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The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

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Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Thursday
September 7
195@



Co-operation Can

Prevent World War

Says Bevin

SOUTHAMPTON, Sent. 6.

BRITISH Foreign Minister Ernest Bevin said

tonight that he believed another World War
could be prevented with the close co-operation of
the Atlantic Powers and other friendly countries.



Boarding the liner Queen Mary
on his way to the United States
attend the United Nations

Advocate Hurricane te

| Assembly, he declared: “I believe
2 that if all the countries which are

Relief Fund lin eee

°

For Antigua

jin the Atlantic Pact, and which
jare friendly to our activities, bind
themselves together and organise
themselves, an aggressor will











Gth September 1950 think twice before he starts any
reviously Acknowledged 1 | trouble
H. Harea Carter ‘|
Miss. E, Chenery | .
“With sour organisation, com-
Daniel 50 | plete under nding, merging our
MeConne 10 00 i. ; hog A
resources so far as we can, I be-
Mrs. G 5 v0 lieve we can prevent any third
Sympath 2 00 World War or any serious distur-
The Miss 00 bance the wor ”
at Chaseesnit 15 0 ; bance in the world.
A Friend ; 1 00 |
N. H. K 5 00 | . : ti
Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Edghill 5 90 | H M ,
Mrs, G. F. Sharp 5 00 emmous ee ing
Miss Holly Skinner 5°00 ‘ |
N. E. Perkins ® 00 ; C ommenting on the meeting of
Soft Spot 3 60 | Foreign Ministers, Bevin declared:
A, iene ra ese tide ie )“It is really a heinous meeting and
St. Patricks R.C. Church 25 00 one of great moment to the future
A Friend 5 OF of mankind.”
Mrs, Violet Bowring 10 00
Dr. as ate A. C G Bevin said he would have talks
@: ae $0. Go. with the United States and deal
G. A. H 10 «@ With cértain mattérs with Canada
Mrs, C. B. tnniss » oO and us
io 5 00
) “ 5 7
vere ens Plantation 100 do «611 «There would be tripartite talks
D.N.B 1 00 ;With France and the United States
Akie 4 00 as well as the United Nations
Miss and Mrs. Browne 3 09 work

Mrs, M. Carmichael




Miss A. Bradshaw 1 00 res y g
Miss F. Carmichael 1 00 “There are fairly intricate and
McClean 1 00 delicate jobs we have to deal with.

MT i 00 We have to discuss the next state
Mr. and Mrs. Geotge in the development of Germany,

Evelyn 120 00 and a lot of matters in connection
TOTAL $060. with rearmament,” he declared.—
Reuter.





‘‘Minnie °° The One Killed In
Traffic Jam

s e
Siren Will
e ; | RIO DE JANEIRO, Sept. 6,
Wail FF cl }~ 'Erattic on otrewof: the principal
: o ay suburban railways here was held

up several hours this morning as

; u result of a collision during the
Barbadians who are eres | aa hour, One person was killed



with the sound of an Air Raid] arid over 20 mjured in an accident
Alarm will be reminded of the in which a loaded passenger train
war years when they hear the)ran head on into a shunting engine.
wail of a Siren at noon today, —Reuter,

A siren has been piaced on the
roof of the office of the Commis-
Sioner of Police at the Central
Station and will be tried out
today for use as a_ hurr «cane
warning.

Colonel R. T.



HURRICANE
FLATTENS
BARBUDA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, Sept. 6.

The sloop “Farmer” ar-

rived at St. John’s from

Barbuda with news that the

Michelin,
missioner of Police, told the Ad-
veeate yesterday that the siren
is being tr’ed out to see how far
away it ean be heard.

There are four other siréns in
the storeroom at the Central Po-
lice Station. They are all elec-
trically operated and were bought

from England during the last
war to be used for Ar Raid

that if
the trial today proves successful,

Com-

little 62 square mile de-
pendency just 35_ miles
north of Antigua with its

Alarms.

1,000 inhabitants had been
. hard hit by the hurricane.
Trial Day More houses were flat
than standing and

The Commissioner said

took refuge in the

the other sirens will be instailed| | Holiness

at other strategic parts of the
island to give warning of the ap
proach of any tropical disturbance



damaged.

Codrington Village
is very flat country,
flooded by a

which
was
tidal

He said, “‘the Antigua hurricane
has shown us how essential it is
to have adequate warning before
hand. Owing to the fact that the
population of that island had good
warning before the storm broke,
no lives were lost.”

badly
wave.

In the past, whenever
hurricanes have hit Antigua,
they have been felt by Bar-
buda, and the slap is usually
more forceful

The Government has sent
food and, the Red Cross
several cartons of clothing.



The trial today is to test the
range of the siren and certain |
people, who are placed at various |
points, will make reports. =

During the war this type of
siren was used all over the world
for air raid warnings.

WAILING



~MEEINNE





TODAY AT NOON this siren will be tested for use a Hurricane
Warning.



people |
Pilgrim
Mission House
which was also damaged.
A section of Warden
Clement Gomes’ house was
'

RELIEF FOR ANTIGUA

°
t

|

i

THE FIRST FOOD AND CLOTHING PARCELS left Seawell yesterday by B.W.LA
Picture shows BWIA. potters

soon aftie noon for Antigua.

‘*A frican
King Is
No King’’

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Sept. 6
British Guiana received a
shock today when the B.G. Branch
of the Coloured Peoples’ League



}announced that investigations dis-|

[closed that Eze Anyanwu Ogueri
is no royal personage, only a
farmer's son, and accordingly hi
visit has been cancelled,

; The L.C.P. statement to-day
|
|
|

explained they received intimation

from the BG Developmen
|League in U.S.A. stating that
|Ogueri, who was associated ‘n a
| newsreel with Dr, Ralph Bunche
and British Consu' Sir Franci
Evans in U.S.A. had expressed a
desire to visit British Guana and
the West Indies. +

Governor Sir Charles Woolley
was consulted and had expressed
willingness to act as joint host with
the L.C.P. in entertaining King
Ogueri, but as a result of en-
quiries at the Colonial Office in
London, and also at U.N.O. head-
quarters and the British Embassy,

U.S.A., it was discovered tha‘
Ogueri is no royal African per
sonage.

The news came as a bitter dis-
appointment to British Guianese
of African descent, who for ‘the
past two weeks have been busy

planning an elaborate
for him

Today’s Georgetown newspaper
headlines splashed “Eze had them
dizzy. “African king is no king”

Ogueri was to stay at the home
of Dr. and. Mrs. J. A, Nicholsou
and an elaborate programme was
prepared by the L.C.P., who were
to be his official hosts

reception



Socialists
Win Danish
Election

COPENHAGEN, Sept. 6.

Hans Heftoft, the Danish Social-
ist Party leader, called upon King
Frederic this morning to advise
him as to the results of yesterday's
general election,

His party topped the poll,
without an overall majority.

A short statement after the
meeting said that Heftoft whose
minority Socialist Government
resigned on August 9 suggested
that the King receive all Party
leaders to hear their views.



but

Heftoft resigned four weeks
because his Crastic economy
proposals—aimed at reducing
Denmark’s balance payment gap,
net overwhelming criticism fron
ombined opposition parties

The Socialists won 59 seats in

House of 150 members

Heftoft was to be received by
the King this morning. He said it
was now up to the King to dis-
cuss matters with party leaders
The Leader of the Liberals-
biggest opposition party with 34
seats in the new House—quashed
all hopes of a Socialist-Liberal
Coalition Governmert, when he
said ‘The Liberal Party could
not consider joining a Government
led by Socialists.”

The biggest gainers in the elec-
tions’ were the Conservatives and

ago



Henry Georgists—-followers of the
nineteentt century American
Economist Henry George The
biggest losers were Liberals and |

jthe Communists

| The Comr Party lost 50,000
votes this election.—Reuter.
|

}

{

unist



“TINBIRA”
LAUNCHED



rude |

}
\
|
|
i
|
|
|



U.N. FORCES CHECK



|







|

}

NORTHWICH, Cheshire, Sept. 6
A OOft hallow - drait}
€ or th
t i nippi A. Fon
& Cr er here
€ I bira i tinea
trade in Northern Brazi
l¢ r tr | the T '
4 baveniet 5
B 2 g

Reuter

te

*

‘plane
loading them into the aircraft.

Rearming May Affect
World‘ Economy

EXPERTS THINK

By HAROLD KING
PARIS, Sept. 6

LEADING FINANCE EXPERTS of 48 countries including
Czechoslovakia but exelmding Russia met at a bank of
France today for the fifth annual meeting of the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund and the World Bank for Reconstruc-
tion

A representative of Czech@siovakia, the only “Iron Curtain
country member was sid following a last minute change
of policy, for the Czechs had not. been expected to attend
the meeting. The actual agenda was restricted to consid-

eration of annual reports and administrative matters.
Vineent Auriol, French resi















dent, weleomed répresetita-

: tives @ the new wing of the

SPORTS wom « aftees: of the aik of

Ky | France inauguratéd’ for the

WINDOW , oceasion. That repercussions of

;rearmament on the world finan-

WATER POO {ial stability is predominant in

THis “‘eidbuede dein Har io” minds was made clear

omewhat w.ckened ey 46 lows Mr. Nicholas Havenga was ex-

of Tony Johns: who left fer | Bectee to raise the question of
Canada on Sat will meet gold prices

tying very’ ‘hig ie the Mae | It was not on the agenda but

tabi, < Hoe: Maa wanes rar informed observers here under-

team Flying Fish must w }stood that Havenga would protest

Taber aoe =e : jin fairly strong terrhs against the

he ther cane wit be iiternational Monetary Associa-

iween Snappers, now |tion's Continued Refusal of the
edged the strongest tearm (1 , price of gold

Hegel es | The two Czech délegates made

surprise appearance today at

the conference and immediately

demanded that the Chinese

Nationalist delegate be excluded

om the meeting

° ‘
“Bashful Boy” Camille Gutt, the Fund’s man-
aging director announced yester-

‘ « lay that Czechs are the only East
ets 30 Years Furopean members of the two
bodies who have taken mo part in

For Ra e their activities for several months,

p ind



were not expected,
But Bohumil Sucharda_ the
LANC: i 4 zech Governor of the Fund anc
Gumuical Sonat a ee fellow-countryman Jaroslav
Wartburg Pétine a 3 Re e ‘otekal, Governor of the bank
, -.F > is ‘ A yn @ 4 ‘es » > ,
entenced to 30 years hard labou: irne up “or toray opening
by a United States courtrartial Resolution

here today and ordered to be dis-
honourably discharged from As

soon as French President

service for criminally assaulting| Vincent Auriol had officially wel-
Mavis Holland, 16-year-old Man-|*omed the delegates, Ucharda
chester chorus gir! | presented a resolution on “un-

He forcibly stripped and assaul-| lawful participation of the Kuom-

ted her in a darkened railway) iitange (Chinese Nationalist) Gov-
carriage, nent’ in the Conference

Jones who is 28 was found Jotekal, supporting the resolu-
guilty of four charges The| lon, condemned the Bank and

Fund as “instruments of American

sentence is subject to review and} ;
| Imperialism,”

confirmation by a higher authority

Other charges were assaulti 1 | eg He argued that the Communist
two constables anid being drunk|@overnment was the only lawful
arid disérdarty He pleaded not government Of China and should
guilty to all cherie therefore be represented in the
* Duri a Seah Bank He said: “My Government

uring his four-day trial Jones} .., t acee he doctri
whb is serving “With the Both)coane accept the doctrine of the
i Pm scat y icred right of the United State
Medical Group of the U.S. Army}; determine who is and who i
in England, was described by @ not the real government of any
witness as a “bashful boy" country”

It was alleged toctiry that the He claimed that the Communist
rl had gone through “55 minutes Government of China had bal
of hell” when shé was stripped] anced ity budget, stabilised its
ind assaulted by Jones curreficy, and was carrying out

—Reuter. reconstruction of plans, al! of

Chinese Spies
Hanged |

FORMOSA, Sept. 6



which, he said were objectives the
International Fund had set out to
encourage, —Reu‘er





TAIPEH

RUSSIA VETOES

Two Chinese found guilty o
spying for Russ a, and their U.S. RESOLUTION
closest collaborators their wife} SE

nd sweetheart were executed LAKE SUCCESS, Sept. 6

Soviet Delegate Jacob Malix







LAKE SUCCES Sept. 6 Melik read to the Council a
Russia toda claimed before note from the Russian Gover
Security Cour that the ment to the American Govern
Soviet plane hot down in ment in which it wa claime
Korean we »1 Monday was that the matter should be settle
{ merel nir flight between the two government
' Soviet € ite Jac Mal
te ‘ ‘ € ele eW
} i ‘ f
Ame e

ee

RED ADVA

Speculation
Over General
Elections

IN BRITAIN

LONDON, Sept. 6

Speculation cropped up again
} about the possibility of a General
| Election in Britain before the end
of the yeur Latest reports are
| that secret preparedness instruc-
|} ions have been issued to the La-
|}bour Party election agents and
jthat Conservative Party organiz-
jors have been told to be all set

ov an appeal to the country in
| November
| These reports however have

een bluntly brushed aside b)
| Government sources as unadul
rromsense based on wish-
ful thinking, The Government
hese sources say, must obviously
” prepared at all times for such
in eventuality but they deny tha
lection orders have gone out
Pglitical e%servers Close to the
iove nment are inclined to agrec
with the view that with an even
balance of strength in Commons
they admit that a snap divisior
migh' conceivably sink the Gev-
rnoment during the approaching
special session or later
But as long as the Governmen
remains fn the driver’s seat the
date of the next election will be
leferred until a favourable time
own choice

erated

In Consultation

Cabinet Minister:

{it

Meéearwi) ile
have been a'most daily in consul-
tation in preparation for th
veeting of Parliament next Tues
day, Details relating to far-reach

ing Departmental commitments
inder the country's mammoth Re-
armament Bill
rain concern
£1,135,000,000 annually on
the next
sudden

have been theh
Expenditure — of
de
three years in-
switch over

nee for

volved a and

the transition has inevitably posed |"

problems, Majorhead-
Governmers is
the spectre of in-

1 crop of
he contronting
GOW to
Jation

defeat

—Can,. Press,



2 Dead: 400
Homeless
IN FLORIDA STORM

MIAMI, Sept. 6

were dead and
more than 400 homeless on
Wednesday in the wake of a vricky
culf hurricane that still loitered in
‘Yampa Bay area

The storm drifting slowly
outhward at about four miles an
hour was apparently losing sore
of its foree after lashing the mid-
div of the Florida gulf coast with
125 miler an hour winds

It doubled baek after stalling all
ay on Tuesday in Cedar Key area
damage

Two persons

where he
reported
Winds near the centre were es-
tmated at 70 to 75
hour with gusts higher. Squalls
covered most af the north ant
Central Florida, Aid Was rushed
Cedar Key wheré thé Highway
400 to

greatest was

miles per



Patrol estimated between
0 homeless
The hurrican@ hrashed Cedar
Key With wihds estimated up to

5 miles an hour throughout the
day. Seventy-five per cent of the
buildings in the small community
sere wrecked

Vieanwhile a great hurricane
vis certred in the Atlantic

out 570 miles northeas’ of Nasp
It had winds of 150
the centre
winds ex-

iu Bahamas
miles an hour
vith hurricane
ending outward 100 miles from
centre and gale toree winds
covering another 200 miles. It was

near
force

expected fo continue on a sigw
northwest movement and ships

been cautioned to avoid iv

—Can Press.

nove

Refuse Russian
Protest Note





|

| WASHINGTON, Sept. 6

| The State Department today
confirmed the refusal of the
li nited States Ambassador in
Moscow, Alan Kirk, to accept the
Russian neve of protest. The fol-
; lowing itement was issued by
| M chael McDermott, th State

| Department spokesman

The Améri.an Ambassador to
Moscow, Admira’ Alan G. Kirk,
was called today to the Soviet

Ministry of Foreign Affairs by

here today at dawn |
One of them worked for the| today veto@d an American réso- | Foreign Minister Vyshinsky who
3ritish consulate at Taipeh until lution in the Security Council jread to him a note on the subject
a few days before his arrest jCcalling on all countries to refrain |jof the aeroplane incident which
March, while, the other man|lrom aiding North Korea |took place off Korea on Septem-
wa radio operator who d | This is the forty-fourth time}|ber 4 and which. was reported
| patched Formosan military jthe Soviet Union had used the |to the Security Council on the
secrets to Russan -agent n}veto in the Councif. The resolu-|fellowing day by the deputy
Shanghai and Peking on tiny | tior tlso condemned the North} representative of the United
Russian-made transmitter Koreans for the defiance of the| State
—Reuter. |United Natior ! Reuter

Reds Demand Compensatian From U.S.



ed to do with the matter. Malik
king for compensation from

iT Unite State declared
Thi yvatter has nothing to do
ith the United Nations”. Sir
Gladwyn Jebb, Council Presi
ent, ruled that the matter wa
the agenda xf the Council

é igse r

Reuter





——_—— ee eee eee eee iin iaigeeneeaaed

Priee:~
FIVE CEN rs.

< ~ Wes
4 Ghee



CE





| in Critical Battle For Taegu

By JULIAN BATis
YOKYO, Sepi. 4.

EARY American aud South i. can troops

had by tonight checked the Northern advance

pouring through the hole torn in the United

ations defence line on the east coast of Korea.

The Eighth Army Headquarters announced that

United Nations forces were “halting’’ the North

Koreans from the exploitation of their break

through south of Kigye, ubout 10 miles inland from

the port of Pohang, which fell to the Communists
last night.

Battered but still fighting bravely, Americans and South
Koreans were pushing north from the Kvongju, the vital
road. and rail junction 15 miles south of Pohang and east
from Yongchou

Earlier Communists
United Nations for

had flung
es oul of Kasan



| ind advanced by two miles, to
U.S. Plan oO withir nine miles of Taegu
t li before be stopped by tank
upported infantry
| Veu ra ise Southwest of Taegu on Nakton
F rive Line Bdtish troops wer
4 ‘6 lefending the F' rst Cavalt
ormosa Division's left flank
, : ; They had their first. taste of
: WASHINGTON, Sept. 6 j (ighitis last night when they
f The Secretary of State, Deai jskirm’shed with Communist pat
\cheson, Said today that nothin: |}behind the lines and smashed an
as being doné by the Unite atiempted crossing of the r ver
ations forces to encourage o x.1’s :
uke shulible it Anke es, | G.Vs Take Slaughterhouse

Ridge

outh in the

hinese Communist
ainland by Chinese

controller

Nationalist Furthet

Nakton;



Formosa wedge” area around the junhetior
Yongsan, an American Division
Acheson told hi weekly. pre ontinued it advanec toward
Wiference of the implementat Vaktong against strong resistance
the United States polity o In the area of Hyenpung, about
eutralising” Formosa during th |!7 miles north of Yongsan, Com-
riod of the Korean wat murnist beat back men of th
Second Division attempting to

Asked why the United State J‘eke high ground
iS still sending aviation petrc Earlier American marines and

nd other military alfa to Chines ,Secend Division men had attacked



ationalists, Acheson said it wa nd captured the “statghter hous
he responsibility of General Mac idge” after flerce fighting, They
Arthur, United Nations an | %eke through the river at one
nited States Commander t ary .

trengthen forces on Formosa. Hi in are the United Nat’ ens
idded that there could not be any ine t read solid and continu-
iitack from Formosa against th | US: though the pos'tion at Chang-
‘hinese Communist-controlte renee ve outh: of Fag
ainland He emphasised tha | * A at . ny Staff Omeer i
thing was being done by th | " oe oo ais - i te iat
Uinited States to make offensive Wats ms Saat vy yy H a,
ection by the Chinese Nationalist Vr gt bgt A nes Be
rhinnt’ the Chinese Matnianed amtous but , thls was contra -
nha ble cote etter licted by al’ frontline reports
' articularly from the north and

ast where South Korean unit
5 meee laa Lae vere taking the brunt of the
ve ‘ . Sfixvest “attack in the ten-weeks

Will Contribute [°",;

The American 24th Division

To Meteorology held in reserve had been flune

~

n to help battered South Korean

(Barbados Advocate Correspo o plug the Fast coast breach



ent)

J Seales , Allied planes grounded vester

,,, KINGSTON, September 6 lay by thunderstorms and low

The House of Representative louds came out in force agai

today voted for an expenditure tc} pday. to ye Ip hardpressed ground
cover Jamaica's contribut on to roops

‘ ards mise Upeepeny: Gt. tit ) ave Fighters and bombers ‘aunched

vest Indian Meteorological Ser big attack on Pohang which wa

vice on the lines proposed by th«

ported to be full of Commutnis

Colonial Office consequent on the antes They left the port

A re . nistry

x ae a ane ot M nistt ‘rouded by a tremendous cloud

7 2c: ‘ a ‘ an » Qave
The Service will have its head-| — Smoke and debri Several

cuarters in Trin'dad vplos'ons were heard as Altied
= 2 lanes blasted ammunition dumps

~Reuter





NO RESPONSE
To Discuss



AIRSTRIP SOMEWHERE IN
KOREA, Sept. 7
The Pohang airstrip near the] § altpetre Export
East Coast of Korea may have
boen evacuated during the night STOCKHOLM, Sept 6

Transporv pilots who yesterday Protessor A. Baltra, Vice Presi-



evening were able to land there | dent of the Chilean Saltpetre Cor-
reported late last night that they | poration ha arrived in Stock-
‘vcre unable to get any response | ho tn to diseuss the increase in
their signals from the ground,|Chile’s saltpetre exports to Eu-
They said they saw many fires | rope
. —Reuter. Reuter

Of Drastic Consequences
Of Shooting Down Red Plane

LONDON, Sept. 6.

RUSSIA TODAY protested to the United States that a
Soviet aircraft flying off Korea had been attacked and shot
lown by 11 American fighters, Moscow radio reported
The protest note was handed to the American Ambassado:
in Moscow today. It stated that on September 4 at 1944
Korean time, a twin engined plane of the Soviet Airforce
having neither bombing nor torpedo armaments” was on
i training flight from Port Arthur

The note aid the American

eee ey ak Government had put out a “lying

versicr pretending that the

JUST MAD Soviet aireraft had flown over an

e g American ship, The Soviet Gov-

Now Engl'shman, anc ernment t et tine Americat

1 elusive character ha version of the incident,” the not
iscinated foreigners eve stated The Soviet Governmer
ince the early days of his also drew attention of the Unit

cry; and if we were to be States Government to “gravity of
if(ve all the thing: that consequences that m follow’
ave been said about hirn such action.
»y friend and foe alike, The Russian note said that



ve should have a thorough eye-witnesses of the attack








ly bewildering picture. He Russian plane were two other
ws been cal‘ed, in turn, an Soviet planes “which were making
tute, scheming politician, training flights: with the plan
slow, stupid, stick-in—the shot down The Russian note
ud, a grumbling farmer, o stated: “The Government of the
barbarian 1 tyrant, a de- USSR considers it necessary
nerate weakling, a bull- the basis of verified data, to make
dog and a bore. His nation the following statement to th
; been derided ag ‘Perfi- Government of the U.S.A. o i
dious Albion’ and called a September 4 at 1944 hours local
ition of shopkeepers. H Time, two engined plane of tl
has been praised as a mod ; SSR gt nda having nepthes
ern Roman, the champion of v he bing por aly do en
' “SRE the ¢« . a carrying © ’ ainit ligh or
the UE ina ‘ ae Port Arthur to the area of Hai
errant. In fact the only point Yun, an island whic is part
the front of Port Art!
of agreement ever reache ae a tac Pee
by foreigners about the Eng th sh soi i sore u
hman seems to be that h wheal ea oes :
utterly and »mprehen ground pretex acked
bl nad ” nd red or DY - t C h
Mar United States Military Force
of As a result of the attack
nt Soviet plane wa rought dov
. anc fell k rnir the .
ee 7 .
y ener —Reuter

atm”





PAGE TWO












a member of the audience

about n'ne months with: Barclays





BARBADOS ADVOCATE




































THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 7, 1950





















Jennifer JONES

ee —
; ' ) ot ieee
e e To Attend Public — OBicer ee ee I Sess Sy SSS
eam GUldD Va Jama a ;)
Health Course een asnitia ae 1} awe o Be ; abers Orly)
R. CLARENCE HAYNES, Housewives i, Mee ATH CLOD CINEMA Me nly
Government Sanitary In- Back to Brooklyn Guide | a rm Presents
spector and Mr. Basi] Jordan, | > ARNAZ d his Orchestra
Chief Sanitary Inspector, St RS. VERA BRYAN, accom- 7 oa DESI AR an TERS
° os Ph ili . oe a . Prices for Pears and Cu- j ETHEL SMITH — THE KING SIS ‘
Holiday Visit Philip, left for Jamaica over the panied by me aughter cumbers in the local market | y y j9°
week-end by B.W.LA. They have Veronica and pcr pi when the Advocate checked |} in “CUBAN PETE
R. Lionel O. Gittens, Organist gone on a Pub! Health Course, Cynthia Bowen, ail of Brool ly, yesterday were wmmencing Friday 8th ies ™ ESQUE”
of Christ Church Parish which is expecicd to last for ten ‘New Yerk ; bad PEARS & cents each | sean CRAWFORD — Odiberal: tities, ne en te
Church was among the passengers Months, and they hope to return holidsy in Barbados _stay- CUCUMBERS cenis d Perch
leaving yesterday Perel ace for St. to Barbados eariy in July. They ing in Maxwells, left for, per Ib SSeS ———
Lucia on a short holiday visit. will be stationed in Kingston, Puerto Rico on Tuesday mormag i
where he lectures are being by B.W.1A, en route to New York, |
Architect H a, bt ‘0 visit ( where they Ii “| C. Radi EL ae ae
rchitect Tiere given, but will also visit some or where they live nex vo ome | B B adio EEE
the outlying districts residence at which Capt FL eh . ole |
R. HERBERT MENDT who is Mr. Haynes until a short time Parris’s wife is siaying in New | | ,
7 ar a and cane ae ago was acting Visiting Public York | Programme it EMPI RE ROYAL
a e Pennsylvania ate - |
versity, is spending a holiday in} —-—-——— ee ae eee | Sepieraber 7, 105 : : 4 DAY Last Two Shows TO-DAY
-| Barbados with his American wife | N 70 am New| Last ye Sone SP 4.30 & 8.30
} and small daughter Christina. > a.m. The Unbearabl 45 & 8.
He was core in Maracaibo and Ru ert and the Bac a.m. The Pimo fo : iteputlic Double . . .
P i Generally Speaking ; lic Pictures present |
first worked there with the - ; Mak ie ee BT Republic Pictures pres > 1
1.M.C.A. Company, but has now . , jum. Programme Parade; 8 15 p.m | John WAYNE cciestiiae
been transferred to their Branch “4 fonimartre Players; §.30 a ms Beoks ‘0 ° | Ann RA
j in Caracas, They are guests at . eed 8.48 aP Een eens i The Paradine {}
“Caerabank.” : Mews: 1534 bie Mowe Analysis: i 4 Ia
| p.m. Programme Parade; 12 | oo i}
Here For Six Weeks i Liste ners achotce: 1:08.» m (oer | Case |) se Flame of
| Newsreel; 1.30 p.m. Much Binding in i ; i
ENOKA Arminda Lopez and | the Marsh 5.00'p ee mews oi Starring ; Barbary
her cGaughter Beatrice and son i= ns = c Heview: 2.00 p.m. Edin- |} | stegory PECK nn TODD |
vuchard are guests at Cacrabank | vurgt International Festival; 3,50 p.m} | on gory He A ; Coast em
for six weeks. Her husband Josias .y j Dvierlude; 4.00 tee The a pies jj Charles ey vies COBURN | ‘
Lopez is with the Van Dissel Coy, g jp ae pal y Sasvioas 5 2. arles BU
ut San Christobel, Venezuela. 0 a oy le RP hg RS And
ee | Choice; 5.15 p.m. Progremme Parse las i
Ww 1 i ht Rupert picks up one of the strange none the worse, so come oF | 5.90 pm, Listeners’ Choice; 6.00 p.m ** Sam Antonio
e terweig : We must finish our walk and yt The Unbeareble Bassington; 6.15 p.m. ;
leaves and tries to tell again the shopnine * 4 Well, voodbye. Billy.” Creatures of Ciroumstance: oe mito ROXY Kid ord
AT SEAWELL YESTERDAY, a visitor aske a question and Miss Pat OE SINGH, from British Guiana story of the imps and the little dark says, Rupert, ‘ae. they: move away Merchant” Navy, ys a vee ee Sam
Bullen who is in charge of the Information Bureau, gives the answer. is at present in England. Joe bottle while Granny Goat rises % Bo be careful that you pengge cuish 7.15 to 7.30 p.m eee Revert aa . With Wild Bill ELLIOTT
The Bureau at Seawell is a branch of the Barbados Publicity is a boxer whose ambition is to shakily to her feet and tries to thar back-room boy again | hen w a XS, ,Minor, Counties: 7. @ fe 1.4 TO-DAY Last Two Shows
ek ae ae operat _ tan ens gg 9 nae ate roe es they ae nae nk Saint Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p m. Gerald eo 4.30 & 8.15
} 7 cham yen. oug ie . Pee D0 her head. “I can’t make head nor screws wu ig , Speaking; 8.30 p.m. Bunny May; 8.55
REVERAT weeks ave: gane by. was. heed ah ooee Ue ee manager to sponsor him, this box- tail of it.” she savs, “but ! seem Runert. p.m. From the ae 9 Pathe Paramount Big Double .. . OLYMPIC
since one of the Public blossoms She carried a pens ing aspirant receives daily train- British ee Me ay? Saheriades i 15 p.m 3
put down an underground of Pink Anthurium lilies, Tube ing at the Bill Kleim gymnasium _ 0 _— Se er Glee Gain, 1a Ray MILLAND in TO-DAY Last Two Shows
along the main highway in Yoses and white Dahlias. = in iendeo 4 a a ae ee ‘i Y 5 8.30 p.m. Special Dispatch; 11.00 p.m. The 430 & 8.15
‘s from the Hotel Royal Miss Marjarie Scott was the decided upon welterweig and no — Oistin : ni & 8. _m. Hand tar; Pleasuy “
to Gace dons ‘Hote’ in. Maid of Honour, wh’le the Misses lightweight. Joe replied, I can't PLAZA Oistin: TO-DA P oifins “The Sealed Columbia Big Double...
l The. tren was fi flaggie argare th were » lower weight.’ Warner Bros. Presents: Errol FLYNN in
Vorthing he trench was filled Maggie and Margaret Welch were make the a eon
x ‘ ea te hich Sand above the Bridesmaids. Flower giris T ial Arti nokweeN euRSUIT | de, Verdict oe Glenn eee Ida LUPINO
the surface of the road, now after were Miss Poe and onsoria } Me fagdbes re okianasaiias i with an wed we
heh ‘ains the rubble has Miss Pauline Nicholls. Soon os ata eee eerie air | i ne
oetind aa eed ae parts of ‘The ceremony was performed EST INDIANS :n_ London RKO-Radio’s Greatest Action Thriller mr ha Lust forGold
rabid Sedan 2 drop of severai by Rev. O. C. Haynes. Bestman now have their own West Paul HENREID in i ? =; oa
inches below the surface of thy was Mr. Arthur Scott and the Indian barber. Edmund Peddie of “SPANISH MAIN (New Copy) | : ae se |
aoa Gary 4 ot *yclists Ushers were Mr. Cecil Toppin Kingston, Jamaica has now opened Color By Technicolor Et Paso << WwW Ww.
roac ery annoying for cyclists Us ‘ patie oh at S Aor Pinte ' ) e ere
who are forced into the gutter by and Mr. Ivan Bowveall, oe at Seymour i
rotor vehicles and very annoying Coincide i i With St angers ~
for “motor vehicles when the'r oinciaes Hyde Park Orator sieiacanernaneianuniaatcinini - 7 —" SPS? ® | ar
tyres get caught in this sink. y' | G IETY C 4 ST JAMES bia hain aii
R. EVERARD CORBIN, who H h A ( ) ; | pee :
ini eers when The Garden . John GARFIELD
Off To Trinidad M hua” Ean 3h eae te ERE were loud c ; Gail RUSSELL

“UE -to leave today by the around the Coloured Workers’ As-






idaqd Bank | arrived yesterday bY sociation platform in Hyde Park

“Lady Rodney” for Trinidad Bw.tkA. to spend a holiday in iuxed a ee id Peng ol fade

is Mr, Roy Colina Barbados. His trip also coincides jngult the British people when youl
Roy was formerly wih Cable

with his brother Lionel’s wedding. have lived in Britain for so many
Lionel is to be married on Satur- years?” Everyone present thought
day to Miss Joyce Farmer, that was a hard nut to crack. But
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. A. for Robert G. Matthews from
Farmer of “Merton”, Strathclyde, Trinidad, the answer was simple.
and Everard is to be the bestman. “Madam,” he replied, “I insult the

and Wireless and is now with the
Demerara Mutual Life Assurance
Ltd. and he has been transferred
to Trinidad

He has asked me to say goodbye

to his many friends here. British people because I love them

Engagement and I shall keep on insulting them

Wedding till they redeem England from the

HE ENGAGEMENT was an- Pawn-shop of America.” This was

R. EVERTON’ BARROW, nounced on Monday night, oe a Ly Saigo Tescinggan

Assistant Teacher of the between Mr. Henry Cuke, son of oan a ae sone abet Hyde

Bay Street boys’ School and Hon, and Mrs. H. A. Cuke of Park Firminn i Oa Medeay .
Empire all rounder was married “Banavie,” 4th Avenue, Belle- oF open-air asylum ' |
on Thursday at St. Barnabas ville, and Miss Alison Warme, Pp ’ |

daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charlie
Worme of “Hillerest,” Rockley.

Miss Patricia Carter
Lilian Carter of

Church to
daughter of Mr:
Brittons Hill

On Short Holiday

The engagement was also an- RRIVING here on Tuesday by
ey ; .. nounced recently, between Mr. the Fort Amherst from the
The Bride who was given 10 Desmond Tudor, son of Mr, C. R. U.S.A. was Mr. Octavius “Ossie”

marriage by Mr.Odiver Smith,

Tudor of “Staten,” Hastings, and Davis. Mr. Davis has been away
Miss Jean de Freitas, daughter of for over sixteen years and is
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley de Freitas spending a short holiday with his
of St. Vincent. family at Howell’s Cross Road.

WAY...

wore a dress of white crepe back
satin, with a nylon embroidered
yoke and a white silk lace whrci

BY THE





By Beachcomber

, Srighhod words fall on my ears.
A

M OUNTED police had to charge who allow the outline of their Tail-Piece

the ¢rowds four times last braces to be seen beneath their

‘ght to clear a way for the bardic nightshirts. They might ,
Liskimo singer Muk-Muk, who was as well wear bowlers. manufacturer of bind~
finally lowered into Vhe theatre -

cages has said, “I want to regain
world-supremacy for British bird-
cages.”

In and Out

T Rillhampton Manc. Foul-

“enough was not even asked
to stay the nigh’. He had come
cut of the Rillhampton Arms,
end noticed a shooting brake
waiting outside the station. He
bought a platform ticket, met vhe
train, and mingled with the five
people whom the brake was
meeting. His old trick worked
They thought he was a guest who

) the chimney of a neighbour-
ing building.

Muk-Muk
sing, he hums. But he is such
a pleasant chap that one does
not mind. The audience rose id
roared their approval when he
sang Vok-Pu-Mob. Though the
words were unintelligible and
inaudible, the charming smile of
the singer won all hearts, .He
went on for an hour, and when
11€ stopped women screamed hys-






does not actually

CROSSWORD

terically and many fainted. jad come in another compart-
Muk-Muk had Wo be got away ment, and when the brake
disguised as a .milkman, but deposited them at vhe manor he
crowds waited all night outside

: was already on ver ood terms
the theatre in the hope of seeing a 4 ae

wo y Ng se with a rather silly widow.
him. They were joined by Major and Mrs. Clodhope were
campers for the next perform- too polite to ask him if he had
ance

been invited. Each thought the



Oh, I Say, Look Here! other had asked him, He an-
, ~ , mounced that his baggage was
SEE that the new Arch Druid Just, so they sent him into the
of Wales has ruled that in nearest vown to buy some things.

future bards must wear “white He returned in time ‘for dinner,

calfskin boovees, so that their with a case of port. By then
trousers may _ not be seem the truth was out, and he left
beneath their robes.” For years again for an unknown destina-

I have been campaigning against

tion. The port was charged to
the slovenliness of some bards,

bis stony-hearted host.

Stee stsaeee arsine sesseneanisnnise

CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work It:
AXYDLBAAXR %



Sounds s
. This stat a . ‘
. Alwaye %
a Reiative,
. Necessasy im vivews. (6)

Senn
Rare ducts give semethhing to be











ROBERT DOLIGLA
come VINCENT SHERMAN m=" JERRY WALD

ROE Pub WH OUREEE OFF KAHHIuL swe RANEY AummeeD Fae 4 ETOH HY WENELAY OaLusE + ume OF mnt rg





Last Showing TO-DAY THURSDAY 6th
20th Century Fox proudly presents

“MESSAGE 10 GARCIA”

PLAZA



Bridgetown's Prestige The:

THURS. SAT. SUN

MON

THEATRE

atre

TUES. 5 and 8.30 p.m

FRIDAY (Special Planter’s Matinee) 2.30 p.m. Night 8.30
SPECIAL KIDDIES MATINEE: SAT. Morning 9.30 a.m

eed ALAN HALE + ROMNEY BRENT
ANN RUTHERFORD




si

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT!

Patrons who plan to see ‘THE ADVENTURES OF DON JUAN”





STARTING

at the
2.30 Matinee on FRIDAY, are reminded that They Can obtain light re-
freshment at the “PLAZA, SNACK BAR” before or after the Show.





TO-MORROW ....

ETURE OF THE YEAR!

&

ridny. Women’s







eae eee (Le | 6



is LONGFELLOW g. The Distangere waten it 1 (0)
One letter simply stands for another In this example A is used z What the artist 1a: iS be. (8) i
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc. Single letters, apos- TAT tee Aiaeiee ioe hae 00 Gothen. MARGARET WENDEL VIVECA
trophies, the length and formation of the words are all hints. word pusmies | (8) SULLAVAN - COREY -LINDFORS
Each day the code letters are different 3. pine: tah Bo trees on these 4
i alt: olerate. (5) 10, Saucy. (4) 3 a sm tetas WOOD = dete MCRTTINE + tas CORN + Mites QRS :
A Cryptogram Quotation . nk. (4) 18. 8 (3) } teenie tp tener alin Ceedea te nian nel
BXGU FLRKUFAMBUK MRI EPMB “Ott, B, beret ee eh ee Beat ’
Heajae i emgiong 28, Fico | |
XK[ TAUN EXBP MTU QUFLGUK AwU- Bais: 25, Glens de, Neoneh aeen ot — SERB O
Bean 8, Bat Pe Gratiatany, 10.84
WXTXLR-—~FLWUAXITU BA, Tillgge: 24, “temo 25. Odal: “IY EF M I R E
azed: 17. Alone: 19. Mash: 21. Lin + +
LOVE HAS A THOUSAND VAKIZ?D
NOTES TO MOVE THE HUMAN HEART—CRABBE rae
jo = — Sena = SSeS ee SSO.
'

USEFUL —
& TIMELY

FOR LADIES i
Plastic Umbrellas Lovely |
Designs $1.64 ea |
Plastic Raincoats.. $2.18 ea. |
Plastic, in lovely designs

The

Sweetest Voice



reeseinesitaegeaeneeernne rm



STAR
OF

FEATURED
CROONER














GYPSY
* CARAVAN
PROGRAM”

Mr. RAY NUNES
Guest Star on Talent Show

GLOBE ON FRIDAY, SEPT. 8th, 8.30

Sun Shades ....



9le. a yd. |

OF Palm Fans .......... 27¢ ea |
| “ THE Straw Fancy Shopping ai)
Straw Fancy Shopping” “* |B)}
RADIO Hats ............ 98c ea | ii

. 54e up |



LEY
BRITISH
GUIANA

FOR GENTS



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Light & Cool Shirts i in!
Cotton & Silk 76¢ to $5.98 +
ui
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FOR CHILDREN {\f
| Panama School Hats $1.20 up ig |
Linens For Uniforms \
79¢c. a yd. |B),
| Boys Caps from. . 1/- up |

i)

bs Vv
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Boys Shoes All Sizes $3.64 :

up. | |

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| Pr. Wm. Hy. St. .:: Dial 3466 |





MADAM

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Toilet Soap! A wash with this deep-
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KIDDIES MATINEE — 2 P.M. TODAY



5 & 8.30 P.M. TODAY

“TO-MORROW IS FOREVER"

Orson WELLES

— Claudette COLBERT

“RACE STREET”

George RAFT



TODAY — 3 BIG SHOWS — 2 P.M., 5 & 8 30
OPENING TOMORROW — 5 & 8 30

UNIVERSAL: INTERNATIONAL presents

EDWARD G. ROBINSON - BURT LANCASTER






»
sy

ee Oe ~ awe

pen

— Plus —








OUR QUARTERLY SUPER STAR SHOW
EDDY HALL singing “The Lord’s Prayer
COLLEEN ASHBY — “Ave Maria”

MALCOLM MURRAY — “Blue Moon”

TREVOR MARSHALL—‘“Marquita”

FITZ HAREWOOD — “Stormy Weather”
ALVA ARTHUR — “Everything I have is Yours”
CHESTON HOLDER — “So in Love”

aid Introducing - - -
RAY NUNES — STAR OF RADIO ZFY.





“THE MIGHTY JOE YOUNG’
|








freshness that /asts /

L FRESHNESS ALWAYS



A LEVER propwcr



POPHSSHEPR Lhe

ane

ne

1H OPP DETR eteme gee topes

PE Ceee eevee aH



THURSDAY SEPTEMBER



NigerianKing
To Visit
West Indies

(From Our Own Correspondent
f GEORGETOWN,
King Anyanwu Agueri of
Ameze, Obibi, in Oweri, Nigerin,
will be visiting the Br tish
Colonies in the Caribbean early
in September to become acquaint-
ed with the pattern of the social
economic and polit.cal life of the
West Indians of African descent.
King Anyanwu will be stopping
first at British Guiana, flying direct
from New York, and will be guest

of Hon. Dr. J. A. and Mrs
Nicholson during his stay in the
Colony. ‘The visit is sponsored by
the B.G. Branch of the League of

Coloured Peoples.

King Anyanwu is the direct
heir of the late King Nwokoro
Ogueri of Obibi and rules over the
Province-Kingdom under Brit'sh
tutelage. His father ruled for
75 years and lived well over 100
years.

King Anyanwu_ received his
elementary education from Mis-
sionaries and then attended the
Government College, Nigeria, in
preparation for the U.S.A. where
he recently graduated in Politica!
Science and Government from)
Adelphi College, Garden City,
Long Island, New York.

He will be returning to his king-
dom after his West Indies tour



B.G. Spending
More On
Education

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN.

THE Deputy Director of Edu-
cation, Mr. A. A. Bannister, B.A,
during the opening ceremo: ot
the new Anna Catherina A ean
School, West. Coast, Demerara,
disclosed that in 1930 the popula-
tion of British Guiana was 296,691,
the number of pupils in schools
12,734, the number of teachers
1,029 and the expenditure from
education $385,783. In 1950 the
population is nearly 420,000, and
the number of pupils at the end
of 1949, 71,249, the number of
teachers 1,708 and the expendi-
ture on education $2,217,500. {

The new school building was |
declared open by Mrs. Cozier, wife |
of Dr. R. N. Cozier, G.M.O, of the |
West Coast Villages. The building!
is 120x30 feet with a teachers’ wing
24x24 feet. It is on 11-foot con-|
crete posts and can accommodate |
360 pupils, and is still rapidly
growing.

“This evolution in the life of
this particular school,” pointed out
Mr. Bannister, “is indicative of |
the expansion which is taking
place in the educational life of |
the Colony.” He then gave the |
figures for 1930 and 1949, as men- |
tioned above, and added that the |
analysis of these figures will show
that the number of pupils nearly
doubled itself and the number of
teachers has risen by nearly 75
per cent, but what is most re- |
markable is the fact that expendi- |

|



ture on education is six times as
much.

Better Facilities

“This expenditure on education
has meant improved accommoda-
tion, better buildings, better
facilities, such as furniture, school
meals, salaries, and pensions. This
very fine building is the result of
the liberality and willingness of
the Imperial Government to im-
prove the cultural life of the
community. Since the introduction
of the Schools’ Building Pro-
gramme in 1945, we have com-
pleted four entirely new buildings,
replaced twenty condemned ones,
given grants for repairs and
extensions to 38 others, and now
in process of erection is one
entirely new school and _ nine
replacements. Two are for repairs
and expansions and more than
$400,000 has been expended on
this work.”









A beauty treatment
only for the
Privileged few?

ARE

‘y

1950

W. Germans | TREES IN HERKELEY SQUARE

| Attack Soviet
Lone Govt.

BONN, Sept.. 5.

Two West German ministers to
‘ight accused the Soviet
Government of
cealing political terror”. A Specia
People’s Court at Waldheim, Sax
ony, were trying 3,400 men anc
" “inflicting
punishments”

|
|
statement

women and

according to

Jakob Kaiser, Minister for all }
German Affairs.
Trials which began early this|

year were before judges choser
for their subservience
munist allegiance, it continued
“The prisoners were exhauster
by | systematic underfeeding
lin many cases seriously
said.

The prisoners were
proper opportunities
themselves against
espionage, sabotage
Communist offences,

ill.?
denied

charges
and

cases, and chosen
of Communist advocates,
Witnesses were seldom
for prosecution, only
from police ‘and
authorities being admitted,
In most cases sentences

regardless
cumstances,

of extenuating

“Soviet
the statement concluded,
depend upon it that one day

wil) have to answer for
deeds”. —Reuter.

Potato Bars
Social Progress

BIRMINGHAM, Sept. 4.

The potato, by making man lazy,

has been a barrier to social pro-
gress according to a potato expert,

76-year-old Dr. Redcliffe Salaman,

at a British

Association
here,

meeting

A former Director of the Potato

Virus Research Station at Cam-
bridge University, he declared that
the potato’s influence had delayed
progress in Britain and in Ireland
in particular,

He told the Anthropology and





The Weather

TODAY

Sun Rises: 5.51 a.m.

Sun Sets: 6.05 p.m.

Moon (New) September 11
Lighting 6.00 p.m,

High Water 1.18 a.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) 1.37
ins.
Total for Month to Yester-
day. 2.37 ins.

Temperature (Max) 86.0 °F.

Temperature (Min) 76.0 °F.

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.
(3 p.m.) E, S. E.

Wind Velocity 8 miles per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.966
(3 p.m.) 29.895



Archaeology sections of the Bri-
tish Association for the Advance-
ment of Science, which is now in
session here, that the potato had
fitted well into the ‘“‘lazy-bed’
system of crop growing which
Irishmen had developed to avoid
draining wet land, :

Dr, Salaman said that squalid
homes, early marriage, large fami-
lies and lack of personal hygiene
were not thé immediate result of
the potato economy, for they had
all existed to some extent before
it. but the potato intensified each
of these factors and gave them
“inviolable stability”.

The effect of the potato was to
stabilise the standard of life at a
lower level than would have pre-
vailed had no such substitute for
ether food been available, Dr.
Salaman declared.—Reuter.



BEAUTY PREPARATIONS ARE USED BY
ALL WOMEN THROUGHOUT

THE WORLD!

LET **SPONDS”® assist you.
COLD & VANISHING CREAMS— |
FACE & TALCUM POWDERS-— |
LIPSTICKS — HAND LOTION— |
SKIN FRESHENER ETC, ETC.

STOCKED BY





Zone |
r ’ r “flagrant abuses!
of justice for the purpose of con-

monstrous |
a}
issued by Dr. Thomas |
Dehaler, Minister of Justice and

and Com-|

and |

‘|
all;
to defend |
of
other |
the state-
ments continued. Defence Coun- |
sels were allowed only in a few |
from a panel

j
heard |
statements
Communist

i were
fixed before trial and pronounced
cir-|
( occupation
authorities and their accomplices”,
“may
they
their

ALL DEALERS.

—_—_Y



|

'
1}
}

in Berkeley Square—where a
popular song once credited a
nightingale with = singing—the











famous plane trees are

being
lopped of some of their branches

London Express Service



Will Malik Help To

Localise Korea War ?

LAKE SUCCESS, Sept. 5.

AMERICAN DELEGATE Warren Austin today told Jacob
Malik of Russia he had “raised doubts in our minds” as to
whether he supported the Security Council’s effort to local-

ise the Korean War.

The Council was discussing an American resolution ealling
on all nations to refrain from giving aid or encouragement

to North Koreans.

100-Year-Old
Labourer Has
First Son

TORANTO, Italy, Sept. 5.

The 100-year-old Italian peas-
;ant Beraro Di Sandra was today
|; presented by his 42-year-old wife
with a son and heir, born during
an earthquake.

It was Di Sandra’s first child
after 24 years of marriage. He
| married his wife Lucia when he
was 76 and she 18. It had been
his first marriage.

Mother and son were tonight
reported to be doing well. She
had been rushed to hospital last
night and gave birth a few hours
after.

Di Sandri works in a field with
his brother-in-law until late at
night. He told reporters: “I am
happy.”’ He chuckled, “Better late
than never, as they say.”

The name for the son has not
yet been chosen.—Reuter.

Union Threatens
General Strike

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN.
The Guiana Industrial Workers’
Union headed by Dr. P. Lachman-
singh have submitted a 3-point
Memorandum containing 32 de-
mands and a 30-day ultimatum to
ithe B.G, Sugar Producers’ Asso-
ciation, threatening to call a gen-
j eral strike of the Guiana Indus-
trial Workers’ throughout the
Colony if the demands are not met.
















Mr. Austin reported to the
Council on the shooting down of
a plane with Red Star markings
off Korea yesterday

He said his Government had
no more information on the inci-

dent than that contained in his
letter sent yesterday to Sir
Gladwyn Jebb, of Britain, this
month’s Council President.

“All we know is that a member
of the Armed Forces of the

USSR was part of the crew of a
twin-engined bomber which fired
upon an air patrol operating as
part of the United Nations
Forees in Korea”, he added

“This incident
desirability of the immediate
adoption by the Council of the
United States Resolution, e
essential purpose of which {< to
localise the conflict in Korea and
prevent it from spreading to other
areas”.

illustrates the

Opening the
Gladwyn Jebb
ments had been

meeting,
said four
received.

—Reuter.

Six
docu-



Emperor Booed

ROME, Sept 6.

About 20 youths booed and
hissed Emperor Bao Dai of Viet-
nam as he returned to his hotel
in Rome last night after
a tour of the city. Police arrest-
ed some of the demonstrators and
detained four. Since his arrival in
Rome three days ago, Dai has been
the target of fierce attacks by
the Communist press who accused

him of being “a Reich puppet”
and “a Nightclub Emperor.”
—Reuter.
j 2
Buried Treasure
ROME.
A_seven-bifanched solid gold
candlestick, looted by the Em-

peror Titus from the temple of
Jerusalem in A. D. 70, and other
fabulous treasures believed buried
in the bed of the Tiber, may be
recovered soon. A plan to dredge
the Tiber has been revived.
After the fall of the Roman Em-
pire many times great treasures
were thrown into the Tyber to
Bave them from the barbarian
invaders.

AACE

5999S 99S IG 9FFFOOS PO V9OF

SOOSSRSSOOSO OSS VISSOSSS

4

bot



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MR. SHOPKEEPER,
MR. GROCER,

MR. & MRS. EVERYBODY

©

TAKE CAREFUL NOTE
THAT AS FROM THIS
WEEK EVERY 100 lb BAG

OF

SEARLES SPECIAL SUGAR

WILL CONTAIN A_ GIFT
NEATLY PACKED

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
Will Survey

_ B. Honduras










_ For Gold

| Filipinos
Ready For



|

| During or after an

Korea Front |





1
}
|
|

|

| Our Own Correspondent } MANILA
GEORGETOWN | The Philippines crack 10th Bat

Mr. C. G. Dixon, Senior Geolo- | talion Combat Team, the only fully
Bist, attached to the Geologic i} motorised unit in t Philippine |
Survey Department British Gui {Armed Forces, will be the first
ana, has been sent to British Hon: | Filipino contingent to fight on
Guras to carry out a Geological | Korean soil }

| Survey of the Mayo Mountair It is composed matniy of Corre-
where there are indications of gol sidor and Bataan veterans

} an @ tin and the possibility of othe: The combat team of 1.200 offi-/

economic minerals ’
This was disclosed by Mr. Smitl
Bracewell, Director of By itish Gui
®na’s Geologica] Survey on hig |
return from an official visit tc}
Antigua, Jamaica and British Hon- |






duras in cx nnectic with a geolo '
gicai survey in u ‘olonies |
In Jamaica, Mr. Bracewell visit |
@d the bauxite and g psum de
Wosits, and some of the irriga
tion schemes in progress The
bauxite deposits in Jamaica, he|
Said, are bigger than those in}

British Guiana, but the quality is}
not as good He advised the
Jamaica Government concerning
their Geological Survey Pro
gramme and the possibility of its |
expansion

Gypsum is made into plaster
boards and exported to be manu-
factured into plaster bars and to
be used in cement manufacture

British Honduras has had no
Geological Survey as yet. No
mining is done in that Colony
but they are starting a rami fibre
industry The fibre which is
planted by the Colonial Develop



ment Corporation is used for
making the silk used for fibre hose
In the Leeward Islands, Mr

Bracewell advised the Government
and helped to formulate proposals

for a Geological Survey

In Antigua there are deposits
of Barytes which is used for adding
weight to textiles, paper and for)

oil well drilling. There are reports
also of other Minerals Mont- |
serrat \

in





Coconut Producers
Form Association

(From

Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN.
3ritish Guiana’s Coconut pro- |
dteers have formed an association
and at their inaugural meeting it
was decided to write the Trinidad
Association to obtain the cost}
of production existing in Trini-|
dad When this information
is secured a comparative table;



cers and men will be commanded |

by Lt. Col
yeay old Fort Knox,
armour school graduate.

