Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text








Saturday

September

1950

eeceeneennaneneneiomte

RedsRenew

Attack
For Pusan

(By JULIAN BATES)

Somewhere In Korea, Sept. 2.

The Communists renewed
their offensive along the
south coast of Korea a few
hours before dawn today
(Saturday) with a_tank-led
attack against the American
25th division defending the
approaches to the vital supply
port of Pusan.

The second dawn of this battle
on the west side of the United j
Nations’ defence box had broken
on a deceptively still 55 miles
front as both sides prepared to
renew their fight to the doath. In
the Naktong river sector further
to the north G.I.’s peered from
their foxholes through the morn-
ing mist susrounding the high
ground overlooking the river, not
knowing whether the northerners
hed crept arouid behind them
during the night. They knew it



would not te long before they,
were engaccd .n ai desperate}
hand-to-hand struple such as}
marked mucin of yesterday’s |
bloedy fighting |

Under continuous Communist
battering, American troops last
night fell back into the hills of}

Naktong. |
|

New Positions

With almost ali the flat country
from Hyonpung to Yongsan in
North Korean hands, Americans}
dug in on new hill-top positions
in some places.

Communists were reported at
the gates of Yongsan and still
surging eastward towards the
Taegu-Pusan highway, the main
artery of Americar and South
Korean communications,

On the south coast American
troops to-night pressed forward
and re-took Haman ten miles
nerth-west of the port of Masan.

Just north of Haman the Com-
munist offensive which began at
midnight drove a wedge four miles
wide and eight miles deep between
the American 25th Division on the
south and the American 2nd Divi-
sion in the area of the old Nak-
tong bulge to the north.

Northwards to Hyonpung where
the Communists overran an area
of possibly more than 120 square
miles in twelve hours, they were
believed to have three infantry
divisions and their crack armour-
ed 105th Division in the battle.

Communist losses in their
massed effort to drive United
Nations forces into the sea were
put at 1,000 dead.

Later frontline reports said that
American troops were “stacking
up” the Communist dead in front
of them by hundreds. |

New Front |

On the middle reaches of the
“west wall” front, the Naktong
River line has ceased to exist.
Over an air line distance of more
than 20 miles, Communists were
tonight swarming over the shallow
sun-dried river to a front eight to
ten miles farther east.

When dusk fell, at least three
American Second Division battal-
ions and several smaller groups
in this old Naktong bulge area
were deeply flanked by Commu-
nist forces, and their communica-
tions to the rear were under
attack.

Aircraft kept them _ supplied
with ammunition, medicines and
food by parachute.

At dawn with Americans falling
back all along the western front
and Communist suicide squads
clearing mine fields by tramping
slowly forward to their death, all
available aircraft was ordered out
t> give close battle-line support.

Carrier-based fighters were or-
dered to the crurmbling front and
raked advancing Communist
troops with machine-gun and
rocket fire. With Australian and
American pilots of the Fifth Air
Force they made hundreds of sep-
arate attacks throughout the day
despite a hampering misty wind.





a iat amen tal =

@ on page 3





|

2



RUMAN HAS 8

— oh eeceementy mene



Hurricane

four days,

Flattens 100 1.P.11. Storm (130 Cross Atlantic
| In 40-Foot Smack

Reach Carlisle Bay After
34 Days At Sea

A ti | Near Virgin
n igua | Islands
, The San Juan Weather Bureau

issued the following advisory
yesterday afternoon,

WORST IN ISLAND'S |
HISTORY |

The centre of the hurricane
Barbados ridaen Goreieoddant) was reported by reconnaissance
een “ANTIGUA, Bet. tf. j aire. aft to be about 80 miles
After 12 hours of nerve-racking| E-N.E. of St Thomas, Virgin
anticipation and preparation, the | Islands at 5.30 p.m. )
most devastating hurricane in| It was believed to be moving
Antigua’s history rapidly ap-|in a W.N.W. or N.W. direction
proached the island ana by 9 p.m,, at about 12 m.p.h. Maximum

winds near the centre are estim-

the horrors of the previous hurri-
ated to be more than 100 a
ing

cune were eclipsed like child's!
play. with hurricane winds exten
Ten hours of continuous agon-! cutwards from the centre 60—70
ising terror befell the island while; miles to the E; and N. and 40—,
winds of 150 to iG0 miles an hour !50 miles to the W. and S. of the
tore and roared unceasingly, de- centre.
molishing the whole island. There} Gale winds extend outward
was extensive destruction every-| 75—90 miles to the E. and N. and
where. Houses were blown into| 60—70 miles to S. and W. If the
the sea, houses blocked the streets,| hurricane continues on its present
the telepho:e service was wreck-! course, its centre should have
ed, poies obstructed the main! passed about 60 miles to the N-E.
highways, roofs were. blown off,! of Puerto Rico between midnight
and palings everywhere collapsed, | last night and 6 a.m. this morning.
including those at Government Unless the hurricane moves in a
Heuse. more westerly direction, hurricane
The Beach Hotel roof is gone; winds should not occur in Puerto
the whole of Thomlinson’s work-, Rico but precautions should be
shop’s roof was blown yards away, | taken against such a change in
a 150-foot wireless mast was | course. . ’
knocked to smithereens, part of Hurricane warnings are display-
Green Bay school, in which people | ed in the N. Virgin Islands and
had sought refuge, crumbled; the | along the N.E. Coast of Puerto Rico



Grammar School and St. John’s |from Humacao to San Juan, |
Boys’ School showed vas! ruins, as| N.E. storm warnings are dis-
well as_ Holberton Hos. ital played along the remainder of

and

the Puerto Rican Coast and N.W.
storm warnings in St. Croix,
| Virgin Islands

Mental Home.

Airport Manager Burton’s House
and the former U.S. Air Base col-
lapsed like a pack of cards. A
cinema i8 flat, and half of a repair,
shed sits on the back of a gasoline
truck

The roof of the Stony Mount
Beach Hotel area, the temporary
residence of the Manager of Bar-
clay’s Bank, A. Rats and Mrs. Bats,
was blown clean off, and A. F.
Turner’s new’ lhungalow had _ its
windows smashed in.

All trees were shredded, includ-
ing huge old evergreens in the St.
John’s Cathedral yard.

'Hong Kong Bandits
Kill 4 Policemen

HONG KONG, Sept. 1
British police



Two

ing in the Ysun Wan area of Hon

1 notorious gang of bandits.
—Reuter.

@ vn page 3

* COMES TO PORT





THE GOVERNMENT CRAFT “Ida” pulis alongside the “Doramas”

regard to size.

ain

Note how

they compare with

es
a.
e

THE ene hundred and thirty Canary Islanders look ove
ing smack “Doramas” that brought them to Barb

officers, a
| Divisional Superintendent and an
Inspector were killed this morn- }







POINTS:

LAND AFTER 34 wis ‘

r the side of the 40’ 14’ fish- +
ados from Las Palmas in thirty-



|



Aduncate

——$_ —$———— TTT,

TO END WAR

Ph
Pr ic et
FEVE CENDS
Year \35

\ a YY



| CONFIDENT OF

|

‘Flying Hearse’ |
Brings 55 Air

Crash Victims
TO CAIRO

CALRO, Sept. 1.
A “flying hearse” today brought
the charred remains of the 55
victims of the Transworld Airlines
Constellation crash to Cairo,
Weeping relatives and friends



AFTER 34 DAYS in the open Atlantic a small forty |Â¥@tched while stretcher-bearers

by fourteen feet fishing

Carlisle Bay shortly after five o’clock yesterday morning
with most of its human cargo of one hundred and thirty |

reached |

smack ‘“Dormas”

Canary Islanders swarming on its narrow deck and cling- |

| ing to its frail riggings,

i The Advoeate’s cameraman and reporter were on th«
| scene within half an hour and while a small row boat
| 10¢cked crazily on early morning choppy ¢wells, the camera.



| B.G. Dakota

_ Crashes Near

| Brazil

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Sept. 1
B.G. Airways Dakota (C47
crashed to-day at Annai Airfield
in the Rupununi District near the
Brazil frontier, The plane was re-
ported badly damaged but no one
injured; cargo is safe.

The crash occurred as the plane
was leaving Annai for Lethem
en route to Georgetown on the
regular fortnightly run, Major
A. J. Williams and a relief plane

left for Annai at noonday.



|
| SPAIN BANS RED
PERIODICALS

PARIS, Sept. 1.
The Frencn Ministry of the In-
terior, today banned publication
and sale of two Spanish language
monthly reviews printed in Paris
Nuestra Bandera and Cultura ¥
Democracia.

Kong when attempting to arrest

The Spanish Embassy spokesman
said that these w-re both Com-
; munist journals “of the extremist,”
The Spanish Government had
not asked for their suppression.
The organ of the exiled Socialist
mee Fuita was banned last
week,



ee

man was able to record a scene as unique and romantic as
the first sight West Indians had of Celumbus the Discoverer,

On the deck there was hardly

space to move. The ship left Las

Palmas in the Canary Islands
bound for Venezuela, 34 days ago
and was forced to put into Car-
lisle Bay for focd and water
supplies and to check a faulty
auxiliary engine.

There were no signs of fatigue
nor despair on the men’s faces,
many of them bearded. They
looked with some’ interest and
speculation at Bridgetown in
the distance,

Old Battledress

Most of them were wearing
some parts of old battledress
while others were naked from
the waist up. Dr. Greaves the
Port Health Officer arrived in an
hour’s time in the Government
craft “Ida” and having tied up
alongside had them come _ over
for inspection in batches of five

There would not have been the
necessary space on board for hav-~
ing this job done satisfactorily.
Meanwhile fresh water was
pumped from the “Ida” into a
tank on board the “Dora-
mas” and immediately rationing
began.

As soon as they had completed
the formalities they settled down
to normal ship’s life. Some plung-
ed in for a swim. Francisco Silva
searched out a violin and Luis
Perez a timple. an instrument
that resembles a guitar

The men are carpenters, ma-
sons, electricians. shoemakers and
other artisans. Most of them are
related and also have relatives in
Venezuela. Many of them have
already secured jobs in Venezue-
la through the post.

@ On nage 5



unloaded
2irfield

the bodies at Farouk
and bore them draped in

sreen and brown blankets to
waiting ambulances,

At the mortuary they wer:
being identified for burial or
eremauion, or transportation to
their homelands.



2gyptian and American officials
vere — still searching charred
wreckage today for clues to the
wooster, The main parts of the
aircraft were flung over an area
80 yards wide, and one of its en-
gines has not yet been found,

H. A. Marvin, a Transworld
Airlines’ expert, said» he believed
that the plane had hit the ground
with its left wing and crashed on
its nose with its fuselage catapul-
ting 60 yards forward,

The plane crashed shortly after
taking off from Cairo for Rome
with Egyptian film star Camelia
Cohen and several United Nations’
delegates and wealthy business-
men on board, There were no
survivors.

For Jeanne Lorenzi, 22-year-old
hostess, it was her last trip before
leaving the company to get mar-
ried. Plans were being made
today for the burial of Egyptian
victims including Camelia. Hindus
killed in the crash will be crem-
ated on pyres in the Egyptian
desert and their ashes scattered
into Indian rivers —Keuter,

France Will
Defend Indo-China

SAIGON, Sept. 1.

Leon Pignon, French High
Commissioner said today that
France had decided to defend
Indo China even without exter-
fal military aid.

The Commissioner, who return-
ed this week to France said that
Indo China would not be com-
pletely pacified before the end
of the cold war.

Outside help to Vietminh Na-
tionalist insurgents would pro-
long the fighting which might
otherwise; have been over in a
year or eighteen months

Reuter.





/ 100,000 Join In “Exercise Rainbow”

HEIDELBERG, Sept. 1.
than 100,000 American,
French and British troops will
take part in September in the
largest combat training exercise
ef Allied troops in Europe held
so far.

More

“Exercise Rainbow” will be the
| biggest exercise ever held. Con-
ducted by U.S. forces, “Exercise
Rainbow” will open on September
il with a simulated tank spear-
head drive from the east towards
Frankfurt, the seat of the Ameri-
can High Commission
In the following ten days,
western Allied forces 1 go
} through a series of withdr Wals,
1egroupings and other tactics de-

the





L

jsigned to test their ability to
convain an attack from the Eas*
i The United States will send

into the field virtually every sol-
dier and gun it has in Germany
with American Air Force and
Naval units taking part in strength
as well

The French are contributing
one battalion and the British two
battalions. One air squadron from

euch of these nations wil! also
participate.
Theoretically the attack from

the Eastern “aggressor” will catch

the Western Allies flatfooted
British and French units will
be integrated into regrouped
Unived States forces Combined
Allied forces then wil! mount a
ecunter attack aimed at pushing
he ag#ressor back East towards

Nuremburg
Courter Attack

“Exercise Rainbow” will end

with the counter attack under way
end the invaders slowly falling
beck

To boister scanty United States
forces in Germany, American
vroops from Austria and Trieste
will be moved into Germany for
“Exercise Rainbow”. One infan-
try battalion from Trieste will be
airlifted into the manoeuvre area
about September 10

Several thousand Germans also
will manoeuvre with American
Turces as doctors. me stewards,
crivers and guards.

It is believed that the exercise
will help to buck up German
morale which wilting in e!
face of Communist propaganda

let loose on the West Germans

—Reuter



KOREA VICTORY

WASHINTON, Sept 1.
PRESIDENT TPUMAN declared to-night that
the Korea fig'.ing would not expand into a
“general war,’’ unless the Communists poured other
armies and brought other Governments into the

battle.
In a nationwide “fireside chat’’ broadcast, he

put forward an $-point programme for ending the

Korean war.

He declared that the Cemmunist invasion of Korea “has
reached its peak” “The task remaining is to crush it,” he
said :

“Our men are confident, the United Nations Command is
confident, that it will be crushed.”

The President again expressed
the hope that the people of China
will not be misled or forced into
ghting the United Na

ns and against the American
copie vho have always bee

nd still are their friends.”

against

Only the
which Fas
i member China
1ina’s invo:vment
Truman said

Mistake

'n a major foreign poticy
ent, tue President warned Soviet
Russia not to make the mistake
{ uncer estimating America
cnomic strength to defend itself
1 establish peace

Communist fmideria
already s‘arted to
could gain f-om
in war”, j4



stave



“Hitler and the Japanese gen-
rals misealeulated badly 10
years ago”, Mr. Truman - said,
when they thought we would

not be able to use our economic
power effectively for the defeat
of aggression,

PRESIDENT TRUMAN.

He then outlined eight points
ind j*rvited all nations of the
world, without exception, to join
with us in this great work.

Americans were now fighting
in Korea with men of many na-

The points were:

1. To seek peace and se-
curity through the United Na-
tions.

2. A free, independent and [tions under a single banner to
united Korea, uphold the rule of law in fhe
3. Prevention of the Ko- world, he said, If that rule of

rean fighting from expanding
into a general war.

4. An appeal to the people
of China not to enter the
Korean war against the United
Nations forces,

5 Peaceful settlement of

the Formosan question by in-

fernational action.

6. Freedom for all
nations of the Far East,

7. Disavowal of aggression
or preventive war.

8. Mobilisation of resources
to create the strength which
will make peace secure,
President Truman opened his

Lroadeast in the friendly manner
in whieh President Rocsevelt s>
oft: addressed the people lis-
tening to their radios by the fire
side in times of crisis—in the de-
pression and in the early days of
World War II °

Mr. Truman's talk will be fol-
‘owed next week by another
‘fireside chat” on the ),ome-front

law was not upheld, they could
look forward only “to the horror
of another worid war and ultimate
chaos.”’ “For our part, we do not
intend to let that happen.”

President ‘lruman outlined the
efforts of the United States to
ichieve a just and lasting world
peace during the last five yeape-
and the “frustration of thése
efforts by the Soviet Union.’

Review

He reviewed the outbreak and
course of the Korean war to date
ind the support given to United
States action by other United
Nations, He outlined what may
become his historic eight point
programme for bringing peace
in Korea and the Far East in
these words,

the

“As we move forward to arn
ourselves more quickly in the days



impact of the war ahead, and as we strive with the
At that time, he said, he ex- | United Nations for victory in
pected to explain “what your }| Korea, we must keep clearly in

mind what we believe in and what

Government proposes to do, anc
we are trying to do

ow each citizen car la iis
part in this national effort.” We also want the rest of the
“We want the rest ot the world | World to understand clearly our
to understand clearly our aims |‘ #4 our hopes.
id our hopes.” @ On Page 9

aaa ee
SEES

Announcement.

Ge is with great” pride that

Caribbean Sheatres Lid, to-day
the

announce

of t he

opening

L laza Sheatre, Bridgetown.

aa

:
Now more than ever you need
to get out and relax in an
atmosphere of beauty, comfort,

friendliness and service while being
entertained by the Top Picture

Product of any Yea t.


























ge hGe TWO ; BARBADOS, ADVOCATE : SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1950
Crossword
Housewives’ ; ret aaa a
leas : OLYMPIC THEATRE
"es

TO-DAY AND SUNDAY, 445 & 8.15
SUNDAY 4.45 & 8.45 s
First Instalment Columbia Serial



Prices in the local market
for plantains and chris-
tophenes when the “Ad-
vocate” checked yesterday ||
were:— |

Plantaims: 7 & 8 cents each

Christepheaes: 1/- per tb |



Ea

B.B.C. Programme
“OFF Te Lea ,

SEPTEMEER 2, 1950









7.00 a.tn. The News. 7.10 a.m. New CLUES ACKUSS
A es wh 7.45 a.m, Peter Meane at the 4. They have a choice sort of job
Ti evire Or 7.0 a.m. The Nature of getting a voter aboard !
the Univer 8.00, a From tt Edi- | % Just the sort of little beast
erties. 8.1% a.m ‘otframme Parade to suck up!
8
0.





































&.15 2 = 3. as th Life Guards. 8.45 . A vulgar person with ‘ni neart.
t Oance Music 9,00 m. Close iC Hebrews f noble ,
Do 12.00 (noon) The ows 12-10 12. Might be ride-sna sounds 7 mma COLUMBIA SERIAL mmumoms
2m. News Analysis. 12.15 p.m. Arthur like it. S i ‘
3 von 2 5p.m. Bery) Kimber ; 1. 00 2 Rain ro the others Suen. Starring ; 9
py iano Playtime. 1.15 p.m. Radio 14. Go first. but give way at the :
Newsreel. 1.36 piu aything to Decl end S ? REEVES as Sir GALAHAD
2.00 p.m. ‘The News. S10-p.m. Home| 15: SyTup oF silk. se NELSON LEIG as KING ARTHUR
loquence 2°50 pra. Eainginy Ina: | 18 A Dlain-clothes branch. HUGH PROSSER as Sir LANCELOT
55 x interlude 20. I'm surrounded by thousands LOIS HALL as THE LADY OF THE LAKE
. . of rupees — = ae
? i Hie, ier 415| 21. Skeieton formation.
s . a or ate oe “" 22 Wee drappie.
: 7 bop. ths kaaenien eiics. 6 se 23. One only may be a complete i |
; Me. 6 30 a TT! Sat enti ari pep eR LF anes I
i 3 7 Q cat ave sOtee hile cuties bows ROXY OYAL
N Analysi 7.18-7 pt + 2. A consuming instruction (tw
‘ p 7 3 e. ~ ai te » ton Wi va ' } word re i ; ;
SOME of the 700 guests who attended the Cocktail Party given by the Management of the Bridgetown Plaza yesterday afternoon. aot a? =a News psn West In- | ‘: Buricoqué me wart | Today To Sunday 4.30 & 8.15 paday and Tomorrow
s. 8 p.m adio Newsre¢ 815 5 on rishi j » Wake 3
p.m. Weekly Sports Summary. 8 7 5 Pert of Amwritear no longer in Paramount: Pictures Tesent Pm. and 8.30 p.m
Hey ines, Ma Die Note | 6 No,itunese ay to eet into a.
ish Sport. 10.45 p.m. Music from. the 1N iv aon > feature "
e e Ballet. 11.00 p.m, Hear it agair é gure the wal ears a “CLEOPATRA “PEDERAL
. ora rophy at 4 airy
| 10. Be tale the rice Starring
‘ What’s i : :
at’s in a name 11. Claimed, possibly, to be asso ; a Dee OPE
¥ ae iy with the bealiug art. Claudette Colbert as RATOR 99”
HE Trade Winds Club in Pic-| 16. You want double ten! “CLEOPATRA” Starring
5 ait x . ie 7 1 ut u call hers en r )
Cross-winds! Divisional Manager—Esso cadilly, which caters for| 1% But wtved ersonality ?
~ 3 : ay » prints ands a ae attractive personality ? " oh tei Mar % BPE ER en vce
EVEN hundred people were in- Hope to leave to-day ESTERDAY, would-be passen- IVISIONAL Hantesr St. the the social activities of West In-| jy. arid ee eee as Henry Wilcoxon as Marc artin Lamont - George |
vited to the Cocktail Party gers by B.W.I.A. and their Tees Standard ‘ONG 2 diane and other people in London, fashion Anthony J. Lewis
; : Maza vesterda\ eee Mrs. Lisle Goddard , Ren oett aA ; o., in has now closed down for repairs “ g's" final item of equipment ¥ Action f ini
one nigga get M*. ee three children, Pit e spent most of the morning B.G., Mr. Geoffrey E@ghill ac- and alterations. Happy Rlalee its| ” Be Pa eee eee Winin Williams as Julias rom Start to. Finish
ing. é sete a looking into the sky at two companied by his wife is wner, says th wher » Clu soluti Pi 3 Ceasear posse ce
Soh mitee ty Charles Bruce § David, wére to (90% ee SKY. 3 and son owner, sé hat when the Club @ Solution on Page 3. asea Rig fs
the. eons Parsstors, Me core ere Barbados yesterday for &-W.LA, Vikings which circled the Bruce were also arrivals from re-opens, ihe nme will be — and — Mon, & Tues. 4.30 & 8.30
8, : ha i arbados yes ; od : ty a , | * os
Nn W. Gittens and Mr. M. V Trinidad after a month’s holiday Seneie., *veral times, A cross B.G. on Thursday afternoom by Changed from Trade Winds Club Another Priest Arriving 20th C-Fox Master Doubl
Rediien and the Manager Mr. Hu- which was spent at Silver Sands ind ew ing across the runway, B.W.LA. They expect to be in to Happy Blake's Club. Asked the Shortly “ DEATH TAKES x Master Double
bert Edwards. Inside the theatre, Lisle is with B.H. Rose Ltd., Cees ( Agts BOE of them ja a0 Parbados for about two or three reason for the change, Happy, in a. rtly a Linda Darnell, Cornel! Wilde
cocktail savouries, drinks and j, Port-of-Spain. They hope t wane fter sree ten oe weeks, staying at Cacrabank Trinidadian aceent replied, with a At TER a two weeks’ visit to A HOLIDAY” : a
other refreshments were served to jeave for Trinidad to-day vith Cap, Rodveaas fa ened Bruce is at school at Stanstead a Tae ra a ic Winds : Barbados, Fr. H. J. Feeny, detchy in
the guests, who stood or r he Going to New Zealand vas able to land. The other one COU?ge, Quebec, and is spending but everybody knows. Happy by BWIA, Fe ra dat te aaa with cee ae
groups in various parts of the WIS. returned to Trinidad the Summer holidays with his Blake - : va Phe avy ry a e is not as many — and —
theatre. Later in the evening two ON'BLE ALLEN M <— oe , Then it amet 1 1 “45 o'clock, an- parents. rth, af Ms . famous West Indian people thought Fr, Selliers relief. Frederick March — Sir Guy “I CHEATED THE LAW”
newsreels, coming probes eae Chairman se the ic na ther Vikiae whish had haan alas It is expected however, that an- Standing — Gail Patrick - with
several shorts were shown before Town Board and one of The yed in Grenada flew over é cther priest will be arriving here aphasia =
pene, sacar Nest ee a aR : tl nde » lay rrenads P r Sea- R d h B . , ries ill be arriving her Kent Taylor Tom Canway—Steve Brodie
the evening’s entertainment came jyicia delegates who att ee well, and this tac: went aa-t4 upert an t e ack- “room Boy-4i — hortly to assist at St. Patrick’s y—Steve Brodie

to a close shortly after 9 o’clock. Oils and Fats Conference A ee
The building, which was de- jngs House during the ba Mage ae sagem —
signed and built by Messrs. Clarke be returning home on angho% ie 14 ‘han twas decided
and Tucker, owes its attractive ap- B.W.1.A. He is staying Vv ith Mi that CRA eat ee re
pearance partly to its unplastered and Mrs, J. O. Tudor of “Edith- Vénesudle trip .
limestone finish which has been ville”, Pine Road, Passengers and baggage loaded
treated with a protective coat of Mr. Lewis who is also a Barris- the Binns att Reston oe ee rs . ,
waterproof Snowcem in a delight- ter-at-Law, told Carib yesterday on ine fini ae Fes a aly Saher:
ful shade of salmon pink. that he will be going to New ofS however she returned to the park-
The theatre, seats 850 persons, jand in October to represent the : ¥* I



while Fr, Selliens is on leave in
England

pomosoqeoeos PPS SCSSSEOO SP SOOPES SSS SSSS

GLOBE.

Crinidad, as conditions were still



yveek, will
Tuesday by







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a snipe ing apron. Due to maintenance ,
and has been designed so that Windward Islands at the Empire anuek Sea teat tn e 7; Y nein oT] a
sci Heat Patan Cone Ne AO ed a OUR CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
toriurn, can see the whole screen , ance flights fo esterday rere can-
The interior colour scheme is First Appear aed EGR PRR RUSRY “WERE ESR NE Ww PLA Z A
predominantly the same as that of Yesterday . iy y
the Plaza Oistins, yet ii has an in- AKING its first appearance at id not leave e ‘
dividuality of its own, There is M Saawall airport. yesterday 7 sia et ? in eli : Oo / De > | >
also a snack bar, a. new feature Seawell airpor yesterda iy ol ae HALVERSSEN Rupart seababetabark:\odasnehls pa knobs 6h ite ur Apologie s to the hundreds of omr
an













was an Information Bureau which her three sons Erik, from th

Clutching the little detk boit! cratche stall hole one ot :
|
=|

for cinemas in Barbados and a , Aes A > : ‘ Podgy has be g himself by
tap ai isa branch of the Barbados Pub- [hor and Olaf, were among the BY Das Deen amuses Tyinget leoks so puzzled D> . a 7,
candy Counter. sige icity, Commitioe’s. "Information pcvenuors we’ Uiought ihey were | <¥i6 his mame ot the mysterious Soin’ hi Patrons who could not get Admission
m4} r . - Bureau at the Ba aggage Warehouse, “turning to Venezuela aft r their tree. ‘It’s lucky you've got a noe, Th
>» auditorium above the screen shy q . returning to Veneguela after their y imps. h e ;
ss tar ney and raltome fea- ,,!n charge of this de sk which 18 Barbados holiday. They even got pocket knife, that's, just what 1 tree would to see the 7 herviller of Vieriliers
: : situated in the Terminal! Building he plane jue ain- d,"" “Can | borro “T hope he did } <
ture to this attractive and modern ; ; : F f into the plane, but due to main nee er Rupert, an rrow wpe he didn't mean that
ics. of the airport, is Miss Pat Mullen. tenance the ‘plane did not take off. it? ith the sharp blade he would vanish suddenly i” TODAY at 5 & 8 30 inui
me her’s Weddi For a long time now it has been She hopes however to leave to- . p.m. & Continuing
For Brother’s edding felt, that such a Bureau was an day, Erik is the eldest member of
RRIVING from Venezuela via absolute necessity at the Ros the family, Thor and Olat ~ Sa Se
Trinidad by B.W.I.A. yes- and yesterday it became a reality. twin brothers,
terday morning, was Mr. Hal Here visitors can buy stamps, Works in the Suan AQUATIC cits CINEMA (Members Only)

Hamilton who has come over for postcards, road maps, pictorial ;
..the week-end to be present at his maps, stationery and there are an M* STEWART ALLAN, who is

frother’s (John) wedding to abundance of leaflets giving tour- with the Surveying Depart- } TO-NIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT AT 8.30

< 4,4, 4:66:64 O65
S 5 OOO SOS OOOO FFP OSS POOOSS CLP LP IPOS SK



MATINEE: TO-DAY AT 5.00 P.M.

HINK OF TT! GAPE! GASP! WORD

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Miss Mary Marst, which takes ists hints about the island, adver- ment of the Government in B.G. J. Arthur RANK presents : ,
place this after, ion. tising matter from Hotels, Guest has returned home after a holiday STPWART GRANGER ® JEAN SIMMONS %

Hal has been working for five Houses, Clubs, Business Houses in in Barbados, om work, he told %
years in Venezuela and is return- Bridgetown and other free litera~- Carib, often takes him for three . “ is >
ing on Monday. This is the first ture about Barbados. There is also or four months at a gjme into the in ADAM AND EVELYNE { x
time in five years that he has seen a basket into which passengers bus h away from civilization, He A Universal-International Release 1 %
his other brother Gordon, who is can post their mail, immediately was a guest at Cacrabank, P d “K g P t f ye x
also in Barbados, on arrival. Going To Ledge ow er e e 0 x

pat Peter Willems arrived
with his grandmother, Mrs

PLAZA — Oistin: Night-Cluh

Ursula Willems from B.G. on







Thursday by B.W.I.A. Peter will Saturday, and Sunday, 5.00 <« F i
* ‘ be going to Lodge School, wher id and 8.30 p.m. ociety!
et the new term begins, Mrs. Wil- Viveca LINDFORS a Dane CLARK :
e iems will be returnirég to B.G. ir Virginia MAYO ites Edmund O’BRIEN

three weeks. Meanwhile they are
staying in Worthing

Delighted
M* HERMANN KAISER who
is a_Professor in Chemical
Engineering at the University of
Caracas has brought his wife and

and Gordon MACRAE in
“BACKFIRE”

New Picture



{
|
|
WARNER'S THRILLING ROMANCE! |
{
!
|
|
|
|













two children to Barbados or a x
month’s holiday. All are guests TO-DAY 8.50 P.M., SUNDAY MATINEE 5.00 P.M %
at ‘““Jacrabank” and they are de- NIGHT 8.30 $$
lighted with Barbados 20th Century-Fox Preudly Present: ib %
Paris Holiday PRINCE OF FOXES Re
QO" to Paris last week for 10 Coming Monday . . . | F
days went Mrs. Gloria God- “JESSE JAMES” j ae) é we
Gard, wife. of “the “Weatlnties ee ern eee ed _ Jb1S gig ibid eh
cricket captain. It is her first visit x
to Paris. 4ey delight is tinged 4

SENSATION
UF SENSATIONS

with one regret: her husband
could not go with her. Cricketing
duties, plus the fact that he 2 to
undergo a slight operation on Sep- ;
tember 10th, made it impossible aaa TERRIFIC i j ‘ 38
for him to accompany her. hee ; f : THE TEN mos TE TURED!
might have made the trip at the , : rf T ¢ x , : ; i 4 4
end of the tour but John’s main i DINE AND DANCE PRLS EVER A: ey cumatiaa 3 , ane %
eoncern is to get home as soon as

: ; ; orilla i . fe rd R ‘4
See ne ee AT Orns se Bh Uae ie LAA
‘Hi Fights capture by aA LE ef eo da
a eee CLUB MORGAN © ints and ors
RRIVING by B.W.LA. from S Tam ed a
B.G. on Thursday afternoon ] night we star!
PICTURED h Tt d Olaf Hat tii brot: was Supt. Allan Outram of the wae F pl muscles 10
» ere are Thor an af Halverssen, twin brothers, British Guiana Pelice, who ac- wh . returning to the Terminal Building yesterday at Seawell from companied by his wife and son THE WEST INDIES MOST POPULAR NIGHT CLUB 0 strongest a ;
the plane, which due to Maintenance did noi teave for Caracas, Neil are here for two weeks’ holi- LICIOUS STEAK DINNERS Balances 9 rl,
These two youngsters have been holidaying in Barbados with day and will be staying with his aa 6 52 piano over head!

as. ‘They ahs Saal ees" aunt Mrs. N. J. A. Bascom at Served throughout the Night
their mother and elder brother. They hope to leave for Ven Cweston? Werathely@e.

TO-NIGHT

GOSS



O36 66 60 ss 4,
CEPOL PEI SOP SPS SOP



Tormented,



ezuela today. Dial 4000 for Reservations goes wild!
6 5 OSORNO FOO PPS PS SOD ee Rip s iron doors,

— ons ti

> steel bars’



Wrecks palatial

HERE'S A NEW LaisT . ee ) CHECK night club! a cea vg
fies Pouce. \ Fea starrin

© machine oon Pena TROT

|

*
MUSSOLINI'S MEMOIRS 1942—1943 NO WwW




© Rern the big blaze! aU ou GUL eae














MAXIM ’S “UNREQUITED LOVE” *
“TRUTH WILL OUT’—by Charlitte Haldane APPROACHING wan ; ere st To dol a ie fey saa
We are fully Stocked with - - - . s ' Screén Play by Ruth Rose*
“FROM EMPIRE TO COMMONWEALTH” 7 Ree R eC ee 7
% Butts & Hinges Latches $ ‘
“PRINCIPLES OF BRITISH IMPERIAL $ |) Locks Nails ¥
GOVERNMENT” x Hasps & Staples Hammers x
$i Barrel Bolts Rito Roofing Compound % :
'“BEAU SABREUR’—by Wren $|)}) Lamp Chimneys een % $
i 4 | Burners & Wicks isal Rope ¥ x
saad “IN FACE OF FEAR’—by Michael Scot y Call at Our Hardware & Ironmongery Dept. | R x
B Telephone No. 2039 $ ~
2 REMEMBER : a 8
ft Deccan eArer’ % i} There is no Parking Problem when you shop with us! jj) %
i . S, i \ 4s rs o
ADVOCATE STATIONERY 8) sspos coopexaive corron {h EXTRA! ENTRA!! :
~y x % - g 4 x ~ ™aAY + e Ye « - ¥
STORE ‘ KACTORY ‘Linen: |. LEON ERROL in Girls! Girls! Girls!
x 90800O9GOPOO9FS 59550090 55550055959 5015 FHF FOO FILO SO HHO DOOWUES CORNED . apeapnhepmpepsnmns eerneNNE RCE mil | $696S66665S55646655566565659066969 GSSG9 SSIS 595S FSS DE DOGGOIOSH ere





*



SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1950
{h-soswilcasercnestinnstanrnmennntsnsioteiesstentedien









BARBADOS. ADVOCATE PAGE THREE



eds Renew ThHeE.GAMBOLS gee Sry ot —<—- | Maid Comes

HOME AGAIN DE _ \aeaa ee OF | (AW Weew * ITS

Attack
On Pusan

@ from page |.
fi tonight on the southern

Back From |
Mountains —

PARIS
THE shutter: are coming down |
all over Paris |
Restaurants which have been
| Closed for the summer holiday dis- |
| play re-opening notices ;
We who have to carry on with,
; our work in servantless apart- |
;ments are getting picture post-/

ft a senior officer told Reuter
e enemy is shooting the works
this offensive. Another said “If
jlose Masan we lose Pusan.”

ell after dark, American
ps whe had pushed through |
an to a ridge-top two miles!



















3t Were under heavy mortar —— ° = ; a4 bt J 4, } - é Od : \eards of the Savo ,
; : i a Za y r ; / : s y mountain
| artillery fire, and another = ~ ee oe ro | rene INA \ as : pe a eee ;
L supported wave of Cosntu- Vi y's SS ae Fad 4 Se Tae, ie ng maid, | saying
} infantry was expected. a ae Pe eee eee aera —— ——— SE ee Ne rena | niet ack in a few days. |
in this front during the day, 4 ' | Soon ood eer ee ~ ery |
h Americans and Communists, Pla E t Of * cieaners, shut since August 1, w
9 Yan out of ammunition,| Jamai ca ns xpor FIRST WITH tr e ay be rea ly to receive long-overdue
ght with bayonets. knives and 1 : ° contributions. fhere are still
> butts. As the day wore on,) 6 | St : Of B S d B di only 24 theatres open, but some at |
fury of the fighting dropped | 2m. tems ananas en @MNS {the 37 which have been enjoying |
from exhaustion, but at night} is J their oléture annueile are pre- |
revived again. ’ B k H i paring to entertain their clients |
ritish troops bivouacked | To The U.K. This Year ac ome again, : |
mewhere in Korea” since their) ; LONDON, |
val on Tuesday, tonight pre-| THE Jamaica banana export trade to the United King- A British company has claim- From Our Own Correspondent The Nu Look }
- . hs into battle ahead dom for 1950 is expected to. be about 6} million stems, vd egy ca = : ei ss Wtbadian oe et ad The swallows nave flown south. |
shedule . 2 ne Whats ac, is ei ve a atk z adie g st-type ‘ret alloy designed to) Barbadian employees in wood-| phe ches en » Ch: .
} the height of the fighting) the same as 1949, Mr. D. C. Ferguson, Commissioner of} put ‘British jet engines ahead of|!ands of the sugar estates mav ianasiee eee thelr aa van eer
iy they got “stand by” orders} Commerce and Industries of that colony told theAdvoeate. | v orld competitors, return home shortly if there is| The reid iain Srirebtes Migs cad
battie and cancelled exercises yesterday. | no end to the strike in the Island’:| * Se he or - Sanit .
+ were to have held tomorrow,; Mr, Ferguson was one of the > ~ | A security ban on even a men-| cast canes growing region. Work ly nich . ot tered ree
y packea heavy lorries with) Jamaica delegates who attended | tion of it has just been lifted, buc}ers in the woodlands of the Nese: MA ace are ene
rcombat equipment and thes@/the Oils and Fats Conference BELL BOY | What goes into the making of the | estates Grandanse, Calicigny, and to = th see ate i na mc lay, ‘the
be leaving for the base area which ended at Hastings House alloy beside Canadian nickel is|Hopegale have struck for a 50| -1o.iq ne wants a8 ‘chara ,
he morning. jon Thursday . ‘ WANTED ? likely to remain a strict secret. | per cent wage increase plus other gtor iously sun anned charms 1
6 the overshadowed Northern | amenities and all these ants ok their returning staff. |
t, early despatches said that| He said that of the 6% million | LONDON. | The Mond Nickel Company first} sented to the empioyers. . This Parisian habit of shut. ing |
vy Reh tieve Pon sinae My FAY | BRAS, 4 million are Lacatan | Mr. and Mrs. R. F Crust went | &»perimented with “Nimonic 75"| Disorderly events within the} U” shop, for most of Augus: Is
around Pohang over a 15-/while the remainder are Grog to Box Hill with their dog, Donny,/2"4 then “Nimonic 80” which] past week have resulted in the| (&rcely, criticised as being ond |
are, Communist reinforce-| Michel. es re S, ~"" went a lon ey ake British | 2 ‘ A . |for business in the height of ce
ts sre reported moving in The pl: . - . ; Donny found a tennis ball in a ° & way to make British] arrest of five men who have been ie ae it 2 |
Poe er Ser: he planting of Lacatan is being} -appit hole. Mr, Crust took it;Jets the world’s best. These al-|charged with the larceny of estate| WUNSt season enue aut |
PI Shot D ; extended particularly in places | away and told Donny: “Go and|leys were used to make the tur-|coconuts. Telephone poles, coco. Rants ROPE Os “BOR at
= eCeee Colne SWE _ay,| Where there is Panama disease so} finq’ another.” Donny did so.|bine blades and the combustion|nut trees are cut down creating| TOUTS coming to Paris this |
ge pained ; ert Korean | that oe ee Asser cannot be} Again the ball was taken from|Chambers of the engines. a traffic blockage — facilitating|™ 0M“) can hear Germun, ren | Quality is the sum a >
s today. sho m @ -! successfully cultivated. tim, dvetn he Want SF in search | pe Agra Rone ‘ @ “land Russian operas They can} ’ : A oO { {
ar aan iateases , age sea F ars ary is als . . ) ape | ee ° ja >
ad eee ee eee | ; ! for another ball, and again he! They had to withstand enor- ported on inrotaned pearl Sty see the Folies Bergere and the Nu | of little things—-extra shill 4 ciga re e
iplane south-east of Kunwi. | Quality Improved found one, Donny continued to|mous temperatures and _ stresses.|where brandishing cutlasses, and| LOX at the Mayol. But they have | 2 ‘ >
te planes dropped leaflets and | ete rhe aifftutty was a é shing cutlasses, anc oats Seger ga ae i in blending—added care
ed South Korean troops | ‘The quality of the banana ship jrun off and bring back more and | ‘ ifficulty was to find a metal} sticks by labourers have made|t? wait until September for the | a i)
a Sout . pd : 7 Dane ship- . 7 | 2g 10 . mera a | ores ‘rene hi iwhts ¢ | ‘ ‘ki ‘ied ‘
ferican Air Force offieiuls|ments has been greatly improved | ™0re balls. Altogether he found | at could be shaped and forged,'the police resort to fire arms|£?e2t French playwrights at ‘the | in packing — insistence on
. } Twentyone policemen Comédie-Francai Because the

the tiniest fraction of an inch un-





that two fighters, both of|since March this year and oe nine—tennis balls and golf balls,

but which did not alter shape by } protection.
fan type, attacked the Obser-| reports from the United Kingdom |

der temveratures of rec heat,

, >
; sefect freshtiven Where s 6
have arrived from St. Lucia by | Comeédie-Prancaise is closed for| peatect feeslaniven Wine ra re a} uh a it y
arr ; oe



















f, plane. The pilot is listed as}on the condition of the arrival ! | - aie t is ores la to sense | the holidays | CRAVEN ° A? ave bough:

g. |of the fruit are much more fa-| | “Nimonic 75” was che answer] \.° 7 BUS) Wael) as Mine's A Gallon or Seratat errs ene en eee eee

te Reuter cables today gave 7 Th ps i 7 a ans : situation Peres : Bae
@ positions in Korea as vou e Weather eee Se warts The strike to-day extended ta |. dee £0 much wleohol in CMP owe Te RE ‘a PON. ENGLAND
Ws: F Arrangements ere in force for | TODAY limportance. It was discovered by |{he estmte Dailes .and Bacolet. | /rance tat Hie HeRt wou s semen
hth: American troops on the) providing succours of Lacatan| ; a team of Mond Wickel setallus, | Meanwhile peaceful St. George’s| Petro! sold will have a dash of it. |
1 coast approaches to Masan| bananas for planting, particularly | Sun Rises: 5.54 a.m gists under Sir Willie G ‘fAths. continues to be uncisturbed with There will be two mixtures
y counter-attacked and re-|by small growers. Arrangements Sun Sets: 6.09 p.m. now the com ables nubene Shout a sim of violence or provo- |the ordinary and the super. The
|, Some. oe lost cin a are also available for the proper|}| Moor (J ost Quarter) Sep - The latest Bice! “Nimonic gor | ation. | ordinary, coloured bright eer
Heer ote ea net towan |SPraying of banana _ plantations| teuber 3 is reported to be 10 per cent Sane Wee nee ae ee ae oe mh
tommunist assault on this aah eat Spot disease, i ed 6.00 p.m. tougher than anything produced| , a = cies F reas fie % the
jern sector drove through on Tn addition there is a compre~ High Water: 6.50 a.m., 6.52 |) before j 3] Of Wi h 9 a Gaia vas € an |
ont four miles wide and 3 hetisive hurrigane | Sever nee An official of the Mond Nickel S e ig ts | erect. if wos 1 vars——thelr
| déep. scheme which is designed to en- emai Company said: | Effect of alcohol on a
htre: Massed North Korean|@ble banana growers to restore FRDAY (From Our Own Correspordent) liquor consumption will go up,
{Its aeross the Naktong River their cultivations in the event of] } jsintall (Codtington) nfl neve, have something that 18 LONDON, Sept. 1 | and they will find it, more aim-
iran most of the flat country|Setious hurricane damage. Senapemiinre ten Hyonpung and Yongsan.| wr Ferguson said that the new|| Tempexsture (Min.) 79.0° F Nothing may be said about the|‘Times” who arrived recently | {Secmk~ ove tained aaa ies
trea of roughly i20 square tries esate f hey : Wind Direction: (9 am.) ingredients of the alloy. But it}from the West Indies, reports} cartoonists

Some American units wera| TUS Processing factory is Boy | $..E. (3 pm.) 8.8 E 7 is not only the formula, it is alto-day that natural leadership |
ff. A massive advance began|COMPleted and will be nee aa Wind Velocity: 9 mites 4 matter of what Americans call|of the Federated Caribbean might . °
imidnight with the Commu-| ‘tials during September prepara-| hour ye meres per || “Know-how.” fall to Jamaica but for the jeal- | Hurricane
$pearbead lighting the way tory to dealing — with the main) Barometer (9 acm.) 29.928 Ousy aroused by Jamaicans.
hundreds of torches. crop beginn'ns; in October. (3 p.m.) 23.863 er “It is not only concerned with} He says jealousy is partly due | Flattens Antigua
fth-Bast: Heavy fighting con-| This factory will produce con-| Peat airplane jet-erngines. GaturBines|t. the size of the island, but is} : iS









(1 on the north side of the/centrated orange juice which has are being built for power instal-|“aggravated by flamboyance, it
} particlarly around Pohang.| been sold under a ten-year con-! es lation, they are being tried out in}must be conceded, in the Jamai-

Rast Coast: American and) tract with the Ministry of Food| Delayed Action ships, and then there is the gas-
i Korean troops braced them-j|for supplies of concentrate suit- | : turbine automobile, as well as
§ for renewed assauits on| able for distrib~tion to children | LONDON. experimental railway locomo-

@ trom page |,
Fibrey Village was floating in
can character” | several inches of sea water. At
Of Barbados he says its instinct | least 50 per cent of the houses in






















; : > with characte, and tradition, and | most villages are flat, and thous-
sector as Communist rein-;| as a welfare :ncasure. Harule Lon: 72, was shot in| tives’—I.N.S. with the old jirish and Vestry | ands are homeless. Grief and mis-
ments were reported pusning | the stomach during the Boer war, system, villnge cluurches and eve-| ery prevailed among the sad and
§tward from Kinwi. 2 In Islani 50 years «fo ; n cricke: might pass for an| Weary population. ne

4 b: Wheetaciometinâ„¢dwed=. by the He died voce: ly and an inquest exotic Isle of Wight. For this Animals and birds lay dead, The



\ hye eae ve said the bu:tet esvsed his death. e island the “ch system of in- | Harbour Master’s launch and 2
Watican Muy |i:\tre' secon’ the island copes Belgium May [isitice eins Pnetopautin jain boatare the'only vats at
atican iv! ay is the second ie the island capa-| A DOMKEY'S YEARS y area would work i rell | anchor in the boisterous sea
R i ble of producin’ this specialised | Pere ‘ rie Pt sae ot a cuireascht Barges were beached, fishing
ne res 0 1€ si reare. - wt 1 Ve . : rreckes, "
- an d 2 ease or. 3 hose Length T atmosphere of Barbados is that boats ane laune hes wreckeg, The
; oe, eet. Tee pew An italian expedition exploring en ame cn separation unthinieable | /guTch Gloria” reposed on Market | SOLE AGENTS:—
Of Cardinal factory will also manufacture! prehisicri- caves near Pisa have ° an island such as Trinidad, | scot
; j grape fruit juice and other citrus iaibarined tbh VERE BE w Bone ervice a vie ~ 1 § as Use, | Street. A schooner Was overturned
ATICAN CITY, Aug. 31 products including cattle feed. | key estimated at 15,000 years old. : ace, yt in the bay. Three members of the
cial Vatican sources said/ Construction has‘ also started on'

|
8 | rew are not yet accoufrted for MANNING & cO LTD.
B 4h. : at RUSSELS, Aug, 31 . The weather is still overcast, °
y that the Vatican was \.-!4 pre-cooling store for handling | Crossword Solution| The Belgigqn Parliament will! ‘“‘Liberty”’ Loses | ne

ugly and treacherous
to approve any Chureb-











: whit, |{resh citrus fruit prior to ship- | Shortly be asked to lengthen the
B vrovide peer }meént overseas. This store is being ; period of compulsory military Its Master {
: Ree tn Teeenh ao built by Colonial Development service, Premier Joseph Pholien

# sentenced to life imprison-|CorPoration and it is expected t
last year on treason charges. be ready for operation in the
¥as reported that the agree- | 1951—52 season. }

announced is « broadcast wonisht.| vom ow vwermun | Ti MOWIES ARE BETTER THAN EVER.
GEORGETOWN, Sept.1,

He said that this was one of a Joseph Lewis, master of the sloop |

‘between Bishops and the} i gm en sie ical ieleate be FI ni hp “Liberty” was knocked overboard |
in Hungary was regarded | This store is on a site in King. Jing of: the Bel ha Werte aa mee'=!from the ship’s deck more than |
uspicion in Vatican circles, ;Ston convenient to the principal 6 ; AR CARON three miles off the port. of
‘ial comment, however, was |@0cks_used for loading citrus, Georgetown around midnight on

|

|

!

|

# available. | Mr. Ferguson said that the citrus The conscript service at present

















ffi |industry is engaged i ampaig! is for a period of 12 months, nae and his body is not yet

ntican official said “Until we stry 18 engaged In a campaign -i tees _| recovered. os ; ’ TINUING nh : C
direct information—and lls increase production within the} a nignt Aigiows was te ee First news reached Georgetown NOW SHOWING & CONTINUING Mat. & Night Shows Daily
ult to obtain since we have |island and nurseries have been ED R| A|MjE;os| 1 | PI not specified by the Premier__! today on the arrival of the “S.S.

Jomatic. relations with Hun-|established from which large PE (Lie! sit) 1 (NE! would be to 18 months. Sundale.” The Sundale’s pilot

at is impossible to com-j|numbers of plants will be avail-| 4 ‘oN — {saw the sloop’s boom swing and

5 —Reuter. able to growers. :

“ Pholien said that other meas-|knocked a man overboard and at

ures which the Government had!once they put on the search lights

decided to propose to Parliament|and lowered the life boats and

included:— joined with the sloop’s crew in

be voke search but was unsuccessful, The

4 ae aoe in peace time|«piperty” was returning from
infantry ivisions an armour- mate f ephice.
ed divisions ready to heh te New Amsterdam, Berbice.

THE BIGGEST SHOW IN TEN YEARS !!













“VITACUP*












LLTELL YOU ABOUT
, MRS. PARADINE'g



liately.
o "The qireperstion. of reeawvel EMPENSIVE BONFIRE
divisions. KINGSTON, Jamaica

An overhaul of home defence} There was an expensive bonfire
forces required to fight para-| 2° Kingston central police station
chutists, hen the police burnt 10,000 dol-

The development of the Air lars worth of marijuana (locally
Force, partly for Belgian defence} Called ganja) seized from illicit
and partly to support grounq| drug traffickers. Passersby said
troops, r they got quite a “lift” out of the





i fumes.

3 An overhaul of the Navy att) ee

4 _ Referring to the Cabinet's de- PERSONAL OPiNION

; cision to ask Parliament to ap- NEW YORK.

: prove of an increase in the term Writes columnist Cedric Adams:
A | of military service, Pholien said:| ‘There is one consolation about

“Great Britain and Holland have] being in the infantry — they
also consented to such saerifices.’| can't threaten you with anything
— Reuter." worse.”

|








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GREGORY PECK

“Atouew
Rtayy, ny

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Bg Rp,

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ett s led

OLEMANS



there was an evil



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QPS SST ROR EHH TKDE Ree He REED EERE REA ER HOE aed ease

ee ane ee



PAGE FOUR
BARBADOS waa ADVOGATE
Bee Se Poses =)

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad 8t., Bridgetown.
Saturday, September 2, 1950

70th Birthday

THE strongest indication of the success
of the Young Men’s Chfistian Association
was the enthusiasm of the members who
attended the Seventieth Annual General
Meeting yesterday afternoon.

A new note of progress was the ambiti-
ous. programme of the Directors of the
Association to take over the premises
adjoining their Hostel at Union Lodge in ,
order to provide space for additional acti-
vities to which the “Y” now caters.
ing sold the premises now occupied to
Chelsea Garage Limited, they have pur-
chased Wakefield for £5,000.

The new premises will have a little over
three acres of land and this must be cleared
and levelled while the house will have to
This will then be added to the
Union Lodge Hostel and a proper hall pro-



be rebuilt,

vided in order to cater to

other organisations which from time to
time apply to the “Y” for accommodation.

This expansion is the greatest step for-
ward the Y.M.C.A. has made since its
beginning although there have been many
changes and developments during its his-

tory.

It was started in 1879 at Planters Hall
on the Wharf and later removed to the
premises of W. L. Johnson in Roebuck
Street. As it grew there was need for
greater space and again the “y” found a

home in Cavans Lane over
of Manning & Co, Ltd.

there was room for tennis
beside the indoor games.

gotten by many.

The “Y” has outgrown its home and with
the increased demand for social, religious,
cultural and recreational activities among

‘ g men, the Directors have once again
attempted to cater to that need.
er institution in this island which

no 0

can be a substitute for the “Y”.
unique place in this community and it is
for this reason that it deserves all the sup-
port which a generous public can give.
tantial increase in mem-
bership can the Y.M.C.A. continue to grow
and foster good citizenship throughout the

Only by a su

community.

3 Million Lepers
LEPROSY can be cured; but it is due
to a general opinion to the contrary that
the work of stamping it out is so slow.
It has been proved that with modern
methods of treatment the disease can be

cured in five years.

Today there are three million lepers
within the British Empire; and of these

90% remain untreated.

This makes the work of the British Em-
pire 5 ae Relief Association an uphill

e methods of treatment are
known, the scientific preparations are
known but the lack of funds for the pur-
pose is a severe handicap. The Association
aims not only at curing those who have

task.

contracted the disease but

children who may become victims of this
“stark tragedy of hopelessness, loneliness,

malformation and decay.”

This wasting disease is not confined to
any particular race of people or any one
nation; and the fact that it is not due to
any peculiar climatic condition but is world

It was in 1898
that it came to Rickett Street where
present day generations will remember it.
A new lease of life was given to the insti-
tution after the period when Mr. Pringle
was General Secretary. There was an in-
crease in membership and a new enthusi-
asm. Finally the “Y” was removed to St.
Germain, Pinfold Street in 1933. Here

Eight years later
Union Lodge was added as a Hostel and
the service rendered to men of His Majes-
ty’s Ships during the war will not be for-



Whether and

ment in
two weeks.

Hav-

At present the

»y the
nents,
The

the needs of

e numerically

French
Dr,

ed power in

f powers”

the premises
e politically

Or, Adenauer
security police
period, before
10,
On the other
and football

he Red
official”

There is

It fills a

enquirers
favoured the

TD aL ee CCCs tetas Ata nineties sesamiae etna

fickle
opinion

and

week Mr.

to save the

war in Korea



wide makes the necessity for controlling it

all the greater.
Those who enjoy good

strength have little idea of the tragedy and
the darkness which comes over others who
have been afflicted with leprosy. And to
those who have not the hope of treatment
there is an even greater load of despair.
The most tangible way to show an appre-
ciation of health and strength is to make
some contribution to the work of those who
have dedicated themselves to the cure of
Send a contribu-
pire Leprosy

leprosy the world over.

tion today to the British Em
Relief Association, 167 Victoria Street, Lon-
don S.W. 1. If through BELRA you can
pass even five shillings into those poor

stumps of hands to arrest

ravages of leprosy you will be doing some-
thing truly humanitarian, something vital.



health and

rotgut? The

the further @ardéne’ at

back in German hands has. been
the predominant subject for argu-
Surope during the last
The notes that fol-
low cover the many, and highly
confusing cross currents of this
complex subject.
Two Schemes

A distinction must be made
between two different schemes,
both of which are being discussed
and argued, The first
Adenauer’s proposal for the estab-
lishment of a West German inter-
nal security police on the same
scale as the political police in the
Communist dominated Republic
of East Germany, Dr. Adenauer
is believed to be speaking of a
force of about 50,000 men, organ-
ised under the direct control of
the Federal Government at Bonn.

n Western Germany are virtu-
illy unarmed and are controlled
eleven Lander govern-

second proposition under
liscussion is the
Vest German contingent to take
ts place—and all admit it would

Vestern European Army,
gested by Mr. Churchill), or the
Atlantic Pact system of Armies.

Adenauer’s proposal that
ae “internal security’”’ police of
/est Germany should be built up
as received sharp criticism. The
rench do not like central organ-

ave always favoured “separation
among the Lander
svernments—and fought long and
ard to have their view accepted.
he question of control of “State
olice” is a test case, The French

German problem”. They see in
ne centralized police proposed by

clepended on the Government of
Prussia. They fear an independ-
German-led,
ust over the Rhine.

re conscious of the need for far
yreater military forces in the West
- to defend themselves should
Army
newspaper,
autiously advances the argument
hat forty million Frenchmen can-
iot bear the military brunt for
‘efending three hundred million
Western Europeans.
strong current of opinion favour-
able to a German Army within
in European army;
will show, there remains
erable dissatisfaction in
with the present Western
defence system.
is that a German Army could be
safely built up as part of an
Europeah Force.
Doubts and Difficulties

Ir the United States 71% of
those asked by the Gallup Poll
have said that they

Western Germany.

In West Germany newspaper
polls showed 77% favoured mili-
tary “aid to the Allies”.

views, why it is dangerous to re-
arm Western Germany.

In the first
themselves are asking whether

BY THE WAY...

A’ article about scents says
that we are losing our sense
of smell, and that “even trained

nauseating wash which women
drenched in strident chemicals
leave in their wake? The heavy
odour of frozen hake being fried
in rancid butter-extract?
mouldy reek of “Chateau—bottled”

wafting—airs of summer?
lovely nose, as Waller said when
he thrust his face into a bouquet
he had gathered for Sacharissa in
Penshurst.
moment there was a raucous oath.
The poet had been stung by a

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Hy David Temple Roberts

LONDON.

how to put arms force—call

begun by

is Dr.

only police forces

formation of a

prominent—in the
(sug-

Reactions the newspaper

the

Germany. They

York

news

conscious of the

absolute desire
a return to the

of the Weimar

Hitler — which —

striking force

hand the French

march. The
Le Monde,

for

ies
There is no fog pd ed ge

yet, as we
consid-
Francs
Europe
The implication

be carried out.
re-armament of

expenditure.
that

creased
public
portion to
first which is

tary men,

the urgent

has changed all
appointment
place Germans

chief? The

the building of an internal security
it police or army—
will provoke immediate civil war
the
German armed police. It is being
asked in Germany
United States and Great Britain
are in fact able to re-arm Ger-
many before the country is over~
run. The whole of Europe is
oppressed with the thought of
being invaded,
eventually liberated in the same
manner as Southern Korea.
There is a second more sinister
reason why German re-armament
is not a correct answer to the
general European demand to be
defended against the Red Army.
A German Army is not necessarily
the servant of Europe, but could
again be its master. If it seemed
to the politically minded generals
of a new West German Army, to
be more profitable to Germany to
reach alliance with the Russians
and themselves to reconquer Wes-
tern Europe, then who would there
be to halt such a German change
of front. According to one General
25—30 panzer divisions must be
created to give Germany security
against the Russians, But the same
divisions would be a powerful
offensive unit against the West.
Within Germany it may not be
so easy to find an army, inspite oi

class is certainly willing; but if
statements
Democratic Party are to be trusted
‘there may be a lack of recruits
to join the new Reichswehr. Herr
Ollenhauer, the Vice President of
the S.P.D. (Socialist Party), has
firmly denounced
armament in the same week tha
Adenauer suggested it in the New
aper
Democrats are at the same time
the most alarmed at the devel-
opment of the East German Police
Force and also most aware of the

lowing not to be involved in an-
war or
which would once again hit the
S.P.D. stronghold in the Ruhr.

The “Atlantic”
View-point

Charles M. Spofford is in Lon-
don. A few weeks ago nobody in
the wide world of international
affairs had heard of him. Now he tier security”.
is the United States Deputy on the
Atlantic Council’—which
body of hard-headed men with the
heavy esponsibility of preparing
Western Europe’s

‘n London. They have before them
two documents put forward by
the French, and one claim from
the British Government.
these documents puts forward a
scheme for defence that would
form part of the general Europ-
ean effort to build an efficient force
in the next 2% years, The British
plan, and the first French docu-
ment have been published. They
have this in common,
both presume a large measure of
United States aid if they are to

is certainly the greater—trelative
to the present French armament
There
the present French forces
are being maintained at minimum

This, perhaps, goes to show that®cost, and that therefore the in-
ihe United States has the most
changeable
in the world and the
German is quick to grasp each
chance of remilitarisation. Cer-
tainly the simple idea that the
enemies of six years ago are
suitable allies to-day has swept
aside all other reasoning. And this
Adenauer, the Prime
Minister of the West German
Government, has created a sensa-
tion with an interview in the
New York Times declaring “we
ought to recognise
necessity for German defensive
forces”, Yet there are still reasons,
inspite of the speed with which

expenditure
equipment will
the military efficiency of forces
already in existence—out of pro-
cost.
French memorandum, (unlike the
in the form of a
plan) comes as a surprise to mili-
The French propose
‘the establishment of a single com-
mand, and the re-organisation and
simplification of the committees
and co-ordinating mechanism of
the Brussels and Atlantic Pacts,
These organisations overlayp—they
fill London with numerous mili-
tary diplomats.
French would welcome an Ameri-
can commander-in-chief? Presum—
ably they would not welcome the
of Field Marshal
Montgomery as
French

would seem to provide just the
form of international defence into
which Germany might be fitted

WINDOW ON EUROPE IDE OF WAR TURNING

|
AGAINST KOREAN |
COMMUNISTS

formidable East Was that the French purpose
Our French reporter hos it that a

whether the German force is already pro-
The French scheme for

and no doubt, country.

the same time,

arate

“overlapping.”

polls, The officer

of the Social

missioner in
Adenauer;

re- Foreign Office

The Social

of their own fol- next month.

bombardment—

is a

sions for a

defence.
force.

are now meeting

Each of the

Each of

generals.

many
that they

The French plan oad

take
train

six
on new into

greatly improve

The second divisions

than
divisions

tegrated = in

Presumably the None of the

Commander-ip- of German

suggestion



wasp.

