda I The British Pilot was killed. Th<> ethers dead were all Airways pvrI and included five Persians ehman, a Gree* and a South Trinidad Heat British Guiana GEORGETOWN. B.G Sept, 14. in the t .,111.11. .HI Lawn Tenm. Tournament now beiisg played at m-ket Club Trinidad today won both m itches against B.G. when Jin Ho beat Edwin Redwin 65, an-l McDonald beat Ivan PhihpToniorroYv's Cricket The fourth series of First Division Cricket games opens tomorrow, and the lixtures with grounds and umpires are as fallows: — nar a iNTkHMLuiAis ssaits ANU 1 Hriai.s ntin iMisc. Ilau, Uimv !>• %  ! a I mpioi H#aH IS. ts. at .."iilNrmrif v* IACUM at Cnniiwtinrrp I. g Kin# O Imd. Cillrsa v. Spartan al C-..ll rK .' f I Walcull I Spall Owing to imfntTsern ami stances the itame bet w een the team from the H.MS "Siurrow" snd a eotnbined .., % %  Po team, had to be |KKl|toned The liiims were Ba-tlUa M. Foster (Capt.), A. Patterson, J Grace O .T-.hnson, T. Ycarwnod. I Innl-s and A. Taylor. sWrrataaeaj H Peres, i> Brooki (Capt.). U. Armstrong, H PorUli, C. Evelyn, p Fletcher and E. Johiuon. FKtn* Fish: P Forter iCapt >. T Yearwood. J. Knight, B. Malone, H. Weatherhead, P. Potter and D. Daviea. Swordfish : A W(Capt-), M. Jordon, N Portillo. H. Jones. M. Fitzgerald. G. Foster and B. dikes Referee: Mr. W. Gibbs t\.. 1 n.. a H R Jordan %  Pnlirr. at limn Hall ,i-ti>ain a D aOactifio IMI liMI in \ il Si 11,..,. i.. 1 11..11 Mental llmintal K.-h W ll.r. v *C, ai Hail a, w Bsyaq Kmplir al HU.I. ">d k W AKhri I C IIPIOMII V ,.,K,. %  %  a C Colly !" Rifle Shooting To-morrow There will W practice shoot at The Government Itifle Itange for members of the BRA tomorrow at 1.30 p.m The shoot will be from the 200, :>0H, and tilHl ,.,1.1i>.inks It Is hoped there will be a good (urn-out of the Club \o afford n welcome to the members of the Bistey Team I They'll Do It Every Time ^~-...~~. By Jimmy Hado RMIN WENT ALL OLT IN HIS /OMiFMTTON SSS SUN SUITS Aswi?N8yu euDNPECunt NEXT POOR— S O HIS MISSUS TOOK TUE CUE ^NP QOT ONE FOR HERSELPBROTHER! THAT'S DIFFERENT! THANX TO tfl>S.fJ.XMAHZE 3O3EBSENH0wreiT. CADI.Ov % 



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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER IS, 1*50 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE FIVE. College Wins Three B^dos Scholarships Lodge School Gets Fourth WHEN G. A. O. ALLEYNE reached scholarship standard in cli • -ics. J. M. G. M. Adams in mathematics and E. De C. hUiltt in science, Harrison College added three more names lo the Honours Lists of Barbados Scholar* in their school hall. R. U. Gooding won the other of the Barbados Scholarships for Ivodge School in Modern Studies. 1 Just 17 yean old now Alley gained hii Higher Certificate after one year in the sixth form, i .unusual feat, hi* Headmaster. M J C. Hammond told the Adrocar.* yesterday. He then obtained I a distinction in Ancient History. In IMS when he passed the school 'certificate, he won the Lynch 'Memorial Prize, a prise which u presented to the boy with th< New B'doe Hardware Opens Tckiay B ARBADOS UAKDWAKE LTD.'best school certirlriite Tor h opens business U "" tuilding at the Corner ot Swan and L*/-as Streets to-day. The building Is one of the most modern along Swan Street. It Is equipped with fluorescent lighting. The hardware department Is on the ground floor while the offices and show room will be on the second floor. The service In the hardware department will be partly "serve yourself". There are three showcases—one to Swan Street and the others to Lucas Street The storeroom to the building Is situated in the rear section which housed Messrs. Da Costa & Co. Electric Department for a short period. \ 8HOW WILL BE given by tha Mobile Cinema at the i His father is Mr C Alley %  recently appointed Headmaster of St. Martin's Boys' School. During the past year. Alley ne played a leading port In the publication of the school newspaper "The Collegian". He is regarded somewhat as %  boxer at the College It Is one of his hobbles and in the ring, he Is a determined puncher It If understood that he -night study medicine. Adams—In Any Group Mr. Hammond thinks that 19year-old J. M. G. M. Adams, son of the Leader of the Barbados House of Assembly, could have Barbados Scholarship In any sixth form group in which he had chosen to specialise HowN.Khtengale Home. Black Roc*.