The Phillippines is on record for}

Marigno N. .Castaneda, commant
ing General of
of the Philippines, has announce:
that he is sending a liaison party
of top Filipino military and diplo
matic officials to confer with Gen
Douglas Mae Arthur

The mission, composed of
representative each from

the Armed Forces

i

Mariano C. Azurin, 41}
iKy., advanced |

|

|

|
|

offering 5,009 trocns to the United |
Nations to help the world organ
ion's efforts in securing peac
in war torn Korea }
The other 3,800 sand men}
are slated to undergo extensive j
| military training before they are |
sent oversea
Liaison Party
In this connection, Maj. Gen |

ene}
he |

National Defense, Foreign Aff: rs |

and Jusmag, and_ three

from }

the Armed Forces of the Phil p

pine Headquarters, is
to leave for Tokyo, preceding he
sending of the first contig
oveyseas,

While in the Japanese

they will take up with Gen, Ma





capital,

schedu ‘ed |

ont |

Arthur pertinent matters on the}
re—supply of troops in Korea |
They will also secure information
of such vital subjects as terrain
weather, enemy techniques and}
tactics, and others for militar
raining purposes |
For Tokyo

Lt, Ccb. Carmel aber wh
rimself Is sc luled to ao to Tolsyo |
s a member of the liaison group
said that the mission's survey it]
be utilized in orienting Filipino}

soldiers on actual bavtle conditions |

tr |
|

ebtaining in Korea and wht

expect in such “slugging contests,’
The 10th’ Battalion Combat}

Team is already adequately

trained, Y
indergo some more training
Japan preparatory to their trans
fer to Korean battlefronts ne
Tn addition to its regular infan

The torce, however, will
in

try unit, the 10th B.C.T, has one

battery of self-propelled artillery
yne company of medium

tanks,

of the cost of production in the two; ene reconnaisance detachment of

colonies will be forwarded to the
Government in an effort to secure |
an increase price for coconuts

The Association also decided to
write the Colonial Secretary re-
questing a copy of the Coconut Bill
Which the Government is putting
forward to reorganise the entire
coconut industry. |

Following are the members of the
Committee of the new Association:
President, Mr. Doroop Maraj; Vice
President, Mr, F. O, Low; Secte-
tary, Mr, J. P. Barlow; Treasyrer,
Mr, B. Boodhoo; Asst. Secretary,
Mrs. E. C. Marks; with Messrs J. F.
Martins, E. Doobay, Carlos Gomes,
JOOP. Barlow, Jnr., H. Rahaman
and M. S. H. Rahaman.



light tanks, plus medical corps and
other subordinate camp pe*son-
nels,--LN.S.



AVALANCHE KILLS
CLIMBERS

MEXICO CITY, Sept. 5.
An avalanche swept down on
25 Mexican mountain climbers on
Sunday, killing three and bury-

ing another
e Alpine
froup of its members was climb-
ing 17,887ft. Mount Popocatepetl

when an avalanche of rocks swept

them away.—Can, Press.



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PAGE THREE



—_—_—_— ‘n-ne



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PAGE FOUR





Thursday, September 7, 1950



TODAY'S SIREN

TO-DAY at noon the wail of a siren will
be heard in Bridgetown.

“At Coleridge Street Central Police
Station an experiment is being conducted
to-day to decide how effective sirens will
be in informing the public of Barbados of
an approaching hurricane.

The Government have shown prompt
awareness of the fact that existing systems
of hurricane and cautionary warnings are
in themselves inadequate to warn the
whole island of approaching hurricanes.
To-day’s practice has been made possible
by the discovery in Barbados of five sirens.
Only one of these sirens will be used to-day.

The purpose of the experiment is to dis-
cover how far the noise of the siren can be
heard from Coleridge Street Police Station.
It is not anticipated that it will be heard
at North Point Lighthouse, The Crane, or
Bathsheba, or even as far inland as Gun
Hill, but, residents in outlying districts or
suburbs of Bridgetown need not be alarmed
if they do not hear to-day’s siren. The
Government does not know what range
each siren has and it is attempting to find
out.

It has made arrangements through
official channels for reports to be made but
it is in the interest of the island as a whole
that people who live in outlying districts
several miles from Bridgetown should
notify the Se¢retariat direct or through
the correspondence columns of this news-
paper if the siren is heard by them.

The test will be held to-day at noon when
there will be much more noise than after
nightfall. Ht will therefore be a crucial
test and results will indicate clearly the
range of the siren.

If to-day’s siren proves satisfactory the
Government will conduct further tests to
see how best the five available sirens can
be used on an island-wide basis.

Tests may prove that five sirens will be
adequate. They may prove that five or
maybe fifteen more are necessary. But
whatever the outcome of the test, the Gov-
ernment are to be congratulated on their
speedy move to improve the system of
cautionary and hurricane warnings. It is
up to the public to express their views
freely on the results of today’s test. The
time for constructive criticism is before the
event, Anybody can be wise afterwards,
Inform the Secretariat and write to this
newspaper to-day so that from your infor-
mation the Government can continue to
take precautions in your own interest.

GIVE MORE FOOD

THE response to the appeal made in this
newspaper for gifts of food and clothing
for the people of Antigua has been good.
During the last two days several ladies,
including Lady Collymore who was head
of the “Win the War” organisation years
ago, have been hard at work parcelling
these gifts. So well was the work done
that three boxes of clothing and one of food
were despatched by plane yesterday.

The packing continues and to-morrow
it is proposed to send more gifts by the
Schooner Princess Louise and on Tuesday
by The Caribbee.

In the circumstances the flow of gifts has
been steady and does justice to the reputa-
tion of Barbadians who are always willing
to help those in distress.

Not only individuals but business houses
have made contributions of food and cloth-
ing old and new and it is noticeable that
clothing for women is in the preponder-
ance. But there is one thing more to be
done. The gifts of clothing have out-
stripped those of food and whilst there can
be no reduction in the flow of gifts of
clothes, there is at the moment greater
necessity for gifts of food.

The Y.M.C.A. has become the headquar-
ters for the work of relief and there the
Secretary, members of his staff and other
helpers are working long periods to collect
and collate the gifts, parcel and despatch
them.

There have been also gifts of money.
Some of these will be added to the general
fund while some will be despatched im-
mediately.

Our Readers Say:

‘Hurricane
To The Editor, The Advocate, .

SIR,—I am reluctant to admit that I am a resi-
sent of St. Peter, and consequently a neighbour
of the correspondent who wrote in your columps
on Tuesday September 5.

I notice that he is a man with a double griev-
ance. First he is angry because the hurricane did
not know its own mind, or else did not
reveal its intentions to those members of the.
community who had the sense to understand its
language. Secondly, the Police did nov serve him
with the false alarm early enough, and then did
not keep their flags flying long enough after all
his trouble of barricading and other preparations.

I think, that instead of criticising the system
of precautions which can never be wholly effective,
your correspondent oughyto thank God who alone
rules the storm

A mere consideration of wind velocity is idle if
England can take a gale of ninety miles per hour
so much the better for it, but Mr. Cunliffe-Owen
should take a trip to Antigua and see if this busi-
hess was just another cry of “Wolf

SPEIGHTSTOWN

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

The Constitution
Of Switzerland



(With Acknowledgement To External Affairs, Canada)

15,950 square miles, and with a
population of 4,555,000, as in Ca-
nada, peoples of different races.
religions and languages live har-
moniously together and the rights
uf minority groups are protected
| by a federal system of govern-
} ment.

The present constitution of
Switzerland can best be under-
| stood in the light of its historical
development. Independence and
| €emocracy began for the Swiss in
1291 when the freemen of the
three forest cantons of Uri,
Schwyz and Unverwalden, under
uttack from the House of Haps-
burg, bound themselves into an
“Everlasting Alliance”. The Alli
ance had to struggle hard for its

|
IN Switzerland, with an area of
}
\
{

existence but gradually it ex-
panded until the original three
founders had formed a_ solid
league with Lucerne, Zurich,

Berne, Glaris and Zug. Later in
the 16th century, Fribourgh, So-
leure, Basle, Schaffhouse and
finally Appenzell joined the
League, and in this form it re-
mained for three centuries as the
“League of Thirteen Members”.
In addition to the thirteen mem-

ber cantons there were small
Allied states, including some
which are now cantons of the
Confederacy and subject terri-

turies such as Ticino conquered
by the three original mountain
cantons, and Vaud conquered by
the Bernese.

At first the Confederacy was a
cose alliance, but in time it be-
same the practice to call together
-very year a Diet made up ot
wo delegates from each canvon
ind one delegate from each allied
state. The functions of the Djet
were largely consultative and the
cantons themselves remained

| sovereign communities. Some of
the cantons, praticularly the
mountain staves, were pure de-
mocracies in which the people
lirectly exercised their power by
meeting in popular assemblies of
all the citizens to discuss public
affairs; other cantons, including
‘hose more urban in character,
had aristocratic forms of govern-
ment with certain families exer-
cising hereditary privileges.
Perpetual Neutrality

The 16th, 17th and 18th centu-
, ries were a period of peaee and
prosperity for the little sove-
reign states. After one disastrous
intervention in the Italian wars
early in the 16th century, the
Confederacy adopted thav policy
of prepetual neutrality which
has since become the cornerstone
ef Switzerland’s existence as a
modern state.

The Confederacy was seriously
weakened by the crisis of the
Reformation. The new ideas made
great progress in the urban can-
tens, bu’ the mountain cantons
remained true to the Catholic
fuith. Civil wars broke out be-
tween the two groups and it was
only continual threats from
abroad that preserved the Con-
federacy.

A loose organization of this
character, made up of svates
with divergent views and lacking
any genuine Swiss patriotism,
was in no condition to withstand
the shock of the French Revolu-
tion and the wars to which it
gave rise. Switzerland was soon
under contro! of the French Re-
public. The new masters at firs’
created the Helvetic Republic, a
centralized state in which the
cantons were merely administra-
tive units. This led to a violent
reaction on the part of the Swiss!
people, who clamoured for can-
tonal autonomy. The only sup-
porters of a strong central gov-
ernment were the inhabitants of
the former subject territowes,
vho welcomed their release from
the control of the cantons, Final-
ly. after a brief period of civil
war, Napolean intervened and
bestowed on Switzerland — the
Act of Mediation of 1803, a Cqn-
stitution drafted with the cols
boration of the Swiss themselves.
The centralized State was com-
pletely abolished, but the allied
and subject verritories were con-
verted into six new cantons, thus
sotisfying the inhabitants of
tnese territories as well as those
who wanted sovereign cantons.
The Constitution provided for a
Diet with one delegave from each
cf the nineteen cantons but with
tie six largest cantons having
iwo votes. Each of these six can-
tons was to have the headship of
the Confederacy in turn for one

year.
The Pact of 1815
With vhe fall of Napoleon the
Diet repealed the Act of Media-



tion and drew up a new Consti-
tution which became known as
the Pact of 1815, This provided
tor two Federal organs: a Diet
in which each canton had one de-
legate and one vote, and a Direc-
torate to be exercised in turn for
vwwo years by the Cantons of
Yurich, Berne and Lucerne. In
cther words, Switzerland was to
remain a Confederacy of sove-
reign states, united in an everlast-
ing alliance for purposes of de-
fence. It was shortly before the
Pact of 1815 that the number ot
cantons was raised to the pre-
sent figure of twenvy-two by
the adhesion of Geneva, Neucha-
tel and Valais. It was also at this
time that the neutrality of Swit-
zerland, which hitherto had bee.
purely voluntary, became con-
teactual. The Powers guaranveed
Swiss neutrality by the Declara-
tion of Vienna of March 20, 1815,
and by the second Treaty of
Paris of November 20, 1815,

The revolutionary disturbances
in France in 1830 were reflected
in a liberal movement in Switzer-
lend, The cantons which had
nristocratic forms of government
introduced democratic consvitu-
tions, at the same time proclaim-
ing the sovereignty of the people
and guaranteeing liberty to the
individual.

Shortly after this the distinc-
tive Swiss polivical institutions,
the referendum and the right of
popular initiative, were introduc-

———— LT

ed, although it may be said that
these rights had _ existed for
centuries in those democratic
mountain cantons where ine
»yeople themselves directly ex-
ercised their power through

meetings of popular assemblies
of all the citizens. The first men-
tion of the legislative referendum
is found in the 1831 Constitution
of the Canton of Si. Gallen. The
right of legislative initiative was
first introduced in the Canton of
Vaud in 1845,

Religious conflicts
wo threaten the
These came to a head in 1847,
when civil war broke out be-
tween vhe Protestant and Catholic
cantons, the latter having con-
cluded among themselves a se-
parate alliance which the Diet
considered incompatible with the
Pact of 1815. After a campaign
of twenty days the Catholic army
was defeated and vhe ground was
prepared for the framing of a
New _Constitution according to
the ideas of the Radical-Liberal
Party which was then predomi-
nant in most of the cantons. The
revolutions which occurred
throughout Europe in 1848 had a
strong influence on Switzerivnd
and served to free the Confed-
eracy from foreign intervention in
Swiss affairs.

A new Federal Constitution
was adopted on November 12,
1848; the old Confederacy dis-
appeared and in its place was
created a federal state—the Swiss
Confederation. The authors of
the Constitution drew heavily
upon the example of the United
Staves, but maintained many
features which were inherited
from Switzerland’s past. Like the
Canadian Constitution, it was a
compromise between the princi-
ples of centralization and of can-
tonal or provincial autonomy. Al-
though a further new Constitu-
\.on was adopted in 1874, it merely
served to elaborate and bring up
to date the 1848 Constitution, In
1948, Switzerland celebrated the
centenary of its existence as a
riodern federal state,

Organization of the

Swiss State

The organization of the Swiss
State consisis of a Federal Coun-
cil, exercising the executive
power; a bicameral Federal As-
sembly; invested with the legis-
lative power; and a Federal Tri-
bunal, endowed with the judicial
power. The Federal Council is a
college of seven public officials,
each of whom devotes his whole
time to affairs of state. They are
elected for a term of four years
by the two houses of the Federal
Assembly, sitting together. A

continued
Confederacy.



London Express Service.



Federal Councillor cannot at the
same time be a member of the
Federal Assembly. This provision
in Switzerland's constitution, se-
parating the executive from the
legislature, is not found in the
Canadian Constitution where a
Federal Cabinet Minisver is also
a member of the House of Com-
mons.

No canton can have more than
one representative on the Federal
Council. There is a tradition that
the Cantons of Berne, Zurich and
Vaud, one other French-speaking
canton, and, to a less extent, the
Centon of Ticino, should be re-
presenived on the Federal Council,
This tradition was sufficiently
strong to secure the election in
1947 of a Vaudois even though
there had been a break in the
tradition for some years. Unlike
the Canadian Cabinet the Federal
Council does not resign if sub-
ject to an adverse vote in the
Assembly. A Federal Councillor
may be, and usually is, re-elected
There have been examples otf
over twenty years service on the
Federal Council.

Each Federal Councillor ad-
ministers one of the seven
government departments: Politi-
eal (External Affairs); Interior
(Cultural Affaws); Justice and
Police; Military; Finance and
Customs; Public Economy (Trade,
Labour and Agriculture); and
Posts and Railways. Another of
the Federal Counc llors is elected
as alternate head of a depart-
ment so that each member of the
Federal Counc 1 serves as head of
one department and alternate
head of another.

The President of the Federal
Council is elected by the Federal
Assembly for one year only and
is not immediately re-eligible for
the position of President. He is
the President of the Confedera-
tion and represents the State at
public functions. He enjoys little
or no special powers by virtue
of his office. Whereas in some
federal constitutions the Presi-
dent has very extensive powers
and is in fact the executive
branch of the government, the
President of the Swiss Confedera-
tion is simply one member of
a college of seven public officials
elected to preside over their
deliberations for a period of one
year at atime. It is this highly
impersonal character of the
Swiss system of government that
distinguishes it from all others,

The Federal Assembly

The Federal Assembly is com-
posed of two houses: the Council
of States. made up of two
representatives from each canton,

and the National Council, made
uv of representatives elected by
Swiss male citizens in the
proportion of one for every
22,000. inhabitants, both Swiss
and fore'gn. A general election

for the National Council is held
every four years, the last having
taken place in 1947. The election
is held on a basis of proportional
reprewintation, each canton o:
half-canton forming ‘a _ consti-
tuency lor electoral college.
Consequently each canton or
half-canton, no matter how smal! |
in population, elects at least one

representative,
As regards the Council 0/|
States, the candns themselves |

freely decide on the way thei. !
representatives are to be electe:t|
or nominated, on their elegibility |
and on their term of office. |
Another link between the |
federal parliament and the can-;
tons, which does not exists in
Canada, is the large number of}
members of cantonal gevernments

elected both to the National;
Council and to the Council of
States. |

The two Councils meet con-

separate
they

sit in
when
Assembly

of the

but
except
the Federal
members
the President

currently
chambers
meet as
(a) to elect
Federal Council, S
members of the Federal Tribunal
and of the Insurance Tribunal
the Chancellor of the Confedera-
tion, who heads the permanent
Secretariat of the legislative anc
executive authorities of tne
Confederation, and in time of war
or national emergency the Genera’
in command of the Army; (b)
to exercise the right of pardon’
and (c) to settle conflicts of
jurisdiction between the Federal
Council and the Federal Tribunal
The two Councils are equal
enjoying the same rights and
powers, and agreement betwee)
them is necessary for the fram-
ing of laws.

Federal Courts
The only federal courts in
Switzerland are the Federal
Tribunal and the Federal Insur-
ance Tribunal, The members of
these two courts are elected by
the Federal Assembly for a term
of six years and are eligible for
The Fed-
also elects the
President and Vice-
President, who are not immed-
iately re-eligible. The Federal
Tribunal has its seat at Lausanne
and the Federal Insurance
Tribunal at Lucerne. The Fed-
eral Tribunal has powers of
original or appellate jurisdiction
according to the nature of the
case. The Federal Constitution
expressly provides that judic al
organization and procedure, and
the administration of justice,
shall remain within the juris-
dction of the cantons in the
same measure as in the past
Appeals to the’ Federal Tribunal
from the decisions of ¢antonal
courts are permitted in certain
eases. The Federal Tribunal has
or ginal jurisdiction in cases of
high treason, ‘n cases involving
the Confederation and the cantons
or between the cantons them-
selves and in certain other cases
specified by federal law. |

immediate re-élection,
‘eral Assembly
Tribunals’

The most important aspect in
which the Federal Tribunal
differs from the Supreme Court
of Canada is that while the

Federal Tribunal may examine
the constitutionality of cantonal
laws, it has no right to discuss
the conformity of federal laws
with the Federal Constitution,

As in Canada, the separation
of powers is not rig dly defined
in the Swiss Constitution which
provides that, subject to the
rights of the people and of the
cantons, the supreme authority
is vested in the Federal Assembly.
Both the Federal Assembly and
the Federal Council have judicial
powers. The two Councils of
the Federal Assembly deal with
appeals aga‘nst certain admini-
strative decisions of the Federal
they also exercise the
amnesty
the

Council;

right of
together,
The
appeals
by
vices,

and, sitting
right of pardon.
Federal Council _ settles
agamst decisions taken
its own administrative ser-
which are not expressly
within the jur’sdiction of the
Federal Tribunal, The Federal
Council has also legislative func-
tions in that it has the right to
publish ordinances in execution
of federal laws.

Residuary Powers Rest With

Cantons

The whole basis of the Swiss
Constitution is that powers not
conferred expressly upon the
Confederation rest with the
cantons. Here the Swiss Con-
federation differs in principle
from that of Canada where the
residuary powers are left in the
hands of@the Federal authorities.
There is not, however, the same
clear cut division of jurisdiction
between the Confederation and
the cantons as exists in Canada
between the Federal Government
and the provinces. One of the
chief aims of the 1874 Constitu-
tion was to bring about greater
centralization of military affa‘rs;
yet the cantons form the battal-
ions, appoint officers, provide the
soldiers’ personal equ pment and
mobilize the troops, although the
provision of arms and ammuni-
tion and the higher direction of
the army rests with the Confed-
eration. Museums and_ art
galleries are the special concern
of the cantons, but the Confedera-
tion helps out in certa’n cases.
Education comes under the
Jurisdiction of the cantons, but
the Institute of Technology at
Zurich is a federal institution
Finally, the Federal Assembly
has enacted a series of codes,
both civil and criminal, which
have almost entirely unified the
laws of the country, ¢

A foreigner‘ from another fed-
eral state is struck by the degree

of co-operation between the
Confederation and the cantons
This is made possible by the
smallness of the country, the
representation of the cantons ‘rn
the Counsil of States and the

number of members of cantonai
governments who are also mem-
bers of the Federal Assembly
Most important of all, however,
is the fact that ,through the
rights of referendum and initiat ve
the people directly participate in

the fram‘ng of laws so _ that
cantonal autonomy is left to the
protection of the Swiss people

themselves as well as to that of

the Constitution,

1

een

' COLUMBUS |

AND THE
DOCKERS

By DONALD CAMPBELL
in the P.L.A. monthly for August

WHEN young Christopher Columbus was

checking goods in a warehouse or on the
dockside between those periods at sea when
he learnt the mysteries of sail and navigation
Genoa was indeed as proud a city as her
nickname, Zena La Superba, proclaimed.
Her fame and wealth were built on her sea
trade, and her merchant bankers were also
shipowners. Greatest of all her institutions
was the. Bank of St. George, with head-

| quarters in that beautiful palace which was

the headquarters of the Genoa Port Authority
in» 1939.

It was in Genoa during the fifteenth
century that the first guild of dock and ship
workers came into being—the Compagnia
dei Caravana. This society was composea
solely of men engaged in physical work ai
the dock or in ships of the port of Genoa
or her colonies.

Unlike other trade guilds of the time, the
Compagnia was not penetrated by the smal:
employer or wealthy burgess. In fact, the
company was very much akin to our trade
unions of to-day. It lived on good terms
with bankers and shipowners, especially with
the all-powerful Bank of St. George, and was
very much a closed shop; “tickets” were
handed down from father to son.

Members of the company had their own
distinctive working dress of sky-blue jersey
and white kilt. Not only did they work at
the docks and in ships of Genoa itself, but
picked squads of volunteers were sent to the
outlying colonies of the republic in Asia
Minor and on the shores of the Black Sea.

The company had an amicable understand-
ing with the Cammali, another guild or union
which dealt with the cartage of goods from
the docks.

The language spoken in Genoa, then one of
the greatest and richest ports in the known
world, was Zenese, that nasal dialect that
you can hear to-day and which is almost
incomprehensible to other Italians, combin-
ing as it does a mixture of old Phoenician and
Celtic languages with more modern Arabic
and Spanish.

In those days in Genoa, capital and labour
lived on very good terms with one another.
Likely lads were given a chance in the ship-
ping business and a number of ships’ captains
and part owners came from the sturdy docker
stock, Education was on a much wider and
higher level in Italian cities than it was in
the rest of Europe and the boy who learnt
his three “Rs” could go to sea as an appren-
tice—as Christopher Columbus did—and
employ his time ashore checking in the ware-
houses and learning the business side of
shipping.

The system of employment appears to have
been somewhat similar to that obtaining in
the Port of London of to-day; the Bank of
St. George employing a large number of the
Compagnia members, and other concerns
maintaining lesser teams while there was a
pool of workers‘ who would be hired as re-
inforcements during rush periods or by small
firms who could not afford to keep on
regular gangs.

Genoa built the best ships in Europe at this
time.
of France, for whom she also built many
warships but her trading caravals, ships
large as they were for the period, carried
very small tonnage so the stowage of cargo
was a very positive art.

Shipowners encouraged their employees
to buy up a few cubic feet of cargo space.
It was easy to find goods at bargain prices

Spain, Portugal, England and even the
Barbary Coast ports. Ships’ captains were
offered a share in the profits as part payment
for their services, and cautious owners and
shippers inserted in their contracts—all set
forth in Latin—that so many men-at-arms
should be carried on board and that a number
of the crew should also be armed and
exercised in the use of weapons.

From what can be gathered from docu-
ments of the period, the dockers and port
workers were a very independent body ot
men, They lived well and were respected
as valuable members of the _ republic's
economic system. An official document of the
time sets forth that they were a municipal
institution which had regard for the welfare
of the public and the trade of the City.
Genoa had by this time established herséli
as a centre of the wool trade, and the chief
weapon factories of the period were also
to be found within her confines, so there was
never lack of employment.

A “ganger” of dock workers might have
one son a ship’s officer, another working as a
cartographer, and a third as a clerk in one
or other of the Genoese banking cifices in
Spain or Portugal. He himself might—and
often did—buy up ship space for a small
cargo to be sold abroad.

It was only later that disastrous wars and
the sudden influx of wealth from the
Americas destroyed the real prosperity of
Zena La Superba.

Her admirals were hired by the King,

in Genoa that would sell at a large profit



|











Ios

.

4
.

>
%



PAL SCSOOSOOSS SS SOSSOOOSS OOS POS O PS FO SSF S COOP OSS

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 7, 1950
seen aman cean emenaatta aA

TO-DAY'S SPECIALS
at the COLONNADE

D, V: SCOTT
& CO. LTD.
Usually Now
$ c. $ c.
3.20 3.00
.33

20

TINS OX TONGUES
TINS KRAFT CHEESE
Bots. N.E. BEER

37

MESH WIRE FOR ALL PURPOSES

24 in, x 12 in., 18 im., 24 in., 36 in., 48 in
\% in. x 18 in., 24 in., 36 in., 72 in.

1 in. x 48 in.

11% in. x 18 in., 24 in., 36 in., 48 in., 60 in.
1% in. x 36 in., 48 in., 60 in., 72 in.

WIRE

1¢ in, x 24 in., 36 in.

4 in, x 24 in., 36 in. '
LASHING WIRE, 14, 16 and 18 Gauge

GALVANISE BARBED WIRE—50 th Coils

GALVANISE WIRE—50' and 100’ Coils

ALUMINUM CLOTHES LINES

STAINLESS STEEL RIGGING WIRE-—', in., 3-16 in., 5-32 in,
GALVANISE STAPLES—', in., and 4, in.

EXPANDED METAL—1 in., 1'% in., 2 in., 3 in. — 8’ x 4’ Sheets

WOVE



WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.
Successors to

C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD.

"Phones 4472 & 4687

PROTECT
vOUR

BUILDINGS

swith

INTERNATIONAL
PAINTS

NON-CHALKING BEST QUALITY
FRESH STOCKS ARRIVED



obtainable at ----

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents.



Dial 4689 for Shades and Particulars





With A Tropical
Pith Helmet

THE CORRECT HEAD WEAR

FOR THE HOT DAYS AHEAD.
Select Yours from the following ...

Covered in White at ............. $4.21 Each
Khaki at ........... ;

” ”

” a” Silk at



DaCOSTA & Co.,
DRY GOODS DEPT.



CARR'S”











$
~ A
TODAY >
%
~
+
Assorted FROM
%
| \ R x
-
-
| 3
New Stocks arrived - - - x
AFTERNOON TEA BIS- ‘7 >
CUITS IN TINS AND PKGS. Toast with the %
ISH ASST. IN TINS ‘
AND PKGS. best %
BOURBON IN TINS AND x
PKGS. x
OSBOURNE IN TINS AND x
AND PKGS. S
OSBOURNE IN TIN AND $
DIGESTIV :
E IN TINS AND x
PKGS. %
CBLERY CHEESE IN TINS %
Tt IN TINS. e q
ALMOND CRISPS IN TINS. GUase STOUT, $
CHEES $s , eae
(CHEESE CRISPS IN TINS. DRY SACK SHERRY. *
Me PRUNIER BRANDY. %
VIELLE CURE. %
GOLD BRAID RUM x
J: CIALS CROWN DRINKS %
26-OZ. WORCESTER
SAUCE $1.06.
RAISINS iéc. PER Lb. aa 8&8
a SMOTIVIX SUVIK et ‘
of SMOTIVIN HSUVIC OYEhEn 8
2 Lb. TIN HUNTLEY AND OX TONGUES x
PALMERS BISCUITS $1.80. FRESH VEGETABLES nS
1 Lb, TIN MARMALADE. ORANGES. x

>

ce NA LLL LC RR

TELL ALCL!

ee



THURSDAY



PTEMBER 7, 1950



Y.M.C.A. Sends First

Relief Flight To Antigua

THE work of relief for the distressed people of Antigua |



who have been hit. by the recent hurrieare continues
and the general public have responded well.

The ladies are on duty for long hours and ‘Lady Collymore

and Mrs. A. A. Gibbons assisted by many others are packing

the gifts from business houses and individuals

Boxes of shoes of all sizes. fo-

* a and women, worn shoes, hats

Bo Ss Clubs old and new, dresses, suits for

y men must all be handled; and deft

fingers are sorting the soft fineries

St t Ph e l from the coarser garments fo-
: ar ysica men and boys.

epace

As soon as these are separated,
they are categorised and made
ready for packing. The boxes from
stores are used as packing cases.

Denied Themselves

PHYSICAL TRAINING Class Several boxes of toilet requisites:

has been started for tnejand other items have been offered.
members of the Bay Street Boys’|Canned goods have been supplied
Club. Although these classes are| by business houses and ‘t is indica-
purely voluntary, an average ofjtive of the Barbadian method of
about 20 to 30 boys turn out|help that individual householders
every Tuesday and Friday. jhave denied themselves of things

A Committee was recently|which they had already bought
‘urmed for the running of the|for their uses and have given them
barbados Boys’ Clubs — as the|for despatch to Antigua.

‘Training

Bay Street Boys’ Club and the Because of the ready response
two new Boys’ Clubs at Pinfold the Committee have been able
Street and Speightstown. will be to send four boxes, one of food

called in future.

This Committee is made up of
Col. R. T. Michelin, Commissioner
ci Police, Miss Betty Arne, Social

and three of clothing yesterday
This was because the B.W.LA..,.
plane service was available and
the agents kindly consented to

Welfare Officer, and Mr. E. H.} help with the early despatch of
Walcott, Probation Officer. these gifts. 2

The Commissioner of Police On Tuesday more parcels will
suid yesterday that two lists of/be sent by the “Caribbee, while

those for despatch by the Schooner

members are now being prepared : ;
' 6 prep “Princess Louise” are getting the

fer the new Clubs that will short- out "
ly be opened at Speightstown and finishing touches today. Others will
Pinfold Street. * be sent as opportunity arises

He said that any boys wanting; Within the next few days.

tu join the Pinfold Street branch All Sympathetic
can now apply to the warden at Yesterday morning, Lady Rae
the Bay Street Boys’ Club and Mr. B. A. T. Williams con-
ORRY DRIVERS, who are/jtinued their tour of the ci oe
carrying passengers, must have | appealing for help for the urri-
their seating accommodation ap- |¢@ne victims. They visited Swan
proved of by the Highways and Street and everyone was sym-
Transport Department, the Com- {Pathetic and generous in their gifts
missioner of Police told the Advo-!and the response was so great that
cate yesterday. the other voluntary workers at the
He said that Y.M.C.A., had an extremely busy
so that people driving in public day receiving, sorting and packing
service yehicles can be given| the various articles, 4
pioper seating accommodation, Mrs, Skewes-Cox who answere
This also refers to cars, etc ,|Phone calls, supervised ae eee
ete. which were converted to|tering of parcels, the fete
rickups for the purpose of taking receipts for donations an -~
passengers. checking on the marking of e
He said that Police Constables | ¢@S¢S, also had a et aro ee
are now out warning drivers of; In, addition a acon per
these vehicles, who are desirous Beanery, gees eae gifts in-
of carrying passengers on October | fi"ms, there were a te
® (Bank-Holiday) to have their|¢!ding hardware, a case 0 a,
seating accommodation approved | Sugar and toilet requisites. isis

of at an early date Small quantities of foodst

, mn Bet {rom various firms and private in-
PICKUP, O-181, owned ==" were also received, but
|







this is necessary

driven by A. Holder of|there is still need for more of
Clevers Hill, St. Joseph, caughi] :hese
afire at about 9.45 yesterday
morning along Horse Hill, op- Messrs. William Fogarty Ltd.,
posite the St. Joseph Vestry rooms, instead of making a cash contri-
The pickup” was: loaded with bution to the relief of the hurri-
passengers who along. with] cane victims, have sent $500.00
residents of the district, assisted] oth of clothing to the Y.M.C.A.,
in putting out the blaze. twhich includes vests, shoes and
RALEIGH BICYCLE, which; gress material for men, women
was removed from the Public! and children.
Library on June 29, was found in More male helpers are wanted
a wéll at Hill Road, Bank Hall on}to assist in the nailing up and
Moriday last. The handle bars| marking up of cases, says the
and wheels were badly damaged.} General Secretary of the Y.M.C.A.
TELLA SKYES of Avondale,| Further donations received were.

$500 Clothing

; ‘ 5 00
Bank Hall, reported to the{ Rev ot ore ean oop
Police that her 30-year-old| MMS) ‘yard 5 00
husband, Holmes Skyes, left home} Mrs. M BE Yearwood ee
- ewis
at about 10 a.m .on Saturday last ore MN Howell 28
for work at Bulkeley Plantation,| xyz City Pharmacy



€t. George, and has not yet re-| Amount previously acknowledged Ee

turned, TOTAL $51.00
YLVESTER SMITH, alias San

s “Paint Donkey,” “Samuel

Smith,” “Clarrie King,” “James

brathwaite” and ‘Adolphus Ben-
skin”,” of Prince of Wales Road |
Rank Hall, was arrested by Cpl.

Country Folk
. T
Byer at about 6.15 a.m. yesterday. Don t Want oO
He was wanted in connection
with the theft of a bottle of sweets In 7 .
irom the First Aid "Shop of Beryl | Stay own
Mayers at Bank Hall on July 238.
AFTER 7 P.M.

WING TO the recent rains the
NOW and again people who live

telephone line at the District
‘E’ Police Station is out of order,

ONICA FIELDS of Bath} in the country parishes write

Village, Top. Rock, Christ! letters to the Press or make
@..a_ch, a pedestrian, was injured complaints otherwise over the fact
man accident along Rockley Road } that buses which serve those
at about 12.30 p.m. on Tuesday | routes discontinue their service
She was treated at the General) around 7 p.m.—three hours earlier
Hospite, and discharged, than normal stopping time in St.











Fields, who had just alighted! ichael,
from a ‘bus, collided with the When asked about it, "bus con-
motor car X-612, driven by Coral
Kinch of Graeme Hall, Christ
Church, 9
on T
HEE ANNUAL Police Dance, What's n ‘oday

which is in aid of the Police
Sports Club, will be held at the

Meeting, Commissioners of
Health, St. Michael at

Drill Hall on Thursday night, 12.30 p.m.
September 28. Meeting, St. Thomas Vestry
‘PRUE POLICE BAND, under at 1.30 p.m.

Water Polo at Aquatic Club
at 5.00 p.m.

Police Band at Charity Con-
cert, Speightstown Boys’
School at 8.00 p.m.

Capt. C. E. Raison, will play
for the two one-act plays that will
be presented by the Junior Bar-
bados Dramatic Club at the Drill
Hall at 830 to-morrow night.
Proceeds from these plays will go
to the Bay Street Boys’ Club.

Tonight at 8 o’clock the Band

Fc

cessionaires give the same answer



will give a Charity Concert ir) The majority of people living in
aid of the Rover Scouts, at the] the country have no reason to
Speightstown Boys’ School. come to the City at night, or have

@NOLONEL MICHELIN told the! no reason to remain in town after
“Advocate” yesterday that} 7 p.m.

the Venezuelan Polo team are ex- It would not be economic to run

pected during the first week of}a service merely for the odd

November. Local Polo players} passenger or two who might want

are at present practising to meet} it, and who will want it only at

them. ) irregular intervals.

FIRST SHIPMENT







RST SHIPMENT of cases of food and clothing for Antigua

terday hy B.W.LA.

THE F
which went ye

neces at te easel eeiomns ed net i llteecncetomyptiomeistichintbgie lates aa cacananaietpt statist tibaines watt caiaceinis oenae e



!

er ee Se

“It is to be hoped that as the
peoples of the Colonies obtain
greater control over their own
affairs, they will realise the value
of the connection with Britain and
will themselves seek to strengthen
the links between their countries
and the Commonwealth. Clearly
the Council can play but a smail
part in achieving this purpose.
Success will depend primarily on
the Colonial policy of the British
government and the measures by
Colonial governments. The task uf
the Council is to promote under-
standing and friendship by activi-
ties which would be outside the
scope of more official organisa-

tions.”

Colonies’ Needs
The Report continues to discuss
particular needs of various
Colonies. In Singapore and Malaya
an urgent need, it is stated, is the

development of the idea of a
common citizenship, and every
effort is made to bring Chinese,

Malay and Indian together througn
some medium of common interest
to all.

Of East Africa it is stated there
are racial problems which can
only be tackled with caution, A‘-
though the Council's representa-
tive in Kenya has often found it
necessary to make a_ separate
approach to African, European
and Indian in some ways he has,
been able to assist in the promo-
tion of inter-racial
Reference is made for example to
his part in planning the Kenya
Institute and his initiation o/
arrangements bringing progressive
African farmers into contact with
European farmers.

The growing interest in



the

‘development of local musie and

art is noted, particularly in the
West Indies and West Africa, In
some of the Colonies a widespread
demand for adult education has
appeared.

New Work

‘Pians have been made for the
Council to take up new work in
Tanganyika, Northern Rhodesiz,
Nyasaland and the Windward and
Leeward Islands.

In the creation of a_ better
understanding of Britain in the
Colonies (as the Report puts it)
the new work is being undertaken
without sacrifice of the day to day
activities of British Council staff
throughout the Colonies and the
Report emphasises the value of
persona] relationships.

Admittedly, it is pointed out,
results are intangible and difficuit
to gauge. The representative in
Kenya, however, reports:

“It is impvssiblg at present to
assess the effect of our explanation
of such aspects of English life as
public opinion on law and order
and the relationship of the public
to the police. It is possible how-
ever, to see results from time to
time in other fields. For instance,
a leading African farmer in the
Machakos district is now growing
crops in the wet weather with
which to feed his livestock in the
dry weather and he now keeps his
animals in pens to prevent their
eroding the parched soil. He is
doing this as a direct result of a
film lecture which I gave two
years ago and many Africans are
being taken to see his shamba and
learn from his example”.

‘ Visits to Britain
Of visits by Colonial people te

Britain under the Council's
auspices the Report says:
“These visits fulfil two pur-

poses; not only do they enable in-
fiuential visitors to see for them-
selves how we live in Britain to-
day, a matter sometimes of con-
siderable surprise to them in the
light of what they hear in their
own countries; the visits also offer
a chance to people of a!i classes
in Britain to learn something ot
Colonial peoples, an opportunity
which frequently administers an
equally agreeable shock to their
own preconceived ideas cand
ignorance of life in the Colonies.

DIAMONDS

DAR-ES-SALAAM

The diamond “act”, which is
put on almost traditionally for
dist‘nguished vis.tors to the Shir-
jyanga diamond mine of Dr. John
T. Williamson—the pouring out
| cf cigarette tins and old sweet
bottles of scores of thousands of
pounds worth of diamonds-—duly
mpressed the British Minister of
State for the Colonie
dale, during tour of Tang

ika



HELPERS AT THE Y.M.C.A. making up parcels of clothing

co-operation, |



BARBADOS. ADVOCATE

BUSY HELPERS



a ’







and tood for shipment to Antigua



“AT PRESENT there are strong links between Britain and
the Colonies which for the most part have not been forged
by the Colonial peoples themselves.
strength of these links is threatened.”
The British Council in its report for the year 1949-50 gives
this warning and goes on to say:

In many ways t!



Fiji Councillor
WillRepresent |
U.K. AtULN. |

RATU Sir Lalabaluvu Sukuna,
K.B.E., of Fiji has accepted an in-
vitation to serve as an Adviser on
questions affecting non-self-gov-
erning territories in the United
Kingdom defegation to the United
Nations Fifth General Assembly
opening in New York, September
19th. |
Born in 1888, Sir Lalabaluvu is
a Barrister-at-Law (Middle
Temple). In the First World War
he served in the French Foreign
Legion winning the Medaille Mili-
taire, later commanding Fiji La-
bour Corps in France. After the }
war he returned to Wadham Col- ;





lege, Oxford. He has served in
numerous administrative and
secretariat posts in Fiji Since

1945 he has been Secretary for
Fijian affairs. He represented Fiji

at the Coronation, In the Sec-
ond World War he served as
Lieutenant Colone) Fiji Defence
Force (Territorial Service) and

commanded the Fi): contingent at
the Victory Parade, :

A member of the Fiji Executive
Council since 1943. he has been a
member of the Legislative Council
since 1932."

V.LP.L.—Or Just
V.LP. ?

BOSTON

Boston scientist Clark tained
said it would be impossible to|
provide atom bomb shelters for |
everyone. And so he thinks that |
people should be “graded” for ad
m‘ssion on the basis of their im-
portance to the nation “Soma
people”, he said, “are more im-
portant than others.”

Our Dumb Friends

NEW
Stephen Moran, the
Commissioner of Newark,
Jersey, has abandoned his cam-
paign to limit the people there
to just one dog or one cat for
each family. What defeated him
—a delegation of dogs, all wear-
ng placards, led to his office bv
iawyer William Clawis..

A CHRISTIAN ACTION
NEW YORK
Two American women announc-
ed a prayer campaign that Jacob!
Malik, Russia’s UNO delegate,
will “become guded by a few
Christian principles.” They have
written Mr. Malik several letters
advising hm that he is being
prayed for.

YORK. |
Health
New







British Council Warns | ‘‘Doramas’’
Of Dangers To Links
With Britain

(From Our London Correspondent)

Leaves This
Evening
FOR VENEZUELA

The s

130 Cc

nack “Doramas” with its
inary Islanders aboard, is
expected to leave Carlisle Bay
for Venezuel this evening

The “Doran.as” made an emer-
icy call at the island on Friday
ifter encountering stormy weather,
having had a breakdown of the
engine The 130 men did not
intend coming to Barbados, but
were on their way to Venezuela
in search of empvoyment

They were without passports
mad could not land here until
three days after the ship's arrival
They were t.en_ given special
permiss on do so



During Monday, Tuesday an
yesterday, groups of them could
be seen around the City and
especially in Broad Street. Yes-
terday, three of them were in the
mood for drinking and the Bar-
badian drink “mauby” was the
order. Others were just getting
the r last look at Bridgetown

Manuel Reina, who acts ai
interpreter for his col eagues, tole
the Advocate yesterday that on
behalf of those on board the
“Doramas”, he would like to ex-
press to the people of Barbados
their grateful thanks for the hos-
pitality and kindness they had
been shown here

He said: “Driven to these shores
by stormy weather, we have had
the good fortune to have found
ourselves in this British island
where we have met many friends
who have made us feel at home.





“We shall never forget’ your
kindness and the-little Island of
Barbados will always remain a

happy memory to us

“We were most happy to meet
with a truly christian kindness in
Rev. Father Hopkins and those
friends who have helped us se
generously—-the Commissioner of
Police, his men and others. Al!
of these will ever be remembered
in our thoughts and our prayers.’

The Commissioner of Police told
the Advocate yesterday that he
had put the Police launches at the
disposal of the men to bring ther
ashore and take them back to their
boat for the three days they were
-oming ashore

ARRESTED ON
“EMIGRATION” CHARGE

THIRTY - TWO - YEAR - OLL
Walter Burton Hinds, a Com-
niission Agent of Pinitold Street,
arrested yesterday morning
members of the C.I.D., ano
to the Central Police
Station where six charges oi
obtaining money on false

pre-

tences were brought against him
He is charged with obtairung
money from six men by faisels

was
by
brought

pretending that he was workin
with Mr. Lewis of the Labour
Commissioner’s Office und twe
fingerprint detectives and that he
(the men) t

Emmigration

them
the

could get
America
Scheme.
The hearing started before Mr
©. L. Walwyn, City Police Magis
Inspec-
pros-

trate, yesterday evening.
Torrence Franklyn is
the Police

tor
ecuting for



GLOBE THEATRE

FLASH !

5

ONE PILOT RADIO

the Super Star
at the GLOBE

as lsi Prize for
Talent Show
on

5
This RADIO
donated by

Messrs BARBADOS AGENCIES
LIMITED.

THE WORLD.

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 8th

FLASH! |

is generously

the Agents





*
BUY A PILOT RADIO AND CONTACT

° ij Y -
>
Air-Sea Co’s
Pla ]

n Joint .
Transport
Trans-Canada Airline hav
entered into air-sea agreement
with the Canadian Nationa
Steamships and Alcoa Steamshi)
Co., Inc., for combined transpor
tation between specific points ir
the Caribbean and points in Car
ada _and the United States. M:
B. W. G. Austin, Director «
Messrs Gardiner Austin & Co
Lgd., Shipping Department, tok

the Advocate yesterday

Passengers taking T.C.A. fro:
Canada or U.S.A. to the Bahamas
Barbados, Bermuda, Jamaica «
Trinidad and = seeking passage
back by ship can now do
an exchange of tickets

In the past, passengers woul
have had to make new bookin;
with the steamship companies an
vay full fare for the trip. Unde
these new agreements, they jus
bass on their tickets from ‘T.C.A
to either of the Shipping Office
where a percentage will be take

so Db

wT the fare

The two new agreements hay
been published in T.C.A.'s inter
national Passenger Rules Tarif
and will become effective on Sep
tember 15 and 20 for C.N.S. anc

Alcoa respectively.
The agreement with Canadiar
National Steamships provides fo)
0-day air-sea trips between an)
yoint served by C.A. or C.N.S



‘rom Canada or the U.S.A. i
Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda
Jamaica or Trinidad and retur

via the alternative carrier

Similarly, this same rule ap-

lies between Bermuda on_ ths
me hand and Barbados anc
Trinidad on the other

With the Alcoa Company the
agreement provide for combinec
transportation valid for one year
from any point served by T.C.A
yw Alcoa in Canada or the U.S.A

to Barbados, Bermuda, Jamaica o1

Trinidad, and return via the al-
ternative carrier as well as_ be-
tween Bermuda on the one hanc

ind Barbados and Trinidad en the
other



2 SPEEDSTERS
FINED

AUSTIN REECE of Hil
was ordered to pay a tine of £3 bs
nonthly instalments or in defaul

Green

‘wo months’ imprisonment whe
“© appeared before His Worshi;
Mr. H. A Talma yesterday {fc

peeding while driving the motor
van M-1913 on Bush Hall Road on
‘uly 8

The Police said the van wa
lriven at over 35 miles per hou
ind the speed limit on that roa
is 20 miles per hour for veinicie
if that type
ANOTHER fine was imposed b:
the same magistrate on Coli’
Maynard of Sugar Hill, St. Joseph

a

\

Maynard was ordered to pay 20/-|

ond 1 - cost for driving the moto:
‘tus O-142 on Station Hill at over
24 miles hour



per On July 29
The speed on this road is also
20 miles per hour for buses
E 7
ingineer For
Antigua
ntigua
SIR GEORGE SEEL, Head
he Development and Welfar:

Irganisation in the West Indies ;

oaning an engineer and enginee

‘ng draughtsman to Antigua
To-morrow Mr. G. M. Gordo

‘Construction Engineer) and M)
i, Keir (Engineering Draught
nan) will fly to Antigua by
LWA



Major Stoute

His Excellency
ae appointed
itoute, Deputy

the Governo:
Capiain R A
Comm ssioner
Loca
15t

alice, to be Major in the
with effect from the
1949

“orees
Jecem ber,












BUY---

White Park Road.







i)
\

PAGE FIVE

LUXURY
SOAPS

BLUE HYACINTH @




TOLLET
«© LINDEN BLOSSOM @ «
Pe ee we

»~ iGAIN IN STOCK ...

PURiNA

> maPERIAL LEATHER







ah)

Chows

POULTRY

Tae ees aay

|
THE MANY
| f



ANIMALS & Pad



DISTRIBUTORS.
Jason Jones & Co. Ld.



LOTE

SPONGES

U seful for the Toilet Useful in the Home.
Sponges that lap up water like a desert. Soft silky
textured, Hard wearing and hygienic
For sure Sponginess insist on ZOTE

Knights Drug Stores





To-day you find a new station!

To-morrow you have forgotten where !

This cannot happen to you when you have
a BUSH. The only Radio fitted with a device
for numbering each station on your dial,

A.C, Sets at $80, $110, $116 & $168, Battery

Sets for 6 volt batteries $135.

~ CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LID.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET



aa

A BRIGHTER
LONGER

“

DURALIFE

AUTO BATTERIES=witH EBONITE SEPARATORS
COURTESY



GARAGE

(ROBERT THOM. LTD.) Dial 4391

even-



0
o re
ee y/


















ore

BY WALT DISNEY

AFTER ME, } HURT SELF 7 + 4



- oe f
+f ~ BOYS! WE'LL Z Gast s"
1 GIVE THE “IRON MASK‘ 4 | SLIPPED!
Ae
vel A
S
aa TS =
—) oa si 3
r
ures atcen 76 lAle e402" i
I
| JUST A MINUTE,

WE HAVE
NY

THE LONE RANGER





‘ HEO—- “B! We TRAILED BIG D ee ee ee

ee. © WE TRAILED BIG DEKE ,20K WHEN RUB THE PAD WitH] (MESSAGE PLENTY
ce 2 * {TO THE TELEGRAPH OFFICE. Na (NDENTATIONS IMPORTANT !
ae STAND OUT IN SHOW

WHITE LP
WHAT WAS WRITTEN ON THE
TORN-OFF PAGE.

K. ©. CANNON ...

18 WHAT WE'LL DO, WHISPER. \><
Bast GLUFF THE SERVANTS INTO}




2 { COME IN, MR, CANNON.I'VE BEER -
DLP EXPECTING YOU...WOULD vou

Oo} MIND RAISING YOUR HANDS ? YO.
cA REMEMBER MED THE Name is







TING US IN,, HAVE A GOOD
Burn AROUND TO SEE IF WE
CAN SPOT ANY SIGNS OF THE

( STLaATE.. COT MAKE ANY
DOPE NIDE-OUT...THEN WE'LL
| ORT AWAY BEFORE THE paces

\COUNT AARIVE Se




BY GEORGE MC.MANUS

‘







|
-—— - ae |
(a FINE STATE OF AFFAIRS /| at i
HE DIDN'T CARE ABOUT oi

rs a | ®
( - m x —
oe : 1G TO } I DON'T THINK |} A MR TINDOME OF THE ROBIN-
“IGE? | A STEAL CO. IS ON THE PHONE!
TIT 1S (AY HE WIGHES TO SPEAK TO YOu






THE “FOR SALE" |









| HE PROBABLY SAW |













SIGN IN FRONT OF THE HOUSE -HE THOUGHT
ABOUT YOUR 4 THE HOUSE -- IT_ Wao A FOUNDRY -
PROPERTY / I ina Wy He WANTED THE

‘ |

Weamaed (at ee ES AND IRON / HUW?
: | BUYS IT/
|
4 .

/





RIP KIRBY
I KNOW YOU NEVER (g
DISCUSS MY BUSINESS b \

p AFFAIRS, HONEY.,BUT BE Pak it

| SURE NOT TO MENTION “as





BARBADOS. ADVOCATE

{ if







\tO MARGIE PELHAM MY re co er P. \
1 TMENT WITH oT, ae
| APPOINTMENT W NYT SHE




| HER TRUSTEE... on







opt. 1950, King Features Syndicate, fic, World phy qeoteve

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

(TS ONLY A CROCODILE. WATCHED BY TH/S STRANGE, BRAVE |
PICK IT UP LL TELL ‘|
You How, -
ir F ux :
2 (ip ‘s.

THE PHANTOM
Saal Ratt MAN, HE CAN'T REFUSE «Hi8 LEGS |
7 Tae TREMBLE +






Specially designed for Barbados, this
brown brodue is now on sale in
the leading storés. .Séé them for yourself

made by

i a Soa thn

Peanut Butter
and Jams

Jars Peanut

Butter 63, 55, .35

Tins S.A. Apricot
Jam—21b

Ib 60
» S.A. Fig. Jam 21b .52

se eeeee ol

» Letona Black
Currant Jam .... .6
.. Sweet Orange

Tins Allson’s Rolled

”

pie alan 31

» Quaker Oats .24 .53
ns Morton’s

51

"Patent Barley .51 .83

Biscuits
Tins Carr’s British

Springtime
Biscuits .....
, . Carr’s
Shepherd
iscuits .....
» Carr’s
Mantilla
Biscuits .....
. Carr’s Celery
Biscuits .....
, Peek Frean
Biscuits

JOHN WHITE

es —



MEAT DEPARTMENT

Australian PRIME BEEF
(All Cuts)

MUTTON CHOPS
VEAL CHOPS
LIVER

WEINERS SAUSAGES

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 7, 1950

'e
1 w- STS,








AND ARRANGE

An ideal Tonic
Beverege after a
Hot and Tiring Dey.