Flobster,
delightful
The

balmy petrol-
Go,

Next the brim is

blustering."”

“The nose have it,’’ said
the beauty, with a laughing dis-
regard of grammar, physical pain

Ewart Hodgson, written in
the chart-house of the Saucy Mrs.
encloses a cutting; a

little homily,
trated about the psychology of
your grip on a tea-cup., Appar- as
ently the man who holds
cup in his fist as though it were
a glass of beer is more at home
in a bar than in a room. The
man who shoves his thumb on
“loud, coarse and
But what of the
man who fans his tea with his



By Beachcomber

hat and then

noses tire easily” (a remark which and loss of dignity, Waller red- Though I am not a psychologist,
does not apply to Evans the dened beneath his tan. I
Hearse) . ‘+ °
Give him his teaina bucket cure his wife of her foul habit of
But does it matter? What does holding the cup as
the tired nose miss today? The NOTE from Admiral Sir

illus-

the

his bachelor in

supplanted.



CRAB-MEAT CONDON FIGHTS ON

The Long-shoreman Has A Cold War Of His Own

NEW YORK.

THE tanned, slightly built young
veteran of Okinawa who stopped
the unloading of Russian crab-
meat and furs from British ships
in New York, is going further
with his campaign.

His name: Longshoreman James
Condon.

His aim: “To show the Rus-
sians that the working people are
fed up with Russia.”

“I am not anti-British or anti-
Cunard,” Cendon told me, his
bright blue eyes deeply serious.
He pointed*to pictures of the Queen
Elizabeth and boron Mary
on the wall of the modest office
he occupies in Manhattan in his
position of commander of the re-
cently created New York veterans
of Foreign Wars Post.

British Pariners

“We like the British,” he said
“We feel they are our partners
in thig fieht seainst Communism
But we do noi like the action of
the British Government in sending
crab-meat over here.”

Thirty-three years old and
grandson of a _ longshoreman,
Condon has been trying to organ-
ise a boycott of Russian exports

for more than two months. He
persuaded 25 longshoremen friends
to help to form an anti-Commun-
ist Veterans Post. Membership has
soared, A quarter of the members
wear the Purple Heart decoration.

Condon’s whole life is devoted
to what he thinks the world should
do for future generations,

‘Fed Up’

He believes the American work-
ing man can play a more impor-~
tant part than the Government
in getting messages “that hit
home” to the people of Iron Cur-
tain countries.

He pointed out that Russian
leaders claim everything the
United States does is dictated by
Wall Street millionaires, Here
was an opportunity to show the

Russian people that the workers

were “fed up” with Russia’s tac-
tics,

Condon’s Veterans’ Post are
active on other fronts of the
propaganda war. Day and night
his Post are turning out leaflets

in French, Polish, German, Italian
Russian, Rumanian They are

placed inside cargoes of
leaving for Europe.

Nearly all the leaflets are com-
posed by Conden himself, One,
aimed at French dock-workers,
says: “Yes we have loaded arms
to France. We have also sent to
France thousands of headstones
for our soldiers who will never
come home, Please don’t let them
down, They would never rest in
any totalitarian ruled country.”

Condom is a pacifist at heart
but believes that when another
country makes trouble the only
way to meet it is with courage.

He does not think the United
States should use the atom bomb.
He does believe America should
tell Russia now that any furtner
acts of aggression, even if made
by another satellite, would mean
War with the United States.

Condon, who has three children,
points out. “My eldest son, now
12 will have to fight soon for us,
unless we do something right now
about the international situation.”

He is proud of his work as long-
shoreman (though he wants his
two sons to take up one of the
professions “where they get well

ships

paid”), because he feels it ean
be an important factor in im-
proving international relations.
He believes that stopping the
flow of trade with an aggressor
can be used as a powerful weapon.

Next: The Batory

Condon is waiting with relish
for the next entry of the Polish
liner Batory to New York His
members intend to give that ship
“the works.” No cargo will be
moved from it unless it is from
countries outside the Tron Cur-
tain,

Condon said his group had
developed its own detective force
which would discover in advance
what the ship carried,

Condon does not look the tough

fighter he is, The only thing
which marks his association with
ships is a tattoo on the right arm

showing two hearts. He admitted
blushingly it was put on for a
pretty girl he met 14 years ago in
New York. She is now the mother
of his three children

* FOOTNOTE: The crabmeat
was due back at Liverpool last
week,

—L.E.S

financing the necessary expendi-
ture would seem to be the forma-
tion of a common fund and the
floating of “defense loans” in each
But Sir Stafford Cripps

ll certainly set his» face sternly
against borrowing in peacetime to
finance military expenditure. This,
to British eyes, is
And the Government will only
permit inflationary measures if, at

controls on everyday life—ration-
ing, shortages, far higher taxation
and compulsory saving. That can
only be done in time of war.
the British alternative is
ance additional military expendi-

certain measure of dollar aid—in
the form of actual equipment from

army under
mand—with co-

British Attitude

At the present date the British
views on these
been expressed :
first, there is Mr. Churchill's advo-
cacy of an European Army, (he
does not speak for the Government
but his view cannot be ignored),
secondly there‘is British identifica-
tion with the very sharp rejoinder
Mr. MacCloy, the U.S. High Com-
Germany,
thir
carefully prepared statement by. a

Britain had “full sympathy” for
Dr. Adenauer’s fears, and that the
proposals for a German militia and
stronger occupation army would be
“studied” when Mr, Bevin meets , . :
Mr, Dean Acheson, and the French | quately and the U.S. was still making fast
Foreign Minister,

particularly from France, seems

contradictory. Logically -— it is
contradictory. |
Foreign Ministers will give ap-

proval next month to a West Ger-
man police force of about 10,000
men—a very different proposition
to Dr. Adenauer’s suggested 50,000
strong para-military body charged
with internal security and “fron-

the British military authorities are
studying reports from certain Ger-
man generals on the possibilities
of rebuilding German panzer divi-
European

The Views of the Generals

many—with the
tion of the French—have “its own”

first in the field as they appreciated
the advantage of acquiring the al-

even during the war with
It seems that “their gen-
erals"—ineluding von Paulus and
his junior commanders who sur-
rendered before
well ensconced in the
German military system .

L , the German generals who confide
is evidence jn the Western Allies are surpris-

They all estimate it would only
months to recruit and
shape a

within
granted equipment, unlimited and

the various experts varies slightly.
Some suggest that there should

divisional
should
“European Army
argue that German generals should
command whole Army Corps, in-
European Armies,
Generals
like the prospect of political prob-
lems — they want to command
only regular soldiers.
unanimous rejection of the idea
“militia service”
a short period.

both hands, plunges into it, and
comes up with a dripping nose?

were a precious stone, and sip-
ping like a gnat at a bird-bath.

Social Note
GENTLEMAN who is known

Europe was
dining in the West End last night
with Dawn Kedgaree, the English

inflationary.

it replaces severe

to fin-

national com-
ordination to avoid

discussions have

in three ways—-| Walker, who

confidence.

gave Dr.

diy there is the] (he line.

spokesman that

in New York

This. to many correspondents— | )robings from becoming breakthroughs. The

But Possible Russian Or Red Chinese
interference Makes Victory Unpredictable.

“The Communist enemy in Korea was still
attacking, but his attacks no longer had the
fearsome power he had put into his drives
three weeks before.
setting against him,” Time magazine reports
in a survey of the War in Asia in its issue of
So, September fourth.

Time explains, “The Allies were steadily
ture out of taxation, add to that a| setting more manpower, weapons, supplies,
mobility; allied morale was sky-high; more
America, and maintain each sep-|~nd more Reds were surrendering. The
cnemy even seemed, as one observer said,
io be running out of plans.
probing for soft spots, and not finding any
that could be exploited as he hoped. General

ssued a stand-or-die order,
necessary to voice a warning against over-

;

“The U.S. now had five divisions on Korea. |
The South Koreans had five divisions more on} |
The first ground troops from other} }
United Nations had also begun to land.”
“Even so,” Time reports “there were still not
enough troops to man the 140-mile (about
33 kilometres)

shifts of fighting units to prevent enemy



The tides of war were

WOVE

He was merely

only a month ago had once
now found it



beachhead perimeter ade- |
{
{

But, probably, the} were slow and cumbersome, mostly carried

At the same time | perimeter . in

defence | 0£ weeks.

Allied authorities

possible excep-

Ger-

Stalingrad—are been severely

two years—

command—that
be fitted into
Corps. Others

consulied

the atomic
There is

holds the cup in

though it

ineligible
seen

most

Thanks to a_ printer! jobs they had before marria
who was short of an “R”, the] of their home
Kedgaree was reported as saying
“We are just fiends”.

i ,
OUR READERS SAY
Which Side
To, The Editor, The Advocate,

Sir, Sometime ago certain
members of the constabulary were
detailed to give talks to schools
on the question of the use of the
streets. They were not clear, when
it came to the question “On which
side of the road a pedestrian
should walk?”

It seemed to be the general
opinion nevertheless that pedes-
trians should face oncoming traf-
fic. I take this to mean walk on
the right side as against the left.

I disagree strongly with one
using the right side when walk-
ing, and had a heated argument
with whom I think a very intelli-
gent person who strongly advo-
eates walking on the right.

I will not attempt to produce
all my regsons here for my contenâ„¢
tion, The most I will say to that
from my experience as a pedes-
trian I must arrive at this conclu-
sion that the left side is the right



as against the wrong side on
which, to walk

I think it would be a good thing,
if this question could be settled
once and for all, and the public
instructed accordingly I think
too that after this question is
settled, policemen on guard should
instruct peo to use the side
apon which it is decided. I have

Kted’s shifts of strength, on the other hand,

open season for prophecies and speculations
on when the Allies would break out of the

In the lines it was widely taken for granted
that a breakout would be made in a matter
‘We'll never even find a North
Korean soldier, said a colonel, ‘they’ll all
take off their uniforms and become refugees.’ | |
and each political party in Ger-}|In Tokyo, one of General MacArthur’s com-
fortable spokesmen said that the war might,
The Russians were the | just possibly, be won by late November.”

But Time points out that “such predictions
legiance of the German generals | ignored not only the facts of life of the Korean
war itself, but the facts of life in the rest |p;s==
of Asia and the world,

East | intervention in Korea, but Stalin’s men have })}
The views being put forward by |a way of recovering quickly from surprises.
Facing this week’s situation, they were well.
ingly similar, one with another, | aware that nearly all combat-ready ground
troops at U.S. disposal, except for thin mini-
_ sh first-rate | mum needs for garrison duty, were com-
mute thst Wentern, Gerinany‘etn mitted or soon would be in Korea.
put into the field some fifteen|could soundly predict victory in Korea by
late November or for that matter by the
free. The “command policy” of|following November unless he ignored the
possibility that Moscow might set up a brush-
be no higher German command] fire somewhere else, or intensify the force
in Korea by getting China’s Communist
troops into the battle.”

In the cover story in its September 4, issue
Time reports on the U.S. Air Force’s Strate-
gie Air Command, the men and the weapon—

Churchill’s words for the one
for }deterrent” hanging over the heads of the,

Soviet Politbureau—the likeliest reason why |
~ | Russia’s aggressors have so far started a)
proxy war in Korea, and not the big one. |

What Women Want To Hear

PEOPLE catering for women’s interests
are inclined to think that women require news
think he would make an|0f fashion, beauty, cooking, home-making, |
excellent husband, and would soon | child welfare and, more than anything, how to |
get their man and, having got him, how to
keep him, Miss Gibbs of the BBC “Woman’s |
Hour” is convinced that in addition to these '
vitally important feminine topics, women
want to hear about life outside the home.| ~
She found that her listeners wanted book |
and film reviews, talks on current affairs, | |
travel and natural history and also talks on: !

odd subjects about which they knew nothing | \

at all. Many women miss the comparatively {

film-star whom Trivia Tansy has| broad and stimulating life they led in the, |'
|

domestic tasks and a programme that brings
them a change of topic is greatly appreciated.

out at night for fear of air attack. \
“The military improvement signalled an
(
!
|
j
}










a general counter offensive.

Ss

Moscow may have
diseoncerted by the bold U.S.



No man

— SS ot
= ——

bomb — which in Winston

“effective

ST Seca



'

\
\
i
}





e. A large part |

life is passed in monotonous

no objection according to one of
your correspondents to a law gov-
erning this, and drunkards who
pitch and totter all over the strets.

I have three cases in mind
where persons have lost. their {
lives by being drunk on the! ”

TEA

Streets. In short, the law affecting
intoxticated users of motor vehi-
cles should be extended to users
of bicycles and pedestrians.
CLAUDE RAMSAY.
The Black Prince

Sir,—I should be glad if you
would kindly permit me to correct



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CARRS BISCUITS

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Joan “The fair maid of Kent” | i COFFEE PRUnae ms —
married first Sir Thomas de Hol- | . cue BER Tin
land, and there are descendants! {}! en F ey s’ ee
through this marriage; and sec-| }{\ AMAICA ee eae
ondly, The Black Prince, by whom | }}) LIPTON maaS Rare
she had one son, Richard II, who| {/! MAXWELL HOUSE 7
left no descendants. Joan, wife of ! i) 1 & BR BREAD

¢

the Black Prince,
Princess of Wales.

was the first
John of Gaunt,
“time honoured Lancaster” had a

Meat Department

WATER BISCUITS

daughter, Joan, who was twice i CHEESELETS OX TONGUES
married, and she has descendants | i ASSORTED — OX TAILS . .
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Sancta

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1950

Outstanding British
Films Coming

THE PUBLIC of Barbados will soon be able to see
outstanding British films, Mz. Henry Teelucksingh Man-
aging Director of Teelucksingh Theatres Ltd. and British
and General Film Distributors Ltd. of Trinidad, told the
Advocate yesterday.

T’dad Saiihabacs
Introduced To
Local Bar

Mr. Tazmool Hosein, young
barrister of Trinidad, was admit-





"
i



. He said that previously, there
was no means of having such pic-
tures released in Barbados, but
now, through his company’s as-
sociation with Caribbean Theatres
Ltd, the local public will be able
to enjoy such outstanding British
films as “Spring in Park Lane”,
the National Academy Award
winner 1949-50, starring Anna
Neagle and Michael

: Wilding;
ted to practise at the local Bar « ”
by His Honour the Chief Judge, Teer eri meta tan

Sir Allan Collymore, before the
business of the Court of Ordinary
was begun yesterday. ° He was
introduced by Mr. F. A. Field,
Acting Attorney General.

Mr. Field making the introduc-

technicolour musical, “The Great
Mr. Handel”; Charles Dickens’
“Nicholas Nickelby”; “‘Elizabeth of
Ladymeade” and “Green Fingers”.
Mir. Teelucksingh said thav the
; 4 s vhy so few British pictures
tion, told the Chief Judge that sca : e ‘i
Mr, Hosein was a Trinidadian by \YTe Shown in Barbados was that
birth, and that he had been ad- PiS company’s competitors were
mitted a member of the Inner contracted mostly with the major
Society of Lincoln’s Inn in 1943. American film companies
In 1946 he had passed the final :
examination for the Bar, obtain~ 44. aig een =
ing a Certificate of. Honour, and Bae) Mayen mene Ses Wilt. DOW.
being placed first in the order of possible at the Plaza theatres to
evit ; 7 get newsreels more quickly thar
: Z it before as arrangements are bein
ue ace % net Fohet *ton marie to release the latest Ameri-
aie be tht ‘ tack a are os ‘ ae can newsreels simultaneously wiih
tscate oe Hon a ae a the Trinidad, British Guiana and New
Buchanan Prize whi Sey wea eDER The British. newsreelt
va Sail tha Would be about two weeks behind
eas ee eke te ah the American ones and he ativib-
first in the first class division ‘and uted 'hat to transport difficulties
whose work was of sufficiently t a: ne, “a ce
high standard to justify the ‘° 8¢t Italian or French films her:
aeatd he said that all films distributed
' in Barbados had to be released

Mr. Hosein was called to the ae ;
; nig " vhrough the Trinidad Film Ex-
English Bar in January, 1947, and changes and due to currency regu-

in May of that year was admitted

Head Leaves
For St. Martin’s

MR. C. O. ALLEYNE, formerly
Headmaster of St Margaret's
Mixed School, St. John, has been
promoted to the headship of St
Mertin’s Boys’ School, St. Philip,
and a farewell function was held
for him recently at the School
where he worked so long



: lations in Trinidad, no foreigr Revd. Mellor speaking at the
to the Trinidad Bar, He was now ae eld be tanpotted. itont function congratulated Mr. Alleyne
a_ practising barrister in that 4, ‘approval of the financial au- 09. his appointment, describing
colony. thorities him as a hard worker, and one

eA that had done much for St. Mar-
Certificate oi Call garet’s. He was sorry, on the
other hand, that the school was

Mr. Field told the Chief Judge
that Mr. Hosein had not got his
Certificate of call with him but
there was a certificate by Mr.

going to lose Mr.. Alleyne’s ser-
vices.

Recitals, Lectures
At British Council

Miss Mabel Hutson who said she

had worked with Mr. Alleyne
W. R. Douglas, the Deputy Regis- Coe f < :
trar confirming that Mr Hosein ISS ENID RICHARDSON, aa SNS ORTA also paid tribute to
was a practising Barrister in Music Officer of the British ‘ed nek Way ie ope mi weenwins
Trinidad. Council, will give recitals and carry out his duties, She Ww eden
“I believe too, sir,” Mr. Field lectures throughout this month. ,) \ a war

said, “that Mr, Hosein is known They will all take place at the ic Rhee Be eae

Mr. H. A. Thorne also ¢ B
to Your Honour, he having ap- British Council, Wakefie/d. Ning quota wit erties fir pad
peared before the West Indian The programme is as follows: Ajjeyne. ‘
Court of Appeal when it was held Lecture — Recitals: Mondays,
in Trinidad recently. September 4, 11, 18, and 25 at 8.15 Mr. C. D. RAMSAY spoke on

“Mr. Hosein as far as I know p.m, The subject for September
is not the first Trinidad Barrister 4 is “Music and the Ordinary
to be introduced to the Bar of Listener.”
this island. I do not know wheth- —_ Lectures (primarily for teachers
er it is his intention to practise but others welcome): Wednesdays
extensively his profession in this September 6, 13, 20 and 27 at 6.00
island. But he many find that p.m. The subject for September
our practice is not as lucrative 6 will be “Aural Training”. Both

behalf of the Social Workers of the
St. Mergaret’s Branch of St. John’s
Baby Welfare League, and said
Mr. Alleyne had always taken
great interest in the social work of
the parish.





A vote of thanks was moved by

as that of Trinidad, For that series are open to the public. Mr. L. T. Gay, Inspector of

reason he probably may not be Schools

so anxious to spend a very long HE POLICE BAND under | Among others present — were

time here. Capt. C. E, Raison will rersyioe “ aah * : aan ne
“I can assure him, speaking on pay at the opening stage show of 47. Lorde, Mr. ell, iss

behalf of all the members of the Play ats : eg 8 Mayers.

the Bridgetown Plaza Theatre to- Mr. ‘Bert Moore ane Mr.

night,

The finishing touches were
done to this theatre yesterday. The
outside of the building has an un-
plastered limestone finish and has
been treated with a_ protective
coat of waterproof salmon pink.

The restaurant was equipped
with glasses, cups and plates yes-

Bar, that if and when he prac- Squires.
tists in any of the Courts of this
istand, he will be accorded the
same courtesies which are accord-
ed to Barbadians practising in
these Courts. I think too that he
will find that the members of
the local Bar will be as anxious
to cross swords with him as he

Court Of Appeal

Reverses Decision

A DECISION of Mr. H. A

H

BARBADOS

QUESTION






ee
-“,, ~~
eee . a

%

ADVOCATE
TIME

€

DR. GREAVES, Port Health Officer, questions the passengers befor. he examines them.

nee ne

St. Margaret's) YMCA Will Soon

Have New H.Q.

WHEN the Y.M.C.A. held their seventieth Annual General

Meeting at their headquartérs

A, E. Armstrong, appealed to the members to do their utmost on the

yesterday, the President Rev.

to increase the membership of the Association which has

decreased this year by 20

The President was presentin,
the Annual Report and account
for the year.

His Excellency the
attended the meeting
sented trophies to the

Governor
and pre-
winners of

billiards, snooker, table tennis and
draughts,
Hon. H. A. Cuke, M.L.¢

presided as Chairman, His Excel
lency and he were welcomed by
the President

The President told the member
that as they would notice in the
report the Directorate had taken
a step that perhaps would write
history as far as the Y.M.C.A.
was concerned, They had sold
the present building and were
going to remove in a short time
over to the building on the other
side of the road. They had
always been yearning for a play-
ing field where they could play
football, cricket, tennis ete., and
so the directorate had seized the
opportunity that had come alony
Probably that afternoon would
be the last time they would he
meeting in that hall on
occasion like the present.

Well Pleased

He would like to draw to the
attention that Mr. B. D. Kaye of
the Scottish National Council had
been to the place and expressed
himself well pleased. He had
even talked of using it as a trai:
ing centre for secretaries of
similar associations in the Carib-

bean area.
He (Rev, Armstrong) cid not
know how that would develop,

but he felt sure that when
Kaye returned home he

Mr.

would

with them, and I believe that torqay morning and chairs and [alma, City Police Magistrate, was | make efforts to put his suggestion
Barbadians are known to be peo- tapjes have also been installed. Yesterday reversed by Mr. J. W. B.| into effect.

ple who can hold their own This restaurant will be opened Chenery and Mr. H. A. Vaughn, As regards the directorate, he

against all comers. from eight in the morning until ae eh ee . wae did not think that at any time

mid-night. ppeal, 1eir Honours dismissed } during his Presidency he had got

Called to the Bar The projection equipment is @ case which the police brought; more co-operation and more

“I now ask Your Honour to ad- «westar” by Western Electric. against Clarence Cummins of | interest in the work than from

mit Mr. Hosein to practise at the : Lemon Arbor, St. John, accusin’| the present Bourd. “All _ the

Bar of Barbados.”’ POLICE CONSTABLE told him of having stolen three pieces] members and I should be fully

of wood from a lorry on May 3
Mr. Talma had fined him £1.

The Court held that the evidence
was altogether too vague to convict
Cummins of larceny.

The Chief Judge said; “Mr. the Advocate yesterday that
Hosein, you have been vouched motorists who park their motor
for as a member of the Legal vehicles in restricted areas some-
Profession practising as a Bar- times slow up the flow of traffic.
rister, by the learned Deputy He also said that this type of of-
Registrar. As the learned At- fender is becoming a nuisance.
torney General, has remarked, I Of the six traffic offences record-
for my part know that you are ed yesterday two motorists were
a practising Barrister in Trinidad, charged with parking in restricted
because you have appeared be- areas, One was charged for fail-
fore the West Indian Court of jng to produce his licence and an-
Appeal, of which at that time I other for failing to stop at a major
happened to be a member. road.

Another rnotorist was charged
for not stopping at the request of
a Police Constable and also not



NEW ITEMS

NEW YORK.

Frogs legs and caviare are on
a list of 60 new items on which
the United States will seek tariff
reductions at a general tariff re-
ducing conference next month
Other items on the new list:
Enamel paints, soya bean oil and
linseed, tomatoes, patent barley
and barley flour, silver, jute, toys
apparel, cast-iron pipes and fit-
tings, aluriinum and alloys.

“In that colony, after a con-
tinuous academic career, I know

that you have obtained a re- moving at the request of a P.C.
markable measure of success. I “NONNIE ALLISON, a Sister at
congratulate you on your pasb the General Hospital, re-
cory gg meee, thin as ported oe tea _ re
ig ce im the Was walking along Bay Street a
soohaas a Sau aie. in the about 10.30 p.m. on mae eraey
_“You now admitted to practise, on bes WM aeieined aaah
if you so desire, in the Courts Of and articles to the value of $53.90.
Mr. Hosein replying thanked Po Te Patestion
the Chief Judge for having ad- ~ nat 4 ak Wereekete) Hos-
i him, and the Acting At- WS treated at Mie Sens S
mitted yi pital for injuries and discharged.



accident on Paynes Bay Road at
about 9.30 a.m. on Friday,

A bicycle owned by Lionel Dash
of Shop Hill, St Thomas, and rid-
den by Livingston Forde of the
same address, was also involved.

ne eo for having in- G6 was involved in an accident
et wish ‘to assure Your Hon- With motor car M 2680, owned by THIRD PEDESTRIAN,

Harold Sisnett of Whitepark Road
and driven by John Sisnett of the
seme address, along Spry Street
at about 10.15 a.m. sia es:
' ti NOTHER PEDESTRIAN, Er-
tain the high traditions of the 7 id
Bar of Barbados, as I have tried meta Grant of Paynes Ray,
during the course of my _ short St. James, was wounded on her
practise in Trinidad.” mouth after being involved in an

Yvonne Waterman of Good
Intent, St. George, was treated at
the General Hospital for injuries
on Friday and discharged.

She was involved in an accident
along Good Intent Road with a
bicycle owned and ridden by Cleo-
phas Ward of Ellerton, St. George.

our,” he said, “that if it becomes
necessary for me to practise in
the Courts of this island. I shall
always do my best to try to main-



AT SEAWELL YESTERDAY

’



wt ca as le Steamy al a ~ oF



MOST OF THE PEOPLE in this picture are would-be passengers by B.W.1L.A. who thought
that they would be leaving Barbados yesterday But Mother Nature had other ideas A cross
wind over the cunway made it impossible for two of B.W.LA’s services to operate at Seawell
yesterday, and the third service which did land, did not leave owing to maintenance. Picture
shows passengers and friends gathered oustide the Terminal Building preparing to return to

Bridgetown.

appreciative of their efforts in the
interest of the Association.”

The Association had been given
a good sevretary in the person of
Mr. H, H, Williams. “The work
of the Association depends largely,
and I might say, entirely, upon
the zeal, enthusiasm and interest
that Mr. Williams puts into it. 1
do not think we can find a better
secretary.”

Spiritual Aspect

He must not leave out what they
might think, and what he regard-
ed, as the most important of their
activities—the spiritual aspect. He
was saying this was the most im-
portant because members of the
Assnciation must try to realise
that the Y.M.C.A. was a brother-
hood of christian young men
bunched together in a spirit
fe‘iowship. It was not a social club

The President ended: ‘“‘May I in
conclusion say that I hope God
will bless our work in this coming
year." He then presented the re-
port which had been printed and
circulated





Mr. M. E. Cox, M.C.P., moved
the adoption of the report and
pointed out that It had been

drawn to his attention that under
the Head Fixed Assets where ap-
peared the item “Land and Build-
ing ‘St. Germain’ $11,238.66" the
figure should have read $13,238.66



instead. It was a misprint

} Mr. L. T. Gay, Inspector of
' schools seconded the motion and
the report was adopted.

Vote of thanks to the directors
and officers was moved by Mr.
E. A. Mayers and Mr. A. de L.
Inniss replied

Mr. F. A. Pile was re-appointed
atiditor.

The Chairman told the meeting.
that he had been very pleased to

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STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO.,. LTD.

The total membership is now 578.

come there that afternoon and
would like to thank them most
heartily tor inviting him to pre-
side over their meeting. He hoped
they would progress very consid-
erably during the coming year. He
ended: “I would also like to take
the opportunity to thank Your Ex-
ellency most sincerely Tor coming
nere and presenting the prizes.”

Mr. V. C. Knight moved a vote
of thanks to Mr. Cuke

The prize-winners were as fol-
lows

Billiards “A”
Lashley

Billiards “B”
Taylor

Class—-Mr. B. D.

Class—-Mr. W

Snooker—-Mr. L, A. M. Watts

Table Tennis “A” Class—Mr. C.
Gooding.

Table Tennis ‘“B" Class—Mr. M.
Cave

Draughts—Mr. W. N. Grannum



Letters Of
Administration
Granted

TWO petitions for Letters of
Administration were granted, and
ihe wills of four people were ad-
mitted to Probate, by His Honour
the Chief Judge, Sir Allan Col-
lymore, yesterday. First petition
was that of Hilda Clarke of St.
Michael, the constituted attorney
of Hugh Clarke, the heir-at-law,
for Letters of Administration to
the estate of her father, Cecil
Hilary Clarke, late of St. Michael

Petitioner was represented
Mr, C. H. Clarke, K.C.,
by Messrs. Carrington & Sealy.

Second petition was that filed
by Evelyn Adora Alleyne of
Welchman Hall, St. Thomas, for
Letters of Administration to the
estate of her late husband, James
Gilbert Alleyne.

by
instructed

The wills admitted were those of
the following: James Adolphus
Cox, late of St. Thomas; Keziah
Austrum, late of Christ Church;
Clarence Bayley, late of St.
Michael; Edith Dorethea Walker,
late of St. Joseph.

130 Cross
Atlantie

@ From page 1

Manuel Vargas is owner-skip-
per of the boat but he told the
“Advocate” that they had all con-
tributed towards its purchase and
also to the cost of the food,

Manuel Reina, a mechanical
engineer is the only one on board
who speaks English. He has tra-
velled extensively and learnt Eng-
lish in London. He also visited
Cuba and the U.S.A.

They left the Canary Islands on
July 28 and they hope to reach
Venezuela sometime next week.

Since Thursday afternoon they
were in sight of Barbados on the
southern coast but they did not
know where they could find the
harbour. '

Yesterday afternoon while Jose
Vargas, the captain’s brother was
working on the engine some were
singing “Isas Canarias’ the na-
tive song of the Canaries.

They will leave in a day or two
as soon as they can get in more
supplies and effect the necessary
repairs to the engine.

‘

6606°

io

building of the
the building of a new warehouse
and that has already been com-








PAGE FIVE



Reeonstruction
Of Castries

Progressing

WORK on the reconsiruction
ot Castries is progressing satis-

tactorily Hon'ble Allen M. Lewis,
Chairman
Board and a deleyate at the Oils
and Fats Conference

of the Castries Town

told the
“Advocate” yesterday.

He said that work is also pro-

gressing on the laying out of the
new streets, Some of the houses
are completed and it is
that they will be tenanted by the
end of this month.

hoped

Work is going ahead on the

laying down of a sewage system
but it is mot possible to say when
it will be finished. There is also
work on the water supply scheme
— anew one approved
years ago — and this was due
to begin yesterday.

some

He said that part of the
town

re-
included

pleted,
The reconstruction employs
about 1,500 people and has led

to an inerease in wage rates for
both skilled and unskilled labour.
£800,000 Reconstruction

It was found that the cost of
reconstruction was going to be
ri her more than the original es-
timates of £800,000, hence a de-
legate was sent to London in July
this year and they have obtained
® substantial increase in the
amount of the Imperial grant in
erder to assist reconstruction, At
the same time, they have obtain-
cd a grant of $720,000 to be used
development of a road
programme which is being inte-

ated with an agricultural devel-
ovment programme in order te
raprove the economic position of
the colony.

Mr, Lewis said that the Vieux
Fort Interim Development Scheme
so far, has been doing well, It is
d.vided into two parts, a central
farm and peasants holdings and
the Agricultural Department has
succeeded in putting about 600
families on to the latter.

For the firs’ two years, the de-
partment’s efforts were directed
.principally to the cultivation of
cotton on the central farm, but
that has not proved very success-
ful. This year they are concentra-
ting on the grow!ng of rice, a
crop to which the peasants have
token more quickly than the cotton
crop,

Rice Cultivation

He said that if the weather re-
rains favourable, it is expected
that the area now in rice culti-
vation, will produce a sufficiently
lerge crop to satisfy the colony's
needs.

The scheme is due to end in
July and efforts are being made
to continue it, at least for a fur-
ther year, as nothing final has
heen decided about the re-estab- |
Vshment of the sugar factory.

He said that there is a large
rumher of Barbadians in the
Vieux Fort area and they orcupy
a number of the peasants holdings }

|
!





What’s on Today

Rifle Shooting, Government
Range at 1,30 p.m.

First and Second Divisions
Cricket, 1.30 p.m.

Police Band at Opening of
New Plaza Theatre, 8.15
p.m

DIAL 3113
The Advocate pays for News |
{ Night and Day. |

APPEALED :
FINED 10]-

HUGH CLARKE of Mt. Stead-~-
fast, St. James was yesterday
fined 10/- by Judge J. W. B, Chen- |
ery and Judge H. A. Vaughan of
the Assistant Court of Appeal,
Their Honours upheld the decision
of Mr. S. H. Nurse, Police Magis-
irate, Who had found Clarke guil-
ty of having assaulted and beaten
James Alleyne on April 23.
Clarke was also ordered.
vay 7s, 8d. appeal costs,

to




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PAGE SIX





Doctors

IINGTON, Sept. 1
mercan Joint Senate
an iy use of Representatives’
Cou © agreed to-day to a Bill
to ¢ p. .or 21 months, male
dectois and dentists up to 50

years old who are nov in armed
Forces reserves.

The Bill would apply also to
pharmacists, veterinary surgeons
and opticians.

The Committee was appointed
to compromise differences be-
tween separate Bills passed by
the Senate and House.

The Bill was later passed by the
House of Representatives; it now
goes to the Senate

—Reuter



Exports To Russia
Will Be Restricted

LONDON, Sept. 1.
Continuous exchanges between
British and American officials
are taking place in Washington
to ensure that strategic materials
are not exported to Russia a Brit—
ish Foreign Office Spokesman

said today
: —Reuter.



Seer BR

To Be

Conseripted



1947.




IMPERIALIST. FASCIST
WARMONGER !"







He said that exchanges have
been taking place for some time
Lut no representation had been
nade on Government level by the
United States on the control of
exports.

It is understood by observers
here, that the exchanges are de-
signed to ensure continuous con -
trols over exports from the West-
ern world to Russia.

—Reuter.



Piugging Trade
“Loopholes”

Against Russia

WASHINGTON, Sept. 1

Diplomatic officials said to-day
they expected United States
Secretary of State Dean Acheson
s0on to discuss with Britain and |
France, means of plugging trade
“loopholes” by which war material
might reach the Soviet sphere.

The United States would prob-
ably bring up the question anew
at a meeting of the “Big Three”
Foreign Ministers this month, |
officials said.

President Truthan said yester-
Gay that efforts were already
being made to get other countries
to tighten up.



—Reuter.



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News Fro

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UKE ME!



aS

m

Britain

By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

LONDON.

Down at Bickleigh, in Devon-
shire, is the training camp where
the Royal Marine Commandos,
who will soon be in action in
Korea, are chafing at the bit, They
will go to war in a new style—
wearing civilian clothes while they
fly half across the world,

This is a young and confident
foree — one of the most highly
trained in the world. Their camp
in Bickleigh was chosen for
natural features nearby that give
the Marines a chance to prepare
for tough conditions. For instance,
they g> over nearby cliffs sliding
down a rope — “the death slide” it
is called—as part of training re-
ferred to as the “Tarzan course.”

Reporters recently jotted down
some of the views of these
men on Korea, One point that
comes clear is that those Com-
mandos are more interested in
their job than in the details of pro-
cedure at Lake Success that will
send them to Korea. ‘We are be-
ing sent out to do a job.” said a
sergeant, “we shall do it to the
best of our ability.” And a younger
und typically eager, Marine said:
“IT don’t know much about Com-
munism, but we'll soon polish them
off.”

They are commanded by a vet-
eran of war in Burma. When they
get to Korea, (time and route of
flight are security secrets) they
will go straight into action, From
the reports coming from the front
this week, troops with the toughest
experience of hill-climbing seem
most called-for,

Meanwhile the British contin-
gent drawn from Hong-Kong is on
its way, And if some stories are
true, they, too are tough fighting
men—not “Occupation Forces.”
idling in the towns,

Fouotball In August

In spite of the fiasco the England
(eam suffered in the “World Cup”
competition earlier in the Summer,
tootball is still the most amazing
Saturday “draw” Even in August,
with the sun shining and the coun-
tryside still calling, 1,200,000
people watched football last Sat-
urday -—- the highest “gate” ever
recorded, Each year the season is
arranged to start earlier, And it
makes no difference to the crowds
that cricket is not over before foot-
ball begins. The great promoters
—mainly of Liverpool—now run
their “Pools” on matches for 39
weeks out of 52 in the year. Per-
haps that is why the football sea-
son grows longer and the “Sum-
mer” shorter.

Channel Swimming

For all that the “Daily Mail”
tried to make the best of it by or-
ganising the year’s Channel swim-
mers into a race, this twenty mile
swimming Marathon seems a dull
sport. It is too long. It has been
proved that men and women can
swim the Channel, The tenacity
of the swimmers; the change of
currents; and good fortune, carry
some swimmers over and defeat
others, But the Egyptian, Hussun
Abd el Rahim, seemed a happy
character who deserved to wit the
race, the prize and the records, H*
did what has never been recorded:
before—managed to speed up eo
he approached the cliffs of Dover
When all was done I thought of
the “others”—the also rans, who
managed to swim the distance but
arrived sixth or eighth, unherald-
ed unsung, and missing the golden
hour of publicity that an individ-
ual swimmer sets out for

*
The Law is an Ass

Did you know that the children
acting in recent English films—
such as Bobby Henrey in “The
Fallen Idol”, have been perform-
ing illegally? Until this week I
had not given more than a passing
thought to what happens to child
actors who travet the country in

troupes. But the report, just pub-
lished, concerning the law on
Child Performances, reveals that
the position is different for stage
and screen For stage perform-
ances, most things were permissi-
ble —under antiquated legislation
that did little to protect the edu-
cation of the children, But Cine-
ma studios are factories as far as

the law is concernéd, subject to
the normal rules forbidding chil-

dren to be employed. The sugges-
tions of the Commission are sensi-
ble. They suggest the law should
be altered rather than have it
winked at for the sake of another
“Oliver Twist.” At the same time
they proposed to put up the age
at which girls could go on the

Stage—to form part of the juvenile
chorusé@s of music hall shows. We
can probably do without those

choruses—if sensible exceptions,
the same for stage and flim -set,
are made for a tew chi'd actors to
perform, under careful safeguards,

King farouk’s Bad rr. is

What is it that excites a kind of
cnvious and malicious glee in the
British Préss at the flamboyance
ef the Idle Rich? King Farouk’s
jaunt to Deauville has i:ritated tht
British public—so an American
reporter says. Certainly his every-
day doings have been reported in
such a way as to make him look
as foolish as possible. If the news
papers are to be trusted, Farouk
seems an unhappy, lonely man,
surrounded only by bodyguard
and stooges, Certainly nis ap-
proach to Deauville was as osten-
tatious as a “Satrap proroguing a
Sanhodrin”, and it appeared too
Eastern and Royal for these days
But why do his dull antics attract
much attention? People play for
higher stakes at Deauville every
season. And none of the reporters
has succeeded in unearthing a
scandal from the hotel rooms of

the French Watering Place, Is it
merely that wealth has, in itself,
unnatural newsvalue in a socialist
state? The American reporter
who noticed the anti-Farouk tone
of our British press, connected it
with anti-Egyptian sentiment. 1
doubt it! He quoted Egypt’s bill
to Britain for saving her from
Rommel, But I doubt whether this
colours British feelings. I would
like to know, though, whether
King Farouk likes getting such a
bad press,
The Festival

“Are you going to the Festival
this year?” There is no need
to put “Edinburgh” into the sen-
tence, The organisers of the
International Festival of Music
and Drama have sold their wares
well, But what is the purpose of
the Festival. Of course, it shows
off the fine streets of the most
beautiful capital city of Northern
Europe. In music, the Festival
organisers are indeed being inter-
national. They have brought the
world’s finest Opera
from Milan—London will be
graced with La Scala after Edin-
burgh, But in drama the temp-



company’

' re -. :
Canada’s

Position

sided and unstable, it is



SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1950

RELIEF FOR
RTHRITIC PAINS

But new treatment does more than

Economic

" a
‘Its Dependence on the Sterling Area ease these terrible agonies.
Acknowledgsme: . EMPIRE PRODUCER, Jjuly—Ausust) LCL has been created which not only gives
—y T economic "relations between nations are one- Se ED ts »! due to the symptoms ot spe and
impossible for them long to] rheumatism, but also affects the metabolic processes which constitu
maintain mutual confidence and co-operation in other ie thoroughly tested in medical institutions.

phases of their international relationship, no matter how
great or important they ray be.

~~ ~ present economic crisia
oft the free nations, any attempts
|to justify a given form of settle-
‘ment the grounds of over-
,"iding political and military ex-
,pedieney are, therefore, ‘based
{upon a fallacy, Unless the eco-
| “ornic settlement be both equitable
jand workable, all political and
| mili efforts will be rendered
not only impotent in themselves,
but provocative of friction. Un-
less economic policies are formu-
lated in the light of fundamental
economic facts, the diplomatic
and strategic potential of the
| whole free world will be seriously
reduced, and it may prove impos-
sible to maintain the unity of the
| free nations, even under the men-
jace of Communist aggression. The
basic economic necessity of every
nation is the maintenance of in-
“cme and employment. This is so
|'n any modern, highly déveloped
nation because the consequences
;of a failure to do so involve not
rnly the economic impoverish-
nent of all Classes in the nation,

it social and political upheaval
ag well.

Necessity of Export Markets

That the maintendhce of income
~nd employment in Canada is de-
fendent upon the maintenance of
xport markets is established by
ue following facts:

(a) Out of every three Cana-
cuans who are gainfully employed
one is directly employed in pro-
duction for export;

(b) The employment and in-
come of the remaining two of
these three, are dependent upon
the maintenance of the purchas-
ing power of the first man through
the sale of his product in export
markets;

(c) This condition has hela con-
sistently throughout Canadian
economic history.

The part played by each of
Canada’s export markets in main-
taining employment and income,
however, is by no means propor-
tionate to its monetary value:

(a) Over the past eighty years,
goods having a high labour-con-
tent have predominated in Cana-
dian exports to the other British
countries; eg., in 1946, 85 per
cent, of exports to the sterling
area were in this category.

(b) Over the same périod,
Canada’s exports to the United
States—Canada’s other principal
customer—uniformly have been of
a low labour-content class. In



1946, 77 per cent. of Canadian =

exports to the U.S.A. had a low
job-value.

(c) Ip this way, the ster
area provides direct employment
for approximately 1,250,000 Cana-
dians; whilst the U.S.A. provides
employment for a maximum of
- 250,000, or one-fifth the num-
er,

The sterling area, therefore, is
the market upon which the main-
tenance of employment and _ in-
come in Canada depénds, That
Canada is rapidly losing this yital
market is a fact easily demon-
strated by a comparison of re-
cent statistics with any earlier
period—post-war or pre—war,
This loss has been attributed to
4 dollar shortage in the sterling
area, The term dollar shortage
may well describe the symptom,
Lut not the malady; the financial
aspect of the present crisis is but
a golden mirror reflecting the
‘ark image of the fundamental
cause: a world-wide break-down
in the exchange of goods and
services. This world-wide break-
down involves changes in both
the relative and the absolute
productive and consumptive ca-
pacities of many nations. These
changes are permanent in that the
old, pre-war economic balance
never again will exist on the
vame basis;
| (a) The accumulated resources
}of an entire century’s productive
\effort in Great Britain and Western
|Europe have been expended in
two world wars;

(b) A substantial part of that
;expenditure has ‘gone to build up
productive capacity in the
United States and in Canada, but
without the normal corresponding
increase in the consumptive ca-
pacity of the nations so expending
their aovumulated resources;

(c) The eccnomically dominant
nation no longer is Grea! Britain
whose economy was based upon a
«vee exchange of goods and servic-
es and the permanent existence of





tation to be Scottish has provedja so-called “adverse” balance of
too much. Four plays made up}trade;

the Festival, and three are by
Scots dramatists. The fourth
would never be played again if it
had not been written by
Jonson, He was probably in fin-
ancial distress and the payment
went by the line—so he made it
long and repeated himself as often
ws he dared.
Fare” has not been rroduced for
100 vears. Why now? f
But Edinburgh's festival \s a
function in the calender, Fy,r all
its aristocracy, for all the gray
hairs of the organisers, for all its
cull choice of excellnt music
wonderfully played by the best
performers, it is a tough crack at
Venice and Florence. Apart from
that, it is always good propaganda

for Scottish Nationalists—aq cause
I have dear at heart since I left

Scotland.

Cattle Hides Need
S. Licenses

WASHINGTON, Sept. 1.
U.S. Commerce



The

some electrical

Ben,

Deyart-
ment has added cattle hider, and
insulating mate-
rial to its growing list of goods

j (d)The economically dominant
ina tou, America, has an economic
system built upon restraint of
trode, and upon the permanent
existence of surplus of exports
over imports;

{| (e) The widespread develop-
‘ment of synthetic products to

“Bartholomew j‘meet the needs of war, has des-

jtroyed many of the markets for
the natural products of other
) countries;

' (f) Inspired by the le of
America, or in order to achieve
military self-sufficiency, many
countties—for example, in South
|America and behind the “Iror
;Curtain’’—are striving to achieve
Fos fact that the process is wholly
uneconomic and eventualty will
depress the living standards of
their people yet further,

The General Agreements on
Tariffs and Trade and the Havana
Charter of the ITO represent an
attempt—perhaps the last attempt
—to turn back the clock:, They
are unworkable because they
presuppose that the funclamental
changes outlined above ‘nave not
taken place; these

ling the fact that blind non-discrimin-

industrial self-sufficiency despite |,

arpreements




now with unprecedented success. DOLCIN

ge the rheumatic state’s background.
used
by d

. 9 d -
joctors now. id a sufferers have already

: resul king DOLCIN.
Don’t Foe ere chorience of Soliow-vidthine of these
Get Di today. A bottle of 100 precious tablets costs
fait wy

fm Sale at ROOKER’s

in American habits and






STORER (Biden) _



um



the 1913 level, Yet in 1913, Cana-
ga’s unfavourable balance. with
the U.S.A.

the effective




latéd to 7

id to 71 cent, of imports

from heU.B A in the same year,
Had the tariff provisions of the

Geneva Trade Agreement been al-

lowed to come into force in 1947,

Vs a
ai\_(G

can give in any trade agreement is

such a fine balance of advantage

that no fundamental remedy for

the dollar shortage can in any way

result.

The non-discrimination clauses
of the Geneva ent, how-
ever, did become operative, with
the following effect: Canada’s
dollar shortage necessitated ces-
sation of purchases of American
vegetables; non-discrimination
made mand
vegetables of all other countries
as well. One result was that to-
matoes soared to six times their
normal price in Canadian mar-
kets, whilst tomatoes which might
have been bought with sterling
rotted in the West Indies. A

case of chocolate which Canadi-
ans did without whilst United
Kingdom manufacturers sought a
market,

So also with Canadian exports:
Canada was required to give up
her preference on apples in the
United Kingdom market, and the
resultant loss brought about the
up-rooting of 240,000 apple—trees
Nova Scotia, whilst Fnglish
people went without the fruit.
These and many other examples
which might be cited, illustrate









EIGHT FRAGRANCES THAT
MEET THE NEEDS OF ALL

%& GOLD MEDAL EAU DE COLOGNE
%& ENGLISH LAVENDER

%& ROYAL BRIAR EAU DE COLOGNE
%& ROYAL BRIAR LOTION

% LOTION EAU DE COLOGNE

%& MIRAGE

& 24 FLOWERS EAU DE COLOGNE

atior in trade, in the present cir- ‘BALLET RUSSE EAU DE COLOGNS

cumstances, can result in a
diminution of world trade and yet

more frantic attempts to achieve
self- lency.

Neither is there any évidence
that any permanent solution is to
be found through efforts to bring
down the cost of sterling area and
Canadian products in the Ameri-
can market through currericy
devaluation, lower taxation, or
even greater industrial efficiency:
the American economy simply
can not absorb the volume of
goo American indus-
trial productive capacity has in-
creased not = than ae 4
—some say per ie
last ten years. The American
labour-force has increased 45 per
cent but the population has risen
by only 12 cenit. in the same
period. The problém thus posed
is this: if a-slightly smaller popu-
lation could not maintain _—_

trial plant in the 1930’s when
oreign goods were ex-
cluded, how could a
larger population maintain, at full
empleyment, a much larger la-
bour-force and industrial plant in
the 1950’s, and also absorb vast
quantities of cheap foreign goods?
Similarly with American agri-
culture. The size and extent of
the American surpluses which
have appeared already are well
known and some of the cycles
have not yet reached their x
Nor is ogee recourse to ?
and credits any more satisfac-
tory; they merely postpone the
day of reckoning which would
ble: ee x more dete
roblem, an e in a
Yom the question of unrequited
exports.
A Fatile Pursuit
All available evidence, there-
fote, indicates that the dollar
will continue throughout
the foresteable future. This is so,
not because of the stupidity or
greed of any power or powers,
but because the cure would be
more difficult and painful than
the malady, No amount of finan-
cial juggling or monetary tink-
= will
ie

BY APPOINTMENT
PRRPUMERS TO H.M. KING GRORGE VI
J. & RB. ATEINSON LID,

ATKINSONS, 24 OLD BOND STREET, LONDON, ENGLAND

t ca would entail the
of solutions which, though
not ideal, are practical possibili-
ties,

In Such, circumstances,

Now's thetime forthis young

Man to learn the safe, gentle
way to Inner Cleanliness ! A glass
of sparkling “fizzy” Andrews is
a delightfully refreshing drink.
More important still, however,

diversified a trading area as is it ensures everyday good health

° to them. The development
or tikes .

arate economic spheres by cleaning the mouth, settling
ui aay coapiealn Sues the stomach and toning up the
the free nations. Such co-opera- liver. Finally, Andrews pantly

tion is essential in the face of Rus-|
sian a. and Red Imperial-
ism, and the achievement of eco-
romic stability by these groups
will the

clears the bowels.

Just a teaspoonful in a glass of
cold water and here’s an excit-
ing, sparkling drink — here’s

assume conditions whic - st eces nner Cleanline:
requiring licences before export/er exist. They cuenta nae to. Southend ceases “amongst the way to fi -
to any country except Canada, efficacious only if the United potential aggressors.

Export controls the Depart-|States wera to adopt in their en- ch grouping would in no way AT ¥
ment announced would he used '|tirety the trade and fiscal policies imply tio a trade-war with the Yu ’ % ‘i
to prevent the res’hipment of|of Great Britain in the 19th cen- United ‘States nor involve discri- ; : a A
Strategic goods to Communist|tury, The Marshall Plan itself is mination against her exports up 3 z ¥
ernnietes and to protect we a tact admission by the most to,the value of the imports which aeeeeedPathn s,apyâ„¢, ga ot
can economy aga’ nst possible | enlightened Americans that sh ud accept f AL Pas
shortages, officials said. £20,000 m. cash @xpenditiire is a erste, The eee ae [= se [ORM OFSLAXATIVE
--Reuter.| lesser burden tham such a drastic On Page 9






























SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1950 BARBADOS, ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN

ValentineBowls Well {: et ee ee ep ee Footballers Cannot Play









Bogota was a contravention of the








oe LONDON, Sept. 1
® * “ Two footballers Neil Franklin | Football Association and Football e
Oo In er ent , : ‘ oe ‘ and George Mountford of Stoke |League Club rules and regula- €
V zm h ; i City have been suspended y| | tions. —Reuter. e
a. il , ; : the Football Association for leav. ;
: s i ing their clubs while under con- : i
He And G. d dar d Dis iss tract. Www .
nm Both had played in Bogota, 3 ).
Colombia. = -
County Bats en For 67 They are suspended until such = s t
m7 ; time as they approach the Asso- 2

i ciation for reinstatement S ‘
cL s Charlie Mitten of Manchester * er
- 265 and (for 6 dec.) 170 | 4 ee and Billy Higgins of t

4 wr a Le verton who are still in Bogota,

KE T 146 and 67 et been similarly suspended.

Matt Busby, Manchester United

CANTERBURY, Sept. 1. j Manager recéived a letter from
| ALFRED VALENTINE and John Goddard, virtually See ee i
unplayable on a pitch which was taking spin, tumbled : Seta hak teactan att cal en | ta F
Kent out for 67 in their second innings to-day to enable ie ‘maaan ea cee .

under contract and playing in | Waa setlt- SECONDS

the West Indies to win their last county matqh of the tour unaffiliated football clubs __ in

by 222 runs.



\
{
aot
+
ae

Earlier the West Indies had
ceclared their second innings
closed at 170 for 6, Valentine who
took five wickets for 6 runs today,
took nine for 63 in the match, and
brought his total for the tour to
114, more than any other West
Indies bowler has ever taken in
England.

He and Goddard frequently
beat both batsman and wicket-
keeper. Coddard claimed four
wickets for 13 runs. °

Ames reached double figures in
the Kent innings, the next best
scorer, being ‘“‘extras” with 14. " ! act

Half the side fell for 51 and the Anybody: 5
remainder went down in 25 min- : \
utes for the addition of 12 runs.

ha h > God- 1 , .
ae ple cto a tne [. uis B A strali: W t I li Australians to return the compli-

ity to complete his 1,000 runs ry £ u : a Vv. Les n TES rm

for the tour, but,he failed by five ‘ . Chiaki yikes SUT

runs wo reac the tareet. Gomer Al K ockout A Cricket “Conqueror” kt a hee oe eee tes

= Gott er Seat ‘ wo countries to be a matter of .
, : (By RAY GRODY . sua importance, then I am cer- neuen
a good catch at sily midon, God- Hy Peter Ditton Sheet Wa Rats Woew oleae
A. VALENTINE dard declared, leaving Kent three (Sports Editor, Milwaukee tan they can see their way clear

Sebtite

Sarre Te eas yen



amy 1Geas i ‘ » © Rio half-way through ti.> season?”

ton Express Service













oe ee

now heads list of W.I. bowlers who Fours, 50 minutes to get 290 runs Sentinel) LONDON. Lo AeA oe SD to Whe Caste Good food tastes all '

be in,

pave peyed in England with his te win. : MILWAUKEE. ON SEPTEMBER 16TH the Australian Cricket Board
si The Start There’s no questioning Joe are to discuss whether an invitation should be extended

sansa. : Louis’ confidence in his comeback Pa a e < $ac aber St
: ‘The West Indies needed runs “yainst Ezzard’ Charles set for to the West Indies to send a team to Australia, probably

General Vidme auickly in order to make an early New York’s Yankee Stadium the 1% 1951-52. But even if the decision is favourable, 1 do not

the better with i
DANCING



























; \ 9 4
ie te ang Goddard found the Might of Sept. 27. think such a tour would come off. | TO-NIGHT )
Lectures To bowling of Tn and eee wuagh dle — heavy- ‘ The West Indies naturally AT
‘ too accurate for free scoring, bu a * v E: B. enough are “cock-a-—t ” afte
aie oP : I expect to knock out Charles. gh are ‘cock-a-hoop” |. aiver Wt | ‘
Polo Playerg —_ 30s, came ata steady one & Wien can't say now. Tl know N-DOXEH __ veir victory over England in this}#) (CASUARINA CLUB i
General Vid The ‘light was bad and rain better when we get to Pompton ; ; pac Pe an cer eee
era idmer gave a most wera Lakes, NJ., where I start neavy re h ‘See, cus 5 ¢ Bertie Hayward’s Orchestra
interesting address to members ot boceree Oe tea ee ganda drills, later this month, ac es CaS | WONk Aree Sree A Los Turistas Venezolanos Se cna maaeiasniiaeea
the Barbados Polo Club at the yeached three figures in an hougy “Then I’ll map out a plan otf : be played as soon as possible to Bien wi@o Al e one — -
Drill Hall on Wednesday after- and a half. battle with Mannie Seamon, my LOS ANGELES ‘ecide which country holds | §) oa ee
pocn. The General has played big With the score at 170, Martin trainer. But I'm sure I can and pate eetrong, ane time Guceet supremacy. CLUB CASUARINA
‘olo in the US.A. for eighteen jnduced Gomez to play too soon, will stop Charles, probably in the abies champion fighter and ve- 4° series of five Tests between 2.9.50.—1n,
years, and there is nothing about and give a eatch at silly mid-on. early rounds.” teran of 200 ring battles, aN- the Caribbean c tri ad A . setae
the game that is not very familiar The sixth wicket stand had added : nounced today that he will devote tii), would amdoubtedly bea
to this great old soldier and sports- 119, Goddard then declared. Is Louis taking Charles lightly? the rest of his life to preaching *")\ Wou pa St ae ae

Tee ot ete ee, ae Kent Batting Answer Joe: the gospel, great money-spinner and, in | #- — “|

coloured chalks he illustrated the yi, Ment Battne oo yg “Not at all. He's a good fighter, | The noted boxer who made a {ery Should Provide some of

many important points to be re- b ~e fortune in his 17 years i the brightest cricket seen in
membered for the safety of horse played a hesitant forward stroke the best around today. And he's s 17 years in the

7 E 1p
‘aoe §5PRINTS
‘ > ar t ) ictes rhe ae oe will be given by
vious that he was concerned over wicket. ple. But he doesn’t punch hard had predicted when he was a Yet MR. IVAN FORDE

and rider, and it was quite ob- 274 gave an easy catch at the badly underrated by a lot of peo- "ing explained that. his mother oe’ Ieee
, d 2 Oe
despite their eagerness to

































é G a oe < » g ‘hild in Mississippi that some day P
th z ated Ames hooked three long hops and I don’t have to worry too ¢ DE some day « Y cha fi as E “ better known as (Peter)
the nang Fiske and breaking of, Ae teks To ee era! lout geting te és he would tum to. the ‘minaty. somite auch, a tare, the West Hl Yoni, wiot WE HAVE
, le ; n hut Valentine, coming on at 34, good boxer; so was Jersey Joe He said that he finally heeded . Yee rai 14th os September ,1090 . -
unknowingly committed in the y “thi pet should go to Australia, This at- B's
local games “Leaning forward ge 7 4 ie ise eee cau Walcott. But they all make mis~- Can pa ct icy Sug er titude is not as: unreasonable’ as octal OLUE TALL. St. Philip SOME NICE
iia : * turn it to leg but the spin was takes. “It was no sudden decision,” 5 onde ro ee aes Re seems re kag S i SE wee
oe nee aaa aetna much and the ball bounced gently “One mistake is all I need. Armstrong said, “My mother was was eS a eee tor pe oe ore pene me F
one of the most dangerous things Oe tort ee *. bites re I got Billy Conn and peng pe aia mystic and raised Paar” ‘aanine cea pte and Music Supplied by Mx. Percy
to do. One of my best friends rd ce s then cott in the second fight.” all of us (children) in the way of ie c hui Green and his Rythum Kings. | 4
was killed that ay ” said. the end and also took a wicket first “The way Louis figures now, he God, and she predicted that some Sat 1 3 aa be ae " If you miss this blame yourstt PY,
General. “I have seen many of ball, Woollett flashed at a ball won’t lay back the way’ he did day IT would be a preacher should tdke place in the West REFRESHMENTS ON SALE
wen Baya ab it’ He then went outside the of sue and eceed against Waleott v “Last December I decided to 2tHes. etal Please invite your friends
ae aes de. it to the wicket-keeper. ree ©, B * rote , 4 2
on to deal with many of the fine wickets were down for 35 at I'm going out after Charles. devote att my time to religion. Money
points of the game such as mark- 1} ch he says. “Make him fight—that’s When the power of God strikes
ing positions and the individual ao Aft Lu ich my best chance.” you, sometimes it turns out Until this present tovr such a
duties of each player. The lecture er ne Do his plans go further than the stranger than_ fiction! proposal wotfld never have been ae Biggest Event
— an oe on btn it wes Valentine worried both Cowdray Charles fight? Armstrong has miade nearly a possible. West ; Indian cricket be fe Suitable for...
San impopsitin Cur. eae an and Hearn with his quick spins Louis said: ps gle of appearances as guest has always been in a wee finan - BONNETT’S
: ? ’ after lunch, Goddard also turned “Well, | can’t say for sure now. Speaker for ministers, Recently cial position. This year howeves “WATT nag 1p =
- 2 Shp. sneruhere. cepld not - the ball a good deal, But if things go the way I expect he took part in a’ week-long they will receive a sum of money COTTON DRESS DANCE BATH SUITS
eethent gs ae 7 2 good Ten of the first thirteen runs them to, I'd like to fight again revival meeting at nearby Mon- far in excess of that for which t
Sere wei aig ae however, an added after the interval came from tais year. One thing's sure— Tovla. they had hoped as a result of = HOUSE COATS
the tadies wiBo with ibe playing in extras. The ball eee so aor there'll be no more exhibitions.” In October Armstrong omb2rks their tour of this country. QUBEN’S PARK
i Te that it frequently beat the wicket- 5 siti rith ON a gospel tour i
te ladies” igams_ im "he near (na frequently eat the wake” | What about his portion vie nd castor Sees duteg’ whieh NO cal, figured are to, be Tomman and
. s s full: Pied he all cnanié { releg 0 ; i :
did not attend, it is hoped that Cowdray defended carefully for ow that he’s back to fighting? he wiil speak in churches and released unti e tour Admission 4 REGULAR SHOPPING DRESSES

ue : : 40 minutes but -eventually lost
aie the General will repeat his lec- , z f
ture, as what he said can go to patience and an intended big leg

‘ f “I resigned from my post as Missouri, Illinois, Pennsylvania
‘make better players, and also —— an easy skied catch to boxing director of the I.B.C., and and New: York.

soe the game safer for man and ‘AY the ae of that over Valen- I’m strictly a fighter. I may re-
east.