^ he cnOM & Mathematical Group and last year was declared of Exhibition Standard In spite to-night for (he benefit of the children there. The children always take a keen interest In these shows and on many occasions tliey can be heard discussing various scenes among themselves. This will be the last performance given by the Cinema for this week \ N ISLAND TEAM will meet a team from the H.M.S. Sparrow in a football match at Combermere School grounds at 4.IS this evening. Included In the Sparraws programme for to-morrow Is a Picnic which will be given at the Crane HoteT from 3 p.m... until 10 o'clock at the night There, wilt be sea-bathing, r'ancing and singing, apart from lcfreshment*. •pOl'lt TRAFFIC OFFENCES SV were recorded in yesterday's Police Reports. Two motorists were reported; for driving without due care and attention, one for driving without the appropriate licence and a cyclist for not keeping his cycle on the left side of the road. M l Mill its ATTENDING the meeting of the Board of Management of the Barbados Cricket Association, which was held in the George Challenor Pavilion at Kensington on Wednesday evening were:— Sir Allan Collymore. President, Mr. A. DeL. Innisa. Mr. E. L. G. Hoad. Mr. W. B Chenery. Mr. T. N. Peirce. Mr. E. D. Inniss, Mr. S. 0*C. Gittens. Mr. E, A. V. Williams. Mr. W. K Atkinson. Mr. BDeL. Inniss, and Mr. W. F. Hoyos, Secretary Mr. K L WishaM, Secretary of the British Guiana Cricket Board of Control, was also present to discuss draft rules of the West Indies Cricket Board of Control submitted by Jamaica along with amendments offered by a Subcommittee. T^THE POLICE BAND, under Capt. C. ERaison. will g.ve one of their fortnightly Concerts at the Hastings Rocks at 8 o'clock to-night. Whenever these Concerts are given people travel from various parti of Christ Church. St. Philip and St. Michael in 'buses, cars and lorries as well as on bicycles and motorcycle* to listen to the music. Between 8 and 9 o'clock both the enclosure and around the Rocks are crowded. The programme is as follows'— TWO SPANISH PASOOOnim Sol A SaviUa Jo** rtnc* ib> Aur*. Joa* JsraW" 'TANDAMO DVETtTUflX Wllllafn Tr Ro—lfll Mom In*The Slorm—."aaioral Mavs hiti ri.iiiiin ranfara—Th FluM and 0*tam anloa in the Pili*l Move by Bandaman of missing much of the summer term due to illness, it was no surprise to his headmaster that he gained a scholarship. He h<>i>es t:> go to Oxford, following hi father, Mr. Grant!*/ Adams. His mother says he may study law. but everything is not settled yet. Young Adams had a three-year period at the Convent before be entered Harrison College. He Is i ardent stamp collector. Inniss—Medicine E. DeC. Inniss was a Primary to First Grade Scholar, coming from St. Giles' Boys' School. He was awarded a Barbados Exhibition to the University College of the West Indies as a result of their February examination. He has now fol'-owed It with the Barbados Scholarship in Science. A very reditable performance considering the difficulties the School has had recently in providing adequate Science Staff During his last School year he had three different Physics masters. He hopes to go to the University College of the West Indies and study Medicine. Inniss will be 20 next week. His father is Mr. O. N. Inniss of Roebuck Street. Good ing—Lodge R. U. Gooding who got his holaxshlp in Modern