Brewed Specially for
Hot Climates.

but conteins
Real Food value
besides being a

FOR YOUR X’MAS

CALENDARS



eS
AVOID THE RUSH
°

ADVOCATE PRINTING
DEPT.

Bots. D.O.M. ......

» Pimm’s No. 1

Cointreau ...
Drambuie ... 6.
Macou (1943). 4.00
Sautenay

Canned Fruit

Tins

A.J.C.
Apricots (23)

, Tropical Fruit

Salad ........

, Peaches (24)

Fruit Salad ..

» Letona Peaches

(Sliced) 11b . .
Letona Peaches
(Whole) 11b
Damson’s

Peaches ..... 5:
Yellow Plums 45

Canned Vegetables

Tins

Dutch Asp:

Parsnips ....
Chivers Sliced
t Teh

Hartley’s Peas

Ovaltine and
Milk Foods

Tins Ovaltine $1.24, $ .73



Malted Milk
Horlick’s
Malted Milk ..



THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 7, 1950 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN






























































ances omen
] tom DOMINICA ie
fie Sleme Pauphail Makhoul, | a
Je eG rawa F unk Blackman re :
® From ST. VINCEN' 4 G04
Olive Deene. Evaline Pitt, ‘
a eens ______,_ TSREPHONE —BB08 | Sharpe, Fred J. Dare, Hilary Da Silva NS oO =
. | washes \
r DEPARTURES By B.W.I.A iL |
THANKS | FOR EN z * For TRINIDAD ‘ }
; stage R T in Carlisle Bay Otilda Martinez, Anolda Martinez 7
hr 1 h be a — eect a - * “ar aa ez.
press “our. sincere nd cia ‘ = Sch Rosarene, Sch. Frances W. Smith Starlawe Martives Aston’ euahen, Wil. “oanaonte
tion (to those who cards, v hs HOUSES M.V. Blue Star, Seh. Beiqueen, Sel . reake Archibald Freakes j
letters. or in ar W Sse Oy) Laudaipha, Sch. Princess Louise, Sch nthe Freakes, Woodia: Anthony, |
pathy with us cor the sad _EVANDALE — Opp: 5th Ave. George | Burma D., Sch. Turtle Dove, | Seh . Cornacehia, Luis Custro |
cesigoned by he .dvath A Srect. 3 Bedrooms. Apply Mrs. King, | Man’ M. Lewis, Sch. Marion Belie Wolfe “ermen Castro, Frank Casure, Cray 5 e }
WORRELL Corner 9th Ave. George Street Sch. Lucille M,. Smith, Sch. W. L astro, Jose Castro, Una Gilbert, Mabel Cc e r e |
The WORRELL famil) 6.9. 30—2n Eunicia, Sch Franklyn D R., Sch. } Cardenas, Hubert Porte, Elmo Beardon,
12.8 n -—— —— ee | Cyclorama O., Sch, Gloria Henrie*ta, | Devaux, George Tempro, Vincent Burns “ aay |
_#Lé.T—Unturnished at Ramsgate, Bay | Sch: Molly N. Jones, S.S. Golfito, M.V.| Winston Wooding, Harry Wooding |
IN MEMORIAM Street within walking distance for Aqua-| Ldy Joy, Sch Amanda T S.S.] Luther Wooding j
d Uc Club and City, Dial 3053, Cenadian Challenger i- Col nes Ol it
eee 2.9.50—én For ST. LUCIA
IN loving memory of our Dear Hus } ‘ $ S Sc 1 Scho
band ond Dedtv 'AMES FDWARD) SPDR RC NOTICES Ships In Touch With SUN | Sen I Canter, Anes =
RRATHWAITE who died o1 ‘he 7th day RLIC NOTICES Wells. Hamish Wells, Allen Lewis :
ng Sarbados Coastal Station |"! "ayn tidak, Ande in the flavour !
’ ye Ss ye ~ .



sed since the om | THE AGRICULTURAL AIDS ACT 1905 t vulay J. Fores h Ormond
we loved so deariy has gone to resi | To the Creditors holding specialty liens CuBoulay, O, J. Forest, Joseph Ormor

Sitep on Dear Dad and take thy rest] against HUSBANDS PLANTATION, st.| C&ble and Wireless (West Indies) Lid Diana Lewis, Wilfred Wardlaw

1?
| And what goes in ? Why, pure












Until we meet in the land of the blest aaa spnicie Gah + ie gg cig een Sot | For ‘TRINIDAD
Caroline Brathwaite (wife: Goul- AK that I, the owner ot | With the following ships through their) “Ada ironside, Urs sby, § tuga res
Lcurenct AN Eric isons [the above named plantation am about | arb: ne — Nap | oe r ; Doris te oat: er | es wheat, fresh eges and butter—
ce (daughter) William inephew to obtain a loan cf £1,800 under the Sunawh, Ss ican, S.S. New “ee Sis . Maine Pile, Waite * . 4
‘A. Germaine (niece: Patricia: Eve | revisions cf the above Act against SS. | Sunwhii, $<. Alcor ee ARVIN, Se eet, | together,with the experience that
isa Hadar? Wkaee deca pavi’ | Sugar, Molasses end other Crops of the s, SS. Cavina, $.8. Elizabeth ies De Freitas, Joseph Dare has made Huntley and Palmers famous the
(Grand Chile ) 7.9.50—1n aid Plantation to be reaped in 1950. a fanigan, S.S. Portugal, S.S., 4 SAN JUAN



No money has yet been borrowed| Mormacgulf, §$.8. Hilverplane, S.S./ James Thompson, Diane King, Sydney whole world over. So many thrilling












































{1N loving memor’ of Our Deer Hus | against the said Crops. 8.8. California, 5.5. Estero.| Chase, Edna Chase, Evelyn Outram, Vera cael a = ie
pant ond Faker JASPER CECIL MIL || Dated this 5th day of September, 1950. | S.3. Fort Amherst, S.S. Ageroen, S.5.| Rryan, Veronica Bryan, Cynthia Bowen, | varsaties to choose from—lusciously-filled
LER, who fell asleep on the Tih dsy o F. B. WALCOTT, Syndale, 3.8, Pnpiicon!, SS. Ewsh-}' tohn Blow, Lucitie Phinkett | ‘Custard Creams ' and ‘ Reading Creams '
September 1949 Owner | inder, S.S, Jutahy, S.S. Lady Rodney} For DOMINICA b } oo ae ‘ ,
rate dieank Bill) SRE nk ik, all 5.9.50—3n | $8 ain John, $8. Mormac | Ever so ofte ne we eall ae aa . Toe 6. | ean dent Dutra, S.S. Quad | Storey, Augustus Emmanuel oven-fresh, sealed in tins and 4 lb. Freshpak
\ a 7 i Fas Ate’ ims nstad, § Patella . Ins anc », Freshpaks.
Ronee Bele occ san NOTICE ranienburg, 4. akormnacrant | For JAMAICA : '
es sh 3 a ; | Alan Squire, Donald Ferguson, Vincent |
phobia ary: Les ww TENDERS are invited for the Pu | Devaux, Shadack Sampath, Dorothy Sam-
See, Pare teria) a whi ¢ a number of Casuarina and rath on Phillips
God's wes ts Nest a gam of + number us Cement, os SEAWELL | sey ANTIgUA ‘res
Thov “ert in ik: heeping Chareh. For further Particulars, apply | Valerie Birkett, June Birkett, Edwin encom muMAnactunins Yo mH. IME cHORGE :
Myer 44.58 rereernuaced De ANG, to the Rector, or Church Warden of st.| = ARRIVALS By, B.W.1.A.1 | BEEKet, ‘Harold, Hose i 2
ean Nereida Dufierin | joseph Parish Frem TRiNIDAD | :
anes 3 A. A. B. GILL, Louis Devaux, Henry Zerpe, Moritze |
Harold, Gibbons Orford Clerk, St. Joseph's Vestry Zerpa, Victor Robinson, Francoy Chris MAIL NOTICES |
‘Brothers) Edna, Carmen, J eae eo a 7.9.50—4n, | tie, Judith Christie, Joan Christie, John +
ters} udu sea Christie, Edna Marchali, Irene Gorms, Mails for Dominica by the Sch Molly } e
BN loving menoy ot out bala NOTICE poscaams Wammate: Parkes te SOs La eae ee eeegee eee delicious
son and bre! her VIC ‘TOR . CAMER( aN acini Hotchkiss Dennis Vaughan, Gerald P Registered & Ordinary Mail 7 J
who fell asleen on Sept, 7th 1942. PARISH OF ST PETER Connelly, Armont Cobhem, Steves! at. 2.20 pm. on the &h Sept. 18s) . : wholesome
Eight years have passed since that sad Clarke's Gap is undergoing repairs | Coomis ts for St Tacia: St Vincen } pant Sh : fh
day, nly and is closed to vehicular traffic Grenada: Aruba by the M.V. Radar opeeeie | and nutritious
When our little beloved suddenly By order of the Commissioners, | from ST. LUCIA: will be closed at the General Post Office
‘ passed away, le BE. H. CHALLENOR, Vincent DeVaux, Kezeile Lencock.| as under Make your white clothes whiter—coloureds A
Your pleasant smile, we can Inspector of H’'ways, Manik Gopivani, Paul § ibok, Eileen . 7 * .. : * t a 5
forget, : St. Peter. | Steinbok, Jeremy Steinbok, Luis Altuna Pivoall Haetaered and, Gedinats Maits| brighter, with rich Rinso lather! It’s so aGONT. 4. 8. OESR1E & CO.LTD.. P.O. BOX 216, BRIDGETOWN) ’
Our tears can never ary 7.9.50-—-2n. | Mec. Kenzie, Peter Lag’, Ann Wajchend a 8h \ ‘ Bads Sa = i ‘ i +
We loved you much, Jesus loved you ier, ERRIUIA Walchendinn, Piety. Wass] Monies Ete On Ure Ah acne ee gentle and thorough—the dirt fl dats out in : ;
nd so he took him for himself NOTICE chendler, Ruben Bello, Alleyne Exkins.| ponies will be chwed at the generat | record time. And you can us: Rinso for - :
And so he took him for himself. Louglas Brook, Perot Phillip Renton, ene ee : i P . !
Sleep on dear little one in the safe Re Estate of Hees Santie: Catherine Monigomnery, | Port Omce, me under fas dishes as well—it makes them re¢ ly sparkle!
And loving arms of Jess. JAMES | SHEPHERD, Arthur Marshall, +i ct on hk ae meer te, For better, easier, and quicke.” results—
Ever to be remembere y Mr. a eceased. a 5 r 9 95 r ,
Mrs. Herbert Quintyne, Pearl, Sybil NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all start using Rinso today !





Rav, Douglas, Chester, Clifton, Vere. } persons having 4 y debt or claim against
aa 7.9.50-—In.| the Estate of James Shepherd, deceased,

an ar ___1 9 7 ite “of Bonnett’, newt Brittons, Saini GOVERNMENT NOTICE RINSO for all your wash!

IN loving memory of our dear be- Michael, who died in this Island on the









ri r ROSABELLA | 14th day of April, 1950, intestate, are - s
joved een areca on Sept, 7th] requested to send particulars of their 7 Pies X-R_233-800-55
NELSON who claims duly attested to me, the under- At noon on Thursday the 7th instant it is proposed to try out a

1941 ene : . RTs :
Tine: peaks URAge: dat vince that sadjsumed, ‘Bustace Maxwell Mattoone, the | siren which has been erected at the Central Police Station, Coleridge





: ww LARGEST, FASTEST;

day sa ae{estate on or before the 30th day of] Street. If the trial proves the siren to be effective, it is planned to ;
When the one we loved best WS! November 1950, as after that date I] 0, . i P : , ; : ee
called to rest shall proceed to distribute the assets of |USe it along with others in connection with hurricane warnings.
























































Over on that bright golden shore | the deceased among the parties entitled ie. Sade es bei ; ae ae ca
Over on that bright golden shore pe Feeiecit veased tonly to. sha toe, This notice is published so that the public will understand and
When the saints of the Lord with the] claims of which I shall then have had will not be alarmed. 6.0. $0.20) == eS, — ee :
angels of the blest notice and that I will not be Liable for MONTREAL AUSTRALIA NEW ZEA OQ
Over on that bright golden shore | assets so-distributed or any part thereof | eo : LAND LINE LIMITED
Clara, Rose and Clyde (children) t6 any person or persons of whose debt 1 SG Ea Bo ali aa a aa vd (M.A.N.Z, LINE) v Sete %
7.9.50—In.] or claim 1 shall not then have had ' Steak: a Snacks perved 24 S.s ‘PORT WELLINGTON” sails THE M.V. “T. B. Radar’” will
ee! notice and all persons indebted to the Th B parte eur at, Pee adstone August 17th, Brisbane August accept Cargo and Passengers for
said estate are requested to settle their e arry west ouse hours A DAY 2 , Sydney August 30th, arriving at St. Lucia, St. Vineent, Grenada
FOR SALE accounts with me without delay. AT Barbados September 27th Aruba, sailing Thursday 7th
——$———$——$—$————— Dated this 4th day of September, 1500 MOUNTAIN ST., My Ss ‘SL CUSaete ER” sails Freemantle fc iat, Sean 4
1950 MONTREAL August 3lst, Adelaide September 1ith, he J. “Caribbee’ will accept
AUTOMOTIVE E. M. SHILSTONE, onebeme CASURINA CLUB Devonport September 15th. Melbourne Cargo and Passengers for Domi- in the . ‘
tar King’s Solicitor. Homely Atmosphere September 28rd, Sydney 20th September, nica: Antigua: Montserrat; St .
CARS—1947 Standard 8 h.p. 4 seate’ | Qualified Administrator of the Estate of Quiet & Resttul. | Dancing at any time to the Brisbane October 4th, arriving at Bar- Kitts-Nevis: sailing Tuesday 12th +
tourer. Excellent condition. 1947 Morris James Shepherd, deceased. x bados November 4th. oo
10 h.p. Saloon, Perfect condition. 193% 7,9.50.—4n. When visiting or on a busines: LATEST RRCGORDINGS, These vessels have ample space for The M.V. “Daerwood” will ac
Dodge Seden. Low Mileage. Mechanically trip. chilled, hard frozen, ond general cargo cept Cargo and Passengers for 3
perfect. Fort Royal Garage Ltd, Tele- es les 2 & to BERTIE HAYWARD’S Cargo acrepted on through bills of St. Lacia, St, Vincent, Grenada, b
phone 4504 2.9,50—8n WANTED Special daily or weekly rates lading with transhipment at Trinidad and Aruba Date of sailing will :
eee after September Ist. Orchestra every Saturday for Barbados, British Guiana, Windward be given, :
CAR—New M.G. 1% litre Sports 2). Reference if required apd Leeward Islands. ;
seater. Fort Royal Garage neg Oh a HELP ——— VENEZOLANOS AMIGOS For further particulars apply: B.W.I. Schooner Owners
phone 4504 2.9. m { ree are ci wwe LYD,, Association Inc â„¢
$e “uo r au e ay ¥
DODGE CAR — M. 161 — Offers in] GIRL—Reliable girl for Office, capable sient ig!" BIRNVFNIDO AL CAB ad Os onl -nndgrre 4
writing to the Secretary, Barbados Tele-| of assisting in bookkeeping. Apply in vows: DA COSTA & CO. LTD., nsignee; $ : :
hone Co., Ltd. 7.9.50—2n. | writing giving experience and references Barbados, B.W.1, =
P pee Me ee Fort Royal Garage Ltd., P. O. Box
TRUCK — One (1) Chevrolet rie 233, Bridgetown. 2.9.50—T7n. — — ;
model. A 1 condition Apply ar ee ae
Herbert. 68 Tudor St. Dial 3680. | |, SOO Re ie as. ee WANTED TO RENT
. State § é
78 SON | experience. Apply to P.O. Box 69. |B) EUROPRAN WANTS 70 SENr
TRUCKS—Morris 5-ton Trucks wit | 7.9.50—3n | BIG MANSIO. THE : 4
auxiliary gear box suitable for field and SUITABLE FOR GUEST HOUSE 7 or , r 3
highway work. Fort Reval Garage Ltd | MISCELLANEOUS | Write “Seaside”, fl &) 3 f i hi) iJ ij





Telephone 4504 2.9, 50—3n | P.O.B. 44,

wena C/o Advocate Co.

ES aS WANTED TO RENT ;

ne eae ROOM—Retired Englishman, recently
VAN—10 horse power iris ae e arrived, desires room in private home,
perfect working order. Dat 3493 * | with or without breakfast. Permanent
fSeott & Co., Whitepark. a 7 if satisfactory. Location between Hast~











PPPS PO PEE LAPP POLO FEL OEOSOO





Hl Presidente”




































































30.8.50-—t.f.n. aS
ings and City preferred. Please write, iS s,
— co aclivery from stock | Siving ‘phone number, to Roy, c/o} %& FRIDAY, 8TH SEPTEMBER ¥
ae niitectramgetinte Se Yery fred Pick. | Advocate Advtg. Dept. 5.9.50—5n. | ¢ ani 3 NEW YORE SERVICE from PORT OF SPAIN
ups. See these new modern vehicles. a Cathe % REMEMBER THE DA x N.Y. Wace Pan American brings a new ere in air te i A
Then decide. Fort Royal Garage Ltd. WANTED & WHY? RQ) +c, @. THULE’ fae hantasniies iil aentuabes we é en 8 nag? é ransportation to the
Telephone 4504 2.9.50—3n > BECAUSE YOU WILL WANT TO HELP % “BYFJORD" dist September Nea eetcbas estern Hemisphere... on the wings of the luxurious double-
ST Bs Ee a RE é WHO? MS | et : oa : eaceieal decked Clippers. Direct connections at New York with other
LIVESTOCK , hee THE PEOPLE OF ANTIGUA — Na CANADIAN SERVICE "EL Presidente” flights to Europe
a , . ¢
COW — One Holstein Guernsey Cow | ,APRNP GEE tte for the Collexe Farm | A FLOWER SALE % | SOUTHPOUND

Heavy in Calf, Produced 36 pints milk | OPSoo"Qcres, Applicants must be of good | 3 x Bails Balls Arrives Super-iuxury & Super-Comfort Between
last calf. Apply to W. Walton, Schoo! | equcation and experienced in Crop and | s$ WILL BE HELD ON THAT DAY AT XN Name of Ship Montreal Nalitax Barbados .
Gap, Hindsbury Rd. St. Michael 3 ‘Animal Husbandry, Labour Management, ss Messrs, G. W. HUTCHINSON & CO., LTD. x ee a. PILGRIM” August 25t August 28th September 10th *Superb meals...including seven-course

7.9.50—1n. | Farm Records and Accounts. Professional |-¥ “em spe oa ALCOA PARTNER September 8th, September iith. September 21st dinner with champagne and Cordials
A cae —— ; | qualifications are desirable but not essen- x COME & BUY SOME FLOWERS — % hevediat vag tasted) aiid

= ; SS prve nble,
vic, CARTS. g aROARS — 2] {ai nck mrs inthe wale e400 525] 8 OUR THANKS TO THIS FIRM, THE ADVOCATE CO. LTD. | TonmanouND vest hedtidal Shih
carts 8s 5 ,

ae eae nara riding pony 5% years.| Living Allowance which is at present | \ AND YOU FOR ATTENDING % Arrives *Club lounge and bar ov fower deck. SPAIN
1 Jenny donkey, suitable for Kids £153: 18: Od, per annum on a basic salary | > z Barbados
Sedge Pond Pitn. St. Andrew of £500, Unfurnished quarters provided | »% OEP PPOEC LOE OOOO | SS. ALCOR PEGASUS Aug. 27th For St. John, N.B. & St. * Orchids and perfume for che ladies,




6.9.50—6n. Lawrence River Ports,

rent-free. Contributory Superannuation
Scheme after two years probation. Cost
of passages to Trinidad may be paid on
appointment. Interest free loan for pur-
chase of furniture may be granted under
certain conditions, 30 working days leave
with pay every year. Applications giving
full details of age, education, qualifica-
tions and experience, and stating earliest
date on which available, together with
copies of two (2) recent testimonials
should be sent to the Bursar, Imperial
College of Tropical Agriculture, St.
Augustine, Trinidad, B.W.1.

6.9.'50.-—3n.

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Maurice Jones.
Manager of China Doli Restaurant of



e Extra flight atte



PUPPIES—Alsatian Puppies. Drayton,
aon F 5.9.50—3n



These Vessels have limited passerger accommodation.
ees

Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD.~Canodian Service
ROBERT THOM LTD.—New York end Gulf Service.

and
dants, NEW

Spacious cabin with room to etroth

e Living room comfort on both decks... YORK
altitude-conditi , sonnd-proofing,
and temperature control. *

Everybody sleeps at night... between RIO DE JANEIRO
Trinidad and Rio...in a Sleeperctte* MONTEVIDEO

seat or, at a small additional cost, in and

a roomy, foam-soft berth! BUENOS AIRES

EMEMBER eeeees

When you order from....

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

we deliver by Motor Van








MISCELLANEOUS

‘AMERA — one Kodak Tourist Came-
x5 Coane with case and adapter kit.
F 4.5 Lens. Speed up to 1/200 sgc
Takes 4 different size Pictures. BR! 7"
WEATHERHEAD Ltd, Head of Broa

Bt. 5.9.50—3n











COOK BOOKS by Eliz. Craig
— also —

BIRTHDAY BOOKS



Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets.







—GUIP-OVER SHADES — For Optic e
lasses “Cronies Lays. Price 0/0, BRUCE SSOS9PIOVG9S9S9 OSS FOOD ODP IODGD DD POS ‘ . ROBERTS & CO.—DIAL 3301—High Street

D Ltd.











5.9.50—3n. | Marhill St. B’town for permission to| * = Sees Seer Only PAA off such a complete choic f ices
oe ——_______—____——— | ell Spirits, Malt Liquors &c., at China] 2 O TL, Ss S 0. s PRESS PSPS SEPS ELE E EE LLLP ELLE APA ALPPS | in ers Ne@ of services;
Do not let the “Flu” get you Sung Doll Restaurant No. 6 Marhill St % RID Yi UR PREM. E, FF eee g ii s premium “El Presidente” service; regular Sleeperette
this weather, If you have as ksh B’town : x Sy + 1 service; and economical Tourist service.
take ORALVA Anti Cold and Influenzi Dated this 6th day of September 1950. | % st NEW SToOd K OF sce a
Tablets. Knight's Ltd. 7.9,50—3n. | To:— H. A. TALMA, Esq 4 MOTHS — FLIES — MOSQUITOES — FLEAS y e Y For information see your Travel Agent or:

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A’.
Sed. MAURICE JONES,
Applicant
N.B.—This application will be consi-
dered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “A’’, on Mon-
day the 18th day of September 1950
at 11 o'clock, a.m.

—GENOZO TOOTH PASTE — Antl- $ LICE — COCHROACHES—BUGS — RATS — MICE Ete. Etc.

Pygonhoetic Antiseptic. Fresh Stock

at HEAD Ltd.
at BRUCE WEATHER *

Get rid of Moths by _ using “OLEY"
Moth Killer. Price 15¢. box Obtainable

FAN AMERICAN

HorRLD AIRWAYS

Â¥,
%
% These are all carriers of GERMS, and Disease......
x Be Sure and keep a clean house, by using:—

Â¥,



GODOSSSOSS









at Knight's Ltd 7.9.50—3n H. A. TALMA, $ ia
at Mnighis Jer eet saan iba ibaienere: ee % MAGIC HOODOO BED-BUG POWDER Le moms
“AUJOL aids inthe relief of consti" Police Magistrate, Dist “S"_|% 0 PEST-KILL (D.D.T. Vapour for Indoor use only) BYMIN AMARA HALIBORANGE Alealssomtoy seats. 28
ati d is tasteless and abs ~ VEXTERM RAT BISCUITS "hone 2122 fter ours 2303)
pure. ‘Try.a bottle today. Sener 3|% LIQUID PARAFFIN SYRUP OF FIGS, i °
Ltd | LOST & FOUND
A Certain Death to Rats and Mice) and '



secre hang peeemomememesiten
PIPES — All shapes and sizes, im-
i he

Juding Ro! Cherry Pipes and t
‘Astor Bantam (a Featherweight Pine)
in 6 popular shapes Prices from 60c
--$18.00 BRUCE WEATHERHPAD, Tia



RUSKS—Baby’s First Solid Food
Also a varicty of CIGARS

All obtainable at:—

Booker'’s «8°>0s) Drug Stores Ltd.

LOST

GLASSES—One pair of Turtle Shell
glasses yesterday at General Post Office
Finder will be rewarded on returning
to the Advocate Advertising Department



ne ee ron
PANTS—Boys Pants, American Style



SSCORGOSSS
ao



Store, Lucas St.

elastic waist in Grey Broad Cloth read” 6.9.50—2n B d St * d H ti Al h Ph
ae cid aka. to Gebers MEAN WAS | errs roa reet, an astings (Alpha Pharmacy) 3
6.9.50—2n AMERICAN PASS PORT Under % 3 COLLINS DRUG STORES

name of Barbara Babb Jeffrey, re-
ward for returning same. Phone 4145
7.9,50—In

'Yy" for 10-inch GOSS 65 7
ty 10-4 OSSOOOS SS SOSB SOB OO FOG BBB SBSOO84 < .

32-inch and carrying cases fo ne

we have the records too - er.

records, and rs - CPS OPLOL IOS

~- 10.8.50—t.f.n.

Â¥
VIDEOS EOC966509 O99 99GB 9 96 OCHO GOOG OC 59589 7.

ALL THESE ARE ...
BAKED INTO YOUR |

J&R ENRICHED BREAD
















This is just a reminder that
Mr. & Mrs. DEIGHTON GRIFFITH
request the pleasure of the com-
pany of their friends and vell
wishers at their

ANNUAL DANCE

ON THURSDAY NIGHT

PUBLIC SALES
AUCTION

I will offer for sale by Public Com
petition on FRIDAY 8th at 2 p.m, ai
my office VICTORIA STREET

1 rood 26% perches land at FITZ
VILLAGE, ST. JAMES For conditions
of sale, ete., Dial 2947 R. Archer Mc
Kenzie, Victoria St. 5.9.50—4n

ene mma oer r aan

f

SCIENCE BOOKS—Complete set ©

books, fr, tet Y0ar ay epleal Agriculture
rial College 0’ ‘opic:

ADs number of V & VI Form books

611
for Harrison College. Phone 4
Corbin. 30.8.50—5n.

——
TYR c a < 16
ES — A few 450 x 17 and 850 x i
Cases and tubes. Secure yours now
Dial 4689 6.9,50—3n
a
“YAN *
YAWL—"'Frapida” approx. 37% fee’
long with Gray Marine engine. Good

condition $3.00 — a bargain. App'y REAL ESTATE

JI. R Edwards. Phone 2



IRON BEDSTEADS
-~3 ft. 0 ins; 3 ft. 6 ins;
4ft. Gins.

KITCHEN CHAIRS





September 7th 1950 at 8.30 p.m
At Lascelles House, St. James
Mr. Percy Green's Orchestra will
supply the music
SUBSCRIPTION %





GALVANIZED BATH PANS













































|
|
“BST FOU | ee . S ON SALE | : 4
1 AM Tis is le ai BUNGALOW — Of Block Stone stand- hes scram He —18 ins; 24 ins; 30 ins.
~ YACHT Centreboard Yacht “Con-|ing on 6,000 sq. ft. of land. Situated I A
dor.” Length 17 feet, bear 6 feet. New- | at Worthing, having water and light, | ss
(orntted “out. Apply, Wicks. Woodside | Apply Norman Alleyne. Phone 8164 ° \f| | GALVANIZED BUCKETS
lephorne 3189 Amit; wdge, /orthing — ~ | * ‘ * é
Cordes Bay since. Telephone, 2 nanan thus making = [| —1 ins; 14 ins :
TO-DAY’S a
: - - |
Barbados Youth Movement if} | COAL POTS, 8
oo WOMEN'S “GAS “COUNCIL NEWS FLASH it th —13 ins; 14 ins |
When you look atid see that even Reine ‘or il t e a; “4
the very Police are interested in boys HOT POTATO DOGS " ‘ . 4
rew, Tam sure you will agree without 6 medium welt-scrubbed potatoes | SCHOOL BELLS || BUCK POTS }
hy decelt or deception, that the Bar- 6 sausages (skinned). | —3-Gallon ‘
hacos Youth Movement has done some Remove a centre core, using an HOUSE B2‘ * . | a
wonderful. work among the youths ot apple corer, from the centre of JUS : “ 1¢ 1esl :
Barbados durin ‘ts fourteen "years ot ||] ach’ potato, and” atug, the cavity - COOKING POTS
social activities, in this Island, so i vit s0 2. ¥ , ae) OE eee c ; 4
socal ac ere yauthe of SavDado eel seseeh ae Bhat pea“ tn- the ie —2-Gallon; 3-Gallon

usual way Serve hot

A few of these snappy lieafiets

“I PASS THIS ON TO YOU”

obtainable FREE to visitors at the
Gas Showrooms, Bay St

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE

ledge; Unity; Culture
Pev I BRUCE -C
Rev. J. B. GRAN
Mrs. OLGA BROWNE
The Barbados Y¢
Tudor Bridge



Vitamin Loaf



| tatoes in their jackets in the
|
|
|
i

| PLANTATIONS LIMITED | >













tivities Religious and General _

|
|
|







" PAGE EIGHT

CLAIMED HONOURS

BARBADOS. ADVOCATE THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 7, 1950

‘Highlights Of The News From Britain

s
— is ;
C1 icket Season From A Special Correspondent Llowing we think there should be country have been flooded by

| | | this week. In fact, there has been;rainfalls in a day equalling that

















aS : } | Jittle official blowing done about,ior the whole of some months of
By PETER DITTON j LONDON. y.eek-end. He kept it strictly on jvur leap forward again in the' August we have known. It hus
. | Eleven years ago this week non-party lines, but he surely} field of research with the produc- heen a reminder of the approach
; ; Britain’s leading scientisis fore- missed an opportunity. Much/tion of the Armstrong-Siddeley >1 winter, something to be dreaded
| | rw befor i es eri te (S| gathered in the Scottish jute more than an increase in th€|Sapphire. Taken off the secret jf the warnings this week of a
assemble at Southampton, whe pp.ared im J ij, {town of Dundee, just as they fighting man’s pay is involved.| list, the announcement to-day of fuel crisis are justifie?. The pre-
rn to their own country. Shortiy bc! ti: ¢ Jer ve,{| have done this week in Bir- But the call, it meant for an! this latest turbo-jetengine +, winter appeal to the miners to
another band of cricketers. the ‘Commonwe@4h tou: ig mingham, for the annual meeting »wakening of soldier and civiliah| accompanied by the simple staie- ;roduce more coal has gone out
sid li be on the aun tall 1 ehh >| ot the British Association slike to world dangers evoked nO| ment: “This is the most powe “i! cartier than last year, but there
| ide, Ww _ res n 4 u ir way oe I ae, nd aay le el at 1¢ ad tre Advancement of Science. re or inspiration in the Premier’s ero-engine in the world.” ave dangers, it is officially accept-
; ‘ime the MCC team will pack their bags and bicl (he.r fond fn ha see disappeared | yoice Perhaps because the Pre- ed, that we maw have to import
; farewe Ils before setting sail for Australia ‘Eee had. at et soon 5a mier vealised there will be plenty The mind is switched. buck,icoal extensively if the home fires

Chis mass exodu sure sig ——— — War a ent valen : ithe World) fire roused elsewhere by the im-|comfortingly, from Korea to the} qre to be kept burning.

that another } t $02. | “Ki | tied irae to thet Ry on ic ee te plications of these Service|cebating halls of Dundee and}

ml ving rapidly to a lose arfetched ltackle the practical, applications | “nmouncements. Turmingham, for though we may} Which swas a toucn of humour
é rok Ge ate to Sa RR aa m $s 3 » | theories Gout wiiel) thay haal Difficul i luck the technique of Pravda of|—or does it?—to the fact that in
‘ rabidly dirniiishing “""'\ Kables’’—Shaw’s | 5een all set to talk ad lib, | ult Juggle the publicity ingenuities of othetforcer to ensure that the heating

j

ee
t

ee

}









SONNY RAMADHIN—

Took 7 for 33

GERRY GOMEZ—
Hit 1,000 runs

RAMADUHIN SKITTLE OUT
MINORS FOK 106: WEST

INDIES HIT

277 FOR 3

NORWICH, Sept. 6.

SONNY RAMADHIN, the West Indies Test bowler, found

the Norwich pitch so respon
took ren Minor Counties
of 106.

By the close of play the West



Indies had replied with 277 for!
Most of Ramadhin’s victims—
six bowled were beaten by

sharply turning offbreaks. Rama-
chin, a§ usual, introduced the leg-
break aS a variation, and _ hit
rivals, looking for this ball, were

perplexed when deliveries came
quickly the other way.
Minor Counties were 48 for

before J. G. Owen, the Bedford-

shire left-hander, rallied ther
with q series of strong legside
strokes

He hit 4 botindarieés and power
fully straight drove Ramadhin for
6, but the innings ended just after
lunch.

The West Indies passed their
opponents’ total in 90 minutes for
the loss of their opening pair, Rae
and Stollmeyer together scored 48
at one run a minute, and Rae,
having hit five fours and a six, a
huge on drive which cleared the
stand, was smartly stumped at 88.

Marshall also entertained the
7,000 crowd with some well-timed
driving. He hit 8 fours and a six
in 56 hefore he was bowled.

Bad light and drizzie spoiled the
spectators enjoyment after tea, but
Trestrail and Gomez, by free
stroke play, did much to atone for
the weathers shortcomings.

In an hour, before rain brought
an end 50 minutes early, the
fourth pair rattled up 128.

Gomez has so far hit 12 fours in
a stay of 90 minutes and Trestrail
10 fours and 2 sixes.

Both men drove and glaneed
beautifully, and the hardworking
bowlers found no relief.

In the second over after lunch,
without addition to the score the
Counties’ innings closed, Divecha
being taken smartly at deep mid-
wicket.

When the West Indies opened
Rae and Stollmeyer treated with
respect the fast bowling of Earl
and Bannister but when Laidlaw
came on with legbreaks, Stoll-
meyer hit him for 3 fours in his
first over. Having hit five fours
in 30 runs out of an opening
stand of 48 in 50 minutes, Stoll-
meyer was bowled off his pads

Marshall and Gomez too were
aggressive, and Marshall hit one
six off Allen over square leg and
had 8 fours in his 56. He was out}



sive to his spin today that he
vickets for 38 out of a total

f dcte intey 1 cér and
rumees { Latest Play wingham: gathering breaking up.
It has heen an intergsting ~ason | . Already the scientists have got inte
in many Ww Pafticular en~ | LONDON, Sept. 6. their stride with predictions of new
hiening of ¢ i er~ | Gtut Bernard Shaw's tatest | *tomic discoveries: about the
| formanee of t tr out-|pLlay, a peep into the post-atomic effect on history teaching to-day
jing side in winning three of the} age, was previewed here on Tues-| Of the legendary tale of King
{four Tests after they had lest the!day night. The play, “Far- Arthur and the cakes he burnt,
first. It seems difficult to realise! fetched Fables”, was shown to an| They warn us yet again that we
ow, having sten these magnifi-|audience of professional critics at}|ust grow more food unless the
cont ericketer throughou the| Watergate Theatre, a tiny house| world’s increasing population is to
immer, that they were more Or}seating onty 106 people, starve to death; they tell of the
less an unknown quantit en| The 94-year-old sage dispenses | discovery of a substitute for blood
they arrived and tr } es|with a plot to present his inter-| plasma that may help to keep
lof their winning the vine r4] pretation of what would happen| Some of us alive.
uoted at far i { t after the atomic era. In five con- But the march of events is
wv versation pieeés and one mono-jalmost as unkind this week to the
I don Se he =| teen he traces the destruction of} British Association as it was in
neallaed dent tripe dtiecoeatart ti ve ene sav zation and rise ot a] 1939, The reporting of its discus-
two spin biwtler Ramad I nd wh te me m organized pereny coer RUE ever for the
Valentine, wete coing to be. Thev ee a mee owes manufacture aymen—takes a minor place in
most Gé@Painly were successful, ena iva : iin Bede ber ot and the _ pages of ‘our newspapers.
NOMMEDE fete GAw one of then tee eae ttial oD oe “ wh cing B itain’s sefentific forces have)
bese GWU tox tour India with inane a etimbersome bedy—a ape, dive way in the headlines
;the Commonwealth side and the| fhe Times critic wrote: “This © Britain’> armed forces,
in the last over before tea. other is feturhning to Jamaica}; no mea itty paredy ia actec Ss eokin “ oh
After tea Gomez proceeded to where a scholarship awaits him. jplayfully as it ew een acee quare Deal for Yommy
hit the bowling freely. In fact In fact, one way and another,|Playfulness comes to very little The news of a square deal at
Gomez was 21 when Trestrail this has been. @ spin howlers sume |! the way of entertainment.” last for Britain’s soldiers, sailors
started, but the latter was the ier, Do you remember the sen-|, The Daily Express critic said: } nd airmen in the matter of their
first to reach 50. He once hit’ cational ‘performance by Jim| !! is a pathetic sight to ste that} Pay occasioned surpr.se only | by
Owen for 6 and then in another [aker, the Surrey _gff-spinner who ighty legend ‘By Bernard Shaw’|the unexpectedly generous im-
over from that bowler reached j,, ihe England ral match took a play built out of the shards} provements the Government con-
the boundary three times. His g poet wickets for two runs? That }224 ruins of genius.”—Can, Press.) ceded, particularly to the lower
50 oecupied 40 minutes ranks, Tommy Atkin won't find
The pair took the seore weil
past the 200 mark and raced

towards 300. Rain stopped play
45 minutes before stumps were i
be drawn and no further play wa
possible. d

Spin and pace bowlirig alike
were treated mercilessly by tne
fourth wicket pair, and Trestrail
hit a second six with an hour
Half an hour later a decision was
reached that play could not con-
tinue, Thus the West Indies are
171 runs ahead with 7 wickets
in hand, In 63 minutes, Trestrail
and Gomez added 128 runs
Gomez hit 12 fours and Trestrai!
10 apart from his two sixes. Both
batted grandly in poor light and
drizzle.

MINOR COUNTIBS—tst Innings

Tealy b Pierre
Sutcliffe ¢ Christiani b Jones 2
Brazier b Ramadhin 16
Bell b Ramadhin 4
Prowd b Ramadhin 9
Owen c Gomez b Ramadhin 32
Firth b Ramadhin 18
Divecha ¢ Marshall b William 13
Earl b Ramadhin 0}
Bannister b Ramadhin 3
Laidlaw not out 3
Extras 3
TOTAL 106
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R Ww
Pierre 8 1 19 1
Jones 8 1 18 1
Ramadhin 13 6 33 7
Williams 8 1 33 1
WEST INDIES—tst Inning
A. Ruo c Firth b Laidlaw 41
J.B iollmeyer b Divecha 30
R. Marshall b Earl 56
Gomez not out 79
Trestrail net out 67
Extras
TOTAL (for 3 wkts.) 277
To bat: Worrell, Christiani, Williams
Jones, Ramadhin and Pierre
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o. M R. Ww
Rarl 12 1 a7 1
Rannister 7 0 30 0
Divecha 16 1 69 1
Laidlaw 13 1 76 1
Owen i 7 0 61 0

—Reuter,



18 Traffic Offences
Recorded

DURING the last two days
traffic offences were recorded by
the Police and of these, five
motorists were charged for driving

in & Manner dangerous to the
public.
Two. motorists were charged

for driving without due care and
attention and another for not stop-
ping after an accident. Two others
were charged for parking in
restricted areas,

There were
not stopping

three charges for
at a major road and



one for going around a curve ai
a fast rate. Two cyclists were
charged for riding without a

lighted lamp to the front of their
cycles and another for not having
his number plate firmly affixed to
the cycle.

A conductor was
carrying passengers

charged
in excess, {

for;





"They'll Do It Every Time








rer




WAITING FOR S
C/MONE HIT 17,
WILLYA #!




So ve FINALLY
SWUNG «ss

V4

*e

Huggins Leaves

Jamaica Saturday

KINGSTON, Sept. 6
Governor Huggins who leaves
the island on Saturday for Eng-
land at the end of his seven years
term, at a farewell dinner given
in his honour by members of the
Executive Council and Legisla-
ture last night said he had done
his duty without fear or favour
and was confident that history
would record that during his ad-
ministration a very considerable
advance had been made in many
directions in Jamaica,
—(Can, Press.)

FELL IN WELL

WILLIE BEST of St. Michael
was treated at the General Hos-
pital for injuries recently after
falling in a well at Seawell.

It is understood that Best had
been working in the well. He
vas being hauled to the top when
he fell back a few feet down.



Raghwered U. 5. Puteat Ofte

nm
dé
“Wf. Ae,
he

‘fe
«
r MW en Pos
fyi
oy? % Pai lias *

a En
4 j
« Aa
be

eo



NOT ‘TILL THEM DUFFERS. ”, “Awa”
GET OFF THE GREEN! AP





was cértainly a record-breaking
performance but not good enough
to gain admission to the full Test
eleyen of England.

And then there are the feats of



but with two leg-spinners and one
left-hander

| Then again, credit must be
{given to Leslie Ames, Kent and
jformer England wicket - keeper
batsman who joined the select
jband of immortals who have

100 centuries, He has ac
cepted the captaincy cf the Com-
jmonwealth side and will presum
‘ably add another couple of
{hundreds to his already magnifi-
Scent record.

| scored



But my choice for the season's
‘best and most unexpected per-
jformer is Emrys Davies, veteran
ies

Glamorgan opening batsman and

| one-time all-rounder. When Gla
; Morgan ran short of spin bowlers

half - way through the season,
I Rmeye rolled back his sleeves and
| with that slow one-two shuffle to

the wicket started once again to
trundle up his deceptively inno-
cent slow left-handers, In spite of

the fact that he had not bowled
more than a couple of overs dur-
ing the previous two seasons and
he was in his forty-ninth
*, he quickly got among thé
wickets tre he had added
another fifty victims to his collec
tion at an average cost of fourteen |
runs each, And just for good mea
sure he passed his 1,000 runs for
the seventeenth consecutive year
That’s no mean achievement for
‘un

YANKEE GIRLS
HIT HARDER

BUFFALO,

United States women
are still superior to their British
cousins because they hit the ball
farther. Power was the deciding
factor as ‘the Americans clinched
the Curtis Cup turning back Brit-
ain’s best 74% to 14s in the two- |



long

an old

Sept. 6
golfers



day international competition
which ended on Tuesday. British
girls were as accurate as the
American girls but they used the
old fashionéd straight left arm.
They usually found themselves

short of the American lassies em-
ploying. the powerful whip-Wash



lick, The invaders were some-
timos left 50 yards in arrears of!
the tees. It was the fifth U.S
victory in six matches since the
seri started in 1932 The best
Britain has been able to manage

There were no
1938-1947
— (Can. Press.)

a tie in 1936.
between

was
matches

By Jimmy Hatlo |

}







a
























Ask £500 For
Valentine

There’s no danger of the Bir-

his new pay packet putting him
on the same affluent basis as say,
G, 1, Joe—or even h’s fighting
counterparts from elsewhere in
his oWn Commonwealth. But if



Tattersall, Berry, Hilton ind (Barbades Advocate Correspondent) ap hs idee” ta : at «
iGrieves, ‘the Lancashire spin KINGSTON, September 6. | TONey ee ae AE en
) bowlers, to be considered They The Jamaiea House of Repre- hae Tees we 1 ei the badly
'most certainly had a wicket at Jsentatives today voted to request a recruits for ritain’s reg-
Manchester that helped them—re-/ the Government to provide the y ra os ati PE Pi teak pik

| member the first Test—but they} sum of £500 towards g scholarsh pt : rime N et at eve broad-
j achieved no inconsiderable mea-] lund for alentine, ce on Wee nesday STS
}sure of success away from home The original motion asked the | this new move to improve Brit-
and Berry and Hilton both earned| Government to provide the full ,8!"'s fighting strength, along with
"Test recagnition, Many people| cost of the scholarship but N, M. |¢Xtension of conscription from 18
thought Tattersall also deserved] Nethersole, Deputy Opposition|months to two years, fell some~-
‘his eap and ¥ must confess that I} Leader advised the House that the | what flat on his listeners. This
was a little surprised to find he| ricket Board of Control as orig- | was a Ministerial policy broad-
|did not gain a place in the fourth] inators of the fund would prefer cast as against the Party broad-
| Test at the Oval, here England] keep the scholarship gift public. cast such as he is due to give this
appeared without an off-spinner












Fonight

Kes vieKs VA-TRO-NOL




















not

A further shipment of
is expeeted this week

f Just a few drops (8

Hlustrated at right is the phenomenal
model 39J which has ELEVEN BANDS.

We ate booking orders now.

P.C.S. MAFFEI & CO., LTD

Don't let stuffy nose due to
a head-cold or catarrh rob
wm of ae A few drops of

a-tro-nol up each nostril
eases breathing almost in-
stantly. Shrinks swollenmem-
branes, soothes irritation,
clears stuffy nose! Try it!





~

?



up each nostril “A





evyoy
BRITAIN’S
LEADING

AMERICAN-TYPE
CIGARETTE

this model

LOCAL AGENTS



countries, the fact is plain that
her Scientists keep Britain to the}
forefront in this particular aspect
cf résearcliThe Sapphire’s pers
formance is amazing. She has des
veloped under test some 7,200
borse-power—vastly higher than
which has denied industrial} @»y other figure so far published
workers satisfaction of claims that |in respect of any gas turbine
it is estimated would cost the;cugine. It means that the Sap-s
j country another £200 million a'rhire provides a power similar to
sear, Whether it cames through that of the four piston engines of
rext week’s Trade Union Con-| 2 B29 Super Fortress,

cress or later from the big unions, . 4 ei

the question of how the wage- Soldier Guinea-Pigs
f-eeze policy can be applied differ- | The rains have come.
ently as betweeen the man in
vniform and the man out of uni-
form will undoubtedly arise to
harass Sir Stafford Cripps in his
juggling to close the dollar gap
while rafsing enough money to
| ensure national security, The
| nasty word inflation creeps again
| into our category of fears.

Lead In The Air
The skirl of the bagpipes telling
of the arrival of British troops in

Korea is not the Sole piece of good
SUPPER & DANCE
at

a

THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB

(Local and Visiting Members Only)

SATURDAY, SEPT. 16TH
COLD BUFFET SUPPER—

| Apart from the conflict with the
jrminority in the Labour Party
cpposed to conscription of any
kind, the Government faces the
complications of this £68 million=
a~year increase in Services pay
against the wage-restraint policy





}















'
|

We have a new assortment

desigrs in Sports Coatings

will be served in the Plaids and Finé Checks
Ballroom from 7.30 to
9.30 p.m.

Price $2.00 each ss

Cream Gaberdine

Please dial 4461 for
Reservations

DANCING
from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.
| 7.9.50.—In.

Cream Serge










Grey Flannels,
Doe Skin



Arrivals

MEAT ROLLS
LUNCHEON BEEF
MUTTON & PEAS
CORNED BEEF
VIENNA eeogcose
COCKTA 8. Se
MACARONI & SE
TOMATO JUICE
FRUIT SALAD

PLUM JAM

» APRICOTS

» TOMATO SOUP

. STEAK. & TOMATO
TOMA’
PINEAPP’

' STUART & SAMPSON

Tins

JAM







FOR

| of MERIT for BETTER

HOME & OFFICE
FURNISHERS

NEW and renéwed Mehogafy and
other Bedsteads, Bow-ftont,
Pedestal and simpler Vanities and
Stools, Wardrobes, Qhest-of-
drawers, Marble Top and other
Washstands, Night Chair Comfort.

| FURNITURE



9 ph.
ATTRACTIVE

MORRIS, Tub and Bergere Suites
and Separate pieces,, Berbice and
other restful chairs Couches,
Framed and Cheval Mirrors up
to full height, 50 x 16-—Ra@io and
Fancy Tables

Dining, Kitchen and Lunch
Tables, Upright and Arméhairs,
China, Bedroom & Kitehen Cabi-
Wargons, Larders, Side-
. Coolerator, Desks, Book-



BUY EARLY



L.S. WILSON

DIAL 4039



)
TRAFALGAR ST,

and Stock

BUCKET

remains dry and clean until
and quickly released.

The BUCKET HOOK can
wall or upright,

See them at — —

C.S. PITCHER
AND



Coastal t by
resorts in different parts of the ! factors.

Cream Flarinels,

in White and Fawn

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD,

10, 11, 12, 13, Broad Street

epECIAL DANCE

VENEZUELAN TOURISTS
IN BARBADOS

Oth of SEPTEMBER, 1950

Calling all Dairy Owners,

No more Feed spoiled or soured by stale or ditty water
remaining in your Buckets if you us@ our patent

Wash your Bucket and hang it upside down on th?
Bucket Hook by its rim. The Bucket is securely held
by its own weight. It draing and dries in no time. It

ONLY @@e. EACH.

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.



arrangements in the new House
of Commons (opening next
month) are adequate, 400 soldier

!guinea-pigs will occupy the build-

ing next week. Probably Guards-
men, they will sit in the seats of
M.P.s. Like M.P.s they will be
allowed to talk, but not to smoke.
Engineers will test out then
whether the ventilating: and heat-
ing systems are in good order.

Perhaps the Cvardsmen will
participate in the experiment with
more agreeable feelings as they
ponder the y rises approved of
their atliamentary bene-










of

in

2 dam.
PRIZES



Race Horse Owners,
Owners.

HOOKS




wanted for use and js easily

be fixed on the side of any



& CO,, LTD.