But I do know that while the : tale a ‘

West Indies would have been pate teeter Fi His Ork le : :
quite happy to have made $ ; 27.8.50—2n 36” Wide — Guaranteed Fast Colours
profit of between £10,000 an
ae yee Armstrong, a long time mem- £12,000 on the trip, the actual sum 86c, — 9le, — 98c. — 97c. — 99c. per Yard
tine’s figures were 100, 8M. 2R, turn to the organization again ber of the Morning Star Baptist they will receive will be much ———

Said Louts: auditoriums in Oklahoma, Texas,

Sa













ee







when I figure I can’t fight any ¢ ; aa ee . a N |
There will be the usual matches. 2M aaition, Clark lost his â„¢ore- : Lebanese T's dak haa |
i h rmits. “ ; 5 inki c » BE dal he _ ‘ ;

\eme atternson: strpatier perce middle stump when trying to But right now I’m thinking of has been receiving instruction in This, coupled with their un- A Grand Dance ‘
drive, and five wickets were down Only one thing—winning back his chosen work. dculbted playing ability, means sponsored by AVE HEPHERD & 0 TD "
for 55 that title, There is more than While he can now take the that for the first time the West Messrs CECIL PINHEIRO & ‘ 9 . as

Tod . *s W I. The last five wickets crashed in one reason for my going after a road as an Evangelist, he hopes Indies are in a cemmanding posi- |§| GODFREY DOTTIN (Tal-a-vi)
a ee 25 minutes for 12 runs. As you know, there are some back jin the near future to be ordain- tion. They can afford to finance | @) , wT 10, 11, 12, 13, Broad Street .
e Valenti d Goddard taxes, and just as important, I eq a Baptist minister. an Australian trip to their own ] ro-NIGH d
Fixture ei ybich oe + are, On i want to prove to the fight public Armstrong hopes to have his CCuntry and even if they don't At The . a
, ht cele ~~ Nee breae oe that I can win that title back own church in time, He already Make as much profit as they have PRINCESS ALICE PAVILION 8 SO °LSCLOCPE ODE PSPSPPPRESSOOL SLPS PPS OPS SOSIS III 4
tine took 5 wickets for 6 runs, and agin. rome, NAS & Name for it. It. will be vet here, they will still have GENTS et ADM 1/6 F
Yesterday the W.1. played Goddard claimed 4 for 13 ? It’s never been done before, known as the Church of the Holy ®nough in the “kitty” to ensure Nusic by Mr. Coa Alleyne’s FOR LADIES:
and won their last County Even allowing for the tricky but that doesn’t worry me. I'l! Trinity, inspired partially by the that the tour is a success | __ Orchestra Bat, | e
fixture in England, and to- ditions, Kent gave a weak dis- Wi? iti" ; anality lightweight, welterweight and aii the present members of the || Finch cite Yous veonds HLS
fans sealers, South ot PIAY. bela just feel the finality middleweight boxing titles he team, anticipate that. they would §\i =MIEXICANS: FOR EVERY DAY WEAR
‘ , n Louis’ p ‘ won. MT eae 7 i ‘ )
England side at Hastings. Niet bes Scores ey a —I.N.S. Armstrong owns considerable a jpemean wee Ee Aes ss epneinmeaaen oneal: , Black $5.25; White $4.95; Brown $4.00
. KENT—Ist Innings ...............- 146 real estate in and about Los An- 4.4 hind 1 ore : Sg
This is the thirty-first WEST INDIES— Second Innings eee se eel : oh eed Goddard, their captain, has said |} ar. . .
game of the tour and there Marshall c Martin b Ridgeway © >. Cowdray ¢ Williams b Valentine 5 ee ee oe Sallding that he will not make ‘any more | $ DANCE 3 > SPORTIES in Brown, Flat Heels
are two remaining fixtures:—- Christiani © Ames b Ridgeway : Clark b Goddard .-..--. > ree ns — a — _— overseas tours. But that does not | % SiS with Leather Sole $5.30, with Crepe Sole $5.80
. Wa Jptop alentine .... ‘ > . s ; 248 Such » > i ,
n ‘ ‘ Trestrail b Martin ... bivesederss: 6 Dovery b Goddard ee 1 would not have to work another |'!°@? he would not be available x at g ‘
Sept. 6—v. Minor Counties. Gomez ec Woollett 4 Martin 88 Martin b Goddard ............ 0 : ; to play against the Australians in XN % i "
Gites Waa gave Be Mirtle bodes + day in hie tite to play aginst the Australians tm | ame Si} NEW DESIGNS IN DRESS SHOES
Sept. 10—v. H. D. G. Lev- oa es anes it Ridgeway b Valentine ....... ‘ 0 5. 2 % 4 oaisdetten Se Re
; yes 3... terres ad Extras:—@ byes, 8 leg byes 14 Armstrong, now 37, prefers to % J , , = .
erson Gower’s XI. — =i slo di el acetals RR i ry AACE ne \ % He ss , Black Suede Court; Snake Skin Platform $8.45
TOTAL for 6 wickets (decd.) .. 170 at) beep etiece 3) at nee feet sunbed git be Some Short % (Members Only) .
he TOT. Bick i alee strc wy s heart-shapec se »m ber: *
me BOWLING ANALYSIS é : coo a in en ae “th Se a shaped — ° h a nat 1% White Buck Court, Platform, Back and Toeless $8.45
‘ l R . Oo, M. RB. W. eee Maes 5 ton 5S, 6 for 62 well suarhed bible ‘at t io Saee if tht we . Indies ie ane wae $ TO-NIGHT %
Ridgeway Oa a ee + ye i > well- 5 > at his finger- i » West Indies were to e|X '
Professiona eaction = Nie cata 8 7] a 1100 Cr Oe rey ANALY IS tips, testifying to the sincerity of a trip to Australia, they would |% % FOR SAFE SEA BATHING FOR CHILDREN
LONDON. Peo Es tetsis 2 5 = > Oo. M. R. W. the former fighter, be short of several of the players | % at x RUBBER SWIMMING RINGS & WINGS @ $1.30
Judy Canova, radio comedienne, KENT—Sé¢ond Innings eee “Some people might think that who helped beat England so atid diate %
defined opera thus: “That’s where Fags ¢ Christiant b go “ exe Crenene: I am capitalizing on my name,” cecisively this summer, $y
a man is stabbed in the back and Woollett fa inter “4g Goddard .. Armstrong explained, “but — I : Music by Me, SYDNEY NILES %!
instead of bleeding, he sings.” Hearn b Valentine .....:..sceseerees 8 mean business, I am in chureh it would not be fair to send %
ae latest Hit Parade tunes. %

: . . Th -prizefight is y tes t Australia. Th ame

They'll Do It Every Time Reghooned ¥. 1. Peseat Ole By Jimmy ,Hatlo mid-cway i eta, nn desigaee- argument might be turned the

’ = — = tional book on his religious ex- other way. Still the fact remains
LLL IT DONT MATTER \V/ OTTO LIKES TO GIVE A

Admission to Bal'xoom 2/
30 8 50—4n,





: SHOEMAKERS TO THE WORLD.

periences. He will call it “Three that the West Indies were the



oS
SISSSO

work for good.” an under-strengt, West Indies x ard his Orchestra playing the
¢
%
5
g
y





















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® PAGE EIGHT

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ADVOCATE __ SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1950

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HENRY














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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 19506

—_—_—_————

CLASSIFIED ADS. |

‘TELEPHONE





IN MEMORIAM





Tn_ loving memory of ANNER JULIA
WORRELL who fell asleep tr: second
46. Rest in peace, farewell to sadness
May rest in Paradise be thine

In Jesus’ sence there is gladness

Light everlasting on thee shine

W. W. Worrell ‘husbend) Relona Git-
tens { er) Ethel Crick (sister-in-law)
Dennis and Walter 2.9.50—1n











In loving m¢mory of my dear Mother
GERTRUDE RAWLINS, who fell asleep
on Sept. 2nd 1948

How often do we tread the path,

That leads us to her grave

Where lies the one we loved so well

But whom we could not save.

At night when all are silent

And sleep forsakes our ey¢s

Our thoughts are om the lonely grave

Where our dear one lies,

Ever to be rememberd by Rhita
tdaughter) Allan, Evelyn, Ernest and
Lisle, (grand children) 2.9. 50—In.



In loving memory of our dear Husbend
and father. JAMES MAPP. Died Sept.
2nd - 1934
For our loss we must not weep
For our loved one long to keep
From the home of rest and peece
Where all sin and sorrow cease
Fdith Mapp (wife) Marguerite and
Fabian (children)
2.9.50—I1n
In loving memory of ovr Dear Mother
RUTH BRATHWAITE, who past away on
September ist, 1949
One sad ;ent has passed away.
When the one we loved was called to
rest,
Out of a world of sorrow
Into a heaven of Rest
God has a beautiful garden for her,
Always choose the best,
The flowers we place upon her grave
Will wither and decay,
But her memories will always linger
In our hearts from day to day
Fiver to be remembered by her child-
ren Ernest, DaCosta, William (U.S.A.),
fsons), Mrs Marrie Greenidge, Mrs
Millicent Buliln, Miss Catherine Brath-
waite (daughters), Viola and Cardon
Tudor (Grand daughter and Grandson-
in-law respectiveiy). 29.50-—4a













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VANS—Immediate delivery from stock
Morris Cowley 10 cwt. Vans and Pick-
ups. See these new modern vehicles
Then decide. Fort Royal Garage Lid
Telephone 4504 2,.9.50—3n









VAN—10 horse power Austin Van in

perfect working order. Anply D. V
Scott & Co., Whitepark. Dial 3493.
30.8,50—t.f.n.
ELECTRICAL



COOLERATOR .—Owen T. Allder, Roe-
buck Street. Dial 3299. 2,9.50—1n

CASH REGISTER—One National Cash
Register electrical operated, as mond as
now, a bargain at $400.00. Phone 2959,for











a demonstration. 1.9, 50—3n
COOL PRATOR—American manufac-
ture. Good condition Pe ere ree
tember 29th, Tel. 2521 Ci As Ss
ae 1,9.50—In

RADIOW—One (1



f-Tuke Phillips P-4io









Tn perfect work er Con be sein e
Horse Hill Plantation, St. Josev!
2.9 59—2n
LIVESTOCK



COW—One larve Guernsey cow to calf
in two weeks. Second calf. Gave 28 pts.
with first calf. Apply: F. King, Roberts
Tenantry, opposte Neils Gap. St. Michael

30.8.50—2r



MECHANICAL



MACHINE—One Treadle Singer Sew-
ing Machine in perfect condition, Offers
will be received. Telephone 3067

: 31.8.50—3n



MISCELLANEOUS



BIG PREDUCTION SALE. Bathing
trunks all colovrs and sizes, going at
half price. Variety Sandal Shoppe, Broad
Street. 2.9. 60--2n

FISHING POAT—Ore Fishing Boat
named “The Hopaway”. Length 19 feet
in good condition. No reasonable offer
refused. Avphy to Mr. Elkano Mason,
Eeet Point, St. Philip 30.8,50—I1n.

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS—A new ship-
ment of NU-SWIFT just received. No
annual refill necessary—Refill only when
used. Protect your business or other
valuable property by the installation of
the world’s fastest Extinguisher, COUR-
TESY GARAGE Dial 4391.









31.8,.50- 3n,
GO-CART—Child’s Go-Cart and Rock-
ing Horse. Phone 4381 2.9.50—1n



HARDWARE ITEMS:—Enamel-it, all
shades, Stoves. Coffee Mills, Corn and
Maize Mills, Small Household Scales. Flit
Sprayers, Self Heating pee rai tan

ly: John D. Taylor & Sons, U
Peery 1.9, 50—2n







PLYWCOD PARTITIONS — 64 feet by
fi feet 6 inches, Includes ? Doors
Excellent condition Apply Top Figor
Reliable Pharmacy, Broad St. Tip! 4183





2.9.50—ga
PINKING SHEARS of the highest qual-
ity. Only $0.69 ana $11.98. Limited

quantity. See vour Jewellers, Y. De Lima

” «+, 20, Broad Street.
wee 26.501"
RECORD ALBUMS for 10-inch and for



12-inch and carrying cases for a
records, and we have the records too
ne A. BARNES & CO.. LTD.
10.8.50—t.f.n.





STOVES—2 & 3 Burner, Gem, Florence
and Perfection, Owen T. Allder, Roebuck
St. Dial 3299. 2.9,50—I1n

SHOES—Ladies’ and children's shoes
Handbags, felt and straw
ankle Socks, Plastic
Variety

end sandals,
hats, Panama Hats,
belts ete. at Reduced Prices
Sandal Shoppe, Broad Street

VIVI-SCRIPT—Ball-Pen refill Kit, will
recharge any ball-point pen. 15 rofi'ls
“Photnix™

1.9

for 3/6. Knights Ltd







OBE TRUNK, Trunks, Valises
WARDR ue
2.9.50—In

Qwen T. Allder, Roebuck St









37% feet

Good
a bargain. Apply
2520

15.8.50—T.F W



YAWL—“Frapid: approx
long with Gray Marine engine.
condition $3,000 —

a. R. Edwards. Phone





Be Wise... Advertise

CARS—-1947 Standard 8 h.p. 4 seater
tourer. Fxcellent condition. 1°47 Morris

FOR RENT
HOUSES

ALOW



BUNG.
nd New

— few steps from

All modern conveniences.
Brawne, Massiah Street, St,

ge Schoo!
Apply A. F

1.9.50—gn



FLAT—Unfurnished
Street within waiking distance for Aqu
Ue Club and City, Dial 3053.

2.9.50—6n
ibe ernest eerie Aliens enna sco
DWELLING oe ms elling House

at Small Town, . in, recently
renovated Electric light and water
2 — ae Lodge School.
vailable ist September. Apply G. L
Bethell, J. & R. Bakeries. ear
30.8.50—3n.

—_—

HOUSE—"New Haven", Deacon's Road.
Sept., 1950 at $40.00 per
2498. 2.9.50—2n.

Avatiable 1st

month. Dial



ee seeenenenensentinninnenstneneeenientnnane!
HOUSFS and APARTMENTS on the

sea, St. Lawrence Gap, fully furnished.
Dial 8357.

SPACE suitabie for
Bonds, ete For
apply K. R. Hunte & Co.,
Broad Street. Dial 4611.





making W:

31.8.50—4n

TANGLIN — Beachmont,
September onwards, monthly or ot!
wise, 3 double bedrooms with s
Simmons bedsteads, children’s roam, «
ing room and lounge. Refrigerator, ;
age, servant's room Apply Howe.

27.8.50—t fon.

WOODYARE — Pine Hill. — Furnished
From 15th September to mid January.
Ring Haslett 3311 or John Bladon 4340

1,9.50——3"

=—
WALLET — Red Leather Wallet o>
Wednesday last in Bridgetown, contain
ing photographs Private papers aad
money along with name inset Vanessa
Floissac Please return to owner c/o
Mrs Clairmonte, The Garden, Worthing
1.9.50—2n

ee
PUBLIC NOTICES

SUGAR USTRY “AG
BANK ree -

APPLICATIONS for the post of Man-
ager of the Sugar Industny Agricultual
Bank, which will become vacant on Ist
November next, will be received by the
ae on or before 15th September,

1 Applicants should have some know
ledge and experience of accountancy and
a sound general education

2. They should state age, which must
not exceed forty-eight years last birth-
day, and qualifications.

3. Submit two recent testimonials.

4. Salary £700 per annum rising by
two annual increments of £50 to £800
MB. “The successful candidate to pasu

; e suce ul ¢: late to me
duties on Ist November, 1980, and he
will be required to retire at the age of

65 years.
A. L. BAMRY.

aig
Sugar Industry Agricultural mk .
24th August, 1950.
26.8.50—3n

——————
THE SUGAR INDUSTRY AGRICUL-
TURAL BANK ACT, 1943
fo the Creditors holding specialty liens
Against HOPE PLANTATION, St. James
TAKE NOTICE that I, the Owner, of
the above Plantation am about to obtain
* loan of £300 under the provisions of
he above Act against the said Plantation,
in respect of the Agricultural year

lo 1951

Bathst © a,
re
le











No money has been borrowed under
the Agrimuitural Aids Act, 1905, or the
above Act (as the case may be) in respect
of such year.

Dated this 2nd day of September, 1950.

SYBIL J. ROCK,
Owner.
2.9,.50—3n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTIC=

The application of Edna Bradshaw of
Black Rock, St. Michael, for permission
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., ata
voard and shingle shop attached to resi-
dence at Lower Black Rock, St. Michael.

Dated this Ist day of September, 1950.
To E. A. McLEOD, Esq.

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”

(Sed.) EDNA BRADSHAW,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be cansid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A, on Monday,
lith day of September, 1950, at 11

o'clock, a.m
E. A. MeLBOp,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
2.9.50—1n

PUBLIC SALES
AUCTION

THERE will be an Auction Sale at
Central Station on Monday next, the 4th
at 2 o'clock, and amongst the many items
are some fowls & Turkeys and 2 Raleigh
Piaycles. After the sale at Central Sta-
tion IT will sell at Holder's fthop at Con-
stitution opposite the Park One (1) Motor
Hearse to satisfy a debt. Terms Cash

D'ARCY A. SC









Auctionéer
2.9.50—2n

UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER

1 HAVE BEEN instructed by Mr. Ulrick
Goodridge to sell by Auttion on 'Thurs-
day next, the 7th Sept., his 16 by 9
houge with shed, on Perryman’s land at
Greens, St. George. House is only two
years old, Terms Cash

D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Auctioneer
2.9.50—3n

icteric estes iveatnamrall tien pnieihi sade a a
1 will sell by auction on Tuesday, 5th
September et my Auction Mart, Baxters
Road, opp. Mason Hall Street. A_ lot
of household furniture comprised of Bed-
1eem Suite, Double bedstead with Vono
Spridg, Vanity table, Bureau, Extension
Dining Table, China Cabinet, Chairs, One
R.C.A. Radio and many other {tems.
Sale et 1.00 p.m. Look out for the flag
Cc. D. ISHMAEL,
Auctioneer.
2.9.50-—2n .

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

BY recommendations of Lloyds Agents
we will sell on TUBSDAY, the 5th Sep-
tember, at our Mart, High Street.

2 Spring filled Mattresses, 18 Pillows
and Cushions, 8 Felt Hats, 11 pes, Silk
Crepe, 12 Sewing Machines, 1 W.C
Cistern, 1 keg White Zinc, 1 keg White
Lead, 136 drums One O One, 50 Pipes,
4 c/s Rolled Oats, 1 c/s Corn Flakes,
a 40 Tins Baking Powsier and other

ems.

Sale 12.30 o'clock. Terms Cash.
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.

Auctioneers,
2.9,50—2n

REAL ESTATE







LS

LAND—One Acre Land at Rockiey
New Road. Good Building Site. Priced
Right. Dial 2230 between 19 A.M. ana
Noon. 31.8.50—3n

gpl ig eee
“MOSSCLIFF", Black Rock, overlook-
ing Fresh Water Bay. Standing on 2
panto! ee hes Ideal pandas Site or
suitable for ity. Apply to I. W
Kirton, c/o Da Costa & Co., Ltd.
2.9.50—2n

Property at
Apply C. A
2.9.50—2n

PROPERTY—One_ Smail
Kensington New Road,
Ishmael, Baxters Road.



_ SOME people waited all théir lives try-
ing to get all the money to buy a house
and failed, while others made a start
and eventually owned a house. Why
den’t you follow the crowd that has
made a start? You can ave the fol-
lowing on terms

At Chapman's street a house with 2
bedrooms, ee & bath, etc.

At Martindale's Road one newly recon-
ditioned house with 2 bedrooms, water-
toilet & bath, etc

At the Ivy Road a small property with
water and light, ete

At Britton’s » Road that comfortable
stone-wall Bungalow called Beverly. It





has verandah, drawing & dining rooms. |

2 bedrooms, Water-toilet & bath, ete
At Pine Rd.,
and many others.
For particulars apply

to D’Arey
Scott, Magazine Lane

A.



~~ Mod Bungalow —
— at Mamsigh Street st



at Ramsgate; Bay



22.8 §0—2n

further particulars
Ltd., Lower



WANTED

HELP

|

rt

ty letter and in’ person.

L. M. B
Meyers & Co., Ltd.

1.9.50—t.f.n



Preferabi;
Position later

James Street
_—_—_——-——_—___—_______.

NOTICE

PARISH OF ST.
AN ORGANIST for
Chepel as from 25th September, 1950.





JONN



| GURL—Réliable girl for Office, capable
of assisting in bookkeeping. Appi; in
wriling giving (xperience and references.
Fort Roygl Garage Ltd.. P. Q. Box

223. Bridgetown 2.9.50—Tn
~ $$$. +
HELE Good experienced general ser-
vant, r family of two. Must have

gvod references. Apply before 10 o'clock

to . Scaife, La . Cave Hill,

St. 1, 1.9.50—2n,

ne eerveeteeianeionapssemniiionie ene
LADY for office with some knowledge
of St€nography and Typewriting Apply

a ee aeaenenninymnper sien eatdivennnertimeinags
YOUNG LADY to learn office work
one with some knowletige of
Shorthand and Typing in view of better
Apply bv letter and in
verson to J. A. MARSON & SON LTD.,
2.9.80—2n.

St. Moergaret’s

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



CANADA’S

ECONOMIC

POSITION

@ From Page 6.
and services which the U.S.A.

can result only in further re-

of world trade and fur-

arias
would sell to each group would }gher attempts at national autarchy:

thus be determined by the Ameri-
can themselves.

(f) In such circumstances, those
nations whose level of employ-

Briefly to recapitulate: Canada {| ment-and-income is determined by
and the other nations of the Brit-| trade must seek association with
ish Empire and Commonwealth | those nations whose economic in-
face certain fundamental facts|terests complement their own and,
which are largely beyond their|conversely, must maintain diserim-
control but which must govern jinatory barriers against non-mem-
their economic policies for many | bers.

years. These facts are:
(a) The basic economic neces-
sity of every nation is the main-

The Only Sound Basis

Integration of the Canadian

tenance of employment and in-/@conomy with that of the sterling

come: for the British nations. this] area is the or;

means export markets;

(b) The t

and contract! of ex! markets

is the result of a world-wide|which wil!
break-down in the exchange of] business, and

Please apply to the Rev. A. Mellor,| goods and services. The financial

Viear.
R. S. FRASER,
Clerk to the Vestry
St. John.

MISCELLANEOUS

Telephone 8606.

LIQUOR. LICENSE. — One
License. Apply to Miss Ira
Upper Collymore Rock, St. Michael.





STAMPS

the B.W.I,, Curaeao and Aruba

2.9.W—2n.

WANTED TO RENT

iish Lady. Near the sea, central
tble. Apply: Box 250.

tie Hood Presser
Kills Men & Women

Twice as many women as men suf-
fer from High Blood Pressure, which
about the time of Change of life and
eeitrianarectmecn peng ute
a on ytic es, Com-

symptoma of High Blood Pres

mon =
sure are: Nervousness, headaches at
top and back of head and above eyes,

ressure in head, dizziness, short
breath, paine im heart, palpitation,
sleep, loss of memory and energy,



1950 |





another small property, |

2.9.50—Bn |

poor
easily excitea, fear and worry. If you
suitor any of these symptoms, don't
jelay treatment a single day, because
your life may be (n danger. Noxco
(formerly known aa Hynox), a new
medical discovery, reduces High Blood
Pressure with the first dose, takes a
heavy load off the heart, and makes
you feel years younger in a few days.
Get Noxco from your chemist oer
ft Is guaranteed to make you (eel
and strong or money back, >

ee SS

1.9.50—2r.
—_—_———



CHRYSANTHEMUM PLANTS—Contact
‘30.8.50—6n.



Liquor
Callendar,

2.9.50—In
MANURE—A quantity of Garden
Manure. Contact Telephone 8600.

30.8.50—6n .

Used and Mint Postage
Steenps of Barbados and other Islands of
Best
Prices paid at Caribbean Stamp Society,

No. 10 Swan Street. _ 2.9.50—3n
WANTED URGENTLY — 220 Volt
Iron. Prodgers, Crane Villa.

FUPNISHED HOUSE or Flat, by Eng-
Reason-
2.9, 50—In

and monetary aspects of this crisis|tien whieh
are the result, and not the cause, | essential

of the crisis:

(c) This break-down is the re-
sult of fundamental changes in
the economic

changes which preclude a restora- | rations

relationships, | sterling

course through
which Canadian employment and
e can hope to be ry intain

incom
crisis} od. This integration must be basea

upon a permanent agreement
provide agriculture,
industry, on beth
the soliq founda-
they require. The
features of such an
agreement ore as follows

sides, with

(a) That it covers the whole
area and those other
whose currencies are

tion of the “status quo ante bel-| freely convertible into sterling;

tum”;

(d) The phenomenon known as} cept sterling
the dollar shortage, therefore, will} sterling area purchases in

be permanent
foreseeable future;

in,
(e) While this dollar shortage op

exists, any attempt to enforce non-
discriminatory, multi-lateral trade

Sr







Beverage after a
Hot and Tiring Dey.

\ Brewed Specially for
“\\ Hot Climates.

anne



OFFICIAL NOTICE

BARBADOS.
undermentioned

The
Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and x
If not then sold, it will be
Friday at the same place and during the same hours

the date specified below.

on application to me.

IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY oi inns age
property will be set up for sale at the Registration Office, | MOt the least Cenadians, but pres
wm. for the sum and on} ent economic policies

ac' up on each succeeding
unt. sold. Full particulars

HUSKISSON vs. BAEZA

PROPERTY; ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land (formerly part of aj with the necessity of adopting
eer parcel of land containing by estimation Five Acres or there-

1

abouts which was part of a larger area containing by
Eight Acres or thereabouts originally part of the lands of
View Plantation) situate in the parish of Christ Church a
aforesaid containing by admeasurement Three Acres,
thereabouts abutting and bounding on lands of the Estate o:

ment

or

Eversley deceased being the remainder of the said Five Acres above

mentioned on lands of the Rockley Golf and
of C, E, Clarke on other lands of Dr, J. I. chi
leceased Right of way Sixteen Feet! revolutions, not for patching

Estate of B. ioe di

wide at the South Easterly corner of the

Sopntey Club on lands
eZa on lands of the

and on a

said parcel of land leading

to the Public Road or however else the same may abut and bound.

Upset Price: £1,750, 0. 0
Date of Sale 15th September, 1950.

istration Office,
RI ace 1950.

H, WILLIAMS.
Registrar-in-Chancery,

30.8.50.—4n,



SHIPPING NOTICES

MONTREAL AUSTRALIA NEW ZEA-
LAND LINE LIMITED
(M.A.N.Z, LINE)

S.S. “PORT WELLINGTON" sails
Gladstone August 17th, Brisbane August
23rd, Sydney August 30th, arriving at

Bsrbados September 27th.

S.S. “GLOUCESTER” sails Freemantle
August 3lst, Adelaide September 11th,
Devonport September 15th, Melbourne
September 23rd, Sydney 30th September,
Erisbane October 4th, arriving at Bar-
bados November 4th. rn

These vessels have ample space Jor
chilled, hard frozen, and general cargo.

Cargo aceepted on through bills of
lading with transhipment at Trinidad
for Barbados, British Guiana, Windward
and Leeward Islands.

For further particulars appiy:—

FURNESS WITHY & CO. LTD.,
Trinidad, B.W.1.

and
DA COSTA & CO. LTD.,
Barbados, B.W.I.















The M.V. “Daerwood" will ac-
cept Cargo and Passengers for St.
Inucia, S&t. Vincent. Grenada,
Aruba, sailing Saturdsy, 2nd Sep.
tember.

The M,V. “T. B. RADAR” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lueia, St. Vineent, Grenade
Aruba, sailing Wednesday, 6th
September, 195)

B.W.1. Schooner Owners
Association Inc.

Consiguee: Dial: ¢047



\ee Alcoa ipa ll

“C. G. THULIN’
“BYFJORD"



NEW ORLEANS SER-ICk
Arr.
B'des

NEW YORK SERVICE
sails Arr.

lst September 12th September
2ist September 3rd October

CANADIAN SERVICE

SOUTHBOUND

Name of Ship
8.8. “ALCOA PILGRIM”
8.8. ALCOA PARTNER”

Sails
Montreal
A it 25th. 7
August Sih umushat | gentomier th

August aut

Arrives
ith,

nn

NORTHBOUND
Arrives
Barbados
3.8. “ALCOA PEGASUS” Aug. 27th For St. John, NB. & &t,
Lawrenee River Ports.

These Vessels have limited passenger accommodation,
—————aa

ly: DACOSTA &
THOM LTD.

.. LTD.—Canadian Service.
lew York and Gulf Service



my HARRISON LINE

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

Vessel From Leaves Due
Barbadn:
S.S. “MOONCREST” .. _London 3rd. Aug. 2nd Sept.
S.S. “BROOKHURST” .. Glasgow &
verpoo! 19th Aug. 8rd Sept.
S.S. “JUNECREST” teoten ALA, Btn Bact.
S.S. “TEMPLE ARCH” - London 5th Sept. 25th Sept.
S.S. “FACTOR” Glasgow &
verpool 6th Sept. 18th Sept.
8.S. “PLANTER” Liverpool Sth Sept. 23rd Sept,
HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
Vessel For Closes in Barbados
S.S. “MOONCRES1” London Laie September

For further information apply to—



(b) That Canada will freely ac-
in payment for all
Can-

throwghout the]aaa, the Bank of Canada convert-

such sterling into Canadian
rs for the exporter;

(c) That the sterling so ac-
quired be liquidated by Canadian
purchases in the sterling area, and
not elsewhere ;

(d) That the sterling area
countries will, in return, remove
all restrictions on purchases in
Canada;

(e) That the sterling area
countries will remove all restric-
tions upon Canadian purchases in
the sterling area;

(f) That the United Kingdom
in particular shall undertake to
produce for the. Canadian market
upon a priority basis;

(ge) at the Imperial Prefer-
ence system be reconstituted on
the basis of an elimination of
tariff barriers between the Brit-
ish countries to the greatest pos-
sible extent;

(h) That all of the countries
covered by the Agreement shalt
provige, each to the others, a sub-
stantial degree of preference over
all non-members—where possihte
by a quota system;

(i) That an Imperial fund be
created to assist defence indus-
tries which are adversely affec-
ted by the general programme
for freedom of trade within the
sterling area;

) That provision should be
made for the future acherence of
other nations,

It is appreciated that these pro-

ls clearly cut across many of
the pre-conceived ideas, habits,
and prejudices of many people,

ean lead
only to disaster, for Canada, for
all the British nations and for all
the world at large. We are faced

drastic economic remedies for a
serious economic illness, an ill-
ness which may well prove fatal.

¢ Nathaniel In the words of Lord Beveridge:

“A revolutionary moment in the
world’s history is a time for

”



Russian Meat

Refused

BOSTON, Sept. 1.

Boston longshoremen have again
refused to unload a shipment of
Russian crabmeat, the second sch
boycott in two weeks.

The cargo was left in the ship
American Invecior yesterday .by
members oi the Invernatio..al
Longshoremen’'s Association

Daniel Donovan, the Longshore-
men's Association's Vice-President
said his Union would refuse «
unload any Russian cargo. H>
thought that the United Ste*>
snould establish a policy of ‘1
trade with Russia or Soviet satel-
lite countries”.

“It should not be left to ()
longshoremen to decide this qucs-
tion” Donovan said, “bu: since )
one in Washington will decide we
will do it”,—Reuter





LONDON CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE EXAMINATION

ENTRIES for the AUTUMN
Examinations, 1950, of the Lon-
dou Chamber of Commerce must
reach the Department of Educa-
tion, The Garrison, not later than
12 noon on Saturday, the 9th of
September, 1950.

2. The Entry Fees will be as
follows :—
Single Subjects .. $1.92 each
Foreign Languages 3.12 each
Full Certificate 10.00
2.9.50, —3n.

, PROD ¢
HAVE YOU GOT A

COLD or COUGH }
FSO TRY



}

BROWNES «=
CERT
AIN COUGH :

?

Pe

CURE :

The Unique Remedy for Cougt ‘
Golds, "Bronchitis, Sore Throat, x
‘seness, Bronchial Astruna, e
Whooping Cough, Discase of the %
Chest and Lungs, etc., etc. b



C. GARLTON BROWNE

Wholessle & Retail Druggist
136, Roebuck St. Dial 2813

29 CECE CSA BEOLGE:

WE CAN SUPPLY...





U.S. Plane
Strafed Red

China Airstrip

HEADQUARTERS ADMIT

WASHINGTON, Sep-. 1.

Air Force Headquarters here
ogreed to-day with the statement
of Warren Austin, American dele-
gece to the United Nations that
an American fighter plane might
have strafed a Chinese Commun-

ist airfield in Manchuria.

Austin said yes‘erday that one
of the F-51 Mustangs of the 67th
Fighter-Bomber Squadron might
accidentally have shot up an air-

feld five miles inside Manchuri?

After the statemer! was made,
from
Tokyo and here that any Ameri-

there were denials both
cen pilot had strafed a Manchur
ian field.
ssid in a statement:

“Austin’s
and
more that can be added.”

The Director of Air Force Pub
he Relations explained that
report came in a personal mes
from Lieutenan\-General



George

Stratemeyer, Far East Air Forces

Commander to Air Force Chief otf
Staff General Hoyt S. Vanden-
berg.

General Vandenberg passed this
lwow ir oy S i ws

ry Steines Pinder a t gain from China's involyment in
reachei Austin through Defences â„¢
Secretary Louis Johnson and Sec-

tery Thomas Findletter, and

retary of Svate Dean Acheson.
Air Force headquarters said the
confusion arose from the fact that
the report was handled at highes}
levels through its passage trom
Tokyo vo Lake Success.
Apparently it was not circulated
among operations and briefing
efficers either here or in Tokyo
—Reuter

38 American
Officers Ask

For Peace

LAKE SUCCESS, Sept. 1.

The Soviet Delegate to the U.N.
Security Council, Jakob Malik, has
handed over to the United Nations
an appeal to end the Korean War
by withdrawing American forces,
said to be signed by 38 United
States’ officers now in North
Korean hands,

The document, which Malik sai!
had been sent to him as President

of the Security Couicil, was made

public at his request,

To-day the Air Force

stalement is complete
factual, and ‘here is nothing

the
sage

Truman Has
hight Points

@ From page 1.

‘4
Pledged To Seek Peace
“F rst we believe in the United
Nations. When we ratified its ehar-
ier, we pledged ourselves to seek
paace and security through this
world organisation. We kept our
ward when we went to the sup-
port of the United Nations in
Korea two months ago. “We shall
never go back on that pledge.
“Second: We believe the Ko-
eans have a right to be free, in-
dependent, and united — as they
want to be. Under the direction
and guidance of the United Na-
tions, we, with others, will do our
part to help them enjoy that right.
The United States has no other
aim in Korea.
“Third: We do not want the
‘fighting in Korea to expand into a










eneral war. It will not spread
Communist imperialism
vs other armies and Govern-

'
nts into the fight of the aggres-
igainst the United Nations.
People Of China
“Fourth: We hope in particu-
lar that the people of China will
not be misled or forced into fight-
ing against the United Nations and
against the American people, who
have always been and _ still are
their friends. Only the Commun-
ist imperialism, which has already
started to dismember China, could

sors



“Fifth: We do not want For-
mosa or any part of Asia for our-
selves. We believe that the future
of Formosa, like that of any other
territory in dispute, should be
ettled peacefully.

“We believe that it should be
settled by international action, and
not by the decision of the United
States or of any other state alone.
fhe mission of the Seventh Fleet
is to keep Formosa out of the con-
Ciect Our purpose is peace, not

onqucst

Freedom For All

“Sixih: We believe in freedom

all the nations of the Far East.

« is one of the reasons why we
ave fighting under the United
Nations for the freedom of Korea.

“We helped the Philippines be-
come independent and we have
supported the national aspirations
to independence of other Asian
countries,

“cussia has never voluntarily
given up any territory it has ac-
quired in the Far West it has
never given independence to any
yeople who have fallen under its
control,

“We not only want freedom for
the peoples of Asia but we also
want to help them secure for
themselves better health, more

“I appeal to you,” it said, “to {s0d, better clothes and homes,

take all possible measures for the
immediate suspension of this
senseless blood-shed.”

The appeal claimed that signg~
tories had come to Korea believing

that they were acting on behalf of

the United Nations and expecting
to find the Koreans friends and
fighting allies.

“You can understand our shoe!
when we were greeted by South
Koreans, not with jubilation, but
with apathy, sullenness = an:
hatred,
South Koreans were against Syng-
man. Rhee’s Government.”

After their capture, these offi

cers found that the United Nation:’

action was illegal and, that fight
ing was caused by unilater
American intervention, the docu
ment said.

—Reuter.

CASUALTIES

WASHINGTON, Sept. 1

The Defence Department a
jounced to-day that the totai «
notified battle casualties in Kor
u) to midnight of August 25 w
§ 886. This includes 503 kille
3.689 wounded, 48 prisoners +
war, and 2,436 listed as missing

This was the first announcem’,

' American easualties since Aur
* 7. The Defence Deopartme
said earlier to-day that it wou
publish casualty figures regularly
vrebabiy once a week. The figure



« not reflect all casualties suffer -

,

up to August 25 because a:

Then we saw that the

and the chance to live their own
lives in peace,

“The things we want for the peo.
pie c Ack a¥> the same things
we want for the people of the
‘est of the world,

Weapon Of Dictators

“Seventh: We do not believe
i. aggressive or preventive war.
such war is the weapon of dicta-
tors, net of free democratic coun-
tries like the United States.

“Ve are arming only for de-

fenco against aggression, Even
though Communist imperialism

does not believe in peace, it can be
discouraged from new aggression
if we and other free peoples are
trong, determined and united,

“Bighth: We want peace and
ve shall achieve it, Our men are
ighting fer peace to-day in Korea.
We are working for peace con-
stantly in the United Nations, and
n all the capitals of the world.
Our workers, our farmers, our
business men, all our vast re-
ources, are helping now to create
the clvength which will give peace
ind security.

“We want peace not only for its
own sake but because we want all
the peoples of the world, includ-
‘ng curselves, to be free to devote
their full energies to ma:.ing their
ives richer and happier,

“We shall give what help we can
to make this universal human wish
come true,

“We invite all the nations of the
worl'l, without exception, to join
with us in this great work.

od : 1 —Reuter.
he time required to receive re-
its from

\he next of kin,

Army casualties were 6,567
Navy 27, Marine Corps 194, an
ir Force 98.—Reuter

ee
| Removal Notice
Dr. FL. A
D.C.P.T,

. COX
{ (Chir .)
| Chiropractor & Optician
| has Removed to Lower Jemes St.
| Hours: 8.30 to 1 and 2 to 11.80.

VENEZOLANOS
AMIGOS

VISITOR FRIENDS!

ORIENTAL GOODS

Tenemos Articlos de Qriental de
In India, China, Egypt.

THANI Bros.

Pr. Wm, Hry. St. Tel

3466

{ Christian Seienee
( licading Room

“T FLOOR, BOWRN & AONS
(Broad Street)

Nourt: 19 asa—2 p.m.
Tuesdays, Wednesdays,

Fridays.
10 a.m.—12 o'clock. )
Saturdays.
this Room the Bible wna D
the Christian Science text-book,
selence and Healt) with Key to



')> Seriptares by MARY BAZ.£B
seoY may Be reed, borrow-d,
or pur hased

Visitors Are Welcome
bwwwwwweo

Special Flat Galrd. Sheets

e x 3; 8 x

3%; 1” x 3

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—(Prorvieors)
Corner Broad and Tudor Streets







‘oe front and notily |) a= SSS a ry

The Barry Guest House

1600 MOUNTAIN ST
MONTREAL









Homely Atmosphere
Quiet & Restrul

When visiting
trip

or ao a busines

Special daily or week!
after September ist
Refercnce if required

rates



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L.A. 3485

—






HEAL ESTATE AGENT
*Phone

THANI

OFFER YOU

PLASTIC HEADTIES

STRAW HATS
STRAW (Shopying)

(Faney)
BAGS

WHITE and KHAKI CAPS
CORK HATS



JOHN M.

A.F.8., F
FOR
|

AUCTIONEER
Plantations’ Building

SUMMER

FOR LADIES
PLASTIC RAINOCOATS (it various shades)

PALM FANS (very light weight)



PAGE NINE

_—_—

HARBOUR LOG

In Carlisle Bay

Sch Philip H. Davidson, Sch. Rosa,
rene, Sch. Frances Smith MV. Bitte
Star M.V. Daerwood, Sch. Belqueen,
Sch. Laudalpha, Seb. Princess Louise,
Seh. Burma D.. Sch. Gardenia W., Sob.
Turtle Deve. Sch. Mary M. Lewis, Soh
Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Marea Henri-~

ett ile m, Smith, sen.

vs
Franklyn D. R., .
Cyelorama O., Sch. Gloria Henrietta, 3.8.
Alcoa Pegasus,





a, Sch



M.V. Moneka, M.V. Cul-
Bolivar
ARRIVALS
Schooner Doramas, 12 tone met. Cant.
Manuel De Varjas, from Canaty Islands.
Schooner Henry D. W 59 ions
net, Capt, King, from Trir
Schooner Belqueen, 44 1 Ccopt.
Simmons ,from St, Vincent.

hips ta fouch With

rb doe Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (West indies) Lt@.
advise that they can now communic,
with the iohowing ships throuch t
Berbados Coast Station:—

SS. Esso Den Hane, M/V. Tumber,
M/S. Caraibe, M/V. Prospector, $38.
Ksso Avila, SS. Sunrell, 5.5. Captain
fohn, SS. Lillohus. S.S. S. Calli, S@
© de Nicaragua, $8.8. Alcoa Polaris, 3.8.
Celilio, S.S, Jose Calvo Sotelo. S.S. Fi









herst, S.S. Unriguay, 53. Atlan
ser, S'S. Beechhill, S.S. Argentina,
jinni, S.S. Bergesund, S.S. Portu-

Dolores, S.S. Captain Lefteris,

8.8
ss
Du Quesne
t Helder,

Francesc

» Morosini. 58
3.5. Afmhanistan,
SS. Golfite, $3
8S. Randford
Belita,
Spuri,
4%, 5S.






Hollanger
3S, Moramac
Heecuba

RUSSIA WILL
NOT BE INVITED
TO AIRCRAFT SHOW

LONDON, Sept. 1

The Society of British Aircraft
‘onstructors announced today
that for the first time since they
reviewed their annual display in
1946, they are not inviting Rus-
sia or any other “Iron Curtain”
countries to send representatives
this year.

Their 1950 show at Farnhor-
cough in Southern Hampshire next
week is the shop window of the
British Aireraft Industry, and
frequently includes planes which
are still partly secret planes.

The first three days of the dia
play are known as Trade days,
efter that planes on the secret list
are withdrawn

The Society or pritise Aircraft
Constructors have since 194€.
usually invited about 10,000 guests
from all over the world inéluding
vice-chiefs, and diplomatic repre
sentatives of all countries

—Reuter,





a








4th, fo
re-opene

closed

vacation and will

on October 2nd.

WESLEY BAYLEY.
*

SSS )
. }

NOTICE i

THIS is to notify my friends and },

customers that my citice will be

)

from September
be

High St



SSS












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That is the name given them
by purchasers
Have you seen them?

They are the Tren mete
FOR SALE ;

At Your Gas Works, Bay St.
Small size @ 1/4 medium size a@
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each dozen lots





uN 4,



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PATIENCE CARDS
and
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At
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I.
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Recent

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LUNCHEON BEEF
MUTION & PEAS

Tins





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COCKTATIL, §



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PLUM JAM
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REAL ESTATE

SURVEYOR





— eo

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98c, each

9c. up

FOR GENTS
COOL COTTON and SILK SPORT SHIRTS from 76c. to $5.98

98¢, each





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G4ELGECEIGA

Jed Presenting forthe first time in BARBADOS at







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QUNNNY TO-DAY

PNG nd oo het — ES LEE Bs te A TE ‘ . <2 —







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Es :
Sones | SHE
SANG WITH ALL HER HEART LIVE ON IN YOURS.. 00K Fo
an ON eee. HANDS’ ¥ ‘WHO’ ee ‘A KISS IN The DAR oR me ears



LAM POWELL:
~ ELABETH TALOR- 2223

fan oe rem & RUSSEL CROUSE
SR Be he Pee | aes wm eee > ane By WP pee Ree















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LON MCALISTER @ 23'S" pay FikignT SS ee, a
Meictaern mene oer : ——EEEE—
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\ quccreo or RAOUL WALSH



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KING VIDOR HENRY ELANKE ™ seeeta—

ADVENTURES OF..
sen SSL WOO ai ‘i & The
[Peron : ee Cie
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ROBERT DOUGLAS san mcr ronments ann arc i EVAN, a rem








BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1950

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Full Text

PAGE 1

Ill BDA1 SI.ITI Mill BARBADOS. ADVOCATE CLASSIFIED ADS. WAKTtM l' W.I TSU'NONt 1104 IN MKMOKIAM ttUBRFa.l. ia*H. • %  I a t aom ••( m> dear MoM f.rnTHinr II\WUNS. who fell asleep i tap) | MM How often do -v, tread ihe pMh. Taat (- ut to ne< grave Wl*' tie. the one # loved *o well Bui whom %  muH not w> Ar nigh.tier a)] an ulent Awl aleea* foraakam our ev<. Our thoitgrili are on ID* lonely gTa* Where our dear on*lie* Eva* lo be remember d *• % Hn.ll %  di(. 'Wife. Marguerite an. I %  ildienI-IP In Irvmc memory .it our Dear atolt.er :rr who pail awav on It, 1S4B 1 naaaed awav When the one we laved wa* called lo Out nf | ..i.l I Into God h,i. .. beaulirul garden fag her rUwWra 'howr the 1 beat. The flower* *r ulj;-e upon her gran Will wllh'r Md devav Rut her ntemoriea will alav* linger ii< war Marts from dv to day Tvwr to hr i>fnen,lm-rl liv her ehlld irn CTMH UaCo.la. William ,V B A %  Marrte Oreenmge. Mr" Mill-rent ' < %  rune Bra*!. ualle idnughUr*.. Viola and C-rdOti Tudor (Grand d..uhler *"1 rirandto". Fon svi i: AITO.MOTIVF. FOR wmm HOI v|; S W(;AU)W Uodaa. — al mam %  !" d exper t— cad general *.< (.mn, w two MUM have |'• M lUmagala, B> Mn l^DY f,^ omee MB n stmocraphy BM 4 TrFrwrltlnt J ~ letter Md In penon I, M LM It - Mayor* ft Ce YOUMG l.OV U. learn oAVe work r^feiii r>i^ with nire ann n lnl|i of i orthand and Tvptof In view nt be>* portion latet Aonl* hlelier and I" Wt-on tr. J A UAR-tlN ft BON I TTl %  "'"'"• ; %  M. Jn NOTICt %  M I-II or T JO A* OBOANIST for *i %  eaaa n't SeotemJn' FaaaaM -p* | Rev A Me| lot CANADA'S ECONOMIC POSITION MISCFIXANEOIS TAVC.IJN Re^hmont. Bathal September nnwarda. monthly or o'* i, 1 double beilroon-a lrnv>na bew.teadr chlkUan a roaan nmm and kaume Rafiineaailai •ervanl'n room AppKHowe 17 a so %  WOODVAHE Piw Hill rurnlahed rom lllh .Sei>t rm ber to mid Janu..-v Rina Huletl Mil or John Rladon *"<> I • li IOSI WAUiT • laaaftatj i I It kMB 1 • <)panr. engine .rcpt for Crankahafl and Minilo:.!. Anolv Service Lt.1 Di',1 SJ I %  In TRUC-U aii.lliarv *> and hlahwav 1 M T.I. %  B Unrrlm 9 ton Truck* with r bear, .ultable for fleht work FMH RD n4104 S.ff in—*" VAVIBajsaJklpj daal Hij from etock Morrl. C'.wlev 10 cwt Van* and Jk* ima Ree "heee new modern vehicle* Than dectcle Foil Royal GUd rat 4i a t to-sn V'v N I perfect wnr %  .-i | Qt Mat power A.i.tln Ina order A-r.lv Whltepark Dial > ELECTRICAL CAM iirXItSTFR—One it two 00 %  COOI fTHATOH Am ti %  ;..,.! %  %  .HI i.i tmiber atth Tel lit I C A Olltlodt 1 a so .*. RA11K•n pert— Hor-e Kill I I IVESTOCK COvT-Oi( rapt -ow to call In rn week. a-cn-H ci" li.ve 7 pl wllh flrat calf Apnlv F King. Robert.* Tenantry, oppoele Nell. 0p • Ml"ha-l 3t| 90-lr Tirrnr .11 Central Sui, "'lock, a i" to** MFCHAVICAL MACHINE One Treadle fllnRer B-wm Machine In perfect condition OfTet. will be rccetvad Telephone SktT (1 a so— *n UNDER THE DIABtOND HAMMER MISCELLANEOUS IHO I'BDt'CTlON faAIX -o'oom and >l*e M .• %  Bftl ,1 BtaaftH I to F'SIIIV: I'OAT *>Fiahmf P-*at it.r Hfi**>" Laiuph It feel in good rnrtdllMNi No ren*onat>le oRVr eefuaed Aoptto Mr Dkano Maaon. Eaet P.lnt. St phlllp SO B BO—ln FniT FXTINnOTKllKRS A new afelPment of N" SWIFT lu't rocvrlvaa Pio annual refill necaaaarv—Refill only when vred Protect your buUneea or other vnluable pr>p-rt. by the Inelallatlon al Hie world'* fnete.rxHorriaher COURfBfY GARAGE Dial 43B1 31 R SOIn %  b. HARDWARE tTTJMS-Enamal.il. a'l •hade*. Slnve* rolf Hiwtlnit lrn. Cnal Pot. Apply: John D Tavtcrr ft SonI'd PI 1 >\ %  H >1> PARTirroNS 04 feet bt f. feel a iiich"i Ircludi-T Door* tarcellent cot rJHtofi Applv Too Floor Reliable Phsfirc*. H-id St D"-' 4HO t • BO— a> PINXINa B1IEARB of the hlghee. •tualIty Only t* B ami DIM Limited ouantlty Ra* vour Jeweller* V De l-tmft CO Ltd JO flroad S're" at v K< RETORT! .XMH-V* for tt-lnc I I IT 13-lneh and cafylnr caaea for 10 inch rtcordi. and we nave th rero-H. "no A RArTNaW ft CO I-TD 10 a BO ill %  TOW 1 1 1 %  /•nd Perfection Owen T St Dial 33BB f OtM Alldar rhlldre fell Bart Pi,. i • tree' rtoiBBwi li. -r. .. t St—in %  HOaW—l^d-a' and ffkl aandal*. Il.ndb.tbat*. Panama Hal*, an .• Reduced Bi-ni-: lb**BB>l l' : %  rkaMi rvd draw Plait le Variety recharte any Ixll.poin' i*n IB lor 1> XritRhi. Md • %  Phoci.ir" YAWT-"Frapldaappro* Bl", !•# laoa with Cray Marine engine Oond ion B3.0W a barfaln Apply Edward* Phone BSBB is a ao-T r i Be Wise...Adverti8P l>dge j M b*t undet*lgi 53 Appllcinta abould have per let ice of ace ,>m lar-c and -..mo general education i Thev ahouki >tate aTa, which mull nol exceed fort* eight year* Uit bltl'i Ban MM *T*a*dBM ItataM J Submit two recent l4a*Wn*>rdal. Salary 47(0 per annum rlrdng b* pti aMum ncT n nU o' U la ir,. I ,..lit,„. h.ldlai -I..-I.U. (I,,,, "KI IKyfata. that I the O-n" o* UM above Plantation am about to obtain • (nan of caoo under the provi t |on* ol inji>o.c Act -galnel Ihe MM p %  %  m ra*pcct of Ihe Agricultural yea. IBM Twi-. _. r from High I la a myatertou about Iba time of .-hang, of l.tv and I* the ra! uae of much heart trouble and laitron of paralytic atrobee. Camaaoa* aytapiome of High Blood Proo%  ure are. Narv.uineaa. haadachea at lop anil back of head and above *>" %  pra*>aure lo head, dlaalaoee. abort braaih. peJna la heart. paJnliaiion. poor alaep. Icaa ol memory and energy. r a ally airlbru. fa*u and worn If >oy aufTer -r.. or thaa. %  •mptoma, don't tel.y treatment a in*;lday. becaua. Four life may be in rtaogrr Naaea Ifoimerii known aa llynoi). a ntw • •ifdical diaootary. redu.ea High lllood IT.aaure with Ihe firat doae. take* a l . luai! ofT Ihe koi you f. • Frtvm P*i* C %  nd aervictw wtuch UBB USA would sol) lo f-e>ch group would Ihuii be dtrtrrnln>rd by tiar AT ierin ihrmttlvBS. Briefly to racapltulalt. Canada and the other natlotu of the BritEmpirr and Comfnonv-.-tlth face certain fundamental facts hich are largely beyond their control but which mutt noven their ecoiiomtc pouciac for man; vear* Theav facts Bits: a I The basic economic ndres•Hy of every nation is the maintenance of emplovment and income: for the Briilh nation*, thl* meant export market*. '* The pretem trade critts nd cotiir ictton of export mBrketa the result of a world-wide break-down in the exchange of ftOOdi and services The llnaiicul aitd monetartBBpscU of this rni* IN the raBult, .nui not the cauae_ of the crUii; 'fl This break-down is the reBUH of fundamental change, m I h e economic Will (lianges which preclude a raaloration of the "status quo untc lellum"; (d> The phenomenon known BM the dollar shortage, therefore, will ba permanent throuTghout the foreseenbli' future; euike you l.el at N, —jnry has bean borrowed under Agr.-illural Aid* Act. 1MB. or ih. -Act .a* thecaeemay be. in reipeci LIQUOR LICENSE N0TICI T' %  Mlc,ia*L i Urad*h.i l-lark Hoc I to *ell Bpl %  .oard and .hingle ^v>p atlatned't. real. t**jce ai Lower Utack R.-rk. SI Mifnan Daleo thi* lat day of September ItSO To E A M.I*U E.M Police Maglitr.i.e. IM-i A •RSd i EDNA llllADalHAW at va %  Appllcanl N 0 Thi. appllcallon will be cunalded at a IJcenalnt Court in be held ..Police Court. Dlrtrict A" OR Monday. llth Bay of Ropirnibcr. i am ,t II o'clock a in E A MclXiJD. Poiwe MaBlatratc l-.i A Ban In PI'tTI.M AI.KS OFFICIAL Pitor-rarr %  l-KIKSON ALL THAT ce laraer parcel of abouta which v.. Eight Acreor View Plamatloti. ... aforeaaid containing by admeasurement Thi theraabouu abutllng and nounding on land* Evariley deceaaed DARUADOM IN THE COURT OP CHANCXRV i. J hf n u ^ !" '"i s l r d property will be wt up (or *>la at tho Reaiattatlon Ofika. labile Building*. Hrldgeinwn. betwa-tn la .-..i, and n m. far the tum am! or Ihe date -pecined below. U nol Uien BOW. Iriday al the name place and during Uie *ai formerly part M in ivniaiiiiiii oy eiunuiion rive Acre* or ll-i'v iart ol a larger area containing by adineaiurn. i %  i -i.,.ut. originally part of tinland* uf Won; n pa run ol Chrtil Church and liUn Two hier B?ih • • -C.l.OUCESTEH aa.l. Fre.mat.tle Autruat 3iit. Adelaide September Mth IBth. Melbourne 30th aepiemocr. Hrpteinber 23rd. Svdt lilabane October 411 '-do. November 4th 1 M %  nil mm Jet DABCV A SCOTT I will .ell by auction on Tueadav. ath B.plemr--i ,1 mj Auction Mart. Baiter* Road, opp Maaon Hall Street A Inol liouM-hoM rurniture comprlaed of Bedloem BUIla. Double bed.trad with Vor" •karlaW. Vanity table. Bureau %  Utcnuor. Dining Table. China Cabinet. Chun One C A Radio and many other Item%  MlleO. hard froien Cargo accepted on ihrough bill* of (aOiiuj with ira*hipmeni at Trinidad lur HarbadiH. Britlih Guiana. Windward 0 leeward Iiland*. Pea -ppiThe M V "Daerwood will aecept Cargo and Paaaenfcr* foi *t l*ta. SI Vincent (Irn,. :a. Aruba. lilig Saturdii'. and Si-pTl.e M V T B RADAR aciapt Cargo and Pauanger* St Lucia. St Vlrvem. Oran Aruba. aalllne Wedneadi> BV'ernber. 1tB> B W I 1-....HI, A.Mni.iiiun Ine rorui|(t> P a> : ||| a | ; D* I : I 1 for I lag l*atMAFJ,, Auctlorieer a v ao-an UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER W Mcoa, StaamAhip fa NRR OBLBAHB SBB.irB K it " loan aeavn 1 BY 1 %  ..!.•„. will M-II on TVmOAember, at our Mart. High Street a Spring Sllad Mattreiae^ IB Pilk.-. i'-l < n.hlnn.. I Fell Hal.. || n,. Silk Crape. ia Sewing Machi.it.. | WC CIMern 1 k.g While Zinc. I keg While Load. IM drum. One O Una, BB Plp-i c* Rolled Oali. I c a Corn Flakea. Shoe. 40 Tin* Baking Powder and other *Je 11 30 o'clock Tarm. Ca*h UK \NM |: TBOTMAN A CO. Auctioneer! a a BO--2. REAL ESTATE* N.I. I.I Sepletnber ll>t Sajiiarnber CAStOIAN IIBFICa %  >' I III" %  Ml Naair at Bhlt BS. "ALCOA PU4RIM" B.B. ALCVA PARTNnt ...m.i' ftth "UBTalBOtND BS "ALCOA PEOASl:s Tkaee Veaaala have HaalteB Arrive, Sarbade* Aug 17th I.V'.'ti .. Acre I* !" a| Ri cklc '."'".. *1! a 52* B'"'tiB %  • I-rlcad RiBhl Dial aS0 between IB A M and """ 11 a ia Mo=>J'UrP—. Black RockT^ ng Freeh Water Bay Stand .era. of land Ideal Rulldiri lultabJe lor Daley Apply <1HOP inFW..r*iT. l-ROi-EHTY-One Bm.ll Propertv %  Kenungion New Road Apply C A l.hm_al %  .%  _— B %  "Tl* J** 1*hmael. Bailer. Road HARRISON LINE OUTWARD FROM TUB UNITED KINGDOM %  eraely. must maintain dlacrtn if.atory barrier* ugam*i rron-mern ben. The Onl> Sound Hatw Integraliof, of the economy with that That the sterling so acquired Inliu.udaU'tl t C'.uui.li.in l-urchases in the sterling area, and 'ut clacwhcre. Id) Thai lira Merlin* area ountrles will, in return, remove %  II rpstricUona on purchaser In Canada; IB) That UHVeiling aiea t.iuntnes will remove BU restmt.uiia upon L'aiiddiaii piuchauvea in the atgnlng area. If) Tlial ihe Unitttd KUlfjdoiii in particular ahaII undertake to produce for the Canudiim nurkel upon a priority basis; (g) That the Imperial I'retfionce >>-.teiu be 11'toiifttituW-d im ihe basu. of an ehmlnatiim ol uriff barriers' bclwetn laV* Brit* •h countiies to the gre.. -Ibie extent. (hi Thai all ol the covered by the Agreement anall provIQe. each to the others, a BUbstantial degree of preference over all non mem bere—where posslhle ty a quota system, (I) That an Imperial rtind bo created lo assist defence baduatries which are adversely unVi tetl by the Kt'iieial iirogramme fin iiiriiom of trade within the ilclhlifc aieu. (J( Thai piovisiiin 1 1 ulii 1n.ade for the future ,ni 1 other nationg. It is apprcciatetl that these pt>uusals clearly cut acroas many of the pre-conreiveii tfjgss, habit*. and prejudices of man) i | %  not the least Cr-nadians. bul i>"" nt economic policies can lead only to disaster, for Canada, for all tho Britiah nalion* w Ihe world at large We are faced wRh the neeestlty of adoptinp (iiastlteconomic remedies for u M'hous cr %  iinii illness. .111 illness which may well prove fatal in ih,. wortis of Lord Btvtrldjo' "A revulutlonary moment In tht world's history is a time tt revnliitlons. nol for palehlnu" I.S. Plane Slrafril Red China Airstrip HEADQUARTERS ADMIT WASHINGTON, ** 1 I Air Force Hrjd.iuarlflkrs here dfO wtth ihe otat-nvrnt f Warren Austin. Amttitraii dels gi c to the United Nal ih-t' an Ashler pi..:e it.mh' h u ve straftd a ('hints* M autieLi in M.iti. lurta Austin said >es crda* abnt one Of tht K-51 Mustangs of the 7th F-ght.r-Bomber Squadron mighi, ACcldenlally have shot up B:I airt'ehl five miles inside HH AtTer the BfsM 1 lliore were denials both from Tokyo an.1 here lha' any AmeriCgn pilot had strafed ., \ To-day the Ail Pare BBaaflM cid factual, ami i gf Aii %  ie in .i pen0111 %  from LitHili ktni Siratemeyei. ,.,: 1 Icmmsnicr to An r'uin .-.•.. ( lt 0*jj ti.il H'.: S V.iml.n btrg. I WIIH.VIIH'I *; passed thli e Seere tnry Thomas Findletier, and it 1...hi 1 Austin through Dalgtu Boenlary Louii loltiaMn and MC B lata DM 1 At '1 An Force baWdq ronfusion nros,. irom the fan thiIhe report was handled ut hlghtt 1< vela through its passage from Tokyo t .i Lake Success. Apparently 11 was not cLrCUuV*. t %  nOBsfl operutions and rfllceTs either here or In Tokyo —Hauler 'Truman Has Eight Points HARBOUR LOG la CarBal* B.r a rn 111.c 1 Hfi Kiissian Meal Refused ;u>STt-N Sepl 1 Boston kHlgsTrgrtynvg hg refused to unit td B %  1. i 1 88 American Officers Ask For Peace LAKF BUO KSS. Sept. I. The Soviet Kelegate to the UN Secunl> Council. Jakob Malik, hj handtil over to the t'liile.t Nnlion' an appeal to eiui the Knir.ni W. Ii> Watiadrtiwtrig American force said to be signed by ss Unit) States' olll.eis IIIIA in North %  %  The document, winch BBaJik 1 had been sent to him as PrtMldeiii of tho Security Cou... il. was man public at his request. "I appeal to you." it Bald, "IJ lake all possible measures foi tin immediate suspension of thi* senseless blood-shed.'' The appeal claimed that signatories had come 10 Korea believing Hint thev were acting on In-half of the United Nations and BXpMrUl to find the Koreans friends am' fighting allies. "You can understand our >lu-' when we were greeted b> ioutl Koreans, not with jubilation, but with apathy, sullenness an hatred. Then wt saw that thi South Korenns were against Svni man Ithru's Uovernmenl Aftfi then .aptiiie. theBe ofll .ers found that the United Nation action was illegal and, that Ugh' Ulg was caused hv 1 In) rrventloo, tho (loot) meiii said. —Header Ruasian trobm roycolt In two The cargo v ini'in JII bit I Longshoremen llu .-...nil %  .' BB left 111 the ship 1.0c >esti relay .'iv Ihe hKLinaUu .1 1 Associntioii Daniel Donovan, Uw Lottgah. men's Assfxifltion's Vict-Preaident sold his Union would ri 1.1.load any Itusslan cargo t! thought that the Uni 1 BU Miould establish a policy of . trade with Russia ur Sovlt I le 1. u itnes" "Il 'Mould not '•• leli to ,i'lK>ii %  lion" Donovan gaid, 'bo 1 1 1 en. In Washington will da will do It".—Reuaer CASUALTIES WASHIN. row The Dgtenca 1. par! luneod lo-day that thi rjotiflod li.ittlt fBmigltlgt] In Kor %  I lo midnight of August 25 v. ;88ti. I 101 kllle BM wotnidrd, 48 pi I %  1 2.430 listed as missing This was thellrst rniiu U] 1 ran A '-imalties since Au. T. The belt t. iM.aitnn gf .o-duy that it wou 1 usually figures regulail % %  Otice a week. The llgui 1 not refleel all casuiolles suffe: c : up to August 25 IwcBUse 1 • required lo r.-ien,. t from tli front and .loin .he next <>r km. Army casualties wt-u -vv 27. Marine Corps 1B4. or 1 F TC PH Rrtiler ledgsKJ To Seek Pea be free, innt, and united as thev aant to be. Under the direction :md guidance of the United Na.vith others, will do ou. l*ri to help then: aajjoj that right The U .lied Slates has no other :im in Korea Thud We do FeM want thr .1 Korea to tgpBOTad into ar. It will not sprc.it am iiiununlBl n | thai aiinieBttd 10 Ihe fight of the aggres t the 1 I', -pi Of I II Ml Kotiuh We hope 111 parlnular that Ihe people of CUlel WlU not i-e mil 1 nto iightiuii ag.unst the United Natiotai agtd %  BBinM the An.1-1 tcan ptx B0 and still ate 1 % %  the Cotwnun1*1 impen.iliMu. which has alreadv t*r Gn 1..1. could u-.ui 1 gn China %  Intialvansa,! bn "'In We ilo uoi w;ui| Kmti.i" %  t .in. p.m if Asia for our%  e!v, We heJie\e that the futur-* of Foimosa. like that of any other rTit0r) In diSpUlB should K' v-fulh H t bBlaaVB thai il should Umtetnational action, and not by the decision Of the limd LtBtgM or of JII, oihn state alone. i h II.!.-, 1011 ot ihe Seventh Fleet %  .1 the conim i-iee IN peace, not Kreetlom For All W. 1*1,1,, in freedom %  all the noting*! ,,f |h,> Far F.asi %  ..I Me ir \K h, sra e lighting Ulldei Hn m of Korea fi|Kti the Philippines he lost ant an 1 the national aspirations to ri i'1-eiii'eiue nf oflier Asian I..1never Kiluutarily ..l\\ lei 1 lion ,1 has .icMn rai Wtot 1! h., in any %  i lOplg WtaO have f.illcn ., %  . 1 ol Asia but we also Maul lo help lliein stvu e |fj themselves better health more : iml. lettti clothes and homes, i banco to live their own lives in pi %  The things we want for the peo p'l 1 A: t llic s-n.e thmns I lag Ihe people of the Osl ol the world Weapon Of Dictators BV %  nth We do not believe .1 aggresalve or preventive war ouch war ia tho weapon of dictators, net of W .nit pent e rtOt Olllj for i<: %  but iieiause uLffg of the world, inrlud%  iVol iheii full energies to ma'.lng their %  lie, grid hapjiiei M Wi hall give what help we can Una universal human wish 1 on*e* true "We invite g|| t!ie Il.it I%  .thout esceplion. to join Aork. — Heuler. MV Daerwoc d. Bel "i*Sr %  it-t'a. SB If M V M.meai %  V Cisl%  •lit Hkit si 1 %  B* aaaster Bvic. i..Simrnana .(von. SI Vineent In louc*. Will -t. cfe,. 1 oasr^l SfntJon llri Irxtieei I . ..,1:171,1 %  Re tksdo. (H.i :• %  S ga-.. it. ri n.. M 1 M • Caralbe, H V Pm.,, \ a g 9 I l.-L. --• ir NK-aaaaua * Ac* %  CaUlaa, BS Jo— Calvo -tcitele SB I'att %  %  %  %  1 RUSSIA WILL NOT HE INVITED TO AIRCRAFT SHOW LONDON, Baq Aircraft 011*11 m tors annou that for UM in,sp ihey Iheii annual %  1946. they ..1 %  not Inviting tRus%  1 Curtain" to B e n d represent ji 1 vet lin* JI-.I Their 13U •' | • ugh m Bouttwrn Harnpabiro next week is the BBVOp hrilLsh Aircraft [ndUBll 1 Includes i Ian 1 trti %  %  .. Laj %  known aa T. ,.:ter that planag ,,M tin secret list ..re v> llhdl The Sociviy 01 (onstructorg ha\f ilnea ntt' usuall) Invited abt l-om all ovoi Ihe v %  %  I LONDON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE EXAMINATION ENTHIES foi the A' I I Ih Fxaminittlona. IBS", of the Loudob Chamber of Commerce must reach the Department of Kduct tlon. The Garrison, not later thnr 12 noon on Salurdat. the 'Jlh gf Septtmher. 1*50 2 Thi Entry ~eea will be as follows HlfiBle Siibjeeta 11.9* each I im 1..11 I iiuii.r.B.IJ eaeh Full t-'t.-tlfleste If.W 2 aVM 3n *-'**,',', nOMs* people waned ail Ihrir live, urig to get all the name%  lo bur a house failed, while otlv •no evei.lu.ll> owned Brn't you 1. naata a Hart* You 1 lowing „ te.m. At Chapman-a %  .* %  1 %  aaBrtkl IT. from hcuae wllh a *drootn*. waSer-tiiilet *V tiata,. eu At MarUrvdile'i fload otsa iwl> r & S. SS. SS. ss SS a sl lai.sl toilet I. bath, eutce ret II-MVI %  Baa %  a heitraea,,. mlOT g g p ratarty wllh | "' %  n baaS ,.(,.,..4. vti.ne-a-.ill Bunffalow called R.*/erl> I ha* verandah, dr..log 4 dining room* %  bedroom*. Waler-tollel aV bath, etc At Pine ltd another im.ll propertv otheri For pattleulari Bcalt UBBMIM I %  Pfly I*Are. A MOONCREST" BROOKHURST JUNECREST" TEMPLF: ARCH" FACTOR' %  •1'I.ANTERnOMEWARIl Vessel "MOONCREST" Lcaeea 3rd. Aug. Due BfirbaoVi2nd Sept 10th Ami 25th Aug Mh Sepl London Glasgow & .-iv -pool • %  London London Glasgow or Llveryt,'>l 6th Sepl Liverpool 94l Sept FOB THE I Mil 11 KINGDOM For Closes tn Batbmdm London La^e September /.v///w>y*-ye o o* HAVE YOU GOT A ; COLD or COUGH \ IF SO TRY I HKOWNKN CERTAIN COUGH > Removal Notice Or V A OON CPT iChar Chlropiaetor a> OptmIliANI Bros. I 1 %  " 1 REAL ESTATE "/•!..• ,• fl.t ','! K.S s<,...'.. 1 I U 'iH.i! ^ t\EVoR HuJi-nr... Whooping Cough Dluaar nf •^haas and Lung., elc etc Brd Sepl Bth Sepl 23th Sept Ifldi Starf brd sept. C. cARLTON BR0WNF tVboleflsl* lata 11 UraagM uh. Koebaek Si Dial I| Si eyaM^j, v&si*mmmmuwi>J& For further inforr.iatio*! apply to— DA COSTA A CO., LTD.—Af.nu I WE CAN S"I'PLY C'ENTHAL FOV.XDHY I 1 It ossfstax rotraan vat. irw.i CoriKi Brod and Tudor Strrei* UNBREAKMtl.r. t. Alllll \ HOTS That I* the MM 1 Have ra Mi %  |Mlt I I I M .IM ;. TODAYS NEWS I'l.ASH TATIIM I t aatOi and n:;iinii: H*ORER8 \i JOHNSON > s| \ riOKI KV VA1II* MKOIIM-i At JOIINSOV-i MAKOtVARI ltt>rt>nt .trrirfi/* vr*i 1 I M Ml'" i %  I > I 1 1 %  %  I t iWKTAII MArAll'INI -V CHXJ-l' TOMATO .HUT • Ml M'BTt il TOMATO SOUP tTTV.K A T'lNUT 1 TQUATOBB PINZAPPIJ.Aal STUART & SAMPSON LTD. JOHN M. BLADON A r s r v A \ i Mslian Science) I ( ..culling l.oont \ \i —,";•-"— ) ( 'li HI. : l'j j.io— 2 u.m Ti.etdaiyB, WtdneadajB, (Frldoya. iO a.m.—12 o'clock (SaturdsjB. %  ••a .:.-.. IB* lUkle ai Ota (hriinan Bclenee te.i lo. k f • %  *• %  a .4 %  •*!• *nta Ka*a 1 f if -.,.„(.,,. a, mm n.t.u f a .'•> ....1 Jt reed, l-nr-w-d. a J Vi.ilorT Are*vV*(comr THANI BROS. SIMM IK i;CIOI)S! FOR I.ADIKS PLAni'lK RAINODATI 'in tvrinu. alutdaa) UA* asysJi I'LAHTK HI AHTII.S Ua, mp VMM fANH "-rv light Bretghl lie. eaeh aiKAW HATI iraneyl r each >TRAW Shu|i;dn< lt\tis Wt. uu FOR CENTS t 00ft Q0VTOM and SILK Sl-or I SHIRTS from Ifc. to U91 Hill It: and KHAKI CAM Ml. taeh roRK IIAIS SIM e*ch