Studies, lives at "Wasons", St. Philip His father is Parochial Treasurer of that parish. His grand father was a Parochial Medical Officer. It is not y*t known what he will study. SUGAR Belore and Alter tha Emancipation du W.I. Produce Association Celebrates Tercentenary Celebration THE Wast Indian Produce Asaoelation, Ltd. which incorporate Davison. Newman & Co.. and numbers among its dn< :i. celebrated th.tercentenary of the business o 20th and was honoured by a visit from the Lord Mayor od London An interesting report of th.' occasion appeared in Thr Tim g on July 27lh. and is here quo'ei "Not ashamod to call themselves grocers, the proprietors are able to boast that they still sell over the original sevenleenlh-eenturv counter, upon which stand a couple of huge tea canisters each ( % able of holding ISO lb. It was ross this counter that the first pound of tea was sold m England for MO. The Lord Mayor was conduct' over the spice impregnate i place by Lieut. Col K. E. Pravite. acting chairman of the com pan.. nd many interesting possessions vtn shown by Mr Skerntt. the managing director, who has spent a lifetime with tht dim "Perhaps the most interesUnr document was a framed original account of sales dated July. 1773 tern being two bills drawn by Francis Rotch, the master of the "Dartmouth" one of the ships volvcd In the Boston tea party. I' a tradition that Daviaon and Newman shipped the te,i which was thrown into Boston Harbouon December 16th. 1773—the prebJda to the American War of Independence '' £800,000 Will Save Butlin's • Er.ai .ace I Press appeared to know more about the Company's affairs than did the Board of Directors Financial Itn.nl. Thoiburn outlined the ComIgtory an.l gave details o! its ilnano.il stats The Company had been sterling devaluation and the London dock strike whirbe) ui. WlppsfSS for the Cam. He had no g" < I thr sharif. U America to ti\ .o raits the necessnry money, but said that one American group was st'll Interested, although he did not bold out much hope in that direction In view of the publicity the Company's affairs have been ctven. he did not think it likel lhat preference shareholders would want to invest furthi !irse sums in It. The Company had spent to date (1.800,00(1 Their litbflll r600.000 to preference shareholders. C800 000 to ordinary shareI olders. £450.000 and some aci rued interest on loans Irom a lity group and £103.000 on bank loans They owed in addition £250.000 to various oth including some £80.000 to people | in Nassau. Small Creditors They were In a very bad position from that point of \ Ism bg %  aid, and were unable to pay off Small < red I tors, as the* had iwvii tor that this would con'-' tinl treatment. "Ever since 1 bSSWBM BStft always Ufect broke." he said later The Board denied that then had been a muddle over the question of arranging air USBSporl to the Vacation Vlliige. Licensing d Hicullies had cropped up at the lu-t moment," but the American Air Charter firm had "sp helped them out Thcj understood, however, that \\< > A C ba now obtained the BsNessarj Iktne to carry passengers from th mainland to the Island Alter KM Masting tin of the Company told mS there ould be no new approach to th< Colonial llevelopmer*. Corporation. C500.001) Oder Withdrawn In view of the benefit the n ony would derive from I i\ of a Vacation VUiSfSi gl the dollars Britain could eai from it. the Corporation first agreed to put up 1500.000. But a later offer VMS withdrawn Anti-Women Bus Strike In London from page 4 this is due to John Stewart, who in 1706 took out a patent for a machine which would: . t Grind more than a Wind-Mill and cattlemill usually do, without any Expense of Fuel, more than is consumed in boiling tha Sugars. The Barbadian planters seem to have been rather sceptical about this new machine, for the steam engine did not arrive