AT





Full Text

PAGE 1

'I' I %  11 I S 11 .1 Sr|i I %  % % %  li r r 7 |g g o Barbauns Vacate %  IVI: IK>I< \ U.N. FORCES CHECK RED ADVANCE Co-operation Can Prevent World War Says Met in SOUTHAMPTON, Sent. C. [JRITISH Foreign Minister Ernest Bevin said tonight that he believed another World War could be prevented with the close co operation of the Atlan'ic Powers and other friendly countries. ——— 1 *.. >.wdii.,; :IL. l.i.ii Queen M*r in the United Nations Ahseniblv he declared; •! believe which are In the Atlantic Pact, and which •re friendly to cm activj ri.cmselrea together and organise • i UN Hank !>i i '.trlii any %  "With %  'in-, merging our %  v. %  %  %  ,, n i. ... %  World War or am sen. banco in the WOI Id Heinous Meeting III I III WTH.I Vd\ iicalc Hiirricam' Relief Fund For Antigua : %  %  i In Critical Battle For Taegu i a p. n %  %  %  i Ian Spot 1. S IlivcM-,, f SonII il I • % %  \i H it A* I* MM and Mm ".• i Mr.. M. Carn-icft..! ... A nradann Mil. r Car.r,„h*l W MrClean -aII M T Mr i.nd MrOcaTBc %  se >li "Minnie'The Siren Will Wail To-day Barboilu.fi who are famillm with the sound of an Air Raid Alarm w 11 bo remind !" of thr war %  u i wha DM; I wall of a Siren at noon today. A siren has been placed on ihe roof of ihe office of the Commlslloner of Police ai T t. Siation and will be tried out today for UM as %  hurr cam warning. Colonel R T, UlcheUn, Commissioner of Police, told HIP Advocate yesterday thai ihe siren is being tr ed out to see hour tar away it can be heard There am (our Other sirrtis in the storeroom at the Central Police Station They are nil electrically operated and were bought from Enphmd dm inn Ihe laid war to l>e UOOd Bar A r Raid Alarms. Trial Day The Commissioner ... the tnnl today prOVea successful, the other sirens will be AV at other strategic parts of the island to give warning Of proach of any tropical disturbance He said. "Ihe Antigua hurricane has shown us how essential it is to have Bd*Quata warning before hand Owtng to the tm population of that Island had good warning before lha rtori no lives were |ggl The trial today is to teal the range of the awn ai people, who are placed points, will make reports During the war thi used all over the world for air raid wai MUn| of i "It i-. reaui i beta AM meeung and 'me of great moment to tin of mankind Bevin said he WOUld have talks with Ihe United Slates and deal with certain matter w.ii Canada and us There a partita tall with Fran* Ited Stataa M will Bl the United Nations work "There are fanl> Intricate and i .in ate loha we hava to deal Ith a next stata In the development of Germany. and .i lot cf matters in cennectiiwi with rearmament." he de> Renter. HI. FIRST KXIII WD (Mil HIM. PAR* U-N left %  iwftl on aft.,noon lor •.ntlguj Picture show.. RH | \ ,,r* naaarawi i H \\ I loading III-III llllo thf One Killed In Traffic Jam ftlO Itt JANEII'o. S. i %  8 .rfinrlpHl i*iimorning a* ii result % %  < during tho msh hour. One person M Injured in an accident : %  wrdeh a loaded passenger train into a -.hunting engine. Boa l or HURRICANE FLATTENS BARBUDA iTrom Our Own Crr. i ANTIGUA. Sept 6 TinFan arrlved Bl St John'' from MWl that the 0 H ilia dependency just SB miles mirth of Antigua with its i.ooo Inhabltanti bad been hard Ml bj ttM hurricane \: i. are "at than stunding and people took refuge In the Pilmun Ion House which was also damaged A etlon of W 11 d <• n damaged, Codrlngton Village which ,thwi net country, was i by a tidal In tl icucvci bun.' mea have nil Antigua, ihey luce been fell by Rariiud.i. and ihe %  The Governn enl .mi. the Red Cross •'fiing WAN IX. "BONNIE" "African King h No King" GEORGETOWN. Sept r> 1 11 • lulai ecorved %  rudt shock lodaj when the B.C Branch ..i the i>i.iinci pi ..|.i, %  closed that Ese Anyanwu Oguan is no ^ royal personage onl> I i and ic ordu visit has been caiictdleil The L.C P. statement to-day Intlmal from the in, Devi lnue in UjB A iided 'n .i rifM^rrci with I>r Ralph Buni h and BiiOsh ('. : Si I can. i Evans in rs.A bad \|>ress*d a desire 1<> %  Qu B) I Ihe Waal liwtit*. • Governor Sir Charles Tfoola3 was consulted and bad ratpreaard willingness in an as joint hosl wlln the UC P ni euleileliiliig Kinp Oguati, bul us a result <>f enquiries at the Colonial OfW bl London, and also at UNO headiiuarters and the British Eiohass\ USA. it was discovered lha* • i no royal African per sonage The news came as a hitter di*Hrltish GuianesOf African descent, who for Ufcl peg) two wee hi hove ixtn busv planning an elaborate reception tor him. (iiiirgetown newspaper headlines splashed "E?.e had Ihem Urican king is no king" Ogueri Wai to IURJ .' the honi" 0( Ur and Mrs J A N and an elaborate pro*rammo was I. r P whO were .ifflrial hots Rearming May Affect World' Economy EXM&8 THINK llv II \ II. 0 11 MM. PARIS. Rapt il LEADING FINANCE EX.-'! RTS i 18 counl includm, Czechoslovakia but exdddinit Russia mel al a hank .,1 Franco lodaj foi ilv UN* annual melting of Ihe Inlernalional Monetary Fund and Ihe World Bank foi RecomtruC' lion. A representative nf 4V.i'v.ikta,i Ihl inl3 "Ifon Curtain country mrmher wan presajit. (..Ilowirma last minute ehaiiKu of policy, for the Czechs had not beer expected •.. attend ihe meeting. The actual airencla was restricted to consul erallon uf atuuinl relmrts and administrative matter. Speculation Over General Electionfl IN BRITAIN LOlVtJON, Sepl i ..ip.ii up again )H uibllhj ol %  leneral n Krttain befon Usa i \ iti reporti srt %  • preporedntai inatrue< %  .. the i JIbOUl Party election Bgetltl Ml i organirbe ell set Bl an ap| narn ..Hi he " thai void an even •i %  anggfl in Ceenmon i I thai a map m\ \^' i l v MUK the Qev< during the approncMni ipeel .1 ai i. • long % %  %  Ihe Govotnmen i seat tin 1 the m M aleetton wlU u referred until a favoo. It own i boteo In loiiMiltation Ml \i w I '. < %  II oonaul preoaretron for th f ParfiaaMnt nesrt i m nls relating U) far-reach t c l>i'ii.irtnieii'..l MII II Itrrx m .i" MI. ith Re Mill have i>een theii El %  it .in • %  000,000 annually on dtthc next Ihree yaon Involved a sudden mtdl Ovdl i %  rMvitabb poard Mtajorneadi he em %  *m i itioi. By JULIM.; ^AV, TOKYO, St \\ IARY Amprican and ttouth .. cln troopb had by tonicht checkert the IVorthra advance pouring through the hole torn in the United Nations defence line on the east, coant of Korea The Eighth Army Headquarters announced that United Nations forces were 'halting" the North Koreans from the exploitation of their break through south of Kigye, ..bout 10 miles inland from the port of Pohanu. which fell to the Communist* last night Bettered bul still I.Khtirt,; bravely, Americans and Sown. Kui ina wtra pushing north from the Kvonanu, the vital md nil Junction 18 miles south ot Poha froiri Yongcho Socialists Win Danish Election COPENHAGEN. Sept . Hans lleflnft. the l)„n h S. nil ist Party leadercalled upon Kim: Frederic this morning to advise him as to the results of vesterday.H'-neral all His party tnpped the poll, but ••ithout an overall maioritr. A short statement after the meeting said that lleflnft whose minor it v Socialist Government reaigned on August 'i rugveetaH that Ihe King receive all Partv iheii views rleflofl reelggaad lour weeks ago bacauaa his oraatii economy pfnpocalu aimed at reducing Dennuuir's balance payment gap. nei overwhelming r>riucisjn from %  opposition part %  %  %  %  f 150 meinlpr lleflnft ., %  bo be 1 MS now up to the King to d I,. id ii dUth part*, leader* The l-eader of the Liberalsi. ii irtj with 3t seats in the new Men*, quaahed all hones I ., Si( Tuny John-.. h MVI fi C'MNHlai an a BiriMUda. lw. .Illwuifh ... %  ll:|. I I.I, TH* .illl.l U;T-.. aVU i .1 H.-I • iliil" • l\r-< in riol. LAUNCHED %  4 A Fon %  %  l*he ves-.. destlnet Wartburg, Tennessee, w.i* %  iilencecl to 3d years hard, lalou' by a United St., here today and ordered to be rllxI mourabfj dlsohergad fi %  • %  % %  rvice for criminally assaulting Mavis HnU*,,K|. jflvear-oln Han iieetei chorue girl He forcibly vfrlpped an led her In p darkened railway i iiriage Jones who i .'S w. foui Wj n four chstrge %  ntence i Nflrmatinn hy a hl*tte r aulhoritv cither atfeal I twg bonatabtea tad bt Ing Ii unf 1 lerb He pu %  %  | d four-daj I ... Hhrvusg with Uegleal cmui, of the i Ii fCnglan. vltra baahful It was alleged tortitv D I mrl had gone Uln %  f heir" bet !" < ttrn>peef(ire his arrest n .".'inch, arhilt %  .111 a r y . Shanghai and Peking 01 -made transmit! —Renter Frenel I c o m e -i i eprrenta i it WHIM uf Hie Rae ( the B-i.k of France inauguratM for the iKx'asfon That repeicuasiorui of learmameni at %  id immediately girnanded that the Chlnoao ^atumaJui delegati be : %  Outt, lha FUIKTI M...II nnounced yeatari..r that Cxocl -idi Ba mem bars of the two Indie* who have l.i.ni im part in i foi (everel month*, not expected, I Sucharda the .. %  %  ..i the r und and .laroslav of tinbank i ipcnlng K<-*oliiliKii Aa soon as .11. walUcharda i %  ..ri "uniicipation ol the K> i1 i ant in lha Cot supporting ihe resolui.'iimed Ihe Hank and rand a %  %  11 r L %  i iperlal He are> td die only lawful rnt f China on lad in the Mank H. . reel the doctrine of th< Ihl I'M:'. %  : arho r n .( the real govei' manl ol anj %  mti' He claii Oovflwnmsnl ••< i • in %  fired itb Higal %  tdbiliaad Iti %  oieni v. ,.n.( ..IF rinj oui lion of plans, all of which, fi' tan .. %  • lOI %  Fund had •testier U.S. Plan To Neutralise Formosa tVAftHlNGl N Bl • % %  Hi haaon. anid lodaj il : doM bj • % % %  • Unlh "tionii i %  to encourage i inke uoaallila in alt % %  h i ni re con i %  %  r ;. t in i/ || ..( Ml 2 Dead: 4(M) Ilonieless IN FLORIDA STORM MIAMI. Sept fl [WO Beetoral "r/. mile-in hot!! II dOUbll o.i 1'ier nalUitg all • v on To. %  ass* in Cedgi Roy BNB %  here JM ari gti n dfunaga we %  t. Windnear the iT"tre woie.-. %  i ro to ;^ roiie. p tour with gusts higher Squalls "i laaiieit by \ hael Mi lJ.rmli. th State %  i>'>kesman' ., %  Antba aadoi lo i .... Alan G Knk. ceiled lodai lo ih. Ministry of Foreign Affairs b) Foreign M nlttci vyahlnaky who rrad to bin %  i D the auhjaci IIK lent which S.ptirn hi i ..' %  i w ,, i I.-I-.I %  i to lha Bi i ell on Ih* %  % %  %  %  alive of lha '' Reds Demand Ctminensatian From U.S. LAKI lapt %  Mi-llk read to • % %  Itu^iia today elan, i • %  '. ivarn m meni in which it Koiean uaters on Monday WBS that the matter should ! %  merelv on a training flight betwi %  '-ient< elegate Jacob Malik Warren shot down "gratuitously" 1-y Auetin salI SecurlAmerican fighters ty Co aaking i %  % %  This matter ha> • tl ng U) Oladwyn l"d that the matter wai M Council .nd would be dlaVusead In due Reuter. I %  I n Unit* d Bl I eutralialngf Foirnoaa i leu ..I Die Ron I %  Bftrj ihe Untt I panding aviation ietri %  "" "tluT lnll^til^^ aid t I aid it it. he resp.iusil.iiii \rthin (' %  • %  irfMu Btatn i | .... i i %  alnland II.mi ha %  %  .iihing was bemi dera Iffillad Stab %  i. i, ihi chin Bins' Ihe C! Im • Rratrr Will Contrib.ilr 'I'll \|r|rm'o|n."\ a. %  !..<... td.. aspaaaaall KlNOSTt iN - pli %  i Tin II % %  ... i da) voted foi i i xpi < ivei l.n'iai. a upkeep %  %  . -I Indian sa>teorologii f a l %  i %  ifriie consequei I u thdrawal ol lha All M nlaifj %  • i vi.. • fron ihi i NO RESPONSE MltMljl' SOMFWIIFKr. IN KOnCA, Sept The I'ohang austrlp i" ••' 'I" Bgel Coaal H Korea n *.*rn avaceurted during the mgin I'l.ir -p..I pll.,1-v I... e *ning were iili TI i leaortea rage fati mght thai the? re imabla lo gat ai | %  %  .-., i —Reuter %  I %  %  lulga of Taegu by tank i infantry %  ) :' II I nW iiati i behind it,. uhad • a r'vai GJ'fl Take SbuuhlrrlioiiM* todgv 1 the "N iktun uncuei 1 %  ontlnui d %  ; %  | of Hvonpi '. mill %  arie higt Earlier American morll %  ttacki i %  >\ tie ''aHRigh %  %  %  : irohi %  Ihe ntied Nat nn^ %  otitini. %  ..' %  it i haggj •' Taegu %  ,1 %  %  B lefl I 'fneer in I fatloi poa I m i frontline report. from the north an i aal win %  BaMrtfi Korean umt %  %  i'h. '. id in i. een flung bal I Si ith K. ana ) %  breech i %  %  .mi* k> | ,.. i %  %  Fighters and bomber P %  ., io nigj ii f' nudod by %  < u*emendooa clou l %  %  I %  lam i % %  lump Renter 7V> Discuss SattpeifB Sfcpori sri >< KHIII.M Bepi a. %  ire Coi ttaeejBI the increase U) Chili to EItCHlrl Russia Warns U.S.A. Of Drastiv Gomequewces Of Shttttli/t;: Down Red Plane I.DNIH N Si I %  i RUSSIA TODAY protearted to the United SUtee that ;. Soviet mrcralt Hying "it Koreg riad bar n Bttai N and ~h. %  lawn by li Amafrican RifHen legatee**, radio re>| The protean note was hguraed to the Ajnoricari Amrjeaeadoi • n Mogoow todai) li stated thai on September I al i'M4 Korean utw. a twin eiuiinid plant ol tfl Bo' %  '' Airforce .,!.: %  tn IUHI bombing nor torpedo waa on tralnim (light from Port Arthur. Tta JUST MAI) No thi .. %  • hu %  i ,' ince thi earl I %  %  ,; %  . all lha ihing Mend and foi I i .. ...ugli %  %  ildortag pictiue Mi ,I.I ii • luU ; "i Ik Ian t . iiek-tn t rind. .i gruAibling f-i % %  ra rale waakling. %  bullliof an*! .1 !-* % %  Hi..tied I ruoe of %  |.-. i i ai • M i hian %  the w. i li knight* t. fad '• point of agroi %  %  %  %  %  "gramme an %  '[ Amerjeai. t had tl-.it Mil that tt.L Soviet Bin i Amerh %  lei Oot • %  '.he not %  dated The 8 %  vemmeni akw drew atti %  follow' such aetiaa BjBta %  kk on thiM> %  n Bovhri phu a era makim* Ir.iiiiing Mighti. With %  • %  i ited li % %  %  rnl of the %  --arv on the basis of rertl i fotti • %  • \ at 11*44 hii.i ... eragined niani bombtni i maments, %  viit from %  jf Ha. V the front ..( I'mi %  : %  ground* or | %  ra of .he dlhbary Force and fell bui lie sea S %  —Renter



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PAGE SIX • TV i J 6*p BARBADOS ADVOCATE TllinSDAT SEPTEMBER 7. HSU BY CARL ANDERSON MT:<— MOUSE "^C-Y* 1 BOVSIWEV 1 GIVE TWE '>5L**4 V\AS< '-".', 1 SOWETHIV5 TO WQKgv BY WALT DISNEY t^rf /"*NJBT 9ELF ? BLONDIE '"'I fir niiiiiiiiinniiiiiiiii ."" BY CHIC YOUNG THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER &'\Nt TAMED BiC. OCKE "I TME TFIEGRAPH CFFIOE. I HE WENTT..ERE TO GFT A I M&S3A&F IT vv#S WRITTEN IWS PAD.' LOOK! WHEN I RUB '*E PftD V A PBMCIL, THE INDENTATIONS STAND OUT IN WhlTB TO ^MOW I WHAT WAS WRlTTCN ON 1 TORN-OfF PAGE. ft. Q. <\\\Q \ I TMIfflAIVMAT WILL>.mWV? I .IT LU TMl MV*NTS INTO) j LITTi** VI %  .. *** %  * 00 /=• I *Ov* % ""•*' 22_!> BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC.MANUS %  %  %  ••I-4U.EP I C/TTV*: WE CAN OfVE IT mm*LET A-..ONS s'J %  >. • % %  %  -. % %  .-. .... fcTSAuCO •SON TVC PHONE' ME W-SHEC TO&PCAK TO-vCU ..; pa J0AM MA TMH VOC 6AL.F' WN 4 FdCJNT QP THE t-OL**l--r.W TlNOCXiE vff vB6-iT'f. A Fug H M 1 -A P*M 6TATC OPAFFAlflVl WH?*" . DH>JT CAPE A80UT I 'JUi— tME "PUSC %  THOUGHT j | |j|| HUH?ii HUH RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND FCA RS -ONEV..9UT B6^_Z_^VO VS. SJ^^---\^ 1 COISM s-e > LOO* .XML* I I I TSJST6*... NMj5P \ THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES WA7cneeey ru/s cnum MAN HC CAN'TBtfVi£•/lit ifJS' —I 7KMLE— I ttUtiUffct.. m *,.*r v0 Am I J..I Teal. B.•-'.. ilii. • H.I •• tuiM Oar Specially designed for Barbados, rhis brown broque is now on sale in the leading stores. See them for yourself made by JOHN WHITE ALL IN AND ARRANGE FOR YOUR X'MAS CALENDARS AVOID THf RUSH &f ADVOCATE PRINTING pin. Peanut Butter and Jams Jars Peanut Butter 63. 55, .35 Tins S.A. Apricot Jam—lib J t .. S.A. Peach Jam—21b .M .. S.A. Fig. Jam 21b .52 .. S.A. P. Apple Jam 2tb ,. Letona Peach Jam .. Letona Black Currant Jam .. Sweet Orange Jam .67 f.4 .no .48 Cereals Tins Alison's Rolled Oats .48 Pkgs. Helloes' Corn Flakes 25 ., Quaker Puffed Wheat 34 Quaker Corn Flakes 28 .. Wafer Corn Flakes 31 „ Quaker Oats .24 .53 Tins Morton's Pearl Barley .51 Robinson's Patent Barley .51.83 Biscuits Tins Carr's British Assorted Biscuits S2.31 „ Carr's Glamour Biscults .... 2.34 Carr's Amber Biscuits .... 2.36 ,. Carr's Springtime Biscuits .. 1.80 .. Carr's Shepherd Biscuits 1.82 .. Carr's Mantilla Biscuits .. .. 1.60 .. Carr's Celery Biscuits .... 1.57 Peek Frean Biscuits . 1.20 MEAT DEPARTMENT Australian PRIME BEEF (All Cuts) MUITON CHOPS VEAL CHOPS LIVER WEINERS SAUSAGES 2/per lb. Liquers, Wines Etc Bots. D.O.M 85.78 „ Cointreau ... 6.00 .. Drambuie ... 6.00 „ Macou{1943) 4.00 „ Sautenay (IMt) 4.00 „ Henneuy Brandy V.S.O.P. .... 8.80 „ Gordon's Dry Gin 2.S0 Pimm's No. 1 Cup 3.38 Canned Fruit Tins A.J.C. Apricots (2A) .62 .. Tropical Fruit Salad .88 .. Peaches (2i) .80 „ Fruit Salad .87 „ Letona Pcache (Sliced) lib .. .37 ., Letona Peachc (Whole) lib .37 Damson's Peaches .52 ,. Yellow Plums .45 Canned Vegetables Tins Dutch Asp: Tips .85 .. Chlvcrs Parsnips . 61 .. Oliver* Sliced Beetroot .45 ,. Chlvers Spinach .41 .. Celery ... .03 „ Sweet Corn . A1 H Smedley's Peas .38 .. Hartley's Pees 44 Ovaltine and Milk Foods Tins Ovaltine $1.24. $ .73 ,. Tono .. 82.21. 1.18 ,. Milo 1.07 .. Vitacup .78 .. Cadbury's Bourn Vita .70 Hemo 1.10 Bots. Horlick's Malted Milk 1.14 .. Horlick's Malted Milk .68 'l|ill|||l||l!i|llll!linill|ll!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIill



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l'xci porn BARBADOS ADVOCATE TIIIRSDAV SEPTEMBER 7. 1M B^BADosj0_Agv5^rE The Constitution Of Switzerland •>•( %  •. >> lb. A4<—<* r.. Ltd.. >••* M.. fl*f.l-w Thursday. September 7, 1950 TODAY'S Sllll \ TODAY ul IUXHI tin' wail ol .i -.nt'ti will be heard m Bridgetown. At CDlatidga sii.ti (Vniii.l PoUe* Station .in xp'i iniitu d bata| conducttd to-day t< decide how i-ITectiviMI' be in informing the public ol Barbados of an approaching hurricane The Government haw i.hown prompt awareness of the I id thai MLJgUm of hurricane and cuutionai \ in themselves inadequate to warn the whole island of approaching hurricanes. To-day's practice has been made possible by the discovery in Barbados of five strain Only one of than sirens will !* %  used to-day. The purimso of the expi riment is U) Mm ON Government does not know what range each siren has and it is attempting to find out. It has made arrangements through official channels for reports to be made but it Is in the interest of the island as a whole that people who live in outlying districts several miles from Bridgetown should notify the Secretariat direct or through the correspondence columns of this newspaper if the siren is heard by them The test will be held to-day at noon when thaYaj will be much more noise than after nightfall, rt will therefore be a crucial test and results will indicate clearly the range of the siren. If to-day's siren proves satisfactory the Government will conduct further tests to see how best the live available sirens can be used on an island-wide basis. Tests may prove that five sirens will be adequate. They may prove that five or maybe fifteen more are necessary. But whatever the outcome of the test, tie i krv ernment are to be congratulated on their speedy move to improve the system of cautionary and hurricane warnings. It is up to the public to express then views freely on the results of today's test. The time for constructive criticism is before the event. Anybody can be wise afterwards. Inform the Secretariat and write to this newspaper to-day so that from your information the Government can continue to lake precautions in your own interest. (With Acknowledgement To External Attain, Canada) IN s.. i/< Hand, with an area of iiicetings of popular assemblies *' the N.I'I It helil li,8S0 square miles, and wilh a i UM l-l hav.ni: .:, Cation of the legUl.r. ,:'. i. | raesa b murui m DM IHSI Coiwuimion IN I %  M hve h.irul the Canton (M s Qals) Hie repcasailatlun. -:>• !y together and :he rights tight or lsj*lauv. irUUativa *- half-canton forming 'a u/ minoruv groups arc protected first M.i.oduced m the Canton of lye" 1 '* (or .a-ctoral culler CctiM qucruly caih canton half-.antor. nM Ihem-eKtfreely dccule on ihc way Ihei taUVSJs are to I or nominated, on their elesjibil.t. %  lid cm u.iu tana of offtc link between th< federal parl.arm-ni and Ihc can ionwlmh Me> not exists I' Canada, is the large number of of cantonal gi-v I National the Council v-lcm of governV*ud in 1843. Religious conflict* continued TinprsaS .t constitution of -o threaten the Confederacy ul mi best be underThese came to a head in IM7, S'.M,-) iii HM light of iU hlstorn, 1 when civil war broke oui be,.impendence and '.ween ,tis Prolejtant and I lor the Swm "m canicn... tha latlSl having cou1291 when the freemen of tho I'uded among themselves a se.antor.* of Uri. paratr alliance which the Diet S>Nwv/ : irn. under tunaidered Incompalible with the iHack Irom thHouse of HapsPact of 1815. After a campaign Wl into an 'A twenly days the Catholic army The AUt was defeated and die ground was ance had to -.'ruggle hard for it* |.iepared lor the framing of a : raduallv it exHew Constitution aeon I] IttrM in.ideas of the Radi.^I-I.il-cral hud tornuvl a solid Party which was then predoml, ," Zurich, nant in most of the cantons. The Beme, Claris and Zug. Later in revolutions which occurred the 18 h cenlury. Fribourgh, Sothroughout Europe In 1B48 had a Mure, Basle, ****ffrmf and itraof taasusnea on Swuwr^nd unally Appenzell jomnl the and served to free the ( afad league, and In this form it reeracy from foreign inu-rvculion in n.ained (Of tttras ntune as the Swiss affairs "League of Thirteen Members'' A new federal Constitution tn addition to the thirteen mem\.as adopted oi November 12. br cantons there were small :848; the oUI Confederacy dls^ Mlied stuU-s. including some appeared and in iU place was sVtrr'elariat of the legislative null are now cantons of the created a federal state—the Swiss oxet u tive authorities of tne Ml subjec.' terriConfederation The %  MtiMXI "t ennfederation. ;ind m time of war t.irles such as Ticlno conquered the Constitution drew heavily nr national emergency the Genera uy the three original mountain upon the example of the United in command of the Army; (b) %  .niiuered by States, but maintained many ln rx , rr | P the right of pardon Mcse. features which were inherited niut (c \ to nd one delegate from each allied tliough a further new Constilu-tate. The functions of the Diet v.on was adopted tn 1874. it merely ... i. largely consultative and Die ^rved to elaborate and bring up cantons themselves remained to date the 1818 Constitution In sovereign communities. Some of 1*48. Switzerland celebrated the :- %  !> the centenary of its existence as a Modern federal state. Organization of the Swiss Stale The organization of the S in The two Councils BW i currently but sit in separate chambers except when thev meet as the Federal AasemWy (a) to elect member* Federal Council, the Pi Of the Federal Tribunal %  nd Of the Insurance Trtbutisj the Chancellor of the Confederation, who heads the permanent f.1% I .MOIII-: FOOII THE response to the appeal made in this newspaper Cor Kifts of food and clothing for the people of Antigua has been good. During the last two days several ladies, including Lady ColJymore who was head of the "Win the War" organisation yen. ago, have been hard at work parcelling these gifts. So well was the work dotM that three boxes of clothing and one of food were despatched by plane yesterday. The packing continues and to-morrow it is proposed to send more gifts by the Schooner Princess Louise and on Tuesday by The Caribbee. In the circumstances the flow of gifts has been steady and does justice to the reputation of Barbadians who are always willing to help those in distress. Not only individuals but business houses have made contributions of food and clothing old and new and it is noticeable that clothing for women is in the preponderance. But there is one thing more to be done. The gifts of clothing have outstripped those of food and whilst there can be no reduction in the flow of gifts of clothes, there is at the moment greater necessity for gifts of food. The Y.M.C.A. has become the headquarters for the work of relief and there the Secretary, members of his staff and other helpers are working long periods to collect and collate the gifts, parcel and despatch them. There have been also gifts of money. Some of these will be added to the general fund while some will be despatched Immediate! v. mountain stales, were pure democracies In which the people 'irecily exercised their power by leeling in popular assemblies of I the citizens to discuss public ..ff-ii>. other cantons, including State consists of a Federal Cowa.hose more urban in character, til, exercising the executive Uc forms of governpower; a bicameral Federal Asth certain families exersembly; invested with the legi*Udng bareditan pnv.legea. !tive power; and a Federal Tnf Perpetual Neutrality bunal 2 do I ? , w h h tu. .. r> Meal Aseeasbbji for %  teni of MX years and are eligible tot immediate re-election The Fcoeral Assembly ahlO elects tha Tribunals' President and Vm President, who are not imme %  SwitsaffUsrafg GeesftHutlOD, seiM>wers. The two Councils of %  i r mint were the inhabitants of PSrattng the executive from the the Federal Assembly deal with ihc former subject tcrrito^c*. legislature, is not found In the appeals aga nst certain adminiv.'ho welcomed their release from Canadian Constitution where a strative decision-; ol the Federal the control of the cantons. FinalFederal Cabinet MinisiVr is abt Council; they also exeni-1 the iv i.ter a brief period of civil a member of lh P House ol Loinngbt of ainnesly and. sillini: ai. Napolean intervened and mons. IS?* 1 0 !' ,he ri J hl 21 i 1 1 1 :' 1 red on Switzerland the No canton can have more than The federal < ounclt Act of Mediation <-'f 1803. a Con<" ie representative on the Federal appeals agaiist decisions taken PlUution droned with the couV Council. There is a tradition that by Its own administrative Mrin>ration of the Swiss themselves tr.e Cantons of Berne. Zurich and vices, which are not expressly Ihc centralized State was comVaud, one olhe, French-speaking withm the ,ur sdiction Ofjw I-klelv abolished, but the alb*-! eanlon, ^id. to a less extent, the FedeTa Tnb mal. The Fed, ,.,i :.nd subject lerritories MM OMCMttOn of ruin., dwuld U regouncfl has also legislative fUricvertert into six new cantons, thus ptesenoed on the Federal Council, lions In tha K has the jUditlO U the inhabitants of This tradition Wig sumciently P 00 1 *" o'diniinceii in execution tnese lerritories as well as those strong to secure the election in "J reri*---ii law*. who wanted sovereign cantons. !W7 of a Vaudols even though Residuary Powers Rest Witt The Constitution provided for a there had been a oreak in the Cantons Diet with one delegate from each tiadition for some years. Unlike _, „,,.„,.. ... „ f ,. f the nineteen cantons but with fie Canodian Cabinet the Federal rf *2ti£r fh % the MX largest cantons having Council do not resign it subConstitution is that powers not iwo votes. Each of these six canJj"* to an adverse vote in the ions was to have the headship of Assembly. A Federal Councillor Ihc Confederacy in turn for one J" 0 be. d usually Is. re-elect.-.1 ear The Pact of 1815 examples ol service on the Our 11... •!• is Say: llmrricmm* To The Editor. Tlie Adeocafe. SIR.—I am reluctant to admit that I am a resident of St. Peter, and consequently a neighbour of the correspondent who wrote in your columns OB Tuesday September S. I notice that he Is a man wi.ti a double grievance. Firrt he is angry because the hurricane diei1er for it. but U: should business was just 'WoU SPEJGHTSTOWN There have been over twenty years Federal Council With die fall of Napoleon tl.e c^, red eral Councillor adDiet repealed the Act of Mediaministers one of the seven and drew up a new Constlgovernment departments Politijiion which became known,. ca (External Affairs); Interior Pact of 181ft This provided (Cultural Affa..s>; Justice and two Federal organs a Diet police; Mihtarv; Finai .n which each canton had one deCustoms; Public Economv (Trade. legate and on* vote, and a DirecLabour and Agriculture); and 'ate to be exercised in turn for *• ,wo years by the Cantons z uriih. Berne and Lucerne. In as alternate head i "her words. Switzerland was to ment %  Confederacy of soveFederal Counc I ser\-es as head of irign states, united in an everlaet..ne department and alternate Inj alliance for purposes of dehead of another 1: was shortly before the The President of the Federal Pact of IBIS that the number ot Council is elected by the Fed* conferred expressly upon the Confederation rest with the cantons Here the Swiss Condiffers in principle from that of Canada where the residuary powers are lefl in the hands ofethe Federal authorities. There is not, however, the same clear cut division of jurisdiction between the Confederation and ihe cantoris as exists In Canada between the Federal Government and the provinces One of the chief aims of the 1874 Const tu%  sir. !" ch d !" mSr d cr, r hc SSLS^S: %  SS* !" v,d .' ^ c.nlons was raised to the preAssembly for out -em ngurc of twenty-two by Is not immed ately re-eligible .„ the adhesion of Geneva. Neuchathe position of President. He s * V-iJl \ lais It was also ot Oils the President of the Confedera!" ,U.?,w!^ "me that the neutrality of Swittlon and represent* the State soldiers' per* ...I eon pment .oid mobilize the troops, although the provision of arms and ammunition and the higher drection of the army peat) with the Confederation M u s e u ms and art er.mon M u s e u ms ai ", % % %  '" ''" —I 11M, .ifiiil^ii. h..< ^r gariand, which hitherto had bee i pablk tunotk "jsivrss by virtue in fomo purely voluntary, became conor no spec a I powers •.inctual. The Powers guaranteed of his office Whcrca Swiss neutrality by the Declorafederal constitutions tlon of Vienna of March 20. 1815. dent has very extensive powers pr.d by the second Treaty of and Is in fact the executive Paris, of November 20. 181*'. branch of the government, the The revolutionary disturbances President of the Swiss Confedrr..in France in 1830 were reflected tion is simply one member of raJ movement in Switzera college of seven public officials 1; nd. The cantons which had elected to provide over their rttslocratic forms of goveinna-n' deliberations tor a period of one introduced democratic consiltuyear at a time. It Is this highly ons at the same time proclaimimpersonal chai-acter of ihe ing the sovereigntv of the people Swiss sv-tem ..f government that and guaranteeing Hberu I diitUunjlshoi H from .. The Federnl Assembly lb concern ntons. but the Confederaui eerli* n cases Education o roe* under the U M ot the cantons, but ;ute of Technolog}' at ^ n Zurich is a federal institution .*l ol-T. Finally, the Federal A MTtol Of coles. bolh civil and criminal, which have almost e it rely unified the laws of the country. A foreigner from another federal state Is stiuck by the degree o* co-operation between the %  lion and (he cantons This is made possible bv 'hr of the country, the ition of the cantons Coun ind fie >mber of members of cantonal governments who are tin after this the dlstincT)u> Federal Assembly is comben of UV %  iss poln'ical institution.. (tf>wy i c f (wo houses: Ihe Council Most important of nil. h tie referendum and the right or of states, made up of tw.i \g the f., ( t ihat throuah t popular initial '-duerepresentatives from each canton, rlghll i>f lofanmlillll %  III! Il I ngh it may be >.mi tha' flnn ,hc National Council made II"BCtb participate In tbeae rtehli had existed for uo ,,f representatlvei i i"nj of laws in UMN aamocratk SwaM mnle Citizens in the cantonal autonomy is left ti> th> mountain cantons where ,n. prooorttori C one for rv. %  of Uie Swiss peopla •liemselves directly ex22.000 inhabitants, both Swiss themselves at well as to that erased their power through nd foro'gn. A general election the Constitution. COLUMBUS AND THE DOCKERS By DONALD CAMPBELL in the P.LA monthly for August WHEN yuunu Chi istoj.h* i ColtimbtH WU checkinij Koods in a warehouse or on the duckside between those pI lodl at he learnt the mysteries of nil and navigation Genoa was indeed as proud a city i %  nickname. Zena l.n Superba, proclaimed. Her fame and wealth were built on her s.'a trade, and her merchant bankets were also shipowners. Greatest ol all her institutions was the Bank of St. George, with bead* quarters in that beautiful palace which WAS the headquarters of the Genoa Port Authoril> :n. 1MB It was in Genoa during tne 11 century that the first guild ul docs and iui> %  vurkii's came into being—tinCaajjpajsnjiii dei Caravana. This society was coniposc-o solely of men engaged in pliysical work a. the dock or in ships ot the port of Geno jr her colonies. Unlike other trade guilds uf the time, the compufcnm was nut penetiated by the smai. employer or wealthy burgess, in fact, tin. company was very much akin to uur trail* unions of to-day. It lived on good terms with bankers and shipowners, especially with the all-powerful Bank of St. George, and was very much a closed shop; "tickets'" wen handed down from father to son. Members of the company had their owi. distinctive working dress of sky-blue jersej and white kilt. Not only did they work ai the docks and in ships of Genoa itself, bin picked squads of volunteers were sent tu the outlying colonies of the republic in Asia Minor and on the shores of the Black Sea The company had an amicable understand-, ing with the Cam mail, another guild or union I which dealt with the cartage of goods from the docks. The language spoken in Genoa, then one o* the greatest and richest ports in the known world, was Zenese, that nasal dialect that you can hear to-day and which is almost incomprehensible to other Italians, combining as it does a mixture of old Phoenician and Celtic languages with more modern Arabic and Spanish. ln those days in Genoa, capital and labour lived on very good terms with one another. Likely lads were given a chance in the shipping business and a number of ships' captains and part owners came from the sturdy docker stock. Education was on a much trtdtr and higher level in Italian cities than it was in the rest of Europe and the boy who lenrni his three "Rs" could go to sea as an apprei, lice—as Christopher Columbus did—and employ his time ashore checking in the warehouses and learning the business ifak ol shipping. The system of employment appears to have been somewhat similar lo that oblaining in the Port of London of to-day: the Bank ot St. QeorgB employing a large number of the Cunipuifiiia members, and other concerns maintaining lesser teams while there was a pool of workers-who would be hired as reinforcements during rush periods or by small lirms who could not afford to kfarp on regular gangs. Qt not built the best ships in Europe at this time. Her admirals were hired by the King of France, for whom she also built many warships but her trading caravals, ships large as they were for the period, carried very small tonnage so thtstowage of cargo was a very positive art. Shipowners encouraged their employe : to buy up a few cubic feet of cargo spac. It was easy to tind goods at bargain prices in Genoa that would sell at a large proli; in Spain, Portugal, England and even the Barbary Coast ports. Ships' captains wen offered a share in the profits as part payment for their services, and cautious owners and shippers inserted in their contracts—all set forth in Latin—that so many men-at-arms should be carried on board and that a DUffibtt uf the crew should also be armr-d and exercised In Ihe use of weapons. From what can be gathered from documents of the period, the dockers and poit workers were a very independent botiv ol men. They lived well and were respecteu as valuable members of the republic's economic system. An official document of the time sets forth that they were a municipal institution which had regard for the welfare of the public and the trade of the City. Genoa had by this time established herseh as a centre of the woo! trade, and the chid weapon factories of the period were also lo IKfound within her confines, so there was never lack of employment. A "ganger" of dock workers miy ; hav< .i ship's officer, another working as a cartographer, and a third as a clerk in one <>r other of the Genoese banking, Spain or Portugal He himself might—and ^ten did—buy up ship space, for a small cargo to be sold abroad. It was only later that disastrous wars and the sudden influx of wealth from the '.roved the real prospertv of Zena La Superb*. o, v. scorr TO-DAY'S SPECIALS ft CO.. LTD. at the COLONNADE Usually Now $ c • c. TINS OX TONGUES 3 20 3 00 TINS KRAFT CHEESE BoU N E BEER ', in. x tt In.. 18 in.. U l" -16 I" 4H in 4 In. x 18 In., t* In. 5S in ".* In I In \W in. I In. x is In., 24 In. 36 In U Tti tails I.M\ INIHI IVIlUt—M and loir Culls ill MINI M < I.OTin.S I IMS STAINLESS STfclX RINGING WIRE—'. in 3-16 In.. 5-3*! In. GALVANISE STAPLESi; in. >i.,| ', in. BXPAJfDCD METAL—I In., I 1 In.. 2 In., 3 In —8x4* Sheets WILKINSON A HAYNES CO. LTD. Sacceasors to C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD. 117.' %  M7 numxr Y1H H HI II. IH. IBS wilh INTERNATIONAL PAINTS NON-CHALKING BEST QUALITY FRESH STOCKS ARRIVED obtainable at DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.— A f nt.. Dial 4689 for Shadei and Particulars THE CORRECT HEM) WEAK FOR THE HOT DAYS AHEAD. SrltTt Vmirs from thr following . Covered in White at $ 4.21 Each ., Khaki at 4.S6 Each .. Silk at 5.39 Each lh.ARDS I OllIU It nun l I ItOU NPM Stork* i; i ,i i( | AFTEBNOON TI \ m-. CUTS IN TIN". AMI I'KGS BRITISH ASST. IN TINS AND PKCis inn :; ii. is IN IINS ANII PKGS. OttllorHNI IN TINS AND AND PKCs osnot KM l\ UN \NI> iKi;-DIGESTIVE IN TINS AND I'KGS CELERY CHEIsi IN ||\s ARROW KOOl IN TINS. VI.MllMl l Klsps |N TINS. I lilt si CMSM iv HNS SPECIALS > u/ VTOKCES'IBI SAl ( I RAISINS Hie. PER Lb. ^C SMOTIVK IISHVK PKR PK 2 Lb. T'V HI LEI \M> IVI Ml .(1l l I'M" I Lb. UN M \HM \l.\ll t tills/ II till till\ GITNNESs STOl'T. —aie. DRV SACTt SHERRY. 1'KI NIEIt RKANDY VIII IE ("RE. ..Ol I) BRAID RI'M I KOWN DRINKS Sfrtciafocm. Ml VI DEPARTMENT < ii;< Kl N8 i • i, t\ IONI.1 is ntrsn \ t <;i i \iu i s OK AN





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THURSDAY SEPTEMBER ;, |5fl BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE TIIKI I ISigeriiinKing To Visit West Indies >'" %  On Own Con***,*..' GEORGE I King Anjanv.-i! \. Amezr. Obibi. m Owe Will be visit.nK !h.Brttttj Colonie* in the Caribbean earij .'l September to btcoiii. Ml wiln Hi*, p-iitern of the tocul economic and poJtrnl life of the Weil Indians of African ducrn: King Aii.vaimu will be stoppuufirst at British Guiana, flving Uire. < from New York. and will be gue*: of Kon Dr. j A. and Mrs N'U-holson .luring his *tav n th, Colony i rip visit is vpa the U.C Coloured People* King A ....'... the direct heir of the late Kin, Oguen of Obibi and m!.Kll tutelage Ha f,nhei 75 years and lived we! I rmrt King Anyanwii received h ( elenietiinry education from Missionaries and then attended the Govtrnment College. Nigeria, in preparation for the USA where he recently graduated In Political Science and Government" fm. Adelphi College. Garden Citv. Long Island. New York. He will be returning to his kingdom after hi* West Indietour AC Spending More On Education trim our on ems. -_ GEORGETOWN. TlfF Deputy Director r,f Education, Mr. A. A. Bonnlstei, BA. during ihe opening ceremony o; the i,ew Anna Catherine Angllcun School. Writ Co**, Demernrs 'Utclnseu that in 1830 the population of British Guiana was 296,691 the number of pupil, in school* 12.734. the number of leachers 1.029 and ihe expenditure from education S38.V783 In 1090 tho population |g nearly 4?n.UOtl. and the number of pupils at the end of 1949. 71.249. the number of leachers 1.708 and the expindt* lure on education $2,317,500 The new school building was declareoc of eonccaluiK POUI in 11 W.klh, %  'ling monstrou. 1 punishment-. McorOMll to >( by l>r Thomas Minister of Justice andJakob Kaiaar, Wtntocr for all' icrman Affairs. rbJeft bagan early this M chown >r their subservience an %  gianca, fc eontimied > rhe prisoners were i b > •yrtOl ding and | in many caaca *iou.-i. said. The prisoners were denied all < proper opportunities to defend', '.hemsclves against charges of espionage, sabotage and othei Communist offences, the statements continued. Defence Coun-j •els were allowed only in a few I case*, and chosen from a panel of Communist advocates. Witnesses wen seldom heard for prosecution, only statements nom police and Communltl authorities being admitted In most cases sentences were fixed before trial and pronounced regardless of extenuating cir.' "Soviet occupation and their accomplices ', ihe statement concluded, "may depend upon It that on day they will turn to answer for their deeds" -geater THEM i\ in HKI M ^ s^l Altl Potato Bars Social Progress BIRMINOHAM, Sept. 4 %  to, by making man lazy. is been a barrier to social progress according to a potato expert war-old Dr. RoddifTe Salamim a British Association meeting A former Director of th.PoUtO Virus IvMeaxch Station at Cambridge University, he declared that the potato's influence had delayed In Britain and in Ireland in particular. He told the Anthropology mid Will Survey Filipinos B. Honduras Ready For For irold Korea Front Th* Weather TODAY -ii ii KakWl .1 SI i.m. Sun SeU: 6.0.1 p.m. Moon (New) September II I.UhUllK li 00 p.01. High lValer 1.18 a.m. VESTKRDAV Kainlall K'odringlon. I II ills ToUl for Month to Yesterday. 7.37 ins. Temperature (Max) 86.0 *F. Trmperalure (Mini 76.0 *F. Wind DlrecUoii (9 a.m.) E. 13 p.m.) E. 8. E. Wind Velocity %  miles per hoar. Barometer (9 a.m ) -!9.96 (3 -m 1 285 Will Malik Help To Localise Korea War? LAKK SUCCESS, StDI AMERICAN DELEGATE Warren Auslin today 1,'ld Jacob Malik ill liussia he had "raised doubls in our minds" as in whether he supported the Security Cu-.incil's effort lo locallee tha Roreen Win The Council was discussinn an American resolution celling on all nations to refrain from jjivlni; aid ..r I'ncouiayenieiit to North Koreans. ~~~—-"•— ~^~~~Mr. Austin 100-Year-OId Labourer Has First Son \rchaeology .sections of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, which is now In session here Ilia! gha potato had fitted well into the -lazy-bed' system of crop growing which Irishmen had developed to avoid draining wet land. Dr. Salnman said that squalid large tamlIles and lack of personal hygieno were not the Immediate result of the potato economy, for they had all existed to <.ome extent before ti but the potato intensified each M thee factors and gave them -inviolable stability". The effect of the potato was to stabilise the -standard of life at a; lower level than would have prevailed had no such substitute fori other food been available. Dr. I Snlnmnn il^lnreil Keuter TORANTO. Italy. Sept 5. The 10(f-year-old Italian peasant Reraro Di Sandra %  i in hi> 42-venr-old wife Hfith %  son and hen. bora during U earthquake. II v iv Di sandras first child after 24 years of marriage. He married his wife Lucia when ho was 7ft and she 18 It hid been his first marriage. Mother and son were tonight leported to be doing well She had been rushed to hospital last night and gave birth a few hours gftgf Di Sandri works in a field with his brother-m-l*iw until late at night. He told reporter?: "I am happy." He chuckled. "Belter late than never, as they say." The name for the son has not yet been chosen -Renter Union Threatens General Strike GEORGETOWN. The Guiana Industrial Workers* Union headed by Dr. P Lachmansingh have submitted a 3-point Memorandum i-cmtflining 32 demands anil %  30-day ultimatum to the B.C. Sugar Producers' Association, threatening to call a general strike of the Guiana Industrial Workers' throughout the Colony if the demands arc not met. {NO— It* for you, %O! BEAUTY PREPARATIONS ARE USED BY ALL WOMEN THROUGHOUT THE WORLD! LET **M*OXnS* 9 ASSIST YOIK COLD & VANISHING CREAMSFACE & TALCUM POWDERSLIPSTICKS HAND LOTIONSKIN FRESHENER ETC., ETC. ARE STOCKED BY ALL DEALERS. reported to the Council on |he shooting down of n plane with Red) Star iMridnga n(T Korea yesterday. had i his Sir this He Md iniJwtfnimui U0 more information on the ami (nan thai contained ii M ('ladw.ni .lehb, of Britain. month 1 ) Council President "All we Know is that : member of the Armed Forces of the USSR was part of the em o| .. twin-engined bomber which fired upon an air patrol operating as pan of me United Nation*. Forces in Korea", he added "This incident Uoktratot lln desirability of the immediate adoption by the Council of the United State.-. Resolution, essential punxwr of wh'ch localise the conflict In Korea and prevent it from spreading to other areas". Opening the meeting. SI* Gladwyn Jebb said four documents had been received. — Reuter. %  H % QD >RGKT< (WIN %  : D v. ... *< J. ha* i sj carrj out ., aid tin and the possibiiu This was disclosed by M %  • on hfa return from an offh %  \ .--it ti Antigua. Janulei duras in i in Jamah ed the bauxite and gv, : f the in m.. 'In Jamaica, hi %  bigger than those ii nana. but the quallt) : %  Government ci !'i. gramme and the poastbi r i 10 plastei tXDt ted fa i1 manu'ai'uie.1 Into pl;ini •d Forces of the Phil p pine llcidnuarters. Is srliedi eii for Tokyo, preceding he ^ ndlnu of t**e firs' Lhsn VMM 1 ike up with Get \ithur pertinent matteti on tht Thoji will %  %  1 Lnl %  • 'in 1 ii 11 For Tokyo %  I f the liaison Rroi*p M During or ak'lrr an a I lark of I N F 11 K N £ A milation •nd Itl umaikabie revivini; and 1 r tiOJ rnjJci it an invahiable jll\. Iluild IIIB miir Sirriiglli on BOVKIL CCMOUUI Produce Form \— 01 -ialinii CKOHGETOWN British Guiana's Coconut pro* 0 formad U nsaocinttou i requesting a copy '>r the Coconut Hill %  rblch ihi Oovtrnmanl ts putting rotward to reorganlai the entire ioconut I"'! 'i Following arc tin* membei 10I the Corrmiftee of the new A President, Mr Uoroop Man | Vice Pre Mi I %  tar>. Mi J P Barlow. 1; > frei Mr. It BoodhOo; '... Mrs i: ( Marks; with Me 1 f S artins, E. Dotiiwy. Carlos Gomes, F. Barlow. Jnr H H.liimn., nd M S II. Hahaman. il battle conditions in Korea and t ' I .-xpc-i in such "slutting The 1 oth Battalion O I %  %  tratood, The force, howovti •fill tortu "tore ti l lap 11 pjropai itot 1 to i 1 1 KM ,1. bnttlcfronts Tn addition I" Itl regular int.m try unit. Uie 10th IK'T has one battery of got! propelled trtfletry, -me cottipanj of madlunt tanks. ne rtcoi 1 e data* rtmtnl ol llk'ht tank-, plus I %  ordlnato camp p %  1 I N.S. "Harp iv tor Bggtomm it's %  eat* i* \nr to I lavaiorv ipockn Just iprinl 'Harpie' into the bowl and len night thcnllu-M 'HtdpicV ckacfeftiruj action dUtlfilfJeil tod ifftyJailttt the S-bcnd where no brush tan reach HARPIC THE SPECIAL LAVATORY CLEANSER AVALANCHE KILLS CUMBERS MEXK AJ 23 Mcsican 1 Sunds.>. kill ing anotio 1 The Alpn group of its ing l-,8B7ft whui mi avi CITY, B p* %  %  %  I' down on ounlaiu i 1: g three and l>ur> FOilaiglluii old 1 rnbet .1.1iiimbunt i"'i 1 lu swept LOOK YOUR Emperor Booed Sept 6 Abuwt 20 >uuths booed and biased Emperor Bao D^. n as he ivturned to his hotel Uonu? last nigh' a tour of the city. Police arrested some of the demonstrators an-l detained four Since his arrival In Rome three days ago. Dai has been tho taigel of llerce attacks b> he Communist press who accused him of being "a Reich puppet" "a Nightclub Emperor — Keufarr Buried Treasure ito.-.ii: A seven-brVmched solid goln candlestick, looted by the Emperor Titus from the |i Jerusalem In A. L>. TO, .mil oUkM fabulous treasures beloved burled in Uie bed of the Tiber, may be >. co v orad soon A plan to dradaa thl Ttbar has Man revived. After the fall of tlic Kouun Empire many times great troaaurea were thrown into the T !• r to have them from the barbarian En va dtn Your hair will be handsomer by lar when you treat it h. Vaseline' Hair Tonic. 1 Just use a tew drops %  day...then see the difference! Buy a bottle today I Vaseline HA,R -,-.'/.-,V.V.V///AV,V/.'^/A'KV^.V.V.V.W.V^-.V.V.-.v/.v,v.More Nourishment for your money QUAKER OATS Quaker Outs supplies active people with key food essentials needed for vihranr energy and real endurance. Quaker Oat offers these important benefits nil in one delicious, nutritious food. And in Quaker Oats all the goodness is put there by Mother Nature herself! I(*ss Nature's way 10 glowing good health. Have Quaker Oats for breakfast every day to carry you thruugb with vigorous energy! MjS£ ENERGY RfSI urhM'MK MS£ STRENGTH *.., .1 r fe agjf STAMINA fMbyTU..i.l.) MOgf ENJOYMENT .pp.i.in, %  .. r W Serve Tho Energy Breakfast I Boil I an ..( •, A.I.I Hit When boOing.add I (upulQulltrr Otis Cboft Ii. tlir. I.fin, lu, It) m.nul,. Ih.,,.11 vv.vv/.v.V''.v,*,'.v, ,v.v/'.'/.'.v/.'.'.y. .v,v/-.'/.v/.y MR. SHOPKEEPER, MR. GROCER, MR. & MRS. EVERYBODY TAKE CAREFUL NOTE THAT AS FROM THIS WEEK EVERY 100 lb RAG OF §*&ssssm5s&0 | J Names Synonymous n rr SEARLES SPECIAL SUGAR WILL CONTAIN A GIFT NEATLY PACKED INSIDE DEMAND SEAIU.ES SPEC MAM. in PAPER Hil.S AND SO HENEFIT RY THESE PREMIUMS. QUALITY & DURABILITY. SPEC1AUXJIK lls; PEBrTfiCT CIRCLE PISTONS KINGS LODGE SPARKING PLUGS FEIIOIJO DltAKK >. CLUTCH L1N1N ATLAS FORD & CHEVIIOLET PARTS ZENITH t'AKln BETTERS .v PAF i I FllAM OIL PILTER8 I'YHENE KIHK KXTINi ;''ISIIKRS TUNGSTONE llATTEKIES SMITH ELECTHICAL BUU1PMEN1 WINGAKU AUTO AC*. BBSORUES PEACOCK & BUCHANS PAINTS DUN1 >p AUTO A CYCLE TYKfS il u 'All DESERVES THE BEST i MENTS OF orAl,IT\ W> ( Jtry Sturk* of thf tbove for .ill populu t'srs and Fruchs ECKSTEIN BROTHERS rilEF.T DIAL 80 [




‘=
‘
te
2
tz

Thursday
September 7
195@



Co-operation Can

Prevent World War

Says Bevin

SOUTHAMPTON, Sent. 6.

BRITISH Foreign Minister Ernest Bevin said

tonight that he believed another World War
could be prevented with the close co-operation of
the Atlantic Powers and other friendly countries.



Boarding the liner Queen Mary
on his way to the United States
attend the United Nations

Advocate Hurricane te

| Assembly, he declared: “I believe
2 that if all the countries which are

Relief Fund lin eee

°

For Antigua

jin the Atlantic Pact, and which
jare friendly to our activities, bind
themselves together and organise
themselves, an aggressor will











Gth September 1950 think twice before he starts any
reviously Acknowledged 1 | trouble
H. Harea Carter ‘|
Miss. E, Chenery | .
“With sour organisation, com-
Daniel 50 | plete under nding, merging our
MeConne 10 00 i. ; hog A
resources so far as we can, I be-
Mrs. G 5 v0 lieve we can prevent any third
Sympath 2 00 World War or any serious distur-
The Miss 00 bance the wor ”
at Chaseesnit 15 0 ; bance in the world.
A Friend ; 1 00 |
N. H. K 5 00 | . : ti
Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Edghill 5 90 | H M ,
Mrs, G. F. Sharp 5 00 emmous ee ing
Miss Holly Skinner 5°00 ‘ |
N. E. Perkins ® 00 ; C ommenting on the meeting of
Soft Spot 3 60 | Foreign Ministers, Bevin declared:
A, iene ra ese tide ie )“It is really a heinous meeting and
St. Patricks R.C. Church 25 00 one of great moment to the future
A Friend 5 OF of mankind.”
Mrs, Violet Bowring 10 00
Dr. as ate A. C G Bevin said he would have talks
@: ae $0. Go. with the United States and deal
G. A. H 10 «@ With cértain mattérs with Canada
Mrs, C. B. tnniss » oO and us
io 5 00
) “ 5 7
vere ens Plantation 100 do «611 «There would be tripartite talks
D.N.B 1 00 ;With France and the United States
Akie 4 00 as well as the United Nations
Miss and Mrs. Browne 3 09 work

Mrs, M. Carmichael




Miss A. Bradshaw 1 00 res y g
Miss F. Carmichael 1 00 “There are fairly intricate and
McClean 1 00 delicate jobs we have to deal with.

MT i 00 We have to discuss the next state
Mr. and Mrs. Geotge in the development of Germany,

Evelyn 120 00 and a lot of matters in connection
TOTAL $060. with rearmament,” he declared.—
Reuter.