PAGE 1

PAGI rwo BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATIRI>A\ si I'll Mill I! Houst-wht-g" Prices "TlMS In |br to... m*rkrf ptMMBM -nd rhrlsi. i>l.... Mhrn (he %  AdJ5.B.C. Program mt %  %  I I*. I 0 %  m rrotn '.he Bdi a n. K^timnr FMl> I IB m II nd ..( fhr I..I.. r,.t.,d IJam.Mimic 90 a.m. Cloa* Nfn u M Anal*l* It Dp m Arthur aWolKlmlMT IU0 1 13 |> in R^ID x -o Datlua 1 00 r> m it Kiwi in ,. Haw. from MriLon I IS ... %  ,• %  t o p m Tvr Pi '. p in Dam-* %  %  jreaUrday iiti-inooii. ^kA^6 Qcdlinq ft I %  Th... K II p m ) m Kadi r ftpori ., i ... InUThidr %  S EVEN hundrcii people were invited |0 I'll' COCkUll KIT''. al the Bhductov. n On arrival gui met HI the lobby <.i the theatre by the Joint aianegli R. N W GlU. Mi M v Redrmn. and the Manage* Mi H < bert Edward* Inside U cocktail (he guests, or aat in groups m vartot theatre Later ki newsi-eel*. comiiiK attr.. I several short* were sbav/n bete %  the evening's entertain; to a clow o'clock. The buildniK. which was designed and I..nit b Ml indTmki C ranee partly to Its nil •stone finish which treated with %  waterproof Boowcem In %  delightful sii.nU' it ulmon pink. The l* i seated in the Auditunu'i i. can see %  Tinnit*irioi olo u scheme i predominant! v the Mine ai thai e4 the Plai lOiatl dhrlduaUt) ol ii also u snack bar, •* new leatuie for olnoinaa In Barbaa %  ountei A clock, on lha left hand side of the auciiioiiiini above tha screen is another new and m ture to this attractive and modern cinema. For Brother's Wedding A RRIVING from Venezuela via Trinidad by W.I A. yesterday morning, was Mr. Hal Hamilton who h,is come over I0J the week-end t> ! %  present at his brother's (John. wedding U> Miss Mary Her**-, which take* place this aftei Hal has been working for live '..III II in. on Mondaj time in linyean thai 11 I his other brothei Gordon, who i-. also In Barbados Hope to leave to-day M B, pad Mrs. Ulle I and tii-ii three children. i. wrereta %  hope t' Going to New Zealand H ON BLE AVUXN M Chairman of th< rown e %  i %  %  %  I be returning nor, II w i A Ha I %  nd Mrs J O Tu vUle", Pine Road mr Lewd who %  % %  %  ,....,•-!.;.w. told Carll LU be going to N< w u i land in Octets windward Islands at U i I First Appearance Yesterday M AKING %  eanratl aarporl Ii i Is %  hrnnch f l %  %  i the BaggM* y in < barge ol thJi m ik which Ii idtuated in the Terminal Building .,i Hi %  airport, I Mb P >' Mullen Km s long lane i felt, thai iu was an absolute necessity at lb terday it became Hare vtsUors i pictorial maps, stiiiioiui-. abundai i at leal %  I i t llteraere is also %  i.in peel their i MI arrival Cross-winds! Divisional Manager -£tso J-VIVISIONAL Manager Of the W I.A. and their \~* Easo Standard OH Co. ii most of the morning II.G Mr. Geoffrey Ecb>hill Into the sky at two companied by his B.W.I.A VtUngs which drdad tha Bruce were also arrivals d airfield several Umes A cross wv. on Thurscuu %  fternooi %  unsay, ~ .i i.r them from sboul ten minu tes one 'if thtni. VPTAT. %  Rodrigueai In command In land The other one Tl ; .ilinl : Muout II. o'clock, anpsrents vudni which had been deida llcw over Sea%  MII. .mcl this too went on tu %  kvere still Ii fnr landing ShortK thai VPTAT" would make uu Venesuela trip. d hafg*f loatdad •.. .1 out in warm up on the runwayi in a (cw minutes, however! she returned loths parkDue to maintenance I*ter on in the da %  a* Ided that all 1 lartW} wore cunWhat's in a name dub In IVi sdUl). a hlch i %  and In DM %  %  a for i epali .i ;irict sJtersdioti H M • % %  i that the 'inii ; I'WIA They expect to be m "> \ KC i lotaaa Dnacli. I'KTI'RKD here are Thor and Olaf Halvenwen. Iwln breOsnTB, retumlna to Hie Trrnilnal Bulldlns ye*lenU> JI Seawrll t'om the plane, whlrh due lo Maintenance did o-.i icavc for t'aracaa. Theoc two seeBafaasgl ham been holldaylmt In ll%  tilth thrlr BBfahaff and rider brother I'hry hope tu leave for Vei.i/in1 I I.PCI.IV s 1>oooccaOOe>&^oo^*c-*ooo^'->o'-'*'. *. ;'.:*.:'.*> -.-.'v> w**> Did not leave M RS. RAND! HALVBHSSaW her threa RSM Brll smeng the ii< nfcir. |ht> sran reiurninji to v< nexuela alter then hoUdai Toes tan KI*I mlii the plane, but due to maini . ,. .i.., MM take off. Bhc bopas taowevej to leave lo* day. Bnk la ihe eldest %  asmbar of the family. Thor and Olaf are twin liiothcis. • -i B Works in the Bush M B BTJEWABT ALLAN, who is with the Burveyloi Denarttnent "f the Government in B.G. has returned i a fters hoi'day loe. lbs work, he told Carib, often takes him for three in four in' i i rt tw % %  Into the %  'i Iviuiatlon, He [u< al i .H raoank. Going To Ledge Y l vi.-i Willems arrived i : .(1:1 H)lh*r MrS WlUerni from IVG. on i v HUM.A IVter will i den Behooli whet i Ifj wu be rvturniilti to B.G. ir M inwtalla they are in Worthing Delighted M R. HKRMANN KAISER wh pp lessor in Chemicn KngiiH>erinK at the University o as brought his wife am two children in Barbados for a All arc guests %  hank" and they are dr Paris Holiday O tt bo parti last week tor 10 wen) Mrs. Gloria Goddard, wife of the Wi I ,:'..,,n It is her first visit i Parti Hei dcUght is tinged \. iiii one ragrel iin husband could not go with her. Cricketing hat he Is to I slight operation 00 S.ptembei inth, made It impossible far him lo aceompany her. They might have made Ihe trip M Ihp end of the tour imt John's mala concern %  • as soon as possible tn be With Ins four young With B.G. Police mtiviNc; by HW 1 A (r. i in; oti Thursday sflernoosi %  Allan Outram of the ..,,. pa Pstuae, who nc, i b) ins wife and wai Ketl r.e here for tWU %  saskaf BOUUiv and will W' staying with his %  unt Mrs, N. J. A. Bascom at %  %  BtratbelydH. OwKbiof ih# attic ekati • %  I'lipei blf" . )> 'i I Podjy hu t>n aanaing Maaell > ; n In* n.nif u:; tin myiitnoui (IM. It's luck, you'va go: poriui knife, itutt lual etial I n*fd." says Rupen. "Can I IT r B Wi'h tht hirp b" I g:<.' . | ...... ..I'd bt tnou*and* of rupao til. SKf-i.m (iirimUuii irappls. 'til* mar Da a compieU %  %  III I IM\ uInaiructHm 111 vordah %  % %  *. UurlMUta. r-.[ nf Amrlt*ni no ;onsrt in eiuBSBsa. s. no uacleaa ua* to s* 1 1 1 '" ) \ .,nt* a muasa I—-* • Plora" liopliv at tlia L>*ir> -. P 10. He upaeta Uia rice. .I>IV t %  < %  >*• %  eartsfl %  % % % %  • l la You want double ten 17. Bo: xiuta vou call nera an |*e pci*onalHv I %  .iiuclura h out ot . uu.i IUIII ill Miutpnipnll 0> s.. Iiiii'in on I'aee 3 Another Priest Arriving Shortly A P~rt!( ., tWO weeks' visit to 'v Barbados. FT, H. J Faeny, i Cd lo BG. on Thuisday b) B.W.I A. He i> not as many I topic thought Pi Belllsrs relief I' is expected however, that an< ther priest will he arriving here assist at St. Palrick'l while Fr. Selhcv is on leave in England OI.YMI-14 TIIEATHi; TO-IIAV AM' SI NDAV. > %  '* ' -I NDA1 !• 15 I,,.. In.t.lmrnl ColumliU Srrtal •A COLUMBIA SIIIAla Slurring: OaOROI RaCVB SU QAIjAHAO NELSUN LEIGH U KING ARTHUR HUGH PROS.SK:: Sil I.AMELOT LOIS HALL .. THE l.ll'V OF THF. LAK8 liMIW Toda> To Sunday a.36 & 8.15 aunt Pttfnsas rresent "CLEOPATRA" St;ir tag < laudrlte Colbert us 0 1. K < % P A T R A Henry Wlleoxon ;. %  Maic Anthony WaaJa Wttaaaas ai Julias "DEATH TAKES A HOLIDAY" mdtrlok March — Sir Guy Btandlni (".an Patrick K.-ni Taylor ROYAL i mi-. I... i, ,..,. 5 p.m. and 8.30 p,., Itepubllc Whole Serial "FEDERAL OPERATOR 99" Starring Martin Lamont — Gconte J. Lewis .Viiini Crom Start to Finish Mon. & Taes, 4.30 A 8 30 20lh CFM V.1-. : Double Unds Diiiniii. Corrn "HALLS OF JERK HO" nd — %  I 0BBATBD THE LAW" with Tom Cunway—Steve Brodie Ss'+'i'SSt'S'*',',', GLOBE OIH COXI.HAII l.\ TIO.XS TO THE SEW RLAZA Our l/ntl*ii/it'\ in flit humlrvtls of WII* I'tiiitms iilut i tmlil not uvt Admission to eats th<> Thriller of Thrillers 8.30 p.m. & Continuing til It IS A NEW LIST .. a.MISSOUNIS HEHOiaa 1912—1943 MAXIM liOKKI'S IMlKllllTKI) I-OVK" •TRUTH WILL OUT"—by Chorlillillaldanc "FBOM EMPIRF. TO COMMONWKALTH" "PRINCIPLES OK IIKITISM IMPERIAL GOVERNMENT" '"BEAU SABRELR"—by Wrc-n "IN PACT OK FK.AU"b] Michncl Scol P ADVOCATE STATIOBTEllIf STORE BUIIS & llili::!-Lacla Hasps & Staples Barrel Bolts l...i..|. I i.ii \Burnvrs & Wicks Call at Our Hardware & Ironmongery Dcpt. 1.1. I.I .11. No. 20.19 REMEMBER : There Is no Parking Problem when you shop with us BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LIMITED. i \ i ii i a EXTM. i a Tl OX I ItIUII i„ Uirls! iiirls! Girls! 1



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PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1930 HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISM t.T xtAN WSABTmS TU1N3I IT 9ILL.V.! ) 1 U /** HOLES: _--E> Z£ SWOBP -OLES1 BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUN'THE LONE RANGER N-NOUSf C-CAN'I Bt">w 1H1 OOOfl: WiVut I luTmn.lFWECVN'I -3 : I. t7Q0IUUK>ilf,WELl 1 rtdUEIlEIWP SoffOCAIE 0RBl*ii Of ATM; BY FRANK STRIKER K. O. < \.\\\ . . . THE RIDDLE Of THE ROME REBtLS ;IT**0> 1 vtNKB.O* COV*St >H|I *g VOC / !" "l DP VOU TMJKK 60i"& "Otv ?. .^^-f I Mvl O*"* rtiTt*N* COUM BV Me ooiSM-T imOttf ver iv .COH BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS RIP KIRBY k>X*ATULTK>*.UJW..IOM, WUSMPI.Y MUST >CUI COlATS A LUCKY /S,PI M3Nf5 Tp H rcuucw.. I ONI-V WISH S w* AW D o* HC*^*... : ccw-D ac AT Tne y I i-vm SOT TO RUN... ftTOOiV... M / V SHe'U.TBU."OJAU_ BY ALIX RAYMO^ THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES W3-I KEEP "IFCBOA* • -1 AM THE HEW KINS.' THE KIM4TOM _SAID' %  Bl HE DID, DIP Hi? > VOUR REJGN V WILL BE SHOBT/J -I 1^ ,•'•••" • %  mm£a.PL'tN6wiN£i 4rBC WAiriUS: I HERE AGAIN &f THREE STARS' SWEDEN'S BEST MATCHES &f OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE, I I 1.^ !" f—i—ii* %  KEATING^ KILLS DOT. S_j^^>i Large. imAim and) amail liiaTlna fir (I! Rheumatism hlle You Sleep *-if ii p •*• 'P %  '*•*"• mini If Mr.lll" % %  % %  % %  M icia-nai jrJ|ri3K5i%£ 3Es8rSleT— r Crab* tnauatM i n>uiir ... ^ ^•c-aHlf. lor nd#-nraw"M' in* iiaiw*. .nd Mat* r tnfl r*aio aeM. and i-n-*". from .oivSfy aafclT, tt i r.J "!> . ~J%  m> nv baiaifui or danarro';. di"f> %  r*a>* 1 O.U ni JflLfaJIB •..UOrU*. d.aal iH>uoaaaa aaW -i* *hkh pa .nirn %  Mprataeu rroin tl* raVaaai of 'd^-waw .tlart' an Ifcf dalieaw BUW argani>in. •"> "i"B.rlcfi a pa."rliaa>lf| 'ffir f •• • >r*f. %  • taaakt HCB".' ••;••• **•';' .nxdr'i !.• %  feai vatlrd %  < %  -<•• •'• •raaM .fill W %  .i* WW Qua.axlaad !• Pt Yaw '•* a %  Ma-ay la "T .. < It r I %  •il U. 1 -cr. o, m' " %  - M< II J i.iatn i(* .a.b'. aackaa*. A.I no' Cystex.LAHii IM cinun.'r COgUK li-^ 1 .n Jeugncd foTccoooeny,depeothldjiy -uj luog lilc Cnx>d a.ccaiibiliit u.iliuici mauncnaocc and irrvicuu. i .1 and unload. Ton.uu ivi indrpcndeoi bum ivbecl •vriaciAf. i^.i vlungc no Meeting tolunwi 1 oui-.pccd geubas. LockbwdIjjU i nab > ind 1'i.inj oihct modem aui'r.iobilc cnginctriag adraaca* "" \\JiUbIc U a cotnpldc van, complete pui-up, og Cgaajaia aaat ga*. Ec o mm al ul aparaUiaa aa>g %  klf >fc a IM CBW-. (•< I ..f load apaia • PH..:. 1 xiaafftM aad •< IKKM • %  h u ud intck aaU • i' .-..4 nu aj-Utw mliHii ilU— I OIM HOV \l U AHAI.i: LTD. Phone 2386 Sole Distributor* Phone 4504 • N' TO-.. U | ? (UP ...(kO GOVtdNj, • Ni* r-i-GLAB UUAYOia • *•• % %  v „.i ,. ,..,.., akW viker t rtM qj, am tt r Tm HK.,- toi fh ihc yorid'i m.-i pcrbci r* i Ncdjpntit' .11 % %  ,,[., Miih ihr great an Acr.i roefrk ink Sytigrn, the NEW I'-ikci -si-i, ,. vcn lincr> ^^ deifjb*ethanei,ei hcloic The Acro-meHK lu. ^>ieni u iM giejlcM e \cr devid lis *holl> oew, KHUIK uwihud of drawioi in. go mg. wreguarding and rck-awng iak g:e^ the nou %  ttffcctmrj po pacRXDaUOl e*cr anoian M-ndtc Ifeii baaoilM pen .. eojof ki ainoolh g/fciw..* aowo . > wu 'fl iuog io on ooc aod givg one. too, a* a >r*xul pfcwni Price with Rolled Gold Cap .. ,. Lustraloy Cap A S. BRYDEN & SONS (Barbados) Ltd.. P.O. Box 403, Bridgetown. $21.18



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PAGE FOl'R 11 Mil! MmM)V(K'ATE SATI RIIIV sEPrana 2, H-... M2&Sk&&' WINDOW ON EUROPE Lit.. '.U SI. I Saturday. September 2. ITIH 70lli INrllidNT THE itrongeti indication ol the of the Y Chfattleri A was the enthusiasm of tho members who attended Ihe Seventieth Annual General Meeting yesterday afterimon A new not* of progress was the ambitious programme of the Directors of the Association to take over the premises adjoining their Hostel at Union Lodge in order to provide space for additional activities to which the "Y" now caters. Having sold the premises now occupied to Chelsea Garage Limited, they have purchased Wakefield for £5,000. The new premises will have a little OVM three acres of land and this must be cleared and levelled while the house will hue to be rebuilt. This will then be added to the Union I^odee Hostel and a proper hall provided in order to cater to the needs of other organisations which from time to time apply to the "Y" for accommodation. This expansion is the jjrealest step forward the Y.M.C.A. has made since its beginning although there have been many and developments during its history. It was started in 1879 at Planters Hall on the Wharf and later removed tfl the premises of W. L. Johnson in Roebuck Street. As it grew there was need for greater space and again the "Y" found a home in Civans Lane over the prcnsfM of Manning & Co. Ltd. It was in 18H.1 that it came to Rickctt Street where present day generations will remember it A new lease of life was given to the institution after the period when Mr. Pringle was General Secretary. There was an increase in membership and a new enthusiasm. Finally the "Y" was removed to St. Germain, Pinfold Street in 1933. Henthere was room for tennis and football beside the indoor games. Eight years later Union Lodge wns added as a Hostel and the service rendered to men of His Majesty's Ships during the war will not be forgotten by many. The "Y" has outgrown its home and with the increased demand for social, religious, cultural and recreational activities among young men, the Directors have once again attempted to cater to that need. There li no other institution in this island which can be a substitute for the "Y". It fills a unique place in this community and it is for this reason that it deserves all the support which a generous public can give. Only by a substantial increase in membership can the Y.M.C.A. continue to grow and foster good citizenship throughout the community. 3 Million Leper** LKPHOSY can be cured, but it is due to a general opinion to the contrary that the work of stamping it out is so slow. It has been proved that with modern methods of treatment the disease can be cured in live years. Today there are three million lepers within the British Empire; and of these 90', e remain untreated. This makes the work of the British Empire Leprosy Relief Association an uphill task. The methods of treatment are known, the scientific preparations are known but the lack of funds ,'or the purpose is a severe handicap. The Association aims not only at curing those who have contracted the disease but to save the children who may become victims of this "stark tragedy of hopelessness, lonehnetj, malformation and decay." This wasting disease is not confined to any particular race of people or any one nation; and the fact that it is not due to any peculiar climatic condition but is world wide makes the necessity for controlling it all the greater. Those who enjoy good health and strength have little idea of the tragedy and ihe darkness which comes over others who have been afflicted with leprosy. And to those who have not the hope o( treatment there is an even greater load 01 despair. The most tangible way to show an appreciation of health and strength is to make some contribution to the work ol those who have dedicated themselves to the cure of leprosy the world over. Send a contribution today to the British Empire Leprosv Relief Association, !67 Victoria Street, London S.W. J. U through BELRA you can pass even five shillings into those poor stumps of hands to arrest the further ravages of leprosy you will be doing something truly humanitarian, something vital. iiS David Tempi*Holx-ris f East Germany. Dr Aden*: iiclicved to be speakl 'orcc of ntmui 50.000 men. organagain be lU maicr. If it teemed ^ done In iscd under ihe direct control ot \ 0 the politically minded general* |h( Br j ush at cr; LONION. ihe building of an internal secunl> would serin p la just the : how t pui anas force—call it police or army— form of Interval i.<:. back in German hand* hat been Wlll provoke immediate Civil wai which Germany ml .lomnam subject fur aigufcpgun by Ihe formidable East Wai lhat tfca 1 CM during 'he last German armed police It is being Our French repot-.. 1 two weeks. The notes that fola^Red m Germany whether th" German foroe is alrenu low cover the many, and highly y n ,| C j State* and Great Britain posed. The French PCtM n confusing cross cuirvnis of this mrc m tmci a bi e \ 0 re-arm Gernnancing Itki 1 .le a. the political police m the general European demand to bo g?^£*&?*g SEE? Communist dominated Republic defended against the Red Army 2^^!" *"^ mm !" ,i^„. ttT Uig That can tine Of war. So .... alternative is to flnDM retleml t.nvemmcui H Bonn „f a new Weat Gorman Army, to ancp additional military expendiM present the only police forces be more profitable to Germany to U|V „j,) lo that a n Western Germany arc virtureach alliance with the Russians ce rtaln mensuf "f dollar aid—In illy unarmed and are rontrolled and themselves la rocoo'iuer WesBjg fana <>t m QUipU 'i tin eleven Lander governtern Kurope, then who would there America, and maintain each sepneni. be to halt such u Oerman change „ %  ., The second proposition under of front. According to one General mand with.n the formation of a 25—30 paosstr divisions must be "overtappllsg." Vest German contingent to take created to fl\ Germany security — ... lllM .i, U place—and all admit il would against the Russians But the same nriUMi .\nmitu e numerualh prominentin the divisions would be a powerful A: he pre*.m dale tinlUsh Vcstcrn European Army, (sugoffensive unit against the West gj" on Uw* discusslims MM jested by Mr C'hurohllli. or the Within Germany it may not be hOOfi WfJO "' !" .,, ULsnttf Pact system of Armies so easy to lind a:, army, insplle 01 Tirst 'here is M J'.'?_'V*^. M -—. &%&,& p2£ g? Es?£rH?^ the >tatmenu of the Social latic Party arc to be trusted ^ r. uciiHivNivuiu or uumun (her,, may be a lack of recruit* M M.CU>v the I'S High Comasirsceived sharp criticism. The , Joln ^ ne w Rechswchr Herr SJSSrV'S!m£r. gave Dr ranch do not like central organoilenhauer. the Vice President of A(ll IS lhc ed power in Germany. They tho SP D (Socialist Party), has rarc f„)iv prepared statement by u %  vr always favoured "separaUon „ rrn i y denounced German reftrsftn Ofl i-.kesman that poweri" among the Lander Hrrni ,ment in the same week th.it Britain had full sympathy" for ivernmentv-and fought long and Adenauer suggested it in the New Dr. Adenauer's fears, and that the ird to have their view accepted. York newspaper The Social proposals for a German militia and ne question of control of "State Democrats are at the same time stronger occupation army would be !>licc" is a lest case. The French lne most alarmed at the devel"studied" when Mr. Bevin meets o politically conscious of the apn -,ent of 'ho East German Police Mr. Dean AchSSCn, and the French lennan problem". They see in Forcv and „i,„ most aware of the Foreign MJBlsta ne centralized police pro p osed by absolute desire of their own folnext month. or. Adenauer a return to the i ow i ng no t to bo involved in anThis. to ma .security police of the Weimar nther waI or bombardment— panicularl iwrtod, before Hitler — which wh| c h would once again hit th. impended on the Government of s.P.D. stronghold In the Ruhr They fear an independit. (iermaii-led. .striking force The "Atlantic" 1 the Ithlrte. View-point On the other hand the French Charles M. Spoffonl is in I.. ,„„• suggested n,ooo f the nerd for far doI1 A r ,. w W eek.s ago 1 ioh.nl harsml %  .le.dei military forces in the West ^ Wldtf wur ld of inU-rnati'n..., with interns 1 fron10 defend themselves should nffaira had hoard of him. How he tier •seurMy* AM -• Ked Army march. The ,„ ih e united SUtes Deputy on the the British ml, t,iy mithnn ..flieial newspuper. U* Mond", -Atlantic Council" -which i* studying reports fi"' MTtaln Oer:>utiously advances the argument body ot nhrc |.heade.| men with ihe man minerals i-n the possibilities al forty millmn Krem-limen cannr;iV y HpoBsBlblllt] ..f prenrtOS Of lebuUdlBS G Di Adei .in' 1 •proposal ic "Internal security" poll' thai New York correspondenbi— from France, seems contradictory, Utftattb H li contradictory. But. probablj, the Foreign Ministers will live approval next mem!'! to I \\ man polio* lorcfl >f sboul 10,000 nun ,1 VSTJ 1' Mil uroposttlor dtfenci 'Ions 1 lone The Views of Ihe (ienrrals Each of the Allied authorities 1 and each politnal party In Gerny—with the possible excep1 ttnn of the French hive its ow it bear the military brunt for for Western Europe's defe afending three hundred million These dc pm,e 5 „e now MeUn A< 1. 111 huropeaw. There is no n i^ >n d„n They have before thcr slroiiK current of opinion favour, WQ jocumenU put forwnrri by :,h\, to 11 Orman Army within „,,. French, and one esBln Bfom ,n Kuroi>euti army; yet, as we the British Government. Eax-h of will show, there remains considy,^^ documents puts forward ••rable dissatisfaction in Franc-, -chcine for defence that would generals The Russians were the With Ihe present Western Europe form vun yf (he general Europ( '^ I" the lh reclatecl ((.-fence system The implication n effort to build an emcieni force '•'; odvanlage .if m>miring the al**S£-S ME£2$% Ir ihe United State* 71% of (xith presume ;i large im ,„., i.„, .,. u.i, ninB H ,rm those askcl 1 the Gallup Poll United States aici .f they are lo m ,^ ',,'n :i I'liunis have said that they lie carried out. The French plan ,;,.,,, .-torn favoured the re-armament of m certainly the greater i.-lalive Tne views being put forward by WStn Germany. to the present French armament the Germ m general! who confide In West Germany newspaper expenditure. There is evidence In < m Western AJllSI are surprisIMIIIS showed 77% favoured millthat the present French (ores* ins.lv similar, .me with %  t.uy "aid to the Allies". are being maintained at minimum They all estimate It would only This, perhaps, goes to show that*cost, and that therefore the intake ;ix months to recrull and the United Stales has Ihe most creased expenditure on new train Into sha|>e .1 llrst-rate lickkand changeable public equipment will greatly improve armoured division. Thoy all estlin the world and the the military efficiency of forces mate thai Western Germany can Ceiman is quick to grasp each already in existence--out of proput Into thi %  I'lfteen Chance Of n'milltnrlsalion Cerportion to cost The BSeond ciivi>ion* within two years— the imple idea lhat the French memorandum, (unlike the Banted equipment, unlimited and vnciiues of six years ago are first which is In the form of a free. The "command police" ol suitable allies to-day has swept plan! comes as a surprise to millthe various experts varies lihjhUi aside all other reasoning. And this tnry men The French propose Some suggest that there should week Mr Adenauer, the Prime the establishment of a single combe no higher Oerman command Minister of Ihe West German mand, and the re—organisation and than divisional command—that CJoveniment. has created a sensasimplification of the committees divisions should be fitted mt< tion with an Interview In the and co-ordinating mechanism of "Eui-opcnn Army Corps Othe Now York Times declaring "we the Brussels and Atlantic Pact* argue that Oerman generals should ought to recognise the urgent These organisiitii" %  iand whole Army Corp'. Inneeearity for Oerman is om 0 be running out Di plans. He was merely probing for soft spots, and not finding any (hat could be exploited as he hoped. ii< MT*] A'alker. who only a month ago had once ssued a stand-or-die order, now found il lecessary to voice a warning against overonlidence. "The U.S. now had live divisions mi Korea The South Koreans had live divisions more on %  he line. The first ground troops from other Jnited Nations had also begun to land." "Even so." Time reports "there were still not enough troops to man the 140-mile (about .13 kilumetres) beachhead perimeter adequately and the U.S. was still making fas; %  I lifts of lighting units to prevent enemy ;>iobings from becoming breakthroughs. The ,{ed's shifts of strength, on the other hand. were slow and cumbersome, mostly carried nut at night I'mfear of air attack. "The military improvement signalled an open season for prophecies and speculations in when the Allies would break out of the 1 i-MiM.-tci in .1 general counter oflsnarra In the lines it was widely taken for granted that a breakout would be made in a matter t weeks. 'We'll never even find a North Korean soldier,' said a colonel, 'they'll all lake off their uniforms and become refugees.' In Tokyo, one of (Jeneral Mac-Arthur's comfortable spokesmen said that the war might. just ixissibly. be won by late November." Hut Time points Out that "such predictions gnored not only the facts of life of the Korean war itself, but the facts of lile in the reel •it Ash) and the world. MOSCOW may have been merely disconcerted by the hold U.S." Intervention in Korea, but Stalin's men have a way of recovering quickly from surprises. Facing this week's situation, they were wellaware that nearly all combat-ready ground Iroops at U.S. disposal, except for Ihin minimum needs for garrison duty, were committed or soon would be in Korea. No man could soundly predict victory in Korea by late November or for that matter by the following November unless he ignored the possibility that Moscow might set up a brushfire somewhere else, or intensify the force In Korea by getting China's Communist troops Into the battle." In the cover story in its September 4, issue Time reports on the U.S. Air Force's Strategic Air Command, the men and the weapon— '.he atomic bomb — which in Winston Churchill's words for the one "effective deterrent'' hanging over the heads of th.Soviet Politbureau—the likeliest reason why Russia's aggressors have so far started a proxy war in Korea, and not the big one. What Women Want To Hear HOVI: '„ In. x 21 in.. 3* In ", In. x U In.. 3* In LASHING WIRE. H. 1 and 18 C.usr OALTANin BAKHKIl WIRE—SO Its Colls GALVANISE WIRE—30' -nd 100' 4'ull* AH MINI M t LOTHES LINES STAIM.f-N NTrKL RIGGING WIRE—). In. <. \l.\ ANISr SI \CI.I-. in. ..1 Ml in EXPAN'llEll METAL—I in 1 3 In.. 2 In.. 3 In 316 In.. 5-3> in. 8' x ' Shm* WILKINSON A HAVNKM CO. LTD. Successors lo C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD. 'Phones U'Z A 4687 SCOTLAND'S BEST SCOTTISH CREAM 1111 \m n sum n utushi A Favourite at the Leading Clubs. SCOTTISH WHISKY at Grocer. With A Tropical rdens at Penshurst. Next the brim Is "loud, coarse and win, moment there was a raucous oath, blustering." But what ot tho KodKiii The poet had been stung by 11 man who fans his lea with his "Wo ni ihTt of an "rV. was reported as >. Just (lands". PEOPLE entering 1 lor women's interests' are inclined to think that women require news of fashion, beauty, cooking, home-makinf;. child welfare and. more than anything, how to get their man and, having got him. how to j keep him. Miss Gibbs of the BBC "Woman's ) Hour" is convinced that in addition to these vitally important feminine topics, women want to hear about life outside the home. She found that her listeners wanted book and Him reviews, talks on current affairs, travel and natural history and also talks on *>dd subjects about which they knew nothing at all. Many women miss the comparativelv broad and stimulating life they led in the jobi they had before marriage. A large part in**l* tneip home life is passed in monotonous domestic tasks and a programme that brings them a change of topic is greatly appreciated. THE CORRECT HEAD WEAR FOR THE HOT DAYS AHEAD. Selrcl Teen from the following . Covered in White et „ „ Khaki at .. Silk at $4.21 Each 4.56 Each .V:t9 Each Da COSTA A Co., Ltd. DRY GOODS DEPT. ,'ing CRAB-MEAT CONDON IK. II IS ON NEW YOltK THE tanned, ilifhtlj bnlll young veteran of Okinawa who Mopped r, the unloading of Itussiun crabmc.it and fuis from British .ihip^ in New York. U going further with his campaign His naatc Longshoreman James Condon. Hta aim: "To show the Russians that Hie working peoplo unfed up with Russia "I am not anti-British or anliCunard." Condon told mo. his bright blue eyes dot;: llepomiod to pictures ol tlk Quteo Elizabeth and Questi ftfarj on the wall <>( the mnitosl office ho occupies in Manhattan in his position nf commander of the rerontly created New York veterans of Foreign W:,rs Post. The Long-shoreman Has A Cold War 0/ His Own pl.iovrt inside cargoes of shi): ha in.nore than two months He peisuadod 25 Ion. to help to form an antl-Commun1st Veterans Post. Igeoibership bat scired A guarlor Of tht wear the Purple Heart decoration. Condon's whole >ii< idevoted to whut he thinks th< 00 for fill \l inside i .d„ %  ng for Europe N.Mily .ill th leaflets are composed by Condon himself One. aimed at French dock-workers, .i>Y.-s too hare loaded arms France \\Y limv also sent lo %  i 1,1 should France Ihnnsurdi of hradih li""for our soldiers who fill nrvrr come home. Please don'f lef fhem -I''ll I T |l" doieii. rh#n u-ould nercr re In Mid*), because bt aQ important factor jiroving intoni.ilior.al rolalmns. He believes that stopping tho I' >w if Irade with an aggressor cm be used us a powerful \M: The Hntor.o Condon Is w.-mine pith roll -i for the next entry of the Polli I liner Datory to New York Hll members intend to give : "the works" No cargo wlll be moved from il unless it is from Countries outside the IOllllll AIIKHSSA. Which Side To, The Editor, The Advocate. no objection according to one ol your correspondents to a law go\erning this, and drunkards who pitch and totter all over tho itrel I have three cases in mind whenpersoni nave lost their I >' H besfig drunk oi\ the %  greeti in short, the bis 401 \ehi• Id bo extended to users ^>f blcyos 'nans. OAUM RAMSAV. /Mr Mack Princ* su. -I should be glad if you I would kindly permit me to corr.il a mistake which crept Into my letter. Joan "The fair maid of Kent" IfcVilisl. |;i We like the British," i< said "We feel they are our partners til "•aif^t Conrniimlsm the Brit1 crab-ineat over here" Thirty-three years old ai d I grandson ol lonfl bOTI B Condon has been trying tn .>rganin Fro Is* a boycott of Russian exports Russia Sir. — Bofhetsi 1 .' ,'. %  % %  : > |lve talks lo SCtl on the quotient ii thi | i olreeU. They Were not clear, when On which side ot the road a pede-'should walk'" It seemed SB 6c the general opinion rsPVorUioloss that pedesfaeo oncoming fafIV. I take tins to BS0OJ1 walk on the ruhl eM %  i tho i. tt .Tip tofelfnyieo ruled country.'' "ho works" No cargo will "* on tonl 1 IL. i ..v.,,.„V,..,t counlry Mini HoubU I I, %  " !" J u,-'h tins m.rj,^ r ^H '^ u or iron turi[ P Hoes not think the United developed Its own detective force 1 will not attempt to produceOho had one son. Richard II, who Slates should use the atom bomli. hk-h would discover m advance ', rmjeonton left %  %  • descendants Joan Wife of' UMI nussnafl He does beUevo Amorlea hould whet the ship certicd, tion. The most I will say to that the Black Prince, was the first i 'no xv\{ RUSSIa now that any further Condon doe* not look th< : tlCOBiormlM .lohn of Gaunt Vi'.. CU ression. even ir made, lighter lu; Is Tho nnlv thu l i ,red Lancaster" had 0' it | (V anothei ntollito would men which marks ins asso < %  thai the len side ii tho right daughter Jegn. who was twica pportun.ty to shew the wr with [ho United Btateo ships Is • tattoo on tht %  | ., endantCondon, wholboo throe ehudron, onowlngj two hoerts. He admitted wl throu sivcmar-i out. "My eldest son. now hiushingly it was put on fol i thmk It would be %  good thing, rled flnrt Sir Robert Femes who il have to right soon for us. pretty girl he met lughter Elizabeth married t'ost ore unless we do something right now New York Bho now the mother once nnd for all. and tho public John nth Lord Oreystock* and other fronts of Hi. about the international situa'lon of hi* three children. I think %  econdly Ralph Earl of Westmorand niRht He la proud of hi< work as long• FOOTNOTE: The crabmcat too Hi question Is land John of (Jaunt also had a turning out leaflets shoreman (thouiih he wants his tea*, due bark at Liverpool hrt settled policemen On guard should sou John Beaufort, Ear' horn he also had IKHtMM \N .^ MVNAII UPTON HLI't CBOS8 TBNDBI 11 \l ciioit i nw KAKUOMAII 1:1 I) ROMK COFFEE tain COul He pointed out %  1 Wall Street militant LMPH:IJAMAK A UPTON MAXWM.I CASKS norst; U5CI us i people th; fed up" i hs> potaita poi^h. r> Itumanian. Unlit Thi v two sons to take of tho i professions wheie they get well —L K.S. jpon rh* B descendants. X V 7. WATER BlNt in-, • in i -i ixra ASSORTED AFTERNOON TEA ShUKI I 'AKK GINGER DIGFSTIA'E Enjoy Your TEA and COCKTAIL PARTIES — We Suggest — For COCtTABM GOLO BKAIIl RIM (3 years old) t'ROYVN I1KINKS 1 1 Flaveurs) ASPARAGl'S TIPS PEANITS COCKTAIL BISCI'ITS COCKTAIL SAl s IGRg PRINTS In Tins HM MIIKK In I I f -IT PASTI MEAT PASTE JAR uri \i. Mi'ut Itcpurlmcnt OX TONGI'ES OX TAll s I Kl.sil VK.ll Mill s Get your supplies from GODDARDS





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,... BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATmiHY ^.FPTEMUnt !. 19VI ^o ft£S% TO-DAY lf Mhvs4>ntiny for thv first tiittv in H \ttftMPffS ni $0 #.*#t## inntinaina MPniiu at 5 and H.XO p.m. WARNER BROS/ SHINING NEW TRIUMPH ".,'. lie BROS.' MUSICAL STORY OF THE f SINGING-DAHCINGEST GIORY-5IFL fee THEM ALL ... MARILYN -MILLER! WR rar r wTMWstffe ?sr[ ?AY it'll im %  ".HI3 in Song :, ' %  '• %  -tf i S CCC1I B D< MULE'S *>;HI.SIUI Delilah SSaiSS.-=S /ft ^"^ U.-.2ES MAYTJ^ BWKWDOBRt^ %  !" ..RAOJl WALSH HMJirRACING THI ,1.1: £' %  io/si-** •" 3 ii I 1 COLBERT J ROBE*' 13J*SL^ % I % 1*2 ., s,i t?2 **;* %  % %  > ^^8*^ J-J ^**#*^^*^*W^^^^^^>^^^^^ *^-**^^****#^*^^*^*^^^^^ll I I



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UTUBDAT, SII'T! \ini R 2. 1*50 IIARBADOS ADVOCATK PACE FIVE Outstanding British Films Coming THE PI-BUC of Barbados will ran be afa outatai • -1. ninu, Mr. Henry Teelucl Director i Teeluckttngh ThccU and General Film Distributors Lid. of Trinidad. I Advocate vesterday. He said that previously, there was no means of having such picture* released in Barbados, bul now. through his company's association with Caribbean Theatre> Ltd. the local public will be able to enjoy such outstanding British film* as "Spring in Park Lane", the National Academy Award 1040-50. starring Anna OIISIIOX TIME T'dad Bmihit Introduced To Local Bar Mr. Turmool Huiwtn. barn.w of Trinidad, was admitii-,.!. 'a v!i*Z£ WiwC. by His Honour tluChief Judge. Courtney, of Curzon Street" "' na Honour ine ini.'i Judge. .••*.. %  ...<.. v__" t.— i .,, Sir Allan CoUrmcn before tlir <*> !" <"* Vean Bnlln's all bu., n sof ,h,,' !" „,, „„.,,.,„ & a ^3***£*2'%2!2i AX Niamey General "*'• ^t^^^TS ".T& lion, fold Ihe Chief Judge thai ," ""* h 'f '" J r 1 U,h '""Xt Mr. BOMta .v... ., Tr,,i„l.„li.„. o. r hown n Barbarlo, w a„ ,h.i birlh. and Ihai he ha,l bm %  ">" ,'"^£f" y ., com K" v" w re muted member of Ihe inner "*22?JEL"X.SS "" Society of Lincoln', Inn in 114* American nlm companies In 1941 he It.iil DMMd Ine fnal \evri.^U vf as? SL^SrSK-r SpWJSSLWaUBS* Mr. Hosem was owarded two „,_„ „.„,,.„,. .. ) „.„i.. ._t_ .. major %  IK. QBEAYlfl, Port Health Oili irderi two pl,/ellj • ..' ;.. ( | tilicate of Hcnu Buchanan Prl •sreeK -Inuiltaneou TrinH.,d. Britlhh Guiana und New ,... St. Margaret's Head Leaves For St. Martin's ''',-' %  ""< "' York The Firm* newarMl' a. rt.JL.ti .miL. nZ If"? ** bout *— ""> banta 1 MH C i> M .1 IYNI formerly ETatV&m** American ones and he at.vlbII,., ,-,.. „r Bl M aEm The r !" ?Ha?dteEl£inrt ""*' '''•'' dlnlcultta. Mixed School. Sl John, hu been Saw IZ,I if! l S^JS! A' 1 *" 1 "'""I" W" poulblr promoted lo Ihe headship of SI high .tandard to luIIV the '~ *" '"" ,n ar rmtch lllms her McrUn-I Bo..' School, Sl Philip ...M h "' d "•* u 1' mi distribute Hid %  twtMU function w held XiTRaWrUrfi £ "S^ SsUd'TrK XreXK.Tl.n.' k" """ films could be imported wltboul ted Mr Allerne the approval of the flnjmcial aunn h,s appointment. claaenHnt thorities h,n i|S %  napd WTKIT. :mri one ._ „ ,n at n 1(| Ojooe much f SL MarCertifieate of < ail faret M, sm ncn on the other hand, that the achtwl was Mr. Field told the Chier Judue HamaMalai I iwlup.^ k"ini! %  > ii> %  • Hr AUeyne'i s*rhat Mr. Hosein had not got his UCtlUUe, Ut.ClUH rt viCM to the Trinidad Bar. He was now a practicing barrister In that colony. that Mr. Hosein had not got Certificate of call with him bul 4 %  • %  •-.i RAMSAY -poke on "Mr. Hosein as far as I know p.m. The subject for September Ixhalf of the Social Workenoftha is not the fir^t Trinidad Barrister 4 |g "Music and tho Ordinary StM Bi anch of St. John's to be introduced to the Bar of rj ten Baby ''• %  i M, and said this island. 1 do not know whethLectlirM (prtmerlly for teachers Mr Iwayi taken er It Is his Intention to practise but others welcome): Wednesdays nc.it interoal In the Mclu work of extensively his profession in this September 8. 13, 20 and 27 at 6.00 the parish island. Bul he many find that p m The subject for September our practice is not as lucrative 3 w ,n he "Aural Training". Both A vote of tl 1 wed by as that of Trinidad. For that series are open to the public. Mr 'T
  • BDOCtOf of reason he probably may not be School*. so anxious to spend n very long •"T-'HK POLICE BAND under v '"''' ';".7 '"' '''"' w f time here. I C apl. C B. Ka.son will ,'., h '\ V ', „ %  gftWSBgpz ^,r,K^^r^e:r,::: :;,; %  : Bar. that if and when he praen|K|ll V "" M> tls^a In any of the Court* of thi* Th p Rntshing touches were island, he will be accordwl ' %  dom u h ,s theatre yesienl;., The —I courtesies which are accordout!iide ot n,,, building has an unpractisini: limestone Anlsh and has Court Of Appeal Reverses Decision A DECISION o| Mi H ed to Barbadian these Courts I think too that he (^ ^^^1 lviUl i( pr0 ict will find that the niembcni of C(M of walerDloof wimun pink. the local Bar will be as anxious Thc j^^uram wa> 0 quippe:,. appealed 10 llie members to do their utmost to increase The membership of the Association winch has j-rogramnna i ti'is year by ^ rt The total memberihip is now 578. Reconstruction Of Castries Progressing ton oa BH of Castnrs is prugreuiiig MUIlactorUy Hun'ble Allen M 1^4, .'lisu-ntwii of the Castries IUAU Board and a delegate at the OiU und Fate Confsraoce told the Advucatv" yaaterdMy. He said that work is also progressing on the laying out of the new streets. Some of the houses -re completed and It is hoped lhat they will be tenanted by the end of this month. Work is going ahead on the laying down of a sewage system l-ut it is not possible lo say when it wiU be finished. There la also work on the water supply scheme a new one approved some years ago — and this waa due to begin yesterday He said that part of the rebuilding of the town included the building of a new warehouse and that has already been completed. The ifconstnietion employs toon! I.MM) people and hn* led !, %  in increase in wage rates for I 'ih skilled and unskilled labour i;Mi" mm He. onMnirtinn It ,,N found that Hi. Koine to Iv %  %  aTrtrtrtrtftrtAnir\rtfl .<, in /\ STDi A ... PQRiNA CHU WS A1WULS Pill I.IK\ %  '! %  %  UM riRii al %  The I'M Uit Annual Keptiit aim for the year. i< i %  th< %  lovenv i md pi.Mated trophies to tl' i.i '. ii t' %  m„: draught; Hon. H. A Cuke. presided a-Chairman. H ii'iitv and be wan tent %  that as they would notice In 10 report thc Dtrectorati tl perhaps Ihe YMCA. was concerned. They had sold the present building and were going to remove in I ^hort lime over lo the building on Ine side of the road. They had Goodlng. %  thai afternoon ami Would Uka to thank them most heartuj lot inviting him to pieIheii rneenna He hoped i-iy conslderabb during the roming year He I arould alao like to take ihe opnortunfty to Ihaak Your Ex• %  llency most Bmcerely Tin aeaiuuj .iere ami prewntmg the prttai Mr V C Knight moved a vote Th.pall Mi Cuke ere a:tol< i %  %  %  Mi B D "i: Claaj Mi w i \ M Watts \ i l.,.Mi i Iways been ye.irning for a pi ing field where |0i football, cricket, tennis etc.. aiid so the directorate had IQlaad opportunity that had COB Probably that aflaraaoi be the last time tin v would I %  meeting in that hall Kaare %  the Bcottlata National Council hi been to the place rxpn himself well psaaaad Hih ••ven talked of Ufinf d as a Iran in*; aaagte %  i similar associations in n bean area. Ho (itev Annatrooa > know how th.it ui ulit Table Tennis "B" Class—Mr. M. c.v. I>i.. %  Mi V. \ 1,1 .uiiiiir. Letters Of Administration Granted TWO iH-titioiis r.ir tatten ol %  ration were granted, and %  it four people were admitted t<> Probate bj Hti Honuui the Chief Judge Sir Allan C.il -it lymon eatei bj nral petrbop %  i i' .: ..I Hilda Clarke of Sl :,,.< Michael, thi iited attorney lop. of Hugh Clarke, the heir-at-law. t.mates of £800.000. hence a deleaato w-aa sent to Ixmdon In July this year ami thev have obtained a substantial inrre ai.iounl of the Imperial grant in %  roar to assist reconstruction At the same tune, thev have oblain< ri a grant of 8720.000 to be used on the develop!in-ill of hkh Is being lnteated with an agricultural dOV 0 uneiit peoavanune bi order i .prove Ihe eeonnmlc position of ihe colony. Mr. Lewis said thai ihe Vieux Fort liilorim Development S. h.-itie %  i far. has been doing well It Is I vidi-ii into two parts. ,. ..ntial farm and peasants holdings and 'he Agricultural Department has succeeded in putting about flOO families on to the latter For the firs, two years, the de1 jrtment s efforts wi-re .hreeted .pri nc ipa ll y to the cultivation of i.itloii on the central farm, but thai has not proved eerj fal This year they are i-oneentratuiil on the gmw'ng of rice, a i ii|i tt> Which the 1. '(Its I He ke-i rnotre quick!) than the cotton ..op. Rita Cultiva'ion He said fhat If the weather re i alns favourable, it || aipicttd Cat the area now m rice cult' %  ilion. will produce a sufficiently %  re crop to satisfv the iol,m\s needs. %  Hie >r Letten Of Administration t Kayo returned horn.he would ln '' ''' %  ,u f '"'' 'ettier, Cecil Fiona to put fits augai lion "nary Ctante hmofa* M-ehaei be JffBfcS iTTBraafi did not think that Dtinj Umo ,, M ,..„, C nt .., m g^ during his President, ha bad petition was that filed -nore eo-operatioa and more bj Evelyn A dor a Alleyne of ntereei m the won than trorn Wekbrnan Hall, st Thomas, for UM preaent Board "All the i.-.ier of Administration to the members and 1 ihOUld be fullv astata of her late husband. James appreciative of theti efforti In the QUbari Alleyne. interest of the Aaaoclation." _., The wills admitted wen thoai of The %  in i..-..., II had beet |ien iho loUowlng James Adolphus a Ko.Ki %  •Cretan, |n the Person of <'o\, late of St Thomas; Keiiah Mi II II Williams. "The work Austrum. late of Christ Church: of the Association depends i.o uei\ Ctareti %  Bayley, late or st and I might sav. entirely, upon Mi. h..e; Rdilh Dorethea Walker, the icol. ol BI Jos. pb that Mr Williams puts into it I %  %  i:ink % %  e ..ii h,..| I. iter secretary." Spiritual ism i : not .1 aVi out what thev might think, .md What I %  ed. as the %  (he spiritual aspect He wa saying; tM t u the moat un portal* be..,use memben of the Association must tt% to reallM that the YMCA was a b.otherMO. d of nnatian rauaa men spirit of It a "ud tun The l'ie. HI. nl ended -May I in roncluaton lay that I will bless our work m thl year" He then presented the rehad beei MI in %  %  Mr M. B, Cox. MC.P moved '"ubn and the U.S.A. ihe adoption ,i the report and i. ,„., „ -. , out thai It had been Thi-y WtUte (anary lalanda .„., July 28 and they hope to read the Head Fixed A eti wtier< ap"•*••>*•" -ometime next week .,1,1. Since Thursday afternoon the: Ofl St Oernuuil the wenIn sight of Barbados on th figure shouln have read *I3.238 southern coast but they did not i'i-' know where iriey emild find Ihe Mr L T Gay. tMpectOl of harbour. i sehmds seconded the motion and ihe report was Yesterday afternoon while Joge Vote of thanks to Ihe directors Vorgai, the captain's brother was and officers was moved by Mr. working on the engine some were I A laayen and Mr. A."-i e I. singing Itas Canariaa" the nai M r c,)l,c 1 "ve song of the Canarle-. r A Pile was rc-aj>(.outed Thev wdl leave In a day or two as soon as they can get in more "eUn*. applies and effect the necessary repairs to the engine. What's on Today Klllr Khwilli.,. I.nvrrnineiil Kaii.e at I 30 p.m. First and Second imLkoni. Cricket. Ill |. m Fullce Hand j| Opcnl,,, ol New naaa IMn> a II III,I. 3113 Tile Advac.le pay, for New. Nlthf and Day Ynu'll ii.n.n,,i,i,.i kMlilllS-PhiH-nix Ml Fountain Gents Footwear BY JOHN WHITE WHITE wilh NCBI'CK BROGUES leather Soles I'repe IIKIIWN SIKI1K IIMMiUES Wilh I r.ilhrl SflleS u 111 II l~r Pair I2.HII per Pair ,i Crepe s ..s per Pair 11.50 per Pair SEVERAL OTHER STYLES in Black und Brawn Irani S7.68 In 9.M per Pair A f tiff st'lt'flinn ot ••!'** SlllH-.S IN BOTH BLACK AND BROWN FROM $14-60 TO $17-90 HARRISON'S BROAD ST. ,l,;e .1 W B I rieue.v and Judge 11. A Vaughan the cost of the food. Manuel Heina, a mechanical engineer is the only one on board .h He h.is Ir.i veiled extensively and learnt English in Indon He also visited APPEALED FINED 101HUGH CLARKE of Mt f ..st. St Jame fined 10/by Jud, st. ad .he Assistant Court of Appeal Cheir Honours upheld the dn-ision ,f Mr S II Nurse. 1'nlice Magisrata. who bad found Clarke gmiv of havlriK a^saultvil und l*eaten an-es Allevne on Apill 23 ci.iiKe vw-. alao ord Hfl .tidltor The Cl Ii lhat he had been ver> pleased to \ '-'-*-'**'*-*''''-^^^--*-^%*.*-'-**o',o%'.^',-,*,-^<.-,',f.^^^',*,*,*^^^'^r — i-.ii •ti C. F. HARRISON & Cia LTD. ANUNCIA OJUB PAKA ACOMOIIM; A LOS TI'KISTAS VIM /l i I.ANOS TIBNEN UNA lINOIITa |l'E II A II 1. A ESPANOLELI.A ESTA A SIS OKHIMS USE A RIPPINGILL.ES BLUE-FLAME STOVE FOR EASY & CLEAN COOKING e A.S.BRYDEN& SONS (B DOS) LTD. AGENTS. MOST <>V IIIH ri-OI'LK in thK pldure sre would-be pasmrncrrs by H.H'.I A Who llteajgfel BMkI Ihcy would be leavinc Barbados testerdsy Bul Mother V-ilure had other id.a. \ I wind over the s e aw aj made it lmt-.ble for two mt BWIt'. oerviee^ n. asfestnla •> %  -,,...!, ,esterdsy. and the third service which did land, did not lea\e owlnc to malntennnc. Pleturr akam-s passengers and friends i-ith-r.-ed ousllrle the Terul.ial BaUdlnc preparlnj to return |g Brldgetaan. LAMB TONGUE — Per Tin 1 1 'AM (1 ti. Tm-) N tff< H ' i' sLADI (7 A Tins) %  %  ' %  pet i-.t Tin I I COCKADE" FLNE RUM • MH 1 48 ? 59 2 59 1 IS 11 04 1 H ;• SIA.XSFELU. S0-OTTA f.. I.TU. SPECIAL VALUES IN MEN'S UNDERWEAR . M tarn a t it i ire on "ii cut ITRI wool. vi>rs llulb.i) Krimt Short Sleeve* Sire* .lb to 4 in*. C.fcR fl'Kl-; WOOL WK1.E I.ENiiTII IANTS Hlies 12 la 111 Ins. INKS! BILK All!!.Hit rKaTff Me %  saevaa, M*r% I Sm;ll SI It, Medium Sl.. I-arae S \Ms| s||.h II.Will WAIST THINKS Btesa siii4ll 11.55. Medium SI.72. Lane S1.90 UIBH INDIA OAOOB \ 111 B Hullun Kront Shr.-t sleeve* siie* 36 lo 46 ins s A1 III.I lit VB8TS, Ma 'burs Kihhed and Plain lea 36 In 16 In* SI 06 $1 Ut IO( KIV SHORTS—Sites : 10 In II ins. sl 19 per pal 5) CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, 11. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET



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    PACK SIX BARBADOS \DVOCATE SATLKDAY, SEPTEMBER t, \*M I94& •947 r*e4& '" %  -' 'Auooonnf MMUKMCm! 'rrS MOT— 'A BlOOOTMiKSTT IHPEWAUJT FASCIST ft*SO "MAT DID I MY IN *>4fc t lOOK AT 100 A •LO0OTH1HS7Y WHWAiiST mSOST ttWHOMCSR, OUT TO DfSTIWT A(T-UMMC -'OPUS LIKF M£ %  %  %  irnose iOfA tuts Th/af (Canada's Economic Position //* Dependence on the Sterling Area ill* AilMaMMmil la INI Una* rBODlt'ES. Ja.l — AUlil WHEN economic relations between nations are onesided and unstable, il is impossible for tbem lung to maintain mutual confidence and co-operation in other phases uf their international relationship, no matter howgreat or important they may be. In the present economic crisis chance In American habits and "l the free nations, any attempt" policy MtSTOftV 0* TK* PAST FIVt YEARS Doctors To Be onscripted H-* 10T< N Sept. 1 •Total senate an n ,. i Representatives' C • Hi lo-day to a Dili 10 p. CM 21 nu.nths. nulu doctuig and dentists up to 90 years old who are no.* m armed Forces reserve* The Bill would apply also to pharmacist*, veterinary surgeons and opticians. The Committee was appointed to compromise differences bctwssn separate Bills passed by the Senate and House. The Hill was later passed by the Hcpresciilatives; It now fcne-i u> thi' Senate He said that exchange* have b--en taking plice for son.o time • it no representation had bean i ade on Government level by the Uniu-d State-, on the control of exports. It is understood by observers here, that the exchanges are dasigned to ensure continuous con trols over exports from the WestBrn world to Russia. —Reuler. Exports To Russia Will Be Restricted LONDON. Sept. 1, Continuous exchanges between BrtCsn and American official* are taking place in Washington to ensure that strategic materials are not exported to Russia a Brltisii Fuicigri Office Spokeirmsn eaid today —Reuler. Plugging Trade "Loopholes" Against Russia WASHINGTON. Sept 1 Diplomatic officials said to-day •'H'V expected United States et State Dean Acheaoi s on ti discuss with Britain an'l France, means of plugging trade "loopholes" by which war material might raui-h the Soviet sphere. The On i ted States woulo probably bring up the question anew nt a meeting; of the "Big Three" Foreign Ministers this month. • Ilk-ials -ild I*resident Truman said yesterday that efforts were already being made to get other countries t > tighten up. —Reuler. If you get caught in a draught Gargle LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC Quick! u. this sensible precaution ai the first sign of a cold. Gargle I 1STERINF Antiseptic, lull strength, and attack germi on throat surfaces before thev attack yoo. LISTFRINE Antiseptic reaches war back on throat sun faces to kill millions of germs... the kind of germs that can make a cold more troublesome. It relieves throat irritation due to cold—may help to ward off a cold entirely! twy LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC IN TESTS OVER A 12-YEAR PERIOD, DAILY USERS Of LISTIRINI ANTIStPTIC HAD FEWER COtDSI You'll enjoy the$e REAL SCOTS BISCUITS baked in Bonnie Scotland at the Sunshine Biscuit Bakery, (ilasgow, where good biscuits have come from for over 90 years. Ask for these fainntrite* to-day: KtortWalinc .ragestiee) '•lade) W i I It Rich Tee < r. i \Viire(orlgBBaJ SCRIBBANS—KEMP LTD. * WVLLIE, BARR & ROSS LTD Sole Agents : H P. CheeaTOan Oo ''-I P OBO* 173 Bridgetown News From Britain By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS *.„ o.,n., -K^?"^; dre W ** ""^oyed. The ausngaa. wn at Bickleigh. in Devonlions of the Commission are "IMshire is the training camp where Die. They surest the |.,w should the ftoyel Marine Commandos, be altered rather than havr it who will soon be in action In winked at for the sake ol another Korea, are dialing at the bit. They "Oliver Twist." Ai the same tkRM will go to war in a new style— 'hey proposed to put up (hi a— wearing civilian clothes while they '' which girls could Down fly half across the world. This is a young and confident force — one uf the moat highly named in the world. Their camp in Unkleigh was chosen for natural features nearby that give t.' i M.nines u chance to prepare for 'ough conditions. For Instance, the> gi over nearby cliffs sliding down a rope — "the death slide" it — the luge -lo iortii part of the Juveoihl huiuse* ul music hall shows. We n probably do without those .i sesudUe SK W Lsame for stag.one I P made fot i ft rform, twdpr careful deguardi King rttOiOfn Bad rr ,s Whai is it .hat excites u kum oi ous ami nwUcipUi *!*. l tailed—as part of training re'hitsh Press at thi tne %  I the Idle Rich"' King fWuk'i juunt to Deuuville has i. mated th 1 UriUah public—so an American ferred to as the "Tarzan course." Reporters recently Jotted down some of the views of these men on Korea. One polnl that '^porter says. Certainly hicverycomes clear Is that those Comday doings have been reported in mandos are more interested in such *> • ** make him look their job than in Ihe details of proM w > lis h as possible, if ti„. „ew* cedure at Lake Success that will ""Pe !" •' 1, be trusted. Farouk send them to Korea. "We are be: cms n uiihspp>. lonely man. ing sent out to do a Job." said a '^'', ou ( J A' JS! l)od >"* u r l sergeant, "we shall do it to the ^iJ^S SSSSZ '" s ap baal of our ahilliv And > vminMr V" !" ?** to ^eauville was as csten!.m t ,ypTc..i?'eLger A Ma;,rs r 2d r LSg. J *£f9 SZ3SH I "I don't know much about ComKSSTanII tl irT"''.^ munism. bu, we'll aoon poll* them $£%,•£ h^d'ilTrn^SS They are commanded by a vetr^WS Kvil^eve?! eran of war in Burma. V. hen they WMOn And none of the renter's get to Korea, (time and route of has succeeded in unearthmg a flight are security garrets) they standal from the hotel room* of will go straight Into action. From the reports coming from the front the French Watering Place. Is it this week, troops with the toughest merely thai wealth has. in itself, xperience uf hill-climbing seem unnatural newsvalue in a soualist most called-for tfate'' The American rcporlei Meanwhile the British contlnwho noticed the anti-Kjin.uk tone gent drawn from Hong-Kong Is on rcd with i^ Seait ,„„ g^,. mer shortei uUrih Bu( n dnma thc emp ^ Channel Swimming [ ft tj 0 n to be ScottUh hsj proved For all that the "Daily Midi" too much. Four plays made up litify a given form of settleupon the grounds of overCnnsMla and the U.S.A. Doncnte example of the inrar assrus sf£Z==^ ipon a fallacy Unleaa the ecotomie settlement bboth equitable •md workable, all polltlci and TuUUu-y efforts will be rendered pot only impotent hi themselves afce any fundamental change in thetr baste economic organisation Is contained In the Canadian-American tariff changes annexed to the Oeneva Trade Agreement It but provocative of friction. Un*" admitted by all that Canada less economic policies are farmuWM ln niost critical position belated in the light of fundamental c u*e of a disastrously Urge ad•eonomlc factr. the diplomatic v ae balance of trade with the and 'trntegic potential of the U.S.A ; thi American negotiawhole fre.wtjrH will be seriously tors genuinely wished to help as •educed, and it may prove imposmuch as possible; arid the Amerl-ible TO maintain the unity of the can tariffs were brought down to free nutlons. even under the menthe 1913 level Y in 1913 ace nt Communist aggression. The da's unfavourable balance with havr economic necessity of every the U S A wa* %  SSV7 !" e,. JLML • me and employment Thai is ao dian uroducts eovereri -*.tJ % %  > „— rtly Ihe economic ImpoverishSSLT^ 0 ?. 1 STliT C Mld *" .em of all elesses in the nation, .*£ £*\ B* cent <* *"**>** nt social and oolitual upheaval !Fi 0 'iA m the same year. ">• well. "* tne tariff provisions of the Geneva Trade Agreement been alNaasaaBBJt* Q f Export Markets lowr ed to come Into force in 1947, That ihe maintenance of lncomt thry w i OUI d have operated to ln"d employment in Canada is decrM ** f e already staggering loss, Odent upon the maintenance of f* w f"fh Canada was suffering GT sport markets Is established by *** tsssgej with the United States. " ,r l M 1 States-Canada-s other principal !" < n L Klnfd dv h:n,. K.U.„ resultan nor—uniformly have been of nt 1o iHtct and th* 1 brouc.it about the S? !" ? I , T 0 .^ P i :rment nUon In trade, in the present ciruL?^, ma *„ y .WS*" C '.^'cumstances. ran reaul only in s diana .whilst the USA. provides dtalmittOn of world trade and yet employment for a maximum of morr frantic attenrat* to achieve only 250.000. or one-fifth the numSl^iufftoency b *'Ii ,. hTelther is there any evidence me sterling area, therefore, is that any permanent solution u to ; ne market upon which the mainbe found through efforta to being '•nance of employment and indown the cost of sterling area and ^omu in Canada depends. That Canadian producta In the Amerl( anada is rapidly losing this vital can market through cur-enc7 market is a fact easily demondevaluation, lower taxation, or trated by a comparison of reeven arrester industrial effsetancy: cent statistics with any earlier the American economy simply crind—post-war or pre-war. can not absorb the volume of This loss has been attributed to goods required, American induai dollar shortage in the sterling trial productive capacity has inirea The term dollar shortage creased not less than 60 per cant may well describe the symptom. —some say B0 par cent—to the but not the malady; the financial last ten years The American ispect of the present crisis Is but labour-force has increased 45 per ft golden mirror reflecting the cent but the population has risen ark image of the fundamental by only 12 per cent. In the same i;.use: a world-wide break-down period. The problem thus posed HI the exchange of goods and is this: If a slightly smaller popu v..This world-wide breaklatton could not maintain a much "own involves change* in both %  maBar l a b oa s f m ss and fasdue'he relative and the absolute tr " 1 P 1 1 in the 1930a when i roductlve and consumptive ca*"•** goods were rigidly x.rltle> nt many nations These c'uded. how could a allghUy < Ganges are permanent in that the burger population maintain, at full 'Id. pre-war economic balance etnploymenl. a much larger laM ver again will exist on the hour-force and industrial plant in me basisthe IBM's, and also absorb vast (a) The accumulated resources l uant 'ties of cheap foreign studs? %  an entire centurVs productive Similarly with American agrieffort in Great Britain and Western "d>" re Th* %  %  snd extent of rurope have been expended in ne American surpluses which two world wan>* have appeared already are well (h> A substantial port of that !* nown and (omo w ' ft '^ e 8 expenditure has yne to build up h ve n0 yeI reachedl % %  P*^' productive capacity in the Nor !g !" United State* and in" Canada, but tinued recourse to Loan! edits any more satlsfacithout the normal corresponding *?&'• W merely postpone too increase in the consumptive cadBJf r r^konlng which w >aclty of the nations so expending ihelr aorumulated resources; fc) The economically dominant notion no longer is Orea' Britain '"rt)se economy was based upon a jtee exchange of goods and servieand the permanent existence rf return with a greatly aggravated problem, and raise in more acute form the question of unrequited exports. A faille Pursuit All available evidence, therefore, indicates that the dollar tried to make the best of It by gai..slng the year's Channel swimmers Into a race, this twenty mile swimming Marathon seems n dull sport. It Is too long. It has l>een proved that men and women can swim the Channel. The tenacity of the .swimmers: the change of currents; and good fortune, carry some swimmers over and defeat "** n others. But the Egyptian. Kussan rowhn Abd el Rahlm. seemed a happ> character who deserved to win thirace, th1 prize ami tinir did what has never be i before—managed to inccd " rhe approached thi i lid<>f Ot ver When all was done I t> the "others"—the also ran*, who naged to swim the distance bu< the Festival, and three are by Scots dramatists. The fourth! ould never be played again If Itf had not been written b\ Ren Jonson. Re was probably In financial distress and the payment went by the line-so he made It long and repeated himself a often dared "Bartholomew i nnt bee "~>v1iir'y' fo' Why now? But Edinburgh's festival ;, ., In the calender. i>a all %  t* aristocracy, for all tV* gray l.airs of Hie organisers, for all its ( ull choice of excell'jnt music wonderfully played by in,, beat iKrformera. it is a tough crack n wolld •idvrr" balance ot ahonale wOl conllnu* throughout n ; "* foreaaaablf (uturr. This Is o. <>T Scottish NaUonalists—a cause I have dear at heart since I left Scotland Cattle Hides Need U.S. Licenses WASHINGTON. Sept, 1. Tr.e US Commerce Dei.iart.nt has added cattle hider, and ual swimmer sets out for The Law is an Ass Did you know that the children acting In recent English filmssuch as Bobby Henrey in "The Fallen Idol", have been performing illegally'.' Until this week I had not given more than a passing thought to what happens to chilu actors who travel the country in ^onie electrical Insulatlne mat*. troupe*. But the report. )ust pub„„ lo u Browin|J £ ^ !" ^ lihed. concerning the law on reauii-,,,,, lirt-,. !" i.^#.,L a 00 "* Child Performance, reveals that ^".' foom^ nv ( ^!, r e 5 P rl thi position i> (Hlfrrent for slate"-ff T lll r > "JOSg* Canada, and screen For stage i>erformM ". porl rontro,s the Departanres, most things wen announced wou'.d he used kit under antiquated legislation 1 P""vent the res'iippirnt of that did little to prntci the edu"ralegic goods to Communist cation of the children. Bu; Cinecountries and to protect *mcrithe law Is concerned, subject in shortage*, officials said. the normal rules forbidding ehU* -Reuter. count ties —for example, ln South America and behind the "Jror Curtain' 1 —ire striving to achieve Industrial self-sufficiency despite tl." fact that the proces* is wholly The General Tariffs and Trade and the Havana Charter of the ITO represent an attempt—perhaps the last attempt —to turn back the cloefc. Thev are unworkable because they presuppose that the fundamental changes outlined above '.uve not taken place, these aip-cemcnts a.'-unu* conditions whlch> no longer exist. They could be made efficacious only if the United state* want to adopt In their sotin-ty the trade and P.seal policies of Great Britain In the 19th cenNEW RELIEF FOR ARTHRITIC PAINS But IMW trMtimnt do*i more than MM thM twrlbl* agonies. A saw aailisnsl. DOLCIN, has ln oreall -bl.h not onhl |l" prompt rahW ha th. pain, due >o th .ymplom. of arfhnta. and fheumatiam but also .ffaeta tba metaholKproc%-aewhirl, .oi-liluta a van laapertaM part of th. .b.unu.t.c auu'a barkifound OdLCrtl baa bain thoreuahly U. IM in "* !" l '"".'{fS'l'-'Ill DOLCIN ia t-tax aaed aaa. with unpncnlanual .ucoaa. 1X11.1 IN tabiV|~iba by doctor, nou Xnd aw -Mmn bar. .Ir^dy raauaZl^orra.1 Uriaf a. a n-ult of takinf U^LUN. Doa/l aalav. Proit by th. .ia.r.n. of Wlow-viotlas. of ttia pain.. Oat DOLCIN today. A bottla of 100 pracwu. tabk>ui coats i nt of synthetic im-ct thc need* of wsr. has des%  : VIY! many of the markets for th<. natural products of other couaMaa; .J,llic!.* p ^f„ b Li.; T!!^Su-Sr lo •* *•" %  hich. thouii, %S5? "i&SS^^S SL** !" p n,rtlc %  *""""• In such clrcumatanees, those i .>:ions with econo m ic interests which complement each Other. mutt associate themselves ln an rfort to maintain as wide and pen to them. The development these separate economic spheres Agreements on need, to no way lessen the political and military co-operation amongst the free, nations. Such co-operation is ensentlal in the face of RusslaD aggression and Red Imperialism, and the achievement of ecoromlc stability by these groups will promote the tranquillity at home and the military strength which are necessary to command respect amongst potential aggressors. Such grouping would In no way Imply Ota a trade-war with the "r ureat Britain in the lSUh cenUnited -States nor involve dirrltmy. The Marshall Plan iu*u u minatlotn against her exports' uo 1 i.SL^f n ^S!L M 5 y ** m ?* t toth vtlue ^ ,np imports which M/, ni 1 1 Arnerlcans that o hc w0llki a copt rrom wh ot lb( c.ooo m. cash expenditure Is a groo'ps, Th e amount of the good! le,er burden lhs/n mrh a draitlc • On Psge 9 m. suu *i wrvtirtni-a nw rn srrnitni fdea) rrn 9? (jiAUmtett ntoVtatt #(Am ty/wftfo of aMfadWb fraofttru%6 of ATKINSONS i:il.HT FRACRAXCESTHAT MEET THE NEEDS OF ALL CWO Mf OAl (417 M CCHOCNi (NC1I1H lAYtNQtn 0-ij a*-* Em 0£ CDtOGMI SOrAl SSIM lOriON lOTiON t*U D€ cotoovc MflUCt 24 riowtltt tHJ Of COLOGNE S4UCT MJUt tm U COtOCNI m • %  .1 ti. ATxnrsoa iro, ITIISIOW, M OLD U ITIUII. LMIM. CIIUID ^OVS the time for thit young man to learn thc safe, gende way to Jim/' Cleanlmtn.' A glass of sparkling "fizzy" Andrews i, s delightfully refreshing drink. More important still, however, it ensures everyday good health by cleaning thc mouth, settling the stomach and toning up the Liver. Finally, Andrews p-jitly clean the bowels. Just a tesspoonful in a glass of cold water snd here's an exciting, spirUing drink — here's the way to tmm Ckonkmut MDREWS LIVER SAIT rHEjfrDCAl.. i fORM; r pF, > LAXATIV/ f :










    Saturday

    September

    1950

    eeceeneennaneneneiomte

    RedsRenew

    Attack
    For Pusan

    (By JULIAN BATES)

    Somewhere In Korea, Sept. 2.

    The Communists renewed
    their offensive along the
    south coast of Korea a few
    hours before dawn today
    (Saturday) with a_tank-led
    attack against the American
    25th division defending the
    approaches to the vital supply
    port of Pusan.

    The second dawn of this battle
    on the west side of the United j
    Nations’ defence box had broken
    on a deceptively still 55 miles
    front as both sides prepared to
    renew their fight to the doath. In
    the Naktong river sector further
    to the north G.I.’s peered from
    their foxholes through the morn-
    ing mist susrounding the high
    ground overlooking the river, not
    knowing whether the northerners
    hed crept arouid behind them
    during the night. They knew it



    would not te long before they,
    were engaccd .n ai desperate}
    hand-to-hand struple such as}
    marked mucin of yesterday’s |
    bloedy fighting |

    Under continuous Communist
    battering, American troops last
    night fell back into the hills of}

    Naktong. |
    |

    New Positions

    With almost ali the flat country
    from Hyonpung to Yongsan in
    North Korean hands, Americans}
    dug in on new hill-top positions
    in some places.

    Communists were reported at
    the gates of Yongsan and still
    surging eastward towards the
    Taegu-Pusan highway, the main
    artery of Americar and South
    Korean communications,

    On the south coast American
    troops to-night pressed forward
    and re-took Haman ten miles
    nerth-west of the port of Masan.

    Just north of Haman the Com-
    munist offensive which began at
    midnight drove a wedge four miles
    wide and eight miles deep between
    the American 25th Division on the
    south and the American 2nd Divi-
    sion in the area of the old Nak-
    tong bulge to the north.

    Northwards to Hyonpung where
    the Communists overran an area
    of possibly more than 120 square
    miles in twelve hours, they were
    believed to have three infantry
    divisions and their crack armour-
    ed 105th Division in the battle.

    Communist losses in their
    massed effort to drive United
    Nations forces into the sea were
    put at 1,000 dead.

    Later frontline reports said that
    American troops were “stacking
    up” the Communist dead in front
    of them by hundreds. |

    New Front |

    On the middle reaches of the
    “west wall” front, the Naktong
    River line has ceased to exist.
    Over an air line distance of more
    than 20 miles, Communists were
    tonight swarming over the shallow
    sun-dried river to a front eight to
    ten miles farther east.

    When dusk fell, at least three
    American Second Division battal-
    ions and several smaller groups
    in this old Naktong bulge area
    were deeply flanked by Commu-
    nist forces, and their communica-
    tions to the rear were under
    attack.

    Aircraft kept them _ supplied
    with ammunition, medicines and
    food by parachute.

    At dawn with Americans falling
    back all along the western front
    and Communist suicide squads
    clearing mine fields by tramping
    slowly forward to their death, all
    available aircraft was ordered out
    t> give close battle-line support.

    Carrier-based fighters were or-
    dered to the crurmbling front and
    raked advancing Communist
    troops with machine-gun and
    rocket fire. With Australian and
    American pilots of the Fifth Air
    Force they made hundreds of sep-
    arate attacks throughout the day
    despite a hampering misty wind.





    a iat amen tal =

    @ on page 3





    |

    2



    RUMAN HAS 8

    — oh eeceementy mene



    Hurricane

    four days,

    Flattens 100 1.P.11. Storm (130 Cross Atlantic
    | In 40-Foot Smack

    Reach Carlisle Bay After
    34 Days At Sea

    A ti | Near Virgin
    n igua | Islands
    , The San Juan Weather Bureau

    issued the following advisory
    yesterday afternoon,

    WORST IN ISLAND'S |
    HISTORY |

    The centre of the hurricane
    Barbados ridaen Goreieoddant) was reported by reconnaissance
    een “ANTIGUA, Bet. tf. j aire. aft to be about 80 miles
    After 12 hours of nerve-racking| E-N.E. of St Thomas, Virgin
    anticipation and preparation, the | Islands at 5.30 p.m. )
    most devastating hurricane in| It was believed to be moving
    Antigua’s history rapidly ap-|in a W.N.W. or N.W. direction
    proached the island ana by 9 p.m,, at about 12 m.p.h. Maximum

    winds near the centre are estim-

    the horrors of the previous hurri-
    ated to be more than 100 a
    ing

    cune were eclipsed like child's!
    play. with hurricane winds exten
    Ten hours of continuous agon-! cutwards from the centre 60—70
    ising terror befell the island while; miles to the E; and N. and 40—,
    winds of 150 to iG0 miles an hour !50 miles to the W. and S. of the
    tore and roared unceasingly, de- centre.
    molishing the whole island. There} Gale winds extend outward
    was extensive destruction every-| 75—90 miles to the E. and N. and
    where. Houses were blown into| 60—70 miles to S. and W. If the
    the sea, houses blocked the streets,| hurricane continues on its present
    the telepho:e service was wreck-! course, its centre should have
    ed, poies obstructed the main! passed about 60 miles to the N-E.
    highways, roofs were. blown off,! of Puerto Rico between midnight
    and palings everywhere collapsed, | last night and 6 a.m. this morning.
    including those at Government Unless the hurricane moves in a
    Heuse. more westerly direction, hurricane
    The Beach Hotel roof is gone; winds should not occur in Puerto
    the whole of Thomlinson’s work-, Rico but precautions should be
    shop’s roof was blown yards away, | taken against such a change in
    a 150-foot wireless mast was | course. . ’
    knocked to smithereens, part of Hurricane warnings are display-
    Green Bay school, in which people | ed in the N. Virgin Islands and
    had sought refuge, crumbled; the | along the N.E. Coast of Puerto Rico



    Grammar School and St. John’s |from Humacao to San Juan, |
    Boys’ School showed vas! ruins, as| N.E. storm warnings are dis-
    well as_ Holberton Hos. ital played along the remainder of

    and

    the Puerto Rican Coast and N.W.
    storm warnings in St. Croix,
    | Virgin Islands

    Mental Home.

    Airport Manager Burton’s House
    and the former U.S. Air Base col-
    lapsed like a pack of cards. A
    cinema i8 flat, and half of a repair,
    shed sits on the back of a gasoline
    truck

    The roof of the Stony Mount
    Beach Hotel area, the temporary
    residence of the Manager of Bar-
    clay’s Bank, A. Rats and Mrs. Bats,
    was blown clean off, and A. F.
    Turner’s new’ lhungalow had _ its
    windows smashed in.

    All trees were shredded, includ-
    ing huge old evergreens in the St.
    John’s Cathedral yard.

    'Hong Kong Bandits
    Kill 4 Policemen

    HONG KONG, Sept. 1
    British police



    Two

    ing in the Ysun Wan area of Hon

    1 notorious gang of bandits.
    —Reuter.

    @ vn page 3

    * COMES TO PORT





    THE GOVERNMENT CRAFT “Ida” pulis alongside the “Doramas”

    regard to size.

    ain

    Note how

    they compare with

    es
    a.
    e

    THE ene hundred and thirty Canary Islanders look ove
    ing smack “Doramas” that brought them to Barb

    officers, a
    | Divisional Superintendent and an
    Inspector were killed this morn- }







    POINTS:

    LAND AFTER 34 wis ‘

    r the side of the 40’ 14’ fish- +
    ados from Las Palmas in thirty-



    |



    Aduncate

    ——$_ —$———— TTT,

    TO END WAR

    Ph
    Pr ic et
    FEVE CENDS
    Year \35

    \ a YY



    | CONFIDENT OF

    |

    ‘Flying Hearse’ |
    Brings 55 Air

    Crash Victims
    TO CAIRO

    CALRO, Sept. 1.
    A “flying hearse” today brought
    the charred remains of the 55
    victims of the Transworld Airlines
    Constellation crash to Cairo,
    Weeping relatives and friends



    AFTER 34 DAYS in the open Atlantic a small forty |Â¥@tched while stretcher-bearers

    by fourteen feet fishing

    Carlisle Bay shortly after five o’clock yesterday morning
    with most of its human cargo of one hundred and thirty |

    reached |

    smack ‘“Dormas”

    Canary Islanders swarming on its narrow deck and cling- |

    | ing to its frail riggings,

    i The Advoeate’s cameraman and reporter were on th«
    | scene within half an hour and while a small row boat
    | 10¢cked crazily on early morning choppy ¢wells, the camera.



    | B.G. Dakota

    _ Crashes Near

    | Brazil

    (Barbados Advocate Correspondent

    GEORGETOWN, B.G., Sept. 1
    B.G. Airways Dakota (C47
    crashed to-day at Annai Airfield
    in the Rupununi District near the
    Brazil frontier, The plane was re-
    ported badly damaged but no one
    injured; cargo is safe.

    The crash occurred as the plane
    was leaving Annai for Lethem
    en route to Georgetown on the
    regular fortnightly run, Major
    A. J. Williams and a relief plane

    left for Annai at noonday.



    |
    | SPAIN BANS RED
    PERIODICALS

    PARIS, Sept. 1.
    The Frencn Ministry of the In-
    terior, today banned publication
    and sale of two Spanish language
    monthly reviews printed in Paris
    Nuestra Bandera and Cultura ¥
    Democracia.

    Kong when attempting to arrest

    The Spanish Embassy spokesman
    said that these w-re both Com-
    ; munist journals “of the extremist,”
    The Spanish Government had
    not asked for their suppression.
    The organ of the exiled Socialist
    mee Fuita was banned last
    week,



    ee

    man was able to record a scene as unique and romantic as
    the first sight West Indians had of Celumbus the Discoverer,

    On the deck there was hardly

    space to move. The ship left Las

    Palmas in the Canary Islands
    bound for Venezuela, 34 days ago
    and was forced to put into Car-
    lisle Bay for focd and water
    supplies and to check a faulty
    auxiliary engine.

    There were no signs of fatigue
    nor despair on the men’s faces,
    many of them bearded. They
    looked with some’ interest and
    speculation at Bridgetown in
    the distance,

    Old Battledress

    Most of them were wearing
    some parts of old battledress
    while others were naked from
    the waist up. Dr. Greaves the
    Port Health Officer arrived in an
    hour’s time in the Government
    craft “Ida” and having tied up
    alongside had them come _ over
    for inspection in batches of five

    There would not have been the
    necessary space on board for hav-~
    ing this job done satisfactorily.
    Meanwhile fresh water was
    pumped from the “Ida” into a
    tank on board the “Dora-
    mas” and immediately rationing
    began.

    As soon as they had completed
    the formalities they settled down
    to normal ship’s life. Some plung-
    ed in for a swim. Francisco Silva
    searched out a violin and Luis
    Perez a timple. an instrument
    that resembles a guitar

    The men are carpenters, ma-
    sons, electricians. shoemakers and
    other artisans. Most of them are
    related and also have relatives in
    Venezuela. Many of them have
    already secured jobs in Venezue-
    la through the post.

    @ On nage 5



    unloaded
    2irfield

    the bodies at Farouk
    and bore them draped in

    sreen and brown blankets to
    waiting ambulances,

    At the mortuary they wer:
    being identified for burial or
    eremauion, or transportation to
    their homelands.



    2gyptian and American officials
    vere — still searching charred
    wreckage today for clues to the
    wooster, The main parts of the
    aircraft were flung over an area
    80 yards wide, and one of its en-
    gines has not yet been found,

    H. A. Marvin, a Transworld
    Airlines’ expert, said» he believed
    that the plane had hit the ground
    with its left wing and crashed on
    its nose with its fuselage catapul-
    ting 60 yards forward,

    The plane crashed shortly after
    taking off from Cairo for Rome
    with Egyptian film star Camelia
    Cohen and several United Nations’
    delegates and wealthy business-
    men on board, There were no
    survivors.

    For Jeanne Lorenzi, 22-year-old
    hostess, it was her last trip before
    leaving the company to get mar-
    ried. Plans were being made
    today for the burial of Egyptian
    victims including Camelia. Hindus
    killed in the crash will be crem-
    ated on pyres in the Egyptian
    desert and their ashes scattered
    into Indian rivers —Keuter,

    France Will
    Defend Indo-China

    SAIGON, Sept. 1.

    Leon Pignon, French High
    Commissioner said today that
    France had decided to defend
    Indo China even without exter-
    fal military aid.

    The Commissioner, who return-
    ed this week to France said that
    Indo China would not be com-
    pletely pacified before the end
    of the cold war.

    Outside help to Vietminh Na-
    tionalist insurgents would pro-
    long the fighting which might
    otherwise; have been over in a
    year or eighteen months

    Reuter.





    / 100,000 Join In “Exercise Rainbow”

    HEIDELBERG, Sept. 1.
    than 100,000 American,
    French and British troops will
    take part in September in the
    largest combat training exercise
    ef Allied troops in Europe held
    so far.

    More

    “Exercise Rainbow” will be the
    | biggest exercise ever held. Con-
    ducted by U.S. forces, “Exercise
    Rainbow” will open on September
    il with a simulated tank spear-
    head drive from the east towards
    Frankfurt, the seat of the Ameri-
    can High Commission
    In the following ten days,
    western Allied forces 1 go
    } through a series of withdr Wals,
    1egroupings and other tactics de-

    the





    L

    jsigned to test their ability to
    convain an attack from the Eas*
    i The United States will send

    into the field virtually every sol-
    dier and gun it has in Germany
    with American Air Force and
    Naval units taking part in strength
    as well

    The French are contributing
    one battalion and the British two
    battalions. One air squadron from

    euch of these nations wil! also
    participate.
    Theoretically the attack from

    the Eastern “aggressor” will catch

    the Western Allies flatfooted
    British and French units will
    be integrated into regrouped
    Unived States forces Combined
    Allied forces then wil! mount a
    ecunter attack aimed at pushing
    he ag#ressor back East towards

    Nuremburg
    Courter Attack

    “Exercise Rainbow” will end

    with the counter attack under way
    end the invaders slowly falling
    beck

    To boister scanty United States
    forces in Germany, American
    vroops from Austria and Trieste
    will be moved into Germany for
    “Exercise Rainbow”. One infan-
    try battalion from Trieste will be
    airlifted into the manoeuvre area
    about September 10

    Several thousand Germans also
    will manoeuvre with American
    Turces as doctors. me stewards,
    crivers and guards.

    It is believed that the exercise
    will help to buck up German
    morale which wilting in e!
    face of Communist propaganda

    let loose on the West Germans

    —Reuter



    KOREA VICTORY

    WASHINTON, Sept 1.
    PRESIDENT TPUMAN declared to-night that
    the Korea fig'.ing would not expand into a
    “general war,’’ unless the Communists poured other
    armies and brought other Governments into the

    battle.
    In a nationwide “fireside chat’’ broadcast, he

    put forward an $-point programme for ending the

    Korean war.

    He declared that the Cemmunist invasion of Korea “has
    reached its peak” “The task remaining is to crush it,” he
    said :

    “Our men are confident, the United Nations Command is
    confident, that it will be crushed.”

    The President again expressed
    the hope that the people of China
    will not be misled or forced into
    ghting the United Na

    ns and against the American
    copie vho have always bee

    nd still are their friends.”

    against

    Only the
    which Fas
    i member China
    1ina’s invo:vment
    Truman said

    Mistake

    'n a major foreign poticy
    ent, tue President warned Soviet
    Russia not to make the mistake
    { uncer estimating America
    cnomic strength to defend itself
    1 establish peace

    Communist fmideria
    already s‘arted to
    could gain f-om
    in war”, j4



    stave



    “Hitler and the Japanese gen-
    rals misealeulated badly 10
    years ago”, Mr. Truman - said,
    when they thought we would

    not be able to use our economic
    power effectively for the defeat
    of aggression,

    PRESIDENT TRUMAN.

    He then outlined eight points
    ind j*rvited all nations of the
    world, without exception, to join
    with us in this great work.

    Americans were now fighting
    in Korea with men of many na-

    The points were:

    1. To seek peace and se-
    curity through the United Na-
    tions.

    2. A free, independent and [tions under a single banner to
    united Korea, uphold the rule of law in fhe
    3. Prevention of the Ko- world, he said, If that rule of

    rean fighting from expanding
    into a general war.

    4. An appeal to the people
    of China not to enter the
    Korean war against the United
    Nations forces,

    5 Peaceful settlement of

    the Formosan question by in-

    fernational action.

    6. Freedom for all
    nations of the Far East,

    7. Disavowal of aggression
    or preventive war.

    8. Mobilisation of resources
    to create the strength which
    will make peace secure,
    President Truman opened his

    Lroadeast in the friendly manner
    in whieh President Rocsevelt s>
    oft: addressed the people lis-
    tening to their radios by the fire
    side in times of crisis—in the de-
    pression and in the early days of
    World War II °

    Mr. Truman's talk will be fol-
    ‘owed next week by another
    ‘fireside chat” on the ),ome-front

    law was not upheld, they could
    look forward only “to the horror
    of another worid war and ultimate
    chaos.”’ “For our part, we do not
    intend to let that happen.”

    President ‘lruman outlined the
    efforts of the United States to
    ichieve a just and lasting world
    peace during the last five yeape-
    and the “frustration of thése
    efforts by the Soviet Union.’

    Review

    He reviewed the outbreak and
    course of the Korean war to date
    ind the support given to United
    States action by other United
    Nations, He outlined what may
    become his historic eight point
    programme for bringing peace
    in Korea and the Far East in
    these words,

    the

    “As we move forward to arn
    ourselves more quickly in the days



    impact of the war ahead, and as we strive with the
    At that time, he said, he ex- | United Nations for victory in
    pected to explain “what your }| Korea, we must keep clearly in

    mind what we believe in and what

    Government proposes to do, anc
    we are trying to do

    ow each citizen car la iis
    part in this national effort.” We also want the rest of the
    “We want the rest ot the world | World to understand clearly our
    to understand clearly our aims |‘ #4 our hopes.
    id our hopes.” @ On Page 9

    aaa ee
    SEES

    Announcement.

    Ge is with great” pride that

    Caribbean Sheatres Lid, to-day
    the

    announce

    of t he

    opening

    L laza Sheatre, Bridgetown.

    aa

    :
    Now more than ever you need
    to get out and relax in an
    atmosphere of beauty, comfort,

    friendliness and service while being
    entertained by the Top Picture

    Product of any Yea t.























    ge hGe TWO ; BARBADOS, ADVOCATE : SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1950
    Crossword
    Housewives’ ; ret aaa a
    leas : OLYMPIC THEATRE
    "es

    TO-DAY AND SUNDAY, 445 & 8.15
    SUNDAY 4.45 & 8.45 s
    First Instalment Columbia Serial



    Prices in the local market
    for plantains and chris-
    tophenes when the “Ad-
    vocate” checked yesterday ||
    were:— |

    Plantaims: 7 & 8 cents each

    Christepheaes: 1/- per tb |



    Ea

    B.B.C. Programme
    “OFF Te Lea ,

    SEPTEMEER 2, 1950









    7.00 a.tn. The News. 7.10 a.m. New CLUES ACKUSS
    A es wh 7.45 a.m, Peter Meane at the 4. They have a choice sort of job
    Ti evire Or 7.0 a.m. The Nature of getting a voter aboard !
    the Univer 8.00, a From tt Edi- | % Just the sort of little beast
    erties. 8.1% a.m ‘otframme Parade to suck up!
    8
    0.





































    &.15 2 = 3. as th Life Guards. 8.45 . A vulgar person with ‘ni neart.
    t Oance Music 9,00 m. Close iC Hebrews f noble ,
    Do 12.00 (noon) The ows 12-10 12. Might be ride-sna sounds 7 mma COLUMBIA SERIAL mmumoms
    2m. News Analysis. 12.15 p.m. Arthur like it. S i ‘
    3 von 2 5p.m. Bery) Kimber ; 1. 00 2 Rain ro the others Suen. Starring ; 9
    py iano Playtime. 1.15 p.m. Radio 14. Go first. but give way at the :
    Newsreel. 1.36 piu aything to Decl end S ? REEVES as Sir GALAHAD
    2.00 p.m. ‘The News. S10-p.m. Home| 15: SyTup oF silk. se NELSON LEIG as KING ARTHUR
    loquence 2°50 pra. Eainginy Ina: | 18 A Dlain-clothes branch. HUGH PROSSER as Sir LANCELOT
    55 x interlude 20. I'm surrounded by thousands LOIS HALL as THE LADY OF THE LAKE
    . . of rupees — = ae
    ? i Hie, ier 415| 21. Skeieton formation.
    s . a or ate oe “" 22 Wee drappie.
    : 7 bop. ths kaaenien eiics. 6 se 23. One only may be a complete i |
    ; Me. 6 30 a TT! Sat enti ari pep eR LF anes I
    i 3 7 Q cat ave sOtee hile cuties bows ROXY OYAL
    N Analysi 7.18-7 pt + 2. A consuming instruction (tw
    ‘ p 7 3 e. ~ ai te » ton Wi va ' } word re i ; ;
    SOME of the 700 guests who attended the Cocktail Party given by the Management of the Bridgetown Plaza yesterday afternoon. aot a? =a News psn West In- | ‘: Buricoqué me wart | Today To Sunday 4.30 & 8.15 paday and Tomorrow
    s. 8 p.m adio Newsre¢ 815 5 on rishi j » Wake 3
    p.m. Weekly Sports Summary. 8 7 5 Pert of Amwritear no longer in Paramount: Pictures Tesent Pm. and 8.30 p.m
    Hey ines, Ma Die Note | 6 No,itunese ay to eet into a.
    ish Sport. 10.45 p.m. Music from. the 1N iv aon > feature "
    e e Ballet. 11.00 p.m, Hear it agair é gure the wal ears a “CLEOPATRA “PEDERAL
    . ora rophy at 4 airy
    | 10. Be tale the rice Starring
    ‘ What’s i : :
    at’s in a name 11. Claimed, possibly, to be asso ; a Dee OPE
    ¥ ae iy with the bealiug art. Claudette Colbert as RATOR 99”
    HE Trade Winds Club in Pic-| 16. You want double ten! “CLEOPATRA” Starring
    5 ait x . ie 7 1 ut u call hers en r )
    Cross-winds! Divisional Manager—Esso cadilly, which caters for| 1% But wtved ersonality ?
    ~ 3 : ay » prints ands a ae attractive personality ? " oh tei Mar % BPE ER en vce
    EVEN hundred people were in- Hope to leave to-day ESTERDAY, would-be passen- IVISIONAL Hantesr St. the the social activities of West In-| jy. arid ee eee as Henry Wilcoxon as Marc artin Lamont - George |
    vited to the Cocktail Party gers by B.W.I.A. and their Tees Standard ‘ONG 2 diane and other people in London, fashion Anthony J. Lewis
    ; : Maza vesterda\ eee Mrs. Lisle Goddard , Ren oett aA ; o., in has now closed down for repairs “ g's" final item of equipment ¥ Action f ini
    one nigga get M*. ee three children, Pit e spent most of the morning B.G., Mr. Geoffrey E@ghill ac- and alterations. Happy Rlalee its| ” Be Pa eee eee Winin Williams as Julias rom Start to. Finish
    ing. é sete a looking into the sky at two companied by his wife is wner, says th wher » Clu soluti Pi 3 Ceasear posse ce
    Soh mitee ty Charles Bruce § David, wére to (90% ee SKY. 3 and son owner, sé hat when the Club @ Solution on Page 3. asea Rig fs
    the. eons Parsstors, Me core ere Barbados yesterday for &-W.LA, Vikings which circled the Bruce were also arrivals from re-opens, ihe nme will be — and — Mon, & Tues. 4.30 & 8.30
    8, : ha i arbados yes ; od : ty a , | * os
    Nn W. Gittens and Mr. M. V Trinidad after a month’s holiday Seneie., *veral times, A cross B.G. on Thursday afternoom by Changed from Trade Winds Club Another Priest Arriving 20th C-Fox Master Doubl
    Rediien and the Manager Mr. Hu- which was spent at Silver Sands ind ew ing across the runway, B.W.LA. They expect to be in to Happy Blake's Club. Asked the Shortly “ DEATH TAKES x Master Double
    bert Edwards. Inside the theatre, Lisle is with B.H. Rose Ltd., Cees ( Agts BOE of them ja a0 Parbados for about two or three reason for the change, Happy, in a. rtly a Linda Darnell, Cornel! Wilde
    cocktail savouries, drinks and j, Port-of-Spain. They hope t wane fter sree ten oe weeks, staying at Cacrabank Trinidadian aceent replied, with a At TER a two weeks’ visit to A HOLIDAY” : a
    other refreshments were served to jeave for Trinidad to-day vith Cap, Rodveaas fa ened Bruce is at school at Stanstead a Tae ra a ic Winds : Barbados, Fr. H. J. Feeny, detchy in
    the guests, who stood or r he Going to New Zealand vas able to land. The other one COU?ge, Quebec, and is spending but everybody knows. Happy by BWIA, Fe ra dat te aaa with cee ae
    groups in various parts of the WIS. returned to Trinidad the Summer holidays with his Blake - : va Phe avy ry a e is not as many — and —
    theatre. Later in the evening two ON'BLE ALLEN M <— oe , Then it amet 1 1 “45 o'clock, an- parents. rth, af Ms . famous West Indian people thought Fr, Selliers relief. Frederick March — Sir Guy “I CHEATED THE LAW”
    newsreels, coming probes eae Chairman se the ic na ther Vikiae whish had haan alas It is expected however, that an- Standing — Gail Patrick - with
    several shorts were shown before Town Board and one of The yed in Grenada flew over é cther priest will be arriving here aphasia =
    pene, sacar Nest ee a aR : tl nde » lay rrenads P r Sea- R d h B . , ries ill be arriving her Kent Taylor Tom Canway—Steve Brodie
    the evening’s entertainment came jyicia delegates who att ee well, and this tac: went aa-t4 upert an t e ack- “room Boy-4i — hortly to assist at St. Patrick’s y—Steve Brodie

    to a close shortly after 9 o’clock. Oils and Fats Conference A ee
    The building, which was de- jngs House during the ba Mage ae sagem —
    signed and built by Messrs. Clarke be returning home on angho% ie 14 ‘han twas decided
    and Tucker, owes its attractive ap- B.W.1.A. He is staying Vv ith Mi that CRA eat ee re
    pearance partly to its unplastered and Mrs, J. O. Tudor of “Edith- Vénesudle trip .
    limestone finish which has been ville”, Pine Road, Passengers and baggage loaded
    treated with a protective coat of Mr. Lewis who is also a Barris- the Binns att Reston oe ee rs . ,
    waterproof Snowcem in a delight- ter-at-Law, told Carib yesterday on ine fini ae Fes a aly Saher:
    ful shade of salmon pink. that he will be going to New ofS however she returned to the park-
    The theatre, seats 850 persons, jand in October to represent the : ¥* I



    while Fr, Selliens is on leave in
    England

    pomosoqeoeos PPS SCSSSEOO SP SOOPES SSS SSSS

    GLOBE.

    Crinidad, as conditions were still



    yveek, will
    Tuesday by







    %,
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    a snipe ing apron. Due to maintenance ,
    and has been designed so that Windward Islands at the Empire anuek Sea teat tn e 7; Y nein oT] a
    sci Heat Patan Cone Ne AO ed a OUR CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
    toriurn, can see the whole screen , ance flights fo esterday rere can-
    The interior colour scheme is First Appear aed EGR PRR RUSRY “WERE ESR NE Ww PLA Z A
    predominantly the same as that of Yesterday . iy y
    the Plaza Oistins, yet ii has an in- AKING its first appearance at id not leave e ‘
    dividuality of its own, There is M Saawall airport. yesterday 7 sia et ? in eli : Oo / De > | >
    also a snack bar, a. new feature Seawell airpor yesterda iy ol ae HALVERSSEN Rupart seababetabark:\odasnehls pa knobs 6h ite ur Apologie s to the hundreds of omr
    an













    was an Information Bureau which her three sons Erik, from th

    Clutching the little detk boit! cratche stall hole one ot :
    |
    =|

    for cinemas in Barbados and a , Aes A > : ‘ Podgy has be g himself by
    tap ai isa branch of the Barbados Pub- [hor and Olaf, were among the BY Das Deen amuses Tyinget leoks so puzzled D> . a 7,
    candy Counter. sige icity, Commitioe’s. "Information pcvenuors we’ Uiought ihey were | <¥i6 his mame ot the mysterious Soin’ hi Patrons who could not get Admission
    m4} r . - Bureau at the Ba aggage Warehouse, “turning to Venezuela aft r their tree. ‘It’s lucky you've got a noe, Th
    >» auditorium above the screen shy q . returning to Veneguela after their y imps. h e ;
    ss tar ney and raltome fea- ,,!n charge of this de sk which 18 Barbados holiday. They even got pocket knife, that's, just what 1 tree would to see the 7 herviller of Vieriliers
    : : situated in the Terminal! Building he plane jue ain- d,"" “Can | borro “T hope he did } <
    ture to this attractive and modern ; ; : F f into the plane, but due to main nee er Rupert, an rrow wpe he didn't mean that
    ics. of the airport, is Miss Pat Mullen. tenance the ‘plane did not take off. it? ith the sharp blade he would vanish suddenly i” TODAY at 5 & 8 30 inui
    me her’s Weddi For a long time now it has been She hopes however to leave to- . p.m. & Continuing
    For Brother’s edding felt, that such a Bureau was an day, Erik is the eldest member of
    RRIVING from Venezuela via absolute necessity at the Ros the family, Thor and Olat ~ Sa Se
    Trinidad by B.W.I.A. yes- and yesterday it became a reality. twin brothers,
    terday morning, was Mr. Hal Here visitors can buy stamps, Works in the Suan AQUATIC cits CINEMA (Members Only)

    Hamilton who has come over for postcards, road maps, pictorial ;
    ..the week-end to be present at his maps, stationery and there are an M* STEWART ALLAN, who is

    frother’s (John) wedding to abundance of leaflets giving tour- with the Surveying Depart- } TO-NIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT AT 8.30

    < 4,4, 4:66:64 O65
    S 5 OOO SOS OOOO FFP OSS POOOSS CLP LP IPOS SK



    MATINEE: TO-DAY AT 5.00 P.M.

    HINK OF TT! GAPE! GASP! WORD

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    Miss Mary Marst, which takes ists hints about the island, adver- ment of the Government in B.G. J. Arthur RANK presents : ,
    place this after, ion. tising matter from Hotels, Guest has returned home after a holiday STPWART GRANGER ® JEAN SIMMONS %

    Hal has been working for five Houses, Clubs, Business Houses in in Barbados, om work, he told %
    years in Venezuela and is return- Bridgetown and other free litera~- Carib, often takes him for three . “ is >
    ing on Monday. This is the first ture about Barbados. There is also or four months at a gjme into the in ADAM AND EVELYNE { x
    time in five years that he has seen a basket into which passengers bus h away from civilization, He A Universal-International Release 1 %
    his other brother Gordon, who is can post their mail, immediately was a guest at Cacrabank, P d “K g P t f ye x
    also in Barbados, on arrival. Going To Ledge ow er e e 0 x

    pat Peter Willems arrived
    with his grandmother, Mrs

    PLAZA — Oistin: Night-Cluh

    Ursula Willems from B.G. on







    Thursday by B.W.I.A. Peter will Saturday, and Sunday, 5.00 <« F i
    * ‘ be going to Lodge School, wher id and 8.30 p.m. ociety!
    et the new term begins, Mrs. Wil- Viveca LINDFORS a Dane CLARK :
    e iems will be returnirég to B.G. ir Virginia MAYO ites Edmund O’BRIEN

    three weeks. Meanwhile they are
    staying in Worthing

    Delighted
    M* HERMANN KAISER who
    is a_Professor in Chemical
    Engineering at the University of
    Caracas has brought his wife and

    and Gordon MACRAE in
    “BACKFIRE”

    New Picture



    {
    |
    |
    WARNER'S THRILLING ROMANCE! |
    {
    !
    |
    |
    |
    |













    two children to Barbados or a x
    month’s holiday. All are guests TO-DAY 8.50 P.M., SUNDAY MATINEE 5.00 P.M %
    at ‘““Jacrabank” and they are de- NIGHT 8.30 $$
    lighted with Barbados 20th Century-Fox Preudly Present: ib %
    Paris Holiday PRINCE OF FOXES Re
    QO" to Paris last week for 10 Coming Monday . . . | F
    days went Mrs. Gloria God- “JESSE JAMES” j ae) é we
    Gard, wife. of “the “Weatlnties ee ern eee ed _ Jb1S gig ibid eh
    cricket captain. It is her first visit x
    to Paris. 4ey delight is tinged 4

    SENSATION
    UF SENSATIONS

    with one regret: her husband
    could not go with her. Cricketing
    duties, plus the fact that he 2 to
    undergo a slight operation on Sep- ;
    tember 10th, made it impossible aaa TERRIFIC i j ‘ 38
    for him to accompany her. hee ; f : THE TEN mos TE TURED!
    might have made the trip at the , : rf T ¢ x , : ; i 4 4
    end of the tour but John’s main i DINE AND DANCE PRLS EVER A: ey cumatiaa 3 , ane %
    eoncern is to get home as soon as

    : ; ; orilla i . fe rd R ‘4
    See ne ee AT Orns se Bh Uae ie LAA
    ‘Hi Fights capture by aA LE ef eo da
    a eee CLUB MORGAN © ints and ors
    RRIVING by B.W.LA. from S Tam ed a
    B.G. on Thursday afternoon ] night we star!
    PICTURED h Tt d Olaf Hat tii brot: was Supt. Allan Outram of the wae F pl muscles 10
    » ere are Thor an af Halverssen, twin brothers, British Guiana Pelice, who ac- wh . returning to the Terminal Building yesterday at Seawell from companied by his wife and son THE WEST INDIES MOST POPULAR NIGHT CLUB 0 strongest a ;
    the plane, which due to Maintenance did noi teave for Caracas, Neil are here for two weeks’ holi- LICIOUS STEAK DINNERS Balances 9 rl,
    These two youngsters have been holidaying in Barbados with day and will be staying with his aa 6 52 piano over head!

    as. ‘They ahs Saal ees" aunt Mrs. N. J. A. Bascom at Served throughout the Night
    their mother and elder brother. They hope to leave for Ven Cweston? Werathely@e.

    TO-NIGHT

    GOSS



    O36 66 60 ss 4,
    CEPOL PEI SOP SPS SOP



    Tormented,



    ezuela today. Dial 4000 for Reservations goes wild!
    6 5 OSORNO FOO PPS PS SOD ee Rip s iron doors,

    — ons ti

    > steel bars’



    Wrecks palatial

    HERE'S A NEW LaisT . ee ) CHECK night club! a cea vg
    fies Pouce. \ Fea starrin

    © machine oon Pena TROT

    |

    *
    MUSSOLINI'S MEMOIRS 1942—1943 NO WwW




    © Rern the big blaze! aU ou GUL eae














    MAXIM ’S “UNREQUITED LOVE” *
    “TRUTH WILL OUT’—by Charlitte Haldane APPROACHING wan ; ere st To dol a ie fey saa
    We are fully Stocked with - - - . s ' Screén Play by Ruth Rose*
    “FROM EMPIRE TO COMMONWEALTH” 7 Ree R eC ee 7
    % Butts & Hinges Latches $ ‘
    “PRINCIPLES OF BRITISH IMPERIAL $ |) Locks Nails ¥
    GOVERNMENT” x Hasps & Staples Hammers x
    $i Barrel Bolts Rito Roofing Compound % :
    '“BEAU SABREUR’—by Wren $|)}) Lamp Chimneys een % $
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    *



    SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1950
    {h-soswilcasercnestinnstanrnmennntsnsioteiesstentedien









    BARBADOS. ADVOCATE PAGE THREE



    eds Renew ThHeE.GAMBOLS gee Sry ot —<—- | Maid Comes

    HOME AGAIN DE _ \aeaa ee OF | (AW Weew * ITS

    Attack
    On Pusan

    @ from page |.
    fi tonight on the southern

    Back From |
    Mountains —

    PARIS
    THE shutter: are coming down |
    all over Paris |
    Restaurants which have been
    | Closed for the summer holiday dis- |
    | play re-opening notices ;
    We who have to carry on with,
    ; our work in servantless apart- |
    ;ments are getting picture post-/

    ft a senior officer told Reuter
    e enemy is shooting the works
    this offensive. Another said “If
    jlose Masan we lose Pusan.”

    ell after dark, American
    ps whe had pushed through |
    an to a ridge-top two miles!



