here until 1848, when there was but one steam engine and 506 windmills. As late as 1911 there were 226 windmills and 109 steam engines. I have only been able to refer to a few of the interesting matters discussed in this, the second volume of the "History of Sugar." Among other things, there are chapters on Asiatic Labour, the Trade in Sugar. Refining and Beet Sugar. I cannot speak too highly of this work. All those interested in the history of the West Indies R Alle> rw? and Band Cadet Hollowav in general, and that of the BUgar Dnfsn rxcKHTTs 'industry in particular, will find SI'ANISH VAI-S1. lastaaaw iMiBSlanUna W.ldPulrl •rt-fCTION Tha Gondollara Sullivan Piivad In honoirs ol In* paaain* of %  '* i.i'. Oarlea I. Elder Th* fcfuatc ol thr Ollbart and Sullivan Operas wae amon. hka favourite band aclttllMM. miul Ow "OondoUrrs" In particular Tonight's %  • crp |a Include (he well Known arms "Take • Pair of Wpaxklins S> SKRENATA lav* in Idleneaa AOan Maateth %  oloiat: Bandrnwn I. MulMU Soto BUp hon.iim r 11 A it* cron SSTIC Old M>imblir.' Moor the Sprer • Thurhan PI-M. a llaht diversion from the Solheii> PUniallon. "flel up • atari. Ut' dan-fin Co : on an' do th' prancln IV gal mah ha-blta on fur fair H"n-cv now donn t<\ funuy. 1 kin* fta-M sot dmore. Rl...f. are in lh' air.' ONr. HaVkUfV OrandfalhcT> Choice Selected HIM MUSIC The lloa-I i" V..rcro lleuain I1AWCT MIJ'I J. You -r* r.rvor I^-vel.er -Jarorxr Kern %  ssjLcoua r male "JW ioy ot Uan'i Depirlng" — 1 a Bach Thu beautiful chorale wsa StSfl beloved b/ our late broUior elan. Oiarle* Luthor Elder, ant lonl(ht-a procramme in Bttln. cat tributa to hii memory by we •.embera ol tho Barbadoa Poller Band. manr of •how received help, .uldanre and InapirMlon from Mm during their earl* day* aa roun* ineirumrntallaU Pli* my aoul the king of Hea.r.. QOD SAVE TTOB KSNO C i: KAlSON Csplr BROAD STREET? "I like your Transjort system —It is so orderly and efficient Bui I am sometimes alarmed— ever> thing goes so fast. In Lhassa it takes hours to walk down a street because we ail know each other and stop to talk, but here nobody knows even their neighbours." Mr. Tsewang Pentoa. a medical student from Tibet speaking In a BBC Ovffaeas Pros' it an absorbing study. ('On sale at the Advaeatel Sparrow Cadets Buy Sea Shells SOME of the cadets from the H.84.S. Sparrow took the oppoi tun ty yesterday to buy souvenus and "get o look at the sunny isle" some said. They bought tortoise shell badges, pins and brooches also necklaces made of white sea shells. Taxi drivers were busy carrying them to and fro with n th r City limits. Queen's Park was also an attraction for lite Cadets. One guide was seen showing a group of nine the anmals' quarters in the Park. The cadets did not gel a good look at the alligator, however. becaure it was well under the murky water in the hole. Perhaps he somehow became aware or the prying eyes. 4,000 BAGS OF CORN MEAL COME OVER 4,000 bags of co from U.S.A. arrived in the island yesterday by the S.S. Seabreeie. Included ID this supply were 1.865 bags of PUlsbury Yellow cornmcal and 530 bags of Kegal Yellow cornmcal. The eornmeal was consigned to Messrs Robert Thorn Ltd.. Messrs DaCosta It Co.. Ltd., and Messrs General Trad Ltd. Auto arriving by the Seabrn from U.S.A. were 919 sacks or Quaker Golden Maize, consigned to Messrs R M. Jones It Co., Ltd From Jamaica it brought 200 cases of cheese, 150 begs congo peax 50 bags of coffee beans ai fcclionery. LONDON. Sept M. Thousands of Londoners p odded through a dr:tze to pat trie trams and railway italnnig today as the strike agains: of "women'' conductors sprend to over 7,000 motoi i A quarter of the total motor bus Heel was oil the toad, paralysing over 60 .if Central tendon's 200 routes 20 clippies today j" nad th,strike which opposes tne engagement of more women on the grounds that this