‘‘Minnie °° The One Killed In
Traffic Jam

s e
Siren Will
e ; | RIO DE JANEIRO, Sept. 6,
Wail FF cl }~ 'Erattic on otrewof: the principal
: o ay suburban railways here was held

up several hours this morning as

; u result of a collision during the
Barbadians who are eres | aa hour, One person was killed



with the sound of an Air Raid] arid over 20 mjured in an accident
Alarm will be reminded of the in which a loaded passenger train
war years when they hear the)ran head on into a shunting engine.
wail of a Siren at noon today, —Reuter,

A siren has been piaced on the
roof of the office of the Commis-
Sioner of Police at the Central
Station and will be tried out
today for use as a_ hurr «cane
warning.

Colonel R. T.



HURRICANE
FLATTENS
BARBUDA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, Sept. 6.

The sloop “Farmer” ar-

rived at St. John’s from

Barbuda with news that the

Michelin,
missioner of Police, told the Ad-
veeate yesterday that the siren
is being tr’ed out to see how far
away it ean be heard.

There are four other siréns in
the storeroom at the Central Po-
lice Station. They are all elec-
trically operated and were bought

from England during the last
war to be used for Ar Raid

that if
the trial today proves successful,

Com-

little 62 square mile de-
pendency just 35_ miles
north of Antigua with its

Alarms.

1,000 inhabitants had been
. hard hit by the hurricane.
Trial Day More houses were flat
than standing and

The Commissioner said

took refuge in the

the other sirens will be instailed| | Holiness

at other strategic parts of the
island to give warning of the ap
proach of any tropical disturbance



damaged.

Codrington Village
is very flat country,
flooded by a

which
was
tidal

He said, “‘the Antigua hurricane
has shown us how essential it is
to have adequate warning before
hand. Owing to the fact that the
population of that island had good
warning before the storm broke,
no lives were lost.”

badly
wave.

In the past, whenever
hurricanes have hit Antigua,
they have been felt by Bar-
buda, and the slap is usually
more forceful

The Government has sent
food and, the Red Cross
several cartons of clothing.



The trial today is to test the
range of the siren and certain |
people, who are placed at various |
points, will make reports. =

During the war this type of
siren was used all over the world
for air raid warnings.

WAILING



~MEEINNE





TODAY AT NOON this siren will be tested for use a Hurricane
Warning.



people |
Pilgrim
Mission House
which was also damaged.
A section of Warden
Clement Gomes’ house was
'

RELIEF FOR ANTIGUA

°
t

|

i

THE FIRST FOOD AND CLOTHING PARCELS left Seawell yesterday by B.W.LA
Picture shows BWIA. potters

soon aftie noon for Antigua.

‘*A frican
King Is
No King’’

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Sept. 6
British Guiana received a
shock today when the B.G. Branch
of the Coloured Peoples’ League



}announced that investigations dis-|

[closed that Eze Anyanwu Ogueri
is no royal personage, only a
farmer's son, and accordingly hi
visit has been cancelled,

; The L.C.P. statement to-day
|
|
|

explained they received intimation

from the BG Developmen
|League in U.S.A. stating that
|Ogueri, who was associated ‘n a
| newsreel with Dr, Ralph Bunche
and British Consu' Sir Franci
Evans in U.S.A. had expressed a
desire to visit British Guana and
the West Indies. +

Governor Sir Charles Woolley
was consulted and had expressed
willingness to act as joint host with
the L.C.P. in entertaining King
Ogueri, but as a result of en-
quiries at the Colonial Office in
London, and also at U.N.O. head-
quarters and the British Embassy,

U.S.A., it was discovered tha‘
Ogueri is no royal African per
sonage.

The news came as a bitter dis-
appointment to British Guianese
of African descent, who for ‘the
past two weeks have been busy

planning an elaborate
for him

Today’s Georgetown newspaper
headlines splashed “Eze had them
dizzy. “African king is no king”

Ogueri was to stay at the home
of Dr. and. Mrs. J. A, Nicholsou
and an elaborate programme was
prepared by the L.C.P., who were
to be his official hosts

reception



Socialists
Win Danish
Election

COPENHAGEN, Sept. 6.

Hans Heftoft, the Danish Social-
ist Party leader, called upon King
Frederic this morning to advise
him as to the results of yesterday's
general election,

His party topped the poll,
without an overall majority.

A short statement after the
meeting said that Heftoft whose
minority Socialist Government
resigned on August 9 suggested
that the King receive all Party
leaders to hear their views.



but

Heftoft resigned four weeks
because his Crastic economy
proposals—aimed at reducing
Denmark’s balance payment gap,
net overwhelming criticism fron
ombined opposition parties

The Socialists won 59 seats in

House of 150 members

Heftoft was to be received by
the King this morning. He said it
was now up to the King to dis-
cuss matters with party leaders
The Leader of the Liberals-
biggest opposition party with 34
seats in the new House—quashed
all hopes of a Socialist-Liberal
Coalition Governmert, when he
said ‘The Liberal Party could
not consider joining a Government
led by Socialists.”

The biggest gainers in the elec-
tions’ were the Conservatives and

ago



Henry Georgists—-followers of the
nineteentt century American
Economist Henry George The
biggest losers were Liberals and |

jthe Communists

| The Comr Party lost 50,000
votes this election.—Reuter.
|

}

{

unist



“TINBIRA”
LAUNCHED



rude |

}
\
|
|
i
|
|
|



U.N. FORCES CHECK



|







|

}

NORTHWICH, Cheshire, Sept. 6
A OOft hallow - drait}
€ or th
t i nippi A. Fon
& Cr er here
€ I bira i tinea
trade in Northern Brazi
l¢ r tr | the T '
4 baveniet 5
B 2 g

Reuter

te

*

‘plane
loading them into the aircraft.

Rearming May Affect
World‘ Economy

EXPERTS THINK

By HAROLD KING
PARIS, Sept. 6

LEADING FINANCE EXPERTS of 48 countries including
Czechoslovakia but exelmding Russia met at a bank of
France today for the fifth annual meeting of the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund and the World Bank for Reconstruc-
tion

A representative of Czech@siovakia, the only “Iron Curtain
country member was sid following a last minute change
of policy, for the Czechs had not. been expected to attend
the meeting. The actual agenda was restricted to consid-

eration of annual reports and administrative matters.
Vineent Auriol, French resi















dent, weleomed répresetita-

: tives @ the new wing of the

SPORTS wom « aftees: of the aik of

Ky | France inauguratéd’ for the

WINDOW , oceasion. That repercussions of

;rearmament on the world finan-

WATER POO {ial stability is predominant in

THis “‘eidbuede dein Har io” minds was made clear

omewhat w.ckened ey 46 lows Mr. Nicholas Havenga was ex-

of Tony Johns: who left fer | Bectee to raise the question of
Canada on Sat will meet gold prices

tying very’ ‘hig ie the Mae | It was not on the agenda but

tabi, < Hoe: Maa wanes rar informed observers here under-

team Flying Fish must w }stood that Havenga would protest

Taber aoe =e : jin fairly strong terrhs against the

he ther cane wit be iiternational Monetary Associa-

iween Snappers, now |tion's Continued Refusal of the
edged the strongest tearm (1 , price of gold

Hegel es | The two Czech délegates made

surprise appearance today at

the conference and immediately

demanded that the Chinese

Nationalist delegate be excluded

om the meeting

° ‘
“Bashful Boy” Camille Gutt, the Fund’s man-
aging director announced yester-

‘ « lay that Czechs are the only East
ets 30 Years Furopean members of the two
bodies who have taken mo part in

For Ra e their activities for several months,

p ind



were not expected,
But Bohumil Sucharda_ the
LANC: i 4 zech Governor of the Fund anc
Gumuical Sonat a ee fellow-countryman Jaroslav
Wartburg Pétine a 3 Re e ‘otekal, Governor of the bank
, -.F > is ‘ A yn @ 4 ‘es » > ,
entenced to 30 years hard labou: irne up “or toray opening
by a United States courtrartial Resolution

here today and ordered to be dis-
honourably discharged from As

soon as French President

service for criminally assaulting| Vincent Auriol had officially wel-
Mavis Holland, 16-year-old Man-|*omed the delegates, Ucharda
chester chorus gir! | presented a resolution on “un-

He forcibly stripped and assaul-| lawful participation of the Kuom-

ted her in a darkened railway) iitange (Chinese Nationalist) Gov-
carriage, nent’ in the Conference

Jones who is 28 was found Jotekal, supporting the resolu-
guilty of four charges The| lon, condemned the Bank and

Fund as “instruments of American

sentence is subject to review and} ;
| Imperialism,”

confirmation by a higher authority

Other charges were assaulti 1 | eg He argued that the Communist
two constables anid being drunk|@overnment was the only lawful
arid disérdarty He pleaded not government Of China and should
guilty to all cherie therefore be represented in the
* Duri a Seah Bank He said: “My Government

uring his four-day trial Jones} .., t acee he doctri
whb is serving “With the Both)coane accept the doctrine of the
i Pm scat y icred right of the United State
Medical Group of the U.S. Army}; determine who is and who i
in England, was described by @ not the real government of any
witness as a “bashful boy" country”

It was alleged toctiry that the He claimed that the Communist
rl had gone through “55 minutes Government of China had bal
of hell” when shé was stripped] anced ity budget, stabilised its
ind assaulted by Jones curreficy, and was carrying out

—Reuter. reconstruction of plans, al! of

Chinese Spies
Hanged |

FORMOSA, Sept. 6



which, he said were objectives the
International Fund had set out to
encourage, —Reu‘er





TAIPEH

RUSSIA VETOES

Two Chinese found guilty o
spying for Russ a, and their U.S. RESOLUTION
closest collaborators their wife} SE

nd sweetheart were executed LAKE SUCCESS, Sept. 6

Soviet Delegate Jacob Malix







LAKE SUCCES Sept. 6 Melik read to the Council a
Russia toda claimed before note from the Russian Gover
Security Cour that the ment to the American Govern
Soviet plane hot down in ment in which it wa claime
Korean we »1 Monday was that the matter should be settle
{ merel nir flight between the two government
' Soviet € ite Jac Mal
te ‘ ‘ € ele eW
} i ‘ f
Ame e

ee

RED ADVA

Speculation
Over General
Elections

IN BRITAIN

LONDON, Sept. 6

Speculation cropped up again
} about the possibility of a General
| Election in Britain before the end
of the yeur Latest reports are
| that secret preparedness instruc-
|} ions have been issued to the La-
|}bour Party election agents and
jthat Conservative Party organiz-
jors have been told to be all set

ov an appeal to the country in
| November
| These reports however have

een bluntly brushed aside b)
| Government sources as unadul
rromsense based on wish-
ful thinking, The Government
hese sources say, must obviously
” prepared at all times for such
in eventuality but they deny tha
lection orders have gone out
Pglitical e%servers Close to the
iove nment are inclined to agrec
with the view that with an even
balance of strength in Commons
they admit that a snap divisior
migh' conceivably sink the Gev-
rnoment during the approaching
special session or later
But as long as the Governmen
remains fn the driver’s seat the
date of the next election will be
leferred until a favourable time
own choice

erated

In Consultation

Cabinet Minister:

{it

Meéearwi) ile
have been a'most daily in consul-
tation in preparation for th
veeting of Parliament next Tues
day, Details relating to far-reach

ing Departmental commitments
inder the country's mammoth Re-
armament Bill
rain concern
£1,135,000,000 annually on
the next
sudden

have been theh
Expenditure — of
de
three years in-
switch over

nee for

volved a and

the transition has inevitably posed |"

problems, Majorhead-
Governmers is
the spectre of in-

1 crop of
he contronting
GOW to
Jation

defeat

—Can,. Press,



2 Dead: 400
Homeless
IN FLORIDA STORM

MIAMI, Sept. 6

were dead and
more than 400 homeless on
Wednesday in the wake of a vricky
culf hurricane that still loitered in
‘Yampa Bay area

The storm drifting slowly
outhward at about four miles an
hour was apparently losing sore
of its foree after lashing the mid-
div of the Florida gulf coast with
125 miler an hour winds

It doubled baek after stalling all
ay on Tuesday in Cedar Key area
damage

Two persons

where he
reported
Winds near the centre were es-
tmated at 70 to 75
hour with gusts higher. Squalls
covered most af the north ant
Central Florida, Aid Was rushed
Cedar Key wheré thé Highway
400 to

greatest was

miles per



Patrol estimated between
0 homeless
The hurrican@ hrashed Cedar
Key With wihds estimated up to

5 miles an hour throughout the
day. Seventy-five per cent of the
buildings in the small community
sere wrecked

Vieanwhile a great hurricane
vis certred in the Atlantic

out 570 miles northeas’ of Nasp
It had winds of 150
the centre
winds ex-

iu Bahamas
miles an hour
vith hurricane
ending outward 100 miles from
centre and gale toree winds
covering another 200 miles. It was

near
force

expected fo continue on a sigw
northwest movement and ships

been cautioned to avoid iv

—Can Press.

nove

Refuse Russian
Protest Note





|

| WASHINGTON, Sept. 6

| The State Department today
confirmed the refusal of the
li nited States Ambassador in
Moscow, Alan Kirk, to accept the
Russian neve of protest. The fol-
; lowing itement was issued by
| M chael McDermott, th State

| Department spokesman

The Améri.an Ambassador to
Moscow, Admira’ Alan G. Kirk,
was called today to the Soviet

Ministry of Foreign Affairs by

here today at dawn |
One of them worked for the| today veto@d an American réso- | Foreign Minister Vyshinsky who
3ritish consulate at Taipeh until lution in the Security Council jread to him a note on the subject
a few days before his arrest jCcalling on all countries to refrain |jof the aeroplane incident which
March, while, the other man|lrom aiding North Korea |took place off Korea on Septem-
wa radio operator who d | This is the forty-fourth time}|ber 4 and which. was reported
| patched Formosan military jthe Soviet Union had used the |to the Security Council on the
secrets to Russan -agent n}veto in the Councif. The resolu-|fellowing day by the deputy
Shanghai and Peking on tiny | tior tlso condemned the North} representative of the United
Russian-made transmitter Koreans for the defiance of the| State
—Reuter. |United Natior ! Reuter

Reds Demand Compensatian From U.S.



ed to do with the matter. Malik
king for compensation from

iT Unite State declared
Thi yvatter has nothing to do
ith the United Nations”. Sir
Gladwyn Jebb, Council Presi
ent, ruled that the matter wa
the agenda xf the Council

é igse r

Reuter





——_—— ee eee eee eee iin iaigeeneeaaed

Priee:~
FIVE CEN rs.

< ~ Wes
4 Ghee



CE





| in Critical Battle For Taegu

By JULIAN BATis
YOKYO, Sepi. 4.

EARY American aud South i. can troops

had by tonight checked the Northern advance

pouring through the hole torn in the United

ations defence line on the east coast of Korea.

The Eighth Army Headquarters announced that

United Nations forces were “halting’’ the North

Koreans from the exploitation of their break

through south of Kigye, ubout 10 miles inland from

the port of Pohang, which fell to the Communists
last night.

Battered but still fighting bravely, Americans and South
Koreans were pushing north from the Kvongju, the vital
road. and rail junction 15 miles south of Pohang and east
from Yongchou

Earlier Communists
United Nations for

had flung
es oul of Kasan



| ind advanced by two miles, to
U.S. Plan oO withir nine miles of Taegu
t li before be stopped by tank
upported infantry
| Veu ra ise Southwest of Taegu on Nakton
F rive Line Bdtish troops wer
4 ‘6 lefending the F' rst Cavalt
ormosa Division's left flank
, : ; They had their first. taste of
: WASHINGTON, Sept. 6 j (ighitis last night when they
f The Secretary of State, Deai jskirm’shed with Communist pat
\cheson, Said today that nothin: |}behind the lines and smashed an
as being doné by the Unite atiempted crossing of the r ver
ations forces to encourage o x.1’s :
uke shulible it Anke es, | G.Vs Take Slaughterhouse

Ridge

outh in the

hinese Communist
ainland by Chinese

controller

Nationalist Furthet

Nakton;



Formosa wedge” area around the junhetior
Yongsan, an American Division
Acheson told hi weekly. pre ontinued it advanec toward
Wiference of the implementat Vaktong against strong resistance
the United States polity o In the area of Hyenpung, about
eutralising” Formosa during th |!7 miles north of Yongsan, Com-
riod of the Korean wat murnist beat back men of th
Second Division attempting to

Asked why the United State J‘eke high ground
iS still sending aviation petrc Earlier American marines and

nd other military alfa to Chines ,Secend Division men had attacked



ationalists, Acheson said it wa nd captured the “statghter hous
he responsibility of General Mac idge” after flerce fighting, They
Arthur, United Nations an | %eke through the river at one
nited States Commander t ary .

trengthen forces on Formosa. Hi in are the United Nat’ ens
idded that there could not be any ine t read solid and continu-
iitack from Formosa against th | US: though the pos'tion at Chang-
‘hinese Communist-controlte renee ve outh: of Fag
ainland He emphasised tha | * A at . ny Staff Omeer i
thing was being done by th | " oe oo ais - i te iat
Uinited States to make offensive Wats ms Saat vy yy H a,
ection by the Chinese Nationalist Vr gt bgt A nes Be
rhinnt’ the Chinese Matnianed amtous but , thls was contra -
nha ble cote etter licted by al’ frontline reports
' articularly from the north and

ast where South Korean unit
5 meee laa Lae vere taking the brunt of the
ve ‘ . Sfixvest “attack in the ten-weeks

Will Contribute [°",;

The American 24th Division

To Meteorology held in reserve had been flune

~

n to help battered South Korean

(Barbados Advocate Correspo o plug the Fast coast breach



ent)

J Seales , Allied planes grounded vester

,,, KINGSTON, September 6 lay by thunderstorms and low

The House of Representative louds came out in force agai

today voted for an expenditure tc} pday. to ye Ip hardpressed ground
cover Jamaica's contribut on to roops

‘ ards mise Upeepeny: Gt. tit ) ave Fighters and bombers ‘aunched

vest Indian Meteorological Ser big attack on Pohang which wa

vice on the lines proposed by th«

ported to be full of Commutnis

Colonial Office consequent on the antes They left the port

A re . nistry

x ae a ane ot M nistt ‘rouded by a tremendous cloud

7 2c: ‘ a ‘ an » Qave
The Service will have its head-| — Smoke and debri Several

cuarters in Trin'dad vplos'ons were heard as Altied
= 2 lanes blasted ammunition dumps

~Reuter





NO RESPONSE
To Discuss



AIRSTRIP SOMEWHERE IN
KOREA, Sept. 7
The Pohang airstrip near the] § altpetre Export
East Coast of Korea may have
boen evacuated during the night STOCKHOLM, Sept 6

Transporv pilots who yesterday Protessor A. Baltra, Vice Presi-



evening were able to land there | dent of the Chilean Saltpetre Cor-
reported late last night that they | poration ha arrived in Stock-
‘vcre unable to get any response | ho tn to diseuss the increase in
their signals from the ground,|Chile’s saltpetre exports to Eu-
They said they saw many fires | rope
. —Reuter. Reuter

Of Drastic Consequences
Of Shooting Down Red Plane

LONDON, Sept. 6.

RUSSIA TODAY protested to the United States that a
Soviet aircraft flying off Korea had been attacked and shot
lown by 11 American fighters, Moscow radio reported
The protest note was handed to the American Ambassado:
in Moscow today. It stated that on September 4 at 1944
Korean time, a twin engined plane of the Soviet Airforce
having neither bombing nor torpedo armaments” was on
i training flight from Port Arthur

The note aid the American

eee ey ak Government had put out a “lying

versicr pretending that the

JUST MAD Soviet aireraft had flown over an

e g American ship, The Soviet Gov-

Now Engl'shman, anc ernment t et tine Americat

1 elusive character ha version of the incident,” the not
iscinated foreigners eve stated The Soviet Governmer
ince the early days of his also drew attention of the Unit

cry; and if we were to be States Government to “gravity of
if(ve all the thing: that consequences that m follow’
ave been said about hirn such action.
»y friend and foe alike, The Russian note said that



ve should have a thorough eye-witnesses of the attack








ly bewildering picture. He Russian plane were two other
ws been cal‘ed, in turn, an Soviet planes “which were making
tute, scheming politician, training flights: with the plan
slow, stupid, stick-in—the shot down The Russian note
ud, a grumbling farmer, o stated: “The Government of the
barbarian 1 tyrant, a de- USSR considers it necessary
nerate weakling, a bull- the basis of verified data, to make
dog and a bore. His nation the following statement to th
; been derided ag ‘Perfi- Government of the U.S.A. o i
dious Albion’ and called a September 4 at 1944 hours local
ition of shopkeepers. H Time, two engined plane of tl
has been praised as a mod ; SSR gt nda having nepthes
ern Roman, the champion of v he bing por aly do en
' “SRE the ¢« . a carrying © ’ ainit ligh or
the UE ina ‘ ae Port Arthur to the area of Hai
errant. In fact the only point Yun, an island whic is part
the front of Port Art!
of agreement ever reache ae a tac Pee
by foreigners about the Eng th sh soi i sore u
hman seems to be that h wheal ea oes :
utterly and »mprehen ground pretex acked
bl nad ” nd red or DY - t C h
Mar United States Military Force
of As a result of the attack
nt Soviet plane wa rought dov
. anc fell k rnir the .
ee 7 .
y ener —Reuter

atm”


PAGE TWO












a member of the audience

about n'ne months with: Barclays





BARBADOS ADVOCATE




































THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 7, 1950





















Jennifer JONES

ee —
; ' ) ot ieee
e e To Attend Public — OBicer ee ee I Sess Sy SSS
eam GUldD Va Jama a ;)
Health Course een asnitia ae 1} awe o Be ; abers Orly)
R. CLARENCE HAYNES, Housewives i, Mee ATH CLOD CINEMA Me nly
Government Sanitary In- Back to Brooklyn Guide | a rm Presents
spector and Mr. Basi] Jordan, | > ARNAZ d his Orchestra
Chief Sanitary Inspector, St RS. VERA BRYAN, accom- 7 oa DESI AR an TERS
° os Ph ili . oe a . Prices for Pears and Cu- j ETHEL SMITH — THE KING SIS ‘
Holiday Visit Philip, left for Jamaica over the panied by me aughter cumbers in the local market | y y j9°
week-end by B.W.LA. They have Veronica and pcr pi when the Advocate checked |} in “CUBAN PETE
R. Lionel O. Gittens, Organist gone on a Pub! Health Course, Cynthia Bowen, ail of Brool ly, yesterday were wmmencing Friday 8th ies ™ ESQUE”
of Christ Church Parish which is expecicd to last for ten ‘New Yerk ; bad PEARS & cents each | sean CRAWFORD — Odiberal: tities, ne en te
Church was among the passengers Months, and they hope to return holidsy in Barbados _stay- CUCUMBERS cenis d Perch
leaving yesterday Perel ace for St. to Barbados eariy in July. They ing in Maxwells, left for, per Ib SSeS ———
Lucia on a short holiday visit. will be stationed in Kingston, Puerto Rico on Tuesday mormag i
where he lectures are being by B.W.1A, en route to New York, |
Architect H a, bt ‘0 visit ( where they Ii “| C. Radi EL ae ae
rchitect Tiere given, but will also visit some or where they live nex vo ome | B B adio EEE
the outlying districts residence at which Capt FL eh . ole |
R. HERBERT MENDT who is Mr. Haynes until a short time Parris’s wife is siaying in New | | ,
7 ar a and cane ae ago was acting Visiting Public York | Programme it EMPI RE ROYAL
a e Pennsylvania ate - |
versity, is spending a holiday in} —-—-——— ee ae eee | Sepieraber 7, 105 : : 4 DAY Last Two Shows TO-DAY
-| Barbados with his American wife | N 70 am New| Last ye Sone SP 4.30 & 8.30
} and small daughter Christina. > a.m. The Unbearabl 45 & 8.
He was core in Maracaibo and Ru ert and the Bac a.m. The Pimo fo : iteputlic Double . . .
P i Generally Speaking ; lic Pictures present |
first worked there with the - ; Mak ie ee BT Republic Pictures pres > 1
1.M.C.A. Company, but has now . , jum. Programme Parade; 8 15 p.m | John WAYNE cciestiiae
been transferred to their Branch “4 fonimartre Players; §.30 a ms Beoks ‘0 ° | Ann RA
j in Caracas, They are guests at . eed 8.48 aP Een eens i The Paradine {}
“Caerabank.” : Mews: 1534 bie Mowe Analysis: i 4 Ia
| p.m. Programme Parade; 12 | oo i}
Here For Six Weeks i Liste ners achotce: 1:08.» m (oer | Case |) se Flame of
| Newsreel; 1.30 p.m. Much Binding in i ; i
ENOKA Arminda Lopez and | the Marsh 5.00'p ee mews oi Starring ; Barbary
her cGaughter Beatrice and son i= ns = c Heview: 2.00 p.m. Edin- |} | stegory PECK nn TODD |
vuchard are guests at Cacrabank | vurgt International Festival; 3,50 p.m} | on gory He A ; Coast em
for six weeks. Her husband Josias .y j Dvierlude; 4.00 tee The a pies jj Charles ey vies COBURN | ‘
Lopez is with the Van Dissel Coy, g jp ae pal y Sasvioas 5 2. arles BU
ut San Christobel, Venezuela. 0 a oy le RP hg RS And
ee | Choice; 5.15 p.m. Progremme Parse las i
Ww 1 i ht Rupert picks up one of the strange none the worse, so come oF | 5.90 pm, Listeners’ Choice; 6.00 p.m ** Sam Antonio
e terweig : We must finish our walk and yt The Unbeareble Bassington; 6.15 p.m. ;
leaves and tries to tell again the shopnine * 4 Well, voodbye. Billy.” Creatures of Ciroumstance: oe mito ROXY Kid ord
AT SEAWELL YESTERDAY, a visitor aske a question and Miss Pat OE SINGH, from British Guiana story of the imps and the little dark says, Rupert, ‘ae. they: move away Merchant” Navy, ys a vee ee Sam
Bullen who is in charge of the Information Bureau, gives the answer. is at present in England. Joe bottle while Granny Goat rises % Bo be careful that you pengge cuish 7.15 to 7.30 p.m eee Revert aa . With Wild Bill ELLIOTT
The Bureau at Seawell is a branch of the Barbados Publicity is a boxer whose ambition is to shakily to her feet and tries to thar back-room boy again | hen w a XS, ,Minor, Counties: 7. @ fe 1.4 TO-DAY Last Two Shows
ek ae ae operat _ tan ens gg 9 nae ate roe es they ae nae nk Saint Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p m. Gerald eo 4.30 & 8.15
} 7 cham yen. oug ie . Pee D0 her head. “I can’t make head nor screws wu ig , Speaking; 8.30 p.m. Bunny May; 8.55
REVERAT weeks ave: gane by. was. heed ah ooee Ue ee manager to sponsor him, this box- tail of it.” she savs, “but ! seem Runert. p.m. From the ae 9 Pathe Paramount Big Double .. . OLYMPIC
since one of the Public blossoms She carried a pens ing aspirant receives daily train- British ee Me ay? Saheriades i 15 p.m 3
put down an underground of Pink Anthurium lilies, Tube ing at the Bill Kleim gymnasium _ 0 _— Se er Glee Gain, 1a Ray MILLAND in TO-DAY Last Two Shows
along the main highway in Yoses and white Dahlias. = in iendeo 4 a a ae ee ‘i Y 5 8.30 p.m. Special Dispatch; 11.00 p.m. The 430 & 8.15
‘s from the Hotel Royal Miss Marjarie Scott was the decided upon welterweig and no — Oistin : ni & 8. _m. Hand tar; Pleasuy “
to Gace dons ‘Hote’ in. Maid of Honour, wh’le the Misses lightweight. Joe replied, I can't PLAZA Oistin: TO-DA P oifins “The Sealed Columbia Big Double...
l The. tren was fi flaggie argare th were » lower weight.’ Warner Bros. Presents: Errol FLYNN in
Vorthing he trench was filled Maggie and Margaret Welch were make the a eon
x ‘ ea te hich Sand above the Bridesmaids. Flower giris T ial Arti nokweeN euRSUIT | de, Verdict oe Glenn eee Ida LUPINO
the surface of the road, now after were Miss Poe and onsoria } Me fagdbes re okianasaiias i with an wed we
heh ‘ains the rubble has Miss Pauline Nicholls. Soon os ata eee eerie air | i ne
oetind aa eed ae parts of ‘The ceremony was performed EST INDIANS :n_ London RKO-Radio’s Greatest Action Thriller mr ha Lust forGold
rabid Sedan 2 drop of severai by Rev. O. C. Haynes. Bestman now have their own West Paul HENREID in i ? =; oa
inches below the surface of thy was Mr. Arthur Scott and the Indian barber. Edmund Peddie of “SPANISH MAIN (New Copy) | : ae se |
aoa Gary 4 ot *yclists Ushers were Mr. Cecil Toppin Kingston, Jamaica has now opened Color By Technicolor Et Paso << WwW Ww.
roac ery annoying for cyclists Us ‘ patie oh at S Aor Pinte ' ) e ere
who are forced into the gutter by and Mr. Ivan Bowveall, oe at Seymour i
rotor vehicles and very annoying Coincide i i With St angers ~
for “motor vehicles when the'r oinciaes Hyde Park Orator sieiacanernaneianuniaatcinini - 7 —" SPS? ® | ar
tyres get caught in this sink. y' | G IETY C 4 ST JAMES bia hain aii
R. EVERARD CORBIN, who H h A ( ) ; | pee :
ini eers when The Garden . John GARFIELD
Off To Trinidad M hua” Ean 3h eae te ERE were loud c ; Gail RUSSELL

“UE -to leave today by the around the Coloured Workers’ As-






idaqd Bank | arrived yesterday bY sociation platform in Hyde Park

“Lady Rodney” for Trinidad Bw.tkA. to spend a holiday in iuxed a ee id Peng ol fade

is Mr, Roy Colina Barbados. His trip also coincides jngult the British people when youl
Roy was formerly wih Cable

with his brother Lionel’s wedding. have lived in Britain for so many
Lionel is to be married on Satur- years?” Everyone present thought
day to Miss Joyce Farmer, that was a hard nut to crack. But
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. A. for Robert G. Matthews from
Farmer of “Merton”, Strathclyde, Trinidad, the answer was simple.
and Everard is to be the bestman. “Madam,” he replied, “I insult the

and Wireless and is now with the
Demerara Mutual Life Assurance
Ltd. and he has been transferred
to Trinidad

He has asked me to say goodbye

to his many friends here. British people because I love them

Engagement and I shall keep on insulting them

Wedding till they redeem England from the

HE ENGAGEMENT was an- Pawn-shop of America.” This was

R. EVERTON’ BARROW, nounced on Monday night, oe a Ly Saigo Tescinggan

Assistant Teacher of the between Mr. Henry Cuke, son of oan a ae sone abet Hyde

Bay Street boys’ School and Hon, and Mrs. H. A. Cuke of Park Firminn i Oa Medeay .
Empire all rounder was married “Banavie,” 4th Avenue, Belle- oF open-air asylum ' |
on Thursday at St. Barnabas ville, and Miss Alison Warme, Pp ’ |

daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charlie
Worme of “Hillerest,” Rockley.

Miss Patricia Carter
Lilian Carter of

Church to
daughter of Mr:
Brittons Hill

On Short Holiday

The engagement was also an- RRIVING here on Tuesday by
ey ; .. nounced recently, between Mr. the Fort Amherst from the
The Bride who was given 10 Desmond Tudor, son of Mr, C. R. U.S.A. was Mr. Octavius “Ossie”

marriage by Mr.Odiver Smith,

Tudor of “Staten,” Hastings, and Davis. Mr. Davis has been away
Miss Jean de Freitas, daughter of for over sixteen years and is
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley de Freitas spending a short holiday with his
of St. Vincent. family at Howell’s Cross Road.

WAY...

wore a dress of white crepe back
satin, with a nylon embroidered
yoke and a white silk lace whrci

BY THE





By Beachcomber

, Srighhod words fall on my ears.
A

M OUNTED police had to charge who allow the outline of their Tail-Piece

the ¢rowds four times last braces to be seen beneath their

‘ght to clear a way for the bardic nightshirts. They might ,
Liskimo singer Muk-Muk, who was as well wear bowlers. manufacturer of bind~
finally lowered into Vhe theatre -

cages has said, “I want to regain
world-supremacy for British bird-
cages.”

In and Out

T Rillhampton Manc. Foul-

“enough was not even asked
to stay the nigh’. He had come
cut of the Rillhampton Arms,
end noticed a shooting brake
waiting outside the station. He
bought a platform ticket, met vhe
train, and mingled with the five
people whom the brake was
meeting. His old trick worked
They thought he was a guest who

) the chimney of a neighbour-
ing building.

Muk-Muk
sing, he hums. But he is such
a pleasant chap that one does
not mind. The audience rose id
roared their approval when he
sang Vok-Pu-Mob. Though the
words were unintelligible and
inaudible, the charming smile of
the singer won all hearts, .He
went on for an hour, and when
11€ stopped women screamed hys-






does not actually

CROSSWORD

terically and many fainted. jad come in another compart-
Muk-Muk had Wo be got away ment, and when the brake
disguised as a .milkman, but deposited them at vhe manor he
crowds waited all night outside

: was already on ver ood terms
the theatre in the hope of seeing a 4 ae

wo y Ng se with a rather silly widow.
him. They were joined by Major and Mrs. Clodhope were
campers for the next perform- too polite to ask him if he had
ance

been invited. Each thought the



Oh, I Say, Look Here! other had asked him, He an-
, ~ , mounced that his baggage was
SEE that the new Arch Druid Just, so they sent him into the
of Wales has ruled that in nearest vown to buy some things.

future bards must wear “white He returned in time ‘for dinner,

calfskin boovees, so that their with a case of port. By then
trousers may _ not be seem the truth was out, and he left
beneath their robes.” For years again for an unknown destina-

I have been campaigning against

tion. The port was charged to
the slovenliness of some bards,

bis stony-hearted host.

Stee stsaeee arsine sesseneanisnnise

CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work It:
AXYDLBAAXR %



Sounds s
. This stat a . ‘
. Alwaye %
a Reiative,
. Necessasy im vivews. (6)

Senn
Rare ducts give semethhing to be











ROBERT DOLIGLA
come VINCENT SHERMAN m=" JERRY WALD

ROE Pub WH OUREEE OFF KAHHIuL swe RANEY AummeeD Fae 4 ETOH HY WENELAY OaLusE + ume OF mnt rg





Last Showing TO-DAY THURSDAY 6th
20th Century Fox proudly presents

“MESSAGE 10 GARCIA”

PLAZA



Bridgetown's Prestige The:

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TUES. 5 and 8.30 p.m

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SPECIAL KIDDIES MATINEE: SAT. Morning 9.30 a.m

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ANN RUTHERFORD




si

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT!

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at the
2.30 Matinee on FRIDAY, are reminded that They Can obtain light re-
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TO-MORROW ....

ETURE OF THE YEAR!

&

ridny. Women’s







eae eee (Le | 6



is LONGFELLOW g. The Distangere waten it 1 (0)
One letter simply stands for another In this example A is used z What the artist 1a: iS be. (8) i
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc. Single letters, apos- TAT tee Aiaeiee ioe hae 00 Gothen. MARGARET WENDEL VIVECA
trophies, the length and formation of the words are all hints. word pusmies | (8) SULLAVAN - COREY -LINDFORS
Each day the code letters are different 3. pine: tah Bo trees on these 4
i alt: olerate. (5) 10, Saucy. (4) 3 a sm tetas WOOD = dete MCRTTINE + tas CORN + Mites QRS :
A Cryptogram Quotation . nk. (4) 18. 8 (3) } teenie tp tener alin Ceedea te nian nel
BXGU FLRKUFAMBUK MRI EPMB “Ott, B, beret ee eh ee Beat ’
Heajae i emgiong 28, Fico | |
XK[ TAUN EXBP MTU QUFLGUK AwU- Bais: 25, Glens de, Neoneh aeen ot — SERB O
Bean 8, Bat Pe Gratiatany, 10.84
WXTXLR-—~FLWUAXITU BA, Tillgge: 24, “temo 25. Odal: “IY EF M I R E
azed: 17. Alone: 19. Mash: 21. Lin + +
LOVE HAS A THOUSAND VAKIZ?D
NOTES TO MOVE THE HUMAN HEART—CRABBE rae
jo = — Sena = SSeS ee SSO.
'

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THURSDAY SEPTEMBER



NigerianKing
To Visit
West Indies

(From Our Own Correspondent
f GEORGETOWN,
King Anyanwu Agueri of
Ameze, Obibi, in Oweri, Nigerin,
will be visiting the Br tish
Colonies in the Caribbean early
in September to become acquaint-
ed with the pattern of the social
economic and polit.cal life of the
West Indians of African descent.
King Anyanwu will be stopping
first at British Guiana, flying direct
from New York, and will be guest

of Hon. Dr. J. A. and Mrs
Nicholson during his stay in the
Colony. ‘The visit is sponsored by
the B.G. Branch of the League of

Coloured Peoples.

King Anyanwu is the direct
heir of the late King Nwokoro
Ogueri of Obibi and rules over the
Province-Kingdom under Brit'sh
tutelage. His father ruled for
75 years and lived well over 100
years.

King Anyanwu_ received his
elementary education from Mis-
sionaries and then attended the
Government College, Nigeria, in
preparation for the U.S.A. where
he recently graduated in Politica!
Science and Government from)
Adelphi College, Garden City,
Long Island, New York.

He will be returning to his king-
dom after his West Indies tour



B.G. Spending
More On
Education

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN.

THE Deputy Director of Edu-
cation, Mr. A. A. Bannister, B.A,
during the opening ceremo: ot
the new Anna Catherina A ean
School, West. Coast, Demerara,
disclosed that in 1930 the popula-
tion of British Guiana was 296,691,
the number of pupils in schools
12,734, the number of teachers
1,029 and the expenditure from
education $385,783. In 1950 the
population is nearly 420,000, and
the number of pupils at the end
of 1949, 71,249, the number of
teachers 1,708 and the expendi-
ture on education $2,217,500. {

The new school building was |
declared open by Mrs. Cozier, wife |
of Dr. R. N. Cozier, G.M.O, of the |
West Coast Villages. The building!
is 120x30 feet with a teachers’ wing
24x24 feet. It is on 11-foot con-|
crete posts and can accommodate |
360 pupils, and is still rapidly
growing.

“This evolution in the life of
this particular school,” pointed out
Mr. Bannister, “is indicative of |
the expansion which is taking
place in the educational life of |
the Colony.” He then gave the |
figures for 1930 and 1949, as men- |
tioned above, and added that the |
analysis of these figures will show
that the number of pupils nearly
doubled itself and the number of
teachers has risen by nearly 75
per cent, but what is most re- |
markable is the fact that expendi- |

|



ture on education is six times as
much.

Better Facilities

“This expenditure on education
has meant improved accommoda-
tion, better buildings, better
facilities, such as furniture, school
meals, salaries, and pensions. This
very fine building is the result of
the liberality and willingness of
the Imperial Government to im-
prove the cultural life of the
community. Since the introduction
of the Schools’ Building Pro-
gramme in 1945, we have com-
pleted four entirely new buildings,
replaced twenty condemned ones,
given grants for repairs and
extensions to 38 others, and now
in process of erection is one
entirely new school and _ nine
replacements. Two are for repairs
and expansions and more than
$400,000 has been expended on
this work.”









A beauty treatment
only for the
Privileged few?

ARE

‘y

1950

W. Germans | TREES IN HERKELEY SQUARE

| Attack Soviet
Lone Govt.

BONN, Sept.. 5.

Two West German ministers to
‘ight accused the Soviet
Government of
cealing political terror”. A Specia
People’s Court at Waldheim, Sax
ony, were trying 3,400 men anc
" “inflicting
punishments”

|
|
statement

women and

according to

Jakob Kaiser, Minister for all }
German Affairs.
Trials which began early this|

year were before judges choser
for their subservience
munist allegiance, it continued
“The prisoners were exhauster
by | systematic underfeeding
lin many cases seriously
said.

The prisoners were
proper opportunities
themselves against
espionage, sabotage
Communist offences,

ill.?
denied

charges
and

cases, and chosen
of Communist advocates,
Witnesses were seldom
for prosecution, only
from police ‘and
authorities being admitted,
In most cases sentences

regardless
cumstances,

of extenuating

“Soviet
the statement concluded,
depend upon it that one day

wil) have to answer for
deeds”. —Reuter.

Potato Bars
Social Progress

BIRMINGHAM, Sept. 4.

The potato, by making man lazy,

has been a barrier to social pro-
gress according to a potato expert,

76-year-old Dr. Redcliffe Salaman,

at a British

Association
here,

meeting

A former Director of the Potato

Virus Research Station at Cam-
bridge University, he declared that
the potato’s influence had delayed
progress in Britain and in Ireland
in particular,

He told the Anthropology and





The Weather

TODAY

Sun Rises: 5.51 a.m.

Sun Sets: 6.05 p.m.

Moon (New) September 11
Lighting 6.00 p.m,

High Water 1.18 a.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) 1.37
ins.
Total for Month to Yester-
day. 2.37 ins.

Temperature (Max) 86.0 °F.

Temperature (Min) 76.0 °F.

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.
(3 p.m.) E, S. E.

Wind Velocity 8 miles per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.966
(3 p.m.) 29.895



Archaeology sections of the Bri-
tish Association for the Advance-
ment of Science, which is now in
session here, that the potato had
fitted well into the ‘“‘lazy-bed’
system of crop growing which
Irishmen had developed to avoid
draining wet land, :

Dr, Salaman said that squalid
homes, early marriage, large fami-
lies and lack of personal hygiene
were not thé immediate result of
the potato economy, for they had
all existed to some extent before
it. but the potato intensified each
of these factors and gave them
“inviolable stability”.

The effect of the potato was to
stabilise the standard of life at a
lower level than would have pre-
vailed had no such substitute for
ether food been available, Dr.
Salaman declared.—Reuter.



BEAUTY PREPARATIONS ARE USED BY
ALL WOMEN THROUGHOUT

THE WORLD!

LET **SPONDS”® assist you.
COLD & VANISHING CREAMS— |
FACE & TALCUM POWDERS-— |
LIPSTICKS — HAND LOTION— |
SKIN FRESHENER ETC, ETC.

STOCKED BY





Zone |
r ’ r “flagrant abuses!
of justice for the purpose of con-

monstrous |
a}
issued by Dr. Thomas |
Dehaler, Minister of Justice and

and Com-|

and |

‘|
all;
to defend |
of
other |
the state-
ments continued. Defence Coun- |
sels were allowed only in a few |
from a panel

j
heard |
statements
Communist

i were
fixed before trial and pronounced
cir-|
( occupation
authorities and their accomplices”,
“may
they
their

ALL DEALERS.

—_—_Y



|

'
1}
}

in Berkeley Square—where a
popular song once credited a
nightingale with = singing—the











famous plane trees are

being
lopped of some of their branches

London Express Service



Will Malik Help To

Localise Korea War ?

LAKE SUCCESS, Sept. 5.

AMERICAN DELEGATE Warren Austin today told Jacob
Malik of Russia he had “raised doubts in our minds” as to
whether he supported the Security Council’s effort to local-

ise the Korean War.

The Council was discussing an American resolution ealling
on all nations to refrain from giving aid or encouragement

to North Koreans.

100-Year-Old
Labourer Has
First Son

TORANTO, Italy, Sept. 5.

The 100-year-old Italian peas-
;ant Beraro Di Sandra was today
|; presented by his 42-year-old wife
with a son and heir, born during
an earthquake.

It was Di Sandra’s first child
after 24 years of marriage. He
| married his wife Lucia when he
was 76 and she 18. It had been
his first marriage.

Mother and son were tonight
reported to be doing well. She
had been rushed to hospital last
night and gave birth a few hours
after.

Di Sandri works in a field with
his brother-in-law until late at
night. He told reporters: “I am
happy.”’ He chuckled, “Better late
than never, as they say.”

The name for the son has not
yet been chosen.—Reuter.

Union Threatens
General Strike

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN.
The Guiana Industrial Workers’
Union headed by Dr. P. Lachman-
singh have submitted a 3-point
Memorandum containing 32 de-
mands and a 30-day ultimatum to
ithe B.G, Sugar Producers’ Asso-
ciation, threatening to call a gen-
j eral strike of the Guiana Indus-
trial Workers’ throughout the
Colony if the demands are not met.
















Mr. Austin reported to the
Council on the shooting down of
a plane with Red Star markings
off Korea yesterday

He said his Government had
no more information on the inci-

dent than that contained in his
letter sent yesterday to Sir
Gladwyn Jebb, of Britain, this
month’s Council President.

“All we know is that a member
of the Armed Forces of the

USSR was part of the crew of a
twin-engined bomber which fired
upon an air patrol operating as
part of the United Nations
Forees in Korea”, he added

“This incident
desirability of the immediate
adoption by the Council of the
United States Resolution, e
essential purpose of which {< to
localise the conflict in Korea and
prevent it from spreading to other
areas”.

illustrates the

Opening the
Gladwyn Jebb
ments had been

meeting,
said four
received.

—Reuter.

Six
docu-



Emperor Booed

ROME, Sept 6.

About 20 youths booed and
hissed Emperor Bao Dai of Viet-
nam as he returned to his hotel
in Rome last night after
a tour of the city. Police arrest-
ed some of the demonstrators and
detained four. Since his arrival in
Rome three days ago, Dai has been
the target of fierce attacks by
the Communist press who accused

him of being “a Reich puppet”
and “a Nightclub Emperor.”
—Reuter.
j 2
Buried Treasure
ROME.
A_seven-bifanched solid gold
candlestick, looted by the Em-

peror Titus from the temple of
Jerusalem in A. D. 70, and other
fabulous treasures believed buried
in the bed of the Tiber, may be
recovered soon. A plan to dredge
the Tiber has been revived.
After the fall of the Roman Em-
pire many times great treasures
were thrown into the Tyber to
Bave them from the barbarian
invaders.

AACE

5999S 99S IG 9FFFOOS PO V9OF

SOOSSRSSOOSO OSS VISSOSSS

4

bot



LOLOL LLL LPL AAT
MR. SHOPKEEPER,
MR. GROCER,

MR. & MRS. EVERYBODY

©

TAKE CAREFUL NOTE
THAT AS FROM THIS
WEEK EVERY 100 lb BAG

OF

SEARLES SPECIAL SUGAR

WILL CONTAIN A_ GIFT
NEATLY PACKED

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
Will Survey

_ B. Honduras










_ For Gold

| Filipinos
Ready For



|

| During or after an

Korea Front |





1
}
|
|

|

| Our Own Correspondent } MANILA
GEORGETOWN | The Philippines crack 10th Bat

Mr. C. G. Dixon, Senior Geolo- | talion Combat Team, the only fully
Bist, attached to the Geologic i} motorised unit in t Philippine |
Survey Department British Gui {Armed Forces, will be the first
ana, has been sent to British Hon: | Filipino contingent to fight on
Guras to carry out a Geological | Korean soil }

| Survey of the Mayo Mountair It is composed matniy of Corre-
where there are indications of gol sidor and Bataan veterans

} an @ tin and the possibility of othe: The combat team of 1.200 offi-/

economic minerals ’
This was disclosed by Mr. Smitl
Bracewell, Director of By itish Gui
®na’s Geologica] Survey on hig |
return from an official visit tc}
Antigua, Jamaica and British Hon- |






duras in cx nnectic with a geolo '
gicai survey in u ‘olonies |
In Jamaica, Mr. Bracewell visit |
@d the bauxite and g psum de
Wosits, and some of the irriga
tion schemes in progress The
bauxite deposits in Jamaica, he|
Said, are bigger than those in}

British Guiana, but the quality is}
not as good He advised the
Jamaica Government concerning
their Geological Survey Pro
gramme and the possibility of its |
expansion

Gypsum is made into plaster
boards and exported to be manu-
factured into plaster bars and to
be used in cement manufacture

British Honduras has had no
Geological Survey as yet. No
mining is done in that Colony
but they are starting a rami fibre
industry The fibre which is
planted by the Colonial Develop



ment Corporation is used for
making the silk used for fibre hose
In the Leeward Islands, Mr

Bracewell advised the Government
and helped to formulate proposals

for a Geological Survey

In Antigua there are deposits
of Barytes which is used for adding
weight to textiles, paper and for)

oil well drilling. There are reports
also of other Minerals Mont- |
serrat \

in





Coconut Producers
Form Association

(From

Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN.
3ritish Guiana’s Coconut pro- |
dteers have formed an association
and at their inaugural meeting it
was decided to write the Trinidad
Association to obtain the cost}
of production existing in Trini-|
dad When this information
is secured a comparative table;



cers and men will be commanded |

by Lt. Col
yeay old Fort Knox,
armour school graduate.

The Phillippines is on record for}

Marigno N. .Castaneda, commant
ing General of
of the Philippines, has announce:
that he is sending a liaison party
of top Filipino military and diplo
matic officials to confer with Gen
Douglas Mae Arthur

The mission, composed of
representative each from

the Armed Forces

i

Mariano C. Azurin, 41}
iKy., advanced |

|

|

|
|

offering 5,009 trocns to the United |
Nations to help the world organ
ion's efforts in securing peac
in war torn Korea }
The other 3,800 sand men}
are slated to undergo extensive j
| military training before they are |
sent oversea
Liaison Party
In this connection, Maj. Gen |

ene}
he |

National Defense, Foreign Aff: rs |

and Jusmag, and_ three

from }

the Armed Forces of the Phil p

pine Headquarters, is
to leave for Tokyo, preceding he
sending of the first contig
oveyseas,

While in the Japanese

they will take up with Gen, Ma





capital,

schedu ‘ed |

ont |

Arthur pertinent matters on the}
re—supply of troops in Korea |
They will also secure information
of such vital subjects as terrain
weather, enemy techniques and}
tactics, and others for militar
raining purposes |
For Tokyo

Lt, Ccb. Carmel aber wh
rimself Is sc luled to ao to Tolsyo |
s a member of the liaison group
said that the mission's survey it]
be utilized in orienting Filipino}

soldiers on actual bavtle conditions |

tr |
|

ebtaining in Korea and wht

expect in such “slugging contests,’
The 10th’ Battalion Combat}

Team is already adequately

trained, Y
indergo some more training
Japan preparatory to their trans
fer to Korean battlefronts ne
Tn addition to its regular infan

The torce, however, will
in

try unit, the 10th B.C.T, has one

battery of self-propelled artillery
yne company of medium

tanks,

of the cost of production in the two; ene reconnaisance detachment of

colonies will be forwarded to the
Government in an effort to secure |
an increase price for coconuts

The Association also decided to
write the Colonial Secretary re-
questing a copy of the Coconut Bill
Which the Government is putting
forward to reorganise the entire
coconut industry. |

Following are the members of the
Committee of the new Association:
President, Mr. Doroop Maraj; Vice
President, Mr, F. O, Low; Secte-
tary, Mr, J. P. Barlow; Treasyrer,
Mr, B. Boodhoo; Asst. Secretary,
Mrs. E. C. Marks; with Messrs J. F.
Martins, E. Doobay, Carlos Gomes,
JOOP. Barlow, Jnr., H. Rahaman
and M. S. H. Rahaman.



light tanks, plus medical corps and
other subordinate camp pe*son-
nels,--LN.S.



AVALANCHE KILLS
CLIMBERS

MEXICO CITY, Sept. 5.
An avalanche swept down on
25 Mexican mountain climbers on
Sunday, killing three and bury-

ing another
e Alpine
froup of its members was climb-
ing 17,887ft. Mount Popocatepetl

when an avalanche of rocks swept

them away.—Can, Press.



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PAGE THREE



—_—_—_— ‘n-ne



attack of
INFLUENZA

The tempting flavour of Bovril, its ease o: similatio

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PAGE FOUR





Thursday, September 7, 1950



TODAY'S SIREN

TO-DAY at noon the wail of a siren will
be heard in Bridgetown.

“At Coleridge Street Central Police
Station an experiment is being conducted
to-day to decide how effective sirens will
be in informing the public of Barbados of
an approaching hurricane.

The Government have shown prompt
awareness of the fact that existing systems
of hurricane and cautionary warnings are
in themselves inadequate to warn the
whole island of approaching hurricanes.
To-day’s practice has been made possible
by the discovery in Barbados of five sirens.
Only one of these sirens will be used to-day.

The purpose of the experiment is to dis-
cover how far the noise of the siren can be
heard from Coleridge Street Police Station.
It is not anticipated that it will be heard
at North Point Lighthouse, The Crane, or
Bathsheba, or even as far inland as Gun
Hill, but, residents in outlying districts or
suburbs of Bridgetown need not be alarmed
if they do not hear to-day’s siren. The
Government does not know what range
each siren has and it is attempting to find
out.

It has made arrangements through
official channels for reports to be made but
it is in the interest of the island as a whole
that people who live in outlying districts
several miles from Bridgetown should
notify the Se¢retariat direct or through
the correspondence columns of this news-
paper if the siren is heard by them.

The test will be held to-day at noon when
there will be much more noise than after
nightfall. Ht will therefore be a crucial
test and results will indicate clearly the
range of the siren.

If to-day’s siren proves satisfactory the
Government will conduct further tests to
see how best the five available sirens can
be used on an island-wide basis.

Tests may prove that five sirens will be
adequate. They may prove that five or
maybe fifteen more are necessary. But
whatever the outcome of the test, the Gov-
ernment are to be congratulated on their
speedy move to improve the system of
cautionary and hurricane warnings. It is
up to the public to express their views
freely on the results of today’s test. The
time for constructive criticism is before the
event, Anybody can be wise afterwards,
Inform the Secretariat and write to this
newspaper to-day so that from your infor-
mation the Government can continue to
take precautions in your own interest.