    3t Were under heavy mortar —— ° = ; a4 bt J 4, } - é Od : \eards of the Savo ,
    ; : i a Za y r ; / : s y mountain
    | artillery fire, and another = ~ ee oe ro | rene INA \ as : pe a eee ;
    L supported wave of Cosntu- Vi y's SS ae Fad 4 Se Tae, ie ng maid, | saying
    } infantry was expected. a ae Pe eee eee aera —— ——— SE ee Ne rena | niet ack in a few days. |
    in this front during the day, 4 ' | Soon ood eer ee ~ ery |
    h Americans and Communists, Pla E t Of * cieaners, shut since August 1, w
    9 Yan out of ammunition,| Jamai ca ns xpor FIRST WITH tr e ay be rea ly to receive long-overdue
    ght with bayonets. knives and 1 : ° contributions. fhere are still
    > butts. As the day wore on,) 6 | St : Of B S d B di only 24 theatres open, but some at |
    fury of the fighting dropped | 2m. tems ananas en @MNS {the 37 which have been enjoying |
    from exhaustion, but at night} is J their oléture annueile are pre- |
    revived again. ’ B k H i paring to entertain their clients |
    ritish troops bivouacked | To The U.K. This Year ac ome again, : |
    mewhere in Korea” since their) ; LONDON, |
    val on Tuesday, tonight pre-| THE Jamaica banana export trade to the United King- A British company has claim- From Our Own Correspondent The Nu Look }
    - . hs into battle ahead dom for 1950 is expected to. be about 6} million stems, vd egy ca = : ei ss Wtbadian oe et ad The swallows nave flown south. |
    shedule . 2 ne Whats ac, is ei ve a atk z adie g st-type ‘ret alloy designed to) Barbadian employees in wood-| phe ches en » Ch: .
    } the height of the fighting) the same as 1949, Mr. D. C. Ferguson, Commissioner of} put ‘British jet engines ahead of|!ands of the sugar estates mav ianasiee eee thelr aa van eer
    iy they got “stand by” orders} Commerce and Industries of that colony told theAdvoeate. | v orld competitors, return home shortly if there is| The reid iain Srirebtes Migs cad
    battie and cancelled exercises yesterday. | no end to the strike in the Island’:| * Se he or - Sanit .
    + were to have held tomorrow,; Mr, Ferguson was one of the > ~ | A security ban on even a men-| cast canes growing region. Work ly nich . ot tered ree
    y packea heavy lorries with) Jamaica delegates who attended | tion of it has just been lifted, buc}ers in the woodlands of the Nese: MA ace are ene
    rcombat equipment and thes@/the Oils and Fats Conference BELL BOY | What goes into the making of the | estates Grandanse, Calicigny, and to = th see ate i na mc lay, ‘the
    be leaving for the base area which ended at Hastings House alloy beside Canadian nickel is|Hopegale have struck for a 50| -1o.iq ne wants a8 ‘chara ,
    he morning. jon Thursday . ‘ WANTED ? likely to remain a strict secret. | per cent wage increase plus other gtor iously sun anned charms 1
    6 the overshadowed Northern | amenities and all these ants ok their returning staff. |
    t, early despatches said that| He said that of the 6% million | LONDON. | The Mond Nickel Company first} sented to the empioyers. . This Parisian habit of shut. ing |
    vy Reh tieve Pon sinae My FAY | BRAS, 4 million are Lacatan | Mr. and Mrs. R. F Crust went | &»perimented with “Nimonic 75"| Disorderly events within the} U” shop, for most of Augus: Is
    around Pohang over a 15-/while the remainder are Grog to Box Hill with their dog, Donny,/2"4 then “Nimonic 80” which] past week have resulted in the| (&rcely, criticised as being ond |
    are, Communist reinforce-| Michel. es re S, ~"" went a lon ey ake British | 2 ‘ A . |for business in the height of ce
    ts sre reported moving in The pl: . - . ; Donny found a tennis ball in a ° & way to make British] arrest of five men who have been ie ae it 2 |
    Poe er Ser: he planting of Lacatan is being} -appit hole. Mr, Crust took it;Jets the world’s best. These al-|charged with the larceny of estate| WUNSt season enue aut |
    PI Shot D ; extended particularly in places | away and told Donny: “Go and|leys were used to make the tur-|coconuts. Telephone poles, coco. Rants ROPE Os “BOR at
    = eCeee Colne SWE _ay,| Where there is Panama disease so} finq’ another.” Donny did so.|bine blades and the combustion|nut trees are cut down creating| TOUTS coming to Paris this |
    ge pained ; ert Korean | that oe ee Asser cannot be} Again the ball was taken from|Chambers of the engines. a traffic blockage — facilitating|™ 0M“) can hear Germun, ren | Quality is the sum a >
    s today. sho m @ -! successfully cultivated. tim, dvetn he Want SF in search | pe Agra Rone ‘ @ “land Russian operas They can} ’ : A oO { {
    ar aan iateases , age sea F ars ary is als . . ) ape | ee ° ja >
    ad eee ee eee | ; ! for another ball, and again he! They had to withstand enor- ported on inrotaned pearl Sty see the Folies Bergere and the Nu | of little things—-extra shill 4 ciga re e
    iplane south-east of Kunwi. | Quality Improved found one, Donny continued to|mous temperatures and _ stresses.|where brandishing cutlasses, and| LOX at the Mayol. But they have | 2 ‘ >
    te planes dropped leaflets and | ete rhe aifftutty was a é shing cutlasses, anc oats Seger ga ae i in blending—added care
    ed South Korean troops | ‘The quality of the banana ship jrun off and bring back more and | ‘ ifficulty was to find a metal} sticks by labourers have made|t? wait until September for the | a i)
    a Sout . pd : 7 Dane ship- . 7 | 2g 10 . mera a | ores ‘rene hi iwhts ¢ | ‘ ‘ki ‘ied ‘
    ferican Air Force offieiuls|ments has been greatly improved | ™0re balls. Altogether he found | at could be shaped and forged,'the police resort to fire arms|£?e2t French playwrights at ‘the | in packing — insistence on
    . } Twentyone policemen Comédie-Francai Because the

    the tiniest fraction of an inch un-





    that two fighters, both of|since March this year and oe nine—tennis balls and golf balls,

    but which did not alter shape by } protection.
    fan type, attacked the Obser-| reports from the United Kingdom |

    der temveratures of rec heat,

    , >
    ; sefect freshtiven Where s 6
    have arrived from St. Lucia by | Comeédie-Prancaise is closed for| peatect feeslaniven Wine ra re a} uh a it y
    arr ; oe



















    f, plane. The pilot is listed as}on the condition of the arrival ! | - aie t is ores la to sense | the holidays | CRAVEN ° A? ave bough:

    g. |of the fruit are much more fa-| | “Nimonic 75” was che answer] \.° 7 BUS) Wael) as Mine's A Gallon or Seratat errs ene en eee eee

    te Reuter cables today gave 7 Th ps i 7 a ans : situation Peres : Bae
    @ positions in Korea as vou e Weather eee Se warts The strike to-day extended ta |. dee £0 much wleohol in CMP owe Te RE ‘a PON. ENGLAND
    Ws: F Arrangements ere in force for | TODAY limportance. It was discovered by |{he estmte Dailes .and Bacolet. | /rance tat Hie HeRt wou s semen
    hth: American troops on the) providing succours of Lacatan| ; a team of Mond Wickel setallus, | Meanwhile peaceful St. George’s| Petro! sold will have a dash of it. |
    1 coast approaches to Masan| bananas for planting, particularly | Sun Rises: 5.54 a.m gists under Sir Willie G ‘fAths. continues to be uncisturbed with There will be two mixtures
    y counter-attacked and re-|by small growers. Arrangements Sun Sets: 6.09 p.m. now the com ables nubene Shout a sim of violence or provo- |the ordinary and the super. The
    |, Some. oe lost cin a are also available for the proper|}| Moor (J ost Quarter) Sep - The latest Bice! “Nimonic gor | ation. | ordinary, coloured bright eer
    Heer ote ea net towan |SPraying of banana _ plantations| teuber 3 is reported to be 10 per cent Sane Wee nee ae ee ae oe mh
    tommunist assault on this aah eat Spot disease, i ed 6.00 p.m. tougher than anything produced| , a = cies F reas fie % the
    jern sector drove through on Tn addition there is a compre~ High Water: 6.50 a.m., 6.52 |) before j 3] Of Wi h 9 a Gaia vas € an |
    ont four miles wide and 3 hetisive hurrigane | Sever nee An official of the Mond Nickel S e ig ts | erect. if wos 1 vars——thelr
    | déep. scheme which is designed to en- emai Company said: | Effect of alcohol on a
    htre: Massed North Korean|@ble banana growers to restore FRDAY (From Our Own Correspordent) liquor consumption will go up,
    {Its aeross the Naktong River their cultivations in the event of] } jsintall (Codtington) nfl neve, have something that 18 LONDON, Sept. 1 | and they will find it, more aim-
    iran most of the flat country|Setious hurricane damage. Senapemiinre ten Hyonpung and Yongsan.| wr Ferguson said that the new|| Tempexsture (Min.) 79.0° F Nothing may be said about the|‘Times” who arrived recently | {Secmk~ ove tained aaa ies
    trea of roughly i20 square tries esate f hey : Wind Direction: (9 am.) ingredients of the alloy. But it}from the West Indies, reports} cartoonists

    Some American units wera| TUS Processing factory is Boy | $..E. (3 pm.) 8.8 E 7 is not only the formula, it is alto-day that natural leadership |
    ff. A massive advance began|COMPleted and will be nee aa Wind Velocity: 9 mites 4 matter of what Americans call|of the Federated Caribbean might . °
    imidnight with the Commu-| ‘tials during September prepara-| hour ye meres per || “Know-how.” fall to Jamaica but for the jeal- | Hurricane
    $pearbead lighting the way tory to dealing — with the main) Barometer (9 acm.) 29.928 Ousy aroused by Jamaicans.
    hundreds of torches. crop beginn'ns; in October. (3 p.m.) 23.863 er “It is not only concerned with} He says jealousy is partly due | Flattens Antigua
    fth-Bast: Heavy fighting con-| This factory will produce con-| Peat airplane jet-erngines. GaturBines|t. the size of the island, but is} : iS









    (1 on the north side of the/centrated orange juice which has are being built for power instal-|“aggravated by flamboyance, it
    } particlarly around Pohang.| been sold under a ten-year con-! es lation, they are being tried out in}must be conceded, in the Jamai-

    Rast Coast: American and) tract with the Ministry of Food| Delayed Action ships, and then there is the gas-
    i Korean troops braced them-j|for supplies of concentrate suit- | : turbine automobile, as well as
    § for renewed assauits on| able for distrib~tion to children | LONDON. experimental railway locomo-

    @ trom page |,
    Fibrey Village was floating in
    can character” | several inches of sea water. At
    Of Barbados he says its instinct | least 50 per cent of the houses in






















    ; : > with characte, and tradition, and | most villages are flat, and thous-
    sector as Communist rein-;| as a welfare :ncasure. Harule Lon: 72, was shot in| tives’—I.N.S. with the old jirish and Vestry | ands are homeless. Grief and mis-
    ments were reported pusning | the stomach during the Boer war, system, villnge cluurches and eve-| ery prevailed among the sad and
    §tward from Kinwi. 2 In Islani 50 years «fo ; n cricke: might pass for an| Weary population. ne

    4 b: Wheetaciometinâ„¢dwed=. by the He died voce: ly and an inquest exotic Isle of Wight. For this Animals and birds lay dead, The



    \ hye eae ve said the bu:tet esvsed his death. e island the “ch system of in- | Harbour Master’s launch and 2
    Watican Muy |i:\tre' secon’ the island copes Belgium May [isitice eins Pnetopautin jain boatare the'only vats at
    atican iv! ay is the second ie the island capa-| A DOMKEY'S YEARS y area would work i rell | anchor in the boisterous sea
    R i ble of producin’ this specialised | Pere ‘ rie Pt sae ot a cuireascht Barges were beached, fishing
    ne res 0 1€ si reare. - wt 1 Ve . : rreckes, "
    - an d 2 ease or. 3 hose Length T atmosphere of Barbados is that boats ane laune hes wreckeg, The
    ; oe, eet. Tee pew An italian expedition exploring en ame cn separation unthinieable | /guTch Gloria” reposed on Market | SOLE AGENTS:—
    Of Cardinal factory will also manufacture! prehisicri- caves near Pisa have ° an island such as Trinidad, | scot
    ; j grape fruit juice and other citrus iaibarined tbh VERE BE w Bone ervice a vie ~ 1 § as Use, | Street. A schooner Was overturned
    ATICAN CITY, Aug. 31 products including cattle feed. | key estimated at 15,000 years old. : ace, yt in the bay. Three members of the
    cial Vatican sources said/ Construction has‘ also started on'

    |
    8 | rew are not yet accoufrted for MANNING & cO LTD.
    B 4h. : at RUSSELS, Aug, 31 . The weather is still overcast, °
    y that the Vatican was \.-!4 pre-cooling store for handling | Crossword Solution| The Belgigqn Parliament will! ‘“‘Liberty”’ Loses | ne

    ugly and treacherous
    to approve any Chureb-











    : whit, |{resh citrus fruit prior to ship- | Shortly be asked to lengthen the
    B vrovide peer }meént overseas. This store is being ; period of compulsory military Its Master {
    : Ree tn Teeenh ao built by Colonial Development service, Premier Joseph Pholien

    # sentenced to life imprison-|CorPoration and it is expected t
    last year on treason charges. be ready for operation in the
    ¥as reported that the agree- | 1951—52 season. }

    announced is « broadcast wonisht.| vom ow vwermun | Ti MOWIES ARE BETTER THAN EVER.
    GEORGETOWN, Sept.1,

    He said that this was one of a Joseph Lewis, master of the sloop |

    ‘between Bishops and the} i gm en sie ical ieleate be FI ni hp “Liberty” was knocked overboard |
    in Hungary was regarded | This store is on a site in King. Jing of: the Bel ha Werte aa mee'=!from the ship’s deck more than |
    uspicion in Vatican circles, ;Ston convenient to the principal 6 ; AR CARON three miles off the port. of
    ‘ial comment, however, was |@0cks_used for loading citrus, Georgetown around midnight on

    |

    |

    !

    |

    # available. | Mr. Ferguson said that the citrus The conscript service at present

















    ffi |industry is engaged i ampaig! is for a period of 12 months, nae and his body is not yet

    ntican official said “Until we stry 18 engaged In a campaign -i tees _| recovered. os ; ’ TINUING nh : C
    direct information—and lls increase production within the} a nignt Aigiows was te ee First news reached Georgetown NOW SHOWING & CONTINUING Mat. & Night Shows Daily
    ult to obtain since we have |island and nurseries have been ED R| A|MjE;os| 1 | PI not specified by the Premier__! today on the arrival of the “S.S.

    Jomatic. relations with Hun-|established from which large PE (Lie! sit) 1 (NE! would be to 18 months. Sundale.” The Sundale’s pilot

    at is impossible to com-j|numbers of plants will be avail-| 4 ‘oN — {saw the sloop’s boom swing and

    5 —Reuter. able to growers. :

    “ Pholien said that other meas-|knocked a man overboard and at

    ures which the Government had!once they put on the search lights

    decided to propose to Parliament|and lowered the life boats and

    included:— joined with the sloop’s crew in

    be voke search but was unsuccessful, The

    4 ae aoe in peace time|«piperty” was returning from
    infantry ivisions an armour- mate f ephice.
    ed divisions ready to heh te New Amsterdam, Berbice.

    THE BIGGEST SHOW IN TEN YEARS !!













    “VITACUP*












    LLTELL YOU ABOUT
    , MRS. PARADINE'g



    liately.
    o "The qireperstion. of reeawvel EMPENSIVE BONFIRE
    divisions. KINGSTON, Jamaica

    An overhaul of home defence} There was an expensive bonfire
    forces required to fight para-| 2° Kingston central police station
    chutists, hen the police burnt 10,000 dol-

    The development of the Air lars worth of marijuana (locally
    Force, partly for Belgian defence} Called ganja) seized from illicit
    and partly to support grounq| drug traffickers. Passersby said
    troops, r they got quite a “lift” out of the





    i fumes.

    3 An overhaul of the Navy att) ee

    4 _ Referring to the Cabinet's de- PERSONAL OPiNION

    ; cision to ask Parliament to ap- NEW YORK.

    : prove of an increase in the term Writes columnist Cedric Adams:
    A | of military service, Pholien said:| ‘There is one consolation about

    “Great Britain and Holland have] being in the infantry — they
    also consented to such saerifices.’| can't threaten you with anything
    — Reuter." worse.”

    |








    “J intend that the “
    whole world shall
    see her asi do...asa
    noble, self-sacrifie-
    ing human being.”

    GREGORY PECK

    “Atouew
    Rtayy, ny

    “She is bad, bad to

    the bone. If ever

    Bg Rp,

    iis
    a
    ett s led

    OLEMANS



    there was an evil



    woman, she is one.”

    LOUIS JOURDAN



    ss
    Dee at

    £
    Ig 4
    eae

    *played by Valle one of the seven great stars in 7”

    DAVID 0. SELZNICK’S production of ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S

    THE PARADINE cast

    CPL i LER OEIELES., AIEEE! LOE PY
    starring

    GREGORY PECK * ANN TODD * CHARLES LAUGHTON
    CHARLES COBURN « ETHEL BARRYMORE « LOUIS JOURDAN
    EXTRA-THE SPONGE DIVER
    RELEASED THROUGH REPUBLIC PICTURES.
    9 i i A eR oa





    THE FAMILY CAR—POPULAR EVERYWHERE
    68 h.p. 6 seater saloon
    THE STANDARD L2 ewt. PICK-UP
    THE STANDARD DELIVERY VAN

    The best value in their class today.

    x





    OR HEAL TH

    GO¢ PER 1/2 LB. TIN.



    See them at - - -

    CHELSEA GARAGE: (1950) LTD.

    Agents Trafalgar ree







    QPS SST ROR EHH TKDE Ree He REED EERE REA ER HOE aed ease

    ee ane ee



    PAGE FOUR
    BARBADOS waa ADVOGATE
    Bee Se Poses =)

    Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad 8t., Bridgetown.
    Saturday, September 2, 1950

    70th Birthday

    THE strongest indication of the success
    of the Young Men’s Chfistian Association
    was the enthusiasm of the members who
    attended the Seventieth Annual General
    Meeting yesterday afternoon.

    A new note of progress was the ambiti-
    ous. programme of the Directors of the
    Association to take over the premises
    adjoining their Hostel at Union Lodge in ,
    order to provide space for additional acti-
    vities to which the “Y” now caters.
    ing sold the premises now occupied to
    Chelsea Garage Limited, they have pur-
    chased Wakefield for £5,000.

    The new premises will have a little over
    three acres of land and this must be cleared
    and levelled while the house will have to
    This will then be added to the
    Union Lodge Hostel and a proper hall pro-



    be rebuilt,

    vided in order to cater to

    other organisations which from time to
    time apply to the “Y” for accommodation.

    This expansion is the greatest step for-
    ward the Y.M.C.A. has made since its
    beginning although there have been many
    changes and developments during its his-

    tory.

    It was started in 1879 at Planters Hall
    on the Wharf and later removed to the
    premises of W. L. Johnson in Roebuck
    Street. As it grew there was need for
    greater space and again the “y” found a

    home in Cavans Lane over
    of Manning & Co, Ltd.

    there was room for tennis
    beside the indoor games.

    gotten by many.

    The “Y” has outgrown its home and with
    the increased demand for social, religious,
    cultural and recreational activities among

    ‘ g men, the Directors have once again
    attempted to cater to that need.
    er institution in this island which

    no 0

    can be a substitute for the “Y”.
    unique place in this community and it is
    for this reason that it deserves all the sup-
    port which a generous public can give.
    tantial increase in mem-
    bership can the Y.M.C.A. continue to grow
    and foster good citizenship throughout the

    Only by a su

    community.

    3 Million Lepers
    LEPROSY can be cured; but it is due
    to a general opinion to the contrary that
    the work of stamping it out is so slow.
    It has been proved that with modern
    methods of treatment the disease can be

    cured in five years.

    Today there are three million lepers
    within the British Empire; and of these

    90% remain untreated.

    This makes the work of the British Em-
    pire 5 ae Relief Association an uphill

    e methods of treatment are
    known, the scientific preparations are
    known but the lack of funds for the pur-
    pose is a severe handicap. The Association
    aims not only at curing those who have

    task.

    contracted the disease but

    children who may become victims of this
    “stark tragedy of hopelessness, loneliness,

    malformation and decay.”

    This wasting disease is not confined to
    any particular race of people or any one
    nation; and the fact that it is not due to
    any peculiar climatic condition but is world

    It was in 1898
    that it came to Rickett Street where
    present day generations will remember it.
    A new lease of life was given to the insti-
    tution after the period when Mr. Pringle
    was General Secretary. There was an in-
    crease in membership and a new enthusi-
    asm. Finally the “Y” was removed to St.
    Germain, Pinfold Street in 1933. Here

    Eight years later
    Union Lodge was added as a Hostel and
    the service rendered to men of His Majes-
    ty’s Ships during the war will not be for-



    Whether and

    ment in
    two weeks.

    Hav-

    At present the

    »y the
    nents,
    The

    the needs of

    e numerically

    French
    Dr,

    ed power in

    f powers”

    the premises
    e politically

    Or, Adenauer
    security police
    period, before
    10,
    On the other
    and football

    he Red
    official”

    There is

    It fills a

    enquirers
    favoured the

    TD aL ee CCCs tetas Ata nineties sesamiae etna

    fickle
    opinion

    and

    week Mr.

    to save the

    war in Korea



    wide makes the necessity for controlling it

    all the greater.
    Those who enjoy good

    strength have little idea of the tragedy and
    the darkness which comes over others who
    have been afflicted with leprosy. And to
    those who have not the hope of treatment
    there is an even greater load of despair.
    The most tangible way to show an appre-
    ciation of health and strength is to make
    some contribution to the work of those who
    have dedicated themselves to the cure of
    Send a contribu-
    pire Leprosy

    leprosy the world over.

    tion today to the British Em
    Relief Association, 167 Victoria Street, Lon-
    don S.W. 1. If through BELRA you can
    pass even five shillings into those poor

    stumps of hands to arrest

    ravages of leprosy you will be doing some-
    thing truly humanitarian, something vital.



    health and

    rotgut? The

    the further @ardéne’ at

    back in German hands has. been
    the predominant subject for argu-
    Surope during the last
    The notes that fol-
    low cover the many, and highly
    confusing cross currents of this
    complex subject.
    Two Schemes

    A distinction must be made
    between two different schemes,
    both of which are being discussed
    and argued, The first
    Adenauer’s proposal for the estab-
    lishment of a West German inter-
    nal security police on the same
    scale as the political police in the
    Communist dominated Republic
    of East Germany, Dr. Adenauer
    is believed to be speaking of a
    force of about 50,000 men, organ-
    ised under the direct control of
    the Federal Government at Bonn.

    n Western Germany are virtu-
    illy unarmed and are controlled
    eleven Lander govern-

    second proposition under
    liscussion is the
    Vest German contingent to take
    ts place—and all admit it would

    Vestern European Army,
    gested by Mr. Churchill), or the
    Atlantic Pact system of Armies.

    Adenauer’s proposal that
    ae “internal security’”’ police of
    /est Germany should be built up
    as received sharp criticism. The
    rench do not like central organ-

    ave always favoured “separation
    among the Lander
    svernments—and fought long and
    ard to have their view accepted.
    he question of control of “State
    olice” is a test case, The French

    German problem”. They see in
    ne centralized police proposed by

    clepended on the Government of
    Prussia. They fear an independ-
    German-led,
    ust over the Rhine.

    re conscious of the need for far
    yreater military forces in the West
    - to defend themselves should
    Army
    newspaper,
    autiously advances the argument
    hat forty million Frenchmen can-
    iot bear the military brunt for
    ‘efending three hundred million
    Western Europeans.
    strong current of opinion favour-
    able to a German Army within
    in European army;
    will show, there remains
    erable dissatisfaction in
    with the present Western
    defence system.
    is that a German Army could be
    safely built up as part of an
    Europeah Force.
    Doubts and Difficulties

    Ir the United States 71% of
    those asked by the Gallup Poll
    have said that they

    Western Germany.

    In West Germany newspaper
    polls showed 77% favoured mili-
    tary “aid to the Allies”.

    views, why it is dangerous to re-
    arm Western Germany.

    In the first
    themselves are asking whether

    BY THE WAY...

    A’ article about scents says
    that we are losing our sense
    of smell, and that “even trained

    nauseating wash which women
    drenched in strident chemicals
    leave in their wake? The heavy
    odour of frozen hake being fried
    in rancid butter-extract?
    mouldy reek of “Chateau—bottled”

    wafting—airs of summer?
    lovely nose, as Waller said when
    he thrust his face into a bouquet
    he had gathered for Sacharissa in
    Penshurst.
    moment there was a raucous oath.
    The poet had been stung by a

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE



    Hy David Temple Roberts

    LONDON.

    how to put arms force—call

    begun by

    is Dr.

    only police forces

    formation of a

    prominent—in the
    (sug-

    Reactions the newspaper

    the

    Germany. They

    York

    news

    conscious of the

    absolute desire
    a return to the

    of the Weimar

    Hitler — which —

    striking force

    hand the French

    march. The
    Le Monde,

    for

    ies
    There is no fog pd ed ge

    yet, as we
    consid-
    Francs
    Europe
    The implication

    be carried out.
    re-armament of

    expenditure.
    that

    creased
    public
    portion to
    first which is

    tary men,

    the urgent

    has changed all
    appointment
    place Germans

    chief? The

    the building of an internal security
    it police or army—
    will provoke immediate civil war
    the
    German armed police. It is being
    asked in Germany
    United States and Great Britain
    are in fact able to re-arm Ger-
    many before the country is over~
    run. The whole of Europe is
    oppressed with the thought of
    being invaded,
    eventually liberated in the same
    manner as Southern Korea.
    There is a second more sinister
    reason why German re-armament
    is not a correct answer to the
    general European demand to be
    defended against the Red Army.
    A German Army is not necessarily
    the servant of Europe, but could
    again be its master. If it seemed
    to the politically minded generals
    of a new West German Army, to
    be more profitable to Germany to
    reach alliance with the Russians
    and themselves to reconquer Wes-
    tern Europe, then who would there
    be to halt such a German change
    of front. According to one General
    25—30 panzer divisions must be
    created to give Germany security
    against the Russians, But the same
    divisions would be a powerful
    offensive unit against the West.
    Within Germany it may not be
    so easy to find an army, inspite oi

    class is certainly willing; but if
    statements
    Democratic Party are to be trusted
    ‘there may be a lack of recruits
    to join the new Reichswehr. Herr
    Ollenhauer, the Vice President of
    the S.P.D. (Socialist Party), has
    firmly denounced
    armament in the same week tha
    Adenauer suggested it in the New
    aper
    Democrats are at the same time
    the most alarmed at the devel-
    opment of the East German Police
    Force and also most aware of the

    lowing not to be involved in an-
    war or
    which would once again hit the
    S.P.D. stronghold in the Ruhr.

    The “Atlantic”
    View-point

    Charles M. Spofford is in Lon-
    don. A few weeks ago nobody in
    the wide world of international
    affairs had heard of him. Now he tier security”.
    is the United States Deputy on the
    Atlantic Council’—which
    body of hard-headed men with the
    heavy esponsibility of preparing
    Western Europe’s

    ‘n London. They have before them
    two documents put forward by
    the French, and one claim from
    the British Government.
    these documents puts forward a
    scheme for defence that would
    form part of the general Europ-
    ean effort to build an efficient force
    in the next 2% years, The British
    plan, and the first French docu-
    ment have been published. They
    have this in common,
    both presume a large measure of
    United States aid if they are to

    is certainly the greater—trelative
    to the present French armament
    There
    the present French forces
    are being maintained at minimum

    This, perhaps, goes to show that®cost, and that therefore the in-
    ihe United States has the most
    changeable
    in the world and the
    German is quick to grasp each
    chance of remilitarisation. Cer-
    tainly the simple idea that the
    enemies of six years ago are
    suitable allies to-day has swept
    aside all other reasoning. And this
    Adenauer, the Prime
    Minister of the West German
    Government, has created a sensa-
    tion with an interview in the
    New York Times declaring “we
    ought to recognise
    necessity for German defensive
    forces”, Yet there are still reasons,
    inspite of the speed with which

    expenditure
    equipment will
    the military efficiency of forces
    already in existence—out of pro-
    cost.
    French memorandum, (unlike the
    in the form of a
    plan) comes as a surprise to mili-
    The French propose
    ‘the establishment of a single com-
    mand, and the re-organisation and
    simplification of the committees
    and co-ordinating mechanism of
    the Brussels and Atlantic Pacts,
    These organisations overlayp—they
    fill London with numerous mili-
    tary diplomats.
    French would welcome an Ameri-
    can commander-in-chief? Presum—
    ably they would not welcome the
    of Field Marshal
    Montgomery as
    French

    would seem to provide just the
    form of international defence into
    which Germany might be fitted

    WINDOW ON EUROPE IDE OF WAR TURNING

    |
    AGAINST KOREAN |
    COMMUNISTS

    formidable East Was that the French purpose
    Our French reporter hos it that a

    whether the German force is already pro-
    The French scheme for

    and no doubt, country.

    the same time,

    arate

    “overlapping.”

    polls, The officer

    of the Social

    missioner in
    Adenauer;

    re- Foreign Office

    The Social

    of their own fol- next month.

    bombardment—

    is a

    sions for a

    defence.
    force.

    are now meeting

    Each of the

    Each of

    generals.

    many
    that they

    The French plan oad

    take
    train

    six
    on new into

    greatly improve

    The second divisions

    than
    divisions

    tegrated = in

    Presumably the None of the

    Commander-ip- of German

    suggestion



    wasp.

    Flobster,
    delightful
    The

    balmy petrol-
    Go,

    Next the brim is

    blustering."”

    “The nose have it,’’ said
    the beauty, with a laughing dis-
    regard of grammar, physical pain

    Ewart Hodgson, written in
    the chart-house of the Saucy Mrs.
    encloses a cutting; a

    little homily,
    trated about the psychology of
    your grip on a tea-cup., Appar- as
    ently the man who holds
    cup in his fist as though it were
    a glass of beer is more at home
    in a bar than in a room. The
    man who shoves his thumb on
    “loud, coarse and
    But what of the
    man who fans his tea with his



    By Beachcomber

    hat and then

    noses tire easily” (a remark which and loss of dignity, Waller red- Though I am not a psychologist,
    does not apply to Evans the dened beneath his tan. I
    Hearse) . ‘+ °
    Give him his teaina bucket cure his wife of her foul habit of
    But does it matter? What does holding the cup as
    the tired nose miss today? The NOTE from Admiral Sir

    illus-

    the

    his bachelor in

    supplanted.



    CRAB-MEAT CONDON FIGHTS ON

    The Long-shoreman Has A Cold War Of His Own

    NEW YORK.

    THE tanned, slightly built young
    veteran of Okinawa who stopped
    the unloading of Russian crab-
    meat and furs from British ships
    in New York, is going further
    with his campaign.

    His name: Longshoreman James
    Condon.

    His aim: “To show the Rus-
    sians that the working people are
    fed up with Russia.”

    “I am not anti-British or anti-
    Cunard,” Cendon told me, his
    bright blue eyes deeply serious.
    He pointed*to pictures of the Queen
    Elizabeth and boron Mary
    on the wall of the modest office
    he occupies in Manhattan in his
    position of commander of the re-
    cently created New York veterans
    of Foreign Wars Post.

    British Pariners

    “We like the British,” he said
    “We feel they are our partners
    in thig fieht seainst Communism
    But we do noi like the action of
    the British Government in sending
    crab-meat over here.”

    Thirty-three years old and
    grandson of a _ longshoreman,
    Condon has been trying to organ-
    ise a boycott of Russian exports

    for more than two months. He
    persuaded 25 longshoremen friends
    to help to form an anti-Commun-
    ist Veterans Post. Membership has
    soared, A quarter of the members
    wear the Purple Heart decoration.

    Condon’s whole life is devoted
    to what he thinks the world should
    do for future generations,

    ‘Fed Up’

    He believes the American work-
    ing man can play a more impor-~
    tant part than the Government
    in getting messages “that hit
    home” to the people of Iron Cur-
    tain countries.

    He pointed out that Russian
    leaders claim everything the
    United States does is dictated by
    Wall Street millionaires, Here
    was an opportunity to show the

    Russian people that the workers

    were “fed up” with Russia’s tac-
    tics,

    Condon’s Veterans’ Post are
    active on other fronts of the
    propaganda war. Day and night
    his Post are turning out leaflets

    in French, Polish, German, Italian
    Russian, Rumanian They are

    placed inside cargoes of
    leaving for Europe.

    Nearly all the leaflets are com-
    posed by Conden himself, One,
    aimed at French dock-workers,
    says: “Yes we have loaded arms
    to France. We have also sent to
    France thousands of headstones
    for our soldiers who will never
    come home, Please don’t let them
    down, They would never rest in
    any totalitarian ruled country.”

    Condom is a pacifist at heart
    but believes that when another
    country makes trouble the only
    way to meet it is with courage.

    He does not think the United
    States should use the atom bomb.
    He does believe America should
    tell Russia now that any furtner
    acts of aggression, even if made
    by another satellite, would mean
    War with the United States.

    Condon, who has three children,
    points out. “My eldest son, now
    12 will have to fight soon for us,
    unless we do something right now
    about the international situation.”

    He is proud of his work as long-
    shoreman (though he wants his
    two sons to take up one of the
    professions “where they get well

    ships

    paid”), because he feels it ean
    be an important factor in im-
    proving international relations.
    He believes that stopping the
    flow of trade with an aggressor
    can be used as a powerful weapon.

    Next: The Batory

    Condon is waiting with relish
    for the next entry of the Polish
    liner Batory to New York His
    members intend to give that ship
    “the works.” No cargo will be
    moved from it unless it is from
    countries outside the Tron Cur-
    tain,

    Condon said his group had
    developed its own detective force
    which would discover in advance
    what the ship carried,

    Condon does not look the tough

    fighter he is, The only thing
    which marks his association with
    ships is a tattoo on the right arm

    showing two hearts. He admitted
    blushingly it was put on for a
    pretty girl he met 14 years ago in
    New York. She is now the mother
    of his three children

    * FOOTNOTE: The crabmeat
    was due back at Liverpool last
    week,

    —L.E.S

    financing the necessary expendi-
    ture would seem to be the forma-
    tion of a common fund and the
    floating of “defense loans” in each
    But Sir Stafford Cripps

    ll certainly set his» face sternly
    against borrowing in peacetime to
    finance military expenditure. This,
    to British eyes, is
    And the Government will only
    permit inflationary measures if, at

    controls on everyday life—ration-
    ing, shortages, far higher taxation
    and compulsory saving. That can
    only be done in time of war.
    the British alternative is
    ance additional military expendi-

    certain measure of dollar aid—in
    the form of actual equipment from

    army under
    mand—with co-

    British Attitude

    At the present date the British
    views on these
    been expressed :
    first, there is Mr. Churchill's advo-
    cacy of an European Army, (he
    does not speak for the Government
    but his view cannot be ignored),
    secondly there‘is British identifica-
    tion with the very sharp rejoinder
    Mr. MacCloy, the U.S. High Com-
    Germany,
    thir
    carefully prepared statement by. a

    Britain had “full sympathy” for
    Dr. Adenauer’s fears, and that the
    proposals for a German militia and
    stronger occupation army would be
    “studied” when Mr, Bevin meets , . :
    Mr, Dean Acheson, and the French | quately and the U.S. was still making fast
    Foreign Minister,

    particularly from France, seems

    contradictory. Logically -— it is
    contradictory. |
    Foreign Ministers will give ap-

    proval next month to a West Ger-
    man police force of about 10,000
    men—a very different proposition
    to Dr. Adenauer’s suggested 50,000
    strong para-military body charged
    with internal security and “fron-

    the British military authorities are
    studying reports from certain Ger-
    man generals on the possibilities
    of rebuilding German panzer divi-
    European

    The Views of the Generals

    many—with the
    tion of the French—have “its own”

    first in the field as they appreciated
    the advantage of acquiring the al-

    even during the war with
    It seems that “their gen-
    erals"—ineluding von Paulus and
    his junior commanders who sur-
    rendered before
    well ensconced in the
    German military system .

    L , the German generals who confide
    is evidence jn the Western Allies are surpris-

    They all estimate it would only
    months to recruit and
    shape a

    within
    granted equipment, unlimited and

    the various experts varies slightly.
    Some suggest that there should

    divisional
    should
    “European Army
    argue that German generals should
    command whole Army Corps, in-
    European Armies,
    Generals
    like the prospect of political prob-
    lems — they want to command
    only regular soldiers.
    unanimous rejection of the idea
    “militia service”
    a short period.

    both hands, plunges into it, and
    comes up with a dripping nose?

    were a precious stone, and sip-
    ping like a gnat at a bird-bath.

    Social Note
    GENTLEMAN who is known

    Europe was
    dining in the West End last night
    with Dawn Kedgaree, the English

    inflationary.

    it replaces severe

    to fin-

    national com-
    ordination to avoid

    discussions have

    in three ways—-| Walker, who

    confidence.

    gave Dr.

    diy there is the] (he line.

    spokesman that

    in New York

    This. to many correspondents— | )robings from becoming breakthroughs. The

    But Possible Russian Or Red Chinese
    interference Makes Victory Unpredictable.

    “The Communist enemy in Korea was still
    attacking, but his attacks no longer had the
    fearsome power he had put into his drives
    three weeks before.
    setting against him,” Time magazine reports
    in a survey of the War in Asia in its issue of
    So, September fourth.

    Time explains, “The Allies were steadily
    ture out of taxation, add to that a| setting more manpower, weapons, supplies,
    mobility; allied morale was sky-high; more
    America, and maintain each sep-|~nd more Reds were surrendering. The
    cnemy even seemed, as one observer said,
    io be running out of plans.
    probing for soft spots, and not finding any
    that could be exploited as he hoped. General

    ssued a stand-or-die order,
    necessary to voice a warning against over-

    ;

    “The U.S. now had five divisions on Korea. |
    The South Koreans had five divisions more on} |
    The first ground troops from other} }
    United Nations had also begun to land.”
    “Even so,” Time reports “there were still not
    enough troops to man the 140-mile (about
    33 kilometres)

    shifts of fighting units to prevent enemy



    The tides of war were

    WOVE

    He was merely

    only a month ago had once
    now found it



    beachhead perimeter ade- |
    {
    {

    But, probably, the} were slow and cumbersome, mostly carried

    At the same time | perimeter . in

    defence | 0£ weeks.

    Allied authorities

    possible excep-

    Ger-

    Stalingrad—are been severely

    two years—

    command—that
    be fitted into
    Corps. Others

    consulied

    the atomic
    There is

    holds the cup in

    though it

    ineligible
    seen

    most

    Thanks to a_ printer! jobs they had before marria
    who was short of an “R”, the] of their home
    Kedgaree was reported as saying
    “We are just fiends”.

    i ,
    OUR READERS SAY
    Which Side
    To, The Editor, The Advocate,

    Sir, Sometime ago certain
    members of the constabulary were
    detailed to give talks to schools
    on the question of the use of the
    streets. They were not clear, when
    it came to the question “On which
    side of the road a pedestrian
    should walk?”

    It seemed to be the general
    opinion nevertheless that pedes-
    trians should face oncoming traf-
    fic. I take this to mean walk on
    the right side as against the left.

    I disagree strongly with one
    using the right side when walk-
    ing, and had a heated argument
    with whom I think a very intelli-
    gent person who strongly advo-
    eates walking on the right.

    I will not attempt to produce
    all my regsons here for my contenâ„¢
    tion, The most I will say to that
    from my experience as a pedes-
    trian I must arrive at this conclu-
    sion that the left side is the right



    as against the wrong side on
    which, to walk

    I think it would be a good thing,
    if this question could be settled
    once and for all, and the public
    instructed accordingly I think
    too that after this question is
    settled, policemen on guard should
    instruct peo to use the side
    apon which it is decided. I have

    Kted’s shifts of strength, on the other hand,

    open season for prophecies and speculations
    on when the Allies would break out of the

    In the lines it was widely taken for granted
    that a breakout would be made in a matter
    ‘We'll never even find a North
    Korean soldier, said a colonel, ‘they’ll all
    take off their uniforms and become refugees.’ | |
    and each political party in Ger-}|In Tokyo, one of General MacArthur’s com-
    fortable spokesmen said that the war might,
    The Russians were the | just possibly, be won by late November.”

    But Time points out that “such predictions
    legiance of the German generals | ignored not only the facts of life of the Korean
    war itself, but the facts of life in the rest |p;s==
    of Asia and the world,

    East | intervention in Korea, but Stalin’s men have })}
    The views being put forward by |a way of recovering quickly from surprises.
    Facing this week’s situation, they were well.
    ingly similar, one with another, | aware that nearly all combat-ready ground
    troops at U.S. disposal, except for thin mini-
    _ sh first-rate | mum needs for garrison duty, were com-
    mute thst Wentern, Gerinany‘etn mitted or soon would be in Korea.
    put into the field some fifteen|could soundly predict victory in Korea by
    late November or for that matter by the
    free. The “command policy” of|following November unless he ignored the
    possibility that Moscow might set up a brush-
    be no higher German command] fire somewhere else, or intensify the force
    in Korea by getting China’s Communist
    troops into the battle.”

    In the cover story in its September 4, issue
    Time reports on the U.S. Air Force’s Strate-
    gie Air Command, the men and the weapon—

    Churchill’s words for the one
    for }deterrent” hanging over the heads of the,

    Soviet Politbureau—the likeliest reason why |
    ~ | Russia’s aggressors have so far started a)
    proxy war in Korea, and not the big one. |

    What Women Want To Hear

    PEOPLE catering for women’s interests
    are inclined to think that women require news
    think he would make an|0f fashion, beauty, cooking, home-making, |
    excellent husband, and would soon | child welfare and, more than anything, how to |
    get their man and, having got him, how to
    keep him, Miss Gibbs of the BBC “Woman’s |
    Hour” is convinced that in addition to these '
    vitally important feminine topics, women
    want to hear about life outside the home.| ~
    She found that her listeners wanted book |
    and film reviews, talks on current affairs, | |
    travel and natural history and also talks on: !

    odd subjects about which they knew nothing | \

    at all. Many women miss the comparatively {

    film-star whom Trivia Tansy has| broad and stimulating life they led in the, |'
    |

    domestic tasks and a programme that brings
    them a change of topic is greatly appreciated.

    out at night for fear of air attack. \
    “The military improvement signalled an
    (
    !
    |
    j
    }










    a general counter offensive.

    Ss

    Moscow may have
    diseoncerted by the bold U.S.



    No man

    — SS ot
    = ——

    bomb — which in Winston

    “effective

    ST Seca



    '

    \
    \
    i
    }





    e. A large part |

    life is passed in monotonous

    no objection according to one of
    your correspondents to a law gov-
    erning this, and drunkards who
    pitch and totter all over the strets.

    I have three cases in mind
    where persons have lost. their {
    lives by being drunk on the! ”

    TEA

    Streets. In short, the law affecting
    intoxticated users of motor vehi-
    cles should be extended to users
    of bicycles and pedestrians.
    CLAUDE RAMSAY.
    The Black Prince

    Sir,—I should be glad if you
    would kindly permit me to correct



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    1 in. x 48 in.
    114 in. x 18 in., 24 in., 36 in., 48 in., 60 in.
    1% in. x 36 in., 48 in., 60 in., 72 in.



    WELKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.

    Successors to





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    Joan “The fair maid of Kent” | i COFFEE PRUnae ms —
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    she had one son, Richard II, who| {/! MAXWELL HOUSE 7
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    WATER BISCUITS

    daughter, Joan, who was twice i CHEESELETS OX TONGUES
    married, and she has descendants | i ASSORTED — OX TAILS . .
    through both marriages, She mar-| })} AFTERNOON TEA FRESH VEGETABLES
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    SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1950

    Outstanding British
    Films Coming

    THE PUBLIC of Barbados will soon be able to see
    outstanding British films, Mz. Henry Teelucksingh Man-
    aging Director of Teelucksingh Theatres Ltd. and British
    and General Film Distributors Ltd. of Trinidad, told the
    Advocate yesterday.

    T’dad Saiihabacs
    Introduced To
    Local Bar

    Mr. Tazmool Hosein, young
    barrister of Trinidad, was admit-





    "
    i



    . He said that previously, there
    was no means of having such pic-
    tures released in Barbados, but
    now, through his company’s as-
    sociation with Caribbean Theatres
    Ltd, the local public will be able
    to enjoy such outstanding British
    films as “Spring in Park Lane”,
    the National Academy Award
    winner 1949-50, starring Anna
    Neagle and Michael

    : Wilding;
    ted to practise at the local Bar « ”
    by His Honour the Chief Judge, Teer eri meta tan

    Sir Allan Collymore, before the
    business of the Court of Ordinary
    was begun yesterday. ° He was
    introduced by Mr. F. A. Field,
    Acting Attorney General.

    Mr. Field making the introduc-

    technicolour musical, “The Great
    Mr. Handel”; Charles Dickens’
    “Nicholas Nickelby”; “‘Elizabeth of
    Ladymeade” and “Green Fingers”.
    Mir. Teelucksingh said thav the
    ; 4 s vhy so few British pictures
    tion, told the Chief Judge that sca : e ‘i
    Mr, Hosein was a Trinidadian by \YTe Shown in Barbados was that
    birth, and that he had been ad- PiS company’s competitors were
    mitted a member of the Inner contracted mostly with the major
    Society of Lincoln’s Inn in 1943. American film companies
    In 1946 he had passed the final :
    examination for the Bar, obtain~ 44. aig een =
    ing a Certificate of. Honour, and Bae) Mayen mene Ses Wilt. DOW.
    being placed first in the order of possible at the Plaza theatres to
    evit ; 7 get newsreels more quickly thar
    : Z it before as arrangements are bein
    ue ace % net Fohet *ton marie to release the latest Ameri-
    aie be tht ‘ tack a are os ‘ ae can newsreels simultaneously wiih
    tscate oe Hon a ae a the Trinidad, British Guiana and New
    Buchanan Prize whi Sey wea eDER The British. newsreelt
    va Sail tha Would be about two weeks behind
    eas ee eke te ah the American ones and he ativib-
    first in the first class division ‘and uted 'hat to transport difficulties
    whose work was of sufficiently t a: ne, “a ce
    high standard to justify the ‘° 8¢t Italian or French films her:
    aeatd he said that all films distributed
    ' in Barbados had to be released

    Mr. Hosein was called to the ae ;
    ; nig " vhrough the Trinidad Film Ex-
    English Bar in January, 1947, and changes and due to currency regu-

    in May of that year was admitted

    Head Leaves
    For St. Martin’s

    MR. C. O. ALLEYNE, formerly
    Headmaster of St Margaret's
    Mixed School, St. John, has been
    promoted to the headship of St
    Mertin’s Boys’ School, St. Philip,
    and a farewell function was held
    for him recently at the School
    where he worked so long



    : lations in Trinidad, no foreigr Revd. Mellor speaking at the
    to the Trinidad Bar, He was now ae eld be tanpotted. itont function congratulated Mr. Alleyne
    a_ practising barrister in that 4, ‘approval of the financial au- 09. his appointment, describing
    colony. thorities him as a hard worker, and one

    eA that had done much for St. Mar-
    Certificate oi Call garet’s. He was sorry, on the
    other hand, that the school was

    Mr. Field told the Chief Judge
    that Mr. Hosein had not got his
    Certificate of call with him but
    there was a certificate by Mr.

    going to lose Mr.. Alleyne’s ser-
    vices.

    Recitals, Lectures
    At British Council

    Miss Mabel Hutson who said she

    had worked with Mr. Alleyne
    W. R. Douglas, the Deputy Regis- Coe f < :
    trar confirming that Mr Hosein ISS ENID RICHARDSON, aa SNS ORTA also paid tribute to
    was a practising Barrister in Music Officer of the British ‘ed nek Way ie ope mi weenwins
    Trinidad. Council, will give recitals and carry out his duties, She Ww eden
    “I believe too, sir,” Mr. Field lectures throughout this month. ,) \ a war

    said, “that Mr, Hosein is known They will all take place at the ic Rhee Be eae

    Mr. H. A. Thorne also ¢ B
    to Your Honour, he having ap- British Council, Wakefie/d. Ning quota wit erties fir pad
    peared before the West Indian The programme is as follows: Ajjeyne. ‘
    Court of Appeal when it was held Lecture — Recitals: Mondays,
    in Trinidad recently. September 4, 11, 18, and 25 at 8.15 Mr. C. D. RAMSAY spoke on

    “Mr. Hosein as far as I know p.m, The subject for September
    is not the first Trinidad Barrister 4 is “Music and the Ordinary
    to be introduced to the Bar of Listener.”
    this island. I do not know wheth- —_ Lectures (primarily for teachers
    er it is his intention to practise but others welcome): Wednesdays
    extensively his profession in this September 6, 13, 20 and 27 at 6.00
    island. But he many find that p.m. The subject for September
    our practice is not as lucrative 6 will be “Aural Training”. Both

    behalf of the Social Workers of the
    St. Mergaret’s Branch of St. John’s
    Baby Welfare League, and said
    Mr. Alleyne had always taken
    great interest in the social work of
    the parish.





    A vote of thanks was moved by

    as that of Trinidad, For that series are open to the public. Mr. L. T. Gay, Inspector of

    reason he probably may not be Schools

    so anxious to spend a very long HE POLICE BAND under | Among others present — were

    time here. Capt. C. E, Raison will rersyioe “ aah * : aan ne
    “I can assure him, speaking on pay at the opening stage show of 47. Lorde, Mr. ell, iss

    behalf of all the members of the Play ats : eg 8 Mayers.

    the Bridgetown Plaza Theatre to- Mr. ‘Bert Moore ane Mr.

    night,

    The finishing touches were
    done to this theatre yesterday. The
    outside of the building has an un-
    plastered limestone finish and has
    been treated with a_ protective
    coat of waterproof salmon pink.

    The restaurant was equipped
    with glasses, cups and plates yes-

    Bar, that if and when he prac- Squires.
    tists in any of the Courts of this
    istand, he will be accorded the
    same courtesies which are accord-
    ed to Barbadians practising in
    these Courts. I think too that he
    will find that the members of
    the local Bar will be as anxious
    to cross swords with him as he

    Court Of Appeal

    Reverses Decision

    A DECISION of Mr. H. A

    H

    BARBADOS

    QUESTION






    ee
    -“,, ~~
    eee . a

    %

    ADVOCATE
    TIME

    €

    DR. GREAVES, Port Health Officer, questions the passengers befor. he examines them.

    nee ne

    St. Margaret's) YMCA Will Soon

    Have New H.Q.

    WHEN the Y.M.C.A. held their seventieth Annual General

    Meeting at their headquartérs

    A, E. Armstrong, appealed to the members to do their utmost on the

    yesterday, the President Rev.

    to increase the membership of the Association which has

    decreased this year by 20

    The President was presentin,
    the Annual Report and account
    for the year.

    His Excellency the
    attended the meeting
    sented trophies to the

    Governor
    and pre-
    winners of

    billiards, snooker, table tennis and
    draughts,
    Hon. H. A. Cuke, M.L.¢

    presided as Chairman, His Excel
    lency and he were welcomed by
    the President

    The President told the member
    that as they would notice in the
    report the Directorate had taken
    a step that perhaps would write
    history as far as the Y.M.C.A.
    was concerned, They had sold
    the present building and were
    going to remove in a short time
    over to the building on the other
    side of the road. They had
    always been yearning for a play-
    ing field where they could play
    football, cricket, tennis ete., and
    so the directorate had seized the
    opportunity that had come alony
    Probably that afternoon would
    be the last time they would he
    meeting in that hall on
    occasion like the present.

    Well Pleased

    He would like to draw to the
    attention that Mr. B. D. Kaye of
    the Scottish National Council had
    been to the place and expressed
    himself well pleased. He had
    even talked of using it as a trai:
    ing centre for secretaries of
    similar associations in the Carib-

    bean area.
    He (Rev, Armstrong) cid not
    know how that would develop,

    but he felt sure that when
    Kaye returned home he

    Mr.

    would

    with them, and I believe that torqay morning and chairs and [alma, City Police Magistrate, was | make efforts to put his suggestion
    Barbadians are known to be peo- tapjes have also been installed. Yesterday reversed by Mr. J. W. B.| into effect.

    ple who can hold their own This restaurant will be opened Chenery and Mr. H. A. Vaughn, As regards the directorate, he

    against all comers. from eight in the morning until ae eh ee . wae did not think that at any time

    mid-night. ppeal, 1eir Honours dismissed } during his Presidency he had got

    Called to the Bar The projection equipment is @ case which the police brought; more co-operation and more

    “I now ask Your Honour to ad- «westar” by Western Electric. against Clarence Cummins of | interest in the work than from

    mit Mr. Hosein to practise at the : Lemon Arbor, St. John, accusin’| the present Bourd. “All _ the

    Bar of Barbados.”’ POLICE CONSTABLE told him of having stolen three pieces] members and I should be fully

    of wood from a lorry on May 3
    Mr. Talma had fined him £1.

    The Court held that the evidence
    was altogether too vague to convict
    Cummins of larceny.

    The Chief Judge said; “Mr. the Advocate yesterday that
    Hosein, you have been vouched motorists who park their motor
    for as a member of the Legal vehicles in restricted areas some-
    Profession practising as a Bar- times slow up the flow of traffic.
    rister, by the learned Deputy He also said that this type of of-
    Registrar. As the learned At- fender is becoming a nuisance.
    torney General, has remarked, I Of the six traffic offences record-
    for my part know that you are ed yesterday two motorists were
    a practising Barrister in Trinidad, charged with parking in restricted
    because you have appeared be- areas, One was charged for fail-
    fore the West Indian Court of jng to produce his licence and an-
    Appeal, of which at that time I other for failing to stop at a major
    happened to be a member. road.

    Another rnotorist was charged
    for not stopping at the request of
    a Police Constable and also not



    NEW ITEMS

    NEW YORK.

    Frogs legs and caviare are on
    a list of 60 new items on which
    the United States will seek tariff
    reductions at a general tariff re-
    ducing conference next month
    Other items on the new list:
    Enamel paints, soya bean oil and
    linseed, tomatoes, patent barley
    and barley flour, silver, jute, toys
    apparel, cast-iron pipes and fit-
    tings, aluriinum and alloys.

    “In that colony, after a con-
    tinuous academic career, I know

    that you have obtained a re- moving at the request of a P.C.
    markable measure of success. I “NONNIE ALLISON, a Sister at
    congratulate you on your pasb the General Hospital, re-
    cory gg meee, thin as ported oe tea _ re
    ig ce im the Was walking along Bay Street a
    soohaas a Sau aie. in the about 10.30 p.m. on mae eraey
    _“You now admitted to practise, on bes WM aeieined aaah
    if you so desire, in the Courts Of and articles to the value of $53.90.
    Mr. Hosein replying thanked Po Te Patestion
    the Chief Judge for having ad- ~ nat 4 ak Wereekete) Hos-
    i him, and the Acting At- WS treated at Mie Sens S
    mitted yi pital for injuries and discharged.



    accident on Paynes Bay Road at
    about 9.30 a.m. on Friday,

    A bicycle owned by Lionel Dash
    of Shop Hill, St Thomas, and rid-
    den by Livingston Forde of the
    same address, was also involved.

    ne eo for having in- G6 was involved in an accident
    et wish ‘to assure Your Hon- With motor car M 2680, owned by THIRD PEDESTRIAN,

    Harold Sisnett of Whitepark Road
    and driven by John Sisnett of the
    seme address, along Spry Street
    at about 10.15 a.m. sia es:
    ' ti NOTHER PEDESTRIAN, Er-
    tain the high traditions of the 7 id
    Bar of Barbados, as I have tried meta Grant of Paynes Ray,
    during the course of my _ short St. James, was wounded on her
    practise in Trinidad.” mouth after being involved in an

    Yvonne Waterman of Good
    Intent, St. George, was treated at
    the General Hospital for injuries
    on Friday and discharged.

    She was involved in an accident
    along Good Intent Road with a
    bicycle owned and ridden by Cleo-
    phas Ward of Ellerton, St. George.

    our,” he said, “that if it becomes
    necessary for me to practise in
    the Courts of this island. I shall
    always do my best to try to main-



    AT SEAWELL YESTERDAY

    ’



    wt ca as le Steamy al a ~ oF



    MOST OF THE PEOPLE in this picture are would-be passengers by B.W.1L.A. who thought
    that they would be leaving Barbados yesterday But Mother Nature had other ideas A cross
    wind over the cunway made it impossible for two of B.W.LA’s services to operate at Seawell
    yesterday, and the third service which did land, did not leave owing to maintenance. Picture
    shows passengers and friends gathered oustide the Terminal Building preparing to return to

    Bridgetown.

    appreciative of their efforts in the
    interest of the Association.”

    The Association had been given
    a good sevretary in the person of
    Mr. H, H, Williams. “The work
    of the Association depends largely,
    and I might say, entirely, upon
    the zeal, enthusiasm and interest
    that Mr. Williams puts into it. 1
    do not think we can find a better
    secretary.”

    Spiritual Aspect

    He must not leave out what they
    might think, and what he regard-
    ed, as the most important of their
    activities—the spiritual aspect. He
    was saying this was the most im-
    portant because members of the
    Assnciation must try to realise
    that the Y.M.C.A. was a brother-
    hood of christian young men
    bunched together in a spirit
    fe‘iowship. It was not a social club

    The President ended: ‘“‘May I in
    conclusion say that I hope God
    will bless our work in this coming
    year." He then presented the re-
    port which had been printed and
    circulated





    Mr. M. E. Cox, M.C.P., moved
    the adoption of the report and
    pointed out that It had been

    drawn to his attention that under
    the Head Fixed Assets where ap-
    peared the item “Land and Build-
    ing ‘St. Germain’ $11,238.66" the
    figure should have read $13,238.66



    instead. It was a misprint

    } Mr. L. T. Gay, Inspector of
    ' schools seconded the motion and
    the report was adopted.

    Vote of thanks to the directors
    and officers was moved by Mr.
    E. A. Mayers and Mr. A. de L.
    Inniss replied

    Mr. F. A. Pile was re-appointed
    atiditor.

    The Chairman told the meeting.
    that he had been very pleased to

    © 99995 599555555966445











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    ORANGE MARMALADE (7 %b Tins) a
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    KKILLER DUNDEE C (Each) 2.12 §
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    P.F, MARTINI CRACKER (Per Tin) 1.64 3
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    STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO.,. LTD.

    The total membership is now 578.

    come there that afternoon and
    would like to thank them most
    heartily tor inviting him to pre-
    side over their meeting. He hoped
    they would progress very consid-
    erably during the coming year. He
    ended: “I would also like to take
    the opportunity to thank Your Ex-
    ellency most sincerely Tor coming
    nere and presenting the prizes.”

    Mr. V. C. Knight moved a vote
    of thanks to Mr. Cuke

    The prize-winners were as fol-
    lows

    Billiards “A”
    Lashley

    Billiards “B”
    Taylor

    Class—-Mr. B. D.

    Class—-Mr. W

    Snooker—-Mr. L, A. M. Watts

    Table Tennis “A” Class—Mr. C.
    Gooding.

    Table Tennis ‘“B" Class—Mr. M.
    Cave

    Draughts—Mr. W. N. Grannum



    Letters Of
    Administration
    Granted

    TWO petitions for Letters of
    Administration were granted, and
    ihe wills of four people were ad-
    mitted to Probate, by His Honour
    the Chief Judge, Sir Allan Col-
    lymore, yesterday. First petition
    was that of Hilda Clarke of St.
    Michael, the constituted attorney
    of Hugh Clarke, the heir-at-law,
    for Letters of Administration to
    the estate of her father, Cecil
    Hilary Clarke, late of St. Michael

    Petitioner was represented
    Mr, C. H. Clarke, K.C.,
    by Messrs. Carrington & Sealy.

    Second petition was that filed
    by Evelyn Adora Alleyne of
    Welchman Hall, St. Thomas, for
    Letters of Administration to the
    estate of her late husband, James
    Gilbert Alleyne.

    by
    instructed

    The wills admitted were those of
    the following: James Adolphus
    Cox, late of St. Thomas; Keziah
    Austrum, late of Christ Church;
    Clarence Bayley, late of St.
    Michael; Edith Dorethea Walker,
    late of St. Joseph.

    130 Cross
    Atlantie

    @ From page 1

    Manuel Vargas is owner-skip-
    per of the boat but he told the
    “Advocate” that they had all con-
    tributed towards its purchase and
    also to the cost of the food,

    Manuel Reina, a mechanical
    engineer is the only one on board
    who speaks English. He has tra-
    velled extensively and learnt Eng-
    lish in London. He also visited
    Cuba and the U.S.A.

    They left the Canary Islands on
    July 28 and they hope to reach
    Venezuela sometime next week.

    Since Thursday afternoon they
    were in sight of Barbados on the
    southern coast but they did not
    know where they could find the
    harbour. '

    Yesterday afternoon while Jose
    Vargas, the captain’s brother was
    working on the engine some were
    singing “Isas Canarias’ the na-
    tive song of the Canaries.

    They will leave in a day or two
    as soon as they can get in more
    supplies and effect the necessary
    repairs to the engine.

    ‘

    6606°

    io

    building of the
    the building of a new warehouse
    and that has already been com-








    PAGE FIVE



    Reeonstruction
    Of Castries

    Progressing

    WORK on the reconsiruction
    ot Castries is progressing satis-

    tactorily Hon'ble Allen M. Lewis,
    Chairman
    Board and a deleyate at the Oils
    and Fats Conference

    of the Castries Town

    told the
    “Advocate” yesterday.