would weaken the men's claim fa a tl par week wage increase as women would be more Inclined to accept a lower wage. The claim is not backed b> tinmen's union The women said that they were striking because of various grn-vances. London Transport lias 26.0tH> male drivers and conductors and 2,000 TOnduclreaaes paid the same rates as men. It plans to take on 1.000 more cUppies as not enough men are coming forward. The London Transports Chairman, Lord I-atham has appealed to misguided men to get back to work. At a garage in East London two crews out of 450 busmen took out their buses but the? did not get a very good reception. —Rcuter The meeting appointed three preference shareholders to vwi.-h over the interest, at thetr feium shareholders. But Uutlin said, "1 Uiink It would be wrong to put false hopes In the sharetuild.iWhile negotiations are going on taj this money, it looks to me that If tbev are going to put i: in the papers, that there is a winding mi petition being mado In Nassau and that they are already selling our goods, people wouldn't like putting up money." IM mt-otmg broke up. little groups of shareholders stood about discussing the Cinnpany's dilemma. A shareholder asked ilutlin to autograph a copy of a photo of himself surf-riding in the Cribbean He did so and remarked "You ought to save this, it mav be worth a lot of money one di ENJOY TO-DAY'S SPECIAL Swiss Stick To Armed Neutrality l.ACSANNE. Sept. 14 Swiss President Max IMiten. said to-day that the Korean war was the danger signal to all countries directly or indirect I v threatened lo strengthen their national defences. Speaking at the official banquet at a "Comptoir Sulsse" trade fair here He added that defence measures might change the course of a MHinlry'i economic position" bul did not develop this hint. The President strongly reafBrtnsd Swiss "armed neutral it v" ix.licy whuh i. sxpSCttd to cost about two-thirds more next year than 460.000.000 Swiss francs voted for lose "The worst Is never inevitable." the President gaJd. "the struggle in which mankind seems to be engaged will no doubt be long •Si %  but we must hone it will not continue to develop in hloodshr I that armed conflicts--If Ihey break out—can be locallred and that the forces of peace v ill ilnnllv win the day" Pet Hern*; %  A S\. d/ciLind "must he Arm and severe towards those arho trv Internally to ow mistrust and discord and who would l>


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PACE Twf| BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 15, 1 %  •.".. Qoudb Calling m >UR E. P. Anuwl ninth. CMC, Adn A Dominica. Mrs. Ano.v&mith and their two dMlfhMn Susan and Jennifer, were arrivals on Tueaday afternoon by B.Q. Airways for a short hohda> and are staying at the Windsor Hotel Mr and Mi.AnvavnMh lame up chiefly to wet their damfhter Susan off to school and she wul be leaving on Saturday morning by Puisne Judge—Trinidad M K Kenneth Vine* PlOMM all ntni b IW 1 v d ,-, -iiendinj three week* %  H On Holiday V^as KAlhLK,;N IAYLO* Off To England WyflltS A MOORE, wife of Canon I StavT.C.A. vtan -.. School in Gluitcestc: Goodirifi. Accompanyli. Dorothy thai %  rba Ml • 111 LManlni ...nd indeiiniu u A NKIVIN*. ri. f\ Tuaad D W Moore, former Rector M si .i..hii. let', on Wadneaday by he S3. Goiflfo for Eneland where aha will be remaining Tor .. year. Accompanying her were her three daughters June who is doing Aniipia, .u • ieshe r second yaar at London Uniday by H M.i .. If lly ,tudvmg Sociology, Nanette 1 t ''-' ,: %  laying at the u ai Hew note! n <. win ba eouruii Lsavdea L'm•"' %  %  • : *' ; "" *• f** % %  • %  • %  Stile varatt] fa tha Hi* Una i I nil juecstcr wn Robert. .| K study Sociology and Helen Protestor of Anatomy Medical btudent Returns who will be put into Welsh Girls RETURNING toKng.a..don the ma K UJERTIC filCAHAM. son of Schoo, *%CoI/!:o on Wcdnesdny went ul the tafca CaM i l.