GIVE MORE FOOD

THE response to the appeal made in this
newspaper for gifts of food and clothing
for the people of Antigua has been good.
During the last two days several ladies,
including Lady Collymore who was head
of the “Win the War” organisation years
ago, have been hard at work parcelling
these gifts. So well was the work done
that three boxes of clothing and one of food
were despatched by plane yesterday.

The packing continues and to-morrow
it is proposed to send more gifts by the
Schooner Princess Louise and on Tuesday
by The Caribbee.

In the circumstances the flow of gifts has
been steady and does justice to the reputa-
tion of Barbadians who are always willing
to help those in distress.

Not only individuals but business houses
have made contributions of food and cloth-
ing old and new and it is noticeable that
clothing for women is in the preponder-
ance. But there is one thing more to be
done. The gifts of clothing have out-
stripped those of food and whilst there can
be no reduction in the flow of gifts of
clothes, there is at the moment greater
necessity for gifts of food.

The Y.M.C.A. has become the headquar-
ters for the work of relief and there the
Secretary, members of his staff and other
helpers are working long periods to collect
and collate the gifts, parcel and despatch
them.

There have been also gifts of money.
Some of these will be added to the general
fund while some will be despatched im-
mediately.

Our Readers Say:

‘Hurricane
To The Editor, The Advocate, .

SIR,—I am reluctant to admit that I am a resi-
sent of St. Peter, and consequently a neighbour
of the correspondent who wrote in your columps
on Tuesday September 5.

I notice that he is a man with a double griev-
ance. First he is angry because the hurricane did
not know its own mind, or else did not
reveal its intentions to those members of the.
community who had the sense to understand its
language. Secondly, the Police did nov serve him
with the false alarm early enough, and then did
not keep their flags flying long enough after all
his trouble of barricading and other preparations.

I think, that instead of criticising the system
of precautions which can never be wholly effective,
your correspondent oughyto thank God who alone
rules the storm

A mere consideration of wind velocity is idle if
England can take a gale of ninety miles per hour
so much the better for it, but Mr. Cunliffe-Owen
should take a trip to Antigua and see if this busi-
hess was just another cry of “Wolf

SPEIGHTSTOWN

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

The Constitution
Of Switzerland



(With Acknowledgement To External Affairs, Canada)

15,950 square miles, and with a
population of 4,555,000, as in Ca-
nada, peoples of different races.
religions and languages live har-
moniously together and the rights
uf minority groups are protected
| by a federal system of govern-
} ment.

The present constitution of
Switzerland can best be under-
| stood in the light of its historical
development. Independence and
| €emocracy began for the Swiss in
1291 when the freemen of the
three forest cantons of Uri,
Schwyz and Unverwalden, under
uttack from the House of Haps-
burg, bound themselves into an
“Everlasting Alliance”. The Alli
ance had to struggle hard for its

|
IN Switzerland, with an area of
}
\
{

existence but gradually it ex-
panded until the original three
founders had formed a_ solid
league with Lucerne, Zurich,

Berne, Glaris and Zug. Later in
the 16th century, Fribourgh, So-
leure, Basle, Schaffhouse and
finally Appenzell joined the
League, and in this form it re-
mained for three centuries as the
“League of Thirteen Members”.
In addition to the thirteen mem-

ber cantons there were small
Allied states, including some
which are now cantons of the
Confederacy and subject terri-

turies such as Ticino conquered
by the three original mountain
cantons, and Vaud conquered by
the Bernese.

At first the Confederacy was a
cose alliance, but in time it be-
same the practice to call together
-very year a Diet made up ot
wo delegates from each canvon
ind one delegate from each allied
state. The functions of the Djet
were largely consultative and the
cantons themselves remained

| sovereign communities. Some of
the cantons, praticularly the
mountain staves, were pure de-
mocracies in which the people
lirectly exercised their power by
meeting in popular assemblies of
all the citizens to discuss public
affairs; other cantons, including
‘hose more urban in character,
had aristocratic forms of govern-
ment with certain families exer-
cising hereditary privileges.
Perpetual Neutrality

The 16th, 17th and 18th centu-
, ries were a period of peaee and
prosperity for the little sove-
reign states. After one disastrous
intervention in the Italian wars
early in the 16th century, the
Confederacy adopted thav policy
of prepetual neutrality which
has since become the cornerstone
ef Switzerland’s existence as a
modern state.

The Confederacy was seriously
weakened by the crisis of the
Reformation. The new ideas made
great progress in the urban can-
tens, bu’ the mountain cantons
remained true to the Catholic
fuith. Civil wars broke out be-
tween the two groups and it was
only continual threats from
abroad that preserved the Con-
federacy.

A loose organization of this
character, made up of svates
with divergent views and lacking
any genuine Swiss patriotism,
was in no condition to withstand
the shock of the French Revolu-
tion and the wars to which it
gave rise. Switzerland was soon
under contro! of the French Re-
public. The new masters at firs’
created the Helvetic Republic, a
centralized state in which the
cantons were merely administra-
tive units. This led to a violent
reaction on the part of the Swiss!
people, who clamoured for can-
tonal autonomy. The only sup-
porters of a strong central gov-
ernment were the inhabitants of
the former subject territowes,
vho welcomed their release from
the control of the cantons, Final-
ly. after a brief period of civil
war, Napolean intervened and
bestowed on Switzerland — the
Act of Mediation of 1803, a Cqn-
stitution drafted with the cols
boration of the Swiss themselves.
The centralized State was com-
pletely abolished, but the allied
and subject verritories were con-
verted into six new cantons, thus
sotisfying the inhabitants of
tnese territories as well as those
who wanted sovereign cantons.
The Constitution provided for a
Diet with one delegave from each
cf the nineteen cantons but with
tie six largest cantons having
iwo votes. Each of these six can-
tons was to have the headship of
the Confederacy in turn for one

year.
The Pact of 1815
With vhe fall of Napoleon the
Diet repealed the Act of Media-



tion and drew up a new Consti-
tution which became known as
the Pact of 1815, This provided
tor two Federal organs: a Diet
in which each canton had one de-
legate and one vote, and a Direc-
torate to be exercised in turn for
vwwo years by the Cantons of
Yurich, Berne and Lucerne. In
cther words, Switzerland was to
remain a Confederacy of sove-
reign states, united in an everlast-
ing alliance for purposes of de-
fence. It was shortly before the
Pact of 1815 that the number ot
cantons was raised to the pre-
sent figure of twenvy-two by
the adhesion of Geneva, Neucha-
tel and Valais. It was also at this
time that the neutrality of Swit-
zerland, which hitherto had bee.
purely voluntary, became con-
teactual. The Powers guaranveed
Swiss neutrality by the Declara-
tion of Vienna of March 20, 1815,
and by the second Treaty of
Paris of November 20, 1815,

The revolutionary disturbances
in France in 1830 were reflected
in a liberal movement in Switzer-
lend, The cantons which had
nristocratic forms of government
introduced democratic consvitu-
tions, at the same time proclaim-
ing the sovereignty of the people
and guaranteeing liberty to the
individual.

Shortly after this the distinc-
tive Swiss polivical institutions,
the referendum and the right of
popular initiative, were introduc-

———— LT

ed, although it may be said that
these rights had _ existed for
centuries in those democratic
mountain cantons where ine
»yeople themselves directly ex-
ercised their power through

meetings of popular assemblies
of all the citizens. The first men-
tion of the legislative referendum
is found in the 1831 Constitution
of the Canton of Si. Gallen. The
right of legislative initiative was
first introduced in the Canton of
Vaud in 1845,

Religious conflicts
wo threaten the
These came to a head in 1847,
when civil war broke out be-
tween vhe Protestant and Catholic
cantons, the latter having con-
cluded among themselves a se-
parate alliance which the Diet
considered incompatible with the
Pact of 1815. After a campaign
of twenty days the Catholic army
was defeated and vhe ground was
prepared for the framing of a
New _Constitution according to
the ideas of the Radical-Liberal
Party which was then predomi-
nant in most of the cantons. The
revolutions which occurred
throughout Europe in 1848 had a
strong influence on Switzerivnd
and served to free the Confed-
eracy from foreign intervention in
Swiss affairs.

A new Federal Constitution
was adopted on November 12,
1848; the old Confederacy dis-
appeared and in its place was
created a federal state—the Swiss
Confederation. The authors of
the Constitution drew heavily
upon the example of the United
Staves, but maintained many
features which were inherited
from Switzerland’s past. Like the
Canadian Constitution, it was a
compromise between the princi-
ples of centralization and of can-
tonal or provincial autonomy. Al-
though a further new Constitu-
\.on was adopted in 1874, it merely
served to elaborate and bring up
to date the 1848 Constitution, In
1948, Switzerland celebrated the
centenary of its existence as a
riodern federal state,

Organization of the

Swiss State

The organization of the Swiss
State consisis of a Federal Coun-
cil, exercising the executive
power; a bicameral Federal As-
sembly; invested with the legis-
lative power; and a Federal Tri-
bunal, endowed with the judicial
power. The Federal Council is a
college of seven public officials,
each of whom devotes his whole
time to affairs of state. They are
elected for a term of four years
by the two houses of the Federal
Assembly, sitting together. A

continued
Confederacy.



London Express Service.



Federal Councillor cannot at the
same time be a member of the
Federal Assembly. This provision
in Switzerland's constitution, se-
parating the executive from the
legislature, is not found in the
Canadian Constitution where a
Federal Cabinet Minisver is also
a member of the House of Com-
mons.

No canton can have more than
one representative on the Federal
Council. There is a tradition that
the Cantons of Berne, Zurich and
Vaud, one other French-speaking
canton, and, to a less extent, the
Centon of Ticino, should be re-
presenived on the Federal Council,
This tradition was sufficiently
strong to secure the election in
1947 of a Vaudois even though
there had been a break in the
tradition for some years. Unlike
the Canadian Cabinet the Federal
Council does not resign if sub-
ject to an adverse vote in the
Assembly. A Federal Councillor
may be, and usually is, re-elected
There have been examples otf
over twenty years service on the
Federal Council.

Each Federal Councillor ad-
ministers one of the seven
government departments: Politi-
eal (External Affairs); Interior
(Cultural Affaws); Justice and
Police; Military; Finance and
Customs; Public Economy (Trade,
Labour and Agriculture); and
Posts and Railways. Another of
the Federal Counc llors is elected
as alternate head of a depart-
ment so that each member of the
Federal Counc 1 serves as head of
one department and alternate
head of another.

The President of the Federal
Council is elected by the Federal
Assembly for one year only and
is not immediately re-eligible for
the position of President. He is
the President of the Confedera-
tion and represents the State at
public functions. He enjoys little
or no special powers by virtue
of his office. Whereas in some
federal constitutions the Presi-
dent has very extensive powers
and is in fact the executive
branch of the government, the
President of the Swiss Confedera-
tion is simply one member of
a college of seven public officials
elected to preside over their
deliberations for a period of one
year at atime. It is this highly
impersonal character of the
Swiss system of government that
distinguishes it from all others,

The Federal Assembly

The Federal Assembly is com-
posed of two houses: the Council
of States. made up of two
representatives from each canton,

and the National Council, made
uv of representatives elected by
Swiss male citizens in the
proportion of one for every
22,000. inhabitants, both Swiss
and fore'gn. A general election

for the National Council is held
every four years, the last having
taken place in 1947. The election
is held on a basis of proportional
reprewintation, each canton o:
half-canton forming ‘a _ consti-
tuency lor electoral college.
Consequently each canton or
half-canton, no matter how smal! |
in population, elects at least one

representative,
As regards the Council 0/|
States, the candns themselves |

freely decide on the way thei. !
representatives are to be electe:t|
or nominated, on their elegibility |
and on their term of office. |
Another link between the |
federal parliament and the can-;
tons, which does not exists in
Canada, is the large number of}
members of cantonal gevernments

elected both to the National;
Council and to the Council of
States. |

The two Councils meet con-

separate
they

sit in
when
Assembly

of the

but
except
the Federal
members
the President

currently
chambers
meet as
(a) to elect
Federal Council, S
members of the Federal Tribunal
and of the Insurance Tribunal
the Chancellor of the Confedera-
tion, who heads the permanent
Secretariat of the legislative anc
executive authorities of tne
Confederation, and in time of war
or national emergency the Genera’
in command of the Army; (b)
to exercise the right of pardon’
and (c) to settle conflicts of
jurisdiction between the Federal
Council and the Federal Tribunal
The two Councils are equal
enjoying the same rights and
powers, and agreement betwee)
them is necessary for the fram-
ing of laws.

Federal Courts
The only federal courts in
Switzerland are the Federal
Tribunal and the Federal Insur-
ance Tribunal, The members of
these two courts are elected by
the Federal Assembly for a term
of six years and are eligible for
The Fed-
also elects the
President and Vice-
President, who are not immed-
iately re-eligible. The Federal
Tribunal has its seat at Lausanne
and the Federal Insurance
Tribunal at Lucerne. The Fed-
eral Tribunal has powers of
original or appellate jurisdiction
according to the nature of the
case. The Federal Constitution
expressly provides that judic al
organization and procedure, and
the administration of justice,
shall remain within the juris-
dction of the cantons in the
same measure as in the past
Appeals to the’ Federal Tribunal
from the decisions of ¢antonal
courts are permitted in certain
eases. The Federal Tribunal has
or ginal jurisdiction in cases of
high treason, ‘n cases involving
the Confederation and the cantons
or between the cantons them-
selves and in certain other cases
specified by federal law. |

immediate re-élection,
‘eral Assembly
Tribunals’

The most important aspect in
which the Federal Tribunal
differs from the Supreme Court
of Canada is that while the

Federal Tribunal may examine
the constitutionality of cantonal
laws, it has no right to discuss
the conformity of federal laws
with the Federal Constitution,

As in Canada, the separation
of powers is not rig dly defined
in the Swiss Constitution which
provides that, subject to the
rights of the people and of the
cantons, the supreme authority
is vested in the Federal Assembly.
Both the Federal Assembly and
the Federal Council have judicial
powers. The two Councils of
the Federal Assembly deal with
appeals aga‘nst certain admini-
strative decisions of the Federal
they also exercise the
amnesty
the

Council;

right of
together,
The
appeals
by
vices,

and, sitting
right of pardon.
Federal Council _ settles
agamst decisions taken
its own administrative ser-
which are not expressly
within the jur’sdiction of the
Federal Tribunal, The Federal
Council has also legislative func-
tions in that it has the right to
publish ordinances in execution
of federal laws.

Residuary Powers Rest With

Cantons

The whole basis of the Swiss
Constitution is that powers not
conferred expressly upon the
Confederation rest with the
cantons. Here the Swiss Con-
federation differs in principle
from that of Canada where the
residuary powers are left in the
hands of@the Federal authorities.
There is not, however, the same
clear cut division of jurisdiction
between the Confederation and
the cantons as exists in Canada
between the Federal Government
and the provinces. One of the
chief aims of the 1874 Constitu-
tion was to bring about greater
centralization of military affa‘rs;
yet the cantons form the battal-
ions, appoint officers, provide the
soldiers’ personal equ pment and
mobilize the troops, although the
provision of arms and ammuni-
tion and the higher direction of
the army rests with the Confed-
eration. Museums and_ art
galleries are the special concern
of the cantons, but the Confedera-
tion helps out in certa’n cases.
Education comes under the
Jurisdiction of the cantons, but
the Institute of Technology at
Zurich is a federal institution
Finally, the Federal Assembly
has enacted a series of codes,
both civil and criminal, which
have almost entirely unified the
laws of the country, ¢

A foreigner‘ from another fed-
eral state is struck by the degree

of co-operation between the
Confederation and the cantons
This is made possible by the
smallness of the country, the
representation of the cantons ‘rn
the Counsil of States and the

number of members of cantonai
governments who are also mem-
bers of the Federal Assembly
Most important of all, however,
is the fact that ,through the
rights of referendum and initiat ve
the people directly participate in

the fram‘ng of laws so _ that
cantonal autonomy is left to the
protection of the Swiss people

themselves as well as to that of

the Constitution,

1

een

' COLUMBUS |

AND THE
DOCKERS

By DONALD CAMPBELL
in the P.L.A. monthly for August

WHEN young Christopher Columbus was

checking goods in a warehouse or on the
dockside between those periods at sea when
he learnt the mysteries of sail and navigation
Genoa was indeed as proud a city as her
nickname, Zena La Superba, proclaimed.
Her fame and wealth were built on her sea
trade, and her merchant bankers were also
shipowners. Greatest of all her institutions
was the. Bank of St. George, with head-

| quarters in that beautiful palace which was

the headquarters of the Genoa Port Authority
in» 1939.

It was in Genoa during the fifteenth
century that the first guild of dock and ship
workers came into being—the Compagnia
dei Caravana. This society was composea
solely of men engaged in physical work ai
the dock or in ships of the port of Genoa
or her colonies.

Unlike other trade guilds of the time, the
Compagnia was not penetrated by the smal:
employer or wealthy burgess. In fact, the
company was very much akin to our trade
unions of to-day. It lived on good terms
with bankers and shipowners, especially with
the all-powerful Bank of St. George, and was
very much a closed shop; “tickets” were
handed down from father to son.

Members of the company had their own
distinctive working dress of sky-blue jersey
and white kilt. Not only did they work at
the docks and in ships of Genoa itself, but
picked squads of volunteers were sent to the
outlying colonies of the republic in Asia
Minor and on the shores of the Black Sea.

The company had an amicable understand-
ing with the Cammali, another guild or union
which dealt with the cartage of goods from
the docks.

The language spoken in Genoa, then one of
the greatest and richest ports in the known
world, was Zenese, that nasal dialect that
you can hear to-day and which is almost
incomprehensible to other Italians, combin-
ing as it does a mixture of old Phoenician and
Celtic languages with more modern Arabic
and Spanish.

In those days in Genoa, capital and labour
lived on very good terms with one another.
Likely lads were given a chance in the ship-
ping business and a number of ships’ captains
and part owners came from the sturdy docker
stock, Education was on a much wider and
higher level in Italian cities than it was in
the rest of Europe and the boy who learnt
his three “Rs” could go to sea as an appren-
tice—as Christopher Columbus did—and
employ his time ashore checking in the ware-
houses and learning the business side of
shipping.

The system of employment appears to have
been somewhat similar to that obtaining in
the Port of London of to-day; the Bank of
St. George employing a large number of the
Compagnia members, and other concerns
maintaining lesser teams while there was a
pool of workers‘ who would be hired as re-
inforcements during rush periods or by small
firms who could not afford to keep on
regular gangs.

Genoa built the best ships in Europe at this
time.
of France, for whom she also built many
warships but her trading caravals, ships
large as they were for the period, carried
very small tonnage so the stowage of cargo
was a very positive art.

Shipowners encouraged their employees
to buy up a few cubic feet of cargo space.
It was easy to find goods at bargain prices

Spain, Portugal, England and even the
Barbary Coast ports. Ships’ captains were
offered a share in the profits as part payment
for their services, and cautious owners and
shippers inserted in their contracts—all set
forth in Latin—that so many men-at-arms
should be carried on board and that a number
of the crew should also be armed and
exercised in the use of weapons.

From what can be gathered from docu-
ments of the period, the dockers and port
workers were a very independent body ot
men, They lived well and were respected
as valuable members of the _ republic's
economic system. An official document of the
time sets forth that they were a municipal
institution which had regard for the welfare
of the public and the trade of the City.
Genoa had by this time established herséli
as a centre of the wool trade, and the chief
weapon factories of the period were also
to be found within her confines, so there was
never lack of employment.

A “ganger” of dock workers might have
one son a ship’s officer, another working as a
cartographer, and a third as a clerk in one
or other of the Genoese banking cifices in
Spain or Portugal. He himself might—and
often did—buy up ship space for a small
cargo to be sold abroad.

It was only later that disastrous wars and
the sudden influx of wealth from the
Americas destroyed the real prosperity of
Zena La Superba.

Her admirals were hired by the King,

in Genoa that would sell at a large profit



|











Ios

.

4
.

>
%



PAL SCSOOSOOSS SS SOSSOOOSS OOS POS O PS FO SSF S COOP OSS

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 7, 1950
seen aman cean emenaatta aA

TO-DAY'S SPECIALS
at the COLONNADE

D, V: SCOTT
& CO. LTD.
Usually Now
$ c. $ c.
3.20 3.00
.33

20

TINS OX TONGUES
TINS KRAFT CHEESE
Bots. N.E. BEER

37

MESH WIRE FOR ALL PURPOSES

24 in, x 12 in., 18 im., 24 in., 36 in., 48 in
\% in. x 18 in., 24 in., 36 in., 72 in.

1 in. x 48 in.

11% in. x 18 in., 24 in., 36 in., 48 in., 60 in.
1% in. x 36 in., 48 in., 60 in., 72 in.

WIRE

1¢ in, x 24 in., 36 in.

4 in, x 24 in., 36 in. '
LASHING WIRE, 14, 16 and 18 Gauge

GALVANISE BARBED WIRE—50 th Coils

GALVANISE WIRE—50' and 100’ Coils

ALUMINUM CLOTHES LINES

STAINLESS STEEL RIGGING WIRE-—', in., 3-16 in., 5-32 in,
GALVANISE STAPLES—', in., and 4, in.

EXPANDED METAL—1 in., 1'% in., 2 in., 3 in. — 8’ x 4’ Sheets

WOVE



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$
~ A
TODAY >
%
~
+
Assorted FROM
%
| \ R x
-
-
| 3
New Stocks arrived - - - x
AFTERNOON TEA BIS- ‘7 >
CUITS IN TINS AND PKGS. Toast with the %
ISH ASST. IN TINS ‘
AND PKGS. best %
BOURBON IN TINS AND x
PKGS. x
OSBOURNE IN TINS AND x
AND PKGS. S
OSBOURNE IN TIN AND $
DIGESTIV :
E IN TINS AND x
PKGS. %
CBLERY CHEESE IN TINS %
Tt IN TINS. e q
ALMOND CRISPS IN TINS. GUase STOUT, $
CHEES $s , eae
(CHEESE CRISPS IN TINS. DRY SACK SHERRY. *
Me PRUNIER BRANDY. %
VIELLE CURE. %
GOLD BRAID RUM x
J: CIALS CROWN DRINKS %
26-OZ. WORCESTER
SAUCE $1.06.
RAISINS iéc. PER Lb. aa 8&8
a SMOTIVIX SUVIK et ‘
of SMOTIVIN HSUVIC OYEhEn 8
2 Lb. TIN HUNTLEY AND OX TONGUES x
PALMERS BISCUITS $1.80. FRESH VEGETABLES nS
1 Lb, TIN MARMALADE. ORANGES. x

>

ce NA LLL LC RR

TELL ALCL!

ee
THURSDAY



PTEMBER 7, 1950



Y.M.C.A. Sends First

Relief Flight To Antigua

THE work of relief for the distressed people of Antigua |



who have been hit. by the recent hurrieare continues
and the general public have responded well.

The ladies are on duty for long hours and ‘Lady Collymore

and Mrs. A. A. Gibbons assisted by many others are packing

the gifts from business houses and individuals

Boxes of shoes of all sizes. fo-

* a and women, worn shoes, hats

Bo Ss Clubs old and new, dresses, suits for

y men must all be handled; and deft

fingers are sorting the soft fineries

St t Ph e l from the coarser garments fo-
: ar ysica men and boys.

epace

As soon as these are separated,
they are categorised and made
ready for packing. The boxes from
stores are used as packing cases.

Denied Themselves

PHYSICAL TRAINING Class Several boxes of toilet requisites:

has been started for tnejand other items have been offered.
members of the Bay Street Boys’|Canned goods have been supplied
Club. Although these classes are| by business houses and ‘t is indica-
purely voluntary, an average ofjtive of the Barbadian method of
about 20 to 30 boys turn out|help that individual householders
every Tuesday and Friday. jhave denied themselves of things

A Committee was recently|which they had already bought
‘urmed for the running of the|for their uses and have given them
barbados Boys’ Clubs — as the|for despatch to Antigua.

‘Training

Bay Street Boys’ Club and the Because of the ready response
two new Boys’ Clubs at Pinfold the Committee have been able
Street and Speightstown. will be to send four boxes, one of food

called in future.

This Committee is made up of
Col. R. T. Michelin, Commissioner
ci Police, Miss Betty Arne, Social

and three of clothing yesterday
This was because the B.W.LA..,.
plane service was available and
the agents kindly consented to

Welfare Officer, and Mr. E. H.} help with the early despatch of
Walcott, Probation Officer. these gifts. 2

The Commissioner of Police On Tuesday more parcels will
suid yesterday that two lists of/be sent by the “Caribbee, while

those for despatch by the Schooner

members are now being prepared : ;
' 6 prep “Princess Louise” are getting the

fer the new Clubs that will short- out "
ly be opened at Speightstown and finishing touches today. Others will
Pinfold Street. * be sent as opportunity arises

He said that any boys wanting; Within the next few days.

tu join the Pinfold Street branch All Sympathetic
can now apply to the warden at Yesterday morning, Lady Rae
the Bay Street Boys’ Club and Mr. B. A. T. Williams con-
ORRY DRIVERS, who are/jtinued their tour of the ci oe
carrying passengers, must have | appealing for help for the urri-
their seating accommodation ap- |¢@ne victims. They visited Swan
proved of by the Highways and Street and everyone was sym-
Transport Department, the Com- {Pathetic and generous in their gifts
missioner of Police told the Advo-!and the response was so great that
cate yesterday. the other voluntary workers at the
He said that Y.M.C.A., had an extremely busy
so that people driving in public day receiving, sorting and packing
service yehicles can be given| the various articles, 4
pioper seating accommodation, Mrs, Skewes-Cox who answere
This also refers to cars, etc ,|Phone calls, supervised ae eee
ete. which were converted to|tering of parcels, the fete
rickups for the purpose of taking receipts for donations an -~
passengers. checking on the marking of e
He said that Police Constables | ¢@S¢S, also had a et aro ee
are now out warning drivers of; In, addition a acon per
these vehicles, who are desirous Beanery, gees eae gifts in-
of carrying passengers on October | fi"ms, there were a te
® (Bank-Holiday) to have their|¢!ding hardware, a case 0 a,
seating accommodation approved | Sugar and toilet requisites. isis

of at an early date Small quantities of foodst

, mn Bet {rom various firms and private in-
PICKUP, O-181, owned ==" were also received, but
|







this is necessary

driven by A. Holder of|there is still need for more of
Clevers Hill, St. Joseph, caughi] :hese
afire at about 9.45 yesterday
morning along Horse Hill, op- Messrs. William Fogarty Ltd.,
posite the St. Joseph Vestry rooms, instead of making a cash contri-
The pickup” was: loaded with bution to the relief of the hurri-
passengers who along. with] cane victims, have sent $500.00
residents of the district, assisted] oth of clothing to the Y.M.C.A.,
in putting out the blaze. twhich includes vests, shoes and
RALEIGH BICYCLE, which; gress material for men, women
was removed from the Public! and children.
Library on June 29, was found in More male helpers are wanted
a wéll at Hill Road, Bank Hall on}to assist in the nailing up and
Moriday last. The handle bars| marking up of cases, says the
and wheels were badly damaged.} General Secretary of the Y.M.C.A.
TELLA SKYES of Avondale,| Further donations received were.

$500 Clothing

; ‘ 5 00
Bank Hall, reported to the{ Rev ot ore ean oop
Police that her 30-year-old| MMS) ‘yard 5 00
husband, Holmes Skyes, left home} Mrs. M BE Yearwood ee
- ewis
at about 10 a.m .on Saturday last ore MN Howell 28
for work at Bulkeley Plantation,| xyz City Pharmacy



€t. George, and has not yet re-| Amount previously acknowledged Ee

turned, TOTAL $51.00
YLVESTER SMITH, alias San

s “Paint Donkey,” “Samuel

Smith,” “Clarrie King,” “James

brathwaite” and ‘Adolphus Ben-
skin”,” of Prince of Wales Road |
Rank Hall, was arrested by Cpl.

Country Folk
. T
Byer at about 6.15 a.m. yesterday. Don t Want oO
He was wanted in connection
with the theft of a bottle of sweets In 7 .
irom the First Aid "Shop of Beryl | Stay own
Mayers at Bank Hall on July 238.
AFTER 7 P.M.

WING TO the recent rains the
NOW and again people who live

telephone line at the District
‘E’ Police Station is out of order,

ONICA FIELDS of Bath} in the country parishes write

Village, Top. Rock, Christ! letters to the Press or make
@..a_ch, a pedestrian, was injured complaints otherwise over the fact
man accident along Rockley Road } that buses which serve those
at about 12.30 p.m. on Tuesday | routes discontinue their service
She was treated at the General) around 7 p.m.—three hours earlier
Hospite, and discharged, than normal stopping time in St.











Fields, who had just alighted! ichael,
from a ‘bus, collided with the When asked about it, "bus con-
motor car X-612, driven by Coral
Kinch of Graeme Hall, Christ
Church, 9
on T
HEE ANNUAL Police Dance, What's n ‘oday

which is in aid of the Police
Sports Club, will be held at the

Meeting, Commissioners of
Health, St. Michael at

Drill Hall on Thursday night, 12.30 p.m.
September 28. Meeting, St. Thomas Vestry
‘PRUE POLICE BAND, under at 1.30 p.m.

Water Polo at Aquatic Club
at 5.00 p.m.

Police Band at Charity Con-
cert, Speightstown Boys’
School at 8.00 p.m.

Capt. C. E. Raison, will play
for the two one-act plays that will
be presented by the Junior Bar-
bados Dramatic Club at the Drill
Hall at 830 to-morrow night.
Proceeds from these plays will go
to the Bay Street Boys’ Club.

Tonight at 8 o’clock the Band

Fc

cessionaires give the same answer



will give a Charity Concert ir) The majority of people living in
aid of the Rover Scouts, at the] the country have no reason to
Speightstown Boys’ School. come to the City at night, or have

@NOLONEL MICHELIN told the! no reason to remain in town after
“Advocate” yesterday that} 7 p.m.

the Venezuelan Polo team are ex- It would not be economic to run

pected during the first week of}a service merely for the odd

November. Local Polo players} passenger or two who might want

are at present practising to meet} it, and who will want it only at

them. ) irregular intervals.

FIRST SHIPMENT







RST SHIPMENT of cases of food and clothing for Antigua

terday hy B.W.LA.

THE F
which went ye

neces at te easel eeiomns ed net i llteecncetomyptiomeistichintbgie lates aa cacananaietpt statist tibaines watt caiaceinis oenae e



!

er ee Se

“It is to be hoped that as the
peoples of the Colonies obtain
greater control over their own
affairs, they will realise the value
of the connection with Britain and
will themselves seek to strengthen
the links between their countries
and the Commonwealth. Clearly
the Council can play but a smail
part in achieving this purpose.
Success will depend primarily on
the Colonial policy of the British
government and the measures by
Colonial governments. The task uf
the Council is to promote under-
standing and friendship by activi-
ties which would be outside the
scope of more official organisa-

tions.”

Colonies’ Needs
The Report continues to discuss
particular needs of various
Colonies. In Singapore and Malaya
an urgent need, it is stated, is the

development of the idea of a
common citizenship, and every
effort is made to bring Chinese,

Malay and Indian together througn
some medium of common interest
to all.

Of East Africa it is stated there
are racial problems which can
only be tackled with caution, A‘-
though the Council's representa-
tive in Kenya has often found it
necessary to make a_ separate
approach to African, European
and Indian in some ways he has,
been able to assist in the promo-
tion of inter-racial
Reference is made for example to
his part in planning the Kenya
Institute and his initiation o/
arrangements bringing progressive
African farmers into contact with
European farmers.

The growing interest in



the

‘development of local musie and

art is noted, particularly in the
West Indies and West Africa, In
some of the Colonies a widespread
demand for adult education has
appeared.

New Work

‘Pians have been made for the
Council to take up new work in
Tanganyika, Northern Rhodesiz,
Nyasaland and the Windward and
Leeward Islands.

In the creation of a_ better
understanding of Britain in the
Colonies (as the Report puts it)
the new work is being undertaken
without sacrifice of the day to day
activities of British Council staff
throughout the Colonies and the
Report emphasises the value of
persona] relationships.

Admittedly, it is pointed out,
results are intangible and difficuit
to gauge. The representative in
Kenya, however, reports:

“It is impvssiblg at present to
assess the effect of our explanation
of such aspects of English life as
public opinion on law and order
and the relationship of the public
to the police. It is possible how-
ever, to see results from time to
time in other fields. For instance,
a leading African farmer in the
Machakos district is now growing
crops in the wet weather with
which to feed his livestock in the
dry weather and he now keeps his
animals in pens to prevent their
eroding the parched soil. He is
doing this as a direct result of a
film lecture which I gave two
years ago and many Africans are
being taken to see his shamba and
learn from his example”.

‘ Visits to Britain
Of visits by Colonial people te

Britain under the Council's
auspices the Report says:
“These visits fulfil two pur-

poses; not only do they enable in-
fiuential visitors to see for them-
selves how we live in Britain to-
day, a matter sometimes of con-
siderable surprise to them in the
light of what they hear in their
own countries; the visits also offer
a chance to people of a!i classes
in Britain to learn something ot
Colonial peoples, an opportunity
which frequently administers an
equally agreeable shock to their
own preconceived ideas cand
ignorance of life in the Colonies.

DIAMONDS

DAR-ES-SALAAM

The diamond “act”, which is
put on almost traditionally for
dist‘nguished vis.tors to the Shir-
jyanga diamond mine of Dr. John
T. Williamson—the pouring out
| cf cigarette tins and old sweet
bottles of scores of thousands of
pounds worth of diamonds-—duly
mpressed the British Minister of
State for the Colonie
dale, during tour of Tang

ika



HELPERS AT THE Y.M.C.A. making up parcels of clothing

co-operation, |



BARBADOS. ADVOCATE

BUSY HELPERS



a ’







and tood for shipment to Antigua



“AT PRESENT there are strong links between Britain and
the Colonies which for the most part have not been forged
by the Colonial peoples themselves.
strength of these links is threatened.”
The British Council in its report for the year 1949-50 gives
this warning and goes on to say:

In many ways t!



Fiji Councillor
WillRepresent |
U.K. AtULN. |

RATU Sir Lalabaluvu Sukuna,
K.B.E., of Fiji has accepted an in-
vitation to serve as an Adviser on
questions affecting non-self-gov-
erning territories in the United
Kingdom defegation to the United
Nations Fifth General Assembly
opening in New York, September
19th. |
Born in 1888, Sir Lalabaluvu is
a Barrister-at-Law (Middle
Temple). In the First World War
he served in the French Foreign
Legion winning the Medaille Mili-
taire, later commanding Fiji La-
bour Corps in France. After the }
war he returned to Wadham Col- ;





lege, Oxford. He has served in
numerous administrative and
secretariat posts in Fiji Since

1945 he has been Secretary for
Fijian affairs. He represented Fiji

at the Coronation, In the Sec-
ond World War he served as
Lieutenant Colone) Fiji Defence
Force (Territorial Service) and

commanded the Fi): contingent at
the Victory Parade, :

A member of the Fiji Executive
Council since 1943. he has been a
member of the Legislative Council
since 1932."

V.LP.L.—Or Just
V.LP. ?

BOSTON

Boston scientist Clark tained
said it would be impossible to|
provide atom bomb shelters for |
everyone. And so he thinks that |
people should be “graded” for ad
m‘ssion on the basis of their im-
portance to the nation “Soma
people”, he said, “are more im-
portant than others.”

Our Dumb Friends

NEW
Stephen Moran, the
Commissioner of Newark,
Jersey, has abandoned his cam-
paign to limit the people there
to just one dog or one cat for
each family. What defeated him
—a delegation of dogs, all wear-
ng placards, led to his office bv
iawyer William Clawis..

A CHRISTIAN ACTION
NEW YORK
Two American women announc-
ed a prayer campaign that Jacob!
Malik, Russia’s UNO delegate,
will “become guded by a few
Christian principles.” They have
written Mr. Malik several letters
advising hm that he is being
prayed for.

YORK. |
Health
New







British Council Warns | ‘‘Doramas’’
Of Dangers To Links
With Britain

(From Our London Correspondent)

Leaves This
Evening
FOR VENEZUELA

The s

130 Cc

nack “Doramas” with its
inary Islanders aboard, is
expected to leave Carlisle Bay
for Venezuel this evening

The “Doran.as” made an emer-
icy call at the island on Friday
ifter encountering stormy weather,
having had a breakdown of the
engine The 130 men did not
intend coming to Barbados, but
were on their way to Venezuela
in search of empvoyment

They were without passports
mad could not land here until
three days after the ship's arrival
They were t.en_ given special
permiss on do so



During Monday, Tuesday an
yesterday, groups of them could
be seen around the City and
especially in Broad Street. Yes-
terday, three of them were in the
mood for drinking and the Bar-
badian drink “mauby” was the
order. Others were just getting
the r last look at Bridgetown

Manuel Reina, who acts ai
interpreter for his col eagues, tole
the Advocate yesterday that on
behalf of those on board the
“Doramas”, he would like to ex-
press to the people of Barbados
their grateful thanks for the hos-
pitality and kindness they had
been shown here

He said: “Driven to these shores
by stormy weather, we have had
the good fortune to have found
ourselves in this British island
where we have met many friends
who have made us feel at home.





“We shall never forget’ your
kindness and the-little Island of
Barbados will always remain a

happy memory to us

“We were most happy to meet
with a truly christian kindness in
Rev. Father Hopkins and those
friends who have helped us se
generously—-the Commissioner of
Police, his men and others. Al!
of these will ever be remembered
in our thoughts and our prayers.’

The Commissioner of Police told
the Advocate yesterday that he
had put the Police launches at the
disposal of the men to bring ther
ashore and take them back to their
boat for the three days they were
-oming ashore

ARRESTED ON
“EMIGRATION” CHARGE

THIRTY - TWO - YEAR - OLL
Walter Burton Hinds, a Com-
niission Agent of Pinitold Street,
arrested yesterday morning
members of the C.I.D., ano
to the Central Police
Station where six charges oi
obtaining money on false

pre-

tences were brought against him
He is charged with obtairung
money from six men by faisels

was
by
brought

pretending that he was workin
with Mr. Lewis of the Labour
Commissioner’s Office und twe
fingerprint detectives and that he
(the men) t

Emmigration

them
the

could get
America
Scheme.
The hearing started before Mr
©. L. Walwyn, City Police Magis
Inspec-
pros-

trate, yesterday evening.
Torrence Franklyn is
the Police

tor
ecuting for



GLOBE THEATRE

FLASH !

5

ONE PILOT RADIO

the Super Star
at the GLOBE

as lsi Prize for
Talent Show
on

5
This RADIO
donated by

Messrs BARBADOS AGENCIES
LIMITED.

THE WORLD.

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 8th

FLASH! |

is generously

the Agents





*
BUY A PILOT RADIO AND CONTACT

° ij Y -
>
Air-Sea Co’s
Pla ]

n Joint .
Transport
Trans-Canada Airline hav
entered into air-sea agreement
with the Canadian Nationa
Steamships and Alcoa Steamshi)
Co., Inc., for combined transpor
tation between specific points ir
the Caribbean and points in Car
ada _and the United States. M:
B. W. G. Austin, Director «
Messrs Gardiner Austin & Co
Lgd., Shipping Department, tok

the Advocate yesterday

Passengers taking T.C.A. fro:
Canada or U.S.A. to the Bahamas
Barbados, Bermuda, Jamaica «
Trinidad and = seeking passage
back by ship can now do
an exchange of tickets

In the past, passengers woul
have had to make new bookin;
with the steamship companies an
vay full fare for the trip. Unde
these new agreements, they jus
bass on their tickets from ‘T.C.A
to either of the Shipping Office
where a percentage will be take

so Db

wT the fare

The two new agreements hay
been published in T.C.A.'s inter
national Passenger Rules Tarif
and will become effective on Sep
tember 15 and 20 for C.N.S. anc

Alcoa respectively.
The agreement with Canadiar
National Steamships provides fo)
0-day air-sea trips between an)
yoint served by C.A. or C.N.S



‘rom Canada or the U.S.A. i
Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda
Jamaica or Trinidad and retur

via the alternative carrier

Similarly, this same rule ap-

lies between Bermuda on_ ths
me hand and Barbados anc
Trinidad on the other

With the Alcoa Company the
agreement provide for combinec
transportation valid for one year
from any point served by T.C.A
yw Alcoa in Canada or the U.S.A

to Barbados, Bermuda, Jamaica o1

Trinidad, and return via the al-
ternative carrier as well as_ be-
tween Bermuda on the one hanc

ind Barbados and Trinidad en the
other



2 SPEEDSTERS
FINED

AUSTIN REECE of Hil
was ordered to pay a tine of £3 bs
nonthly instalments or in defaul

Green

‘wo months’ imprisonment whe
“© appeared before His Worshi;
Mr. H. A Talma yesterday {fc

peeding while driving the motor
van M-1913 on Bush Hall Road on
‘uly 8

The Police said the van wa
lriven at over 35 miles per hou
ind the speed limit on that roa
is 20 miles per hour for veinicie
if that type
ANOTHER fine was imposed b:
the same magistrate on Coli’
Maynard of Sugar Hill, St. Joseph

a

\

Maynard was ordered to pay 20/-|

ond 1 - cost for driving the moto:
‘tus O-142 on Station Hill at over
24 miles hour



per On July 29
The speed on this road is also
20 miles per hour for buses
E 7
ingineer For
Antigua
ntigua
SIR GEORGE SEEL, Head
he Development and Welfar:

Irganisation in the West Indies ;

oaning an engineer and enginee

‘ng draughtsman to Antigua
To-morrow Mr. G. M. Gordo

‘Construction Engineer) and M)
i, Keir (Engineering Draught
nan) will fly to Antigua by
LWA



Major Stoute

His Excellency
ae appointed
itoute, Deputy

the Governo:
Capiain R A
Comm ssioner
Loca
15t

alice, to be Major in the
with effect from the
1949

“orees
Jecem ber,












BUY---

White Park Road.







i)
\

PAGE FIVE

LUXURY
SOAPS

BLUE HYACINTH @




TOLLET
«© LINDEN BLOSSOM @ «
Pe ee we

»~ iGAIN IN STOCK ...

PURiNA

> maPERIAL LEATHER







ah)

Chows

POULTRY

Tae ees aay

|
THE MANY
| f



ANIMALS & Pad



DISTRIBUTORS.
Jason Jones & Co. Ld.



LOTE

SPONGES

U seful for the Toilet Useful in the Home.
Sponges that lap up water like a desert. Soft silky
textured, Hard wearing and hygienic
For sure Sponginess insist on ZOTE

Knights Drug Stores





To-day you find a new station!

To-morrow you have forgotten where !

This cannot happen to you when you have
a BUSH. The only Radio fitted with a device
for numbering each station on your dial,

A.C, Sets at $80, $110, $116 & $168, Battery

Sets for 6 volt batteries $135.

~ CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LID.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET



aa

A BRIGHTER
LONGER

“

DURALIFE

AUTO BATTERIES=witH EBONITE SEPARATORS
COURTESY



GARAGE

(ROBERT THOM. LTD.) Dial 4391

even-



0
o re
ee y/















ore

BY WALT DISNEY

AFTER ME, } HURT SELF 7 + 4



- oe f
+f ~ BOYS! WE'LL Z Gast s"
1 GIVE THE “IRON MASK‘ 4 | SLIPPED!
Ae
vel A
S
aa TS =
—) oa si 3
r
ures atcen 76 lAle e402" i
I
| JUST A MINUTE,

WE HAVE
NY

THE LONE RANGER





‘ HEO—- “B! We TRAILED BIG D ee ee ee

ee. © WE TRAILED BIG DEKE ,20K WHEN RUB THE PAD WitH] (MESSAGE PLENTY
ce 2 * {TO THE TELEGRAPH OFFICE. Na (NDENTATIONS IMPORTANT !
ae STAND OUT IN SHOW

WHITE LP
WHAT WAS WRITTEN ON THE
TORN-OFF PAGE.

K. ©. CANNON ...

18 WHAT WE'LL DO, WHISPER. \><
Bast GLUFF THE SERVANTS INTO}




2 { COME IN, MR, CANNON.I'VE BEER -
DLP EXPECTING YOU...WOULD vou

Oo} MIND RAISING YOUR HANDS ? YO.
cA REMEMBER MED THE Name is







TING US IN,, HAVE A GOOD
Burn AROUND TO SEE IF WE
CAN SPOT ANY SIGNS OF THE

( STLaATE.. COT MAKE ANY
DOPE NIDE-OUT...THEN WE'LL
| ORT AWAY BEFORE THE paces

\COUNT AARIVE Se




BY GEORGE MC.MANUS

‘







|
-—— - ae |
(a FINE STATE OF AFFAIRS /| at i
HE DIDN'T CARE ABOUT oi

rs a | ®
( - m x —
oe : 1G TO } I DON'T THINK |} A MR TINDOME OF THE ROBIN-
“IGE? | A STEAL CO. IS ON THE PHONE!
TIT 1S (AY HE WIGHES TO SPEAK TO YOu






THE “FOR SALE" |









| HE PROBABLY SAW |













SIGN IN FRONT OF THE HOUSE -HE THOUGHT
ABOUT YOUR 4 THE HOUSE -- IT_ Wao A FOUNDRY -
PROPERTY / I ina Wy He WANTED THE

‘ |

Weamaed (at ee ES AND IRON / HUW?
: | BUYS IT/
|
4 .

/





RIP KIRBY
I KNOW YOU NEVER (g
DISCUSS MY BUSINESS b \

p AFFAIRS, HONEY.,BUT BE Pak it

| SURE NOT TO MENTION “as





BARBADOS. ADVOCATE

{ if







\tO MARGIE PELHAM MY re co er P. \
1 TMENT WITH oT, ae
| APPOINTMENT W NYT SHE




| HER TRUSTEE... on







opt. 1950, King Features Syndicate, fic, World phy qeoteve

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

(TS ONLY A CROCODILE. WATCHED BY TH/S STRANGE, BRAVE |
PICK IT UP LL TELL ‘|
You How, -
ir F ux :
2 (ip ‘s.

THE PHANTOM
Saal Ratt MAN, HE CAN'T REFUSE «Hi8 LEGS |
7 Tae TREMBLE +






Specially designed for Barbados, this
brown brodue is now on sale in
the leading storés. .Séé them for yourself

made by

i a Soa thn

Peanut Butter
and Jams

Jars Peanut

Butter 63, 55, .35

Tins S.A. Apricot
Jam—21b

Ib 60
» S.A. Fig. Jam 21b .52

se eeeee ol

» Letona Black
Currant Jam .... .6
.. Sweet Orange

Tins Allson’s Rolled

”

pie alan 31

» Quaker Oats .24 .53
ns Morton’s

51

"Patent Barley .51 .83

Biscuits
Tins Carr’s British

Springtime
Biscuits .....
, . Carr’s
Shepherd
iscuits .....
» Carr’s
Mantilla
Biscuits .....
. Carr’s Celery
Biscuits .....
, Peek Frean
Biscuits

JOHN WHITE

es —



MEAT DEPARTMENT

Australian PRIME BEEF
(All Cuts)

MUTTON CHOPS
VEAL CHOPS
LIVER

WEINERS SAUSAGES

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 7, 1950

'e
1 w- STS,








AND ARRANGE

An ideal Tonic
Beverege after a
Hot and Tiring Dey.

Brewed Specially for
Hot Climates.

but conteins
Real Food value
besides being a

FOR YOUR X’MAS

CALENDARS



eS
AVOID THE RUSH
°

ADVOCATE PRINTING
DEPT.

Bots. D.O.M. ......

» Pimm’s No. 1

Cointreau ...
Drambuie ... 6.
Macou (1943). 4.00
Sautenay

Canned Fruit

Tins

A.J.C.
Apricots (23)

, Tropical Fruit

Salad ........

, Peaches (24)

Fruit Salad ..

» Letona Peaches

(Sliced) 11b . .
Letona Peaches
(Whole) 11b
Damson’s

Peaches ..... 5:
Yellow Plums 45

Canned Vegetables

Tins

Dutch Asp:

Parsnips ....
Chivers Sliced
t Teh

Hartley’s Peas

Ovaltine and
Milk Foods

Tins Ovaltine $1.24, $ .73



Malted Milk
Horlick’s
Malted Milk ..
THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 7, 1950 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN






























































ances omen
] tom DOMINICA ie
fie Sleme Pauphail Makhoul, | a
Je eG rawa F unk Blackman re :
® From ST. VINCEN' 4 G04
Olive Deene. Evaline Pitt, ‘
a eens ______,_ TSREPHONE —BB08 | Sharpe, Fred J. Dare, Hilary Da Silva NS oO =
. | washes \
r DEPARTURES By B.W.I.A iL |
THANKS | FOR EN z * For TRINIDAD ‘ }
; stage R T in Carlisle Bay Otilda Martinez, Anolda Martinez 7
hr 1 h be a — eect a - * “ar aa ez.
press “our. sincere nd cia ‘ = Sch Rosarene, Sch. Frances W. Smith Starlawe Martives Aston’ euahen, Wil. “oanaonte
tion (to those who cards, v hs HOUSES M.V. Blue Star, Seh. Beiqueen, Sel . reake Archibald Freakes j
letters. or in ar W Sse Oy) Laudaipha, Sch. Princess Louise, Sch nthe Freakes, Woodia: Anthony, |
pathy with us cor the sad _EVANDALE — Opp: 5th Ave. George | Burma D., Sch. Turtle Dove, | Seh . Cornacehia, Luis Custro |
cesigoned by he .dvath A Srect. 3 Bedrooms. Apply Mrs. King, | Man’ M. Lewis, Sch. Marion Belie Wolfe “ermen Castro, Frank Casure, Cray 5 e }
WORRELL Corner 9th Ave. George Street Sch. Lucille M,. Smith, Sch. W. L astro, Jose Castro, Una Gilbert, Mabel Cc e r e |
The WORRELL famil) 6.9. 30—2n Eunicia, Sch Franklyn D R., Sch. } Cardenas, Hubert Porte, Elmo Beardon,
12.8 n -—— —— ee | Cyclorama O., Sch, Gloria Henrie*ta, | Devaux, George Tempro, Vincent Burns “ aay |
_#Lé.T—Unturnished at Ramsgate, Bay | Sch: Molly N. Jones, S.S. Golfito, M.V.| Winston Wooding, Harry Wooding |
IN MEMORIAM Street within walking distance for Aqua-| Ldy Joy, Sch Amanda T S.S.] Luther Wooding j
d Uc Club and City, Dial 3053, Cenadian Challenger i- Col nes Ol it
eee 2.9.50—én For ST. LUCIA
IN loving memory of our Dear Hus } ‘ $ S Sc 1 Scho
band ond Dedtv 'AMES FDWARD) SPDR RC NOTICES Ships In Touch With SUN | Sen I Canter, Anes =
RRATHWAITE who died o1 ‘he 7th day RLIC NOTICES Wells. Hamish Wells, Allen Lewis :
ng Sarbados Coastal Station |"! "ayn tidak, Ande in the flavour !
’ ye Ss ye ~ .



sed since the om | THE AGRICULTURAL AIDS ACT 1905 t vulay J. Fores h Ormond
we loved so deariy has gone to resi | To the Creditors holding specialty liens CuBoulay, O, J. Forest, Joseph Ormor

Sitep on Dear Dad and take thy rest] against HUSBANDS PLANTATION, st.| C&ble and Wireless (West Indies) Lid Diana Lewis, Wilfred Wardlaw

1?
| And what goes in ? Why, pure












Until we meet in the land of the blest aaa spnicie Gah + ie gg cig een Sot | For ‘TRINIDAD
Caroline Brathwaite (wife: Goul- AK that I, the owner ot | With the following ships through their) “Ada ironside, Urs sby, § tuga res
Lcurenct AN Eric isons [the above named plantation am about | arb: ne — Nap | oe r ; Doris te oat: er | es wheat, fresh eges and butter—
ce (daughter) William inephew to obtain a loan cf £1,800 under the Sunawh, Ss ican, S.S. New “ee Sis . Maine Pile, Waite * . 4
‘A. Germaine (niece: Patricia: Eve | revisions cf the above Act against SS. | Sunwhii, $<. Alcor ee ARVIN, Se eet, | together,with the experience that
isa Hadar? Wkaee deca pavi’ | Sugar, Molasses end other Crops of the s, SS. Cavina, $.8. Elizabeth ies De Freitas, Joseph Dare has made Huntley and Palmers famous the
(Grand Chile ) 7.9.50—1n aid Plantation to be reaped in 1950. a fanigan, S.S. Portugal, S.S., 4 SAN JUAN



No money has yet been borrowed| Mormacgulf, §$.8. Hilverplane, S.S./ James Thompson, Diane King, Sydney whole world over. So many thrilling












































{1N loving memor’ of Our Deer Hus | against the said Crops. 8.8. California, 5.5. Estero.| Chase, Edna Chase, Evelyn Outram, Vera cael a = ie
pant ond Faker JASPER CECIL MIL || Dated this 5th day of September, 1950. | S.3. Fort Amherst, S.S. Ageroen, S.5.| Rryan, Veronica Bryan, Cynthia Bowen, | varsaties to choose from—lusciously-filled
LER, who fell asleep on the Tih dsy o F. B. WALCOTT, Syndale, 3.8, Pnpiicon!, SS. Ewsh-}' tohn Blow, Lucitie Phinkett | ‘Custard Creams ' and ‘ Reading Creams '
September 1949 Owner | inder, S.S, Jutahy, S.S. Lady Rodney} For DOMINICA b } oo ae ‘ ,
rate dieank Bill) SRE nk ik, all 5.9.50—3n | $8 ain John, $8. Mormac | Ever so ofte ne we eall ae aa . Toe 6. | ean dent Dutra, S.S. Quad | Storey, Augustus Emmanuel oven-fresh, sealed in tins and 4 lb. Freshpak
\ a 7 i Fas Ate’ ims nstad, § Patella . Ins anc », Freshpaks.
Ronee Bele occ san NOTICE ranienburg, 4. akormnacrant | For JAMAICA : '
es sh 3 a ; | Alan Squire, Donald Ferguson, Vincent |
phobia ary: Les ww TENDERS are invited for the Pu | Devaux, Shadack Sampath, Dorothy Sam-
See, Pare teria) a whi ¢ a number of Casuarina and rath on Phillips
God's wes ts Nest a gam of + number us Cement, os SEAWELL | sey ANTIgUA ‘res
Thov “ert in ik: heeping Chareh. For further Particulars, apply | Valerie Birkett, June Birkett, Edwin encom muMAnactunins Yo mH. IME cHORGE :
Myer 44.58 rereernuaced De ANG, to the Rector, or Church Warden of st.| = ARRIVALS By, B.W.1.A.1 | BEEKet, ‘Harold, Hose i 2
ean Nereida Dufierin | joseph Parish Frem TRiNIDAD | :
anes 3 A. A. B. GILL, Louis Devaux, Henry Zerpe, Moritze |
Harold, Gibbons Orford Clerk, St. Joseph's Vestry Zerpa, Victor Robinson, Francoy Chris MAIL NOTICES |
‘Brothers) Edna, Carmen, J eae eo a 7.9.50—4n, | tie, Judith Christie, Joan Christie, John +
ters} udu sea Christie, Edna Marchali, Irene Gorms, Mails for Dominica by the Sch Molly } e
BN loving menoy ot out bala NOTICE poscaams Wammate: Parkes te SOs La eae ee eeegee eee delicious
son and bre! her VIC ‘TOR . CAMER( aN acini Hotchkiss Dennis Vaughan, Gerald P Registered & Ordinary Mail 7 J
who fell asleen on Sept, 7th 1942. PARISH OF ST PETER Connelly, Armont Cobhem, Steves! at. 2.20 pm. on the &h Sept. 18s) . : wholesome
Eight years have passed since that sad Clarke's Gap is undergoing repairs | Coomis ts for St Tacia: St Vincen } pant Sh : fh
day, nly and is closed to vehicular traffic Grenada: Aruba by the M.V. Radar opeeeie | and nutritious
When our little beloved suddenly By order of the Commissioners, | from ST. LUCIA: will be closed at the General Post Office
‘ passed away, le BE. H. CHALLENOR, Vincent DeVaux, Kezeile Lencock.| as under Make your white clothes whiter—coloureds A
Your pleasant smile, we can Inspector of H’'ways, Manik Gopivani, Paul § ibok, Eileen . 7 * .. : * t a 5
forget, : St. Peter. | Steinbok, Jeremy Steinbok, Luis Altuna Pivoall Haetaered and, Gedinats Maits| brighter, with rich Rinso lather! It’s so aGONT. 4. 8. OESR1E & CO.LTD.. P.O. BOX 216, BRIDGETOWN) ’
Our tears can never ary 7.9.50-—-2n. | Mec. Kenzie, Peter Lag’, Ann Wajchend a 8h \ ‘ Bads Sa = i ‘ i +
We loved you much, Jesus loved you ier, ERRIUIA Walchendinn, Piety. Wass] Monies Ete On Ure Ah acne ee gentle and thorough—the dirt fl dats out in : ;
nd so he took him for himself NOTICE chendler, Ruben Bello, Alleyne Exkins.| ponies will be chwed at the generat | record time. And you can us: Rinso for - :
And so he took him for himself. Louglas Brook, Perot Phillip Renton, ene ee : i P . !
Sleep on dear little one in the safe Re Estate of Hees Santie: Catherine Monigomnery, | Port Omce, me under fas dishes as well—it makes them re¢ ly sparkle!
And loving arms of Jess. JAMES | SHEPHERD, Arthur Marshall, +i ct on hk ae meer te, For better, easier, and quicke.” results—
Ever to be remembere y Mr. a eceased. a 5 r 9 95 r ,
Mrs. Herbert Quintyne, Pearl, Sybil NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all start using Rinso today !