    He said that work is also pro-

    gressing on the laying out of the
    new streets, Some of the houses
    are completed and it is
    that they will be tenanted by the
    end of this month.

    hoped

    Work is going ahead on the

    laying down of a sewage system
    but it is mot possible to say when
    it will be finished. There is also
    work on the water supply scheme
    — anew one approved
    years ago — and this was due
    to begin yesterday.

    some

    He said that part of the
    town

    re-
    included

    pleted,
    The reconstruction employs
    about 1,500 people and has led

    to an inerease in wage rates for
    both skilled and unskilled labour.
    £800,000 Reconstruction

    It was found that the cost of
    reconstruction was going to be
    ri her more than the original es-
    timates of £800,000, hence a de-
    legate was sent to London in July
    this year and they have obtained
    ® substantial increase in the
    amount of the Imperial grant in
    erder to assist reconstruction, At
    the same time, they have obtain-
    cd a grant of $720,000 to be used
    development of a road
    programme which is being inte-

    ated with an agricultural devel-
    ovment programme in order te
    raprove the economic position of
    the colony.

    Mr, Lewis said that the Vieux
    Fort Interim Development Scheme
    so far, has been doing well, It is
    d.vided into two parts, a central
    farm and peasants holdings and
    the Agricultural Department has
    succeeded in putting about 600
    families on to the latter.

    For the firs’ two years, the de-
    partment’s efforts were directed
    .principally to the cultivation of
    cotton on the central farm, but
    that has not proved very success-
    ful. This year they are concentra-
    ting on the grow!ng of rice, a
    crop to which the peasants have
    token more quickly than the cotton
    crop,

    Rice Cultivation

    He said that if the weather re-
    rains favourable, it is expected
    that the area now in rice culti-
    vation, will produce a sufficiently
    lerge crop to satisfy the colony's
    needs.

    The scheme is due to end in
    July and efforts are being made
    to continue it, at least for a fur-
    ther year, as nothing final has
    heen decided about the re-estab- |
    Vshment of the sugar factory.

    He said that there is a large
    rumher of Barbadians in the
    Vieux Fort area and they orcupy
    a number of the peasants holdings }

    |
    !





    What’s on Today

    Rifle Shooting, Government
    Range at 1,30 p.m.

    First and Second Divisions
    Cricket, 1.30 p.m.

    Police Band at Opening of
    New Plaza Theatre, 8.15
    p.m

    DIAL 3113
    The Advocate pays for News |
    { Night and Day. |

    APPEALED :
    FINED 10]-

    HUGH CLARKE of Mt. Stead-~-
    fast, St. James was yesterday
    fined 10/- by Judge J. W. B, Chen- |
    ery and Judge H. A. Vaughan of
    the Assistant Court of Appeal,
    Their Honours upheld the decision
    of Mr. S. H. Nurse, Police Magis-
    irate, Who had found Clarke guil-
    ty of having assaulted and beaten
    James Alleyne on April 23.
    Clarke was also ordered.
    vay 7s, 8d. appeal costs,

    to




    C. F. HARRISON |
    & Cia. LTD.

    fi

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    a

    ANUNCIA QUE PARA

    ACOMODAR A_ LOS
    TURISTAS VENEZO-

    LANOS, TIENEN UNA

    SENORITA QUE

    HABLA _ ESPANOL-

    /

    ‘STA A SUS



    ELLA
    ORDENES.

    _



    Sizes 32 to 48 ins.

    CELANESE SILK ATHLETIC VESTS
    Sizes : Small $1.22, Medium $1.30, Large $1.55
    CELANESE SILK ELASTIC WAIST TRUNKS

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    ENGLISH INDIA GAUGE VESTS

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    PAGE SIX





    Doctors

    IINGTON, Sept. 1
    mercan Joint Senate
    an iy use of Representatives’
    Cou © agreed to-day to a Bill
    to ¢ p. .or 21 months, male
    dectois and dentists up to 50

    years old who are nov in armed
    Forces reserves.

    The Bill would apply also to
    pharmacists, veterinary surgeons
    and opticians.

    The Committee was appointed
    to compromise differences be-
    tween separate Bills passed by
    the Senate and House.

    The Bill was later passed by the
    House of Representatives; it now
    goes to the Senate

    —Reuter



    Exports To Russia
    Will Be Restricted

    LONDON, Sept. 1.
    Continuous exchanges between
    British and American officials
    are taking place in Washington
    to ensure that strategic materials
    are not exported to Russia a Brit—
    ish Foreign Office Spokesman

    said today
    : —Reuter.



    Seer BR

    To Be

    Conseripted



    1947.




    IMPERIALIST. FASCIST
    WARMONGER !"







    He said that exchanges have
    been taking place for some time
    Lut no representation had been
    nade on Government level by the
    United States on the control of
    exports.

    It is understood by observers
    here, that the exchanges are de-
    signed to ensure continuous con -
    trols over exports from the West-
    ern world to Russia.

    —Reuter.



    Piugging Trade
    “Loopholes”

    Against Russia

    WASHINGTON, Sept. 1

    Diplomatic officials said to-day
    they expected United States
    Secretary of State Dean Acheson
    s0on to discuss with Britain and |
    France, means of plugging trade
    “loopholes” by which war material
    might reach the Soviet sphere.

    The United States would prob-
    ably bring up the question anew
    at a meeting of the “Big Three”
    Foreign Ministers this month, |
    officials said.

    President Truthan said yester-
    Gay that efforts were already
    being made to get other countries
    to tighten up.



    —Reuter.



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    PIOPLES



    News Fro

    oe oe

    “WHOSE /OEA |



    UKE ME!



    aS

    m

    Britain

    By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

    LONDON.

    Down at Bickleigh, in Devon-
    shire, is the training camp where
    the Royal Marine Commandos,
    who will soon be in action in
    Korea, are chafing at the bit, They
    will go to war in a new style—
    wearing civilian clothes while they
    fly half across the world,

    This is a young and confident
    foree — one of the most highly
    trained in the world. Their camp
    in Bickleigh was chosen for
    natural features nearby that give
    the Marines a chance to prepare
    for tough conditions. For instance,
    they g> over nearby cliffs sliding
    down a rope — “the death slide” it
    is called—as part of training re-
    ferred to as the “Tarzan course.”

    Reporters recently jotted down
    some of the views of these
    men on Korea, One point that
    comes clear is that those Com-
    mandos are more interested in
    their job than in the details of pro-
    cedure at Lake Success that will
    send them to Korea. ‘We are be-
    ing sent out to do a job.” said a
    sergeant, “we shall do it to the
    best of our ability.” And a younger
    und typically eager, Marine said:
    “IT don’t know much about Com-
    munism, but we'll soon polish them
    off.”

    They are commanded by a vet-
    eran of war in Burma. When they
    get to Korea, (time and route of
    flight are security secrets) they
    will go straight into action, From
    the reports coming from the front
    this week, troops with the toughest
    experience of hill-climbing seem
    most called-for,

    Meanwhile the British contin-
    gent drawn from Hong-Kong is on
    its way, And if some stories are
    true, they, too are tough fighting
    men—not “Occupation Forces.”
    idling in the towns,

    Fouotball In August

    In spite of the fiasco the England
    (eam suffered in the “World Cup”
    competition earlier in the Summer,
    tootball is still the most amazing
    Saturday “draw” Even in August,
    with the sun shining and the coun-
    tryside still calling, 1,200,000
    people watched football last Sat-
    urday -—- the highest “gate” ever
    recorded, Each year the season is
    arranged to start earlier, And it
    makes no difference to the crowds
    that cricket is not over before foot-
    ball begins. The great promoters
    —mainly of Liverpool—now run
    their “Pools” on matches for 39
    weeks out of 52 in the year. Per-
    haps that is why the football sea-
    son grows longer and the “Sum-
    mer” shorter.

    Channel Swimming

    For all that the “Daily Mail”
    tried to make the best of it by or-
    ganising the year’s Channel swim-
    mers into a race, this twenty mile
    swimming Marathon seems a dull
    sport. It is too long. It has been
    proved that men and women can
    swim the Channel, The tenacity
    of the swimmers; the change of
    currents; and good fortune, carry
    some swimmers over and defeat
    others, But the Egyptian, Hussun
    Abd el Rahim, seemed a happy
    character who deserved to wit the
    race, the prize and the records, H*
    did what has never been recorded:
    before—managed to speed up eo
    he approached the cliffs of Dover
    When all was done I thought of
    the “others”—the also rans, who
    managed to swim the distance but
    arrived sixth or eighth, unherald-
    ed unsung, and missing the golden
    hour of publicity that an individ-
    ual swimmer sets out for

    *
    The Law is an Ass

    Did you know that the children
    acting in recent English films—
    such as Bobby Henrey in “The
    Fallen Idol”, have been perform-
    ing illegally? Until this week I
    had not given more than a passing
    thought to what happens to child
    actors who travet the country in

    troupes. But the report, just pub-
    lished, concerning the law on
    Child Performances, reveals that
    the position is different for stage
    and screen For stage perform-
    ances, most things were permissi-
    ble —under antiquated legislation
    that did little to protect the edu-
    cation of the children, But Cine-
    ma studios are factories as far as

    the law is concernéd, subject to
    the normal rules forbidding chil-

    dren to be employed. The sugges-
    tions of the Commission are sensi-
    ble. They suggest the law should
    be altered rather than have it
    winked at for the sake of another
    “Oliver Twist.” At the same time
    they proposed to put up the age
    at which girls could go on the

    Stage—to form part of the juvenile
    chorusé@s of music hall shows. We
    can probably do without those

    choruses—if sensible exceptions,
    the same for stage and flim -set,
    are made for a tew chi'd actors to
    perform, under careful safeguards,

    King farouk’s Bad rr. is

    What is it that excites a kind of
    cnvious and malicious glee in the
    British Préss at the flamboyance
    ef the Idle Rich? King Farouk’s
    jaunt to Deauville has i:ritated tht
    British public—so an American
    reporter says. Certainly his every-
    day doings have been reported in
    such a way as to make him look
    as foolish as possible. If the news
    papers are to be trusted, Farouk
    seems an unhappy, lonely man,
    surrounded only by bodyguard
    and stooges, Certainly nis ap-
    proach to Deauville was as osten-
    tatious as a “Satrap proroguing a
    Sanhodrin”, and it appeared too
    Eastern and Royal for these days
    But why do his dull antics attract
    much attention? People play for
    higher stakes at Deauville every
    season. And none of the reporters
    has succeeded in unearthing a
    scandal from the hotel rooms of

    the French Watering Place, Is it
    merely that wealth has, in itself,
    unnatural newsvalue in a socialist
    state? The American reporter
    who noticed the anti-Farouk tone
    of our British press, connected it
    with anti-Egyptian sentiment. 1
    doubt it! He quoted Egypt’s bill
    to Britain for saving her from
    Rommel, But I doubt whether this
    colours British feelings. I would
    like to know, though, whether
    King Farouk likes getting such a
    bad press,
    The Festival

    “Are you going to the Festival
    this year?” There is no need
    to put “Edinburgh” into the sen-
    tence, The organisers of the
    International Festival of Music
    and Drama have sold their wares
    well, But what is the purpose of
    the Festival. Of course, it shows
    off the fine streets of the most
    beautiful capital city of Northern
    Europe. In music, the Festival
    organisers are indeed being inter-
    national. They have brought the
    world’s finest Opera
    from Milan—London will be
    graced with La Scala after Edin-
    burgh, But in drama the temp-



    company’

    ' re -. :
    Canada’s

    Position

    sided and unstable, it is



    SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1950

    RELIEF FOR
    RTHRITIC PAINS

    But new treatment does more than

    Economic

    " a
    ‘Its Dependence on the Sterling Area ease these terrible agonies.
    Acknowledgsme: . EMPIRE PRODUCER, Jjuly—Ausust) LCL has been created which not only gives
    —y T economic "relations between nations are one- Se ED ts »! due to the symptoms ot spe and
    impossible for them long to] rheumatism, but also affects the metabolic processes which constitu
    maintain mutual confidence and co-operation in other ie thoroughly tested in medical institutions.

    phases of their international relationship, no matter how
    great or important they ray be.

    ~~ ~ present economic crisia
    oft the free nations, any attempts
    |to justify a given form of settle-
    ‘ment the grounds of over-
    ,"iding political and military ex-
    ,pedieney are, therefore, ‘based
    {upon a fallacy, Unless the eco-
    | “ornic settlement be both equitable
    jand workable, all political and
    | mili efforts will be rendered
    not only impotent in themselves,
    but provocative of friction. Un-
    less economic policies are formu-
    lated in the light of fundamental
    economic facts, the diplomatic
    and strategic potential of the
    | whole free world will be seriously
    reduced, and it may prove impos-
    sible to maintain the unity of the
    | free nations, even under the men-
    jace of Communist aggression. The
    basic economic necessity of every
    nation is the maintenance of in-
    “cme and employment. This is so
    |'n any modern, highly déveloped
    nation because the consequences
    ;of a failure to do so involve not
    rnly the economic impoverish-
    nent of all Classes in the nation,

    it social and political upheaval
    ag well.

    Necessity of Export Markets

    That the maintendhce of income
    ~nd employment in Canada is de-
    fendent upon the maintenance of
    xport markets is established by
    ue following facts:

    (a) Out of every three Cana-
    cuans who are gainfully employed
    one is directly employed in pro-
    duction for export;

    (b) The employment and in-
    come of the remaining two of
    these three, are dependent upon
    the maintenance of the purchas-
    ing power of the first man through
    the sale of his product in export
    markets;

    (c) This condition has hela con-
    sistently throughout Canadian
    economic history.

    The part played by each of
    Canada’s export markets in main-
    taining employment and income,
    however, is by no means propor-
    tionate to its monetary value:

    (a) Over the past eighty years,
    goods having a high labour-con-
    tent have predominated in Cana-
    dian exports to the other British
    countries; eg., in 1946, 85 per
    cent, of exports to the sterling
    area were in this category.

    (b) Over the same périod,
    Canada’s exports to the United
    States—Canada’s other principal
    customer—uniformly have been of
    a low labour-content class. In



    1946, 77 per cent. of Canadian =

    exports to the U.S.A. had a low
    job-value.

    (c) Ip this way, the ster
    area provides direct employment
    for approximately 1,250,000 Cana-
    dians; whilst the U.S.A. provides
    employment for a maximum of
    - 250,000, or one-fifth the num-
    er,

    The sterling area, therefore, is
    the market upon which the main-
    tenance of employment and _ in-
    come in Canada depénds, That
    Canada is rapidly losing this yital
    market is a fact easily demon-
    strated by a comparison of re-
    cent statistics with any earlier
    period—post-war or pre—war,
    This loss has been attributed to
    4 dollar shortage in the sterling
    area, The term dollar shortage
    may well describe the symptom,
    Lut not the malady; the financial
    aspect of the present crisis is but
    a golden mirror reflecting the
    ‘ark image of the fundamental
    cause: a world-wide break-down
    in the exchange of goods and
    services. This world-wide break-
    down involves changes in both
    the relative and the absolute
    productive and consumptive ca-
    pacities of many nations. These
    changes are permanent in that the
    old, pre-war economic balance
    never again will exist on the
    vame basis;
    | (a) The accumulated resources
    }of an entire century’s productive
    \effort in Great Britain and Western
    |Europe have been expended in
    two world wars;

    (b) A substantial part of that
    ;expenditure has ‘gone to build up
    productive capacity in the
    United States and in Canada, but
    without the normal corresponding
    increase in the consumptive ca-
    pacity of the nations so expending
    their aovumulated resources;

    (c) The eccnomically dominant
    nation no longer is Grea! Britain
    whose economy was based upon a
    «vee exchange of goods and servic-
    es and the permanent existence of





    tation to be Scottish has provedja so-called “adverse” balance of
    too much. Four plays made up}trade;

    the Festival, and three are by
    Scots dramatists. The fourth
    would never be played again if it
    had not been written by
    Jonson, He was probably in fin-
    ancial distress and the payment
    went by the line—so he made it
    long and repeated himself as often
    ws he dared.
    Fare” has not been rroduced for
    100 vears. Why now? f
    But Edinburgh's festival \s a
    function in the calender, Fy,r all
    its aristocracy, for all the gray
    hairs of the organisers, for all its
    cull choice of excellnt music
    wonderfully played by the best
    performers, it is a tough crack at
    Venice and Florence. Apart from
    that, it is always good propaganda

    for Scottish Nationalists—aq cause
    I have dear at heart since I left

    Scotland.

    Cattle Hides Need
    S. Licenses

    WASHINGTON, Sept. 1.
    U.S. Commerce



    The

    some electrical

    Ben,

    Deyart-
    ment has added cattle hider, and
    insulating mate-
    rial to its growing list of goods

    j (d)The economically dominant
    ina tou, America, has an economic
    system built upon restraint of
    trode, and upon the permanent
    existence of surplus of exports
    over imports;

    {| (e) The widespread develop-
    ‘ment of synthetic products to

    “Bartholomew j‘meet the needs of war, has des-

    jtroyed many of the markets for
    the natural products of other
    ) countries;

    ' (f) Inspired by the le of
    America, or in order to achieve
    military self-sufficiency, many
    countties—for example, in South
    |America and behind the “Iror
    ;Curtain’’—are striving to achieve
    Fos fact that the process is wholly
    uneconomic and eventualty will
    depress the living standards of
    their people yet further,

    The General Agreements on
    Tariffs and Trade and the Havana
    Charter of the ITO represent an
    attempt—perhaps the last attempt
    —to turn back the clock:, They
    are unworkable because they
    presuppose that the funclamental
    changes outlined above ‘nave not
    taken place; these

    ling the fact that blind non-discrimin-

    industrial self-sufficiency despite |,

    arpreements




    now with unprecedented success. DOLCIN

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    fm Sale at ROOKER’s

    in American habits and






    STORER (Biden) _



    um



    the 1913 level, Yet in 1913, Cana-
    ga’s unfavourable balance. with
    the U.S.A.

    the effective




    latéd to 7

    id to 71 cent, of imports

    from heU.B A in the same year,
    Had the tariff provisions of the

    Geneva Trade Agreement been al-

    lowed to come into force in 1947,

    Vs a
    ai\_(G

    can give in any trade agreement is

    such a fine balance of advantage

    that no fundamental remedy for

    the dollar shortage can in any way

    result.

    The non-discrimination clauses
    of the Geneva ent, how-
    ever, did become operative, with
    the following effect: Canada’s
    dollar shortage necessitated ces-
    sation of purchases of American
    vegetables; non-discrimination
    made mand
    vegetables of all other countries
    as well. One result was that to-
    matoes soared to six times their
    normal price in Canadian mar-
    kets, whilst tomatoes which might
    have been bought with sterling
    rotted in the West Indies. A

    case of chocolate which Canadi-
    ans did without whilst United
    Kingdom manufacturers sought a
    market,

    So also with Canadian exports:
    Canada was required to give up
    her preference on apples in the
    United Kingdom market, and the
    resultant loss brought about the
    up-rooting of 240,000 apple—trees
    Nova Scotia, whilst Fnglish
    people went without the fruit.
    These and many other examples
    which might be cited, illustrate









    EIGHT FRAGRANCES THAT
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    & 24 FLOWERS EAU DE COLOGNE

    atior in trade, in the present cir- ‘BALLET RUSSE EAU DE COLOGNS

    cumstances, can result in a
    diminution of world trade and yet

    more frantic attempts to achieve
    self- lency.

    Neither is there any évidence
    that any permanent solution is to
    be found through efforts to bring
    down the cost of sterling area and
    Canadian products in the Ameri-
    can market through currericy
    devaluation, lower taxation, or
    even greater industrial efficiency:
    the American economy simply
    can not absorb the volume of
    goo American indus-
    trial productive capacity has in-
    creased not = than ae 4
    —some say per ie
    last ten years. The American
    labour-force has increased 45 per
    cent but the population has risen
    by only 12 cenit. in the same
    period. The problém thus posed
    is this: if a-slightly smaller popu-
    lation could not maintain _—_

    trial plant in the 1930’s when
    oreign goods were ex-
    cluded, how could a
    larger population maintain, at full
    empleyment, a much larger la-
    bour-force and industrial plant in
    the 1950’s, and also absorb vast
    quantities of cheap foreign goods?
    Similarly with American agri-
    culture. The size and extent of
    the American surpluses which
    have appeared already are well
    known and some of the cycles
    have not yet reached their x
    Nor is ogee recourse to ?
    and credits any more satisfac-
    tory; they merely postpone the
    day of reckoning which would
    ble: ee x more dete
    roblem, an e in a
    Yom the question of unrequited
    exports.
    A Fatile Pursuit
    All available evidence, there-
    fote, indicates that the dollar
    will continue throughout
    the foresteable future. This is so,
    not because of the stupidity or
    greed of any power or powers,
    but because the cure would be
    more difficult and painful than
    the malady, No amount of finan-
    cial juggling or monetary tink-
    = will
    ie

    BY APPOINTMENT
    PRRPUMERS TO H.M. KING GRORGE VI
    J. & RB. ATEINSON LID,

    ATKINSONS, 24 OLD BOND STREET, LONDON, ENGLAND

    t ca would entail the
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    ties,

    In Such, circumstances,

    Now's thetime forthis young

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    a delightfully refreshing drink.
    More important still, however,

    diversified a trading area as is it ensures everyday good health

    ° to them. The development
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    arate economic spheres by cleaning the mouth, settling
    ui aay coapiealn Sues the stomach and toning up the
    the free nations. Such co-opera- liver. Finally, Andrews pantly

    tion is essential in the face of Rus-|
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    will the

    clears the bowels.

    Just a teaspoonful in a glass of
    cold water and here’s an excit-
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    assume conditions whic - st eces nner Cleanline:
    requiring licences before export/er exist. They cuenta nae to. Southend ceases “amongst the way to fi -
    to any country except Canada, efficacious only if the United potential aggressors.

    Export controls the Depart-|States wera to adopt in their en- ch grouping would in no way AT ¥
    ment announced would he used '|tirety the trade and fiscal policies imply tio a trade-war with the Yu ’ % ‘i
    to prevent the res’hipment of|of Great Britain in the 19th cen- United ‘States nor involve discri- ; : a A
    Strategic goods to Communist|tury, The Marshall Plan itself is mination against her exports up 3 z ¥
    ernnietes and to protect we a tact admission by the most to,the value of the imports which aeeeeedPathn s,apyâ„¢, ga ot
    can economy aga’ nst possible | enlightened Americans that sh ud accept f AL Pas
    shortages, officials said. £20,000 m. cash @xpenditiire is a erste, The eee ae [= se [ORM OFSLAXATIVE
    --Reuter.| lesser burden tham such a drastic On Page 9



























    SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1950 BARBADOS, ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN

    ValentineBowls Well {: et ee ee ep ee Footballers Cannot Play









    Bogota was a contravention of the








    oe LONDON, Sept. 1
    ® * “ Two footballers Neil Franklin | Football Association and Football e
    Oo In er ent , : ‘ oe ‘ and George Mountford of Stoke |League Club rules and regula- €
    V zm h ; i City have been suspended y| | tions. —Reuter. e
    a. il , ; : the Football Association for leav. ;
    : s i ing their clubs while under con- : i
    He And G. d dar d Dis iss tract. Www .
    nm Both had played in Bogota, 3 ).
    Colombia. = -
    County Bats en For 67 They are suspended until such = s t
    m7 ; time as they approach the Asso- 2

    i ciation for reinstatement S ‘
    cL s Charlie Mitten of Manchester * er
    - 265 and (for 6 dec.) 170 | 4 ee and Billy Higgins of t

    4 wr a Le verton who are still in Bogota,

    KE T 146 and 67 et been similarly suspended.

    Matt Busby, Manchester United

    CANTERBURY, Sept. 1. j Manager recéived a letter from
    | ALFRED VALENTINE and John Goddard, virtually See ee i
    unplayable on a pitch which was taking spin, tumbled : Seta hak teactan att cal en | ta F
    Kent out for 67 in their second innings to-day to enable ie ‘maaan ea cee .

    under contract and playing in | Waa setlt- SECONDS

    the West Indies to win their last county matqh of the tour unaffiliated football clubs __ in

    by 222 runs.



    \
    {
    aot
    +
    ae

    Earlier the West Indies had
    ceclared their second innings
    closed at 170 for 6, Valentine who
    took five wickets for 6 runs today,
    took nine for 63 in the match, and
    brought his total for the tour to
    114, more than any other West
    Indies bowler has ever taken in
    England.

    He and Goddard frequently
    beat both batsman and wicket-
    keeper. Coddard claimed four
    wickets for 13 runs. °

    Ames reached double figures in
    the Kent innings, the next best
    scorer, being ‘“‘extras” with 14. " ! act

    Half the side fell for 51 and the Anybody: 5
    remainder went down in 25 min- : \
    utes for the addition of 12 runs.

    ha h > God- 1 , .
    ae ple cto a tne [. uis B A strali: W t I li Australians to return the compli-

    ity to complete his 1,000 runs ry £ u : a Vv. Les n TES rm

    for the tour, but,he failed by five ‘ . Chiaki yikes SUT

    runs wo reac the tareet. Gomer Al K ockout A Cricket “Conqueror” kt a hee oe eee tes

    = Gott er Seat ‘ wo countries to be a matter of .
    , : (By RAY GRODY . sua importance, then I am cer- neuen
    a good catch at sily midon, God- Hy Peter Ditton Sheet Wa Rats Woew oleae
    A. VALENTINE dard declared, leaving Kent three (Sports Editor, Milwaukee tan they can see their way clear

    Sebtite

    Sarre Te eas yen



    amy 1Geas i ‘ » © Rio half-way through ti.> season?”

    ton Express Service













    oe ee

    now heads list of W.I. bowlers who Fours, 50 minutes to get 290 runs Sentinel) LONDON. Lo AeA oe SD to Whe Caste Good food tastes all '

    be in,

    pave peyed in England with his te win. : MILWAUKEE. ON SEPTEMBER 16TH the Australian Cricket Board
    si The Start There’s no questioning Joe are to discuss whether an invitation should be extended

    sansa. : Louis’ confidence in his comeback Pa a e < $ac aber St
    : ‘The West Indies needed runs “yainst Ezzard’ Charles set for to the West Indies to send a team to Australia, probably

    General Vidme auickly in order to make an early New York’s Yankee Stadium the 1% 1951-52. But even if the decision is favourable, 1 do not

    the better with i
    DANCING



























    ; \ 9 4
    ie te ang Goddard found the Might of Sept. 27. think such a tour would come off. | TO-NIGHT )
    Lectures To bowling of Tn and eee wuagh dle — heavy- ‘ The West Indies naturally AT
    ‘ too accurate for free scoring, bu a * v E: B. enough are “cock-a-—t ” afte
    aie oP : I expect to knock out Charles. gh are ‘cock-a-hoop” |. aiver Wt | ‘
    Polo Playerg —_ 30s, came ata steady one & Wien can't say now. Tl know N-DOXEH __ veir victory over England in this}#) (CASUARINA CLUB i
    General Vid The ‘light was bad and rain better when we get to Pompton ; ; pac Pe an cer eee
    era idmer gave a most wera Lakes, NJ., where I start neavy re h ‘See, cus 5 ¢ Bertie Hayward’s Orchestra
    interesting address to members ot boceree Oe tea ee ganda drills, later this month, ac es CaS | WONk Aree Sree A Los Turistas Venezolanos Se cna maaeiasniiaeea
    the Barbados Polo Club at the yeached three figures in an hougy “Then I’ll map out a plan otf : be played as soon as possible to Bien wi@o Al e one — -
    Drill Hall on Wednesday after- and a half. battle with Mannie Seamon, my LOS ANGELES ‘ecide which country holds | §) oa ee
    pocn. The General has played big With the score at 170, Martin trainer. But I'm sure I can and pate eetrong, ane time Guceet supremacy. CLUB CASUARINA
    ‘olo in the US.A. for eighteen jnduced Gomez to play too soon, will stop Charles, probably in the abies champion fighter and ve- 4° series of five Tests between 2.9.50.—1n,
    years, and there is nothing about and give a eatch at silly mid-on. early rounds.” teran of 200 ring battles, aN- the Caribbean c tri ad A . setae
    the game that is not very familiar The sixth wicket stand had added : nounced today that he will devote tii), would amdoubtedly bea
    to this great old soldier and sports- 119, Goddard then declared. Is Louis taking Charles lightly? the rest of his life to preaching *")\ Wou pa St ae ae

    Tee ot ete ee, ae Kent Batting Answer Joe: the gospel, great money-spinner and, in | #- — “|

    coloured chalks he illustrated the yi, Ment Battne oo yg “Not at all. He's a good fighter, | The noted boxer who made a {ery Should Provide some of

    many important points to be re- b ~e fortune in his 17 years i the brightest cricket seen in
    membered for the safety of horse played a hesitant forward stroke the best around today. And he's s 17 years in the

    7 E 1p
    ‘aoe §5PRINTS
    ‘ > ar t ) ictes rhe ae oe will be given by
    vious that he was concerned over wicket. ple. But he doesn’t punch hard had predicted when he was a Yet MR. IVAN FORDE

    and rider, and it was quite ob- 274 gave an easy catch at the badly underrated by a lot of peo- "ing explained that. his mother oe’ Ieee
    , d 2 Oe
    despite their eagerness to

































    é G a oe < » g ‘hild in Mississippi that some day P
    th z ated Ames hooked three long hops and I don’t have to worry too ¢ DE some day « Y cha fi as E “ better known as (Peter)
    the nang Fiske and breaking of, Ae teks To ee era! lout geting te és he would tum to. the ‘minaty. somite auch, a tare, the West Hl Yoni, wiot WE HAVE
    , le ; n hut Valentine, coming on at 34, good boxer; so was Jersey Joe He said that he finally heeded . Yee rai 14th os September ,1090 . -
    unknowingly committed in the y “thi pet should go to Australia, This at- B's
    local games “Leaning forward ge 7 4 ie ise eee cau Walcott. But they all make mis~- Can pa ct icy Sug er titude is not as: unreasonable’ as octal OLUE TALL. St. Philip SOME NICE
    iia : * turn it to leg but the spin was takes. “It was no sudden decision,” 5 onde ro ee aes Re seems re kag S i SE wee
    oe nee aaa aetna much and the ball bounced gently “One mistake is all I need. Armstrong said, “My mother was was eS a eee tor pe oe ore pene me F
    one of the most dangerous things Oe tort ee *. bites re I got Billy Conn and peng pe aia mystic and raised Paar” ‘aanine cea pte and Music Supplied by Mx. Percy
    to do. One of my best friends rd ce s then cott in the second fight.” all of us (children) in the way of ie c hui Green and his Rythum Kings. | 4
    was killed that ay ” said. the end and also took a wicket first “The way Louis figures now, he God, and she predicted that some Sat 1 3 aa be ae " If you miss this blame yourstt PY,
    General. “I have seen many of ball, Woollett flashed at a ball won’t lay back the way’ he did day IT would be a preacher should tdke place in the West REFRESHMENTS ON SALE
    wen Baya ab it’ He then went outside the of sue and eceed against Waleott v “Last December I decided to 2tHes. etal Please invite your friends
    ae aes de. it to the wicket-keeper. ree ©, B * rote , 4 2
    on to deal with many of the fine wickets were down for 35 at I'm going out after Charles. devote att my time to religion. Money
    points of the game such as mark- 1} ch he says. “Make him fight—that’s When the power of God strikes
    ing positions and the individual ao Aft Lu ich my best chance.” you, sometimes it turns out Until this present tovr such a
    duties of each player. The lecture er ne Do his plans go further than the stranger than_ fiction! proposal wotfld never have been ae Biggest Event
    — an oe on btn it wes Valentine worried both Cowdray Charles fight? Armstrong has miade nearly a possible. West ; Indian cricket be fe Suitable for...
    San impopsitin Cur. eae an and Hearn with his quick spins Louis said: ps gle of appearances as guest has always been in a wee finan - BONNETT’S
    : ? ’ after lunch, Goddard also turned “Well, | can’t say for sure now. Speaker for ministers, Recently cial position. This year howeves “WATT nag 1p =
    - 2 Shp. sneruhere. cepld not - the ball a good deal, But if things go the way I expect he took part in a’ week-long they will receive a sum of money COTTON DRESS DANCE BATH SUITS
    eethent gs ae 7 2 good Ten of the first thirteen runs them to, I'd like to fight again revival meeting at nearby Mon- far in excess of that for which t
    Sere wei aig ae however, an added after the interval came from tais year. One thing's sure— Tovla. they had hoped as a result of = HOUSE COATS
    the tadies wiBo with ibe playing in extras. The ball eee so aor there'll be no more exhibitions.” In October Armstrong omb2rks their tour of this country. QUBEN’S PARK
    i Te that it frequently beat the wicket- 5 siti rith ON a gospel tour i
    te ladies” igams_ im "he near (na frequently eat the wake” | What about his portion vie nd castor Sees duteg’ whieh NO cal, figured are to, be Tomman and
    . s s full: Pied he all cnanié { releg 0 ; i :
    did not attend, it is hoped that Cowdray defended carefully for ow that he’s back to fighting? he wiil speak in churches and released unti e tour Admission 4 REGULAR SHOPPING DRESSES

    ue : : 40 minutes but -eventually lost
    aie the General will repeat his lec- , z f
    ture, as what he said can go to patience and an intended big leg

    ‘ f “I resigned from my post as Missouri, Illinois, Pennsylvania
    ‘make better players, and also —— an easy skied catch to boxing director of the I.B.C., and and New: York.

    soe the game safer for man and ‘AY the ae of that over Valen- I’m strictly a fighter. I may re-
    east.

    But I do know that while the : tale a ‘

    West Indies would have been pate teeter Fi His Ork le : :
    quite happy to have made $ ; 27.8.50—2n 36” Wide — Guaranteed Fast Colours
    profit of between £10,000 an
    ae yee Armstrong, a long time mem- £12,000 on the trip, the actual sum 86c, — 9le, — 98c. — 97c. — 99c. per Yard
    tine’s figures were 100, 8M. 2R, turn to the organization again ber of the Morning Star Baptist they will receive will be much ———

    Said Louts: auditoriums in Oklahoma, Texas,

    Sa













    ee







    when I figure I can’t fight any ¢ ; aa ee . a N |
    There will be the usual matches. 2M aaition, Clark lost his â„¢ore- : Lebanese T's dak haa |
    i h rmits. “ ; 5 inki c » BE dal he _ ‘ ;

    \eme atternson: strpatier perce middle stump when trying to But right now I’m thinking of has been receiving instruction in This, coupled with their un- A Grand Dance ‘
    drive, and five wickets were down Only one thing—winning back his chosen work. dculbted playing ability, means sponsored by AVE HEPHERD & 0 TD "
    for 55 that title, There is more than While he can now take the that for the first time the West Messrs CECIL PINHEIRO & ‘ 9 . as

    Tod . *s W I. The last five wickets crashed in one reason for my going after a road as an Evangelist, he hopes Indies are in a cemmanding posi- |§| GODFREY DOTTIN (Tal-a-vi)
    a ee 25 minutes for 12 runs. As you know, there are some back jin the near future to be ordain- tion. They can afford to finance | @) , wT 10, 11, 12, 13, Broad Street .
    e Valenti d Goddard taxes, and just as important, I eq a Baptist minister. an Australian trip to their own ] ro-NIGH d
    Fixture ei ybich oe + are, On i want to prove to the fight public Armstrong hopes to have his CCuntry and even if they don't At The . a
    , ht cele ~~ Nee breae oe that I can win that title back own church in time, He already Make as much profit as they have PRINCESS ALICE PAVILION 8 SO °LSCLOCPE ODE PSPSPPPRESSOOL SLPS PPS OPS SOSIS III 4
    tine took 5 wickets for 6 runs, and agin. rome, NAS & Name for it. It. will be vet here, they will still have GENTS et ADM 1/6 F
    Yesterday the W.1. played Goddard claimed 4 for 13 ? It’s never been done before, known as the Church of the Holy ®nough in the “kitty” to ensure Nusic by Mr. Coa Alleyne’s FOR LADIES:
    and won their last County Even allowing for the tricky but that doesn’t worry me. I'l! Trinity, inspired partially by the that the tour is a success | __ Orchestra Bat, | e
    fixture in England, and to- ditions, Kent gave a weak dis- Wi? iti" ; anality lightweight, welterweight and aii the present members of the || Finch cite Yous veonds HLS
    fans sealers, South ot PIAY. bela just feel the finality middleweight boxing titles he team, anticipate that. they would §\i =MIEXICANS: FOR EVERY DAY WEAR
    ‘ , n Louis’ p ‘ won. MT eae 7 i ‘ )
    England side at Hastings. Niet bes Scores ey a —I.N.S. Armstrong owns considerable a jpemean wee Ee Aes ss epneinmeaaen oneal: , Black $5.25; White $4.95; Brown $4.00
    . KENT—Ist Innings ...............- 146 real estate in and about Los An- 4.4 hind 1 ore : Sg
    This is the thirty-first WEST INDIES— Second Innings eee se eel : oh eed Goddard, their captain, has said |} ar. . .
    game of the tour and there Marshall c Martin b Ridgeway © >. Cowdray ¢ Williams b Valentine 5 ee ee oe Sallding that he will not make ‘any more | $ DANCE 3 > SPORTIES in Brown, Flat Heels
    are two remaining fixtures:—- Christiani © Ames b Ridgeway : Clark b Goddard .-..--. > ree ns — a — _— overseas tours. But that does not | % SiS with Leather Sole $5.30, with Crepe Sole $5.80
    . Wa Jptop alentine .... ‘ > . s ; 248 Such » > i ,
    n ‘ ‘ Trestrail b Martin ... bivesederss: 6 Dovery b Goddard ee 1 would not have to work another |'!°@? he would not be available x at g ‘
    Sept. 6—v. Minor Counties. Gomez ec Woollett 4 Martin 88 Martin b Goddard ............ 0 : ; to play against the Australians in XN % i "
    Gites Waa gave Be Mirtle bodes + day in hie tite to play aginst the Australians tm | ame Si} NEW DESIGNS IN DRESS SHOES
    Sept. 10—v. H. D. G. Lev- oa es anes it Ridgeway b Valentine ....... ‘ 0 5. 2 % 4 oaisdetten Se Re
    ; yes 3... terres ad Extras:—@ byes, 8 leg byes 14 Armstrong, now 37, prefers to % J , , = .
    erson Gower’s XI. — =i slo di el acetals RR i ry AACE ne \ % He ss , Black Suede Court; Snake Skin Platform $8.45
    TOTAL for 6 wickets (decd.) .. 170 at) beep etiece 3) at nee feet sunbed git be Some Short % (Members Only) .
    he TOT. Bick i alee strc wy s heart-shapec se »m ber: *
    me BOWLING ANALYSIS é : coo a in en ae “th Se a shaped — ° h a nat 1% White Buck Court, Platform, Back and Toeless $8.45
    ‘ l R . Oo, M. RB. W. eee Maes 5 ton 5S, 6 for 62 well suarhed bible ‘at t io Saee if tht we . Indies ie ane wae $ TO-NIGHT %
    Ridgeway Oa a ee + ye i > well- 5 > at his finger- i » West Indies were to e|X '
    Professiona eaction = Nie cata 8 7] a 1100 Cr Oe rey ANALY IS tips, testifying to the sincerity of a trip to Australia, they would |% % FOR SAFE SEA BATHING FOR CHILDREN
    LONDON. Peo Es tetsis 2 5 = > Oo. M. R. W. the former fighter, be short of several of the players | % at x RUBBER SWIMMING RINGS & WINGS @ $1.30
    Judy Canova, radio comedienne, KENT—Sé¢ond Innings eee “Some people might think that who helped beat England so atid diate %
    defined opera thus: “That’s where Fags ¢ Christiant b go “ exe Crenene: I am capitalizing on my name,” cecisively this summer, $y
    a man is stabbed in the back and Woollett fa inter “4g Goddard .. Armstrong explained, “but — I : Music by Me, SYDNEY NILES %!
    instead of bleeding, he sings.” Hearn b Valentine .....:..sceseerees 8 mean business, I am in chureh it would not be fair to send %
    ae latest Hit Parade tunes. %

    : . . Th -prizefight is y tes t Australia. Th ame

    They'll Do It Every Time Reghooned ¥. 1. Peseat Ole By Jimmy ,Hatlo mid-cway i eta, nn desigaee- argument might be turned the

    ’ = — = tional book on his religious ex- other way. Still the fact remains
    LLL IT DONT MATTER \V/ OTTO LIKES TO GIVE A

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    —_—_—_————

    CLASSIFIED ADS. |

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    IN MEMORIAM





    Tn_ loving memory of ANNER JULIA
    WORRELL who fell asleep tr: second
    46. Rest in peace, farewell to sadness
    May rest in Paradise be thine

    In Jesus’ sence there is gladness

    Light everlasting on thee shine

    W. W. Worrell ‘husbend) Relona Git-
    tens { er) Ethel Crick (sister-in-law)
    Dennis and Walter 2.9.50—1n











    In loving m¢mory of my dear Mother
    GERTRUDE RAWLINS, who fell asleep
    on Sept. 2nd 1948

    How often do we tread the path,

    That leads us to her grave

    Where lies the one we loved so well

    But whom we could not save.

    At night when all are silent

    And sleep forsakes our ey¢s

    Our thoughts are om the lonely grave

    Where our dear one lies,

    Ever to be rememberd by Rhita
    tdaughter) Allan, Evelyn, Ernest and
    Lisle, (grand children) 2.9. 50—In.



    In loving memory of our dear Husbend
    and father. JAMES MAPP. Died Sept.
    2nd - 1934
    For our loss we must not weep
    For our loved one long to keep
    From the home of rest and peece
    Where all sin and sorrow cease
    Fdith Mapp (wife) Marguerite and
    Fabian (children)
    2.9.50—I1n
    In loving memory of ovr Dear Mother
    RUTH BRATHWAITE, who past away on
    September ist, 1949
    One sad ;ent has passed away.
    When the one we loved was called to
    rest,
    Out of a world of sorrow
    Into a heaven of Rest
    God has a beautiful garden for her,
    Always choose the best,
    The flowers we place upon her grave
    Will wither and decay,
    But her memories will always linger
    In our hearts from day to day
    Fiver to be remembered by her child-
    ren Ernest, DaCosta, William (U.S.A.),
    fsons), Mrs Marrie Greenidge, Mrs
    Millicent Buliln, Miss Catherine Brath-
    waite (daughters), Viola and Cardon
    Tudor (Grand daughter and Grandson-
    in-law respectiveiy). 29.50-—4a













    FOR SALE





    AUTOMOTIVE

    CAR—New M.G
    seater, Fort Royal
    phone 4504



    1% litre Sports 2!
    Garage Itd. Tele-
    2.9.50—3n



    Perfect condition. 1°25
    Tow Mileage. Mechanically
    Garage Ltd. Te'e-

    2.9.50—8n

    10 h.p. Saloon
    Dodge Seton
    perfect. Fort Royal
    phone 4504



    BEDFORD 30 Cwts. Heavy Duty
    PICKUP—Done only approx. 2.300 miles
    and in A-1 condition. Complete with
    Spotlight and removable side & top
    rails and newly spraypainted. Courtesy
    31.8.50-3n.

    CAR—1947 Hillman Minx. 17.000 miles
    Owner leaving is!ant
    1.9.50—8n

    Gerage Dial 4610.





    Perfect condition
    Greenland, Telephone Co



    Pick-
    good tyres with spare, engine
    Crankshaft and
    Salts &

    PICK-UP—One (1) Ford 15 Cwt
    vp Mh p
    complete
    Manifolds
    Service Ltd

    except for
    Apply = Flectric

    Dial 4629
    2.9,.50--2n







    Morris 5 ton Trucks with
    suitable for field
    Fort Reval Garage

    2,9.50—3n

    TRUCKS —
    auxiliary gear box,
    and highway work
    Ltd. Telephone 4504





    VANS—Immediate delivery from stock
    Morris Cowley 10 cwt. Vans and Pick-
    ups. See these new modern vehicles
    Then decide. Fort Royal Garage Lid
    Telephone 4504 2,.9.50—3n









    VAN—10 horse power Austin Van in

    perfect working order. Anply D. V
    Scott & Co., Whitepark. Dial 3493.
    30.8,50—t.f.n.
    ELECTRICAL



    COOLERATOR .—Owen T. Allder, Roe-
    buck Street. Dial 3299. 2,9.50—1n

    CASH REGISTER—One National Cash
    Register electrical operated, as mond as
    now, a bargain at $400.00. Phone 2959,for











    a demonstration. 1.9, 50—3n
    COOL PRATOR—American manufac-
    ture. Good condition Pe ere ree
    tember 29th, Tel. 2521 Ci As Ss
    ae 1,9.50—In

    RADIOW—One (1



    f-Tuke Phillips P-4io









    Tn perfect work er Con be sein e
    Horse Hill Plantation, St. Josev!
    2.9 59—2n
    LIVESTOCK



    COW—One larve Guernsey cow to calf
    in two weeks. Second calf. Gave 28 pts.
    with first calf. Apply: F. King, Roberts
    Tenantry, opposte Neils Gap. St. Michael

    30.8.50—2r



    MECHANICAL



    MACHINE—One Treadle Singer Sew-
    ing Machine in perfect condition, Offers
    will be received. Telephone 3067

    : 31.8.50—3n



    MISCELLANEOUS



    BIG PREDUCTION SALE. Bathing
    trunks all colovrs and sizes, going at
    half price. Variety Sandal Shoppe, Broad
    Street. 2.9. 60--2n

    FISHING POAT—Ore Fishing Boat
    named “The Hopaway”. Length 19 feet
    in good condition. No reasonable offer
    refused. Avphy to Mr. Elkano Mason,
    Eeet Point, St. Philip 30.8,50—I1n.

    FIRE EXTINGUISHERS—A new ship-
    ment of NU-SWIFT just received. No
    annual refill necessary—Refill only when
    used. Protect your business or other
    valuable property by the installation of
    the world’s fastest Extinguisher, COUR-
    TESY GARAGE Dial 4391.









    31.8,.50- 3n,
    GO-CART—Child’s Go-Cart and Rock-
    ing Horse. Phone 4381 2.9.50—1n



    HARDWARE ITEMS:—Enamel-it, all
    shades, Stoves. Coffee Mills, Corn and
    Maize Mills, Small Household Scales. Flit
    Sprayers, Self Heating pee rai tan

    ly: John D. Taylor & Sons, U
    Peery 1.9, 50—2n







    PLYWCOD PARTITIONS — 64 feet by
    fi feet 6 inches, Includes ? Doors
    Excellent condition Apply Top Figor
    Reliable Pharmacy, Broad St. Tip! 4183





    2.9.50—ga
    PINKING SHEARS of the highest qual-
    ity. Only $0.69 ana $11.98. Limited

    quantity. See vour Jewellers, Y. De Lima

    ” «+, 20, Broad Street.
    wee 26.501"
    RECORD ALBUMS for 10-inch and for



    12-inch and carrying cases for a
    records, and we have the records too
    ne A. BARNES & CO.. LTD.
    10.8.50—t.f.n.





    STOVES—2 & 3 Burner, Gem, Florence
    and Perfection, Owen T. Allder, Roebuck
    St. Dial 3299. 2.9,50—I1n

    SHOES—Ladies’ and children's shoes
    Handbags, felt and straw
    ankle Socks, Plastic
    Variety

    end sandals,
    hats, Panama Hats,
    belts ete. at Reduced Prices
    Sandal Shoppe, Broad Street

    VIVI-SCRIPT—Ball-Pen refill Kit, will
    recharge any ball-point pen. 15 rofi'ls
    “Photnix™

    1.9

    for 3/6. Knights Ltd







    OBE TRUNK, Trunks, Valises
    WARDR ue
    2.9.50—In

    Qwen T. Allder, Roebuck St









    37% feet

    Good
    a bargain. Apply
    2520

    15.8.50—T.F W



    YAWL—“Frapid: approx
    long with Gray Marine engine.
    condition $3,000 —

    a. R. Edwards. Phone





    Be Wise... Advertise

    CARS—-1947 Standard 8 h.p. 4 seater
    tourer. Fxcellent condition. 1°47 Morris

    FOR RENT
    HOUSES

    ALOW



    BUNG.
    nd New

    — few steps from

    All modern conveniences.
    Brawne, Massiah Street, St,

    ge Schoo!
    Apply A. F

    1.9.50—gn



    FLAT—Unfurnished
    Street within waiking distance for Aqu
    Ue Club and City, Dial 3053.

    2.9.50—6n
    ibe ernest eerie Aliens enna sco
    DWELLING oe ms elling House

    at Small Town, . in, recently
    renovated Electric light and water
    2 — ae Lodge School.
    vailable ist September. Apply G. L
    Bethell, J. & R. Bakeries. ear
    30.8.50—3n.

    —_—

    HOUSE—"New Haven", Deacon's Road.
    Sept., 1950 at $40.00 per
    2498. 2.9.50—2n.

    Avatiable 1st

    month. Dial



    ee seeenenenensentinninnenstneneeenientnnane!
    HOUSFS and APARTMENTS on the

    sea, St. Lawrence Gap, fully furnished.
    Dial 8357.

    SPACE suitabie for
    Bonds, ete For
    apply K. R. Hunte & Co.,
    Broad Street. Dial 4611.





    making W:

    31.8.50—4n

    TANGLIN — Beachmont,
    September onwards, monthly or ot!
    wise, 3 double bedrooms with s
    Simmons bedsteads, children’s roam, «
    ing room and lounge. Refrigerator, ;
    age, servant's room Apply Howe.

    27.8.50—t fon.

    WOODYARE — Pine Hill. — Furnished
    From 15th September to mid January.
    Ring Haslett 3311 or John Bladon 4340

    1,9.50——3"

    =—
    WALLET — Red Leather Wallet o>
    Wednesday last in Bridgetown, contain
    ing photographs Private papers aad
    money along with name inset Vanessa
    Floissac Please return to owner c/o
    Mrs Clairmonte, The Garden, Worthing
    1.9.50—2n

    ee
    PUBLIC NOTICES

    SUGAR USTRY “AG
    BANK ree -

    APPLICATIONS for the post of Man-
    ager of the Sugar Industny Agricultual
    Bank, which will become vacant on Ist
    November next, will be received by the
    ae on or before 15th September,

    1 Applicants should have some know
    ledge and experience of accountancy and
    a sound general education

    2. They should state age, which must
    not exceed forty-eight years last birth-
    day, and qualifications.

    3. Submit two recent testimonials.

    4. Salary £700 per annum rising by
    two annual increments of £50 to £800
    MB. “The successful candidate to pasu

    ; e suce ul ¢: late to me
    duties on Ist November, 1980, and he
    will be required to retire at the age of

    65 years.
    A. L. BAMRY.

    aig
    Sugar Industry Agricultural mk .
    24th August, 1950.
    26.8.50—3n

    ——————
    THE SUGAR INDUSTRY AGRICUL-
    TURAL BANK ACT, 1943
    fo the Creditors holding specialty liens
    Against HOPE PLANTATION, St. James
    TAKE NOTICE that I, the Owner, of
    the above Plantation am about to obtain
    * loan of £300 under the provisions of
    he above Act against the said Plantation,
    in respect of the Agricultural year

    lo 1951

    Bathst © a,
    re
    le











    No money has been borrowed under
    the Agrimuitural Aids Act, 1905, or the
    above Act (as the case may be) in respect
    of such year.

    Dated this 2nd day of September, 1950.

    SYBIL J. ROCK,
    Owner.
    2.9,.50—3n

    LIQUOR LICENSE NOTIC=

    The application of Edna Bradshaw of
    Black Rock, St. Michael, for permission
    to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., ata
    voard and shingle shop attached to resi-
    dence at Lower Black Rock, St. Michael.

    Dated this Ist day of September, 1950.
    To E. A. McLEOD, Esq.

    Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”

    (Sed.) EDNA BRADSHAW,
    Applicant.

    N.B.—This application will be cansid-
    ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
    Police Court, District “A, on Monday,
    lith day of September, 1950, at 11

    o'clock, a.m
    E. A. MeLBOp,
    Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
    2.9.50—1n

    PUBLIC SALES
    AUCTION

    THERE will be an Auction Sale at
    Central Station on Monday next, the 4th
    at 2 o'clock, and amongst the many items
    are some fowls & Turkeys and 2 Raleigh
    Piaycles. After the sale at Central Sta-
    tion IT will sell at Holder's fthop at Con-
    stitution opposite the Park One (1) Motor
    Hearse to satisfy a debt. Terms Cash

    D'ARCY A. SC









    Auctionéer
    2.9.50—2n

    UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER

    1 HAVE BEEN instructed by Mr. Ulrick
    Goodridge to sell by Auttion on 'Thurs-
    day next, the 7th Sept., his 16 by 9
    houge with shed, on Perryman’s land at
    Greens, St. George. House is only two
    years old, Terms Cash

    D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
    Auctioneer
    2.9.50—3n

    icteric estes iveatnamrall tien pnieihi sade a a
    1 will sell by auction on Tuesday, 5th
    September et my Auction Mart, Baxters
    Road, opp. Mason Hall Street. A_ lot
    of household furniture comprised of Bed-
    1eem Suite, Double bedstead with Vono
    Spridg, Vanity table, Bureau, Extension
    Dining Table, China Cabinet, Chairs, One
    R.C.A. Radio and many other {tems.
    Sale et 1.00 p.m. Look out for the flag
    Cc. D. ISHMAEL,
    Auctioneer.
    2.9.50-—2n .

    UNDER THE SILVER
    HAMMER

    BY recommendations of Lloyds Agents
    we will sell on TUBSDAY, the 5th Sep-
    tember, at our Mart, High Street.

    2 Spring filled Mattresses, 18 Pillows
    and Cushions, 8 Felt Hats, 11 pes, Silk
    Crepe, 12 Sewing Machines, 1 W.C
    Cistern, 1 keg White Zinc, 1 keg White
    Lead, 136 drums One O One, 50 Pipes,
    4 c/s Rolled Oats, 1 c/s Corn Flakes,
    a 40 Tins Baking Powsier and other

    ems.

    Sale 12.30 o'clock. Terms Cash.
    BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.

    Auctioneers,
    2.9,50—2n

    REAL ESTATE







    LS

    LAND—One Acre Land at Rockiey
    New Road. Good Building Site. Priced
    Right. Dial 2230 between 19 A.M. ana
    Noon. 31.8.50—3n

    gpl ig eee
    “MOSSCLIFF", Black Rock, overlook-
    ing Fresh Water Bay. Standing on 2
    panto! ee hes Ideal pandas Site or
    suitable for ity. Apply to I. W
    Kirton, c/o Da Costa & Co., Ltd.
    2.9.50—2n

    Property at
    Apply C. A
    2.9.50—2n

    PROPERTY—One_ Smail
    Kensington New Road,
    Ishmael, Baxters Road.



    _ SOME people waited all théir lives try-
    ing to get all the money to buy a house
    and failed, while others made a start
    and eventually owned a house. Why
    den’t you follow the crowd that has
    made a start? You can ave the fol-
    lowing on terms

    At Chapman's street a house with 2
    bedrooms, ee & bath, etc.

    At Martindale's Road one newly recon-
    ditioned house with 2 bedrooms, water-
    toilet & bath, etc

    At the Ivy Road a small property with
    water and light, ete

    At Britton’s » Road that comfortable
    stone-wall Bungalow called Beverly. It





    has verandah, drawing & dining rooms. |

    2 bedrooms, Water-toilet & bath, ete
    At Pine Rd.,
    and many others.
    For particulars apply

    to D’Arey
    Scott, Magazine Lane

    A.



    ~~ Mod Bungalow —
    — at Mamsigh Street st



    at Ramsgate; Bay



    22.8 §0—2n

    further particulars
    Ltd., Lower



    WANTED

    HELP

    |

    rt

    ty letter and in’ person.

    L. M. B
    Meyers & Co., Ltd.

    1.9.50—t.f.n



    Preferabi;
    Position later

    James Street
    _—_—_——-——_—___—_______.

    NOTICE

    PARISH OF ST.
    AN ORGANIST for
    Chepel as from 25th September, 1950.





    JONN



    | GURL—Réliable girl for Office, capable
    of assisting in bookkeeping. Appi; in
    wriling giving (xperience and references.
    Fort Roygl Garage Ltd.. P. Q. Box

    223. Bridgetown 2.9.50—Tn
    ~ $$$. +
    HELE Good experienced general ser-
    vant, r family of two. Must have

    gvod references. Apply before 10 o'clock

    to . Scaife, La . Cave Hill,

    St. 1, 1.9.50—2n,

    ne eerveeteeianeionapssemniiionie ene
    LADY for office with some knowledge
    of St€nography and Typewriting Apply

    a ee aeaenenninymnper sien eatdivennnertimeinags
    YOUNG LADY to learn office work
    one with some knowletige of
    Shorthand and Typing in view of better
    Apply bv letter and in
    verson to J. A. MARSON & SON LTD.,
    2.9.80—2n.

    St. Moergaret’s

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE



    CANADA’S

    ECONOMIC

    POSITION

    @ From Page 6.
    and services which the U.S.A.

    can result only in further re-

    of world trade and fur-

    arias
    would sell to each group would }gher attempts at national autarchy:

    thus be determined by the Ameri-
    can themselves.

    (f) In such circumstances, those
    nations whose level of employ-

    Briefly to recapitulate: Canada {| ment-and-income is determined by
    and the other nations of the Brit-| trade must seek association with
    ish Empire and Commonwealth | those nations whose economic in-
    face certain fundamental facts|terests complement their own and,
    which are largely beyond their|conversely, must maintain diserim-
    control but which must govern jinatory barriers against non-mem-
    their economic policies for many | bers.

    years. These facts are:
    (a) The basic economic neces-
    sity of every nation is the main-

    The Only Sound Basis

    Integration of the Canadian

    tenance of employment and in-/@conomy with that of the sterling

    come: for the British nations. this] area is the or;

    means export markets;

    (b) The t

    and contract! of ex! markets

    is the result of a world-wide|which wil!
    break-down in the exchange of] business, and

    Please apply to the Rev. A. Mellor,| goods and services. The financial

    Viear.
    R. S. FRASER,
    Clerk to the Vestry
    St. John.

    MISCELLANEOUS

    Telephone 8606.

    LIQUOR. LICENSE. — One
    License. Apply to Miss Ira
    Upper Collymore Rock, St. Michael.





    STAMPS

    the B.W.I,, Curaeao and Aruba

    2.9.W—2n.

    WANTED TO RENT

    iish Lady. Near the sea, central
    tble. Apply: Box 250.

    tie Hood Presser
    Kills Men & Women

    Twice as many women as men suf-
    fer from High Blood Pressure, which
    about the time of Change of life and
    eeitrianarectmecn peng ute
    a on ytic es, Com-

    symptoma of High Blood Pres

    mon =
    sure are: Nervousness, headaches at
    top and back of head and above eyes,

    ressure in head, dizziness, short
    breath, paine im heart, palpitation,
    sleep, loss of memory and energy,



    1950 |





    another small property, |

    2.9.50—Bn |

    poor
    easily excitea, fear and worry. If you
    suitor any of these symptoms, don't
    jelay treatment a single day, because
    your life may be (n danger. Noxco
    (formerly known aa Hynox), a new
    medical discovery, reduces High Blood
    Pressure with the first dose, takes a
    heavy load off the heart, and makes
    you feel years younger in a few days.
    Get Noxco from your chemist oer
    ft Is guaranteed to make you (eel
    and strong or money back, >

    ee SS

    1.9.50—2r.
    —_—_———



    CHRYSANTHEMUM PLANTS—Contact
    ‘30.8.50—6n.



    Liquor
    Callendar,

    2.9.50—In
    MANURE—A quantity of Garden
    Manure. Contact Telephone 8600.

    30.8.50—6n .

    Used and Mint Postage
    Steenps of Barbados and other Islands of
    Best
    Prices paid at Caribbean Stamp Society,

    No. 10 Swan Street. _ 2.9.50—3n
    WANTED URGENTLY — 220 Volt
    Iron. Prodgers, Crane Villa.

    FUPNISHED HOUSE or Flat, by Eng-
    Reason-
    2.9, 50—In

    and monetary aspects of this crisis|tien whieh
    are the result, and not the cause, | essential

    of the crisis:

    (c) This break-down is the re-
    sult of fundamental changes in
    the economic

    changes which preclude a restora- | rations

    relationships, | sterling

    course through
    which Canadian employment and
    e can hope to be ry intain

    incom
    crisis} od. This integration must be basea

    upon a permanent agreement
    provide agriculture,
    industry, on beth
    the soliq founda-
    they require. The
    features of such an
    agreement ore as follows

    sides, with

    (a) That it covers the whole
    area and those other
    whose currencies are

    tion of the “status quo ante bel-| freely convertible into sterling;

    tum”;

    (d) The phenomenon known as} cept sterling
    the dollar shortage, therefore, will} sterling area purchases in

    be permanent
    foreseeable future;

    in,
    (e) While this dollar shortage op

    exists, any attempt to enforce non-
    discriminatory, multi-lateral trade

    Sr







    Beverage after a
    Hot and Tiring Dey.

    \ Brewed Specially for
    “\\ Hot Climates.

    anne



    OFFICIAL NOTICE

    BARBADOS.
    undermentioned

    The
    Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and x
    If not then sold, it will be
    Friday at the same place and during the same hours

    the date specified below.

    on application to me.

    IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY oi inns age
    property will be set up for sale at the Registration Office, | MOt the least Cenadians, but pres
    wm. for the sum and on} ent economic policies

    ac' up on each succeeding
    unt. sold. Full particulars

    HUSKISSON vs. BAEZA

    PROPERTY; ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land (formerly part of aj with the necessity of adopting
    eer parcel of land containing by estimation Five Acres or there-

    1

    abouts which was part of a larger area containing by
    Eight Acres or thereabouts originally part of the lands of
    View Plantation) situate in the parish of Christ Church a
    aforesaid containing by admeasurement Three Acres,
    thereabouts abutting and bounding on lands of the Estate o:

    ment

    or

    Eversley deceased being the remainder of the said Five Acres above

    mentioned on lands of the Rockley Golf and
    of C, E, Clarke on other lands of Dr, J. I. chi
    leceased Right of way Sixteen Feet! revolutions, not for patching

    Estate of B. ioe di

    wide at the South Easterly corner of the

    Sopntey Club on lands
    eZa on lands of the

    and on a

    said parcel of land leading

    to the Public Road or however else the same may abut and bound.

    Upset Price: £1,750, 0. 0
    Date of Sale 15th September, 1950.

    istration Office,
    RI ace 1950.

    H, WILLIAMS.
    Registrar-in-Chancery,

    30.8.50.—4n,



    SHIPPING NOTICES

    MONTREAL AUSTRALIA NEW ZEA-
    LAND LINE LIMITED
    (M.A.N.Z, LINE)

    S.S. “PORT WELLINGTON" sails
    Gladstone August 17th, Brisbane August
    23rd, Sydney August 30th, arriving at

    Bsrbados September 27th.

    S.S. “GLOUCESTER” sails Freemantle
    August 3lst, Adelaide September 11th,
    Devonport September 15th, Melbourne
    September 23rd, Sydney 30th September,
    Erisbane October 4th, arriving at Bar-
    bados November 4th. rn

    These vessels have ample space Jor
    chilled, hard frozen, and general cargo.

    Cargo aceepted on through bills of
    lading with transhipment at Trinidad
    for Barbados, British Guiana, Windward
    and Leeward Islands.

    For further particulars appiy:—

    FURNESS WITHY & CO. LTD.,
    Trinidad, B.W.1.

    and
    DA COSTA & CO. LTD.,
    Barbados, B.W.I.















    The M.V. “Daerwood" will ac-
    cept Cargo and Passengers for St.
    Inucia, S&t. Vincent. Grenada,
    Aruba, sailing Saturdsy, 2nd Sep.
    tember.

    The M,V. “T. B. RADAR” will
    accept Cargo and Passengers for
    St. Lueia, St. Vineent, Grenade
    Aruba, sailing Wednesday, 6th
    September, 195)

    B.W.1. Schooner Owners
    Association Inc.

    Consiguee: Dial: ¢047



    \ee Alcoa ipa ll

    “C. G. THULIN’
    “BYFJORD"



    NEW ORLEANS SER-ICk
    Arr.
    B'des

    NEW YORK SERVICE
    sails Arr.

    lst September 12th September
    2ist September 3rd October

    CANADIAN SERVICE

    SOUTHBOUND

    Name of Ship
    8.8. “ALCOA PILGRIM”
    8.8. ALCOA PARTNER”

    Sails
    Montreal
    A it 25th. 7
    August Sih umushat | gentomier th

    August aut

    Arrives
    ith,

    nn

    NORTHBOUND
    Arrives
    Barbados
    3.8. “ALCOA PEGASUS” Aug. 27th For St. John, NB. & &t,
    Lawrenee River Ports.

    These Vessels have limited passenger accommodation,
    —————aa

    ly: DACOSTA &
    THOM LTD.

    .. LTD.—Canadian Service.
    lew York and Gulf Service



    my HARRISON LINE

    OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

    Vessel From Leaves Due
    Barbadn:
    S.S. “MOONCREST” .. _London 3rd. Aug. 2nd Sept.
    S.S. “BROOKHURST” .. Glasgow &
    verpoo! 19th Aug. 8rd Sept.
    S.S. “JUNECREST” teoten ALA, Btn Bact.
    S.S. “TEMPLE ARCH” - London 5th Sept. 25th Sept.
    S.S. “FACTOR” Glasgow &
    verpool 6th Sept. 18th Sept.
    8.S. “PLANTER” Liverpool Sth Sept. 23rd Sept,
    HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
    Vessel For Closes in Barbados
    S.S. “MOONCRES1” London Laie September

    For further information apply to—



    (b) That Canada will freely ac-
    in payment for all
    Can-

    throwghout the]aaa, the Bank of Canada convert-

    such sterling into Canadian
    rs for the exporter;

    (c) That the sterling so ac-
    quired be liquidated by Canadian
    purchases in the sterling area, and
    not elsewhere ;

    (d) That the sterling area
    countries will, in return, remove
    all restrictions on purchases in
    Canada;

    (e) That the sterling area
    countries will remove all restric-
    tions upon Canadian purchases in
    the sterling area;

    (f) That the United Kingdom
    in particular shall undertake to
    produce for the. Canadian market
    upon a priority basis;

    (ge) at the Imperial Prefer-
    ence system be reconstituted on
    the basis of an elimination of
    tariff barriers between the Brit-
    ish countries to the greatest pos-
    sible extent;

    (h) That all of the countries
    covered by the Agreement shalt
    provige, each to the others, a sub-
    stantial degree of preference over
    all non-members—where possihte
    by a quota system;

    (i) That an Imperial fund be
    created to assist defence indus-
    tries which are adversely affec-
    ted by the general programme
    for freedom of trade within the
    sterling area;

    ) That provision should be
    made for the future acherence of
    other nations,

    It is appreciated that these pro-

    ls clearly cut across many of
    the pre-conceived ideas, habits,
    and prejudices of many people,

    ean lead
    only to disaster, for Canada, for
    all the British nations and for all
    the world at large. We are faced

    drastic economic remedies for a
    serious economic illness, an ill-
    ness which may well prove fatal.

    ¢ Nathaniel In the words of Lord Beveridge:

    “A revolutionary moment in the
    world’s history is a time for

    ”



    Russian Meat

    Refused

    BOSTON, Sept. 1.

    Boston longshoremen have again
    refused to unload a shipment of
    Russian crabmeat, the second sch
    boycott in two weeks.

    The cargo was left in the ship
    American Invecior yesterday .by
    members oi the Invernatio..al
    Longshoremen’'s Association

    Daniel Donovan, the Longshore-
    men's Association's Vice-President
    said his Union would refuse «
    unload any Russian cargo. H>
    thought that the United Ste*>
    snould establish a policy of ‘1
    trade with Russia or Soviet satel-
    lite countries”.

    “It should not be left to ()
    longshoremen to decide this qucs-
    tion” Donovan said, “bu: since )
    one in Washington will decide we
    will do it”,—Reuter





    LONDON CHAMBER OF
    COMMERCE EXAMINATION

    ENTRIES for the AUTUMN
    Examinations, 1950, of the Lon-
    dou Chamber of Commerce must
    reach the Department of Educa-
    tion, The Garrison, not later than
    12 noon on Saturday, the 9th of
    September, 1950.

    2. The Entry Fees will be as
    follows :—
    Single Subjects .. $1.92 each
    Foreign Languages 3.12 each
    Full Certificate 10.00
    2.9.50, —3n.

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    U.S. Plane
    Strafed Red

    China Airstrip

    HEADQUARTERS ADMIT

    WASHINGTON, Sep-. 1.

    Air Force Headquarters here
    ogreed to-day with the statement
    of Warren Austin, American dele-
    gece to the United Nations that
    an American fighter plane might
    have strafed a Chinese Commun-

    ist airfield in Manchuria.

    Austin said yes‘erday that one
    of the F-51 Mustangs of the 67th
    Fighter-Bomber Squadron might
    accidentally have shot up an air-

    feld five miles inside Manchuri?

    After the statemer! was made,
    from
    Tokyo and here that any Ameri-

    there were denials both
    cen pilot had strafed a Manchur
    ian field.
    ssid in a statement:

    “Austin’s
    and
    more that can be added.”

    The Director of Air Force Pub
    he Relations explained that
    report came in a personal mes
    from Lieutenan\-General



    George

    Stratemeyer, Far East Air Forces

    Commander to Air Force Chief otf
    Staff General Hoyt S. Vanden-
    berg.

    General Vandenberg passed this
    lwow ir oy S i ws

    ry Steines Pinder a t gain from China's involyment in
    reachei Austin through Defences â„¢
    Secretary Louis Johnson and Sec-

    tery Thomas Findletter, and

    retary of Svate Dean Acheson.
    Air Force headquarters said the
    confusion arose from the fact that
    the report was handled at highes}
    levels through its passage trom
    Tokyo vo Lake Success.
    Apparently it was not circulated
    among operations and briefing
    efficers either here or in Tokyo
    —Reuter

    38 American
    Officers Ask

    For Peace

    LAKE SUCCESS, Sept. 1.

    The Soviet Delegate to the U.N.
    Security Council, Jakob Malik, has
    handed over to the United Nations
    an appeal to end the Korean War
    by withdrawing American forces,
    said to be signed by 38 United
    States’ officers now in North
    Korean hands,

    The document, which Malik sai!
    had been sent to him as President

    of the Security Couicil, was made

    public at his request,

    To-day the Air Force

    stalement is complete
    factual, and ‘here is nothing

    the
    sage

    Truman Has
    hight Points

    @ From page 1.

    ‘4
    Pledged To Seek Peace
    “F rst we believe in the United
    Nations. When we ratified its ehar-
    ier, we pledged ourselves to seek
    paace and security through this
    world organisation. We kept our
    ward when we went to the sup-
    port of the United Nations in
    Korea two months ago. “We shall
    never go back on that pledge.
    “Second: We believe the Ko-
    eans have a right to be free, in-
    dependent, and united — as they
    want to be. Under the direction
    and guidance of the United Na-
    tions, we, with others, will do our
    part to help them enjoy that right.
    The United States has no other
    aim in Korea.
    “Third: We do not want the
    ‘fighting in Korea to expand into a










    eneral war. It will not spread
    Communist imperialism
    vs other armies and Govern-

    '
    nts into the fight of the aggres-
    igainst the United Nations.
    People Of China
    “Fourth: We hope in particu-
    lar that the people of China will
    not be misled or forced into fight-
    ing against the United Nations and
    against the American people, who
    have always been and _ still are
    their friends. Only the Commun-
    ist imperialism, which has already
    started to dismember China, could

    sors



    “Fifth: We do not want For-
    mosa or any part of Asia for our-
    selves. We believe that the future
    of Formosa, like that of any other
    territory in dispute, should be
    ettled peacefully.

    “We believe that it should be
    settled by international action, and
    not by the decision of the United
    States or of any other state alone.
    fhe mission of the Seventh Fleet
    is to keep Formosa out of the con-
    Ciect Our purpose is peace, not

    onqucst

    Freedom For All

    “Sixih: We believe in freedom

    all the nations of the Far East.

    « is one of the reasons why we
    ave fighting under the United
    Nations for the freedom of Korea.

    “We helped the Philippines be-
    come independent and we have
    supported the national aspirations
    to independence of other Asian
    countries,

    “cussia has never voluntarily
    given up any territory it has ac-
    quired in the Far West it has
    never given independence to any
    yeople who have fallen under its
    control,

    “We not only want freedom for
    the peoples of Asia but we also
    want to help them secure for
    themselves better health, more

    “I appeal to you,” it said, “to {s0d, better clothes and homes,

    take all possible measures for the
    immediate suspension of this
    senseless blood-shed.”

    The appeal claimed that signg~
    tories had come to Korea believing

    that they were acting on behalf of

    the United Nations and expecting
    to find the Koreans friends and
    fighting allies.

    “You can understand our shoe!
    when we were greeted by South
    Koreans, not with jubilation, but
    with apathy, sullenness = an:
    hatred,
    South Koreans were against Syng-
    man. Rhee’s Government.”

    After their capture, these offi

    cers found that the United Nation:’

    action was illegal and, that fight
    ing was caused by unilater
    American intervention, the docu
    ment said.

    —Reuter.

    CASUALTIES

    WASHINGTON, Sept. 1

    The Defence Department a
    jounced to-day that the totai «
    notified battle casualties in Kor
    u) to midnight of August 25 w
    § 886. This includes 503 kille
    3.689 wounded, 48 prisoners +
    war, and 2,436 listed as missing

    This was the first announcem’,

    ' American easualties since Aur
    * 7. The Defence Deopartme
    said earlier to-day that it wou
    publish casualty figures regularly
    vrebabiy once a week. The figure



    « not reflect all casualties suffer -

    ,

    up to August 25 because a:

    Then we saw that the

    and the chance to live their own
    lives in peace,

    “The things we want for the peo.
    pie c Ack a¥> the same things
    we want for the people of the
    ‘est of the world,

    Weapon Of Dictators

    “Seventh: We do not believe
    i. aggressive or preventive war.
    such war is the weapon of dicta-
    tors, net of free democratic coun-
    tries like the United States.

    “Ve are arming only for de-

    fenco against aggression, Even
    though Communist imperialism

    does not believe in peace, it can be
    discouraged from new aggression
    if we and other free peoples are
    trong, determined and united,

    “Bighth: We want peace and
    ve shall achieve it, Our men are
    ighting fer peace to-day in Korea.
    We are working for peace con-
    stantly in the United Nations, and
    n all the capitals of the world.
    Our workers, our farmers, our
    business men, all our vast re-
    ources, are helping now to create
    the clvength which will give peace
    ind security.

    “We want peace not only for its
    own sake but because we want all
    the peoples of the world, includ-
    ‘ng curselves, to be free to devote
    their full energies to ma:.ing their
    ives richer and happier,

    “We shall give what help we can
    to make this universal human wish
    come true,

    “We invite all the nations of the
    worl'l, without exception, to join
    with us in this great work.

    od : 1 —Reuter.
    he time required to receive re-
    its from

    \he next of kin,

    Army casualties were 6,567
    Navy 27, Marine Corps 194, an
    ir Force 98.—Reuter

    ee
    | Removal Notice
    Dr. FL. A
    D.C.P.T,

    . COX
    { (Chir .)
    | Chiropractor & Optician
    | has Removed to Lower Jemes St.
    | Hours: 8.30 to 1 and 2 to 11.80.

    VENEZOLANOS
    AMIGOS

    VISITOR FRIENDS!

    ORIENTAL GOODS

    Tenemos Articlos de Qriental de
    In India, China, Egypt.

    THANI Bros.

    Pr. Wm, Hry. St. Tel

    3466

    { Christian Seienee
    ( licading Room

    “T FLOOR, BOWRN & AONS
    (Broad Street)

    Nourt: 19 asa—2 p.m.
    Tuesdays, Wednesdays,

    Fridays.
    10 a.m.—12 o'clock. )
    Saturdays.
    this Room the Bible wna D
    the Christian Science text-book,
    selence and Healt) with Key to



    ')> Seriptares by MARY BAZ.£B
    seoY may Be reed, borrow-d,
    or pur hased

    Visitors Are Welcome
    bwwwwwweo

    Special Flat Galrd. Sheets

    e x 3; 8 x

    3%; 1” x 3

    CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

    CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—(Prorvieors)
    Corner Broad and Tudor Streets







    ‘oe front and notily |) a= SSS a ry

    The Barry Guest House

    1600 MOUNTAIN ST
    MONTREAL









    Homely Atmosphere
    Quiet & Restrul

    When visiting
    trip

    or ao a busines

    Special daily or week!
    after September ist
    Refercnce if required

    rates



    Telephone M.A. 0827
    L.A. 3485

    —






    HEAL ESTATE AGENT
    *Phone

    THANI

    OFFER YOU

    PLASTIC HEADTIES

    STRAW HATS
    STRAW (Shopying)

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    A.F.8., F
    FOR
    |

    AUCTIONEER
    Plantations’ Building

    SUMMER

    FOR LADIES
    PLASTIC RAINOCOATS (it various shades)

    PALM FANS (very light weight)



    PAGE NINE

    _—_—

    HARBOUR LOG

    In Carlisle Bay

    Sch Philip H. Davidson, Sch. Rosa,
    rene, Sch. Frances Smith MV. Bitte
    Star M.V. Daerwood, Sch. Belqueen,
    Sch. Laudalpha, Seb. Princess Louise,
    Seh. Burma D.. Sch. Gardenia W., Sob.
    Turtle Deve. Sch. Mary M. Lewis, Soh
    Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Marea Henri-~

    ett ile m, Smith, sen.

    vs
    Franklyn D. R., .
    Cyelorama O., Sch. Gloria Henrietta, 3.8.
    Alcoa Pegasus,





    a, Sch



    M.V. Moneka, M.V. Cul-
    Bolivar
    ARRIVALS
    Schooner Doramas, 12 tone met. Cant.
    Manuel De Varjas, from Canaty Islands.
    Schooner Henry D. W 59 ions
    net, Capt, King, from Trir
    Schooner Belqueen, 44 1 Ccopt.
    Simmons ,from St, Vincent.

    hips ta fouch With

    rb doe Coastal Station

    Cable and Wireless (West indies) Lt@.
    advise that they can now communic,
    with the iohowing ships throuch t
    Berbados Coast Station:—

    SS. Esso Den Hane, M/V. Tumber,
    M/S. Caraibe, M/V. Prospector, $38.
    Ksso Avila, SS. Sunrell, 5.5. Captain
    fohn, SS. Lillohus. S.S. S. Calli, S@
    © de Nicaragua, $8.8. Alcoa Polaris, 3.8.
    Celilio, S.S, Jose Calvo Sotelo. S.S. Fi









    herst, S.S. Unriguay, 53. Atlan
    ser, S'S. Beechhill, S.S. Argentina,
    jinni, S.S. Bergesund, S.S. Portu-

    Dolores, S.S. Captain Lefteris,

    8.8
    ss
    Du Quesne
    t Helder,

    Francesc

    » Morosini. 58
    3.5. Afmhanistan,
    SS. Golfite, $3
    8S. Randford
    Belita,
    Spuri,
    4%, 5S.






    Hollanger
    3S, Moramac
    Heecuba

    RUSSIA WILL
    NOT BE INVITED
    TO AIRCRAFT SHOW

    LONDON, Sept. 1

    The Society of British Aircraft
    ‘onstructors announced today
    that for the first time since they
    reviewed their annual display in
    1946, they are not inviting Rus-
    sia or any other “Iron Curtain”
    countries to send representatives
    this year.

    Their 1950 show at Farnhor-
    cough in Southern Hampshire next
    week is the shop window of the
    British Aireraft Industry, and
    frequently includes planes which
    are still partly secret planes.

    The first three days of the dia
    play are known as Trade days,
    efter that planes on the secret list
    are withdrawn

    The Society or pritise Aircraft
    Constructors have since 194€.
    usually invited about 10,000 guests
    from all over the world inéluding
    vice-chiefs, and diplomatic repre
    sentatives of all countries

    —Reuter,





    a








    4th, fo
    re-opene

    closed

    vacation and will

    on October 2nd.

    WESLEY BAYLEY.
    *

    SSS )
    . }

    NOTICE i

    THIS is to notify my friends and },

    customers that my citice will be

    )

    from September
    be

    High St



    SSS












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    They are the Tren mete
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    2/0 and a few large ones @
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    BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1950

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    PAGE 1

    S . I urdui S <• 11 I <111 l> • r 2 Backj&ns luuwate Price: nvi: J \T Ye., r ..J TRUMAN HAS 8 POINTS TO END WAR RedsRenew Attack For Pusan (By JULIAN BATES) Somewhere In Km... Sept. 2. i The Communist* renewed their offensive along the' south toast of Korea a few' hours before dawn today (Saturday) with a tank-led attack against the American! 25th division defending tin* approaches to the vital supply port of Pusan. Thisecond dawn of th.a twittbnn Hie DPMI sill' of the United Nations' defence box h. %  m a deceptively ^T ill 55 mile* rtonl H both HAS pn-| ,i..' i. renew then LUtM to ihe UOath In ihv Nuktong rlvei seeto: further i the nuii" 0.1.1 Mend from beta? foxholes through the mbrn.nK ir,si HI nui'iding thi high around overlooking (he river, not | know.ng whether the northerners %  pi arou id behind them! during the night, They knew it 1 would not iii in-fore the.'; weft efUJB Iiand-eo-haod Ptruntta WCli a. marked mi C I U i toed* RghUleg Under continuous Communist j lulttiinL. Ame.-K-on troop* last night f.*ll baric ntu the hills of] Naktoog New Positions i the (Lit country [ LAJVB) AFTER .11 II ;i. Win. aln Hyu ba Nmth Korean hands. Ameucans dug in on new hill-top position* in tome places Communists were reported al the gates of Yongsan and still surging eastward towards the Taegu-Pusan highway, the main artery of American and South Korean communications. On the south coast American Hoops to-night pressed forward am* re-took Hainan ten miles Ml of the port of Masan Just north %  I Haman the Communist offensive winch began at midnight drove a wedge four mile* wide and eight miles deep between the American 25th Division on the south and the American 2nd Division in the area of the old Naktoug bulge to the north. Northwards to Hyonpung where the Communists overran an area %  >f possibly more than 120 square miles in twelve hours, they were believed to have three infantry dlvbdou Md then crack armoured 105th Division in the battle Communist losses in their moaaad erlort to drive United Nations forces Into the sea were put at 1.000 dead. Latei frontline reports said that American troops were "stacking up" the Communist dead In front 01 them by hundreds. New Front On the middle reaches o' Uut "Waal wall" front, the Naktong River line has ceased to exist Over an air line distance o( more than 20 miles. Communists wero tonight swarming over the shallow sun-dried river to a front eight to ten miles farther east. When dusk fell, at least three American Second Division battalions and several smaller groups it. this old Naktong bulge area were deeply Ranked by Communist forces, and their communications to the rear wenunder attack AJearafl kep' them supplied with ammunition, medlclnis and food by parachute. At dawn with Americans falling back all along the western front and Communist suicide squads clearing mine fields by tramping hlowly forward to their death, all available aircraft was ordered out give close battle-line support. Carrier-based lighters were ordered to tha crumbling front and raked advancing Communist troops with machine-gun and rocket lire. With Australian and American pilots of the fifth Air Force they made hundreds of separate attacks throughout the day despite J hPmpcring misty wind Hurricane Flattens Antigua WORST IN ISLANDS HISTORY l,: ""'I'"'' 1 '""}. >*!'•"* t'nrj M..n.l.rs l,„,k over the s„lc of ll„10' H flea). I2/3S* D """" %  "' •*• %  • '•' "• Barkedea Ir,.„, U, l'„l,„a~ i,. ,!,„„. CONFIDENT OF KOREA VICTORY WASHINTON, Sept 1. PRESIDENT ITi.i MAN declared tonight that the Korea ..R' -ing would not e v pund into a "general war," naif**, the Comriiunists poured other armies and brought other Governments into the battle In a nationwide "fireside chat" broadcast, he put forward an 8 point programme for ending the Korean war. He declared that th CY it munis t invasion of Korea "ha< reached its peak" "Ti.task remaining is t• crush it." m aid "Our men art Ihe United Nations Command is it, thai H %  rill bt rruahed" %  hi %  : . % %  B ,i thai' frtai im, which • i triad 'e %  %  Mistake i %  ia the mlataJi • I (in. %  e UOUII A I net I rend ii.—i* %  %  %  %  '. %  i baidtj Mi M whan they thought %  Del be able to IBM Dui a c onoan %  %  '!• %  uvei >t!li <• %  % % %  a M page 3 ANTIGUA, Sept Aftii u bourg Hi in %  11 racl anticipate most devastating liui < Antigua's hiaton raji i proached the %  aiaui I ana by B p.m. the horror^ of the previous hum :,.ne were < %  < hpsed like child's. Jlay Ten hour, of continuous agon| lung terror befell the island while winds of IM to .Go miles an hour 1 tore and roared unceasingly, demolishing tJ id There was extensive ii. %  There floujaa aai : Ii the sea, house* blocked the streets, the talai i %  kg a/a* wreck-j ed. pole. obstructed the main tdflhways, roofa aan blown on.and pnlini %  .,, ,, where pee including Ihote at Got Hcuse. I Tin Beach 11. tei roof is etna; the Whole HI Tho'nlinsim'.s woikshop's rtKif was blowo vardk away, a 150-foot wireless mast was knocked ti> smithereens, part of Green llay school, in wh'ch people had sought refuge, crumbled, the Grammar School mid St. John'* Boys' School showed va. %  ruins, as well as Holbarton Hoital and Mental Home. Airport Manager Burton's House and the former V S Air Base collapaed Uka %  peck of cardl A dnema i flat and ball o* %  leaal shed sit> on the back of a gasolin • truck The iT.of cf the Btoas Uoonl Beach Hotel area, the tcmporni> residence of the Manager of Barclay's Bank. V Bats and Mrs. Bats. was blown clean off, and A F Turner's t had its windows : mashed in. All trees were shredded, including huge n! ,.-1 ,„-,,,, B.G. Dakota Crashes Near Brazil ibado* Adu.'. ';Kul{i;KTOWN, lie, Sept. I B.G Airways Dakota C47 craslieil I.. ,i.,> .,! Alilial AlttleM in the Rupununl District near the BraaU frontier. The plane was reeil> rlamaajed bul no one injured; cargo is safe. The .-rash occurie.l as the plane was leaving Aunai tor Let hem en route to Qaoraajlown on the re il.ir fortidgl tly run Major A J Williams and a relief plane led for Anna! at noonday. -IMMIA .MAS" I O.MI-.S TO POHT THE GOVERNMENT CRAFT reesrd to else. Ida' pulls jlnrc-.idr I!,. %  ll.ir.nu. \ i, the. -.mil irwith SPAIN BANS RED PERIODICALS PARIS, Sept. 1 The Frencn Ministry of the Interior, today banned publication and sale of two Spanish language %  view.' pi int. i i jfeaatca Handera an t Cultura Y llemoer I>.• Ihe Spanish E.nbasty |Kikcsman said thitt these %  r*ee both Communist journals "of the extremist." The Spanish Government had not asked for their suppression. The organ of the exiled gocUUtt I'artv (ulU was banned last On the deck there was hardly •pace to move. 'ITie .ship left I..,., Palmas in the Canary Island* boood for Venezuela. 34 daya ago and was forced to put into Carlisle Bay for focd and water tupphea and to check a faulty auxiliary engine There were no signs of fatigue nor despair on lh men's faces, many of them bearded They looked with some interest and slieeulation at Bndgetown 111 the distance. Old Haiti. .1, • Most of them were wearing some pans of old battledress while others were naked from Ihe waist up Dr. Greaves the Port Health Officer arrived in hour's time in the Government craft "Ida" and having tied up alongside had them come over for inspection in bab hes of Dye There would not have leen thi necessary space on board for having this Job done satisfactorily Meanwhile fresh water wa: pumped from the "Ida" Into i tank on board the "Doramas" and immcduilel> reUoflUlg began. As soon as they had completed the formalltir-; thr> settled dowr to normal ship's life Soima i>Iung <"\ in for a swim. Frsn-'isro SHvj %  eacahed otri a rloun and Lull I^re? a tlmpte an invlrumeM that resemhle^ a guitar The men are carpenters, masons electrician* shoemakers and %  ther nrtisans Most of them related and also hsve relative Venezuela Manv of them have already secured Job* In Venezuela through the post at On fMure 5 Tlyingllearst^ Brings 55 Air Crash Victims TO CAIRO l AlKO. Sept. I. !i> ing % %  %  .,:'• todai brought the chaired remains of the 55 I ihe Transwortd Airline Cnnttellatlon 11 eh to I 'eiro Weeping relatives and fu.-nd, vatchad while %  treteht the bonies at r'arouk u .,. ,i 1(1 .,| | ii %  brown bl inkats t. A.oting ambulances. \t tinmortuai . lentined fm i urlal o 1,1 oi tranaporti n t. U I homelands ii and %  mark an oAelali %  %  hing charred >>! i gage lodaj tat Fuaa la thi .. "te, riie main paii ..t tha Urcrafi were Bung ovei an ana ida BM one i %  n.i not \t-i b>fii found A Mai Ml. n TiailSWOrld (relieved that |he plane had liil lh< roui %  ith its left wing and en bed i mi its (uaalaaa catapul rd Tna plane eraanad Koertljr after il big ..IT rrom Cairo ft r Rome litu.ll Dim Btai lameh Cohen ami several United N.ili.in. delegnles and weallh.v huRinaasmen on board, There i FM Jeanne Loreaal, 22-vear-ohi II was her last trip before leaving the company to get mui ried Plans were being made today for the burial of Egyptian victims Including ('amcha llindii killed in the crash will I,nemBted 00 pvie.s In tl.i UM their Bshe into Indian 1 IM Rmler. France Will DefendIndo-China SAI(;tN, Sept. 1, Leoa Pafnon, IVench High C omm laaloaier said today that France had decided to iMend Indu China even MithOUl eteimil mililaiv am The Commissioner, who rattan Bd this we>k to Ki Judo China would not ba eon 11> teh paeitied before the and of the cold war Oundda help to Vietiiiinh Nationalist Insurgents would prolong Ihe lighting Wh I might otnerwlse have been over In 1 year or eighteen months Rewter 100,000 Join In "Exercise Rainbow" HBDaXBBRG s>i-t 1 More than 100,000 American, French and Brirtsh troops will take part In Septendver In thi largest combat training exercise • J Allied troops In Bun e Rainbow" will be the %  1 us forcea, Baerclae September .1 with .1 aknunrted tank spearhead drive from the <„••, toward' 'heeat it thr Amerir.in High Commission. %  Will go through a series of withdrawals, legroupings and other tarilcs e%  Igned to test their ability to contain an attack from the Eas" The United States will tend IB8D the field virtually every soloier and gun It hain Germany vlth American Air PorO afld Naval units taking part in strength well The French are contributing 11.11 and the Brttuth two One air squadron from M* <'f these nations will ahW p rtarlpata Theoretuaiiy th. attack rrom 1 rn "aggressor" will eat> h Ihe Western All.. 1 %  1 .iiits arlll %  ruled into regrouped ombinad mount a .ounter attack aimed at imshlng he aggressor back East towards Nuremburg Counter Attack "Exercise Rainbov," wUl end vailcrs slowly f d lllu %  ith the iid the To bolster scanty Un.-. to <• %  In Oerrnany, American W'fOps from Austria and Tries!. arUI be moved Inti 'ii-imtny for ow" One Infan%  %  TM' rta %  '.!' b> airlifted Into I %  rvre area bet 10 SeVfl J Will n ineeuvre with American mess utewards. ami guards. %  Uoved thai tha aaerebai will in i|> (• buck un 1 Morale which is Wilting L* face of Communist piopagnndi iinam. —Reuter the point*. wt-r>: 1. To se--k pear" and aerurllv Un.• %  !£>' the 1 nit. it Na tioiia. 2. A free. Independent and united Korea. a. Prevention of Uie Hu reaa flshtliig from rvpandhu into a general war. 4. An -1.1 %  -I tn Ihr priiple ..I I htea not to ruler Ihe Korean war taafcait the 1 nited N ui-. 11forces. Ff %  I ui lllei lit of the t' ii-r.i.iliimil .11 (Inn I I rrcilom for .1: Ihr nation, of Ihr Far fr.*-l. 7. DtsavowaJ of an reunion ur prere aMya arar. a MiiM|l talk will inroiarOd r.ext week b) %  I I %  D -front apect of the kvai At that Mine DO I. he CKlad to e gp lgla "what your I -I %  IIII ill) Il >" each cttlaeu can piav 1 is national effort." We ant the r-l ol the world tmcler.tand clearly our alms id our hopes." I'ltl -llltNT Till MAN He ther oitthi ght point* and rivited all nations Of Oho world, vrlthoul exception, to join • Ith 11In %  > reat work are now righting in Korea with men of many nav hanner to uphold tha 1 Law m Ike ..ild. he aaid. If that rule of law WHS not upheld, they 00UU OIK forward only "to the horror .1 and uitlmato rot out part, e do not intend I ippen .11 outlined thv • ll.itol |ha Unit.si States ta .1 hieve a )u-t and lasting WOT 11 pea ce during the last live year,11.1 11, e frustration of UtCar %  ii.it03 |M s... %  1 Review 11. (viewed the mitbreak auJ • e Ko en 1 woi to dale • given i" United States actlnn by other United il.outlined what may bacons* hli hlatork eight point ,. I01 bringing peace tha Far East In % %  1 "As we 1110M forward to antt 1 11 in quickly in th* days thead ind as we strive with the United Nations for victory In must keep clearly in iH-lieve in and wtlSt ti ving to do ils.i want the rest of the understand clearly our mi hopes. tin Paae •> 1.1 to Announcement. eft *3 wif/i ijretil prut? that L.tirthtmtn cjfteatnr.i J. '.1 tu-c/ay announce trie OfltfiMQ of the [Plata ^ ftiiiilfi' /ji-i./t/r/own (ia Flow than ever uou need to gel out and relax tn an atmosphere of oeautu. comfort, friendliness and service white ofMflg entertai'ied by the cJop {Picture 'Product of any ijear.



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    SATURDAY, StI'Tt.MULK 2, lUU lUKIIADOK AI1VOCATK PAf.F SEVEN IValentineBowlsWell To Win Over Kent fe And Goddatd Dismiss County Batsmen For 67 W.I. 265 and (for 6 dec.) 170 KENT 146 and 67 CANTERBURY. Sept. 1. ALFRED VALENTINE and John Goddard, virtually unplayable on a pitch which was taking spin, tumbled Kent out for 67 m their second innings to-day to enable the West Indies to win their last county match of the tour by 222 runs hrliai the West Indie* had eeclaVed their second inning?, closed at 170 for 6. Valentine who wlcJU for 6 runs today, took DtaM tor 63 in the match, and brought his total for the tour to 114. more than any other West Indies bowler has ever taken in %  Mland He and Goddard frequently beat both batsman and wicketl-ecper Coddard claimed four aril kcis for 13 runs. Anu~. reached double figures in in,. Kent Innings, the next best tig "extras*" with 14. Half the side fell for 51 and the lemamder went down In 25 minutes for the addition of 12 runs At the start of the day Goddard gave Gomez the opportunity to complete his 1.000 runs -..,-____ -_ for the tour, hut,he failed by five ^^^-^( I runs to reach the target. Gomez -^laaaaaa^^ 4M ami Goddard) carried their stand ^^*H to 119, and when Gome* fell to .1 good catch at lily midon, God.1.11.1 declared, leaving Kent three now fu-orfj lisf / W.I bowUn who I ours. 50 minutes to get 290 runs ftacc jitayerf in £iiu(and u-lth fits i,. w in JI4 ipfcMs, The Start The West Indies needed runs ouickly In order to make un early declaration. OoaW and Goddard found the tttwllng of Martin and Rldgeway too accurate for free scoring, but runs came at a steady one a minute. The light was bad and rain th.-eatened. but the batsmen ward and their stand Footballers Cannot Play LONDON Sapt1 l wo roocoauer* NeU rransuin %  in.! Gear* Mountford of SloU City turn tan suspnrtTl o to* rootbaii Assocuttoa for *MT. mjfcthei: clubs while un-.* tract Both had pl.ivo.1 in H..*..'.< ColnMabii They are auspendad until sucn time as they ap|>n>.ich the Association 1<* reinstatement MlUaa ol M I'niU-d anta. i similarly suspended. Matt llusby. Manchester United Manager rvreivstl a letter from Sir Stanley Itoua. SecreL.rjof Fix*hall Association, which slated that leaving the clubs while tier contract and playing in .minted football clubs in Anybody B Louis By A Knockout General Vidmer Lectures To Polo Players General VktaMr fa* a most Interesting eddm to members of ioldom in troubfa_. Polo Club at UN tinned three figures in an houu tho Burbado Drill Hall on Wednesday afternoon. The General has pluyed big Polo in the USA. for eighteen years. ,uul Uu-n the game that is not very familiar to this great old soldier and sports] man. With a hi..tkbo-iJ and coloured chalk;, he illustrated the many Important points to be remembereii for the safety of horse and rider, and it was quite 0D", .i„.V vlous that he was concerned over '" the many risks and breaking of the "danger rules" that have been unknowingly committed In tho .. half With the score at 170. Martin induced Gomez to play loo soon. %  catch at silly mid-on i wicket stand had added III Goddard then declared Kent Baiting Vith twelve scored, Fags pliyed a hesitant forward strokeand gave an easy catch at thu kit. mes hooked three long hops m i.n. to th Um houiidary. hut Valentine, coming on at 34. SMS & %  *%& ^ one of the most dangerous things Goddatd came UI1 „ thr other l 0 .c d 1 i ,i2. nP ^ or my ^ ,'J t "£ B * * >*> * %  wickpl nr8t ^ the ,. nl Woollm fla5hed at i. ball 01 outside the oft* slump and edged It to the wicket-keeper. Three wykets were down for 35 at lunch After I.unrh was kilted that Oencrnl "I MV* seen i you boys do it He than went on to deal with many of the line points of the name sued In* positions and the Individual duties of each player The |* was only HciHrvl <•<, when it w. v.dentine worried both Cowdray found thai pby im !!%  i!il matches I this afternoon If weather permits. ftcr lunch Goddard also turned good and Today's W.L Fixture Yeatcrda) die W.I. played and won their last Couuy flxtore In Kngland. and to •l.i% they open a thr-e-day game against a South of England sidr M llulings. This is the thirty-first gane of the tour and there are two remaining fixture*:-Sept. 6—v. Minor Counties. Sept. 10—v. U. U. C. Leverssn Gower's XI. Ten of the first thirteen runs added after the Interval came from extras. The ball turned so much thai it frequently beat the wicketkteper as well as the batsmen. Cowdray defended carefully for 40 minutes but eventually lost patience and an intended big leg easy skied catch to At the end of that over Valentine's tlgurcs were 100. 8M. 2R. 2W. Without addition, Clark lost his middle stump when trying to drive, and live wickets were down for 55 The last five wickets crashed in 2^ minutes for 12 runs. Valentine and Goddard, on a pilch which took spin, were almost unplayable. In 13.2 overs Valentine took 5 wickets for 6 runs, and Goddard claimed 4 for 13. Even allowing for the tricky conditions. Kent gave a weak display. Scores WUTT IXDIKS ll Inntnn* ... Mi KtAT lit tt.ntnfu M S WEST INDIES%  feVou'l InliinB* M.ir.hll c M.rlm I. Kldnwar 10 .1 c A"" b RidMway Hssm h Martin (By RAY GKODY (Sports i iiuur Milwaukee Sentinel) MILWAUKEE There's no queatiuniiiK JM Louis' confidence in his comeback Lgainat Ezzard Charles set for New York's Yankee Stadium the night of Sept. 27. Here's what the former heavyweight champ says: "I expect to knock out Charles. When, I can't say now I teller when We get to Panpton Lakes. NJ., where I atari Man drills, later this month "Then I'll map out a plan ol battle with Mamur Sctmion. mj trainer. But I'm sunl en will *trui Charles, probably in the early rounds." Is Louis taking Charles llghlly'.' Answer Joe; "Not al all. ile\s %  good Bghtet, tl.e best around today. Aim i badly underrated by a lot of people, but he doesn't punch bard end I dou't have to worry too much about getting nil He'good boxer; so was Jersey Jot Walcott. But they all make m"takes. "Ono mistake is all 1 Mod That's how 1 got Billy O 01) U then Walcott In the second fight" The way Louis figures now, he won't lay back the way he did ngainsl Walcott. "I'm going out after Charles.' he says. "Make him fight—that's n.y best chance." Do his plans go further tli.in the Charles DghtT Louis said: %  Well, I can't say for sure now But if things go the way I expect tnem to, I'd like lo hghi igalD t..!-. year. One thing tnere'll be no more af fntWhon i What about his position sylth the InlernaUonal Boxing Club, now that he's back to lightin.; Saul Louis: "I resigned from my post s boxing director of the I.B.C., and I'm stnetly a lighter. I may return to tho organization aain when 1 figure I can't fight any more "But right now I'm thinking of enly one thing—winning back that title. There Is more than one reason for my going altar it. As you know, there an %  taxes, and Just as important. I want to prove to the fight publli that I can win that title again. "It's never been done before. but that doesn't worry me I'll win it!" You could Just feel the finality In Louis' prediction I N S Australia v. West Indies A (Cricket "C '0/1*7 ueror" IK Vrtvr llin. MI I.CIMM) o\ SEPTEMBER II ttraUw Crtcki ,ni' to dltcufi whether n Invitation slumld I" Mttended in tlit \ to nil ii te*fn tn Austrnli.i. prol>ablv in l a 51-."i2. Hul i\rn II tiwdfJOtHoti i-; f.iv% ponsible U> rhloh countiy hold. ket luprefnacy. Ex-Boxer Preaches \ M ol live Teats between % %  I.< irlbbean oaunMaa and Ai r. 11 • wuulii undoubtedly be a ,i moaey apinnai 1 and. in I'll-" Slliitllil ptUVi'li MHIle nf v\v-.-\ ineket seen in %  %  inie uMtr eagemeaa to omj rte sued .1 lixttire. the West a no) willing that the* l f0 to Auittialla. This Utude is not aa unreum.ihle .is nds. They have already senes of TeaU "down umliwinning one game, and v nf the) feel that Uw return tlxturo '"" sh.uil l.1ke pla 111 0M Weal bftftt* %'ii Money UiU i>r LOS AD Anristi'niK in triple champion ftghter i nd telan of .'i | i ounoasj tixi.iN ihot ha mil uaiiuai %  I •' nil Itta to nr—ihlnfj %  The m %  .. ni.id, fortune, in the ring explained that Ids mother when he was a child in Muadasippl thai ntm to thi He ^..i.l Mint he flli.llv heeiied I "II %  Iden rid. "Id other ' % %  samethi' %  nd mbed nil of u %  hfldren) emoted that da* l IrOald M I on-.icher %  I T, ,., %  religion When the power of Col ind never have been %  nearly a possible. West Indian cricket score of appearances as guest haalways been In a weak flnanIpteket (01 iniiusters Ke-'efiilv 0 1Itton This year howeve* he t.K>k part in a w—at long Bs#>) "i 1 receive a sum of money revival meeting at nearbv Mon'"' in excess of that for which rovla. t hi 1 h|>et Indies would have been kppgr to have mode a profit or between £10,000 and Armstrong, a long ; 1100 on tho trip, the actual sum Ur of Uie atonung S* will receive will be much Church, one of the laigest coloured nearer double that figure. churches in the west, said that be has been receiving .iisiruciiuii in This, coupled with their uni.i cltneatl work. dated playing al^ilily means While ho can now take Die %  for the first time the Woat road H 1 be hopea 'nd-ea are in a commanding posiin the Mar future to be ordain,l "" They can afford to finance td a i;.ipUst minister. *<' Australian trip to their own %  .111: hopes, tn bmee lus %  ''' %  llt •* 1B lf t,xe y don'i Own OAUrCb in unit, lie ..Inndy m.'ko ;ui much profit as lbt) llaw it. It will bo 0, '" r ,,in '' """> Wi *"" hMV0 ICDOWn M the Church of the Holy ^ •> in Uie "kitty" tn ensure Tinuty. inspired putially by the t,at ""^ tour '* %  lightweii.il' %  .vcltuwnight and %  tgfat bosflng titles he won. Ai-inslrong owns coiutiderablu %  UdltOCiunu in Oklnhnma. Texas. %  %  I I Ne. At ;tiali,intn return (he eatnpllm %  then can con11 r a T 1 %  -i.-i. tav w %  counlne to bg .1 matter, ol 1 lapoftnnea, then 1 am cerl 1 they cm aM thoti way clear t naking the trip to the C irfb be 41 Bogota was a contravention of the rootbaii Association and Football League Club rules and regulagttnM mil UM////M \MfY7M£! 1 nww.v-^Ktr Cfanr StvtfyAfose.. .i.v#.v<. fW-.V./## (ASUARINA GUI Berth 11.,.w.mis Oreheatn A 1-os Turbilaa Veneiolanoo Itlruvenldii Al Good food tastes all the better with Colman's Mustard RKAWAY a en A GRAND DANCE %  All the present inemWlS of the IMI antlci|Nite that they would available tOl a" Australian Ueir ctjuntry Joh . . \1 >i 1 til niru cnini'' ess'tonat Reaction Exa-uv Bras a %  TOTAL lor wksk*Ui lOtcd I tlOWl.INO ANA1.VS1S ; % CnwHray c Wtlllama b VakiH Clark a Goddarfl Uplun b Valanlmr n-.vrrj b GodtUrO M.111111 b Goadard W riht 1** mil l.m.rwai b Vaati.tiiir EvtrM -e by. 1 las %  •> % % %  TOTAL rail at wlckea: {,., M I tc.I ; f.H SJ • fur 03 IWUUM. lor 13, I fur M. 3 LONLX)N. Judy Canova, ndiO comedienne, defined opera thus: "Theft i fl ^ Ur a man is stablK^I in the back and ^ inr e QOMMTA b vau-miw instead of bleeding, he sings" gelea, Incltidinj PJt builuing containing stores and puifininnal oOlcast. His income is nich tiiat he would not have to work on*^ber day In in life Ani.s'.."ni:. uni 17, prefen lo be calico od Armstrong." At his heart-shaped desk In hia oflice, there is a rked bible at bJ tips, tesiifving to Uu alncaTitj of the Conner fighter. "Some people might thmk that I am capitalizing on m Aiiiislrong explained, "but I mean business I am in churcn %  raril for good." TT %  ex prized ghter id-way in wTtUnj said • i:| not make Uf more overseas tours. But that does not i K-.in he would not be available I plav against the Australian* i ..r British Guiana Some Short On the other hand. I know That the West Indies were to make l trip to Australia, they would !-• short of several of the players •vho helped beat Kngland M :ie.lsivoly this summer Tilt TALK or on rmv* A Grand Dance iO-M<.IH |-HINCrs Al.Ut: I'AV TALKING OF PRINTS WK IIAVK SK.MK NICK ENGLISH JM PRINTS c -/ Stiilahle for BATH SUITS BOOH COATS / end KM;I"I.AB siiorriNt; DRKSSK.S :ili" Wide — (iuarmitecd Fnl C'oloiira KSr. — lc. — 3c. — 7c. — ic. per Yard al book on his religious %  iences. Ha N :i I -ill II %  'Thr.. iwns for God." send Indies is now team to Australia The ui i iM-piin. i-gumant might be turned Jt would not be fair t< n under-stnangth West SI I i the h> the West Indies were thr "visltors." Now it is up to th> DANCE THr BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB (M*mbors Only) TO NIOHT M yM, SYDNFY NILI'.fl | xr-1 bi Orctm U pitying tlie ; laMM Hit p'sd* un" AdmUi.en to Bl'>oou 1/ I In CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., LTD. 10, II. 12. 13. Brcud Street FOR r.UHKS: 111 \M VVN: FOR EVERY DAY WEAR Black -.' %  .. White 14.93; Brown 14.Ot SIMHl I IIS in Brown. Flat Heels with Leather Sole > iu. with Crepe Sole 15.80 \ I H IMSK.XS IK Hill SS SIMMS Blark Suede Court; Hnskr Skin I'laUann IB.4S White Buck Court, Platform, Hack and l... i. SH.I5 FOR SAFE SEA BATHING FOR CHILDREN Kl lilii K HWIMMINU KIM., al WIN'US | |l.30 A BRIGHTER LONGER LIFE!! BUY— DURALIFE AI'TO IIATTKHIKS-WITH EBONITE SEPARATORS


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    s \TI -WIAV. SEPTEMBER 2. |i:,i. BARBADOS UIVOI \T1 i\< .1 rmt.T Reds Renoir Attack On Pusan GAMBOLS le tonight on the SOU K. air* %  aftauttve Another UKI "If I irk, American p* Afiu had pushed through. 1MB tO dMHM tWO note: ..I1U ..llulnei -juppcncd wave of Cottimu-, WM expected. brant during the day. b Ami. ••••> and Canu 3 ran Ml ot ammunition. ba\onets. knives and [ butts, A. ib daj a %  : EbtiBI iir..pp-d . Iiut at night' t | .main. t 0 0 p I bivouacked %  k'al on Tui-diiy, tonight pulo battle ahead) %  d tha lighting % % % % % % %  Mr. rVrguion was one of the ( •Inmalca delegates who %  ttvrritd ilpmem and these the Oils and Fats Conxemoc* be leaving (or the base area which endej at HaslLruis House %  tjtclM HM Hud He t aJd that of the 6 B million k fighting Klgyc stems, i million .tic I.acatan around I'ohang over u 15while the remainder are Qroa i %  Michel Maid Comes Back From Mountains I'AKIS nmg down H \rted moving Di Plane Shot Down North Koreei toda> shot down an un t nnwrtcan Ai n plane snulh-east of Kunwi. i, %  leaflets am d South Korean troops. Ur Force orTnaaU that two fighters, botii Jamaica Plans Export Of 6'/2m. Stems Of Bananas To The U.K. Thi* Year THE Jamaica banana export trade to the United llinjjdoffi En (990 1 expected to be about 6j million Che saint as 1!149. Mr. D. C. Ferguson, Commissioner oi eaof thai colony tcM t hoAdvoeate %  Mr. Ferguson HELL HOY WANTED? LOMBOM Mi and Mrl H F Crust wenl Id B \ Hill with ttu'ii dog, Dunuy. Kali in a rabbit hoia Mr. Crust took it Op and rind %  nonMr." Dontv Again the Uill WO* taken fun hn he went on thflr bull, and again FIRST WITH JETS I The puu I .1 i%  .. eatenaed particularly In place* where there Is Punama disease o that the Grus Michel cannot be lU) cultivated. (Jinlity Improved The quality of the banana ahlpbaan gfeatlj unproved [since March this year and the raporta from the United Kingdom plane. Thi nditinn >f the arrival ** "I the iruil are much more faKeuter MDMa today gnvui vmirable e positions In Korea a* faAnuiif. Q force for r th: American troops on the'providing luccoun of LacaUui coast approaches to Masan bananas for planting, particu'nrly counts-attacked and re-; by small growers. AnungenaBB Iome ground lost in last ftr ,. abo ovi Hable for the proper C'ommuntat oftenUpraylnti of banana plantations * Ha, !" "Megaln*t Leal Spot disease. ni *! In addition there Is a compre'uimenne insurance scheme which is designed to en( able banana growers to restore their cultivations in the event of serious hurricane damage. LONDON. A British company has claimed development of j new toughesMvpe secret alloy designed to put Brituu |a ingiiaai I \ ortd A aaeuritj him on v an I .what goes into the RUOI %  un baatea Canadian i likely to remain a strict secret. The Mond Nickel Company Unit experimented artOi 'Nil /and then "feunonk 80" which went a lonit wny to make Brittan jetthe world*! beat These al. 1 d %  met %  bine blades and the CO ehunben of the engines. They had to withstand enorfound one. Doniiy eonUnuad to jwua Mmperaturai and stractes run off and bring back more and The difficulty was to find a metal more balls Altogether he found j that could be shaped aie nine—tennii balls and golf hulls, but which did not alter sharby the tiniest fraction of un in.ii unugf) on and f 1 .itskirt* foinniuns! assault ^nt lour mllea wUt I deep Bd North Korean Naktong River t of the flat l.n Hyiiripm., roughly J<> iuare % %  % %  p. Ami beitan lidniatit with the t'nmniu1 1 ted liKhtliui thi way lundreda of torches. [eavj flghtinK con1 on 'ho north side of the. ly around pohang. iQpa braced themfor renewed assin.. %  eote r as Communist rein '•re reported t>VShtng it ward from K^nwi. Vatican May ei.mtul Releani* Of Cardinal %  ATICAN CITY, Aug. 31 %  hn.il Vatican sources said %  that the Vatican wu any Cliurchgureeincnt in HuiiRiiry which Fprovide for immediate repf Cardmil Joseph MindIsantenred to life imprison%  ist year on ': ported that the nfrreebetween Bishop* end the n 1 %  ... %  %  %  available. Uiean ooVtal said "Until wt irect information—and tlmt ult to obtain since A-C have omstir rotation! with II111 %  %  tibia 10 ode —Itrater. Mr. Fer[iis<>n said that the new dtna praoanunc factory Is now. completed and will be undergoing 1 Irials during September prepare-I tory to dealinK with the main I crop bcgtnn": in October. Thi' factory wffl rroduce concentrntf-l orange JuL-e which has been sold under a ton-year eon-' tr, ic t with the Ministrv of Food | H ->f eoneentr %  • able for di.d-i. • t..n to rhildren i as a welfare luOJuTI. 2 In Isl" 1 Th W.alhr TODAV sun K %  aw 5.SI am. *„,. AT %  : 019 a.m. MOMil>*l Omaraeri Srici .be l.htttf amdoCtot this speeialised product. 11 %  %  m ae t aal that the new factory will also munufttclure, grape fruit iuteo and other citrus mwtruteo products b luding cittle feed Delayed Action LONDON. Harol'' Lcn,.. Ty, was shot in Ihe 8l-ciu<.h dvrlng 'he Boer war. 50 yufs fJ Ha d'.t\i %  %  oai '• and 111 inquest said tne b\, % %  %  t'vagd hi^ death A DO^-KsY'S YEARS An pieiii A %  ROOT. ntpofllUun exploring vet neur Pis-J have skeleton of a donold Con si ruction has aUo started w.' a pre-coollng store for handling! fresh citrus fruit prior to ship; mem overseas. This store is beteg ; bull: b) Colonial Development Corporation and it is expected tA be ready for operation in thai 19ri—52 season. key estii..'tted at 15.000 year "-vsttorcl Solulion This stor. || on %  .ite in Kin %  too convenient to the prini docks uied for loading citrus. Mr Fergiisoii said that the ettroi i-ngaged in a campaign to increase production within the island and nurseries have been 1-I established from which large r I numbers of plants wtU be available to growers. 44 VITACUP" "Nimonic 73" Mai ink answer .when, in 1S3U. espertmontl with Jet angtnea assu.ned wertlrae importance !• a team of Mond Hi tl inetallurI gists under Sir Widlam Grimths. now the companv s .huirmnti The latest alloy. "Nimonic W %  0 reported to be 10 per cent 1 tougher than BBything pniduced be for i' An ofllcial of Hn ItOfad Ni.kil i Comiauiy said: "We have something that I miles ahead ef any other rnuntry. Nothing may be said about the I ingredients of the alloy. But It is not only the formula, it is j matter of what Americans call I "Know-how." j "It is jiH only concerned with ] nirplnne iot-ervrtnci. OattaB t n— are being built for power Installation, they are being tril out In chips, nnd then there is the gnterbnM automobile as well experimen'nl railway locotno-Ive'"—I N S Belgium May LengthenTime Of Service BRUSSELS. Aug 31 The Belgian I*arliami-iit will jthcr Uj be asked to lensthen the period of compulsory military %  1 .1 Phohen nadoaal tonlghl H< .. l that 'hi^ \^us one of I decisions on national ocfenoa taken 1 %  raoeni matting of the Belgian Cabinet. i 1 period of 12 months. Well-informed quarters here tonight hrheve-i thai ihe increase— not specified by the Pn \sould be to 18 months Pbotian said ihat other meaiures which the Government had decided to propose to Pal Included:— The constitution !:i [> %  of infiintry divisions and, armoured divisions ready to All diately. The preparation of reso i"V.l.il %  An overhaul of home defence force* required to light pemThe development of me An Farce, partly (< r EMfjan |K"gale have struck for a 3D ier cent wag,increase phtt OUkaf imefiitie-. nnd all these are pre antad tn the antployan Disorderly events within thoast waah have raauhad in the %  va men who h barged "itii the larceny of i-*tate — onuts. Talephone potei coco nnf trcs are cut dowi ; %  tranic Mix-knee factlttathig %  1 uAprotetted where beand -t. %  % %  [] have made the poltee raeorl ;.> H Twantj ons %  have arrived from St Lucia h. 'l>.poli.e to eope with th" The itrl 1 1 li Mei.nwhlle peaceful St gatton An ovarhj id of tba Keva sion to U sk Paiatenva 1 1 prove of an Increase in of military service PhoUi "Great Britain and Holland have also consented t., *uch sacrifices." — Heater Isle Of Wight? LONUON Sept I A special %  % %  : . n| of the rue-" VPhO BITtVad ni-entl" f-im tin reports l'-day thai natural h oi :he Vtadi aan mlglii fall to Jamaica but for the )calnmused by Jamaii He says Jealousy Is partly due Ite of the island, but 1= iid by rtamboyance, d be c needed In thr .inmnl1 1 oi Barbad..ha aaya II %  iractei nnd tradlUOD, and wi tea oi .,ri, h an Vestry s> --iik. \ili mrches and ave1 eke n ighl i>;<* 'or an 1 a ol Wight rot this bland the sTrancb %  yatam of inwtth %  met aiea would work an tl One n ..tim aprH Barbado is that rn, ufihmknbte Kte as Trinidad, lunjara ^n "Liberty" IMSCS Its Master Joseph 1#WLS. master of the sloop Wai knoekwl %  from the ship's deck more than three mile %  %  First aewi reached Q today on the arrtval of the ss BlDUalo.' The aauxLale 1 isaw the 'ink' anil knocked a man ovagboard and at put on 'be acaitta lights and lowered Ihe life boats and joined with the aloop's crew In saarch but was unsuccessful. The Liberty" was returning from New Amsterdam. Berbice. % %  aria %  nto iuraraei • • 1 isloy re-openum 1 %  %  ta getting pieture post-! tu lavag aaavaaanai from mir dailv maid, sayinu %  Will be back In :i few daya." Soon the laundry and thai diy shut since August I. will overdiv eonartbutlona rhata are stui .otdy -'i theatres open, but some 11 ti i' 37 which hw ti IMI elouirraa.'.iirlle are pr-1 pi nnr to antei I Bgate I he S.I Look The .-.wallow., nave Boa il ir-eev on the Champ%  1 to the Id' I' ck than %  %  turning staff. Tins Parauan bafatt ol up shop ' \ni:u1 dercelj critiii>d as beiii^ :to ',, so ii h Bert Pai Li goai on (i Tourists ifintiiii b n onto aai k i: 1 'i I %  ap tin Fulies ilii ( look a. ti %  ktayi 1 Bui I to wai'. 1 I I tl %  %  1 I I Mine A Gall m rtm %  Thasa wtU be two mixtures . %  .. %  %  %  .: • %  ill have 18 i'r canl all "ill COal about -is 3d u gallo.i 11. %  %  : BOW Bflucl of -ii' ohel 01 1 Hi Han liquor eonauuipoon will go up. and teey wU Bnd U more %  when tee %  rn IO.00O dolh of marrjoana (locally %  i.'.'ci from din [j drug Iran "i-Kby said teej got q % %  !• %  Ufl 1 furnee PERSONAL OPiNlON NKW YOItK writes columnist Cedric Adams' l 1 one coiiHolatlca about r T.g in % %  !( .1 % %  %  Hiv nytli ng %  ,.>, %  • %  FOR HEALTH 73^ PER 1/2 LB. TIN. THE STANDARD VANGUARD THE FAMILY CAR-POPULAR EVERYWJIKKK iia h.p. 0 seati-r saloon THE SI A\lAllli 12 r. I'U I'-l I" THE S I AMIAIEII IMIIUItV V W The \*M value in their class today. See them at • CHELSEA GARAGE (1950) LTD. Agents. Trafalgar street Vl ii> i nf %  Ma lliiit||. -.aan in lilrn.1 11)1 — %  Mai in !.,.,,„ %  P* MM In %  L 1 1 mil s v m i"" ;.;, A Crgftrette ot r.ire qualilv I .., /, 1 ... n..r/f iMrnKirr n •,. t i li n g i;x.i.t>H u-tn %  Hurricane Flattens Antigua # fritm pace I, Pibrey Village ws >' %  %  %  i.'iit ot the %  1 igao are flat, and ihoua* ,nd 1111 ciy pravalled ninong the snd nnd weary population Aiunuuf nnd birds lay dead I I.Harbour M 1 lei niufrfh and 2 uUlng boal %  ... 1 ware baai had. ftahlng < • 1 11 1 n Market %  overturned %  %  %  4 %  ei .' 1 ourf %  The wenthei is -lill d ireeeharoui II. URRAYS ] MILK STOUT L' EDINBURGH SCOTLAND SOLE AGENTS:MANNING & CO., LTD. MOVIES ARE BETTER THAN EVER. EMPIRE THEATRE NOW SHOWING fc CONTINUING Mat. & Night Show. Daily mi. UH.VI:SI SHOW IX TE.X TEAMS tl LL TELL YOU ABOUT "I inlrnH that tlie> wholo irorttl -hull -ff'lu Tils I ilo...fi-u noMc. • •If-i-.trrifi*'hu ngn boldg. CfttCORY PKIt "She i* liml. btvi to the DOBd If 1 M*r there *v;iun evil \.<>ni:tn. -IntgfMM %  •'" tours JOUPDAN LnJbl WUlX splayed by \JQ^JJ^ one ef the seven great star* i* DAVID 0. SEL/RICkS protiuct.ua of ALFRED HITCHCOCK S THE PARADINE SE starring GREGORY PECK ANN TODD CHARLES LAUGHTON CHARLES COBURN EiHEL SARRYMbiiL LMK JOURUAN fv?i-THi; SPtsNfSE mvi:ii RELEASED lllKnli.il It in in li I'U11 in > J


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