-orge t.raham Aff T C —a Dr. and Mrs R G llaniton and and Mrs Graham ul Maxwell reU lo &t VinCMt Iheir two children who had spent turned to Ei.gl-.nd on ttVn/ %  !... Vf ,( JA CK CLARKE, Manager throe moniha holiday as guests of bj the Golni.i i iIi Clifton Hall Plantation and %  wLa".^ M Ti^.,. ";. G 1 !" ""dlfs - > %  HoMtnl, I-m.don, Mr. Cecil Dear. Assistant Secre1 %  ' ' 1'hlln %  H % %  %  ,„ 0 i %  ,., gar, £j= Thltf Clu(j daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bartlt I pant hi unmcr I*" on Tuesday by B.C. Airways henwith his mother. lor Sl Vlnf ent where they will Firit Visit %  '"'' %  WM k ' holiday before goVee*euela on '£L£ l Cren d '<* %  *&" formerly i • t i. DamanatraeTaVTueedaj bj B.D LA tor In Human Anatomy doing Mi and Mrs Edward Saotana tcachuiK and raaaarch and a M low of Pembroke College, Oxford, spending three I Dr. Harrison will he talcing up a BUSah at u. Hotel new appointment on hn. return lo Mi Sant.n* Who hi (Living his England as Professor of Anatomy Iwst visit lo the I at the University of Liverpool. He Industrial Bafhtj Ilt-parUm-nt ol said that he will have about bin tha Texas Oil o, Venezuelans Holidaying Here M R. and Mr* Alberto Bust* Hectur Toali. _. I ROW in Barbados fur n rhej aapacl t>i be here until Monda* and ,irc staying at tha Hotel Ry B |. Mr. Itustamante is a lawyer whila Mr. Tosta Is In the 1U..1 relate ImsiiH'ss. Spent Three Weeks AHTHL'll de LIMA ..( Trinidad, return.'.i hena on Monday evening bv B.W.I A. arter tp an dl n g three waalu here. He was a guest of Mrs. C Goddard of 11 ison. Mr. de Lima is Managing DlrccjyiH and Mrs, R Medealdea and tor of Y. de Umi and Co., Ltd. Rupert and the Castaway—5 and Dial M'-j days Uf, spend tliem in Oxford From Paramount Pictures M K. II D HUNTER of Paramount Pictures, Trlaii an arrival on Tuesday evening by the Alcoa Ityljttrit fur •• holiday He was anromiiansad iiv hti mCa and they anStaying at the Occult flow Hotel. Honeymoon Couple Leave M R. and Mrs. A. B. Mackie of Trinidad who were up here on their honeymoon, returned yesterday evening by B W.l A The.had spent 11 days here and were staying at the Hastings Hotel. Mr. Mackie is employed with Trinidad leaseholds Ltd After Five Days t. and Mrs R Medealdea and lor I ilicii three children. Ligia, Beatrice and Oahrlal of Caracas Veneiuela, lift by It W I A for Trinidad yesterday evening to apend a further holiday before reluming home Accompanying them was Mr. Cesar Rodriguez. They hod nil spent fl holiday here and were ^^,lvlh^; ,it the Windsor Hotel For U.K. Holiday B. R. HEAD, whose nunPaid Brief Viait A fTER paying a brief visit to the island. Mr N. Karlsbad, a hat manufacturer of Trinidad, returned home yesterday evening by B W.I A. He was staying at the Hotel Royal. 1 llOSSUOIIIr Mr iawaaar >i Port-or*Spi Fernando and Bndgeti.wii. 16—Not Out B RITISH GUIANA'S Freddie Grant Una year celebrates his 18th anniversary nf life In Great Britain It i* a long time to be away from one's own home, but > earns to enjoy it and has made good use of hi* i M physiotherapist, he is also the RS. ft. R. HEAD, whose huaGdoi of i %  even-piece band which band u i engineer of Messrs pl,,vs at the London I'..n.„ ch.h Cable and Wirelew. Hounlcd Hall. Any prosM ini ing to I trw> ImiiifUn (in wiliw^l'.u -Hi, ur_>> I_.I: — i With i uiitful dianuiatca in at*. 85, __ JB£, IS 91. Pi 'JU -.n, I. Ml%  1 | Bft A i. %  4ori UO*D i. citn'fTi !.,!. %  in • icii suigtiM %  K m* • % %  %  ir-i .If1 rhi* (1 ratMaa left on the Golftto on Wednesday :he" West Indies? evening for England where ahi will apend a holiday. She was accompanied b] her two children For One Week A RRIVING from Trinidad on Wcdnestlay afternoon on the %  Colflto" for .IUHII %  week's sta> was Mr. L. Grant of J. N. Harriman and Co., Ltd. He la staying at the Ocean View Hotel. look, (reddle say* "Maybe!' Clever People I m good pmpie rat rlrxi. BU CWVM is. W wrti food. worM WauM B r>. fCT Ih.n > hmi|M I hat ii oowlblv .on id d. •RilPtn .it nrvri i ..a law ,o.iia ; h-rJi | Ui* ttrvar, nafa "' '"• aoI. tailnbril, WciriHw.it 11 II TMI wo ha Tinf— I IIT eO. (VI 4 iwtirti. %  currant piaa. Ul ', llirte imvr l>w .!.> ">iBl 1 impimni Hi riidtno rod U. inn im • lotin> oeen usen out. rlani.. (If II Pe* or mint