Rav, Douglas, Chester, Clifton, Vere. } persons having 4 y debt or claim against
aa 7.9.50-—In.| the Estate of James Shepherd, deceased,

an ar ___1 9 7 ite “of Bonnett’, newt Brittons, Saini GOVERNMENT NOTICE RINSO for all your wash!

IN loving memory of our dear be- Michael, who died in this Island on the









ri r ROSABELLA | 14th day of April, 1950, intestate, are - s
joved een areca on Sept, 7th] requested to send particulars of their 7 Pies X-R_233-800-55
NELSON who claims duly attested to me, the under- At noon on Thursday the 7th instant it is proposed to try out a

1941 ene : . RTs :
Tine: peaks URAge: dat vince that sadjsumed, ‘Bustace Maxwell Mattoone, the | siren which has been erected at the Central Police Station, Coleridge





: ww LARGEST, FASTEST;

day sa ae{estate on or before the 30th day of] Street. If the trial proves the siren to be effective, it is planned to ;
When the one we loved best WS! November 1950, as after that date I] 0, . i P : , ; : ee
called to rest shall proceed to distribute the assets of |USe it along with others in connection with hurricane warnings.
























































Over on that bright golden shore | the deceased among the parties entitled ie. Sade es bei ; ae ae ca
Over on that bright golden shore pe Feeiecit veased tonly to. sha toe, This notice is published so that the public will understand and
When the saints of the Lord with the] claims of which I shall then have had will not be alarmed. 6.0. $0.20) == eS, — ee :
angels of the blest notice and that I will not be Liable for MONTREAL AUSTRALIA NEW ZEA OQ
Over on that bright golden shore | assets so-distributed or any part thereof | eo : LAND LINE LIMITED
Clara, Rose and Clyde (children) t6 any person or persons of whose debt 1 SG Ea Bo ali aa a aa vd (M.A.N.Z, LINE) v Sete %
7.9.50—In.] or claim 1 shall not then have had ' Steak: a Snacks perved 24 S.s ‘PORT WELLINGTON” sails THE M.V. “T. B. Radar’” will
ee! notice and all persons indebted to the Th B parte eur at, Pee adstone August 17th, Brisbane August accept Cargo and Passengers for
said estate are requested to settle their e arry west ouse hours A DAY 2 , Sydney August 30th, arriving at St. Lucia, St. Vineent, Grenada
FOR SALE accounts with me without delay. AT Barbados September 27th Aruba, sailing Thursday 7th
——$———$——$—$————— Dated this 4th day of September, 1500 MOUNTAIN ST., My Ss ‘SL CUSaete ER” sails Freemantle fc iat, Sean 4
1950 MONTREAL August 3lst, Adelaide September 1ith, he J. “Caribbee’ will accept
AUTOMOTIVE E. M. SHILSTONE, onebeme CASURINA CLUB Devonport September 15th. Melbourne Cargo and Passengers for Domi- in the . ‘
tar King’s Solicitor. Homely Atmosphere September 28rd, Sydney 20th September, nica: Antigua: Montserrat; St .
CARS—1947 Standard 8 h.p. 4 seate’ | Qualified Administrator of the Estate of Quiet & Resttul. | Dancing at any time to the Brisbane October 4th, arriving at Bar- Kitts-Nevis: sailing Tuesday 12th +
tourer. Excellent condition. 1947 Morris James Shepherd, deceased. x bados November 4th. oo
10 h.p. Saloon, Perfect condition. 193% 7,9.50.—4n. When visiting or on a busines: LATEST RRCGORDINGS, These vessels have ample space for The M.V. “Daerwood” will ac
Dodge Seden. Low Mileage. Mechanically trip. chilled, hard frozen, ond general cargo cept Cargo and Passengers for 3
perfect. Fort Royal Garage Ltd, Tele- es les 2 & to BERTIE HAYWARD’S Cargo acrepted on through bills of St. Lacia, St, Vincent, Grenada, b
phone 4504 2.9,50—8n WANTED Special daily or weekly rates lading with transhipment at Trinidad and Aruba Date of sailing will :
eee after September Ist. Orchestra every Saturday for Barbados, British Guiana, Windward be given, :
CAR—New M.G. 1% litre Sports 2). Reference if required apd Leeward Islands. ;
seater. Fort Royal Garage neg Oh a HELP ——— VENEZOLANOS AMIGOS For further particulars apply: B.W.I. Schooner Owners
phone 4504 2.9. m { ree are ci wwe LYD,, Association Inc â„¢
$e “uo r au e ay ¥
DODGE CAR — M. 161 — Offers in] GIRL—Reliable girl for Office, capable sient ig!" BIRNVFNIDO AL CAB ad Os onl -nndgrre 4
writing to the Secretary, Barbados Tele-| of assisting in bookkeeping. Apply in vows: DA COSTA & CO. LTD., nsignee; $ : :
hone Co., Ltd. 7.9.50—2n. | writing giving experience and references Barbados, B.W.1, =
P pee Me ee Fort Royal Garage Ltd., P. O. Box
TRUCK — One (1) Chevrolet rie 233, Bridgetown. 2.9.50—T7n. — — ;
model. A 1 condition Apply ar ee ae
Herbert. 68 Tudor St. Dial 3680. | |, SOO Re ie as. ee WANTED TO RENT
. State § é
78 SON | experience. Apply to P.O. Box 69. |B) EUROPRAN WANTS 70 SENr
TRUCKS—Morris 5-ton Trucks wit | 7.9.50—3n | BIG MANSIO. THE : 4
auxiliary gear box suitable for field and SUITABLE FOR GUEST HOUSE 7 or , r 3
highway work. Fort Reval Garage Ltd | MISCELLANEOUS | Write “Seaside”, fl &) 3 f i hi) iJ ij





Telephone 4504 2.9, 50—3n | P.O.B. 44,

wena C/o Advocate Co.

ES aS WANTED TO RENT ;

ne eae ROOM—Retired Englishman, recently
VAN—10 horse power iris ae e arrived, desires room in private home,
perfect working order. Dat 3493 * | with or without breakfast. Permanent
fSeott & Co., Whitepark. a 7 if satisfactory. Location between Hast~











PPPS PO PEE LAPP POLO FEL OEOSOO





Hl Presidente”




































































30.8.50-—t.f.n. aS
ings and City preferred. Please write, iS s,
— co aclivery from stock | Siving ‘phone number, to Roy, c/o} %& FRIDAY, 8TH SEPTEMBER ¥
ae niitectramgetinte Se Yery fred Pick. | Advocate Advtg. Dept. 5.9.50—5n. | ¢ ani 3 NEW YORE SERVICE from PORT OF SPAIN
ups. See these new modern vehicles. a Cathe % REMEMBER THE DA x N.Y. Wace Pan American brings a new ere in air te i A
Then decide. Fort Royal Garage Ltd. WANTED & WHY? RQ) +c, @. THULE’ fae hantasniies iil aentuabes we é en 8 nag? é ransportation to the
Telephone 4504 2.9.50—3n > BECAUSE YOU WILL WANT TO HELP % “BYFJORD" dist September Nea eetcbas estern Hemisphere... on the wings of the luxurious double-
ST Bs Ee a RE é WHO? MS | et : oa : eaceieal decked Clippers. Direct connections at New York with other
LIVESTOCK , hee THE PEOPLE OF ANTIGUA — Na CANADIAN SERVICE "EL Presidente” flights to Europe
a , . ¢
COW — One Holstein Guernsey Cow | ,APRNP GEE tte for the Collexe Farm | A FLOWER SALE % | SOUTHPOUND

Heavy in Calf, Produced 36 pints milk | OPSoo"Qcres, Applicants must be of good | 3 x Bails Balls Arrives Super-iuxury & Super-Comfort Between
last calf. Apply to W. Walton, Schoo! | equcation and experienced in Crop and | s$ WILL BE HELD ON THAT DAY AT XN Name of Ship Montreal Nalitax Barbados .
Gap, Hindsbury Rd. St. Michael 3 ‘Animal Husbandry, Labour Management, ss Messrs, G. W. HUTCHINSON & CO., LTD. x ee a. PILGRIM” August 25t August 28th September 10th *Superb meals...including seven-course

7.9.50—1n. | Farm Records and Accounts. Professional |-¥ “em spe oa ALCOA PARTNER September 8th, September iith. September 21st dinner with champagne and Cordials
A cae —— ; | qualifications are desirable but not essen- x COME & BUY SOME FLOWERS — % hevediat vag tasted) aiid

= ; SS prve nble,
vic, CARTS. g aROARS — 2] {ai nck mrs inthe wale e400 525] 8 OUR THANKS TO THIS FIRM, THE ADVOCATE CO. LTD. | TonmanouND vest hedtidal Shih
carts 8s 5 ,

ae eae nara riding pony 5% years.| Living Allowance which is at present | \ AND YOU FOR ATTENDING % Arrives *Club lounge and bar ov fower deck. SPAIN
1 Jenny donkey, suitable for Kids £153: 18: Od, per annum on a basic salary | > z Barbados
Sedge Pond Pitn. St. Andrew of £500, Unfurnished quarters provided | »% OEP PPOEC LOE OOOO | SS. ALCOR PEGASUS Aug. 27th For St. John, N.B. & St. * Orchids and perfume for che ladies,




6.9.50—6n. Lawrence River Ports,

rent-free. Contributory Superannuation
Scheme after two years probation. Cost
of passages to Trinidad may be paid on
appointment. Interest free loan for pur-
chase of furniture may be granted under
certain conditions, 30 working days leave
with pay every year. Applications giving
full details of age, education, qualifica-
tions and experience, and stating earliest
date on which available, together with
copies of two (2) recent testimonials
should be sent to the Bursar, Imperial
College of Tropical Agriculture, St.
Augustine, Trinidad, B.W.1.

6.9.'50.-—3n.

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Maurice Jones.
Manager of China Doli Restaurant of



e Extra flight atte



PUPPIES—Alsatian Puppies. Drayton,
aon F 5.9.50—3n



These Vessels have limited passerger accommodation.
ees

Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD.~Canodian Service
ROBERT THOM LTD.—New York end Gulf Service.

and
dants, NEW

Spacious cabin with room to etroth

e Living room comfort on both decks... YORK
altitude-conditi , sonnd-proofing,
and temperature control. *

Everybody sleeps at night... between RIO DE JANEIRO
Trinidad and Rio...in a Sleeperctte* MONTEVIDEO

seat or, at a small additional cost, in and

a roomy, foam-soft berth! BUENOS AIRES

EMEMBER eeeees

When you order from....

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

we deliver by Motor Van








MISCELLANEOUS

‘AMERA — one Kodak Tourist Came-
x5 Coane with case and adapter kit.
F 4.5 Lens. Speed up to 1/200 sgc
Takes 4 different size Pictures. BR! 7"
WEATHERHEAD Ltd, Head of Broa

Bt. 5.9.50—3n











COOK BOOKS by Eliz. Craig
— also —

BIRTHDAY BOOKS



Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets.







—GUIP-OVER SHADES — For Optic e
lasses “Cronies Lays. Price 0/0, BRUCE SSOS9PIOVG9S9S9 OSS FOOD ODP IODGD DD POS ‘ . ROBERTS & CO.—DIAL 3301—High Street

D Ltd.











5.9.50—3n. | Marhill St. B’town for permission to| * = Sees Seer Only PAA off such a complete choic f ices
oe ——_______—____——— | ell Spirits, Malt Liquors &c., at China] 2 O TL, Ss S 0. s PRESS PSPS SEPS ELE E EE LLLP ELLE APA ALPPS | in ers Ne@ of services;
Do not let the “Flu” get you Sung Doll Restaurant No. 6 Marhill St % RID Yi UR PREM. E, FF eee g ii s premium “El Presidente” service; regular Sleeperette
this weather, If you have as ksh B’town : x Sy + 1 service; and economical Tourist service.
take ORALVA Anti Cold and Influenzi Dated this 6th day of September 1950. | % st NEW SToOd K OF sce a
Tablets. Knight's Ltd. 7.9,50—3n. | To:— H. A. TALMA, Esq 4 MOTHS — FLIES — MOSQUITOES — FLEAS y e Y For information see your Travel Agent or:

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A’.
Sed. MAURICE JONES,
Applicant
N.B.—This application will be consi-
dered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “A’’, on Mon-
day the 18th day of September 1950
at 11 o'clock, a.m.

—GENOZO TOOTH PASTE — Antl- $ LICE — COCHROACHES—BUGS — RATS — MICE Ete. Etc.

Pygonhoetic Antiseptic. Fresh Stock

at HEAD Ltd.
at BRUCE WEATHER *

Get rid of Moths by _ using “OLEY"
Moth Killer. Price 15¢. box Obtainable

FAN AMERICAN

HorRLD AIRWAYS

Â¥,
%
% These are all carriers of GERMS, and Disease......
x Be Sure and keep a clean house, by using:—

Â¥,



GODOSSSOSS









at Knight's Ltd 7.9.50—3n H. A. TALMA, $ ia
at Mnighis Jer eet saan iba ibaienere: ee % MAGIC HOODOO BED-BUG POWDER Le moms
“AUJOL aids inthe relief of consti" Police Magistrate, Dist “S"_|% 0 PEST-KILL (D.D.T. Vapour for Indoor use only) BYMIN AMARA HALIBORANGE Alealssomtoy seats. 28
ati d is tasteless and abs ~ VEXTERM RAT BISCUITS "hone 2122 fter ours 2303)
pure. ‘Try.a bottle today. Sener 3|% LIQUID PARAFFIN SYRUP OF FIGS, i °
Ltd | LOST & FOUND
A Certain Death to Rats and Mice) and '



secre hang peeemomememesiten
PIPES — All shapes and sizes, im-
i he

Juding Ro! Cherry Pipes and t
‘Astor Bantam (a Featherweight Pine)
in 6 popular shapes Prices from 60c
--$18.00 BRUCE WEATHERHPAD, Tia



RUSKS—Baby’s First Solid Food
Also a varicty of CIGARS

All obtainable at:—

Booker'’s «8°>0s) Drug Stores Ltd.

LOST

GLASSES—One pair of Turtle Shell
glasses yesterday at General Post Office
Finder will be rewarded on returning
to the Advocate Advertising Department



ne ee ron
PANTS—Boys Pants, American Style



SSCORGOSSS
ao



Store, Lucas St.

elastic waist in Grey Broad Cloth read” 6.9.50—2n B d St * d H ti Al h Ph
ae cid aka. to Gebers MEAN WAS | errs roa reet, an astings (Alpha Pharmacy) 3
6.9.50—2n AMERICAN PASS PORT Under % 3 COLLINS DRUG STORES

name of Barbara Babb Jeffrey, re-
ward for returning same. Phone 4145
7.9,50—In

'Yy" for 10-inch GOSS 65 7
ty 10-4 OSSOOOS SS SOSB SOB OO FOG BBB SBSOO84 < .

32-inch and carrying cases fo ne

we have the records too - er.

records, and rs - CPS OPLOL IOS

~- 10.8.50—t.f.n.

Â¥
VIDEOS EOC966509 O99 99GB 9 96 OCHO GOOG OC 59589 7.

ALL THESE ARE ...
BAKED INTO YOUR |

J&R ENRICHED BREAD
















This is just a reminder that
Mr. & Mrs. DEIGHTON GRIFFITH
request the pleasure of the com-
pany of their friends and vell
wishers at their

ANNUAL DANCE

ON THURSDAY NIGHT

PUBLIC SALES
AUCTION

I will offer for sale by Public Com
petition on FRIDAY 8th at 2 p.m, ai
my office VICTORIA STREET

1 rood 26% perches land at FITZ
VILLAGE, ST. JAMES For conditions
of sale, ete., Dial 2947 R. Archer Mc
Kenzie, Victoria St. 5.9.50—4n

ene mma oer r aan

f

SCIENCE BOOKS—Complete set ©

books, fr, tet Y0ar ay epleal Agriculture
rial College 0’ ‘opic:

ADs number of V & VI Form books

611
for Harrison College. Phone 4
Corbin. 30.8.50—5n.

——
TYR c a < 16
ES — A few 450 x 17 and 850 x i
Cases and tubes. Secure yours now
Dial 4689 6.9,50—3n
a
“YAN *
YAWL—"'Frapida” approx. 37% fee’
long with Gray Marine engine. Good

condition $3.00 — a bargain. App'y REAL ESTATE

JI. R Edwards. Phone 2



IRON BEDSTEADS
-~3 ft. 0 ins; 3 ft. 6 ins;
4ft. Gins.

KITCHEN CHAIRS





September 7th 1950 at 8.30 p.m
At Lascelles House, St. James
Mr. Percy Green's Orchestra will
supply the music
SUBSCRIPTION %





GALVANIZED BATH PANS













































|
|
“BST FOU | ee . S ON SALE | : 4
1 AM Tis is le ai BUNGALOW — Of Block Stone stand- hes scram He —18 ins; 24 ins; 30 ins.
~ YACHT Centreboard Yacht “Con-|ing on 6,000 sq. ft. of land. Situated I A
dor.” Length 17 feet, bear 6 feet. New- | at Worthing, having water and light, | ss
(orntted “out. Apply, Wicks. Woodside | Apply Norman Alleyne. Phone 8164 ° \f| | GALVANIZED BUCKETS
lephorne 3189 Amit; wdge, /orthing — ~ | * ‘ * é
Cordes Bay since. Telephone, 2 nanan thus making = [| —1 ins; 14 ins :
TO-DAY’S a
: - - |
Barbados Youth Movement if} | COAL POTS, 8
oo WOMEN'S “GAS “COUNCIL NEWS FLASH it th —13 ins; 14 ins |
When you look atid see that even Reine ‘or il t e a; “4
the very Police are interested in boys HOT POTATO DOGS " ‘ . 4
rew, Tam sure you will agree without 6 medium welt-scrubbed potatoes | SCHOOL BELLS || BUCK POTS }
hy decelt or deception, that the Bar- 6 sausages (skinned). | —3-Gallon ‘
hacos Youth Movement has done some Remove a centre core, using an HOUSE B2‘ * . | a
wonderful. work among the youths ot apple corer, from the centre of JUS : “ 1¢ 1esl :
Barbados durin ‘ts fourteen "years ot ||] ach’ potato, and” atug, the cavity - COOKING POTS
social activities, in this Island, so i vit s0 2. ¥ , ae) OE eee c ; 4
socal ac ere yauthe of SavDado eel seseeh ae Bhat pea“ tn- the ie —2-Gallon; 3-Gallon

usual way Serve hot

A few of these snappy lieafiets

“I PASS THIS ON TO YOU”

obtainable FREE to visitors at the
Gas Showrooms, Bay St

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE

ledge; Unity; Culture
Pev I BRUCE -C
Rev. J. B. GRAN
Mrs. OLGA BROWNE
The Barbados Y¢
Tudor Bridge



Vitamin Loaf



| tatoes in their jackets in the
|
|
|
i

| PLANTATIONS LIMITED | >













tivities Religious and General _

|
|
|




" PAGE EIGHT

CLAIMED HONOURS

BARBADOS. ADVOCATE THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 7, 1950

‘Highlights Of The News From Britain

s
— is ;
C1 icket Season From A Special Correspondent Llowing we think there should be country have been flooded by

| | | this week. In fact, there has been;rainfalls in a day equalling that

















aS : } | Jittle official blowing done about,ior the whole of some months of
By PETER DITTON j LONDON. y.eek-end. He kept it strictly on jvur leap forward again in the' August we have known. It hus
. | Eleven years ago this week non-party lines, but he surely} field of research with the produc- heen a reminder of the approach
; ; Britain’s leading scientisis fore- missed an opportunity. Much/tion of the Armstrong-Siddeley >1 winter, something to be dreaded
| | rw befor i es eri te (S| gathered in the Scottish jute more than an increase in th€|Sapphire. Taken off the secret jf the warnings this week of a
assemble at Southampton, whe pp.ared im J ij, {town of Dundee, just as they fighting man’s pay is involved.| list, the announcement to-day of fuel crisis are justifie?. The pre-
rn to their own country. Shortiy bc! ti: ¢ Jer ve,{| have done this week in Bir- But the call, it meant for an! this latest turbo-jetengine +, winter appeal to the miners to
another band of cricketers. the ‘Commonwe@4h tou: ig mingham, for the annual meeting »wakening of soldier and civiliah| accompanied by the simple staie- ;roduce more coal has gone out
sid li be on the aun tall 1 ehh >| ot the British Association slike to world dangers evoked nO| ment: “This is the most powe “i! cartier than last year, but there
| ide, Ww _ res n 4 u ir way oe I ae, nd aay le el at 1¢ ad tre Advancement of Science. re or inspiration in the Premier’s ero-engine in the world.” ave dangers, it is officially accept-
; ‘ime the MCC team will pack their bags and bicl (he.r fond fn ha see disappeared | yoice Perhaps because the Pre- ed, that we maw have to import
; farewe Ils before setting sail for Australia ‘Eee had. at et soon 5a mier vealised there will be plenty The mind is switched. buck,icoal extensively if the home fires

Chis mass exodu sure sig ——— — War a ent valen : ithe World) fire roused elsewhere by the im-|comfortingly, from Korea to the} qre to be kept burning.

that another } t $02. | “Ki | tied irae to thet Ry on ic ee te plications of these Service|cebating halls of Dundee and}

ml ving rapidly to a lose arfetched ltackle the practical, applications | “nmouncements. Turmingham, for though we may} Which swas a toucn of humour
é rok Ge ate to Sa RR aa m $s 3 » | theories Gout wiiel) thay haal Difficul i luck the technique of Pravda of|—or does it?—to the fact that in
‘ rabidly dirniiishing “""'\ Kables’’—Shaw’s | 5een all set to talk ad lib, | ult Juggle the publicity ingenuities of othetforcer to ensure that the heating

j

ee
t

ee

}









SONNY RAMADHIN—

Took 7 for 33

GERRY GOMEZ—
Hit 1,000 runs

RAMADUHIN SKITTLE OUT
MINORS FOK 106: WEST

INDIES HIT

277 FOR 3

NORWICH, Sept. 6.

SONNY RAMADHIN, the West Indies Test bowler, found

the Norwich pitch so respon
took ren Minor Counties
of 106.

By the close of play the West



Indies had replied with 277 for!
Most of Ramadhin’s victims—
six bowled were beaten by

sharply turning offbreaks. Rama-
chin, a§ usual, introduced the leg-
break aS a variation, and _ hit
rivals, looking for this ball, were

perplexed when deliveries came
quickly the other way.
Minor Counties were 48 for

before J. G. Owen, the Bedford-

shire left-hander, rallied ther
with q series of strong legside
strokes

He hit 4 botindarieés and power
fully straight drove Ramadhin for
6, but the innings ended just after
lunch.

The West Indies passed their
opponents’ total in 90 minutes for
the loss of their opening pair, Rae
and Stollmeyer together scored 48
at one run a minute, and Rae,
having hit five fours and a six, a
huge on drive which cleared the
stand, was smartly stumped at 88.

Marshall also entertained the
7,000 crowd with some well-timed
driving. He hit 8 fours and a six
in 56 hefore he was bowled.

Bad light and drizzie spoiled the
spectators enjoyment after tea, but
Trestrail and Gomez, by free
stroke play, did much to atone for
the weathers shortcomings.

In an hour, before rain brought
an end 50 minutes early, the
fourth pair rattled up 128.

Gomez has so far hit 12 fours in
a stay of 90 minutes and Trestrail
10 fours and 2 sixes.

Both men drove and glaneed
beautifully, and the hardworking
bowlers found no relief.

In the second over after lunch,
without addition to the score the
Counties’ innings closed, Divecha
being taken smartly at deep mid-
wicket.

When the West Indies opened
Rae and Stollmeyer treated with
respect the fast bowling of Earl
and Bannister but when Laidlaw
came on with legbreaks, Stoll-
meyer hit him for 3 fours in his
first over. Having hit five fours
in 30 runs out of an opening
stand of 48 in 50 minutes, Stoll-
meyer was bowled off his pads

Marshall and Gomez too were
aggressive, and Marshall hit one
six off Allen over square leg and
had 8 fours in his 56. He was out}



sive to his spin today that he
vickets for 38 out of a total

f dcte intey 1 cér and
rumees { Latest Play wingham: gathering breaking up.
It has heen an intergsting ~ason | . Already the scientists have got inte
in many Ww Pafticular en~ | LONDON, Sept. 6. their stride with predictions of new
hiening of ¢ i er~ | Gtut Bernard Shaw's tatest | *tomic discoveries: about the
| formanee of t tr out-|pLlay, a peep into the post-atomic effect on history teaching to-day
jing side in winning three of the} age, was previewed here on Tues-| Of the legendary tale of King
{four Tests after they had lest the!day night. The play, “Far- Arthur and the cakes he burnt,
first. It seems difficult to realise! fetched Fables”, was shown to an| They warn us yet again that we
ow, having sten these magnifi-|audience of professional critics at}|ust grow more food unless the
cont ericketer throughou the| Watergate Theatre, a tiny house| world’s increasing population is to
immer, that they were more Or}seating onty 106 people, starve to death; they tell of the
less an unknown quantit en| The 94-year-old sage dispenses | discovery of a substitute for blood
they arrived and tr } es|with a plot to present his inter-| plasma that may help to keep
lof their winning the vine r4] pretation of what would happen| Some of us alive.
uoted at far i { t after the atomic era. In five con- But the march of events is
wv versation pieeés and one mono-jalmost as unkind this week to the
I don Se he =| teen he traces the destruction of} British Association as it was in
neallaed dent tripe dtiecoeatart ti ve ene sav zation and rise ot a] 1939, The reporting of its discus-
two spin biwtler Ramad I nd wh te me m organized pereny coer RUE ever for the
Valentine, wete coing to be. Thev ee a mee owes manufacture aymen—takes a minor place in
most Gé@Painly were successful, ena iva : iin Bede ber ot and the _ pages of ‘our newspapers.
NOMMEDE fete GAw one of then tee eae ttial oD oe “ wh cing B itain’s sefentific forces have)
bese GWU tox tour India with inane a etimbersome bedy—a ape, dive way in the headlines
;the Commonwealth side and the| fhe Times critic wrote: “This © Britain’> armed forces,
in the last over before tea. other is feturhning to Jamaica}; no mea itty paredy ia actec Ss eokin “ oh
After tea Gomez proceeded to where a scholarship awaits him. jplayfully as it ew een acee quare Deal for Yommy
hit the bowling freely. In fact In fact, one way and another,|Playfulness comes to very little The news of a square deal at
Gomez was 21 when Trestrail this has been. @ spin howlers sume |! the way of entertainment.” last for Britain’s soldiers, sailors
started, but the latter was the ier, Do you remember the sen-|, The Daily Express critic said: } nd airmen in the matter of their
first to reach 50. He once hit’ cational ‘performance by Jim| !! is a pathetic sight to ste that} Pay occasioned surpr.se only | by
Owen for 6 and then in another [aker, the Surrey _gff-spinner who ighty legend ‘By Bernard Shaw’|the unexpectedly generous im-
over from that bowler reached j,, ihe England ral match took a play built out of the shards} provements the Government con-
the boundary three times. His g poet wickets for two runs? That }224 ruins of genius.”—Can, Press.) ceded, particularly to the lower
50 oecupied 40 minutes ranks, Tommy Atkin won't find
The pair took the seore weil
past the 200 mark and raced

towards 300. Rain stopped play
45 minutes before stumps were i
be drawn and no further play wa
possible. d

Spin and pace bowlirig alike
were treated mercilessly by tne
fourth wicket pair, and Trestrail
hit a second six with an hour
Half an hour later a decision was
reached that play could not con-
tinue, Thus the West Indies are
171 runs ahead with 7 wickets
in hand, In 63 minutes, Trestrail
and Gomez added 128 runs
Gomez hit 12 fours and Trestrai!
10 apart from his two sixes. Both
batted grandly in poor light and
drizzle.

MINOR COUNTIBS—tst Innings

Tealy b Pierre
Sutcliffe ¢ Christiani b Jones 2
Brazier b Ramadhin 16
Bell b Ramadhin 4
Prowd b Ramadhin 9
Owen c Gomez b Ramadhin 32
Firth b Ramadhin 18
Divecha ¢ Marshall b William 13
Earl b Ramadhin 0}
Bannister b Ramadhin 3
Laidlaw not out 3
Extras 3
TOTAL 106
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R Ww
Pierre 8 1 19 1
Jones 8 1 18 1
Ramadhin 13 6 33 7
Williams 8 1 33 1
WEST INDIES—tst Inning
A. Ruo c Firth b Laidlaw 41
J.B iollmeyer b Divecha 30
R. Marshall b Earl 56
Gomez not out 79
Trestrail net out 67
Extras
TOTAL (for 3 wkts.) 277
To bat: Worrell, Christiani, Williams
Jones, Ramadhin and Pierre
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o. M R. Ww
Rarl 12 1 a7 1
Rannister 7 0 30 0
Divecha 16 1 69 1
Laidlaw 13 1 76 1
Owen i 7 0 61 0

—Reuter,



18 Traffic Offences
Recorded

DURING the last two days
traffic offences were recorded by
the Police and of these, five
motorists were charged for driving

in & Manner dangerous to the
public.
Two. motorists were charged

for driving without due care and
attention and another for not stop-
ping after an accident. Two others
were charged for parking in
restricted areas,

There were
not stopping

three charges for
at a major road and



one for going around a curve ai
a fast rate. Two cyclists were
charged for riding without a

lighted lamp to the front of their
cycles and another for not having
his number plate firmly affixed to
the cycle.

A conductor was
carrying passengers

charged
in excess, {

for;





"They'll Do It Every Time








rer




WAITING FOR S
C/MONE HIT 17,
WILLYA #!




So ve FINALLY
SWUNG «ss

V4

*e

Huggins Leaves

Jamaica Saturday

KINGSTON, Sept. 6
Governor Huggins who leaves
the island on Saturday for Eng-
land at the end of his seven years
term, at a farewell dinner given
in his honour by members of the
Executive Council and Legisla-
ture last night said he had done
his duty without fear or favour
and was confident that history
would record that during his ad-
ministration a very considerable
advance had been made in many
directions in Jamaica,
—(Can, Press.)

FELL IN WELL

WILLIE BEST of St. Michael
was treated at the General Hos-
pital for injuries recently after
falling in a well at Seawell.

It is understood that Best had
been working in the well. He
vas being hauled to the top when
he fell back a few feet down.



Raghwered U. 5. Puteat Ofte

nm
dé
“Wf. Ae,
he

‘fe
«
r MW en Pos
fyi
oy? % Pai lias *

a En
4 j
« Aa
be

eo



NOT ‘TILL THEM DUFFERS. ”, “Awa”
GET OFF THE GREEN! AP





was cértainly a record-breaking
performance but not good enough
to gain admission to the full Test
eleyen of England.

And then there are the feats of



but with two leg-spinners and one
left-hander

| Then again, credit must be
{given to Leslie Ames, Kent and
jformer England wicket - keeper
batsman who joined the select
jband of immortals who have

100 centuries, He has ac
cepted the captaincy cf the Com-
jmonwealth side and will presum
‘ably add another couple of
{hundreds to his already magnifi-
Scent record.

| scored



But my choice for the season's
‘best and most unexpected per-
jformer is Emrys Davies, veteran
ies

Glamorgan opening batsman and

| one-time all-rounder. When Gla
; Morgan ran short of spin bowlers

half - way through the season,
I Rmeye rolled back his sleeves and
| with that slow one-two shuffle to

the wicket started once again to
trundle up his deceptively inno-
cent slow left-handers, In spite of

the fact that he had not bowled
more than a couple of overs dur-
ing the previous two seasons and
he was in his forty-ninth
*, he quickly got among thé
wickets tre he had added
another fifty victims to his collec
tion at an average cost of fourteen |
runs each, And just for good mea
sure he passed his 1,000 runs for
the seventeenth consecutive year
That’s no mean achievement for
‘un

YANKEE GIRLS
HIT HARDER

BUFFALO,

United States women
are still superior to their British
cousins because they hit the ball
farther. Power was the deciding
factor as ‘the Americans clinched
the Curtis Cup turning back Brit-
ain’s best 74% to 14s in the two- |



long

an old

Sept. 6
golfers



day international competition
which ended on Tuesday. British
girls were as accurate as the
American girls but they used the
old fashionéd straight left arm.
They usually found themselves

short of the American lassies em-
ploying. the powerful whip-Wash



lick, The invaders were some-
timos left 50 yards in arrears of!
the tees. It was the fifth U.S
victory in six matches since the
seri started in 1932 The best
Britain has been able to manage

There were no
1938-1947
— (Can. Press.)

a tie in 1936.
between

was
matches

By Jimmy Hatlo |

}







a
























Ask £500 For
Valentine

There’s no danger of the Bir-

his new pay packet putting him
on the same affluent basis as say,
G, 1, Joe—or even h’s fighting
counterparts from elsewhere in
his oWn Commonwealth. But if



Tattersall, Berry, Hilton ind (Barbades Advocate Correspondent) ap hs idee” ta : at «
iGrieves, ‘the Lancashire spin KINGSTON, September 6. | TONey ee ae AE en
) bowlers, to be considered They The Jamaiea House of Repre- hae Tees we 1 ei the badly
'most certainly had a wicket at Jsentatives today voted to request a recruits for ritain’s reg-
Manchester that helped them—re-/ the Government to provide the y ra os ati PE Pi teak pik

| member the first Test—but they} sum of £500 towards g scholarsh pt : rime N et at eve broad-
j achieved no inconsiderable mea-] lund for alentine, ce on Wee nesday STS
}sure of success away from home The original motion asked the | this new move to improve Brit-
and Berry and Hilton both earned| Government to provide the full ,8!"'s fighting strength, along with
"Test recagnition, Many people| cost of the scholarship but N, M. |¢Xtension of conscription from 18
thought Tattersall also deserved] Nethersole, Deputy Opposition|months to two years, fell some~-
‘his eap and ¥ must confess that I} Leader advised the House that the | what flat on his listeners. This
was a little surprised to find he| ricket Board of Control as orig- | was a Ministerial policy broad-
|did not gain a place in the fourth] inators of the fund would prefer cast as against the Party broad-
| Test at the Oval, here England] keep the scholarship gift public. cast such as he is due to give this
appeared without an off-spinner












Fonight

Kes vieKs VA-TRO-NOL




















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A further shipment of
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BRITAIN’S
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LOCAL AGENTS



countries, the fact is plain that
her Scientists keep Britain to the}
forefront in this particular aspect
cf résearcliThe Sapphire’s pers
formance is amazing. She has des
veloped under test some 7,200
borse-power—vastly higher than
which has denied industrial} @»y other figure so far published
workers satisfaction of claims that |in respect of any gas turbine
it is estimated would cost the;cugine. It means that the Sap-s
j country another £200 million a'rhire provides a power similar to
sear, Whether it cames through that of the four piston engines of
rext week’s Trade Union Con-| 2 B29 Super Fortress,

cress or later from the big unions, . 4 ei

the question of how the wage- Soldier Guinea-Pigs
f-eeze policy can be applied differ- | The rains have come.
ently as betweeen the man in
vniform and the man out of uni-
form will undoubtedly arise to
harass Sir Stafford Cripps in his
juggling to close the dollar gap
while rafsing enough money to
| ensure national security, The
| nasty word inflation creeps again
| into our category of fears.

Lead In The Air
The skirl of the bagpipes telling
of the arrival of British troops in

Korea is not the Sole piece of good
SUPPER & DANCE
at

a

THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB

(Local and Visiting Members Only)

SATURDAY, SEPT. 16TH
COLD BUFFET SUPPER—

| Apart from the conflict with the
jrminority in the Labour Party
cpposed to conscription of any
kind, the Government faces the
complications of this £68 million=
a~year increase in Services pay
against the wage-restraint policy





}















'
|

We have a new assortment

desigrs in Sports Coatings

will be served in the Plaids and Finé Checks
Ballroom from 7.30 to
9.30 p.m.

Price $2.00 each ss

Cream Gaberdine

Please dial 4461 for
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DANCING
from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.
| 7.9.50.—In.

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and Separate pieces,, Berbice and
other restful chairs Couches,
Framed and Cheval Mirrors up
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Dining, Kitchen and Lunch
Tables, Upright and Arméhairs,
China, Bedroom & Kitehen Cabi-
Wargons, Larders, Side-
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BUY EARLY



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epECIAL DANCE

VENEZUELAN TOURISTS
IN BARBADOS

Oth of SEPTEMBER, 1950

Calling all Dairy Owners,

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arrangements in the new House
of Commons (opening next
month) are adequate, 400 soldier

!guinea-pigs will occupy the build-

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men, they will sit in the seats of
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allowed to talk, but not to smoke.
Engineers will test out then
whether the ventilating: and heat-
ing systems are in good order.

Perhaps the Cvardsmen will
participate in the experiment with
more agreeable feelings as they
ponder the y rises approved of
their atliamentary bene-










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in

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PAGE 1

PACE EIGHT (I.AIWF.II IIOXOI IIS BAHIIAIMtS ADVOCATE THl RSDAY SEPTEMBER 7, 1M0 Highlights Oi The Cricket Season II* l-l II It IMTTOX %  %  %  %  Hme team will ba I tting salt for Aunrilla i i. "Farfetched rabies "— Shaw 9 s Latest Play News From Britain I mm A Sprrial I errr*ftaiicl'iil .•:.i %  I (vn of Dundi i ak % %  --IK!. lie kept H strictly on Art i.on-party line*, but he surely msaed An opportunity. Much Scottish htte more than an increase in the sjhtJflg man'* pay is involved. BirBut the call it meant ,ngham. foi Aual Daa) a/akanni of soldier and civilian ., eompanied by the simpl (.lowing we think there should be country have been safes %  I'swck In fact, there has been f rainfalls in a day equalling (but little oflkial blowing doi about ..,, the whole o( some month* t ur leap forward attain In the' August we have known Held of research with the proouc'ien *. reminder of the B| lion of the Armstrong-Siofcleley ,i winter, something U> be dreadct Sapphire Taken of! the aecret if the warning* thiweek ot a I st. the announcement to-day o( tuel crisis are ]usttn>-< The pn his latest turbo-jettngine -. intei appeal to tlie Mt mt | r : \M \IIII\ i.FRR* GOBC1 / f/if 1.1100 ram RAMADHCS SKITTLE OUT MINORS FOR 106: WEST INDIES HIT 277 FOR 3 NORWICH, Srpt 8. SONNY RAMADHTN, the found rwlch pitch n rtfponstva) to hhj spin today iha %  i i %  t h i It %  %  %  %  ( their w|i %  .. 1 I Elan %  i took seven Muiui C ... :r. A, %  %  .i:.'.\ li Mill! tix bowled %  arm 11 i %  d the leg* %  i %  i ptexi ... %  jay. %  | i ad, ine Bedfor IHi \ ith u Mffiat oi stron %  fully straight drove Kamadliu. lor G. but tl %  wd just atter %  TinW %  i in M minutes for of their opening pair. Rae and Stollmeyet togethei u nunute, and Hae. having hit flva fi I loared the %  tend, %  %  i wall-timed driving Mi' hi' ft fonts and a six in 5fi pafnee he wai howled. Bad light and drlxzlt spectators enjoyment aftl restrail nnd Gomel, by free %  the w Ingft. In an hour, before ruin brought i mi 50 mh fourth pah rattled up I2H. %  i a stay of 90 minutes and Treslrail i. ii, benutlful. urtworking i-.. round no relief in the leoond ova. after lunch. without addition to the score the i d Dtvech %  %  it e\ wlekai When tin Weal Indli lino null BtoUineyer on respect the f.i-t t wlmj of Earl and Bannuttai but wlw I I moral nil him for 3 fours in hi %  i Havlni hll (n .III nil I sraa bowled oil hi* pad Harahall and Ootnei too were aggre ssi ve, and Marshall hit six off Allen over BQuari had 8 four* In hi* M. He was out Ickef or ii %  %  %  %  m ot he r, .111! %  ltd to I* U i %  . %  i,wealth the last An. %  i <;. ma pro* • %  oii 1 i-.it tin bowling freely pi faci n tt ,,., „._ w ._ Qmm mu tl whan Treat, mernb %  ; %  %  ** '" "'• %  ""'' h ilonnl ...i Owen far nno then m anotl %  ,na < ouwlei reached ,. , -. „ 1>(A DM D0u %  i nmut i poll iuok me aeonwell past me 200 mark and raci towards 300. Rain stopped pla> i. 45 minutes before itumps wen u ,\ HP %  | I i % %  %  .iion | S|>III and pace bowling aliki i Tlu-> were treated mercilessly by fourth wicket pair, and Treat mil Manchester that helped them—re%  id -ix with an hour member the fir r Taal hut they Half an hour later id* learned that plav ecmhi net GOn Tt Of Unuc Thus the West IfMiej are nnd Ben. 171 runs ahead with 7 wicket in hand. In 63 minutes, Trcstrnll ithouihl T ttet and Gome/ nddri 12K rw Qomag hit 12 fours ami TrastI fi| he :r.m his two i I i %  fOtirttl In poor light and Test ,it ifai i with but wit) drtato anwoa > <" MI— i%t laaaasi %  %  I ,,! %  ,. note on Tuesi > nlsM !• nown to an %  1 • .i tmv housa 100 people %  %  %  %  u %  .. % %  uiii happen five enn%  % %  ,!. Don >,t %  .. .in manufacture! In a labon i bcinj %  The Tliw. i iiiwroU Thi iixfiiiiK vry llttla %  11 !' %  i Kpreta %  %  k tight U) M Shaw' tulll ..nt of 1 i Ask Z500 For Valentine KINGSTON, September : Repratodaj voted to request i manl lo prot 'i ne. %  iti; t | motion asked the Ciovernment to prnvi'd Aarthlp imt N. M. DafMb Oppoaitlon rJouaa that the : %  lot %  %  r-hip gift public T#.iy *iii-l*lii Chrlauanl i> J<-> %  %  *rII h ll.nuHlhin %  i '.ndhin Own f fi.'inr/ Ii ftaiiimlliii ri.it. Ii Hainadhln l> Willim Rn b Nan I I 11 %  %  .1 < %  !,! I IS., \\ %|,Tls arnanl "f Science lentiata 1 -idee almost a; lived then World war 2 tatervenod and they srur:^ then laboratories to ackle the practical applications -•f theories about which they had set to talk ad lib no danger of the BirDlngham aaihei luaj breaking up h ntarti haea aot Inh Uwnr atrida with pradletloi atomic djarovarlaa about the effect nn history teaching to-day of the legendary tale of King Arthur and the cakes he burnt. They worn us yet again that we %  %  food unless the world'a increasing population is to ,.., death; they tell of the %car ii lute for blood plasma that may help to keep name of us alive. Hut the inarch of events in unkind this 'Aeek to the Britiih Association as it was in B reporting of its discussions—intriguing even for the lavii.cn takes u minor place in the |MKe* of our newspapers Britain's -dentine forces have five way in the headlines armed forces S^tUf* l>cnl (or Tommy i ai I Of .i square deal at last lm n-iLiui'. soldiers, s.-iilm-. and irmen la the inanei of thai rpi M only by %  t| e I... a) ni reoa lm tiuu iv u> the U ".I ranks. Tommy Atkln won't (ind his new pay packet putting nth uma affluenl uali >'• I Joe—Of even hs tightlilg ... euwwhen th But if money meiuis anything at all the new rates will attract the badly r.eesJwi recruits for Britain's regular forces. Minister Attlei cs; < 1M Wcdnrsdny announcing i improve BrilabVa (lahtlng strength, along with extension of conscription from 18 months to two years, felt some vhai Mai on his listeners. Tr vas a Ministerial |>ollcy broad%  i hc Party broadcast such a* he is due to give this like to world dangers evoked piratical in the Premier's isappeared votet i-erhaps because the Pre>ucI-realised there will be plenty An roused elsewhere by the imitations of these Service nnounrements. Difficult Juggle Apart from tin conflict with the i morttvIn the labour Party i pposed lo conscription of aflQf kind, the Government laces the iompln-.dii.ns of this £88 mllllonn-ycar increase in Services pay iigainst the wage-restraint policy which has denied industrial ..tisfaction of claim* thai II is estimated would cost the I Irtry another EWO million a' Whether it comes through waatra Trade Union Con-) ress or later from the big unions, lie question of how the wageoeie policy can be applied differntly as betweeen the man In "iform and the man out of unineni will undoubtedly arise t.i I r StofTord Crlpps In his igglmg to close the dollar gap hile raising enougli money to nsure national security. The *stv word Inflation creeps again %  do our category of fears lent "This is the most now. ero-engine in the world rrOCkUeC more coal has gone out -iilier than last year, but QterJ ada dangers, it is ofhcially accepted, that we mav have to Import The mind is .witched t>-i*. !coa | extensively if the home fire %  infoitmily, from Korea to thr \ „ c to be kept burnmr (ebating halls of Dundee an oi humou; l^ck the technique of Pravda or'—or does it'.'—to the fact that in the publicity Ingenuities of other Inner to ensure that the heating cuntrles, the fact is plain that larranacmenl* in the new Housu ner scientist* keep Britain to lh Jot Commons (opening next toiefront in this particular aspect month) are adequate. 400 soldiei *J, Probably OuartSvHoped under test some fS Jjan. thairwill lU to^ i-jltt Of rorse-powcr—vast y higher than 1 M p S J UKP '£i' "V „V = other rtgure so far SMUgSf ^^'roT ZTtU .. respect of any g turbine < ^ uhtr h( v nlIIu!i „„.,„,, ,„..,,. engine. It means that the Sap, v tcm urft ltl ^ oroer ihlre provides a power similar to that of the four piston engines of %  U29 Super Portress Soldier titiinea-Pik's The rains have come, resorts '.n different part Perhaps the t-vardsmen w.ll participate In the experiment wd;, more Bgraaable feelings as they lnder the pay rises approved of Coastal %  by their Parliamentary beneof the 'factors Lead In The Air The skirl of the bagpipes tcllinii I the arrival ot British troops In j orea Is not the sole piece of good TOTAL dot 3 wfctt i n.iiani Wiiimnv MVnUMfl INAI.T1Iij; I rallir OfftMltts Recorded DURING the last twi %  : %  %  .' %  %  %  %  ... tl public Two a Ob wre chiiry.'d for driving without due care and and .mother for not stopping after in ii-idcMt Two others were chamed for parking in %  %  rat BhaVgai foi i major road and i ne foi .i curve at %  %  lie front Of then • md another for not slaving %  the cycle. Huggins Leaves Jamaica Saturday KINGSTON. Sept 6 Governor Huggins who leaves %  Batiu daj tor Engi.uid at the and of 1 tarn, at a farewell dUnnai given in his honour by members of the %  h re last night said he %  .1 Favour oni 'i.t thai history would record that during his art advance had been made directions In Jai —(Can 1're A condti %  iloi FEU IN WELL WILLIK HKST of st Michael %  i • the General rloapital for injuries recr-nlh BfWl Ulna In .< wall at SeaweU It is understood that l en anartsBBf In Ufa well He as iH'ing hauled t<> the top when hrtl baaJl %  few feet down. Then ajsjaln, credti I lrot %  I.. Vnv '. keej batsman who lolned tin % %  i-ored KMi lent' rfc captad the captatni 1 pt %  monwaalth side upia ot i . eein rai But m> .... rotniai %  ] vatarsu 1 %  one-time all-n u %  half Way through tl i %  %  iiii that slow m.i -twi the wickel irain t< trundle up I 'ly InnoI alow lei the fact that ho had not bowled M.of oven i dm %  ing ihe prevtou hi vas li %  i v kdbsta Bra long he had added Ii ; foui leei i-ms each And lust for w left so yards In ..i Ira t.-c. ir was thi fifth U B i %  II.'K' rha beat Bble lo man.n. ai ,i in in Ida i %  I!i3!t-lP47. — (Can. Praav.) fhcyTl Do It Every Time •#—...-*.Byjinuny Hatlo 1 i, ..n i-d at right is the phenomenal model 39J which hia F.I.F.VEN BANDS. A further shipment of this model is xpicted this week Wc ire booking orders now. P.C.S. MAFFEI & CO., LTD LOCAL AGENTS


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THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 7, li BARBADOS ADVOCATE I'M.I -.1 U S CLASSIFIED ADS. THANKS %  woHnn.1. The VflRRFU. i IN MRMOMAM PPATU %  ..i ami !•*• Ot*a .-*** %  h*. %  i USA CVariraln* I iOraa< C ; a > I i > rife : Can c • i A. cMir ^. > • %  Ami UP. %  • f;...rv. Thou atEver >o i> nmmmhmni >>• AK MII| I .'.! % %  %  Harold. OP '"* • BrotherI I iMM 'Ma ,-„, It.lt in T5* m r~VcV>d \ l.TOH I'AMBtfW . ami Ki '*• met that akd ,... i n* i-L.n.i paaBed Youl plaaVSn' mil!*, w* %  forget. Our tear* can ran W* lov-d >ou much Haul lovatl TOO. And O-I "nre .. _, i.... : i. ..._•. origin golden Over on that bright toMan When th* Mint, of >• I" 1 1 unplt ol lb* >*t Ovet on that bright toMM Cla* Baaa. Fon s.%i.r AUTOMOTIVE CABSIW7 Standard S h P t a** relleiil condition 1MT Mot 10 h p •a-Oon Pff*>t condition > Sedan-Badan U.WU.B "T*?"'!! ^Stci Fo,i Howl Oast* IM T. phona MM • w CAJI-Hrw MO IS %  *• %  *•* %  %  M rt item c-r-tw^ phono ta at t.aw DODGE CAH M l ""'L.,,, .(Hint U, The aacrotary. •>rt** >B hl p hon* Co Lid It tO-Sn TKVCK On* .1. CJ*"W ^ ? 1*34 model A I !" '"!' ,m A Dp Herbrrl M Tudor St Dial •' TRUCKS— Morrti t-lon auxiliary war bo ...liable hifhujv work mtt Pi m Teleph.-ne tUt VAN -It hora* power A 1 peifect working order / troll Co Whtlapork Telephone 4So4 LI VESTOCK "~COW -On* Holateln Cuerna* Heavy In Calf pTodiir*d_* P I...i rait Apply 1 Mill III \ I iioi ^i v \\X Opp' Jlh Av* Ooort* \'-,'.<,,n. A|>pl> Mi. King i. or net r.h Av* Cieotg* Btrect • -I i i' nmhrd at tUinuama. Ma> %  K^IHinc dislan lot AquaUC Clul .i.,l City Dial J053 a t -*o PiniJI .VOIHr.S rii Ct> %  % % %  H I*ay. TAKE Ni %  NOTICE fa. the nerlo. tne Pin SI Joarph'i Pariah i tartlrvl tufh Wardon of i> A A B C.ll I Joaph- Vaatty 7 t SO—*n NOTICE I-.I i-H or *T rtnn O.p I* undrtcoma I IBi tl ar.d l cloed lo vehieular ttaBIc By ordat f mo Conunw-kHirrH. t H %  %  %  I %  Ii^perlor Ol H'.'-. NOTICE, JAMES Slil.l HKBJ) NOTICB T-! IIFREnV OIV1 *rn< henna: any debt or cl E>ll# of Jnnn Shrpheid 1,:'V i Ii— 1 ..' iot died in th J April. ItM •auaatat '<• -end par! lann< dulv aiiaa>" tuatooa MJ quallAad Admlniili II Khll.lonc. ihe Ihe %  M rs,' ... Ihe .TOIh S-.-vember 1VJ0. a. aller thai dele I I14II |ir,.re(Hl t.i dulTiliulr Ihe awn Ol hr dnaaaed |nn| Ihe parlla. enllllad heieio hivina taaarrt only to the 'bum! Ol which I *hall then have had hat I will nol be liable !< nl.tiibuled or anv |kai 1 thnr-it rrum 01 paraona of whow debi nr ciaini I "hall not then haie had i .11 prrwtn* Indebtad to the .ml nialr ate teqimtad to -elll. then •innmlwith me without dalay. Dated Ihitill day of 4*ptt>lt>bet. %  M. SHILSTONE Kma%  oUailor, 'J .hlie.l Administrator of tha Eitate of Jame* Hhepherd. deirmeil HAMTII BELT CAM. Kellnble aiil for Office, eaoabh it atilallna In bookk'oplnf Appt> I' wiltinf Elvliij ciperlence and reference* Fort Roval ti.ri.ne Ltd P. O Bo> ID. Firldaelown a.ttt-Tn HARBOUR LOG ia C.rlitle Bay .1... M 1. ,.,. -.,%  St. Il< |M "A .n. *ch l^rille M Smllh. ach W I. %  -. h Flanttlyn D R Sch Ocloram. | lUmii". Sch MoUy N Joiiea S S Golflto, M V Ladv J01. 4,-h Amanda T. ft Cinadian Challant^i Shipt In I ouch With J.irh-doa Coatta) Statior, % %  '.,.. 1 DOMINICA ,r* Sic Makhoul. ..... piaakm." Pitt, tamai** pi. rnx n. khra Kafarl Ma-tlnn MAi. tt tH • M-' %  S. a a Ja... .. %  %  I %  aat %  LN U'AH' lli..ci|>'. n. S Jam** T.impa,n, Diann %  %  %  SwiiUI*. S S Then.., 1 • I laatj If lal • 1 Dulra. II V"'"'" •led. as PMalfa s H 8 Mormartnai I (aatro. Joa* Caatro. Una Gtlbwt. Mab*. Cardanaa. MnDrt Port*. Elnw tarnkxi. INv.a R. I 1 !>.. %  • twnootar, ritia"aid btauay, Anaa W.Ua. Ha >a. All*n LaTtrM tmm. Andt*%  %  %  HMD I D .I'-' %  M. %  KktUM 1'ilr. Wall*! B..I Ann* Baal. Fiona Brat eph Dart Kina. 8>dn<> Outraam, \>* nlh>a B...i.. %  SEAWELL I IK %  .. \1 .1 /. rpa V' T-T laapl m, t..,,..... chrn II*. Judith Chn.ti.. Joan Chriaii*. J *n 1.... Ma.ch,.li. In Kuallupo Hrdni|..>l 1 1 %  1 J.me> HolthMlaa, Joyce VaiiKhan. Otrtlrl si.Caoml* 1 R I UCIA v % %  %  1I K*a. 1 tUl Itiillip KrnWu. Hirvav Smith. Oathanw M Afthur Manfiall. '... DOMINICA Je.-m A.rd. El VW JAMAICA SI John 11" %  lluruWI FrrlUMii. ajtn Alloa l-Mlhi.. • 1 ANTKSI'A Valerie Rukell. J... 11. kott Ha %  MAIL NOTICES M. Jon** will b* rloaad al It* Pool Offco a* HtMl %  : Mi.lrinl Otdmai al 2 p m ,. Ihe P.h *pl -1 lair'a f Gimada. Aruba Uy end Ordinary Mai ft//totf0€4 w tk w&i comes out ^ in the flavour! And what go*aj in Wiiv. pun* atigar. wheat, froth ***[* Hid Mit %  togtaW[Witii the ei|-'tni baa maoe Huntley ami I'ultn-r| •nmu. the whol. world ovrr So nmiiv llin! .111 TBi-ietiet to chouto from lu*.mur.lv-filled Costard ( Toaint and Kcatlm*: 1 'r.-amt'. %  Mttingiv d.liri.nin Hhort.ki> . all (pVtaavfrcah,saabtl in tin-; and J llv Fn aim -ill !• cktaed :*t-d and t GOVERNMENT NOTICE At noon on Ttiuraluy the Tth instant it tl propoed to try out a siren which has bttal artcttttl m the CttatTal Police Station. Coleridge Street. H Ihe trial prOVM tlM WH n U. biefTit-tive, It Is planned to use It along with ntlur* In ronnwtion with hurricane warnlint'This notice IN published to "tint tlM public will iimlerstand and will nut be alarmed. C. 9.502n. The Barry Guesl House BOOK-KERI tit. f.om It to t St. x iiet lane* Applv M., I* a|* and pr*vl?! TO BUTT %  OOM Uetlted ttnallahman. It t a HU j arrived, rtc-licroom In prlvnl* homa wl'h or without brenkfaal P*i-m>-"*ni If tall.faelory location between llniti'u-* and City preferred PI*o* writ* giving phon* numhti, to Boy. *• advocate Adv D*pt 9 St—Sn A-IT WAITED NT FAKM NANAGII. I.C.T.A M-iant I Of invited _. for th, .-Applicant* muat b* of aood education and aiiinl*)u>d quarters provided rant fraa. Contributory Supotannuatlon ftrlieme after two yean prnballon Coat of pai.aaci to Trinidad may be paid on appointment Inteieat fre* loan fnr p4irchaae ol furniture may be atanle'1 undet certain eondlllnn. SO working day* leave wi-h pay cverv year Applicalloni giving full detail* ol aae. education, quallflraHorui and experience, and atallna earlle*t data on which available tnaether with coptaa of JH *nl to th* Buraar. ]n>pe ft Tropical Agriculture. Tilntilad. B W f tt'Bt Ol,,a*. Croote. L*na Ptw* S S BBUCE WT^THEIUaAD tttt-ar. rk. not m lha 'Flu" *t dorlnf •1 la wimther tf y> u bav* a co ;* OraALVA Anil bald and Intu^na. Tnb leM Knlghfa Ud "> i;F -.,-., T.H.TII PAiTE Anil. p.gnnhoetlc *" ^Sll p .,'; r ?, 1 SIort Q BRUCE WEATMEB1IKAD 1M „,< "OUW" Ohtalnablr ^ t 10—*> • NVJO* aid. in th* relief of cotwtl-" p-.Si 7nd U l-atam. an *£*%. pure Trv a bottl. today ^ *•** PTPErB All ahapa* and alre*. eluding Bopp Chernf Pipe, and Aatoi Bantam In t nopiitn. ah tn on Bmrcr fautherw elatht . Price. tm>' \C\niErlMEAD %  : LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE 111 Mau ol Chin.. Doll lU-ta.ir..n1 Marhlll Bl Blown lor Dcrmlmon Spirit*. Mall Ltquora A. tl Cr Doll Retilaurnnl No fl Maihlll Blown llii.-d tinnth dav of September I To II A TALMA. Eaoj Police M-ifl-ir.lc Dial "A" sgd MAinucr. JOKES Appltci N 11 —Thli application will b* > % %  > dr*d at a LleanilnE Court to be held at Polfa* Court. Diatrlct "A", on I.. ^n> ihe lath da> of September lt a| II o'clock, am K A TAIJdA Police Maglatrat*. Dial A" l.fIS I 4% IOIMI illy Aln.uapl.cii apcclal dally or we-ll after Sepirmbei l-i Refetanc* II raquit. fASHKINA GUP I.ATFST BaTaKlRlllNOM. a to BEHTIF IIAYWARD'S I *.*e, Saturday faaaVMaJKMJ AMPOOW BIENTVKNIDO AL CLUB WANTED TO RENT EUROPEAN WANTS TO RENT BIG MANSION ON THE HEACII SUITABLE FOR GUEST HOUSE Write "Seaside", I'.OU 44, C/0 Advocate Co. FRIDAY. 8TH SUTCMBER 11 Ml Mill t; THE DATE WHY' BFIAISI V(H WH-t WANT TO HELP WHO* THE PEOPLE OF ANTIGl'A — A FL0WEB SALE WILL BE IIELI> ON THAT IAV AT Mtitam, Q, W. lll'Tf'HINSON A (O., LTD. COME of Bl'V SOME FLOWERS — Ol'R THANKS TO THIS FIRM. THE ADVOCATE CO.. AND TOO FOR ATTf:NDING Makeyourwhuc clothes whiter-coloured* brighter, with rich Rinso lather! It's so aentle and thorough—Ihe dirt fl ats out in record lime. And you can 11* Rm*x> for dtthesaswellilniakcs ihcm re; lysparklc! For better, easier, and qukki results — start using Rinso today RtNSO for off yoi r wash / HUNTLEY a PALM I BISCUITS delicious tcfio/esome tmd nutritious aOINTl> t. a.ail. CO ttiocirot SHIPPING NOTICES alONTRI-AI. AtaTHAI.lt SgW /It LAND LINB MM1TID (M.A.N.a. LINtl HS -JI>IIT WnJ.INOT.lN-' >all> OUd.lnna Au*M*t llth. Btlahan* Augu-I Mid. S.dney Augil.l With, BMIVKIH ..I b.rbado* Scpaantbet TJIh SB "OlAlUCiaiTEB" Mil. rreatnaiiM.A ,gu.t six. Adelaide Sep.-mhet llth, Hevonp<^t Sepiexibet IMt. Meltaournc %  aWttahW d. N.dn.-! ."Oil "lubtt tth. arriving at BatI No. I tin 1 %  %  eaaali chiliad. Una (1 -aI. Cargo acrepled on Ihrough lading with lradi Utlllah Oulan.. H loi lurlhnr paiticul.t* dppt. FI'RVESS WITHV a CO I T.lnldad. B.W.I. Jo. KHtj Mt> MUI ; nRalaatl '•' ,,L Tie M V "Ilaarwoodwill I %  SI. lain*. Wt. Vinranl. fJtenai and Arube Dal* of .ailing be given I W.I cVfhooner A-aorlaUon Inc C.iialrnc. Dial: tt FLY TO NEW YORK LARGEST, FASTEST; MOST LUXURIOUS COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT WORLD! Ii the % CUPPER' :'.;'.: W//AV* J N|M I i-h KIVKI aalla Art H.f. f— Illh Bepte I Seplainber Jrd Orlo CANAallAV BtaVrTB \niMI UIIIMt When you order from .... THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM we deliver by Motor Van Corner of Btoad and Tudor Streets. J LOST PANTa—Bora Panti. Am *T' r '" LagM walat In Orey Broad C-c-th \ rnadt and m*d. to ord*r BTAW S'ore. I.uc*a It %  % %  C orb In I St-6n a t Seoir ;: H SrdU^In Mttt a batg^ln A j R Edward* Fno *,J^ J 1 v <*nT dor I—ig'l iv ntted 01 I renliehoard Yo*ht *l 11 led b*am t !•** %  — 1 APPlv W-k. Wood-id. %  Irarti T*l*pho"*'" %  AMEKICAN PASS ..me of Barbata I .ard for returning 1 PITBl.lt' WALES RID YOUR PREMISES OF... MOTHS — FLIES — MOSQUITOES — FLEAS LICE — COCHROACHES— BUGS — RATS — MICE Etc Etc. These arc all carriers of GERMS, and Disease Be Sure and keep a clean house, by using:— MAGIC HOODOO BED-BIG POWDER PEST-KILL (D.D.T. Vapour for Indoor gag only) VEXTERM RAT BISCI'ITS A Certain Death to Rats and Mitel All obtainable at:— Booker's (BDOS> Drug Stores Ltd. Hrond Street, und IlasliiiKs (Alpha Pharmacy) Mllil IIIIMI Mi Tkeae V*aa*la ha<* 1.aa.ua paaaai I Gull Servlc* COOK BOOKS by I 1/ Craig BIRTHDAY BOOKS ROBERTS & CO.—DIAL 3301— High Street ,V*VV//*V.-,V,',-.V'/.'-'-',V///.'.V,V/////*//.V ItJBW STOCK OF El Pte&idente from PORT OF SPAIN Jarariltli,,,,-., ,),.r, I ,.„.'.. ,o,,. ~H /Ve.l.lYiifr'ftfijlftf. fo gtumpm Stftr itivry 1 SuSfr-Ctn'tr? %  ""U|wrlt mi"l-.'l" In...Ii.1.1 II i nil. dinner willi I j %  %  timl rortfl .*...! | M.ur I.I.U. i.lnal I. .). %  t lull IIIUIIK* and hat on IdJWtW •!•• • Orrlil.l. .ml |r(iime for (ht L| % %  • I lra fllahl alliiitlaitl-. aSpar...u. al.il> will, M lo lit II. llMM rtttJSM .II>IIMI ol. l-nlli .1.. I. alliludt-oiinlill |g{, %  om|.|' •••< a riHiiai, fi.aMi.itli iH-rlh' llli/Dirlilliiill |o Inc /"• II'III in .II.II/II. Forlr .mi, ..I., Berwoan PORT OF SPAIN oncJ NEW YORK RIO Dl JANEII0 MONTIVIDI0 %  al BUINOS AIIIS in MIS \M\K\ HAUBOBANOE I.HIMIi PARAFFIN SVUI'I' OF FlOB and RUSKS—Baby's FirM Solid Feat AUo a variilj o( CIGARS A -Wa,l ////Awy/V//////.v///V/,v/,v/v///Av,v//.vAv.v, V AUCTION I tttll Ottar foi aal* 1 a* office VICTlJKIA I.T r JAMES if v.!*. ate Dial TM1 i.tfle. Victoria St. >r rondill s • SO REAL ESTATE Barbados Youth Movement "..iice are irat*r****d if &f -** .. t am >"* >i. wall —' % %  ri %  %  %  work n roon Ihe voutha o* Tarbadn* durlnaf lla loiinea-n year. % %  ..itiea. in thililand. ao karlp n. to help Ihe \ouln* of B-i thrlUaa Bellgloua and Oeneeat Knowle't*. fnl'. Cl. I In re BRUCI I'l-tHKE — Foiiftdaa tauurr r>.piain ;i.A BROWNE 'Gam f**cty The Barbadoa Vouth Mov*merit — Tudor Brldi* T t to—in HL'Nf.Ai^tW <>( %  M on H.aOO an ft of Und S. Worthing, havlnf wal*r aaid Apply Norman Al-rvn* Phone i \£<-. Worthint WOMEN S GAS COUNCILRrclpa for HOT rOTATO OO).t -i*diai apeli-arrabbed poiotoe t miuaa" 'i*.ti*di. ""!'* a ra-nli* core, ajinu > ujiple t*m. ''Om lb* c"C* each potolo, and rtkff ihr ~ I.ICI aatiaaa* m*ai Boka taioaa ia lMMr >o*k*t* A law of thaae PASB THIS 'I-. tattlnstli ntaaV ia %  Cat showroom*. i",ANNUAL DANCE Ot TiaitsnAV NIGHT uteinber Tth ItSO .1 I W p M M Laarel.ea Houac. B1 Jam*. r Paray Groan'* Orche.ti. will %  upply th* muak tl'BBCRIPTION I %  lU^'BXSIIMENTS ON SALE I t aoIn MM I INS IHU G Vk OIII.S >.V/aW.V.V/^/aV//yy /A^VV.V//rV.VeVA'*Va JIB!'**' H ftHf.O l/HHIi.S l. l.-.i. J...liJ.B.u.JSt itiaiaii.1 >• -"> 1 TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH SCHOOL BELLS HOt -t K JOHNSONS STATIONERY and HARDWARE ALL THESE AltE ... BAKED INTO YOUR J&R ENRICHED BREAD llius making il the KiclieHl Bj Vitamin Loaf USEFUL ITEMS FOR THE HOME IRON BF.DSTKAOS —3 ft, II in-: :i fl. 6 las: 4ft. tint. KITCHF.N CHAIRS OAI.VANIZFI) BATH PANS —18 ins; 24 inn; 30 ins. (iAI.VANIZFI) BUCKETS —10 ins; 14 ins. COAI. POTS. —13 ins; 14 ins. DUCK POTS Inatlan COOKING POTS —2-Gallon; 3-Gallon PLANTATIONS LIMITED ^



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r VGI TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATF THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 1, 1950 Cabib Ccdting M Holiday Vi.il R Uonal u QltMM, Ornaiii*l Church Parish nli wji among the passenger* Ing yesterday morning (or St la on a short holiday vt-.it Architect Here AT 8EAWKLI. YKHTERDAY. a Tlsitir uk> a iiiic-UOii and Mlaa Pat Bullcii who IK lit charge of the Information Bureau. ll*ea th Uiwir. Tbr Bureau at Seawall la a branch of the Barbados Publicity CommitteeBureau at the Baggase Warehouse S I %  > % %  Public indergTound %  Hotel Royal %  i ,,i %  -. H % % %  i : h was Ailed In arltl. rabble which Ml now aftei %  %  %  tot nreiistj who arc fnrcpd Inl %  %  for motor vahlclaa urban tha*r lyres get caught In tin Off To Trinidad D l'K Ifl D) the i %  ti ay" ror Trinklad %  ..>ina ih Cabla with the Assurance to Trinidad. .> gidb>. •nany frienda hwe. Wedding M R, EVERTON BARBOW, Assistant Teacher of the i. .. School .Hid %  i roundar ., %  in Thursday al St. Barnubas Church to Mlaa i %  Carl daugnti r "( Mr Ullan Brit tons IMI The EMda) •• marriage by Mi O'lVii Smiti.. Inhi ..r whtta 11 gajln. With ;i nylon .mbrnidere'! yoke and a white -ilk laoa whxn Id iii alaca by Orung> b She can hid %  bouquc: of Ptnh Anthurftun lilies, lube i arhtta Dahlia*. . Scott was the Honour, wB la the Misses Maggie and Margaret Welch were i Flower glrll %  .. n Mi** Monica Ho A PMlUM NlchoUs. • finony was perforniod ba U<\ (> C. Haynrs Bestina-, WM Mr Arthur Srott and the Ushers were Mr Cecil Toppln Ivan Bovnll Coincides M R EVERARD C'ORBIN. who has %  Utii m Grenada for %  months with Barclaylived yesterday by ii spend u holiday in Ho. trip also coincide* Ih his brother Lionel's wedding. I.mi.I |g in I.mi -.1 on Salurdav to Miss Joyce Farmer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C A. Farmer of "Merton'\ Slrnt.ic.yclc, and Everurd Is to be the bestman Enffagcment 1 MIF ENGAGEMENT was an(.1 mi Monday night. between Mr. Henry Cuke, son of HOD and Mrs. H A. Cuke of "Elfinavlc." 4Ih Avenue, Belleville, and Miss Allison Wdrme. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charlie %  forma of Tuikr aat,' 1 lUmday. liic %  igaaaiiianl was also announced recently, l-ctweei. Mr Daamond Tudor, ton at Mr. C. R. Tudor of %  Staten," Hastings, and Miss Jean de Freltna, daughter of Mr and Mrs Stanley de Freitas 'if St. Vincent. nbout B W l A Barbed M K HERBERT MXNDT who la n Architect and was trained a. the Pennsylvania Slate University, is spending a holiday In Barbados wiih hl American wife and small .laughter Chrl I He was born in Mar.n.nbo and i t worked i h %  i a with the I MCA Company, but has now • f erred U> their Branch la Caracas Tbej are guests at i i ibank." Here Fur Six Week, %  Arminda I-opez and *J ailfhtar Beatrice and son u hard are guests at Cirrabank Hi. >.... band JOM.U II V .i Dui el CO) ... Ban Chrurtnbel, Venezuela Welterweight J OE SINGH, fron, HriUsh Guiana is at present In England. Joe is a boxer whose ambition is to become the British welterweight champion. Although he has no manager lo sponsor him, this boxing aspirant receives dally training at thr Bill Kleirn gymnasium in London Asked why he had decided upon welterweight and not lightweight Joe replied. "I can't make the lower weight TonsorUI Artist W EST INDIANS .n London now have their own West Indian barber Edmund Peddle of Kingston. Jamaica has now opened a barber's shop at Scvinour Place, Marble Arch Hyde Park Orator T HERE were loud cheers when a member of the audien around the Coloured Workers' A soclation platform in Hyde Pai asked the speaker—"how dare yc insult the British people when yc; have lived in Britain for so man years?" Everyone present thought that was a hard nut to crack. But for Robert G. Matthews (yea Trinidad, the answer was simple "Madam," he replied, "I insult UM British people because I love then and I shall keep on insulting thentill they redeem England from the pawn-shop of America." This art followed by uproarious laughtei Afterwards, Mr. Matthews was asked his impressions about Hyde Park Firmly, he replied—"It || in open-air asylum." On Short Holiday A rtRIVING here on Tuesday hi the Fort A inherit from thi U.S.A. was Mr Octavlus "Ossie Davis Mr Davis has been awai for over sixteen years and n upending J short holldav with tin family til HowcM* Cross Itoa.l To Attend Public Health Courar M R CLARE.N Government Sanitary inspector and Mr Basil Jordan, b pactai s' Philip, i) n waaa t ia g| M BWIA They have %  %  %  to Barbados e-r.y in ill will be given, i' it mil %  Mr Haynaa ut ago was acting Viaittnsj Pubi.c Health Ofllcer at Mr Sam G Back to Brooklyn M RS VERA BRYAN, accom%  Vet %  sta>Maxwells. I %  residence at which O .-.sying in New %  BY THE WAY ... By Beachcomber M i >'"\TE!> police bad locbarga %  I for the 1 fcimi ger MuK-Muk. who was i%  hi thaatra i Hsjbbour. Idlnaj. Muk-Muk dOM ni>I iriually huma tint i %  %  d ehup tliat mi,, iiu, %  a rose Ad proval when he Bang Vok-Pu-Mob. Though the i era unlnteUli I %  the charming amilc of tr won all ba i Hi hum. and whan i reamed hys,.r..i man) (a ntad Muk-Muk had 0D i>got away .i: .i milkman, bUt U d all rtiKtil outside ... m ie joilierl by toi Iha next parform.ir 11 Oh. I S,n. I.„„k Urn-! I IbM iha new Aj %  ni Vfalaa haa ruled ibal In future bards mu %  i %  .. %  e %  II' I %  I .! %  iiipnignlng against the slovenliness of some bards. who allow the outline of their t.r.iIM b.,.•,•(, U'lieath their bardie nlghtablrta. The, might m II wear bowlers. Tail-Piect> B RAVE words fall < A manufacturer oi woi' i-iiiii.ii .tin i m WUjl It. nmd II-, i ,iV ''has s; lt '" %  % %  Ul ,, '' : L : in ami IIUI ....rid-supremacy for British bird oagaa AT Hillhainpton Mam. Foul£aenough area not even asked to stay the night'. He had conic out of the Hillhampton Arms. and noticed a shooting brake watting outside the station. He bought a platform ticket, met \he %  mingled with the live people whom the brake was meeting. His old trick worked The* thought lie was a guest who hud come in another eompartiTic-iit ud whan ih,. brake deposited them at the manor he was already on very good terms with a rather silly widowMajor and Mrs Clodhope wore loo poUta to ask him if he had been Invited. Each thought me other had asked him. He anIbal his baggage was lost, so they sent him Into the nearest rt>wn to buy some things He returned In time for dinner, with a case of port. By Ihen the truth was out, and he left njfiiin for an unknown destination The port was charged to I' Inl \ %  %  ti. hn> %  CROSSWORD M 1 r KV 1 -> 1 I s II 1 _jri_ A r' CUVPTOQl'OTE—Here's how to work It: AXVDLBAAXR la IO\HHI.O One letter simply stands for another In this example A In used for the three L. X for the two U>. etc Single letters, apoatrophies. thr length and formation of the words are all hints Each day thcode lettira are different A Cryptogram quotation BXtiU F L R K U K A M B V K MR1 EPMB X K T A V N E X h I' MTU U F L C U K WXTXLK--P1. WUAXITU A ULOVE HAS A THOUSAND VAKI1 NU1-BS TO MOVE THK HUMAN HEAR T I'HABBE From a aacr W N QM |M i i LgasyLff*^ Qt ah II. I:.o, U e u *|)Vn"| is X . aaassK tar iv whM -^aTaslTi laksaam ,,. "a*. ui *i*u %  *•* aisBaaaaBa h iaiud. iv> j. Thr piuMswssra wkiaa it : n J. In. -nn ID oufMasst iTl 4 #afE un iw.. w, or isesaa, ie. ara elaarti wont ii.i-w* | t. mere an mc K alaa. (S| .li-t!f l-V) *. Prnk. ft) Wi*lin V Plni .i [* % %  i '•*, t a*n ro ludB|l1 ii a The Sweetest Voice in the Caribbean . naiiuD ^^k SIAK (HOONEII N OF IIADIO in •IHE GYPSY lililllMI CARAVAN GUANA • PROGRAM Mr. RAY NUNE& ( %  nest Stiir on Talent Show GLOBE UN FRIDAY. SEPT. 8th. 8.30 USEFUL A #///# FOR LADIES Plastic I'mbrrllaa Lovely Ihralana Sl.M ea riaatlc Raincoats. S2.1B et. Plastic In lovclv designs 91e. a yd. Palm Fana 21c ea .Straw Fane> Shopping * %  9Hr ea Straw Fancy Shopp'ng Hate Re ra Sun Shades . l. up FOR CENTS Light & Cool ShlrU f n Cotton A Silk 76c to $5 U* FOR llll.DKKN Pivmi s, | | ||..i, si. In uiLinens For Cnlforms 79c. a yd. Boy a Caps from 1/up Boya A Glrla Veala 30c up Roya Shoes All SUes S3.S4 %  P. THANI'S I'r. Hm lly. SI .:: DUI 34C Rupert and the Back-room tUn; 44 I Hou8e\vive8' Guide Piu.'n for Pears Bl nunbei market when ll Mcked A F|l PEARS *; re : eaeh AMI ATM' OJBB CINBMA ;M.mb.r onK/) TOMOHT at 1.3a Universal PresenU IESI ARNA/ AM4 hla Oreswalrs HIIH. SMITH — THE KINti S1STFKin *. 1 it am The I r < % %  : A m TM PlW. 7 U %  rr. UenitiUl Sf>e>tfl-ig. :e i i a ,. HI Pi.',: %  IS j.m fuprn pulu up one ol the itrjngt no kavei nd tne io tell igam the *' HOTV ol the impi ind the little dark bonk while Cranny Goat ciaei linith on >i> • M>i Rupcti, aa ihe) iv, .... Do br cjtetul thtt •bikily io hat !.. %  %  nd ines < %  V* hj(k-'< !" n be • i Ih. .lie ihjk*. %  hey hivt walked HH| 1 her hcil. < ->'. -i 0 iraBf '"d msav rail of b.' yh. ..IV.. "but Mn, Ruoen. Vl.Xi.X Oistin: TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. "NOKTIItCKN PI RSITT 1 i mo SAi SUN I md i a p "< IlKlMtadio'* Orealetl A<-iu Thrtller Paul HRNRTJI' in SPANISH MAIN iNrwC.pvi 12 M | r. Paeaat! ' • % %  *"•••' r t i\ D m Haa< Hi* Unit. 1 00 l %  t m Sport. KrvlPW. I JO p m Ta\p ... J SO • p rn T>.. N'"f .., Tinn-iiy Barrtsa 4 is • ih* Wnld" • prn lJ>t m I li-i'i rnf JmMe. • "• p m The U.,b....r H-^ iLl4!n. IS p m Marclan* 7 00 p irfea NSW*; 10 p n> Now ArnOU. IS H> T 30 p in CkiekM n-p.nl W W I v. Minoi Counlla*. 7 *l to 7.*! p in OiUln, the WHI lndl. a 00 p m lUmo Newereel. Ilipm Oerakt B*rr Spnlmr. B JO p m Bunny May; I pin rrom tl Bditorlata. W 00 p 10 OS p m The .v. „ I' .1 Th. Georse Mitchrli (lire Club. 10 p m Special Dtopatrn. II 00 p m T I. % I LI A (The Garden) ST. JAMES Lai Showing TO-DAY THURSDAY 6th 20th Cenlury Kox proudly presents -MBSSAtlB 11% U,\HVI.\ with an £xt6e BATTERY 1 Pi;. IZI THE A TRE MgsjM %  ..,. %  . aajBBtn Titins SAT SUN MOM TUBS a -na a 30 p m FRIDAY ( But la l PUinl.fi Ualinre' 130 pm NisM IJ0 SPECIAL KIDlUI'.s \'ATINrr SAT Hornlns tMa.m. liaWKlb^^ %  Bja4faaV" U -5. ES OP EMPIRE L*st T Knows TO-DAY 4.15 A 139 Republic 1'i.lurvs present "//if' /*/ /if' •?*#•* Slarr at Gregt'r^' PI K | TODI) LAU<;HTON Cbarlea COI;UKN now TO-DAY l-"l Two .SBOn 1.30 it S.1S Patjmoum Big Double . Roy v.lI I AND In Thv S,-nl,-l I -rtliel And "El I'.is,," With John PAYNE Gall RUSSELL IIOYAL LMI TUB Show* TO-DAY Ul A 8 3D .. p, I.. DauUi . Mm WAYNE Am DVOilAK l.l "fhHM of Hiirbur/f 1 owl "*.V#f .Infnriiri Hid With Wild BUI ELLIOTT OLYMPIC TO-DAY Lut Two Show* 4 30 & 8.15 Columbia BIR Double . Olfnn FORD Ida LUPINO In "Lust lor Hold" And Wm ll •-,• Slrontifi-s With John GARF1ELD Jennifer JONES you on SURE STARTING! 'ROBERT DOUGLAS"*" ,.,„.„-•VINCENT SHERMAN JERRY VVALD SPECIAL ANNOINCEMENTI P-lroiu ho pin. lo %  THE ADVESTUIU* Of DON JUAN' al %  M.lnwr on rHIPAY. -rr .... < no obl.! n li,ln lr..|im. n i al IK. flalA, SNAIK HAII l*tof. or alt.i In. Show si in ii M, in-Miniiiim . ..ft 9 'RE OF THE YEAR! story ql thoi lofietome cry in rrlany women's hearts! o Sad Songs For Me SULLAVAN COREY LINOFORS aa —— "000 • %  — bkaill*X • X. DOUR %  MM + EMPIRE + Lota more pleasure going places when your car is equipped with an EXIDE Battery. EXIDE gives you dependable and faster starting. EXIDF economical features make it the oinscinding battery for the needs of your car loday. When It's ao Elide.. YOl'Start! DEPENDABLE BATTERIES FOB 61 YEARS! AHACE TRADING CO GLOBE THEATRE TODAY a BIO SHOWS 2 P.M.. B A 8 30 KIDDIES MATINEE — 2 P.M. TODAY "THE MIGHTY JOE YOUNG 0 a 8 30 P.M. TODAY TO-MORROW IS FOREVER Or>on WELLES — Claudettc COLBERT "RACE STREET r.corne HAFT OPENINO TOMORROW ii a 8 30 UNlVrKSAL NTIBNATlON. „„,-., EDWARD G. ROBINSON • BURT LANCASTER "' %  %  afri;*^??/^ — Plaa — OUR QUARTERLY SUPER STAR SHOW EDDY HALL sln(lna The Lord'. Prayer COLLEEN ASHBY — "Ave Maria" MALCOLM MURRAY — -Blur Moon" TREVOR MAItSHALL--Mnrqulto" WTTt MABEWOOD — "Stormy Weather" ALVA ARTHUR "Everythlnn I have Is Yours" CHE8T0N HOLDER — "So In Love" n.id inlrodlirliio RAY NINES STAR OF RADIO ZFY. MADAM FOR YOUR KITCHEN I..1I1 iiii-., il \ln linn Mini and I iiaiiM II, il Sinks SIZES St ins. a 14 in. 21 int.. %  16 Ins.. 3* Ins x IB Ins. I II 111. ii...ii Sinks it Ins. x IS Ins. ills,. Aluminium Sinks COMPLETE WITH IIRAINBOARDS Only 87X27 Each THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LIMITED. keep fresh all day... Use LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP At any time of the day this freshness can be yours too — when you use Lifebuov Toiafl Soap A wash with this decpdfaTMifjg lather get' rid ol weariness, |Jf|•, you an exhilarating frc-hncss that lasts.' ion PERSOX \l. FRESHNESS tin \ys I •



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TIHTtsltW sITTI MI1FR T. IKO BARBADOS AOVOf\TR PAGE riVK Y.M.C.A. Sends First Relief Flight To Antigua THE work of relief fnr the distressed peop who hfcve been hit by U and tlgeneral public haw rrgrwn.uasj well. The ladies* m i n duty asi and Ledj CoUymon %  ndUn A A.GibboneMisUHi b> n.anv others anthe icifls '"m business houses and individuals i sheas ..i ii lajaa ..• ,-__ [men ami women, worn ihues. hai* I lai'iV'^ I llllk.^ -""' IUW >resae*. %  *VTO Vi'llMPrv imrn must .ill be handled, and .! %  '; 'lingers are sorting ihe soft i from the coarser garmenta) \ men and boys. as these are separated. bsed and mad? %  patldn The boxes Irom %  tores are used as packing cases Denied Thenwl\ M Several boxes of toilet requisitei DOUfht lor their uses and have given them for despatch to Antigua of the ready re|>onsi m si III I I'l IIS Start Physical Training A I'lIVSICAL TRAIMNt, (_ Ms%  %  > has been started for tne member-, of tha uay Otr* %  r %  verage of about 20 to 3u boys turn .Kit eery Tuesday ami I, A Commute. It ii.ti-i tor UM running of the Boys Clubs — as th %  Clubi at Pinfold d tpelg&tMown .MI! M .alien* lo future. This Committee is made up of Col R. T Mirhelih. Commissioner i PoHce, Miss Baity Arne. Social Welfare Officer, ind Mr. E. II Waicott. Probation Officer The Commissioner of Police I i i\ That two lists of members are now being prepared for the new Clubs that will shorti street He said that any boys wanting to join the Pinfold Street branch edit now apply to the warden at the Bay Street Bovs' Club L OMtT IHtlVrRK. who are carrying passengers, must havo their seating accommodation approved: of by the Highway.* and Transport Department, the Commissioner of Police told the Advo-*l* yesterday Ha i i thai tinka naca %  o that paopla driving in public service values** can be gfvan pioper seating arcommodntinn This alia refers to I etc. which were oOCrtfl | kkupf for the DUTpoai of taking • neare He laid that Police Con-tables are now out warning driver* of these vehicles, who are dclrout of carry In* passenger, on October 9 (Bank-Holiday) to have their seating accommodation approved nf at an early date A PICKUP, 0-181. owned and drtvan by A. Holoer of Clcvers Hill, St. Joseph, caught %  lire .ii about 9.45 yesterday morning along Horse Hill, opposite the St. Joseph Vestry rooms. The pickup*' was loaded with passengers who along With of the district, assisted in putting out the blaze. A BAUKHI nCIOLft, which was removed from the Publbj Library on June 29. was found in a w*il at Hill Road, Bank Hall on Monday lasC The handle bars % %  nd wheels wars badly damaged. S TELLA shVIS of Avondale. Bank Hall, reported to the 1'olice that her 3l)-yenr-oM husband, Holmes Skyes. left home at about 10 am on Saturday last %  M George, and hai not % %  re turned. S YLVESTER SMITH, alms "Paint Donkey," "Samuel Smith," "Clnrrie King.** James ral walte" and A iniphus Benskin"," of Prince of Wales Road.. Uank Hall, was arrested by CpL fX e. Wowf TaTl liyer at about 6 15 am yesterday | UOil l Will He was wanted in connection vith the theft of a bottle oj iwaeta from the First Aid Shop of Beryl Mayers at Bank Hall on July 23 O WINC, TO the recent rains the telephone lire at the District "E" Police Station is out of order. the Committee have been able bo paBd fOW boxes, one of food and three of clothing yesterday This was because the B.W I.A plane service wa available ami the agents kindly consented to hel|. with the early despatch ol these gilts On Tuesday more parcels will be sent by the "Caribbee. while. those :or despatch bj the Schooner Princess l-ouise" are getting the finishing touches today. Others will be sent as opportunity arise* within the next few >..-.All Sympathetic Yesterday morning. Lady Rao and Mr. B. A. T Williams continued their tour of the city firm, appealing for help for the hurricane victims. They visited Swan Street and everyone was sympathetic and generous in their gifts nd the iespouse was so great that the other voluntary workers at the Y.M.C.A., haJ an extremely busy day receiving, sorting and i>ackina; the various articles. Mrs Skewes-Cox who answered phone calls, supervised the registering of parcels, the giving of receipt* for donations and tho checking on Ihe marking of the cases, also had a busy day. In addition lo clothing and .lacking cases from the various • ran there were other gifts in,'-.ding hardware, a case of tc-a. sugar and toilet requisites. Small quanUties of foodstuff from various Arms and private individual* were also received, but thara is still need for more ol %  IfM Clothing tlesan Will am Fogarty Ltd.. Initaad of making a cash contribution to the relief of the hurricane victims, have sent $500.00 worth i clothing to ihe Y.M.C.A. which Includes veeta, -hoes and dress material for men. women and childien. More mule helper* are wanted to assist in the nailing up and m.rHng up of caaae, * %  "V 5 Qanaral Secretary ol the Y.M.t JV further donations reeeived wer*. Ret .nd Mr. r. Oodr-Mr. OA. PUStim HMl ASird u_ \i r. Yssrwooe Hi %  AUnrJ*vm • j 5i 10 00 XYX I'h.ii.i i ly C r>wlI*#d H_y •51 00 Country Folk Stay In Town AFTER 7 P.M. British Council Warns Of Dangers To Links With Britain (From Our London Correspondent) "AT PRESENT there are strong links boiw.i the Colonies which for the moat part have nol be* n forged b> the Colonial peoples themselves In many v> %  UeiWth of these luiks is threatened." The British Council in ils report for the year IMP iO I this warning and goes on to say: It is to be hoped that as Uu — — peoples of the Colonies obta NOW i nd again people who live ._ country parishes write Rock. Christ j, tiers lo th e Press or make C..*.ch. %  pedestrian, was in)ured (C cmplalnts otherwise over the fact n an acciuent along Roeklcy Road|inat buses which serve those at alwut 1230 p.m. on Tuesday riules discontinue their service M ONICA FIF.LDH of Bath| h "7h"' Top ~ She was treated at the General Hospltr. and discharged. Field;.. ho had lust alighted from a 'bus. collided with the notor car X-612. driven by Coral Gratem* Hail, Christ Church. r lt ANNUAL Police Dance, which is in aid of the Police Sport* Club, will be held at the Drill Hall on Thursday night, September 28 T >iir. rOUCC BAND, under Capt. C. t lUison. will play (or the two one-act play* that will be presented by the Junior Baruados Dramatic Club at the Drill hall at 8.30 to-morrow night iToeeeds Irom these plaj to the Boy Strecl Boys* Club. Tonight at 8 o'clock the Band will give a Charity Concert lr aid of the Rover Scouts. B t the Speight*!wwn BOS*' School. /-lOLONF-L MICHKL1N told the "Advocate" yesterday that ire yapasuatan Polo team are noted during the first waah NovembcLocal PotO player* "re at present practising to meet than around 7 p.m.—three hours aarlktl than normal stopping time In St. Michael. When asked alwut it, 'bus conWhat's on Today Mrrtins. Commbwluner* of Health. St Michael at 12.SO p.m. Meeting. Si Thorns* Vetry at 1.30 p.m. Water Polo at Aquatlr Club at 5.00 pm. i'..ii %  Band at Charity Coneert Spnlghtstown Boys' School at 8.00 p.m. tcssionalres give the same answer The majority of people living in tl-e country have no reason to coma to the Cily at night, or have DO reason to remain in town after 7 p.m. It would not be economic to run a service merely for the odd passenger or two who might want it. and who will want 11 only at irregular Interval greatei control over their own affairs, they will realise ihe value of ihe connection with Britain and II themselves seek lo sliengthen UN links between their countries and the Commonwealth. Clearly the Council can play but a smail part in achieving Uii* purpose. Success will depend primarily on the Colonial policy of the British government and the measures by Colonial governments The task of the Council i* to promote understanding and friendship by aclivlhieh would be outside the scope of more official organIsaColonies' Needs The Report continues lo discus* parUoutar needs of various Colonies. In Singapore and Malaya an urgent need, it is stated, is the development ol the idea of o mmon cdizenshlp. ami ever; effort is made to bring Chinese. Malay and Indian togethei thmiBfl some mciiium of common interest to all. Of East Africa it is stated ther. are racial problems which can only be tackled with caution. Although the Council's representative in Kenya has often d.und II necessary to make n separa'e approach lo African, European and Indian in some waytie bsU been able to assist in the promotion of iiiter-rncial > i %  it. Reference is made [or example :o hi* part in planning the Ken> Institute and bli Initiation < %  iirrangemenls bringing progressive African farmer* into contact with European farmers The growing interest In the development of local music and art is noted, particularly m th-' West Indies and West Africa. In some of Ihe Colonies a widespread demand lor adult education has ppeared New Work Plans have been made for the Council lo take up new work in Tanganyika, Northern Rhodesii', Nvasalan'd and the Windward and leeward Mandi h, tincreation of a bet I %  :' understanding of Britain In tile Colonies ).is the Repott puts it; the new work is being undertaken without sacrifice of the day to day activities of British Council staff throughout the Colonies and the Report emphasises the value of personal relationships Admittedly, it is pointed out, results are intangible and difficult to gauge. The representative iii Kenya, how <. < %  reports: 'It is IHIL. -ibl| at present to ess the effect of our explanation of such aspects of English life a public opinion on law and order nd the relationship of the publn to ihe police. It is possible however, to see results from time to time in other Held*. For instance. eadlng African fanner in th-_Machako* district Is now growing 1 crops in ihe wet weather with which to feed his livestock in the dry weather and he now keeps his pen* to prevent their eroding the parched soil He it. doing this as a direct result of a film lecture which I gave two and many Africans are being taken to *ee his shamba anu from his example" Fiji Councillor Will Represent ILK. At U.N. RATU Sir Lalabtluvu Bukuna, KB E. of FIJI has accepted an initation to serve as an Adviser on questions affecting non-self-governing territories in ihe United Kingdom delegation to the United Nations Fifth Qanaral A opening in New York. Scptertd>er 19th. Born in 1888. Sir Lalabaluvu ia Barrister-at-Law (Middle Temple). In the First \\, he served in the French PoralCn Legion winning Ihe Medaille Mihtaire, later cominandinj; FIJI Labour Corps in France Afte, the war he returned to Wadhani < ol lege. Oxford. Ha hai arved mini, um admlnl ti.ii-> secretariat post* in Fiji Sinn 1945 he has be. % %  Seciel.ii> No Fijian affairs. He represented Fill at the Coronation In th. Sec ond World War he served as Lieutenant Colonel Fill Defence Force (Territorial Service) and commanded the Fiji contingent at Ihe Victory Parade. A member of Ihe FIJI Executive Council since 10AX he h member of the LogUlatlva Coum II since 1932V.I.P.I.—Or Jus/ V.I.P. ? m I9TON Boston sciential dark Goodman said H WOUld I provide atom bomb shellers for everyone And n ho think* that people should bo -| m sslon on the basu ol Ufeali poitanee 1.. the | people", he said, "arc more important than others Our Dumb friends NEW YOHK Btaphan atoran, tha Hoa Ui Commissioner of Newark, New Jersey, has abandoned his campaign to limit the p00| lo Just one dog or on each fam ly what defeated him -a delegation of dogs, all wearng placards, led to h.s ...wy.r William Claw...... MUMSMI1MIIM "D6rama# 9% Leaves This Evening FOR VENEZUELA Dorarnasr' snth lb Igndeti ..i..,ird. u ive Cai i %  vanlnf The -r>i ran %  made an anar> II at ttie (slwnd on /nda\ nterlng rtormy weathai id a breakdown of the .nine The 130 men did not Intend coming to Barbados, but win on llu i ..-. I.. VeiieEiiela •>. inent .. i. without passjHirt %  id not land hsjre until p :in h i 1 %  n given special on da go During Monday. Tuesday an. gyoupe ol tiiem could I MS-II around tlie Ci'> .in oSpSTially in Broad Street Y<-starday, three of them were In the drinking and Ihe Barbadian drink "mauhy" was the %  i Otben Were jusl getting the r last look at Bridgetown Manuel Hem... Who acts a. inti rpreter for hi the Adooestn yaatei Isn that on behalf of those on lioard Ihe he wmiid nk. lo "• %  M i SarbackM their grateful thanks fm the hoendnese they ,L :"' %  Mi ,\ an to these bora weather, we have hud ihe good fortune bn have found ..ui-.h.in tins British Island have met mam friemu who have made o* feel at home v,', shall %  "v.r foigei your H %  lutie Island of it.ii badoi %  • UI alw.n s te II. .in .i I %  "We wore ".0*1 lumen I neat with a lrul\ ehriSStau kindness in Rev rathai Hoplana and thoae no have IMlpad uj a generously the Comml Police, his men ami OtlW 1 W will 1 M-i be ran bored in OUI thOUjOaU and OUI The Commualonar of P %  stcrday thai h hud pm the Police launel 1 disposal of thmen t.> bring then 10 take them back to theii boal for the three dsiya the) wen %  %  aagorad into ah*H ith tba Steamship5 ami \ ie. fm i Dtttblnad b union bats 1 Caribbean and polnb and %  .. Unib W t; Austin, Din Messrs Gardiner Austio .^ Co Lid. Shipping IVpaitmeni lol. "he Adrocaic rssstardai Passengers taking Ti'A fro 'anada or 1'SA to the Bahamas Barbados. Bermuda. Jan fttnldad -hip can BOW do BO b 1 astehangai of bkaiali In the pasl, passengernmul< tve had to make nsm llh Tin pny full fara toi 'he trip Undi sfflfessnssnt. thev ms >a*s on Iheir tickets froon n HI mthei of the SNpfltti where a Dereentaev ww >(T the fare. Th. I ,v. ui-. Ii.e een published in TI'A s Intel oattonal Paaaansjer Ruh I ind W'U I" ember 15 and 2U for 1 U.-oa re*t)ectivel> The agreemenl Ith Canadlai Vational Stcanmhips provides f< •0-day air-sea trip* IK 1 !". xam served bj re 1 m C ^ S rom Canada or the 0 s \ Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda Trinidad and re-tun /la the altai native 1 .11 h 1 Similarly*, this aame 1 i.. >ne hand and Bai I 1 %  the othoi Wnh ihe Alcoa Company thi n v.. ratssportaUoii valid foi on 'rom am : T (' .-. %  Alcoa In c.n..d. or Uu DM \ lo Bar'>ados. Bermuda. Jam.u.-.i 1 Irlnldad, and return n.i Hie %  %  rrmilive ...iner ( v ,v,!| .,-. !„ %  >woan Bermuda on the one naw ind It.irliados and Tntm. .t he 1 A CHRISTIAN ACTION NEW YORK Two American women announced a prayer campaigji u Malik. Russia's UNO will "become (U'ded b) .. f-w Christian princ.ple* They have written Mr atal lattl advising hn thai he 1* being prayed for Of Brilaii tuspb Th Visits ti> Britain isits by Colonial people t under the Council's •s ihe Report says visit* fulfil two pur; not only do thev enable in.iturs to *ee for themselves how we live in Britain %  stag sometimes of considerable surprise to them in the 1'iht of what thev hear in tl own countries; Ihe visits also offer a chance to people ..f ..' m Britain to icarn sonsi Colonial paop l ea, an oppoetunltj which frequently sdminnteis an equally agreeable shock to th-M own pieeoneetved idea* and ignorance ol life in the Colonief. DIAMONDS THFFIRST SHI %  rhlch went yesterday • B.W.I.A. 1 of food .md clothing for Antigua. DAK-ES SALAAM The diamond "act", which I ut on almost bradltk dlst nguish^.i v s.torlo the Shirjvanga diamond mine of T Williamson the pouring out I tf e.garette tins and old sweet I bottles ol utands of I pounds a laids*—duly %  dale, during his tour of Tanganyika. ARRESTED ON 'EMIGRATION'' CHARGE THIRTY TW< I YKAIt OLL Walter Burton Hinds, l 1 om n.i'-ii.n Aaani oi Puuolo Street, 1 %  ti-l l;i> niullilN: by members of the C.I D.. am brought io the central Pellet Station vrbera six charge-, oi money on false prsbrought against him Hi charged with obtalninj n oney from M> men by fr.isel} IU) that he was worklni with Mr Lewis of t>H %  1.1 I 1 Mtlie -nid tVrt tingerprint oasectlvea and "'•" " nlt< Messrs BARBADOS LIMITED, AGENCIES BUY A PILOT RADIO AND CONTACT THE WORLD. HrSea Co*s Plan Joint Trans/port ide U| 2 SPEEDSTERS EI\E1) AUSTIN ftU I ii.-a>ai ordarod to pay .. na "i U •< %  iionthly Instabxwnti .wo monuU Imprlionmanl whs %  apix>ared befi N H W Mr. H. A Talma yesterday h peedlog] v/hlia driving tha mo .an M-1913 on Bush Hall KiMid pn .1, H TinI'MII.C paid %  i an 11 Inven at over 35 miles pel hi UI ind the speed limit on thai i s 20 miles per hour fa i A that type ANOTIIKIt line was l*Ti| he same nsoglstrate on Coin Maynnrd of Sugar Hill. BJ Maynau d • %  ordered to pej 21 %  nd i i 'ist for driving the moto u O tea on Btatlon Hill ol ovei miles per hour o-i lulj '" Phe % %  %  i tl •0 miles pel hour foi buse* UUHBB • e LSNnsN BLOBJUM • ail k IIYHM" a L.(. ut i\ STOCK %  • %  PURlNA ChOWS itmuLs x iiiii.iH) ^ rsrVif*r V ^ r V k Vk% F, ii; v ^ *H LCHOVVSj Disimuiots ,0" )o—t & Co.. Uo CHECK THE MANY USES OF ZOTE SPONGES 1 %  %  !' %  %  % %  ttH Pollet V eful in Ihe Home p up aralai like .i daeerl s,.n *iiag evenHard sraarinsj and liygdi nlc For sure Sp..nitne IHM.I UII /OTi: Knights Drug Stores Engineer Far Antigua Slit CTOIICK SEKL. Head . I* Devolopmani i w.-n.., 'irganisiiiii n in the wast Indie*, i oanlnsj an ang ng draughtsman to A'III To-morrow Mr (J M Qordl Ei I K.ii (feunneerlns D um) will iiv to Ai tlaua b IW I A Major Stou if His Kx.ell.m. tt,. 0 *•> aopninletl Capunu It. A lb ub i" i % % % %  Cot n doni i %  in"-, ba inM,.JOI m th< i %  ii affeet from tha ifai l!H9 To-day von lind n now station ; Tii-morrow you have fori;otleii where This rniiimt happen to yim when yuu huve u BUSH. The only Kudu, filled wilh n device for numbering each slaliun mi your dial. A.C Sels ill SK0. SHU. SHI* & IIO, BOtaV] Seta lor t; veil iHttlerieo sn.v CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET A BRIGHTER LONGER ^ijj'LIFE!! DURALIFE BUY--AI'TO IB ATTEIIIKM-WITH EBONITE SEPARATORS tnuiiisi i. All \t. i White Park Road. — (ROBERT THOM. LTD.) — Dial 4391