  • i leeiii -. Hit*r I Mi,-. l^?lSA.fw F ^DrstaC"* '* BY THE WAY ... By Beachcomber A MAN was boasting to me the other day that he had one of those naw cars in which. said he, "There Is button for everything — even for opening or cloaiiijt the doors." %  ft there %  button for trouaarsr n I asked courteously. "How do you mean?" he answered. And I could sec Unit he was annoyed at the possibility that his car was not perfect "What trousers?" he asked. • Anvone's," said I. Surely." I continued, "among all those buttons, there is a spare one for u trouser or waistcoat ernergenej 'I wasn't talking of that kind of button." he said Ind "Well." said I, "I wouldn't be seen In a ear that was designed without giving thought h) oaople's trousers. A fin. fool you'd look If you couldn't get out of the car because all the buttons were off your breeches, and you had to sit there with them falling about your feet." "1)00*1 ba fool," he said coldly, and moved But he was rattled, I'm Ifta #ho*l of a hnw A CORRESPONDENCE |boul -* the ghosts of dogs recalled to me Watts-Dunton's experience ird a noise In the night, %  : %  I saw ., louse Dairying m head undor its leg. It walked straight through a wall and then disappeared wilh a sound of chinking harness-chains. Next day ba told Swinburne about I. "It's not me that's seeing things this time." said the poet. laughingly. f>/M'/i.rs( /-.-„.' A COMMITTEE is ex,.tmnln* tho possibility of making coal nl hi., in order to diicit farmers and agricultural workers away rrom land which Is only good !ni growing rood. Experiments have already shown that tinned coal remains fresh for a considerable nine, and is a better body-ruel than meat, since it contains 6 per cent, per hundredweight more vitamin G. A spokesman said yesterday: 'The ch Id who tries to eat coal Is unconsciously obeying the dictates ot nature. Trip only reason why so many people regard coal as eatable is because the Idea is unfam liar lo them. Half of them could not even tell you what coal tastes like. Prejudices A Ufd Tnunhunv Lullaby* 1 Xiitradays one experts rum* misunderstood oi'mu* lo n-rtle piece of music for a couple frombo-nes. (Article on music.) I HAVE myself set to music a tender "Lullabye for Four Trombones." If uour fact Is rrallu your fortune iBInir, my bully bom, blotc'l Herr'M a penny, dear Miss Pibblesfotir. For Ihe poorrrf yirl / know. Refrain: ffuahabyr, etc. What A Yield!! STEELE BRIGGS SEEDS THERE IS A REAL DIFFERENCE WITH We have a Freth Stock of — — BEET, CUCUMBERS, CARROTS, CABBAGE, 8^ *nA LETTUCE, TOMATO. BUTTER BEANS \%tf pet pk. GARDEN TOOLS FORKS, SHOVELS, RAKES, WATERING CANS. SHEARS AT THE CORNER STORE THIS IS THE INGRID BERGMAN PICTURE THE WORLD HAS BEEN WAITING TO SEE! Rupert findi ih* (ootpiih U-.ding up from iht undi lo in* lop o> ih. hudlutd but Kt aersn'i fabow h. laaHaS he uaaa s sbatt out up Jn „„ par, gt fa dl fl *hkh bhugi him amghi 10 C*otMi tWiuck'. ahadu Ih. old him in Swfp'ist. aaaarawi. usssara. mm parson 10 chui np Rupan," ht .i, I oan OOWQ in ih* dumpi ul>." "That'i o*i." r.pl,,. ih* ti'tle beat. I'm in 'he dump,, loo. bccinM my fmod Bill ihould Kiv, brcn here but he', ill." Then ki'e tiufe eetf IroMblei," i,, th, old Ceptuek ( HYITOQIOTK—llfre'i, how to work H: A X V D L B A A \ R !• LOMarCLLOW One letter umply ettnde for another In thii example A la v lor the three L'a. X for tha two O'l. etc. sinrle lettere. apo*. trophlea, the lengUl and formaUon of the worda are all hlnte. lach day the code rattan an duterent A cSplegran QaotaNoa JMF RXXHVHW NMBKVW Q M B T M C Tr KNCftOBT N PCI BW KFN JH M H atO c x Ft Q ITS A NEW HIGH FOR THE UNEXPECTED! THE UNEXPECT! %  Bit riiW INGRID BERGMAN HIT! IKGRIDRERGMAN JOSEPH GOTTEN >00*> O CO O O*000< 0<


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    PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 15. USD HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY I HAVE A, PLAN 10 LOCATE TVS T-.I5 AWHU T OK PEP I f Jl<0f \ \OWEk* • ^E5S... : T.. NK >o-* , LITTLE 6Pl WOW! <3 \ ( lOJ-S A SCT coc -~s iill oCE!E*IE=' I ALWASS i n—. sue^cTEP IT' ^ ^E r-^HO' NO' PLEASE.. ( A *J""^ ^SBo**-,'-" ENTS.BTAIN **> RAMIIIA, MVOCA WOULD VOU -iK TO CN'tUTA! |OUB -uibTs WHILE il SE E TO THEIR A Jfvou PICK 'SOME NICE ^FRIENDS, K 0> am IICHT A )M THt CANALS THE CASA 0*Ti fALCO BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MAN IIS AM-NCV PO A 6CCO 8NOOze' 90V" Tv*. I6 00AKT Cbael 2 -1.M-THAT MJ--.T Be n-c RJ-.TMAN e RIP KIRBY / I* AWAlO SO. OoaUerdV. _, %  —^^ /'T' may* i-c*.6v...SH *ve; POSTWAR \ T -c vsw. <*...ANC s-< : H *TC -Ava i ***** w* "? 'Ovs TO I ..-<3V... Of TH* AUNOLStl f H8fl A*CSeA3E WAS CttVPTiC... TJATf BAD. /APPARnwTLX S-S COULDN'T CAV • 1 ^ MLCH IN IT...8A/T HAS* WSTAN'N* 5 LNAMSTA*ONSV tS I. OANGSR' _^ BY ALEX RAYMOND C*=-vOsO. CALL VJ ANCOEV.S, THB SANKBR^ %  S THB TBtjftTEg CT MAQAfl FFL-AM'S ^ THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK A RAY MOORE S fi'M ,.;;,; AT TGOHM, KADLV I CM/ H--0f4CFi K£ MAD-UUHTEe. SPECIFY BURRELL'S ,,th mgiedit.iu ol v:cki VopoRuk JOINT AND MUSCLE PAINS may mean kidney trouble A function of the kidney* in to H i m i tw hAftniBJ iaepuntie* from Uw BTBtem. II tho In aw i Tl gTew sluggnh, ihnr imparibeA— in pArticuUi fii"i Add* %  ciinuiUie and %  ettle. And bflconM A CAnic of pain and %  oSVring in joints and muscle*. The way to tackle the root of the trouble la to help the kidneys. Ther ahouM be toned op with De Witt's Pills the medsttnc ssade OpeosUy for this oorpose. De Witt's Pills have a soothins;, cleansing and antiseptic action on the kidneys that g brings them back to perform their %  natural function properly. ( pe Witt • Pilto *r^ a very welMfios! retnedy. They are sold all oTer the world nod we hare inany letters from sufferers telling of relief rained, after years of stiffrnnK after taking; De Witts PUhv They act on the kidneys quickly. Why not try them for your trooblc? Go to your cheuust and obtain a supply te-doy. D.WIttiPMIi — ** BACKACHE JOINT PAINS (MEUMATK PAINS LUMBAGO SCIATICA 0U 6UAAM1BE DeWHTl PUHr irjd? nnder ilnctlj hyrMoic condiUocis ana the iarndients aiin dreams. Its requisite bouriuct comes from a %  ecret ueddinnof at rare perfumes. Huhr'.MtM '. %  •ritiirrr llmim. i Soap daily ut you'll aluay* lie dainty, desirable, exquisitely feminine. HEJUTHIBENEFITS \D • TONES UP DIGESTION r ENRICHES THE BLOOD •RESTORES NERVOUS ENERGY • BUILDS UP THE BODY BYNIN AMARA I.1I.IAIIHBYS 110.. LONDON '///////ILLUMAWI sat/in N S.HI f>l lutk... med and Jcprcswd. the wnoii a thai our Woo,! n ihio aad pak stthout eaoiigh red Woodvorpiwcle*— *nd \,>ui ner.e.re •.<- ,,nd undeinourished Now red! I Wh-oouncevli-ia^ourwof Sjnatoacn Nsr^o foaw rood. Sunjioceo' combine* ihe two oroat body-huiklmu f.ww*—orf-n* pho\phoru 4nd protein *h..h huild up new red corpusrte* in your Mood and lard vour voakoned nerves •kss d> hv da, fiHin B vow body with mjrvas>iu-, ne^s M> Ml*, h as hh and liaes^mosi ] ,. en a coerce o( &>nitofen %  fa SA\ATOIi.E.\ i ir...-i afasMslaM asial ,1, .,,.. • M Nic >( .\/< lf|a)rcg health. >ouih : I nta.il> VOUR %  a AND SPECIFY "HORNIMANS' PURE TEA IT'S QUALITY rJjt ft AT ITS M %% BEST OBTAINABLE FROM YOUR GROCER : PRICES / / / JAMES A LYNCH k CO.. ITD.j i if SOLE AGENTS.